Skip to main content

Full text of "A glossary of terms used in Grecian, Roman, Italian and Gothic architecture [by J.H. Parker]. 2 ..."

See other formats


Google 



This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 

to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 

to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 

are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other maiginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 

publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing tliis resource, we liave taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 
We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain fivm automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attributionTht GoogXt "watermark" you see on each file is essential for in forming people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liabili^ can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 

at |http: //books .google .com/I 





Cg.c , <j, 




<X --. . c. 




<?:;« < c 


c 


<r!c<' > c 




<? V' ; c c< 




<£ 


"j<f- 1 <f 






" « . f <? 






a , ( (. 


JsL. 






-^^f^^^^^^fe^ 






£m^M}\ ft ■BJBb^^^K^ 






I'I'iO ci-,5^ 




< 


. «r ct c 




V < I 


■<1 «:<sv CfC 






c cc :« 






fl^^^^^^Hc 



'" 








< c 

1 i i 


■< ' ' 








< < ■ 


3 


< 


' < 


■i< f t c,«. ^Tc 




' c 


' c 


'" C'v^c <r:<-' 


■ <<-<' ■ . 


' c 




'< <JV 


V C - 


4 






> ( i 










. ? ,"^^^^r, 




^'<s«c<.c; 


1 '*• 








.<'■ «■ ■, 


< 

( 


^>^^ 

-'^'^^l: 









r 




. • • • 



19469. 



► 



IliO A..S 




GLOSSARY OF TERMS 



USED IN 



GRECIAN, ROMAN, ITALIAN, 



AND 



(3oti)it ^xtl)ittttuxt. 



THE FIFTH EDITION, ENLARGED. 
EXEMPLIFIED BY SEVENTEEN HUNDRED WOODCUTS, 



VOL. n. PLATES. PAET I. 



OXFOKD, 
JOHN HENRY PARKER; 

DATID B00I7E, FLEET STREET, LONDON. 

M DCCC L. 



M mf ■1.1.. ^. ^, , .^ _ 



oxfo&D : 

PRINTED BT I. SBJUMPTON. 




ABACUS. Gheciaw-Dosic, Eomak-Dobio 

TtIBCAl(^.^Ba01AIT-IOKtO, CoBINTHIAir, COMPOBITE 

'EoYPtUkX. Soipseion. Temple of Luxor. DeDdorah 
KoBUAlT. Byton^ Warwickaliire. Norwich cathedral. 
Great Guild, Bfeicoln 
LincolE cathedral (Hemigiua), A.D. 1100; Ibid. 
(Aleiander), A.D. 1140. Jewa' house, LidcoId, 
1150. New Komney, Kent, c. 1180 
The vest liant of Linroln catlifdrsl is extrcmel; valmblr for thi 
invcitigfllion of the bUtar; of the Normin atyle in EngUnd : Ihi 
iDMrtion of the rich dODrways of bishop Alexander in the i>l0in worl 
or biihop KemigiuB ennblet us to coiilrosl and compace earl^ and liti 



Norn 



^ork ir 



iclory IT 



£A.SLy English. Liocolu cathedral, choir, A.D. 1200. 
S. Saviour's, Southwark, c. 1250. Oxford cathedral, 
chapter-houBc, c. 1250. Wells cathedral, A.l). 1264. 

B; ui error ot the press the words Early Enqlish sre misplaced, 
they should obviouily be placed be/on the (itst two examples of that 
iljle, Lincoln and Soathwark, instead ofaller them. 

Eablt Fhench. Eu, Normandy 

Decobated. Choir of Mertou college chapel, Oiford, 
A.D. 1277 ...... 

8. Alban'8 abbey, c. 1320. York catbedraf, c. 1330. 
Caatle Aahby, Northamptonshire, c. 1360 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



ABACUS. 

Pebpskdicular. Crojdon, Surrey, c. 1450. Heniy 
Vllth's chapel, Westminster, A.D. 1503 . 

ACANTHUS 

ACEOTEEIA 

ALMEBY, or AM6EY, or LOGEEB. Cliapel in Chepstow 
castle. Bramshot, Hampshire • • 

AHBBT. Foulis, Perthshire, Scotland • 

The Oothic arcbitectnre of Scotland dif^ so mnch from that 
of England, and has at present been so little inTestigated, that it is 
hardly safe to assign a date to any particular work by comparison. 
The present rich and beautiful specimen may, howcTer, be safely as- 
•igned to the beginning of the sixteenth century ; its character is much 
more like the French Flamboyant than the English Perpendicular, 
though partaking in some degree of both. 

Biishden, Northamptonshire . • • . 

This occurs in good Decorated work of about the middle of the 
fourteenth century; it is chiefly remarkable for having retained the 
wooden door, and having within the small niche for the cruets of 
the altar. 

Lincoln cathedral • • • • • 

From one of the chapels in the south transept, part of the original 
work, and therefore according to the history belonging to the time of 
S. Hugh, or about A.D. 1200, a Tery early date for such pore and good 
Early English work ; but the history of the church is perfectly clear 
and well authenticated, and it only proves that the progress of art at 
that period was more rapid than has been commonly supposed, and 
that it advanced more rapidly in some places than in others. It is not 
luual to find such good work quite so early. 

Drayton, Berkshire ..... 

This example retains its old oak doors with the original ironwork ; 
these are very rarely met with, but either part of the hinges, or traces 
of them, generally remain, and the rabbet, or rebate, in the stone for 
reoeiving the doors, often serves to distinguish the Ambry from any 
other kind of recess in the wall. In the example from Bramshot both 
the rabbet and the hooks of the hinges are very distinctly shewn. 

AXjTAB ••••••• 

An altar complete with its hangings, distinguished as the reredos, 
(upper frontal, or retrofrontal) curtains, and lower frontal, (or antepen- 
dium,) with the fringed frontlet on its upper border. The host is sus- 
pended above, and a prayer-stool is placed in front This engpraving is 
a lac-simile from an illumination in a manuscript of Lydgate's life of 
S. Edmund, in the British Museum, Harl., 2278. The object of giving 
this specimen is to shew the manner in which the plain stone altars 
were ornamented (or vetted) at the time they were erected. 



PAGE 

6 
6 

10 



PLATm 



8 



292 



13 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



8 



AIiTAB. 

Arundel, Sussex, tlie high altar 

Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire, in the vestry on the north 
side of the chancel. Shotteswell, Warwickshire, in 
a small chapel at the east end of the north aisle 

Broughton castle, Oxfordshire, in the chapel, which is 

part of the work of the fourteenth century • 
Enstone, Oxfordshire, circa 1420 

At the east end of the Math aisle, with its reredos ; and nichea in 
the jamhs of the window. 

Wenlock priory, Shropshire, c. 1450 . 

This chantiy altar stands in the recess of a window in a room said 
to have been the abbot's chamber : in which case this must have been 
his private oratory ; the stone desk which stands upon the altar does not 
belong to it, bat is yery elegant work of the thirteenth century. 

Super-altare, or portable altar of oriental jasper, orna- 
mented with nielli . . • . . 
See also RooDLorr, Fulgoat, Plate 170. 

AMBO. B. Clement's church, Bome, the Oospel ambo, and 

the Epistle unbo ..... 

ANCONES, or CONSOLES . . . . 

Palace of Diocletian • • • • • 

This specimen shews the earliest known instance of the use of the 
zigzag;, or chevron ornament, in a similar manner to what afterwards 
became so common in Norman work. 

ANDIEON. Godington, Kent . . . . 
ANNTJLET 

APSE. NoBKAK. Dalmeny, Linlithgowshire, Scotland, c. 
1150 ...... 

A good and pure specimen of rich Norman work. Even at this early 
period the architecture of Scotland seems to have been more akin to that 
of France than to that of England. The apse was never a common 
featore in England, and it would be difficult to find so good a specimen 
as this remaining in so perfect a state. 

Bomsey, Hants, c. 1180 • . « . 

This apse is at the east end of the south aisle of the chancel ; and 
there is another to the north aisle, but the chancel is square ended. 
The style la laU Norman. 



PAOS 

15 



PLATS 



16 



17 



19 



28 
25 
142 



26 

ib. 
27 



ib. 



DSSCBIFTIYE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTBATI0N8. 



▲P8E. 

Eablt English. Tidmarsh, Berkshire, c. 1250 ; exterior 
and interior ...... 

This apse has been lately restored, together with the rest of the chnrch, 
with taste and liberality, much to the credit of the rector, the Rev. T. 
Wintle, and R. Hopkins, Esq., at whose joint expense the restoration 
was effected. The apse was perfect except the yault, of which the 
yaulting • shafts and springing of the ribs only remained, sufficient 
however to indicate what the form of the vault had been, although its 
place had been supplied by a flat plaster ceiling and some hideous 
modem monuments. No liberty has been taken in the restoration, ex- 
cept the introduction of the cross on the point, which might perhaps as 
well have been omitted, as there was no authority for it. The roof could 
hardly have been different, as the vaulting- shafU and the springing of 
the ribs are original. This example of a semi-octagonal apse in the 
Early English style to a small village church is believed to be almost 
unique in this country. 

ABABESQUi; from the Alhambra . 

English Arabesque . • . • . 

ABABIAN ABCHITECTUBB, caUed also MOOEISH, 
and MOHAMMEDAN. Doorway, Taragona, Spain 

Window, Giralda tower, Seville 

Entrance to the mosque of Cordova, Spain. Three 
capitals from the palace of Alhambra 

ABCADE NoBiCAN. S. Botolph's, Colchester, c. 1120. 
S. Augustine's, Canterbury, 1150 (or 1130). Christ 
Church cathedra], Oxford, east end, exterior, c. 1180. 

S. Frideswide's church, Oxford, now the cathedral, was consecrated 
in 1180, (see Ingpram's Memorials of Oxford,) and the greater part of 
the present building must have been completed about that time. 

8. John's, Devizes, c. 1160 

S. Peter's, Northampton, c. 1140 

S. Bartholomew's, Smithfield, London, c. 1160 

The choir of S. Bartholomew's is early Norman work, but the tower 
from which this is taken is late ; the upper part of the tower and the 
nave are destroyed. 

Canterbury cathedral, c. 1120, or more exactly, A.D. 
1110 ....... 

This it part of the work of Priors Emnlf and Conrad, under Arch- 



PAOX 



rukSM 



81 
ib. 

32 
33 



109 



6 



ib. 
7 
7 



ib. 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUBT&ATION0. 



ABCADE. 

bishop Anselm : tee Willis'i History of Canterbnry Cathedral, p. 17. 
Ernulf also built parts of Rochester and Peterborough. 

Font, Goleshill, Warwicksliire, c. 1150 
TsAirsinoir. Stoneleigh, Warwickshire, c. 1190 

This is a g^ood specimen of the gradual transition from the Norman to 
the Early English style, having all the details of Norman character, 
though late, and the arches acutely pointed. The date may probably be 
earlier than that here assigned to it; the transition began about 1170 in 
England, and a few years earlier in France. 

Canterbury cathedral ..... 

Eably Ekolibh. Haddenham, Bucks, 1280 
Stone, Kent, for 1270 read 1240 
Lincoln cathedral, south aisle of choir, and south tran- 
sept, c. 1200 .••••. 

Parts of the ori^al work, which history assigns to Bishop Hugh, who 
died in 1200^ otherwise the character of the work would lead us to sup- 
pose it of later date. The arcade is double in both these examples^ which 
are part of tbe aame range ; it is formed by placing a row of trefoil 
arches over another series of plain arches, both supported by shafts. 
The vaulting-shafts are carried up on the face of this outer plane, so 
that in the angle of the lower example three distinct shafts may be 
seen, one behind the other. 

Entrance to chapter-house from cloisters 
Decorated. Lichfield cathedral, A.D. 1320 
Norwich cathedral, (for 1340 read c. 1320) 

ABCH. Twentj-four diagrams of the forms of arches 

Three specimens of the masonry of arches in France, at 

Autun, Castle Langeais, and Le Mans 
■ three diagrams shewing the construction 

BoHAN. Theatre, Lillebonne, Normandy 

This example shews the usual construction of Roman walls, with 
layers of tiles at regular intervals. 

Part of the Boman wall at Colchester, Essex • 

The Newport gate, Lincoln . • • . 

This is also an example of Roman ashlar work, without the layers of 
tiles which commonly distinguish it. Some suppose that the facing of 
the work is gone. 



r.voB 



rULTS 



8 
ib. 



85 



9 
ib. 

10 



163 



11 
ib. 



89 

44 
45 



12 



ib. 
ib. 



6 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



ARCH. 

(Supposed) Saxoit. Brig8tock,Nortliamptonsbire. Bamaok 
Northamptonshire. Britford, near Salisburj 

Early Normait. Chapel in the White tower, London 
A.D. 1081 ..... 

Built by Gandulpb, bisbop of Rocbester, Terj soon after the Con 
. qaest ; it was tbe royal residence for a considerable period. 

West end of Lincoln cathedral, c. 1090 

This arcbed recess clearly belongs to tbe original work of Remigius, 
bat it is probable that some of tbe enriched capitals may have been 
inserted at a sabseqatnt time. 

Great Malyem, Worcestershire, c. 1100 

The Tery masslTe and simple character of this work seems to indicate 
a date nearly as early as the two preceding, but the arch being recessed 
ia generally a somewhat later feature. 

Chancel-arch, Headington, Oxfordshire, c. 1150 
Buina of S. Clement's, Worcester, c. 1060 

The character of this work is early Norman, but a gold coin of Edward 
tbe Confessor was found in the wall immediately above the arches, and 
this evidence, coupled with its very massive character, may perhaps fairly 
JustiQr its being assigned to tbe time of that king. There are some re- 
mains of the original work of the monastic buildings at Westminster, 
now partly concealed in the cellars of tbe houses of the prebendaries, 
which agree in character with this work. 

Transition from Norhak. Galilee, Durham cathedral. 

The lightness of the work here agrees with the general observation, 
that the Norman style gradually lost its massive character as it ap- 
proached its close ; this is, however, not an invariable rule, as we some- 
times find very late Norman work still retaining its massive proportions, 
as at Islip and Appleton ...... 

Fountain's abbey, Yorkshire, c. 1180 . 

This may probably be of earlier date ; the character of the work is 
pure Norman, and not late, except that the arch is pointed. 

Earlt Evolish. Lady Chapel, Oxford cathedral, c. 
1220 



rAOB 



rz.4Ta 



18 



14 



ib. 



ib. 



15 

ib. 



16 



147 
ib. 



17 



SB8CRIPTITS INSBX OP THK ILLUSTSATIONS. 7 


A A ■" 1. . -- > ABCH. 


FMl 


fUTB 


M%w|MKg^ 8. Marr le Wig- 






^^nvHRKjBvf ford, Lincolo, C. 






^BlHTjKA^^r^ 1200 . 





17 




ThU is oTidently tn 








i ImiUtion of the cithednl. 








but prolablj rtther l.ter. 








Nave, Lincoln ca- 
'' thedral, o. 1220 


_ 


ib. 






B 


Another example of ■ 










pltin Earl; Engliib arch 








n B,: 


from Barton Stace;, Wilt- 








m~' 


ihircishere added to abew 










■ Tery common type in 
eoontry ehurcbea. 
Dkoohated. Chip- 
^ ping Warden, 








%^^^^:^i^^ Northampton - 








[^^-Til-l^*^ flbire, c. 1350. 






^==^^^ _^^ ^=^^^=^ Howden, Tork- 






u,b^ -« «-,..!**.-. shire, c. 1350 . 





18 


Dorcbester, OzfordBbire, circa 1300 . 


— 


19 


FEKP£imioni.A.B, with shafts, nare of S. Morj's, Oxford, 






c. 1488. FaneUed, Sherborne, Dorsetshire, A.D. 1490 


— 


20 


Minster LoveU, Oifordsbire, c. 1430 . 





ib. 


TbttK It the tawei-inhci in ths centre of Lhe church ; the MWng*- 






mcDt ii Tcrjr peculiar, ind very el^aut, uid ii belicTed to be unique. 






aCH-BUTTEESS. Hartlepool, Durham. (See Buttkibs.) 


46 


— 


8TBAGAL 


49 


— 


ALISTEARIA. (See Loophole, or Oiliet) . 


62 


— 


ALL-FLOWEB 


53 


— 


Stringcourse, Kiddington, Oion, c. 1360. Tabernacle, 






Exeter cathedral, A.D. 1290. Doorway, Bloxham, 






Oxon, c. 1280. Doorway, Chipping-Norton, Oxon, 












Window, Gloucester cathedral, A.D. 1320. Spire, 






Salisbury cathedral, two examples, c. 1300. Window- 






jamb, Oxford cathedral, c. 1320 


— 


21 


The object of thi> pUte ii to ihew the Tirione modet in wbtch thi* 













8 



DE8CRIFTIVB INDEX OV THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



BALL-TLOWBB. 

early put of the fourteenth century. The profusion with which it was 
used in some parts of England, especially in Herefordshire and Glouces- 
tershire, is quite extraordinary, and although the ornament was used 
occasionally Jn France at an earlier period, this profuse use of it is be- 
liered to be quite peculiar to England. 

BALIJSTEB. Tewkesbury, and S. Alban'fl 

BAND OF QTTATBEFOiLB. Cranford S. John's, Northants . 
^*— On shafts. S. Peter's, Northampton. Lincoln 
cathedral. Chapter-house, Oxford . 
Whitby abbey ...... 

BABGE-BOABD. Shrewsbury abbey 

BABTIZAN. Walmgate, York . . . . 

BASE. OBECIAN akd BOMAN. Tuboak. Trajan's column, 
at Bome.— BoMAK Dome. Colonnade of S. Peter's, 
at Borne. — Iokio. Aqueduct of Adrian, and Erech- 
theum, at Athens. — CoBnrTHiAK. Temple of Jupiter 
Stator, at Bome. Choragic monument of Lysicrates, 
at Athen8.^-Co]CP08iTE. — ^Attio 

Ncbmak. Crypt of S. Peter's, Oxford, c 1140 . 

Bochester cathedral, c. 1120 . . • . 

The base of one of the pien of the naTC, which are of enormous size ; 
the form is here giTcn accurately, but it was impossible to preeenre any 
Male of proportion as to the size of the different objects represented. It 
was part of the work of Emulf. 

8. Peter's church, Northampton, c. 1140 

The age of this church is much disputed, and it is not easy to decide 
the point ; the work is Tery rich, and its general character, with the 
banded shafts, appears late, but it is peculiar, and banded shafts in 
themselTCS are no proof of late date ; they occur in foreign work at a 
much earlier date. It agrees in many details with the work of Bishop 
Alexander at Lincoln. 

Two from the nave of Norwich cathedral, c. 1100 
Bomsey abbey, c. 1180 
Hadiscoe, Norfolk 

Eablt English. Great Haseley, Oxfordshire, c. 1200 
S. Alban's abbey, c. 1250 

Canterbury cathedral, A.D. 1178 

The character of this base would appear much later, but the history 



PAOS 



PL4TI 



54 
55 

55 
56 

59 

ib. 



22 
23 
ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



60 
61 



24 
ib. 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OP THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



BASE. 

of the churcb makes it clear that the portion from which this is taken 
was huilt in 1 1 78, and there is no appearance of the bases having been 
renewed at any subsequent time. 

Chapter-house, Lincobi, c. 1200 (or rather 1220) 

This is usually attributed to S. Hugh, but is in all probability later, 
its mouldings shew that it was finished after the nave. 

Temple church, London, A.D. 1240 
S. Mary's abbey, York, c. 1250 

Stanton Harcourt, Oxfordshire, and Hereford cathedral 
on window shafts .... 

Decorated. Merton college chapel, Oxford, tower-arch 
A.D. 1331 ..... 

This chapel was left unfinished by Walter de Merton, and continued 
gradually by the college for a long series of years as shewn by the 
bursar's accounts ; the eastern part was clearly the work of the founder, 
the date of the tower-arches is recorded in the accounts. 

Beverley minster, shaft of arcade in south aisle, c. 
1350. Welboume, Lincolnshire, c. 1350. Dorches- 
ter, Oxfordshire, c. 1300 and 1340 . 

The eastern part of Dorchester church is evidently of two or three 
difi^nt dates, the progress of the work was probably slow. 

Stanton S. John's, Oxon. Dorchester, Oxon 

Perpendicular. Lavenham, Suffolk, c. 1460. S.George's 
chapel, Windsor, c. 1480. S. Mary's, Oxford, nave 
A.D. 1488. Croydon, Surrey, c. 1450^ 

Ewelme, Oxon, A.D. 1435 

Double-base ..... 

BASE- ORNAMENTS, or FOOT- ORNAMENTS. Crypt 
York cathedral, c. 1160. Stockbury, Kent, c. 1220 
S. Cross, Winchester, (two examples) c. 1180. Canter- 
bury cathedral, c. 1180. Salisbury cathedral, c. 1230 

BASE OF A WALL, or BASEMENT-MOULDINGS 
BATTER. Tower of Oxford castle . 
BATTLEMENT. S. Mary's, Beverley 

Walls of York % , . . . 

BAY, or COMPARTI^IENT. Transept, Winchester cathedral 
circa 1090 ..... 



PAOB 



PLAtl 



24 



ib. 
ib. 



61 



25 



ib. 



62 



26 



ib. 
63 



27 



64 

66 
67 
68 



28 



10 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OP THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



BAT. 


PAOl 


FLATB 


Becket*8 crown, Canterbury cathedral, 1182 


aa^^ 


28 


Beverley minRter, c. 1250, or 1220 


» 


29 


From the resemblance in the character of this work to that of Lincoli 


1 




it it probably not later than 1220. 






Thornton abbey, Lincolnshire, ruins of the chapter-house 


» 




c. 1282 ..... 


^^^m 


30 


There is evidence that this chapter-house was built about this date. 






Fothcringhay church, Northamptonshire, A.D. 1440 


» 


31 


The contract for this church is dated in 1435, but the work was noi 


t 




completed for several years; this plate shews the usual arrangemen 


i 




of a church, having aisles and a clerestory, but no triforium. 






BAY-WINDOW. Compton Winyate, Warwickshire 


70 


— 


BELL OF ▲ Capital .... 


73 


— 


BELL -GABLE and BELL -COT. Nokman. Littleton 






Hampshire, c. 1100. Northborough, Northampton- 






shire, c. 1150 .... 




32 


Eably English. Manton, and Little Casterton, Rutland 






c. 1200 ..... 




ib. 


Little Coxwcll, Berkshire, c. 1200. Skelton, Yorkshire 






c. 1220 ; this is oyer the chancel-arch. Chapel of the 






hospital of S. Mary, Glastonbury, c. 1250. Shiptoi 






OUiffe, Gloucesterrriiire, c. 1260 


— 


33 


Leigh Delamere, Wilts, c. 1250 




— 


34 


Decorated. Cleeve abbey, Somerset, c. 1320 




— 


ib. 


Harescomb, Gloucestershire 




74 


— 


Pebfexdiculab. Corston, Wilts, c. 1420. 






ib. 


Idbury, Oxfordshire, c. 1450 




— 


ib. 


BENCH-TABLE. Fothcringhay . 




75 


— 


BUJiET. Binham priory, Norfolk . 




ib. 


— 


BLOCKING-COURSE .... 




76 


— 


BOAST. Boasted capital, Canterbury cathedral crypt 


77 


— 


BOSSES. NoBMAN. Iffley, Oxfordshire, c. 1150. . 


— 


35 


Kilpeck, Herefordshire, c. 1150 


— 


ib. 


Elkstone, Gloucestershire . . . . 


78 


— 


Cathedral of Notre Dame, Paris . 


< 


ib. 


— 



DBSCHIPTtVB INDEX OF THE ILLUBTRATIONB. 
BOSSES. 

Baalt Eholish. Chapter-home, Oxford, c. 1250. War- 
mington, Northamptonshire, c. 1275 . 

Tboe illiutratioiii itiew the foliage ueiullf met mth in Euljr Engliih 
work ; the fint alao ihevi k ^nn of the bleued Virion and CbUd, of 
the ume elegance of attitude and dnpei; M genenll; characUnie thii 
atjle. 

Decobated. S. Albau's abbey, Herts. 

Trinity church, Edinburgh .... 

Mebose abbey, c. 1350 ..... 

A good ipecimm of Decorated fbliagej the whole of the voik at 
Melnne ii remarkablf good, and (Tom the excellence at the stone ii u 
aharp and perfect aa the da; it «*a cut, atill ahewing in many caae* 
the nurlu of the chiaeL 
PEfipEMi>icDi.AS. CloistetB, Oxford cathedral, circa 1450 

Shewi a head-dreu of a laahion peculiar to the fifteenth eenturj, 
which, with the atyle of the mculdingi, doe* not agree with the tradition 
that IheM cl<u>len were buill by Lady Eliiabeth de Montaeute in the 
fourteenth century. The style ii decidedly Perpendicular, but the Mon- 
taeute umi being foond there may ahew that thej were partly built with 
her money. 

Wellii^boTough, Northamptoneliire 

Thia ia from the punted wooden roof of a chapel of rather late Perpen- 
dicular date. 

Cloisters, Magdalen college, Oxftird, A.D. U80, (two ex- 
amples) 
Flaubotaht. Notre 
dame la ricbe. Tours. 
Tbi* ia here intro- 
duced aa an excellent 
example of Flamboyant 

BOWTELL. Fother. 
inghay, Nottbants . 
BRACE. Roofofnorth aisle, Dorchester, Oxon 
BRACKET. S. Stephen's cbapel, Westminster 

See CORBBL, platea 51 to 61. 
BRASSES. Sir Rt^r de Trumpington, 1289, Trumpington 
church, Cambridgeshire .... 

Sir John de Creke, 1325, Westley Waterless 




12 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



BRASSEa PAGB 

Henry Denton, chaplain of ChUston, Higham Ferrars, 
Northamptonshire . . . . • 86 

BREAST-SUMMER. House, Newgate, York . 91 

BRICK. Little Wenham hall, c. 1260 , . .94 

Two specimens of moulded bricks .95 

Specimens shewing the Flemish bond and English bond 96 

BROACH. Horsley church, Derbyshire . .97 

See also Spire. 

BUTTRESS. Norman. Fountain s abbey, Yorkshire, c. 1 1 70. 
S. Mary's, Leicester, c. 1150 . 
Round buttress, S. Remi, Rhcims . . .98 

Transition. Glastonbury abbey, c. 1180. 
Monk's Horton priory, Kent, c. 1190 

Early English. Choir, Lincoln cathedral, c. 1190 

The grounds on which this early date is assigned have been already 
mentioned : this is a very fine example of pure Early English work, and 
early in the style, though the date is earlier than it is usual to find such 
work. It exhibits part of the north aisle and clerestory of the choir, 
and part of the transept. The buttresses are of two kinds, small ones 
between the windows and large ones which divide the bays. I'he lesser 
ones have a chamfer for the greater part of their length, and which is 
finished with a capital, but in the large ones the chamfer is very wide 
and occupies nearly the whole depth of the buttress, and is also finished 
with a capitaL The face of the buttress is by this considerably nar- 
rowed, it is deeply moulded and has in the centre a banded shaft with 
capital and base, and at each angle is placed a detached shaft similar 
to the centre one, but more slender. The capitals of these three shafts 
combine with that of the chamfer, thus carrying out the same idea as 
in the pillars of the choir where the capitals of the small shafts are 
combined with that of the centre pillars, as shewn in plate 50. The 
pediment or capping of the buttress is plain and very massive, to sup- 
port the arch or flying buttress which connects it with the clerestory. 

Higham Ferrars,Northamptonshire,c. 1 220 
'the chamfer is finished in a simple and elegant 
manner by a trefoiL 

Warmington, Northamptonshire, c. 1260. 

Pottem, Wilts, c. 1250 

South wellminster,Nottinghamshire,c. 1210 
This is chamfered, and ii finished with a pediment 
or gablet 

Salisbury cathedral, c. 1250, or 1230 ib. 



PLATl 




37 

ib. 
ib. 

38 



39 



ib. 
ib. 



TarmWMaoB uf rhamlvr of 
baunaa, Highaai Pvrrus. 



DESCRIPTIVB INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



i;3 



BUTTRESS. 

Decorated. Dorchester, Oxfordshire, c. 1300. Brington, 
Northamptonshire, c. 1320. Oxford cathedral, c. 1330 
Church Brampton, Northamptonshire, c. 1350 . 

A diagonal buttress. 

S. Mary Magdalene, Oxford, A.D. 1337. Gadsby, Leices- 
tershire, c. 1350 .... 

Orton-on-the-Hill, Leicestershire 

Perpendicular. Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, c 
1450. Gloucester cathedral, south porch, c. 1430. S 
Laurence, Evesham, c. 1450. Divinity School, Oxford 
c. 1490 ..... 

Fotheringhay, Northamptonshire, c. 1440 
FLYING BUTTRESS. S.Denis, near Paris, c. 1240 

This example shews the double flying buttress, which is the usual 
arrangement in France, but comparatively rare in England, it occurs 
however at Westminster abbey, and in some other instances when the 
clerestory walls are high enough to require it. 

Chapter-house, Lincoln, c. 1220 

Examples of detached flying buttresses of this kind are not very 
common, in this instance they appear to have been added very soon 
after the walls were built, probably in consequence of their beginning to 
give way to the thrust of the roof, but not to have formed part of the 
orig^al design. Similar detached masses of masonry with arches from 
them to siipport the wall are employed at Westminster hall, and on a 
small scale at the parish church of Langford, Oxfordshire. 

Fotheringhay, Northamptonshire, A.D. 1440 

This is taken from the roof of the aisle, and shews the " six mighty 
arches butting on aither side to the clerestory." 

Sherborne, Dorsetshire, c. 1470. Caythorpe, Lincoln- 
shire, c. 1320 ..... 

BYZANTINE ARCHITECTURE. S. Nicodemus, Athens. 
Front with cupola, capital, and panelling 

Details fix)m S. Mary at Mistra, and S. Nicodemus at 
Athens ...... 

CANOPY. (See Tabernacle.) 

CANT. CANTALIVER 



PAGl PLAT! 



99 



ib. 



40 
ib. 



ib. 



41 



42 



ib. 



101 



102 



107 



43 



ib. 



14 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



PA6B 



FLAT! 



CAPITALS (and ENTABLATURES). Grecian Doric. 
RoiLAN Doric. Grecian Ionic. Roman Ionic. 
Corinthian. Composite . 

Norman. White tower, London, c. 1080 

This is one of the capitals of the chapel in the Tower of London which 
was built by Giindulph, bishop of Rochester, in 1081. It is a veiy 
valuable example as exhibiting the peculiarities of the early Norman 
capitals. The general design of them seems to have been an imitation, 
though sometimes extremely rude, of the Corinthian capital ; they have 
almost invariably the volute at the angles, and in some instances, as in 
some of those in the White tower, have a row of short stiff leaves in 
imitation of the foliage below. There is also another peculiar feature 
which is veiy characteristic of this early style, this is the plain projec- 
tion which occupies the place of the central branches of the caulicoli, 
and is in general either left square, as at Caen, or cut into the form of 
the tau cross, as in this instance. Capitals of this form occur in the 
work of Remigius at Lincoln, in the early portion of the crypt at Can- 
terbury, and in the crypt at Oxford castle. 

S.Nicholas, Caen, c. 1100 . . . . 

This is of the same general design as the last, but a little varied. 

Whitby parish church, c. 1100 . 

In this a further deviation has taken place, the projection being cut 
into a kind of lozenge. 

Westminster hall, c. 1090 .... 

This occurs in the oldest part of Westminster hall, which was built by 
WiUiam Rufus. 

Lincoln cathedral, c. 1100 . . . . 

This singrular capital occurs in the west front of the cathedral in the 
portion built by Remigius in the reign of William I. The foliage is 
veiy remarkable, and might at first sight be taken to be of much later 
date, but a little examination will shew it to be very different, and on 
comparison with some of the capitals in the White tower, it will be 
found that the foliage is the same in character but different in propor- 
tion. The mid-rib of the leaves at the angles is detached and forms a 
kind of loop. The arched moulding shewn in this example is of early 
Norman character. The rest of the capitals in the work of Remigius 
are similar to those described under White tower. 

Crypt, Canterbury, c. 1100 .... 

This belongs to the earlier portion of the crypt This crypt under 
the choir is part of the work of Emulf soon after 1 100, but the sculpture 
of the capitals has evidently been executed after they were erected, and 



44 
45 



ib. 
ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



DESCRIPTIYB INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



16 



APITALS. 



FAOB 



FLATV 





Xortk Triaupt, Wto^«rt«r CatlMdnl. 



Gloucester cathedral 



may hare been done at intenrals 
when conTenient, some of them 
are still unfinished (see Boast), 
this work having probably been 
interrupted by the great fire and 
never resumed. • 

Waterperry, Oxfordshire, 
c. 1180 

This is a very common form 
of Norman capitals, and seems 
to have been in use at almost 
all periods. 

Cassington, Oxfordshire 

Is a good specimen of the com- 
mon cushion capitaL Another 
variety of this form is also here 
given but of earlier date. 

Dorchester, Oxfordshire, c. 
1180 : 

This is taken from the original 
chancel- arch. It is very pecu- 
liar in its form, and its foliage 
is of rather late character. 

Steetley, Derbyshire . 

Is from a small and interest- 
ing church of pure Norman work 



S. Peter's, Northampton, c. 1160 or earlier 

This is one of the finest examples of a rich Norman church in the 
kingdom. The specimen here given is frt>m the chancel-arch. It 
exhibits besides the capitals, which are of the same general form as 
Waterperry, the interlaced and beaded ornaments of the shafts. From 
the similarity of ornaments with those on the work of Bishop Alex- 
ander at Lincoln, it may be of the same date, c. 1 140. 

Grafton Underwood, Northamptonshire, c. 1180 
The foliage is of rather late character. 

Haseley, Oxfordshire, c. 1200 .... 

The mouldings of the arch and the foliage shew this to be of tran- 
ntion character. 



46 



108 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



16 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



CAPITALS. 

Easton, Hampshire ..... 
This is of late or transition character. 

Norman ; English Transition. 

The capitals of this period frequently display great richness in their 
foliage, which paftakes both of the Norman and Early English cha- 
racter. 

Christ Church cathedral, Oxford, c. 1180 (two examples) 

The first example is taken from the south aisle of the choir, and shews 
a combination of a capital and two corbels, the latter supporting the 
diagonal ribs of the Taulting. The second is from one of the pillars of 
the nave ; the foliage creeping up upon the abacus is a very unusual 
feature, it is quite of transition character. 

Canterbury cathedral, A.D. 1177 

This is from the choir, and is the work of William of Sens. The 
foliage is a close imitation of Corinthian. 

Oakham castle, Rutlandshire, c. 1180 . 

The building from which this is taken, the hall, the only part now 
remaining of the ancient castle, is a very interesting one. The design 
and execution of the ornamental parts are particularly fine and good. In 
the capital here given, the foliage and volutes, and even the caulicoli of 
the Corinthian, are clos<.ly imitated, but the tooth -ornament which was 
then just coming into use is introduced inlo the bell, and on the aich, 
while the abacus has a Norman ornament This combination very 
clearly points out its transition character and its date. 

Foreign examples of Transition. Murrhard, c. 1188 . 

Soissons, choir, A.D. 1212 

There is much resemblance between this and Canterbury. The upper 
moulding of the bell is ornamented with the nail-head instead of the 
tooth- ornament as at Oakham, this ornament never having come into 
such genera] use in France. 

S. Nicolas, Blois, c. 1200 (two examples.) 

This church is of particular interest from its connection wiih Lincoln 
cathedral, the architect of the latter having been a native of Blois, and 
there are many curious points of resemblance in the details of the two 
churches, especially the plate tracery of circular windows. 

Early English. Burton Latimer, Northamptonshire, 
c. 1190 

The square section of the upper member of the abacus shews its 
early character, partaking of Norman, and marks it ns belonging to 
the period of transition, and therefore probably rather before A.D. 1200. 



PAG I 


nxn 


108 




— 


47 


— 


ib. 


— 


ib. 




48 


— 


ib. 


— 


ib. 



49 




DSSCRmiVX INDEX OP THE ILLUBTKATlONa. 

unTALS. 

AbBBT of JoUltoES, NOKMAITDT. 

In the nuni of tbc abbe; of 
Jumitge* in Nonnandj then ut 
KTCtal cipiuli anuineDted with fo- 
liage painted on a plain mrfacf ; thia 
painting is clearl; of Nonnaa cha- 
racMr and data, and aa the foundation 
of the abbej ia known to b« earlj, 
they have long been mppoaed to be 
of that period : (the chorch wu eon- 
■ecrated in 1067.) Bat it haa ra- 
centlf been diacOTered bj accident 
that thia painting ia execDted on 
pUater, and thai under the plaatn la 
tome mde and early aculptuie, at- 
milar to other early Noiman ca^tal* 
aa already deacribed i the painting 
ia therefore of lalt Noiman dat<^ and 
it agreea mach better with the cha- 
racter of late Nornum aculptiire than 
with the early date to iriijch it bu 
" been nanally uaigned. 

Bloxham^Oxfbrdshire, c. 1190 . . . . 

The nme may be iud of thia aa of Bnrton Latimer. 

Woodiord, NorthamptonBhire, c. 1 190 . 

In thia the ftiliage haa a more decided Early Englieh chaT*eter, but 
the abaena itill partakes of the Korman. 

Hiueley, Oxfordshire, c. 1200 .... 

Thia, though one of the capitali of an Early Eagliah door, haa aome 
Norman character about it which ahewi ita early dat«. 

Nun Monkton, Yorkahire, c. 1200 

Thia ia from > window of a very curioua little church, and ia of early 
date. The abacua ia aqnare in aection, but ia indented on the lower 
edge, which giTca it a very lingular appearance. The dripatone ahewa 
the nail-head, and the chamfer ii BUed with tooth-omamaita. 

Herefordcathedral, c. 1200 . . . . 

Thia beautiful and early example of the capital of a email abaft hM 
Ibe nail-head and tooth-onuunent on ita mouldinga. 
Eaju-t EiTQtiBK. Lmcoln catLednl, choir, c. 1200 

Thia portion of Ihe cathedral ii oae of the earliest^ aa it ia alao one of 
the moat beautiful tpc«iinena of thia etyle which we poaaaaa. The 
fbli^e throughout ia marked.hy the greateat boldneai and freedom, and 



18 PUCUfTlTC IXDBX OP TBI ILimKATIOm. 

CAnxALs. 

ID the euvple ben prai One conbmatioa of the optih of ^ iloidB 
drttcbcd (li»n> irith thu of t^s^id piUBin t^ eoitn is U^dy n^^ 
Biovi ami bcuUitnl, Dk abarta ul Ae atrial teniagtthe nne time 
■■ ■ band to the tsnltiDg iluft wUek i* onicd dmogh withnol aaj 

S. Mairle Wigfiml. Linndn, c. 1200 . 

Thn u the tune in gmtnl doipi, aoil h>* aridtBt) j ban eofitJ fhaa 

thoK bi tbe efaoi/ of tbt catliednl, but the abaeiu ij difinau ia fbon. 

Another example from a window-jamb in the aame 

chorch ...... 

Roahden, NorthamplaaahiTe .... 

A mull exunple &om the Kdilia, of tbr nunc chmcter » Ihr ImL 
Naaeby, XorthamploBBhire, c. 1220 

TtuiiiafUto'cluncter; theintnidiictiiiaaf headiamong thefbliage 
■BI Bied dcciManallj bMh in thii ind the HiFTerdiiig stjiea. 

Destxmnigh, Northamptooahire, c. 1220 

Thii ii of nrij date, lod 




COOESHOE, XOBTHAHTS. 

AjKitliei eoriooi exunple i« 
hen inlTodnnd bum Cogoi- 
hoe, u beiidt* ib nngular 
character, 

rial bearing* in Ihii nmatioa, 

the amu being thoae of Six 

NichuUs de Cogenboe, the 

bunder of the church, who 

died in the time of EdwanI L 

See Bridget' KorthtmptMi- 

■Un, ToL L p. 349. It in aim an earij inituice of the introdnctiiMi 

of beadi m part of the onuunent of the capital, which ii more frequent 

in Decorated work, though occuionalljr Ibund in Norman. 

Lincoln cathedral. Presbytery, c. 1260 . 

Thia belonga to a later period, but ii equailjr beautiful ; nothing can 
exceed the grace and elegance of the foliage in thii poRion of the 
bnilding. The ahaf^ in the example giren an nliered and ornamented 
b; amall fcnota of foliage riang from tlie centre ihaft, and paitlj orer- 
Ijiag the detached oDca. 




DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE I LLCST RATIONS; 



The greale>t xarietj of deiign 
ocean in the capitals of this 
building, and an addldoDal en- 
ample is here introduced to illna- 
trate another form of foliage. 

There is no mistaking the de- 
cided Early Englisli character of 
this foli^e, and of the other de- 
tails of the Presbytery of Lin- 
coln, although the windows hiTs 
bar-tracery, which is considered, 
in one seDse, u marking tlie com- 
meneement ofllie Decorated style. 
Wanningbm, Nortliants., c. 
1280 (two examples) 
These capitals support the wooden ^nnned roof of the beantiful 
chsTch to which they beloug. It is rather tale in the Myle, but all 
its details are worth stndyinf i perhaps 12fi0 would be a more cor- 
rect date than the one giTen in the plate. A set of diawinga of this 
church has been lately published by Mr. CaTeler. 

Decobates. Hampton Fo^le, Oxfordshire, c. 1300 

This cnriona eiample is early in the style, and helongi to the geome- 
trical period, of which the east window of the church is a good specimen. 

Another capital from 
ihe same chureh . 
Cottingham, Notting- 
hamshire . 
Is an example of simi- 
lar character to the first 
from Hampton Poyle. 

Harrington, North- 
amptonshire, circa 
1300. 

The example here given 
is of the same early period, 
but is nngular from the 
character of its foliage, 
which runs round the bell 
in the manner of a wreath. 
The other capitals in the 
church have the oak and 
vine leares. 




20 DMCBIWIVE INDEX OF THE ILLPBTftATIONS. 


C1PIT1L8. 


reae 


ea... 


Christ Church, York. 






b>l-k.l ixJBMH a corbel for cuTjing the ircb 












rp^^i'^I^^H capiul in * umilu mumer M 






-i^aStSlW^^ ""' "' ""^ *" ^'^ "^' ^* 






fMBPnCPQ^^^K i. lim imgulmi in luyiog no 












^^S&Vr'M^''^ 


B^r Doieliater.Osfordjthin, 








^g E. 1300 . 


— 


51 


■C^w *'■■■'■' i 


^M ThieixgeodpUineiemple 










^^M vitliaut Koj tiling peeuUu, 
^■1 liter date tlion Iieie uiigned 












' 1320. (Two exam- 






"—<*-*-- pies). 


— 


ib. 


Slunring the Twirtie. of Deconted folUge. 






SandhurBt, Kent ..... 


HO 


— 


A good exunplo of > form of verj general ocenneDce. 






Lincoln cathedral, c. 1360 (misprinted 1300) . 


™ 


ib. 


TUi capiul ii from the iateiioi of the weat end, and though of good 


















Southwell minster, Notts, c. 1300 


_ 


ib. 


Tlul a takea &om the Jtrj beiuUfol KTeen at the entnuce of the 






ehoii, aU the detuli of which an eiqmiitdy floe. 








_ 


M 


Thiaii a verf good and characteriiticeiampU of & plain capital. It 






ocGui* in the chanceL 






Nevark, Nottinghamshire, c. 1380 


— 


ib. 


This ii one of the npituli of the naTc, which are all of rimilar 














- 


ib. 


Xhia ohewa a pecuuantjr which is of frequent occuvrencA in the Per- 






luiu], racedei ind illom the grMtait proj^tiou to the faluge, whieli 






tliai tppnn tnoie like > bud tliM ■ cepiuL 







DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



21 






CAPITALS. 

Cromer, Norfolk, c. 1420 .... 

The singularity of this example consists in the small foliated arches 
by which the capital is connected with the mouldings of the pillar, but 
which produce a very good effect llie church is a fine one, but dis- 
plays the localisms of Norfolk architecture. 

Piddleton, Dorsetshire, A.D. 1505 

This is a good example for shewing the capitalling of the small 
shafts, while the main mouldings of the arch are carried down the pillar. 

XJpwey, Dorsetshire, c. 1500 .... 

This is another example of the localisms of Perpendicular in the 
south of England. The capital in the form of a canted square is 
carried over the whole of the mouldings and shafts of the pillar. 

Ewelme, Oxfordshire, c. 1450 . 

Cloisters, Christ Church, Oxford, c. 1450 

Both these are capitals of small shafts, and are good general forms. 

CASEMENT, or hollow moulding . 

CHAMFER ...... 

CHAMFER - TERMINATION. Exton church, Rutland 
Abbey bam, Glastonbury. Court-lodge, Godmersham 
Kent . • 

Haseley, Oxon 

See also Mouldino-tebmination 
CHAMPE 

From the tomb of Richard, earl of Warwick. 

CHESTS. Early English. Stoke Dabemon, Surrey 

Graveney, Kent .... 

Church Brampton, Northamptonshire 

Decorated. Gimmingham, Norfolk 

Huttoft^ Lincolnshire .... 

Flamboyant or Flemish. Guestling, Sussex 

Two from Rockingham castle, Northamptonshire 

CHEVRON ..... 

See also Zio-zao and Moitldinos 

CHIMNEY. Early English. Abingdon abbey, Berks 
c. 1250 ..... 



PAGl 



111 

ib. 

113 
117 



ib. 
118 



ib. 



PIAVI 

52 



ib. 



ib. 



136 



53 



124 


— 


125 


— 


126 


»— 


— 


ib. 


— 


ib. 


ib. 


— 


128 


• — 




114 


^^^ 


54 



22 PESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 


CHIMNEY. 


PAOI 


PLATl 


Aydon castle, Northumberland, c. 1280 





54 


Decorated. Sherborne abbey, Dorsetshire, c. 1300 




ib. 


Chepstow castle, Monmouthshire 


128 


— 


Exton, Rutland, c. 1350 .... 




ib. 


Northborough, Northumberland, c. 1340 




55 


Burford, Oxfordshire 


129 


— 


Perpendicitlar. Sherborne, Dorsetshire 


ib. 


— 


Tisbury, Wiltshire ..... 


ib. 


— 


Thombury castle, A.D. 1514 . 


— 


ib. 


Layer Mamey, Essex, c. 1530 .... 


— 


n>. 


Tonbridge school, Kent, c. 1560 


— 


ib. 


The three last specimens are executed in moulded hrick, which was 






extensively used in the time of Henry VIIL 






Plans of double chimneys .... 


130 


— 


CINQUEFOIL. Two specimens .... 


133 


— 


CLEAR-STORY. Section to explain 


134 


— 


Windows. Decorated. Witney, Oxfordshire. Stanton 






S. John*s, Oxfordshire, exterior and interior . 


ib. 




See also vol. ii. Plate 260. 






WFfER. Lron. In the possession of Walter Long, Esq. . 


137 


— 


COFFIN. Roman. In the museum at York 


ib. 


— 


Bishop Ralph, Chichester cathedral, A.D. 1123 . 


138 


— 


Temple church, London .... 


ib. 


— 


Tiincoln cathedral^ tomb of the little S. Hugh 


ib. 


— 


COLUMN. Classical and Mediaeval 


— 


56 


With the names of their respective parts. The Composite colunm is 






from the arch of Titus at Rome. 






CONSOLE. Palace of Diocletian .... 


142 


.^^ 


COPING. Of tUe. LitUe Wenham haU, c. 1260. Three 






examples ...... 


ib. 


— 


CORBELS. NoRiCAN. Kirkstall abbey, c. 1150 . 


— 


57 


Transition. Oakham castle, Rutland, c. 1 1 80 




ib. 


Broadwater, Sussex, c. 1180 . 


144 


, 


Haseley, Oxfordshire, c. 1200 .... 


— 


ib. 



DE8CBIFTIVE INDEX OF THE II.LU8TKATIONS. 



23 



OBBSLS. 

Early English. S. Sepulchre's, Northampton, c. 1200 . 
This is in the east wall, and has been an altar- bracket 


YAOB 


PLATB 

57 


Acton Bumel, Shropshire, c. 1260. Rievaulx abbey, 
Yorkshire, c. 1250 . . . . . 


» 


58 


Transept, Lincoln cathedral, c. 1200 




59 


Grafton Underwood, Northamptonshire, c. 1200 





ib. 


Kirkby Wiske, Yorkshire, c. 1 250 


^ 


60 


Wells cathedral, c. 1250 . . . . 





61 


East Dereham, Norfolk, c. 1280 


. 143 


— 


Decorated. Merton college chapel, Oxford, A.D. 1277, 
(Two examples) . . . . . 


^__ 


ib. 


Melrose abbey, Scotland, c. 1350 


— 


58 


Caldeeot, Northamptonshire, c. 1350 


— 


59 


Melrose abbey, c. 1350 . . . . . 


— 


ib. 


* Crick, Northamptonshire, c. 1350 


. — 


ib. 


Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, c. 1350 


— 


60 


Two from S. Aldate's, Oxford, south aisle, A.D. 1336 


— 


ib. 


Northmoor, Oxon, c. 1320 


— 


61 


This supports the inner arch of the window. 






Early PEBPEinjicxxLAR. Thornton abbey, gateway, Lin- 
colnshire, c. 1380 .... 




59 


Pbrpejidicxtlar. Duston, Northamptonshire, c. 1450 

This is one of the corbels of the chancel ; It is of wood and painted 
The rest of the corbels are similar in character, and all represent 
performers on musical instruments. There are corbels of this kin^ 
also at S. Sepulchre's, Northampton. 


t 
I 


60 


Long Buckley, Northamptonshire, circa 1450 . 
A blacksmith with his hammer and pincers. 


» "^^^ 


ib. 


HaU, Christ Church, Oxford, A.D. 1529 


^^^m 


58 


Another on the staircase to the same, A.D. 1640 


• 


ib. 


8. Mary's church, Oxford, A.D. 1488 . 


m ^"^"^ 


61 



24 DESCBIPTIVS INDEX OF THE ILLCSTBATIONfl. 


CORBELS. 


■ 


l-AW 


tun 


York cathedral, c. 1450 





61 












, In Polebrook, c. 1200. 






lil 1 






V'A-^ 


: 1 K- Thii giTei alio inotlieT 






I^^^Li^ 


||b^(p Tuiet; of the chamfer ter- 






\^m^ 


X "^ miiutiaa, ud > muk. 






^ Norwich cathedral 


143 


_ 


<m 


Thi» reprewnl» a h«t 

lying iD the water, ud 

i> inlended u > rebni of 

Walter Lybut, the bi*hop 

■^ by -bom rhi. ptrt of the 

^. othednl wu built 

COBBEL - TABLES. 
NoKKAN. SomBe}' 
church, Hants, c. 






AKW 


1180 . . 





62 


• ■ if^j 


Eabit Emoush. 








Romsey, Hants, c. 








1220 


_ 


ib. 


-.^ 


laihiaexuuplelhecor- 

rnent i> tegular]/ allenute 
withtheoUieni it i. taken 
I from Ihe north »ide of the 
1 chnrch, but the head ia 
1 brought from another ulu- 
1 ; i atJonforthe-teofvariety. 
1^- ^^ Portsmouth, c. 1230, 
Ik ^^ or rather earlier 








mr pn.bably . 


_ 


ib. 


J '19 


■S In Ihii example the 






^wt^B 


PM corbels are all takea from 








'^W the «uth eide of the 






^'it ^^i 


Bh church, though not in the 






IJC 


, W exact order here lepre- 






1" ■■ aented. The church -u 






-..- . ■ ' 


b^unabont1180,but pro- 






UMI.. 


bably not flniahed lutil 








after 1200. ' 





DE8CRIPTIYB INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



25 



COBBEL-TABLBS. 

Warmington, Northamptonshire, c. 1250 

Salisbury cathedral, c. 1260 .... 

Hartlepool, Durham ..... 

C0RBIE-BTEP8. From a house at Cologne, of the twelfth 
century ...... 

CORNICES. Decorated. Tower of S. Mary's, Oxford, c. 
1280 ...... 

Tliis date is probably rather too early, the exact age of this very 
beaatifiil tower and spire is not known, but must be about ISOO. 

Chancel of Qrantham, Lincolnshire, c. 1320 
Altar-screen, Wi;nche8ter cathedral 

Perfeivdiculab. Ensham, Oxfordshire, c. 1450. Bp 
Beckington's chantry. Wells cathedral, 1465. Gate- 
way of the Close, Wells, 1505 

CORONA ...... 

CREDENCE. Decorated. Kidlingtcm, Oxfordshire 

Woodford, Northamptonshire . 

Peependicttlab. Fyfield, Berkshire, c. 1500 

This has been removed from its original position in the north-east 
coiner within a few years. The mark of it in the plaster is still visible 

S. Cross, near Winchester, c. 1460 

Wooden table of the time of James I., Chipping- Warden 
Northamptonshire .... 

CREST. Exeter cathedral, (this is of lead) 

CREST-TILES. Leyerington, Cambridgeshire, crest of stone 
roofed porch .... 

Easton, Hampshire . ' . 

CROCKETS. Early English. Two from Salisbury cathe- 
dral, c. 1240 .... 

Choir, Lincoln cathedral, c. 1200 
This is from the large piers of the choir, and is there used on the 
central pillar between the slender detached shafts. See Plate 150. 

Westminster abbey, c. 1260 .... 

This is an ornament used in one of the mouldings of the chapter- 
house door, but in form and character it corresponds very closely with 
an Ejurly English crocket 







pAoa 


PLAVS 


— 


62 


— 


ib. 


144 


— 


ib. 


— 


— 


63 


—^ 


ib. 


146 


— 


_ 


ib. 


147 


— 


148 


— 


ib. 


— 


— 


64 


— 


ib. 


149 


m^m. 


150 





151 


.— 


ib. 







65 


— 


ib. 


— 


ib. 



26 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



CROCKETS. 

Presbytery, Lincoln cathedral, c. 1200 . 

This is taken firom the shafts of the arcade in the presbytery. It rises 
from the centre one, and lies partly over the detached ones, producing 
a very rich effect. See Plate 150. 

Decorated. Hawton, Nottinghamshire, c. 1320 

Lincoln cathedral, c. 1330 . . . . 

Gnisborough, Yorkshire, c. 1300 

Southwell minster, Notts, c. 1300, from the chapter-hoiise 

Ditto, ditto, a second example .... 

Perpendicular. S. Mary's, Beverley, on south porch, 

c. 1390. S. Alban's abbey, c. 1420. Crick, Northants, 

c. 1420. Litcham, Norfolk, c. 1450. The two last are 

of wood ...... 

Flamboyant. Clery, near Orleans ; and Villequier, near 
Candebec, Normandy ..... 

CROSSES. Early English. Warkton, Northampton- 
shire, c. 1250. Peterborough cathedral, A.D. 1238, 
(two examples.) Warmington, Northants, c. 1260 . 
Peterborough cathedral. Cheltenham. Ickford, Buck- 
inghamshire ...... 

Decorated. Horsepath, Oxfordshire, c. 1250. Asthall, 
Oxon, c. 1350. Cranford S. John, Northamptonshire, 
c. 1350. Morton college chapel, Oxford, c. 1300 
Morton, Lincolnshire, c. 1350 
Winchester cathedral, c. 1354 . 

Perpendicular. Stanton S. John's, Oxfordshire, c. 1460 
S. John's hospital, Northampton, c. 1450. Coombe 
Oxfordshire, c. 1450. Rotherham, Yorkshire, c. 1450 
Ecclesfield, Yorkshire, c. 1500. Pinhoe, Devonshire 
c. 1450 ..... 

Oxford, Merton college chapel, transept 
Yamton, Oxfordshire, churchyard cross 
Higham Ferrars, Northants., capital of market cross 

CUSPS. Two examples of the early form 
Norman. Ely cathedral 

Early English. Nun Monkton, Yorkshire, c. 1200 
Higham Ferrars, Northamptonshire, c. 1220. Preston 
Yorkshire. Baunds, Northamptonshire, c. 1220. 



FAoa 



151 



210 



152 



ib. 
153 
154 

157 



nAffi 
65 



ib. 
ib. 
66 
ib. 



ib. 



67 



ib. 
68 



ib. 



69 



— ib. 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



27 



CUSPS. 

Four from the presbytery, Lincoln cathedral, c. 1260 

Early Decorated. Solihull, Warwickshire. See Plate 234 
Little Addington, Northamptonshire, c. 1300. Pidding- 
ton, Oxfordshire, c. 1300. Aldworth, Berkshire, c 
1300 ...... 

Late Decorated. From an arcade at the west end of 
Lincoln cathedral, c. 1380 

Presbytery, Lincoln cathedral, c. 1260. Two examples 

Perpendicular. Oxford cathedral, A.D. 1525 . 

■ Ornamented. Crosby hall, London 
Screen, Lincoln cathedral. S. Gorge's chapel, Wind< 
sor. Eltham palace, Kent 

CYMA RECTA, and CYMA REVERSA 

CYMATITJM 

DAIS ...... 



PAOX 



158 



ib. 

159 

ib. 

160 



piau 
69 



70 

ib. 
ib. 
ib. 



DECORATED STYLE. 





PAOS 


PLATS 


Abacus .51.. 


Altar 


16 


— U 


Ambry 


10 


3 B 


Arcades 


163 


H 1 


Arches . pis. 18 


and 


19 1 


Ball-flower, pp. 53, 






164; and 


pi. 


21 


Bases, p. 62,and pis. 25 


and 


132 


Bell-tuiTets . 


74 


34 


jDOSses • 


— 


36 


Broach 


97 


— 


Buttresses p. 99, and 






pis. 40 


and 


43 


Capitals,p.ll0,163,& 


pi. 


51 


Chamfer 


117 


53 


Chest 


126 


— 


Chimney 


129 


— 


and pis. 54 


and 


55 


derestory 


134 


— 



Corbels .143 

and pis. 58, 59, 60 and 61 

Cornices . 146 63 
Credence . .148 
Crest . . 151 

Crockets . 151 — 

and pis. 65 and 66 

Crosses .152 — 

and pis. 67 and 68 

Cusps . .158 — 
Diaper, p. 165, and 

pis. 69, 70 and 103 

Doorways . .180 — 

and pis. 79 and 80 

Dormer .185 — 

Dripstone . . 188 98 

Fillet *. . 206 — 

Finial, pis. 84, 85 and 86 

Fireplace — 88 



28 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



DBCORATED STYLE CONTINUED. 



Fonts 

Four-leaved flower 
Gallery 
Gtirgoyle 
Hoodmoulds . 
Impost . pis. 99 

Lavatory 
Low side window 
Lettem 
Masks 

Monument . 
Mouldings, pp. 164 
817, 318 ; and pis 
125, 126, 127, 132 
Mullions 
Panel 
Parapet 
Pillar 

— ^ sections of 
Pinnacle 
Piscina pis. 156 

Porch pis. 163 

Pulpit 
Reredos 



PAOl 


pLAn 


213 


91 


164 


. . • 


— 


94 


228 


95 


188 


98 


and 


100 


— 


103 


295 


— 


— 


104 


* 


106 


310 


... 


and 


135 


— 


136 


336 


137 


340 


139 


— 


148 


— 


152 


— 


154 


and 


157 


and 


164 


— 


166 




168 



pis. 172 
pis. 182 
pis. 190 
• 
pis. 196 



Boof 

Screen 

Sedilia 

Squinch 

Tabernacle 

Tower 

Turret 

Vault 

Vestry 

Windows, single light, 

pis. 226 
' of two lights, 

pis. 234 

— of three or 
more lights, p. 162, 
and pis. 239, 241 

square-headed, 
pis. 256 

of spires 

of towers 

— ^— in gables 

circular, pis. 

261 



DENTELS ....... 

DL^ER. Two examples. Tomb of William do Valence, 

Westminster abbey .... 
DOORWAYS. Supposed Saxon. Brixworth, Northants 

Norman. Essendine chapel, Rutland, c. 1130 . 
S. Margaret's at Cliffe,near Dover, Kent, c. 1130 
S. Ebbe*s, Oxford, c. 1140 . 

This church is modern, hut this old doorway has hetn preserved and 
rehuilt in the wall of the vestry. 

Iffley, Oxfordshire, c. 1140 . . . . 

Or more prohahly 1 160. See the grounds for this date in Archaeolog. 
Journal, toL iv. p. 219. 

Fordington, near Dorchester, Dorsetshire, c. 1160 

This is a rery curioui example. The sculptures hare evidently 



PAoa 

to 
and 
and 

and 



and 



to 



to 
and 



and 

165 

ib. 
175 



PlAtl 

176 
183 
191 
193 
197 

212 
215 
221 
223 

227 
236 



248 

257 
258 
259 
260 

264 



71 
ib. 
72 



ib. 



73 



]>B8CKIPTm INDBX OV THB ILLUSTBATIONS. 



29 



D0OBWAT8. 

been cut after the door wis Imilt, and appear to hate been drum on 
the surface, and only so much of it cut away at would giro relief to 
the figures. The kite-shaped shields and nasals shew sufficiently its 
Norman date. 

Stofoeleigh, Warwickshire, c. 1160 

Penmon, Anglesea ..... 

The Welsh antiquaries are generally inelined to assign a very early 
date to this and similar examples. The probability however seems to 
be that they are more likely to be later than earlier than corresponding 
examples in England. The very thick abacus is often a mark of early 
work, but it is also frequently only a sign of rude country work, or a 
prorincialisno. It is difficult to find a dated example of stone sculpture 
in this country before the twelfth century, to which period the Norman 
doorwajTS with sculpture in the head almost invariably belong. 

Barton Seagraye, Northamptonshire, e. 1150 
Middleton Stoney, Oxfordshire, e. 1150 
Dorchester, Oxfordshire, o. 1160 

This doorway is very late Norman, almost of transition character ; 
the head of it affords a good example of vetioulated masonry, which is 
not very common in England. 

FritweU, Oxfordshire, c. 1 150. Kirkham prioiy, York- 
shire, c. 1150. Newington, Oxfordshire, c. 1160 
Coddesden, Oxfordshire, 0. 1160 

This is quite of transitional character, the lozenge moulding with the 
points projecting and standing clear approaches very near to the tooth- 
ornament ; the capitals are more Early English than Norman. The 
door retains its original iron-work. For the mouldings see 

Chapter-house, Oxford, c. 1160 
Nail-heads on door, Compton, Berks 

Eably English. Lutton, Huntingdonshire, o. 1200 

This form is to be found in all the styles, but most frequently in the 
Early English. (See note, p. 4S, toL i.) 

Burton Latimer, Northamptonshire, c. 1220 
Wamungton, Northamptonshire, c. 1260 

EidliDgton, Oxfordshire, c. 1220 

The square form and the mouldings of the abacus mark this as 
early in the style. 

Irchester, Northamptonshire, c. 1220 

An example of the use of stones of different colours, for the take of 



FAOl 



176 
177 



73 

74 



ib. 
ib. 
ib. 



75 
ib. 



120 



76 



ib. 

a. 

77 



ib. 



DESCRIPTIVE INDKX OV TBB ILLUstHAtlONH. 



EARLY ENGLISH STYLE. 



Abociu 
Ambry 
Apse 
Arode 



Is. 9 



Arch. 
Bond. 
Base 

ornaments 

BaBement 

Bay J 

Bell-cot pis. 32, 33 



, pp. 46, 98; 
and pis. 38, 39 
Bracket 

Cbpital, pp. 109, 1 10, 

191 ; and pis. 49 

Chamfer 

Cheat 



Chinmey 
Coping 
Corbel, pp. 143, 192 
and plfl. S8, 59 
Corbel-table, pp. 144, 
192; and 
Crocket 
Cross, p. 152, 1 54 ; and 

and pb. 69 
Doorway, pp. 178, 
190; and pis. 76 
Feaestral 
Finial pis. 64 

Fire-place pis. 87 
Font 



,„. 


run 


10 


3 


— 


5 


361 





and 


10 


190 


17 


55 





61 


24 


— 


27 


— 


132 


and 


30 


and 


34 


- 


35 


and 


42 


81 


- 


and 


50 


117 


_ 


124 


53 


— 


260 


128 


54 


142 


- 


and 


60 


pi. 


62 


— 


65 


pi. 


67 


157 


— 


and 


70 


to 


78 


204 


_ 


and 


86 


and 


68 




90 ' 



Hoodmould . 

Impost 

King-post 

LaTatory 

Low side window 

Mask 

Masonry 

Miserere 

Monument 

Mouldings 

of arches, 

pis. 121 

of base- 



- of string 
-of ribs 



pis. 130 



Moulding - termina- 
tions 
Mnllion 
Panel 
Parapet 
Perpeyn wall 
Pillar 

■ sections. 

Pinnacle 

Piscina 

Porch 

Pulpit 

Roof 

Screen 

Sedilia 

Sqninch 

Tabernacle 

Tower 

Turret 

Triforium 

Vault 



pis. 214 





81 






— 


98 


301 


99 


278 


— 


_ 


102 


295 


- 


_ 


106 


301 


_ 


307 


_ 


309 


— 


316 


- 


to 


124 


_ 


132 


_ 


133 


- 


134 


_ 


135 


— 


136 


335 


— 


_ 


139 


351 


— 


— 


147 


and 


151 


- 


154 


204 


156 


— 


162 


— 


166 


— 


171 


— 


181 


and 


189 


— 


193 


— 


196 


— 


211 


and 


215 


— 


216 


— 


220 



82 



DESCKIFTIVS INDSX OF THE ILLTTST&ATION8. 



EARLY ENGLISH STYLE CONTINUED. 



Window, one-light, p. 

191; and pis. 226 

■ ■ ■ two-light, pis. 

229, 230, 231 

three -light, 

pis. 237 to 240, 242 

EARLY FRENCH STYLE. 
Abacus 



TAQM 


PLATI 


and 


227 


and 


233 


and 


243 



Window, square-headed 
■ in gables 

— ^— circular, pis. 

261, 263 



5 
78 
98 



Crocket 
Pillar 
Tower 
Windows 



Boss 

Buttress 42 
Capital 48 
ECHINUS 

EGFYPTIAN. Portico of the temple of Phite 
Capitals, Debut. Temple of PhilsD. Edfu 
Bell-capital, temple of Camac. Base, temple of Medinet 

Abou, Thebes .... 

Bell-capital, Ramseion; Bud-capital, Luxor; Isis capi 
tal, Denderah .... 

ENTABLATURE. Corinthian, shewing the Vitruvian and 
modem arrangements of the parts 
Grecian Doric and Ionic, Roman Doric, Ionic, Corin 
thian and Composite 

ESCUTCHEON, or SCUTCHEON. Headington church 
Oxfordshire ..... 
Tickencote, Rutland .... 
Beauchamp Chapel, Warwick, c. 1450, (three examples 
Ryarsh church, Kent, c. 1480 
Westcott Barton, Oxon ; Stogumber, Somersetshire 

FALDSTOOL. Queen Mary's chair, Winchester cathedral 

FAN-TRACERY VAULTING 

FEATHERING, or FOLIATION. Four examples 

FEMERELL. Westminster hall . 

FENESTELLA. Piscina, Burford, Oxfordshire 

FENESTRAL. Shutters, LitUe Wenham haU 

FILLET on a moulding, otherwise KEEL and WINGS 
Three examples 



PAOI 



and 



210 
483 
193 



194 
3 

196 



198 
199 



270 

201 
ib. 
202 
203 
204 
ib. 



206' - 



FLAn 

255 
260 

264 



150 
211 
232 

83 
ib. 



44 



186 
ib. 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



88 



FEN^IAL. Spire, Yardley, Oxon .... 

Early English. Bishop Bridport's tomb, Salisbury cathe- 
dral, A.D. 1246 . 
Lincoln cathedral, c. 1260 .... 

These are both good examples of the most usual form of finials in 
this style, which are varied by having greater or less richness in the 
foliage. 

Decorated. Merton college chapel, Oxford, A.D. 1277 . 

This is from the pinnacle of the piscina in the ante-chapeL 

Wimbome minster, Dorsetshire, c. 1350 
Winchester cathedral, c. 1300. 
Hawton, Nottinghamshire, c. 1300 

Pbrpbitdicular. Magdalen college chapel, Oxford, A.D. 
1456. Chittlehampton, Deyonshire, c. 1500 
King's college, Cambridge . . • , 

FINIAL-DOMESTIC, or HIP-KNOB. 

Northborough, c. 1320. Two examples from Bam, Bath 

Hampton, o. 1350. Wolyerton hall, Dorset, c. 1500. 

Shrewsbury, o. 1580. Castle inn, Cambridge, c. 1620 . 

Friar gate, Derby . . . . , 

The ornamental finish of gables of mediaeval houses. The two last 

are of wood, and shew the usual mode of ornamenting the gable of a 

timber house. 

FIREPLACE. NoRMAK. Rochester castle, c. 1130. Conis- 
borough castle, c. 1170 • . • . 

Early English. Aydon castle, Northmnberland, c. 1270 

Aydon castle, Northumberland, c. 1270 
Decorated. Edlingham castle, Northmnberland, c. 1330 
Perpsndicxtlar. Sherborne abbey, Dorsetshire, c. 1470 

FLAMBOYANT STYLE. 



Doorway 


PAOl 

209 


pLAn 


Pillar 


Impost 


259 


— 


Rib . 


Mouldings 


— 


131 


Rood-lolt 


Gallery 


— 


94 


Window! 


Parapets 


340 


140 





Boss. Notre dame la Riche, Tours, c. 1500. (Descrip- 
tion of Plates, p. 11.) 



TAQM 

206 



viAtm 



ib. 



254 



209 
208 



84 
ib. 



ib. 
ib. 
85 

ib. 



86 



87 

ib. 

88 
ib. 
ib. 



153 

170 
250 



DSSCRIPTIVK INDEX OP THE ILLUSTUATIONS. 

FLTITINGS or FLUTES. Gbeciak Doric. Partlienon . 

Gbkcian Ionic. Erectheum, and cabled flutes 
FOIL-ARCH. TrefoU opening. TrefoU arches. Cinquefoil 

arch ..... 

FONT. Norman. ColeehiU, Warwiclcshiie, c. 1150 

Arcade rmm da., *M PUte 8. 

Thii is n TGTj curiouB and temarluble exunple, and U Tilnable fbi 
the arcade filled irith rich folia{[e with which it ii aiaroanded, part of 
' which ii given under arcade, and the real her& The form of the 
nimbai ia remarkable. 




DESCRIPTIVE iNDEt OF THE liLUStRATIONS. 



85 



212 

217 

219 
220 



221 



223 



90 

ib. 
91 



FONT. PAOi PLA.n 

It is only the bowl which is Norman, and it has been placed on a 
later shaft, which is also of a difie^rent kind of stone. 

Eablt English. S. Giles's, Oxford, c. 1220. 

Remarkable for the boldness of the tooth-ornament 
Lackford, Sussex, c. 1250 ... & 

Decorated. Offley, Hertfordsliire, c. 1350 

Window tracery either of the whole window or only the head was a 
frequent ornament of Decorated fonts. 

Stanwick, Northamptonshire, c. 1350 ■, • ^ ib. 

This has been a very rich example, but has lost its shaft and been 
much mutilated. It stands in a very interesting church. 

Wymington, Bedfordshire, e. 1380 .213 

This is late in the style and is f^om a remarkable church, the date 
of the erection of which is tolerably well ascertained. See a pillar 
from the same church, PL 148 ; part of the roof^ p. S99. 

Pebpendicitlar. Fotheringhay, Northamptonshire, A.D. 

1440 . . . . . _ 92 

A very usual form of a Perpendicular font 

Bradford Abbas, Dorsetshire, c. 1480 . .. ib. 

Font cover, Monksilyer, Somersetshire . 

FRACTABLE ...... 

FRElT ....... 

Reticulated ...... 

FRTTHSTOOL, FRIDSTOOL, or FREEDSTOOL. Bever- 
ley minster ...... 

GABLE. West end of Bede-house, Higham Ferrars, North- 
amptonshire ...... 

George Inn, Salisbury, c 1320 or 1350. Salisbury, A.D. 

1360. Eltham palace, Kent, c. 1490 . . . 93 

These three are all examples of the gables of timber houses, and 
might more properly perhaps have been called Barge-boards, which 



Shrewsbury abbey, c. 1350. Newgate, York . 59 







rnai 


run 


^ \ GABLET. Sutton Comtenay, 




1 


j3L_ \ BerlMhire . 


225 


_ ! 


ijKI^KS[¥'~ Another example frDiD s bnttren 






"iffi- - jA' '' ^"* Derehwn ii here iotrCK 






7^V(n^^ duced. 






'/^LvKk-^^B^ GALLERY. Decoeated. Ex- 








_ 


94 


/JHUr^^^L !^|f Thii ia > atone pllery in the 






IL^'-'^^^^^^ Flahbotant. Burgoe,Spain, 










|k^ '"^^V'fl '^'^ - 


— 


ib. 


P^ yjj^: H QLAZINO QUARRIES 


233 


- 


■ r n , . ■ GUILLOCHE 


244 


- 


OUHOOYLE. Merton coUege chapel, Oxford, A.D. 1277. 


228 


- 


Howdea, YorkBhire, c. 1350. Horaley church, Der- 






byddre, c. 1450. S. Alkmund'a church, Derby, c. 






1450. S. Cuthbert'a, York, c. 1450 . 


_ 


95 


Stony Stratford, Warwickshire, c. 1480 


— 


ib. 


Th!> ie ftnm the nuned church of S. Mary Megdalen. The tower. 












KodyiDg. 






GDTT^ ....... 


244 


- 


HAMMF.R-BEAM 


247 


_ 


Single and double hammer-beam roof . 


394 


_ 


HAUNCH. Door, Jubbei^te, York 


248 


_ 


A beautiful example of a rich tmiber doorway, of which there were 












HERRINGBONE WORK . 


249 





Tamworth castle ..... 





108 


HERSE, over the effigy of Richard earl of Warwick 


250 


— 


HINDOO ARCHITECrURE. Capital, Elcphanta. Capital 






and base, Salsette. Pillar and entablature, Salactte . 


_ 


96 


HINGE. FaringdoD, Berks .... 


253 


_ 


Maxrtoke priory, Warwickshire. Laon cathedral. Comp- 






ton, Berkshire. Bouen cathedral 


— 


97 


HIP 


254 


- 



DESCRIPTIYS INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



87 



HIP-KNOB. Friar gate, Derby . . . . 

See also Plate 86. 

HOODMOULD TERMINATIONS. Nobman. Malmsbury^ 
abbey, Wilts, c. 1150 . . . . 

This is a Tery characteristic ornament, and is of frequent occur- 
rence in Norman work. 

Eablt English. S. Benedict's, Lincoln, c. 1250 
Stanwick, Northamptonshire, c. 1230 
Qarsington, Oxfordshire, c. 1200 

Decobated. Merton college chapel, Oxford, A.D. 1277 . 

This appears to be the head of Edward I., in whose reign the 
chapel was built 

Rnshden, Northamptonshire . • . • 

Pebfendictjlab. Chippenham, Wilts, c. 1460. Layer 

Mamey, Essex, c. 1520 .... 

Marston, Oxfordshire, c. 1520 .... 

This contains the monogram maria, so frequently used. 

HOUR-GLASS STAND. Leigh church, Kent 

IMPOST. Continuous. Fig. A. S. Pierre, Avignon 

Finchale priory, Durham, A.D. 1266, the second ex- 
ample • . • • . 
Keyingham 

Discontinuous. Fig. B. La Chapelle, Brussels 
Finchale priory, first example 
S. Nicholas, Coutances, c. 1250 
Cathedral, S. Lo, Normandy, c. 1300 • 

Shafted. Fig. C . . . . 

Banded. Fig. D. Lucca cathedral 

Discontinuous and banded. Dreux, Normandy 

Discontinuous and shafted. Lowick, Northampton- 
shire ..... 

Continuous and shafted alternately. Yarmouth, Norfolk 
Ely cathedral .... 



PAOl 

254 



pLAn 



255 
259 



ib. 



ib. 

ib. 

260 



98 



ib. 
ib. 
ib. 

ib. 



ib. 

ib. 
ib. 



99 
100 

99 
ib. 
ib. 



100 



ib. 



88 DBSCRIPTIT8 INDXX OF TBI 1 LLUfltRATIONB. 


lUPDBT. 


USB 


run 


CoMTimrouB and DiscoNriMuouB. S. Cna, York 


— 


99 


^ This U Tery curiom. 






/-^^Sj^^ The annexed pkn, in 






; J^^^^^^( *'"■='> A B^*' '^ P>" 






] ^^^^^B l\ uid B the RTch mould- 










1 jM^^^^^B / junclion of the Me 






H^^^^^d .mie. of moulding. 






jb i^^n -'""" 






; 


A ' -^^^^^^^^ S. Helen's, Stone- 








'ift^^^Hrf 


1 gate. York 


- 


i-b. 




w IHI 1 


Thin ii partly canti- 








n ^s^ni 1 


nuouB, but tbe outer 








II 


^^^11 1 


moulding are carried 








11 


11 


un a eorbel. 






VMi 


1 1 IONIC ORDER. Ca- 
■ pital from the 














f Ereetheum, 






..^u„„--« Athens 


267 


— 


IHON-WORK. Part of a door, WiBcherter cathedral 


_ 


I00« 


H.B, The woodeut it luiiied k u la plaea Iho lop of the igore on 






Iba I«n band. 






Monumpnt of Queen Eleanor, WestrainBter abbey, A.D. 






1294 


— 


ib. 


A very fine eiainple of lliat period, very limiUr lu chanicler 10 






tbu on the chapliT-hou«f door, York. 






On an Early Euglish chest .... 


I3fi 


— 


Iron coffer 




137 


— 


Nuit-hcnds. On a Normiin dour 




177 


— 


On a Decorated duor 




ISt 


— 


Of Early English hingi's 


p. 1 79 and 


253 


— 


Escutehcons on doors 


p. 198 and 


199 


— 


Ilour-glaaa stand 




255 


— 






269 


— 


NaU-hcad. Henry Vll.'a chnpcl 




ib. 


— 


Cathedral, and tj. Martin, Laon 




ib. 


— 



BI8C1IPTIVE INDKX OF THB ILLUSTRATIONS. 




89 


tON-WOBK. 


ri.. 


^ 


Door-hftndle ...... 


269 


— 


Do. Westeott Barton, Oron. St<^imiber, Somersetsliire. 


270 


— 




371 





See >1m Plate 18S. 








ib. 





Lock, Winchester cathedral .... 


291 


__ 


See alio Ekocur, P1*U 101 i and Lock, FUte IDS. 






OOOLE ..... p. 275, and 


276 


_ 


ONa-POST. Old Shoieham, Sussex 


278 


_ 


:N0CKER. Erreux cathedraL Rue dea Consuls, Auxerre. 






Rouen 


_ 


101 








Stockbuiy, Kent 


- 


ib. 


-AVATORY. Chapter-house, Selby, Yorkshire, o. 12«>. 






Salisbury cathedral, circa UOO 


_ 


102 


Lincoln cathedral, c. 1350 . 


_ 


103 


This with Hm •creea ooaupie. t)» 






^^^^^ lut htj of Ou Mutt aidB of the 






jH^^^^^^ clioii >t its juQclion with du eaatem 
W ^Hin tnuiKpt. The fire-plice bdongiog to 










■W A ^P^^fgL- it >■ inHrtedin the Eul? EnglJlh 










^^- '^^^^^W^^ ■■>'! remuni on the ouimde. 






^^^ CloiBters, Norwich 


_ 


ib. 


^^^. Id tbii initanee thenars two lava- 






^H toriet adjoining, and tbeir are of fif- 






m^M teenth century date, and have been 






vV inierted wilh their nichei and panel- 






fWt ling, under the Decorated archet of 












II LETTERN. Bury chnroh, Hun- 








— 


104 


W^^L A curiou* and early wuunple, and 






P*B^ -j' may probably be iomewhal earUn 






- ^^^9'W^ than the dale here given. 






„^^--.«_^^^X^^^ Ramsey churdi, Hunting- 






"^^y'S;,^ donshire, o. 1450 


_ 


104 


- "T*^"*"^ XhB book ii chained to the deak 













DESCRIPTIVK INDKX OP THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



LR7TBBN. 

S. Hidiael's, Norwich . . . . ■ 

DetUng, Kent ...... 

A Tcrj rich eumple of nnuiiul form, luTing >U the font udea 
■lo^ng initeid of two m ii oauaL 
S. Qregory's, Norwich. A brass eagle 
8. Cnii, York ...... 

Lingfield, Surrey, (last page.) Albiuy, Hertfordshire. 
Two good iiimple* of pUin Perpendiealar work. 
Islip, Oxfordshire. 

A *>I7 pUin and rilher lingalir eiunple of tbe reTived uH of the 
Uttcrn in tbe time of Chulea U. [t formed put of the furniture of 
the chancel built by Dr. South. The book of Homiliea ia placed upon 
it, aad it may haie been originally intended fbr that purpoae, according 
to th« Injunctiona, 




DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



41 



[CH-GATE. Garsington, Oxfordshire 

[GHTS OF A WINDOW. Beauchamp chapel, Warwick 

XIK. Winchester cathedral 
Rouen cathedral 
Eyreux 
Gisors . 
S. George's chapel, Windsor 

3CKER. Drayton, Berks. (See Almert) 

30P-H0LES ... pp. 52, 68, and 

DUVRE. Westminster hall 

Lincoln collie, Oxford, A.D. 1435 

3W SIDE WINDOWS. Binsey church, Oxfordshire 
North Hinksey, Berks • 

Eaydon, Suffolk . . ; • 

ACHICOLATIONS .... 

ASEIS. Steeple Barton, Oxfordshire. Ensham, Oxford- 
shire. Dover priory. Three examples from Higham 
Ferrers, Northamptonshire. West Claudon, Surrey. 
Castor, Northants. Rothwell, Northants 

ASONRY, Soman; (misprinted Norman in the Plate.) 
Soissons. lillebonne, (a specimen of Roman ashlar.) 
Silchester. Colchester, Essex. Mint wall, Lincoln. 
Perensey, Sussex ..... 

Serringhone work. Tamworth castle . 
These itones are laid edgeways. 

Biuhble. S. Leonard's, Mailing, Kent . 
Lang and short work, Burcombe, Wiltshire. Witter- 
ing, Northamptonshire .... 
Wide jointed. White tower, London . 

This is early Norman work, and is a Ysluable example. The same 
kind of joint occnrs in the work of Remigius, at Lincoln. 

Wide and fine jointed, Winchester cathedral . 

This shews the junction of the early Norman or wide jointed 
masoBxy with the later or fine jointed, and is yaluable for fixing dates. 

Rochester ...... 

Impost, Whitby abbey, Yorkshire 



289 
290 
291 



FLATi 



292 

293 

203 
ib. 

294 

295 

ib. 

296 



249 



105 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 



106 



107 
108 

ib. 

ib. 
ib. 



ib. 



300 
301 



g 



42 



DESCRIPTIYE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



MASONBT. 

METOPE •.....• 

MISERERE. Henry VIL's chapel, Westminster . 

MITRE. Of a moulding . . . . . 

MODILLION ... pp. 107, 142, and 

MONUMENT. Norman. Coffin-slab, Bishop Ralph, Chiches- 
ter cathedral, A.D. 1123 . . . . 

Early English. Coffin-slab. Romsey, Hampshire 

See Cutts' Manual of Monomental Slabs. 

Decorated. Coffin-slab. Bredon, Worcestershire 

This is a Tery remarkable example. It is now placed apright 
against the wall in the chancel. For description, see AicbmoL Jooxnal, 
ToL ii p. 90. 

S. Stephen's, Bristol ..... 

A Decorated monument, or high tomb, with effigies and canopy. 
For a description, see ArchsoL Journal, voL ilL p. 82, but the monu- 
ment is evidently of earlier date than there assigned to it. 

MOORISH or ARABIAN ARCHITECTURE. Entrance 

to the mosque of Cordova, Spain 

This example is given as shewing several peculiarities, vie, a door- 
way of the most usual form, a horse-shoe arch within a square label 
and having its Arabic inscriptions from the Koran, an arcade, windows, 
and lastly a singular form of battlement. 

Three capitals from the Palace of Alhambra, Spain 
Doorway, Tarragona, Spain 
Window, Griralda tower, Seville 
Arabesque ornament from the Alhambra 

MOULDINGS. Grecian and Roman 
Chrecian avolo. Temple at Corinth 
Haman avolo. Theatre of Marcellus, Rome 
Scotia, trochihu, or casemefU. Baths of Diocletian, Rome 
Cavetto. Theatre of Marcellus, Rome . 
Ckfma recta. Theatre of Marcellus, Rome 
Chfma reversa, or ogee. Temple of Antoninus, and Faus- 

tinus, Rome ..... 
Quirked ogee. Arch of Constantine, Rome 
Torus. From Palladio 
Bead ...... 



PAGl 

306 
307 

ib. 

ib. 

309 
ib. 

310 



riAts 



311 



32 
33 
31 



159 

ib. 
379 



109 



ib. 



110 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 



ib. 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 



DxscRipnyx index of the illustrations. 



43 



MOULDINGS. 

Astragal. Theatre of Marcellns, Eome 
FiUet ..... 
Apophyges, Baths of Diocletian, Eome 
JEteeds ..... 
DcnMs .... 

Egg amd Anchor 

NoRKAN. Fire-place, Newcastle castle, Northumberland, 
c. 1080 ...... 

This is an early example of the billet moulding, as the castle was 
Xnult by order of Robert, duke of Normandy. The mouldings are very 
nmple. 

West front, Lincoln cathedral, c. 1090 . 

This is the section of an arch at the west end, which was the work 
of Remigius the first bishop. The ornament under the dripstone is 
rery characteristic of early work. 

Square billet^ Ardenne abbey, Normandy 

Canterbury cathedral, c. 1100 .... 

The ornaments of this, the flat billet and sunk lozenge, which are 
shallow and require little skill in the execution, bespeak the early cha- 
racter of this example. This is the work of Emulph. 

Arch, choir, Peterborough cathedral, c. 1140 J. 
A good example of plain Norman. 

Binham, Norfolk ..... 

Norwich cathedral ..... 

Peterborough cathedral, (two examples) 
Canterbury cathedral, c. 1178 . . . . 

This is from the work of William of Sens, and a comparison of this 
with the one above it, which is from the same part of the cathedral but 
of later date, will shew the progress which had been made between the 
two periods. In the first the work is of the most simple design and the 
work shallow, while in the last a more elegant outline has been given, 
and the cutting is bold, deep, and finished. See Willis's Canterbury, 
P.SS. 

Western transept, Ely cathedral . 

The keeled moulding on the angle of this shews a late date, and a 
tendency to transition. 

S. Mary's guild, Lincoln, c. 1140 

This building, which is commonly called John of Oaunt's stables, has 
a fine entrance gateway, of which this is a section. It is remarkable 



PAOB 



165 
193 



316 



315 
ib. 
ib. 



fhktm 

no 

ib. 
ib. 
ib. 



Ill 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



112 



44 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



MOULDINGS. 

on several accounts, first the sunk roses or flowers on the dripstone ; 
secondly, the ornament in the hollow, which, at first sight, closely re- 
sembles the tooth-ornament, but differs from it in several respects, and 
particularly in its want of projection, the angles formed by the sides 
being very obtuse and the centre flat The same ornament occurs in 
the west doorway of the cathedral, which was the work of Bishop Alex- 
ander about 1 140. The next peculiarity is the moulding which occurs 
twice in the section. This is a round with a gproove or channel taken 
out on its most projecting part 

S. Peter's, Northampton, e. 1140 ; arch on the tower 

The section here given is that of an arch on the exterior of the west 
side of the tower, the original intention of which does not seem to have 
been well understood. It is, however, most probable that it was the 
arch of the original west window. The church is a celebrated example, 
and this arch will fully bear out its reputation. The details are ex- 
tremely beautiful and varied, and worked with great delicacy but not 
much depth. 

Window, Moyes's hall, Bury S. Edmund's, e. 1160 
Door, Middleton Stoney, Oxfordshire, e. 1160 , 
Ambrosden, Oxfordshire, e. 1160 
These are all good specimens of late Norman work. 

MOULDINGS and ORNAMENTS. Early Norman 

These examples are brought together for the purpose of shewing 
what were the general modes by which ornament was produced in the 
early Norman buildings. It will be seen that this was in general ac- 
complished by making the simplest forms possible, two sets of oblique 
lines crossing each other, and then from the centres of the lozenges 
thus formed cutting away the stone slopingly to the points, and thus 
by lowering one set giving relief to the alternate ones. By these means 
the lozenges at Old Sarum, Deeping, and Walmer, and the hatchings 
at Westminster, have been produced. 

White tower, tower of London, A.D. 1081 

This is the abacus of the capital described on Plate 45. The orna- 
ment consists of the cable, and a variety of what is sometimes called 
star moulding. This is formed by drawing the diagonals of a square 
and cutting down the intervals. 

Clemping, Sussex, c. 1100 . . . . 

This ornament consists merely of a set of hollow squares which have 
been cut down in the manner above described. 



PASS 



PKAtS 



112 



ib. 
ib. 
ib. 

113 



ib. 



ib. 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



45 



MOULDINGS AM9 ORNAMENTS. faob PLin 

Remains of Old Sarum. In the wall of the north gate of 

the Close, Salisbury, e. 1120 . . — 118 

In the walls of the Close and in some of the interior walls of the 
cathedral at Salishury, are buHt in many stones carved with Norman 
details, some of early and some of later date. These must evidently 
have been brought from the cathedral of Old Sarum when it was pulled 
down and the present structure buHt. The specimens here given are 
from the north gate of the Close, and from the character of their orna- 
ments have evidently belonged to the older portions of the ancient 
cathedraL 

Deeping S. James, Lincolnshire, c. 1120 . . — ib. 

This shews a raised lozenge, and single zig-zag. 

Walmer, Kent, c. 1120 . . . . — Ji,^ 

Has the sunk lozenge and double billet 

Transept, Winchester cathedral, A.D. 1090 . . — ib. 

This has been called a prismatic billet It is produced by marking 
out squares on the three sides of the moulding, and cutting away the 
alternate spaces, and has much the effect of bricks set end-wajrs and 
comer-ways. 

Westminster hall, A.D. 1097 . . . — ib. 

This is called the hatched or saw-tooth ornament ; it is here worked 
on the three faces of the string. 

SouthweU minster, Nottinghamshire, c. 1100 . . — ib. 

The first of these is an arch-moulding, and shews the ornament men- 
tioned before, and also a singular one of double cones or fusils lying 
side by side, and which produce a curious eflbct The second is an 
ornament on a capital. 

NoBMAN. 2iigzag or chevron . . . — 114 

This Plate presents an assemblage of varieties of the zigzag, the most 
characteristic ornament of the Norman period. See also pp. 128 and 525 

North Hinksey, Berks . . . . — ib. 

This is a common form ; the mouldings consist of a hollow and a 
round cut on the plane of the wall. 

Guibray, Normandy . . . • . — ib. 

Shews the zigzag projecting, that is, cut with salient and re- 
I entering angles. 

Fresne, CamiUy, Normandy . . . — ib. 

Has the two varieties forming a hollow lozenge between. 



46 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OP THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



MOULDINGS Airo ORNAMENTS. 

Bredgar, Kent . 

Has the nail-head on two of the mouldings. 



West door, Lincoln cathedral, c. 1140 . 

This is from the elaborate work of Bishop Alexander, in the time of 
Stephen, and is remarkable for exhibiting an ornament very similar to, 
though not identical with, the ball-flower, and another which was after- 
wards used in Early English work. Very similar ornaments occur in 
France, in late Norman work, as at Notre Dame, Paris. 

New Romney, Kent ..... 
Shews another variety of the projecting zigzag. 

Iffley, Oxfordshire ..... 

A series cut on a plain surface. 

Hadiscoe, Norfolk ..... 

This is a very singular example, the zigzag being reversed and cut 
across the moulding. 

Andover, Hants ..... 

Combined with the scallop. 

Beanlieu, near Caen, Normandy 

Is an example of the mode of filling up the zigzag in rich work. 

Barfreston, Kent ..... 

Is a very curious example. It is cut on two planes, that on the 
lower one forming a regular zigzag, while that on the upper is inter- 
rupted, and forms alternate lozenges with the lower one. 

Sutterton, Lincolnshire .... 

Shews a very good but unusual mode of ornamenting the zigzag. 

Cable. Komsey, Hants .... 

This moulding is used in almost all periods of Norman work. 

Twining stem, Wimboltsham, Norfolk 

This is another variety of the same, but not so conunon. 

1. Beadedj 2. Twisted panel. Durham cathedral 
Is an unusual variety of the same type. 

JBilleted cable. Jew's House, Lincoln , 

Is another variety, but ornamented with the billet 

Intersecting and cable. S. Georges de Boscherville 



114 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



lb. 



lb. 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



115 



lb. 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



DESCRIPTIVE INDBX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



47 



MOULDINGS AVD ORNAMENTS. 

Nail-head. Upton S. Leonard's, Gloucestershire 

The nail-head being an ornament easily cut, was much used in al- 
most all periodi of Nonnan work, and also in the earlier examples of 
Early English capitals, &c., and may be safely considered as the origin 
of the tooth ornament 

S. Ck)ntet, near Caen, Normandy . . * . 

This and another of similar character are generally used in late or 
trmnaition work, as at Glastonbury abbey, and at Hargrave, Plate 120. 

Star. Herringfleet, Suffolk .... 

This ornament, which is formed by cutting down in a sloping 
manner the intenrals between a square and its diagonals, is much used 
in abaci and aimilar titnationf. 

Jjozenge. Tickencote, Rutland . 

This church has a very rich chancel- arch, from which this moulding 
is taken. The lozenge is formed by the junction of two zigzags. 

JEnriehed Lozenge. Montivilliers, Normandy . 
In this the spaces in the lozenges are merely sunk. 

Segmental Billet. Abbaye aux Dames, Caen 
N^ntle and Billet. S. Contet-les-Caen 
Boll Billet, double. Binham Priory, Norfolk . 
Square Billet^ double. S. Augustine's, Canterbury 
Segmental and square Billet. S. Mary's, Leicester 
Billet and studded. Llandaff cathedral 

The billet in its yanons forms being merely the retaining or cutting 
away of alternate portions of any given moulding, was an ornament 
easily executed, and therefore extensively used in all periods of Nor- 
man work. In the Abbaye aux Dames it is a half round laid on the 
flat &oes of a three-sided moulding. In S. Contet, Binham, and Llan- 
daff, it is cut on round mouldings, at S. Augustine's on a square, and 
at S. Mary's, Leicester, is altemately a half round and half square. 

doisten, Peterborough cathedral 

This ia a very singular ornament, and consists of two rows of stones, 
the semicircular ends of which project at right angles from the wall, 
but it produces a very good eflect 

Bredgar, Kent . 

This ia the nail-head cut altemately on the upper and lower face of 
a three-aided moulding, and is another example of what might be 
easily converted into a tooth ornament, and the same may be said of 



rAOB 



115 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 

116 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



48 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



MOULDINGS An ORNAMENTS. 

Iffiey and North Hinksey. The indented is much used in transition 
work, and sometimes in Early English. 

Indented. 1. Iffley, Oxfordshire. 2. S. Nicholas, Nor- 

WlCJD. • • * • • a 

Ditto, North Hinksey, Berks 

Beak-head. S. Ebbe's, Oxford . 

CafS'head. Tickencote, Rutland 

Ditto, West door, Lincoln cathedral 

Ditto, Chamey, Berks • . . . 

See also Capital, Nun Monkton, p. 110. 

These are all varieties of a mode of ornament much used in the 
richest period of Norman for ornamenting doorways, windows, and 
arches. The one from Lincoln is from the rich door of Bishop Alex- 
ander, and shews the double as well as the single head. Very fine ex- 
amples of both occur also at Iffley. 

Bird's head, S. Cross, Hants .... 

This occurs on a window, and is a very beautiful variation of the 
mode of filling up a zigzag. 

Scolloped. Hadiscoe, Norfolk. Castor, Northamptonshire 

The scollop is an ornament frequently used either by itself or in 
combination with others. 

S. Alban^s abbey church . 
S. Julian's, Norwich 
S. Peter at Growt's, Lincoln 

Binham Priory, Norfolk .... 

These are two varieties of the waved line or nebule which is not 
infrequently used as a corbel-table. 

Bellet, Door, Iffley, Oxfordshire 

The doors and arches of this fine church present a great variety of 
details, two of which are here given ; viz., the pellet, which is an orna- 
ment very frequently in use, and the rose, which is more unusuaL 

Studded. Hales, Norfolk .... 

Fir-cone <yr Mr-apple, Croyland abbey, Lincolnshire . 
This is a variety of the pellet, but being cross-hatched gives it the 
appearance of a fir-cone. 

Base, Door, Iffley, Oxon .... 

Ditto, Nun Monkton, Yorkshire 

Is another variety, and occurs here in transition almost Early English 
work. A form very similar is found in the work of Bishop Alexaader 



PAOB 



Tkkn 



Interrupted arched. 
Label corbel-table. 
Nebule corbeUtable. 



116 

ib. 
117 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 
ib. 
ib. 

ib. 



118 



ib. 
ib. 



ib. 
ib. 



DBSCRIPTIYB INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



49 



MOULDINOS Am ORNAMENTS. 

at Lincoln, Plate 114, in the Early English work in the choir at 
Lincoln as a hoodmould termination, and again at S. Mary's, Bererley, 
Plate 127. It seems therefore to have been a favourite form, though it 
is impossible to say what it is intended to represent 

1. Diamond frette. Lincoln cathedral, c. 1140 

The two examples here given occur in the work of Bishop Alex- 
ander so often mentioned. 

Chain, S. William^s chapel, York 

The chain moulding is not common, and the chapel from which this 
was taken is now entirely destroyed. 

Double cone. Stoneleigh, Warwickshire 

This is not of conmion occurrence; an example differently ar- 
ranged is shewn in Plate 113. 

Triangvlar Jrette or dovetail. Ely cathedral 

2. Embattled. Lincoln cathedral 

TrelUe and MedaUion, Malmsbury ahbey 

These two ornaments are much used in rich Norman work, the first 
Uu enriching the shafts, and the latter for the arches of doors, &c., 
where the medallions are generally filled with the signs of the sodiac 
and other subjects. 

Open heart and Antique, Jew's House, Lincoln 
These, the second of which is an evident imitation of Grecian or- 
nament, are taken from the fine twelfth-century house known as the 
Jew's House in Lincoln, and which appears to be of about the same date 
as the next examplt. 

3. West door, Lincoln cathedral, c. 1145 

The work of Bishop Alexander. The specimen here given is an 
abacus of one of the shafts. 

Overlapping, S. Margaret's, York 

This is an uncommon and very curious example, the orna- 
ment appearing to lie over the mouldings which are seen through the 
openings. 

Patricksbonme, Kent ..... 
These appear to belong to the same class as Malmsbury. 

4. West door, Lincoln, c. 1145 .... 

This is another example from the work of Alexander so often men- 
tioned. It, as well as the three following examples, have a strong re- 
semblance to the tooth ornament, but die differences are pointed out 
in Plate 112. 



pAoa 



PIATB 



118 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 

ib. 

119 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



50 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



MOULDINGS AND ORNAMENTS. 

Patricksboume, Kent • . . . . 

Canterbuiy catliedral, c. 1180 . . . . 

From the so-called baptistery at Canterbury. (See Willis's Canter- 
bury cathedral, p. 82.) 

Norman and Transition . . . . 

The whole of the examples in this Plate are transitional. 

Nun Monkton, Yorkshire, c. 1180 

This is taken from a small but highly interesting and curious 
church, which is for the most part Early English, but has many por- 
tions which have more or less of Norman or Transition character 
about them, and of this class is the west doorway from which this 
section is taken. It is an excellent specimen of transition, though it 
has more of Norman than Early English character. The profile 
retains the general square form of the Norman, but the angle mould- 
ing is keeled, and the hollows on each side are enlarged. The orna- 
ment is an enriched zigzag which'overlies the keeled moulding, allow- 
ing it only to be seen through the intervals. (See Arch. Journal, 
voL ir. p. 131.) 

Canterbury cathedral, c. 1 1 78 . 

This is a rib-moulding from the work of William of Sens, and has 
much of transition character about it, for though in general appearance 
it is Norman, the deep hollows of the moulding and the almost entire 
loss of the original squareness of the whole mass, approximate it to 
Early English. 

Ratcliffe, Bucks, c. 1180 . . . . 

In this again the zigzags form lozenges, but they are not pierced as 
in the last example. An obtuse tooth ornament is used in the drip- 
stone. 

Cuddesden, Oxfordshire, c. 1 1 80 

The ornament here is produced by the meeting of two zigzags on 
the angle, and by cutting away the stone of the alternate spaces they 
are left detached, and the large round moulding shewn underneath. 
A small tooth ornament is also used. 

Hargrave, Northamptonshire, c. 1200 . 

In this almost all Norman features have disappeared except the 
disjointed chevrons which lie over the hollow mouldings. The tooth 
is used, and the mouldings are more rounded than in the preceding 
examples. 

Glastonbury abbey, c. 1180 . . . . 

This is A portion of one of the doorways, and is of transition charac- ' 



PAGB 



nktM 
119 

ib. 



120 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



^ 



DEBC&IPTIVE 1 



[ OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



U0UI.DIN09 AID ORNAMENTS. 

tcr, bul the faluge of thi* viry inUreating rain ii or the moit 
and varied design. 
Eablt English Chancel-arch, Great Haseley, Oxford- 
shire, c. 1200 ..... 

West door, Haseley, Oxfordshire, c. 1200 
In Ibeae >ie diitincl fealuieg of truiiition. In the chuiccl-arch the 
iquan Norniuk ronn and the tniititioa Iceel mnulding ate bath evident. 
Id tbe doorwiy, though the aquare onlUne i< still retained, it ii cut i 
into ao Dunj mouldinga and deep hollowa, that it is no longer trani 
tion, bat geaulne Euly Engliih, tbongli certaiol; larly in tfae atyle. 

Great Addingtou, Northamptonshire 
Thia ha* little o( traniition remaiaing except the zigiag, and, ■ 
tlKn^hioiind.headed,isaa Esil]' English arch in the rest ot its detaila. 

CoDTtlodge, Godmersham, Kent, c. 1260 
Netleyabbey, c. 1250 .... 
North door, Kidlington, Oxon, c. 1250 . 
These are all genuine Eiil; Engliib.and exhibit Ihecharacleristic, 
deeply nndercat roundi and deep hollows. 

Diagram of Early English mooldiiigs. See pp. 316 and 

SaUsbuiy cathedral, A.D. 1225 

T^nple church, London, A.D. 1240 (two examples) 

Tha first of these exhibits the filleted rounde, and the second ha 
TCTf lingular grooTed moulding which appean to be of eailj' character. 
Another moulding from the same church is here introduced, which is 
still bellar example of Early English. 



ib. 

ib. 
ib. 




52 



DESCRIPTITE IKVBX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



MOULDINGS An ORNAMENTS. 

Woodford, NorthampUnishiTe .... 
Is a particularly good speeinien of this period. 

College church, BracUey, Northamptonshire 

Early English. Tooth Ornament. Lincoki cathedral. 

This is from the doorway of the north aisle of the choir. This and 
the next shew two of the most nsual plain fiDnnsi 

Chipping Warden, Northamptonshire . 

Peterborough cathedral ..... 

The tooth in this example being osed at long intenrals, produces a 
Teiy singular e£^t. 

Stone, Kent ...... 

Rinham pricny, Norfolk (four examples) 

These are taken from the west frimt of this interesting building. 

Dunstable priory . . . . . 

West door, S. Cross, Hants 

These shew some of the numerous Tsrieties of ornament which this 
originally simple form gave rise to, and it would be curious to trace h 
from the simple nail-head until it was lost in the Decorated foliage of 
the next style. 

Decorated. Tooth Ornament. Southwell minster, 

Notts. Cherrington, Warwickshire . 

These are Decorated examples, the first occupies the cornice of the 
chapter-house, and the latter is from a monument. 

Early English. Ornamented. Lincoln cathedral, 
A.D. 1200 (two examples) .... 

As before observed, this cathedral is particularly rich in light and 
elegant foliage. The first example is a specimen of this. The foliage is 
entirely undercut, and lies completely detached from the hollow mould- 
ing. The second consists of a series of roses, and is from tht door- 
way of the north aisle of the choir. 

Ely cathedral, A.D. 1200 . 

Galilee, Lincohi cathedral, c. 1220 

Is a portion of the doorway leading into the transept It consists 
of two round and two angular mouldings, but the latter are cut into 
tooth ornaments and the former into trefoils, and produce altogether 
a most rich effect 

Hythe, Kent, c. 1220 ..... 
This is part of a string under the east window, and is yery sing^ular. 



rAOB 



316 



run 
122 



ih. 
123 



lb. 
ib. 



ib. 
ib. 

ib. 
ib. 



ib. 



124 



ib. 



ib. 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OP THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



63 



MOULDINGS ABX> ORNAMJSNTS. 

It coniists of a series of squares enclosing circles and quatrefoils, 
which are very deeply cut, so that the centres stand in very bold relief. 

Peterborough cathedral, c. 1240 

Winchester cathedral, c. 1260 . 

Transitioii. Dorchester, Oxfordshire, c. 1280 n. 

Window, north aisle, Dorchester, Oxfordshire, c. 1280 

Both these sections, particularly the first, belong to the transition 
or geometrical period. 

Bishop Bridport*8 tomb, Salisbury cathedral, A.D. 1246. 
Warmington, Northamptonshire, c. 1250 
Old organ-screen, Salisbury cathedral, A.D. 1258 (two 
examples) ...... 

Ely, Peterborough, Winchester, Warmington, and Salisbury shew 
different applications of the characteristic trefoil, and otber Tarieties 
of foliage. 

Decorated. Ely cathedral, c. 1330 
Howden, Yorkshire 
Selby, Yorkshire 
Dorchester, Oxfordshire, c. 1320 
Headington, Oxfordshire, c. 1300 

By comparing this plate with that of the Early English, it will be 
seen that there is a great difference of character. The hollows are not 
so deep, and the rounds are scarcely undercut, and the fillets are more 
common. The one from Headington exhibits a moulding which seems 
to be peculiar to thia style. This is what may be called a $unk 
ckaa^er, and consists of a chamfer with a small square cut on its 
upper and lower edge, and thus by the light and shade produced adding 
greater distinctness to the outline. 

East window. Great Haseley, Oxfordshire, c. 1300 
Door, N. aisle. Great Haseley, c. 1350 . 
Thorpe Malsor, Northamptonshire 
Door, Kiddington, Oxfordshire, c. 1350 . 
Window, Great Haseley, Oxfordshire, c. 1350 . 
Window, Little Wenham hall, Suffolk, c. 1300 

The whole of these examples exhibit different varieties of the scroll 
moulding in their hood-moulds, and the first one from Haseley shews 
also the inner arch of the window, or as it is sometimes called, rear 
arch, or tscoinson arch. 



VAOI 



FLAX! 



124 
ib. 

122 
ib. 



124 

ib. 

ib. 



125 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 



126 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 



Bucumvs »B<x or ish uxcvtm^-non- 

Tk bUdviag — — r'— inm 3. Sci'pbei't chapd 
ben, w bfiBf frtnUdy fooi. Mid anncvluc £&nst bam aaj pnn 




The wurk li tiii1«bt«l to Mr. Mackeniie for tliew fouT 
niauldlnf*. 



^^^ nnrnitht' 

f P 



llnmKhtoii ohtirch, Oxon, (two cumpIeB) 
llotim (liriipy, Oxon 

ibc. Northiunptonahiro . 



"" 


run 


317 


_l 


ib. 


_- 


318 


_ 


ib. 


— 



DB8CJUPT1VE INDXX OF TBI ILLCSTKATlONa. 




A leetioD of the uehe* of IheniTe, (c. 1300,] prcibyUry, (e. 1370,) 
■ad choir, <c 1390,) of York, ii iatroduced bere on accooat of the 
eluraetraiitic form of the mouldingi, which coDtitt chiefly of filleted 
Touods uiil onaU hoUowi. (Willii'i Arch. Hirt. of York Cathedral, 
p. 23.) 

Onrnmented. Decokated. Hawton, Notts, c. 1300 

The chancel from which Ihii ii laken ii of earlj Decorated or gv 

metrical Gharacler,iDd contaiaa aoine of the ricbeit and molt beautiful 

wott of Ibat period which we poiiesa, and of which the flnial, Plate 85, 

u ■ ipecimeo. 

"West door, York cathedral, c. 1350 

Thii ia from the Terjr rich weit door, and ibewa a lariety of the 
faui-leaved flower, which ii, next to the Ball Flowek, (Plate 21,) the 
moat characteriatic oroiment of the Decorated period. Wells, Oxford, 
and Cogga, shew the aiinple and more common rormi of ihii flower, 
while that from Wellingborough, which ia taken from the beautiful 
east window, Plate 247, ahewa a atill richer example. 

Southwell minster, Notts, c. 1300 

Theae are taken from the chapter-houie, the work of wliich ii 
exqniiile. 

WelliogboTough, NorthmnptonBhire, c. 1300 



56 



DcscmimTB nn>EX of the hxustbations. 



MOULDIXGS 

S. Manr's, Berefkr, c, ISOO .... 

Tins has been lefcind to bctee vader PUte 114. 

Door, Adderbarr, Oxon, c. 1330 

Is a Tery ine chnrdi, tlie sostb doorwaj, frooB whidi tbis is taken, 
mntaiwmg a gmt Tariecj of nA detaiL 

Southwell minster. Notts, c. 1300 

Lady Chapel, Wells cathediaL c. 1330 

North window, Coggs, Oxod, c. 1350 

Latin chapeL Oxford cathedral, c 1350 

Dorchester church, Oxfordshire 

This is the moaJding of tlie doorway on page 180, ToLL Theeentre 
member is remarkable, being g^oored and ornamented with the four- 
leaTed flower. 

Sterentcm church, Berkshire .... 

Pespexdicfulb. Door of refectoiy, cloisters, Norwich, 
A.D. 1415 ...... 

Pier-arch, presbytery, Norwich, A.D. 1480 

West door, Enmeth, Norfolk .... 

Nave, Winchester cathedral .... 

Hen. Vllth's chapel, Westminster abbey 
West door, Iselham, Cambridgeshire 

This is a plate of the most characteristic forms of monldinga of this 
style, and differences will be best understood by comparing them with 
the plates of the preceding styles. The cloister, Norwich, shews the 
small rounds and shallow hollows so frequently met with. Emneth, 
Winchester, Westminster, and Iselham shew a form which is very 
much used, the double ogee or brace-moulding, which consists of two 
ogees cut in opposite directions. Westminster and Iselham shew also 
the deep wide hollow lo often met with in doors and windows. Win- 
chester shews the most common form of hoodmould. 

Window, east end of north aisle. Great Haseley, Oxford- 
shire, c. 1430 ..... 

This shews more clearly the wide hollow in windows and doorways, 
and is altogether a very characteristic example. 

Clerestory window, Fotheringhay, Northamptonshire, 

A.D. 1440 

West door, Fotheringhay, A.D. 1440 (two examples) . 
West window, Fotheringhay, A.D. 1440 
All the details from this church are Taluable from the date being so 
well known, because the contractfor the building ofitis still extant The 



TAQM 



318 



ib. 



nut 

127 
ib. 



ib. 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 



128 
ib. 
lb. 
ib. 
il>. 
ib. 



129 



ib. 

ib. 
ib. 



DBSCKIPTIYE INDBX OF THB ILLU8TB/LTION8. 



57 



MOULDINGS AID ORNAMENTS. 


PAOS 


riiAn 


doorway (Plate 81) exhibits good examples of the boutel or roun^ 


I 




moulding. The centre one is here finished with a capital to carry the 


* 




arch mouldings, and the other two have bases and run round the square 






door without capitals. 






Door, Heavitree, DeTonshire, c. 1480 . 


^^^m 


129 


Ornamented. Porlock, Somersetshire, c. 1460 . 


^^t^ 


130 


Porlock and S. Alban's in this, and Hearitree in the last Plate 


1 




shew the introduction of the square form of ornament which snccaedec 


I 




the four-leared flower of the last style. 






Combe in Teignhead, DeTonshire, c. 1500 


^^■B 


ib. 


Is a good specimen of the style of wood -carving in Devonshire. 






Monument, Wells cathedral, A.D. 1465 


^^■» 


ib. 


S. Alban's, Hertfordshire, A.D. 1447 . 


^^^ 


ib. 


S. Frideswide's shrine, Oxford cathedral, c. 1480 (twc 


\ 




specimens) ...... 


t^a^am 


ib. 


These are taken from the stone portion of the beautiful shrine in the 


) 




cathedral. The first example is a Tariety of what is generally called 


I 




the Tudor flower, but it is not detached as it commonly is. 






Whitchurch, Somersetshire, c. 1480 


-1— 


ib. 


S. Alban's, Hertfordshire, c. 1480 




ib. 


West end of nave, S. Mary's, Oxford, A.D. 1488 




ib. 


Henry VII.'s chapel, Westminster, A.D. 1510 . 




ib. 


Balliol college, Oxford .... 


. 318 


— 


Brace moulding . . . . . 


, 319 


— 


UnduUtting moulding . . 


, ib. 


— 


S. Mary, Overee, Southwark, c. 1480 . 


ib. 


— 


Flamboyaj^t. Nave arches, Abbeville . 




131 


Nave arches, S. Trinity, Falaise 





ib. 


Nave arches, S. Pierre, Ck)utances 




ib. 


Side window, church at Villequier 




ib. 


Window on south side, S. Trinity, Falaise 




ib. 


Window, church at Clery . . . . 




ib. 


These are selected from various French churches, and exhibit the 


i 




peculiarities of the mouldings. The thinness and great projection oJ 


F 




those at Coutances, Villequier, and Falaise, are yery remarkable. 






MOULDINGS OF BASEMENTS. Early English. Lin- 


• 




coin cathedral, c. 1200 


^^"" 


132 



58 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



MOULDINGS OP BASEMENTS. 

Southwell minster, Nottinghamshire, c. 1220 . 

The first is from the choir of Lincoln, and is remarkahle for the 
great boldness of its mouldings by which that portion of the building 
is characterised. Southwell, though not so bold, is a very good ex- 
ample. 
Decorated. Leadenham, Lincolnshire, c. 1330 

Grantham, Lincolnshire, c 1330 

These are both marked by the distinctive mouldings of the style, but 
the one from Leadenham is unusually rich. 

Perpendicular. New College, Oxford, A.D. 1386. 
S. Mary's, Oxford, A.D. 1488 . 

MOULDINGS OF STRINGS. Norman. Peterborough 

cathedral, c. 1140 ..... 

Ely cathedral, c. 1140 . . . . • 

These iu« both from large fine buildings, and are highly ornamented, 
bat though strings are frequently cut in various ways, they are more 
commonly plain and of the form of the abacus, that is square with the 
lower side chamfered, or with both sides chamfered. 

Early English. Choir, Lincoln, c. 1200 , 

S. Sepulchre's, Northampton, c. 1220 . • t 

The first is from the choir at Lincoln, Plate 88, where it is very 
much used. The second, the sharp-keeled moulding, is a very common 
form, and much used in country churches. 

Romsey, Hampshire, c. 1250 .... 
Salisbury cathedral, c. 1240 .... 

Decorated. Merton college chapel, Oxford, A.D. 1277 
Sedgebarrow, Worcestershire, c. 1360 . 
Warmington, Warwickshire, c. 1350 
Finedon, Northamptonshire, c. 1340 

Merton and Finedon exhibit two forms of the roll moulding. They 
are both much used, particularly the latter. Warmington is unusi^ally 
deep and bold. 

Perpendicular. Magdalene college, Oxford, A.D. 
1480 ....... 

Wilby, Northamptonshire, c. 1450 

These are two of very common occurrence. The one from Magda- 
lene does not differ materially from that at Sedgebarrow, except that 
the latter has greater boldness of curve in the upper moulding, and a 
chamfer instead of a small round moulding below. 



PAOB 



PLAT! 

132 



ib. 
ib. 



ib. 



133 
ib. 



ib. 
ib. 



ib. 
ib. 

ib. 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 



ib. 
ib. 



DESCRIPTIV£ INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 59 




PAOB 


FLATS 


MOULDINGS OF RIBS. Norman. Gloucester crypt, A.D. 






1100 (two examples) . . . * 


— 


134 


The first example exhibits a massiTe square rib without mouldings, 






the next is little more than circular. 






• 

Transition. Oxford cathedral, c. 1180, and Glastonbury 






abbey, c. 1190 ..... 


— 


ib. 


I« a form of very frequent occurrence. 






Early English. S^sbury cathedral, A.D. 1250 




ib. 


Si Saviour's, Southwark, c. 1250 (two examples) 




ib. 


Temple church, London, A.D. 1240 


_^_ 


ib. 


Four different forms are here given, but those from Salisbury and 






S. Saviour's are the most usual. 






Decorated. Gloucester cathedral, c. 1300, and c. 1318. 






(Two examples.) ..... 




ib. 


The second is the most general form, but it is here decorated with 






the ball-fiower, which gives it greater richness. (See Plate 221.) 






Perpendicular. New College, Oxford, A.D. 1386 




ib. 


Divinity School, Oxford, c. 1450 




ib. 


These are both good and common forms. Another, perhaps more 






tinial one, is the New College one with a plain round substituted for the 






filleted moulding. 






FUlMBOYANT ...... 


209 


— 


MOULDENG TERMINATIONS. Warmington, Northamp- 






tonshire . . . . . 


— 


135 


Westminster abbey 










ib. 


Salisbury cathedral 










ib. 


Rothwell, Northamptonshire 










ib. 


Canterbury cathedral * 










ib. 


Finedon, Northamptonshire 










ib. 


Bayham abbey, Sussex . 








— 


ib. 


Pitsford, Northamptonshire 










ib. 


Finedon, Northamptonshire 










ib. 


This Plate exhibits the various modes used in the Early English and 






Decorated styles of ornamenting the junction of a chamfer and a square. 




• 


The chamfer, sometimes plain and sometimes hollow, is much used on 






the inner splays of windows and in door jambs, and indeed in every 






situation where it was necessary for the admission of light or for the 







60 



DBSCRIPTITB INDEX OF THE ILLU8T&AT10NS. 



MOULDINO TSRMIKAnONS. 

lake of efiect to Uke off tlie iqiiare angle. The janctioii of these has 
been laid hold of at an opportunity of adding ornament to plain sarfacea, 
and the ingenmty and beauty with which thb has been executed is sar- 
prising. One of the most elegant is that finom Warmingtan, whidi is 
iOled up with Early English fcdiage. The one from Finedon shews the 
moat usual mode of finishing the upper and lower terminations of the 
chamfer of a window spiny, that at Rothwell is on a large scale in the 
window in the tower, and the one from Salisbury is on a buttress. 

MULLIONS. Early English. Sfure, Witnej, Oxon^ 
c. 1250. (See Plate 258) . 
Plain mullions, early and late 

Decorated. Spire, S. Maiy*8, Oxford, c. 1280. (See 

Plates 154 and 258) 

Choir, Merton college chapel, A.D. 1277. (See Plate 

242) 

S. Michael's, Oxford, c. 1300. (See Plate 239) 
Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, c. 1 320. (See Pkte 239) 
Oxford cathedral, c. 1320 and c. 1355. (Two examples.) 

Pebfekdiculab. Westminster hall, c. 1380 
New College chapel, Oxford, A.D. 1386 
Merton college chapel, A.D. 1424. (See Plate 253) 
Lincoln cathedral, c. 1450 
Burford, Oxfordshire, c. 1500 . 

BiULTIFOIL ARCH 



MUTULE . 
NEWEL. Belsay castle 



NORMAN STYLE. 



Abacus 

Apse 

Arcade 

Arch 

Balustre 

Base . 

ornaments 

Bay . 
BiUet 
Bell-gable 



pis. 6,7 
pb. 14 



rAQB 


rLATX 


4 


1 


— 


4 


and 


8 


and 


15 


54 


— 


60 


23 


— 


27 


— 


28 


75 


116 


— 


32 



Boss . 
Buttress 

Capital, pp. 108, 828 ; 
and pis. 45 
Corbel 

Corbel-table . 
Cusp . 

Doorway, . 176, 
327; and pis. 71 
Dripstone 



TAGM rLATt 

I 



321 



322 
ib. 



136 



ib. 

ib. 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 



825 


-— 


78 


35 


— 


37 


and 


46 


144 


57 


ib 


62 


-* 


69 


to 


75 


187 


•- 



DESCRIPTIYB INDEX OP THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



61 



NORMAN STYLE CONTINUED. 



PAGB 



Fire-place 
Font . 

Hoodmould . 
Masonry 
Mouldings, p. 315; 
and pis. Ill 
Parapet 

Pillar, p. 328; and 

pis. 147 
Piscina 

Porch 
Ribs . 



PAOB 


PLATJ 





87 





89 





98 





108 


to 


120 


— 


139 


and 


149 


— 


155 




161 
134 1 


— 



Scjreeii 
Sedilia 
Strings 
Tabernacle 
Tower 
Turret 
Triforium 
Vault 
Window, pis. 224, 225, 

22d 
Zigzag 



pis. 214 

• • 

pis. 218 



and 
and 
and 



NAIL-HEAD. TweHth century. Compton, Berks 
Thirteenth century. Laon 
Fourteenth century. S. Augustine*s, Canterbury 
Fifteenth century. ColeshiU . 
Fifteenth century. Henry VII.'s C^hapel 

OGEE. Diagram of the forms of . 

ORGAN. Fifteenth century 

ORIEL WINDOW. Vicar's Qose, Wells 

OVOLO. Moulding .... 

PANEL. Early English. Lincoln cathedral 

Decorated. Tomb of Lady Montacute, 1355, Oxford 
Aymer de Valence, 1324, Westminster 
Johnof Eltham, 1334 .... 

Perpendicular. Sir Giles Daubeny, 1508 
Ruthel, bishop of Durham, 1522 
John Langston, Esq., 1487, Caversfield, Bucks 
Font, Little Walsingham, Norfolk, c. 1500 
Colchester, c. 1500 .... 
Layer Mamey haU, Essex, c. 1530 
Shewing the linen pattern. 

Layer Mamey hall, (two other examples.) 
Norwich cathedral . . . . 



177 
269 
181 
323 
269 

330 

332 

333 

334 

335 
336 



PLATI 

181 
187 
133 
196 
210 
215 
216 
219 

262 
114 



137 
ib. 

ib. 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 
138 
ib. 

ib. 



337 



62 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



PAEAPET. Norman. S. Etieiine, Caen, c. 1160 
Early English. Salisbury cathedral, c. 1250. Panelled . 

Decorated. Tower of S. Mary's, Oxford, c. 1280, or 

1300. With pierced trefoils 
S. Mary Magdalene, Oxford, A.D. 1337. Pierced, 

with a waving line ..... 
Beverley minster, c. 1350. Ornamented with diaper- 

woric *•••■■ 

Merton church, Oxon, c. 1880. With sunk panelling . 
Raunds, Northamptonshire, c. 1360. With a small 

Decorated battlement .... 

Perpendicular. S. Peter's, Dorchester, c. 1450. Bat- 
tlemented ...... 

S. Peter's, Oxford, c. 1420. With sunk quatrefoils 
Thombury, Gloucestershire, c. 1540. With open work 
and pinnacles ..... 

Flamboyant and Foreign Decorated. S. Giles, 
Caen . . i . . 

Abbey of Ardennes, near Caen 
S. Trinity, Falaise 
S. Q^rvaise, Falaise. (Two specimens.) 

PARGETTmG. Part of Bishop King's house, Oxford 
A.D. 1628. The date is cut on the wood-work 
From a house in the High-street, Oxford, A.D. 1642 

This house was pulled down in 184Z 

In the Corn-market, Oxford, c. 1620 . 
At Banbury, Oxfordshire 

PATEEA. S. Alban's abbey 

PEDESTAL. Diagram of 

PENDANT. Ottery S. Mary, Devonshire, c. 1500 
Collumpton, Devon, A.D. 1526 
Divinity School, Oxford, A.D. 1490 . 
Henry VII.'s chapel, Westminster, A.D. 1510 
Christ Church hall, Oxford, A.D. 1528 

PENDANT POST. Burford, Oxfordshire 
Fotheringhay, Northamptonshire 



PAGB 



340 



run 

139 
ib. 



ib. 

ib. 

ib. 
ib. 



ib. 
ib. 

140 



340 






341 

343 

ib. 



ib. 
ib. 
ib. 

141 
ib. 

ib. 



345 
ib. 



142 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 

ib. 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OP THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



63 



THE PERPENDICULAR STYLE. 



Abacus 

Altar. 

Arch . 

Barge-board 

Base . 

Battlement 

Bay . 

Bay-window 

Bell-cot 

Bench-table 

Base . 

Bowtell 

Buttress 

flying 

Capital 
Chimney 
Corbels 143; pis. 58,59 
Cornice 
Credence 
Crest tiles 
Crocket 
Cross. 
Cusp . 
Doorway, pp. 1 82, 1 83 
188,248,348,349 
and pis. 81 
Dripstone 
Finial, p. 206; and 

pis. 85 
Fan-tracery vault 
Fumerell 
Fireplace 

Font . ... 

Gable 
Gateway 
Gurgoyle 



PAoa 

16 
349 
59 
62 
67 

70 

75 

80 
99 

111 
129 
and 



151 

152 

158 



PLATI 

1 i 

2 
20 : 
93 
26 

31 

34 

36 

41 
43 
52 
55 
61 
63 
64 

66 
68 

70 



and 


82 


188 




and 


86 


201 


— 


203 


— 


— 


88 


— 


92 


223 


93 


350 


— 


.^ 


96 



Hoodmould termina- 
tions 
L-onwork,pp. 269, 270 
Lavatory, . pis. 102 
Lettcm, pp. 285, 286 ; 
descriptive index, pp. 
39, 40, and 
Lights 
Lock . 
Louvro 
Miserere 
Monument 
Mouldings 

ofarche8,pls. 128, 

129, 

of basements 

' of strings 

of rib^ . 

Mullion 

Nail-head, pp. 269 and 
Oriel . 

Panel, . p. 337; 

and pis. 137 

Parapet, p. 67; and 

pis. 139 
Patera 
Pendant 

post . 

Pillar, p. 357; and pis. 

148 
Pinnacle, pp. 359 and 
Piscina 
Porch 

Pulpit, pis. 166 

Quatrefoil 
Reredos 



PAoa 

188 
271 
and 



pi. 

290 

291 

203 

307 

311 

319 

and 



321 
323 
333 

and 

and 
343 

345 

and 
361 

368 
and 
378 



PLAn 

98 

103 



104 



193 



130 
132 
133 
134 
136 



138 
140 
142 



153 

158 
165 
167 

168 



PERPENDICULAR STYLE CONTINUED. 



Respond 

Ridge-crest 

Roodloft, 

Boot, pis. 

Screen, 

Sedilia 

Sepulchre 

Squint 

Stall . 

Stoup 

Tabernacle, 



pis. 169 

178, 179, 

pis. 184 



PAOB 

385 
151 
and 
and 
and 

422 



PLATB 



pp. 452, 
453, 454 



170 
180 
185 
192 

194 
195 



447 



and 



197 



Tower 

Turret, pis. 214 

Vane 

Vault, pp. 508, 509 

Vestry 

Window, one-light 

two-light 

ihyee or more 

lights, p. 349 ; and 
pis. 253 

of spire . 

of tower 



PA6B 



PERPEYN WALL. Lincoln cathedral, c. 1200 . 

This is one of the dwarf walls or solid screens which divide the 
chapels on the east side of the transept 

PEW. Decorated. Dol, Brittany, c. 1300 

A very curious and early example, with early Decorated tracery. 

Pekpendiculak. Irchester, Northamptonshire, c. 14j50, 
Finedon, Northamptoushire, c. 1450 . 

These two are very fine examples of wooden panelling. At Finedon, 
nearly the whole church still has its original open seats of this cha- 
racter. 

Nettlecombe, Somersetshire, c. 1500 . 

A late hut very good and uncommon specimen, ornamented with 
foliage ; this engraving is repeated hy accident in the text, p. 352. 

Kidlington, Oxfordshire, c. 1450 

A good example of an end pew with the return and diagonal hut- 
tresses, ornamented with the monograms of the name of Christ. 

Milverton, Somersetshire, c. 1540 

The arms on this pew are those of Henry VIII. ; on another corres- 
ponding exactly with this is the date 1540 as part of the ornament 

Braunton, Devonshire, c. 1500 

This is one of a set of fine old pews with which this church is fitted, 
on several of them are the different instruments of the crucifixion ; on 
this one the ladder and the hammer are represented. These implements 
are often called the emhlems of the crucifixion, and are most exten- 



and 
505 
and 



and 



351 



353 



TLkfB 

213 
215 

222 
223 
227 
236 



254 
258 
259 



143 
ib. 



ib. 



0). 



144 



ib. 



DESCBIPTIYE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



65 



PEW. 



PAOX 



PLATS 



UTelj employed as ornaments in medisval work. These and the fire 
wounds were called the coat armour of the Church, and are constantly 
represented on shields, as an armorial hearing. 

Great Tew, Oxfordshire, c. 1500 

This church has heen repewed of late years, the present example is 
one of the old pews which were removed at that time. 

Steeple Aston, Oxfordshire, c. 1500 

The whole of this church is fitted with fine old pews of the same 
character as this one, hut of a great Tariety of patterns, no two heing 
alike. A series of engravings of them has been published by the 
Oxford Architectural Society. 

Headington, Oxfordshire, c. 1360 

The moulding of the rail of this pew appears like Decorated work. 
A working drawing of it has been published by the Oxford Architec- 
tural Society. 

Great Haseley, Oxfordshire, c. 1450 

A good example of plain work rather early in the Perpendicular 
style : a working drawing of this has also been published, and it has 
been extensively copied. 

Elkstone, Gloucestershire, e. 1350 

This pew has a very early appearance, and may perhaps be as old 
u the fourteenth century. Examples of this early period are however 
extremely rare. 

Cubberley, Gloucestershire, c. 1520 

A good example of the linen panel, which is generally of the time 
of Henry VIII., to which period the greater part of our ancient pews 
clearly belong. 

Dorchester, Oxfordshire, A.D. J 510 

The abbot's crozier with the name of Richard Bewforeste on a 
scroll shew this pew, or rather stall desk, to have been erected by that 
abbot, whose brass is on the fioor in front of it. 

Stanton S. John's, Oxfordshire, c. 1520 

The very singular seriesof poppies in this church, of which a speci- 
men is here given, are believed to be unique, the costume of the heads 
marks the time of Henry VIII. ; the diaper-work cut upon the face of 
the pew is also unusual at that period. 

Binham priory, Norfolk, c. 1500 

The wayy line of the open-work at the back of this pew gives the 
idea of Decorated work, but the other details do not agree with that 
period. The poppies representing infants swathed are very curious. 



144 



ib. 



145 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



146 



ib. 



ib. 



66 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE 1LLUSTEATI0N8. 



PILLAR. NoKMAN. S. Peter's, Northampton, c. 1140 

Geddington, Northamptonshire, c. 1150 

Islip, Oxfordshire, c. 1180 

Appleton, Berkshire, c. 1180 

Notwithstanding the dwarfish and heavy character of the two last 
examples, they helong to the period of transition, as shewn by the 
moaldings of the bases, and they haye pointed arches. 

Four plans .... 356 and 

Eably English. Lincoln cathedral, choir, e. 1200 

The crockets between the main pillar and the detached shafts are a 
Tery unusual feature, they are shewn also in the section of the pillar, 
Plate 150. 

Salisbury cathedral, choir, c. 1250, or rather perhaps 
1225, the year that the eastern part was conse- 
crated ..•••• 

This example shews the detached shafts. 

Salisbury cathedral, nave, c. 1250 
In this the shafts are attached. 

Welford, Northamptonshire, c. 1250 . ... 

A good example of the rather clumsy character which we frequently 
find in country churches, even in this elegant style. 

The Minstrel's Pillar, S. Mary's, Beverley 

This engraving is presented to the work by the liberality of J. H. 
Markland, Esq., of Bath, it is taken from his valuable little work, the 
"Remarks on English Churches, and on the expediency of Sepul- 
chral Memorials subservient to pious and Christian uses," in the hope 
that this beautiful example of the good taste of the minstrels of those 
days, may induce others to go and do likewise. How much betler 
it would be for all parties, if the executors of a person deceased, would 
enquire if the church in which it is proposed to erect a monument to 
his memory could not be improved by a new window, a new porch, or 
a new pillar, which might serve for the monument, instead of the 
hideous pagan deformities, or the mere patches of black and white 
marble with which our churches are commonly disfigured. 

Decobated. Orton-on-the-hill, Leicestershire, o. 1350 . 

Wymington, Bedfordshire, c. 1380 

S. Michaers, Oxford, c. 1380 .... 

Wymington is an uncommon and curious example from haying 
channels cut in the face of the pillar, and not carried through to the 



PACK 



856 



tX.AXB 

147 
ib. 
ib. 



857 



ib. 



lb. 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



148 
ib. 
ib. 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX 07 THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



67 



PILLAR. 

capitaL The other two are of the kind commonly found in country 
chnrches, and which with slight variations belong to all the styles. 

Plan of pier ... ... 

PERPE:jTDicirLAR. Old, Northamptonsliire, c. 1460 

A very common Perpendicalar pillar with four shafts attached, each 
with its separate capital and base, the hollow moulding between them 
continued from the arch to the plinth. 

Stogxunber, Somersetshire, c. 1500 

In this example the mouldings of the capital and base are continued 
found the pillar, and not broken into separate shafts, the fbliage is also 
continued round as a band, and the abacus recedes, according to the 
fiuhion of the west of England. 

S. Mary's, Oxford, A.D. 1488 . 

A good specimen of the ordinary clustered pillar of this style. 

PELLAE, SECTIONS OP. Noki^ln. Rochester cathe- 
dral, c. 1150 or 1160, (two examples) 
8. Margaret^s at Cliffe, Dover, c. 1150 . 
Islip, Oxon, c. 1200, Transition. (See Plate 147) 
Cathedral, S. Die .... 

8. Etienne, Nevers .... 

These two foreign examples are given to shew the comparison, they 
ire probably of rather later date aa well as later eharacter than the 
English examples above. 

Diagrams ... 356 and 

Eably Ekolish. Lincoln cathedral, choir, c. 1190 or 
1200 .....«« 

See the capital on Plate 50. 

Lichfield cathedral, c. 1260 . . « . 

Boche ahbey, Yorkshire, c. 1260 
Finchale priory, Durham, A.D. 1266 • • 

Ruflkington, Lincolnshire, c. 1250 . pis: 150 

Two examples, both of which shew the tooth ornament introduced 
6a the body of tbe"piUar, between the shafts. 

8. Saviour's, Southwark, c. 1250 

Bicester, Oxfordshire, c. 1260 . . • • 

Cogenhoe, Northamptonshire, c. 1240 . « 

8ee the eapiUl of this pillar on p. 17 of the Descriptito Index. 

Eault Pbekch. Eu, Normandy, c. 1230 • 



PAoa 



PLATB 



358 



857 



and 



148 



ib. 



ib. 



149 

ib. 

ib. 
ib. 

ib. 



150 



ib. 
ib. 

ib. 

151 



ib. 
ib. 
ib. 

150 



68 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



PASS 



PILLAR, SECTIONS OF. 

Cathedral, Chartres, c. 1220 (two examples) 

These three examples shew the similarity between Early English 
and Early French work, and yet the difference in the manner of work- 
ing the two styles ; in the French there is greater simplicity, mas- 
siveness and boldness of character, in the English more elegance, and 
more ornament 

Decorated. Westminster abbey, nave . 
Berkeley, Gloucestershire, c. 1360 
Bottisham, Canlbridgeshire, c. 1350 
Dorchester, Oxfordshire, c. 1360 
Manchester cathedral, c. 1380 . 

The last is a particularly fine example of the clustered pillars, and 
of the boldness with which the hollows we re cut into the heart of the 
pillar. 

Perpendicular. Arundel Sussex, c. 1450. Manchester 
cathedral, c. 1450 ..... 
Fotheringhay, Northamptonshire, A.D . 1440 . 
S. Mary's, Oxford, A.D. 1488 . 

Cromer, Norfolk ..... 

See Capital, Plate 52. 

Flamboyant. Clery ..... 

A round pillar with shafts attached, but of very difi^erent character 
from the Perpendicular. 

Abbeville ...... 

This is a conmion Flamboyant pillar, the hollows are so shallow as 
to produce little more than a wavy line, and the projections scarcely 
cast any shadow. 

PINNACLE. Eably English. Oxford cathedral, c. 1220 . 

These four curious and early pinnacles have lately been rebuilt with 
the upper part of the spire, and have lost much of their original cha- 
racter in the process. 

Peterborough cathedral, c. 1238 
Bampton, Oxfordshire, c. 1240 

In this elegant spire, the usual positions of the pinnacles at the 
four angles of the tower, are occupied by figures, of which this is o^e ; 
the other three represent saints. The shafts and capitals are of Early 
English character, the latter with an imiUtion of the volute ; the bases 
are ornamented with figures of animals. 

Battle church, Sussex . . . I 360 



PLi 

15 



15: 
il 
it 
il 

ii 



15i 
il 
it 
il 



ib 



15^ 



ib 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



69 



PINNACLE. FAOI PLAT! 

Decorated. S. Mary's, Oxford, e. 1300 . . — ib. 

This celebrated and beautiful cluster of pinnacles is now being re- 
built (June 1 850)» the lower part with the canopies very faithfully re- 
stored, the upper part from the set-off had been previously rebuilt in 
the time of Charles I., and it is impossible to say how far the original 
design had been then exactly copied, but they are here represented as 
tiiey are believed to have been originally built, preserving the propor- 
tions and the outlines exactly as they were handed down to us from the 
time of Charles 1., and restoring the details only. In the new pinnacles 
a second set of canopies is introduced at the set-off) and the upper part 
of the pinnacle is carried up six feet higher than it was before. 

For other details of this beautiful tower and spire see the cornice, 
Plate 63; a mullion, Plate 136; the parapet, Plate 139; one of the 
spire lights, Plate 258. The exact date is not known but is believed 
to be from 1280 to 1300. 

Perpendicular. John of Gaunt*s palace, Lincoln . 361 

S. Stephen's, Bristol ..... 359 
The projecting wing of this pinnacle is now destroyed, but at Thorn- 
bury (Plate 140) they still remain : this appears to have been a fashion 
in late examples of the rich Perpendicular churches in the west of 
England. 

This is a curioiu example of a kind of turret, or pinnacle, not un- 
common in rich towers in the west of England, having a flying ox 
hanging buttress at the outer angle. 

For other pinnacles see also Porch, Plate 165, and p. 209; Para- 
pet, Plate 140; Turret, p. 50; Monument, p. 311. 

PISCINA. Norman. Crowmarsh Gi£&rd, Oxfordshire, c. 
1120 ....... 

Ejrkstall abbey, Yorkshire, c. 1160 

Towersay, Buckinghamshire, c. 1150 . 

Ryarsh, Kent, c. 1150 ..... 

Early English. Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, 
c. 1250 ....... 

Rushden, Northamptonshire, c. 1250 . 

Cowling, Suffolk, c. 1260 

This example is remarlcable for the richness of the mouldings. 

Warmington, Northamptonshire . . .361 

Decorated. Fyfield, Berkshire, c. 1350 . . — ib. 

Long Wittenham, Berkshire, 1300 . . . — ib. 

A cnrions example of a piscina and monument combined, having a 
dimlnntiye effigy across the basin. 



155 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 

156 
ib. 
ib. 



70 DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 


PISCINA. 


PAttB 


nkn 


Cumnor, Berkshire, c. 1320 .... 




156 


Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, c. 1350 . 


— 


157 


Blythford, Suffolk, c. 1300 . 


— 


ib. 


These two are examples of the angle-piscina, which is not very 






common, though more so in some districts than in others, as in Bed- 






fordshire. 






Dorchester, Oxfordshire, c. 1300 


^^^_ 


ib. i 


Great Bedwin, Wiltshire, c. 1310 


— 


ib. 


Stanford in the Vale, Berkshire, c. 1310 




158 


A very singular example with a reliquary above connected with it, 






and forming part of one design. 






Great Addington, Northamptonshire 


362 


^^ 


Binsey, Oxfordshire ..... 


ib. 


— 


Perpendicular. Tackley, Oxfordshire, c. 1450 


^^ 


ib. 


Seton chapel, Scotland, c. 1450 .... 




ib. 


It will be observed that this example, like others from Scotland, 






differs considerably from either of the English styles, though more like 






the Perpendicular than any other. 






Cobham, Kent, c. 1490 ..... 


% 


ib. 


POPPY-HEAD, or POPPIE. AU Souls' coUcge chapel, 






Oxford, (two examples,) c. 1450 


— 


159 


Clifton CampviUe, Staffordshire .... 


— 


ib. 


Merrow, Surrey. ..... 


366 


ib. 


This is an example of the fleur-de-lis form of poppy-head, which is 






common in country churches, and being worked very plain it is often 






difficult to tell the age of them, some are supposed to be as early as the 






Early English and Decorated styles, but the greater part are Perpen- 






dicular. 






Cumnor, Berkshire ..... 


ib. 


_ 


Christ Church, Oxford, (four examples) 


.^ 


160 


These four are all now in the Latin chapel, but have been brought 






from the choir, and belong to two different periods. The two upper 






are part of Wolsey's work, and have his badges upon them, the 






other two are couKiderably earlier, and the set of stall desks of which 






these form a part, are ornamented with the emblems of the four Evan- 






gelists, which, though common in most parts of our churches where 






ornament was used at all, are not common in detached sculpture of 






this kind. 







DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OP THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



71 



PORCH. Norman. Kelso, Scotland, c. 1160 

A fine specimen of a shallow porch with an enriched gable. 

Sherborne, Dorsetshire, c. 1160 

The window is an insertion, and the parapet an addition in the Per- 
pendicular style, c. Ii50. 

Early English. Bamaek, Northamptonshire, e. 1250 . 

Skelton, Yorkshire, c. 1250 . . . . 

These two are both fine examples, the latter has an unusually rich 
doorway. 

Uffington, Berkshire ..... 

Decorated. S. Alban^s abbey, Hertfordshire 

The inner arches and the doorways are Early English, the outer 
arch is good Decorated. 

Kidlington, Oxfordshire, e. 1350 

The outer arch and the tabernacle over it are enriched with the ball- 
flower. 

Warblington, Hampshire, c. 1350. Aldham, Essex, 

e. 1350 ...... 

These two are of timber ; porches of this description are common in 
■ome parts of the country, especially in Herefordshire, and there is a 
good example at Long Wittenham in Berkshire. 

Perpendicular. All Saints', Stamford, Lincolnshire, 

e. 1500 ...... 

A good example, with a panelled outer arch and an ogee>crocketed 
head, pinnacles, and small flying buttresses. 

Winchester cathedral, west firont, c. 1390 

This shews the panelling and lieme yault, and the external gallery 
at the sill of the window. 

8. Peter's in the East, Oxford .... 

PORTCULLIS. Henry VH.'s chapel, Westminster 

PULPIT. Early English. Beaulieii,Hampshire, c. 1260 . 
Decorated (late). Coombe, Oxfordshire, c. 1360 

Perfenbicxtlar. Magdalen college, Oxford, A.D. 1480 . 

This is in the open air at the angle of the outer court of the college, 
and was formerly used for the Uuiyersity sermon on S. John Baptist's 
day, when the court was strewed with rushes for the occasion. 



PAQl 



867 



368 
370 



PLATl 

161 
ib. 



162 
ib. 



163 



ib. 



164 



165 



ib. 



166 
ib. 
ib. 



72 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



PULPIT. 

Fotheringhay, Northamptonshire, A.D. 1440 

A fair specimen of the panelled oak pulpits of the Perpendicular 
style, which are common in some districts, especially in Somersetshire 
and the west of England, and in Norfolk. The ceiling of the original 
small canopy with its fan-tracery is shewn under the sounding-board of 
the time of James I. A fine example of the canopy over a pulpit entire 
from Eddlesborough, Bucks, is given on p. 4^2. 

Cirencester, Gloucestershire, c. 1420 

Handhorough, Oxfordshire, c. 1460 

Wolvercot, Oxfordshire, c. 1500 

Frampton, Dorsetshire, c. 1450 . 

Trinity church, Coventry, c. 1500 

The two last are of stone, the two previous of wood ; that at Framp- 
ton has some curious sculptures upon it, one figure is evidently that of 
a priest or a saint holding up the monstrance ; that at Coventry was 
restored by Mr. Rickman. 

QUATREFOIL. King's college, Cambridge 
Six common forms 
Quarter. From tomb of earl of Warwick 

QUIRK. Quirked ogee 

llEAll- VAULT. S. MichaePs, Oxford 
Luddcnham, Kent 

REBATE ..... 

REREDOS. Bampton, Oxfordshire, c. 1350 

This, which is now built into the wall of the north transept, repre- 
sents our Saviour and the twelve Apostles under tabernacles. The 
figures from their emblems appear to be, 1. S. Peter; 2. S. Philip; 
8. S. James the Greater ; 4. S. James the Less ; 5. S. Andrew ; 
6. S. Matthew; 7. S. Bartholomew; 8. S. Matthias (?); 9. S. Jude; 
10. S. Simon (?); 11. S. Thomas; 12. S. John. The length of 
the sculpture is 6 ft. 10 in., and breadth 2 ft. 1 in. 

Somerton, Oxfordshire, c. 1400 .... 

This, which is in its proper place under the east window, is sur- 
rounded with a modern wooden frame. It represents the Last 
Supper. There appear at first to be only ten Apostles shewn, but on 
examining it, it will be foimd that the subject is taken from the gospel 
of S. John where the Evangelist is said to be *' lying on Jesus' breast," 
and this it will be seen has been literally rendered. The time chosen 
is after the departure of Judas, and this accounts for there being only 
eleven. The length is 8 ft 6} in., and height 2 ft. 1 in. 



FA«1 



PUITI 

166 



375 



167 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 



878 

379 

ib. 

ib. 

381 
ib. 

382 



168 



ib. 



DBBCRTPTiyB INDBX OP THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



78 



BBBEBOS. 

S. Thomas's, Salisbury, c. 1450 . . . . 

This occupies the whole width of the east end of the chancel. The 
angels have all of them scrolls on which inscriptions appear to have 
been painted, hut they are now gone. 

S. Michael's, Oxford 
RESPOND. Fotheringhay, Northants 
KESSAHNT. Redcliffe church, Bristol 
RIB. Westminster abbey and Clery 
RIDGE-TILE. Lincohi and Gfreat Malyem 
ROLL-MOULDING. Fifteen varieties 
ROOD. Sherborne, Dorsetshire 
ROOD-LOFT. Charlton^n-Otmoor, Oxfordshire, c. 1490 

A fine example of a rood-loft, with the cornice, and the wooden 
groining under it ; upon the left is placed a wooden cross, ornamented 
with erergreens and flowers, which are renewed annually on the first of 
May, when the cross so ornamented is carried in procession round the 
▼illage, and then placed again on the rood-loft ; this ancient custom is 
stiD continued, 1850. 

Llanegrynn, Merionethshire, c. 1500 

A very rich rood-loft and screen of late character, hut the roof over 
it slightly shewn appears to be Decorated. 

Handborough, Oxfordshire, c. 1480 

Flaicboyjlkt. Fulgoat, Bretagne, c. 1500 

A very rich example, with its parapet entire, and with altars under 
it on each side of the central doorway, according to the ancient custom 
described in the " Antient Rites of Durham," &c. These altars have 
images upon them ; the high altar seen in the distance, also has the 
loper-altare upon it, and the hangings over it. 

BOOF. Two diagrams of modem roo& 

Single and double hammer-beam roof . 
Early and late canted roo&. Three diagrams . 

Eably English. Solar of house at Chamey, Berkshire, 
c. 1270 ...... 

A good specimen of the construction of a canted roof, with tie-beam 
and king-post. For an account of the house see Archsological 
Journal, toL y. p. 811. 

Aisle of Eochester cathedral .... 



PAoa 



383 

385 
ib. 

387 

389 

ib. 

391 



PLAT! 

168 



169 



ib. 



170 
ib. 



394 
395 
398 



171 



I 396 I — 



1 




74 



DBSCRIPTIVB INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



BOOF. 'ASM run 

Teansition fbom Eakly English to Decorated. 

South aisle, Kidlington, Oxfordshire, c. 1280 . — 172 

A curioas example of a lean-to aisle roo£ Some of the braces are 
of earlier character than the rest 

Aisle, Haslingfield, Cambridgeshire, c. 1300 . . — ib. 

This is similar in construction to the last, but is richer. 

King-post, Headington, Oxfordshire . . .397 

Decorated. Kiddington, Oxon, c. 1350 . . . 173 

A good plain example of a fourteenth- century roof, of a form which 
is not unconmion. 

HaU of Malvern abbey, Worcestershire, c. 1360 . ib. 

A very fine example not only of a roof but of the construction of a 
timber house. It is, however, no longer in existence, having been taken 
down some years since. 

Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, c. 1350 . . — 174 

The singularity of this roof consists in having side- posts and braces 

supporting the purlins, as well as a king-post and braces to the ridge- 

piece. 

Little Coxwell, Berkshire, c. 1350 . . . ib. 

An example of a plain simple roof of easy construction, but which 
produces a good effect. 

Hall of the abbey manor-house, Sutton Courtenay, 

Berkshire, c. 1350 . . . . . 175 

A very fine roof, being in construction something similar to the one 
at Chamey, but much richer. The windows were originally twice the 
height they are now, the upper part having been taken away. The 
piece of roof therefore from the tops of the present windows to the 
purlins is modern. The short bay at the far end of the hall is cut 
off for the purpose of forming a passage, commonly called "The 
Screens." 

Beckley, Oxfordshire ..... 393 

Sparsholt, Berkshire, c. 1350 . . 176 

Another plain example, the only enrichment attempted being in the 
spandrels, which are filled with open tracery. Roofs of this flat form 
are more commonly of the Perpendicular style, but the details of this 
shew it to be Decorated. 

Wymington, Bedfordshire, c. 1370 . ib. 

Of the same character as the last, but the small shafts and the 
foliations of the arch add greatly to its enrichment 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILHISTBATIONS. 75 


BOOP. 


risa 


f^„ 


South aisle, Kidlington, Oxon 


397 


~ 


Headington, Oxon ..... 


ib. 


— 


Tkaksition from Decokated to Perpendiculae. 






Faringdon, Berksliire. c. 1400 .... 


_ 


177 


Tbii rorm of roof Is used of much eaiUet date than heie given, bul 












be of the date aaBigned. 






Newel staircase, Thornton abbey, Lincolnshire . 


_ 


ib. 


Thii ii the roof of the termination of the Qenel in the gateway 






wUch vai built about 1382. The ribs ue of atone, though from their 






conitructioD [be; might at first ught be taken for wood. See Arch. 






Jounul, Tol. ii. p, 362. 






P*fiPE!rDicu].iB. Godshill, Isle of Wight, c. 1450 


_ 


178 


Athelhampton hall, (commonly called Admeston,) Dor- 






setshire, c. 1508 ..... 


_ 


ib. 


Nave, Kidlington, Oxon, c. 1450 


— 


179 


A good plain example of a Perpendicular roof of frequent oc- 






cnirence. 






8. Stephen's, Norwich, c. 1480 .... 


_ 


ib. 


A Tcry rich and beautiful specimen of » hatnmer-beam roof, and ia 












S. Mary's, Devizes, A.D. 1436 .... 


_ 


180 


A rich root bul the large projeclion. from the ridge-piece and pur- 






li&a, to which it it difficult to give a name, haTC a very awliwaid and 






■tompj appearance. The date is recorded on one of the tie-beams. 


J» 




Hall, Weare Gifford, Devonshire, c. 1500 


ib. 


A rich specimen of panel- work to common on late Perpendicular 






roofi 


















■Mm =( ™t. 1. ll.„\ k.riq. 


8. Mary's, Beverley. (This ia called by mistake, Wym- 






ington, Beds. 


399 


~ 



DEacaiFTIVB INDEX OF TBI ILLCSTBATIONB. 

Stone roof. WolTercot, Oxon 
ROSE-WINIM'W". (SeeWiKDow.) 

RUSTIC WORK 

SAUCTE-BELL. Long Compton, WarwicloihiTe 
SAXON ARCHTTECrURE. Arch 

Baluatre 



Capitals 

Doorway 

Herringbone work 

ImpoBta 

Long and abort work 

Maaoni; 

String . 

Tower 

Windows . pp. 408, 409, 

SCBEEN. NoBKAM. Compton, Surrey, c. 1180 

Ttii lutyect is itrictlj mun of u open gallerj front (hu > lerem ; 
OTCT the GMt end of the chuieel or thii church ii ■ Tanit inppoiting 
an upper floor, formed; uied m a chapel, whiob is open to the ohureh, 
except that there ii a low parapet in front, on which itaadi the range 
of wooden arehei here repreiented. 
Easly English. Stanton Earcourt, Otfordsbire, 



p. 406 and 
p. 17fi and 



412 ; and pis. 224, 2 




DBSCBiniTl INDEX OV THR ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Ea^IiY Decorates. Northfleet, Kent, c. 1800 . 

A nlnable ■pecimnibottiDf icreen-woik tad inm-work of tbaetU'ly 
Deoorated period, the moalditigi ara veiy ebinwUrutic and arc here 
giTcn. 





Sttme BcreeD, choir, Canterbuij CBthednl, A.I). 1304i . 
For ui intereitiiig hutory lad deBcription of tliu, we Fiofenor 
VUlit'* Cuitabazj Citlicdnl, p. 91, ■ 

Dbcouted. SbotaweD, Oxfordshire, e. 1350 
Thi« choTch conUim • good deal of original wood-vock, 

Oeddingttm, Northamptonshire, c. 1300 

Crapieij, Northamptonshire, c. 1850 . 

Spanholt, Berks ..... 

Perfkniucoiar. Fyfield, Be^, c. 1460 

lliia i> a Taluable iumpic of the amngcmmt irf a cbantij diqwl. 

S. Mary's, Leicester, c. 1460 . . . . 

OpBK Tracbbt and Panel Tracxrt. Rnshden, North- 
amptonshire, c. 1460, (four examples) 

RmhdcD ia a paTticulailj fine ohnrch, and containa a good deal o( 
ridi acTten-woik. The eumplei here glTen are tiom ■ screen io the 
north aiale, now mach mutilated. The (iro upper onee are from the 
opon part of the acreen, aad the two lower from that which ii laid on 
Iha boaidi of the panela. 

8. CHles's, Northampton, c. 1450 

Thia it part of the chancel-acreen in the north aiala. 



78 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OP THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



SCAiOijij . • . . . . . 

SCUTCBDEON. (See Escittcheon.) Beauchamp chapel, 
"Warwick, c. 1450, (three examples) . 

The bears* heads in the centre, and the staff raguUe which sar- 
rounds one of them, have reference to the ancient cognizance of the 
earls of Warwick, " the bear and ragged staff" 

Ryarsh church, Kent, c. 1480 . . . . 

SECTION 

SEDILIA. Norman. S. Mary's, Leicester, c. 1150 

There is a piscina attached to these in the same style, but which is 
not here shewn. 

Transition Norman. Wellingore, Leicestershire, c. 
1160 ...... 

Early English. Eushden, Northamptonshire, circa 
l^oO ...... 

These stand in the usual place in the south wall of the chancel, but 
it is singular that an opening or window is cut through this wall into 
the south aisle, the use of which it is difficult to understand. This 
arch has a double plane of tracery. The capitals are all plain except 
one which is given in vol. i. p. 109. 

Uffington, Berks, c. 1250 

Lenham, Kent .... 

Bench sedilia, Cogenhoe, Northants 

Decorated. Chesterton, Oxfordshire, c. 1320 . 
"Willesborough, Kent, c. 1350 . 
Merton church, Oxfordshire, c. 1350 . 
East Haddon, Northamptonshire, c. 1360 
Harleston, Northamptonshire, c. 1350 

The piscina in this example is fixed in the angle, and one of the 
altar brackets is shewn above. 

"Wymington, Bedfordshire 

Perpendicular. Famham, Surrey, c. 1480 
S. Mary's, Oxford, A.D. 1445 . 

SEPULCHEE. Stanton S. John's, Oxfordshire 
Bampton, Oxfordshire .... 

SET-OFF. Cockington, Devon . 

SHAFT. S. John's, Chester 



VAGI 

417 



ib. 
420 



419 



421 
423 

ib. 

425 



ru 



18 



i1 

418 - 
— 18 



il 



18 



m 



ib. 

190 

ib. 

191 

ib. 



192 
ib. 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



79 



8HEINE. Ely cathedral, (from Bentham) 
SILL. Fotheringhay ..... 

SKEW . . . p. 428 and 

SPUR. Walmgate, York. (See p. 248, vol. i.) . 

SPIEE. (1.) Turret, S. Peter's, Oxford. (2.) Turret, 
Rochester cathedral. (3.) Pimiacle, Bishop's Cleeve. 
(4.) Than church, Normandy. (6.) Almondsbury 
church, Gloucester. (6.) Salisbury cathedral. (7.) 
S. Mary, Cheltenham. (8.) Bayeux cathedral . 
Old spire, Oxford cathedral and Wollaston, Northants . 
Broach spire, Leckhampton, Gloucestershire . 

SxLA.x ....... 

SPRINGING. Waterbeach, Cambridgeshire 

SQUINCH. Salisbury cathedral, c. 1300 

Oxford cathedral, c. 1240 .... 

In the first example two of the squinch arches for carrying the oc- 
tagonal faces of the spire are shewn, but in the second, one angle and 
two of the sides of the tower are shewn. The octagonal face of the spire 
rests first on an arch, below this it is narrowed and rests on another arch, 
below which it is again narrowed down to the floor. 

Canon's Ashby, Northants .... 
Tong, Salop, and S. Cross, Hants 

SQUINT. Kenton, Devonshire .... 

This is cut through a pillar so as to obtain a view of the altar from 
the north aisle. The opening in the chancel is very much less than 
the outer one here given. The church is a particularly good specimen 
of Devonshire Perpendicular, and has a very fine wooden pulpit and 
chancel- screen gorgeously gilt and painted. 

Crawley, Hampshire ..... 
S. Mary Magdalen, Taunton .... 

This is taken from the east side, looking into the north aisle. 

Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire 

Haseley, Oxon ...... 

Mayor's chapel, Bristol .... 

For an article on this subject of squints, see Archaeological Journal, 
vol iii. p. 299. 

WooDBN STALL and MISEEEEES. S. Margaret's, 
Leicester, c. 1450 ..... 



PAOI 

426 
428 

429 
433 



PLATB 



434 
436 
438 

439 

440 



193 
ib. 



440 
441 



194 



ib. 
ib. 

ib. 



441 
442 



196 



80 



DBSCBIPTIVE INDBX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



STALL. 

Christ Church cathedral^ Oxford, c. 1450 

These occur in the Latin chapeL In both examples ths 
are shewn shut down. 

STANCHEON. Eyworth church, Bedfordshire, (three 
examples) .... 
Warborough, Oxon* 

STOUP. PyUe, Somerset, and Bomsey, Hants 
Graville, Normandy 

STRING. See also Mottldings, pi. 133 . 
TABERNACLE. Norman. Hadiscoe, Norfolk, c. 1160 

A very good example of the common fonn of the shallow Norman 
niche or tabernacle. 

Warmington, Northamptonshire, c. 1260 

This, which was until a few years since covered up with plaster, has 
been cleared by Mr. Caveler, and is here shewn as it now appears. 
(See Architectural Illustrations of Warmington Church by W. Careler, 
Esq., Architect) 

Decorated. Queen Eleanor's cross, Northampton, A.D. 

1 M^^ . . . . • • • 

Ditto, Geddington, Northamptonshire, A.D. 1294 

These examples are from two of the most celebrated and beautiful 
erections in the kingdom. That of Northampton has four of these 
tabernacles, each containing a different figure of the queen, and standing 
upon four of the sides of the lower octagon. The sculptures throughout 
are exquisite both in design and execution, and the cross, standing on 
an elevated spot of ground and having a fine background of beeches, 
has a very striking efi!ect on approaching it from the London side. 
For a plate of the cross, see Rickman's Gothic Architecture, fifth 
edit, p. 182. 

The Geddington cross is triangular in plan, and has in its upper part 
three niches or tabernacles, each like that at Northampton, filled with 
a statue of the queen. The figures on both crosses, though having a 
general resemblance, are ingeniously varied, so that no two are alike. 
The whole of the lower surface of the cross is covered with diaper- 
work. (See Hickman's Architecture, fifth edit, pp. 172, 173.) 

Lady Chapel, Exeter cathedral, c. 1280 

This is the centre niche of a series against the east window, and is 
original, those on each side having been restored. 

Walpole S. Andrew's, Norfolk, c. 1350 



PASS 



m 



la 



444 

447 
448 

449 



19 



il 



il 

il 



19 



il 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



81 



TABERNACLE. 

Pebpendicitlab. College, Higham Ferrers, North- 
amptonshire, A. D. 1415. 

This stands over the centre of the gateway and ih front of the window 
of the entrance to the ruined college of Higham Ferrers, which was 
fimnded by Archbishop Chichele. 

Merton College chapel, and Edlesborough, Bucks 
Coombe church, Oxon 

8. Michael's, Oxon., and Bouen cathedral 
Kidlington, Oxfordshire, c. 1450 

TILES. Diagram .... 
Canterbury cathedral, c. 1180 . 
Westleigh, Devon, c. 1700 

Ditto. Plate 198, Nos. I, 2, 3, 6, 10, 13, 14, 15, 16, 20 
Romsej church, Hampshire 
4, 5, 7, 19. Wherwell church, Hampshire 
8, 18. S. Cross, "Winchester . 

9. Salisbury cathedral 
11, 12. Chapter-house, Salisbury 
17. "Warblington church, Hampshire 

21. 24, 27. S. Alban's abbey church . 

22. Etchingham church, Sussex 

23. Great MalTem church, Worcestershire 
25. Chinnor church, Oxfordshire 
26*, 28. Gloucester cathedral 

Ditto. Plate 199. 1, 2. Chapter house, Salisbury 
dy 4r. Gloucester cathedral 
6, 7. Great Malvern church, Worcestershire 
6, 10, 11. Sandhurst church, Kent 
8. S. Cross church, Hants. All the small border-tiles 
£rom the chapter-house, Salisbury 

Most of the examples on this plate are compound patterns, and sur 
lounded with small border-tiles taken from the chapter-house, Salisbury 
The first and second patterns, each formed of four tiles, are from the 
ciiapter-house, Salisbury ; the third and fourth from Gloucester ca- 
tiiedral ; the fifrh and seventh from Great Malyem church, Worcester- 
diire (these are of two tiles each) ; and the sixth, of four tiles, from 
Sandhurst church, Kent 

Oxford cathedral . . pis. 200 

These have been collected from tarious parts of the cathedral, chiefly 



PAOS 



452 
453 
454 

468 
465 
472 



and 



TtMn 



197 



ib. 



198 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 
199 

ib. 

lb. 

ib. 

ib. 



201 



m 



82 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OP THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



TILES. 



PAQR 



run 



the Lady-chapel and the Latin chapel, and are of various dates. Some 
of the patterns occupy only a single tile, in others it takes four, and in 
the lower one on Plate 201 sixteen tiles would be required to make the 
pattern complete. 

Library of Merton college, Oxford, A.D. 1377 

These pave the path in the centre of the library, which has a 
boarded floor. The tiles are in general in a much worn state, so that 
in some instances tliey are difficult to make out. They seem all of 
one date except the first, which is of earlier character. Those which 
have letters are very curious, but it is difficult to understand the 
meaning of them. It is very possible that others which would have 
helped to make out words with these, have been lost 

Woodpeny, Oxfordshire .... 

These, which are all of Early English character, were found in 
digging on the site of the destroyed church of Woodperry, and along 
with them some coffin-slabs in their original situation. For an in- 
teresting account of them, see a paper by the Rev. J. Wilson, Ar- 
chsol. Journal, vol. iii. p. 116. 

Old singing school, Worcester cathedral 
TILE PAVING. Old singing school, Worcester cathedral 

This Plate exhibits in the upper example a very valuable 
piece of tile paving, shewing the complete arrangement of an entire 
room, and Plate 204 shews some of the patterns on a larger scale. 
The date seems to be early in the fourteenth century, and the foliage, 
particularly of the sixteen tile pattern on Plate 204, is like all the 
ornaments of that period, bold, free, and elegant. The introduction of 
black tiles among the coloured ones is a great relief to the eye. The 
two lower examples on Plate 205 are from other parts near the former 
one. 

Ditto. Plate 206. 1. Great Bedwin, Wilts 

The black lines shew the division of the tiles. The centre of the 
circle is made up of four tiles, the circle itself of twelve, and the span- 
drels of two tiles each, making in the whole twenty- four. On two sides 
of it are plain yellow border tiles, and outside these, ornamented border 
tiles. 

2. All Saints, Leicester .... 

3. S. Alban's abbey, Herts .... 

4. Brookham . ..... 

5. Beaulieu abbey, Wilts .... 

These four are border tiles. 

6. Helpstone, Northamptonshire 

This is from the same church as Plate 209. 



201 



469 



203 



204 
205 



206 



ib. 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 



ib. 



DESCtflPTIVB INDEX OF THB ILLUSTRATIONS. 



88 



UE PAYING. 

7. Wells cathedral ..... 

Thif it a purely architectural and very uncommon design. 

Fochester cathedral (five examples) 

"Winchester cathedral ..... 

Haccombe, Devonshire .... 

Tb a small but very interesting church. For an account of the tiles, 
lee ArchseoL Journal, voL ill p. 151. 

Helpstone, Northamptonshire .... 

This ia the paving of the altar platform, the lozenge border being 
the edge of the step. 

Pan tiles ...... 

Inlaid tiles, Canterbury cathedral 

Flanders tiles, Westleigh, Devonshire . 
It is rather difficult to affix dates to these tiles, but the 
following arrangement is believed to be nearly accurate. 

Op THB TWELFTH CENTUKY. Canterbury 

Op the eablt part op th^ thirteenth century. 
Plate 198, Nos. 6, 15, 16, 18, 19, 20, 27. 
Plate 199, No. 8. 

Helpstone, Plate 206, No, 6 ; and Plate 209. 
Bochester, Plate 207. 
Winchester, Plate 207. 
Brookham. Plate 206, No. 4. 

Late in the thirteenth century. 
Plate 198, Nos. 1—10. 
Oxford cathedral, Plate 200, Nos. 1—7, 9—11 ; 

Plate 201, Nos. 1, 2, 5—7, 16, 17, 20, 21. 
Leicester, Plate 206, No. 2 ; Beaulieu, Plate 206, No. 6. 
Woodperry, Plate 203. 
Worcester, Plate 204 and 205. 

Op the fourteenth century. 

Plate 198, Nos. 11—14, 17, 21, 22, 24, 26. 

Plate 199, Nos. 1, 2, 11. 

Oxford cathedral, Plate 200, Nos. 8, 12, 13 ; 

Plate 201, Nos. 4,8, 9, 12—14, 16, 18, 19. 
Oxford, Merton Library, Plato 202. 
Great Bedwin, PI. 206, No. 1 ; S. Alban's, PL 206, No. 3. 
Wells, Plate 206, No. 7. 
Haccombe, Plate 208, Nos. 3, 10, 11. 



FAGl 



PLAT! 

206 

207 

ib. 

208 



209 



463 
465 
472 



465 



DB8CRIPT1TI IHDXX OV TBI IU.UBTRATIOM8. 



TIL! fATaa. 

Op the fipteekth csimrKy. 

Plate 198. Noe. 23, 26, 38. 

Plato 199. Noe. 3—7, 9, 10. 

Oxford cathedral, Plate 201, Noa. 8, 10, 11. 
The following armorial beariDgs occur in the tile« here given. 

Plate 198. No. 9. is Uie griffin of the Despeueer &mity ; 
28. the arms of Sebrok, abbot of Gloucester in 1450. 

Plate 199. No. 3. the arms of the family of Clare; 
No. 4. RtglMml and Fiance, quarterly in the time of 
Henry VT. ; 5. and 7. England and the Coofeaeor in 
the same reign, "Anno 14S3." 

Plate 204. Worcester. No. 3. Richard Plantagenet, 
earl of Cornwall and king of the Ramans. 

Plate 205. Border, first row, Dighy, second, Clare. Na 
5. Warren; 6. Beauchamp; 7. England; 10. Ver- 
dun, Willoughby or Hodelston. 

Plate 201. Oxford cathedral. No. 8. See of Exeter; 
19. Engkad. 

Plate 208. Haccombe. No. 6. England: 7. Ercedechne, 
or Archdeacon ; 9. Haccombe. 

TOOTH ORNAMENT .... 
Nun Moukton, Yorkshire 
Canterbury cathedral. (See also Plate 123) . 

TOETIS 

TOWER. Supposed Saxon. Sompting, Sussex . 

Thia ii k *ery ■ingular Hid Tilaabl* ciuDpI* of Suon. B*ch *ide 
tenniaalc* in a gable eTidtnllj' origin*), lad thne aupport a diagonal 
rooC Tbii kind of (emunilion ha* a great reuiabUiice to H 
Iha Qennan churcbei, but it, a* Tar ■> ii known, unique in England, 
thoogh it wai probably the mode in wbieb man; Saion towere tei- 
minaled origrinilly. 

Earl's Barton, Northamptonshire 

Bound tower, Devenish Island, Lough Erne, Ireland 

Dunham Magna, Norfolk 

8. Peter at Gowt's, Lincoln, c. 1070 

Thii in a chronologicil Tiew is Tory valuable, ai formiag a son 
neeling link belween tbe Saion and early Norman. There uami 
goml eridenee that it wa* buill immediately after Ihe Norman con- 
qucil, but by the Saxon inhi^lanti of Ihe eily, and it dispUya moM 
of tbe pecntiariliea of tbe Saxon rtyle, but of better workmanihip than 



DK8CBIPTIVK INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



86 



IW£B. PAOI FLAfft 

viul, and with ■ome mixture of early Norman featnret. The neigh- 
bouring tower of S. Mary le Wigford is another example of the same 
date. The history of thejte two towers is well made out in the " Intro- 
duction to Gothic Architecture," Oxford, 1849, p. 33. 

S. Julian's, Norwich . . — 210 

One of the round flint towers so common in Norfolk, where they 
ippear to be almost of all dates. This of S. Julian is apparently Nor- 
man, with later windows inserted. 

Wameford, Hampshire, c. 1170 . . — ib. 

An inscription over the door of this church records it^ rebuilding by 
Adam de Port, who held the manor during the reigns of Henry II., 
Richard L, and John. See Arch. Journal, vol. ii. p. 19 1. 

Little Saxham church, Suffolk . .481 

Ea&ly Ekolish. Middleton Stoney, Oxon, c. 1220 .211 

This shews the very characteristic arcade through which the win- 
dows are pierced, in the upper story. The buttresses both in this and 
the next example are rathe^ peculiar. 

Bishop Cannings, Wiltshire, c. 1220 . . — ib. 

A rich and beautiful example, exhibiting two corbel-tables and triple 
belfrj windows, the composition of the tower and transept is rery 
good. 

Brookthorpe, Northamptonshire, c. 1250 . _ ib. 

Tbia and the following are examples of gabled or pack-saddle roofs. 

Ickford, Bucks ...... 482 

Versainyillc, c. 1250 ..... 

Mortain, Normandy ..... 488 

Decobated. Bavensthorpc, Northamptonshire, c. 1300 . 

Coggs, Oxfordshire, c. 1350 .... 
A curious tower, belonging to an inttretting little church. 

Church Brampton, Northamptonshire, c. 1340 . 
An example of diagonal buttresses on a tower. 

Transition. Little I{arrowden, Northamptonshire, c. 

1370. . — ib. 

This ia almost Perpendicular, but the tracery of the window is 
Decorated. 

Pbkpekdicular. Welford, Northamptonshire . . — 213 

The buttresses are rather peculiar, but are found on several churches 
ia the county, they are neither diagonal nor parallel, but are angle- 
tlatpimgf as we sometimes find in earlier examples. 

Cromer, Norfolk . . . — ib. 

This tower is of squared flint with th« quoini and mouldings of 



ib. 

212 
ib. 

ib. 



DEBCBIPTIVB INDEX OP THE ILLDSTKATTONa. 



Df the Noifolk 
le. The panpet 



stone. It i* very lofly and well built, but like 
cburchei the work is shallow, owing to the wial ■ 
ia very tiagulsr. 

Isljp, Osfonlshire, c. 1450 

Brislington, Soiuersetehire, o. 1500 

A good oxample of the rich Somorsctshirc ton 

TRANSOM. Bampton, Oion 

TEEFOIL. (tttoeKampW) 

TBIGLTPH 

TUDOH FLOWER 

TUBHET. Tewkesbury, 0. 115D . 

Thii U one ofrhe turrets of the fine wait front, and is rerr 
for the baluBters which divide t!ie upperwindowi. The pinnacle 
helong to the same period, but arc Esrty English. 

S. Peter'a, Oxford .... 

Bocliester catiiedral .... 
Bishop's Cleeve, GloucCBtersliire 
Glastonlniry abbey, e. 1200 
Gateway of the bishop's palace, Peterborough, 



Selby, Torkahire . . . . . 

S. llaty's, liuverlcy. c. H50 . , . . 

One of the turreU of the west Trant. 

TUBRET-STAIBCASE. Nobmaw. Goring, Oxfordshire 
c. 1120 . 

A good form of rtsir turret of e»rly Normsn dale. Tiie lowci 
appears la haie been raiwd at a aubiequent period. 
Christ Church. Oxford, c. U80 . 

One of the turtilg of the north transept of the cathedral. The uw 
of Ihc round-headed arcade above Ibc pointed one ia curious, and ■hewi 
ill transition dale. 

Betkley, Osfordshire, c. 1350 . . . , 

Bishop's palace, Salisbury, c. 1450 

Thin ia on the gateway tower of the palace. 
TRIFORIUM. Malmsbury abbey, Wilts, c. 1150 . 

8. Cross, Hampshire, c. 1160 . . . . 

Lincoln cathedml, c. 12(50 . . . , 

TANE. Stanton Harcourt, Oion . . . . 



DB8CBIPTIVB INDKX OP THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



87 



PAOl 



VAULT. I, Bomau groined vault 

2, Cylindrical, op waggon vault 

3, Groined vault, mixed cylindrical and pointed 

4, Pointed groined vault 

5, Sex-partite vault .... 

6, Welsh groined vault 

Norman. Cylindrical or waggon vault . 
White tower, London, A.D. 1081 
Sherborne castle, Dorsetshire, c. U 10 
Groined without ribs. Ditto. 

Sex-partite vault. Transition, groined with moulded 

ribs. Choir, Canterbury, c. 1180 . 
Crypt, Gloucester cathedrtd, c. 1100 . 

£[a:bly English. Groined with moulded ribs. Salisbury 
cathedral, c. 1240 .... 

Groined with ridge-rib and intermediate ribs. West- 
minster abbey, c. 1 260 

Decobated. South aisle, nave, Gloucester cathedral, c 
1320 ..... 

Lieme vault. Choir, Bristol cathedral, c. 1350, (with 
plan) ..... 

South porch, Hereford cathedral, with plan 
Plan of lieme vault, S. Bicquier, near Abbeville 

PEaPENDiciTLAR. Licme stellar vault. South porch, 
S. Mary Redcliffe, Bristol, A.D. 1443 (with plan) . 

Fan-vaulting. Cloisters, Gloucester cathedral, c. 1450 

VAULTING-SHAPT 

VESICA PISCIS. Ely cathedral . . . . 

VBSTET. Willingham, Cambridgeshire, c. 1360 . 

This 18 a remarkable little building, the roof being of stone and sup- 
ported on stone ribs in the manner of a timber roo£ A view of the 
mterior is giren in Rickman's Architecture, fifth edition, p. 179. 

Worstead, Norfolk, c. 1460 . . . . 

This building is of squared flint, and exhibits in its parapet and 
basement the flat panelling of flint and stone so frequent in Norfolk. 



507 



509 
508 



510 
511 



PLAT! 

217 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 

218 

ib. 
ib. 

219 
ib. 

220 
ib. 

221 
ib. 



222 
ib. 



223 



ib. 



88 DE8CHIPTITB INDEX Ot TUB ILLVHTHATIONS. 


VIGNETTE 


riat 

&I2 


™ 


VITEUVIAN SCROLL 


513 


- 


TOLUTE 


ib. 


- 


VOUSSOIR. Beeaton S. Laurence 


ib. 


_ 


\VIXDOWS. SUPPOSED SAXON. 






Brixworth. Northamptonshire .... 


- 


22- 


Thit is >a url; eismple. The ircb of the wiadow u lumed with 






Roman liln, but it differs &om moit Saxon wiodona in not hiTing ao 






external splay. 






Sompting. Sussex, three examplei 


407 


_ 


Beeston S. Laurence, Norfolk .... 


409 


_ 


CavewGeld, Buckinghamshire .... 


408 


_ 


A ■mall church with a tower of Saxon cbaraeler; the windowi are 






extrenul; amall and rorte, «o as scarcely to be called window*. The 






opening for light is pierced through a single stone, and Ihey hare > 












S. Peter at Gow-t's, 






Lincoln . 


_ 


22 


T— r T !*'*■**>■ ***«■ another 


413 






J Q XC«^. In TIT- J* 1 






Tn 






—— ' S. Mary le Wigtord, 




A 


P?^Wj 




-- '_, Lincoln . 


ib. 


_ 








The name, of thoe 








ttT^?3 




--X- two ehucche. are Saxon, 






' 5- 


ifeJ^ 




h- and they appear to be of 






'" 3r- 










^A- 






-J the Conquest! Le Wig- 
! ford signifies at the wick 


















■ ■liv 


'~~ - ford: see pL 210: At 






f 




Gowt's ligniGes at the 
slaicei, the Und having 






m 




' then been &at drained 






ST«rMa«..u««. ^.^^j^ ^^^^ jj^.^ window 






is a figure of S. Peter, 






which is here given. 






Deerhurst, GlouceBterahire, A.D. 1056 





S3 


la an example of the lri.ngul.r- headed window ao frequent in thia 






style, but (hi. i. a much richer specinien than is generally (bond. 







DESCBIPTIYS INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



89 



WINDOWS— SUPPOSED SAXON. 

Wickham, Berkshire ..... 

Shews the small central shaft which supports the long impost stone 
on which rest the arches of the windows. 

EarPs Barton, Nortbamptonshire 

A remarkable window from a most remarkable church tower, the 
•tjle of which is so peculiar and so different from any thing Norman 
that it must be considered as unmistakably Saxon. 

S. Benet's, Cambridge .... 

This shews the balustre shaft for supporting the impost 

S. Mjlry, Bishop Hill, Junior, York 

In this the impost is chamfered and is supported by a plain shaft 
The exterior shews the framework of projecting square-edged stones 
which is Tery characteristic of the style. 

NOEMAN. Cassington, Oxfordshire, c. 1150 . 

A plain window of a form of frequent occurrence. 

Sandford, Oxfordshire, c. 1120 . 

This appears to have been stilted by the insertion of plain blocks 
•boTe the capitals. 

Bucknell, Oxfordshire, c. 1150 

S. John's, Devizes, c. 1160 . . . . 

Is a rich example of the best style of Norman. 

8. Cross, Winchester, c. 1150 . 

"— - ciBCULAB. Lamboume, Berkshire . 
8. Cross, Winchester, c. 1150 . 
Barfreston, Kent, c. 1180 . . . . 

This church is well known as a fine example of transition from 
Norman to Early English, and this is a very remarkable window. 
The ornaments of the circle are entirely Norman, as are also the 
capitals and the shafts, but the form of the arches is Early English. 
It is altogether an early example of plate tracery. 

Christ Church, Oxford, c. 1180 

This is the interior of one of the windows shewn on each side of the 
door of the chapter-house on p. 1 76, vol. i 

WINDOWS. TRANSITION fbom NORMAN to EARLY 
ENGLISH. 
Sutton Courtenay, Berkshire, c. 1170 . 

This is a very curious and beautiful example, the intersection of the 
arches producing a double lancet. 



PAOB 



PLAn 
228 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



224 



ib. 



517 



ib. 



225 

ib. 

262 

ib. 



ib. 



229 



90 PESCBIPTITB INDEX OF THE ILLrST&ATIO.NS. 


WI iriH) WS— TRAKSinON. 


tM 


run 


Christ Church cathedra], Oxford, c. 1180, two examples 





311 


TTmm we cIere»toi7 window* of the ume date uil occurriog in the 






ttmt wotk, and ihew the pre»l«ict of both fonni ased u thit 






period. 






Christ Church, Oxford, c. 1180 


— 


m 








^te, lad (hewi the clcreitotj puuga through the walL 






8. Maurice, York, c. 1170 .... 


— 


330 


Thii U ■ very ar]j eiarople of the circle pierced in ihe hr»d of the 






wiDdow. 






S. ffiWa, Oxford, c. 1200 .... 


— 


ib. 


This ii Uur, il hu the pointed arch ind the piercing i> Uucet- 






■faaped. The EapiuU shew a mixture of the two itjlei. 






North Hintaey, Berkshire (a low aide window) 


295 


- 


EARLY ENGLISH. 






Burwash, Sussex, c. 1200 ... - 


519 


- 


A dtnple UdceI window. 






Witney, Oxfordahire, c. 1220 


_ 


2U 


Both the exterior and inlerior of tbii window are gi.en in order to 






ihew the Terj wide interuil ipUy which ii lo common in Early Engliib 






windows. 






Bakewell, Derbjshire. c. 1250 .... 




ib. 


A lancel with ihafta on the anglei of the .pl.y. 






Luddenhara, Kent ..... 


381 


_ 


Bojtoii, Wiltsliire, c. 1250 .... 




237 


An earlj eiample of ihe ns;ee.hc»dcd windo«. The sank *tar omi- 






raenl in the ipandrelt is a Tery peculiar and nncomnion feature. 






Shipton Olliffe, Gloucestershire, c. 1220, (two examples) 


_ 


239 


Tl.e.e are two eiceUent example, i the firil ah^w, the detached cen- 






tral >hafl to common in Earl.T Engliah work, and Ihe aecond exhibit* 






the ejt*raal aqaare<he>ded wiudowj and the iotemal trefoil-hMded 






rear-arch. 






Lincoln cathedral, c. 1220 .... 


_ 


ib, 


Barton Stacey. Wiltshire, c. 1220 


519 


_ 


Jesus college chapel, Cnmhridge, c. 1220 


191 


_ 


LittleWenhanihall, c. 1250 .... 


204 


- 


With the original shatter, or fenestral. 







DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



91 



riNDOWS— EARLY ENGLISH. 

•LATE TRACERY. Lynchmere, Sussex, c. 1 220 . 

An excellent example of the primitive form of what hecame after- 
wards a geometrical window. 

Greetwell, Lincolnshire, c. 1220 
An example of the lozenge- shaped opening in the head. 
Louviers, Normandy, c. 1220 .... 
Windows of this character are much more common in France than 
in England. 

The King 8 hall, Winchester, A.D. 1222, 1235 

For an excellent history of this interesting building, by Mr. S. Smirke, 
we the Proceedings of the Arch. Institute at Winchester, 1845. 

The four windows on Plate 231 are all examples of plate tracery, but 
ihew an advance on those of the preceding plate. 

Woodstock, Oxfordshire, c. 1240 

Has trefoil -headed lights and a quatrefoiled circle in the head. 

Cotterstock, Northamptonshire, c. 1240 

A tower window. The circle in this example is beautifully cusped 
with trefoil foliage. 

Stone, Kent, c. 1240 ..... 

This is a more advanced example, and is an early specimen of 
plate tracery on a double plane. The outer wall shews only the two 
phun lancets and the quatrefoil pierced above, but the inner plane 
has the quatrefoil so much larger in proportion, with small circular 
piercings in the spandrels, and supported on a slender shaft that it 
•Imott amoimts to bar-tracery. 

Salisbury cathedral, c. 1240, or rather perhaps 1225 

This is from the east end. The circle is much larger than is usual 
in English examples, and is the only part pierced. 

Salisbury cathedral, triforium, north transept, A.D. 

1 <6^o . . « « ... 

The two examples given shew the interior aiid exterior of these 
windows and are examples of plate tracery. The mouldings which 
nin round the circle and arches lie on the flat surface, and are not 
connected with the chamfer. 

Salisbury cathedral, south transept, A.D. 1225 
A beautiful combination of windows and an excellent example of 
plate tracery. The surface mouldings in this example are remarkably 
bold. It also exhibits a good specimen of an Early English pinnacle. 

Salisbury cathedral, north transept, interior, c. 1225 
This shews an outer and an inner plane of tracery. The outer one 
ii quite plain, baring merely a quatrefoil pierced in the head, but the 



PAOI 



PLATS 

230 



ib. 



484 



485 



231 



ib. 



ib. 



ib. 



233 



237 



ib. 



92 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



WINDOWS— BARLY ENGLISH. »^«» 

inner one has an octofoil in the head and is supported on slender shafts, 
some single and some clustered. The effect of the two from the re- 
flected light hetween is frequently highly beautiful. 

It has been customary to consider Salisbury cathedral as belonging 
to the middle of the thirteenth century, about 1240 or 1250, and a 
great part of the building is undoubtedly of that date, but the eastern 
part is earlier, though it is doubtful how far this early part of the work 
extends. The history tells us that the foundations were laid in 1220. 

Deanery, Norwich, c. 1250 .... 

In this the spandrels are pierced and the openings are well moulded, 
forming an example of early tracery. The fillet springs from the ex- 
ternal wall. 

Charlton on Ofcmoor, Oxon, 1250 

This is similar to the last example, but it is not moulded, and the 
spandrels are sunk instead of being pierced. 

Grouped Lancets. Wimbome minster, Dorset, c. 1220 . 

In this, though the lancets with the openings above are separate on 
the outside, they are in the interior combined into one general 
design. 

Headington, Oxfordshire, c. 1240 

Warmington, Northamptonshire, c. 1240 

Ditto, c. 1250 ...... 

These are examples of three lancets brought together and combined 
under one dripstone. 

XJffington, Berkshire, c 1220 . 

A very singular example, in which the head of the window is made 
to take the form of the gable in which it is placed, at the back of 
a small recess for an altar. There are several of these recesses on the 
east side of both the transepts. The church is altogether a very ?«• 
markable one, and worthy of more attention than it has received. 

Amesbiiry, Wiltshire, c 1250 .... 420 

A good example of an unglazed window in a gable, the tracery is 
a kind of mixture of plate tracery and bar tracery. 

Romsey abbey, Slitmpshire, c. 1250 

S. John's church, Winchester, c. 1250 

S. Mary le Wigford, Lincoln, o. 1220, with cusps 

This is from the east end of this very interesting church, where it 
combines with the two lancets below, and forms one of the first steps 
towards plate tracery. 

The front is here given as a good example of a plain Early English 
east end, shewing the arrangement of the windows. 



PU! 



23 



i1 



22 



1 
1 
1 



21 



2 
2 
2 



DBSCEirriVB INDEX OF THB ILLUSTRATIONS. 



iWB— EARLY ENOLISH. 




XTABK-HEASES Windows 

This cUu of windon of early date bas been almoit oTerlaaked, but 

rare of moK frequent occiureDce thnn hai lieen generally inugined. 

Deaa's chap«l, Lincoln cathedral, c. 1200 

Thii (till retaim iti original shutter uid iron-work. 

Covley, Oxfordshire, c. 1220 . 
tJDdemutli thi* a a Ion aide vindow blocked ap. 
Uncoln cathedral, c. 1200 
Glapthome, Northamptonshire, c. 1220 
Old house, Newgate, York, c. 1220 



94 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



WINDOWS— EARLY ENGLISH. 

Wituey, Oxfordshire, c. 1240 (spire window) . 

Oxford cathedral, spire, c. 1220 

Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, c. 1260 (tower 

window) . . . • . 

York cathedral, c. 1250 (gable window) 
Binsey, Oxford (with a low side window) 
Kirkstead priory, Lincolnshire (gable window, called 

by mistake on the plate S. Mary le Wigford) 
Beverley minster, Yorkshire, (gable window,) c. 1 220 

These are examples of different proportions of the pointed oval, or 
vesica piscit as it is often called. 

Beverley minster, c. 1220 (circular window) 

A good specimen of plate tracery. The rest on the plate are 
Decorated. 

Beverley minster, Yorkshire, c. 1220 (circular window) 

This is of much the same design as Barfreston, but is decidedly Early 
English. It is an excellent illustration of plate tracery, and shews 
clearly the piercing through the solid plate of stone for the sake of 
light before the idea had occurred of forming it into tracery. 

Lincoln cathedral, c. 1200 (circular window) • 

This is in the north transept, and is part of the orig^inal work of 
Bishop Hugh. It is also a specimen of plate tracery, and is perhaps 
the richest and most beautiful window of that kind which we possess. 

EAELY FEENCH. Chartres cathedral, c. 1220 . 

A good example of plate tracery, which is much more abundantly 
used in France than in England, and apparently at an earlier period 
also. 

S. Martin des Champs, Paris, c. 1220 . 

Another good example of Early French work with plate tracery, it 
will be observed that a discharg^g arch is carried over the window 
firom buttress to buttress, and that there are very few mouldings. 

Auxerre, c. 1240 . . • • . 

This example has bar tracery in the head, but the space between 
the circle and the heads of the lights is still solid. 

Noyon, c. 1250 ..... 

In this the change to bar tracery is completed, though it is still rather 
clumsy ; this window is more enriched with mouldings than is usual in 
Early French work. 



FAQB 



519 



run 

258 



259 
260 



294 



ib. 
ib. 



261 



263 



ib. 



232 



l1). 



ib. 



ib. 



DB8CR1PTIV1S INDEX OP THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



95 



WINDOWS— EARLY FRENCH. PAOi 

Bourges, c. 1240 ..... 

Another good early example of bar tracery. Many of the windows 
of Amiens are of precisely the same form as this. Those in the eastern 
part of Westminster abbey, have the foliated circles in the head of 
almost identical form. 

TRANSITION from EARLY ENGLISH to DECO- 
RATED 
Raydon, Suffolk (a low side window) c. 1260 . . 295 

S. Michaers, Oxford, c. 1260 , 

This in construction is the same as those from Warmington, except 
that the spandrels are pierced. Its details are Early English. The 
width of the splay is remarkable, and the manner in wbich the arch 
mouldings die upon it 

Thanington, Kent, c. 1300 .... 

Tbis form, the square-beaded trefoil, is used in the two preceding 
eentnries as well as in this. 

Boyton, Wiltshire, c. 1260 (circular window) . 

This naturally follows the Lincoln window Plate 263, in the series, as 
tbii is an early example of bar tracery, but it is formed in the most 
simple manner. The radius is taken to divide the circle into three equi- 
latoal triangles, and these and the spaces between are filled with circles 
of such sizes as they will contain, but there is no combination, the circles 
being entirely independant of the triangles, and in this, as well as other 
particulars, it differs from the geometrical tracery of the next style. 

Boyton, Wiltshire, c. 1260 . 

A fine example of the earliest form of tracery before it had attained 
to the geometrical, properly so called. The capitals and details are 
Early English. This and the circular window Plate 264, are the east 
and west windows of a chantry chapeL 

DECORATED. Single-light. 

Appleford, Berks, c. 1350 .... 

A curious example of the different modes of foliating a lancet 
window. 

Shotteswell, Warwickshire . . . -16 

Geometrical Traceby. Merton college chapel, Oxford, 
A.D. 1277 ...... 

Ditto .••.... 

The window from Merton chapel, and those from Dorchester, may 
be taken as perfect examples of the geometrical period of Decorated. 



JLkTM 

232 



239 



227 



264 



240 



227 



241 
242 



96 



DSSCBIPTIYB INDEX OP THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



WINDOWS— DECORATED. 

Dorchester, Oxfordshire, c. 1300, (five examples) 

pis. 234, 241 
Dorchester, Oxfordshire, c. 1280 

This ifl the east window of the north aisle» and though evidently of 
the same date is much earlier in character than the rest of the aisle. 
The mouldings (see Plate 122) are almost Early English. 

Hampton Poyle, c. 1280 .... 

A very good specimen of geometricaL 

Ensham, Oxfordshire, c. 1300 

Solihull, Warwickshire, c. 1280 

This is a very curious and early example. The cusping is very 
peculiar, and has quite an Early English character. 

Headington, Oxfordshire, c. 1320 
Thuming, Huntingdonshire, c. 1300 . 

An uncommon form of double lancet 

Great Haseley, Oxfordshire, c. 1300 . 

This is little more than a repetition of the last, but thrown into one by 
the completion of the arch and the filling the head with a quatrefoiL 

Aldworth, Berkshire, c. 1300 .... 
Piddington, Oxfordshire, c. 1300 

A small church, but containing in the chancel many curious and 
interesting features. The windows are of the kind here given, they are 
on the intersecting principle, but being solid in the head come under 
the denomination of plate tracery. 

Long Wittenham, Berks, c. 1280 
Waterperry, Oxfordshire, c. 1280 
Broughton, Oxfordshire, c. 1300 . : 

Remarkable for the ornament of the rear arch. 

Bloxham, Oxfordshire, c. 1300. 

Geometrical Intersecting Tracery. 

Northfield, Worcestershire, c. 1320 . 

A plain and good original example of this kind of tracery without 
foliations. 

S. John's hospital, Northampton, c. 1320 

The primary tracery of this is similar to the last, but it has small 
arches and foliations added on the secondary plane. 



raa nu 



and 
436 



241 



ib 
23* 



il 

23. 
it 



il 
il 



24 

il 
24 

il 
24 



il 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



97 



riKDOWS—DEOO RATED. 

Bushden, Northamptonshire, c. 1300 . 

The intersecting tracery of this window is concentric, that is, it is 
drawn from the sanae centres as the window arch, while in ihat of the pre- 
ceding examples it is drawn with the name opening as the window arch 
but with different centres. This gives the Rushden window a strange 
and uneasy look. 

Stantoa S. Joliii, Oxfordshire, c. 1300 . 

A very uncommon example, the intersecting tracery being formed 
of straight lines instead of curves. Ii is the east window. 

Stan ton S. John's, Oxfordshire, c. 1300 

This is one of the side windows from the same beautiful chancel, and 
fhews the trefoil -headed lancet ; it also exhibits the interpenetration of 
the mouldings which is so common in the geometrical period. 

Late Geometrical Tbaceby. Great Bedwin, Wilts, 
c. 1320 ...... 

Dunchurch, Warwickshire, c. 1320 
Shenstone^ Staffordshire, c. 1350 
Cbamel chapel, Korwich, c. 1320 

This is a very singular and unusual combination of tracery, and the 
Arrangement of the mouldings is curious. The building is now used 
M the grammar school. It was built by Bishop i»almon ; the foundation 
4eed is dated 1316. 

Kidlington, Oxon, c. 1320 .... 

This sJiews a tendency to flowing lines. 

iMixED TRACERY. Standish, Gloucestershire, c. 1350 
Great Milton, Oxfordshire, c. 1350 
East window, Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, c 
1300 ...... 

The tracery of this very beautiful window is a mixture of geomttri 
cal and flowing. Tlie mouldings arc very good, and the hollow is filled 
>vith rich folirge and heads. A portion of it is given ou Plate 127. 

Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, c. 1320 . 

The idea of this seems to have bceu taken from that of three lancets, 
of which the centre one is the tallest. 

Bloxham, Oxfordshire, c. 1320 .... 
The same may be said of this. 



PAGE 



PLATE 

245 



ib. 



226 



244 

ib. 
ib. 
ib. 



243 

247 
ib. 

ib. 



239 



ib. 



o 



98 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



(PABTLT Flam BOT ANT.) Bishop's palace cbapel, 

Norwich, c. 1350, east window 
Ditto, two side windows .... 

Good ex;imple8 of tracery of Fltimboyant forms, though the mould- 
ings shew they are not French work. 

Rnunds, Northamptonshire, c. 1350 
Duston, Northamptonshire, c. 1350 
Llan Tysilio, Anglesey, c. 1350 
Salford, Warwickshire, c. 1360 

The tracery approaches nearer to the Flamboyant in form than is 
usually met with in this country, but the mouldings have no resem- 
blance to those of that style. It does not seem that genuine Flamboyant 
is met with in England. 



r Aea run 



162 
486 



487 



236 



WINDOWS -DECORATED. 

Flowing Tracery. Kingsthorpe, Northamptoushire, c. 

A good example of a plain ogee-headed window, but the point ter- 
minating in a head is unusual. The tracery, by the slight alteration of 
changing the curved sides of the pointed oval into straight lines, becomes 
a very common form of a Perpendicular two-light window. 

Slapton, Northamptonshire, c. 1350 
A curious combination of the ogee and seiiiicircle. 

Faringdon, Berks, c. 1320 . . . . 

Another example of the ornamental ion of the rear arch. 

S. Mary Magdalen church, Oxford, 1318-37 . 
Friary, Seading, A.D. 1306 . . . . 

For an account of this building, see Archsol. Journal, vol. iii. p. 141. 

Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, c. 1350 . 

Remarkable for the acute ogee of the window head. The same form 
but without foliation occurs at Fiiiedon in the same neighbourhood. 

Cranford S. Andrew's, Northamptonshire, c. 1350 

Great Milton, Oxfordshire, c. 1350 

Slapton, Northamptonshire, c. 1350 

Melrose abbey ...... 

The tracery of this window is of Flamboyant character. 

S. Peter's in the East, Oxford .... 
Oxford cathedral, chapel of Lady Montacute . 



ib. 
246 

ib. 
ib. 

ib. 



248 
ib. 
ib. 
ib. 



249 



ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

250 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



99 



IKDOWS— DECORATED. 

Square-headed, &c. Ardley, Oxfordshire, c. 1320 

The lower part of this has been used as a low side window. 

Friary, Beading, Berkshire, c. 1320 

(See Archaeol. Journal, vol. iii. p. 141.) 

Denford, Northamptonshire, c. 1350 
Wymington, Bedfordshire, A.D. 1380 . 

A wiudow of unusual form and late date, hut which has a good 
effect The church is very interesting, from several peculiarities, and 
from the dates of the erection of the principal parts being known. 

Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire .... 
Ash by Folville, Leicestershire, c. 1350 
Kiddington, Oxfordshire, c. 1350 
Coggs, Oxfordshire, c. 1350 .... 

This is from a curious and interesting little church. The window 
ii remarkable for the rich cornice of four-leaved flowers, a portion of 
which is given on Plate 127. 

Orton-on-the*Hill, Leicestershire, c. 1350 

This is a good example of the difference of form of the window and 
the rear arch which is frequently met with. 

Chapel Cleeve, Somersetshire, c. 1350 (<1ormor window) 
S. Mary's, Oxford, c. 1300 (spire light) 
Bampton, Oxfordshire, c. 1360 (spire light) 
Newark, Nottinghamshire, c. 1350 (spire light) 
King's Sutton, Northamptonshire, c. 1380 
8. Nicholas, Abingdon, Berkshire, c. 1350 

Small Windows and Boses. Duston, Northampton- 
shire, c. 1350 (three examples) 

These are good specimens of the small clerestory windows so fre- 
quently used in Decorated churches. In these the windows are each 
cut in a single stone. The first and second are the exterior and the 
interior of the same window. 

Stanton 8, John, exterior and interior . 

Witney ...... 

ClBCULAR. 

Berkeley, Gloucosstoraliire, c. 1320 
Stratford-on-Avon, Warwickshire, c. 1350 



PAriE 



16 



185 
349 



104 
ib. 



PLATK 

256 
ib. 

ib. 
ib. 



257 

ib. 
ib. 



ib. 



258 

ib. 

259 

260 

ib. 



261 
ib. 



DESCBIPTITE IXDEX OP THE ILLCSTRATION8- 



WINDOWS- DECOR. ITEU— CI BCr LAB. 

Clianiel chapel. Xorwich. c. 1300, or 1316 

(See nole on Plile 2+*.) Thii i> from the crypt under tlie eh»pel. 
bul the nindows ire now much mnlililed. 

8. Jolm's hospital, Northampton, c. 1360 

8. Darid's, Pembrokeshire, c. 1360. (See p. 401) 

Lincoln cathedral, c. 1350 

This it in the louih airle, and it ■ \tTj bcantirul example ofDeco- 
nted irwcry, hating >omeliiing of FUmboy»nl chsTmclCT in it> fori 

TRANSITION TBOM DkCOBATED to PEKPESDICCCiB. 

"Whisaendine, Rutland, c. 1350 

This is a gnod ippcimm of Decorsied, bul the introdudion 
strsighl linn shewi in lendency to the ncil slyle, 

Eyp, Susses, c, 1360 . 

The lame may he laid of this. 

■\Vndworth, Yorkshire, c. 1380 

A very curioii): exnmpU of early Irnniition, in which the itraigltt 
lines inlrodueed do not comhine wilh the flowing tracery, lut n 

lis means produce to awkward and diskgree- 



,t through it 



Clinrlton on Otmoor, Oxfordahire, c. 1360 

In this the tiraight lino harmoniae with the flowing onca, and pro- 
duce n gnoJ etTect. 

King's Sutton, North am pt on shire, c, 1300 

Tl'if liai made an advance, two of the ninllions are carried through 

S, Bartholomew's chapel, Oxford, c. 1380 
An example of Iransilion neatly »ppro«ching to the next, which ii 
decided Perpend ioular. 

Ediugton or Eddingtou, 'Wiltahire, A.D. 1361 (two 
examples) ..... 

Thene are very inlereKling and Taluable examples. They are 
the cliurrh of Ediugton wliich was built by Bishop Edin):lnii, the pre- 
decessor of William of Wjkeham, and ii therefore Ihc earlieil exampli 
of Perpendicular which we pos»fe«, though, as might be mppoacd, ii 
retains much of tlie Decoratid mixed with it. The first example 
appears at fittt aight nlrnoiit pure Deconled, but on ciaminin 
e the quatrefuila are seen to be straigh 

■ decidedly Per- 



■tead of being flowing, and the upper < 



DESCRIPTIVE INDEX OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



101 



fTDOWS— PERPENDICULAR. 

cndicular form. In the second, the two mulHonB which enclose the 
entre light are carried through in the manner of genuine Perpendi- 
alar, and a transom is introduced between them, but the side lights 
xe as genuine Decorated. 

Presbytery, Norwich cathedral, c. 1 360 (two examples) 

The principal lines of these windows are Perpendicular, but the 
ming up is mostly Decorated. The introduction of the transom in the 
lead of the second gives it still more of a Perpendicular character. 

3EPENDICULAR. 

New College chapel, Oxford, A.D. 1386 

We are now arrived at the period of pure Perpendicular, and thi«, 
which is the work of William of Wykeham, is one of the earliest and 
best specimens of the style. 

Merton college chapel, Oxford, A.D. 1424 

The ante-chapel from which this is taken is a particularly fine spe- 
cimen of this style. The windows are good in their proportions and 
pure in their details. 

Headcorn, Kent, c. 1420 

Minster Lovel, Oxfordshire, c. 1430 

S. Mary's, Devizes, Wiltshire, A.D. 1436 

8. Mary's, Oxford, A.D. 1488 . 

Bwinbrook, Oxfordshire, c. 1500 

In this tlie Perpendicular principle is carried to excess, and the 
ei&ct is not so good as in the preceding examples. 

King*8 college chapel, Cambridge, c. 1500 

A good example of a large late four- centred window. The em- 
battled transom was a frequent ornament in late windows. 

Wilby, Northamptonshire, c. 1420 (spire window) 

The tower of this church is a fine specimen of Perpendicular. The 
lower part is square, hut the part which carries the spire is octagonal, 
to the angles of which it is connected hy flying buttresses as here shewn. 

New College, Oxford, A.D. 1386 (tower window) 

This is from the tower, where they are used in pairs. 

Huish Episcopi, Somersetshire, c. 1450 (tower wn'ndow) 
S. Peter's, Dorchester, Dorset, c. 1480 (tower window) 

These two last are examples of a mode of filling belfry windows with 



PACK 



PLATS 



252 



253 



ib. 



ib. 

236 

253 

254 

ib. 



ib. 



258 



227 



252 
ib. 



DESCHtPTIVE INDEX OP TBE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



WIXDOWa— PERPEITDICirtAB. 

artiatneiiinl Monc-wntk in'tead orthe CDminon lom 
very prevnieiil in the churches of iioTmi and Sonie: 
lliou};h le» I'requenll; in olher plat'CK, » 



boirdi which ii 
1 Sonieriel, imd foiind *lu 
Mmgdalen callege, Oxford. 



Compton Winyatp, 'Warwiclialiire (bay window) 
Iliglmni Terrere, Northamptonshire, A.D. H23 (gjibt. 

window) ..... 
Willi nn DgK head mil crai:keted hoodmould. 

Wells. Vicnr'a Close (oriel window) 
B. jricliael'a, Oxf.ird . 
Bnaenoae college 

Flambotast. S. Ouen, Rouen . 
Hnrflcur. Normnndy . 
Fulair^e, c. 14.^0 
S. Mary'i, Diimn. c. 1450 
Beouvais catln^dral, c. 1450 

FRONTISPTECE TO VOLUME I. 
PoRcn. CiaTLB AsituT CnuHCir, NoETiiAMPTOHsninE. 

A fine ipeeimen of (mn.iti.-n work frnm Sarmtn (o Eu-lj Engliih. 
Il hu been Fili-rnively repnired, or, which i« more pro- 
bable, rehuih, iiid the jnmbi Iiare BufTi^red ran. 
tiderably, althaugli ■ large portion of ihe ori|tinal 
work reiriaina, and ja curioiu ; on {urts of Ihene, 

ill omamcnl* liave been marked wilh a ehiMl /^^% 
prepsrntery to carvinR, *nd one or two are in > 
more »d»anced itsle, bul tliey tnay be liler^addi- 
tiona; the leave* of Iht capitila are very limple, *iid of ralht 
mon eharacliT ; the moulillnes of Ihe arch are very 
foail and in line prcnerration : amonf; Ihe enrich- 
menlK ii a aeries of four-teaved flooera, rurmed tx- 
aclly like [he " lomli.omnmcnf' of the Early EnftHih 
>ty)e. Thia porch, totirther with Ihe whole building; 
lo which it is aliached, ia mojl carefully preierved from injury by 
noble owner oflhe adjoininj; maniion. 

FRONTISPIECE TO VOLUME II. 

Window, Cabtle Abuuv C'lirnrn, North AMrroKsn iiie, 
c. 1330. 



DesCKIFTIVS INDEX OP THE ILLDITBATION8. 



«ad of the nanh aiile, it lemulC' 



f window, which ii in (he wi 
>r Ihs e1rg«ace of iti Iracei] 
'conted character, but the mould- 
II thewn in the leclion, particularly . 

dripaloae, ahew it to be rather late 
I ttyle. The other windowi in the 
ai*1e, u ifaewn in the Fruulinpiece, 

the lame itjle and dale as thoae of 
ry MagdaUne, Ozfonl (Plate 157}, 
QDKqnently aomewhat earlier than 

■ cngraTiDg, and that of tWdoarwa; 
■anie church, given aa a fnin'ii- 
are praenteil to the work by the Moat Honoarable the Marquia 




'iDitialletteriarechieS)' copied Ihim a tnanmcript oftheVnlgate 
IStb ccDtuiy, from the Caoouici collectiun now iu the Bodleian 



CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE. 



For the use of the stadent )[r. Rickman's table with some slight 
alteration is subjoined, shewing the duration of the stjlea of English 
arcliiiectuie, and the kings reigning in each period. 



DzU. 



WlLLIlli I 

WuiiiM 11 1"'^7 

Henbt I l]'»j V 

SlEFHEX libo 

HtsBT IL llo4 to llSi« 



RichabdL' 11>9'\ 

Jobs llyy v 

HlvrtIU 1216 to Uli) 

Edward I* 127?^ 

EOWABD II IS'S"^ 

Edward III/...13:?? lo 1377 ^ ^ 



Normal. 

^or English 

Ronuuiesque/ 



Remarks, 

Prevailed little more than 
1^4 years; no remiins 

< REALLY KNOWN tO be VUM 

than a few years older thin 
l^the Conquest 



Richard II 1377'j 

IIxsrtIV 131»y 

Hlnrt V 1413 

Henry VI Mii , 

Edward IV 1401 '^ 

Edward V U'^a i [or 3ni Pointed.] 

Richard III. ^ 14S3| 

Henri VII l4So ' 

Henry V1II....151K) to 1546^ 



Early r 

EsGUsH. ] Prevailed abont 100 yean. 

^or 1st Pointed.] t 

Continued perhaps 10 or 
15 years later in some in- 
stances. Prevailed aboat 
llW years. 

Prevailed about 1G9 yesn. 



Decorated 

Englisu. 

or 2nd Pointed. 



Few, if any, whole buiM. 

PERrENDicr- ' '"8* ««="!?* ^ vm "*** 
L.K English. -; later than Henry ^ UL 

This style used in addi- 
tions and rebuilding^ but 
often much debased, as late 
i^as 1C30 or 1040. 



• The reign of Kichanl L wms the cLief 
period of the Trmnfli:ion firum the Norman to 
the Karl J English htrle. The charge began 
perhaps a little earlier in a fow instaKce^. and 
ccntinned a little later. »-me ba^diDg« of the 
time of King John being of Trauiution cha- 
racter. 

^ The Transition from the Eailj Erg'ij^h tu 
the Decorated htvle tiiok place cbiefly in the 
reign of Edvrard I. Tiie KleAUor croisae« beloiig 
rather to the latter than the fttmuT «tyle. 

' In thv latter part of the Umg re.gn of 
Ed w aid III. the Tranidtiun from the I>eco- 
rat(;d to the Perpendicular sty'.e bt>gau, and 
vraB almost completed by the time of the acces- 



•ioQ of Richard II. iSome boUdings of Ibe 
Ilecorated style may be fuand of hi* reign, bat 
the works of William of Wykeham, West- 
minster Ilall, and many other buildings of tku 
penod. arc of Teiy decided Perpendicolar rt»- 
racter. Perhaps one of the earlieat and best 
authenticated examples of this Transltioa, 
shewing a carious mixture of the two styles, 
is Kdington church in Wi'.tshine, founded If 
Ui^hup William of Edingtnn in 1352, and coo- 
socraiod in I3C1. The same bishop, who died 
in l%ti, commenced the alteration of ^'in- 
clie^ter cathedral into the Perpendicular style, 
which was continued by William of WykehftB* 






<^-:; 



v/- 






, ■. . 






■ \ 






■ / 






f\ 



■ --■. '/ t 



- --: '/ »v 










\ 






--;.■. V* 









I- ■.■•• • ^ . 






f .' 



X 






..>' 









i 









I 




I 



I 



/* » 



s 



X 



V •♦ ' ■-■" • V--J 






II 




I 











Jf' 



« I 



.„„„... 


... 






•^i d 




la: a 




Ii; - 


r i 




*ir 


-'Tii rf 


11 




?■' 


1 33" 


i tl. 






1 1 


1 Ii 


^., 


tbmif 


^ s 


\ 1 


1 




I 



<1 .:•r^^ 



V -■■/ <> 



>\ 



^/ 



/ 






N. i. 



/ 



ill 



.11 




i; 
I- 



^* ft * 

.*% * :.■ . . 
# • • ■ ■ 

• . %. • . ■• f.' 
. «■' " '■ 
■" .- '■ ■■-* 

> ■'. o ' .V' 



I 



' r. - 

ir"- I 

i 
■ ^1 • 

> .» 

■■'■- -i'i 



A 









I 



./ 






BALL-FLOWER. 




rvT • >s 



i 
\ 






'^•.'*- 



• . \ 



•<^ 



BASE, GRECIAN AND ROMAN. 



PLATE 22. 



T08CAN. 



ROMAN DORIC. 




w 








■ I. 


1 


• 






.1 
1^ 













* 


m 




%* 


rt 



TRAJAN'S COLUMN. 



COLONNADB OF ST. PETER 3 



IONIC. 



IONIC 



IHTi- 





OEDUGT OP HADRIAN 



KKECBTHEUM. 



CORINTHIAN 



CORINTHIAN 





PUB OP JUPITER 8TAT0R 



CHORAGIC MONCMENr OF LY31CRATES 



COMPOSITE 



ATTIC. 





I 



I 












N'-;/- .- 



I 



\s . 



\ 




yjil J ■ 


iH"^ 


J|l^ i! 




BASC-ORNAMENTB OF. 




*< 






.../ 



• v 



* I 



■->> 







tl : 


IK 




mk 1 




-* ill .- i 



BELL OABLE AND BELL COT. 




'\ 









!• . 



\s 



SEU. OABLES ANO SELL COTS. PLATE 31 




BELL TURRET AND BELL COT. 




/■■- 

"'-S 



\ J 



\ ♦ *y 






.y 



I - 



\ 






•»<« ' 



FiariNDicauia 




BELL OABLE AND BELL COT. 




>.. 



11' 



u\ 



V.-: -^s 









L< ■ « 






BELL OASLES AND BELL COTS. PLATC » 




TURRET AND BELL COT. PLATE » 




CLEIVX ABBKT. (OUBBSII 0. 









\ 



♦ * .*' 






I 



;*— ■- \ ... .' 



■ ^ 



- f 



nmnHDicoLiB 




J- 



^• , 






^-7:-. 



>« ' 



I" - 
i- • 

< f 






*in-niE«s-n.vitM. 




fLVINO BUrmEtt. 




I' 



h 



E! ■' 



li 1 



CAPITAL AND CNTABIATURE. PLATC 4- 




III 
















*aiTBT PASISH CHURCa. 



^ • 


\ 




; >.. 




' \- i. 


! "*1 ^ 




1 


V" - ^ 




-f 




1 


J^ 



J^ 



t > 






7 






I- 









■ 



i ■ 



^" /•>. 



■---'•. 




^^k \|\V ( 







• • ■' >« 






^».^ 



. •' iV 



. » ■ 

-'.»•■ 

v-»..' :' 

■4 . ■ 



1 •;■•-. 



\ 



*^"w i 






l! 

I 

1 
I 



I 






■ i'^ 



Ac . 



C 









- > 

I 
« t 



I 



i . 



'l 



rr-rt' ■■■■: 



\ 






I 



^ - ■ 


- "^-^ 


/ 








«' ■ ', 


.. 4 


\y . 




v.. 


. / 




\/ 




.0 












r„ 


i 

T 












L 




3 




i 




■■•"- 




'i.Tj':.:;, 











/ 



:i 



/ ■■■.; 



\ 






- 1 










CMBEL TABLE. 




•^.^" 



\ 



t. 






i 

* 

-A 



/•A 



*-:i^- \_> 



-y 



A 









/ . 



it- 



I. 



y 




IDTHAUnoMSBtRE 









•r -/ 








/ 



rHEBTOH TOKKSBIR: 






PBEBEIIEBT, LINOOLH CilHIDEiL. 0. 15ft) 





I US). UHOOUr CATHSDBII^ s. 



y 



I ■ 
I 

.1. 



; "r',. 












^-^*' 



V - <■ • 

•. . 



I 



, ,rf ' '--IT 




^Fm 


^ 


11 " ' I ■ 




1 ! 


^' 




\ 



V 



J 

I... 



V :- 






i V 






,-fV 



iXi 



"-!;'' v;~i' 




TOUB, sALiaaoftT 





OUCOE CBIPIL. OirOKD, WUIBORNI UUIBtBH, 





OSITTUBUUTaH. DEtOIIaB:BB. 



L-DOtwarifi OR Hlp^u«OB■ puate as. 










«,n>011 OAgTUI, HOKTHC 






»;-; 




v.- •* 




V . ' ' "'• 




V .- 




•/ , 






• 



. V 



.'^'* {'"' "■•■■> ">•• 

/«-■>• . • • . • . - » 

A./ • ' \ -. A 

i ■ ". ' -. .i 

t . ' . •. . . •I 






-•— ««»- 



:.>^ 






/• 



> ■» 









. . V • *■ .• A 

. ... • •-,■ -■ \ 

' -J 



»•••* 



..•^ 



9^- 




./--. 


^ 


Mg 


k 


1 


i 


r 


( 

1 


^¥m 




1 








HOOD*IOULD TCRMINATKm. 




L. CHAMtl* BUBHOTM. ( 



I 




IL 



'\ \ ; • r>K 



, 


■'■■; . \ 


% 


'.'■.- J 


A 


* n 




•i,m- 


> 


■»- « 1 



IRON-WORK. 





^'-■-. 



^.^ 


■ ^- ' ' x 


r 


• ■" • \ ■ \ 


'• .. 


V 




■ ^ .-y.\ 


•.• 


' ■ ■■' . 1 


• « 


• . »■ • 






\ 


■^ y^ 


, , 


.•^r^ *.. 


\ »", 


■ -'< ■ ■.* 


^^ 


.. •-:>-' 



LETrEIIN & FAUMTOOL 












i 


-^m 


^i^ 


it 




miM 


* 


*^?!!! 








iSs* 










hRmhmm 


KR 













nmiiininm^ir 



:y 






. ■ ^« - ^ • • / 



ARCHITECTURE. 




w 



%J' 



MOULDINGS^ GRECIAN AND ROMAN. 


PLATE 110. 


1 ^tigi . . 


^■■■^^■^^ * 1. -T ' "-rf"**^ [HI^H^HH^HIH 


' 



GRECIAN OVOLO. 
Tempi* at CorintJU. 




SCOTIA, TROCH1LU8 OR CASEMENT. 
Baths of Diocletian. Home 




CTMA RECTA. 

Theatre of Uarcellus, Rom'i 




QUIRKED OGEE 
Arch of CoDstantixie. Rome 



BEAD 




APOPHYOtta 
Batha of Diocletian, Rome 



I 



ROMAN OVOLO. 
Theatre cf Marcellua. Heme 




CAVETTO 
Theatre of Maroellus. Rome. 




CTMA REVERSA OR OGEE 
Temple of Antoninus and Pauatinui, Rome. 




TORD8. 
From Palladio 



^ 



^ 



ASTRAGAL. 
Theatre of Marcellus. Rome 



■y 



zi 



F11XF.T 



g 



REEDS 



- • .. ' 






X^•■ 



A 






/ 






MOULDINOS, NORMAN. 




/-.v^- 



jC ■ 



^1 



• 






MOULDINOS AND ORNAMENTS. 



^ HHBHH 



^.;.^..^ Etmim 







A.. 

( - ■ 



•-.■ 






MOULOINOS, NORMAN. 




W^l^ 




^ ^^m 



-" . 11 11 1 r ^ - Ii 1<_ 



•'w r s - . -■ • • 



r.l 

V- 



« • 






/f'^' 






M0UUMNQ8, NMMAN. 




'^»^>^ 






^S3S2^22S- 




MOULDINGS, NORMAN. 



PLATE 118. 



PeUet 



Studded 





DOOB IFFLEY. OXfXDRDaHlKt. 



HALES. KORFOLK. 



Fir con« or Fir apple 



-.ftr- 






Rose. 



mi^- 



a m m m m 




CROTLAilD ABBEY, LINCOLNSHIRE. 



DOOB. IFFLEY. OZON. 



Diamond Prrtte. 




.j'hiTr.^c 



NUN MONKTON. YORKSHIRE 




LINCOLN CATHEDRAL, 0. 1140 



Cbsln. 



Double Cona 




-"iniii.lb-*"j I . 



■"ilP*'^^^^ 



ST. WILLIAM'S CHAPEL, YORK 



8TONELEIGH. VVARWiCKSHlBE. 



Triantfula.T Frette or Dav^^tall 



Embattled 





ELY CATHEDRAL 



LINCOLN CATHEDRAL, c. 1140 



MOULOINOS, NORMAN. 




ClHTEKBaRT CATHEDIUI., 



■V 



MOULMHQ^ l«Om«H AWP TMmiTIOIL FUTf MA 




MOULOINOS, EARLY 




MOULOINOS, EARLY ENGUSH. PLATE 193. 







:i 



•^)* ■•.' 



» ■ 



?/ 



MOUUHNOS-EARLY ENOUSH. PLATE 133 







. ^ 



MOULDINOS, EARLV ENOUSH. 









^ 





w 







\ 



"^. 



/<r 



MOULDINOS, DECORATED. 




V^-A v.... ..-, .•/ 

• si ■ ■ ■• .../ 



MOULDINGS, PERPENMCULAN. - PLATE 19a 




MOULDINGS, PERPENMCUIAR. 




MOULDINGS, PERPENDICULAR. 



PLATE laa 





PORLOCK, 60MERSET8HIRS 
drcaUOO 



OPEN SEAT. COMSE IN TEIONBXAD, 
DEVONBHIBS, o IflOO. 




UONUMSKT, WELLS CATESDRAL, A D. IM0. 




ST. ALBAN'8. HERTPORD8HIRB. A.D. 1447. 





bT FhlDESWIDE'S faHklNE, OXFOBD CATHEDRAL, circa li80 





WHITCHURCH. 30aiER3E"I3HIKE, 
circa 14*. 



ST aLRAN S. HERTFORDSHIRE, 
circa li80. 




WEST END OF NAVE. ST. MARYS. 
OILFORD. AD 1*68. 




'4MS 



K 



UEMRY VII CHAPEL. WESTUIKSTXE 
AD. 1510. 



MOULDIN09, FLAMBOYANT. 







T^.5 



MOULDINGS -STIIINQ9- 




/ ■ 









r :."»7> 






•:.' 



,f 



.<'^'A 












'I 



'. " • . Si 



MOULDINGS -STRINGS. 



PLATE 133. 



NORUAN. 





PETERB(lRODQB CATHEDRA!,, c 1140. 

EARLY ENGLISH 



ELY CATHEDRAL, c 1140, 





CHOIR. LINCOLN CATHEDRAL. 0. 1200 



8T. BEPULOHRE'a, NORTHAMPTON, c 1230 




ROM8EY, HANTS, o 1250. 




8ALI3BDRY CATHEDRAL, o 1240. 



DECORATED 




MERTON COLLEGE CHAPEL, A.D. 1277 




8EDGEBARROW. WOKCEBTERflHIRE. o. 1800. 





WaRMINGTON, WAKV/ICK-dHLHIt, c 1350. PINBDON, NORTHAMPTONSHIRE, 0. 1840 

PERPENDICULAR 




MAGDALENE COII.EOS. OXFORD, AD. 1400. 




WILB7. NORTBAMPTONBHIRB. 0. 1440. 



NnULCHNaS OF niBS. 




/ 



n^i •• 






V. 



\* 



^^^ 



; -» 



MOULDINGS OF RIBS. 



PLATE 134. 



MO&MAII. 





CRYPT, GLOUCESTER CATHEDRAL, A.D. IICO 
TRANSITION 





OXFORD CATHEDRAL. C 1180. 



GLASTONBURY ABBEY, cllflO 



EABLY ENGLISH 





SALISBURY CATQEDRAL. A.D. 12.'0 



ST BA\ lOURB. BOUIHWARK, c. 13fi0. 





ST. SAVIOUR'S. 30UTHWARK. C 1350. TEMPLE CHURCH. LONDON, A J). 1340 

DECORATED -.-Jj 





OLOUCE6TEH CATHEDRAL, c. 1300 GLOUCESTER CATHEDRAL, AD. 1318. 

PERPENDICULAR. 





HEW COLLEGE. OZJOBD. A.D 1360 



DIVINITT SCHOOL. OXTORD. o 1«C0 j 



y\y>^. 












.f 



vTf??;, 



■.?/ 



* ■>_-. J) .:> -i JJ 


■ •* . > " 


> Wi j» > T) 'X)) 


t) 


' > \j> >) > J) a) 


jy ■ 


> > \.»'3^ '-"^ ' ■ '^-^ 


> 


> ^ O) 2> >^^ ' '^^ 


;> 




-^io ^o 


'> J J> ' ))>^> •' '>i> 


-^^, , » .,, 


S> >:> -> t))^?^ '■>>> 


^^ y 


?■:_>)>.) >>'■.■> )T ''^> 








1 >^J.>>j 


' > ■■ 


' ■ >0.'>J) 


? 


»)o> 




:>-■:>/)>, .,:,^> 




>'j>':»> '_)'>i> 1 




) "-, ■ ■ ,-,-> . 





_ ■ . * 








«»j2> 




*>:>y> i» 


,yi > 


I 


»)>),» 


■■>' 


»J»l-)-^?J>-.7 


yy» 


) 


Oj>^ 


o 


»J»>> r^>> )D^ 


;.' 


)) i 


> > 


>)j>?)^ ^:3i» 


■>» 


J 


O -) ) ■ 


> 


»3>>>J»> 


3.S> 


> 


o ):> 


2> 


^>>S>OIS>> 


~1 V 


1. 


> >^' 


> 


0«> ) :>> , 






> ) 


:> 


'>> > >> i- 


. J 




)' > 


> 


'■JO . » ■> 






i' > 


:^ , 








H 1' 


> , 




,;) ; 




_J. .» 


:J> ■.,, 


'" > )>> 


St)=» 


,W 


)>> 1. 


•^ : 


' ■■ , . > >, - 


^■» -> 


)) 


:> ) ■> , 


^fJ 




1.1 V 








"4>) n>-„ 








' ) 


> 
) 






"1 


> 

> 

i 










J ., ,'. 


MBM 


{■p 


■