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I 


STifiTteete 

Vol. 9 January-February, 1962 No. 1 





















PAGE TWO 


SUP NEWS 


JANUARY - FEBRUARY, 1962 


Historic Saltair Beach and Great Salt Lake — 
Brief Story of Its Past, Present and Future 


SUP 

PROFILES 


CREED HAYMOND 

Creed Haymond was born Dec. 2, 1894, 
in Springville, Utah. His father was 
Amasa Lyman Haymond, who was born 
in western Iowa in 1848 while his par¬ 
ents were en route west with the pioneers. 
Edward Owen Haymond, grandfather, was 
a blacksmith, converted in Illinois and was 
sent for by Brigham Young to come to 
Great Salt Lake to make the "irons” for 
the first saw mill in Bingham Canyon. 
As was common in the early days of Pio¬ 
neer construction, the different settle¬ 
ments bid for the services of the black¬ 
smith and Springville offered the best 
inducements to Edward Owen and he 
settled his family in Springville. Mother 
was Eliza Jane Bringhurst, born in Cot¬ 
tonwood in 1851, the daughter of Wil¬ 
liam Bringhurst and Ann Wollerton Dil- 
worth, pioneers of 1847. In 1855, Wil¬ 
liam Bringhurst was called by President 
Brigham Young to establish a colony at 
Las Vegas Springs, Nevada, as a way-sta¬ 
tion between St. George and Los Angeles. 
After the colony was established he went 
to San Bernardino as Mission President, 
to succeed Charles C. Rich. On returning 
home, President Young called him to go 
to Springville to build a cottonmill to 
process the cotton grown in Utah’s Dixie. 
Wm. Bringhurst was a woolen mill man¬ 
ager in Philadelphia before he joined the 
Church in 1844. 

Creed attended high school in Spring¬ 
ville, where he was active in athletics, 
winning letters in baseball, basketball and 


By S. R. Anderson 

Long prior to the time white men first 
trod the shores of this briny sea, strange 
stories of its existence and of the mar¬ 
velous properties of its waters had found 
their way into civilized lands. 

In 1689, Baron La Hontan, a French 
traveler of note, gathered from the Indian 
tribes of the Mississippi Valley their tra¬ 
ditional reports of a Great Salt Sea lying 
amid the solitude of the western moun¬ 
tains. These stories, doubtlessly embel- 
ished by additions from his own imagina¬ 
tion, the traveler sought to perpetuate. 
His narrative was first published in Eng¬ 
lish in 1735. 

In 1776, Padre Escalante, a Spanish of¬ 
ficial exploring for routes of travel, 
crossed the southeastern rim of the Great 
Basin Region. From the Indian tribes of 
what is now Utah Valley he heard stories 
of a Lake many leagues in extent lying 
in the valley northward. Escalante ap- 


track. After graduating from high school 
he entered the University of Utah, con¬ 
tinued on at the University of Pennsyl¬ 
vania and did graduate work at North¬ 
western University. While at the Univer¬ 
sity of Pennsylvania he twice made the 
All-American College Track Team, in 
1918 and 1919, and in 1918 was selected 
as a member of the Inter-Allied Track 
Team which competed overseas. 

He enlisted in the United States Army 
during the first World War and was hon¬ 
orably discharged in December, 1918. 

He came back to Utah to practice in 
his profession of dentistry, which he has 
continued in. 

In December, 1921, he married Elna 
D. Parkinson in the Salt Lake Temple. A 
daughter and two sons blessed their mar¬ 
riage, with 15 grandchildren. 

After serving in ward and stake offices 
in Ensign and Liberty Stakes, Creed was 
called to the Liberty Stake High Council. 
A little later, in 1934, he was called to the 
YMMIA General Board, where he served 
for a year. Bonneville Stake was organ¬ 
ized in 1935 and for the next five years 
he was a member of the Stake Presidency. 
In 1940, he was called back to the Gen¬ 
eral Board, where he served until Decem¬ 
ber, 1945, when he was called to preside 
over the Northern States Mission. Re¬ 
turning home in 1950, he was in Church 
retirement for a few years, when he was 
selected to preside over the Bonneville 
Stake Mission. At present he is advisor 
to the Priests Quorum of the Holladay 
18th Ward. Creed and his wife reside 
at 2840 Floribunda Drive, Holladay, Utah. 


pears to have contented himself with this 
hearsay information as he made no record 
of having reached the shores of Great 
Salt Lake. 

Perhaps the truth regarding the first 
white man’s visit may never be known, 
though there have been many claimants 
to this honor. 

By chance Brigham Young’s party in 
1847, following the Hastings-Donner trail 
west to the Lake, had been led to the only 
good beach. All excursions for nearly 25 
years followed the beaten track to where 
Black Rock upthrusts its somber bulk 
along the south shore. 

A succession of resorts were built and 
maintained at or near Black Rock and at 
Syracuse, Utah, along the Eastern shore 
of the Lake. All had a moderate success 
for a period of time. 

In 1893, the great Moorish Pavilion at 
Saltair was opened June 8th. Saltair Pa¬ 
vilion was reached by a pile-supported 
track 4,000 feet out into the Lake. On a 
pile-supported platform itself the Pavilion 
was shouldered by concessions of all kinds 
and by long rows of bath rooms capable 
of serving thousands at a time. There was 
no beach at Saltair; and the bathers de¬ 
scended by steps directly into the water, 
which was a novelty as well as a de¬ 
cided convenience. 

Saltair reigned over the Lake in soli¬ 
tary splendor for 20 years. Then the dis¬ 
astrous fire of 1925 occurred. However, a 
new resort replaced the old without delay. 

In the years following high water level 
in 1870 the Jake level has continued to 
rise and fall with corresponding periods 
of drought and precipitation with the 
"highs” getting lower after each cycle. 
Drought, coupled with the fact that prac¬ 
tically all surface waters from the five 
rivers flowing into the lake have been 
directed to irrigation and industrial uses. 
As a result, we now find the lake at the 
lowest point since the arrival of the Pio¬ 
neers, and not too much prospect of its 
gaining much of its previous higher level. 
Five years have passed since the closing of 
Saltair Pavilion and no practical attempt 
has been made to re-open the resort and 
it was feared the "Grand Old Lady of the 
Lake” would be razed. 

Now under the able guidance of Dr. 
Thomas C. Adams, a practical plan to 
bring the water back to the Pavilion is 
proposed. Water will be screened and kept 
at a proper-density of salt content; and 
many new and novel attractions are con¬ 
templated. All objectional items can and 
will be overcome and the resort has a 
good chance of once again becoming the 
popular resort and tourist attraction it 
once was. 









JANUARY - FEBRUARY, 1962 


SUP NEWS 


PAGE THREE 


LEHI CHAPTER 1962 OFFICERS 



Officers for 1962, left to right, Clifford Austin, President; J. Earl Smith and David Roberts, Vice 
Presidents; and Jacob G. Cox, Assistant Secretary. Walter Webb, the Secretary, was unable to 
attend when the picture was taken. 

This chapter, one of the first organized, meets every month on the third Thursday. Most of 
the time their lovely partners meet with them for a very interesting program and refreshments. 

Of the thirty original members there are only twenty now living, and there are nine of the 
criginal members still active. Most of their number belong to the "Mormon Battalion" and one 
of their members, Virgil H. Peterson, is the Chaplain of the Mormon Battalion. 


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BEST WISHES to 
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from 

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1670 South State 

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1676 East 13th South 

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ISxMAAJettd. 




















PAGE FOUR 


SUP NEWS 


JANUARY - FEBRUARY, 1962 


President's Message for January - February 


Published Bi-Monthly at Salt Lake City, Utah 
by Sons of Utah Pioneers at 

PIONEER VILLAGE 
2998 South 2150 East 
Salt Lake City 9, Utah 

Subscription Rate, $3.50 per year, 35c copy 

Entered as second-class mail at Salt Lake City, Utah 


NATIONAL EXECUTIVE BOARD 

D. Crawford Houston.Salt Lake 

President 

Arthur W. Grix.Ogden 

Immed. Past President, Pacific Coast Chapters 

VICE PRESIDENTS 

V. R. Leany.St. George 

Membership Chairman 

George B. Everton, Sr.Logan 

1962 Encampment Chairman 

K. Grant Hale.Holladay 

Treks Chairman 

William Hurd, Jr.....Tremonton 

Trails and Landmarks Chairman 

John A. Shaw.Ogden 

Projects Chairman 

Lorenzo B. Summerhays -.Salt Lake 

Treasurer and Finance Chairman 

J. Rulon Morgan.....Provo 

Historical Chairman 

LIFE MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE 

Adolph Reeder, Chairman. Logan 

James H. Miller.Brigham City 

Curtis W. Brady. Midvale 

Carl J. Christensen.Salt Lake City 

Fred E. Curtis.Salt Lake City 

OFFICERS 

Horace A. Sorensen...Salt Lake 

Managing Director, SUP Villages 

T. Mack Woolley.Salt Lake 

Executive Secretary 

Earl A. Hansen.Logan 

Mormon Battalion, New Chapters Chairman 

Gaylen S. Young. ..........Salt Lake 

Judge Advocate 

George A. Parry£&&&&...Salt Lake 

Chaplain 

Milton V. Backman. Salt Lake 

Pioneer Village Citizenship, Public Relations 

Walter A. Kerr. Salt Lake 

Pioneer Stories 

AWARDS COMMITTEE 

William E. Nelson, Chairman.Salt Lake 

Evert H. Call...East Mill Creek 

Verl G. Dixon....Provo 

Frank L. McKean......Salt Lake 

Memorial Theatre Plaque Chairman 

T. M. Woolley...Salt Lake 

Editor, SUP News 

Executive Offices: 

2998 South 2150 East 
Salt Lake City 9, Utah 

TELEPHONE .....HUnter 4-1462 

If No Answer Call...EMpire 3-9458 


By D. Crawford Houston 

A prominent son of Utah pioneers, 
when invited recently to become a mem¬ 
ber of the National Society, asked, "What 
does the Society do for me?” What would 
be your answer? After a few minutes’ 
discussion about the objectives and mi¬ 
raculous attainments of our illustrious 
progenitors, he volunteered the best an¬ 
swer IVe heard: "It provides,” he said, 
"an organization to help me more effec¬ 
tively promote among my own children, 
neighbors and business associates the 
American ideals and vision of personal 
freedom and opportunity so wonderfully 
exemplified by the attainments of our 
Utah pioneers. It provides me important 
cooperation with other Utah pioneer sons 



D. CRAWFORD HOUSTON 


in planning, organizing und executing 
projects emphasizing the necessity for 
maintaining, even at the risk of personal 
inconvenience, the free American insti¬ 
tutions they established.” 

This thoughtful statement of "What’s 
in SUP membership for me” seemed to 
give new meaning to the Society’s Article 
IX definition: "It is an educational, his¬ 
torical and benevolent society intended to 
develop and promote cordial association 
among its members, good citizenship and 
appreciation of the ideals and vision of 
the pioneers and the carrying forth proj¬ 
ects tending to the betterment of the 
American way of life.” 

The organizations effectiveness in at¬ 
taining its goal is directly proportional to. 
the number of active sons participating in 
SUP activities. How may we, therefore, 
influence more of our SUP neighbors to 
become acquainted with the Society’s goals 
and concerned about their individual 
stakes in SUP success. Most effective ap¬ 
peals have been based on assistance in 
the attainment of important person objec¬ 
tives. One of the most intense desires of 
any American father is that his children 


shall develop feelings of security and per¬ 
sonal attainment. How best can such feel¬ 
ings be fostered? Is it not through instill¬ 
ing personal faith, high ideals, determina¬ 
tion to live by and encourage such ideals 
in others, and dare to do right under all 
circumstances regardless of personal con¬ 
sequences? How better can feelings of 
personal independence be acquired than 
through helping our children and their as¬ 
sociates to become not only acquainted but 
also identified with the saga of the pio¬ 
neers — to know first-handedly about pio¬ 
neer faith, struggles and unbelievable at¬ 
tainments in spite of obstacles which to¬ 
day seem impossible. If Society activities 
can assist our children to obtain personal 
knowledge of and experience in some of 
the intense feelings of their ancestors, they 
are more likely to stand firmly together in 
preserving and maintaning the progres¬ 
sive, the free institutions inherited from 
their forefathers. Thus, they will continue 
to enjoy personal freedom and attainment 
of nobility in the mortal life, and inci¬ 
dentally pass on to their children the bul¬ 
warks of freedom, protecting against the 
enslaving onslaughts of ever - increasing 
Satanic influences threatening supremacy 
over the souls and minds of all men 
everywhere. 

Our responsibility as loyal members of 
the Society of the Sons of Utah Pioneers 
is to bring into active participation every 
eligible pioneer descendant. 

Certainly one of your president’s most 
urgent duties it to encourage every SUP 
member to bring into this freedom-pre¬ 
serving activity at least one member per 
month. The chairman of your chapter 
membership committee or the National 
Society membership committee chairman 
will be pleased to receive your questions 
and requests for recruiting aid. 

Yours for increasing numbers of active, 
enthsiastic SUP members, 


SUP LAPEL PIN AVAILABLE 

We still have a fine supply of beautiful 
bronze SUP Lapel Pins at National Head¬ 
quarters at just $2.00 
each. New members, 
this is a distinctive 
button for your lapel. 

Chapters, you can 
use these in your 
ceremonies in taking 
new members into 
your chapter. Also, as a token of a job 
well done for some project your mem¬ 
bers have completed. 

All members should be proud to wear 
this very beautiful insignia. 






































JANUARY - FEBRUARY, 1962 


SUP NEWS 


PAGE FIVE 


CHAIRMAN WALTER A. KERR ANNOUNCES 1962 CONTEST 
FOR STORIES OF PIONEER ANCESTORS- JUNE 15 DEADLINE 



One of the great purposes of the Na¬ 
tional Society of the Sons of Utah Pio¬ 
neers is to collect and preserve the pre¬ 
cious gems of histor¬ 
ic lore to be found in 
the experiences of 
our pioneer ancestors 
in the establishment 
and development of 
this commonwealth. 

The president of 
each chapter should 
w V appoint a commit- 
^ tee or a chairman to 

take charge of the 

Walter A. Kerr ° j 

story contest and 
send the name of the chairman to the 
National Chairman. The National Society 
through its chairman will provide all 
application blanks. 

It is suggested that local chapters in¬ 
vite the three Senior and three Junior 
winners in the local contests as their din¬ 
ner guests and award some kind of a prize 
at a May or June meeting. The winners 
would be first place, second place and 
third place winners. 

Applications are to be submitted to the 
local chairman or to Walter A. Kerr, Na¬ 


tional Chairman, 132 University St., Salt 
Lake City 2. 

The story should not exceed 1500 
words, and must be a true story or biog¬ 
raphy of some pioneer, preferably a Pio¬ 
neer ancestor of the contestant or a dis¬ 
tant relative. All stories submitted become 
the property of the National Society of 
the Sons of Utah Pioneers. 

The contest begins February 1st, 1962, 
and ends June 15, 1962. Contestants are 
divided into two divisions, Senior Divi¬ 
sion — 18 years of age and over; Junior 
Division — 11 to 17 years of age. 

Contestants should retain for themselves 
a. copy of the story submitted. The Na¬ 
tional Society assumes no responsibility 
for a copy of story submitted. 

Contestants at large should obtain ap¬ 
plication blanks from and send their 
stories to the National Chairman not later 
than June 15, 1962. 

The three Senior and the three Junior 
winners in the National Contest will be 
dinner guests of the National Society of 
the Sons of Utah Pioneers at the Annual 
Encampment to be held in August, 1962, 
in Logan, where they will receive their 
awards. 


APPLICATION 


Name of Contestant... 

Address .. 

Division. Date of Birth. 

Source of Story. 

Send this application and your story to your local SUP contest chairman, or if a 
contestant at large to Walter A. Kerr, 132 University St., Salt Lake City 2, Utah. 


ALBERT J. ELGGREN, SUP 
STALWART, DIES AT AGE 85 

Albert J. Elggren, 85, chairman of the 
board of A. J. Elggren and Sons Broker¬ 
age Co., died Dec. 18, 1961, in a Salt 
Lake hospital of a lingering heart ailment. 

Mr. Elggren had started his business 
career as a clerk in the office of the 
State Superintendent of Public Instruc¬ 
tion. He was later employed by the E. F. 
Hanna Merchandise Brokerage Co. 

In 1906 he formed, with his brothers, 
A. Fred and Lorenzo E., the Elggren 
Brothers and Co., food brokerage firm. 
In 1939 he and his sons founded the firm 
of A. J. Elggren and Sons Brokerage 
House. 

Born June 29, 1876, in Malad, Idaho, 
he was a son of Adolph Frederick and 
Johanna C. Samuelson Elggren. He mar¬ 
ried Vilate Elizabeth Lewis, June 5, 1901, 
in the Salt Lake Temple, Church of Jesus 


Christ of Latter-day Saints. Mrs. Elggren 
died Feb. 16, I960. 

Mr. Elggren had resided in Salt Lake 
City and Hooper, Weber County. 

He was a member of the University of 
Utah Emeritus Club, and was a charter 
member and past president of the Sons 
of Utah Pioneer Luncheon Club. He had 
also served as treasurer of the club for 25 
years. 

He had been treasurer and a member 
of the executive committee of the Days 
of ’47 centennial celebration. 

Survivors include his sons and daughter, 
A. Lewis, S. C. Allen, William H. and 
Ray W. Elggren, all of Salt Lake City; 
Mrs. Thirl M. (Mary) Marsh, Salt Lake 
City; John Elmer Elggren, Centerville, 
Davis County; 26 grandchildren and 14 
great-grandchildren, brother and sister, 
Lorenzo E. Elggren and Mrs. Esther Mor¬ 
rison, both of Salt Lake City. 


JANUARY-FEBRUARY COVER 

Clock shown on cover was built by 
Christian Jenson, father of Andrew Jen¬ 
son and grandfather of Harold H. Jen¬ 
son, who now has the clock in his home, 
1840 Westminster Ave. It not only told 
the time of day but also the day of the 
month. The lovely young lady is Sandra 
Jane Cleland, a descendant of Christian 
Jenson. (Picture courtesy S.L. Tribune.) 


CONDOLENCE EXTENDED 

The Sons of Utah Pioneers express 
deepest sympathy to William (Bill) Mc¬ 
Henry in the loss of his beautiful wife 
and helpmate, "Nada.” Death came sud¬ 
denly, Dec. 27, 1961. 

There never was a more ideally mated 
couple than "Bill and Nada.” They liked 
the same things, particularly horses. Their 
work with the Ute Rangers and with the 
Sons of Utah Pioneers Ute Rangers Chap¬ 
ter will never be forgotten. They liked 
sports, and never missed a wrestling or 
boxing contest, always together. 


NO S. U. P. TREK IS COMPLETE WITHOUT 

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FREE DELIVERY 





ISje/MM&ttd- 




















PAGE SIX 


SUP NEWS 


JANUARY - FEBRUARY, 1962 



SUP 

PROFILES 





ARLEY F. SAVAGE 

I was born 82 years ago at Salt Lake 
City, the youngest son of C. R. Savage 
and Ellen Fenn Savage. I attended pub¬ 
lic schools at Salt Lake and Provo and 
was a graduate of the Commercial De¬ 
partment of the Brigham Young Acad¬ 
emy in 1897. I was stenographer for at¬ 
torneys M. M. Warner and D. D. Houtz 
in Provo and Stewart & Stewart in Salt 
Lake. I joined the National Bank of the 
Republic and after a number of years 
was chosen by the Cosgrriff banking in¬ 
terests to manage the newly formed First 
Bank in Murray City, where I success¬ 
fully operated as cashier for four years 
and then resigned to engage in the auto¬ 
mobile and amusement business for my¬ 
self. I was one of Utah’s first automobile 
dearel,s controlling agencies in Utah, 
Idaho, Wyoming and Nevada. I originated 
and developed the power flushing and 
sprinkling truck system used so success¬ 
fully to clean Salt Lake City streets. 

I owned amusement concessions at the 
old Salt Palace and built the famous circu¬ 
lar cushion spring dance floor in "'The 
Trocadero” Hall at Murray, Utah. I owned 
and operated the American Eagle, Mur¬ 


FIVE STATIONS TO SERVE YOU 
GREETINGS FROM 

WAGSTAFF OIL 

AND TRUCK CENTER 1775 BECK STREET 
On Hi-Way 91 — Ask for Free Literature on 
Pioneer Village. From DON WAGSTAFF, 
Member Holladay SUP 


NOTICE TO CHAPTERS 
AND ALL SUP MEMBERS 

As published in our September-October 
issue of The SUP News, we have an out¬ 
standing project for the members of SUP. 
This is the project of a bust of our 
founder, Lawrence T. Epperson, to be 
placed in our own Hall of Fame at the 
Pioneer Village. We have had only a very 
few members and chapters respond to the 
above notice. Therefore, will you please 
check with your chapter and urge them 
to donate to this worthy cause. Bro. Thom¬ 
as B. Child, the Chairman of this project, 
and Bro. John A. Shaw, Chairman of the 
National SUP Committee, are hoping to 
complete this project by the first of May 
this year. 

Here is a report on how we stand as 
of January 15, 1962: 

Individual members of the Salt 


Lake Luncheon Club.$27.00 

Dixie Mission Chapter. 10.00 

Pioneer Chapter . 25.00 

Temple Fork Chapter. 10.00 


Total, $72.00. Will you all please help 
these fine men to get this assignment 
over in a big way. Do it now! Don’t wait! 


ray’s weekly paper, which I later sold to 
John P. Cahoon. 

In September of 1922, I liquidated my 
automobile and parts business and moved 
to California where I explored the various 
cities from San Francisco to the Mexi¬ 
can border and then settled at Santa Moni¬ 
ca; after 6 months’ vacation and rest I en¬ 
gaged in the real estate, insurance and 
building business. With Doctor Otto 
Monson and others we built the first Mor¬ 
mon Church at Ocean Park, Santa Mon¬ 
ica, where I served in the Sunday School 
Superintendency and my wife Sylvia start¬ 
ed the first Primary in the Los Angeles 
Stake. 

I have two sons, Doctor Ellsworth Sav¬ 
age and Charles R. Savage; five grandchil¬ 
dren and eight great-grandchildren. I keep 
active looking after my interests, and 
while we enjoy California’s moderate cli¬ 
mate, affectionately we love and call Utah 
our home. 


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SEE 

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Keys Duplicated in One Minute 


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ON THE MOVE WITH THE 
MORMON BATTALION 

Members of the Battalion appeared in 
uniform with their costumed ladies, Jan. 
19th, at the reception given by the DUP 
Central Camp at the Pioneer Museum, 
from 7 to 9 p.m. 

Del Adams of Layton showed pic¬ 
tures of the Battalion on their Cen¬ 
tennial trek in 1950. Ft. Stockton pictures 
also were shown. 

Daughters provided refreshments. The 
lovely affair was in appreciation of the 
Battalion support at the time of the dedi¬ 
cation of the monument honoring those 
who fought in the Civil War. 

Cecilia Morrison was Chairman of the 
DUP committee on arrangements. She was 
supported by Col. Ray L. Alston of the 
Battalion and Col. Mary Goodman of the 
Battalion auxiliary. 


We congratulate Verl Dixon, south¬ 
ern division officer, on his election as 
mayor of Provo. This is reassuring evi¬ 
dence of his continuing popularity. 


Col. Ray L. Alston, training officer, 
is presenting some real meaningful eve¬ 
nings. At our last meeting a practical 
demonstration was given on safety prin¬ 
ciples involving flammable liquids. The 
next meeting is Feb. 8, 1962, 7:30 p.m. in 
the West Armory. 


Trek officers are in process of learn¬ 
ing of the interest of the Battalion as to 
time and location of this year’s tours. Be¬ 
sides Tucson, Arizona, on Feb. 22, the 
World’s Fair at Seattle has been sug¬ 
gested for May, August and/or September, 
with or without side trips into Canada. 
The September date seems to be a popu¬ 
lar choice. 


Sheldon R. Brewster was recently 
named 1962 President of the Utah Apart¬ 
ment House Assn. Congratulations! 


Ray L. Alston and Elias A. Day have 
been asked to assign names of the origi¬ 
nal Battalion to the current members for 
the purpose of collecting historical data. 
This project is to begin immediately. 


Col. Mary Goodman, commander of the 
ladies’ auxiliary to the Battalion, reports 
that they have now completed the com¬ 
pilation and printing of a booklet cov¬ 
ering the highlights of the 1961 Inaugu¬ 
ral Trek of the Battalion to Washington, 
D.C. It is offered for $1 per copy. 



























JANUARY - FEBRUARY, 1962 


SUP NEWS 


PAGE SEVEN 


EAST MILL CREEK INSTALLS 1962 OFFICERS 



NEW OFFICERS OF EAST MILL CREEK CHAPTER - First row, left to right, W. W. Caldwell, Dr. Herbert 
P. Ungricht, Wesley T. Osguthorpe, Evert H. Call, Past President; Lorenzo J. Bates. Second row, center, 
Courtland P. Starr, 1962 President, and Lionel J. Halvorson. Other officers not present are Jack H. 
Goaslund and Arthur W. Wiscomb. 


EAST MILL CREEK CHAPTER 
HONOR WIVES AT DINNERS 

Busy "Sons” in East Mill Creek Chapter, 
Salt Lake City, believe in honoring their 
lovely ladies every month on a dinner- 
date, with Pioneer motif. 

Their motto is "If you are too busy to 
belong, and be active in Sons of Utah 
Pioneer’s activity, you should belong to 
insure having at least one wonderful eve¬ 
ning of enjoyment with your partner.” 

Eating around-the-town at unusual 
places has proven very interesting and sat¬ 
isfying; the gifted speakers and entertain¬ 
ers have been enlightening. Whenever 
possible, historic and pioneer themes have 
been presented. 

Always an active group — the new of¬ 
ficers for 1962 are shown in the accom¬ 
panying photograph in a planning meet¬ 
ing at the home of newly elected Presi¬ 
dent Courtland P. Starr. 


SENATOR BENNETTS OFFER 
ON FLAG STILL GOOD 

Senator Wallace H. Bennett’s offer on 
obtaining a flag, which was first an¬ 
nounced in the September-October, 1961, 
issue of The SUP News, is still good. 

If any of your organizations would like 
a United States flag that has been flown 
over the Capitol in Washington, D.C.: If 
they have a flag they would like to have 
flown over the Capitol, they may send it 
to Senator Bennett and he will arrange 
to have flown over the Capitol. The flag 
must be standard size, 3 feet by 5 feet, or 
5 feet by 8 feet, or if they would like 
Senator Bennett to purchase a flag for 
them and have it flown over the Capitol, 
send him a check made out to "Keeper 
of the Stationery,” U. S. Senate, Washing¬ 
ton, D. C. The prices are $3.25 for the 
3x5-foot size and $6.25 for the 5x8-foot 
flag. 


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PAGE EIGHT 


SUP NEWS 


JANUARY-FEBRUARY, 1962 


SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAPTER 1962 OFFICERS 



OFFICERS FOR 1962 OF CALIFORNA CHAPTER — Left to right: S. E. Sessions, H. E. Phelps, E. B. Perkins, 
L. T. Smithson, R. Stewart, W. R. Quist, J. Astle and C. C. Perkins, immediate past president and brother 
of E. B. Perkins. 


BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF 
NEWLY ELECTED OFFICERS 
OF CALIFORNIA CHAPTER 

Romney Stewart, President, was born in 
Salt Lake City, the son of Charles B. and 
Katherine Romney Stewart. He is a grand¬ 
son of Miles Romney, who came to Utah 
in 1850 and was later sent to St. George 
to be Superintendent of the construction 
of the St. George Temple. 

Romney Stewart married Melba Dar¬ 
lene Robinson and they have three won¬ 
derful sons and two lovely daughters. 
Their oldest son is now a missionary for 
the L.D.S. Church in England. 

Romney is a special agent for the Fed- 
edal Bureau of Investigation and has been 
for many years. He is a charter member 
of the Southern California Chapter of the 
Sons of Utah Pioneers. He has always been 
very active in his Church, having held and 
still holding important positions in the 
Church. 


Harold E. Phelps was born and edu¬ 
cated in Salt Lake City, Utah. He is the 


great-grandson of William W. Phelps. 

Mr. Phelps is married to Dawn Adams 
Phelps, noted Southland concert violinist, 
and is the father of four little girls. 

He is a Realtor in Los Angeles, spe¬ 
cializing in income real estate. He served 
as Chairman of the Holly wood-Wilshire 
Division of the Los Angeles Realty Board 
and Was a director of that organization 
for two terms. 

He currently is serving as First Coun¬ 
selor in the Bishopric of the Hollywood 
Ward, Los Angeles Stake. 


James Astle, Jr., was born in Pocatello, 
Idaho, the son of James and Elizabeth 
Mayhew Astle, native pioneers. 

He moved to California at an early age 
and was educated in California. He mar¬ 
ried Evelyn Quist, a member of the 
Daughters of Utah Pioneers, and is the 
father of two sons. 

He is a practicing attorney in Culver 
City, California. He is a past President of 
the Culver City Bar Association. 


Mr. Astle is First Counselor in the 
Bishopric of La Cienega Ward, Santa 
Monica Stake. He is a member of the 
Board of Directors of Culver-Palms Chap¬ 
ter of American Red Cross; and presently 
is chairman of the Culver City Planning 
Commission. 


Louis T. Smithson was born in Eden, 
Arizona. His father, Charles W. Smithson, 
was born in San Bernardino, California. 
His grandfather, Allan Freeman Smithson, 
came to Salt Lake Valley July 29, 1847, 
with the Mississippi Saints, five days after 
Brigham Young. He was later called to 
settle in San Bernardino, California. 

Louis is presently bishop of Wilshire 
ward, Los Angeles Stake. He graduated 
from the Los Angeles College of Chiro¬ 
practic in 1944 and is currently a prac¬ 
ticing chiropractor. 

He married Vanira Wilkins in 1926 
and they have four children and four 
grandchildren. 

See CALIFORNIA, Page 11 














JANUARY - FEBRUARY, 1962 


SUP NEWS 


PAGE NINE 


OGDEN PIONEER LUNCHEON CLUB INDUCTS OFFICERS FOR 1962 



1962 OFFICERS OF THE OGDEN PIONEER LUNCHEON CLUB - Seated, left to right, Arnold R. Standing, 
1st Vice President; G. Stanley Brewer, President; John O. Reeve, 2nd Vice President. Top row, left 
to right, William E. Johnson, Treasurer; Austin H. Show, Chaplain; Archie L. Christiansen, Historian; 
D. Jay Wilson, Immediate Past President; Clyde S. Hunter, Secretary. George H. Handy, Judge Advocate, 
was not present when the picture was taken. 


The 1962 officers of the Ogden Pio¬ 
neer Luncheon Club are as follows: G. 
Stanley Brewer, President; Arnold R. 
Standing, 1st Vice President; John O. 
Reeve, 2nd Vice President; William E. 
Johnson, Treasurer; Austin H. Shaw, 
Chaplain; Archie L. Christiansen, Histo¬ 
rian; D. Ray Wilson, Immediate Past 
President; Clyde S. Hunter, Secretary; 
George H. Handy, Judge Advocate. 

The captains appointed for the year 
1962 are Aaron B. Ross, Ferrel C. Car¬ 
ter, Delbert B. Foulger, L. Grant Lofgreen, 
Gerald Waterfall, Frank Maughn, John 
G. Price, Elmer Buckner, George I. Nich¬ 
ols and Milton Shurtleff. 

The Ogden Pioneer Luncheon Qub is 
one of our larger clubs, having eighty-two 


members at the year’s end. They had a 
very successful 1961 under the presidency 
of Brother D. Jay Wilson. Besides meet¬ 
ing the second Friday of each month for 
lunch at the Mansion House, they have 
had a very active year. Some of their ac¬ 
tivities were treks to historic spots and 
over pioneer trails featured in the 1961 
program of the Ogden Pioneer Luncheon 
Club. On June 22 to 24, members of the 
club and their sons traveled over the Cali¬ 
fornia Trail from City of Rocks, near 
Almo, Idaho, to Wells, Nevada. We slept 
under the stars two nights and enjoyed 
old-time dutch oven cooking. A good rep¬ 
resentation of members and their families 
traveled the pioneer trail from Henefer 
to Salt Lake City on July 15, from Fort 
Bridger to Weber Canyon on August 5, 


and visited the John Hutchings Museum 
and Camp Floyd on August 19. 

Eleven members from our group, nine 
of whom were accompanied by their 
wives, participated in the very successful 
annual encampment at St. George. 

Our program also included inspirational 
luncheon meetings each month with good 
speakers on pioneer subjects. We enjoyed 
a lovely dinner meeting with our wives 
in November. The pleasure of this eve¬ 
ning was enhanced by the presence of Na¬ 
tional Executive Secretary T. M. Woolley 
and National President D. Crawford 
Houston and their wives. 

We are looking forward to an equally 
enjoyable program in 1962. 













PAGE TEN 


SUP NEWS 


JANUARY-FEBRUARY, 1962 


TEMPLE QUARRY CHAPTER INSTALLS OFFICER SLATE FOR 1962 



TEMPLE QUARRY CHAPTER 1962 OFFICERS — Top row, left, Kenneth P. Rasmussen, 1st Vice President. 
Center, H. Allen Jensen, President. Right, Joseph Leon Smith, Second Vice President. Bottom Row — 
Left, Carter E. Grant, Historian; Center, Victor Nelson, Chaplain. Right, Albert Crane, Secty-Treasurer. 


We present short biographical sum¬ 
maries of new Temple Quarry Chapter 
officers: 

President, H. Allen Jensen, of Midvale, 
is employed by the Kennecott Copper Co. 
as an electrical supervisor. He has had 
varied experiences in both Church and 
civic organizations. His earliest pioneer 
ancestors came to Utah in 1848. 

First Vice President, Kenneth P. Ras¬ 
mussen, lives in Midvale and is owner and 
operator of the Jordan Floor Service Co. 
His earliest ancestors came to Utah with 
the Mormon Battalion pioneers. He is ac¬ 
tive in his Church and also in civic 
matters. 

Second Vice President, Joseph L. Smith, 
lives in Draper, where he is an outstand¬ 
ing poultryman. His grandparents were 
all pioneers to Utah and also to South 
Willow Creek (now Draper). Brother 
Smith is very active in both Church and 
civic organizations. 

Historian Carter E. Grant lives in 
Sandy with his wife, Pamela (Mamie) 


Smith Grant, whom he married in 1905. 
He is a grandson of Jedediah M. Grant, 
the first Mayor of Salt Lake City. His first 
pioneer ancestor arrived in Salt Lake 
City in 1847. Carter was a teacher in the 
LDS Church school system for thirty-five 
years. He has written two important books 
—"The Kingdom of God Restored” and 
"I Saw Another Angel Fly.” At present he 
is editorial associate of the Improvement 
Era and a patriarch of the Sandy Stake. 

Chaplain Victor D. Nelson was born 
in Ferron, Utah, in 1889. His first Pioneer 
ancestor was Andrew Nelson, who came 
to Utah in 1853. He has had many as¬ 
signments in his Church, having served 
two missions and twice being a bishop of 
an L.D.S. ward. He has been a Stake Presi¬ 
dent and a patriarach twice. He is now 
High Priest group leader in the Grant 
Third Ward of the Grant Stake. 

Secretary-Treasurer Albert J. Cranes’ 
first pioneer ancestors came to Utah in 


1866. Albert is a charter member of 
the Temple Quarry Chapter of the Sons 
of Utah Pioneers. He has acted as Sec¬ 
retary-Treasurer for the past four or five 
years. 


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JANUARY-FEBRUARY, 1962 


SUP NEWS 


PAGE ELEVEN 


Sketch of H. Allen Jensen, Life Member No. 69 



H. ALLEN JENSEN 


H. Allen Jensen is Life Member No. 69 
of the SUP. He was born Jan. 23, 1904, 
at West Jordan, Utah, to Henry P. Jensen 
and Annie Mae Wright Jensen. His father 
was the son of Swedish converts and a 
missionary to Sweden. He is a great-great- 
grandson of Benjamin T. Mitchell, promi¬ 
nent stone mason and contractor, and his 
wife, Lois Judd Mitchell, who arrived in 
Salt Lake City, 1848. He is also the great- 
grandson of William and Charlotte Rouse 
Wright, pioneers of 1862. He is a grand¬ 
son of John George Wright, Utah Pioneer 
of 1861, and his wife, Ruth Judd Mitch¬ 
ell Wright, born in Salt Lake City, 1851. 

Allan is President of the Temple 
Quarry Chapter, SUP. It was largely 
through his efforts that the memorial hon¬ 
oring Col. Philip St. George Cooke was 
erected and dedicated at Fairfield, Utah, 
Aug. 19, 1961. 

He is a Sergeant Major in the Mormon 
Battalion and he and his wife made the 
Trek and marched in the Inaugural Pa¬ 
rade. They are both active in treks. Allen 
portrayed General Robert E. Lee in the 
Days of ’47 Parade last year. 

Long active in Church, and Civic work, 
including Scouting. Allen is President 
of the 33rd Quorum of Seventies and 
Budget Director of the Midvale 2nd LDS 
Ward. 

He is a collector of relics, especially 
clocks and watches, having been a horolo- 
gist for many years. 

He is a member of the Brigham Young 
Archeological Society and affiliated with 
the Salt Lake Chapter. He is also a Char¬ 
ter Member of the BYU Forum. 


Allen has been employed at Kennecott 
Copper, for 38 years and is an Electrical 
Supervisor. 

Allen married Verna R. Carrigan in 
1928 and they had four children: Allen 
J., Mrs. Calvin (Dixie) Allen, Kent C. 
and Darhl. After Mrs. Jensen’s death, he 
married Blanche Reid, the widow of Don¬ 
ald G. Reid and together they share 24 
grandchildren. 

Allen and Blanche are both busy people 
but they find time to enjoy hobbies of 
photography and fishing. In the summer 
you may see them and Darhl with their 
house trailer traveling or in their boat 
fishing on the many lakes. 

Allen is the first Life Member since 
1957. 


CALIFORNIA, From Page 8 

Samuel E. Sessions was born in Marion, 
Cassia County, Idaho. He was the son of 
Harvey and Alice Bryson Sessions and the 
grandson of Perrigren and Ludna Call 
Sessions, who were closely associated with 
the Prophet Joseph Smith and Brigham 
Young, and who were the founders of 
Bountiful, Utah. 

After his marriage to Zatelle Funk, 
Samuel established a home in Burley, 
Idaho, operating farms in that vicinity. 
In 1926 they moved to Los Angeles, Cali¬ 
fornia, where they have since resided. 

Samuel was in the bishopric in Burley 
and filled two local missions. As soon as 
he retired, he and his wife filled a two- 
year mission to England. Since returning 
home, they were ordained as workers in 
the Los Angeles Temple. 

His family consists of four children, 
two boys and two girls. The first child, 
a boy, died in infancy. 

At present, Samuel Sessions is a worker 
in the Los Angeles Temple, group leader 
in the High Priests quorum in Westwood 
II Ward, a member of the Beverly Hills 
Bowling Green Club, and is active in the 
Sons of the Utah Pioneers. 


James C. Perkins, immediate past-presi¬ 
dent of the Southern California Chapter of 
the Sons of Utah Pioneers. He has worked 
with the Sons of Pioneers for many years, 
but he did not include his history with 
the other officers. 


William Ray Quist was born in Rich¬ 
field, Sevier County, Utah, the son of John 
Lester Quist. John Lester was the son of 
Peter Ludwig Quist. 

On his maternal side, William Ray 
Quist is the grandson of William Henry 
Seegmiller, who was sent to Southern 


Utah by Brigham Young in the early 
days of the church. He came to Utah Sep¬ 
tember 13, 1861, in the "Homer Duncan 
Independent Company.” 

Ray’s mother’s maternal line extends 
back to Scotland through William A. 
Stewart of Tuscaloosa County, Alabama. 
William A. Stewart came to Utah in Sep¬ 
tember, 1847. 

James Green Browning, father of Wil¬ 
liam A. Stewart’s wife, came to Utah in 
1850. 

William Ray Quist s church activities 
have included M Men President, offices in 
the Aaronic Priesthood quorums, Mel- 
chizedek Priesthood Presidency, Bishop’s 
Counselor for five years and Los Angeles 
Stake High Council for two years. At 
present, he is First Counselor in the Stake 
High Priests’ Presidency and Ward Chair¬ 
man of Scout Committee, Westwood 
Ward. 

Employment is real estate in Beverly 
Hills, California — "Trousdale Estates.” 

He is the father of five children, three 
by a former marriage and two by his pres¬ 
ent wife, Mary Lancaster Quist. The fam¬ 
ily reside at Westwood, California, and all 
are very active in the church. 


Edward B. Perkins comes from a rich 
pioneer heritage. His grandfather, George 
W. Perkins, Sr., came into the Salt Lake 
Valley in the spring of 1848. 

He is a charter member of the South¬ 
ern California Chapter of the Sons of 
Utah Pioneers and has held many posi¬ 
tions on the executive board, including the 
position of President of this chapter in 
1949 and 1950 when the Mormon Bat¬ 
talion Centennial was held in California. 
He has held many positions of leader¬ 
ship in Santa Monica Stake — a mem¬ 
ber of the High Council for three years, 
bishop of Westdale Ward for six years, 
and at present is President of the Santa 
Monica Stake High Priests quorum. 

For All Your Printing Needs 

UTAH PRINTING CO. 

17 W. SO. TEMPLE - Phone EM4-1849 

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L.D.S. Books and Genealogical Supplies 

FRED and KAY SCHWENDIMAN 










PAGE TWELVE 


SUP NEWS 


JANUARY - FEBRUARY, 1962 



SUP 

PROFILES 


ALBERT E. MILLER 

Albert Edwin Miller was born at St. 
George, Utah, January 9, 1873, a son of 
Henry W. and Fanny Gunn Miller. 

His first school was taught by Julia 
Cox in a room in a private home as there 
were too many children for the school 
houses they had in St. George. Later he 
attended in the Third Ward school. Still 
later, he attended school in the basement 
of the Tabernacle with Martha Snow as 
teacher. 

Albert s father died when he was twelve 
years old, and it was up to him to make 
his own way in the world. 

In October of 1889, Albert became an 
apprentice in the carpenter trade to Rob¬ 
ert G. McQuarrie and his brother John G. 
The friendship with these two gentlemen 
and Albert lasted throughout the lives of 
the McQuarrie brothers. 

In 1890 Albert attended school in the 
Third Ward school house and reached 
the fifth grade, taught by Andrew N. 
Winsor, and this was the extent of his 
formal education. 

His mother died in June of 1892. 
After his mother died he boarded with 
John and Jessie Gray, who were like par¬ 
ents to him. 

On Christmas day, 1895, Albert mar¬ 
ried Mary Ann (Annie) Cottam. 

In 1896, when work was slow in St. 
George, he went to Delame, Nevada, to 
help built a quartz mill and also to Pa- 
naca, Nevada, to build a home for N. J. 
Wadsworth. 

He was employed during 1897-1898- 
1899 by the McQuarrie Brothers, Woolley, 


Lund & Judd and the Utah Eastern Cop¬ 
per Company, as head timber foreman for 
various mines. 

Albert went on a Mission for his 
Church in August of 1900 and served 
as President of the conference he labored 
in for nearly a year. When he was called 
to Mission headquarters to finish his 
Mission in the presidents office, the 
president being John G. McQuarrie, with 
whom Albert had worked at home in the 
building trade. He was released and re¬ 
turned home in August of 1902. It had 
been a real struggle for his lovely wife, 
Mary Ann, to keep things going while 
Albert was on his mission. 

Albert served as Senator from the 
Eleventh District in 1907-1909 session 
of the Utah State Legislature. 

While he was a member of the City 
Council of St. George in 1912-13, he was 
instrumental in getting the Telluride 
Power Co. to investigate the possibility 
of bringing more electricity to Washing¬ 
ton and Iron counties by building power 
plants on the Santa Clara Creek and the 
Dixie Power Co. was organized and qame 
into being in 1916. 

Albert was elected Mayor of St. George 
in 1917, a position he held for two years 
and was again elected Mayor in 1921 
and served until 1924 and he was again 
elected Mayor of St. George in 1935 and 
again in 1937. 

From his youth, through his public serv¬ 
ice, he had associated with many of the 
pioneer builders of southern Utah and 
having gathered data and information 
on all phases of the settlement and growth 
of that locality and with the help of a 
wonderful wife, he published the book 
"The Immortal Pioneers” in 1946. A fine 
citizen, a great church-man and a good 
neighbor. 


REX F. MOSS 
General Contractor 

CALL INgersoIl 7*5538 
Member Holladay SUP 


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TO ALL 

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Call HENRY FORENCE or ROY KEYES 
Members SUP 


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WESTERN VILLAGE 

A Complete Travel Center 
For Reservations Call ELgin 9-4371, 

Salt Lake City 

or Fireside 6-2448, Mesquite, Nevada 

Wm. J. Pulsipher, Member Pioneer Chapter 
and J. L. Pulsipher, Jr., 

Sugar House SUP Chapter 


CALL DA 2-3447 
MOENCH LETTER SERVICE 

Duplicating — Printing — Mailing 
43 West Broadway, Salt Lake City, Utah 
D. EUGENE MOENCH, Manager 
Best Wishes to SUP 


We Are Proud to Serve the 
Sons of Utah Pioneers 

FOR ALL YOUR OFFICE SUPPLIES 
And OFFICE FURNITURE - See 

Mid-West Office Supply 

60 W. 2nd SOUTH - Dial EM 4-3527 
Clyde J. Powell, Manager 


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JANUARY • FEBRUARY, 1962 


SUP NEWS 


PAGE THIRTEEN 


SUGAR HOUSE CHAPTER LEADERS FOR 1962 



OFFICERS OF SUGAR HOUSE CHAPTER, SONS OF UTAH PIONEERS - Front row, left to right, 
Dean W. Andrus, President; Raymond R. Trinnaman, Immediate Past President. Back row, left 
to right, Allen S. Grow, 2nd Vice President; Milton V. Backman, 1st Vice President; Tanner L. 
Brown, 3rd Vice President. 


Sugar House Chapter recently installed 
a new set of officers. Here are brief bio¬ 
graphical sketches: 

Dean W. Andrus, President, joined 
the chapter in 1949. In subsequent years 
he has held all vice presidential offices 
and has been a member of the Board of 
Directors. He has served on the Calling 
Committee and the Membership Com¬ 
mittee. Dean participated in the Mormon 
Battalion trip in 1950, and is still on the 
Executive Board of the Mormon Battal¬ 
ion. When he is not busy with SUP, Dean 
is earning a living as a general remodel¬ 
ing and painting contractor. 

Milton V. Backman, First Vice Presi¬ 
dent, joined the chapter in 1954. Capi¬ 
talizing on his ability as an attorney, the 
National appointed him Judge Advo- 
vate, in which capacity he served for 
three years. He was second and third 
vice president for the National in 1957 
and 1958. He is presently serving his 
seventh year on the National Executive 
Board. Last year Milt was appointed 
Chairman of Pioneer Village Citizenship 
and Public Relations Committee, and is 
continuing in this capacity this year. He 
has also been Associate Director of Pio¬ 
neer Village under Horace Sorensen for 
five years. For the last four years he has 
been Judge Advocate of the Sugar House 
Chapter. 

Allen S. Crow, Second Vice President, 
joined the Sugar House Chapter in 1957. 
Since that time he has been a member of 
the Calling Committee, Chairman of the 
Calling Committee, Director, and Third 


Vice President. Allen is employed by the 
Bureau of Land Management in the Sur¬ 
vey Office. 

Tanner L. Brown, Third Vice President, 
joined the chapter in 1955. He is retired 
and has devoted a great deal of time to 
the Building Committee on the National 
level. He contributed greatly to the con¬ 
struction of the Administration Building. 
Tanner mixed and hauled mortar for the 
bricklayers, and assisted in the installation 
of the heating, plumbing, and electrical 
work. He made donations to the building 
fund, as well as soliciting many of the ma¬ 
terials for the building. Tanner has served 
on several chapter committees, and has 
held all the vice presidential offices. He 
devotes much time to Pioneer Village as 
a guide. 

Raymond R. Trinnaman, Immediate 
Past President, joined the Sugar House 
Chapter in 1957. He has been a member 
of the Calling Committee, Chairman of 
the Calling Committee, Treasurer, First 
Vice President, and was President in 
1961. Ray is employed by the Depart¬ 
ment of Highways as a Right of Way 
Designer. 


PLATT BROTHERS 
Funeral Directors 
WHITE CHAPEL MORTUARY 

20 Years Faithful Service 
124 SOUTH 4th EAST 
Phone DAvis 2-3419 


SUGAR HOUSE CHAPTER HAD 
FUN AT HOLIDAY PARTY 

By Ralph A. Barnes 

On Thursday evening, December 28, 
1961, the Sugar House Chapter of the 
Sons of Utah Pioneers held their annual 
Christmas dinner party at the Parleys 
Ward Chapel. The usual fine roast beef 
dinner, with oven-browned potatoes and 
all the trimmings was served to nearly 100 
people by the Distinctive Caterers. 

Unde r the supervision of Florence 
Backman the tables were very appropriate¬ 
ly decorated in accordance with the festive 
season. 

The new officers for 1962 were intro¬ 
duced and favors given to the ladies and 
gentlemen in attendance. A surprise favor 
was given to all through the generosity 
or Horace and Ethel Sorensen — a beau¬ 
tiful 1962 calendar dinner plate. 

After the dinner we went into the 
chapel and were entertained by a youth 
choir under the direction of William 
Post. This was an outstanding program. 

At the conclusion of this program those 
who were young at heart again went into 
the recreation hall where an orchestra was 
provided for an evening of dancing. 

This was one of the nicest Christmas 
parties that has been held for some little 
time. 


DAVID M. HORNE 
General Building Contractor 

1980 Michigan Avenue, Salt Lake City 
Phone EL 5-5535 
Best Wishes to SUP 
Member Pioneer Chapter 


HARMAN CAFES 

Extend a cordial invitation to all families 
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our banquet facilities whenever the need 
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brand-new one in Ogden. 


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at 42 West 2nd South 





























PAGE FOURTEEN 


SUP NEWS 


JANUARY - FEBRUARY, 1962 



ROBERT BARLOW FOX 

Robert Barlow Fox was born December 
11, 1930, in Ogden, Utah, the son of Or- 
land J. and Laura Sanders Fox. He early 
became interested in Utah and pioneer 
history because of his heritage. His great- 
great-grandfather through his mother’s 
lineage, Erastus Snow, was one of the first 
of the Mormon pioneers to enter the Salt 
Lake valley on horseback with one of the 
Pratt brothers. His great grandfather, 
Robert Fox, for whom he was named, mi¬ 
grated to the United States from York¬ 
shire, England, in I860. Along with his 
family he crossed the plains that same 
year at the age of 12, walking the entire 
way. He settled in Lehi, Utah, and on 
May 1st, 1866, at the age of 18, he was 
mustered into service for the Blackhawk 
Indian War. He served in the Bishopric 
of the Lehi Fourth Ward when the chapel 
was erected. He lived a colorful life and 
died January 15, 1933, at Lehi. 

Robert Fox graduated from Weber 
High School and then joined the Navy 
in 1949, serving sea duty in the Pacific. 
Shortly after being released from the 
Navy, he was called on a mission to New 
Zealand, where he served from 1950 to 
1953. After returning from his mission 
Brother Fox still had military obligations, 
so entered the Army. During 1953-55 
he had the opportunity to travel a great 
deal with the Army, spending some time 
in Europe. 

Robert received his Bachelor’s and Mas¬ 
ter’s degrees from the Brigham Young 


University. He has worked as a juvenile 
probation officer and caseworker. He is 
presently a school counselor with the 
Weber County School District, in which 
position he has been for the past three 
years. Mr. Fox is married to Kathleen 
Redd of Monticello, Utah. They have 
two children, a girl and a boy. 

As hobbies, Robert lists reading, writ¬ 
ing and wood carving. He has been writ¬ 
ing for publication for the last two or three 
years, during which time he has had 
over fifty items published in magazines 
and periodicals. Many of his poems are 
on pioneer topics or the "Old West," and 
some have been featured in SUP News. 
Mr. Fox’s most recent publication is a 
book entitled "Pray Without Ceasing." It 
is a compilation of thoughts and poems on 
prayer and was published by the Deseret 
Book Company. 


CALL HARRY POLL 

INgersoN 7-7965 — For 
CUSTOM SOUND, INTERCOM SYSTEMS, 
HI-FI MUSIC and TELEPHONE SYSTEMS 

Harry has made SUP Treks Hearable — 
Including Centennial in 1947, Mormon Bat¬ 
talion in 1950, Old Folks' Days and SUP % 
Treks at Corinne and Southern Utah. 

11th EAST and 17th SOUTH 


PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

Boston Bldg., 347 S. Main; Ph. EL 5-3461 
"Open 7 a.m. to 1 a.m." 

Sunday & Holidays, 8 a.m. to 1 a.m. 

MEDICAL ARTS PHARMACY 

Medical Arts Bldg. 

50 E. So. Temple Phone EM 4-7815 
Open 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. 

Best Wishes to SUP 


MANSION HOUSE 

2350 Adams, OGDEN, UTAH 

IS PROUD TO BE CHOSEN FOR 
MONTHLY PIONEER CLUB, SUP 
And to Have Served as Headquarters 
for National SUP Convention 

Phone MILTON BERLIN 
EX 2-2225 FOR SPECIAL RATES 
FOR PARTIES, DINNERS or CONVENTIONS 


MURDOCK TRAVEL 

35 RICHARDS ST. - DA 2-1129 

A World-Wide Travel Service For You 
at No Additional Charge 

CALL US FOR ANY TRIP ANYWHERE! 

There is no substitute for experience 
in travel 



Their Joining The Friendly Staff of SUNSET LAWN MORTUARAY 

SUNSET LAWN MORTUARY 

UTAH'S FINEST MORTUARY 
2350 EAST 1300 SOUTH, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 
PHONE IN 7-1582 

We Invite You to See Our Beautiful New Redecorated Mortuary 
ALL ARE OF PIONEER HERITAGE 


JOHN MACKAY and A. BURT KEDDINGTON 

Announce to the Many Friends and Relatives of 


F. MELL WHITNEY 

A Descendant of Newell Whitney 


GLEN G. SMITH 

Former President Texas-Louisiana Mission 




















JANUARY - FEBRUARY, 1962 


SUP NEWS 


PAGE FIFTEEN 





PIONEER CHAPTER HAS 
VIGOROUS, ABLE LEADERS 

The Pioneer Chapter is composed of 
about 65 young business and professional 
men of the Salt Lake City metropolitan 
area. They meet in the Lion House for 
luncheon on the second Thursday of each 
month, September through June. 

This chapter was organized in 1946 by 
Aldon J. Anderson, Jr., and Stanford 
P. Darger in response to solicitation from 
the National Society. The initial objec¬ 
tive was to assist in the 1947 Pioneer cen¬ 
tennial celebration and participate in the 
re-enactment of the Nauvoo Trek. Twen¬ 
ty-one members were enrolled and the 
name Ensign-Emigration Chapter was 
chosen. The name was later changed to 
Pioneer Club and then to Pioneer 
Chapter. 

Projects have since included re-finish¬ 
ing the Eagle Gate in 1947, work parties 
at Pioneer Village, conducting pioneer 
story telling and oratorical contests in 
Salt Lake High Schools, and placing Pio¬ 
neer Village literature in Salt Lake mo¬ 
tels and hotels. 

Members who have filled national of¬ 
fices are Ned Winder and Frank Mc¬ 
Kean as vice presidents, and Clarence 
"Bud” Reeder as executive secretary. In 
I960 the national "man and wife” award 
was presented to Bud and his wife. 

Present chapter officers are Foley 
Richards, President; Graham "Bud” 
Doxey, Vice President; Truman Clawson, 
Vice President; Mark Schwendiman, Vice 
President; Richard Winters, Secretary, 
and David Doxey, Treasurer. 

The underlying objectives of the chap¬ 
ter from the beginning has been to en¬ 
courage younger men to associate in shar¬ 
ing and perpetuating their common 
pioneer heritage. The Lion House was 
chosen as an appropriate meeting place 
because of its spiritual pioneer influence. 


been a farmer and fruit grower. He has 
also held many offices, such as County 
Agent, Inspector, etc. 

Secretary-Treasurer Leland F. Druce 
was born in Salt Lake City in 1907. He 
is married to Mary Ellen McDonald. 
They have four lovely children, one boy, 
Floyd, and three daughters, Shirley, Patsy 
and Carol. 

Asahel F. Eldredge is the son of Fred¬ 
erick E. Eldredge and Julia Lambert. He 
was born and raised in Granger. He is 
married to Catherine Beckstead and they 
have six lovely daughters, also one grand¬ 
daughter. He has had many church as¬ 
signments, such as President of his Dea¬ 
cons quorum secretary, of Seventy’s Quo¬ 
rum and Supt. of the Sunday School 
and is presently on the High Council of 
the North Jordan Stake. 


GOLDEN SPIKE CHAPTER 
ELECTS MYRL R. MASON 


OVER-JORDAN CHAPTER 
ELECTS 1962 OFFICERS 


MYRL R. MASON, President and ALBERT D. EARL 


President Myrl R. Mason is a rancher, 
living in Howell, Utah, where he has re¬ 
sided for over thirty years. He has al¬ 
ways been active 
both in Church 
and civic affairs. 
He is a charter 
member of the 
Golden Spike 
Chapter of the Sons 
of Utah Pioneers. 

First Vice Presi¬ 
dent Boyd Munns 
of the Golden Spike 
Chapter of the SUP 


Boyd Munns 


is a very successful dairy farmer of Gar¬ 
land, Utah, where he has lived since child¬ 
hood. He is very active in his Church 
and community and is working bard in 
the SUP to keep it active. 

Albert D. Earl, Second Vice President 
and Secretary of the Golden Spike Chap¬ 
ter, is a resident of Tremonton, where 
he is in the farm equipment business. He 
helped organize the Golden Spike Chapter 
and has been an officer of the chapter 
ever since. 


Biographical 
sketches of 1962 of¬ 
ficers of Over-Jor- 
dan Chapter are as 
follows: 

President, Wendell 
A. Newman. Wen¬ 
dell is a charter 
member of the 
Over - the - Jordan 
Chapter. He was 
born in Salt Lake 
City and is married 
to Hilda Fowler. He has had many 
church assignments in Ward bishoprics, 
Stake Presidencies, and is at present Presi¬ 
dent of the High Priests of Granger 
Stake. 


1st Vice President William A. Coats. 
William was born in Granger in 1898, 
where he has lived to the present time. He 
is married to Marjory E. Harman. He is 
a farmer by vocation. He has had many 
church assignments — in presidency of 
the Elders quorum, superintendent of the 
Sunday School, in the bishopric, and at 
present is a High Councilman of the Tay¬ 
lorsville Stake. 


Second Vice President, Harrison Wood¬ 
bury, was born in Salt Lake City in 1887. 
He is a graduate of the University of 
Utah. He was assigned to work for the 
Argentine government in 1913 by Presi¬ 
dent John A. Widtsoe in the Department 
of Agriculture. He is married to Esther 
Larsen and they are the parents of nine 
children. For the past thirty years he has 


Complete Line of Restaurant Equipment,— 
Fixtures and Supplies—Refrigerators and 
Soda Fountains—Silverware—China, Pots, 

Pans, Ranges, Cutlery, Sinks, Tables, 
Peelers, Mixers, Etc. 

RESTAURANT AND STORE 
EQUIPMENT CO. 

136 S. West Temple Phone EM 4-1981 


LARKIN MORTUARY 

260 EAST SOUTH TEMPLE 
EMpire 3-4417 












t'AGE SIXTEEN 


SUP NEWS 


JANUARY - FEBRUARY, 1962 


SONS Ur Ui^n 


nwr 





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