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fALBERTA . 
NATIVE 'J 
NEWS 


























Alberta Native News December, 1999 


£«flLBERTR3 


"No Government Grants" 


Suite 330,10115 IOOA Street 
Edmonton, Alberta T5J2W2 
Tel: (780) 421-7966 Fax: (780) 424-3961 
E-mail: nativenew»OpowerM«fr.com 


Canadian Pubtcatlon 
Mart Product 
Sales Agreement 
No. 0467 057 


Volume 16, Number 12 December, 1999 

ISSN #08294135 


PUBLISHER-EDITOR: Dave Moser 
ASSOCIATE-EDITOR: Deborah Moser 
ADVERTISING: Larry Shenker 

Danita Nanaquawetung 
Mark McCallum 
Edmond SI. Louis 
CIRCULATION: Kelly Whiskeyjack 
CUSTOMER RELATIONS: Sharon McClure 
DISTRIBUTION by S. A. R. G. E. 

Alborta Nation Mows is published monthly lor distribution to Nabve 
Bands and Moss Settlements across Alberta. Saskatchewan. 
Manitoba. Ontario, tho Yukon and Northwest Terrtlodes. 

All rights roservod. No part of this newspaper may be reproduced 
without writlon permission from the publisher The opinions 
oxprossod heroin aro not nocossarlly those ol the Editor. Alborta 
Nation Nam Is published by 320764 Alberta Ltd. 



Season's Greetings, end best wishes 
for a prosperous New Veer 

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Alborta Native News 

Suite 330, 10115 100A Street 
Edmonton, Alberta T5J 2W2 


Name 

Address _ 




Millennium 

Shmillennium 

by Xavier Kataquapit 


You probably had a shower this morning, brushed 
your teeth at the sink and used the toilet. These are 
life’s little luxuries that we take for granted. How¬ 
ever, if you are a First Nation person living in some of 
the mure remote Native communities in Canada these 
comforts are not available to everyone. 

It’s hard to believe that at the dawn of the new 
millennium many Canadians are living in poverty, 
with inadequate housing and services. You don’t have 
to travel to the third world to see third world condi¬ 
tions. Just hop a flight to a northern remote First 
Nation community and you’ll get an eye full. 

It was only a few years ago that most of the people 
in my home community of Attawapiskat First Nation 
received running water. Now you might not think 
that that is a very big deal but the fact is that I 
remember only a few short years ago we had to go to 
an out house for a toilet. Conditions in those days were 
very bad with a series of ditches dug throughout the 
community that carried sewage and contaminated 
water throughout the town. During the summer 
months it was very difficult to ignore the stench and 
unsanitary conditions that existed. 

The ’honey bucket’ was a common sight in every 
home. The bucket was used extensively during the 
cold months and pity the poor soul that had to empty 
it in the morning. Not only were these conditions 
difficult but they were dangerous to health in terms of 
disease. 

It used to bother me a lot to have to watch my 
parents and the elders in the community struggle to 
head out to the out house while I realized that most 
people in the province and the country had indoor 
toilets. Initially there was running water in some of 
the homes in Attawapiskat but these were reserved 
for the hospital and education staff that came from 
outside the community. It was a treat to visit someone 
in one of these fancy homes to use the toilet or maybe 
even have a shower or bath. 

In those days I remember my mom would have to 
heat up a five gallon pail of water on the stove and 
then pour it into a large plastic tub that each one of us 
kids would bathe in. Because this was such a diffi¬ 
culty wo only bathed twice a month although we 
washed our hair once a week. There was no such thing 
as simply turning on the faucet for hot water. 

Something as simple as wanting a glass of water 
took a great deal of effort. I recall going with my dad 
and my older brothers to the nearby rapids on the 
Attawapiskat River to fetch five gallon pails of water 



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from fast flowing river. We would then empty these 
pails into a 45 gallon drum which we would haul back 
to our home. We drank this water, cooked with this 
water, made tea in this water and washed and bathed 
in it. In the summer, it wasn’t too difficult but in the 
winter we Bad to go further out into the ice covered 
river, cut a hole in the ice and haul out the water. We 
also gathered ice and snow to melt for drinking water 

Most non-Native people I know or Native people 
who live in the south don’t ever remember being 
without running water. 

They are amazed when I tell them that we only got 
the luxury of running water in Attawapiskat in about 
1990. As a matter offset there are many First Nation 
communities in remote locations today that are still 
not fully serviced with running water or dependable 

So the next time anybody out there thinks that life 
in a First Nation community is rosy and that we First 
Nation people complain too much just think to your¬ 
self—would you want your family to live without 
these basic services? Scientists are talking about 
interplanetary travel and yet there are still many of 
my people that don’t have the most basic comforts 
that should be a reality at the start of the year 2000 




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Alberta Native News December, 1 


Lubicon talks stop, start 
and wait for the new year 


by B 




The talks between the Lubicon First Nation and the federal and provincial 
governments which had shown some progress over the summer seem once again 
to have hit bureaucratic snags. 

Lubicon adviser Fred Lennarson expressed resignation with the way the talks 
seem to have stalled. 

•A number of things agreed to in October were supposed to be done in 
November,” describes Lennarson. "There were supposed to be discussions be¬ 
tween the province and the feds and the province was supposed to make a 
presentation, but the things to be done in October were not done so the Lubicon 
Lisked that the meetings be postponed until these bilateral issues between the 
| Lubicon and the federal government are completed.” 

Both sides now have procedural proposals before each other and Lennarson calls 
I the current impasse, “a very complicated situation.” 

“Nothing is scheduled until there’s a response to the Lubicon proposals and until 
I the Lubicon respond to the federal document.” 

Lennarson guesses that the Lubicon response will come within the next seven 
I to ten days after review of the 50-page document sent to them by the federal 
I negotiators. 

h Lennarson describes the actions of John McCarthy, a lawyer negotiating on 
I behalfofthe province, as "another twist” in the proceedings. In July McCarthy told 
I Lubicon negotiators he had yet to receive instructions from Shirley McClellan, the 
I new minister of international and intergovernmental affairs. 

“The feds had been pushing the province for months, to come and make a 

I 1 presentation on what the province was prepared to contribute to the settlement. 
A meeting was scheduled and again the bilateral issues weren't done but progress 
was being made and the feds were pressing hard for the province to come and make 
this presentation," explains Lennarson. “The Lubicon agreed because they hoped 
progress was being made but the progress they hoped for in July hadn't been 
I accomplished by October." Lennarson says he found out about the problems was 
I from a journalist who notified him of a change in the province’s agenda. 

I “They were attending to get a progress report on how the negotiations were 
I going—which is what they did; they showed up and they had nothing to say 
I because they had a new cabinet minister because of a cabinet shufile and they 
I were hoping to meet with her in September. They did request documents that were 
I being discussed between the Lubicon and the feds for their briefing. 

I Frankly it doesn’t make sense,” blasts Lennarson. The government knows 
I exactly what’s going on, they get briefings regularly by the feds, and the feds say 
Iso.” 

I- Lennarson says the Native negotiators were told of a series of delays in meeting 
I with the new minister and so had no mandate. A November meeting was cancelled 
I by the Lubicon as progress slowed and things agreed to months ago failed to 
I materialize. 

I The next meeting will be in the new year, perhaps as late as February, 
I speculates Lennarson as the band once described by the New York Times as the 
“tribe Canada forgot” takes its struggle for justice into the 21st century. 
Lennarson says that other factors have also slowed talks, such as band elections 




iLirst lllislirs for a liraiitiful (Christmas 
attb a happy aitb peaceful Nctu IJcar 


Honourable Mike Cardinal 
M.L.A. Athabasca/Wabasca 
(780)415-4815 


and, in the next year and a half, federal elections. 

The band still holds to its long time claim of a 246-sq. km reserve, promised to 
the band by former Premier Don Getty in 1988 and later revoked by current 
Premier Ralph Klein. 

Other concerns include environmental, wildlife, infrastructure financing and 
compensation for post resource exploitation. 

■ Max/ the hCessings of Christmas he with aff the people 
ofthe Tirst ‘Nations, 
from 

HONORABLE STAN WOLOSHYN 

MINISTER OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 
MLA and his staff at the Stony Plain Constituency Office 


Constituency: 4995 - 53 Avenue 
Stony Plain, AB 177. IV4 
(780)963-1444 


Legislature: 204 Legislature Building 
Edmonton, AB I 5K 2B6 
(780) 427-4928 


Social Services Bursary Program 


If you are a Metis or Non-Status Indian student interested in pursuing 
post-secondary education in the social services fieldoatumay qualify for 
the Social Services Bursary Program. 



5 and Employment 
M08 Street 
AB TSJ 3EI 
Phone: (780)427-5949 

o be connected toll-free in Alberta, dial 3104)000. 




TRAINING / SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITY 


To Quality: 

You must be a membei ol one of the following bands: 

e. Cold Lake, Frog Lake. Kehowln, Goodllsh La 


e. Saddle Lake 


• Firsl Nations Treaty must live off reserve lor 3 months 

• Musi be 18 years ok) 

• El and Reach-back clients may qualify 

• Must express a serious commitment lo completing the program 

• Musi be out of school for one year 

• All applicants must submit to an assessment and evaluation process 

• All traming/sponsorthip programs have lo lead towards employmenl opportunity 

• For short term programs applicabons musl be submitted two week In advance lo 
starting date 


For more information please contact: Marcel or Darlene 

Treaty Six Employment and Training #2 

4709 - 50 Avenue. St Paul AB 

Phone: 780-645-6852 • Fax: 780-645-6823 

























Alberta Native News December, 1999 


Native casino profits 
the concern of the day 





May tha blasting* of haalth and proiperity bo with you this Christmas Season 
and throughout tha New Year, from 

BUFFALO LAKE 
METIS SETTLEMENT 



r. u. boi zu, basian, Aioerta iua uku ^ 

Phone (780| 689-2170 • Council (780) 689-8981 • Fax (780) 689-2024 


Wismr^ you peace and joy at 
A it., ^ lnstl,uls **tuT in the year to c 
Jrom 

Vp ^ Chief John Shirt 
Councj| t|de(is 
Staff and Band Members 




Saddle Lake 
First 
Nation 


Saddle Lake, Alberta TOA 3T0 
(780) 726-3829 Fax: (780) 726 3788 



legalities of doling out First Nations-generated money is bound to be one that will 
be carried into courtrooms across the country as society tries to determine when 1 
the fairness line begins, and the blood line ends. 


Canada, and best Wishes in the ci 


e First Nations aero: 


World Vision 

World Vision Canada Aboriginal Programs 

6630 Turner Valley 
Mississauga, Ontario 
L5N 2S4 

E-mail: leblanct@mb.sympatico.ca 
Phone toll free: 1-800-268-3922 
Fax: (905)821-1354 

Serving the Aboriginal Community in Development 



W»8tm9unt 















































Alberta Native News December, 1999 


5 


Fraud allegations 
double on 
Alberta reserves 

by Brian Savage 

Allegations of fraud on Native reserves have risen 
sharply from last year according to government docu¬ 
ments and nowhere is this increase in concern over 
financial accountability seen more than in Alberta. 

Alberta jumped from 13 allegations of fraud in 
1997-98 to 25 in 1998-99. Eleven allegations of fraud 
_from Alberta have now been referred to the ROMP. 
This represents a significant majority of the 16 cases 
nationally which have been referred to the police. 

The figures were released by the Department of 
Indian Affairs and fuel concern from some Native 
groups and the auditor general about accounting 
practices that take place on some reserves. 

These figures and demands for more accountability 
do not come as any surprise to Greg Twoyoungmen, a 
r- Stoney tribal councillor. “People are standing up, 
they've had enough of corruption," he says. “It's some¬ 
thing we’ve seen as grassroots people. Since the Stoney 
situation came to light it opened some eyes and gave 
courage to the grassroots to stand up for their rights.’ 

The plight of the Stoney band attracted national 
attention in 1997 when an internal audit showed the 
band had a $5.6 million operating deficit while receiv¬ 
ing $15 million in natural gas royalties and $19 
million from the federal government only the year 

"Inequitieshaveexisted,” says Twoyoungmen. "Mas¬ 
sive inequities existed and still do." Financial prob¬ 
lems on reserves stretch across Canada, says the 
councillor and takes objection to Assembly of First 
Nations Chief Phil Fontaine who calls the fraud 
allegations isolated. “I’ve been all across Canada on 
reserves and I hear the same thing,” says the Native 
activist. However, he adds that the “total lack of 
accountability” in the past is now slowly changing, 

- Audits of band spending are questioned by 
Twoyoungmen who feels their practice is largely ig¬ 
nored by some bands. 

“No one gets charged," he says, “and if this was 
white society, in the corporate world, they would be 



out in the cold pretty quick and charges would be laid. 

“Indian Affairs has a hands off policy—they don't 
want to deal with it. I've yet to sec one charge laid." 

The Stoney councillor notes that it has been a year 
since the forensic audit of the band’s spending was 
carried out and still not one charge has been laid. 
“We'd like to see justice served. There were supposed 
to be charges laid but I've talked to KPMG (the 
accounting firm), Indian Affairs and the RCMP and 
they give us the run-around because no one wants to 
admit to anything and look incompetent and ineffi- 

Twoyoungmen says that the Stoneys are now in the 
black in their financial matters through third party 
management—money spent is now scrutinized. “At 
least it’s not spent wantonly and recklessly ." 

There were now 48 fraud allegations laid with the 
police by Indian Affairs in 1998-99. The year before 
there had been only 26 and the year before that, three. 

The federal government allocates $4.6 billion for 
Native programs. 



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SEASON'S GREETINGS 
May your hearts be open at Christmas 
so that the Circle ot Love and Peace may grow 



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Alberta Native News December, 199S 

Residential school 
victims get their 
day in court 

by John Copley 

I If the day of reckoning hasn’t yet been realized by 
ictims of Canada’s now-defunct residential schools, 
,-ill it ever be? With each passing day, surviving 
. ictims from across the country are making their way 
,nto the courtrooms and into the history books as one 
foul deed after the other is uncovered, exposing the 
perpetrators, often sending them to jail. But the 
verdict inarecent 
case conducted! 


For example, the British Columbia Supreme Court, 
in an earlier decision, held that the Anglican Diocese 
of the Cariboo was 60 percent responsible for one 
sexual assault claim that had been made against it. In 
the same case, the judge. Justice Janice Dillon, deter¬ 
mined that the federal government must assume 40 
percent of the responsibility. 

The Anglican Diocese of the Cariboo and its na¬ 
tional body have filed a notice of appeal in B.C.'s 
Supreme Court. So far no word from the federal 


This particular case involved Floyd Mowatt, just a 
young man when he was sent to St. George's Residen¬ 
tial School in Lytton, B.C. Sexually and physically 
assaulted from the time he was nine, Mr. Mowatt 
might once again be forced to stand up in court and 


The church, 
however, has 
much to lose, thus 
their reluctance 
to sit still for a 
guilty verdict. 
The dormitory su- 

took advantage of 
his position with 
Floyd Mowatt, is 
currently in 



o blessed Christmas 


$135,000, the 
lawyer repre¬ 
senting the fed¬ 
eral government 
in the matter, 
called the judge’s 
decision prec¬ 
edent-setting. 

That’s because 
Court of Queen’s 

mch Justice, Darla Hunter, failed to find enough 
idence to hold the federal government liable for 
punitive damages. 

"We’re hopeful (the decision) will have a beneficial 
result in claims across Canada,” said attorney, Dale 
Kohlenberg. "It will provide us with some guidance in 
' ow the courts will assess these claims.” 

In this particular case, in which the defendant 
cannot be named by court order, the victim, now 31, 
was only seven years old when the abuses occurred. 
Calling the incident(s) “the cruelest thing that ever 
happened to me”, the victim said he still bears the 
scars that were left on his back by then-school admin¬ 
istrator William Peniston Starr. 

Despite Kohlenberg’s expectations, however, each 
ise is judged and based on its own merits, though 
when the case is lost it’s normal for governments and 


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contested by the 

settlement of 
$250,000, The 

Anglican Diocese ran nearly 20 residential schools 
across Canada, at a time when pedophilia was raging 
through the government created, church run schools. 

According to national news sources, the church has 
sought an appeal in the Mowatt case for numerous 
reasons, one of which questions Justice Dillon's per¬ 
ception of alleged coverups involving church officials. 

The Anglican Church was not alone in its adminis¬ 
tration of residential schools in Canada. Other ad¬ 
ministrators included the Roman Catholic Church, 
and both the United and Presbyterian Church. Alle¬ 
gations of sexual, physical, emotional and mental 
cruelty and abuse have come forth from virtually 
every former residential school in the country 
To date, the RCMP and other policing services h 
charged dozens of former administrators and empl . 
eeswith numerous types of abuse offences. Others are 
still being investigated. 



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Alberta Native News December, 1999 


Don’t put off dealing with 
the Y2K problem 

(NCl-The fact that Home computer systems will have a problem with the year 
2000 is familiar to most of us by now The “millennium bug or "Y2K problem has 
received unprecedented coverage in the media, and for good reason. Many 
computer systems cannot handle dates beyond December 31.1999-they simply 

weren’t programmed to cope with the next century and beyond. 

Efforts to correct this defect have come to be known as Y2K remediation. The 
term is apt, for it encompasses not only repairing the faulty programmingof older 
hardware and soffware, but also planning for related contingencies that will be 
needed After all, even if your own operation has the Y2K problem well in hand, 
disruptions may still occur as a result of external factors beyond your control 

Approximately 80-85 percent of small and medium-sized businesses in Canada 
have already defended themselves against the Y2K computer bug. So, if you re 
among the unprotected 15-20 percent, your competition is way ahead, and you II 
have to act fast to catch up to them before December 31 But even before then, you 
stand to lose business because clients, prospects and suppliers won t want to risk 
being let down—or being infected by your Y2K problems—by dealing with a 
company that’s not Y2K safe. 

Although Canada docs not expect to suffer from any major Y2K problems the 
Canadian Bed Cross suggests you take the following steps to prepare for an 
unforeseen emergency: 

• Check with manufacturers of any essential computer-controlled electronic 
equipment in your home to see if that equipment may be affected. This includes 
firo and security alarm systems, programmable thermostats, appliances, con¬ 
sumer electronics, garage door openers, electronic locks, and any other electronic 
equipment in which an “embedded chip" may control its operation. 

• Stock disaster supplies to last several days to a week for yourself and those 
who live with you. This includes having non-perishable foods, stored water, and 
an ample supply of prescription and non-prescription medications that you 
regularly use. 

• Similar to preparing for a winter storm, it is suggested that you keep your 
automobile gas tank full. 

• In case the power fails, plan to UBe food that docs not require cooking or use 
alternative cooking devices in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions. Don’t 
usu open llunius or charcoal grills indoors. 

• Have extra blankets, ‘ 1 ‘ J 

to use gus-fuclled nppliai 
same goes for wood-burning or li 

tobousedinarosidei. 

out of dc 



device, make sure it is approved for use indoors and is listed with the Canadian 
Safety Association (CSA) or Underwriters Laboratories. 

• Have plenty of flashlights and extra batteries on hand. Don’t use candles for 
emergency lighting. 

For information on how to deal with the Millennium Bug, visit Industry 
Canada’s Task Force Year 2000 Secretariat’s Web site at http://strategis.ic.gc ca/ 
sos2000 or call toll free 1-800-622-6232. 


s, and gloves to keep warm. Please do not plan 
an oven, as on alternative heating source. The 
cs that are not designed 


May the Creator bring safety, strength and guidanc 
this Holiday Season 



•ngth and guidance to alt 


KEE TAS KEE NOW 
TRIBAL COUNCIL 


Atikamcg, Alberta TOG 0C0 



oaU 


Dakota Tipi First Nation 

P.O. Box 1569 

Portage La Prairie, MB RlN 3P1 
Phone (204J 857-4381 
Fax (204) 857-9855 



‘May the Creator 

Bring safety, strength and guidance to ad 
this MoCiday Season 

ALBERTA 
PLYWOOD LTD. 

MITSUE INDUSTRIAL PARK 
P.O. BOX 517, SLAVE LAKE, AB TOG 2AO 

Phone: (780) 849 4145 
Fax: (780) 849-2426 



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OR MORE INFORMATION: (780) 926-2278 
WRITE TO: CARIBOU MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS 
BOX 1165. HIGH LEVEL. ALBERTA T0H 1ZO 



Best n’Wtea for a safe and happy holiday 

do Union of Ontario Indians 

P.O. Box 711 
North Bay. ON P1B 8J8 
Phone:(705)497-9127 
Fax:(705)497-913S 
ToU Free: 1-800-334-3330 
Internet: l ! OI(ivi»net.on.cs 


Offering Courses: 

Native Community Care; Counselling and Development. Native 
Early Childhood Education, School Trustees Training: Education 
Administrators Training. Career Counselling; Small Business 
Management Training; Professional Development Workshops. 






































alberta Native News December, 1999 


IF YOUR BUSINESS IS NOT 
Y2K READY, YOU CAN START 
A CHAIN REACTION. 



We have the tools to assist your business. 
Take action today! 


Your partners, suppliers and customers 
are depending on you to continue providing 
services beyond January 1, 2000. 

You CAN’T AFFORD NOT TO BE Y2K READY. 
Imagine if all your systems - from 
computers to cash registers to security 
systems - were shut down by the Year 
2000 computer “bug". Now imagine 
missing a deadline or failing to meet a 
contractual obligation. This can seriously 
affect your continued operations, and 
can cost you business. And, you don't 
want to miss out on the tax relief available 
for any replacement of computer hard¬ 
ware and software you made between 
January 1998 and October 1999. 


Y2K Info: Call 

1 800 O-Canada (1 800 622-6232) 

TTY/TDD 1 800 465-7735 

Or visit http://strategis.icgcca/sos2000 for SME Programs. 
Or contact the Canada Business Service Centre nearest you. 


Time is running out. 

Start with the nine-step Y2K checklist for 
small and medium businesses listed on 
this advertisement. Then access Industry 
Canada's SOS2000 Web site to find out 
how their Y2K programs can help your 
business prepare. 

Or contact the Canada Business Service 
Centre nearest you. (They’re listed in the 
blue pages of your phone book.) 

Or simply call 1800 O-Canada for more 
information on how the Government of 
Canada can help you. 


1 + 1 


Canada 


Y2K Checklist for 
Small- and Medium- 
Sized Businesses 



J Designate one person 
responsible for Y2K readiness. 
Ensure that they write a Year 
2000 action plan. 

Li Take inventory of all your 
electronic systems, hardware 
software applications - every¬ 
thing with an embedded 
time/date chip. 

J Determine which inventory 

ITEMS COULD BE AFFECTED by 

Y2K. what will need to be done 
to make these products Year 
2000 ready and how much It 
will cost. 

□ Priorities according to which 
systems are essential for day-to- 
day operations. Including those 
linked to, or dependent on, 
outside systems. 

□ Correct or replace your 
systems, ensuring compatibility 
with your customers' and your 
suppliers' systems. 

□ Test all corrected systems 
thoroughly, simulating real 
operating conditions. 

□ Assess the risk or dealing 

WITH NON-Y2K READY COMPANIES. 

Ask suppliers, customers and 
service providers for Information 
on their Y2K readiness. (Be 
prepared to provide them with 
the same.) 

U Develop a Contingency Plan 
In case something goes wrong, 
e.g., paper-based or other manual 
systems, alternative suppliers On 
case regular suppliers' systems 
fall), etc. 


□ Consider the Legal 
Implications. Ensure that you 
cannot be proven negligent by 
suppliers or customers for not 
having taken adequate measures 
to ensure Y2K readiness. 


Very Small Businesses 

Seek advice from your computer 
and software vendors, service 
providers and other experts. But 
don't forget your place In the 
business supply chain. Write to 
your key partners and customers 
to ensure their Y2K readiness, 
and be prepared to provide 
them with the same. 



















Alberta Native News December, 1999 


Aboriginal Music 
Awards a big hit 
in Toronto 

by John Copley 

The Toronto-based Canadian Aboriginal Festival 
(CAF), billed as the country’s largest powwow, took on 
a new challenge this year when they played host to the 
Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards (CAMA). The 
gala, referred to as "a big success’ by reviewers from 
across the nation, took place at the Toronto Skydome 
on December 2nd. 


The powwow, which took place the following day, 
• i patron of more than 1,000 dancers, 
singers vying for a record $75,000 in 



Notice 

Members of the 
Algonquins of 

PlKWAKANAGAN 

(Golden Lake) 


A new Membership Code and an Election 
Code are being developed. All members over 
the age of 18 will receive a copy of the new 
Codes and be invited to an Information 
Meeting and Referendum to vote on the 
acceptance or rejection of the Codes. 

We arc trying to obtain current mailing 
addresses for all of our members. You can 
contact the Algonquins of Pikwakanagan, 
P.O. Box 100, Golden Lake, Ontario KOJ 
1X0 tel 613-625-2800, fax 613-625-2332, 

email algonquinl@rcnc.igs.nct. 

If you know any other members, please have 
them contact us. If you know a member has 
died, please advise us so that we can update 
our records, Your help is greatly appreciated. 


prize money 

The annual Aboriginal 
may have found a permanent home if this year's event 
is any indication. More than 150 entries were consid¬ 
ered by the judges, who had to choose the best in each 
of the 15 different categories up for grabs. In the end. 
it was a combination of well-known names and newly 
discovered talent who strode to the podium, each 
nodding in delight as the thunderous ovations rose 
from the crowd. 

Fara, the well known singing sensation from Van¬ 
couver, B.C., walked away with the Best Song award 
for her rhapsody, Walk Away. She was also named by 
the judges as the top pick for the Best Female Artist 
category. 

Named the Best Male Artist for 1999 is Derek 
Miller, a member of Ontario's Six Nations on the 
Grand. 

The award for the Best Canadian Aboriginal Song¬ 
writer of 1999 went to the sensational, Murray Por¬ 
ter, a member of Ontario's Six Nations community. 

Tom Jackson and Jon Park Wheeler took home the 
Best Producer award for their album, That Side Of the 
Window. 

Chester Knight and The Wind were named as the 
nation's Best Group of Two. Chester hails from Sas¬ 
katchewan's Muskoday First Nation. 

The Winnipeg, Manitoba group, Eagle & Hawk, 
were named winners of the Best Country or Folk 
Album for their acclaimed work, Indian City. 

Named as winner of the Best Blues, Jazz or Gospel 
Album was The Ronnie Douglas Blues Band Live, a 
remarkable piece of work delivered by Rama, On¬ 
tario's Ronnie Douglas Blues Band. 

The Best Music Video award went to Jerry Alfred 



and the Medicine Beat for their presentation, Kehlon • 
Alfred and his group are members of the Northern 
Tutchone First Nation, near Pelly Crossing, Yukon 

The Best Album Cover Design went to Daniel Lands 
Bob Lanois and Emma Lee for their fine work on_ 
Derek Miller's, Album Sketches. 

The award for Best Traditional Album (Historical 
went to Alacle Tullaugaq and Lucy Amaraulik for 
their work, Katutjatut Throat Singing. Alacle and 
Lucy are from the northern Quebec community of 
Inukjuak. 

The Best Traditional Album (Contemporary) award 
went to Saskatchewan’s Little Island Cree for their 
winning entry, For Old Times' Sake. 

Sandy Bay, Ontario’s Whitefish Bay Singers, one of 
the country’s most popular powwow singing groups, 
took home the first prize in the Best Powwow Album 
(Traditional) competition with their award winning 
album, Whitefish Bay Singers Volume 49. 

The Northern Cree Singers are one of Canada's best 
known and most successful powwow singers/competi. 
tors. The Hobbema, Alberta, group took home top 
honours in the Best Powwow Album (Contemporary 
category for their 1999 release, In Our Drum IVe 
Trust. 


(m) 

SIFC J 

SASKATCHEWAN INDIAN FEDERATED COLLEGE/ 

\ NATIONAL SCHOOL OF DENTAL THERAPY 

/ Now accepting applications for 2 year Dental Therapy 
training course in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. 


d Application deadline: March 31, 2000 


I For more information on this excellent career 
opportunity, please call 1-800-359-3576 


’» Greetings, cashing you good hi 


td prosperity in the m 


<s> 


millennium from the monogement ond staff 

Cobbe’s 

Plumbing & Heating Ltd. 


1 800 Sask. Ave, E. - Box 970 
Portage La Prairie, Manitoba R1 N 3C4 
Phone: 204-857-6833 - Fax: 204-239-6090 


May the Creator bring safely, strength and guidance to all this holiday season 

ARNOLD BROS. 
TRANSPORT LTD 

M OttfeMMlaAdNtface! 

COMPANY DRIVERS - OWNER OPERATORS 

CONTINUOUS GROWTH • 17% IN 1999 

Youcansecureyourt'uture NOW • TEAM SCHEDULES AVAILABLE 

call 1-800-567-3656 

Required: 

✓ 1 year minimum OTR experience ✓ Good Abstract 
✓ USA clearance ✓ Professional Attitude 

r MOVING , 

Forward 


<3$iaij the ^zealot 

bring safety, strength and guidance to ad 
this (Zploliday Reason 

PHOTOS WITH SANTA 
START DECEMBER 10TH 


MASKWACHEES MALL 

Box 219, Hobbema, AB TOC 1N0 

Phone: (780) 585-2600 



S,a sen's /.am the mana f .m.at and Staff 

EVERGREEN PARK 

“Where the excitement begins“ 

• Rodeos • Senior Cozens' Functions 

• Chuckwagon Racing • Agricultural Seminars & Clinics 

• Pan-mutuel Racing • 4H & Gymkhana Activities 

• Livestock Shows & Sales • Archery Range 

• Dog Shows • Minor Baseball 

• Trade Shows 

• Wedding. Company & Family Gatherings 

• Farmer's Market Saturdays 10 a.n 



































Alberta Native News December, 1999 


11 


An Opening Prayer 
For Christmas 



Christmas day is often started with a prayer. These prayers are for 
giving thanks for today and for wishing to express a chance to see 
another tomorrow. This is an opening prayer often used in the Cree 
community. 


Nohtawenan saweyiminan oma Ka Kesikak 
Our father, bless us this day, 

Ayis Kiyehewini pimatisiwin 
For your breath is life, 

Saweyiminan mena ota mamawi Kayayahk 
and Bless us here together, 

Meyinan, muskawisewin mena ayinesewin 
Give us—strength and wisdom, 

Ta natohtamahk menata nahehtamahk 
To listen and to hear, 

Namoya ayiwakeyimowin ta pimitsahamahk 
Not to follow enviousness 
Meyinan asumena ta wapahatamahk 
Give us again to see, 

Sakastewini mena ka nanaskomitinan 
Sunrise and Sunset, 

Hiy hiy ki nanaskomitinan 
Thank you, we are all most thankful, 

Pitane ekosi teyihki 
Hoping that will happen 


May i)ie Creator bring safety, strength 
and guidance to all. this holiday season. 


Sakimay First Nation 





or a safe and happy holiday to 


ARCTIC CATA 



lARINE 

PIPELINE CONTRUCTION OF CANADA (1893) 

A Division ol Murphy Pipeline, Inc. 


2308 8to Street Nlsku, AB 181 712 
Ph: (780) 855 3880 Fix: (780) 855 7148 



North Slave 
Metis Alliance 

We extend our best wither 
to all for a 
Merry Chrvtnuui 

Happy Nero Year 

The NSMA office 
can be contacted at: 
Phone 867-873-9176 
or fax 867-669-7442 





















































12 


Alberta Native News December, 1999 


Protesters confront Metis 
leadership in Saskatchewan 

by Ennis Morris 

A fraud investigation by Saskatoon Police Services into allegations of financial 
wrong-doing ha* prompted two Metis activists in the province 
protest that demands even more .nvestigation into the activities of the adrnims 
tration of Metis Employment and Training of Saskatchewan Inc METSI ia a 
Metis Nation of Saskatchewan <MNS) affilia te that receives more than *10 million 

in annual funding from the federal government. . , „ 

John Melenchuck, a co-founder of Saskatchewan's New Metis Party and Rose 
Boyer, a former Metis Local president, gathered with a small group ofprotestera 
recently todemand a forensic audit of the MNS and its eight amiiates. The protest, 
which turned into a shouting match inside the wallsof the MNS headquarters last 
week, isn't the first incident to plague the organization in recent weeks. 


Season's Greetings. wIsHng you good health and prospcrlly 
In the new millennium... from ‘Denise and ‘Ed at 

Lakeside Hotel 
(780) 355-3581 

• TAVERN WITH VLT's • 15 ROOMS AVAILABLE 
• RESTAURANT WITH HOMECOOKED MEALS 

HILL AND HOLLOW CAMPSITE 

• 40 STALLS • 4-1 /2 KM EAST OF FAUST ON HIGHWAY 2 
Faust, Alberta Phone: (780) 355-2225 



co ne^ 


TOSHIBA 




Muy the Creator bring safety, strength and guidance 
to all this Holiday Season 


xJhotel5^ 


Stay at Fort McMurray’s 
Premier Business Class Hotel 
Conveniently located 5 min 
from the airport 
and 5 min from downtown 



500 MacKenzie Blvd • Toll Free: 1.800.661.6567 



"We want something done," shouted Boyer. “Romanow," she called out, hoping 
the missing Saskatchewan premier could hear, “you wake up and listen to me! \Ve_ 
want something done about those taxpayers dollars. The farmers are out there 
crying for dollars (and) they don't get it. Yet they (governments) see fit to put $ l; 
million into the Metis Nation." 

Boyer estimates that the entire financial package received by the Metis from 
government totals about $17 million a year. She's demanding accountability 
Boyer says she’s become even more upset about the situation since being accused 
of theft by the organization, who, she says, threw her out of office when she started 
asking questions about the organization’s financial situation. At least three other 
MNS Local presidents say they've also been suspended from office because they 
went to the police with their concerns. 

The MNS has more than 100 Locals, each of which is organized into one of the j 
association's 12 provincial regions. 

An investigation by Saskatoon Police Services began this past summer, follow, 
ing a visit by several METSI organization officials with concerns over misman- 

**MNS President, Clem Chartier, the target of choice for the questioning protest 
era, was not in the province at the time and couldn’t be reached for comment 

The police investigation into the Saskatoon METSI branch has prompted the 
organization's head office to temporarily oversee the administration a 
offices in Yorkton, Regina and Prince Albert. _ 

Human Resources Canada, the main funding body for Saskatchewan s Metis 
Nation, has told MNS leadership to get METSI's affairs in order, before the end 
of the year. 


May the Creator bring safety, strength and guidance to all 
this holiday season, from 


Chief Reggie Mason 

and Councillors Alex Flett, Jack Mason, Arthur Flett, 
Cornelius Harper, Charles Monias and Monica Mason 


St. Theresa Point First Nation 

General Delivery, St. Theresa Point, MB ROB 1J0 
Phone. (204) 462-2106 Fax. (204) 462-2646 


1-888-CUSSTUM 

Email: inlineOontis.com 

METIS OWNED* OPERATED 
5710 - 39A AVENUE. WETASKIW1N, AB 


A AUTO BODY - All Insurance Claims 

* AUTOMOTIVE - Heavy Duty / Ught 

* AUTO SALES - Quality Used Cars 

* AUTO DETAILING - Complete 

A FREE TOWING-Wetaskiwin Customers II 
A USED PARTS - A Full Une of 

Quality Used Parts 

r ce FAX (7 80)352- 7712 

(780) 352-8286 


RESERVE! 


The all new exclusive 
Native Spirit dabbers 
Available in 8 magnificent 
I colors of flourescent ink 
f 125 ml/4oz 

At our low prices!! 


PHONE TOLL FREE 1 -800-265-2696or fax 1 -800-481 -5762 









































13 



May the Great Spirit guide us on 
the healing path ~ free of 


Blood Tribe 
Family Community 
Support Services 



ICE ARENA EQUIPMENT 


• PREPACKAGED ICE PLANTS 

. HEADERS and ARENA FLOORS 

• HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEMS 
. DEHUMIDIFICATION 

• AIR CONDITIONING 

• INSTALLATION and/or PROJECT MANAGEMENT 

• EXPANSION ini SYSTEM CONVERSION 

• WALK-IN FREEZERS and COOLERS 


Home Protection 

$199 Installed 


under your rool. can you atlord not to be protected 
by a home security system? 


SPECIAL OFFER 

• 1 Security Control Panel b Keypad 

• 1 Seen • 1 Motion Detector • 2 Door Contacts 

_ ONar end# 01130/2000 - 


P. O. BOX 60 
Standoff, AB T0L 1Y0 

Phone (403) 737-2888 

Fax (403) 737-2877 


• MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS 
740 DUFFERIN AVE. Ph (204) SS2-4620 

WINNIPEG. MB R2W 2Z6 Fax; (204) S82- 
E-MAIL: nhJnuMraescapeca 


b 




































































14 


Alberta Native News December, 1999 


Celebrating Culture 


Making creative 
history on 
Christmas Da y 




Stason't Grttlings from Ihe nmagtm/nl and sin// 

- Spruce Grove Flowers & Gifts f 

f 321 Pint Avenue, Highway 16 ; 

P. O. Ho* 5033, Spruce Grove, AB T7X 3A2 

?EEt;Bz 

Co-op Assn. Ltd. 

BOX 60 VALLEYVIEW, ALBERTA TOH 3N0 

■ pro S duce EAT f(780) 524-3101 

The Pas USA ( 1878) Food Products 

w 

Western Star -- 

Trucks (North) Ltd. 

CANADIAN BUILT 

CANADA WIDE DISTRIBUTION FACILITIES 
SALES • SERVICE • PARTS 

15205- 112 Avenue, Edmonton, AB 
(780) 453-3452 Fax (780) 447-5317 

4904- 

TAMARACK Bt 

inoior inn Ch mas 

• 66 DELUXE QUEST ROOMS 

• MEETING & BANQUET ROOM 

• FACILITIES UP TO 75 PEOPLE 

Toll Free 1-877 845-5252 

FAX (403) 845-4848 

45th Street, ROCKY MOUNTAIN HOUSE, AB 

EXCELLENCE IN SERVICE 

Mtirrdn-Drnl 

VOLVO ^ - 

^ EDMONTON, ALBERTA T6H 4J9 

LEASING AVAILABLE PHONE 17801 436-9970 

Many Chrretmai and Happy Naw Year, 

tceiiUng &<nU«ftp»vu«. 

PROFESSIONAL OILFIELD SCOUTING 

Phone 1-888-261-7630 

P. O. Box 1153. Rad Deer. Alberta T4N 6S6 

jUa, ,» l«t from the 

1 fuKp'ia.r »( IlH.aa VILLAGE 

OF ONOWAY 

\ \ 

Precision Appraisals Ltd. 

Suite /104.17415-102 Ave Ph.(730)484-0035 

Edmonton. Alberta Fax: (780) 486-3631 

T5S1J8 TOH free: 1-800-934-3544 

Sc<tMM j (o all lit "pint ‘JtaOMJ 

/>« lit TKayn W gatutttl af (At 

VILLAGE OF t 
BERWYN jA 

Or 

Ph. (780) 3383922 Fax. (780) 338-2224 
BOX 250, BERWYN, ALBERTA TOR OEO 

Season's (Ireebngs to all the First Nations 

r* BEAVER 

4 LU . MBER 

franc " s£00£au * 

H*h LavaL Afceria 

TOH 120 

Ross Hunter Bus Ph: (403) 926-2281 

Sim Manager Res Ph: (403) 926-2714 

Merry Christmas and a very Happy New Year. 

^\0T0((ty Motown" 

V4$il$$0 MOTOR INN 

AIR CONDITIONING • CABLE TV • PLUG IN PARKING 
Downtown Across From Crescent Park 
Compementary Morrxng Coriee • 2 8*ocxs from Spa 

(306) 692-0601 

132 ATHABASCA ST EAST. MOOSE JAW. SK S6H 0L4 j 



























































When you need Something 

for Everyone 


Alberta Native News December, 1999 


17th Annual Gathering of Nations 
Powwow set for April 2000 

by John Copley 


If you're familiar with the term, powwow, it's likely I 
you’re also familiar with North America's premiere I 
event, the annual Gathering of Nations Powwow. I 
held each year in beautiful. Albuquerque. N ew Mexico. I 
Organizers of the gala, who call the festival North | 
America's biggest powwow event, are currently pre¬ 
paring for their millennium celebration, schedule! to 
take place next April 27 - 29. 

The 1999/2000 celebration will mark the 17th anni- 
versary of the Gathering of Nations Powwow, and the 
festival committee has gone the extra mile to ensure I 
a well-rounded program guaranteed to draw the 
crowds and satisfy the competitors. More than 3,000 
Native American singers, drummers and dancers 
from across the United States and Canada are ex¬ 
pected to attend the powwow. With more than $100,000 
i USD) up for grabs, the best groups on the continent 
are expected to attend. 

In addition to the powwow, the Gathering of Na- 
- tions celebration will also play host to the Miss Indian 
World 2000 Pageant, a popular annual event that last 
year saw the crowning of 22 year old, Mitzi Tolino, 
currently a Political Science sophomore at the Uni¬ 
versity of New Mexico. 

A giant three day trade show and fair will also share 
the spotlight during the Gathering of Nations’ millen¬ 
nium celebration. More than 1,000 traders and artists 
will be on hand, ofTering visitors a shopping extrava¬ 
ganza not soon to be forgotten. 

The new Miss Indian World will be crowned at the 
powwow event site, the trade show will be set up in the 
Albuquerque Convention Centre. 

The Secretary of the Department of Veterans Af¬ 
fairs, Togo West, will also attend the event, both as a 
speaker and as an honoured guest. He’s expected to 
have a special dance named, then performed for him 
More than 200,000 visitors are expected to partici¬ 
pate during the three day event and organizers say 
there’s no time like the present to ensure your ticket 
L gets to you on time. Advance tickets are available 
P untilApril 1 next year. You can call (505) 836-2810 or 
order on-line at www.gatheringofnations.com. 

U.S. residents contact www.gatheringofnations.org. 
The Gathering of Nations organization is a non¬ 
profit body They'll raise some money selling raffle 
tickets on their website — the winner gets a free trip to 
the event. Also on the website will be an opportunity 
to chat with the current Miss Indian World, Mitzi 
- Tolino. Join the website chat line on January 1 ifyou'd 
like to participate. 

TheGatheringofNations millennium powwow event 
will incorporate more than 28 different dance catego¬ 
ries, including some brand new ones. There will also 
be competitions for golden agers as well as for Elders. 

Invited Drums include Wild Horse, a well-known 
group from North Battleford Saskatchewan; Shawnee, 
Oklahoma’s, Sizzortail and world-renowned Red Bull 
from Cut Knife, Saskatchewan. 

I Deadlines for Miss Indian World expire on March 
I 20, 2000, so get your nomination in early. More 
I information about entry forms can be obtained by 
I contacting the number above, or by sending a fax to 
1505)839-0475. 

Southwest Airlines is ofTering special Powwow 
Travel Packs;call MarcieorSherryat(505)898-1245 
I for fares and scheduling. 

I The Gathering of Nations Powwow has been hailed 
I as the number one folk festival in the world. 

L. Don’t miss your chance to be there. Call, fax or check 
out the website today. 


Season's Greetings, from Tracy and Joe at 

LAYTON BROS. 
CONSTRUCTION LTD. 

• oilfield & road 
construction 

6015 - 50TH AVENUE 
BONNYVILLE, ALBERTA 

Phone (780) 826-6969 

FOX (780) 826-2756 

PROUDLY WORKING WITH FIRST NATIONS 
IN NORTHEASTERN ALBERTA 


PLEASE RECYCLE THIS PWIR^ 





















16 


Alberta Native News December, 1999 


LEGEND 


The Sacred Koch is 
Curriculum Resource 
quality educational n 


ov ided by the Lac La Ronge Band 
nit who are dedicated to providinj 
lurces to all the people of the Firs 


The Sacred Rock 

Collected and illustrated by Jamei Ratt; told by Jean Robert* 

Long ago, there lived a widow who had two email boys. She made two 
small bows with arrows and taught them how to use them. 

One day, she told them to go out and shoot some birds to eat. 

“Later I will make you stronger bows so that you can shoot bigger game, 


she told tnem. , . . .. . 

She put some ready cooked meat in a bag and told them to sit on a large 
rock when they got hungry and wanted to eat. 



Season's Greetings, may the Creator bring safely, strength and 
guidance to all the First Nations In the coming New Year. From 



Fort McKay First Nation 
and the 
Fort McKay 
Group of Companies 

(780) 828-4216 
Fax: (780) 828-4393 


Box 5360, Fort McMurray, Alberta TOM 3G4 


Merry Christmas and a very happy New Year! May the blessings of 
health and prosperity be with all our brothers and sisters. From 

Naskapi NNADAP Procram and tk 

Naskapi Nation of Kawawachikamach 


P. O. Box 5111, 

Kawatvachikamach, Nouveau-Quebec, GOG 2Z0 



One day while the boys were eating their lunch on a large rock, they 
heard a voice saying, “I’d like to tell you boys a story.” They looked all 
around but did not see anyone so they kept on eating. 



“Shall I tell you some stories?” the voice asked again. It was coming from 

the rock they were sitting on. 


“What kind of stories do you tell?” the boys asked then. The rock said he 
told stories of things that happened a long time ago. He said, “If you will 



On their way home, the boys shot three birds each. When their mother 
asked why they didn’t have more, they said the ducks and geese were 
getting scarce. The same thing happened the next day and also the day 
after. 




Season s Greetings to our students and staff. 

May your holiday season be blessed with joy and peace. 

/l/ort/itfandl 

SCHOOL DIVISION NO. 61 

Phone: (780) 624-2060 
Fax: (780)624-5914 

Bag 1400 • Peace River • Alberta • T8S1V2 

















































Alberta Native News December, 1999 

The mother knew that her children were not telling the truth. So, she 
went to the Chief and told her the problem. 

The Chief said, "I will send two men tomorrow to follow your sons to see 
what they are doing with their catch." 

This was done and the two men watched the boys shoot ten birds each. 
The boys then laid them down beside the rock. 

As the men watched, they were surprised to hear a voice coming from the 
rock saying, "Bring all the people from your village here tomorrow. Tell 
them to bring some food or a git and I will tell them many stories." 

The Chief and all the people were astonished to hear what the braves had 
to tell. The Chief said, “We will do as the rock says." 



The rock never spoke again, but for many years the Indians visited the 
sacred stone. Today, some old people still remember those legends and 
stories. When you visit old people, you should always carry a git. The old 
person will never refuse it 




May your Christmas be filled with family 
and the warmth of the festive season 
We sincerely appreciate your business 
over the past year and took forward to 
serving you in the new millennium 


Wtog (lie Ot eaten thing safety, sbieaylk and guidance ts alt, 
tkia holiday season 

Treaty 8 First Nations 
of Alberta 

Telephone (780) 444-9366 
Fox ( 780 ) 484-1465 

c/o 18178 - 102 Avenue. Sonta Fe Plaza, Edmonton. Alberta T5S 1S7 



Kch Ixartlj <Stnre 

£ ' { J‘n 'J r no) •J/rtt cA 

Box 170. Red Earth Creek. AB 



(780) 649-3435 


Everyone took some gifts or some food and went to the talking rock. 

When the people had all made their offerings, they sat down around the 
stone and the voice began to speak. It told wonderful stories of beautiful 
lands and strange creatures. It told of animals that could talk to one 
another and of people yet to come to this land. 

When it was almost sundown, the rock said, “I have told you many stories 
and it is up to you to keep them as long as the world lasts. Tell them to your 
children and grandchildren but make sure they always place tobacco or a 
little food before the story tellers.” 




DALMATIAN 

FIRE ft SAFETY INC. 

RECONDITIONED SCBA’S 

MSA / SCOTT / SURVIVAIR ETC- 
ALL MAKES, ALL MODELS. 

2 YEAR WARRANTY! 

TOLL FREE 1-800-436-6450 


lUioluMg a It tewed CUniabuno and a heuUUy, 
pioop&uuio Hem Yeah to a£E oun fyuendo and 
caatoMteho. Ftow 

Paddle Prairie Store 

"Your one stop shopping centre" 

• OPEN 24 HOURS • 



Phone: (780) 981 -2343 or (780) 981-2257 
Fax (403)981-2522 


Landmark Inn 

4150 Albert Street Regina. Saskatchewan 

Owned & Operated by 
Ochapowace First Nation 

1-800-667-981 I 


• FIRST NATION THEME ROOMS 

• EXPANDED FIRST NATION RESTAURANT MENU 

• NEWLY RENOVATED POOL & WATERSLIDE AREA 
(certified pool attendants) 

•AFFORDABLE FAMILY RATES STARTING AT $49.95 

• KIDS ALWAYS STAY FREE!! 

• MEETING & BANQUET ROOMS FOR UP TO 200 PEOPLE 

• FIRST NATION HOSPITALITY AT ITS FINEST!!.. 















































18 


Alberta Native News December, 1999 


music revieui 

Susan Aglukark 

Unsung Heroes 

Produced and Recorded by Chad Irachick 
Manufactured and Distributed by EMI Music 

Review by John Copley 

Canadian singing sensation, Susan Aglukark’B pro¬ 
fessional singing career began in earnest just seven 
years ago with an independent album release that 
stunned the nation. In fact, the music on her debut 
album, Arctic Rose, was so good, and Aglukark’s voice 


Seaaon'a Greetings, 
front the 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION 
OF FRIENDSHIP CENTRES 



275 MACLAREN STREET 
OTTAWA, ONTARIO K2POL9 


For a Friendship Centre near you 
Phone 16131 563-4844 Ext. 20 
Fox: 16131 594-3428 
E-mail: levecqueOnalc.aborlglnal.com 


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was so stunning, that just a few months later she 
signed an exclusive worldwide recording contract 
with Mississauga, Ontario-based, EMI MusicCanada, 
one of the country's largest music manufacturer/ 
distributors. In 1993 they put Aglukark on the world 
stage with a well planned Christmas release that 
featured the popular single, Little Toy Trains. Soon 
after that, they re-released Susan’s Arctic Rose al- 

She never looked back and today Aglukark's career 
is soaring like the eagles, her voice and her image 
stronger than ever. Want confirmation? Check out 
her latest release, Unsung Heroes. 

Yes, Aglukark and EMI have once again combined 
their efforts and the result is an extraordinary collec¬ 
tion of tunes that offer listeners quiet insight , sooth- 

heard this year. 

Aglukark's success comes together via the efforts of 
many; she's fortunate enough to be surrounded by 
talented and dedicated people, including album side- 
kick Chad Irschick, who produced, recorded and had 
a hand in the mix of Unsung Heroes. He co-wrote most 
of the songs on the new 12-cut CD and his musical 
prowess is obvious when you listen to the rippling 
sounds of his hammond organ, piano and the mood 
synthesizer. 

Unsung Heroes is a well planned CD with a sound¬ 
track that offers listeners an array of upbeat songs 
with meaningful words delivered in a laid-back fash¬ 
ion. The lyrical content is powerful, thematic and 
inspiring. Love songs with personal gravity, offering 
numerous subtle messages that encourage self fulfil¬ 
ment through positive action. Messages with a gentle 
influence toward self-belief and forgiveness and the 
shedding of demons. 


Joint vantursi hsve become a critical strategy lor 
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book lays out the state ol the art In analyzing, 
negotiating, and structuring joint ventures that work for 
communities. Includes many illustrations, checklists, and 
sample agreements to help negotiating teams keep out of 
trouble and on track. Illustrated. 75 pages. $30. 


There are more than 50 workshops, manuals, 6 videos 
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Aglukark’s music is soft, her voice able to tranquil¬ 
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Susan Aglukark is a role model and inspiration for 
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in Churchill, Manitoba, about 30 years ago, Susan, 
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As a polished keynote speaker and an exciting 
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Aglukark brings her experiences, her dreams and her 
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beauty, her vibrancy and her sensational voice to the 
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inspired poets before her, they may never be recog¬ 
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As I’ve said in the past, all CDs should come with the- 
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Jrom the 'Board oj '•Directors. 
'Executive 'Director, glajj and :,Vmbers of 

MANNAWANIS NATIVE 
FRIENDSHIP CENTRE SOCIETY 


































Alberta Native News December, 1999 


Under the Northern Sky 


Mary Wabano 

by Xavier Kataquapit 

With the passing of Maiy Wabano in Attawapiskat 
recently the traditional Cree way of living has also 
slipped away. Mary, who was 98 years of age, was 
born in the James Bay lowlands in 1901 when the 
James Bay Cree were still living a nomadic way oflife. 
Her husband John died a few years ago. 

Ironically, it was not until she moved into the 
community of Attawapiskat that she took sick and 
passed away. She was just too old to keep living on the 
land and at the urging of many people came in from 
her traditional wilderness home to live more comfort¬ 
ably in Attawapiskat. A recent wave of flu made many 
In the community sick and when it hit Mary she was 
too weak with age and her immune system had not 
developed over the years. This resulted in her pass¬ 
ing. I can’t help but think that maybe ifshe had stayed 
out on the land she would have lived well past 100 
years of age. 

She had only been living in the community since 
August. In the fall of 1998 she was medivaced out of 
her very remote home on the Ekwan River to Moose 
Factory for treatment of a stomach ailment. This, 
combined with failing eyesight, led to her having to 
give up her life on the land. 

Mary was a very special elder with much knowledge 
of the traditional Cree way of life. My dad and my 
brother Anthony have described the scene where she 
lived all her life. In the summer Mary and her son 
Peter lived in a kind of meegwam which was basically 
a tent, known as a Maki-Oskinikan. This is a beauti¬ 
ful spot called Neh-Aish-Kooyaow on the Ekwan River 
about 130-miles north of Attawapiskat by water travel. 

' In the winter Mary and her son lived in an Aski-kan 
which is a traditional Cree home. The Aski-kan is in 
fact a building with four sides made of logs which are 
covered with a layer of moss. As the weather turns 
cold the moss freezes solid and provides excellent 
insulation. The ground inside the Aski-kan is made 
comfortable with the placement of many soft spruce 
bough tips that are expertly woven. 

There is no electricity in this remote location, no 
“ running water and no facilities of any type. Mary and 
Peter were true survivalists living off the land by 
gathering food, hunting, trapping and cutting wood 
for fire. At times they would go for months without 
seeing another human being and 1 can't help but 
think that it must have got a little bit lonely during 





er experience to 


passing, the sky over Neb- Aish-Kooyaow ruined tcan 
of sadness and the wildlife must have felt her spirit 
pass. We lost so much when Mary went. It is time we 
recorded the experiences and knowledge of our elders 
in Attawapiskat because once they nre gone so is this 


those minus forty degree winter nights. 

Once a year in June, Mary and Poter would make 
the long trip by boat, a 20 foot freighter canoe, front 
their home. They had to travel about 80 miles on the 
Ekwan River just to reach the great James Bay and 
then the voyage was another 50 miles over big water 
to Attawapiskat. They would stay until late Septem¬ 
ber and loaded with the bare necessities of provisions 
they would head back to Neh-Aish-Kooyaow. Mary 
and Peter spent so much time on the land that they 
never really felt comfortable in the community. 

She was provided with a new home at one point in 
the community but never really adapted to it and on 
her visits to Attawapiskat chose to stay in a small 
shack. My dad tells me that Mary never considered 
herself a poor person but that she was very proud that 
she and her son Peter were independent and could 
live off the land with their own skills. They never 
asked for help from anyone. 

Mary was known for her kindness and was always 
happy to see any visitors who came her wny She 
treated these travellers well and would sharo her 
stories of the traditional Cree way oflife with them. 
Her son Peter by the way, has chosen to return to Neh- 
Aish-Kooyaow to carry on in the way his mother 
taught him. Peter’s brother, Mike is also well known 
for his knowledge of the traditional Cree way of life 
and he is very comfortable in the non-Nativc world to 
the south where he has lived and worked for many 


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20 


Alberta Native News December, 1999 















Connie is not a phone number. 


She is a wolf. 

She is a raven. 

She is a bear. 

She is Connie Sterritt, artist, 
using the modern to express 

Elegantly, unforgettably, 
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To serve you better, 
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We are the people of TELUS 



Sing your own song. 




22 


Alberta Native News December, 1999 


Focus on Education 


Prince Charles School 
becoming renowned for its 
meaningful curriculum 

by John Copley 

In mid-September the staff and student* at Edmonton'a Prince Charlea School 
(PCS) reached another mileatone, they celebrated the achool'a 25th anniversary. 

The well known facility, which fall* under the auspices of the Edmonton Public 
School Board, is home to the highly regarded Awa*i« Program, a uniquely 
designed Aboriginal component geared specifically to Native students who live in 

The Awasi* Program," explained PCS principal, Jeanne Carter, "a**i*t* 
students to be successful learners. Learning,"she added, "is achieved through the 
cooperation of students, parents and community members. The Awasi* program 
allows students to increase both their knowledge and their appreciation of Native 
culture and tradition." 

Carter explained the schcsil's motto as Thinking, Learning, Sharing, and 
Caring within n strong academic community." 

The Prince Charles School, which now operates from two separate locations, 
offers classes from Kindergarten through to grade nine. The Prince Charles 
location, 12.326-127 Street, offers grades kindergarten through grade four, while 
the Sherbrooke location, 12246 1.31 Street, offer* grades four through nine. 

Cultural programming, explained Carter, "is integrated into all aspects of the 
curriculum." That includes a full Crec instruction program, available to all 
students attending Prince Charles. "Many of our students also participate in 
Trnditiunal Native Dance and Metis Dancing," she added. "Drumming and 
traditional singing instruction are also available to students both through our 
music program und our good range of extra curricular activities." 

3’he Prince Charles School strives to meet the educational needs of the indi¬ 
vidual and ns a result instruction is offered in a variety of groupings. 

“Our kindergarten togrndosix classrooms ore currently involved in offering the 
Balanced Lite-racy Program to ussist our students to become confident and 
competent readers,"explained Jeanne Carter, who added that PrinccChnrlesnlso 
offers a specialized reading program. Rending Recovery, to assist students who 
nre experiencing difficulty in reading. 

A school lunch program is available for students in the kindergarten to grade six 
classes but all students, kindergarten to grade nine, receive a nutritional snack 
each morning. 

"Our Sherbrooke locution,*continued Principal Carter, "offer* the opportunity 
for students to participate in a variety of sport* activities. 

Tho Prince Charles school team name is tho Prince Charles Predators. Native 
Continued on page 25 



•W. 


Wishing our students and their families 
Merry Christmas and a prosperous New Year! 
From everyone at 

Nipisihkopak 
Secondary School 


To contact the Registrar's Office 
Phone: (780) 585-4449 
Fax: (780) 585-2259 


University exhibition 
features Treaty 8 artifacts 

In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of Treaty No. 8, a special 
exhibition has been developed highlighting the ethnographic artifacts collected 
by Dr. Oliver Cromwell Edwards that are now in the University of Alberta Art 
and Artifact Collection. Located in the Print Study Centre, University of 
Alberta, the exhibition opens December 8,1999 and closes January 28, 2000. 

In 1899 and 1900, Treaty No. 8 was negotiated between the Crown, repre¬ 
sented by the Government of Canada, and Aboriginal peoples in what is now 
northern Alberta, northwestern Saskatchewan, northeastern British Colum¬ 
bia and the Northwest Territories to the shores of Great Slave Lake. Dr 0 C 
Edwards accompanied the Treaty party in 1900 as its Medical Officer. 

Curated by Dr Patricia McCormack of the School of Native Studies at the 
University or Alberta, this exhibition will interpret the dual roles of Dr. 0. C. 
Fad wards as a physician and a collector. It provides an opportunity to view 
rarely seen artifacts, and learn about an important time in our country's 
history This project, developed by the School of Native Studies and the 
Department of Museums and Collections Services, is the culmination of 
student-led research on the artifacts, Treaty 8, and the exhibition process. 

Additional artifacts and archival material have been generously loaned by 
Uie Provincial Museum of Alberta, the Glenbow - Alberta Museum Archives 
from the collection of Dr. Patricia McCormack, and from the University of 
Alberta: University Archives, Museum of Dentistry and the Clothing and 
Textiles Collection. The University of Alberta Art and Artifact Collection is 
munnged by the Department of Museums and Collections Services and consists 
ir 5,000 works of art in all media, and historical artifacts. 


LINKING 

YOU TO 

EDUCATION 


May our Creator bring safety, strength and guidance to 
all First Nations in the new millennium. 

From the Board of Education. 

Teachers. Students and Staff of 

• fi’f] ' ft rvet 
rut J atkm #//Sy 

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

For program information 
Phone:(300) 724-4700 Fax (30c) 724- 
Box 51 9, Debden, Saskatchewan • S0| i 



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Alberta Native News December, 1999 

Riel Benn, portrait 
of a great 
emerging artist 

by John Copley 

He's quiet, soft spoken and reserved in his judg¬ 
ment. He doesn't really know what inspires him, he 
just knows that he's most comfortable when he's got 
a paint brush in hand and peace in his mind 

His name is Riel Benn. He’s 20 years old and has 
had a mere four years experience behind a canvas, 
having picked up his first brush at age 16. But you'd 
never know his age by his work—that's because the 
depth of his vision is matched only by the valour of his 
stroke. The intricacy of his work, the boldness of its 
theme and the haughty presence that exudes from the 
canvas are all elements that make young Mr. Benn's 
magnificent work seem older than he his. 

He’s already garnered considerable acclaim, in¬ 
cluding his first place showing at this year's nation¬ 
ally recognized, YTV Awards. His work was selected 
above 2,300 other competitors. 

"Actually," remarked Riel, during a recent inter¬ 
view, “I do it mostly for the pure enjoyment. My 
culture, however, is the other main ingredient in my 
work. I like to paint about cultural things, things that 
are important to me as both a person and an artist.” 

Riel Benn is a member of Manitoba’s Birdtail Sioux 
First Nation. Born and raised in the small community 
of Birtle, young Riel admits that he's not yet a world 
traveller. His paintings, however, hang across Canada, 
the U.S.A., New Zealand, Australia and beyond. Mr. 
Benn’s portfolio includes numerous favourable com¬ 
ments from well-known art critics and university 
professors. One comes from Greg Cajete, a professor 
with Sante Fe, New Mexico's, Institute of American 
Indian Arts. Immediately taken aback when he first 
viewed Riel’s work, the professor said he was im¬ 
pressed by “the sincerity, the raw talent, the sensitiv¬ 
ity and the fact that so much of his work is 
autobiographic and very powerful in terms of bring¬ 
ing forth emotions and feelings.” He closed his com¬ 
ments by saying that these elements “are the basis of 
not only a good artist, but a great artist. He (Riel 
Benn) has advanced so quickly in terms of intuitively 
knowing how to use paint—it's the mark of those who 



23 

unveiling took place in the November issue of Satur¬ 
day Night magazine. The magazine hit the news 
stands just days after Riel was nominated for a 
National Aboriginal Achievement Award. 

If the adage, good fortune follows good habits' is 
true. Riel Benn is lining up for a few more first place 
tickets. His work is scattered around the world but 
Benn sticks close to home. “It's like 1 said, 1 eqjoy who 
I am and I like what I do," he explained. “Right now 
there’s no reason to go anywhere. - 

But Mr Benn is gotng somewhere and it's more 
than likely straight up because in his case, the adage, 
tho sky's the limit' is true. 


have inborn talent.” 

Inborn talent, indeed. In the past year and a half, 
Riel Benn's work has appeared with the covers of such 
magazines as People, Time, Rolling Stone, Spin and 
Vanity Fair. It doesn't matter that those actual com¬ 
panies didn't print the covers of those magazines that 
Riel has his visions appear on, he chose to put their 
names at the top of his work. 

‘This is North America,” said the young artist. “You 
look at magazine covers and you wonder where all the 
Indians went. I put them on there because, well, I just 
think that they deserve it." 

The series was so outstanding, Benn walked away 
with this year's YTV Award. 

Friend and mentor, Roxann Barker, says young 
Riel “paints what he likes and what he likes is looking 
for the right face, in the right place, at the right time. 
He searches not only for historic Aboriginal figures, 
but is also interested in painting the fictitious, the 
fantastic and the real." 

Riel Benn's most recent accomplishment came with 
iling of his photo display Uncovered. The 



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Alberta Native News December, 1999 


Aboriginal 

students earn CN 
scholarship 
awards 

Three highly promiaing Aboriginal studenl* from 
Western Canada have been awarded scholarships by 
Canadian National to further their post-secondary 
education. 

This year's recipient* are: 

• Gary Campo, studying Law at University of Vic- 

• Russel Halpin, studying Art* and Sciences at 
Calgary's Mount Royal College; 

• Suzanne Shukin, a student in the Criminal Jus¬ 
tice program at Lethbridge Community College. 



black oe /te jourucy. © CwrsrorH«.H«veY,cwAM0AU0.»* 


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Halpin and Suzanne Shukin for outstanding aca¬ 
demic and personal achievements," says CN Presi¬ 
dent and Chief Executive Officer Paul M. Tollier. 

"They arc inspiring many in First Nations commu¬ 
nities to take advantage of the opportunities avail¬ 
able through colleges and universities," he said. 'We 
are delighted to lend a helping hand in their pursuit 
of higher education.' 

The scholarships are provided by CN's Aboriginal 
Awards program, established in 1988 to help Aborigi¬ 
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program encourages Status Indian, Non-Status In¬ 
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Alberta Native News December, 1999 

book review 

Raven Books 
Presents 

by John Copley 

Yellowknife's Raven Rock Publishing might not be 
the biggest book publishing house in Canada, but it 
certainly does produce some of the finest reading 
material available for youngsters today. With more 
than a dozen books currently in print and several 
others in the process, Raven Rock is quickly establish¬ 
ing itself as a bonafide contender to any publishing 
house that specializes in books for young adults and 
children. 

After reading, and listening to others who'd just 
finished reading some of the young publishing house's 
recent titles, it became obvious that Raven Rock is 
more than just interested in putting out kids books. 
They do it with style and they do it with quality. They 
also understand the use of colour and realistic story 
material that grabs your attention and peaks your 
interest. Let's take a look into three of their 1999 
offerings. 

First up is the brilliant work of Jaya Bastedo, whose 
book, A Winter Walk with Haley, was written before 
the young author reached her ninth birthday. Young 
Bastedo’s 24 page book captures the reader with its 
unique style, its easy to read poetic theme and the 
interacting, crystal clear photos that accompany every 
page. An ideal book for the pre-reader to grade 3 age 
level, A Winter Walk with Haley offers an interesting 
series of sense-stirring scenes that every kid (and 
adult) will be familiar with. The story line is simple 
and straight forward and each page is illustrated with 
a beautiful photograph, the work of 25 year veteran 
Tessa Macintosh. 

Uniquely written, A Winter Walk with Haley carries 
the reader from page to page, his or her eyes glued to 
the words, looking for the end of the rhyme. Bastedo 
has a flair for describing realistic fun in the cool of the 
winter sun. Your kids will love it. 

Spring Blizzard, another recent Raven release, is 
written by Diane Brookes, already well-known forthe 
many titles she’s released with the publishing house. 
Illustrated by Betty Wilcox, who with husband John 
has also published a book of her own, Brookes’ newest 
offering is another colourful tale about life in Cana¬ 
da’s far north. The down-to-earth story line, written 
for kids grade 1 through 4, is a teaching tool that will 
help non-northern readers understand some of the 
differences between their way of life and that of the 
story’s main character, Susan. 

Like many of their titles, this Raven Rock book will 
be appreciated by both outdoor enthusiasts and dog 
lovers alike. The upbeat tale does have a worrisome 
moment or two, especially for readers who've only 
heard of and not experienced a 'spring blizzard’, but 
for the fun loving Susan and her dog Uviluq, the 
blizzard is nothing more than a romp in the park. 

Wilcox's handcrafted illustrations add a sense of 
reality to Brookes' words. The story, written from a 
northern perspective, offers those unfamiliar with 
the terrain a different type of education. It also goes 
a long way to dispel any myths that portray remote 
living as nothing but hard work and no play. 

Look for Diane Brookes’ upcoming release, A Sum¬ 
mer to Remember, soon to be published by the 
Yellowknife printing house. 

One Lucky Fish, written by Fran Hurcomb and 
illustrated by KrisScMagintwelt, is another of Raven 
Rock Publishing’s newly released books. Written for 
kids in the grade 5 through 8 level, Hurcomb’s book, 
the first for the long time Northwest Territories 
resident, deals with a holidaying pair of young girls, 
Tina and Amy, anxious to venture out on their first 
fishing trip. Set on Great Slave Lake, the story moves 
the reader across the land and into a commercial 
fishing vessel, owned by Tina's father, John. 

Once aboard the fishing vessel, Betty-Sue, the two 
girls learn that it will take a 12 hour ocean voyagejust 
to get to where the nets have been set. The outing is 
an all-day affair that is bound to enhance the commer¬ 
cial fishing knowledge of every young reader 
Hurcomb's realistic expression and detail offer no 
room for imagination. In fact, her descriptive style 
throughout the book helps to give the real sense of 
being there rather than just reading about it. The 
halogue between the girls and the crew is spontane¬ 
ous, often funny. Hurcomb's appreciation for outdoor 

•mg is obvious on every page; her recipe on the 
inride back cover is proof. 

‘fehlagintweit’s illustrations provide readers with 
multiple opportunities to appreciate her art and also 
m recognize fish. That’s because Kris has numerous 
•ypes of fish pasted to the pages of One Lucky Fish. 
> oung readers will quickly learn to distinguish the 
difference between pike and whitefish, tulabee and 
trout, ling cod and inconn ue 



As in the forementioned mentioned books, One 
Lucky Fish, is also a great example of how two out¬ 
standing talents, writer and illustrator, combine their 
energies and utilize their talents to bring young 
Canadian readers an excellent selection of bright, 
realistic and educational reading material. 

Raven Rock Publishing—look for their titles. 




25 

Prince Charles School, 

Continued from page 22 

Studies and Cree Language Studies are also offered 
at the school, as are numerous other options. We also 
have a strong technology program that provides the 
students with many opportunities to communicate 
with students across Canada and in other countries." 

Carter says that Prince Charles students are given 
"many opportunities" to demonstrate leadership in 
the school. Students who demonstrate either aca¬ 
demic leadership or traditional forms of leadership 

A group of 15 students, known as The Fifteen Wise 
Spirits, is made up of those people who have demon¬ 
strated leadership in the school while exploring tradi¬ 
tional beliefs and values. 

There's been talk in Edmonton recently about form¬ 
ing a new Native high school, one that complements 
bo tit the Public and Catholic School Boards. If the 
dream becomes a reality, the school would bo the first 
of its kind anywhere in Canada. 

“I think the plan is a good one," said Carter. "An 
Aboriginal high school would help to reduce the high 
numbers currently associated with drop-outs in the 
Native sector. Parents have repeatedly said that they 
don't want a watered down education—they want a 
strong academic program." 

Carter says that she can't over-omphasize the im¬ 
portance of a good education. “Education is going to bo 
their power for a secure future," she suid. “Education, 
it’s going to make the difference." 

For more information about the Prince Charles 
School or its many programs, call 455-5533 or 454- 
5202. 


- 







































































Alberta Native News December, 1999 


27 


Building Our Communities 


Pond Lake’s new school 
an educational heaven 




to do and (consequently) the interest level is high * ‘ _ '' 


May the Creator bring safety, strength and 
happiness to all this holiday season, 


Canative Housing 
Corporation of Alberta 


8726 -112 Ave. 
Edmonton, AB T5B 0G6 


Tel: (780) 471-2560 
Fax: (780) 477-1460 



Head Office / Plant 

4315 - 92 Ave., Edmonton, Alberta T6B 3M7 • Tel. (780) 465-9771 • Fax (780) 469-1667 
Manitoba Office / Plant 

P. O. Box 580, Boissevain, MB R0K 0E0 • Tel. (204) 534-2486 • Fax (204) 534-2236 


A 

Located at 15f 

Senons Greetings, end beef wishes for e 
prosperous New Veer, from 

SAUNDERS GOOCH 
Architects 

fixperienced of assisting Canada s First 
Nations to develop their design requirements 

Fur personal assistance or further information call 

Ken Saunders or Ed Gooch at 

Phone (780) 425-2115 • Fax (780) 425-7646 

320 - 111 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T5M 2R7 




If* 


AA 

jUNKYAJto 




CASH 

FOR CARS & TRUCKS 
• SCRAP REMOVAL • 

( 403 ) 248-4004 










































Alberta Native News December, 1999 




St. Albert becomes first municipality 
in Alberta with trilingual street signs 


‘May your Christmas 6e filled with the 
warmth of the festive season, from 

MILLRIDGE BUILDERS LTD. 


Let u% put a y '°°fi° v * almen/ > 

205 • Caribou Trail NW m __. 

Slave Lake. AU _ _P«—' 

too mi W^Willrnar 

(M0)M9-3677 mm. c Windou / S' 


The French Canadian Association (centraitai, the 
Metis Nation, the Metis Settlements and the City of 
St, Albert have unveiled 18 new street signs in St. 
Albert's downtown core area. The new trilingual signs 
i French, English and Creel will highlight St. Albert's 
rich and unique history. 

"Our goal is to revitalize and enhance St. Albert's 
history by making it more visible to residents and 
tourists,' says project coordinator, Sheila Risbud “St. 
Albert has grown very quickly in the last few decades 
and we want to ensure its past is preserved." 

The sign project is the result of a partnership 
between the French Canadian Association (centraitai, 
the Metis Nation and the Metis Settlements. The 
group hopes to spark interest in St. Albert’s rich 
history and expects the Bigns to add a tourism feature 
for the many visitors to the city. 

The economic advantages of preserving and en¬ 
hancing historical buildings and character have been 
widely proven in areas such as Whyte Avenue in 
Edmonton. This project is a step towards recreating a 
sense of history in St. Albert’s downtown core. St. 
Albert will also be able to boast that it is the only 
municipality in Alberta with trilingual signs. 

Through this project. St. Albert joins the numerous 
communities across the country celebrating the new 
millennium by commemorating the past. The trilin¬ 
gual sign project is part of a two-part proposal by the 
partnership. Phase two involves making interpretive 
signs along Red Willow Trail, bilingual (french- 
onglish). The City of St. Albert contributed to half of 
the $5000 project. 

The project is also supported by the City of St. 
Albert, the Musee Heritage Museum and the Arts and 
Heritage Foundation. 




Wishing you a joyous holiday season 


COMPLETE PRINTING SERVICE 
Pcr.oiu.Uied Service For All Your Printing Need. 
Monday to Friday IDO a.m. - 400 p.m. 

Box SOS, Lac La Biche, Alberta ToA ZCo 

"We we loaned In (he same building as 
the Lae La Biche Post’ 

♦ Business Cards ♦ Carbonless Forms ♦ Letterheads 
♦ Computer Forms ♦ Envelopes ♦ Flyers ♦ Memo Pads 

♦ Invoices ♦ Rubber Stamps * Decals 

♦ Full Colour Printing ♦ lypeseltlng ♦ Art Work & Design 
♦ Folding ♦ Stitching 

» Padding ♦ tsl.iplmg ♦ Drilling • Ferforaung 

♦ Scoring Sr Trimming ♦ Numbering 

Phone: (780) 623-7093 Fax: (780) 623-4230 


wmiiit; you a mini ownmii im a iimmom new mm 

^ KNELSEN 


COMPUTE GRAVEL, CONCRETE. ASPHALT SERVICES 


HIGH LEVEL (780) 926-3170 
Asphalt Plant: (7B0) 926-3189 
LACRETE OHice/Plant (780) 928-3935 


8:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. 
8:00 a.m. -10:00 p.m. 
8:00 a.m. -10:00 p.m. 
8:00 a.m. -10:00 p.m. 
8:00 a.m. -10:00 p.m. 
8:00 a.m. -11:00 p.m. 
8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m. 


Week of December 19 to December 24 


Sunday, December 19th 
Monday, December 20th 
Tuesday, December 21st 
Wednesday, December 22nd 
Thursday, December 23rd 
Friday, December 24th 


8:00 a.m.- 9:00 p.m 
8:00 a.m. -11:00 p.m 
8:00 a.m. -11:00 p.m. 
8:00 a.m.-11:00 p.m. 
8:00 a m.-11:00 p.m. 
7:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. 


Wo thank you for your patronage in the past gear 
Wishing you a blessed Christinas, and a healthy, 
prosperous NeiO year, from 

LAF0RCE 

Construction (1984) Ltd. 

OILflELD CONTRACTING • GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
EQUIPMENT RENTALS 

Equipment rentals indude: 

•CATS • BACKHOES • GRADERS 
SEWER A WATER UNE INSTALLATIONS 
• Residential • Commercial 

Bus: (780) 467-7189 Fax:(780)467-3852 
Cell: (780) 446-0713 

52347 - HWY 21, Sherwood Park, AB T8B 1J7 
(780)891-3135 

P. O. Box 759, Wabasca, AB TOG 2K0 






































Alberta Native News December, 1999 


29 


Economic Development 


BDC: removing 
barriers for 
Aboriginal 
entrenpreneurs 

The Business Development Bank of Canada is a 
financial institution wholly owned by the Govern¬ 
ment of Canada. BDC plays a leadership role in 
delivering financial and consulting services to Cana¬ 
dian small business, with particular emphasis on the 
emerging and exporting sectors of the economy. BDC 
is a different kind of bank with a variety of innovative 
loan products which round out the financing available 
from other lending institutions. 

By virtue of the unique role BDC plays, numerous 
partnership agreements have been entered into with 
other Financial Institutions, Crown Corporations and 
Regional Agencies. This same approach toward part¬ 
nership is being adopted to address the financing 
needs of businesses in the Aboriginal market. In fact, 
the motto for BDC's Aboriginal Banking unit, formed 
in 1997 and headed by Jim Richardson, is "Partner¬ 
ship - The Key to Success.” Agreements have been 
signed with CIBC, Royal Bank, Scotiabank, National 
Bank and an ACC to collaborate in the development 
of products and joint lending initiatives to better meet 
the needs of Aboriginal entrepreneurs. 

Many of the innovative loan products developed by 
BDC meet specific financing needs and provide greater 
flexibility in dealing with some of the barriers entre¬ 
preneurs face. BDC focuses on the long term viability 
of businesses and places less emphasis on security. To 
help the entrepreneur overcome management defi¬ 
ciencies, BDC has developed various loan products 
incorporating management support such as the Mi¬ 
cro-business program, the Young Entrepreneur Fi¬ 
nancing program and the Growth Capital for Aborigi¬ 
nal Business loan product. Jim Richardson refers to 
this approach toward management support as the 
“Circle of Entrepreneurial Success" because of the 
link management and training and mentorship have 
to financing and ultimately the success of the busi- 

Business start-ups are viewed as risky by financial 
institutions. Statistics reveal that 50% of businesses 
that start today are not around in three years time. 
The Indian Act restrictions on security, a lack of 
equity by many Aboriginal entrepreneurs and a lack 
of management experience in some cases further 
compound the difficulty for financial institutions to be 
more receptive in financing business start-ups in 
Aboriginal communities. Conventional lending pro¬ 
grams offered by most financial institutions often fail 
to address the needs of small businesses for financing 

Despite BDC’s growing Aboriginal loans portfolio 
which is comprised of a variety of loan products, there 
was a realization that there were still unique circum¬ 
stances faced by Aboriginal entrepreneurs wanting to 
start a small business or expand an existing business 
which made it difficult for them to obtain financing 
BDC’s Growth Capital for Aboriginal Business loan 
product was developed to increase access to capital for 
Aboriginal entrepreneurs who want to start a small 
business or expand an existing business operating on 


or off reserve in Canada. The product was launched in 
late September 1997 and piloted in select regions but 
is now available across Canada. 

This loan product provides greater flexibility in 
overcoming the main barriers that Aboriginal entre¬ 
preneurs face in accessing capital for commercially 
viable businesses. For example, the loan product 
provides for greater flexibility with respect to the 
equity an entrepreneur must have to qualify for a 
loan The Indian Act restrictions are not viewed as a 
barrier. Management support is provided in most 
setup situations as a condition of the loan to strengthen 
certain management skills or expertise that may be 
lacking but that are vital to the success of the busi 
ness. Management support is made available through 
a special alliance with CESO Aboriginal Services and 
includes on going mentoring and business manage¬ 
ment counselling for the first two years following loan 
approval. 

The Growth Capital for Aboriginal Business pro¬ 
vides loans up to $25,000 for start-ups and up to 
$100,000 for existing businesses wanting to expand. 
A unique feature of the loan is that BDC will refund 
a portion of the interest paid on a loan to a community 
organization or charity chosen by the borrower. It is 




Wishing you a Joyous holiday season 




Best wishes for a blessed Christmas and strength, safety and peace 
In the new millenniumI From 


MATHIEV, HRYNIUK, SHYNKAR & ERICKSON 

Barristers 6 Solicitors 
A vocals el Sot a ires 

P- O. Box 6210 Phone: (780) 624-2565 

10012 - 101 Street Fax: (780) 624-5766 

Peace Rhrer, AB 1 800-661-1962 

T8S 1S2 


A GENERAL PRACTICE LA W FIRM SERVING NORTHERS ALBERTA 
FOR THE LAST SO YEARS 


Branch Offices: Father. McLennan. High Level La Crete 


EMCO 


LIMITED 


SERVING 

ALBERTA • BRITISH COLUMBIA • YUKON • NORTHWEST TERRITORIES 


SUPPLIERS OF 

• Plumbing • Water and Sewer • Pumps • Heating • Forced Air 
• Hot Water • Radiant • Pipe Valves and Fittings 
• Design and Material Take-off Assistance • Site Visits 
For the EMCO Ltd. Office nearest you 
Phone (7B0) 45I-9SSI Fax (780) 454-9565 
Western Westlund, 14615 - 111 A Avenue, Edmonton, AB T5L 2T1 


































30 


Alberta Native News December, 1999 


book review 

Aboriginal 
Joint Ventures 

Negotiating Successful Partnerships 

Written by Mike Lewi* & William J. Hatton 
Published by CCE Publicatione, Port Alberni, B.C. 

ISBN#: 1-895818-00-1 
Review by John Copley 

Port Alberni, Britiah Columbia’e Centre for Com¬ 
munity Entcrpriec (CCE), working in conjunction 
with ite project arm, Wcetcoaet Centre for Develop¬ 
ment Management, publiehed Aburiginal Joint Ven¬ 
tures, Negotiating Successful Partnerships in 1992, 
but never hae it been in need more than it ie now. 

The 74 page, 8 1/2 by 11 inch eollcover manuacript 
ia just what the doctor ordered, a book of remedica for 
virtually every problem and every Bituation imagina¬ 
ble. In the word of economica, entreprencura and 
money making, that ia. 

Aboriginal Joint Ventures, Negotiating Successful 
Partnerships offer* it* reudera »ix comprehensive 
chapter* that contain information and valuable tip* 


aMaif til Csiatox txiny i afily, 
xtxcnytfi and guidance 
to off till JUidag dbtaion 

& fe. 


HORSE LAKE FIRST NATION 


Box 303, 

Hythe, Alberta 
TOH 2C0 

Ph: (780) 356-2248 
Fax: (780) 356-3666 


and atrategies on everything from thinking about a 
business to setting one up and operating it. Partner¬ 
ship enterprise ia a relatively new term in Aboriginal 
business circles but one that has caught on Cast over 
the past two or three years. 

Written by Mike Lewis and William Hatton, the 
material, information and foresight contained within 
the pages of Aboriginal Joint Ventures, Negotiating 
Successful Partnerships .didn't come about in a day or 
two Instead it represents an accumulation of experi¬ 
ence* and insights that have come from many Cana¬ 
dians over the past several years. 

The graphics are eye-catching, the layout has an 
easy to read format and the editorial content is well 
written. Input into the book came from a variety of 
source* including some First Nations activists and 
advisors from communities like the Kaska Dene, La 
Ronge and Nisga'a First Nations as well as from 
"those who have been working in the trenches for 

Many Aboriginal businesses are thriving in Canada 
today but there's room for a lot more. Communities 
and individuals who decide they'd like to pursue a 
particular business venture are often put off because 
of their lack of knowledge or unfamiliarity with busi¬ 
ness practices and contemporary issues. They might 
ask themselves, ‘how can we participate if we have no 
business or management experience,' or 'how do we 
gel capital to become venture owners,' or 'how do I put 
a plan of action together to get my business idea off the 
ground?' 

There's one answer for all of these questions and 
more Aboriginal Joint Ventures, Negotiating Suc¬ 
cessful Partnerships— get a copy for yourself today. 
You'll find that this book offering is one that can be 
put to good use. It presents all of the central issues 
that both First Nations and other Aboriginal entre¬ 
preneurs and organizations need to know in order to 


ABORIGINAL 
OINT 


Negotiating 
Successfu I 
Partnerships 



Mike Lewis & William ). Hatton 


DOWNTOWN EDMONTON 


HOWARD JOHNSON PLAZA HOTEL 

* 138 Luxury Rooms and Swiss with Balconies 



Wng the theatre briny lafelg, itnnqth 

. $f 

Louis Bull Tribal Administration 

j&V 


For Information on programs and services. 

contact the Louis Bull Tribal Oltlce. 
Monday to Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. 

Phone (780) 585-3978 
Fax(780)585-3799 
P.0. Box 130, Hobbema. AB TOC 1N0 


iu 


Absolute Accounting 


• Personal and farm income lax preparation 

• Agricultural F.l. D P. applications 

Karen Krswchuk DA. 5028 - 50 Avenue 

Box 7037 Phone (780) 573-7718 

Bonnyvlllc. AB TON 2H4 Fax (780) 573-7719 


strategize effectively. 

Readers will be pleased with the amount of signifi¬ 
cant, comprehensive coverage they'll find between 
the pages of Aboriginal Joint Ventures, Negotiating 
Successful Partnerships, including a variety of useful 
checkliats, diagrams, explanations and asample agree 


Aborigma 
bookshop (s 
6779. 


& Rubyjean Ceramics Ltd. 

GARE DISTRIBUTOR 

Greenware • Paint 8- Supplies W 

Brushes • Tools • Molds 


CLASSES - SEMINARS AVAILABLE 

fi (780) 447-2118 Phone/Fax Jeanette 

*• 13204 -146 Street. Edmonton. AB T5L 4W8 

fifes 





==p*rk (780) 963-6297 

Stony Plain. AB T7Z 1V8 Hany Qrundke 


* ^PRINTERS & NATIVE ART GALLERY (j 

UJl 

Custom Picture Fnm>ng • St* Screwing 

T Sfwts • Sweets • Ceps • Deals, etc rrr 

Serpent River First Nation ■ 

Culler. Ontano POP 1B0 

Tel: (705) 844-2132 

Fax: (705) 844-2281 

r 1 

[22QQCBD3 

CESSHS3B 

SUck-Ups' 



• LiOW 4 Heavy Oilfield Hauling 

• Pickai Service - Up lo 28 tons 

• Hi-boys and Lo-Boys 

• Hot Shol Vehicles • Pilot Veh.des 

High Level, Alberta 
Ph. (780) 926-3282 


Merry Christmas — Happy New Yearl 

BUFC0 PLUMBING LTD. 

TRACHOt 

* Backhoe service available • Industrial steamer 
• Industrial high pressure washing 
Call Cameron S. Buffalo 


'Wishing you all a Merry Christ) 



AUTO BODY LTD. 


GUARANTEED EXCELLENCE 

IN AUTO REPAIR A PAINT 


CADOTTE STORE 


Open Monday lo Friday 
8:30 a.m. lo 10.00 p m 
Saturday - 9:00 a m lo 10:00 p.m. 
( Sunday- 11:00 a.m. to 10:00 pm 

(780) 629-3992 

Cadotte, Alberta TOH ONO 





































































Alberta Native News December, 1999 


31 


Coping with 
financial 
difficulties 

by Rhonda Fox-Miles 

Christmas is the time of year for celebration and 
giving. It’s the thought that counts during this tune of 
the year, and not how much we spend. However, 
sometimes we face financial difficulties in the New 
Year as a result of overspending during the holidays. 
Some indicators of financial difficulties are: 

• Bouncing a cheque 

• Not having enough money to pav rent or utility 
bills 

• Exhausted emergency funds or savings 

• Personal sacrifices having to be made to meet 
minimum credit payments 

If financial difficulties are taking control of your life 
there are alternatives available to help you deal with 
the debt load. Some alternatives are: 

• Budgeting 

• Consolidation loan 

• Informal agreement with creditors 

• Orderly Payment of Debts 

• Consumer Proposal 

• Personal Bankruptcy 

Some causes of financial difficulty are within the 
control of the individual while many others are not. 

Rhonda is a licensed Trustee in Bankruptcy with 
Fox-Miles & Associates Inc. 



Season's Greetings, wishing you good health 
and prosperity in the new millennium, 
from management and staff at 

RECONDITIONED 

dU^^^^^reezers * Ranges 
★ Washers * Refrigerators 

INCUS ★ CE * MAYTAC 

lHllHUtijJ Tire & Auto I 

1 12 Months • Parts & Labour Warranty . 1 

Box 3821, 10 South Avenue, 

Spruce Grove, Alberta 

(780)962 1155 

SALES & SERVICE 

|» 7^ '4422 - 1 18 Avc., Edmonton, AB 

tui->d.l> - Fnclj, Noon - I, p m _Ml 

Sam'davMOa.m..:Sip.m. 

Call Anytime! (780) 452-9829 ——1 1 



Wishing you peace and joy at Christmas 
and in the year to come... 

From all of us at 

SSWif* Ctx*u 

QQttQO 


• 50 Regular Games • 2 Bonanzas 
• 1 Odd/Even • 2 Early Birds 
Satellite Bingo played nightly at 9:00 p.m. 


3414 • 116 Avenue. Edmonton. Alberta 

(780)474 4870 


'Season j (Jreefintjs 
from the 
Staff atu! 
dtanac/emeni of 


63S0 - 67 Street 
Red Deer. AB 
TAP 317 

Dots your non profit organization need 
HO RISK fund-raising dollars?’? 




(780) 454-3635 


Why not host a casino 
In Red Deer al 
Newly Renovated facility 

is available at your 

this NO RISK fund-raising 
event to your organization 

Please give us a call: 

Red Deer 403-346-3339 

Calgary Location: 

4040B Blacbfoot Trail S.E. 
EXPANSION NOW OPEN 




FOX-MILES 

M & ASSOCIATES INC. ^ 

(£y% TRUSTEE IN BANKRUPTCY 

(780) 444-3939 


✓ Free Initial Consultation 

✓ Monthly Payments Available 

✓ Flexible Appointments 

- Evenings <£ II VeJtemiv 

✓ Free Parking 

✓ Convenient Location 

✓ Warm Friendly Atmosphere 
t/ 20 Years Experience 

✓ Children Welcome 


Fax: (780) 444 0150 











































































32 

Pool etiquette 

by Kevin M. Cardinal 


uie course of a match. Believe me the trial* and tribulation* encountered wi 
guideline* or experience* during play can be tough My philosophy is "treat others 
how you would be like to be treated during play". The following detail* will help 
you develop into a better player or spectator. 


I'Lyi i r.u uc/o 

Feel free to shake your opponent* hand beforc/or after a match. 

If a question or dispute arises, communicate with your opponent in a level voice 
and in a rational manner. Call over an official to help settle a disputed issue. 
Remain Btill and quiet when your opponent Is at the table. 

Treat your opponent with the respect you would like to receive in return. 

Smile once in a while, will show your enthuslasism for pool. 


PLAYER DONTS 

Don't get into heated exchanges with your opponent or spectators. 

Don't move around or talk while your opponent I* at the table. 

During a match, don't try to pursue conversation with opponent if you see that 
they do not wish it. 

Don't walk away from the playing area without extending your opponent the 
courtesy of telling them. 

Don’t fight fire with fire, learn how to deal with bad situations while maintaining 
composure and dignity. 

SPECTATOR DOS 

Feel free to speak to your favorite players, but wait until after their match. Give 
them extra time for themselves if they've lost. Players usually need quiet time 
before a match and sufficient time (6 to 15 minutes) to get over a lost match. 

By all means applaud your favorite player. Cheering them on helps them stay 
motivated. Beware of your timing Applaud after a good shot or run out. 

While wutching, keep your conversations to a whisper 
SPECTATOR DONTS 

Never visibly cheer against a player. No mattor how much you dislike them. It is 
downright rudu, and it makes you look worse than the person you're cheering 

Don’t sit directly behind a player's chair and have a conversation with a friend. 
Spectators behind players need to be awnre of their voices and movements. 
Don’t get up out of your sent or mnko sudden movements. You might distract a 
player shooting in your direction. 

Lot's continue to enjoy pool in a proud fashion. You'd be surprised how far a little 
courtesy cun go and how it will be appreciated by the players and fans. So readers/ 
players send your suggestions or comments to email cnrdinulkevin@hotmail.com 
or send letters/fax to Alberta Native News, Suite 330,10115-100A Street, Edmon¬ 
ton, Alberta T5J-2W2 (780) 421-7966. 

MERRY CHRISTMAS AND HAPPY NEW YEAR TO YOU ALL! 



teenow 


Employment & Training Society 


"74e ‘Sound and of Oteenou. £mp(<UfmeMt & 

TnrrWrar? Society would tide ft* you it “gdaiatmao 

(?deen sW It “Zletppy 'Ttcw “tftan." 


74< Sooed St uitu(ii (ide ft* iuoite you ft* oun 

Oficu Xm. 

- Open House - 

Date: January 12, 2000 

Time: 9:00 am to 12:00 pm - Industry & Partners 
12:00 to 4:00 pm General Public 

Place: Suite 103, 10470 - 176 Street, Edmonton. Alberta 

Refreshments anil • business card draw 
with 1st, 2nd and 3rd place prizes. 

Meet new people, make new friends 
and meet the new Board and Staff of Otccnow. 

Preparing First Nations people today 
for employment tomorrow.... 
www.otaenow.com 

■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■a 


Alberta Native News December, 1999 


Contract awarded for 



northern organizations.” 

The Deton’Cho Corporation, the Dogrib Rae Band and the North Slave Metis 
Alliance will address a number of immediate environmental concerns. These 
include preparing to pump water from the tailings pond into the mine's open pit 
in case there is heavy snowfall this winter, continuing to pump seepage at Dam 
1 back into the tailings pond, modifying the existing fuel storage system, 
classifying and consolidating waste oil and other lubricants at the site and 
maintaining the fuel containment boom at Steeves Lake. 

The Aboriginal consortium will conduct studies into contamination at the site, 
and develop plans for remediation. This includes determining the concentration 
and distribution of the cyanide in the water of the tailings pond and open pit, and 
initiating an investigation into the contamination of soil in areas such as the tank 
farm, maintenance shop, power plant, and waste oil storage area. This group is 
also responsible for on-going environmental monitoring and maintenance of the 
site. 

The consortium will be doing work that Colomac's owner, Royal Oak Mines, Inc 
had been directed to carry out under an inspector's order, issued by DIAND under 
the NWT Waters Act. Royal Oak Mines was placed into receivership in mid-April. 
Neither the company nor the Interim Receiver have complied with the order. The 
contract with the Aboriginal consortium will ensure that, if the Interim Receiver 
abandons the site, it will continue to be maintained in an environmentally 
appropriate manner. 

All remediation work will be monitored by DIAND inspectors and will meet the 
provisions of the NWT Waters Act. 



Northlands Denesuline 
First Nation 

is proud to announce the recent signing of the 
Treaty Land Entitlement Agreement 
This is the fulfilment of the promise to our people 
from the original signing of Treaty No. 10' 

Under this First Nation specific Treaty Land Entitlement Agreement: 

Manitoba will provide Northlands Denesuline First Nation with 38,075 hectares 
(94 084 acres) of Crown land and Canada will provide $2,289,482 for the use and 
benefit of its members 

• The land to be selected by Denesuline First Nation is pan of the total amount of 
445,452 hectares (1.100,626 acres) of land negotiated under the Manitoba Treaty 
Land Entitlement Framework Agreement 

• The TLE Framework Agreement is intended to provide land to the 19 First 
Nations, fulfilling a long-standing commitment arising from treaties signed by 
Canada and the First Nations betw een 1871 and 1910. Northlands Denesuline First 
Nation is a signatory to Treaty No. 10. 


May f/if Creator bring safety, strength Sr guidance 
to dH flu first ‘Mahons in tfte coming Mine Tear.fom 

Cree Nation Child & Family 
Caring Agency i ji 

P O Box 3910, The Pas, Manitoba R9A1S5 V 

Tel. (204) 623-7456 Fax. (204) 623-3847 V 

Mosakahiken Cree Nation_(204) 678-2175 

Grand Ropids First Nation...(204) 639-2518 

Chemawawin First Nation_(204) 329-2161 

Mathias Colomb Cree Nation..(204) 553-2139 

Sapotaweyak Cree Nation_(204) 587-2216 

Wuskwt Sipthk First Notion.. (204) 236-4831 

Oposkwoyak Cree Nation-(204) 623-7456 
























Alberta Native News December, 1999 


33 


The Healing Journey 



Are Children Involved? 


THINK ABOUT IT ... 

...they suffer the most! 

YOU CAN MAKE THE DIFFERENCE 
Call Peter A. Dyck, Family Therapist. M.S.W., R.S.W. 

Phone (780) 469-6605 

Some Evenings and Weekends Available Sliding Fee Scale 


l T'Liking you pence an? joy at Cbrutmae an? m tbe year to come 



Beaver Lake 
Wah-Pow 

Detox and 
Treatment Centre 

Counselling Services Available 
DOREEN LAMEMAN 
Executive Director 


Box 1648. LacLaBiche. 
Alberta T0A2C0 


call (780) 623-2553 


Reformers stall Nisga’a passage 

by Ennia Morria 



TO ALL ABORIGINAL WOMEN 

Caring for your breasts is important for ALL WOMEN 


Screen Test is a provincial program offering: 
• screening mammograms 



•Araac.AB • Bonnyvdte A8 • Cold Lake, AB • Conklm, AB • Fort Chipewyan, AB 
• Fort McKay. A8 • Fort McMurray. AS • ivrrm, AB * lac La Bicbe, AB • Sikaika, AB 


. phone to find out when <he mobile ra in your area 

• (780) 474°43<X> an ^Cdg T, - (403) 262-4460 
Long Distance 1 -800-6670604 (toll free) 

i 











































34 


Alberta Native News December, 1999 


'Merry Christmas and tfappy ’Hewjtar 
from 

Londonderry Optical 

66 St. & 137 Ave., Edmonton, AB 

For more information on tpecials please call 

(780) 475-6658 


Tom Jackson: A 
Huron Carole 


JPRa? the blcooinge of health anb prosper it? 
be with you throughout the year 

Mamawetan Churchill River 
District Health Board 

P.O. Box 6900, La Ronge. SK SOJ 1LO 
Phone (306) 429-2422 
Fax (306) 429-9432 


REGIONAL 
CRISIS LINE 

High Prairie (780) $23-2717 
Toll Free: 1-800-232-7288 


Jean Baptiste Robert Potskin 
for Homecare 8c 
Medical Supplies 


Classic Health Supplies Ltd., a medical 
& homecare supply company, is pleased to 
announce that Jean Potskin has Joined them. 
Jean, who is a Native and who is in a wheel¬ 
chair, will focus on identifying and responding 
to the needs of the Native community. Some of 
the products include wheelchairs. Kith bench 
es, catheters, leg bags, diapers, ostomy, wound 
care, walkers, mattresses, cushions, bed over¬ 
lays, etc. Please call Jean for information on 
these and our other products. 

10576 - 113 Street 
Edmonton, Alberta 
Phone (780) 421-4372 
or 

Toll Free at 1 (888) 421-0488 



by John Copley 

Well known Canadian entertainer, Tom Jackson, is 
not only one of the country’s most popular people, he's 
also one of the busiest. As Alberta Native Newt gets 
ready to publish its Christmas special, the Winnipeg- 
born Jackson is just finishing up his cross-country 
Huron Carole Christmas Tour, an annual undertak¬ 
ing that has raised hundreds of thousands of dollars 
for Canada's food banks. 

This year the Huron Carole concert tour began in 
Vancouver, then made numerous stops along the way, 
including Edmonton. Calgary and Fort McMurray, as 
it moved eastward, finally winding up in St. John's, 
Newfoundland, where it closed on December 15. 

1999 marks the twelfth year that Jackson has been 
delivering his powerful Huron Carole performances. 
Beginning with a single performance to raise money 
for the food bank in Winnipeg, Manitoba, the concert 
tour now involves visiting a half dozen cities over 15 
days. Last year the concerts raised more than $400,000 
for the Canadian Association of Food Banks. 

Tom Jackson's fund-raising causes have never failed 
to inspire the goodwill ofhis peers. This year, as in the 
past, another great bunch of actors, singers and 
entertainers joined him on stage, all in the name of 
helping the less fortunate. 

Edmonton's Winspear Theatre was sold out at least 
a week before the popular troupe arrived. Accompa¬ 
nying Jackson was the incomparable, Shannon Gaye. 
Other special guests included Patricia Conroy, Lisa 
Brokop, Mark Sterling and Thomas Wade. 

Tom Jackson's been around for a while. He’s one of 
the boat known Canadian personalities in the country 
today; his involvement in his career and in the com¬ 
munity have won him not only acclaim, but the hearts 
of Canadians everywhere. Jackson might be remem¬ 
bered by some for his role in North of 60. Others will 
remember the great reviews he got in 1993 for his part 
in The Diviners or in 1996 for, Judge and Jury. Others 
will remember his roles in such programs as Star Trek 


Wishing a Meriy Chnslmas and a healthy, happy New Year to all 
4804 • 48 Street. 

Rocky Mountain House. AB (403)845-2626 

X ScfltMM An6c 
tL ot&ud 


) 

51 / 


hlng you peace, health K 
and happiness In this joyous season 
and throughout the year! On behalf of 

The Boyle McCauley 
Health Centre 

Td. (780) 422-7333 
iribL 10628 96 Street. JL 

[[ )[)) Edmonton, AB T5H 2|2 fn rMI 


Professional Rehabllltiatlve |t| 7 J 

,h * Prosthetics 

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& Orthotics 

• WO. vanary o> lines 4 

BIZ] Company 



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AM- C.T. (c o.) 

10613 - 82 Street 


Edmonton. AB I6A 3N2 

( 780 ) 448-1281 

_ 


M \ 

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■OL To Daily Living Ltd. . 


„ ’5819 Stony Pton Road Ph (780) 483-1762 J 
3 Edmonton. AB T5T 327 Fax (780) 489-6813 ? 
Toll-Free: 1-80O-2S2-8368 





(1987), Chicago Hope (1994) and Sliders (1995). Or 
perhaps more recently for his role as Joshua in the 
1999 film, Grizzly Falls. But everyone will remember 
him for the important role he played after the disas¬ 
trous Manitoba floods in 1997. That’s when he joined 
up with Susan Aglukark, Randy Bachman, Tina 
Keeper and others, performing for free as they hosted 
the Manitoba Flood Relief Concert. The effort helped 
to generate thousands of dollars in cash and goods, all 
of which went to help feed, clothe and house many of 
the thousands of Manitoba flood victims. 

Like his spirit, Jackson’s music is also full of energy 
A couple of months ago, Canada’s Country Magazine 
ran a piece on him. As part of a personal message he'd 
been asked to give to his fans and fellow music lovers, 
Jackson talked about songs, and the importance of 
getting them just right. 

"Singing,'' he said, “is more than just hitting the 
right notes and songwriting is more than finding 
words that rhyme. It’s capturing the emotion that 
causes the twinge in your heart, creates the chill on 
your skin and ultimately brings us together, soul to 

In the same article, Jackson said though he’s liked 
the character roles he's played in film and on televi¬ 
sion, music was his first love. 

“I realize acting has provided me with a privileged 
introduction,’ he wrote, “(but) please know that al 
though I have great respect for the characters I have 
played as an actor, they are not me. My music is me 
It is my life experience, and I am delighted to share 
some of my stories. Thank you for listening.’ 

Thank you for sharing, again. 



MessedChristmas to attFirst Marions 


Yewchin’s Funeral 
Chapel Ltd. 


Serving al faiths In St Paul and Area 
• Prearranged fuseral Plans • Cremation Av&aUe • 
• florab • Monuments • Grave Covers • 


80,425 (780)645-5177 

St Pout AS FAX (780) 645-4672 


0201 SO Ave 
ST Pout AB 


24 Hour Service - John YewedSn - Dkector 


w ' shmg oil o hoppy holiday* 

l Helma Votf; 

BA. Bid. AA Ed. C Psych 












































Alberta Native News December, 1999 


Developing a First Nations blueprint to buoyancy 
no easy task 


There's hardly a week 
goes by that one of Cana¬ 
da's major dailies doesn't 
run a story about some 
kind offinanci ' 


one of the country's Fii 
Nations communities. 
The stories almost always 

politicians and others who 
believe they have the an¬ 
swers to the problems and 
issues that confront 
Canada's Indigenous peo¬ 
ples. One such person, 
respected for his political 
savvy and opinions, is 
writing a book about his 
ideas on how to create a 

Jean Allard, a former 
Manitoba MLA and a past 
president of the Union 
Nationale Metisse St. 
Joseph du Manitoba, says 
he thinks he’s got the so¬ 
lutions necessary to elimi- 
nate Native poverty and 
rid Canada of what he 
calls a bureaucratic night¬ 
mare, deliberately set up 
to fail. 

In recent interviews 


with Canada's media, and 
in a pamphlet he's been 
distributing throughout 
the west since late this 
summer. Mr Allard, who 
sat in the Manitoba legis¬ 
lature from 1969 to 1973, 
calls Ottawa's way of deal¬ 
ing with Aboriginal gov- 

"has militated against the 
chiefs and councils work¬ 
ing for their people' 

Allard, who is currently 
writing a book on his theo¬ 
ries, says the answer lies 
in offering Aboriginal peo¬ 
ple annual treaty annu¬ 
ity payments, whether 
they live off the reserve or 

In a draft of his new 
book. The Rebirth of Big 
Bear’s People, Allard says 
if government offered to 
update the value of the 
dollar - mid-1800 versus 
1999, the annual five dol¬ 
lar “treaty payment’ of 
yesteryear would amount 
to about $5,000 per year, 
for every man, woman 
and child today. 

Twenty years before the 


£)[-$ Preserving & Enhancing 

_Johnson _^rr° rL "* 

—&Oliver - 

OPTOMETRISTS 

5216A-50th Avenue (780)361-2 


Wetaskiwin, AB 


1-888-296-7797 


by John Copley 

says Allard, land was 
worth about one dollar an 
acre. Today the price tag 
for the same land is closer 
to $1,000. 

Mr. Allard, who has re¬ 
ferred to Canada's cur¬ 
rent chief and council sys¬ 
tem as, “a reward system 
for noncompliance.* has 
made it clear that he 
thinks the country's Na¬ 
tive people would fare 
better if they didn't have 
to rely on their chiefs and 
councils. 

Assembly of First Na¬ 
tions (AFN) Grand Chief, 
Phil Fontaine, was ques¬ 
tioned about Allard's 
theories during a mid- 
Novemberteleconference 
he initiated with Native 
media outlets across the 
country. He told journal¬ 
ists that government 
couldn't afford Allard’s 
plan, adding that if they 
would just settle the 
claims already before 
them, Canada's First Na¬ 
tions would be financially 
viable and able to begin 
realizing their objective. 


right of self-determina¬ 
tion. or self-rule or self- 
government," empha¬ 
sized Fontaine. "All peo¬ 
ple in the world have this 
right,’ he added. ’First 
Nations in Canada were 
denied that' 

Welfare rolls and gov- 
ernment/Band handouts 
is all 



It's about First Nntioi 
in Canada having the 
right and the ability to 
exercise control over their 
own future. 

talk about less than that,’ 
reiterated Mr. Fontaine 
“It demeans and mini¬ 
mizes First Nations peo¬ 
ple. Our people havcevery 
right to establish our own 


He . .. 

the AFN with his idea, 
but Grand Chief Fontaine 
says he's up for a meeting 
if Allard wants to present 
his ideas to the national 
body But, Fontaine 
added, the bottom line is 
self-determination. 

"I'm interested in mak¬ 
ing sure our treaties are 
honoured," concluded 
Fontaine. ’I’m interested 


a sufficient lane 


ms of gi 


and talk of anything less 
than that is just unac¬ 
ceptable." 

Word is that Jean 
Allard is considering of- 


and sustainable jobs fe 
our people. We want to bo 
able tu revitalize our 
economies; wu want to be 
independent, notdepond- 
ont on foreign govern¬ 
ments or our own govern¬ 
ments. We want people ti 
be able to make their own 
way through life.’ 


rjEH Pastoral Counselling Group 

Helping People Heal Themselves 

Experienced counsellors and psychologist provide: 

♦ Individual, couple, and family counselling ♦ addictions counselling 

♦ marriage preparation and enrichment courses * workshops lot couples 

, ding fee scale Call (780) 482-8998 


CUBIST*AS 
£ QpmmrtHGS ... 

•0 TKtUf the <Uc44ut$4 tiealiA <x*d 
tubfificHete 6c udtA tfou t&ic 
U hotictcUf €L*ut 

t/iiouq/ioxt t/tc 
TUuf Iftan. f 




£8hr 


the Creator bring safety, strength 
and wisdom to all First Nations 
this holiday seaosn, 
and through the to come 

Niwihcihow 
Acceptance Ltd. 

P. O. Box 838, Hobbema, AB TOC IM0 
Tel. (780) 585-2970 
or Fax. (780) 585-2257 




-dW' 


.'Ujir the creator tiring safer,, strength and guidance 
to all t Ik first stations in the iu» nUennium. 

Community Health 
Services 

• Alcohol and Drug counselling 

• Child Welfare Prevention 

• Educational Counselling 
• Health and wellness 

(70S) 756-2354 fax. (705) 756-2376 
wahta Mohawks 

Bala Ontario 


ft 


For the Birthright office nearest you phone 
1 800 550-4900 (24 hour* a day. 7 day* a week) 
Birthright oilers free, non-judgmeniai, confidential, 
practical and material support to women facing 
unplanned pregananae* to aaui them to carry (heir 
babies to term Help i* provided regardless of age. 
race, religion, marital status or economics. 

Visit us on the World Wide Web: 
hltp.//www.birthrighl.org 
E-mail: info 0 birlhrighl.org 
Fax. (416) 469 1772 

^ ^777^Cozwell > Avenue, Toronio^N^.V^C JC£ . 


iiiiii 

We wish all our clienli 
and friends a safe and 
happy holiday seasoi 

All Nations 
Hope 

AIDS NETWORK 


Addictions and HIV 
There is a connection 
Help ui face 
the challenge 
of healing both 

Ph. (306) 924-8424 

1504B Albert Street, 


c 

R 

I 

S 

I 

S 

AND 

T 

R 

A 

U 

M 

A 

TRAINING 

PROGRAM 

Designed for on 
site delivery to 
help counselors 
and caregivers 
gain the new 
skills to belter 
respond to crisis, 
suicide 

intervention and 
trauma recovery 
For a detailed 
description of the 
Crisis & Trauma 
workshop 
telephone 
604-983-9813 

LMAN 

CONSULTING 
SERVICES INC, 





































Alberta Native News December, 1999 


Clearing/Connecting House 
provides help for the disabled 



the management and staff at 


Baker Funeral CfiapeC Inc. 

5.102 • 50 Avenue. Wetasklwln. Alberto T9A OTI 


Marlyn Kaus Phone: 1780) 352-2501 

President Fax; (780) 352-8426 







also be contacted toll free at 1-888-661-0766. You can also fax your request to (306) 
47/*8894. 



Helping Aboriginal People Heal Themselves 


The Aboriginal Healing Foundation is accepting F unding Proposals for the 
February 25 and August 25, 2000 deadlines. Find out more: utile to us at 
Suite 801.75 Albert Street, Oaawa, Ontario, KIP 5E7. OrcallunoD-free: 1- 
888-725-8886. Visit the Aboriginal Healing Foundation website at 
www.ahf.ca 


• The Aboriginal Hexing Foundation was sa up in 1998 with hind* g from the 
Cowmmenr of Canada Wfc recctad i one-tune grant of (350 raJlioi to provide 
project findiag and to cower our expenses far op to 10 pare. TbeFoundUKois 
in independent, not torpiufit oiganuattoo. li is not a gowenunenl age ier. 

• The Abonpnal Healing Found*** - mbam is lo encourage tid support 
















































Alberta Native News December, 1999 


37 


Justice for All 


Urban Aboriginal people concerned 
with slow government response 


Noting that the Supreme 
Court decision on Corbiere 
takes effect in one year, Dennis 
Francis, President of the Na¬ 
tional Association of Friend¬ 
ship Centres (NAFCi stated 
that he is surprised by the fed¬ 
eral government's slow 
sponse in working towards i 
plementing the decision. 

The decision, which real 
firmed the right of First Na 



elections, was handed down on 
May 20, 1999. However, the 
Supreme Court suspended the 
decision’s effect for a period of 
eighteen months, to allow time 
for the government and First 
Nations groups to consult and 
develop an implementation 
process. 

“We believe that an imple¬ 
mentation plan for a decision 
of such scope can only be effec¬ 
tive if all those involved are 
consulted or, in fact, direct the 
consultations,” says Francis. 

"Yet six months have gone by with little apparent work on implementing Corbiere since May and h 
progress by the department." developed comprehensive consultation models I 

Mr. Francis stated that the NAFC has been ready to working with urban First Nations people. The nsi 


Attention Youth 18-24 Years 


ciation has also been partnering with the Assembly of 
First Nations (AFN> and the Native Women's Asso¬ 
ciation of Canada (NWAC) to discuss and refine strat¬ 
egies and positions. 

"Friendship Centres across this country—and there 
ore 116 in operation—have received calls from First 
Nations people who are clients or members of the 
centres regarding Corbiere’ commented Francis. 

their communities’ elections, and what the govern¬ 
ment is doing to assist the national Aboriginal organi¬ 
sations in implementing a smooth transition proc- 

Francis noted the frustration expressed by many 
First Nations people living in urban communities on 
the delay. "Many have kept close ties with their home 
communities and may wish to be active participants 
in governance issues—Corbiere provides n first stop 
in this process," ho added. 

The NAFC is a national Aboriginal organization 
which represents the interests of Aboriginal people 
living in an urban environment. Paul Lucerte, Execu¬ 
tive Director of the British Columbia Association of 
Aboriginal FrieiidshipCentrosiBCAAFC), commented 
that "...the NAFC represents the interests of Aborigi¬ 
nal people in obtaining services when they ore away 
from their home communities Friendship Centres 
are well positioned to assist with the implementation 
of Corbiere ” 


Seaton’s (/reefitte/s, front 

Hawkings Epp Dumont 
Chartered Accountants 


Fox; (7801 484-9689 

(780) 489-9606 

Suite 101, 17107 - 107 Av 


Fox: (7801 963-1294 

(780) 963-2727 

*101,5300 -50 St. 
Stony Plain, AS 
T7Z 1T8 


The Alternative Learning Program at Edmonton 
John Howard Society has a FREE drop-in 
program. Learn the Internet. Research careers 
on the computer. Create a personal portfolio. 
Call Sally at (780) 428-7590. ^ 

• EDMONTON Zf 


5013A -50 Avenue 
Wetaskiwin, AB 
T9AQS3 


Phone:(780)352-9221 
Cell: (780) 361-9383 
Fax: (780) 352-5185 


May the Great Spirit watch over 
our paths and guide our Journeys 
in the New \feetr, 
front 

KEE TAS KEE NOW 
POLICE SERVICE 

insisting of detachments from 

• Whitefish Lake First Nation 

• Woodland Cree First Nation 

• Loon River Cree First Nation 

For more information 
Phone (780) 767-2070 
Fax (780) 767-2069 

Kee Tas Kee Now Police Service, 
Whitefish Lake Detachment 
P. O. Box 180, Atikameg, AB TOG 0C0 


GRAND1N *•. W AGENCIES 


St. Albert, AB T8N IN3 
Representing 




11 >ska’s Insurance Agency 
.na l nig lobe llyska’s ’lYavrl 


Box 489, Churchill, MB ROB 0E0 

I. (204) 675-8829 Fax (204) 675-2258 


<u, heartfelt wishes fa, a hinted Cheisl, 




a, to all on 

William (Ml) J Warded, QC. 
•Donald'L. Worme 
•Ronnie ». Minent 
Helen ij. Stmaganis 
•Donna L. V,sedge, 
Ldu’ard Chandnn 
Mj/y L. ‘Radge,s 
Helen Colton (Student at law) 

WARD ELL, WORME & M 1SSENS 

Located at 

Suite 300, 203 Packham Ave. 
Saskatoon, SK S7N 4K5 
On tha Aslmakanlteekan Aakly Indian Rsaarvs 

Phone: (306) 956-3393 
Fax: 956-3012 



On beholt of all the R.C.M.P Members 
and Staff of - K # Divttan (Alberta) we pray 
that the Great Spirit gtide: you lornHes 
and communities into o joyful Christmas 
with you loved ones, and biases you 
with o Happy New Year 


FROM 

k THE COMMANONG OFFICER. 
R.CM P MEMBERS, 

AND STAFF 

OF X DIVISION (ALBERTA) 



Comma D. N. (Don) McObmio 












































38 


Alberta Native News December, 1999 


Focussing Our Resources 



Impala Auto Wrecking 

Quality parts For Domestic & Light Trucks 

WE BUY CARS AND TRUCKS FOR WRECKING 

“SAVE! — WHY BUY NEW WHEN USED WILL DO?“ 

Telephone: (780) 447-4696 

Fax: (780) 451-0480 1-877-447-3971 

11310 - 224 Street. Edmonton, Alberta T5S 2B6 


May the blessings of health and prosperity be with all First Nations 
this holiday season and throughout the new mlllenium. from 

Ainsworth Lumber Inc. 

proud to be: 

A part of the Alberta Forest Industry. 

Working with Aboriginal Communities. 

■W _ _ P.0. Bag 6700, Grande Prairie, A8 T8V 6Y9 

Amswartn rsssasr 

SUPPLY 

• SlSlUilLAiYT 

• Camping Supples • Camouflage Clothing 
• Arnty, Work 4 Combat Boots 

• Mdila/y Insigma. Capa, Pais 4 Dog Tags 

M ^ ^k • Nylon Paracbuta Covers • Knives 4 Svwvds 

■ % ^k ’Law Enforcement 4 EMT Accessories 

\ Competitive Prices 

1 ^ A^/1 (780) 444-1540 

1 Iky <«* f?80) 486-3422 

Iv* 1 WEST EDMONTON MALL. EDMONTON. AB 

,26 «6. Entranca •« Naai me Pataca Cas«> 


we hope this Christmas season 
will be a happy one for you and your family, 
and we wish you success, prosperity and 
good health in the new millennium 

>l^/T\QniobQ P.O.Box 815 

mum kuHm Winnipeg. Manitoba R3C 2P4 

rMfwro Phone (204) 474-3775 

www.hydro.mb.ca Fax (204) 474-4868 











































Alberta Native News December, 1999 

Award-winning 
documentary 
highlights eulachon 
conservation 


Nimpkish Wind Productions' latest documentary 
co-production with the National Film Board of Canada. 
Tlina: The Rendering of Wealth has earned excellent 
reviews on the festival circuit this fall. The film 
played to a sold-out house for its world premiere at the 
Vancouver International Film Festival in October, 
opened the IMAGeNATION Aboriginal Film & Video 
Festival in early November, and was recently hon¬ 
oured with the -Best Short Documentary Award” at 
the American Indian Film Festival in San Francisco 

This is the fourth time Nimpkish Wind’s filmmaking 
team has garnered a Best Documentary” award at 
AIFF in recent years. 

Written and directed by Barb Cranmer. tensed by 
Doug Sijoquist and edited by Bill Campbell, Tlina: 
The Rendering of Wealth offers a rare portrait of a 
traditional way of life that continues to give strength 
to the Kwakwaka'wakw people of British Columbia's 
northwest coast. Producers for Nimpkish Wind are 
Barb Cranmer and Cari Green, and producer for the 
National Film Board is Selwyn Jacob. 



Extensive dearcut logging that disturbs watershed 
habitats, and the wastage of eulachon in commercial 
fishery by-catches are pointed to as prime causes 
behind dwindling stocks Fisherman Stevie Beans 
voices his concern that, "The eulachon fishery is the 
only free fishery we have left, that we're not restricted 
on We don't want to lose the eulachon.” 

Cranmer's grandfather Arthur Dick emphasizes 
that, “You've got to be careful what you do in the river. 
The old people were very strict about it. They said wo 
belong to the river. Respect the river.” 


In the Kwakwala language t'linalpronounced gloet • 
na) is the name of the precious oil rendered from the 
tiny eulachon fish, harvested each spring at Drawadi. 
or Knight Inlet. This oil is a symbol of cultural wealth, 
a valuable trade item and important food staple for 
First Nations people. The giving away of tlina is of 
great significance to the potla 


7Kc*ruuC a 7te4» 'Ifcwt 

• Grooving Edmonton. Alberto 

1 Adb^l High Preu^ Nipplo* bvv (7IO) 43*1020 


Merry Christmas and 

Happy New Year 

ttCIIMTII-WM mUH^raiTD. 

Edmonton, Alberta 

Phone: (780) 944-0363 

Fax: (780) 426-6217 




COSY 

INSULATION LTD. 


Marry Chriilnui tad ■ Happy Nau Yur. 

Praia Itaai aad Staff al 

TTCKPAFT 

Jtfc. Specializing in: 

• NEW CONSTRUCTION ^ ‘- 

. renovations iiMHMhf 

INSULATION 4 UPGRADING 

(780)460-2433 

LA CRETE TIRE & BATTERY 

Complete Toe 6 Automotive Service 

Wheel Alignment.Exhausts*Brakes •Front End 

Roadside Tire Setvico • Batteries 6 Shocks 

Most major brands o( tires (passenger, buck 6 industrial) 
Ph.(780)928-3858 La Crete, AB Fax (780) 928-2907 




Wishing you peace, health aad happiness this 
joyous roatoa and throughout the yaar, from 2? 

i STANLEY PUMP SUPPLY ITD.|§ 
REPAIRS AND SALES £ 

§2 • Jet Pumps • Submersible Pumps 

&f • Sewage Pumps 

83i and much more 

9(780)453-5861 ammp 14606-115 Aval 
Q Fax (780) 452-3106 L«r»J Edmonton, AB 3 

PLAIZIER CONTAINER SERVICE 

COMPLETE LOADING A HAULING 

CONTAINER RENTAL SERVICE 

DEMOLITION. CLEAN UP, EXCAVATING 

OFFICE EDMONTON YARO 

(780) 484-5213 16805 128 Av* N.W. (780)447 1074 


Proud Partners with more than 2000 
fishers on over 400 Canadian lakes 
throughout Manitoba, Saskatchewan, 
Alberta, the Northwest Territories 
and Northwestern Ontario. 



1 » 

ii'' As 

u 


U/ishing gnu pence, health n 
this jegeut tens 


Pimee 

Well Sen icing Ltd. 


NATIVE OWNED ♦ NATIVE KUN 
^ Phone: (780) 826-6392 ^ j 


SAWMILL $4895. 


FREE 

INFORMATION 

Norwood Sawmills 
RR2 

Kilworthy, Ontario 
POE 1 GO 

1-800- 

661-7746 



Alberta Trappers’ Compensation Board 

< o P2.9919- lOOStTMt, WeaHoch. AOMrta T7P 2KI 



o> atari M can wity km 
























































40 


Alberta Native News December, 1999 




1 -800-632-2901 

If calling from Saskatchewan please call collect 


Call your local Aboriginal dealer now! 

We will get you driving your new vehicle today, 
these people did: 

Pete Watkahat, Tribal Venture*. Danny Bellrote, Driftpiie, Sandy Dion, Frog Lake; 
Suzanne Qulnney, Saddle Lake; Mr*. Singer, Frog Lake; M». Port*. Hobbema; 
Roland Laboucane, Fox Lake; Connie Anderson, Gift Lake; 

Clifford Frylngpan, Frog Lake; Rocky Wade, Frog Lake; Keith Fryingpan, Frog Lake; 
Mr*. McGlivery, Wabatt* Eddfy Kywahat, Edmonton; Terence Tallman, Slave Lake; 

George Brertton, Saddle Lake, Michael Waskahat, Frog Lake; 

Chrirtine Nahachick, Atikameg; Mary PoUkin, Sawridge; Shelley Cardinal. Frog Lake; 
john Gadwa. Kehewin; Jeff Bleu. ' ~ 



WESLEY BAND -fiTONEY TRIBE 

Post Olllce Box 149. Morley. Alberta TOL I NO 
Telephone 1403) 881-3949 Fax (403) 881-3901 


Wishing ell our Native customers and triends a Merry Christmas 

( HOME BUILDING CENTRE 
MEADOW LAKE 

For all your building supplies call us first. 


03 H 

. For an y 

Ao » 




802, 1st Avenue West, Meadow Lake, SK SOM 1V0 

Phono (306) 236-4467 


CanAmera 

Foods 


2190 South Service Rd. W. • Oakville, Ontario • Canada L6L 5N1 


Season's Greetings to the members of the Ermineskin, Louis Bull, 
Montana and Samson First Nations, tram the management and staff at 

Southside Convenience Centre 

R full Service Retail outlet and Convenience Store 




5526 - 37A Ave.. Wetaskiwin, AB jj 

(780) 352-5999 ! &.»»« 


Monihly Household Income Check One I 


1200 1500 1500-2000 Over 2000 


CUT HEATING COSTS 


-With The VALLEY COMFORT 
WOOD FURNACE: 


BASSETT 

PETROLEUM DISTRIBUTORS 


May yow heart* be ope* *1 (krlstaei 
»o that Re Circle of Lore aid Perce mtj grow. 
M»y yoe k*vc * pio&pcroei **d Milling flew Year 
BULK PETROLEUMS 

Serving the Communities 
of the South MacKenzie 


HEATING OIL 


Aviation Products - Diesel - Gas - Oil and Grease 

(867) 874-2562 Fax: (867) 874-2732 

43013 MacKenzie Highway 
HAY RIVER. N.W.T. X0E 0R0