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Historic, Archive Document 

Do not assume content reflects current 
scientific knowledge, policies, or practices. 

















U. S. DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE 
NATION.*! SPPICIJLTHRAL M'BRARV 


CURRENT SERIAL RECORD 


FEDERAL - STATE - PRIVATE 

COOPERATIVE SNOW SURVEYS 

for 

ALASKA 


U. S. DEPARTMENT of AGRICULTURE , SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE 

a nd 

ALASKA SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICT 


Data included in this report were obtained by the agencies named above in 
cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, 
Alaska Highway Dept., Alaska Department of Fish and Game and University of 
Alaska, Greater Anchorage Area Borough, and others. 


Illllllllll AS OF lllllllllll 

APR. 1, 1967 








SNOW COURSES for ALASKA 


100 150 


SCALE IN MILES 


31 20 


SNOW SURVEYS 

m 

ALASKA 


Report Prepared by 

T. G. Freeman, Snow Survey Supervisor 


Issued by 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE 
Blaine 0. Halliday, State Conservationist 
P. 0. Box F, Palmer, Alaska 


INDEX OF ALASKA 


SNOW COURSES 


Map course Map Course 


NO . 

COURSE NAME 

NO . 

ELE V . 

No . 

COURSE NAME 

NO . 

Elev . 

l 

Anaktuvuk Pass 

51TT1A 

2100 

38 

Fog Lakes 

48NN1A 

2270 

2 

Betties Field 

51RR1A 

640 

39 

Oshetna Lake 

47NN1A 

2950 

3 

Chandalar Lake 

48SS1A 

2040 

40 

Little Nelchina 

47NN2a 

4160 

4 

Squaw Lake 

48SS2a 

2150 

41 

Lake Louise 

46NN2A 

2400 

5 

Venetie 

46SS1A 

610 

42 

Lake Minchumina 

52001A 

730 

6 

Arctic Village 

45TT1A 

2300 

43 

Farewell Lake 

53NN1A 

1090 

7 

Koness Lake 

44SSla 

1790 

44 

Chelatna Lake 

51NNla 

1650 

8 

Coleen River 

42SS1A 

1100 

45 

Peters Hills 

50NNla 

2010 

9 

Vundik Lake 

43SSla 

950 

46 

Talkeetna 

50NN2 

350 

10 

Fort Yukon 

44RR1A 

425 

47 

Bald Mt. Lake 

49NN1A 

2150 

11 

Black River 

42RR1A 

650 

48 

Skwentna 

51MM1A 

158 

12 

Circle City 

44QQ3A 

600 

49 

Alexander Lake 

50MM1A 

200 

13 

Bull Lake 

42QQla 

950 

50 

Willow Airstrip 

59MM2 

150 

14 

Eagle Village 

41PP1A 

°00 

51 

Independence Mine 

49MM7 

3300 

15 

Boundary 

41PP3A 

3300 

52 

McArthur 

51LL1A 

120 

16 

Chicken Airstrip 

41PP2A 

1650 

53 

Sheep Mountain 

45MM1 

2700 

17 

Yak Pasture 

47PP1 

540 

54 

St. Anne’s Lake 

46MM1A 

1985 

18 

Cleary Summit 

47QQ1A 

2230 

55 

Worthington Glacier 

45MM2 

2400 

19 

Little Chena 

46QQ2A 

2200 

56 

Moraine 

48MM1 

2100 

20 

Mt. Ryan 

46QQ1A 

2950 

57 

Ptarmigan 

48MM2 

3000 

21 

Chena Hot Springs 

46QQ3 

1250 

58 

Marmot 

48MM8A 

2000 

22 

Big Windy 

44QQ2A 

3850 

59 

Goat 

48MM7A 

3200 

23 

Munson Ridge 

46PP1A 

3100 

60 

Grizzly 

48MM4A 

5000 

24 

French Creek 

46PP2 

2010 

61 

Arctic Valley #1 

49MM1 

500 

25 

Little Salcha 

46PP3 

1500 

62 

Arctic Valley #2 

49MM2 

1000 

26 

Glenn Creek 

47PP2 

925 

63 

Arctic Valley #3 

49MM3 

2030 

27 

Colorado Creek 

46PP4 

750 

64 

Arctic Valley #4 

49MM4 

2330 

28 

Caribou Mine 

45PP2A 

1115 

. 65 

Arctic Ski Bowl 

49MM5 

3000 

29 

Big Delta 

45PP1 

975 

66 

Bird Creek 

49MM6A 

2350 

30 

Tok Junction 

43001 

1650 

67 

Ship Creek 

49MM7A 

1750 

31 

Mentesta Pass 

43NN1 

2430 

68 

Indian Pass 

49MM8A 

2350 

32 

Mankomen Lake 

44NN1 

3050 

69 

Log Cabin (B.C.) 

35KK1 

2880 

33 

Fielding Lake 

45001A 

3000 

70 

Upper Long Lake 

33JJ2a 

1000 

34 

Haggard Creek 

45NN1A 

2540 

71 

Long Lake 

33JJ1A 

1075 

35 

Monahan Flat 

47001 A 

2710 

72 

Speel River 

33JJ3A 

275 

36 

Clearwater Lake 

46NN1A 

3100 

73 

Crater Lake 

33JJ4a 

1750 

37 

Sanford River 

44NN2a 

2280 






*PRIL 196? 


Snowfall was heavy in several areas of interior Alaska during the month of 
March. A substantial increase in snow cover was measured cn the Chena, Upper 
Tanana and portions of the Upper Yukon drainage systems. These areas now 
have a greater snow cover than last year and considerably more snow than 
average for April 1. 

If the present storm situation continues well into April, heavy runoff can 
be expected in the interior rivers. Soil under the snowpack, however, is 
very dry throughout the interior of the State. It is expected that a portion 
of the water from melting snow will be absorbed by the dry soil, and less run- 
off should result than is indicated by the heavy snow cover. 

Near average snow conditions exist in the rem; inter of the areas where snow 
surveys are made, with the exception of the Koyukuk watershed - this area 
has deep snow with high water content. 

ThNaNA-CHENh Drainage 

Heavy snowfall during the month added approximately three inches of snow- 
water equivalent to several courses in the Chena River watershed during the 
past month. Snow cover is now almost 125% of normal, and 109% of that 
measured last year. The Upper Tanana is also considerably above average. 
Substantial inc#6ases were measured at all snow courses in this area,exceot 
at Fielding Lake which has less than normal for April 1. 


MATaNUSKA-SUSITlia-COPriR 


Slightly above average snow cover was measured on most courses in the 
Susitna and Copper river drainages. The Sheep Mountain snow course had 
considerably more snow-water than has been measured for several years. 

KUSKOKWIM 


The Two snow courses in the Kuskokwim basin had a slight increase in water 
content over that measured last month. These courses had 5.2 and 6 inches 
of snow-water, which is estimated to be near average for April 1. 

KOYUKUK 

Heavy snow cover exists in the Koyukuk watershed, an average of 8.3 inches 
of snow-water equivalent was measured at the Betties Field course. This is 
considered to be substantially above average for this area. 

CQj-iSTaL Drainage 


Snow cover in the Co .stal drainage near anchorage is somewhat below normal 
for April 1, Snow courses at the higher elevations had a considerable in- 
crease over last month. 


SNETTi SH AH Drainage 


Relatively light snowfall occurred in the mountains of Southeast Alaska 
during the month of March. Only slight increases were registered on the 
snow courses in the Snettisham drainage, but snow cover is considerably 
above average for the short period of record. 



-oz le- 


ALASKA SNOW SURVEYS Previous 


drainage basin 

MAP 

DATE OF 

SNOW 

WATER 

WATER 

CONTENT 

YEARS 

AND 

SNOW COURSE 

NO. 

SURVEY 

( INCHES) 

CONTENT 

(INCHES) 

LAST YEAR 

Average * 

OF 

RECORD 

YUKON Drainage: 


4/7/67 






Chanda la r Lake 

3 

23 

3.5 

3.7 

3.7 

3 

**Squaw Lake 

4 

4/7/67 

21E 

3.2E 

- 

- 

- 

Venetie 

5 

4/7/67 

20 

3.4 

3.2 

2.4 

3 

Arctic Village 

6 

4/8/67 

20 

3.2 

3.6 

3.4 

3 

*-*Koness Lake 

7 

4/8/67 

18E 

2.9E 

- 

- 

- 

-x-x-fjolsen River 

8 

4/8/67 

19E 

3. IE 

2.7 

2.7 

2 

**Vundik Lake 

9 

4/8/67 

20E 

3.4B 

- 

- 

- 

Fort Yukon 

10 

4/8/67 

27 

4.9 

3.2 

2.5 

3 

Black River 

11 

4/8/67 

26 

4.8 

3.8 

3.6 

2 

Circle City 

12 

4/9/67 

25 

5.2 

3.0 

2.2 

2 

**Bull Lake 

13 

4/9/67 

28E 

5 . 6 e 

- 

- 

- 

Eagle Village 

14 

4/9/67 

23 

5.3 

4.8 

3.4 

2 

^'Boundary 

15 

4/9/67 

30E 

6.0E 

- 

- 

- 

Chicken Airstrip 

16 

4/9/67 

18 

3.5 

3.3 

2.6 

2 

Log Cabin (B . C„ ) 

69 

4/4/67 

40 

11.5 

11.5 

12.2 

7 

TANANA-CHENA 
Drainage : 








Yak Fasture 

17 

3/29/67 

25 

5.d 

4.8 

3.9 

6 

Cleary Summit 

18 

3/29/67 

32 

7.3 

7.5 

6.4 

7 

Little Chena 

19 

4/3/67 

37 

7.8 

5 . 2 

5.1 

5 

Mt . Ryan 

20 

4/3/67 

46 

1C. 7 

8.5 

7.0 

5 

Chena Hot Sprang 

s 21 

4/3/67 

31 

6.3 

4.1 

5.3 

5 

Big Windy 

22 

4/3/67 

22 

5.8 

2.7 

2.6 

3 

Munson Ridge 

23 

4/3/67 

54 

12.5 

19.8 

16.2 

5 

French Creek 

24 

3/29/67 

45 

10*8 

8.5 

7.1 

4 

Little Saloha 

25 

3/29/67 

39 

8*9 

8.5 

5.9 

5 

Glenn Creek 

26 

4/4/67 

29 

5.8E 

4.9 

- 

- 

Colorado Creek 

27 

4/3/67 

31 

6.6 

- 

- 

- 

Caribou Mine 

28 

4/3/67 

36 

7.4 

6.6 

5.0 

2 

Big Delta 

29 

3/29/67 

29 

5.3 

3.5 

2.1 

7 

Tok Junction 

30 

3/29/67 

27 

6.0 

3.© 

3.1 

6 

Men be son Pass 

31 

3/31/67 

32 

7.1 

4.7 

5.9 

5 

F: elding Lake 

33 

3/30/67 

36 

8.3 

9.7 

12.8 


COPPER RIVER 
Drainage : 








Mankomen lake 

3d 

— 

— 

— 

- 

— 

— 

Haggard Creek 

34 

3/30/67 

31 

6.7 

6.3 

4.8 

3 

Sanford River 

3 r/ 

3/30/67 

29 

6.0 

- 

— 

— 

St. Anne 1 s Lake 

54 

3/31/67 

25 

5.8 

4.8 

5.1 

3 

MATANUSKA-SUSITNA 
Drainage : 








Monahan Flat 

35 

3/30/67 

26 

5.2 

6.1 

5.1 

* 

Clearwater Lake 

36 

3/30/67 

21E 

4.2E 

5.9 

4.7 

4 

Fog Jakes 

38 

3/30/67 

20 

3.8 

3.6 

2.5 

3 

**Oshetna Lake 

39 

4/1/67 

24 

4.6 

2.9 

3.4 

3 

Lake Louise 

41 

4/1/67 

30 

6.0 

3.9 

3.4 

3 


Aerial Markers 

(*) Average for Period of Record 




ALASKA SNOW SURVEYS 


Previous 


D R A 1 N AGE BASIN 

MAP 

DATE OF 

SNOW 

WATER 

WATER 

CONTENT 

YEARS 

and 

SNOW COURSE 

NO. 

SURVEY 

( 1 NCHES ) 

CONTENT 
( INCHES) 

LAST YEAR 

Average * 

OF j 

RECORD 

MATANUSKA-SUSim 
Drainage (Cont'd 








*-*Chelatna Lake 

44 

3/30/67 

36E 

9.2E 

8.7 

— 

3 

Talkeetna 

46 

3/30/67 

33 

7.7 

- 

- 

- 

**Bald Mb. Lake 

47 

3/30/67 

29E 

5.5E 

2.7 

4.9 

3 

Skwentna 

48 

3/30/67 

3/30/67 

35 

9.0 

- 

- 

- 

Alexander Lake 

49 

38 

9.7 

10.9 

10.3 

3 

Pillow Airstrip 

50 

- 

- 

- 

8.3 

6.1 

3 

Independence Mine 

* 51 

- 

- 

- 

12. C 

- 

2 

Sheep Mount air. 

53 

3/31/67 

27 

6.1 

3.4 

4.7 

9 

KUSKOKWIM Drainage 


4/3/67 






Lake Minchumina 

42 

28 

6.2 

- 

- 

- 

Farewell lake 

43 

4/3/07 

22 

5.2 

- 

- 

— 

KOYUKUK Drainage: 








Anaktuvuk Pass 

J.. 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Eat ties Field 

o 

<- 

4/7/67 

44 

8.3 

- 

- 

- 

CO ASIA! Drainage: 








Mo Arthur 

52 

3/30/67 

75 

20,2 

14.2 

23.2 

3 

Wo:: t hip. gi.on 








Glacier 

55 

3/31/ 67 

40 

13.6 

16.3 

21.3 

9 

Mora ine 

56 

4/4/67 

27 

6.6 

10.0 

9.4 

11 

P tarsi gan 

5? 

4/4/67 

35 

8.3 

11.8 

9.8 

13 

LaTTuet 

58 

4/4/67 

51 

18.8 

24.1 

19.5 

4 

G o^.ti 

59 

4/4/07 

29 

8.6 

10.8 

16.6 

4 

Grizzly 

60 

4/4/67 

44 

12.8 

17.1 

21 c 0 

4 

Arctic Valley #: 

61 

3/31/67 

11 

2.2 

3.2 

1.7 

3 

Arctic Valley jf'. 

5 62 

3/31/67 

14 

3.2 

4.2 

2.3 

3 

Arctic Valley #; 

5 63 

3/31/67 

22 

4.8 

5.5 

'Ll 

3 

Arctic Valley #< 

1 - 64 

3/31/67 

23 

4.8 

6.5 

5.4 

3 

Arrti’: 31:1 Fowl 

65 

3/31/67 

44 

14.5 

10.7 

12.1 

3 

Bitd Creek 

66 

4/3/67 

45 

11.1 

- 

- 

- 

Ship Creek 

o7 

4/3/67 

38 

9.2 

— 

- 

- 

Indian Pass 

68 

4/3/67 

58 

18.1 

- 

- 

- 

S NETT IS HAM 
Drainage : 








Upper Long Lake 

70 

3/30/67 

3.33 

51,3 

43.0 

35.5 

0 

Long Lake 

71 

3/30/67 

150 

53,8 

4 7 .4 

40.7 

2 

Speel River 

72 

3/30/67 

3/30/67 

106 

39.6 

38.6 

34.8 

2 

Crater Lake 

73 

5 82 

74.5 

80.5 

58.8 

2 


Aerial Markers (•) Average for Period of Record 



*»> ’ 







1 . 




i 


.■hut 





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/■£ 

V-. 

<> 

A /. 







TO RECIPIENTS OF WATER SUPPLY OUTLOOK REPORTS: 


Most of the usable water in western states originates as mountain snowfall. This snowfall accumulates during the winter and 
spring, several months before the snow melts and appears as streamflow. Since the runoff from precipitation as snow is delayed, 
estimates of snowmelt runoff can be made well in advance of its occurrence. Streamflow forecasts published in this report are 
based principally on measurement of the water equivalent of the mountain snowpack. 

Forecasts become more accurate as more of the data affecting runoff are measured. All forecasts assume that climatic 
factors during the remainder of the snow accumulation and melt season as they affect runoff will add to be an effective average. 
Early season forecasts are therefore subject to a greater change than those made on later dates. 

The snow course measurement is obtained by sampling snow depth and water equivalent at surveyed and marked locations in 
mountain areas. A total of about ten samples are taken at each location. The average of these are reported as snow depth and 
water equivalent. These measurements are repeated in the same location near the same dates each year. 

Snow surveys are made monthly or semi-monthly from January 1 through June 1 in most states. There are about 1400 snow 
courses in Western United States and in the Columbia Basin in British Columbia. In the near future, it is anticipated that 
automatic snow water equivalent sensing devices along with radio telemetry will provide a continuous record of snow water 
equivalent at key locations. 

Detailed data on snow course and soil moisture measurements are presented in state and local reports. Other data or 
reservoir storage, summaries of precipitation, current streamflow, and soil moisture conditions at valley elevations are also 
included. The report for Western United States presents a broad picture of water supply outlook conditions, including selected 
streamflow forecasts, summary of snow accumulation to date, and storage in larger reservoirs. 

Snow survey and soil moisture data for the period of record are published by the Soil Conservation Service by states about 
every five years. Data for the current year is summarized in a West-wide basic data summary and published about October 1 
of each year . 

Listed below are water supply outlook reports based on Federal-State-Private Cooperative snow surveys. Those published 
by the Soil Conservation Service may be obtained from Soil Conservation Service, Room 507, Federal Building, 701 N. W. 
Glisan, Portland, Oregon 97209. 

PUBLISHED BY SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE 
D. A. WILLIAMS, Administrator 

The Soil Conservation Service publishes reports following the principal snow survey dates from January 1 through June 1 in 
cooperation with state water administrators, agricultural experiment stations and others. Copies of the reports for Western 
United States and all state reports may be obtained from Soil Conservation Service, Western Regional Technical Service Center, 
Room 507, 701 N. W. Glisan, Portland, Oregon 97209. 

Copies of state and local reports may also be obtained from state offices of the Soil Conservation Service in the following 
states: 


STATE 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Colorado (N. Mex.) 

Idaho 

Montana 

Neva da 

Oregon 

Utah 

Washington 

Wyoming 


ADDRESS 

P. O. Box "F", Palmer, Alaska 99645 

6029 Federal Building, Phoenix, Arizona 85205 

12417 Federal Building, Denver, Colorado 80202 

P. O. Box 38, Boise, Idaho 83701 

P. O. Box 855, Bozeman, Montana 59715 

P. O. Box 4850, Reno Nevada 89505 

1218 S. W. Washington St., Portland, Oregon 97205 

4001 Federal Building, Salt Lake City, Utah 84111 

840 Bon Marche Bldg., Spokane, Washington 99206 

P. O. Box 340, Casper, Wyoming 82602 


PUBLISHED BY OTHER AGENCIES 

Water Supply Outlook reports prepared by other agencies include a report for California by the 
Water Supply Forecast and Snow Surveys Unit, California Department of Water Resources, P. O. 

Box 388 , Sacramento , California 95802 — and for British Columbia by the Department of Lands, \$\ begins with the as 
Forests and Water Resources, Water Resources Service, Parliament Building, Victoria, British Columbia 



The Conservation of Water begi 
i vith the Snow Survey' 1 '' 





O 


CD 

C 

CO 


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co 

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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POSTAGE AND FEES PAID 

SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE U . S . D E P A R T M E N T OF AGRICULTURE 

P.0. BOX F, PALMER, ALASKA