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’DI5Ce--9VAShSemP€R-VICTVRV/S- * ViV/6 •<pV/ASI* CRAS-MORITV/RV/S* 

Vol. XXXIX. NOTRE DAME, INDIANA, April 21 , 1906 . . No. 267 


Pax Vobis. 


C^URREXIT Christus! Nova lux, nova vita sepulcro 
Emicat, et toto regnat pax aurea nmndo. 
Saepius apparet dubiis redivivus aniicis 
Cliristus, et ingenti tristes solatur amore. 

Nunc silet, attonitis monstrans nianuumque pedumciue 
Vulnera, nunc loquitur, legis praecepta docendo 
Se probat esse Deum, neque iam dubitare valebunt 
Discipuli. Vivum properant celebrare Magisthim, 
Inque dies numerus, Petro (luce, crescit eorum 
Qui sacra iam Fidei mysteria credere gaudent. 

Idoneus. 


The Irish Bard. 


EUGENE P. BURKE, ’06. 



ROM the earliest da} r s Ireland 
has been a land of poetry and 
sonar. Before the time of Christ 
the pagan poets of the Gael 
wove strange stories of myth 
and fable into musical poems 
and chanted them in the halls of kings 
and chieftains. These .poems were great 
in number; thousands have been destroyed 
by the ravages of centuries and thousands 
. more are now being brought before the 
public through the efforts of the Gaelic 
•League. Not a few of these legendary 
stories have been done into English verse 
by Aubrey de; Yere, William Butler Yeats, 
Ethna Carberv and others; but some of 
these are hardly intelligible unless the reader 
be acquainted with that haze of mythology 
that hung about the early Irish life, and 
colored all the activities of Erin’s ancient 
.heroes. It is the purpose of this paper to 
examine the life of the early Irish bard 


and to see how he was trained to perform 
his extensive duties. 

In ancient Ireland the bard was looked 
upon as holding an official position. He 
had charge of the genealogies and history 
of the people, and he reduced the -laws -of 
the country to poetic form as the best means 
of having them remembered at a time when 
writing was little known. He had to be 
acquainted with every form of metrical 
structure — and there were verv manv in the 

mJ 

. Gaelic language — and be able to compose 
verses upon any theme that might be given 
him. Battles fought, wars waged, the 
glories of chiefs and the praise of heroes, or 
some wild tale where fact and fable inter- 
mingled, and giants and fairies contended 
in battle— all these might form the theme 
of the songs of Irish bards. Dressed in a 
long white robe and sometimes accompanied 
by a retinue of musicians he followed, his 
chief into evert' battle, and the varying 
fortunes of the fight gave inspiration to 
his song. As the battle-line advanced : or 
retreated he poured forth his fervent exhor- 
tation and praise ; he encouraged the timid, 
applauded” the brave and shamed with bitter 
satire the coward of the fray. But when 
the smoke of battle was gone and the 
country flourished under, a. peaceful reign, 
he sat next the king at table, and the great 
halls rang with the music of his songs, as 
he celebrated the glories of his sovereign^— 
his bravery in war, his skill in the chase 
and his mighty wisdom in council. . . 

The bards were given estates, and some 
of them received large enough salaries to 
live with all the dignity of princes. Colleges 
were established where the young poets 
might be trained, and by the end of the 
sixth century thev- had grown to so great 
a number and possessed so great wealth 
that one -third of Ireland was said to be 


NOTRE DAME 

in tlieir hands. But this wealth begot 
insolence, and it is related that they went 
about the country in bands carrying with 
them a silver pot called by the people ‘‘the 
pot of avarice” to which was attached nine 
bronze chains hung on golden hooks and 
which was suspended on the spears of nine 
poets thrust through the links on the end 
of- the chains. These poets then selected 
some unfortunate victim, and approaching 
his homestead they sung songs of praise in 
his honor, while the nine best musicians 
accompanied them with harps. During the 
performance the unfortunate listener was 
expected to throw into the pot a reward 
of gold or silver, but if he failed to do this 
the poets severely satirized him, and rather 
than suffer the sting of these bitter verses 
he usually complied with their demands. . 

King Aedh mac Ainmirecli, who reigned 
about the close of the seventh centuiy, 
deeming the bards too great a burden upon 
the people determined to banish them - all. 
He summoned a great council at Drum Ceat 
to deliberate upon this and other questions 
that concerned the public peace, and it was 
almost decided to send the bards out of 
Ireland when St. Columcille, who was a 
poet himself, crossed over from Iona and 
pleaded for his fellow song-makers. “He 
represented,” writes Montalembert, “that 
care must be taken not to pull up the 
good corn with the tares; that the general 
exile of the poets would be the death of a 
venerable antiquity and of that poetry 
which was so dear to the country and so 
useful to those who knew how to employ 
it.” The issue of this convention, in so far 
as it regarded the bards, was the reduction 
of their number. It was agreed that 
henceforth the High-King should retain in 
his service one chief ollamh — the highest 
class of bard — and that the kings of the 
-four provinces, the chiefs of each territory 
and the lords of each sub-district should 
all retain an ollamh of their own; but no* 
other poet except those mentioned by the 
council was to pursue this profession. 

For this act of kindness on the part of 
St. Columcille the Irish bards were ever 
grateful, and from this time forward the 
^“opposition between the religious spirit and 
-the influence of the bards disappeared.” 

1 But when Ireland was brought under the 


SCHOLASTIC. 

power of the English government, the bards 
were treated with great cruelty 7 and a price 
put upon their heads. The}" were forced to 
flee from- the land, but the Irish minstrels 
who were the successors of these great 
bards clung to their native soil and sounded 
their harps in glorious praise of their coun- 
try. Under Queen Elizabeth rewards were 
offered to all who would sing “her Majesty’s 
most worth}" praise,” but such an offer 
could never wake a song on the lips of an 
Irish- minstrel. He wandered over the hills 
singing the glories of Irish heroes and 
Irish martyrs, and the shame and cruelty 
of apostates. 

“Land of song!” said tlie warrior bard 
“Tho’ all the world betra}'S thee 
One sword at least thy rights shall guard 
One faithful harp shall praise thee.” 

Let us now look at the schools where 
the Irish bards received their training and 
examine the course of studies thev had to 

m* 

pursue. The Files were the highest class of 
Irish poets. They were divided into seven 
grades, the highest of which was called an 
ollamh. These last bards were so highly 
esteemed that the annalists of Ireland 
wrote their obituaries as though they were 
the chiefs of the land. The course of study 
the bard had to go through before he 
reached the dignity of ollamh lasted origi- 
nally seven years, but it was later increased 
to twelve. After the poet had worked 
himself up to the grade of ollamh, which 
meant at least twelve years, and sometimes 
twenty years of industrious study, he knew, 
in addition to his other knowledge, over 
three hundred and fifty kinds of versifica- 
tion and was able to recite two hundred 
and fifty prime stories and one hundred 
secondary ones. 

The schools in which these bards were 
trained, at least in which the ollamlis spent 
their last three years, are well described 
by Dr. Douglas Hyde in his Literary History 
of Ireland. He writes: - ; 

“ The session of the bardic schools 
began about Michaelmas, and the youthful 
aspirants to bardic glory came trooping 
about that season from all quarters - of 
the four provinces to offer with trembling 
hearts their gifts to The ollamh of the 
bardic college- arid to take possession of 
their new quarters. - Very extraordinary 


NOTRE DAME 

these quarters were ; for the college 
usually consisted of a long, low group of 
whitewashed buildings, excessively warmly 
thatched and lying in the hollow of some 
secluded valle\', or shut in by a sheltering 
wood, far removed from the noise of human 
traffic and from the bustle of the great 
world. But what most struck the curious 
beholder was the entire absence of windows 
or partitions over the greater portion of . 
the house. 

“According as each student arrived he 
was assigned a windowless room to himself 
with no other furniture in it than a couple 
of chairs, a clothes rail, and a bed. When 
all the students had arrived a general 
examination of them was made by the 
professors and ollamhs, and all who could 
not read and write Irish well, or who 
appeared to have an indifferent memory, 
were usually sent away. The others were 
divided into classes, and the mode of pro- 
cedure was as follows: The students were 
called together into the great hall or sitting- 
room, amply illuminated by candles and 
bog-torches, and we may imagine the head 
ollamli, perhaps the venerable and patriotic 
O’Gnive himself, addressing them upon their 
chosen ' profession, and finally proposing 
some burning topic such as O’Neill’s abroga- 
tion of the title of O’Neill for the higher 
class to compose a poem on. . . . 

“The students retired after their breakfast 
to their own warm but perfectly dark 
compartments to throw themselves each 
upon his bed, and there think and compose 
till supper-hour, when a servant came round 
to all the rooms with candles for each to 
write down what he had composed. They 
Were then called together into the great 
hall, and handed in their written composi- 
tions to the professor, after which they 
chatted and amused themselves till bed- 
time.” 

The ancient manuscripts from which the 
examples of Irish metres have been collected 
are now in a fragmentary condition, but 
they show that there existed between two 
and three hundred different kinds of metres. 
The text-books too, which the young bards 
studied are. gone, “and' with them, ’’ says 
Dr. Hyde, “the particulars of a. civilization 
probably the niost unique and interesting 
in Europe.” 



. Two Sprains. 

BY S. P. DAXXE. 


IN wanton mischief once, long years ago, . y."*-. 

I pushed a plaj-mate down a brook’s steep bank 
Whereon grew alders wild and sedges dank;' > 
Tripped by a trailing root he fell, and lo, - ' " 

An ankle sprained: then tears began to flow, y 
Mine own the bitterer. With kindness frank 
He freel\* pardoned me the thoughtless prank, — 
Yet none the less his healing lagged full slow: 

E’en thus the wrench a friend late gave my heart. 
Although forgiven fully, pains me still, ; ' 

Still throbs at times with sudden poignant smart,— 
We can not bid such aches begone at ’ will : - 
From sprain of heart as foot, beyond all doubt, 
’Tis time alone can draw the soreness out. 


The Mystery of Maroomma. 


THOMAS A. E. LAIXY, ’ 06 . 


Having just returned to Berlin after a 
short hunting expedition in the wooded 
country, I spent the evening at the home 
of some friends rather than go directly 
to my lodgings which I knew would be 
cheerless on such a night. It -was late in 
October, and the weather was such as a 
man in my business despises.' The air was 
chilly and after a continuous rain all day, 
a dense fog had lowered over everything. 

As I ascended the steps of my lodgings 
I grumbled to myself for not having sent 
word to the landlord to have my apart- 
ments ready for me. I went slowly down 
the long, dimly lighted corridor to my door, 
and automatically took the key from my 
pocket, when -I noticed, through the glass, 
a light in my living room. It came from 
the fire in the open grate. Much surprised 
at seeing this I stood- gazing at it for some 
time before I realized that there was a 
man in the room. It was Myer, the great 
detective, seated in my chair before the fire. 
Seeing that he was not smoking I remained 
outside for several minutes, for I knew .that 
he had something of importance on his 
mind. As often before, I was admiring his 
profile which was set off to advantage by 
his position before the light of the grate. 
His black : hair, high forehead, straight, 
regular nose and determined lips; all indeed 


43 6 


NOTRE DAME SCHOLASTIC : 


worth} 1 " of admiration. His chin was covered 
with a short pointed beard which was of 
the same color as his hair. As the flames 
occasional^ flickered in the grate I caught 
glimpses of his piercing black e}’e. During 
all this time he had been as quiet and 
motionless as a statue, but he present^ 
arose to. stir the fire as I entered. 

“Yes,” he ..said after we had exchanged 
greetings, “I am glad } r ou have returned. 
My apartments have been almost deserted 
since you left. I never thought I would miss' 
my assistant so much.” Lighting a cigar 
and handing me another, he continued : 
“To-morrow we have to commence on 
what appears to be a very interesting case 
at Schleswig, a small town north of here. 
The case offers no sign of a working clew, 
so the sooner we start at it the better. 
I saw an account of it in this evening’s 
paper, but the only facts given were these r 
A young married woman was found dead 
in bed this morning by her maid. Some 
minor details were given which can not 
be relied upon. Here is a telegram I received 
about an hour ago.” I read it: 

“Schleswig, Oct., 30. — Come at once 
to Maroomma. Very important. — George 
Neave.” 

I handed it back to Myer and remained 
silent, waiting as usual for him to open the 
conversation on such matters, but for several 
minutes he said nothing but watched the 
•smoke curl from his cigar until it was lost 
in the darkness above. Presenth r he rose, 
passed in front of me and went through 
. the door leading to his apartments. When 
he had almost closed it after him he turned 
and said: . “We will leave on the six o’clock 
train in the morning.” 

Any other person might have considered 
his manner rather gruff, but I knew him too 
well for that. Whenever his mind was 
seriously occupied he seemed oblivious of 
everyone around him. I remained where I 
• was for some time listening to the burn- 
ing cedar logs crackle in the grate and 
watching the fanciful, shadows dance on 
.the wall. The bell of a near-by clock struck 
•twelve, and I retired with the thought 
of a reluctant departure in the morning. 

After a two hours’ ride we arrived in 
.Schleswig, and were much surprised to find 
the roads perfectly dry. We .were met at 


the station by one of Mr. Neave’s servants 
who took us at once to “Maroomma,” an 
old estate about a mile from the town. It 
was hedged in by great pine and cedar 
trees and was bounded on the w est by a 
small stream. Everything appeared so 
cheerful in the warm sunlight that I could 
scarcely realize a tragedy had occurred 
here and, as yet, I had no ground for 
such a belief. 

Mr. Heave’s brother showed us into a 
spacious room with a very high ceiling. 
On the walls were hung many fine old 
paintings; the furniture was of an antique 
but costly pattern; the floor was covered 
with heavy rugs which smothered. the sound 
of our footsteps. Everything bore an air 
of past grandeur, which was not surprising, 
for the building had been standing for nearly 
one hundred years. After a few r incidental 
remarks our host said : 

“On last Sunday^ the day before yesterday, 
George’s wife retired apparently in good 
health. She and her husband had been 
entertaining friends all day and w-ere as 
happy as any .of them. He spent the night 
in town w r ith me, and in the morning w r as 
informed by telephone that his wife w r as 
dead. The maid found . the corpse with a 
bruise on the head as if inflicted by some 
sharp-cornered instrument; apart from this 
we have no clew whatever. My belief is 
that somebody gained admittance to her 
room during the day and hid until night, 
intending to commit robbery". She probably- 
heard him and was about to give the alarm 
when he killed her and made his escape. 
She and mv brother have been married but 
a few months, and no couple could be more 
devoted to each other than they were. 
George is almost prostrated by the affair.” 
Walking to the door he concluded : “ I have 
an engagement at my office this morning, 
so I will call George wffio can tell you all 
that I know.” 

He left the room and soon the ycmng 
widower entered. His eyes were red and 
swollen and his face wore a haggard expres- 
sion, showing that the shock was hard on 
him. He told us practically the same story 
as that of his brother and believed that 
somebody had killed her in an attempt to 
commit burglary. When he had finished 
his story Myer said : . 


437 


NOIRE DAME SCHOLASTIC. 


“Now, Mr. Neave, I must ask some ques- 
tions which will seem to you more or less 
personal, but they* are absolutely necessary*, 
so please answer them in full, leaving out 
no details whatever. To begin: How long 
have you and your wife Marie been 
married?” 

“Nearly* six months,” he answered. 

“Did you and she ever have any* mis- 
understanding ? ” 

“No, Mr. Myer, we- have never had the 
least trouble ; not even a harsh word has 
ever been spoken by either of us. We were 
al wavs together except when I would spend 
a night with my brother John who is a 
dentist in town. He is only a step-brother, 
but he always thought very much of Marie 
and me.” 

“How long has your brother been prac- 
tising his profession ?” ' 

“Nearly a year. Our parents have been 
dead for some time, and until a few years 
ago John spent his time traveling until his 
inheritance was spent, when I sent him to 
college to study dentistry. Although he 
was of a wild nature he is as good-hearted 
as any*one could be.” 

Myer was silent for a minute then he 
continued: “Tell me what places, if any, 
your wife visited during the week preceding 
her death.” 

After a little reflection he answered: “She 
was at home until last Wednesday when 
we attended a reception with some friends 
in town. On the following day she had an 
appointment with my brother for some 
dental work, so we spent most of that day 
with him. Friday* evening we spent in 
town, and since then she has not left the 
house.” 

At Myer’s request we went to his wife’s 
room to see the corpse which had not yet . 
been placed in a coffin. The room was 
darkened except for two candles which 
were burning on the stand beside the dead 
woman. Between them stood a large 
crucifix and over the brass bed hung a 
picture of the Madonna. A priest had just 
left the room as we entered. There was a 
bruise on the dead woman’s head and a 
long scratch oil her cheek. The maid told 
us that the bed clothing was disordered 
and everything showed that she had strug- 
gled with her assassin. This was my con- . 


viction too, and when ' she attempted' to 
call for help, he struck the fatal blow. 
Myer leaned over and carefully examined 
the wound on the scalp for some time, and 
we then left the room. He told tie to 
examine the yard around the house while 
he would study* the interior. I uttered a 
sigh of relief as I left the gloomy* house 
and came out in the warm sunshine. 

Below. Mrs. Neave’s room there was no 
porch which anyone might climb and gain 
entrance through the window, nor could 
any ladder have been used r for there was 
a wide, even bed of black earth extending 
ten feet in width from the house and in 
length, the whole side of it. Had any ladder 
been used marks would have remained. 
Suddenly* my* eyes fell on a flat impression 
on the black soil, directly* beneath a window, 
made bv laving the flat side of a board on’ 
it. I. concluded at once that a ladder had 
been placed on it so that the usual marks 
would not be left. I went immediatelv to 

ml 

Myer and told him of my* discovery. He, 
came out, and after seeing all returned 
without a word. He met the priest at the 
door and spoke to him in a low voice. I 
wandered through the great house, from 
tilt cellar to the attic, and found that 
entrance had not been forced at any place. 
As I passed the death chamber I saw Myer 
and the priest enter it and close the door 
after them. Finding Mr. Neave in a room 
near by* I questioned him about the servants, 
but learned that thev were all old and 

mi 

trusted, and grieved over the death nearly 
as much as he did. He told me four stag 
hounds were kept in different parts of the 
building at night so that nobody could 
move about without arousing them. The 
more I learned, the more faith I put in 
the clew of the ladder and the impression ; 
beneath the window. When I told him of 
it he went to see for himself. He put 
confidence in the idea and was so expressing 
himself when Myer came out and asked to . 
be' taken to the town. When he had gone 
we asked the priest what clew had been 
found, but he told us he knew nothing 
about it and was in the room with Myer 
only at the latter’s request for the sake 
of propriety*. ‘ 

We were left by ; ourselves for several 
hours before the detective returned. At 


43 s 


NOTRjel dame scholastic. 


noon I dined with the priest who spoke 
very highly of the deeeased . and of her 
luisband . Late in the afternoon Myer 
returned and sought Neave whom he 
questioned : 

“You told me your parents were dead, 
did you not?” 

“Yes, sir.” 

“Are Mrs. Neave’s parents living?” 
“Only her mother, who is very feeble and 
does not \ r et know of Marie's death.” 

“Has she any other children?” 

“No, sir,” Neave answered, “Marie was 
the only child.” 

“Tell me about her mother and whether 
or not she is wealthy.” 

Neave somewhat confused, answered : 
“She is very feeble and can not live much 
longer, so we have not told her of Marie’s 
death. We are afraid she can not stand the 
shock. Never having had a son she thought 
much of John and me. She had considerable 
wealth and made a provision for both of 
us in her will.” 

“When did she make her will?” 

“About a month ago,” answered Neave. 
“What were the provisions it. made for 
you and John?” 

• “Her wealth was to be divided so that 
one-third would come to Marie, another to 
me and the other to our children. In case 
we had no children, that third was to go 
to John. Some personal property was to 
go to her servants and friends. She also — ” 
“That is all I care to know,” interrupted 
Myer. “ My part of the work is now 
finished.” 

Neave’s face showed that he did not 
understand, so the detective continued: 

. “I have discovered who committed the 
crime. His apprehension and punishment 
are the duty of others.” - 
“Who. did it! exclaimed Neave. . 

“Your brother, John,” said Myer, coolly. 
Neave’s face turned scarlet and then a 
sickly pale. He tried to speak, but for 
some time was unable to control himself. 
Noticing this Myer continued: “When I 
was in the death chamber to-day with the 
priest I found this,” holding up an irregular 
piece of silver bent into a cup -like shape. 

- “What is that?” asked Neave. ,1 
“It is what solves the whole problem,” 
said Myer. “It is the crown of a tooth. 


Your wife had this put on one of her teeth 
last week. Within this was a capsule made 
of a gelatinous substance which contained an 
arsenic solution, so that when this crown, 
which is very thin, wore away by friction 
with the other teeth, the capsule would have 
been melted by the heat of the mouth, thus 
letting out the poisonous fluid. This hole 
3'ou see in the crown was probably made 
just as ymur wife was retiring, so that she 
swallowed the poison when about to go to 
sleep. Had it occurred in the daytime, it 
would probably have been at a meal when 
she was using her teeth, and she would have 
swallowed the drug unknowingly with her 
food, for it is almost tasteless. I have good 
grounds for saying 3'our brother committed 
the crime, for there is no other dentist in 
the town. If what I have told 3 r ou is not 
strong enough evidence this is,” handing a 
note to Neave. “I went to his office to 
have a talk with him and found it on his 
desk.” It read : 

“George, I must have been mad when 
I did it; but it’s done now, so good-bye 
forever. I wall suffer until the day I die, so 
keep M3 r er off my. track. — John Neave.” 

When Neave finished reading it, his e3 r es 
wore a glassy^ stare while his bod3 r shivered 
with emotion. Myer continued: 

“The scratch on 3 r our wife’s face was 
inflicted by herself while in agony, and the 
wound on her head was caused b3>- her 
striking a pointed ring on the bed 7 post. 
Your brother’s motive for doing the deed 
is evident from what you said with regard 
to the will of your mother-in-law. Had 
any children blessed your- home he would 
not have received his share of the estate. 
In order to secure this for himself he admin- 
istered the poison, thinking it would never 
be known.” 

Neave was about to tell Myer to continue 
his search- for John when his eyes ' turned 
to the words, in the note, “keep M3 r er off 
my-"" track.” His better mature overpowered 
his desire for revenge, and after a steady 
glance at the note he said: “Well, your 
work is done.” 



Ale the trees that bear fruit are not 
straight.-.; 

The future belongs to those who work 
best in the pfesent.— A. £. B. ; 


NOTRE DAME SCHOLASTIC 


439 


V arsity V erse . 


The Character of Caliban. 



TO A CHILD! 

T OST in a tlrcket of blighted success, 

Dark is 1113- mind with despair; 

Not a friend near me to lend a kind hand, 

No one to whisper a pra^'er. 

Over the hills like an angel of light 
Conies tin- bright foi m from afar, 

Leading me back to the cpiiet of home — 

Little one, thou art 1113- star. 

• Tossed on an ocean of wean- unrest 
Troubled with sorrow and care, 

Helpless and hopeless alone would I be. 

Driven lw winds of despair, 

Save for the light that is marking 1113- path 
Guiding me safe o’er the bar, 

Leading me clear of temptation’s black rocks — 
Little one, thou art mv star. 

Whether I make through the unbeaten wood 
Or through the measureless sand, 

Whether I move on the wind-driven waves 
Or down the treacherous land, 

Ever before me thv brightness doth shine, 

No clouds tin- splendor can mar,' 

Leading me, guiding me, ever aright— 

Little one, thou art mv star. 

T. E. B. 

INVITATION. 

Come out in the breeze of the morning, 

The robin’s astir on the green, 

The buds on the thorn, 

The dew of the morn 
Glistens with silver sheen. 

The sun is a-glint on the water 
That splashes the soft grass3' shore, 

The blue bird’s a-perch 
In the budding white birch 
That hangs like a veil at mv door. 

E. P. B. 

AT LARGE. 

A 3'oung man who hailed from South Wales 
In Kentuclw was caught stealing nails, 

He was locked up in jail, 

Shredded wheat was his bail, 

But he broke loose and now the South wails. 

T. E. B. 

INCONGRUOUS. 

There was an old man named Tom Thomson, 
Whose son .was then also a Thomson, 

It is funn3 r indeed, 

How it can be agreed, 

He was Tom’s son besides son of Thomson. 

- A. A. W. . 

\j F. T. II. 

A mathematician named Rhvne 
On a diet of surds used to dine, 

While a lunch of ’ light squares 
Mixed with cube roots in pairs 
Is a dish he would seldom decline. 


JAMES II. GALLAGAN, ’ 06 . 


In reading Shakspere one is perpetually 
struck with the poet’s wonderful knowledge 
of human, nature. In oneplajr he represents 
for us a mob of uneducated citizens, ready 
to go whithersoever a leader may choose 
to take them; in another play he places 
before us a noble old man, generous and 
kind, the victim of cruel . and ungrateful 
daughters. Again he gives us a noble young 
man seeking to avenge the death of his 
murdered father and to dethrone a usurping 
king of a haughty and vacillating character. 
Thus he portrays for us all the different 
stages of life from the humblest to the most 
exalted and dignified. But in “ The Tempest” 
we come in contact with two entirely new 
characters, the like of which, perhaps, is 
not seen in any of his other plays. These 
characters are Ariel and Caliban. 

Ariel is a spirit imprisoned by Prospero, 
and is willing to serve this banished duke, 
if only at the end of a specified time 
Prospero will set him free. He is a noble 
character, alwa\ r s bent towards what is 
good, and alwaj^s shunning what is evil, 
although he is ready at all times for sport 
and innocent tricks. He loves his master 
and is willing to suffer great torments 
rather than see the duke injured in any 
way. He has no definite human form, but 
yet just enough human nature about' him 
to let us know how he would act or feel 
towards his fellow-men if he were human; 
and we can not but have a tender feeling 
towards a creature who is so loving, kind, 
faithful, and dutiful towards lxis master. 

The other preternatural character in this > 
play is' Caliban, who is the direct opposite 
of Ariel, both externally and internally. 
He has a weak mind, a bad- character, a 
grumbling spirit, and .is always ready to 
work some injury to the duke, as is shown 
in the scene where he meets the drunken 
boatmen, and is wiHing to -deliver Prospero 
into their hands, and ready almost to sell 
his soul for a drink of liquor, as he very 
pompously sings : . : 

I’ll swear,' upon that bottle,, to be thy- LVy'.H 
... : True subject; for the liquor is nobreaitily.y-y'; 


440 


NOTRE DAME SCHOLASTIC . 


As Ariel is the most graceful of creatures, 
and possesses a beautiful form, so Caliban 
is the most awkward, and is greatly 
deformed. . Then too, we can not justly 
expect him to be much better than he is, 
since he had the witch Sycorax for his 
mother, and the devil for his father. He was 
banished from Argier for his pranks and 
tricks, and sought refuge in this isolated 
island. He was reared in solitude, a prey 
to his brutish impulses, and is justly called . 
by Schlegel a half demon and beast, half 
goblin and savage. He is a mere animal, 
resisting all active employ-ment, and having 
no taste for good food. He is all wicked- 
ness, born to be a slave, although he is 
continually grumbling when in subjection. 
Education had little or no effect upon him, 
for when Prospero found him a mere brute 
living on the island, he captured him, tamed 
him, and tried to instruct him in the 
rudiments of knowledge.. He succeeded in 
teaching him to speak; but education is not 
for such a nature as his, as he very plainly 
tells the Duke: 

You taught me language; and 1113- profit on’t 

Is I know how to curse. 

He used his speech only to curse and 
malign his benefactor ; he could not appre- 
ciate kindness, and could be brought into 
subjection only by chastisement ; he kept 
company with men only as a brute and 
could not learn to love them. The bottle 
of liquor was far more attractive to him 
than Prospero’s lessons, and he preferred 
the company of drunken men to that of 
his noble benefactor. 

Prospero obtained mastery^ over him, as 
Caliban afterward complains, and took the 
island from him, but only r that he might 
escape the violence of the savage, and he 
justifies his action by trying to humanize 
him. We may, however, overlook much ot 
the uncouthness and savagery of Caliban 
who had much less to attract him to man- 
kind than Ariel, and who at last ackno wl- 
edged to Prospero his bad behaviour and 
promised amendment. 


They live long who live best. 

If you are good, were the whole world 
to say you are bad, you would still be good. 
Into the dove-cot geese never fly. — A. E. B. 


Baseball vs. Science. 


FRANK T. .MAHER, ’OS. 


The bell rang for the last afternoon class, 
but a group of students still lingered on 
the steps of Science Hall as if reluctant to 
change the outdoor freshness for the con- 
finement of the class-room and the pursuit 
of some dry scientific subject. They were 
discussing the living questions of the day — 
not the elections • nor the trust reform, 
but the Senior Hop, the year book and 
the baseball team. Though they' carried 
biological text-books under their arms or 
in their coat pockets their conversation was 
not of genera or species. Far more interest- 
ing to them were speculations on the 
outcome of the morrow’s game. Baseball 
was in the air, and almost everybody 
seemed glad of it ; the exception was “ Old 
Shannon,” as the biological professor was 
playfully’- termed by his not over-fond stu- 
dents. He was a German born and bred 
and a true disciple of the old school whose 
creed had ever been that play r and amuse- 
ment are essentially an evil. The professor 
saw in baseball only a crazy game fit for 
wasting time that could be spent much 
better on the noble study of science. Needless 
to say, his pupils and he differed widely 
on this point. Though they found interest 
and amusement in observing the birds and* 
flowers discovered in the course of a walk 
through the woods or along, the river, 
nature mummified and preserved in- dusty 
books held little attraction for them. S.o 
they lingered daily- outside the class-room 
and talked baseball. ' - 

One of them had special cause to linger; 
It was Harland, who, though the idol of 
the students and their champion in the 
box, was no favorite with “Old Shannon.” 
The professor blamed baseball for Harland’s 
dullness in the class-room, and all the ill- 
feeling he had for the game itself fie trans- 
ferred to Harland as its most enthusiastic 
exponent. 

Harland had little to say to the crowd 
around him; he .was gloomy and sour; 
the bi-monthly “exams” were only a few 
days off, and it was customary for Harland . 




NOTRE DAME SCHOLASTIC. 441 

to look gloomy and sour just before cally backward and forward, gave them 
“exams.” His showing in class was ordi- but a poor view of the cage. "• 

narily poor, but this } r ear it was worse than Suddenly in the midst of a sentence 
ever before, especially in “Old Shannon’s” the professor stopped short and a silence 
class. He bitterly reflected that unless he fell upon all. The boys quaked in antici- 
could qualify with the necessary average pation of the. “call down” that was about 
he would be dropped from the team ; and to descend upon some poor unfortunate 
another .such mark in biology as his last who had allowed his thoughts to wander 
one would make his suspension almost cer- beyond the precincts of the class-room, 
tain. The greeting of a belated fellow-student “Harland,” said the professor in cold, 
aroused him from his gloomy thoughts: measured tones, “what have yon there in 

“Hello! Harland, old man! Going to your hand?” - - 

pitch to-morrow’s game?” “A-a ball, sir,” stammered Harland as if 

“Yes,” replied Harland, brightening; and, waking from a deep reverie.' ! 

yielding to a happier mood, he took a “You are a miserable idler,” shouted the 
shining new ball from his pocket and professor in his wrath, “and you deserve 
began to toss and catch it. to be thrown out of the class.” 

“Fellows,” demanded the newcomer of Searceh r were the words uttered when a 
the others, “ did 3m u ever see Harland surprising change came over the culprit; 
without a -ball about him somewhere ? Why he caught his breath, his e\ r es glittered; his" 
even at the swell hop last Easter I noticed grip on the ball tightened, his arm flew* 
a bulge in his coat pocket which bn exami- back and came forward like a flash*; some- 
nation proved to be a new Spalding. thing white and round shot like a bullet 

“Well,” responded Harland to the laugh- through the air straight at the professor’s 
ing crowd as the\' filed into the class-room, - head. Those in the room’ gasped in aston- 
“ if ‘Old Shannon’ does not handle me ishment, but even as they gasped they under- 
pretty gently this ‘exam’ 3' on will have a stood. The rattler had managed to get 
beautiful chance to see me without a ball through the trap-door of the cage, and was 
in my hand for some time to come.” reaching over the professor’s . shoulder with. 

The professor lost no time in starting, its wicked fangs scarcely an inch from his 
class; he had a sharp, brisk way of putting neck. There was a crack as the ball struck 
questions which, with his serious treatment the wall. The professor jumped to his feet,- 
of delinquents, assured fair work in his saw. the open cage and the big rattler 
class. When the hour was about half over writhing on the floor with its head crushed 
he stopped in the course of his lecture and flat,, and realized that he had been saved 
took a small box from the floor. Undoing from a fearful death by the dullard*, base- 
the fastenings he lifted out a small wire ball player. 

cage that contained half a dozen wiggling, “Maybe Harland won’t have a cinch with 
squirming snakes. ‘Old Shannon’ now,” remarked one boy to 

“Gentfemen,” he said, “here are some bis companion on the following afternoon-, 
specimens, some very interesting ones for as they talked over the event on their wav. 
our work. They were sent to me from to the baseball field. - 

India by a friend of mine, the renowned Dr. “Yes,” replied his companion, “and may- 
Luigi Grossman. But I see that he neglected ' be we won’t have a cinch for the pennant 
to remove the fangs of that vicious old with Harland to pitch for us all season, 
fellow in the corner, so until he can Te at- Say, but you should have seen ‘Old Shan- 
tended to we will make no investigations.” non’ this morning getting a season ticket 
The professor placed the cage upon a shelf and a Spalding’s Guide-Book at the office. , 
back of where he was sitting, and taking He’s a red-hot convert to baseball, and 
up another topic of the lesson, began a before the season’s over you’ll see him on the . 
lively quiz. The ; boys could pay but little bleachers shouting till he’s blue in the face.^. 
further heed to the snakes, for “Old - — - — — -yv 

Shannon” was jealous of their attention Know what thou art and care not for, 
and, too, his bald head, bobbing energeti- what thou art deemed to be.— A. E. Bl : ~ 


44 2 


NOIRE DAME SCHOLASTIC. 


Notre Dame Scholastic 


The Founder’s Monument. 


Published every Saturday during Term Time at the 
University of Notre Dame. 

i ntered as second-class matter at the Post Office, Notre Dame, lnd. 

Terms: $J.50 per Annum. Postpaid. 

Address: THE EDITOR NOTRE DAME SCHOLASTIC, 
Notre Dame, Indiana. 


Notre Dame, Indiana, April 21, 1906. 


Board of Editors. 

EUGENE P. BURKE, ’06 

CHAS. L. O’DONNELL, ’06 JOHN F. SHEA, '06 

WILLIAM A. BOLGER, ’07 JOHN M. RYAN, ’06 

THOMAS E. BURKE, ’07 JOHN C. MCGINN, ’0 6 

WESLEY J. DONAHUE, ’07 LEO J. COONTZ, ’07 

CORNELIUS HAGERTY, ’06 EDWARD F. O’FLYNN, ’07 

WALTER O’DONNELL, ’06 ROBERT L. BRACKEN, ’OS 


— Theodor Leschetizky, the famous music 
teacher of Vienna who counts Paderewski 
and Mark Hambourg among his very cos- 
mopolitan pupils, says of American students 
that, accustomed to keep their faculties in 
readiness, their perceptions are quick, and 
they have considerable technical skill, but 
to balance this statement he adds that 
perhaps they study more for the sake 
of being up to date than for the love 
of music. 


—The Literary Digest quotes some figures 
from the Detroit Free Despatch which show 
that humorous literature as a money propo- 
sition pays well. George Ade’s income from 
his writings amounts to $150,000 annually. 
This is a far greater sum than Dickens, 
Thackeray and other illustrious novelists 
ever received. Some fifteen years ago George 
Ade was working for $5 a week, and now 
he earns $400 a day. But he does not 
depend upon his signature for this salary. 
He is a sincere worker with the infinite 
capacity of taking pains, and this is, in 
great part, the secret of his extraordinary 
success and the strongest hope of those 
who would wish to reach an equal standing 
in the literary field, • 



May third, the Feast of the Invention 
of the Hoty Cross, will witness a very 
interesting ceremom'- at Notre Dame. On this 
date will be unveiled the bronze monument 
which the friends and alumni of the Uni- 
versity have erected to the memory of the 
late Very Reverend E. Sorin, C. S. C. 

The pedestal, which is made of the best 
Vermont granite, was put in place some 
time ago and is declared by^ everyone to be 
a splendid specimen of the stone worker’s 
art. The statue, which was modeled by the 
celebrated sculptor, Ernesto Biondi, will, 
we are sure, attract more than ordinarv 
attention. It represents our Founder as he 
appeared when he was wont, in years gone 
by, to greet students and friends on their 
arrival at Notre Dame. 


We shall give in an early issue of the 
Scholastic a picture of the monument 
for the benefit of our readers, and we 
venture the prediction that all will be 
pleased therewith. Contributions towards 
the monument fund have come in from all 
quarters. The following is a list of those 
sent by old South Bend friends of Father 
Sorin and the University : — 


Studebaker Mfg. Co $1000.00 

First National Bank 500.00 

James Oliver .' 250.00 

Joseph Oliver 250.00 

John Ellsworth 250.00 

George Wym an ~ 200.00 

Mrs. Maud Coquillard 200.00 

Hering & Murphy . ioO.OO 

Meyer. Livingston 100.00 

Dr. Bovrl-Snee 100.00 

Dr. J. A. Stoeckley........; 1 75.00 

Mr. P. O’Brien..... 50.00 

W. R. Baker &. Co...... : 50.00 

E. C. McDonald 50.00 

Dr. j. Berteling .:. 50.00 

South Bend . Engraving Co ..50.00 

Gabriel Summers. 50.00 

South 'Bend Tribune .•.....‘.50.00 

AVenderoth & McGill......... 50.00 

Frank Toepp.. ;..... 25.00 

McErlain & Jackson 25.00 

Senricli & Co :.. 25.00 

Moses; Livingston..:..;: 25.00 

Leo Eliel....:............. ....... 25. 00 

A. C. .Cleis......i..:...';.i : .......... 25.00 

Sliidler Bros.........i.............. ’ 25.00 

City Roller Mills.......,...:.............; 125.00 

"Indiana. Lumber Co;,;,,.,..... ...,.,,, .25.00 



< 






NOTRE DAME SCHOLASTIC. 


George Clarke 25.00 

Thomas Millea 25.00 

Dr. \V. A. Hager 25.00 

South Bend Fruit Co 25.00 

Staley & Robinson 25.00 

Michael Hastings 25.00 


We give the names of those only whose 
subscriptions have been paid. A number 
of others have promised to contribute, and 
we shall take pleasure in recording, their 
names in a future issue of this paper. 

The letters that . have accompanied the 
subscriptions bear eloquent testimony to the 
esteem in. which Father Sorin was held by 
all classes, and more especially by the old 
students. The following two letters are 
samples of many others that might be 
given. Their writers .sent in unsolicited 
subscriptions. 

Elgin, III., Sept. 4, 1905. 
The Rev. John Cavanaugh, C. S. C. 

Deak Sir: — It has lately' come to my notice in the 
newspapers that a movement has been started to 
erect a statue to Father Sorin, Founder of the 
University'. 

I was a student at Notre Dame for a very brief 
time in the winter of 1S46— ’7, and though I never 
afterwards met Father Sorin, I remember him with 
admiration and love; and I therefore enclose my' 
check for twenty-five dollars to assist in preserving 
the memory' of a great and good man. 

Respectfully yours, 

Tiios. S. Wallin. 

Belen, New Mexico, Sept. 20, 1905. 
Very Rev. J. A. Zahm, C. S. C. 

Dear Father: — Enclosed you will please find my' 
check for one hundred dollars. I should like to give 
all I have for a statue to our dear Father Sorin. 

Very' Respectfully' y'ours, an old student, 

Jose E. Chaves. 

Both these letters have deeply'- touched 
the committee having the monument in 
charge, and have been especially gratifying 
to the authorities of the University. Mr. 
Wallin’s letter, coming as it does after an 
absence of sixty' years from his Alma Mater, 
is not only a high tribute to the memory 
of Father Sorin, but the best possible 
indication that Mr. Wallin’s heart is in the 
right place. We sincerely' trust that he will 
be able to be present at the : celebration on 
the 3d of May. Mr. Chaves— Jose we always 
called him— was for many y'ears a popular 
student in the Minim Department, and was 
always a great favorite of Father Sorin’s. 
Jose, too, as he well knows, is always 
welcome at Notre Dame, and we shall be 


443 

especially' glad to meet him on the 3d prox. 
Lack of space prevents us from giving the 
list of old students and friends, outside of 
South Bend, who have contributed to the 
monument fund ; but we shall take pleasure 
in putting this list in a future number of the 
Scholastic, when once the list is complete. 

Many' who have not yet sent in their 
contributions have signified their intention 
of having a part in the erection of the mon- 
ument to Notre Dame’s Founder, and we 
trust that they' will find it convenient to 
send in their contributions, if not before 
the statue is unveiled, at least as soon 
thereafter as may' be. Promptness in remit- 
ting will materially aid the work of the 
committee, and enable us to give, at an 
earlier date than would otherwise be pos- 
sible, a complete list of the friends and 
admirers of Father Sorin and his work!' . 


The Philopatrians 


That enterprising and enthusiastic body 
of students, the Philopatrians, rendered their 
annual entertainment in Washington Hall 
on Easter Monday'. . 

For years the record of this organization 
has been one of excellence and talent. 
From them have sprung the stars of 
our University dramatics. With the true 
American spirit of zeal and perseverance 
these Carrollites have set an example to the 
student body, and have made themselves 
worthy' of the admiration they have received. 

Their program this year was not a depar- 
ture from the precedent already' established, 
and so we were treated to an afternoon of 
real pleasure. No doubt the greatest praise 
is due Prof. Frederick Karr who besides 
teaching his classes in oratory and elocution 
found ample time to train the young stu- 
dents in this line of work. With Brother 
Cy'prian as a. leader, we could not have 
but expected something good from his 
energetic efforts. 

Noticeable was the new scenery which 
was used for the first time, and we must 
compliment our stage directors for the 
effectiveness displayed in the several scenes. 

The program was made up of two parts: 
a Drama in one act and another in five. 


444 


NOTRE DAME SCHOLASTIC. 


The first, “Until the Rising of the Moon,” 
is the work of Maurice Francis Egan. It 
was a pathetic story and well rendered. 
A case of heaping coals of fire, in which the 
hero is injured by Captain Tom Crawford, 
but when Captain Tom was placed in his 
power he returned only" good for evil. E. C. 
Clear as Captain Edward Arden was very 
good and was well supported by L. Symonds 
and the rest of the cast. 

“The Prince and the Pauper” made up 
the second part of the program. In it H. R. 
Symonds and J. L. Weist took the leading 
roles , and their efforts were the subject of 
very favorable comment. 

H. W. Hilton, who has been seen before 
with the Philopatrians, was the same amus- 
ing character in his part of Miles Hendon, 
the big-hearted hero. Jim Fox as Mad 
Sam was quite effective. 

The other members of the Compaq did 
well and are entitled to the greatest amount 
of praise. Especially deserving of comment 
are the younger members who executed 
very well the difficult minuet in the second 
act. 

When we consider that each year the 
Philopatrians lose some of their star mem- 
bers and that they are made up entirety 
of Preparatory students we can not help 
but admire the result of their earnest efforts. 
They deserve our congratulations. 

THE PROGRAM. 

THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER. 

(A' Drama in Five Acts.) 

Cast of Characters. 

Edward, Prince of Wales ..H. R. Symonds 

Tom Canty, the Pauper.. ,J. L. Weist 

Henry YHL, King of England .....C: P. Devett 

Earl of Hertford, Lord Protector E. L. McDermott 

Eord St. John H. S. Warren 

Prince Godfrey, Cousin of the Prince J. R. Tomlinson 

Page to the Prince '. .J. F. Mclver 

Court Physician........ : T. B. Roberts 

Miles Hendon H. W. Hilton 

Servant to Hendon „W. W. Rice 

John Canty, Father of the Pauper.. ...... G. E. Washburn- 

Sykes, Uncle of the Pauper C. F. Reilly 

Dan Canty, Tom’s Brother.... R. N. McDowell 

Yokel, a Vagabond..........;....:..... ....:.....L....B. Landon 

Mad Sam :.J. MI Fox 

Humphrey Marlow, Whipping Boy....'...T. J, McFadden 

Anthony Gorse j .. :i C. D. Murray 

)• Guards -/ ; 

Hugh Gallord j \ ~ J, P: GormleA- 

Messenger , ... , . . .... ;B: Roe 


Dancing. Pages 
and 

Court Jesters 


Ashton Y-. Byrne 
Paul V. Byrne 
L..S. Dillon 
Thos. A. Byrne 
W. C. F ole\" 

J. B. Gallart 
C. H. Jones • • 

J. J. Lee 
J. F. Mclver . 

• J. M. Olston 
F. F. Mclver 
L. G. Rempe 
B. Roe . 

Courtiers, vagabonds, etc., by .members of the Society. 

• Musical Numbers. 

Selection from “The Umpire”......... .J. Howard 

Selection from “ Wonderland ” ..: V: Herbert 

Selection from “The . Burgomaster” Gus Luders 

Selections from “Me, Hint, and I” Max Hoffman 

March — “Nora Floradora” IF. O'Harc 

March from “The Rollicking Girl” .....IF; T. Francis 

UNTIL THE RISING OF THE MOON. 

,„(A Drama in one Act. Ba - Maurice Francis Egan, LL. D.) 
Cast of Characters. . 

Captain EdAA-ard Arden, U. S. A E. C. Clear 

1st Soldier, U. S. A : C. Kelley 

2d' Soldier, U. S. A : R. Pa3 r ne 

Captain Tom j CraAv ford’s Tigers H. 0. Dierssen 

Sentinel. - . disguised as J. G. Sexton ■ 

Ted, tlie Drummer J U. S. Soldiers . L. SA’monds 


The Senior Hop. 


“Under the folds of the garnet and grey 
. • Merrilj- glided the hours aAA'aA'.” 

On last Monday evening the senior hop 
was held in the upper hall of the gymna- 
sium and the result was another star in 
the bright escutcheon of ’06. For weeks the 
energetic seniors had planned and worked 
with the sole object in view of exceeding 
all previous -class hops, and as nothing is 
impos'sible To ’06 their -plans had a glorious 
consummation. The toil and work was all 
forgotten, and sweet indeed was the reward 
when fair eyes sparkled as they entered and 
“Glorious ! wonderful ! ” and “ 0 dandy ! ” 
escaped in profusion from delighted guests. 

The hall was beautifully decorated in 
an original and artistic manner. Gold . and 
blue was used to decorate the walls and 
galleries,, and was r the predominating color 
scheme of the hall. Pennants of the different 
colleges were scattered over the walls and 
their bright colors added to the gaiety of 
the occasion. The most striking decorative 
effect was secured by the erection of a large 
canopy over the south window which was 
constructed of garnet and grey, the class 
colors, , and served as a delightful retreat 


NOTRE DAME SCHOLASTIC. 


445 


for the weary dancers. The stately folds 
of the immense curtains were drawn back, 
and the numerals ’06, in colored electric 
lights, shed a beautiful lustre over ..all, 
making the whole effect one of almost 
oriental magnificence. 

Another beautiful, coz\ r comer was built 
in the northeast end of the hall and was 
tastefully decorated with 'college posters and 
sofa pillows in profusion. Over the north 
window was the large American flag pre- 
sented by the class to the University, and 
the outline of incandescent lights that was 
placed around it made it one of the most 
beautiful and conspicuous decorations in the 
hall. Dancing began promptly at 8:30, when 
from behind a beautiful bower of palms 
and gold and blue bunting, the Mattes 
Orchestra, dispersed the sweet strains of 
“Forbidden Land.”. Twenty-four dances 
with liberal encores filled up the. delightful 
program of the evening. During the inter- 
mission ices were served, and throughout 
the entire evening a bowl of delicious punch 
reposed beneath a small canopy . decorated 
in class colors. The punch arid refreshments 
were in charge, of Messrs. Evaristo and 
Jose Batlle, and to them the highest praise 
is due for the smoothness of arrangement 
which contributed, in such a marked degree 
to the success of the evening. 

Many distinguished guests favored the 
class by their presence during the evening. 
The Rev. President, Fathers Crumley and 
Regan were present for a time. * Among 
others present were Mr. T. Dart Walker, 
New York; Mr. and Mrs. John -Schwab, 
Loretto, Pa. ; Misses McNemy and Murphy, 
Elgin, 111.; Misses Lally, Julia and Helen 
Beck, Michigan City ; Miss Virginia Craft, St. 
Louis ; Miss Kelly, Messrs. D. J. O’Connor, 
Robert Lynch and many others from South 
Bend and St. Mary’s. 

The patronesses of the dance were Mrs. 
Dr. Berteling and Mrs. Dr. Stoeckley. , 


Athletic Notes. 


South Bend, - 2 ; Notre Dame, 7. . 

We won the third in a full nine-inning 
game by the score of 7 to 2. 

Perce and Waldorf pitched for the Varsity, 
and between them allowed the Greens five 


hits. Captain McNemy stole home in the 
last of the third, and while sliding into the 
plate was spiked on his left hand and will 
be out of the game for some time. Three 
stitches were taken in the injured hand, and 
it is hoped he will be able to get into the 
game against Illinois on the 26th. The 
Varsity is playing good ball and are 
starting right for the championship. 



Summary. 


South Bend 


RHP A ; E 

Tieman, 1. f. 


0 1 2 0 0 

Anderson, c. f. 

' " 

10 10 0 

Richardson,' c. 


0 0 6 0 0 

Conners, lb. 


1 010 0 0 

Francis, ss. 


0 1 2 4 1.- 

Johnson, 3b. 


0 1 0 2 1 

Trouteman, r. f. 


0 10 1 0 

• Grant, 2b. 


0 0 2 4 2 

Schaffer,- p. 

* 

0 10 0 0 

Telinde, p. 


0 0 0 4 1 

Guhl, p. 


0 0 111 

- 

Totals 

2 52416 6 

Notre Dame 


R H P A E 

Bonan, r. f.-2b. 


0 2 3 0 2 

• McNemv, 2b. 


1 0 2 3 0 

Farabaugh, 1. f. 


0 1 0 0 1 

Murray, c. 


0 0. 8 1 0 

Stopper, lb. 


.1.1 9 1 >0 

Sheehan, e. f. 


2 1 0 0 1 

Brogan, 3b. 


2 12 10 

Shea, ss. 


1 0 3 9 0 

Perce, p.-r. f.' 


1 2 0 0 1 

Waldorf, p. 


0 0 0 0 0 


Totals 7 8 27 15 5 


Double plays — Shea to McNemy to Stopper (2), 
.Francis to Grant to Conners. Base on Balls — Off Perce, 
1; off Waldorf. 2 ; off Schaffer. 1; off Guhl, 2. Struck 
out— By Perce, 1 ; b\- Waldorf, 2: by Schaffer, 1; by 
Telinde, 1; by Guhl, 1. Hit by . pitched ball — Shea. 
Umpire, O’Shaughnessv. 

* 

* * 

.On Saturday, the 14th, the first game, 
which was to have been played in South 
Bend, was called off because of the bad 
weather. 

* „ ■sv 

* * 

South Bend, 5 ; Notre Dame, 7. 

On Easter Monday morning the Varsity 
won again, defeating the Greens by a 
score of 7 to 5. 

The Score R H E 

South Bend — 0 0 0 4 1 0 0=5 4 6 
Notre Dame — 1 0 2 1 0 3 0=7 S 5 
* 

■* * 

South Bend, 7; Notre Dame, 1. 

South Bend won one on Tuesday. In a 
seven-inning game the Greens defeated the 
Varsity by the. score of 7 to 1. 

Captain McNemy is still out of the game 
and Shea stepped on a nail and injured his 



44 6 


NOTRE DAME SCHOLASTIC 


foot and was also out of tlie line-up, so 
the team represented a patched -up affair. 
Birmingham has been compelled to leave 
school because of sickness, which makes 
“Jerry” Sheehan the busy man in centre 
field. “Young” O’Gorman blew up in the 
air in the third inning and Waldorf went 
in the box, Murray going to second. And 
when the bee ended, South Bend had seven 
and we had one. O’Gorman showed all 
kinds of speed and had eveiything — but 
control. 


South Bend 

R 

H 

p 

A 

E 

Fleming, 1. t. 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

Anderson, c. f. 

2 

1 

4 

0 

0 

Francis, 3b. 

1. 

2 

1 

0 

0 

Conners, lb. 

1 

0 

9 

0 

0 

Tieman, c. 

2 

1 

5 

0 

0 

Trouteman, r. f. 

0 

2 

0 

0 

0 

Kuelin, ss. 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

Grant, 2b. 

0 

0 

1 

6 

0 

Ferris, p. 

0 

1 

0 

2 

0 

Moffit, p. 

0 

0 

0 

1 

0 

Totals 

7 

S : 

21 : 

11 

1 

Notre Dame 

R 

H 

p 

A 

E 

Bonan, ss. 

0 

0 

0 

2 

0 

Perce, r. £ 

0 

1 

1 

0 

0 

Farabaugh, 1. f. 

0 

1 

0 

0 

0 

.McCarthy, c. 

0 

1 

5 

1 

0 

Stopper, Hi. 

0 

0 

11 

0 

0 

Sheehan, c. f. 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

Brogan, 3b. 

1 

0 

1 

2 

0 

Waldorf, 2b. -p. 

0 

0 

0 

3 

0 

Murray, 2b. 

0 

0 

0 

2 

0 

0’ Gorman, .p. 

0 

0 

0 

2 

0 

Totals 

1 

3 21 : 

12 

0 


South Bend ; 
t : Fleming; 1: f. 

' Anderson, ct f. ; 
Francis, 3b. • 
Conners, lb. , 
^tf^ieniaii,- Ci- 7 - 
n'rou.teman,; r. £ 


Summary. 


R n r A. E 
0 1 0 0 0 
1-0 0 1 0 
0 0.010 
: 0 1 12 0 0 
: o in o .o 

o o o o o 


Kuelin, s. s. 

0 

0 3 3 

1 

Grant, 2b. 

0 

0 13 

0 

Telinda, p. 

0 

0 0 3 

0 


Totals 1 

3 27 11 

i 

Notre Dame 

R 

ii r a 

E 

Bonan, 2b. 

1 

12 3 

0 

Waldorf, r. f. 

0 

0 10 

0 

Farabaugh, 1. f. 

0 

0 10 

0 

McCarthy, c. 

0 

2 S 1 

0 

Stopper, lb. 

0 

Oil 0 

0 

Brogan, 3b. 

0 

113 

1 

Shea, ss. 

0 

0 12 

1 

Sheehan, c. f. 

0 

0 2 0 

0 

Perce, p. 

1 

10 2 

0 


. Two base hit — Francis. Three base hit — Farabaugh. 
Struck out— 0’Gonnan, 2; by Waldorf, 3; by 
Ferris, 3. Base on balls — Off 0’Gonnan, 2 ; Waldorf, 
2; Moffit, 3. Hit by pitcher — Murray. Wild pitch — 
O’Gorman. Umpire, O’Shaughnessy. 


On Wednesday the South Bend fans saw 
“Willie” Perce from Notre Dame give their 
leaguers as nice a trimming as they will 
get this season. A full nine-inning game, 
and we won by the score of 2 to 1. 

Perce allowed them three scattered hits 
and pitched ; a game good enough to win 
at any time. Shea and Brogan shared 
equally in fielding honors, Brogan cutting 
off a sure hit by making a one-hand stop, 
And Shea doing the same had a much harder 
chance. “Loud” McCarthy was there with . 
the stick: . getting two singles. 


Totals 2 5 2711 2 

Struck out — B 3 t Perce, 7 ; by Telinde, S. Passed balls, 
Tieman. 3 base hit, Tieman. Umpire, O’Shaughnessy. 

* 

* * 

South Bend, S ; Notre Dame, 7. 

South Bend won another on Thursday. 
Up to the eighth inning we had the game 
put a war' apparently safe, the score being 
7 to 3, but in the eighth South Bend got 
on O’Gorman for two hits, and when 
Waldorf went in the bases were full and no 
one out. The Greens got another off him, 
and ended the inning with five runs. 

O’Gorman showed his best form so far 
this year. He has the spit ball working 
well, and in eight innings allowed but five 
hits. His control was good and he is 
rapidly rounding into shape. 

Waldorf did not have a chance to do any- 
thingbut save the game, and it was asking 
a lot from one man. No one out and the 
bases full with the team on the run. 


South Bend 

R 

H P 

A 

E 

Fleming, 1. f. 

0 

0 4 

1 

0 

Anderson, c. f. 

1 

1 3 

0 

0 

Francis, 3b. 

1 

3 1 

2 

0 

Conners, lb. 

2 

1 7 

0 

1 

Tieman, c. 

2 

1 S 

0- 

0 

Trouteman, r f. 

2 

2 1 

0 

0 

■Kuelin, ss. 

0 

0 1 

1 

2 

Johnson, 2b. 

0 

0 1 

0 

0 

Guhl, p. 

0 

0 1 

1 

1 

Nelson, p. 

0 

0 0 

1 

0 

Totals 

S 

S 27 

6 

4 

Notre Dame 

R 

H P 

A 

E 

Bonan, ss. 

2 

1 5 

1 

0 


Brogan, 3b 
McCarthy', c. 
Murray', r. f. 
Farabaugh, 1. € 
Stopper, lb. 
-Keeffe, 2b. 

■ Sheehan, r. f. ’ * 
O’Gorman, p. 
Waldorf; p. 


2 0 0 1 1 

116 0 0 
12 10 0 
1 1 .2 1 1 

0 19 0 0 
0 0 13 0 
0 2 3 0 1 

0 0 0 1 0 

0 0 0 0 0 


Totals " _ . 7 S 27 7 3 

Bases on balls— Off O’Gorman, 1; off Guhl, 2; off 
Waldorf, 1. Wild pitch— Waldorf. Two - base, hits — 
F rancis, Conners. . Struck out— By O’Gorman, 4 ; by 
■ Waldorf, !; by Guhl, 4; by Nelson, 3. Hit by pitcher— 
Keeffe, Murray. ^Umpire— H’Shaughnessy. . 7 


NOTRE DAME SCHOLASTIC. 


447 

LAW DEPARTMENT. . 


IN RE BROWN’S ESTATE. 

Recently in the Moot Court the ease 
founded on the appended statement of facts 
came up for trial. Judge Andrew Anderson 
of South Bend presided, with Edward J. 
Schwab and Terence B. Cosgrove arguing for 
the appellant, and Gallitzen A. Farabaugh 
and Clayton C. Golden sustaining the 
appellee. 

Statement of Facts. 

John Brown, in the year 1890, made a 
will by which he gave all his estate, both 
real and personal, to three trustees. He 
• directed that the trustees should -pay to 
his wife, Jane, all the net incomes, rent’s 
issues and propfits of his estate, of whatever 
nature the same might be, for and during 
the period of her life. The testator died 
October first in the same year that he made 
the will, and his wife survived him ten 
years, dying December first, 1900. The 
will was duly probated. The trustees took 
possession of "and managed his entire estate 
during the life of his wife, Jane Brown. It 
was further provided in the will that on 
the death of the wife the trustees were 
to divide the estate into five equal parts, 
giving one-fifth to each of the three sons, 
and one-fifth to each of the two daughters. 
At the time of the death of Mr. Brown he 
owned fifty'- thousand dollars of the capital 
stock of the Eagle Manufacturing Company, 
which was worth par. The business of that 
corporation was extremely profitable, and 
for five years after the death of Mr. Brown - 
the trustees received annually on November 
first, as dividends, an amount of money 
equal to ten per cent, of the face value of 
the stock. A large surplus accumulated. 

Five years after" the death of Mr. Brown 
the corporation made a stock . dividend, 
giving to each stockholder an amount of 
stock equal to ten per cent, of the original 
amount, thereby' doubling the stock of the 
company-, making the stock $100,000.00, on 
-all of which an annual dividend of Ten per 
cent, was paid- to the trustees on November 
first each year except November first, 1900. 
On the. first' day of October, 1900, the Eagle 
Manufacturing Company . made „ another 
stock; dividend of ten per : cent,, the effect 
of which was to give to these trustees 


$100,000.00 more of the capital stock of 
the corporation, making $200,000.00 their 
total of such stock, on which no dividend 
had been declared. During the life of Mrs. 
Brown the trustees had paid her only what 
she required for her .actual necessaries, the 
total amount of payunents to her being 
$500.00 each year. On the death of Mrs. 
Brown an administrator was appointed 
who, of course, was entitled to all of her 
estate, and he demanded of the trustees 
that they should assign to him all of the 
stock dividends that had been made, and 
account for all cash dividends made either 
on the original stock or on the stock issued 
as dividends. The trustees and four of the 
legatees of the state claim that the stock 
dividends were not income. On the other 
hand, the administrator of Mrs. Brown’s 
estate claims that the stock dividends 
represented the profits, and were really a 
part of the income of the estate, and that 
Mrs. Brown was entitled to all those 
stock dividends and all cash dividends paid 
thereon, and he brought suit against the 
trustees to compel them to transfer to him 
all of the stock issues as dividends, and to 
pay and account to him as administrator 
for all cash dividends that the trustees had 
received either on the original stock or on 
the stock that had been issued as dividends. 

OPINION. 

After going into the question of stock 
dividends at some length in his opinion 
Judge Anderson decided that the profits in 
this case must be regarded as forming part 
of the corpus of the estate rather than 
income, and to this end he awarded the 
judgment to the trustees, and assessed the 

costs against the executors of Mrs. Brown. 

• „ $ 

* 

* *■ 

At a recent meeting of the Law Debating 
Society , the following officers were elected. 
President and Moderator, Dean Hovnes; 
1st Vice-President, C. C. Golden; 2d Vice- 
Presidentf G. A. Farabaugh ; Corresponding 
Secretary, A. B. Oberst ; Recording Secretary, 

S. F. Riordan; Treasurer, T. B. Cosgrove; 
Critic, M. J. Brown; Sergeant -at -Arms,. 

T. F. Healv. 


44S 


NOTRE DAME SCHOLASTIC. 


Personal • 


— The Very Rev. Father Frahcais, Superior- 
General, C. S. C., and Dr: Morrissey, after a 
week’s visit at Holy Cross College, Washing- 
ton, left for New Orleans. They' will visit the 
colleges of the Congregation of the Holy' 
Cross in New Orleans, Texas, Oregon and 
Wisconsin, and expect to reach Notre Dame 
by midsummer. 

— We take exceptional pleasure in noticing 
the appointment of Mr. John Neeson, C. E., 
’03, to the position of Ass’t. Superintendent 
of Bridges in Philadelphia and county. 
There were many' other competitors in the 
field, and the fact that John received the 
highest average in the examination for the 
office is an honor to Notre Dame and a 
great credit to the y'oung alumnus himself. 

• — Mike Powers, Notre Dame's old catcher, 
who is receiving the benders for the Phila- 
delphia nine, paid a visit to Father Bums 
and students at Holy Cross College, Wash- 
ington on Easter Sunday. He presented the 
glove .he used in last year’s champion series 
(Philadelphia vs. New York) to Mr. Farley 
who intends to send it to Notre Dame to 
grace the walls of the trophy' room in the 
Gym. Mike is also a journalist, using his 
spare time to prepare short articles for. the 
Philadelphia papers. 


Local Items. 


— Keep off the grass. 

— Is. Sorin to have a baseball team ? If 
so they should get busy. 

— Found. — A ring and some moneys Apply 
to Brother Alphonsus, C. S. C., Brownson 
Hall. 

— Found. — A- gold class pin marked C. L. 

•, 95 D. A., N. D. U. Call on William Byrne, 
St. Edward’s Hall. 

-- —The Rev. John T. O’Connell, pastor of' 
the Church of St. Francis De Sales, Toledo, 
Ohio, will deliver' the Baccalaureate sermon 
June 10. Father O’Connell is a man, of fine 
culture and enjoys. national reputation as 
a preacher. 

—The Debate with . Iowa University next 
Friday is an important event in the college 
year. , Iowa has a strong team and comes 
Jo us strengthened with a brilliant record in 
; debating, but unless, the Scholastic misses 
its guess they will be astonished at the 
quality of the . men they will meet on the 
field at Notre Dame. The common impres- 
- sion here seems to be that our first debating 

- team? would be a match -for anything that 
treads the boards in the country. . 

- —Navigation was opened last Wednesday 


night when the boat club got together at 
the Oliver and strengthened itself by a good 
feed for the activities of the present spring. 
The rowing commenced - next- morning, and 
now the blue is split, with shouts of “ stroke ! 
stroke!” at early dawn. The indications 
are that the crews this year will be a little 
heavier than hitherto, but in spite of this 
fact they will probably establish new 
records. The interest they show in the 
work assures this. 

— The Philopatrians enjoyed an excellent 
spread in the new banquet hall at the Oliver 
last Thursday at 1 p. m. The menu was 
varied and appetizing, and the Philopatrians 
on their part displayed considerable enthu- 
siasm in the proceedings. After the banquet, 
brief, very brief, addresses were made by 
Messrs. Jay Qualey, George Devitt and 
Wilbur Rice. The President of the University 
closed the pleasant event by some words 
of compliment and of serious advice to the 
members of the society. 

— This year marks the' golden jubilee of 
the entrance of Archbishop Riordan of San 
Francisco into Notre Dame as a student. 
In a letter received at the University the 
Archbishop hoped to visit Notre Dame by 
way' of a jubilee celebration, and would 
unquestionably^ have done so were he not 
halted in Chicago by news of the terrible 
calamity' that came upon San Francisco. 
The Scholastic assures His Grace of the 
cordial sympathy' of all at Notre Dame 
in the grief that has come to him. 

— At one of the late meetings of the 
Brownson Literary and Debating Society, 
an interesting preliminary' debate was held 
to choose two teams to represent the society 
in its debates with the St. Joseph Society. 
There were thirteen who contested, of whom 
eight were selected to compose the teams. 
The decision of the judges, Professors 
Deahey, Schwab and Funk, resulted as 
follows: A. Blum and J. Young tied for 
first place ; G. Sprenger and r C. Rowlands 
tied for 2d ; E. Clear, 3d ; D. McDonald, 4th ; 
P. Depew and J. Condon, tied for 5th place. 

— Brownson Hall has again given evidence 
of the prevailing congenial spirit of its 
members. This time it was in the nature 
of a social gathering in the reading-room 
Easter night. The Brownson Hall faculty 
and students w ; ere present and Mr. Donovan 
presided. The program was both interesting 
and instructive, the readings of. Messrs. 
Clear, Williams and. Blum surpassing expec- 
tations. Brothers Hugh, Alphonsus and 
Aiden very ably upheld the faculty part of 
the program. Messrs. Maguire, Gushurst, 
Rowlands, McDonald, Springer and Depew 
contributed their , share of wit and humor, 
which helped to. make the evening a very - 
pleasant one.