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, By Robin Oakley, Political Editor 
Mr David Steel yesterday order to strengthen his band in P 1 .™? a half of his audience 
n_j .... manifesto discussions withDr 


Ur =^ 


defied his party's vote this 
week for a non-nuclear de- 
fence policy by pledging him- 
self to the maintenance and 
updating of Polaris. 

In one of the toughest 
rebukes any political leader in 
Britain has delivered to his 
own rarty in years heseomed 
the' Liberal activists for living 
in an unreal world. 

He told them in his assem- 
bly address at Eastbourne that 
they bad shown "breath-tak- 
ing misjudgement'’ and put at 
risk the hopes of an Alliance 
victory at the next election. 

. It was a speech addressed to 
those outside the conference 
hall to correct what the Literal 
leader admits has been a week 
of public relations disasters 
for his party. 

Using phrases borrowed 
from the SDP Leader, Mr 
Steel lined himself up four- 
square with Dr Owen and 
defied his party not to follow 
him. In a particularly scathing 
passage he derided the non- 
nuclear amendment passed by 
the party assembly on Friday 
as no better than the placards 
on Lambeth lamp-posts 
proclaiming a nuclear free 
zone. 

There were shouts of 
"rubbish" when Mr Steel criti- 
cized the majority in his party 
who had backed the 
controversial defence amend- 
ment. It was their "completely 
misguided belief' that it was 
the assembly's task to accen- 
tuate the few remaining points 
of difference with the SDP in 


Owen. 

“That is a breathtaking 
misjudgement. We are either 
in alliance or -we -are noL We 
must live and breathe the 
alliance. It is unthinkable that 
we enter the election with two 
defence and disarmament 
policies." 

Assembly reports 4 
Leading article 9 

Frank Johnson 20 

Evidence of what a high-risk 
strategy the Literal leader had 
chosen came immediately 
when a leading Liberal ac- 
tivist. Mr Tony Greaves, said 
he was very disappointed with 
Mr Steel’s speech. 

"He has split the party 
completely on this issue. He 
has gained Alliance unity at 
the expense of splitting the 
Liberal Party. It’s very sad." 
Mr Steel, he said, should have 
been healing his party’s 
wounds. 

.Mr Simon Hughes, the 
envHonmem spokesman and 
one of the defence rebels 
among Liberal MPs, shook bis 
head on the platform during 
the speech and was said 
afterwards to be -considering 
resigning as a party 
spokesman. 

. The Liberal CND leader; 
Mr Kevin While, called the 
speech provocative. And Mr 
Steers controversial . finger- 
wagging passages were ap- 
plauded by no more than -a 


in Eastbourne. 

Most of Mr Steel’s par- 
liamentary colleagues, how- 
ever. called his speech brave 
and believed that it had won 
over the wavering centre 
- ground in the Liberal Party. 

Mr Malcolm Bruce, MP for 
Gordon . said: " He's given the 
candidates on the doorsteps 
the answers they need to be 
able to give". 

It is clear, however, that Mr 
Steel still has a big task ahead 
in persuading his rank and file 
to back any deal that is 
eventually achieved with the 
SDP. 

Dr Owen is pressing for the 
Liberal leader to have their 
agreement endorsed not just 
by a joint candidates’ meeting 
but by another Libera! 
assembly. 

If he were to try and fail to 
get such an assembly to en- 
dorse the concept of maintain- 
ing Polaris alter yesterday's 
spech some senior . Liberals 
feel that it would be impos- 
sible for Mr Steel to remain as 
party leader. Few, however, 
expected it to come to that. 

Mr Steel warned the Lib- 
erals. as he has teen doing 
throughout 1 his 10 years as 
leader, that .they would never 
be in a position to realize any 
of their ideals if they did not 
win power. And he told them 
bluntly that they would never 
win even a share in power 
without a carefully thought 
out defence policy. They had 
to have heads as well as hearts. 

Assembly report^ page 4 



• There is £20.000 to be 
won today hi The Times 
Portfolio Gold 
competition — £16,000 
in the weekly 
competition because 
there was no winner last 
week and £4,000 in the 
daily competition 

• Yesterday’s £4,000 
prize was shared by two 
readers, Mrs Jane 
Locke of Twickenham, 
Middlesex, and Mr 
Sidney Shore of 
Camberiey, Surrey. 
Details page 3. 


TSB statement 
delayed 

The estimated 4.25 million 
people who have applied for 
Trustee Savings Bank shares 
will not know until tomorrow 
or Monday how much in total 
has teen subscribed. 

Lazard Brothers had ex- 
pected to make an announce- 
ment last night but said more 
time was needed. 

The City is speculating on the 
future moves of TSB 
shareholders - now that five 
million people have applied 
for a stake in the bank 

Page 21 

Family Money, pages 26 to 34 

Surprise move 
by Karpov 

With five days to go before the 
final shoot-out. excitement hit 
Leningrad yesterday when 
Anatoly Karpov unexpectedly 
used his third and final time- 
out in the World Chess 
Tournament. 

Explanations f<3r the move 
varied from genuine illness to 
the desire for a complete rest. 


Nuclear rules 

A set of international mea- 
sures designed to cope with 
nuclear disasters, the first such 
agreement since the Chcrno- 
bvl disaster, was agreed in 
Vienna P*8 e5 


Beirut escape 

A journalist employed The 
(iuurdian escaped from three 
gunmen who were trying to 
abduct him in Beirut by 
running down an alleyway to 
hail a taxi P*** 7 


Home Me** 
0*«w» 

Xrl- 

Birth*, death*, 
marrutfi 
Bridge M 

Business 21-34 

Court 19 

Dors 8 


2-1 Lenders v 

5-7 Letters 9 

10 OMinan I? 

Religion IV 

Science . 2 
Snort 3Wfc40 

Radio 

Weather M 


* * * * * * 


Left mounts twin 


"realignment” was actually 
"stoked up by sources dose to 
Neil . Kinnock • who, not 
surprisingly; saw personal 
political mileage in k". 

Meanwhile the controversy 
over, nuclear energy, ■ which 


attack on Kinnock 

By Robin Oakley and Martin Fletcher 

Mr NeiLKinnock, the La- enabling Jum to. marginalize 
bout leader, came under twin 
attack from within his, party 
yesterday over his stance on 
midear energy and over his 
alleged desertion of bis party’s 
soft left. 

With the Labour conference 
due to open in Blackpool 
tomorrow, further' ructions 
also seem inevitable because 
Mr Kinnock’s parly managers 
are going back on a promise to 
increase the conference voting 
strength of the predominantly 
left-wing constituency parties. 

The formerly Bennilenews- 
paper. Tribune , which two 
years ago triggered the so- 
called realignment of the left 
to offer Mr Kinnock a new soft 
left power base, launched a 
scathing attack on the party 
leader, accusing him of being 
in hock to the party's right * 
wing and of turning his back " 
on those who made possible 
his and his party's resurgence. 

Though appearing under 
the byline of Tribune's editor, 

Mr Nigd Williamson, the 
article will almost certainly 
have been written after, wider 
consultation with .such key 
figures as Mr David Blimkett, 
leader of Sheffield City' Coun- 
cil Mr Tom Sawyer, the 
National .Union of Public 
Employees’ deputy .general 
secretary, and Mr Ken Living- 
stone, the former leader of the 
Greater London Council. 

Mr Williamson daims that 
“realignment" has been mi 
"enormous success" for Mr 
Kinnock in electoral terms. 


survives 
10 days 
adrift 

By David Sapsted 

A British yachtsman flew 
home last night after the 
"unimaginable nightmare" of 
surviving 10 days in a liferaft 
after .a wave capsized his 
catamaran, drowning his wife 
of just two months. 

Mr Ron Hughes, aged 44, 
was picked up by a Spanish 
fishing vessel in the Bay of 
Biscay, two days after an air- 
sea rescue for him and his wife 
Helene, aged. 29, had been 
abandoned. 

"Although it was a miracle 
that I was picked up where I 
was. many miles from any 
shipping lanes, nothing can 
replace this tragedy of losing 
my wife", he said. . • = • 

enaouug^nu iSS 

the hani left and to restore but 1 IdUW j?ve 

Labour's credibility whereas iHP-^ope of bemgrescued.1 
before it had- teen, "looking 
into the abyss”. 

Much of the wide publicity 
that surrounded the 



Mr Rim Hughes and his wife Helene, before setting out on the voyage to Australia. 

Yachtsman i EEC declares war 

on the 200 most 
wanted terrorists 

By Michael Evans, Whitehall Correspondent 

The bi&est intelligence-co- 
ordination operation ever 
mounted in Europe to counter 
terrorism was set in motion 
yesterday following the 
successful Trevi Group meet- 
ing of Interior Ministers on 
Thursday. 

Police and security services 
began to compile a blacklist of 
the most dangerous terrorists 
who threaten the security of 
Europe. With over 40 dif- 
ferent groups either based in 
Europe or using EEC capitals 
to mount terrorist actions, 
intelligence experts anticipate 
that at least 200 names of 
those known to be the chief 
assassins, planners and arms 
dealers will be on the list. 

These men will then be 
targeted by the police forces 
throughout Europe and a day- 
by-day assessment of their 
movements and meetings will 
be collated in each capital 
According to British se- 
curity sources, it has teen 
decided that this vital 
information will be sent to all 
EEC police forces via a secure, 
coded facsimile service. It will 


Mr Khwock, facing clash 
on leftist ami atom powef 

will mark a comeback for Mr 
Arthur Scargfll, the miners' 
president, has arisen because 
the national executive^ with 
Mr Kin nock’s . support, is 
backing , the phasing out of 
nuclear power stations as a 
decades-long process. 

Mr Kinnock has issued a 
warning that the nuclear 
power , stations cannot be 

Omtinned on page 20, col 1 


bad no food while I was adrift 
and had not eaten for 10 days 
when 1 was found. A couple of 
days I was drinking my own 
urine.” 

Mr Hughes and his 
Wifesailed from their home in 
Findhom, north-east Scot- 
land. on July 5 — the day after 
they married — planning to 
spend 1 5 months cruising to a 
new life in Australia. 

The couple completed the 
first leg of their journey to 
Falmouth. Cornwall arid left 
m their catamaran. By Ear, on 
September 15. The following 
day they ran into heavy seas 
and one large wave swept both 
Mr Hughes, formerly a North 
Sea oil consultant, and his 
wife into the water. 

A French warship found the ‘ 
upturned By Ear last Saturday, 
about 150 miles west of Bor- 
deaux. An immediate air-sea 
search was launched but it was 
called off on Tuesday when it 
was considered that there 
could be no survivors. 

!Mr Hughes, having been 
setveti wiii whisky, beer and 
-egg and chips on the trawler, 
he was taken to the Spanish 
port of Vigo where he was 
treated for exhaustion and 
exposure. 

• The first person in Britain 
to learn of Mr Hughes' sur- 
vival was Right Lieutenant 
Allan Bone, aged 33, the best 
man when the couple married. 


Safety checks ordered on DC9 jets 


By Harvey Elliott 
Air Correspondent 
An urgent safely check has 
been made on the world’s fleet 
of DC9 jets after a control 
column snapped off in a 
pilot's hands. ■ . 

The captain of a Scandina- 
vian Airlines McDonnell 
Douglas DC9 was checking 
the aircraft's controls before 
taking off from Stavanger 
airport when he felt "some- 
thing odd". He decided to 
move the control column 


backwards and forwards a few 
more times - and it broke off 
inhis hands. 

McDonnell Douglas im- 
mediately warned airlines of 
the incident and suggested 
that they check all the DC9s in 
operation around the world. 
But - nothing was discovered. 
British Midland Airways op- 
erate eight of -the popular jets 
and subjected their aircraft to 
minute examination. 

ft- is thought that the prob- 
lem - the first of its kind in 


more than 32_ million flying 
hours with .the jet - was caused 
by a defective rivet 

-The -column is the main 
mechanism' for manoeuvring 
the aircraft in flight arid 
controls the elevators and 
ailerons. 

The defective part has now 
been sent to McDonnell 
Douglas 

Had the column snapped in 
flight., control would have 
' teen automatically passed to 
: the co-pilot 


are involved in planning, tac- 
tics and propaganda as wed as 
the known hit men of the 
active service units. 

Many of the most dan- 
gerous Arab terrorist leaders 
will also be on the list, 
including the Palestine libera- 
tion Front leader Abu Abbas, 
who was responsible for the 
hijacking of the Italian cruise 
liner Achille Lauro last sum- 
' mer, and the killers known to 
be members of the fanatical 
Abu Nidal faction. Nidal him- 


Lending article 


merely involve picking up the 
phone on a guaranteed secure 
line and will ensure that 
urgent information will be 
available to everyone at ex- 
actly the same time. 

The ministers were warned 
that if the coded communica- 
tions system was too sophis- 
ticated several countries, like 
Portugal, Spain and Greece 
would not be able to benefit 
because their computers were 
not as advanced as those of 
Britain, West Germany and 
Italy. 

The blacklist will include 
the names of the four chief 
"godfathers" of the IRA who 


self will also be on the list, 
although he has never been 
spotted by any intelligence 
service In Europe. 

In order to put into practice 
- what was derided at the Trevi 
meeting in London the gov- 
ernment officials responsible 
for the police in each EEC 
country are expected to meet 
next week. They will be led by 
Mr Michael Partridge, the 
Home Office official who 
heads tbe police department 

According to security 
sources, the mam drive during 
this present campaign against 
the terrorists will be on the 
intelligence side. 

So Britain's counter-terror- 
ist experts from the Special 
Branch, the security services 
and Scotland Yard will meet 
their counteiparts in ' the EEC 
over the next few weeks to 
explain their techniques in 
intelligence-gathering. 

But there is not expected to 
be any general arrangement 
for permanent exchanges ofj 
personnel between the special 
counter-terrorist units like the 
British SAS and the West 
German GSG9. 


Cabinet may ban Libya 
airline from Britain 


By David Sapsted 


The Cabinet is to consider a 
complete ban on Libyan Arab 
Airlines flights into Britain 
after yesterday's 25-year fail 
sentence imposed by an Old 
Bailey judge on an extreme 
Arab terrorist leader. 

- Rasmi A wad. aged 43. a 
member of the fanatical Abu 
Nidal group, was accused of 
trying to organise a terror 
campaign in Britain last year. 
He was arrested by police after 
taking delivery of four gre- 
nades sent from Libya. 

A Foreign Office spokes- 
man said last night: "The 
Government is gravely con- 
cerned that this case clearly 
implicates Libyan Arab Air- 
lines in terrorist-related activ- 
ity. 

“Increased security mea- 
sures for LAA flights were int- 
roduced immediately after the 


arrest. Ministers are urgently 
considering what further ac- 
tion to take in ibis case." 

Any decision would un- 
doubtedly affect the EEC atti- 
tude towards the airline, with 
European governments likely 
to be urged to follow Britain's 
lead. 

A second Arab cleared by 
the jury yesterday — Mr 
Nassar Muhammad, aged 28 
- was immediately served 
with a deportation notice by 
the Home Office. It was issued 
on the instruction of Mr 
Douglas Hurd, the Home Sec- 
retary. 

Mr Muhammad's conti- 
nued presence in the United 
Kingdom was not considered 
conducive to the public good 
on the grounds of national se- 
curity. a government spokes- 
man said Trial report, page 3 


White gunmen free rival of homeland chief 


From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 

certainly related incident on 
Thursday --night President 
Sebe's son. Major-General 
Kwane Sebe. head of an elite 
unit of the Ciskei. security 
forces. ■ and his second-in- 
command, Colonel Z. Ngwan- 


A dynastic power struggle in 
the Ciskei tribal homeland m 
South Africa took a .bizarre 
turn when unidentified white 
men armed with submachine 
ns stormed -a prison and 
...'ed Lieutenant-General 
Charles Sebe. the homeland's 
former security chief 
Ueut-Gen Sebe was ar- 
rested in July 1983 on the 
orders of his brother. Presi- 
dent Lennox Sebe. and later 
sentenced to 1 2 years in prison 
for terrorism. He was alleged 
to have been plotting a coup 
against his brother, though no 
real evidence has ever been 
adduced to support this claim. 

In a separate but almost 


Three men, two of them white, 
were injured when a bomb 
exploded in a hotel in 
Johannesburg yesterday. 

A black man and two women 
had a narrow escape when the 
Hght trnck in which they were 
riding detonated a landmine in 
northern NataL 


between their eldest sons. Stouth African police force, 
which in turn led to questions . One of his tasks was tailing the 
being asked about the legiti- black leader Steve Biko, who 


ya. were abducted by another 
group of unidentified men. 

Lieut-Gen Charles Sebe was • 

sprung from the Middddrift nically defined mini-states re- 
prison on the same night. His • saided by Pretoria, at least for 
liberators fought their way legal purposes, as independent 


Into his cell wounding a 
warder, and then he and they 
left by a rope ladder, according 
to Ciskei s Director-General 
of Communications, Mr 
Headman Sontunzi. 

Ciskei is one- of four eth- 


foreign countries. Ciskd and 
nearby Transkd are allocated 
to the Xhosa-speaking people. 

At the time of Lieut-Gen 
Sebe’s arresL the feud between 
him and his brother was said 
to have teen started by rivalry 


macy of President Lennox 
Sebe's birth and hence his 
claim to the chieftainship. 

Certainly. Resident Sebe. a 
former country preacher and 
school inspector, and his 
brother. Charles, could not 
look less alike. Lennox is 
darker skinned and heavily 
built while Charles is slim 
and feline. There is no ferial 
resemblance at all. 

At one lime. Charles ex- 
ercised huge power in Gskei, 
running noi only the police, 
infant army and intelligence 
service, but the prisons and 
traffic departments as well. 

He began his career in the 


died from injuries received in 
security police custody 

During his trial Mr Pik 
Botha, the South African For- 
eign Minister, appealed to 
President Sebe to show le- 
niency. President Sebe re- 
sponded by accusing the 
South Africans of withholding 
information about a "treason- 
ous letter" his brother had 
allegedly written to Mr Botha. 

There were reports last 
night that Lieut-Gen Sebe had 
been sighted in Transkei. 
There is little love lost be- 
tween President Sebe and 
Transkefs ruling Matanzhna 
family. 


Reagan 
faces 
revolt 
on veto 


From Michael Binyon 
Washington 

President Reagan was yes- 
terday vetoing a tough 
Congressional bill of eco- 
nomic sanctions against South 
Africa, provoking uproar 
among anti-apartheid ac- 
tivists, and risking a humiliat- 
ing override of his action by 
both the Senate and the House 
of Representatives. 

The President's long-threat- 
ened action came after Con- 
gress sent him a bill, imposing 
a ban on US imports from 
South Africa of textiles, coal 
steel iron, uranium and agri- 
cultural products in addition 
to other measures. 

Mr Reagan has always 
strongly opposed punitive 
sanctions, saying they would 
hurt South African blacks 
more than the Pretoria Gov- 
ernment, and will make the 
hardliners there more stub- 
born in resisting an end to 
apartheid. 

His veto, however, may not 
stick, as even his own Repub- 
lican supporters, including 
Senator Robert Dole, the Sen- 
ate majority leader, and Sen- 
ator Richard Lugar, chairman 
of the influential Foreign 
Relations Committee, have 
called for sanctions. 

A presidential veto can be 
overridden by two-thirds 
majorities in both the Senate 
and House. 

The While House admitted 
that Mr Reagan would have a 
“very difficult" time persuad- 
ing enough congressmen to 
sustain the veto. A defeat 
would mark the first lime that 
Congress has overridden the 
President on a major foreign 
policy issue. 

To mitigate the adverse 
impact of his veto, Mr Reagan 
is planning to announce soon 
the nomination of the first 
black US ambassador to 
South Africa. He is expected 
to be Mr Edward Perkins. 

Mr George Shultz, the Sec- 
retary of State, is due to visit 
South Africa and some 
frontline states, such as Zam- 
bia, for talks next month. 
President Reagan is consid- 
ng * $500 million (057 
million) plan to bdp some of 
the frontline states. 


Next week 


Death camp 
charges 
prepared 

From Ian Murray 
Jerusalem 

A 25-page charge sheet 
against the man Israel claims 
was the executioner at the 
Treblinka death camp has 
been completed for sub- 
mission to the Jerusalem Dis- 
trict Court on Monday. 

Ivan John Demjanjuk was 
extradited from the United 
States last February. 

Israel's dilemma, page 8 



On Monday 
The Times starts 
an investigation 
no reader can 
afford to miss. 
Britain is in 
the middle of the 
biggest property 
boom since the '70s. 
But behind the 
figures lies a 
startling and 
disturbing story; 

• Record levels of 
repossession as 
couples break under 
the strain of 
making huge 
mortgage payments. 

• Brokers offering 
loans even they 
regard as suicidal. 

• Political leaders 
paying scant regard 
to warnings about 
cheap loans. 

• An ever widening 
north-south gap. 

• A three-part series 
goes behind doors 
to find the realities 
of the boom and the 
chances of a collapse 

Tuesday 



Next month the 


Queen goes to 
China, the first 
British monarch in 
history to penetrate 
the most isolated 
nation on earth. The 
Times has been on 
ahead to find a 
China ablaze with 
change; now Peking 
is more Dallas than 
dynasty. The 
Chinese today dress 
differently, eat 
differently, and fill 
their homes with 
things beyond the 
dreams of five years 
:o. But at the end 
of a fascinating 
glimpse into the 
Orient the mystery 
remains intact: are 
the Chinese really 
changing? 


“La Manga Club is 
perhaps the most remarkable 
development in all Spam” 

Dady TeJf^aph 

Imagjne a pnwte parados m Southern Span enortted by Ms and lemon 
groves and the blue waters of the Medtferranean And all yours. 

Spend the day at your own private beach dub with the best windsurfing m 
Europe. Or go saibaKJnimg from your own 
Medferranean cove. 

If 9pp«g a cold drink by the pool s more 
your tieaof Wss. you've got at least 3 pools to 
choose from. 

And that's only a tmy part of the 
pleasures of La Manga Guta 
ft's the two championshp gof comes 
wfach lure Seve Balesreros had: 
whenever he can rake ume off from 
toumgas La Manga Oub's professoral 
Anyone for terms 1 The Dawd Lloyd 
Rachel Centre a one of the Uggesi and 
best oqupped Europe. 

There's ihe only cnetet oved Southern Spam And where ebe courid you go 
nd*ig through hits overioolang the Medaerranean. without ever leaving your 
own pounds*. 

Come the evenqg and there's agneatchoce of restaurants, bars and rv^itbfe 

Th«i U Manga Oub for you. A un«^ vvorid of aU year iwk! leisure. 

Urw^ie too «i the range of holriay homes you cm make vour own. From a 
deightW I bedroom house at £49.500 to one of a sdret group of Andaman 
styte vilas. clustered aromd private swimrrwig pooh. You can even have a vda 
m its own grounds, from £ 1 1 iLOOO to one ndudualfy 
designed and buA for up to QSOjOOO. 

What's more, as La Manga Club is owned 
and run by a British company, European 
Femes Group Pie. you can be sure your 
nvestmert s thorough^ safe and wefl 
managed 

Send for the brochure. A wonderful 
discovery awaits you 

Or rf you are n London, cal m and see oar 
wteo presentation and 
wfe model display at oca 
showroom office- |ust 
opposite Hanods 





P-WMnsMs 
Address _ 


Postcode, 


Telephone 


La Manga Club Limited, Silver City House 
62 Brompion Road London. 5W3 IBW Tetephoie 01-2252215 
71MEjq86 


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2 


HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 




NEWS SUMMARY 


Workers protest over 


dockyards job cuts 


More than 12,900 workers at Devonport naral dockyard 
walked oat yesterday id protest at government plans to pri- 
vatize the yard*. 

At Britain's other naval dockyard, Rosyth in Fife, which 
is also doe to be privately managed from next April, about 
2,400 workers joined the 24-honr strike. The demonstra- 
tion came after yesterday's prediction that the Devon port 
workforce could he cat by half within eight years. 

The running of Rosyth dockyard is likely to be given to 
one of three bidders, all of whom have warned of the need to 
reduce jobs by between 2,000 and 3,000. 

Mr Denzil Davies, Labour defence spokesman, con- 
demned planned job cots at the yards as a “harebrained 
scheme" and urged the Government to think again abont its 
proposals. 


Protest halts buses 


Bus travellers in London were left stranded for more than 
two hours yesterday when drivers and conductors took 
industrial action over the use of non-onion agency staff m 
their canteens ( Angel Ja Johnson writes). 

Drivers from the capital's 55 bus garages drove their 
buses into the depots at 10 am after completing the early 
morning rush-boor services, in response to a call from the 
Transport and General Workers Union to support canteen 
staff who have refused to work with non-union agency staff. 
Eight canteen workers, members of the transport union, are 
facing a disciplinary bearing. London Regional Transport 
said using temporary people is the only way it can provide a 
decent canteen service. 


Tapes aid for police 


Guilty suspects are more ready to confess when 
interviews with the police are being tape recorded, Mr 
Douglas Hogg, Under Secretary of State for the Home Of- 
fice. said yesterday (Peter Evans writes). 

“The preliminary results have been very encouraging, 
with general indications that the number of early 
admissions of guilt have increased as a result of interviews 
being recorded", Mr Hogg said. 

Two years of trials in various regional forces showed 
that suspects interviewed on tape were less likely to 
challenge police evidence in court. The trials were carried 
ont under procedures drawn np by the judiciary, the legal 
profession, local authority associations and senior officers. 

The Home Office said that tape recording would 6e 
phased in under draft guidelines in the next few years. 


Cottages 
arson fear 


Soldiers 


North Wales police be- 
lieve arsonists have re- 
newed their campaign 
against English-owned 
property after fire de- 
stroyed three holiday 
cottages. 

Two of die cottages were 
in the Snowdonia village of 
Deiniolen and the other 
was m an isolated spot near 
Tywyn, Gwynedd. 

Police scientists were 
last night searching for 
evidence of time-delay in- 
cendiary devices. 

The cottages are owned 
by families who live in 
Liverpool. Wolverhampton 
and Ruthin. Clwyd. No one 
has claimed responsibility. 


get life 


Two soldiers were sen- 
tenced to life imprisonment 
in Belfast yesterday for the 
murder of a Roman Catho- 
lic on Easter Monday last 
year. 


Mark Edward Trotter, 
aged 22, an Army me- 
chanic, and Robert Kenny, 
aged 23, a UDR private, 
both of Enniskillen, denied 
murdering Edward Martin 
Love, who was shot as he 
walked alone in the town. 


Mr Justice Carswell was 
told that Trotter used a 
9mm pistol given to him by 
Kenny to shoot Mr Love 
once through the head, 
then four times in the body. 


Cruise protester hurt 


An anti-nuciear group protested yesterday after one of its 
members was injured and ignored by a military ambulance 
crew during a demonstration which disrupted the biggest 
ever cruise missile exercise in Britain (Michael Horsnell 
writes. Peace protesters stopped a cruise missile support 
convoy of 40 vehicles returning to the United States air 
force base at RAF Greenbam Common, Berkshire, after a 
week-long exercise on Salisbnry Plain. 

They blocked the A34 at Beacon Hill near Newbury and 
then let down tyres on the leading vehicle. In the confusion 
a protester, Mr Christopher Conduct, aged 27. of 
Southampton, was bruised by a jeep. He was eventually 
taken to hospital by private car. 


A proud 
farewell 


Mr Harold Musgrove, 
the retiring chairman and 
chief executive of Austin 
Rover, believes the com- 
pany now has a range of 
cars that wQJ see (be end of 
its reputation for poor qual- 
ity and unreliability. 

He says that his succes- 
sor. Mr Graham Day. has a 
quality product range right 
across the board from the 
Mini to the Rover 800. 

He said he was particu- 
larly proud of the Rover 
800; “It is probably the 
most successful joint ven- 
ture car in the world and 
that is why I think ft was so 
right for Austin Rover to 
produce cars with Honda." 



‘Dead’ man is alive 


The Foreign Office is investigating why a tourist who 
died on holiday in Spain bad a British Visitor’s Passport 
made ont In the name and address of a man who was safely 
at home in Worcestershire. 

After the tourist fell to his death from a fourth floor hotel 
balcony in Benidorm, his passport showed him to be 
Edward Horace Preston, aged 27, of Kempsey Close. 
Woodrow. Redditch. 

But when police called to break the news to his family 
the* found the real Mr Preston, aged 37. safely at home 
with bis wife and five young children. 


‘Minister is to us what Durham is to Church’ 


Tory MP calls on Currie to quit 


By Jill Sherman 

A Conservative MP has 
called for the resignation of 
Edwina Currie after only two 
weeks in office as junior health 
minister. 

The cal! comes after Mrs 
Cunie's remarks on a visit to 
Newcastle upon Tyne this 
week when she said that ill 
health was not linked to 
poverty. 

Mr Richard Holt, MP for 
Lanbaurgh. Cleveland, has 
written to Mrs Currie about 
her “crass" remarks that the 
relatively poor health of 
northerner was partly due to 
their ignorance. 


"Mrs Currie has become to 
the Conservative Party what 
the Bishop of Durham is to the 
Church of England", he said. 

Mrs Currie blamed poor 
diet, smoking and alcohol for 
the high incidence of mortal* 
ity and permanent sickness tit 
the North-east, and claimed 
that northerners aie too many 
crisps. . 

Mr Holt, who has Just 
returned from a visit to the 
United States with the all-;, 
party Brilish-American par- 
liamentary group, said: “1 
have written a curt note to 
Mis Currie saying that per- 
haps before she embarrasses 
the party further she might 


like to reconsider her position 
and stand down — and not 
put the Prime Minister into a 
situation where she has to take 
more positive action." 

,He added: “It is hard 
enough being a Conservative 
MP in the north, of England; 
especially tn desperately mar- 
ginal seats, without having a 
stnpid woman Hkeher making 
these crass remarks." 

But. other Conservative 
MPs in the North have rallied 
to Mis Currie’s defence. ■ 

Mr Piers Merchant MP for. 
Newcastle upon Tyne, Cen- 
tral, while admitting that Mrs 
Currie should not have gone 
to someone ebe’s area and 


told them what to do. said that 
he admired her for saying 
what she believed. 

“1 won't join those people 
who want to stone her in 
public. 

"1 think she is too abrasive, 
but I would rather have one 
hundred Edwina Conies than 
all the grey men who populate 
the officer ofsiate, including 
the Cabinet, and spend all 
their lives trying to make 
uncontroveisial statements." 

Mr Merchant said that 
many .of Mrs Cunie's state- 
ments about northerners were 
tree. 

Mr Michael Fallon. MP for 
Darlington, also backed Mrs 



Ted Hughes, the Poet Laureate, at yesterday's rarefling of a plaque to TJS. Eliot (Photographs: Ros Drinkwater). 


Liberal Party Assembly 


Tories capitalize on Alliance disarray 

Thames: “It really does not 


By Richard Evans 

Political Correspondent 

With the Liberal Party 
assembly hardly over, senior 
government ministers last 
night swooped to take- full 
advantage of the apparent 
shambles and political 
embarrassment caused to Mr 
David Steel by denouncing the 
week's proceedings as a fiasco 
and disaster. 

Mr Kenneth Baker, .Sec- 
retary' of State for Education, 
led the carefidy co-ordinated 
onslaught by claiming that the 
Liberal leader's authority and 
credibility had been fatally 
undermined. The British peo- 


ple-respected firm leadership 
but Mr Steel could not even 


command a united .party: 

' " The Liberals had suffered a 
“disastrous'* conference and 
were now at odds with the 
SDP on the “vital” issues of 
defence and nuclear energy. 

“This extraordinary, inept 
show of party disunity dem- 
onstrates yet again that the so- 
called Alliance is a two- 
headed horse. The SDP head 
favours nuclear power and 
nuclear weapons. The Liberal 
head favours windmills and 
lances." 

Mr Baker told Conservative 
supporters in Kingston upon 


ally a 
iuch 1 

Davids may agree if their two 
parties do not agree. It's no 
good the two Davids having 
tea together when their parties 
are choosing different menus 
at separate tables." 

His Cabinet colleague, Mr 
Nicholas Ridley, Secretary of 
State for the Environment, 
■pinpointed the “fiasco” be- 
tween the two parties over 
defence and asked how they 
could .join forces in govern- 
ment while disagreeing on 
such a fundamental issue. 

He accused Dr Owen and 
Mr Steel' of having been 


involved in. an imedifying 
spectacle of trying; to "Cobble 
up? some .compromise <pyer 
defence simply to improve 
their, r chances 
The Government has -often 
found foe Alliance a difficult 
target to criticize in the past 
but the public differences 
between the SDP and Liberals 
wifi give Mr Norman Tebbit 
Conservative Party chairman, 
and. his colleagues immense 
scope in the months ahead to 
play up thespliisanddisagree- 
ments. and yesterday's attack 
is likelyto prove the opening 
salvo. 

Assembly reports, page 4 


‘No indoctrination’ in 
school peace studies 


By Mark Dowd, Education Reporter 
that schools which State for Education, who ac- 


Fears 

include peace studies in the 
curriculum successfully indoc- 
trinate their pupils are ill- 
founded according to a survey 
of 25 British schools. 

Dr Armando Gaifo. a senior 
professor of education at Wil- 
liam and Mary College, Vir- 
ginia. led a team of researchers 
to the schools, which represent 
almost 30.000 students, to 
question teachers and pupils 
about their attitudes towards 
the Nato/Warsaw Pact 
conflict 

His pilot study, published in 
the Journal of Educational 
Administration and History. 
states that teaching materials 
such as newspaper dippings, 
books and television pro- 
grammes were balanced and 
objective. 

The inclusion of peace stud- 
ies in the school curriculum by 
some local authorities since 
1980 has attracted criticism, 
particularly from Sir Keith 
Joseph, formerly Secretary of 


cused left-wing councils of 
bias towards unilateralist 
views held by groups such as 
CND. 

But Dr Gaifo, a former U S 
Air Force colonel, says in his 
study: "Pupils in the schools 
where peace studies have been 
introduced did not display 
signs of the indoctrination 
feared by the Government.” 

If anything, the study sug- 
gests. pupils tend to com- 
pensate for perceived bias 

However, although the In- 
ner London Education 
Authority allowed a member 
of the research team to exam- 
ine its curriculum libraiy. ii 
refused Dr Gaifo permission 
to visit its schools. 

It is some of these Ilea 
schools that government 
spokesmen and pro-Nato 
groups have had m mind 
when voicing their reserva- 
tions about the place of peace 
studies in the school 
timetable. 


New drive to 
boost sale of 
council homes 


The Government is plan- 
ning a new campaign to 
encourage council tenants to 
buy their homes under its 
“right to buy" legislation 
(Christopher Warraan writes). 

Seen as an attempt to woo 
voters at the next general 
election, the Housing and 
Planning Bill .which is ex- 
pected to become law in 
November, will give tenants 
higher discounts when buying 
their council home. 

About a million tenants 
have bought their council 
homes under the legislation. 

The new campaign will be 
aimed particularly at the ten- 
ants of council flats, since so 
for only four per cent of them 
have been sold. The Housing 
and Planning Bill increases 
discounts for flax tenants, 
raising the minimum discount 
after two years' occupation to 
44 percent, and increasing the 
maximum discount after 15 
years to 70 per cent 


Tougher rules 
on use of 
pesticides 


ByJohnYonng 
Agriculture Correspondent 


New regulations governing 


the supply, storage'and use 
pesticides, indudiiig controls 
on aerial spraying, were an- 
nounced by the Ministry of 
Agriculture yesterday. 

The regulations implement 
pan three of the Food and 
Environment Protection Act 
1985. 

From October6 it will be a 
■criminal offence to -supply or 
use any pesticide which has 
not been approved by' foe 
Government 

The regulations replace the 
voluntary safety scheme op- 
erated by foe industry. That 
means that -anyone still hold- 
ing stocks of DDT, for exam- 
ple, which was “voluntarily 
withdrawn in October 1984. 
will risk prosecution. 

The regulations apply to the 
use of pesticides not only in 
agriculture and forestry bat 
also tn domestic gardens and 
allotments. 


Thatcher advice on cutting waste 


By David Young. Energy Correspondent 

Mrs Margaret Thatcher powered, triple glazed home I am afraid it will not always 


toured the Energy Worid ex- 
hibition in Milton Keynes 
yesterday and advised 
businessmen on how they can 
cut waste within their com- 
panies and within their 
homes, save monev and create 
jobs. 

The Prime Minister went 
round the exhibition where 50 
of the most energy efficient 
homes have been built to 
demonstrate the latest energy 
saving equipment and build- 
ing techniques. 

“The houses are wonderful. 
The appliances in them have 
changed so much from the 
appliances that were on the 
market on [v 10 years ago.” she 
said. 

But Mrs Thatcher drew the 
line at selling up in Dulwich, 
south London, where she has 
bought a house, and moving 
into a solar heated, windmill 


in Milton Keynes. 

She said: “Dulwich is only 
30 minutes from Downing 
Street and I still have to spend 
most of my time living above 
the shop 

However the Prime Min- 
ister called for more people to 
save more energy. 

She told 400 businessmen, 
including executives of the 
country's top 100 companies: 
“We spend £35 billion a year 
on energy. That is more than 
twice what we spend on the 
National Health Service. 

“If we could only get our 
spending cut by 20 per cent we 
would release something like 
£7 billion for purchasing other 
things. Because if you have 
more to spend on other things 
that in itselfcreates morejobs. 

"You will recall what people 
did to cut costs when the oil 
price went up. Now it is down. 


be down, we have got to be 
just as concerned as we were 
then because we are compet- 
ing with other nations who 
do." 

Mrs Thatcher said that sav- 
ings of £700 million in foe 
industry energy bill had al- 
ready been made and savings 
of £200 million had been 
made by domestic consumers. 
• County councillors have 
called for higher benefit levels 
for the elderly and disabled to 
help them pay foeir heating 
bills during cold weather (Jill 
Sherman writes). 

The .Association of County 
Councillors has pm a nvo- 
lcv el benefit plan to the 
Department of Health and 
Social Security to replace gov- 
ernment plans to make special 
payments when foe tem- 
perature in a local area falls 
below -1.5 per cent. 


Science report 


Doctors’ dilemma on implants 


Neural implants are one of 
the new hopes for treating 
sufferers of degenerative brain 
conditions, hot they pose an 
ethical dilemma to American 
researchers. 

The implants have been 
demonstrated on experimental 
animals, most notably rats. 
They involve injecting into the 
brain of a diseased animal 
cells which perform the func- 
tion that the brain has lost 
_ The source of such cells for 
injection is (he brains of early 
embryos. While that may be 
acceptable in work with rats, it 
is clearly beyond the pale for 
humans. 

One alternative, now being 
explored in tests on humans in 
.Sweden, is cells from the 
recipient's own peripheral ner- 
vous system. Foot Swedish 
patients with Parkinsonism 


By A Special Correspondent 

have received snch treatment 
bot with only modest success. 

.Another alternative is cells 
grown in culture. At the 
University of Rochester Medi- 
cal Centre in foe United 
States. Dr Don Gash and 
colleagues have been working 
with cells from a type of 
human tumour , called 
neuroblastoma. 

Their advantage is foeir 
similarity to brain cells 1 and 
their ability to be separated 
into different cell lines, each of 
which produces a different 
cocktaD of substances found in 
the brain. 

That means ft should be 
possible to select foe cell fine 
best suited to a particular task. 
The cells have the extra 


advantage in that they can be 

indefinitely. 


have to be treated In some way 
to make them non-tumourous 
before they could be consid- 
ered as neural implants. 

That Is what Dr Gash and 
colleagues have done. They 
hare formulated a chemical 
treatment which ■ prevents 
neuroblastoma cells' from mnl- 
tiplying but which preserves 
the cells' desirable properties. 

They have injected .foe 
treated cells, labelled with a 
radio, isotope, into certain 
regions of foe brains of five 
monkeys- Nine months later, 
the labelled cells could stiQ be 
identified and there, was no 
evidence of tsmoer formation. 

Dr Gash now plans- to 
explore the influence of the 
cells on various brain-diseases 


grown in adtnre 
However, the 


cells would 


Science. September 26,1986, pp 
J420-I422. . 


\ 


Currie: “If you drink bep- all 
night and eat chips all day ** 
[ill health] is hardly surprising. 
I foink she talked a great deal 
of hard sense/ 


Meanwhile. Mrs Currie has 
been trying to pul her remarks 
behind her and tackle the issue 
of transferring the mentally ill 
and mentally handicapped out 
of hospital - into . foe com- 
munity. 


Addressing health pro- 
fessionals at a conference in 
London, she admitted that the 
Government's policy of care 
in the community would need 
extra resources. 


Tribute to 
poet who 
loves cats 

By Philip Howard 
literary Editor 


Who owns these velvet pads 
with .needles? 

Cat. 

Who has a silver coat and 


pans? 


Cat. 

Who made these unspeak- 
able pigeon gats? . 

Cat 

Who mbs his bade 
your -and growls 


Col . Cat Cat - 
- The most famous cats in the 
worid were honoured yes- 
terday, when the Poet Laure- 
ate, known for his work about 
less urbane and less urban 
animals, unveiled an English 
Heritage bine plaque to the cat 
lover and cat Homer, at 3 
Kensington Court Gardens, 
west London. 

• T S. Eliot lived at this 
address for foe last right years 
of his life, after his second 
marriage, and died there in 
1965. Kensington is easily foe 
most appropriate borough of 
London in which to commemo- 
rate Eliot He was a church- 
warden at St Stephen's, 
Gloucester Road, for 25 years. 
He lived at several addresses 
in Kensington and was a local 
air raid warden there during 
tine war.. . .. 

Four Quartets were orig- 
inally called The Keusmgtou 
Quartet* and Gloucester 
Road Tube station occurs to 
Jbggy . effect In them. And 
several of Old POssmrt Prac- 
tical Cats hekmu in Kensma- 
ton, most notably Moogojerrie 
and'Knmpef teazez, who made 
their home, in Yptoria Grove, 
Cornwall Gardens, and, Laun- 
ceston Place. Furry footfalls 
echoed in foe memory as Ted 
Hughes drew foe veil No foe 
pihi^ There was a shadow of 
the elusive Macavfty, a crea- 
ture to put foe fear of God into 
even the Blade Beast Crow. 



Memorial to a wordsmith, 
the plaqne in Kensington- 


Company 

mistrusts 

Wapping 

ballot 


By Tim Jones 

News International which 
has offered compensation of 
£58m to settle foe eight- 
month-old Wapping dispute, 
said yesterday it had little or 
no confidence in the voting 
system being used by Sogai 
’82. foe largest print imam, 
involved 

Because of its concern foai 
every Sogat ’82 former em- 
ployee should have a vote; foe 
company has invited the TUG 
to conduct or monitor a new 
balloting process to ensure 
that each dismissed worker 
receives a voting paper; that 
each dismissed worker - is 
given an opportunity to ex- 
press his view free ftonj 
interference or undue -prejj 
sure: and that foe ballots are 
properly and fairly conducted 

TTie company decided to try 
to involve the TUC after 
viewing, “with considerable 
apprehension" remarks made 
by Miss Brenda Dean.: the 
union’s general secretary, on 
Thursday night. 

Miss Dean had said. - " All fob 
members who came out in 
dispute in January this year 
are entitled to a ballot paper to 
vote and are urged to do so. 
Our branches have been in- 
formed that members who do 
not attend chapel meetings 
where the ballot papers are 
issued must have, one. sent to 
them • by first class post 'if 
necessary." ■ 

The company said: “This 


suggests very strongly that the 
general secretary ofSogatis far 


un- 


gen 

from confident that so 
portant a ballot will be 
ducted fairiy. or that 
dismissed worker will receive 
a ballot paper." 

Miss Dean said on Thurs- 
day night that the union had 
recommended acceptance to 
its members. 

But yesterday the company 
said it was a fundamental 
concern that, following any 
recommendation, there 
should be property conducted 
ballots of the dismissed 
workers. . 

If the TUC wished to have 
additional time to conductor 
monitor a ballot then foe 
October 8 deadline for accep- 
tance could be extended. 

The dispute began, after 
print union members went on 
strike and were dismissed. 
Since . then. News Inter- 
national haspublishedits four 
txdes. The Times. The. Sunday 
• times. The Sun and the Nest/s 
thewdrld at foe high 
technology plairt at Wapping, 
east Loqdon. . 

On Thursday,, the Amal- 
gamated Engineering Union 
became foe first union in- 
volved in the dispute, which 
affects 5,500 former News 
Internationa] employees, to 
recommend acceptance of foe 
deal 

The other key union, the 
National-- Graphical - Associ- 
ation, has yet to decide on 
whether to ballot its members. 




Cnudi S2.7S: 

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Seh 39: JBeWura B Fra 
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carts: Denmark Dkr id 


Ml* 9.00: France F-SJOQ^W 


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170: Singapore S&SO: Spain Pea 200: 
Sweden Sta- 9.00: Switzerland S Fra 

3.00: Tunisia Dbi 80 00 ; USA St.78i 

Yugoslavia Dm 400. 



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.21 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Got death research 
urged as mother Is 
cleared of blame 


The Foundation for the 
Study of Infant Deaths last 
night called for the immediate 
establishment of regional cen- 
tres to investigate the causes of 
1,500 medically unexplained 
cot deaths which occur in 
Britain each year. 

Lady Limerick, executive 
vice-chairman of the char- 
itable foundation, which was 
set up in 1971 by parents 
whose babies died of the 
syndrome, wants £1 million 
raised to fond the centres 
which would be staffed fay. 
paediatric pathologists, 
virologists ana biochemists, 
and supported by the Home 
Office and Department of 
Health and Social Security. 

The call came at the end ofa 
two-day inquest which cleared 
Mrs Virginia BitheU, aged 34, 
of any involvement in the 
death of her son, Adam, at the 
age of seven months. He was 
her fourth child to become a 
cot death victim. 

An inquest jury at Colwyn 
Bay. North Wales, deliberated 
for just 18 minutes before 
returning a verdict of death 
from natural causes, overturn- 
ing the findings of an earlier 
jury which decided the child 
had suffocated and gave an 
open verdict. 

Alter the first inquest, im- 
mediate public and political 
pressure was exerted to 
countermand claims made by 
Dr Donald Wayte, a Home 
Office pathologist, that a huge 
proportion of cot deaths was 
caused by smothering. 

After lengthy legal 
representations by the family, 
a High Court judge quashed 


By Ian Smith 

the original verdict and or- 
dered a second inquest ■ 

The jury yesterday decided 
unanrmously that the child 
had died of**sudden death in 
infancy syndrome" and re- 
- turned a verdict of natural 
causes. 

Immediately Mrs BitheU 
buried her head on the shoul- 
ders of husband. David, a 
maintenance technician, and 
the couple, of Clarence Road. 
Wrexham, wept openly with 
relief. 

As they left the court Mrs 
BitheU said: “It has been a 
very hard two years. AU we 
wanted was justice and we are 
delighted we have achieved 
ourgoaL” 

The couple's first child, 
Clare, died on January 19, 
1978, when she was just seven 
weeks old; the next. Ian. died 
10 months later after just 19 
days of life. The thira, An- 
drew, was found dead in his 
col two days after he was 
returned home from Wrex- 
ham War Memorial Hospital 
where he had spent six weeks 
under a round-the-clock 
supervirion of doctors and 
nurses. 

Dr Wayte yesterday told the 
inquest of the terrible upset 
among medical and nursing 
staff who had cared for 
Adam's younger brother and 
the doctor's own reservations 
about putting cot death as the 
cause of death for Andrew, 
precluding the necessity of an 
inquest. 

But when Adam died. Dr 
Wayte said, he felt he had no 
alternative but to give the 
cause of death as cardial 


respiratory 

suffocation. 


failure doe to 
_ He told the jury: 

“I am not making any allega- 
tions, I never have done. 

“But as a pathologist I have 
responsibility for the dead. We 
have four infants here and I 
am their only advocate.- I 
thought with the past history 
of the family what should I 
do?" 

AD four children, he added, 
bad died as a result of obstruc- 
tion of main airways but there 
was no evidence to suggest 
intentional suffocation by Mrs 
BithelL who was alone with 
each child when it died. 

Professor Hugh Johnson, a 
pathologist at St Thomas's 
Hospital. London, who was 
retained by Mr and Mrs 
BitbelTs solicitor ro make an 
independent examination of 
Adam, told the inquest that 
although four successive cot 
deaths are highly unusual 
there was a vast difference 
between suspecting homicidal 
suffocation and proving 
pathologically. 

The inquest heard evidence 
from four highly qualified 
doctors and ail agreed the 
definition of cot death was an 
unexpected, unexplained 
death for which no cause 
could be found even after an 
intensive post-mortem 
examination. 

Lady Limerick said the 
inquest verdict would be 
greeted with enormous relief 
by many cot death syndrome 
parents, who fell they were 
under the suspicion of rel- 
atives and friends after the 
first verdict. 




The relieved parents, Mr and Mrs Bithell, tearing court after yesterday's inquest, and Dr Donald Wayte, pathologist. 


Electronic 
signs to 
aid drivers 

The Government took the 
first steps yesterday towards a 
£20 million electronic sign- 
post system for London. 

The Department of Trans- 
port launched a discussion 
document on the “Autoguide 
system which has been devel- 
oped at the Transport and 
Road Research Laboratory. 

. .London would, be a natural 
starting point for the system, 
the document .states. It would 
mean the mtrodutfion of elec- 
tronic signposts at tain junc- 
tions which would be read by 
in-car computers. 

The driver would feed into 
the computer, which would 
cost about £150, his destina- 
tion and, using constantly up- 
dated data from the signposts, 
the system would guide him 
on the best route. 

The road laboratory experts 
have estimated that installa- 
tion of the system in London 
would cut journey times by 10 
per cent and bring savings in 
foel, lime and accidents total- 
ling £100 million a year. 

They believe it would cost 
up to £20 million to install the 
system and up to £3 million a 
year maintenance. 

Mr Tony lee, the RACs 
director of public affairs, said 
that although the system 
would enable drivers to 
achieve safer, easier and more 
convenient movement 
through the congested urban 
areas and also select the most 
advantageous routes for inter- 
urban journeys. “We will 
continue to press for new 
roads and the improvement of 
existing ones," he added. 

Rubber tests 
promise 
safer car tyre 

Hair bleach and ant stings 
are set to produce a safer car 
tyre, thanks to a new way of 
improving natural rubber 
, (Keith Hindley writes). 

The unlikely pair of chemi- 
cals: hydrogen peroxide and 
formic acid, gives the kind of 
: material the car industry has 
been looking for for years. 

The result, epoxidized natu- 
ral rubber, grips better in the 
wet but will give more miles to 
the gallon than either natural 
or synthetic rubbere. The re- 
verse is normally true: a 
rubber that grips better usually 
wastes more petrol as it rolls 
along the road. 

The new material was 
developed in Britain' by sci- 
entists at the Malaysian Rub- 
ber Producers’ Research 
Association in Hertford and 
has immense potential. 

It deadens impact and 
vibration bener. making u 
ideal for mounting engines 
and generators. It could even 
proride foundations for build- 
ings in earthquake zones. 

It is oil and gas-resistant, 
opening up markets for pipe- 
lines and chemical plant and it 
forms a belter airtight seal. It 
also slicks quite easily to Py C. 
so we may all be walking 
round on it soon on the soles 
of our shoes. . . 

The new material is simply 
made by heating the latex 
rubber with the two chemicals 
for 24 hours. It will cost no 
more than synthetic rubbers 
and tonnes of the new ma- 
terial are already under test by 
potential users. 

Full production will get 
under way within a year. 


Post chief pledges 
letter price freeze 

By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 


Postal charges will be frozen 
for at least a year after next 
month's increase. Sir Ron 
Dealing, the Post Office chair- 
man. said yesterday. 

Sir Ron said he stood by his 
earlier promise to limit price 
rises to no more than one a 
year, and that any increase 
would .be below the rate of 
inflation. "I repeat that 
commitment arid 1 intend to 
better it," he said. 

The increase, which could 
be the last until after Christ- 
mas next year, will take {dace 
on October 20, when first class 
stamps rise Ip to I8p and 
second dass stamps, pre- 
viously cut by Ip. return to 
I3p. 

The chairman also an- 
nounced that for the first time 
the Post Office was beating its 
own target of having nine out 
of 10 first class letters ready 
for delivery by the next work- 
ing day after collection. 

A survey of more than 
100.000 letters posted in Au- 
gust showed that 90.7 per cent 
were ready -for delivery the 
next day. Sir Ron said: “This 


is a mayor breakthrough. We 
are spending £10 million this 
year alone on improving the 
reliability of the mails net- 
work. and with a clear run, 
free of industrial problems, 
the investment can now be 
seen to be paying off" 

In an attempt to speed 
delivery of first and second 
class letters on trunk routes 
between cities, the Post Office 
has launched Capital Letters, 
a computerized system de- 
signed for mail traffic between 
large cities. 

Using road, rail and air 
transport, the Post Office is 
hoping for a big improvement 
in deliveries. A new team of 
mail inspectors could create 
up to 500 jobs. 

Cities covered by the 
scheme are London, Belfast, 
Birmingham, Bristol Cardiff 
Edinburgh, Glasgow, Leeds, 
Liverpool. Manchester, Nor- 
wich. Plymouth, Sheffield, 
Bradford, Brighton, Coventry, 
Derby, Leicester, Newcastle, 
Nottingham and 

Southampton. 


New station planned 
for City Tube link 

By Rodney Groton, Transport Correspondent 


British Rail is planning 
changes on the London 
Underground' rail link be- 
tween Waterloo station and 
the Gty. known to thousands 
of commuters as “The Drain". 

They will include the likeli- 
hood of a new intermediate 
station being opened at 
Blackfriars and replacement 
of 46-year-old rolling stock. 

Less agreeably, for pas- 
sengers who are discovered 
travelling on the line without a 
ticket, a flat rale fare of £2.50 
will be levied for the 50p fare. 

The first phase of the mod- 
ernization of the Waterloo- 
City fine, a new. maintenance 
depot which cost £1 million. 


was opened yesterday by Sir 
Anthony Jolliffe, Lora Mayor 
of London. 

Mr Chris Green, director of 
British Rail's Network South- 
East. said that over the next 
few years they wanted totally 
to renew the line which carries 
30.000 passengers a day. 

Two firms of consultants 
are carrying out studies on 
alternative tight railway sys- 
tems. They are expected to 
produce rival schemes by the 
end of the year. 

Mr Green hoped that the 
modernized link, including an 
intermediate stop at 
Blackfriars. would open in 
1989. at a cost of about 
£15 million. 


Hard stuff 
knocks out 
the worms 

By Robin Young 

Unlike the Chinese, who 
have developed a method of 
making spirit by distilling an 
essence of worms, or the 
Mexicans, who flavour bottles 
of Mezcal with the corpulent 
corpses of worms, the Irish are 
using worms only as a conve- 
nient excuse to return to their 
centuries-old practice of 
distilling poteen, the illicit 
Irish whiskey euphemistically 
known as Mountain Dew. 

Thanks to the worms, they 
have won approval from their 
ancient enemies, the Customs 
and Excise. The new product 
of the little pot stills that gave 
poteen its name is a. moon- 
shine medicine called Vet- 
ichol, developed by Mr Jeny 
Cahalane, a County Cork 
veterinarian.' 

He bit upon the idea after 
seeing farmers administer po- 
teen to their wormy and off- 
colour beasts, perhaps in 
urgent need to shift stocks 
■fore the excise men arrived. 
Apparently a drop of hooch 
did the animals a power of 
good. Mr Cahalane put in 
eight years' beady research to 
find out why, and how the 
effect might be most economi- 
cally reproduced. “We believe 
we have the answer now”, he 
said yesterday. 

His patent elixir is .distilled 
from wastes supplied by the 
Carbeny Milk Products dairy 
in western Cork. 

Distasteful as that may 
sound, it is possibly a more 
salubrious source than the 
origins of some traditional 
poteen, haphazardly con- 
cocted on bare mountainsides 
or on board small rowing 
boats at sea, where even excise 
men might not detect the 
odour of its manufacture. 

Vetichol sells at about £6 a 
bottle: 

“It has been properly reg- 
istered and passed as legal by 
the Customs and Excise", Mr 
Cahalane said yesterday. That 
would certainly detract from 
its attractions for the average 
poteen drinker, for whom the 
thrill of doing something 
against the law seems to have 
been a powerful incentive. 

Just in case it does not put 
them off completely, special 
additives have been in- 
troduced, which are claimed 
to make Vetichol unpalatable 
to even the most hardened 
human drinker. But then most 
people would have said the 
original poteen was pretty 
undrinkable loo. 


Crash award 

Mohinder Rathour, of Stoke 
Newington, north London, an 
uninsured mini-bus driver 
found guilty of causing the 
death of four passengers by 
reckless driving, was ordered 
to pay the widow of one of his 
victims £75,000 damages by 
the High Court yesterday. The 
Motor Insurers Bureau will 
pay the award. 


Arab bomb trial 


Terrorist jailed for 25 years 


An Arab terrorist leader was 
jailed for 25 years at the 
Central Criminal Court yes- 
terday for his part in a Libyan- 
backed plot to mount a 
grenade attack on a target in 
the United Kingdom. 

Rasmi A wad, aged 43, a 
Jordanian doctor and a mem- 
ber of the fanatical Middle 
Eastern terrorist group, Abu 
NidaL was sent to Britain to 
organize a terror campaign 
last year, the prosecution had 
alleged. 

The judge. Mr Justice Si- 
mon Brown, sai± “The mind 
shudders to contemplate the 
devastation, the carnage and 
the heartbreak that you were 
intent on causing. I have no 
doubt you are a ruthless and 
dangerous man.” 

But Mr Nassar Muham- 
mad, aged 28. a student who 
was accused with Awad of 
conspiring to cause explosions 
in the UK, was cleared by the 
jury. 

Throughout the trial, 
Muhammad's counsel had 
maintained that he was used 
as an innocent pawn in a 
terrorist plot 

Muhammad shouted: “I 
love you” to the jury as the 
judge ordered him to be freed. 

The jury had been told that 
both men were arrested on 
September 22 last year by 
officers of the anti-terrorist 
squad after Awad was seen to 
collect four grenades m a bag 
from a Libyan contact at 
Warren Street Underground 
station in centra] London. 

Unknown to Awad, the 
contact was an opponent of 


Colonel GadafiTs regime and 
had tipped off British police 
who foiled the terrorist plot 
The five grenades bad been 
substituted with perfect rep- 
licas after the double agent 
had collected them from a 
man wearing the uniform of 
Libya's national airline. 

In court the young double 
agent said that he foul been 
recruited by a man high in 
Colonel Gadaffi's regime to 
act as a weapons courier for 
terrorists planning a bombing 
outrage in the UK. 

But in reality he was an 
avowed opponent of the Lib- 
yan leader determined to foil 
the terrorists. 

He gave his evidence before 
the court wearing a false 
beard, moustache and glasses 
to disguise his identity. 

Detectives have not discov- 
ered where the grenade attacks 
were to take place. 

One theory was that Awad 
was setting up a raid at 
Heathrow Airport: another 
suggested an attack in Golders 
Green, the north London 
suburb with a large Jewish 
community: and a third at 
Speaker's Corner in Hyde 
Park in London was the target. 

Awad showed no emotion 
as he was sentenced. The 
judge told him: “It is difficult 
to think of a more terrible 
conspiracy than to explode 
grenades in this country 
whether to cause indiscrimi- 
nate slaughter or to hit specific 
targets. 

‘T’his country has a. long 
and proud tradition of democ- 
racy and freedom. Here you 


may hear, read and speak 
what you like. But you may 
not bring us your grenades. 
The public is rightly outraged 
by terrorism. 

“Many lives would have 
been lost had your plot not 
been thwarted. I have no 
doubt you were a central 
conspirator.” 

The judge also recom- 
mended Awad's deportation 
at the end of his sentence. 

During the two-week trial 
Mr Muhammad denied being | 
a “sleeper" planted in London 
by terrorists and emphasized 
throughout that he opposed 
violence and was not an Abu 
Nidal member. 

He told the jury he loved 
Britain “perhaps even more 
than the British" and wanted 
to five here. 

After the two men were 
arrested, Muhammad told po- 
lice be had been asked by a 
distant Middle East relative to 
show Awad around London 
and had innocently agreed. 

At the time he was unaware I 
of Awad's name, having been 
told he was called Ibrahim. 

When Awad asked to go to 
Warren Street station he ! 
drove him there, but had no 
idea that his fellow Jordanian 
was collecting grenades. 

“I did not know what was in 
the bag," he said. 

His counsel Mr Brian 
Higgs, QC, said there was “no 
doubt that fanatical terrorists 
would stoop to involve, the 
innocent agent in the further- 
ance of their terrorist 
activities”. 


—t&dd-' 

Prize will 
be spent 
on house 

A housewife and an assis-. 
tant bank manager share 
yesterday's Portfolio Gold 
prize of £44)00. 

Mrs Jane Locke, aged 37, 
from Twickenham, who has 
been playing the Portfolio 
Gold game for the past two 
months, said she was very 
^excited about winning. 

“I am on such a high. I can't 
believe it,” she said. 

Mrs Locke said her 
winnings will be used to 
redecorate the boose and ra 
pay off debts she had incurred 
in renovating it. 

“1 will also invest something 
for my little girl's education,” 
she said. 

The other winner, Mr Syd- 
ney Shore, aged 53, from 
Camberley, Surrey, said be 
was very surprised. 

“I started playing the Port- 
folio Gold game about six 
months ago, bat I was nor- 
mally about 10 numbers out 
every day." he said. 

Mr Shore said be intended 
spending his prize money on a 
winter holiday. 

Readers who wish to play 
the game can obtain a Port- 
folio Gold card by sending a 
stamped addressed envelope 
to: 

Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Box 40, 

Blackburn, 

BBl 6AJ. 



New threat of jail 
for hippie convoys 

By Sheila Gunn, Political Staff 


Groups of trespassers, such 
as hippie convoys, will face up 
to three months in jail and 
£1,000 fines under a new 
clause to the Public Order Bill 
tabled by the Government 
yesterday. 

The clause is due to be 
debated in the House of Lords 
on October 6, where it is 
expected to be approved, and 
should become law by the end 
of the year. 

It gives the police powers to 
evict trespassers, who will face 
arrest only if they fail to obey 
“as . soon as reasonably 
practicable". 

Mrs Thatcher promised in 
June to tighten up the law of 
trespass after the invasion of 
farmland by a “peace" con- 
voy. 

She wis said to have been 
greatly shocked by their activ- 
ities, especially the interfer- 
ence with the property and 
livelihood of Mr Leslie 
Attwell the Somerset farmer 
whose field was occupied for a 
week while he sought civil law 
redress. 

The new clause states that 


the police can evict two or 
more trespassers if they have 
either brought 12 or more 
vehicles on to the laud or they 
have caused damage or used 
threatening, abusive or insult- 
ing behaviour. 

If the trespassers do not go, 
or if they return within three 
months, they are liable to up 
to three months' imprison- 
ment and /-or a fine of up to 
£1,000. A uniformed con- 
stable would have the right to 
arrest them without a warrant 

The National Fanners' 
Union welcomed the new 
controlsbut felt the clause 
would not for example, give 
farmers added protection 
against attacks by animal 
rights' groups. 

The Country Landowners’ 
Association said that for the 
first time the “police had 
statutory powers to evict tres- 
passers from open land". 

• Hippies who set up home 
on school playing fields in 
Windsor Great Park were 
ordered to leave by a High 
Court judge yesterday. 


Woman killed 
husband in 
fear at move 

A devoted wife killed her 
husband then tried to kill 
herself because she was “ab- 
solutely terrified" of moving 
home, a judge at the Central 
Criminal Court was told 
yesterday. 

The court heard that Mrs 
Gloria Hewitt aged 65. and 
her husband. Jim could not 
face the prospect of leaving 
their council flat although it 
was in a terrible state. 

They had lived in Barcombe 
Avenue. Sireatham. south 
London, for 14 years eating 
and sleeping in the tiny 
kitchen because the rest of the 
flat was damp. 

A minor problem over a 
carpet proved “the last straw" 
for Mrs Hewitt She battered 
her husband, to death with a 
hammer and kilted their blind 
pel dog before taking an 
overdose of drugs. 

Mr Justice Steyn ordered 
that she should receive psychi- 
atric treatment after she 
admitted manslaughter. Her 
pica of not guilty to murder 
was accepted on the grounds 
of diminished responsibility. 


Ulster surgeon retires 


Lifesaver in ‘the troubles’ 


An Ulster surgeon who has 
earned a worldwide reputation 
in emergency surgery through 
beading the casualty depart- 
ment at Belfast's Royal Vic- 
toria Hospital for the entire 17 
years of “the troubles” retired 
yesterday. 

Mr WnUam Rutherford, 
aged 65, spent his last working 
tay passing on some of his 
immense experience to a road 
accident conference In New- 
castle. Co Down. Last night he 
was honoured by more than 
150 colleagues at dinner. 

Mr Rutherford was born in 
Ulster daring the year of 
partition, 1921, and educated 
at Trinity College, Dublin. He 
was appointed bead of tire 
hospital's accident and emer- 
gency unit, itself located at a 
flashpoint corner on Falls 
Road, in 1967. soon after 
returning from almost 20 years 
in India as a medical 
missionary. 


Since the start of political 
riotence in 1969 he and his 
team have made, often within 
seconds, thousands of crucial 


medical decisions affecting the 
life or death chances of its 
victims — together with those 
of road accident casualties and 
other emergency patients who 
are the staple of casualty 
departments elsewhere. 

Yesterday, he recalled his 
shocked disbelief when be saw 
the first ballet wound of the 
troubles in August 1969. “I 
simply believed until then that 
we were too nice in Belfast to 
do such things” 

Worse horrors were in store 
for Mr Rutherford as the 
casualty toll rose and the 
terrorist boml 
the 1970s got trader way. 

Often the department's staff 
heard the sounds of an alr q ri t y 
— an explosion, or sustained 
shooting — only inmates be- 
fore a flood of injured victims 
came through its doors. On 
such occasions, organization 
was as important as medical 
skills, Mr Rutherford said. 
“The problems are' far more to 
do with Organizing your ser- 
vices so that the right person is 
on hand to make the right 


decision for the patient at the 
right time.” 

He said modestly yesterday 
that “some real advances" 
remained in certain branches 
of medicine by studying inju- 
ries which received their inftiaJ 
treatment in his hands. Some 
of those techniques were used 
by service doctors id the 
FalUands war. 

Mr Rutherford's reputation 
as an emergency surgeon now 
stretched arohnd the world, 
Mr John Templeton, one of 
his cofleagnes, said yesterday. 
Mr Rutherford, whose two 
sons are doctors and whose 
daughter is a dime, says the 
admission of children, some- 
times dead, gave him his most 
harrowing moments. “They 
were so small so vulnerable 
and so dead, and their rel- 
atives were so terribly upset 
Emotionally, that was the 
most difficult thing to take." 

He will retire to his garden 
and to voluntary work for the 
Corrynweta C om mun i t y for 
Peace and Reconciliation and 
for the Presbyterian church. 


Thatcher says 
Luton right 
on hooligans 

By David Young 

The Prime Minister yes- 

S ’ said that Luton Town 
be reinstated into the 
Little woods Cup football 
competition and supported its 
stand against hooliganism. 

Mrs Thatcher said the Foot- 
ball League should allow Lu- 
ton back into the competition 
and that its “home fans only” 
scheme should be allowed to 
continue for an experimental 
period. 

She also called for proper 
sentences to be imposed on 
football hooligans. 

“ It is vital to get hooligans 
out of footbalL It is vital for 
the playera. the game and for 
the public. 

“It's a good idea .which 
Luton have had. It makes 
people foel safe. 

“It is quite difficult to get a 
new idea off the ground in this 
Country. People give you a 
hundred reasons why you 
can't do iL We want to change 
that attitude and find a hun- 
dred reasons why it should be 
done." 

Luton sees league, page 40. 


or 


£55m plan 
for Covent 
Garden 

By Gavin Bell 
Arts Correspondent 

The trustees of the R> 
Opera House are to apply 
permission to go ahead with a 
£55 million development in 
Covent Garden, central Lon- 
don, which will be paid for, in 
part by the shops and offices 
it will create. 

Unveiling the proposals 
yesterday. Sir Claus Moser, 
chairman of the opera, said 
they envisaged “one of the 
most beautiful and exciting 
arts complexes anywhere in 
the world". 

The opera development 
board will submit an applica- 
tion for planning permission 
to Westminster City Council 
next Friday. If it is approved 
by next spring, construction 
would begin in 1988 and be 
completed by 1993. 

“What we are trying to do is 
first of all to modernize the 
Opera House, to make it 
belter for audiences and art- 
ists, and also to create some- 
thing of benefit to the 
community in which our op- 
era lives." Sir Claus said. 

Sir John Tooley, the general 
director, said the facilities in 
the Victorian theatre, which 
was opened in 1858 and last 
renovated in 1902, were woe- 
fully inadequate for modern 
productions. 

“Frankly the conditions are 
vile, and consequently there is 
a lot of aggravation and waste 
of time. We desperately need 
to enlarge the stage and to 
install modem amenities. 
Also there are quite a lot of 
health and safety regulations 
we can no longer comply 
with." 

Features of the renovated 
theatre would include a new 
stage and orchestra pit, and 
three rehearsal studios to al- 
low the Royal Ballet Company 
to move from Baron's Court 
to a permanent home at 
Covent Garden. Audiences 
would benefit from improved 
sight-lines, air conditioning 
and new bars and entertain- 
ment rooms. 

The Royal Opera House 
would occupy just over half 
the floor areas of the 12.500 
square- yard site. 


Mr Shore, who wfll use the 
money for a winter holiday. 

Twin births 

Mr John Paynter and his 
twin sister, Solly, aged 19, 
became parents yesterday, 
within 12 hours of each other. 
Their children weighed 61b 
2oz and the only difference 
was that Sally had a girl and 
John a hoy. They will cele- 
brate the double christening in 
their home town. King's Lynn, 
Norfolk. 

Toll remands 

Fifteen toll collectors, who 
work on the Tamar bridge 
between Devon and Cornwall 
were remanded until Novem- 
ber 28 on unconditional ba3 
when they appeared before 
magistrates at Plymouth 
yesterday. They are charged 
with stealing from the Tamar 
Bridge and Torpomt Ferry 
joint management committee. 

PC appeals 

The South Wales policeman 
jailed for six months for biting 
off part of a rival officer’s ear 
daring a rugby match, is to 
appeal against his sentence. 
Lawyers representing PC 
Richard Johnson, aged 31, of 
Pontypridd, Mid-Glamorgan, 
hope a hearing can be ar- 
ranged in London next week. 

Arson charge 


Okech Igwe, aged 27, a 
student, of St Ann's Street, 
Westminster, was remanded 
in custody for three weeks at 
Cierbenwell Magistrates' 
Court yesterday, accused of 
setting fire to 15 parked cars 
in the West End, causing 
£40,000 damage. 

Fishing death 


A salmon poacher was 
swept to his death yesterday 
after becoming caught in his 
own nets on the river Wye at 
Brockwier, Gloucestershire. 
Mr Terence Maniield, aged 
34, of Cornish Units, Sung, 
near Coteford, was a non- 
swimmer. 

Baby charge 

Jane McCandless and Wil- 
liam Frederick Carry, a police- 
man from Northern Ireland, 
have been detained in Te- 
nerife, Canary Islands, ac- 
cused of murdering their 
newly-born son, police there 
said yesterday. 

Police on bail 

Seven policemen accused of 
assaulting football fans after a 
fight at a London Tube station 
last year, were granted un- 
conditional bail at Maryte* 
bone court, London, yesterday. 

Nude bathing 

Nndtsts in Brighton, Sus- 
sex, will be allowed to swim 
naked in the town's public pool 
after local councillors agreed 
to let the British Natarism 
Council use it once a week. 


MP charged 

Sir Peter Emery, aged 60, 

Conservative MP for Honfton, _ , 

is to appear before Tiverton London degrees 
magistrates next month ac- A farther list of London 
cued of driving recklessly at University degrees will be 
Gi msh a m , near Honfton. published on Monday, 


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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 


LIBERAL ASSEMBLY 


Steel derides decision on 
defence as unthinkable 

... r ..j mmc nf Rrirain unit the next COVetT 



& 




- Wfe 









.■■■■:#! If 


The Liberal Assembly de- 
cision against nuclear defence 
on Tuesday was the equiva- 
lent of putting a sign saying 
•‘nuclear-free zone on a 
lamppost in Lambeth. Mr 
David Steel, leader of the 
Liberal Party, said to some 
shouts of “rubbish" in his 
assembly address, which 
nevertheless won a five- 
minute standing ovation. 

The decision had made him 
not angry but profoundly frus- 
trated that electoral victory for 
the Alliance could have been 
put temporarily and un- 


nishing and polishing, policy 
rather than dealing with the 
real, harsh world. . 

He had to pause in his 
speech for protests when he 
added he was also disturbed 
that some completely mis- 
guided people thought the 
assembly’s task was to accen- 


Europe and pans of Britain 
carrying its dread fall-out. in 
the wind should have taught 
us, if we did not know before, 
that you cannot create 


nuclear-free zones by putting 
nn on the lampposts of 


up signs on the lampposts 
Lambeth." 


There were some interrup- 


will free the next government 
on taking office. 

“We have repeatedly stated 
our goals very firmly and we 
have them firmly in view as 
we do that. I am reported as 
being angry with the assembly. 
My emotion is not one of' 
anger but of profound frustra- 




minute standing ovation. oraer to sirenguicu lira *« amenu™ » “*** 'r*. r.: 

The dec^onhad made him negotiations with Dr David one of those signs and nwiU 

not artery but profoundly frus- Owen. , . convince, no one that weare 

iratedfhai electoral victory for "That is a breathing capable of advancing from 
the Alliance could have been misjudgement", he said to where we are now to a 
put temporarily and un- loud applause. We are either genuinely nuclear-free world, 
necessarily at risk, he said, to in alliance or we are not. we ^ Jo Gr i m ond had written 
further heckling must live and breathe Qn Wednesday: “For Britain 


farther heckling. 

“I am not interested m 
power without principles, but 
equally I am only faintly 
attracted to principles without 
power. Without power all our 
resolutions, all our idealism, 
all our compassion, will re- 
main mere intention, mere 
hope, mere dream", he said. 

. “We have so much to do, so 
much to change, great busi- 
ness to achieve, but we wilt do 
nothing, change nothing, 
achieve nothing, unless we can 
first gain power and then use it 
wisely." 

In a dear rebuke to his 
party, he said the defence 
decision had disturbed him as 
a sign of the Liberals reverting 


in dJiioiiu 

must live and breathe alliance. 
It is unthinkable we enter an 
election with two defence and 
disarmament policies." 

In launching into the de- 
fence issue. Mr Steel told the 
assembly: “It is one thing to 
declare our goal of ridding our 
country, continent and world 
of nuclear weapons. That we 
must assert with all the pas- 
sionate intensity at our com- 
mand but if we are ever going 
to be in a position to influence 
our destiny in that direction, 
we must also convince the 
electorate we have carefully 
thought through the painful 
steps we must take to reach 
that non-nuclear goal. 

“Declaring the objective is 


alone to abandon nuclear 
weapons would be to retreat 
from those doctrines of inter- 
national collaboration and 
collective security which have 
been the main afrn in 
Liberalism." 

Mr Steel declared: “L too. 
want intellectual consistency 
and integrity in our policy." 

He added: “Neither David 
Owen nor 1 are prepared to 
arrive at any election policy as 

a. 


Olive vui n 

temporarily and unnecessarily 
put at risk" 

The previous day a dear 
signal had been sent to the 
electorate that the Alliance 
was on its way again. There 
was overwhelming endorse- 
ment of the joint Alliance 
document Partnership for 
Progress and a massive vote of 
confidence for the democratic 
procedures by which they 
would determine their mani- 
festo for the election, involv- 
ing the policy committee, the 
parliamentary party, and the 
candidates. 

“Both David Owen and I 
are well able to move forward 
on all policy issues including 
defence on the basis of that 










4 Iff 







arrive at any eieuiou puni-y u usigim «« 
a result of some botched-up document^ That is a clc&r 
bargaining, hauling process, message 1 give to you, the SDP 

... “ »j’ <Iia nlpHnnifp " 


Mr Steel and bis wife Judith after his speech (Photograph: Harry Ken-)- 

infallibly of party leaders, at Liberals government if 

least I don’t - (laughter) - but They were ihev went into them with the 
nor does he. No one should be ' portoftheNatoalhanct Thqr heUeving all they 

worried by differences in style wanted a moratorium °h ^ . . do ^ drag out 

or even occasionaflyof opm- ther deployment of mure ^,^005 over the years, as 
inn tetween David Owen and missies in Britain and maeeu nego “ .. . pnlans 


a sign 01 uie UDerais reverung -j — 

u> a habit he thought they had not enough, because the objec- 
kicked 10 years ago: being tiye is not the pohey. The 
seen sining in a corner bur- Chernobyl cloud drifting over 


We would not convince the 
country; we would not con- 
vince you; we would not even 
convince ourselves. We will 
arrive at our election by 
applying our common judge- 
ments to the problems whiich 


and the electorate." 

His meeting the previous 
day with Dr Owen was a good 

V . ■ c : l:. 


ion between David Owen and 
myself. The reality is that this 
relationship will work and the 
two leaders and the two 
parities are growing steadily 


Hay vyiui 1/1 unvn « — — — — o- — 

meeting, confirming his belief closer together. 

.Li 1 1. -r.l,. tllUniu Mr Ciwl tw>ri 1 


that the bonds of the Alliance 
would hokL “Neither of us 


Mr Steel went op to outline 
the defence and disarmament 


would noia. iNciurci ui us uig usigiki. , -T l 

subscribes to the doctrine of- fundamentals on which the 


expected to see a negotiated 
reduction of those already 
here before the next election. 

They had accepted th^ 
wanted to put Britain’s Polaris 
system into the next round of 
the strategic missile reduction 
talk*; They would- be in a 


IT- ChemODyi CIOUO arming over muira HU 

Business begins at40 



tadTo do was drag out 
negotiations over the years, as 
they could, until the Polans 
submarines rusted away. 

If they were to get reduc- 
tions in missiles pointed at 
this country as well as those 
based in it, the Russians must 
know that the Alliance would 
maintain and if need be up- 
date their nuclear capability 
until such . time as those 
negotiations succeeded. 

“If we are not so prepared, 
he went on. “we might as well 
follow the Labour Party logic 
and abandon the nuclear 
deterrent system unilaterally, 
hoping that out of the good- 
ness of their hearts the rulers 
in the . Kremlin, will kindly 
destroy theirs." 

The two parties were agreed 
in their opposition to the 
replacement of Polaris by 
Trident as it represented an 
enormous escalation in 
nudear fire power from 64 to 
512 warheads. That was un- 
acceptable to both parties. 

The Alliance was seeking to 
contribute to disarm ament 
He wanted the Tories to have 
to defend their commitment 
to Trident on every doorstep 
at the next election. 

“ The public are on our side 
but wifi not support us unless 
they know we are prepared to 
rpjain a minimum deterrent 
capacity no higher than the 
pfesemJPoteri^ force. We can 
achieve . this;, through 
collaboration, with ouir Euro- 
rpean. neighbours- - 
■ - ^Nothing in that is designed 
to -create a myw .European 
super-power; or a Euro-bomb, 
or a committee of fingers qn 
the button as • some have 
sought to suggest Securing 
greater European cooperation 
to get better value for money 
in defence, to promote world 
disarmament and to switch 
global- resources to develop- 


_„ n , ; s wholly in tune with 
the European ideals of this 

pB He said the two MPs who 

had spoken against the policy 
resolution said a npn-nudair 
Europe was a final aim and 
S3r amendment was not 

intended » 

efforts to find an etiecuve 
European policy. 

Earlier in the speech Mr 
Steel said it was a disgrace that 
SuT British economy was being .. 
manipulated to help the pro$\ 
Stttf the Conservatives m 
the next election. Assets were 
being sold; investments id* 
pressed. consumption 
boosted, money was being 
printed and taxes cut not to 

help the long-term future of-, 
the economy, but to buy votes. 

The Government had no 
strategy in areas that 
mattered: energy, industry, 
education, housing or 'Welfare. 

The Alliance would invest 
in education and housing, me 
state of which filled him with, 
fury. Mr Thatcher did not 
understand how the lethal 
cocktail of unemployrof?* ; 
and squalid housing had ted to 
an explosion of vandalism, 
crime and drugs in society. 

An Alliance government, 
would take four immediate 
■ steps 10 create both jobs and. 

#°Qnmcils would be allowed; 
to spend the £6 billion locked 
in their tank accwjj& w. 

! capital receipts from me sate 
of council houses; 

• More money must be made 
; available for home jmprove- 
i ment grants; 

t • A tenants’ charter would be 
1 introduced 10 give tenants the 
, right to run their own estates; 
r • A long-term plan would be 
: launched to galvanize build- 
ing activity, using partnership 
' schemes to encourage private 
I investment in new homes.. 

: Abroad the Government 

r had chosen isolation and 1 m- 
’ potence, in the EEC the . 
“ Commonwealth, Nato.. and 
s the United Nations, instead oi 
y acting on South Africa Mrs 
, Thatcher preferred to enjoy 
3 ihe remaining short-term 
e profits of its historical, and 
y commercial links with Britain: 

“ The Prime Minister’s atti- 
“ tude to South Africa was the 
, mirror image of her profound 
racism at home. The new visa. 

0 restrictions were part of the 
t. growing racism of officialdom 
, e m Britain. . 

it The country hungered for a 
p change of government The 
Liberal Party had advanced 
le from me fringes of politics to 
ss the very centre of me stage- 
10 - He told me assembly; “Ten 
ot yean ago when I became , 
*e leader I promised to. lead tbe 
id .party to the achievement of 

ih power for Liberalism in oijr 

> generation.' : I-. made this 
commitment, to you and 1 will 
!d keep it But you made - a 
in commitment to. me and 1 
b, require yon to keep it My 
m commitment is to turn hope 
ve into fact intention into 
ng achievement dream into re- 
in ality and I will honour that 
ey commitment Together we 
id have made a commitment to 
ch me people of our country and 
ip- they require us to keep iL" 






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David Steel had a strategic 
choice hi his dosing speech, to 
Oie assembly yesterday. He 
could.have appeased his^ p arty 
and then haggled with the 
SDP over nadcar defence 
policy. Instead he preferred to 
confront his. party with a 
defence policy that ought to be 
acceptable to the SDP.- 

I have no doubt that this was 
the correct choke. It could not 
cancel at a stroke Mr Steel's 
fellings of leadership earlier in 
the week. But party leaders do 
not have the privfiege of 
jobbing backwards any more 
than the rest of us. Mr Steel 
deserves to be judged yes- 
terday not by the disaster of 
Tuesday's defence debate, but 
by' his response to that 
disaster. On that score I 
believe he ought to be given 
high marks. 

Had he simply tried to make 
the best of Tuesday’s decision, 
emphasizing the areas of 
agreement between his views 
and the resolution that was so 
narrowly passed, be could 
have earned himself some 
cheap applause. 

He would; certainly have 
avoided the occasional cries of 
“rubbish" that greeted some of 
.his remarks — the first time 
that I can recaD any hostile 
reaction to him from a Liberal 
conference since his first 
speech as leader at Llandudno 
10 years ago. Had he played 
safe be might more easily have 
united the party. 

But that would have been a 
unity that was not worth 
having, as he made abundantly 
dev. lit would have been unity 
without the prospect of power, 
beganse-it would have widened 
the gap with the SDP and 
diminished public respect. 
Had be taken that coarse, be 
would have been unfaithful to 
his fundamental political 
strategy — which attaches 
overriding importance to the 
Alliance — and would have 
given the impression of a 
leader in pursuit of his party. 

- The defence policy that he 
did put forward yesterday 



Geoffrey Smith 


Address 


Nature of Business 


” Bmplorcts I I taOllrfP& CIZl 


cant develop meat in his think- 
ing- It amounted to a 
commitment to the 

British deterrent unless and 
until there are successful nego- 
tiations with the Soviet Union, 
even if that requires repla cing 
Polaris. 

He did not specifically say 


that Polaris would have to be 
replaced, but the dear and 
natural meaning of Ms words 
is that be would support 
replacement if Polaris comes 
to the end of its effective life 
before the satisfactory -ooudo- 
sion of negotiations.' Obvi- 
ously the details of such a 
policy will need to be worked 
out but the general foranda- 
tioa offered by Mr ' Steel 
yesterday should be agreeable 
to David Owen and the SDP. 

In confronting his party in 
that way Mr Steel is playing 
for high stakes. That is the 
only course that offers a 
reasonable chance of a share 
of power because if the Alli- 
ance were to crumble the 
Liberals would be doomed to 
return to the political periph- 
ery where they have been for 
most of the past half century. 

But there should be no 
illusions that he will have 
converted all his critics with a 
single speech, or that it is only 
the memory of Mr Steel's 
oratory that the public will 
recall from this week.'So there 
now remains a doable chal- 
lenge for the Liberal leader- 
ship. 

Once the details of the new 
policy have been worked oat 
with the SDP, the consent of 
the Liberal Party will have to 
be secured, even if that means 
a further bruising battle. The 
public will also have to- be 
persuaded that this consent is 
wholehearted. Parties that 
have not convinced themselves 
are not likely to convince the 
electorate. 

But at least Mr. Steel has 
now offered the liberals the 
prospect of rehabilitation.. 


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21 


* 


Measures to cope with 
nuclear disaster win 


_ THE* TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 




From Pearce Wright, Science Editor, Vienna 


Agreement was reached in new. measures into force is 
Vienna yesterday for the first stressed in the final' technical 
5 et 01 international measures report od the Chernobyl ac- 


fi>r coping with a nuclear 
disaster. 

It is the first constructive 
<r envelopment to follow the 
Chernobyl nuclear power sta- 
tion .disaster in April and 
comes with the adoption of 
two conventions by 85 coun- 
tries at a special session here 
of the International Atomic 
Energy Agency (IAEA). 

One convention is an “early 
notification" scheme, obliging 
one country to tell its neigh- 
bours of accidents which 
might be the.source of radio- 
active fallout. The other cov- 
ers the type of assistance 
between countries for coping 
with an emergency. 

Although many Of the coun- 
f tries attending the meeting 
had reservations about the 
restricted scope of the two 
conventions, most' were ex- 
pected to sign them by the end 
of next week, when all 113 
members attend the IAEA 
annual meeting. 

The urgent need to bring the 


cideot accompanying the two 
conventions, winch was pre- 
pared by a special leain .called 
the ; agency's international 
nuclear safety advisoiy group. 
_ Its members included nine 
experts from the Soviet Union 
and members from all of the 
major nuclear industrial coun- 
tries. 

The introduction to the 
report says that the most 
serious nuclear accident ever 
to have happened “brought 
the realization that an event, 
considered to have an 1 ex-, 
inanely low probability, had . 
become a reality.™ 

The convention intended to 
provide as early warning of 


in spacecraft or space plat- 
forms. • 

It also covers radioactive 
releases that might be con- 
nected with the manufacture, 
use. storage* disposal and 
transport of radioisotopes for 
agricultural industrial, medi- 
cal and scientific and research 
purposes. 

. “TTie object is for the precise 
time and location, of a release 
to be made known as soon as 
possible. 

Although the conventions 
embrace all nuclear materials, 
including military flights, the 
criticism of some countries is 
the voluntary nature of the 
agreements. 

-The group of countries 
called the Club of 77, from 


any accident covers nuclear ~ Latin America, Africa, the 
power stations, all other plants Middle East and Asia, believe 


where uranium is extracted 
and reprocessed, any radiation 
from a waste storage she, 
radiation arising from the 
transport and storage of 
nuclear fuels or wastes, and 
the use of radioactive sub- 
stances for power generation 


Reactor back ‘in days 9 

From Christopher Walker, Moscow 


The Chernobyl power sta- 
tion. scene of the world's worst 
one] ear accident on April 26, 
is doe to resume limited energy 
production in the next “few 
days* 1 a report in Prutda said 
yesterday. 

The Communist Party pa- 
per saul that workers entomb- 
ing the plant's stricken fomth 
reactor in walls of concrete 
were now starting to dose up a 
bole in the top ripped open by 
the explosion. 


When that is complete, 
power production in the first, 
and then the second of the four 
original reactors is doe to 

begin. 

“Within a few days, the first 
reactor wQl be set in morion,™ 
Prarda said, adding that when 
repair work was completed 
workers would raise a red flag 
to signify the end of a difficult 
effort No dale has been set for 
the resumed operation of the 
third 1,000-megawatt reactor. 


that the agreement should be 
binding. 

Similarly - they . would like 
inspection of sites by special- 
ists attached permanently to 
the IAEA to be mandatory. 
Thai would require a change 
m the agency's charter. 

There also remain dif- 
ferences between the Soviet 
Union and the United Slates 
on the scope of the agree- 
ments. The' Russians wanted 
nuclear weapon test sites in- 
cluded, the Americans did 
not. 

None of these differences is 
halting signing of the agree- 
ments. The issues raised are to 
be reviewed at a meeting later 
this year. 

Mr John Herrington, the 
US Secretary of Energy, said 
that while the technical details 
had been analysed in a 
constructive manner, serious 
questions soil needed to be 
answered. 



Nakasone;j 
apology - 
to US 
Congress 

Tokyo — Mr Yasuhiro 
Nakasonc. the Japanese Prime 
Minister, yesterday made a 
special statement apologizing 
to the US Congress and ibe- 
Adminisimiion for his re-* 
marks about the allegedly lovf» 
intelligence levels of Ameri-J 
can minorities (David WausP- 
writes). | 

Mr Nakasone's statement- 
was made public as it became* 
clear that the issue was not* 
just going to die away in* 
Congress. 

Greece bans 
right’s fiesta [ 

Athens — The Greek Gov-- 
entmem banned a conference' 
of members of the three for* 
right panics in the European. 
Parliament, which was to have, 
been held in northern Greece^ 
next week (Mario Modiantf 
writes). ; 

The conference of Greek, 
rightists was to have beca 
attended, among others, by ty 
Jean-Marie Le Pen of France 
and Signor Giorgio Almirant? 
of Italy. ; 


. . . . Two reporters: 

| Co mmun ity leaders in Andorra welcoming Presid en t Mitterrand of France, the Pyrenean principality's co-prince, during a ) ■■ « 

Of- brief visit yesterday. As head of the French state, he shares the title with the Bishop of Urgel in Spain. 6Xp6U6Q 


South Dakota drought leads to suicide 

Farmers give up the prairies 


From Michael Binyon, Sioux Falls 


Russians prepare 
trial for Daniloff 

From Christopher Walker, Moscow 
A senior Soviet official said questioned Mr Pyadyshev 


yesterday that this week’s 
intense diplomatic negotia- 
tions in Hie US had so far 
made no progress in resolving 
the affair of the American 
journalist, Nicholas Daniloff 
.and that the authorities were 
preparing to tryjdiim on es- 
pionage charges. J . - . 

Mr Boris Pyadyshev, first 
deputy head of the Foreign 
Ministry information depart- 
ment, fielded hostile questions 
about the case. 

"Contacts are taking place 
in New York, but as far as is 
known, no constructive steps 
have been taken by the US 
side." he said. "The Soviet 
side does not think such ques- 
tions cannot be resolved." 

Mr Pyadyshev challenged a 
Western newsman who de- 
scribed Mr Daniloff as a 
hostage. "1 would like to say 
that I protest against that for- 
mula. Mr Daniloff is not a 
hostage, he is a person arrested 
red-handed when his illegal 
activity was stopped," the offi- 
cial said. 

Many correspondents, es- 
pecially Americans, have not- 
ed a growing reluctance 
among Soviet correspondents 
to have dealings with them 
since the arrest and sub- 
sequent stream of propaganda 
attempting to link US journal- 
ists with the CIA 

Another western reporter 


about Mr Daniloffs current 
status, claiming that plans to 
put him on public trial ap- 
peared “irrelevant" since the 
authorities had made it dear 
that they were certain of. his 
guilt 

‘ The spokesman appeared 
taken aback by the question 
and responded with a demand 
to the newsmen not to further 
complicate the affair. He said 
that it was up to the courts to 
determine Mr Dani toffs guilt 
and to determine a “corres- 
ponding punishment™ for him 
if convicted. 

Many officials here have 
been trying unsuccessfully to 
minimise the importance of 
the case. But journalists 
remain convinced that the 
case is being used by the KGB 
to further increase the prob- 
lems of main taming unofficial 
contacts with Russians. 

Mr Pyadyshev said the 
Kremlin would retaliate if the 
US expelled 25 Soviet person- 
nel from the UN in New York 
by Wednesday of next week, 

• WASHINGTON: US and 
Soviet officials are intensify- 
ing their efforts to resolve the 
Daniloff affair and the case of 
a Russian accused of spying in 
New York, but despite several 
proposals from both sides, an 
agreement has so for not been 
reached (Mohsin Ali writes). 


France set 
to try 
Abdullah 

From Diana Geddes 

Paris 

Georges Ibrahim Abdullah, 
the man at the centre of the 
recent wave of Paris bomb- 
ings, will probably go for trial 
before the Assize Court in 
Paris next February on 
charges of complicity in the 
murder of Charles Ray, the 
American military attache 
and Yacov Barsimentov, an 
Israeli diplomat, in Paris m 
1 982, M Albin Chalandon, the 
French Justice Minister, an- 
nounced yesterday. 

Abdullah, who » serving a 
four-year sentence for pos- 
session of forged papers, is the 
alleged leader of the Lebanese 
Armed Liberation Faction 
(Farl). which is suspected of 
being behind the Paris attacks. 
His release is one of the. I 
bombers' chief demands. 

M Chalandon’s announce- 
ment underlines the Gov- 
ernment's repeated determ- 
ination not to do any deal over 
Abdullah with the terrorists. 

• Two Iraqi dissidents, Mr 
Hassan Kheireddine and Mr 
Fawzi Hamza, aged 38 and 36, 
whose expulsion from France 
to Iraq last February formed 
the pretext for the alleged 
“execution" by the Islamic 
Jihad of one of the French 
hostages in Beirut, returned to 
Paris yesterday to resume 
studies as adult students at the 
Sorbonne. 


Grey thunderclouds roll 
over the huge prairies and 
sheets of rain sweep across the 
treeless grasslands which are 
dotted with large dark bales of 
hay — reminders of the bison 
which once roamed the plains. 

South Dakota's formers bat-, 
ten down in their isolated 
homesteads. They are accus- 
tomed to harsh weather, ready 
for the approach of the chilling 
winter. But the economic 
storm now bufletting them is 
more severe, and no let-up is 
in sight Falling prices and 
soaring surpluses are driving 
formers off the land, ana 
reducing others to poverty, 
anger, despair and even 
suicide. 

South Dakota is among the 
worst-hit forming states in the 
nation. It has the highest 
proportion — more than 13 
cent cent — of fanners of any 
state. This year there, have 
been some 400 bankruptcies. 
A survey predicts that about 
7,000 of the state's 34,000 
formers will he forced, off the 
land. 

There is little else for them 
to do in South Dakota, and 
many will leave the old fron- 
tier land permanently. With a 
population of only 650,000, 
South Dakota has just had its 
House of Representatives 
membership reduced to one 
man for the whole state. 

'It’s the most difficult tune 
we've faced since the 1930s,” 
said Mr Chuck Groth, of the 
state fanners' union. Land 
prices have dropped 60 per 
cent in five years. Small banks 
have come to the end of their 
credit and marry have with- 
drawn from agricultural lend- 
ing altogether. Even the vast 
government-run Farmers 
Home Loan Administration 
has called in private debt 


collectors to get its money 
back. 

For some it Is too much. 
Last winter a former shot him- 
self and his family. Others, 
deeply in debt, are “hanging 
on by their fingernails," Mr 
Groth said. They are having 
their telephones cm off burn- 
ing no fuel except wood in 
winter, postponing new pur- 
chases, repairing old mach- 
inery. The Fanners Union has 
set up a help hotline. 

Neighbours rally round. But 
slowly the rural community is 
dying. As forms close, village 
shops can no longer keep 
going. The bleak landscape is 
dotted with abandoned form- 
houses while tell-tale shut- 
tered stores and empty schools 
herald the collapse of the 
forming villages. 

Many young people, es- 
pecially those with qualifica- 
tions and technical training, 
leave for industry in the big 
towns for away. But for those 
forced away at the age of 50 it 
is harder. 

A former president of the 
Farmers Union is now a 
security guard in a Mock of 
flats in Denver. Stuck by a 
television monitor day after 
day, he wrote to his former 
neighbours of his loneliness 
and yearning for the open 
prairies. 

For some, this is the second 
upheaval in two generations. 
Their parents came north 
from- the dustbowls of the 
mid-west in the 1 930s to start 
again in South Dakota. Others 
come from families of formers 
In Norway, Germany or Rus- 
sia before they fenced and 
planted the prairies and raised 
their herds. 

They ding stubbornly to 
their way of life. But even they 
are beginning to see that the 


markets are no longer there, 
that without new exports or 
mandatory production cont- 
rols. success brings only ever 
greater problems. 

Grain elevators are full of 
unsold com from last year. 
Mountains of grain are piled 
up in makeshift wooden stock- 
ades. There are no buyers. 

South Dakota's formers 
cannot switch to a more inten- 
sive use of the land — to mar- 
ket-gardening or poultry pro- 
duction. It is too cold, too re- 
mote and there are too few 
people. 

Last year their anger led to 
rallies mid marches, to delega- 
tions to Washington, to 
speeches and lobbying. But 
emergency legislation has 
changed little, and the mood 
has changed to malaise and 
resignation. 

Spirits were lifted briefly 
this summer by "Project Hay 
Relief’, the spontaneous 
donation of hay and grass 
from the nation's formers in 
the north to the drought- 
striken South. "It made usfeel 
for a month or two that we 
were doing something good,” 
Mr Groth said. "But h’s 
passed now." 

There is no political issue in 
South Dakota but agriculture. 
Ordinary people know little of 
the outside world — an airport 
newsagent told me she had 
never sold a stamp for over- 
seas before- but they know of 
_ the Canadian and Australian 
grain exports, the protec- 
tionism in Japan and the 
European Community, the at- 
tempts to gel the Russians to 
buy US grain. “We are swim- 
ming in a sea of 
commodities," Mr Groth said. 
“Something has to change." 


Nasa trims 
its space 
platform 

From Mohsiu AU 
Washington 

The US space agency Nasa 
has unveiled a plan for 17 
manned shuttle flights to as- 
semble a space station, begin- 
ning in 1993 and ending in 
mfi-1994. 

The new plan, a modified 
version of earlier proposals, 
was drawn up in the light of 
the Challenger disaster. It 
calls for a smaller manned 
space station requiring fewer 
shuttle flights to place in orbit 
Mr James Fletcher, Nasa 
administrator, has told a 
House of Representatives Sci- 
ence Committee the new ap- 
proach would provide the 
United States with a perma- 
nent space station by toe mid- 
1990s, as originally planned, 
hot cutting back the number of 
astronaut-manned mainte- 
nance and assembly flights. 

The original design, calling 
for a dual keel station 500ft by 
361ft,. would have taken 31 
shuttle - flights over .eight 
years. Nasa- officials say the 
new approach could involve 
fewer than six flights, with a 
station operating by 1994. 

The new configuration, Mr 
Fletcher said, would not alter 
the planned participation of 
the European Space Agency, 
Canada or Japan. Assembly of 
the station would cost an 
estimated SB billion (£5.6 
bOlkm). 

The Soviet Union has a wide 
lead over toe United States 
and is now replacing its small- 
er Salynt stations with a 
larger, permanently-manned 
©rirting station. 

On Thursday toe House of 
spresentatives gave Nasa 
permission to beiild a replace- 
ment for the Challenger, 
which exploded on January 28 
soon after take-ofL 


Eyewitness tells of Soviet hijack 


Britain chided over 
‘boat people 9 camps 

From Alan McGregor, Geneva 


From Our Own Correspondent, Moscow 
independent ac- passengers on board for sev- 


The first 
count has finally emerged here 
of the hijack drama last Sat- 
urday night in the remote 
central Russian town of Ufe in 
which a total of six people, 
including the two Soviet 
hijackers were shot dead. 

A Soviet eyewitness who 
arrived at the airport soon 
after the was taken over said 
the hijackers were in control 
of a Tupolev 1 34 plane with 76 


era! hours before it was 
stormed by anti-terrorist 
troops. 

The plane had been sur- 
rounded by other Aeroflot air- 
craft to block its path and the 
negotiations were undertaken 
via a woman passenger. 

The account of the incident 
was given to an Italian 
journalist,. Mr Guillato 
Chiesa. the veteran Moscow 
correspondent . of the com- 


munist daily Uniia. by a 
friend who had been at toe 
airport. 

“It wasa scoop that at first I 
could not write, because no- 
one would confirm that such 
an incident had taken place," 
Mr Chiesa said- 

The brief official account of 
the incident described the 
hijackers, who had killed two 
militiamen on their way to the 
airport, as “drug addicts". 


Britain's policy of confining 
to three closed Hong Kong 
camps — two on outlying 
islands — some 12,000 Viet- 
namese boat people is 
counter-productive, the UN 
High Commissioner for refu- 
gees, Mr Jean-Pierrc Hocke, 
said yesterday. 

-The high commission 
“never agreed with the ctosed- 
camp policy", Mr Hocke, who 
has just returned from a visit 
to the camps, said. ‘ 

"It may well be diminishing 
the chances of Hong Kong 
finding resettlement places in 


other countries for people wbo 
may have developed psycho- 
logical problems as a result of 
being in closed camps.” 

• HONG KONG: Britain 
should consider "how we 
might best make an approach 
to Vietnam” over repatriating 
the refugees, Mr David 
Waddinglon, Minister of State 
at toe Home Office, told a 
press conference here (David 
Bona via writes). 

Mr Waddington added that 
many of the boat people were 
“economic refugees™ rather 
than political asylum cases. 


Four accused 
walk out of 
‘dirty war’ trial 

From Eduardo Cn6 
- Buenos Aires 

The opening session of the 
trial of two former Buenos 
Aires police chiefs and 10 
other men was disrupted when 
four accused walked out after 
one of them screamed at the 
judges for refusing to allow 
him to read a statement. 

Senor Migud Etehecolatz. 
former police chief of in- 
vestigations during the mili- 
tary dictatorship, asked to 
read a statement claiming that 
the hearing was a show trial. 

When Judge Guillermo 
Ledesma refused. Senor Etch- 
ecolau and three other 
defendants joined in a chorus 

0< Vhe events appeared to be 
pan of a defence strategy to 
discredit the court. 

Chief defendants are gen- 
erals Juan Ramon Camps and 
Ovidio PaWo Ricchen, who 
are charged with more than 
280 cases of kidnap and 
torture during the "dirty war 
against terrorism. 


By-election will test Chirac’s appeal 


From Diana Geddes 
Paris 

Six months after its victory 
in March, the right-wing 
French Government is to 
undergo fts first real test of 
popularity tomorrow in ejec- 
tions for a third of toe Senate 
seats and a by-etectom for 
eight National Assembly seats 
in toe Haste Garonne. 

Most of toe attention has 
been centred oa Haute Ga- 
ronne, where an unnsnaf battle 
has been going on between a 
leading outsider, who is an 
MP in Paris but who promises 
to give np his seat if elected in 
toe department, and a- highly 
popular "local boy” who has 
promised to resist his seat 
immediately oa being elected 
to devote his energies to 
Toulouse, capital of Haute 
Garonne, and the town of 
which he is Mayor. 

M Lionel Jospin, first sec- 
retary of the Socialist Party, 
has been parachuted into the 
department to bead the party 
list and to help to revive 
morale in what was once a 

Socialist stronghold. 

M Dominique Baudis, who 



left, the ‘local boy’, and M Lionel 

t outsider, who square up at Haute Garonne. 


took over from his father as 
Mayor of Toulouse in 1983, is 
beading the RPR-UDF list, 
represe nting the two coalition 
parties in toe Government of 
M Jacques Chirac. 

In toe general election, die 
Socialists won four seats in Che 
department, with 37.9 per cent 
of the vote, while toe RPR and 
UDF, presenting separate 
fists, also won four seats, with 
43 per cent of the vote. 

.There ;is danger that the 
Socialists' might this time lose 


a seat, thereby striking: a 
severe blow to M Jospin's 
political ambitions as well as 
to those of toe party. 

Tim by-election has been 
rolled because the March poll 
in toe department was an- 
nulled. Voting will- be ander 
toe proportional representa- 
tion system, although a law 
has since been passed re- 
introducing two-round major- 
ity voting for parliamentary 
-elections. - 

The Senate elections are 


expected to produce a 
boost for the Ganllist 
party, which may even emerge 
for the first time as toe largest' 
group in the Upper House, 
while toe Communists could 
lose enough seats to be de- 
prived of their right to form an 
officially recognized group. 

One third of the Senate is 
elected every three years for a 
nine-year term by an electoral 
college comprising all the 
MPs and regional and depart- 
mental coradllors in the 
departments concerned, and a 
roughly equal number of 
representatives of the com- 
munes — some 100,000 elec- 
tors in alL 

The Comnimusts hold 24 of 
the 319 Senate seats. 

- Fifteen National Assembly 
MPS are among those stand- 
ing for the Senate, but their 
election will not mean a mass 
of parliamentary by-elections 
because the system of propor- 
tional representation under 
which they were elected as 
MPs provides for toe next 
candidate on toe party fist in a 
particular department to .take 
the vacant seat 


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Kuala Lumpur (Reuter) — 
Malaysia ordered two cor- 
respondents of The Asian 
Half Street Journal to leave 
the country and banned sales 
of the newspaper for three 
months. John Berrhelsen and 
Raphael Pura were given 48 
hours to leave. 

The ministry said the ban 
was imposed after it studied 
articles in the paper. 

Failed bomb 

Guernica (Reuter) — Span- 
ish police safely detonated a 
car bomb containing 801b of 
explosives and shrapnel 
planted by the Basque sepa- 
ratist guerrilla group ETA 

Locusts hit i 

Peking (Reuter) - Thou- 
sands of peasants in Henan : 

province have almost wiped 
out a huge swarm of locusts 
with the help of pesticides. 

Bridge mishap [ 

Moscow (Reuter) — Ten 
people were killed and 14 were i 

taken to hospital after a bridge 
collapsed at a hydro-electric 
power station in Latvia. 

Bombers’ end ! 

Tehran (Reuter) — Three * 

men convicted of planting a 
car bomb which killed 13 
people and wounded more 
than 100 in Qom were exe- 
cuted here as spectators 
chanted "Atlahu akbar ” (God 
is greatest). 

Nuclear leak 

Berne (Reuter) — A defec- 
tive filter caused a small leak 
of radioactivity from a nuclear 
power station at Muehleberg, 
near the Swiss capital, con- 
taminating a worker. 

Chile blast 

Santiago (AP) — Leftist 
guerrillas blacked our half of 
Chile by blowing up two 
power pylons in what a guer- 
rilla ■ spokesman called “the 
beginning of an offensive 
against the state of siege ” 


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>~ 6_ ^OVERSEAS NEWS ' 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 


Basques head for polls 
after party split in 
tussle for ancient label 


Sefior Jose Ardanza. Chief 
Minister' in Spain's troubled 
Basque region, yesterday fi- 
.nally called an election for 
'‘‘November 30 because of a 
.split in the ruling Basque 

- Nationalist Party (PNV). 

*; He particularly blamed Se- 
" nor Carlos Garakoechea. his 
■[•predecessor, who decided a 
Mew days ago to join the newly- 

* launched Basque Nationalists 
f(NV). with 10 other PNV 
■‘MPs. including the Speaker of 
.the Basque Parliament. 

? Nationalists out-bidding 
; each other will bea feature of a 
.^.campaign for elections that no - 
•/party really wanted 

Confusion over the PNV 
■’ and NV is quite intentional, 
'neither side being. willing to 
/give up the magic of a label 
r * going back almost a century in 

- Basque politics. 

There arc fears that ETA, 
"the Basque separatist group, 
•jwill seek to add its violent 
■’■■‘word*' to the campaign. 
.‘People's Unity, its political 
•' wing, will also try to raise the 
.-stakes in- the name of 
; separatism. 

Unlike.. the PNV and the 
Socialists, both of which lost 
/support in the region in the 

- June general election. People's 
Unity advanced to 17 percent 

• of the vote. 

7 Senor Ardanza, who at best 


From Richard Wjgg, Vitoria 

commanded the support of 
only 32 MPs in the ■ 75- 
member Basque Parliament, 
and governed only with 
Socialist tolerance, told the 
votera bluntly yesterday that 
promises of continued sup- 
port from, PNV “deserters" 
and the Socialists were not to 
be trusted. Regional elections 
were not due until 1988. 

Opinion polls suggest that 
the November result could be 
an even split between Senor. 
Ardanza and his NV rival. 

Spain's deputy Prime Min- 
ister, Sefior Alfonso Guerra, 
forecast that the election will 
' riot resolve "the problem of 
govemability" in the Basque 
country. In saying this he cut 
across his Socialist Party's bid 
to offer the region an alter- 
native government. 

In the old Parliament the 
PNV had 32 MPs, the Social- 
ists 19. People’s Unity 11 
(though its members never 
took their seats), the right- 
wing Popular Alliance seven, 
and the Basque Left six.. 

The question that will 
underlie the November poll is 
whether the constant feuding 
among moderate Basque poli- 
ticians has achieved an ETA 
goal by making the region 
ungovernable. 

This is a question which 


must also worry the Madrid 
Government, despite its pre- 
occupation with terrorism. 

True to their centralist tra- 
ditions. the Socialists under 
Senor Felipe Gonzalez, the 
Prime Minister, have failed 
the Basque country in not 
living up to commitments to 
settle full autonomous powers 
on die moderates in Vitoria, 
the seat of the regional 
government 

The haggling is still going on 
over the finances of the 
devolution process, despite a 
promise to settle the issue by 
the end of last year. 

For the PNV, Spain’s sec- 
ond oldest political party, 
founded in 1895, what has 
• happened is little short of a 
tragedy. 

After withstanding the long 
night of Francoism and the 
ETA terrorism, the party has 
shown itself incapable in prac- 
tice of giving Basques the 
home role it advocated for so 
long as a panacea. 

Failures by Vitoria and 
Madrid have been exploited 
eagerly by People's Unity, 
which dismissed the 19/9 
Statute of Guernica as nothing 
but sham autonomy, and boy- 
cotted the Basque Parliament 
in the name of a vague 
separatism. 


Duke calls 
for fresh 
philosophy 
on wildlife 

From Peter Nichols 
Rome 

The twenty-fifth anniver- 
sary meeting of the World 
Wildlife Fand in Assisi beard 
an appeal yesterday from the 
Duke of Edinburgh for a new 
guiding philosophy to con- 
vince the hearts as well as dm 
minds of the people of the 
rightness of its cause. 

To meet this need, the Fund 
has invited to this meeting 
representatives of tine Chris- 
tian, Muslim, Buddhist, Hin- 
du mid Jewish retigjons, in an 
unprecedented initiative aimed 
at involving them directly in 
the conservationist cause. 

The Duke, who is inter- 
national chairman of the 

Fund, said that each of these 
religious representatives wo- 
uld be asked on Monday to 
address their followers on bow 
they saw the task of safeguard- 
ing nature. 

He had said earlier that 
once the Fund was a voice in 
the desert, but results showed 
that the voice had been 
heeded. 

In its 25 years it had backed 
4,200 projects in 130 countries 
for a total expenditure of $110 
million (£77 million). The 
Fund now has more than a 
million members drawn from 
23 countries and' the Duke 
announced the enrolment of a 
new member: President 
Cossiga of ftafy. 



The Duke of Edinburgh at the World Wildlife Fund meeting 
attended by representatives of the major refigfons. 


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Honduran hostility growing 

‘New Nicaragua’ 
in Contra hands 

From 

As the inhabitants of the 
war-torn eastern frontier zone 

of Honduras brace themselves 
for resumption of heavy fight- 
ing between Contra forces bas- 
ed there and the Sandinista re- 
gime in Nicaragua, there is ev- 

Smce of growing heghtyto 

the presence of the US-backed 
rebel troops. _ 

According to reports from 
the region, the Contras have 
taken over a broad swathe of 
Honduran territory, renaming 
It “New Nicaragua". 

Within this area, covering 
200 square miles. Contra 
forces are said to exert almost 
total authori ty, restricting the 
movement of focal people. 

There are complaints that 
the growing shortage of food 
in the Contra-controlled zones 
has forced large numbers of 
Hondurans to move out, 
becoming refugees in their 
own country. 

“We are under occupation 
by a foreign army," says one 
angry resident of the town of 
Danli, some 60 miles from the 
Honduran capital. 

Not far away, in El Paraiso, 
the leader of the local coffee 
workers, Seilor Antonio' Er- 
avn says that Hondurans 
there live in constant fear of 
Sandinista attacks on the rebel 
concentrations. The local 
Contra commander (a self- 
styled general) is, says Senor 
Erazo. a “little Napoleon 
who ignores completely the 
hardships caused to people by 
the presence of his men. 

The US Embassy m Teguci- 
galpa privately dismisses sug- 
gestions that the Contras are 
alienating public opinion by 
their conduct in the enclaves 
they occupy as left-wing pro- 
paganda. But the Honduran 
authorities are acutely aware 
of the challenge to national 
sovereignity posed by these 
“liberated" zones. 


ministration, which came to 
power only last summer, was 
first to admit that the rebels 
had established large training 
bases on Honduran soil Since 
then reports that Government 
troops are sometimes barred 
from Contra territory have 
not always been denied 
convincingly. , „ 

Sources close to the Hon- 
duran armed forces claim mat, 
for all the counuy's dwe 
military links with the US, the 
situation in the eastern r egion 
is causing considerable, aggra- 
vation, especially among the 
younger officers, some of 
whom are American trained. 

On a wider front, despite 
recent opinion polls showing 
strong support for ihe Rcagan 
Administration’s hard line 
against the Sandimsta s. a 
broad strain of popular oppo- 
sition appears to be emerging 
among Hondurans alarmed at 
the prospect of becoming 
dragged into a major conflict 

The impact of Contra activ- 
ities in the vital coffee-grow- 
ing regions where they are 
concentrated can only add to 
the severe economic problems 
feeing Honduras. 

The same would apply to 
the widely anticipated renewal 
of fighting on the eastern bor- 
der with the approach of the 
dry season and the imminent 
availability of massive new 
US military aid for the 
Contras. 


President Jose Azcona’s ad- 



Two 

and French, have been sen- 
tenced to five years in jail here, 
for luring helped Nicaraguan 
Contras to operate illegally eat 
of Costa Ska. 

It is the first tine foal 
foreigners have been convicted 
for fighting with the PKa- 
raguan rebel forces^ 

■ Judge Carlos VtOalobos 
found Peter Gfibhery, aged 25, 
of Solihull, West Midlands, 
and Claude Chauffsrd, aged 
31, gailty of carrying out 
hostile acts against a 
neighbouring state. 

A Costa Rican and eight 
Nicaraguan Contras were also 
jailed. Two Nicaraguans, said 
to be leaders of the rebel band 
which was part of the US- 
backed Nicaraguan Demo- 
cratic Force (FDN), were 
sentenced to SVi years, and the 
other nine to five years each. 

The harshness of the sen- 
tence stunned the geensed and 
those in court, as the Govern- 
ment prosecutor had recom- 
mended that the foreigners 
simply be expelled from the 
country. 

Glibbery and Chanfiard 
were separated from the others 
and driven toa jail in Alajnela, 
some 15 miles outside the 
Costa Rica capital, San JosA 

Glibbery said that be was 
disappointed by the sentence 
and planned to appeal. He had 
been antionatine- -that he 
wotrid be deported and allowed 
to return to England. 


Observers interpret the stiff Rica and Honduras. 


Police suspect 
murder bid as 
Aids maii dies 

From Ivor Davis - 
Los Angeles 

An Aids patient who sur- 
vived a near-fetal dose of 
insulin prescribed for him by a- 
caller who pretended to be the 
man's doctor has died of 
complications. 

Santa' Monica detectives 
say, however, that they will 
continue to investigate the 
case as an attempted murder, 
following the death on Wed-' 
nesday afternoon at St John's 
Hospital. Santa Monica of Mr 
Edward Lebowitz, aged 48. 

Mr Lebowitz, of Los. An- 
geles. went into a coma and 
was placed on the critical list 
before doctors realized what 
bad been done. . . 


Czechoslovak 
ties fellow 
guard to defect 

From. Richard Bassett 
Vienna . . 

A Czechoslovak soldier tied 
up one of his fellow guards 
patrolling the frontier with 
Austria and defected to the 
west yesterday.. 

Die soldier, who has been 
identified by ' the. -Austrian 
Interior Ministry- only as Si- 
mon B, forced his compatriot 
to disarm and smash his radio. 
Then, at pistol-point, he hand- 
cuffed- and marched 1 the man 
toa tree where, after tying him 
up, he escaped across the 
frontier near Retz, in lower 
Austria. 

. Last month another border 
guard fled to Austria while on 
patrol. 


World Bridge 

British pairs start wel 

From A Bridge Correspondent. Miami 

The British pairs made an events, 
excellent start in the first '<■ . 

session of the pairs champion- Db^2 l i5 l ]S 1StS 
ship being played here: ofcontiimw 

Andy Robson and Glyn ?, e an <* a 

Uggins were placed 17th ina Son* for tw0 “ 
select field of 48 pairs. ao " s hours each day. 

. The current women's world r™ ~*L end ** “con 
team champions. Sally Hor- 2? 1 S 551 ?" PauI . Marsto 
ton and Sandra Landy. were in Burgess i 

second place, almost a board fJjJfiS?* le< J? wh, te Robsc 
behmd the new formation of t£ i§ & ^ t 5 oppcd . 10 33n 
the world champion, Jacqui in US “d fiv ° P^rs in til 
Mitchell, and Amalia Kearee, i„ th 
which promises a real tf,™.. -JP JJ® ° ocn “Ties Mitcfte 


Briton gets 5 years 
for helping rebels 

From Martha Honey, AUjuela, Cotta Rka 
mercenaries, British sentences us indications of the 


Costa Rica Government's 
determination to enforce its 
policy of neutrality and to stop 
illegal Contra activities. 

The prosecutor quoted from 
Presjdent'Oscar Arias' speech 
to die United Nations tills 
week is vjhkh h* vowed that 
.armed groups would wtt.be 
.-sUowedto* operate from Costa 
Rican territory. 

During the day-king trial 
three police officials presented 
evidence that foe Contra 
group, which was arrested in 
April 2985 in a camp six miles 
from the Nicaraguan border, 
bad carried out attacks against 
Sandinista positions and was 
planning to make another 
foray into Nicaragna within 
foe next few days. . . . 

One security officer de- 
scribed the fire mercenaries as 
“specialist In counter-gnerilla 
warfare" 

The 11 on trial were ar- 
rested with three other for- 
eigners, two American and 
another Englishman, Mr John 
Davies, aged 26, also of Soli- 
hull, who left Costa Rica 
before thetriaL 

Over toe years scores of 
foreigners, mainly Americans, 
hare been involved with toe 
Contras. 

Two captured Cuban Ameri- 
cans are awaiting trial ■ la 
Managua. An nndisdased 
number hare been killed in toe 
war and several dozen others 
have been expelled from Costa 


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. ■ 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 


If. yon move, I kill you’, blindfold British journalist warned 

dian’ man SSSIlMi 


y.S*W* 


■ v 




It was, as David Hirst ‘said . 
afterwards, a bit of. bad luck. . 
First, there was the puncture ■ 
on the Beirut, front line. Then 
■there were- his Druze escorts, 

■ who wemofftohdp his driver 
mend the tyre. 

And then there were the 
three armed men who just 
happened to catch sight of “a' 
nice juicy ■foreigner 7 '. 

It was then that The Guajr- 
. d Jan's naan in Lebanon found 
out what it was like to be a 
. kidnap victim.' - 


From Robert Fisk, Beirut 

id Hirst" said .from Amal Security, but in 
of bad luck, fen .they were just zaaran 
Lhe puncture • (thugs). They said they wanted 
it line. Then my papers and passport and 
mze escorts, then they pushed me into their 

dp his driver .BMW. I was forced into the 
back seat with a man beside 
re were , the me who put agun to my head, 
o who just He kept saying. *Jfyou move, I 
h sight of "a kill you'.” 
er” The car drove away, as Mr 

it The Guar- Hirst put it delicately, “at the 
banon found usual Beirut speed” and for 
like to be a ten minutes the gunmen and 


Shouting and struggling, 
'■tearing ofihis blindfold as the 
: gunmen drove him through 
- the crowded streets at pistol 
point. Mr Hirst . eventually 

■ escaped - from his captors in 

■ the southern suburbs of Bei- 
’ . rut. running down an alleyway 

> and climbing into a passing 

■ taxi which drove him ■ to 
freedom. He arrived at. the 

‘news agency office where be 
■ . works with no more than a few 
-.•scratches and a thirst for a 
n well-chilled German beer. 

Mr Hirst is the doyen of 
’ . west Beirut’stiny press corps, 
vone. of the very few western 
journalists who has stayed on 
. in a city where merely to be a 
foreigner is to be a target. 

A quiet, charming man of 
i '50 with- a disarming shyness 

* that hides a brilliant analytical 

mind, he was, on the face of it, 

; ■ an unlikely kidnap victim. But 
he did' what so few foreigners 

* ;do when they are abducted. 

> He fought back. • 

! He had left his home in the 

* suburb of Ein el-Mreisse just 
i .after dawn to travel by taxi to 

* the Christian sector of Beirut: 

For the last part of _ his 
journey he was escorted in a 
separate car by Druze militia- 
men. "As we -were approach- 
ing the line at Mreijeb. a 
BMW passed us going in the 
Other ' direction ' with three 
characters inside and I ; 
remember thinking that -1 
didn't like tho look of them, 
Mr HirSt said 

“When we -had- the flat tyre 

* at Mreijeh. the escorts went to 
help my" driver. That was 

* when the armed elements 
-• came" uj). It ' was the -same 
' people l had seen earlier. ' 

’• ^They Claimed they 


their potential victim headed 
into true Shia Muslim suburbs. 

“I shouted,” he said contin- 
ued “I tried to make as much 
noise as I could especially 
when the- car stopped or. 
•slowed down at traffic jams. 
The gunman in the back had 
my head pushed down and put 
a blindfold on me, but I 
. managed to get h off after halt 
a minute. 

“Eventually we came to a 
deserted place, half lawn and 
half country, in the southern 
: suburbs. 

“They wanted to put me 
into this concrete hovel house 
and 1 started shouting and 
screaming to alert people.” 

In desperation, he kicked 
the nearest kidnapper. “I 
struggled and managed to 
detach .myself and ran away. 
Maybe they were frightened, 
but they didn't shoot at me. I 
ran down this alleyway and at 
the other end was a main road | 
with jots of people. 1 caught a 
taxi- there and the gunmen 
didn't follow me.” 

With neither his passport 
norhis Press credentials, all of 
which had been taken by the 
. gunmen, he arrived back 
. safely in the. Hamra -commer- • 
. rial district of west Beirut, 
-where officials of the Amal 
militia, highly, displeased that 
their name had been taken in 
vain by the gunmen, turned 
: up to ask The Guardian 
correspondent- -for. a descrip- 
tion of his tormentors. 

.The author of a highly- 
acclaimed book on the Middle 
East conflict. The Gun and the 
Olive Brunch, Mr Hirst .was 

thus left with the sort of fim- 

• person* story that his few 
: cofleagues.in Beirut were quite 
j happy not-.to have themselves. 





Mr David Hirst, The Guardian correspondent in Rebut, explaining bow belled from ithree 
armed men who abducted him to the Shia Muslim suburbs after his car bad a flat tyre. 


Engineer 
killed in 
Sri Lanka 

From Vyltha Yapa 
Colombo 

There have been conflicting 
reports about the kil li n g on 
Thursday night of a German 
engineer attached to the Deut- 
sche Welle radio relay station 
near Trincootalee in Sri Lan- 
ka's eastern province. 

First reports said that Mr 
Urich Heberfing had been 
lfillwt by the guerrilla Libera- 
tion Tigers of Tamil Edam, 1 
but a Government commu- 
nique later said be was caught 
in a crossfire between Tamil 
terrorists and the Anny at a 
partly demolished bridge. 

. The bridge was destroyed by 
guerrillas last year and it was 
the German team's practice to 
travel by car to the bridge, 
walk across, and board a car 
on die other side to take them 
to the radio station. • 

■ The Government said that 
the Germans were walking 
across die bridge when there 
was shooting between the ter- 
rorists and the Army. A 
splinter from a mortar shell 
caused Mr Heberiing severe 
brain damage. 


Canberra asks how 
far an MP dare go 

From Stephen Taylor, Sydney 


When does the acerbity of 
parliamentary debate exceed 
the limits of acceptability? 
Canberra politicians have had 
cause to discuss the issue 
among themselves this week. 

Mr Paul Keating, the Trea- 
surer. has a line in invective 
which sometimes causes even 
his own party to flinch. 

Among the milder terms of 
abuse he has employed have 
been his description of the 
Opposition as “stunned mul- 
lets”, and “boxheads”, and his 
dismissal of one MP as a 

“hare-brained hillbilly”. 

When provoked, however, 
he has been known to refer to 
the Liberals as “sleazebags”, 
“criminal intellects", “per- 
fumed gigolos", and “pigs”, 
and to one individual as a 
“gutless spiv” and another as 
a “piece of criminal garbage” - 

He described one - liberal 
MP who really aroused his ire, 
by alluding in Parliament to a 
past love affair, as “a stupid, 
foulrtnouthed grub”. 

It may not be the sort of 
language normally associated 
with a man of renowned taste. 


but Mr Keating is a graduate 
of the toughest school in 
Australian politics: the New 
South Wales Labor Party. 

His language was under 
scrutiny because of an episode 
in which Mr John Howard 
became the first leader of the 
Opposition to be suspended 
from Parliament since Robert 
Menziesin 1949. 

Mr Howard had refused to 
withdraw an accusation that 
Mr Keating had told “a par- 
liamentary lie” in a debate on 
allegations that the Treasurer 
had abused his travel entitle- 
ment. He said that both Mr 
Keating and Mr Bob Hawke, 
the Prime Minister, had used 
the term in the past 

“Mr Keating has an appal- 
ling record as a mud-slinger,” 
Mr Howard" said. . 

The Opposition leader took 
his place in the House again 
on Thursday, unrepentant 
over the 24-hour suspension. 
Indeed, be seemed quite 
cheerful, reminding all and 
sundry that six months after 
Menzies’s suspension he be- 
came Prime Minister. 


Mugabe to 
introduce 
socialist 
penal laws 

From A Correspondent 
Harare 

Mr Robert Mugabe, the 
Zimbabwe Prime Minister, 
plans to introduce a new 
socialist system of penal law to 
replace the centuries-old Ro- 
man Dutch framework it 
shares with neighbouring 
South Africa. 

- He told prison officers at a 
passing out parade on Thurs- 
day that his Government was 
committed to severing all 
links with the “abominable 
and abhorrent system of 
apartheid as soon as possible". 

He said: “All our laws 
should be formulated in such a 
manner as would facilitate the 
restructuring of our society in 
order to construct a socialist 
state. 

“The new Zimbabwean le- 
gal system would replace 
punishment with rehabilita- 
tion and re-orientation of 
criminals and other social 
deviants".. 

Dr Eddison Zvobgo, the 
Minister of Justice. Legal and 
Parliamentary Affairs, this 
week defended the Zimbabwe 
Government's actions in ig- 
noring certain judgments by 
the High Court and the Su- 
preme Court. 

He told white senators, who 
had complained that the integ- 
rity of the judiciary; was being 
undermined, that it was “an 
impossible dream" for the 
Slate to abide by all 
judgments. 

“The present state of the 
law is that where any action is 
instituted against the State, 
and the applicant succeeds, 
the State may, not shall abide 
by the judgement," claimed 
Dr Zvobgo. 

Mr Justice Enoch Dum- 
buishena. Chief Justice of 
Zimbabwe, warned of a pos- 
sible “slide into chaos" if 
courts could not get their 
rulings enforced after two 
while Customs officers were 
i re-detained in May, hours 
after having been freed by the 
[ Supreme Court, on allegations 
of spying for South Africa. 


OVERSEAS NEWS 7_ 

Nato allies pose 
questions about 
US missile offer 

From Frederick Bonnart, Brussels 

Serious questions are being has said that its nuclear forct 
asked at Nato about the as a national deterrent, is nw 

American proposals at Geneva up for negotiation, 
for reducing intermediate The British Gore™™, 
range unclear forces (INF) - and recently theJJDPjhaiJ 
the Soviet SS20 and the made dear that replacement of 
American Pershing 2 and Polaris will go ah ® uL __ „ 
cruise missiles. No details 

The European allies are however, on the thtid problem, 
concerned by two main as- Soviet SS23. (Send) and 
peels. One is the limit any SS12/22 (Sailebpard) inis- 
agreemeut will impose on the sites « moved fotwwdmto 
Soviet modernized shorter- CrathadwaUiiandM Ger- 
ranee missile force, which has many about two years ago, 
teSTbdlt as a further res- when Yuri Andropov, then fte 
ponse to the introduction of Soviet leader, repJjedW the 


PODSe tu MIC muvuuu»» ” ““ ■•■ “ ■«. 

US missiles in Europe. deployment “ 

The other is more ftnida- cruise and Pershing missiles 
mental: how can the political .These 
coupling of North America timated ranges of 300 and 556 
and Europe be maintained miles respectively and from 
once the missiles are with- there can easily reach most 


drawn? 

Any agreement most fulfil 

. _ mwt 


western Europe. Some taw 
now been moved back, bat the 


three basic conditions: it must official said that they are so 
be “globaT’, it must not in- mobile that their location is 
dude “third-party systems”, entirely indevant E urope an 
and it most impose constraints military leaders are extremely 


on short-range nuclear forces. 
The global aspect has been 

. . • . ■ 1 i: tkwa 


concerned about them. 
General Bernard Rogers, 


covered by including those Supreme Allied Commander, 
Soviet SS20s stationed in Asia Europe, has recently put tor* 
and American Pershing 2 and ward initial proposals for de- 


cruise missiles in North Amer- fences against such nussues. 
ica. Under the proposal these They were also mentio ned last 
should be limited to 100 war- week by Nato s cousdtativc 
heads each. However, accord- group - the body monitoring 
rag to the official, this raises the negotiations - which re- 
fomwf in I S efforts in ob- 


1 U uie uiiikiw, — d ' _ . 

more Questions. Negotiators ferred to US efforts in oo- 
must be realists and envisage taining “concurrent cons-; 
possible contraventions. traints on s norter-range iwr 

What would happen, for systems”. The other trig qnes- 
example, if; in a period of tioa is the political dimension. 


tension, the Soviet Union de- 
cided to move its Asian mis- 
siles Into the western Soviet 
Union, which would be phys- 


The deployment of cruise 
and Pershing missiles in 
Europe was intended to create 
an irrevocable and demon- 


UU uni* WUH.U wwiaiaw MV. FMJ- — - .. 

i rall y easy’ to do? No eqniva- strable Irak between the tw® 
lent response would be parts of the Alliance, 
available to the Alliance: it It showed the commitment 
would be politically almost of the United States to Europe 
impossible to move the with- at a time when the two saper- 
drawn Pershing 2 and cruise powers were n^otiating stra- 
m issUes back into Europe. tegk treaties bilaterally while 
The proposal has also made at the same time tying Europe 
dear that British and French firmly into Nato's strategic 
nuclear forces, the third par- nuclear plans. 


ties to this bilateral agree- 
ment, are not to be considered, 
though the Soviet side has not 


At a time when, internal 
Alliance relations are already 
under stress, how, in the 


IUVUKU IUC UUVHi -v* . 

yet withdrawn its stipulation absence of the American iwr, 
that they must be frozen at can such a commitment be 


if spying for South Africa. I their present leve ls. France maintained? 

French troops answer Togo appeal 


Paris (Reuter) - About 250 
French troops arrived in Togo 
yesterday to back President 
Gnassingbe Eyadema after an 
apparent attempt to over- 
throw him on Tuesday. 

The soldiers, including 
paratroops, were all drawn 
from French bases in Africa. 


France said on Thursday 
that it would send a small 
force of soldiers and aircraft to 
its former colony in West 
Africa , . 

Officials say the force is 
intended to prevent foreign 
interference in the unrest, 
which the Togo Government 


blames on terrorists from 
neighbouring Ghana. . ’ 

Ghana denies the accusa- 
tion 

“The force we have sent is 
relatively .small, but it is 
possible to adapt it if the Togo 
government modifies its .de- 
mand,” .one official said.'. 



THE SUNDAY TIMES 


Till N ill 


MacGREGMTS 

FIGHT 

Part 2 How Scargtl fell into my trap’ 





mm 


64 PAGE 
FASHION 












t r 3 








*• ? f v 


'' \rs 

t « 4 1 i i . r 
If l » ( * 

1 





THE MAKING 
OF OTELLO 

by Franco Zeffirelli 

• Tomorrow, in The Sunday 
Times, the Italian film director 
describes the joys and 
difficulties encountered during 
the making of his film and 
how his plans nearly came to 
nothing 




OK 












8 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 



SPORTS 

DIARY 


Simon Barnes 


The tie of 


real trauma 


The passion and hysteria gen- 
erated by die tied Test in India this 
week was nothing compared to the 
. tied Test at Brisbane in 1960. The 
situation at the death in that year 
was so confused that hardly any 
- player, and none of the spectators, 
had any idea of the result when the 
last wicket fell so dramatically. 
Most of the West Indians thought 
they had won. The Australians 
thought they had Iosl The umpire 
who gave the final historic run-out 
decision said: “My finger was 
boring holes in the air ... it was 
only then that' 1 dared to look at 
the scoreboard. But the score- 
board, was wrong" 

Australia's last batsman. Kline, 
appeared with two balls to go. But 
Meckiff, batting at the other end. 
had miscounted, and believed 
there was but ' one ball left 
Accordingly, he arranged with his 
partner to run for anything. They 
tried a wild run. but Solomon ran 
Mcckiff out with a direct hit “It 
was only three quarters of an hour 
afterwards, that- 1 discovered the 
result was a lie." MeckifT said. 
A pan from .the umpires. Worrell, 
the West Indian captain, was the 
only man to have counted balls 
and runs correctly. 


Winning Wish 


Princess Anne is preparing to get 
one up on her brother by riding a 
winner under National Hunt 
rules; Prince Charles never won — 
indeed, scarcely ever completed — 
a race over the sticks. Now 
Princess Anne is likely to ride a 
horse called Well Wisher in a 
hurdle race. She has been school- 
ing him for trainer David Nichol- 
son. The horse has not yet run 
over hurdles in anger and is likely 
to have his first attempt with a 
professional on board. After that. 
Princess Anne should get the 
chance to kick him home herself. 


• What, they are asking north of 
WatforiL is the difference between 
Manchester United (or Aston 
Villa) and a triangle? Answer A 
triangle's got three points. 


Joy confined 


The answer to England's football 
problems would seem to be hold- 
ing matches without spectators: in 
Italy without players. This per- 
haps desirable situation came 
close to reality when Italian courts 
ordered the confiscation of the 
passports of all 22'membersof the 
1982 Italian World Gup squad as 
they await trial on charges of 
illegally importing dollars on their 
triumphant return home and fail- 
ing to declare them for lax 
purposes. With second leg ties in 
th6 three European competitions 
coming up. the situation began to 
look more than a little embarrass- 
ing: now. however, a judge has 
ordered that passports can be 
temporarily returned to those 
players in away matches. Mean- 
while. the threat of prison sen- 
tences still hangs over the 
victorious gladiators. 


Weather eye 


Canards, makers of the original 
America's Cup 138 years ago. 


havejust made a replica for Eileen 
>nd. 


Bond, whose husband Alan led the 
victorious Australian syndicate 
last time. She is giving it to him as 
a keepsake. In a speech when the 
£30.000 replica was handed over, 
Robin Knox-Johnston suggested 
that the insurance people had 
insisted on it to minimize damage 
to the original if Bond ever had to 
give it back. 


BARRY FANTON1 



‘I had nn idea be played rugby* 


Bawled out 


This has been the year of Boycott 
and Botham. Like all other years. I 
am reminded of the story of 
Boycott in his fascinating cap- 
taincy of England during the 1977- 
78 tour of New Zealand, as told to 
Phil Edmonds by the then aspiring 
Botham. The need was for quick 
runs, but Boycott had said: “You 
play your way and I’ll play mine." 
Edmonds continued: "So Botham 
went in out of order to hurry 
things along. His version of what 
happened is that he played out to 
short extra cover and called for a 
run that wasn’t there. Boycott ran 
towards him saying: “What have 
you done? What have you done?" 
Botham says that he ran straight 
past. Boycott and shouted- "I've 
run vou "out. you — !" I don't 
know if that's the truth, but it’s 
Both's version." Boycott went 
back- into the dressing room, 
covered his head with a towel, and 
refused to talk to anyone, after 
toiling Edmonds; “You and Willis 
are running the tour — you work n 
oiiC* England won. 


Raymond Keene analyses Kasparov’s world title disintegration 


Too late to pick up the 



Leningrad 

One week ago Gary Kasparov's 
triumph in tnc world champion- 
ship seemed assured. He led his 
great rival. Anatoly Karpov, by a 
full three points: he had just won 
his I6lh game, perhaps the most 
brilliant in the history of world 
title matches, and on the wings of 
his success Kasparov appeared set 
to launch a crusade against the old 
guard of Fide, the World Chess 
Federation, whom he has for the 
past two years regarded with bitter 
enmity. In liule more than a week, 
after three consecutive defeats. 
Kasparov has lost his lead and his 
status as favourite. 

Karpov is making his moves 
with rapid self-confidence, est- 
ablishing crushing positions in the 
opening stages of the game, while 
Kasparov's brain appears to have 
seized up. With the disadvantage 
of the black pieces he has been 
fortunate not to be lost as early as 
move 14 or 15, while with white 
(equivalent to having the initia- 
tive of the serve in tennis) winning 
tries and drawing coups have been 
overlooked with an almost cava- 
lier abandon. 

When analysing the reasons for 
the disaster which has overtaken 
Kasparov it is necessary to exam- 
ine each of his three fetefiil losses 
in turn. For game 17 Kasparov 
was suddenly unable to cope with 
Karpov's latest weapon against his 
favourite Grunfeld defence; Kar- 
pov introduced a new idea. 
Kasparov went into shock and lost 
(ike a child. 

With a three-point lead one can 



in 


had used up too much time, and . 
the rush at the dose of the first 
session of play, a definite win 
swung right round to. a probable 
loss. Even at the crisis of the 
second session next day Kasparov 
could still have drawn. He pushed 
the wrong pawn and bad to resign 
.on the spot. 

Kasporov took his final time out 
io restructure his mental defences. . 
Now was the time to retnerich and" 

. (tig in, as he did. in the heroic 
rearguard action of games 10-48 in 
the first match' against Karpov. 
Instead, with black, be came out 


fighting in game 19. Tbefopening 
‘ trefly sound. 


was new, but hardly 
Karpov was ready and waiting 


Karpov: an original and 
stunning strategy 


Kasparov: a case of too 
much too soon 


with a devastating knight move, 
loown- 


and Kasparov was ait ) 


The score is now 9>ri points each 
left to - play. 


ascribe such a setback to an 
understandable feeling of eu- 
phoria at the imminent overall 
match victory. - Most observers 1 
ascribed this loss to an accident, 
but on closer inspection I felt that 
Kasparov's conduct of game 17 
exhibited alarming symptoms of 
nervous collapse. " 

I had seen Korchnoi collapse 
against Spassky at Belgrade eight 
years ago, losing four games in 
succession. I had also witnessed 
Kaipov's slide from 5-2 to 5-5 
against Korchnoi at Baguio in 
1 978. In all three cases the man on 
the run seemed to have something 
hollow and impatient about his 
play. The common factor was that 
the overwhelming leader fell (erro- 


neously) that he bad already won- 
and that the rest of the match 
would be a mere formality. • ■ 

Kasparov still led by 2 points; 
quite enough to ensure his victory 
had be sensibly steered for draws 
in the seven games left to be 
fought out But the champion, still 
flushed with a burning desire to 
obliterate his older rival, decided 
to go straight for Karpov’s jugular. 

For game 18 Kasparov • bril- 
liantly established a winning po- 
sition. His strategy was oblique, 
original and stunning and twice he . 
could have forced a win. But his 
loss in the previous 1 game had 


with .five games „ r _,. 
Kasparov must make 23fe points to 
keep bis title, but be has not 
notched a single half point for 

week and a haft 

- • In a sense, too much hascorne 
too soon to Kasparov, the youn- 


gest champion in the 100 years 
of the title; If be can 


subtly and imperceptibly under- 
mined h/s-oonfidence. To t 


achieve 

bis dominating position Kasparov 


history .. — ... — 

salvage 50 per cent in the last five 
games he will truly deserve to be 
world champion in what is the 
most typically -Soviet sport. He 
will have excelled both ih.term$of 
guts and brilliance. If not it will 
become dear that fie still lacks 
maturity arid has glaring psycho- 
logical weaknesses, and that 
Karpov wili only have tan his title 
for a year. At fo&momem Karpov 
seems: to be. irresistibly in the 
ascendant. 


John Derryanjuk. the 67-year-old 
alleged Nazi war criminal, will be 
formally exharged in Israel on 
Monday with the murder in 1942- 
43 of 900.000 people at the 
Treblinka extermination camp in 
occupied Poland. Dubbed by in- 
mates “Ivan the Terrible", he is 
said to have been one of the most 
feared and hated men in thecamp. 
He and another young Ukrainian 
SS auxiliary are said , to have 
pushed the victims into the gas 
chamber and activated the motors 
which released the fatal fumes. 

Apert from having to prove 
Detnjaryuk's identity, the Israeli 
court will have to decide whether 
his crime is punishable by death, 
according to a law passed in Israel 
in 1950 on “crimes against 
humanity". Already many voices 
have been raised in Israel 
questioning the wisdom of yet 
another public journey into this 


Gitta Sereny on the war crimes trial 


that shows signs of turning sour 


Why Israel is 


terrible past The young genera- 
ired of nearing 


tions say they are tired 
about it: many of the older ones 
are just tired. Nor is it certain what 
effect the. inevitably emotional 
publicity will have. anti-Semitism 
having re-emerged in Europe : 
more openly than at any time 
since the end of the Third Reich. 

Israel has shown itself reluctant 
to lake on more of these cases: had . 
it wished, it could as easily have 
found and. brought to Israel 
Mengcle. Rauff and Barbie, as it 
did Eichmann. In the case of John 
Demjanjuk. who was already con- 
victed of these acts elsewhere, 
Israel was forced to assume the 
burden. 

Dentfanjuk. a Ukrainian who 
had emigrated to the United States 
in 1952. was deprived of his 
American citizenship in 1982 and 
deported, after two trials in his 
home town. Geveland. Ohio, 
established that he had lied about 
his wartime activities on the visa 
application he had filled out in 
Stuttgart. Germany. 30 yc&is pre- 
viously. 

The Americans had had inform- 
ation and documents from the 
Soviet Union about Denyanjuk 
and five other Ukrainians and 
Balts since the early 1970s. In- 
vestigation of three of these men 
dearly established that they lied 
on their visa applications — a civU 
crime for which offenders are 
deponed, usually to a country of 
the individual's choice. But the 
Americans find themselves con- 
fronted here with a political 
dilemma of potentially huge 
proportions. 

Ukrainians and Balts probably 
constitute the largest group of 
immigrants to the United States 
since the end of the war. Most 
came in the late 1 940s and early 
1 950s from displaced persons' 
camps in Germany. Virtually ail 
had gone to Germany to work and 
virtually all were anti-Soviet. 
Documents in the West German 
archives confirm that most went 
for materialistic rather than politi- 



from photographs of him as a 
young man. 

- Also in evidence will be an 
identity card, the original of which 
is in the state archives in the 
USSR which, if accepted as 
authentic by the Israeli court aS it 
was by the Americans, would 
prove that Demjanjuk was a guard 
in the “Spedal Police Unit of the 
Reichsfeader SS — in the New 
Eastern Territories and was. pre- 
pared -for these duties at 
Trawniki". It was at Trawniki. 
between, late 1941 and 1943, that 
about 4,000 so-called. Hiwi SS 
(Hilfsfreiwillige — volunteer 
auxiliaries), most of them Ukrai- 
nian. and Balts, were trained for 
special police assignments. 


No “Hiwis” were sent. to the 
camps without - having gone 
through the Trawniki course; no- 
body entered Trawniki who would 
not. - after six or eight weeks 
training, work in one or other 
installations serving the exter- 
mination qf the Jews. 


. . Demjapjuk has. denied through- 
out that he wa$ ever at.Trawmki or 
a guard in any camp: be, his 
lawyers add the huge American- 
Ukrainian community.' wfcb have 
1 collected $750,000for his-defencc. 
-claim foe whole thing is* matter 
of -mistaken identity, that the 
witnesses' are mistaken or lying 
and that the 1 identity .document is 
a'Soviet take. 


Demjanjnk leaving an extradition bearing at Dayton, Ohio. Thousands 
• of feUow new Americans are rallyhig to h» defence • 


..cal reasons; technically, however, 
they did volunteer. ‘ 

Strictiv speaking this could have 
disqualified them for immigration 
to the United States and therefore 
they too no doubt used some 
discretion when they filled out 
their visa application forms. (It is 
known that at least some of them 
were indeed advised to do so by 
American officials, many of whom 
by this lime were also anti-Soviet). 
It is thus conceivable that the US. 
authorities could now be faced 
with possibly 100.000 or more 
foully visa applications. 

Understandably enough, these 
anti-Russian new Americans, 
effective propagandists both in 
America and through family 
connexions in the USSR, are a 
thorn in Moscow's flesh, and it 
will do anything it can to discredit 
them. It is unlikely to succeed on a 
large scale, but the small minority 
who worked in the Nazi 
concentration and extermination 
camps — many outdoing their 
masters in brutality — are highly 
vulnerable. 

The archive material dem- 


onstrates. however, that the 
majority who volunteered for 
work in Germany did not know m 
advance what their tasks would 
be. And once initialed into it they 
were by no means uniformly 
diligent Some escaped — an 
undertaking no less perilous than 
the escape of prisoners. 

Be that as it may,, the Ameri- 
cans, putting Demjanjuk (and 
others) on trial, did so with the 
information on hand from the 
Soviets that these men had been 
guards in extermination camps. 
Israel formally .requested 
Damjanjuk’s extradition in 1982; 

Aside from some additional 
material the Israeli prosecutors 
have found in their search all over 
Europe since then, the evidence 1 
they will present at their trial is 
essentially the same as that used in 
America. There are four witnesses, 
three men and one woman, who 
worked in — and survived — the 
gassing and incineration of 
Treblinka (Camp Two). All of 
them, and a number of others who 
testified in America but will not be 
called now. identified Demjanjuk 


The Israelis are already showing 
prudence. Determined to avoid an 
EidimaiHype . show trial, they 
have moved the venue- to a 
smallish court in Jerusalem and 
have offered every , facility to 
Denjanjuk's defence. Further, 
they will not rail any of the many 
Germans who. as members of the 
SS in the camps at the time, could 
identify Demjanjuk. 

It is a known feet that when the 
Russians captured foe Polish city 
of Lublin they foundalargepartof 
the personnel file of. “Aqtion 
ReinhanT, foe. unit responsible 
for the extermination of foe Jews. 
It is thus reasonable to assume 
that the ID paper is authentic But 
it is not helpful to foe Israelis in 
that it does not mention 
Treblinka. The American judges 
decided to ignore 1 this deficiency; 
the Israeli judges, who will lean 
over backwards to be fair, may 
noL 

The . final irony, would be if foe 
Israeli courts were to. find the 
whole case uisuffirientiy proved 
or provable Denaturalized in 
America — where such a verdict 
would create anger and resent- 
ment among the Ukrainians and 
Baits at foe way Washington has 
handled the affair — and doubt- 
lessly unacceptable to any other 
country except Russia, where he 
could hardly be sent, Israel might 
well find itself having to keep 
Deujanjuk at liberty there for the 
rest of bis life. . 


Defence: more a liaison than a marriage 


Paris 

How for is France willing to go - 
towards a fully co-ordinated pol- 
icy of European defence? Earlier 
this month. David Steel and 
David Owen returned from their 
talks with French political leaders 
enthusiastic about the positive 
response they had received for 
fodr ideas for strengthening the 
European pillar of Naio and for 
increasing Franco-British defence 
co-operation. 

They seemed to regard this 
apparent shift in French thinking 
as a possible solution to the 
Alliance's dilemma over foe 
replacement of Polaris. For if 
Franco-British co-operation 
meant total joint control of 
nuclear forces. Britain could rely 
on the six French nuclear sub- 
marines and would have no need 
for its own nuclear force. 

Thai is dearly not a realistic 
proposition, as Owen and Steel 
would be foe first to admit But if 
co-operation means something 
much more limited, such as co- 
ordination of nuclear submarine 
refit cycles, harmonization of 
patrols, joint discussion of target- 
ing options etc, then the Polaris 
problem remains. The issues of 
Polaris and European defence co- 
operation have to be separated. 

France has been moving toward 
a much more open-minded and 


"European" view on defence. The 
process began with the Socialists' 
election victory six years ago and 
is continuing under foe present 
right-wing coalition. But there is 
no question in the foreseeable 
future of France coming back into 
Nato's integrated military com- 
mand or accepting anything which 
might undermine the indepen- 
dence of its midear deterrent. 

Three years ago, Jacques 
Chirac then leader of the Gaullist 
RPR party, caused a -stir when he 
was reported as saying in Bonn 
thai West Germany should be 
allowed to share responsibility for 
a future European nudear deter- 
rent force. Realizing his gaffe, he 
quickly backtracked: today there 
is no longer any hint of that in his 
prime ministerial declarations. 
Two weeks ago Chirac said France 
was fully aware that “if foe 
Survival of foe nation lies at foe 
country's frontiers, its security lies 
at the frontiers of its neighbours". 
It was therefore actively exploring 
“the ways and means of 
strengthen i ng deterrence in 
Europe - while preserving its in- 
dependence. Although West Ger- 
many is France's most important 
defence partner. Chirac expressed 
the desire for greater co-operation 
with Britain “on the basis of our 
numerous common interests". 
The traditional Gaullist distrust of 


Britain nevertheless came out 
when he added that this would be 
possible only “provided that our 
two peoples overcome reflexes 
inherited from a long tradition of 
■ rivalry." 


Those words were spoken only 
one week after Chirac's apparently 
enthusiastic response io foe Steel- 
Owen proposals. When listening 
to foe French, it is always im- 
portant lo distinguish between 
what they consider interesting 
ideas io toss around, and whal 
they might be be ready to apply. 

The idea of co-operation be- 
tween Europe's only two nudear 
powers is not new. Exploratory 
talks were initiated in 1970 be- 
tween Lord Carrington and Mi- 
chel Debre, but they ended up 
being dubbed the “cornflake 
talks” because it quickly became 
dear that they were able to talk 
only aboui what foe crews of a 
future joint nuclear submarine 
force might eat for breakfast. 

However, there are now four 
good reasons why the French are 
genuinely interested in exploring 
the possibility for closer; albeit 
limited. European defence co- 
operation:, recognition that French 
.security necessarily begins, not at 
home, but on ns neighbours' 


borders: (he emerging challenge of 
ccl mdudmg “Star 


foeforeat this may oneday pose to 
the doctrine of nudear deterrence: 
foe escalating cost of amts: and foe 
fear that Europe may not always 
be able to dqtend on foe US 
defence guarantee: . 

There is talk of . joint arms 
production, induding nudear 
weapons. Here France has always 
been considered the one dragging 
its -feel, but Francois Hdsbourg. 
director-designate of foe Institute 
of Strategic Studies, feels that it is 
rather on foe British side that 
problems may arise "The cost of 
the next ' generation of weapon 
systems means, that European 
arms co-operation is riot only 
desirable but an absolute neces- 
sity. But cap foe British, with fodr 
special relationship with the US. 
work with the French without 
breaching foe , confidentiality of 
their contracts with the 
Americans?" 

After a force-year plateau. 
French defence spending win in- 
crease by S percent in real terms 
next year.' with; priority being 
given once again to the -nudear 
deterrent. Whatever develop- 
ments el s ewhe re , “it would be 
unwise" Chirac says, "io imagine 
that for a long time yet there is any 
'alternative to 'nuclear deterrence 
for our country." 


space; mdiifotig "Siac'Wans”. and 


Diana Geddes 


Peter Brimelow 


The romantic 



•’if;’; 



HeTfiSS dark eyesand hffdead 
white skin, kept carefully from foe 
sun. were foe only hints of her 
heritage* Her 1 mother was a Metis, 
a member of foe Frencb-Jndmn 
hybrid race found ■ all over 
Canada's prairies; her lather an 
unknown European. When I met 
her soon after I arrived from 
Britain, she had already clawed 
her way from the -slums of 
Winnipeg into an advertising 


career in Toronto, studying at 
ick of formal 


night to remedy her lack 
education. Her ultimate ambition: . 
to succeed in New York- • 

You had to be impressed by her 

dedication — and her ruth Icssness. 
She had completely cut off her 
mother and many, variously- 
fathered. . brothers and sisters. 
Equally impressive this explosive 
dnve to alter her fife had been 


triggered by foe chance readingof 


one book - not foe-Bibie or _ _ 
/Capital but Adas Shrugged, a 
novel in which an increasingly 

collectivist world -is brought to a 
halt by a strike of its few creative 
minds. It was foe crowning ach- 
ievement of the American writer 
Ayn- Rand, who died in 1983. 

Ayn Rand is almost unknown in 
Britain. But there is something 
positively 1 uncanny about her ef- 
fect on foe North Atherton 
psyche. My Canadian friend was 
not unusual: Rand’s -novels and 
essays have transformed literally* 
hundreds of lives. Among the 
conservative ideologues who cap- 
tured foe presidency for Ronald 
Reagan in 1980 a revelation on 
first looking into Rand during 
adolescence was almost the rule 
rafob* than exception. 

America's literary critics are at 
least -as much on the left as 
Britain's. Rand's hostility to 
collectivism and communism ap- 
palled them. At first she was 
ignored: later she was savaged. It 
made no difference. Word of 
mouth turned Atlas Shrugged and 
its predecessor. The Fountain ? 
head, into best-sellers.- The 
Fountainhead, foe story of an 
architect who blows up a public 
housing project when his original 
design is compromised. was made 
into a film starring Gary Cooper 
almost three decades after Atlas 
Shrugged, Rand's books still sell 
hundreds of foousands of copies 
each year. 

When Barbara Branden's 1 new 
biography. The Passion of Ayn 
Hand; started to show up on. the 
best-seller lists this summer, even 
her publisher was taken aback. 
There is not much excuse for this: 
apart from its: appeal to Rand’s 
admirers: it- is a wonderful -story, 
ranging from Rand's birth in - 
Tsarist St Petersburg through her 
escape' fronr-foe Soviet Union to 
her triumphamid foe rityscrapers 
of Manhattan, foe city she always 
maintained .was the supreme tes- 
tament to the human spirit. 


It -is a story Mrs Branden is 
peculiarly qualified to tell- Her; 
former husband. Nathaniel, was 
for many years foe oigan^r ofa 
systematic, almost culMtke effort 
to propagate Rand’s philosophy of- 
-Objectivisnr - and also. Mis 
Branden reveals. Rantfs lover, 
despite being 25 years younger. 
The collapse of this tormented, 
relationship was the real omse at. 
foe schism that sundered kind’s 
unknowing supporters in ivoo- . 

Objectivism is a completely 
integrated philosophy that lays... 
down foe law in every ana of 
human life, ostensibly on the basis 
of pure reason. Somewhat in foe 
manner of Viciorian classical 
liberalism but mom passionately, 
it asserts the supreme importance- . 
of foe individual, opposes coer- . 
Cion by foe state or by received; 
hua.y; and approves of capitalism ; 
as foe economic expression of 
personal freedom. Ferociously 
atheistic, which has earned it fob-, 
enmity of many otherwise sympa- 
thetic American conservatives, it 
attempts to bridge the celebrated 
dichotomy between "i s” a nd 
“ought” by arguing, in essence, 
that values can indeed be derived 
from fects - some values are 
dearly life enhancing. This is 
based, of course, on the value- 1 
judgement that .life is a Good. 
Thing. „ . 

However, Mrs Branden s real 
interest is not Rand’s ideas, but 
her character. This relentlessly 
rational philosopher was also . 
intensely female' — and Mrs 
Branden obviously thinks she 
never frilly reconciled the contra- 
diction between her intellectual J 
and emotional needs. Rami was 1 
indomitable in debate, but foe sex 
scenes in her novels seethe, in a 
non-explicit but very notable way. 
with force, conquest, and ecstatic ) 
capitulation. She was a successful j 
woman in 1 a male world, but ! 
hardly a feminist role-model. . 1 

The Passion qf Ayn Rand\ 
reportedly had trouble finding a 
British publisher (it is now to be 
brought out .by W.H. Allen). 
R&nd's literary style, which was 
avowedly romantic, may just be 
too gross for British tastes, al- 
though her -novels do achieve a 
strange, lurid power. . 

Alternatively, foe reality of the 
wdfere stale may have too com- 
pletely extirpated the ghost of 
classical tiberalisn from its orig- 
inal home for a revisionist version 
to be acceptable. Or there may 
•simply -be no local equivalent to 
the class of turbulent New York 
intellectuals, many of foem secu- 
larized Jews like Rand herself, that 
provided.^ both her most ardent 
supporters and her bitterest foes. 

Axe foe British too sophisticated 
for Ayn Rantf— or loo inert? 


PeterBrimelow is a senior ediror of 
Fdrbes’ Magazine in Sew York. 


He wid be writing on this page 
emyfortnight. 


Philip Howard 



up a 
science 


Maths, is magic. Plato considered 
it foe highest form of human 
thought, and had written over foe 
entrance to foe Academy: “Let no 
one ignorant of mathematics enter 
here." Those of us who got as far 
as calculus and then gave up, 
whosefrighest form of maths these 
days is sudring our thumbs over 
the tax return, tend to overrate the 
mystery. Because it is inconceiv- 
able, it must be important. - 

Ramanujan, foe Indian math- 
ematician, visited Britain between 
1914 and 1919. and under- 
standably fell ill in* Putney. 
J.E. Littiewood visited him. and 
remarked, as mathematicians will, 
that he had ridden there in taxicab 
number 1792. and that this 
seemed a dull number. He hoped 
it was not an unfavourable omen. 
Ramanujan replied: “No: it Is a 
very interesting number, it is foe 
smallest number expressible as foe 
sum of two cubes in two different 
ways." • 

Such numerical agility makes 
roe Mink- But in feet there is no 
real problem about maths. It is a 
dosed, analytic system: a tool that 
tells us nothing new about the 
wpricL All mathematical state- 
ments, however magi cal they 
seem, are tautologies. Number is 
not inherent in the universe, only 
in man's attempts to organize the 
universe. I know that some have 
aigoed that other animals can 
count. For example a cow always 
going to the seventh stall on the 
left even in a new milking parlour. 
But no cow I have milked has ever 
shown signs of numeracy, only of 
bloody-mindedness. 

Since most of us are in awe of 
maths, we expect too much from 
dtsnplines that apply maths to the 
real w orld. Because it 'deploys 
percenia&s and tables, we expat 
economics to be a rigorous science 
like maths or chemistry:' in feet 
because h deals with foe infinite 
variables and perversities of hu- 
man nature, it is not a science at 
all. more a feshionable slogan. 

N?{, ■“ sociology is bunt 
uurkheim, Weber, and even that 
monstrous Jatgonaut, Tafcott Par- 
sons: found new waysoflookingai 
and explaining foe way we behave 
in societies. But let nobody be 
misled by the mathematical and 
scientific jaigon into supposing 
that sociology is a sdence like 
nudear. physics. 

But the most fashionable bogus 
science, most respected, by foe 
mnumerale. is statistics, and in 
pamciriar ponmg md opin ; 0 „ 
Polk *o foe layman a statistic is a 
pjece , of. .numerical information 
usually, of -a . .singularly useless 


variety, and often inaccurate; But 
because it is expressed mathemat- 
ically, we non-mathematicians 
think it must be more reliable and 
more important than some- other 
form of junk. j 

Even the simplest form of poU ■> 
from which it gets its name, the ' 
census, as in those days tint there 
went out a decree from Caesar 
Augustus, is notoriously inexact] 
When you ask people for their, 
opinions or tastes, or to rate foe; 
qualities of foe prime minister 



CMsWtaratf 

against a scale of crude judge- ( 
meats, you are extracting sun-4 
brains out of cudunbers, however 1 
scientific you make it 'sound, AT 1 
random sample ofhumansgives a 
random selection of rardess. po- 
lite. untruth fid. and dotty answers. 
A’ good politician or journalist is i 
always better at predicting! foci 

result of an election than foe polls;] 
Because most of us are largely ' 
ronwneraie, we make the mistake 
of supposing that polls must be 
scientific because they are ex-] 
prwsed mathematically. . / 

• When Tennyson wrote: , 


Every minute dies a Mm. 
minute one is bom. 


i . 


Charles Babbage, who . occupied 
foe l - ncasi an chair of mathematics 

fiL, a ? lbridee ' pointing out 
foat foe world’s popufetidn was in 

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m tnc next edition of youc 
P 0011 tf* erroneous 
calculation to which I refer shook! 
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rSSE 1 a man/ And One and 

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1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone; 01-481 4100 


COURAGE OR DEATH 


• There is the smell of failure 
over the Lrbcral-SDP Alliance . 

; this weekend; h is a bitter 
. smell that the. leading mem- 
bers or the two parties know 
well and which Mr Steel— for 
dll his enthusiastic reception — 
was struggling vainly to dispel 
~ in his speech yesterday. ■ . 

'll was all around them 'when • 
they came together six years 
,, ago — Dr Owen from a party 

- that was unfit for success. Mr 
1 Steel from a party that by itself 
■; "could win nothing.- it ,was 

• failure not philosophy that 
‘tn'aSc them allies. Failure may 
yet make them adversaries 
again. 

- Mr Steel’s speech was a' 
mostly sad spectacle. Was he 
trying to summon the spirit of 

; Hugh GaitskelTs Scarborough 
^ conference speech of 1960? 

. GaitskelPs determination to 
fight and ftght-again was based 
i on- principles .of protecting. 

••« Britain: Mr Steel was, in his. 

own words, only faintly at- 
/ iracted to principles without 
power. 

- Was he attempting to use - 
the tactics of .Mr Kin nock's . 
Bournemouth speech of 1 986? 

- Mr Kinnock had attacked the 

- Militants of Liverpool for so 
\ * demeaning Labour policy that 
y it had to be carried out front •. 
■. taxis: Mr Steel likened his 

■ opponents' views on defence - 

- to the- futility of Labour coun- ■ 
v cils who declared themselves’ 

v nuclear-free zones. But while 
' Mr Kinnock was assaulting a! 
'/ pernicious minority iir his 
party. Mr Steel was taking on 
1 , ihe'clearly expressed - majority 
i view of the party assembly 
itself. li was not enough. 

" He had certainly borrowed' . 
.his clothes. He • looked un- 
/ comfortable in them. But ihey ; 


belonged to neither Gaitskell 
nor fCinnock. They belonged 
fo David Owen arid they still 
do not fit. 

-Mr Steel. received powerful 
applause for the vague well- 
meaning policies that are so 
manifestly his own, more pay 
for teachers, something to be 
done about racist policmen, an 
end to "reactionary terrorism 
in Nicaragua**. He said he was 
“furious" -about bad housing; 
and although he sounded 
about 'as furious as a cat 
without cream .he struck a 
chord. 

But .standing ovations not 
withstanding, these past two 
weeks of Alliance conferences 
now have to be seen as largely 
wasted weeks. "Die task ahead 
of the would-be partners in 
government is colossaL 

It is true that since 1981 
their policies have been grad- 
ually coalescing A dis- 
passionate reader of the 
reports from Harrogate and 
Eastbourne will find more 
evidence of like minds than he 
is likely see this week in 
Blackpool. But. even at the 
best of times, vast obstacles to 
persuading the electorate of 
their progress have remained. 

: There has never been a 
single issue — no Corn Laws, 
no Home Rule, no Imperial 
Preference — to concentrate 
minds. Few. political, minds 
can ever have been less con- 
centrated, at so crucial a junc- 
ture as were the minds of the 
“succesful” Liberal delegates 
in Tuesday's defence debate. 

, If there is to be any chance 
of -a -way forward- the first task 
for MrStee! is to impose some 
minimum discipline on 
Liberal MPs. It would have ' 


SCOTCHING THE SNAKE 


.This week's emergency meet- 
ing of EEC. interior ministers, 
•to discuss concerted; anti-ter- 
rorist measures Has - been 
. praised- for being wefl-oe- - 
gariized, purposeful and co- 
hesive. Unfij^unately. : the 
terrorist groips; with. whom. , 
.they have . to^deaf are. even ... 
more so; and : doubts"' wW ,■ 
always exist about -how far 
democratic governments can 
-prevent - seemingly - random ~ 
crimes committed by fanatics. 

Nonetheless, - .the- prelimi- 
nary results of the Trevi Group 
meeting should, help to take 
the cause of anti-terrorism, in 
Europe-' a. liule further.. -An- 
agreement " to share police 
intelligence ono. routine basis 
with a view to targeting sus- 
pected terrorists “is a minor 
achievement, as is the institu- 
tion of a pan-European anti- 
terrorist • communications 
system, though the effective- 
• ness of such a system will, for 
obvious reasons, be hard for 
.the public to assess. 

- Most important, perhaps, is 
the. belated recognition, of the • 
problem by at! members of the 
European Community- as 
shown by the speed with which 
the London meeting was con- 
vened and the -100 per cent 
-turnout — and the acceptance 
that terrorism . should be 
treated as a crime arid not. ■ 
-selectively, as the 'pursuit of 
. international politics! Neither 
.-'■had- been especially evident at 
an- £EC forum before. ... 

Yet a question inark must 
bang over the effectiveness of 
.evqii these specific pleasures. 
France was inspired to join a 

European consensus qn* terror- 
ism — to call for it indeed — 


only by a sudden, but highly 
localized, outbreak, of Arab 
terrorism in Paris. At the same 
. time, the jealousies and dis- 

■ cord within the French police. 
and -secret - service^ have few . 
parallels':- Arid If onepart rif : 
French iriteOigenpemoes not 
kriqw wbat'the other is’ doing - 
(or will noi tell^ wfiat hope is? 

■ there lhal i nfonpation will bfc 
passed on to arch-rivals in 

-- Britam-or Spain? There is little 
. point in. enhancing European, 
communications networks un- 
less' "domestic intelligence is 
pooled' effectively. 

• An even larger question 
mark relates to measures the 
Trevi Group has postponed 
for review and possible action 
in the future. Airport security 
is still • not uniformly strict 
across Europe. Neither are visa 
requirements. There are still 
gaps in Europe's defences 
which could ,be plugged if the 
standards of the more lax were 
brought up to those of the 
more rigorous. 

There is room for improve- 
ment, too. in the co-ordination 
of extradition and exclusion 
procedures within Europe, and 
in the interpretation of dip- 
lomatic privilege. Tightening 
•security in these. areas would 
have a practical and a dip- 
lomatic cost to most European 
countries. Each would see its 
cherished “special 

relationship” with this or that 
country. . jeopardized — as a 
potential market, a diplomatic 
partner or ally. But the Euro- 
pean interest must supersede 
the national interest if the EEC 
is serious about concerting its 
anti-terrorist action. 

Nor. Is Britain above. criti- 
cism. Despite the relative se- 


curity provided by our 
geography, it is worth recalling 
that British extradition ..pro- 
visions are one 'obstacle to 
easier . extradition within 
Europe, that a number of 
suspected Libyans . were at 
large m Britain and untrace- 
able; and that at least one 
excluded person, the Ameri- 
can Noraid - representative 
Martin Galvin, was' able to 
enter Northern Ireland' and 
appear at a rally despite a full 
security alert. 

~The experience gained in 
combating terrorism in Ulster 
has. however, given Britain 
invaluable expertise in co- 
ordinating anti-terrorist work 
— especially in the gathering 
and use . of intelligence — 
which could usefully, be. 
shared with our European' 
partners. But the 'Northern 
Ireland experience also sug- 
gests some of the limits on a 
democratic state facing terror- 
ism. 

In spite of rigorous controls 
on the dissemination of 
information about acts of ter- 
rorism, in spite of counter- 
intelligence work which is the 
envy of many Other countries, 
and in spite of heavy penalties 
for convicted terrorists, the 
killings and the terrorist black- 
mail continue. " 

•- Without the full consent of 
the population to root out 
terrorism, containment may 
be all that is possible. Simi- 
larly, until a// the countries of 
the EEC give their consent to 
the elimination of terrorism 
and agree that national in- 
terests may have to be sac- 
rificed. containment will be j 
the best that can be achieved. 


FOURTH LEADER 


Some weeks ago. the British 
Association heard from 
Professor McNeill Alexander 
of Leeds University that. the 
■ familiar picture of prehistoric 
animals — lumbering, slow 
and ungainly - may be en- 
tirely misplaced. His calcula- 
lions suggest that .a 
Brontosaurus “could manage a 
slowirot”. others “could break 
into a run”, and the Tricer- 
aiops could give Sebastian Coe . 

. a run for his money in the 1 500. 
metres, which it could cover m 
two minutes five seconds 
(Coe’s best is . three minutes 
thirty-nine). 

On the other hand, dino- 
saurs were probably unable to 
keep up their remarkable, 
speed for very long” (nor could 
we. Professor, nor could we) - 
because “they suffered from 
overheating” . and therefore 
“would have quickly become 
exhausted” (so would we. 
Professor, so would we). 

This news puis Miss Raquel 
Welch into an altogether dif- 
ferent light. She, 't may 
recalled, was the heroine of a 
film called irheit Ammoj«k 
Ruled the Earth , and there 
were dreadful dangers for her 


10 survive; before arriving at a 
happy .ending. Great though 
our terror for her predica- 
. ments was. it would have been 
even’ greater if we had' known 
that the. fearsome beast in 
pursuit of her was likely to be 
festooned with Olympic gold 
medals, at least (“probably 
unable to. keep up their 
remarkable speed for long") 
for any event up fo the 400 
metres hurdles. 

A year or two ago. also at the 
British Association (and. now 
we come to . think of it 
probably in .a paper by Profes- 
sor Alexander), it was asserted 
that the Pterodactyl was so 
badly constructed that, so far 
ftpm swooping about aggres- 
sively to the terror of the 
passers-by. ah it could do was 
stand on cliff-ioix. looking 
pretty silly, waiting for a 
following breeze to gel it 
airborne: Miss Welch could be 
: pardoned for feeling confused, 
what with birds that couldn't 
fly and fiftv-ton monsters 
dashing about like grey- 
hounds. (If a sequel isplanned. 
and Miss Welsh ha$ had 
chough.- they should oigage 
Miss .Fatima Whitbread; at 


least she could pul a javelin 
-into a galloping dinosaur from 
a very safe 1 distance!) 

We do not feel easy in our 
minds at the toppling of these 
ancient certainties. We 
remember learning that the 
thought-processes of a dino- 
saur were so stow that if you 
trod on its tail Jialf an hour 
would -pass before h yelped. 
But now ft seems that half an 
hour's start would be nothing 
to the monster, and mis- 
chievous liufcboys who try the 
experiment may have : a very 
nasty shock coming. Whatever 
next? 

We look forward with some 
nervousness to the 1987 Brit- 
ish Association meeting; when 
we shall doubtless .learn that 
the people on Mara are not 
gFcen. : web-footed and 
equipped with antennae stick- 
ing out* of their pointed ears, 
but that. on the.contrary. they 
look just like us. or even like 
Miss Welch. Though even that 
comforting knowledge will 
probably be balanced by an 
announcement that the 1 moon" 
is made of green cheese; after 
all. And the processed kind, at 
that. "■ 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Nuclear partners for the Alliance 


been bad enough onTuesday if 
the anti-nuclear amendment 
had been carried in the teeth of 
united parliamentary oppo- 
sition. Bat. with the fracking of 
allegedly responsible par- 
liamentarians. delegates were 
encouraged in the fantasy that 
as long as . their first act in 
government was not to scrap 
every nuclear weapon in Brit- 
ain. they could not be dubbed 
as unilateralist; It.was a gross 
deception Which Mr Steel 
should have exposed during 
the debate itself He should 
make ft clear that his continu- 
ing leadership depends on it 
not being repeated. 

The second task for Mr Steel 
is to recognise that however 
courageous his. speech may 
appear in newspaper head- 
lines. his party will carry no 
credibility in the country until 
it has overturned Tuesday's 
vote. Some of his advisers are 
recommending a so-called 
“low-risk strategy” in which 
Tuesday is written off as an 
aberration and only a meeting 
of Alliance candidates is 
needed to endorse their 
leaders' position on nuclear 
defence. Mr Steel, himself, 
doubtless considers his stem 
speech yesterday to constitute 
a“high-risk strategy” in itself 

The harsh reality is that the 
risk-taking has not even begun 
yet. A conference of Alliance 
candidates and a special one- 
day Liberal assembly must 
endorse the policy that Mr 
Steel was booed for uttering 
yesterday. The. Liberals may 
lose some candidates al- 
together; they may lose some ! 
MPs. But there is no alter- 
native if the smell of failure is i 
not to become the smelL of ! 
death. 


From Jean-Nod. Contfe de 
Lipkawski 

Sir. It may be that in the few weeks 
following the visit to Paris of Dr 
Owen and Mr Steel some mis- 
understandings have arisenin the 
United Kingdom over present 
French nuclear policy and our 
plans for the future. I would like to 
set out. very briefly, the position 
as wc in France see rt- 
‘ France has never wavered in her 
resolve to -build and maintain an 
independent nuclear deterrent. 
Currently our deterrent force is 
being updated with the M4 missile 
system (just as you in the United 
Kingdom plan to replace Polaris 
with Trident), and we expect by 
1990 to see a new generation of 
these more powerful nuclear 
weapons installed in all our sub- 
marines. All parties in. France, 
both Government and Oppo- 
sition. are committed to this 
replacement. 

I would emphasise again that vn 
arc resolved to make the necessary 
provision for the completion of 
this expensive programme which 
wc consider vital not only for the 
future security of France but for 
the Western Alliance as wdL. 

Naturally we would welcome 
British support in such an essen- 
tial matter but. whh or without it. 
our national commitment to a 
continuing nuclear policy is ab- 
solute and dear-cut 
Yours faithfully. 

JEAN de LIPKOWSKI. 

(Charge de Mission aupres du 
Ministredes Affaires Etrangeres). 
Assemblee Nationate. ■ 

Place du Palais Bourbon, 

Paris 75007. 

From Mr Alan Lee Williams 
Sir; The Liberal Assembly's rejec- 
tion (report September 24) ofthe 
British deterrent as well as a 
possible European deterrent sys- 
tem highlights a number of current 
contradictions within the Alliance 
which have never been realis- 
tically feced. L for example, felt 
obliged to resign as prospective 
SDP candidate for Hornchurch 
and Havering largely because of . 
the unilateralist sympathies of the 

S Africa sanctions 

From the Chairman of the UK South 
Africa Trade Association. Lid 
Sir. I have just returned from a 
visit to South Africa in rime to 
(earn of the EEC- decision as 
rteards sanctions. 

. Unfortunately, the effect of the 
threat of sanctions — and now 
their implementation, albeit on a 
Jijnited scale — is having .exactly 
the* result feared by- those- who 
opposed them. -A mood.of defi- 
. ance and even euphoria is appar- 
ent in the white community now 
that the country is seen to be 
“under attack”. 

The reaction of rallying round 
the Government in such circum- 
stances is instinctive and: very 
soon I fear dial criticism of the 
Government and the advocacy of 
.fester reforms may become an 
unpatriotic ad. This under- 
standable reaciion is precisely 
what we anticipated from the 
imposition of- sanctions and will 
make the prospect of reform more 
remote. 

. Nor, as far as one can gather, is 
the- so-called “message to South 
-African non-whites”too welcome. 

Scanning the portents 

From Dr John' P. Glees 
Sir. A quick test of a patient's 
intellectual faculties when in hos- 
pital is to ask the patient to' name 
the Prime Minister or the Queen. 

Recently the answers have var- 
ied from Mrs Clement Attlee, to 
Queen- Victoria.- Mr Churchill and 
Mrs Margaret Thatcher. The next 
question is to ask- whether Mrs 
Thatcher is any good. Tonight ray 
pariem replied. “-How should 1 
know?" Fhir enough. ! thought, 
i veiy sensible. 

, -One senior consultant assesses 
Still further. If the patient thinks 
Mrs Thatcher is a good Prime 
Minister -he does not waste his 
time -or that, of the NHS with • 
additional investigations such as a 
brain C-T scan (computerised 
tomography, "a special' X-ray 
examination). “Nothing wrong 
with that patient”, he declares, 
and the group of dodors moves 
on. ■ 

' Are primeministers and royalty 
aware of the important role they 
play in neurological assessment? 

Is Dr 'David Owen, himself a 
former -registrar ih neurology, a 
suitable candidate for this-type of 
exposure? . 

As far as I and my patients are 
concerned. Mrs Thatcher and the 
Queen are doing a grand job and 
we arc not interested in learning 
new names. Neurological testing is 
hard enough. 

Imagine asking a patient. “Does 
Prime Minister David Steel wear 1 
trousers or a dress If the 

pattern stated the latter. 1 would 
certainly suggest a' brain C-T scan. 
Yours faithfiafly. 

JOHN GLEES. 

5 Lcopold'Court. 

Leopold Avenue. SW 19. 

Costs of manofsctiire 

From Mr A.R. Conquest ^ 

Sir. Further lo Mr Paddy 
Rooncv’s letter about wage costs 
(September 17). 1 can say- that in 
fUlly automated manufacturing 
industry the wage bill* is insignifi- 
cant compared with .the cost of 
servicing the capital employed. 

Frora my own experience, in a 
typical plant it can be shown that 
riming operating hours to a third 
(employing single-shift working) 
.will double - the unit cost of 
. manufacture because of the 
greater share of overhead costs per 
unit. It is for this reason lhal a full 
and steady order book is required, 
so . that the plan can operate at 


local Liberals who presumably 
disapproved of my support both 
for a British replacement of Po- 
laris and for a viable European 
deterrent system. 

However, it has been said that 
few of my SDP colleagues (and 
especially those on the Alliance 
joint. commission) have yet faced 
up to what a real European 
deterrent implies. As for the 
Liberals, they wish to appear good 
Europeans in an absurd con- 
ditional sense, namely, m wanting 
only a civilian power base and noi 
a military power base for the 
defence of Western Europe. 

But civilian power alone will 
not doc if is military power that a 
united Europe will require. This 
means addressing the issues in- 
volved in getting a European 
deterrent system off the ground, 
which involves the crucial ques- 
tion of West Germany as well as 
France as partners in the pro- 
vision of nuclear capabilities. 

German participation in a Euro- 
pean deterrent need not involve 
them in the need to test nuclear 
weapons nor flight-test missile 
systems. Why is it, then, that West 
Germany is never mentioned as a 
potential partner in this context? 

Well, the answer appears to be 
that there would be few votes in it 
for the Alliance. Yet though there 
appears to be little support for 
German participation (still less 
much German enthusiasm) 
clearly without such participation 
no European deterrent is possible. 

In the absence of such a 
European capability Britain must 
remain a midear power armed 
with a weapons system capable of 
deterring the Soviet Union. Thai 
is, Rolans must be replaced by a 
credible capability: the ability to 
penetrate Soviet defences must be 
assured. If in the event that 
capability can only be guaranteed 
by the' retention of Trident then 
the SDP at least must have the 
courage to say so. 

Yours faithfully. 

ALAN LEE WILLIAMS, 

Reform Cub. 

. Pal! MalL SW1. 

September 25. 

Certainly among the older people 
in the community and those in 
work the imposition of sanctions 
is seen as a severance of links with 
those on this side who are still able 
to influence their Government 
and this is quite apart from their 
natural fear oflosing their jobs. 

Nor do they think it would be 
any easter to persuade the younger 
and more radical elements in their 
commimi&es to lode for more 
peaceful solutions in the.face of a 
government which ft inevitably 
going to be driven Into -a more 
intransigent posture. 

1 fear that the imposition of 
sanctions is not going to help at all 
in the attainment ofthe objective 
.of all of us. which is the abolition 
of apartheid, leading to a just and 
free. society in South Africa. On 
the- contrary, it will polarise 
radicalism on both political wings 
and at the same time damage the 
economic base on which the future 
must deixnd. 

Yours faith fully. 

N. M. FORSTER. Chairman, 
United Kingdom South .Africa 
Trade Association. Ltd. 

45 Great Peter Street. SW1. 
September 17, 

Fiscal policy 

From the Permanent Secretary to 
the Treasury 

Sir. Your leading article of 
September 24. “Taxing our 
patience”", says that the Treasury 
has 1 disbanded its Fiscal Policy 
Group as a separate entity. This 
follows the even stronger assertion 
in Mr John Kay's recent lecture to 
the Institute for Fiscal Studies that 
'the group had been disbanded 
completely. 

Both these statements are un- 
true. The Fiscal Policy Group has 
not been disbanded and it is a 
.separate entity. . 

It says a lot about the standards 
. ofthe IF5 that one of the central 
theses in this lecture (report 
September 23) was based on a 
ample ; fact . which could easily 
have been checked and which was 
quite wrong. 

Yours sincerely. 

PETER MIDDLETON. 

Permanent Secretary. 

HM Treasury. 

Parliament Street. SWi, 

September 26. 

To the point 

.From MrColin Read 
Sir, What will' happen to all the 
pins removed from the cheques 
attached to the TSB application 
forms? Will a secondary market be 
formed on the LME (London 
, Metal Exchange)? 1 estimate they 
will total more than ! ton m 
weight. 

Yours feithfaUy. 

COLIN READ. 

Drayton Manor. 

Tring. Hertfordshire. 

September 24. 

maximum efficiency in relation to 
die capital employed. 

Some degree of order book 
.variation is expected but increas- 
ingly many, abnormal changes are 
being brought about by the politi- 
cal and economic actions of 
speculators, governments and 
unions. Should lhc Government 
wishtoimprovc the situation their 
actions must be aimed at stabiliz- 
ing long-term attitudes so that 
accurate business forecasting be- 
comes possible. 

‘Yours faithfully. 

A.-R. CONQUEST. 

6A Eureka Gardens. 

Epping Green. Essex. 

September 21. • 


Doubt about 
sale of vicarages 

From the RerJ. li\ Masding 
Sir. The Rajneesh sect has opened 
a school in the West Country in a 
former rectory. It would seem to 
me that the Church is continually 
shamed by the purposes to which 
its former properties, often on a 
resale, are put. 

The selling, or demolition and 
redevelopment, of parsonages, 
like the abandonment of churches, 
is an important indicator of the 
appallingly low state the Church 
las sunk to. It cannot easily be 
defended against the charge ot 
asset-stripping. 

Although parsonages are some- 
times justifiably disposed of. all 
too frequently it is the profit 
motive and not the serving of the 
people of the parish which is the 
springboard for change. This is ot 
course alt honourable and above 
board so far as the Church is 
concerned, but it may find itself 
exploited by some developers. 

Dioceses and their surveyors 
have to lean over backwards to 
make objective decisions during 
vacancies, when all power is theirs 
because there is no vicar to hold 
the freehold. 

They arc often embarrassed to 
profit from a fair decision and 
sometimes gram back to the 
parish some of the money - it 
originally put into its house. But 
the parish loses first its head- 
quarters. manned 24 hours a day 
throughout most of the year as a 
rule; secondly, a commodious 
home upon which hangs so much 
of the wellbeing, if not the 
essence, of the Church: and 
thirdly, a generally attractive 
house usually well integrated with 
the parish church in a unified site, 
often the only place of beauty left 
to some of our more unfortunate 
parishes. 

Moreover, in a smaller house, 
often at some distance from the 
church, the vicar can find con- 
ditions difficult and may set up an 
office manned for part of the day 
in a corner of the church or hall 
while his wife does her best to cope 
with poor sound insulation when- 
ever her husband is at home. 

There are, of course, good 
modem vicarages and there were 
bad old ones, but the whole thing 
has gone much too far. The 
destruction of the integrated par- 
ish church site is usually irrevers- 
ible and the Church's decline 
indelibly marked. Houses tem- 
porarily unwanted should where 
possible be let to suitable tenants. 
Yours faithfully, 

J.W. MASDING, 

Hamstead Vicarage, 

Walsall Road, * 

Birmingham. 

September 18.: ; 

Many mansions? 

From Mr Nicholas Doak 
Sir. What schisms and heresies go 
unreported within the established 
Church? For. according to a South 
Croydon estate agent, one of the 
properties he currently offers was 
“used by The Bishop of Croydon 
prior to conversion”. From, what 
or to what can the appropriate^ 
authorities advise me? 

Yours faithfully. 

NICHOLAS M. DOAK. — [ 

I Tipton Drive. ■" 

Park Hill, 

Croydon. Surrey. _ . - 

September 22. . 'V 

Science schools 

From Mr John Webb 
Sir. The letter from Dr David 
Branchcr today (September 22) on 
the need to clarify the role of 
science schools hits many nails 
accurately and squarely, but strays 
in pressing the Department of 
Education and Science to set up 
new schools around yet a new 
curriculum. 

Maths and physics and a lan- 
guage or two are taught well in 
certain schools as well as a “study 
of man” subject — economics, 
geography, history and a sixth 
.subject chosen from any of the 
above but more often from an 
additional group such as art. They 
arc underpinned by a seventh 
subject which seeks to enable its 
students to think and criticise 
.more effectively, to read, listen 
and communicate more carefullv, 
entitled “theory of knowledge” 

Such a curriculum exists, is 
recognised „fay . fifty and more., 
countries.'' is offered by 8.000 dr 
more students per year and is. 
widely accepted by universities. It 
is a programme which helps the 
artists, the inventors, the creators 
to -develop themselves and io 
express themselves whilst en- 
abling them to maintain effective 
contact with their colleagues in 
mathematics and science, arts or 
languages. 

It is called the International 
Baccalaureate. 

Yours sincerely. 

JOHN WEBB. 

Senior Administrator. 

St Clare's, 

139 Banbury Road. Oxford. 
September 22. 

Identity crisis 

From the Rev Dr T. .-I. Chadwick 
Sir, The Reverend M. R. Kemp 
(September 16) speaks of diffi- 
culties arising with young ladies 
who find difficulty with the word 
^spinster” to describe their mar- 
ital status and asks for suggestions 
for an alternative word. 

Bearing in mind that a person 
who has been divorced and is re- 
marrying is officially described < 
under marital status as “previous 
marriage dissolved”. 1 can only 
suggest the very unromantic “not 
previously married” to replace 
both “bachelor” and “spinster”. 
Yours faithfully. 

T. .A CHADWICK. 

The Cliff. 1 19 Mcllor Road. 
Ashion-under-Lync. Lancashire. 


ON THIS DAY 


SEPTEMBER 27 ISO 

Sir Walter Scntt ( 1771 - IS3JI bed 
entered in J bit? into partnership 
u-ith John Ballantxne and Co who 
became invoiced in rh*’ 
bankruptcy nf Constable, the 
puhhshvrs. Acivrdmf! to The 
Oxford Companion to English 
Literature. Scott "found himself 
liable fur a debt uf about 
£IN.n00"andu'orked 
strenuously to pay e/f ki.s creditors 
’’ ivho rccaci'd full pay merit after 
his death. " 


SIR WALTER SCOTT. 

Sir Walter Scull, as we men- 
tioned on Tuesday, has died the 
victim of his zealous desires and 
excessive exertions to pay his 
debts. His remarkably robust 
frame and resolute mind could not 
stand before the Herculean task 
which he undertook, in the latter 
years of his life, for the sake of 
Eaiistyiog the demands of bis 
creditors and gratifying his own 
feelings nf independence. 

From the immense range ut his 
studies — from his profound acqui- 
sitions in several difficult branches 
of knowledge — from the rapid 
succession uf those acknowledged 
works, which appeared from his 
pen with a prodigal profusion, of 
which (taking into account their 
excellence) the world has wen no 
example — from the numerous 
paths in which we can trace his 
brilliant course in reviews and 
periodical literature — frum his 
extensive correspondence with 
nearly all the moat celebrated 
literary characters of Europe, > 
large portion uf which the world 
(we are happy to state) must soon 
he pul in possetsfon from ail these 
occupations and productions of his 
mind, it must be at once seen that 
his life, from his first appearance as 
an author, 30 years ago. up to 1826, 
must have been one of uncommon 
labour. 

But there is an immense differ- 
ence between voluntary labour, 
prompted by inclination, and en- 
dured with buoyant spirits, and a 
task inspired by duty, and executed 
for profit. His early works ap- 
peared the fruits of relaxation from 
official labour, or of hours stolen 
from social or domestic enjoyment. 
They never gave him the habits, or 
imposed upon him the hardship, of 
a recluse student. The world never 
knew that he had work on hand, by 
his abstinence from its pleasures, 
or his inability to attend to its 
interests. He was never restrained 
from a dinner party, or a country 
excursion from a meeting with 
his friends -at a hunt or at a ball — 
fay the- professed necessity of 

- devoting himself to literary 
labours. 

White he -continued the “Great ^ 
Unknown" of the Waveriey novels 
his toils were as unknown from the 
noise that was made abo ut them, as 
: tbose of the benevolent Brownie in 
his country, which performs the 
task of the peasant in thrashing his 
corn while he himself is asleep.The 
greatest part of Marmion is said to 
have Wen composed at the table of 
the Court of Session, to which he 
was clerk, in the intervals of 
recording the proceedings or draw- 
ing out the orders of that tribunal. 
His works were said to booksellers 
without any affectation of superior 
finish. 

But the case was altered when, 
after his losses with Constable, he 
had to labour for creditors, or for 
bread — to save his family from 
want, or to relieve his- affaire from 
embarrassment. Then the mid- 
night oil shone on a tasked page — 
then the image of the “printer's 
devil" haunted him as a sign of a 
dun. — then bis worn-out faculties 
could not always be braced for a 
new day’s exertion by “kind 
nature’s calm restorer." 

Hence, no doubt, the paralysis 
with which he was attacked nearly 
two years ago, and from which be 
never recovered the full vigour oi 
his masteiiy intellect. In saying 
this we mean no reflection an his 
creditors, for whom be wrought 
nor on lus family, who permittee 
the exertion. Indeed, we know that 
when, white on. his way to Naples 
last year, bis friends pressed upor 
him the necessity of not exerting 
himself, and of not allowing the 
objects which surrounded him tr 
excite his strained imagination, hi 
replied — “You may as well put : 
kettle of water on the fire, and bic 
it not boiL". . . . - 

He has paid .the debt of nahut 
before he could pay that of he 
more forbearing creditors. After 
devoting all his property to tin 
former purpose — with the exdu 
sion of Abbotsford, which is en 
tailed to his eldest son — his estati 
will still be 60,0001. or 80,0001. h 
debt. To meet this his onl; 
available assets are his householi 
furniture, his books, a few unfin 
ished manuscripts and letters 
which will compose ten volumes o 
correspondence with nearly all th> 
distinguished literary characters a 
his time. These, of course, will b 
given to his creditors, as direct* 
by his will; but his unmarrie< 
daughter, who accompanied him t 
Italy, and the younger branches c 
his family, will thus be Left withou 
a farthing of pecuniary interest i 
the munificent and glorious tegac 

which their illustrious father ha 
left to his country and to mahkint 

From Li Cmdr J.A.S.£bw\\ h 
t retd) 

Sir. An Italian spinster is nubile 
Failhfullv. 

J. A. S. DAVEY. 

Martin's Hill. Lewes Road. 
Uckfield. Sussex. 

From Miss Alison Chapman, B. 
Sir. May we not also be dcscrib 
as bachelors? 

Yours faithfully. 

ALISON CHAPMAN. 

45 Caldcrdale Road. SW4. 

From the Re*‘ Professor B.Lmdi 
Sir. Unmarried. 

- Yours. • 

BARNABAS LINDARS. ; ■ 
HulmeHall. 

Oxford Place. 

Victoria Park. Manchester. 




I 


10 


thf m fF c,gA ' rrTRPAVSEyrEMBEK 27 1986 


Television - 

Just how 
able is 


Caine? 


Marti Caine ms ecoaroged by 
her grandfather to enter the 
1961 Miss Great Britain con- 
test, and came third. But 
according to the account of her 
life now appearing in TV 
Times, she did not hit the Mg 
time tmtfi 1975, when she won 
ITVs New Faces. “Later came 
divorce, depression and career 
arms," we discover, bat she 
has thankfully surmounted 
these, and is now presenting 
New faces of "86, the second 
episode screened last night 

She learned her trade in 
Northern working men's 
clubs! in these she excelled. 
Bat whether her ait translates 
to television is questionable: 
both the immediacy and the 
bawdiness of her dab perfor- 
mances get left behind. 

She says of her tow-cut 
dress: “If you see two pink 
bits, give ns a dap, right-" But 
she cannot go farther than 
that, which in a ’dob she 
undoubtedly won Id. That is 
why many viewers disagree 
with my opinion, expressed 
last Saturday, that explicit sex 
and violence.. should not be 
shown on television. Bat it is. 
also a reason for going to see, 
or at least hear o^ the real 
thing in dobs. 

Sk new variety acts appear 
on each of MartTs shows. The 
audience in the Birmingham 
Hippodrome then votes on 
their respective merits. First, 
however, a panel of three 
critics sitting in a box give 
their verdicts. Some of .these, 
such as “Tin not sore how 
much demand (here is for tap- 
dancing," are unremarkable, 
but my colleagne Miss Nina 
Nyskow, television critic of 
The News of the World, man- 
aged in the first episode to be 
more vivid. Discussing the 
dress worn by the lead singer' 
of a band from Leeds, sbe 
commented: “I just thought it 
wasa ridicule us outfit to wear 
and I'm afraid when she was 
jumping around . . . from the 
knees op I just have to make 
her wobbly of the week." 

the audience in the Hippo- 
drome disliked this. “Yah, 
yeah,". said Marfi,“WeIl it 
takes one to know one.“ This 
was a toodi of the Northern 
dab circuit, and it got the most 
prolonged applause. '•! J 

Andrew Ghnson 



BUI Nicholson, author of BBC’s acclaimed drama, Shadowlands, talks about his 

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with his fourth 


Right from the start, everyone 
assumed it was about sex round the 
world. 1 think this must be a 
hangover from the early anthro- 
pological films: love in foreign 
countries equals interesting sexual 
practices. It's as -if people have a 
pre-form ed slot in their minds for 
such enterprises, and what I have 
been .trying to do. being a different 
shape, simply, doesn't go in. 
Throughout the * two years of 
planning, researching, filming and 
cutting, I became weary of explain- 
ing what I was actually doing, and 
why. Now that the films are 
finished, and about to transmit, I 
find that, in its long journey from 
idea to 1 actuality, the series bas 
evaded my original intentions 
anyway. Those who resent and fear 
the power of television directors 
may be interested to know how the 
best-laid plans do indeed go astray. 

The idea, not a particularly 
original one, was born out of a 
strong personal interest in the way 
our love-lives are influenced by 
general social attitudes. 1 belong to 
the generation that grew up believ- 
ing that all things done with, by or 
for love are by definition good. 
Now that the Sixties have become 
period drama, this quaint fancy has 
had to be replaced by sturdier 
structures. 

Permissiveness had a generous 
ring to it when 1 was 1 9; today I am 
twice that age. and it has come to 
sound like lack of caring. Commit- 
ment once only appropriate in the 
political arena, has re-established 
itself as a virtue in sexual relation- 
ships. But commitment to what? In 
the name of what? If bur sexual and 
-romantic impulses are to be subject 




to some sort of social discipline, 
who is to lay down the rules? - 

Armed with a trial slogan (“Your 
love-life is not your own”) and a 
Big "Question (“What rules should 
we love by?”). I began casting out 
for a way to turn the issue imo 
television. Here I had a further 
ambition. Many years of travelling 
the world, making documentary 
films, had convinced me that 
people in other countries want 
pretty much what I want out of lift: 
a good marriage, a fulfilling job. a 
car that starts every morning and 
soon. Yet all 1 was seeing of foreign 
people on television were their 
traditional dances, their abject 
poverty, their, ageless wisdom and 
. their comic failure to be like us. 

An unfair generalization. I sup- 
pose, but it left me -determined to 
make a film series in which 
foreigners actually talk. My subject 
— the management of love-lives — 
was well suited to this* because it is 
not an area in which we can claim 
any superiority. In fact, it seemed 
to me to be an area in which we- 
could afford to learn from others. 

This approach had practical 
consequences at the planning stage. 
Although there is an insatiable 
appetite for films about lost tribes . 
who live in harmony with their 
environment, nobody actually be- 
lieves that they present a working 
model . for . ourselves. These 
peepings'at other worlds are part 
daydream and part self-abuse. Now 
it so happens that I spent 


T2months. in my late teens, living 
with a Central American Indian' 
tribe who were so detached from 
the greater world that they had not 
heard - of the various world wars. 
These decent and kindly people 
spent pan of their time committing 
adultery and coveting consumer 
durables, very much like everyone 
el$& Yet once 1 was home again in 
England, alt my anecdotes tended 
to glorify the non-material, non- 
competitive side of Kekchi life. I 
remember saying “They have no 
roads., because all they desire is 
within walking distance of home". 
There's something about isolated 
tribes that we need to believe so 
forcibly that we reject the reality; 
which, in the case df the Kekchi, 
was they were lobbying hard for the 
building of a road. 

For my film series, therefore, I 
resolved to film middle-class peo- 
ple. living in towns andsuburtk. 

'This meant, inevitably, that our 
interviewees would have been 
exposed already to. the;. potent 
propaganda of the West. And so it 
proved. Everywhere we went, we 
found a struggle under way be- 
tween modern romantic individ- 
ualism and the older, more 
communal, traditions of- the host 
society. My own opinion, seven 
countries later,- is that the western 
model — companionate marriage. 

. expectations of fulfilment through 
personal . relationships, minimal 
social duties — is so potent, that it 
will take over the world. Like -the 


fruit oftheTree of Knowledge; one . 
taste and you can never -return" to 
■your former state. ' ? . 

.. Then there- was the. trickiest : 
question of- all:. was- the series to 
have a. point? Were viewers, sup- . 
- posed to be persuaded of some- , 
tiling' by the end? Television 
producers are nervous of admitting. ' 
to a governing idea, preferring to 
cast themselves in the role of 
neutral observer of reality. In my. 
experience, the steady observation 
or reality does tend la neutralize 
governing ideas: but, without-, one, 
you can't really get started My": 
governing idea was that restrictions 
on individuals* love-lives by their 
society are necessary* - indeed in- 
evitable. 

From such thoughts came the 
series title. Lovefaw , a yoking., 
together of the personal and the 


-lives. Thoughts I had long been, 
strained- hot to.think. thoughts fluff 
undermined everything I wanted to 


believe, were blithely uttered ^ in 
liftl 


public that still baffles many of my 
" jr.-they say 


colleagues. “Love lore?”. . . 

hopefully. No: law. Both public 
legislation and the unwritten.' un- 
spoken laws that hold a society 


together. - the agreements that 
reasure us that the liberties we deny 


ourselves are denied to everyone 
else. 


• . So.much for the theory. Reality 
s. The fir 


struck in two waves. The first wave 
was the experience of researching; 
and filming in other countries. 
■Neither the long meetings with " 
experts in London. nor the poring • 
over books, quite prepared me for - 
the shock m- hearing how our-, 
interviewees perceived their love* -; 


Kyoto 4nd Cairo, as if they were no 
more ibarr common truths. Hedp- - 
.n&m in Budapest promiscuity in 
Nairobi, - romanticism in Califor- 
nia: - it "was not the attitudes 
themselves that were so surprising, 
.but the discovery of a whole society 
in which they were supposed to be 
normal s 

. ■ Most disturbingof all. to me, was 
. exposure .ito unashamed male 
power. Mqst df the women I know 
iti London earn their own money,' 
and most of the men I know do not 

. expect or say they do not expect, to 

be serviced by women. Whatever 
the reality, it is possible to make 
men here ashamed of- treating 
wppien as instruments. .Yet in 
many of the countries we visited, 
such dominioif is"a source of male 
pride. The men explained that 
what looked like exploitation was 
in (act a .rich and subtle traditional 
balance of power, some -women 
~ datined this too: and so jrmayjberi 
can-only report that the majority of 
the ^ women we, met looked .with 
envy at "the relationships' of, mutual 
" respect we erydy, as .they imagine, 
in-Britain.- 

_';Tfre second. Wave of reality 
struck’in’ the cutting-room. little 
by little my cheri Shed-theriries were 
wueezed^tify the tftdre; vigorous- 
life-forms in thfcrosaes.T1xe people: 
"^.had 'filmed; were .amply more . 


interesting than anything I had to 
say about them. With the zeal of a ~ 
convert," I filially surrendered to the 
. “talking heads" : - . - - v— 

. In my business the talking bead 
is apprentice stuff: you' need no .. 
directorial skills to point a camera 
at a person. There's no peer-group __ 
applause for a film made of talking 
heads. Nor should there be; .the 
applause belongs lo the heads . 
doing the talking. But we're J 
primarily driven- by the need to - 
demonstrate that we too have a- v 
necessary job to do. My humbler f 
directing- style in these films is the 
product not only of my limitations « 
as a director but of the strength of 
my material. There are several ? 

, scenes of couples talking, sustained ■! 
: shots with no cuts or camera- ’ 
moves, and these are the moments 
■ i now like best. When I re-run the * 
• ewer-familiar films; I' now watch : - 
the partner who is not speaking. , 
' fascinated by howpeople coromur. :■ 
nicate as they listen. . . • : . a 

' - The final stra will come for me- 
when I leant how casual viewers 
perceive. the films. Experience Bas 
. taught me that even my friends;", 
watch my films inattentively, and* ; 
so miss the crucial lines of narrai' 
tionpver which I have agonized for * 

. hours. Even' if they hear every* * 
word; they seenr to manage .tor.’ 
.'.think. at- the end< much what they 
thought .at . the beginning,. There's • 

• very littie^exin th^ films*; Ttiey're • j' 
, really all about nforalassumptioris* 1-. 

. But T. suppose that Ufa few weeks' ' :' 
time Hi* be nodding politely as 
people at' parties '.tell me now 
intaesting.it was. "•••.■" -• - f ••)£ 

October 5 *tx -r 

.- ■ • • ' v. -.v 
r* 


• >» 


\hofdeae ^ 

non 



Concerts 

to enjoy so much 


LS/Atherton 

Festival Hall 


It is bard to have a festival 
without people around to 
celebrate, and the thin audi- 
ence at this'openrng concert of 
the London Sinfonieua's 
Britten/Tippett Festival did 
nothing for the . party at- 


mosphere. But happily the 
iffected: 


musicians were not at 
sne just wishes there had been 
more people to enjoy the 
generosity and colour of their 
playing for David Atherton, 
•specially in two big Tippett 
works, the First Symphony 
md the Concerto for 
Orchestra. 

There was also colour in 
;heir clothes, and that, too, 
A-as appropriate. It is still a 
ihock in this hall when the 
Sinfonietta come on in shirts 
)f scarlet and claret, blue and 
pnecn. but the glad informality 
went well with the Tippett 
iymphony, where the ven- 
erable four-movement form 
suts on ribbons lo go Morris 
lancing ' 


Tippett’s own notes draw 
attention to what is traditional 
in its structure: sonata form in 
the first movement, a ground 
bass in the second, then 
proper scherzo form followed 
by a fugue as finale. Mr 
Atherton, though, was as con- 
cerned with, the bounding 
rhythms that festoon the en- 
tire work, and, keeping , the 
mu&ic almost always freely in 
the air. showed that Tippett 
was already fuHy prepared for 
the world of The Midsummer 
Marriage he was about to 
enter. 

Indeed, this perfor m ance 
suggested he was even pre- 
pared for the Concerto for 
Orchestra, nearly 20 years 
ahead. What we beard was 
very much a “concerto for 
various instrumental 
ensembles", to quote the 
composer's description of the 
later work. The spangling in 
both scores seemed to drive 
rather than inhibit the lyrical 
flow, and to show off the 
strengths of an expanded 
Sinfonietta: a brilliant brass 
section, crisp and fresh wood- 


wind colours (though the clari- 
net solo of the symphony's 
slow movement remains 
problematic) and dark 
conversations from divided 
lower strings, even if the 
violins were not always so 
admirable. 

The Britten in the Tippett 
sandwich was his Nocturne, 
which provided more chances 
for strong, certain and direct 
musical images from the wind 
soloists, timpanist and harpist 
of the Sinfonietta. But the 
voices were almost as various 
as that that came from Philip 


Langridge, whose sensitivity 
to language and line led him to 
a different texture for each 
song. Inevitably, some were 
more successful, than others. 
He has difficulty in fitting the 
dedamtmy bravura of the 
Wordsworth setting into his 
voice, and the work has. a 
couple of awkwardly low 
patches. But the oddity of 
“The Kraken" and the naivety 
of the Middleton song were 
magnificent for their lack of 
affectation. 


Paul Griffiths 


LSO/ 

Shostakovich 

Barbican 


THE BRAND NEW DIGITAL RECORDING OF 





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It is tempting, the prc^ramme 
note for this concert implied, 
to read loo much into any 
.composer's last symphony. 
Nevertheless. Shostakovich's 
enigmatic Fifteenth Sym- 
phony. given here in honour 
of the 80th anniversary of his 
birth, positively invites some 
kind of subjective interpreta- 
tion with ns strange, often 
banal references to Rossini 
and Wagner and to the 
composer's own music. 

For all the climactic power 
of the first Adagio, its 
predominant atmosphere- is 
one of desperate emptiness. In 
the sinister dead-pan ex- 
pression of the first, third and 
last movements, culminating 
in the coldly nostalgic . tick- 
locking with which the work 
fades away, it seems as if he is 
articulating his self-doubts, as 
if he is asking himself wearily 
whether he has ever achieved 


anything. Simply by asking, 
however, he provides a pos- 
itive answer. 

This was a disciplined 
performance, given by a Lon- 
don Symphony Orchestra well 
aware of the significance of the 
occasion. The conductor, 
moreover, was none other 
than the composer’s son, 
Maxim Shostakovich, whose, 
direction was executed with 
sweeping, passionate gestures 
that readily betrayed his sense 
of mission in promoting his 
father's work. 

Indeed his manner . was 
perhaps better suited to the 
rather more extrovert First 
Cello Concerto, in which the 
soloist, Lynn Harrell, pro- 
jected an intense line, whether 
the music was fast and gritty 
or stow and anguished. He. 
also met what is .a formidable 
technical challenge with ease, 
though without . compromis- 
ing the work's elements of 
daredevil virtuosity. Full 
marks, too. to the solo ham- 
player. Hugh Scenan. 

Stephen Pettht 


*. -A 


The Rhinegold 
GbventGarden 




As ifthe nethermost Eflai that 
launches The Rhinegold was 
not portentous enough in its 
dramatic context, the first 
sounds to emanate from" the 
Royal Opera House; pit last- 
night bad an extra significance 
which, if less -metaphysical in 
origin, certainly added to the 
tension and the expectation of 
the moment ' 

They crowned, for instance, 
the massive company effort 
needed to accomplish this 
final assembling of Welsh 
National Opera's Ring -cycle, 
the oldest pari of which (this 
Rhinegold ) dates back to 1983. 
They heralded the first Ri'agin 
English at Covent Garden for 
over half a century (arid it-was 
noticeable how much -using - 
the vernacular, when as care- 
fully enunciated as here, im- 
proves- ah- audience's 
attentiveness)... 

Gdran Jfirvefelt’s produc- 
tions were.' of course, initially 
designed for touring to rather - 
less grand venues; -hence their 
comparatively modest tech- 
nical demands. Despite-Carl 
Friedrich ■ .Oberle's frocks 
coated, powder-faced gods 
and 19th-century railway-sta- 



tensions 


lion sbdl of a $eL JarvefHlV 


staging . is essentially' con- 
frorn the 


ventionak in, fact, far 
'Chercau-iike reinterpretation 
it superficially evokes. . 

It is weakest at its. outset — . 
where all -the pre-Raphaelite ' 
twirls of the Rhine daughters 
do not compensate for the 
absence of anything remotely 
resembling the Rhine —and at 
points where it becomes pro-, 
sale. The discovery- that 
Wotan is withholding the ring 
from .the giants, was pne 
instance where a little more 
visible passion would- have 
underlined the music> awe- 
some significance. . 

The giants were .dearly, 
building-site navvies .— but 


does* navvy ever go down on 
one .knee when be 


stys .he. 
longs for a . woman?. Against 
this, -though, one could die 
many subtle ideas:, the first 
sight of ibe gods, .dossing 
elegantly like down-on-their- . 
luck aristocrats; or the. Rhine 
daughters' reappearance just 
before the final curtain^ tp - 
spoil the gods' proud entry . 


into" - Valhalla - with their pa- 
thetic dambshow. • 

There was. one .uttarguabiy ’ 
outstanding -performances 
■Graham Gark’s Logo. Before 
his entry few had seemed 
capable of projecting any son 
of ironic overtone- A bald, 
slightly oriental trickster, he 
.matched a brilliantly intisive. 
metallic timbre to a stage 
presence, of flash and illusion. 

■His commentary . on . .the. 
wilting gods after Freia's 
-departure -was a -masterpiece 
of. sardonic nuances. Philip 
Joll's characterisation qf a 
shuffling, indecisive Wotan 
inevitably seemed " pale be- 
stdes'-this jHitlbis voice has a 
waromras big as his physique.- ' 
‘ Nicholas Folwell’s Afoerich . 
was. another honestly . crafted; 
' perfonnanbeJ at times' bring-", 
ing ap apposite dark tinge to 
■the voice' but with a tendency 
■ for -tfie.- tone to, ataver. when 
- cursing. John 1 Harris made, a 
coloumil' • ..Mimp, Richard 
Morion's Froh was sWeetly 



suag. land. Anne Conics pul 


arid soul into j 


; wise 


-. FhmpJoU as Wotan . g 

words. As Fricka, Fendope : 
Walker revealed much; .worm 
. tone,.. excellent diction and, ‘ 
some teftiteicy io safopL W h 
contrast. Anne ■ Williams- " ! ij 
‘ King's-Freia produced a dean. \ 
lively vocal line but her 'Words ^ 
were not so dkaar. •; 

?."Rtcbard Armstrong’s ■, 
inducting- seemed a little 
,one-paced early on, but the r 
grams' entry (done with raw -i 
■menace) seemed to inspire :• 
-him to instil greater drama Z 
.land flexibility. ' • 

Richard Morrison \ 


Radi6 

What the papers ssty 


more 


H . if* ,C , . IL 




mmm 


D I I! i' 


‘An expressive force 
ot great impact' 


Two proQr.~ m.-riE! 5 ; :t 
modern Dollei-. 
including Ch-risToaNer 
Bruce's Ghost Donees 
with f he band Incantation 


Sadler's Wells 
Theatre . ’ 


21-25 OCTOBER 7.30pm 
Tickets E3.50T10 



The Press hats always .taken a. 
somewhat' less than beneVo- 
lem ipterest tji the BBC, ah’ 
interest which, m.the early 
days,: was based on , fear. If 
radio were to flouridi as. a 
bringer of news, 'that could 
only be at the expense of 
□rculatioiu and until tbe 'out- 
break of the Second World 
War the newspaper^ mdguW 
actually stuieeded in resin cl- 
ing regular news broadcasting 
so ’that most of it banxmed in 
the. evening well after they 
had pm their last .editions <og 
the streets. 

By .contrast, and quite pos- 
sibly this has done nothing to 
improve... the relationship; 
broadcasters bavr never paid 
anything like the same .anw- 
tion.-to . the Press, ta fact- I 
believe Slop Press (Radio 4,- 
Fridaysk.now approkhinglts 
second anniversary,, to be the., 
first . regular programme jo 
take a serious, wfde-rangmg 
and well-informed interest in ■ 
what newspapers do and how 
and why they do it 

Each edition crams in a vast 
amount. A week ago. in the 
fourth of the current series.- 
Ludovic Kennedy . inter- 
viewed William Allison about 
the The Monoc/cd Mutineer 
fuss and left us in no doubt 
that- he and his coauthor.. 
John Fairley, had taken some 
trouble to.estab'lish the points 


which: are nmy under attack. 
Then Edvard ".Pearce , spoke 
■path refreshlngcandouroflhe, 
difficulties; a columnist faces' 
when something" like thc -SDP 
. conforcalce trffeEs hiiji.arfd his:. 
. readers so Jittle to .feed r the 
insauabie htimaii appetite : for 
wcIL-iaflated personalities. " 
.. Tom. . Bmstow . explained 
why tte strident tatofoid style:- 
is.cdndiuoned by fabloidscre 
ft does not accommodate 
f deadline* with words of more I 
rthan four.or-flve letters - and 
- he-vem on ,to idemify -the-, 
debaseruein. -of .language ia 
whictw m his view. Dip Press as 
; a whole is rtow, contribulfog. ' 
Finally. Frank Giles recalled 
hrs byorand-a^half years - as 
'editor of the Sunday Times. " 
:■ This - is fairly typical of -a . 
week's -rhateriar ip- scope and 


'Comfortable . study of a 
collapsing relationship- He is a 
.-midctie-agecl. unsuccesful.dis? 


ntemational 
lifetime? 


in 


density; .and .surely it . is WO 
25.1 ‘ 


much for a mere 25 .minutes. 
'.Yet here. and. always-.in my ■ 
hearing; , thoughtful interview. 
irig /combined .with 
discrimmatioti in the editing 
ensures a. programme that. is 
amazingly unhurried and 
authoritative.' . • • ■_ 

The last two. Fridays on 
Radio 3. ha ve brought a couple 
of highly contrasted and in- 
teresting plays. Dreams, Se- 
• crets, BeantUal Liesby Robert 
Fergnsoiijnarred Diana Quick 
and Charles Kay in an exceed- 
ingly well written and un- 


• enjchanled arrist-kfesierier: she, 

- much younger.; is; ■ making' a i 
career for herself in soft ‘porn : 
publishing and is keeping him 
on die proceeds of a- world he . 
tfospises." Fine, ncryy acting in. 

. bqin parts was fully matebed 
-by. an astonishing 1 petfor- . 
; mance from 13-yeafyold -■ 
■Emma . Glasner -as -.the 
■" woman's, dau^iter -? a chHd ■ 
disquieiingjy 'dbsenaw -and ' 
,'^rong. 

Ust.night The Compromise ' 
by Istvart Eorsi . presented, a ^ 
: contemporary . Hungarian d> _ ‘ 
/.temnia. Should Zohan; .'ihe - 
' author of a- massive, and 
brilliant work of recent: his- : 
: tory. agree to rewrite his final 
chapter, bring the .took into 
tine with official thinking apd 
; so., achieve publicatiari : ^nd. . 


renown in his 

— 4me? /Or should he refuse 
and forgo them? One factor is 
that Zohan .fs-’dying of- stom- ' 
acb cahcer -which he believes 
to be billy tr duodenal ukq‘. 
“If it; 'were; cancer." he re>- 
marks, rj wouldn’^ alter iC 


But' perhaps, he.' iknpws ft»- 
i and alters pi! the same.; 


traih'and , 

-' Here- was a 'pla^ in wfuifo 
everybody ft'engaged in some, 
degree, of ; decc]ption. ' sdf- 
deception orboth. Yet unlike 
Mr FefgusbhV’Sttiry. Whicb 
eame ;acroai 'with', painful, 
familiar immediacy', .this 'had 
the.fiayour'of a: highly .inteni- 
gent^ercise even 

rorne: excellent lacthsg (Juliet 
Stevenson:.- 'rRpnald Picktift. 
John -Hurt;: Berrtwri ' Heptoh) 
cpuld quftridispet .; "* 

- . . i i • } - J • mm m J Y • 


DaridWaafe 


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* vt»> nin *. Kir'C 


» 




September 17-October 3, 1986 




A weekly guide 
to leisure, entertainment 
and the arts 










praying for sun inthe*M6doc and 
none more fervently than the British, 
whose interest in claret dates back a 
tfaoiisand years. Jane MacQnitty 
meets the families who took root there 


There are still some parts 
of4 foreign land that are 
for . ever England. These 
partsaue now worth wore 
than 50 tunes as much as 
the best Brithh agri- 
cultnral countryside. But 
then, Bordeaux always 
has been big business. 
Today -the region*? 860 
million vines are groaning 
with grapes that, from 
October 6 onwards, wffl 
be turned- into mote 1 than 
five mflfion hectolitres of 
purple gold. 

Net' so' long ago we 
wonld' have owned the 
whole lot. It was fo il 52 
that foe 30-year-oki El- . 
ean'ftr/ of . AqnJtaine 
bounteously . gave ’ Bor- 
deaux to the Bpfish'.wheir 
she ptarried Henry- El. 
Three centuries ami 10 
English kings later, we 
lost Bordeaux back to foe 
French but since' then, 
aparf from the odd gap, • 
Britain has continued to 
control the area's - la- ; 
crative wine trade by buy- 
ing, making andr trading 
in claret . • i. : - 

Today it is difficult . to 
calculate exactly foe value 
erf foe British share? of;. 
Bordeaux's wine trade. 
We know, however, fo at 
there' foe about 50 British ■ 
people? actively' involved, 
from the smallest courtier 
en v ms (wine broker) to 
the grandest premier 
grand, cm clasU propri- 
etor. And we. know ;that l 
Bordeaux's 210,000 acres 
of quality red and white 
appellation contrdlie 
vines produce some 650- 
miUiou bottles of wine 
worth £13 billion an- 
nually. 

Land prices tell - file 
story. Just one hectare of 




are 




prime vineyard land In 
PomeroV the tiny and 

much-prized right bank 
comiqome, recently 
fetched 3 million francs. 
And fo 1983 the some- 
what rundown St Jnlxen 
third-growth Chilean La- 
grange was bought for 
Simtory, the giant Japa- 
nese spirit empire, for 54 
million francs.. ' 

v Bqrdeaibc,«salI wine 
experts coucede, ft -foe 
m^rffofoortaqtfine wine- 
prodadagr region in . the 
world, and its 21,000 
growers -consistently still 
make more 4 gnat, wines 
per pcre than any other 
country- This? ft despite 
'increasing competition fo. 
the shape of some, stylish 
wines from California and 
Australia. 

Little of foe .great 
wealth of Bordeaux . ft 
ever in view. Tree, the 
imposing towers, turrets 
andPalladian porticoes of 
thegrandest chateaux are 
occasionally,. . glimpsed 
from the road- Bot it ft file 
grey /Gironde,- with- 
green reglmencs! rows; . 
of vines, marching in 
endless Ones, along its 
gravel spit banks, that 
dominates the scenery. 

Driving through foe 
dreary little town of 
Paufllac at 8pm ou a 
Friday, without a soul to 
be seen, it is hard to 
believe that this ft claret; 
country. But fo nine days 
time the first mechanical, 
harvester will be out at 
dawn, trundling along the 
rows, and -foe villagers, 
with secateurs and bas- 
kets, will be bent double 
to bring in the grapes. 
The . Medoc will have 
come to life. 


Alan Ham and hb wife J01 at work on file British-owned Chateau Latour estate: “One always remembers that the Kings of England were drinking claret before the Kings of France" - 






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‘Nathfe’: lucrative business 


JOHNSTON ET FILS 

Nathaniel Johnston 


British Bordeaux life has as 
much to do • with- -being- a 
courtier (broker) or nigocianl 
'{merchant) as with owning a 
chateau. Amiable Nathaniel 
Johnston, whose company 
was founded in 1734, is 
known 'affectionately as 
Natbie by the English wine 
trade. He is the-eighth genera- 
tion of his family to ran the 
firm.’ . 

- Nathie's broad knowledge, 
polite - manners. Prince of 
Wales check suits and endear- 
ing French .accent has wooed 
many an important British 
buyer . to’Tiis 'Quit des 
Chartrims office in Bordeaux: 
-The - 'exterior, reeking' of wine 
and drains; isras sleazy 4 and 
dilapidated as everywhere else 
on 'this quayside but inside. 
Nathie's hibiscus plants and 
1 4-year-old cairn terrier Ju- 
dith both thrive, as he and his 
two sons Deriis and Archibald 
get on with their lucrative 
buying and selling 

The Anglo-Irish Johnston 
femily is probably more 
French now than anything foe 
but Nathie remembers fondly 
that his grandmother, 
Georgroa White, never both- 
ered to ham French; and hi? 
family tree is peppered with 
British names. His youngest 
son. mdeed. is called Ivan hoe. 

I YANGLUDET 

Peter Sichel 


peter Sichel is Our mbsi 
important man in Bordeaux. 
Son of AllanSichel-a noted 
wine merchant and author, 

. Peter writes what are generally 
agreed to be the masLexpert 
vintage reports m.the Modoc 
and is head of Maison Sichel 
a powerful nigociani business 
that 'trades tartly under the 
name of Gaillaire and owns a 
third of the delectable Chateau 
Primer.- ' 

Peter and Tiis down-to-earth 
wife Diana, who breeds Welsh 
ponies, live at Chiteau 
d'Angludet — a highly-re- 
garded cru exceptionnel. Peter 

bought the chateau in 1961. 
“If was like when my father 
bought Primer , in ;38. they 
were practically giving these 
places away. A lot of people 
walked away after the .'56 
frosts -and didn't bother to. 
. replant." Since then Peter and 
l Diana ’ have, created . the 


chateau MEA UME 

Alan Johnson-Hill 


Alan and. Sue J.ohnson-Hill 
fulfilled many an English 
couple's most cherished 
dream of owning and living in 
a -French chateau when they 
moved to Meaume, a stylish 
Bordeaux Supftrieur property. 
Mfaume is an attractive ram- 
bling’ chateau prettily kitted 
put in -the best. Peter Jones 
patterns and dozens, pf china 
frogs. It is much 'suited to this 
vivacious.- - entertaining and 
enthusiastic couple who'aflec- 
tionately refer to each other as ‘ 
“fish”. 

Alan Johnson-Hill got the 
wine bug after spending a 
weekend at a Provencal wine 
estate. As well as his 25 
hectares of predominantly 
Meriot yin«. he now owns 25 
per edit of Majestic ' Wine 
Warehouses. This mostly self- 
taught wine man spends more 
than four months every year 
working and making the wine 
at Meaume as .does his wife 
Sue, who copes with the 
administration arid . the 
bookkeeping. 

The quality of Meaume 
.claret has improved dramatic 
cslJy under his aegULdne, ii) 
— 4 to considerable - help 
>m local oenologists. As 


Sue and Alan Johnson-Hill: “Special welcome for the British" 


Johnson-Hill says: “A British 
person has-a special welcome 
in this area. If we had been 
Parisiens moving into the • 
French countryside we would 
not have- had the same- • 
reception." 

He is under no illusions as 
to the money being made by 
his coropetititors. “It costsjhe- 
same mone y to m ake ah ’* &4 as 
aiH^ PrimTinpled with the 
'82s. It’s enormous, the sums 
of money these big chateaux 
are making. In a good year 


they are getting on for up to 
200 francs profit a bottle." - 

Locking up the chateau late 
at night, be takes one last look 
at the ^rden and vineyard. 

“This is why we do it. Just 
smell that' air,- listen to the 
cicadas: it's a fabulous night 
Forget about 'the wine. The 
.te m per a ture was only 5°C 
(4I°FJ in London this morn- 
ing. One would be mad to live 
anywhere else.” 

Purple gold comes as a 
welcome bonus. 


Anthony Barton tests the grapes: “Here I fed perfectly at home, hot not at M6docam r 


garden, planted the 30rhectare 
vineyard and produced the 
next Sichel dynasty of five 
boys and- a girl 

Like everyone else, the 

Sichels will not forget the 

boom, and . bust years of 

Bordeaux's, past "During the 
mid- 1970s crash, we opened a 
stall in Camenac to. sell wine 
to passers-by because things 
were- that rough”. Bm life is 
goodin Bordeaux now. due to 
a string of good bumper crop 
vintages including the - ex- 
cellent '8Js and '83s. the 

reasonable'SSs and the superb 
'Sis. ... 

New choir are mushroom- 
ing- everywhere. -As Peter 
Sichel puts it: “Everybody's 
building their pyramids np 
and down the Midoc.” 


leovjlle barton 

Anthony Barton 


The .Union. Jack -flies over 
several chateaux at vintage 
lime in the Medoc but none 
with such an ancient lineage as 
Langoa Barton, bought by 
Hugh Barton in 1821: 

The distinguished Ronald 
Barton, much loved fo both 
the British and the Bordelais.' 
presided over Langoa and 
Leoville Barton until his death 
last year, aged 83. He lived 
very simply at the charmingly 
proportioned Langoa, -despite 
its considerable prosperity in 


ISATUKDAY 


A star is reborn: 
Trevor Howard 
turns 70, and the 
tributes finally 
flow in — page 18 


Arts Diary 

Bridge 

Chess 

Concerts 

Crossword 

Dance ' 

Drink 

Eating Out 

Films 

Galleries 


recent yearxand caused a stir 
by marrying Phyllis, an 
Englishwoman, late in life. 
She was described by one 
Bordelais as being “very 
Beauchamp Place”, and did 
not endear herself to local 
people fo drinking Guinness 
at smart luncheons. 

Ronald's nephew is An- 
thony Barton, handsome, ca- 
pable. well-connected and the 
godfather to Lady Sarah Arm- 
strong-Jones. He runs the 
estate ably assisted by ■ his 
daughter Lilian Sartorius. 
Horses, cals and dogs abound 
here, as they do everywhere in 
Bordeaux. An eighth genera- 
tion Barton. Anthony, Tike his 
Uncle Ronald, speaks im- 
peccable French but says that 
“basically I'm used to being a 
foreigner everywhere. Here I 
feel perfectly at home bur I'm 
not a Medocain.” 


OmsadAB 
l5 Opera 
18 Radio 

17 Review 

18 . Rock £ Jazz 
15 Shopping 
IS Trlrnsioa 
IS Times Cook 
18 Travel 


The Archers 

Last Saturday's picture of 
Grace, the character from The 
. I rehers. was in feci of Pamela 
Main, the actress who played 
Christine. Grace was played 
by Ysannc Churchman. . 
- 1 .- 


CHATEAU LATOUR 
Alan Hare 


One property that surpris- 
ingly perhaps. will not be 
entertaining visitors daring 
the vintage but concentrating 
instead on the laborious busi- 
ness of harvesting its 
Cabernet Sauvignon vines, is 
the mighty first-growth Cha- 
teau Latour. The celebrated 
pepper-pot tower and small, 
doll's house-like chateau. has 
been 52 per cent owned fo the 
Pearson Group since 1963. 
with Harveys of Bristol taking 
25 per cent. - — 

Pearson's man in Bordeaux 
is now the Hon Alan Hare., 
previously with the Financial 
Times, who. together with his 
bubbly wife Jill obviously 
takes his recently acquired 
responsibilities seriously, right 
down to wearing n workman- 
like blue checked shirt and 
jeans (albeit well-pressed and 
with a tie) about the property. 
He is quick to point out that 
the Colefex and Fowler wall- 
papers and patterns that be- 
deck die bijou chateau are the 
only .obviously English things 
in the place. Although I did 
just spot Floris Rose Gera- 
nium scent in a cloakroom. 

Alan Hare states firmly: “As 
foreign owners we don't want 


to intrude on the traditions of : 
the place, ofwhich we are very. - • 
proud ” This did not stop the - 
Pearson Group from ripping .- 
out the ancient wooden cure? 
(or vats) and replacing' them 
- with shining, revolutionary. ' . 
easy-to-work stainless steel' 
just in time for the '64 vintage. 
This was a subject of much 
controversy a! the time, with >. 
the Mtdocains accusing' 
Latour of turning their cuverie - ' 
into a milk parlour. 

As it turned out. the 1964' - 
Latour, picked early before the 
heavy rains that dashed so - 
many other important M4doc : ‘ 
chateaux's prospects that year, 
was hugely successful and 
quickly established the reputa- 
tion of the new regime. . Or, as, _ 
Alan Hare politely puts it: 
“Philippe de Rothschild [from 
Mouton Rothschild, a premier 
grand cru tfastfeompetitor] is 
a terrible tease and is inclined 
to serve one's wine with • 
onions. My counter lease was 
to serve him Latour '64 with - 
the beef and his own with the"-' 
cheese.” "*-J 

The Medocras the Bordelais — 
often point out. is a friendly - 
place, especially to the British. > 
but- competition between pro- '-■ 
perties is keen and. among the. - 
French, family feuds are- 
commonplace. . Latour. rises - 
effortlessly above that kind of ; 
carry-on: ''One always*: - 
remembers that the Kings of - 
England were drinking dam _ ; 
before the Kings of France". _• - 


Only one 
decaffeinated 
coffee tastes 
as good as 
Nescafe Gold Blend? 


iivaijjcinuteil 






One of the family in a land of flowers 


Mafia scandals and boiling volcanoes 
— this is the stereotypical Sicily. 
Ann Monow found a surprising 
contrast in its beauty and history 


There was a tremendous 
sound oT squefchy kissing, as 
sh on-haired Sicilian mam- 
mas, in scrappy Provencal 
sun-dresses, rushed to scoop 
up grandchildren who had just 
toddled through from the 
London flight. This hardly 
seemed the brooding, volcanic 
Sicily of The Godfather. 

Outside Catania airport 
there was no sign of any 
saturnine figures in black, 
talking hoarsely, just ecstatic 
family scenes as the be- 
wildered little people were 
hugged some more, before 
being squashed into their 
grandparents* rickety Fiats. A 
world-weary Sicilian smiled: 
“The trouble is, mention Sic- 
ily and everyone thinks of the 
Mafia, the cactus in the mouth 
and volcanoes. ** 

The island in May is fresh 
and herby. A country the size 
of Wales, it has a wild charm. 
You drive for miles getting 
whifls of wild garlic and 
lavender. The stillness of 
bosky vineyards is broken 
only by cowbells, and every 
few mites another headland 
appears with a tiny ruined 
castle above a deserted beach. 

The ora age and lemon 
gtoves are a special green, 
though the Sicilian spring is in 
February. Even the motor- 
ways are divided, not by crash 
barriers, but by sentinels of 
pink and white oleander and 
swaying arum lilies, and the 
roadside shrines are covered 
in roses. 

The Sicilians are relaxed 
about their heritage. Discern- 
ing Greek. Phoenician, Nor- 
man and Arab invaders who. 
3,000 years ago also found 
Sicily irresistible, have left a 
legacy of pure medieval cities, 
fine temples and baroque 
villas. 

The equivalent of a crisp 
National Trust aesthete (at the 
Villa Palagonia outside Pa- 
lermo with its 62 gargoyles, 
monsters and dwarfs incon- 
gruous on the walls above the 
honeysuckle) is a pious old 
lady doing her ironing. She 
fishes a ticket out from under 
a statue and waves to a 
departing priest. Inside the 


18th-century villa there is 
nothing but an empty, dusty, 
mirrored elegance. 

Sicily reeks of dignity. You 
are part of the family, there is 
no fuss. There are few ingra- 
tiating signs. If you are bred 
and hungry, you make your 
own discoveries. The simplest 
cafe, often hidden behind 
ancient olive trees, offers de- 
licious antipasto and jug wine. 
They could make a fortune 
with their stunning views 
across the plains of almond 
and apricot orchards, running 
down to coastal farms where 
huge dumps of yellow broom 
— ginistra, the symbol of the 
P)antagenei5 — is no defence 
against a rocky blue Medi- 
terranean. 

Pesticides have blade us 
forget about wild flowers and 
butterflies. But here luxuriant 
bunches of poppies, butter- 
cups and daisies shake their 
heads from rocky crevices, 
softening the sternest concrete 
warning sign of another curva 
pericolosa. 

No matter bow hard we 
tried to drive like Sicilians in 
our hired little Italian road- 
ster, we never got away first at 
the lights, always frightened of 
hitting a Vespa scooter, often 
ridden by veoerables - in 
squashed straw hats with 
black bands, and with a box of 
oranges on the pillion. But the 


asked us to moderare 
vciocita. Slow down, unwind 
— no trouble when heading 
towards Taormina. 

In this town of gentle ele- 
gance, above a pretty bay, 
Goethe and even the troubled 
Garbo found peace. In the 
grand shuttered villas, the 
stone lions and cherub foun- 
tains are dry. Olive-green 
louvred shutters keep out the 
heat and the curious. Pink 
geraniums still brim over 
terracotta urns but are hardly 
ever seen by the owners who 
mostly live in America. In 
fact, out of the 25 million 
Italians in the United States, 
18 million are Sicilian and 
many are married to girls of 
Irish Catholic descent 

A path of pink roses and the 


Island charms: houses perched «* the rambling shoreline (above) and (right) a coconut seller in Palermo 


scent of tobacco flowers is the 
guide to the Villa Sant’ Andrea 
restaurant perched above 
spotlit rocks. Once a private 
villa, it was built by Alfred 
Trewfaella who married a girl 
from Messina called Gertrude. 
Almost hidden among white 
columns and smothered by 
shawls of pinky-purple 
bougainvillaea, there is a 
plaque to this couple who died 
together in 1959 after 56 years- 
of marriage. They left a family 
villa with fall bookcases, lov- 
ingly tended marble floors and 
terraces of flowers and herbs. 

There is a sheltered private 
beach with royal blue deck- 
chairs, matching towels and 
d«arwater. You can swim to a 
liny private island or just sit 
on the sun terrace, with, its 
apricot tablecloths, and nibble 
almond cake and sip lemony 
coffee. Subtly attentive, the 
staff seem like family retainers 


- refreshingly different from 
some grand hotel desk clerks 
who. like fugitives from La 
Cage aux Foiles. look as if 
they might hit you with their 
handbags if you asked for a 
stamp. 

We take a cable-car to the 
old town of Taormina, swing- 
ing over pine forests to 800 
feet above sea level and 
wander along the Corse' Um- 
berto where no cars are al- 
lowed. Old- women in black 
huny to kneel in elaborate 
churches and in their shadow, 
irreverent cake shops sell 
small rude flesh-coloured 
cakes, topped with cherries 
called mamelli di Virgin# 

A climb to the old town of 
Castelmola. to the ruined 
castle where old men in formal 
black sit on wooden seats 
drinking Vino Mandola, the 
local almond wine, and lairing 
the sunset for granted.' 


To the north are the Cala- 
brian mountains under a pale 
sky, the colour of the Ionian 
Sea, but dominated by the 
incontinent Mount Etna. 
Europe's highest volcano 
looks deceptively .innocent 
with its gentle curl of grey 
smoke steaming from the top. 
But, like a capricious bene- 
factor. it devastates the valleys 
below wiih lava which, ironi- 
cally, will make them fertile 
again. 

There is pasta and Pindar at 
Termini Intense; sulphurous 
Roman baths at the spa town 
of Sciacca and the Alcantara 
Gorge to be .climbed in thigh- 
high wellingtons. Taste the 
wine at Marsala, a little like 
Cheltenham and proud of hs 
English wine; see the remains 
of the fifth-century BC Greek 
city Halaesa is the shadow of 
Caste! di Tusa with lunch 
afterwards at Le Lampae. By 
the water's edge, shaded with 
cool white houses, it served 
squid, a springy rose and 
fraises debo/s for 2 1,000 lire— 
about £10 for two. This was 
followed by a doze chi the 
smooth rocks to the sound of 
schoolboys jumping in the 
water. 

They say that you can see 
Africa on a dear day from 
Erice. Stopping for fresh 
peaches by the roadside, even 
the dried-up riverbeds were 
full of oleander, and suddenly 
we were into the pure air of 
sleepy Erice, a perfect medi- 
eval town of shiny cobbled 
streets and wild decay. 

Ydlow flowers sprouted on 


either ride of medieval church 
doors propped by inadequate 
pieces of wood, cypress ave- 
nues ted to Romeo and Juliet' 
Caputet balconies. Even the 
grey stone smelled of fran- 
gipani and orange blossom as 
swallows darted near die great 
Byzantine church. Its rose and 
gold dome was topped by tee- 
white cloud from the love 
goddess Aphrodite's mystic 
mountain. Mount Eryx, where 
Daedalus offered her a honey- 
comb of gold and her warriors 
kept watch on Carthage. 

Below lies the worldly, 
seedy port of Trapani and real 
life. Video Africa, drags, bas- 
kets of tuna and silver sword- 
fish, but the old sepia 
mermaids have some ro- 
mance apd sturdy car ferries 
have names like Canaletto. 
The statue of Garibaldi has a 
pigeon on his head. Not much 
mythology, but then there is a 
religious procession, a float of, 
pink roses and a Virgin with a 
gold crown and luxuriant dyed 
black curls, a band, pious 
widows and young men in 
sharp suits and dark glasses. 

On the road to Palermo, 
stopping near Capo (TOriando 
it seemed almost wimpish to 
order a green salad with 
volcanic spaghetti a la sugo 
nero in its rich black sauce 
made from the juice of a 
squid. It followed a marinade 
of tuna, shrimp and roe at 
another discovery, the modest 
Hotel La Tartaruga with its 
pebbly beach and almost the 
best food we tasted in Sicily. 


At dawn, a breathy escape 
from daunting Palermo, in the 
throes of its Mafia trial, up 
Mount Pellegrino with a feel- 
ing of lightheartedness: past a 
black snake on the road and a 
nun eating a salami sandwich 
under a gum tree. 

There is no menace about 
Agrigenlo. After a shower of 
rain, foe earth is red and fresh 
in the 5th-century BC Valley 
of the Temples and smells of 
wild mint and rosemary. 
Brown eagles swoop to the 
perfect Doric columns, as 
children in First Holy 
Communion clothes ~ the 
boys -with bow ties and the 


girls in white - eat cakes and 
pineapple. 

You go to sleep with the 
window open to frame the 
Temple of Concord and keep 
it near, waking at dawn to find 
it has not been a dream; just 
classical Greek perfection, and 
even more moving with 
birdsong. 


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taw lawon Wiih malic ftili & 
corah. GKc name 4 mMkml 
O ctal* OI Ml 8784 I 340 TM 


COSTCUTTXNS (M ntonn/bot* 
to Euroor Lisa A meal dtoltaa 
Now*- DHMnM Tram 01-730 
9901 ABTA I AT A ATOL. 


CNnarln. Srpl/Qrl. 
man. to* nnw Iran lwfc 
CI 6 ». 2 wto Ultra TrL-fOM 3 ) 
771260 . Ttmtway Moiutayv. 
AST A/ ATOL HOT. 


LATIN AMB PC A. l«w MM 
fliytiH #q. IW £ 485 . UlM 
£483 rtn. AM ftwll Onw* 
HoMn> Mucncw-uv Peru 
Horn CSSOi JLA 01707 -Jloa 


LOW FAMt WIMUNMMl ■ 
iw. & Amnra. iM an 4 Far 
CmL s Alnra Travxolr. 48 
Mar som Slrrfl. Wl. Ol MO 
3828 no A«r*lr4l 
UMMimmin MoUCorw 
acAn tfnrbuuon* v*s*n*r 
OI - 4 Q 2 a3bS/OOSa ABTA 
(,1004 ATOL 1900 


A few days 
to spare? 


Dwcfea short tw* too Atom 

bddge/oinAeonmetlietoeal 

cmne. mt tanousw&esfls-irsala 

oat brodve FrennelulkaBeMiof 

Raiv An«»i&n and BRseb N ta 

am idaw) atnwlwe oi Boeo. 
Acntar Amen. Qara a romaBK 
cluleauKlviousHgOTdiinaibotrt. 
Dm* YOBW0 am) &f tan 25 dan 
WbH tah cot ol Mqrt*s you gst 
talc a hcaH. For (Mats art 

0306 886122/ or 


;k getaway 


887733 (24hrs) 



SPEEDWING 


01-491 1734 
01-629 3368 



VtMstataMwnml 

IRAfBBAGj 

muniMMwd 


NEW YORK, 
NEW YORK 


SMkto Ow non. 075 MM 
oin^nJ’ n?* P***”* 'Wl 
YOU to! NMrMM WafeW 

Creative Travel 


Trt 01 W 7574 / 9*7 BttZ 


M 8 CMMT PANS* WwMWMik 
0 IA 3 a 0734 AMUr TO* 


WCOONTD • OKOOP r AMU. 

L TC. Owen SaL 07358 * 7036 . 


tars UCNWHC. Ol >387 9100 


. Ol 441 
till TiMrtwmr. AMa AML 


TuMMA/Moaoeea bwa 
thrown tor North Africa Sac- 
rtafcM. Samara Flytns Services. 
T(i 01 3 fca 9734 . 


ALL U 8 arms. UWM l«m on 
nutor irnraulnl ranees, ox- 
584 7371 ABTA 


- Tailor made MMays. 
Da, tv am sotaman ttbvm. oi 
370 7307 


Us* tmwwr COST. OHM* 
ft nIM Ol 884 0814 ABTA. 

LAW! HOLIDAYS. Earnahc 
Tr*irl Ud. 1 A 8 TA/IATA) 01 
48 (, 1401 . 

SYD/MEL OU 8 Perth tMA AA 
nutor nmm lo Ain/MZ. oi- 
S 84 7371 ABTA. 


CORPS BJUGAWS 

rV o n j Ai i Osachtd sabs Of Bn 
beach dOTOThom Oo SHall Mi 
HlBpIrt t 223 2 Mkx 
^■l<n Da 6 rt or H'rw.^B 


..otter tank hfewiS 
U 8 rtand.Holrts& AjKs. 
0p« Sits. 81-734 2562 

Paa WarM 

(Sam 01-736 


MALAGA 


SATURDAYS 
SEPT/OCT Fr £89 
M«tr Yerit from £130 
RITES 
202 3830 

ABTA/ATOL 448 
Aww/n»» 


KV LOW FANES 
vosunriBE 

QQ WUttCW £270 

BOMBAY EX 5 LAEOS £330 

CARO £210 IMm J 283 

DELH 0*5 ROW ntt 

HMTORT Si SEOUL {G 05 

HWGR 0 HGE 495 SYO/MEL E 7 » 
BWrtft Effl TOKYO £580 

SKTU8D TRAVEL LIB 

2 D90HN STffiEX^UMOOH W1 
T«t rt-or 
JHKME 


LOWEST FARES 
Pans 06 ri YORK S 75 

FniAkrt £ 6 Q LA/GF E 395 

LA 9 BS TOO ton eazo 

ttah OB g , m w ram 

gicss.^ 

Oelffleni G 33 & Rmgeea 050 
Hpng KenpaiO 


on 1 st 8 Ckib Ctns 
SUM 8 SMD 
21 3 m Ha» ft. Lwtow Wl 
91 -OS 1 WW 0 S 3 T 


TDKJHH, Cn*t Mand Alvar, 
ir. Menorca. VUlat. opta. 
Bcirawm- Unertwi HoBOaiW- 
IWffl. hrocnurni/ tzrsUK 


DQCAinox. Ventura HoMm 
Trt Obi 834 3033 


MIAMI. JAMAICA, M.YOKX, 
wonowioe ctwaoep Caeca. 
ntrMnoml T»rt. 1 Duke St 
RMTHWind ABTA 01-040 4073 . 

aouert HOMt/nimirr wto- 
itr hwmbyhi ncuervnr 
only. 01-434 1942 24 W sec- 
>KY- 01-788 8030 ABTA 

8 . AP 1 BCA Tram CUL OL- 8 B 4 

7371 ABTA. 


flaSDt 


7 H* MtterV most orUnaf a -3 

it mcHa — 


iM 4 k Oakdays. In 


n i t se lwi DMBt CUM ncL 


caroai ^rfc mtplqiing 


tamous Pfra s 

Vto g ra . 6 y boat ml tain 

trough fes Ossa South. Abo 
IMtanfs GatSm Trisngls 
ttcL S4ay HBHm MUL fiom 
£ 7 SGl Contact 


e|*m WMdsMs ffIT) 
7 Hnh(B. AMsntnt, HMs 
M 8Q4 W - 


SEULCATEUNG 

FRANCE 


AOTtMW m BW aMm. Beonu- 
- iw VB» SH a/9. Own pool. 1 
amr nrwrtc sewnos. eat. 
Avaoauc from Oct, 2 nd. Fran 
cno PW. Trt 01-874 BOOB 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


CRUISE & SAIL ABROAD 


TOMMY m» 40 “ yaetn Inc 
w/«rf. w/rtd. Snpn wcL 
«•». Med SMI 0243 874333 


GENERAL 


Autumn and 
winter magic. 

Week-ends orweeks, 
honeymoons or second 
boncyittoons...discover 
xheMajjic of Italy's 
roman tied ties in auiunm 
orwintci. ' 

Indulge yourself in a 
visit to Venice, Rome, 
Florence, Tuscany or 
Sorrento. Enioyrhc food, 
the sights, Che sajes 
bantaTns... you deserve it. 

CUl 01-7^9 7444 fooxmr 
FREEootourbroctimc.Mj 8 k 
ofliaty, 47 Shephmft Bosh 
Omen, London WH 2 8 PS. 



r Wert*. Hooey, 
moon*, or 2nd HBanonoons 
Dhtouy uie MMk ontdy^i r»- 
OunttC CMOS u Auiamn or 
W*n*w. Call 01-749 74*9 lor 
sour free colour otvcMov. 
Move Ol Utv OCM T. 47 SM»- 
torts Bud> Gran. London. 
W12 BPS. 


TAKE use OPF IO Mrs. Am- 
sienunn. Bimm. Btooisl 
Coma. Brae. Lwuhm. Tno 
Hague. Dubim. Room. Boo- 
10900 A DMnr. Tune on. 3 a. 
Cbcslcr Ooso. London. 3 W 1 X 
7 BC* 01236 - 8070 , 


SELF-CATERING 


a /3 MMIBW FU*» Special 
Wn*f Rates Donuhatu Ltd. 
P.O.Box 3 ia rWiavCypna. 
or nap < 078 * B 1 B 4 S 3 . 


SELF-CATERING 

CARIBBEAN 


OW cntcntM name. 
2 min* Uracn and 
■Ml C 300 pmi Ol 328 67*9 

C A WB OH Ln vIBUSl apta wttn 

pooh MW On Bm> wmitr. 
VilUWorM Ol 409 3838 . 


CORFU &PAXOS 


Wesantfw h Wtx Nofidays sndl 

Mte sdBCtn] a qnMy onge ol 
bwdi wltas. and ndudw cottages 
more grans dose to some ol the 
linest bcacnes os the istsHl. 4 yj 8- 
■ rtddy 30® Sept & Oct «bwm&. ■ 


I Corfubfoqtric* 


AM 1519 


:OMU BaiMnS PwbIIM <trt 
Vina* nr the bwh. 24 ra 
C 199 I wtc. C 229 a wtaln OcL 
Ca« or HTow. Open Sals, Ol 
734 2 S 02 Pan World Halldasn. 


U» rte.vnia*. 

Tiurna* Peouom. Stmoty 
Clwooer. Stop tar Soport Snnoty 
Skim Hoawi Ol 573 1933 . 

8KSOL unswn Manttk ClMra 

tognta. visa reoUb etc. Zeus 
HotL Ol 434 1647 . AM. AUo. 
"WOOD lux apart AMs (Com 
C 189 pp l.tAll Oct StttaM 
0708 - 802814 “ 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


Central. 

IW. Wrwi Prom Nov 

Chapter Travel 01-886 94S1. 
ABTA. IATA. 

WMCK AMa to mu ta central 
vertcc. PiW Iran £S 9 tew 
QuWcr Travel Ol GBA 9481 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


P00LSHKAT94WS 
FU6BTS! FLHHITS! 

VIA ifltoe a tow suSMous VUb 

tba CosM Vent Ftfly Booded 

★ Wghtt tiMi £85 

' PORTU VILLAS 

8892B 84245 

AM 1791 


aloabv*. prh«ir vuta on mn 
Mde. lawilotw vtrw*. 16 mma 


ran. pool. Sleeps 6 on. £200 
mv. Trt 0204884031 


ALSJUrVt ALTCRMATIVC. The 
■tom Imums tar rcotgL 73 St 
J«i SI. SWl Ol 491 0802 . 
SUUmiK vuas 1987 Summer 
SpWtoOfc now n tntcO. 
Can/nis anvl leL 0823 7761 1 
oa ATOL Z 31 

M ^ lr-r OJUS Frw gum left 

Thvr» 230 rt Alpane 1/2 wM. 
DeuiK Sentettano Spetut 
iO«to 21 802231 ATOL. 
ALOMIMLi Lux vUlaa/apta wtth 
OOMS. Sept. On* mru winter, 
Ol 409 2838 . VUtaWartu, 

BnvutM prKaleto 
owned 2 / 3/4 Brtcaouic a vutn 

wui prKaieMMis. 01 «W 6182 


SELF-CATERING U&A. 


MMPOMASB Seal M*e lo USA-Ca- 
rtbbean-Far East-Auomila. CM 
me proAttNonaH A8TJVt WTA 
cc excepted. Trt 01 264 S788 


SELF-CATERING SPAIN 


SUMSCUA New OeacMIde 4 
hedroomeo HOa. sleeps lO. 
AvanaWr 30to August co- 
want*. Prom C 20 O to J 3 SSO piw. 
Phene- oi-4a6-7aa6 day 
0028826743 evenings 


MR SBJM tux Sumo aoi (n lenuCr 
country rtuo. Oou rate, £90 
p.w. 0734 786 276 . 


LA SMNOA SOUt CLUB 2 bM. 2 
batli penthouse, vacancies Octo- 
aer No, ember Ocmmaer Trt Ol 
272 7013 


vma 

Visas, stas 2 - 10 . squash, muds. 
6 pools. 08 DP p.w. 668 6888 . 


SPECIAL INTEREST 


CANTERBURY 

Fnre 



EEVT CI3 1JU 
0227 720517 


WINTER SPORTS 


SMI Wesr Btanpcr teut l mv out 
now packed «nm aS uve too re- 
torts. Sunday luonts dm itae 
Jrawnj. and amazliMy low 
prices starting at C 39 . HUtgiOU 
783 9989 tor yoar cow. 
ABTA 69266 ATOL 13 B 3 . 


a»ti VAL Thorens. Munreml for 
4 . Jan OUi lTOi. any £350 
iceoao ntrtti ™ 069 its 3ai. 


lammm . mist cnatn on 
ton Seem*. Omstmta *ort- 
mgM. Trt : 0692 661334 


SBu Holidays In Crtndrtwpld S, 
flime. Powder row**. Skt Safa- 
ri. wrand statatL Stoitod 
rtiaMs-S/C-horts. Ski Quides. 
For bcoenuro tel 01 223 0601 


•VMS ALPS Prtv lux S/C apta. 
sta 4 or & superb locadm. 
Mom diairsn. omhki bow. 
0734 733246 anytime. 


JR Owlet Mk 
AryeoBc r e O. from C 2 S 0 « wn 
Superb Sid -tag. < 0626 ) 20680 . 


MottareL Pwra. 16 
bed. entered daW 200 »l 

mam bfl on. Trt K» 9274 B 627 . 


mu 80 . Pm ale lux rotated 
riwIrL a nfliM (rom nwln tart. 
SUM 12 . 0890.636746 

8 W TOTAL. SitaKb rbtarts. art. 
hotels in Top Prcnfb/Ausu^i 
Report, tr cat 109321 231113 . 


UJL HOLIDAYS 


MSC0VER CKSBBE 


Swrt 1 rating Irak ■ tv 
fmrty totsd Vlooian tanSmint 


Supcra tood ad acsroiwauvi 
- tatomado 


Iran iral taO- 

twa. tonal ImimMb l astral 

mam. Nnr StoJa 6 anwrfiak 
«8L f bum timer, bed and 
traps mo*. 


(027874) 210 


INDULGE 

YOURSELF 


InoGoB.Sqwxh orSiobetokm rh« 
dsUMnlCaimoMt. Finns { 0452 } 
ZM 53 bro< 9 eiourbmdnm. I 


^/(iRtqCM 


opr. t sotfawoooHu.auwasi 8 i 


ACTIVITY HOLIDAYS 


panrnm a pawma. oeiober 

wpckmds. Rural Worcester 
Stare. FUll board. 0684 79404 . 


AUTUMN BREAKS 


DARTMOOR 


Avium Bento In pmial ewauy 
tone towt Wnl-tln* tor «do» 
■ to Ji* aid ntttdta. Big to; Tam. 
bnr parteiK M ta bad. Aay 2 
afcdne 14 H op draw. tod. bnaktoi - 
CIU pp p vert. 


Two 


Prime Ball BdteL 
“ ' " .Tsto 


Nr. 


Deroa 

Teh (082289) 442 


RES NOVA FLOATING 
INN 


Maned ta to 

Beautilul Dart 


town sttfl. Cosy qtas. EM cv 
M 8 MMI MWM. 


TatapbOM DnttuOfe 4710 


SA1X0MBE 
. S6VTH D£YW 
COURTENAY HOUSE 


Eqmr country inks hospttfty. 
Ttaw mautts mih fnm ttwdtes. 
Lun? bedrooms wad bsctnas. 
sea news rad a dttaou Devon 
tndetaa. Spectacular coastal 
w#s. god deadly 

Tel 654884 2781 


SANDRINGHAM 

HOTEL 


Saadam, Isia ol 

Special mn meats tar October. 4 
m t/Dts Mon-tii SH t omtom - 
MtarcwymM pmarebmoms. 
tor TV / m m ms. Oftt on sedan 

£65 iacL 

PfanK 0983 403870 


. U044UP penod «/p 
nat ww w 4, ip mmobk- 
WirkawDrtb. HhI Automo 
torak Trt - 1 
■ 062882 ) 4849 / 2661 . 


COLOUftFUL HtiMand 
■dirfe) TryJmjutunui holiaay In 

kmoai Rwtnsm. Good food. 
CH. lop Ore. mtapnabta ram. 
Awbvw A Janet Mtnryho. Vrat 
TrinMir Hoot*. KWeM Rw 
nocb, by Ptnocneiy PHibtQC 
or plKMC 08 B 23338 - 


AUTUMN BREAKS 


laOandBay 



Ddigbtfal Cornish country home, pan 16 th Conniry sci in 
Jovdy garden* in beainifuJ rursl shnanon with gk»iou» 
views of wo headlands and the sea. Heated swimming pool 
Comfortable rooms with puratc bath, TV and rdcphooe, 
fine renanram aud rare wines. Caring service. Nearby golf, 
fishing, mini* and gkains waJkng. Aafimni Breaks. 

■ Artist and Bridge hofidays. 
TaQawl-bylxmc, CocmndL TeL Polperro (0503) 726(7. 

BTA Commended and Egon Ronay 
AA*** RAC** A 


OCTOBER IN TORQUAY 


AA 


3 nights C 80 

7 nights £160 


RAC 


TMSMCE MCUUIU «M> EJR. AMD VAT. 
ALL ROOMS BnTHPmVATEBMH, COLOUR TV 
AMDTEAMA«f« 3 FAC 8 jnESINTH 18 
LUXURY SEAERONT 3 -STAR HQTB^ 



CaiyiiHaadfibtd 


( 080^213811 


TAKE A BREAK 
M THE COTSWQLOS 
AT THE 

BEAR OF RODBORQUGH 
HOTa 


r ebarwnar ikU ton 
OakBtoRH-KWBBanuns.supwb 
ud. w an «ere> M Nnonal Tnoi 
told OOpponDSaa 

NrttxxtanauetotanMVMM 


AWBERLEY (845387) 3522 


SPECIAL AUTUm BREAKS 
NORTHUMBRIA 
ALNMOUTH 

Marne house luei tung mh 
Wb and Mu beams. Cog 
tnewfiy 




I raftaJir AftAiAklrt ™ 

a wws 


0665 830 349 


SIDMOUTH 

Peace and quid in a bcau- 
uful taraily-mn Gemmas 


bote). Lovdy gar^cnsTsu- 
EnoeUcm “ 


' rews. ExocUcm food. 
D.B&B from £ 15^0 dajlv- 
£WJQ wccUy. 
^WOOIURE; 
SIDMOUNT HOTEL 
TEL (03955) 3432 


WEEK-END BREAKS 


- — 7 . Snull vcciudea 

country nurt Bcmuiiui SIo 
«««» nmulf. Getaway arerai 
J 4 *w Caspp po wci. o'raui 
■ww. Cnmimn mmiob 
raw beta* Ohm. The midrrt 

tot- Volley Hold, 04287 3 S 799 : 


DORSET. HANT&, A 
LO.W. 


********* A**, 

* BOntHBMWTH 

* tqwh com 

* HOTEL ORANVOU 

* AUTUMN SPECIAL) 

* 3 n 9tot3< 3 »hs t45 

t 

* w loans, at ba> an, dan 
2 mmpatem toot 

* » 8»4 

* WtSTMUX ftO, WB 5 TCUJ 

***♦********< 


£***+**+*+* 

l Springfield £2 


* f^nttyHoiel 


* Ptato* 


n&aStsS? 


* , . 8 H 20 SAL 

f &SEtvi 




* - 

{ ^T n A?- beiwi 


ana Tm 




ST® 


COTTAGE 

COHNECnONS 

WB8geda5se In letting 
teghdass cottages tor 
hoWays in 

Ti 

10590) 612562 



MTTaer 

rtiv wrfj 
lYnAvM 

ILHAHTS. 

•tolcbMi 
All year 


Contbned 


'“Wat 35 




r z:,y r' r 
















■t* r n 




r °nian t; 


3f. 




■ ‘ V 




' ■-. * 




-■*i-. * 


■ • r r- 
. : ■>:*■ 


• V . \ 

•* .. f*K 

' l 's- 

1 >.. 


} : il.iH.ini 

nming ups 

udo science 






» JWjrrTi iraarv & v jpniym* nnn art in or 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 


nuCrttroo a XTT"\ CTM a TvT/^C 



- : . . :* 




‘ . ' — £ * : -r « :■ J*. 

' ■'■ 'S— -c-'. ' •Vf ' 1 ‘ V-*"- 


TRAVEL 2 

Shona Crawford Poole lands a salmon on Royal Deeside 

. Scottish ■■■ -- :> 
mist and 
manners 

The memory of a fisherm an 
standing up to his waist in a 
bank of wild blue lupins and 
casting a line against the sun is 
one’, of those frozen moments 
that make travelling worth the 
(trouble of leaving home. That 
:was when the sun came out. In 
'the morning it had rained with 
^such Scottish resolution that 1 
was grateful for the drying 
power of the fishing hut’s 
blazing fire and the warmth of 
the customary tot 
- My persistence in the face of 
foul weather was rewarded by 
more than a lew late afternoon 
sunbeams. From the lower 
Birfcenbaud pool of the 
Knappach beat' of the River 
■ Dee below Balochry I landed Rushing riven the old bridge over die Dee near Balmoral 

my first salmon to the * . 

accompaniment of good ad- tresh from 'the baker on the Craigendarroch, whic 
vice roared from the opposite breakfast tables, and hand- translates as hill of oaks, ri» 
bank- If there was more luck knitted stockings and fishing above Ballaier. Here tl 
than Judgment involved no permits from the tackle shop. Keillers, of marmalade fain 
one saw fit to say so. There is Pamphlets on distillery visits, built a country house (ookit 
an awful lot to be said for old- golf and gliding are dispensed down on the Dee. Like many 
fashioned good manners. from the station, now disused, country bouse it is now a hot 

It is only a 40-minute hop The railway lines have gone and scattered through the oal 
"from Heathrow to Aberdeen, for scrap and their path is are expensively fitie 
An hour’s drive goes right to designated a walking trail. tiraeshare cottages. Attache 
the heart of Deeside where ' There are castle trails too. to the hotel is a new re 
time passes at a saner, steadier Balmoral is not far upriver tauram. bar and sports, con 
face with every mile from the from Ballater but I felt no urge plex. and - the who! 
airport. to see it “in person". As the development is calle 

it would be no surprise in subject of the biggest jigsaw 1 Craigendarroch Hotel an 
Ballater to see people wearing have ever finished, its outline Country Gub. 
the clothes our grandparents seemed familar enough to The development is a brea 
wore when young. Visitors are miss in a weekend visit with tradition in these part 

as likely to wear kilts as The names on the 1:25000 And when the bar promise 
jogging pants, and the shops Ordnance Survey map make for the hotel guests span 
look in danger of keeling into evocative reading. Through a them sunsets to the sound c 
the streets under the weight of land littered with boulders Muzak in the dub next doo 
heraldic bestiary in the royal and grouse butts run streams the hotel will be very pleasar 
. warrants over*, the doors, called Ballochbiri Burn, and indeed. Its chef Bill Gibb, i 
There are Aberdeen butteries - Alh na Caillich. Scottish Chef of the Year. 


fresh from the baker on the 
breakfast tables, and hand- 
knitted stockings and fishing 
permits from the tackle shop. 
Pamphlets on distillery visits, 
golf and gliding are dispensed 
from the station, now disused. 
The railway lines have gone 
for scrap and their path is 
designated a walking trail. 

■ There are castle trails too. 
Balmoral is not far upriver 
from Ballater but I felt no urge 
to see it “in person". As the 
subject of the biggest jigsaw 1 
have ever finished, its outline 
seemed familar enough to 
miss in a weekend visit 
The names on the 1:25000 
Ordnance Survey map make 
evocative reading. Through a 
land littered with boulders 
and grouse butts run streams 
called Ballochbiri Burn, and 
. Alh na Caillich. 


TRAVEL NOTES 


British Airways (01-697 
4000) flies London to Aberdeen 
from £80 Apex return. The 
fuH economy fare Is £154 . 

return. 

European (central 
reservations 01-950 5050) 
offers weekend rates from 
£3955 for hire of a Group A 
car from noon on Friday to 
10am on Monday inclusive of 
insurance and VAT, with 
unlimited mileage. Fuel and 
personal aeddent 
insurance are extra. An estate 
car on the same terms 
costs £82.95. 

Craigendarroch Hotel end 
Country Club, Braemar Road, 


, Sicily for £10 J 

I SttthBandmang Wand rftocomlortoi job 1 1 

I Kama Swd tor our motion tneboa TW m 

CauMot ttikAf pomucUdniferwiy I, 
Ctun {wftjndaMtagi^WrabdWBYboottT® 

■ Name . 1 


Aberdeen 


Balmoral 


10 miles 


|tonss 

^ ... .... PCode 

| lendoBcteqH/reiorrooo 


I teeSSam LMWa ^MQt | 

^MvrtBrtMM^akinrMicanjvJ' 


Ballater, Royal Deeside 
AB3 5XA (0338-55858) offers a 
fuH programme of autumn, . 
winter, Christmas and New 
Year breaks. Mini-breaks (2 - 
nights minimum) cost £42 per 


Ueily_ 

=Capo D’Oriando £199 

AtawauMM0nalKiit« narnsoit 
ahCAftx«tnd)'(aarawym>Bttfa«t 
a — i wB aettraws'fiieaMaBittMa 
hotel LA TART AMIGA fi tETOnnW hr • 

oeesiaxjngaBmparxa^wataxljndiaas 
taady.itmgMBastam 
H9a,MykKM«7frigMeH8ntMHOoai. 
«tandaT*raema& tool ratios 8 agon ms. 
HOHDDBt EXHUS. 

Overt Qmfctt October 




I ONECTfc 1*0*01X7431 
Ueteedi m ea w —M r — , 


jpsssAtmJMN & WINTER IN ■ M 
Cultural Experience' V 

Smijf from £139 

For nearly 100 years the British have recognised the great 
attraction of this enchanting island as an kfeai wmtrr 

Sidiy is the perfect touring country, wfth its wealth of 
history, culture, scenery arte worminvidr^ peopfe 
No-or>e knows Stay better than ISLAND SUN and we 
offer you three attractive options: 

TOW GRAND TOUR, by luxury coach with 
comfortable daily mileages, staying : 3/4*ar ton*. 

Art archaeology & sightseeing for the scholar and the 


^MlSepmSEuySSoignMese 

avaiyioeoaliArlDdaoangmiliMrv 


rtn,HIU»KWiuvor “ —■J — 

holidaymaker. From £298 . _ 

TKTiy A LA CARTE RV/Drive with hotel vouchers, 
qivrnq you the freedom of Sidiy. Rom £189 

TAORMINA Stay in comfort or luxury in one of the 

world's most elegant resorts, arte take excursions by 
coach or hire-car. From £139 
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Kingston won Thames Suney KTi 106. 


77 New Oxford Street, UmdonWOA 1PP. 
Telephone (01) 831 122L 


OUT AND ABOUT 


Winchester’s perfect legacy 


Craigendarroch, which 
translates as hill of oaks, rises 
above Ballater. Here the 
Kefllers, of marmalade fame, 
built a country house looking 
down on the Dee. Like many a 
country bouse ft is now a hotel 
and scattered through the oaks 
are expensively fitted 
tiraeshare cottages. Attached 
to the hotel is a new res- 
taurant. bar and sports, coin-' 
plex. and - the whole 
development is called 
Craigendarroch Hotel and 
Country Gub. 

The development is a break 
with tradition in these parts. 
And when the bar promised 
for the hotel guests spares 
them sunsets to the sound of 
Muzak in the dub next door, 
the hotel will be very pleasant 
indeed. Its chef Bill Gibb, is 
Scottish Chef of the Year. 

person, per night inclusive 
of fuH Scottish breakfast ste 
an allowance of £12J>0 
towards dinner. Bask: rates 
run from £80 to £1 05 for a 
double room per night mdiisive 
of breakfast 
The hotel can arrange 
fishing, golf and many other 
activities fbr visitors. 1 
caught my salmon tinder the 
auspices of Macsport, . 
sporting agents of Macsport 
House, Aboyna, 

Aberdeenshire (0339 2896). 

The oompany also offers 
intfividual tours of Royal 
Deeside and the Eastern 
-Highlands of Scotland with 
accommodation in privately 
owned castles and . country - 
houses' 1 


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Time OfFL&L, 

2* Chester Clce. 
loadooSWlX7BQ, 


The remarkable 
cathedral is just 
the first of many 
, historic delights, 
says Nigel Andrew 

That comer of heaven re- 
served for the backward-look- 
ing middle classes must surely 
include these amenities: 
branches of Laura Ashley and 
Cl'othkits, a good second-hand 
bookshop, two ancient pubs — 
one large, one small — and, 
across a wide green, the 
welcoming doors of a first-rate . 
cathedral This nexus of felic-. 
ities exists on earth, I am 
happy to report, at the north- 
west approach to Winchester 
Cathedral. 

- Like much else in this 
ancient and unspoilt city, ft 
seems almost too good to be 
true. No wonder people are 
queueing, up to live in Win- 
chester and property prices — 
as any estate agent's window 
will tell you - are sky-high. 

Winchester has never had to 
dirty its hands with industry, 
and has distanced itself even 
from commerce. It was the 
effective capital of England 
under- Alfred the Great, has 
always been an important 
administrative centre and seat 
of justice and. for 600 years, 
has been home to one of our 
great public schools. Little has 
disrupted its long history of 
settled prosperity, and in re- 
cent decades the forces which 
have ripped the heart out of 
many a fine old town have 
been triumphantly resisted. 

Winchester is not, for all its 
historic riches, an olde-worlde 
Disneyland, existing purely to 
service tourists — which is 
more than can be said for 
some other jewels in the 
“heritage” crown. It wears its 
history lightly, inviting a lei- 
surely inspection. 

Even the cathedral is not 
overwhelming — though it 
ought to be; apart from any- 
thing else, it is the longest 
medieval cathedral in Europe. 
But its siting is against it. Built 
on low ground, with no spire 
to top its rather dumpy Nor- 
man tower, it fails to domi- 
nate its surroundings. From 
the outside you can't even get 
a complete -view of -that im- 
mensely tong nave:- there arc 
too many trees ftt ihe way. 
Besides,' the exterior' doesn't 
have enough vertical empha- 
sis to cut a real dash. . 



It is only when you step 
inside that things begin to take 
shape. You arc invited to 
deposit a “gift” of “at least 
75p” in one of two huge 
collecting boxes placed where 
you cannot possibly ignore 
them. Then you are greeted by 
a lady in a red robe and 
handed a leaflet, which in- 
cludes a good outline of the 
Christian faith. “Please find a 
seat and read this”, it invites 
optimistically. 

At this point, the astonish- 
ing length of the cathedral 
makes itself felt as you gaze 
along the lofty nave. Actually, 
it isn't too lofty as these things 
go~- a mere 78 feel— and that 
helps accentuate the effect of 
vast length.’ The nave was 


originally Norman, but has 
been remodelled in an airy 
perpendicular style and given 
a lovely lieme vault — a 
considerable improvement. 
The transepts alone remain 
chunkily Norman. 

The original lower fell down 
in 1 107 — supposedly because 
the “heretic” King William 
Rufus had been buried under 
it — but was promptly rebuilt. 
The cathedral bouses assorted 
remains of Saxon kings, 
perched in mortuary chests on 
top of the choir screens. In 
feet, it isfuHofbizarre items— 
the most strikingly horrible 
being the decomposing corpse 
sculpted in the. lower reaches 
of Bishop Fox's elaborate 
chantry. The whole east end is 




a jumble of these wonderful 
little chapels, many standing 
in isolation. There are un- 
dulating floors of 1 3th-ceniury 
tiles and a surprising amount 
of lively medieval painting: in 
the Holy Sepulchre Chapel it 
can be lit up for lOp. 

One of the oddest items is a 
little bronze statue of “Wil- 
-liam Walker the diver, who 
saved this cathedral with his 
two hands. 1906-1912”. This 
refers to the heroic feat of 
underpinning, which saved 
the building from sinking into 
completely -waterlogged 
■’ ground; • 

You needat least aahour to 
appreciate this extraordinarily 
rewarding interior. Allow ex- 
tra time for the tour' of the 


V— •' " -:;'1 


crypt (dry months only!), the 
treasury and the magnificent 
library." Leaving through the 
Close, which itself has more 
architectural • interest than 
many a large town, you can 
take a pleasant stroll past the 
house where Izaak Walton 
died (in Dome Alley), the 
house where Jane Austen died 
(on College Street). Win- 
chester College. Wolvesey Pal- 
ace; where the Bishop lives, 
and down to the water mead- 
ows by the River lichen. A 
' walk ofabout a mile writ take 
you out to the Hospital of St 
Cross, the oldest charitable 
: institution in England.' And 
■ you- will still have seen only a 
portion of what Winchester 
Tc& Id often 1 


under ground 
. for charity 


OUTINGS 


GAMES DAY: Numerous 
board and computer games on 
show, plus demonstrations 
of adventure and 
role-playing gamesxrf., .> 
varying degrees of complexity. 
Trade and information 
stands and plenty of expert 


Royal Horticultural 
Society's Halts, Greycoat 
Street and Vincent Square, 
London SW1 (01-834 4339). 
Today. 10-30anv6pm, 
tomorrow 10anv5pm. 
Admission £1.50. 

LEEDS CASTLE HARVEST 
FESTIVAL: Dramatic 
arrangements of focal 
produce - fruit flowers and 
vegetables — from the 
county of Kent otherwise 
known as "the garden 
of England”. The 31 
exhibition arrangers include 
many top practitioners who 
have created displays in St 
Paul’s Cathedral, for the 
wedding of Prince Charles and 
Princess Diana, In . 
Westminster Abbey fbr the 
Fruits of 

the Earth Festival and for 
the LJveipool Garden Festival. 
Leeds Castle, Maidstone, 

Kent (0622 65400). Today, 
tomorrow 1 0 am- 6 pm. 
Admission to castla and 
grounds, adult £3-65, child 


two well-known continental 
exponents — Gdignol from 
France, and Kasperle from 
Austria. 

The Piazza, Covent 
Garden, London WC2. 
Tomorrow, 10-30am-5pm. 
Free. 

MASHAM “SHEEP AID” 

FAIR: Revival of an ancient 
fair in a town which has 
always had dose 
associations with sheep, 
shepherding and wool Sheep 
show this morning, sate 
of rare and coloured 
sheep this afternoon anda 
procession In honour of 







. Flocking together: now these woolly wonders can play their part for famine 
relief in the drought-stricken Sudan (see Masbam 'Sheep Aid' Fair) 


Bishop Blaize, patron saint 
of wool-combers. Sheepdog 
trials tomorrow from 
8.30arr>-dusk and. throughout, 
a flower, craft and 
history show In the church. 


PUNCH AND JUDY 
fellowship FESTIVAL: Non- 
stop entertainment by some 
of the country's most 
experienced^ '’professors", 
including Professor Percy 



That's the way to do it: Punch and Judy on parade 


brass band, beii-ringing, stalls 
and a variety of 
refreshments. 

Masham, North Yorkshire. 
Today lOam-dusk, tomorrow, 
12 noon-dusk. Free but 
collections in aid of famine 
areas in the Sudan. 

BRITISH ISLES HORSE 
AND TRACTOR PLOUGHING 
CHAMPIONSHIPS: Annual ' 
event which sees the heavy 
horses at their working 
best Also a sheepdog 
trial, fanning and 
agricultural trade stands, 
refreshments, licensed 
tents. 

Holly Bank, Cruckton. 
Shrewsbury, Shropshire. 
Today, lOam-dusk. Adult 
£2, child free. 

BUXWORTH STEAM 
PARTY: Always a /oily affair 
with traction engines, 
traditional fairground rides, 
morris dancers, a celfldh 
and brass band, songs -and 
music by Don.Partrtdge and. 
other entertainers. Sheep 
roast, real ale and other 
refreshments. 

Navigation Irih, Buxworth, 
Whaley Bridge, Derbyshire. 
Today, 9.30am- 11pm, 
tomorrow 9.30am-6pm. Adult 
£1, child free. 


TAORMINA Autumn Sun- 

Taormina is an ideal choice for autumn land «*»»■ 
hoSdays, with plenty of sun, superb beadws. brautiful 
arc ha eologic a l sites and exctjskxB to Mount Etna. 
For reservations # 88 CATA Hotels corrtacb- 
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m 


j%^§^\y^Distance: 8 mSes 

ggflr A walk in die Cots- 
welds on a snn- 
W drenched summer's day is 
bard to equal for the sense of 
wellbeing induced by warm 
boney-coloured limestone-’ 
built villages and the tower- 
ing bine slues. This walk 
follows the beautiful Coin 
valley near North! each. Park 
in Chedworth or, if room, 
north of the village at the 
Roman villa, noted for its 
mosaics. 

Chedworth village has a 
Norman cfanrch enriched in 
perpendicular Gothic word- 
trade days. Walk sooth-east 
along the road, lake the left 
fork towards PancakehilL, 
leaving the road at a sharp 
left-hand bead to follow the 
footpath along Hedgley Bot- 


\ftricakrhiir'j 

M2Q i i ■ i ii 

"" \L" Foss Way 
jy?Cotn ■ 

Cob Rogers /7 St Demis 



/AbJiogton 


tom to the Foss Way, an 
arrow-straight Roman road. 

Take tbefootpath opposite 
the T-junction into the Lower 
Coin- Valley which has a 


AUTUMN RALLY: 

Opportunity to see not only the 
fine collection of 
commercial vehicles Inside tiiB 
museum, but also 300 
exhibits arriving for the 
occasion. These Include 
buses, steam, traction 
and stationary engines, fair 
organs, fire-fighters, military 
vehicles, motor cycles and * 
working model engines. 

British Commercial Vehicle 
Museum, King Street, Ley land, 
Lancashire (0772 451011). 

; Tomorrow. 10am- 5pm. Adult 
£1.50. child 50p. 

LONDON UNDERGROUND- 
CAPITAL CAPER: Fund-raising 
evBnt in aid of Capital 
Radio's '‘Help a London ChSd“ 
scheme, which entails 
visiting 18 nominated 
underground stations, at 
each of which special events 
such as break -dance, BMX 
and pizza-eating competitions 
will take place. 

Many celebrities at the 
-various venues and live 
broadcasting at Warren - 
Street. 

Today, 8am-6pm. Collect 
sponsorship and competition 
entry forms from any 
London underground station. 

Jody Froshaug 

succession of fine stone vil- 
lages along this trout stream. 
The path leads to Coin St 
Dennis and its Norman 
church. Follow the road to 
Calcot with the Coin on your 
light. Tom right in Calcot 
and the - lane becomes a 
footpath that leads to Coin 
Rogers whose church has 
Anglo-Saxon work. 

At Lower Farm turn sobth 
to find . the . footpath to 
Winson which has yet an- 
other good church. South Of 
(he village, turn left to 
recross the liver and follow 
footpaths and tracks to Ab- 
lington, a superb hamlet with 
its splendid manor of 1590. 
The last mfle and a half 
follows the road into Bibury, 
a deservedly well-known 
tourist village, highly 
upraised by William Moms, 
-and the end of the walk! 

- Martin Andrew 


I 










R 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 



By Beryl Downing 


SHOPPING 

An illuminating look at some new energy-saving devices designed to reduce the charge of the electric light brigad 

Spotlight on the shape of things to come 


As the darker nights dose in. it is 
time the electrical fittings makers 
and retailers got their act together 
to help customers to choose new 
lamps for old. 

There are some exciting 
developments in the industry ana 
a number of new energy-saving 
products coming on to the market, 
but many customers are being . 
kepi in the dark. 

The two most important recent 
innovations arc special lamps for 
use with VDUs — a 
nccessaryhealth requirement — 
and an interesting easy-fit ceiling 
and wall socket. 

Low-enei$y tungsten halogen is 
the favourite of lighting design 
specialists because of the effects 
which can be achieved with 
various widths of beam. It has 
been available for domestic use for 
some time, but very little attempt 
has been made to teach customers 
about its possibilities. 

This week I went into Rack- 
hams in Leamington Spa. 
Warwickshire, and asked to be 
shown energy-saving light fittings. 

! was told that they had once 
slocked the Philips low-energy 
bulb but hod stopped because 
“there was no demand**. They bad 
never heard of halogen for any- 
thing but store spotlights. 

Information is not much easier 
to obtain in London. Con- 
ventional lighting departments are 
unable to show the effects of low- 
energy fittings, and there is still 
only one specialist shop. Lighting 
Design in Chelsea, where cus- 
tomers can have all the possibil- 
ities of spotlighting and wail 
washing demonstrated in a dark- 
ened showroom. 

For those who like avant garde 
Italian lighting. Artemide and 
London Lighting are favourite 
haunts and recently Mr Light in 
Fulham Road introduced 1920s 
and 1930s style fittings with linear 
halogen tubes so that those with 
more traditional interiors can also 
choose low-energy lighting. 

But nationwide department 
stores are being cautious to the 
point of invisibility in their ap- 
proach to informing their 
customers. 

John Lewis have found that 
their provincial customers are 
much less adventurous than their 
counterparts in London and say 
they do not intend to push low 
energy lighting until there is a 
demand for it. 

British Home Stores, who have 
long been known for good value 
lighting, still sell 75 traditional 
styles and have only a smattering 
of low-energy fittings — tungsten 




Light fantastic: the Shogun Tavoto in black and white metal with 
mesh shade will take either a conventional 150 watt bulb or a tung- 
sten halogen. Designed by Mario Botta, £251.85 from Artemide '■ 


Task force: low-energy lamps for every occasion include, from the 
left, tall black lamp with long, flexible arm for desk or floor, £29.99, 
white asymmetric reading lamp with oblong head, £29.99, both made 
in Finland by Lival and available from mid-October at British Home 
Stores; big-headed Anglepoute 433T for VDUs in red, black or white, 


£55 at V & M Taylor; executive desk lamp with silvery finish and 
long slim head 433PL by Anglepoise, £59.50 to order from V & M 
Taylor, elegant O-Lnce Wing 509 desk lamp with curvaceous fixed 
arm, £202.40 from London Lighting; gold plated small lamp with 
arm flexible at head and base by Ftexurnlo, £59 at John Lewis 


halogen is a “new venture" for 
them this season. 

A much greater problem may be 
that saving energy for many 
people is a big yawn. Energy- 
saving bulbs are much more 
expensive than the conventional 
lype and most shoppers tend to 
pay as little as possible over the 
counter and noi to worry about 
future sav ings on their electricity 
bills. 

The latest technical develop- 
ment is a socket made by Rock 
Electrical called the KJik Connec- 
tor system - a form of ceiling rose 
which is wired into the circuit and 
can then have fittings simply 
clicked into place. 

Wall lights and skirting sockets 
are also available and can be wired 
into existing houses or at the 


building stage. The system makes 
changing fittings as easy as plug- 
ging in an iron. 

House of Fraser think the 
development is so important that 
they are planning to re-fixture" 
some of their lighting departments 
in order to show customers how 
Klik works. 

The system at the moment is 
limited to conventional brass 
fittings — models made by 
Contessa can be seen at D. H. 
Evans in London and two tra- 
ditional. wall finings with Klik 
connectors are being tried out now 
in seven Marks & Spencer stores. 

But House of Fraser expect a 
variety of styles to come. “We 
think the system will become 
standard and other manufacturers 
will follow”, they say. 


There is indeed talk at the 
moment of a nationwide construc- 
tion company installing the Klik 
system in its new housing estates, 
so makers of new light fittings 
should be getting their design pads 

OUL 

Anglepoise, who were well 
ahead of their time in 1933 when 
they created the spring-balanced 
lamp that became a design classic, 
are now producing a range of 
reading • lights and fittings for 
specific purposes. 

For work at home, with 
computers and VDUs, there is the 
433T. which overcomes the prob- 
lems of tight reflected in the 
screens and of overhead fluores- 
cent light, both of which can cause 
eye strain. It bas a hooded -shade 
which directs the light only- on to 


the desk top and. when fitted with 
an anti-glare louvre, cuts out any 
side spread of light. For very close 
work, including sewing, model 
making and fisherman’s fly-tying, 
their hobby lamp 87-V07 has an 
acrylic magnifying lens, set next to 
a 40 wart bulb, shielded by a shade. 

The latest range in traditional 
fittings at Christopher Wray’s 
Chelsea shop is inspired by the 
headlamps on a- 1928 Bentley 
Vanden Plas open tourer and 
conies in a dark livery green. Wray 
also has original period lamps in 
his collection and Jones in 
Westboume Grove. London, is 
one of the best sources of art 
nouveau and deco — about 2,000 
fittings from the 1860s to the 1940s. . 
including pieces by all the great 
late 19th-century ;gla$s designers. 



Showing them all up (left): John Cullen's Highlight riplighter 
designed to create shadows beneath plants or to spotlight objects 
from below, £65 with a choke of three bulbs, narrow, medium or wide 
beam, each about £11.80. From Ughtug Design. Guiding fight 
(right): the current tread far Deco style expressed in. the Bentley ta- 
ble Lamp, £260 from Christopher Wray. Peri od p lace -(below): art 
nouveau bronze lamp with pendan t Schneider shade, can also be used 
. . as a wall brackeLMade about 1910 — £850 from Jones 


10 M 5 MAAMW 
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Order m CLEAR BLOCK CAPITALS 
with payment TODAY! Dd 21 Days. 
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IN THE GARDEN 


Don’t be rash-handed when 
tackling prickly primrose 


One of the most consistently 
flowering pot-plants is the 
primrose Primula obcohica, 
with its large, clustered flow- 
ers, which will bloom from 
December until May if the 
plant is treated kindly. 

Sadly, it is one of the most 
notorious plants for triggering 
allergic reactions, usually 
through skin contact with the 
leaves, the sharp glandular 
hairs of which contain an 
irritant called primin. After 
potting some, my brother has 
had hands and arms covered 
in blisters which look and feel 
like burns. Subsequently, even 
being in the same room as 
these plants caused the same 
reaction. Rashes are also com- 
mon. as are swelling of face 
and arms. These symptoms 
are often accompanied by 
faintness and -general debility. 

But it is possible to mini- 
mize the risk of allergic re- 
sponse. Primula obconica is 
usually raised from seed and 
potted on several times during 
the summer, the period when 
the leaves are at their most 
irritant. In the wild this pro- 
tects the plant during its 
growing period: in the green- 
house. wearing rubber gloves 
is a simple precaution. Only at 
the delicate stage of pricking 
out seedlings might gloves be a 
nuisance: using a silicone 
barrier cream is a good idea. 

The seed should be sown 
sparsely and pricking out done 
property for best results. 
Horticultural experts usually 


Ctaro Roberts 



Primula obconica: notorious for triggering allergies 



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direct you to discard plants 
after flowering. However, I 
not only dislike this throw- 
away attitude, but happen to 
have a particularly beautiful 
tawny gold variety which I am 
keen to keep. 

Primula obconica blooms 
perennially in its native 
China, and can be induced to 
go on for at least another 
season if it is planted out in 
the garden in summer and 
brought back indoors about 
now. 

Both new and old plants 
appreciate a good peat-based 
potting compost for their 
flowering period (use 4 or 5 
inch pots). The nursery 


WEEKEND TIPS 


• Prone loganberries by 
cutting canes which have 
fruited. Train in the new 
canes and tie in canes of 
black berries. 

• Lift and store carrots 
(best in a box of sand) 
especially if yon have 
evidence of carrot fly. 

• Unless canker is a 
problem, leave parsnips in the 
ground as frost improves 
rheir flavour. 


grower’s tip is to water the 
compost in ihe pot and leave it- 
for a few minutes before 
introducing the plant Desist 
from watering further for at 
least a week. 

Feed with ' a half-strength 
liquid fertilizer after about six 
weeks or so when the roots 
have completely penetrated 
the compost — gently tap the 
plant out of its pot and look if 
you are in doubt 

Over-watering, over-heat- 
ing and whitefly are the main 
causes of distress in this 
species, which is generally 
very robust Remove the leaf 
at once if you spot whitefly 
eggs on it; a healthy plant will 

m Make sure tender plants 
in pots have been brought Into 
the greenhouse or house 
before the hard frosts get to 
them, 

• Pot Christmas bolls of 
daffodils, crocuses, 
rhinnodoxas and sdflas. 


soon make a replacement 
Remember also to takeout old 
stems as soon as the flowers 
fade to get continuous bloom- 
ing (don't forget gloves for 
these operations): 

Primulas are by no means 
the only plants to trigger 
uncomfortable allergic re- 
sponses. A number of species 
are recognized as “plants 
which are particularly 
provocative", in the words of 
Dr Jean ■ Monro. Medical 
Director of Allergy and 
Environmental Medicine at 
the Lister Hospital 

She advises caution when 
dealing with such plants. 

At this time of year, for 
instance, it is wise to cover 
bare skin when you are putting 
old tomato plants on the 
compost heap, working with 
chrysanthemums, or clipping 
a conifer hedge — especially if 
you are transplanting rooted 
cuttings of rue or euphorbia to 
over-winter in a cold-frame.. 

Covering up and using a 
mask — even a simple cotton 
one — are basic safety precau- 
tions if using synthetic chemi- 
cals and pesticides or weed- 
killers. but it is better to use 
safer organic-based products 
such as pyreihmm. derris and 
sodium chlorate. Allergies de- 
velop out of complex inter- 
relationships between 
ourselves and our environ- 
ment. Some are unavoidable, 
but we can at least try to lower 
the odds. 

Allergies are difficult to 
treat so if your skin prickles, 
or you begin to fed unwell 
while gardening, it is wise to 
stop and seek medical advice. 

Francesca Greenoak 


weeks to encourage a; 

root formation. 

• Place orders for Shrubs 
and trees new or some 
varieties may be out of 
stock by planting time in 
November/December. . 


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ADDRESS 

BOOK 


Artemide, 17 Neal 
Street London W2 (01- 
240 2552). 

Christopher Wray's 
Lighting Emporium, 600 
King's Road, London 
SW3 (01 -736 8434). 

Jones, 194 Westboume 
Grove London W1 1 (01- 
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Street London SW3 (01- 
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London Lighting, 135 
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(01-589 3612). 

Mr Light 275 Fulham • 
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London EC1 (01-405 0042). 


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THE TIMES COOK 

Good braising days 


_ - > 

- *>:. 


on 


Uets 5 yen 
Ipinerebk, 




..»*•* I.ars:.-. 


Partridge for a 
1 pair: Shona 
, Crawford Poole 
discovers a festive 
^ autumnal menu 

There must now be thousands 
of cooks who would pass 
Richard Olney in the street 
without a glimmer of recog- 
nition but who would know 
his hands anywhere. His are 
the competent fingers and 
talented thumbs which chop, 
trim, stir and whisk through 
all 25 volumes of The Good 
Cook series published by 
Time-Life Books. 

; Innumerable writers con- 
tributed recipes to this 'ency- 
clopaedic work but it is 
Richard Olney's style of cook- 
, ing. his pleasure in the pro- 
^ cesses of food preparation, his 
celebration of offal and his 
passion for moulds which, as 
chief consultant, he stamped 
on the series. 

It is the style of his earlier 
work, too. 1 am ashamed to 
say I had never owned a copy 
of his French Menu Cook- 
book. first published 16 years 
ago and reissued this week by 
Doriing Kindersley (£12.95). 
By way of compensation, 
opening it for the first time 
was to meet Richard Olney in 
his own kitchen. It is a place 
for cooks who can be 
bothered. 

f The following recipe, quot- 
ed from the menu for a festive 
autumn meal for two. is 
typically painstaking and yet 
still robust. 

“Braised old partridge {per- 
drix) and cabbage usually is 
served as it is. the bind 
presented crowning the mount 
of cabbage, the garnish of 
carrots and side pork 
surrounding it. A sausage is 
often braised and included in 
the garnish. 

“One must not expect too 
much of the old partridge, all 
I of whose flavour has gone to 
" enrich the cabbage, but in 
combination with the young 
partridge {perdreau) roasted 
slightly rare, just out of the 
oven, the total experience is 
perfect” 

Braised and roast 
partridge with cabbage 

Serves two 


lean green bacon, 
icksAces _ 






-,-r A 

.. - ■; r i'l ? 


< , '-4 


t old partridge 
1 5g (ttoz) unsalted butter ~ 
4 tablespoons white wfrie 
Mirepoix, prepared from • 

1 meefium carrot 1 large 

on ton, and more herbs than 
usual 

2 carrots, peeled 

500ml flSfloz) veal stock 


Pinch of oregano 

15g (%oz) unsalted butter 
1 thin bard fresh pork fat 

Remove the outer leaves from 
the cabbage, cut it in two, cut 
out the core, separate the 
leaves and pare the thick ribs 
from each. Gather the leaves 
together on a chopping board 
and shred them coarsely. Par- 
boil the cabbage m a large 
quantity of salted water for 10 
minutes, drain it in a colander, 
refreshing it with cold water, 
and squeeze it thoroughly in 
your hands to rid h of all 
excess water. 

Cover the slices of green 
bacon with cold water, bring 
to a boil, simmer for 8 
minutes and drain. 

Cook the old partridge in 
the butter in a small skillet or 
heavy saucepan for about 15 
minutes, turning it regularly, 
keeping the heat low enough 
to avoid any smoking. When 
it is lightly coloured on all 
sides, remove it and wash out 
the jnn with the white .wine, 
scraping loose any frying 
adherents and reducing the 
liquid to a tablespoon or tw& 

Line the bottom of a heavy 
copper saucepan or an earth- 
enware or enamelled cast-iron 
casserole with half the mire- 
poix . spread a bed of cabbage 
on top, place the partridge in 
the middle, a carrot and a slice 
of bacon to either side, pour 


over the bit of white wine 
reduction from the cooking 
pan, regularly distribute the 
remaining mirepoix, adding 
the rest of the cabbage, pack- 
ing it lightly and smoothing 
the surface. Heat the stock 
enough to melt it, pour in 
enough to rise just above the 
cabbage's, surface, bring to a 
boil over medium heat and 
cook, covered, either over 
very low heat or in a slow oven 
at a bare simmer for at least 
2'k hours in alL 

After 1-1 Vi hours the bacon 
should be thoroughly cooked. 
Remove it carefully and pot it 
aside. If the quantity ofliquid 
seems excessive, continue the 
braising with the lid ajar, if h 
seems low, add some boiling 
stock. 

After 2'h hours, remove the 
partridge, lift the .flesh from 
the bones (it win fall oft), chop 
it coarsely and return it to the 
cabbage- The braising liquid 
should be almost completely 
reduced — if the cabbage is still 
quite liquid continue cooking 
it for 10-15 minutes on top of 
the stove with the lid off, at a 
sufficient heat to produce a 
regular bubbling, or drain the 
liquid into a saucepan, reduce 
it over a high heat and pour it 
back over foe cabbage. (If it is 
to be reheated it may remain 
slightly liquid — it will arrive 
at the correct state of reduc- 
tion through slow reheating.) 

Return the bacon a Few 
minutes before serving to heat 
through. Taste for salt; none 
should be needed as the stock, 
the mirepoix and foe bacon 
are all sited and. reduction 
should do the rest 

The roast partridges: once 
cleaned and winged, sprinkle 
salt, pepper and oregano into 
foe body cavity and insert the 
butter; salt and pepper the- 
outside, place the bard of pork 
fet over the breast and lie foe 


BRIDGE 


bird encircling it 2 or 3 times 
with kitchen siring to keep the 
slice of fat in place. 

It is difficult to give a 
precise timing or meihod for 
roasting partridge - a fresh 
sped men requires a bit longer 
than one several days old and 
despite thermostats, ovens 
differ. 

Choose a heavy shallow 
roasting pan just large enough 
to hold the trussed bird (a 
small flying pan or a tiny I 
gratrn dish), start it out in a 
very hot oven and after 5 
minutes or so. turn it down to 
about t75°C/350°F w gas mark 
4. After 10-12 minutes in foe 
oven, dip the strings, remove 
the sheet of fat and 5 minutes 
later, turn the oven off, leav- 
ing foe bird inside for another 
5 or 6 minutes (something 
over 20 minutes in all). 

From the time the bard of 
fat is removed ft should be 
basted every couple of min- 
utes. When done, the breast 
should remain slightly rosy in 
colour. 

(A more usual but less 
satisfactory method consists 
in roasting the bird un- 
attended in a moderately hot 
oven of 200°C/400°F, gas 
mark 6 , for 18 minutes.) 

Mound the cabbage on to a 
heated deep serving platter, 
split foe roast partridge in two, 
place! the. halves on the cab- 
bage and surround them with 
the slices of bacon, each cut 
into four or five sections, and 
foe carrots, cut into thick 
slices.' 

This menu begins with 
cucumber salad dressed with a 
lemon and fresh cream sauce, 
followed by a lobster baked 
with herbs and anchovy but- 
ters. Cheeses follow foe par- 
tridge. then figs with rasp- 
berry-flavoured cream. 

Fresh figs with raspberry 
cream 

Serves fwp 

450g (11b) fresh figs 


DRINK 


A tale 
of two 
regions 

Tall, bearded' Robin Yapp, 
generous of girth and jovial of 
disposition, represents most 
people's Idea of a trine mer- 
chant. Yet foe energetic Mr 
Yapp trained as a dentist and 
has only jnst given up that 
profession to concentrate on 
wine fall-time. Yapp Brothers, 
specialists in Rhdue and Loire 
wines, are now something of 
an institution in foe wine world 
but foe firm started in 1969 
with wine stored in a garage- 
Whether Robin Yapp, who 
is assisted by his wife Judith, 
realized his meat good sense 
in plumping for foe Khfoe and 


EATING OUT 


Ftones Mosley 


Sugar to taste 

150ml (U pint) whipping 
cream ' 

Fed foe figs, leaving them 
whole (foe skin pulls off very 
easily in strips), arrange them 
in a serving dish and chilL 
Pass the raspberries through a 
nylon (not metal) drum sieve 
and stir in the sugar. Whip foe 
chilled cream in a drilled bowl 
until just stiff, mix in foe 
raspberry puree and pour over 
the figs; 


Loire as his specialist regions 
back in 1969, it is hard to telL 
But since then, with top Bor- 
deaux and Burgundy Staving 
steadily priced themselves out 
of most wine drinkers' pock- 
ets, first-class Rhone and 
Loire wines have rapidly be- 
come foe next best thing. 

Sancerre, i mi t a tin g n»>Hh 
perhaps, has now become so 
due and expensive both here 
and elsewhere, that It is a 
wonder that any of us even 
dream of drinking it. But Jean 
Vatan's Oos Les Porters, 
Sancerre *85 is soperb with its 
greeny- white colour and 
steely, gooseberry-like bou- 
quet and taste, priced at £5.50 
a bottle is only £1 more than 
supermarket Sancerre and is 
infinitely more agreeable than 
a great deal of much more 

expensive white burgundy. 

Drinking Provencal wines at 
this time of year is a pleasant 
reminder of sunny summer 
holidays spent in foe south, 
and Yapp have a very unusual 
white wine from the Alpes de 
Haute Provence. This 184 
Coteattx de Ptemvert, from 
foe Domaine de Rfgnsse, has 
an intriguing soft, smoky fla- 
vour reminiscent of apricots 
and is a good bay at £335. As 
usual, I also ranch enjoyed 
their Alsace offering, this tune 
a delirious rich, spicy lycbee- 
layered H3 Gew nratnu niner 
(£4.15) from Charles SchlereL 

Of the reds, the "85 Camay 
de PArdecfae priced at £3.40 
with its light, fruity, raspberry 
jam-like style makes a useful 
autumnal wine. But for me the 
star of the tasting was August 
Gape's 114 Comas (£930) 
with a rich tannic taste, 
packed with blackberry and 
loganberry. 

Jane MacQuitty 


J. 


When luck plays to win with skill 


Vv'«! 


"Do you believe in luck?" a 
correspondent enquires. "For 
three years”, she continues, "I 
have held foe most dreadful 
cards. Bad enough in itself, 
worse when I must suffer 
being called The Jonah'. As 
for the idea of 'unlucky at 
cards, lucky in love’ — to 
justify that. I'd have to be a 
nymphomaniac." 

While acknowledging that 
some players will hold slightly 
better than average cards and 
others rather less than their 
foir share, the mathematicians 
tell us that the luck wjD always 
even out in foe end. 

Most players find ft difficult 
to be objective, allowing out- 
side factors to influence their 
perception of how they have 
been treated by foe fetes. To 
put this in perspective, ray 
own longest losing run was six 
months during which I played 
over 2.500 rubbers, probably 
more than foe "vicarage” 


exponent will play in two or 
three years. 

Good players give the 
appearance of bolding good 
cards. I remember when 
Kenneth Konstam was foe 
Lion of Ctockftnds, someone 
saying: "Hardly a hand passes 
without Konnie making a 
bid". That was true because 
Konstam often bid on pea- 
nuts, confident that he would 
fall on his feet. 

But it is not only a matter of 
technical skill. Some years ago 
there was a player who con- 
stantly bemoaned his persis- 
tent losses, despite being a 
class better technically than 
the school in which he played. 
It was hard to understand 
nnlil you noticed his hopeless 
lack of psychology, and foe 
way he strayed outside foe 
scope of his weaker partner's 
bidding vocabulary. It is no 
good making the correct deli- 
cate inferential cue bid if it 




THE BRITISH 
SUMMER. 


leads to playing the hand with 
only three trumps. 

There are mathematical 
delusions as well Consider 
this proposition: "I will give 
you £5 for every hand I hold 
with more than 10 points, if 
you give me £5 for every hand 
I hold with fewer than 10 ". 
Sounds fair, doesn't it? But 
because there must be com- 
pensation for foe hands which 
contain more than 20 points, 
foe chances of bolding fewer 
than 10 is greater than even 
money. 

At rubber bridge, lack. is 
obviously all-important in foe 
short run but, indisputably, 
skill will be the determining 
factor in foe end. 

Tournament players are in- 
clined to be lofty on the 
subject. They argue that since 
both teams hold foe same 
cards at duplicate, luck is 
eliminated. A fatuous, over- 
simplification. This was foe 
trump suit in a grand slam: 

Q 9 8 6 4 2 A J 

A grand dam at 1 teams 
should of course be an oddsr 
on proposition. The chances 
of playing this suit for no loser 
would be more than 12/2 
against On this occasion foe 
slam succeeded, which would 
be ; unremarkable except for 
the feet that it decided the 
World Championship in Ber- 
muda in 1974. 

Although played many 


years ago, this remains the 
luckiest hand I can remember. 
I would advise those of a 
nervous disposition to dis- 
regard foe bidding. 

Rubber Bridge. North 

South game. Dealer East 

ft A aa 

09872 
OJ43 
4 1082 

ft 1073 u 1ft § 

OQJ1053 J g ?84 

0 2 ft E O KO109S7B5 

4J543 5 I4KO 

4 KQJG4 2 
O AK 
0 A 

4 A976 


Opening toad 02 

Declarer's first task was to 
picture any distribution that 
would permit success. Obvi- 
ously East had eight dia- 
monds; he must also be 
assumed to have a double ton 
honour in dubs. The only 
hope was an elimination, 
which required two entries to 
dummy to ruff foe diamonds. 
But any diamond ruff would 
be' susceptible to an overruff 
by West. Worse still, even a 
ruff and discard would only 
produce II tricks. 

Eventually light dawned. A 
spade to dummy's 9 of 
spades was followed by a 


CHESS 


diamond, ruffed with the 4K, 
and a second spade to 
dummy's 48 permitted a 
further diamond ruff with foe 
4Q. Now came two lop 
hearts to extract East's. exit 
cards, and then foe Ace and 
another club. This was the 
end game: 


4 10 M 4 - 
WE V- 

O- W s E O K 109 B 
4J5 5 4- 


East played foe OK which 
South ruffed with foe 4J, 
discarding' dummy's dub. If 
West discards a dub, he is 
lost. His best chance is to 
underruff, but using the 497 
as equals, declarer could 
establish one by foe ruffing 
finesse. 

Notice that without the 
fancy footwork in foe spade 
suit foe plan fails, because 
West will be able to overruff 
at trick ID. And if West 
discards his 97Q declarer can 
draw West's trump and cash 
dummy's hearts. 

Who was declarer? It might 
be unlucky to reveal that 

Jeremy Flint 


Fino 


W ONE THING 
Jj YOU CAN 
£ RELY ON. 


Victory by double negative 






[i jjPB Dnv OHM** 

■ ■■ &mmi E 




San P&tricio- simply 
the finest Fmo sherry. 
Serve it chilled. Anytime. 


The most colourful character 
at the Leningrad half of foe 
World Title match is Grand- 
master Eduard Gufeld. Pro- 
moted to Chief of foe Press 
Centre here he is nolable for 
his impressive 20 -stone frame, 
dazzling white suits and 
flamboyant misuse of foe 
Queen's English. His predilec- 
tion for foe double negative is 
notorious, as m: “You never 
not see such brilliant game!" 
When challenged, his invari- 
able retort is: "My freend, but 
my Eenglish maybee beiterr 
foan yourr Rrussian". Quite. 

Gufeld is always ready to 
show his games where his 
favourite piece, the Black 
King's Bishop in fianeftetto, 
i triumphs over ail odds. What . 
follows is an extraordinary 
example of this thane:' 

White: Kotronias: Black: 
Gufeld. King's Indian De- 


fence. Internationa] Tour- 
nament. Athens 1985. 

1 84 urn let gi 

3 No3 Bq7. 4 «4 £ 

SO « • M Hoc 

7 Npaz as *35 Hr 

8 M IS 18 Oa3 b5 

11 W MbS 12 NH Mff 

Black loses some time, but it is 
worthwhile to exchange 
White's useful Queen's 
Bishop. 

13 *5 ItapS 14*nt eS 

IS OKS BaaS If MiS M 

Rather too risky. The simple 
16 ~.Be 6 guarantees Black an 
easy life. Gufeld runs enor- 
mous risks in the interests of a 
fascinating idea. 

17 j)4 tng4 II onto a * m 

Much stronger is foe immedi- 
ate 19 Ne4, but the text also 
looks devastating; 

O _ 887 38 Na4 left 

21 Kaffct W 22 Mffcfc Kgf 

23 NON ok 



22M7cb Kgf 


Black appears to be in a vice, 
but a brilliant Queen sacrifice 
turns the tables. 

23 _ (Ml 24 MM ok » 
3M tup ftna Kxe* 

27kM4 Sn4 bw bo. ; 

2flRx« <3 30 M odflek 

SIMA Radi n « Mick 
33 Kc2 Met MKfcS JU3cft 
3S KM MM aaWMa naJpw 

(36 Ka5 Ra3 ch. 37 Kb6 Bc5 
Mate). 

Raymond Keene 



Streetwise pizza 


The pizza, a food born of 
indigence, feres better in 
southern Italy than foe north, 
whose prosperous cities have 
their own versions (different 
doughs, different toppings), 
none matching foe Neapolitan 
type. 

In the. north, foe pizza 
mutates from a staple into a 
more frivolous dish — foe 
proportion of topping to 
dough increases, and foe door 
opens to such foreign aberra- 
tions as the "deep pan" pizza, 
foe frozen pizza, foe card- 
board frisbee with pineapple 
and processed cheese. 

It is fitting that the best 
pizza in London should not be 
found in a gimmick-littered 
fast-food place, nor in a 
minimalist, self-conscious 
"cafe". It is in a utilitarian 
establishment m Elephant and 
Castle, an area which is a 
cartoon of “inner-city” un- 


The scents and 
sights suggest 
Naples itself 9 


loveliness. It can make the 
dubious boast of having the 
longest system-built domestic 
block in Europe. Its centre is a 
charmless duster of buildings 
by the modernist Erao Gold- 
finger (yes, that is where Ian 
Fleming got foe name), and 
there is so much traffic that 
even foe hardiest jay-walker is 
forced into foe mugger’s para- 
dise of subterranean tunnels. 

It may not be Naples — it’s 
not half as lovely - but it 
certainly advertises its decay, 
its dangers. I parked in a street 
overlooked by a massive 
seedy block, all of 1 5 years old, 
illuminated by an impromptu 
bonfire of mattresses, planks 
and lumps of furniture fuelled 
by paraffin. The young 
pyrotechnicians responsible 
looked on. giggling. A wino 
slid down foe wall of a tattoo 
parlour. 

Inside foe Pizzeria Gastello 


One of London’s 
most unlovely 
areas produces the 
best pizzas, says 
Jonathan Meades 

you're a world away — why, 
you might be in some anony- 
mous, hardly decorated haven 
in a slum of Naples itself. 
Indeed the scents (garlic, bak- 
ing) and sights (banks of 
ovens, balls of dough, crowds 
of people) and sound (Italian 
waiters at full throttle) suggest 
that you are. The crowds are 
petitioning for tables, the wait- 
ers are all practising tick-tack, 
foe dough is turning to bread 
in foe ovens, foe scene is one 
of vital animation. It never 
lets up, which means that 
sometimes the service is 
brusque. Last week, though, it 
was sweetness itself. 

The food, by contrast, is 
unvarying in its excellence: I 
say this with foe sureness of 
one who always eats exactly 
foe same dishes. And who 
drinks the same wine, too — a 
Montepulciano d’Abruzzo 
called Colie Secco. This is an 
Adriatic wine of great rich- 
ness, depth and alcoholic po- 
tency (13 per cent), which is 
offered at foe singularly low 
price of £ 6 . It costs £3.20 at 
Oddbinr, in either circum- 
stance it is a bargain. It is a 
good complement to this 
pizzeria's punchy, straight- 
forwardly flavoured dishes. 

The mozzarella salad could 
be faulted for its want of basil; 
but really only a mean charac- 
ter would seriously complain 
about such a detail when the 
other ingredients — tomato, 
anchovy, sweetish onion, 
cucumber (odd, that) — are 
supplied in such quantity and 
freshness. The olive oil may 
not be extra-virgin, neither is 
it foe opposite of that unlikely 
condition. The garlic bread 
has no correspondence what- 
soever with foe usual foul. 


butter-logged mess. Here it is 
itself a son of elemental pizza. 
The same dough that is used 
for the pizza, a succulent and 
crisp and delightfully oily 
dough, is baked with a 'further 
sprinkling of oil and a snow- 
storm of chopped garlic to 
make something that is fine in 
itself, more than a mere 
■companion to the salad. 

The pizza I've always eaten 
here is called Nettuno and is 
composed of tuna, anchovy, 
capers, onion and crushed 
tomato. Others include a 
confection fit for vindaloo- 
victims called Siriliana: lit- 
tered with green chilli, chilli 
sausage, ham and mozzarella. 
The pizzas are obviously fired 
at precisely the right heal and 
for foe right time; beyond that 
foe toppings are not so thick 
foal foe bread fails to cook, the 
spicing and herbing make no 
concessions to what London- 


‘Waist-expanding 
marvels of the 
baker’s craft’ 


Italian catering usually con- 
siders to be British taste. 

The results are waist- 
expanding marvels of the 
baker’s craft. The sweets — 
profiteroles, fruit salad, 
cheesecake and so on — look 
good: I've never felt capable of 
trying them. The espresso is a 
welcome assault, and drinks 
like strega and sambucca are 
not expensive. 

Most customers appear to 
be middle managers of foe 
black economy and anyone 
who still doubts the realism of 
Minder should get down here 
sharpish. Two could drink 
beer, eat pizza and pay less 
than £10. On the other hand, 
you could go foe whole hog 
and splash out for £19, includ- 
ing service. 

Pizzeria Castedo, 20 
Walworth Road, London SE1 
(01-703 2556). Open Mon- 
Fri noon-1 1 pm; Sat 5-1 1pm. 


MOLESKIN” TROUSERS 

| _ Tp'hese “Moleskin” trousers are 

X ideal for the cold winter months 
Mr ahead as they are made from 1009b 

■A ft* SS'JJtt brushed cotton which offers con- 

T) ^ 8 ] siderable protection against chilling 

iL m winds and other harsh aspects of the 

colder weather. Apart from their 
• warmth they are well styled with a zip- 

Kj W jB pB fly and clip-fastener, two side 

jf / ' ,y A' v pockets and a buttoned back pocket. 

\‘i ^ A viable in Lovat green (a grey/ 
( /xgreen), and suitable for both 

| _ ** men and women, with waist sizes 

ran g i n g from 28 '’-48” Cut 2" intervals). 
The inside leg measures 36” and the 
\ \ « S-\ \\ \V hem has been left unfinished to allow 

lfl § \ \\ adjustment to individual require- 

/ I \ \\ ments, or you may prefer to wear 

I /’ I , \ them as turn-ups. 

k I I / 1 r phe “Moleskin” finish and easy to 

A I/ I J ' \ match colour will enable you to 

l 1 - ' If / / • 1 “®^ warm and stylish throughout the 

I I /; / / winter as the trousers adapt to both 

1 I IJ a I j casual and more formal wear. 

I If / I Pri ce: £28-95 

r // Ifft III AH prices are indusive of post and packing. Please 

I 1/ itif III a/tow up to 21 dors for dcOmy from receipt of 

I If //'/ till order. If you are noi satisfied The Times will refund 

1 If Ki U H yow money without question. In addition to our 

| 1 Iff/ Viv guarantee you have the benefit of your stanaory 

\ V fly 61 \ which an not affected. Orders and enquiries 

I I 111 W \ dtould be sent to: Thr Times Moleskin Trouser 

1 | If I > Offer, Bourne Rood. Bexley, Kent DAS 1BL. 

1 I [M 1 Tel: Crayford 53316 Tor enquiries only. 

M I Jf \ 111 Pkase send me “Moleskin Trousers” @ £28.95 

I I f| \ III cadi as in dicated below, (sizes range from 

ha'd /fl Ijll waist - at 2* intervals). 

I QUANTITY | SIZE I 


THE TIMES 


DIAL YOUR ORDER 

RAPID ORDER] SC SERVICE 

BYTELEPHONEON r \ 1 
ACCESS OR VBA 

(nonteitotompleu coupon) 

(Crayford) 0322-58011 
24 hours a day — 7 daysa weeJt 


I enclose cheque/FO far £ made payable to: 

The Times Mol eskin Trouar Offer. Ordcfeu my 

AccessATuaNo I I I ! I I I I I I I I I I I I I 


Expiry Dae .. 
Signature ...... 

Mr/Mre/Miss 












16 



i 



THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


* 1 THE SOUTH BANKCEN 


MV.UIIl ~CNC.Cn or 1 . A** jo-aC' 



OoenuU day w^fi^eaN»kmo«Jb«htimpH«^ Shaft Bufo.BmondRMWWfaCJ*. 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL- 


Hunky 

zrsw 

7 JO pm 


»Sw* 

3.10 pm 


53T 


»s*** 
7 JO pm 


NH 
7 JO pa 


IM 

USp» 


noTALPHuUAUUni4^H^_ 

w»V(Wi Icavkianr! BnaMAKtMnot 
iHinnimiifiii 'ii i — t~h 'tr imm 
Na 1 Bmhms V»w *> 4 
cfrao.g-g.es. mao cm 


Gbmm Mam on a hm ot Randal. BMP Soroka n Q moor. 
BWVK7. ftUPp nakAWM Fugue «C mm. Op »Np to 

UariFjnHSuandKjguOQn'MMttMHhMieeumHM' 

— ' - CISC Tl»Soitei Ban*, flood 


TOd 

7J0pm 


tSSj 
a do 
7 JO pm 


[IMOwimimaHaMmllMtiaMaAwQWMNa 1, 

wxun Ew nBotwaoM. aoaittaftttgfcga ag uo 

UtuTTEtirneptn- fcsttV/U. u»dcn Srtkjfteia aw awuTM 


(Dwm AMfian icona) PMp Lm g rai g r mat *■ 
OMnneauan Sapno* * Itaad- ■ 


hbpntpnMlI 
teoM am 


300 
7 JO P» 


|ROT*CPHH>UtBll4oWKioWCHeST tu r 


f an Pmm< (canaunan to *t» M tctuai flMtoz Owmee Swtnae 
■ Benm>ctDw«MiCaloConnwg8»Ma0te*3»Sir»ipBepyy *0 
50.0 B.Et 50 C14 RPOLiq 


Suaky 
5 00 
IIS pm 


500 
7 JO pm 


700 

7J0pm 


BOO 
7 JO pm 


900 

7J0pm 


not 
10 Oo 
TAStm 


OBlWIimCtMCeirTlnDolueMdMcaMiiaeeOyAnlewHopMm 

OrcMten U*i WUQi Ipeng. Gubin Pragma. 
■ MB' 


vantbom rai i GoRnywn RMtBoay r 
and Baa Synvnnc PO»m 
tajftaaqg mm aa mb 


LMAmemaninPam 


Ue 


USJoBwWE mB&BSISF 

Hrara Timm iconaucwu poo Bbwmu (panot 

Puna Concerto No ISymiMnyNO JlEracai 

E> CSflD USD mSQ Et* LPO Lid 

Bgaagrogw Bg i B T 


Gfempp* SoopOMOmoucM'i SJPW IM* Inco t) 
fartra rk n Orarorc. Cownan. Wotm Ccnrano.SmfronyMo « 

O 90 MM C5J0 D ES.O DO. CIS WN tla nnono LW. 


nor 


HPQLn 


(conductor] Itoye 


Mt»pal 


T»pt«Qm 


SyngMOyNO 2 . 


Smu r— u PtiAcbanaUa 


Cal* CONCERT esc Ftaoo Odmn mnooucM t> Bab M 
IM Romm (can) Mm Sam icon) Mart Wet*. 


(can) ... . 

M m m omu • rnaare Mm ■—» Far toft Song* tram am 
Snow*. Sraona raU Song* limn ton* 

□ O.D8 O»OS 0 BBOSouai Bank Board 

jonotBOLCT ISUWI 


Haydn AMHiae con mrucm. M* XVB 8. Sonm m E Bsl Hrti XVI S3 
ISdmMlFMPvnCOt >7. STOg P rtBoenG rimer. Op 2*. 
Uol Venom o Mbok 

C3 t.«aa g50.C7Sfl.tBS) £10 HunWvPWCT U1 

London PMuMjoibroc 


On* Tha Dsn Coarg* Bay* Orate 
10— T O w Bd l IOWUB) 1 UMMwdM— iCOnnW 


M«nU» Syirpnony No 3 030. £533 BAJ CIS 
iloscbw PHvm.i«*Q»co«CMCsTiU. US»T 


LPO an. 


lo— rnkyyafevtaxUkcmnMki ■!■) Mm* (panel 

S ~ totem* ky Fiancaca <to Hum* P icko — Paw CqncWO No. £ 
Ekmnkuw Symphony no 3 

O 50 ff .jsc. CS Cl.- 05 HMpmm tiro 

tODMuOM «MU«AflMOfrilC 


A London 


Sy " w S2 t 


larauoor) 

, - .SoOBMOJ.1 

c? ago £590.090 ci5 lpOlbi 

Htekawi je*wOuai.Ot))CTgm)h»*akp«iim«k — raufra 

BOO a*ch ccrowo m C. BMW SSa. Schanrayi fix* Sascftm. Op 58 
pinna ate yffiainuPateuy'ia.ffraynwiki ran one adnnrnaarwira 
Bum a ma StudormCMFVOBklCiSO TBeSoueiHmOB— 


asSf 

7.0 pm 


JPVRCai. ONdCSTM fte*fc» Pkp* tcong P— O OI ■ Bn mnp 
lNum . * Cancan o* Scflnowvon Mope CrWo h afc wfl Sow 
MW* No 3 IM Boon p**J: »“I ugndoufli 


7amttf 

JAM 


®3y 


JOO 

7A9pm 


StrnMi m G a mi i I n i m S p awm O w Op 

lamon immaucaan mo POo<m«e HHe tMd Hwli'On Am' 

itaouit AmuASaruianA. 

m«a ra*n £«aa ".Mi Ena Ogacurt 

p m^) warm UOTa?rP?W Senate 1 


IB5» 

JOB 

7J5pm 


AnnorOSar.MkmiScnaRiQp W|MlPnp0.8oWp>SOMBNo9 

(Bock Mmi. ampin 3 Mannkai Uot Himgawr Rnapaody Cx 6 

Q.anO.& HecnAmoonMctPoannnl 

loi®o»i bac+1 ondKifkS 


Km i (warn) T— MM loco*) BWPIOWQWMEUW 

L. rmdMi yiunmn H aoMM lRPM«M T*»pe» 5u«e Won t. 


psSS OBnc^OM«nO^S. l 3isSiS'«iWB Hrni M WMec Uo*e 

KukuNoZ PSO C S^.CT .12 Lanaotr Sag) O h-Tiol a ua 


J Oct 
7.4 pm 


Sunday 
soa 
HO pm 


- is«yN.ijrtiwv aJmwinaw 

_ _ . iMOl Lamom As GmAOt Om Comma 

, Burm m mks oy tMadeA. Wtaed ana A. Bm«kmn. 

[£2» aba. wao, SSSO.E65Q uinw Oo. 

MCS^srsTwaTS5fi?tr5s 


Sda 
7.15 pm 


BOO 
74 pm 


700 
1.10 pm 


TOO- 
74 pa 


• Oo 
74pm 


Tluu—y 
• OO 
74pm 


I MmiHrg Mm No 3 IM or gan pq 
HkiiilPaMljdktnMwCkBngi | 
^ MCLSuisoasaiew 

LAXf irw») 


PmokUQadmm 


(Oreeto'j 


A'FTAHC |wb|T 

XAMay (paoJC 




tnonT)f=obnTaraock«om)T hj <ii« i l l—n ;«iaBI 

HuMMSOMMrt Sanaa. mp> Ouarar m Q. Op 76 14 1. tN|*a 

OuramOnoiO.OO 78 Mo 2. teNOW OON in F DB03 
CM |n *irwaci AtaB Mane pnmerc 


BUCK CUL>W)u. Aftcmes CONCERT Tn—a *o KSSm A 

d m ok canoe* t omchw ev nonwis poetry. cMg tom at w 

;*narn m moovno mono Oy (pack coapomas mgnnmie ackiOtl 

aorta oy Oa n i m l aian al and JoaBa Lm« *»^ 

a 50 gfiSD CUQ 0550 TTwBMc * COkirjlA*OB»q 


Wr^5~o* tbycxVi —a fl kkPafr' icon) Haag maai 

■icon* WH WI « — n Prualn ) emi S aa w m y 

^ ^m F iwm S«on« ro Tnom. 1 


ISdaen EatN Sons, somom SepMi iBrmsn mcmi. 

Wm n*!n mm aso.OSO The fifes tdOjniJnitai 

nasiTiE^sgKBes — — ' 


cayoum 


^■Tne Foil Seaatma CZSO aa wmt d tnc k i t a m kmoone 

nPOagagA kmyrayonm* geTOQZ _TA«JLxanJamBomo_ 


OoinmamC D« 

MendNamm Oao n E OK. Op JO 


*S§S?§&BraR5SEfmA 


The Scum Am* Board 


g PmkoOm Umkfl Concerto No 2. Hoal Aowyo m E. KJ8I. 

3 ai C. K. 373. Profccmn# Sympnooy No 1 lOmca*} 
usiax asoeso £co&*u*:soomLu 

BWBBSiKSWSBiBSdWnBS N 


lyananoneandFuguemElaianaeierneironiProiMtheu* iBoca 

tvanjuomt Qmpm Andante Smu and Gande »Oon»*e 

' iMU m—k m a Sd—i No J gftfuy i 

THtPMM 


Petuor muse (ram me heyday o* the Fta to 




J fna a n . omt a my a iL mrtne Baren ana com i _ 

U3.M.es. £6.0 TMNMCauiiMmaaara 


N to map a* Tim Ac 

SCLT** 


PURCELL ROOM 


TiSrOAl PNlUvUlMtiMC *ba^TY 


.Becdumm Chertuie TneConiecraMnoiamHouaa.1 
[NoSiEnmaiori. *L end a*) Symcamny No 3 
Jet ««i a £ 8 X » £8 SO. El I TheW—IMWw i ama c SeCWly 


GALA VIENNESE EVENINC Nn Symphony OeMoBa mpoduced 
ana camniatd w Many WonJawortn Mwkyn HB Stm laopi 
Programme or»mnal7»Sa)pga.XSk— »LX«—B. Jo wl ft— . 


PSD r«SO £550 P. CBM £9» ttflSO Vow Ftennmgnr 

LONDON PHrutAfUKMNC cart Dmta icmi Oary Karr (OOuBexan) 


MVMCWakyna 


aVanaeomonaLnemeoi 


(Havdn. OikoonaW CSomm Mr (FOOM and ongm aM L Pmdaiwen 
tSvnumony NO S and cuaicly# Gary hoi tweanVMaw 
KL75ieiCOM>e>) (POLM 


39 SO* 
7 Japan 


[THREE HAMU AT ONE PIANO AM NaWon (cunOI RWa Baaftl 

... __ I Hi par Sonata an C. Btmt Jeu* cTartDrm. 

boJZ Moaart Sanaa, aai C AMI. MW OmyCen Or ftaekxul F*I 
padkcM E—So um a^ 0.0 C« “ ' ’ 

ipajnol iksxn SWNta" 


hiCtoA BANCKMOO ipuno) t*az*n Sanaa n O. kStC 
fet— ky Thea»onflmw«i*ara»aia ah. Op (9 Bm aW ENpam. 


lAPRaka Sooswu Na6 super Cknaon. (M» y images. Senas ) A i 
n on a Vieane W GoaaaE 0p42 


iHkcPandaotrl/JBCkoMonaHeaneWCotefc . 

fan Kaounan Concert Saaoary Do 

l LftAHArt5&a|IL«)AuJSOiillRt*f»TB1ii>anol 36 Saa*5'mau 


QUEEN HLIZABFO H HALL 


27 Saw IMMI— IJ0imilttar,swt*mr)5fcfMH— AlKhaafttUW 

74pm -ADDancamanuracWDa anummtsaHOato(eaaDm(an|[KkwicWaa«' 

_ Gunon a. CLSO £550.(650 Q 50 AIM Pnxansora 

•*Xa 3 t. Ate tutalMCC FIGARO 6oSi*nad rancor part 


2 00 
rjdpn 


No ?anEULBWV 1031. Vaughan 1 _ . 

imroducean aam asnaeorw on a meme tram aw 'tmeaeadai D 802. 
DuXtm Sosame NcOart kAKOjaaaM Sonata. Op w 
QSO OK U50 _ __JonnFkgh«m m ta i ai aoa W Atarta Lid 

ilHEi 


ItaM fq*. CamW jaekatm Am Onngar list peril. 

.Marta Aamatnay-TUmaga On All Aoun Hantaan BbtWaMk Saoury An 


itART LOO SuU3V»Nb6LC«» UOCraroT 


7.18 pm 


, , I Optra Hogar SnaM. (COM) Suaanna Baat (Cka| 

|So*0a5tj veama pnaamnn Teodor Oardn. KNan Blctaara. Main 
MrgaaMN(ld.OaWdOa>yime,AngWa>4ckay, Hama Mala. 

*5tt QSO. C8SC CJSO tuonnam AMkorW Oeera 


SOUTH BANK CRAFTS . 

({(( + for perfect gifts t u es-Sun 1 }cm-7pm 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 


<? 


PHILHARMONIA 

ORCHESTRA 


Principal Conductor Giuseppe Sinopoli 


TOMORROW at 7 JO 

GIUSEPPE SINOPOLI 
SHLOMO MINTZ 

Beethoven: Overture, Corioian 
Beethoven: Vkdio Concerto 
Beethoven: Symphony No. 4 


Sponsored by NISSAN UK LIMITED 


Ttdwlx 
A«aOibt Iidib 


■-t.W. &.V. £7. ff. £». OO. £12 

JWI * C.C. |()l-^i8 WUO) & jgem 


lUI-VJU 


J 


SUNDAY 5 OCTOBER M 3J5 pn> 
HnrriaoaT*arraa Ltd preicnu 

ORGE BOLET 


‘The playing was altogether in a class of its own’ 


Telegraph 1935 

Haydn.- Aoahmc can Ywnu m F mmor. Hob XVII * 
Haydn: Sitau n t Ito. Hah SVI.y 


Schumann: Faannv in C Opt 17 
- ' “ - ‘ ' Or, Op. 24 


Cricjc: BalLkie m G minor, 

Lin: Venera e Napoli 
£X £4.50, iS.iO.ih.SJ. i.'T.'SO. £8.90, £10 
Bui OlVicc 01-925 M9I CC 01-928 8buG 



HAKOLD HOLT UMITHD pmaems 
MONDAY « OCTOBER at 7. JO 


MOSCOW 
PHILHARMONIC 

DMITRI KITAYENRO conductor 
TCHAIKOVSKY Francesca da Rimini 
PROKOFIEV Piano Concerto No. 2 
iSokrist NIKOLAI PETROV) 
RACHMANINOV Symphony No. 3 

£V £4 50, £h su, £9, £12. £15 Hall iOl-9» SWltCC \«|.9288800) 


RAYMOND GWWinM 
SATTamAY 18 OCTOBER M IMjlo. 

POPULAR CLASSICS 



BARBER OF SEVILLE OVERTURE 
BLUE DANUBE WALTZ 


PIANO CONCERTO No. 1 
■CAPRKC30ITAUEN I 


?ro!5i»)Ba5c^^^^5aScB^il 


LONDON CONCERT ORCHESTRA 
Condactat MI CHAEL LLOYD 
raiLIPFOWXSmDo 

£4. £S. fb.SO, C8. £v.50, tlO 90, III .50 Hall 01-928 1191 CC.0 1-028 B800 



VICTOR HOCHHAUSER him with the NSOp 
a the ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 


TONIGHT at 7.30 

GERSHWIN 

Introduced and conducted by ANTONY HOPKINS! 


CUBAN OVERTURE. VARIATIONS ON I GOT RHYTHM. 
RHAPSODY IN BLUE. AN AMERICAN IN PARIS, 

PORGY AND BBSS SYMPHONIC PICTURE 
NEW SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Soloist: ANDREW HA1GH 
L) 50. £1.50. £5.50, £7.00, £8.50. £• 51). £10.10 Item HlS 01-528 Hkim»8BOO 


VICTOR HOCHHAUSER 


n the ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 



THURSDAY 9th OCTOBER at 7^0 

GALA VIENNESE 
EVENING 


Introduced and conducted by BARKY WORDSWORTH 
NEW SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Soloist: MARILYN HOI. SMITH 
SUfftOr Moroiaf! Noth nd Nrcta. Or. Indn Camlrr; }• STRAUSS 
Whipimh Polka, I L tpann a n Mabik.CbaupCM Poto, Wine. Vmto rod Sene, 
Otar Sotted Polka. TiprSoqtlA 10 Venial, QoM)’ lift (Gmteah Aaml 

lUha. Dnpjofly TWka. RMeuky MnttwHwoderrod U*hnuog Pota 
Blur Dannbr Walir. LEHAR Jon erfa'a lw March, Vila ITh* Merry Widow* 
MRXOCKER The doleful PnmaDnuuiDnarmeJdnaUwe) 
i»W.tiM.£5».CJ.£8.M.£9,M l n0 5dftoBiHiUOIAM3l91l9M8«IO 


Royal Festival Hall 


Tuesday 14 Oembee St 7 JOpm 

HALLfe 

SKROWACZEWSK3 

B EE THOVEN JHano Concerto No 3 

SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No 5 

MALCOLM FRAGERSoinst 

T**m £3.W,£J,£ivS0i£8.£5 J0,£ii,£iLX> 01-938 J191CC 01-938800 
3lantk*MltiwiaifCiHw 


OdotXT 2 


ST PAUIa^S CATHEDRAL 

CELEBRITY ORGAN 
RECITALS 

Thazadays at 6pm 
October 1986 

tonal hao Rcnaett 
(Elpy. Pauctaon. Healey Wilfaml 
NKholu kyiwHOn 
(Reger. Alain. Dupre. Germain) 
rhiKtophcr Deamler 
(MedclKohn. dc Snx. Bach. Manin) 
frier Hurford 

(Frandt. Mcdeteotui. Kcrg-Ekri. Bach) 
Anhur With 

(Bach- Fnihiu Wills. Moworysky) 
ADMISSION BY PR0GR5MMEC.no __ 
OBTAINABLE AT THE DOORS FROM S.30PM 




October 9 


Octohcr lh 


rvtoher B 


fVinher 30 


QUEEN ELIZABETH HALL 


FRIDAY NEXT 3 OCTOBER at 7.4$ pm 


LONDON BACH ORCHESTRA 

Director NICHOLAS KRAEMER 


‘BACH and the CITIES OF EUROPE* 
‘LONDON* 


Firil eaacm af the 85/87 mbacripboa aeries 


See South Bank Psod for furttao- Jrtaib 


htnauncaAnuD'Ma 


iprcaem 


CHBLINGIRIAN QUARTET 

HAYDN- SCHUBERT SERIES 


SUNDAY 5 OCTOBER at 3 pm 
Haydn G mnor. D trnrwr. Op. 7b N*. 1/2 Schubert Octet 

mahANDREW MARR1NER efannn JONATHAN WILLIAMS boa 
FBLtX WARNOCK hasAOao THOMAS MARTIN doobtolnw 
SUNDAY 9 NOVEMBER at 3 pm 

Haydn ‘Emperor'. Sunrise' Op- 7* Nut- V4 Schubert A mmor. D9M 

SUNDAY 7 DECEMBER m 3pm 
Haydn Eb nmor. D mamr. Op «b No*. to5 Sctuibon Tiduj" Qiman 
vub CLIFFORD BENSON pona THOMAS MARTIN double-*** 

Subs. £102)0 £1320, £15.50 
CC U1-V288800 


£2.50. £JS0, £4.50, £i 50, £hS0 

Bcuc Office 01 -KS 3191 


MONDAY » OCTOBER m 7^5 1 


PETER MAXWELL DAVIES 
JILL GOMEZ 
THE FIRES OF LONDON 

Stravin^/Grange/MaxweaDavie&'Berg/S chnitt h p 


See Queen Ehabeih HaB panel Cor detnh 


TUESDAY 7 OCTOBER at 7 AS pa 

Medici String Quartet 
Marilyn Taylor Peter Pople 
Michael Cookson Moray Welsh 

SCHUBERT: Quinret in C D.956 
MENDELSSOHN: Octet in E flat, Op. 20 

l2.£L t*.£5.L0lram Baa Office II I -*03 JWI CCOIAGS'Aft) 
Seacn.HmeaLuL 


Wednesday 8 October u 7A5 pm 


ENGLISH CHAMBER 
ORCHESTRA 

Conducted by RAYMOND LEPPARD 
FRANK PETER 21MMERMANN violin 


Moron: Ballet muse 6mm (domaeo, KJ67 
preMce Vmho Goooerm No 2 in G am, Op 63 

Mocarc ddapo m E. K26I garni Rnrato in C W73 

ProkaGem Symphony So. I m D.Op. SrCbaar) 
Spomond by Goldman Smhi taenrotaonal Cerp. 
T-d«xv £3 S0.£4 50. £5.90. £050. £7« 
lirom HaS ul-Wh M9| iCreda CatdaOI.9» 8800 1 5c Apems 


THURSDAY » OCTOBER at 7A5 pro. 
The Tchcyaa Cateaosl Amcmti w a presems 


SETA TANYEL piano 


BAC H: Partita in C minor, BWV826 
BEETHOVEN: 'Eroica' Vanations, Op- 35 
CHOPIN: Andante Spianato and Grande Polonaise 
RACHMANINOV: Sauna No. 2 in B flat minor. Op. 36 
£2. ii. £4. £5. £6 Boa CXSce (01-928 3191 j CC 101-926 88001 


IGNITE THE LIGHT 


Gala Evening 


V'. L-r ★ 

* IT:* 


■ At The Royal Albert Hall 
Sunday 5tb October at ?. 00pm. 







First Barth Fun 


CONCERTS 


St Abk & St Agaes 

Gretfen SJ EC2 {B Part Irtfl 


Sob 2BSn* 7pm 
Dob rt Comm ta 1*4 
tccHitk Ernnoe 
to mraegm omg* Qfhnm 


Gadena CMr tim Ftod 

Sin 19 Qd Tan 
Brndi 'jueA lesaraon kml 
Aaimsok ‘3 dm 
Samoa &r Pasi»4* . iuy m 


km 01-373 SM. 81-789 077 

ha daMh a d Mis rt 
& Asael 


EVENTS 


rtW<Srrond Hjmd A Ann 
gwua Boom h «mw 
Suntw sent Stvtenmcr Old 
Town Had UfeM-aoctc HflL 
NWS. rOPP Setsszr Par* 8taV 


exhibitions 


ALAN INGHAM 


WkTtACOlWR [XH1BITTON 
A Mater ovi of Won nml MmcTb 
Wnlrrrelaur DrawM) df 
Drmv^iuirSYerMlitre'Slafcc 
Onlncl * ThrCMIwetb. A mW 

OrlraMluJ collrmon ^ _ 
Fnuy » W sd llj »t 

Daily lOJO-SOOdOUthllittlt 


Water Lotte. gjWw#Pj»jnWr» 
Tef 002 981 3080. 


JIJ* BARBICAN HALL 

■Q Barbican Centre. Silk Si, BC2Y 3DS 

Mil 01-638 8891/628 8795 

•Telephone Bookings: 10am-8pm 7 days 3 v^eek 


C»--e2 ‘-f’lCi'* C a .- iC t i -**■? n '. f mo C«'v "j* jivX:- 


vttt&HfiaL « ftse c*a«g Huaw- 


lltamor uQHPCMSVMWOIV ORCHESTRA. London Sympfwy Cberu* 
28 Sec* ShCBBnDaiMiamUBnwUmmdoOafearliMAejBMaioHR: i 


AlllU8CCMHnY6WAC0HC&i anx i wil bytMCnpIc 

2 #S«rt nBie presence of WM T h e Prtnc — 8 Wren*tt,CourtiBB»rt 

7A5pm Snowdon inMrtNSPCC A phtortSl John rtrt twnefif » 


QrBfi^nTngt 8 VCwendan Ahmuaic Ptei, Loodon^mpbary 


OrebJWaiCMaKaihrcondlaalooaOeoLMne,. 


awdxo RkM SOgM, Guy Bet* it* mm* Sngera. 
— "-""^BUengniYigm 


John Dertgmrtti'WcL Some f 




The SCOTTISH CHAMBER OHCHgTH* Jkhna Laedo 0*Vdlr) 

^Htotrarri'A 


38Sepi itamt&fcKtaiw Naomi* Hendebsrtw Suite! 
ZdSpre Mtesuneim Ki^riTS DrearrT Wkrtdfc Four Seasons. 
ca^O. C 7A0. a M, eg-56, C6.-C3. 


Wed 

10c* 

229E" 


Thu 

200 

715pm 


THC COUNT BMUeORCMSTHA. The a*mf««tartm Unee hi 
jtfFlrt FW8 (8i)Vbrt ge l <ctea lyC8tetelBdad 
AtmaiewiEB. 


CITY OF BrthWOHAM 8YM9HONY ORCHESTRA. ShDOn 


M 

a Oct 

UMpra 


Tim Movement Gantorireftano Dcrario In F MB 

PaYiatoaBweblavam-CiihO. caai.t7S0.c6. C4Jo. 




No 7 m D. Op 10 No 3. Sonea No 23 In P minor. Op f 


ftf 

aod 


SEATS C3.C«iMgi,auileno and QtfY Eg. Hart*)HdtU!l 


TWMHCNSKV EVB 0 HG. London Corewt Orefrenra. Herrr 
RrtiinMh i cond) Wflm Stephenson (pdflo) Band of bteh 
Gpjfda Matbe Stews. ‘Saraft Lew Sd». rtano Concrete No \ 
■NoaracMF Suite: «12 Ok h*Ni cannon end monar eftecro) 
cwjqcsa.a S0.C7.ES. a. RnmondGubbv/M 


U*OON SYlrtHONV OHCHESnUL Aodrakrmmn (COnd)- 

■ ■ ■ '>>. frrxn ’Peter 


_ t|cnlo)Bill*Bi»:FVire8ae Interludes f 

OnmeT Bgn; Ceto Concve n E nmreRedmnfm. 9papr>any 
... _ ,E3H> 


_ _. I OTWWOMY ORCHESTRA. Kenneth KfceitajfXf) 
Cterio* Bone* (gUHr ) Bertte Owwrti I^Coesmra - Rene*: 
Pamne paw ime Merle dMmte, Brian Ctmbrtar Esprtte 

RodHpo: Oaneteno de Aramuez RhaelMteisteeov: CapncOQ 
Ssoxntto. C11JO.e9SO.rr5Q.CS.C45Q. E3J0- 


The 

70d 

74pm 


WREN QROHESrnA & Oim f 


Sheitoy (pmnoi Stertbc Kwtei&iee 


a Theme rt Paganini 

SO. C7S0. C6 SO. CS. C4. 


C9SO.C850. 


HirCBPdaifiaoiomi 


600 

74pm 


LONPONSriiPHOlfroBOiESTRA. Ora nwienbwevIcortrt ■ 
Anne Joeeph ptetol Menrfkltalhn- Or. ’A Hiiasunimer Ntfre 
I Dmam' Herd*: Wa ter Muac SOte Bmcto Vtain Concanowo i. 


Cl 150. C1QS0. C9J0 


fia&. 


ItearHoeWieugarm 


Thu 
9 Oct 
MSpra 


IxmmsYwm-Qm Hte aotea 


Ft) 

nod 

Zttpm 


PMap P erebBipmnoi n o m lidOr -The Barter rtl. 

PaerQym bet tteetonartnoe: rtano Concano No 2 
B mt tt m c . Symphony Ho 3 ’Eraca'. 

cn SO, , cm ^. ^50. cajs jq, csjm. HernondGM oY m 


OTYOFLOIBON 

Ibctama (ham) 

Canoenoe No 2 in E flax. 
40 et Q mnoi K5SQ 
cs, r7so,ca 5o.es, C4. 


mcheto HhhDk icond) Bany 
rstuny NO 29 n A. K201 Horn 
,1ft 3 in E tat. K*47. Spnphonr No 


ILSO 


LONDON SYMPHONY 


ORCHESTRA 


ante 


Tomorrow 28 September 730pm 

SIR COLIN DAVIS 

oonduoor 

BRUNO LEONARDO GELBER 


BEETHOVEN ... Piano Concerto No 5 ‘Bmperor* 

RAVEL Daphnis et Q 1 J 06 (compiete) 

LONDON SYMPHONY CHORUS 


Seal PrwslliSa 110 J0,«-50.£6J0. £3.£L50 
Box Office Tel. lMckaYdaymc. Sun 01-638 88P1/62A8795 


ILSO 


Sateiday 4 October at 7-45pm 


BRITTEN 


ELGAR. 


.Four Sea Interfudes 
fttMn ‘Rster Grimes’ 
Cello Concerto 


RACHMANINOV 


.Symphony No 2 


ANDREW LITTON conductor 
ALEXANDER BADLUEcdio 


ILSO 


Sunday 5 October at 730pm 


BERUOZ. 
RAVEL. 
RAVEL- 


-Overture *Le Corsaire* 
Jpavane pour une Infante d^fimte 
Botero 


RAYMOND GUBBAY presents 

ax the BARBICAN 

tonight 

MUSIC AND DANCE 

ALL SEATS SOLD 

npafl BYPUBLTC DEMAND BOO^G 
NOW OPEN FOR DECKA®ER£7 
PERFORMANCES AT 3pm AND 145pm 



FRIDAY NEXT 3 OCTOBER at 7.45 p.m. 

TCHAIKOVSKY 


MARCHE SLAVE,- SWAN LAKE SUITE* 

pirn ocow irro i fe. u 

THE NUTC RACK ER SUITE; 

1812 OVERTURE 

rertho— merfroerd ^ offerer 
LONDON CONCEHTOR^^r^ 
Coafacttr. HARRY RAmNOWTTZWnXIAM STOPHSTSON pone 
band of the nnsa GUARDS 

£5,£8,g£BJft£9-».£M J0 



THURSDAY SOCTOBHam 7*5 pro. 

RtusitiL BARBER OF SEVILLE OV. 

Grier PEER GYNT SUITE 

Rachmaninov.... PIANO C0NCEKT02 

BcedMvcn EROICA SYMPHONY 

LONDON SYMPHONY ORC^^IUt 

enr-nfM^ * s ram miat rBUPFOWKEpsoo 
£550, £8.50, £8, 0^0. £10-50. £050 




SATURDAY It OCTOBER ttS pus. 

PUCCINI GALA NIGHT 

*. hm. LBBobon*CheGchdaMntma.Sl imCMemano 
_ ..£aL OSeere&roitiHa; Modem BwterflyUnBelDi, 

; |74| Hmpiiiiia Chegg*. lore Duer. Teeea B ec a ndia Annoon, 

1 Wa VaeliyArte^ELnceTka U St rl h r . Ommd SchledO nno 

Bitbbinc; Tar end et Natan DoRop, toqntBB SegM 
Ctennc Scene. 

LONDON CONCERT OROEKTRA 
Cocdnapn DAVID COLEMAN • LONDON CHORALE 


anUAN DAVIES. EUZABETHYAUGBANte paW 
^HTBffokLAM. ADRIAN MABTCtHH 


EENZ1HH1 

£530, f*-50, £8, £9-50, £10.50, £11.50 


TUESDAY U OCTOBER mX«S pro. 

AUTUMN LOVE CLASSICS 

... SLEEPING BEAUTY WALTZ 

— , CARMEN SUITE 

|7MI r>|*. , PTkVOCOhfCSRTONn.1 




WILLIAM TELL OVERTURE 
^■BLUE DANUBE WAJCT2 


ROMEO AND JULIET 


C ONCERT ORCHESTRA 
Condactoc JAMBS BLAIR YITKINSEOWpaao 
■ il Mnu llm^rwiryl rt i ii i M mtirirfM Urth i 

£5, £6, £1 £8 50. £9.50, £1050 



SUNDAY I* OCTOBER *rXJ0 pro. 

rn.~i.4-ni™. HEBRIDES OVEHTUBE 


—ROYAL FIREWORKS MUSIC 
BeetteYca^EKFEROR PIANO CONCERTO 
Mmn SYMPHONY No. 40 


LONDON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

rwnrtnr - NORMAN DEL MAR ntCALftOGfipnoi 
£5.50. £650, £8. £950, £30.30. £U.» 

Box Office □ 1-628 8795 CC 01-438 8891 




WfGMCRi STREET MiH 5DT 

■ - f/ASACE? WILLIAM LYtic 

SOY CFfICE Cl CCS 2141 MAIIMC LIST C3 


WICMORE HALL 


271.. 

7 Jo pm. 


SSSw* 

asrt 

1 U 0 u 


omuuksaxy celebrates, shura chbikassky pteno. 

Lvteon Pianoiane Sroea. Bdwbere Sorroe m A 0664. 
9cbu»enn:Knesierar8apiARadifMrtDo«:Vene»)rBOneTnena 

o< Cora* 0042 -|| ‘ - fir <M Feu t ana 2 . UasHonpinan 

NO 12 C750. C6.t450.P 




Beedmmn: Sonet* m E op UBi Butene: Ha* Pmoee op 1 iB.Chopbc 
Nbitv*Nle*>TaroBeap6a BdtedemF rnmorap92.SbmrofQoaro*FlMna. 

8nm:7.pmwroiTienmgSo«n)E4S0£«.D.l2 


Sf» 

TJOpjm. 


Tuemej 

30 SNA 

7 JO pm. 


CHABREEK. 


.Espai 


RODRIGO — CbndertD de Aranjuez 

RJMSKY-KORSAKOV„ Capriccio Espagnole 

KENNETH KLEIN conductor 
CARLOS BONELL guitar 


Scat Prices £IL50,£9J0,r7J0. £6. £450 

Box Office Td 10-8 everyday tuc Stm 01-438 8891/4288795 


BARBICAN HALL 


Twadsy 39 September, 7.45pm 

JAIME LAREDO 

~A superior* musiaan'- Wlifaraglon Pofl 

sooitish chamber orchestra 

-IdteakiUafuaabouthebtadtatibtraKhaBwJuMaap’ 

- frier Maxwdl Danes 

EbeUeneNatofflik - Mozart 

Mhto n uimff E^fcft Dream Suite Madebsobi 

The Four Seasoos Vhwlifi 


~A ipkmU»a1bmM*i <ifVbBUSFo*Siio*t**mLav+*ii&utlm 

p a ra p rprttee ewig 6ft te>ptrt » <towH n8*i» * - P TB 


Trtrotemaffl Tekrtopeboataw: ftebmt Bra OBeeWdJI 8891/01-6288795. 


qp 


Thursday 2 October 7.15 pm BARBICAN HALL 

SIMON RATTLE 

conducts 

CITY OF BIRMINGHAM 
SYMPHO NY ORCH ESTRA 
PETER DONOHOE piano 

STRA VINSK Y Symphony in Three Movements 

GERSHWIN Piano Concerto in F 

STRAVINSKY Petrushka 

RAVEL LaValse 


Sen Price.JJJJa £9-50. £7.50, £6,£4.J0,£3 
01^38 8891 028 8793 



VICTOR HOCHHAUSER praeots *r da BARBICAN - 

WEDNESDAY 8th OCTOBER at 7.45 

POPULAR CLASSICS 


MENDELSSOHN Overture A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM 

(UNDO. WATER MUSIC SUITE 


BRUCH VIOLIN CONCERTO NO * 

DVORAK. NEW WOULD SYMPHONY 


LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Conductor: BRAMWELL TOVE Y Soloist: ANNA JOSEPH 

£7. £8. £9.50. (10 50. £1 1. 50 fmmHafl 01-6 18 8091)028 0195 


BARBICAN HALL 


Monday 13 October 7.45pm 

ROYAL GALA CONCERT 


yXMATXNESE&JRlTlESiElJftOPE) LTD. 

attended by HJLH. THE PRINCESS ANNE 

as Presideiu ofSave the Qaldren 

«ithtbc 

LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

ocodooedb; 

SIR CHARLES GROVES 

ALAN BRIND BBC Young Musician of Che Year violin 
EVEUN G LENNI E pereusbo 
JO ANN PIC KENS s oprano 
DONNIE RAY ALBERT bass bariiQDe 

See ftrtaeea taods above Dor {bDpmBSwne (tadb 
•nA^£lO.£8-£6,£^?3 B« Office 01^388*91/6288795 


VICTOR BOCSaaUSER in anec. •** the BARBICAN j 

SATURDAY 25th OCTOBER at 7.45 

[BEETHOVEN CONCERT 

LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Conductor NORM AN DEL MAR 
Salois: PETER FRANKL 
OVERTURE •LEONOBE XO J’, 

PIANO CONCERTO NO 3 m C MINOR, 
SYMPHONY NO < fa F, ‘PASTORAL’ 

£7, £8, £9 50. £10.50, £H.WfromHilK)14tt889i)eM8795 



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10 Oct 
T JO pro 


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tSacSV SrtDWiLL VJO DOROTHY UM£LL lute n) OWM 


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It a rasmnsn tner ow concen nee oeen CANCELLED Tk*te money 


a a asaBag purct ^ e « „ „ 

EChouyeau duA-rtidR. liitea imdi aura CKl>lfa * .**|""°^ ; 




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PRUSSIA COVE Mlt&C-irn M mane Seminar Pete BordL Oertte 

PHBpe. Ute boro Teeaw KupWnen. Melmd Letev. hen Room. 


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Ou«mop87ES50.E«50,D.fa.QSOSpOTAPtePC» Partly C<y.W>a^ 

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JOHN VAUJBt pteno 


Chapin Pipfnmae roc Maeue Op a.2au0e».3P«teudeiOpJ8, 

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IcilO i - tB30 Nam cneoge oi eraet mo programme 

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ET. JAifeT rpi-ToH ettm . 

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eng bee ertfea. wrory or agumn after peiformenge 

ftobortTrarter^p. 


* DAT _ 

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ERNST KoVAdC nakn DAVID OWB* NORRIS nw> Ute 


ftompDoc* Aueme 8 Caraeny tewert Sonm a 8 far 1078. Ptemec 

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m Dnwitr Oo 108 IA50.I A £3. £2CrwmopmrTemenl Artiste Mp 

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conductor. Bnw taafl* oeflo. Pac**; The memed Braun 

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eus dem Tratarut Dw A)p«nF*gtr. Hctenung. Stemsutw. D» 


WIGMORE HALL 


^9 EARLY MUSIC 
& BAROQUE SERIES 


OCTOBER 1986 to JANUARY 1987 

Tel 01-935 2141 FOR FREE BROCHURE 
OR WRITE TO WIGMORE HALL 
20% discount if you book for 6 concerts or more, 
out of a choice of 24 




ALBINONI CONCERT/ MARTIN BEST MEDIEVAL ENSEMBLES 
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25TH ANNIVERSARY /PURCELL QUARTET/SALOMON QUAR^H 
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TiSay 7 October « 1.10 P*n - W 

BRITISH PREMIERE 


“livre du Saint Sacremcnt 
- Olivier Messiaen 
JENNIFER BATE Organ 


n 


Or 


10 JSJyj’ltL .VI jRi^Sfi* 1 * ******* 

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Gnorus Hasten ftank teswfael 


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m TC1NTOS A NTH FINANCE 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 




Classical records 

■ Return of 
the master 
musician 


Horowitz in Moscow DG 9 
. . v 499-2 (CD, also black disc and 
. cassette) 

The Glenn Gould Logoey, 
wl 3 CBS M3 42107(3 Wat* 
.S' discs, also CDs and 
" cassettes) 

. ' ypyrd. Gibbons: Keyboard 
'■ Tnusic. Glenn Gould. CBS MP 
39552 (black dfec, also CD 
and cassette) 

: N wagnen Piano 

transcriptions. Glenn Gould. 
CBS MP 39764 (black disc, 
also CD and cassette) 

. 

' Most readers will be aware of 
. the story of Vladimir Horo- 
- witz's return to his homeland 
•’■■■ earlier this year, after a 60- 
< year exile. Bat it is an essen- 
** tial background to DG’s aural 
• postcard of that emotional 
" • occasion, and it possibly ex- 
plains why so much of the 
Russian audience's cheering 
■ \ ted stamping is left on this 


REVIEW 






Horowitz: magisterial command 

Chopin mazurkas and Schu- 
mann's TrBumerd reveal that 
whimsical rhythmic licence — 
almost extinct these days — 
that infuriates or .brings 
ecstacy according to taste. 

It is, though, Horowitz’s 
incomparably grandiose play- 
ing of two Scriabin studies that 
arouses the greatest acclaim 
from this audience. 

The Glenn Gould Legacy 
continues to nJL Since the 
^Canadian pianist cut 90 al- 
bums for CBS, before _ his 
in timely death in 1982, it is 
mssible that this retrospective 
series mil rival The Archers 
or longevity. L for one, would 
not complain. Volume 3 con- 
tains his last recording, of 
Richard Stranss's under- 
played B minor Sonata, and it 
reveals Gould at his best 

The Strauss is not the only 
rare work championed here: 
there is also Grieg's early E 
minor Sonata and several 
Sibelius pieces. But the high- 
lights are probably 10 of 
Brahms's Intermezzi and the 
Vagner transcriptions. The 
single disc of him playing 
Elizabethan and Jacobean 
keyboard music Is obviously 
not for diehard virginals fanat- 
ics, but there is a serene, 
natural sweep to hfe phrasing 
and superb delineation of in- 
ner parts. 

Richard Morrison 



ON THE AIR 

A closer encounter 
for just good friends 


The programme Is a 
- trimmed version of wfaat was 
- . transmitted live by BBC TV: 

the old virtuoso's brief and 
\ highly idiosyncratic homage to 
Scarlatti and Mozart, then 
‘ number after number of 
flamboyant Romantic 
outpouring. 

Each piece uncovers another 
-v. facet of his extraordinary tech- 
\ niqne. Rachmaninov preludes 
v . show off the magisterial com- 
■/’ mand of tonal colouring. The 
■. > Liszt-Schubert Soirees de Vi- . 
f;; enne and Moszkowski's 
"Morcam caracteristique dem- 
' onstrate the deft, gfchimring 
control of prestissimo filigree. 


Karajan's deathly triumph 


■ Mozart: Don Giovanni. Tomowa- 
an^/Baltsa/Battte/Ramey/Rjrianetto. 

Berim PhiJ/ Karajan DG 419 179-2. (3 
CDs, also black disc and cassette) 

The opening chords — each held, h 
seems, for an eternity — of Karajan’s 
Don Giovanni (out next week), deceive 
in part. The implication that this is 
going to be an old man's interpretation 
of Mozart slow and lacking in arrack, is 
quickly dispelled. 

Karajan, with the Berlin Phil- 
harmonic on peak form, is ever power- 
ful on musical drama, whether it be the 
hush of death that comes over the 
orchestra at the killing of the 
Commendatore. or tire snarls of rage 
-that accompany Elvira in her angrier 
moments. On the other hand, this is a 
Giovanni where the sense of mortality is 
strong and the sense of fun in Mozart's 
dramma giocosa distinctly 
underplayed. 

The pleasures of this life below are 
distinctly fleeting, Karajan seems to be 
saying, especially through his orchestra 
where dark and ominous chords 
prevail And the Beilin Philharmonic, 
as in some other Karajan opera sets, 
take prime position. They have, of 
course, the opening word and they have 
too the dosing word, as Karajan makes 
them almost cover the final ensemble, 
with those left on stage sounding 
considerably less joyful than they claim, 
to be (“ripetiam aUegramente”) at the 
punishment of Giovanni 


Karajan is much more concerned 
with the struggle against death by 
Giovanni than the peasant frivolities 
that go on around him. In Paata 
Burch uladze as the Commendatore and 
Samuel Ramey in the title role he Iras 
two redoubtable adversaries. Burch- 
uladze’s bass, as he accepts the invita- 
tion to dine and, indeed, arrives as 
promised, is a true voice from the grave. 

Ramey's Giovanni is far more bass 
than baritone, a bit in the Siepi mould. 
Some of the higher-lying parts of the 
role find the tone a little arid, but there 


•He has gone for big voices 
and also singers who can 
sustain a line without ever 
appearing to draw breathy 

is compensation in plenty from the 
vocal command and virility in the 
timbre. Apart from Zeriina when we 
first meet her, Giov anni is the only 
person who finds much, pleasure in 
Seville. 

Karajan in his casting, which contains 
one or two surprises, has gone for tug 
voices and also for singers who can 
sustain a line without ever appearing to 
draw breath. Gosta Winbergh as 
Ottavio puis stylish phrasing and 
caressing tone before character. Anna 
Tomowa-Sintow, who previously re- 
corded Anna under Karl Bohm, may 
now be a bit matronly for the part, but 


when it comes to "Non mi dir" she 
delivers a piece of singing that is both 
beautiful and virtuosic — and it is clear 
why Karajan stuck with her. 

Kathleen Battle's Zeriina, curious as a 
kitten until she finds out what life is 
really like among the gentry, is a total 
success. Agnes Baltsa's Elvira, though, is 
one of the set's question marks: she and 
Karajan are as one in “Ah! fuggj i] 
traditor” and then at total odds with one 
another in “Mi tradi". where the 
conductor sets impossible speeds in an 
aria probably not within Baltsa's natural 
range. 

Frerrucio Furianetto, a baritone little 
known in Britain although he did sing at 
Glyndebourne some years back, is a 
grumpy, characterful Leporello, be- 
moaning his lot and generally not much 
liking anyone — excellent diction and 
more than a touch of the Taddeis. 
Alexander Malta is dull casting for 
Masetto: an unduly harsh and brash 
performance. 

In sum, a highly personal dark-fa ued 
grand opera view of Giovanni, with 
some moments to make the listener sit 
bolt upright and certainly enough to 
encourage a visit to Salzburg next 
Easter, when Karajan and most ofhis 
forces will -be on stage at the 
Festspielhaus. 

John Higgins 

• DG have gently pointed out that the 
Kleiber Traviata is available on CD and 
has been since last spring. My apologies. 


FILMS ON TV 


In the distinguished film 
canon of Sir David Lean The 
Passionate Friends is one of 
the least considered. It is also 
rarely shown, which makes 
tomorrow's screening on 
Channel 4 (2.30-4. 1 5pm) 
particularly welcome. 

It appeared in 1949 and 
despite a strong literary pedi- 
gree — a story by H. G. Welts, 
screenplay by Eric Ambler — 
tended to be dismissed as an 
inferior version of Lean's Brief 
Encounter, which had come 
out four years before and was 
still very fresh in the memory. 

Certainly there are similar- 
ities. with Trevor Howard 
again cast as a nice doctor at 
the centre of a romantic 
triangle. But the structure and 
setting of The Passionate 
Friends make it an entirely 
different experience. 

Ann Todd and Claude 
Rains play a married couple. 
She was once in love with 
Howard but chose the older 
Rains for his wealth and 
security. Five years after the 
marriage she meets Howard 
again, and the old fires are 
rekindled. But she decides to 
return to her husband, who 
forgives her on condition that 
Howard goes out of her life for 
ever. 

Fate decrees otherwise. An- 
other four years go by and 
Todd is on holiday in Switzer- 
land. Who should she bump 
into but (you have guessed it) 
Trevor Howard. This time the 
consequences are not as 
straightforward and against 
the wishes of all concerned the 
marriage comes under threat. 

Lean chose to tell the story 
in a complicated series of 
flashbacks which seemed to 
some contemporary critics 
that he had become a slave to 
technique. Had he told the 
story as a straightforward 
narrative, he might have been 
in danger of exposing its 
slightness. Ambler admitted 
that be could get it on to a 
postcard. 

For all that, it is a polished 
and sympathetic piece, distin- 
guished by that impeccable 
craftsmanship which makes 
Lean so much admired by his 



We'U meet again: Ann Todd and Trevor Howard 


fellow film makers. Like much 
of Lean's work, the film has 
the quality of an exquisite 
piece of furniture, a triumph 
of fit and finish. 

The three central perfor- 
mances are excellent and 
nicely complementary. Ann 
Todd, the cool blonde who 
was then married to Lean, has 
seldom been better in films, 
and in depth and subtlety her 
playing in The Passionate 


RECOMMENDED 


King’s Bow (1941): The one 
in which Ronald Reagan has 
his legs amputated and 
asks, "where's the rest of 
me?" (BBC2, today, 1.55- 
3.55pm). 

Once in a Lifetime (1932): 

Jack Oakie In classic Kaufman- 
Hart satire on Hollywood 
(Channel 4, today, 2-3.45pm). 
Dance of the Vampires 
(1967): Roman Polanski's 


Friends eclipses her more 
famous performance in The 
Seventh Veil 

Rains, who shortly before 
his death worked with Lean 
again in Lawrence of Arabia. 
displays his usual intelligence, 
while for Trevor Howard the 
picture was another early 
milestone in a rich career. 

Peter Waymark 

British-made horror spoof 
(BBC2, today, 11.45pm- 
1.35am). 

Dark Passrae (1947): 
Humphrey Bogart as an 
escaped convict hying to 
prove his innocence (BBC2, 
tomorrow, 3-4 40pm). 

* The Return of Martin 
Guerre (1982): Daniel Vigne's 
acclaimed drama of French 
village life in the 16th century 
(Channel 4, Wed, 10pm- 
midnight). 

* Rrei British TV showing 


Modem drama out of Africa 


Richard Strauss's “last rose” 
faces Beethoven's final ques-^ 
lion and answer in two of the 
year's most valuable record- 
ings in their field. 

Jessye Norman was not the 
first, to find StrausS’s last 
“Malven", the song he wrote 
II months before his death, 
came to light in a New York 
Sotheby’s sale in 1984, and 
was recorded for the first time 
by Eva Marton with Andrew 
Davis for CBS last year. But 
Norman's is the first recorded 
performance to hear in the 
song's contours the echo of the 
closing horn solo in his 
“September" and to lead it 
into rhapsody. 

More affirmative and ener- 
getic than Marion's somewhat 
tense reading, Norman's is a 
picture of mallows, phlox and, 
indeed, the composer's own 
writing in late but still full 
bloom. 

The 19 other songs (which 
include “Stiller Gang" with its 
original viola obbligato) are 
equally luxuriant. “Aller- 
seelen”, for instance, is dar- 
ingly slow; yet the way in 
which Strauss's harmonic 
placing of each word is lis- 
tened to, then suspended 


The Norman 
conquest 


R. Strauss: Lefafer Norman / Parsons. Philips 416 296-1 
(black (fisc, also CD and cassette) 

R Strauss: Four Last Songs Tomowa / Sintow/ Berlin 
Philharmonic J von Karajan. 

DG CD 419 1 88-2 (also on black disc and cassette) 
B eet hov en: The Late String Quartets Melos Quartet DG (3 
CDs) 415 676-2 (also on cassette and black discs) 

Schubert String Quartets, etc Busch Quartet / Serkln. EMI 
EX 137 29 095GG (three black discs) 


TELEVISION 


for the trembling innigkeit of 

the Op 132's thanksgiving 
song, and enables the long In Death is Part of the Process 
variation movement ofthe Op the BBC has festooned a 
IjJ to unfold in ever- d rama about South Africa 
regenerating speeds and with political backbone which 
timbres. ; s certain to stimulate 

As thoroughbreds from the controversy. 

DG stable, it goes without Alan Plater's screenplay 
saying that these perfor- based on Hilda Bernstein's 
mances are given in intensely novel is passionate about the 
dose recording acoustic which impossibility of peaceful re- 
eavesdrops on a fair share of forms under a police state 
breathing, and are accompa- posing as a democracy — let 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1065 

Prizes of the New Collins Thesaurus will be given for the first two 
: correct solutions opened on October 2. 1986. Entries should, be ad- 
- dressed to The Times Concise Crossword Competition, I 
Pennington Street. London, EIX9. The winners and soluuon will 
be announced on Saturday. October 4. 1986. 

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te Provide loan (4) A CROS& 1 Masof $ MeasJy 8 Iey 9 Cd- 

5 Encourage (4) „mn ,q 

6 Hawaiian guitar I?) key 17 J 9 & “far* ri Aehut 28 

7 Samis biography (II) Abuser 25Eraser MaBC Z7Aghasi 2* 

8 Four ptanc-fiiced fig- gwr*,. 2Adoie 3SpaVlik 4 Finicky S 

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14 Egyptian cobra (31 2|Caral 23 Sneer 


lightly on long breaths, re- 
leases it from cloying 
sentimentality. “Sfendchen” 
by contrast, barely touches the 
ground, as the lips merely 
brush against its consonants in 
a midsummer night's dream 
of an evocation. 

“September", the song hith- 
erto considered Strauss's last, 
has a new interpreter In Anna 
Tom owa-Si n tow, whose Four 
Last Songs have an impatient 
excitability about them. Com- 
pared with Norman's rapt 
ecstatic 1983 performances, 
these have a forceful, at times 
literally breathless physical 
presence, reinforced by von 
Karajan's orchestral propul- 
sion and a recording which 
brings harp and celeste into 
glittering prominence. 

Both Tomowa-Sintow’s 
personality and the way in 
which Karajan exploits the 


acoustic of the Berlin 
Philharmonic have more to 
offer the Moonlight Music and 
the Countess's monologue 
from Capriccio. Her last ques- 
tion, poised in gleaming 
mezza-voce. rings on long 
after the disc has stopped 
spinning. 

On to Beethoven's final 
question, the Op 135 quartet’s 
“Must it be?", posed with 
proper intensity by the Melos 
Quartet in the disc which 
completes their Beethoven se- 
ries. Listening closely to the 
vibrantly sustained support to 
the “question" itself reveals 
something at the heart of these 
performances: a fearless assur- 
ance of balance in both en- 
semble and musical structure. 

It plunges the opening mae- 
stoso chords of the Op 127 i 
deep into the work’s base- 
rock, provides the confidence 


nied by a most conscientiously 
researched booklet 
The susurration of 78 pre- 
cious revolutions per minute 
lakes over from the heavy 
breathing on modern record- 
ings in a new compilation of 
the pre-war 1930s Schubert 
recordings of the Busch Quar- 
tet The troubled intensity of 
the four sepia faces on the 
front of the box is misleading. 
There is, it is true, a sense of 
highly strung vulnerability in 
the individual character of the 
two violins, even as they track 
each other in the 1938 B flat 
D1 12 quartet; and it is tempt- 
ing 10 hear in it a vibration of 
the year in which it was 
recorded. In every other re- 
spect though, these are perfor- 
mances out of their time, 
astonishing in their buoyancy 
and clarity of purpose. 

Hilary Finch 


alone majority black rale. 

The excellent Art Malik 
stars as an Indian student who 
abandons the law in the 1960s 
to join the first fumbling 
attempts at armed resistance 
to apartheid. 

Death is Part of the Process 
(BBC 1, tomorrow, 9.05- 
10.20pm), which follows The 
White Tribe of Africa (BBC 2, 
8.10-9.05 pm), projects the 
seething discontent sym- 
bolized by the Mack power 
salute of the clenched fist. 

Political debate in Jeffrey 
Archer's First Among Equals 
(TTV, Toes, 9-10pm) is more 
polite, although no less vindic- 
tive, taking place in the ele- 
gant chamber and bars of 
Westminster's talking shop. 

Dramatized by Derek Mar- 
lowe in 10 parts, First Among 
Equals follows the burning 
ambitions of four fledgling 
MPs elected in 1964 as they 



Third degree: Indris (Art Malik) meets the Special Branch 

try (0 scramble np the greasy cultural and class-conscious 
pole of political opportunism vein of the successful Mapp 


to the pinnacle of power, 
number 10 Downing Street 

Jeremy Child is the 
haughty, aristocratic Tory 
Charles Seymour weighing in 
the votes in Sussex; James 
Faulkner has more steel as his 
self-made Conservative rival 
Simon Kerslake; Tom Wil- 
kinson plays the inteUectnal 
bntcher's sou, Raymond 
Gould, championing the 
underprivileged; and David 
Robb bis fiery Scottish Labour 
colleague, Andrew Fraser. 

Politics never rears its ngly 
discordant head in 
E. F. Benson's fictional world 
of genteel ladies and retired 
Army officers in the well- 
heeled Home Counties. Paying 
Guests (BBC 2, Wed and 
Thors, 930- 10 JO pm) is in the 


and Lucia adaptations. 

Set in a determinedly 
respectable health spa board- 
ing bonse, Paying Guests of- 
fers hypochondria, breathless 
high-pitched dialogue and the 
superb Robert Hardy as the 
barking, bicycling and insen- 
sitive Colonel Chase. 

The little spa dramas are 
worlds apart from tonight's 
unsettling supernatural setting 
of The Last Seance (JTV, 10- 
11pm). Exquisitely photo- 
graphed, Agatha Christie's 
short story features Norma 
West as a medium haunted by 
her earthly powers and the 
mysterious Madame Exe 
(Jeanne Moreau). 

Bob Williams 


“A fascinating story . . . 
an intriguing tale of greed, 
high explosives 
and evil deeds.” f { 

Wall Street Journal 



THE NEW WHO’S WH0 AND 
WHO’S BEST IN CLASSICAL MUSIC 


Angry atheist at 
the church organ 


12 CnidlM 

14 Egyptian cobra (3) 

15 Small restaurant (6) 

19 Well-being (71 

20 Spoil (3) 

14 Group slang (3) 

25 YhjW (4) 

20 Magic stick t«> 

27 Applaud t*) 


J sSuw. .ittrwMf Road. Elihant south cast 
London 



NAME — - 

.Stress 


SI-ISSSviE SIS ! 






EDWARD GREENFIELD, ROBERT 
^ LAYTON AND IVAN MARCH 

W Authors of the worl(Hap"" e 
' COMPLETE PENGUIN. 

^ STEREO RECORD AND 
||k CASSETTE GUIDE 


r 


Douglas Poole, the central 
character of David Gregan’s 
new play The Awful Insola- 
tion of Rage (Radio 3, Fri, 
9.25-10-35pm). is a man who 
affects to be angry with the 
world but is really angry with 
his inability to find a place in 
it. 

Played by Ronald Pickup, 
he is a brilliant church or- 
ganist but a non-believer who 
is likely, just for the hell of it 
to switch from the Nunc 
Dtmittis to the Red Flag. He 
lives with a politically postur- 
ing flautist (Diana Quick) but 
has a string of affairs. 

“No blood flows through 
England, " he exclaims, recall- 
ing the invective of such 
Osborne ■ heroes as Jimmy 
Porter. Bui there is humour in 
the play as well as pain, and a 
nicely ironic ending. 

Fritz Hochwalder's play 
about the Jesuits in Latin 
America. The Holy Experi- 
ment (Radio 4. Mon. 8.15- 
9.45pm). appears in a new 
translation by Basil Ashmore 
which presents the work in its 
original form. 

The 40-year-old play has 
previously been performed 
here only with an altered 
ending that, according to 
Ashmore, changes its whole 
spirit and message. AJan Do 
bie. Alfred Burke and Peter 


Jeffrey take the leading roles 
in a drama about the Jesuit 
society in which the South 
American Indians sought ref- 
uge against the barbarism of 
Spanish colonial rule. 

Michael Hordern plays 
Moltere’s The Miser (Radio 4, 
tomorrow. 2J0-4pm) in the 
latest in the Globe Theatre 
season of stage classics. The 
production uses the transla- 
tion by the actor. Miles 
Malleson. who did much to 
make Moli£re accessible to 
British audiences. 

Roald Dahi. who is 70 this 
month, has sold more 
children’s books than any 
other author, not excepting 
Beatrix Potter and Enid 
Blyton. He has penned some 
memorable stories for grown- 
ups as well. A Dose of Dahl's 
Magic Medicine (Radio 4. 
tomorrow. 9-9‘30pm) is 
particularly concerned with 
the darkness at the heart ofhis 
writing. 

How to Listen, a gently 
satirical guide to the wireless 
by Stephen Potter and Joyce 
Grenfell, was the piece that, 40 
years ago. launched the Third 
Programme. To mark the 
anniversary it is being re- 
peated on the Third’s succes- 
sor, Radio 3 (Mon, 7.10- 
7.45pm). and gi ves a chance 10 
hear again such radio im- 
mortals as Carieion Hobbs 
and Gladys Young, p 






18 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 


THE WEEK AHEAD 








RADIO 


INTO BATTLE: Siegfried Sassoon 
was horn 100 vears aoo this month. 


His autobiographical classic. 
Memoirs ora Fox-Hunting Man, 
charts an orphan boy's progress 
from an idyllic rural England to the 
trenches of the First World War. 
Radio 4, today, 4.45-5pm. 


THEATRE 

FAMILY CURSE Vanessa 
Redgrave plays the upright Mrs 
Alving in Ibsen's Ghosts. 
Considered shocking in its time, the 
play is about a respectable family - 
trying to live with the scandal of 
venereal disease. Young Vic (01- 
928 6363), from Thursday. 


BOOKS 


to ensnare Britain's naval hero. Lord 
Nelson. Beloved Emma (published 
on Monday by Wekienfeld. El 4.95), 
is a biography by Flora Fraser, 
daughter of Lady Antonia. 


W! i FTd J:’ 

f c i n'l 1' 

| B^WfrT]|i|i7u»37T 


m V r ? 


1 





DANCE 


TIMES CHOICE 

(ElSE CONCERTS 


I 


CENTRAL BALLET OF 

CHINA: Making its first visit to 
Britain, opening Thurs with 
the first of twoprogrammes 
ranging from The new 
Years Sacrifice, based on a 
Chinese story about a 
young widow forced Into a 
second marriage, to the 
lakeside scene from Swan 
Lake. Excellent dancers 


Lionel Jeffries pile on the 

Shaftesbury (01 -379 5399). 

WOMAN IN MIND: 


nuiimn 

Ayckbourn's latest foray into 
middle-class frustration. Julia 
McKenzie shines as the 
touched fantasist of the title. 
Vaudeville (01-836 9988). 

THE HOUSE OF BERNARDA 
ALBA: Lorca's last tragedy of 
Spanish manners, robustly 


and an interesting repertory. 
Sadler's Wells (01- 
278 8916),Thurs-Oct18. 

SCOTTISH BALLET: Starts 


MOZART PREMIERE: The 
first performance of the 
Ouartettsatz K 464a, a 
piece left unfinished by Mozart 


lately completed by 
iRe Howard. 


Underground (Thurs). Other 
directors featured include 
Hitchcock, Powell, Reed and 
Adrian Brunei. „ 

Museum of London (01-600 
3599). Tubs and Thurs, untn 
Dec 11. 


and still battling 


ARTS DIARY 


Colour 

bind 


played by Joan Plowright, 
Glenda Jackson. Amanda Root 


Les Be Howard. 

St Samson's Church, 
Cricklade. Wiltshire (0793 
750338). Today. 3pm. 
WAR REQUIEM: Britten's 
War Requiem by massed 


ROCK 


, i 

•• T* jry-** 
■* 

H -V 


JOAN ARMATRAOING: 

Start of an autumn tour for the 


soul-searching songstress. 

Wed. Ipswich Gaumont 


a tour in Bath (Tues) with a 
revised production by Peter 
Darrell of Gisetie. Three _ 
different casts perform this 
week. 


ex ai- _ 

Lyric, Hammersmith (01-741 
2311). 


OUT OF TOWN 


Theatre Royal, Bath 
(0225 65065). Tues-Oct 4. 

NORTHERN BALLET 
THEATRE: At Doncaster, 
Tues-Oct 4. with its ^ 

production of Coppeha which 
transfers the action to 
northern England. 

Gaumont. Doncaster 
(0302 62523). 


COVENTRY: The Boys from 
Hibernia: New comedy about 
computer fraud by Mark 
Power, the author of Modem 


Belgrade Studio (0203 
553055)- Opens Thurs. 

GLASGOW: The 
Representative: Robert David 
MacDonald's translation of the 
Rolf Hochhuth drama, (greeted 


LONDON 

CONTEMPORARY DANCE 
THEATRE: At Edinburgh 
today, Sunderland from Tues, 


by MacDonald. 

Citizens' (041 429 022). Free 
dress rehearsal Thurs. Opens 
Frl. 



Wed, Ipswich Gaurm 
(0473 53641): Thurs, 
Bournemouth Conference 


□UUiiroiiiuuui vviHMiwi.— 

Centre (0202 22122); Fn, 
Brighton Centre (0273 
202881). 



STEVE RAY VAUGHAN: 

The Texas guitar stinger with 
the meanest hat in town. 
Thurs, Hammersmith 
Palais. London W6 (01-748 
2812). 

NEW ORDER: The 
Mancunian lords of the post- 


punk dancefloor mix. 

Thurs, Tower BaHroom, 
Birmingham (021 4051503); Fri, 
Malvern Winter Gardens 
(068453377). 

CHRISTY MOORE: Gentle 



WATFORD: So Long On 
Lonely Street British premiere 

of a Broadway success, a 
comedy by Sandra Deer. 

centred on the reacting of a wm. 

Gayle Hunntautt. Snap •. 
.Protheroe, directed, by Lou.. 
Stein. 

Palace (0923 25671). Previews 
from Thurs. Opens Oct 8- ' * 


forces conducted by Sir 

John Pritchard (above) and 
David Atherton. 

Royal Albert Hail, 

Kensington (01-589 8212). 
Tomorrow, 7.30pm. 

DAVIS/ARRAU: Sir CoTri 
D avis conducts toe London . 
Symphony Orchestra in # 
Ravel's Daphtiis e t Chtoe ana 

Bruno Leonardo Geiber 

solos in Beetoovph's Piano 


vrintv. ■ i..ww— - — - — 

songs and harsh words from 
the Irish folk star. 


OPERA 


Concerto Nd5 “Simeror". 
Barbican Centre, Silk 


with new works by Robert 
Cohan (above) and 
Christopher Bannerman 
and a revival of Robert North's 
Troy Game. 

King's. Edinburgh 


King's. Edinburgh 

(031 229 1201). today. Empire, 

Sunderland (0/83 42517), 


Tues-Oct 4. 


THEATRE 

IN PREVIEW 


LES LIAISONS 
DANGEREUSES: HitRSC 
production of Christopher 
Hampton's adaptation of the 
18th-century novel by Lacks: a 
study in aristocratic sexual 
corruption and cynicism. 
Howard Davies directs a cast 
headed by Lindsay Duncan, 
Alan Rickman, Jean Anderson, 
Suzanne Burden. 

Ambassadors (01-836 6111). 
Thurs. press night Oct 14. 

THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA: New musical based on 
the classic story by Gaston 
Leroux. Music by Andrew 
Uoyd Webber. Michael 
Crawford is the Phantom. 
Sarah Brightman Is Christine. 
Harold Prince directs, with 
choreography and "musical 
singing" by Gillian Lynne. 

Her Majesty's (01-930 
4025/6606/2046/2856). 

Previews from today. Opens 
Oct 9. 


ROYAL OPERA HOUSE: 

Welsh National Opera's Ring 
cycle is completed this 
week with performances of 
Valkyrie ton Wit (5pm), 
SfagiHedon Tues (5pm) and 
Gotterdammerung on Thurs 
(4pm). G&ran Jarvefelt directs 
and Richard Armstrong 
conducts. 

Covent Garden, London 
WC2 (01-240 1066). 

OPERA NORTH: Opens its 
new season tonight with a new 
production of The Capture 
of Troy, the first part of 
Berlioz's Les Troyans. 

David UoyckJones conducts a 
cast led by American 
soprano Kristine Cieslnki as 
Cassandra, Ronald 
Hamilton as Aeneas. On Fri, 
Madam Butterfly: all 


, Barbican Centre, SHk 
Street, London EC2T01 -628 
8795, credit cards 01 -638 
8891). Tomorrow-, 7.30pm. 

ZARA NELSOVA: The 
distinguished cellist plays 
sonatas by Beethoven, 
Rachmaninov and Poulenc. 
Wtamore Hall. Wed, 
7.30pm. 


the Irish folk star. 

Thurs, Hammersmith 
Odeon, London W6 (01-748 
4081). 

TED HAWKIN&The LA 
■ blues/soul singer joins. Peter 
.iRowari; Brendan Croker & 
the Five O'Oock Shadows and 
frie Bectric Bluebirds for 
the ambitiously titled third 
London Cajun 'n.' Country • 
festival. j 

Fri, 100 Club; London Wt 
(01-636 0933>. 


GALLERIES 

OPENINGS 


FILMS 

OPENINGS 


MASQUERADIN: Spectacular 
costumes from the Netting Hill 
Carnival, in Arts Council 
touring show. 


Graves Art Gallery, Surrey 
Street Sheffield (0742 
734781). From today. 

NEW ARCHITECTURE: First 
major architecture show at toe 
RA for 40 years, examining toe 
work of three British 
designers: Foster, Rogers and 
Stirling. 

Royal Academy of Arts, 
Piccadilly, London W1 (01-734 
9052). From Fri. 

ARIKH A: Paintings, pastels 
and drawings over the past 
four years by the artist and art 
historian, Avigdor Arlkha. 
Marlborough Fine Art, 6 
Albemarle Street London Wt 
(01-629 5161). From Thurs. 

CONSERVATION: Special 
display demonstrating the 
restor a tion of antiques. 


TOP GUN (15): Tom Cruise 

stars as a cocky naval pitot 


Empire (01 -437 1234). From 
Fri. 


performances start at 7.15pm. 
Grand Theatre. New 
Briggate, Leeds (0532 459351). 

KENT OPERA: A new 
production of Carmen by Robin 
Lefevre starts Kent's 
season at Canterbury on Wed 
at 7.15pm. The Swedish 
mezzo, Anne-Marie Muhte 
makes her English debut in 
the title role opposite the Don 
Jos6 of Howard Haskin. 

The Marlowe, Canterbury 
(0227 67246V 


RENDEZ-VOUS (18V Stylish 
French drama of destructive 
passions, directed by Andrti 
Techinfc with Juliette Binoche 
as the provincial girl aiming for 
a Paris theatre career. 

Cannon Piccadilly (01-437 
3561). From Fri. 

GOOD TO GO (1 5fe Musical 
drama set in Washtnoton's 


black ghettoes, with . _ 
Garfunkel as a boozy reporter 
desperate for a story. 

Cannon Panton Street (01-930 



The “colorization* con- 
troversy thunders on. Now . 
American studios haye bagged 
the rights to two British classic 
black-and-white films - 

Room At The Top and A Taste 
of Honey 1 - and plan to colour fj 
them by computer and re- - 
release them. 

This inroad into our cine- 
malic heriaff has bjougt 
howls of rage from the British 
film industry, with veteran 
director Fred Zinnetnann m 
the van. He and half a dozen 
interested bodies have per- 
suaded the BBC and Channel 
4 to agree not to show certam 
black-and-white films which 
may be coloured in the States 
and sold here. Zinnemann 
says: “When I mad t High 
Soon 1 spent weeks trying to 
evoke the atmosphere of arte 
1880s photograph: the white 
sky. the grainy texture. It 
would be disastrous to tun) it 
into colour." 


• Great news this week for the 

Newcastle Theatre Royal, 
which has received a £25 mil- 
lion EEC grant Just -as weH 




Jp. . rn 
& B? • 


. ... ", . 




they didn't listen to toe — _ 
with responsibility for their 
cause, Anthony Kindi of toe 
Emopdan regional sferelop- 
meflt Gind. Last week he told 
the SDP conference: *TU lose 

my job if I teD yon this, bat the 

Theatre Royal’s going to get a 
grant: one-and-a-halr 

nuUiooT 

Pater familiar 

The stare of Tom Sharpe’s vi 
campus comedy. Porterhouse 
Blue, which will be shown 
next year on Channel 4, are 
father and son Ian and Miles 
Richardson. Dad plays Sir 
Godber Evans, the new 
reforming master of Porter- 
house College, -while Miles is 
Gimingham, the student lead- 
er who resists his changes; The 

book has been adapted by 
Malcolm Bradbury, whose 




• i - 


R obert Mitchum once 

said of Trevor How- . 
ard that “the nice 
thing about Trevor is 
you never catch him acting". 
Howard regards this is as the 
greatest of compliments, and 
indeed he has managed to 
make more films than the 
years he has lived — he is 70 on 
Monday — without ever 
behaving like a star, on-screen 
orofT. 

As a result, it-might be said 
that he probably let go, by . 
default; a career as one of the 
best British film actors of his 
generation. But now his tai- 
ents are to be fully appre- 
ciated, with seasons of his 
films on Channel 4 and at the 
National Film Theatre and a. 
sympathetic biography — 
Trevor Howard: a Gentleman 
and a Player, by Vivienne 
Knight — on the book stalls. . 

“Now he is 70. everyone is 
rushing to say how marvellous 
he is", his staunchest’ cham- 
pion, critic Dilys PoweU. said. 
“Why didn’t' they say it 
before?" 

One of the reasons is that 
despite his reputation as a 
walking volcano always liable 
to erupt, Howard is a surpris- 
ingly shy. unpushy man. an . 
instinctive actor who would 
not dream of analysing how he 
does it. He has not let acting 
get in the way of playing a 
good deal of cricket or of a 
happy home life and a gen- 
erous amount of revelling. As 
a resulL there have been years 
when he hardly worked atalL 
• Howard emerged in 1945 to 
play a key part in the golden 
age of British films. He broke 
new ground away from the 
English studio stereotypes or 
silly-ass eccentrics or decent 
but wooden chaps strangled 
by a combination of : old 
school tie and stiff upper lip- 
. His silences were _ never 
more eloquent than in the 
evergreen Brief Encounter as 
Celia Johnson's would-be 
lover. Nor could pity and 
defeat be better conveyed than 
in his. performance as toe 
tormented police chief Colo- 
nel Scobie. in The Heart of the 
Matter. Dilys Powell called 
this one of toe great perfor- 
mances in the English cinema 
and another critic wrote that 
he had never before feK toe 
Catholic struggle in . an -ir- 
religious world 
Still, he is probably prouder 
J ofplayingfortocMCCthanof 


Park Lana Hotel Antiques Fair, 
Piccadilly, London W1 (01-995 
5094). From Wed 


0631), Cannon Charing Cross 
Road (01-437 4815). From Fri. 

SELECTED 


JAZZ 


SELECTED 


OPENINGS 


CATHERINE OF SIENA: Lynda 
Bellingham as the 14th-century 
saint and writer, in Retta 
Taney's one-woman show, 
directed by Joan Kemp-Weleft. 
King's Head. Islington (01-226 
1916). Opens Mon, press night 
Tues. 

nicolson fights 
CROYDON: Simon CaHow 
directs Angus Mackay in 
Mackay's adaptation of 
Ga How s scenario. The 1948 
campaign by Harold Nicolson 
as Labour candidate for North 
Croydon. , „ 

Offstage Downstairs, 37 Chalk 
Farm Road, London NW1 (01- 
267 9649). Opens Tues. 


SELECTED 


ROOKERY NOOK: Tom 
Courtenay oddly , though 

effectively, cast in Ben 

Travers's classic farce, lan 


LOOSE TUBES; _ 

Exhilarating 21 -piece orchestra 
featuring Django Bates, lain 
Ballamy. David DeFries and 
many other talented young 
improvisers. 

Tomorrow. 1 00 Club. 

London W1 (01-636 0933); 
Thurs. Mitchell Theatre, 
Glasgow (041 552 5961). 

IRAKERE: The inheritors of 
a proud tradition of Cuban-jazz 
fusion, Havana's finest 
export guarantee a rousing 
night Alan Skidmore, 

perhaps the most convincing 
British disd pie of John 

Cohrane, shares toe bfll 
Mon to Sat Ronnie Scott's 
Club. London W1 (01-439 
0747). 

COUNT BASIE 
ORCHESTRA: Now led by the 
saxophonist Frank Foster, 
a noted post-war Basieite. this 
ensemble — of the genus 
known in the trade as "ghost 
bands" - aims to keep the 
Count's flame burning. 

Wed. Barbican HaH, London 
EC2 (01-628 8795). 

SALENA JONES: Stylish 
American jazz-slanted cabaret 
singer, familiar to Londori 
audiences in the early 1 970s. 
From Wed (to Oct 31). The 
Ritz, London Wl (01-493 
8181). 


MADE IN LONDON SEASON: 
The Museum of London’s 
indispensable cycle of British' 
classics and curios ities 
continues with two Inventive 
silent dramas - Maurice 
Bveys 77te Passionate 
Friends (Tues) and Asquith's 


CONTRARIWISE: Major show 
of Surrealist art from painting 
to photography and adverts. 
Glynn Vivian Art Gallery, 
Alexandra Road, Swansea 
(079255006). 

PICASSO: What toe master 
kept in his 175 sketchbooks. 
Royal Academy, Piccadilly, 
London Wt (01-734 9052). 


BOOKINGS 


FIRST CHANCE 


MENOTTI DOUBLE BILL* 
Postal booking opens 

Wednesday for AmaM and 
the Night visitors and Britis 
premiere of The Boy Who 
Grew Too Fast Dec 11-27. 
Sadler's Wells Theatre, 


Early Musk: Centre. Charles 
Ctore House. 17 Russell 
Square, London WC1 (01- 
580 8401/2). 


3SIH1 UOOWiiyuviwu - ' 

XSftSSXSL LAST CHANCE 


Rosebery Avenue, London 
EC1 (01-278 8916) (01- 

278 5450 information). 
NEWCASTLE LITERARY 
FESTIVAL: Booking opens for 
programme inducting 

Martin Amis. J P Donleavy. and. 
Anthony MingheHa. Oct 26- 

KSLcastie Literary Festival, 

10 Osborne Terrace, Jesmond, 
Newcastle (091 281 7701). 

EARLY MUSIC CENTRE 
FESTIVAL: Booking opens tor 
•The Flower of English 
Chivalry", a musical monument 
to Sir Philip Sidney. Oct 11- 25. 


Ifa/fC. fkafrt c0 " p, " , Kffif 

944043 J 


performances today of BSC 
production of Klaus Mann 

novel directed by Adrian NoWe. 
Barbican. SMk Street, ■ 

London EC2 (01- 
628 8795/638 8891). 


ST AUGUSTINE: Exhibition 
celebrating 1.600fo 
anniversary of toe 
conversion of St Augustine. 
Ends tomorrow. 

- British Lforary, British 
Museum, Great Russell Street, 
London WC1 (01- 636 1544). 

MICHAEL CLARK: His 
London season ends tonight at 
Sadler's Wells (01- 
278 8916) before his New York 
debut 


CC 1 W WW WW 


For ticket availability, performance and openug tones, 
telephone the numbers fistwLDapce: JohuPerovat 
Theatre Tony Patrick and Martin Cropper; Om Hilary 
Pinch; Jazz: Richard Wiffiams; Concerts: MaxHamsoK 
Films: Geoff Brown: Galleries-. Sarah JaneCheckland; 
Rock: David Sinclair; Bookings:. Anne Whitehonse 


Without trying to, 
Trevor Howard 
became one of the 
finest film actors 
of his generation 


most of his films. In the hall of 

his. house in Hertfordshir e is a 

large photograph' of the great 
Australian Keith Mifler driv- 
ing off the back foot -and 
en scribed: “To Trevor, my old 
mate". He must be the only 
screen actor who insisted on a 
clause in his contracts which 
excluded him from working 
on Test match days. 

Howard’s first ambition in 
life was to play serious cricket. 
He was too busy playing it at 
school r— Clifton — to act, but 
he climbed out at night to 
watch Sir Frank Benson and 
his company playing Shake- 
speare “He was a bit 'of a joke 
by then". Howard recalls. “I 
thought Mf this is toe best they 
can" do, TU haye a try*." 


W hile at Rada he 
spent weekends 
at a hotel in 
Broadstairs pat- 
ronized by Henry Aimley, 
who heard him memorizing 
his- lines and took an en- 
couraging interest. “He be- 
came a bit of a father to me — I 
think I got toe bug from him.” 


It led. by way of Stratford, to a 
pari in Terence Rattigan’s first 
hit comedy French Without 
Tears, which ran for two years 
and put Howard off Jong runs 
for life. . 

He joined the Old Vic just 
after toe Second World War. 
but his path had already been 
diverted into .films. Carol 
Reed, who gave him his first 
screen role m The Way Ahead. 
directed The Third Man. vet 
which Howaind's'British major 
provided a moral counter- 
weight to Orson -Welles s 
Harry Lime. In another Reed 
film. The Outcast .of the is- 
lands. he gave a dazzJmg 
display as a cad going to toe 

bad. . 

The years passed mostly m 
uniformed roles when, out of 
the blue, came the invitation 
from Reed to play Japtain 
'Bllgh in Mutiny On ine 
Bouhir. Neither of them knew 
• what iay m- store fortoem in 


toe shape of Marion Brando's 

overweaning behaviour. Reed 
was replaced and during toe 
close-ups of Howard’s key 
scene, Brando chose to rattle 
and toss a handful of coins off- 
camera. 1 For once. Howard 
blew his top while working. 
His Captain Bligb emerged as 
an icy study- in exasperation 
which was only too real. 

Tales of his roistering 
abound.- .One evening at La 
Mere Catherine restaurant in 
Mon , Marche, be ordered 
champagne for- the entire or- 
chestra. “Then I discovered I 
- hadn't toe money to pay for it. 

I spent toe night, in jail but 
then, that often happens." he 
said mildly. “Later. I was 
asked back to the restaurant 
and given toe freedom of Mon 
Marche." 

In Pamplona he ran before 
toe bulls because a journalist 
friend. William Halt had 
offered to do. it. if be did. Just 
before they reached toe bull- 
ring. he said to HalL- “I see no 
bulls" ■ when round the 
corner they charged, with a 
Swede .suspended from the 
horns of one of them. 

When I asked him if he I 
needed danger as a stimulus. 1 
he corrected this slightly. “A 
touch of drama?" 

He does not regret toe parts 
-he has turned down — al- 
though they include The 
Horse's Mouth and Tunes of 
Glory— but admits that he has 
spent loo much time “sitting 
watching the trees grow". It is 
partly his own fault: his 
boisterous behaviour has not 
given him a reputation for 
reliability. But he is meticu- 
lous about his work and 
' people who have put him to 
bed at 3.30am say they have 
been astonished to see him on 
. the set at eight fully prepared 
and .word-perfect: a two-take 
man. 

Not an easy man to be 
married to. however. .Another 
sign that he is not quite as wild 
as he seems is that he has been 
married for 42 years to actress 
. Helen Cherry. She once ex- 
. plained this stability by say- 
ing: “Give a man enough rope 
and he will follow it home." 


* -**■**. -w 





Miles and Ian Ric har d so n 
dramatization of 'Sharpe's 
Blott on the Landscape is 
currently being repeated on 
BBCl. The cast for Porter- 
house Blue also includes 
David Jason as toe /porter, . 
Scullion, and Paul Rogers. 
The Richardsons will be act- 
ing together for the first time . 
since Peter Hall’s film of A flfi 

Midsummer Night's Bream in 

1967, .in which lan was 
Oberon and Miles, then four, 
was painted bright green- and 
played a fairy.. 


Entrance free 


H came as no surprise to those . 
who know the Victoria and -- 
Albert museum that its vol- 
untary admission charge 
scheme would be a washout 
This week toe V & A admit- 
ted it had barely covered its- 
costs on toe year-old scheme 

and blamed “negative 

publicity" for toe feilure. Only 
one in a dozen people entering j* ( 
toe museum actually 1 coughs 
up the suggested £2. Some 
remember toe day . tellers got 
so confused that they - es- 
timated more people had paid . 
their entry fee than were 
actually in the museum. . 


Windsor soap 


Peter Lewis 

Tribute to Trevor Howard is 
on Channel 4 tomorrow (1045- 
11.15pm). See alsto FDms 
on TV. page 17. . 


TV. page 17. . 

©"ft®** NmapBiwr* lm IMS 


In 1955 Malcolm Muggeridgt 
coined toe notion of the Royal 
Family- as a soap opera: Next 
month toe notion becomes 
reality with toe publication o^ 
Palace, . a send-up of Daflashy r - 
Neil Mackwood and Bryan 
Rostron. using the script-style 
of Soulhfork and the charac- 
ters from SWi. Muggeridge. 
now 84. has declined an 
! newspaper’s invitation to. re- 
j view the book. His excuse 
Tm too old." 


Christopher Wilsott 






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THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

_ BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
V September 26c The Duke and 
Duchess of York this evening 
attended a Concert given by 
Chris de Burgh in aid of the 
Leukaemia Research Fund at 

the Wembley Arena. 

Miss Helen Hughes and Wing 
Commander Adam Wise were 
in attendance. 

The Princess Anne. Mrs Mark 
Phillips. Immediate Past Master 
of the Worshipful Company of 
Farriers, today attended a Court 
Meeting of (he Company,- fol- 
lowed by a Dinner, at the 
Innholder's Hall. London. EC4. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by the Master of the 
Company (Mr A.B. Wilson) and 
. the Senior Past Master (Mr S.R. 
(Walker). 

Mrs Timothy Hoktemess 
Roddam was in attendance. 


KENSINGTON PALACE 
September 26: The Duke and 
Duchess of Gloucester returned 
to RAF Northolt this afternoon 
in an aircraft of The Queen's 
Flight at the conclusion of their 
visit to the Federal Republic of 
West Germany and Berlin. 

YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMESTS PALACE 
September 26: The Duke of 
Kent. Patron, today attended a 
Council Meeting of the National 
Army Museum, at Royal Hos- 
pital Road. London SW3. 

Captain Michael Campbefl- 
Lamerton was in attendance. 

The Duchess of Kent today 
opened the new Divisional 
Headquarters. Maidstone Police 
Station and later visited 
Pilgrim's Hospice. Canterbury, 
Kent. 

Her Royal Highness, who 
travelled in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight, was attended by 
Mrs Peter wilmot-SitwefL 


Birthdays 


TODAY: Sir Robert Adcock. 
87; Miss Josephine Barstow, 46: 
Mr Philip Blacker. 37; Dr Tessa 
Blacks tone, 44; Surgeon Captain 
F. T. Heaton. 71: Mr Gordon 
Honeycombe. SO: Lieutenant- 
General Sir Ian Jacob, 87: Mr 
Denis Lawson. 39; Lord Miles. 
79; Sir Edward Nichols. 75; the 
Rev Professor D. E. Nineham. 
"65; General Sir Ian Riches. 78: 

Dr .Margaret Rule. 58; Lord 
Shepherd, 68. Mr Alvin Star- 
dust. 44; Mr Lech Walesa. 43. 


TOMORROW: Miss Brittle 
Bardot, 52; Sir Thomas Bar- 
nard. 93; the Duke of Bucdeuch, 
63: Lord Cock field 70; Miss J. 
M. Drew, 57; Dame Phyllis 
Friend. 64; Sir David Hannay, 
51: the Ven Frank Harvey. 56; 

Sir Trevor Hughes. 61: Mr 
Jeremy Isaacs. 54; Lord Layton, 
74; the Earl of ListoweL 80; Miss 
Ellen Malcolm. 63; Mr Marcello 
Mastroianni. 62; Mr Peter 
Miller. 56: Lady Moriand. 81; 
Mr Michael Somes. 69. 


Dinner 


Middlesex Hospital Medical 
School 

The annual dinner of die 
Middlesex Hospital and Medi- 
cal School was held last night at 
the Savoy Hold. Dr A. L. Miller 
presided and Mr W. W. Sack, 
dean. Dr A. H. Mayor and 
Professor J. R. Pattison also 
spoke. Others present included: 

Lora OommM. Lady AM. Sir James 
UgtiiftUI. sir DouoIU Ranger. Sir 
David nines Williams. Professor Sir 
Bnan Wlndncr. Mtoor-Cenerai I H 
Baker. DrJEO Otwwoody and Mr O 
b Mooey-Oouita. 


Marriage 


Mr N. Bargess 
and Miss C. Ramsdeu 
The marriage look place on 
Saturday. September 20. at St 
Mary's Church, Carew 
Chen ton, between Mr Nigel 
Burgess, son of Mr and Mrs 
Christopher Burgess, of The 
Grove. Great Horkesely. Chi- 
chester. and Miss Clarissa 
Ramsden. daughter of Major 
and Mrs Ivor Ramsden, of 
Cosheston Hall. Pembroke 
Dock. 


John Cole 


Serenity, the achievement of age 


Shakespeare, in As. You Like ft, 
portrays an old man as 'The lean and 
slipper’d pantaloon, with spectacles on 
nose_and ins big manly voice turning 
again towards childish treble", progress- 
ing inexorably towards "second 
childishness and mere oblivion, sans 
teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans 
everything”. This unduly pessimistic 
view of old age is a half-truth, a most 
subtle deceiver. 

In contrast to Shakespeare,, the Ro- 
man'lawyer, Cicero, writes in his essay 
on old age “It cannot be supposed that 
nature alter having wisely distributed to 
all tire previous periods of life their 
peculiar and proper enjoyments, should 
have neglected- .the last act of the 
human drama, and left it destitute of 
suitable advantages”. 

This is a wiser and more mature 
estimation of what lies ahead for an 
increasing number of us. Pain, depriva- 
tion, fears and frustration are not the 
monopoly of the last two ages of man, 
they occur with equal frequency in the 
first five, though perhaps in different 
forms. 

As disabilities occur at all stages of 
life, so too each stage has its enrich- 
ments. though these differ from age to 
age, being appropriate to our physical 
condition. 

In youth and maturity we eagerly 
strive, as Kipling bids, "to fill .the 
unforgiving minute with sixty seconds 
worth of work wdl done"; or if not with 
work with pleasurable activity. In old 
age when activity is curtailed, if "our 
psychic development remains at the age. 
of forty, the minutes now seem empty 
and we fed frustrated and depressed. 

Mature and wise men like Cicero bid 
us enjoy the physical activity of youth 
and maturity, then leaving it behind go 


on to discover the quieter riches of old 
age. No longer able to splash and swim 
in the feu tide of life we are to progress 
to the joy to be found in resting on the 
river tank, watching the tide flow by, or 
silting like the elders of Troy at the 
Scaean Gate nuking available to those - 
who seek it wisdom acquired in life's 
rich experience.. 

It was reported some years ago that 
neurotkism among the old was highest 
in America, where old age is dreaded 
and every effort, however ridiculous, is 
made to preserve youthful appearance 
and activities beyond their natural span, 
and lowest in China where the old are 
venerated and respected for their 
wisdom. 

The psychologist, Carl Jong, writes 

that "the afternoon of life most have a 
significance of its own and cannot be 
merely a pitiful appendage of life's 
morning" We cannot live life's after- 
noon according to the programme of the . 
morning. For Jung, youth and maturity 
are times of expansion, for building a 
career, founding a family, acquiring 
wealth; at these stages of life it is 
unseemly to be inward looking, but 
when with age vigour declines and 
activity is limited, h is dangerous to rely 
on the external world for happiness and 
necessary to seek and cultivate inner 
peace. 

For the old, due to infirmity and 
impairment of communication systems 
such as sight, speech and hearing, 
enjoyment of .the external world ts 
vicarious through children and grand- 
children and by watching the world go 
by, but Shakespeare was wrong if he 
thought the old were “sans everything”, 
for many achieve a serenity and peace 
impossible in youth. 

Lao Tse's saying “Muddy waters let 


stand become clear” gives a hint as to 
how this is possible. In youth the stir of 
life’s business leaves the waters of the 
inner life muddied, and with age we 
discover- that the activity and strivings 
that have brought achievement in the 
external world are ineffective in dealing 
with the inner life to which nature in her 
wisdom bids us now turn. 

Then it is that we discover the 
profundity of Lao Tse’s raying and the 
wise man gradually raids from a life of 
activity to one of quiet, from active 
■doing to fuller being. He begins to view 
himself in relationships to the totality of 
existence rather than continuing to 
‘strive to manipulate life's surface 
material. 

In second. chDdbood many recover 
something precious which they had lost 
when they left behind first childhood; 
the capacity to experience wonder, awe 
and a sense of mystery in regard to the 
world around them. When to this 
renewed experience of childhood is 
added the experience of a Jong life; in 
stillness the waters clear and then comes 
a sense, not of solitude* but ofbeing part 
of something infinitely greater than the 
individual seK 

This development of an intimate 
relationship with ~all being" becomes 
so intense that even in physical solitude 
and deprived by bodily infirmity of 
many social activities the soul is never 
spiritually alone; but. dwells in and with 
an Eternal Presence. 

Such old people, and there are many, 
are indeed “sans” much, but not “sans 
everything” for experiencing the truth 
of the Psalmists words, “Be still and 
know chat I am God”, they have 
reached that state of serenity and peace 
which is the fulfilment of a tong life. 

The author.- an Anglican priest, formerly, 
researched in physiological psychology. 


Service 

dinners 

Royal Nani College. Greenwich 
A ladies' guest night dinner was 
held last night at the. Royal 
Naval College. Greenwich. Ad- 
miral Sir Nicholas Hunt was the 
principal guest and Commander 
T. Jones, commander of the 
college, pleaded. 

Sikh Brigade 

Brigadier G. Lerwfll was in the 
chair at the annual reunion 
dniner of the Sikh Brigade bdd 
last night at the Army and Navy 
Club. 


Forthcoming 

marriages 




Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


BIRTHS. MARRIAGES. 
DEATHS ud H NBUHOM 
£4 i to + T» WIT 

(muiimtnn 3 Encsl 

A m m uncv a n cnH. authenticated by ihc 
name and. permanent addreat Of the 
sender, may be sent he 

THE TIMES 
PO BOX 484 

■■ — »— ■— fi. - -g . 

VIlQMIl oUBCl 

London El 9X5 ■■ 

Announcements can be rece i ved by 
Idcpbonc between 9.00am and 


5 Jupm Monday to Friday, on Satur- 
day between 9.00>m and 12 noon. 
pMtl UN tefy). For publication the 
following day by l JOpm. 


etc on Conn and Soc i a l Page Uifet 
+ 15% WT. 

Cowl and Social Page aiw o u ccmcnu 
cm not be accepted I 
Enquiries tot 11-BZ 9953 
(after lOJOaml or send la 
Strati Loodaa E! 


Please allow ai least 41 boors before 
pobUonion. 


ror Hw> pnm> hoa sftouwi kem 
knowWdBr. and they should set* ihr 
taw at h*s mouth, for hr is the 
: mewnora of Hie Lord at Haas. 

murtll 2: 7 


BIRTHS 


On September 241h. 
Epsom. k> Edwtna and Tim. a a i 
Edward Tbnottv. 


% GALBBRT - On August 24th. to Bridget 
inft Hooper] and Peter, a son. 
t Samuel John, a brother for Thomas. 

■ MU - On September 3401 to Ingrid 
S and Geoffrey, a daughter. Cecily, a 
J staler for Rupert and Thomas. 

MKM.TSV . on S eptemoer 23 m. to 
\ Caroline infer MMcatfe] and John, a 
*. - daughter. Itosanaa. a staler for Kate. 

* atOMAM . On asm Sept e mbe r . 1986 

to Barry and Jffl Wife) SzmhSU. a son. 
Alexander Peter, at the Norfolk and 
. Norwich Hospital. Norwich. A broth- 
er for Aubrey. Ashley. Adrian and 
Andrew. 

'raOUL- On 21sl September 1986. at 

* St. Thomas' Hospital, to Catherine 
; and Nicholas, a son. Oliver Augustus 

. Alexander. 

UUfNESm ■ On September 22nd. 
-- 1986. to Tracy and David, at 
Shrewsb u ry Royal Ho s pita l , a son. 
. AtaAatr Philip. 

" MfMLYMEAUX . On September 24th. at 
B.M.H.. Rtntefc. to Annabel <n*e 
OootfeoouofU and Paul, a daughter. 

1 taUKMKLXY ■ On September 24m. to 

* Fiona iitoe Grant) and WUKam. a 
daughter, Oil via Lucy. 

.- NUB . On 28th August at Stobhlll 
~ Hospital. Glasgow, so Patricia ut*« 
Robertson) and Stewart, a son. 
MKtuci Dunbar, a brother lor SHnoo 
P E PP ER BRE AK -On September 26th. 
1986. to Rose m ary and Scott m me 
Conform? BtrUwlace. Agoura MBs. 
California. a daughter Sa m a nt ha 
Jean. 

■ W— H OW ■ On 29th September, to 

Susan mtc Ttrotn) and Rictwrd. a 
son. Thomas Richard. 

HOUMU - On September 29nL 
1986 at Queen Charloitrt Hospital, 
to Catherine and Edward, a 
daughter. Carottne o ntlan . a stater 
for VmeUa and Sophie. 

- SIR CL AW - On September 15m. to 
" Amanda firie Topptc) and Ian. a 
daughter. Emma Alexandra- 
Surra . on September 7tn. ta New 
York, to Chartooe firie Hastes) and 

* Richard, a »ohl Alistair Davis, a 
brother for EmUy and Ntohotas. 

IMVmC . On September SBnd. at 
Perth Royal Infirmary, to Mayra 
(nee Ctogui) and David, a son. 
Alexander Thomas Graham. 

. SHOW ■ On September 2SB1. at 
SamrrMgfi Court. Dorchester, to 

■ -Joanna and Max. a son. Henry Philip 

MaxweiL 

IHUR H E - On September 23rd. at St 
Mary's. Paddington, to Jon* Orir 
O'Shea) and John, a son. Oscar Liam 
Ashley. 

urtLKMSOM - On 22nd SeotoraMr. 
1986. to Jane mee Poster) and Pcttr. 
a son. Hugh James Watson. 


MARRIAGES 


; DCAWR ■ On S e ptember 
26th. at Tunbridge weds. Kent. 
. Bony to Annie. The Bride was given 
away by her brother. Martin Tadd. 
Tudor WWtams was Best Mao. 

MUKAKLiJI The marriage of Ertc 
■ C Mtfn* and Annie t Mary* Anne} 
' Abell* too* place on September 20th 
1966 In Manfla Cathedral. Manila. 
FhWptom 


The marriage of 
Ouiican and Helen look place an Sep- 
tember 20Ut at Si Stamen's Church. 
Setty Park. Birmingham. 


1 


DEATHS 


■On 2401 Septe mber . Doc- 
tor Georgs O.W. Adamson LRLCJ»_ 
LEC&. ULFPS. M3Z. In Shef- 
field Hospital after a 
leaves Mo wife Patricia mid children 
David. MfctaeL astro. John. Peter 
and Rob. Service at Hillsborough 
Baptist Church. TOpUn Rood. Shef- 
field on Wednesday. 1st October at 
3.00 pm. Kfiowsd by cmatton at 
CNy Rond Crematorium. Cut Sowers 
or donations ftar Httaboroogh Baptist 

' Church may besot to John Heath « 

' Sons. 14 EUshani Street. Sheffield 
S* 7LS 

BARKER - On 24th Se p tember. 1986. 
suddenly at Ebsworth. Hampshire. 
Stephen Geoffrey, formerly Head- 
master of sir wmiam Tamers 
School. Redcar aged 74. Beloved 
husband of Kay and dear father dr 
Neil and Michael and a much loved 
grandfather. Funeral Service at 
WarbMnglon Church on Thursday. 
2nd October at ZA8 pm. followed by 
private cremation. Family flowers 
only but donations, if dedrsd. to Roy- 
al National Lifeboat Institution of 
Wea l Qu ay Road. Poole. Dane!. 

TO. IR to. il -On September 26th. 1986. 
peacefaBy at his homo. 9 he View 
Road. Desbornugh. Norttnota. 
WJX. Bennett OXE. date of East 
bourne) aged 84 years. Beloved 
husband of Kat h leen and father of 
John and Stella. Funeral Service al 
the Albert Miam ChapeL Kettering 
Crematorium on Tuesday. Septem- 
ber 30th m SMpm. 

Ple ase . Donations. If desired, to 
Oesboroutfi Baptist Church, c/a The 
Church Treasurer. Mr R- Chew. 164 
Dunkirk Avenue. 

Nortlunts. 

BUTLER - Peacefully on 2<Uh Septem- 
ber. at RMeauciest Home. Kingston. 
Ontario. Hannah Wilson, wife of the 
late Brian Dear, mother at Patricia 
and David, dearly loved. 

CAREY M O H U UI - On 24th Septem- 
ber 1986. nevcefnBy and hi loving 
care at Bunwood. (oBowtng a long 

Btoess bravely borne. Winifred Oo- 
rts, in her 92nd year- Beloved ami 
devoted wife of the late Charles, lov- 
ing and darling mother of Aim. 
Cremation ornate. Mowed by Ser- 
vice of Thanksgiving at Si Mary* 
Church. Goudhurst on Thursday. 
2nd October at 12.00 noon. FamUy 
Dowers only. Donations. V wished, to 
the Dorothy Kerin Trim. 
B m r s wood. croombrtdge. Kent TN3 
9PY or to* Mane Curie Memo ria l 
Foundation. 28 Beigrave Square. 
London SWtX BOG. 

C U B HB Unr • on September 
26th. peacef uny. al the Evelyn Hop- 
pitaL C a mbri d ge. Alexander Charles 
tAtecL Very dear husband at 
EUzabrth. tamer of Lo u is e and Kate, 
grandfather of Chartas and Hugh. 
Funeral Sendee at SL Mary's 
Church. Great AMngMa. on Wcdnep- 
day. October isL at 11-16 am. 
fotiowed by private crswisnm Fam- 
ily Dowers only, bat d on atio n s may 
be sent if d esir e d tot The Ely CaOws 
dral Restoration AppeaL C/a 
Barclay's Bank. Barit Sheet. 
Cambridge. 

CURTIS - Or September 24th. peace- 
fully at borne. Brigadier Francis 
Gockbum Curds. CSX- aged 88. 
Dear huituod at Joan and greatly 
loved tether or DovM. Andrew m 
O ita and grandtethcr. Private cremo- 
Uon followed by Thanlagh'tng 
Service at SL EdwanTs. Cambridge 
on September SOtb at 3.30p m . 

DOBME - On 84th Siptembsr. in bop- 
pttai l otto v toi a rood acctdoL 
Audrey Dobbte. aged 8D yearn, or 
Tunbridge Writs. The dear mother of 
David ant stater of Co n st an ce 
WBcox. immensely generous and en- 
ergetic to me cud. Enables and 

Dowers to J Kempster * Sons. 2 6 4 
AMon Road. Tonbridge WeBs. Tot 
0892 2JUI 

ELLIOTT - On September asm 1966. 
pearefuBy. Dorothy Beatrice, widow 
of the late Dr KeSh Futon. D.M. 
Oxan-FJt.c. Ttedi.. loved by aU the 
lamlty. Funenl Service at the 
Downs Crrmunrtum BripMcn on 
Wednesday, October tst at 2JO pm, 
FamKy flow«n duty ple» bW dona- 
tions. if desired, tor the Sussex 
Stroke aodCtrcutaUPP Fund may be 
sent c/o W a Stringer A Son. 12 
Kensington Oardens. Brighton- 

CWART-lAldCS see PSMRAS. . 

FLElWWn - Ob Sepannber 22nd. 1986. 
peacefully in her steep at the 
Hastemcre Hospital after a log Ill- 
ness. Jean Law. Dearly loved and 
dearly toeing why of John. Private 
cremat ion took plan on C anter 
26m. No tetters phas e buL If derired. 
donaOom w be sent to Bie Arthri- 
tis and ftbeumaUun COOKS. 41 
Eagle Street. London Wd. 

FRANKLM ■ On September 2Rh. 
peaceftmy. Herbert J a mw of West 
Itep p e l Farmhouse. Morvrib (tote o* 
WalrMwuae Cowes). HsaMBd < Of toe 
late Betty and tether of Mriante and 
Robert. OrnmUon at West Rood Cte^ 
maloti inn. Npweasue. on 
Wednesday October 1st. at 2.000. 

MART - On Z&ti September 1986- to 
the Otenflstd General HospilaL 

LriemSer. ftoorge Kart ofCi^nglw. 

U h Mtccst ai c. the **”4 Mrimd 
of Oucc. OoednWd Darting. The 
Funeral Service and aeaaUon to 
take place privairiy al Peterborough. 
No Dowers at his own rec uest Pon a- 

tlons preferred in fleu for OmMs 

Parish Church, c/o Gtmm* & 
Cuiteridgc Ud. Funeral DtceCtors of 
L O c ester. U?L 063S S161S7. 

I 


• On S e ptem be r 2UL Peter, 
beloved son. or Eddie and Ob aite 
much loved brother cf Kefty and 
Din. Private Funeral - at SL 
Margaret's Church. Stanford Rivera, 
fariai fTmli i Km Tfilli No dowers 
New. dB B B U C Rp to Live Aid. PO 
Boo 4TX. London W1A 4TX. 


Oo-Septeraher 24th. sud- 
denly to a car acridenL JUL beloved 
daughter of Frances HUda. Funeral 
Service at Coventry Cathedral at 
12.30 pm on Thursday. October 2nd- 
FaraBy Dowers only- DonsUons. if 
- desired. toCoMe Dogs for toeBUnd. 
Leamington Spa. 

■ACXK- On September 25th. 1986 at 
BurnhaniHmSea. SonwrseL Mabel 
Enid, widow of Mg a disr ajl 
M ackto CXE. .and a 
mother and grandmother. Fimeral 
Service at SL Manns -Chtach. 
Berrow. Somerset at 2-50 pm op 
Wednesday. .Octobo- IsL Fbodly 
Dowers only pieuse. nniufkms If de- 
sired. for the Bu rnham Brandi of 
The Royal Britten Legion (Treasure 
Court AmmenMes Fuad) To Messrs 
PJ. Harris. Funeral Otoactors. 2 
cross StieeL Bunibaro-oiFSea. Som- 
erset Tri 10278) 7821 

PAMUnmc - On tataitor 24th. 
peacefuBy at home after a tong m- 
nem bravriy botne. Si 
Cotta. Much loved husband' of Rose- 
mary and beloved father of Richard 
and Graham . Family Dowers only. 
Donations. K dashed, to CMaena to- 
bnuttaaL to Thy _ 
ftdtaesa of toy- Thanksgiving Service 
al Rutallp 8ag(M Church on Wednes- 
day. October 1st at 2A8 pm. 

KM • On Sept e mber 25th. pdacefUDy 
at home. Brigadier John Handley 
Pegs. CHE , aged 86 yeas. Dear 
burband of Heather and much toved 
father of Chartea j . _ 
Funeral Sendee to lake Place at SL 
John the Bapttet Church. FHteM on 
Friday. October 3rd al 2.00 pm. fal- 
lowed by private c remation- Al hta 
tequeSL fOmOy Dowers ordy. Dona- 
tions to hta memory pleas* to 
Wychwood Surgery Care Fond. M8- 
ton-Under-Wychwood. 

POND • On 2QD1 Se p te mb er, very 
peocehtoy. Katoleea Htaahrth. for- 
marly of Casa PBar. 26 
Road. Oxford, to her 88th year. Fcr- 
tuird hy Ota RDes or Holy Church 
Requiem ai BtacM H ars. Oafterd on 
Diursday. 2nd October at 1 1.00 am. 
followed by burial al Wotvercote 
Cemetery. 

PSAHRAS - On September 17th. 1986. 
George. Orthopaedic Surgeon, aged 
37. e u dd eid y to a sh ooti n g accident 
in Corfu, very greatly toved and lov- 
ing burband of Lavinia <n 4e Ewart 
James) and devoted father of Anna- 
Louisa and Alexis. Service of 
Thankrgivtng win be 


On 

I986. at Christ Church HospKaL 
Herb er t Edward (Sherry) Of 2 Saint 
Georges Close. HtohdHe. Dorset 
Devoted and much loved husband of 
Anne. Father of David. Marion and 
Mark. Gr an d fa ther of Courtenay. 
AsMeigh. Twmay. Thomas. 
Georgina and Whitney. Funeral Ser- 
vice al HKhrtWb M ethod is t Church 
on Sep temb er Both at 2J0 pm. Ptou- 
Ry Dowers only- Do n ati on s, if 
d esi red, to Cancer Research or The 


Church HomiUH. 

HABBEI I. - On 2401 
denty at home. Alexander Wan 
(Sandy), loving Husband of Ann. 
Crematton Service to Putney Vale 
Crematorium at 3JO pm on Tues- 
day. 30tb S ep te mber- No D owers 
Mease. Dorattom to R.NXJL 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


HO— I AM. GeoOTey. A Me m or i al Sen- 
vwe to celebra te the Bte of Gwflhy 
N u t im sl who died p ca c ef nBy on FY1- 
day. 121b September. 1966. «H be 
MM at SL PewrsChiutb. Edtonona. 
Newpo rt . Shropridre. on Saturday. 
Xlib October. « UO pan. Al Ms 
reouaL uo darkcoloura. Donation 
to ’Shrewsbury Hostoce A ppea l . 

WADE - On September 19th. 1986. 
suddenly and vagfcaay.'iw betoved 
Princess was taken from me. She 
wH nr always reme mb ered wMi 
love. Pride -and affection. I ton devas- 
tated. but comforted knowing Out 
one day we wbl be together ogam. 
All my low forever. Jan. . 


IN MEMORIAM- WAS 


■ In proud and tovtog memo- 
ry «f Henry Dwdas-M.a (and Bart. 
Acting Captain. 1st aanatton Scoti 
Quanta. Scnatarriea of Christ 
Church. Oxford, who was tolled to 
acnoo. at the Cud dtiNonL Septem- 
ber 27th. 1918. aged 21. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


BATCOOL Other Gordon, 
producer, cricketer, in happy memo- 
ry. Guy's Hospital S e pte mber 26th. 
1 970- Family and friends. 

■AYE* - in affectionate and ever lov- 
ing memory of our darttng flounder 
Diana, passed away 27th September 
1969. -And use is eternal and tove-ts 
toTsnaruf and death is otdy an horl- 
. zoo and an horizon is not hi ng save 
me htnk of our pghT. Mommy. Dad- 
dy. Patricia and Pamelo. 


MrMD, Mason 
And Miss NJ. HaQ 
The e n gage m ent is announced 
between Martin Derrick, eldest 
son of Mr and Mis D.W. Mason, 
of Donntngton. Chichester, Sus- 
sex. and Nicola Jane, eldest 
daughter of Sir John and Lady 
Hall, of Thames Ditto n, Surrey. 

Mr ILWjG. AsteO 
and Mrs &M. Thoopsoa 
The engagement is annotmeed 
between Richard William God- 
frey, son of Major Henry AsteO, 
The View. Bishop’s Castle, 
Shropshire, and of Lady Htz- 
Herbert, Tissingtc-n Hall, 
Ashbourne, Dexbyshiie, and Sa- 
rah Mary, daughter of the late 
Mr Robert BeDord and of Mrs 
BdkmL 60 da re w oo d Court, 
London, Wl. 


Mr AJL McArthur 
and Dr RJ. Bright 
The engagement is announced 
between Alistair Hugh, sou of 
the late Sir Gordon and. Lady 
McArthur, .ojT. Mejoingoort, 
Campeniown, Victoria, Austra- 
lia. and Rowena Jane. daughter 
of Major and Mrs F.W. Bnght, 
of White Lodge. Kemsxng, 
Seven oaks, KenL 

Mr SJL Axbey 
and Miss Ci- Gonnky 
The en ga gemen t is annotmeed 
between Stephen Robert, elder 
son of Mr and MrsRJC Axbey, 
of Bkixbam, near Banbury, and 
Charlotte Louise, only daughter 
of Mr and MrsT.G. Gonnley, of 
Middleton Cheney, near 
Banbury. 

Mr AXLM. Chater . 
and Mbs L.M. Dyson 
The engagement is announced 
between Andrew, youngest son 
of Brigadier and Mrs J.K. 
Chater, of Mickleton, 
Gloucestershire, and Louise, 
second daughter of Mr arid Mrs 
J.A. Dyson, of Tniro, CornwalL 

Mr EJW.W. Denison * 

and Mias C Baggaley. 

The engagement is announced 
between Mark, son of Mr and 
Mrs ELA.K. Denison, of Bossall, 
York, and Claire, daughter of 
Mr and Mis J. Baggaley, of 
Norman ton, Leicestershire. 

Mr JJL Duckworth 
and Miss CJ. HDl 
The engagement is announced 
between Jonathan, younger son 
of Mr and Mrs Jobn 
Duckworth. of Elton, 
Cambridgeshire, and Carotine* 
Jane, only daughter of Mr and 
Mis John Hill, of Peebles. ■ 


Mr AJLJ. FeUaws 
and Nfiss J.V. Macabre - 
The engagement is announced 
between Andrew, youngest son 
of Mr HA. Fellows, of Fdsted, 
Essex, and of the late Mrs 
Fellows, and Juliet, eldest 
daughter of Mr and Mrs R-F. 
Macaire, ofNedging, Suffolk. 

Ueateaaat MLEA. Flanagan, 
RN, 

and Min J. Richards an 

The eng ag ement is announced 
between Martin, younger son of 
Kevin and Palsy Flana^m, and 
Jane eldest daughter of John and 
Jean Richardson, of Hutton 
Rudby, North Yoritshire. 

Mr SLN. Hkks 
and Miss VA. 

The engagement is announced 
between Simon, son of the late 
Mr Rex Hicks and of Mrs 
Barbara Greening, of Freeland, 
Oxfordshire, and Victoria, 
daughter of Mr Mark Summers, 
of Scmsted, Essex, and Mrs 
Jonathan ' Crouch,- of 
Wkktinglpn, Essex, 

Mr PJL Johann 
and Miss CA. Rooks - 
The en g a ge ment is announced 
between rani Robert, oxnly son 
of Lieutenant-CornmarideraiKl 
Mrs Paul Peter- Johnson, of 
Merrow, Guildford, Surrey, and 
Chariorte Ann, eldest daughter 
oTMrs Ann Rooks and the late 
Mr Peter Martin Rooks, -of 
Rookery HiH, Ashtead Park, 
Surrey. 

Mr PX?. Ma cL eo d 
and Mbs LM. Hutchins 
The engagement is announced 


Receptions 

Commonwealth 


High 


The Speaker was present at a. 
reception held last night at fee 
Commonwealth Institute by the 
Commonwealth High Commis- 
sioners for parliamentarians 
attending the Common wealth 
Parliamentary Conference nx 
London. The High Commis- 
sioner for Swaziland, Doyen of 
the Diplomatic Corps and Se- 
nior High Commissioner, was 
host The Mabysian Minister of 
Welfare Services was also 
prisem. A supper party was bdd 
afterwards. 

Hunterian Society . 

The French Ambassador re- 
ceived Mr George Jantet, Presi- 
dent. and Fellows of the 
Hunterian Society at a reception 
bdd on Monday, September 22, 
at the Ambassador’s residenc e . 


b etw e en Patrick George, youn- 
ger son of Sheriff and Mrs 
Norman MacLeod, of Busby; 
Glasgow, and Lada Maureen, 
second daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Ronald- Hutchins, of Buddina, 
Queensland, Australia. 

Mr NJL Squire . 
and Mm SJJH. Llewellyn 
The en ga gement is announced 
between Nicholas, elder son of 
Mr and Mrs E.R. Squire, of 
Buileigb, Somerset, and Susan, 
only daughter of Dr ancT Mrs 
P.G. Llewellyn, of Wonersb. 
Patk. Guildford. Surrey. 

Appointments 

Latest appointments indude; 
Mr Alderman Hugh B (dwelt 
and Mr Alderman Michael 
Graham to be Sheriffs for the 
City of London for the forth- 
coming year. 


Service reception 

31 at (Greater London) Signal 
Regiment (V) 

Major-General Sir Roy 
Redgrave, Honorary Colonel, 
31st (Greater London) Signal 
Regiment (V), Lieutenam-Colo- 
neTC P. Stenmn&- Command- 
ing Officer, and officers of the 
regiment were hosts at a recep- 
tion held last night at the 
Regi m ental • HQ. Hammer- 
smith. Major P. D. Whittle 
presided and among the guests 
were: 

The Lord Lteutenant Of _ 
London, tor Mayor of Hannaswniifi 
and Fldhtaii. and. On* Mayor 
KWto B i M ivand Owtato c BM oga. 

41 * ’ 

mnfKtaters" 


■te Master . or Die 


OM Eleans’ Club 

The annua! meeting and annual 
dinner of the Old Eleans’ Club 
will take place at The King's 
School, Ely, on Saturday. Octo- 
ber 1 1. Details of the meeting 
abd an application form for the 
dinner will appear in the Year 
Book. 


Stowe 

Autumn Term at Srowe began 
on September IQ. In the most 
recent -phase' of building 
development, the £ute ; of 
Nugent have moved mto their 
new extension and- the boys of 
Grenville ' into their new and 
renovated wing, which will' be 
fonnaUy opened by the chair- 
man ofgovcrnorson November 
15. The fifth annual McAlpine 
lecture on technology and soci- 
ety 1 will be given by Sir John 
Hedley Greenborou^L on Octo- 
ber 3. This year's sixth form 
industrial conference, to be held 
jointly with the Royal Latin 
School, will be sponsored by 
Kodak. 


Services tomorrow 


Eighteenth 
Sunday 
after Trinity 

CANTQR8URV CATHEDRAL: 8 HC 
9.30 M. Admtasfon of Head master a nd 
Ktntfs Netware- .RW ACJPU HroU 

Sung Eocn. Brtvta (Mozarq. 

nu J»-m dneepo WtetUMl. Itev A 

StTO5Tto^rtnoi5 0 BBuit»te Deo 
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Qutorc ptOki orttavs tPoatencx Jtov 

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MftiOSO Sung Eocti (Stanford IrvB 
natJ. . La\e b*Oe ma w lconte 


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HOLY TTONITY. BrangMai Rood. 
SWT:&30HC: It Ordlnraou Sendee. 
gn i ug oc London. 6JO ES. PJreb J T 

HOLY '-^rNTTY. Prtoee Contort 
Road, SWT: a JKK UM6 MC 11 MP. 
Rev Ma tin t MU L _ 

HOLY TRINITY.. Stoaw 

swiaja 12.10 ho taso 

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(Vaughmi w maw. Res- R a RwA , 
ST^PETER’S. Eaton Spuare. SW~ 
a.15 HC lo Farattr Mac 1 1 mated 
Qaenmunlon Serctoa, to B flat flff 
(SUrVorrJX O Nata Lua de LMmtne 

Stein Cervus (Palcstrinal. av* vtrm 
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OBITUARY 

MR STANISLAUS 
SEUFFERT 

Divorce judge and papal knight 

Mr Stanislaus Seuflert. QC, was. periiaps undersiandaWy, 
who died on September 22 ai supported by the Law Society, 
the age of 87. was Special though some members or the 
Divorce Commissioner and public, with first-hand expoi* 
Deputy' Judge from 1967 to euee of DIY divorce, felt that 
1975. . his comments were not wholly 

. Born in Johannesburg on justified. 

May 17, 1899, the elder son of Throughout his career, 
a Cape Town tea and coffee Seu fieri was the most ip- 
merchant be was educated by proachable and accessible of 
the Marist Brothers before . mC n- He was always ready to 
coming to this country, where give of his time and expert 
he went to Stonyhurat. He cnee in helping the younger 
joined the Middlesex Regi- members of nis chambers with 
ment in 1917 and served with their problems, both profes- 
ii for the remaindcrof tire war. sjonal and personal. His 



He was admitted to the 
Middle Temple in 1925 and 
called to tire Bar three years 
later. He took an active inter- 
est in- politics and was elected 
Labour councillor in Fulham 
in 1934. He remained on the 
council until 1949 during 
which time be was its leader 
(1939-44) and Mayor of Ful- 
ham (1944-45). He also con- 
tested East Grinstead for 
Labour in 1935. 

He became bead of a small 
set of chambers at tire end of 
the Second World War and 
built it up with great dedica- 
tion and enthusiasm, until it 
became one of tire largest and 
most thriving in the Temple- 
In addition, in 1971. he found- 
ed tire first set of chambers in 
Cambridge and ensured that 
this venture, too, prospered. 
He took silk in 1965’ and 
became a bencher of Middle 
Temple five years later. 

In 1975, tire year of his 
retirement, while sitting in the 
London Divorce Court, be 
issued a warning to those who 
sought to conduct their own 
cases without recourse to so- 
licitors and counsel. In this be 


luiowiedge and ability in fam- 
ily law and practice were 
widely respected, and he 
brought to even the most 
difficult of cases a warm and 
human touch. 

He was also a man of 
boundless energy and, despite 
the burden of a very large 
practice, was able to take a 
most active pari in much 
charitable and church work. 
He was. for many yeanL the 
driving force in the Catholic 
Prisoners' Aid Society and tire 
Society of Our Lady of Good 
Counsel. As early as 1929, he 
became the first chairman of 
the Guild of Catholic Artists. 
He received a papal knight- 
hood in 1962. 

He was the author of a 
Handbook of Matrimonial 
Causes arid annotated Matri- 
monial Causes Act (1937k 
Local Government Act (1949) 
and Adoption Act (1950). 

He married, first, in 1924, 
Alice Jackson, who died in 
1948. That year, he married 
Nonna Pienaar, who survives 
him together with a son and a. 
daughter. . 


SIR LAWRENCE PENDRED 


Air Marshal Sir Lawrence 
Pendred, KBE, CB, DFC, died 
on September 19 at the age of 
87. His service to the RAF 
over many years was as valu- 
able as it was varied. 

Lawrence Fleming Pendred 
was born on May 5, 1899, the 
son of a doctor. After school- 
ing al Epsom College, be 
joined, first, the Royal Naval 
Air Service, and then the 
infant RAF. For his work as a 
reconnaissance pilot he was 
awarded tire DFC while still in 
his teens. 

After the war, be stayed in 
the service with a regular 
commission, and from 1920 
to 1923 was attached to a 


moved to tire Air Ministry as 
director of intelligence, and 
was chief intelligence officer 
to the AEAF (for the invasion 
of Europe) in 1944. After an 
interlude at the RAF Staff 
College he became, in 1946. 
director of intelligence to the 
supreme commander in 
south-east Asia. In 1947*49 he 
completed his service in this 
line of work as Assistant Chief 
of Air Staff (Intelligence). 

Between 1949 and his retire- 
ment in 1955. Pendred was, 
successively, commandant of 
the School of Land-Air War- 
fare and AOC-in-C Flying 
Training Command. After .his 
retirement he was. for eight 


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^5e ANNUNCIATION. 

9WL Wl: 1 1 SM- Mtan 

bonum masaieri. Factum toSUniton 



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Factum ■** •ueaito® (PhUtoto. 


.15 HC: 
Brown). 
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10.30 MP antf, HC Byre, to four 
voice*. IlnNWJr: *JO E. JinUSTOtn 
agjnate Mg ft Rev n war. 

ST MARGARET’S. WMHilmhr. 

EP. B*» Vicar. 


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Factum cst SUcnflian cDerrtwa. . 


WERtCAN OjllRCT.PJ LONDON. 
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Kofuiaq. 


squadron in Egypt and Tur- ^yeara. Director of Civil De- 
tey. Between 1924 and .1930 fence for tire' Midland region. 


he was a flying instructor, fin- 
pan of the time at the Central 
Flying ScbooL , 

But in tire. latter year be 
entered a different sphere, in 
which he was to excel, when 
he was posted to Transjordan 
and Palestine as staff officer, 
intelligence. In 1936, be re- 
turned to instructing, and 
between 1937 and 1941 per- 
formed other important du- 
ties. including that of a 
bomber station commander in 
194041. But in 1942 he was 
appointed chief intelligence 
officer to Bomber Command. 

The following year he 


He lived in tire region 
himself -at Leamington Spa - 
andrbecameAa DL for War- 
wickshire in 1959, 

Apart from his British hon- 
ours, he was a Commander of 
tire Legion of Merit and a 
Grand . Officer of Polonia 
Restituta (two Polish, bomber 
squadrons having been under 
his command- early in the 
war). 

His Russian wife, formerly 
Nina Chour, died a few days 
before him. They were mar- 
ried for over 60 years and are 
survived by two sons. 


SIR WILLIAM GOODE 


Mr Lee Kuan Yew. Prime 
Minister erf Singapore, writes: 

In 1953, ! first met William 
Goode, newly arrived as chief 
secretary, to press the griev- 
ances of the postmen's union 
over red stripes on their 
uniforms. Unlike the year 
before, with his predecessor, 
when the union had to go on 
strike, the issue was resolved. 
The stripes became a narrow 
piping, less prominent but 
enoujpi to discourage postmen 
from, wearing them when off 
dirty.' 

Overtire next five years, we 
negotiated: we sparred, and we 
debated with one another, in 
and out of the 
Assembly. 

One night in December. 
1957, at about 1 1.00 pm. I was 
milling with a huge dense 
crowd of excited Chinese- 
educated youths outside the 
Victoria Memorial Hall, wait- 
ing for the results of City 
Council elections. 

1 suddenly saw tire tall, 
lanky' frame . of William 
Goode, in sports shirt god 
shorts; striding through this 
crowd. He was unaccompa- 
nied and quite relaxed. Aston- 
ished, f asked him what he was 
doing. He smiled and said he 
wanted to see what it was tike 
when I was but with my boys. 
He knew well, from 


Singapore’s history of riots, 
the xenophobic streak in our 
young Maoists of the 1950s. 

He never mistook me for 
the communists with whom I 
was working in a united from. 
I was not arrested in the two 
purges of the PAP and the 
united front in 1 956 and 1 957. 
This, was something of a 
political embarrassment. And 
in the months before the 
elections; be must have bad a 
restraining influence .on the 
then elected chief minister and 
his cabinet colleagues. As their 
political fortunes declined, 
their policies became increas- 
ingly erratic. 

He anticipated the difficul- 
ties we would face when we 
won tire elections. Winning 
was not the problem; staying 
in charge was. He knew how 
formidable the communists 
were. He also knew how few 
and how pitifully ill-organized 
the- non-Marxist , socialists 
were, compared to . the 
communists. 

Hi s in tegrity, competence 
and commitment to a proud 
code of conduct enjoined him 
to hand over an administra- 
tion in good working order. So 
I inherited an administration 
effective both in improving 
the lives of tire people and in 
dealing with the communists. 
It made a difference to the 
history of Singapore. 


BRIGADIER F. G CURTIS 


. Brigadier Frands Curtis, 
CBE. who died on Septernber 
24 at the age of 88. was one of 
the earliest 'of regular officers 
to take a Cambridge degree 
during tire inter-war period. 

Francis Cockburn Curtis 
was born on May 2, 7898. tire 
son of an Army officer. He was 
educated . ar Bedales. the 
RMA. Woolwich, and King's 
CoHeg* Cambridge: 

He was commissioned in 
Ihe Royal Engineers m 1917 
and raw action in Flanders. 


to 1941 he was OC 38th 

(Welsh) Divisional Signals; in 
the War Office, he- became 
deputy director of Military 
Operations (1943). then direc- 
tor of Post-Hostilities nans 
(1944) and. later, director for 
European fmer-Ailied Plan- 
ning from !948to.l951. ■ 

He retired from the Army in 
1 951. and after a short spell in 
business became, in 1952. the 
first fuff-time Bursar of Trin- 
ity Hall Cambridge. 

Obliged by iU-heattb lo 


nou aatw amuo in rMwucrs. . to«o't, . : _ 

being mentioned in despatch- r e ; n CamhrilfB^a.S?^ 10 
es: also tn Iraq and Palestine. 2 JZ. f?!* 85 ? 



He transferred to the Royal 
Signals in 1923 and went up to 
King’s the following year, 
obtaining first-class honours 
in. the Mechanical Sciences 
Tripos (1926) and becoming 
an honorary exhibitioner- of 
tire college. 

He was concerned, on the 
eve of war in 1939. with plans 
for Gvil DefenceJFr^h- 1 940 

^ 1 


welcome member of the al- 
lege as an emeritus fellow. 

Curtis was a thorough and 
studious man. He was a ; keen 
skier from the earliest days of 
the sport and - an able trout 
fisherman before his eyesight 
failed. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Dorothy, whom he married, in 
1933: also by their two sons 
and a daughter. 





t 

i 

j- 



Rt£fit*u-A •ui.^&kT. V’ 



20 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 


Leftists 
mount 
Kinnock 
attack 


Pride of the locks is a family affair 


Continued from page 1 

dosed down immediately “or 
even quickly". 

While the Labour leader- 
ship has promised to scrap the 
Dounreay nuclear reprocess- 
ing plant it has undertaken 
only "economic appraisal” for 
the Thorp reprocessing plant 
being built at Scllafield in the 
constituency of Mr Kinnock’s 
spokesman on the environ- 
ment, Dr John Cunningham. 

Bui more than 200 motions 
on the Labour agenda want 


the party committed to a 
of 


policy of iota) opposition to 
nuclear energy. 

The opponents of nuclear 
power. led by Mr ScargiU, had 
60 per cent support at last 
year's Labour conference. But 


although they are confident 
off< • • ■ 


this lime of forcing the plat- 
form to toughen up its anti- 
nuclear stance they will be 
opposed by the power 
workers’ unions, led by Mr 
Gavjn Laird, of the engineers, 
and Mr Eric Hammond, of the 
electricians. 

The n udear battle will come 
on Wednesday. But them are 
Other trouble spots ahead for 
Mr Kinnock during the week: 

• Defence: With all eyes fo- 
cused on the troubles of the 
Alliance parties. Mr Kinnock 
and his spokesmen are anx- 
ious to keep the spotlight off 
their unilateralist policies. But 
they' will have trouble avoid- 
ing a frenzied response to the 
criticisms of Labour's stance 
by Mr Caspar Weinberger, the 
United States Defence 
Secretary. 


• Party discipline: More than 
30 resolutions and amend- 
ments oppose the expulsion of | 
two members of Mr Roy 
Hattcrslcy's Birmingham 
Spark brook constituency 
party. 


• Housing: There may be 
calls for the dropping of Mr 
Jeff Rooker. frontbench 
spokesman on housing and 
one of the most effective 
members of Mr Kinnock's 
team. He has angered left 
wingers by calling for in- 
creased discounts on certain 
categories of council house 
sales. 



Mr Frank Butter was yes- 
terday awarded the title of this 
year's British Champion Lode 
Keeper for his work on a 
stretch of the Shropshire 
Union Canal (Nicholas 
Beestan writes). 

Mr Rotter, who is respon- 
sible for a length of the canal 
which includes live locks and a 
bridge at Adderiey Locks, 
near Market Drayton, was 
presented with the the Ritchie 
Rose Bowl by the British 
Waterways Board. 

The board cited Mr Butter's 

landscape guiding work 
along the tow path and the 


Photographs by 
GRAHAM WOOD 


excellent working condition of 
the locks as reasons for his 
success. 

He does much of the work in 
his free time and is helped by 
his wife, Gladys, and Some of 
his six children. One son has 
become a ranalmau. - 

“I have pat a lot of time each 
day Into the locks ami they 
were looking very good this 
year," Mr Butter said. “I am 
delighted with the award: and 
look forward to competing 
a gain next' year." ’ 


Mr Batter has bees em- 
ployed as a leading canahnan 
since 1977 and has won the 
award twice before. The run- 
ner-op was Mr Donald Smith 
a lode keeper from Revere 
Lock, on the River Severn. 



Mr Frank Butter, right the keen gardener who has won a third title as champion lock keeper, at Adderiey Locks on the Shropshire Union Canal. 


-> ,’v r . \ ~ 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Solntfon to Puzzle No 17,156 Solution to Puzzle No 17.161 | Today’s events 





LiinaisncraBE 





The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,162 


A prize ofThc Times Atlas of World History will be given for the 
first of three correct solutions opened next Thursday. Entries 
should be addressed to: The Times. Saturday Crossword 
Competition. PO Box 486, / Virginia Street, London. El 9XN. 
The winners and solution will be published next Saturday . 

The winners of last Saturday's competition are: Mrs A/ A 


Caldwell. Springfield. Brookinount. Lisburn. Co Antrim: .4 
Guiding. Asher kc 


-wwfe Langton Green. Tunbridge fi ells. Kent: 

R Hearing. Schvyn Road. Edgbaston, Birmingham. 


Name...... 


Address. 



ROSS 

Treatment, tho' a type so 
unorthodox ( 1 0). 

Scots striking in multi- 
national company? (4). 
Acted as judge at trial hear- 
ing. . . (10). 

... if heard in this 
monarch's reign (4). 


A small amount imported, 
tin (121. 


*c hear in bulletin (l 
indifferent, in a way - call 
rack later (9). 

Russian runner conceals 
ovc affair (5). 

Priest invested in a sort of 
rhristian memento (5k 
Outstanding view of sea 
torn here? (3.6). 

'quality hard to achieve in 
Mountain camp (5.7). 

\ccommodation for bailing 
janners (4j. 

Jsc other words, perhaps 
vronglv. about a painter 
10). " . _ 

•viract of drag is toxic sub- 
stance (4J. 

’lace for viewing weather 
union (10). 

Concise Crossword page 17 


DOWN 

1 Scottish town where any- 
thing goes? (4). 

2 Commotion for leaders of 
Tory party (2-2). 

3 Neglected when caught in 

snowstorm. perhaps 

(3.13.4). 

4 Extremely eager to get love 
in abundancc(J.4>. 

5 Clamour for handy cure 
when poorly (3.3.31. 

7 Crowns done differently for 
special coinages (5-5). 

8 Cost too hard to be upset 
(10). 

11 joint accounts at first for 17 
( 12 ). 

13 Irishman sniggering security 
activity ( (0). 

14 Flirts with about four suit- 
ors ( 10). 

16 Source of bitterness all taste, 
perhaps (5.4). 

21 Trov’s based on this (5). 


22 Sort of garment Mum 
makes the most of. . . (4). 


23 ... nor quite a march for 
this one (4). 


Royal engagements 

Princess Anne. President, the 
Save the Children Fund, attends 
the opening concert of the 
Swindon Festival. Faningdon 
Park. Swindon. 8. 

Last chance to see 

Five Years with the Face; City 
Museum and Art Gallery, 
Forcgaie St, Worcester, . 9 JO to 

Pacesetters 6: work by Chris- 
topher Bledowski, Sarah Green- 
grass and Richard Webb; 
Museum and Art Gallery. 
Pricstgate. Peterb or ou g h; 12 to 

Julia Parry: The Old and the 
Derelict; Postern gate Gallery. 6 
Posterngaie. HulL 10 to 5 JO. 
Music 

Concert by the City of Lon- 
don Sinfonia; High Wycombe 
Parish Church. 8. 

Concert by the London Festi- 
val Orchestra; Lichfield Cathe- 
dra). 7.30. 

Piano recital by Jeremy 
Menuhin: Melbourne Church, 
nr Derby. 7.30. 

Concert by Celi Azulek (viola) 
and Alan Brown (piano); 
Pyrford Court, nr Woking, 7J0. 

Organ recital by Simon Lind- 
ley: St Peter's. Monkweannontfc, 
Sunderland. 7.30. 

Recital by James Paso ns: St 
John's. Wolverhampton. 7.30. 

Piano recital by Jon Kimura 
Parker: West Somerset School, 

Mine head. S. 

General 

Great Western Society enthu- 
siasts gala weekend; Dhkot 
Railway Centre, near Swindon, 
today and tomorrow 1 1 to 5. 

National Plant Sale; Burford 
House, Tenbory Wells, 11 to 5. 

National Trust Day for the 
Disabled; Canons Ashby House, 
Canons Ashby, Davenuy, 1 to 
5.30. 


Tomorrow 


Royal engagements 
The Duke of Kent visits 
Botswana: departs Heathrow 
Airport. 3.15. 

Last chance to see 

Paintings and prims by Mike 
Exail. Elizabeth HowletL Mar- 
cia Ley; Linton Court Gallery. 
Duke Sl Settle. 2 to 5. 

20rh century drawings; works 
b\ artists of the British School: 
Octagon Gallerv. Fitr-villiam 
Museum. Cambridge; 2.15 to 5. 
Music 

Concert by the Orehcstrc 
National? dc UUe: Canterbury 
Cathedral. 7.30. 

Redial by Robert Jacoby 
(violin, oboe). Elisabeth Jacoby 
(bassoon) and Paul Searie- 
Bames (piano): The Drama 
Hall. Weymouth College. Cran- 
ford Ave. Weymouth. 3. 

Redial by the Nash En- 
semble: East Betgboli Church. 
Suffolk. 3. 

Concert by the Halle Or- 
chestra; Free Trade Hall. Man- 
chester. 7.30. 

Concert by the English Cham- 
ber Orchestra and Wind En- 
semble: .Assembly Rooms. Bath. 
7.30. 

General 

Canterbury ' Festival 86: ex- 
hibition. talks, concerts and 
excursions: further details from 
the Festival Box Ofice. Forwood 
Booking. 37 Palace Sl Caster- 

Imp x ifl 


bur} (0227) 455600 (today until 
Oct 18). 


Gardens open 


PsHMiorS* - 

TODAY AND OTHER DAYS 

Ayrshire: Cutzaan Castle Garden and 
Country Parle. 4m W rt Msytola on 
87023, man off A719: . herbaceous bor- 
ders. rose garden, interesting trees; (My 
10 to dusk. 

Perthshire: Ckmy House, fcm NW of 
Aberfekty on BS46 turn E lor 2fcm ten N 
to Edrsoynate: many rare and unusual 
plants, fine autumn barms and colour; P; 
tJafly urns end of October 9 to 5. 
TOMORROW 

Dorset Ivy Cottage. Anstv, 12m N Of 
Dorchester, off A354 Puddletown- 
B landlord. 1st left after Glue Vmney, US 
acres, ptanurnsn'e garden, unusual 
perennials and moi s ii ee loving plants, 
specimen trees and sfmbs; 2 to 5^0. 

O d u d eM w: Garstogtor Manor. SE of 
Oxford H at 8430b tenpunds . cokmbar- 
lum. floworpartarro. Katen garden, line 
trees: 2 to 6. 

Suncfc Bm Green Pamttouso, Brad- 
field St Oars, 7hi.SE of Buy Si Edmunds: 
t acre pCantsmansgarden. wide variety of 
shrubs, herbaceous and atom plants; 2 
» 8. 

G lo ur.uit r u lhi a. Newark Path. Qzie- 
worth. ISm E of WottWHmder-Edge, 
iVn S offuncoon A4135/B405& lOacro 
wooctand garden; 2 to 5. 

Cumbria: Levans HU. 5m S of Kendal 
on Mftnhorpe road. Afi: exit 36 from Mft 
10 acres, famous topiary garden. tormsJ 
bedOng, herbaceous Dorters <> also 
open tomorrow and Tuesday; n to 5. 


The. pound 


Australia 3 
Austria Sch 
BetgioniFr 

CanadaS 
Denmark Kr 
FWandNdt 
France Fr 
Germany Dm 
Greece Dr 

SBS?* 

KafyLira 
Japan Yen 
WetoertandsOd 
Norway Kr . 
PortagalEsc 
South Africa Bd 
Spent Pta 
Sweden Kr 
Switzerland Fr 
USAS 
Ya 


Bank 

sS 

2150 
64.15 
2055 
1153 
752 
9J96 
209. 
20&50 
1150 
1.12 
212000 
234.00 
SM 
11.12 
22050 
480 
19925 
■ IOJ7 
2485 
150 
75000 


Bank 


■ Ut 

2 tUto 
6055 
- 1.965 

1093 
1 JU 
9M 
289 
193-50 
. 1180 
186 
200000 
22000 
227 
1052 
20050 
3.40 
18925 
SJB 
IMS 
1.43 

eojto 


Rates tor small denamnsUon bank notes 


only as auppBgd by Barclays Bank PLC. 
Dfffersnt 


rates apply fo travetferc 1 
tr toretgn currency 


cheques and after 
business. 

Retail Price Index: 3854 


tnmtae TTm FTIndSK dosed down 09 at 

1238.4. 


Weather 

forecast 


6 am to midnight 


Lake District, We of jlwc ^ Clo ud y , 


occasional rain: wtod-SW 


Anniversaries 


TODAY 

Births: Samel Adams, Amer- 
ican independence leader. Bos- 
ton. 1723: George Cnrikshank. 
caricaturist. London, 1792; Al- 
fred Mahan. naval historian. 
West Point. New York. 1840; 
Lows Botha. 1st Prime Minister 
of South Africa 1910-1919. 
Greytown, South Africa. 1862. 

Deaths: William of Wyke- 
ham. chancellor, bishop of Win- 
chester and founder of Win- 
chester College and New 
College- Oxford. Bishop's Wal- 
tham. Hampshire. 1404; Edgar 


Degas. Paris. 1917; Aristide 
MalUoL 


painter and sculptor. 
Banyuls-sur-Mer, 1944: Clara 
Bow, the 'It gjrf film star, Los 
Angeles. 1965-The Society of 
■Jeans was founded. 1540. 
TOMORROW 
Births: Caravaggio, painter. 
Caravaggio. Italy. 1573; Richard 
Bright- physician. BristoL 1789; 
Georges Clemeoceaa, premier of 
France 1917-20. MouiUeron-en- 
Pareds, 1842; Edward Herbert 
Thompson, archaeologist. 
Worcester. Massachusetts. 
1856. 

Deaths: Weaceslas, patron 
saint of Czechoslovakia, mar- 
tyred. Stara Boleslav, 929; An- 
drea del Sarto, painter. Flor- 
ence. 1530: Lotos Pasteur, 
Saint-Cloud. Paris. 1895: Emile 
Zola. Paris. 1902; Andre Breton, 
pioneer of surrealism. Paris, 
1966: Garaal Abdel Nasser, 
president of Egypt 1956-70. 
Cairo. 1970. 


Road$ 


Wain and Waak M* Contraflow 
batmen uebons IS and 17 (Srorv- 
don/CrencesterJ. A3U Contraflow ba- 
tman Exeter and O k e ha mpton at 
Wfnddon Dawn. Devon. A* Te 


E Bemesda. GwYrtvdd- 

k Uk vrbis lane and skp 


Ttaa North; 
road downs at pinctton 37 N and 
southbound MGlr Inside bna closures N 
and southbouvl ai Walton SunmtL 
Greater Menefwstsr. Afil: Roadworks at 
Bsldersby interchange. N Yorks: delays, 
Seedond! M8r tmer ring rood at 
Townhoad wch anga. StratfKfyea, to 
Caracuba flyover, cased: diversions be- 


fwean 6 am and 1Z30 pm. A8£ Smgle lm 
aWspean 


traffic at various locations batmen 1 , _ 
Dnoge and fnvetgarry. AB2 Sngte ins 
traffic and temporary bghc (2« horn) at 
tneNandoflodJf — 


wchy. 

wn&edbyi 


Tower Bridge 


Tower Bridge will be raised 
today at 4.15 pm. 6 JO pm and 
9.30pm- 


9b/i^o/w 

For readers who may have 
nrissed a oop} of The Times this 
week, we repeat below the 
week’s Portfolio price changes 
(today’s are on page 25). 

*to* ore rare wre-Ttot m sw t tSbi' 

1 

+5 

+1 

44 

43 

46 


1 

2 

+1 

+5 

46 

42 

46 



3 

+3 

+2 

+3 

45 

44 



4 

+2 

+3 

42 

42 

42 



5 

+4 

+1 

45 

41 

43 



6 

+1 

+2 

43 

42 

+2 



7 

+4 

43 

+7 

43 

45 



8 

+3 

+3 

43 

43 

41 



9 

+2 

+4 

+5 

43 

43 



10 

+6 

44 

44 

42 

44 



11 

+5 

+3 

43 

42 

41 



12 

+6 

-1 

+3 

42 

+5 



13 

+2 

+2 

+3 

+1 

43 



14 

+5 

+2 

45 

43 

42 



15 

+2 

42 

45 

42 

+3 



16 

+1 

+1 

43 

+2 

42 



17 

+3 

42 

44 

42 

43 



18 

+4 

+2 

+3 

45 

+2 



19 

+3 

42 

+3, 

44 

44 



20 

+4 

4? 

46 

+2 

+7 



21 

+5 

+1 

44 

+3 

45 



22 

+1 

+2 

+2 

+4 

45 



23 

+2 

+3 

47 

43 

+5 



24 

+5 

+2 

43 

+1 

44 



25 

+3 

43 

42 

43 

45 



26 

+2 

+1 

45 

+2 

42 



27 

+2 

+1 

43 

+1 

46 



28 

+3 

1+2 

+5 

+5 

+3 



29 

+2 

+2 

+3 

+5 

43 



30 

+1 

+2 

+2 

44 

45 



31 

+3 

+1 

+5 

+2 

45 



32 

+2 

1+2 

+5 

+3 

+7 



33 

+3 

42 

42 

44 

43 



34 

+6 

+2 

45 

41 

+3 



35 

+2 

+2 

"45 

,+1 

44 



36 

+5 

+1 

43 

43 

44 



37 

+2 

43 

+1 

+2 

42 


! 

38 

+2 

41 

+5 

45 

45 


1 

39 

+3 

+1 

+5 

+2 

45 



40 

■*3 

41 

♦2 

41 

+3 



41 

4-2 

41 

43 

+3 

+6 


to 

42 

+3 

42 

45 

42 

47 



43 

+1 

42 

42 

42 

43 





s 


Roles and How to Play Page 35 


Barden, 


1 Fkth, I . 

spreadmg E: wind 


Sreaand, dtaagow, Central 
Argyfl, Neo iw ra SetarKfc 


ram. heavy at times, beco mi no 
* “ J ng. locaBy 


Becoming doudy. rain 
n Win a f te rnoon : wmoS or 


23S; 

Knaran 


1 bright or aunny 
kr far N. Dry 



je doud: c- 


. _ _ , a<injztf: n- 

mtst-mtal: r-rotn: s-«now: tti* 


Frank Johnson with the Liberals 

Just a touch of 
French farce 


Mr Steel yesterday made 

much ihebestofihc amuml 
leader's speeches whtch he 

has now been making 10 tne 
Liberal Assembly for a de- 

This was because it bene* 
filed from ihe one indtspens- 


IIIVAJ Hl/n* - | . 

able condiuon for 


memorable a lead er's . 
to any party conference: a 
party split. Hardly anyone 
remembers any of Gaitskell s 
conference .speeches except 
the one about fight fight and 


Lambeth." Since this was a 
reference to the action of a 
notorious Labour-controlled 
council, everyone applauded: 

Bui Mr Steel added that 
Tuesday's Assembly vow on 
defence had been "ihe 
equivalent of one ol those’ 
signs." (Applause, but alsaj" 
hisses, shouts of protest). A 


lot of people were now very 
angry with 


fight again. V£e remember 


that because the people he 
was promising to fight were 
in his own party. . 

Mr Kinnock’s speech to the 
Labour conference last year 
was his only .famous one so 
for because it was. directed 
against the Militant Ten- 
dency. . ^ .. 

The paradox is that, if a 
split is the precondition of a 
speech's immortality. “>e 
leader would rather not say 
anything immortal, since 
there is nothing that leaders 
hate more than splits. The 
goal of all leaders, in these 
annual ordeals, is to get 
through them without giving 
offence to, anyone, apart from 
the other parties and their 
voters, and be seen amid a 
standing ovation on the eve- 
ning news. , 

The hall was packed and 
hot as we awaited Mr Steefs 
arrivaL The television cam- 
eras roamed. Perhaps for that 
reason, a banner which had 
. hung over the balcony for two 
days, and had home the 
legend "Libgay — Liberal Gay 
Action" was now strangely 


gone. It was replaced^b^ 


"Rosemary Cooper 
(Prospective Parliamentary 
Candidate) for Knowsley 
North, " a very straight 
reference to an impending by- 
election. An anti-Aids 
advertisement in the con- 
ference agenda had contained 
an even more bourgeois slo- 
gan: "Avoid exchanging 
bodily fluids” — presumably 
another controversial policy 
on which the Liberals will be 
fighting the general election. 

The vital moment of Mr 
Steel’s speech was when he 
said:“You cannot create 


him. He lad 
uttered the phrase which 
would ensure the speech’s 
feme, bill he may eventually 
regret when next he has tp^ 
please his party rather than 
Dr Owen. , . . ' 

He turned to explaining hisJ; 
defence policy. By now the? 
Liberals were probably sor 
busy preparing to take sides, 
over the phrase about signs, 
and lamposts, that few were 
following these details. This, 
was just as well since, to-; 
though he did not mention 
the French, and spoke only or 
the need to agree a defence, 
policy with our European 
partners, it was essentially the: 
hazy Anglo-French sub-f 
marine arrangement which] 
he and Dr Owen had recently I 
talked about with various f 
French polilicians-lts poten- 
tial for farce seemed 
immense. , ' ' 

Would the French nava(l 
boffins know, for instance^ 
that the phrase "hello sailor? 
has a meaning in English^ 
especially in some Liberal 
circles, to which the literal 
translation, 6o»joiff, 
maiclot . simply does not do. 
justice. 

Then there was the quev 
•lion of what President 
Mitterrand was told wheabfc 
asked his chef de cabinet fora 
dossier on who Mr Steel was, 
and what he was most fam- 
ous for in Britain. Perhaps, in 
a reference to Mr SieePs 
private member’s bill of 
1967, the answer was: "abon- 
tions. M le President." 

Monsieur 1 1 

Mitterrand;" Abortions? This 
little Ecossais is a man Of 
many mistresses, then? P« 
de problemc. Jc suis homnte 
du morale aussi." 

The Owen-Steel defence 


nuclear-free zones by putting 
up posts of 


policy is ripe with misunder- 
stand! 


up signs on the lamp posts < 


ling. But its great merit 
was to inspire yesterday's 
brave speech. . 







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A ridge of pressure will 
persist over S Eughnd but a 
strong SW airstream will de- 
velop in tire N as a frontal 
system, moves across N 
districts. 


London, SE. onW S, SW Eogtand, 
East Anflta, E WUmta, Chmsl to- 
tandK Dry, sunny or dear Intarvsis. fcg 
patches cteartng in morning, reforming 
mbt. wind many SW Sght; mas tamp 18C 
(64P) 

E, cantnd N England, W MAnds, S 
Watea: Dry. rather doudy. sunny or clear 
to t e i va t t. wtod SW 6gw or moderate: max 
tamp t7C(53Fl 

H Wales, NW. NE Engtoncfc Mostly 
cloudy, perhaps a me ratn to daces, 
some sunny Intervals In ahettarad parts: 
wed SW moderate: max temp 17C (63 F) 



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High Tides 


TODAY 

London Bridge 


Avomnouth 


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Dover 


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AM 

HT 

PM 

HT 

1 8.12 

55 

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5.4 

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3.1 

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88 

626 

26 

651 

28 

1238 

85 

1257 

83 



1226 

43 

5.45 

43 

639 

4.7 

1156 

48 



7.19 

38 

7.34 

4.1 

6.00 

38 

8.39 

3 3 

5.19 

48 

682 

4.1 

1206 

5.4 

1-27 

5.1 



1238 

63 

9.43 

4.1 

1021 

4.1 

552 

6.6 

638 

6.7 

4.T4 

28 

531 

20 


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11.44 
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5A2 
550 
1229 
11j06 
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42 

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34 6.14 
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35 6.44 


3.7 

48 


28 Oban 


15 

43 

34 

68 

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Tide measured in 


TOMORROW AM 
9.22 
10.12 
2.10 
7.55 
1-55 
1.15 

7.43 
12.45 

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8 3 306 
28 807 
70 28V 
38 188 

'4.9 826 
3.7 126 
3.7 885 
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40 7.43 
52 308 
60 2.40 

4.1 11.47 
68 824 
20 &51- 
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4.6 3.15 

4.7 2.14 
28 348 

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684 em 


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6.48 pm 


Mormsets: Moonrtees: 
449 pm 1181pm 


Mew moon: October 3 



Sun itoeK Smsekc 
886 am 646 pfQ 


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Eastbourne BJ 
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13 57 sunny 
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15 59 sunny 

14 57 brt*s 


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17 S3 sunny 

18 64 SttWf 

19 66 sunny 

17 63 sunny 

18 64 stMy 


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15 M sunny 
17 63 sunny 

61 sunny 

16 61 sunny 


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32 
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4.4 
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16 61 
15 59 
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18 81 sunny 

15 58 am if 

19 68 StfSIV 
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13 55 doudy 
11 52 ortnto 
13 55 doudy 




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IUI<2TNIFS<5 AN D FINANCE 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 



21 


21 


TIMES 


SPORT 35 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 39 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Beet 




STOCK MARKET 


FT 30 Share 
1238.4 (-3.9) 

FT-SE100 
1568.6 (-7.3) 

Bargains 

21638 

USM 

122JJ4 (-0.7) 

THE POUND 


US Dollar 
1.4380 (+0.0045) 

W German mark 
2.9429 (+0.0064) 

Trade- weighted 
68.7 (Same) 


r(\ 



A 


* 

/ 


[I 


Gill leaves 
the LME 

Gill & Duffus, the commod- 
ity trading company taken 
over by DaJgely last year, is 
tbe latest London Metal Ex- 
change member to leave tbe 
ring as a result of the tin crisis 
last October. ■ 

The crisis, which precip- 
itated a huge fell in tin prices, 
resulted in a £27.8 million 
extraordinary loss for Dalgety. 
Gill & Duffus. best taown for 
its cocoa trading, has been 
winding down its LME opera- 
tions and will formally leave 
the ring on .Wednesday when 
its last contracts come to 
fruition. 

Its departure brings to seven 
the number of companies 
which have left the ring since 
the crisis, and this leaves the 
LME with 21 full members. 

Mr Michael Brown, the 
exchange's chief executive, 
said that he was “very 
disappointed” to see another 
member depart. 

Liberty drop 

Pretax profits of Liberty, the 
retailing, printing, converting 
and wholesaling group, more 
than halved in tbe six months 
to July 31. down to £417,000 
from £896,000. Turnover rose 
by 5 per cent to £26.5 million. 
The interim dividend is main- 
tained at 1.8p. 

- Tempos, page 22 

Elders leap 

i Elders IXL, 4hfr. Australian 


vv"»0~i _ 

pretax operating profits of 
AusS236.8 million £103 mil- 
lion) in the year to June 30 
compared with AusSl 33.4 
million the previous year. 

Tempos, page 22 

Argos up 18% 

Argos Distributors, the cat- 
alogue showroom subsidiary 
of BAT Industries, increased 
first half sales by ! 8 per cent to 
£178.6 million. Trading prof- 
ils were up 15 per cent to £5 
million. The company aims 
for sales in excess of £480 
million for the full year. 

Merger 

Two of Britain's smaller 
building societies, the Nor- 
wich and the Peterborough, 
merge on October 31. The 
Norwich and Peterborough 
Building Society will be 25th 
in size, with 60 branches in the 
cast of England and assets of 
about £500 million. 

Costs down 

The cost of living in West 
Germany is 0.5 per cent below 
that of September, 1985. It fell 
by 0.4 per cent in AugusL 

98% accept 

The Scottish and Newcastle 
Breweries offer for Home 
Brewery has been declared 
fully unconditional, with acc- 
eptances for 98.92 per cent of 
ordinary shares. 



The Government is to 
amend the Financial Services 
Bill to impose an industry- 
wide compensation scheme 
on the entire network of self- 
regulating organizations. 

The amendment is to be 
tabl ed on Tuesday in the face 
of fierce opposition from the 
Stock Exchange.and the Inter- 
national Securities Regulatory 
Organisation (Isro). It has 
sparked considerable tension 
among' the individual self- 
regulating organizations. 

It will create a central 
compensation scheme to pro- 
tect investors who lose money 
through the fraud or bank- 
ruptcy of any authorized 
investment business. Ail 
SROs will be required: to take 
part in it on behalf of their 
members. 

The scheme is likely to 
stipulate a maximum com- 
pensation limit of £30,000 per 
investor, although the Securi- 
ties and Investments Board, 
which will be responsible for 
determining how much 
compensation is available, has 
not decided on the figure. 

The Government amend- 
ment, put forward by the 
Department of Trade and 
Industry, will require the set- 
ting up ofa central compensa- 


ByLawrence Lever 
tion board to determine 
whether payouts are neo- 


The, board will be run by 
representatives firorp the in- 
dividual self-regulating org- 
anizations. 

The SIB is at present having 
discussions with a number or 
banks over -the financing 
arrangements for the scheme. 

It is intended that there will 
not be & pool of monqy drawn 
from : the SROs. Instead, the 
banks will make finance avail- 
able as and when necessary in 
return for committment fees 
from the SROs themselves. 

Tbe -.Stock Exchange and 
Isro are furious at the pro- 
posal because -they consider 
they wDl end up subsidizing 
what they consider are weaker 
SROs for the default of their 
members. 

The Exchange is partial-, 
lariy angry because it win have 
toabandon its own compensa- 
tion scheme, which provides a 
fund .with no limit on the 
compensation for investors. 

The success of the scheme 
has meant .that the Exchange 
has been able to negotiate very 
fine rates with. insurance com- 
panies to insure the -com- 
pensation fund. - 

ft wanted to retain its own 


scheme which it is at present 
i modifying in the light of the 
Big Bang to provide a ceiling 
on the compensation available 
of £250,000 per investor. 

A spokesman for the Ex- 
change saidTWe are aware of 
the Government's plans and 
ihey give us great cause for 
concern. The member firms of 
the Stock Exchange and in- 
deed the Exchange itself are 
going to be asked to under- 
write a fund which will in- 
dude people oyer whom it has 
no power at all. 

“Moreover, a ceiling .of 
£30,000 is going to miss out an 
awful lot of investors”. 

The SIB will suggest to 
individual SROs that they can 
set up their own compensa- 
tion scheme to top up the 
central one. 

Moreover, it is considering 
methods of making the SRO 
to which a defaulting business 
bdongs partially responsible 
for compensating investors. 

A DTI spokesman con- 
firmed yesterday that the 
Government will introduce a 
central scheme. 

He said: “The government 
believes the public should see 
the compensation provisions 
as effective and well-funded. 


Group of Five seek 
to heal the rift 


Tempos 22 
WalfStnet 22 
Co News 22 
Comment 22 
Stock Market 23 
Money Mrkts 23 


Foreign Excfa 23 
Traded Opts 23 
Unit Treats 24 
Commodities 24 
USM Prices 24 
Shire Prices 25 


From Bailey Morris and 

David Smith, Washington 

Ministers of. the Group of 
live industrialized nations 
met in closed session yes- 
terday in an attempt to heal 
the growing rift over policies 
amid growing concern that 
Britain will be forced to raise 
base rates if the sharp slide in 
the pound cannot be halted. 

Before the closely-guarded 
session the United. States and 
Wc$t. .Germany met. privately, 
tot -resolve differences, over 
interest-rate policies to enable 
the G5 nations to present a 
united front to nervous cur- 
rency markets. 

The meetings were held 
even as finance ministers dis- 
cussed a list of potential 
candidates to succeed M Jac- 
ques de Larosiere as mi 
director of the Intematioi 
Monetary Fund. He resigns 
offidally later this year. 

Over the past few days the 
list has grown to include two 
West German candidates, 
Herr - Manfred Lahnsiein, a 
former finance minister, and 
Herr Otto Graf Lambsdorf in 
addition to two British “dark- 
horse candidates” — Sir 
Jeremy Morse of Lloyds Bank 
and Lord Richardson, former 
Governor of the Bank of 
England.- 

Mr Paul Volcker. chairman 
of the US Federal Reserve 
Board was meeting Herr Karl 
Otto Poehl, president of the 
Bundesbank, at the same time 
as Mr James Baker. US Trea- 
sury Secretory, was meeting 
Herr Gerhard Stoltenberg, the 
West German Finance Min- 
ister. in long sessions after the 
decision of the Bundesbank 
not to give in to US pressure 
to lower interest rates. 

Officials said that both na- 
tions were eager to cool the 
rhetoric of recent weeks which 
has led to speculation that the 
G5 “plaza accord” negotiated 
in September to stabilize ex- 
change rates had begun to 
unravel. 

Although no dramatic 
announcements are expected 
as a result of the G5 and G7 
sessions yesterday and today, 
officials said that West Ger- 
many was expected to agree to 



market summary 


Lord Richardson: Could be 
IMF post candidate. 

modest rate cuts some time in 
October. 

Tbe cuts would be timed to 
give the Reagan Administra- 
tion political leverage before 
the November elections. 

“We would like to do what 
we can to help the Repub-j 
licans retain control of the 
Senate because we think a 
Senate controlled by Demo- 
crats would be more 
protectionist.” a senior West 
German official said. 

Officials emphasized, how- 
ever. that a modest rate cut in 
the future should not be 
construed as support for tbe 
US position that Japan and 
West Germany must reflate 
their economies. 

' The G5 meetings this week, 
in conjunction with the an- 
nual meeting of the World 
Bank and the. IMF, will focus 
heavily on the individual 
policies of the industrialized 
nations. 

Specifically, the indus- 
trialized nations will attempt 
to enact the surveillance 
procedures over each other's 
economies, agreed at the To- 
kyo economic summit 

The slide in the pound took 
some of the focus off the 
dollar. Officials said the Bank 
of England, which has inter- 
vened to defend sterling, 
would like to avoid another 
rise in interest rales- which 
would further, weaken tbe 
British economy. 

But if tbe intervention foils, 
Britain would have little alter- 
native -but to raise interest 
rales in a move that would 
hurt its negotiating position in 
Washington. 


Opax faces 
rival bid 
for printer 

By John Bell 
City Editor 

The battle for control of 
McCorquodale, the banknote 
printer, took a new twist 
yesterday with news of an 
approach from a third party 
which could lead to a higher 
offer than the £146 million at 
present on the table from the 
rival printer Norton Opax. 

Majpnquodale's chief exec- 
utive. Mr John Holloran. 
refused to disclose the identity 
of the potential white knight 
He said: “The board would be 
bound to tell shareholders of 
any approach from a quality 
company which offered some 
strong possibility of synergy 
between its own business and 
our own.” 

In the City, speculation over 
the name of the third party 
included both the security 
printer, De la Rue, and the 
United States group R R 
Donnelly, 

Norton Opax, which re- 
newed its bid for McCor- 
quodale on Thursday after 
clearance by the Monopolies 
and Mergers Commission, 
called for the possible new 
bidder to be identified 


Edinburgh 
hotels sold 
by Guinness 

By Alison Eadie 
Norfolk Capital Group, the 
hotel company chaired until 
earlier this year by Sir Max- 
well Joseph’s widow. Lady 
Joseph, has emerged as the 
buyer of two Guinness hotels 
in Edinburgh — the Caledo- 
nian and the North British. 

The price is £23.5 million, 
with the five-star Caledonian 
costing £18.5 million. Gui- 
nness, which acquired the 
hotels during the 1985 take- 
over of Arthur Bell, is keeping 
the world-famous golfing ho- 
tel Glen eagles. t 

Norfolk is raising £20.2 
million by a one-for-one rights 
issue at 18'Ap. The balance 
will be funded internally. 

Norfolk reported interim 
profits to June 30 of £439,000 
pretax, up 39 per cent. 



Lord Pennock, left, and Mr Michael J alien: Pleased by the interest in the placing. 

Eurotunnel projects profits 
of f 109m after first year 


By Teresa Poole, Business Correspondent 


EorotnnneL the Anglo- 
French partnership chosen to 
build and operate the £4.7 
billion cross-Channel link, 
yesterday launched an inter- 
national private placing to 
raise £206 million. 

Institutional investors in 
Britain, France, Japan, the 
United States and selected 
other countries will be offered 
Earotmmel Units, comprising 
one share in the French com- 
pany and one share in tbe 
English company. 

The placing, originally 
planned for July but post- 
poned while the construction 
contract was finalized, follows 
the reconfirmation by all . 40 
international banks to under- 
write about £5 billion of loans 
and stand-by facilities for the 
project 

Lord Pennock, the British 
co-chairman, said: “We have a 
very convinced feeling now 
that our act is really coming 
together.” 

According to projections in 
the Pathfinder prospectus, 
Eurotunnel will move into 
profit in 1993, the first year of 
operations. Revenues will then 
rise with pretax profits of £109 


million in 1994, soaring to 
£12,192 million in 2041, allow- 
ing for Inflation. 

The average after-tax re- 
turn, attributable to share- 
holders over the 55-year 
concession, will be 17.7 per 
cent The average dividend 
return to subscribers will be 
17.2 per cent 

Mr Michael J alien, deputy 
chief executive, said there had 
already been considerable in- 

Rnandal projection* far EuMuand 


Year 

Trnnowr 

Pre-tax 

profit 


Em 

Em 

1994 

752 

ire 

2002 

1.320 

727 

2012 

2.608 

1.919 

2022 

4.923 

3,896 

2032 

8355 

7,260 

2041 

15,150 

12.192 


terest in the placing with 
“pood indications’' from finan- 
cial institutions. 

A farther £748 rnOlioa will 
be raised next summer 
through a public offer for sale, 
before a stock market flota- 
tion. It will offer shareholders 
a 16U> per cent return, with tbe 
first dividend in May 1995. 
There were indications yes- 
terday that the ofler-for-sale 


share price is likely to be at 
Least 30 per emit higher than 
the placing price, which will be 
announced in October. 

Tbe projections show an 
increase in dividends from 
£334 per anil for 1994, to 
£200.68 in 2041. Eurotunnel 
directors said that the 
company's distributable prof- 
its would be paid out as 
dividends and that all loans 
would be repaid by 2005. 

Following an analysis of 
cross-Channel traffic, 
Enrotnnnel forecasts that 
a boot 60 per cent of pas- 
sengers travelling by car and 
75 per cent of passengers on 
foot wifi use the timneL The 
total number of crossings ris- 
ing the Channel tunnel is 
expected to rise from 29.7 
million in 1993 to 36 mOHoo in 
2003. 

Many of these projections 
were questioned yesterday by 
Flexifink. Flexflink, which 
represents port and ferry op- 
erators. has published an in- 
dependent assessment wara- 
mg that investors could face a 
nfl return. 

Comment, page 23 


Burrups to print gas prospectus 


Burrups, part of tbe Extel 
news and information group, 
has clinched the order to print 
the prospectus for the British 
Gas share flotation, the biggest 
City print contract so for. 

The company fought off 
fierce competition to land tbe 
order and it comes after its 
success in printing the pros- 
pectus for the Trustee Savings 
Bank and British Telecom 
flotations. 


By Cliff Feltiuun 

No figure is being placed on 
the size of the contract but it 
comes at an important time 
for Extel, under threat from 
the publisher, Mr Robert 
Maxwell, and which has just 
lost to a rival consortium of 
bookmakers over the beaming 
of satellite coverage of race 
meetings to betting shops. 

Some analysts say the loss 
of this contract could be worth 


up to £3 million over the next 
three years. 

Burrups' success in landing 
the prestigious and highly- 
profitable British Gas contract 
confirms its importance as the 
jewel in the Extel crown and 
the most likely reason that Mr 
MaxwelL who at present owns 
25 per cent of the group, has 
been intent on acquiring 
control. 


Delay 
in final 
TSB 
figures 

By Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 

Lazard Brothers, the mer- 
chant bank handling the 
Trustee Savings Bank share 
issue, yesterday delayed ann- 
ouncing the size ofthc sub- 
scription for shares but said a 
statement was likely tomor- 
row or Monday. 

Lazards would give no rea- 
son for the delay but insisted it 
was not because the receiving 
banks, which are counting the 
applications, had seriously 
underestimated subscriptions. 

Preliminary estimates sug- 
gest that 4.25 million people 
applied for shares. The 
amount of money put up for 
the issue is still uncertain. 

Meanwhile, prospects for a 
large premium on the issue, 
once shares start unding on 
the stock market, dwindled 
further as the grey market 
price of TSB shares dropped 
to around 87p. A few days ago 
the price was well over 100p. 
giving a more than 100 per 
cent premium on the 50p 
partly-paid shares. 

A spokesman for Cleveland 
said that buying was thin 
yesterday with institutional 
investors and stockbrokers 
talking down the price. He 
added that the grey market 
could drop to 75p before full 
trading in the shares begins on 
October 8th. 

Building societies have 
experienced a huge outflow of 
funds over the last few days of 
the issue as savers withdrew 
money to apply for shares. 

Experts estimated that a 
total of around £500 million 
had been withdrawn but ex- 
pect that a substantial propor- 
tion will return to society 
accounts from people who do 
not receive their full alloca- 
tion or sell their shares 
quickly. 

The Abbey National said 
more money had been with- 
drawn for the TSB issue than 
for British Telecom. 

The issue will have caused a 
net outflow of funds for the 
industry during September, 
only the second net monthly 
outflow on record, leading 
societies to dip into their 
reserves and rely more on 
funds raised in wholesale 
money markets. 

Mr Callum McCaskill, a 

S neral manager for the Hali- 
i Building Society, said: 
“We have passed out a lot of 
cheques but the majority will 
come back again in October 
because of the oversubscrip- 
tion. You have to take the 
building society figures for 
September and October to- 
gether to get a fair picture.” 
Lazards warned investors not 
to be pressured into selling 
their TSB shares immediately, 
as many experts were urging. 


Kleinwort aids 
privatization 
of StGobain 

By Richard Lander 
Kleinwort Benson, the Brit- 
ish merchant bank and the 
French arm of Lazard Broth- 
ers, has been chosen to play 
important roles in the priv- 
atization next year of St 
Gobain, the glass-making and 
industrial group, which will 
spearhead the French 
Government's denationaliza- 
tion programme. 

Kleinwort, along with 
Credit Commercial de France, 
is to advise the French Gov- 
ernment white the British 
bank will handle the sale to 
institutional investors outside 
France. Lazard and Banque 
National de Paris have been 
chosen to advise St Gobain 
itself. 

Kleinwort is thought to 
have beaten off stroug inter- 
national competition 


STOCK MARKETS 

New York ^ 

Dow Jones 1770.39 (+1.83J - 

• Tokyo 

Nikkei Dow 17960.98 (-27.37) 

Hong Kong: 

Hang Seng 2034.36 (+22-«a 

Amsterdam; Gen 279.5 (-5.5) 

Sydney. AO 12585 (+5-6) 

Frankfurt 

f Commerzbank . 1985.1 (-10.1) 

Brussels; 

Genera) 3876.55 (+2^1) 

Parts: CAC 386.4 (-2.9) 

Zurich: 

SKA Genera) 51B.00 (-4.0) 

London closing prices Page 25 

INTEREST RATES 

London: 

Bank Base: 10% 

3-month Interbank 

3-month eJ$bte MteilOtt-lO** 

bujpng rate 

„ Prime Rate 7.50% 

1 T Federal Funds 5 U »%* 

3-month Treasury Bffis 5-25-5-23% 
30-year bonds 94 l(, ie>95* 


CURRENCIES 

London: New York: 

£: $1 4360 £51.4370- 

£; DM2.9429 S: DM2.0455* 

£: Swfr2.36S4 index: 1 1 0.7 
£. FFr9 6380 

£: Yen221 .88 ECU EO-71 !“£ 

£: mdex.68.7 SDR £0.834170 


main price changes 




RISES: 

Blue Ckde ■— -v- 

Iceland F. Foods , . .. r 

1C Gas 49§p (+8p 

Consolidated Gold — 569p (+I5p; 

W & R Jacob 198p(+12p 

Transport Devs. 812p (+9p 


FALLS: 

6KN . — 

Natwest 

Sale Tilney. 

Burgess — 

Johnson Matthey — 

HTV. — 

United News 

BPCC 

Dixons 

GUS’A' 

Wellcome 

ISSsi'iTsaateW 

NMW Computers 


244p/-10p) 
524p Map) 
_ 198p(-8p) 
241p(-17p) 
213pt-15p; 
503p -12p 
228p(-12p! 


- 358p 1-1 2p) 

.. 891p(-14pJ 


GOLD 

302.00) 

Kc°&.05432.80* 


NORTH SEA OIL 


Brwrt( tov-ipm $14-10 

- Denotes ttUrst traomg 


Success of small businesses 
delivers a million new jobs 


By Derek Hhztis, Industrial Editor 


New snail businesses cre- 
ated a million new jobs be- 
tween 1982 and 1984, acc- 
ording to research by the 
University of Newcastle. The 
total Includes all one-person 
businesses. 

This was In addition .to the 
known growth jn employment 
in the private sector, -which 
during the 1983-84 period, 
rose by about 250,000 jobs. 

What tbe latest research 
shows is the unexpectedly 
large contribution by one- 
person businesses — classified 
as self-employed — and busi- 
nesses employing fewer titan 
20 people. 

Tbe main conclusions from 
the analysis, still to be pub- 
lished; have been disclosed by 
Lord Young, Secretary of 
State for Employment who 
has been generating a number 
of initiatives to encourage the 
formation of small businesses 


and improve their commercial 
perfor ma nce. 

Many such businesses are 
in tbe services sector, almost 
half being involved in retafl- 
ing. Tbe development iff tour- 
ism withio Britain is seen by 
the Department of Employ- 
ment as a breeding ground for 
small businesses and the addi- 
tional jobs they could bring. 

Lord Young sakh “Too 
many people regard the 
emphasis we place on small 
firms as some amiable ecc- 
entricity. Yet their record In 
creating jobs shows that for 
from being a fringe activity, 
they are at the centre of 
generating employment." 

An average of 500 busn- 
nesses were set up every week 
since the beginning of 1981, 
according to Lord Young. 

At the end of last year there 
were L44 million small busi- 
nesses in Britain. Between 


1980 and 1985 there has been 
a net increase of about 150,000 
or 115 per cent. This balances 
the number of firms going out 
. of business with new ones 
being set up. 

Lord Young foresees a pat- 
tern of large companies shed- 
ding labour and small firms 
creating jobs. He said: “Taken 
individually, small firms can 
create only a small number of 
jobs. Bat there are many small 
ffrms. Their combined dBTect in 
creating jobs is significant” 

Training under tbe Gov- 
ernment's new enterprise pro- 
gramme is paying off, he said. 
About 1.000 people had under- 
gone training since 1977 and 
more than 70 per cent had 
established new businesses. 

The other important statis- 
tic was that in the first three 
years of trading fewer than 2 
.per cent foiled, a for lower 
proportion than expected. 


Two year 
performance to 
1st September. 

The most recent Oppenheimer 
fund launch was in September 1984 
so we are now able to show the two year 
performance for all of our ten funds. 




Trust 

European 

U.K. 

Pacific 

Japan 

International 
Worldwide Recovery 
Income & Growth 
High Income 
Practical 
American 


Percentage 
increase 
in value 

+ 189.2 

+lia4 

+ 117.6 

+95.8 

+88.8 

+86.1 

+82.7 

+55.3 

+52.2 

+25.0 


Position and 
total number 
in sector 


6th 

..104 

2nd 

.35 

21st 

-37 

6 th 

-..83 

7th 

-83 

6th 

,..81 

7th 

-15 


3rd 5 

39th 76 

Six of our funds were in the top 
quarter of their respective sectors. 

For further details telephone us 
on 01-489 1078, or write 
to Oppenheimer Fund 
Management, 66 Cannon 
St, London EC4N 6AE. 



Oppenheimer 

Fum Management Lid 


A member company of the Mercantile House Graft. 



m 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


Tftpntenite gATTTRDAY SEPTEMBER 


27 1986 


WALL STREET 


Retreat continues 


engine 


TEMPUS 


in early trading 

n. Vnrlr fRwrttprt — Wall Dftiots to 20048 and Stock 


New York (Renter) - Wall pomtsfo 
Street investors, still Shatoi 

by fte big decline of two weeks The Simian! and woo 
zL fear Of hkdter 100 index was down lMi at 


£300m Qantas battle 

By Harvey Elliott, Air Correspondent 

ww flv tn Australia that the air 


Liberty loses out as 


by the big decline of two weeks iw 

So ana the fear of higher 100 index was down UR at 
interest rates, continued to 218.14. . • . , : 


retreat in early trading Mr Egbert R*tter 
yesterday. ... Rotbchild, Uatarbeig I®wbm 

The Dow Jones industrial ■ the. market On bold 

average was down 10.26 p®fesSs geod* near this month’s low of 
to 1,75830. Declining issues , 758.72 in the short tent 
led advancing issues by a However, it corfd wjfc « 


Mr Mat 1«» « f V: F 
Rntbcfafld, Unterbeig Towbm 
the i?iarket to fc®M- 


led advancing issues oy a However, it coaid easuy.ne 

margin of seven to three, on a 1 ^ ^ te j, 7 W k»d befiwe 

volume of II milHoo shares. the correction was ova. 

Month s M"? 


Borg-Wama- led me aenve m, Martin 


78058. utilities lost I XI ■ , certainly, m said. 


By Har vey tuiion, : — 

Threeaen«npiwirani^> R ^ffiS«SwStl 2 ve < beSi 
uireis have each launched a -^toauons^rcn na pan ^47 percent in the past 

majoF- campaign to persuade sn S^^^ la5 i nc toted year and plansa farther 50 per 

Qantas. the Australian airline, | ^ s . ! 5 P ®^^Mjp frran « air- cent increase next year. . 

JJf ^^^ihey^U craft te replace soroeriOts 23 Rolls-Royce is anxious to 
to not yS^beeh jumbo jets.: the engtomakera clinch the wdomKl lBsafo- 
mwer has not. moved to Sydney in force. . men are reporting that the 

cb £5J- sales ream - from . Qamassaid last night thatrt compa^iswdlmcontCTtion. 
D^^SflSandWhit- hadstill not made up its mind So fo Qam* has no General 

SSs aa-s^jiiri gatmisw 
ESSFS ■5srfc-w*w tfwssis 

Sass&fls 

^*M§sg ssesssa 


tourists stay away 

: . ' what are quaintly c 



2s.« vsss 

General ' still on the drawing board and 


engines 


Airways’ new 
747-400 jets. 


British justify mil-scale produc tion. • 
Boeing Qantas needs new aircraft 
because of a dramatic rise- m 


■TW'fiSt was won .by the number of toimstsvisiu 

tJSovf A 10 ao> Austcaliaandtiera^wme 
usatioiisOfGoveninient inter- its 747s are becoming old. 
S5S rod -dirty tricks” by So many Japancse want 


W nuwuiv r .- r . r • 

existing jets, and its new PW- 
4000 engine is a dose rival to 
ihe -new Rolls-Royce high- 
thrust S24-D4D engine. 

Should Rolls-Royce win ihe 
order- which cquldjje for 
considerably more than 50 
engines ' ■ 77 V it" would nave 
enormoussignifi caocefQr die 
company as it prepares for 
privatization. . ' ; 


This summer it was pleasant 
to walk down. London s R«- 
gent Street without being 
trampled underfoot by tour- 
ists weigheddownby earner 
bags fiBed with goods from 

^Bomb threats scared off the 
faint-hearted, while currency .• 
movements meant many for- ■ 
rign shoppers received • 
for their money. 

Tourists -usually account 
for a third of fint^ulf.bus- 
ncss at liberty’s flagship 
store but thfeir absence was 
fell this -year. British retail 
results -were' pushed from a 
wofit of£45I,Q00to a loss of 
£163,000..-' ~ 

The RegentStrcet shop did 

Iaa mi mAilMr hflf 1V9C. 


Liberty is a dose 


(five shareholders and their 
associates control more than 
65 per cent of the voting 
shares} so dealing! in the 

shares is difficult Tne market 
size .yesterday was, in a .mere 
250 shares. ; 1 4 - j .• 


osecompany 

srs and their the rest of 


SSBKEg 

such JKffisftS 


zju snares. • ' h wjndteU income 

Apart from this objade 10 ggL^Salis still feriift W 
building up a decent holding, ga« Qualities as a divas* 

opportunity, w ftwst m an ^ -J* into Bnt- 

yerticaBftiniegraied specif ^un^Tying profit pwflh 

19 retailer. , ■■■■. v 'invBiments •» *™™> 

TVcompanies ^ — 


The: omens anr feood for the 

quoted, independent tel^ 

virion companies, alter tnree 


20 per cent last yemyev™ 
after a subM n «*i m 

ES5!df&A^ 


■% UV |W, p»» »w-^r. T OHM llllinwvi - * *m — 

not lose money, bat was. -central Television an- 
unal^foabso*thertonnaj jounced onThoVsday.^. 
costs- incurved by -provincial .. The signs are foat ScotuM 1 

Outiets ^Whosfc business is Tekrision wilfsteo be rtiak- 
wejgfifcd towards'the second jni' so'afe 'optimistic ftw® 

about the fitiire in its half*. 


• ELLIS & EVERABD:. Group 
in the current year are 


jn the current year are 
nearly, one-third up cm.last year, 
margins are holding up well and 
net profit b wdB ahead, the 


hiuhqI mcetiDft was tokL 
• THARS1S: Interim payment 
'held ai 2p. It wiU be paid on 
Nov. 4. Turnover £2-59 million 


no*. •». iuiuu»w 
(£25 million). Pretax profit for 
the first half rf 1986 -£404.000 
(£660,000). Earnings per share 
14-2p (22.7P). 


• FINLAY PACKAGING: Six 
months to June 30. -Interim 


lUVIlUU 

1 dividend 0.-75p (same), payable 
■ on Nov. 3. Turnover ■ £4.63 
million (£4.59 million). Pretax 


senior managers, whojogetber 
have- htvesxed £56,000. Kent ■ 
specializes in supplying retail 
chemists with, -generic 
pharmaceuticals, which are non- 
branded drugs supplied only by 
prescription. 

• WOLD: Half-year.to June 30. 
Interim dividend tinchanged ai 
0.75p, payable oh Nov. 28. 
Turnover- £1 1.8 3, ini Hron 

(£ 12 J 8 i mjllfoihV Pnewx'to« 

• £1.65 milhon tfl^vmflbonX 
Loss per share 7.9-7p (9.40p). 

•MOSS BROS: Interim 1 dm- 
dend (gross) 13 pa* cent (U-25 
-• cent) for die «x months to 


• NORISH: Six 1 'monte « 


June 30. Interim divkfcnd . 3p, 
payable on Od-31. Pretax profit 
1ri837,727 (£771.000). 
Ir£7Q5,15Q. Turnover Ii£1.97 
million (b£1.4l million).. Earn- 

SIVES: Six months to June 30. 
• ■ : 1 Cn n in\ 


■ The eflect of being over-- 
dependent - on tin e outlet K 
cfcar.The poaptsweli awmc 
of this and soon to open ' 

tenth fiee^taoding ~ store- 1 
These.: ^wtfa . r sforts. within 
stores,. - increase -.-the ■ geo- 


^uoted, moepenacni g^ed the panou* ^ 

ririon ewnpanics, after tiiree Austra iian farmers. ■ : - 

riitcessfidw^ons dMtf cariton, the fewgw; 

and imprtiwivte r^ults from ^ a . paniafl»ly 

ing sohfe, optimistic an< j falling RKi 

about the fotiire in its haU-. consumption.' '- . 

year • annoanoement ■ oexx Elders is also flexing, ns , 
week.*’ . ' marketing muscles 

Thelattstneseardt^n the u^ted States »*ere JJ®. 
sector nShSlS hoping to have theJFostcrs 

Grievestm — Is bulhshtibout uJi-:-* with the same tod 


SASSW* Mf- 

^tear announcement • next 

week-* 


Interim dividend 2.6p (L4p). 
payable " on Nov. 28. Sales 
g4^3 million (£22.95 million). 
Pretax ’ profit £1.24 p million 
(£1.09 million). The foil yea r's 
profits should show an improve- 
ment over 1985 and the total 
dividend should be not less than 
last time, says the board. - ~ 
• WILLIAM MORRIS FINE 

ARTS: first half of 1986. Turn- 
over £4.67 million (£6;A7 mif- 
, v, rioa nrm 


UIMIIVU yyr»M^ ^ _ 

profit on ordinary activities 
£408,000 (£385,000). Earnings 
per share 3.08p (2.72p). • 

4 ASSOCI AT.E-D BOOK 
PUBLISHERS: Interim divi- 
dend raised to 2JI5p (2. Ip) for 
the half-year to June 30. Turn- 
over £36.45 million - (£31.66 
millienL Pretax profit £L21 
million (£2.L5 million). Earn- 
ings per share 3-9p (3.8p). 

• LOGICA: Dividend lp 
(0 -3Sp) for the year to June 30. 
Turnover (including related 
companies) £87.04 million 
(£62J28 million, adjusted). Pre- 
tax profit £6.8 mull cm (£5.01 
million). Earnings per dare 
I0.07p (6.95p, adjusted). Ptoa- 
pecu for continuing profitable 

.l tKe Knurrl 


per cfcnt) tor me six momns »« 
July 26. It wfll be paid on Nov. 


peus iw WIIU1I-", r— ■ — , 

growth are excellent the board 
■declares. At the year-end, n« 
cash balances stood at £8J 
million, compared with a net 
overdraft of£l 1.9 million at the 
start of the year. 

•GRESHAM £ TRUST^The 
. trust basin vested £1 25,000 tn a 
new cbthpanyV Kent 


la.Turnover (excluding VAT) 
£9.74 million 

Pretax . profit,. £348 J 000 
(£315,000). Ea rn i n gs per share 
7.1 5p (5.93p). 

• CAKEBREAD ROBEY: Six 
months to June 30. Interim 
dividend 8 per cent (same), 1 
payable' on Jan.' 7. .Turnover 
£1 1.19 million (£l(L52 mlbon). 
Pretax - profit £362,000. 
(£240.000).. Earning* per share 
3.9p (2-3p)- ■' 

• TOZKR • KEMSLEY A 
MHXBOURN: Six monlh* to 
-June 30 (comparisons restated). 
.Turnover £270.57 million 
(£227.04 million). Pretax profit 
£7.07 million (£2.41 . miflipn). 

a-Wm- Kocir "l In 


Earnings per share: basic 3. Ip 
(Z.3p) ana fidly. diluted 2-Sp. 

• MACFARLANE GROUP 
(CLANSMANS The interim 
dividend for the six months to 
June 30 is being ratolto 1.1 Ip 
ft.01pX payable on Oct. - RJ. 

-■TuritoyCr i.£26..?4 . tntUion 
. (£23,61 million). Pretax . Profit 

,£L9\ million L75 mifoonL 
' Earnings , * per. . ifiXTO * ?^3l> 
(3.36p). 


new iuuih—;', m . . 

pharmaceuticals, which ixcon- 
trolfed by O’Nefll, the 

managing director and three 


after all charges, 0.3^> (1.46p 
loss) and before extlaonhnary 
ilems. 0.62p (0J8p)._ . . 

• EDMOND HOLDINGS: 
Half-year to June 30. Interim 
payment 0.1 5p (nil), payaNe on 
Nov. 7. Turnover 
(housebuilding) £5.79 miBibn 
(£4.65 million). Pretax profit 
£156^10 (£140.175 loss). JEarn- 
. ings per share 0J9p (QJSp loss). 

• KALAMAZOO: Dividend 
for the year to July .3 1 halved to 
lp. Pretax toss £276,000 (pTpfo 
£1.65 million). Turnover £43.91 
million (£44.21 miUKMi)- Loss 

GROUP: The company is to 
buy the Western Group for 
about £1.1 million in adult 
will also repay at par £2 00,000 
nominal of preference gum 
aiuf^EZOa.OOO nominal of loan , 
sux*. Western nins a ttain of: 
19 retail' Ashion shops^in the. 
M^HOmcEsapd north df England: 


^^STof&rists affected 

profitability at Schiphol Air* 
^ in The Netbertands. The 
seixjnd half-wilLbenefft from 
the bunch of the refurbished 
store m Amsterdam. ' . 

■ -At home. 1 -Americans .are 
less impressed^ 

products, which cost twice as 
nrodLKotieyeJoootaw 
been reduced from £1-71,000 
to £107,000 after the dpsure 
of the store in DaUas, Texas. 
The group is workmg hard » 
return this business, to the 
black. ■*' 1 ' 


Grieveson - fe bullish about ^Sning with the same tod 
prospects for (he sector as a . has achieved in Britain.. 
wholeT * The group’s finance diviaon 

■ More than 95 per cenljof oico achieved a 37 per cen t, 
the independem/tt)mpam« rfse despite the keaiccmi- 

maiihe comes firomadwrtfr, -g^on in the Australum - 

ing and with adVertiat»g;ratM ^, anc , a j services industry. • 
looking likelyfoshow a ^ Which brings uS w Conr- 
per cent gro wth for the whole - 

of this year theboirfpanies are rr g^jgrs can increase m^-- 


that the Peacock 


Report seems to l^Ve put a 
{SdcoB Ah: BfrCjdoptmg 
advertising until' 1J90 at the 
eariiest deariy helps the 
independents. 

; is the advertising 

boom likely to benefit only 
the independent companies 

<k, rnncmniK 


attf ' , 

If Hders can increase mmj 
keit share from a maigmoT48 
per cent in a country 
15.5 million people, whatamr 
it doin Britain wh«e rt loa9 
per cent of a 56-imlU«B ; 
strong market? Such thoughts 
are' undoubtedly -afready- 
exercisihg the strategy squato 
at Grand Met, Bass and 
Allied. Tor the myestre;. 


black. • the rodepatdent companies Allied. For the . investor,- 

A quarter of converting operating in the- prosperous should sooh oe 

and whotesating turnover » Souih-easL „ broadly neutral financially, ir 

thej«rmancingdwristiedTJP 


ana wiHjiEMuut "z aouin-caw- broaaiy neuuai — 

generated by 'valufradded . Analysts therefmancingdealistiedTip 

products. This percentage^ Wood Mackenzie fuDy^pect imerest rates of around U 

rapidly increasing and will be- ^ adverasing boom - 

.reflected by the improvement w hich has been, g 1 "This year of course, Hdws 

in profitaWUty in die second .the care of financial advertise hasriso a large chunk of BHR 


rapiuiy inuwau> 6 «"«.— .7 

■reflected by the improvement 
in pnrftaWflty m the second 
half of the year. 

Printing in Bance,--.a 
beneficiary, of lower energy 
costs, continues to make 
good .progress. UnderTO per 
cent of Its ! business is for 
Liberty. .... _xr 


wHiui iub 1 jus year 01 iuuhh . 

the care of financial advertis- ^ ^ a chunk ofBHP. 
ing - to become nationwide . accounL although it 

' in the fullness of time. ^ toying with the idea | 

Elders-IXL • 

standing the recent boaid- 


Britisb- investors tempted suuwe 1 

7 —- — — I — ... . • trv huv Shares in Elders-IXL- room pact there. Kf 

Liberty. ... <«• »ha> it owns theiCourage Mr i. Robert _ Gibson | 

Tlie second Mf to gotoff • win have 10 County Secunti«, EhfcrS 

to an encouraging «arti Bar- brewing mm ^ British brokers, « looking for 

-Taw*— EssffjlgES 

: Sion (£W.3 miUTon) but* ities and a htahhier-IOoking 


!▼%! > IWWV.. . TnJ,Lu% 

County Securities, otters 
British brokers, « looking for 
pretax profits of -A$482 mu* 


business iiHudi itfflects the 


group’s qualify image- 


; liair (£58 imUion) to AaZUv.o given ine courasc.i«»^ 
: miflion ?(£«).3 million) but* ities and a holthier-ldoking 
th^ inaude $61.1 million of Australian dollar. 


f» 


a 


e 


wha 



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apP 4 


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.u ' 


6^,- - 


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uff...- ' 

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0 * .. 

ffip- 


«r J . ... . 

#fi u . .- 

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Sss^- 





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; 0 NDONFtMANClAl 


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TRADmOHAiQ 


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xxxi^V.jCrpTCMDED 7A lOQA,. 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 


RI I<5INF«vS AND FINANCE 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


21 


23 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


.• ^ 

. .' ■*- > . i 


Speculation grows as buyer 
appears for Grand Met 


, By Michael Clark and Caro] J^eonard 






,**!> 


*'i r . 


r, 


• • 


tinon 



izc is 



■ 9™^ , Metrepolitoa, the ■ nhies for anyone who can win 

notei, brewing and * leisure control of Grand MeL" 
group, was the centre of - At test night’s dosing price, 
attention during- after hours' the entire group is valued 
trading yesterday asohemys- almost 0-5T trillion. Earlier 
tep' buyer tried to bid ovtt the this' wedui ir 'confirmed ‘the- 
odds tor stock outside- the' report in TheTimes that it was 
. . in talks aimed at disposing of 

This led to speculation that its US subsidiary. Liggett My- 
someone was trying to build ere. the generic cigarette 
up a stake 1 in the -company, producer, 
which has often been tipped as A management buyout is 
a potential takeover target considered -the' most likely 
because of its break-up poien- possibility. An earlier attempt 
ttaL Once again the name that 18- months - ago ended in 
was on everyone's Bps was Mr failure. But the. likely asking 
Aten Bond,' the entrepreneur juice of more than f 100 holding ofbetween 2 and 3 per ««ed 7p to 797p. Fisous was 

million will disappoint the cent. • • down 3pto 563p and Beccham 

market which had already Charles Pulley, a small job- was 3p lower at 390p. 
awarded liggea a much bing firm, now part of Hoare The stock market in general 
higher prjee-tag. .. Goyett, the broker, was said to ^ erratic. The FT 30 Share 



respectively, while BP put on 
2p to touch 658pL 

Saatchi & Saatchi, the 
world's biggest advertising 
agency, rounded off what has 
been a miserable week for the 
group with a tell of 20p to a 
fresh low for the year or 585p. 
The shares have alien 60p on 
the week. 

This- follows new fens in 
New York, highlighted in The 
Times yesterday, that Saatchi 
is about to lose another $40 
million (£28 million) 
billings. A number of ' 
company's diems have talked 
about a conflict of interests 
following this year's $450 


..the metal 
slitbered.Jfl. perxetat to 


• Rowe &. Pitman and a ri- 
val broker, Alexanders Laing 

j, . . — ... n U w.,ub i j ju . .. & Cmkkshank. hsd a . 

Some analysts .have conser- be -m the market, buying all index closed at one of its best strode yesterday to pteoe the 
ymiye ly esti mated that Grand stock that came its way yes- levels of the day. down 3.9 at puSST 

Mel s assets are.wonh340p a on behalf ofKitkat lt238A M jtsWorsTat 3 pm, BPCC shares issued to help 

dare - if someone like Mr Aitfcen. . the broker, and even- h was off 13.9. The broader- finance the acquisition of 

Bond could arrange a break- tually_!he Barclays. No one at FT-SE 100 indicator — 

up of the group* But be would the Barclay's London office ,*3 down 23 2 by mid- after- 
haye to convince the Moriopo^ was available for commenL nnon hot also nericed un 
lies and Mergers Commission WeUceme earci 3p to 192p {g* tireendof today, to 



P hilip Hilt Investment Trust. 
The 20 nriUion shares 
which had been left with the 
■mderwriters were even- 
tually placed at 25Sp. 


million acquisition of Ted 


120p m the past month after 
the failme of ifcr bid for 
GMI Holdings. Brit there iy 
now tafic that itis fining *p - 
an acquisition which will 
bring with it a new 
management team. The 
present' directors have an 
average age of 60-pfes. 

' ■■■■ 1 t lias chmbed JSp to company nas just completed ’ ~ 

and . head of Castlemame 503p on heightened expecta- the acquisition of • Fairfield ■ * n •market, TSB 

Tooheys, the Australian tions that the long-awaited bid American Corporation, which snares e^ed a coupte more _ 

brewery.. will come next week. Mr T specia li zes m the marketing pence with toe licensed dealer, . ]ik & 

RivJn the Australian bro- Boone . Pidojns, the Texan and sale of pesticides, in a deal Cleveland SecunLies quoting ,Mmol life PrortCT* 

business man, is known to be worth about milM Fair- . a rmdjepnce of^pont^ ggg and ^ate ?SS- 

rfitwj at Sn for t min inn ch™* in .town and. interested, along field, based m New Jersey, will parily-paid _ 50p shares and cwiiched 

sssjemss 

immediately responded by bus]ness Oils were mixed. SheQ fell - 

marking Grand Met 5p higher Barclay brqthqs, of EUennan mtheUi 
aTdf Irf aftpr 4 n?n R.vtlnk Line * are standing on the Other drug companies were 

£ri o?to HoJig k£T& side-tines and have amassed a also lower. Recldtt & Colmaa 

Shanghai Banking, empire, 
which also incorporates James 
Cape! (the . broker) and 
Wardleys', — its ' merchant 
bapkjng arm which Mr Bond 
bas used, in the past to finance 
I ”' S<1 “ |S - ' 

One ■ leading stockbroker BroM S* K 
-commented: “Obviously peo- 
pie became suspicious when SoHomelStS) 
they heard someone was pre- Bie Construction nospj 
pared to pay way over the 
odds. There are great opportu- Hsmsoo (isop) < 


7p to 898p, BP lost 3p to 6S8p. 
Britoi! and Bunnah both went 
down 2p, to 1 1 3p and 352p 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUm^ 


S«cs (11Sp) 
Droign (67p) 


163 
69 
ISO 
49-2 
130 
180-3 
133 
106-1 
-•68 
161 -*4 
158 


HOB _ 

Food (20p) 
Local Lon Op 
M6 Cash & C (100p) 
Marina Dev (11 r 
Nnwon Trans ( 
Perfdns (1 
Scot Mtga 10Q% 
Stanley 

Thames TV (11 
Trftas sH%lf] 201$ #97 
Unlock (63o) 
Yeiverton^p) 
YorfcsMra TV fl2Sp) 



23'? 

153-1 

93 

88 

75 

' 158+1 
£18'2 -2F>4 
135+3 
247-1 
£34% +V 
68 

"35+1 
138 -T 


® RIGHTS ISSUES 


, Tech F/P 
Boots tifP 
Brown & Tawse F/P 
Burst N/P 

Cambiwn Venture N/P 
Christy Hurt N/P 
New Ct Nat Res N/P 
Sedgwick F/P 
Tfchook N/P 

(Issue price in brackets). 


216 

146+1 

6-4 

’2 

8 

3% 

335-1 

48+1 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


, Dec 86 . 
i Mar 67. 
> Jun67 . 
i Sap 87. 
- Dec 87 
i Mar 87. 


L75- 

89b5 

89^0 

8935- 

N/T 

N/T- 


8&2S 

8842 


8602 

6620 

8930. 


Prevtout day's torakipen'nw r aa t t3901 : 
TtneMonth Euradohalr . 

Dec 86 : 9335 . 

Mar 87 — 93JJ6 

Jun67 i. 93.63 

Sep 87. ...a ’,63-33 , 

USTtwauryBond 

Dec 86 1— — L. S+24'‘. 

^S===-^ 


8603 

8S3T 

89.40 

8930 

89.17 

8836 


4680 
518 
254 - 
56* 

0 

0 


- Previous 
8337 - . .... 

9338 9330 

93-67 ■ 8657 

9333 . ' .9326 


s total 


9430 


a day’s I 
9401 


.B3S3 

19333 

9330 

[93261 

te, 

83-13 


tatwest 23194 


406 
311 : 
131 
5713 
5614. 

0 

o 


Start OH 
Sep 66 — 

Dec 86 
Mar 87 _ 


zxtpao 

Dec 86 — 

Mar 87 

Jun87 — 
FT-SE 100 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 


96-03 
■ N/T 

110*22 

N/T 

15650 

15950 


” T:v 

96-10 

9630 


Pravtousdw'stotai open intarea «67" 
0. 964S 9604 70 


9660 


9630 


211 

0 


Previous day's total open interest 15032 

110- 17 0 

111-24 11600 111-19 9503 

111-06 11622 111-14 . 10 

111- 14 0 

■I open Internet 2645 

15660 671 

15950 812 


15750 

16050 


Pravtouadagsi 


155.7 

15850' 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


Sap 22 
Oct 6 
Oct 20 
Call opt! 


Oct 3 
Oct 17 
Oct 31 


Dae 18 
Jan 6 
Jan 22 


For SMI 

Jan 5 
Jan 19 
Feb 2 


Prestwich, Miteday. Piet Ratrotaem, 
Tst BnuA Amarsham tot. BOMS. E 


Brown 
Put Brat 


Westgertfi. 
md, DewBjrWwrwi. Arrow 
Buckley's Braw, 


Spargos. 


Laura Ashehr. 
Put 6 CaE Cons. 


Waklontan. WaBcmna. FaMine BoDs. TiM 6 BrfL, GDxo. 


GdcLAmstrad. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND .FORWARD RATES 


faetanLarto 

N York UKO-15392 
Mon*®* 15913-15868 
Amsdam35OO7-3520O 
BUM* 60.723155 


fSSfSS 

15980-15989 


80546155 


a49-048prani 
033tL23pram 
1 %-IXpram 
17-1 2pma 
8pram-Kdb 

paf-5cfis 
1%-iXpram - 
70-135do . 

30-65da 


Cpligwi 11571611.1136 115922-11.1071 

Dubfit 15893-15783 • 1.0719-15729 

Fwikftst29Z77-25438 2939425438. 

Lisbon 21159-21354 ” 211.4521354 

Madrid; 183.2849450.- ' 1985419351' 

Mm . 202454203851 . 203256203851 
QUO 105136-105828 105482-T0LG628' 

Paris 95905-85419' - 8525685418 - 1%-TXpram 

Srkhkn 95529-95848' - 5570685848 K-Kpnxn 
Tokyo. '-220742221a - ' .52173-22210 IVKprim _ 
Vienna 20.662059 2056-20* 8V6pram 

Ziaich 23673-23856 23047-23855 tX-lXpram 

B ta taghMa cim parad 11 * 1878 1 — a waatWJMYai 


1.83-1 58prera 

ssr 

. 61-42pram 
IK-Kpram 
6 - 20 « 

55 - 115 tfi« - 

1-7«*S 
96-10X4S 
-.•X-S^pram . 

' 2JW5tprani 
3%-avMi - ' 
26X^3 Kpram“ 
3%3Xpram 
•8.7-815). 


OTHER STERUNG RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Aiuentbia antral* 
Austrafa dollar , 
Bahrain <£nar. 
Brazi cruzado ‘ . 
Qfpupcuid. 
Finland marita. 
Greece drachma ^ 
Hong Kong dollar , 

fcufl a rupe e 

Iraqwnar , 


KuwotdnarKD 
MWaysiat 
Mexico pi 
New Zealand doiar . 
Saucfi Arabia riyal _ 
Singapore doMr — 
Soum Africa rend 

UAEdrtwo 

UoydsBank 


, 0538605420 
19.75-1958 
673160.7410 
.75535-75935 Sweden 
— 1 9380-19550 Norway 
11.1858-112044 Oaranerk 

1615-1855 ’ WestGennany 

— — n/a Switzerland 
17604215 

107000-112050 
.2546629609 
. 5554695940 


9A86919702 Hong Kong 
3.1958-33126 Portugal 


5543693630 Spain 
Auatria 

by Barclays Bank HOFEX and 



LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


Saries Od Jan Apr Oct 


AMed Lyons 
(3018 


300 

330 

360 


14 

5 

IK 


22 35 
11 18 
4 8 


it is a 

» 40 43 ‘ 

62 68 70 


BP 

(*6S5» 


550 112 126 145 1 4 9 

600 65 85 110 3 11 20 

650 30 55 76 18 80 42 



500 

65 

87 

104 

5 

20 

30 

CSB9) 

550 

30 

5b 

7b 

2b 

40 

50 

600 

12 

37 

47 

62 

12 

82 


260 

28 

40 

SO 

2 

6 

11 

cm 

'I 

16 

78 

3/ 

10 

15 

18 

300 

5 

18 

2b 

21 

24 

27 

- 

330 

1 

10 

— 

4/ 

48 

— 


280 

9 

21 

30 

17 

19 

22 

cm 

300 

3 

12 

2d 

31 

33 

36 

330 

1 

8 

13 

59 

59 

50 

Cable & Wire 

300 

6 

22 

35 

17 

25 

32 

r284> 

325 

7 

10 

75 

40 

44 

55 

350 

1* 

6 

13 

6b 

70 

77 


375 

* 

2* 

— 

90 

95 

— 


600 

125 

— 

— 

1* 

— 

— 

r7io» 

850 

700 

76 

25 

— 

D 

8 

— 



160 

14 

70 

26 

6 

10 

11 

(■1821 

180 

4 

11 

18 

20 

20 

24 

200 

2 

4 

8 

38 

38 

40 

Grand Met 

327 

80 

— 

— 

1 

— 

— 

(■401) 


52 





■■ ■ 

360 

— 

80 

67 

— 

5 

8 


382 

28 

— 

— 

5 

— 

— 


350 

m 

170 

180 

3 

12 

13 

P079) 

1000 

1050 

90 

52 

120 

87 

130 

94 

8 

15 

20 

34 

27 

44 


1100 

20 

54 

n 

45 

60 

65 


300 

15 

24 

33 

6 

9 

12 

C306) 

330 

4 

11 

19 

24 

25 

28 

360 

1* 

S 

10 

52 

52 

b2 


180 

200 

220 

15 

5 

1 

23 

14 

6 

30 

18 

11 

2 

12 

32 

5 

18 

34 

.7 

18 

36 

Shrt Trans 

C895) 

758 

800 

157 

107 

175 

135 

192 

157 

1 

2 

4 

12 

10 

20 

650 

70 

100 

11/ 

12 

2b 

35 


280 

280 

300 

17 

8 

3 

25 

17 

9 

35 

24 

17 

4 

14 

30 

10 

21 

38 

17 

28 

42 




H 

E3 

a 

a 

Jan 

Deocham 

f385) 

•360 

390 

420 

42 

27 

14 

58 

40 

25 

, 48 
■ 33 

. 8 
25 

•48 

10 

28 

SO 

33 

55 


460 

8 

13 

f_ 

78 

W 




22 

30 

40 

4 

7 

10.. 

f21S) 


13 

7 

1! 

29 

18 

15 

30 

17 

31 

21 

34 

BTR 

cm 

280 

25 

35 

42 

16 

20 

.25 

Id 

"5 

25 

32 

53 

32 

35 

Bro 

ftoS) 

700 
• 750 
800 

40 

17 

10 

50 

30 

17 

60 

31 

25 

62 

108 

32 

B&- 

108, 

35 

TO 

BhieOrde 

C5661 

550 

600 

650 

37 

17 

5 

50 

28 

15 

92 

35 

23 

46 

96 

28 

48 

.96 

32 

53 

DeBeera 

rT40) 

650 

700 

750 

120 

90 

55 

145 

115 

85 

ino 

9 

27 

50 

23. 

40 

70 

85 


800 

35 

55 

75 

90 


IIS 

Dixons 

(*336) 

300 

330 

360 

44 

22 

11 

56 

28 

16 

44 

» 

3 

13 

30 

5 

17 

36 

22 

38 

GKN 

r244) 

280 

260 

300 

12 

5 

3 

27 

17 

10 

36 

25 

24 

.38 

58 

27; 

4T 

58 

in 

43 


'330 

1H 

5 

— 

88 

88. 

**- 

Glaxo 

cm 

«0 

-.950 

85 

55. 

38 

120 

100 

75 

150 

tzs 

100 

40 

70 

100 

SO 

83 

no • 

70 

95 

1?0 


1050 

25_ 

55 

- 

13b 


— 

Hanson 

135 

— 

— 

— 

— 



P181) 

160 

100 

200 

30 34 
15 21 
7* 11* 

25- 

IB 

3 

8* 

2D 

6 

13 

22 

15 

27 


September 26 1986. Total contracts 213SB. 






tele 



Ms 




Series 

Dec 

Mar 

Jon 

Dec 

Mar 

Jm 

ser 


500 

37 

50 

65 

32 

35 

40 


550 

18 

3 b 

4 b 

HO 

68 

67 


600 

9 

18 

— 

I 00 

10 b 

— 

ThomEMJ 


420 

52 

65 


8 

12 



(* 454 ) 


460 

2 b 

42 

5 ? 

M 

28 

32 


SCO 

12 

25 

38 

50 

SO 

57 



550 

6 

1 11 

• — 

97 

9 / 

— 



330 

75 

. 


1 

— 

_ 

C 3931 


360 

bO 

62 

— 

6 

9 

— 


390 

28 

42 . 

53 

1 / 

20 

30 



420 

15 

27 

38 

33 

40 

45 



•sites 

Nov 

FtaMsjr 

Nov 

Fab 

”3- 

Brit Aero 


420 

30 

47 

60 

17 

22 

27 

r«si 


480 

11 

30 

43 

40 

45 

90 


500 

4 

12 

30 

/b 

75 

80 

BATkxls 


360 

88 

100 

— 

* 

2 

— 

C 4411 


390 

58 

73 

83 

3 

6 

9 


420 

37 

53 

S 3 

/ 

IB 

23 



460 

17 

28 

35 

35 

38 

42 

Barclays 


460 

32 

47 

57 

9 

15 

22 

C 469 ) 


500 

13 

28 

40 

3 b 

40 

45 


550 

4 

12 

22 

78 

60 

82 



180 

13 

21 

27 

5 

10 

14 

n«) 


200 - 

4 * 

9 

1 / 

19 

23 

25 


220 

1 * 

4 

12 

37 

37 

40 

1 Cacttxay StJiwppe 

1 ri 74 l 

160 

180 

18 

7 

28 

15 

33 

16 

3 

12 

8 
. 14 

10 

16 



200 

3 

6 

— 

27 

28 

— 



300 

27 

37 

50 

5 

13 

17 

(* 316 ) 


330 

10 

20 

30 

20 

27 

32 


360 

b 

8 

18 

4 b 

SO 

52 

' Imperial Or 
(* 375 ) 


300 

BO 





1 * 

— 

— 


330 

50 


— 

1 * 

— 

WWW 


360 

23 

— 

— 

V 


— 

Ladbroka 


330 

30 

43 

El 

3 

6 

10 

(*3511 


380 

12 

23 

30 

1 / 

20 

25 


390 

5 

8 

1 / 

37 

42 

47 

LASMO 


110 

10 

17 

23 

10 

14 

17 

( 108 ) 


120 

5 

13 

1 / 

15 

22 

23 


130 

3 

9 

13 

2 b 

30 

33 



500 

El 

87 

97 

3 

10 

15 

C 547 ) 


550 

30 

50 

6 b 

20 

27 

35 


600 

12 

23 

32 

50 

KU 




460 

58 

73 



2 

5 

— 

r 518 > 


500 

25 

53 

55 

8 

18 

27 


550 

8 

20 

30 

4 b 

S 2 

58 



600 

2 

— 

— 

96 

— 

— 

Racal 


160 

14 

20 

30 

7 

10 

13 

KHBif 


180 

a 

11 

IB 

20 

22 

■ ■ 


200 

2 * 

6 

10 

40 

tJ 

Ell 

RTZ 


550 

m 

97 

_ 

5 

15 

- 

T 829 ) 


600 

4 ? 

6 ? 

82 

13 

28 

40 | 


650 

20 

38 

55 

40 

50 

u 



700 

7 

20 

— 

80 

82 

M 

Vaal fleets 


70 

15 * 

20 23 * 

3 

5 * 

7 * 1 

f 8 ll 


80 

7 * 

14 

17 * 

7 

10 11 * I 


90 

^4 

J1L 

11 *_ 

12 15 * 



Series 

Nov 

Mar 

Jen 

Nov 

Mar 

Jon 



n 

mm 

27 

32 

5 

11 

15 

(-Z 13 ) 


218 

9 

-w- 

— 

12 

— 

— 



4 

WWW 


26 

WWW 

— 



240 

__ 

11 

15 

— 

38 

41 



255 

2 * 

— 


44 






^C 1 

ca 

Fab 

May 

Tr 11 *-s* 1891 


108 


* 


4 * 

5 *t« 


■£102) 


106 

’v 

* 


6 * 

7 * 

7 * 


ehj 

* 

><• 

* 

8 * 

9 

tP» 

Tr 11 *^* 03)07 


114 

* 

2 *» 

3 

6 **. 7 * 

8 K 

reio^ 


1 W 

H -IV. 2 »* 

6 

■ 9 

9 * 


lie 

'w 1 *h> 

I’w 




120 



1 * 




122 

bs 

*• 


3 * 

4 * 

-r 



124 


— 

— 

5 * 

— 


[' ' ' ' S 3 * 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec Sepi' 'Oct 

Nov Boe | 

FT-SE 1525 

45 

‘60 

■75 


1 

10 

13 

— 

Iratar 1550 

27 

45 

60 

— 

5 

20 

25 - 

— 

H 5 ra) 1575 

12 

3 / 

4 H 

R? 

IK 

30 

4 U 

47 

1600 

2 

.'27 

40 

50 

43 

45 

SO 

57 

1825 

2 

18 

32 

40 

67 

70 

73 

77 

1650 

1 

10 

25 

32 

92 

9 ? 

95 

97 

1675 

1 

6 

20 

30 

117 

116 

120 

122 

1700 - 

* 

4 . 

1 b 

AM 

27 . 

342 143 

14 b 

147 


MONEY MARKET 
AND GOLD 


i% 

dewing Banks 10 
Finance House 10 


of them, worth hundreds of 
millions of dollars, to rival 
agencies. 

There have also been in- 
ternal problems which came 
to a head earlier this week with 
the resignation of Mr Robert 
Jacoby, the chairman and 
chief executive of Ted Bates. 
Those institutions who do* 
cided to support Saatchi's 
£400 million rights issue this 
summer are now becoming 
increasingly concerned about 
the recent course of events, 
having seen the shares slide 
from a peak of 936pL 

The overnight setback on 
Wall Street hit some of the 
stocks quoted in London with 
a transatlantic flavour. .Jag- 
uar, a strong market of late, 
went into reverse, slipping by 
lOp to 505p. Only last week, 
the shares hit 533p following a 
visit to Coventry by analysts 
for the unveiling or the latest 
XJ series. The XJ40 saloon 
appears to have impressed the 
analysts, ' having been* de- 
signed to compete against a 
wider range of models in the 
f executive car markeL 

Bid speculation in the brew- 
ery sector has switched from 
Belhaven to the rival 
Buckley’s Brewery. The news 
came earlier this week that Mr 
Raymond MiqueL the former 
head of the Betts whisky 
company, had taken over the 
running of Belhaven m a 
Woodless coup after acquiring 
a 115 per cent stake. 

Shares of Belhaven slipped 
another J p to 75p — making a 
fall on the *eek of 12p — as 
hopes of a full-scale bid 
continued to subside. 

Whitbread has got a near-16 
per cent stake in Buckley's, 
while Britannic Assurance ac- 
counts for a further 1 1.1 per 
cent At the last count there 
were several smaller holdings, 
including one built up by 
Flske & Co, the broker, on 
behalf of its clients, amount- 
ing to 7.4 per cent 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


The long view at the 
end of the Tunnel 


A combination of French persistence 
and bankers* tolerance effectively 
saved the Channel Tunnel from 
running into the sands of Kentish 
lobbying and almost total indifference 
throughout the rest of Britain. 

Barring a political accident, it is 
now certain that the tunnel will be 
built — a prospect that brought relief 
and satisfaction yesterday to the eyes 
of Frank Gibb, chairman and chief 
executive of Taylor Woodrow, who 
has lived with the scheme for a long 
time. It promises good business for 
Eurotunnel’s contractors. 

Having secured the loan finance, 
Eurotunnel yesterday bravely set out 
projected returns until the year 2041. 
By then, on a gaggle of assumptions, 
pretax margins will be running at 
around 80 per cent, a dividend of 
£200.68 per unit win be paid and the 
average net return to shareholders will 
have reached 1 7.7 per cent. 

It is all guesswork, if informed 
guesswork. A safer projection is that 
by 2041 most of the fund managers 
now deciding whether to subscribe for 
die £200 million placing will not be 
around to claim they were misled. 

Investing in Eurotunnel demands 
the long-term view in extremis. 
Dividends will not be paid until 1995 
and those plump margins will not 
come through until the early years of 
the next mfilenium, when the loans 
have been paid off. Projections 
stretching that for into the future have 
to be hedged with so many assump- 
tions that they can hardly be taken 
seriously. 

Remember all those oil companies 
which came to the market in the early 
1980s with their healthy discounted 
future revenues? And that was pitch- 
ing only 1 5 years ahead. 

Inflation steady at 6 per cent from 


1991 to 2041 is maybe no more than 
wishful thinking; British economic 
growth of 2.15 per cent from 1983 to 
2003 is not unreasonable; an expecta- 
tion that three-quarters of foot pas- 
sengers will choose the tunnel rather 
than the ferries is anyone's guess. 

The Pathfinder prospectus will do 
its best the defend the project as 
robust. Sensitivity tests have been 
carried out taking worst-case cost 
overuns, project delays and dis- 
appointing cross-Channel traffic. 
These appear to show that those 
healthy returns are relatively un- 
affected. But then the returns are 
based on all those assumptions. 

Flexilink, in an independent assess- 
ment also published yesterday, begs to 
differ. Not surprisingly, it warns 
would-be shareholders that there may 
be no return at all on their investment 
if the ^extremely optimistic" forecasts 
are not met. One set of forecasts 
demonstrates debts rising to £1 i 
billion and loans still unpaid in 2023. 

Financial safety nets have been 
provided. Eurotunnel is expecting to 
draw down £3.7 billion of the loan 
facility but has arranged stand-by 
facilities so that up to £5 billion is 
available. If £4.5 billion is needed the 
return to shareholders will foil from 
the projected 1 7.7 per cent to 15.4 per 
cent, the worst case return, says 
Eurotunnel. 

But British institutions, which are 
expected to come up with £70 million 
towards the placing, might do better at 
this stage to look on the tunnel as a 
reasonable gamble. Whether the Brit- 
ish fond manager can be tempted by 
this remains to be seen. Interestingly, 
of the 40 international banks which 
have agreed to underwrite the £5 
billion of loans, only two are British: 
National Westminster and Midland. 


Privatization now on sale 


Privatization is becoming Britain’s 
new export industry. A wide array of 
governments have looked at the 
Thatcher experiment and seen that it 
works. They have seen also that the 
City of London has built an unrivalled 
expertise in handling the complex 
details of restructuring capital, arrang- 
ing relationships between government 
and company and, especially, market- 
ing the shares to every kind of 
investor. - 

■ Not least, as Government and 
investors are well aware, Britain’s 
merchant bankers and stockbrokers 
have made most of the obvious 
mistakes and progressed well up the 
learning curve. 

Now that is paying off. Earlier this 
week Schroder Wagg won an im- 
portant contract to advise on the 
privatization of Singapore’s Mass 
Rapid Transit System. Schroders had 
shrewdly appointed Gerry Grimstone, 
the Treasury’s top man on the 
privatization programme, as a 
director. 

Yesterday’s announcement that 
Kleinwort Benson had been ap- 
pointed joint adviser to the French 
Government for the sale of shares in 
St Gobain is even more significant. To 
permit a British firm to advise the 
French Government must have re- 
quired much clenching of Gallic teeth. 
And in addition to Kleinworts’ coup. 


the appointment of Lazard Freres, 
French arm of the linked Anglo- 
French-American partnership, as 
joint adviser on St Gobain surely owes 
something to the expertise of Lazard 
Brothers, which is currently handling 
the TSB issue. 

In Britain, the advisers to the 
Government earn the big foes for 
handling the prospectus and the 
marketing of the issue — although the 
company’s advisers have, the 7 im- 
portant consolation of a likely long- 
term relationship with .a big new 
client In France, the company’s 
advisers are to be responsible for 
placing the shares. 

Either way, the importance of these 
contracts lies in the scale and intended 
speed of the French privatization 
programme. St Gobain is first to go. 
Thereafter, Paribas and other finan- 
cial companies are scheduled. There 
is, however, a long list including the 
oil company Elf-Acquitaine, which 
met City interests earlier this week. 

Clearly, the French will want to 
learn from British expertise to do it 
themselves. Even then, however, 
firms such as KJeinwort and Lazard 
will be in a strong position to handle 
marketing outside France of up to 20 
per cent of most of the companies. 
This looks like good business and 
publicity for contracts in other 
countries. 


0wan4ghtHtah:7V Low 2 
Weak aw fcBtt-Bft 


fSref! 10% 

Smith 10* 


> (Discount 

from? 

3mnth 10X 


10X 


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1 mrth 1054-10* 2 mnth 10»*-10% 
3mmh 10>w-10»w Brrwrth 10%-IOX 


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1 mnth 10 * 2 mnth 11 H. 

3 mrah ft'w 6 mnth 11 * 


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Overnight open BV dose 2* 
iweefc 95% 6 mnth 10%-iWl 

1 mnth 10»«--IP« 9 mnth 10»M-10n>« 
3 mnth 10%-10H 12rwh IViv-IO** 

Local Authority Dspoata (%^ 


2 days 9* 

1 mrth 9* 
B mnth 10* 


7 days 
3 mnth 10* 
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1 mnth 1014-10 2rnrm 10%-10K 
3 mrth 10*-10* 6 mrth io*-10* 
9 mrth 10%-1014 12 mh 1DK-10S 


1 mrth lOi^lo’ 1 

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6 mnth 555950 


3 mrth 10K-10K 
12 nth 10X-10* 


3 mnth 555950 
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EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


6*914 

7 days 5*w6H 1 mnth 6‘»9»w 

3rmth G'lrS^ia 6 mrth 6 1 w5’ s »* 
5-4 


7 days 4K-4K 
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7 days 8K-7* 
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7 days 9%-8X' 
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Knmemmr (per cob* 
$43150-43450 (£3000030250) 


(i 

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TREASURY BILLS 


E3i3.ltn afeatadiClOOn 

£87585% raertmtsar* 

Last Male £9759* recenradiElOO 

AygenoK £9,6866* !ariwk£9466S% 
Next male £100m. replace £10ftn 


ECGD 


Fixed Rata Starting Expert finance 
e iv Average reference rate for 
M period August 9.' 19B6 to 


FREE PRIZE DRAW 


Willyou turn £500 of penny shares into 
£1,000 in just six weeks? 



At 9azn on Wednesday 
11th Ffebraar? 1987 weTI prove, con- 
dnahndyi thatitiaatill poenble todoubie younnooey 
in just six m olts with onrpaugd uwi m qa tda. 

Id onkr to do thia, ml) enter your name in our 
next Free Prize Draw. More details an bow to enter 
the draw later 

the Kx nans * EpEiT 

a rstiw inauspidoos looking news eheec wfaxi is 
nnnf li| fint imwpnal frmrr'Trnctnnwta][ tumiinn 
Despite its mnocnooe appearance it is eager)? 
readonThctreday mor ning a h and fa Uinreatora 
op and down tAwiiwrntry. 

Some oftheeeiuwialuiawfllbepwfeBrional 
sted^rakmheadseflndnstzy and other lending 

financial experts. Between t* 

literally, miuicnsorpoanda 

ajfcaaujjgUMjpNfcfei 

era with aeUttleaaSSOO orSl . 
itamecahte. 

But what every reader of Stoekmvfcet 
Confidential has in cotznnuo is the desire to discover 
what is likely te happen on t he a to chniarh e t that 

coming week. 

Bluntly, they want to know w h ic h share s a re 
String to go on and which shares are going to cone 
down. Ami tbQ' wantto know why. • 

THE SECRET OP 
INVESTMENT SUGCESS 
Itw raily wtqrt o maketnoneyont he at nck inarhBt 
is to have reliable advice and the ahiHcy to mwe last, 
hedge the wad get s around and prices rockati 

b S t ock— ri atCedMenM m mahe toying 


HOW WE WILL DO UBLE 
YOUR MONEY IN SIX WEEKS 
As Wve already explained, it iapcaaible to 
dmbieyounnonoy by investing the prize, if you win, 
in penny shares. 

AU you need to do ia enter our Free Prize Draw 
Iff ixanpLeting and returning the nonpon 

tfynuwin.ynuUrecaive£GOOtoapendarinvestaa 

yoaptcaae-Wdanggeettbatyouinveetitinanypperf 


FULL PROF IT RECORD FROM 
2nd JULY -17th SEPT 1986 


H%aU my w el l know! 
m»l»u 1 1 r Is ~ 
fell •Wear 1 recent 


wtat loadL TMa la aa 
the 2nd July 1986. 


Airflow! 
MtaiUlaw 


bepAast 

A-G.hux 

h hm ltPwpM 


h nhm aF tan 
(tbranty Ah w aadltm 
sfieweDna) 
■St.lreeata 
HM pww Crwy 
&8Bl Coapeten 

Sm-ri— Ciiep 
Goodlslttksi 


to to 

l»P tl«P 
Clp Up 
Up lUp 
I4»p 2lSp 
»P tap 
lUp JUp 
38Tp U 4p 
INp IBOp 

to M«y 

■7M4 
tap tap 
ltap I2Sp 

to MTp 
*7p 158p 

tap *40p 

HP I4to 


1UX 

2S% 

MX 

ns 

1380% 

87* 

14* 

ns 

ns 

«3X 

IT* 

18* 

811* 

447* 

XI* 

51* 


HOW TO M AKE MORE MONEY 
ONTHESTOCKMARKET 
Claim this Unique 3 part guideFREE. 

• Leamn eyrtedmigneg, use the little 
known wrinkles the professjonaU 
nee to maximifle their itodminr kBt 
profits. 

• Diac oiert heioost profitable wayto 

NEW ISSUES, pick PENNY 
SHARE winners, spa gear your in- 
vegtments for msodmnm growth. 

• All thia and mare ia packed in your 
three part guide. 


ofaaut Winners' names are poblidwd in SMC 
The dising date of the draw iaSlat December 1966. 

FREE! TEN TRIAL ISSUES 

Of course, dun prices can go down, as well as 
up. Butwedoot wutyoutonsfca penny of your own 
moneyontfl you’re convinced that jnu will makaa 
profitpy edingon oar adricn 

So ifyou return thaeonspleted delayed action 
™BCt deUt bdoir t woeTll rush you the wxt ten issues 

oar experts’ valuable advice fin - tan whoitrpreekgat 
nocosttoyounelC 

ttyta deride aotto e ontiiioe with SMC, theojast 

write to ouranhecrindandepartmentand cancel your 
direct debitbeftre the payment date. 


(hn*± debit attheenmot price of £36 per quartet L 
„ _ „ , fo^pnceAonldritafaga wo wfll ghwyoo me weeks 

oarHotT^ps^fiar that Because ifyou demand adrameawaming. 

ymr £500 ofsbares aren't worth £1,000 within six 1 rtcro Mrmrrvr 

weeks weTl make op the difSeroice in cash. „ LOSE NOTHING 

l ^Hl l r"lf ,tf "T s ^ 17 r ,,fll V Tl w t iier , wur tea week free trial has no ride, aoconqjleu 
advioelsawndwebeUewt un* Sewortfc the coupon today -you don’t need a stamp 

. _ .. „ Brarioww«i«*oentet^FraePri» STOCKMAHKET CONFIDENTIAL 

aiai a nll la grtc ommmfinflota , cffereocad mraziineirt DnwlfoimichaBewmnBTAfhDhrtflfFieel^ - ■ - - - . 

anajjygna n d . mat important cf ail, aggeeatemeor _ Dra w w mn eTsandfa lln iies are available on receipt 
more “Hot Tip^'fiartheweA. 

. EachWsdnfiadaysrrenMjmLwillbeteiitlylst 
rinas mail your iHtestissueofaKlIfyOTtfaat art, on 

our "BotTipe” qaiekteytm may miratheboat-other 

aiCagfaac ri bM will hare already pushed prices up 
%u 11 discover that very often the best 


%n 11 discover that reryoftmt 

inreatjuentsarethe “penny aharea". . .Ffenoefior ■ Jtwamiw Mii wnnuBBiiiiii 

instance; which rocketed fhsnl5p to 61p..^ran I ?Rl56 HWr i Rni!lfll ld,B8BaKRMBlBR 

Rotdafromtato^n . .HfdlmBms.ftom%»to77p . . § 


! FREE TRIAL ORDER 

I P leas— nd ta: 

" SIXX^KMARKET CONFIDENTIAL 


NAMBfCAPSL 

AWmESS__ 


r ehares- 

WHY YOU CAN ACT WITH 
SUCH CONFIDENCE 

Eacb week theediterflfSfC cfansnuritMe 
meeting □fdieSMCBoardcfAdTiaors.'lbBeSei-LheSB 

Hiymri» 1 ■p^-l, K rf- t p*i*J rn fmiuH i m, wMliai 

Bonro e s.an ddi iic iiBitbelat«tCity wfaj^mra-Atthe 
end ofthemertinB tb^ trill haw ehoren the three 

hottest tipa and decided wbteher or not to sell shares 

tUt P lou e ly r rrwra iw n dwd . w 

WhgaarantwthatndBfthBHtipflwfflbe 
leaked by the SMC EditoiarBoani, or puUhdMd. ' 
except in SUC. 


I Please send me my FKEE 
ist— udREE 

I STOCK MARKET GUIDE 

tlHal tahseribrnawd^ 


□ 


SICNEEL 


Ttfc_ 


jwra. 



_8AKKpLC 


BBANCHMDDRESS- 


‘in the 11.000 
EREEPK1ZED2IV 


I 

I mdeddetosuhscribelwlllpaythe 

current pziceoQost£3Sa quarter hy 

direct dridt. 

u 


□ 


SM9603 


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Pg»CrogmNCMAIIBlM«lffllhaiithB H> B y ana raU 1teteM‘ I 
nobniswThuigiocliairaeiaiqpten-actoaiitwiihyaa three I 
ra mwh aalterttada w ma wn a n dqnMyrtyrherealteriin- | 


ACCOCNTNa. 




_ , i PnbBrati«a Limited by direetddft. 

BanksmaydaeilitenMtrDertDeetadtainadlrettiMaifiocaitain 

tarp ra rfactmniLotharihancnnrefeeoaata 





















business and finance 





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.nnmnnn . «. VTTV nM A M/'B 


TH E TIMES SA TURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


^ * y.5? 


V .V v !* 



STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 



t i« 
. * i? 


-k 

»*» H; 


to account 


ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began on September 15. Dealings ended yesterday. §Contango day Monday. Settlement day Octobers. 
7 . . §FoEward baigains are pennitted on two previous business days. 


-% 

M- 

. DAILY 

dividend 

£4.000 

Claims required 
for 

—16 points 
Claimants shook 

WEEKLY 

DIVIDEND 

£16,000 

Cairns required 
for 

+1 10 points 
rims 0254-53272 




Avon Ruhhrp 


Ckfivri (nslramcnts 


Henderson- 


ipnpcEai 

IKrmpFrifl 

IE2EE2EE1I 


IE32T3ES3I 


fell 


Armstrong 


MoWSAircraft 


E nii.nj ese , *a\ 

EQfl 

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Matthews (Bernard) 


j-igf fg 


mi 


Combined English 


Raidifls (Gt Bridget 


|eS3E3C£3SBB 

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btial 


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EHion IB) 


Arlington Secs I Property 


Harris (Philip) 


ESS3 —i 

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BU.ILDINGS-AND ROADS' 


El T*Ty in iTWI' i "H'fTIM 1 


Drapery; Stores 


MoujrtAirrraft 


Industrial^ A-D 


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Ptease be sure to take account 
of any minus signs 


Weekly DivStend 


. Please make a note of your daily totals 
.for the? weekly dividend' of £16.000 in 
today's newspaper. 


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26 


tot; n viFS SATURDA Y SEPTEMBER 27 1986 

Edited by Martin Baker 


FAMILY MONEY/1 



SECOND ABBEY BES SYNDICATE 


THECHINCEllOR 
WANTS TO HELP YOU 

...TO INVEST IN 
EXPANDING 

BRITISH BUSINESS 


The Business Expansion Scheme 
(BES) provides an outstanding 
opportunity for you to Invest in BntisM 
businesses - with the help of the 
Government who are actively 
encouraging private investment by 
offering extremely generous tax reliefs. 

Abbey Unit Trust Managers, already an 
established force in the UnitTrust industry. 

are again joining forces with Hodgwn 

Martin Ventures - specialise in BES 
investment - to promote the SEconu 
ABBEY BES SYNDICATE- 

The Syndicate has been formed with 
the intention of investing in a spread « 
qualifying BES companies by the end oi the 
current tax year. 

Major Tax Concession* 

Underthe Business Expansion Scheme, 
relief is given against tax on income for 
investment made from capital. This means 
thatfor every £1.000 invested on your ^ 

behalf.you receive tax relief from the Inland 
Revenue on the following scale. 

£ 1,000 invested Tax Rate: 29% 40M 50% 60* 
Tax relief £ 290 400 buu wj 

%££& £ 710 600 500 400 

SS&m* 41* 67%1Q0%150% 

“as* of net cost to investors 

The higheryourtax bracket, the higher 

ynr Mv relief h<rt even for a basic rate 

♦wpaypr the effective subsidy is worth 41 g 
nf t he net outlay (the above figures do not 
allow for the initial charge of 5% plus VAT, on 
which there is no tax relief). 


Expert Investment 
Management 

Hodgson Martin Ventures 
are one of the oldest 
established Managers of BES 
Funds in the UK. with eight syndicates 

already successful/ formed and under their 

management Over the past four years they 
have screened over 900 candidate 
companies, from which they have selected 
less than 5% for investment 

Abbey UnitTrust Managers, sponsors 
of the Syndicate, already manage 
15 authorised unit trusts valued at over 
£600 million, including 5 trusts worth 
£187 million investing in British companies. 

High Rial**- High Rewards 

Investing in unquoted companies carries 

a higher risk than investing through an 

authorised unit trust - that is one reason 
why the Government is so generous with 
tax reliefs. However, there is also scope for 

higher rewards and the risks can be reduced 



Keep your eye 
on the boss’s 
BES cut 


jt,. _ n V* 1 


significantly by the spread of investments 
and the careful and skiHlil selection that this 
Syndicate will enjoy. This is illustrated by the 

RrstAbbey BES Syndicate. where one 

investment recently rejected a takeover 
approach atseveral times our invertors cost 

To find out how you can Join the 

Second Abbey BES Syndicate, comptete 
and return the coupon to us today. Wfe will 
send you a copy of the Fund Memorandum; 
applications to subscribe will be accepted 
only on the basis of the terms and 
conditions set out in it The minimum 
subscription will be £3,000 and the 
maximum £40.000; subscriptions will 
remain open until 28 February 1987. 




SEND FOR MORE DETAILS NOW ★ 


PWase*^ i^a c °py°^ t ^ e Merno , andimilnvttinjpaitldp*tkJn 

iBiheSaoondAbbty BESSyndhaw 


NameMr/Mrr/Wtn 

Address 


A sabsktay of Abbey UF« Croup P*- 

MantaroftheUBeTuBtAModattoa. 



( INVESTMENT" ) 

If you are thinking of putting 
some money into a Business 
Expansion Scheme fund one 
of the factors you should take 
into account is what tw 
managers of the fund will be 
taking by way of 

remuneration. 

Because of the practice oi 
BES fund managers tatang 
: options in the. companies they 
choose for the funds, potential 
1 BES investors run the risk ot 
seeing their investments 
diluted. . : 

Even worse, they might end 
up with a fond where the 
managers’ interests in making 
money for therasdves does 
hot coincide fully with making 
money for their investors. 

• John Spiers, of stockbrokers 
Green wdl Montagu, thinks 
managers ought to late theur 
slice of the cake ui the form of 
a percentage of the amount 
realized on disposal of the 
investments - rather than 
. share options. 

Moreover, the investors in 
the fond should get a first dice 
, of the uplift all to themselves 
before the managers qualify 

for any profits. 

“The venture capital nuu£ 
agers an use this method 
1 says Mr Spiers. “The BES 

fund managers choose options 
because so for they have found 
that they can get away with il 
S hare options come m one 

of two forms. 

Sometimes the prospectus 
will say that the managers wui 
be entitled to take options in 
the target companies of up to a 
certain percentage^ of the 
amount which the fund itself 
has invested. . 

Of the BES fond issues 
currently on offer, Johnson 
Fry and Castleforth chooses 
this route. „ Wth . 

Watch out, however, for the 
second type of option. Some 
funds will stipulate that the 
managers are entitled to takea 
percentage of the target 
company. 


Funds that are giving man- 
agers this right are the Cave 
1986-7 Fund, the Second Ab- 
bey BES Syndicate and the 
Sixth Alpha Business Expan- 
sion Fund. 

Whichever type of options 
the managers take they pay 
nothing for them. It is also 
standard practice for the 
managers' options to be ex- 
ercisable at the same price as 
the fond has paid. 

So if the fond had bought 
shares in a company at £ 1 , the 
options normally give the 
managers the right to buy 
shares at £1 for, say, the next 
10 years. 

The net effect of all this is 
that there is considerable 
potential for watering down 
the investments in the fond 
where ihe managers have the 
second type of option giving 
■ --•its to a substantial 



L- 


Ssb^bes maaa « ers tave ** away wth * 


The investors would stitt be 
»in^°eSt?bfo^e 

managers, who have taken a 
large option as a percentage ?| 

. b . Mmmnv. Will 


second type of option giving large option. as 

them rights to a subsumed ihe successful coin|wmy.w£ 

chunk ora company at a fixed be^o jg^midrom^pro^ 

C °“There is no justification money, on the five failurw^ 

for options to be linked to the tfiey simply do not exercise 
size of the company rather their options. 

'toU.efcnd. Ttey AouW be 

ruled out of court. 


Capital Venture's own oi> 
lions are a percentage of £ 

their options at a 
price below that ai which the 
investors buy shares. 

Mr Underhill says *‘Wc 
keen our own directors 
charges at a low level and lake 
ow real reward on thcopuons. 

We take the vast maj only of 


Spiers. . . 

“There is definitely a poten- 
tial conflict of interest wub 
options of this kind. The 


Sjffi worth bearing 

** in mind that managers who - n al less means that wc can be 
- have the right to take options flexible on the fees. 

« with no ten- 


have me ngm iu 
will be negotiating with poten- 
tial target companies on benaii 


The managers’ options will be part of 
the package agreed with the company 


managers could want to see 
the companies expand, mak- 
ing acquisitions and issuing 
new shares. This would bene- 
fit the manager more and 
more, but not necessarily the 
shareholders.” 

Moroever, the managers 
may have taken large options 
over one company but in- 
vested a small amount of the 
fond in it. Where will the focus 
of their energies lie? 

Again, one could have a 
fundwbich is spread evenly 
over six companies, five ot 
which go bust. The other one 
may quadruple in value. 


He agrees that the system of 
managerstaking options does 

lead to conflicts at the nego- 
tiating stage. 

However, he thinks that the 
idea of fund managers taking a 
percentage of the amount 
realized on disposal is legally 

and administratively unwork- 
able. because individual 
participants in the fund have 
the financial paciuqs^ •« w i 0 receive their shareholdings 
agreed with the company. after f, ve years. 

A linle generosity with the • idea 

fund's money could mean a He says, u s * 

i .l. nvffr ivnirh 


of themselves as well as the 
fond. 

Their options are, therefore, 
to be very much part of 
' * package to be 
h 

„ «-n< 

fund's money 

' for the managers 
on me *,«. of the options they 
get and the period over which 
they can exercise them. 

peter Underhill, a director 
of Capital Ventures, which 
manages the Cave Fund, de- 
fendsthe policy of taking 
options as . a method ot 
remunerating managers. 


to retain control over the 
shares which it cannot legally 
do and then it would be 
impractical to chase individ- 
ual participants for the 
managers' share of the profit. 

Lawrence Lever 




ylbbeyUnitTrusts 


WHATEVER UNIT TRUSTS 

MAY SAY, THEIR WORDS SELDOM 
MATCH OUR FIGURES. 


Atlantic Assets 


Number 

One 



Charlotte 

Square 


* 


Performance. It’s foe most 
important word in foe mind of any 
shrewd investor 

But while unit trusts are quick 
to tell you how they perform in 
relation to other unit trusts, they 
never mention how they 
measure up to Investment 
Trusts. 



Atlantic’s Net Asset Value 
reaches an all tune high. 


THE FIGURES 

Over the years Investment 
Trusts have performed extremely 
well. And many of those managed 
by Flemings have consistently 
beaten the industry 
average. 

According to Vtood 
Mackenzie & Co. Ltd., 

£100 in the average unit 
trust would have grown to a 
healthy £232 over foe five years 
to December 1985. 

But that same £100 invested 
in foe average Investment Trust 
would have risen to £256. And 
don't forget that's just foe average. 
Many Investment Trusts have per- 
formed substantially better. 



FLEMINGS INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


Another important difference is the cost of 
investing. Investment Trusts have a fixed capital. This 
means you buy shares in the trust rather than units. 

And that means you only pay 
normal Stock Exchange 
costs, not foe more expen- 
sive unit trust charges. 
There are of course, 
some similarities. You can 
Still opt for capital growth 
or income or a combination 
of foe two. 


-iujP "\bu can make investments ty buying shares 
through your usual financial advisor or take achantage 
. of our Dividend Reinvestment and Savings Scheme. 
In this way you can invest in lump sums of 
£250 or more, or by regular savings- 
\ from as little as £25 a month. 

To find out more about this 
Scheme and foe 10 Investment Trusts 
managed by Flemings send 
, ? us foe coupon now. 

V\fe are a leader in our 
" field, after all. 

■’ q:. ’ : ; Oh dear Now we sound 
°"K: ’ like a unit trust advertisement 



TT27/3. 1 

To; Robert Fleming Services Ltd. I 

25 Copfoall Avenue, London EC2R /uk. 

Please send 
and' 

Trusts. 


Copfoall Avenue, London tttZK /u*. 

ase send me details of your Dividend M"*™* 

1 Savings Scheme and the 10 Flemings Investment 

ete 


NET ASSET VALUE PERFORMANCE 
1976-1986 GRAPH 

% Indices based to 100 in 1976 


EXTRACT FROM 
CHAIRMAN’S REVIEW 


0 



Net 

Asset Value 
per share 


M0.72p 



70.3 6p 


1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 

All values stated at 30 June 

_ NetAssciVdhie FT Actuaries All Share Index 

Ml Standard & ftwra Composite Index (expressed in sterling) 


35.18p 


I7.59p 


Atlantic Assets 
Trust’s net 
asset value rose 
this year by 7% 
to a record of 

143 .8p per share. 

We believe that the fall in the 
Dollar against Sterling is largely 
over and that the United States 
will increasingly be seen as an 
attractive area for UK. based 
investors. Reflecting' this, Atlantic 
has positioned the portfolio with 
80% of its investments unhedged 
in North America. 

In addition, the tax reform 
proposals currently being con- 
sidered by the US. Congress will 
constitute a major positive factor 
and in the long term, should be 
extremely beneficial for the 
economy and hence stockmarket 
.values. 





Name:. 


IVORY &SIME 


Mr. John M Menzies, Chairman 
22. September 1986. 


PUBLIC LIMITED COMPANY 


Address:. 


investment management worldwide. 

One charlotte square ■ Edinburgh eh2 -idz telephone 031-225 057 

StaTpicTo™' Ou^ttTs^are, Edinburgh EH2 4DZ. Please send me a copy of the 1986 iWd 
Report for Atlantic Assets Trust- _ 



.Postcode. 


FLEMINGS 

investmeotjrustsj 


Address- 







27 






THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/2 


The new shareholders’ new problem 


c 


TSB 


3 


The Trustee Savings Bank 
share subscription lists closed 
on Wednesday with riot police 
and crash barriers to hold back 
the crowds. 

The crowds, however, failed 
to materialise, and the 
mounted police were left to 
feed sugar lumps to their 
horses. 

But the issue itself has 
attracted a record number of 
investors, exceeding even the 
heights scaled by the British 
Telecom issue. Then more 
than 2.3 million people 
subscribed for shares: the 
latest estimate from the TSB is 
that more than five times the 
target number have submited 
applications. 

That means about five mil- 
lion people have applied for 
less than fl_5 billion worth 
shares. Clearly, there are not 
enough shares to go round, 
and anyone who has applied 
without priority status — 
through the medium of the 
famous pink slip — cannot be 
sure of a share. 

Lazards. the bankers lo the 
issue, and the TSB manage- 
ment met last night to decide 
how to allot the goodies to the 
eager millions. It seems cer- 
tain that there will be a ballot 
to decide who gets what 

Lazards handled the sale of 
the last tranche of Britoii. 
when most people received no 
more than £100 worth of 
shares. There was then a 
minor outcry at the more or 
less derisory holding doled out 
to applicants. 

A mere £100 stake in a 
company is hardly a signifi- 
cant shareholding, and many 
look the tiny allocation as a 
cuc'io “slag” the issue, that is, 
they sold straightaway and 
made a quick £20- or so on 
their shares. 

For its part.ihe TSB is 
making it very clear that it 
does not welcome the stags 
and will go to some lengths to 
discourage them. It looks a 
racing certainty that ap- 
plicants without priority sta- 
tus will be balloted to son out 
(he few who will receive the 
coveted TSB shares. 

Share ballots, of course, are 
different from the industrial 
secret balloL These ballots 
have nothing to do with 
democracy and everything to 
do with luck. They are no 
more than a drawing of lots. 

How the lottery is to be 


arranged is anyone's guess. A 
recent popular issue was Ab- 
bey Lift, which was heavily 
oversubscribed in the way that 
the TSB already is- the latest 
guess is. that there are roughly 
£12 billion chasing the not 
quite £1.5 billion shares. 

The Abbe? Life allocation 
was worked on the basis that 
those who. made bigger 
applications- stood more 
chance of receiving some 
shares. The TSB might con- 
ceivably be curved up on that 
basis. 

But what then. would have 
happened to < the “people's 
share” of which the TSB 
chairman. Sir John Read, 
spoke so warmly earlier this 
month? 

The Government does not 
receive any of the money from 
the TSB. and the issue is not 
therefore a privatization. 
However, the courts have 
ruled that the Government, 
docs in feet own the bank. 

It would carry a dear politi- 
cal message to many un- 
successful applicants if they 
were told that because they 
did not have enough money 
their chances of obtaining a 
stake were Jeopardized. 

For the Government these 
sales are supposed to be means 
of luring voters, not alienating 
them. 

The TSB has decided to 
encash all priority status 
cheques, plus the “smaller” 
non-priority cheques — a 
£2.000 cheque would be classi- 
fied as a smaller cheque. It 
seems reasonable to assume 
that the smaller investor wifi 
be favomed over the larger. 

The situation is now sharply 
polarized between those with 
priority status and those with- 
out. The certainty of obtaining 
shares with the pink slip seems 
doubly valuable when set 
against the uncertain lottery 
which non-priority applicants 
must face. 

Before the news of the 
probable lottery leaked out 
applicants could say with 
some confidence that they had 
backed a winning horse but 
did not know how much they 
had won. and what the odds 
were — anyone who does not 
think the shares will start out 
at a premium is welcome to 
sell them to the writer, who 
will buy as many as are offered 
at 50p! 

Now. non-priority ap- 
plicants can only say that they 
know they have backed a 
winning horse., they still do 



0I/ER-5I/BSCK/BERS, 

anonymous 




’imtk: 


'' "v." • • • : 



It was all too much: TSB share application sorters found five million people chasing £13 billion worth of shares 


not know the odds, and there 
is the extra worry that the 
clerk of the course might just 
decide that their bet is void for 
not being drawn out of a haL 

More than 5.000 people are 
working through the week-end 
on an allocation whose details 
are as yet an imponderable. 
The only certainties are that 
no one will be entirely happy 
with the result, and the shares 
will be spread thinly among 
millions. 

So what happens if you do 
not receive any shares? You 
have probably been reading 
and hearing till you are thor- 
oughly sick of it that the TSB 

Stockbrokers have 
clear valuations 

shares represent a unique 
investment opportunity — you 
and five million others. 

Should you go out and buy 
the shares in the market on the 
first day of trading, which, 
assuming the allocation is 
derided quickly and goes 
smoothly, should be October 
8 ? 

The stockbrokers and an- 
alysts in the market have fairly 
dearly defined views on how 
much the TSB is worth. “At 
SOp the TSB is good value. 
Anything over 90p is a bit 
expensive.” says Malcolm 
Roberts, of brokers Montagu 
Loebl Stanley. 

Mr Roberts compares the 
TSB with the Scottish banks. 


Royal Bank of Scotland and 
Bank of Scotland. By compar- 
ing the dividend — the income 
which shares will provide — 
with the price, brokers seem 
derided dial 80p to 90p is the 
benchmark price for early 
dealing. 

The right lo hold shares had 
been changing hands in the 
unofficial “grey” market at 
more than lOOp. or double the 
paid price. But that was last 
week. Since then the grey 
market, which is a good test of 
investors' expectations since 
they back their judgment with 
money, has been drifting 
down. 

Julian Gordon, of stock- 
brokers Greig Middleton, also 
looks lo the Scottish banks as 
a point of reference. By 
comparing share price with 
expected yield Mr Gordon 
calculates that the TSB will 
fetch something between 77p 
and lOOp. 

His advice to those with 
very few shares is to go into 
the market and “do a little 
evening up”. He says: “If you 
wanted, say. 1.000. and got 
just 200. it might be worth 
going in and buying 800 at 
market value. The 200 you 
have will mean that you hold 
the 1. 000 quite cheaply.” 

Mr Gordon believes that 
those who receive no shares at 
all should think very carefully 
before splashing out and pay- 
ing the premium, depending 
of course, on how large it is. 

Mr Roberts is marginally 


more optimistic: “Provided 
the initial premium isn't ter- 
ribly high, we see the TSB as 
an issue which might well 
build in the way that a 
successful issue like the 
'Wellcome Foundation man- 
aged to start well and build on 
its initial success.” 

Not surprisingly, Derek Ste- 
vens, finance director at the 
TSB, is positive about the long 
term prospects: “We have five 
years* protection from take- 
over. and that means that we 
don't have to do things which 
look good in the short term 
but don't do much for us over 
a longer period. 

Argument for long 
term is strong 

“Over the past 18 mdnlhs 
we managed a 22 per cent 
return over net assets. With 
the the capital raised by the 
issue we shall start off with 
returns at about 14 per cent, 
but will be looking to build 
back up to where we were by 
investing judiciously in areas 
such as technology.” 

The argument in favour of a 
long-term hold must be 
strong especially because of 
the bank's “dean” operation. 

Analysts like the high-tech 
efficiency with which services 
are dispensed, while the fact 
that the TSB has no portfolio 
of rather dodgy South Ameri- 
can debts like (he big four 
clearers is another reason for 


investors to sleep a little 
easier. 

For those who receive 
shares, the choice must be 
between slagging thereby 
making a quick and probably 
rather small profit, and buying 
a more worthwhile holding 

The market has a surpris- 
ingly dear idea of the price at 
which purchases should be 
made. 

Those who are unsuccessful 
cannot, of course, make any 
quick killing Yet the argu- 
ments in favour of going 
shopping in the market still 
remain substantial. 

This method of investment 
is certainly a long-term strat- 
egy. however: Brokers point to 
the fact that the institutional 
investors, such as pension 
fund and unit trust managers, 
will have very few shares and 
will be virtually forced to buy 
into the TSB. 

But they wifi probably bide 
their time, as they did with 
British Telecom, and take 
their holdings when the price 
has dipped “on a dull day”. 
There can be no guarantee of 
making a profit on shares 
bought in the market 

The ‘TSB, of course, wants 
to make life difficult for the 
stags. Most people intending 
to make a quick gain face a 
choice between a small profit 
on their allocation, and taking 
a straightforward commercial 
risk on a well priced share 
bought in the market. 

Martin Baker 


M AGNIMFD>®WI3NEC 

. INVESTMENT PORTFOUOS O 

15-17 King Street, SL JamesU London S\V 1. 

East rash conversion 
Strong international demand 
20% compound growth since 1978 
Outperformed KT. index by 63% 

Telephone: 01-839 5732 


Over 55? Why not 
enjoy a tax free 

income? Life may begin at 40, but 

tax free income for you begins at 55. 

That is, if you have invested in the right 
place. You see, we have a plan for turning taxed 
investment income into tax free income. 

This is particularly good news for those of 
vou retired or semi-retired with lump sums of 
£10,000 or more and wanting to maximise 
income in the most tax efficient manner, without 
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And your capital appreciates without 
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worth looking into. 

It’s no more bother 
than a building society 
account. 

We are one of the 
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firms of personal 
financial advisers In the 
U.K. offering specialist 
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There is no charge 
or obligation for our 
services, but there is 
much to be gained 
from simply sending in 
the coupon. 


Thlkto 
Unary Law 

for impartial 
financial advice . 

Tou vy Law d: Ca Ltd-, 
FftLEKiST. 11 'indsorSU IBT. 
757: 075) 868244. Outside 
office hours 01-936 9037. Or 
031-226 2244 (Edinburgh) 
or 05)2 445911 (Leeds). 

Please sen d me full 
details without charge or 
obligation. I am/am not an 
existing lown'Law client 

Name 

Address 


U 


Postcode. 


T/27/9/B 6 


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Advice to the unwary abroad in the City, or 


WHY THE METEOROLOGICAL 
OFFICE SHOULD 
BE STAFFED BY GIRAFFES. 



^THE sun blazed down on the scorched savannah. The 
dry grass rustled like sandpaper in the hot breeze. 


Overhead, the sky was porcelain blue. But the giraffe 
was donning a sea-green sou’wester. A sunbathing lion 

opened a quizzical eye 
and started to roar with 
laughter. A pack of 
hyenas cackled hyster- 
ically. Undeterred, the 
giraffe tugged on his 
Wellington boots, one, 
two, three and four. 

Gnus gnudged each 
other, whispering and 
giggiing/The giraffe pooh 
poohed their jibes and 
unfurled a sober black 
umbrella. Still, the other 
animals broiled in the 
sun. Elephants sported 
smart new trunks. A 
long-legged camel shyly adjusted the bikini top on her humps. 

But the giraffe was studying the skies. 

And, sure enough, a little black cloud came scudding 





in from the west. Then another. Then another. Until at 
last the sky above was as black as ink. With a violent crack, 
the clouds split open. The sunbathers were bathed in a 
torrent of rain. As they scurried for cover, awash with 

mascara and suntan 
oil, the giraffe reflected 
on the benefits of being 
the tallest animal of all. 
From his lofty vantage 
point, he’d been able 
to see the clouds gather 
on the horizon. 

Just like the giraffe, 
Mercury Fund Managers 
benefit greatly from their 
stature. With the enor- 
mous resources of 
Mercury Warburg at 
their disposal and their 
network of offices all 
over the world, Mercury 
can command a superior 
view of international 
stock markets. So no 
one is better equipped 
to detect the slightest shift in the economic climate. 

For watertight advice on our ten unit trusts, please write 
to: The Client Services Director, Mercury Fund Managers 
Ltd., FREEPOST, London EC4B 4DQ, (01-280 2800) or contact 
your usual financial adviser. 


MERCURY UNIT TRUSTS 

Investment by Mercury W uburg Investment Management Ltd. 










; . - . I ' . _ , — • - -> w J 

***•—— — - » k — ~ -— >•- - - ■— — — i 


FAMILY MONEY /3 



Even 

( PENSIONERS ) 


age has its compensations 

for on Ihe demands for local entertainment, handicrafts. meiersand ^ 


. • - — 

The time to take it w mnch is now offered to make life more comfortable for the elderly 


When an 80-year-oW film star 
was asked if she regretted 
anything in her life, she an- 
swered: “Yes, that i’U never be 
60 again." So say many of the 
country's 10 million pension- 
ers - but not all of them. 

Because of good financial 
planning and a company pen- 
sion scheme, some are able to 
please themselves how they 
spend their days. Others are 
not so lucky. They may be ill 
or lonely, have suffered 
bereavement, or made no 
provision for their old age. 

Fifty per cent of retired 
“singles" and more than 30 
per cent of couples rely on 
state pensions and social se- 
curity benefits for 75 per cent 
of their income. One-third of 
the over-65s live alone; two- 
thiids of the disabled are over 
retirement age; and 40 per 
cent of pensioners receive 
means-tested supplementary 
benefits to ease their poverty. 

Thai number excludes the 
25 per cent of pensioners who, 
according to the DHSS, are 
entitled to a supplementary 
pension but do not claim it. 

Those whose enjoyment of 
the golden years is impeded by 
ill health or poverty can find 
help from organizations such 
as Age Concern, which cam- 
paigns on behalf of the elderly 


ts&SF* 

household possessions. 
m JoBiing: F“ n runs at St 

'h £ S m«*: sw " t " 


9tu , nmvides services for on ihe demands for local entertainment. 

• S £?'** am ^ £n£&-S 

Commercial orpniauons # ^ Over-65, L^ing charges from 50p» Helens. 

too offer discounts and con- t ^ j ncrease d personal £j j n nearby Sutton, prices mtng.^ 35 al Sunder- 

«sa°ns AS! d< T Slowance of £2.850 for single ire around85p- Essex has 600 Yorkshirejlancnig^iM> ^ 

people and £4.505 for married clubs for varying need* Sal- land. Tyne ^ keep-fit 
incomes and beef up everytoy C0Wf n ieSm This is reduced by f on j j n Greaier Manchester Hammctsnmh^a g arrow . 
living- Even the hdand.Rey- tw^Srds of income over has lts brass band and Shrop- for young • 

£9.400. and lost altogether shire its choir festival. while in-Fumess, Cum 

for a married couple. H °™ 


: VP ''* "■ 

; Li!^- 


uvmg. I#»vu — „ 

enue grants a tax concession in 
the form of the age allowance. 

Subsidized services for the 
elderly vary from area to area. 
They usually cover leisure, 
travel and financial 
“bargains”. Before looking for 
these, however, check with 
your local DHSS office to 
make sure you get the pension 
and other rights to which you 
are entitled by virtue of your 
age and past contributions. 


: v 


\ . 


i v 


tor a niiuiKu . m „ rt#spe 

_ • . ■ outstanding on your mortgage 

• British Rail issues two andthe Hdifax Building Soo 
Senior Citizen Railcar^. One ^ after your title 




at £12 cuts a third off Saver 
tickets, a half off cheap day 

returns, a half off standard day 

returns and a third off stan- 
dard singles and returns. 
There are also inductions on 


ety will look after your utle 
deeds free (not only, for 
pensioners). 

• Department of Health and 
Social Security: Form FB- 
Which Benefit?, for list of 


vMrSffi* ffiEMSss 


£1 jvu imvw MV* — 

tional Insurance contributions 

Until May 1987, holders of 
supplementary benefit, even if both cards can also getem-rate 
you own your own home. Or London Underground tickets 

J - . f* m- 4 ft llnnriov. t/t Fn- 


or in’Fntnityi UWP™>I 
editions available. 
a Meals on wheels: 'Check 
with local authority. Sunder- 



j vw w"u i— ; — - — 

you can get assistance for rent 
and rates. Inquire at council 
offices. 

Libraries and Citizens’ Ad- 
vice Bureaux give out leaflets 
and information about facil- 
ities for the elderly in e very 
area, including cheap or free 
educational courses. 

Various “perks” and rights 
for pensioners are listed below 
in an A to Z fashion- Some, 
including the age allowance, 
are statutory. Others depend 


MilWVII vmvmhj*™— 

after 930am Monday to Fri- 
day and all day at weekends 
and on public holidays. An 
extra £5 from holders of either 
Railcard buys the Rail Europ 

r. ■ I /iliaan CM 


Senior Card' giving cheap sea 
and a 30 to 50 


crossings, and a 30 to 5U per 
cent discount on most Euro- 
pean railway fares. 

• Christmas bonus of £10. _ 

• Cinemas: Special price 
reductions usually early in the 
week on sight of pension book. 

• Day centres and dubs for 



j/fu sum uivw - • — 

certain areas around London, 
serving disabled people at 
cheap rates. In Havennj^east 
London, housebound peop^- 
can be collected and taken to 
day centres. In the west Lon- 
don borough of Kensington 
and Chelsea, volunteerelearn 
to manipulate wheelchairs, 
and help the elderly 
housebound. 

• Dry cleaning: Personal gar- 
ments at various shops at 
reduced raxes. 

• Ethnic elderly: Pakistan 
Welfare Association in Nel- 
son, Lancashire, provides mu- 
tual support and company, in 
Leicester there is help in 
neighbourhood work with the 
ethnic elderly. 

w Education: Cheap or free 
day and evening courses. In- 
quire at the local library or 
education offices. Only - per 
cent of pensioners use educa- 
tional facilities. 

_ Flying: Relations in Can- 
ada? Wardair makes a £20 
reduction for pensioners on 
fares to Toronto from several 
English airports, including 
Stansted and Manchester but 
not Gatwick. British Caledo- 
nian offers return flights to 

• r rzc (.„ini,irti et!*v 


elderly. 

ttssfflsffia 

discount on standard adult 
fares. _ „ 

• Prescriptions free for all 
pensioners. 

■ Pop-in centres (Age Con- 
cern): Lewisham and 

Peckham. south ^ ndo "; i ^ r 
snack meals, coffee.; sand- 
veches; and a. 

Buckinghamshire and Black- 
bum, Lancashire. 

• Retirement P®**™ taafl* 
NP32 for rent and rale rebates: 
inquire at the local authority 
tr eas urer's office. 

m Security chains and door 
viewers through Manpower 
Services Commission m 
North Humberside and East. 
Yorkshire at cost of materials 
only- . 

• Sports: All kinds from bowls 

(Kent), badminton and dam 
to swimming, whist (Oogar, 
Essex) and dancing (Ware 
Hertfordshire). 

m Sheltered housing tn associ- 
ation with housing associ- 
ations and local authorities or 
voluntary and church groups. 
Telephones: Not much help 

. * T. _ _u l.. Dnlich 


J * ' 


J 


nian offers return flights to # Telephones: Not much help 
Jersey for £65 (maximum stay ^ ^ the elderly from British 
three months). Bookings can Tdecom. Local authorities 

be made by telephone (01-668 *■ — 

TV,. Air nivK in nfr 


uc iiiouv ’■'J 

4222); Dan Air gives 30 per 
cent discount on domestic 
flights, for example, Heathrow 
to Inverness. 

• Hairdressing: Cheap rates at 
some salons, mostly Mondays 
to Wednesdays, for men and 
women. 

• Home help: For the infirm 
or ilk doctor’s recommenda- 
tion may be necessary. 

Holidays: Several small 
local authorities offer sub- 
sidized “breaks”. Tower 
Hamlets in east London has 
spring and autumn holidays at 
Oevedon Court, St Leonard’s- 
on-Sea and Strathearo Hotel 
at Southsea, near Portsmouth. 
The cost of full board for 
ioners is £34. Bookings 
/or March and April must be 
made on October 1 at speci- 
fied venues in the borough, or 
from October 2 to 14 at 
Cheviot House, Commercial 
Road, London El. Hammer- 
smith and Fulham also has 


1 cicvum. , 

have limited obligations in 
law to help with the installa- 
tion of a telephone for 
pensioners who can dem- 
onstrate a need, but inter- 
pretation of that duty vanes. 
Southwark in London and 
Sutton operate for some 
pensioners a portable alarm 
system, triggered off when a 
button js pressed so that help 
comes to someone who has a 
fell or is taken suddenly ill 

• London Underground 
travel free after 9.30am daily, 
and London buses at any time. 
Apply for pass at post offices. 

• Voluntary homes for 
residential care: Ask the 
organization to negotiate with 
the DHSS office ifyou cannot 
pay the full charges. 

• Warmth in winter Free 
leaflet (Health Education 
Council) and heating help in 
retirement. 

Your Rights is a useful 
booklet costing 90p published 

l... aaa r'AKMMm I'/wAnno ‘nil 


^ . . uwivvi p '-r r-’ 

smith and Fulham also aa* by Age Concern covering 'all 
cheap holidays for pensioners, pensioneis 1 rights, and much 
^ Am«r , niuwn mnrp 


Insurance: Age Concern (60 more, 
d, Mitcham, Sur- 


Jennie Hawthorne 


Now open 


By phoning Fidelity today you can 
take part in a revolution in unit trust 
investment. 

A unique seven day service. 

Now you can get that personal invest- 
ment advice you need, directly by phone. 

Outside normal office hours. 

You can also buy and sell Fidelity unit trusts 
at that day’s price. 

This sendee is available from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
every weekend, and from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 
Monday to Friday. 


shopping 


Should I switch my investments 
in America? 


What investment opportunities are 


available through PEPsr 

You need never make a blind invest- 
ment decision again. 

For the answers just ring Fidelity. 


For example, you may well have asked 
mo 


yourself the following questions. 

Will the Japanese market maintain its 

upward thrust? 

Has Europe plateaued or will it rise again? 


Whikwcrid markets move, 
iheCitydeep&EM^Rddity 

It's 4 p.m. and the banks are shut 

It’s 5.30 p.m. and the best answeryou get 
from most trust unit groups is an answerphone. 

It’s Sunday and the building societies are 
closed. 

But Fidelity is open for business. 

This is the importance of our new 
investment and advisory service. 


Ihequestkms^needanswered 

forbattrinvestmmL 


The changing temper of world markets this 
•year alone demonstrates the need for immediate, 
sound, professional and active advice. 



YiurBerso^InvesiarAcccii^ 

As an investor, you will receive our new 
Fidelity ‘Personal Investor Account 3 card. 

Using our special Callfree number quoted 
on your card, you have immediate access to 
valuable up-to-the-minute advice on whether to 
buy, sell orhold your position to your advantage. 

And remember, you don't have to make a 
decision - this advice service is completely 
without obligation. 

As an account holder you also benefit from 
advance notice of our new funds, regular 
investment newsletters, and priority invitations 
to our Investment Seminars. 


Check the 


lepapers. Chedcyourpricea 
CBedcwidiBddjty 


Talk IQ our team of irwesraent advisers now. 


You’ve read today’s personal finance 
columns and studied the markets. 

You don’t have to wait until Monday to act. 
Callfree Fidelity on 0800 414161 for Saturday 
shopping now. 


Callfee 0800 4W16L until midnight, tonight 



Fidelity 


MAKING MONEY MAKE MONEY 


BEMUSED 

BTUN/TTRUSTS? 



Send off for your FREE Guide 
to Unit Trust Investment 
or cafi us for FREE on 
MONEYLINE 0800 282 101 


To: S«e Sc Prosper. FREEPOST. Romford RM 1 1 BR. 

Plea* iud c* i copy of 'A GttUJt To UrU Tfvtf Investment' 


4®, SAVE & 
W PROSPER 


THE INVESTMENT HOUSE 


riJ 



mUmfiE THE FROWN 
OFFYOURTACE. 



Name (MrfMrs/MIsa) 

Addrtm 


- 

i 

Potfeode 

TU.No. 

i 


•i.. , , 


!:• I 


s... • 

• i , : . 












29 





THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 









k A- 






FAMILY MONEY74 


Difficult deals for 
tenants who trade 



hi ii ii ii u 


WARbRDM&cRSotJ 

UMntb 

W£ HAVE EXCEU&JT 
i£CAL FAtiumes) 







// 


X 

V 




. 

fain n 


□in 

nil 

mi 

ii i 

n 



4M 


Mi 


ii 

ii 


nil 
ii n 


* 


in] 
1 W 1 
illi 
nn 

i 

«&fcr 


( TENURE ) 

Thoasanrfs of small busi- 
nesses are at risk of losing the 
security of tenure granted in 
the 1954 Landlord and Tenant 
Act, thanks to a tittle-publi- 
cized Conrt of Appeal rnfing at 
the end of last year. 

The case involved a coapie 
called Christina, who took an 
assignment of a lease of 
premises at 20 Montpelier 
.Vale, in Biackheath. south 
London, into their personal 
names so that they could trade 
from there. Later they incor- 
porated into a limited com- 
pany to carry on the business, 
hot they kept the lease in their 
own names. 

The company then went into 
liquidation bat they set op 
another in its. place .and, mice 
again, it Was the company 
which traded from the 
souses. The lease expired in 
item her 1983, by which 
time the business had been 
carried on in the name of one 
company or the other for nine 
months. 

As tenants bolding the 
lease, Mr and Mrs Christina 
applied for a new lease under 
the 1954 Act. But their land- 
lord claimed that by trading 
through the medium? of ' hi 
limited company, they had lost 1 
their rights under that Act, 
The county court judge and the 
Court of Appeal agreed w id 
him. 

The Act specifies that e- 
newal rights are given only tea 
tenant who occupies the 
premises for the purpose of his 
business. The Christims* • 
landlord succesftdly argued 
that it was their limited on- 
pan} and not the awple 
themselves that occupied the 
Montpelier Vale premises and 
that it was the company's 
business, and not theirs, 1 that 
carried on there. • 

Peopfe often talk of carrying 


on a busings “through a 
company” bit that is not 
recognized in law. The stum- 
bling hlpck ras an ancient 
court rating (feting from 1897, 
which held dot a company 
was a sepxate legal entity 
from its shaieholders and that 
its bnshiessdfd not belong to 
the Share bdders. 

That tale was applied 
strictly in the Christmas' case 
and they 'rare deemed to have 
no legal entitlement under the 
Landlord and Tenant Act 

The ‘ property solicitor 
Philip FVeedman rays the 
derisiot may affect innumer- 
able fastnesses where the 
lease fc held in die names of 
indivHtaais who carry on busi- 
ness dirongh a limited com- 
pany. “Astute landlords will 
be frvestigating this when 
leases come up for renewal, 
and tenants should seek legal 
advice if they are in this 
sftation,” be said. 1 

There is an anomaly, he 
safs, in that the Act specifi- 
cally protects groups of com- 
ptmes where one company 
hrids tire lease aid another 
fades - from -the premises, 
d though that does net apply 
io companies whose shares are 
owned by private individuals 
holding tire lease fe.tbeir own 
names 

There may be ways round 
the problem with carefully 
documented arrangements. 
But the only real solution is 
legislation, ironically though, 
as Mr Freedman is to point out 
In a forthcoming issue of Rent 
Review end Lease Renewal 
Journal, the Government — 
self-pro daimed champion of 
small businesses — has re- 
cently expressed satisfaction 
with the workings of the Act 
and has said it will not he 
changing the law. 

Frances Gibb 

Legal Affairs Correspondent 


This Sc 
Trust P 



education costs 


All school fee plans are effective- 
ly not the same as so many parents 
might mistakenly suppose. 

Our new School Fee Trust Plan, 
linked to a trust with charitable 
status, will provide a head start in 
providing for school fees in the years 

ahead. • 

That trust basis, combined with 
our first-class investment track re- 
cord, is the answer to your problem. 

And, what’s more it is fully 
recommended by . the National 
Independent Schools Information 
Service. 

ICnnfiMi | M | »'M Rtl — ■ 1 ■ " * — "* " 


IXolCodr 





TdilHwnri 




The Equitable Life 

) _ _You gain because we’re different... 


I 
I 
I 
I 

_J 


BKASA 


Small, but with 
hopes of £30m 

■ "We've bunched the smaH 
companies unit trust because quality 
management Is small, "says Trevor 
Pullen, of Prudential Portfolio Mare# 

The Holbom SmaH Companies Func 
will, it is daimed, outperform the market 
on the way up and will be slower on 

the way down. Thera Is anomer school of 
investment philosophy that projects a 
sharper downturn than average for smaH 
companies in a faffing market Up to a * 
quarter of the fund may be invested in the 
Unlisted Securities Market 

income is payable twice yearly or can 
be automatically reinvested to buy more 
units. The minimum investment is 
£1,000, with further tranches of £200 or 
more possible. Unit price is fixed at 
5 Op until October 17. There wS be no 
discount to the Initial charge of 5 per 
cent The annua! charge is 1 per cent 
Mr PuBen wBJ be “disappointed" If the 
fund does not attract at east £10 million. 
He hopes for as much as £30 mtton. 

Super for expats 

■ Building societies continue to go 
international. The. Surrey BuHdrng Society 
has produced an account for British 
citizens not resident m Britain. More than 
20 societies are now aiming at the 
expatriate market The mfewnum 
investment in the Super Plus 
Overseas Account Is £500, with a 
maximum of £105,000. The annual 
percentage return is 1 1 .65 per cent This 
will of course be paid without 
deduction of income tax. 

Details: Surrey SuScfing Society, 216 
High Street. Dorking, Surrey RH4 1QR. 

More units 

■ Yet more unit trusts. Gresham Unit 
Trust Managers, the investment arm of 
Gresham Life, have produced two 
funds to increase the range of choice still 



Fidelity Unit Trust Managers seem to be 
taking efieat service more seriously than 
most They are spending a considerable 
sum of money on a telephone advisory 
service (at work, above). They ore oat of 
pocket by “more than a quarter of a 
million, indsding setting-up costs” 
according to the managing director Barry 
Bateman. 

A team of 16 investment advisers win 
be available from 9am to 9pm on 
weekdays, and 9am to 6pm on Saturdays 
and Sundays. They win provide advice on 


a broad range of investment topics. Mr 
Bateman says: “The group has made a 
tong-term investment. We are not nec- 
essarily looking for a short-term pay- 
off.” 

Part of Fidelity's investment is its free 
telephone line for callers — 0800 414161. 
Innocent inquirers should, however, re- 
mind themselves that the ret ur n on 
Fidelity's investment will be their pur- 
chase of unit trus ts . No one Is doubting 
the quality of the advice, bid callers 
shotud remember who is giving it. 


further. The International Income Trust 
is expected to provide a ywkl of 5.5 per 
cent from bonds and shares around 
the worid, while the North American 
Growth Trust wfB arm at maximum 
capital growth by committing to the 
United States and Canada. The unit 
offer price for both funds is 25p.The 
minimum investment is £500, with 
larger sums attracting a modest bonus. 
Details: Gresham, 2-6 Prince of Wales 
Road, Bournemouth BH4 9HD. 

After inflation 


■ Inflation is deed, Iona five controlled 
price increases. If you fancy investing ‘ 
what Aucffey Twiston Davies, of F&C 


in 


Unit Managers calls “the death of 
inflation”, its financial unit trust may 
be for you. Some might say. however, 
that inflation is far from dead. Money 
from the fund win go to financial 
institutions all over the world, including 
the TSB. Mr Twiston Davies says: “We 
might welt attract failed TSB 
applicants, being failed TSB-ers 
ourselves." Charges are standard at 5 
per cent initially and 1 per cent annually. 
The minimum initial commitment is 
£500, with bonuses for subscriptions of 
£2,500 or more. 

Details: F&C Unit Management, 1 
Laurence Pountney Hill, London EC4R 
OBA. 


Annual Contractual rate 

8.oo% 

8.30% if compounded monthly 
8.16% if compounded half yearly 

SUPER SHARE ACCOUNT 

Equivalent to 11.27% to Basic Rate Taxpayers 
Our assets now exceed £39 million. 


The peckham is pleased to announce that the 
rate for the second issue superstore account is 
now 8 sxn, or higher if compounded. 
as an added bonus withdrawals can be made 
without notice and without penalty, provided 
your balance does not fall below £2,000. There is 
also the option of a monthly income, 
if this advert seems too good to miss - you're 
right! Fill in the coupon below and send a cheque 
to the Pecicham Building society, if you think trs 
too good to be true, fill in the coupon and tide 
the box for further information. 

Peckham BullcUng Society; 
craviaw House, 
i Copers Cope Road. 

Beckenham KentBR3iNB mrenstMte 

Tel. 01-656 7m may vary 

— ■ -ip, i in, w« ■■■•wmir" 


can Freephone 
Peckfiam for 
futfoetatt. 


BaUdiofi 

Society 


TO: Pecxnam Building Society, ftcepgst Becfcennam Kent 863 ujf 
l Please send me further derails 

□ » would like to invest £ in Pecxnam super Share 

Account (2nd issue) and understand that this investment 
can be withdrawn at any time given 5 months notice. 

A cheque is enclosed. 

Name — 

Address . ■ _ 


Signature . 


When Is The Best Time To Invest 
In A Successful Company? 


Or Here? 



It s sometimes hard to remember that 
Habitat was once just a one-off store in 
Londons Fulham Road. 

That Saatchi and Saatchi was a four- 
man creative consultancy as little rime ago 
as 1970. 

And that Amstrad was started with 
the. preposterous idea that a British 
company could make money from 
electronics. 

Yet look at. them now. All Hugely 
successful businesses that have rewarded 
investors who shared their frith with 
handsome returns, to put it mildly. 

So what of todays embryonic 
companies driven by good ideas and 
aggressive managements? 

• Will the}’ reward the farsighted 


investor with equally’ lucrative returns? 

According to The London Business 
School the answer is ‘Ye& 

A recent survey by diem confirmed 
the results of similar studies conducted 
internationally. 

• They show that a unit trust investing 
in small companies should always out- 
perform a portfolio of ‘blue chip’ 
companies over the long term. 

Which is why we, at Prudential, are 
launching our brand new Holbom Small 
Companies Trust. 

Its aim: to achieve capital growth by 
investing in small companies, mainly in 
the UK- 

And ■ although the Holbom Small 
Companies Thist is a new idea, spotring 


winners is something Prudential has 
made a habit of in the past. 

Every year we investigate hundreds 
of companies and their managements. 
This enables us to identify which young 
businesses are most likely to become.big 
businesses, well ahead of the market 
Of course, you must remember that 
the price of units and the income from 
them can go down as well as up. 

But from past success we feel pretty' 
confident about the future. 

If you’d like a stake in our new 
Holbom Small Companies Trust, 
nothing could be easiec 

To buy units at the initial price of 
50p just complete the coupon. 

Oryou can buy' them directly' over the 
phone by ringing our LinkLine number 
below; between 9 am and 5 pm weekday's 
or weekends. need only pay w^hen 
you receive the contract note. This offer 
must close on the 17th October 1986. 

Admittedly our Holbom SmaH 
Companies Trust is still in its infancy, but 
as we’ve already pointed out, isn’t that 
the best time to invest? 


& 




TO: PnhJrmul L'tm TniM Mana^rn- LtmnrA 
FREEPOST. INo sump irqinreJt. NIchJ. Emci 
K il -*DL-Ttl: OUTS « ITT. 

|ftV( n-ivh id imN i he sum of |- 
di Holhom Small CompanioTitM Mmuniun CIQOO 
jt ihf imtul ofler price «rf‘iOp. 

PIca-e lick box if von Jo SOT « - »h id hive income rr-inic'trd m 
additional iiiw* D 

Your cheque >hould he nude pavabte to Prudential L'mi Tnix 

Miniiirrs LrtniirJ 

PJea«c ,-ompli ic the fbflomnc in BLOCK CAPITALS. 7VSC/1 

Surname (MrlMirlMu.); 

Fmi Siimr(»); — 

A JJrew ■ — 


-IWeodr.-. 


&15NIU7TT- 


■Oiir; 


If i he unii. ire rr-.T-icrcii in mote ihan our namr. plea«c attach the 
other nnrthoUcif.) information loihMi^h'iiun form. 

^■'OTE: Application' recenvJ h ITih October Wife mil he drill zl 


lhr fi.cjnncc ol *0p. After iliai date unit'Will be available at ihrdaih' 
diioieJoHer price, a pp e a r in g inihe national pew 
Thi'uller mat claer earlier ai ihr Minacm? discretion. 

PRLDBvrnALlw 

Pnidemul L mi Trii*i Nbiuvrr. Limned. ff Jr 


“lb Buy Units At 50p In The New Holborn Small Companies Trust Ring Linkune 0800 010 345 Free Today 


General flifontiaiun; Eiiwnc and *llm< umrv Comnci nnits are normally wni oni hr remit! of p"*i. ccmli.-atc'.vnll 
inlkrtt nilhin 2t day-. L'ntl' fan he -.tld al ihe prcvaJinc hid price bv -jniph tending ibr itnotin-f J .-enifirile 10 the 
,\Lna t \t- Paiment mil nomufli hr made mihm 1 Jai >. Afti r the .low cJ ihe imtul ptft’r iinil price- anJ > irld- mil 
fa- cilctilaitd Jath and shim-n m ihe Tinir-s ihc Financial Time, and other national nr»,pipri>. Rcmtincraiion i> 
pjtf |J» fjinJiheJ jui.-rmcdurK-. i/vi rate' arr juilahle .in n-tfjmi Thr7r i»an milial chaise nl ■■'tool ihr ojitr pn.v ol 
unit •• An atmnal manaoitw m chncc ol Wi 1+ V.VT) nfihr \ atue oh hr hind fc Jrduncd tiiini income and allmiT J 


for in the t-omaird ^o.. tield.Th,- Tniw Dcrd permit' a ttu'imum annual chatfir of 2 4 *'ubjcci 10 ihe Maiu^rf' 
pmeidine * nttmih' noli.* liw--tnc: The imtul ecttmaied ^rns. iielJ. at llie uiiml offer piier of iOp o Inronir e. 
di-anbincd ‘‘ J Iiath on loot and 2U DrcemKr and thr lira dearihmion mil be Jlu June WJ7. Tlir Ttu,i h 


Aulhnened hi ihr nepartmtnt .il Tiadr and Indu'iry. The Trim Deed Coniam- pionunn. for ihr Manager, todral vtl 
Traded Option*. M.i.l.y*': Prudimiial L'nu Trim Manajjer. Limilrd. Rrcmrird in England. No. |T<ll>dih Member of 
Unit Tow Amoi-uiicni. TiW'lce; Midland Bank Turn Cotnpjm Lid. Thu oifrri' nm open loroadcnt' nl'Eire. 


T8 


* 



FAMILY MONEY/5 


Hidden cdsts 
of a council 
house divorce 




Divorce is an expensive busi- 
ness and many couples usually 
have no choice butto sen the 
former matrimonial home 
and divide what is left Of the 
sale proceeds.. 

As a result of a recent 
decision in the High Court, 
onp couple. Thomas and 
Caroline Barren, had the 
amount of their sale proceeds 
reduced by £ 10 , 000 . and thou- 
sands of other divorcees are 
likely to be in a similar 
financial predicament 

Mr and Mrs Barrett married 
in March 1994. In October 
1 984' they bought their rented 
council house from Rushmoor 
Borough Council. Under the 
righMo-buy legislation, coun- 
cil house tenants are entitled 
to a discount off the market 
value of their home. Mr and 

‘Itis a manifestly 
correct decision’ 

Mrs Barren received a dis- 
co untrof £12.650. 

-The document transferring 
the property from . the council 
to them contained the usual 
dause that the discount would 
have to ' be repaid if they 
disposed of the. property 
within fiw years. The amount 
that has to be repaid by a 
purchaser reduces on a sliding 
scale. 

In December 1995 Mr and 
Mrs Barrett were divorcedand 
in February .1986 the court, 
with the couple's consent, 
-ordered a sale of the matri- 
monial home, with the pro- 
ceeds of .sale to- be divided 
equally. 

The house was sold in April 
1986. The council demanded 
repayment of the discount, 
-time'll was then £l 0.120. Mr 
and Mrs Barret argued that 
their sale fell within one of the 
exemptions to the pay-back 
provisions, and they did not 
Have to repay the discount. 

Mr and Mrs Barrett lost, the 
case. In simpie terms, the 
judge said the exemption from 
paying back the discount was 
not intended to apply where 
there was a sale of the matri- 
monial home. It was designed 
for the situation where one of 
the spouses, remained in 
occupation and the ownership 
of the matrimonial home was 


transferred from one spouse to 
the other. 

The matrimonial solicitor 
• Peter Gross Hodge, of 
Speechley Bircham. sank "It is 
a manifestly correct decision. 
It does indeed sound (airly 
hard, but I cannot see bow the 
judge could have come to any 
other conclusion-” 

. Another .solicitor. Pauline 
Walker, of Payne Hicks and 
Beach, agrees: "What the 
judge said makes sense. It is 
difficult financially to set 
two homes, but some 
would query whether a coun- 
cil bouse purchaser morally 
should be entitled to take the 
discount to rehouse 
themselves." = 

According to the Depart- 
ment of the Environment, 
“the court's decision is com- 
pletely in line with tfte 
department's undemanding 
"of ibe rules governing pay- 
back of the discount". 

But some solicitors would 
query the department's inter- 
pretation of the rules and the 

- way local councils are carrying 
them out. 

A spokeswoman from solic- 

- rtors Tanner and Taylor, who 
br o ugh t the case, said' "In this 
case Rushmoor Borough 
Council asked for the discount 
back. But we were indirectly 
involved in another case with 
similar circumstances, with. 
East Hampshire District 
Council. At first they said they 
could not accept the discount. 

“I contacted Rushmoor and 
told them of the view of the 
neighbouring authority. The. 
two authorities put their heads 
together and East Hampshire 
then changed their mind. 
They said the discount was 
repayable." 

- East Hampshire District 
Council argues: "Initially we 
wrote to the people concerned 
on the basis that if seemed to 
be an exempt disposal. But 
then Rushmoor drew our - 
attention to the Department 
of the Environment inter- 
pretation. and we asked the 
solicitors -16 pay the discount 
back. Tire solicitors said. 'No'. 

“But we finally agreed that 
if the Rushmoor case succeeds 
we will be asking for the 
money back." 

A firm of solicitors in the 
Midlands is locked in battle 






with a local council on the 
same point. A solicitor in- 
volved explained: “The 'coun- 
cil have now landed everyone 
in, the cart We were most 
careful to check with them 
before contracts were ex- 
changed and they appeared to 
agree that the sale was exempt. 
• “Bur they have now 
changed their mind apd they 
wam_ repayment, of the. dis- 
count of about £2.000. We 
took a barrister’s advice and 
she agreed that , the discount 
should not.be repaid. We are 
still arguing with the council." 

The arguments about repay- 
ing the discounts op divorce 
are likely to continue for some 
time, not least because Tanner 
and Taylor have decided to 
take their case to the Court of 
Appeal. 

- In themeantime, all council 
home purchasers should soon 
benefit from changes in the 
law. The Housing and Plan- 
ning " Bill reduces the 1 time 
period for repaying discounts 
from five years to three. The 
Department of the Environ- 
ment said:. "The BO! should 
receive Royal assent at the end 
of October apd the provisions 
should be -in force in 
December." 

Susan Fieldntan 


How your Home can 
pay off your bills 


( ANNUITIES ) 

Just in case yon thought (he 
financial world was ramie 


do with real life, consider 1 

Elderly house owners can 
attain higher income because 
of die weakness of the pound 
on the foreign exchanges. 

There have been few buyers 
of special government fixed 
interest bomb, or gilts, 
recently. 

This is partly because many 
people expect interest’ rates on 
deposit account to stay as high 
as they are or go erea higher. 

Higher interest rates tend to 
make gibs less attractive for 
rather dull, technical reasons. 

Another factor driving gilts 
dawn has been the weakness of 
the pwmd, winch pots ferae® 
i n vestors off haying most 
things denominated in 


And for yet 

i technical reasons, when 


rather 

boring 

the capital market .value of a 
gift goes down the- effective 



Did you know that there are thousands of 
men and women in this country quietly 
making money out of low priced Fenny 
Shares? 

Most of these people are private Inve- 
stors- Many of them started with jusia few 
hundreds pounds. Few had any previous 
stockmarket experience. Some never buy . 
any other son of share .What is ihe secret 
of their success? 

FANTASTIC GROWTH 
RECORD 

Sixteen out of tost year's top twenty per- 
forming shares were Penny Shares. Here 
acre a selection of the recent winners. 


WHAT ARE 
PENNY SHARES? 
^and WHY IS THEIR 
RECORD SO GOOD? 


Penny Shares of the moment, and keeps 
invertors in touch with his past recom- 
mentations. Yta onhr make money when 
you sell,, and it’s the aim of FENNY 
SHARE FOCUS to get you outat the top of 
the market so you can move onto the next 
Ferny Share winner. 


APPLY NO W FO R 
YOUR MEMBERSHIP 
— AND SAVE 520 



from 

to 

gam 

^NnMc&Lund 

10p 

lOlp 

+9105. 

W A Holdings 

** 

45p 

+400% 

WoodhouseRbcaon 

15p 

tap 

+420S; 

Fnmponn 

tap 

188p 

+8891. 

Ashley lndustml 

14p 

88p 

+528% 

ACCan 

30p 

125p 

+316% 

TnzrrKemsfey 

26p 

■ 115p 

.. +31211 

BmtshBetunl 

Up 

83p 

+654% 

I'nigroup 

I-lp 

I20p 

+737% 

Spencer Clark 

35p 

172p 

+391% 


A Fenny Share is quite simply a share that 
you can buy formere pennies. The shares 
are cheap because the City has lost confi- 
dence In the company's ability to make 
profits. It could be because of poor mana- 
gement, adverse trading conditions, or 
just plain bad luck. But the stump m the 

price of the shares means something has 

to be done _ something has to change. An annual s ub scription to PENNY 

In some cases the company maybe SHARE FOCUS is normally S50£O~a 
restructured, new management installed, sum easfiy recouped by investing in just 
new products launched, new Ideas and one Penny Share winner, 
techniques introduced. Alternatively, the As a fine time su bscrib er you qua- 
company’s shares may be so cheap that a wy for a £20 discount, if you complete 
rival companymoves in to take them over. areirttum the onfcr Tram hdnwwiihm^ 
Or a successful private company might next seven days, 
buy them out as a cheap way in to the That’s right, you pay just £3950 for 
stockmarket. Whatever happens, it’s twelve month’s issues of -PENNY 
nearly always good news for the investor SHARE FOCUS that wffl put you Wefl 
who was brave enough to buy when the on fee road to stodonarket riches-sim- 
wasdown. ply foflow dur advice-. . 


ret Clark 35p I72p +381% company was down. 

Imagine how much your capita) Remember, these con y aaie sa rertffl 


would have increased if you had invested 
in any of these Penny Share winners. But 
where do you find them? _ after afi, sha- 
res do not rise in value just because they 
are low priced. 

If you had the time, and the know- 
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ners and then complete a thorough inve- 
stigation of the company. 

Now- there is an easter route to Penny 
Share success. Each month the Penny 
Share Focus team of analysts condense 
days Of research into a six page no non- 
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trading and they often have quite sizeable 
assets. Apart from the very few that do “go 
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has feDen to mere pennies can go is up. 
Join the Penny Share investors today 

and subscribe now to claim a discoantof 
£20 off your first years membership sub- 
scription and be (tally protected wfth our 
unique MONEY BACK GUARANTEE. 

The editor of PENNY SHARE 
FOCUS has fa* more than ten years been 

Shares _ the man who spotted Wire and 
Ptesticwtwn ft was just 27p, and then wat- 


UMQUE MONEY BACK 
GUARANTEE 

-We are confident thrt you wiD 
make money from our recommen- 
dations. If you invest equally in- any 
five of our recommendations over 
the next six ■ mends,:. and don't 
make enough money to rectum the 
cost of your membership subscrip- 
tion at feast ten times over by fids 
time next year, we wffl refund your 
subscription in FULL in CASH by 
retain of post 


-ssfifcsfifL'Bs nfsatJ 


ring evay Penny Share on the market - 
by collating masses of firandsl and com- 
pany data -by imkngpalnsttldng enqui- 
ries into the company's management, 
sometimes even v is itin g their offices, 
PENOTSHARE FOCUS helps you to spot 


you had invested jurt £500 in Wire and ^ fr^ iook g* r* 

Plastic when he told you, that investment Smewm dtS 

would now be worthmore than 5&500! Eih«J-Sm£e and return yox 

You can now have access to this nambeirtmi 
valuabte information each month throurii H 

the pages of PENNY SHARE FOCU&In 


©Penny Share Fo cu s l*d. 1986 

the next Penny Share winner, and keeps just 6 tightly written pages he reviews the Registered in En^rid 1846796 ' 
you clear ofihe losers. blest news, recommends . the hottest IlBteniMS(imXtaiikmEC2M?AY 

| Hease return this form to-Fenny Share Focus, 11 Bkwrffeld Jfcreeiixmtton EC2M 7AY m 

I YES Please show me how I can make money with 
Penny Shares and enter my subscription to Penny 
I Share Focus on the understanding that I am fully 
5 covered by your Mo ney Back Guarantee above. 


To .. 

Branch Address. 


Name 


Address. 



A/c Name and No. (if known) 


-Postcode-. 


PWifTOTAunactiNLy 
MKMRKUMW'NU _ 


TWI 


2ttAJphagrHignralk,kindOT 

of Penny Share Focus. Account number 4 WI 99 Wttesnnof 
£$50 an receipt of this order and thm«ftre£5aS0ootheraxne 
date earh year until counter man ded by me. 

Date. Signed — 


TS/2309 Jl 
Bank pic ■ 

I 

=J 


yield - increases. -Buyers ere 
paying out less money for the 

sune'figed re tai n. * «• 

So where do the elderly 
home owners come in? Most 
elderly people -with -a house 
can take out a mortgage and 
ase the money to buy a special 
in com e-prod Being contract 
called an annuity. Almost all 
insurance companies have a 
wide variety on offer. 

The ‘ annuity's income 
should pay off the mortgage 
debt and provide tin -home 
own er with extra cash every 
month. This is especially use- 
ful if . pension jprovisfons are 
less than adequate. - 

But annuities are worth 
doing only provided die in- 
come thqy generate Is suf- 
ficient to pay off dm interest do 
the mortgage with plenty left 
over to spend. 

When you purchase the 
annuity, your income wffl nor- 
mally be set at a certain level 

for as long as you five, so die 
Tates. offered at a given time 
make all the difference for 
future prosperity. 

: The connection is tint many 
managers choose to boy things 
such as gilts to Hw ky sure that 
they can pay out die incomeou 
tbe amuuties they offer. 

Norwich Union has just 
raised the rates it offers on 
annuities because of the in- 
creased yields on gifts, and the 
ssastained returns they have 
been making on commercial 
mortgages and debentures — 
both a 
pay debt. 

, Who said that Oe finandal 
world was remote from reality? 

Martin Baker 


policy 



WITH-PROFITS 

ENDOWMENTS 




If you have a mortjpge you 
probably have two significant 
investments. Apart from the 
bourn, which investment cli- 
che tells us is the "most 
significant investment most 
individuals ever make, bor- 
rowers with endowment mort- 
gages have the contract — 
normally a. special sort of life 
assurance contract called 
“with-profits" — which should - 
pay off 1 Uk.Iou at thread of 
theternu. 

'» The incentive for borrowers 
is that there should also be-a 
profit ' which they can collect 
themselves. But which, life 
- policy should you choose from 
the hundreds available?-. 

’ In order to assess what u on 
offer, it is important to under- 
stand the basic mechanics ofa 
with-profits'policy. Quite sim- 
ply, the company issuing the 
contract guarantees to pay. in 
.return for the premiums paid, 
a . .minimum sum which, 
depending on the company’s 
profits, may be boosted from 
time to time by bonuses. " 

There are two -types of 
bonus — reversionary ; and 
terminal Reversionary bo* 
muses are added either an- 
nually or every three years, 
and a terminal bonus isde- 
. dared on .the maturity of the 
policy. 

So, assuming that the policy 
is not encashed ahead of 
schedufe,-yqu should receive a 
total maturity value made up 
of the guaranteed sum Plus 
any reversionary or terminal 
bonuses applied. - 
. Naturally, every investor 
wants the maturity value to be 
as high as possible. To dale, 
there have been two easy ways 
to judge which company is 
likely to produce the best 
results.' One relies on ' past 
performance and the other is 
based on future projections. 

the use of past performance 
figures, however, will shortly 
assume far greater significance ' 
because the . calculation of 
future projections (or illustra- 
tions, as some companies 
prefer to can them) is. the- 
subject of some controversy 
and is likely to be changed. 

- The primary reason for the 
unrest is that future projec- 
tions given to anyone taldi 
out a contract now are f 
on current reversionary end 
terminal bonuses^ However, 
these bonuses are at a .bision- 
cally high level reflecting the 
high inflation rates and* 
accompanying' high invest- 
ment, return enjoyed by life; 
offices in the past lOyears. 

. But tbe economic dimale is 
changing, and ft .looks as 
though the future may bring 
us lower inflation coupled 
with lower returns! on 
investment 

In order - to take into ac- 
count such developments, 
ground rules for the calcula- 
tion of future projections are 


Standard U to 
Friands’ Provident 
CtoricaJ Medical 
Scottish Widows' 
Norwich Unton 
Scottish Amicabte 
Sun-AManca 
Scottish Lite - 
ftNPF.tarNursM 
Equity and Law 


13.48) 

iMfl 

1170? 


going to be. * wWished under 
the finarid I Services -Bml 
H owever. it the meantime 

the mertbes of 'foe .Life _ _ __ — - — . 

Insurance . otmcn of ^ *ftactkl at 

Association ^British Insurers . T 


if 
lift* 
.11,848 
11 . 8 * 
n* 8 i 

11 Ate.' 



* ! * 


w! - , 

it*?.; or •;* 
’.MS ' 


have comef up with Some 
interim measures: . 

Consequretiy. with effect 
from November I. life offices, 
•when iHuttfiting future bene- 
fits, will be allowed to 
show nn bfestmem return of 
more 7 than/ 13 per cent per 
annum benre tax, or 10.7S per 

cent per a^num net of tax 

The trfshot* of this, of 
course, isiln it will be more 
difficult ftr any one company 
tostandmit on the basis Of its. 
future projections. From the 
invest oTsporitt of view, ■how- 
ever, th !i * L *■ **“ “ 

setback. — 

preferable! to have expecta- 
tions. wbih are based on 
realistic oiteven conservative 
assumption. . 

In terms * f assessing which 
company's ^contract .to use. 
these changfc mean that the 


Wefe 


Friends’ Provkfert 
Scottish Wtfows' 
Standard Ufa 
fiNPF for Norse* 
Seottish Amieabie 
EquttaWeLite 
Clerical Medtort 
ORE 

Norwich unton - 


4^8 
AiJi 
4^ 
4.7* 
4; 


4A* 

4yfll 




ior’spoiitt of view.how- ^ - a 25-year contract '*^ 
this is hardly a major number would have paid tear * 
*.H the end, n must be rftan£ 7 , 50 a . 


than £7JHXX 
Of course, there is no guai^ 
antee that tire ftont-runnefs 


Indicate 
it ability 


tick for anyone 
out a policy 
performance 


only real 
wanting to 
now is 
figures. 

Fortunately,; 
such iafomta 
difficult as 
financial .. 
publish annual su 
include com 
comparative 
mance tables. 

The table showtAbere. for 
example, identifies the com- 
panies producing ire highest 
total value for bath'l 25-year 

and a 15-y ear en — 

policy maturing at _ 

June this year. Thi 
that these contrac 
have been taken out _ 
aged 30 next birthday 
and 197 1 respectively, 
premiums paid over t) 
would have amoun 
£2.500 and £Ii500. 

Although the table 
onstraies the attractive 
made, it failsto show jus., 
costly taking out a policy 
one of the bottom perfc 
would have been. In 
several companies would 
paid out less than £3.000 
15-year poficy afld^smn" 


BIIIK UWI “tv tawin - 

1986 will still be heading™. 
i~»w»» rabies when your policy 
matures in several years tirjuc. 
Nevertheless, past . perform 
mance figures, .do give an 
indication of the invesupcm 
team'? ability, Moreover,. the 
remarkable consistency 
shown by -soine Gompanic&'is 
bound to inspire confidesde. 

Taking foe lop performers 
in the 25-year endowment 
category shown in the tyWe; 
ing hold of Clerical Medical, Equity .and 
is not too Law. Norwich Un/on. Scottish 
Widows' and Standard , Life 
have all appeared apnualjy fo 
the top 10 for the.past *10 
years. 

Turning to the 15-year 
endowment policies, we see if 
similar unbroken record 
achieved by Equitable life. 
And of the other top com- 
panies this year; several have 
reached the first* 10 ai feast 
five times since .1977. t .' 

It Is also worth' meiitiortiqg 
that~back in June companies 
were still quotingfoiure bene- 
fits - r based on Current hi{^i 
bonus rates, ' 
Interestingly, pf the^ offices 
offering the to. highest ma- 
turity values, only three ap- 
peared, in the top 10 for put 
peiformanc^ ’- * ••'•• — * - 
So when ft corifes to choos- 
ing a policy, it can. certainly 
pay to took at the' company's 
-track record,. . . * • *r - 


specialist 

usually 

; which 

ive and 
perfor- 


end of 
means, 
would 
man 
1961 
the 

ITS 

to 


r;- izut* 



yn|l 

us 

■ -<5 

r- 

am 


{indudlngth^ 

iew range) . 

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U INVESTMENT 'I 

- It toy be intutmt, btrt for unit 
trusts it is springtime. Though . 

: consumer? may not be aware 

' of ft, that' almost nhpencfes- . 
* tiWsbbufranean rumbling is- 
tt lbe- sound of - unit- trusts 
multiplying ■ 

-•■ ' Thtreareataadymoreihaii 

- 910 to diose from,*,' rod that 
. figure is likely, to exceed 1,000 

: by next year; - 

‘ The sheer range of fimds 
. makes many investor reluo- 
' rant to choose. Will it . be 
c AustralianGoki Shares, Japa- 
■ nese - Second Sector" High 
! Growth or thesttflid oUfUK. 

‘ General? ■ "■ - 

2 As the .world's stock mar- 
fets waver an&flocauate even 
more crazily than usual, it 

- requires , an ejepert’^ con- 
, SdeaceM know where and 

bow to invest. . perhaps you 
. would be better advised to 
fellow, fee mgnagere .of tbe 
v unit tn^stS, who are tbero- 
;; sejycs jupppsed tp be .experts, 

; rather featCTalring ^ view” of 
7 what is Ming to happen to tbe 
U$ eamomy and worrying- 
:■ yourselfj unduly - about; .the 
1' si^tfifidance of the' latest ,cy- 
cl teal . . indicators . (they are 
, 'virtually meaningless to most 


The answer- lies with, the 
categorizihjg WT unit trusts, 
which are spHtmto.lS sections 
fa?ihe i UnnTflttt Association- 
The idea* is to- compare like • 
wiffi'-fite *v-T.Tbe Japanese- 
: Technblgjr fend -obviottsly is 
• ftot- running foe State nice as* 
the Australian-Gold Shares — 
but tMs produces a marketing 
managers delifehL Instead of 
just one winriefclhere'are IS. 

, The table cn^y help you to 
■ appraise the' ijlaitris of -the 
various managers just a fittle 
-more cribcaflyJ The. figures 




' Folfowftte a! unit trust man- r 
a^er Tst the equivalent of 
bickihg the jockey rather than - 
thfe horeC- Many a- punter 
mad? a idfHng by following 
Lestek Piggoti: • 

But "the analogy with horse- 
racing ’takes us . only -so -far. 
Nijinsky could probably have 
won many a race with a sack 
of ‘ potatoes oq its back, 
whereas,; accenting: to one 
investment adviser,- “a unit 
trust only as good as the 

manager -.-ft is the manager 

who' 'selects tbe stocks and 
. decides when lo adT: 

How then; are we to' decide 
between the unit trust, man- 
ager^- U ..-seems , from' iV the 
i advertisements that ^ every 
: management group can in- 
dulge in its own bout of chest- 
beating. Tbe hype of tbe 
copywriters underscores; the 
; “top.peiformers'' of-the man- 
agers. HowctaWbe? ‘ 


more critically* The. figures 
show how, a c hypothetical 

Betterthjmwitft •: 
abniidi ngsotiety • 

- investment oTfi^O’ wmld.. 
have performed if“fevested in .. 
the “average” unitrust run by. 
eyeiy one of the groups. -T' 

The table te "yrightedT so 
-that the- figares^show how the • 

■as opposed' .^ur^a straight 
arithmetical calculation of 
percentagtgain-or loss. - 

JFor^examp^ if one group 
has an American fund which- 
is up fey 10 tier cent over the 
year and a UK fond which is 
down 10 pcr-ceot over- the 
year, the peroenatgegainand. 
less balance each other. But if 
the American fund was £100. 
million at she start of the year 
and the U.K fond was justilO 
million, Abe managers will 
have gained £10 milli on in the 
United ^States and lost £1 
million jn the UK. 

- These!:-' “weighted" figures 
reflect that feet They measure 
hoiv wdl the managers have 
done with the money en- 
trosled to thepi by the public 
in a hypothetical average trust - 
which does not exist. 

. The figures are, in effect, a 
financial version- of the par- 
able of tbe> stewards. What 
counts is how. the managers 
ha^e-' done, wife (he talents 
entrusted to them. ■, 

Not all managers run' ex- < 
actiy the same range of funds. 
S6me of fee smaller managers 

t. ■ . 


have- only two or three trusts. 
So the table compares onlythe 
biggest players who offer a 
wide-rangh of funds -touching 
most markets and industrial 
' sectors around die world.' 

They range from M&G, 
with 0.254 million managed 
in 26 funds, to Edinburgh, 
Fund Managers, with £-15.3 
million spread across eight 
unit trusts. 

Plaudits over the long term 
go to Perpetual, Framlmgton, 
M&G and GT, while Fidelity, 
.Schroder and GT have suc- 
ceeded in sustaining their 
strong performances during 
the past year by -featoring m 
the' top lO over five-years. 

. Those at fee bottom end of 
the table can console them- 
selves' with the thought that 
their investors have done 1 for 
better -than they would have 
with a building society. 

Standard Life, whose single 
fond is included because of ns 
huge size (£323.2 million), 
would say that despite its 
position as 26th of the top 30 
over one year the fond was the 
best performer over three 
yeats; 

Martin Baker 



Mining for gold in Australia, one of the investments coveied by &e greitt range of trust funds 

-l- infer TRUST GROUP MANAGEMENT 
' ! . ktOO Invested as at September 1,1986 

• - * TOE-BEST 1 -- ~:- 

-One Vsar ,'v FhtYin- ' Ten Years 


GT ■ 

EFM ■-... 

Gartmore - ' 
Schroder. ' 
Henderson.. 
Mercury 


Sector average* - 


Standard Life 
Britannia 
- Legal & Genera) 
Prudential 
GRE 


-Proafic • . 

GT 

M&S 

Henderson "- - 

Mercury - 

Gartmore - . 

Sector average* - - • 

THEWORST 

Five Yean 


Target 

PruaenUal 

TyrolaJJ 

GRE 


Britannia 


Perpetual^ vv. 
Pr amfi ngton 
Schroder 
GT 

Legal & General 

Prolific 

Mercury 

Norwich 
Henderson 
M&G 

Sector avaraget 


245.8 HOI Samuel - 
239.1- Target 

233.1 County Bank 
224.6 Tyndall 

212.1 Britannia 


RETIRED 




How ? 

. * By advising wluch investment gives 

the most income. 

* By reducing your income tax bill. 

* 'By making your capital grow to 
increase income in the future. 

Knight Williams has specialised for many 
years in identifying income investments 
for retired people. Send for full details. 




Independent Financial Advice 
33 Cork Street, London W1 X I HB 
01-409-0271 

Name... : 

Address , 


Members of FIMBRA 
Offices in London & Leeds 


1 Prices are offer to bid Source: 


entices in London «r Leeds m 

' [ ___ 77J9/K J 


Planned Savings 





• * -'?* • -Ji 


DWhr 

0 

coitm 


; ; The 1 989-incentive 

5 •‘Stick witb me, k«L andywlt : 5e fe this with its 

go far” seems to be the? : I oya I ty r bonus ^ *-<: *o od 
^aaettiil^libai4BfcNMio«widef-^ 

BvildlKg^ooet^TDtayaM^ lfluereiinkiaTtfOVtftito 
* -savfaMawwticalled Cajutai - next Bin* yearslt may not be^ 
; Growth 7®, b awiMfe 4 e it' may well be that mtmey 
►. branches throughout tee ^pyuda he earning hi gher re- 
country. t wards elsewhere rather than 

-• investors who commit t&A Ung nfahm g in an onfinary 
« cash in chinks of £L,000 vpll «h trie account, even with the 
■ receive interest at the onfiiaaiy jam at the end of Bie term. 


It may well be that money 
should be earning higher re- 
wards elsewhere rather Bum 
languishing in an ordinary 


share rate, currently 5.25 pc* 
cent,-plus a guaranteed boons 


at tbe end of three years. . . 

- If interest rates do * not 
• change m feat period, as lfeely 
\ as Britain haring t rain-free 

summer, the yield' in 398 9 
wooW be £L268. That works 

- oat- at a net mterest-mte of 
uroand 85 per cent 


However, if interest rates 
fofl the gaarantee of £100 per 
£1,000 invested will be diffi- 
cult to beat 

Withdrawals can be made, 
in Bfiifs of £1,000, without 
interest penalty at any turn. 
Bat withdrawals wfl) not qiiaE 
ify for the boons. 

MB 



| — — — 


Giir** 4 **! 



99% of 

unit-linked 
personal pension 
policies will cost 
you dearly. 
Here’s 

one that won’t. 


- ^IfoHinkediwsonriiSra 
. dass investment. But you may have to pay a high pnee u> 

I the insurants i C0rap*ny s costs- orcommissioo to au 

I . , nKm ^iS 5 wni an your investment by as much as 5 0% in 

8 ihefirsryeanorevedm the firsr wo years. -. 

I nSS will apply the far, year or. two ^ ^yeus 

i contributiOTB to ‘intnaS’ or so called W«l nmts which 

I ^^S^^burions, rheu tbe 
I charong process is applied to fee extra money yon have 

I deci*dro pag others, The. Equhabfe has no policy 

I AaqOii initUl' units, and no 'capital' umu toeat rare 

j Equiableoffer, xtcCaonaHjonus 

i 

I 



Aridity. — ' 


natfotBinh- 



Td: IQffto) 


i TbeEquitabteJJie 

' j J v j ■Jftu gain because we’re different— — 

. j 1 1 ' 

fl .* jt* . 


Buying shares made as easy as filKng 
yourtank? 

Easier in Fact 

With a ShareCall account all you do 
is pick up the telephone ring the free 
-T .irjflirift '; number on yourxard, and issue 
mstractions. . . . 

Buy these shares, : sell tho^.; We’ll 
complete the deaFat once, at the best price 
available. . ’ . \ 

Its the most direct system that exists 
for buying and selling shares. Which lets 
us keep fees to a minimum' 

We charge 1.65% plus VAX as low as 
you’ll-, find anywhere. That’ll go down to 
1,00% plus VAT after.Octoher 27th. 


jl- 


. For. small deals there will ;be a mini- businesses you see around you has never 
mumchargeof £12 plus VAT. Gn the other- been more straightforward We have, even 
hand ho wever high flle value of shares made 'applying simple. .. - 

j^oirre dealing irf youil .n^er pdy more ... Just send us ^ coupon, and well 
than our ceiling charge of £100 jphis W. . ^ a KfeinvyOrt. Grieyeson ShareCall 

- application form to you right away; 

- ’ - ' Please send nie a ShareCall application form. I am 

over eighteen years of age I will be happy to.allow you tp 
apply lor a reference from my bank. 

NA ME/- - - - - ' ■ \ : - ' ; , 

: ADDRESS 1 

c 

POSTCODE 

invest as litde (oiQ of COlirse, Send to: Kleuiwort Grieveson ShareCall, 10 Fenchurch St, 

'■ i.i V -- ■ London EC3M 3LB. 


KlcimvDrt Grie> eson 

fit' , t -,„ -0. <Zii 

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as much) as you like. - : • • 

-Getting -a -piece- . of -those -.thriving . 


A KjinN\\dRTCIUEVTSONSEKV3CT 










32 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 



INTEREST 

WITH INSTANT 
ACCESS AND 
NO PENALTIES! 

The simple^ no-stiings promise of Moneyspinner 
Plus is the big attraction for serious investiors who dorft 
want their money tied up - and who dorrt see why 
they should have to pay forth® privilege of getting 
itoutqukkty 

Moneyspinner Pfcjsgtvesyou high interest; 
with instantaccessat any time -and no penalties 
ataflThemicETniminv^stmentis£500arxia 
balance of £20000 or more earns the highest 
rateof82S%netp&lntei^isadMannualtyin 
October or you can receive Unas monthly income. 

Write to us FREEPOST; Newcastle or ' 
telephone uson01-200-020Q, and start earning 
high, r»-5trings interest 


' AMOUNT WVE5TH3 

INTBlESr 

PA* 

GROSS 

PAt 

£500 or more 

730% 

1028% 

£5,000 or more 

755% 

1063% 

£10^000 or more 

aoo% 

1137% 

£20,000 or more 

&25% 

1152% 


r7o;M3ieMcCardc; 

I Northern Rode BuBding Society FREEPOSI Gosforth, 

’ Newcastle upon Tyne NE31BR. 

| l/We endose cheque for £ to be invested in Moneyspinner Plus. 

I rTimerest to be added annually pi Interest to be pad monthly 
‘ — 'to the account LJ 

( please confirm theappllcatloa 

I Meanwhae.nivtnwestrnefit is to start earning interest upon receip t 



FULL NAME/5:. 
ADDRESS: 


j SIGNATURE/S. 


.POSTCODE. 
.DATE_ 


T39 


Wt^iktniMrtfarhMte 

WWW 


NORIHERM ROCK 

IBULONG SOOEIYI 

ftepfle with your interest at heart 

Chief Office: 

Northern Rock house, Gcsfwth, Newcastle uponTyneNB4HL 
letephone:091~28S 719L 
City of London Office: 

Stone House 128^40 KshopsgateEC2M4HX.Tfelephone: 01-247 E86L 
Scottish Office: 27 Castle Street. Edinburgh EH2 3DN.TH: 031-2263401. 

Mender of the Mkflng Sodetia AewcMoa 
Authorised for knaanent by trustees. Btmehes and Agents throughout the UK. 
Assets exceed CV650 irition 



INVESTMENT RECORD 


Over the last thirty years you probably could not 
have held a unit trust with a better performance than 
M&G SECOND GENERAL 

£1,000 in vested at its launch in June 1956 would 
now be worth £67,208 with aU income reinvested, 
compared with £8,104 from a similar investment in a 
building society. To have maintained its purchasing 
power over the period, £1,000 would need to have 
grown to £8,748. 

The British Stockmarket has-been strong for a 
number of years, which is why many investors am 
now looking at overseas markets for new investment 
opportunities. But conce n tr at ion in one particular 
area can produce very volatile mvestment results, 
and this year’s high flier can often be next year'spoor 
performer. You should be wary of short-term per- 
formance claims, such as the TDver 50% growth in 
just five months" quoted recently for a European 
unit trust 

M&G has two Internationa) Funds which solve the 
problem by spreading your investment effectively among 
the major stockmarkets of the world. 

The M&G International Income Fund aims to 
provide a high income, and one that can be expected to 
increase over the years, from an international portfolio of 
equities. 

The M&G International Growth Fund aims for all-out 
capital growth by investing in the major stockmarkets of 
the world. 

If you remain optimistic about the British Stockmarket 
and want a balanced portfolio, look at M&G SECOND 
GENERAL, which aims for consistent growth of income 
and capital from a wide spread of shares mainly in British 
companies. 


SECOND ^NERAL PERFORMANCE TABLE. 

Vtew of £LCXXIimesaadcHi 58i Aow 19^6. 

Data 

MAG 

SECOND 

F.T.Ontoaiy 

Index 

Building 

Society 

5 June ’56 
31 Dec *66 
31Dec7e 

5 June ’86 

£1,000 

£2,996 

£7*812 

£67^208 

£1000 

£2,472 

£3^59 

£2im2 

£1,000 

£1,699 

£3,437 

£8404 

NOTES; AR fioires incftjde remweaed income net of basic-rate tax. 

The BuASngSociety f^ures are based an an extra interest account offering 
li=%atxwetheava^eyea>ty rate (source; BuWtng Societies 

Association). M&G SECOND GENERAL ngunes are reaeatkinwaluas. 


• To celebrate M&G SECOND'S Ihirty^nJerformance 
reaird we are offering an extra 1% unit allocation if you invest 
£1,000 or moreand 2% if you invest £10,000 or moreinany 
of these three unit trusts before 31st October 1986. 

The price of units and the income from them may 
go down as weUas up. This means thatunittnistsarea 
long-term investment and not suitable for money you 
may need at short notice. 


INTERNATIONAL PEFtPORMANCCTABLE.Vabe on 1st SQfnenib«r 1906 
ofiLOOO m«siM at the bunch of MAGsbro mtemauonaiFunds. 



Launch 

Date 

M&G 

Unit Trust 

BuBding 

Society 


International 

Income 

International 

Growth 

May "85 

Dec ‘67 

£1,238 

£12^375 

£14-05 

£4585 

- 

NOTES.- AB teresindwie ranwested income net ofbaste-rstetax. 
the BuddingSociety ligresare based on an extra rterest *co«it offering 
115% above the average yearly rate (Source: BuidngSocicttes 

Asaooatton). M&G flatras se roafesation values. 

• 


FURIHEIUNFOWVUirK>NOn24ItTSeqtemberl986offered 

pnees and estimated gross current yidds were 

Income Accunutafian Yield 
faiWr u ti gna t Income 64-Sp S£-5p 5 - 28 % 

International Growth 814 4p 1311 2p 1-47% 
SECOND GENERAL 762 7p I505 5p 3-67% 
Puces and yields Jppe* daily n me financial Times. The 
tfittetence between the 'ottered* once (at which you buy units) 
andlhe'bttf pnee (at which you &eW e normaDy 6V An initial 
chejrge of 5 imduded in the offered price and an annm) 
charge of up to 1% of each Funds value -currently (except 
International Income winch is i?o| - plus wr is deducted tto<ti 

gross mewne income lor Accumulation units is remwstfidto 

morose thor value and for Income united is dstnhiteflrretot 
(jas«c-rate tan on the fallowing dates: 

In te rn a tional I nt er na ti on al 

Income Growth SECOND 


SPECIAL OFFER CLOSES 31st OCTOBER 


AUappticatiomforEljMOwrncrarccehrodbySlttCkXober.lsaGwfflbeglYenanextra I 
1% aBocatron of units, increasing to 2% for appScations of £10,000 ormorepw Fund. I 

To. «MS6CURmES UJWTER THREE QUAYS. TOWER HH1, LONDON EC3R68Q 
Please Invest the sum(s] indicated below in the Fundfs) of my choice (mintonum investment in 
each Fun±£l.C>00) in ACCUWJUmONiTNWME urate (del«easapplici^ or Acamubtion 
umtswfl be issued far international Growth and SEOND and Income units wfl be fisuedfor 
Int anatora) Income A thepricerotagon receipt of tfeappkcabon. 

DO NOT SEND ANY MONEY. A contract note vrill be sent to you stating exactly how much you owe 
and the settlement date. Ybur certificate will 
fallow shortly 


Distributions 


1 Jane 
1 Dec 


20 Mar 
20 Sep 


IS Feb 
15 Aug 


Nextrfistrftotlon I Dec 
(or newnwestors 1986 


20 Mar 
1987 


13 Feb 
1967 


You can buy Of sen units on any business day, Contacts far 
ptiitfiase ot sate will be due for sefflemert tm to Ihree weeks 
later. Remuneration is payable to accredited agents rates aie 
available on request the Trustee for frTternatxmaf Growth rs 


International 

Income 

(MniLOCXn 

£ 00 


SECOND 

(UNatXMl 

£ *00 


hitemattonte 

Growth 

£ DO 


Barclays Band Trust Co United and tor international income 

and SECOND " 


wKfBT' 

State 


_ GENERAL IS Lloyds Bank Pic The Funds are alt 
rnvesmientsarKfareauthO'Tsed^'tfwSeo'etaryof 


9GMTIKE. 


MAG Securities Limited Three Quay*. Tower Hit. 
London EC3R GBQ. Tab 01-626 4588. 
Member ot the UmtTrust AsSOWtBHi 


I 


DATE - — ... 

•trswBwl-wr's Wa ®«t »»»»• '--.vrr 


HI sassy” 


Ml aoreess 


TV 483916 



1 


THE M&G GROUP 


FAMILY MONEY/7 


It’s celebration 
time in the 
auction room 


<*. * c. ■ 


( WINES ) 

As Europe's fine wine produc- 
ing districts: sun picking a 
generally large crop, the new 
wine auction season has not 
seen the downward trend pre- 
dicted by ■ some com 7 
mentators. In fact the first 
sales of Ihe autumn - at 
Christie's and International 
Wine Auctions last week and 
at Phillips and Sotheby's this 
week — show firm prices and 
no bade of demand. 

In the early part oflast year, 
the dollar and sterling were 
virtually at parity and the 
significance of the American 
buyer meant a reduced level of 
bidding. 

Vet the overseas investor is 
cenainly not only from the 
United States, which explains 
the importance of storing 
wines wherever possible In 
bond, that is, by owning wine 
on .paper rather than phys- 
ically taking possession of it 

Storing in bond has the 
additional bonus of assisting 
cash flow by not financing the 
duty of £8.82 pgr dozen bottles 
for still wine and £14.56 for 
sparkling wine such as 
champagne- 

At least half the overseas 
bidders for UK wine stock are 
how nour American. They are 
evident from Australia, Japan, 
Mexico,' Denmark, France 
and The Netherlands: Since 
many are buying for current 
drinking — as indeed are 
British restaurateurs — ' the 
darei vintages of the 1960s 
and particularly the 1970s and 
the red and white Burgundies 
of the early 1 980s are much in 
demand. 

The new season has seen the 
introduction by Christie's of a 
buyer's premium of IP per 
cent on wine after intense 
criticism of its main' rival, 
Sotheby's, last year when that 
auction house started this 
move. 

' Phillips has announced that 


it also intends to introduce a 
buyer's commission. Its sale in 
Oxford on Tuesday was the 
Iasi without iL - 

The effect of this commis- 
sion last year was io dampen ■ 
prices, but whh all except 
London-based- International 
Wine .Auctions now making 
the charge the investor has 
lirtie option. Partly to com* 
pensate, die setter's premium 
has been dropped from 15 to 
10 per cent arid' this is nego- 
tiable for large stocks. 

Already two dr three com- 
panies established under the 
Business Expansion Scheme 
are disbanding; since the In- 
land. Revenue has ruled that 
their arrangements were 
in valid- They are understood 
to be 'relatively. small and it is 
possible that tire investors will 
simply take delivery of the 
slock so purchased. 

The larger BES companies 
m wine are not too evident in 
the saleroom, bat are trading 
in the traditional wine role. 
Those ihai have- a- large hold- 
ing in 1982 darets will cer- 
tainly have to wait until the 
end of the legal minimum 

Keen demand for 
1983 expected 

time for the BES to see a 
reasonable return, as (his sec- 
tor was the most disappoint- 
ing at Christie's sale of 
Bordeaux on September 18. 
Shares in a . BES company 
must be held for five years to 
qualify for tax relief at the 
highest rates on investments 
made out of income. : 

The largfe andgood quality 
crop in Bordeaux will cer- 
tainly have an effect on cur- 
rent prices here at auction, 
according to the Master of 
Wine, Michael Braadbent, of 
Christie's. While, there -is no 
reason for prices for grapes 
still on the vine to be set, the 



Optimistic auctioneer: David Molynetix-Bewy, left 


likelihood is that 1986 -may 
open about. 20 per cent down 
on 1985, which was an 
outstanding vintage. 

David Molynenx-Berry, of 
Sotheby's: says .investors 
should see firm prices for 1 970 
and 1977 vintage port and- 
expects keen- demand for 
1 983, the first of which will be 
sold at- the 1 . New Bond Sheet 
saleroom -on- October 8 with a 
tasting before starting 9.45am. 
"There B concern that, if the 
pbrt shippers declare 1 985 as a 
"vintage" the additional stock 
win .depress the market 
. -White burgundy, -after a 
spectacular rise- in the past 18 
.months, is unlikely to con- 
tinue to increase. fadeedvCha- . 
Mis is an unstable market - 
• In - fine darei.' there is ' 
continued deraancL.lnthe past 
•JO days sales have shown 
.prices at the lop end or above 
the estimates. Examples in- 
clude. Cos d’Esioumel 1978 
£180 (estimate £140-£I7G), 
.Mouton Rothschild 1980X195 
(estimate’ "£<40X180), and- 


Lynch-Bages 1978 £1 80 («r 
limate £140^170). The 1976 
clarets are in demand tor 
current consumption. 

The small but significant 
white Bordeaux market is also 
buoyant Wines such as Cha- 
teau Suduiraui 1975. expected 
to reach £1 l0-£l-50. have sold 
already this season for £155 
per dozen bottles. 

WHJi the warning to wine 
BES companies that they must, 
not be asset businesses but 
active trading companies in 
wine, there is likely to be a 
greater flow of fine wine 
through the best barometer, 
the saleroom. 

It is, therefore, a good time 
for ‘ the private investor to 
reshape his cellar. A good 
introduction is How to Buy 

Fine Wines, by Steven Spur- 
rier and Joseph Ward, hand- 
somely illustrated, which is to 
be published by Pbaidon* 
Christie's on Oobber 9' at 
£14.95. 

... Canal Gregory 


Caller, you’re 

C TELEPHONES ) 



Now that- British Telecom's 
monopoly has been abolished, 
we are finally free to march 
into high street shops, obtain 
equipment by mail order or 
buy or rent telephones, acces- 
sories. such as feint speech 
amplifiers at £1.60 per quar- 
ter, or one of three loud- 
speaker units at £13.50 a 
quarter. 

Indeed, we are. almost 
spoiled for choice. . 

There are inexpensive light- 
weight plastic phones, modern 
designs,- including com- 
plicated electronics Jmd exotic 
models best suited to the 


households of Dynasty and 
Dallas. 

“Bel-Air” is all white and. 
gold with an old-fashioned 
rest receiver at £59.95. A pink 
Jasper Wedgwood base phone 
with dial sells at £189, or with 
push button (PB) £199195. 

A porcelain model with 
poinsettias seems destined for 
that special Christmas call at 
£99.95 (dial) or £109.95 (PB). 
Ail prices include VAT. 

Cordless machines range 
from BTs £99.99 model , to 
Ranger’s 2000 at £149.95, The 
perfect gift for gardeners or 
those who are beyond jump- 
ing. np every- time, the tele- 
phone rings, despite the snag 


INCREASED 

INTEREST 


EXTRA-OROINARYSHARES 

IMMEDIATE WITHDRAWAL 

with no Joss of interest or penalty 

Effective 1 0ctober 1386 

Net%pau" Gross Eqtfte- % pa-t • 


BALANCES £1 0,000 AND OVER 

8 . 30 % = 11 . 93 % 


BALANCES £500 (minimum) - £9,999 

8 . 15 %= 11 . 70 % 


•BweltelHK paid, tftws eqafwto* to basic rate taxpayers, 
Merest oonpowdetf te#^ea^(CXfi.hRaksare«rtaW«. 

BOLTON BUILDING SOCIETY 

3SSZ37BAKEH STREET. LONDON NWl. TEL: 01-8350138 
.24 Hour Answering Service \ 

Members of fbe.Buikfing Societies Association, 
Trustee Status' 

Estnfc*sh«j1864 


of . haying to remember to 
replay it oacharge overnighL 
. Further, if anything goes 
-wrong, yon cannot simply 
.replace . the batteries. . You 
have io send the actual tele- 
phone to the manufacturers 
for repair. • ... 

• '..for years, a similar choice 
of equipment has been avail- 
able! jn. the United- States, 
Users needed only to drive to 
: the" nearest telephone dtop or 
;retaifeTV pick -up a -telephone 
. -add -plug,- .it in. at home, after 
making amuigementswitii the 
locafteJeplKme company. 

. 7 vBot buying rather than reov 
ing -eitiwr letephofie or tele- 
i .pfcone fine -has. its> financial 
ramificaiions,.. .particularly, 
iwhen-it comes to maintenance 
randiepmr. .... 

'. -The. new technology, seems 
tohave, outrun the manpower 
capabfiities required 1 -of it 
Soititf of the. technolcfey. also 
imdudes -radio transmission, . 
such as- the cordless phones. 

' Privacy caraiotbe guaranteed. 

- And 'deliveries of new. models 
xaribeddayed. 

. . Iris surprising lMi BT to 
date has only one customer 
reptur centre m itsshops in the 
■Whole : of -Britain. This -is in 
BromJey. Kem, ;althqugh BT 
hopes to open .others. .The 
retail- part ; pF the shop and 
.maintenance and repair pan 
.;areseparai£. 

Should rented equipment 
■feil. BT.wfil- send an engineer 

- to investigate, at no charge — 
and either the w^J be 
repaired or another telephone 
substituted on loan. 

: V Where equipment is bought 
from ' BT but is blit of gnar- 
amee. a chMgc will be made 
for repairs: 

- . If however, , you buy a 
telephone 'from BT which is 
not included on its list of BT 
phon^.thishasto be returned ' 
to the manufecturer for repair. 

At this stage BT ' is not 
geared to repair or loan tele- 


phones purchased in the high 
street, r by mail order or else- 
where. &j»iyouTnaysaveafew 
pounds roiiiafiy. butyou must 
depend on the retailer-making 
good- the guarantee — . and still 
being there when needed, 
which sadly is -not always the 
case today. 

What does, it cost for’BT.lo 
send an engineer, to fix a 
telephone on the premises?' A 
general figure of £1'5 was 
suggested by BT, which adds 
thara sensihte way of saving 
. money is to. unplug yoor 
telephone and take it to your 
focal BT office. 

This, of course, refers to 
customers', own telephones 
out of guarantee. Charges for 

Buying can 
-reduce your bill 

labour would start at £10.92 

including VAT. taking, say, 
half an hour. For addresses, 
inquire at local BT offices. 

. By now. every BT customer 
should have received- Your 
Guide to Tetepfione Equip- 
ment Rental Charges \ Effec- 
tive from Noretnber 1.1 1986. 

There are 23 BT basic 
models listed under £3.10 per 
quarter rental and ei^it under 
£4. 10 per quarter rental ■ 

However, buying your own 
telephone can possibly reduce 
your quarterly bill, as! the 
rental charge should be omit- 
ted —a point to watch — plus, 
of course^ VAT on rental. -. 

The system charge in 
November will be £13.95 and 
apparatus rental either £3.10, 
£4. 10<or either figure plus 90p 
for those with a business rate 
exchange line). 

■ So whatever model you buy. 
there is a corresponding sav- 
" 18 * even though you may opt 
to add £2 for a service contract 
per quarter, as extra cover.' 



PREMIER PACKAGE 

Forfuti details of our prompt . 
postal service — 
jus! send this advertisement 
with yo ur name and address 
or 

telephone at any time. 


GUARDIAN 

BUILDING SOCIETY 

Dept TP, 120 High Holtaorn, London WC1V 6HH 
Tel: 01-242 0811 (out-of-hours answerphone) 

RATES VAfU ABLE - TRUSTEE STATUS - NDHCn OF 8AJL 


Wa after yoqth&streflgtti of _ 

4c the highest tesarvetatiQ. amongst the top 

twenty soefetfes . 

and 

* w operate: without braflctiofflcas to 
matmain the^lowest cast ratio. 


Arda Lacey 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


Adam 4 Gontnanv 

aa.— 

Savingst 
JwaAtted Crts 


-10.00% 

10 . 00 % 

1(U10% 

10.75% 

1OLO0% 

1000 % 

10.00% 


SSkSf 

^1 fook of Scofend — ipo% 
Otiarik %& _ “ " 

t fctrage Bate Bate, 


.mqo% 

-ioo»% 



uV- — — w , ; . t i t v 




M*W>‘k4 WJ.1' X ut<4 W>A\ ■• I 1>WW 


is 


■ v... 
•U.-'i- 
_< 
"i>- 


' v >.‘ 


* 




• .;■* 


&: 

r. ? 

**/ 

«r. 


FAMILY MONEY/8 


T opping up for that retirement 

C pensions ) 


If life were perfect, we might 
atj retire at 35 or so. preferably 
with the odd million to keep 
us jo comfort through the 
years ahead. For most, of us, . 
however, the reality is that we 
soldier on to 60 or 65. with 
only a pension to look forward 
to, ' 

This being the case; it would 
be comforting to feel that the 
pension, when it finally ar- 
rives, wfllat least be adequate. 
Those II million people ra 
Britain who belong to a com- 
pany pension scheme may 
think they need . have' no 
worries on that score. Un- 
fortunately, though, this con- 
fidence is not always justified. 

The Inland Revenue rules 
allow, a maximum pension of 
two-thirds of final salary. In 
practice* few people receive as 
much as that, and some finish 
up with: nearer one-third. 

This is because pension 
entitlements are usually based 
on years of service with the 
employer.; For example, the 
company may offer one-sixti- 
eth or one-eightieth of final 
salary for every year. If it- is 
one-sixtieth, it would take 40 
years — practically a working 
lifetime — to achieve the 
maximum two-thirds, while at 
one-eightieth this can never be 
reached. 

• Of course, many people do 
nor stay in thesamejobfor40 
years. If you change jobs, any 
pension- .rights you have ac- 
quired can be preserved in 
your old company scheme, to 
be paid when you retire. But 
these will, of course, be based 
on -your salary at the time of 
leaving. 

To improve the position of 
earty leavers, the Government 
last year made it compulsory 
for such preserved benefits to 
be revalued every year in fine 
with inflation. However, this 
applies only to benefits ac- 


_ _iiuaiy 
Entitlements Which accrued; 
earlier may srift be ^"frozen" re- 
value. Moreover, if increases - 
will be to * maximum of 5 per ■ 
cent a year, your- preserved 
pension is not going to match 
up to your final salary. 

Fortunately there is a seda- 
tion to this problem/ You cah- 
lopirp your company pension 
by making what are known as 
additional voluntary 
contributions, : or AVCs for 
short. 

The name; & more - or less 
selfexplanatory. Such pay- 
ments are ' ’ made at jthe 
employee's' own .discretion, 
and in addition to any com- 
pulsory contribution required 
by the company scheme. - ' 
The Revenue allows an 
employee to contribute 15 per 
cent of his taxable earnings to 
a petition scheme. ;; Com- 
. pulsoiy payments; where re- 
quired, are typically of the 
order of 4 to- 8 per cent and 
this may nor -include any 
earnings from Overtime, bo- 
nuses or fringe benefits, all of 
which count towards.* salary. 

The fimd Itself is 
exempt from tax 

So most people should have 
f scone 



lerscermissmt/rr- rw „ 
vmTMWErmHke to w>pur 
YovRcmmirpafitovi 



plenty o; 
AVCs. 


scope- for making 


The advantage they have 
over other forms of raving is 
in the tax treatment. 

First, AVCs qualify for full 
tax relief at your highest rate. 
This means that a contribu- 
tion of £100 would cost only 
£71 of post-tax income if you 
are a basic rale taxpayer, and 
less still if you are Sable at 
higher rates. 

Secondly, the fund in which 
AVCs are invested is itself 
exempt from tax, as are other 
types of pension fund. This 
will make a considerable dif- 
ference to its rate of growth. It 


£100 is invested for an annual 
return of .10 per cent gross, 
after 25'yeanr it will be worth 
£ J 083.47. If only bade rate tax 
is deducted from the interest, 
tije figure -fells to £555.57 — 
just over half as much. ......... 

like most good ideas, AVCs 
do -have their -drawbacks. The 
main disadvantage of any 
pension investment is that the 
money is effectively tied up 
until retirement 

Even if you change jobs, you 
cannot withdraw your 
contributions if you have been 
in ihe* scheme five years or 
more. This period is to be 
reduced to two years under 
new regulations, as the Gov- 
ernment wishes to discourage 
people from, cashing in their 
pension nest-egg to spend in 
some less worthy manner. . 

Another point to remember 
is ihai once y ou start to pay 
AVCs. you will be committed 
to continuing them for at least 
five years, unless you retire 
sooner than . that. Otherwise, 
contributions can be stopped 
only if you can prove extreme 
financial hardship; It is pos- 
sible, however, to vary the 
level of payments subject to 
scheme rules. 

The greatest restriction is 
that you can pay AVCs only if 
your company scheme offers, 


Banks battle for a share 


C PEPS ) 

Whether we are interested iu 
shares and share dealing or 
not, it looks as though the big 
hanky are set to offer ns a 
fulsome opportunity to become 
share-owning democrats. 

Probably the biggest ob- 
stacles to wider- share owner? 
ship are a., limited 
understanding o f tint share* 
are - and the fed that they 
certainly do not double over- 
night like British Telecom a n d 
perhaps TSB — allied to the 
tortuous and expensive busi- 
ness of dealing in equities. : 

The Personal Equity Plan 
(PEP), announced by Nigel 
Lawson in this year's Budget, 
is specifically' designed' to 
promote wider share owner- 
ship. Since April it has been 
kicked around, if not to d eath, 
by investment and unit trust 
managers, the building soci- 
eties and anyone else with a 
vested interest hi selling finan- 
cial goodies to the public. 

The concern shown has 
perhaps been a little puzzling. 
PEPs, after all, will be of most 
benefit to those who already 


have capital gains of more 
tfafre them £6J00 annual in- 
dividual exemption. There are 
not many such people, around. 
A recent Gallup survey 
showed that only 1 percent of 
die participants definitely in- 
tended to invest, with another 
5 per cent indicating they 
would probably nse PEP. 

' Bat "-'competition among 
banks and buffeting societies is 
stfch .ffiat*if-ooe kfads- the 
others tend to follow forfear of 
letting someone • achieve' a 
competitive edge. 

Barclays Bank was the first 
to - announce its attention to 
sell PEPs to the paMic. Its 
Bardaysiare subsidiary will 
attempt to popularize ordinary 
share dealing, bnt will start off 
by concentrating- on PEPs. 
Now National Westminster is 
indicating that it toohitends to 
be in the field when the 
starter's gnn goes off next 
year.- 

According to NafWest, 
PEPs will be available In all 
its branches from January 1. 
The options available will 
todode a monthly subscription 
into County Bank nnit trusts of 


£20 to £30 a month. This plan 
wfll provide a small income tax 
breakfor customers inthat the 
new softs purchased will not 
be subject to tax as normal 
mSt trust holdings are now.. 
But by NatWest's own ad- 
mission the scheme “is hardly 
going to provide a huge in- 
centive to invest; we are 
marketing the scheme within 
the TiitiCs laid v dow* hy .tbe 
Government". • “ 

' - Another option will he to 
mat# p • monthly uwmuiOnenf 
of £36 to £200 into a managed 
discretionary PEP, which will 
iu some respects be similar to 
a nnit trust. The spread of 
shares, however, wifi be much 
narrower, - and this 'route is 
inherently morerisky. ‘V 

Lastly, investors can place a 

lump snm — at least £L200 but 
no more than the- stat utory 
maximum of £2,400 — with 
Nat West and specify the 
particular share or shares in 
which h is to be invested. Here 
investors are faking their 
financial-fife in their hands. 
This is only for those who 
know what they are doing. 

MB 


reliable wav to bu y 
and sell 


shares 


HOARE 
( lOYVTV 



,o.^ 

In just 12 months since we ^vestment transaction 

introduced Dealercall over is£7bO. 

8,500 investors have become card q Hoare Govett negotiates the best 
holders and many of them are now price available - and reports back 

to you immediately. 

□ An interest paying deposit facility 
and a pre-recorded market review 
and recommendation service now 
available. ■ 

For further information and an 
application form, contact Nicholas 
Hunldke or send in the .coupon 
below. • ~ 


using the service regularly. 

Here's how it works: 

D You apply for an investment limit 
to suit your requirements. 

□ You receive your personally ■ 
numbered Dealercall Account Card. 

□ To buy and sell shares, 

you simply call the special - 

Hoare Govett Dealercall telephone 
number-01-242 3696 with your 
instructions. Our minimum 

hoare 

GOVETT 

Financial Services Group 

Hfvw Co*Mt LMBIWd WtlWl TW SlOCh Exc "0* 

Heron Howe. 3t9-3»N.gh Hojbom. London WCW.7PB 
Tel D1-404 0344 Tele* 805773 


HOARE 

GOVETT 

DEALERCALL 


1 Nicholas Hunloke. Hoare 
1 House. 319-325 High Holbom. London WCtV 7P8. 

I Please send me turttier information and a 
j Dealercall account opening form. 

I Name — — - : — 


Address. 


L- 


TZ7B 


-LJ 


the facility. It is not possible to 
make contributions on* an 
independent basis. 

The investment of AVCs 
can. in feet, be something of a 
headache for company pen- 
sion schemes. What to do with 
the contributions? If they are 
included in the same fund as 
the maanscheme. it is difficult 
to identify every individual's, 
contribution. On ihe other 
hand, a separate fond involves 
additional administration 
costs. 

Significant inroads 
by budding societies 

A common solution is to set 
up a subsidiary fimd within 
the main one, separately 
identified but subject to the 
same overall rules. Frequently 
the AVC portion is placed 
with an insurance company, 
even if the main scheme is' 
administered by the company 
itself! 

■More recently, however, 
building societies have started 
to make • significant inroads 
into the AVC market. In feet. 
Abbey National is now the 
second largest operator in 
terms of premium income, 
although Equitable Life still 
has a considerable lead. 

Given the choice, the youn- 


ger employee may find an 
insured fond more attractive. 
With an underlying portfolio 
of stocks and shares, this is a 

more risky investment but it 
offers greater potential bene- 
fits in the long run. 

Conversely, those closer to 
retirement may prefer the 
safer option of the building 
society. Most employees, how- 
ever. will have no say as to 
how their AVCs are invested, 
unless the company finds it 
worthwhile to run more than 
one scheme. 

Despite these drawbacks, 
you should certainly consider 
making AVCs if you can. Even 
if you expect to get the 
maximum possible pension, 
die company scheme may not 
include other allowable bene- 
fits, such as a spouse's pen- 
sion, or a cash sum should you 
want it before retirement In 
this case. AVCs can be used to 
provide what is lacking, and 
by highly tax-efficient means. 

If your company scheme 
does not allow AVCs, you will 
get the opportunity in the 
future. Under the new pen- 
sions legislation, it will be 
compulsory for afl occupa- 
tional schemes to provide the 
facility. 

-Liz Walkington 



i% 


DISCOUNT 

to 14 th November 


IMMEDIATE INCOME PAID FREE OF TAXf 

THE FUND - prtmaniy invests in -exempr 
Bnusn Government Securities (Gifts). Tnese are 
Gl Its wn Ich are not Hawetn any UK. taxation. 

QUARTERLY DIVIDENDS - pain tree 
of any w Knowing taxes. 

A REAL RETURN — inflation is now 
unaer 3%. tne Fima therefore provides a real 
return of more man 9% 

NO FIXED TERM - the investment can 
K neia (or as long as you w*sn. you can sell at 
any ame. on any Duslness day 

MINIMUM INVESTMENT £1,000 
The Fund has been certftea as a 'Distributing 
FUncr under the provisions of tne UK. Finance 
Act i9S4in resoect of to latest account period. 

MIM BRITANNIA INTERNATIONAL 
MlM Britannia international is part of Britannia 
Arrow Holdings PLC. a u.K public company 
capitalised at over £300m vvtth over 30.000 snare- 
nolders. Companies wttnin me Britannia Group 
manage imesxmerrts ualued In excess of £8.000m 
from International offices in London. Jersey 
Boston. Denver, ana ibKyo. investment clients >*—“•- 
include pension funds, unit trusts, mutual funds, 
msmutlonal and private accounts. — — ■ 1 

BRITANNIA JERSEY GILT FUND LIMITED 

COMPifTECOUPOV-aiO/KmtWaalHlBJB: ..... n M„i..l l,'t.rT, 1 Hnnin ItWfert 1 

RMetnerwflriour latest inveKnemt)uii«ir>anomeFuno 1 , MIM BrlUTHwa international tumiiiea « 
OrSSiure inciuamoyouruppircjl^nK-nn I po Hcner. Jersey cnanneiistands. 3 

■ l, wc*r«joajtTir'» " 

•Catcuiat&fasatzsnaseptemoer tssfi i H»aa«m jpnevc™* ■ 

I »*ucnj-unejooiicJti.^RlilMtlO«vacra3J Jj 

TteFurettsoaseoinJerseyanajsiisifiaon : . 

TheSMCfcExcnange.Loneon J I 

• wrf - uk iwiwjBwwimwi' atswergw I - * )M£SS 

nwc'rvTreuncrt grwsu. aonwunT.W'K , I 

amcnnm> iww k n.i | * I 

OKit»o«aei«i>rnc-'TofnMjierc»^T, m* {•j’.pecttCT TJ'J . 

C^aiirmmfWatwvn'ntrjnWvjnBeW I -* I 

QrcoratMtecJ&ayiC* an Jwasrsmne 1 — -- -i.* 

MIM^BRIIANNIA 

RO. Box 271 . SL Heller. Ssw/ INTERNATIONAL 

Jersey. Channel islands. A memberof tne Britannia Arrow Croup 

7HeE*MneJeisey«os34i73n4»n «ig2092BRiTTMO Investment Services worldwide 




F&C Financials Fund 



Provides an international portfolio in the most progressive market sector 


F&C Financials Fund 

The F&C Financials Fund is a unit trust 
authorised by the Department of Trade and 
Industry which is designed to give investors the 
opportunity to participate in the growth of the 
Financial sector worldwide. The fund will invest 
internationally in companies that are benefiting 
from the rapid changes in the financial markets. 
The estimated gross starting yield is 3 % with 
dividend payments expected to recreate each year. 
The potential for capital growth is substantial 

The trust is managed by F&C Unit Management 
Ltd. part of the Foreign & Colonial Management 
Group. The Group is responsible for investments 
worth more than £1800 million. Founded in 1868. 
Foreign & Colonial Management Ltd is 
independent and manages money for a vide range 
of clients including Universities. Investment 
Trusts. Pens on Funds. Foreign Institutions, Local 

Authorities. Charities and Private Clients. . 
Investments are made in 33 countries on behalf of 
over 35.000 diems. ... 


Why invest in the FfnarfcU sectornaw? 

•‘Big-Bang' This is much more than just a 
change in ihedealing arrangements of UK 
stockhrokersdue to“takc place on 27th 
October. It embraces all tne changes that arc 
taking place in ihe Financial sector 
worldwide. ; 

• Freedom lo compete in any market 

• International boundaries arc freely crossed 
. • 24 hour markets in currencies, securities. 

stocks and shares, futures and options 

• International competition for Insurance. 

Banking qnd Capital markets 

• Tim© zone and language advantages to 

London based concerns. 


• The quality of earnings from the Financial 
sector has improved substantially 


• International deregulation of the Financial 
sector. Just as the Japanese and Americans 
arc. entering.the London market, so are New 
York and Tokyo being opened to foreign 

- financial institutions: 

• The Financial sector is a prime beneficiary 
of low rates ofinflation and declining interest 
rates.- 

• Tbe worldwide supply of money has 
increased significantly due to relaxed 
international monetary policy. 

• The return of the private investor after 15 
years of decline. 

• Fading of fears of an international debt crisis. 

The Financial sector includes any activity that 
involves the provision of a financial service. The 
main activities are. — Clearing Banks. Merchant 
Banks. Discount Houses. International Banks. 
Insurance Companies. Insurance Brokers. 
Underwriting Agencies. Stockbrokers, Investment 
Management Companies. Hire Purchase 
Companies. LcasingCompanies. Commodity 
Brokers. Venture Capital Companies. Money 
Brokers, Property Developers. Savings and Loans. 

How important is the Financial sector? 

In all the major stockmarkcLs the Financial sector 
is very significant. Set out below is the weighting of 
the Financial sector in the various markets. 


Switzerland 

Germany 

Japan 

France 


Howto Invest 

Read the general information following and then 
complete and post the coupon together with your 
cheque for the amount you wish to invest, 
investors are reminded that the price of units, and 
the income from them, can go down as well as up. 


General Information 

The^ 7ru« i>. autboraed htr Ae Department of Trade & Indumy and 
comruied byTnul Deed. 

R e ifati a n HieRcpiiraf feMamhcacTUintTnin Adnw wiUCB 
Company LwdkxL 33 Founr«tn Sbwl Manchester M2 2AF. - 

The M»l chvce included n the pnee o( the Unit* 
VAT) of ihe «duc of the Fund. 


nSVThcamKOrichargeis 1 %(+Va‘ _ 

Cnamnsoon a paid to agents m acconlance with ihe pndchac& laid down 
hy the Umi Tnm AuocaMuraietait available mi icquesL 
Unit Pricer Pnees and yield*, ere pubhslmj daily in the rfctm&al Tmes 
Deily Tdegraphsul The Times. 

Idcmw DfctfbntiMS I nenme wiH be dteributed on 3 1 R March 4nd 30th 
Scpmrtwt cadi year. The GnldMubtaioa will he 30th Sqjttnt n IW7. 

Boj^ IJahsUnni are iOtkSKdai Ihe price rohoe when aenKcrwryoui 
order. AppiteanfWBareurt-nn— Inrt^ivienrlc-ertifiCMCTniJmiaUy toe 
within JS d«y«. Buying units idqjbonr. to purchase unm vou need onhi 
p«eidephonc aMnenno in the Deafen on n I -623 4 cmcD. Mo 
confirmaBcm » necewiy. You will receive a contract wittoi icweadn-s 
and your unit cemfieaie widua 30 daytof tetdcmeai. 

SefcR Uaha: Unm mav be cold hacS ai any time M a pnec n« lew. chan 
ihctad pncccalcubiicdin aecordahN wth ihemiuurentcnKol Or 
Oeponman of Trade 4 Industry. P a ymen t a nonaally made wilhn in 
working days of receipt of yciur renounced cnuRcnc. 
towM Adriw Foreign & Colonial ManapcwecH LhniteA 
Tnmte Midland Bank Tnm Cooraam Limned. Midland Bank HmMrm 
POBm 3JO. 56 Spring Gardens. Manehcaer M60 2RX. ^ 

AikSuts Pnee Vfaotiousc. 

h lm ae err r&ClJtM Managewew liwitwt l Laurence ftwnncYHB. 

Lnndoa EC4R OBA. RCri.MraUon No. Enri«nd VAT ' 

RegBtRUra No, 244 4043 kK 


F&C Financials Fund 


1fr«CUBttMfl n « p t ii e n r tMwg . 

FroipotfRuigD kCdvreL omm ro«s «xr. 

nWewMMp KMnaa«9iiog*0(yn»eM>flnil RskiuMS^ 


53% 

UK 

20% 

34% 

Netherlands 

15% 

29% 

USA 

9% 

21% 




{Mwmurt ■r wu rft int a csoo? nvieiACFiNoncAiieiaaiiiiaDncoiuangwima 

I aoyyouieeefmwy awocpae n aein taOpgrmOciooor Oh) | 

«*encn otsaiCO o» more bHsre OcttOO* X»i *^b#bmwio aaeeuiJ oils ■ 

I i4*>ettornven«oua'TioaeDoyaOtaioFK:unitManogenieniunmttf I 

. iena ina you cWaiMiunaeiBaiMDtelilMK. i 


sumanw Vb Hbs Un_ 

Howcwiwsntitt 


60"oamt. 


I imoi a B«4i«j»ianu u num»im<aahM»oti r< dBi l ' d’"«4 uftes ^ I 

MenBa>conniMi^grL(nM]wiiauofiaiaoo<»eiiwanaaneiaM> | 

l^aweactnwttp cnasnaeomiiaDar r«iwj 












THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/9 


INTEREST 

RATES 

ROUND-UP 


1 fflftdh 6*7 70S 075? 287 753 

CNAR - CofiBOuRHd Net Amnl Rbm. 
figures on ttn tatesi mM*i H [Bib tbm of 
gomg id pews. Research: D. Benn 


Banks 

Current account- no rntBrestpaki. 
Deposit accounts - seven days' 
notice required for withdrawals. 


per cent Midland 4^5 per cent 
Newest 4.375 per cent National 
Girobank 4.35 per cent Fixed term 
deposits £10.000 to £24*99 : 1 
month 6.75 per cent 3 months 
6.375 per cent 6 months 6.875 per 
cent (National Westminster); 1 
month 6.728 per cent 3 months 
6.728 per cent 6 months 6.728 per 
cent (Midland). Other banks may 
Other. 


N ationa l Savings Bank 
Ordinary Accounts - if a minimum. 
balance of £100 maintained for 
whole ol 1986. 6 per cent Interest 
p_a. tor each complete month where 
balance is over £500. otherwise 3 
per cent investment Accounts - 
10.75 per cent interest paid without 
deduction of tax. one month's 
notice of withdrawal, maximum 
investment £100.000 . 


excluding holdings of other issues. 
Return tax-free and finked to 
changes in the Retail Prices Index. 
Supplement of 3.00 per cent in the 
first year. 325 per cent in the 
second. 330 per cent in the third, 
4.50 per cent in the fourth and 6.00 
per cent In the fifth. Value of 
Retirement Issue Certificates pur- 
chased in September 1981. £14728 


Local Authority Yearling Bonds 
12 mon th s fixed rate investments 
interest 1 0H per cent taste rats tax 
deducted at source (can be re- 
claimed by non-taxpayer), minimum 
investment £1,000. purchased 
through stockbroker or bank. 


The cost of four-legged friends 


. Including bonus and supplement. 
August RPI 3852 . (The new RR 
" lure is not announced unfi the 
rd week of the fotowtng month). 


National Savings income Bond 
Minimum investment £2.000. maxi- 
mum £100,000- Interest 1125 par 
cent variable at six weeks’ notice 
paid monthly without deduction of 


National Saving* Ctetffcate 

31 st issue. Return totally free of 
income and capital gains tax, equiv- 
alent to an annual Interest rate ovbt 

. f 1 T AC anr M il l 


Guarante ed Income Braids 
Return paid net of basic rate tax; 
higher rale taxpayers may haw a 
further ■ Babffity on maturity, lyr 
Credit 6 Commerce, 7.75 per cent 
2yrs Credit & Commerce. 7.50 per 
cant 3yts Premium Life, 7.70 per 
cent 4yrs Prov Capital 825 per 
cent 5yrs Pmnacte ins, 7.75 per 
cent. 


PETS 


the five-year turn of 7.85 per cent, 
maximum investment .£1 0.000. 


MONEY FUNDS 
Fund Nat CNAR Ti 

AiptmHum 

monmtymc. SSI 7.13 tit I 

Bof Scutate 85S 7.1B Oil 

Bwcbm Highar Rata 
OapnKACOOUnc 


£190049999 
t10jD00&ovar 
Crier Attn cm 
Ctttw* 


653 679 
7.00 7.19 
7.10 734 


0t 626156? 
01 6261567 
01 588 2777 


Moray Mkf Plus 700 723 
HFC Trua 7-ray 7J5 730 

Htndarson Uoray 
M«k*t 

Craoun Account 635 7.18 
UOHetiM.0so.725 738 


01581 1422 
012368381 


UOHtfiMOsp.725 738 
Uoytli WCA 720 740 

MAG HO 637 7.10 


016385757 
013863211 
016261500 
01 626 4586 



Local authority town hall bonds 
Fixed term, fixed rate in vest men ts . 
Interest quoted net (basic rate tax 
deducted at source non-redalm- 


abie) lyr Northampton 7.1 per cent 
2yrs KjfkJees 725 per cent 3yrs 
Manchester 725 par cent, min rnv 
£500: 4yrs Bristol 7 per cent 
5.6&7yre Hereford & Worcester 7 
per cant 8yra Taff By 5.95 per cent 

S&lOyrs Taft By 621 per cent, min 


Further delate avatebte from Char- 
tsred Institute of Public Finance A 
Accountancy, Loans Bureau (638 
6361 between 10am and 220p<m) 
sea also Prestei no 24808. 


li is not easy to balance the 
cost and rewards of keeping a 
pet- Those with pets and those 
without fight — at least ver- 
bally - like cats and dogs. 
Every species of animal oners 
the owner financial and emo- 
tional rewards, and whether 
the animals are worth it will 
depend on the indi vual’s taste. 

More than 200,000 dogs are 
handed in- every ye®* 10 ^ 
police and 30 per cent at least 
are destroyed. They account 
for about 1,800 road ac- 
cidents, and the death of 6,000 
firm animals through the 


worrying of livestock. In fo 1 * 
litany of complaints, the final 
sting comes in the tail with the 
fouling of paths, parks and 
public places. 

When well treated and 
cared for, dogs give a friend- 
ship that matches or excels 
human company, yet de- 
mands fir less. This relation- 
ship is shown at its best in 
dogs Tor the blind. 

The idea for a training 
programme for dogs started in 
i Germany after the First World 
War. Dorothy Eustis, who saw 
and described the system, was 
asked to train a dog fora blind 
i American, Morris Frank. 

The partnership became a 
success. The idea spread and 
the first British guide dogs 
went to their owners in 1931. 


MktondHICA 

£200949399 6.73 692 074220989 

W0900 and war 790 7.19 074220986 

NatWUtHgh 
bn Spec Henna 

r2ifi<m.999 688 7.05 017261000 

£10.000 6 mar 790 7.19 01 728 1080 
opperlwkner Morey 

6.71 012369382 

Over £10.000 663 690 01 2388362 

Royal B ol Scottate 

Premium Account 7.T0 723 0315570207 
S&PCtt 690 7.14 0706 60966 


tax. Rapeymem at 3 months’ notice. 
Penalties In test year. 


012369382 
01 Z369362 


National Savings Indexed I nc o me 
Bond 

Start rate monthly income for first 
year. 8 pereent . increased stand of 
each year to match increase in 
prices as measured by Retail Prices 
Index. Cash value remains the 


£2900 K) £9999 
over £10.000 
TtXM&Rfeyctf 
T8R7-ray 
TrnetaOoa 
Tynda* 7-day 
UDT 7-day 
Wetfem Trust 


6.73 694 0705 827733 

691 7.13 0706 627733 
694 8.47 Of 236 0952 
691 695 012360952 


same. Income taxable, paid gross. 
Three months' notice of withdrawal. 
Minimum investment of £5,000 In 
mutinies of £1,000. Maximum 
£ 100 , 000 . 


790 7.19 0272 732 24T 
790 7.18 0872 732241 

7.10 729 018264681 


National Savings 4th Cndex-Unksd 
Certificates 

Maximum investment - £5,000 


General extension rate for hoWers 
of earfier issues which have 
reached maturity is 8.01 
National Savings Yearly Plan 
A one-year regular savings plan 
converting into four-mar savings 
certificates. Minimum £20 a month, 
maximum £200. Return over five 
years 8 . 1 9 per cent, tax-free. 
National Savings Deposit Bond 
Minimum investment £100, maxi- 
mum £100.000. Interest 1 125 per 
cent variable at six weeks' notice 
credited annually without deduction 
of tax Repayment at three months' 
notice. Half interest only paid on 
bonds repaid during first year. 


Bulcfing S w i l n fips * 

Ordinary share accounts — 5.25 per 
cent Extra Interest accounts usual- 
ly pay 1-2 per cant over ordinary 
share rate. Rates quoted above are 
those most commonly offered. Indi- 
vidual buflding societies may quote 
different rates. Interest on al ac- 
counts paid net of basic rate tax 
Not redalmabie by non-taxpayers. 


Foreign currency deposits 
Rates quoted by Rothschild's Old 
Court International Reserves 0481 
26741. Seven days' notice is re- 
quired for withdrawal and no charge 
is made tor switching currencies. 
Sterling 895 per cent 

US dollar 5.ie per cam 

Yen 4 .50 per cent 

p Mark 392 per cent 

French Franc 644 per cent 

Swiss Franc 495 per cent 



> i' v l 


•’■r ; *- . * i U 


, "&1. ^ 


Riding oat is fine and relaxing, but only if yon can afford it 




- the same goes for any pet 


Guide dogs get no government 
binding, cost around £1,000 to 
train and. like humans, not an 
entrants. pass their test 
For keeping an ordinary dog 
of no particular merit except 
to its owner, the total first-year 
costs, with insurance, vet- 
erinary treatment, equipment 
• food and perhaps two weeks' 
boarding will be £250 to £650. 
Horses and ponies as pets 
-9eem to have no detractors at 


❖ 

❖ 



•> 



❖ 

❖ 


Allow us to present what is surely the 
most flexible business loan available on 
the market today. 

Namely, the Lloyds Bank Business 
Loan. 'With it you can borrow as little as 
£2000 or as much as £1 million. 

And it also offers you a choice of 
repayment options no other bank can 
compete with. 

Repayment Loan 

If you opt for a straight repayment loan, 
you can have up to 30 years to pay it back. 
And you may also plump for regular 
monthly or even quarterly payments, 
whichever suits you best. 


Endowment Loan 

You can take advantage of this unique 
option when the .term of your loan 
exceeds ten years. Interest is payable 
throughout the whole term, while capital 
is repaid with an endowment assurance 
policy. It usually leads to a healthy cash 
bonus at maturity. No other major bank 
offers this. 


an agreed percentage above our base rare. 

Fixed or Variable Interest 
Wharfs more, you can switch from a fixed 
rate to a variable rate or vice versa every 
five years if you so wish without any 
charge whatsoever. 

Capital Holiday 

From the outset of the loan, you can defer 
capital repayments for up to two years 
while your cash flow grows ever more 
favourable. 

Stepped Repayments 
Alternatively, stepped repayments may be 
more to your liking. This way, you can 
gradually increase the amount you pay 
over the first two years. 

Early Repayments 

If your business performs better than 
originally forecast you’re entitled to repay 
part or even all of the loan early without 
giving any notice and without incurring 
additional cost. 


Death Cover 

This insurance also sees to it that in the 
event of the: insured person’s death, the 
whole outstanding balarice.of the loan is 
cleared forthwith. • 

. The invaluable protection afforded 
by Loan Repayment Insurance is avail- 
able at set races on loans up to £50,000 and 
for periods of up to ten years. 

However we’ll gladly offer individual 
quotations on other loans. 

Whatever your needs' in the cut and 
thrust world of. business, we can help. 
Simply cut out the coupon and thrust it 
in an envelope. 

Alternatively, you can' always call in 
at your local Lloyds Bank branch or call 
us fiee on 0800 444140. 


| To: Lloyds Bank Pic, Business Loans. FREEPOST, j 
. Newbury, Berkshire RGU2DE » 

| Please send me details of your Business Loans and J 

I Services tt> Business. > 


Fixed Interest 

There’s a simple advantage attached to 
the fixed rate option. It allows you to 
budget precisely when forecasting your 
cash flow. 


Variable Interest 

On the other hand, you may well prefer 
to take advantage or an interest rare at 


More Than One Loan 
You can cake out as many loans as you 
require, be they for individual assets or 
complete projects. 

Accident and Sickness Cover 
Should you, your partners or your key 
directors be prevented from working 
through injury or illness, Loan Repay- 
ment Insurance buys valuable time by 
meeting repayments as they fall due. 


BUSINESS NAME AND ADOB 


NATURE OF BUSIN £ 


| I am VI am nor a business cuswnerjKUayds Bank. My branch*' j 

L iny naccemvaiMM branch n. ■ 

T3 *Driae« appropriate. [ 


Lloyds 

Bank 


A THOROUGHBRED AMONGST BANKS. 


Wrincn details of our endu rams available on itquM from Lloyds Bank Pic. 71 Lombard Sweer, London SOP SBS.Seeuntv may be required. Loam gran ted at the Bank’s discretion. Sotnref the terms an 

requirement » tor or lew. Further details from any UK branch of Lloyds Bank-Insurance adwccpcowticd by Lloyds Bank I n an an reSqnM L imited . 


and options described riUf not apply' if the few 




all Children’s books from 
Black Beauty on are full of 
horses as heroes. Films such as 
Black Velvet add io their 
attraction, white tales of the 
turf, by Nat Gould, Edgar 
Wallace and Dick Francis 
have fascinated adults who 
will never keep a horse or visit 
a racecourse in their lives. 

Add to this the inter- 
national glamour of Arab 
horses. Austrian riding 
schools, Irish breeding stables, 
horse shows, the thrill and 
spill of the chase, Betjeman's 
obituary on the trainer of 100 
winners who paid the Final 
Entrance Fee, and the image 
of the polo field — “where else 
does one meet one's 
husband?” How can a mere 


Grass is the natural food of & 
a horse, but in winter hay and 
concentrates take its place ;* 
Sib a day for young stock, 1 21b 
for a small pony. 251b for a 
mature horse. A useful rule of 
thumb is 2'Alb of food daily 
for every 1001b of body 
weight. 

By contrast, to buy a grey- 
hound with a good pedigree 
could cost £500. A winner 
could cost £3,000 to £4,000 
and training, according to the 


dog compete? 


Tico. the winner of this 
year's Greyhound Derby at 
Hairingay. does not match the 
charisma of the Aga Khan's 
Derby winner. Shahrasiani. at 
Epsom.. Maybe this is due to 
the difference in prize money: 
£25,000 for the former and 
£250.000 for the latter, plus 
£15 million to £25 million in 
likely syndicate . foes to the 
owner, all - hold your breath 
— free of tax. 


These figures show why 
there are 6.8 million dogs in 
4.9 million UK households. 
They are cheap to buy. They 
may even come free as gifts or 
for a small donation to an 
animal organization. 


A polo pony could 
cost yon £5,000 


If you are looking to wo 
prizes at Cruft’s, or Harringay, 
however, you will have to pay 
anything from £100 to £300, 
depending on the breed. 


The financial rewards may 
be greater, but. horses and 
ponies are never cheap. A 
pony suitable for a 1 2-year-old 
might be priced between £400 
and £2,000, or more. To buy 
an Argentinian pony for polo 
will put • you back £5,000. 
Blackiake Velvet, a 1 3.2-hand 
mare belonging, to 12-year-old 
Jemima Goldsmith, daughter 
of Sir James Goldsmith, com- 
petes in the Horse of the Year 
Show and might command a 
price of anything from £500 to 
£ 10 , 000 . 


To count the costs of keep- 
ing a pet is fairly easy. The 
benefits and rewards are often 
incalculable. 


Jennie Hawthorne 


■ But the buyhjg price is just 
the banning. Then come all 
the .extras — clothing and 
instruction for rider, insur- 
ance, bridles, saddTes, stabling 
and veterinary treatment. 


Which investment 
offers the potential 
of a top performing 
unit trust 

and guarantees that 
your original 
investment 
is secure? 


SAFEGUARD 





See next weekend’s 

press for details 

Jjartmore 


S ‘ *21 


! ^• v 1 


Rewards and benefits 
are incalcalable 


FtmV&S 


manager at Harringay. about 
£3 per day. Here too, extras 
mount as they do for a less 
exalted pet. 

Dogs aged more than six 
months still need a licence of 
37p. Insurance, loo. though 
not a legal requirement, is 
esscntiaL Owners are liable for 
accidents or damage caused by 
their pets, and horses on the 
highway are especially vulner- 
able — they are involved in 
almost 3,000 accidents a year. 

Pet Plan (01-995 14(4) of- 
fers five policies ranging from 
Vet Plan at a £21 annua] 
premium up to the Gold Plan 
Plus at £44.75. Quarterly pre- 
miums work out dearer. 


! O' 1 


Camvr 


r 

5 

; pT > 


With Equine and Livestock 
Insurance (01-568 3431). pre- 
miums depend on how often 
and in what way a horse is 
used. Polo, dressage and gym- 
khana events involve cheaper 
premiums than, for racing and 
hunting. . 


uni : n . 


PAWS, administered by 
Jardine Glanville (021-236 
9741) and underwritten by 
General Accident, offers 
cheap basic insurance for dogs 
aged eight weeks to eight years 
at entrance, to cover vet- 
erinary foes. For £5 more than 
the basic annual premium of 
£26.75 (with £6 high cost area 
supplement) extra benefits 
such as cover for accidental 
death, loss by theft or straying, 
and kennelling, can be 
included. 


IBBIHDnWPS s 1 




L i. -: ■ 


h: 


British Horse Society. 0203 
52241 ; Guide Dogs for the 
Blind Association. 0753 
8557 J: Joint Advisory J» 
Committee on Pets in Societv: 
01-836 2843; Royal Society for 
the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Animals. 0403 64181 


| own !|i>h j j 

I FjIikuu!^ • 


! :,v 


cot* A r * ' 
'"WCil ’V “ 
■"SEIJI 


. »i*. 





CLaS 













THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27- 1986 


SPORT 


35 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


All chsdbl odvemsemcnis 
can be aocEfRcd by telephone 
(acem Announcements). The 

deadline is 5.00pm 2 days prior 
» publication (ic SflQpm Mon- 
day for WedoedByL Should 
you wish to send on ndvenite- 
mear in writing please include 
your daytime phone number. 
CUSTOMER SERVICES D£- 
i PMTMSIT- JF you have any 
Rucries or pnUems mating to 
your adven dement owe it has 
appeared, please contact our 
Ciotomcr Services Oep aru nent 
by telephone on WriW 4100k 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Fund lor Qinomi. Send far for 
XiKMnMkwim.sDnlgN- 
MIS of 6. SSo ■ £1.70. Calrn- 
®W- Diary. lo M AMagten 
Ram. wa oaf. Fmonai snop- 
IM M»Fn 9-304-30. 


SERVICES 


"OR A REGULAR part-lime 
Homr Ckwilnt Smkr by Mi 
eibif dally tvaim arras - 
don't drtav anolncr day poem 
Anglo Conunralaf iEMP ACY.i 
on Ot 730 6123 now 1 24 HRSl. 


IIIUMav, Leir or Martov. 
All mic*. mn*. OMeurv. Cbat 
«QIC>| 23 Abingdon (toad. Lon 
don WB T«. OI UB lot I. 


WHEN IN LONDON rml a TV or 

\MMo by day wk or month. 
TOPS TV 01-720 4469. 


ANCESTRY 


Contact 
the team with the best] 
experience Wortd-wtde 

ACHIEVEMENTS 

DEPT ST. NORTHGATE 
CANTERBURY CTt ISA 

TEL: 0227 462618 


HERALDRY 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Cancer 


Together we can beat it 

We fund over one third of 
ill research into the preven- 
tion and cure of cancer In 
the UK. 

Help us by sending) dona- 
tion or make a legacy 10 : 

Cancer, 
Research 
Campaign 

2 Carlton HonrTcfra v. 
(DvpflJ/WAiLuHdonSWlY SA8 



SERVICES 


MWMMft monm - wt n 

oui aow Htorr De ini hr hw 
vm a S7 w wertaibM. 
nurruxi hdnw for aMKUvf <bs- 
vt m am of. ouMandino 
natural beauty, Slatted by 
tiinn. roumniQK. nyrooto 
vtto- ptontettirrapM . and 
Wtodmr mrdiral mime For D- 
6>Niraird omorrtiHriuiun the 
(Urrriu. Oouds House.- East 
Knwif.-wins SP3 6BE Or trto- 
OftOfir 074783 666. 


raswN onxr al & *u oum 
nmercratm PmonaiSarMce. 
Cau anyumr. Ot 349 9978. 
*0®T ntlCMK, EMtam m- 
Irodurikom For I ho unUiwbM. 
58 MtoMOV streti. London Wl. 
Trinhooo Ol 495 9937. . 


WANTED' 


QOOO QUAUTT anttaur mvW 
4 imho nrootwoi. Tob Ot-«34 
22TO or w m<* M Omr 26 
Sutherland Sum. London SWI 


NEW ZEALAND tomtirnwa work- 
ing lii hotel In Mayfair, mom 
atroiMdaUon m/nr vicinity. 
unlU Fro *87 Wonting long tin 
■9-30an>-lt-S0nini 90 maiml 
rctiLil dost rod. m mclwiw (or 

MiwnMiiw uyw no m«i 
■Msbmce kindly phone 402 
7633 b/ween S^Spm &oopm. 
ask io speak ko Stephen Casidy. 
Thank you. 


£23 per or up to paM lor stiver 
arttetav C 260 per oz lor go*). 
au diamond te-wetlery boodM. 
Mr Hart 01-9603030 Or WrW 
3ol Marrow Road. London. 
W9. AU EMMM rocerrd. - 


MftMTT Lnaw IvoM. (2-6 Vi-arsi 
wanted io buy 3 bed flat wMn 
easy arms U SUt Ketninotoa. 
Phone. CTSuMian I’WortO Ol- 
853 0664 'Homel 01-946 1494 


FOR SALE 


MORS OF NCTYLEBCD The 

ummaie repn ra lurmiure «pe- 
rtausls. One ol engtancr* 
laroesi roUerUons of 17th t, 
lBib Century penod style lurnt- 
lure. C 2 million storks for 
immediate delivery Nrmrbrd. 
near Henley on Thames 10491 i 
641115. Boumrmocim < 0202 # 
293580. Tmntim. Devon 
<0392871 7443. Berkeley. GU* 
<04631 810952. 


FINEST quality woe) carpets. Al 
trade mm and under, also 

avaUcMe IOOM extra L4T9r 

room -dye- remnants under naH 
normal prfre. Ctuulccry carpels 
Ol 405 0453. ; 
SCATFMOEKS. Best Urkrts (or 
aU sold -out ecenta. Our rttanfe 
■nrtiKte roost major twia mlw. 
Credit rams accepted. 01-828 
1678. 

THE TOWEB 1795-UM- Other 
uues avalL Hand bound ready 
tor presentation also 

'Sundays'*. 012.50. Remember 
When. 01-688 6323. 


RESISTA 

CARPETS 

S pedal Offer 

WsnBHW&i Rm SriMi Wm 
80% wool 20% nylon. Vwy 
heavy wa jyafc. l2tt ***• 
12 irian cokm (ram stock. 
£085 per *q yd + VAT 
14« lMsavliBrite Road 
Pams firean. wfli 
Tab 01-731 330/9 
Fits 


FOR SALE 


IsnnKRCKCMISai Tan. 
Cri TV* Item 049. Videos. from 
C99. 91 Lower Wnar 6t_ 
swi. 730 0933- 


CANCELLED Furauare Protect. ■ 

Maonmrcn! Rroonry Myle tXn- 

IM uNn ki.sobd nwbogtoiy. 

hidlt idiMflr -nandbuiH. Solid 
nr«w mumfs. Ltuom storm. 

Seed Ltuwkui <Pra>eMlonU qv 

amhuuon weKomed). Scaona 

up to 10 G47S. scaling opto 12 
£7sa <MKna *14/16 Cl 500 ■ 

hoot nnhrmn/tamMUits/ 
boardroom tapir IF>4- C2.O0O 

II 4MVI. Mining Cham, solid 

mahogany hand mbMd £60 

each WheMshNl pattern 
chairs £75 rOctv. Prtnre of 

Wkies ■ n»nd ran edi wiJUi sbletd 

■ barks C12S 01-203 6027. 


NS rontemporsry ■ American 

diiHno linfe 8 charts. flUtttUltD 
glah dKptay cabinet Cost 
data FttnoM aunt 
£1300 Aho mwaUlut 9 ll sofa. 
2 nuiiv 2 side tables, salt fur- 
mshinas Ocnpme A LUiK- 
mjoo S»«v Ware Sum 
swi. Phone Ol 828 1348. 


•newen FOR AMY CVCMT. cats. 
Suthtfd £*». Cnna. Lr* Mis. 
All {fMvurv and sports. 

Tel 32 1-061 6/828-0496- 
A£s / Visa / OWrv 
BMTKMY DUC 7 Ghf sofnoooe 

■ ■ an original Tunrs Newspaper 

dated me vwy day they ww* 
bom £13 so: oniAueo. 
COHOS - latest M-tecti Zoom / 

■ Reduction enl ar gement Coptem 
from (he StMPUrr al TRADE 
PRICES 01-278 6127. 

CUOMtSSY «CAM gamw and 
laektds by LC Trjrdteur Low 
srlre^OM UrtreOuirmwCMr 
<Sk Lrkftetd. Sx <0823/ 3764. 


bk> M«t» etc. Nationwide 
deliveries. Tffc >0380 » 860039 
’•Wilts) 

YORK njUBSTONES for pauos A 
driveways uquMaitensaie Tet 
061 223 0881/061 231 6785. 


SHORT LETS 


brtobl comfortable 2 bedroom 
Chet— Oat avhHabta holiday 
lets Oct/Nov. low so— o n . Price 
from Ci60pw. Td 0435 
873119 

LUXURY SCJtVTCeo -FLATS, 
eemral London from £325 pw. 
Ring Town Hw AMS 373 3433 

rimer rum ltd for couples For 
6 months from 29 SeM. 
£102pw. Ol 7896030. 


- ROYAL COURT 
APARTMENTS V2 

Fufor turn. 6ft. pnone, Svs. IV. 
lacco. 

autofr 


Uu fo 3 mths. 

No Extras, do Coflimssaxi. 

51 QaiLlllR Tame*. W2 
21-724 7821, 723 9217 0) 


FOR HER 


MINK COAT 

Mi raid lent Quality Frandi *- 
sttier coat of finest tamale 
s3i See 10. £6 AX) «d ac- 
OA £3,000. 

NECKLACE 
Mi ettawrafly beaoOri IB 
cans goo neemee with mo 

Please call S3S 7622 


MUSICAL 

instruments 


•CNAPfeLL mahogany graM. t 6 

IlL eweBeM tone m en. £ 1 2 00 - 

prarUre ctaiy-r nCentk 1891N. 

HK fraohn. CSOft let Ol 788 

•6343. • 


TMC HAND 8MMM71W 

rmH over - 1 year iAP»f <M 
Low inlerwl rates over 2 1 tan 
•APR «S”-i * S yews (API* 
t 22 s..i written oumuous- 
FiVe CaUUVM » HkweWc 
MM. NWS. 01-267 7671. 

2 BEAWTVUL Brrrahfn Crsoda. 

nMir m .tainME «nl 

prtcr far mark sale. BS6 4981. 
H8MO any Grand. Seek 1930. 

oft 6tl» treondhloncd. £1196. 
Trl 0604 .65294. 


HOME A GARDEN 


logur 6 * rotoufiui ™-- 
HundrNK of retow ria w* 
balm aad (towers plus —fid 
growing nuns wun ss coomc- 
uUve geld mnUBs at Oietscb. 
yooTr assured of B* best, 
wnte Ron non. Dei* TIE 
uatKdm WararO. 

78tL Or phene 0923 672071 
<24 nrsk 


cork \neror5Bprh ******** 

any price AKS 0932 784128 


C01 


ANTIQUES A 
iLLECTABLES 


vlmlk- walcx colours of Oxford 
Colleges m numbered, aagoed 
editions of BOO copies. Trinity, 
wotcester. Keo Ic. Pembroke 
mid Or/el Colleges. 17 i 20 
inches. £75 OO mounted. 
Brochure- from watercolour 
Faramucs umued. 8 hooerUJ 
Square. cneUentwm CLBO 
lOB. Telephone 0242 314212. 
please stair which 
. CoHege/Cooeoes. 

WANTED rtfwaidun. Victorian 
and au painted lunsnee. Mr 
Ashton. 01 947 6946. 657-669 
Garralt Lane. EarhfMd. 66*117. 

ROYAL BOULTON Toby JWS 
rmuefnes. animals, etc- ws wil- 
ed. Ot 883 0024. 


FLATSHARE 


BA IH38U RT own Dole rm in 
spaciout lux ( 1 st- swie prof pen 
28 +. IO mm Oty. £300 PCfb 
estCL TeL Ol 607 0939. 


BATTERSEA prof male wanted Io 
share huger, nice flat overlook- 
ing park. C260DOV. tel Ol 
6227674. 


CLAPTON Double room la tsrpe 
nvaboneiU- lor pro f essional pee 
ton M IT. ISOpweiC. Phone 
Ol 800 3449 


WANTED. Prof non smoking I. 
23. requires ojr Hi name or Ihd 
m- central lube. £« pw max. 
Ol 360 2076. 


WANTED Flahhare for -Cerfen 
Blew Diploma Course studs*. F 
• 17). K/5. untu June 1987. Trt 
0889 26328 aoy «me 


N7 • Prof female, own room, 
share large mixed flH. AM. mod 
rm. cm. Near luces, shops, 
etc. £160 pan. Td ; 431 ItOl 
•John / days) or 281 2993 
(weekends tt eves) 


FLATSHARE 


BL4CKMCATM S£3 Prof N/S. to 
snare targr FlM.o/r. gdv wash- 
ing machine ciso non Trt 01 
319 3024 irves/wkcndN) 


NBTCHAM / T noting border. Prof 
F. .0/0. Share gdn fit. M od 
cons. Kr BR/tubr. E200PCXI 
axel. 01 640 3101. 


NW2 Lux Fbl own roam. Jubdec 
line <WdieMien Green), profs 
ofi». £60 pw + MBs. Trt. Ol 
431 STUB (weekends ft even 


W3 - Own rooms |gr 2 proto, in 
cgTOMruble fpraBDM flM wim 
super mwd kd & bath. Parking. 
£50 pp. pw. Trt : 01 993 3641 


WANTED* Room In shared house 
/(las near Baker Si. Lp to £40 
pw roc Oxford Grad 12 ZL now 
with M & S. Td ; 288 0269 *xt 
128. 


CL4PMAM Prol 20^1 Non/S. own 
room iwibbr. £40 per wk exet. 
Trt: Ol 274 1389 Uay> 

KEN. WB O/R. H» 23*. wtoto- 
eo to share rut. torlih 2 p eople. 
£63 pw. CM Td: 01-937-7887 

TU8NHAM 68EXM crof m. o/r IP 

large house, nr lube. Avail 
unsned. £196 atm. 747 3145. 


RENTALS 


, KMrtil 

via. punMro. Wounmur. 
Uncun' houses aad flats avail- 

able lor long or snort lets. 
Photo ling far current Usl 

Cootm. 69 Buckingham Wm 

Rd. SWI. -01-828 8251. 


IlhMPlTEAU NWS Elegant fur- 
nished Dal hi residential street, 
i iK-arooTP 4- thing room, fully 


SutNde for one ggrsoo. £13 
pw Td 794 4960 


HAMPSTEAD BARREN SUburto. 

Detigluiui 3 bedrgomed luRv 

lumohed wed equipped, gen. 

cottage Ideal lamHy/cvrTttany 

let Available 1 year. £176 pw. 

Trt: 01-468 6771 


»/ OWNERS. If you 

have a quality property to lev 
MU IN shout U. We offer a pro- 
Irpmnnf A reliable service. 
Ouratoi ConslanUnc. Trt: Ol 
244 7303. 


AVJULA8LC now. S mO» 8toane 
Square. 2nd * 3rd door turn 
mats, l ctol bed rm. 2 eBts v/rm. 
Ml/cUner. bUum HOC !«■ 
Refs red’d. Trt. Ol 730 2800 


BDanr A IA8KS Contact va now 

on 01-256 8861 for toe beslw 
lection ot furnished daw and 
houses to rent in Kroghhhrtdpe. 
cnotsea and Kensington IT) 


SUKRSOR FLATS A HOUSE* 

avail. A reqd. (or dtptomols. 
esecuiHes. Long 0 Niort lets ut 
all arran. Upfrtend A Co. 48. 

Amcmarle SI W 1 . 01-499 S334. 


RAMFSTEAD and environs. For 
a srtecllon of viewed and rec- 
ommended (torts and houses 

a\ aiianfo Far long term MUiw to 

North London's Brenner district 
contact the spectatols who, can 
offer numerous homes (Tom 
XI 60 to £i JOOa week. Qrorpe 
Knight • The Len ina Ag ent. 9 
Heath Swert- Hwigmd wl 
. logs NW3 6TP. 01-794 1125. 


RENTALS 


AimCAM EXECUTIVE seeks 

lux fUl/hausr. up to CSOOpw 
1.0131 hrv req- PfUlUyt Kay A 
LewK. South of the Park Cnrt- 
wa ottiro. 01-362 Bill 
North of .aw f^rtc. 

Park office. 01-386 


CMKtSMORE Cardens SWT: In- 

laual. 1/2 OrNroomML first 

floor balcony nat overtook mg 

pane, vuin Mtnstm bukty 
“ ‘ . 235 1909 




£06645 


WUNSTOM. owners period •» 
Clous ban nr tttor. 3/4 dbfo beds. 
2 mm superb xudto wilt . 
tovety views, foe thing ana. 
CH. T\. S/facuH) gttn. ggr. 
£260 pw. 0680 712806. 

emu« Chamtmg gsrden flal 
to M 12 months upwards. 
Tastefully fum&hrd A luRy 
eqWP Ll75 PW. Ol 362 0682 
■BOH—g Lux a ted- a- 
Herr one- Huron* person. £96 
pw imrttMPnq nmi N/S pre- 
ferred. Trt Oi Sea 9613 
mm a/C font 9M nr flat » bed. 

2 recep. KM « bath. Store heat- 
mg. Phone £80 p.w. No iM*. 
SWI prof couple. 4SS 6146 

SWtO D0k> Bed Flat clave Tube. 
Read. KAB. Quiet. £150 6/12 
ruths. Owners Home Cahban A 
Ctortee 589 5481. 

•YWBroraplon rube z bed v mod 
nat Cot TV MU me ch close 
shens CIBSpw 3706646 evgt 
DOCKLANDS FlMS and iwnsrs to 
let inrovshout me Docklands 
ana T« 01-790 9560 
—M AW N6 newly furotsbed 
luxury 2 bed OsL oarage avwl- 
able. £150 pw. Ol 340 7408 


4 beam mews hse. 

AvadtongM. Details 262 4064 
MAYFAIR Lux 2 d/bed 4th Hr 
sen atl. All machMir*. Co let. 
£300 pw Mir 723 0072 
SW19 SOUTHFIELD*. SpaCtOUS 
sell con 1 bed oan Ubl 
C 460Pcm. Teh 789 9006. 
SW10 attractive comer hse. 3 
beds- 2 recep. lined ML bath, 
root leer. C260pw Ol 351 0016 
SWI*. Prof F. 23* to share nix. 
naL o/r. £30 v.w. exclusive. 
Tel: 01 76951 82 after told day. 
WL4 Quirt garden audio Loft 
bed. n/s. 25 yr + Til July 87 
£80 pw carl. Trt: 045850372 


DOMESTIC & 
CATERING 

SITUATIONS WANTED 


(iiinMUUfrfV 

avakkude Cali The Au-pah Cen 
tre (Dip. ACY i now on Ol 
730 8122 124 HRSi lor detaito. 


CANARY ISLANDS 


TEMER0X SOUTH 1 bed lux Apt. 
dub Atlantis 021 783 8980 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


ART DEALER 

OH i ftiJh i sh BH firm irilera per- 
mineo: position lo recenr 
(Imruaty SradOH to lean and 
m t»oy aspect ot the 
... Gemma Merest pi 
more Impoftara (Jan M 


Dftalir la wr»m DOT Ic 
UgN. 13 OH Boed SL, 


GENERAL 


MMTIIIA. Fun» anl in KaPTim nr. 
?r* am See Famous winter «. 
Mimthre inort Wl 4. Good 
rental income. Swmumng POOL 
W OO D Trt- 0241 72383 


SPAIN 


MAR8CLLA Outstanding vws 
of the sea and moanuu. Se- 
cluded villa- vet in aosrox 1 
acre land. 6 bedrooms. 3 recep- 
WHS rooms- 4 bathroom* / 
Shown* new swimming pool. 
Garage, lok of letrarm Mr. 
£145 000 ao°- Bank loan al 
ready arranged Trt: London 
740 £148 morning* only 


MERCEDES 


C4 UW 0R M UMS VPrttflcaUOO 900 
SC. 1977. Fully loaded, a/c. 

leather, e/sunreoi. cruise run- 

irol Superb ntroughotd Low 

rndeape. FOB senior Mstoty. 

(3300. Tet 01-684 7486. 


500 SL 86 Rre. As new. Smoke 
sever Extra*. Low milage. 
C28JOOO. Trt 01 994 0630. 


ROLLS ROYCE A 
BENTLEY 


ROLL* ROYCC Stover Scru 1982 
•V Regi elegant hnirae » 
ivory roach work MUi immar- 
toMemutonry trainer updoMry 
ad usual R/R an.ooo twin tuu 
ventre bKtory. £29.750 tele- 
phone 0425 613201 


LEGAL NOTICES 


Rt: ELCCTROSCT LTD 
•In Volunurv Uouxttlfoni 
Ana me Companm Act 1985 
NOTICE IS HCRC8Y CHOI 
that the CREDITORS Ol the above 
named Ooraoanv are required on 
or before Fndav 24lh Ortnoer 
1 986 to send thetr name* amt ad 

drew* and particulars oi Ihrtf 
di-txsor ctaum to the unoertogned 
RKhand Adrew Sepal of 18 
DrnrMirvi cardem. woodtord 
wen*, ts&ex. ICBOPA the Ucnn 
dator ol the vad Company and it 
so n-ouirrd by noorr in wruinq 
Irora live said Liquidator are lo 
come In and prove then said Ortrts 
or claim* al sum tone or blare a* 
shall be specified in such ncnvte or 
mortauu Ihereoi they will be ex 
eluded tram tor benefit ol anv 
dblnbvdion made before such 
debts are proved 
Dated IMS 161b day of S epte mb er 

1986 R A SEGAL 

LIQUIDATOR 


COURSES 


YOUR 

EXAMS 

MgiguUKi harm-study far 
GCE. Degress (London & 


Exams. 

1 Free Prospectus 
Dept. AL4. Wttsey Hal. 
^ordCKZ8PRV’(0B65) 
52200(241118.) 


HOLIDAYS &VILLAS 


Cendmwd from page 12 


CORNWALL k DEVON 


BROADSANDS LINKS HOTEL 

***BWXHAM, SOUTH DEVON, TQ5 OT*** 

• • Bargain Breaks 

Enjoy pcaoe and quiet in mnqail DimwndingL Pmomnic 
lading tdbeadi road, lenaracoun. two 


sea views, own pdtor ™nj •« «“-• •- — 1 ~— r, ~ — . * ~:r 
acres of gardens adjoining Ctamdon »>If coutk. ABroomscn 
suite. Tea making facilities m all rooms. TV if requested. 

Midweek St weekend breaks araflable 
Telephone (0803) 842360 


tbbhuy 

BEVORSHHE HOT& 

44 AIC "" 44*BW44t«D 19*5 

vwiy it towy » roar ttre* MNg 
on Bid Engfcsb Awn htm 0630 
DM room mBi pnrete IHB» far > 2 
my oniaa Bdtntog b yw resh 

n hrf'to 2 *Mys 

SnaNd a wm gmwAi 
pardens brtwen o» fiartxx* m i 
boa ftoo t Bsacb 

OWfUBOLOUIMMRW 

rzzws?: 


CROFT HOTEL 

Falmouth 

Ml rooms cn wile, ctri TV. lea 
fact h ues, indoor pooL spa A 
sauna. Excrlkni cownc. 

Vacs 27th Sept; . 
4, 18. 25 Oct 
BBEM From £90 p.w. 

0326 312814 


imSTTE MTBW OF 
gwowaii t 
rstktm 

i tat oMbe cosrflrypde nn> 
Grams bong, cm TVs. 
gnga and nare. 

Ibmv camorol wdh gtd rotfl 
i Mw cos y pw UBftioN W 

I* «ro* !2 8, SiS tf S3? 

to John and Urag -wn- 
iwne Giro Lo«- ConroU 

0903 20333 


Mm. PORTO D£VOH 
ME ROCKY ALE ROTH. 

R was udb crawly n 
«Wl Camrai hrothfl. bro 
pk. chocs ol mnnq. uanni 
tot -rt stortdd bw 

m CM UU fae Ml 

rofe 0598 52279 


beautiful aetung overlooking 
atari Bay. Nfrty appbtotad 
now avafbMc. 


Plenty to do. see and ML spe- 
nd £42 for 3 day break, tftauur 
8AH. TH. 08228334(2. 


LAKE DISTRICT 


ENGLISH LAKE 
DISTRICT 

Myfficaily situated, team 
puxful Rydateratar. youil 
find our 17th C courtry 
house tnteL Good food and 
real ate. afl rooms an suite, 
some with 4-poster tods. 
For further details wrfie or 
phone Sten Rottiw How. 
flydai. AmWeside. Cumtera. 

0966 32524. 


BLACKPOOL CarrRAL 
“MSS8DALE HOUSE** 

31/33 Baratore Si 
Few itHis S8L shops, thohes, 
chits. Large bar. Pud Table. 
Free Wjysfflng. Coach 
weic. Ilium's 
Mon-Fri E38. 

Td (0253) 22148 


AMB MMriT, 

NOOHSmE 


50 CorooMoa St 

Blackpool 

uc.cBnS3_wv» 


Free 


sups. 
OAPS. 


Td 0258 22114. 


LONDON 


KENSWIsrON Wit Lux ScrvtoM 
aokL Col TV. Unicorn LUL 15 
Opto ores. Wit O* 461 309* 



EGILDRY HOta 
fL KBFORD RIVER 
AA**BAC 

lira hoW o 8 « wjn WTror- 

lecnxm mpa mtn baworo 
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THEATRES 


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SUPBIB VALUE 
AUTUMN BREAKS 
fH SNOWDONIA 

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3 OCT Mike NrwetTs THE 
£3000 FATHER (15) SEATS 
BOOKABLE LAST EVE. 
PCTFS ’ _ 


SCREEN AT THE ELECT RIC 229 
3694. CHAN 8 MWI NI 8 11(0 
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The Times Classified 

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MONDAY 

EdoadoK Unimrity 
Appoin l mcnB. Prep & MHt 
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EdnettkMiI CoarscL - 
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La CUrae to la Crime and oUw 
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TUESDAY 

r«apffkr IIwfTiMji Computer 
Appomtmcmts wnh cdiioraL 
Le*sl A pirel ti uu Solidlon. 


romnurrmT Lawycra, Legal 
Ofliccre. Prime & Public 

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IarsI La Crcflw for top legal 

secretaries. 

PdfaBc Scaor Ap pote tMeR te .- 


WEDNESDAY 

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Property: ReadenuaL Town & 
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THURSDAY 

CrartA mtaarar . 

Management and Execuuye 
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FRIDAY _ 

Motors; A conwkm car buyers 
guide with editorial. . 
Bimbw to Borinas: BusmesS 
opportunities, franchises etc. 
with editoriaL .. .. % 

hunt Gride. (Mroi«J) 


SATURDAY 

OmscRi aad UK HafiduS 
VUtes/Couages. Holds. Flisbte 
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THE WORLD FAMOUS PERSONAL COLUMN. INCLUDING 
RENTALS. APPEARS EVERY PAY. 


CRICKET 


Torn covers catch 
India napping to 
delay Test match 

From Rkhard Streeton, Delhi 


A succession of heavy rain- 
storms. coupled with inad- 
equate covering , prevented the 
second Test match between 
I ndia and Australia from start- 
ing here yesterday. Any hope of 
play was abandoned by lunch 
and neither side announced 
their team. The immediate pros- 
pects for a start remain poor. 

with further wet weather fore- 
cast for the weekend. 

To the astonishment of the 
Australians, they found the 
pitch in a worse state than the 
outfield when they reached the 
und. It had rained early and 

storms did not return for 90 

minutes. The covets were off 
and revealed that the bowling 
approaches were muddy. There 
were damp patches on the pitch 
as water had clearly seeped 
under the 


The Feroz Shah Kotla mound 
has always been one of most 
poorly appointed Test cemres in 
the world. The Delhi and Dis- 
trict Cricket Association. 
Though not lacking funds, have 
never felt it necessary to spend 
money on modern covering. 
This time they have been badly 
caught out. The covers only 
comprise four huge tarpaulins, 
one of them badly tom with 
eight jagged holes, some about a 
foot wide. 

The present Australian 
management are more dip- 
lomatic than some of their 
predecessors. They said nothing, 
although unofficially, there are 
certain to be representations to 
have improvements made be- 
fore next year’s World Cup 
matches here. 


In one sense both the Indians 
and Australians in the present 
series arc victims Of the intense 
demands made by modern 
programming. In weather terms 
this Australian visitis about six 
weeks too early if the planners 
wished to miss any delayed 
monsoon rain. It did. however, 
suit both countries to take the 
ramble and start the tour in the 
first week of September. 

The Indians have an extraor- 
dinary season arranged. They 
will play 1 1 Test matches and 17 
one-day internationals before 
the end of March as Australia. 
Sri Lanka and Pakistan tour. 
India are also committed to one- 

day tournaments in Sharjah in 
late November and next ApriL 
The thinking is to try and find 
new players for the world Cup. 
but the established stars will 
certainly be tired men in six 
months time. 

The Australians were anxious 
for their newcomers to gain tour 
experience before they meet 
England for the Ashes. The 
present crammed eight-week 
tour itinerary — with cricket or 
travelling every day and no rest 
days in the Tests was also the 
Australian choice. 

They have an ingrained pho- 
bia about tours to the sub- 
continent since Australia's first 
full length visit to India and 
Pakistan, led by Bcnaud in 
1959-60. Living conditions for 
overseas visitors, it must be 
stressed, have improved greatly 
since then, but Benaud's team 
were racked by illness. 


Remedial coaching 


Greg Thomas And Richard 
Ellison, shrugging off their dis- 
appointment at being overlooked 
for the tour to Australia, will 
undergo special coaching ses- 
sions with Geoff Arnold, the 
former Test bowler, to help them 
regain their Rjigtand places next 
summer. 

Thomas, the Glamorgan fust 
bowler, and Ellison, the Kent 
aU-ronnder, believe Arnold, the 
former Surrey and Eng la nd 
bowler, can provide the exper- 
tise to help them iron oat flaws 
in their bowling technique. The 
coaching sessions, which will 
take place at the Oval from 
Monday to Wednesday next 
week, were the idea of Mickey 
Stewart, the Surrey cricket 
manager. 

Stewart, who win be assistant 
manager on England's winter 
tour, said: “They've welcomed 
the idea, and, by and large, it is 
the first time something like this 


has been done. Geoff Arnold is a 
splendid cricket coach, and it 
should be very valuable for 
them.'* 

A love letter 

Vivian Richards, the West 
Indies cricket captain sacked b) 
his English comfy dab. still 
maintains: “My heart belongs to 
Somerset.'* In a letter published 
Id a Taunton newspaper yes- 
terday, Richards explained his 
view of Somerset's decision last 
month not to renew his contract, 
and that of his West Indies 
coUeagne, Jod Garner, which 
split the dob and led lan 
Uflllwm , (he g-n gltowd all- 
rounder, to threaten to leave the 
county unless both were re- 
instated. Richards, who consid- 
ers he has many good years to 
offer as a player, said: “People 
have asked me why I do not just 
walk away, bat my heart belongs 
to Somerset." 


RUGBY LEAGUE 

Mansfield set 
to break 
new ground 

By Keith Mackiin 

The game breaks new ground 
temporarily tomorrow when 
Mansfield Marksman, who 
have been moved from pillar to 
post recently, play Fulham at the 
Meadow Lane ground of Notts 
County Football Club. 

Mansfield were pioneers in 
north Nottinghamshire and now 
they test the market for Rugby 
League interest in the heart of 
the county. It is only a one-off 
match at the (bird division 
club's stadium, as Mansfield 
wait for improvements to their 
own ground. 

Among the giants of the first 
division. Wigan entertain Hall, 
St Helens uavel to Hal! Kings- 
ton Rovers and Widnes are at 
home to Leeds. 

Ray Moidt, the South African 
winger, retains his place in the 
Wigan side after returning from 
a long injury spdJ and scoring 
four tries in the Lancashire Cup 
game against Whitehaven last 
Wednesday. 

The other Hull side. HnD 
Kingston Rovers, are in an even 
worse pickle. They are totally 
out of form at the moment and 
were held to a 20-20 draw by 
Featherrtene Rovers in the 
Yorkshire Cup. 

Leeds are a third side strug- 
gling to put things together and 
they were well-beaten by 
Chstfeford in the Yorkshire 
Cup. 

Casileford themselves should 
retain their 100 per cent record 
at home to their lowly neigh- 
bours' Feathersione but there 
will be a battle royal at Halifax, 
where ' Warrington are the 
visitors. 


HOCKEY 

Bolland’s last 
chance to 
stake a claim 

By Sydney Friskin 

England have a chance to put 
the final touches to their World 
Cup preparation when they play 
Canada at Bishara Abbey today 
and tomorrow, and against 
Australia at Pickens Lock on 
Tuesday. By that time, England 
will have played all the teams in 
Group B except India and 
Poland. 

The exercises against Canada 
provide a late opportunity for 
Phul BolJand to play at right 
back. He has been sitting on the 
bench during the five inter- 
national matches England have 
played so far on the way u> the 
World Cup, which starts in 
London on October 4. At half 
back. England are well-equipped 
but injuries to Clift (inside left) 
and Batchelor (outside right) 
still pose problems up front 
Canada modestly expea to 
finish anywhere between sev- 
enth and ninth in the World 
Cup. but have been practising 
strenuously. They are captained 
by Burrows, a solid and reliable 
full beck who -has earned 64 
caps, not quite half as many as 
the versatile Satinder Choban 
who tops the list with 132. 

• Hassan Sardar. the Pakistan 
centre forward who was top 
scorer with 12 goals in the Los 
Angeles Olympic Games and 
Player of the Year for 198S. has 
been dropped from their World 
Cup squad, reportedly because 
of his loss of form. The inside 
story, however, is that he led a 
players' revolt last April against 
the Pakistan Hockey Federa- 
tion, who had allegedly not 
fulfilled their promises of gifts of 
land after the Olympic triumph. 



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SPORT THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27-1986 


RACING: HILLS-TRAINED COLT SET FOR WINNING RETURN IN ASCOT FEATURE 


Sure Blade looks cut above rivals 


By Mandarin 

Sore Blade can give a 
further boost to this season's 
classic form and reaffirm his 
position as a top performer in 
his own right by winning the 
Queen Elizabeth 11 Stakes, the 
£40.000 highlight on a 
magnificent programme at As- 
cot today. 

After finishing fifth to 
Dancing Blade in the 2,000 
Guineas. Sheikh 

Mohammed's three-year-old 
was sent to Royal Ascot where 
he gained an authoritative 
victory over Green Desert, in 
the process reversing the New- 
market placings with his 
nearest victim. 

Convinced that the Kris colt 
was not at his best. Barry Hills 
then gave Sure Blade a lengthy 
rest. “Like several of my 
horses, he was not moving 
right and had some muscular 
problem.*’ said the trainer 
yesterday. “However, he 
worked well at Newbury last 
Saturday and l am very happy 
with his condition." 

Of Sure Blade's opponents. 
Teleprompter won this race in 
1984 and covered himself 
with glory when runner-up to 
the brilliant Shadeed last 
September. 

On balance Lord Derby’s 
gallant gelding seems to have 
lost a little of his fire this 
season, but on his most recent 
run did pretty well to -finish 
seventh to Esirapade in die 
Budweiser-Arfington Million 
in Chicago after being ham- 
pered at the start, h will be 
most unwise to dismiss 
Tcleprompter's chance of 
gaining a second victory in 
this group two race. 

By far the best recent public 
form is possessed by Hadeer. 
Clive Brittain's consistent 
four-year-old has been run- 
ning with tremendous zest all 
season, winning three of his 
last four starts. After finishing 
unplaced behind Then Again 
in the Waterford Crystal Mile 
at Goodwood. Hadeer re- 
cently produced a tremendous 
burst of finishing speed to 
catch Moonlight Lady in the 
final stride of the Kiveton 
Park Stakes at Doncaster. 

The main doubt concerns 
Hadeer's ability to last out the 
mile, as seven furlongs has so 
far appeared to be the colt's 
best distance. 

Of the other, runners Efisio 
has been pefdrming consis- 
tently well in top company but 
Sure Blade looks well worth 
the nap. 

-Lester Piggott, who had his 
first group winner as a trainer 
on ! this track' : wtaett . Cutting^ 
Blade won .the Coventry 






Gwydion (left), touched off here by Double Schwsutz at Goodwood, is a fancied contender for Ascot’s Diadem Stakes 

hakes at the royal meeting, Hallgate would be a confident r) rt c 4- nn 

an now land the most im- selection to master Gwydion i UlK ft 1 -* X [Hc» - LI I U 

wrtant prize of his career by and Acushla, Vincent r ^ 

apiuring the Royal Lodge O'Brien's recent winner of the otroCfe IIAlIICYOI* 

>takes with Deputy Governor. Glen International Eying V'Ckii t-UHUvUgVl 

After beating Angara Abyss Five at Phoenix Park. _ - . _ . - , rnn „* nnt 

. i inofirfri and then winnina The afternoon onens with Pro™ Our Irish Racing Correspondent, Dublin 


Stakes at the royal meeting, 
can now land -the most im- 
portant prize of his career by 
capturing the Royal Lodge 
Stakes with Deputy Governor. 

After beating Angara Abyss 
at Lingfield and then winning 
Newbury's Washington Singer 
Slakes. Deputy Governor then 
proceeded to run his best-ever 
race when giving Don’t Forget 
Me such a tremendous fight 
for his money in the Laurent 
Perrier Champagne Stakes at 
Doncaster. 

Who Knows finished fourth 
that afternoon and will obvi- 
ously have to improve to be 
involved in the finish. Bengali 
Fire. Rock Chanteiir and 
Santeila Sam are other 
improving two-year-olds, but 
Deputy Governor is difficult 
to oppose. 

It hard also to ignore the 
chance of Hallgate in the 
Diadem Slakes. In the 
Vernon's Spring Cup at 
Haydock Sally Half’s three- 
year-old recorded the finest 
performance of his career 
when finishing within a neck 
of Green Desert* previously 
the winner of the July Cup. • r " 
. Ifit were hot for the flactttaat 
the ground is. riding * last; 


Hallgate would be a confident 
selection to master Gwydion 
and Acushla, Vincent 
O'Brien's recent winner of the 
Glen International Eying 
Eve at Phoenix Park. 

The afternoon opens with 
the Red' Deer Stakes. At 
Newbury last Saturday 
Almaarad would undoubtedly 
have beaten Broken Wave and 
HauwmaJ instead of finishing 
ihiixl, but for being badly 
hampered and having the bit 
slip through his mouth. 

John Dunlop's three-year- 
old has previously shown a 
tendency to veer from a true 
line, but should still prove too 
good' for Pochard and 
Weshaam. 

l.asi year Michael Stoute 
chose the Blue Seal Stakes as 
the introductory race for the 
brilliant Sonic Lady. This 
afternoon the season's leading 
trainer is expected to capture 
the same event with Unite, 
who is the subject of glowing 
reports from Newmarket 

At Redcar the 16-year-old 
Amanda Harwood can record 
her seventh success on the Flat 
by winmngthe Red Mountain 
Coffee Civ Amateur. Riders* 
Stakes on Vagador. 


STRATFORD 













— ^A»-| • • i; : 




■n ii ■■w. ji ipj n i i.iii 


Henry Cedi rarely sends a 
botse over to run in Ireland bat 
bis decision to take on Park 
Express with Mashkov in the 
Bbndford Stakes at The Car- 
ragh this afternoon gives this 
group two pattern race quite a 
lift. 

Jim Bofger, deciding against 
two trips to England hi quick 
succession, has elected to ran 
Piark Express in the BUodford 
Stakes rather than the Son 
Chariot Stakes as a prelude to 
her participation in the Dnhai 
Champion Stakes at New- 
market. 

Park Express proved herself a 
test developing fifty by the 
manner in which she beat an 
ivteniatkma) line-op to earn 
more than £250,630 in the 
Phoenix Champion Stakes. 
Once John Reid set her alight 
halfway up the straight she had 
the race wen in a matter of 
strides. 

That was, however, over 19 
teriongs and ft remains to be 
seen today whether she is as 
effective at lib mfles^lthongh 
she won the Lancashire Oaks at 


REDCAR 




this distance earlier hi- the. 
summer. 

Mashkov wQl provide a 
Stiffer test than the fillies she 
beat at. Haydock Park, es- 
pecially as he meets her on 4£b 
better than the normal weight 
lor sex terms. 

He beat the snhsequeut St 
Leges winner. Moon Madness, 
by a head for second plan when 
going down by the same margin 
in the Great VoWgev Stakes to. 
Nisnas- The ted that there are 
only five rn users suggests that 
the balance today will rest with 
Park Express and Steve 
Clothes will have to make .Ms 
own pace. 

John Dunlop coshl bring to an 
end die unbeaten record of 
Darcy's Thatcher with Sanam in 

the group three Ferrous Fotnrity 
Stakes. 

The argument in tevonr of 
Sanam is that he divided Shin- 
ing Water and Lockton in the 
Glen International Solarfo 
Stakes at Sandown when set to 
give weight to the first and third. 
Lockton aft e rwards won the 
National Stakes here in Ireland. 




ESKSSbwafa 

■Li -1 J J 


Songster 

denies 

Manton 

split 

By Midifid Seely 

Robert Sangster expressed to- 
tal astonishment at Ascot yes- 
terday about a newspaper report 
that Jje would be unfikeiy to 
renew Michael Dickinson's con- 
tract -to train bones for. him 
privately ax Manton. 

"The report in the Daily Mail 
is- cruet inaccurate and totally 
fabricated. Michael's contract 
extends to October, 1990, not 
next year as stated. And anyone 
who knows me — and all racing 
writers should — will be aware. 
ibat 1 have never taken away a 
horse from a trainer in 25 years 
of ownership," Ite said. 

Earlier in the day Sangster 
bad said from his home in the 

Isle of Mam about bis installa- 
tion of The former champion 1 
National -Hunt trainer m the 
£!4m complex in Wiltshire. 
"The whole idea is absurd. This 
has always been a long- term 
project. Of course, to have had 
only two winner so ter is -rather 
disappointing, but Michael has 
only two-year-olds to train and 
most of them are backward.” 

Dickinson's comment was 
brief. “The whole article is a 
pack of lies and - 1 shall be 
consulting my solicitor about 
the affair/’. 

One of the points made in the 
article was. that Anthony Stirk, 
the resident veterinary surgeon, 
had been sacked. “Anthony is 
now employed by the 
Swettenham Stud and not di- 
rectly by Michael,” said 
Sangiter. “But his services are 
still entirety at his disposal. This 
is only a technical matter.” 

However, allegations made, 
that four yearlings are to be re- 
routed to Ballydoyle was at least 
partly true. 

Sangster sake “There is a 
Northern Dancer colt out of 
Detroit which might have gone 
to Michael- But SO per cent of it 
is owned by an American who 
wants to send it to Vincent 
O'Brien. Then there is a Storm 
Bird colt which Vincent and 
John Magnier own in partner- 
ship with me. But don't forget 
I've got about 90 yearlings to 
place with different trainers of 
which about 27 will go to 
Manton.” 

There is no inconsistency in 
Songster's statement- The com- 
petition for hones in this multi- 
million pound business has 
always been intense, and what- 
ever the temporary movement 
in the disposal of bis extensive 
empire, in the tong run 
Sangster’s total commitment 
and loyalty to Dickinson will be 
absolute. 

Blinkered first time 

ASCOT: &40 NamfaeMon, GwyUton. 
REDCAR: 1.45 Gantilascftl. 

4.15 BMigraw Lad. • 


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SWiLTRAl 


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■ Ascot selections * 

By Mandarin 

2.0 Almaarad. 135 SURE BLADE (nap* M Govctw«* 

3.40 Hallgate. 4.15 Manchesierskytrain. 4.45 Unite. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent ■ 

10 Weshaam.' 135 Truly Nureyev- 3.5 Deputy Governor 
3.40 Gwydion. 4. 15 Pinstripe- 4.45 Unite. ; 

Ely Michael Seely j 

K) ALMAARAD (nap|l 135 Sure Blade. 4.45 Unite. . 










210 0B324S MOOHUGHT IADV (RoWwta U® P JThtaaB* 

fr4 Sun Biado. 5-2 Hadeer. 5-t Mooniflht Lady. 6-1 TelaprompBV. 12-1 Iha^t 
Nureyev. Effsto, Tff-1 Mata- 
















3.40 THF DIADEM STAKES {Group lib £18,620: fift (12) • ; ■> 

iaasmaassiSgi 
1 1 j gsp g p ggarsgl 

pU Acushla; 7JZ ©wydkm. « HaigUB, 9-t Tfc i«* ro3 ” ^ 1 , 0 '! h ^? l *" to> ’ 
Sperry. 14-1 Meteoric, ZO-lfirjn Lanfqg. ZS-l Ponadym 33-1 

rfiftM NbimATitiHlwfndtiui skide Hoyal Ascot Bart er, Mi 21 2td (fr dl to 
PUnm HtwricAinfaBrta-lllatftaCqrraQhspenqlhenedftetrnprB S Si ontheih nA 
best with give in tha ground (Bl. HH11550. heavy. May 17. 11 ranj.TWreHCM«, 
Mflen import, is unbeaten *! 6 0 








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dMattowsj ( Msahem 4-7-tf 

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(C-OI (P Bowdtch) 0 BsModh 7-7-10 GCwMC 






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A share In - 

NEWMARKET THOROUGHBRED RACING pk 

. pin you up to 15 horses taming and miming lor you next season, far onh 

Thnvareonh a tuniird aurnher of shares left, so call es qnidUy for our (rcc 
culuur brochure, widioul oUqaama. 

Anna Ludlow- Ncwmatlo Thoraughtnd Racmg pie. 

|\nsus ShN«. Ncwmarti.1 SuHfolk. CBS 7DJ 
Phone WJBAM00 

tin wimI B»ta dot* m cawwe » mm id iwtas* S«m. "mu *4 M "ta * ** 

hM b) n» unas til on e w tatpecao 


• Tattersalls Indand are plan- 
ning to move their sales opera- 
tions to Fairyhouse from Dublin 
following the purchase of tite 
Old Fairyhouse Stud. 

OFFICIAL SCRATCHMG& bS engeg»- 
mems (deacQ; Ufflo Rock. Ponr Aran. 
Over The Rhne. Oet Atnque. Cool Tor. 
Uganda. Burnt Heatner. Smark. Gay 
Caruso. Sarem Kyt». Toy Cupboard. Run 
Ciwrfie. Wisbech UHL Sergeant Mactcay, 
Mr Nash. 


2 31-3 PWNCE SANTIAGO (USAim Denys Smnh 7-1 1-7 

CM 

4 IM GLORY SHATCtei (D)G RKhanta 10-11-3_PTu<* 

fl 0M mLLOWSURN R Bhnns !2-f3-7 .ASfanger 

Evens Prince Santiago, 5-4 story Snatcher, 5.1 WHovfagm. 

3.45 GREEKALL WHITLEY HANDICAP CHASE 
(£1.251: 3m 100yd) (10) 

4 010- MASTBI RICHE D Smraflebtrtt 5-11-7 

MrDSwMMieiat 

5 4-10 EASTBt WO (OF) G Riefwroa S-11 -S ^ PTbc* 




6*4 Another Gear. 3-1 CknstaragA 4-1 CeMb'TfaBfa 

4.45 UULSWATER NOVICE HURDLE (Dhc lb £685: 
2m 330yd) (7) 

t 430- BUJ7TOaMSPi»iW&-It-fl.. . ----r: gfpr 

4 0002 M0UtrrGB»«EAW0n^1-0------- . Hlfaeg er 

5 0- NAUTICAL JOKE W A Sfptienson 7-11-0^ H U«* 

6 01- TDRStTMooifieedS-iMi — ^-rsns— B t%SE 

9 00-0 MASTBtAT T 0 regY DMcCan4-1tH2 KP«*» 

10 00-4 ROYETZIff WMp6We4.10.1 7 - sgx- - ~1 

13 P4-fl PLAYING N Prkigie 7-TM — ; M H—^ ta O 

114 HoyaJzky._ 3-1 BRy Tobfa,-7-« ftay**si. MH«4 








m (Paul Cook). a 


















l t \fS)»u«UAfl>p 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 


SPORT 


37 


RACING 




ah 

w V; J: '1^ 

*» i.i! 

?.^0 

^ "■ * * 


Ajdal sparkles 
as 



golden summer 
lingers on 




i* 


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g?S 

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fa *■ ... 

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S;|'s at 

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V 


By Michael Seely . 

Stoute's golden favourite at 15- 1 with Power 
Bender to repeat Inter- 


: h - Michael 

year continued in brilliant 
sunshine at Ascot yesterday 
when the season's leading 
trainer landed a treble with 
Kabiyla, Lisana and Ajdal. 
who is now the new favourite 
Tor next spring's 2.000 Guin- 
eas at 10-1 after an impressive 
win in the EBF Moramgton 
Stakes. 

.The ease of this victory had 
to be seen to be believed. 
Walter Swinburn kept Sheikh 
Mohammed's Northern 
Dancer coll tucked in behind 
the leaders until he moved the 
favourite out tti challenge two 
^furlongs from home. The 
Ttickey then looked thought- 


to 

mission's 1976 win in the 
Cambridgeshire for the stable. 

“! didn't fancy her an that 
much today but she's certainly 
earned the right to mn now,” 
Stoute said. A Sib penalty for 
yesterday's victory brings the 
Aga Khan's filly's weight for 
the first leg of the autumn 
double to nine stone. _ 

Lisana, Stoute's . second 
winner of the day, gamed a 
decisive two-length win over 
Swimmer in the EWar Stud 
Farms Stakes. The AgaKhatTs 
Alleged fitly was ridden' with, 
coolness and judgment by 
Michael Giles, one of Stoute's 


|t fully at GreviUe Starkey ~on . apprentices, who was record^ 
p ! u? Sharp Victor before allowing ing the fifth win of his career. 






I; 5*-. ; 


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**• a ? 





."*** * * i. % : 

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Ajdal to stride home two 
lengths clear to win -on the 
bridle. • 

After having saddled bis 
fifth winner during the first 
fyo days 1 of the September 
meeting. Stoute said: "The 

rally to mind liti?nff«ve to 
Ijirnk about ft first. I definitely 
want him to have one more 
race for experience before the 
end of the season." 

. The Dewhurst has already 
been announced as the objec- 
tive fbr Bellotto, Khaled 
Abdulla's impressive winner 
$f the Acomb Stakes at York. 

- The trainer then said that 
reen Desert had been with- 
wn from this afternoon’s 
iadeni Stakes in order to try 
and repeat Maxwell's 1981 
victory fbr the stable in the 
Birix de J’Abbaye at 
Longchamp on Arc day. 
*^Green Desert will go to Paris, 
provided that the ground is 
dot too soft” he said. "His 
remaining objective is the 
Breeders’ ■ Cup six-furlong 
“i 6reht on din." 

■ Talking about Shahrastani 
and Shardari, his two can- 
didates for the Arc, Stoute 
concluded: *Tm not putting 
gny 'pressure on Waiter to 
fnaJce up his mind I’ve got 
Such a strong back-up avail- 
able in GreviHe-Starkey." 

;■ Kabiyla, who had started 
the. trainer’s flow of winners. 
When storming home to a 
seven-length wm.in the Taylor ' 
Woodrow Construeiiozs 
Golden Jubilee Charitj 
Stakes, is now joint 


As well as Stoute, the Agfc 
Khan also landed -a treble as 
early in the afternoon Paul 
Code had brought Najidiya 
with a well-timed late nut to 
overcome Satisfaction and 
Festival City in the Terry 
Ramsden Stakes. "This is a 
pretty decent little fifly,” 
Fulke Johnson Houghton 
said. "I think, we should '-be 
able to find another race for 
her.” 

A marvellous advertise- 
ment fbr HaUgate*s chances in 
this afternoon's Diadem 
Slakes was given when Chris 
Rutter drove Polykratis to a 
two-length win over Perfect 
Timing in the Wilfiam HiH 
Stakes. Here Polykratis was 
defying 10 stone 11b in a 
competitive handicap, having 
finished third to Green Desert 
and Hallgate in the Vernons 
Sprint Cup at Haydock lasti 
time out 

"Thai was a pretty good 
performance,” .Memcic ran- 
ds, the winning trainer, said. 
“He'll now go for the Prix 
Omenoni- in Milan in. a 
fortnight's time." - • 

In the last race of the (fay, 
the Kensington Palace Stakes, 
Starkey gained revenge for his 
earlier defeat by Swinburn 
when bringing Bourbon Girl 
with a devastating ran to 
overhaul Miss Storm Bird, 
who had been made a short- 
priced favourite to give Stoute 
his fourth whiner- of the 
afternoon. Barry- Hills trains 
the . winner ,-fof :J>anring 
Brave’s owner,,. Khaled 
Abdulla. 1 - 


Yesterday’s results 

Ascot 


um: 7 iwvWm.3LW.ii A Hkte at 
Mn w ia ri M ii Tote B4.TO;£2.90.O .10.0* 


Tricast £45855. 2mte 1242s#c. 

XS (Sf> 1 , POtXKRATWIC RuBar. 1M 
fc-Pwfect TWng (S CButhan. X 
- ~ MN Csrfste, 1 6-1). ALSO FlAta 

Resoact, 6 WoodfeW. 134 




. Fawny. 12 Smooch IBM. 1_ - - - 
MMepar. 10 ran. 7L 

Stoute tfNmnnrkM. Tort: £440: £140. 
£ja £2. 3a DR 2124a CSF: £4742. 

Jpcasc £281 JX irate 41.70MC- 

STa. 21 . ltd. 4L M Stoute at Wjwjwtg. 

2gto I3844MC 

’MLW (T0 1. AJDAL (W R ©ytrtbwn, 8-13 

l»ewrrwtwtTo*K2140;ei40. EiaaOF: 

£2,00. CSF: raraimln 2947S6& 


t 



(W4. 20 OrianW E»mw (At). Ouan 01 
Swordt-Srwv. XC3T4I. ^aLMPrrocod 
at New ma r tet Tot* £240: eiaa £2.10. 
El.ia OF: 2104a CSF: £23^5 . 

445 (1(10 1, ATHENS OAT* (N 

CMca 8 Forei^i Krtght 
(tth). 20Bonatomne (4mK 33 
Ftoxon Worrior. UndTa GokLTha «jca to 
“ ' ' wwajarief . 12 an. ins>L 


*C 5L 4 w Watts at ftdVTwna 
Esao: n.ea ri4a ei4a dr nxta 

CSF: £24.73. After stawanto' nquky. 
result stood. 

SLlSPn01.ZI0F P F l N O tJCanp8.ia- 
2k 2. Iterto Trector (G Bjrd-A tMtS. 

—p, 0 GSndori. 20-1 k 4. Janwton 

jr, '12-11. ALSO RAftB <av Gods 
i Goidan Baau (ma 9 Rune Trecfc 

DF: £14030- CSF: £78^9. Trfcaat 
£133026. _ 

ptmpoecssao 

Worcester 

G o to B-fto n 

240ancW1. r re Wf aWwqiiqnanto 

' • HI. It R 0 -SoU^-Tc*k E4.lt 

.70 £240 DR £3746. 


£1.60 DF; £1140 CSF: £2071. Imte 
japfcppc not worn Naaapafc C13145 

Redcar 


rSfiWSISS 

Tow £1440: £2-90 040 DR £1 

C <£^ : San. o a teOTBi ipi w M yc . 
11-iO far^r^^MWy Sujaat PMfc* 
Plauldain P*-1)- 10 ran. 4L 8LJ Norton. 

TOteQ-40: El.ia £1-44 21-W- DR 

£440. CSFi £*42. 



h(RHff4-1|i&.ALS02Ml|4 SSfRfftATl.ia neafoR 


iMtaPh 

ii. 6 CheswoM. B Owrpoww {MO W 
tort' s« Un. 12 Princess SJnffi, » 
Radd» Ashton, tors Pride, ^ 1 1ren- ». 
hd. sh hd. til hO »4 Rjw « 
HawmartMt Tote PfiJIfcl EOgO . 

£K6a DF: £89.10. CSF: £7140 TWcaae 
£264.17. 


Ewa. Tow SjOt £1-10 Cl. 60. -DR 
E34aCSft£448. 

54 (2m_2i i hdte), i..rete 


E ‘s?Mt2m21hdW1.PowPto4rK! 
jTOttsUittby. iefen* gg 


RUGBY UNION; JAPAN MUST KEEP THE BALL AWAY FROM THE SET PIECES 


Scotland 
may not 
find it 
so easy 

By Da^ld Hands, Rn^y 
Correspondent 

- Derrick Grant, ' Scotiarefs 
coach, held a soroewhai more 

prolonged run-out on the bade 
pitch at MurrayfieW yesterday 
than is usual. He. may have 
sensed a degree of over-con- 
fideoce about Iris i 
approach today's 
sponsored by Toshiba, 

Japan at MurrayfieW - a feeling 
encouraged by the indifferent 
record of the touring party in 
their three games so far, is 
which . they have beaten the 
Scottish North toad Midlands 
bat lost (heavily) to the South of 
Scotland and to Edinburgh. 

It- is a difficult mated) for 
Grant who, with his co-selec- 
tors. has picked the strongest 

available combination. He wQl 

wish his side to win weU to make 
h a meaningful occasion, but if 
the Scottish score mounts to the 
forties or fifties he may well 
i e g ret not- having chosen some 
of his younger men to see their 
reaction to a tug representative 
occasion. 

He will have at the back of bis 
mind, too, the storming finish 
staged by Japan in their last 
international in Britain, three 
years ago, when three late tries 
brought them within five points 
of Wales at Cazdiffi Speed of 
thought and of hand will be 
Japan's ambition today since 
they must keep the boll away 
from the set pieces where,- 

despite the corre ctn ess , of 
Japan’s scrummage, Scotland 
should dominate. ■ •• - 

Jt will make little difference to- 
Scotland that- Baird has been 
forced out for a grain strain. His 
plaeeoa the wing goes to Tukalo 
who was capped against Ireland 
last year and whose speed and 
elusive running baffled the Japa- 
nese when they played the South 
ofScotiand at Melrose last week. 
But Scotland’s backs will not 
have their wn until the back 
row has sapped - Japanese 
strength, driving down the mid- 
dle; chivvied on by Laidlaw at 
their beds. 

It will be a welcome return to 
the Scottish jersey for Sole, the 
Bath tooserh ead prop; whose 
run in the side was ruddy 
disrupted -last ' February by > 
facial injury in a dub match. It 
is-a vote of confidence to- which 
the young man will respond and' 
certainly his dub do not expect 
to see xooiaucb of him this ride 
of Christmas. • • 
tiayashi, the Japanese cap- 
tain, nasmoved from the second 
row to flanker to increase their 
lysical presence -.and 
ii i. pi deed to tour as a stand- 
off half, has been called in at foil, 
back, Hirao and Matsuo will 



turned out 10 years ago to watch 
Japan but the Scottish dubs 
have not re-arranged their fix- 
tures and the attendance may be 
thin. 


Tukalo, who can baflle Japanese again with Us muring 

seek to create chances for the 
dusive Onuki on the wing, and 
' Konishi win test the Scottish 
defence dose to the scrum but rt 
is difficult to see them upsetting 
such an e x perienced Scottish 
side. 

This does not mean there wQI 
be any lack of entertainment 
despite the claim, of Shiggy 
Konnot, their manager, that “We 
don't play thegame in this open 
style merely in order to enter- 
tain the crowd -it's simply the 

way we have to play to stand a JAMfeK Wv; NTsunoafotai. 8 H*ao, E 
chance against, bigger, fafler gWStoafcK»^D.YK S «*o 
opposition. Whether the Scot- 

tishpuMic respond may depend T Hspow fcap- 

upon the weather; some 30,000 n ws ». L MPiMMux(Bstendj. 



Fouroux is under fire for 

a style 



PWer Cadeftein, the French 
centre, capped 31 times with 
Nartcane, has joined T mdwwe - 

largdy on the touch fine with aa 
iajwry. The “Petit Prfaca" .fa 
d^eniuned to Brake a royal 
comeback in sne af the rul i w i l 
XVs against the AO Blacks, bat 
at Tofaoaae he wiD have to 
displace either Denis Chamt or 
Eric Bounevai fa the dab's bock 
division — unless Pierre 
-VBteareax, thrir coach, is pre- 
pared fa move Booneval to the 

"itlwse. who repealed their 
dub championship win of fast 
■enson over Agen when the two 
dnte met in die Du Manofir 
Challenge, hare seven players in 
France's World Cap squad, 
among them the Bankers Kart 
Jaaft aud .Thierry Maset. A 
fiaulcer of Masetls ahiBty and 
speed, coupled with an almost 
reckless capacity to win the hall 
on fte ground, was sorely missed. 

daring France's su mmer tour of 

the seuthern hemi s p h e re. 

The faiiwe of. the. team in 
threeof their four fatei w a t iona b 
provided the mate t h e m e of n 


By Chris Than 

i of the top 4® French 
held in Toulonse tarty 
this mouth. In France c ou che s 
are . more Eke so« 
than -their anch 

and dab 
have been invited to 
help the national s e le ctor s and 
esnchft in their task of prepur- 
ing a credible side for neyt year's 
World Cap. 


tumal team emfaate In this 
respect the most successfhl dnb 
side — To _ 




Jacques Fearoux, the national 
coach, for Us dedsiou to alter 
radically the style of play from 
one game to another. “France 
need a style,” Vfflepreux says, 
“and that is something Fowoux 
has been suable to He is a 
pragmatic, opportunist who 
changes Us approach far too 
.often.” 

Fouroux, whose confidence 
seems little shaken by his 
nnsfortuaes Down Under, has 
legitimately replied that the 
variation in France’s approach b 
dictated by the kind of oppo- 
sition they play and points out 
with some bony, tut the na- 


TODAY'S TEAM NEWS 






>- V 


rtmotB* 

# Pactolus has been — , . 
backed for the Tote C«arewj 
with Ladbrokes who ; liunm bid 
the horse 10 lose £100.000 avail 
prices from 20-1 down to IM 
favourite. Corah make Gay 


^F; noa.17. Mobto. 


heavily 

uewjtcn 


^■Hoa.17 Mob«. ravyuiuc. cuiou 

115(501. ouraswoh (P Brett*. 5-i>: Kindctstey’s tbree-ycar-oWJO-l 

joim-favounte.wrth hisformo- 
nrior ot Soh»n(J stable companion. BaMerolvaf' 

aSgfo.®. a ier laying him to lose 04-000. 




Today’s coarse specialists 


ASCOT 

TRAINERS: H vtonora frum^ 

tenners. 2S.4-XC ajjaacoe^OWj”^ 
54 ii ctnqjwu 36 from 178* <P»l %i 
fajOCKEYS: w Carson. 44 jwwtos hm 
wroos. 107VW Ed ouy^ WJ 
282. 16.0ft;' 6 Sterirtjf. 3* ,rom 21S - 
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REDCAR 

TRAINERS: G Harwood, 12 wiu qwsn qni 
Socxfiva n PE»W.J2««Wsfcom72 

^Tia7V A Mackay.11 

G Du*itoM.34 from 334. IQ^ft- 

- CARLISLE 

164 rumwre. 184ft: D McCain, 7 ho" 41. 


i7.iv w a steptiwfa".; »;*«*" ,B7 - 
joCIEV 8 e G Grant 16 mnn (ram 93 

Toefc. 8 from UK 7.7ft. - 

MARKET RASEN 

TRAWOW: M H Eamrt*. fitahma 

SASfoSSiBSA 

fan 157. 11-5%. _ ■ ■ . 

joatEYSiP Dutton. 24 wKVwrs hum IBS 

Ftfles. 145%. tody on* q««fati- 

STRATFORD . 

nuKuun .SAf 1, 


Gloucester r Bristol 
Menard WKants. from Naath, 
plays scrum half for Gkxicasfar 
dmpifa an Injury against 
MuMir. FDWtep&tttottwbaEk 
row agrinst a BrWdl side with 

Mdes and Eves In their back row. 

Sale ▼ Coventry 

Thu second of today's John 
Smith's m art tatoto Ajamas.i 
Covunhy north fath Boston 
back at standKiff half, which 
remaios a problem posMcn for . 
the MkSand dub. MctQa te . 
uravaiabte for Sale, who are . 
otherwise at stoangth.- 

Bedford t RiduDond 

fan Powfar. 

2dsmu*^^^ad after lost 
weekend's defeat against 

Northampton. Southern and 

Heaton come In at centre for 
this table B game. . 

London Irish ▼ Bosslyn 

Pfark 

Rosstyn Parte, afeo in uafaB. 

welcome the afleleesWptoy to Bmr 
back row instead of Bracks, 1 
who is fa. Pfummer and Read some 

into the centre against the Irish, 
who spent a successful weekend in 

Ctontarf fast week. ■ 

Bath ▼ Llanelli 

John Haft, the England fanker. 
returns for the Ct» holders and 
Simpson is rested It isihe first 
of three home games against 
Vfofeh opposition and Uansl 
bring backPerego in place of 
Pickering, who « making a 
careful comeback. 


Harleqmns ▼ Leicester 

Charfle Smith, the former 


Many of the estabtisbed 
French coaches resent 
Fouroroft a ppninuei it at the 

top of the national stmetme. 
They fad he has jumped the 
queue and that his cnariuug 
backgremnd at dnb level does 
not warrant his high pos i ti on . 
Fouroux proved Ms critics wrong 
on mere than an occasion fast 
season; he may yet succeed ia 
his attempts to build aa unbeat- 
able forward platform which wiB 
allow the Frisch back division 
to thrive. 

He and Ms feBow sel ect o r s 
have been digesting the pabH 
lessons of the tour fa Argentina, 
Australia and New Zealand. 
Whatever may not have hap- 
pened an the tour, the schedule 
resembled closely the playing 
pattern in the World Cap when 
the top seeds are expected to 
play several hard games hi quick 
soccesshm. It has also provided 
the French with invaluable 
mteffigewce on their 
opponents. 

Haden puts 
himself out 


of reckoning 


tar Harfeqbins, along with 
Harriman, who won a Wue on the 
wing lor C a mbrid g e University 
last season- Leicester's ful 
strength squad Includes sbt 
tntBfneuonats. 

Wasps v Headingley 
Pet er Wintarbctt om makes ds 
firat appearance of the season as 
captain of Hoad ng to y and 
Irving, ttw England rott. makes his 
dabut on the wing against 
Wraps, who have Rigby in their 
bade row. and Simms, making 
his dub debut In the seconds. 

London Scottish i 
Newbridge 
Scottish, due to play London 
welsh who me cup-tied, meet new 
oppone n ts In Newbridge. They 
have Inane, their vice-captain, at 
fufl back and retain Tosh In the 
bade row while Paton plays centra 
instead of the injured Gorton. 

Abentvonv Cardiff 
Cardffl welcome bock Norifar 
to their pack and O'Brien at scrum 


half agwnst struggling 
Abertoron, for whom the 
Marlin teams up in the second 
row with Writs, formerly of 
Morriston. 

Swansea v Newport 

BleddynTay tor. so metimes 

^SforsS^^wh^giv^ ^ 
debut tothe second row to Brown 
(ex-Abetsren). Watktos returns 
tor Newport who are forced louse 
Wlddeco m b e , stock, at prop. 


Auckland (Reuter) — Andy 
Haden. the New Zealand All 
Blacks forward, chose his 36th 
birthday yesterday to announce 
that he would be unavailable for 
the forthcoming New Zealand 
tour to France next month. In so 
doing, he made virtually certain 
of his retirement from inter- 
national Rugby Union. 

Haden said; “I do not think 
the All Black selectors wiD be 
looking to include me in the 
World Cup side next year at the 
age of 36 — not after tbey have 
done their building in France 
this year." . 

Haden will, however, tour 
France this your with his Auck- 
land dub side Fonsonby. which 
will compete in a masters' 
tournament at Toulouse in 
December. 

Haden. who has done more to 
help change the shape of rugby 
than any other New Zealand 
player in recent times, played 41 
intrniationals. .« 

His Alt Blade career began 
with the 1972-73 tour of Britain. 
His most recent Test appear- 
ance was against Argentina m 
Buenos Aires last year. 


England’s 
problem 
is finding 
cover 

By David Hands 

England's selectors take their 
final look this weekend at 
candidates for the team to play 
Japan while Michael Weston, 
their chairman, will be at 
MurrayfieW to watch the Japa- 
nese themsdves. The team is 
due to be announced on Tues- 
day, after squad training at 
Solihull tomorrow, and since 
there have been no additions to 
the original squad of 40. it is 
reasonable to assume that En- 
gland wiB draw largely upon 
that squad. 

The main doubt concerns the 
tack of cover at scrum half and 
full back; of the three scrum 
halves Melville bas retired and 
Hannaford is not yet fit enough 
to play fbr Gloucester today. He 
has. however, a week to recover 
from a bade injury if he is 
named as replacement fbr HiD 
who must also be on a very short 
list to captain the national team. 

Rose, who has recovered from 
a muscle injury in time to (day 
for Harlequins against Ms old 
dub, Leicester, is the only 
available full back but Barnes, 
as be has done before, could 
offer cover whether he be cho- 
sen at halfback against Japan or 
occupies the replacements 
bench. 

Injuries and absentees will 
dictate certain areas of the team: 
second row. for instance; where 
neither Cokkwgh nor Dooley 
have started the season. This 
suggests that Redman and 
Bainbridge will be paired and it 
will be interesting to see if Brain 
- now with Rugby - retains the 
confidence of the selectors or 
whether Simpson or Moore will 
jockey him out of the hooking 
berth. Neither Moore nor his 
squad colleagues, Cook and 
Rees, 
against 

rest for Tuesday' 
dash with Coventry. 

The selectors will be at Harie- 
qafas, Bath and Wasps; with 
particular attention being paid 
to the game at Twickenham 
where Dodge jousts with 
Salmon - the two men played 
together against New Zealand 
last year -and it may be that the 
solid virtues of Youngs.) 
Leicester's scrum half capped 
five times in 1983 and 1984, will 
recommend t hem sdves once 
more. 

Meanwhile, up and down the 
country, the first round of the 
John Player Special Cup will be 
decided, on a regional basis at 
this stage. London Welsh, final- 
ists in 1985, play Metropolitan 
Police for the second time in 
four days while another famous 
flnt-dass dub. Bteckbeath, 
travel to Saffron Wakku. 

' Perhaps the most compe tit iv e 
area in the cup will be the north 
which mdudes the tie between 
Wigtoa and Uvopoo|/St Hel- 
ens. The amalgamated dob las 
met with distinct success in its 
first month at Moss Lane, 
winning five games - including 
an away win against Gosfarth - 
and losing by only 12-9 to 
Wasps. They have benefitted 
from the o uts ta ndi ng form of 
Jeffiey, the stand-off baft of 
Nick Simms, younger brother of 
Kevin, at centre and Ingram, in 
thrir bade row. However, 
Wigton, too. have aspirations to 
bring thrir Cumbrian rugby to a 
wider stage and Liverpool/St 
Helens will treat them in justihe 
same way as they did Wasps, 


coucagucs, cook ana 
pfay for Nottingham 
: Gala today, preferring to 
it Tuesday s merit table 


last season's cop 

The draw for the second 
round is on Monday and it 
would be a brave man who 
predicted which of Lytkney or 
Berry HIH will be re prese nted. 
Lydney have three of thrir 
regulars back fbr the trip to their 

Gloucestershire neighbours and 
I dare say they will think that, 
should they reach round two. 
they could have few harder 
opponents. 

Captains 
ruled out 

By George Ace 

Philip Matthews and Hans de 
Goede. respective captains of 
Ireland under-25 and the Ca- 
nadian XV team that meet at 
Lansdowne Road this after- 
noon, have both been ruled out 
with leg injuries. Clinch, the 
Lansdowne centre wbo has cap- 
tained the Irish universities, 
takes over the leadership from 
Matthews whose back row place 
goes to Kenny, his Wanderers 
dubmate. McTavisb will lead 
the Canadians who make eight 
changes from the side which lost 
to Ulster in Belfast on Wednes- 
day night. 

Tucker, who sustained torn 
ligaments in the ankle against 
Ulster is returning to Canada at 
his own request and Chris 
Tynan, an uncapped 20-year-old 
scrum halt is flying to Dublin as 
a replacement. 

Tony Ward replaces Paul 
Dean on the Leinster team that 
meets the Canadians at 
Lansdowne Road next Wednes- 
day. Dean is not available for 
business reasons. 


IRELAND UNPBMfc TLg fara Pjo hft 



(Shvnoii). P O'Hara , 

Marnlon (Corinthians}. 

CANADIAN XV: M Wyatt: P Vassori. T 

astamStiac 

Evans. B Rama J Robertsan, B VBn (ten 
Brito. G IldOmon. G bras. 


ICE SKATING 


Astonishment as 
Austrian couple 
beat French pair 

. V _ fa few 


By JohnHenoessy 


Richmond ice rink was buzz- 
ing with astonishment at the 
result of the St Ivel ice dance 
event on Thursday night. Of-, 
fidally. the Austrian couple, 
Kathnn and Christoff Beck, 
won the free dance and the 
overall title, with Sharon Jones 
and Paul Askhajn. of Britain, 
second overall and Isabelle 
Ducbesnay and her brother 
PauL the French couple; third. 

Had the free dance marks 
followed popular expectation, it 
would have been France clearly 
first in the face dance. Britain 
second and Austria a d i sta n t 
third. In that case, all three 
couples would have finished 
With 4.0 points and the trophy 
would have gone to France on 
the score of thrir superior free 
dance. Some severe criticisms 
were voiced, not by igporam 
spectators who know no better, 
bat by professionals. 
“Disgusting” one called it. “a 
scandal" another, and a third 
walked out halfway through the 
Austrian performance. 

Certainly, in this tittle comer, 
the Ducbesnay brother and 
sister seemed head and elegant 
shoulders above all opposition. 
They produced a routine that 
had all the exdung impact of the 
bullring, full of strong edges, 
original lifts and dramatic flare. 


They even slotted the pair 
skaters* death spiral seamlessly 
into thrir choreography. They 
are trained in Obcrisdorf by a 
Czech oslo vac. Martin 

Skotnicki. but Betty Calloway 
has been drafted in to help them. 
It shows. 

Askhamaod Jones, wbo woe 
placed joint second with the 
French in the free dance, offered 
by contrast a rhythmic mo- 
gramme which paled by 
comparison with those who 
have gone that big-band way 
before, and with the French 
couple, who preceded them last 
night. But at least they had some 
spark, whereas the Austrians 
were lacking in any kind of 
dynamism or appeal. 

DANCE: FM dw»« 1. Mn K ta* 
and C BMk (AuaateL 14 powsj £M**i 

Ductwanay and PDuciwsoay (Frt wid 

Mn S Jonw and P AsUtatn tQoK 20; 4, 

Mess Wynne «mj DnargiS), 44c 5. 
MtssSSorteS* 


JBGandA2Hw*o%'fl 

I 6. Mt*s s Carto»ri and P Cunwwngp wj. 

6.0. FM pafaw 1. Beck and SAli 
atom: 2 . Jones end Askhem. Aftg. 

Ducriesmy Mrt (kirttMnw. SA A^Wyme 

end Draw. 84: 5. SertS and Zhjrtov. 
10.0: SUmMCenertmo. 124. 

MEN'S ntEEBCATaiG: i. D Doran (Ufa 

14 poms: Z O Hnw (Swur). 24: 3. C 


(Can). 84: 7. F 


w;.a 


124. 


SQUASH RACKETS 

Challengers with 
accent on change 


By Cohn McQmllan 

When the English Squash 
Rackets Association invented 
the British undeiv23 dosed 
championships back in 1975. 
there was not loo much concern 
that the title might actually pass 
out of England. Nor has such an 
eventuality threatened — until 
this year. 

Philip Kenyon, Gawain Bri- 
ars, David Pearson, Christy 
Win strop and Ashley Naylor 
have all kepi the title firmly 
planted in English soil of one 
regional character or another. 

Jamie Hickox. though his 
English credentials are im- 
peccable, speaks with a pro- 
nounced mid-Atlantic dialect. 
Already national under-23 
champion three times, when the 
tournament began last night at 
Lambs Squash Club, London, 
he was going fora record fourth 
win. 

There are other accents 
appearing in the field this year, 
however, which are quite ca- 
pable of drowning out the 


seed, is from Carmarthen, while 
Mark Maclean, a 22-year-old 
from Edinburgh, is seeded in the 
5-8 group. 

Davies has hovered on the 
brink of mqjor success since 
joining up a couple of seasons 
back with the former national 
champion, Geoff Williams at 
the Manchester Northern Club. 
Prolonged ttmsititis and inter- 
mittent nose bleeds hampered 
his progress last season but, after 
summer surgery, Davies re- 
appeared recently to collect the 
scalps of senior England inter- 
nationals David Peanon, Ash- 
ley Naylor and Neil Harvey in 
regional tournaments. 

Maclean sprang to fame last 
year, ending the long unbeaten 
domestic record of former world 
champion Jonah Barrington. 
Already this season be has 
overturned Hickox in the 
Knolls Invitation final which 
suggests his dramatic imi 
mem still continues, alt) 
his seeding means he must 
defeat Davies in the quarter- 
finals if he ix to gun a chance of 
repeating' the exercise in the 
-final on -Monday. 


FOOTBALL 

Fulham’s 
move is 
a surprise 

Fulham have made an auda- 
cious attempt to take Gordon 
Davies, the Welsh international 
forward, bade to Craven Cottage 
in a surprise deal which would 
do much to restore the con- 
fidence of players and support- 
ers after the 1 0-0 defeat by 
Liveipoo! in the Littlewoods 
Cup in midweek. 

Manchester Qty are prepa r ed 
to release Davies, who scored 
113 league goals for Fulham 
before moving to Chelsea two 
years aga But after only 13 first 
division games. Davies, now 
aged 31. moved on to Maine 
Road for £100,000 last season. 

Ray Lewington, the Fulham 
player-manager, admitted last 
night : “I have already talked to 
Gordon, whh the permission of 
his dub. I played in the same 
Fulham team as him, and he 
was a big favourite with the fans. 
I have been - looking for a 
striker.” 

Jimmy Frizzell, the acting 
Manchester City manager, said: 
“We have had an approach from 
Fulham fbr Gordon and I have 
said be can go fbr the right 
price.” That could pose a prob- 
lem because Lewington offered 
less than £100.000 and Davies is 
thought also to be reluctant to 
move south again. 

Meanwhile. Lewington insists 
his team will recover quickly 
from that defeat at Anfield. He 
said: “We were mauled and 
humiliated, but now we can't 
wait to get back out on the pitch. 
Liverpool are the best club ride 
in the world, and Ted Drake and 
Alec Stock, whose memories of 
football go back quite a way, 
said it was one of the best 
performances they had seen 
from any side. 

“We were drained afterwards 
and it was difficult for me to say 
anything, but we are as good as 
anyone in the third division, 
and now. with a home game 
against Middlesbrough, the 
leaden of our division, we have 
the chance to bounce straight 
bade.” 

• Geny Peyton. Fulham's for- 
mer goalkeeper, now with 
Bournemouth, has caused a 
postponement of thrir third 
division home game with 
Gillingham, scheduled for Octo- 
ber 14. because he may be called 
up for the Republic of Ireland's 
international with Scotland 


BASEBALL 


BASKETBALL 


FOR THE RECORD 

BOXING 


FOOTBALL 


TENNIS 


ssssasGsaws 

tsmsOP 

ss&s 

SZSV&SiiS^^'i 


CARLS8SRG NATIONAL LEAGUE PH Nan 
‘One HomaSpn Bason anUBwy 7S (Bon 


DARTS 




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S-4:G gtorga nOp K Knony. 53: 0 


VVMcomM b?T CciBns. 


22. findby 14L jean fttycao tauten 100 
IBonm SftDiws 20. Uojteia; Hemal aid 
WMtoiUBowti SB (Hale 37. Kamn 23, 
Kflucklas 171 BnM and Ccysai Palace 107 
(PDOI3T. Kefatawto. Roberts 2H. ammo, 
ham &gtoa T06 (Ham 3*. Shatter} S. 
Mm I3J. Rag Varty feirtertend SS (Brown 
25. MeCraySf NotoG* IZl 

"7 SPEEDWAY “ 

■mnSH LEAGUE: Swmdon 44. Brta Vu 34: 
1 32. Cmaav Hash 46; Sie&aid 29. 


CRYSTAL PALACE: Su fta m , 

—Ml! LlrtiHiaaftor Rocfe Kefy trt Mark 
STsevereh raito. ItfiHn WtewteBh C (S 

round* w 0 WWn HGanta McCWM. IW 
. muoTniaaiaiii aljhr 9 iwifflt wan Drtnry 
fit Denny Laa. porno. 

GOLF 

FOUNDATION TEAM CHAMMONMP PM 
SCHOOLS: QwWyteg A! lanmfc 0C: 
2JDs Care* grammar. 2 tit tuctartfe AeaUa. 

my. ISO: Otnaiea Hqh.BotMMdMfemB 

Malyncuii (Lanartq. At W h U ct w ch 


QC: 920: 

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Sum. Pmarth. 

O Cam* (Berry L-,— ™— , — 

6C: S4: Casii Manor LteptfiHawaraa and 
teSwUL 25* G Ml -Yamwah-Hgh. 


EUROPEAN UWER-ZI CHMfaraMMft 
OnwsiE kebnUO. CUetK»tovaka<- „ 
FOOTBALL COMBMATKK BngNon Rps tt 
Cryaw P«uea Ras 2: Oartw fija JjHotaj 
ham Forest Res 1; Arsenal Has 2. 

1. 

SOUTHERN JUNXM FLOOOUT OUP: WM- 
fott 3. Future 1. 

VOLLEYBALL 

HEN'S WORLD CHAMPMKSHWS: Hnt 
malt Ohm* A aaortpaturt: France M 
Cbna.3-0. Group B CTourcon# SouW ttttn 
B PBtett. C (Oerroo nt- Ferranctt 

Brad W Bufcana. 34. Oms D (Ortaenefc 
tinted Staes M Greece. 3-0 


SAN FRAHCB Ctt TWMralM m 
tauMf rewd <U8 utteas nateite B Edom 

3-6. 64: J Comers BP ™ 

BARCELONA: Creed pitae 1Wl« *mm± K 

Carluon torn) M E Swictiez SM. 6 - 1 . 3«. B- 
7: A Maurer (WO) tx F tin 8-2. S-1: H 

Sttd (AwBrtaiW D Karwc ( ^ 7-6, 64; 
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JAus),74.6.i:ZGiiw* 
(Can). 64. 6-3. 


ASIAN GAMES 

Chinese 
hold on 
to medals 

Seoul (AP) — China, already 
holding well more than half the 
gold medals awarded in the 
Asian Games' first six days, 
collected three more on yes- 
terday with triumphs by women 
sharpshooters and a woman 
diver. The platform diving vic- 
tory by Lu Wei completed a 
Chinese sweep of all four of the 
Games' diving events. . 

She edged team mate, Xu 
Yanwri. with 460.02 points to 
456.90. Japan's Yayoi Kihara 
was thud with 425.91. Mean- 
while, Japanese swimmers 
broke two more records in 
qualifying heats as the Asian 
Games swimming record book 
was nearly rewritten. 

The Chinese boosted thrir 
overall gold total to 49 with the 
diving triumph and victories by 
their women s sport pistol team 
and their team in the small-bore 
standard rifle, ihrce-posmon, 
event. They also had 33 silvers 
and 18 bronzes in all Japan 
have 21 golds, 28 silvers and 31 
bronzes, and South Korea 15 
golds, 19 silvers and 22 bronzes. 
The Philippines (golf) and Iran 
(cycling) are the only other 
nations to win gold medals. 

In the rifle event, China's 
score of 1.735, of a possible 
1,800. broke the Arian record of 
1.700 set by Chinese shooters in 
1980. Japan was second with 
1,697 and South Korea third 
with 1,689. The Chinese won 
the sport pistol gold with a score 
of ‘ 1,748 points to 1,719 for 
Japan and 1.718 for Thailand. 
So far. the Games have two 
quadruple gold medal winners — 
die Chinese gymnast, Li Ning, 
and the Chinese shooter, Xu 
Haifeng. 

The record breakers m the 
pool were. Kiyomi Takahashi, 
in the women's 200-metre 
butterfly, and Naritoshi 
Matsuda, in the men's 200- 
metre individual medley. 
Takahashi led the qualifying 
rounds m her event in 2min 
I426scc, breaking the mark of 
2:15.79 set by Yasue Matsuda. 
of Japan, in 1978. His team 
colleague, feaimi Kxwahara, was 
almost as fast finishing hi 
2:14.28. Musutfa's time of 
24)5.59 broke the mark of 
2:10.22 set by Tsuyoshi 
Yanagawa, of Japan, in 1978. 

The individual rifle gold went 
to' Zhuo Dan hong, of China, 
whose 588 in qualifying broke 
the Asian record of 570. In the 
new expanded format, she 
ended up with 682.4 to 670.8 for 
the silver medal winner Soma 
Dutta, of India. 

At a news conference in 
connection with the Games, the 
Seoul Mayor. Yum Bo-hyun, 
said: "The city was virtually 
ready to play host to the 1988 
Olympics., and promised even 
more meticulous security mea- 
sures than have been imposed 
during the Asiad.” Referring to 
a bomb explosion that, foiled 
five people at Seoul's inter- 
national airport six days before 
the Games .opened. Yura said: 

We will take every measure to 

prevent those kinds of raridem£ 






SPORT 


THE TIMES SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 

FOOTBALL 


Mists of poor fortune 
obscure the vision of 
television’s star-gazers 


The crystal ball of the 
television chiefs was never so 
foggy as when they predicted, 
before the start of the season, 
that Manchester United v 
Chelsea would be the star 
attraction of the sixth week- 
end of the season. Who could 
have forseen that United and 
Chelsea, fourth and sixth 
respectively in the first di- 
vision last season, would be 
nearer 10 relegation play-oils 
than championship glory. 

YeL lTV's “Big Match” at 
Old Tiafford tomorrow is not 
without some fascination, 
operand above that of morbid 
curiosity, it is hard to imagine 
that Manchester United and 
Chelsea will not eventually 
justify star billing but. for the 
time being, both are staggering 
from one minor disaster to 
another. United's problems 
were well amplified in last 
week's televised game and. no 
doubt, much can be put down 
to the recent absence of Rob- 
son. their inspirational En- 
gland captain. But Chelsea's 
sudden demise this season is 
not so easy to explain. 

Like United, they failed to 
win any of their opening four 
games, and even now. both 
have only one victory to their 
credit. Chelsea appeared to 


By Clive White 
rediscover themselves in a 
thoroughly deserved 3-1 win 
at Tottenham, but the Bush 
creativity and understanding 
they showed withered before 
the raging Forest fire of Brian 
Clough’s young pacesetters 
last week. The six goals they 
conceded to an exceptional 
side merely diverted attention 
from Chelsea's main mal- 
function so far which has been 
that of die attack, where they 
have averaged only a goal a 
game. 

It was impotent in the 
midweek Littlewoods Cup de- 
feat at York, where only 
Dixon was striving to positive 
effect. Speedie, who was so 
outstanding against Totten- 
ham, was busily ineffective 
while Nevin's obvious reluc- 
tance to attack his foil back 
smacked of lost confidence. It 
was symbolic of the depths to 
which Chelsea have sunk that 
John Hollins, the manager, 
should seek solace in a narrow 
defeat against a third division 
club. 

Hollins' return on his near 
£900.000 outlay on two club- 
record signings during the 
summer is a slow one. due to 
the fact that neither Wicks nor 
Dune have been able to 
command a first-team place. 


TODAY'S TEAM NEWS 


Coventry v Watford 
Bfissett and Starling, dropped 
in midweek, are back in tne Watford 
squad. Coventry, who recently 
announced a new shirt 
sponsorship, are unbeaten at 
home. 

Liverpool v Aston VQla 
Liverpool expect to have Molby 
back after an Achilles tendon 
problem. McNeill retains three 
centre backs and it Keown Is unfit 
Glover. who has not played 
since March, wifl deputise. 

Luton v Manchester C 
tf City select White. IS, half 
their side will be under 20. Baker 
(hamstring) and Brtahtwell 
(knee) are out and Clements and 
McNab doubtfuL Luton recall 
Nwajiobi after averaging only a goal 
a game. 

Norwich v Newcastle 
Norwich have Buttsrworth, on 
loan from Nottingham Forest, bade 
in the side after the midweek 
cup match In place of Rosario, who 
seriously damaged knee 
ligaments. Newcastle may play two 
teenagers. Stephenson and 
Alton, m attack. Beardsley and 
Clarke should be fit after 
midweek knocks. 

Nottm F v Arsenal 
Fairdough plays his first game 
for Forest mfr months because of 
an ankle injury to Walker. It is 
their first change in eight games. 
Arsenal may award Groves his 
first full game in the absence of Rbc. 
AUinson and Caesar also join 
the squad. 

Oxford v Charlton 
Six Chariton players face tests, 
Aizehvood (toot), Johns (thigh). 


Pearson (toe) and Raid, Walsh 
and Stuart (ail ankle). But Lee has 
recovered from concussion and 
Peake is avalabie again. Lewortfiy 
takes over for Oxford from 
Charles, who is having an 
exploratory operation on Ms 
knee. 

QPR v Leicester 
Rangers give Walker, the 
former Cne/sea winger, his chance 
to establish himself in the side. 
McDonald may return to the 
defence releasing Roserior into 
attack. Leicester, with Ramsey and 
Kefiy rrassmg after midweek 
injuries, promote Fbefey and 
Mauchlen. 

Sheff Wed v West Ham 

Wednesday wiH be without 
Snotfinfsnf under observation in 
hospital after being concussed 
last week. Dickens has recovered 
from a virus and rattans for 
West Ham. Devonshire misses his 
fifth consecutive game with 
hamstring trouble. 

Tottenham v Everton 
Everton hope to field the same 
side that defeated Manchester 
United on Sunday. Tottenham, 
cheered by last week's win at 
Leicester, will a in? to Improve 
on last season's performances 
when they lost home and away 
to Everton. 

Wim’don v Southampton 

Jordan is poised to return for 
his first league match of the season 
because ofwfaUace's absence 
with a tom ankle tendon. Fashanu 
may stfil be omitted by 
Wimbledon ff Gordon s knee is 
better. Smith (groin) and 
Sanchez (leg)have tests. Thom 
and Gannon stand by. 


JUDO 


Appearances are 
most deceptive 


By Nicolas Soames 


To all except her closest 
friends and training partners, 
Diane Bell seems to possess the 
distinctly placid, and even shy, 
nature that is expected from her 
pale, and slightly fraiL appear- 
ance. So the personality that 
emerges when she steps on to the 
jndo mat comes as something of 
a shock - as those who natch 
her fight In the British women's 
open champfoatbips at Crystal 
Palace today will discover. 

Even when yon know that she 
was only 18 when she non her 
first world medaL and that this 
year, aged 22, she won the 
European light-middleweight ti- 
tle, yon are still unprepared for 
the onslaught she unleashes. 
But. on her own admission, she 
wins because she can fight. 
Unlike her teammate, the world 
bantamweight champion. Karen 
Briggs, who is known for her 
crisp, technical displays. Miss 
Bell takes a different approach. 
Losing her superb fitness, she 
simply wears down her oppo- 
nents. and when they can no 
longer see straight, she snatches 
a point. 

This is not as unscientific as it 
sounds. She has a natural talent 
to side-step, squash, absorb or 
generally frustrate all the best 
attacks of ber main opponents. 
"1 know I am very difficult to 
throw** she admits, and has to 
think hard before she can 
remember the last time she was 
thrown deanly on to ber back for 
ippon. the perfect score that 
ends a jndo contest. It turns Oat 
to be 19&1. which is a long time 
at top international level. 

That does not mean that Mbs 
Bell has forgotten what pain is 
like, for the daily, free-fighting, 
training that judo demands can 
be a braising business, es- 
pecially for women travelling 
around die mate-dominated 
dabs. Despite the misogynist 
tradition in jodo^ - inherited 
along with everything else from 


the Japanese - most British jndo I 
men are aware chat free-fighting 1 
practice with women must be I 
done judiciously. Top women I 
like Miss Bell have to be treated : 
with respect — the over-con- 
fident are regularly overturned — 
bat, as is evident in all sports, 
women cannot match a man’s i 
strength-power factor. At 61 
kilos. Miss Bell cannot deal with ! 
most highly-trained men the 
way she deals with most highly- 
trained women. 

“But some men feel that, 
because they are practising with 
a women who is a European 
champion, they have something 
to prove, and the practice can | 
then become a bit much" she 
confessed. There is always a 
possibility of serious injury in 
these circumstances, but it cer- 
tainly boues the fighting spirit. 
And she n-fll need all of that this , 
weekend, for a strong foreign I 
entry includes most of the i 
leading opponents she will meet 
in the world championships, in 
Maastricht, on October 25. 

The coming world champion- 
ships are important to her, for 
she wants to wipe oat the 
memory of Vienna two years 
ago. After three months of i 
intensive training, she was | 
strangled by the Austrian chare- | 
pi on. Dr Cerda Winklbaner. In ] 
the first minute of the first 
round. “I cried for two weeks,** I 
she recalls. Bat the defeat forced 
her to look objectively at her 
judo, and last year, she switched 
weight catetories with her fram- 
ing partner. Ann Hughes; Miss j 
Bell going up to fight-middle- I 
weight and Miss Hughes drop- ; 
ping to lightweight. 

It was a gamble that paid off 
as the European title earlier this 
year indicates. “I was having 
difficulty in holding my weight 
down to 56 kilos — 61 kilos is 
closer to my natural weight" she 
said. The question now is,' 
whether the world title is within 
ber reach. 


GOLF 


Three share the lead 


Abilene. Texas (Reuter) - Three 
Americans. Dan PoftL Morris 
Haialsky and D A Weibring. 
mastered the strong winds yes- 
terday to record rounds of 66. 
six-under-par. and lie for the 
first -round lead in the South- 
west Golf Classic. David Frost 
of South Africa. Dave 
Eichclbergcr and Greg Twiggs 
were all one stroke behind at the 
Fairway Oaks club and there 
were 1 1 more players level on 
68 . 

Pohl has won twice this year 
but has been at home in Arizona 


for the last month. "During all 
that lime, 1 only played one 
round or golf." he said. **I really 
didn't expect too much today." 
He birdied each of l he first three 
holes and then added three more 
before draping a stroke at the 
1 7th when he three putted. He 
came back with another biidie 
on the paMive 18th. 

LEASING FIRST ROUND SCORES (US 
urtess sate* fifcO PoN. MHatafcsy.b A 


Weibring. 67: D Frost (SA). D 
Eichelbflrger. G Twiggs. 68: M 
McCuflougn. T Jenkins. F AUnper. M 
Cateevecehu. R Eastwood. T Byrun..W 
Wood. R Struck. W Sander. C BoBng. J 
MaggarL 


S packman, who has had the 
good fortune to be absent 
because of a groin strain -for 
the last two defeats, is likely to 
'return, possibly in place of 
Hazard who was anonymous 
at York. Godden, who was 
dropped after the Forest goal 
riot is included in the squad. 

Billy McNeill, one manager 
who has left Manchester of his 
own accord, could hardly have 
a more intimidating league 
start with his new club, Aston 
Villa, than a match at An field. 
What was good enough at 
Reading in midweek, McNeill 
hopes wifi be good enough 
against Liverpool. 

Just how genuine were those 
encouraging signs of recovery 
that Villa showed at Elm Park, 
we shall discover by courtesy 
of the champions, who dem- 
onstrated ten times during the 
week to Fulham how ruthless 
they can be in exposing any 
frailties. McNeill will be look- 
ing for a double success 
against Liverpool whose re- 
serves face a Villa side at Villa 
Park which includes Walters, 
ihe England under-21 player, 
who has recovered from a 
dislocated shoulder. 

Another of the quality play- 
ers to whom McNeill is look- 
ing to lift Villa off the bottom 
of the table, is Hodge, the 
unsettled England inter- 
national. McNeill told Hodge 
yesterday that he would not be 
allowed to leave Villa Park in 
a hurry. 

Should Nottingham Forest 
lose today, even a victory will 
not restore Liverpool to the 
top of the first division. Only 
two dubs are capable of that 
today — Everton and, less 
obviously. Norwich City. Just 
as Chelsea and United have 
been alarmingly poor for 
teams with such potential, so 
Norwich have been alarm- 
ingly good for a side who sold 
their two best defenders before 
the start of the season, Watson 
and Woods, their . England 
internationals. For the last 10 
days, they have also been 
without Elliott, bought from 
Sunderland to take Watson’s 
place. 

The away form of last 
season's Second Division 
champions • has been 
particuajrly impressive for a 
team whom many thought 
would be struggling by now. 
No doubt their position is a 
slightly false one since their 
opponents have all been in the 
bottom half of the table. But 
Brown will not let that detract 
from his celebrations -should 
victory over Newcastle United 
placed 20th in the table - 
hoist them above their richer 
and more famous rivals. 





Spademan: fortunate to have missed defeats through injury 

John aims Virus cuts 


hit the roof 

Watford may move out of 
Vicarage Road — despite yester- 
day’s disclosure that Elton John, 
the chairman, is ready to spend 
another £2 million on the 
ground. John has already 
ploughed £22 million into the 
dub. nearly all going on ground 
improvements. 

He accepts that he may have 
lo spend as much again to bring 
the ground up to the standard he 
wants. John, a rode singer and 
musician, pays tax at over 70 
per cent, and so would have to 
earn £8 million to present £2 
million to Watford, yet insists 
the dub may be forced to move 
even once this money has been 
spent on the ground. 

John said: “People laughed 
when I said 10 years ago 1 
wanted Watford to be a first 
division dub. But that dream 
came true. Now my dream is for 
a new stand opposite the one 
we've just opened^ and a roof on 
all four sides of the stadium. 

"But we still haven’t ruled out 
the possibility of moving from 
Vicarage Road to a new site in 
the area where we could have 
better leisure and parking facil- 
ities. We have to deal with the 
present, and that means spend- 
ing money now to improve Vic- 
arage Road. But that does not 
mean we will not start the '21st 
century somewhere eke." 


down 

Blades 

Sheffield United and Scun- 
thorpe yesterday called off their 
weekend - League fixtures after 
the playing staff at both dubs 
had fallen victims to a rims. 

Second division Sheffield, 
with a dozen players hit, polled 
out of the away .match at 
Plymouth. Scunthorpe were 
scheduled to face Stockport in 
the fourth dmsioo last night, bat 
hare been similarly affected. 

Derek Dooley, the Bramall 
Lane managing director, said: 
“With the bmg trip to Plymouth, 
we had to make an early 
decision. Peter Withe was the 
first player affected in midweek, 
and others quickly developed the 
same symptoms." 

Another second division dub, 
MIUwalL, warned Blackburn 
they might have to call off tire 
game at The Den hot decided 
that the match goes ahead after 
a head count at training 
yesterday. 

Mill wall's midweek 

Littlewoods Cup game at Wal- 
sall had to be postponed became 
the Midland ers had suffered a 
boot of illness — thought to be 
salmonella poisoning — among 
its playing staff. Walsall return 
to the fray today when drey 
travel to Pwt Vale. 


Ferguson 
steeled 
to topple 
Rangers 

By Hugh Taylor 

There is a siedy glini in ihe 
eye of Alex Ferguson as he 
contemplates Aberdeen’s en- 
counter with Bangers at Ibrox 
today. That is a warning to 
anyone who dares suggest that 

Aberdeen are about to surrender 

their claim to being Scotland's 
outstanding team of the decade 
. . . especially not to Rangers. 

Not long ago Ferguson could 
have found turaseHin charge at 
Ibrox, but he stayed at Aberdeen 
where his success has become 
legendary. Therefore; the emer- 
gence of the expensively re- 
constructed Rangers as tire team 
of the season so for is a challenge 
he is desperate to accept. 

He is. indee&.so keen to win 
today that the impression 
gained is that he regrets he is no 
longer, young enough to play in 
direct apposition to Graeme 
Sonness. the player-manager, 

who has inspired the. dub's 

revival 

Although Aberdeen have sel- 
dom touched their best form 
this season, mainly because of a 
long fist of casualties, Connor, 
an influential wing half will 
return -as Aberdeen attempt to 
extend their record of not 
having lost at Ibrox since April 
1 983; Rangers are expecting that 
McMinn. who injured a foot on 
Wednesday, wilt be fic The 
gangling attacker has become , a 
firm favourite at Ibrox. He is a 
character in the mould of 
Kitcfaenbrand. the rumbustious 
South African who was the j 
darling of the Rangers crowds in 
the 1950s* . ■ j 

David Hay, the Celtic man- 
ager, is not yet convinced that 
his side are - playing with tire 
authority required and- remains 
displeased with his players after 
a poor display in the fortunate 
victory on penalties over 
Motherwell and has asked for a 
more distinguished perfor- 
mance at Brock ville today 
against Falkirk. Adding to his 
worries are the injured regulars 
Grant. McClair, McGugan, Ait- 
ken and O'Leary and it is likely 
that McInaUy, perhaps the 
■Parkhead answer to Ibrox’s 
McMinn, and the promising 
Shepard wall start the match. 

Heart of Midlothian must 
have .thoughts of vengeance in 
their minds as they travel to 
Dundee- Hearts will be hard- 
pressed to take - a point, even 
though they lost the champion- 
ship at Dens Park m May, -as 
Dundee have come back . to 
form, their victory last Saturday 
ending Rangers winning run. 

Dundee United should return 
to favour at Easter Road with 
their supporters, where Hiber- 
nian, despite revealing flashes of 
skill, continue to struggle. 

St Mirren, however, - are 
improving. They have taken 
five points from their last three 
games and should win two more , 
today at the expense of Hamil- 
ton Academicals, who remain 
anchored at the bottom of the 
table, with only one point from 
eight games, while Motherwell's 
splendid mid-week display,, if 
repeated, should see them 
through against Clydebank at 
Fir Park. 


HORSE TRIALS 

Green will run the t 

gamut of her 

skills 

By Jenny MacArthnr 

Lucinda ft«n has hcrwcjk AnyCWncc- who is.also .son. 

cut ouTtilis weekend When She to Bocmmo. . ^ . 


89 £. 


cut out tnis weexena wn™ 
rides three advanced hones and 
two novice ones at the JngenoH 
Engineers' Bourton horse tnais 
^Warwickshire. 

As Mrs Green isafeo riding ait 

- _ ... thlC 


W Captain Mark Philli^jmd 
John Evans, who is based- af 
Gatcombe Park. a* 
Bourton as a 

next week's Ctotswwtli three 


As Mrs Green isafeo ndingan next £ ^ icr onc pfCap- 
intermediate event horse tius <fay C iSi ns's two rides, and 
morning at the £**g?™* m 2? Th? Cordwainer both 


morning at .the Twttridown) corner both ■ 

hoise trials »n Hampshire she Evans sitre^y aurings „ 
intends to make ajightning dash h^ sucocss^ ^ and wifl 

after completing Tweseldown m Tflbuw ^ warns" ^ 

order to get toBourton in time probably jus c ttr vfav ftn 
for her dressage with one of her 

novice horses this afternoon. Captam PniUips "fund 

Her three advanced horses, all take BoU I jJjP'JgL xSbuty, 
owned by S R International cross-counity Attcri «cur£ 
Communications are Shannagh. where ‘hf tiS 

who ■s'headiiv for the Boeketo h^ a 6U « ^ 


three-day event in The Nether- 
lands next- month. Count de 
Bolebcc who she rode success- 
fully round Burgh tey earlier this 
month and Min's Lincoln, who 


STtafK-i h« m *?*«!!* 

cast in his box three daw Wfc*. 
He is now reported wen ana. 
with Chatsworth looming. J 

good round tomorrow would he 


is seven and has only recently reassuring- fmm her 

have plenty or victcwy auhe 


opposition. ‘ Boulton's solid 
well-built course over rolling 
countryside has attracted many 
leading riders. New Zealand's 
Mark Todd, who won last year 
of Charisma; is competing on 


vkiwj ai i"*. ■ v— ■ - — . 

ships, misses Bourton but* _ 
having a last outing on. Master j) 
Craftsman at TweseMown be- • 
fore going to the Lion D Anger 
three-day event in France next 
month. 


TENNIS 


Unpopular 

Lendl 

laments 

New York (AP) - Ivan LendL 
the world's top-ranked player, 
said on Thursday that he and 
women's- No. 1,- Martina 
Navratilova, do sot like being 
viewed as viUaias when playing 
in the United States. But they 
have teamed to adjust to it 

LendL a Czech citizen who 
lives in the United States, and 
Navratilova, * a naturalized 
American since defecting from 
Czechoslovakia, often play in 
front of crowds that overwhelm- 
iagly favour their opponents. 

“The fact that Martina or I 
live-bere will not change the fact 
that we were not born here," 
Lendl 'said, while announcing 
the eight-man field for the 
AT&T Challenge tournament 
which will lalufdace in .Atlanta 
in November. “That’s - the way it 
is . for both - of ns." 

Navratilova, winner of 42 
grand slam tides, often has the 
crowd against her when she 
plays Americans, particularly 
Chris Lloyd. . 

The crowd was also against 
her when she played 17-year-old 
West German Steffi Graf at the 
recent US Open. 

After Lend! won his second 
US Open Championship this 
year. Sports fUnstrw*dpbuxd t 
hint on the cover with the title, 
"The Champion Nobody Cares 
About" and in the story called 
turn “dnUL" . 

"If s something Martina and I 
have to accept,” Lendl said. "It 
wonld bOovely if- people would 
be behiad ns every time we 
played, bid they Ye not going to." 


Top three 
coast 
to victory 

Agencies — Jimmy Connors. 
John McEnroe and 1 . Stefan 
Edberg swept past unseeded 
opponents in the second round 
of the $289,000 Trans-Amenca 
Open tournament in San Fran- 
cisco. Connore, aged 34, the No 
2 seed, moved into- the quarter- 
finals by downing Peter FTcm- 
itig, of the United States 4-3!. 3-6, 
6-3. McEnroe, a four-time 
champion of the event but 
seeded only fourth this year, 
used a- Mistering service to 
overpower. John Letts, a quali- 
fier. 6-2, 6*2 despite playing 
sluggishly at times. 

In an earlier match. Edberg, of 
Sweden, the No 1 seed and 
defending champion, breezed 
past Bud Schultz, of the United 
States 6-3. 6-2. 

'The Americans, Bonnie 
Gadusek and Zina ' Garrison, 
won straight-set victories on 
Thursday to advance to the 
semi-final round of the 
$100,000 San- Diego women’s 
. invitational tournament. 

The second-seeded Gadusek, 
presently ranked eighth in the 
world relied on a steady basdine 
game to get past Liz Smylie, of 
Australia, 7-6. 6-1. Garrison, 
mixing' an aggressive pound 
game- with an effective sente, 
eliminated ' Canadian,- Carting 
Bassett 6^4 6-3. 

. Laura GikJcmeister,, jof Pern, . 
the second seed, conceded her 
match to unseeded, Beth Hot, 
of the United Stales, after 
disputing several cafis of the 
umpire during die' Virginia 
Slims of Tulsa toumamenL. 


WEEKEND FOOTBALL, RUGBY AND OTHER SPORT FIXTURES 


FOOTBALL 

3.0 unless staM 

First division 

Coventry v Watford — — 

Liverpool v A Via — - — 

Luton v Manchester C — 

Norwich v Newcastle 

Nottingham F v Arsenal 

Oxford v Charlton 

OPR v Leicester 

Sheffield Wed v West Ham 

Tottenham v Everton — 

Wimbledon v Southampton 

Second division 

Binrtngham v Ipswich — 

C Palace v Rearing 

Grimsby v Barnsley — — 

Leeds v Hull 

MOwaO v Blackburn 

Oldham v Brighton — 

Plymouth v Sheffield Utd r 

Portsmouth v Huddersfield 

Shrewsbury v Bradford - - 

Sundertand v Stoke — — 

WBA v Derby 

Third efivision 
Bournemouth v Bristol C 

Bristol R v Blackpool 

Bury v Newport 

Carlisle v Mansfield — 

Ch es terfield v Notts Co 

Darlington v Chester — 

Doncaster v York 

Fulham v Middlesbrough 

GBtingham v Brantford 

P Vale v Walsall 

Swindon v Rotherham 

Fourth division 

Aldershot v Tranmera 

Burrriey v Hafifax 

Cambridge v Lincoln 

Carditi v Hereford 

Colchester v Peterborough 

Crewe v Swansea 

Northampton v Wolverhampton — 

Orient v Hartlepool 

Preston v Torquay 

Wrexham v Exeter 

GM-Vauxhal! conference 

Boston v Enfield 

Dagenham v Bath 

FrickJey v Nuneaton — — 

Maidstone v Altrincham 

Scartxxo v Barnet 

Wasldsfone v TeWmf 

Weymouth v Runcorn 1 

Scottish premier division 

Dundee v Hearts 

Falkirk v Caftic 

Hibernian v Dundee UW 

Motherwell v Clydebank 

Rangers v Aberdeen 

St Mirren vHamSton„ — 

Scottish first efivision 

Dumbarton v E Fife 

Oun (ermine v AMrie 

Forfar v Morion 

K8mamock v Clyde — 

Montrose v Queen of Sth 

Part** v Brechin 

Scottish second division 

Albion tf Ayr — 

Arbroath v Meadowbank 

Berwick v Afloa 

E Stiffing v Raith 

St Johnstone v Queen's Park 

SUrfing v Sten'h’muk' — 

Stranraer v Cowdenbeath 

MULTOtRT LEAGUE MaodBStMd v 
Bangor Cfty: ume v BwitNc MMfacfc * 
Norwich: myt * Oswestry: South Uvar- 
pootvWiQon. 


VAUXHAU.OPEL LEAGUE: ftwntor.d- 
WtiOK Bognor * Tooting X Mitcham; 
BroMaf v Barfing; Croydon v tVortfang; 
Famborough « Harrow: St AMDS v 

I filrfiin e** wifih m l**A«~ii 1 1 iJtiri- MIL Mjw nr * 

■menu*, gonn v wwiaran; vniosw ft 

Eton v Bishop's Storttord; Yaovl v 
Wycombe. Nm dwWsn: Epsom and 
Email v Kingsbury; Hnchtey v Bearicay; 
Laatramsaa v Lewes; Maidenhead 
Unted v Oxford aty. BasMon v 
Leytonstone/IMoni. Second dMston 
north: Avatey v Trine; Berkttsmstad v 
Roystom Chastain v Owshunt: Clapton r 
Wivonhoe; Hartford v Conor Row; 
Heytridge Swifts v Letchworth (XX Saf- 
fron WaMen v Rain ham; Vauxhafl Motors 
v Barton. Second dMskm aonttc 
Cambutey v ChoNont St Paten EOham v 
BanstajsS; Horsham v Foflham: Motasay v 
Hungerfoid: VWiytBhMda v B l IwMd: 
Mariow v Eastbourne United- 


OTHS1 SPORT. 



REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


Continued from facing page 

SATURDAY 






Sutton. 

Wefttg v Bracknell; Chertsey v Handon: 


WembUjy V DuAwfch Hamlet Staines v 
UvimSfi Manor RarHI v Buckingham; 
Haringey v WaUngham; EesflfoumeTawn 
» Carsfaltem: Dow v Leyton Wingate; 
WMstaMa v Folkestone AnnM v Home 
Bay; Eastleigh v Crawley; Woking v 

j asouSs* 

Newbury v Faraham: Devizes v Road 
S«a (Southampton); Wimborne v 
Cfvppawwn: Havant r Tattoo; Stoiv- 
bridge v Raddttdr Trowbridge v Snfer 
bory; Sharpness v Tor Pentre.-ae*etlanv 
Msnjntsfletd: Forest Green v Dorchester 
Saftssh • Brdeford; Mtnehead v 
Barnstaple: Weston-super-Mare v 
Exmouth. 

FA VASE: fte Beti iiin f roond repl a y: ■ 
Cfipstone Waifsra v Radtonf Ofymeto; 
FairtOrt v Walngton; Lowestoft v Hfcttoc: 
Pa i chway v Lymmgton: St 9t izey v Right 


RUGBY UNION 
TOUR MATCH 

Scottati xv V Japan (230 st MurrayMd} 

. JOHN PLAYER SPECIAL CUP 

FbitRoWd 

Asfcaansv Sudbury 

Beny HNl v Lydney - — 

Bfritanfwad ParX v Fyide — — 

Bkrringnarav Le i g h to n Burzard 

DurtwnvAastan Grasshoppers 

uchWU vTynedale 

London Welsh v Police — 

Maidstone v Havant , . ■ 

OUReigaitois vKCSQS 

Oxford v Exeter : 

Pawns v Syston 


TOMORROW 
FOOTBALL 
First division 

Manchester Utd v Chelsea (2-35) ; 

RUGBY LEAGUE 
STONES BITTER CHAMPIONSHIP: 
Gasiiefortl v Fewherseone Hsfilax v 

’Wsfrtngton; Hitf KR «r Sr Haters; Lergh * 
Oktinm (3.30); Sattord v Bammr. Wwe- 
BeW w Brantard (&30k Wkfoas v Leeds; 
Wigan « Hull. 

SECOND DMStoN: Botiey « Whtolswm; 


SHAtfflSIkJfrXSS 

TL30-12JM Terrebawks 1SL3®®® 
Boomtown Rrts 1 M Ctosedown. 

11.10-1240 Knitfit Rider 4£5pn- 
SOO Sports Result 12J0a« Clondown. 


■■ ^ ceptll no— 

Hbesona Frolic* 11^0-1200 

Terraiwws iXJOen Poetry of me Peo- 
Pte. Ctosedown. 

UFO12J0ea-Waetarand 

Closedown. 

TSW As London except runn 
-Laii GusHoneybwill-05^l2JD0 Oth- 
erwofld SLOfan Niwanort S.1® Con- 
nections 5AOOJ0 A-tSwi 1240m 
PostcripL Ctoaodown. 

GRANADA * 8 .. . 


Aj ^aijssa ^. 

WaSerSoSio FenniogSy SBO- 

jsmcggggs^ • 

Opeedown.- 

aSS-lOuqO Border Di«vl3oim 
Faming Outlook 1 -3p-2J» Sunfval 8J0 



M saBsa' 

Friends UOFaradraoutiooklOJO - 

ZOo TUk 10-06 Srtt&y DocamerS™ 
IMO-llJDOOne Qod ’ 

fsatasBsssr*-* 


Doncaster v Hwslet Keighley v Carlisfe 
(3.15k Mansfield Marksmen v Wham 
030 at Notts Oo FC ground); Rochdale v 
Swinlon : Sheffield ir Uewsbury.- 
Wortdngton v Hufldarsfiald; York w 
Bromley. 

OTHER SPORT 


CENTRAL LEAGUE: FM dfeUoK 
Ewten w Manctwste- Unbad (2J1): 
FOOTBALL COMBMATION: Arsenal v 
MNwaU: Chelsea v Luton 12.16); Remfingv 
Norwicfi (2.0fc y ToCBnftam; 

Watford v Oxford: West Ham v Ports- 
mouth QLOL 

SMIRNOFF IRISH LEAGUE; Bangor v 
Cantcfc CUtonvda v Aids Cderam v 
Crusaders: DIStfltoty * BaBymena; 
Gienavon v Glenforan; Larne v 
Portadown: Unfleu v Newry. 

SOUTH EAST COUNTIES LEAGUE: Rnt 
OMeioie Charlton v Orient: Ruiawi v QPH; 
Ipswich v Tottenham; Norwich v West 
Ham; Portsmouth « Carribridge; Southend 
V Qralsea: Wattord * GTEngham. Leoaoe 
Cwk Hret round motor- WtiBwril v 
WimtHedon. Second dWbkm; Brentfanf v 
CXSchester; Brighton v. Reading; Crystal 
Palace y arfstof Rswerat Luton vOxfartf; 
Northampton v Southend; Southampton w 
Tonenhem. 

LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE: League 
Cub Rf*t nmt B rtme d aw n Rovers v. 
Cmngford. Premier Arttkini Amentum v 
Barwustde: Crown and Manor * South- 


Stives v Mariow 

Saffron Walden v BtocMaatti 

Sofitwlv Stourbridge — — 

SwMonv Camborne — 

Taunton v Reading — : — 

Wfigton v Uverpod St Helens 

West Haritopool v Moriey 

Worsting v Hartford 

JOKH SMITH'S NERIT TABLES 

Bedford v Rlriunond- — 

London Irish v Rcoatyn Park 

CLUB MATCHES: Abonwjn w CanSff — 
Abennory vMaes»eg„„ 

Bahvuanrai 

BoroughmurryNarthefn ; 

Brtdgm v Pontypool — 

Broughton Parii-v Gostonh 

Chetonham v Saracens 

BibwVteiv-Sautn Wales Pouce — ™ 

Gtomorgan Wndrs v WastotHsiiper-Mare 

Guy's HosprtH] y Nuneaton 

Hartaquins v l.efcester...M- 

Harogga vValeofLune...- .....^ 

PrwypritM 

Northampton * Moseley ..... . 

Nottingham v Gala-— 

Ones v Wakefield 

Otffcy v Kelso. — 

Penarihv Cross Keys~ 

Plymouth vTredrmar 

Roundhay w Knoffal - 

ShoffieM ir Maw Brighton.. 

Swansea » vwipnn- . — 

Wasps i Headtogtoy. 


Cep: Pra lnti ra ry round, aecond leg: ; 
Sporting Usbon v Manchester Unhaa l 
Pr&dtonwNattorafCktiEl'fisrroiiKfMpin | 
unless stated^ CBS Centurions Col- 
chester v Plymouth Raiders; Lambeth I 
Topcats V Just Rentatt Rhondda; Team j 
wSaH v Spmings Solertt Stars. Second 
round: Happy Eatar BrecknaB P irates v. 
FetBTtKnwqti Jets. MBL first dteamo 
Lady Topcets.v Not- 

C^^SftwSewr«$erpentoTa« 

England finals- (at 
cw * WWf )- „ . , : . 1 
C01A EngBsh county .finals <at Join I 


Tafzan 2-1 Spm-ZAS Benson 
1Z30m Special Squad 1M Ctosedowa 
Y O R K SHIRE ^on^- 
T2JJ0 Ptannot the Apes IXBOem- 
646 Muse Box. 

SCOTTISH Aslzmdonax- 

s yy* 2 .! Ijn cepe liMm Jam 
and urn Wheeled wanws iijo- 
ikflO capun Scariat iZBOan La» ca, 
Oosadown. 

■Th» 

255 1 


sonaport liXtom Lau Cafl. ClOMdOML 

YORKSHIRE ffi flwspg* 

W-ggpaML*.' 




Ctosedown. 


Eivo pem. 


federation ebampion- 


- ■ IIJOWnBrebtilaj 

^ta-AttheEndoftheOey.- 

CENTRAL Aalfndqteyact 

TVS Aa London ewceotltJO— i 


HTV WEST As London ex- 

iupsr 

HTV WALES 

TYNE TEES as London aw. 

asSSfaSsssat 


nafoi *» 

;*i’i til ■ , 

k'.'M-' - ‘ ‘ 

irti' 1 

jf-v.-:? 1 - • • 
• • - 

'i' 'll' V c l • • : 
!X"j • . 

t-jr-ji t't" 

CUtJ.i'M- • •• 


4 flEOUEMCES R* 


CHANNEL excaptBja^startng 

Point SJO-NLOO LesFrancais Chez- 
Vous 1-30^-00 Farm Focus S.30 The 
Camptoefc 55S Butene 85H50 
News 1250MB Ctosedown. . 

Tye As London except 6 Tot 
— " Cartoon >JVltUJ0 Smurfs UOQ 
Sravfval L30-2JW Ftom Focus 5J0 

nws i z j O wh Coraparw. 

Clo i odowa 




<- 

^aS=S“ 


lonmirr Fnt dMOTm B oii rd taa n bod . 
Ectfav Old Hutmeiars: Cheadft v. 
Ashton; Old Stopfordians t’OW; 
Wacontens: Sato v Mata: (tenstM v 

UmORCTcStia: FJJI. Ewvpean 
championships (Oonmgton Patfcj- 
SailmG: Johnnie VMkar world safing 
speed record week (at Portend). 
SNOOKS!: BCE international ' far, 
Treottam Gardens. StoktHm-Trarx). • 
YaCHTHG: World 476 chMsptotMhipB 
(Sofou. SpaAL. ■ 


Twahawl»ia30OTBorantewri 
usem Company, Closedown. 

GRAMPIAN 


SUNDAY 




ULSTER ^wdorvaxcenh 

sgUgUsea r*" 9 

GRAMPIAM AS Londn^^. 
youeeSj; T^tiw^iS^£3 l SJiSnf■ l, * 











BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


el-j^rfejSSL'^r^a 


XHB.T 1 MF j »S,TUESDA.Y SEPTEMBER 30 1986 


21 



Weekend television and radio programmes 
Edited by Peter Dear and Peter DavaDe 


Sunday 


O.t 


2SS 

'!'S 

:' 4 S 

2 s ^ 

V 

*;¥? 

^ >h 

«. I 

■ 

-To* 


u» k 


'> 

: "5t: 


BBC 1 


«J0 The Family-Nus. (r)£35 
The Moppet BaMas. A 
I»w animated series. 

9 -°° Saturday Superstore 
presented by Mito Read. 

Kath Chegwin. Sarah 
Graane and Vicky Lieorfsh. 
A new series begins with 
- Paul Young’s latest video, . 
Scottish singer Owen 
Paul, and Cnas 'n' Dave, 
from the pop music worid; 
Phifijp Schofield presents 
TV Talkback tn which 
viewers can requesters 
. from their favourite 
programmes; Julian 
■PettKer discusses a 
project to counter acid 
rain; and vet Nfejel Taylor 
' has advice' on care of 
kittens. 

12.15 Grandstand introduced by 
Stave Rider. The Bne-up 
ise 1135 Footbafi Focus; 
1.00 News summary and 
weathenl.10 Vofcybelt 
' The Royal Bank Cup from 
BfcmingtiamilJlO.iOS, 
2.45. 3.10 and 3^0 Gotf; 
The Dunhffl Cup from St 
Andrews; 1-55.2.30. 320 

and 325 Redrew from 
Ascot; 4.40 Fmal Score. 

505 H aws with- Jan L oo ming. 

• -Weather. 5.15 

• -Spoft/Regkmal news. 

- £20 Roland Rot - The Series. 
-The guest is Brian 
Blessed. 

£45 .Doctor Who. Part four of 
the 14-episode adventure. 
The Trial of a Time LonL 

- --WfttrCoSn Baker in the 
title role. (Geefax) 

6.10 The Noel Edmonds Lata 
Lota Breakfast Show. A 
repeat of the 1 1986 Golden 
Egg Awards. 

£40 Every Second Counts. 

i show 


TV-AM 


£55 TV-arri introduced by 
Richard Keys. Weathei 
£5&new&at720. 

7-30 The Wide Awake Club 
indudes the first heat of 
the WAG short snooker 
championships. 


!TV LONDON 


£25 No 73. Madcap series for 
chDdranilJJO Knight 
Rider. Michael Knight - 
helps a young woman fo9 
an assassination attempt 
on her head of state 
lather. 

12*00 News with John Suchet 

12.05 Saint and Oreeva i e. Ian 
and Jimmy reflect on the 
week's football news and 
took forward to this 
weekend's action 1220 
WresUpg. Two bouts 
tram Stratford Civic HaU, 
Stratford-upon-Avon. 

.120 Akwotf . A young woman 
saves Hawke from kfllers 
and insists on tagging 
. along when he goes in 
search of stofen 
. information. 2.15 The 
Cuckoo Waltz. Comedy 
series starring Diane 
Keen.(r) 

£45 Snooker and International 



ISIpfS?® 


I by Paul Daniels. - 
7.15 The Ruaa Abbot Show 
.with ouest Lea Dermis. 


7.45 Casualty. Drama serial set 
in a night Casualty 
-- Deptarunent under threat 
" of closure. This averring, a 
motorway crash leaves 
two dead and Dr Thalton is 
desperate for organs from 
- one of the corpses. 

; .(Geefax) 

£35 FBm: Seems UkeOM 
- - Tiroes (1980) starring 
Gokfie Hawn and Chevy 
Chase. Comedy about a 
bank robber who takes 
-refuge in his ex-wife's 


T: 


' unlucky place to choose 
as the woman is a lawyer 
• 2nd her new husband the 
— • District Attorney. Directed 
by Jay Sandrich, (Ceefax) 

,10.15 Mews and Sport. With Jan 
Learning. Weather. 

IQJMtBlott on the Landscape. | IOlOO 


m the BCE International 
snooker tournament and 
tt» WBC Lightweight 
Championship of me 
World between the holder, 
Hector Camacho and 
Cometius Boza-Edwards, 
at Miami Beach. 

445 Results service. 

£00 News. 

£05 Btocftbustera. 

-525 The A-Team. The tab four 
help a wife find her 
precious metal expert 
husband who has been 
kidnapped in a small town. 

£30 Llind Date. A lighthearted 
look at what could happen 
’ on a blind date. Presented 
by Cflla Black. 

MS Copy Cats. Comedy 

impressions from a host of 
artists headed by Bobby 
Davro. (Oracle) 

725 3-2-1. Game show for 
couples, presented by Ted 
Rogers. (Oracle) 

£45 News and Sport 
£00 Dempsey and 

Mahepaaca. The two 
secret investigators arrest 
three men and dacover an 
arms cache in the men's 
hideout In his efforts to 
discover the supplier of 
the arms Dempsey's 
unorthodox methods of 
itionleadtoa 



I and Biott continue 
- to plot to stop the 
motorway even though the 
' bulldozers are out in 
strength. Starring 
.. ..Geraldine James and 
David Suchet(r) (Ceefax) 

1125 FBm: Two Mania Wanting 

I. .<■ (1976) starring Chariton , 
Heston as a poNce captain 
— .. . witii the task of capturing 
a sniper before tampan 
. begin shooting attfte 
100.000 spectators at a - .. 
football game in Los 
Angeles. With John 
Cassavetes, Martin 
Balsam and Beau Bridges. 

' Directed by Larry Faeroe. 

120 Weather. 


Christie’s The 
Lest Seance, starring 
Anthony Higgins, Norma 
West and Jeanne Moreau. 
Mystery thriller about a 
celebrated medium, 
Madame Simone, who is 
growing weary of her 
strange powers. 

114)0 LWT News headlines 
followed by Snooker. The 
BCE Interna tionaL 
1220 Blisa In ConcorC Spear of 
Destiny perform in. the 
MusieShed. ’ ’ * : 

120 Woman of Iran. A 

documentary about two of 
theworid'smost 
success f ul female body 
buffiJere, training for the 
title of Ms Ofyrhpfa. 

1.40 Night Thoughts. 


Pleasant bride: One 
Beraard 



BBC 1 


e Viila&em China (BBC2, 8Jft»ra). And, right, 
GaUajfheR Casesliy (BBOL 7.45pm) 


BBC 2 


£05 Open University. Until 

125 FOnc King’s Row* (1941) 
starring Ronald Reagan, 
Ann Sheridan, Robert 
Cummings and Betty FlekL 
Romantic drama, set at 
the turn of the century, 
about a wealthy man, 

' thwarted in Ms desire to 
. many the daughter of the 
. town doctor, who, on the 
re-bound, faflsforone of 

Directed Iw^mWMx^ 5 
£55 Laramie. Western 
adventures, (ri 

■445 Championship Darts. The 
final of the Unbart 
BritishChamptonship. 

635 Worid Chess Report 
Kasparov versus Karpov 
. in Leningrad. 

725. News View with Jan 

Learning and Moira Stuart 
Weather. 

7.45 Saturday Review. The first 
of a new series of the arts 
and med ia magazine 

Russefl Dalv^^n^ ^ 

Bennett talks about his 
new play, Kafka’s Dick, 
and presents extracts 
from the production. 

Steven Berkoff. Michael 

Hastings and ttriary 

- Spurring (focuss the work; 
Solomon Volkov defends 
Iris biography of 
Shostsftovien; the work of 

- American artist Andrew 
Wyeth is assessed; and 
two leading bookmakers 
lay the odds on the Booker 
Prize result 

£35 One VBtageki China. Tfria 
first of three proy am mes 
about fife in rural China 
focuses on the women 
who five in a small vile 


£15 


BPwng. 

Ashkenazy to Weis. 

Vladimir Ashkenazy and ' 
the Engfish' Chamber 
Orchestra p(ay Mozart's 
Piano Concerto In D minor 
(k466) and Divertimento in 
D (k205). Recorded at 
Weis, a smaH town ri 
Upper Austria. 

1025 Championship Dart*. 
Highlights of the final of 
ttie Unipart British 
Professional 
Championship. 

11.05 fntamatkmalGolLThe 
DunhHICup semifinals. - 
1145 Bins Dance of the 

.Vampires (1967) starring . 
Roman Polanski and 
Sharon Tate. Spoof horror 
fibn about a pair ol 
vampire hunters lodging In 
a vfiagein central 

RoraarrPolansJd. Endsat 
12 £ — 


CHANNEL 4 


125 A Fragment of Memory. 
Flm-maker Michael Orrom 
recalls his years at 
Cambridge University hi 
the late Thirties. M 

2.00 FBm: Once in a Lifetime* 

JacfcOakie 
whose 
is mistaken for 



D Mack. 
Crtcker 

andNaunton 

w&yne. Comedy about 
two intelligence officers 
who are retired early after 
faffing to capture an 
escaped Nazi (Maurice 
Denham). Directed by 
Alfred Roome and Roy 
Rich. 

£05 Brookeide.(rKOracie) 

£00 Right to Reply. Why was 
the Channel's 'gay 
season' put out so late at 
night? This and other 
criticisms are answered by 
the commissioning editor. 
Alan Fountain. 

620 Plenty Chapati, Plenty 
CNpe. A profile of the 
Asian Barot family of 
Leicestervfa East Africa- 
a husband who fikes to 
write pop songs; a hard- - 
working wife: and four 
defiant and outspoken 
children. 

720 News summary and 
weather followed by 
Crusade. Eight survivors 
ofthe200 Jarrow 
Crusaders recall the 
march on the 50th 
anniversary of the protest 

£30 The Orchestra. Mime 
cometfian Jufian Joy- 
Chagrin returns again to 
lampoon the worn of 
classical music. 

£00 Paradise Postponed. A 
repeat of part two of John 
Mortimers drama stmrkn 
Michael Hordern. Whfle 
Henry is being courted 

a Hollywood mogul, 
brother Fred sets his sight 
on a general practice. 
(Oracle) 

Ha Street Blues. Captain 
Furitto becomes involved 
in his chiefs machinations 
to steal the thunder of a 
rival candidate for the post 
of mayor. (Oracle) 

Almost Live, 
comedy 
by Steve 

M 

1125 Fflnt Tarantulal* (1955) 
starring Leo GCarrofi and, 
m a minor rate. Cent 
Eastwood. A tarantula the 
size of a bam causes 
havoc in the Arizona 


1020 


1025 


' Jack Arnold. Ends at 1 


FREQUENCIES; Radio 1:1053k 
92.5; Ratio 4; 200kHz/1500m: 
1458kHz/206m: VHF 94.9; Work! Service: 


!kNz/285m;1 089kHz/275m; Radio 2r 693kHz/433m; 909kHz/330m; Radio 3: 1215kHz/247m:VHF-90- 
• vH^92-95; LBGlj 52Mi7J2B\ m: VHF 972; Capital; 1548kHz/194m: VHF952; BBC Radio London: 
rid Service: MF 648kHz/4fi3m. _ 


( Radio 4 


3 

On king wave), (s) Stereo on VHF 

£55 Shipping. £00 NewsBrtefing. 
£10 Prelude (s) £30 
News; Farming. 620 Prayer 
■ 4s)- 625 Weather, Travel 

720' News 7.10 Today's 
Papers. 7.15 OnYour 
•Farm. Profile of Frank 
Whitley who went Into 
■ terming in 1981 but has not 
found the going easy. . 

745 in Perspective, with 
Rosemaiy HartilL 720 
Down to Earth, gardening 
magazine. 725 Weather; 
Travel 

£00 News. 8.10 Today's 
Papers. £15 Sport on 4. 

827 Weather; Travel 

£00 News 

£05 Tm Sony I Haven't A 

Clue. Humphrey Lyttelton. 

• chairs the pan® game (s) 

£35 Adventure. Mike 

HoNlngworth reports oa 
new ideas In outdoor 
pursuits. 

£50 News Stand. David 
Walker reviews the 
weekly magazines. 

10.05 Conference Special 
Labour MP Ann Ctywd 
reports on the LfoeraJ . 
Assembly in Eastbourne. 

1020 loose Ends with Ned 
Sherrin end stutfo 
guests. 

1120 From Our Own 

Correspondent Life ancf 
noBfes abroad. 

1220 News; A SmaW Country 
Living. Jeenine McMullen 
on the delights of Kving in 
rural Britain. 

1227 After Henry. Comedy 
series starring Prunella 
Scales. I225weather. 

120 News 

. 1.10 Any Questions? Lord 
Chappie. Emma 
Nicholson, Oavid Penhafigon 
MP and Andreas 
Whittam Smith tackle issues 
raised by an audience in 
' Otford, Kent(r). 125 

220 Newsrfiie Afternoon 
- Pfay: &rup of Flw, by Jo 
Heaton, wth Suae Brant 
Set in a convent schooL 

320 News; Travel: 

International 
Assignment BBC 
correspondents report 
from around the worid 

420 The Saturday Feature: 
Britain's Young 

Achievers. Profile of some of 
the 75 young people 
whose charitable works, or 
'. triumph over adversity, 
are beirw honoured « a 
party on Radio t. 

445 Memoirs of a Fox- 
Hunting Man. Siefgried 
Sassoon's novel uridoed in 


52(7 The Living Worid. Shell 
Beach on the Channel 
Island of Harm. 

525 Delve Special. Spoof 
■investigation by David 
Lander £50 Shaping. 525 
Weather; Travel 

620 News; Sports Round-up. 

£25 Stop the Week with 
Robert Robinson (s). 

.With a song from, 
Nicholas. 

720 Saturday-Night Theatre; 
'Marge, by David Parker. 
With Sally Eldridge as the 
woman who wants to 
return to teaching. 

£15 Islands of Hope and 
Glory. Story by Ronald 


Knox-Mawer. read by Frank 
Duncan. 

£80 Baker’s Dozen. Richard 
Baker with records (s). 

820 Thrifieri Peter Lovesey's 
Rough Cider, read by 
Dam March (f). £58 
weather 

1020 News 

10.15 Evening Service from St 
Georges HBl, Brandon 
HM, Bristol (s) 

1020 The Good Book. Brian 
Redhead wHMtotenars' 
reactions to his journey 
through the Bible. 

1120 Poor Technology: 

Designers and 
technologists on how we! 
the West is tackling the 
problems of developing 
countries. 

1120 The Mifflbn Pound Radio 
Show. Comedy half-hour 

1220 ISbws; Weather. 1223 . 
SMppJng. 

VHF (avatobleln England ancTS 
Wales only) as above except 526- 
aWeal “ ‘ ' “ 


ithenTraveLlSS- 
220pm Programme News. 420- 
620 Options; 420 Rambles in 
tretand. 420 Brainwaves. 520 This 
Language Business. 520 Fit for 
What? 

( Radio3 ) 

On medium wave end VHF/FM 

£35 Open University. Education 
buletin. Unfit £S5eni 
£55 Weather. 720 News 
725 Aubede: Debussy 

(Printemps). Honegger 
i (fete), 


(Midsummer Night’s dream 
scherzo, transc 

Rachmaninov: Botot, piano), 
Tippett (Ritual Dances, 

The Midsummer Marriage), 
MHhaud (Lteutomne: 

Noel Lee. piano); Faute 
(Automne: Janet Baker, 
mezzo), Vivaldi (Winter, The 
Four Seasons), Prokofiev 
(New Year's Eve Bail, tram 
War and Peace), 

Schumann (songs indudfog 


soprano), Kabalevsky 
■ 3. Op 65). 920 


£05 Record Review; includes 
Lionel Sauer's 
comparison of recordings of 
Mozart's Plano Concerto 
No 20. With Paul Vaughan 
10.15 Stereo Release: 


Schumann (Introduction 
and Concert All egro. Op 134: 

Philharmonic ot Radio 
Franca), Mahter’s 
arrangement of Schubert’s 
String Quartet In D 
minor, D 810 

11.15 Phiadeiphia (under 

Muti). wm Ctaudto Arrau 
(piano). Rossini (WHSem TeO 
overture), BdMhoven 
(Piano Concerto No 3), 
Hindemito(SgTi^Kwiy in 

125 ^^teand totete 

Quartet- Haydn 
quartet), Bartok 

220 Chopin and Brahms: 

Barry Douglas (piano) 
rta^O^UmrtemdudJnc 
• scherzos no 3 ano 4, 
and Brahms’s Variations and 
Fugue on a Handel 
theme 

320 Mengefoerg's 

Beethoven: Symphony 
No 1 and Symphony No 3 
(played by Amsterdam 
Concartgebouw). In mono 

420 Violin and piano: 

Krzysztof Smietana and 
John Btekety. Shostakovich 
(FOur Preludes, from Op 
34). Prokofiev (Sonata In D, 

425 of the Mbeiung: 

the Welsh National 
Opera production of The 
Valkyrie. Direct from 
Royal Opera House, Covent 
Garden. Conductor: 

Richard Amstrong. Cast . 
incudes Warren 
EUsworth, PhUfip Jofi, Anna 
Evans. Kathryn Harries. 
Penelope waffier. Act one. 

£10 The Turkish Letters: 

- Neville Jason reads part 
oneafOdlerGhiseiinde - 
Busbecqs memoirs 

6-30 The Valkyrie: act two 

£10 Critics' Forum: topics 
Indude Alan Bennett's 
play Kafka's Dick and Alan 
Rudolph's film Trouble in 
Mind 

£10 The Valkyrie: act three 

1030 A Conversation about 
Sfiencs Peter Quigley 
; reads die story by John 
Cameron Bumskte 

1IL45 Dvorak: Lindsay String 
Quartet ptey the C 

Quartet No 5, and 

A minor, Op 16 

H2S The Jazz Pfartst Per 
Henrik Wallin plays Ms 
own improvisation 



The musfcaf Bare* of Leicester: Ck«uiri 4, £30pra 


Knaliedonia. 1127 News. 
1220 Closedown. 


£55 Play SchooL £15 Asian 
fttagaoine. This week's 
edition indudes a preview 
of the Men's Hockey 
World Cite. 945 Arteries 
of Faith. Rediscovering 
religious belief. 

1020 Sunday Worship for 
Harvest from the 
Shropshire village of 
Ruyton-Beverv-Towns. 

1120 International Golf. The 
final of the Dunhill Cup 
from the Old Course, SSI 

Andrews. 

12.10 See Heart Magazine 

i for the 

_ . 11225 

Fanning Includes a 
discussion on the 1988 
arable harvest 1228 
Weather. 

120 This Week Next Week. On 
the eve of the Labour 
Party Conference David 
Dimfreby talks to Neil 
KJrmock in Blackpool. 220 
EastiEnders. (rtf' 

320 bttemationaiGolf, Fi 
coverage of the Dunhill 
Cite final. 

435 Roif Harris Cartoon Time. 

The first of anew series. 
£00 South Pacific in London. 
The Rogers and 
HammersteJn musical 
l recorded at 
i's Henry Wood Hall 
, KlriTe 
, Sarah Vaughan 
and Mandy Patinkin with 
the Ambrosian Singers 
and the London 

r Orchestra 
I by Jonathan 

Tunlck. 

620 Pet Watch live from 
Alexandra Palace, the 
venue of the Pet Trade 
and Industry Exhibition. 

620 News wth Jan Learning. 
Weather. 

£40 Songs of Praise for 
Harvest from the Parish 
Church of St Mary the 
Virgin, Saffron Walden. 

_ (Ceefax) 

7.15 Ever Decreasing CfrcteSL 
Martin befieves wife Ann 
has become a 'pawn of 
the Kremfin' thereby 
his new 
i of an up- 
market dub. (Ceefax) 

745 Howards’ Way. Episode 
five of the 13-part drama 
set among the sailing folk 
of the south coast 
(Ceefax) 

£35 Only Fools and HorpeaL. 
Rodney becomes 
everybody's friend when 
he is given £1 0,000 by the 
council to make a 
community fflm. (Ceefax) 

£05 Sunday Premiere: Death 
is Part of the Process. 
Episode one of a two part 
drama adapted by Alan 
Plater from the novel by 
Hilda Bernstein, set in 
South Africa during the 
1 Sixties. Starring Art 
Ilk as a South African 
dissident whose group 
initiafly seek a change In 
the apartheid laws through 
peaceful methods but then 
dedde that; force is the - 
only way. Wkh Louis " 
Mahoney and Moira 
Downie. (Ceefax) - 
1 1020 Wewa with Jan Leemfngr 
Weather. 

1025 Heart of tha Matter. How 
can the indhrtduai . 
reconcile the obli 
of conscience 
obligations to the State? 

11.10 Discovering Animals: The 
third of eight programmes 
on the mammals of ' 

Britain, (i) 

1125 Intern a tional GoH. 

Highlights of the find of 
the DunhWCup. 

12.15 Weather. 


TV-AM 


£55 TV-am 

Comment?20 Are You 
Awake Yet? 725 Wac 
Extra. 

£30 David Frost on Sunday. 
The guests are Dams 
Healey. Rank Bruno, and 
Natan Sharansky. 


1TV/LONDON 


£25 Witice Ifo London The 
Vicious Boys become 
jppeteers 925 Roger 


520 


1020 

Church of St 
Bartholomew. Chipping, 
near Preston 1120 Link, 
ago Nicola 
wrote a book 
about her severely 
handicapped daughter. 
She now brings the story 
up to data (Oracle) 

1120 working fora Better Ufa. 
How a community in the 
north of England took over 
a derelict factory, ft) 

1220 Weekend World. After the 
Chernobyl disaster should 
the government give the 
go-ahead for a new 
nuclear power station at 
SizeweA? 125 Police £ 
1.15 European Folk Tates. 
The Bag of Wind 120 The 

Smurfs, (r) 

220 LWT News headlines 
followed by One 
God~Three Gods. A 
of Father Elias 
. a Greek Catholic 
pried who is bath Arab 
and Israel 

220 The Big Match Live. 
Manchester United play 
Chelsea at Old Trafford. 
Brian Moore is the 
commnetator * 

420 International Boxing and 
Snooker. Welterweight 
Championship of the 
World. The holder. Don 
Curry, meets Britain's 
Lloyd Honeyghan, at 
Caesar's, Atlantic City: 
and the BCE international 
from Trentham Gardens. 
Stoke-on-Trent 
Sunday Sunday. Gloria 
HunnHord's guests are 
Gene Hackman. Mike 
Yarwood.KeJtyMonteith 
and Nana MoiishouiL - 

£30 News with John Suchet 

£40 Highway. Sir Harry 
Secombe visits 
Wavendon. the home of 
John Dankworth. 

7.15 CNkfs Play. Lionel Blair 
and June Whitfield try to 
decipher chidren's 
descriptions Of everyday 
things. 

745 Live from the PiccadBiy. 
The first of a new season 
of variety shows 
introduced by Jimmy 
Tarbuck. Among those on 
tonight's bill are Suzi . 
Quatro and the cast of 
Annie Get Your Gun. 

£45 News. 

£00 Inside Story. Part one of a 
new dramaseries about 
the behind-the-scenes 
wrangling over the 
fortunes of a Fleet Street 
newspaper. Starring Roy 
Marsden, Francesca Annis 
and Hairy Andrews. 

1020 Spitting tmage. .. ... ..1 . 
1020 Down for the Cup. The ' 
story of the preparations 

for the challenge to ' - : ' 

Australia for the America's 

^120 News head fines 
foBdwed by Snooker. The 
BCE International. 

1220~ Tobacco on TriaL Why 
Belong smokers In the 
United States have begun 
to sue the tobacoo 
companies. 

125 Night Thoughts. 



Directin' Franco Zeffirelli and his Moor (Ptaddo Donringo} iafhe 
behind-tbe-sceoes documentary ZefEreUTs Oteflo (BBC2. 925pm) 


BBC 2 


920 Open University. Until 
12£ 

220 The Gospel According to 
St Matthew. An omnfous 
edition of the series first 
shown six months ago. 

£00 FHm: Dark Passage* 
(1947) starring Hurr 

Bogart and Lauren 

Drama about an escaped 
convict searching for the 
kffier of hs wile. Directed 
by Defmer Daves. 

440 FBm: The Tiro Mrs 
Canolfs* (1947) starring 
Humphrey Bogart and 
Barbara Stanwyck. 
Thriifer, set in an English 
cathedral town, about a 
widowed artist who 
remarries. The match 
appears to be going 
smoothly untH the artist 
paints his wife as an Angel 
of Death and she falls 
mysteriously ill - a chain of 
events that preceded the 
first Mrs Carroll's demise. 
Directed by Peter Godfrey. 

£15 Music In Camera. Peter 
Maxwell Davies previews 
a new series of chamber 
music. 

£30 The Money Programme. A 
new series begins with an 
investigation into whether 
the City's seif-regulation 
policy is sufficient to 
protect investors' money 
when investment firms 
collapse. 

7.15 Birds for AU Seasons. 

This final part of the series 
examines the birds ofthe 
tropical regions and 
inefudes the first film of a 
bird of paradise thought to 
have been extinct for 60 
years. (Ceefax) 

£10 The White Tribe of Africa. 
The fifth and last 
prog ram me of the series 
andDavid 


returns to South Ai 


Dimbleby 

Africa two 


previous programmes 
toseerf any progress has 
been made or attitudes 
changed about the lot of 
the oppressed blacks, (r) 
£05 ZefflreflFs OtaBo. A 
behind the scales look at 
the making of Franco 
Zeffirelli's new feature film 
-of Venfi'a opera, starring 
Ptaddo Domingo in the 
' titierote. " : 

1020 Fibre True Confessions 
(1931) starring Robert ^ 
Duvafl and Robert De Niro. 
Drama abouttwo 
brothers, one a policeman, 
the other a Roman 
CathoRc priest with 
poetical ambitions, who 
cross swords when the 
policeman is investigating 
the murder of a prostitute 
and discovers res brother 
is protecting a leading 
businessman connected 
with the kilting. Directed by 
Ulu Grosbard. Ends at 
12.101 


CHANNEL 4 


125 Irish Angle. A report on the 

wide-spread fraud 
involving the social welfare 
system which is costing 
the Irish government as 
much as does the multi 
million pound business of 
tax evasion. 

120 Out of Europe. The story 
of a six-month expedition 
from Algeria to Kenya 
undertaken by a group of 
32 young people. 

220 Everybody Here. 

Multicultural entertainment 
for the young, (i) 

220 FBm; The Passionate 
Friends* (1948) starring 
Trevor Howard, Ann Todd, 
and Claude Rains. 
Romantic drama, based 
on a novel by H.G.WeBs, 
about a young scientist 
who falls for a young 
woman who chooses 
instead a wealthy man 
who can give her the 
security she needs. 

Directed by David Lean. 

4.15 The Little Birds. A 
Spanish film about a 
couple attempting to unite 
their respective canaries. 

4.45 Flkrc HafcShot Shooters* 
(1936) starring the Three 
Stooges as First Worid 
War veterans trying to get 
even with their sergeant 
Directed by Preston Black. 

£15 News summary and 
weather foflowwd by 
Fifties Feature -The 
Women Behind the 
Pictures. The second 
programme in the series 
about women working in 
the British film industry in 
the Fifties. 

£00 American FbothalL Miami 
Dolphins versus New York 
Jets. 

7.15 Chasing Rainbows -A 
Nation and Hs Music. The 
third programme in the 
series examining popular 
music and entertainment 

£15 Pillar of Fire. Part three of 
a seven-programme series 
tracing the history of 
Zionism. 

9.15 The Channel 4 Inquiry. 

The future of the Atlantic 
Affiance is discussed by. 
among others. Casper 
Weinberger. Henry 
Kissinger, Denis Healey. 
David Owen, and Michael 
Resetting. 

1045-Tribute to Trevor Howard. 
Reminiscences and dips, 
from the actor’s bast- 
. ' known fflms. 

11.15 Film: Cathodes (1973) 
starrirw Trevor Howard. A 
made-for-taievison drama 
about the abbot of a 
remote Irish monastery, 
who comes into conflict 
with the Pope ova the 
matter ot saying Mass in 
Latin. With Martin Sheen 
and Cyril Cusack. Directed 
by Jack Gold. Ends at 
1220 . 


C _ Radio 2 ) ( Radio 4 ) 

MF fmetSum wave). Lamo on ✓ 


MFpnecBum wave}. Stereo on 

News on the hour until 120pm, 
then 320, 82£ 7.00 and hourly 
from 1Q20L Sports Desks 
1122am, 1022pm. 

420am Dave Bussey 620 
Steve Truatove 825 David Jacobs 
1020 Sounds of the 60s 1120 
Album Time with Ttm Rice 120pm 
The Good Human Guide. With 
the National Revue Company. 120 
Sport on 2- fodudas Raang 
from Ascot, Golf: (Dunhill Ojp) and 
Rugby union: (Scottish XV v 
Japan). 6.00 Sports Quiz Kid. The 
Final 620 The Press Gang. 

Quiz chaired by Giyn Worenip 720 
Three in a Row. From the Priory 
Cteirch of St Mary and St Michael, 
Cartmel. Cumbria. 720 Gaia 
Concert 820-840 IntervaL Michael 
Meech visits Sheffield Gardens 
end explores Bluebell Ralway 920 
String Sound, (strings of the 
BBCRadfo orchestra) 1005 Martin 
Kelner 122Sam Night Owls 
120 Ntohtride 320-420 Big Fight 

Pnnnuif Ufnltnrrininht 

opocw- wBUHwaran 
Championship of tne worid. Don 
Curry v Uoyrf Honeygan. 

C Radiol ) 

MF (medium wave). Stereo on 
vhf (see below) 

News on the han-hour until 
1220m. than 220, 320, 620, 

920, 1ZQ0 midnight. 

62 -m Mark Page 820 Peter 
Powell 1020 Dave Lee Travis with 
the Radiol Roadshow at West 
Piazza. Covent Garden 120pm 
Adrian Juste 220 City to City. 

Mark Page drives around Liverpool 
320 Tie American Chart Stow. . 
From New York, with Gary Byrd 
520 Saturday Live with Andy 
Kershaw 620-1220 Caribbean 
Focus. With John Peel, The 
Ranking Mira P and SmSey Culture. 
VHF Stereo Radios 1 6 fc* 

420am As Radio 2. 120pm As 
Radio 1. 720420am As Radio 
2. 


_.£00 News 
j. Weather. 

£10 Prelude (music) (e) 
£30 News; Morning 

has Broken (hymns). 626 

Weather; Travel 
720 News. 7.10 Sunday 
Papers. 7.15 Apraffi 
GharSflmapiiva. 745BeRs. 
720 Turning Over New 
Leaves. 725 Weather Travel 
£00 News. £10 Sunday 
Papers. £15 Sunday 
(Reflgfous news) 820 John 
Akterton appeals for the 
National Bfrida Rathbone 
Society. 625 Waathen 
Travel 

920 News. £10 Sunday 
Papers 

£15 Letter from America 
rCooke) 

920 Momrig Service from 
Welsh 

Church, Capel Cedtg, Bala 
10-15 The Archers. Omnibus 
edition 

11.15 Pick of the week. 


Margaret Howard (s) 
12.15 Desert island Discs. 

Novetia Richard Condon 
Is tha castaway (s). 1225 


120 The Wbrid This 

weekend; News. 125 


WORLD SERVICE 


620 Newfdask 620 Martfan zjw Nm 
728 IWsmvfour Hour* 720 ftom tha 
WhMm 745 Network UK 820 News 

US Reflections 1.16 A Jo* Good Show 

920 News 929 Review of the Britfrii 

Press S.16 the World Today SL30 Hnan- 

ete News 940 Look Ahead 945 About 

Britain 1020 News Summary 1021 

Hare's Humph! KLtS letter From Awed- 

a 1120 News 1129 News About Britain 

in. I S En gM t 


220 News; Gardener's 
Question Time. Experts 
tackle questions from 
Burnham and District . 
Horticultural Society, 
Somerset 

220 Globe Theatre. Mofere*s 
The Miser, with Michael 
hordem, Eleanor Bran and T 
P McKenna (broadcast 
simultaneously with the BBC 
World Service) 

420 News; Origins. Lions and 
Christians. The Duke of 
Edinburgh talks about his 
concerns as President erf 
the Worid WokMife Fund <0 
520 News; Travel 
525 Down Your Way. Brian 
Johnston visits Thame, 

Oxfordshire. 520 Shipping 
£55 Weather 
620 News 

£15 Weekend Woman's 
Hour. Safly FOUman wffii 
highlights of tha past week's 


Goe s 12-451 

usm 

221 Saturday] 

rad 3.18 Smmfl 

OommamaryA.' 


Newsreel 12.15 Anything 
120 News 


720 Nostromo-Part5ofa 
six -port dramatization of 
Conrad's novel (s) 

•20 A Good Read. 


WoirauONsreoricUk 
■240 News Summvy 

s c FtaUto Nows- 

||«20N«w942e 

rtosaSSRMTheAskEigsIiSo 

News Summary 921 Iflsto rie n s 0.15 
Wfafs New SJO Poopto and Patecs 
1020 News 1029 From Our Own C5 w- 

spondent 1020 New ideas 1ILW Raflec- 

eora mas Sports Rowtdro tum News 
1121 C o mi i M nm y 1US Women AtHie 

Top 1120 tkwwig Heroes 1220 News 

1229 News About Britan 12.15 Radio 

Newareel 1220 Sunday Sendee 120 
NBMSuynwy 121 GfaselcPn} Concert 
220 News 229 Review Of The British 
wees 2.15 Like Wobegon Oty* 220 
Album Thus 920 News 329 News About 

Britan 3.18 from Our Own Correspon- 

dent 4 AS Mtoao as 450 Rnanctal 
Rmiew 520 News 529 TWen ref o u r 
Hows MS Letter From America. AM dm— 
ieOMTl 


Regional TV: on facing page 


1 Gear. Joseph Hone 
andPhffipGlazebrook 
£30 The Maestro. Jeremy 
Siepmpnn's series on tha 
history of conducting. 

£00 News; A Dose of Eton's 
: Medicine. A 70th- 

1 of the writer, 
'Peter Nichoii 
with contributions from the 
authra'stemfiyandthe 
writer iwrtseir 
£30 A Dandelio n in Bloom. 

Feature about the New 
Yorker's gardening 
columnist Kathenne 

Angefi. £55 WeatiwnTravel 
1020 News 

10.15 You the Jury [new 

series] inherited Wealth 
Should be Abolished is the 
. motion put on trial before 
' a studio audience. Chaired 
DyDiekTevemeQC(s). 


1120 Seeds of Faith. Rabbi. 
Anthony Bayfield 
explores the prayers of the 
Jewish peof 
11.15 Music from the 
Jkn Lloyd on the 
century revival Of EngEsh 
fbflc song. 

1145 Long H& and the Lord. 

A short stoty from India, 
by Uma Preed. read 


1220 



VHF{ 

Wales on), 

620am U/aathen TraveL 720- 
820 Open University: 7.00 Maths 
Foundation Tutorial. 720 The 
Kmr 7.40 The Roman tic Legacy 

42tF£OT^tore^35The 
Education Roadshow. £30 
Prefaces to Shakespeare. Sir 
iWchael Hordsm's personal 
view of The Tempest 


( Radio 3 ) 


University. U 
6JS5am. Prepalng for 
exams 

625 Weather. 720 News . ' 

7.05 Vivaldi’s Venice: the 
Vivaldi recordings 
Include Bratus vfr, RV 597, 
and the Trio-Sonata In G 
minor, RV 81. ABO GaJuppTs 
Concerto a 4 No 1 in G 
minor 

820 Edwin Fischer: piano 
recital, includes 
Brahms's Sonata No 1 (with 
De Vrto. violin), Bach 
Preludes and Fugues. The 
Well TemperadCiavler; 
and Handel's Prelude, Air 
and Variations: Presto 
(Suite No 3 in D minor). £00 
News 

£05 Your Concert Choice: 
Safot-Saens (Phaeton. 

from AiWioodI , Op^£ n * S 
Curzon. piano), Holst 
(Invocation Op 1 0 No 2 
for cello and orchestra: Lloyd 
Webbw/Pttiharroonia), 
Mozart (Serenade in E flat 
major, K 375), Ravel 


1020 Music weekly: indudes 
Roger Wright on music 
for radio drama, and an 
assessment of the 
composer-teacher Roger 
Sessions 

11.15 Dd me String Quartet 
Haydn (Quartet in G. Op 
54 No 1), Simpson (Quartet 
No 2).Sbefius (Quartet 
in D minor, Voces intimaa) 
12-35 Ulster Orchestra (imder 
HandteyL with Malcolm 
Binns (piano). Beethoven 
(Pr o metheus overture). 

Brahms (Variations on St 
Anthony Chorale). Lbzt 
(Prometheus). Sanford . 
(Ptarto Concerto No 2) 

220 Three Times Seven: 
recordings of Beyer's 
Septet Bsler'a Septet No 2. 
and BerwakTs Grand ' 
Septet in b flat 
225 Viola and piano 1 , esaba 
Erdetyi and Rebecca 
Hott. Bartok (Hhapsody No 
1L Enesoo (Concert 
Piece). Shostakovich 

(Sonata Op 147) 

345 The Age of 

Enfigi'-snmentfte 
. orefes a, urtderS*giswald 
Kuflken plays Rameau's 
Dardanus suite, also 


Gossec's Symphony in E 
flat. Op 12 No 5), Telemann'! 
Overture in D, and 
Haydn's Symphony No 83 
£30 The Harlequin Years: 

Roger Nichols on the 
musical life of Paris between 
1925 and 1926 (r) 

£15 Josef Hasted: the 15- 
year-old violinist (with 
Gerald Moore, pun) In 
works by Elgar, Achron, 
Saiasate and Tchatirsovsky. 
Mono. 

620 Uszt and the piano: 

Peter Frank! plays works 
including Nuagesgris. La 
lugubre gondolaf wst 
and second versions), and 
Am Grabs Richard 
Wagner 

7JB Britten's War Requiem. 

BBC SO (under SkJoTW 
Pritchard), London 
Sinforietta (under 
Atherton). Choristers of 
Westminster Cathedral, 
London Philharmonic Choir, 
BBC Symphony Chorus, 
and soloists Lott, Langridge, 
and Shiriey-Quirk. 

920 A Tate of a Cavalryman: 
Neville Jason reads the 
story by Hugo von 
Hofmannsthal 
£25 King's Lynn Festival: 
Divertimenti Ensemble 
(under Benjamin), with 
Phffippa Davies (flute). 

Part one. Boccherini (String 
Quintet in A minor. G 

works 
rag 
? talk by 
.amateur 
and sociol o g i st 
Tom Lubbock 
1020 King's Lynn Festival: part 
■ two. Mendelssohn (Octet 
in E flat. Op 20) 

1120 Benny Goodman: . 
recordings of Bartok's 

Contrasts, with tee 
composer at the piano, 
and Brahms's Clarinet 
Quintet in B minor, Op 


10.10 In Our 
Frank 




Moira Dovraie: BBC!. 925jhh 


115. 1127 News. 1220 
Closedown. 

( Radio 2 ) 

MFJmedium wave) Stereo on 

News on tee hour (except 
“ Desks 1222pm, . 


422, 


B20pm) Sports Desks 1222pi 
£02, 10L02. Golf (DwihH Cup) 
Reports at 122pm, 222, 322, 


420 Dave Bussey 620 Steve 

Good Momirn^toBwS& ^ 
Melodies for You (BBC Concert 
Orchestra). With Richard Baker 
1120 Desmond Carrington. 220 
Benny Green 320 Nights at the 
Paris Olympia 420 Moira Anderson 
Sings with the Langham 
Orchestra 420 You Can Sing the 
Next Song 520 Charlie Chester 
with Sunday Soapbox (tot 061 228 
1B84)720 fit's a Funny 

Business. Mffie CraJg talks to Ben 

Warriss 720 Grand Hotel from 
Manchester 820 Sunday Half-Hour 
from Chelmsford Corp of tee 
Salvation Army 920 Your Hundred 
Best Tunes (Alan Keith) 1025 
Songs from the Shows 1045 Tony 
Lee at tee Piano 1120 Sounds 
of Jazz 120am Nightride 320-420 
A Little Night Musk 

C Radio 1 Q 

MF (medium wave) Stereo on 
VHF (see below) 

News on the half-hour unta 
1120am, then 220pm, 320, 42£ 
720, 920, 1220 midnight. 

620 Mark Page £00 Peter 
PoweU 1020 Mike Read 1220pm 
SaviBe's 'CHd Record* 


Club (1980, 74, and ‘68)220 
Classic Concert Emmyfou 

Harris and the Hot Band 320 Radio 
1 More Uma 420 Chartbusters. - 
Bruno Brookes with new records at 
the Top 40's door 520 Top 40 
~ Brookes) 720 Tha Arme 
, gale Request Show 920 
Robbie Vincent 1120-1220 Tha 
Rankin' Miss P with Culture 
Rock. VHF Stereo Radios 1 42: 
420am As Radio 2.520 As 

Radio 1 . 1220-420m As Radio 2. 


WORLD SERVICE 


7.00 Nows 7.09 TWamy-Four Hon T: 

^s^>^SS r SSLJS 

AlfiThePtiwsin's Youra BJ» News 929 

RavtewOf ^eBrttsh Press £15 Setance 
hi Action £45 Haarans 1000 News 
SuiMTiay 1021 Short Suty 10.15 CtassF 
cai Rottrd Renew 1120 News 1129 

Jtowi About Bntaki 11.15 From Our Own 

1246 sports Roundup 120 News 129 
1 30 Globe Them: 

Th» Miser 320 Radio Newsreel £15 

9°gy ^.f ww ^*29<kXnmentMv 
Book - 900 Yean On 
545 Spons Roundup 820 News B 2 S 

I Sma » ^ 

How 920 News Summary 921 Short 
£15 ' the i Ptowum's Yours 1000 

1940 Reflections 1245 Sports Ffoundup 

yjo News 1129 Ccmmemaryiui 
Lomr from America 11 JO Nettanatem 
1220 News 1229 News About Britan 

BrhWiPlntea 2.15 Peebles Chdca 
230 Science In Action 320 News 329 

Retierom 450 waveguide 620 News 

SS. 1 !® SMfSSS."™** 


Regional 71 "• on facing page 




SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27 1986 


Flrat published In 1785 


Cameras 

watch 

wrong 

matches 


League chiefs 
find Luton 



... 


By Stuart Jones 
Football Correspondent 

Manchester United, second 
to bottom of the first division, 
will appear live on television 
tomorrow for the 5 ?E? n “ 
successive weekend. Their 
opponents tomorrow are 
Chelsea, who are fifth to 
bottom, and United will also 
feature in the third televised 
match of the season, on 
October 26, when they meet 
their local rivals. Manchester 
City, currently eighth from 

bottom. , . . 

Pan of the television 
companies* agreement with 
the Football League is that 
decisions on which games are 
to be televised should be made 
well in advance. When the 
companies decided which 
matches to cover live in die 
first half of this season. they 
could hardly have imagined 
that their first three games 
would feature only one team - 
Evenon — which is currently 
making a serious challenge 

Neither Wimbledon, the 
surprising early pacemakers, 
nor the leaders. Nottingham 
Forest, widely regarded as the 
most exciting team in the 
country, feature in the list ot 
matches to be televised over 
the next four months. 

United are being thrust in 
front of the television cameras 


escape route 


By Peter Ball 

Luton Town’s place in the 
Uulewoods Cup is sull in the 
balance. Yesterday's meeting 
between club and Football 
League management commit- 
tee representatives at Lyfoam 
Si Annes succeeded only in 
postponing a decision on 
Luton's expulsion, which has 
now been passed on to a 
meeting of the 92 Football 
League dubs, at Villa Park on 
October 6. 

The move represents 
surprising sleight of hand by 
the Football League manage- 
ment committee, a body not 
..c.niiv noted for political 


Live matches 

TOMORROW: Manchester United v 
Ch&is&ci 

OCTOBER 26: Manchester City v 
UWOd * Shel ' 


NOVEMBER 23: Everton v Liverpool 

NcSSfBER 30: New«stle Urfted v 
West Ham United (ITV) 
DECEMBER 7: Manchester United v 
Tottenham Hotspur (BBC) 
DECEMBER 14: Liverpool v Chel- 
sea (BBC) 

JANUARY 4: Tottenham Hotspur v 
Arsenal (BBC). 


when least they needed na- 
tional publicity. Liverpool 
and Everton will share the 
billing on three occasions, 
including their local derby at 
Goodison Park, before the 
turn of the year. . , 

The television companies 
schedules will then con- 
centrate increasingly on 
domestic cup lies. Both foe 
BBC and ITV have yet to 
confirm their choices of 
League matches in 1987. One 
necessary requirement is t he 
atmosphere of the crowd. 
Even though Newcastle 
United are currently twentieth 
in the first division, for in- 
stance. they have been se- 
lected as one of the 
forthcoming hosts to the cam- 
eras because of the noise 
generated by their supporters 
Another requirement is the 
quality of the two teams as 
well as their level of success. 
ITV picked United's games 
against Chelsea and their City 
neighbours, expecting them 10 
be among the championship 
leaders. Instead, the next two 
shows will highlight life at the 
other end of the table. 

More football on 
pages 38 and 37 


usually noted for political ■ 
finesse. Assailed from all 
sides, including the Govern- 
ment. in the last week for their 
original decision; and ex- 
peeled to reverse it under the 
extreme pressure, they have, 
instead, deflected any further 
flak onto their members while 
maintaining their own po- 
sition unchanged. 

If the clubs accept Luton s 
argument, the club will be 
reinstated without tne 
management committee being 

seen to succumb meekly 
against their belter judgment. 
The expectation, however, 
must be that the members will 
ratify their committee's de- 
cision. 

Before the meeting, Luton 
chairman David Evans, the 
prospective Conservative par- 
liamentary candidate for Wel- 
wyn. had announced in the 
best “dry” tradition that 
“compromise” was not part of 
his vocabulary. Yesterdays 
agreement however, suggests 
that “backing down" may be. 
for it appears that Luton has 
made the major concession by 
their agreement to abide by 
the vote of the clubs and. 
crucially, to withdraw their 
threat to take the matter to the 
High Court should they lose. 

Luton had been expelled 
from the competition on 
Monday for their refusal to 
permit away supporters to 

attend the first leg of their 
second round match , against 
Cardiff City, competition 
.rules requiring visiting sides 
to be allocated 25 per cent of 
the tickets. This season, in the 
attempt to combat hooligan- 


F A inquiry 

The Football Association 
are to hold an inquiry at 
Bradford City’s Odsal Sta- 
dium on Monday into the 
trouble cau sed by Leeds 
supporters during tl@ir Sec- 
ond Division match mere on 
Saturday. Two days later, the 
FA chairman, Bert MHUAsp, 
oiHl meet the Association of 
Chief Police Officers to .dis- 
cuss the control of visiting 
supporters. 

Palace and Chelsea, have in- 
stituted a membership 
scheme, but, -uniquely. 
Luton's allows no provision 
for accommodating visiting 
supporters. - 

Yesterday's meeting, con- 
vened as a result t)f an 
intervention by the Minister 
of Sport. Dick Tracey, re- 
vealed that the considerable 
gap between the two sides had 
hardly narrowed, although a 
joint statement after the three 
hour session proclaim ed^that 
“progress has been made . 

At the meeting, attended by 
management committee 

members Ron Noades (Crys- 


competition should revert to 
their current practice of home 
supporters only. 

TTie league management 
committee rejected this 
suggestion but,, in the face or 
the political and public pres- 
sure which has been exerted, 
have agreed that the final 
decision should be passed to 
the 92 clubs. Luton will be 
allowed to put their case to 
their peers at Villa Park. If 
they win the vote, they will be 
reinstated;, if not, the expul- 
sion will stand. 

If this concession by the 
management committee ap- 
pears to be an abdication of 
responsibility, as undoubtedly 
will be claimed, Mr Carter 
replied; “It is an extraordinary 
measure, but it is an extraor- 
dinary situation. We would 
not accept Luton's sugjpstion 
but, in view of the national 
interest in the matter, we 
think it is right to go back to 
the clubs and give them the 
right to consider it." 

Although, in their normal 
bumbling way, the Football 
League have had the worst ot 
the media arguments, Mr 
Carter pointed out that the 


members Ron . |N °?£r 5 Leaaue, too has been pushing 


("■“gg Kfi SSTCSSiS per cent of 

™ the spectators in any ground. 


■ — f ..ton tne Spectators m auj 

retary Graham Kelly, unon ^ *There is a 

difference between apply- 


ment to play home games m 
the competition without any 


ing this particular scheme at 
Luton with their gates, and 


— -T-, Luton wim meir 

away supporters. Theyadded JJ"®. clubs, 

that, if this was sucossftd, of the ground 

away supporters, would be who navels * ^ 


away ------- h neoDle cannot oc 

gSSSSs 


dubs' membership schemes. 

Luton also offered, as a 
compromise, that the home 


Record gate 

Preston North End s 
Littlewoods Cup tie against 


match against Cardiff should Wesl Ham. the first division 
be played behind closed doors, ^de. on Wednesday^ni&hl pro- 


bul insisted that any sub- duce d a club record gate with 
sequent home games in the receipts of over 00.000. 

Welsh plan crackdown 



Complacency 
eases path 

for US victory 


■bSS Hole".bunker ui the 
Si Cup nver 'ta OW 

Course at St Andrews 
yesterday- 

The Canadian, aged 28, 
required four shots to escape 
tom one of the mosWioiaMe 
landmarks in ana jus 


hoUnga 20ft putt , 




holed fiwm 1 5ft for a birdie? . 
three and Halldoreon was - 
unable to foUqw.h.mmwiJa , 
putt of somestx mch« ^°tler . 
in length. Floyd 
haven’t got my breath h a c fc. .. 
after that. I've been & Prtjjy 
fessional for 25 years but. I v 
«nnoi think of when I wat,> 


ZSSSm failure swung £n no t think or when i war, 

SefrSwbackinfevouroT Ser under so mu<fopr^ir& * 

United States. It was a Scotland progre^ed ut^; 

of justice that he convincing style when Gor- 
travesty 01 wu (681. and," 


should lose to Mark O’Meara 
and his enor was com- 
Dounded when Ray Floyd 
mo“«l past HuMdonon 
the United Sfflie » 


^-ft, ! dma«*.todnywid. 


japan, who beat Argentina 2- ^ match 

’ Scotland, who beat Ireland 
less comfortably than foe 3-0 ^ ^ 

score suggests, will meet tne 
SStl ASwlia, who over- 
came Wales 3-0, in the other , 370 

semi-final, today. 3 371 

Zokal. who gained some 4 463 

noS- on JeUS Tom^ g *4 

years ago when he used a 7 372 

portabletapeplayerandhe^- a its 

ket to listen to soothing music 9 356 

between shots in the beUet 

that it would help to relax him Outran 

and improve his concentra- Tota | ynd 

tion. found he. became the ^ 

loneliest man m the auw ^ving < 


rn^ndjunior^S)^, 

Sam Torrance (70) and 
Lyle (701 an sconng welLEvar . 
J Ireland let them off foe;.,* 
hook in the dosing stag ^u ^ 
Des Smyth virtually forto^; a 
his match against Torrance 


Card of course c 

TUB CHd Court®, St An*m . sV 
Hohi Yda Par Hole Yd» 

t 370 4 10 3*3 

9 411 ♦ 11 172 sq 

2 37] 4 12 StB •••♦?' 

4 S3 4 13 4as . A-i 

5 5W 5 1« 667 fc f 

« JJI 4 it S82 f ' 

1 ire 3 IT Y- 

a 356 4 18 354 . 4 » 


In 3,432 


Total yardage: 6,933 


loneliest man in the Auld ou t of bounds at |he- 

Grey Toon". Zokal, one shot 17th David Feherty led Lyje ,. 
ahead at the time, and by on e shot with three holes to .^ 
O’Meara, both found the cav- ^ but he dropped a shot a - . 
ernous bunker at the 17th with ^ ch 0 f ^ose closing bol^.— ; 
their approach shots. Zokal wales, following their fine •, 


O’Meara, both found the cav- 
ernous bunker at the 17th with 
their approach shots- Zoka! 
twice unsuccessfully at- 
tempted to splash the ban out 
directly towards the pin then 
aimed 45*degrees to the right 
and still left the ball in the 
sand. He escaped at the fourth 
time of asking but by then he 
was staring an eight in the face 
and once again the Roan 
Hole" bunker had been 
responsible for a player pluck- 
in® defeat out of the jaws of 


The Welsh FA yesterday 
launched their own crack- 
down on hooliganism, bnt 
decided not to follow Luton 
Town. 


Representatives of Cardi ff , 
Swansea and Wrexham met 
Welsh FA officials for two 


spectators who have been con- 
victed of hooliganism. 

Alan Evans, the secretary of 

the Welsh FA, said: "We sue 
Ont to ensure that people who 
attend games in Wales are 
responsible and well behaved 
and do not tarnish the image of 
Welsh footbalL" Evans said 
there would also be more Hse 


Almost there; Lyle jest Ms a birdie attempt ■ 
Ian Stewart) 


win in the first round against 
Spain, found Australia ^too . 
tough a proposition. Greg 
Norman once again demv 
onstraied his enormous atnlrty _ 
to overpower a course by 
compiling a 67 to defeat fan - 4 
Woosnam by four shots. 

Quarter-final results:^ 

us M Canada M 

a , ssrT |7 D 4 Sr B i®3?^wSp. 

HaUdonan (70). 

japan MAigantiRa 2-1 - - 


ing defeat out of the jaws 01 

victory. % HMdorwnpO). 

The United States were -topan M ^ ^ H : 

already under pressure as 
Lanny Wadkins, m spite of a toASawwdra^ 
sequence of five successive AusnaSabtWakaSf 
SSrlJl th- civ wnc on R f7ii w M Moutond (37); ° 


BOXING 


birdies from the six, ^ on 
the way to suffering a two-shpt 


attempt to com Dai noou^ur- wh<B they there would atoo ne more ns* 

ism. Luton, along with several . to try to exclude all of closed aremt television. • 

other clubs including Crystal agreeo u. uj . . 

Arsenal face stern test 


Honeyghan finds 
its risky business 


TODAY'S DRAW 
Semi-finals 


pacfwsspnsw' 


George Graham, the Arse- 
nal manager, fears that Italy’s 
decision to lift theirban on the 
import of new foreign players 
will complicate still further his 
attempts to sharpen his team's 
cutting edge. Top-class for- 
wards in this country are 
scarce enough without com- 
petition in the market-place 
from wealthy Italian clubs. 

For the lime bejng he 
persists with Niall Quinn, the 
6ft 4in Irishman, who hopes 
that his luck will finally 
change today in the unlikely 
environment . of the City 
Ground. Nottingham. 


By Clive White 
To all intents the game 
should be about a .battle 
between the First Divisions 


again." He added; "He had his 
sights set on going to Mexico 
and was as good as there when 


mott rampant attack, that of he was injured." 

hSS The inactivity, of the E_n- 



and the meanest defence. 
Arsenal have so disassociated 
themselves with goals, for or 
against, that they have not 
conceded any in five games 
while going three in the league 
without scoring any. Forest 
scored more in one game last 
Saturday than Arsenal have 
done all season. But the 
Londoners were given hopes 
of switching the play yesterday 
when Walker. Forest’s young 
centre back, withdrew with an 
ankle injury. 

His absence necessitates the 
first change to the clockwork 
movement of Forest in eimit 
matches and prompts the 
return of Fairclough whose 
brilliant career was halted by 
multiple injuries 17 months 
ago. He had operations on 
both calves and suffered groin 
trouble, too. but Brian Clough, 
the Forest manager, said yes- 
terday; “Fairclough is now 
match fit and it means thaL at 
*»!, he'll be starting all over 


gland under-21 international 
may be the only chink in the 
Forest armour as Arsenal 
attempt to reopen their 
goalscoring accounL It took 
Davis, a midfield player, to 
end the drought in all com- 


Atianiic City (Reuter) - 
They are offering odds of 6-1 
in America's east coast gam- 
bling’ resort against Lloyd 
Honeyghan. of England, tak- 
ing the world welterweight 
title away, from Don Curry. 
But business remains very 
slow; American boxing 
supporters have found, that 


uppercuts and left jabs sliced 
open the Welshman s nose. 

Honeyghan. aged 26. and 
ubeaten in 27 bouts, does not 
possess the punching power ot 
Jones and often appears to 


nmrh. 

Auttraia vSgMawd fi|4C 

Brand Jim D GraMm v S L; 
vS Toman* 


R Davis vQ' 
e;G Norman 


burning money gives more- on the way to winning the 
pleasure than betting against Europea n title and slopping 


Curry, who has unified the 
three world titles on the way to 
25 unbeaten professional 
fights. 

-The Cobra", as Curry is 


thewaytosunenngawo-snoi ; 

defeat at the hands of pave seothmdWlrttowJ34^ ■ • 
Barr. But Zokal opened foe 6 bt^jw W m" 

_ door for Floyd to rescue his ^ P * ; 

ail Tinas country from the embarrass- MDM ^ ArsmMI • 

ment of a. premature SemVAiMs 

■ 0 departure. 

business „asAUj gMcidf 

uppercuts and left jabs sliced self under pressure when ms ys tonanc® 

open the Welshman's nose. opponent gatherttlsucceffliye f ,1 

Honey^n. aged 26. add |fg SlX Of foe beg 

ubeaten in 27 bouts, does not £ V en so, he launched a Desmond Douglas, foeEn- 

possess the punching power of ’recovery with a birdie at glish and c ommon\^fo 

Jones and often appears to ^ ^ ^ Games table tennis champion, 

lose his composure when hit where he holed from is one of six mternattoiMg 

hard. But his skills have * feet j nd Halldorson involved in foe SchildknJ 
developed beyond aU n?cog- *“?. from inside hi m . That British League opening match 
nilion over the past two years ^ square between champions GKN 

on foe way to winning foe ^XtHoydmoved ahead Steelstock Wolverhampton 
European title and slopping “far Halldorson and Grove Market Draytod 

American Horace Shufford in ^ dered a shot, then on Sunday. 

.1 rr^ol ollminainr fnra craCX 


Six of foe best 


Desmond Douglas, the En- 
glish and Commonwealth 
Games table tennis champion,; 


hard. But his skills have 
developed beyond all recog- 
nition over the past two yews 


petitions when he opened the known, is quite ruthless in foe 
scoring against Huddersfield ring, winning 20 of his fights 


in the Littlewoods Cup tie in 
midweek. 


Graham, now in his fourth 
month as manager, must be 
envious of foe side that 
Clough has assembled. But he 
knows that such a team has 
been years in foe making. He 
said: “I know supporters want 


by knockouts, and combining 
ferocious punching with both 
hands and impeccabble tim- 
ing. He can pull away and 
score from a distance or step 
in and slug it out with the best. 
In short, he is considered 
unbeatable at welterweight 
and even Honeyghan’s 
trainer, Bobby Neill, says 


American Horace Shufford in 
the final eliminator for a crack 
at Curry’s title. Curry is 
unlikely to be impressed by 
Honeyghan’s successes in 
Europe. . 

The memory of world 
featherweight champion Barry 
McGuigan's defeat by Steve 
Cruz on his first foray across 
the Atlantic reinforces Ameri- 
can feelings of superiority 
over their European nvals. 
Thus, while Curry remains the 
epitome of foe smiling host, 
Honeyghan is playing mean in 


Captain courageous 
to the last green 


Although his team was 
beaten on the first day of foe 
English Golf Union’s county 
championship at John 
o’Gaunt yesterday, Stephen 
Wild, foe Staffordshire cap- 
tain, was the individual hero. 


By John Hennessy 

am was short 16th in a bunker at the i 
ay of foe next and that, as it turned out, 

’s county was that 

t John With Hamer Dormie, UXL 
Stephen against foe left-handed Beedv 
hire cap- Lancashire needed only aaj 
Lual hero, other half point. Martin Wud 


said: “I know supporters want namer, Bobby Weill .says topump himself After losing the first five ; boles theniced their rake witfi a 

spectacular overnight success- Curry, who is. considering ^ ^ against Alan Squires he fought superb 8 iron to 5 feet W the 

But that is not for me. It has to moving up in weight for better JJJ* r guy /5l I back courageously to win on last Evans, a former AmOteur 

- — ' «' the last green. Lancashire’s champion now returned from 


be gradual We are not as 
strong as 1 would like in quite 
a few positions. And foe lifting 
of foe Italian ban makes it 
even more difficult to find 
players at the right price. But 
we'll keep looking." 


competition, may well be foe 
best fighter in foe world at any 
weight. Neill’s opinion is 
partly based on Curry’s 
destruction of another British 
boxer, Colin Jones, in January 
1985. when a. series of vicious 


want to meet foe guy. Ail I 
want is to take his title, to 
punch his face in" he said- 
Buu realistically, his on, y 
chance lies in surviving until 
foe later rounds i n. the hope 
that the champion tires. 


CYCLING 

Hour record Richards 


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Don't forget you can exchange murweeksfer f”" 

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or borrow our video (VHS/Bcia) and see all our resorts in the 
comfort of vour own home. l£9.9S deposit). 


broken 
by Moser 

Milan (API - Francesco 
Moser, foe Italian nder, yes- 
terday staged the worlds best 
one-hour performance at sea 
level, turning out an average 
speed of 4S.543kmph at the 
Vigorelli Velodrome. . 

The distance covered in one 
hour bv Moser improved the 
prev ious record, set by Hans 
Henrick Oersted of Denmark 
in September last year, by 398 
metres. The Danish pursuit 
specialist had then docked an 
average of 48. 145kmph. 

Moser, who is the holder ot 
foe overall worid one-hour 


gesture 

Islamabad (Reuter) - The 
West Indies will play a one- 
day charity match for drought 
relief in Bombay on October 9 
before starting their seven- 
week tour of Pakistan. 

Viy Richards's side then 
embark on a gruelling pro- 
gramme of three Test match- 
es. three first classfixiures and 
five one-day internationals — 
29 days of play in only 45 



British control 


The International Tennis 
Federation have chosen an all 
British team to officiate in the 
Davis Cup semi-final between 
Czechoslovakia and Sweden, 
foe holders, in Prague from 
October 3-5. Peter Webster, 
the manager of umpires at 
Wimbledon this year, will be 
foe referee and foe umpires 
are George Grime and Mal- 
colm Huntington (Y ork). 


strength in depth, however, 
was enough to take Jhem 
comfortably home by 5% 
points to 3 l h. In foe second 
match Devon, foe holdejs, 
were beaten by Hertfordshire 
6 ‘ 3 - 

After winning foe four- 
somes 2-1, Lancashire, who 
last won the title as long ago as 
1967. seemed to be cruising 
home on another golden after- 
noon. when the situation sud- 
denly became a little fraught. 
Wild, playing for Staffordshire 


foe professional ranks, missed; 
the green right and hhd>na 
hope of winning the hole. 

STAFFORDSHIRE « LANCASHWE: FtUh 
worm: (Staffordshire names IWp D 
Ewans and MHassafl tost to SHiroefW 
M WHd 6 and 5: C Pomn and S WM tatttt 

one hole. Foinorees result; Statforostw* 
1 Lancashire 2. Singles: Poxon lost « 
Baidsfey. 4 and 3: Hassal tost to 6 
Boordman, 3 and Sfc Evans halved eAhJJ 
WB* S VWd beat Squires, one hojfcBwj* 
tost to Hamer, one hole: P GrtHSUa J** 
Walls. 3 and 2. Stogies result 9nHa» 
shire 2ft. Lancashire 3ft. Mnedne** 
Lancashire 5ft. S taffordshire 3ft. 
DEVON v HERTFORDSHiltE: FoUrtOWto 
(Devon names fsstj: P Nescombe and » 


for the first time at the age Ol . and t: J Langmwd md M Symons MC 
40. began disturbing Squires s Boa«andPCherrv2hales:MBlat)arBndP 


composure and elsewhere the 
holes began to slip away. 

Wiki got back to all square 
finally at foe 15th and his 
opponent, by now . seriously 
ranted, put his tee shot to the 


2 holes; Master anar 
Watts lost to A Clark and Ai 

Foursomes result Devon 1 

Nawcombe bt AmbrtdflA'jj 
holes: langmead bt R. Latham. 8 and* 
Symons tost to Cherry, one hotK **■ 
tost j8md^&tol««to | 

7. angtaa result Devon 2, Herttordshto 


Pat for Pearce 


E^Esi 


oa — , - J- "Jti 

aeaxuusssg 

Oct 31-Nov 2: Opponents to b a d ectoad. 
Sahhrat NWA Gupmwala.lwcqnd 


foe overall world one-hour 0^7-12: Second ^ 

mark, was cheered on,, by “i!£> 1 SSSa 1 5«^ 


ALOHA GOLF MARBELLA 


, Your own tauHow.2 Mreom XE 


! USSR famous fairways and the Mediterranean. Only minuw 
SaitaiTe craU Of Puerto Banus. Our unHjuchpliday 

dub includes four full memberships ofihcpolf y* J jjg 
l__ v i)Ur afc sold ond proceeds disinbuied proporticnttidy 
iSdilSb^aub^wmbmhip is also araifabteat 
JE^Srid faSSsTCNINA GOLFESTATE onthc 


I For free colour brochure ring 


thousands of fens. The Ital ian, 
who does equally well m road 
and track races, was off to a 
slow start and was as much as 
10 Msec behind Oersted s 
schedule after 30 minutes. He 
staged a strong comeback 
from the 35th kilometre and 
ended triumphantly. 

Moser's absolute world 
record of 5L151kmph was set 
at altitude, in Mexico City, in 

January of 1984 

The Italian, who used a bike 
weighing less than 7kg. said; 
“It was harder here than in 
Mexico.” and added that 
wind, which troubled his 
performance, prevented him 
from covering 49km in the 
hour. 


I Test Karachi. 


Clark mark 


A break of 141 by Marlin 
Clark has broken Joe Johnson, 
foe worid professional cham- 
pion's amateur record of 14U 
Set in 1978. Clark, aged 17 
from Sedgley in foe wert 
Midlands, compiled the break 
for England in the home 
international snooker cham- 
pionship last week. 

On safe ticket 

Police have instructed Old- 
ham Rugby League dub to 
make their Lancashire Cup 
semi-final agamt Widnes on 
Wednesday night. all-tickeL 


Garv Pearce, the former | 
Wales‘stand-off, has received 
praise from Len Casey. Hull's 
manager, before his -Rugby 
Hoddle: 350th appearance match at Wigan to- 

Select club 

appearance for Tottenham Daring Soviet 
Hotspur against Everton at . Gudimbatovsky. the 
White Hart Lane. Only six c_^. tnampolinist agpd 21, 


OLYMPIC GAMES 


Soviet praises security 


i 


other Tottenham players have 
reached that landmark: Mau- 
rice Norman. Jimmy Dim- 
mock. Cyril Knowles. Ted 
Ditchbum. Pat Jennings and 
Steve Perryman. 


Hilton leads 


Soviet tnampolinist aged 21, 
has been practising a more 
difficult finish in J 

beating his world rtoora 01 
13 5 marks in the voluntary 
routine at 

against Scotland in Perth- 

Aussies sign 


John Hilton, foe fornier 

European table tennis cham- have signed eeneral situation in foe Olympic Olymp^anT'Sromis^cvS- 

pion. takes up his new po-- ^ Glen Hs^A. *jo fay." “ ifetkrSeSfar TcSuS 

snion as the Ormesby No 1 Australian forwards from foe There is some uncertainty have been imposedduring .’ 

pi aver in the opening fixture i ps wich club; Brisbane. Both 0> “_ be- current Games. “In 19$8 every 

of * the Schildkrot Bntish ^ foeir-debuts at Mans- one win be safe and sound.* 

1 Mima tnmnrmuf at Neats. minnrmw. . wtui communist North Korea. Seoul, he said ‘.V 


Fulham Rugby League dub 
have -signed Pat . O’ Doherty 


Seoul (AP) A senior Soviet 
sports official yesterday praised 
security measures here in foe 
Asian Games for reaching the 
highest level, yet gave foe first 
hint that foe boycotts that have 
plagued foe Olympic Games 
since Montreal in 1976 might 
recur in two years time. 

Dr Viacheslav Koloskov. 
vice-president of FIFA and a 
member of the Soviet Union's 
National Olympic Committee, 
praised security — foe official 
reason the Soviet . Union gave 
for boycotting the 1984 Games 
in Los Angeles. But he said he 
could not confirm whether the 
Soviet Union would participate 
in South Korea in 1988. noting 
it depended, in pan, on “the 


Dr Koloskov could only con- 
firm foe Soviet Union football 
team were preparing for the 
1988 Olympics. “My tusk is 10 
prepare the Soviet football 
team. That is being done " fe 8 
said. 

Dr Koloskov is inspecting 
preparations for the 1988 foo*" 
ball competition, and said Ufa t 
His report would be very 
itive. Koloskov. and a FfF* 
team, have toured venues. H* 
Seoul and four provincial ciu® 4, . 
He said work still had to be don* § 
on locker rooms, medical sta- 
tions and press facilities m tw 
cities of Kwangju and Tat®**' . ' > 

Yum Bo-hyiin, the mayor.. 1* • 
however confident that ihe..cfcSL 
IS virtually ready to host . fo® 


League tomorrow at St Neots. g^jd tomorrow. 


Seoul." he said.