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SALUTING GRADUATING STUDENTS OF 2001 


Volume 18 Number 6 
June, 2001 


XX9990 (U) 


ALBERTA 

^NATIVE: 

ItNEWSz 





















Alberta Native News June, 2( 


0 *flLBERTR 3 


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Volume 18, Number 6 June, 2001 

ISSN #08294135 


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Alberta Native News 

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Address, 



First Nations veterans deserve 
recognition and compensation 


In October 2000, a working group was created in 
Drder to address issues raised by First Nations veter- 
ms about the way they and their dependents were 
created during and after the Second World War and 
the Korean War. Last month a National Round Table 
produced a report of findings based on the establish¬ 
ment credits that were to be made available to return¬ 
ing First Nations veterans. A list of names of First 
Nations veterans as well as oral testimonies of First 
Nations veterans accompanied the report. It also 
chides recommendations to the federal government. 
I he members of the National Roundtable commit- 
consisted of: Grand Chief Howard Anderson, Chair 
| ° f the National Roundtable, Tony Cote, National 
Roundtable committee member, Larry Whiteduck 
(Assembly of First Nations), National Veterans Coor¬ 
dinator, Roberta Soo-Oyewaste (Federation of Sas¬ 
katchewan Indian Nations), and federal officials from 
the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern De¬ 
velopment (DIAND), Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) 
and the Department of National Defence (DND). This 
is the first time that there has been commitment from 
three federal ministers to deal with the injustices 
committed to First Nations veterans, a commitment 
that has been long overdue. The report of findings is 
a consensus document between all parties involved 
Many First Nations citizens enlisted in the Cana¬ 
da 11 Armed forces and participated in various con¬ 
flicts to fight racism and discrimination. When they 
returned from overseas they were quickly struck by 
the irony of the situation. They had fought alongside 
non-First Nations soldiers and were treated as equals 
in the heat of battle but when they landed on the 
shores of Canada, they were quickly relegated to 
second-class citizenship. The Canadian government 
was not willing to treat First Nations Soldiers as 
equals and give them the full recognition they so 
richly deserved. World War I and World War II First 
Nation veterans, for example, found that they did not 
receive similar benefits as Non First Nations veter¬ 
ans, even though they were legally entitled to much 
more valuable off-reserve farm loans, grants and 
educational funds and fee simple title to land. 

Our veterans are happy that the final report has 
been completed. It is unfortunate that we have lost 
many First Nation veterans during this process. We 
are hopeful that the next phase will result in a richly 
deserved recognition and compensation package that 
our World War I veterans,” stated Grand 
C/hief Howard Anderson. 

“Our veterans have waited longer than any other 
group of veterans to receive justice from the federal 



government. I can only hope that the government v 
act quickly to resolve this injustice. Our veterans < 
only asking for fair and equitable treatment. They 
not deserve to be treated like second-class citize 
any longer," stated National Chief Matthew Co 
Come. 

The report of findings entitled: “A Search for B 
Ulty: A Study of the Treatment Accorded to Fit 
Nations Veterans and Dependents of the Seco 
World War and the Korean Conflict” has now be 
ratified by its committee members. 

“Finally after three years, we are getting close 
completing this process. This report is critical as 
provides evidence that legitimizes our veterans’ claii 
that they were not treated with the same respect 
other veterans or that our people did not receive ti 
same compensation for serving their country. Nc 
that the report is complete there is a sense of urgen 
to achieve a final compensation and recognition pac 
age for our First Nation veterans as many of them a 
passing away at an alarming rate,” stated AFN Vic 
Chief Perry Bellegarde. 


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0 e, 2001 Alberta Native News 

i National Aboriginal Day 
| takes place June 21 

by John Copley 

I is National Aboriginal Day. And true to its mandate, the special day of 
n, designed to promote the rich cultural diversity of Canada’s Native 
is, is indeed a day to celebrate. It didn’t happen overnight, thus all the 
on to appreciate the significance of its design. First launched in 1996, 
Aboriginal Day actually got its start a long time before that. In fact, it 
n 1982 when the National Indian Brotherhood (NIB), now known as the 
of First Nations (AFN), first introduced the idea via a national 
to secure a special day of recognition for Canada’s Indigenous peoples, 
e the NIB’s plan was to incorporate June 21, the first day of the summer 
!tice, as National Aboriginal Solidarity Day. 

hirteen years later the idea for a special day of recognition surfaced again, this 
e with the backing of many organizations and government bodies now in 
)ur of promoting the concept. In 1995, participants of the Sacred Assembly, a 
ional meeting of peoples held in Hull, Quebec and organized by MP Elijah 
rper, called once again for a national day that would recognize the contribu- 
idofCanada’s Indigenous peoples. One year later Aboriginal Day was launched 
DSS the country via a special ceremony hosted by Canada’s then Governor 
leral, Romeo LeBlanc. 

he June 21 date was chosen because the summer solstice, the longest day of the 
r, is a day on which many generations of Aboriginal peoples have traditionally 
■brated their heritage and culture. Every Canadian is encouraged to partici- 
einNational Aboriginal Day by honouring and recognizingboth the significant 
tributions that Aboriginal people have made to Canada’s growth, and by 
ireciating and recognizing the Aboriginal community for what it is, a rich and 
turally diverse society that is moving quickly forward in its quest for self- 
ermination via self-sufficiency. 

rational Aboriginal Day is designed to represent the achievements and history 
11 Aboriginal peoples in Canada. Indian Affairs describes the word ‘Aboriginal’ 
>eople who are “the descendants of the original inhabitants of Canada.” In other 
■ds, all three recognized Native groups within the Canadian Constitution, First 
tions (formerly called Indians), -Metis and Inuit fall under the general term, 
uiginal. “Although these groups have much in common,” says DIAND, “they 
separate peoples with unique heritages, languages, cultural practices, and 
ritual” beliefs. 

)ver 25,000 people participated across the country last year and this year’s 
ivities are guaranteed to provide fun for the whole family, 
it 9:00 a.m. July 21 in Edmonton, events will kick off at Canada Place 
vntown where over 4,000 people are expected to gather. Exhibits will be on 
play until 3:00 p.m. and children’s activities will run from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The 
in stage will be featured from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. and a highlight of the 
emoon will be a performance by Susan Aglugark. 



Activities will also run in the afternoon and evening at Borden Park, which will 
include traditional games, races, a canine demonstration by the Edmonton police, 
Elders’ storytelling and a Metis exhibit of artifacts. The Borden Park activities 
will also include a concert and an attempt to set the world’s record for the largest 
round dance. The park is located at 112 Avenue and 73 Street. 

In Regina, National Aboriginal Day festivities will be held at Wascana Park. In 
Saskatoon they will be located in Kiwanis Park and in Winnipeg they will once 
again be held at the Forks site. For a complete listing of National Aboriginal Day 
activities coast to coast, log onto the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs 
Canada website at www.ainc-inac.gc.ca. 



NATIONAL ABORIGINAL DAY, JUNE 21 

Share in the celebration! 


Canada 


www.ainc-inac.gc.ca 














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entangled in controversy 



i 

Sr.'tSSTSKSSSE 

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said Oxenford, “was made only after 


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are*aituml)e™of other appro^als^smd 


public processes required first.” 




Lewis rendered his decision to overturn tte injunction. Oxenford, ’ " ' 


















































































Alberta Native News June, 200] 


Tax case relies on 


by John Copley 

A precedent setting trial taking place before the 
Federal Court of Canada in an Edmonton, Alberta, 
courtroom provides the scene; a group of northern 
Alberta First Nations determined to see government 
live up to promises made during treaty negotiations 
at the turn of the 20 Century provide the case; the 
testimony of several Native Elders, well versed in the 
traditions, customs and histories of their people, pro¬ 
vides the controversy that last week threw a wrench 

ants in the case have to pay federal taxes. 

When Treaty 8 was signed in 1899 between govern¬ 
ment and the Chiefs of the Dene, Beaver, Slave, 

Northern Cree and Chipweyan Nations, the Treaty 
Commissioner at the time, David Laird, noted in his 
remarks to the Crown that tax exemption was a 

written on the treaty agreement itself. Thus, the Q CHRIST0PHER.HARVEY.CHAMBAUD.200O.RETURN OF the BUFFALO. 


expert testimony 
of Elders 



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reason for the trial in the first place. The court, relying 
on whatever written documentation they can gen 
their hands on, is also calling on historians and) 
Native Elders to help comprehend the interpretation I 
of the early treaty. 

V Any hope that the words of the N ative Elders called I 
to testify would be given the same credibility by all of' 
the court’s officials as that given to expert witnesses 
such as educated historians, was quickly dashed 
when federal Crown lawyer Bonnie Moon, questioned 
the necessity ofthe testimony by one of the Aboriginal 
Elders called by defense attorney Karin Buss. The 
trial was delayed for more that two hours as both sides 
debated and Sucker Creek First Nation Elder, Francis 
Willier, 72, waited. 

Federal Court Justice Douglas Campbell finally 
gave the patient Mr. Willier his chance to take the 
witness stand, but not before the court argued, among 
a variety of other issues, about the type of testimony 

The quality of an interpreter’s work in relaying the 
words of Francis Willier’s 95 year old uncle, Joe 
Willier, several weeks ago was another key issue 
brought to the attention of the court. In fact, questions 
over the accuracy of the interpretation has led the 
court to consider whether or not to use a translation 
of his testimony rather than the words of the inter- 

Francis Willier said the federal government’s case 
was ill-prepared and that “these (Crown) lawyers, 
have a lot to learn. “ He told media that the court 
should have had the sense to choose an interpreter 
who spoke the same dialect as his uncle. 

“They’re trying to undermine everything,” he said. 
“They try to get you confused, asking questions back¬ 
wards and forwards, just like stirring tea, first this 
way then back the other.” 

Despite all the controversy over words and inter¬ 
pretations and language barriers, this case, which isj 
expected to continue until end of July, will eventually 
be determined by the relevance that Justice Campbell 
puts in the testimony of the Elders and the historians 
who come before him. 

The stories, traditions, customs and unique skills of 
Aboriginal people all across North America are de¬ 
pendent on the knowledge and the wisdom of the 
Elders in the community, because it is their job to 
teach the young and to encourage them not to lose 
their culture, not to give up their language, not to 
forget their customs. 

To this end, it is only fitting that Judge Douglas 
Campbell consider the testimony of the Elders who 
are called to testify in the precedent setting case, 
expert testimony. 


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June, 2001 Alberta Native News 


Gov’t continues 

+ ' + + 

to ignore water 


contamination 


concerns 

by Brian Savage 


A recent Health Canada survey has found 79 com- 
ounities at risk over contaminants in their drinking 
irater. Of these, two-thirds had fecal coliform and 
ight had trihalomethane readings, a chemical which 
s used in chlorination but on its own is a carcinogen. 


This survey, conducted by telephone, follows a more 
omprehensive 1995 health survey that found 171 


; Jative communities faced tainted water supplies. 

The severity of the situation in Saskatchewan was 
ecently revealed in a leaked report conducted by the 
irovincial Water Corporation and the Departments 

CHRISTOPHER,HAKVEY.CHAfIBAUQ ^ 

if the Environment and Health. One hundred twenty 
me communities had inadequate water treatment - 
J B3 had none at all and “many municipalities” were not 



ssssssss 


^ssm 



properly monitoring their water supply. 

“The safety and security of Saskatchewan’s drink¬ 
ing water supply is threatened and the potential for a 
Walkerton-type situation exists,” says the report, 
—which also warned that the different branches of 
'government failed to communicate with each other, 
(delaying decisions and “subjecting the public to un¬ 
necessary risks.” 

The report, which included a warning by the Justice 
department that Walkerton-type situations could 
exist with potential lawsuits, was kept confidential 
for eight months until the oppos 
party received a copy. 

_ The response from the government was that the 
document was merely a draft copy and not the official 

FSIN vice-chief Laurence Joseph expressed resent¬ 
ment and frustration that the government is not 
reacting to the situation. When asked if the govern¬ 
ment had responded with any initiatives to the con¬ 
cerns of Natives about water safety in 1995 Joseph 
replied, “absolutely nothing.” 



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June, 2001 Alberta Native News 

Ottawa says lawsuits from 
former residential school 
students a priority 


e its efforts to 


by John Copley 

At the beginning of June the federal government began to incres 
resolve what has become a potential national treasury nightmare, tne lawsuits oi 
thousands of former residential school students victimized by an ignorant govern¬ 
ment and the misguided, self-righteous group of religious organizations they 
chose as overseers of the young children they nonchalantly plucked from their 
homes and dispersed like cattle simply because they were of Aboriginal ancestry. 

“I am now in the position to begin formal discussions with the churches with a view 
to reaching an agreement with them,” remarked Deputy Prime Minister Herb 

( Gray, in a recent interview with Southam Press, nearly a year after Prime 
Minister Jean Chretien gave him the job of addressing the churches and the 
critical issues facing them in Canada today. Both the Anglican and United 
Churches have been soliciting government’s help for the past several years, but 
now that the courts are beginning to order restitution for the victims ofthe crudely 
and cruelly-run institutions, they are literally banging at the door in an effort to 
get government’s moral and financial support. 

The Roman Catholic Church was also involved in a major way with the day to 
1 day administration ofthe old residential schools. They have more money than the 
i other churches but they too are seeking government help and holding closed door 
_. meetings with Gray and other religious organizations as they try to figure out the 
[ i best way to deal with the problems they are about to face as a consequence for the 
■ i inappropriate actions ofthe members of their residential school staff and clergy 
' they failed to control, or hold accountable when acts of atrocity were reported to 

Gray wouldn’t commit to how much money the government would be willing to 
1 contribute to help the churches cope with the onslaught of lawsuits but he did say 
that the discussion had come up. 

Gerry Kelly, the coordinator for a Catholic task group on Indian residential 
- | schools told media the meeting with government was seen as a step in the right 
direction. 

“There’s been a long period of dialogue,” he said, “and we have reached a greater 
level of common understanding. Our hope is that this will allow a better process 
for victims to have their claims heard.” 

Not too many claims against the churches have yet been heard, at least not in 
a courtroom, facing a jury of their peers. Instead, cash settlements have been the 
order of the day. So far government has paid out about $27 million, not including 
the $350,000,000 they have set aside for the Aboriginal Healing Fund. 

But some Canadians think the churches should be left off the hook and others 
' fail to recognize, or at least report, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. 

Political columnist for the Montreal Gazette Brian Kappler is advocating 
punishment for government and absolution for the churches. He says “Gray needs 
to convince cabinet that these suits should be handled by government alone,” and 
that residential schools were nothing more than “an extension of government 
policy, at a time when government didn’t have the enormous manpower and vast 
bankroll that are available to it now.” 

Southam news correspondent Rick Mofina, says “after they were phased out in 
the 1960s, stories of physical and sexual abuse in the schools began emerging.” 

Nothing could be further from reality than those two statements. 

■ The church, regardless of faith or belief, did have the money, they had 
manpower, and we have to assume because of the high moral ground they claim 
to walk on, they had the intelligence not to abuse children by beating, raping, 
threatening, starving and demoralizing them by making them eat their own vomit 
and stand for hours in a comer with their hands held above their head because 
they dared to speak their own language. 

A little checking will prove that the National Indian Brotherhood (AFN) called 
on government in 1972 to turn control of the school facilities and programs over 
to Native people. 

The last residential schools in Canada didn’t actually close their doors until the 
early 1980s and in 1993 there were still seven in operation, though they were 
administered by First Nations bands. 

Gray is currently meeting with the various churches involved, Catholic, Angli¬ 
can, United and Presbyterian, to “discuss parameters or a format for formal 
discussions.” 



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10 


Alberta Native News June, 2001 


Metis leaders 
re-elect 
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.'■■.Y.Y.V, 















































Residential school cases may 
bankrupt Anglican Church 





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12 
















































June, 2001 Alberta Native News 


13 


Saluting Native Grads 













































































































































*June, 2001 Alberta Native News 

Summer camp for youth 
travels to rural locations 


by John Copley 


is fun t 


! well spent with the Sherwood Park, 


“The Robcan Group provides children and youth who live in rural communities 
the opportunity to go to summer camp,” explained founding partners Brenda and 
Len Robinson. “Our summer camps are different than most because we bring our 
camps to the community. We offer a series of structured programs, or we can 
(develop one to meet the specific needs of an individual community or group. Our 
programs provide an abundance of fun activities, but everything we do promotes 

' respect, responsibility, trust, fairness and caring. Our program” 1 - 1 —” 

developed by- r —•'—' ’ ’ " ' ”' * 


il educators and they are delivered by experienced 


15 

themselves and others.” 

Youth, she added, will be reminded “throughout the program that drugs and 
alcohol destroy healthy minds and bodies and inhibit their ability to excel at sports 
and other lifelong activities.” Sporting activities such as volleyball, baseball, 
soccer, dodge ball, hiking and indoor sports may also be included in the program 
as will activities that include treasure hunts and AIDS risk awareness games. 

The Back to Nature program is another example of Robcan’s ability to mix 
innovative thinking with practical action. In this program kids create and learn 
more about nature and the environment. The program is designed to develop 
responsibility and respect for self and others; the emphasis of the program is 
nature, and it will be demonstrated through the use of hikes, scavenger hunts, 
crafts, nature photography and more. Elders are invited and encouraged to 
participate and assist the youth with traditional ideas and practices. Individual 
and team skills are developed through play and recreation activities. 

For more information about the exciting summer camp programs offered by the 
Robcan Group contact Brenda or Len Robinson at (780) 467-4112 or fax (780) 464- 
1876. Email inquiries can be directed to robcan@telusplanet.net. 


.facilitators/programmers accompanied by a youth worker-in-training. Through 
.group and individual activities, games, crafts and other projects, participating 
youth will focus on self-esteem, self-confidence, responsibility and teamwork. 
During these fun activities youth will write resumes, learn how to manage money, 


understand the concepts ar 


is of setting and meeting goals and much 


Sending kids off to summer camp can be \ 
structure offered by the Robcan Group, ho' 
family-pays-the-bills-for camp philosophy. 

“Instead,” explained Brenda Robinson, “there is one set fee for the camp and 
therefore it’s ‘the more the merrier!’ We encourage band managers, chiefs and 
councils, youth workers and others involved in the decision making process, as it 
relates to children and youth activities, to contact us for a full rundown of activities 
— and to learn how their community can participate in one of our exciting and 
r fulfilling programs. 

! “A lack of money often prevents families from being able to send their children 
i tosummercamp,”Brendacontinued.“That’soneofthereasonstheRobcanGroup 
was formed. Money, or the lack of it, shouldn’t prevent a child from experiencing 
the joy of participating and it shouldn’t deprive him or her of the great memories 
that go along with having a good time. We’d like every young person to 
iparticipate.” 

Because of the size of the staff and the complexity of the programs, numbers for 
each camp are limited to 25 persons, but the Robcan Group has three teams, so 
■ _ more than one session can be booked - if you do it early enough. That’s because 
in order to get the camp on the weeks you want them, you have to book them before 
someone else does. 

Brenda Robinson is an experienced and qualified educator who’s spent more 
than 20 years in the classroom teaching students. She believes in using trained 
personnel and as a result, all of the Robcan Group’s facilitators bring something 
special to the camp. 

“Our facilitators have a wonderful combination of abilities and knowledge,” she 
assured. “Their range of experience includes coaching, early childhood education, 
4H, Girl Guides, team sports, leisure activity programming, arts and crafts and 
more. Of course, the age difference between children and youth doesn’t allow them 
1 to participate fairly in the same programs together, so to compensate for that we 
, offer camps for both age groups.” 

The youth camps are more complex and more involved than those organized for 
children, but both have been developed to encourage, to teach and to allow 
participants to explore themselves and the world around them through programs 
and projects that they can identify with and have fun with. 

“Participants will be involved in a positive, fun program which will challenge 
them, keep them busy and build their strengths and interest in community 
involvement,” explained Brenda Robinson, talking about the overall goals of the 
program. “Development of self-esteem is a priority in all of our programs and each 
program offers a multi-generational framework to enhance youth involvement 
with all others in the community. Elders, community leaders, community mem- 
bers and families will be encouraged to participate in some of the activities.” 

The Robcan Group’s structured summer camp programs offer more than a half 
dozen themes, each with a specific goal in mind. For example, Flying Highfocuses 
on fun without drugs or alcohol. “The theme flight’ encourages confidence and 
self-esteem,” explained Robinson, “and helps to create a positive outlook for the 
youth involved. Kites, airplanes and model rockets will be made and flown, each 
helping to develop not only specific skills, but also responsibility and respect for 


Give your children and youth the gift of 
a fun and meaningful summer.., 

The youth in your community will; 

• Build confidence and self-esteem 

• Create a positive outlook 

• Develop responsibility and respect 

• Enjoy learning with others 

• Work and play in teams 

• Develop leadership skills 

The Robcan Group has extensive 
experience in providing summer youth 
programs in Aboriginal communities for children 6 - IByears. 

Each Robcan program includes: 

✓ 2 facilitators ✓ training costs ✓materials ✓snacks 

✓ supplies ✓ travel costs ✓ prizes ✓ participation certificates 

To schedule a program in your community contact 
Brenda or Len Robinson at The Robcan Group 
31 Meridian Road, Sherwood Park, AB TBA O N5 
Tel. (780) 467-4112 • Fax. (780) 464-1876 
E-mail: robcan@telusplanet.net 



A Northern 
Z V\ Lakes 
1 A Colli 


f College 
Your future begins here! 

Thinking of upgrading your education? 
Now is the time to take another look at 
Northern Lakes College. We have a new 
name and renewed mission of helping 
people further their education and improve 


I For years, we’ve been Northern Alberta's 
I centre for learning. Now we are offering 
an even greater range of programs for 
I students right out of high school or those 
I coming from the work force—academic 
I upgrading, career programs such as 
power engineering and practical nursing, 
I and university transfer programs—right 
I in your community! 


fteenow 


'' Employment & Training Society 


“Preparing First Nations People for EmploymentTomorrow..." 

The Board and Staff of 
Oteenow Employment & Training Society 
would like to wish all powwow participants 
a safe journey along the powwow trail 

At the Oteenow Employment & Training Society, we focus on skill 
development and employment; the provision of quality, employment 
assisted services (through ACCESS and ACES 2000); the formation of 
partnerships; and strengthened accountability with community 
involvement. Our goal is to assist urban First Nation's people to become 
self-reliant and lead productive lives. 

Oteenow Employment & Training Society* 

Suite 202,10470 -176 Street 
Edmonton, Alberta T5S 1L3 


Access Employment Centre 
(A Division of Oteenow 
Employment 
& Training Society) 

11205 -107 Avenue 
Edmonton, Alberta T5H 0Y2 
Phone: (780)423-2340 
Fax: (780) 421-4760 
www.accessemployment.org 


* Federally funded through Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC) 


ACES 2000 

(In partnership with 

Metis Nation of Alberta) 

3rd Floor, 

12308- 111 Avenue 
Edmonton, Alberta T5M 2N4 
Phone: (780) 423-2237 
Fax: (780) 482-2834 























Fetal Alcohol Syndrome 
on the rise but funding 


remains at a minimum 

by John Copley 



Alberta Native News June, 2001 


Right now, says Ritchie, “the average FAS and FAE individual costs the 
taxpayer about $3 million (Canadian fluids) in his or her lifetime. The govern 

-*"*al $11 million FAS funding is less than the direct cost to the taxpaye, 

4. -c — ■*"" - Te currently 


of four FAS children. Conservatively, 11 children out of every 100 
being bom to mothers who drank alcohol while they were pregnant. All will have 
varying degrees of effects. Health problems, special education, psychotherapy 
counselling, welfare, crime, jails, lawyers - the costs of not dealing with the 
problem are phenomenal," he reiterated. “And of course, no one suffers as much 
as the child bom with FAS. 

“Symptoms vary but the harsh facts for FAS individuals are just that, harsh . 
ADHD, ADD, impulsiveness, inability to predict consequences, difficulty under a 
standing abstract concepts or social cues, tremors, asthma, cerebral palsy, 4 
autistic traits, Tourette’s traits, night-terrors, depression, mental retardation “ 
deafness, epilepsy, sleep disorder, heart defects, dyslexia, behavioural problems 
these are just some of the negatives that face FAS children as they grow. The 
systems in the child that are most affected are those that were developing when 
the mother was drinking. There is no safe level of alcohol consumption during >[ 
pregnancy. FAS children become FAS adults and many will be permanently H 
dependent on their families. The costs to the families and the individuals can be S 
far higher than the cost to the taxpayer.” 

FAS has an extremely adverse affect on the central nervous system, creating 
various degrees of brain damage, slow growth patterns that include below-normal 
weight and height and smaller than normal head circumference. Facial character 
istics such as a short opening between eye lids and flattened vertical grooves 
between the nose and upper lip are other signs of FAS. Unusual or abnormal 
physical features are generally more pronounced in infancy and early childhood . 
but only a small percent of those affected by FAS show physical signs severe 1 
enough to recognize. 

FAS/E is a lifetime disability. It is not curable. A child does not ‘grow out of it. 
However, early diagnosis and intensive, and appropriate intervention can make 
an enormous difference in the prognosis for the child, explains Ritchie. “There 
a small window of opportunity, up to about age ten or 12, to achieve the greater 
Continued on page 1 


One of the most lamentable of North America’s medically diagnosable condi¬ 
tions is FAS, the abbreviated form for Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, a completely 
preventable condition that describes a set of birth defects seen in children whose 
mothers consumed alcohol during their pregnancy. “Completely preventable, but 
tragically, not curable for children who are diagnosed with the syndrome,” 
explained Deborah Landry, Project Manager for the Alberta Partnership on FAS, 
a provincial program operated through the Ministry of Children’s Services. “The 
only cure is prevention, and that means staying away from alcohol during 
pregnancy. A child with FAS becomes an adult with FAS, the damage is irrevers¬ 
ible.” Prenatal exposure to alcohol, explained Landry, “is one of the leading causes 
of preventable birth defects and developmental delay in children in Canada and 
~ie of the top three known causes of mental retardation; along with Spina Bifida 


id Down Syndrome.” 

FAS was identified as a medical condition in 1973, and even though a great deal 
of research has been completed, and awareness information from that research 
distributed, so far no medical or scientific data has been able to confirm a safe level 
of alcohol for a woman to consume while pregnant. Experts say the safest thing 
for women, and the only way to guarantee protection against FAS, is not to 
consume any alcohol during pregnancy. 

According to research documents FAS is considered to be at “the extreme end of 
n of observable effects.” In other words, FAS is the worst possible 


a continuu ----- F „ rallJ 

scenario for children of women who drink alcohol while pregnant. There aic, 
however, a great many more children who have been affected by alcohol-related 
birth defects than the numbers of FAS cases reflect, and even though they may not 
all show the characteristics of FAS, the neurological damage, depending on the 
severity, can have an affect on the way these children learn, grow and reason. 
People affected with these less serious FAS-related tendencies are known as 
having FAE (Fetal Alcohol Effects). 

FAS is not a cultural disease, it is not inherited, it is not contagious, it does not 
favour one nationality over another. FAS is a world-wide problem that continues 
to m agnify, noticeably so in Canada, say some experts, who point the finger at poor 
funding from Ottawa as the reason for FAS’s continued growth rate. 

Bruce Ritchie is the Executive Director of the Bright’s Grove, Ontario-based, 
TRIUMF Project (Teaching & Research for the Identification, Understanding & 
Management of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome) and head of FASlink, Canada’s largest 
FAS-related help agency. FASlink provides a free internet discussion forum for 
individuals, families and professionals who deal with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and 
maintains the largest archive of FAS information in the world. FASLink serves 
parents (birth, foster and adoptive), caregivers, adults with FAS, doctors, teach¬ 
ers, social workers, law students and government policy makers, etc. He says 
Ottawa needs to “realize the magnitude of the problem and begin to deal with it 


“Allan ^lock recently announced an $11 million input into FAS programs in 
Canada,” Ritchie told Alberta Native News in a recent interview, “but I’d sure like 
to know where it went and how it was disbursed. When we applied for some of the 
funding we discovered that the money was goingto short-term projects only. What 
good is that when FAS is a long-term problem? FASlink is Canada’s national FAS 
communications network ar J 1 — A1 --’- x * *• • - 


m FAS yet has been denied the vital funding. Because we have long term goals 
we didnt qualify for a dime. We, and a few others like us, are doing all the 
groundwork and most of the research, but without proper funding. FASlink is 
privately funded and serves more than 150,000visitors per year to the website and 
an estimated more than one million queries per year on the FASlink Archives ” 
„. Rltchi ? criticized government for spending “only $11 million,” a figure he called 
insignificant when you consider that FAS and the problems related to it costs 
Canadians about $6 billion a year.” He says government “is in massive denial” 
when it comes to the reality of FAS, and warns that “if government keeps turning 
the Other way and pretending the problems don’t exist, the costs they are afraid 
to face today, will only multiply tenfold in a few more years.” 


FETAL 

ALCOHOL 

SYNDROME 


It’s 100% preventable. 



There are few things more heartbreaking than 
the limitations put on children with Fetal Alcohol 
Syndrome, even before they’re bom. FAS is a 
disability that lasts a lifetime. 


The fa 


3 that all fetat alcohol damage can be 
prevented if a woman drinks no alcohol during 
pregnancy. Friends and family can be a big help. 
So if you know someone who is pregnant, 
support her in her decision not to drink during 
this important time. 


When you’re pregnant, 
NO alcohol is best. 


For information on 

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome call 

1 - 800 - 559-4514 
















Lne, 2001 Alberta Native News 


17 


Fetal Alcohol 
Syndrome, 

Continued from page 16 



Congratulatione to our new Grade: 
Colin Bear - Ochapowace 
Kirby Bear - Ochapowace 
Nina Cheriyan 
Alicia Delorme - Cowessess 
Ella Delorme - Cowessess 
Ityan Isaac - Sakimay 
Randi Lerat - Cowessess 
Brandon Pelletier - Cowessess 
Jamie Pelletier - Cowessess 
Cory Redwood - Cowessess 
Geneen Sparvier - Cowessess 
Terrilee Sparvier - Cowessess 
Tricia Sparvier - Kahk 

We are proud of your 
accompluibment.il 

5 Chief Pat Sparvier, 

* Council 
& Membership of 





The courts don’t understand because government, 
even though they’re finally beginning to hear the 
voices of their constituents, also don't really under¬ 
stand or they would be doing more. 


• Professional Rehabilitiative 

,he Prosthetics 

• Free consultations 

• Custom limbs 

& Orthotics 

• Custom insoles 

HI! Company 

• Best quality and tit 

Inc. 

C ^TAN WLODARCZYK 

E#mcn t on S ABT6A3N2 

(780)448-1281 


The Staff at 

Ta-Otha Community School 
■would like to take this 
opportunity to salute 
all Grads of the 
Stoney Nakoda Nation 


Ta-Otha School 
P.O. Box 39 

Nordegg, Alberta TOM 2H0 
Phone: 403-721-3989 Fax: 403-721-2174 
E-mail: ta_otha@hotmail.com 
Contact: Butch French 



Cowessess 
First Nation #73 


■3K2* 


Box 100, Cowessess, SK SOG 5L0 
(306) 696-2520 Fax: (306) 696-2767 


Phone (780) 799-5725 -Fax (780)79 
Fort McMurray, Alberta T9H 11 

— ----- - 


































































18 


Alberta Native News June, 2( 


Celebrate the Powwow 


The powwow, for 
first time visitors 



Each year, young and old take up the path of the 
Elders, honouring the old ways and breathing new life 
into ancient rhythms. May you draw strength and unity 
from your journey along the powwow trail. 

From the 

Fort McKay First Nation 

and the 



Fort McKay 
Group of 
Companies 


(780)828-4216 
Fax: (780) 828-4393 
Box 5360, Fort McMurray, Alberta T9H 3G4 


Check this newspaper for a list of powwot 


Qood luck to all the 
participants and have 
a safe journey as you 
travel the powwow trail! 


Devonshire Realty Inc. 

HAROLD BURDEN 

Bus: (780) 438-2500 

Fax: (780) 463-7857 
E-mail: haroldburden@hotmail.com 
11058 - 51 Ave., Edmonton, AB T6H 0L4 
Each Office Independently Owned and Operated 





W R l E M N t T N 0 D J 1 


We encourage and support 
all powwow visitors 
and participants... 
this tradition helps to ensure 
the survival of our culture, 

from Chief, Council 


Community Members of Cree Nation of Wemindji 



ALBERTA 

CARE-A-CHILD 

10637- 124 St., 
Edmonton. AB T5N 1S3 
Phone: (780)944-1233 
Fox: (780)944-1663 


FOSTER PARENTS REQUIRED WHO 
ARE WILLING TO BECOME 
SPECIALIZED FOR NATIVE 
CHILDREN. 

Alberta Care-A-Child is seeking homes to meet 
cultural and specific needs for Aboriginal children 
Successful families will provide an environmenl 
that promotes cultural identity with a professional 
and respectful approach. Foster families wi[ 
receive Aboriginal support and resourc 
hour foster support from qualified agency 
personnel, ongoing training and finane 
compensation. 

For more information contact either: 

Brenda Gladue or Deborah at 780-944-1233 

during regular business hours. 














































June, 2001 Alberta Native News 

Edmonton Folk Music 
Festival a true gem 

The City of Edmonton has many wonderful services and activities that it offers 
„s residents and visitors and the Edmonton Folk Music Festival held each 
summer at Gallagher Park is definitely one of the city’s finest events. The festival 
1 brings together a host of talented musicians from around the world and showcases 
their eclectic backgrounds in the natural amphitheatre formed by the hill at 
Gallagher Park. 

For over twenty years the Edmonton Folk Fest has delivered a weekend full of 
inder to thousands of music fans and this year will undoubtedly prove to be one 
of the best festivals ever. 

~ " " August 9 -12 Folk Festival 2001 is a terrific blend of old- 

rs, world and folk, Celtic and reggae that is sure to please 
folkies with a wide range of musical tastes. Headliners include Dennis Lakusta, 
Richie Havens, Black Umfolosi, Cindy Church, Cowboy Junkies, Great Big Sea, 
The Holmes Brothers, Baaba Maal featuring Daande Lenol, Natalie McMaster, 
Maria Muldaur, Puentes Brothers, The Duke Robillard Band and Toots and the 
Maytals, and many, many more. 

The Edmonton Folk Music Festival has come a long way since its inception in 
980. In fact, it’s now one of the largest festivals of its kind anywhere in North 

“The success of the festival,” say organizers, “is based on the energy and 
ommitment of hundreds of volunteers who, collectively, contribute thousands of 
hours of time each year, planning, managing and delivering a festival described 
by others as among the top three of its kind in the world. Almost 90 percent of the 
tasks are completed by volunteers. The festival now has a $1.8 million budget and 
1500 volunteers on 37 crews." 

The Edmonton Folk Music Festival is a not-for-profit society with an elected 
nine-person board responsible for setting operating policy and hiring the pro¬ 
ducer, Mr. Terry Wickham. He is the one who manages operations and all staff 
(currently one full-time and two part-time plus seasonal staff). 

With so much talent to choose from and so many great entertainers who have 
dready made a name for themselves at the folk festival, it’s a difficult job trying 
o finalize the list of entertainers. And the job starts just a few weeks after the 
'current year’s festival winds up. 

it “Starting in September,” explains Wickham, “I review the festival just past. 

1 What were the weak areas that we should improve for next year? Who are the 
“dream performers” who still haven’t appeared on our stage yet? Who, from 
, previous years, should we ask back? After 21 years, our festival is very connected 
i in the folk music world. I have contacts all over the world that I check with for 
ideas: other festivals, music media, record companies, performers, friends, pa¬ 
trons. I keep an open mind for suggestions of performers that might add to the 
msical experience of our audience. " . .. 





July 10,2001* 6:00 to 11:00 p.m. 
Chautaugua Tent, 
Heritage Park, Calgary, AB 
Phone 403-237-0755 for tickets 



Looking for contestants who wish to run for 

'Miss ‘Indian Canada 2001 
Canadian Tfationaf Competition Tow-wow 
(August 7, 8 & 1 9,2001 at (garrison ‘danger; Tfamaio, ‘A‘B 
Open to affTirst 'datums women across Canada ofi8 - 24 years of age 
Tor more information contact Corrine or Vicki 
at (780) 645-4288 or (780) 481-3363 or visit our website at 
www.sierraventures.ab.ca/MissJndianCanada 
e-maif: trichiefPtefuspfanet.net 
Ajopfication ‘Deadfine isjufy 6,2001 



















20 


Alberta Native News June, 200] 


GRAND »t 

HOTEL 

» Free Full Breakfast 
A Complete Modem Hotel Facilities 
* Daily - Weekly - Rates 

► 76 Comfortable Guest Rooms with Colour TV’s 

► Conveniently located downtown near 
Greyhound Depot and Eaton Centre 

► Cafe & Sports Tavern with VLTs panaw 

► Liquor Store 420-0266 I - 

EH (780) 422-6365 

Toll Free 1 -888-422-6365 Fax (780) 425-9070 
10266 -103 St., Edmonton, AB f 



HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTRE 

11727 Kingsway, Edmonton, AB (780) 452-7770 


then homilies 01 id leaetuns 

e-mail: info@chateaulouis.com 



pkqsc recycle this .paper 


Congratulations to oil Class of 2001 graduates, 
from the management and staff at 

\ MOTOR INN 


Hythe 


ntxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx^ 


24 MODERN GUEST ROOMS 

- ncoTnO KANT • PUB 

• CABLE TELEVISION 

• AIR CONDITIONING ImSI 

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( 780 ) 356-2151 §□ 

FAX (780) 356-2157 
BOX 478, HYTHE, AB TOH 2C0 


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<We are proud 

our 'Elders. 

Your wisdom 
has helped us 

language, 
culture and 
traditions. 

You have 
protected 
our heritage 

spirit could 
jfourish. 

( \Ve wish you many more years 
of health and happiness 

A message Jrom the 

)><N<<(uiTtm tmiruK 

Box 570 

Hay River, NWT X03 0R0 
Tel. (867)874-8480 
Fax. (867) 874-3867 



Congratulations to the Class of 2001 



SLtaMl 


m m m st 


8124 Sparrow Drive Toll Free: 1-877-986-7868 

Leduc, Alberta (780) 986-7868 


A>A8A>A8A>m>AmA>A8HA< 


We ere pleased to salute the Native Grads stress Canada 

ABORIGINAL PEOPLES 

Television & Radio 

CHON FM HAASHAGOON NEDAA 

All the best in Wednesday Sunday 

News 10:00 am 10:00am 

Music 4:00 pm 2:30 pm 

Sports 9:30 pm 8:00 pm 

We serve all your advertising and video production needs... 

• Artist Recording sessions • Avid Editors • Betacam SP Camera Packages 

• Corporate and Broadcast Videos • Education and Training Videos 
•Video Stock Sales *50001 Writing 

Call Randy McKenzie at (867) 668-6629, local 233 
Radio advertising: call Pamela Fraser at (867) 668-6629, local 242 
E-mail: nnby@yknet.yk.ca 
Northern Native Broadcasting, Yukon 
4230 A - 4th Avenue Whitehorse, YT Y1A1K1 













































June, 2001 Alberta Native News 


21 


Powwows & Gatherings 


Join the 
Powwow Trail 


It’s Powwow Season again! 

At Alberta Native News we have put together a 
schedule of some of the coming powwow events and 


• Calgary Stampede 
Calgary, AB 1-800-661-1260 

July68 ■T' 

• White Bear Powwow 
Carlyle, SK (306) 577-4553 


Our list will be updated as the season progresses 
and we hope it gives you an idea of what to expect in 
the weeks to come. Good luck to all the summer 
festival participants. 

Have a great time! 

June 18 - 22 


June 20 - 21 


;ritage Park and Sask. Indian 


• Comox Valley Powwow 


• Prince George Native Friendship Centre 
Competition Powwow 
Prince George, B.C. (250) 564-3568 


June 29 - July 1 

• Ft. MacKay First Nation Treaty Days 
Fort MacKay, AB (780) 828-4220 


June 21 

• National Aboriginal Day 

• Canadian Native Friendship Centre 
Summer Round Dance 
Edmonton, AB (780)479-1999 

• Hire A Student Aboriginal Day Celebration 
Dinwoodie Lounge, University of Alberta Campus 
Edmonton, AB (780)495-2070 

June 22-24 

- Whitesand First Nation Powwow 

North of Thunder Bay, ON (807)583-1084 


July 9 - 14 

• 8th Annual Metis Nation of Ontario 
General Assembly and Metis Gathering 
Sault Ste. Marie, ON 1-888-789-0868 

July 10 

• CCAB Stampede BBQ (See ad page 19) 
Heritage Park, Calgary, AB (403) 237-0755 

, July 10-12 

• Denesuline Women’s Gathering 

Cold Lake First Nation 1-888-222-7183 

July 13 - 15 

• Cold Lake Treaty Days 
Cold Lake, AB 888-222-7183 


July 19 - 22 

• Kainai Indian Days 
Standoff, AB (403) 653-4516 

July,'J9 -28 

• Klondike Days (see ad page 22) 

Edmonton, AB 1-888-800-7275 

July 20 ij/fflll III 11/ 

• Muskoday First Nation Treaty Day 
Muskoday First Nation, SK (306) 764-1282 


July 20 - 22 
• Sioux Valley 
Sioux Valley, 


• Head Smashed In Buffalo Jump Powv 
and Tipi Village 

Fort MacLeod, AB (403)553-2731 


• Buffalo Lake Rodeo 

Buffalo Lake Metis Settlement, AB 
(780) 689-3981 (See ad this page) 


July 27 -29 

• Touchwood Agency Tribal Council Powwow 
Kawacatoose First Nation 

Raymore, SK (306) 835-2125 

July 28 - 29 

• Champion of Champions Powwow 
Grand River Reserve, ON (519) 758-5444 

• Muskeg Lake Cree Nation Veteran’s Memorial 
and Traditional Powwow 

Muskeg Lake Cree Nation, SK (306) 466-4959 


Hobbema, AB (780)585-4122 


• Wikemikong Anishnaabe Giizhgadoonh 
Annual Competition Powwow 
Manitoulin Island, ON (.705) 859-2385 


• Voices of Tomorrow Youth Gathering 
-Selkirk, MB (204) 269-3430 

Continued on page 22 



Saluting the powwow - it brings our heritage to life! 

fi£, Muskowekwan Band No. 85 


P. O. Box 249, 

Lestock, SK S0A 2G0 
Tel. ( 306 ) 274-2061 • Fax. (306) 274-2110 


Buffalo Nations 
Luxton Museum 

Afifl 

Journey into the extraordinary heritage of the Indians 
of the northern Plains and Canadian Rockies 

1 Birch Ave. (across the Bow River Bridge - See Banff Map for location) 

Banff. Alberta • Tel: (403) 762-2388 • Fax: (403) 760-2803 
E-mail: luxton@telusplanet.net 





























22 


Alberta Native News June, 2001 


Powwoi\rs & Gatherings 


Saluting all powwow parti, 

D & B 

CONVENIENCE 
STORE LTD. 

• Grocery • Household Items 

• Fireworks • Drycleaning 


Celebrate the powwow! 




Food & Gas 


Bakery and Deli 
Deep Fried Chicken 
Fast Foods 

9 Flavours of Soft Ice Cream 
Pizza Hut Express 
& MUCH, MUCH MORE 

WY. 41, ELK POINT, AB Ph. (780) 724-4373 


RIGGERS DINING LOUNGE 


INTERNATIONAL 

INN 

EXCELLENT ACCOMMODATION 
& CASUAL DINING 
501-11 Avenue, Nisku, AB 
Phone (780) 955-3001 

Located just south of County of Leduc Building 


August 4 - 8 

• Norway House Cree Nation Treaty 
and York Boat Days 

Norway House, MB (204) 359-4729 

August 7 - 9 

• Canadian Competition Powwow and 
Miss Indian Canada 2001 

Namaio, AB (780) 645-4288 (See ad page 19) 

August 6 -10 

• 11th Annual Elders’ and Youth Conference 
hosted by Horse Lake First Nation 
Hythe, AB (780)356-3013 (see ad page 33) 

August 10 - 12 

• First Peoples’Festival 
Victoria, B.C. (250) 384-3211 


• Songhees Powwow 
Maple Bank Park, B.C. 
(250) 385-3938 


August 12 -16 

• Saskatchewan First Nation Summer Games 
Lac La Ronge, SK 1-800-567-7736 

August 17 -19 

• Crooked Lake Powwow 
Broadview, SK (306) 696-2644 


August 21 - 23 

• SCTC Residential School conference 
The Pas, MB (204) 623-3423 

August 27 - 30 

• Nekaneet International Healing Gathering 

Maple Creek, SK (306) 662-3660 


ir 15 -16 
• Treaty 4 Traditional Powwow 
Fort Qu’AppeUe, SK (306) 332-6 


Taxidermy Specialty Products 

Complete line of forms, 
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for the amateur and 
professional taxidermist 


• Mohr Jawsets 

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• Van Dyke & Tohichon 
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• Bighorn Noses 

• Breakthrough 
Taxidermy Manuals 

• Taxidermy and 
Tanning Courses 

7 - 2121 - 41 Avenue N.E., 
Calgary, Alberta T2E 6P2 


















































































































24 


Alberta Native News June, 2001 


Modern powwow 
dances reflect 
old traditions 





. 


ent campfires. - 

The big drum of today was once a hollow log, or Today, powwows are held frequently throughout 
folded rawhide, beaten with a stick. Bells and rattles the year, and schools and friendship centres — 
added pleasant sounds. Originally a bell was worn for encouraging dancers to learn the time-honoured i 
each time a warrior had been wounded. tom for performances and competitions. It is espe 

Today, Native people still enjoy dancing; indeed the dally exciting to see the beautiful traditional c 
art is enjoying a resurgence of popularity. Traditions tumes becoming more frequently worn. It seems c 
have been modified to allow men and women to tain this historical and significant pastime will 
participate equally. The influence of the cultures of main an important part of our culture. 


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Pay Rates: $8.50 - $10.00 per hour 


Ask about other summer employment opportunities! 

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(780)428-1266 


Beat uiiahea to all ptuuuuuu pantictpauta. 
We ealule tfeun ceUelmtieu oh That Hatiaua 
culiwie, l/u>M the management and atalh at 


Richards Lumber 
Co. Ltd 


“Committed 
to Quality 
and Service 
For Over 
40 Years" 


(780) 523-3696 

High Prairie ; • Alberta 






































































June, 2001 Alberta Native News 


25 


Economic Development 






















































26 


Alberta Native News June, 2001 


Building Our Communities 






























































June, 2001 Alberta Native News 

First Aboriginal Housing 
Conferences set for autumn 

by John Copley 

The first Aboriginal Housing Conference to take place in the province will get 
underway this September 17 when Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation 
(CMHC), presents its first in a series of two western Canadian conferences 
designed to introduce new ideas and practical solutions for building, repairing and 
maintaining quality housing in Aboriginal communities. 

The first, the B.C. Aboriginal Housing Symposium and Trade Show, takes place 
at the Delta Pacific Resort and Conference Centre in Richmond, from September 
| 17 - 20. The second, the Yukon and Northern First Nation Housing Conference, 
which is being presented by CMHC in partnership with the Yukon Housing 
Corporation and Indian and Northern Affairs, will be held at the Westmark Hotel 
[ in Whitehorse on October 23 and 24. Both conferences have been developed in 
I close consultation with First Nations groups and will entertain the ideas and 
expertise of First Nations leaders and housing experts who will share their 
1 knowledge on topics that will include community planning, economic develop¬ 
ment, property management and partnerships and joint ventures. Other present- 
I ers will focus on new and innovative housing designs, construction practices and 
understanding the importance oflocating and utilizingthe best possible products 
for a particular region. 

“Both conferences," explained CMHC’s Senior Advisor of Aboriginal Capacity 
Building for B.C. and the Yukon Region, Cliff Grant, “will provide participants 
with housing information and training that reflects the specific needs of Aborigi- 
I nal communities. Conference participants will not only learn about the latest 
I construction techniques and materials for a given region, they will also learn how 
I to access government resources and trainingprograms for Aboriginal housing and 
I will network with housing service providers as well as government agencies and 
| other First Nations communities who have the same housing concerns.” 

I Because of the interest being given the two CMHC-hosted conferences, and 
I because of the huge success experienced at similar venues in Edmonton and 
I Saskatoon, early registration is advised. 

i “As is usual with these types of conferences,” emphasized Grant in a recent 
interview with Western Native News, “space is limited, but those who register 
before the Early Bird deadlines can take advantage of our special $200 rate.” 

The deadline for the Richmond conference is June 29 and for the Yukon 
conference, August 31. Those registering after the Early Bird deadline date will 
. pay $250. 

Backed by major sponsors that include the Bank of Montreal, the Royal Bank 
of Canada (Aboriginal Banking) and Natural Resources Canada, the two confer¬ 
ences promise to provide an abundance of information, contacts and material. 
Ideal participants include First Nations tribal councils, bands, chiefs, councillors, 
administrators, housing coordinators, property managers, urban Native housing 
groups and Metis organizations, as well as any business or individual interested 
in or already providing services and/or materials to Aboriginal housing projects 
and communities. 

The B.C. Aboriginal Housing Symposium and Trade Show offers an ideal 
opportunity for participants to gather up-to-date housing information that re- 
1 fife Aboriginal housing needs, both on and off reserve. 

“Delegates will receive practical information in both the desip and building of 
f durable housing and in achieving and maintaining self-sustaining communities,” 
continued Cliff Grant. “Also important is the fact that participants will have 
' access to key players in Aboriginal housing, something that will allow them to both 
share their concerns and their solutions as well as to seek answers to problems or 
difficulties being encountered in their individual communities.” 
f-i TheB.C.SymposiumwillalsofeatureperformancesandartfromtopAboriginal 
entertainers and artists. Well known comedian Don Bumstick, will be on hand as 
will traditional drummers, dancers and fashions. Sandy Scofield, a contemporary 
voice for Aboriginal musicians and an up-and-coming artist, will also give a specie 
concert following a traditional longhouse evening banquet on Wednesday, Sep¬ 
tember 19. Her latest CD, Riel’s Road, won Best Alternative Album and Best 
I Single (Beat the Drum) during Aboriginal Music Awards 2000. Scofield’s dynamic 
style, original songs and stunning voice have earned her a reputation as one of the 
West Coast’s best original artists. 

Accompanying the Vancouver conference, which gets underway with a wine and 
cheese reception on Monday, September 17 and concludes with a talking circle and 
spiritual closing ceremony on Thursday, September 20, will be a conference trade 
show. About 25 housing industry, government and education exhibitors are 
expected to participate. This unique networking opportunity will allow partici- 
L _pants to gather information on new construction techniques, education programs 
and other resources that government and industry have to offer Aboriginal 
builders, contractors and others involved in the housing industry. 

Several of the invited guest speakers have announced their plans to attend the 
Vancouver conference in September. Among them, Osoyoos First Nation Chief 
Clarence Louie (Economic Development) and architect Ross Goesselin (Talk 
Grass Project) who will speak on Community Planning. Others invited, but not yet 
confirmed, include Assembly of First Nations Grand Chief Matthew Coon Come, 
Wendy Grant, Indian and Northern Affairs and CMHC President Jean-Claude 
j Villiard. 

CMHC is Canada’s housing agency. As such, it “supports Aboriginal communi¬ 
ties in their efforts to become self-sufficient in developing and maintaining their 
housing." The organization has many programs and projects underway in numer¬ 
ous First Nations communities across the country. Included in the wide range of 



CMHC’s education and training programs to Aboriginal communities are prop¬ 
erty management and home maintenance workshops and housing internship 
initiatives. CMHC also provides funding for new social housing projects on reserve 
and financial assistance for existing housing projects off-reserve. 

To register for the B.C. Aboriginal Symposium and Trade Show, contact GEMS 
Registration Services at 1-877-754-8876, or send an email to 
cmhc2001@gemsregistration.com. 

To register for the Yukon and Northern First Nations Housing Conference 
contact 1-867-633-5269 or send an email to leaf-adrin@yknet.yk.ca. For informa¬ 
tion on these or other CNHC programs contact Cliff Grant at (604) 737-4102. 


|ET THE HOUSING 
RESOURCES YOU NEED 


ATTEND THE FIRST ABORIGINAL HOUSING 
CONFERENCES IN B.C. AND YUKON THIS FALL! 


Leam new ideas and practical solutions for building, repairing 
and maintaining quality housing in your community - on and 
off reserve. 


Register by June 29th to take advantage of our 
lower Early Bird rate! 

B.C. Aboriginal Housing Symposium and Trade Show 

September 17 - 20, 2001. Richmond. B.C. 

Call 1-877-754-8876 

Presented by Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) 

Yukon and Northern First Nations Housing Conference 

October 23 - 24. 2001. Whitehorse. Yukon 
Call 1-867-633-5269 

Presented by CMHC in partnership with The Yukon Housing Corporation 
and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada 



Congratulations to all Class of 2001 Graduates, 
from the Management and Staff at 

SERVICE WHEN 
YOU NEED IT, 
SERVICE WHEN 
YOU WANT IT. 



. OILFIELD HAULING . SPECIALIZED EQUIPMENT 


(780) 986-5310 FAX: (780) 986 3324 
Leduc, Alberta 







HOME TO CANADIANS 

Canada 



















Protecting Mother Earth 


Alberta Native News June, 2001 

EB 



WCWC lobbies 
for species at risk 




We Care About Your Future! 

Producers of 
• Oil & Gas 
• Oilfield Drilling 
& Exploration 
Calgary: (403) 267-0700 
Fax: (780) 942-3327 
(780) 942-2644 


Box 880, Redwater, AB 


m 


Saluting the spirit 
WWWm entrepreneurship 


Retail Merchants' Association 
of Canada (Alberta) Inc. 

Serving Retailers Since 1896 

Low Visa/MasterCard Rates 


Group Health/Dental Plan Programs 
and Commercial Insurance 
Fuel Discounts and Air Miles Program 
Travel Services • legal Services • Quarterly Newsletter 


10W MEMBERSHIP FEES. NO G.S.T. 

For More Information Contact 


Wilderness Committee members have been “ringing 
the phone off the wall" asking for additional opinion 
cards to distribute to friends and family. 

Barlee and Joe Foy, Wilderness Committee Cam¬ 
paign Director, were recently in Ottawa delivering 
the same message - strengthen Bill C-5 or get rid of 
it - to the House of Commons Standing Committee on 
the Environment which is collecting comments on the 
proposed legislation. (See the Wilderness Committee 


web site 


presentation on the Bill C-5 or 
www.wildernesscommittee.org). 

“The vast majority of Canadians (over 90 percent in 
a 1999 Pollara poll) are in favour of strong endan¬ 
gered species legislation that includes mandatory 
habitat protection for species at risk across Canada,” 
said Foy. 

“That’s what we intend to work full out on until 
Canadians get what they want and deserve,” he added. 


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Saluting Grads 2001. Wishing you continued success in the future 

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A (District of Mackenzie) 

(( Regional Council of Carpenters 
and Allied Workers 


Office (780) 474-8599 • Fax (780) 474-8910 


B.S.L. MACHINE LTD. 


Saluting the Grads of 2000/2001 
/Jest Wishes for a 
Bright Future 
























































June, 2001 Alberta Native News 


Resource Development 



Osburn 1600 - Clean Air Always. 


NWT oil and gas projects 
make good business sense 


We're proud to be 

the North's 
resident drilling 
company 

Shehtah is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Denendeh 


We are proud to salute the Grads of 2000/2001, 


PanCanadian 


PanCanadian Petroleum Limited, PanCanadian Plaza, 
150-9 Avenue S.W. Calgary, Alberta T2P 2S5 


Fax: (780) 452-1877 
























































30 


Alberta Native News June, 2001 


Funds needed to ensure 
equitable share of 
Mackenzie Valley pipeline 

by John Copley 

























































June, 2001 Alberta Native News 


The Healing Journey 


Calgary Rocky 
View finds good 
homes for children 


Dean Weasel of Calgary couldn’t be happier. Al¬ 
ready the father of three young children, he and his 
wife recently welcomed another member of the family 
into his home - his fifteen year-old niece. 

The temporary arrangement is the result of Calgary 
Rocky View Child and Family Service’s Kinship Care 
program, which aims to place children with relatives 
j until it is determined they can live with their biologi- 

I cal parents or other arrangements are made. This is 
bnly one of the ways this regional children’s authority 
aims to meet the needs of all children who are unable 
to live at home for various reasons. 

“I think that as an Aboriginal person, one of our 

( values is to not only provide for our own family, but for 
our extended family as well,” said Weasel, an or¬ 
dained Christian minister who welcomed his niece 
into his home in January. His name has been changed 
i to protect her identity. 

“I didn’t even have to think about it, the decision 
was already made for me (because of these values). 
We’re glad we could be there to help bring the family 
. back together, and to give my niece some stability,” he 

The Weasels weren’t alone in this new arrange¬ 
ment. A social worker at Calgary Rocky View helped 
in guiding them along. “She visits on a regular basis, 
and any questions we have, we can ask her. She’s 
been very supportive, and we have someone to bounce 
ideas off of. It’s a learning process and you need 
people to come along beside you. She was really good 
for that.” 

Weasel said the experience has been valuable for 
both his niece and his immediate family not only 

but also because they can get to know each other 
better. “Right now we have an opportunity to make a 
, positive influence inher life, and steer her in the right 
direction. I think many teenagers want and need 
, somebody to show that they care, to show them love 
and affection and to be a mentor. If we have that 
opportunity, especially within our own family and 
extended family to make a difference in the life of a 
child, then we need to make that sacrifice,” he said. 

- The Kinship Care program has been very success¬ 
ful in its early stages, with 106 children currently 
placed with relatives. However, for many children in 
the system who don’t have relatives, the option of 
foster care and adoption placement is pursued. The 
need for families is great, with an average of 65 to 70 
(children currently waitingfor an adoptive home within 



«ALGARY ROCKY^VIEW 


Numerous opportunities are available if you are 
interested in being a Foster Parentand/oradopting 
a child/children in care. 

Foster Care: 

Calgary Rocky View Child and Family Services 
Authority are looking for people interested in 
fostering children. You can make a difference in 
a child's life. If you are energetic and flexible, 
and want to learn more about the challenging 
and worthwhile program, please call: 

Native Foster Care: (403) 297-2789 
General Foster Care: (403) 297-5957 
Training will be provided 
Adoption: 

You can enrich the life of a child by providing a 
stable loving family and home. If you are 
interested in being parents of children between 
the ages of 5-12, please call: 


the province. Out of those numbers, it is estimated 
that one-third are Aboriginal children. Adoptive par¬ 
ents assume permanent guardianship of the child and 
raise them as their own, while foster parents are seen 
as part of a team, which cares for the child. 

“It’s important to know we are looking for a good 
home for a child, not a child for a home, and that’s a 
big difference. The needs of the child always come 
first, and that’s our focus.” 

The process in becoming a foster or adoptive parent 
is quite similar. In Alberta, adoptive and foster par¬ 
ents can be a minimum age of 18 years, married, 
common law or single, and must be a resident of the 
province at the time of application, home assessment 
and placement. The applicant must be physically and 
emotionally capable of meeting the needs of the child. 

Those who consider becoming an adoptive or foster 
parent are encouraged to learn about the process in 
two ways. Anyone who is interested in becoming a 
foster or adoptive parent may decide to attend an 
awareness meeting, but it is not mandatory. 


Applications and recruitment for Aboriginal adop¬ 
tions are completed through Calgary Rocky View’s 
Native Multi Service Team office, where an Aborigi¬ 
nal professional processes the application. A com¬ 
pleted application is then returned to the local child 
welfare office with delegated child welfare workers. 
In Calgary, this would be the Native Multi Service 
Team office or a Community of Service office in the 

Once the application is handed in, a social worker is 
assigned to the applicant and after a background 
check is completed, a home assessment is done. This 
is a step that takes place for all adoption applications. 
For Aboriginal applicants in Calgary, an Aboriginal 
Home Assessment worker conducts the home assess¬ 
ment. Once a child is placed with an adoptive family, 
training is provided to help the family and the child to 
adjust to the new situation. Post adoption support 
services are available as well. 

Before a child is placed with a family, 
foster and adoptive parents attend pre¬ 
service training courses, which prepare 
the family for placement of the child. 
Foster parents are also compensated 
through a basic maintenance rate, 
which directly reimburses foster 
homes for expenses incurred meeting 
the day-to-day needs of the child. Skill 
fees or special rates are paid in addi¬ 
tion to basic maintenance to foster par¬ 
ents for their time and expertise, based 
on the extent of their training and expe- 

Karen Tinevez, a Foster Care Recruiter with 
Calgary Rocky View who is also a foster parent, said 
that tolerance and a sense of community are impor¬ 
tant qualities for a parent to have. 

“I think the general population at large needs to 
become more aware of what exactly foster care and 
adoptions are all about. If a person is willing to foster 
or adopt a child, their relatives and neighbours need 
to be supportive too. That’s why one of the questions 
we ask is what kind of supports they have not only 
within their immediate and extended family, but in 
their community as well,” she said. 

Iris Udchitz, a Foster Care Screener at Calgary 
Rocky View’s Native Multi Service Team office, said 
the ultimate reward in her nine years of being a foster 
parent is seeing the difference it makes in the life of 
a child. 

“When you get a child in your home whose physical 
needs were not being met, and you see that coming 
around - their hair is shining, school is better for 
them, and they’re excited about their day, that’s the 
biggest reward.” 

Dean Weasel added, “I think that in the Aboriginal 
community, if we don’t take the time and make the 
sacrifice for our young people, whether they’re rela¬ 
tives or not, then who will? It’s our first responsibility 
to meet the needs of our children.” 

“Creating awareness is important as well, making 
it known that these opportunities are available,and a 
big thing is that support is there, and you’re not on 
your own. Hopefully that will encourage more fami¬ 
lies to step forward and realize these support systems 
are in place, and it’s worthwhile.” 


We extend best wishes to our 
Native community and all 
powwow participants 

Blood Tribe 
Family Community 
Support Services 

P. O. Box 60 
Standoff, AB T0L 1Y0 

Phone (403) 737-2888 

Fax (403) 737-2877 


Best wishes to clLL thejowwow j>artLctpants. 
Have a safe Journey an thejaowwow trail, 

Community Health 
Services 

• Alcohol and Drug Counselling 

• Child welfare Prevention 

• Educational counselling 
• Health and Wellness 


* J ,L>r" 




(705) 756-2354 fax. (705) 756-2376 
“Wahta Mohawks 

Bala. Ontario 





















32 


Alberta Native News June, 2001 


Coming out of the smoke 


by Xavier Kataquapit 






A Native AddiciioNS Services 

◄y^- ., ; H=.sss„ 
"t SSS£ 



INSURANCE SPECIALISTS 

and Royal & Sunalliance < 


CLINICAL SUPERVISOR 




BoxVost Hay Wver!NTXO e"!M 
Fax:(867)874-6611 


.. .■ 2?,?qq i.. 


We are proud to salute the Grads of 2001. In your hand lies the future. 


ECOVERY CENTRI 


28 Day Residential 
Treatment Centre 


RECOVERY CENTRE • Co-Ed Programs 

mk. 


Phone (780) 926-3113 
Fax(780)926-2060 
CALL OR WRITE FOR 
MORE INFORMATION 
Box 872, High Level, AB TOH 1Z0 



WHERE 

TOMORROW 

BEGINS 































































June, 2001 Alberta Native News 


Focus on Diabetes 


First Nations 
entitled to free 
MedicAlert® 
protection 

Canadian MedicAlert Foundation is remindingSta- 
tus First Nations people they are entitled to a free 
MedicAlert membership under the Non-Insured 
j Health Benefits Program of Health Canada. 

As MedicAlert members they receive five key mem¬ 
ber benefits: 

• Immediate access by first responders and other 

(health professionals to the 24-hour MedicAlert Emer¬ 
gency Response Centre, which speaks for members 
; anywhere in the world when they need help most - in 
1 an emergency; 

• A customized stainless steel MedicAlert bracelet 
and wallet card, which list key medical information, 
a member ID number and the telephone number of 
11 the MedicAlert Emergency Response Centre; 

|| • A confidential, comprehensive member record on 

a centralized database, which includes additional 
medical and personal information, medications and 
emergency contacts; 

• A lifetime of MedicAlert service with unlimited 
I free updates to the member’s record; 

"a • Membership in the international MedicAlert net¬ 
work. 

i ft To help simplify the application process, applicants 
send their completed membership applications to 
Regional Medical Services Branches ofHealth Canada, 
which forward them to MedicAlert. 

An estimated one in five Canadians have a medical 
condition that should be known in the case of a 
medical emergency. These conditions include diabe¬ 
tes, food and drug allergies, asthma, high blood pres¬ 
sure, heart conditions, Alzheimer’s, and osteoporosis, 
as well as many other conditions. Diabetes is espe¬ 
cially serious within the First Nations, with Health 
• ■ Canada statistics reporting rates at least three times 
the national average. 

“We know that MedicAlert® protects and saves 
lives in an emergency by alerting first responders to 
these critical conditions on the scene,” says Shelagh 
Tippet-Fagyas, president of Canadian MedicAlert 



Carl Bailie, a B.C. paramedic with 15 years experi¬ 
ence, describes MedicAlert services as irreplaceable, 
especially when people suffer an emergency in the 
absence of a family member or friends. “The ability to 
access medical information immediately provides 
paramedics and emergency staff with the extra min¬ 
utes that can save lives.” 

“In an emergency situation, the right treatment at 
the right time can mean the difference between life 
and death,” adds Dr. Michael Murray, past president 
of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physi- 

Since 1961, Canadian MedicAlert Foundation has 
been saving lives by providing accurate personal and 
medical information in emergencies. Today, as Cana¬ 
da's largest non-profit membership organization, 
MedicAlert serves the needs of nearly one million 
active members of all ages. The national registered 
charity invests all membership proceeds and dona¬ 
tions back into MedicAlert to increase the reach of 


Enrolment i 


ication services, 
ormation and forms are a’ 
ss, or band health no 


orby 


contacting MedicAlert directly at 1-800-668-11- . _. 
www.medicalert.ca. The original enrolment form must 
be sent to the Regional Medical Services Branch for 
processing. In Alberta, a prescription must accom¬ 
pany the 
enrolment 
form to be 




idicAlert 



Education and 
awareness are key 
to diabetes 
management 

by John Copley 

Type II diabetes is the the most prevalent and one 
of the fastest growing health concerns in First Na¬ 
tions and other Indigenous communities across North 
America. In fact, both the Canadian Paediatric Soci¬ 
ety (CPS)and the First Nations Health Commission 
have expressed their concern over the increasing 
numbers of non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus 
in the Aboriginal community. They’ve determined 
that “effort needs to be made to assess and initiate 
preventative strategies throughout.” 

A recent look into the problems of diabetes in the 
Aboriginal community by the CPS’s Indian and Inuit 
Committee, produced several recommendations, one 
ofthem being the initiation of preventative and aware¬ 
ness programs. They also “recognize a critical need for 
diabetic education programs specifically for Native 
peoples. These programs must be developed in con¬ 
sultation with, and under the control of, First Nations 
peoples.” 


Because there is a high prevalence of Type II (dia¬ 
betes mellitus) diabetes in most North American 
First Nation communities, it is imperative that edu¬ 
cational material and instruction be implemented at 
the grass roots level. 

“Diabetes is indeed a complex issue in the Aborigi¬ 
nal community,” explained National Aboriginal Clear¬ 
ing/Connecting House manager, Archie King. “It is 
also a relatively new problem in our communities. 
Before 1940 diabetes was apparently a rarity in North 
American Aboriginal communities, but that is no 
longer the case. The prevalence is much higher today 
and the education programs have gotten better but 
there is always room for improvement.” 

Studies on diabetes and how the disease manifests 
within the Aboriginal community are continuing across 
the continent but in the meantime, statistics among 
some groups has sky-rocketed. “It can take anywhere 
from 10 to 25 years before diabetes shows up,” said 
King, “so where once it was rather difficult to measure 
the increasing rate of diabetes in the community with 
any accuracy, sufficient time has lapsed since the 
problem was recognized in the early 1940s making it 
easier and far more accurate.” 

Updated data on the extent of diabetes in Canada’s 
First Nations and Metis communities is somewhat 
limited. Type II diabetes usually develops in adult¬ 
hood, although increasing numbers of children in 
high-risk populations are being diagnosed with the 



AUGUST 6 - AUGUST 10, 2000 
Registration Fee $55.00 includes the following. 


All meals 

Access to all workshops 

- Womens & mens healing circle ~ Drug and alcohol awareness - Other various topics 
Recreational activities include: 

- Native Dancing - Air Band - Dance - Skits ~ Giveaway - Live Talent 

Master of Ceremonies: Russell Auger 
(Camping Spaces Available) 

Conference open to Youth Ages 12 and Up 


For further information pleast contact 

THE WELLNESS CENTRE 

at Phone (780) 356-3013 • Fax (780) 356-2587 
P. 0. Box 303, Hythe, Alberta TOH 2C0 






















Alberta Native News June, 2001 


The importance of blood 
sugar (glucose) testing 






Diabetes management, Continued from page 33 j 



/^Terra 

Services for Pregnant and Parenting 

Teens and their Children 


❖ Prenatal Classes 

❖ Support Groups 

❖ Home Visiting 

❖ Career Planning 

❖ Life Skills 

❖ Individual Counselling 

❖ Child Care 

❖ Parenting Support 

❖ Labour Support 

❖ Crisis Intervention 

❖ Aboriginal Support 

❖ Services for Young Fathers 

Services 

❖ Housing Support Services 

Call (780) 428-3772 For Further Information 

Terra Association 

9930 - 106 Street, Edmonton, Alberta T5K 1C7 

website: www.terraassociation.com 


St. John Ambulance 
First Aid and CPR 
Training 

Alberta Branches 

EDMONTON AREA.1.800-665-7114 

GRANDE PRAIRIE AREA.(780) 532-1012 

CALGARY AREA.(403) 250-2922 

FORT MCMURRAY AREA.(780) 743-0991 

LETHBRIDGE AREA.(403) 327-2847 

MEDICINE HAT AREA.(403) 528-3292 

RED DEER AREA.(403) 342-7744 



















































f s”L^S£sF’fMS,'S 

S?£iipq;S53^S I 




^^,-S-SSE 




In cehehration ofthej>owwow:afestiva[of<(ance antfcufture~ 
"Renewing Our Spirits •through the Tower of the •Drum" 

Pincher Creek Women’s 
Emergency Shelter 

Provides a safe secure haven for abused women and 
' theirfamilies.WealsohaveaHealingCirdeforvictims 
of abuse. Let us help you heal the emodonal scars. 

' The shelter welcomes contributions. We issue tax 
receipts for financial aid. Contact us at (403) 627-2114 
or pcwesa@ telusplanet.net to find out how you can 
help us stop family violence. 

- If you need help call 1-888-354-4868_ 



We are proud fo salute the Grads of 2000/2001 


( 

W Syl’ 


Sefhuut 

'pUH&Kzt *%<Mte 










































































fcalahool 

WHOLESALE MEATS 
and GROCERIES 

Specializing in 

Supplying Hotels, 
Restaurants, Institutions 
& Industrial Camps 

| Neats Ltd. 

R.R. 1, CALAHOO, AB (780) 458-2136 

Fax:(780)458-2146 1-800-567-8371 


We salute all Owe involved ui the 
puiwuil al knowledge. 
CongwlulaUono G wdo 20011 


LOCAL UNION 4811 



16214-118 Avenue 
Edmonton, ABT5V1M6 
Phone. (780) 488-1266 
Fax. (780) 482-9520 
























































37 


June, 2001 Alberta Native News 


Dream Catchers 

(also called Dream Webs and Dream Wheels) 


Dream Catahers are a gift to all people through the Navajo from the Spider 
Woman (Grandmother Moon). Mostly females were blessed with the understand¬ 
ing and interpretation of dreams. Dream Catchers catch good and bad dreams. 

Good dreams are given a safe passage into the dreamer by dripping down into 
the dreamer out of the feather. They are also allowed to return again. Bad dreams,, 
are fragmented in the web. There they try to reunite to get into the dreamer. Light 
reflecting off the stone chases all pieces toward the centre, where they fall in - 
never to return! Bad dreams go to the Spirit World and are changed from bad to 
good. 

Dream Catchers are very spiritual and sacred. They are not for sale or to be used 
as burnt offerings (hidden personal meanings). Dream Catchers without sacred 
feathers can be marketed commercially. They have no spiritual significance. 

Constructing a Dream Catcher involves prayers and offerings from start to 
finish. Usually willow, sinew, a pebble and asacred feather are used. When woven, 
one can see the body of a spider within the web. Dream Catchers enhance dream 
recall, vision, speech, hearing, taste, smell, colour and many sensations. 

Dream Catchers are meant to provide balance in the' spiritual, physical, 
emotional and mental aspects of life. When one area is affected - all are affected! 
Dream Catchers will help anyone, who truly believes they work. 


AFN-NEXUS Conference, 

continued from page 25 

Captain Frank Nevin of the Shubenacadie First Nation will offer the opening 
prayer for the second day of the conference and Don Julian, the Executive Director 
of the Confederacy of Mainland Mfkmaq, will offer opening remarks, including a 
brief overview of opening day. 

Day two topics will include Traditional Knowledge, Cultural Values and 
Expanding Land Rights ; Travelling the Information Technology Highway; Con¬ 
tracting with Federal Government Procurement Strategies and Accessing Capital 
for Aboriginal Business. Associate Deputy Minister of Aboriginal Affairs, Dennis 
Wallace, is the scheduled keynote speaker for AFN-NEXUS day two (July 18). 

The special Gala Evening at this year’s conference and trade show will be worth 
the registration fee all by itself. Festivities begin with a Carnival Reception - 
featuring magicians, fortune-tellers and games of chance - in the Casino Nova 
% Scotia’s Compass Room from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m. on July 18. The facility’s Schooner 
Room will provide the venue for dinner and entertainment. A welcoming address 
by invited speaker, National Grand Chief Matthew Coon Come will be followed 
’ with a talk by invited keynote speaker Ethel Blondin-Andrew, Secretary of State 

(Children and Youth). An Aboriginal Entrepreneurship Award ceremony will 
highlight the evening, as will the magic of Lisa Odjig, last year’s World Hoop 
Dance Champion. Odjig will join the Mi’kmaq Fiddlers and other entertainers 
throughout the course of the evening. A portion of proceeds from the Gala will 
benefit the Three Feathers Research Foundation in their quest to help find a cure 
for Aboriginal Diabetes.” 

a After the traditional Morning Prayer, the final day of AFN-Nexus will begin 
with remarks from Mary Jamieson, Vice Chair, National Aboriginal Economic 
Development Board. Speakers and topics for the day will include Darliea Dorey, 
President ofthe Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) who will discuss 
NWAC’s Role in the Business Community, and Doreen Daulis, Brenda Chambers 


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More conference information and/or registration forms and airline/accommoda¬ 
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ToU free: 1-800-684-0881. Or write to NITA at Suite 508,100 Park Royal, West 
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Alberta Native News June, 2001 



LEGEND 


The trick is on Wesehkechahk 

Collected and illustrated by James Ratt: told by Mary McKenzie 


One day Wesuhkechahk was walking along the lake He travelled along and soon came to a creek It 

and saw a beaver swimming by. He took a rock, threw wasn’t very wide and he decided to jump across it. 
it at the beaver, ~ ~ r-j. // ^ "4 

hit it on the head, ~ ~ V ^ WB - ■ 

and dragged it , I -1 ' I 1 \ > 7" , 

to shore /■' ^FvW '' 


By and by Wesuhkechahk spotted some chickadees 
in some branches. They were throwing their eyes up 
in the air and then flying beneath them before their 
eyes hit the ground. Their eyes fell into place in their 



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June, 2001 Alberta Native News 


Wesuhkechahk erected a teepee and asked the 
ducks, geese, loons and grebes to come to his dance. 



When the dancing started, he asked them to do the 
“Shut Eye Dance,” in which all the dancers close then- 
eyes and bump into someone. 





All the geese, ducks, loons and grebes ran for the 
door before Wesuhkechahk could catch them. 
Wesuhkechahk ran after a loon and managed to get 
one swift kick at its rear end before it reached the 
lake. 

The loon’s legs were broken and to this day all loons 
limp when they walk on land. 


39 


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Congratulations to the 2000/2001 graduates. 
Have a safe and happy grad! Don't drink and drive! 
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Safe travels along the powwow trail! 
Best wishes to all powwow visitors 
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Alberta Native News June, 2001 


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a cSnsumel'rS' 3 ulV.hoIwil! ^ C 5 U ^ CV r" " mpl6,B " ess °' ,he i " lormalio "' a "“ ■»*» lake notice that the dealer proposed to procure or cause to be prepared 

Alberta Native News May, 2001 


I___