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First Annual Report 



OF THE 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



OF THE 



Province of Ontario "^ 



1907. 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 



m 



TORONTO 
L. K. CAMERON, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 
1908 







la F. 



WARWICK BRO'S & RUTTER. Limited. Printers 
TORONTO. 



To His Honour Sir William Mortimer Clark, K.C, 

Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario. 

May it Please Your Honour : 

I have the honour to submit herewith, for the information of Your Hon- 
our and the Legislative Assembly, the First Annual Report of the Game and 
Fisheries Department of this Province. 

I have the honour to be, 

Your Honour's most obedient servant, 

J. 0. Reaume, 
Minister of Public Worhi. 
Toronto, 17th March, 1908. 



First Annual Report 



OF THE 



GAME AND FISHERIES 



OF THE 



Province of Ontario. 



To THE Honourable J. 0. Reaume, 

Minister of Public Works. 

Sir, — I have the honour to transmit herewith report of the work of the 
Department of Game and Fisheries for the year ending Slat December, 1907. 

This being the first report of the consolidated department of Game and 
Fisheries, it will be in order to refer to the cause or reason for merging what 
had previously been two departments. During the Session of the Legisla- 
ture of 1907, an Act passed and entitled "An Act respecting Game, Fur-bear- 
ing Animals, and Fisheries of Ontario," which enacts as follows, viz. : "The 
administration of this Act, and of all matters relating to fish and game in 
the Province shall be under the control and direction of the Minister, and 
shall constitute a branch of the public service, to be known as the Game and 
Fisheries Branch." The Act further enacts : "The Board of Game Commis- 
sioners of the Province is hereby abolished." It is further provided that 
the administration of the Game und Fisheries Branch shall, under the Min- 
ister, be in charge of the chief officer thereof, who shall be known as the 
Superintendent of Game and Fisheries. I, having the honour to be appointed 
to the responsible position of Superintendent, have under somewhat difficult 
circumstances endeavored to perform the duties of the position to the best of 
my humble ability, and I trust in some measure satisfactory to you. 

The usual statistics, so far as procurable, representing quantities and 
values of the fisheries, plants, etc., with other matters pertaining to the 
fish and game of the Province, will be found in the usual order. 

The Department, with one Inspector and one Acting Inspector, and a 
full staff of seven Game and Fish Wardens in charge of districts, has been 
able to obtain a large amount of valuable and much needed information for 
use in the future administration of Game and Fisheries. The duties of 
these officers have been faithfully performed, with credit to themselves and 
to the Department. 

[5] 



REPORT OF THE No. 32 



Enfoecing the Laws. 

I regret the necessity of having to refer to the impossibility of effec- 
tively enforcing the fishery laws and regulations in the Province of Ontario, 
in consequence of the unsatisfactory conditions that have prevailed in this 
Province for some years, viz., abolishing close seasons for whitefish in the 
waters of Lakes Erie and St. Clair, bordering on the Counties of Essex, Kent, 
Haldimand and Monck, and for pickerel in Lake Huron and River St. Clair 
off the County of Lambton. 

The abolishing of close seasons in the above mentioned waters has sub- 
jected our respective Departments to adverse and uncomplimentary criticism. 
I have been frequently asked the reasons for allowing whitefish to be taken 
with impunity from the spawning beds in some portions of Lake Erie during 
the month of November, and disallowing the same in the other portions of 
this lake under Canadian jurisdiction. Of course my inability to answer 
this question will be understood, it being as much of a conundrum to me as 
to those asking the question. I have very decided opinions regarding close 
seasons, viz., that nature's laws should be strictly observed while fish are 
engaged in propagating and perpetuating their species. I fail to see the 
difference between taking fish full of spawn, unless it is utilized in the 
hatcheries, and shooting game and other birds on their nests. 

In consequence of Lake Erie exemptions, the traffic in whitefish went 
on during the last close season to nearly the same extent as during opien; 
season. When shipments were seized by our overseers, affidavits were fur- 
nished to the effect that the fish were legally caught in Lake Erie off the 
Counties of Haldimand, Monck, Essex or Kent, as the case might be. Ship- 
ments were made from other waters to these points for re-shipment to dealers. 
The_^exemptions in question are causing much dissatisfaction. Those fisher- 
men not fortunate enough to have limits in the exempted waters bitterly com- 
plain at being compelled to stop fishing for whitefish during November, while 
those fishing in adjoining limits are allowed to reap a veritable harvest. I feel 
sure you will agree with me that there is no valid reason for continuing the 
exemption affecting these waters. We have difficulties enough to contend 
with in enforcing the fishery laws and regulations, without unnecessarily 
increasing them ourselves. I am aware that many of our fish culturists are 
under the impression that the work accomplished by the fish hatcheries is 
a great improvement on nature. I do not agree with them. No doubt the 
hatcheries should be utilized to hatch the spawn procured from fish caught 
during the open season, but I have doubts of the wisdom of taking fish off 
their spawning beds during the close seasons even to supply hatcheries. The 
close season cannot be too rigidly enforced, notwithstanding the annual 
crop of hard luck stories advanced bj the fishermen as a reason to be allowed 
to fish during part of the inadequate close seasons. Difference of tempera- 
ture has been advanced as a reason against a uniform close season, but this 
cannot possibly prevail as an excuse or reason for having a month's close 
season for whitefish bordering on the shores of several counties, and exempt- 
ing the waters of the same lake from close seasons in front of other counties. 
I feel sure that if the absurd and unnatural conditions above referred to are 
fully realized by the Department of Marine and Fisheries, the Department 
will see the justice and urgent necessity of abolishing the exemptions com- 
plained of, and will accord us their hearty co-operation in having the close 
seasons strictly observed. 

Forest and Game Commissioner Hon. J. S. Whipple, for the State of 
New York, in addressing Members of the Legislature, at Albany, on February 
3rd, 1907, on the important matter of game and fish protection, spoke as 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 



follows : "The necessity for the propagation and distribution of fish, and the 
necessity for the improvement of the law, is apparent when it is remembered 
that in this State there is annually consumed for food more than |41,000,000 
worth of fresh fish, that more than |30,000,000 worth are taken from the 
waters in our jurisdiction, that very much of this valuable fish product may 
be destroyed by improper fishing or by not stocking our lakes and streams 
or by the loss of the forests of the State. We must never lose sight of the 
fact that the best inland lake or the best trout stream may have its fish, 
supply destroyed in a single year, were there no restrictions placed on fishing. 
Restrictive laws are necessary. Law is simply a rule of action. 
When there were few people and much forest, fish and game, no 
restrictions seemed necessary. Now we have 8,000,000 people in the State, 
with a rapidly decreasing forest and less fish and game. We must have more 
restrictive laws. The necessity for the law and its enforcement, and the pro- 
tection of our forests, is better understood when it is remembered that the 
game birds, fur-bearing animals and the game animals are worth annu- 
ally more than |750,000, and that all this great value in annual product 
may.be destroyed by non-observance of the law." Commissioner Whipple's 
remarks are as applicable to Ontario as to his own State. It requires no 
stretch of imagination to enable us to decide where the greater portion of 
the 110,000,000 W9rth of fresh water fish annually imported into the State 
of New York is procured. In view of Mr. Whipple's statement, it behoves 
us in Ontario to be up and doing, for the purpose of perpetuating what should 
be worth millions of dollars annually to the people of the Province. How 
can this be best accomplished ? Only by increased restrictive laws and honest 
enforcement of existing ones. Laws are made in the interest of the public 
at large, and are intended to be obeyed. 

The illegal catching and shipping of immature undersized fish has 
caused considerable trouble to the Department, and no doubt in some cases 
has been the cause of injustice to some fishermen desiring to act in full 
accord with the laws and regulations. Experience has convinced me that 
in justice to all concerned, a staff of reliable, practical and competent 
inspectors must be engaged to inspect shipments at the different points from 
which shipments are made. This action is imperative to -prevent a repeti- 
tion of unsatisfactory transactions that have occurred in the past on the 
Niagara frontier. The men employed in this work must not only know their 
business, but must have the courage to do it without fear or favor, and must 
not allow any interference with them in the honest discharge of their duties 
from any source, not even by irresponsible parties who may desire to pro- 
cure cheap fish by questionable nxeans. Anglers, in their zeal and anxiety 
to protect their own interests, should realize that net fishermen have rights 
that must be respected. 

Supplying the Home Market. 

From careful enquiries made, I am satisfied that the complaints from 
various organizations and private parties that the fishermen will not supply 
local dealers is much like pig-shearing — more noise than wool. I have 
ample and satisfactory evidence that dealers all over the Province have fre- 
quently to cancel orders for fish, the supply exceeding the demand. Many 
of the fishermen who are not controlled by the American companies have 
satisfied me that they only ship their surplus catch to the United States, 
left over after filling all orders from local dealers. The price appears to be 
the difficulty. As stated in Report for 1906, the home market is a matter 



REPORT OF THE No. 32 



of dollars and cents. Tlie price of fish has increased in the same ratio as 
other commodities. Scarcity of means or inclination to use them, and not 
scarcity of fish, appears to be the trouble. 

Many consignments of fish were examined in transit by our officers, to 
see if the requirements of the law were being observed, and the result was 
that during the early summer some shipments were found to contain illegal 
fish, and were confiscated, but the lesson proved a wholesome one, and after 
that but few consignments were found to be wrong. To afford better pro- 
tection of the fisheries, it is believed that if the fish were examined at import- 
ant shipping points before being shipped, and the packages labelled bj an 
officer of the Department as having been inspected, much of the illegally 
caught fish which have been finding their way to the American markets 
would be prevented from reaching the other side. 

The preservation of our Great Lake fisheries is one of the utmost import- 
ance. The Department is unable to consider favorably a great many appli- 
cations for fishing licenses, having in mind that the first care is to see that 
the waters are not overfished. It is to be regretted that the co-operation of 
the fishermen, which it would only be reasonable to expect, is seldom if ever 
given, and one wonders when hearing the fishermen complain of what they 
call the hard conditions of their licenses, but which, after most careful con- 
sideration, were made a part of their licenses, the sole reason being the 
better protection of the fisheries. 

During the past year much discussion has taken place between this 
Department and the tug fishermen as to the amount of net that they should 
be allowed to fish, and while the matter has not yet been definitely settled, 
it is one that will have to be dealt with in the very near future in a manner 
which will be fair and just to the fishermen, with due regard to the fisheries. 

During the past summer I had the pleasure of a visit from Hon. K. A, 
Gupa, of the Indian Civil Service, Calcutta, who was desirous of obtaining 
information regarding the fisheries of Ontario. He had been sent out by 
his Government to study the fisheries in Europe, the United States and 
Canada, and on his visit to me he was given all the information obtainable. 
I also delegated an officer of the Department to show him the actual taking 
of fish by nets, and upon his departure he assured me that he appreciated 
very much the official attention and courtesy he had received, and that he 
expected the information given would be of much benefit to him. 

Nepigon. 

The Nepigon River had this year many of its regular visitors, and in 
addition many new faces were seen. The excellent fishing was a source of 
much pleasure to those who were able to visit this renowned stream. The 
cold backward season prevented many from going who had made arrange- 
ments to spend a few weeks in that locality. 

Re-Stocking. 

The work of re-stocking the inland waters with parent bass had to be 
abandoned this year, owing to the cold backward spring, which caused 
these fish to delay their coming to their spawning grounds until it was too 
late to carry this important work on with any probable degree of success. 
The undersigned has been considering whether it would not be better to do 
some of this work with fingerlings, and with this object in view enquiry 
has been instituted to find where suitable ponds could be secured for the 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 



propagation of these fish, which to many anglers afford the most enjoyable 
of all sports, and it is hoped that during next year some plan may be 
decided upon which will enable this work to be carried on without inter- 
ruption. 

Angling Permits. 

Many of our summer visitors who were obliged to take out angling per- 
mits before being able to legally angle in our waters expressed themselves 
as being pleased with the new regulations, believing that now fishing would 
be better protected, for no longer could ignorance of the regulations 
as to size and number of fish which could be legally caught be urged as an 
excuse. Our officers fulfil their duty in regard to the selling of these per- 
mits in a much more satisfactory manner this year than last, owing, I 
believe, to the better understanding of their instructions, and in conse- 
quence the revenue received from the sale of these exceeded considerably 
that of last year. 

Patrol Service. 

The patrol service during the year was performed partly by boats owned 
by the Government, and partly by boats chartered for that purpose. The 
"I'll See" was put in commission on the Georgian Bay as soon as the ice 
had disappeared in the spring, but it was found that she was not suited to 
those waters, and it was thought that the protection of the fisheries would 
be best served by chartering a steamboat, and the "Mary L." was then 
secured. For three months, with the assistance of the "Pearl" (which was 
used exclusively for patrolling the waters of Parry Sound and the Bustard 
Islands), she patrolled the waters of the Georgian Bay and the North Channel 
of Lake Huron in a very satisfactory manner; and while it was necessary 
at times to impose fines, the law in my opinion was never better observed. 
Capt. Gidley, who was in charge of the "I'll See," acted as an officer of the 
Department on board the "Mary L." and directed where the boat should go. 

During November, the close season for whitefish and salmon trout, the 
tug "Thos. Maitland" was secured as an additional protection of those waters, 
and the officer of the Department who remained on board during her term 
of service reports that undoubtedly the presence of this boat prevented many 
nets being fished that otherwise would have been fished. 

The purchase of the "Lurline" for patrol service was a wise one. She 
was well adapted for that purpose, and but for her untimely end the fisheries 
of the Georgian Bay and North Channel of Lake Huron would have received 
next year the protection which long ago they should have had. 

The "Pearl" was chartered for three months during the summer, and 
carefully searched for trap nets, finding but few — a different situation from 
that of last year, the officer in charge assigning the reason to the thorough 
patrol which this boat gave- to those waters, thus preventing fishermen, who 
year after year have made a profitable income out of the illegal trap net, 
from using this net. 

The "Eva Bell" patrolled, as in former years, the Rideau waters. The 
officer in charge reports the law being well observed. For three months the 
"Dean" patrolled the waters of the Bay of Quinte, and filled a long felt 
want. Her services during the past summer prevented much illegal fishing, 
which year after year has been going on in spite of the watchfulness of our 
over^'eers. There is no doubt that a constant patrol should be kept of these 
waters for at least six months every year. 



10 REPORT OF THE No. 32 



The officer who has charge of part of the waters of the North Channel 
of Lake Huron, and also part of Lake Superior, patrolled his district with 
gasoline launches, and many nets illegally set were confiscated, and some 
fines imposed. It is the opinion of the undersigned that, while the patrol 
service last year never was better, it is necessary in the immediate future 
to make it much more effective, and would suggest for your consideration 
that a fast seaworthy boat be put in commission as early next spring as pos- 
sible, and be kept in commission until after the close season in November, 
on the waters of the Georgian Bay, North Channel of Lake Huron and Lake 
Superior. 

During the past year the Department has lost two of its officers, viz., 
W. D. Wigle, of Cedar Springs, who was Game and Fishery Warden of West- 
ern Ontario, and who discharged his duties in a manner most satisfactory to the 
Department, and Mr. J. H. Starling, who this year was appointed a special 
officer to look after the waters of the Bay of Quinte and vicinity, and who 
rendered excellent service, which was much appreciated, not only by the 
Department, but by the residents of that vicinity who were interested in the 
protection of the game and fisheries. 

Ruffed Grouse and Partridge. 

The general hunting during the open season of 1907 has been fairly good, 
with the exception of ruffed grouse. These grand and hardy birds, _ during 
the last two seasons, have been very scarce, not only in Ontario, but all over 
the United States and the Dominion. No doubt two or three cold, wet and 
late springs are to some extent the cause of the scarcity, but owing to the 
immense extent of country in which the scarcity prevails, other causes must 
be sought for. The prevailing opinion of sportsmen and writers is that a 
general epidemic prevails from which these beautiful birds are suffering all 
over the continent. The comparative absence of snow in the northern woods 
of the Province, during the winter of 1905-1906, killed immense numbers. 
What little snow fell became crusted, on the surface of which thousands of 
dead ruffed grouse, better known as partridge, were found. These birds can 
endure very cold weather when on the move during the day, but they can- 
not live through the long winter nights on the exposed limb or branch of 
trees with the temperature 25 or 30 degrees below zero. During normal 
winters in our back woods, with two to four feet of snow on the ground, the 
partridge do not suffer from the extreme cold, in consequence of passing the 
long nights covered with from twelve to eighteen inches of snow. Never- 
theless, the unfortunate fact is, that from a combination of circumstances, 
the partridge have decreased to such an alarming extent as to necessitate 
one or more close seasons to prevent the extermination of these, the most 
valuable and interesting species of our native game birds. 

Quail. 

In consequence of the quail nesting later than partridge, the late cold 
springs did not have the disastrous effect on our cheery and useful "Bob- 
AVhites." I" am glad to say, owing to close seasons and re-stocking, the 
effect of several hard winters have entirely disappeared. Sportsmen report 
having found, during the past season, these grand little birds more numerous 
than in past years. I hope the sportsmen, in conjunction with the farmers 
and their sons, will practise self-denial, and that care so essential in keeping 
up the supply of quail in the south-western counties of the Province. Modern 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 11 



and improved methods of farming liave not improved the chances of quail 
successfully contending with long and severe winters. The wire fences that 
are replacing the stump and rail fences, provide neither food nor shelter, 
while the latter provided both, to a large extent, during severe weather when 
neither were obtainable from other sources. It is not wise to depend on 
perpetuating the supply of quail by re-stocking. The sale and export may 
be prohibited by those States from which we have in the past procured breed- 
ing stock. If the Hungarian or European partridge will not fight and molest 
the quail, it would be advisable to endeavor to acclimatize these strong and 
hardy birds in our quail districts, which I am convinced would be suitable 
for them, they being similar in their habits as to feeding, nesting, etc., to 
quail. As I have previously stated, it rests with the sportsmen whether 
quail are to be perpetuated or exterminated, as in some of the neighboring 
States. If the unwise and selfish practice of killing entire ■ bevies and not 
leaving any for next season's crop be pursued, then the end is in sight. 

Ducks. 

The duck shooting, which is general to a great extent over the whole 
of the Province, was not as satisfactory as in former years, no doubt in some 
measure due to the unusual cold and late spring. Although some good bags 
were made in some localities, good bags were not general. Now that our 
neighbors realize the folly of shooting ducks in the spring en route to their 
nesting grounds, we may reasonably expect to have more ducks in the fall 
than for some years past. 

Woodcock. 

These beautiful game birds, so dear to the heart of every true sports- 
man, are becoming scarcer in the Province each succeeding year, no doubt 
resulting from too many colored sportsmen and cheap pot-metal guns in the 
south, the winter home of these famous game birds. I have known one man 
to kill 300 woodcock in one season, within a radius of ten miles from Hamil- 
ton, a far larger number than can be killed in the whole Province in one 
season now. 

Snipe and Plover. 

These birds were found in sufficient numbers to afford good sport, in fact 
plover shooting is reported to have been more satisfactory than for many 
jears past. 

Capercailzie. 

Mr. G. W. Bartlett, Superintendent of Algonquin Park, where the 
imported capercailzie were released some years ago, reports that three were 
seen last summer on the island on which some of the imported birds wert 
liberated. Several others were seen by reliable parties. Mr. Bartlett 
reports having seen one himself. I am not surprised that more have not 
been seen, as they are very shy and solitary in their habits, retiring to the 
most dense and inaccessible pine woods. They do not increase as rapidly 
as other members of the grouse family, not rearing more than five or six in 
a brood. I consider it very satisfactory that numbers of them have been 
seen years after the imported ones were liberated, which proves conclusively 
that their surroundings are suitable, and that they are there to stay. 



12 REPORT OF THE No. 32 



Caribou. 

Few caribou have as yet been killed by sportsmen in tlie Province. 
Many bave been killed by Indians who occupy the caribou grounds, beyond 
the reach of sportsmen. In the near future when the railroads under con- 
struction, and those contemplated, are completed, the caribou grounds of 
Ontario will become as famous as those of Newfoundland. I have heard 
of some very fine heads being obtained by Indians, within forty or fifty 
miles of Bear Island, equal in dimension to any procured in the Maritime 
Provinces or Newfoundland. 

Moose. 

One hundred and seventeen moose, or heads of same, were carried by 
the Dominion Express Company during the open season, exclusive of those 
killed by Indians and local hunters. 

Deer. 

3,886 carcasses of deer were carried by Express Companies, being 406 
less than carried by them in 1906, and 576 more than they carried in 1905. 
Of course this is not one-third of the number killed in the Province during 
the year, when we consider those killed by Indians, and settlers under 
permits. The reduction from 1906 is due to the decrease in the number of 
non-resident licenses issued in 1907, compared with 1906. 

Eur-Bearing Animals. 

When we take into consideration the fact that, as a rule, beaver and 
otter frequent the rivers, streams and small lakes in the northern portions 
of the Province, inhabited by Indians, and where lumbering operations are 
carried on, it is surprising that so many of these valuable fur-bearing animals 
are to be found in their usual haunts. Many of the beaver dams are 
destroyed and flooded out by the construction of large dams for logging pur- 
poses. The rapid construction of railways, making nearly all portions of 
the Province easy of access, make it almost impossible to ever have an open 
season for these interesting denizens of the north country. One open season 
would be tantamount to extermination. 

Muskrats are holding their own better than any other species of fur- 
bearing animal in the Province. When December was added to the open 
season, April should have been added to the close season, for various reasons 
too numerous to mention. 

The present market value of mink has been adduced as a reason for 
their being protected during a part of the year. 

The coarser species of fur-bearers have been fairly abundant. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Tour obedient servant, 

E. TiNSLEY, 
Superintendent of Game avd Frshrries 
Toronto, December 31st, 1907. 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 13 

Game a^d I'ishekies Inspectors. 

Toronto, Dec. 31st, 1907. 
E. TiNSLEY, Supt. Game and Fisheries, 

Sir, — After travelling over a large portion of tlie Province during the 
fishing season and over a smaller portion during the closed season, I can 
say that I have found nearly all of the overseers and officers of the Depart- 
ment to be very attentive to and faithful in the discharge of their various 
duties. 

The commercial fishermen are fairly well satisfied with the season's 
catch, although in many localities not as large as in previous years, this 
shortage in many cases being due to the late opening of navigation, caus- 
ing them to be almost three weeks late in getting started. 

In connection with this, I wish to call your attention to the almost 
universal belief among fishermen that wherever there has been young fish 
from hatcheries dumped on their fishing grounds that they can see the good 
results. This is especially true in the case of the men fishing above Point 
Edward, in Lake Huron; they know (they do not think) that the whole 
credit for the improved fishing is due to the Sandwich Hatchery. 

I am of the opinion that if we had a number of these hatcheries at 
different points on the lakes that the results would be noticeable in a very 
few years, this I believe would be the case with whitefish more than any 
other kind. I would also call your attention to the difficulty your overseers 
have in enforcing the close season in some parts of Lake Erie, caused largely 
by the fact that in other parts of the same lake the close season for white- 
fish has been abolished. 

Regarding angling permits, I do not find that there is any feeling among 
tourists or others against them, all acknowledge that it is the correct thing 
to do, but at the same time saying that most of this should be used in the 
restocking and protection of the angling grounds. 

The licensing of guides is a matter worthy of your consideration. Not 
as a matter of revenue, but of protection. If these guides were licensed, 
the Department would have a certain amount of control over them and could 
make it part of their duties to see that the regulations as to the number and 
size of fish caught were adhered to, and no one can be in as good, a position 
to do this as the guides. 

I have talked to a number of anglers about this and nearly all of them 
agree with me in saying that this would be one of the best ways possible to 
enforce the regulations. The only objection that I have heard to this being 
done is the fear that it would be liable to create a monopoly, as they claim 
that there are not too many guides at present. But I am of the opinion 
that this would not be the case ; by making the fee merely nominal it would 
not be a hardship on anyone and it would have a tendency to decrease the 
hours of labor, as a guide's day would end when his party had caught their 
legal number of fish, and this chance of shorter hours no doubt would 
encourage more men to engage in the business. 

I might say that the above rule is in use in some localities and works 
well. 

The Department should have a few bass ponds for the hatching of black 
bass, there being no doubt that the young bass are much better for restock- 
ing purposes than the parent fish. 



14 REPORT OF THE No. 32 



The policy of the Department in not issuing any licenses for inland 
lakes where there are already settlers, or likely to be, is no doubt the correct 
one, but in some of these lakes far removed from any settlement and where 
the surroundings make settlement impossible, there might be (after a thor- 
ough investigation) no harm in allowing a certain amount of fishing, but 
not to the extent that there would be any danger of fishing them out. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Wm. W. Holden, 
Insfector Game and Fisheries. 



Toronto, 31 Dec, 1907. 

Sir, — I submit herewith a report of my work of inspection during the 
past season, memos, of which have been furnished you. I will therefore 
summarize these memos, as follows : 

Exainination of Inland Lakes. 

It is well known that in Northern Ontario there are a number of lakes 
and rivers about which we practically know nothing. Their value has not' 
been ascertained. This lack of interest was due largely to their surroundings 
being wild and unsettled. It is pleasing to note that the Minister is fully 
alive to the situation, and has decided to utilize them for the benefit of the 
Province in accordance with their value. Although late in the season before 
I got to work, I succeeded in getting information that enables me to say that 
there are numbers of these waters that teem with the finest quality of com- 
mercial fish, such as salmon trout, whitefish, pickerel, and pike, and can, with 
proper fishery regulations, be made to yield a continuous large revenue. It 
would be necessary, however, to change the system of granting fishing privil- 
eges from that which now prevails in the older part of the Province, where 
the licenses are granted on a yearly fee based upon the kinds and quantity 
of nets used, to a system of charging a royalty on the quantity of fish taken, 
and especially so, in view of the fact that the fishing operations will, in all 
likelihood, be carried on by, and in the interest of foreigners, or, which is 
most likely, altogether in the interest of the latter, as you are fully aware 
that fully 95 per cent, of the catch now goes to the United States, and the 
Dep«jrtment receives a mere pittance by way of license fees. 

Now that these waters are getting more and more accessible, owing to the 
construction of railroads, the time is opportune for adopting a policy to meet 
these requirements, and should the above plan be adopted, it is pretty safe 
to say that the problem of granting more assistance to Northern Ontario will 
be greatly lessened by the outlay in some way of the revenue derived from 
those waters which are at present lying idle, although containing great 
wealth. 

Fishery Laws. 

The cry has been raised so often that the only thing necessary for the 
protection of the fish, is the establishment of uniform laws between Canada 
and the various States bordering thereon, that most people believe that there 
is something in it, but when we look at the facts, the hollowness of the cry is 
easily observable. 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 16 



In the first place, it is a well known fact that the best fishing obtains on 
the Canadian side in all waters, not as is generally considered, on account of 
better protection or of less fishing, but is attributable to nature. 

The question of making uniform fishery regulations with the several 
States bordering on International waters, being now under consideration at 
Ottawa, need not be commented upon here. The fact that the Federal 
authorities have had the right of making regulations for the proper preser- 
vation of the fisheries since 1867, and have left the fisheries to be destroyed 
during close season in certain localities noted for natural spawning grounds, 
cannot be successfully defended ; nor can the action of that authority be 
justified in using the most destructive nets possible in dragging over the 
spawning beds at the breeding time in the Bay of Quinte waters, to take fish 
for the purpose of obtaining eggs to put in the waters where they have 
removed the close season for that particular kind of fish, while the netting 
is being carried on and millions of these eggs taken with the fish, which if 
permitted would have deposited them on the natural spawning beds. This 
is robbing Lake Ontario of the remnant of the whitefish for the very doubtful 
benefit of Lake Erie, 

Stocking depleted waters. 

For a number of years parent bass were caught in Lake Erie under con- 
tract, for the purpose of stocking inland waters, but the results are not very 
satisfactory for the following reasons : 

Ist. These fish were placed in waters thoroughly unsuited by reason of 
the lower temperature of the water than that from which the fish were taken, 
and the shock was too great for them to survive, particularly after having 
been caught and penned up for several days previously, and after travelling- 
several hundred miles by rail. When placed in the new waters, a very large 
percentage of them died. The only feasible way* of re-stocking waters with 
these fish is to select small ponds or streams having a similar temperature to 
the waters from which they are to be taken. Procure the parent fish in the 
fall months and place them in these rearing ponds and allow them to hatch 
out their own young in the following spring ; these young fish will be suffici- 
ently large enough for transportation in the fall, or perhaps it would be 
well to leave them until the following year, when they would be better able 
to take care of themselves, before removal. In this way we would have fish 
that were acclimatized, and they would be too small to be captured by the 
angler as is the case with the parent fish that survive the hardships incident 
to their transportation. 

Enforcement of Regulations. 

The regulations in some cases were not lived up to, and many fines were 
the result ; but on the whole they were better observed than formerly, owing 
to the fact that it was found that the Department was not inclined to show 
partiality. 

Staff. 

The present outside staff, so far as I have seen, are fully capable of per- 
forming their duties, but are not sufficiently remunerated for the amount of 
work actually necessary for the protection of the game and fish, but neverthe- 
less have done fairly well, considering the limited time they are able to 
devote to the work. 



16 REPORT OF THE No. 32 



In some instances there are overseers who are stimulated into special 
activity from their sportsmanlike interest more than from any personal 
advantage, while others, although equally desirous of enforcing the regu- 
lations cannot afford the time unless at a great loss to their business. It is 
therefore absolutely necessary, if the game and fish are to be efficiently pro- 
tected, that our officers be properly remunerated. 

I regret to note the action of certain gentlemen in continually calling 
public attention to the necessity of protecting the game fish, while not a word 
is uttered in the interest of our great commercial fisheries. Those portions of 
the waters of the Bay of Quinte, River St. Lawrence, and Georgian Bay 
frequented by game fish, have been receiving, for years, special protection, 
and the sale of bass, maskinonge and trout has been prohibited, as well as a 
limit placed on the size and number of the fish taken. It will be thus seen 
that the Department has not overlooked the protection of game fish, and I 
am satisfied that these regulations are fairly well observed. 

I have the honor to be 

Your obedient servant, 

J. S. Webster, 

Acting Inspector. 
E. TiNSLEY, Esq., 

Superintendent of Game and Fisheries. 



bei 

ali^ Game and Fishery Wardens. 

Pro- 

I S^*^ Game and Fishery Warden William Burt, Simcoe, reports that the 
^ speckled trout have become very scarce in his district. In the few streams, 
however, where this game fish is found, they are reported to be as numerous 
as in the previous year. The bass at Long Point have been very plentiful, 
anglers having no difficulty whatever in securing the limit allowed by the 
Fishery Act. 

During the year he was asked to investigate the fishing in the Grand 
River below Brantford. He found that a glue factory and a starch factory 
in that city were discharging their refuse into the river. This had the effect 
of polluting the waters so that the fish were killed, and, in his opinion, it 
would be impossible for fish to live in these waters while this pollution con- 
tinues. 

There are not many quail in this district, but during this year they have 
been fully as numerous, and he thinks a little more numerous than in the 
year previous. Partridge have been very scarce all through his district. The 
woods have been cut down, and the land cleared, so that there is not much 
cover left for them, and even in the covers the birds have been scarce. He 
attributes this "to the cold late spring, although a number of people who study 
the habits of these birds think they were afflicted with some disease. Owing 
to the clearing up of the land there are not many black squirrels left in his 
district, but in places where the woods are dense enough they have been 
fairly numerous this year. The wild geese rarely visit his district in the 
autumn. Formerly great numbers stopped there in their northern flight in 
the spring, but of late years they have been very scarce, so that it is now a 
very rare thing to hear of a goose being killed in his district. Along the 
Niagara River and the Grand River wild ducks are reported to have been not 
80 numerous as in previous years, but in the Long Point Bay district they 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. i, 



have been more numerous than for many years past, and the varieties of 
ducks have been good, there being great quantities of canvas-backs and red- 
heads amongst them. The muskrats have been numerous, and if it were not 
for the illegal killing of these animals, he is satisfied they would soon 
become a large source of revenue to owners of marshes. 

A great many people have applied to him for permission to shoot ducks 
more than two hundred yards from the shore, their complaint being that in 
a number of places private persons or companies owned the waters two 
hundred yards from shore, so that it was impossible to get any shooting 
without breaking the game law or trespassing upon private property. Of 
course, he was unable to grant any such permission, but he would suggest 
that something be done to give the public the right to shoot more than two 
hundred yards from the shore where the land is taken up by companies or 
private individuals along the shore. He has watched closely the shipping of 
ducks on coupons issued to American citizens. He has visited nearly all the 
trains passing through Simcoe from the shooting district, and found quan- 
tities of ducks being shipped, but in all cases with the coupons attached. He 
is convinced, however, that more ducks were shipped than the licenses issued 
to this district would warrant. His impression is that some of the coupons 
were used more than once, and would therefore suggest that the Act be 
amended, making it necessary, when cancelling the coupons, that the date of 
cancellation should also be written on the coupons. He thinks this would 
prevent the coupons being used a second time. 

A number of complaints have been made to him by owners of marshes 
that people have been illegally spearing the muskrats. As this is done 
secretly, it is very difficult to obtain evidence of such spearing. He is told 
that the owners of the marshes always prefer to trap the rats instead of spear- 
ing them. He would therefore suggest that the spearing of rats and the 
carrying of rat-spears in or near any place where rats frequent should be 
prohibited. 

Owing to the fact that the residents along the shores are largely in 
sympathy with the persons who break the game laws, he has found it difficult 
to procure transportation by boat. He thinks it would be well worth while 
for the department to purchase a motor boat of high speed for use by the 
game and fisheries officers along the shores of Lake Erie. It would make it 
much easier to catch the offenders red-handed, and to confiscate boats, guns, 
&c., used illegally. 

The game laws in his district, owing to a more vigorous enforcement, 
have been much better than in the. past. 

Acting Game and Fishery Warden Victor Chauvin, Windsor, reports 
that the fishermen are fairly satisfied with the year's fishing, especially 
with whitefish, the catch of which has been unusually good. He thinks some 
regulations should be made regarding sturgeon. He has seen people carry 
two or three of these fish at one time on their bicycle, and says it seems hard 
to see fish that grow to the size sturgeon do, caught when they are so small. 
He thinks if the season were closed for about two years, and not allowed to 
be taken of a less weight than 20 lbs., it would be more satisfactory to the 
public. He reports a fair catch of perch in Lake Erie. 

As regards Game, he reports that quail have been more numerous than 
for some years past. The reason of the increase to a large extent has been 
the re-stocking done by the Department during the past few years. He is 
pleased to say that sportsmen as a rule are pleased with a smaller bag of 
birds than formerly, and have more dogs worked on game. The rabbit hunters 
are very destructive to quail on the snow, after the season closes. Quail are 

2 F. 



REPORT OF THE No. 32 



reported plentiful this winter, and are doing well so far by the report of the 
farmers through the country. With a favorable spring, quail should be 
plentiful next fall. Partridge are becoming scarcer each year. Last fall 
there were few killed in the neighborhood, so the season he thinks should' 
be the same as for quail. When the season opens on the 15th Sept. and 
closes on the 15th Dec, it gives the shooters too much excuse to be out shoot- 
ing quail, and they claim they are out shooting partridge. 

Wild geese were there in large numbers during the spring and fall of 
1902 and 1903. The sportsmen used to have great sport chasing them and 
trying to get a shot at them. In those years he and his partner killed 146 
one season over a life decoy, but the last few years they have been getting 
more scarce. They seem to change their feeding grounds, and the sportsmen 
are getting very few of them. Wild duck were abundant in spring, but they 
were very scarce last fall, except the grey and black duck, which were more 
plentiful than in years past ; but the bluebill and other river ducks were very 
scarce, so the fall shooting was not satisfactory to the sportsmen for river 
shooting. Muskrats are as numerous as ever, a large part of his district 
being suitable for them. Sportsmen enjoy hunting them. 

The game laws have been fairly well observed in his division. 

Game and Fishery Warden T. A. Hand, Sault Ste. Marie, reports that 
the fishery laws were broken in several instances, but chiefly by Americans. 
They have been doing as they like up in this country so long that they seem 
to have got the impression that they own the country. When you get 
American trap and gill nets set in our waters twenty miles over the boundary, 
it is time something was done. He got these nets on several occasions, bat 
was unable to get their boats on account of not having a proper boat, and he 
thinks, to do justice to the men who pay a license and live up to the laws, 
there should be a good boat on the water all the time between Killarney and 
Michipicoten. It is very Hiscouraging to our own men to pay a license, set 
their nets, and then have an American come along and set his net right across 
our man's who pays his license. He has seen this done, and of course he 
seized their nets every chance he got. 

Judging from the success of the various hunters during the past open 
season, he is of the opinion that deer and moose are becoming more plenti- 
ful in that district. He is proud to say that he thinks the game laws are 
pretty well observed, as he had only one conviction during the year — that of 
killing one moose during the close season. He is also pleased to say that there 
were about three bucks killed this season to one doe. It will be noticed by 
the returns from there that they did not sell so many non-resident licenses 
as last year, owing, he has no doubt, to the raise in the fee, which he thinks 
was proper. He had about half a dozen Americans come to him, and when 
they found the fee was $50 they did not stay. 

Wolves are on the increase — at least that is his opinion, and he thinks 
the bounty should be raised to at least |25 per head, and then a great many 
more would be killed. Beaver are getting more plentiful, also muskrats. 
Partridge are very scarce, owing, he thinks, to the lateness of the spring, 
also on account of the heavy fall of snow on the 28th May, which he thinks 
killed a great number of the young birds. 

Game and Fishery Warden, Capt. A. Hunter, Belleville, reports that 
on the whole the commercial fishermen have had a very successful year. He 
would suggest that farmers and residents of the Province be allowed to spear 
suckers and pike for their own use in the early spring. He found that the 
fishery laws were fairly well observed throughout Eastern Ontario. He 
thinks better results and more revenue would follow if the angling permits 

2a F. 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 19 



were raised to $5 per rod instead of $2 as at present. He would recommend 
that net fishing in inland lakes be prohibited or restricted, and the angling 
fee raised for non-residents of the Province. The American angler is 
perfectly satisfied to pay the increased fee if the game fish are protected. 
It is estimated that the tourist trade is worth at least $1,000,000 a year t!bl 
Eastern Ontario. He would also suggest that some close season or other 
restriction be placed upon frogs, as, unless something along this line be done, 
the, frogs will become extinct. Five years ago frogs were plentiful in num- 
erous creeks, and now these waters are quite depleted. 

In going through his district during September, duck hunters reported 
ducks unusually plentiful this year, particularly in the eastern porton. He 
thinks that the season for shooting ducks should not begin until September 
15th, as in late springs (as was last) the young ducks are not completely 
feathered out • and consequently become an easy prey to hunters. He 
thinks it would be better if the open season for ducks, shore birds, and all 
small game should begin at the same date each year. 

He thinks that mink and muskrats should be grouped together having 
the same close season, as both seem likely to become extinct in a short time, 
if the present demand for their fur continues, and no restrictions are placed 
upon them. He is informed that both these kinds of fur bearing animals 
were scarcer this year than last, as also were beaver and otter. Deer also 
were less plentiful than formerly. He would recommend that hunters be 
limited to killing one deer each for the next three years, also that the use of 
dogs in killing deer be prohibited. 

He would suggest that more care be taken in issuing settlers' permits, 
and none should be issued except to actual settlers, who should be bona fide 
farmers or householders of at least six months' occupancy. He finds that in 
several cases men living outside of the settlers' limits obtained permits from 
the issuers, killed their deer, and consumed it in towns and villages where 
they lived, some of whom he fined for so doing. 

Game and Fishery Warden G. M. Paries, North Bay, reports deer as 
very plentiful, but going farther north; moose plentiful in the northern sec- 
tion of his district; partridge very scarce. 

The Indians are very destructive to game and fish, and settlers would 
like to see greater restrictions placed on the Indians, preventing indiscrim- 
inate slaughtering of game. 

Tourists are coming to the district in greater numbers each year, and 
a large summer colony is springing up along the French River, where many 
cottages have been built. The number of tourists visiting French River 
in 1907 was double the number of any previous year, and it would be an 
inducement for a still greater influx if the fish in Lake Nipissing were pro- 
tected by the prohibition of net fishing. 

Game and Fishery Warden C. N . Sterling, Kenora, reports that he has 
had very encouraging reports from his deputies. The Indians are the cause 
of the most trouble. He has been along the line of the C.P.R. to Port 
Arthur, and is trying to get Port Arthur, Fort William and Kenora to form 
a protective association, which will do a lot in protecting the game. The 
lumber camps on the Lake of the J^oods will not buy any game from the 
Indians, as the contractors have told them that if any game is bought from 
the Indians, and they are found out, the fine will be taken out of their 
wages. This is a great help. 

Game and Fishery Warden J. H. Willmott, Beaumaris, reports as 
regards Game that the experience of deer hunters during the past season 
undoubtedly shows that in many parts of the Province \there hunting has 



20 REPORT OF THE No. 32 



been indulged in for many years, more drastic restrictions should be enacted, 
in order to leave a sufficient supply for breeding purposes. Many causes 
are assigned for tbe decrease in tbe game supply, but he thinks the real cause 
is that experienced by every new country, viz., the diminution of game as 
settlement and civilization advance. His opinion is, and always has been, 
that the prohibition of hunting with dogs is the keynote to the preserva- 
tion of deer. On the other hand this would not be fair to men who tak© a 
pride in their dogs and enjoy the "music" of these animals as much as the 
actual killing of the game. The best hunting district in the Province is 
now being cut up by railways, making the ingress and egress comparatively 
easy to places which formerly were inaccessible. Many hundreds of deer 
have been taken out of such places during the past open season, and it is 
only a question of time before the stock is depleted. Next year the rail- 
way construction will penetrate that section much farther than at present, 
and an additional influx of hunters will be the natural result. He thinks 
that the day is not far distant when each hunter will have to be satisfied 
with one deer as his limit. 

The "Fawn" clause is most objectionable for the following reasons: 
1st : It is most difficult when taking a snap shot at a deer when running 
through the bush, to discern (in many cases) whether it is a buck, doe, or 
fawn, particularly whether a fawn or a yearling. 2nd : Many fawns are 
sure to be killed by mistake, and the result is that they are used in camp, 
fed to the dogs, or left to rot in the bush, and other deer killed to make up 
the hunter's complement — perhaps fine does which if saved would probably 
produce two good fawns in the spring. 3rd : It tends to make sneaks of 
honest men, as it is only human nature to resort to actions which one does 
not approve of in order to evade the paying of a fine. 

The necessity of having to make affidavit by hunters as to the number 
killed by them is also most unpopular, and impossible to enforce without 
going to extreme measures with the majority of licensees. He would 
respectfully suggest that in framing the laws it is most necessary to make 
the clauses brief but plain, so that they can b© understood by the masses 
and also to abstain from inserting any clauses which cannot be enforced. 

Many complain of bull moose becoming scarce. Should this be so, the 
only remedy is to put on a close season for a term of years. He would most 
urgently advise the preservation of partridges for two or three years. These 
birds are becoming very scarce in the southern parts of these districts, and 
if not protected, there will soon not be enough left to perpetuate the species. 
He would recommend the same portion of the Province to be set apart for 
this protection as that previously named by him, viz., south of the French 
Hiver, thence south of Lake Nipissing to Nipissing Junction, thence south 
of the C.P.R. to Mattawa, and west of said line to Ottawa. 

Wolves have been reported as numerous in various sections. He would 
repeat his recommendations of last year — ^to leave the bounty on wolves as 
at present, but to increase it on females. 

Regarding fish, he says that as his district is confined solely to inland 
lakes^ in which no netting licenses are issued, he can only speak as to ang- 
ling. This was poor at the commencement of the season, but materially 
improved later on. As many of our northern lakes teem with herring, and 
as these fish cannot be procured except by netting, he would recommend 
that settlers be allowed to use nets of certain length, mesh, etc., during the 
month of November, when these fish are found in shallow bays, a small 
license fee for which would not be objectionable. A few of these fish salted 
down for winter use would be a god-send to many settlers in the sparsely 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 21 



settled portions of our north country. In case the privilege was abused, 
there is always the law to resort to. This would also refer to whitefish. No 
other varieties would be likely to be found in such bays at this time of the 
year, as the game fish would be in deep water. The introduction of maski- 
nonge into Muskoka lakes (Muskoka, Rosseau and Joseph) he believes would 
not be prejudicial to other fish, as they are found in waters which abound 
with bass, pickerel, etc. A rather remarkable occurrence came under his 
notice during the past season, viz., the catching of three whitefish on trolls, 
the artificial minnow being the bait on which all three were caught. 

The laws, as a rule, have been fairly kept, netting being the chief con- 
travention. He has during the past summer forwarded nine of these to 
the Department, which were confiscated. 

Special Game and Fisheries Overseer. 

Special Overseer Henry Watson, Toronto, reports that the catch of 
all kinds of fish was about the same as in 1906, with the exception of sal- 
mon trout, some very good catches being taken, considering the outfit of 
the fishermen. The fishing business is carried on in a happy-go-lucky man- 
ner by the majority engaged in it, and with very little profit, but he thinks 
it could be made fairly remunerative if gone about in the right way. The 
fishery laws were well observed by the fishermen, a small amount of ille- 
gal fishing being attempted in prohibited waters. The rod fishing around 
Toronto gets poorer every year. Some of the anglers blame it on the large 
number of carp, but the greater number attribute it to illegal fishing, while 
the cause of it all is the large amount of poisonous matter poured into the bay 
through the city sewers. The refuse from the gas works is bad, and there 
is lots of it, but the most poisonous of all is what comes from the tanneries, 
and paint works, and the wall paper factory. If the city council would 
stop this pollution they would do more for the -rod fishermen than by the 
making of twenty |5,000 fish ponds. During the year he seized eight ille- 
gal shipments of fish, six passing through Toronto going to the United States, 
and two coining to the city. 

Regarding game. On the whole the law has been better observed than 
ever before, very little illegal shooting having been attempted, considering 
the number of guns and motor boats owned in the vicinity, and that for four 
or five weeks in the spring between two and three thousand ducks made their 
home around Toronto Bay; some of them remain with us the whole year 
through. Out of three hundred motor boats he had trouble with only three, 
they having been too fast for him to catch with anything he could borrow 
or hire. All other kinds of game seem to be about holding their own. 

With reference to illegal shipments of game coming into and passing 
through Toronto, very little of that business is now carried on, in com- 
parison to what was done a few years ago. A portion of the falling off may 
be attributed to the scarcity of partridge. From enquiries made from 
returning deer hunters (and he made it a point to interview as many as pos- 
sible), this grand game bird is very scarce all over the northern country, 
in some parts being totally extinct. 

Overseer John Kennedy, Meaford, reports that the angling has been 
good in his division during the past year, bass, lake trout and speckled trout 
having been plentiful. The law has been well observed. 

Overseer C. H. Knight, Byng Inlet, reports that of four licensed fish- 
ermen in his division, two were prosecuted for illegally fishing in close sea- 
son, and were fined ten dollars each, and their boats and nets were confis- 



22 REPORT OF THE No. 32 



cated. If the law is observed, the close season is just right to protect the 
whitefish when spawning, in the fall. The fishermen report to him a scar- 
city of, fish, and very little money made by them this year. Angling was 
good, apd the bass were plentiful, and of large size. The law in reference 
to angling was well observed. The pickerel caught by angling were of 
small size. He would recommend that the fishery law be posted up on 
rivers and fishing grounds, so that local fishermen and tourists could read 
them, and thus have no excuse to offer for breaking the law. 

Deer were very plentiful in the summer months, and the temptation is 
strong and the opportunity great for pot hunters, of which there are a few 
there, and they are very crafty. No violations of the law were brought to 
his notice that he could get evidence sufficient to prosecute, neither did he 
observe any himself. One man was shot there in mistake for a deer. While 
there was no evidence to convict, it was evident he was hunting for a deer, 
and he would recommend that steps be taken to have a law passed to make 
a penalty for an offence of this kind. While acting as special patrol in 
the open season for deer, he visited a number of hunters' camps, and found 
the law well observed. He would recommend that detectives be sent to 
places like Byng Inlet to detect pot hunters in the summer months, as it 
would be the means of preserving the game. 

Overseer Henry Laughington, Parry Sound, reports that net fishing 
in his district was better this season than in 1906, and very few complaints 
came from the fishermen, as all seemed to be going along well. They all think 
it would be a good scheme to put in a fish hatchery in this locality. The 
rod fishing for black bass was much better than in the season of 1906, 
especially among the islands from Franklin Island to the Point au Baril 
section. There was very little trap net fishing in his locality, as the men 
that followed that kind of work had to give it up, on account of the boats 
cruising on the shore, which is very hard on that kind of net, and they have 
been cleaned out of his district pretty well. 

Lake Huron (proper) and River St. Clair. 

Overseer H. A. Blunden, Sarnia, reports that the season opened early, 
but, owing to rough weather, some of the fishermen could not set their 
pound nets till late in the season. The most of them reported a large run 
of undersized whitefish during the herring and pickerel season, making it 
rather difficult to sort them out and return the same to the water without 
injury. There were complaints of Americans coming over to the Canadian 
side of St. Clair River and catching minnows. He made several attempts to 
catch the guilty parties, but. owing to the fact that they were equipped with 
a very speedy launch, Jie was unsuccessful. 

There were few violations regarding the catching of undersized pickerel, 
in which all guilty parties were prosecuted. Taking the season all through, 
the fishermen had very little to complain of, as they had good catches, and 
were able to sell the same at good prices. 

Overseer D. Kehoe, Millarton, reports that he had only two convictions 
in his division the last year. There was no fine ; they were let off with a warn- 
ing. 

There has been no violation of the Gam^ law that he had heard of, 
and he has been making enquiries. Game is scarce in that section of the 
country, but is more plentiful in the eastern part of the county. 

Overseer R. McMurray, Bayfield, reports that the catch of fish during 
the past season has been good — better than last season. Trout fishing was 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 23 



not so good, but whitefish are becoming more plentiful. Percli are plenti- 
ful, and the fishermen are fishing more for perch than for trout or white- 
fish. The pound net fishermen in his district are going more into gill net 
fishing, to fish for perch. It is only of late that the fishermen thought of 
fishing for these fish. He thinks that if there were more perch caught her- 
ring would become more plentiful, and while the fishermen are fishing for 
perch they also give the trout and whitefish a chance to multiply. He 
would recommend licenses for perch fishing. The close seasons were well 
observed. He made special trips more frequently during the close season, 
often going out to the nets with the fishermen, and found no cause for com- 
plaint. Of course, once in a while a few fish out of season will get into 
their nets, but this cannot be entirely stopped, although the men are care- 
ful not to make a point of catching fish which they know to be out of sea- 
son. He had but two complaints of the infringement of the fishery laws 
for illegal fishing, but he did not fine any one. He found a gill net that 
was set through the ice to catch herring, which he took out and destroyed^, 
but he could not find out who set it. There are no fishways in his district. 
There are sawmills on some of the rivers, but no sawdust or refuse is thrown 
in the water. About 75 per cent, of the amount of fish caught are exported 
ho the United States. 

As to game, he has kept a close watch over his territory to see that the 
law was carried out, Partridge are becoming more scarce each year in con- 
sequence of nearly all the woods being cut down for farming and other pur- 
poses. Wild ducks are plentiful in .spring and fall. There are no deer 
aor wild turkeys in his district. The Game laws have been fairly well 
abserved during the past year. 

Overseer D. Robertson, Southampton, reports that the fishermen in his 
division did not have as good a season as last. In the early part of the 
summer the fishing was fairly good, but the season as a whole was very 
3tormy. The fall fishing was almost a failure on account of the weather 
up till the last week, when the weather was all that could be desired, and 
the fishermen got some extra good hauls. One tug got five tons at one lift. 
That good week relieved the fishermen of a good deal of financial difficulty. 

One man was fined |10 and costs for setting a net in the Sauble River. 
He believes the close season was well observed, as no violations came to his 
notice, although he kept close watch for same. Bass fishing was very good. 

Lake St. Clair, River Thames and Detroit River. 

Overseer J. D. Campbell, Sylvan, reports that the law has been well 
observed in regard to illegal fishing in his district in the Aux Sauble River 
and its tributaries. The angling has been fairly good, but the catch was of 
coarse fish, there being but few game fish on account of the carp being 
very numerous. He has granted but two dipi net licenses during the year, 
and their catch was very small. 

In regard to the game, not one single violation of the Game laws 
came to his notice. 

Overseer John Crotty, Bothwell, reports a decrease in the catch of fish 
this year, which may be accounted for by seines not having been used. 

The fish caught were used for home consumption. 

No abuses existed. 

The close season has been strictly observed. 

No illegal fishing came to his knowledge, therefore there were no fines. 

No mill refuse has troubled the fish. 



24 REPORT OF THE No. 32 



There are no fishways, but it is all clear sailing for the fish to get 
through. 

Overseer Henry Osborne, Dante, reports that the catch of 1907 is a 
little below that of previous years. There is an apparent increase in the 
amount of pickerel over previous years, the principal of which is exported. 
The coarse fish are sold or peddled through the country in the locality of 
the fishing. No abuses have come under his notice, all the fishermen being 
resident farmers in close proximity to the river. Upon close examination 
he finds that the several close seasons are fairly well observed. Some of 
the fishermen say they realize the necessity for their own benefit of protect- 
ing the fish. There are no mills in his division, consequently no mill refuse 
in the river. There are no dams or fishways, and nothing to prevent the 
free passage of the fish. 

Overseer Theodore Peltier, Dover South, reports that there have been 
no violations of the fishery laws in his division, and that the fishermen's 
reports compare favorably with those of last year. 

Licenses having been cut off in the River Thames, there was no fishing 
in the river this year. 

Overseer Remi Laframhoise, Canard River, reports that the carp fish- 
ing has been a disappointment to the fishermen on the Detroit River, pro- 
bably due to the lateness of the spring. However, some of the carp fisher- 
men went to a big expense in constructing ponds in which to keep the carp 
during the time the prices are low, which shows that carp are becoming a 
commercial fish. He is strictly opposed to a carp license for the Detroit 
River, unless there are restrictions on the size of mesh. The carp licenses 
issued heretofore have contained no restrictions as to size of mesh to be used. 
The seines used have been of much smaller mesh than necessary, and there 
is a great temptation for the fishermen to keep the small pickerel and other 
fish that are often caught in them instead of returning them to the water. 
He would recommend that were a carp license issued for the Detroit River, 
a mesh of not less than three and one-half inches extension measure should 
be stipulated. However, the white-fish season has been fairly good. He 
has noted that for some time the catch each season has been larger than that 
of the preceding season. He is convinced that this result must be attri- 
buted to the fish hatcheries. Large quantities of fry have been placed in 
Lake Erie and the Detroit River by the United States hatcheries, and of 
course our hatchery at Sandwich has helped to produce this result. But he 
thinks that our hatcheries could be made to hatch twice as many eggs at 
a very small additional cost, which might do away with the aid of a close 
season in regard to different kinds of small fish. The catch has been about 
the same as last year. He has been over his territory from time to time, 
and is satisfied that the fishermen have fairly well observed the law. 

In regard to Game, he arrested one offender for shooting game out of 
season, and fined him. 

Lake Erie and Geand River. 

Overseer H. A. Henderson, Pelee Island, reports that, from various 
reasons, there has been a falling off in the catch of fish in this district, the 
principal reason being the less vigorous prosecution of the fishing. His 
returns for the year 1907 confirm these conclusions. A comparison of the 
returns of previous years will, however, show that the fish still inhabit these 
waters in fairly good numbers, but that less means are employed in taking 
them. The season was very favorable to those employed in the industry, 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 25 



and the returns, in his opinion, should have been greater. He is inclined to 
think that some of the fishermen are a little careless in keeping track of their 
catch, hence incorrect returns are made. 

As formerly, all fish caught were exported to the United States, except 
a small quantity sold for home consumption. 

No abuses existed in his district. The close seasons were well observed, 
and no illegal fishing came to his notice. 

Ov.erseer Henry Johnson, Brantford, reports that the angling has been 
good in his division; bass and pickerel have been the best for some time, 
and numbers of coarse fish have been taken. Trout fishing has also been 
good. He thinks the law has been well observed, there having been only 
one fine for trout under size. He has had complaints about the starch and 
glue works emptying the refuse from their factories into the river. 

There are four dams in his divisions, and only one has a good fishway. 

All fish caught were for home consumption. 

The rabbits in his division are very plentiful, but he thinks the game 
law was well observed. 

■ Overseer S. Kraft, Ridg,eway, reports that the fishing was very good 
the early part of the season, but during the sumer season not so good. A few 
of the fishermen did not fish, on account of sickness and death, but those who 
did fish did very well. The fish caught were mostly for the home market. 
They realized a very good price, and about one-fourth were sold in Buffalo. 

The law was well observed in his territory. He kept a close watch over 
the fishermen. The game laws were also well observed. 

Overseer Edward Lee, Lowbanks , reports that the pound net fishermen 
in his division had good catches early in the season, with a falling off later 
on. The nets were not set for late fall fishing on account of the loss and 
damage to them by storms. The ti^^ fishermen had most excellent fishing 
in spring, the catch consisting chiefly of whitefish, and fishing continued 
good up to about the middle of August. They report a larger catch of white- 
fish this season than for a number of years — blues on the increase, herring 
better than last two years, perch not so plentiful, and not many jumbo 
herring. There was an enormous catch of blue pickerel in the fall, the nets 
having almost invariably been overrunning with fish when lifted. The 
present season promises one of the largest catch of fish recorded in many 
years. The blues, in spite of the large annual catches, seem to be on the 
increase. The catch of herring also has been good, but not so plentiful as 
the blues. This fall the catch of perch has been about the same as for the 
past five or six years, no great quantities being caught. Although the supply 
of fish was greater this year, the price was practically unchanged, owing, 
the dealers say, to the high prices of meat, which caused a greater demand 
for fish. The success of the fishermen who fish every day during the season 
contradicts the supposition that the lake's supply of fish is giving out. 

About 95 per cent, of the fish caught are exported to the United States, 
the balance being used for home consumption. 

No violation of the game laws was reported or came to his notice. 

No abuses exist. 

The several close seasons have been well observed. 

He had one case of illegal fishing without license of gill net, which was 
confiscated and reported to the Department. 

Overseer J as. McVittie, Blenheim, reports that generally speaking, the 
fish industry has been a paying investment, largely due to the favorable 
weather during the fall, whicH compensated to a large extent for the small 
catch in the earlier part of the year. The peculiar conformation of the shore 



26 REPORT OF THE No. 32 



line in Kent has a tendency to affect the uniformity of the fishing. While 
the fishermen west of the Point of Pines were favored, the ones east lost 
heavilj late in the fall; an opposite condition may prevail another year. 

The regulations as to the observance of the law have been well maintained. 
Although some seizures were made from his district at the Falls. The carp 
fishing at Rondeau Bay has not been pushed to any extent — only four parties 
having licenses. He is pleased to note the disposition of the Department 
to increase the number, and would recommend that along with the seine 
license, a tremmel license be granted, on account of the short season that the 
fish are on shore. The tremmel net would enable them to fish in the deeper 
waters, and also among reeds and in localities where a seine could not be 
drawn. 

Overseer J . P. Pierce, Port Rowan, begs to report that the general catch 
of fish for the past season have been about the average, both in quantity and 
size. The bass, however, in Long Point Bay have been far more numerous 
than for several years past, owing, he believes to the enforcement of the 
law prohibiting their shipment. This has led to the large increase in the 
number of summer visitors. The fishermen have respected the law very well. 

Game. 

Ducks have been plentiful especially the smaller varieties. Squirrels 
and rabbits were numerous. There were a few partridge shot, but quail 
are practically extinct in this part of the country. 

Muskrats have been plentiful, with fur of a good quality, and the general 
opinion is that appearances are very promising for next year. 

He would strongly recommend that the spearing of muskrats at any 
time or under any conditions be totally prohibited. 

Overseer James Vokes, NanticoTte, reports that with the exception of 
some minor infractions of the laws> and some more or less groundless com- 
plaints, he has not had much trouble with his licensees during the past year. 
The two or three sharp lessons of the previous year evidently had a beneficial 
effect. Fishing all along his frontage has been exceptionally good again, 
whitefish and pickerel being very plentiful, and sturgeon more so than usual. 

Overseer Lewis Wigle, Leamington, reports that the catch in his division 
has been very good, more particularly in the fall. It has been a long time 
since whitefish and pickerel were so plentiful, and the only way it can be 
accounted for is through the hatcheries. Herring are plentiful, and much 
larger than a few years ago. Some of the oldest fishermen claim that herring 
are larger because the number is less, and the feeding grounds better. 

Lake Ontario and Bay of Quinte. 

Overseer John Gov ell, Brighton, reports that the fishing and game of 
the past year in his division were much the same as the previous year. About 
90 per cent, of the fish was exported, and 10 per cent, used for home con- 
sumption. 

Overseer Thos. Gault, Deseronto, reports that the catch of fish with both 
gill nets and hoop nets was very much larger than that of 1906. The fisher- 
men were well satisfied, and mostly observed the law in not abusing the 
privileges granted them. The angling was good apd on the whole a great 
increase of fish was to be found in the Bay of Quinte. 

It was also a prosperous season for game. The duck hunting was very 
good, and the laws were fully observed. 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 27 



Overseer Irving Glass, Trenton, reports that he has only one licensed 
fisherman in his district, and he has a license to fish six sets of hoop nets. 
Gill net fishing is entirely prohibited in his district. He finds that fish, such 
as bass, maskinonge and pickerel are very much more numerous than in pre- 
vious years. Angling has been excellent, and there have been some very nice 
catches made. No complaints of illegal fishing of any great consequence 
have been reported. He seized a few rods of gill net on two different occa- 
sions, and he thinks that the law has been fairly well observed in his district. 

There have been a few cases of duck shooting in the. spring which he 
investigated, but was unable to secure any convictions. 

Overseer H. W. Hayes, Murray, reports that the fishermen in his dis- 
trict have had the largest catch this season in fifteen years. He has had no 
fault to find, as the fishermen have observed the regulations. One fisherman 
reported that when he was lifting his net, his little boy took an axe and 
chopped a ling in two, and he called to his father to come and look, as it was 
full of young whitefish and pickerel. It was the first time he ever remarked 
anything of the kind in all his experience in fishing. 

He finds that since the doing away with gill net fishing in the Bay of 
Quinte, fish have multiplied. He also finds that the more ling, dogfish and 
carp that are caught, the more fish increase. 

He has not discovered any illegal fishing this season. 

Overseer Henry Holliday, Wolfe Island, reports that black bass 
fishing was all that could be desired through the latter part of July and 
August, but not very good the first part of the season. A great many 
Americans visit the waters for the purpose of angling, paying their usual 
angler's fee, although quite a number this past season availed themselves of 
the international waters below Kingston, where the bass fishing has been 
better than for years. The net fishermen also had an extra good catch dur- 
ing the past season. All kinds of fish were plentiful with them, and to his 
knowledge there were no violations among the fishermen, and not any fines. 
He also found the fishermen willing to observe the law. 

Regarding game. The wild ducks were not very numerous during 1907. 
It was the worst year in his memory. Muskrats also were not as plentiful as 
in 1906. 

Overseer E. M. Huffinan, Hay Bay, reports that the fishermen of his 
division declare the season of 1907, as a very satisfactory one. A number of 
tourists visited there, and the catch was above the average ; maskinonge were 
plentiful. There were no violations, except one case where three men from 
another division fished there without license. They were fined, and at once 
left. Some of the fishermen complain about the carp, and think there 
should be some means provided to destroy them. 

Overseer C. J . Kerr, Hamilton, reports that the catch of herring, trout 
and whitefish has greatly fallen off this year, although the gasoline launch 
men fished with their usual energy. In regard to the boat fishermen at 
Burlington Beach, who do not fish far out in the lake, their catch was small, 
as the herring did not run on the shore last fall to any great numbers. There 
were 927 lbs. of pickerel caught, while previous years' returns do not show 
any. 

He secured 2,000,000 whitefish fry from the Sandwich hatchery, and he 
planted them off the Beach on the old whitefish spawning beds in about 30 
feet of water, f of a mile from shore in the finest condition. He alsq secured 
500,000 pickerel (dore) from the same place, and those he planted in the bay 
on the north shore well down to the Beach, in the best water in the bay. The 



28 REPORT OF THE No. 32- 



500,000 pickerel put in last year are beginning to show, on several occasions 
having been seen in thousands down near the beach, three and four inches 
long. In a few years he hopes to see good results from this consignment. 

The usual spearing through the ice on the bay was permitted, and 93 
persons took advantage of the privilege, but owing to the sudden breaking 
up of the ice and mild weather, and the dirty state of the water, fishing was 
almost a complete failure. 

An attempt was again made down at the beach by some four fishermen 
there to carry on fishing in the bay in open defiance of the law, and it was 
there he gave two of them the race of their life. He pursued them by boat 
to land and then continued the chase by land, and made them drop their nets 
to get away. The nets and fish he seized, but the men escaped. He also 
seized several other nets in the bay from time to time, and effectually stop- 
ped illegal fishing there, but he suggests that a good man be placed on the 
beach continually during the next spring to assist him in enforcing the game 
and fishery laws, as he cannot be down there all the time. This he thinks 
would put a stop to all illegal fishing there. 

He says he has had a great deal of trouble in regard to the whitefish caught 
in Lake Erie off the Counties where the close season has been abolished. A 
dealer in Hamilton states that he got all that was caught off Haldimand and 
Monck — 11,000 worth. It appears that the fishermen look to November up 
there for their main supply of fish during the year, as the whitefish come to 
shore at that time to spawn on the reefs and rocks, and it is at this time they 
are caught. All the fish he saw in the dealers' stores were spawners, and 
when he questions the dealers they slap an invoice in his face and say their 
fish come from these open counties, and nothing can be done in the matter. 

Regarding the game he says, that at the opening of spring the wild 
ducks came to Burlington Bay in thousands, and remained up to the latter 
part of May. A few snap-shots were taken at them, but on the whole they were 
very seldom molested, one man being convicted for illegal shooting. Rail 
and other water-fowl were in abundance during the spring months. 

Considerable difficulty was experienced in protecting the early fall 
ducks, some of the sportsmen making a dash into the Dundas Marsh during 
the month of August, but after all very little actual killing was done. The 
duck hunting in Burlington Bay this fall was not of the best, some claiming 
that the carp had destroyed the feeding grounds, but I cannot understand 
how this can be, for thousands of ducks are to be seen on the very same feed- 
ing grounds in the spring, and scarcely any in the fall. He suggests that 
sportsmen put feed upon the grounds they wish to shoot, as was done at 
Gage's Inlet with great success. Something of this kind will have to be done 
if we wish to keep the ducks in our waters, for any length of time, during 
their fall migration to the south. Some shooting from a steam launch was 
done during the fall, but the prosecution and eonviction of one party of five 
put a stop to the practice. 

A large flock of birds known as the * 'Guillemot" visited the bay during 
the fall, some few being shot before it was discovered what they were. This 
is the third time that these birds have visited the bay in thirty years. 

Muskrats he says have been very plentiful in the marshes, at least three 
thousand pelts being taken during the year. 

Regarding insectivorous birds he says; that human inclination to des- 
troy bird life has not abated to any great extent since he was a boy, and a 
great deal of work is necessary to prevent men and boys killing off our song 
birds. 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 29 



The foreign element lie says is very hard to handle. They go about the 
woods and fields, with their cast iron guns, killing everything in sight from 
the robin to the ground-hog, anything in that line being considered a delic- 
acy by those people. TKey are very poor marksmen, otherwise the damage 
done would be more than is actually the case. Sunday is their favorite day 
for this kind of work. They are dangerous people to handle, all going 
heavily armed, and would not hesitate to injure anyone interfering with 
them. He had some trouble with them during the year and succeeded in 
putting a sto^to most of the Sunday hunting. 

Overseer Thos. Mansfield, Pichering, reports that the general opinion 
among the fishermen was that the fishing was a great deal better than the 
previous year. The whitefish seem to be increasing every year, and the her- 
ring fishing was also better than for some years past, although the fishing was 
not pushed much by the fishermen in his district for several reasons. One was 
the good times and high wages at other callings, which coaxed them away 
from fishing. The fishermen observed the law very well. But he got some 
reports of illegal fishing for pike, etc., by parties living in the vicinity of 
bays and creeks, and he visited Whitby and seized 200 yards of net contain- 
six pike, but did not catch the parties to whom it belonged. He also visited 
Rosebank in the west end of his district, looking after things in general, and 
also with the object of selling angling permits, but found none but residents 
of Ontario fishing there. He watched for illegal fishing, and dragged Picker- 
ing Harbor, commonly known as Frenchman's Bay, but got no nets there. 
The trolling for pike has not been as good for the last two or three years. It 
seems to be the general opinion that this is caused by the increase of carp, 
and he thinks that if some way of catching them was allowed so that the 
other fish could be liberated, and the carp sold to defray the cost of net, etc., 
it would be a good thing for the anglers. 

Overseer J. C. May_^ St. Catharines, reports that the fishing for the year 
1907, has been a trifle over the average, the catch of whitefish being about 
the same as other years ; but there has been a large increase in the herring 
catch, making it the best season the fishermen have had for some years. 
Some of the fishermen in his division did very little fishing, excepting in the 
fall for herring. The laws have been well observed by the fishermen. He 
has been over his division several times during the season, and has always 
found them living well up to the law. 

Overseer J. H. Murdoch, Bath, reports that the catch for 1907, as far 
as he could make out, was as good as 1906. Whitefish and trout were plenti- 
ful. The catch of coarse fish was small compared with the catch of other 
years. The anglers were well satisfied with the fishing, and as far as he' 
knows, the law was well observed. There is no strife there between the gill 
net men and the anglers. There have been no abuses of the law, and the 
fishermen have well observed the close seasons. There have been no viola- 
tions of the Game and Fishery laws. 

Overseer Wm. Sargant, Bronte, reports a small decrease in the catch 
of fish as compared with previous years. Herring fishing is the chief 
industry, but had the fishermen fished for trout with the same vigor as they 
do for herring, the catch would have been a large increase over the former 
years. They use nothing but six and seven inch mesh, as they find it pays 
a great deal the best. The German Carp are very numerous in the twelve 
and sixteen mile creeks, and he thinks some way should be adopted to destroy 
this noxious fish. Angling has been very fair in the twelve mile creek, but 



30 REPORT OF THE No. 32 



he is strongly of the opinion it would hdTve been a great deal better had it not 
been for the German Carp. 

The fishery laws have all been well observed. 

Overseer J. W. Taudvin, Kingston, reports that fishing of all descrip- 
tions in his district was above the average, in fact much better than in 
former years. Probably there were not any more fish caught by angling 
than in former years, but it was owing to a lot of stormy weather in July 
and August. The black bass fishing has been the best in years. 

Overseer R, J. Walker, Port Credit, reports that the season's catch has 
been good, being an increase over the year 1906. The prices and demand 
have both been good, a large quantity of fish being used in the vicinity of 
Port Credit, the balance being shipped to Toronto. As for angling, it has 
been the best for years. Black and white bass have increased considerably, 
also perch. It is quite a difficult task to estimate the amount of angling 
done, but as the electric cars run to Port Credit, a great many more people 
came out to fish, and on holidays there are scores of people fishing along 
the river for the distance of a mile and a quarter. The law has been very 
well observed. He has had to keep his eye on a few parties whom he sus- 
pected, but it did not amount to much after all. 

Overseer H. E. Wartman, Portsmouth, reports that the bass were not 
so plentiful in 1907 as the year before, but he never saw so many eels. One 
could go out when it was calm and see them crawling in every direction. 
The old fishermen in that section claim that eels live on the spawn of other 
fish, and if that is the case he thinks that is one reason why the bass were 
not so numerous this year. 

The wild ducks in this section were more plentiful, also plover. There 
was quite a lot of shooting done out of steam launches, but he could not 
get nigh them in a rowboat. He thinks game and fishery overseers ought 
to have good strong glasses to enable them to see the name of the launches 
two or three miles off. The season for muskrats, he thinks, is too long, 
He has noticed the rats killed in December and January were not well 
furred, and the skins consequently not worth as much as if they had been 
caught later. He found that some unprincipled person had cut holes in 
houses the 'first of the winter, which made it ruinous to the rats. March and 
April are the two months their skins are prime. 

Overseer W. R. Wood, Toronto, reports that there has been a consider- 
able increase in the quantity of trout caught, but otherwise the situation 
remains much the same as last year, with a slight falling off in the herring 
and whitefish. It may be said, however, that fishing as it is carried on here 
can hardly be called a commercial enterprise, as very few devote their whole 
time to the business, but depend on other forms of employment. 

During the season six small gill nets were confiscated, which had been 
set in prohibited waters. They were probably set by boys for sport. At 
present the licensed fishermen strictly observe the laws governing the fish- 
ing industry. 

River St. Law^reitce. 

Overs^eer Nassau Acton, Gdnanoque, reports that the fishery and game 
laws were well observed in his district. He had no complaints as to netting, 
etc., and the guides in his division are trustworthy and would have reported 
any violations. 

The fishing has been as good as the average, but the guides say they 
did not do much this season on account of the summer hotel not having been 
opened until late in the season. 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 31 



Overseer Isaac Blondin, Cornwall, reports that the angling in his 
division, which is the only fishing done, was about equal to former years. 
Anglers report a catch of from 40 to 50 maskinonge, and the catch of dore, 
pike and perch was also good. There were no licensed fishermen for set 
lines this year; all the fish caught are for home consumption, little or no 
fish being shipped from there. The close season was well observed. No 
violations of the law or illegal fishing of a serious nature came to his notice. 
There are no fishways in his division. The number of tourists has decreased 
in the last year. 

Lake of the Woods and Rainy River District. 

Overseer Fred. Blanchard, Fort Frances, reports that he has been over 
nearly all the fishing grounds in his district, and finds the few fishermen that 
are holding licenses observing the law. There are no speckled trout or 
black bass in Rainy Lake; adjoining lakes in Manitou have lake trout and 
black bass. Bass are the only game fish in that country, but he has beei 
given to understand the whole American shore of Rainy Lake will be fi8he( 
next summer, and as there is only an imaginary channel boundary, it wil 
need a lot of watching. He has only had one case of poaching, which w 
a conviction and fl5 fine. About 75 per cent, of the fish caught in th( 
lakes are shipped to the United States. The fishermen were disappoint 
in their last season's catch. The water was too high for a successful season, 
but nearly all will want renewal of license. He cannot report on increase 
or decrease of fish, as this is his first season as overseer. 

Lake Superior. 

Overseer W. Gordon, Port Arthur, reports that the fishing has not been j 
good this year as last. The cause of this was the late spring, the navig 
tion being considerably later in the different fishing grounds. Owing 
the lateness of the spring, the run of fish to the different grounds was la't 
than usual. This was especially noted in the eastern portion of his distri( 
At Rossport the fishermen had small catches during the earlier montl 
However, later in the summer the catches increased and throughout t 
reports were encouraging, and the fall catch was large. 

In the Thunder Bay grounds the herring fishing was particularly goo 
some good large catches being made. As high as seven tons having be 
taken from the nets in one instance. The gill nets were filled with the fi 

There is but one inland lake licensed in his district, viz.. White* 
Lake. The reports of the fishing on this lake were good. The licensee 
been husbanding the resources of the lake during the years she has b 
fishing. At times she will give the lake a rest, not putting a net in ( 
ing the whole season. By doing this she has kept the lake up to the S> 
ard, and there has been no decrease in the output. 

Owing to the large demand now for fish in the Canadian market: 
shipments of fish to American points have dropped off. The local m; 
also take a large supply of fish, the result of the great increase in pc 
tion of Port Arthur and Fort William. 

He has made every possible effort to protect the fish during the 
season, and he might state that the fishermen have observed the season 

Owing to the fact that the mill owners in this section do not df 
their mill refuse in the waters, there has been no injury occasioned t 
fisheries as a consequence. No illegal fishing came to his notice d 
the season. 



32 REPORT OF THE No. 32 



During the season lie visited the different fishing grounds and found 
that the fishermen were all complying with the regulations. 

The fishermen of this district deem it advisable that a hatchery should 
be established here. At the present time the spawn is taken to Duluth, 
by employes of the Duluth Fish Commission. In the fall some fry is 
returned, but it is thought that only a small portion comes back to the 
Canadian waters. It is felt that if a hatchery were established at this point, 
it would do considerable for the fisheries of Lake Superior. 

RiVEK Nepigon. 

Overseer P. A. Leitch, Nipigon, reports that the number of tourists 
visiting the Nipigon waters during 1907 was not so large as on previous 
years. This was accounted for principally by the season being over a month 
later in opening, and the extremely cold weather generally prevailing 
throughout the whole season ; making it unnecessary for the people to leave 
he large centres to escape the heat. 

Owing to the extraordinary dry season of 1906, when the swamps, tri- 

'^tory to the Nipigon, were completely dried up, and the snow disappear- 

^ so slowly last spring, the waters of the Nipigon were much lower dur- 

g 1907 than on any previous season recorded. On this account fishing 

m these waters during the past season was very good, until the stream was 

swollen by the continuous rains of July, August and September. 

The good fishing was accounted for by the low water making numerous 
pools accessible, that, during high water or ordinary conditions, are too dan- 
gerous to approach sufficiently close enough to fish them with safety. 

The low water also gave opportunities to observe how numerous the 
tarse fish are becoming in this river, and the destruction they are causing 
)on the famous game speckled trout for which the river is renowned. 
. Considering that for years the Nipigon has been fished for nothing but 
e game speckled trout, this would naturally reduce their numbers by 
•grees; but when also considering that nothing has been done to reduce 
e quantity of the coarser varieties, it is quite easily accounted for why the 
ver is becoming overrun with the coarser varities which live largely upon 
e spawn and fry of the speckled trout. It is, therefore, not surprising 
at the speckled trout should be becoming less numerous year by year when 
>y have such odds to contend with. 

As a natural course of events the famous Nipigon, known the world over 

its large speckled beauties (attracting as it does numerous wealthy peo- 

from, practically, all parts of the world), will in a very few years, if 

_ething is not done to rid it of the course varities, become so unattractive 

, •'„ be classed with the fished out streams. 

x'he money spent annually in the country by this class of people is 

, small importance. But this to my mind is only of minor importance 

uparison with other benefits to be derived from attracting large num- 

r of this class of people to the country annually for recreation. These 

°e on such trips incidentally become acquainted with the undeveloped 

•al resources of our country, and are largely instrumental for the intro- 

on of much foreign capital in the development of these resources, and 

lich we are so much in need. 

^^There is only one Nipigon, with its world-wide reputation for its large 

^tc speckled trout, and its magnificent scenery. It would, therefore, be a 

^^is mistake and loss, not only to the Province, but the whole Dominion, 

the necessary precautions not adopted, to not only maintain the standard 
did 

opened umn lauc xxj. -^^ cao^. — . 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 33 



of this River as a speckled trout stream^^ but to add to its attractions in 
every way possible. 

Any expenditure in this direction would be handsomely repaid in other 
ways. 

There are two different methods which could be adopted to greatly reduce 
the number of these coarse fish in the river, and yet cost the 'Province but 
very little. The first method is for the Department to improve the portages 
on the river, and place three launches on streams between these portages, 
put up ice at a couple of points on the rWer, and net th© river for these coarse 
fish, transport them down here, and ship to the eastern markets. This could 
all be undertaken by the Department. The Revenue from this method would 
I think pay for all expenses. The second method is for the Department to 
improve the portages, and grant someone the privilege of netting the river 
(under proper supervision), for these coarse fish, for what they could make 
out of them by bringing them down her© and shipping to markets. 

Whether anything is done to rid the river of these coarse fish or not, 
these portages should he repaired, particularly the two long ones, namelyj 
Camp Alexander, two and one-half miles long, and Pine portage, between 
three and three and one-half miles long. Horse teams are used upon these 
two long portages for transporting tourists' camp outfit and supplies; also 
that of prospectors and others. They are, from years of traffic, in very bad 
condition, making it almost impossible to travel on them with teams, and 
should he put in good condition the first thing in the spring as a puhlic 
convenience. 

It might be feared by some that permitting netting in the river would 
be dangerous, as the speckled trout would also be netted; but when it is 
considered that the Nipigon is, practically, a chain of long narrow lakes, 
full of numerous arms, etc., and creating large stretches of dead water which 
these coarse fish inhabit principally, while the trout keep more to the rapid 
running waters, except in spawning' season when they go to gravel beaches of 
the dead waters ; with the result that their spawn is practically all consumed 
by the coarse fish, or that which escapes them and is hatched out. The 
fry are then devoured before large enough to take care of themselves. 

Hoop nets should be used principally, so that any trout netted could 
b© released uninjured; and the Fire Rangers on the river each season, who 
also act as Game and Fishery guardians, would be able to see that th© 
speckled trout were not molested. 

Some local people here are considering the advisability of putting a 
system of launches on the river between the various portages, to transport 
tourists up and down the river, and in speaking to them re fishing the river, 
he thinks it could be arranged that they would do this work for traffic for 
their launches and to make the river more attractive from a tourist stand- 
point, which would also mean an increased traffic from that source for them. 

To market these fish, it is absolutely necessary to have launches, owing 
to the distance they have to be transported,, and ice must be put up at, at 
least, two different points on the river to preserve the fish. 

If anything is to be done in this direction this coming season arrange- 
ments would have to be made without delay, in order that ice could be put 
up before too late. 

He would again strongly recommend that the Department give this 
matter early attention. 
3 F. 



34 REPORT OF THE No. 32 



North Channel, Lake Huron. 

Overseer, Joseph Hemhruff, Manitowaning, reports that the fishing in 
his district was good, and that tourists could get their lawful catch in a 
day. The law as to close season was well observed. 

Game was very scarce. There were hardly any partridge to be seen, 
and ducks were not very plentiful. 

Overseer William Hunter, I'ehJcummah, reports that the fishery laws 
have been fairly well respected in that part of the country during 1907. 
He got one net set for trout, but has had no complaints of illegal fishing in 
the streams around that neighborhood. The Manitou Fish Co., are doing 
good work at Manitou Lake, stocking the lake with trout and whitefish. 
There do not seem to be as many trout in Manitou River as there should 
be. There are no fishways on the river, and when the water is low the fish 
cannot get up from Lake Huron, as there is a dam at Michaels Bay, but no 
fishway. He would recommend granting settlers' licenses to fish for their 
own use in the fall, say for two weeks, for herring, as it would be a benefit 
to them, and no one would object to pay for a license for that privilege. 

The game laws have been well respected. He heard of no one doing 
any shooting out of season. 

Overseer Oliver, Little Current, reports that angling for game fish along 
the North Shore in his division has been good, that is to say, for black bass, 
pickerel and 'lunge; and hunting also in the shooting season has been good. 
The revenue for angling and shooting this year has been a great deal larger 
than any previous year. The fisheries in his division have been a fair aver- 
age catch. From the best information he can gather so far, they are some- 
thing less than last year. The whitefish catch has been much less. He 
fears that unless some strict measures are taken to protect whitefish, they 
will soon be a thing of the past ; they are going fast in his division. Prices 
have averaged about five cents per pound for trout, and six cents for pick- 
erel and whitefish. He thinks there were about seventy-five or eighty per 
cent, shipped to American markets. He believes the fishery law has been 
fairly well observed this year in his division. 

Georgian Bay. 

Overseer B. A. Dusang, Fesserton, reports that carp and other coarse 
fish are increasing in the waters over which he has supervision. There 
were about 1,100 lbs. of carp caught during the season. About 75 per 
cent, of the amount of fish caught in this district are exported to the IFnited 
States, 20 per cent, used in Canada, and five per cent, used for home con- 
sumption. 

The close seasons have been well observed throughout. He seized six 
large trap nets, and also twelve small gill nets, half a mile of night line 
with 85 hooks on it, all of which he destroyed. He had one of the parties 
fined. There were a great many tourists this season, and they were all 
well satisfied with the fishing, which has been very good. There have been 
good reports from all the fishermen. 

Overseer James Hewitt, Honey Harbor, reports that there has been no 
netting in Honey Harbor during the past year. The angling and still fish- 
ing were good, also pike trolling; the catch of maskinonge and black bass 
was fairly good, and they could very nearly get their limit every day. Rod 
fishing is improving, and the rules are being lived up to. He is sorry to say 

3a F. 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 35 



that there are some who would like to slaughter the fish. The Ameri- 
cans are getting to understand that the angling permits are for the pro- 
tection of the fish, and as for young bass they are getting numerous. He 
says he could sit on his own dock last summer and see lots of small bass 
swimming, and quite a number on the shore spawning, and he is thoroughly 
convinced that they are increasing in the last three years by the numbers 
caught. There are more rod fishers coming to the Georgian Bay every year, 
but he thinks the pike ought to have a close season. Their spawning time 
is from the 1st of April to the 20th. The pickerel have had a hard blow 
with the trap nets, and it is very seldom that a pickerel can be taken on 
this end of the Georgian Bay. 

Deer hunting was good last year in his district. The settlers are begin- 
ning to see the folly of killing them out of season, and as far as he could 
see by the number that went out in the fall they are holding their own. 
Partridge are not as plentiful as formerly, but if they are closely pro- 
tected they may increase. The half breeds are hard on them during the 
early part of the winter when they are breeding. He has never had a com- 
plaint against any of them for killing them out of season, nor has he ever 
run across any one with partridge out of season. Ducks have increased in 
numbers in his district during the past year, but there is one thing about 
it, the trappers kill quite a few in the spring. The fall shooting of ducks 
was good. 

Overseer J . W . Jermyn, Wiarton, reports that the fishing in his dis- 
trict was not good during the early summer and part of the fall, the weather 
being very rough, and heavy winds prevailing most of the time, conse- 
quently the catches were light. However, the latter part of October was 
fine and fish plentiful. Those engaged made a fairly good season. Dur- 
ing the month of December the weather was exceptionally fine. Steam tugs 
were not in commission at that date, but the fishermen with sailboats did 
well, getting large catches of fine trout. The herring fishing was also good. 
The trout and whitefish were later than usual this season before coming on 
the shoals. About October 15th they came to Tobermory, and from there 
down the Bay to Wiarton, therefore the season was short. 

Most of the fishermen in his district observe the law very well, but yet 
there are others (outlaws) who get no license, set nets and lift them during 
the night, salt thc'r fish, hide them in caves in the rock and thick under- 
bush along the shore, making it almost impossible to trace them. If the 
Department could furnish a small steam launch, or even a good gasoline 
one, this illegal fishing could soon be stopped. 

Overseer J. A. Eraser, Prescott, reports that the "Laura" was fitted out 
about the 10th April, making her first trip on the 13th, and periodical trips 
through the rest of April and May, keeping on the move through June, 
July and August, as the weather would permit. The balance of the season 
she made a few odd trips, as occasion required. He says that the "Laura" 
did good service this year, and that he did not have any trouble with her 
engine, with the exception of breaking a couple of paddles off her wheel 
while in shallow water. He also made a successful season otherwise, hav- 
ing seized and confiscated one skiff, two spears, one large jack, one night 
line, and two lots of fish, and having one fish company fined, besides repri- 
manding and letting off with a caution several miiior cases, where he was 
convinced there was a misunderstanding. 

He collected a lot of information, which will enable him to either catch 
or put down some illegal work which still exists. He believes he has 
succeeded in putting a stop to the worst evil in that part of the St. Law- 



36 REPORT OF THE No. 32 



rence, namely, dynamiting. There is still, and ever will be, much hard 
work to be done, as fishermen in general are bound to have fish, legally or 
illegally, most especially in that locality, where the Americans come over, 
fish and get out. He had the pleasure during the year to see several on the 
run, which plainly gave him to understand that they kept their eyes "open 
for him, and also were afraid. 

Overseer James McNairn, Iroquois, reports that during the past year 
in his district there was a better catch of pike and pickerel, but black bass 
were not so plentiful. He thinks the close season should be extended until 
the 1st July instead of the 15th June. He attributes the improvement in 
the catch of pike and pickerel to the fact that the parties who fish net and 
use dynamite there have been pretty well scared. 

No fish were exported, but all were used at home. 

To the best of his knowledge the close seasons were kept, and no illegal 
fishing came to his notice. 

There are no saw mills or other mills in that locality that dump refuse 
into the river. 

There are no fishways in his district. 

Overseer Geo. M. Slate, Rockport, reports that in his district the fish- 
ing has been much better this year than last, the catch being much larger 
in size. In regard to illegal fishing, he has found very little of it being 
done, although he has had occasion to warn several parties during the season, 
especially at the opening, when he had some trouble owing to the American 
season opened on the 9th and ours not until the 15th. They were under the 
impression they could encroach on our territory. The license granted for 
minnow catching in his division is very beneficial, as they must have the 
minnows to catch the fish. 

Overseer George Toner, Gananoque, reports that he captured five sets 
of hoop nets, three of which he returned to the owner, who made a sworn 
statement that the tags had been stolen off. The other two sets he has in 
his possession. He has made repeated enquiries of oarsmen and guides, 
who make it their business to row fishermen and tourists in his district, and 
one and all of them distinctly state that the fishing in that locality was the 
worst last season it has been for ten years. He would recommend that no 
licenses for netting be granted there. He would also recommend that no 
licenses be granted to net any kind of fish from the mouth of the Gananoque 
River to Marble Rock. 

NiPISSING. 

Overseer F . Baechler, Nipissing, reports that there were no nets in 
operation in the South Bay portion of Lake Nipissing, the use of pound nets 
being confined to other portions of the lake. It is the general opinion of 
everyone that the fish in Lake Nipissing are becoming scarce, owing to the 
continued use of pound nets in some portions of tl^ lake, and^ the feeling 
in the locality is that no licenses should be issued for Lake Nipissing. The 
number of tourists, mostly Americans, who visit that locality, seem to be 
increasing, each year showing fresh faces. But a good proportion of theja 
go to Restoule and Mamasaugmasene lakes, owing to the fact that the fish- 
ing in those waters is considered superior to that in Nipissing. The law 
is well observed by these tourists, who scarcely ever take the legal maximum 
limit. 

Overseer D. McKelvie, New LisJceard, reports a slight falling off in the 
quantity of fish caught, due to one licensee not operating in those waters. 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 37 



All fish were used for local consumption; no abuses existed; the close 
seasons were well observed ; no illegal fishing came to his knowledge ; the 
mill owners observed the law respecting dumping sawdust or other refuse 
into the waters; there are no fishways in his division. 

Lakes Simcoe, Couchiching and Sparrow. 

Overseer Samuel Coulter, Gilford, rejjorts that the season of 1907 has 
closed with the law being very well observed. The fishing season there was 
hardly as good as in former years. Maskinonge seem to be on the decrease — 
perhaps due to so many carp in the bay destroying the small fish and spawn. 
Bass and herring were quite as good as in former years, and suckers and 
whitefish also. The whitefish caught in those waters are not the same kind 
as those in the Georgian Bay. If the carp could be destroyed, he thinks 
the better class of fish would greatly increase. The game laws were also 
well observed this year. Geese and ducks were not quite as plentiful as 
usual, possibly due to the long cold spring of 1907. 

Overseer Wm. McGinn, Orillia, reports that he is pleased to say that 
he has had very little trouble with law breakers as to fisHing unlawfully, and 
it has not been necessary to make a conviction for an infraction of the law. 

He had a little trouble with the Indians in the spring of the year, spear- 
ing in the east branch of the Severn River, near Washago, and they claim 
this as part of their reserve. 

The fishing in the Severn River and Sparrow Lake last season was very 
good, especially lunge and pickerel, and the large number of tourists that 
annually visit this district have some good sport. 

He thinks they ought to have a few cars of bass put in these waters, 
and hopes the Department will favor them with some early in the year. 

In Lakes Couchiching and Simcoe, the fishing was also good, especially 
bass. 

He is also pleased to say that he has a good gasoline launch which he 
uses to good advantage in protecting the fish, as he can get around much 
better and cover more ground in the time he is out. 

Regarding the game report for North and South Orillia, there is very 
little to say respecting game in this district, as there is very little of any 
kind, but what little there is haa been protected by both himself and settlers 
generally. 

Overseer Donald McPhee, Uptergrove, reports that the bass is small 
but plentiful, and the whitefish and trout are increasing. The carp are very 
plentiful. The fishing has been better in Mud Lake this year than it has 
been for several years. Pickerel, maskinonge and bass are the chief fish 
caught in that lake. 

Muskrats are plentiful in his territory. The partridge are scarce, the 
cold spring having killed all the little ones. Ducks are plentiful, minks 
very scarce. 

Overseer Hector Macdonald, Beaverton, reports that he visited the dif- 
ferent fishing grounds in his district, and no illegal fishing came under his 
personal notice. He had a couple of reports of illegal .fishing, which he 
investigated, but could lay no charge, and in all he thinks the law was 
pretty well observed. There were quite a number of campers dviring the 
summer, and they appeared to be very well satisfied with their catches, 
although the weather was very rough in the first part of the^ season. He 
would like to see the close season for lake trout from the 10th October until 
the 10th November, as they come in to spawn about the 10th October. 



38 REPORT OF THE No. 32 



Overseer Harry Mayor, Painswick, reports tliat no violation of the 
fishery laws came under his observation during the last year, and conse- 
quently there were no convictions. He received three applications for licenses 
for night lines, which were granted by the Department. I understand the 
privilege of using night lines in Lake Simcoe was granted for the purpose of 
getting rid of some of the objectionable coarse fish, such as dog fish, etc. 
He finds that there have been verj few of this variety of fish taken, the kind 
caught being chiefly whitefish, and not in very great numbers. To his mind 
a greater harm is done in the destruction of vast quantities of what are com- 
monly called minnows, but which he believes to be the small fry of other 
fish. He did not have occasion to grant any angling permits, as all tourists 
fishing in his division were residents of Ontario. 

As regards game, his duties have been light, by the co-operation of the 
residents. The game in that locality consists chiefly of hares, black squirrels, 
partridge and ducks, the two former being very numerous. 

Overseer Robert Tillett, Roach' s Point, reports a decrease in the number 
of maskinonge caught in 1907, but the bass fishing was very good. There 
is an abundance of whitefish and trout in Lake Simcoe, and the men who 
live around the lake would like to have a license to spear them through 
the ice. 

Only one case of illegal fishing came to his knowledge — ^that of some 
whitefish caught in close season and shipped to Toronto and seized. The 
guilty parties were fined. 

The close seasons were very well observed. 

Overseer Henry Thompson, Brechin, reports that trout and whitefish 
are very scarce, only one trout being caught last year to his knowledge, and 
very few whitefish. No herring were caught last season, but bass were very 
plentiful toward the close of the season. Carp are verj numerous, thousands 
being along the sand and muddy parts of the shore. They are always in the 
shallow water in June. The other kinds of fish have been getting scare 
fast since the carp first came around five years ago. The close season has 
been well observed in his division during the past year, there having been 
no occasion to fine anyone. He sold one permit for angling in Rama, which 
is not in his division. 

Overseer C. West, Holland Landing, reports that the Game and Fish 
laws have been strictly observed in his division, and he has had no occasion 
to fine anyone. He regrets to say, however, that the black bass and maski- 
nonge are on the decrease, but the pickerel are very plentiful, the reason 
being, he thinks, that they spawn early in the season before the carp come. 
The smaller fish are also very plentiful, that is to say, catfish, perch and small 
rock bass. 

Overseer G. W . West, Holland Landing, reports that the Game and 
Fishery Laws have been well observed in his district. He regrets to say, 
however, that maskinonge and other game fish are on the decrease, owing 
to the carp being so numerous, which he believes destroy the spawn, and 
are also destroying the rice beds on the river and baj shore. Bass fishing 
is fairly good, and some very large bass have been taken. 

Counties of Beant, Dufferin, Durham, Grey, Middlesex, Ontario, 

Peel, Wellington. 

Overseer William Boler, Byrorii, reports that the fishery laws were well 
observed this year in his district, and that more bass were caught than 
last year. 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 39 



The game laws were also well observed. He posted up all tlie notices in 
various parts of his district. Black squirrels are getting to be very scarce. 
There should be a close season for them for the next three years, or else they 
will ,soon be extinct. Quail are more numerous than last year, and partridge 
are very scarce. He would suggest that a license fee of |2 per year per head- 
be charged all people coming out from towns to shoot on farms, as they try 
to run things round Byron and vicinity. 

Overseer A. Clunis, Claude, reports that he feels quite well satisfied 
that the close season for fish has been very well kept this season so far. He 
thinks the people are beginning to understand that if thej do not obey the 
law as to close season, they will very soon have no fishing at all. He finds, 
in going over some of the tributaries of the Credit, that there were some 
very fine spawning beds of speckled trout. He has kept a close watch of 
those beds, and has not got any trace of them having been molested. 

As to game, we have quite a few partridge, but they are quite hard to 
get, as the woods are run by hounds at all times of the season. They are 
making rabbits and hares very scarce, as they catch and kill the young. 

Overseer A. Corsant, Masonville, reports that the principal fish caught 
in his district last season were nearly all suckers, although there were a few 
fine specimens of black bass. The close season was fairly well observed. 
He received one report of illegal fishing in the south branch of the River 
Thames, which he investigated and found to be false. There are five fish- 
ways in his district, two of which are fairly good. In his opinion the parties 
owning dams on the River Thames should be compelled to erect proper 
fish ways. 

Overseer J. W. Gibson, Strathroy, reports that last spring he had some 
trouble with parties putting refuse into a stream and in one instance an old 
dead horse, all of which he made them remove forthwith. The anglers have 
had a fairly good year's sport. Some fine pike were taken, one weighing 
14 lbs. There have not been manj black bass taken. There are many kinds 
of bass there, such as rock bass, which makes good sport, and green bass 
in great numbers. The people there are not so afraid of the carp now as 
they were, as they find they do not do much damage to other fish. 

There are two sawmills in his district, but no sawdust goes into 
the water. 

He has had enquiries about licenses to use gill nets in the stream four 
or five miles west of Strathroy, but does not think it would do to grant them, 
as no fish would get up there. 

Overseer James Gillespie, Berkeley, reports that he issued no license 
to anyone, and cannot say anything as to the larger fish. As to speckled 
trout, which are plentiful in his district, he has reason to believe that the 
law has been fairly well observed. Some parties have been suspected of using 
nets, but he has not been able to get any evidence. Some years ago the netting 
of speckled trout was, he believes, a common thing, but the fact that there is 
an overseer in the district has almost put a stop to it. In 1906 he had a 
notice in the local papers warning the public that anyone violating the law 
would be prosecuted, and he believes it had a good effect. No illegal fishing 
came to his knowledge. There are no navigable waters in his district, and 
no fishways, so far as he knows. He is of opinion that the law with regard 
to netting speckled trout should be published and printed in the Fishery 
Rules and Regulations, as well as the close season. He has had those rules 
posted up in different parts of his district. 

Overseer FranJc Hunter. Dorchester, reports that no illegal fishing came 
to his notice, therefore, there were no fines or confiscations. The principal 



40 REPORT OF THE No. 32 



fish caught at that point on the River Thames are bass and pike. Some 
fishermen report large catches of bass this fall. There are no mills or dams 
in his district, and the fish have a clear right of way. 

Overseer J . F . Kern, Burford, reports that for the past year the fishing 
has been considered good by the majority. He finds that pike and bass are 
plentiful in the waters known as Whiteman's Creek, and also that carp 
abound in the Lower Pond at Oakland. He has no infractions to report 
as those fojid of angling have helped them to prevent any illegal taking of 
fish. Taking it all over his district, there was rather an increase in the 
take of fish. 

As far as game is concerned, he says it is scarce in his district, muskrat, 
quail and partridge being all there is to be seen, and these are not at all 
plentiful. 

Overseer George Mojfatt, Glen Cross, reports that this has not been so 
favorable a season for fishing as usual, on account of the dry summer and 
the streams being so low. The trout seem to be getting scarcer every year, 
which he attributes to the suckers interfering with their spawning beds; 
the suckers are increasing every year. 

No violation of the Fishery Act were brought to his notice during 1907, 
and the mill owners are observing the law better than they did years ago. 

Overseer James Myers, Orchard, reports that the chief fish in his dis- 
trict are bass and speckled trout. The trout he examined were not as large 
as last year. No fish were sold, all being used at home. No abuses existed, 
except fishing bass out of season. The bass season was violated by a party 
at Mount Forest, whom he had up before a J. P. He was let go with a 
warning. No illegal fishing came to his notice, except a party at Holstein 
whom he found with two trout under size. He warned him not to have 
any trout under six inches. No sawdust or refuse is allowed to go into the 
waters in his division. There are three fish ways in fair order. The slides 
are hard to keep in order, as the high water in the spring wrecks them. It 
it the general wish of the trout fishermen that the season should end Sept. 
1st in place of the 14th. 

No violations of the Game Act came to his notice. 

Overseer John Small, Grand Valley, reports that he has nothing but 
speckled trout in his division, and they are not very plentiful in the streams, 
but there are three private ponds in Melancthon with quite a number of 
trout in them. The close season has been well kept, as far as he knows. 
No illegal fishing came to his notice. There were no fish sold in his divi- 
sion. 

Overseer C. Twamley, Cavan, reports that he watched the creek known 
as the Cavan Creek, from the middle of May till the bass went down to the 
Otonabee River. There has not been a net set since he was appointed. He 
went twice a week from September till December up into Manvers to look 
after the trout, and he is informed by the farmers along the creek that this 
is the first year the law has been observed. 

Counties of Frontenac, Leeds, Prescott, Russell, Carleton, Renfrew, 

Lanark, Grenville. 

Overseer Erwin Christinh, Pemhrohe, reports that there were seventeen 
fishing licenses for domestic purposes taken out for the year, 1907, in the 
district of North and South Renfrew. Licensees all complied with the law, 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 41 



with the exception of one, who was prosecuted and his nets confiscated. He 
thinks that the shortage of fish in different lakes is owing to the fact that 
there are too many suckers and coarse fish in those waters. 

He has seized and destroyed twelve nets used for illegal fishing. He 
also destroyed different fish dams used for illegal fishing in the spring. He 
prosecuted two fishermen, and fined one of them |50 and the other |20. 

He fined three men for having venison illegally got in their possession. 

Overseer H. N. Covell, Lombardy, reports that the fishery laws were 
fairly well observed, no instances of illegal fishing having come to his notice, 
and there were not so many applicants for licenses as in past years, owing, 
he presumes, to the unfavorable season. He thinks the angling permits 
have been the means of keeping the Americans from ou^ waters. 

The season's catch of fish was satisfactory for the amount of angling 
done, considering the increase of ling in Bass and Otter Lakes, which are 
very destructive to other fish. He thinks if there were some way of destroy- 
ing these coarse fish, it would be very beneficial for angling in said waters. 

There is one saw mill in his division, but the dust is not allowed in the 
streams, but is consumed as fuel. 

Overseer J. W. Davis, Sydenham, reports that there are twenty-five 
small lakes in his district, and nearly all contain large and small mouth 
bass. Seven lakes contain lake trout, but none of the lakes contain pickerel 
)r maskinonge. 

The fishery law has been well kept. He has heard several times of par- 
ties fishing illegally, but on investigation the reports proved false. 

His district is nearly all settled, only a few lots at the north remain- 
ing unoccupied, and the timber on these lots has been cut, and fires have 
destroyed what the axes left, therefore there is little or no protection for 
game. Sydenham Lake has marshes at north and east sides, which in for- 
mer years afforded breeding places for wild ducks; now there are nine sum- 
mer cottages on the lake and islands, and the boats are going constantly, 
which has caused the ducks to seek other breeding grounds. 

Overseer Ephraim Deacon, Bolinghrohe, reports that the quantity of 
mixed fish taken by angling or otherwise will be about the same as last year. 
He does not observe any decrease in the quantity of fish in his division. The 
several close seasons were well observed, only one violation of the law hav- 
ing come to his notice, that of dynamiting fish in the Fall River. 

Partridge were very scarce in his district, but deer seem to be increas- 
ing. He heard of no violations of the Game laws. 

Overseer W . J . Donaldson, Donaldson, reports that there was no fish- 
ing license issued in his district during 1907. There was considerable 
angling done by tourists and others throughout the district, who appeared 
to be well satisfied with the results. The fishery laws have been fairly well 
observed, there having been only one case of illegal fishing brought to his 
notice, but on investigating which he failed to get sufficient evidence to 
warrant a conviction. The close seasons were strictly observed. There are 
no fishways in his division 

Regarding game, he believes the game laws have been fairly well 
observed, especially by sportsmen. He is of the opinion, however, that 
settlers and lumbermen sometimes violate the law by killing deer and other 
game during close season. But it is very difficult to bring those parties to 
justice, and although he has been very vigilant along those lines, he has not 
succeeded in making one conviction. He is pleased to say the deer appear 
ti» be on the increase. Partridge are getting scarcer every year. Ducks 
are also scarce. Fur-bearing animals, such as beaver, fisher, otter, mink, 



42 REPORT OF THE No. 32 



racooon and muskrat appear to be very scarce. This is accounted for by 
the high price paid for this kind of fur, which makes trappers more vigilant 
in the pursuit of those animals. 

Overseer John Dowker, Hartington, reports that he finds that in com- 
pelling the fishermen to use three-inch mesh nets it has increased the size 
of the fish. He allows no nets to be used in lakes where pickerel are found, 
and they are getting very plentiful for fishing with rod and line. 

He finds the muskrat very plentiful in his district this year, and he 
recommends the close season to be kept on till the first day of March. The 
otter are increasing. He has about ten miles of river that does not freeze 
over, and the otter collect there from the surrounding lakes to winter. And 
in regard to ducks, he has a large hatching ground for black and grey ducks 
and found them very plentiful last year; he finds it very hard to protect 
them from the trappers shooting them in the spring. With regard to 
partridge, they are very scarce in his district, and he recommends them to 
be prohibited for two years. 

Overseer Henry Drew, Long Lake, reports that the catch for past season 
was small. In regard to angling permits, he thinks it would give overseers 
a better chance if guides were licensed, as he has had some trouble getting 
after some of the anglers, especially on Sharbot Lake, otherwise the fishery 
laws have been strictly adhered to. As he is now in about the centre of 
his district, and as he does not allow any hoop nets, and there are none but 
settlers' licenses issued, he can keep a pretty close watch on all the lakes. 

Overseer James Dunlop, Mackey's Station, reports that the people in 
his district are afraid of the law of last year, and consequently there have 
been no convictions. In former years there were nets set and quite a lot 
of fishing done. There is any amount of fish in both the Ottawa River and 
lake, but no one comes to fish on the Ontario side — they go to the Quebec 
side. 

Overseer Henry Esford, Barrie field, reports that fishing has been very 
good, and also angling up to late in the fall. All of the fishermen are com- 
plaining about the dogfish becoming so numerous. There were tons of them 
destroyed last season, and the carp are beginning to be seen, but as yet are 
small. There were dozens of them caught last fall. 

Game was very scarce in the fall, especially ducks. Where in other 
years they were very numerous, this season there were hardly any to be seen. 
Muskrats seem to be on the increase. 

Ovrseer Adam Greene, Diamond, reports that there are probably no 
finer places on the Ottawa than the mouth of the Mississippi and the mouth 
of the Carp Rivers. These waters have plenty of bass, pike and pickerel, 
and all kinds of coarse fish, and can easily be fished from boat or from shore. 
There are no fish caught except for local use. The close season has been 
fairly well observed. 

Overseer U. R. Knight, Sunbury, reports that the season of 1907 was as 
good as that of 1906, if not better. The weather was warm and the catches 
were quite plentiful. The Americans and tourists appeared to be well satis- 
fied. It is reported that there is a petition going around to have Loughboro 
Lake closed up from foreigners for a period of three years. In his opinion 
this would be a wrong move, for as long as the fish are as plentifulas they 
are, and the Americans and tourists are satisfied with their catches, it would 
be too bad to have the lake shut up from them. Besides, there is quite a 
revenue derived from this like. He judges there were $250 or $300 collected 
from parties fishing there this season, and he himself received $150. 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 43 



Overseer A. Knox, Jr., Carleton Place, reports that the game and 
fishery laws have been well observed during 1907. The supply of game and 
fish in the waters in his district during the past season, owing to the care 
and attention expended, has in his opinion greatly improved. In the month 
of May he found two gill nets that were illegally set, but he could not find 
out who set them. 

Overseer E. T. Loveday, Ottawa, reports as follows: — In regard to fish, 
bass, pickerel and maskinonge are about the same as other seasons. Some 
heavy bass have been taken — 4, 5, 6 and 6^ lbs. 

Sawdust is allowed to go in the river just the same as other years. 
There was a big kick from boat clubs, fishermen, etc., through the papers, 
and reporters and others came to see him. He in turn sent them to the 
Marine and Fishery Department. 

Regarding game, compared with other yeaTs not so many seizures were 
made. Seven carcasses of deer were seized and placed in cold storage (ship- 
ped from Province of Quebec), but were allowed to proceed to destination 
upon Dominion Express Co. furnishing afiidavits and paying cold storage 
and other expenses. He is sorry to say that partridge is almost nil. What 
with the late, cold spring, very little snow in the winter, and the terribly heavy 
slaughter in past years, by both (so-called) sportsmen and the market hunter, 
it is almost surprising that there are any birds left. Hunters thought noth- 
ing of killing hundreds of birds in a single fall. To-day, or rather this past 
fall, the largest bag he heard of was 10 birds, and the gentleman told him 
he must have walked 20 miles for them. Sportsmen here favor closing the 
season for killing partridge for two or three years, and he says if this is not 
done, in a couple of years partridge will be a thing of the past. He spent 
two days at his old favorite place, 60 miles from Ottawa, where he has passed 
a couple of days nearly every fall for the past 30 years. He walked at least 
20 miles and came home without a bird. A few years ago there were thous- 
ands of birds. 

According to the amount of deer shipped from both Ontario and Quebec, 
and the reports of hunters, these game animals are more than holding their 
own. All the hunters he met with were very well satisfied, in fact a great 
many of them only killed bucks. 

There is the same cry about wolves. There is no doubt that wolves do 
destroy deer, but in the last five years the two-legged wolves have got lessons 
in fines that he believes has done more good than the bounty on the four- 
legged fellows. 

Early in December a deer was killed within two miles of his house. 
This was about 2.80 p.m. Before 6 p.m. he had been notified by 'phone by 
no less than four parties. 

Wild ducks are fairly plentiful, some very good bags being made. 
Plover were scarce. The usual flight did not come that way.. 

Overseer John McGuire, Jones Falls, reports that the season of 1907, 
was a very successful one in his district. The hotel keepers, boarding house 
keepers, livery men, guides, and also the farmers who get a lot of money out 
of the tourist business, all report that their profits far exceeded any previous 
year. The anglers or tourists were all as a rule well satisfied with the fish- 
ing. The number of those may be imas'ined by the fact that he collected 
for anglers' non-resident permits alone at Jones Falls and Chaffeys Locks, 
the sum of |440. He says he found the non-resident anglers, who were 
mostly Americans, perfectly satisfied to pay the sum of $2 for a permit to 
fish, some saying they would willingly pay $5 if we would keep out the nets 
and protect the fish, and he thinks there is more money for the Canadian 



44 REPORT OF THE No. a2 



people from the tourist traffic and more revenue for the Government than 
there is from licenses for gill nets to catch fish for market, which fish are 
mostly shipped to the United States. He thinks the time has come when 
commercial fishing with gill nets should be abolished in those waters. 

- He kept up almost a constant patrol of the waters of his district the past 
summer. He patrolled every part of it once a month, and some of the back 
inland lakes twice each month, the effect of this being that he thinks there 
has been very little, if any, illegal fishing or poaching done there, and on the 
whole the fishery laws were well observed. 

Overseer J. H. Phillips, Smiths Falls,' Teports that he fitted out the 
Eva Bell and was ready to start on the 2nd May, and kept up a steady patrol 
until the 8th November, when the row-boat was used for the remainder of 
the season. 

The past fishing season has been a very satisfactory one, although 
shorter than usual for tourists. The earlier part was so cold that they were 
later in coming, but the amount of permits sold in his division was a little 
in excess of last year, and he finds it is so all the way through. The salmon 
fishing never was better, and some very weighty specimens have been reeled 
in. On June 18th several cans of salmon fry, 30,000 in all, were deposited 
in the Big Rideau. The bass fishing also was good, and some of the sports- 
men reached their limit almost every time. But he must say that the laws 
have been well observed, for he has not had a single conviction for illegal 
angling during the whole season. The illegal fishing, if any, is done with 
nets ; the old fish pirates cannot resist sticking in a net when they get the 
overseer's back turned, but they are sure to get pinched. There have been 
eight convictions and eight gill nets seized in the past season. He would 
respectfully suggest that the close season for bass be extended to the last of 
June, as bass were on their beds on the 1st July last, probably owing to the 
cold season. He would also advocate a |5 fee instead of $2 to non-residents, 
for if fewer sportsmen there would be as much revenue, and it would save 
the fish. The weather last summer was very rough, high winds and sudden 
squalls, but on the whole it was a good fishing season. 

Overseer Nathaniel Shillington, Burridge, reports that the black bass 
are decreasing, but the pickerel are on_the increase. The sports claim that 
the pickerel are far more numerous than the bass. There were more sports 
on the water this last season than usual. The herring are as plentiful as ever. 
The fishermen did not stav as long on the lakes this season. No violations of 
the law came under his notice, nor did he hear of any. He believes that if 
the residents were only allowed to catch enough for their own use, there 
would be fish there for years to come. 

Game was very scarce last season. Partridge never were so scarce, 
which a good many attribute to the cold spring. The ducks also are dimin- 
ishing. The muskrat is about the only fur-bearing animal around there. 

Overseer William Spence, Athens, reports that it is his opinion, and 
also the opinion of the guides at Charleston Lake, that the small salmon fry 
are of little benefit to the lake. They ought to be as large as the largest that 
were put in a couple of years ago, and then they would be capable of taking 
care of themselves.. He says there is no increase whatever in salmon. Before 
the limit for salmon, from twenty to thirty a day would be caught by one 
person, while now hardlv the limit can be caught. He thinks the limit for 
pike should be down to eight or ten. The pike are a favorite fish with certain 
tourists, and they are satisfied when they catch a ten or twelve pound pike. 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 45 



If there is no change, they might result as the salmon. Black bass are better 
than previous years, but are very small. The large-mouthed bass are 
plentiful. 

There are no fishways in the lake. One is needed badly at the outlet of 
the lake, as the fish go through and cannot get back at the time they should, 
owing to stop logs being in the lake about the time the fish are migrating. 
There was just one case of illegal salmon fishing, but he got several gill nets. 

He thinks the duck shooting law should be strictly looked after by all 
overseers, because he has found out there is an increase in the number of 
ducks in these lakes by not allowing shooting before sunrise and after sun- 
set; it gives the ducks a chance to feed. Partridge are scarce. 

Overseer Jas. S. Stewart, Lanark, reports that during the past year 
there has not been any fishing in his district for export, no licenses having 
been issued, and no net fishing of any kind. There are no game fish there 
yet, excepting bass, the season for which has been fairly good for local 
anglers. There have been several attempts made thefe to stock the waters 
with pickerel, but it has not yet been successful. Suckers and other coarse 
fish devour the spawn of bass and other game fish. There have not been 
any violations of the Fishery Act, the close season having been well observed. 

Overseer James Townsend, Long Point, reports that he visited the waters 
under his supervision at various times, and only one violation came to his 
notice, for which he imposed a fine. A number of tourists visit these waters 
during the summer months, and report the fishing for the past season fairly 
good. The |2 angling permit he thinks a good thing. Much dissatisfaction 
exists among the people over commercial fishing, as they think the netting 
rids the waters of too many fish. While some means should be used to keep 
down the ling, catfish, eels and suckers, he thinks pike should be protected. 
He would like to draw the attention of the Department to the xe-stocking of 
Singleton Lake with bass, and Red Horse Lake with salmon fry, as he fears 
they will not hold out. 

Overseer J . R. Wight, Newhoro, reports that during the past season in 
his district he did not detect a single violation of the fish and game laws. 
The residents in the vicinity of the lake co-operated in keeping a strict 
watch over the game and fish. In most of the lakes the fish are reported more 
plentiful, with the exception of salmon and small-mouthed bass. He would 
recommend that the fee of |2 for non-residents be left as it is, except where 
they bring their own boats and guides, when the fee for angling permits 
should be $5. Non-residents fishing in his district seem inclined to protect 
the fish more than anglers from nearby small towns. This latter class seem anx- 
ious to take all the law allows them, and take their whole catch away. Within 
six miles of Newboro there is poSsibly the best lake trout fishing in Ontario. 
Last season was the first time it had been tried, and every day brings fish 
ranging from 10 to 26 lbs. Newboro is the nearest port to those lakes, 
and is reached by railroad, steamer or stage. They have telegraph, tele- 
phone, three mails daily, two good hotels, several boarding houses, a bank 
and the best boat livery in Ontario. A petition is now in circulation to have 
some of the lakes re-stocked with salmon and black bass fry. He strongly 
recommends granting herring licenses to proper parties who reside near the 
various lakes. In lakes where there are salmon, the licenses should be with- 
held until Nov. 5th, when the salmon have done spawning. As the law is 
now, salmon can be caught in October, which is the spawning time in all 
the lakes near Newboro. 



46 REPORT OF THE No. 32 



Overseer D. E. Younghusband, South March, reports that during the 
year 1907, the law was fairly well observed in his district, with a few excep- 
tions. There was very little angling done. The fish generally caught are 
pike, suckers, bullheads, perch, sunfish, sturgeon, catfish, a few pickerel, 
and an occasional small bass. He thinks .that trout might be introduced into 
the Ottawa River. If the Georgian Bay Canal goes ahead, and the proposed 
work of raising the water about five feet in this district is done, there should 
be room for a good supply of trout. The waterfowl would then have a bet- 
ter feeding ground. 

Game was fairly plentiful, and close seasons and Sundays very well 
observed. One fine was imposed for Sunday shooting, and two guns were 
confiscated. In his district only an occasional partridge was seen, although 
ducks were numerous. 

PETERBORO, NORTHUMBERLAND, VICTORIA AND OtHER InLAND COUNTIES. 

Overseer Bradshaw, Lindsay, reports that bass and maskinonge were 
very plentiful in the waters of his division below Lindsay, and good catches 
of these fish were made. He is of the opinion that a decided increase in the 
number of maskinonge is visible over last year; this he attributes to the 
growing feeling amongst all good citizens that it is a great wrong to destroy 
the parent fish in their spawning season, and the dread of heavy fines being 
imposed by others less scrupulous, whose only aim is to escape the strong 
arm of the law, if they can. 

The opening of fishing in Scugog Lake on the 2nd September last was 
welcomed by many people who were not allowed to fish in that lake for the 
last two years. Bass were plentiful, and some maskinonge were also caught 
there, but, owing to low water, and the weedy condition thereof, fishing was 
not as good as some expected it would be after two years of a rest. 

The water has risen in Sturgeon Lake, and the river below the dam at 
Lindsay to its normal depth, while in Scugog Lake, although not as high as 
it usually is at this time of the year, there is a great improvement in its 
height over what it was in the past summer, and if the winter is not too 
severe the fish are not likely to suffer from the lowness of the water. The 
catch of coarse fish was about the same as last year. 

He is strongly of opinion that the close season for maskinonge should 
begin on April 1st, instead of the 15th, as he knows from practical experi- 
ence, having often seen maskinonge on their spawning beds in the first week 
of April, and he also believes that the number of bass and maskinonge which 
is now allowed is too many. 

There is one fishway in his division, and it seems to work all right in 
spring when there is high water, and this is when it is needed. However, 
it is reported that a new dam is to be built at Lindsay, and if so there will 
have to be a new fishwajr also, if one is still kept in the dam. 

The law was fairly well kept in his division during the last year. Only 
three breachs (killing maskinonge) came to his knowledge, and the parties 
were promptly fined and the matter reported to the Department at the time. 

Mill owners and others gave no trouble during the season. 

The amalgamation of the game and fish protection seems to work all 
right. As a rule, when patrolling to guard the fish, water-fowl and fur- 
bearing animals that make their homes along the water, also receive protec- 
tion at the same time, so that extra work is avoided in each case. 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 47 



Overseer T. C. Caskey, Blairton, reports that he visited all the inland 
lakes, and found the law observed fairly well. Ther© were not so many 
tourists during the past season, and all of them had permits procured in 
Toronto, Port Hope or Cobourg, He has been all through the district at 
different times, and could not find any violation of the Fisheries Act. Fish 
are plentiful in Eound Lake, Belmont and Crow Lake. At Sandy Lake and 
Twin Lake the bass are numerous, but much smaller than in other lakes. 

He found only one man who had broken the game law, whom he fined. 

Overseer C. H. Cassan, Campbellford, reports that during the summer 
of 1907, the fishing in his district from Campbellford to Trent Bridge and 
Crow River was as good as in any of the late years. The bass were a little 
smaller, and not so numerous as formerly, while the lung© were a little 
smaller but much more numerous. He would recommend that these waters 
be re-stocked with bass. This could be easily done, as a suitable place along 
these waters could be found for establishing a hatchery at very small expense. 
The district was visited by a considerable number of American anglers, as 
well as by a number from other parts of Ontario. He would also recom- 
mend that guides b© required to have a license at a very small fee. 

Overseer William Clarkson, Lakehurst, reports that the catch of bass 
and maskinonge in his division was up to the average, there being some very 
large fish caught. Th© tourist trade is increasing, the two dollar angling 
permit giving good satisfaction. The fishermen report that the catch of 
salmon trout in Catchacoma Lake, and those other lakes north, was below 
the average, due to cold weather. Th© fishery regulations and close seasons 
were well observed. The mill owners oloserve the law fairly well as to dump- 
ing refuse in the waters. There are no fishways in his district. 

Overseer J. F . Cryderman, NorhaTn, reports that his division is that 
part of the River Trent between Campbellford Bridge and Hickory Island, 
and streams emptying into the same. For several years there has been a 
large number of licenses granted for netting in his division, which has had 
a tendency to deplete the waters of fish. Since th© netting has been stopped 
there has been a very marked, improvement in the catch by angling, the 
past season having been the best in years. He believes the fishery laws have 
been well observed, and it is generally conceded that there has been less 
illegal fishing during the past season than for years. Illegal netting is 
nearly or quit© abandoned in his division. In one or two instances mill 
refuse has been found being dumped in streams that empty into Trent River, 
but after notifying the parties the practice has been discontinued. He 
has almost succeeded in stamping out the catching of small fish in nets in 
the streams in that district for fishing in Lake Ontario, which has prevailed 
to quit© an extent for a number of years. The people of his district were 
very much pleased when the Department discontinued the licenses for nets, 
and they consider it would be unwise to grant them in future, at least for 
a considerable time. 

Overseer J. A. Cunninghain, Maynooth, reports that lake trout and 
speckled trout are the only fish caught in his division, and they are caught 
by local fishermen, who report the catch very satisfactory and about the 
same as previous years. 

No fish of either kind were sold or exported, and for home consump- 
tion he would say that from 1,000 to 1,500 lbs. would cover the catch, as 
near as can be estimated. 

He is not aware that any abuses exist. 

The close seasons have been well observed. After he has explained the 
matter, the settlers are anxious to protect the fish.. 



48 REPORT OF THE No. 32 



He has not heard of a single case of illegal fishing. 
There is one saw mill in his district where the sawdust and refuse are 
allowed to go into the river, which is disastrous to the fish for about four 
miles below the mill before the sawdust is arrested in another mill pond 
containing brook trout. , 

There are no fishways in his district. 

Overseer Edward Fleminrj, Hastings, reports that there have not been 
many violations of the Fisheries Act come under his notice from Hastings 
to the Narrows, or in his division, and angling and trolling have been good. 
There have been some fine catches reported, and the guides in Hastings 
claim the men they have rowed for went away quite pleased. There 
is a power house in Hastings, where the fish, after spawning, gathered in the 
swift water. He found that there was spearincr going on under it in the 
raceway, and he spoke to the owner, who helped him board it up, and from 
that on he had no complaints. He finds that since the nets were taken out 
the bass and maskinonge are getting much more plentiful, and altogether 
the sportsmen and local fishermen who fish on the division of this River 
Trent seem perfectly satisfied. 

Overseer John Green, Marmora, reports that he only saw one fish light 
out in 1907, but could not catch them, as the wind was in their favor. The 
water was about two and one-half to three feet higher in Crow Lake than 
in the two previous years, and the fishing was not as good. The water stayed 
up longer and higher in the spring, which he hopes has covered the eggs. 
Some years the eggs are left bare from water going down. He believes it 
would be a good idea to have a fish channel through the dam at Marmora, 
as it would let the maskinonge go up and down. 

Overseer J . H. Hess, Hastings, reports that he finds a great improve- 
ment in the bass and maskinonge fishing since the removing of the hoop nets, 
especially maskinonge. The small bass is particularly plentiful, and the 
law regarding the taking of small bass and maskinonge has been well adhered 
to by all anglers. The catch of bass was somewhat smaller than other years, 
but judging from the quantity of small bass that there seem to be in the 
water, in the course of a short time the bass fishing will be again up to the 
standard. The law regarding fishing has been well observed. 

Overseer J. E. Irish, Vennachar, reports that the catch of fish in his 
district was small, owing to the fact that he would not recommend licenses 
In any of the trout lakes. In November he visited a few of the lakes, and 
found nothing illegal going on. The fishery regulations were well observed. 
The two dollar permits gave good satisfaction, but, as he did not receive 
them until late in the season, he only sold one. 

The mill owners observed the law fairly well. 

Partridge were scarce this year ; wild ducks were not any more numerous 
than last year; muskrats are scarce; and deer are as numerous as in other 
years. 

Overseer W. H. Johnson, Harwood, reports that this has been a remark- 
ably good year for fish and the protection of spawn, as the water stayed 
about the same all through the close season. The law has been fairly well 
observed. Two violations came to his notice. He found the parties with 
spears and rifles, took their outfit, imposed a fine, and returned the outfit 
after close season under warning. Quite a number of Americans visited 
Rice Lake. Fish were plentiful, and they, as well as others, were well 
satisfied with the catch. 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 49 



In regard to duck shooting, he would suggest that decoys be set not 
more than 100 yards from any hard shore, and no shooting done from rice 
beds, as it is the feeding ground for the ducks. Shooting from the rice beds 
drives the ducks from the lake. 

Overseer John Jones, Fenelon Falls, reports that there has been no 
illegal fishing in these waters since his appointment, that he is aware of, 
although he has kept close watch at all times. 

The fishing in these waters during the summer of 1907 was better than 
ever before, which would show that the fish are on the increase. There is 
one thing he wishes to draw attention to, namely : The water on the dams 
at Fenelon Falls, Rosedale and Bobcaygeon is kept too high during spawning 
time and the water goes out on the low lands around the borders of the lakes. 
The fish then go out to the warm shallow water to spawn, then tlie water 
after a time recedes and leaves the spawn on the dry lands. No doubt but 
this diminishes the quantity of fish materially. 

Overseer Thos. H. Johnston, Royston, reports that fish is a very scarce 
article in his division. There is no net fishing done there, and a person 
cannot go out in the evening and catch fish as in years past. The tourists 
also complain of no fish. Some advise him to get calico bass, or croppy, as 
some call it — a good fish, and very prolific. But he says the great impedi- 
ments are the dams on the Magnetewan River, and the absence of fish slides. 
There is not a fishway on the whole Magnetewan River. He has gone down 
it, and it is obstructed all the way by dams. 

There were no fish sold there — only what were imported. 

The great obstructions are the lumbermen's dams, and they should be 
compelled to put in fishways. The only attempt at a fishway was done by 
Knight Bros, at Burk's Falls — from there to Bying Inlet there are some 
twelve or fifteen high dams. 

The close seasons have been well observed. He has always put up notices 
nbout this. 

There were no fines imposed. He caught a few fishing without permits, 
but they immediately bought them. 

During the summer he visited Rainy Lake, Doe Lake, Cecebe Lake and 
Ahmic Lake. The first two lakes have a few tourists from our own Province, 
while the two latter are getting quite popular for Americans, four new 
houses being built last summer, and one hotel on Ahmic Lake. The majority 
of the tourists get permits at Niagara. He happened to visit this lake in a 
very stormy time, but he waited, and watched some parties fishing, who 
willingly bought permits. He visited every American hamlet and house 
on the whole lake. A great many denj^ fishing at all, and he has to watch 
them, but they are getting to understand the law better. There is another 
lake coming into prominence — Sand Lake near Kearney in Armour township. 
Several houses are being built there. 

Overseer Wellington Lean, Apsley, reports that the close season and 
fishery regulations were well observed, there being only one case of 
illegal fishing, in which case a fine was imposed and reported to the 
Department. 

The mill owners observe the law, and there is no sawdust or mill refuse 
allowed to go in the water. There are no fishways in his division. 

The granting of angling permits to non-residents, he thinks a good thing. 
All seem perfectly satisfied to take out permits and pay the sum required. 

A larger number of tourists visited Loon Lake this summer than usual. 
All report good fishing. More tourists are expected next summer, as there 
will be another summer boarding house built. 

4 F. 



50 REPORT OF THE No. 32 



Overseet J. R. McAllister, Gore's Landing, reports tliat there were 
more maskinonge taken in 1907 than for years, one weighing 32^ lbs., and 
a great many over 20 lbs. But there were fewer small-mouth black bass 
taken in 1907 than he can remember since 1895. There was very little 
illegal fishing in his division. He found two farmers trying to kill fish on 
the marsh behind Jubilee Point, but he got them before they got any fish 
and took the spear from them. He also got a gill net in Kent's Creek about 
five miles up the Otonabee River. It had killed three maskinonge; the net 
was 100 feet long. 

Ducks are quite plentiful, but there were not many killed. What few 
were killed were got out of blinds built in the water some 150 yards from 
shore. He wishes that blind building in the open water in Rice Lake was 
stopped, as it drives a great many ducks to Lake Ontario in the day time. 

Overseer A. W. Mclntyre, Keene, reports that there was a good catch 
of fish in his division — an increase, he thinks, over the previous year. They 
were all consumed in the neighborhood. There were no infractions to report. 
The close seasons were strictly observed. 

Overseer Enoch Merriam, Harv)ood, reports that the fish were as plenti- 
ful last spring as ever he knew them to be, and the water was in their favor. 
The law was very well observed, with few exceptions, and after the fishing 
started the catch was good. He saw several, and heard of more, maskinonge, 
that weighed twenty pounds each. There were about as many Americans 
there as usual, and they were all well pleased. 

Ducks were not so plentiful as usual. ^ good many were under the 
i^mpression that as the spring was so late and cold, the young ducks did not 
have time to become well fledged and come south with the older ones. 

Overseer F. J. Moore, Lakefleld, reports that the laws have been fairly 
well observed on Stony Lake waters during the jear, by the settlers. The 
catch of bass and maskinonge was not quite so large the Tatter part of the 
season as in other years. This was caused by the waters being very low 
during the year. 

He issued about 173 fishery permits, and would suggest that the guides 
be asked to take out a license, and that they be compelled to see that the 
fishermen observe the laws while they are in their employ. 

He would also recommend that the Stony Lake waters be restocked 
with parent bass this year, as it is of great importance that the supply of bass 
be kept up in these waters in order to encourage tourists who come there 
to fish. 

Overseer J. W. Morton, St. Ola, reports that the catch of fish last year 
was not as large as the previous year. There seemed to be plenty of fish, 
but they did not bite so well; high water was supposed to be the cause. "No 
illegal fishing came under his notice, and no fines were imposed or any con- 
fiscation of nets or fishing apparatus made. There was no sawdust or any- 
thing injurious to fish allowed to be thrown into the water to his knowledge. 

Overseer Garner Nichols, Bobcaygeon, reports that the catch of fish 
was about the same as 1906, but there were smaller maskinonge caught this 
year, which had to be put back into the water. 

Deer in his locality were very plentiful, there having been somewhere 
in the neighborhood of 112 killed round Bass Lake, Long Lake, Black Duck 
Lake and Round Lake, and he is glad to say the law was well kept. There 
was no muskrat trapping done there in the fall. 

Overseer P. Pilon, Sudbury, reports that the year 1907 was the first 
year he was employed as overseer, and he cannot say whether there was an 

4a F. 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. , 51 



increase or decrease. The only licensee in his district reported a catch of 
about 100 lbs. of mixed fish, and he did not apply for renewal. 

All fish caught were used for home consumption. jVo abuses existed, 
so far as he knows. The several close seasons were well observed. No illegal 
fishing came to his notice. The fish are not prevented from free circulation 
by mill owners, and no injury is done by sawdust or mill refuse thrown 
into the watei ii. his* district. There are no fishways in his district. 

Overseer H. R. Purcell, Colehrook, reports that bass are increasing in 
the Massanoga, Marble and Long Lakes. There is one of the finest summer 
resorts on Lake Massanoga in the Province, and fine hotel owned by Dr. 
Price. Several of the lakes in that district have been stocked with black 
bass, and some with the large-mouthed bass, and those put in three years 
ago are twelve and thirteen inches long. 

With the exception of a couple of complaints and a few nets destroyed 
by him, the law has been very well kept. On© case was dismissed, one 
allowed to go on suspended sentence, and one party fined |5. 

His district is somewhat large, some seventy-five miles in length, with 
some of the finest bass and trout lakes in the Province. 

As regards game, deer this season was plentiful, but not so many were 
taken out as some seasons on account of the swamps being full of water and 
cold. A deer will run a long way before taking to the water in cold weather. 

Overseer Neil Sinclair, Glenarm, reports that there was very little fish- 
ing done in his district, and very few bass or maskinonge were taken during 
the past season. No violations of the Fisheries Act were brought to his 
notice. The laws were well observed. 

Wild duck were not so plentiful as in other years, and very few wild 
geese were on the lake this fall. Muskrat are not as numerous, and mink 
are very scarce. There are no deer in his district. 

Overseer William Smith, Gravenhurst, reports that the fishing opera- 
tions of 1907 have been equal to any former years. The number of anglers 
has increased, and some of them report the fishing very satisfactory, in fact 
the fishing in the immediate vicinity of Gravenhurst has greatly improved 
and some splendid large bass have been landed by local sportsmen. 

The close seasons have been well observed, and the game and fishery 
laws generally. Except in two cases no violations of the law came to his 
notice, and these two were of catching bass under size. The offenders were 
convicted and fined |5 and costs each. 

The law respecting the pollution of the waters was not violated, as great 
care is taken by the several mill owners to keep the sawdust and other refuse 
out of the lakes. 

Overseer C. St. Charles, Madoc, reports that he has given careful super- 
vision during the close season of 1907, and has had no instance of illegal 
fishing brought to his notice. He sold one angler's license during 1907. 
In former years there was considerable fishing done during the close season, 
but this has been stopped and the laws have been very well observed. The 
fishing in Moira Lake during the past season has been very good, the prin- 
cipal fish caught being pickerel, black bass and maskinonge. Large quan- 
tities of the spawn of those fish are destroyed annually by the eels, cat-fish 
and suckers that abound in those waters. 

Overseer D. C. Stuart, Codrington, reports that he has taken every pre- 
caution in regard to the fishing and game under his supervision. He has 
not issued any licenses or permits during the year, nor found any person 
violating the law, therefore has not collected any fines. There has not been 



52 REPORT OF THE 



No. 32 



any net fishing m his territory during the past two years, therefore there 
appears to be quite an increase of fish, judging from the great number of 
small fish that are there now compared with two years ago. 

Overseer B. H. Sweet, Bancroft, reports that the fishery and game laws 
were fairly well observed in his district in 1907. The angling was very good 
in that locality last year. He seized one net illegally set for trout in Clear 
Lake in the Township of Dungannon, but he could not find the owner of 
the net. 

As for the game laws, they have been fairly observed. He has not heard 
of any complaints. 

Overseer Thomas Swift, Port Perry, reports that in the early part of 
the season the law was well observed, as he did not see nor hear of anyone 
spearing fish. The season was so cold and rough that the fish had to spawn 
in the deep water. There is any amount of small bass and maskinonge in 
Lake Scugog this season. Owing to the water being so low, and the rice so 
high, not many fish were caught— some bass, but no maskinonge. The 
water has not been so high for the last ten years. 

Overseer W . H. Switzer, Gooderham, reports that there is only one small 
lake in his district (known as Horseshoe Lake), containing bass. They were 
placed in the lake by a settler in 1901, and now there is plenty for the settlers 
near by. There are also German carp in the same lake, placed there by a 
settler some years ago, but it seems they cannot be caught, although they 
may be seen. There are a number of fine lakes in that locality which he 
thinks ought to be stocked with black bass and salmon trout, as they contain 
only coarse fish, such as shiners, catfish, chubs and perch. The settlers have 
caught quite a number of bass in Horseshoe Lake and placed them in other 
lakes to stock them. 

The close season for fish and game was well observed. He heard of 
one instance of illegal fishing, and that was with night lines. There was an 
increase in the catch of bass and trout, some weighing 13 lbs. All were used 
for home consumption, none exported or sold, so far as he knows. 

There are no fishways in his district. There are nine saw mills, but 
none of the refuse is thrown into the water. 

He heard of no illegal hunting going on. The deer killed this season 
were not up to the average in number, but there was quite a number shipped 
out of his district. 

Overseer Fred. Taylor, Huntsville, reports that he had many complaints 
during the months of September and October about netting, and spent con- 
siderable time trying to bring the parties to justice. But it would require 
all his time at this season of the year to anywhere near cope with the netting 
that is going on. He does not think the fish are increasing in Vernon, Fairy 
and Peninsula lakes, and he believes the lowering of the water by taking 
out stop logs at locks at close of navigation has considerable to do with it. 
He would recommend close season from Sept. 1st instead of Sept. 15th, as 
female trout are full of spawn after that date. These are the fish the people 
are after', and if not protected more than at the present they will soon be 
a scarce article. 

There are no fishways in his district to his knowledge. 
Overseer Ira Toole, Omemee, reports that the fishing during the summer 
was fairly good for maskinonge and bass, but the former were chiefly small 
in size, owing he believes to the large ones having been caught for some 
years past by snaring through the ice in winter, but with proper protection 
he thinks they will become plentiful again in a couple of years. There 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 63 



were seven violations, all being for the same offence— snaring maskinonge, 
and the usual fine was imposed in each case, which seems to have consider- 
ably lessened the amount of illegal fishing up to the present time. 

There are no fishways in his division, although there is one badly 
needed there, as the maskinonge come up to the mill dam and cannot get 
any further in the spring of the year. There has been no trouble up to the 
present time with sawdust here, as there is only one saw mill, and the owner 
observes the law in that respect. 

Wild ducks were plentiful until the season opened, and then they seemed 
to fly away before daylight and did not return to the rice until after dark. 
Muskrats are becoming more plentiful, as trappers are beginning to find 
out that it pays to observe the law and protect the rats during the close 
season, and he believes from his own experience, with the close season as it 
is at present, and if it is properly observed, they will continue to increase 
m numbers, as the fall trapping and the cutting of their houses open in winter 
is where the trouble has been with the muskrat. Mink are becoming very 
scarce in that locality, and if they are not protected in some way before long 
they will be a thing of the past around there. 

Overseer John Traves, Sr., Fraserburg, reports that for the past two 
years in his vicinity he had found that deer have increased considerably, 
and beaver have also increased in numbers. Partridges were scarce, and 
he blames dogs for destroying the eggs and young birds before they are able 
to take care of themselves. 

Overseer John Watson, Ccesarea^ reports that, as the fishing on Lake 
Scugog has been prohibited for the past two years with the 2,200 small and 
adult b,ass put into the lake in 1904-5-6, he thinks that they have a fairly 
good supply of fish at present. As the fishing season did not open on that 
lake until the 2nd of September, there was a fine lot of maskinonge caught 
for that late season. There was but little fishing done for bass. There were 
more small bass around the shallow water the past season than he has ever 
seen in the past 42 years. He says that the spawning season has been fairly 
well observed, and very little illegal fishing (if anyj, has been done. He 
made four convictions for buying and selling maskinonge. 

He also made six convictions for violation of the game laws. There 
were but two Americans fishing in his district the past season, as the sea- 
son came in so late. As our mink are not protected at present, he would 
advise that they be protected, as they are the most valuable fur-bearing 
animal in Ontario to-day. 

y Overseer John Watt, Peterboro, reports that he has a very difficult 
task, and a never ending one, watching his territory, it being in and around 
the city. Nevertheless, the law is being better observed now than any time 
in his recollection. The catch of bass, maskinonge and catfish has been 
very good as to numbers, but small in size. The waters there are being 
overfished. It is quite common to see twenty canoes trawling at one time 
in a radius of half a mile, and this is kept up all summer. There are great 
numbers of suckers caught at the dams in the early spring when running. 
There have been a few good specimens of pickerel caught this year and last — 
the result of fry deposited about five years ago. No noticeable damage from 
sawdust or mill refuse, and no fishways in his territory, but considerable 
injury is done by the lowering and raising water levels in the spawning 
season. There has been some illegral fishing, but less than in past years. 
He imposed a fine on six persons for violations of the law, and seized three 
gill nets. He sold six game dealers' and seven hotel keepers' licenses, and 
disposed of eight angling permits to tourists passing through the city, all 



54 REPORT OF THE No. 32 



of which were cheerfully paid. There have been complaints of fish being 
sold in the city, brought in by squaws, Indians and settlers from Rice and 
Chemong Lakes principally, but no one is brave enough to give the infor- 
mation necessary for a conviction. He spent a great deal of fruitless time on 
this affair. They have so many spotters and sympathizers who keep them 
posted on the movements of the officer, that it makes it very difficult to 
catch them red-handed. It would require an overseer to go around in dis- 
guise. If a small fee were levied, say fifty cents a rod or line, he believes 
all would most willingly pay to have the fishing better looked after, and he 
thinks they would take more interest in the preservation of our fish and 
game. 

Fines and Confiscations during the year 1907 on Account of Fisheries : 
7 Spears; 5 Jacklights; 1 Dip net; 30 Trap nets; 65 Gill nets, and 8,190 
yards of same; 3 Seines; 6 Hoop nets; 1 Night line; 8 Boats; 58 Boxes of 
fish. Amount of fines, |956."94. 

Game : Amount of fines and confiscations, |1,462.71. 

Biological Department, 

University of Toronto, 
December 31st, 1907. 



E. TiNSLET, Esq., 

Superintendent of Game and Fisheries. 

Dear Sir, — I beg to report on the operations carried on at the Biologi- 
cal Station, Georgian Bay, during the summer of 1907. 

The following workers were in attendance during the season: Dr. E, 
M. Walker, Lecturer in Zoology; Dr. A. G. Huntsman, Instructor; Mr. E. 
V. Cowdry, and Mr. W. J. Eraser, students all of the University of Toronto. 

Considerable progress was made in the collection and study of aquatic 
animals bearing on the natural history of fishes, particularly the study of 
the life histories of aquatic insects, of fish parasites in relation to their hosts, 
and the microscopic life of the water. 

The experiments begun in the former season with a view to the relation 
of size of mesh in nets to the size of fish taken were continued, in-shore fishes 
being used for the purpose. Owing to the inclemency of the weather it was 
not possible to continue the work on the measurement of fishes taken by fish- 
ermen in nets of authorized mesh. 

Further collections were made illustrating the food and growth of in- 
shore fishes. 

Arrangements were made for tagging experiments with the object of 
studying the movements of the black bass. The experiments will be begun 
on the opening of next season and the co-operation of sportsmen and others 
will be invited in reporting the locality and the weight and sex of the fish 
taken. 

The station has now in preparation a card catalogue which when com- 
pleted will furnish an index to the fauna of the region. 

Tours respectfully, 

B. A. Bensley, 

Assistant Director. 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 



Report of the Work Performed by the Steamer "Lurline" during :^art 
OF sTEASON 1907 ON Lake Erie, Rivers Detroit and St. Clair, and 
Lake Huron. 

Left Walkerville October 15tli at 4 p.m., and arrived at Amherstburg 
at 6 p.m., and stopped all night. Mr. Holden and Mr. Shooan were on 
board. Left Amherstburg next morning at 7 for Pelee Island, soutb wind 
blowing bard, and returned to Amherstburg for the night, and spent all 
next day there waiting for orders. On the 18th we left again at 7 a.m. and 
went in to the harbor at Kingsville, where we stopped the balance of the 
day, leaving again next morning at 9, going down around the Pelee Point, 
and from there to Wheatley, where we overhauled two steamers, the "Dres- 
den" and the "Louise" of Sandusky, both with fish on board and found them 
all O.K. Returned to Pelee Island west dock, thence back to Amherst- 
burg at 9.30 p.m. Weather stormy, rain and wind northeast blowing hard. 
Sunday morning at eight it was still raining hard when we left for Wind- 
sor, where we arrived at 10.30 a.m. From there we went to Walkerville, 
and next day went out on Lake St. Clair and looked over the pound nets, 
which we found to be all O.K., and returned to Walkerville at 2 p.m., 
where Mr. Holden and Mr. Shooan left the "Lurline," and as the engine 
was not running properly, we remained there for repairs. The engineer 
left, as he did not understand the engine. We stayed over at Walkerville 
until October 25th, when we left at noon for Lake Huron. Wind blowing 
hard. Stopped at Courtwright all night. Left again next morning at 
seven, and stopped at Sarnia, to repair engine, and left at eleven for God- 
erich. Arrived off Goderich at 5.10 p.m., and there ran upon a submerged 
crib at 5.20. We then worked at the boat until midnight with the tug "Hor- 
ton" but could not pull her off, so left to wait for morning. The weather 
at that time was calm. Went out to the boat at daylight, and found she 
was filled with water. Wind at that time was northwest, and commenced 
to blow hard. Returned and got tug "Horton" and lighter and returned 
to wreck and stripped all the gear that could be got off and left her at 10 
a.m. with the wind fresh and the seas making fast. 

On Monday the 28th there was nothing left of the hull of "Lurline" 
boiler and engine on the crib, both having been washed off. 

V 

Report of the Work Performed by the Yacht ''I'll See" and other 

PATROL boats ON THE GEORGIAN BaY AND THE NoRTH ChANNEL DURING 
THE YEAR 1907. 

The "VTi See" left Penetang on Tuesday the 30th April at 3 p.m. on 
her first trip up the North Shore, and arrived at Muskoka Mills at 5 p.m. 
in a snow storm. The weather was very cold. The next few days we 
patrolled among the islands and bays searching for nets, but found only 
one trap net, which we destroyed. By the end of the .week the weather was 
so rough we had to put in to Go Home Bay for shelter, and while looking 
around there we found some gill nets, which we lifted. We remained there 
all night, and went to Penetang on Sunday morning. 

The following week we patrolled around One Tree Island, 
Indian Harbor, Burrowes Point. Shawanaga Bay. Point au Baril, and Mc- 
Coy's Island. At the latter place we saw some Indians fishing illegally, 
but, as our engine was not in good working order, they got away from us. 
After stopping the engine we could not start it again, so we towed the yacht 
with our patrol boat to a place of shelter, where we had to stop for two or 
three days on account of the rough weather. 



56 REPORT OF THE No. 32 



On Monday the 13tli May we left Toad Island and patrolled around where 
there had been seining don© in other years, but we saw no signs of any fish- 
ing. We then went through Shebeshekong to Thistle Island, and arrived 
at Moon River at 6.15 p.m. On Tuesday, while patrolling Sweets Bay, 
we found two trap nets, which we burnt, and the next day two more in the 
Moon River Channel. Searched the remainder of the week, but found 
nothing. Spent Saturday in Penetang cleaning and painting. 

The weather was too rough and stormy to do any patrolling until the 
following Thursday, when we went to Giants Tomb Island, but, although 
there was formerly quite an amount of illegal fishing done there, we saw 
no signs of any, so returned to Penetang and remained over Friday the 24th 
May, it being a holiday. Left Penetang for Victoria Harbor at 8 a.m., 
and as it was blowing hard w© had all the sea that our boat could stand. 
We captured one trap net, which we burnt, and then returned to Penetang, 
where we had to remain until Wednesday on account of the bad weather. We 
had to put out two anchors to keep our boat from blowing ashore. Wed- 
nesday and Thursday we patrolled Woodruff and Whalesback Shoals, Ken- 
nebec Island and Moon River. W© found no nets, but found a lot of dead 
pickerel, which had been caught and put in pens to keep until the open 
s©ason, but we were keeping such a strict watch they could not be taken to 
market. For several days we were unsuccessful in finding anything irre- 
gular, but on Friday, June 7th, at the Bustard Islands we found a seine 
drying on the rocks, which we confiscated; and the next day as we were 
entering the harbor at Killarney we saw two men with a seine in a punt, 
but they got to the shore and escaped. We got the seine and punt, but 
found nothing more. 

On Monday the 10th June, we left for Little Current, where w© saw Mr. 
Oliver and got a list of licenses from him. I told Mr. Oliver our engine 
was not working well enough to take him over his division, and he said that 
around Killarney was where there was need of someone to look after things. 
We had to remain all next day at Little Current, as it was blowing too hard 
to leave. We started on Wednesday for Killarney, where we got one seine 
and a trap net, both of which we burnt. We then went and looked at the 
books of the Dominion Fish Co., and the Wolverine Fish Co., to see who 
were selling fish. I found the names of some Indians who had no licenses, 
and who had sold a few. I told the buyers that if they bought any more, 
they would have to pay a fine. We left Killarney on Thursday, and when 
about eight miles from the Bustard Islands, the engine stopped, and it was 
one hour before we could get under way. The wind was blowing too hard 
the next few days to do any patrolling. We made several attempts, but 
always had to turn back, on account of the rough sea. The engine also 
gave us a good deal of trouble, stopping every now and again. 

On Friday the 21st June I went to Toronto to report about the engine, 
and was given orders to get a gasoline launch and go to Point au Baril and 
seize a tug and nets that were being fished without a license. We could not 
get a launch until Monday the 24th, and then, as the rain was coming down 
in torrents, and it was an open boat, we could not start imtil the next day. 
We arrived at 3 p.m. and seized the tug. The party said that as his nets 
were all in the water it would be some days before we could get all his net? 
lifted. The following two days the weather was too rough to venture out, 
but on Friday the tug went out and lifted one gang of nets, and on Saturday 
another. Monday and Tuesday were too foggy to go out, so we spent the 
time drying the nets we had ashore. Wednesday being a fine day we got 
another arang lifted, on Thursday another, and on Friday the last gang. 
Saturday being a fine day, all hands worked at the nets trying to g©t them 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 57 



dried, also on Monday and Tuesday. As there had been nothing done 
towards repairing the "I'll See" there was little patrolling done for the rest 
of the month. I got an occasional chance to go among the islands, but 
found nothing irregular. 

On Thursday, the 1st August, went to Point au Baril on the steamer 
■'Lee" with a number of tourists who were going on a fishing trip. I asked 
them to show their permits, and found they were 14 short, so they bought 
them from me. For a week or ten days we went between Parry Sound and 
Penetang on the steamers' "Lee" and "City of Toronto, '^' waiting while the 
Department was trying to get a boat. On Monday. August 19th; we left 
Penetang, with the steamer "Mary L.," calling at Minnecog on our way 
to Muskoka Landing for the night. On Tuesday the wind was too strong 
for us to go up the shore, so we spent the day patrolling among the islands. 
On Wednesday we left Muskoka Landing, and called at the Iron City Club, 
where we were told the fishing was not as good as other years, and that the 
law was well observed. We then went to Moon River, where we took on 
some wood. We tied up at Wassoon Island for the night, and next day 
called at Copperhead, Spider Bay, Sans Soucie, and then on to Parry Sound, 
where we had to tie up, on account of the strong wind. On our way we saw 
nothing irregular. On Friday we left Parry Sound and went by Shebeshe- 
kong to the Ojibway Hotel in the Point au Baril Channel. 

The guests were nearly all gone. At Hang Dog we found two men who 
had caught 52 bass in one day. We took them back to Point au Baril, 
where they paid their fine of |20 each. It being too late in the day to go 
my further, we remained at Point au Baril over night, and as the weather 
was too rough to go out, we were compelled to stay for three days. We 
went into Sturgeon Bay and cut some fuel, as we were getting short. 

On Tuesday August 27th we went by Hang Dog and Bayfield to Byng 
Inlet, where we took on wood, and saw Mr. Knight,. :sjho said, that there 
was nothing doing there in the way of fishing. We then went as far as 
Key River, where we stopped for the night. Next day we visited the Bus- 
tards, where we found the fishermen taking out their nets and getting ready 
to leave. Their nets were ruined by the bark off saw logs. We next called 
at Killarney, and then at Little Current where we took on wood and sup- 
plies, and left, with Mr. Oliver on board, for Kagawong for the night. The 
fishermen there said they had had better fishing than for some years. From 
there with^'n the next few days we went to Gore Bay, Meldrum Bay, Cock- 
burn Island, Kitchener Island, Rickett's Harbor, Duck Island, Providence 
Bay, South Bay, Rattlesnake Harbor, Squaw Island, Centre Island, and 
back to Little Current, where we took on wood, and remained over Sunday. 

On Monday, September 9th, we left Little Current with Mr. Oliver on 
board, and went to Killarney, where there were complaints about some par- 
ties not lifting their pound nets for three weeks, but found there was no 
truth in these complaints. Next day Mr. Oliver returned to Little Cur- 
rent, and on our way down we called at Black Point. We patrolled for a few 
days around Byng Inlet, Point au Baril, Shawanaga, Oak Islands, Mink 
Islands, Copperhead and Muskoka Mills, and on Saturday the 14th arrived 
at Penetang. On Monday received a telegram from Mr. Holden to come 
to Parry Sound, so we put on wood and left that evening, took Mr. Holden 
on board next day and went to Byng Inlet, next day to French River, and 
thence to Killarney, where we had to remain all day on account of the 
weather. It was too rought to go to Squaw Island, where Mr. Holden 
wished to go and see the fishermen. It was still too rough on Friday^ 
so in the afternoon we left for Little Current and had a very rough trip. 



58 REPORT OF THE No. 32 



On Saturday we left for Kagawong, remaining there over Sunday. On Mon- 
day we started for Meldrum Bay, but liad to go in to Barry Bay for shelter, 
as the wind was too strong for our boat. After the wind went down we 
continued our journey to Meldrum Bay, where we had to stay for two days 
owing to the rough weather. Mr. Holden left on Wednesday evening by 
the steamer "Caribou" to return to Penetang. On Thursday we left for 
Meldrum Bay on our return trip, and when we were off Gore Bay the wind 
blew so l;ard from the northwest we had to run in to Gore Bav for shelter. 
The fishermen said they had not had as rough weather in two years. 

On Friday the 27th September, the weather being more favorable, we 
left for Little Current, where we took on wood for fuel, and saw Mr. Oliver, 
who said there was nothing for us to look after round there. From there we 
went to Killarney, where we had to remain all next day. Sunday being 
more favorable, but not by any means a nice day, we left for Collins Inlet 
and Beaverstone, and on to the Bustards for the night. The fishermen there 
said the weather had been so rough they had only been out once in ten days. 
In the afternoon of Monday we went to t^e mouth of the French River, 
where we could get on the inside channel, and went by Dead Island and 
inside to Byng Inlet. From there to Point au Baril and Camel's Rock, and 
to Penetang. 

On Thursday, October 3rd, we patrolled at Green Island and Quarry 
Island, and in the bay near Pine Point. We were wind bound all next 
day, and could do no patrolling. On Saturday went to Waubaushene, where 
we found the fishermen getting their nets ready for the fall fishing. On 
Monday the 7th, I left Penetang and went to Walkerville to go on the 
steamer "Lurline." 

On Tuesday the 29th October I returned to Penetang from Goderich, 
after the "Lurline" was wrecked, and remained in Penetang until the 4th 
November, when I left with the steamer "Mary L." for the North Shore, 
spending the night at Jubilee Island, as well as the whole of the next day. 
We saw no fishermen on our way up the shore. The next two days we 
visted Point au Baril and Byng Inlet, and on Friday the 8th, the weather 
being more favorable, with Mr. Knight on board, we went to Dead Island, 
where we made a seizure of the boats and nets of two fishermen, it being 
the close season. When we got to Byng Inlet we fined them $10 each, and 
the boats and nets were left with Overseer Knight at Byng Inlet. We then 
took on some wood for fuel, and left for Point au Baril, but when we got 
to Duffey Island it was blowing too hard for us to go out, so we tied up and 
waited two days for better weather. On Friday we went to Point au Baril, 
and from there to Indian Harbor, and on Saturday to Penetang. As the 
small bays were , freezing over^ and our boat was not ironed to break ice, we 
took all that belonged to the Department off the boat, and stored it away 
for the winter. 

Report of the work done by the patrol steamer "Pearl" during the 

SEASON OF 1907 ON THE GEORGIAN BaY. 

On July 12th she left Parry Sound, called at Rose Point, Sans Souci, 
Philadelphia Club House, Somerset Island, and various other places to sell 
permits to the tourists. Continued thus calling at various tourist • points 
for some time. No evidences were seen of illegal fishing of any kind. All 
the tourists had taken out permits. After calling at Snug Harbor, Dillen's 
Port, Shanagan Point, Grancaw, Point aux Baril, Palestine Island, she 
went to Good Cheer Island. From thence she returned to Parry Sound by 
way of Long Sault Channel, calling at many islands on the way. 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 59 



On July 28th she left Parry Sound again, and continued cruising among 
the islands. On August 3rd one trap net was seized at Grancaw; one was 
also seized and burned on Aug. 4th, and on Aug. 6th still another at Moon 
Falls. She then returned to Parry Sound. On her next trip she seized 
a trap net at Pose Point. She went to Blair's landing on August 19th, to 
investigate a report that gill nets were being set there. None were found, 
however, so she cruised among the islands for a few days. On August 23rd 
she went to Iron City Club House where she seized some gill nets in the bay 
east of the club house. She grappled in other bay^s, but got nothing. 

On September 1st she left Parry Sound and for a month cruised among 
the islands and elsewhere, grappling for nets and looking after the interests 
of the fisheries in general. She generally returned to Parry Sound for 
over Sunday. During this month no nets were seized, although the 
grappling operations carried on by the steamer were extensive. 

On October 1st she left Parry Sound, and after calling at many places, 
had to remain for a day or so at Shebeshekong on account of a gale. While 
the boat was laid up, the crew went around among the islands in the row- 
boat. She had to stay at Sans Souci for two days, because of another heavy 
gale. As soon as the gale abated she continued patrolling and searching 
for nets and shoal fishers. This continued for some weeks. On November 
6th she went to Shanagan Point, where there was a hunting party. All of 
them had licenses. 

On November 11th she left Parry Sound, called at Sans Souci, Copper- 
head Island, Burnt Island, where she grappled for nets, but without success. 
She spent the night at Long Sault. On November 12th she left Long Sault, 
went to Campbell's Rock, thence to Palestine Island, Snug Harbor, Dillen's 
Port, and finally arrived at Shebeshekong Point, where she stayed for the 
night, She was forced by the gale to remain here all next day. During the 
day it snowed very hard. On the 14th in the afternoon she went to Shana- 
gan River, then to other places. On the 15th November she returned to 
Parrv Sound, whre she was laid up for the season. 



.60 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 32 



LIST OF GAME AND FISHERIES WARDENS. 



Name. 


Residence. 


District. 


Burt, William 


Simcoe 


Niagara Peninsula. 


Chauvin Victor 


Windsor 


Western District. 


Hand, T. A 

Hunter, Capt. A 

Parks, Gr. M 


Sault Ste. Marie 

Belleville 


District of Algoma. 
Eastern District. 


North Bay 


District of Nipissing. 

Thunder Bay and Rainy River . 

Muskoka and Parrv Sound . 


Sterling, C. N 

Willmott J. H 


Kenora 


Beaumaris 









LIST OF OVERSEERS. 



Name. 


Residence . 


District. 


Acton, Nassau 


Gananoque . . . 


Gananoque River and for that part of the River St. 
Lawrence lying between Wolfe Island and Rockport. 


Baechler, F 


Nipissing 

Callander 


South River and South Bay, Lake Nipissing. 

Lake Nipissing, in the Districts of Parry Sound and 
Nipissing. 


Bailey, G. L 


Birch W J 


Delta 


Upper and Lower Beverley lakes and rivers . 
Province of Ontario . 


Black J. N 


Killarney 

Fort Francia . . 


Blanchard, F 


Rainy River and adjacent waters. 


Blondin, Isaac 


Cornwall 


Co. ' s Stormont and Glengarry and St. Lawrence River. 


Blunden, H. A 


Sarnia 


Co. Lambton, exclusive of Walpole and St. Ann's islands. 


Boland, Jno 


Wahnapitae. . . 


District of Nipissing. 


Boler William 


Byron 


River Thames, between London and boundary line be- 
tween Townships Delaware and Westminster, County 
of Middlesex. 


Bourgon, J. B 


Rockland 


Counties of Prescott, Russell, Stormont and Glengarry, 
with jurisdiction over so much of the Rivers Ottawa 
and St. Lawrence as lies in front of said counties. 


Boyd, J. H 


Merrickville . . 


Rideau River and tributaries, fronting on County of 
Grenville. 




Bradshaw, A 


Lindsay 


Townships Mariposa and Ops, County Victoria. 


Briees. T. J 


Bridgeburg . . . 


County of Welland. 


Tlnrtp Gpo 


Perth 


For the Town of Perth, Tps. of North Emsley, Drum- 
mond, North Burgess, and the first two concessions 
of the Tp. of Bathurst, Co. Lanark. 






Burtcheall, C 


Coboconk 


Balsam and Mud Turtle Lakes, County Victoria. 


Campbell, John 


Sylvan 


River Aux Sauble and tributaries. 


Caskey, T. C 


Blairton 


Townships of Belmont and Methuen, County Peterboro'. 



1907 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



61 



Name. 


Residence. 


District. 


Cassan, C. H 


Campbellford . 


Trent River and tributaries, County Northumberland, 
from Campbellford to Trent Bridge. 


Chambers, Thop 


St. Clair Flats. 


For St. Clair Flats. 


Chapue, Alberique . . 


Ojibwa 


Caldwell Marsh, Co. of Essex. 


Chauvin, Victor 


Windsor 


Province of Ontario. 


Christink, Irwin 


Pembroke .... 


County Renfrew. 


Clark, Marshall 


Picton 


County of Prince Edward exclusive of the Townships of 
Ameliasburg and Sophiaeburg. 


Clarkson, William . . 


Lakehurst 


West half of Township of Smith, Township or Ennismore, 
west half Township Harvey, Townships of Galway 
and Cavendish, County Peterboro'. 


Clunis, A 


Claude 


In and for the Townships of Chinguacousy, Caledon and 
Albion, in the County of Peel. 


Colter, Samuel 


Gilford 


Lake Simcoe, from the 10th concession, Tp. Innisfil, to 
the mouth of the Holland River. 


Corsant, A 


Masonville 


Co. Middlesex, east of boundary line between the Tps. 
of Westminster and Delaware, London and Lobo. 




Covell, H. N 


Lombardy 


Township South Emsley, County Leeds. 


Covell, John 


Brighton 


Lake Ontario, fronting County of Northumberland, also 
inland waters tributary to said lake in the above 
counties . 


Cook, H. G. A 


Niagara Falls . . 


County Welland. 


Cox, Matthew 


Howe Island . . 


The waters of St. Lawrence River around Howe Island. 


Cox, James 


Hillsburg 


Province of Ontario. 


Crotty, John 


Bothwell 


River Thames between Village of Wardsville and east- 
erly limits of County of Kent, in County of Middlesex 


Cryderman, J. F 


Norham 


Trent River and tributaries, County Northumberland, 
from Percy Boom to Campbellford Bridge. 


Cunningham, Jas. A. 


Maynooth 


Townships Bangor, Wicklow and McClure, Co. Hastings. 


Davieau, H 


Michipicoten I. 

Sydenham 

Bolingbroke. . . 


Michipicoten Island. 

Township Loughboro. • 

Townships Bathurst and South Sherbrooke, Co. Lanark. 


Davis, J. W 


Deacon, Ephraim . . . 


Donaldson, W. J 


Donaldson . . . ", 


Townships of Palmerston, Clarendon, Barrie. Miller, 
North Canonto and South Canonto, electoral district 
of Addington. 


Dowker, John 


Hartington 


Township of Portland. 


Draper, Samuel 


Elmvale 


For the County of Simcoe. 


Drew, Henry 


Long Lake 


Townships Hinchinbrooke, Oso, Olden and Kennebec, 
District of Addington. 


Dun lop, James 


Mackey's St'n . 


Ottawa River between Deux Joachim and Mattawa, and 
over waters in townships in Ontario bordering on 
said river. 



62 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 32 



Name. 


Residence, 


District. 


Dusang, B. A 


Fesserton 


Tps. of Freeman, Gibson, Baxter, Wood and Morrison 
in District of Muskoka, also over Severn River. 


Elliott, Robert 


Bayfield 


County of Huron. 


Englehart, G. M . . . . 


Inglewood 


Province of Ontario. 


Esford, Henry 


Barriefield 


Rideau waters between St. Lawrence River and Brewer's 
Mills. 


Fisher, James 


Sunbury 


Tp. Storrington, including Rideau waters from Brewer's 
Mills to south limit of the township with jurisdiction 
over all of Loughboro Lake and the lakes of the 
Township of Storrington. 


Fleming, E 


Hastings 


Village of Hastings. 


Fogg, Thos 


Sunderland 


County of Ontario. 

County of Kent. 

St. Lawrence River from the head of Cardinal Rapids 


Forbes, Hy 


Jeannette's Ck. 


Eraser, J. A 


Prescott 




west to Rockport . 


Gainforth, Wm 


Haliburton . . . 


Townships Stanhope, Guildford, Harburn, Dudley. 
Dysart and Minden, District of Haliburton. 


Gallagher, Hugh 


Eganville 


County of Renfrew . 


Gault, T. G 


Deseronto 


Bay of Quinte, East Riding County of Hastings and for 




Moira River and other waters in said Riding . 


Gibson, J. W 


Strath roy 


County of Middlesex . 


Gidley, W. C 


Penetang 


Province of Ontario. 


Gillespie, James 


Berkeley 


Electoral District of Centre Grey and for Township of 
Glenelg in South Grey. 


Glass, Irving 


Trenton 


Bay of Quinte from City of Belleville west to the Trent 
River and for Trent River from its mouth to Chis- 
holm's Rapids and for the tributaries thereto. 


Glendeuning, John. . 


Vallentyne . . . 


County of Ontario. 


Godfrey, James 


Pefferlaw 


Township of Georgina, County of York. 


Gordon, Walter 


Port Arthur. . . 


In and for the District of Thunder Bay. 


Green, Adam 


Diamond ..... 


Townships Huntley and Fitzroy, County Carleton. 


Green, John 


Marmora 


Township of Marmora, County Hastings. 


Hales, Hiram 


Brigden 


County of Lambton. 


Hastings William. . . . 


Aurora 


Wilcox Lake. 


Hayes, Henry 


Murray 


Bay of Quinte, as lies in front of the East Riding of 
Northumberland, for that portion of the River Trent, 
lying between the Township of Sydney and the Bay 
of Quinte, and for the Inland waters of the Tps. of 
Murray, Dry den and Cramahe and Haldimand. 


Hembruff, Jos 


Manito waning. 


Lake Manitou on Manitoulin Island and the streams 
tributary thereto. 


Henderson, H. A . . . 


Pelee Island . . 


For Pelee Island and the other islands in Lake Erie, 
south of the County of Essex. 



1907 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



G3 



Name. 


Residence. 


District. 


Hess, James 


Hastings 


Trent River and tributaries, in County Northumberland, 
from Trent Bridge to Rice Lake. 


Hewitt, James 


Honey Harbor 


Province of Ontario. 


Holliday, Henry 


Wolfe Island. . 


Township of Wolfe Island and for the islands of Simcoe, 
Garden and Horseshoe, and any other islands com- 
prised in the Township of Wolfe Island. 


Horton, H 


Sand Bay 

Hay Bay 


Province of Ontario. 


Huffman, E. M 


Townships of Richmond, Adolphustown, North and 
South Fredericksburg, with jurisdiction over Hay 
Bay and Bay of Quinte, in County Lennox and 
Addington. 


Hughson, George 


South River. . . 


Township Laurier. 


Hunter, Frank 


Dorchester 


Thames River, easterly to the boundary line, between 
Oxford and Middlesex. 


Hunter, William 


Tehkummah. . 


Manitoulin Island in Lake Huron. 


Irish, John 


Vennachar 


Townships of Anglesea, Effingham, Ashby, Denbigh and 
Abinger, Counties Lennox and Addington. 




Jack, jr., Jas 


Forester's Falls 


County of Renfrew. 


Jermyn, J. W 


Wiarton ...... 


Georgian Bay, County of Bruce, lying east and south of 
Tobermory Harbour, but exclusive of the said 
Harbour. 


Jickling, Chas 


St. Paul's Sta- 
tion. 


County Perth and for Townships East Nissouri and East 
and West Zorra, in County Oxford. 


Johnson, John 


Port Hope 


Townships Hope and Cavan, in the County of Durham, 
with joint jurisdiction with any other Game and 
Fishery overseer or overseers over County Durham. 


Johnson, Henry 


Brantford 


That part of Grand River lying between the southerly 
boundary of Town of Gait and the boundary line 
between Tuscarora and Ono daga Townships in 
County Brant and the Townships of Seneca and 
Oneida in Haldimand County ; also concurrent juris- 
diction with Overseer Kern over Tributaries to the 
Grand River in Burford, Oakland and Brantford 
Townships west of the Grand River. 


Johnston, D 


Peterboro 


River Otonabee and tributaries, between the Canadian 
Pacidc Railway Crossing in Peterborough and the 
mouth of the River and Rice Lake, Township 
South Monaghan, 


Johnston, Thos 


Royston 


Townships of Lount, Machar, Laurier, Croft, Chapman, 
Strong, Jolly, Spence, Ryerson, Armour, Proudfoot, 
Monteith, McMurrich, Perry and Bethune, District 
of Parry Sound. 


Johnston, W. H 


Harwood 


Rice Lake, in the Townships of Hamilton and Alnwick, 
County Northumberland. 


Jones, John 


Fenelon Falls. 


For the north end of Sturgeon Lake, and Cameron Lake 
to Rosedale Locks, Burnt River and Rosedale River 
in the County of .Victoria. 


Karr, Richard 


Forest 


For the Townships of Plympton, Boeanquet and War- 
wick in the County of Lambton. 



64 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 32 



Name. 



Residence. 



District. 



Kehoe, D 

Kennedy, John 

Kern, Jacob 

f 

Kerr, C. J 

Kinder, Jos , 

Knight, C. H 

Knox, A., Jr 

Kraft, Samuel 

Laframboise, Remi . . 

Landoni, Louis 

Langford, Newton. . . 

Latimer, George 

Laughington, Henry. 

Laughlin, J. H 

Leadley, Robt 

Lean, Wellington . . . 
Lee, Edward 

Leitch, P. A 

Little, Richard 



Millarton . 

Meaford 

Burford 

Hamilton 

Rockingham. . 
Byng Inlet 

Carleton Place 



Ridgeway . 



Canard River. 

Dracon 

Dorset 

Eugenia 

Parry Sound. 

New Lowell. . 
Barrie 

Apsley 

Lowbanks 

Nepigon , 

Wallaceburg . 



That portion of County Bruce lying South of Indian Re- 
serve and Township of Amabel, with jurisdiction 
over Lake Huron in front of said county, south of 
Southampton. 

County of Grey, exclusive of Townships of Proton, Egre- 
mont and Normanby. 

County of Brant, comprising Townships of Burford, 
Oakland and Brantford, west of Grand River, but 
exclusive of said River. 

County of Wentworth. 

Lake Charlotte, Township of Brudenell, Co. of Renfrew. 

For the River Magnetewan, and for the waters of 
Georgian Bay lying between the said river and 
French River. 

Townships Fitzroy, Huntley and Goulbourn, County 
Carleton ; and Townships Beckwith, Drummond, 
Ramsey and Packham, County Lanark. 

In and for Electoral District of Welland, with jurisdic- 
tion over so much of the waters of Lake Erie and 
the Niagara River, exclusive of the waters of said 
river north of the Niagara Falls, as lies in front of 
the said Electoral District. 

Detroit River, fronting Townships of Sandwich, West 
Anderdon and Maiden, and also Canadian Islands in 
said River, County Essex. 

County of Wellington. 

Townships McLean, Ridout, Franklin and Brunei, Dis- 
trict of Muskoka, and Townships McClintock, Liv- 
ingstone, Sherbourne and Havelock, District of 
Haliburton. 

Township of Artemesia. 

For the Townships of Shawanaga, Ferguson, Carling, 
McDougal, McKellar, Christie, Foley, Parry Island, 
Cowper and Conger in the District of Parry Sound. 

For the County of Simcoe. 

For the Township of Vespra and the Town of Barrie, in 
the County of Simcoe, and over so much of the 
waters of Kempenfeldt Bay as lies in front of the said 
town and township ; also, that portion of Kempen- 
feldt Bay, lying in front of the Township of Oro. 

Tps. of Anstruther and Chandos, County of Peterboro. 

Townships of Moulton, Sherbrooke and Wainfleet in the 
District of Monck and Lake Erie. 

River and Lake Nepigon. 

County of Kent, fronting on Lake St. Clair, exclusive of 
Dover West Township, also Walpole and St. Anne's 
Islands, County Lambton. 



1907 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



65 



Name. 



Loveday, E. T. 



McAllister, J. R. 



McClennan, Kenneth 



McEwen, A. 



McGinn, William. 

McGuire, J 

Mclntyre, A 

McKelvie, D 

McLeod, A 

McM array, R 

McNairn, Jamee. . . 
McPhee, D 

McVittie, James. . . 

Macdonald Hector. 

Macdonald, J. K . . 
Macdonald, S. C. . . 
Major, William . . . 
Mansfield, Thomas 

May, J. C 

Mayor, Hariy 

5 F. 



Residence . 



Ottawa. 



Gore's L'nding 
Grovesend 

Aldboro' 

Orillia 

Jones Falls 

Keene 

New Liskeard. 
Credit Forks. . 

Bayfield 

Iroquois 

Uptergrove . . . 

Blenheim 

Beaverton 

Toronto 

Bear Island . . . 
Woodlawn. . . . 
Pickering 

St. Catharines . 
Painswick 



District . 



In and for the Townships of Nepean, Gloucester, North 
Gower and Osgoode, in the County of Carleton, 
with jurisdiction over so much of the River Ottawa 
land the River Rideau and the Rideau Canal as lies 
in front or within gaid Townships, and over the 
tributaries to the said rivers and canals. 

Rice Lake, between Jubilee Point and Lower Close's 
Point and the waters tributary thereto, in the Tps . 
of Hamilton and Alnwick, Co. of Northumberland. 

Townships of Yarmouth, Malahide and Bayham, with 
jurisdiction over so much of the waters of Lake Erie 
as lies in front of the said townships and the tribu- 
taries thereto . 

Townships of Southwold, Dunwich and Aldborough, 
exclusive of the River Thames, with jurisdiction 
over so much of Lake Erie as lies in front of the said 
townships and tributaries thereto. 

Townships of Orillia, and Oro, in the County of Simcoe, 
and over so much of Shingle and Carthews Bays, and 
Lakes Couchiching and Simcoe, as lies in front of 
said townships and over River Severn. 

Rideau River, fronting on the Township of South Crosby, 
County of Leeds. 

Tps. of Otonabee and Asphodel in Co. of Peterboro'. 

Lake Temiskamingue and tributaries. 

Province of Ontario. 

County of Huron. 

River St. Lawrence, fronting on County of Pundas. 

Lake Simcoe, fronting on Tp. of Mara and the tribu- 
taries thereto, and for Mud Lake, in the Tps. of 
Mara and Garden. 

Lake Erie fronting on Co. Kent, together with inland 
waters of said Co. tributary to Lake Erie. 

Lake Simcoe and tributaries thereto fronting on Tp. of 
Thorah, in County of Ontario. 

Lake Kagawong on Manitoulin Island. 

Lake Temagami and tributaries. 

Townships of March and Torbolton, County Carleton. 

Electoral District of South Ontario, exclusive of the 
Township of Reach. 

County of Lincoln and over so much of the waters of 
Lake Ontario as lies in front of the said county, and 
with jurisdiction over the Niagara River between 
its mouth and the Falls. 

Lake Simcoe, from Lovers' Creek, near Barrie, on Kem- 
penfeldt Bay, to concession 10 of the said Township 
of Innisfil. 



66 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 32 



Name. 


Residence . 


District. 


Merriam, Enoch 


Harwood 


Rice Lake, Townships Hamilton and Alnwick, between 
Clone's Point and Rock Island and waters tributary 
thereto, County of Northumberland. 


Meyers, James 


Orchard 


Townships of Proton, Egremont and Normanby, County 
Grey, and Townships Minto, Arthur and West Lu- 
ther, County Wellington. 


Mitchell, Geo 


Flesherton 


County of Grey. 


Moffatt, George 


Glencross 


Townships of Mulmer, Mono and East Garafraxa. 


Moore, F. J 


Lakefield 


Townships of Douro, Dummer, east part of Smith, Tp. 
of Burleigh and east half of Harvey, Co. Peterboro'. 




Morton, John 


St. Ola 


Townships Limerick, Tudor, Wollaston, Cashel Lake 
and Grimsthorpe, County Hastings. 


Munro, H. G 


Ivy Lea 


River St. Lawrence. 


Murdoch, John 


Bath 


Townships of Adolphustown, South Fredericksburg, 
Ernesttown and Amherst Island, County Lennox 
and Addington. 






Murphy, Timothy J . 


Calabogie 


Calabogie Lake in Countj^ Renfrew. 


NichoUs, Garner 


Bobcaygeon. . . 


Townships Verulam, County of Victoria, and Harvey, 
in the County of Peterboro'. 


Oliver, R. C 


Little Current. 


District of Algoma lying east of Algoma Mills, including 
Cockburn and Manitoulin Islands. 




01ton,W. 


Sand Lake . . . 


District of Parry Sound. 


Osborne, Henry 


Dante 


River Thames, between the Village of Lewisville and 
the easterly limits of Kent County. 


Palliser, Squire 


Foxboro 


County of Hastings. 


Patterson, S 


Dunkerron. . . . 


County of Simcoe. 

River Thames from Lewisville to its mouth, also the 
tributaries of said river between these points ; also 
the Township of Dorer West, County Kent. 


Peltier, Theo 


Dover South . . 


Phillips, J. H 


Smith's Falls. . 


County Frontenac lying north of the Townships of 
Kingston and Pittsburg, the Townships of North and 
South Crosby, Bastard, South Elmsley and Kitely, 
County of Leeds, and the County of Lanark. 


Pierce, J. P 


Port Rowan. . . 


County of Norfolk. 

For the Townships of McKim, Broder, Dill, Neelon, 
Garson and Blezard in the District of Nipissing. 


Pilon, Phillippe 


Sudbury 


Poupore, Andrew 


Westmeath — 


For that portion of the River Ottawa lying between 
Des Joachim and Fort Coulonge. 


Purcell, H. R 


Colebrook .... 


Townships Camden, Sheffield, Kaladar and Barrie. 


Raphael, J. C 


Mallorytown . . 


Townships of Front of Yonge and Elizabethtown in the 
C unty of Leeds and over the waters of the River 
St. Lawrence fronting the said townships. 


Rivet, Jos 


Sturgeon Falls. 


That portion of the District of Nipissing lying west and 
north of the Townships of Widdifield, Merrick, 
Stewart and Osborne, exclusive of Lake Temiscaming 
and its tributaries. 



5a F. 



1907 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



67 



Name. 


Residence . 


District. 


Robertson, C 


Hillsburg 


Townships of Erin and West Garafraxa. 


Robertson, D 


Southampton . 


County Bruce fronting Lake Huron, lying between 
Southampton and Tobermory Harbour" 


Robinson, G 


Bradford .... 


Holland River. 


Robinson, T. W 


Collingwood . . 


Townships Collingwood and Osprey, County of Grey, 
and the Townships of Nottawasaga and Sunnidale, 
County of Simcoe. 


Robinson, Wm 


Kilworthy ... . 


Severn River and Sparrow Lake. 


Rose. Wm 


Nobleton 


County of York. 

Township Kawdon, County Hastings. 


Rupert, Thos 


Springbrook . . 


Sargent, W. J 


Bronte 


County of Halton, also County of Wentworth north of 
the Canal, and Lake Ontario. 


Saunders, W. H 


Toronto "... 


Province of Ontario. 


Savage, Thos. Chas. . 


Waterford 


For the County of Norfolk. 


Schell, S 


Port Perry 


Lake Scugog, lying southerly and easterly of the Scugog 
Bridge, and southerly and westerly of the Cartwright 
Bridge. 




Senecal, John 


Cornwall 


County of Stormont. 


Shillington, N 


Burridge 


Township of Bedford, County of Frontenac. 


Sinclair, N 


Glenarm 


Balsam Lake, County of Victoria. 


Slate, George 


Rockport 


River St. Lawrence, between Jackstraw Light and 
Mallorytown Landing. 


Small, John 


Grand Valley. 


Townships of Melancthon, Amaranth and East Luther, 
County Dufferin. 




Smith, William 


Gravenhurst . . 


Lakes Muskoka, Rousseau and Joseph, in the District o 
Parry Sound. 


Spence, William 


Athens 


Charleston Lake and its tributaries, County Leeds. 


Spracklin, Jos 


Windsor 


County of Essex. 


Stewart, Albert 


Goodwood 


County of Ontario. 


Stewart, Alex 


Sand Point — 


For the County of Renfrew. 


Stewart, James 


Lanark 


Townships of Drummond, Lanark, Darling and Lavant, 
County Lanark. 


St. Charles, C 


Madoc 


Townships Madoc and Huntington, County Hastings. 


Stuart, D 


Codrington . . . 


Trent River and tributaries, County of Northumberland. 




from Chisholm's Rapids to Percy Boom. 


Sweet, B. H 


Bancroft 


Townships Faraday, Dungannon, Mayo, Herschel, Mont- 
eagle and Carlo w, County of Hastings. 


Swift, Thos 


Port Perry.... 


Township of Reach, County of Ontario, and Township 




of Mariposa, County Victoria, also River Scugog, 
and joint jurisdiction over Lake Scugog. 


Switzer, W. H 


Gooderham . . . 


Townships of Snowden, Glamorgan, Monmouth, Cardiff, 
and Harcourt, District of Haliburton. 



68 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 32 



Name. 



Taudvin, J. W. 
Taylor, Fred... 



Thomson, Henry 

Tillett, R 



Timlin, M. 
Toner, Geo. 



Toole, Ira. . . 
Townsend, J . 



Traves, J. A., Sen. 



Turner, Samuel. 

Twamley, C 

Vincer, Wm. ... 
Yokes, James . . 



Wadsworth, C. 
Walker, R. J. . 



Wartman, H. iE. 

Watson, Hy. . . . 
Watson, J 



Watt, John Peterborough 



Webb, R. H. . 
Weldon, J. O. 
Weasels, E. M. 
West, Chas . . . 



West, Geo. W. 



Residence . 



Kingston 

Huntsville 

Brechin 

Roach -s Point. 



Atherly 

Gananoque . 

Omemee . . . . 
Long Point. 



District. 



Fraserburg. . 

London . . . . 

Cavan 

Mindemoya 
Nanticoke . . 

Queenston . . 
Port Credit . 

Portsmouth . 

Toronto 

Cseserea 



Barrie 

London 

Wooler 

Holland Ldg. 

Holland Ldg. 



For the City of Kingston, and for the waters fronting 
the County of Frontenac. 

For the Townships of Stephenson, Stisted, Chaffey, Sin- 
clair and Brunei in the District of Muskoka. 

Lake Simcoe and tributaries fronting on Tp. of Mara. 

North York, with jurisdiction over Holland River and 
that portion of Lake Simcoe lying in front of North 
Gwiliimbury and Georgina Townships. 

Lake Couchiching and tributaries fronting Townships 
Mara and Rama. 

River St. Lawrence between Rockport and Brothers Is- 
land. 

Township of Emily, County of Victoria. 

Lyndhurst waters south of Lyndhurst ; also South and 
Gananoque Lakes. 

For the District of Muskoka with joint jurisdiction with 
any Game and Fisheries overseers who have been or 
may be appointed over the District of Parry Sound. 

Province of Ontario. 

Townships Cavan and Manvers. 

Manitoulin Island. 

Townships Walpole, Rainham, South Cayuga and 
Dunn, County Haldimand. 



Lake Ontario, fronting County Peel, and for Rivers 
Credit and Etobicoke, tributary to said lake. 

For the Township of Kingston in the County of 
Frontenac . 



Province of Ontario . 



Townships of Cartwright and Manvers, the waters of 
Lake Scugog fronting on said Townships and the 
waters tributary to said lake . 

River Otonabee and tributaries lying between the Cana- 
dian Pacific Railway Crossing in Peterborough and 
the Village of Lakefleld. 

County of Simcoe. 

Province of Ontario. 

For the County of Northumberland. 

Joint jurisdiction along the east bank of the Holland 
River, through the Township of East Gwiliimbury, 
and along the shore of Lake Simcoe, through Town- 
ship of North Gwiliimbury in the County of York. 

With joint jurisdiction along east bank of Holland River, 
through Township of Gwiliimbury, and along the 
shore of Lake Simcoe, through Township of North 
Gwiliimbury, in the County of York . 



1907 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



69 



Name. 


Residence. 


District. 


West, Wm. F. 


Midland 


Tadenac Club waters, Georgian Bay. 


Widdup, J. W 


Brantford 


For all waters in County of Peel owned or leased by the 
Caledon Mountain Club. 


Wight, J. R 


Newboro' 


For the Township of North Crosby extending to Smith's 




Falls on Rideau waters, together with the inland 
lakes and tributaries thereto. 


Wigle. L 


Leamington. . . 


Townships of Maiden, North Colchester, South Col- 




chester, North Gosfield, South Gosfield and Mersea, 
in the County of Essex, with jurisdiction over so 
much of the waters of lake Erie as lies in front of 
said Townships. 


Williams, J. T 


Penetang 


Townships of Matchedash, Tay, Medonte, Tiny, Flos, 
County of Simcoe and over Christian, Beck with and 
Giants Tomb Islands. 


Wilson. H 


Elphin 


Townships of Dalhousie and North Sherbrooke, County 
of Lanark. 




Wilson, Luke 


Orillia 


Province of Ontario. 


Wood, John 


Whitestone . . . 


Townships Mackenzie, Hagerman, Burpee, Burton and 
Ferrie. 


Wood, P. V 


Port Severn . . . 


For the District of Muskoka, with joint jurisdiction with 




other overseers over the District of Parry Sound. 


Wood, W. R 


Toronto 


Township of Etobicoke, York and Scarboro, and City of 
Toronto, County of York. 


Worden, F 


Courtice 


County of Durham. 


Wornnoorth, F. L. . . 


Arden 


Townships Kennebec and Barrie, County Frontenac. 


Younghusband, D . . . 


South March . . 


Townships March and Nepean, County Carleton. 



70 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 32 



WATERS STOCKED FROM 1901 TO 1906, WITH THE NUMBER AND KINDS OF 

FISH PLANTED IN EACH. 

1901 . 

Waters stocked. Species. Number. 

Muskoka Lake Base ... 1,205 

Lake Rosseau Bass 700 

Lake Joseph Bass 1,052 

Fairy and Vernon Lakes Bass 244 

Lake of Bays Bass 693 

Thames River at Ingersoll Bass 225 

Thames River at Woodstock Bass 225 

Bear Creek at Strathroy Bass 396 

Thames River at Dorchester Bass 696 

Lake Couchiching Bass 436 

Stoney Lake Bass 751 

Lake Simcoe at Jackson's Point Bass 603 

Holland River Bass 387 

Golden Lake Bass 372 

Severn River Bass 526 

Grand River at Cayuga Bass 400 

Grand River at Brantford Bass 274 

Kempenfeldt Bay Bass 300 



1902. 

Waters stocked. Species. 

Muskoka Lake Bass . . 

Lake Joseph Bass . . 

Lake Rosseau Bass . . 

Lake Couchiching Bass . . 

Bear Creek at Strathroy Bass . . 

Stoney Lake Bass . . 

Huntsville Lakes Bass . . 



— Winnipeg River , Brook trout. 



9,481 

Number. 
. . . 246 
. . . 256 
. . . 227 
. . . 285 
. . . 395 
. . . 330 
. . . 265 
55 



2,059 



1903. 



Waters stocked. Species. Number. 

Bear Creek at Strathroy Bass 926 

Lake Rosseau Bass 1,130 

Lake Joseph Bass 500 

Muskoka Lake Bass 1,002 

Lake of Bays Bass 371 

Sparrow Lake Bass 650 

Lake Couchiching Bass 258 

Long Lake at Rat Portage Bass 460^ 

Golden Lake Bass 100 

Mink Lake Bass 85 

Clear Lake Bass 85 

White Lake Bass 100 

Lynn River, at Lake Simcoe Bass 355 

Grand River at Brantford Bass 425 

Thames River at Ingersoll Bass 75 

Thames River at London Bass 200 

Thames River at St. Marys Bass 205 

Grand River at Fergus Bass 100 

Grand River at Grand Valley Bass 70 

Grand River at Paris Bass 130 

Musselmans Lake Bass 200 

Lake of Bays Bass 500 

7,927 



1907 GAME AND FISHERIES. 71 



WATERS STOCKED FROM 1901 TO 1906, WITH THE NUMBER AND KINDS OF 
FISH PLANTED IN EACH. —Continued. 

1904. 

Waters stocked. Species. Number. 

Credit River Bass 115 

Lake Rosseau Bass 380 

Green Lake Bass 135 

Opinicon Forks Bass 50 

Lake near Barry's Bay Bass 30 

Barry's Bay Bass 100 

Gorman Lake Bass 75 

Golden Lake Bass 565 

Mink Lake Basp 60 

White Lake Ba«8 160 

Clear Lake Bass 50 

Snell's Lake Bass 100 

Lake Joseph Bass 725 

Bass Lake Bass 200 

Lake Couchiching Bass 230 

Lake Joseph Bass 415 

Lake of Bays Bass 530 

Lake Simeoe at Jackson's Point Bass 785 

Beaver River at Cannington Bass 250 

Balsam Lake Bass 400 

Lake of Bays Bass Fingerlings 5,000 

Oxbow River at Komoka Bass Fingerlings 1,200 

Lake Scugog Bass Fingerlings 1,400 

12,955 
1905. 

Waters stocked. Species. Number. 

Lake Scugog Bass 400 

Stoney Lake Bass 600 

Muskoka Lake Bass 500 

Thames River at Stratford Bass 250 

Thames River at Mitchell Bass 350 

Lake Couchiching Bass 500 

Gull Lake (near Gravenhurst) Bass 100 

Lake of Bays Bass 400 

3,100 
1906. 

Waters stocked. Species. Number. 

Lake Simeoe Bass 450 

Lake of Bays Bass 700 

Gull River Bass 610 

Grand River Bass 575 

Lake Scugog Bass 400 

Muskoka Lake Bass 700 

River Nith Bass 600 

Lake Simeoe Bass 700 

do Bass 700 

5,435 



72 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 32 



Statement of Revenue received from the Fisheries during the year ended 31st December, 1907. 



District. 


Name of Overseer. 


Amount. 


Total 


Lake of the Woods and Rainy River 
District 


Blanchard, F 


$ c. 

85 00 

1,269 00 

30 00 


$ c. 


Nash, John 

Sterling, Chas 










Leitch, P. A 


1,384 00 


River Nepigon . . 


1,200 00 




Ashforth, J. G 


1,200 00 


Lake Superior 


321 05 
160 00 

2,275 00 

1,188 00 

460 00 




Calbeck, A 






Gordon, Walter 

Hand, T. A 






Van Norman, R. M 

Hembruff, Jas 


4,404 05 


Lake Huron (North Channel) 


24 00 

16 00 

6,928 65 

5 00 




Hunter, Wm 






Oliver, R. C 






Vincer, Wm 






Bennett, E. C 


6,973 65 


Georgian Bay 


8 00 

5 82 

121 00 

35 00 

60 00 

105 00 

39 00 

41 00 

698 85 

812 00 

25 00 

1,164 00 

447 00 

230 00 




Cautley, J. C 






Dusang, B. A 






France, Jr., W 






Free, John 




, 


Gidley, W. C 






Grise Bros 






Hewitt, James 






Jermyn, J. W 

Kennedy, John 

Knight, Chas 






Laughington. H 

Robinson, T. W 

Williams, J. T 

Blunden, H. A 


'3,791 67 


Lake Huron (projier) and River St. Clair. . 


3.901 83 
106 00 
222 00 
646 00 

1,249 45 

7 50 

23 00 

169 37 

18 00 

1,068 00 

479 00 

44 00 

423 00 

165 00 

58 00 

1,468 00 

7 00 

216 00 

292 00 

69 00 

844 00 

3,709 00 

3,300 00 


Karr, Richard 






Kehoe, D 






McMurray, R 






Robertson, D 




Lake St. Clair, River Thames and Detroit 
River 


Campbell, John 

Chambers, Thos 

Chauvin, V 


6,125 28 








Crotty, John 






Drouillard, A 






Little, Richard 

Osborne, Hy 






Peltier, Theo 




Lake Erie and Grand River 


Briges, T. J 


2,231 87 




Fradenburg, D. A 

Henderson, H. A 

Johnson, Hy 






Kraft, S 






Laframboise, R 

Lees, C. H. A 

Lee, Edward 






McClennan, K 






McEwen, Arch 






Carried fonoard 






10,158 00 


26,110 52 



1907 



GAME AND FISHERIES, 



73 



Statement of Revenue. — Continued. 



District. 



Lake Erie and Grand River — Con. 



Lake Ontario and Bay of Quinte 



Counties, Frontenac, Leeds, Prescott, Rus- 
sell, Carleton, Renfrew, Lanark, Gren- 
ville 



Peterborough, Northumberland, Victoria 
and other inland counties 



Name of Overseer. 



Amount. 



Total. 



Brought Forward 

McVittie, Jas 

Moriarity, J. J 

Pattison, F. T 

Pierce, J. P 

Wigle, Lewis 

Wigle, W. D 

Vokes, Jas 

Scott, Wm 

Brick wood, J. H 

Buckley, G. E 

Clark, Marshall 

Covell, John 

Gault, Thos 

Glass, Irving 

Hayes, H. W 

Holliday, Hy 

Huffman, E. M 

Kerr, C. J 

McGlynn, P. J 

Mansfield, Thos.... 

May, J. C 

Murdoch, John . . . . 

Sargant, Wm 

Taudvin, J. W 

Starling, J. H 

Walker, R. J 

Wartman, H. E 

Wood, W. R 

Birch, W. J 

Bourgon, J. B 

Boyd, J. H 

Christink, E 

Davis, J. W 

Deacon, E 

Drew, Hy 

Esford, Hy 

Hull.Chas 

Hunter, A 

Knight, U. R 

Loveday, E. T 

McGuire, John 

Phillips, J. H 

Shillington, N 

Spence, Wm 

Taylor, Chas 

Townsend, Jas 

Wight, J . R 

Best, S. G 

Blea, Daniel 

Bradshaw, A 

Burtcheall, C 

Cassan, C. H 

Carried forward 



10,158 00 



5,998 00 


49 00 


19 00 


2,780 00 


2,580 00 


10 00 


2,380 15 


87 00 


146 00 


2,190 00 


355 00 


99 00 


443 00 


30 00 


55 00 


240 00 


523 00 


218 00 


155 00 


22 00 


482 77 


244 00 


405 00 


269 00 


51 00 


27 00 


35 00 


171 57 


16 00 


53 00 


52 00 


23 00 


34 00 


15 00 


29 00 


152 00 


55 00 


24 00 


184 00 


268 50 


497 00 


265 00 


91 00 


142 00 


2 00 


118 40 


240 00 



15 00 
19 00 
50 00 
76 00 
89 00 



249 00 



$ c. 
26,110 52 



24,031 16 



6,161 34 



2,260 90 



58,563 91 



74 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 32 



Statement of Revenue — Continued. 



District. 



Peterborough, Northumberland, Victoria 
and other inland counties. — Con. 



River St. Lawrence. 



Lakes Simcoe. Couchiching and Sparrow . 



Nipissing. 



Name of Overseer. 



Brought forward . 



Clarkson, Wm 

Crump, C. J. C. . . . 

Gaudree, E. E 

Green, John 

Greenwood, T. D. . 

Heath, A. J 

Hess, J. H 

Irish, John 

Johnston, W. H. . . 
Johnston, David . . 

Jones, John 

Langford, Newton 
Lean, Wellington . 
McAllister, J. R. . . 
McElwain, S. C . . . 
Mclntyre, A. W. . . 

Merriam, E 

Moore, F. J 

Morton, J. W.. ..-. 

Muir, Capt 

Nicholls, Garner . . 

Pilon, P 

Purcell, H. K 

Rice, M. A 

Smith, Wm 

St. Charles, C 

Taylor, Fred. 

Telfer, J. A 

Toole, Ira 

Watson, John .... 

Watt, John 

Widdup, J.. 

Willmott J. H . . . . 
Worden, Frank... 



Acton, Nassau . 
Blondin, Isaac. 
Cox, Matthew . 
Dowker, John . 
Eraser, J. A 



Doolittle, H 

Dodds, W. T 

McGinn, Wm 

McPhee, Donald, 
Mayor, Harry , . . 

Tillett, Robt 

Thomson, H. S. . . 



Baechler, Fred . . 

Cartier, A 

Ferguson, 0. L. . 

McKelvie, D 

Macdonald, S. C. 
Rivet, Jos 



Carried forward. 



Amount. 



9 c. 
249 00 

127 00 

30 00 

6 00 

18 00 

43 00 

2 00 

25 00 

2 00 

22 00 

12 00 

57 00 

50 00 

CO 00 

76 00 

114 00 

2 00 

79 00 

361 00 
17 00 
24 00 

522 00 

10 00 
36 50 
14 00 
47 00 

2 00 

22 00 

6 00 

60 00 
9 00 

70 00 

61 00 
159 00 

5 50 



15 00 
5 00 
20 00 
11 00 
15 00 



48 00 

16 00 

87 00 

23 00 

3 00 

9 00 

2 00 



24 00 

110 00 

19 00 

75 00 

955 00 

4,159 00 



Total. 



$ c. 
58,563 91 



2,400 00 



66 00 



188 00 



5,342 00 
66,559 91 



1907 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



75 



Statement of Revenue. — Continued. 



District. 


Name of Overseer. 


Amount. 


Total. 




Brought forward 


f c. 


$ c. 
66,559 91 


Unclassified 


Licenses issued from 
office 


538 00 

26 00 

5 00 

8 00 

850 00 

125 00 








Fines 






Sale of boat 






Sale of fish 






Sale of boiler and engine, 
Lurline 






Balance account, J. K. 
McCargar, 1904 


1,552 00 








68,111 91 



Game. 



Hunting and other Licenses 


Deer Hunters' Licenses, 1906 

do do do 1907 


$ c. 

93 00 

12,068 84 

7,327 00 

1,440 35 

641 97 

180 00 

1,485 91 


$ c. 




Non-resident do 1907 






Moose do 1907 






Game dealers' do 1907 

Hotel and Cold Storage Licenses, 1907. . 
Fines and Confiscations, 1907 








23,237 07 







76 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 32 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, the 

during the 





Districts. 


Fishing Materia 


. 








Tugs or Vessels. 


Boats. 


Gill-nets. 


a 


No. 


Ton- 
nage. 


Value. 


Men. 


No. 


Value. 


Men. 


Yards. 


Value. 


1 


Lake of the Woods and Rainy 
River District. 

Lake ot the Woods 


4 


300 


1 
6,000 


12 


9 
3 
1 
3 
1 

4 
2 

3 


$ 

1,950 
800 
200 
375 
200 

800 
450 

75 


19 
8 
3 

7 
2 

8 
5 

5 


12,000 
6,000 
2,000 
6,000 
2,000 

9,000 
3,000 

4,000 


1,625 


9. 


Shoal Lake 


875 


3 


Wabigoon Lake 










250 


4 


Vermillion " 










800 


f> 


Eagle " 










250 


6 


Denmark Star, Long and San- 
dy Lakes 










1,150 


7 


Dryby and Hawk Lakes 










450 


8 


Whitewater, Rainy and Big 
Clearwater Lakes 










400 




Totals 


4 


300 










6,000 


12 


26 


4,850 


57 


44,000 


5,800 







Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs 



Districts. 



Lake of the Woods and Rainy 
River District. 



Lake of the Woods 

Shoal Lake 

Wabigoon Lake 

Vermillion " 

Eagle " 

Denmark, Star, Long and San 

dy Lakes 

Dryby and Hawk Lakes , 

Whitewater, Rainy and Big 

Clearwater Lakes 



Totals . 
Values . 



brls. 



lbs. 



lbs. 

239,600 

147,640 

20,000 

12,500 

85,000 

18,260 
13,000 

76,000 

612,000 

$61,200 



lbs. 

2,960 

80 

10,000 

16,400 

9,020 

3,350 
500 



42,310 
$4,231 



lbs. 



CLi 



lbs. 

88,990 

24,220 

500 

6,800 

16,000 

8,000 
8,200 

6,300 

159,010 

$15,901 



lbs. 

66,600 
29.450 



2,000 
10,250 

1,500 
6,350 

6,000 

122,150 

$9,772 



1907 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



77 



FISHERIES. 

quantity and value of all fishing materials, also the kinds and quantities of fish caught, 
vear 1907. 



Fishing Material. 


Other Fixtures used in 
Fishing. 




Seines. 


Pound Nets. 


Hoop Nets. 


Night Lines. 


Freezers and 
Ice Houses. 


Piers and 
Wharves. 




No. 


Yards. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 
Hooks. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


a 






$ 


14 


2,000 


2 


250 




$ 


4 


5.000 




$ 


1 














9. 


1 
























8 


















2 


5,075 


1 


200 


4 


1 
















5 


















3 


750 






6 






















7 


























8 










? 
























14 


2,000 


250 






9 


10,825 


1 


200 

















vessels and boats, fishing material, etc. — Continued. 



4) 

be 
C 
c 
a 


Sturgeon. 


Eels. 


u 


Tullibee. 


Catfish. 


Mixed and coarse 
fish. 


Caviare. 


Sturgeon Bladders, 


S 


'6 
S 

CO 

w 

CO 

IS 


Value. 


a 
5 


lbs. 


lbs. 
83,900 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

8,950 
750 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 
4,300 


No. 
200 


brls. 


brls. 


$ 

56,025 

19,595 

3,050 

9,105 

11,822 

4,764 
2,678 

8,920 


1 
















9. 






















3 








300 


6,000 




100,000 










4 
















5 




7 220 












600 








6 






















7 


1,400 




















8 




1 






















92,520 300 


15,700 




100,000 


4,900 


200 






115,959 














$13,878 




$15 


$942 




$5,000 


$4,900 


$120 


■■> 




$115,959 













78 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 32 



ONTARIO 
Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, 





Districts . 


Fishing material. 




Tugs or vessels. 


Boats 


Gill-nets. 


a 


No. 


Ton- 
nage. 


Value. 


Men. 


No. 


Value. 


Men. 


Yards. 


Value. 


1 


Lake Superior. 
Thunder Bay . . . .' 


23 
1 


249 


$ 
46,020 
1,500 


90 
5 


37 


2,605 


31 


270,600 
24,000 
10,500 

24,000 
48,000 
7,500 
48,000 
18,100 


$ 
15,670 


o 


Point Mamainse 


1,500 
65 


s 


Gras Cap 


3 


300 


4 


4 


Michipicoten Island 


1 
2 


15 
58 


1,500 
10,000 


3 

16 


1,500 


5 


Gargantua 








3,000 


fi 


Goulais Bay . 


4 


400 


5 


500 


7 


Richardson's Harbor 


2 


71 


15,000 


18 


3,000 


8 


Batchewana Bay 


5 


600 


10 


765 


















29 


393 


74,020 


132 


49 


3,905 


50 


450,-700 


26,000 



Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and ^'alue of tugs. 



a 

pi 


Districts. 


GQ 

a 


J3 
1 

c 




o 
o 


M 


<]5 
1 
o 

o 
S 


6 


1 


Lake Superior. 
Thunder Bay 


brls. 


lbs. 
799,200 


lbs. 
223,810 
4,060 
7,500 
6,200 

14,350 
4,350 

13,820 

27,050 


lbs. 

1,104,170 

56,590 

4,500 

24,000 

149,530 

5,650 

200,350 

30,250 


lbs. 


lbs. 
63,090 


lbs. 
1,950 


2 


Point Mamainse 






^ 


Gras Cap 








150 




4 


Michipicoten Island 








5 


Gargantua . . 












6 


Goulais Bay . . ... 










900 


7 














g 
















Totals 
















799,200 


300,640 


1,575,040 




63,240 


2,850 




Values 










$39,960 


$30,064 


$157,504 




$6,324 


$228 











1907 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



79 



FISHERIES. 

vessels and boats, fishing material, etc, — Continued. 



Fishing material. 


Other fixtures used in fishing. 




Seines. 


Pound nets. 


Hoop nets. 


Night lines. 


Freezers and 
ice-houses. 


Piers and 
wharves. 




No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value . 


-No. 


Value. 


No. 
hooks . 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


a 








31 


3,700 










8 


$ 
1,250 


1 

1 


$ 

lOO 
2,000 


1 
















? 
























s 




















1 
2 


350 
6,000 






4 
























5 






















6 




















2 


7,000 




7 




















i 


8 
























' 










31 


3,700 










13 


14,600 


2 2.100 










# 


' 








i 





vessels and boats, fishing material, etc. — Continued. 



8) 

a 
o 

c 


s 
o 

3 


_0B 


1 


0) 


3 


1 

8 

G 
OS 

r3 ^ 

lbs. 
22,200 


6 


a. 

o 

B 

OQ 


1 

E 


1 


1 
Value. 


a 

s 


lbs. 


lbs. 
2,540 


lbs. 
29,600 


lbs. 


lbs. 
44,400 
200 


lbs. 


lbs. 


No. 


brls. 


brls. 


$ 

185,154 

6,077 

1,215 

3,020 

16,595 

1,072 

21,841 

5,730 


^ 












?. 






















3 
























4 










3,450 














5 






















6 










7,900 














7 






















8 




























2,540 


29,600 




55,950 




22,200 










$240,704 


















$381 


$1,776 




$3,357 




$1,110 










$240,704 

















80 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 32 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, the 

during the 



Districts. 



Lake Huron (North Channel). 



Thessalon , 

St. Joseph's Island 

Bruce Mines 

Mississauga 

Blind River 

Haywood Island 

Manitowaning Bay 

Kaga':vong 

Badgely, DarshJA Innis islands. 

Meldrum Bay 

Club Island 

Cockburn Island 

West Bay 

Fitzwilliam Island 

Squaw Island 

Duck Islands 

South Bay Mouth 

Killarney 

Bustard Islands 

John and Aird Islands 

Providence Bay 

Cape Robert 

Bedford Islands 

Pt . Aux . Grondine 



Totals 



Fishing material. 



Tugs or vessels. 



No, 



22 



Ton- 
nage. 



394 



Value. 



Men* 



2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
18,000 
3,500 
5,000 



15,060 

13,000 

8,000 



7,000 
8,000 



2,000 



80,500 



10 



122 



Boats. 



No. 



Value. 



1,100 
200 
45 
500 
650 
700 
300 



110 
260 



1,050 

175 

560 

200 

1,100 

1,270 

1,510 

750 

200 

100 



300 
800 



11,^ 



Men. 



Gill-nets. 



Yards. 



30,000 

11,000 

6,000 



12,000 



6,000 
24,000 



78,000 

20,000 

36,000 

12,000 

36,000 

102,000 

114,000, 

132,000 

63,200 

84,000 

6,000 

4,000 



Value . 



1,200 

90 

500 



1,100 



900 
3,000 



150 



776,200 



8,100 

2,500 

3,600 

450 

2,775 

10,700 

9,000 

8,465 

5,500 

10,800 

300 

600 



69,580 



1907 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



81 



FISHERIES. 



quantity and value of all fishing materials, also the kinds and quantities of fish caught 
year 1907. 



j 
Fishing material. 


Other fixtures used in fishing. 




Seines. 


Pound nets. 


Hoop nets. 


Night lines. 


Freezers 

and 

ice houses. 


Piers 

and 

wharves. 




No. 


Yards. 


Value. 


No. 

2 

1 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 
hooks . 


Value. 


No. Value. 


No. 


Value . 


s 

25 






. 


500 
175 


















1 
























?, 




















3 








6 

5 

5 

10 


2,000 
1,200 
1,200 
3,000 










1 
1 
2 


500 
200 
475 






4 




















5 




















6 
















1 .^00 






7 
















1 


200 






8 








12 


2,400 












9 
















1 


1,500 


1 


1,500 


10 




















n 








2. 


400 


















1? 
















1 


75 






18 
























14 




























15 








5 


1,250 










1 


300 


1 


1,000 


16 
















17 








6 


1,500 


















18 
























19 








10 


2,400 






. 




2 


500 






?0 


















?A 






7 


2,000 
2,000 
3,000 










1 


750 






?.?. 






8 
11 














^^3 
















1 


800 






?4 




























90 


23,025 










13 


5,600 


2 


2,500 










"■■■| 









C F. 



82 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 32 



' ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boatB, the 

during the 



District. 



iMke Huron {North Channel) . 

Thessalon 

St Joseph's Island 

Bruce Mines 

Miseissauga 

Blind River 

Haywood Island 

Manitowaning Bay 

Kagawong 

Badgely, Darsh & Innis Islands 

Meldrum Bay 

Club Island 

Cockburn Island 

West Bay 

Fitzwilliam Island 

Squaw Island 

Duck Islands 

South Bay Mouth 

Killarney 

Bustard Islands 

John and Aird Islands 

Providence Bay 

Cape Robert 

Bedford Island 

Pt . Aux Grondine 



Totals . 

Values . . 



ffi 



bis. 



19 



19 
$190 



w 



lbs. 



100 



2,000 



400 



4,000 



2,900 

100 

2,200 



20,000 
31,700 



$1,585 



lbs. 

26,460 

800 

100 

26,000 

13,000 

8,040 

39,100 

18,100 

101,390 

27,000 

22,500 

27,700 

2,000 



110,600 

126,200 

36,790 

56,440 

90,000 

2,960 

300 

22,100 

1,200 

30,000 

787,780 



$78,778 



lbs. 

48,340 

1,600 

500 

2,000 

7,000 

3,970 

12,600 

76,000 

23,530 

209,000 



56,950 

1.000 

83,500 

249,400 

372,000 

326,750 

52,540 

101,000 

26,000 

2,800 

4,000 

1,600 

3,000 

1.665.080 



$166,508 



pq 



lbs. 



^ 



lbs. 



1,650 

100 

20,000 

18,000 

23,210 

19,180 

1,600 

9,060 



2,000 

8,000 

10,000 



25,950 

20,000 

120,000 



5,700 

60,300 

1,200 

345,950 



$34,595 



lbs. 



1,950 
1,400 
1,000 



10,250 
3,850 



325 



3,000 



1,775 



1,460 



3,100 

19,900 

.6,000 

54,000 



$4,320 



6a F. 



1907 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



83 



FISHERIES. 

quantity and value of all fishing materials also the kinds and quantities of fish caught 
year 1907. 



<0 

bO 

a 
o 

.s 

1 


8 




Oh 




X3 

o 


Mixed and coarse 
fish. 


o 


1 

a 
o 


1 

s 


1 

S 


Value. 


B 

3 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


No. 


bis. 


bis. 


$ c. 

7,636 00 

634 00 

359 00 

6,500 00 

4,400 00 

4,424 00 

7,833 00 

9,570 00 

13,765 00 

24,340 00 

2,460 00 

■ 8,465 00 

960 00 

9,150 00 

37,000 00 

50,020 00 

36,964 00 

13,562 00 

21,100 00 

16,655 00 

315 00 

3,840 00 

9,629 00 

5,500 00 


1 














2,340 
3,780 
20,000 
4,000 
140 
1,140 










o 








300 














3 




4,000 

2,000 

500 

1,320 








100 








4 


















5 




















6 










150 


80 




9 




7 










H 




1,180 








50 


2,400 


20 








9 












49 
21 


25 


10 




















11 




















]?, 




200 




















13 






















14 
























15 




















20 
41 




16 




















17 




180 
















18 






















19 




3,666 








600 


20,000 










?.o 


















21 




1,960 
8,200 
2,000 












. 8 








?.?. 










900 


8,500 
2,000 








23 










200 








24 






















24,540 




300 




1,700 


64,300 


408 




140 


25 


295,081 00 






13,681 




$15 




$136 


$3,215 


$408 




$1,400 


$250 


$295,081 00 





84 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 32 



ONTARIO 



Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, the quantity and 



!2, 



Districts. 



Georgian Bay. 

Parry Sound 

Waubaushene 

Penetanguishene 

CoUingwood 

Meaford 

Byng Inlet 

Colpoy's Bay and Tobermory 



Total' 



Fishing material. 



Tugs or Vessels. 



No. 



24 



Ton- 
nage. 



105 
14 



170 
i65 



494 



Value. 



17,800 
700 



24,800 



17,500 



60,800 



Men. 



29 



32 
111 



Boats. 



No. 



Ill 



Value. 



980 
1,950 

980 
2.400 
1,125 

515 
2,822 



10,772 



Men. 



18 



Gill-nete. 



Yards. 



222,000 
54,000 
45,600 

101,000 

266,000 
18,000 

306,700 



204 1,013,300 



Value. 



19,860 
1,660 



3,625 
18,090 

1,000 
21,795 



66,030 



Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs. 





Districts. 


1 

W) 

.S 

u 

0) 


Herring fresh. 


4 
1 


Trout. 




Pickerel or dore 


Pike. 


1 


Georgian Bay. 
Parry Sound 


brlB. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

211,515 
11,750 
33,800 
14,870 
3,500 
17,600 

205 


lbs. 

334,100 
15,700 
28,200 
51,790 

358,900 


lbs. 


lbs. 

1,400 
6,575 


lbs. 
1,300 


2 
3 


Waubaushene 

Penetanguishene 

CoUingwood 

Meaford 


5 

50 
25 


4,900 

39,720 

6,000 

100 

24,180 


47,280 


4 






500 


5 








6 


Byng Inlet 






10,400 


10,900 


7 


Colpoy's Bay and To- 
bermory 

Totals 

Values 


19^ 


513,493 




15 






18,375 






m 


74,900 


293,240 


1,302,183 




59,995 




$995 


$3,745 


$29,324 


1130,218.30 




$1,837.50 


14,799.60 



1907 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



FISHERIES. 



value of all fishing materials, etc. — Continued. 









Fishing Material 








Other fixtures used 
in fishing. 




Seines . 


Pound nets. 


Hoop nets. 


Night lines. 


Freezers and 
ice houses. 


Piers and 
wharves. 




No. 


Yards. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. : No. 


Value. 


No. 
Hooks 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


a 








$ 




1 




$ 


7 
1 


$ 

1.1 SO 
200 


6 


$ 
925 


I 





















9 




















3 




























4 


















2 


200 






5 








1 


400 














B 
















10 


15,200 


2 


6,500 


7 


























1 


400 










20 


17,750 


8 


7,425 






■ 













vessels and boats, fishing material, etc. — Continued. 



i 

o 


o 
So 




Si 


6 

1 


si 
O 


CD 

2 

'^ 

5 


o 


3 
c 
o 

3 


1 

1 


M 

OQ 

la 


Value. 


a 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


No. 


brls. 
10 


brls. 
10 


$ c. 

55,005 50 

8,134 90 

7,555 00 

11,398 00 

36,700 00 

4,087 00 

53,335 00 


1 




1,500 




600 




100 


12,400 


17 




? 






35 
34 
16 


26 
10 


s 




4,940 




600 






5,100 


995 




4 








5 




400 










7,000 






6 
















56 




7 
























6,840 




1,100 




100 


24,500 


1,012 




151 


46 


176,215 40 






$1,026 




155 




18 


$1,225 $1,012 

1 




$1,510 


$460 


$176,215 40 

! 



86 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 32 



ONTARIO 



Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, 





Districts. 


Fishing material. 




Tugs or vessels. 


Boats. 


Gill-nets. 


0) 

a 


No. 


Ton- 
nage. 


Value. 


Men. 


No. 


Value. 


Men. 


Yards. 


Value. 


1 

2 
3 


Lake Huron (Proper). 

Cape Hurd to Southampton. . 
Southampton to Pine Point . . 
County Huron 


9 
2 
1 

1 


246 
60 
13 

25 


34,000 
6,000 
1,500 

1,500 


47 

12 

6 

7 


51 

5 

12 

60 


5,476 

250 

2,250 

7,965 


94 

8 

37 

99 


505,500 
116,150 
127,200 

35,000 


$ 

29,121 
6,615 
3,500 

1,200 


4 


County Lambton, including 
St. Clair River 




Totals 




13 


344 


43,000 


72 


128 


15,941 


238 


783,850 


40,436 







Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs 



a 

5^; 


Districts, 


•73 


a 

'b 


cc 


p 
2 

H 




u 

o 

o 

o 
■p-i 




1 

9 


Lake Huron {Proper). 

Cape Hurd to Southampton . 
Southampton to Pine Point. 
County Huron 


brls. 
462 


lbs. 
47,680 


lbs. 
5,840 


lbs, 

748,690 

171,700 

63,790 

78,080 


lbs. 


lbs. 
290 


lbs. 
1,500 


s 




6,120 
114,700 


28,400 
47,580 




6,540 
391,570 




4 


County Lambton, including 
St Clair River 




700 




Totals 

Values ' 








462 
$4,620 


168,500 


81,820 


1,062,260 




398,400 


2,200 




$8,425 


$8,182 


$106,226 




$39,840 


$176 



1907 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



87 



FISHERIES. 



vessels and boats, fishing material, etc.^ for 1907. — Continued. 



Fishing material. 


Other fixtures used in 
fishing. 




Seines. 


Pound nets. 


Hoep nets. 


Night lines. 


Freezers and 
ice houses. 


Piers and 
wharves. 




No. 


Yards. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 
Hooks 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


a 


*10 




$ 


2 


$ 
300 


t2 


$ 




$ 


4 
2 
4 

12 


$ 

6,500 
700 
400 

2,500 




$ 


1 


















9 








7 
67 


1,200 
14,580 














s 


15 


939 


293 


2 


10 










4 














^5 


939 


293 


76 


16,080 


t4 


10 






22 


10,100 





















* Dip-nets. 



t Spears. 



vessels and boats, fishing material, etc., for 1907.— Continued. 



0) 

a 
o 
a 

'2. 
1^ 


o 


GQ 




'a 
H 


3 


C3 

8 

IS 

a 


o 


o 


00 

E 


OQ 

IS 


Value. 


u 

a 

!z; 


lbs. 


lbs. 
980 


lbs. 


lbs. 
64,560 


lbs. 


lbs.. 


lbs. 
3,280 


lbs. 


No. 


brls. 
823 


brls. 

1 



$ 

94,385 
17,170 
21,998 

68,150 


1 









9: 




960 
4,260 




223,620 
33.500 






9,880 
83,360 


• 








3 






1,650 


1,127 


4,825 






4 












6,200 




321,680 




1,650 


96,520 


1,127 


4,825 


823 


1 


201,703 






$930 




$16,084 




$132 


$4,825 


$1,127 


$2,895 


$8,230 


$10 


$201,703 





88 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 32 



ONTARIO 



Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs. 





Districts. 


Fishing material. 




Tugs or vessel 


s. 


Boats. 


Gill-nets. 


s 

s 


No. 


Ton- 
nage. 


Value. 


Men. 


No. 


Value. 


Men. 


No 


Yards 


Value. 


1 


Lake St. Clair. 
River Thames 






$ 




20 


11.660 


39 

19 

156 

88 


*43 




$ 


9, 


Lake St. Clair 

11 .( 


7 
5 


"io 


2,600 
1,350 


12 

8 


13 365 






8 


96 
25 


2,655 
335 








4 


Detroit River 










Totals 


12 


10 














3,950 


20 


154 


15,015 


302 


*43 

















Dip nets. 



Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, 



a 
5 


Districts. 


1 

be 
a 

■ 'B 

<v 






2 

H 




i 

O 

S-i 

a> 


6 


1 


Lake St. Clair. 
River Thames .... ... 


brls. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

21,331 
9,036 

46,400 
2,000 


lbs. 
8,100 


2 


Lake St Clair 




22 

5,545 

50 








9,510 


3 


i> (( 




119,310 
24,500 






15,620 


4 


Detroit River 








10,365 




Totals 














5,617 


143,810 






78,767 


43,595 




Values 
















$280 85 


$14,381 






$7,876 70 


$3,487 60 















1907 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



89 



FISHERIES. 



vessels and boats, fishing material, etc, for 1907.— Continued. 



Fishing material. 


Other fixtures used in fishing 




Seines. 


Pound nets. 


Hoop Nets . 


Night lines. 


Freezers and 
ice houses. 


Piers and 
wharves. 




No. 


Yards. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 
hooks. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


s 

2i 


7 


2,100 
1,616 
4,710 
1,840 


770 

320 

1,525 

672 




$ 


56 
38 
44 


$ 

2,575 
2,215 
2,320 


900 


1 

38 




$ 




? 


1 


5 






2 
3 


325 

450 


3 


3,050 


? 


36 


10 


2,625 


2,300 


140 


3 


25 


1) 

14 


3,545 


4 


















775 




73 


10,266 


3,287 


10 


2,625 


138 


7,110 


3,200 


178 


5 


6,595 





vessels and boats, fishing material, etc., for 1907. — Continued. 



a 
o 

a 

1 


o 
a> 

3 






1 

H 


J3 

3 


Mixed and coarse 
fish. 


i 

> 

O 


c 
8 

3 


1 

2 

H 


'6 
.a" 

cc 

IS 


Value. 


M 

3 


lbs. 


lbs. 

1,960 

1,290 

37,625 


lbs. 


lbs. 

21,007 

5,040 

26,390 

625 


lbs. 


lbs. j lbs. 

19,140 187,860 

4,945 128,070 

17,850 249,240 

401 50,690 


lbs. 


No. 


brls. 


brls. 


$ c. 

15,049 65 
8,909 30 

40,212 10 
6,051 45 


1 












?. 




1,261 








8 










4 




1 














40,875 




53,062 




41,975| 615,860 


1,261 








$70,222 50 






$6,131 25i.... 


$2,653 10 




$3.3581 $30,793 


«1.261 








$70,222 50 

















90 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 32 



ONTARIO 
Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, 



Districts. 



Fishing material. 



Tugs or vessels . 



No. 



Ton- 
nage. 



Value. 



Men. 



Boats. 



No. Value. Men 



Gill-nets. 



No. Yards. Value 



Lake Erie. 

Pelee Island 

Essex County 

Kent County 

Elgin West 

Elgin East 

Houghton . 

Walsingham '. 

Long Point 

Charlotteville 

Inner Bay 

Woodhouse 

Haldimand 

Port Maitland to Port 

Colborne — 

Port Colborne to Niagara 

Falls 



49 
88 
254 
25 
94 
55 
22 



10,500 
8,000 

15,100 
8,000 

17,450 

10,500 
2,500 



1,000 
7,445 
14,450 
7,750 
3,120 



12 
66 

109 
39 

- 38 



530 
370 

1,205 
850 



11,500 
18,200 

6,300 



178 
700 



36 



763 



108,050 



214 



319 45,596 



587 



14,500 
10,000 

8,000 

24,000 

136,000 

32,000 

10,000 

5,000 
26,000 

5,000 
32,000 
85,800 

31,700 

60,500 



$ 

5,500 

2,239 

2,070 

2,000 

12,445 

1,100 

700 

264 

1,110 

473 

1,800 

10,119 

6,623 

450 



480,500 46,893 



Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs 



Districts. 



ffi 







6 






u 






o 






TJ 






IH 






o 












(1> 












<v 


2 


1 




H 


CQ 


s 



Ah 



Lake Erie. 

Pelee Island 

Essex County 

Kent County 

Elgin West 

Elgin East 

Houghton 

Walsingham 

Long Point 

Charlotteville 

Inner Bay 

Woodhouse 

Haldimand 

Port Maitland to Port Colborne 
Port Colborne to Niagara Falls. 



brls. 



Totals . 
Values 



$10 



lbs. 

87,220 

206,900 

669,740 

396,100 

854,700 

124,060 

45,520 

1,900 

3,580 



lbs. 

4,300 

194,530 

52,850 

48,5C0 

7,760 

2,370 

19,560 



230 



183,860 

162,900 

83,400 

1,240 



53,880 

157,970 

31,540 

800 



2,821,120 



574,290 



$141,056 



$57,429 



lbs. 



150 



310 
1,000 



300 



1,760 



$176 



lbs. 



lbs. 

4,760 

88,760 

205,350 

595,400 

108,800 

12,530 

99,610 

150 

52,320 

1,490 

371,430 

342,630 

4.980 

7,620 



lbs. 

31,250 

144,000 

1,097,300 



1,000 



14,650 

800 

6,550 

5,850 



1,895,830 



$189,583 



2,200 

185,800 

30,800 

1,520,200 



$121,616 



1907 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



91 



FISHERIES. 

vessels and boats, fishing material, etc., for 1907. — Continued. 



Fishing material. 


Other fixtures used in fishing. 




Seines. 


Pound nets. 


Hoop nets. 


Night lines. 


Freezers and 
ice houses. 


Piers and 
wharves. 


0) 


No. 


Yards 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. of 
hooks. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


a 

a 


2 


40(» 

900 

3,150 


33 

400 
1,590 


9 

57 

110 

54 


$ 

3,000 
20,975 
41,050 
20,000 








$ 


3 
13 
41 
22 
15 
2 
2 


$ 

1,200 

4,220 
15,350 

7,200 
10,275 

1,500 
400 




$ 


1 


s 














9 


6 










1 


100 


% 










4 








*6 












5 














200 
400 


2 

4 


1 


50 


8 


8 


3,200 
2,000 
4,000 
3,600 


1,125 

410 

1,135 

1,000 










7 


6 






2 








8 


IS 




















9 


13 










3,000 


30 






1 


50 


10 












3 

21 


1,900 
5,025 


n 








20 


4,400 


*57 








2 


800 


1? 














18 
















8,500 


85 










14 












65 














51 


17,250 


5,693 


250 


89,425 




12,100 


121 


122 


47,070 


5 


1,000 





*Dip nets, 
vessels and boats, fishing material, etc., for 1907. — Continued. 



i 

c 


c 
o 




J3 
o 




00 

g 




2 

si 
1 


OT3 
bCoJ 

-1.3 

CO 


1 
S 

H 




s 
'3 


B 

s 


lbs. 


lbs. 

1,360 
6,620 
9,240 
3,680 


lbs. 


lbs. 

6,100 

75,420 

213,320 

43,800 

25,600 

6,400 

24,620 

740 

17,760 

2,700 

5,440 
26,040 
12,640 
11,940 


lbs. 


lbs. 

725 
6,000 


lbs. 

8,940 

231,500 

194,580 

41,500 

11,380 

180 

35,560 

58,520 

57,140 

133,000 


lbs. 

97 

550 

1,182 

325 


No. 


brls. 


brls. 


$ c. 

8,878 00 

67,563 00 

170,054 00 

89,473 00 

56,330 00 

8,022 00 

18,875 00 

4,719 00 

9,955 00 

8,182 00 

52,027 00 

65,962 00 

24,936 00 

7,653 00 


1 










2 










3 






1,700 








4 










5 




















6 











6,075 

100 

3,150 

9,750 










7 




4,800 




854 








8 










9 
















10 
















11 




9,820 

4,300 

12 100 






3,050 
50 


19,640 

9,120 

11,020 


468 

513 

1,145 


20 


.... 


300 


12 
13 




245 






14 
















51,920 




472,520 




30,600 


812,080 


5,134 


265 




300 


592,629 00 






$7,788 




$23,626 




$2,448 


$40,604 


$5,134 


$159 




$3,000 


$592,629 00 





92 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 32 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, 





Districts. 


Fishing material. 


^ 


Tugs or vessels. 


Boats. 


Gill-Nets. 


a 


No. 
1 


Ton- 
nage. 


Value. 


Men. 


No. 


Value. 


Men. 


No. 


Yards. 


Value. 


1 

9 


Lake Ontario. 

Lincoln 

Wentworth 


52 


$ 
5,000 


3 


83 

17 

18 

2 

17 

7 

1 

16 

59 

99 

39 

31 


$ 

3,466 

3,715 

4,060 

400 

1,250 

104 

150 

935 

1,390 

4,581 

1,300 

458 


98 
34 
37 

2 


*47 


96,128 

52,200 

122,000 

5,000 
44,600 

7,900 

3,000 
54,000 
37,200 
38,900 
19,000 

5,280 


$ 
4,822 
2,088 
4,345 

375 


3 


Halton . 










4 


Peel 










5 


York 


3 




1,900 


25 


2 567 


6 


Ontario 


i2 
2 
19 
90 
182 
48 
40 




'214 




Durham 










150 


8 


Northumberland 










1,150 

874 


q 


Prince P^dward 










10 


Bay of Quinte 










503 


n 


Amherst Island 










1,450 


T> 


Wolfe Island and vicinity. . 




. 






79 




Totals . . , 














4 


52 


6,900 


28 


389 


21,809 


564 


*47 


485,208 


18.617 









Dip nets. 



Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, 



Districts. 



Lake Ontario. 

Lincoln 

Wentworth 

Halton 

Peel 

York 

Ontario 

Durham 

Northumberland 

Prince Edward 

Bay of Quinte 

Amherst Island 

Wolfe Island and vicinity. 

Total 



Value 



tn 



brls. 
399 



476 
1,760 



lbs. 

470,540 
79,380 

209,000 
10,000 
40,000 
6,140 
16,000 
12,520 
15,280 
47,920 
6,680 



913,460 
$45,673 



lbs. 

23,600 

13,050 



3,000 

4,350 

990 

800 

8.310 

57,940 

99,890 

131,660 

100 



343,690 
$34,369 



lbs. 



8,000 

1,800 

5,000 

11,320 

40 

1,500 

29,680 

32,260 



16,190 



m 
lbs. 



105,790 



$10,579 



lbs. 
14,730 
930 



60 

2,450 

40,520 

13,410 

290 



72,390 



17,239 



jbd 

s 

lbs. 
3,200 
40,000 



450 

550 

50 



33,000 
13,500 
155,050 
22,800 
27,600 



296,200 



$23,296 



lbs. 



1907 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



93 



FISHERIES. 

vessels and boats, fishing materials, etc., 1907. — Continued. 



Fishing material. 


Other fixtures used in 
fishing. 




Seines. 


fSpears. 


Hoop nets. 


Night lines. 


Freezers and 
ice houses. 


Piers and 
wharves. 


1.: 


No. 


Yards. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 
hooks. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


5 






$ 




$ 




$ 


200 
100 


4 

2 

• 


2 
3 

18 

I 
2 


200 
675 
885 
100 
600 




$ 


^ 








90 












?. 


















3 
















300 


6 






4 




















5 
























6 




























7 












8 

14 

138 


200 

415 

2,065 














8 
















18 
4 


558 
110 






9 












600 


12 






10 
















n 


e> 


60 


62 
62 






35 


745 


100 


2 


1 


50 






^?. 




90 










H 


60 




195 


3,425 


1,300 


26 


49 


3.178 















vessels and boats, fishing materials, etc. — Continued. 



c 
o 

CD 


QQ 




H 


m 

o 


i 

T3 
C 
OS 

'O -• 

hi °Q 


o 


8 


1 

i 


Whitefish, salted. 


Value. 


M 
s 

S3 


lbs. 
4 800 


lbs. 

1 Of,C\ 


lbs. 
5,440 
1,460 


lbs. 


lbs. 
3,500 
700 


lbs. 

10,580 

21,700 


lbs. 


No. 


brls. 


bils. 


$ cts. 
33,470 00 
10,617 00 


1 


' 600 










9, 










10.630 00 [ 3 
1,414 00 4 


300 


500 
160 




225 


340 

6,180 

20 

2,000 

35,920 

28,360 

l.^n 880 




















3,928 00 1 5 


1 














415 OOi 6 




40 
23,940 
10,600 
98,300 
11,460 
17,020 














1,132 00' 7 


! inn 


2,666 
550 


24,150 

17,600 

221,625 






12,002 OOi 8 


380 


, 1,950 
5,400 

iV,666 










15,019 00! 9 












59,900 OOilO 


1,900 


600! 1,200 
28,900| 25,960 








1 


19.260 00 11 
7,471 0012 






7 










7 080 


20,400 


168,920 


3,150 


297,3001 28.^ 140 






7 


1 


175,258 OOl 






' 








$1,062 


$1,224 


$8,446 


$189 


$23,784 


$14,157 






$70 


$10 


$175,258 Ool 











94 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 32 



ONTARIO 
Recapitulation of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, 



Districts. 



Lake of the Woods and 

Rainy River 

Lake Superior 

Lake Huron ( North 

Channel) 

Georgian Bay 

Lake Huron (Proper) 

Lake St. Clair and River 

Thames 

Lake Erie 

Lake Ontario 

Inland Waters, including 

Lake Nipissing 

Totals 



Fishing material. 





Tug8( 


)r vessels 






Boats. 






Gill nets 




Ton- 


Value. 




No. 


Value. 


Men. 


No. 


Yards. 


iz; 


nage. 




1=5 
















$ 






$ ■ 








4 
29 


300 
393 


6,000 
74,020 


12 
132 


26 
49 


4,850 
3,905 


57 
50 




44.000 
450,700 


22 

24 
13 


394 
494 
344 


80,500 
60,800 
43,000 


122 
111 

72 


75 
111 
128 


11,880 
10,772 
15,941 


150 
204 
238 


*4 


776,200 
1,013,300 

783,850 


12 

36 
4 


10 

763 

52 


3,950 

108,050 

6,900 


20 
214 

28 


154 
319 
389 


15,015 
45,596 
21,809 


302 

587 
564 


*43 
*65 

*47 


480,500 
485,208 


5 


30 


4,400 


14 


197 


4,857 


303 


*8 


14,860 


149 


2.780 


387,620 


725 


1.448 


134.625 


2,455 


*167 


4,048,618 



5,800 
26,000 

69,580 
66,030 
40,436 



46,893 
18,617 

663 

274.019 



* Dip nets. 
Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, 



District. 



Lake of the Woods and 
Rainy River 

Lake Superior 

Lake Huron (North 
Channel ) 

Georgian Bay 

Lake Huron (Proper).. 

Lake St. Clair and River 
Thames 

Lake Erie 

Lake Ontario 

Inland Waters, includ- 
ing Lake Nipissing 

Totals 



Values. 



ffi 



bris 



19 

99^ 
462 



1 
476 



7* 



1,065 



10,650 



lbs. 



799,200 

31,700 

74,900 

168,500 

5,617 

2,821,120 

913,460 

66,890 



4,881,387 



244,069.35 



lbs. 

612,000 
300,640 

787,780 

293,240 

81,820 

143,810 
574,290 
343,690 

29,620 



3.166,890 



316,689 



lbs. 

42,310 
1,575,040 

1,665,080 
1,302,183 
1,062,260 



1,760 
105,790 

2,205 



5,756,628 

$ c. 
575,662.80 



pa 



lbs. 



lbs. 

159,010 
63,240 

345,950 

18,376 

398,400 

78,767 

1,895,830 

72,390 

160,290 



3,192,252 

$ c. 
319,225.20 



CL, 



lbs. 

122,150 
2,850 

54,000 

59,995 

2,200 

43,595 

1,520,200 

296,200 

82,850 



2,184,040 

$ c. 

174,723.20 



lbs. 



1907 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



1^5 



FISHERIES.— Continued. 

vessels and boats, fishing material, etc., for 1907. — Continued. 



Fishing material. 


Other fixtures used in 
fishing. 




Seines. 


Pound nets. 


Hoop nets. 


Night Lines. 


Freezers and 
iice houses. 


Piers and 
wharves. 


1^ 


No. 


Yards. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 
Hooks. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


B 

o 






$ 


14 
31 

90 

1 

76 

10 
250 
*90 

20 


2,000 
3,700 

23,025 

400 

16,080 

2,625 

89,425 

90 

7,900 

145,245 


2 


1 

250 




$ 


9 
13 

13 
20 
22 

5 

122 

49 

22 


e 

10,825 
14,600 

5,600 
17,750 
10,100 

775 

47,070 

3,178 

5,815 


1 
2 

2 

8 


200 
2,100 

2,500 
7,425 


1 












? 

















3 
















4 


95 


939 

10.266 

17,250 

60 

255 


293 

3.287 

5,693 

62 

330 


3 

138 

65 

195 

80 


10 
7,110 
3,425 
1,530 






5 


73 

51 

6 


3,200 

12,100 

1,300 

4,300 


178 

121 

26 

46 


14 
5 


6,595 
1,000 


6 

7 
8 


n 






9 










166 


28.770 


9,665 


582 


483 


12,325 


20,900 


371 


275 


115,713 


32 


19,820 





* Spears, 
vessels and boats, fishing material, etc., for 1907 — Continued . 



o 

g> 


i2 




'0 
H 


1 



m 

u 

C 

ScS 


6 


1 

a 


B 


1 
H 


1 

1 

A 

ca 


Value. 


a 

s 


lbs. 

92,520 
2,540 

24,540 
6,840 
6,200 

40 875 


lbs. 
" 29,666 

" 20,466 


lbs. 
300 


lbs. 

15,700 
55,950 

"3,156 


lbs. 

1,700 

100 

1,650 

41.975 

30,600 

297.300 

65,000 


lbs. 

100,000 
22,200 

64,300 
24,500 
96,520 

615,860 
812,080 
283,140 

198,890 


lbs. 
4,900 


No. 
200 


brls. 


brls. 


$ c. 

115,959.00 
240,704.00 

295,081.00 
176,21.5.40 
201,703.00 

70,222.50 
592,629.00 
175,258.00 

67,253.00 


1 






? 


300 

1,100 

321,680 

53,062 
472,520 
168,920 

15,800 


408 
1,012 
1,127 

1,261 
5,134 


4.825 


140 
151 
823 


25 
46 

1 


3 

4 
5 

6 


51,920 
7,080 

84 030 


265 


7 


300 
1 


7 
8 


9,455 




q 












316,545 

$ c. 
47,481.75 


50,000 

$ 
3,000 


1,033,682 

$ c. 
51,684.10 


74,800 

4,488 


438,325 

$ 
35,066 


2,217,490 

$ c. 

110,874.50 


23,297 
23,297 


5.290 

% 
3.174 


1,121 

$ 
11.210 


373 

$ 

3,730 


1935.024.90 

$ c. 
1935.024.90 





96 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 32 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, 





Districts. 


Fishing material. 




Tugs or vessels. 


Boats . 


Gill-nets. 


s 


No. 


Ton- 
nage. 


Value. 


Men. 


No. 


Value 


Men. 

138 

78 

45 

36 

6 


No. 


Yards 


Value 


1 


Inland Waters. 
Frontenac, County 






$ 




77 
55 

41 

18 

6 


8 

1,133 

725 

284 

2,615 

100 


*8 


2,720 
1,080 

6,560 
4,500 


$ 
310 


? 


Leeds, Lennox & Addington. . 










99 


3 


Russell, Prescott, Carleton and 
Renfrew Counties 










104 


4 


Nipissing District 


5 


30 


4,400 


14 


150 


5 


Simcoe . . . 






Totals 


















5 


30 


4,400 


14 


197 


4,857 


303 


*8 


14,860 


663 



Dip nets. 



Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs 



a 


Districts. 


IS 




m 


'a 


-1^ 
2 


OQ 


i 

o 
o 

M 
o 


0) 


-[ 


Inland Waters. 
Frontenac, County 


brl. 

7i 


lbs. 

4,880 
5,000 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 
25,150 


2 


Leeds, Lennox & Addington. . 

Russell, Prescott, Carleton and 

Renfrew Counties 


570 

27,800 

1,250 


1,000 






6,950 


3 




590 
159,700 


1,850 


4 


Nipissing District 




56,990 
20 


1,000 
205 




48,900 


f> 


Simcoe .... 








Totals 












7i 


66,890 


29,620 


2,205 




160,290 


82,850 




Values 






$75 


.«3..S44 50 


$2,962 


$220 50 


$16,029 


$6,628 











1907 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



97 



FISHERIES. 

vessels and boats, fishing^materiali-etCi^for 1907. — Continued. 



Fishing material . 


Other fixtures used in fishing. 




Seine? 


. 


Pound-nets. 


Hoop nets. 


Night lines. 


Freezers and 
ice-houses. 


Piers and 
wharves. 




No. 


Yards 


Value 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 
hooks. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


B 

s 






( 




$ 


28 
52 


572 

958 




1 


2 
3 


1 

90 
75 




$ 


1 


11 


255 


330 














2 








2,400 


46 






3 








20 


7,900 






17 


5,650 






4 












1,900 








5 




























11 


255 


330 


20 


7,900 


80 


1,530 


4,300 


46 


22 


5,815 










1 





vessels and boats, fishing material;, etc., for 1907. — Continued. 



4 
§ 

a 


Sturgeon. 






a 


QD 

O 


8 
a 

X 


Caviare. 


a 

1 


1 
1 




V^alue. 


a 

3 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

6,720 
8,986 

100 


lbs. 


lbs. 

27,200 
37,300 

500 


lbs. 

61,530 
33,320 

53,000 
50,390 
' 650 


lbs. 


No. 


brls. 


brls. 


$ c. 

7,919 50 
6,005 00 

2,966 50 

50,183 00 

179 00 


1 
















2 




50 

83,980 












3 




9,455 








1 


















5 


























84,030 




15,800 




65,000 


198,890 


9,455 








$67,253 00 
















$12,604 50 




$790 




$5,200 


$9,944 50 


$9,455 








$67,253 0© 















7f. 



98 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 32 



Comparative Statement of yield 1906-7, according to Districts. 



Lake of the Woods and Rainy River Dis- 
trict : 

Whitefish lbs.... 

Trout " .... 

Pickerel " 

Pike " .... 

Maekinonge " 

Sturgeon " 

Tullibee " .... 

Catfish " 

Coarse fish " 

Caviare . " • . . . 

Bladders " .... 

Lake Superior : 

Herring " . . . . 

Whitefish " .... 

Trout " .... 

Pickerel " .... 

Pike " .... 

Sturgeon " 

Tullibee " .... 

Coarse fish " . . . . 

Caviare " 

Trout ' bbls.... 

Whitefish " .... 

Eels " ... 

Lake Huron, N. C. 

Herring bbls 

Herring lbs 

Whitefish " .... 

Trout " . . . . 

Pickerel " 

Pike " .... 

Sturgeon Bladders " 

Sturgeon " 

Perch " .... 

Catfish "... 

Coarse fish " . •• • 

Caviare " 

Trout bbls 

Whitefish ... " .... 

Georgian Bay : 

Herring bbls 

Herring lbs 

Whitefish " .... 

Trout •".... 

Pickerel " •.•- 

Pike " •..- 

Sturgeon " 

Perch " .... 

Catfish " .... 

Coarse fish " . . • 

Whitefish 1 bbls. . . . 

Trout " .... 

Caviare 

Sturgeon Bladders 

Lake Huron (proper) : 

Herring bbls. . . . 

Herring lbs 

Whitefish " .... 

Trout " • • • 



1906. 



388,200 
100,100 
244,600 
113,800 



54,000 

4,900 

82,900 



3,050 
100 

196,500 

420,700 

1,173,1-50 

19,250 

2,300 

300 

6,100 

9,'000 



1,138 
1.580 



380 

36,600 

879,500 

1,997,200 

479,300 

46,300 



22,100 

200 

6,100 

63,600 

725 

108 

41 

76 

35,400 

379,950 

1,538,410 

43,650 

40,100 

17,050 

800 

3,400 

12,600 

31 

278 



760 

250,900 

43,300 

967,700 



1907. 



612,000 

42,310 

159,010 

122,150 



92,520 
15,700 



100,300 

4,900 

200 

799,200 

300,640 

1,575.040 

63,240 

2,850 

2,540 

55,950 

22,200 



29,600 

19 

31,700 

787,780 

1,665,080 

345,950 

54,000 



24,540 

300 

1,700 

64,300 

408 

140 

25 

99^ 

74,900 

293,240 

1,302,183 

18,375 

59,995 

6,840 

1,100 

100 

24,500 

46 

151 

1,012 



462 

168,500 

81,820 

1,062,260 



Increase. 



223,800 



8,350 



38,520 
10,800 



100,300 

1,850 

100 

602,700 



401,890 

43,990 

550 

2,240 

49,850 

13,200 



29,600 



7.700 



2,440 
100 



700 
32 



2^ 

39,500 



19,895 
"366 



11,900 
15 



1,012 



38,520 
94,560 



Decrease . 



1907 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



99 



Comparative Statement of yield 1906-7, according to Districts. — Continued. 







1906. 


1907. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Lake Huron (proper) : — Co 
Pickerel 


ntinucd. 
lbs.... 


425,800 

4,300 

15,300 

158,800 

700 

101,600 

3,750 

10 

847 


398,400 

2,200 

6,200 

321,680 

1,650 

96,520 

1,127 

1 

823 

4,825 

143,810 




27,400 
2,100 
9,100 


Pike 




Sturgeon 

Perch 




162,880 
950 


Catfish 




Coarse fish " . . - . 


5,020 

2,623 

9 


Caviare 


.■..'.".'.'bbls'. '.'.'. 

n 

. ......\hs.... 




Whitefish 




Trout 




24 


Sturgeon Bladders 

Lake & River St. Clair and 
Whitefish 


4,825 
97.610 




Thames River: 

lbs.... 

bbls.... 

lbs 


46,200 
2,000 




Herring 

Herring 

Eels 


2,000 


5,617 


5,617 




(( 






Pickerel 


<( 

u 

(( 
it 
n 


124,900 

59,200 

38.350 

56,900 

41,200 

665,400 

1,225 

4,200 

3 

2,823,200 

359,100 

2,400 

1,557,000 

1,386,900 

65,600 

334,000 

20,800 

33,880 

932,800 

2,770 


78,767 
43,595 
40,875 
53,062 
41,975 
615.860 
1,261 




46,133 
15,605 


Pike 




Sturgeon 

Perch ... . 


2,525 


3,838 


Catfish 


775 


Coarse fish . . 


49,540 




it 


36 


Tullibee . . 


4,200 
2 


Lake Erie : 

Herring 

Whitefish 


.. ...bbls.... 
lbs.... 


1 

2,821,120 

574,290 

1,760 

1,895,830 

1,520,200 

51,920 

472,520 






2,080 


215,190 




Trout 


n 

t( 

1( 

(1 
(( 
<( 


640 


Pickerel 


338,830 
183,300 




Pike 




Sturgeon 

Perch 


13 680 


138,520 




Tullibee 


20,800 


Catfish 


30.600 

812,080 

5,134 

265 

300 

476 
913,480 
343,690 
105,790 

72,890 

296,200 

7,080 

20,400 
168,920 
297,300 
283,140 




3,280 


Ciiarse fish 




120 720 




2,364 
265 
300 

398 




Sturgeon bladders 

Whitefish 


.... bbls.!!. 






Lake Ontario : 

Herring 

Herring 

Whitefish 


bbls.... 

lbs.... 

i( 

(( 

<( 

<( 
(( 


78 

924,200 

354,000 

107,300 

54,100 

251,400 

13,100 

18,400 

194,200 

275,000 

220,500 




10,740 




10,310 


Trout 

Pickerel 


'18,296 

44,800 


1.510 


Pike 




Sturgeon 

Eels 


6,020 


2,000 






25,280 


Catfish , 




22,300 
62,640 




Coarse fish 




Caviare 


(( 






•( 










Tullibee 


(1 

!!!!." .bbls!!!! 

bbls.... 


2,000 

4 

13 


3,150 
7 

1 


1,150 
3 




Trout 




Whitefish 


12 


Nipissing District : 
Herring 

Whitefish 






lbs.... 


25,000 
4,000 


56,990 

27,800 

1,000 


31,990 

23,800 

1,000 






Trout . . 













100 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 32 



Comparative Statement of yield 1906-1907, according to Districts. — Concluded. 



Nipissing District : — Continued. 

Pickerel IbB . 

Pike " . 

Catfish " . 

Sturgeon " . 

Perch " . 

Coarse Fish " . 

Caviare , " . 

Bladders " . 

Eels " . 

Inland Waters : 

Herring bbls. 

lbs. 

Whitefish " . 

Trout " . 

Pickerel " . 

Pike " . 

Sturgeon " . 

Eels: " . 

Perch " . 

Catfish " . 

Coarse Fish " . 

Caviare " . 



1906. 



3,200 
500 



103,100 
9,950 



19 

9,200 

500 



4,400 

45,400 

100 



9,800 

87,700 

132,700 



1907. 



159,700 
48,900 



83,980 



50,890 
9,455 



7J 

9,900 

1,820 

1,205 

590 

33,950 

50 



16,800 

65,000 

148,500 



Increase. 



156,500 
48,400 



50,390 



700 
1,320 
1.2e5 



6,000 
15,866 



DecBfeaee. 



19,120 



495 



lU 



3,810 

11,450 

50 



22,700 



Comparative Statement of the yield of the Fisheries of the Province. 



Kinds of Fish. 


1906. 


1907. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Whitefish 


.. lbs 


2,875,450 

52,200 

4,280,500 

263,200 

6,456,260 

475,000 

2,956,200 

1,950,200 

329,000 

21,520 

20,100 

754,700 

530,800 

2,138,200 

38,000 

500 


3,166,890 

74,600 

4,881,387 

213,000 

5,756,628 

224,200 

3,192,250 

2,184,040 

316,645 

23,297 

50,000 

1,033,682 

438,825 

2,217,490 

74,800 

5,290 


291,440 

22,400 

600,887 




(salted) 




Herring 

(salted) 

Trout 




50,200 
699,632 
250 800 




(salted) 

Pickerel 




236,050^ 
233,840 

i',777 

29,900 

278,982 




Pike ■ 




Sturgeon 

Caviare 


12,455 


Eels 

Perch 




Catfish 


92 475 


Coarse Fish 


79,290 

36,800 

4,790 




TuUibee 






Bladders 








Total 


23,141,830 


23,852,424 


1,816,156 
711,594 


1,105,562 


Total increase 1907 











1907 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



101 



Statement of the yield and the value of the Fisheries of the Province for 

the year, 1907. 



Kinds of Fish. 


Quantity. 


Price. 


Value. 








$ c. 


$ c. 


Whitefish 


bbls 


373 


10 00 


3,730 GO 


II 


lbs 


3,166,890 


10 


316,689 00 


Trout 


bbls 


1,121 


10 00 


11,210 00 


II 


lbs 


5,756,628 


10 


575,662 80 


Herring 


bbls 


1,065 


10 00 


10,650 00 


II 


lbs 


4,881,387 


5 


244,069 35 


Pickerel 


i< 


3,192,252 


10 


319,225 20 


Pike 


II 


2,184,040 


8 


174,723 20 


Sturgeon . 


II 


316,545 


15 


47,481 75 


Caviare 


II 


23,297 


1 00 


23,297 00 


Bladders 


II 


5,290 


60 


3,174 00 


Eels 


<i 


50,000 


6 


3,000 00 


Perch 


II 


1,033,682 
438,325 


5 
8 


51,684 10 


Catfish 


II 


35,066 00 


Coarse Fish 


<< 


2,217,490 


5 


110,874 50 


Tullibee 


II 


74,800 


6 


4,488 00 


Total 






1,935,024 90 











Value of Ontario Fisheries from 1870 to 1907 inclusive. 



Years. 



1870 

1871 

1872 

1873 

1874 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

Carried forward 



Value. 



$264,982 

193,524 

267,633 

293,091 

446,267 

453,194 

437,229 

438,223 

348, 122 

367,133 

444,491 

500,903 

825,457 

1,027,033 

1,133,724 

1,342,692 

1,435,998 

1,531,850 



$11,760,646 



Years. 



Brough t forward 

1888 ■ 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1607 

Total 



Value. 



$ c. 

11,760,546 00 
1,839,869 00 
1,963,123 00 
2,009,637 00 
1,806,389 00 
2,042,198 00 
1,694,930 00 
1,659,968 00 
1,584,473 00 
1,605,674 00 
1,289,822 00 
1,433,631 00 
1,477,815 00 
1,333,293 00 
1,428,078 00 
1,265,705 00 
1,535,144 00 
1,793,624 00 
1,708,963 00 
1,784,865 00 
1,935,024 90 



44,902,376 90 



102 



REPORT OF THE GAME AND FISHERIES. 



No. 32 



Recapitulation. 
Of the Fishing Tugs, Nets, Boats, etc., employed in the Province. 



Articles. 



Value. 



149 tugs (2,780 tons), 725 men . $387,620 

1448 boats, 2455 men 134,625 

4,048,618 yds. gill net 274,019 

166 seines (28,770 yds) 9,665 

582 pound nets 145, 155 

483 hoop nets 12,325 

121 dip nets 



Articles. 



Value. 



20,900 hooks on set lines $371 

275 freezers and ice houses 115,713 

32 piers and wharves 19,820 

90 spears 90 

Total $1,099,403 



Statement showing the number of fry distributed in the waters of the Province 
by the Federal Government from Dominion hatcheries. 



Years. 



1868-73.... 

1874 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

190T 

Total 



Newcastle 
Hatchery. 



1,070.000 
350,000 
650,000 
700,000 
1,300,000 
2,605,000 
2,602,700 
1,923,000 
3,300,000 
4,841,000 
6,053,000 
8,800,000 
5,700,000 
6.451,000 
5,130,000 
8,076,000 
5,846,500 
7,736,000 
7,807,500 
4,823,500 
9,835,000 
6,000,000 
6,000,000 
5,200,000 
4,200,000 
4,325,000 
4,050,000 
5,175,000 
5,900,000 
650,000 
2,500,000 
1,475,000 
1,480,000 
1,550,000 
1,807,000 



145,911,700 



Sandwich 
Hatchery. 



8,000,000 
8,000,000 
20,000,000 
12,000,000 
13,500,000 
16,000,000 
44,000,000 
72,000,000 
37,000,000 
68,000,000 
57,000,000 
56,500,000 
56,000,000 
21,000,000 
52,000,000 
75,000,000 
44,500,000 
68,000,000 
47,000,000 
73,000,000 
61,000,000 
72,000,000 
71,000,000 
73,000,000 
90,000,000 
67,000,000 

100.000,000 
90,000,000 
75,000,000 

106,000,000 
88,000,000 

103,000,000 



1,844,500,000 



Ottawa 
Hatchery. 



5,732,000 
7,043,000 
4,909,000 
6,208,000 
4,480,000 
3,210,000 
3,950,000 
4,100,000 
3,020,000 
3,700,000 
3,450,000 
3,410,000 
1,245,000 
1,201,000 
877,000 
1,103,000 
1,123,000 
1,152,000 



59,913,000 



Total. 



1,070,000 
350,000 
650,000 
8,700,000 
9,300,000 
22,605,000 
14,602,700 
15,423,000 
19,300,000 
48,841,000 
78,053,000 
45,800,000 
73,700,000 
63,451,000 
61,630,000 
64,076,000 
26,846,500 
65,468,000 
89,850,500 
54,232,000 
84,043,000 
57,480,000 
82,210,000 
70,150,000 
80,300,000 
78,345,000 
80,750,000 
98,625,000 
76,310,000 

101,895,000 
93,701.000 
77,352,000 

108,583,000 
90,673,000 

106,359,000 



2,050,7X4,700 



Second Annual Report 



OF THE 



Game and Fisheries Department 



1908 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE 

LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




TORONTO : 

Printed and Published by L. K. CAMERON, Printer to the King s Most Excellent Majesty 

1909 



WARWICK BRO'S & RUTl'ER, Limited, Printers 
TORONTO. 



la G. F. 



To His Honour John^ Morison Gibson, 

a Colonel in the Militia of Canada, 

Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario. 

May it Please Your Honour : 

I have the honour to submit herewith, for the information of Your 
Honour and the Legislative Assembly, the Second Annual Report of the 
Game and Fisheries Department of this Province. 

I have the honour to be, 

Your Honour's most obedient servant, 

J. 0. Reaume, 

Minister of Public Works. 
Toronto, 24th March, 1909. 



[3| 



Second Annual Report 



OF THE 



Game and Fisheries Department. 



To The Honourable J. 0. Reaume, 

Minister of Public Works. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit for your approval the Annual Report 
of the Department of Game and Fisheries for the year ending December 
31st, 1908, which I venture to hope will be found even more satisfactory in 
some respects than those of past years. 

The usual statistics, Reports of Inspectors, Wardens and Overseers 
appear in due order. 

Enforcing Laws and Regulations. 

Divided jurisdiction has, I regret to say, during the past year, as in 
former ones, resulted in destructive infractions of the laws of nature and 
common sense. No matter how expensive or efficient the protection of the 
fisheries of the Province is during the open season, the desired effect of pre- 
serving and perpetuating this valuable asset will be of no avail so long as 
those controlling the seasons submit to be periodically held up by those 
determined to kill the goose that lays the golden eggs. I know of no con- 
ceivable cause, except national and wide spread famine, that would justify 
any man or men, no matter how exalted their position may be, in issuing 
orders or instructions having the effect of allowing fishermen to invade the 
spawning grounds of our most valuable species of fish with impunity during 
the time alllotted by nature for the propagation of the species. I am char- 
itable enough to believe that those directly responsible for allowing fish to 
be taken from the spawning grounds when full of spawn and unfit for food 
have not the least conception of the sin they are committing against nature's 
laws and future welfare of the Province, unless they do it on the pernicious 
principle that the end justifies the means. Those responsible for the period- 
ical encroachments on the inadequate close seasons may attempt to justify 
their unwise and questionable policy by referring to what they are doing 
with the hatcheries. The hatcheries may be useful in assisting nature, but 
will certainly be a miserable failure to those attempting to reverse and 
supersede the perfect plan of nature's reproduction. The time is not far 
distant, unless close seasons are extended and strictly enforced, when the 
miserable work of extermination will have reached that stage when spawn 
will not be" procurable for the hatcheries. This is not an exaggerated view 
of future possibilities ; it is. a state of affairs that will occur as sure as fate 
unless a halt is called in time, and wiser councils prevail to prevent such 
an undesirable consummation. It is utterly impossible to compute with any 
degree of accuracy the percentage of fry from hatcheries that mature after 
being placed in public waters. The result of encroaching on the close sea- 
sons is demoralizing and destroving the fisheries of the Province to the 

15] 



THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



detriment of the general public, and from which the dominant fish companies 
reap a rich and illegal harvest. I hope the combined wisdom of the two able 
representatives of our respective countries, who are so eminently qualified, 
from their vast experience, to solve the problem of an equitable system of 
fish protection in international waters, will succeed in so doing to the satis- 
faction of all concerned. This important matter has been in abeyance, and 
going from bad to worse during the last eighteen years, when General R. TJ. 
Sherman and Dr. G. A. MacCallum, assisted by leading fishery authorities 
and economists from both sides of the border, unsuccessfully endeavored to 
reach a mutual understanding on this very important question. To prove 
the disastrous effect the ignoring of nature's laws and close seasons has had 
on the fisheries of the Great Lakes, I quote from Report of joint Commission 
appointed to confer on the subject of fish protection in the International 
waters between the Canadian Provinces and the State of New York. This 
meeting, at which I was present, was held at Hamilton, Ontario, on Decem- 
ber 8th, 1891. The Committee of that Commission reported : "That the 
food fish supply of the Great Lakes has been for the past thirty years suffer- 
ing rapid diminution is too apparent to need statistical proof. On the New 
York side of Lake Ontario, where salmon trout, whitefish, and even the 
lordly salt water salmon were so abundant as to furnish all the near markets 
with an abundant supply at prices within reach of the means of the day 
labourer, the product now scarcely recompenses the netter, and these fish, 
once so abundant and cheap, are no longer available for food to the multi- 
tude, but have become table luxuries to be enjoyed only by people of ample 
means. On the Ohio side of Lake Erie there has been a nearly equal falling 
off of the higher grades of fish. On the Canada side of these waters, the 
supply, though showing each year an additional falling off, yet holds good 
for profitable netting, and it is from the fisheries of Canadian waters that 
the principal market supply for the State of New York comes." 

The remedy. Given then that the food fish supply needed for the con- 
sumption of the border States is approaching practical exhaustion, what 
is the remedy? Two leading measures are obviously necessary. They are 
protection and multiplication, and to make these effective, concert and har- 
mony of action is necessary between all the Government authorities inter- 
ested. If this was the unfortunate state of affairs eighteen years ago, what 
must it be now, with comparative absence of close seasons in many of these 
States, and the frequency with which on any flimsy pretence permission 
has been given our fishermen to continue their destructive work, in some 
cases during the entire close season, and in others during a considerable part 
of them. It is unfortunate that by design or otherwise instructions have 
been sent to the fishermen to continue fishing during a portion of the close 
season, without those responsible for those instructions having considered ^t 
necessary to notify you or this Department. I regret during the past tourist 
season having had to put the law in force against a number of non-resident 
visitors, some of them occupying prominent positions in judicial and financial 
affairs, who no doubt claim to be gentlemen. They are not the genuine 
article who ignore the laws and regulations when temporarily sojourning in 
a neighbouring country, and when caught try to condone their wrongdoing 
by traducing the officers they cannot corrupt. Money does not make men 
gentlemen — that is nature's prerogative. I am glad to know that a con- 
siderable majority of tourists who spend their vacations in our northern 
country are gentlemen in all the term implies, who not only obey our laws, 
but value the facilities for health and enjoyment our lakes and rivers accord 
them. Those of our summer visitors who are not gentlemen have compelled 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 



the Department to abolisli family angling permits, in consequence of their 
miserable system of subterfuge and evasion. 

Since referring as above to the International Commissioners, a draft 
of the proposed treaty, result of the Commission's work, has been loaned 
me by a party to whom it was sent, and endorsed by the United States mem- 
ber of the Commission. To say that I read it with surprise and indignation, 
is to put it mildly. Of course, it would be very nice, and eminently satis- 
factory to our American friends, to be allowed to come when and where they 
choose into the waters of the Province, and without let or hindrance, or 
restrictions as to numbers, take our bass and other fish for the alleged pur- 
pose of re-stocking their own depleted waters. This would result in deplet- 
ing ours. It is also proposed to allow Americans holding licenses or permits 
issued by United States authorities to angle in certain waters of the Province 
irrespective of provincial authority. These gentlemen also propose to 
improve the fisheries by abolishing close seasons. If the Commissioners 
responsible for these one-sided measures expect them to be tamely submitted 
to by the people of Ontario, they, the Commissioners, must have an abiding 
faith in the Barnum theory, that people like to be humbugged. 

Referring to the proposed Treaty, in which it is proposed to have the 
North Channel of Georgian Bay included as being International waters, I 
take the liberty of copying from the forty-first Annual Report of Depart- 
ment of Marine and Fisheries for 1907-8, issued in 1909, page 182, as fol- 
lows : 

''General Description of Georgian Bay and Contiguous Waters. ' 

"The fisheries of Georgian Bay and the North Channel are in maiiy 
respects the most valuable fresh water fishing grounds in the world. They, 
are so for two main reasons : The physical and biological conditions which 
they provide are precisely those most favourable to fish life, especially cer- 
tain species of prime value for commercial and food purposes, while they 
possess the advantage of being exclusively within the Canadian territory, 
and not liable to injury and contrariety in regulations resulting from divided 
international jurisdiction and control. With the exception of Lake Superior, 
the vast area thus opened to the operations of Canadian fishermen exclu- 
sively, and restricted by law to exploitation by British subjects under the 
fishery regulations of Canada, is larger than any other inland fishing rrea 
in the Dominion, being more than twice the area of the Canadian portion 
of Lake Ontario, almost exactly twice the extent of the Lake Erie fishing 
grounds, and more than one thousand square miles vaster than the part of 
Lake Huron which lies within British territorial boundaries. 

The area of the Canadian waters in the Great Lakes may be estimated 
as follows : Lake Ontario less than 4,000 square miles ; Lake Erie about 
5,000 square miles; Lake Huron 11,000 square miles; whereas Georgian Bay 
and the North Channel exceed 12,000 square miles in extent. From CoUing- 
wood, at the northern end of the bay, to the outlet of St. Mary's River, the 
distance is 225 miles, and the greatest width is 54 miles. The fact that in 
the Great Lakes and other contiguous waters Canada shares the fisheries with 
the United States, and that fully one half of the area of these waters is 
within the bounds of the Republic to the south. 

It is entirely different with the Georgian Bay fisheries, for they are 
wholly within Canadian limits, and under Dominion laws and regulations, 
and no such disadvatage affects them as affects the Great Lake fisheries." 



THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



It is inconceivable, in view of the above statements published by author- 
ity of the Honourable the Minister of Marine and Fisheries, and sanctioned 
by His Excellency the Governor- General, that any man, no matter how 
exalted his position may be, should be allowed to decide that the North Chan- 
nel, which to all intents and purposes is a Canadian inland water, should 
be international. International boundary lines between the United States 
and Canada have for some years past been fairly well defined, and while it 
is no doubt the duty of the Federal authorities respectively to guard and 
protect those boundaries for the purpose of preventing international compli- 
cations, the provinces should have the power untrammelled to transact and 
administer provincial affairs. It having been decided that the fish in pro- 
vincial waters are the property of the Provinces, it naturally follows that 
the provincial authorities have the right or power, and they alone, to say 
what aliens or others should pay for the privilege of catching them. Pro- 
vincial authorities should not be compelled to acknowledge licenses or per- 
mits issued by alien authorities to aliens empowering them to take provincial 
property from provincial territory. 

The only way the fisheries can be perpetuated in the international 
waters of the Great Lakes is to have identical and adequate close seasons on 
both sides of the boundary, ajid preventing the use of nets of any descrip- 
tion with small mesh that destroy immense numbers of immature fish. 

Each section of our waters should produce revenue at least equal to the 
cost of protecting them. It cannot be reasonably expected that the Govern- 
ment should continue to spend upwards of |5,000 a year to protect the fish- 
eries of the Eiver St. Lawrence between Kingston and Prescott for the almost 
exclusive benefit of residents of the State of New York. To prqtect the fish 
effectively in those beautiful waters, it is imperative that fees for angling 
should be collected, and the non-sale of bass and maskinonge enforced on 
both sides of the river. Residents on the Ontario side bitterly complain, 
and not without cause, that the waters on the Canadian side of the river 
are being depleted for the purpose of supplying the State of New York with 
bass and maskinonge, where these game fish are allowed to be sold. 

I regret that, with the construction of railroads in the sparsely settled 
parts of the Province, professional and business men, for speculative pur- 
poses, apply for licenses for net fishing in many of the small lakes in the vicin- 
ity of the new roads. Many of these lakes are shallow, and others small areas, 
and would soon be depleted, for the purpose of enabling these gentlemen to 
add to their professional incomes, and supplying the American market with 
fish. These lakes, if kept free from the speculative fishermen, will be a 
prominent factor in opening up and settling these new districts. 

Nepigon. 

The Nepigon River was not visited by as many tourists this year as form- 
erly, owing for one reason in particular to the unhappy state of the financial 
situation in the United States, and also the pending election. The fishing, 
however, was good, and to those who were able to take advantage of it, 
it afforded excellent sport, and many a visitor was heard to remark that it 
would not be his last visit. 

Re-Stocking. 

The re-stocking with parent bass in the inland waters was unfortunately 
begun later than usual, and was not carried on to the extent that the Depart- 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 



ment would liave liked. Those lakes, however, which were re-stocked were 
done so most successfully, and the results will doubtless in a few years' time 
be a source of much gratification to those tourists who make their summer 
home in the vicinity of these lakes. One inland lake which lies in close 
proximity to an important inland city was stocked with fingerlings, and 
should in the near future afford to the inhabitants of that city good fishing. 
I am glad that you have given your consent to the establishing of a breed- 
ing pond for bass at Brantford, which place is excellently situated for hand- 
ling them on account of the facilities offered by the different railways, and 
it is the intention of the Department to use every means in its power to make 
this venture a success, which in my opinion is the best means of carrying 
on the important work of re-stocking. Should this prove successful, many 
thousands of fingerlings will be available for re-stocking next autumn, and 
this would encourage the Department to use other ponds for this purpose. 
The experience of some of the adjoining States with bass ponds has been 
exceedingly successful. Sometimes the first year's experience was not very 
encouraging, but after that, apparently there was no trouble, and from a 
small beginning they have now in many instances very extensive hatcheries. 

Angling Permits. 

Tourists who visited us this past summer expressed themselves as being 
much pleased with the fishing, which must have been good, if the reports 
of our ofiicers can be relied upon. The sale of angling permits was in excess 
of last year to a considerable extent, in spite of the falling off of the revenue 
from Nepigon. The only regret the Department has is that the family per- 
mits that were issued, in many instances were abused. Many officers were 
satisfied in their own minds that in some instances they were transferred 
several times, but the officers were unable to procure sufficient proof to lay 
an information; and from the numerous requests received from them that 
they should be abolished, I felt it my duty to ask for your consent to have 
this class of permit discontinued, and accordingly an Order-in-Council was 
passed abolishing them. The revenue from these permits should increase 
year to year, as the tourist traffic is bound to increase owing to the many 
excellent summer resorts the Province can offer to all sorts and conditions 
of men. 

Patrol Service. 

I am glad to say that last year's patrol service was most satisfactory, 
as far as it went. I venture to say that never in the history of the Province 
have the fisheries received that protection they did last year. The "Edna 
Ivan" was chartered and put in commission about the first of May, and kept 
in commission until the end of November. She patrolled the waters of Lakes 
Superior, Huron, St. Clair and Erie, as well as the Georgian Bay and North 
Channel of Lake Huron, and the result was most satisfactory. Many a dis- 
pute was by this means settled that otherwise would have been impossible, 
and arrangements of a similar nature for next year would be what the 
Department would like. Several excellent launches were supplied to different 
officers, particularly on the Georgian Bay, enabling them to better discharge 
their duties. The yacht "Vega," which was procured for the officer in 
charge of the North Channel and part of the Georgian Bay, was a happy 
find, and is not only a credit to the Department, but should render excellent 
service in the protection of those important fisheries, where such open viola- 
tions have been carried on in the past. 



10 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



The "I'll See" and the "Eva Bell," which had outlived their usefulness, 
were disposed of, and the "Naiad," a much more suitable boat, was secured. 
She was kept on the Rideau waters, from Kingston to Smith's Falls in par- 
ticular, and sometimes as far as Ottawa, until the 15th October, when the 
crew was changed, and she then patrolled the waters between Kingston and 
Belleville. Her presence on the Bay of Quinte during the spawning season 
broke up the illegal fishing which had been regularly carried on for years. 
This boat during the summer patrolled the Rideau waters under direct 
instructions each week from the Department, and no services in past years 
could be compared with those which she rendered last year. 

The overseers at Kingston and Gananoque were provided with launches 
which gave satisfactory service. The overseer at Inner Long Point Bay 
was also provided with a launch, which was very needful. The usefulness 
of these launches to offiecrs is plainly shown by the one furnished to our 
overseer at Hamilton. The results obtained from this boat proved conclu- 
sively how handicapped an overseer is if he has not the means at his disposal 
to go upon the water when necessity requires. 

There is one locality in particular that I feel it my duty to point out 
to you that needs a patrol service similar to that of the Rideau waters, viz., 
Lake Simcoe, Couchiching, and the Kawartha Lakes, which now, owing to 
the Trent Canal, can be patrolled by one boat. I feel satisfied that should 
you authorize this, the results would be most gratifying to you and the 
Department. Overseers on these waters in the main give good service, but 
are unable to cope with the situation when the summer season with its 
thousands of tourists is in full swing. This boat would be the means also 
of preventing to a considerable extent the early duck shooting in the autumn, 
and also the illegal setting of nets in Lake Simcoe during the spawnino: sea- 
son in October. 

Special Overseers. 

Several of these were appointed for a number of months during last sum- 
mer to inspect every shipment of fish, and to see that none, excepting those 
legally caught, were being shipped. They were supplied with tags to attach 
to each box inspected, which authorized them to be sent through to their 
destination without any further examination. This experiment was one of 
the most successful that has ever been tried by the Department, and pre- 
vented to an enormous extent the exporting of undersized whitefish and 
salmon trout. These special overseeers were also required to keep an account 
of all the fish which were shipped from these different fishing stations, and 
forms were provided them to send in at the end of each week to the Depart- 
ment statistics of the fish that were shippped, and which gave the Depart- 
ment more reliable reports regarding the catch of fish than they ever obtained 
before. 

As in the past, the Department received all possible assistance from the 
press, railroad and express companies during the year. Railroad and express 
companies now realize the value of the tourist and hunters' traffic. As a rule 
inspectors, wardens in charge of districts, overseers and deputy game wardens, 
have performed their respective duties with credit to the Department and 
themselves. Fish and game have a value far in excess of amount realized 
from the sale thereof. Anything that has a tendency to improve the people 
morally and physically has a value beyond computation. The attraction of 
game and fish induces residents of cities and towns to spend their vacations 
in the enjoyable and health giving districts with which the Province is so 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 11 



liberally endowed. I have had the pleasure of meeting numbers of deer 
hunters on their return from their annual hunting trips, many of them 
farmers from the older settled parts of the Province, and many of whom have 
enjoyed these annual outings for forty or fifty years. One grand old man 
in particular, in his eightieth year, said it was only the anticipation of going 
the next season that kept him alive from year to year. As a rule, by the 
first of November farmers have completed their fall work, enabling thousands 
of them to enjoy their annual deer hunt, and looking forward to it with each 
recurring year as one of the most enjoyable events of their lives. 

RxjFFED Grouse — Partridge. 

The close season of 1908 for ruffed grouse, better known as partridge, 
had the expected beneficial effect. This, in conjunction with a favourable 
nesting season, resulted, except in the older settled districts, in a large and 
satisfactory increase in number of these grand and valued game birds, to the 
extent of justifying an open season for 1909. To what extent open seasons 
may prevail in the future depends upon the self-denial practised by sportsmen 
and hunters in general. It may be necessary in the near future, as in the case 
of quail, to reduce the open season to one month. 

Quail. 

The wisdom of having close seasons and re-stocking was apparent last 
season, when these grand little game birds were fairly numerous in the south 
western counties. As I have stated in former reports, it rests to some extent 
with the sportsmen whether the quail in the Province are perpetuated or 
exterminated, as in some of the States. It may be necessary to even further 
reduce the present open season to make the protection of quail more effective. 

Ducks. 

Ducks were abundant all over the Province, but in consequence of the 
prevailing fine weather, with few exceptions, they were enabled to stay out 
in the open waters, by so doing affording only moderate sport. Ducks were 
more numerous during the present winter in the vicinity of Toronto and 
Hamilton Beach than ever before during the winter months. 

Woodcock. 

vSome very fine bags of these beautiful game birds were made in the 
Province during the past open season, much to the surprise and pleasure of 
those who delight to hunt these beautiful and elusive birds. 

Snipe and Plover. 

These birds were found as usual fairly numerous, and afforded in many 
localities sport equal to that of past years. 

Capercailzie. 

Mr. G. AV. Bartlett, Superintendent of Algonquin Park, reports that 
several broods of these magnificent birds were seen by the rangers in the 
Park during the past summer. That more adult birds have not been seen is 
in a large measure due to their shyness and retired habits, the old birds 
retiring to the dense and most inaccessible woods. 



12 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



Caribou. 

Few have as yet been killed in the Province by sportsmen, but with the 
extension of railroads into and through the caribou haunts, making them 
more accessible to sportemen, many will take advantage of the improved 
facilities to hunt these wary denizens of the far north. 

Deer. 

The number of carcases of deer carried by express companies during the 
open season of 1908 was 4,387 as against 3,886 in 1907 — increase 501. This 
number, large as it is, is not one-third of the totdl actually killed, when taken 
into consideration that 11,353 deer hunters' licenses and settlers' permits were 
issued, holders of each being entitled to kill two deer. In addition to the 
above, Indians and settlers in unorganized territory were allowed to kill two 
each without licenses or permits, for their own use, but not for sale or barter. 
In view of the large increase of hunters and the number of deer killed, it may 
be necessary in the near future to limit the number to one that may be legally 
kill on each license. It seems incredible that our northern districts should 
continue to supply these immense numbers year after year with no apparent 
diminution, except in older settled portions of the Province, where the deer 
are disappearing with the woods. 

Moose. 

Fifty-nine moose, or heads of such, were carried by express and rail- 
road companies during the open season. A number were taken out of the 
woods by teams, of which we have no record. To state the number killed 
at one hundred is a low estimate. Many very fine heads were procured, one in 
particular killed near the Montreal Hiver in the Temiskaming district by a 
Toronto sportsman having the unusual spread of horns of 71^ inches, and for 
which it is reported he refused the sum of |300. 

Fur Bearing Animals. 

Beaver and otter are reported as being found fairly numerous in some 
portions of the Province, but in waters adjacent to lumber camps and other 
works in which large numbers of men are employed, it is a difficult matter 
to protect these valuable animals. Although a number of the employees of 
these camps have been convicted, many still consider the venture equal to 
the risk. Muskrats are still found in large numbers in all portions of the 
Province, and should have most effective protection. The skins of these 
animals will be utilized in the near future in the manufacture of sealskin 
coats, when the seals have become things of the past. It may be necessary 
to have a close season for mink, for the purpose of preventing them being 
killed when the fur is of little value, although they kill large numbers of 
muskrats in localities where both species are found. The coarser species 
of furbearing animals appear to be holding their own, judging from the 
condition of the atmosphere in the vicinity of shipping points and express 
offices. It is considered advisable to license trappers to enable the Depart- 
ment to have the espionage over them their wrong doing ncessitates. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Your obedient servant, 

E. Tins LEY. 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 13 



GAME AxXD FISHERIES INSPECT0K8. 

Toronto, March Ist., 1909. 
E. Tins LET, 

Superintendent Game and Fisheries, 

Sib, — I beg to submit report for the season of 1908. 

Commercial Fishing. 

The catch of the past season was, with a few exceptions, as good as in 
former years, in some cases much better, notably that of herring in Lake 
Erie, where the lifts of fish were so heavy that the market was glutted, and 
for a time it was impossible for the 'fishermen to dispose of them at a 
remunerative price. 

Lake Ontario produced during the season of 1908, at least double the 
number of whitefish that were caught during 1907, most of this increase 
being in the Bay of Quinte, and adjoining waters. The catch of herring 
was also far above the average. Lake trout were also a good catch, and would 
have been better if the weather about the 1st of November had been more 
favourable : it was very stormy about that time and interfered with the work 
of the fishermen, but this was in some ways a blessing, as the extension of 
open season for seven days in November was not as harmful as it otherwise 
would have been. 

Yellow pickerel were not as plentiful as formerly, and sturgeon are almost 
a thing of the past, and if a close season of a few years for the latter is not 
soon made, they will be entirely depleted. 

The patrol boat "Edna Ivan" visited nearly all commercial fishing ports 
from the Niagara River to Port Arthur, and no doubt was the means of pre- 
venting a great deal of illegal fishing ; although she did not succeed in finding 
a great number of illegal nets (20 trap nets and 3 seines being seized and 
destroyed) her presence would prevent these nets being used to the extent 
they were formerly. If this boat, or a similar one, is again in commission, 
as well as the gasoline launches and the auxiliary yacht provided for the 
overseers on the Georgian Bay, where most of these nets were used, I believe 
in another season it will be practically stamped out. ^Another great help, 
both in preventing the destruction of immature fish and illegal fishing, was 
the placinar of inspectors at several of the more important fishing stations ; 
these men being on the ground all of the time did more to destroy the market 
for these fish than could have been done bv any other means, and if the 
market is destroyed the temptation to catch fish illegally is considerably 
lessened. I would recommend that this system be increased, as there are 
several stations where they could be placed advantageously. 

I congratulate you on the success of this new plan, and ^.so on the class 
of men secured to fill the rather difficult position, th«y all having done 
splendid work, and I can say the same of your whole staff of overseers with 
very few exceptions. 

Before leaving the commercial fishing, I wish to say a word in favour of 
the fish hatcheries. The fishermen in Lake Ontario give the Sandwich and 
Cape Vincent hatcheries credit for the increase of whitefish in those waters ; 
those at Point Edward give the same credit, and T must acknowledge that I 
believe they are right in doing so, along with the better enforcement of the 
close season. 



14 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



Angling. 

Nearly all of the auglers with whom I came in contact were well satisfied 
with the results; they have no fault to find with angling permits, only ask 
to have this regulation more strictly enforced. 

The time will come when it will be necessary to consider every person 
outside his home township a tourist and compel him to have a permit. This 
cannot be done too soon. It would make it easier for your officers to enforce 
the law, as no one could escape by saying he was a resident of Ontario, as is 
done now in some cases, \kLt 1 am satisfied not to any great extent ; But why 
should not our own anglers help to pay for the protection of the game fish? 

Licensed Guides and Trappers. 

I wish again to call your attention to the licensing of fishing and hunting 
guides. This should be done for the protection of the fish and game, also 
for the protection of the anglers and hunters. If these licenses were only 
granted on the recommendation of the overseers, it would be a guarantee to 
the parties engaging them that they were procuring the services of a capable 
man, and would place these guides in a position to enforce the Game and 
Fisheries Act. Why should not trappers be compelled to take out a license 
as well as fishermen? They need regulation as well as the others, and if 
licensed and provided with blanks for making returns would give you in a 
few years an idea of the value of the fur industry of the Province. It would 
also give your officers a chance to have a certain amount of control over them, 
and would also prevent foreigners from coming into the Province and doing 
pretty much as they like during the winter months. This is done in the 
northern parts of Ontario at present. 

I am pleased to know that you have succeeded in procuring a suitable 
pond for bass propagation. This no doubt will be more satisfactory for 
restocking purposes, as the young fry will stand the transportation much 
better than the parent fish, and will not suffer as much from the change of 
water, being taken from water of nearly the same temperature. I was on 
board the patrol boat during the month of November, and believe that the 
close season for whitfish and trout was well observed, not a single case of 
fishing during that time coming to my knowledge. Of course, the close 
season commencing on the eighth instead of the first of the month may have 
made it easier for the fishermen to quit, as the run of trout is nearly over by 
that time, in some places quite over. There is no doubt a growing feeling 
among fisherman generally that it is necessary to keep within the regulations. 

I have the honour to be. 

Your obedient servant, 

Wm. W. Holden, 

Inspector. 



Toronto, 15th March, 1909, 

Sir, — During the past season I made further investigation respecting the 
inland waters of Rainy River and Thunder Bay Districts, and found that they 
are all well stocked with fish, and of easy access by rail. 

In many cases the lands surrounding these waters are fit for agriculture, 
and will no doubt soon be taken up bv settlers, while the surroundings of 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 15 



the other lakes are fit only for hunting and mining. I would not, however, 
recommend the granting of licenses for commercial fishing in any of these 
waters, as the present supply of fish will be required as food for the incoming 
settlers. 

So far, these waters have not required much supervision, but, as they 
are within easy access to the International boundary line, there will be great 
danger should the contemplated arrangement with the United States citizens 
be carried out. It is a very large and sparsely settled territory, and it will 
be found difl&cult to give it the required supervision. 

Moose are very plentiful throughout, and can be seen daily. I have 
already reported the necessity of appointing an officer for the mouth of 
Rainy River, owing to the raids made by residents of the State of Minnesota, 
after the moose. 

The inland waters of the Province are showing the result of the protection 
given them during the two seasons past. 

It gives me pleasure to report the active interest taken by the wardens 
and overseers in the performance of their duties. This interest is not occa- 
sioned by the remuneration received, which is in many cases a mere pittance, 
but from the sportsmanlike interest in protecting the game and fish. 

I feel that with the advent of a boat patrol service in the inland waters of 
the Province, and with a more liberal remuneration to the most active officers, 
the anglincr would improve to such an extent that the revenue derived from 
the sale of permits would be more than ample to pay the cost of protection, 
and at the same time cause a considerable outlay among the settlers. 

I have the honour to be, 
Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

J. S. Webster, 

Inspector. 
E. TiNSLET, Esq., 

Superintendent Game and Fisheries, 
Toronto. 



GAME AND FISHERY WARDENS. 

Game and Fishery Warden Wm,. Burt, of Sinicoe, reports as follows: — 

Speckled Trout. 

These are still very scarce in his district, but from all reports, do not 
seem to have materially decreased in numbers during the year. 

Bass. 

The bass in Long Point Bay are reported more plentiful than for some 
years past. The anglers, however, have not taken as many bass as in former 
jears, the decrease being attributed to the fact that the bay was full of 
minnows, so that the fishermen supposed the bass were so well fed that 
they did not take the bait as well as usual. The bass that were caught, 
however, were much larger than have been caught for a number of years 
past. This is attributed to the prohibition of the sale of the bass, and the 
enforcement of the law against illegal fishing. 



16 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



Commercial Fish. 

The fishermen report that herring and carp are increasing, and that 
larger catches have been made than for several years past. The other com- 
mercial fish seem to be in about the same quantity as in previous years. 
There is considerable dissatisfaction amongst the fishermen owing to the 
fact that there is no close season for white fish opposite certain counties in 
Lake Erie. In the counties where there is a close season, the fishermen feel 
that they are not fairly treated, as they report that large numbers of white 
fish are taken when full of spawn in the counties where fishing is allowed 
during the close season. He would, therefore, recommend that a close sea- 
son be instituted for all parts of Lake Erie. 

Quail. 

As he reported last year, this bird is not very numerous in his district. 
This year they are reported even fewer than in the previous year. 

Ruffed Grouse and Partridge. 

These birds are still very scarce, although, owing to the prohibition 
of shooting, more were reported this fall than a year ago. He would recom- 
mend that neither quail nor partridge be allowed to be shot in his district 
during the season of 1909. 

Black Squirrels. 

Owing to the clearing up of land, these are now becoming scarce. They 
are reported, however, to have been as numerous this year as last year. 

Wild Geese. 

The wild geese seem to have changed their flight as it is seldom that 
one is killed in his district. 

Wild Ducks. 

Along the Niagara River and the Grand Eiver ducks are reported to 
have been as numerous as the last year, while at Long Point Bay they are 
reported to have been more numerous. The bags were not as numerous as 
in past years, as the weather during the shooting season was too fine for 
good shooting. It was also thought that the enactment of the law prohibit- 
ing shooting more than two hundred yards from the shore, by allowing the 
ducks a chance to rest, has been to some extent, responsible for the decrease 
in the bags, and also for the increase of the ducks in the vicinity. Since the 
amendment of the last season, allowing persons to put out decoys, and shoot 
within two hundred yards of the line of any private property, there has 
been less dissatisfaction with this law, and th^'s law has been well lived up 
to. After making one seizure of ducks, shipped illegallv to the United 
States, he has been unable to find any illegal shipping. There is no evi- 
dence of coupons being used again as appeared to be the case last year, and 
he is satisfied that the law in this respect has been well observed. 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 17 



Fur-bearing Animals. 

Large quantities of muskrats were taken last spring, and it is reported 
that many rat houses have heen built in the different marshes in the district 
for the present winter, so that the prospects of a good catch next spring is 
good. He still finds that there is considerable illegal killing of rats in his 
district. It is very difficult to get evidence of the illegal killing as so many 
of the residents along the shore are in sympathy with the persons who break 
the game laws. He has already secured two convictions for having rat 
skins in possession out of season, and one for spearing rats, and have other 
complaints, but without sufficient evidence to warrant a prosecution. He 
would again suggest that the carrying of rat spears in or near any place 
where rats frequent should be prohibited. He would also suggest that the 
killing of muskrats by dogs or by any other means than trapping, except on 
a person's own lands, be prohibited. The legitimate trapper only uses traps. 
It is only the law breaker who desires to use dogs, spears or guns, which 
depreciate the value of the furs. He does not think the public at large 
realize what an important animal the muskrat is. The furs have doubled 
in value in a very few years, and if the wholesale destruction of these 
animals is continued, they will soon cease to be a source of supply of furs. 
Although these animals are very prolific, their natural enemies kill a great 
many, so that men should only catch them in conformity with the game 
laws if it is desired to keep their numbers. The numbers of mink, fox and 
skunk skins taken in the district seem to be about the same as in the previous 
year. 

He is of opinion that the game laws in his district, owing to the efficient 
manner in which the deputy wardens and overseers have discharged their 
duties, have been better observed than in the previous year. 

Game and Fishery Warden Victor Chauvin, of Windsor, reports that 
the fishermen claim that the catch of fish was much smaller than last year, 
especially whitefish, but perch has been a fairly good catch, only the most 
of them were very small, and he thinks there should be a regulation as to 
size. He saw some of them shipped from three to five inches long. The blue 
pickerel also was a large catch, and they were also small. He has seen a 
box full no more than from six to eight inches in length. There was an 
immense catch of herring this fall in Lake Erie, but the majority were small, 
and the prices very low — about one-half cent per pound at times. He 
thinks the regulation for mesh nets should be enlarged so that so many 
small ones could not be taken. It has been a good year for angling for bass 
and other game fish, and all the sportsmen he has seen in his district have 
been satisfied with their catch. He has had very few convictions in regard 
to the fishermen breaking the law. 

Quail were very plentiful, but it was a poor season for shooting, as the 
fall was so dry, and such a covering for the birds, that it was impossible 
for the dogs to locate them. 

Partridges are still very scarce, also black squirrels. Gray and black 
ducks around Detroit River are very fair shooting. The river ducks were 
very small around St. Clair Flats, but the Mitchell Bay ducks were more 
numerous, especially the redhead and canvas back. 

Muskrats are very numerous this year, and he thinks they should be 
looked after, as the skins are worth about 35 cents apiece. He thinks there 
should be a small license put on the trappers, so that it would do away witli 
all the young boys who chase around the marsh skating with a spear and 

2 G.F. 



18 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



destroying the cabins and spearing a rat whenever they can. By having h 
trapper's license, he could make a report once a year to the Department of 
how many rats he caught and the price he got for them. 

The law was fairly well observed, except by the Americans fishing and 
trapping without a permit or license. 

Game and Fishery Warden A. Hunter, of Belleville, reports during the 
past year fishing on the whole has wonderfully improved, especially com- 
mercial fishing in the Bay of Quinte district. There has been a slight falling 
off of the tourist trade in the Rideau waters, caused possibly by the American 
Presidental election last year. He has been informed that angling in the 
Hideau waters has never been as poor as last year, and the cause is claimed 
to be the increased number of ling found in the different lakes. Tourists 
claim that ling destroy the game fish, and he is glad to know that the Depart- 
ment is taking steps to eradicate this noxious fish from the Rideau waters. 

He would recommend that more hoop net licenses be granted in waters 
frequented by ling, as, in the Bay of Quinte, where so many hoop net licenses 
are granted, no ling are found. 

He thinks that if there were a few fish hatcheries erected at different 
points; say, at or near the Bay of Quinte, and on the Rideau waters, the 
results would be more than noticeable. 

He is told that ducks are on the increase. He knows for a fact that 
partridges have t-ecame very plentiful, but would suggest that the closed 
season be extended still another year, or until September, 1910. He has 
been over his district several times during the past year, and has found that 
both the fish and game laws were fairly well observed. Several cases of 
infractions have been brought to his notice, and the different parties pun- 
ished. He is told that deer are becoming scarcer each year, as not nearly 
so many were killed in 1908 as in former vears. He knows of several parties 
returning without even having seen a deer. An old deer hunter lately 
informed him that in ten years deer would be as scarce as wild pigeons if 
something was not done to prevent their destruction. He suggested that 
no permits be issued for at least two years to shoot deer, and by that time 
they would have become tamer and more plentiful. He found that the 
wolves destroyed a great number of deer during the past spring and winter, 
and in many cases the poor settler is credited with having killed deer that 
the wolves killed. 

Game and Fishery Warden G. M. Parks, of North Bay, reports the fish- 
ing to have been good this season in nearly all of the lakes and rivers, more 
especially Lake Nipissing, as almost every angling party camping in various 
places around the lake and in the French Eiver were well pleased with the 
fishing. ISTo doubt this is due to the stopping of net fishing, and there is no 
doubt that Lake Nipissing will be one of the best fishing grounds in the. 
district, if well protected and no nets allowed. 

There have been very few infractions of the law during the year. No 
doubt a great many reports are circulated by parties who do not make any 
effort to ascertain if such reports warrant investigation. 

He regrets to say that in nearly every township a large number of 
settlers' permits are being issued to parties who are not bona fide farmers 
or householders, and in many cases men living in towns and villages obtain 
permits from the issuers. 

Judging from the success met with bv the various hunting clubs during 
the past open season, it would appear that the deer were holding their own. 
This certainly is the case in many sections, and there is even a marked 
increase in some of the old hunting grounds, and in many places further 

2a G. F. 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 19 



north the red deer are abundant, whereas some years ago the species was 
unknown. Moose are quite plentiful in some sections along the southern 
part of the district, but hunting parties wishing to have success must go into 
northern parts of the district, where the moose are to be found in large 
numbers. 

Beaver and otter are becoming very plentiful again, and the protection 
of these animals is a very difficult matter to contend with, owing to the high 
prices realized from the pelts, which many of the trappers are unable to 
resist. 

Mink, muskrats, and other small fur animals are quite plentiful, but 
he would suggest that mink and muskrat be grouped together, having the 
same close season. 

He is pleased to say that there has been a great increase in the number 
of partridge this season. The close season has been well observed by the 
hunters, and he thinks that the close season for partridge should be enforced 
for another season. 

He would like to see a general gun license established in the Province 
at a moderate license fee. 

Game and Fishery Warden C. N. Sterling, of Kenora, reports that uj» 
till fifteen months ago there was no game warden in that district, which 
meant to go as you please, and which has made it very difficult for him to 
get it in any kind of order. But he found a greut improvement during the 
past year. A large portion of his district is unorganized, and extremely 
difficult for him to travel over, which makes it hard to secure evidence suf- 
ficient for conviction. 

He says that fishing has been, if anything, a little better than last year, 
and he has had little or no trouble in this connection, most of his trouble 
])eing along the line of construction of the Grand Trunk Pacific, but as this 
is nearly completed in his district, he hopes to have things a great deal 
better next year. 

With regard to game. Moose and caribou are very plentiful, and there 
have been more red deer this fall than he has seen in the last twenty-five 
years. He thinks the reason of this is the numerous fires in Minnesota. 

The wolves are very numerous, and he would suggest that a larger 
bounty be given for the female. 

Partridge are very plentiful a few miles back from the railways. 

Ducks and geese are also plentiful in the western portion of his district. 

There have been more mink and muskrat caught this year than for any 
single year for some time. 

The protection of beaver and otter has been the most difficult to contend 
with. Although it ig well known that there is a large traffic in illegal fur, 
yet the protection has had a most beneficial effect. 

He has been over a large portion of his district, which is very extensive, 
being about six hundred by four hundred miles. He would strongly 
suggest that more deputy wardens be appointed, in fact in two or three 
places he would like to see salaried officers, as they are bounded on the north 
by Keewatin Territory, on the west by the Province of Manitoba, and on 
the south by Minnesota, U.S. 

Game and Fishery Warden J. H. Willmott, of Beaumaris, reports that 
anglers during the past season have met with better success than for 
several seasons. This has not onlv come under his own observation, but has 
been corroborated by others in various sections. There is a difficulty in 
collecting the fee from non-residents, as many only remain for a day or two. 
He would recommend that in lake districts where summer resorts are num- 



20 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



erous, gasoline launches should be provided, and should visit hotels and 
boarding houses, say twice a week, and should also be on the lookout for 
nets and other illegal contrivances for procuring fish, etc. 

He would again point out the mistake in the close season for lake trout. On 
the Georgian Bay, and in our inland lakes, these fish go on the spawning 
beds about the 8th or 10th October, and by the time the close season sets in, 
viz .,the 1st November, they are through spawning and off the beds again. 

The laws have been fully as well observed as could be expected. Of 
course there have been violations, and always will be, especially in illegal 
netting, but this is not carried on to nearly so great an extent as formerly. 
During the past season he has forwarded to the Department eleven con- 
fiscated nets. 

Deer. Judging from the number of these animals which were taken 
out by the hunters during the late open season, the natural conclusion would 
be that they are numerically holding their own. The reason of this, how- 
ever, is that the best hunting ground on the continent has been opened up 
by the construction of the new lines of railway, which has made the hereto- 
fore inaccessible hunting grounds easy of access, and are constantly crowded 
with hunters along those lines. He thinks the time is not far distant M^hen 
huiiters will have to be satisfied with one deer as the limit allowed, instead 
of two as at present. He noticed numbers of does and fawns being taken 
out at the close of the past hunting season. 

Moose hunters have been fairly successful, but many complain that it 
is much more difficult to procure good specimens than it was a few years ago. 
This of course, he says, could be remedied by putting a close season of say 
three years on these animals when found necessary. 

Partridge. It is most gratifying to notice the increase in these birds. 
The favorable breeding season, coupled with the protection for the past 
season should leave a nice number for breeding for the ensuing spring, 
which, if favorable, will produce a good crop for the fall shooting. He 
would, however, recommend a further close season for another year. 

Beaver and otter. These animals have undoubtedly increased to a large 
extent, but the law in regard to their protection is most difficult to enforce, 
it being so easy for law-breakers to get their pelts out in various ways. 

Wolves have been reported as numerous in various sections. He still 
thinks it would be advisable to increase the bounty on females, so as to give 
hunters an impetus to seek these animals, on the chance of procuring some 
of this sex. 



SPECIAL GAME AND FISHERY OVERSEER. 

Overseer Henry Watson, of Toronto, reports that the net fishing during 
the past season was about the same as last. The season on the whole was 
very stormy, the latter part of it being the best, when some very good catches 
of herring were taken. Those engaged in the business who attended to their 
duties properly were fairly successful. The law was well observed by the 
licensed fishermen. A very little illegal netting was attempted by poachers 
in prohibited waters. 

The rod fishing does not improve any around Toronto. The large 
amount of deleterious matter poured into both Ashbridge's and Toronto Bay 
has driven nearlj all the fish away; even the carp are not nearly as num- 
erous as they were a year or two ago. 

With reference to angling permits. He found the tourist, when a 
sportsman, not only willing but anxious to contribute his two dollars towards 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 21 



the cost of protecting the fish for his enjoyment. The summer resort keeper 
and tradespeople, who supply tourists and campers, and some of our people 
who have become American citizens and "struck ile," are the only persons 
who consider the small fee charged a hardship, included in the latter class 
are some of the worst "game hogs" and fish butchers we have to contend 
with. Illegal shipments were fewer than in former years. The falling off 
in the number of seizures made may be attributed to the new regulation 
requiring the fish to be inspected at point of shipment. With a water- 
proof tag and a better method of cancellation it can be made more efficient 
still. 

Concerning game. In Toronto and vicinity all kinds are about holding 
their own. The snipe shooting was the best for years. The game laws 
were well respected, onlj an odd snap shot being attempted, and that gener- 
ally on the coldest days in the winter. It will no doubt be news to many to 
learn that we have remaining with us during the whole winter a large number 
of blue-bills, red-heads and canvass backs, besides thousands of coween. 
Illegal shipments of game and furs have greatly decreased in the last two 
years. 

The express companies give all the assistance possible and do their best 
to help put down all illegal work. 

Returning deer hunters all report a remarkable increase in the partridge 
in the northern country. In parts where none were seen last year, quite a 
number were seen this, and in other places where only an odd bird was in 
evidence last year they were quite numerous this season. 

Lake of the Woods and Eaint River District. 

Overseer Fred Blanchard, of Fort Frances, reports that the fishing for 
the past season has been up to the average both in catch and size. The 
fishermen have observed the close season, and are well satisfied with the 
season's catch. He has had one case of gill net poaching by a Canadian, 
and is waiting for a conviction. 

There is a terminal at that point for two American railroads, and there 
is considerable rod and line poaching in the summer, but he thinks it is 
through ignorance of the fishery laws. 

Ninety per cent, of the fish caught is shipped to American markets from 
Rainy Lake. 

The big game poaching is carried on by tourists with American guides. 
The tourist seldom knows which side of the boundary he is on, but the guide 
is well informed as to his whereabouts, and can mislead the tourists and 
jump the boundary if occasion calls for him to do so. 

There are nearly two hundred miles of frontier to protect, and, unless 
a man is constantly on patrol, by the time he is informed of the offence the 
offender is across the boundary. 

The timber wolves are greatly on the increase on both sides of the 
boundary line. 

River Nepigon. 

Overseer P. A. Leitch of Nepigon, reports that the number of tourists 
visiting the Nepigon during the past season was much smaller than for 
some years, owing principally to the general depression throughout Canada 
and the United States, and also owing to the elections in both countries. 
Those visiting the Nepigon during the past season invariably reported good 



22 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



sport and fair catches. The regulations were well observed, and no prosecu- 
tions were necessary. 

The construction of the Transcontinental Railway along the north end 
of Lake Nepigon, which was started during the past season, made it necessary 
to place a steamer on the Nepigon River betwen Nepigon Station and Camp 
Alexander — a point 12 miles up the river, as far as it is navigable. From 
that point to South Bay on Lake Nepigon, a distance of 18 miles, a steam 
tramway was constructed, making a system of transportation for supplies, 
etc., for the contractors constructing the Transcontinental Railway. This 
tramway does not interfere with the river, as it keeps about three miles west 
of the river, after it leaves Camp Alexander. He says that should the 
Department desire to open Lake Nepigon for commercial fishing, this 
sjstem of transportation would furnish an outlet for the catch packed in 
boxes. 

Lake Superior, 

Overseer W . L. Gordon of Port Arthur, reports that the fishing business 
throughout the district has been fair this year, the fishermen at different 
stations reporting the catches about the average. In the fall the herring 
catches in Thunder Bay were particularly large and the market for this 
class of fish was found to be good, large shipments being sent east to Toronto 
and other points. 

This year licenses were issued for fishing on White Fish Lake and Lac 
de Mille de Lac. On both these lakes catches were fair, the licensees not 
overdoing the fishing. During the year he visited Savanne and inspected 
the fishing being done by Messrs. Bowman, Little and Laurie, and they 
were meeting with the requirements of the law. He also went up to White 
Fish Lake and there discovered that there had been several Finlanders 
evading the law and were fishing. He lifted all the nets and destroyed them 
and learned afterwards that they had stopped the illegal fishing. 

He also visited Rossport, Jackfish, Port Caldwell, Wolf River and Heron 
Bay on different occasions during the season, and found the fishermen living 
up to the requirements of the law. 

He thinks that the fishing industry has been quite as good this year as 
in former years, and all the fishermen report having had a good season. 

Lake Huron (North Channel). 

Overseer Joseph Hembruff, of Manito waning, reports that the angling 
for bass was as good as last year, but there were not so many tourists. 

The laws were well observed all through the season. The Manitou Lake 
Fish Co. fished all summer, but their catch was small. 

Game has been more plentiful this season. There are more partridge 
and ducks, but deer were scarce. He has not heard of any partridge being 
shot in his neighbourhood. 

Overseer William Hunter, of Tehkummah, reports that the fishery laws 
have been fairly well observed in that part of the country, and there have 
been no complaints of any illegal fishing. There are not as many trout in 
Manitou River as some years ago, and the only reason he can give is the need 
of a fishway at Michaels Bay. Different parties have been complaining 
about the matter. 

As for game, it is a difficult matter to get proof sufficient for a con- 
viction, as the parties complaining are not able to prove their statements 
about illegal shooting, and the only way to stop it, he thinks, is for the 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 28 



Department to give overseers fair wages and let them put in the whole of 
their time in the woods in hunting season. He thinks a few heavy fines 
will stop the practice. He would also recommend two more years of close 
season for partridge, though owls and foxes kill a great many. 

Overseer David Irwin, of Killarney, reports that the fishing at Killarney 
during the past season has been very good, quite up to the average, but, 
owing to the dense smoke which prevailed and the rough weather during 
the latter part of the season, it was not quite as good as it otherwise would 
have been. 

The close season was well observed, there being no law-breakers in his 
division. The angling was good, the tourists being well pleased. 

Regarding game. The deer and moose back of Killarney were very 
plentiful, quite a number of these having been shot during the season. 

Some moose were killed without a license, the parties having secured a 
license afterwards, but he seized the moose. 

Overseer Oliver, Little Current, reports that the fishing in his division 
for the past j^ear has been a fair catch, considering the amount of nets used 
by each licensee. Whitefish, trout and pickerel have brought a good price, 
averaging about six cents per pound. Although the catch has been a great 
deal less than last year, fishermen have done fairly well owing to the prices 
being good. There has not been much herring fishing in his division during 
the year. Prices for herring averaged about 2\ cents per pound. He finds 
that the catch of whitefish, trout and pickerel, especially whitefish, is 
decreasing verj^ fast, and he has come to the conclusion that there are too 
many nets being used in his division. In his opinion, if there are not some 
of the heavy rigs shut off, or some other means taken to keep up the supply, 
the fish will soon be so scarce that fishermen will not be able to make it pay. 
They have been gathering whitefish spawn and trout spawn this fall, and 
he believes they are taking it out of Lake Huron and the Georgian Bay to 
hatch. If these young fish are not returned to the lakes they were taken 
from, he thinks it is an injustice to these fisheries. 

No violations of the fishery laws have come under his notice, but he has 
not been able to patrol his division as well as he hopes to next year, with the 
yacht with which the Department has furnished him. It is well equipped 
and suitable for the business, except that it should be supplied with a small 
boat, which is very much needed for grappling and lifting nets. The "Vega" 
went into commission on the 26th October, and was laid up on the 25th 
November. During that time he was able to do some very good service with 
her, although the weather was very rough. 

The angling in his division for the past year for black bass and pickerel 
has been good. There were not quite as many tourists as the year previous. 
Only one serious violation of the Game Act came under his notice, and that 
was a party from Collingwood shooting two moose in McGregor Bay. He 
notified Overseer Irwin, and had it attended to. He is afraid the Game Act 
has not been as well enforced as it should have been, as he has had several 
reports of violations, but he hopes to be able to give a better report of its 
enforcement in future. 

Georgian Bat. 

Overseer John Beatty, of Old Fort, Midland, reports that the fishery 
laws were fairly well observed, no illegal fishing having come to his notice. 
The principal fish caught in his division were pike and maskinonge, there 
being more maskinonge caught in 1908 in the Wye River and Mud Lake 



24 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



than for a number of years past, and angling fishing for bass was good. 
There has also been a good number of tourists around there this summer. 
The muskrats are numerous as ever. Quite a number of wild geese 
stop with them for two weeks on their way south. The black and gray duck 
were in abundance, and the sportsmen enjoyed hunting them. The fall 
duck was not so plentiful as blue bills, redheads and whistlers. The deer 
hunting has been the best for a number of years, and the hunters were well 
pleased. 

Overseer B. A. Dusang, of Fesserton, reports that carp has been plenti- 
ful, but very few were caught. Trout and whitefish have been plenti- 
ful, and angling has been as good as last 3/ ear. Pickerel have increased. 
There were quite a number of tourists, but not as many as the year before. 
The close season has been well observed. He fined one fisherman |20 and 
costs, also seized over a mile of night line, and 425 .hooks, which he destroyed. 
About half of the fish this year were consumed in Canada, the other half 
going to the United States, as the Canadians are paying better prices. He 
has travelled 2,500 miles in 1908 by gasoline launch and train and other 
conveyances. He has sixteen licensed fishermen in his division, besides 
about seven or eight others who get their licenses from other overseers. 

Overseer James Hewitt, of Honey Harbor, reports that rod fishing has 
been good in Honey Harbour. He has had guests at his house who caught 
their limit for three days; and as for small black bass below the limit, the 
guests remarked upon their catching so many little ones that had to be put 
back again, and thought that it went to show that the bass is increasing. 
As for pickerel, he says they had more caught at their house than for 
the last four years, so he believes that the pickerel is catching up a little, 
but yet there are some trap nets found inside of the boundary line. Trolling 
for maskinonge was better, and pike trolling was good. Bass was plentiful 
on the shores in spawning time, and he also saw quite a few schools of little 
bass swimming around the shore this year. There were bass around all 
the shoals and rocks and in places where he never knew bass to be before. 

Deer was prettj plentiful in his district. There are a number staying 
in the little swamps near by, and if let alone will be free from the wolves. 
There are quite a few partridge, and he believes they have increased over 
last year. Duck hunting was not very good in the early part of the season, 
but from November till it froze up they were plentiful, in fact there are some 
around yet, as he saw some on the 5th January. Snipe and woodcock were 
rather plentiful. 

The laws have been fairly well observed around Honey Harbor as 
regards game. 

Overseer J . W . Jermyn, of Wiarton, reports that the fishing in the early 
spring and summer was very light, small catches being general. In the 
fall the fish were late in coming on the shoals, and the latter part of the 
season the weather was rough and high winds prevailed, so that the fisher- 
men could not either set or lift nets for several days at a time. Another 
cause was the dense clouds of smoke from bush fires, which made it impos- 
sible to see any distance on the waters. While there were not as many fish 
caught this year as last, he cannot attribute this cause to the scarcity of 
fish, as thej were plentiful wjien the weather permitted the fishermen to 
take them. He is pleased to be able to state that the game and fishery laws 
were well observed in his division during the past season. 

In respect to the game on the Bruce Peninsula. He regrets to state that 
it suffered severely from the terrible bush fires. During the hunting season 



1908 GAME AND FISHEI^IES. 25 



they found several dead carcasses of deer that perished in the fires. He also 
saw two more that were shot by hunters, but were not fit for use. The front 
feet were off, and other parts of the bodies were badly burned, and they 
considered it a humane act to destroy them. Eabbits and partridge also 
were destroyed by the same cause. 

Overseer John Kennedy, of Meaford, reports that the summer fishing in 
his division was fairly good. The trout fishing came on earlier than usual. 
The fishermer. say the fishing was better this fall than it has been for a 
number of years. They had some very heavy catches in October. He has 
seized a number of herring nets of undersized mesh, which had been used 
for catching bait for night lines. He also tried to find out who owned them, 
but failed. Angling has not been as good this year as in 1907. 

Partridge are increasing, as the people have observed the law. The 
number of red deer landed at Meaford station was 25, which all had coupons, 
and which had been killed in different parts of Muskoka. 

Overseer C. H. Knight, of Byng Inlet, reports that the fishing has been 
up to the average, and no complaints have been received from the fishermen. 
Out of fourteen licensed fishermen in his division, there were no prosecu- 
tions or convictions, as against two fined in 1907. There was some seining 
for whitefish in the early spring carried on by Indians and others, who take 
advantage of this opportunity, the whitefish coming in shore as soon as the 
ice goes out. The gasoline boat furnished by the Department will, he trusts 
put an end to the seining in his division, as it will enable him to get on the 
fishing grounds more easily. 

The angling was fully as good as in 1907, bass and pickerel being as 
plentiful. The pickerel in the Magnetawan River were more plentiful, and of 
a larger size than the two years previous. The French River was reported 
to be not so good as in previous years, the bass and pickerel being scarcer, 
which he believes is due to fishing the river with nets. He had an oppor- 
tunity of visiting this river on the line of the C.P.R., where he located and 
destroyed a large trap net used for catching pickerel. 

The deer were very plentiful in the summer months, but the bush fires 
that raged through there destroyed their feeding grounds, so when the 
open season came very few deer were to be found in that vicinity, and a 
number of hunters failed to get their deer. He thinks that hunting deer 
with dogs should be prohibited. 

The partridge were more plentiful than for a long time, and very tame. 
He thinks it would do no harm to have another year of close season for them. 

Overseer Henry Laughington, of Parry Sound, reports that the fishing 
for 1908 was on an average about the same as in 1907, only a slight increase 
in the month of October for trout. He thinks the fishermen should not be 
allowed an extension of time in November, but that the last ten days in 
October should be added to the close season. 

As to the angling for game fish, it was good, and a larger number of 
the anglers are non-residents of Ontario, which means a large revenue to 
this country. He thinks there should be a small patrol boat which could go 
through among the islands and the shallow waters, and it should be on from 
the opening of navigation till the close of same. The steamer "Pearl" was 
on at short intervals last season, and proved a success looking after non-resi- 
dents' licenses and also illegal fishing. 

The close season for partridge was a good move, and if we have a fair 
average spring they will be quite numerous. He says it would be a good 



26 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



idea to make 1909 a olose season also, and then the flocks would get a chance 
to spread out. The close season has been well observed here. 

Deer were not so plentiful as last year, although there was a large 
number taken out of the district, bat that was owing to the greater numl)er 
of hunters in the woods. He would suggest to make the limit next year 
one deer to one man. 

Overseer T. W . Robinson, of Collingwood, reports that there was a 
slight decrease in the catch of whitefish and sturgeon, and a very large 
increase in carp, of which very little is caught in that district, owing to 
poor markets and the general dislike to this class of fish. All other kinds 
remain about normal. The reasons for decrease in whitefish and sturgeon 
are that the fishermen did not prosecute their work as briskly as usual, 
and continual foggy weather. 

The percentage of fish shipped to the United States was about one tenth 
of total catch. 

No abuses exist, to his knowledge. 

Close seasons have been strictly observed. 

No violations of the law came to his knowledgj'e. 

There are no fish ways in his district, nor any dumping of mill refuse. 

Lake Huron (Proper) and River St. Clair. 

Overseer H. A. Blunden, of Samia, reports that the season opened with 
a period of very uncertain winds, making it very difficult for the fishermen 
to get their stakes and nets in place. During the latter part of the month 
of May, and part of June there was a spell of strong south wind, which 
the fishermen claim caused very uncertain hauls of pickerel. But taking 
the season as a whole, the fishermen received very fair returns, more par- 
ticuarlj on whitefish grounds north-east of Kettle Point. He thinks that the 
reason the pickerel and whitefish are not decreasing in Lake Huron the way 
it is claimed they are in other waters is because th'^re are few large towns 
or cities to empty their sewage into these waters. 

There were no prosecutions in his division during the year, although 
he seized two American gill nets ir> Sarnia Bay and destroyed them, but 
he could not find the guilty parties. 

Overseer Dan Kehoe, of Millarton, reports that the fishermen in his 
division have observed the law, both as regards fish and game. No viola- 
tions have come to his notice. 

Game is not plentiful in that locality. 

Overseer Robert McMurray, of Bayfield, reports that the catch of fish 
during the past season has not been as good as the previous season. Perch 
were not as plentiful, but whitefish are becoming more plentiful. The close 
seasons were well observed. He made special trips more frequently during 
the close season, often going out to the nets with the fishermen, and found no 
cause for complaint. Of course once in a while a few fish out of season will 
get into the nets, but this cannot be entirely stopped, although the men are 
careful not to make a point of catching fish which they know to be out of 
season. He had no complaints about illegal fishing. There have been no 
violations that he has heard of. 

Game is scarce in that section of the country. 

Overseer D. Robertson, of Southampton, reports that the fishermen in 
his division have not had quite as good a season as in 1907. The tugs have 
had a fairly good season, but the sailboats not as good as in 1907. The fishing 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 27 



season opened late, and in the first part of the season the tugs did well. In 
July and August the catch was light, in September very good but the 
fishermen could not make regular trips on account of rough weather. 
In October (the weather was very -stormy, and the fishermen did 
not do much on that account. On the 9th and 10th November there 
were landed at that port fully 30 tons of fine large trout, principally female 
trout, undoubtedly on their way to the spawning beds. In his opinion there 
could not be a better way of depleting the waters than by extending open 
season. Otherwise the close season was fairly well observed. 

In his division there were four convictions, one for shooting fish, two 
for spearing pike in Chesley Lake, and all fined $5 and costs, one for retain- 
ing undersized bajss taken from Saugeen River, fined |10 and costs. 

Pai-tridges are more plentiful this year than for some years. The past 
spring was dry and favourable to the young birds, and the close season was 
better observed. 

Hares are very numerous this season, and close season was well observed. 

Lake St. Clair, River Thames and Detroit River. 

Overseer John Crotty, of Bothioell, reports an increase in catch as per 
statement of last year, but that is accounted for by returns being received 
from all the fishermen this season. 

Probably 75 per cent, of the catch was exported, the balance being for 
home consumption. 

No abuses came to his notice. 

The close seasons, as far as he knew, were strictly adhered to. 

No violations of the Act were brought to his knowledge, and consequently 
there were no fines or confiscations. 

There are no mills in use in his division, and no dams or fishways. 

Overseer Remi Laframhoise, of Canard River, reports that the carp fish- 
ing has been very light, having fallen off about 40 per cent, from last year. 
He thinks from what he can learn from the fishermen that the high water 
was the cause, as the carp had the chance to get into the big marshes where 
the fishermen could not get at them. Pike has also fallen off, while the 
])ickerel, bass and perch have increased. Whitefish have also been scarce in 
the Detroit River, I presume on account of the constant northwest and west 
winds, and the river being nearly half its width west of Bois Blanc 
Island, and the heavy blasting going on at that point would naturally keep 
them back during the year. He seized one hoop net, one minnow net, night 
lines, and also prosecuted three different parties for illegal fishing. Two were 
fined, and one let off on suspended sentence. He has been over his territory 
on different occasions, and is satisfied that our licensed fishermen have fairly 
well observed the laws. 

Re Game. There was any amount of ducks in the Detroit River in the 
spring of the year, but very few in the fall. Quails are quite numerous, but 
on account of the dry fall there were not many killed. Muskrats are very 
plentiful. He has found some of their houses broken, and he is informed 
that some people are hunting them with guns and dogs, and it is the dogs 
that are destroying the houses. He thinks that any person hunting muskrats 
in the marshes should be prohibited from having a dog with him. 

Overseer Richard Little, of WaJJaceburg, reports that the fishing for 
both large and small mouth bass has been the best since he has been acting 
as game and fishery overseer, and old anglers tell him that it has not been 
equalled in ten years. 



28 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



Partridge are becoming more scarce eacli year, no doubt on account of 
less cover. Quail, in the districts where re-stocking was done, showed good 
results, but in the other districts there were not many reported. 

Woodcock seemed to be plentiful on St. Ann's and Walpole Island 
Indian Reserve. There was the usual supply of snipe and plover. The marsh 
variety of ducks, such as Mallard, etc., show no improvement, and have for 
the last few years been growing less. The canvas back, blue bill and red 
head were abundant, but, owing to the feed growing so far out, and the 200 
yard limit, with rough weather, there were very few shot. 

Muskrats seem to be plentiful, judging from the number of houses they 
have in the marshes and along the streams. Fox, mink and racoon about the 
usual number. 

The laws were well observed, excepting in one instance by Americans 
placing decoys outside the 200 yard limit. They had their license taken 
from them. 

Overseer Henry Osborne, of Dante, reports that the catch of the papt 
season exceeded that of the previous season. The fishery laws were fairly 
well observed, apparently from a desire to protect the fish. He discovered 
two violations of the law and seized two nets, but found no person operating 
them. However, owing to the nature of the evidence, he was afraid to prose- 
cute for fear of not being able to secure a conviction. He says that there are 
very few except those living on the river who fish, and when any violation 
exists it is by some one coming from a distance. 

Overseer Theodore Peltier, Dover South, reports that the catch of fish 
has been very good, considering the short season on account of wind, it hav- 
ing been a remarkably windy spring and fall. There is no indication of a 
decrease. The close seasons have been well observed, and no violations of 
the law came to his notice. 

Lake Erie and Grand River. 

Overseer T. J . Briggs, of Bridgeburg, reports that there are whitefish in 
the Niagara River, and the Americans are running back and forth with 
seines all times of the night. Two seines were seized from parties who were 
supposed to be Americans, who dropped their nets and rowed away. The 
nets were burnt. 

The angling was poor last year, caused, it was supposed, by so much 
dynamiting. Every month, or sometimes once a week, this was used to 
kill fish. 

Overseer H. A . Henderson, of Pelee Island, reports that the season has 
been a very prosperous one, that the catch of fish largely exceeds that of 
previous years, and might even have been greater had not the market become 
glutted and dealers unable to handle the supply. This bears out his former 
reports that the fish are in the lake, and a more vigorous prosecution of the 
fishing will give greater returns. Of course he does not mean that fishing 
should be overdone, but he believes that Lake Erie is not so nearly depleted 
of fish as some reports would make people believe. He is also of opinion 
that the stocking of the waters with young fry is having a good effect. The 
season, too, has been very favourable — ^the best in years, as formerly all fish 
caught were exported to the United States except a small quantity sold for 
home consumption. 

No abuses existed in his district, and no illegal fishing came to his notice. 

Overseer Henry Johnson, of Brantford, reports that the fishing in his 
division has been good. Coarse fish was never better, bass was good, pickerel 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 29 



not so good as last year, trout fishing good. There has been some illegal 
fishing. There were five fines for fishing out of season, and four for Sunday- 
fishing. Most of those fined were fol-eigners. The fish are all used for home 
consumption. The fishways at Caledonia, Brantford and Paris should be 
put in repair, as they are in very bad condition. 

Muskrats were plentiful. He had some complaints about rabbits, which 
were very plentiful. There were two fines for shooting rabbits out of season. 
A Game Protective Society has been formed there, which he thinks will help 
the law, as the members are all good sportsmen. 

Overseer Samuel Kraft, of Ridgeway, reports, that fishing M^as very 
good the fore part of the season, but during the latter part it was not so good. 
Some of his fishermen did not fish at all on account of sickness and death. 

The fish they caught were mostly sold at the home market, and the 
remainder shipped to Buffalo sold for a good price. 

The game and fishery laws were well observed by our own citizens, 
but once in a while some Americans would steal over, but when they found 
out they were closel;y watched, they stopped fishing and hunting. The law 
was well observed during the year 1908. 

Overseer Edward Lee, of Low BanJcs, reports that the fishermen in 
his division have had a successful year. The catch of whitefish by the tug 
fishermen during the spring season and up to the end of May was one of 
the heaviest they have had in years. This is one of the most profitable fish 
the lake produces, and every means should be used for their protection dur- 
ing the spawning season. The catch of herring in his division has been 
good, but above there it was unusually heavy during the month of June, 
although the fish taken were small. The catch of pickerel (blues) was as 
heavy as last year, but on account of bad weather the fishermen could not 
get out when run was heaviest, consequently the returns may not exceed 
those of last year. Pickerel (dore) was about the same as last season, perch 
also about the same. The pound net fishermen have had an increased catch 
over last season. There was a decrease in sturgeon and caviare, carp, 
suckers, mullett and sheepshead. Although carp are very numerous in lake, 
very few are taken, fishermen giving as a reason they do not lead well into a 
pound net. 

About 95 per cent, of the fish caught are exported to the United States, 
balance used for home consumption. ^ 

No abuses exist. 

The close seasons have been well observed by licensed fishermen, and 
nothing irregular except minor matters already reported. 

The game laws have been very well observed. 

Overseer K. McClennan, of Grovesend, reports that the catch of fish 
during 1908 shows a vast increase over that of 1907. The catch of herring 
has been exceptionally large all through the year, and especially in the fall 
season, such large hauls were never known in that district. The quality also 
compared favourably with the quantity, evidencing very plainly that the 
waters are not being depleted. But the prices were so remarkably low that, 
notwithstanding the large catch, the fishermen came out in debt, owing to 
the extra amount of help required to take care of the fish. The close season 
having been taken off blues from April 15th, to May 15th, the fishermen have 
been considerably benefited. One fishermen informed him that his catch 
of blues during last season amounted to about |3,000, but had the close 
season been left on it would not have exceeded |700. The close seasons 
were all well observed, as were all other regulations. 



30 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



The close season on game was also well observed, no violations of the 
Game Law having come to his notice. This is largely due to the notices being 
posted up in conspicuous places, so that the public were well acquainted 
with the rules and regulations. 

Overseer A. McEwen, of Aldboro, reports that the catch of fish in West 
Elgin during the year 1908 by pound net men was below the average, and 
prices were not all satisfactory, being much below the level of 1907. 

The laws and regulations were well observed. 

Gill net fishing proved somewhat of a surprise, owing to the immense 
catch of herring made by tugs late in the fall, but prices were very low. 

Overseer James McVittie, of Blenheim, reports that personal observa- 
tion and authentic reports both agree that the year 1908 has been the ban- 
ner year, as far as quantity of fish taken from Lake Erie is concerned. This 
was decidedly noticeable during the last half of the year. The catch being 
principally herring, the fishermen complain that there has been little money 
made, but this is only the result of over production. This difficulty could 
be easily overcome, if the regulation demanded a larger mesh for gill nets, 
and also for cribs in pound nets, when only the larger or full grown fish 
would be marketed. This year has demonstrated beyond doubt that Lake 
Erie has not been depleted. 

The fishermen in his district have obeyed the regulations to the letter, 
as far as he could see, giving no trouble at all. The carp catch has been 
small this year, on account of the water being very high, letting the fish get 
over the marsh. The prospects for next jear look better,, as the water is 
some two feet lower. 

Overseer J. P. Pierce, of Port Rowan, begs to report that the fishing 
season of 1908 in that district was one of the most successful that they have 
ever had there. No violations of the law in any way came to his attention. 

The bass fishing was very successful from the date of the opening of 
the season until about the last day of July. The number of tourists here 
Was greatly in excess of any other year and the amount received for non- 
resident licenses consequently considerably in excess of other years. For 
some reason, the bass, while still numerous in Long Point Bay, ceased to 
bite at any usual bait about the end of July, although some were caught by 
using small crabs for bait. 

The seine and gill net fishing was about average. If anything, the catch 
was slightly larger than last year. 

With regard to the game he would report that the number of ducks 
shot during the year was much less than any previous year of which he 
has any knowledge. The limit of 200 yards for setting decoys was generally 
lived up to, he having neither seen nor received any information as to any 
breach of the law in this respect. Personally he considers that this limit 
is not great enough, and instead of this provision increasing the number of 
ducks in the Bay it has had a totally opposite effect. Sportsmen, not being 
allowed to place decoys outside of this limit, have taken to running the 
ducks in boats, at. times twenty or more boats chasing about the bay, prac- 
tically clearing the water of ducks and totally ruining the shooting of other 
persons. A great many complaints have been made to him of this practice 
and he has been requested to call the attention of the department to it. 

One very flagrant violation of the law respecting the shipping of ducks 
came to his attention during the season by the holder of a game dealer's 
license. The license was cancelled by the Department. He would strongly 
recommend that all officers of the Department be strictly enjoined not to 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 31 



hand over any licenses with coupons to any person but the one for whom 
the license is taken. If every person wanting a shooting license was com- 
pelled personally to apply for and receive his license it would almost 
certainly do away with shipping coupons coming into the hands of other 
persons who could make use of them to avoid the law against shipping ducks 
out of Canada. He should also recommend that no game dealer's licenses 
be granted without the endorsement of the Local Overseer. 

There were three violations of the law with respect to muskrats reported, 
in all of which cases action was taken and fines imposed. 

Overseer James Yokes, of Nanticoke, reports that the season has been 
very good, as far as fish are concerned, and large catches of whitefish and 
herring are reported. Pickerel and perch were plentiful at times. Unfor- 
tunately prices were somewhat low during the late summer, and some of 
the tugs were laid up for a few weeks, preferring to leave the fish in the 
lake rather than dispose of them at such a low figure. 

The catch of sturgeon was somewhat less than usual. Coarse fish were 
ver- plentiful, carp steadily increasing in numbers. 

The fishery laws were well observed by his fishermen, and, excepting 
some few minor complaints, he has had no trouble with them, although 
there are always some men who require constant watching. 

In May he reported an important seizure of seine nets and boats, impli- 
cating some 10 or 12 men for illegal fishing in the Grand River. The matter 
was turned over to the police magistrate at Dunnville for settlement. 

The game laws in his district, and the close seasons were fairljf well 
observed. 

Muskrats appear to be very plentiful. 

The duck shooting in the Grand River was well up to the average. 

Overseer Lewis Wigle, of Leamington, reports that there was good 
spring fishing on the east side of Point Pelee, but not so good in the fall, 
while the fishermen on the west side did scarcely anything in the spring, 
but made nearly their whole catch during the latter part of November and 
fore part of December. About ten or twelve pound nets are frozen in the 
lake. Herring, whitefish, blue pickerel or pike, and pickerel or dore, are 
well up to the mark in quantity. The prevailing winds during the fall were 
from the south and south-west, which appeared to have driven the bulk of 
herring towards the north shore of Lake Erie, and which made that kind 
of fishing extra good, in fact almost too good. In several instances herring 
perished in the gill nets and became almost valueless before they could be 
taken care of. He is informed upon good authority that on account of the 
prevailing wind blowing from south and southwest to this shore the fall 
fishing was much better, more particularly herring, than along the south 
shore in the State of Ohio. 

Lakp: Ontario and Bay of Quinte. 

Overseer Irvine Glass, of Trenton, reports that he has had only one 
licensed fishermen in his district. There were quite a large number of 
domestic licenses issued, and there were not any violations of the laws. 
They all report very good catches of whitefish. Gill net fishing, except for 
domestic purposes, is strictly prohibited in his district. Angling has been 
excellent. Pickerel, maskinonge and bass have been very plentiful. There 
have been more anglers there than ever before, and all have been successful 
and no violations on their part. There is good accommodation for anglers 
at hotels, and plenty of boats and guides can be had at Trenton. 



32 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



Overseer Thos. Gault, of Deseronto, reports that the fishing season was 
on the whole considerable better than last year. The laws and regulations 
were well observed by the fishermen. The home market was well supplied 
with good fish, the result being generally satisfactory. Angling was good, 
there being quantities of bass. The whitefish and herring have not been 
80 plentiful in years. 

Overseer Henry Holliday, of Wolfe Island^ reports that the angling in 
his district never was better through June, July, and August for bass fishing, 
and pike fishing was good all season. Pike are very plentiful, and the net 
fishermen have had good catches, and are willing to observe the law, there 
having been few fines. Hoop net fishing was also good, bullheads were larger 
than for years, and the fishermen report good catches. The dogfish are very 
plentiful, and seem to be increasing. He saw over 25 taken out of one hoop 
net at one time. 

E-e game. The wild ducks were very scarce through September and 
October, but the rest of the season very plentiful. He thinks that trolling for 
pike with those gasoline boats cause the ducks to stay away, for they troll 
where the du6ks feed, and the ducks do not have a chance to light or rest. 

Muskrat were not very plentiful, and not many were caught. The trap- 
pers think the cause was the water being so high last spring. 

Overseer U. W . Hayes, of Murray, reports that during? the year 1908 
the fishermen observed the law, with the exception of one, who kept his hoop 
nets in one week longer than the law allowed. He captured one hoop net and 
about 10 rods of gill net belonging to parties unknown. The fishermen report 
good catches. Very few carp were caught in the Bay of Quinte in his dis- 
trict. American anglers were reported to have caught bass and let them spoil, 
and that great quantities are found lying dead on the shores. It has also 
been reported that a great many ducks were caught in nets in Weller's Bay. 

Overseer E. M. Huffmom, of Hay Bay, reports that the past season has 
not been as good as last for the net fishermen, but the angling was very suc- 
cessful, especially for bass. The close seasons were observed, but there were 
some fishermen fined for fishing more net than their license called for, and 
their licenses were cancelled. He made one seizure of about 4,000 yards of 
gill net, which was confiscated and sent to the game warden at Belleville. 
He approves of the raise in gill net fees, as the returns from them were much 
greater than the hoop net, and the fish of more value. He would also recom- 
mend that anglers be located and take out permits for whatever division 
they fish in. The local fishermen complain that they are located to one 
division, or else pay a license in another if they wish to fish there, whereas 
anglers for the one permit, be it two or five dollars, fish wherever they like 
for three months. 

Overseer John Johnson, of Port Hope, reports that he has taken every 
precaution in regard to the game and fishery law in his division during the 
past year. 

He has not found any person violating the law, therefore has collected 
no fines. 

Speckled trout are very scarce, also partridge and grouse. 

Overseer C. J. Kerr, of Hamilton, reports that there has been an increase 
in the catch of whitefish, trout, pickerel, perch and herring, over the catch 
of last year. The whitefish were of a uniform and fair size, and commanded 
good prices. The trout caught were also good. In handling the herring 
during the busy fall when the bulk of them were caught in a short time, with 
the exception of one case no fish were lost, and all reached the market in good 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 33 



shape. The fishermen in his district fish no herring nets less than 2^ inch 
extension measure, with the exception of one man, and he has orders to 
destroy it before his application can be received for a license for 1909. The 
herring caught were of a good size, and he heard of no complaints of small 
and useless herring caught at any time during, the season by the fishermen, 
while complaints were continually heard of the Bronte, Grimsby, Jordan, 
Port Dalhousie and Niagara fishermen, who are reported to use exclusively 
a 2| inch mesh, glutting the markets with small herring, to the injury of his 
fair fishing licensees. 

He would recommend that the size of the herring gill nets in the waters' 
of Lake Ontario be confined to the two sizes — 2| and 2|, all nets under 2^ 
to be destroyed before next fishing season, and the 2| inch mesh be allowed 
one year to be fished out, and then 2f can become the lawful size under 
Order-in-Council, or otherwise the blue back herring of Lake Ontario may 
be classed with the ciscoes, which are almost extinct. He would strongly 
recommend that no herring fishing be permitted during the months of June, 
July, and August. This will stop the catching of small and immature white- 
fi-h. which congregate on the herring grounds at this particular season, and 
daring these months. 

The spearing in Burlington Bay during the winter was a part failure, 
owing to the continued dirty water and bad ice. 

The usual good trolling for pike in the bay was enjoyed by the fishing 
public. Angling for black bass was good, and one sportsman made some 
good catches, being forced to stop fishing on four different days, owing to 
his having caught his lawful number. This party and his son brought to 
the overseer's house 16 black bass for his inspection, a lawful day's catch, 
weighing 40 lbs. 

The angling for sun fish, cat fish, perch and eels continued good through- 
out the season, and taking into consideration the number of anglers who line 
the shores of Burlington Bay from spring to fall, it is a wonder there are 
any fish left. 

The usual number of whitefish fry and pickerel fry were received by me 
and planted in their proper grounds — 1,000,000 and 500,000 respectively. 

The taking of carp in Burlington Bay was tried again, but owing to 
high water not many could be taken out. 

The ducks on Burlington Bay have greatly increased in numbers this 
fall, being 25 to 1 last year, and he has no complaints of a shortage of ducks 
of any kind. In September the ponds were full of rail, having witnessed 
dozens at one time in Big Creek Pond, and everywhere else it was the same. 
There was also good duck shooting early in the season, and altogether 1908 
has been the best season in a great number of years. 

The protection service of Burlington Bay has always been a difficult 
question, but he is pleased to say that this year it is in a perfect condition. 

The gasoline patrol boat "Panger" was placed in his hands on the 5th 
September, and after it was repaired he caught three men shooting from a 
launch at the Beach. He fined them |5 each, and seized 400 yards of net 
cut in Lake Ontario, and did a great deal of patrolling on the bay. No other 
attempts of shooting from launches on the bay were made. The launch will 
be of great service next year, as he will have his protection complete then. 

Several contraventions took place, and all were more or less severely 
punished. 

There are some quail east of the city, and he suggests that an open sea- 
son for meadow larks during the month of November might be made. 

o G. F. 



34 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



He also suggests that the King Fisher be placed on the free list, and a 
license fee be placed on muskrat trappers, as 4,920 skins were taken this sea- 
son at 30c. per skin, amounting to |1,476. 

Overseer Thomas Mansfield, of Pickering, reports that he visited up and 
down the lake on several occasions, got a report that some one was fishing 
at the extreme west end, and went up to investigate, but found that they had 
left. He got some track of the parties, and will be on the lookout for them 
in the future. Outside of this he did not hear of any illegal fishing. 

There are no fishways in his division. There was very good fishing in 
the lake, especially of salmon trout and whitefish, which are without a 
doubt on the increase, but the fishermen did not do quite so well with herring 
on account of the winds off the lake, which were quite frequent. They are 
ai the present time complaining of the Department making the size of mesh 
3 inches for herring, which they say is too large, and that they cannot make 
a living with that sized mesh. He also thinks it is too large, from his per- 
sonal experience. There is the same complaint from the anglers about the 
carp as in previous years doing considerable damage to the line fishing. 

As for game, he does not think that the law has ever been better observed. 
Everyone seemed to observe the law, the consequence being that the ducks 
stayed around quite late. 

Overseer J. C. May, of St. Catharines, reports that there has been a 
marked increase in whitefish and herring, but the fishermen had to stop on 
account of the very poor prices. 

The law in his division has been well observed, except in a few cases of 
illegal dip net fishing. He confiscated several dip nets at the Twenty Mile 
Creek, and also one at Port Dalhousie. 

As far as the game laws are concerned, there have been no violations that 
he knows of. 

Overseer J. H. Murdoch, of Bath, reports that there has been an 
unusually good catch during the past year, all kinds of fish having been 
plentiful, especially whitefish, which are the most profitable to gill net 
fishermen. To his knowledge there have been no violations among the fisher- 
men. 

Angling was good. Bass were abundant. A good number of tourists 
visited there in the summer. 

The close seasons were well observed, and all felt pleased with the seu- 
scn's catch. 

Overseer W. Sargant, of Bronte, reports a large increase in the catch of 
fish during the past year, and had the fishermen obtained the same price as in 
the former year they would have almost doubled the money as compared with 
last year, but owing to such a large catch on Lake Erie the result was herring 
was very cheap. 

The fishermen smoke about three-quarters of their fish, and in that way 
realize a great deal more than if they were sold fresh. In fact there are 
more fish smoked in Bronte than any place he knows of. All the fish have 
been sold in home markets, Toronto being the chief place. He has seen 
Toronto take 2,000 baskets a week and realize a fair price. 

Trout fishing is increasing each year, and he has seen some very fine 
ones caught. One catch of 400 lbs, averaged 13 lbs. per trout. 

Angling was very fine in the Twelve Mile Creek. 

The laws have been well observed by the fishermen. He has been over 
his division a number of times during the year, and has always found them 
living well up to the law. 

3a G.p. 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 85 



Overseer R. J. Walker, of Port Credit, reports that there has been an 
increase iu the herring and trout fishing over last year, while whitefish was 
about the same. The increase was not on account of more vigorous fishing, 
but the fish seemed more plentiful in the locality of the fishing grounds. 
As to the amount caught by angling, he would judge it to be about the 
same. While he has urged in the past that some measures be taken to get 
rid of the carp, they do not seem to destroy the fishing as much as at first 
thought. 

The laws have been very well lived up to. 

In reference to game. The laws have been well observed, except by the 
Italians and young boys coming out from Toronto and shooting the small 
birds, but the Italians were informed they could not shoot the birds, and 
since that he has had no further troublr. 

Overseer W. R. Wood, of Toronto, reports that conditions remain about 
the same as last year in this part of the lake. The catch is poor, but it 
would be difficult to form an opinion as to the real condition of these waters 
from the figures submitted. The fishermen as a rule do not devote their 
whole time to the business, and some who were the best equipped with plant 
did not fish at all. The whole catch was sold in the local market at good 
prices. 

Line fishing for pike seems to be improving, but this is not the case 
regarding other species. 

He has every reason to believe that the law regarding the close seasons 
was thoroughly observed. A few nets were set in Ashbridge's Bay, but 
there was no evidence as to the identity of the offenders. 

Counties Frontexac, Leeds, Prescott, Russell, Carleton, Renfrew, 

Lanark, Grenville. 

Overseer J . H. Boyd, of MerrichviUe, reports that during the year 1908 
he kept close watch in his division, and found less* infringements of the 
Game and Fisheries Act than in previous years. 

Five licenses were issued for fishing for coarse fish. A very small 
quantity of fish was taken by those to whom licenses were issued, as they were 
fishing merely for their own use. 

In the reach from Merrickville to Kilmarnock he finds that fish are 
increasing rapidly. From Burritts Rapids to Wellington there appears to 
be no increase, if anything, a decrease is taking place. This is probably due 
to the fact that summer campers are numerous along this reach, and a 
great many fish are caught by them. 

He has had very little trouble with sawdust being allowed to run into 
streams during the past year. 

The game laws are well observed, only one case of deer killing being 
reported, and that case too late to prosecute. 

Overseer George Barr, of Harrow smith, reports that Napanee and Pond 
Lily Lakes have an increase this year (said lakes contain pike and catfish 
only). The reason of increase is that no hoop nets are allowed to be put in, 
and formerlv hoop nets were used continuously. 

Rock and Long Lakes, near Verona, are about the same as last year. 
Those persons who went angling said the sport was a little better than last 
year, as no fish has been caught, except by hook and line, and entirely for 
home consumption. These lakes contain pike, pickerel, bass and suckers. 



36 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



Silver Lake contains pike, bass and suckers. All fish caught therein 
are caught by hook and line, and the reports are the same as last year, as 
near as he could gather from those engaged in fishing there. 

Thirteen and Fourteen Island Lakes contain pike and suckers. Not 
much fishing done there, except by the settlers or residents of the place. 

Knowlton Lake contains herring, salmon and a few small perch. An 
increase reported this j'ear, being more closely watched against netting. In 
this lake he found there were more licenses granted than these waters could 
supply without being depleted. He sent five there to fish, and the Overseer 
at Sydenham sent four, as he was not aware that it was not in his division, 
so to remedy this the fishermen were told to fish three or four nights each 
and then leave, and they agreed to this. 

Mud Lake on stream from Knowlton to Desert Lake, contains abundance 
of catfish. He had none engaged in fishing in this lake. The residents catch 
them with "bobs" for their own use. The lake is very backward and out of 
the way. 

Desert Lake contains herring, salmon and suckers. This is a very 
popular resort for fishermen. He found it very difficult to watch, as other 
overseers had granted licenses, and he was not aware of this and found 
difficulty in locating them. The catch was not as great this year, owing to 
the waters being so rough, and .the men were unable to put out their nets, 
except one night. In this water the fish run at a later date than in the 
other lakes. 

He does not think there are any fish to spare in the waters in his dis- 
trict, if the residents get justice. He does not approve of overseers grant- 
ing permits or licenses to non-residents over-crowding the fisheries so that 
residents cannot be allowed to fish, as cases like this have come to his 
notice, of residents seeking a license, and though living on the banks of the 
waters there was no room for them to fish. 

There are no fish ways in his district. 

There is but one mill, and he has watched closely to see that no rubbish 
is being dumped in the water. 

He has a few violations to report on Napanee waters, the marshes of 
Long and Eock Lakes, viz., the cutting open of muskrat houses, which des- 
troys more than are caught. He could not find proof as to who did it. He 
ventures this suggestion, to prohibit trapping muskrat until 1st March, as 
they are very plentiful and have become very valuable. It was estimated 
that the catch in that township alone last year totalled |1,500. 

Overseer W . J. Birch, of Delta, reports that the chief fish in the waters 
in his division that need protection are small and large mouthed bass, which 
w^ere very plentiful there about twenty years ago, but kept gradually decreas- 
ing until about five years ago, and since that time they seem to be on the 
gain, and this last season they have been very plentiful, sportsmen having 
very little trouble in getting their limit at any time. 

Lower Beverley Lake has twelve fine cottages on its islands and shores 
owned by residents of Leeds County, and they are interested in the welfare 
of the fishing, occupying the cottages for a lengthy time every year. They 
prove a great help to him in stopping illegal fishing. He patrolled the 
waters quite regularly, and seized two giir nets, but although finding the 
owners, was unable to prosecute. The law was quite well observed in his 
division. The fishermen of Upper Beverley Lake report much better 
catches this past year than previous years. 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. g7 



Tlier^ is no summer hotel or boarding house in his division, therefore 
very few non-residents visit that locality. He considers the angling permits 
very good. 

There are no fishways in his division, but he thinks there should be one 
at Lyndhurst, the outlet of Lower Beverley Lake, which would be a great 
benefit to those waters. 

Muskrats were very plentiful last spring, over 2,000 being taken out 
of Upper Beverley, and prospects good for another year, unless the water 
being so low they freeze out this winter. 

Ducks w?re more numerous last fall in that section than for years past, 
also black squirrels which ore quite plentiful round there. 

. Partridge were verj- scarce, very seldom one being seen in a day's 
travel . 

Oreri<eer J. B. Bourgon, of Roclland, reports that there was a slight 
increase in the catch of coarse fish in 1908 over 1907 and previous years, but 
the same number of fishermen. Fish in the Ottawa River is as plentiful as 
in former years. He thinks means should be taken to keep the river as free 
from sawdust as possible, so as to preserve the fish. 

No illegal fishing has been brought to his notice during the past season. 
He has not received any complaints to that effect. 

No hunting has been done in his territory, as very little game can be 
found on the Ontario side of the Ottawa River. He has not received any 
complaints in regard to game during the past year. 

uverseer ixeorge L>urke, of J:^ert/t, reports that in his district the fish 
and game laws have been observed better than in previous years, partly 
owing to the increased vigilance of the Department, and partly to the edu- 
L-ational and otiier ehorts of the local branch of The Ontario Forest Fish and 
Uame i'rotective Association. 

Infractions of the law have not however ceased, as nineteen convic- 
tions were obtained last year making in fines $lbU, and |55 worth of nets 
seized. No cases were brought which did not result m convictions, but in 
bome cases of strong suspicion, warnings, which had a good effect, were 
given. Up to the date of this report four more cases are pending in which 
the evidence will justify convictions. 

Bass are decreasing in the Rideau lakes, and the legal limit as to num- 
bers is not strictly observed. There are no fishing licenses in his district. 

Hoop and gill nets in these inland waters he thinks should be abolished. 
Non-residents paying a license strongly object to them, and would willingly 
pay a license fee of ^b if this were done. An increase of revenue would 
thereby be secured. Most of these non-residents observe the law, but many 
do not. The netting of the destructive ling, under the direction of the 
Department, has been a success, and should be extended to the Rideau lakes, 
which are of paramount importance as revenue producers. 

Partridges are still scarce, but increasing under the wise protection now 
afforded them, which should be continued for a couple of years more. 

Deer are not noticeably decreasing, but this may be accounted for by 
the fires to the north driving them down here. 

The lumber camps outside his district still continue to illegally kill deer 
in large numbers. The still hunters in the northern parts of the county con- 
tinue to kill more deer illegally than are killed by any one else in the open 
season. Now that his district is extended he hopes to be able to change this. 
Ducks are decreasing in numbers, but infringements of the law as to 
them are also decreasing. At Mississippi Lake near Carleton Place the 



38 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



poaciiers did as they pleased, until one conviction having been obtained, 
much good resulted. 

The system of deer hunting permits is not giving satisfaction either to 
the settler or the sportsmen. A settler in one township gets a permit for 
twenty-five cents, and hunts in the neighboring townships, where the resi- 
dents have to pay the regular fee of |2. Eesult — the settlers in the sur- 
rounding townships are angry and jealous. 

Overseer H. N. Covell, of Lombardy, reports that the game and fishery 
laws have been well observed. There are no saw mills in his division, as 
the former one was destroyed bv fire. There has been no non-resident 
angling, and the angling has not been as satisfactory as past seasons, on 
account, he presumes of the steady increase of ling. The ling, he says, is 
very destructive to the lakes, and he is very much pleased with the steps 
the Department has taken to rid Otter Lake of those destructive fish. There 
have been up to the present date over four thousand ling taken, and although 
it no doubt will take a few years to touch the standard of past seasons, if 
those steps are continued it will do much to improve the angling. 

Overseer Erwin Christinh, of Pem,broJce, reports that the game and 
fishery laws were pretty well observed. He destroyed two gill nets which 
were illegally set, took four beaver traps and seized one beaver skin. There 
are different so-called trapper camps near the Algonquin Park, and he was 
,until now unable to look particularly after these, as the distance is very 
great, and it is all wild bush. 

Beavers are increasing, also deer and partridges, and sportsmen are 
fairly satisfied with the result of deer hunting this year. 

Overseer J. W. DavHs, of Sydenham, reports that the numerous lakes in 
his district abound with large and small mouthed bass, which makes it an 
ideal spot for rod fishing. 

There is a decided increase in the number of partridges, and the law 
has been strictly observed. 

Ducks are every year decreasing in number and variety. 

There are a few deer in that district, and he thinks that if hunting were 
prevented in the Townships of Storrington, Loughboro' and Bedford, in the 
County of Frontenac, and the Townships of North and South Crosby, in the 
County of Leeds, for two or three years, there would be a good many deer 
in the territory named. 

Overseer Henry Drew, of Long Lake, reports that there is no fishing 
in his district, except by farmers living near the lakes. He would recom- 
mend that there be some way provided to catch catfish and pike in Sharbot ' 
and Eagle Lakes, as those fish are getting so numerous as to destroy a large 
quantity of game fish, and he asks if it would be possible to let some 
responsible man have a hoop net license for a time and watch results. 

Overseer W. J. Donaldson, of Donaldson, reports that there has been 
only one license issued in his district, and this was for domestic use only. 
There have been a greater number of tourists than in past years, and all 
report satisfactory results by angling. All appear to have observed the law, 
with a few exceptions. In the month of October last, a party of six men 
camped on the shore of Trout Lake and were reported to him as having nets 
set, taking salmon trout, and also shooting partridge in that vicinity. He 
at once went to investigate, and found that thoy had left for home 
previous to his visit. He also found considerable evidence of illegal work. 
He reported the fact to the Warden of that District, who, he understands, 
had the parties summoned before him and dealt with according to law. A 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 39 



number of other cases of illegal fishing have been complained of, and sum- 
monses have been issued for them to appear before the Warden. He has at 
present quite a number of cases of illegal fishing under investigation, 
and the parties will in due course be called on to answer to the charge against 
them. He savs that, although considerable illegal fishing has been going on 
during the past three months, nearly all of the oiienders were people living 
in his district, and that they are very hard to watch, but as a number of 
prosecutions will take place at an early date, he hopes to have the law better 
observed in future in this respect. 

Re game birds and animals. He was notified about the 5th Octol>er 
last that two men were trapping muskrats on the waters of Gull Lake, Town- 
ship of Clarendon. He immediately went to investigate, and found their 
camp abandoned. He was advised by residents living in that vicinity that 
they had taken over two hundred skins. He followed them to Snow Road 
station, and found that they had shipped their camping outfit to Cache Bay. 
He immediately wrote the Game and Fishery Warden at North Bay, advising 
him of the matter, and he has since advised him that he has located the men 
referred to. About the 8th October he was notified that a party of Indians 
were killing deer on Crutch Lake, Township of Palmerston, and on investi- 
gation he found them camped on the shore of the lake with sufficient evidence 
to prove their guilt. He had them summoned before the Warden and after 
proving their guilt they were let go on suspended sentence. The law in 
other respects appears to have been fairly well observed. 

Overseer Ephraim Deacon, of BolinghroJce, reports that the close seasons 
were well observed, and no informations were laid against anyone. 

The season for angling was a good one, but there is no appreciable 
decrease in the number of fish. 

Deer and partridge are increasing in his district. Several deer have 
been seen where some years ago there were none. 

Overseer Henry Esford, of Barrief\.eld, reports that the net fishing in 
his district has not been as good as last year, but angling has been better, 
and has been good up to a late date, on account of such a fine fall. His 
fishermen report that dogfish are very numerous. He has not seen any carp 
since last spring, and the fishermen have not reported any. Plenty of black 
bass are reported in his section of Rideau Canal, where there never were 
ar^- before. There were always plenty of large-mouthed bass, but now there 
are plenty of small-mouthed as well.' 

Ducks are scarce this fall, but last spring there were thousands. Musk- 
rats are plentiful, the catch being larger last spring than other years. Mink 
was a little scarcer than other years. 

The law was strictly kept. 

Overseer James Fisher, of Sunhury, reports that he cannot say whether 
there was an increase or decrease in the catch of different kinds of fish, as 
compared with that of previous years, as this is his first year, only that 
the Americans claimed this to be one of the best years for bass fishing. 

There were no abuses to his knowledge. 

Five men were fined for illegal fishing, and one net confiscated. 

There was no injury done to the fish by mill owners. 

The fishways in his district are in good repair. 

Overseer Adam Greene, of Diamond, reports that the fishing in the 
Mississippi, Snye, Ottawa, and mouth of the Carp River was better the past 
season than in 1907. Pickerel and bass were plentiful, but pike were scarce, 
owing, he thinks, to being too well fed. Small fish were very plentiful. Ho 



40 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



seized two gill nets, and confiscated them. There were no fish caught for 
sale. 

Overseer Hugh Gallagher, of Eganville, reports that during the first half 
of the year he heard of no illegal fishing or violations of the Game and 
Fisheries Act, 

He was appointed on the 1st August to look after the Townships of Jones, 
Raglan, Radclilfe and Sherwood, and on that date he went to Combermere in 
the Township of Radcliffe and spent some time in the territory assigned to 
him posting notices received from the Department, etc. Later on he visited 
Lake Clear on request of Department on two different occasions. On his first 
visit he secured five nets which were in the water, but the owners having 
been put on the alert by a former visit from another game warden, he found 
it impossible to obtain evidence against any of them. After his first visit 
netting on the lake was abandoned. 

In November, he visited hunting camps throughout the country, as per 
instructions from the Department, but found nothing illegal. 

Overseer E. T. Loveday, of Ottawa, reports that from his own experi- 
ence, and from what he has heard from others, fishing in his district has been 
better than for past years, in fact he has on several occasions been reminded 
of from 20 to 25 years ago. Bass, that noble fish, has been plentiful, good 
catches having been made with both fly and bait. The largest he got weighed 
4| lbs. Quite a number larger than that have been taken, he understands, 
but a two pounder is considered a good one. These catches have been made in 
Ottawa River from city limits upwards above falls. Below the city there 
are no bass, or at least he has not seen or heard of any being caught — ^too 
much sawdust, the river is full of it. However, there are pike, perch, etc, 
to be had. He only seized 3 nets during the summer, and these were 
small ones. 

Game. He claims that deer are on the increase, within say 50 miles of 
the city, all things taken into consideration ; also there are more partridge. 
Ducks were not plentiful, but plover were for a short time. He saw only 
one woodcock during the summer ; they are very rare. He believes beaver are 
on the increase. He knows of about fifty places where beaver were at work 
last fall, within 50 miles of city limits. If they were let alone they would 
close in on the settlements. The price of otter skins is too high for them to 
be plentiful — 150 to |75 is a snap. He thinks it is time a close season was 
put on mink, as their fur is very valuable. 

The laws have been well observed all along the line. He has covered 
more territory and met more trains, but he says "things" were not coming 
his way, and he has not made anything like the number of seizures he has 
made in other years, and concludes that perhaps law breakers have come to the 
conclusion that it is better to observe the law than to lose their fur, game or 
fish, and run up against a good stiff fine. 

Overseer John McGuire, of Jones Falls, reports that on the whole the 
past season has been a very successful one, although the spring was very cold 
and late, which made the tourists later in coming over by about two weeks, but 
all this drawback was more than made up later on in the season. He says, he 
knows this to be so, as he sold more non-resident angling permits than any 
previous year, and returned more money to the Department. The hotels at 
Jones Fails and Chaffey's Locks, which are both in his district, also private 
boarding houses, all report 1908 to be the best season in their business. 
The men who furnish the bait say they have made more money. Although the 
two men who furnish the bait at Jones Falls were both fined during the season, 
nevertheless, they report favourably and are well satisfied. They have made 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 41 



more money than any other season, and it is the same at Chaffey's Locks. 
The guides, too, say it has been their best season. Some of them had work 
asvlate as the 15th October, and some of them are living on the money they 
made last summer. The tourists also were well satisfied. He did not hear a 
complaint from one of them, and he was amongst them every day the whole 
season through. 

The fishing was good on that part of the Rideau Canal up to the close 
of the season^ fully up to other past seasons, both in numbers and size. He 
never saw finer specimens of both large and small mouth bass than he saw 
brought in. by the anglers this past season, large-mouthed variety weighing 
from four to seven pounds were frequently brought in to the hotel by the 
very much delighted tourist. He thinks the fee, $2, for non-resident anglers 
permits quite right as it is, and that if it was raised to $5, as some of the over- 
seers suggest, it would tend to lessen the number of tourists considerably, and 
that would badly affect all the Canadian people concerned in the tourist busi- 
ness. Even the farmers who produce a good deal of the stuff' consumed at the 
summer hotels and boarding houses would be affected by this change ; but if the 
limit of the daily catch by each angler could be reduced from 8 bass to five 
or six, he believes it would save the fish and please the tourist just well after 
he found it was law and affected all alike. They in nearly every case try to 
catch the full limit and bring them in at night, for fear some one might say 
thev did not catch them. If five was the limit, it would fill the bill just as 
well and save a lot of fish for another day. Where there are 40 or 60 tourists 
or anglers stoDning in one hotel, as there often are , all bringing 8 bass and 
some pike besides, it is too many fish, and some of them are certainly lost. 
If the limit were reduced to five, it would prevent part of the above waste. 

After the tourist season was over he was not in his own district very 
much of the time. He was first assisting Overseer Phillips on Devil Lake in 
Frontenac County to protect the salmon trout during their spawning season, 
which is the last half of October in this lake. They seized a number of gill 
nets and secured two convictions, and had some lively times with the .inhabit- 
ants. During the month of November, he was on Big Rideau Lake in Mr. 
Phillips' stead, who was assigned other work. He was there the whole month 
for the purpose of protecting the salmon trout and whitefish, the month of 
November being the spawning season in this lake for those species of fish, 
He kept up a steady patrol whenever the weather would permit. The lake ^s 
a large one, and pretty rough weather prevailed the greater part of the time, 
but when the rough weather affected him, it affected the fish pirates as well. 
He is furnished with a first-class rowboat and a good assistant, and could 
go out with any of the poachers. He seized two gill nets and secured one 
conviction while there in November. 

He says he spent almost his whole time in patrolling and looking after 
the fisheries this past season, and is quite sure there has been little or no 
illegal fishing done in these waters of the Rideau. In June, he received 8 
cans of salmon fry, for which he had applied, and which he distributed in 
Indian and Dog Lakes in his district. 

Overseer William Major, of Woodlaivn, reports that during the year 
1908, the law wa^ fairly well observed in his district. There was very little 
angling done. The fish generally caught are pike, bullheads and suckers, 
which are all plentiful. Bass and pickerel are scarce. He seized one old 
net in the spring, and destroyed it, not finding the guilty parties. 

Game is scarce. The law is well observed. No Sunday shooting in his 
district. 



42 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



Overseer J . H. Phillips, of Smitiv s Falls, reports that he started out with 
the "Eva Bell" on her usual patrol the first week of May, and continued until 
the last of June, when the Department put in commission a more efficient 
boat — the "Naiad," with which he was enabled to run over his division more 
quickly, and also to stand a rougher sea, and on the whole was much more 
comfortable, which he highly appreciated. 

They lost the first ten days in July in painting the boat and overhauling 
pumps, but finally got started and kept up a constant patrol according to 
orders until the 14th October, when she was taken off the E-ideau and sent 
to finish the season on the Bay of Quinte. 

On Rideau Lake there were fewer tourists this season. The salmon fish- 
ing, he believes, was very satisfactory, but the bass fishing was not so good 
as in former years, owing it is said to the immense quantity of ling, which 
are rapidly depleting our lakes. 

The fishery laws were fairly well observed. 

During the entire season they seized one gill net in June off Stonehouse 
Point, one minnow seine in July in Rideau Lake, six gill nets in October in 
Devil Lake, and one gill net in December in Otter Creek, all of which were 
delivered over to the Department or destroyed. 

No violations of the game laws came to his notice. 

There are no licenses for commercial fishing in his division. A number 
of minnow licenses to guides who supply the summer tourists with bait, and 
a few domestic licenses for dip nets are all he has. 

He was taken from his division the latter part of October and sent to 
Christy's Lake, where the Department were doing a grand work in having 
the ling fished out. They took out about 300 ling in three weeks. He then 
got orders to go to Otter Lake for the same purpose, and there is where they 
got them, the farmers drawing them away in sleighloads for hog feed. At 
one lifting of the nets they took out 507 ling, 5 small pike, and 13 very small 
bullheads. They are very destructive on other fish, and he has found as many 
as seventeen small pickerel in one ling, besides several other fish of different 
kinds. 'In six weeks the aggregate taken out was 2,348, and the last lift alone 
brought out 775. He thinks if the Department continues this excellent work 
for a few seasons in different lakes, that a much better class of fish will be 
supplied, both in quality and quantity. 

Overseer John C. Raphael, of Mallorytown, reports that the bass fishing 
was very, good this season, and the maskinonge fishing was also good in his 
district, but pike were very scarce, and he has found no illegal fishing. 

The wild ducks were very plentiful in the spring, and the law was well 
observed by our people, but while the ice was shoving out the Americans 
would come across and shoot in Canadian waters. But as soon as the river 
was clear of ice he had no trouble with them. There was a great flight of wild 
ducks in the fall, and good shooting in the first part of the season, but the 
latter part of the season the put-puts would hardly give thera time to light, 
and you cannot catch them with a rowboat, as they are Americans, and when 
they see him coming they are not long in getting into American waters. 

Overseer Natha/niel Shillington, of Burridge, reports that during the 
past season the fishing in general was good. The tourists report a good catch 
of pickerel, and also of black bass. There were some fine salmon caught this 
season, some of them tipping the scales at 25 pounds. He thinks the close 
season for salmon in his district should start about the 15th October, as the 
salmon in those waters spawn in October. 

No violations of the law came under his notice. 



19(18 GAME AND FISHERIES. 43 



Partridge and ducks are scarce there, and also the fur bearing animals. 
There have been some deer seen around this season. 

The laws in regard to game were strictly observed. 

Overseer William Spence, of Athens, reports that there was an increase 
in the catch of salmon over previous years. Black bass were better, but were 
very small. The large-mouthed bass were very plentiful. 

The fishery laws were well observed. There were a few cases of illegal 
fishing with nets. He got one gill net and two night lines. He kept up 
almost a constant patrol of the waters of his district during the summer, the 
effect being that there was very little illegal fishing done. 

Partridge and ducks were more plentiful than previous years. 

Overseer James S. Stewart, of Lanark, reports that the past year has 
not been marked by anj special feature. 

The Game and Fishery laws have been fairly well observed, and the 
catch of fish about normal. 

The open season for fur bearing animals was up to the average, about 
1,800 muskrats having been taken. 

Overseer J. W. Taudvin, of Kingston, reports that during the months 
of June, July and part of August the angling was better in his district than 
it had been for twenty years. All kinds of fish were plentiful, especially 
bass. The fishing was not so good during the latter part of August and the 
month of September, and very little was done, owing chiefly to rough 
weather, fogs and smoke. 

He would recommend the doing away with family licenses, and charg- 
ing |2 per rod for non-residents who are domiciled in the Province in the 
summer, and |5 per rod or more for those who return to their own homes 
or hotels, etc., outside of the Province. 

He would also recommend charging non-residents for fishing in the St. 
Lawrence River between Galoups Rapids (4 miles below Prescott) and King- 
ston the same fee as elsewhere. There is excellent bass fishing at the head 
of Galoups Rapids. 

Overseer James Townsend, of Long Point, reports the past season to 
have been a very satisfactory one. More tourists are visiting tnose waters 
every year. He sold three times the number of permits that he sold the year 
previous, and the prospects for the coming season are still better. Bass fish- 
ing was never better in Gananoque Lake. He would approve of keeping in 
hoop nets to rid the waters of coarse fish, and would refer for an example to 
the above mentioned lake, which has been fished continuously for years, and 
is the best bass fishing ground in his division. He does not approve of gill 
nets, as thej are destructive of game fish. He thinks the |2 angling permits 
are all right. 

He says that as his district is about twenty-five miles in length, besides 
its tributaries, it is almost impossible to watch it with a row-boat. Quite 
a few tourists got away from him last season, as a number of them come for 
only two or three days' fishing. 

Overseer H. E. Wariman, of Portsmxmth, reports that the catch of 
bass in his division was up to the average, there being some very large ones 
caught this year. The Americans who got permits for angling were well 
satisfied. Fishermen in Ward's Bay, a portion of Cataraqui Creek border- 
ing on Lake Ontario, report a large increase of carp and dogfish — 900 dog- 
fish and 4,522 lbs. of carp. The carp have just appeared in the last two or 
three years. 



44 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



Ducks and plover are on the increase, especially black and the late kinds. 
The law was well observed this season. Muskrats are plentiful. He has 
examined a great many muskrat houses, and found quite a few broken and 
damaged by some unprincipled parties who do not care how many rats they 
destroy as long as they can catch one. He thinks the remedy would be to 
allow no rats to be taken, only in March and April, when the skins are the 
best. 

Overseer J . E. Whaley, of Westp.ort, reports that he has in every way 
tried to fill his office in the true sense of the law, and can certainly vouch 
that very little, if any, illegal fishing was done in his jurisdiction, as he 
made the impression on the minds of the fishermen that great harm would be 
done in destroying fish in the close seasons, as we derived quite a revenue 
from summer tourists throughout Ontario, and by their acting in con- 
junction with him, they could make the Rideau waters one of the most 
attractive summer resorts in Canada, and every one living near the respec- 
tive lakes he had to inspect would reap a certain amount for such supplies 
as they could deliver to each visitor who might be a guest in their neigh- 
bourhood. 

They had not many tourists there this season, as the lakes in that 
locality are not very well advertised, but they are certainly the best bass 
and salmon fishing lakes in Ontario, and he will be pleased at any time to 
give any information regarding these lakes to intending visitors for the 
coming season. 

Overseer J. R. Wight, of Newhoro, reports that, with the assistance of 
tourists, guides and hotelmen, and others interested in the preservation 
of game and fish, he has been able to give the lakes in his district proper 
protection without any cause for inflicting a single fine. The lakes adjoin- 
ing Newboro contain some of the finest bass in Ontario, and the lakes directly 
west of there are reached bj crossing Newboro Lake, and contain some very 
fine salmon. One specimen caught in Buck Lake in August v.'eighed 34 
lbs. and other catches in Devil Lake weighed from 10 to 15 lbs. These fish 
are the original species, the lakes never having been re-stocked with fry by 
artificial means. He thinks that the fee of |2 for non-residents should be 
left as it i^, for if it was raised to |5 it would close the lakes to a number of 
good people who have only a few days to spend. If some provision could 
be made tor charging tourists who bring their own help and yachts or house 
boats a fee of at least |10, it would be a good thing, as this class leaves 
little or no money in the country, and are the hardest to watch, as they have 
every facility for taking their full catch away when they go home. He 
thinks more licenses for hoop nets should be granted than heretofore, for 
the reason that bull heads, ling and other coarse fish are a nuisance to the 
game fish, and the sooner the lake is rid of them the better. He uses dis- 
cretion, of course, in recommending licenses, and recommends only those 
who do not have to be watched too closely. The granting of licenses to catch 
herring in lakes where they are is also a good move, as the herring cannot 
be taken in any other way, and they are relished ver;v much by settlers as a 
rare article of food. There was no bass or other game fish caught 
in any of the nets licensed in his district, and he would strongly recommend 
the planting of a large quantity of small-mouthed bass fry in Newboro Lake, 
as that species is getting scarce. The large-mouthed are plentiful as ever 
through the natural increase and respect for our laws and close seasons by 
the guides and tourists. Newboro is fast becoming a tourists paradise. 
There are two good hotels, and a number of good boarding houses, a bank, 
long distance telephone and telegraph, the mails every day, steamer and 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 45 



railway connection, a good boat livery, and an extra good lot of guides, 
who by the way are good cooks, and best of all plenty of fish, which is 
natural, as Newboro is the higest point between Kingston and Ottawa, and 
in the centre of Rideau Lakes. 

Overseer Hugh Wilson of Elphin, reports the game and fishery laws 
to have been well observed in that section. 

Six years ago some 60,000 whitefish and 30,000 salmon were put in 
Dalhousie Lake, and no one has ever seen them since. This year 70,000 
pickerel were put in the same lake, and they seem to be doing well. There 
were no fishery licenses sold in his division in 1908. 

Partridges were plentiful. He thinks they should not be killed for a few 
years yet. 

Overseer F. L. Womnoortli, of Arden, reports that there are two sum- 
mer hotels in Arden. With the exception of two fines for net fishing, the 
law has been well kept in that district. In each case the parties were fined 
|5 and costs. He sold only two settlers' permits for fishing, and they only 
caught a little over a 100 lbs. each of herring. There are quite a number of 
tourists coming there every summer. He has sold a good number of non- 
resident permits, but only a couple of deer licenses. 

The fishing in that locality is very good, the principal fish caught being 
pickerel and bass, and the ling and catfish are destroying the spawn of those 
fish. He thinks the |2 angling permit is a good thing, and very few non- 
residents object to paying this amount. He had quite a time last summer 
with sawdust by parties allowing it to go into the river and lake, but he 
thinks there will be none of that this summer. 

He says the lakes there are in need of some bass, and that they do well 
in those waters. 

There are no fishways in this district. The non-residents enjoy the 
fishing, and were well satisfied with what they caught. They did not violate 
the law with refrence to the size caught. 

Deer are very scarce. Most of the residents are pleased with the close 
season for partridges. In other years there were a great many partridges 
killed, but he does not know of one case where there were any birds killed 
this season. There are a lot of mink caught around there. He thinks they 
should be protected, as they are the most valuable fur bearing animal in 
that part of Ontario. 

Overseer D. E. Young husband, of South March, reports that there has 
been no fishing of any account in his division. Angling was very poor. 
The only fish obtained there are pike, sturgeon, suckers, bullheads, perch, 
sunfish, and an occasional bass and pickerel. 

He would suggest that the Government consider the advisability of 
stocking Lake Constance and the Ottawa River with trout such as are found 
in the Rideau Lakes and other waters of the Province. 

Peterborough, Northumberland, Victoria and Other Inland 

Counties. 

Overseer William Boler, of Byron, reports that the fish and game laws 
have been very well observed. No violations have come to his immediate 
notice. He saw only one partridge during 1908. Quail are also becoming 
scarcer. He saw one flock of wild geese numbering fifty about the middle of 
October. Black squirrels are not any more numerous than they were a year 
ago. He would ask the Department to put them on the prohibited list for 
1909. 



46 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



Overseer A. 0. Boynton., of Kirhfield, reports that the waters of the 
Trent Valley Canal afford plenty of sport to the local fishermen. The bass 
are becoming more plentiful every year, and there are a few maskinonge. 
Carp are to be had in thousands west of the "Lift Lock." 

His division includes one of the best duck shooting grounds in the Pro- 
vince. The marshy lands lying along the Trent Valley Canal were sown a 
few years ago with wild rice, which now makes an ideal hatching and feed- 
ing ground. The ducks were more plentiful this year than for some years 
previous, and although hosts of sportsmen took advantage of the open season, 
no violations of the law were brought to his notice. 

Muskrats are increasing rapidly, although a large number are taken 
every spring, nearly 500 being taken by trappers in April, an Increase of 
nearly 200 over the same month of the previous year. 

A few deer have been seen, but none were to be had during the open 
season, and no violations have been known. It is to be hoped that they may 
become more plentiful. All the citizens are quite anxious to see the law 
enforced, so that each year may see both game and fish more plentiful. 

Overseer A. Bradshaw, of Lindsay, reports that the number of bass and 
maskinonge caught in that section during the trolling season was about 
the same as last year, although fishing when the season opened was better 
than last year, larger sized fish having been taken, but the dry, hot month of 
September was not as good for fishing as that month had been last year. 

The close season was an ideal one for the protection of the fish while 
spawning; rough and windy weather for the most part of that season pre- 
vailed, a,nd this protection given by nature herself while the fish were 
depositing their ova on the spawning beds, and the vigilant watch which 
he kept up, prevented destruction, which under less favourable conditions 
might have been attempted by unscrupulous poachers. 

He cannot too strongly reiterate his opinion that the close season for 
maskinonge should begin on April 1st and not the 15th of that month, and 
he also believes that one-half the number which is now allowed to be caught 
in one day by one person would be enough. Owing to the number of people 
who come there to fish from other parts of the Province of Ontario, and 
live in camps or cottages along the waters during the summer, two mas- 
kinonge and four bass each in one day should be sufficient for them. 

Frogs, which are protected during May and June in each year in Vic- 
toria County should in his opinion have general protection, if not over the 
whole Province, at least in all the northern counties along the wa'^ers of the 
Trent Valley Canal. 

The law was well observed in that section, as far as he could usceriain. 
Millmen and others lived up to the law, and gave no troubb-* iluring iLe 
year. The water is low at this time of writing in the river and lakes, but 
is expected to reach its normal condition when the fall rains are over. 
Surveys for the new lock and dam at Lindsay are about completed, and work 
is supposed to begin on them in the near future, and the old fishway in the 
dam is not likely to be of any more use. Next spring a new one will be 
required, if it is to be maintained there. 

Partridge. It is to be sincerely hoped that the measure of protection 
given these splendid game birds may increase their numbers, which have 
sadly diminished during the last few years. 

Ducks were plentiful when the shooting season opened, and some good 
bags were gotten by local sportsmen. The protection given these fine game 
birds during their breeding season is naturally being felt in their yearly 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 47 



increase iu numbers, and is being thorouglily appreciated by all good 
citizens. 

Muskrats are a great boon to local trappers, and many thousands of 
these valuable little furbearing animals are required to give up their life 
and skin yearly in that section. He has been told by Indians and old trap- 
pers that the chain of waters in that locality is the best breeding ground in 
Ontario for muskrats, and as long as their destruction in fall and winter can 
be prevented, they will increase and multiply in abundance. 

Mink, which are the most valuable of all the small fur-bearing animals 
are becoming scarcer every year, owing to the wanton destruction at all 
times. They should receive protection of some sort. 

Overseer C. Burtcheall, of Coboconk, reports the fishing on Balsam and 
Mud Turtle Lakes to be good at the first part of the season, but the catches 
were not so good towards the end. 

Regarding the close season. He finds it quite hard to watch certain 
parties during the close season for both fish and game, and also finds it 
hard to protect the partridge. He has to make a great many trips through 
the woods and around where there are likely to be deer and partridge. Deer 
seem to be scarce this fall. Some of the hunters who went a distance were 
more lucky in getting their number. Ducks and geese are not very plenti- 
ful around in that vicinity, although there seemed to be quite a number of 
ducks in the spring. He thinks there should be a clause in the Act to pre- 
vent boys frojm doing so much unnecessary shooting. 

Overseer J. D. Campbell, of Sylvan, reports that the general catch of 
fish for the past season has been about the average, both in quality and size, 
there being but few game fish. 

The law was well observed. 

There is one dam in his division, and it has a good fishway. 

Ducks have been plentiful, especially along Lake Huron. Rabbits were 
numerous. All other game was very scarce. The law was well observed. 

Overseer T. C. CasJcey, of Blairton, reports that he made several trips 
and visited different lakes in his district, and found the law fairly well 
observed. 

A number of tourists visited Belmont and Crow Lakes during the past 
season, having secured their permits in Toronto. 

The fish are quite plentiful in all the different lakes — Round Lake, Bel- 
mont, Crow, Sandy and Twin. 

He found one man who had violated the law in regard to trapping 
muskrat out of season, and find him for same. 

Overseer C. H. C assart, of Campbell ford, reports that the fishing in his 
division has not been as good this year as last, that is in some parts of it. 
And he thinks the cause of it is that there were Government works going on 
and the waters was held back, and that made the water high above where 
the works were going on, and low below. The fishing was better where the 
water was low. But he would recommend that the water be stocked with 
bass, as the Americans would much rather catch bass than any other fish on 
account of their being so gamey. 

He would also recommend the licensing of guides at a small fee, and if 
they did not abide by the law, have their license taken away for that year. 
This he thinks would be a great help towards keeping the laws. He would 
also recommend that fish hatcheries be built, as the supply of fish must be 
kept up or our revenue will drop off. 



48 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



He thinks that close season should be put on frogs, as they are getting 
very scarce. He would also recommend that pickerel fishing and bass fish- 
ing come in at the same time for the better protection of the fish laws. 

He thinks there should be something done to destroy the bill fish, as, 
in the spring of the year when the bill fish are running, they come up the 
rapids in hundreds, and there should be some means taken to kill them, as 
they are hard on the game fish. 

Overseer William Clarkxon, of Lahehurst, reports that the bass an.d 
maskinonge caught in his division was over the average ; also the catch of 
salmon trout. 

The game and fishery laws were well observed. The regular patrol in 
the close season is a good preventive of any violations. 

The tourist trade is also increasing. The |2 angling permit is giving 
satisfaction. 

The mill owners observe the law well. 

There is no fishway in his district. 

Overseer Alex. Clunis, of Claude, reports that he has gone over his brook 
trout territory a great deal this season, and found no room to complain regard- 
ing the way the law was observed. He thinks that if the overseer is not too 
severe, the people try to keep the law much better. He came across quite a 
few very fine spawning beds this fall, which means brook trout fishing for 
1909. if all goes well. 

The closing of this year against shooting of partridge was a good act, 
only it would have been better if it had been two or three years instead of 
one. There has not been nearly the amount of shooting nor the running 
of dogs this fall to frighten everything out of the woods. He came across 
a very nice covey of quail a short time ago, the like of which he has not 
seen for a great number of years. Now, he thinks if there was a close season 
for partrido-e for a couple of years longer, there would be abundance of both 
quail and partridge, and it would be like old times again. 

Overseer Arthur Corsant, of Masonville, reports that the principal fish 
caught in his district were suckers, with a fair number of black bass. He 
thinks the supply of fish is on the increase since the nets have been removed 
from the Eiver Thames. The close season has been very well observed. 
There was just one violation of the fisheries law, and that was catching 
black bass under size. As the fish were all alive — eight in number — he 
returned them to the water, and let the party go with a warning. 

There are five mill dams in his district, and only one properly con- 
structed fishway. He thinks there should be some way of compelling mill 
owners to construct proper fishways, as the fish get as far as the dams at the 
city, and are slaughtered by a few fishermen. 

Overseer Frank Coultous, of St. George, reports that there is no fishing 
in his district, and the only game in that division are rabbits, grey and black 
squirrels and some partridge and muskrats. He has looked after these. 

Overseer, J. A. Cunningham, of Maynooth, reports that he notices a 
decided decrease in speckled trout in Lake St. Peter this season, and would 
recommend that fishing therein be prohibited for a period of one year, as 
the lake has been overfished. 

From all he can learn from different sources, the total catch in his dis- 
trict would not exceed 1,200 lbs. 

No abuses exist to his knowledge. 

The close seasons have been well observed. 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 49 



There has been no proof of any illegal fishing. 
There are no fishways in his district. 

Overseer Eduard Fleming, of Hastings, reports that there have not been 
any violations of the law in his division. The fish were in the marshes very 
early spawning, and there was little or no spearing done. There were not 
many big catches this summer, on account of the river being so low, although 
he thinks the maskinonge and bass were plentiful in the River Trent. 

While deer hunting in the north of Hastings Co., he found the deer 
plentiful, and is satisfied that the settlers are living strictly up to the law. 
They told him that the wolves were very destructive among the deer last 
winter, in fact, one settler told him that he had to knock eight deer on the 
head that had been torn and were on the ice and could not live. 

Overseer William Gainforth, of Halihurton, reports that there are no 
fishery licenses issued in his district, and no fishing done except by settlers 
for their own use. 

There are no fish exported. 

No abuses exist. 

The close seasons were well observed. He visited the different lakes 
several times during close season. 

No violations of the Act came to his notice, and there were no fines 
imposed. 

The Act respecting mill refuse was observed. 

There are no fishways in his district. 

Overseer J. W. Gibson, of Strathroy, reports that there are no licenses 
issued in his district. There are two sawmills, but they do not put their 
sawdust into the stream. He has had some trouble with different parties 
putting rubbish on the banks of the stream when inside of the town limits. 
He told them he would fine them unless they removed the nuisance at once. 

The anglers there have had fairly good sport with pike and many differ- 
ent kinds of bass. There is abundance of rock bass, and chub as large as 
a medium sized lake herring. Black bass are scarce, but carp is very abund- 
ant, and he cannot see that they do much damage. 

The quail have had a good fall, as the season was as dry as summer, and 
the dogs could not find the birds, so there are lots of them left. There are 
a few partridge left, but not many. He has got the pot hunters afraid of 
the law. 

Taking it all together, everything is in good shape in his district. 

Overseer James Gillespie, of Berkeley, reports that his duties are more 
particularly confined to looking after inland streams and small lakes, and 
preventing the netting of speckled trout in those; also to see that the close 
season for those fish is observed. He has every reason to believe that the 
law is being fairly well observed. People in the vicinity of lakes and streams 
where brook trout are, tell him that they have very little reason to suspect 
anyone of netting now, although it was much indulged in a few years ago, 
and claim that it is due to the fact that they know there is an overseer and 
believe they are being watched. The same may be said of the close season, 
which he believes is being observed, no violation of the Act having 
come to his knowledge. 

He is not aware of any fishway in his district, nor has the pollution of 
any stream by sawdust or mill rubbish been brought to his notice. 

He has reason to believe that the close season for game has been fairly 
well observed in that part. There was some uncertainty about the shooting 
of grouse and partridge. He had the notices sent from the Department dis- 

4 G F. 



50 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



tributed through the district, and they may yet be seen in many places. He 
is of the opinion that dogs do a great deal of harm to hares in the close sea- 
son, particularly in the spring of the year. It is a common thing in spring, 
where parties own dogs and live near a swamp, to hear those dogs day after 
day running rabbits until dark, and he thinks many are killed. He is of the 
opinion that owners of dogs should keep them for at least three months in 
spring-time. 

Overseer John Green, of Marmora, reports that last year he found the 
fishing fairly good, and he saw only one light out. 

He has a summer hotel on the shore, where he can see everything that 
is going on. He got one net, and fined one party for shooting partridge and 
one for catching bass under size. He also fined two men, one for selling 
maskinonge, and one for buying. One party caught one maskinonge that 
weighed 21 lbs, on a rod, and landed it alone on Crow Lake. 

Overseer R. H. Gunter, of McRae, reports that during the latter part of 
the year he visited Mud Turtle Lake and waters in other townships in his 
division, where he had heard rumours of the law being violated, but after 
making an investigation he found nothing. 

Overseer F . H. Heneilley, of Warkworth, reports that there are not any 
licenses for net fishing issued in his district, but from the anglers he finds 
that fishing is improving since nets have been banished from these waters. 

All fish caught in his district are used by the parties who catch them. 

No abuses exist, so far as he knows. 

The close seasons have been well observed. 

One case of using a net was brought before the Warden, and was settled 
by him, the net being confiscated. 

No refuse is put in the river. 

No fishways in his division. 

Overseer /. H. Hess, of Hastings, reports that during the fore part of 
the season bass fishing was very poor, and he is not prepared to state the 
reason, unless it was owing to the high water, as later, when the water had 
fallen, there were some good catches of bass, and maskinonge seemed quite 
plentiful and, of a nice large size. The quality of both bass and maskinonge 
was better than last year-, which he attributed to the better observance of the 
fish law by anglers. 

The law was well observed in his territory, with the exception of one or 
two cases just before the season opened of parties gaffing some maskinonge 
at Hastings dam, but it seemed impossible to get evidence to convict the 
guilty ones. 

Regarding game. He thinks the law is being well observed, as he has 
not heard of any infractions. 

Overseer J. E. Irish, of Vennachar, reports that the fishery laws have 
been fairly well observed, as he has not heard of any illegal fishing going on. 

Regarding Game. He has had a great many complaints about hunters, 
and he has spent considerable time trying to bring the parties to justice, but 
could find nothing positive. He says it would require all his spare time 
to cope with the complaints about hunting going on. 

Overseer Charles Jickling, of St. Paul's Station, reports that the black 
bass have been fairly plentiful in some streams, where they have been stocked, 
but being a dry fall and water being low, they have been fished out pretty 
close. He would like if the Department would grant the overseers permis- 
sion, in case of a late spring, to post up notices to protect the spawning season 

4a o. F. 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 51 



on those small streams. He has repeatedly seen parties in 1907 taking the 
bass right on the spawning beds, but it being the open season he did not 
dare interfere with them. 

There is one mill pond near his own house, which is half a mile long, 
and touches on two hundred acres. The parties whose farms touch on this 
pond have asked him to see if there is no way to have it protected. It appears 
to be a natural spawning bed at the head of this pond. He has visited this 
pond on several occasions, and in spawning season could count as many as 
17 to 20 black bass spawning in a distance of five or six rods, and he says 
that in this mill dam there is no fishway, and there was never known to be 
a bass in this pond till after the river had been stocked at St. Mary's, so 
they must make their way up in high water. They seem to thrive and do 
well. 

The law with regard to fishing has been fairly well observed. He has 
had some little difficulty in regard to muskrat and rabbits, but he went right 
after the parties to a finsh. 

As regards Game. In districts where last year the partridge were quite 
plentiful, this year he has not seen a single bird. He thinks it would be 
wise to have the closs season extended for another year to see if these birds 
cannot be increased in numbers. There are a few quail to be heard, but not 
many. He has interviewed the various gun clubs in his district, and all 
seem to take a great interest in protecting the birds and want them to live 
over. The black and grey squirrel seem to be plentiful in some localities. 
Wild ducks seem to be very scarce in his district, and woodcock are nearly a 
thing of the past. Occasionally there are a few plover, but they are not very 
plentiful. The wood hare or cotton tail are quite numerous. They have in 
the vicinity two or three deer running at large, and the farmers are taking 
great interest in protracting them. The muskrat are rather on the increase, 
and are quite plentiful. 

Overseer W. H. Johnson, of Harwood, reports that this year has been a 
very good one for the protection of spawn and little fish, although not quite 
as good as last year, as the water was higher than for some years previous. 

Quite a number of Americans visited Rice Lake this season and were 
quite satisfied with their catch. 

The law was fairly well observed. No violations came to his notice. 

Duck shooting was not as good this year, on account of blinds not being 
allowed in rice beds. He destroyed a number of blinds that were built in 
the rice beds for duck shooting, but found no one occupying them at the 
time. Partridge are very scarce in that vicinity, also black squirrels. 

He would recommend that the close season for mink and muskrats be 
the same, as he lifted a number of traps that had been set for muskrats 
before the muskrat season came in. 

He would also suggest a close season of from 3 to 5 years for frogs, as 
they are becoming scarce, and at the end of that time any persons wanting 
to catch, sell, or export frogs, to pay a license for same. 

Overseer D. Johnston, of Peterboro, reports that the fishing on the 
Otonabee River has been very good, considering the remarkable number of 
fishermen there in close touch with the city all the time. Last spring the 
water was very high and cold, and remained high until the spawn should 
have had plenty of time to come out. 

There was very little illegal fishing done. He got only three gill nets, 
and none of these had any fish in them. 

He suggests that the close season for maskinonge should begin on April 
Ist, as some seasons he has noticed them coming in to spawn very early. 



52 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



He thinks that Americans and all foreigners should pay |5 instead of 
|2 for permits to fish in Ontario. If there is good fishing they will pay the 
price, and if there is not they will not come. 

As to Game. Ducks were very plentiful on the river, in fact he saw 
more ducks last fall than at any time during the past twenty years. He 
thinks the close season for muskrats should begin on May 1st, and last until 
March 1st. On account of the scarcity of mink, muskrats have been in 
great demand, and bring good prices. 

Overseer Thomas H . Johnston, of Royston, reports that in the l>eginning 
of the close season he put up notices about the size and the close seasons for 
the various fish. At the same time he examined the several saw mills in the 
vicinity of where he has to make a trip during the season, and found two 
mills putting sawdust into enclosures of pretended wharfs, which would be 
destroyed by a storm. He threatened them with the law, and at the same 
time advised them to change their stop chains, which they did. 

In the tourist season he visited Rainy Lake, Doe Lake, Ornick and Horn 
Lakes. The latter has some fine trout, but nothing else in the line of fish. 
It is a long spring lake on the boundary between Ryerson and Chapman 
townships. 

During the fishing season he found some four or five fishing without per- 
mits, who owned houses and claimed to be residents. One man who lived in 
Georgia thought he could do so because he was a Canadian, but when it was 
explained to him that he could not vote here he bought a permit. 

He would suggest the Department providing a small gasoline launch, 
which could be procured for about |200, and on which a man could watch 
these lakes and rivers forty miles long, and it would also come in well in 
hunting season, in fact it is very necessary, as tnese lakes are just fine m 
summer and are becoming prominent. 

He would further suggest that dogs be stopped hunting deer. To see a 
big buck come out of the lake, and before he can shake the water o^ to be 
surrounded by several hounds and torn to pieces while alive is a sight he 
says he does not wish to see, any more than a Spanish bull fight. He saw a 
deer chased past his farm by hounds with his tongue out the length of his 
hand, and thinks that if there is a humane society in Ontario, or a Member of 
Parliament who does not care to see the deer extinct, let him stop dogs during 
the hunting season. 

Overseer David Jones, of Welland, reports that the catch of coarse fish 
was very fair according to the statement of the anglers, but there was con- 
siderable poaching before an overseer was appointed. Since his appoint- 
ment he has had very little trouble with any one, but there is liable to be' 
trouble next spring. 

Overseer John Jones, of Fenelon Falls, reports that fish are more plenti- 
ful now than they have been for some years previous, owing, he believes, to 
the law being observed, and the water in the lakes and rivers being kept 
at a uniform height. He only found one infringement of the law, and that 
was in the month of June last while patrolling Cameron Lake. He came 
across 60 ft. of gill net, which he immediately took possession of, but has 
been unable to find out who placed it in the water. 

Frogs in Victoria County had a close season last year, and those engaged 
in catching them observed the law to the letter. They were plentiful last 
season, and the close season will no doubt make them much more numerous 
during next year. 

Muskrat and mink are plentiful, some 2,000 rats having been caught 
within a radius of three miles from here on Cameron Lake and Burnt River 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 58 



during three weeks of the season of 1908. The law in this respect is well 
observed. Beaver are not in evidence in his territory, but in the northern 
portion of that county the number are increasing, and he thinks that dis- 
trict should be carefully watched. 

Overseer J . F . Kern, of Burford, reports that the fishing for the past 
year has been very good, the chief fish caught being pike, bass and trout. 
Although he kept a strict watch for infringements of the law, he has found no 
evidence of illegal fishing. 

As far as game is concerned, it is far less plentiful than usual. Muskrats 
are in abundance, and doing much damage to mill dams. Rabbits are espe- 
cially plentiful, but all other game is scarce. 

Overseer Wellington Lean, of ApsJey, reports that the close season for 
fishing has been well observed, and he is not aware that a single abuse exists. 
The fishing was better than last year. Quite a number of American tourists 
visited Loon and Long Lakes this summer. They report good fishing, and 
are all willing to pay for angling permits. He thinks it would be well to 
hSve the guides pay a small fee for license. 

Mill owners observe the law. There are no fishways in his division. 

He would like to call the attention of the Department to the stocking 
of Wolf and Crab Lakes with bass, as it would be giving new grounds for 
tourists, and would also help the settlers. These lakes are both of a rea- 
sonable size, and suitable for fish. 

Deer were very scarce this fall. They are growing less numerous every 
fal], owing to the large number killed by wolves every winter. No case of 
illegal hunting came under his notice. Wolves were very numerous this 
winter. There is quite a number of beaver in his division, but none have 
been caught, so far as he knows. He found one trap net set for beaver near 
where they had been working, but although he watched and made enquiry 
and did everything he could he was unable to find who had set the trap. 

Overseer J. R. McAllister, of Gore's Landing, reports that there has 
been more maskinonge taken out of Rice Lake by angling than he has known 
for a great many years. Black bass for some reason unknown to him has 
been very scarce, but those that have been taken were very fine fish. 

Muskrats are plentiful, and are well protected. There was a very large 
catch in April, one man catching over 700. 

Ducks have been more plentiful than usual, but very few killed. Since 
the duck hunters have been stopped from putting out decoys by the rice 
bed, duck shooting has not been any good. 

He thinks they had more non-residents at Gore's Landing this past 
s\immer than ever before. 

The law was well observed on his part of the lake, both as to fish and 
game. 

Overseer A. W. Mclntyre, of Keene, reports that the fishing for bass 
and maskinonge last season was very good. 

The close season was well observed. 

There is no mill refuse dumped into the water. 

There are no fishways in his division, and none required, as the fishing 
is as good above the dams as below. 

Overseer Enoch Merriam, of Harwood, reports that last spring was a 
very suitable one for fish. The water was very high, and as soon as it began 
to recede the heavy rains came on and held it up till long after all the 
fish were out and the spawn was hatched and gone. The fishing was good 
last summer, and they had more Americans than ever before, who were all 



54 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



well pleased. Tlie law was well observed, wi.h the exception of two cases, 
and they were fined and reported to the Department. 

The muskrats were very plentiful last spring, and the ducks were in 
larger flocks this last fall than he has seen them for years. There was no 
shooting last spring, and very little in the fall, as you could not shoot in 
the rice beds with blind or decoys. The ducks would go out in the lake in 
large numbers and feed on water celery in day time, and then come to the 
rice beds at night, then back again to the celery beds at daybreak. 

Overseer George Mojfatt, of Glen Cross, reports that the fish in his 
division are mostly trout and suckers, which seem to be about as numerous 
as last year. He has not discovered any violations of the fishery laws, nor 
has any been brought to his notice. The law was well observed by mill 
owners and others. 

The game in his division are partridges, and they are scarce. Foxes 
are plentiful, and there have been quite a number shot. 

Oiferseer F . J . Moore, of LaJcefield, reports that the fishery regulations 
and close seasons have been well observed, except by a few of the miners 
and tourists, there being complaints of them using dynamite and gill nets. 
He seized a couple of the gill nets and spent several days trying to find out 
the parties that were suspected of using dynamite, but could not get suf- 
ficient evidence in either case to convict. 

Tourists have had fairly good luck fishing with rod and spoon this 
year. He issued about two hundred fishing permits. The fishery laws have 
been well observed by the settlers. 

He would recommend that something be done to compel the guides to 
comply with the fishery laws. He would suggest that guides be required 
to have a license at a small fee. These guides could be a great help to the 
overseers if they wished. 

He would again strongly recommend that Stony Lake be restocked with 
parent bass, as it is of great importance that the fish supply b-e kept up» 
Even if the Americans had to pay more for their permits, he does not 
think they would mind as long as the supply of fish was kept up. 

He thinks the close season also for maskinonge and bass should be from 
the 1st of April instead of the 15th, as these fish run immediately after the 
ice disappears. 

Hunters and trappers have had a fairly good year, about sixty deer 
hunting licenses being issued by him at Lakefield. 

Ducks and partridge are very scarce in his district. Muskrats have 
been very plentiful. 

] Minks are becoming very scarce in this locality, and if they are not 
protected in some way before long they will be a thing of the past around 
here. He would suggest that a close season be put on them, as their 
fur is becoming very valuable, and when trappers are trapping mink they 
are apt to kill rats as well. 

Overseer J. W. Morton, of St. Ola, reports that there was no increase 
in the catch of fish over that of the previous year. The water in the lake> 
has been pretty high for the last couple of years for good fishing. 

As far as he knows, the fish have all been used for home consumption. 

There have been no abuses existing. No illegal fishing came to hi> 
notice, and consequently no fines were imposed, and no confiscations made. 

The close seasons for game and fish have been strictly observed, as far 
as he could ascertain. 

There are no fishways in his division. 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 65 



He sold more licenses to foreigners in 1908 than in any previous year, 
angling principally for sport. 

Overseer James Myers, of Orchard, reports tliat as far as lie can learn 
there was no difference in the catch of fish between last year and this, but 
fairly good catches were made. 

The chief fish in his district are speckled trout and black bass. None 
are sold, but all used at home. 

No abuses exist that he is aware of. 

The several close seasons were well observed. 

There were no violations, except some boys fishing bass, and no fines 
were made. 

The Act is well observed by mill owners, and no sawdust or rubbish is 
allowed to go into the water. 

There were three fishways in his division, but they are out of order. The 
high water in the spring wrecks them. But he says it seems to him there 
are more fish above in some of the ponds than below, for the reason that 
they winter better in the deep water in the pond, and in the dry time in 
the summer they do better in the dee-^ water. 

The general wish of the people in his district is that the trout season 
should end on August Ist. 

Overseer Garner Nicholls, of Bohcaygeon, reports that the maskinonge 
fishing was even better than 1907, Bass was not as good, but much larger 
lunge were caught during 1908. He says that the law was well kept last 
spring during spawning season, both for lunge and bass. There is no fish- 
ing through the ice this winter for bass at all. Giving a rough estimate of 
the boats fishing every day, would say there would be about twenty-five. 
There must have been about 4,000 lunge caught, all told, and about 3,000 



Overseer C. W . Parkin, of Valentia, reports that fishing was fairly good 
during the past season. Green bass were quite plentiful, and some very fine 
black bass were captured, and he saw quite a number of maskinonge weigh- 
ing from 5 to 16 lbs. caught around Bald Point. He thinks fishing through 
the ice should be prohibited, as when a man cuts a hole through the ice over 
a bass bed, he can fish away until he has taken every bass feeding near. He 
is of the opinion that if the close season was from December 15th to June 
15th, and the laws strictly enforced, in a few years fish would again be really 
plentiful there. 

The laws have been fairly well observed in his division. No reports of 
illegal fishing were brought to his notice. 

He sold only one family permit, as the Americans who came preferred 
not to fish rather than pay the fee. 

Ducks were very plentiful, but owing to fine calm weather there were 
not as many killed as last year. He thinks the law forbidding the hides 
being built not more than 200 yards from shore is a good one for Scugog 
lake, as it gives the ducks a chance to feed. He is very glad the use of 
automatic guns was prohibited, as they are regular slaughtering machines. 
He has heard a lot of fault-finding with regard to them, and he hopes they 
will never be allowed in use again. Muskrats are becoming numerous since 
their houses have been closely watched and protected. He thinks the mink 
should be protected, as they are the most valuable fur-bearing animal we 
have, and they are nearly extinct around that lake. He would advise an 
open season from December 1st to March Ist. He had one conviction for 
spearing muskrat houses. He had some difficulty in keeping hunters from 
building their duck hides too far from shore. 



66 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



On the whole, the game and fishery laws are beincf better observed than 
ever before, owing, he thinks, to there being more inspectors on the lake 
during the past year, and through the people getting to understand the laws 
better. He has not lost an opportunity of explaining the reasonableness of 
our laws to the people and that it is to their benefit to observe them. The 
result is, that a much more friendly feeling exists towards the laws and the 
inspectors than he has ever known to exist before. 

Overseer H. R. Purcell, of ColebrooJc, reports that the angling has been 
very good, and that there were not so many Americans as in former years 
visiting in his district. There have been no net licenses taken out. He sug- 
gests that every trapper should take out a license at a fixed price, and all 
dealers in fur should take out a license, and only one deer should be allowed 
to each hunter. There were not so many deer taken in his district as some 
years on account of fires on the best hunting grounds, as the deer were 
scattered and had no particular runways. 

There were some violations in his district the first part of the year, and 
he took proceedings against the guilty parties. He thinks fall trapping for 
muskrats should be stopped. 

Overseer Chas: St. Charles, of Madoc, reports that there is only one 
small lake in his di.strict where any fishing is done, and that is Moira Lake. 

There have been no violations of the game and fishery laws. What 
fishing is done is principally by residents for their own private use, and 
the law has been well observed. 

Overseer Neil Sinclair, of Glenarm, reports that the fishing was fairly 
good the first of the season, but towards the end of the season the fish did 
not take the bait, although there seemed to be lots of them in the water. The 
lake was very low in the fall. 

MusKrats were plentiful last spring, and trappers made a good catch. 
Mink were scarce. Very few wild geese light on the lake this fall. Ducks 
seem to be getting fewer every year in his district. He would like to see 
decoys prohibited. One man will shoot from thirty to fifty ducks with 
decoys, when he could not shoot six in the same time without them. 

No violations of the Act were brought to his notice. 

The laws were well observed. 

Overseer Small, of Grand Valley, reports that the fishery laws in his 
division in 1908 were well observed, he not having had one complaint dur- 
ing the year. 

With regard to game. There are a few deer and partridge in his divi- 
sion, but they have not much swamp or bush to harbour in on account of 
the heavy fires this fall. There have been some complaints about dogs hunt- 
ing deer last spring, but he could not prove the owners of the dogs. 

Overseer William Smith, of Gravenhurst, reports that it is the opinion 
of anglers that the fishing in this section compares very favourably with 
other years' fishing. 

He has had little or no trouble with tourists in regard to size and quan- 
tity of fish taken, as they seem to realize the importance of the enforcement 
of the laws to protect their own interests. 

No violation of the fishery or game laws have come to his-notice. Several 
complaints have been made, but upon investigation proved to have been made 
on little or no foundation. A complaint was made that mill refuse was being 
put into the lakes, but upon investigation it was found that this was not the 
ease, and indeed, the mill owners are very careful to dispose of their mill 
refuse otherwise, so that it is impossible for it to get into the waters. 

The close seasons have been well observed. 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 67 



Overseer D. C. Stuart, of Codrington, reports that the law has been 
fairly well observed in the waters over which he has control. He has taken 
every precaution against allowing sawdust to run into any of the waters. 
There appears to be quite an increase of fish, and he is satisfied the increase 
would be much greater if the Government would take some action in the 
destruction of cranes, as he has seen as many as 25 or 30 at one time on the 
drowned lands walking around in the water, and picking up the young fish, 
as they live entirely on the young fish instead of the dead fish, as supposed. 

He had a little trouble at first preventing the shooting of partridge, but 
has succeeded very nicely. 

Overseer W. H. Switzer, of Gooderhamfi, reports that the close season 
for fish was well observed, no instances of illegal fishing having come to his 
notice. He is sorry to say that some settlers do not stop fishing when they 
catch the number of fish the law allows them, but catch all they can, large 
or small, and take them away. The salmon trout catch was more than up 
to the average, some fine specimens having been caught; but the black bass 
fishino- was not up to the average, as the settlers fished so much they fished 
out all the large ones. 

There are no fish ways in his district. The mill owners have observed 
the law fairly well. There were no tourists visiting that neighbourhood, but 
he believes that in a very short time they will have them there, as some of 
the lakes are getting fairly well stocked and fish more plentiful. There was 
one salmon trout caught in Litte Bear Lake, which weighed 7^ lbs. 

The game laws were well observed, so far as he knows. He was talking 
to some sportsmen concerning deer, and they said they did not seem to be 
as numerous as formerly. He thinks the bush fires had something to do with 
it, as it seemed to drive them further back. 

Overseer Fred Taylor, of Huntsville, reports that, as far as he could 
learn, bass was more plentiful than other years, but lake or salmon trout not 
so plentiful. 

There were no fish exported from his division. 

An abuse exists — a lock in Brunei, and he would recommend that a 
proper burner be built and lower part of mill be repaired to prevent sawdust 
from falling in river. 

The close seasons were fairly well observed. 

There were violations reported to him, but not sufficient evidence to 
warant him to proceed, hence no fines were imposed. 

There are no fish ways in his division. 

Overseer Ira Toole, of Omemee, reports that the maskinonge seem lu 
be on the increase in Pigeon Lake and River, as the fishing was good all 
through the open season. Bass fishing was not so good as in 1907, although 
the fish seemed to be just as plentiful as other years. 

Frogs appear to be on the increase, the close season having certainly 
helped them, but he thinks it should extend further than Victoria County. 

Wild duck were very plentiful when the season opened, and the shoot- 
ing was good in the early part of the season, but not so good later on. 
Muskrat were also plentiful, last spring there having been the largest catch 
of rats that he has ever known in these waters. 

Partridge are about the same as they have been for the last three years 
— pretty scarce. 

The game and fishery laws have been fairly well observed during the 
past year. There were only two cases where fiines were imposed, one for 
snaring maskinonge, and the other for illegal trapping of muskrat, fines 
being collected in both cases. 



68 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



Overseer John Traves, St., of Fraserhury, reports that the fishing in 
his division is chiefly angling. He has watched the lakes carefully during 
the fishing season and found no one violating the laws. The laws have been 
well observed. 

Deer has been increasing for the last three years as reported by the 
different hunters that he visited during the open season. Partridge are 
scarcer. Fur-bearing animals, such as beaver, otter and muskrat, are increas- 
ing very fast. He travels the woods considerably all the year round, and 
finds the settlers in his division trying to preserve our game in the close 
season for three or four years past. 

Overseer C. Twamley, of Cavan, reports that there has been no illegal 
fishing in his division. He watched Cavan Creek during the bass spawning 
season a little more carefully than usual, and found nothing wrong. The 
trout are becoming very scarce, and he would recommend that fishing in the 
creek be prohibited for two or three years. 

Ducks and partridges were scarce this year. 

Overseer John Watson, of Caesarea, reports that he is pleased to say 
that the fishing in Scugog Lake the past season has been verj good, a lot of 
fine maskinonge being caught, none less than 4J lbs. As for bass, there 
appear to be lots of them, but very few caught in his division. At port 
Perry they caught plenty of bass, but no maskinonge, and he thinks that 
by good protection — that is each overseer doing his duty, they will soon 
have plenty of fish. There were just 8 Americans there this season. 

He would recommend that permits be issued to all residents of the 
Province at 50c. each for fishing with rod and line and angling for any kind 
of fish, and 25c. should go to the overseer and 25c. to the Department. It 
would help the overseers to do more work, and it would help them to discover 
any non-residents better, and also be a help to the Department. 

The water in Lake Scugog is lower than it has ever been since the dam 
was put in at Lindsay, and if there is not plenty of rain now, or an open 
winter, the fish will be gone again. He says that unless some means can 
be devised whereby the water can be kept up to a fair level, it is no use 
expecting to have any fish for all time to come. He would suggest that the 
Government buy out the Flavelle water tower at Lindsay, and then the 
water can be kept up to high water mark, and there would be good boating, 
fishing, trapping and shooting, and it would be much better for the health 
of the inhabitants at large. As it is at present they have not been able to 
run their private launches, and had to pull them out of the water. 

With regard to game. He notes a marked change in the number of 
ducks at the opening of the season. Owing to little or no shooting having 
ijeen done last spring, thej stayed and hatched in the marshes, and the 
hunters are pleased with the protection the game has had in his division. 
He thinks the sale of ducks should be prohibited. 

Muskrats are very plentiful in his division, as there has been no fall 
trapping to speak of for the last two seasons, and there will be a good spring 
catch if he can keep them from being taken out of the houses in the winter 
time. But he says this is a hard thing to prevent, as they are taken out on 
very stormy days, and after night, and the only way this can be overcome is 
by taking a trip around the marsh every morning, let the weather be what 
it will. This means a lot of hard, laborious work for very little money for 
him, and still expensive to the Department, but he intends to do his best 
for the protection of the game and fish. 

Mink is nearly a thing of the past in his division, and unless they get 
protection, these valuable little animals are done for. He thinks that they 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 69 



should be protected with an open season from November 1st to December 
15th, as they are not prime until November, and when the snow comes is the 
time the trappers skin them out; and besides, he finds that if traps are set 
in September or October, the excuse is that they are trapping mink, and at 
the same time it is muskrats they are after. 

Partridge are verj- scarce of late years, owing chiefly to the destructive 
bird called the owl, which he understands is protected. He thinks there 
should be a bounty paid for the killing of them. 

He is pleased to say that there are some deer in his division, and he is 
very anxious to protect them so that they may increase. A doe and two 
fawns have been around near his home since May, and last month he could 
have shot three deer, and it has been reported to him that eight deer have 
been seen around Pigeon Creek. 

Overseer John Watt, of Peterboro, reports that he has had a very busy 
season trying to see that the laws were observed, and the result is that there 
has never been such good fishing in his district. He picked up four nets, 
also captured several spears, and a number of snares which he destroyed. 
He has not had many convictions, as the offenders in most cases were minors, 
whom he let go with a warning, as it was a first offence in each instance. 

He has had difficulty in apprehending those parties who operate on the 
ice under a blanket, as by the time he would get to them they would have 
whatever instruments of destruction they might be operating with shoved 
under the ice out of sight and almost impossible to find. They go in pairs, 
usually one keeping on the lookout. 

Overseer G. W. West, Holland Landing, reports that the fishing and 
shooting were about the same as in 1907, excepting partridge, which is 
very scarce in that neighbourhood. The game and fish laws have been well 
observed, and he had no occasion to fine anj one. 

Overseer Chas. West, of Holland Landing, reports he made several 
trips during the close season over his district, and found the law being still 
observed, and there was no occasion to fine any one. 

The catch was about the same average as last year, with a slight increase 
in the catch of black bass. 

River St. Lawrence. 

Overseer Nassau Acton, of Gananoque, reports that, as far as our own 
people are concerned, the season has been very agreeable, no serious com- 
plaints having been received. The fishery and game laws have been well 
observed. The catch of fish has been good, fully up to the average. Customs 
receipts there show 40,948 lbs., valued at |2,770, exported to Clayton, N.Y., 
during the year, and about a like amount shipped by express to Kingston, 
Ont., and thence to Cape Vincent, N.Y.. The above is what is termed coarse 
fish, and legally taken. For home consumption 7,200 lbs. would be a fair 
estimate. A small percentage used for home consumption would consist of 
game fish, A large percentage of citizens have decided objections to allow- 
ing foreigners from the American side of the river coming into our waters 
in their own launches, bringing their own guides and supplies and returning 
again with probably excessive catches of our fish, and not even reporting at 
our custom houses. He considers this a serious abuse, as no benefit what- 
ever is received from this source, and he would suggest that a suitable rod 
license fee be imposed in this connection. In the event of these parties 
above mentioned becoming domiciled in our hotels or boarding houses for a 



60 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



week or ten days and employing our guides, no license might be required. 
He considers that non-residents or foreigners owning and occupying cottages 
should have the same fishing privileges *tis residents on the St. Lawrence. 

There are no fish ways in his division, and no sawdust or mill rubbish. 

Overseer Isaac Blondin, of Cornwall, reports that the fishing this year 
has been as good as in previous years. Anglers in that vicinity report a 
good catch of maskinonge — about 40. Perch and pickerel are very plenti- 
ful and a good size, and a few bass are also reported caught. He had a 
number of applications for set lines early in the season, which however, 
were not granted, so all the fishing was by angling Most of the fish caught 
are for home consumption. He disposed of five angling permits to tourists 
passing through the town, all of which were cheerfully paid. It is difficult, 
however, to watch Americans who come across the line for a day's fishing. 
There seems a decrease in the number of tourists. No violations of the 
law or illegal fishing came to his notice, and to his knowledge there are no 
fishways in his division. 

With regard to game. There were plenty ducks, but less shooting than 
in previous years on account of the very foggy and smoky weather in the fall. 
He destroyed a number of ilegal blinds, and found a rather general ignor- 
ance of the law concerning them. No Sunday shooting came to his notice, 
and no fines were imposed. 

Ovei^seer Mattheto Cox, of Howe Island, reports that fishing of all kinds 
in his district is much the same as in former years, except bullheads, which 
are much more plentiful than last year. 

Overseer J. A. Fraser,^ of Frescott, reports that the "Laura" was fitted 
out on the 3rd April, but could not be got out until the 15th May, on account 
of high water under iron bridge. Having a good many complaints up the 
river, she was filled up with bags of sand until she was clean down near the 
water's edge, and got her under bridge, when the sand was dumped into the 
river. On tEe same day he seized two nets and boat. Before this he had 
occasion to go to Morrisburg, where there had been some illegal work, and 
not being able to obtain a conviction, he settled with some of the friends of 
the party paying the costs. 

Nothing of any note happened again, except patrolling up and down 
the river, until June 25th, when orders from the Department came to go to 
Cornwall. The canal bank gave way at Cornwall at that time, therefore he 
took train to Cornwall, and got Mr. Senecal, Game Warden, with his 
gasoline boat, and went to Stanley Island and across the lake to Lancaster, 
where he interviewed some people and found the fishermen had quit work 
altogether. Next morning went up the river and viewed the great break in 
the canal, and on up and down south side of Cornwall Island, interviewing 
American Emigration Agent, South end New York & Ottawa R. R. bridge, 
who gave much information, then back to Cornwall and home. 

July 2nd went up to Gananoque, taking boat up from Cornwall for Mr. 
Taudvin, Game and Fishery Overseer, Kingston. Patrolled up and down 
until the 14th, when he started a cruise down the river to Cornwall, Stanley 
Island, Hamilton Island, then patrolling home again. Only got one jack 
and one spear, which he threw into the Long Sault. On July 20th went 
down to Iroquois, got Mr. McNairn, Game and Fishery Overseer, to go up 
the river to Shavers Island, where they searched two houses and barns for 
net, but got only two spears. Nothing more of note occurred until Aug. 
7th, when, by a pre-arranged plan, one of the American overseers and he 
went up the river, and when opposite Jones Creek they met two American 
poachers, who at once put up a fight. They did not succeed in capturing 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 61 



them until they got into American waters, when they ran into them for the 
iifth time, nearly swamping them and jamming his boat pretty badly. Being 
now in American waters, the American overseer examined their tags, took 
their names, and let them go. One man proved to be the same from whom 
T took a boat and net once before, and probably having a gasoline boat this 
time made them more desperate for fear of losing it. They proved to have a 
very large minnow net and a barrel with minnows, and a big stone about 20 
lbs. weight, which he raised and threatened to throw into his engine, (Mr. 
Fraser's). They then proceeded up the river again to Eockport, patrolled 
down south side of Grenadier Island, at the foot of which there are a few 
very small islands. On one of these he got a couple of spears and jack last 
year, and thought it well to look over the place again. On landing he found 
hanging up to dry a large gill net and another in a box, also another jack, 
which he seized and brought away under great protestations from a woman 
who was there. 

To sum up, he says that from all sources and information the fishing in 
the St. Lawrence has been better than in previous years for most kinds of 
fish, except black bass, which are getting scarcer all the time, rarely a man 
catching the limit, and he would recommend that they be replenished in 
some way. 

Ducks were plentiful where there was any open water on April 1st and 
many a hunter spoke to him very wishful. 

Overseer James McNairn, of Iroquois, reports that there has been a 
decrease in the catch of small-mouthed bass, caused by the shortness of the 
close season. 

No fish are exported from there. They are all used for home consump- 
tion. 

The only abuses that exist are catching bass while on nests after the 
season opens. He would suggest that the close season be from 1st July 
instead of the 16th June. 

The several close seasons have been strictly observed, so far as he knows. 

There were no violations except that some parties were fishing with gill 
nets. j\o fines were imposed, as the parties were not caught. The net was 
seized and destroyed. 

There are no fishways in his division. 

Overseer George M. Slate, of Itockport, reports that the last season for 
bass and pickerel fishing was the best for some seasons past. The river in 
places were swarming with minnows, and he considers the allowing of min- 
now fishing to be a great benefit. 

During the latter part of the season, maskinonge was quite plentiful, 
and a goodly number was caught weighing from 10 to 40 lbs. 

Good duck shooting was limited to a couple of weeks, although there 
were plenty flying. 

He has pleasure in reporting that there were no violations of the law. 

Overseer George Toner, of Gananoque, reports that for many years pre- 
vious to the season of 1908 net-fishing was very prevalent in the St. Law- 
rence River, with the result that fish of almost any kind became very scarce. 
This militated against the interests of those who wanted to fish for profit and 
who desired to keep within the law, as well as against those who, for various 
reasons, wanted to promote the reputation and increase the attractions of 
Gananoque and the Canadian Thousand Islands as a tourist's resort. 

On assuming the duties of overseer there was much opposition offered 
to his work, on the part of those who had heretofore used these waters much 



62 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



as they pleased, whether legally or not he does not say. He is pleased to be 
able to state, however, that the great majority of the people, who are anxious 
to promote the best interests and welfare of their town and the St. Lawrence 
supported and encouraged him in his work. The results have been very 
encouraging indeed. 

During the season of 1908 there was, perhaps, more trolling -and rod-and 
line fishing done than for many years, and it was the unanimously expressed 
opinion that not only did the fishing improve as the season advanced but 
that the fish were more plentiful at all times during the season than in 
former seasons. This improvement can only be accounted for by the fact that 
net-fishing was practically done away with. 

He has also discussed the question with as many of the river guides as 
possible, and they all agree with the general opinion expressed above, that 
is, that there was a decided improvement in the number of fish over former 
years. That net-fishing was practised extensively until the past season also 
accounts for the fact that many of the fish taken in a legitimate way were 
small in size, but he is firmly convinced that if net-fishing can be contin- 
uously prevented, it will not be long until the St. Lawrence shall have 
recovered its reputation as a sportsman's paradise. 

He calls the attention of the DeDartment to the fact that much net-fish- 
ing is carried on in the winter months, and in the opinion of a great many 
of the best and most responsible citizens your overseer vshould be appointed 
for the full year, so that a few, who h^ve the facilities, may not reap illegally 
the benefits for which your overseer works during the summer months. 

Lakes Simcoe, Couchiching and Sparegw. 

Overseer Saviuel Coulter, of Gilford, reports that with but one exception 
he has had very little trouble with either illegal fishing or game. 

In the early part of last winter there were about 80 huts on the bay for 
the most part of the day fishing for herring with hook and line. The herring, 
though small, seemed for a time to be quite plentiful, some parties being so 
successful as to catch as many as eighty a day. But maskinonge and white- 
fish seem to be on the decrease, owing to the large number of carp in the bay 
eating the small fish. 

For the past two seasons game in that locality was quite scarce, the long 
cold and wet springs of 1907 and 1908 proving too severe for the hatching 
of the wild fowl. 

The law was well observed, with but one exception. In April of the 
past year five parties appeared before the magistrate in Lefroy to answer 
to the charge of illegal duck shooting. Two of the parties were innocent, 
and the remaining three convicted. They were fined the smallest possible 
fine, owing to it being their first offence. 

Overseer George G. Green, of Bradford, reports that the run of fish in 
Holland River was very late this season, and also very light, in fact very 
few fish were seen, and each year they are becoming scarcer. 

Regarding illegal fishing, there was practically none done. He had one 
report of a net, but on going up and investigating no trace could be found, 
and dragging failed to discover anything. He had occasion to put out only 
one light in his territory. The Deputy Warden in the village, caught a 
couple of parties who were fined for having maskinonge. This was the only 
case that was heard of, and these fish came from King Township. 

He says the waters this past spring were simply alive with carp, hun- 
dreds being killed and shipped by express to Toronto, the men killing them 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 63 



with clubs out on the flooded lands, and he thinks this is the primal reason 
for the depletion in both fish and game. A few years ago this river was a 
natural breeding ground for ducks of the following varieties : Black, Wood, 
a few Blue Bill and the Teal, and thousands bred there. This season hardly 
a bird was to be seen, and as a matter of fact not a dozen duck have been 
killed. There were simply no snipe^ and not a single bird has been killed. 
All this is owiiig to the carp. This river and Cook's Bay were formerly a 
mass of rice, but is now an open sheet of water — not an acre of rice in the 
whole stretch. 

Partridge and Woodcock are very scarce, in fact, he says, only one wood- 
cock is reported to have been seen on grounds where formerly there were 
dozens. He would earnestly recommend that something be done to exterm- 
inate the carp plague, and so restore what was once one of the finest nesting 
grounds for our game birds. 

Overseer Robert Leadley, of Barrie, reports that bass are small but plenti- 
ful. There have not been as many whitefish caught as in other years, on 
account of bait being scarce. Trout are plentiful in Lake Simcoe, but seldom 
ever caught in Kempenfeldt Bay. He thinks it is on account of the refuse 
from the tannery running into the bay. 

Partridge are increasing, and ducks have been more plentiful than in 
1907. 

Overseer Heot^r McDonald, of Beaverton, reports that the bass fishing 
in his district was very fair, and the campers seemed well pleased. He 
thinks the quantity of fish is increasing in Lake Simcoe. He would like to 
see licenses granted for spearing through the ice. 

The law has been well observed, no reports of illegal fishing having 
come to his notice. 

Partridges are very scarce in* that district. , 

Overseer William McGinn, of Orillia, reports that the fishing in Lakes 
Simcoe and Couchiching has been exceptionally good, especially bass and 
lunge. The trout in Lake Simcoe are also plentiful, and good catches in 
all have been reported. The law has been fairly well observed, only an 
occasional disregard of same having been reported. In one case he found a 
net had been placed in Lake Simcoe, which he seized and sent to the Depart- 
ment, although he never found the owner. In the Longford district the law 
has been broken in a number of cases, a lot of illegal fishing having been 
carried on in the Narrows between Mud Lake and Lake St. John, where 
the settlers took large numbers in other ways than by rod and line. These 
lakes are fine breeding grounds for bass, pickerel and lunge. He thinks 
there should really be more protection on these lakes at once. He made a 
number of trips to these points during the summer putting up notices, etc. 
The fishing has been very poor in Bass Lake, and it being protected ought 
to be much better. There ought to be something done to protect this small 
lake again. 

The fishing in Sparrow Lake has been very good, especially lunge, which 
were more plentiful than bass. The settlers and tourists are very thankful 
to the Department for the car of parent bass put in this lake in November 
last, and would be most happy to have another car in the spring. There 
was an association formed among the tourists and residents for the pro- 
tection of fish and game in and around the lake, as well as for promoting 
business in all ways for the good of Sparrow Lake. As there were no fish 
deposited in Lake Couchiching since 1906, he thinks they should have at 
least two cars in the spring. 



64 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



The tourist business in Orillia has been up to the average, and in 
Sparrow Lake and places on Lake Simcoe has been rather better than in 
former years. 

He was out on Lake Simcoe during the trout season and found very 
little illegal fishing, where in other years the law has been disregarded. 

Game has been very scarce in the Orillia district, very few deer, and part- 
ridge almost extinct. 

Overseer DonalJd McPhee, of Uptergrove, reports that bass has been 
plentiful in Lake Simcoe this year, more so than in past years, and much 
larger. Trout, whitefish and herring are increasing. Carp also are more 
plentiful. 

The tourists all were satisfied with the angling this season. 

Angling was good in Mud Lake. Pickerel and maskinonge are the 
chief fish caught in that lake. There are no carp. No illegal fishing came 
to his hearing, and the law was well observed in his territory. 

There are no saw mills or fishways in his district. 

Game. Muskrats are very plentiful, but mink seem to be scarce. Ducks 
are numerous. Partridge seem to be more plentiful than they have been. 

OV'erseer Harry Mayor, of Painswich, reports that during 1908 there 
were no violations of fishery or game laws in his division. The local anglers 
report the bass fishing not so good as last year. Trout are also very scarce. 
Other fish seem to be about as numerous, in fact the coarse varieties are 
becoming more numerous. 

As regards the game. He finds the hares are very plentiful, and black 
squirrels quite numerous. In the protection of the latter the farmers and 
people in this community give every assistance, all being anxious to pre- 
serve these beautiful creatures. Partridge are very scarce. He picked up 
one lying dead on the shore and examined it carefully, but found no trace 
of injury, which leads him to believe in common with others that disease 
is the cause of such rapid extermination. Duck and the other smaller 
varieties of game seem about as plentiful as usual. 

Overseer S. Patterson, of Dunkerron, reports that during the past year 
he did his duty in keeping a close watch in the close season in his division. 
He did not receive any fines, and for the future he will do his duty regard- 
ing game and fish. 

Overseer William Robinson, of Kihcorthy, reports that the tourists were 
not pleased with the fishing this season. It was not as good as 1907. 

The deer are increasing, and partridges are as plentiful this fall as he 
has seen them for years. 

The law has been well observed, both by Americans and settlers. 

Overseer Henry S. Thompson, of Brechin, reports that there are no 
licenses for netting granted in the waters of Lake Simcoe to his knowledge. 
There are angling permits, of which he could not sell any on account of 
there not being any foreigners camping in his division. There were several 
gasoline launches in his division last summer, and he could not get near 
any, but one that was from Beaverton. 

There was fine bass catching at times last summer, and very poor 
trolling for trout. 

There is no game of any account. There are no deer, and partridge are 
very scarce. There is no feeding place for ducks. 

Overseer Robert Tillett, of Roach's Point, reports that there was about 
the same catch of maskinonge caught as the vear previous. There are abun- 
dance of whitefish and trout in the lake. There was quite a lot of illegal 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 66 



fishing done with nets for trout in October. He got a lot of net that he 
grappled on the shoals, but could not get the guilty parties. He would 
like to see the close season for trout start on the 10th October, as that is 
about the time the trout come in to spawn. The bass fishing was very good. 
The game laws are very well observed. There are not very many ducks 
or geese. Old sportsmen say it is owing to the carp destroying the wild rice, 
and there is no food for them. 

Overseer Michael Timlin, of Atherley, reports that the game and fishery 
laws have been well observed in his division during the past year, and he 
has had no occasion to fine anyone. He posted up all the notices in various 
parts of his district. 

There are four mills in his division, and the law regarding the deposit- 
ing of sawdust and mill refuse in the waters was well observed. 

Herring, maskinonge and bass fishing was fairly good. Pickerel, cat- 
fish and perch are also plentiful in Mud Lake. 

As to game. Muskrats, rabbits and raccoons are quite numerous in the 
marshes. Ducks are plentiful, but partridge scarce. 

NiPISSlNG. 

Overseer G. L. Bailey, of Callander, reports that the laws have been 
well observed in regard to fishing. As there is no licensed fishing with nets, 
the angling has been much better than in former years when net fishing 
was permitted. The bass fishing in particular was exceptionally good, and 
in the early season pike and pickerel were quite numerous. There are no 
streams of speckled trout close by running into the lake. He had occasion 
to visit a stream about 20 miles away, where they filled their baskets in less 
than two hours with speckled trout that measured not less than ten inches. 

Lake Nipissing is becoming more of a resort every year for tourists from 
different parts of Ontario, and Americans, who have cottages on the islands 
and shores of the lake. 

The hunting season was not so good as former years, on account of the 
bush fires in the district making it almost impossible getting through the 
bush. The deer did not keep to the runways, there being so much falling 
timber. However, the hunters were numerous, and they got a good supply. 

The law pertaining to partridge was well complied with, and by another 
season the birds will be more plentiful. 

Overseer James Dunlop, of Maclcey's Station, reports that the people 
in his district between Des Joachim and Mattawa have learned to abide by 
the laws regarding game and fish. 

He sold no licenses for fishing or hunting. 

As regards the game. The close season law has helped considerably, 
as the deer are now quite plentiful, and are often seen to enter farmers' fields. 

Overseer D. McKelvie, of New Liskeard, reports a slight falling off in 
the quantitiy of fish caught, due to the inexperience of the fishermen. 

All the fish were used for local consumption. 

No abuses exist that he knows of. 

The close seasons have been well observed. 

No violations came to his knowledge. 

The mill owners observed the law as to dumping refuse in the water. 

There are no fishways in his division. 

Overseer Philippe Pilon, of Sudbury, reports that no applications have 
been received by him for fisheries during the year 1908. No licenses have 
been issued, and no money has been received by him. 

5 G. F. 



66 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



He has visited the townships of Broder, Dill, Capreol, Neelon and Gar- 
son in his division at different intervals, and has found nothing against the 
game and fisheries regulations. 

Overseer Joseph Rivet, of Sturgeon Falls, reports that there were no 
licenses issued in his division for nets of any kind, and he only sold twelve 
angling permits. 

As for game, there was no complaint against any one, and there was 
no illegal fishing in his district, as far as he knows. • 

Fines and Confiscations During the Year 1908 on Account of Fisheries. 

5 spears, 6 jack lights; 17 hoop nets; 111 gill nets, 10,149 yards of same; 
18 seines ; 24 trap nets ; 14 dip nets ; 12 night lines ; 2 scoop nets, 7 boats ; 
3 gaffs; 6 iron anchors; 33 boxes fish, 2,000 lbs. of same. 

Amount of fines fisheries, |1,575.77. 

Game, amount of fines and confiscations, |1, 524.33. 



Biological Department, 

University of Toronto, 

December 31st, 1908. 

E. Tinsley, Esq., 

Superintendent of Game and Fisheries, Toronto. 

Dear Sir, — I beg to submit the following report on operations at the 
Biological Station, Georgian Bay, for the season of 1908. 

Those engaged at the laboratory during the summer were: Dr. E. M. 
Walker, lecturer in Zoology; Messrs. T. R. Hanley, W. P. Thompson, and 
J. M. Livingstone, students of the University of Toronto, and Dr. S. Silcox, 
of the Normal School. The work was distributed as follows : Dr. Walker 
and assistants — studies of life-histories of aquatic insects, faunistic work, 
and studies of the time of appearance and growth of parasitic worms in 
larval and young black bass; T. R. Hanley and J. M. Livingstone — statisti- 
cal studies of whitefish and other species taken in gill nets; Dr. Silcox and 
W. P. Thompson — studies of aquatic vegetation; B. A. Bensley — examina- 
tion of the lower portion of Georgian Bay with respect to habits and dis- 
tribution of carp, and tagging experiments with adult black bass with a view 
to determining the movements of the fish. 

In addition to several improvements in the appliances of the labora- 
tory, a new building, giving better living accommodations, was erected in 
connection with the station dwelling house. 

It is a pleasure to acknowledge the courtesy of your Department in pro- 
viding for the use of certain nets in connection with the station's work. 

Tours sincerely, 

B. A. Bensley, 

Assistant Director. 

5a G.F. 



1908 GAME AND EISHERIES. 67 



REPORT OF THE WORK PERFORMED BY THE STEAMER "EDNA 

IVAN" ON THE GEORGIAN BAY AND NORTH CHANNEL 

OF LAKE HURON DURING THE YEAR 1908. 

We left Gore Bay on Monday, the 11th May, at 8.20 a.m., arriving at 
Little Current about noon, and left again in the afternoon for Killarney, 
where we remained all night and up till noon of the following day, when 
we left for Club Island. Found no one there, nor any signs of any one 
having been there so far. Went on to Rattlesnake Harbor, which place we 
left next morning at 7.20, and proceeded to South Bay. There were no 
tugs in, so we waited all afternoon for them to come in. Weather cloudy. 
The following morning we started at 6.20, going as far as Providence Bay, 
where we remained an hour, and then went on to Duck Island. Wind blow- 
ing too hard to go any further that night. Next day laid our course for 
False Detour Channel and from thence to Kitchen Island, Cockburn Island, 
and Meldrum Bay, where we remained all night. Big sea all the way from 
the Ducks. Weather cloudy on Saturday with rain and fog. Called at 
Cutler and John's Island, and then on to Gore Bay, where we spent Sunday. 

On Monday, the 18th May, we were detained at Gore Bay to finish the 
Inspector's room, but left at 11 a.m., with Mr. Holden on board for Little 
Current, where we landed Mr. Oliver, and proceeded to Killarney for the 
night. Next day, started at 7.15 a.m., but the weather was cloudy, with 
rain and high wind, and also thick fog. The engine stopped at 1.30, but 
about 3.30 the fog cleared, and we arrived in Byng Inlet at 5.30, losing two 
hours by fog. The next day the fog lifted about 9, allowing us to start out. 
Mr. Holden and Mr. Knight left with boat and went up the shore about 
three miles, where we met them, after which we shaped our course for the 
Bustards, arriving at 3.30. Made two stops, and came on to French River, 
leaving there again next morning at 7.30 for the Bustards, where we remained 
until noon, and then left for Point au Baril. Remained there over night, 
and in the morning came out through the inside channel and out by Red 
Rock Light, and into the Parry Channel, arriving at Parry Sound at 11.45 
a.m. Mr. Holden left for Toronto at 2 p.m., and Mr. Knight for Byng Inlet. 
Left Parry Sound at 6 a.m. on Saturday, came out by Red Rock, and shaped 
our course for Giant's Tomb. Lost two hours with fog. Arrived at Pene- 
taug at 3 p.m., where we spent Sunday. 

On Monday, 25th May, left Penetang at 7.25 a.m., out Christian Chan- 
nel, and made for Griffith Island, and then on to Wiarton, where we met 
Mr. Jermyn and Mr. Robertson and arranged for the trip. Left next morn- 
ing at 8.10, with Mr. Robertson and Mr. Jermyn on board. Stopped at 
Griffith Island for one hour, and landed Mr. Jermyn by boat. The fog was 
so dense from there to Cape Croker that we had to stop the engine at the 
Cape at 11.45. At 2.30 the fog lifted and we made our course for 
Lion's Head, which place we left next morning for Tobermory. Heavy 
banks of fog on Lake Huron. Stopped at Tobermory for balance of day. 
Found all the tugs in port on account of fog on the lake. Next morning 
came out through Cape Hurd Channel and shaped course down Lake Huron. 
Arrived at Southampton at 1.30 through thick fog. Mr. Robertson left the 
boat in the afternoon, and Mr. Holden came on board this afternoon. 
Detained at Southampton the next day until 2.30 p.m., and when about one 
mile out the fog again shut us in and continued all the way down to Goder- 
ich. Engine stopped four hours, and fog cleared with a squall about mid- 
night from the south. On Saturady, the weather was cloudy, with rain. 



68 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



Left Godericli at 9.50 a.m., with Mr. H. Blunden on board, ran down the 
shore and past Point Kettle, and struck a squall from the west. Arrived 
at Point Edward at 5.15 p.m., where we landed Mr. Holden, and Mr. Blun- 
den at Sarnia, where we spent the night. Left Sarnia on Sunday morning, 
arriving in Walkerville at 1.30 p.m., with Mr. Chauvin on board. Remained 
at Walkerville until Wednesday repairing boiler, etc., when we left for 
Pelee Island, calling at Sandwich and Amherstburg on the way. Next day 
went over to the Old Hen Island, and cruised about around East Sister 
Island and North Harbour, but no one to be seen on those islands. Returned 
to the west dock of Pel^e Island about noon, expecting steamer "Louise," 
but she passed the dock. We left again at 3 p,m., arriving at Kingsville 
at 5, and made fast for the night. Left again next morning for Amherst- 
burg, where Mr. Holden left the boat for Windsor. The three following days 
were spent at Walkerville, and on Tuesday, as Mr. Chauvin reported that 
he would be ready to leave, we started at 1.45 with Mr. Chauvin and Mr. 
McVittie on board, arriving at Kingsville at 6.35. Left Kingsville at 9 a.m. 
next day, with Mr. Chauvin, Mr. McVittie and Mr. Wigle on board. Stop- 
ped at Leamington, where Mr. Wigle got off. Left again at 10, and down 
along the shore and hailed for Wheatley, stopping the steamer "Louise" 
while Mr. Chauvin and Mr. McVittie examined the fish for about 20 minutes. 
Then continued along the shore and arrived at the Rondeau at 5 p.m., where 
Mr. Holden came on board. Left again at 5.30 in the morning in the teeth 
of a gale with a big sea. Arrived at Port Stanley at 11 a.m., and left again 
at 1 p.m., for Port Burwell. Remained there over night, and started again 
at 6.30 a.m., with Mr. Holden and Dr. Burt on board. Rounded Long 
Point with a big sea from the east and arrived at Port Dover at 2 p.m., and 
waited there for Mr. James Vokes, who arrivied about 6 p.m. Left Port 
Dover on Saturday at 6.20 a.m., with Mr. Holden, Mr. Vokes and Dr. Burt 
on Board. Ran down the coast, but too much smoke to see. Arrived at 
Port Maitland at 11.30, where these gentlemen left the boat to go to Dunn- 
ville. Left Port Maitland at 1 p.m., and arrived at Port Colborne at 3.30, 
and stopped for the night, and over Sunday. Mr. T. J. Briggs on board. 
Remained at the Port all morning waiting for Capt. C. Moller and Mr. 
Holden, who arrived at noon. Left dock at 12.30 noon, with Capt. Moller 
out on the lake and adjusted the compass, returning at 2.30 and left again 
with Mr. Holden, Dr. Burt and Mr. Briggs on board. Arrived at the ship- 
yards at Bridgeburg, below Fort Erie, at 5.45 p.m., where they all left the 
boat. Left Bridgeburg at 7.30 a.m. Weather fine. Passed the outer buoy 
at 9 a.m., and shaped our course to Long Point. Arrived at Port Burwell 
at 8.45 p.m., remained there all night, and proceeded next morning at 5.30 
for the Rondeau, arriving at the harbour at 1 p.m. Wind blowing a gale, 
with a big sea on. Left again next morning at 6.30 for Kingsville, reaching 
that place at 1.30 p.m., after a rough passage all the wav up. Mr. Chauvin 
came on board at 2 p.m., and as he wished to see the fishermen we remained 
over night. Next day we visited Pelee Island and stopped at the west dock 
for an hour, but as there was too much sea there we went over to the north 
dock, and put up for the night, leaving next day at 7 a.m. for Sandwich 
coal dock at 12.30 noon and put on 18| tons of coal. Started again at 3 
p.m. for Walkerville, and then on to Windsor for a couple of hours, and 
back again to Walkerville, where we spent both Saturday and Sunday. 

On Tuesday, the 23rd June, left Walkerville, and when about three 
miles out on Lake St. Clair, picked up a buoy with gill, net, about 130 yards, 
and continued along the shore, arriving at the Thames River at 2.30 p.m., 
where we stopped for two hours and left again at 4.30, up the river to 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 69 



Chatham, where we remained for the night. Wednesday, we called at 
Walkerville, and had to stay there a couple of days looking after the power 
boat, which was not giving satisfaction. On Saturday went up the lake and 
through the River St. Clair past Fort Gratiot and on to Goderich, remain- 
ing there till Monday morning, when we proceeded to Kincardine. We there 
handed out laws, notices and reports, and left again at 1.40, arriving at 
Southampton 5.30 p.m., Mr. Chauvin on board. Remined there all day wait- 
ing for orders, which Mr. Holden brought at 5 p.m. Stopped there for the 
night. Mr. Chauvin left next morning. Started from Southampton at 7.40 
a.m., with Mr. Holden on board, and arrived at Providence Bay, where we 
spent the night waiting for Mr. Oliver. Left next morning and ran down 
the shore, stopping at South Bay, arriving at 12.30 noon, and stopped bal- 
ance of day. Next morning at 8.45, shaped our course through the Owen 
Channel, and stopped at Rattlesnake Harbour, and then on to Killarney, and 
thence to Little Current, where we remained over night. Mr. Holden on 
board. Next morning proceeded on our way to Kagawong, and from there- 
to Gore Bay, where we remained over Sunday. 

On Monday, July 6th, left Gore Bay at 10 a.m., with Mr. Holden and 
Mr. Oliver on board. Headed for Little Current, where we arrived at J1.40 
a.m., took Mr, Irwin on and proceeded on to Killarney for the night. Left 
Killarney next morning, running down the shore and stopping at Tod 
Island, with Mr. Oliver, Mr. Irwin and Mr. Holden on board. Dropped 
anchor and put power boat in the water, and Mr. Holden and men left the 
"^dna Ivan" and found trap nets around the shore of Tod Island. Picked 
up 6 traps and one seine, and destroyed same by burning on the rocks. 
Reached Killarney at 6.15, where Mr. Irwin left the boat. Next morning 
we went to Little Current, leaving Mr. Oliver there, and proceeded to Gore 
Bay with Mr, Holden on board. Put on coal and provisions at Gore Bay, 
and left again on Thursday morning for Little Current, going down through 
Maple Channel to Little Current, Got power boat in shape to run and left 
Little Current at 11.40, with Mr. Oliver and Mr. Holden on board. Ran 
down Wabuno Channel to Wells Island, where Mr. Oliver and Mr. Holden 
left by power boat and returned at 5 p.m. After leaving Wells Island, rtin 
west to Holy Island, and then returned to Little Current, where we arrived 
at 11 p.m. The power boat had broken her coupling pin, which we repaired 
next day before leaving for Killarney^ where we remained one hour and left 
again in a big sea foj the Bustards. Mr. Oliver and Mr. Holden left in the 
power boat to go to one of the fish houses, and they returned with Mr. Black, 
fish inspector. The power boat worked well all day. Left the Bustards on 
Saturday morning at 7.40. Weather fine but smoky, with a big sea on. 
Detained outside in getting hold of the ranges on account of the haze on 
the land, but found them and proceeded to Byng Inlet j arriving about noon. 
Took Mr. Holden up the river by power boat to the bridge to take the train. 
Mr. Oliver still on board. Remained at Byng Inlet over Sunday, and also 
over Monday, waiting for Mr. Knight. Worked all day at gasoline boat 
and could not get her to run. Left Byng Inlet at 10 a.m. Tuesday, with Mr. 
Knight. Arrived at Point au Baril about 1.30 p.m. Stopped at two docks, 
and left there at 3.30, ran down the channel and stopped five miles from 
Point au Baril, put power boat in and called at fishing cottages and disposed 
of some permits to parties who had not got them, and returned to the steamer 
for the night. On Wednesday morning, left the boat with Mr. Knight and 
called at more cottages, and patrolled all round the bays, returning again 
to the steamer and got under way at 9.15 a.m. Ran down the channel five 
miles and stopped, made tug fast to rock and left with power boat at 10 a.m., 



70 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



dragging and patrolling all around Shawanaga Bay, and returned to 
steamer at noon, after being out two hours with the power boat, which was 
running all right. Got under way again at 1 p.m., and as the wind was too 
strong to do more, we went on to Parry Sound, where we remained over 
night, leaving again next morning at 6.45. Ran down through the Wabuno 
Channel and stopped at Tottens Island. Mr. Knight left with the power 
boat at 12.45 with two men to patrol as far as Moose Point, returning to 
steamer at 7.40, After supper called at two cottages, and returned at 9 p.m. 
for the night, making the boat fast to a rock. The weather was stormy on 
Friday morning, with rain, and wind blowing a gale. Not fit to send the 
boat out, so left Turning Island at 8.45, and came out by Lone Eock and on 
to Methodist Bay. Still raining hard with a big sea all the way down. 
Arrived at the dock at 1 p.m. Still too stormy to work the boat, so remained 
over night, leaving again next morning at 7.30. Mr. Knight put the boat 
in the water and patrolled round Methodist Bay and Point, but found 
nothing wrong. Then ran over on east side of Giant's Tomb, when it started 
to rain hard. Ran down to the north end and stopped at 10 a.m. The boat 
broke down after patrolling the west side of Giant's Tomb. Got under way 
about 2.30 and reached Penetang at 4.30, where Mr. Knight left for Parry 
Sound. Spent Sunday at Penetang. 

On Monday, the 20th July, left Penetang at 5.45 a.m., passed through 
Christian Channel and shaped our course to Griffith Island, thence down 
the bay to Owen Sound, where Mr. Jermyn came on board. Left 
Owen Sound at 9 a.m. Tuesday morning, taking Mr. Holden and 
Mr. Jermyn. Ran out in the bay and circled around off Griffith 
Island, but found nothing out of the way. From there went on to Cabot's 
Head. Abreast of Winfield Beacon picked up a fish buoy with small mesh 
net attached — about 536 yards, which Mr. Holden ordered taken on board. 
We then continued on our way to Tobermory, where Mr. Jermyn left the 
boat. Did not leave till ten o'cock next morning, being detained by fog. 
Went out by Club Island, and found nothing doing there, so proceeded to 
Killarney, and thence to Little Current. Next morning shaped our course 
up 'the bay through rain and fog, arriving at Gore bay at 11.30 with Mr. 
Holden still on board. Remained at Gore Bay balance of the day and all 
night, and next day went to Blind River and on to Thessalon for the night. 
Left again on Saturday morning for Bruce Mines, and thence to Sault Ste. 
Marie, calling at Hilton, Richard's Landing and Desbarats on the way. 
Remained at the Soo over Sunday and until 4 p.m. on Monday, when, with 
Mr. Hand and Mr. Holden on board we left for Point au Pins, where we 
spent the night, leaving again next day for Gros Cap and along the coast 
and down the bay to Goulais Bay, and thence to Batchewana Bay. On 
Wednesday we put the gasoline boat in the water and ran over to the Chip- 
pay River and up the Batchewana River about three miles, returning to 
steamer at noon. Left again at 1 p.m., and ran up the shore to Rosseau 
Harbour, and then to Agawa Bay. 

On Thursday as the wind was off the lake with a big sea, we shifted out 
into deep water and hung on till 3 a.m. Started to get under way, got anchor 
up at 4 a.m. and worked slowly up the lake, ran past Sand and Gravel Rivers, 
but did not call as there was too much sea to land a boat. Arrived at Gar- 
gantau at 7 a.m. and were shut in by fog until 1.25 p.m., when we started 
for Michipicoten, but could not make any stops on the way on acount of the 
wind and heavy sea. Left next morning for the Island, and were out li 
hours when the wind came down from the west with a big sea. Turned back 
at 11.30 a.m. and ran for Gros Cap, where we remained until next morning 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 71 



at 4,50, when we shaped our course for Michipicoten through squalls and 
rain all the way over. Arrived there at 10 a.m., with Mr. Holden and Mr. 
Hand on board. Spent the balance of the day putting in new bridge wall 
in furnace and cleaning boiler. Remained there over Sunday. Left again 
at 5.45 a.m. Monday for Jackfish with the sea dead astern. Shut in with 
fog until 5 p.m. and had to stop for two hours. Arrived at Jackfish at 6.30 
p.m. after a hard day's run with sea and fog. Left there next morning at 
7.15 for Rossport, where we arrived at 11.15 and waited for Mr. C, N. 
Sterling, Game and Fishery Warden, and found lots to do, as Mr. Holden 
wanted to see some of the fishermen. Remained there over night, and left again 
at 2 p.m., steaming slowly up Nipigon Bay and stopped at Simpson's Island 
one hour on account of fog. Came to anchor under the main land, wind blow- 
ing hard. Mr. Holden and Mr. Sterling on board. Commenced to get under 
way on Thursday morning at 7.30. Ran down to Jack Pine Bay, where we 
left gasoline boat in water and went on shore and found a party of 13 men' 
camped in the Bay from Houghton, Michigan, without angling permits. 
After supplying them with permits, we returned to the steamer and headed 
for Nipigon River, arriving off the river at 1 p.m. Weather stormy. Anchored 
and came into river with gasoline boat, then returned and got under way, 
and came in the harbour, as it began to blow a gale. Arrived at dock at 6 
p.m. Yery stormy. Left on Friday at 2 p.m. after the wind died down, 
and came slowly down the river and got over the bar all right, hoisted gaso- 
line boat on deck and shaped our course for Nipigon Straits, anchoring inside 
Moss Island at 6 p.m. for the night. Left on Saturday at 5.40 a.m. Arrived 
at Port Arthur at 2 p.m., where we landed Mr. Holden and Mr. Sterling, 
then shifted to coal dock and put on coal, returning to Booth dock, where we 
made fast for the night. Left Port Arthur on Sunday at 5.45 a.m. for Ross- 
port, arriving there at 5 p.m. Mr. Holden and Mr. Gordon on board. Left 
again next morning by the steamboat channel and hailed down the shore to 
Jackfish harbour, where we had to remain till next day on account of fog. 
We then called at Michipicoten Island, and from there on the day following 
shaped our course to Whitefish Point and thence to Sault Ste. Marie. On 
Thursday called at Thessalon, and on Friday at Gore Bay, where we painted 
the deck and overhauled the engine. Remained there until Monday the 17th 
August, when we left for Little Current and Killarney, and on Tuesday at 
the Bustards and Byng Inlet. Yery heavy sea. On Wednesday, after the 
weather cleared somewhat, we went on to Point au Baril and Ojibway, and 
the next day went down the Inner Channel to Parry Sound, leaving again in 
the morning early for Carling Rock light, but as the wind was blowing a gale 
had to turn back to Depot Harbour and remain all day. On Saturday, started 
again at 4 a.m., but as there was too big a sea on, had to turn back to the 
Pancakes, where we dropped anchor and remained all night. On Sunday 
we tried it again, but once more had to return to Depot Harbour, which place 
we left on Monday at 4.30 a.m., arriving at Penetang at noon. Next day 
called at Beckwith Island, Lone Rock Island and Big Gull Rock, and on to 
Sans.Souci, where we arrived at 4 p.m., and at 7 p.m. shifted over to Copper 
Head Island and made fast for the night. On Wednesday went up the 
Wabuno Channel and out by Snxrg Harbour ranges, up Point au Baril Chan- 
nel and stopped at Point au Baril. Called on some of the hotels, and stayed 
all night. Patrolled round Copper Head and Sans Souci with power boat, 
and found everything all right. Sold three angling permits at Oldfield's 
House. On Thursday had small boat round Point au Baril and Ojibway for 
three hours, and called at some cottages, where we found all with permits. 
On Friday the 28th went down the inner channel and out by Red Rock to 
Parrv Sound, leaving next morning for Penetang, where we remained over 
Sunday. 



72 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



On Monday left Penetang with Mr. Holden on board, out by the Christian 
Island for Collingwood. The next few days were spent between Collingwood, 
Meaford, Wiarton, Owen Sound, Lion's Head and Tobermory, with Mr. Hol- 
den and Mr. Jermyn on board. The week following called at Southampton, 
Goderich, Sarnia, Walkerville, Windsor (where we took on Mr. Victor 
Chauvin), Sandwich, Kingsville, and Pelee Island. Weather very smoky. 
Searched for gill nets round the Hen and Chickens, but found nothing. Spent 
Saturday and Sujiday at Walkerville. Navigation stopped on account of 
smoke. 

On Monday, the 14th September left Walkerville for Lake St. Clair, 
where the smoke was so dense we could see nothing, so turned back to Windsor 
and landed Mr. Chauvin and then ran down to Sandwich coal dock, where we 
filled up with coal and returned to Walkerville. Left again on Tuesday with 
Mr. Chauvin, stopped at Toronto Club a short time, and continued on up the 
river, when we ran into the smoke again. Arrived at Sarnia at 5.30 p.m., 
and remained for the night. Started at 6.15 Wednesday morning, and found 
it very smoky up the coast to Kettle Point, where we found a gasoline boat, 
which we found belonged to a party who was fishing with gill nets, and as his 
name was not on my list, Mr. Chauvin made note of same. Proceeded on to 
Grand Bend, where we arrived at 11.30, put the gasoline boat in the water, 
and found she was leaking badly, and engine would not work, so used the oars 
and rowed ashore. Next day called at Lambton and the Toronto Club, where 
Mr. Little, Game and Fishery Overseer came on board. Shut in by fog on 
Friday until 9.10 a.m., when we went out through the cut and over to 
Mitchell's Bay and let go anchor in 12 ft. Mr. Little and Mr. Chauvin 
went out by gasoline boat and boarded us at 1 p.m., and after dinner left for 
the Thames. Yery smoky. Coasted along the shore, arriving at the Thames 
River at 4 p.m., where we stopped for the night. Left again next morning 
and ran down the lake. Still very smoky. Ran for two hours, stopped to 
lift a buoy, and found nothing on it. Mr. Chauvin took the boat and went 
over to the pound nets and down the Isle aux Peches Channel. 

On his return, left for Walkerville, where we were forced to remain for 
the next nine days on account of the smoke. 

On Wednesday, September 30th, left Walkerville at 9 a.m. with yacht 
"Yega" in tow out on Lake St. Clair. Found the sea too much for the yacht, 
as the wind had freshened to a gale and the sea choppy. Turned back to 
Peche Island, when it commenced to rain and wind shifted to southwest, so 
left the island and ran across the lake with the wind and sea astern, about 
all the yacht could stand, and up the river, stopping at the Crystal Salt dock, 
and discovered that the yacht had made some water while crossing the lake. 
Left next morning at 6.15 a.m. Weather fine. Arrived at Sarnia at 10 a.m., 
where Mr. Holden came on board. Northwest storm warnings were out, so 
remained there for change of weather, as it was necessary to choose good 
weather with the yacht in tow. Left Sarnia on Saturday, having had to 
remain there all day Friday. Called at Point Edward and went on to 
Goderich. The "Yega" behaved very well all the way up. Left Goderich 
at 8 a.m. Sunday, October 4th, for Kincardine. Yery smoky. Next morn- 
ing went on to Southampton, got Mr. Robertson, Game and Fishery Overseer, 
and ran out five miles, but found too big a sea for the yacht, and the smoke 
too dense, so returned to the harbour and remained over night. Could not 
leave next day until 1.30 on account of the smoke, when we went in to Main 
Station and stayed till Friday till the sea calmed down. Called at Johnison's 
Harbour on our way to Tobermory, and on Saturday proceeded to Little 
Current and found the "Yega" in good shape when we handed her over to 
Mr. Oliver, Game and Fishery Overseer. Left Little Current on Sunday for 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES 73 



Gore Bay, and on Monday, with Mr. Holden and Mr. Oliver on board pro- 
ceeded to Meldrum Bay, where we were detained until Wednesday by smoke. 
Left there for Duck Islands, and were again detained by smoke until Sunday, 
October 18, when we left for Gore Bay^ and on Monday proceded to Little 
Current, where we had to remain Wednesday the 28th. Navigation was 
completely blocked by smoke. No boats running. On Wednesday stopped 
at Tobermory on our way to Southampton, at which place we were storm 
bound until Monday the 2nd November, when we returned to Tobermory 
through a very heavy sea. Left again Tuesday at 7 a.m., and ran in to Lion's 
Head for shelter from the gale. Very heavy seas next day breaking over 
the pier and the "Edna Ivan." All hands at work getting out ropes. At 
T.30 shifted into more sheltered place. Blowing a gale all day and very cold, 
Lion's Head a very poor harbour in gales from the north and northeast. Three 
boats broke away from pier and went on the beach — one tug a total wreck. 
Left Lion's Head next morning in the teeth of a gale with a big sea, cleared 
Cape Croker at 9.30 a.m., and arrived Owen Sound at noon, and did not 
leave again until Saturday when we went out the bay and past Cape Rich, 
but could not make Meaford on account of the big sea, so shaped our course 
for Collingwood, arriving at 1.30 p.m. after a big rolling all the way down. 
Spent Sunday at Collingwood, and left on Monday for Meaford, and on Tues- 
day returned to Collingwood for inspection, and as the weather was very 
stormy remained there until Thursday, when we only got as far as Meaford. 
Went to Wiarton on Friday, and got Mr. Jermyn, Game and Fishery Over- 
seer. Mr. Holden got ashore at Whitecloud Island dock, and there found a 
quantity of salt fish, which he put on board, and then went slowly round the 
island, but saw nothing more. Returned to Wiarton, when Mr. Jermyn left the 
boat, and we proceeded through a heavy snow storm to Tobermory and 
remained over Sunday. The following day ran to Killarney, and from there 
to the Bustards with Mr. Holden and Mr. Irwin on board. After dinner 
they put on board about twelve trap nets and one seine, and found nothing 
more, so left the Bustards at 3.30 p.m. for French River. Next day went to 
Byng Inlet through stormy weather, and on Thursday tried to get out but 
had to turn back to harbour. As the sea was calm next morning we left at 6.45 
and had a fine passage all the way to Killarney, where we arrived at noon. 
On Saturday went to Little Current, and left for Gore Bay, where we remained 
till Monday, putting ofE all the trap nets and boxing up one large seine and 
one small seine. Made an attempt to leave Gore Bay at noon, but after being 
out about an hour had to return on account of bad weather. The same thing 
happened next day, but on Wednesday we were more successful. Left at 6.10 
a.m.. shaping our course for Cockburn Island. Arrived at Thomson's Point 
at 11 a.m., got two lines on steamer "Winona," which was stranded, and 
helned to pull her ofF. Worked two hours and returned to Cockburn dock, 
nnd then on to Meldrum harbour. Went on to Gore Bay next morning, 
leaving again at one for Little Current, where we had to remain until Sunday, 
when we left for Gore Bay, and on Monday turned the steamer over to Messrs. 
Purvis Bros. 



74 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



REPOET OF WORK PERFORMED BY THE PATROL BOATS "EVA 
BELL" AND "NAIAD" ON THE RIDEAU WATERS DURING 
THE SEASON OF 1908. 

The "Eva Bell" steamed up and left port at 2.30 p.m., Saturday, May 
2iid. Ran to Gem Island and remained over Sunday. On Monday took a 
general run over the lake, where fishing was likely to be going on, but saw 
nothing illegal. On Tuesday patrolled Noble's Bay with rowboat, and 
several of the smaller bays. As Wednesday was a very wet day, did not steam 
up, but on Thursday patrolled Adam's Lake and north shore of Rideau Lake 
for three or four miles, going round several of the small islands, and next 
day came down to Beist's wharf and patrolled McVeity's Bay with rowboat, 
and on Saturday patrolled the route to Smith's Falls. In port at Smith's 
Falls on Sunday, steamer in charge of engineer. Left for Kingston to view 
the yacht "I'll See" upon receipt of telegram from Mr. Taudvin, and returned 
next afternoon, having received information of illegal trapping at Toledo, 
where next day we fined a party for illegal trapping and returned to Smith's 
Falls at 5 p.m. On Wednesday left for the Rideau at 6 a.m. and went as 
far as Newboro, patrolling the Big Rideau, then proceeded on to Devil's Lake 
on Thursday — a place inaccessible with steamer except in very high water, 
but noted for its large salmon. Left Devil's Lake next day and came back 
to Newboro, and on down the Rideau to Oak Island, leaving Oak Island on 
Saturday for Camp Ottawa, where we were delayed while we fixed the rudder 
post. Proceeded on down to Smith's Falls. 

On Monday, the 18th left for the Rideau, patrolling around Stonehouse 
Point and in towards the Tay on the way up. Next day the wind was blow- 
ing and quite rough. Patrolled with rowboat along north shore from Gem 
Island to Hogg's Creek. The next few days called at Portland, Trout Island, 
Tar Island, Murphy's Bay, Little Boy's Camp and back to Smith's Falls to 
get mail and attend to business in general. Monday, the 25th being Victoria 
Day, did not steam up, but on Tuesday started at 6 a.m. for the Rideau and 
went as far as the "Highlands," where we tied up for a couple of hours on 
account of wind. Then went on to Oak Island for the night. On Wednesday, 
we ran over upper salmon grounds and around Grindstone Island. Patrolled 
shore with rowboat. Next day ran around Turnip Island, also Trout Island, 
but did not find any nets. Went down to Gem Island for the night. From 
there went up through the Rocky Narrows, crossed over to the north shore as 
far as the "Muskrat Hole," and on Saturday arrived at Smith's Falls, where 
we got our mail and supply of coal for Kingston trip, and returned to the 
Rideau for Sunday. On Monday morning we took the route to Kingston and 
stayed at Jones Falls over night. Sold two permits on the way up for catch- 
ing salmon. Spent the most of the next two days at the Kingston foundry 
looking over the yacht "I'll See," and seeing engine taken apart. Left Kings- 
ton again on Thursday on the return trip, arriving at Oak Island at 8.15 
p.m., and on Friday called at the American clubhouses and camps, but there 
were no new arrivals. Spent the next three days at Smith's Falls, and on 
Tuesday got information of illegal fishing, and took steamer on to Gem Island, 
tied up and rowed back to Stonehouse Point and in towards Pike Falls. 
Grappled and found one gill net about 80 yards long, which we confiscated. 
Worked around that vicinity well but found nothing more. On Thursday 
steamed up and ran up through the Rocky Narrows and on to Portland, mak- 
ing several calls at cottages on the way. Ran over salmon grounds, and 
remained on Oak Island. Next day we left steamer and patrolled with row- 
boat around Grindstone Island and Turnip Island, then came back and ran 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 75 



steamer up to Trout Island aud down shore to Hogg's creek, wliich we patrolled 
on Saturday with rowboat, and then returned to steamer and took the route 
to Smith's Falls. 

On Sunday, May 14th, left the steamer "Eva Bell" at Smith's Falls and 
went to Kingston by train with engineer to take charge of yacht "I'll See." 
Spent Monday getting ready for a start. Made a short run to Wolfe Island 
and back in the evening, and next day left Kingston with "I'll See," having 
Mr. Cox and Capt. Hunter on board. Remained at Newboro over night. As 
things were not going very satisfactorily, returned to Kingston, where we took 
train for Smith's Falls, where we arrived at 8.10 a.m. Got ready and started 
for the Rideau with the "Eva Bell," and arrived at Gem Island at 7.30 p.m. 
There was such a gale on Friday that, after trying to go to Portland, we had 
to turn back. Took rowboat and patrolled Adams Lake. On Saturday came 
down to Rideau Ferry, stayed an hour and proceeded on to the Tay. Patrol- 
led slowly down to Box's Island and on to Smith's Falls. 

On Monday, June 22nd, started for the Rideau. Ran to Westport and 
saw Mr. Whaley, Game and Fishery Overseer. Proceeded on to Newboro and 
did some business there and returned to the Little Rideau for the night. Next 
morning came down to the Big Rideau and ran in to Portland, stayed at the 
"Little Boys' Camp" (American) over night. 

For the rest of the week we ran over the salmon grounds and down the 
south shore to Murphy's Point, patrolling along the shore with rowboat. Took 
rowboat and went up Noble's Bay, then with steamer down to McVeity's 
Bay. then proceeded on down to Stonehouse Point, where we grappled for 
a while, but got nothing. Went to Smith's Falls, got mail and returned to 
the Rideau for Sunday. 

Monday the 29th, ran to Rideau Ferry, and measured out two barrels 
of gasoline, and on Tuesday left at 3 a.m. for Jones Falls with steamer "Eva 
Bell" to meet steamer "Naiad." Arrived at 8 a.m., exchanged boats and 
returned to Rideau Ferry for the night. On Wednesday (Dominion Day) ran 
to Sm,ith's Falls with "Naiad," and back to the Ferry same night to repair 
pumps. Spent next day overhauling pumps at ferry, under supervision of 
Hugh Harold, engineer. The whole of next week worked at boat, and on 
Monday, 13th July, steamed up and ran to Rideau Ferry, then to Garrett's 
Rest, called at Portland and all the clubhouses, found everything all right, 
stopped at Newboro, and arrived at Jones Falls in the evening. On Tuesday 
took Overseer McG.uire along and ran to Seeley's Bay, patrolled Whitefish 
and Cranberry Lakes, and as far as Dog Lake with rowboat. The following 
day patrolled Sand Lake, Indian, Clear, Mud, and the Little Rideau, then 
called at the "Bungalow" clubhouse, Garrett's Rest, and on to Gem Island 
for the night. On Thursday ran to Rideau Ferry, and on to Smith's Falls, 
took on coal, and left at 2 p.m., patrolling north shore back to the Big Rideau 
for the night. On Friday patrolled north shore to "Little Boys' Camp," 
called at "Anglers' Inn" clubhouse and at Portland, came down south shore 
and arrived at Gem Island at 5.30 p.m. Raining hard all day. Stopped for 
the night. Next day left at 7.30 a.m., patrolled to ferry and on to Tay locks, 
up Tay Canal to Perth, then back to Big Rideau and on to Gem Island. 

Mondav the 20th Julv. patrolled the waters to Smith's Falls, where we 
took on coal, then ran to Stonehouse and patrolled the Tay and back to Gem 
Island. Next day ran to Garrett's Rest and sold two permits, called at 
Anerlers' Inn. Rothschild's clubhouse and Portland, visited Camp "Ottawa" 
and seized minnow seine, and fined the oruilty parties. Instead of steaming 
up on Wednesday, drove to Port Elmsley to look after some illeqral 
business, and fined a party for buying and selling bass. Drove 
\o Perth next day, and gave a case to Mr. Burke to look after. On Friday 



76 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



steamed up at 6.30 a.m. and ran up nortk shore to Murphy's Point, crossed 
over and came down south shore to Rideau Ferry and on to Smith's Falls, 
took on coal for the next week, and returned to the Itideau. Took the south 
shore on Saturday for Portland, attended to business there and returned by 
north shore, calling at Rothschild's clubhouse, Houseboat, and Garrett's 
Rest. Patrolled McVeity's Bay in the evening with rowboat. 

At 6.30 a.m. Monday, the 27th, we steamed up and ran to Portland to 
watch fishermen going out and see that all had permits. Left at 9 a.m. and 
ran to Newboro. Patrolled to Jones Palls. Tourists report fishing good. Tues- 
day patrolled Sand Lake, Clear and Indian Lakes, and on to Newboro for 
dinner. Left at 2 p.m. and ran down to the Big Rideau for the night. On 
Wednesday patrolled south shore in to Portland, then on to Garrett's Rest, 
calling at Anglers' Inn Clubhouse, where we found every thing all right. 
Patrolled on to Gem Island for the night. Next day patrolled south shore 
to Rideau Ferry, where we stopped for a while, and then on to Smith's Falls, 
where we got mail and attended to business and left at 3.30 p.m. for the 
Big Rideau. On Friday ran to Portland, calling at all the summer resorts, 
finding everything right. Crossed over and came down the north shore, 
stopped at Hogg's Creek and examined some boats which were fishing. None 
of them had the limit. We did not take the steamer out on Saturday, but 
had her cleaned. Took the engineer and patrolled Noble's Bay with rowboat, 
watching four American boats. Examined them when they came in, and 
found that six bass was the most any of them had. 

On the 3rd August steamed up at 4.30 a.m. and proceeded to Kingston 
for repairs, arriving there about 6 p.m. Commenced work on Tuesday on 
engine at Kingston foundry, and finished up next day. Left Kingston on 
Thursday at 6.30 a.m. with Capt. Hunter on board. Ran against a floating 
log and broke a bucket off the wheel. Ran on to Newboro and remained for 
the night, leaving next day for the Big Rideau. Arrived at Gem Island at 
11 a.m. Drove to Perth in the afternoon to post reports. On Saturday 
patrolled Adam's Lake with rowboat, and then went across to Otty Lake to 
see what was going on there. Found everything all right. 

The next few days were spent in patrolling the north and south shores, 
Noble's Bay, McVeity's Bay and Adam's Lake, calling at all the clubhouses. 
On Thursday ran to Smith's Falls to put on wheel, and on Friday went to 
Portland, Newboro, Chaffey's Locks, and back to the Rideau for the night. 
Left at midnight for Poonahamalee to watch ducks, but found no shooting. 

On Monday the 17th, patrolled with steamer ais far as Rideau Ferry and 
back, and on Tuesday as far as Smith's Falls. Did not steam up on Wednes- 
day, but men patrolled Adam's Lake and Noble's Bay with rowboat. Next 
day steamed up at 7 a.m., ran to Portland, calling at all the clubhouses, where 
we found things all right. The men patrolled Hogg's Creek on Friday with 
rowboat, and on down the north shore to McYeity's Bay. On Saturday ran 
as far as Smith's Falls and took on coal, patrolled back as far as Garrett's 
Rock and arrived at Gem Island at 8 p.m. 

Steamed up on Monday at 5.45 a.m. and started for Kingston Mills, 
arriving about 3 p.m. Hired horse and drove ten miles to see Mr. Fisher, but 
could get no information. Left Kingston Mills again next morning, going 
down to Brewers. Remained on the Little Rideau all night, and in the 
morning went down to the Big Rideau. Ran over the upper salmon grounds 
and examined several boats, but found nothing wrong. Went oh down to Gem 
Island. Next morning visited Portland, called at Garrett's Rest and Roths- 
child's clubhouse and at Little Boys' Camp. (American). 

Friday and Saturday were spent in patrolling the waters to Smith's 
Falls, returning to the Rideau to watfch duck grounds. 



1908 GAME AND FISHERIES. 77 



Monday, August 31st, patrolled south shore to Portland, collected 
August revenue for permits and called at all the clubhouses, when tourists 
reported the fishing good. Next day patrolled the waters to Newboro and on 
to the Elbow to the foot of Clear Lake to get some information. Left at 
7.30 on Wednesday and patrolled back to the Big E-ideau. Stopped at Gar- 
rett's Rest over night to watch fishermen coming in, and next day ran across 
the upper salmon grounds and sighted several boats, but no one had made 
a catch. Called at Anglers' Inn, and on down north shore to Gem Island. 
On Friday cleaned yacht, and took engineer to patrol with rowboat Murphy's 
Bay and north shore of Tar Island. When we returned the engineer cleaned 
out boiler and hull of boat. On Saturday we steamed up and patrolled the 
waters to Smith's Falls, took on coal for coming week, made out reports and 
attended to business in general. 

Monday, 7th September, (Labour Day). Steamed up at 7 a.m. and pro- 
ceeded to the Rideau, patrolled to Garrett's Rest and on to Oak Island, where 
we stopped for the night, leaving next day for Newboro and Jones Falls, 
and on Wednesday patrolled Sand, Indian and Clear Lakes, and then went 
down to the Big Rideau. Ran into Horseshoe Bay and stayed all night. On 
Thursday ran over upper salmon grounds to Portland and called at all the 
clubhouses. Not many tourists left. Went .down to Noble's Bay for the 
night, and the following day patrolled all the bays down to the Tay locks, 
and across to Stonehouse Point and back by the south shore to Gem Island,, 
leaving on Saturday for Smith's Falls, where the boat was cleaned up and 
things got ready for the trip to Ottawa. 

Met Mr. Loveday at train on Monday, had steam up ready to start at 
2 p.m., ran down to Merrickville, got Mr. Boyd, Game and Fishery Over- 
seer, and patrolled down to Burritt's Rapids. The following day took row- 
boat about 6 a.m. and patrolled about six miles, but found nothing. Ran 
on to Wellington for dinner, then patrolled Cranberry Bay with rowboat, 
and on to Manotick for the night. Broke our wheel just below Wellington. 
Left at 8 a.m. on Wednesday, patrolling down to Ottawa, arriving about 
3.30 p.m., amid dense clouds of fog and smoke. Left Ottawa again on Thurs- 
day at 8.30 a.m., and proceeded very slowly. The water was fully three 
feet lower than at the beginning of the season. Stayed over night above 
Merrickville, and the following day patrolled slowly on the way up, but 
saw no sign of any nets. Could not get the steamer into Jones Lock to fix 
the wheel until Monday morning early, when five hours were spent repair- 
ing boat and getting wheel fixed. Left at 1 p.m. and ran as far as Bachus' 
Island, when eccentric rod broke, and had to anchor steamer and return to 
Smith's Falls with rowboat for repairs. Next day, after rod was repaired, 
patrolled as far as Gem Island and stopped for the night. On Wednesday 
we patrolled all the bays on the north shore from Adams' Lake up to Hogg's 
Creek with rowboat, but the weather was so foggy and smoky no one was 
out. On Thursday we steamed up at 7.30 a.m. and ran to Portland, call- 
ing at Garrett's Rest and clubhouse, crossed over salmon grounds and 
patrolled north shore down to Gem Island. The following day patrolled 
McVeity's Bay and McLean's Bay with rowboat, but it was so smoky had 
to give it up. Cleaned up the steamer in the afternoon, and on Saturday 
ran as far as Rideau Ferry, where we stopped for a while for the atmosphere 
to clear, and then on to Smith's Falls. 

As the Poolamalee Lock was under repair, we could not get through 
until Monday afternoon, when we ran to McDonald's Bay for the night, and 
next day patrolled round Stonehouse Point with rowboat, but found nothing. 
After leaving there we went on to Gem Island, and on Wednesday drove to 



78 THE REPORT UPON No. 32 



Lombardy re sawdust in Otter Creek, and found that no refuse was falling 
into creek. On Thursday, October 1, patrolled with rowboat south shore of 
Rocky Narrows as far as Guinea Point, and in the afternoon Noble's Bay 
and part of Adam's Lake. The following day took a general run over the 
Upper Rideau, patrolling with rowboat around Trout Island and Grindstone 
Island, stopping at Oak Island for the night, leaving again at 8 a.m. on 
Saturday and ran over to Portland. Collected permit revenue, and attended 
to business. Called at clubhouses on the way, and proceeded to Smith's 
Falls. 

On Monday, October 5th, spent the forenoon fixing stern bearing and at 
1 p.m. steamed up and left for the Bideau, going as far as Noble's Bay and 
stopped for the night. As Tuesday was very foggy, did not take the 
steamer out, but patrolled with rowboat both shores of the Rocky Narrows 
and several of the small bays. The atmosphere was clearer on Wednesday, 
so we steamed up at 7 a.m. and patrolled as far as Newboro and then on to 
Jones Falls, leaving there the following day and patrolling Sand Lake 
down to Fleming's Bay, and on to the Little Rideau. On Friday left at 
6 a.m. for the Big Rideau, taking a general run over the lake. Left the 
steamer in Gould's Bay, took rowboat and went up to Minnow Bay, but 
found nothing. On Saturday, went over to Ottv Lake and found everything 
all right there. Steamed up at 1.30 p.m. and took the route for Smith's 
Falls. 

On Monday, October 12th, left Smith's Falls about 8.30 a.m. for Best's 
Landing and Jones Falls, leaving the latter place on Tuesday for Kings- 
ton, where we arrived in the afternoon and tied up for the night. The fol- 
lowing day gave the Steamer "Naiad" to Captain Hunter, and returned home 
by train, along with the engineer and boy. 



REPORT OF THE ''NAIAD," CONTINUED BY CAPT. ESFORD. 

On October 16th left Kingston at 3 p.m. and patrolled to Deseronto. 
Next day patrolled the waters from Dcvseronto to Belleville. Overhauled 
three fish buyers' boats, but found nothing in them but a light catch of 
whitefish and a few bullheads. On Saturday patrolled to Glenora, calling 
at a number of fishermen's places, examined and measured a lot of nets and 
two fish houses, and found everything according to law. Returned to Belle- 
ville at five, and left again on Monday morning, patrolling to Murray Canal 
and Trenton, and back to Belleville. The following day patrolled to Picton, 
examined some nets of fishermen, but found everything correct. Left Picton 
next morning for Belleville, calling at the Napanee River, encountered 
nearly all the fishermen, examined three fish buyers' packing houses, but 
found nothing wrong. On information received that illegal fishing was 
being carried on in Weller's Bay, started on Thursday to investigate, but 
on getting as far as Presque Isle light, found the sea too heavy to proceed, 
so patrolled back to Belleville, which place we left next morning for Kings- 
ton, examining fish houses on the way, measured three fishermen's nets and 
found everything all right. On Saturday patrolled to Collin's Bay and 
back to Kingston, and did not go out again until Tuesday morning, when we 
left for Northport, where we remained over night on account of fog. Exam- 
ined fish houses on the way. Next day was still foggy, but we patrolled to 
Belleville, where we had to remain for two days. We employed the time 
painting the smoke stack and making sundry repairs. On Friday went to 



1908 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



79 



Deseronto, where we took Overseer Gault on board and patrolled to Napanee 
River. Tlie following day left Deseronto and patrolled to Thomson's Point, 
returning to Belleville in the afternoon. 

On Monday 3rd November, after receiving a letter from the Department, 
we immediately started for Weller's Bay. On arrival at Presque Isle light, 
found sea too heavy and had to return to Canal, where we got a horse and 
drove over to the bay, but found there that the wind blew too hard to do any- 
thing, so returned to Belleville. The following day patrolled to Napanee, 
where we seized two half sets of hoop nets in Napanee River and took action 
against the party and returned to Belleville. ' There was such a gale blowing 
on Wednesday that we could not go out, so employed the time packing the 
cylinders. Left on Thursday for Weller's Bay, but could not do anything, 
as every one knew we were coming. Storm bound at the bay until Saturday, 
when we were afraid to stay any longer, as the coal was getting short, so 
left at daylight. Heavy sea broke our port pane of glass. Arrived at Belle- 
ville at 9.30 a.m., and left again at 12.30 for Kingston. Monday, November 
10th, being a holidav. did not move out, but on Tuesday patrolled to Belle- 
ville, calling at the fish houses on the way. Took on the Dominion Inspector 
at Massaga Point. Notified all fishermen regarding nets. Next day 
patrolled to Pike Island, as two American hunters were reported to be shoot- 
ing there, but found they had a license. On Thursday patrolled from Belle- 
ville to Deseronto, examining every fish house. Next day went to Thom- 
son's Point, then returned to Belleville, calling at the fish houses and 
grappled nearly all the way, but found no nets. Left Belleville at 6 a.m. 
Saturday to see if we could catch any fishermen netting, but saw only one 
that looked suspicious. Next day patrolled to Deseronto, grappling all' the 
way. Returned to Belleville, and left again next day for Collins' Bay, 
but the sea was so heavy we had to lie at anchor till next morning. Left 
Collins' Bay next morning for .Kingston. Sea too heavy to return, so had 
to remain at Kingston until Friday, when we patrolled to Belleville, and on 
Saturday patrolled all over the bay, but could not find any nets, so returned 
to Belleville, which place we left on Sunday, as the ice was very thick. 
Went to Deseronto on Monday, and left again on Tuesday for Belleville. 
Could not go further on account of ice. Left there on Wednesday and 
patrolled to Adolphustown, returning at 3 p.m. 



LIST OF GAME AND FISHERY WARDENS. 



Name. 


Residence. 


District. 


Burt, William 


Simcoe .'. 


Ni^ara Peninsula. 


Chauvin, Victor 


Windsor 


Western District. 


Hand, T. A 


SaultSte. Marie 


District of Algoma . 


Hunter, Capt. A 


Belleville 


Eastern District. 


ParkP, G. M 


North Bay 


District of Nipissing. 


Sterling, C. N 


Kenora 


Thunder Bay and Rainy River. 


Willmott, J. H 


Beaumaris — 


Muskoka and Parry Sound . 



80 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 32 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and vahie of tugs, vessels and boats, the 

industrj- during 





Districts. 


Fishing material. 


1 


Tugs or Vessels. 


Boats. 


Gill-Nets. 


!?; 


No. 


Ton- 
nage. 


Value. 


Men. 


No. 


Value. 


Men. 


No. 


Yard.s. 


Value. 


1 

7 


Lake of the I Foods and 
Rainy River. 

Lalce of the Woods 


2 


150 


« c. 
5,100 00 


6 


9 
;■< 
2 
3 
3 
3 
9 


» c. 

2.225 00 
770 00 
225 00 
550 00 
8M0 00 
475 00 

1.725 00 


22 
8 
3 
li 
8 
6 

23 


••'-••• 


12,000 
6,000 
4,000 
6,000 

10,000 
8,000 

2H,000 


$ c. 

1,755 00 

1,025 00 

600 00 


3 


Wabigoon and Minitalcie. . 










4 


Vermillion 










S 


Eagle and Pelican 










1 .Vio no 


6 

7 


Sandy, Abraham and Long 
Rainy and Kariskong 


1 


75 


700 00 


2 


1,250 00 
3,900 00 




Totals 










3 


225 


5,800 00 


8 


32 


^770 00 


76 




72,000 


10,980 00 









Return of the kinds, quantities and values 



1 

s 


District. 


•d 

1 

t 

c 

hi 


bo 

C 

'C 

4) 


1 
si 
cc 

■§ 


5 

01 


■6 

i 

s 


S 

S 


s 


1 


Lake of the TFood* and 
Rainy River. 


brls. 


lbs. 


brls. 


lbs. 

348.652 
160.195 
8,200 
10,800 
79,100 
15,000 
72,400 


brls. 


lbs. 
4291 


lbs. 

Ill 889 


7 












36 750 


S 












7,100 
6.02.i 
8 200 
1.060 
5,660 


2 400 


<t 












6,100 
11 900 


<i 










f, 












15 100 


7 












46,360 






















694,347 




32,336 


230 499 




Values 














« c. 


« c. 


S c. 


$ C. 

. 69,434 70 


$ c. 


9 c. 
3,233 60 


$ c. 

18,439 92 















1908 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



81 



FISHERIES. 

quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the fishing 
the year 1908. 



Fishing material. 


Other fixtures used in 
fishing. 


Seines. 


Pound nets. 


Hoop nfets. 


Dip nets. 


Night lines.. 


Spears. 


Freezers and 
ice houses. 


Piers and 
wharves. 


«5 

2: 


Yds. 


Value. 


d 


Value, 


d 


Value. 


d 
Z 


Value. 


No. 
Hooks 


Value. 


6 
Z 


Value. 


d 
Z 


Value. 


d 
Z 


Value. 






» 


14 


9 c. 

3,000 00 


3 


$ c. 

575 00 




9 




S 




9 


4 


1 c. 

5,600 00 




9 


























































.... 






























































































2 

S 


300 00 
1,600 00 






... 






























. • . 






14 






























3,000 00 


3 


675 00 














14 


7,450 00 





























of fish caught during the year 1908. 



Pickerel, 
or Dore. 


1 

3 
W 


1 


J3 

2 


1 


5 


•0 

s 
«s 

«^ 


.2 

6 


CO 

QO 


a 


d 

3 
> 


lbs. lbs. 
176 281i ^ s^"^ 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 

11,760 
1,000 
1,300 
2,300 
150 
2,230 

56,663 


lbs. 

27,847 


lbs. 


lbs. 
3,200 


No. 
290 


lbs. 


8 0. 

76,338 63 














19,019 50 


1,500 
10,780 
19 700 


















1960 00 


















3,386 50 


















11,661 00 


11,040 

76,250 


















4,051 80 


1,566 








45,200 


50 






25,074 68 


296,55ll 56,885 






75.403 


27,847 


45.200 


3,250 


290 




$141,482 01 


j 

$ C.| J c 

29 555 10 « S82 7.'S 


9 c. 


$ c. 


$ C. 

4.524 18 


9 c. 

2,227 76 


$ c 

2,260 00 


3,250 00 


$ C. 

174 00 


$ c. 


9 c. 

141,482 01 






' 













6 G. 



82 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 32 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, the 

industry during 





District. 


Fishing material 


S 
1 


Tugs or Vessels. 


Boats. 


Gill-Nets. 


No. 


Ton- 
nage. 


Value. 


Men. 


No. 


Value. 


Men. 


No. 


Yards. 


Value. 


1 


Lake Superior. 
Thundor Bav 


18 


144 


« c. 

24,450 00 


71 


29 
2 
3 
4 


$ c, 
915 00 
150 00 
175 00 
436 00 


40 
4 
4 
6 




447,500 
17,000 
17,000 
173,000 
120.000 
30,000 
26.500 


$ c. 
19,930 00 


? 




750 00 


8 












7.=iO 00 


4 

5 


Michipicoten Island, 

Gargantna 


3 
2 


45 
30 


11,60660 
15,000 00 


19 
18 


8,000 00 
6,2.50 00 


6 




8 
4 


900 00 
475 00 


15 
6 






7 


Batchewaiia 














Totals 














23 


219 


50,450 00 


108 


50 


3,070 00 


75 




811,000 


35,680 00 









Return of the kinds, quantities and values 



1 

i 
2 


District. 


1 

c 
•c 
S 


Herring, fresh. 


1 

'4 

■■a 
2 


Whltefish, fresh. 


i 
1 




.c 

1 

a 
2 

H 


0) 


1 


iMke Superior. 


bils. 


lbs. 
353,905 


brls, 
5 


lbs. 

287,837 
2,500 


brls. 

2 

4 

3.200 


lbs. 

791,090 
6,000 
2,100 
200 235 
289 295 
9-800 
6-850 


lbs. 

66.507 
145 


? 


Point Mamainse 




H 


Gros Oap 










4 










28,455 
34,195 
5,800 
2,800 


2,025 


5 


Gargantna 










6 


Goulais Bav 








106 




7 














Totals 
















353,905 


5 


361,587 


3,312 


1,305,370 


68,677 




Values 






9 


9 c. 

17,695 25 


9 c. 

50 00 


$ c. 
3(3,158 70 


9 c. 

33,120 00 


9 c. 

130,537 00 


$ c. 

5,494 16 









1908 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



83 



FISHERIES. 

quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the fishing 
the vear 1908 . 











Fishing material. 












Other fixtures used in 
fishing. 


Seines. 


Pound nets. 


Hoop nets. 


Dip nets. 


Night lines. 


Spear*. 


Freezers and 
Ice houses. 


Piers and 
Wharves. 


o Yds. 


Value. 


d 

Z 


Value. 


d 
2; 


Value. 


d 


Value. 


No. 
Hooks 


Value. 


d 

SB 


Value. 


d 

^5 


Value. 


d 


Value. 






« c. 


33 


3,700 00 




S c. 




$ c. 




9 c. 




5 c. 


9 


9 c. 

3,610 00 


2 


9 c. 

12.3 00 










































































































































20 


1,000 00 


















































































2 










33 


3,700 00 


20 1,000 00 














9 


3,610 00 


125 00 



of fish caught during the year 1908 . 



Pickerel 

or Dore. 


s 

3 


« 

% 
» 


43 

H 


Tullibee. 


•s 

1 




a: 

a 


i 

■a 

|3 

3 


5 


3 
> 


lbs. 1 lbs. 
100 622 ' ^ ■"■'> 


lbs. ! lbs. 

i 


lbs. lbs. 
19885 


lbs. 

3.450 
4,000 


lbs. 


No. 


lbs. 


$ C. 
142,942 56 


35 


' 
















1,105 10 





















32,210 00 


60 








805 
900 












23,085 30 




















32.403 00 




















•-•,620 00 






















965 00 
























r — ■ 
100 717' 5 ?i7.«> 






21,690 




7,450 






235,330 96 




















« c. 

10.071 70 


« c. 

536 25 


« c. 


$ c. 


¥ c. 

1,295 40 


$ c. 


« c. 
372 60 


$ 0. 


r c. 


$ c. 


9 0. 

235,330 96 




















84 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 32 



ONTARIO 
Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, 





District, 


Fiiihing materials. 




Tuga 


or vessels. 




Boats. 


Gill nets. 


2 


d 

5c 


Ton- 
nage. 


Value. 


Men. 


d 


Value. 


Men. 


d 

55 


Yards. 


Value. 


1 


Lake Huron 
(North Channel). 

Thessiilon 






5 c. 




2 

4 
4 

1 
3 
4 

1 

2 
1 
4 

13 
4 
6 
6 

13 
7 
2 
1 
1 
5 


8 c. 

175 00 
425 00 
350 00 
500 00 
900 00 
1,050 00 
150 00 

6.54 00 

200 00 

1,600 00 

2,175 00 

1,425 00 

750 00 

1,225 00 

2,675 00 

850 00 

125 00 

50 00 

500 00 

950 00 


4 
7 
6 
2 

10 
5 
2 

4 

2 

8 

27 

4 

12 

13 

24 

12 

3 

1 

3 

10 




12,000 

9,000 

15,000 


8 c. 

400 00 


2 


St. Joseph Island 










300 00 


3 


Bruce Mines 










500 00 


4 


Missis.saaga 












5 


Haywood Island 












3,750 
60.000 
12,000 


120 00 


6 
7 
S 


Manitowaning 

Kagawong 

Badgley, Dftrch and Innis 
Islands 


1 
1 

1 
3 
1 
1 
4 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 


15 
15 

15 
67 
20 
20 
83 
40 
40 
35 
15 
20 
8 


2,700 00 
2,500 00 

1,0«0 00 
15,000 00 
5,000 00 
3,000 00 
16,500 00 
7,000 00 
5,000 00 
3,800 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
1,800 00 


5 
5 

4 

18 

6 

6 

23 

10 

10 

9 

• 4 

6 

4 


250 00 
6.200 00 


9 
10 


Meldrum Bay 

Cockburn Island 




1 '80,000 
28,000 
96,300 
198,000 
126,000 
156,000 
126,000 
22,500 
66,100 
600 


13,000 00 
5.000 00 


11 
12 


Fltzwilliam Island 

Squaw Island 


6,650 00 
10,359 00 


13 


Duck Islands 


12,600 00 


14 


South Bay Mouth 


11,075 00 


15 
16 


Killarney 

Providence Bay 


8,190 00 
1,115 00 


17 


Cape Robert 


2,660 00 


Ifi 


Bedford Island 


100 00 


19 


Point aux Grondine. 




20 


Green Island 












30,000 


2,666 CO 




Totals 














21 


393 


73,300 00 


110 


84 


16,729 00 


149 




1,141,250 


81,119 00 









Return of the kinde, quantities and values of 



1 

»5 


District, 


•6 

S 

_g 

u 

a 


.a 
1 

60 

a 

« 


1 

JS 

•■a 


4 

1 
1 


i 
1 

1 


1 
1 


Pike. 


1 


Lake Huron 
t North Channel). 

Thessalon 


Brls. 


Lbs. 


Brls. 


Lbs. 

125 

1,628 

100 

20,000 

9.036 

-30,1.55 

33,353 

76,702 

96,000 

42,485 

35,500 

91,800 

12,400 

39,078 

131,602 

7.,500 

3,000 

16,4F0 

5,055 


Br)s. 


Lbs. 

1,600 

2,650 

2,6.50 

2,000 

5,427 

9,865 

72,021 

12.052 

272,000 

17.5,445 


Lbs. 

300 


? 














3 












,525 


4 














f, 


Haywood Island 




1,000 






10,303 


6 






6,595 














S 


Badgely, Darch & Innis Islands. 
Meldrum Bay ... 




4,000 






890 


q 






' 




10 








ie 


i2 




n 


FitzwiP iam Island 


11 






166,920 




1? 








244,359 
328.000 




11 














14 


South Bay Mouth 








27 
10 


114,936; 56 


15 


Killarney. 








9e,.541. 5,420 


16 






.5,000 




17,06.Sl 2.818 


17 










108,200 

5,300 

2,500 

50,000 




18 












1,980 


19 












17,807 


70 














Totals 

Values 
















11 


10,000 


16 


657,969 


49 


1,689,434 


46,694 




9 c. 

110 00 


« c. 

500 00 


« c. 

160 00 


9 c. 

66,796 90 


$ c. 
490 00 


9 c. 

168,943 40 


9 c. 

3,656 52 



1908 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



85 



FISHERIES. 

vessels and boats, the quantity and value of all fishing material, etc. — Continued. 



Fishing materia}. 


Other fixtures used in 
fishing. 


Seines. 


Pound nets. 


Hoop nets. 


Dip nets. 


Night lines. 


Spears. 


Freezers and 
ice houses. 


Piers and, 
wharves. 


6 


Yds ': Value. 

! 


i 


Value. 


o Value. 


« Value. 


No. 
hooks. 


Value. 


1 


Value. 


6 


Value 


d 
'A 


Value. 






$ c. 




9 c. 




8 c. 




?c. 




?c. 




« c. 




Sc 




to. 




:::::: .:;:;::::; 


6 


1,000 00 






























































6 
5 


1,200 00 
1,000 00 
1,500 00 


















1 
1 
1 


500 00 
250 OC 
400 00 




























































































13 

4 

? 


2,800 00 

1,000 00 

880 00 

1,400 00 


















1 


200 00 








::::::.:::.:;;: 


























































7 


























































10 


2,000 00 




























































10 
10 


1.750 00 
2,000 00 




























































































7 

8 


1,.500 00 
1.600 00 


















1 


150 00 









































































































92 


19.630 00 


















5 


1,500 00 





























fish caught during the year 1908. — Continued. 



Pickerel, or 

Dore. 


3? 








1 


11 







e 


& 

s 


s 
■5 
> 


Lbs. 
475 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 

500 
16,832 

300 
20,000 

289 

695 


Lbs. 


No. 


Lbs. 


9 c. 

269 00 


100 


















1,''7& 40 


300 


















352 00 


11,000 


4,.500 

532 

1,270 














5,575 00 


14,174 










50 






3,882 19 
6,212 35 


15,375 






* 








1,570 
















10,^94 40 


23,858 


4,655 










2,772 


20 






12,389 25 


2,000 














37,000 00 






















22,073 00 
20,562 00 


100 












4,000 


























33,615 90 
34,040 00 




























526 
1,000 














15,702 18 




585 
5,20-2 








ib,666 


115 
50 






24,100 65 
10 676 34 


59,001 








20,274 






















11 120 00 


6,.516 
34,481 


1 875 


















3 266 25 


6.288 


















6,571 36 
5,000 00 






































168,950 


24,907 




1,526 






75,C«2 


235 






264.381 27 












. 


$ c. 

16,895 00 


1 c. 

3 736 05 




« c. 
76 30 






1 c. 

3,788 10 


8 c. 
235 00 






S c. 

264,381 27 

















86 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 32 



ONTARIO 
Return of the number of fisher u en, tonnage and value of tugs, 





District. 


Fishing materials. 


1 


Tugs 


or vessels. 




Boats. 


Gill nets. 


6 
fe5 


Ton- 
nage. 


Value. 


Men. 


i 


Value. 


Men. 





Yards. 


Value. 


1 


Georgian Bay. 


5 
2 


85 
2 


8 c. 

23,000 00 
140 00 


26 
6 


15 
16 
lo 
21 
13 
11 
52 


8 c. 
2,625 00 
1,840 00 

945 00 
2,270 00 
1,045 00 

810 00 
4,402 00 


27 
31 
30 
42 
29 
23 
98 




398,000 
52,000 
31,445 
133,000 
334.000 
192,000 
453,600 


8 c. 
17,655 00 


? 


Waubaushene 


2,880 00 


^ 


Penetanguishene 


12,000 00 


4 


Colling wood 


1 
7 
4 
7 


20 
135 
260 
100 


2,500 00 
18,900 00 

6,800 00 
18.100 00 


5 

28 
17 
36 


6.160 00 


5 


Meaford 


14,780 00 


6 


Uy ng I nlet 




7 


Colpoy's Bay & Tobermory 
Totals 


21,802 00 




26 


602 


69,440 00 


118 


143 


13,937 00 


280 




1,594,045 


64,477 00 



Return of the kinds, quantities and values, of 



i 

3 
s 
S5 


District. 


S 
be 

a 

■£ 

<u 

W 


o 

be 
a 
'C 

Ut 

<u 
33 


i 




1 
f 


Tiout, fresh. 


Pike. 


1 


Georgian Bay. 


Brls. 


Lbs. 


Brls. 


Lbs. 

241,636 
13,600 
10,905 
20,860 


Brls. 
33 


Lbs. 

230,664 
17,200 
25,460 
09,407 

327,900 
90,109 

393.814 


Lbs. 
3,240 


7 








22 
75 
3 


26,900 


3 




106 


2,500 
42,100 


177 
2 
10 


1,150 


^ 


Collingwood 




■i 




g 




25 
52 






233,135 
7,946 


8,894 




Colpoy's Bay and Tobermory. . . . 
Totals 


7,145 




iie 




' 








224>^ 


51,745 


100 


530,082 


338 


1,154,884 


40.184 




Values 






8 C. 

2,245 00 


8 C. 

2,587 25 


$ c. 
I,t00 00 


« c. 
53,008 20 


$ c. 
3,380 00 


$ C. 
115,488 40 


$ C. 
3,214 72 









1908 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



87 



FISHERIES. 

vessels and boats, the quantity and value of all fishing material, etc. — Continued. 



Fishing material. 


Other fixtures u.sed in 
fishing. 


Seines. Pound nets. 


Hoop nets. 


Dip nets. 


Nighi lines. 


Spears. 


Freezers and 
ice houses. 


Piers and 
wharves. 


6 


Yds. 


Value. 


c Value. 


o Value. 


6 


Value 


No. 
hooks. 


Value. 


55 


Value. 


d 

S5 


Value. 


d 

2; 


Value. 






« c. 




$ c. 




1 c. 


$c. 




«c. 




»c. 



5 
2 


« c. 

250 00 
200 00 


4 


% c. 

1 650 00 






















































































... 


























1 
1 
7 


5(j 66 

300 00 

3,500 00 












11 


4,800 00 








200 


200 


























1 


18 00 


































11 


4,800 00 








200 


2 00 




16 


4,300 00 


5 


1,668 00 








1 











fish caught during the year 1908. — Continued. 



s 


1 

00 


1 




i 

"5 

H 


6 


43 


2 • 

> 

5 


V 

o * 

3 
OQ 


6 


1 

> 


Lbs. 

2,178 
9,800 


Lbs. 
56 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


No. 


Lbs. 


f c. 

48,045 40 
7 163 00 








175 


9,700 
120 

8,220 






1,(»0 






370 
5,950 








6,813 00 




'4,3i6 








656 






14,252 70 














32,890 00 


19,109 


L144 










2,500 


190 






35 713 42 














42,216 25 
























81,087 


5,510 




6,320 




175 


20,540 


846 


1.600 


$187,093 77 








$ C. 
3 !08 70 


$ c. 
826 50 


$ c 


? C. 
316 00 


% c. 


$ c. 
14 00 


9 c. 
1,027 00 


$ c. 
846 00 




$ C. 

32 00 


$ 0. 

187,093 77 













38 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 32 



ONTARIO 
Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, 





District. 


Fishing material. 


i 


Tugs or vessels. 


Boats. 


Gill-nets. 


a 

a 
is, 


d 


Ton- 
nage. 


Value. 


Men. 


6 


Value. 


Men. 


No. 


Yards. 


Value. 


1 

2 


iate Huron (proper). 

Cape Hurd to Southampton 
Southampton to Pine Point 


9 
2 
2 


201 

2,980 

16 


8 c. 

82,800 00 
6,000 00 
3,200 00 


58 

11 
5 


35 

8 
18 

62 


» c. 

4.105 00 67 
1,050 00 13 
2,465 00 35 

10,875 00 118 




588,400 
156,175 
176,000 

75,000 


$ c. 

27,410 00 
2,090 00 
3,500 00 


4 


County Lambton, includ- 
ing St. Clair Kiver 


275 00 




Totals 














13 


3,197 


42,000 00 


69 


123 


18,495 00 233 




995,575 


33,275 00 



Return of the kinds, quantities and values of 





District. 


■a 
1 

.S 

V 

. a 


1 

bio 

a 
a 


'6 

i 


Si 


13 

1 

3 

2 


3 

o 
H 




I 
2 


Lake Huron (proper) . 

Cape Hurd to Southampton 

Southampton to Pine Point 


Brls. 

494 
15 


Lbs. 

27,875 
1,000 
6,610 

234,772 


Brls. 
3,315 


Lbs. 

6,787 

950 

39,855 

124,700 


Brls. 

843 
25 


Lbs. 

062.319 
175,800 
95,552 

18,724 


Lbs. 
7,831 


3 




49 


4 


County Lnmbton, including St. 
Clair River 


10 






2,735 




Totals 

Values 










519 


270,257 


3,515 


172,292 


868 


952,395 


10,615 




S c. 

5,190 00 


9 c. 

13,512 85 


» e. 
35,150 00 


» c. 

17,229 20 


« c. 

8,680 00 


8 C. 

96,239 50 


$ c. 

849 20 



1908 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



89 



FISHERIES. 

vessels and boats, the quantity and value of all fishing material, etc. — Continued. 



Fishing material. 


Other fixtures used in 
fishing. 


Seines. 


Pound nets. 


Hoop nets. 


Dip nets. 


Night lines. 


Spears. 


Freezers and 
ice houses. 


Piers and 
wharves. 


o 


Yds. 


Value. 


2 


Value. 


d 

2; 


Value. 


d Value. 


hSks. value. 


d 


Value. 


d 
55 


Value. 


d 


Value. 






$ c. 


2 


S c. 

500 00 




S c. 


3 


«c. 

3 00 




$c. 


8 


$c. 

8 00 


7 
? 


$ c. 

3.2.50 00 
500 00 
700 00 

200 no 




« 0. 




















... 






10 
31 


6,650 00 
8,550 00 






4 


4 00 










P. 






12 


648 


495 00 


1 


25 00 


500 


5 00 






1 












! 






12 


64^1 iQ.'s no 


43 


15.700 00 


1 


25 00 


7 


7 00 


500 


5 00 


8 


8 00 


16 


4,650 00 

















fish caught during the year 1908. — Continued. 



i 

o 

2 
« 

u 

0^ 


i 

3 
00 


1 




3 


si 

8 


Mixed and 
coarse fish. 


.5 

8 


il 

00 


d. 

8 


> 


Lbs. 

48 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 
25,784 


Lbs. 
17,443 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 
800 


Lbs. 
148 


No. 


Lbs. 


9 c. 

119,976 91 














18,125 00 


11,490 
310,187 


1.653 
13,040 




60,310 
10,232 


1,000 
28 


305 
356 


40,014 
98,809 


88 
914 






20,460 67 




291 


1,000 


65,965 31 












321,725 


14,693 




96,276 18.471 


661 


139,623 


1,150 


291 


1.000 


224,527 89 












S C. 

32,172 50 


> C. 

2,203 95 


$ c. 


$ C 

4,813 80 


8 c. 
1,108 26 


S c. 

52 88 


9 c. 

6,981 15 


S c. 

1,150 00 


$ c. 

174 60 


9 c. 

20 00 


9 c. 

224,527 89 









90 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 32 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, the 

industry during 





District. 


Fishing materiaJ. 


s 


Tugs or vessels. 


Boats. 


Gill-neU. 


s 


d 


Ton- 
nage. 


Value. 


Men. 


d 
>5 


Value. 


Men 


No. 


Yards. 


Value. 


1 


Lake St. Clair. 






8 c. 






S c. 


37 

190 

95 






8 c. 


? 


Lake St. Clair 

Detroit River 


10 




2,425 00 


20 


117 
34 


6,960 00 
1.911 00 








!) 










Total 


















10 




2,425 00 


20 


151 


8,871 00 


322 

















Return of the kinds, quantities and values of 



1 

'A 


District. 


i 
1 

til 
u 

a 


1 

u 

so 
_c 


1 

1 


Whitcflsh, fresh. 


1 

o 
H 


Trout, fresh. 


Pike. 


1 


Lake Si. Clair. 


Brls. 


Lbs. 


Brls. 


Lbs. 


Brls. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


') 


Lake St Clair. 




1,000 




■.'9,57.b 
24.325 






27 909 


^ 


Detroit River 










13 313 




Totals 














1,000 




53.900 






41 222 




Values 


« c. 












8 c. 

50 00 


8 c. 


8 c. 

5,390 00 


8 c. 


8 c 


8 c 

3,297 26 

















1908 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



91 



FISHERIES. 

quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the fishing 
the year 1908. 



Fishing material. 



Otlier fixtures used in 
tishing. 



Seines. 


Pound nets. 


Hoop nets. 


Dip nets. 


Night lines. 


Spears. 


Freezers and 
ice houses. 


I'iers and 
wharves. 


© 




Value 




Value. 


d 


Value. 


6 


Value. 


No. 
hooks. 


Value. 


o Value. 

7^ 


d 


Value. 


d 
Z 


Value. 






5 c. 




« c. 




« c. 


37 


9 c. 

55 0« 




$ c. 




% c. 




« c. 




S c. 


47 


X901 


2.770 00 
1,399 00 


12 


2,200 00 


1.56 


7,9-6 66 


4,950 


87 50 






10 


2,900 00 


12 


1,950 00 


33 3*027 






80 




















— 












11,318 


4,169 00 


12 


2,200 00 


156 


7,970 00 


37 


55 00 


4,950 


87 50 




10 


2,900 00 


12 


1,950 00 











fish caught during the year 1908. 



o 
•o 

© 
"3 
a> 
M 
u 


i 

u 


"3 




Tullibee. 


•2 
1 


K U 

i 


5 
> 

5 


2 

II 


d. 

S 


6 

s 

> 


Lbs. 
5,528 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 

7,195 

588,80y 

41,930 


Lbs. 


No. 


Lbs. 


9 c, 

912 55 


63,634 


33,975 
700 




72,040 
3,665 




68,999 
350 


1,366 




60,552 
2,000 


57,839 28 


6,245 




6,574 79 












75,407 


31,675 




75,705 




69,349 


637,934 


1,366 


? 0. 


62.552 


65,326 62 










8 c. 

7,540 70 


$ c. 
5,201 25 




« c. 

3,785 25 




$ c. 
5 547 92 


$ C. 
31,896 70 


$ C. 
1,366 00 


9 0. 

1,251 01 


$ C. 
65,326 62 









92 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 32 



ONTARIO 

Return of the numberof fishermen, tonnage and vahie of tugs, vessels and boats, the 

industry during 





District. 


Fishing material. 






Tugs 


or vessels. 




Boats. 


Gill-nets. 


s 


o 


Ton- 
nage. 


Value. 


Men. 


0' 


Value. 


Men. 


d 

S5 


Yards. 


Value. 


1 


Lake Erie. 
Pelee Island 


2 
2 
2 
14 
2 

f 


51 
148 
661 
184 

" ' ' 52 
55 


« c. 

9.500 01) 
14,000 00 
13,100 00 
42,650 00 
10,000 00 
13,000 00 

9,000 00 


6 
10 
16 
81 
13 
• 18 

9 


15 
41 
68 
11 
32 


$ c. 

1,925 00 

9,730 00 

16,265 00 

705 00 

9,600 00 


38 
67 
1-22 
6 
56 





22,000 
11,500 
16,000 
122,000 
22.000 
24,000 
13,000 
10,000 
3'i,000 
2,f00 
40,000 
93,000 

37,570 

48,400 


« c. 

2,100 00 
1 800 00 





Essex County 


3 




3.800 00 


4 
ft 


Elgin West 

Elgin East 


13.360 00 
3 000 00 


6 


Houghton 


1 500 00 


7 




16 

12 

23 

6 


470 66 

496 00 

1,341 00 

165 UO 


34 

25 
53 
16 




750 00 


8 


Long Point 


325 00 


q 


Charlotteville 










1,236 00 
90 00 


10 


Inner Bay 










11 


Woodhouse 


3 

6 

9 


84 
118 

43 


12,606 60 
19,000 00 

6,762 00 


18 
29 

24 


3,200 00 


1? 


Haldimand 


33 

9 
25 


1.180 00 
127 00 
650 00 


74 

9 

29 




10,839 00 

5,466 00 

824 00 


13 


Pt. Maitland to Pt. Col- 
borne 


14 


Pt. Colborne to Niagara 
Falls 




Totals 














44 


1,396 


119,012 00 


224 


291 


42,654 00 


529 




493,470 


48 290 00 









Return of the kinds, quantities and values o 



a 

a 
55 


District. 


13 


1 
be 

B 

K 


S 

b£ 


■6 

0) 

i 

••a 
S 


u 
■■r. 


•0" 

1 

s 
2 







1 


Lake Erie. 
Pelee Island 


Brls. 


Lbs. 

365 290 

229,987 

1,708,750 

4,595,792 

482,000 

187.720 

67,000 


Brls. 


L1.S. 

6,500 
176.974 
71,586 
24.171 
68.800 
38,753 
27,100 


Brls. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 
33,700 


f 


Essex County 










191 545 


S 












886,637 
68,000 


4 


Elgin West 

Hllgin East 


1 
1 




23J^ 




ft 







4,000 


fi 








26,094 


7 












12,073 
144 


n 


Long Point 










q 




15,746 










15.077 


in 








267 

60,296 

257,483 

>.a.409 

2.850 






855 


n 






190,664 

315,995 

134,571 

6,900 






504 

2,380 
1,000 




T' 






2 




2,471 
158,231 


IS 


I't. Maitland to Pt. Colborne... 
Pt. Colborne to Niagara Falls... 

Totals 

Values 






14 






8 735 














2 


5,300,415 


2 


826,189 


rsy^ 


3,884 


1,407,562 




9 c. 

20 00 


8 C. 
265,020 75 


9 c. 
20 00 


S c. 
82,618 90 


« c. 
236 00 


9 c. 

388 40 


% C. 
112,604 96 









1908 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



93 



FISHERIES. 

quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the fishing 

ihf VPAT 1908 



the year, 1908. 



Fishing material. 


Other lixtures used in 
fishing. 


Seines. 


Pound neU. 


Hoop pets. 


Dip nets. 


Night lines. 


Spears. 


Freezers and 
ice houses. 


Piers and 
wharves. 


6 

!5 


Yds. 


Value. 


6 


Value. 


6 


Value. 


o 
2 


Value. 


No. 
books. 


Value. 


d 


Value. 


§. 


Value. 


d 
Sz; 


Value. 


5 


266 


S c. 

55 00 
r.nn ivi 


9 
64 
114 


$ c. 

3.000 00 
23,050 00 
48,850 00 




S c. 




1 c. 




» c. 




$ c 


3 
25 
37 

17 
28 


$ c. 

1,200 00 
7.42U 00 

27.220 00 
6,875 00 

10,900 00 




« c. 


2 










200 


25 00 










8 


2,400j 1,075 00 


















1 


3 




8 


40 00 




















54 


23,800 00 










































19 


3.200 
1,080 
2.6<i0 
1,100 


775 00 
320 00 
705 00 
325 00 
















- 














6 














100 
















11 




























8 


































































24 

7 


5,675 00 
2,450 00 






73 
S 

1 












14 
6 


5,575 00 
3,760 00 


1 


100 00 








9 50 
3 50 


500 

■7 JM\ 
















67 50 
























" -' 














60 


10,706 


3,855 00 


272 


106,825 00 


3 




8f) 


53 00 


8,300 


92 50 






178 


62,940 00 


1 


100 00 

















fish caught (luring the year 1908. 



Pickerel ordore. 


i 

55 


1 


A 

a 

S 


1 
1 


a' 
1- 


4 
i 


6 
.2 


CO 


d. 

5 


Value. 


Lbs. 
5,350 


Lbs. 

2,200 

7,095 

20,917 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 

2,500 

78,159 

233,853 

93,607 

42,300 

19,806 

$7,489 

233 

27,374 

699 

4,276 

61,726 

19,606 

8,803 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 

836 
4,732 
1,406 

300 

885 


Lbs. 

18,175 

77,738 

127,104 

5,618 
36,200 

4,800 
43.259 

5,960 
101,249 

8,955 


Lbs. 

185 
429 
167 


No. 
9 


Lbs. 

26,500 
103.370 
109,795 


$ c. 

24,291 13 


70,545 






63,404 31 


176,764 




204,864 24 


282,346 
623,200 




121,111 55 


4,110 
47,308 












98,242 30 








2,500 
6,005 

42,750 
5,875 

30,275 


23,725 32 


7 368 






2,669 

14 

6,175 

341 






12,134 86 


55 


4,729 






718 




2,609 64 


44.214 

1,612 

245 355 






13.457 51 












1.372 02 


" " io.oT? 

5,247 
5,510 










40,362 45 


379,432 




751 

54 

425 


40.471 
15^58 
14,620 


373 
193 
935 




1,462 
287 


87,085 15 







31,3% 24 


19,420 


6,237 45 










1.855,661 


107,823 




680,420 




18.591 


500.107 


3,000 


9 


328,879 


730,244 17 


S c 


i c 

16,173 45 




f c. 

81,521 00 




$ c. 

1,487 28 


9 C. 

25,005 35 


f C. 

3,000 00 


» 0. 

5 40 


6,577 58 


$ C. 


18,\566 10 






730.244 17 









94 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 32 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, the 

industry during 





District. 


Fishing material. 




Tugs 


or vessels. 


Boats. 


Uill-nets. 


B 

a 


6 
2; 


Ton- 
nage. 


Value. 


Men. 


6 


Value. 


Men. 


* Yards 


Value. 


1 


Lake Ontario. 

Lincoln 

Wentworth 

Haltoii and Peel 






8 c. 




61 

21 

22 

1.5 



3 

12 

62 

114 

44 

20 


« c. 
4,514 00 

495 00 
5,295 01 
2,725 00 

205 00 

1»0 00 
1.190 00 
9,29(> 00 
5,328 00 
1,580 00 

780 00 


81 
28 
47 




91,0.50 

59,900 

123,0o0 

43.100 

7,500 

3,850 

31,200 

72,600 

62,750 

27,100 

3,100 


8 c. 

5 830 00 


2 
3 


5 




4,71 00 


11 


3,952 00 
5,K.55 00 


4 


York 










25 


3,430 00 
380 00 


5 


Oniario 










12 
4 

14 
121 
194 

54 

34 




6 


Durham 










410 00 




Nortlnimberland 










2,9.50 00 


8 


Prince Kdward 










3 675 00 


9 


Bay of Quinte 










3 2' 2 00 


10 


Amherst Island 










1,680 00 


11 


Wolfe Island and vicinity. 
Totals 










266 00 




















5 




4,700 00 


11 


380 


31,582 00 


614 


531.150 


31,680 00 











Return of the kinds, quantities and values of 







-o" 


.c 


a; 


J3 














V 


ei 


2 












g 


i: 




"" 


S 


j= 






District. 


Sj 


Ul 


.a 




g 


2 




x> 






^ 


s> 


Q 


^ 


^ 




PI 




^ 


u 


^ 


^ 


a 


3 


<u 


a 




V 


O 


^ 


a 


£ 


2 


M 


^ 




K 


K 


^ 


^ 


H 


H 


a. 




Lake Ontario. 


Brls 


Lbs. 


Brls. 


Lbs. 


Bris 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


1 


Lincoln 




270,270 

404.250 

380.000 

24,800 

7 498 

12,200 

13,890 

2,0-'3 

22.714 

3,139 




51,167 

5»i,7.50 

3.000 

7,610 

4 3S5 

1,000 

17,924 

227,610 

202 012 

199,709 

2,200 




14,700 
36,200 
21.000 
14,342 
918 

2,000 
26,231 
40,651 

2.020 
18,219 


4,130 


7. 


Wentwonh 








22,300 


3 


Hal ton and Peel 




400 


4 


York 






580 


5 


Ontario 






597 


6 


Durham 








140 


7 


Northumberland 








18,629 


8 








21,600 


q 




906 


i'i 
100 




87,925 


10 






8,098 


n 


Wolfe Island and vicinity 




5 


18,795 




Totals 












906 


1 140,784 


112 


773,397 


5 


176,284 


183,194 




a C. 


$ c. 


« c. 


« C. 


« c 


- ,c. 


9 c. 




Values : 


9,060 00 


57,039 20 


1,120 00 


77,339 70 


50 00 


17,628 40 


14,655 52 



1908 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



95 



FISHERIES. 

quantity and value of all fiehing matetials and other fixtures employed in the fishing 
the year 1908. 



Fishing material. 


Other fixtures used in 
fishing 


Seines. 


Pound nets. 


Hoop nets. 


Dip nets. 


.Night lines. 


Spears. 


Freezers and 
ice houses. 


Piers and 
wharves. 


d 


Yds. 


Value . 


d 
z 


Value. 


d 


Value. 


d 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value. 


2 


Value. 


d 
S5 


Value. 


d 


Value. 






« c. 




S c. 




8 e. 


73 


Sc. 

157 75 


200 
600 
200 


Sc. 
6 00 
6 00 
2 00 




»c. 


4 
3 
20 


S c. 

37.-) 110 

675 00 

1,390 00 




« c. 


? 




50 00 










123 


iss 66 


123 


162 00 


























































































































22 

7 
213 


435 00 

140 00 

4,570 00 














3 


p6 66 




































. 










750 29 00 






10 


295 00 
















. 








5 


145 140 nn 






27 


495 00 




































123 




40 










Uh 


190 00 






309 


5,640 00 


73 


157 75 


1,750 43 00 


153 00 


2,795 00 


123 


162 00 















fish caught during the year 1908. 



Pickerel or 

Dore. 


o 


S 
^ 


43 


4) 

a> . 
S 


1 


Si 

QC CO 

« 3S 

<u o 


6 


il 

a 

00 


8 


3 

"5 

> 


Lbs. 
83,207 


LibS. 

1,700 


Lbs. 

1,350 

2,300 

330 


Lbs. 

8,42.=) 

2,.500 

600 

565 

135 


Lbs. 
1,000 


Lbs. 
4,963 


Lbs. 

13,340 

22,700 

300 

4,160 

5,145 


Lbs. 


No. 


Lbs. 

4,265 

7.000 

100 


1 c. 

30,717 89 


1,750 






33,004 50 








200 






21,514 80 


134 


_ 








3,731 25 


















1,216 96 






600 

400 

4,200 

6,155 












957 20 


49 


6u6 


26 
3,100 
54,993 

6,886 
11,450 




15,0i7 

6,300 

175,739 

2,.5C0 

26,175 

230,901 


23,747 

3,078 

127,188 

1,400 

19,127 








9,020 33 


1 800 








2.900 
2,100 


30,048 15 


a 374 








61,S72 77 


19 t07 


25 






26,156 34 




7.000 










6,816 45 
















138 721 


2,325 


22.335 


88,680 


1,000 


220.185 






16,365 


226,756 64 










13,872 10 


$ c. 

348 75 


t c. 

1,310 10 


9 c. 

4,434 00 


$c. 
60 00 


$ c. 

18,472 32 


$ c. 

11,009 25 






< 

327 80 


S c. 

226,756 64 









9G 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 32 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, the 

industry during 





District. 


Fishing material. 


1 


Tugs 


or vessels. 


Boats. 


Gill-nets. 


s 

9 


6 

J5 


Ton- 
nage. 


Value. 


Men. 


i 


Value. 


Men. 


6 


Yards. 


Value. 


1 


Inland Water$. 
Frontenac County 






S c. 




90 

37 

69 
3 
2 
2 


9 0. 

1,041 00 

358 00 

715 00 
55 00 
20 00 

550 00 


136 

69 

86 
5 
2 
4 




4,620 

750 

1,915 


S c. 

416 00 

149 00 


2 


Leeds, Lanark, Lennox & 
Addington 










3 
4 


Russell, Prescott, Carleton 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 


2 


1 


50 00 


2 


224 00 


5 


Welland 
















fi 


Temiscamingue 












4,.500 


400 00 




Totals 














2 


1 


50 00 


2 


203 


2,739 00 


301 




11,785 


1,189 00 



Return of the kinds, quantities and values of 



1 

a 


District. 


i 
1 
& 

c 

1 


J3 
« 

a 

a 




01 

•s 
s 


1 

1 

1 


43 

i 


J* 

E 


1 


Inland Waters. 


Br Is. 
29 


Lbs. 
5 420 
5,300 


Brls. 


Lbs. 


Brls. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 
38,819 
7,071 


2 


Leeds. Lanark, Lennox and Ad- 










3 


Russell, Prescott, Carleton and 






235 

895 






1,534 


4 












15 


«) 


Welland 










30 








2,000 




5,750 






5,000 




Totals 

Values 












29 


12,720 




6,880 




15 


51,954 










9 0. 

290 00 


9 c. 

636 00 




9 c. 

688 00 




$0. 

1 50 


9 c. 

4,156 32 













1908 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



97 



FISHERIES. 

quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed in the fishing 
the year 1908. 



Fishing material. 


Other fixtures used iu 
fishing. 


Seines. 


Pound nets. 


Hoop nets. 


Dip nets, 


Night lines. 


Spears. 


Freezers and 
ice houses. 


Piers and 
wharves. 


6 


Yds. 


Value. 


d 


Value. 


6 


Value. 


d 


Value 


No. 
Hooks 


Value. 


d 


Value. 


d 


Value. 


d 

Hi 


Value. 


R 




« c. 
65 00 

50 00 




8 c. 


34 
59 


S c. 

755 00 

885 00 


15 


«c. 

15 00 


400 


«c. 
4 00 




»c. 




« c. 




S c. 


(, 










6 
1 


600 00 
3U00 












8 


8 00 


5,650 
900 


108 50 
7 50 














































2 


6 00 






1 


15 00 






























— 




























14 




115 00 




93 


1,640 00 


25 


29 00 


6,950 


120 00 






8 


750 00 





















fish caught during the year 1908. 



u 

u O 

"3 

o 


a 

is 




04 


•3 


4 

s 

S3 


-2 

II 

V O 

HO 


d 

8 


3 


& 

8 


a> 

3 

"3 
> 


Lbs. 

225 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 
450 
50 


Lbs. 

3,990 
12,428 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 
28,034 
42,717 
13,800 


Lbs.- 
82,.521 
6,140 
60 315 


Lbs. 


No. 


Lbs. 
5,672 


9 c. 

10,357 73 
5,479 44 
5,741 12 


3,000 










7,022 


5.035 








885 
















91 00 


25 






3 




10,012 


100 
9,000 








811 01 


7,800 


200 




2.000 








2,455 00 
















18,072 


5, '235 

S c. 

785 25 


500 


1,6421 


2,000 


94,663 


158,076 






6,557 


24,935 30 










9 c. 

1807 20 


9 c. 

30 00 


« c. 
821 05 


$ c 
120 00 


$ C. 

7,565 04 


9 c. 

7.903 80 






» C. 

131 14 


24,935 30 











7 G.F. 



^8 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 32 



ONTARIO 

Recapitulation of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, 

industry during 





District. 


Fishing material . 


1 


Tugs 


or vessels. 




Boats. 


Gill-nets. 


a 


6 


Ton- 
nage. 


Value. 


Men. 




Value, 


Men. 


i 


Yards. 


Value. 


1 


Lake of the Woods and 
Rainy River 


3 
23 

21 
26 
13 

10 

44 

5 


250 

144 

393 

602 

3,197 

20 

1,396 

60 


« c. 

6,800 00 
50,450 00 

73,300 00 
69,440 00 
42,000 00 

2,425 00 

149,012 00 

4,700 00 


8 
108 

110 
118 
69 

20 

224 

11 


32 
50 

84 
143 
123 

151 
291 
360 
205 


S c. 

6,770 00 
3, #70 00 

16,729 00 
13,937 00 
18,495 00 

8,871 00 
42,654 00 
30,802 00 

2,789 00 


76 

75 

149 
280 
233 

322 
529 
580 
351 




72,000 
811,000 

1,141,250 

1,694,045 

995,575 


• c. 

10,180 00 


? 


Lake Superior 


35,680 00 


3 


Lake Huron (North Chan- 
nel) 


81 119 00 


4 


Georgian Bay 


64,477 00 


6 
6 


Lake Huron ( Proper) 

Lake St. Clair and River 
Thames 


33,275 00 


7 


Lake Krie 




493,470 

528,050 

11,785 


48,290 00 


8 


Lake Ontario 


31,414 00 


q 


Inland Waters 


1,189 00 




Totals 














145 


6,062 


397,127 00 


668 


1,439 


144,117 00 


2,595 




5,647,176 


306.424 00 



Recapitulation of the kinds, quantities and values of 



1 

s 

s 

i<5 


District. 


a 

u 

W 


el 


1 
.a 

S 


2 


•a" 
S 

3 
2 


i 




1 


Lake of the Woods and Rainy .^ 
River 


Brls. 


Lbs. 


Brls. 


Lbs. 

691,347 
361,587 
657,969 
530,082 
172,292 
53,900 
826,189 
773,397 
6,880 


Brls. 


Lbs. 

32,336 

1,305,370 

1,689,434 

1,151,884 

952,395 


Lbs. 

230,499 
68 677 


? 


Lake Superior 




353,905 

10,000 

51,745 

270,257 

1,000 

5,300,415 

1,140,784 

12,720 


5 

16 

100 

3,515 


3,312 

49 

338 

868 


3 

4 
6 


Lake Huron (North Channel) . . . 

Georgian Bay 

Lake Huron (Proper) 


11 

2241^ 
519 


45,694 
40,184 
10,615 
41,222 
1,407,-562 
183,194 
51,954 


6 


Lake St. Clair and River Thames 
Lake Erie 


7 


•2 
906 
29 


2 
112 


2o>^ 
5 


3,884 

176,284 

15 


8 
9 


Lake Ontario. 

Inland Waters 




Totals 

Values 








1,691% 


7, 140,826 


3,750 


4,076,643 


i,b%}i 


5,314.602 


2,079,601 




8 c. 
16,915 00 


$ c. 

357,041 30 


i c. 

37,500 00 


9 c. 
407,664 30 


i c. 

45,955 00 


i c. 

531,460 20 


$ C. 

166,368 08 









1908 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



99 



FISHERIES. 

the quantity and value of all fishing materials and other fixtures employed m the fishing 
the year 1908. 



Fishiug material. 


Other fixture* used in 
fishing. 


Seines. 


Pound nets. 


Hoop nets. 


Dip nets. 


Night lines 


Spears. 


Freezers and 
ice houses. 


Piers and 
wharves. 


i 


Yds. 


Value. 


6 


Value. 


6 

55 


Value. 


d 


Value. 


No. 
Hooks 


Value. 


d 


Value. 


d 

55 


Value. 


d 


Value. 






S c. 


14 
33 

92 
11 
43 

12 
272 


« c. 

8,000 00 
3,700 00 

19,630 00 
4,800 00 
15,700 00 

2.200 00 
106.825 00 


3 
20 


$ c. 

575 00 
1,000 00 




• c. 




Sc. 




$ 0. 


14 
9 

5 
16 
16 

10 

128 

40 

8 


t c. 

7,460 00 
3,610 00 

1,500 80 
4,30* 00 
4,650 00 

2,900 00 

62,940 00 

4,300 00 

780 00 




t c. 


.... 


















2 


125 '66 






















** 














200 
500 

4,950 
8,300 
1,750 
6,950 


2 00 
5 00 

87 60 
92 50 
43 00 
120 00 






6 


1,668 00 


12 


648 

11,318 
10,706 


495 00 

4,169 00 

3,855 00 

50 00 

115 00 


1 

156 

3 

242 

93 


25 00 

7,970 00 

75 00 

5,145 00 

1,640 00 


7 


7 00 


8 


8 00 




80 


371 .'iS no 


12 

1 
123 


1,950 00 
100 00 


60 


85 
73 

25 


53 00 
157 75 
29 00 






•> 


123 


153 00 


162 00 


14 






















168 


22,672 


8,684 00 


477 


155,855 00 


518 


16,430 00 


227 


301 75 


22,650 


350 00 


131 


161 00 


246 


92,430 00 


143 


4,005 00 



fish caught during the year 1908. 



Pickerel or 

Dore. 




1 


1 


0) 

OI 


43 

2 

6 


"Sg 


2 

6 


2 

il 

S 

03 


& 


a 
I 


Lbs. 
295,551 


Lbs. 

55,885 
3,575 

24,907 
6,510 

14,693 

34,675 

107,823 

2,325 

5,235 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 

75,403 
21,590 


Lbs. 

27,847 


Lbs. 

45,200 
7,450 
75,662 
20,540 
139,623 
637,934 
500,107 
220,185 
158,076 


Lbs. 
3,250 


No. 

290 


Lbs. 


$ c. 

141,482 01 


100 717 








236,330 96 


168,950 

31,087 

321,725 




1,526 
6,320 


235 

846 

1,150 

1,366 

3,00t 






264,381 27 






175 

661 

69,349 

18,591 

230,904 

94.563 


29i 

9 


1,666 
1,000 

62,552 
328,879 

16,365 
6,557 


187,093 77 




96,276 


18,471 


224,527 89 


75,407 




75,705 

630,420 

88,680 

16,421 


65,326 62 


1 855,661 




""i.ioo 

2,000 


730,244 17 


138,721 
18,072 


22,335 
500 


226,756 64 
24,935 30 










3,005,891 


254,628 


22,835 


915,348 


118,464 


442,090 


1,804,777 


9,847 


590 


416,953 


2,100,078 63 


$ c. 
300,589 10 


9 c. 

38,194 20 


1,370 l6 


f C. 

45,767 40 


S C. 

7,107 84 


$ C. 
36,367 20 


9 C. 
90,238 85 


1 C. 

9,847 00 


S c. 

351 00 


$ c. 

8,339 06 


« c. 

2,100,078 63 



1908 



THE REPORT UPON GAME AND FISHERIES. 



101 



Comparative Statement of yield for 1907-8, according to Districts. 



Lake of the Woods and Rainy River Dis 
trict : 

Whitefish lbs . . . 

Trout " .. 

Pickerel "... 

Pike " .... 

Maskinonge ** 

Sturgeon ' * ... 

Tullibee " .... 

CatfiBh "... 

Coarse fish " ... 

Caviare " — 

Bladders " ... 

Lake Superior : 

Herring " .... 

Whitefish " .... 

Trout " .... 

Pickerel " .... 

Pike " .... 

Sturgeon " 

TuUibee " .... 

Coarse fish " 

Caviare " 

Trout bbls 

Whitefish " ... 

Eels lbs ... . 

Lake Huron, N. C. 

Herring bbls 

Herring lbs . . . . 

Whitefish " .... 

Trout " .... 

Pickerel " . . . . 

Pike " .... 

Sturgeon Bladders " 

Sturgeon " 

Perch " .... 

Catfish " .... 

Coarse fish " 

Caviare " 

Trout bbls . . . 

Whitefish " .... 

Georgian Bay : 

Herring..'. bbls 

Herring lbs . . . . 

Whitefish ' " .... 

Trout " .... 

Pickerel " 

Pike " .... 

Sturgeon " 

Perch " .... 

Catfish " .... 

Coarse fish " 

Whitefish bbls. . . . 

. Trout " .... 

Caviare lbs , . . . 

Sturgeon Bladders " 

Carp " .... 

Lake Huron (proper) : 

Herring bbls 

Herring lbs 

Whitefish " .... 



8 Q.F. 



1907. 



612,000 

42,310 

159,010 

122,150 



92,520 
15,700 



100,300 

4,900 

200 

799,200 

300,640 

1,575,040 

63,240 

2,850 

2,540 

55,950 

22,200 



1908. 



Increase. 



694,347 

32,336 

295,551 

230,499 



29,600 

19 

31,700 

787,780 

1,666,080 

345,950 

54,000 



24,540 

300 

1,700 

64,300 

408 

140 

25 

99J 

74,900 

293,240 

1,302,183 

18,375 

59,995 

6,840 

1,100 

100 

24,500 

46 

151 

1,012 



462 

168,500 

81,820 



55,885 
75,403 
27,847 
45,200 
3,250 
290 

353,905 

361,587 

1,305,370 

100,717 

68,677 

3,575 

21,590 

7,450 



3,812 

5 



11 

10,000 

657,969 

1,689,4.34 

168,950 

45,694 



24,907 
1,526 



75,662 

235 

49 

16 

224J 

51,745 

530,082 

1,154,884 

31,087 

40,184 

5,510 

6,320 

175 

20,540 

100 

338 

846 



1,600 

519 
270,257 
172,292 



Decrease. 



82,347 



136,541 
108,349 



59,703 

27,847 



90 



60,947 



37,477 

65,827 

1,035 



3,312 
5 



24,354 



367 
1,226 



11,362 



125 



236,842 
' 12,712 



5,220 
75 



54 
187 



1,600 

57 

101,757 

90,472 



9,974 



36,635 



55,100 
1,660 



445,295 
269,676 



34,360 
14,750 



29,600 

8 

21,700 

129,811 

177^666 
8,306 



1,700 



173 

91 

9 



23,156 
147^299 



19,811 
1,330 



3,960 

"iee 



102 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 32 



Comparative Statement of yield 1 907-8, according to Districts — Continued. 



Lake Huron (proper) : — Continued 

Trout lbs 

Pickerel 

Pike 

Sturgeon 

Perch 

Catfish 

Carp 

Coarse fish 

Caviare 

Tullibee 

Whitefish bbls. . . . 

Trout " .... 

Sturgeon Bladders lbs 

Lake & River St. Clair and Thames River : 

Whitefish lbs. . . . 

Herring bbls 

Herring lbs 

Eels 

Pickerel 

Pike 

Sturgeon 

Perch 

Catfish 

Coarse fish 

Caviare 

Tullibee 

Carp 

Lake Erie : 

Herring bbls 

Herring lbs 

Whitefish 

Trout 

Pickerel 

Pike 

Sturgeon 

Perch 

Tullibee 

Catfish 

Coarse fish 

Caviare 

Carp 

Sturgeon Bladders 

Whitefish bbls. 

Trout.... " . 

Lake Ontario : 

Herring bbls. 

Herring lbs 

Whitefish 

Trout 

Pickerel 

Pike 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Catfish 

Coarse fish 

Caviare 

Carp 

Bladders 

Tullibee 

Trout bbls. 

Whitefish " . 



1907. 



1,062,260 

398,400 

2,200 

6,200 

321,680 

1,650 



96,520 
1,127 



1 

823 

4,825 

143,810 

"'dMl 



78,767 
43,595 
40,875 
53,062 
41,975 
615,860 
1,261 



2,821,120 

574,290 

1,760 

1,895,830 

1,520,200 

51,920 

472,520 



30,600 

812,080 

,5,134 



265 
300 



476 
913,460 
343,690 
105,790 

72,390 

296,200 

7,080 

20,400 
168,920 
297,300 
283,140 



3,150 

7 
1 



1908. 



952,395 

321,725 

10,615 

14,693 

96,276 

661 

1,000 

139,633 

1,150 

18,471 

3.515 

868 

291 

53,900 



1,000 



75,407 
41,222 
34,675 
75,705 
69,349 
637,934 
1,366 



62,552 



5,300,415 

826,189 

3,884 

1,855,661 

1,407,562 

107,823 

630,420 



18,591 

500,107 

3,000 

328,879 

9 

2 

23J 

906 

1,140,784 

773,397 

176,284 

138,721 

183,194 

2,325 

22,336 

88,680 

230,904 

220,185 



16,365 



1,000 

5 

112 



Increase. 



8,415 
8,493 



1,000 

43,113 

27 

18,471 

3,514 

45 



22,643 

27,374 

J2,074 

105 



62,552 

1 

2,479,295 

251,899 

2,124 



55,903 
157,900 



328,879 



23J 

430 

227,324 

429,707 

70,494 

66,331 



1,935 



16,365 



111 



Decrease. 



109,865 
76,675 



225,404 
989 



4,534 
89,910 



4,617 



3,360 
2,373 
6,200 



40,169 
112,638 



12,009 

311,973 

2,134 



256 
298 



113,006 
4,755 



80,240 
66,396 
62,956 



2,150 
2 



1908 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



103 



Comparative Statement of yield 1907-8, according to Districts. — Continued. 



Island Waters : 

Herring , bbls. 

Herring . •. lbs . 

AVhitefish 

Trout 

Pickerel 

Pike 

Sturgeon 

Eels 

Perch 

Catfish 

Coarse fish 

Carp 

Caviare 

Tullibee..-. 



1907. 



9,900 

1,820 

1,205 

590 

33,950 

50 



15,800 

65,000 

148,500 



1908. 



29 

12,720 

6,880 

15 

18,072 

51,954 

5,235 

500 

16,421 

94,563 

158,076 



6,557 
2,000 



Increase. 



21i 
2,820 
5,060 



17,482 

18,004 

5,185 

500 

621 

29,563 

9,576 



6,557 
2,000 



Decrease . 



1,190 



Comparative Statement of the yield of the Fisheries of the Province. — Concluded 



Whitefish 

" (salted). 

Herring 

" (salted)... 

Trout 

" (salted) 

Pickerel 

Pike 

Sturgeon 

Caviare 

Eels 

Perch 

Catfish 

Coarse fish 

Tullibee 

Bladders 

Carp 



Total 

Total increase 1908 . 



3,166,890 

74,600 

4,881,387 

213,000 

5,756,628 

224,200 

3,192,250 

2,184,040 

316,545 

23,297 

50,000 

1,033,682 

438,325 

2,217,490 

74,800 

5,290 



23,852,424 



4,076,643 

750,000 
7,140,826 

338,300 
5.314,602 

919,100 
3,005,891 
2,079,601 

254,628 

9,847 

22,835 

915,348 

442,090 
1,804,770 

118,464 
590 

416.953 



27,610,495 



909,753 

675,400 

2,259,439 

125,300 



694,900 



3,765 
* 43,664 
416,953 



5,129,174 
3,758,071 



442,026 



186,359 

104,439 

61,917 

13,450 

27,165 

118,334 



412,713 
4,766 



1,371,103 



104 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 32 



Statement of the yield and the value of the Fisheries of the Province for 

the year 1908. 



Kinds of Fish. 



Whitefish 


'. bbls 




lbs 


Trout 


hhifl 


" Ihs 


Herring 


bbls 


i< 


Ihs 


Pickerel " 


Pike 


i( 


Sturgeon " 


Caviare 


(( 


Bladders " 


Eels " .... 


Perch " 


Catfish 


<( 


Coarse Fish 


(1 


TuUibee 


(1 


Carp 


(( 



Total 



Quantity. 



3,750 

4,076,643 

4, 695 J 

6,314,602 

1,691^ 

7,140,826 

8,005.891 

2,070,601 

254,628 

9,847 

590 

22,835 

915,348 

442,090 

1,804,777 

118,464 

416,953 



Price. 



I c. 

10 00 

10 

10 00 

10 

10 00 

5 

10 

8 

15 

1 00 

60 

6 

5 

8 

5 

6 

2 



Value. 



% c. 

37,500 00 

407,664 30 

45,955 00 

531,460 20 

16,915 00 

357,041 30 

300.589 10 

166,368 08 

38,194 20 

9,847 00 

354 00 

1,370 10 

45,767 40 

35,367 20 

90,238 85 

7,107 84 

8,339 06 



12,100,078 63 



Value of Ontario Fisheries from 1870 to 1908, inclusive. 



Years. 



1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
-188S 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 



Carried forward. 



Value. 



1264,982 

193,524 

267,633 

293,091 

446,267 

453,194 

437,229 

438,223 

348,122 

367,133 

444,491" 

509,903 

825,457 

1,027,038 

1,133,724 

1,342,692 

1,485,998 

i;531,850 



$11,760,546 



Years. 



Brought forward 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900... 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

Total 



Value. 



11,760,546 00 
1,839,869 00 
1,963,123 00 
2,009,637 00 
1,806,389 00 
2,042,198 00 
1,694,930 00 
1,659,968 00 
1,584,473 00 
1,605,674 00 
1,289,822 00 
1,433,631 00 
1,477,815 00 

'1,333,293 00 
1,428,078 00 
1,265,705 00 
1,535,144 00 
1,793,524 00 
1,708,963 00 
1,734,865 00 
1,935,024 90 
2,100,078 63 



$47,002,455 53 



1908 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



105 



Kecapitulation. 
Of the Fishing Tugs, Nets, Boats, etc., employed in the Province. 



Articles. 



145 Tugs (6,062 Tons) 668 men. . . 
1,439 boats, 2,595 men 

5,647, 175 vards Gill net 

168 Seines "(22, 672) yds 

477 Pound nets 

518 Hoop nets 

227 Dip nets 

22,650 Hooks on Set Lines 

131 Spears 

246 Freezers and Ice Houses 

143 Piers and Wharves 



Value. 



$397,127 00 

144,117 00 

306,424 00 

8,684 00 

155,855 00 

16,430 00 

301 75 

350 00 

161 00 

92,430 00 

4,005 00 



Statement showing the number of fry distributed in the waters of the Province 
by the Federal Government from Dominion hatcheries. 



Years. 



1868-73.... 

1874 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880.... 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

Total 



Newcastle 
Hatchery. 



1,070,000 
350,000 
660,000 
700,000 
1,300,000 
2,605,000 
2,602,700 
1,923,000 
8,300,000 
4,841,000 
6,053,000 
8,800,000 
5,700,000 
6,451,000 
5,130,000 
8,076,000 
5,846,500 
7,736,000 
7,807,500 
4,823,500 
9,835,000 
6,000,000 
6,000,000 
5,200,000 
4,200,000 
4,325,000 
4,050,000 
5,175,000 
5,900,000 
650,000 
2,500,000 
1,475,000 
1,480,000 
1,550,000 
1,807,000 



Sandwich 
Hatchery. 



145,911,700 



8,000,000 
8,000,000 
20,000,000 
12,000,000 
13,500,000 
16,000,000 
44,000,000 
72,000,000 
37,000,000 
68,000,000 
57,000,000 
56,500,000 
56,000,000 
21,000,000 
52,000,000 
75,000,000 
44,500,000 
68,000,000 
47,000,000 
78,000,000 
61,000,000 
72,000,000 
71,000,000 
73,000,000 
90,000,000 
67,000,000 

100,000,000 
90,000,000 
75,000,000 

106,000,000 
88,000,000 

103,000,000 



1,844,500,000 



Ottawa 
Hatchery. 



5,732,000 
7,043,000 
4,909,000 
6,208,000 
4,480,000 
3,210,000 
3,950,000 
4.100,000 
3,020,000 
3,700,000 
3,450,000 
3,410,000 
1,245,000 
1,201,000 
877,000 
1,103,000 
1,123,000 
1,152,000 



59,913,000 



Total. 



1,070,000 
350,000 
650,000 
8,700,000 
9,300,000 
22,605,000 
14,602,700 
15,423,000 
19,300,000 
48,841,000 
78,053,000 
45,800,000 
73,700,000 
63,451,000 
61,630,000 
64,076,000 
26,846,500 
65,468,000 
89,850,500 
54,282,000 
84,043,000 
57,480,000 
82,210,000 
70,150,000 
80,300,000 
78,345,000 
80,750,000 
98,625,000 
76,310,000 

101,895,000 
93,701,000 
77,352,000 

108,583,000 
90,673,000 

106,859,000 



2,050,724,700 



106 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 32 



LIST OF OVERSEERS. 



Name. 



Acton, Nassau . 

Baechler, F 

Bailey, G. L..., 

Barr, George 

Beatty, John . . . 

Birch, W. J .... 
Blanchard, F. ., 
Blondin, Isaac . , 
Blunden, H. A. . 

Boate, J . R 

Boler, William. 

Bourgon, J . B . 

Boyd, J. H.... 

Boynton, A. 0. 
Bradshaw, A. . . 
Briggs, T. J... 
Brisbin, Angus 

Burke, George. 

Burtcheall, C . . 
Campbell, John 
Caskey, T. C... 
Caesan, C. H. . 



Residence. 



Gananoque . . . 

Nipissing 

Callander 

Harrowsmith.. 

Old Fort, Mid- 
land 

Delta 

Fort Frances . . 

Cornwall 

Sarnia 

Fowler's Cor's 
Byron 

Rockland 

Merrickville . . 

Kirkfield 

Lindsay 

Bridgeburg 

Picton 

Perth 

Coboconk 

Sylvan 

Blairton 

Campbellford.. 



District. 



Gananoque River, and for that part of the RiverTSt. 
Lawrence lying between Wolfe Island and Rock- 
port. 

South River and South Bay, Lake Nipissing . 

Lake Nipissing, in the Districts of Parry Sound and Nip- 
issing. 

Tp. Portland in Co. Frontenac, with joint jurisdiction 
over Desert and Knowlton Lakes . 

With jurisdiction with other overseers over Tps. Tay 
and Matchedash, Co. Simcoe . 

Upper and Lower Beverley lakes and rivers. 

Rainy River and adjacent waters. 

Co.'s Stormont and Glengarry and St. Lawrence River. 

Co. Lambton, exclusive of Wal pole and St. Ann's islands. 

Tp. Emily, in Co. Victoria. 

River Thames, between London and boundary line be- 
tween Townships Delaware and Westminster, County 
of Middlesex. 

Counties of Prescott, Russell, Stormont and Glengarry, 
with jurisdiction over so much of the Rivers Ottawa 
and St. Lawrence as lies in front of said counties . 

Rideau River and tributaries, fronting on County of 
Grenville. 

Tp. Eldon, in Co. Victoria. 

Townships Mariposa and Ops, County Victoria. 

County of Welland. 

For the waters of Lake Ontario fronting Tps. North and 
South Marysburg, including all waters surrounding 
islands in said townships, also Main Duck Islands, 
and that portion of Bay of Quinte fronting these 
townships, as well as the waters of the Bay of Quinte 
known as Picton Harbor, in Tp. Hallowell. 

For the Town of Perth, Tps . of North Emsley, Drum- 
mond, North Burgess, and the first two concessions 
01 the Tp. of Bathurst, Co. Lanark. 

Balsam and Mud Turtle Lakes, County Victoria. 

River Aux Sauble and tributaries . 

Townships Belmont and Methuen, County Peterboro' . 

Trent River and tributaries, Co. Northumberland, from 
Campbellford to Trent Bridge . 



1908 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



107 



LIST OF OVERSEERS.— Conhnwed. 



Name. 



Residence . 



District. 



Cheer, T. H. 



Brighton 



Chrietink, Erwin. . . 
Clarkeon, William . 

Clunis, A 

Colter, Samuel 

Conger, David 

Cook, H. G. A 

Corsant, A 

Coultoue, Frank 

Covell, H. N , 

Cox, Matthew , 

Crotty, John 

Cunningham, Jafi. A 

Davieau, H 

Davie, J. W 

Deacon, Ephraim . . , 
Donaldson, W. J 

Drew, Henry 

Duffy, Thos 

Dunlop, James 

Dusang, B. A 

Eeford, Henry 



Pembroke . . . 
Lakehurst . . . 

Claude 

Gilford 

West Lake... 

Niagara Falls . 
Masonville . . . 

St. George 

Lombard y 

Howe Island . 
Bothwell 



Maynooth 

Michipicoten I, 

Sydenham 

Bolingbroke. . . 
Donaldson 

Long Lake 

Parham 

Mackey's St'n. 

Feseerton ... .. 
Barriefield 



For the waters of Lake Ontario fronting Co. Northum- 
berland, also inland waters tributary to said lake in 
eaid county. 

County Renfrew. 

West half of Township of Smith, Township of Ennis- 
more, west half Township Harvey, Townships of 
Gaiway and Cavendish, County Peterboro'. 

In and for the Townships of Chinguacousy, Caledon and 
Albion, in the County of Peel. 

Lake Simcoe, from the 10th concession, Tp. Innisfil, to 
the mouth of the Holland River. 

Lake Ontario fronting Townships Hallowell and Athol 
also for the Village of Wellington in the Township of 
Hillier, and for the inland lakes and streams in said 
Townships of Hallowell and Athol. 

County Welland. 

County Middlesex, east of boundary line between the 
Townships of Westminster and Delaware, London 
and Lobo. 

That portion of South Dumfries lying east of tlie Grand 
River. 

Township South Elmsley, County Leeds. 

The waters of St. Lawrence River around Howe Island. 

River Thames between Village of' Wardsville and east- 
erly limits of County of Kent, in County of Middlesex. 

Townships Bangor, Wicklow and McClure, Co. Hastings. 

Michipicoten Island. 

Township Loughboro. 

Townships Bathurst and South Sherbrooke, Co. Lanark. 

Townships of Palmer«ton, Clarendon, Barrie, Miller, 
Nortii Canonto and South Canonto, electoral district 
of Addington. 

Townships Hinchinbrooke, Oso, Olden and Kennebec, 
District of Addington. 

Township Hinchinbrooke with joint jurisdiction over 
Township Bedford, County of Frontenac. 

Ottawa River between Deux Joachim and Mattawa, and 
over waters in townships in Ontario borderii^g on 
said river. 

Tps. of Freeman, Gibson, Baxter, Wood and Morrison 
in District of Muskoka, also over Severn River. 

Rideau waters between St. Lawrence River and Brewer's 

Mills. 



108 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 32 



LIST OF OYERSEERS.—Canlimied. 



Name. 


Residence. 


District. 


FiBher, James 


Sunbury 


Township Storrington, including Rideau waters from 
Brewer's Mills to south limit of the township with 
jurisdiction over all of Loughboro Lake and the lakes 
of the Township of Storrington. 


Fleming, E 


Hastings 

Northport 


Village of Hastings. 

•For that portion of the Bay of Quinte fronting Town- 
ship Ameliasburg east of Belleville Bridge, and also 
Township iSophiasburg, and over all the inland 
waters within Township Sophiasburg, and with joint 
jurisdiction with any other overseer over all inland 
waters in Township of Ameliasburg. 


Fox, Eben R 


Fraser, J. A 


Prescott 


St. Lawrence River from the head of Cardinal Rapids 
west to Rockport. 


Gainforth, Wm 


Haliburton .... 


Townships Stanhope, Guildford, Harburn, Dudley, 
Dysart and Minden, District of Haliburton. 


Gallagher, Hugh 


Eganville 


County of Renfrew. 


Gault, T. G 


Deseronto 


Bay of Quinte, East Riding County of Hastings and for 
Moira River and other waters in said riding. 




Gibson, J. W 


Strathroy 


County of Middlesex. 


Gillespie, James 


Berkeley 


Electoral District of Centre Grey and for Township of 
Glenelg in South Grey. 


Glass, Irving 


Trenton 


Bay of Quinte from City of Belleville west of the Trent 
River and for Trent River from its mouth to Chis- 
holm's Rapids and for the tributaries thereto. 


Gordon, Walter 


Port Arthur. . . 


In and for the District of Thunder Bay . 


Green, Adam 


Diamond 


Townships Huntley and Fitzroy, County Carleton. 


Green, Geo. G 


Bradford 


Holland River on the north side in Township West 
Gwillimbury westward to the forks of the river in 
County Simcoe. 


Green, John 


Marmora 


Township of Marmora, County Hastings. 


Gunter, Harvey 


McRaeP.O.... 


Townships of Grimsthorpe and Cashel in County Hast- 
ings, and with joint jurisdiction over Townships 
Tudor, Lake, Wollaston, Limerick, Faraday, Dun- 
gannon and Mayo, in said county. 


Hayes, Henry 


Murray 


Bay of Quinte, as lies in front of the East Riding of 
Northumberland, for that portion of the River Trent, 
lying between the Township of Sydney and the Bay 
of Quinte, and for the inland waters of the Townships 
of Murray, Dryden and Cramahe and Haldimand. 


Hembruff , Jos 


Manito waning. 


Lake Manitou on Mantoulin Island and the streams 
tributary thereto. 


Henderson, H. A 


Pelee Island. . . 


For Pelee Island and the other islands in Lake Erie, 
south of the County of Essex . 


Heneilly, F. H 


Warkworth . . . 


River Trent and tributaries, in County Northumberland 
from Percy Boom to Campbell ford Bridge. 



1908 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



109 



LIST OF OVEKSEERS.— Continued. 



Name. 



Hees, James 

Hewitt, James . . 
Holliday, Henry. 

Howell, James . . . 
Huffman, E. M . . 

Hunter, William. 
Irish, John 

Jermyn, J. W. W 

Jickling, Chas . . . 
Johnson, John . . . 

Johnson, Henry. . 



Johnston, D 



Johnston, Thos. 



Johnston, W. H. 

Jones, David 

Jones, John 

'Kehoe, D 



Residence. 



Hastings . 



Honey Harbor. 
Wolfe Island. . 



Bancroft. . 
Hay Bay. 



Tehkummah . 
Vennachar 

Wiarton 



St. Paul's Sta- 
tion. 

Port Hope 



Brantford. 



Peterboro 

Royston 

Harwood 

Welland 

Fenelon Falls 

Millarton 



District. 



Trent River and tributaries, in County Northumberland, 
from Trent Bridge to Rice Lake. 

Province of Ontario, 

Township of Wolfe Island and for the islands of Simcoe, 
Garden and Horseshoe, and any other islands com- 
prised in the Township of Wolfe Island. 

Townships Faraday, Dungannon and Herschell, in 
County Hastings. 

Townships of Richmond, Adolphiistown, North and 
South Fredericksburg, with jurisdiction over Hay 
Bay and Bay of Quinte, in Counties Lennox and 
Addington. 

Manitoulin Island in Lake Huroii. 

Townships of Anglesea, Effingham, Ashby, Denbigh and 
Abinger, Counties Lennox and Addington. 

Georgian Bay, County of Bruce, lying east and south of 
Tobermory Harbour, but exclusive of the said 
Harbour. 

County Perth and for Townships East Nissouri and East 
and West Zorra, in County Oxford. 

Townships Hope and Cavan, in the County of Durham, 
with joint jurisdiction with any other Game and 
Fishery overseer or overseers over County Durham . 

That part of Grand River lying between the southerly 
boundary of Town of Gait and the boundary line 
between Tuscarora and Onondaga Townships in 
County Brant and the Townships of Seneca and 
Oneida in Haldimand County ; also concurrent juris- 
diction with Overseer Kern over Tributaries to the 
Grand River in Burford, Oakland and Brantford 
Townships west of Grand River. 

River Otonabee and tributaries, between the Canadian 
Pacific Railway Crossing in Peterborough and the 
mouth of the River and Rice Lake, Township 
South Monaghan. 

Townships of Lount, Machar, Laurier, Croft, Chapman, 
Strong, Jolly, Spence, Ryerson, Armour, Proudfoot, 
Monteith, McMurrich, Perry and Bethune, District 
of Parry Sound . 

Rice Lake, in the Townships of Hamilton and Alnwick, 
County Northumberland . 

County of Welland. 

For the north end of Sturgeon Lake, and Cameron Lake 
to Rosedale Locks, Burnt River and Rosedale River 
in the County of Victoria. 

That portion of County Bruce lying South of Indian Re- 
serve and Township of Amabel, with jurisdiction 
over Lake Huron in front of said county, south of 
Southampton 



110 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 32 



LIST OF OVERSEERS. —Continued. 



Name. 



Kennedy, John 

Kern, Jacob 

Kerr, C. J 

Knight, C. H 

Kraft, Samuel 

Laframboise, Remi. . 
Langford, Newton... 

Laughington, Henry 
Lead ley, Robt 



Lean, Wellington 
Lee, Edward..... 

Leitch, P. A 

Little, Richard . . . 

Loveday, E. T... 



McAllister, J. R. 



McClennan, Kenneth 



Residence . 



Meaford 

Burford 

Hamilton ; 

Byng Inlet 

Ridgeway 

Canard River.. 



Dorset. 



Parry Sound . 



Barrie. 



Apsley 

Lowbanks 

Nepigon 

Wallace burg. 

Ottawa 



Gore's L'nding 



Grovesend. 



District . 



County of Grey, exclusive of TownshipB of Proton, Egre- 
mont and Normanby. 

County of Brant, comprising Townships of Burford, 
Oakland and Brantford, west of Grand River, but 
exclusire of said River. 

County of Wentworth . 

For the River Magnetewan, and for the waters of 
(Georgian Bay lying between said river and French 
River, 

In and for Electoral District of Welland, with jurisdic- 
tion over so much of the waters of Lake Erie and 
the Niagara River, exclusive of the waters of said 
river north of the Niagara Falls, as lies in front of 
the said Electoral District. 

Detroit Eiver, fronting Townships of Sandwich, West 
Anderdon and Maiden, and also Canadian Islands in 
said River, County Essex. 

Townships McLean, Ridout, Franklin and Brunei, Dis- 
trict of Muskoka, and Townships McOlintock, Liv- 
ingstone, Sherbourne and Havelock, District of 
Hali burton. 

For the Township of Shawanaga, Ferguson, Carling, 
McDougal, McKellar, Christie, Foley, Parry Island. 
Cowper and Conger in the District of Parry Sound. 

For the Township of Vespra and the Town of Barrie, in 
the County of Simcoe, and over so much of the 
waters of Kempenfeldt Bay as lies in front of the said 
town and township ; also, that portion of Kempen- 
feldt Bay, lying in front of the Township of Oro. 

Tps. of Anstruther and Chandos, County of Peterboro. 

Townships of Moulton, Sherbrooke and Wainfleet, in the 
District of Monck and Lake Erie. 

River and Lake Nepigon. 

County of Kent, fronting on Lake St. Clair, exclusive of 
Dover West Township, also Walpole and Ste. Anne's 
Islands, County Lambton. 

In and for the Townships of Nepean, Gloucester, North 
Gower and Osgoode, in the County of Carleton, with 
jurisdiction over so much of the River Ottawa and 
the River Rideau and the Rideau Canal as lies in 
front or within said Townships, and over the tribu- 
taries to the said rivers and canals. 

Rice Lake, between Jubilee Point and Lower Close's 
Point and the waters tributary thereto, in the Tps . 
of Hamilton and Alnwick, Co. of Northumberland . 

Townships of Yarmouth, Malahide and. Bayham, with 
jurisdiction over so much of the waters of Lake Erie 
as lies in front of the said townships and the tribu- 
taries thereto. 



1908 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



Ill 



LIST OF 0YER8EERS. ^Continued. 



Name. 



McEwen, A. 



McGinn, William . 

McGuire, J , 

Mclntyre, A , 

McKelvie, D 

McMurray, R 

McNairn, James 

McPhee, D 

McVittie, James 

Macdonald, Hector. 

Major, William 

Mansfield, Thomas. 

May, J. C 

Mayor, Harry 

Merrian, Enoch . . . . 

Meyers, James 

Moffatt, George 

i\Ioore, F. J 

Morton, John 

Murdoch, John 



Residence. 



Aldboro' 

Orillia 

Jones Falls . . 

Keene 

New Liskeard 

Bayfield 

Iroquois 

Uptergrove. . . 

Blenheim 

Beaverton . . . 

Woodlawn . . . 
Pickering 

St. Catharines 

Painswick . . . 

Harwood 

Orchard 

Glencross .... 
Lakefield 

St. Ola 

Bath 



District. 



Townships of Southwold, Dunwich and Aldborough, 
exclusive of the River Thames, with jurisdiction 
over so much of Lake Erie as lies in front of Ithe said 
townships and tributaries thereto. 

Townships of Orillia, and Oro, in the County of Simcoe, 
and over so much of Shingle and Carthews Bays, and 
Lakes Couchiching and Simcoe, as lies in front of 
said townships and over River Severn. 

Rideau River, fronting on the Township of Sonth 
Crosby, County of Leeds. 

Tps. of Otonabee and Asphodel in Co. of Peterboro'. 

Lake Temiskamingue and tributaries. 

County, of Huron. 

River St. Lawrence, fronting on County of Dundas. 

Lake Simcoe, fronting on Tp. of Mara and the tribu- 
taries thereto, and for Mud Lake, in the Townships 
of Mara and Garden. 

Lake Erie fronting on Co. Kent, together with inland 
waters of said Co. tributary to Lake Erie. 

Lake Simcoe and tributaries thereto fronting on Tp. of 
Thorah, in County of Ontario. 

Townships of March and Torbolton, County Carleton. 

Electoral District of South Ontario, exclusive of the 
Township of Reach. 

County of Lincoln and over so much of the waters of 
Lake Ontario as lies in front of the said county, and 
with jurisdiction over the Niagara River between its 
mouth and the Falls. 

Lake Simcoe, from Lovers' Creek, near Barrie, on Kem- 
penfeldt Bay, to concession 10 of the said Township 
of Innisfil. 

Rice Lake, Townships Hamilton and Alnwick, between 
Close's Point and Rock Island and waters tributary 
thereto. County of Northumberland. 

Townships of Proton, Egremont and Normanby, County 
Grey, and Townships Minto, Arthur and West Lu- 
ther, County Wellington. 

Townships of Mulmur, Mono and East Garafraxa. 

Townships of Douro, Dummer, east part of Smith, Tp. 
of Burleigh and east half of Harvey, Co. Peterboro*. 

Townships Limerick, Tudor, Wollaston, Caehel Lake 
and Grimsthorpe, County Hastings. 

Townships of Adoiphustown, South Fredericksburg, 
Ernestown and Amherst Island, County Lennox 
and Addington. 



112 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 32 



LIST OF OVERSEERS. — Continued. 



Name. 



Reeidence. 



District. 



NichoUs, Garner 

Nicholls, Peter 

Oliver, R. C 

Osborne, Henry 

Parkin, C. W 

Peltier, Theo 

Phillips, J. H 

Pierce, J . P 

Pi Ion, Phillippe 

Poupore, Andrew . . . 

Purcell, H. R 

Raphael, J . C 

Rivet, Jos 

Robertson, C 

Robertson, D 

Robinson, T. W.... 

Robinson, Wm 

Sargant, W. J 

Shillington, N 

Sinclair, N 

Slate, George 



Bobcaygeon. . . 
Bridgenorth . ^ 
Little Current. 
Dante 



Valentia 

Dover South . . 

Smith's Falls. . 

Port Rowan. 
Sudbury 



Westmeath . 

Colebrook . . 
Mallorytown 

Sturgeon Falls 

Hillsburg 

Southampton 

Collingwood . 

Kil worthy. . . 
Bronte 

Burridge, 

Glenarm 

Rock port 



Townships Verulam, County of Victoria, and Harvey, 
in the County of Peterboro'. 

Chemong Lake, Lovesick Lake and Deer Bay, County 
Peterboro'. 

District of Algoma lying east of Algoma Mills, including 
Cockburn and Manitoulin Islands. 

River Thames, between the Village of Lewisville and 
the easterly limits of Kent County. 

Towsnhips Mariposa and Ops, County Victoria. 

River Thames from Lewisville to its mouth, also the 
tributaries of said river between these points ; also 
the Township of Dover West, County Kent. 

County Frontenac lying north of the Townships of 
Kingston and Pittsburg, the Townships of North and 
South Crosby, Bastard, South Elmsley and Kitely, 
County of Leeds, and the County of Lanark . 

County of Norfolk. 

For the Townships of McKim, Broder, Dill, Neelon, 
Garson and Blezard in the District of Nipissing. 

For tliat portion of the River Ottawa lying between 
Des Joachim and Fort Coulonge. 

Townships Camden, Sheffield, Kaladar and Barrie. 

Townships of Front of Yonge and Elizabethtown in the 
County of Leeds and over the waters of the River 
St. Lawrence fronting the said Townships. 

That portion of the District of Nipissing lying west and 
north of the Townships of Widdifield, Merrick, 
Stewart and Osborne, exclusive of Lake Temiscaming 
and its tributaries. 

Townships of Erin and West Garafraxa. 

County Bruce fronting Lake Huron, lying between 
Southampton and Tobermory Harbour. 

Townships Collingwood and Osprey, County of Grey, 
and the Townships of Nottawasaga and Sunnidale 
County of Simcoe. 

Severn River and Sparrow Lake . 

County of Halton,- also County of Wentworth north of 
the Canal, and Lake Ontario . 

Township of Bedford^ County of Frontenac. 

Balsam Lake, County of Victoria. 

River of St. Lawrence between Jackstraw Light and 
Mallorytown Landing. 



1908 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



113 



LIST OF OVERSEERS.— CVn<tnu«d. 



Name. 



Small, John 

Smith, William..., 

Spence, William . . , 
Stanzel, Fred 

St. Charles, C 

Stewart, James. . . . 

Stuart, D 

Swift, Thos 

Switzer, W. H.... 

Taudvin, J. W.... 

Taylor, Fred 

Temple, Jas . M . . . 

Thomson, Henry . . 
Thurlow, George.. 

Tillett, R 

Timlin, M 

Titus, E. A 

Toole, Ira 

Townsend, J 

Traves, J. A., Sen 



Residence. 



Grand Valley. 

Gravenhurst . . 

Athens 

Carleton Place. 

Madoc 

Lanark 

Codrington. . . , 

Port Perry 

Gooderham . . . 

Kingston 

Huntsville 

Dorchester Stn. 

Brechin 

Nairn Centre. . 

Roach's Point. 

Atherly 

Wellington . . . 



Omemee 

Long Point . . 

Fraserburg. . . 



District. 



Tfiwnehips of Melancthon, Amaranth and East Luther, 
County Dufferin. 

Lakes Muskoka, Rousseau and Joseph, in the District of 
Parry Sound . 

Charlestown Lake and its tributaries, County Leeds. 

Townships Beckwith, Drummond, Ramsay and Packen- 
ham in County Lanark, and Townships Fitzroy, 
Huntley and Goulbourn in County Carleton, with 
joint jurisdiction over the waters of the Township 
Drummond with any other overseer. 

Townships Madoc and Huntington, County Hastings. 

Townships of Drummond, Lanark, Darling and Lavant, 
County Lanark. 

Trent Rirer and tributaries. County of Northumberland, 
from Chisholm's Rapids to Percy Boom. 

Township of Reach, County of Ontario, and Township 
of xMariposa, County Victoria, also River Scugog, 
and joint jurisdiction over Lake Scugog, 

Townships of Snowdon, Glamorgan, Monmouth, Cardiff, 
and Harcourt, District of Haliburton. 

For the City of Kingston, and for the waters fronting 
the County of Frontenac. 

For the Townships of Stephenson, Stisted, Chaffey, Sin- 
clair and Brunei, in the District of JMuskoka. 

Thames River, easterly to the boundary line between 
Oxford and Middlesex . 

Lake Simcoe and tributaries fronting on Tp. of Mara. 

For the Townships of Merritt, Nairn, Lome and Bald- 
win, in Dist. Algoma. 

North York, with jurisdiction over Holland River and 
that portion of Lake Simcoe lying in front of North 
Gwillirabury and Georgina Townships. 

Lake Couchiching and tributaries fronting Townships 
Mara and Rama . 

For that portion of the Bay of Quinte fronting on Tp . 
Ameliasburg lying west of Belleville bridge, also for 
the waters of Lake Ontario fronting on Tps. Amelias- 
burg and Hillier, with the exception of Village of 
Wellington, and including Weller's Bay, Consecon 
Lake, and all inland waters in said townships. 

Township of Emily, County of Victoria. 

Lyndhurst waters south of Lyndhurst ; also South and 
Gananoque Lakes. 

For the District of Muskoka, with joint jurisdiction with 
any Game and Fisheries overseers who have been or 
may be appointed over the District of Parry Sound. 



114 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 32 



LIST OF OVERSEERS.— Continued. 



Name. 


Residence. 


District. 


Twamley, C 


Cavan 


Townships Cavan and Manvers. 


Yokes, James 


Nanticoke 


Townships Walpole, Ranham, South Cayuga and 
Dunn, County Haldimand . 


Walker, R. J 


Port Credit . . . 


Lake Ontario, fronting County Peel, and for Rivers 
Credit and Etobicoke, tributary to said lake. 


Wartman, H. E .... 


Portsmouth . . 


For the .Township of Kingston in the County of 
Frontenac. 


Watson, Hy 


Toronto 

Csesarea 


Province of Ontario. 


Watson, J 


Townships of Cartwright and Manvers, the waters of 
Lake Scugog fronting on said townships and the 
waters tributary to said lake. 




Watt, John 


Peterborough . 


River Otonabee and tributaries lying between the Cana- 
dian Pacific Railway Crossing in Peterborough and 
the Village of Lakefleld. 




West, Chas 


Holland Ldg. . 


Joint jurisdiction along the east bank of the Holland 
River, through the Township of East Gwillimbury, 
and along the shore of Lake Simcoe, through Town- 
ship of North Gwillimbury in the County of York. 




West, Geo. W 


Holland Ldg. . 


With joint jurisdiction along east bank of Holland River, 
through Township of Gwillimbury, and along the 
shore of Lake Simcoe, through Township of North 
Gwillimbury, in the County of York. 


Whaley, J. R 


Westport 


Township of North Crosby in County Leeds, with joint 
jurisdiction over Devil Lake. 


Wight, J. R 


Newboro' 


For the Township of North Crosby extending to Smith's 
Falls on Rideau waters, together with the inland 
lakes and tributaries thereto. 


Wigle, L. 


Leamington.. . 


Townships of Maiden, North Colchester, South Col- 
chester, North Gosfield, South Gosfield and Mersea, 
in the County of Essex, with jurisdiction over so 
much of the waters of Lake Erie as lies in front of 
said Townships . 


Williams, J. T 


Penetang 


Townships of Matchedash, Tay, Medonte, Tiny, Floss, 
County of Simcoe, and over Christian, Beckwith 
and Giant's Tomb Islands. 


Wilson, H 


Elphin 


Townships of Dalhousie and North Sherbrooke, County 
of Lanark . 




Wood, John 


Parry Sound , . 


Townships Mackenzie, Hagerman, Burpee, Burton and 
Ferrie. 


Wood, W. R 


Toronto 


Townships of Etobicoke, York and Scarboro', and City 
of Toronto, County of York. 


Worden F 


Courtice 


County of Durham. 

Townships Kennebec and Barrie, County Frontenac. 


Wornnoorth, F. L.. 


Arden 


Younghusband, D. . . 


South March. . 


Townships March and Nepean, County Carleton. 



1908 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



115 



WATERS STOCKED FROM 1901 TO 1908, VlTH THE NUMBER AND KINDS OF 

FISH PLANTED IN EACH. 



1901. 



Waters stocked. 



Species. 



Muskoka Lake Bass 

Lake Rosseau Bass 

Lake Joseph Bass 

Fairy and Vernon Lakes Bass 

Lake of Bays Bass 

Thames River at Ingersoll Bass 

Thames River at Woodstock Bass 

Bear Creek at Strathroy Baas 

Thames River at Dorchester Bass 

Lake Couchiching Bass 

Stoney Lake Bass 

Lake Simcoe at Jackson's Point Bass 

Holland River Bass 

Golden Lake Bass 

Severn River Bass 

Grand River at Cayuga Bass 

Grand River at Brantford 

Kempenfeldt Bay 



1902. 

Waters stocked. Species. 

Muskoka Lake . Bass . . . 

Lake Joseph Bass . . . 

Lake Rosseau Bass . . . 

Lake Couchiching Bass . . . 

Bear Creek at Strathroy Ba«s 

Stoney Lake. 
Huntsville Lakes. 



Number. 

... 1,205 

. . . 700 

... 1,052 

... 244 

. . . 693 

... 225 

... 225 

... 396 

... 696 

. . . 436 

... 751 

... 603 

... 387 

... 372 

... 526 

... 400 

... 274 

... 300 



9,841 



Number. 
. . . 246 



Winnipeg River Brook trout. 



256 
227 
285 
395 
330 
265 
55 



2,059 



1903. 



Waters stocked. Species. 

Bear Creek at Strathroy Bass . . , 

Lake Rosseau Bass . . . 

Lake Joseph Bass . . . 

Muskoka Lake Base . . . 

Lake of Bays Bass . . . 

Sparrow Lake Bass . . . 

Lake Couchiching Bass . . . 

Long Lake at Rat Portage Bass . . . 

Golden Lake Bass . . , 

Mink Lake Bass . . . 

Clear Lake Bass . . . 

White Lake Bass . . 

Lynn River at Lake Simcoe Baes . . . 

Grand River at Brantford Bass . . . 

Thames River at Ingersoll Bass . . . 

Thames River at London Bass . . 

Thames River at St. Marys Bass . . 

Grand River at Fergus Bass . . , 

Grand River at Grand Valley Bass . 

Grand River at Paris Baas . . , 

Musselman's Lake Bass . . 

Lake of Bays Bass . . 



Number. 
. . . 926 
... 1,130 
. . . 500 
. .. 1,002 
. . . 371 
... 650 
. . . 258 
. . . 460 
. . . 100 

85 

85 
. . . 100 
... 355 
... 425 

75 
... 200 
... 205 
. . . 100 

70 

. . . 130 

200 

... 500 



7,927 



116 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 32 



WATERS STOCKED FROM 1901 TO 1908, WITH THE NUMBER AND KINDS OF 
FISH PLANTED IN EACH.— Continued. 

1904. 

Waters stocked. Species. Number. 

Credit River Bass 115 

Lake Rosseau Bass 380 

Green Lake Bass , 135 

Opinicon Forks Bass 50 

Lake near Barry's Bay Bass 30 

Barry's Bay Bass 100 

Gorman Lake Bass 75 

Golden Lake Bass 565 

Mink Lake Bass 60 

White Lake Bass 160 

Clear Lake Bass 50 

Snell's Lake Bass 100 

Lake Joseph Bass 725 

Bass Lake Bass 200 

Lake Couchiching Bass 230 

Lake Joseph Bass 415 

Lake of Bays Bass 530 

Lake Simcoe at Jackson's Point Bass 785 

Beaver River at Cannington Bass 250 

Balsam Lake Bass 400 

Lake of Bays Bass Fingerlings 5,000 

Oxbow River at Komoka Bass Fingerlings 1 ,200 

Lake Scugog Bass Fingerlings 1,400 



12.955 



1905. 



Waters stocked. Species. Number. 

Lake Scugog Bass 400 

Stoney Lake Bass 600 

Muskoka Lake Bass 500 

Thames River at Stratford Bass 250 

Thames River at Mitchell Bass 350 

Lake Couchiching Bass 500 

Gull Lake (near Gravenhuret) Bass 100 

Lake of Bays Bass 400 



1906. 



3,100 



Waters stocked. Species. 

Lake Simcoe Bass . . 

Lake of Bays Bass . . . 

Gull River Bass . . . 

Grand River Bass . . . 

Lake Scugog Bass . . . 

Muskoka Lake Bass . . . 

River Nith Base . . . 

Lake Simcoe Bass . . . 

" Bass ... 



Number. 

... 450 

. . . 700 

... 610 

. . . 575 

... 400 

. . . 700 

. . . 600 

... 700 

... 700 



1908. 



5,435 



Waters stocked. Species. 

Sparrow Lake Bass . . . 



Number. 

500 

Haliburton Lake Bass 520 

Puslinch Lake Bass Fingerlings 725 

River vicinity Kenora Trout, Speckled, fry 2,000 



3,745 



lOOS 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



117 



Statement of Revenue received from the Game and Fisheries during the year ended 

3l8t December, 1908. 



Game. 



Deer Licenses, 1907 

1908 

Non-resident Licenses, 1907 . . 
1908.. 

Moose Licenses, 1907 

1908 

Game Dealers, 1908 

Hotel a!id Cold Storage, 1908 
Fines and Confiscations, 1908 




28,040 20 



Fisheries. 



District. 



Lake of the Woods and Rainy River 
District . 

River Nipigon 

Lake Superior 

Lake Huron ( North Channel) 

Georgian Bay 



Name of Overseer. 



l.>ake Huron (proper) and River St. Clair. 



Lake St. Clair, River Thames and Detroit 
River. 



Amount. 



Blanchard, F 

Sterling, 0. N ...... . 

Leitch, P. A 

Calbeck, A 

Gordon, Walter 

Hand. T. A 

Jackson, H. T 

Johnston, T. H 

Bradbury, J. R 

Graham, W. J 

Hembruff, Jos 

Hunter, Wm 

Irwin, David 

Oliver, R. C 

Vincer, Wm 

Dusang, B. A 

France, Jr. , W 

Hewitt, Jas 

Jermyn, J. W 

Kennedy, John 

Knight, C. H 

Laughington, Hy 

Malcolmson, J 

Robinson, T. W 

Williams, J. T 

Wood, P. V 

Blunden, H. A 

Karr, Richard .... . . 

Kehoe, D 

McMurray, R 

Robertson, D 

Campbell, J. D 

Chambers, Thos 

Carried forward 



f c. 

182 00 

1,019 00 



895 00 



82 00 

3,204 67 

2,074 92 

9 00 

21 00 



5 00 

115 00 

15 00 

27 00 

193 75 

6,627 25 

9 00 



301 00 

9 00 

47 00 

1,038 75 

765 00 

1,003 00 

1,243 00 

20 00 

750 00 

247 00 

8 00 

3,725 00 

127 00 

S52 00 

858 00 

1,400 50 



7 50 
60 00 



$ c. 

1,201 00 
895 00 



5,391 69 



6.992 00 



5,431 75 



6,462 50 



67 60 26,373 84 



9 Q.F. 



118 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 32 



Statement of Revenue received — Continued. 



District. 



Lake St. Clair, River Thames and Detroit 
River. — Con. 



Lake Erie and Grand River. 



Lake Ontario and Bay of Quinte 



Name of Overseer. 



Counties Frontenac, Leeds, Prescott, Rus- 
sell, Carleton, Renfrew, Lanark, Gren- 
ville. 



Brought fur ward . . 

Chauvin, V 

Crotty, John 

Holman, B 

Hubbard, J. H 

Laframboise, R 

Little, Richard 

Osborne, Hy 

Peltier, T 

Briggs, T. J 

Burt, Wm 

Henderson, H. A . . . , 

Johnson, Hy 

Kraft, S 

Lee, Edward 

McClennan, K . . j . . . . 

McEwen, A 

McQueen, H 

McVittie, Jas 

Moriarty, J. J 

Pierce, J. P 

Scott, Wm 

Vokes, Jas 

Wigle, Lewis 

Boulter, G. H 

Cheer, T. H 

Covell, John 

Gault, Thos 

Glass, Irvine 

Hayes, H. W 

Holliday, Hy 

Huffman, E. M 

Johnston, J 

Kerr, C. J 

McGlynn, P. J 

May, J. C 

Mansfield, Thos 

Murdoch, John 

Sargant, Wm 

Walker, R. J 

Wad&worth, C 

Wartman, H. E 

Wood, W. R 

Worden, F 

Barr, George 

Birch, W. J 

Boyd, J. H 

Bourgon, J. B 

Burke, George 

Christink, E 

Covell, H.N 

Davis, J. W 

Deacon, E 

Donaldson, W. J. . . . 

Drew, Hy 

Duffy, T. J 

Esford, Hy 

Carried forward 



Amount. 



c. 

57 50 



1,410 

7 

19 

4 

296 

1,142 

46 

614 



93 

10 
1,909 
7 
156 
1,000 
2,947 
3,275 

11 
6,650 

38 

2,632 

133 

2,680 

4,060 



609 

5 

168 

490 

77 

162 

338 

801 

15 

368 

213 

523 

40 

321 

35 

27 

45 

61 

148 

10 



11 
184 

6 
88 
28 
32 

3 
63 
30 

1 
39 

7 
180 



672 75 



26,373 84 



3,596 50 



25,602 20 



4.457 10 



60,029 64 



1908 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



119 



Statement of Revenue received — Continued. 



District. 



Counties Frontenac, Leeds, Prescott, Rus- 
sell, Carleton, etc. — Con. 



Peterboro, Northumberland, Victoria and 
other inland counties. 



Name of Overseer. 



Brought forward . 



Fisher, Jas 

Hunter, Cap. A . . . 
Loveday, E. T.... 
McDonald, Allan. . 

McGuire, John 

Mallett, W. H 

Ostrom, B. B 

Phillips, J. H 

ShilHngton, N 

Spence, Wm 

Taudvin, J. W.... 

Thomson, J. E 

Toner, G 

Townsend, Jas. . . . 

Wight, J. R 

Whaley, J. R 

Wornnoorth, F. L. 



Bennett, E. C 

Best, S. G 

Blea, D.aniel 

Bradshaw, A 

Brownell, T 

Buckley, G. E.... 
Bunting, C. H.... 

Burtcheall, C 

Cassan, C. H 

Clarkson, Wm 

Crump, C. J. C. . . . 
Cunningham, J. A. 

Farrow, C. N 

Forrest, J. B 

Gaudrie, E. W.... 

Gouldie, E. J 

Green, John 

Grise Bros 

Hess, J. H 

Howard, T 

Johnson, Thos 

Jones, D 

Jones, John 

Kelly, Edward .... 
Langford, Newton. 
Lean, Wellington . 
McAllister, J. R. . . 

McConkey, R 

McElwain, S. C. . . 
Mclntyre, A. W. . . 

Maughan, W 

Merriam, E 

Morgan, H. M . . . . 

Moore, F. J 

Morton. J. W 

NichoUs, Garner.. 

Nicholls, Peter 

Parkin, C. W 

Phemister, G 

Purcell, H. R 

Radcliffe, J. H.... 



Amount. 



Carried forward . 



« c. 

672 75 

183 00 
284 50 
154 00 

10 00 
575 00 

16 00 

29 50 

310 32 

, 143 00 

76 00 

718 00 

8 00 

37 00 
192 06 
362 00 

20 00 

45 00 



24 00 
23 00 

131 00 

' 18 00 

8 00 

1,680 00 

15 00 

58 00 

126 00 

125 00 

28 00 

6 00 

4 00 

48 00 
10 00 

2 00 
21 00 

47 00 

5 00 

13 00 
35 00 

7 00 
61 00 

25 00 
43 00 

49 00 
103 00 

4 00 
82 00 

6 00 

14 00 
102 00 

64 00 
399 00 

53 00 
432 00 

31 00 

5 00 
387 00 

32 00 

48 00 



4,374 00 



60,029 64 



3,836 07 



63,865 71 



120 



THE REPORT UPON GAME AND FISHERIES. 



No. 32 



Statement of Revenue received — Concluded. 



District. 



Peterboro, Northumberland, Victoria and 
other inland counties. — Con. 



River St. Lawrence 



Lakes Simcoe, Couchiching and Sparrow. 



Nipiasing 



Unclassified. 



Name of Overseer. 



Brought fortvard. 



Reeve, H. J. . . . 
Rice, M. A . ... 
Scott, G. W, . . . 
Simpson, Jos. . . 
Sinclair, A. E. . 

Smith, Wm 

Sturdy, W. J. . . 
Taylor, Fred... 
Telfer, J. A.... 

Toole, Ira 

Train, G. T. S.. 
Watson, John . 

Watt, John 

Wessels, E. M. . 

Widdup, J 

Willmott, J. H. 
Woods, John . 
Wright, E. P. . 



Acton, Nassau . 
Blondin, Isaac 
Cox, Matthew . 

Eraser, J. A 

Senecal, John. . 



Green, Geo. G. . . 
Greenwood, T. D. 

Lead ley, R 

McDonald, H.... 
McGinn, Wm. . . . 

McPhee, D 

Mayor, Harry . . . 
Robinson, Wm. . . 

Tillett, R 

Timlin, M 



Macdonald, S. C. 

McGaw, Capt 

McKelvie, D..... 

Parks, G. M 

Rivet, Jos 



Amount. 



Licenses issued from 
Office 

Fines 

Manitou Lake (payment 
on lease) 

Sale of Yacht "I'll See" 

Sale of "Eva Bell" 



Overpaid into Treasury . 



Total Fisheries . 
Total Game 



Total. 



$ c. 
4,374 00 

10 00 
36 00 
45 00 

50 00 
4 00 

33 00 
6 00 
33 00 
43 00 
10 00 
10 00 

51 00 
41 00 
15 00 
62 00 

.264 00 
36 00 
19 00 



5 00 
16 00 
10 00 
20 00 

4 00 



25 00 

64 00 

8 00 

15 00 
68 00 

16 00 
8 00 

210 00 

4 00 

10 00 



851 00 
41 00 
75 00 

309 00 
24 00 



679 20 

12 45 

750 00 
675 00 
105 00 



1 00 



I c. 
63,865 71 



5,142 00 



55 00 



428 00 



1,300 00 



2,221 65 
1 00 

70,013 36 
28,040 20 

101,053 56 



Third Annual Report 



OF THE 



Game and Fisheries Department 



1909 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE 

LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




TORONTO: 
Printed and Published by L. K. CAMERON, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

1910 



Printed by 

WILLIAM BRIGGS, ' 

29-37 Richmond Street West, 

TORONTO 



To His Honour John Morison Gibson, 

a Colonel in the Militia of Canada, 

Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario. 

May it Please Your Honour : 

I have the honour to submit herewith, for the information of Your Honour 
and the Legislative Assembly, the Third Annual Eeport of the Game and Fisheries 
Department of this Province. 

I have the honour to be. 

Your Honour's most obedient servant, 

J. 0. Eeaume, 

Minister of Public Worlcs. 
Toronto, 16th December, 1909. 



[3] 



Third Annual Report 

OF THE 

Game and Fisheries Department 



To the Honourable J. 0. Eeadme, 

Minister of Public Works. 

SiE, — I have the honour to submit for your information and approval the 
report of the Department of Game and Fisheries for the ten months ending October 
30th, 1909. 

In consequence of the change in the fiscal year from December 31st to October 
30th, this report cannot be as complete as those of former years. Many of the 
statistics and other matters that can only be computed from the end of the calendar 
year will therefore appear in the report for 1909-1910, comprising the last two 
months of 1909. I desire to call your attention to the fact that a large portion 
of the revenue of the Department is received during the last two months of the 
year, the revenue from which will appear in next report. Notwithstanding this, 
the revenue is considerably in excess of that for the first ten months of 1908. This, 
I venture to hope, will be satisfactory to you and all concerned. 

Enforcing Lav^s and Regulations. 

I regret having been compelled to prosecute during the present year for infrac- 
tions of the fishery laws a number of fishermen, farmers and others, who, having 
obtained licenses for alleged domestic purposes, have grossly abused the privileges 
accorded them, by illegally catching, selling and exporting black bass. These 
parties foolishly killing the goose that lays the golden egg. Most of these infrac- 
tions occurred in localities and vicinities of summer resorts visited by large numbers 
of foreign tourists, the attraction being the angling for bass and other game fish. 
It is surprising that men living in these favoured localities should be so shortsighted 
to their own permanent intere^s as these men have proven themselves to be for 
doubtful and temporary gain. These men, instead of being poachers and law- 
breakers, if alive to their own interests, would neither violate the law nor allow 
others to do so. Having a market for their produce and a demand for their services 
as guides, etc., and highly remunerative terms, should convince them of the folly 
of their past conduct and the wisdom of the Government in protecting and per- 
petuating the interests of those evidently unable to protect themselves. I fail to 
realize why the conditions of a license to take fish from the public waters should 
not be carried out and observed to the same extent as those relating to cutting and 
taking timber from the public domain. They are both valuable assets, and the 
same conditions should prevail. There is only one way to accomplish this, and that 
is to let all obtaining licenses realize in the most unmistakable manner that it is 
a business transaction, and must be carried out on business principles to the fullest 
extent, and in the event of their failure to do so no influence will be tolerated or 
allowed to shield them from the consequences of their wrong doing. Men who 

[5] 



THE REPORT UPON No. 13 



knowingly take public property in excess of that they are legally entitled to by 
lease or license are not honest, and when caught have no right or cause to com- 
plain at being treated the same as other wrong doers. 

The Government in the interests of the general public have been compelled to 
withdraw the privilege of hunting permits that have been grossly abused by 
residents in certain portions of organized territory to whom they were issued. It 
is time the settlers realized how unwise their conduct has been in the wanton 
destruction of game and fish. They fail to realize that with the disappearance of 
game and fish in the northern portions of the province, that the tourist would 
also disappear, and with them the large amounts they annually spend in the 
province, by which all portions of the community are benefited. The tourist 
business in the province is as yet comparatively undeveloped. The more I see 
•and learn of our Northern Country the stronger is the impression on my mind 
of its special adaptation for a breathing place for the residents of the overcrowded 
Cities and Towns of this Continent. The increased facilities for reaching our 
Northern Country, with its thousands of miles of forests, lakes and rivers resulting 
from railroads recently constructed, and under construction, have been taken 
advantage of by many wealthy non-residents who have bought property on which 
to erect their summer houses in localities unexcelled. When we realize that one 
of the principal attractions to these pleasure seekers is the fish and game, it 
should be the duty of all classes of the community to assist the authorities in their 
efforts to protect and perpetuate this reproductive source of revenue so essential 
to transportation companies, hotel keepers, guides and settlers. 

I regret that the absurd and unwise regulations that have prevailed in 
portions of Lake Brie for some years are still in effect, by which fishermen in 
these favoured localities are still allowed to violate the laws of Nature and common 
sense with impunity. Those responsible for these unjust and destructive regu- 
lations may have their own reasons, but a discerning public will have no difficulty 
in concluding that those reasons are not in the interest of the general public. 
I fail to realize how any matter of expediency of whatever magnitude would justify 
the issuing of regulations to fishermen allowing them to take whitefish from the 
spawning grounds during the entire close season. These absurd and unjust regu- 
lations make it impossible for this Department to enforce the laws in other locali- 
ties where close seasons are supposed to be observed. No matter where whitefish 
are procured during the close season, dealers and others affirm they came from the 
exempted district. The other fishermen operating in Lake Erie waters adjoining 
the exempted waters, and who pay the same fees, complain, and not without ample 
cause, at being compelled to stop fisihing during the month of November, while 
their favoured neighbours are allowed to continue fishing and reap a veritable and 
sinful harvest. 

Re-stocking. 

The first experience of this Department in raising Bass Fingerlings was tried 
by means of a pond at Brantford, with results exceeding our most sanguine expecta- 
tions. At least 25,000 of these Fingerlings of the small mouth variety were raised 
and deposited in various waters of the Province. During the summer much 
anxiety was felt as to the success of the venture, and on more than one occasion 
it was thought that the result would be disastrous, and not until the work of 
transplanting was commenced, was it known to be a success. With the experience 
of the past year it is not unreasonable to look for at least one hundred thousand 



1909 GAME AND FISHEKIES. 



in this same pond which has been secured for that purpose for another year, pro- 
viding no unforeseen circumstances should arise. This will, I hope, lead to the 
establishing of a series of ponds, which will enable the work to be carried on on a 
much larger scale, and allow the re-stocking of those waters which have been depleted 
in years gone by, by settlers who had no regard for the welfare of future generations. 
It will also be the means of re-stocking inland lakes, that were never known to have 
fishing of any importance, but which are now becoming settled more and more eaqh 
year by the summer Tourists. The State of Michigan with their bass ponds at Grand 
Eapids this year deposited over a million and a half of these bass fingerlings in the 
waters of that State, and there is no reason why the Province of Ontario should not 
do likewise. 

Angling Permits. 

The sale of these Permits was much in excess of last year, giving only another 
proof of the increased Tourist traffic, which the Province attracts with its numerous 
resorts for holiday making; not only is a pleasure derived from the summer outing, 
but the health-giving qualities are of ffuch a nature that one experience leads to 
another. The abolishing of the much abused Family Permit has given general satis- 
faction, and I am glad to say that from the Officers' reports must less illegal fishing 
was done by the summer tourists this year than in former years. 

Patrol Service. 

The last few years of patrol service has been a decided improvement, but this 
year was so infinitely better that a comparison with former years is out of the ques- 
tion. The purchase of the "Navarch" and placing her on the Bay of Quinte, Lake 
Ontario, St. Lawrence Biver and Rideau Waters has proven to be a wise decision. 
The illegal fishing which was openly carried on in some of these aforementioned 
waters in utter defiance of the local Officers met its reward this year, when thousands 
of yards of net, boats, guns and many illegal contrivances were confiscated by the 
officers of this boat, and in many instances the culprits were caught and dealt with 
in a manner that should at least make them think that the Department intends to 
carry out the laws and regulations a wise Legislature decide to enact. The 
Department has received many compliments upon the attractive appearance this 
boat presented wherever she went ; and it certainly was a decided improvement upon 
the craft which formerly were known as the Ontario Government Patrol Boats. The 
work that this boat began this year will, I trust, be carried on next year with as 
great a success, and there is no reason why it should not be even greater for at least 
she will go into commission six weeks earlier, which, through unforeseen circum- 
stances, she was* prevented from dping last year. 

The "Xaiad" which for the first time last year patrolled the waters which the 
"Navarch" did this, was placed upon the Kawartha Lakes and Lake Simcoe, with the 
result that laws and regulations were never so well observed. The tourists who 
openly boasted of their large daily catch of fish much in excess of what the law 
allowed, were this year much more observant of the laws and regulations knowing 
full well that should the officer in charge of this boat apprehend them in their illegal 
work prompt action would be taken to prevent a re-occurrence. The work this boat 
did on Lake Simcoe in breaking up illegal net fishing was alone worth the cost of 
her maintenance. It is expected, and reasonably so, that next year even better 
results will be obtained, the officer will be more familiar with his work, and it is 



THE EEPOET UPON No. 13 



to be hoped that he will have the co-operation of all those along his route, whose 
interests should be to preserve the Fisheries. 

The *^ega" which was purchased late last summer had not much chance to show 
what she would be able to do in the patrol service. This year she was on continual 
patrol from the 15th May until the 31st October patrolling waters around Manitoulin 
Island and Georgian Bay as far as Penetanguishene. The waters of the inner 
Channel of Georgian Bay with the "Vega," the "Charlotte" and "Florence," the two 
last being gasoline launches, never before received such good protection from the 
illegal fishermen; these boats being so constantly on patrol very few infractions of 
the law were observed. 

The "Edna Ivan" in charge of Captain E. Dunn was chartered in the same 
manner as last year and went into commission the 1st of May and continued until 
the 31st November. She patrolled the waters of all the Great Lakes, visited the 
various fishing stations, settled many disputes between fishermen, prevented much 
illegal fishing by her presence and in fact gave excellent satisfaction. 

Special Officers. 

Another year's experience of having special officers at important shipping points 
to inspect all shipments of fish and to see that none were shipped excepting those 
legally caught has met with excellent results. I do not hesitate to say that this 
means has prevented, perhaps more than in any other manner, thousands of tons 
of fish which otherwise would be illegally caught, and a great improvement to the 
Fisheries will undoubtedly be observed in the course of the next few years. 

Pollution of Public Waters. 

The prevention of pollution of lakes, rivers and streams in the Province is most 
urgent. Three reasons why stream pollution must be curtailed are given in the 
Bulletin of the New York State Department of Health, as follows: "Among the 
many objections to the pollution of our natural watercourses there are three that 
stand out most prominently and which in fact embrace all the reasons advanced for 
the preventing the defilement of our lakes and rivers. 

1. The Protection of Public Health. When the subject of Stream Pollution was 
first given serious attention the conditions attending the use of watercourses differed 
materially from those obtaining at present, and it was the necessity of preventing 
nuisances in streams and not that of preserving the public health which constituted 
the first reason advanced for requiring the purification of domestic sewage and manu- 
facturing -vyastes. Under present day conditions, however, the principal justification 
for the campaign that is being universally waged against the discharge of crude 
sewage and wastes into streams is the need of protecting the public health. Not all 
Municipalities may secure public water supplies from springs and mountain streams 
flowing from uninhabited regions and so beyond doubt the danger to public health 
resulting from the unrestricted pollution of streams is the most important reason 
on both moral and economic grounds for demanding the purification of sewage. 

2. The Prevention of Public Nuisances. Next in importance as a reason for 
requiring the treatment of sewage and wastes is the necessity of preventing public 
nuisances. Putrefactive conditions and other objectionable effects are set up in 
streams which have received organic matter and other wastes in excess of the capacity 
of the streams to properly digest or dilute the amount of sewage and wastes that has 
been discharged in its crude state into the stream. As stated above the conditions 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 



of nuisance thus brought about called forth the first demands that were made for 
the treatment of sewage and wastes. 

However, while the methods of treating domestic sewage are no longer in the 
experimental stage the same cannot be said of the methods of treating manufacturing 
refuse. This is true principally because of the fact that experimentation and re- 
search in evolving processes for treating industrial wastes has been carried on almost 
solely along utilization lines, rather than with the object of providing means for 
reducing and rendering unobiectionable such wastes before their discharge. From 
an economic standpoint this tendency is commendable, but in view that great damage 
is done to streams by the discharge of such wastes, greater attention should be 
given to providing means for their reduction even though no u?eful by-products 
will result from the process. Considerable interest is rightly centred of late on 
the conservation of the natural resources of the country, and the fact should not 
be lost sight of that pure water is the greatest source of health and that health 
is the first wealth." My object in making the above extract is to demonstrate that 
similar causes are producing the same effects in Ontario as those complained of by 
the authorities of the State of New York. Some two years ago a letter reached 
me from the Reeve of a village situated on the banks of the Grand River to the 
effect that in his official capacity in the interest of the inhabitants he had been 
compelled to have buried tons of putrid fijsh that had been killed by deleterious 
matter from a near-by factory. Many of the fish so wantonly destroyed had at 
the urgent request of the residents, been recently placed at considerable expense in 
these waters for restocking. For many miles below the factory referred to these 
contaminated waters run through a fine grazing country. Results from cattle drink- 
ing these waters, and even from eating fish caught in them can better be imagined 
than described. Although this Department is interested in this matter to the extent 
of being anxious to prevent the unnecessary and useless destruction of fish, it 
certainly appears to me that it is or sliould be the duty of the municipal authorities 
to do all possible in future not only to prevent such violations but also punish 
those committing them. 

Ruffed Grouse — Partridge. 

Two close seasons have been favourable to the increase of these grand native 
birds, especially in the northern portions of the Province. Of course, in the older 
settled parts of the Province they will disappear with the woods. The open season 
should be reduced to one month, the same as quail, from the first day of November 
to the thirtieth, both inclusive. This would prevent them being killed when imma- 
ture, when whole coveys are destroyed. 

Quail. 

These birds were found in average numbers, in some localities. In the low 
lands many small immature birds were found, in consequence of the first nests 
being destroyed by flooding. I am not very sanguine as to the future of quail 
in the Province. Food and shelter, so essential to them in winter, is becoming 
scarcer each succeeding year. Of course, the reduced open season should have a 
favourable effect, and tend to keep up the supply. 



10 THE EEPORT UPON" No. 13 



Woodcock. 

These birds are not increasing to the extent desired, although some fair bags 
were made during the season just closed. 

Snipe and Plover. 

Snipe and plover were found as numerous as usual, and in some localities 
afforded good sport. 

Ducks. 

Duck shooting early in the season was not satisfactory, owing to the unusually 
fine weather prevailing, but later on in the season, for some days, the shooting was 
all that could be desired by those entitled to be known as sportsmen. 

All of which is respectfully submitted by. 

Your obedient servant, 

E. TiNSLEY, 

Superintendent. 



GAME AND FISHERIES INSPECTORS. 

E. TlNSLEY^ 

Superintendent of Game and Fisheries. 

Sir, — I am pleased to be able to report that notwithstanding the drawbacks 
caused by severe storms during October (when Commercial fishermen as a rule 
have their best catches) the past season has been fairly successful and would 
have been fully up to the average if these storms had not occurred. 

The increased catch of Whitefish is the surprise of the season. This increase hag 
not been local, but has been noticeable from one end of the Great Lakes to the other. 

The catch of Trout was not as large during the Spring and Summer months 
as usual, but the fishermen all agree in saying that they were as numerous as ever 
during October and that the catch would have been as good as in former seasons if 
they could have lifted their nets regularly during that month. 

These same storms caused heavy losses among the fishermen, some of the tugs 
losing half of the nets that they had in the water, but I have not heard of any loss 
of life by these storms. 

The fisheries laws and regulations have been, on the whole, fairly well observed 
by licensed fishermen, only a few cases having come to my notice when it was neces- 
sary to impose a fine. 

The patrol boats ''Edna Ivan," "Navarch," "Naiad" and *'Vega'' that have 
been in commission the whole season as well as some others that were chartered for 
shorter terms have done splendid work, the Overseers in charge of them being very 
diligent in the discharge of their duties. I can say the same of all the Overseers 
and officers with very few exceptions. 

I wish to congratulate you on the success of the experimental Bass Pond estab- 
lished near Brantford. For the first year I consider the hatch something to be 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. ^ 11 

proud of and the small bass in shipping proves beyond a doubt that the fingerlings 
can be moved much more successfully than the older fish. You were also fortunate 
in securing the services of a competent man to place in charge of this important 
work, and I have no doubt that he can another season profiting by the known mis- 
takes of this at least double the number of the hatch. 

The service can be improved by adding several gasoline launches to your fleet, 
there being three or four places where these boats could be used to advantage. We 
need a good boat for service on the eastern end of Lake Superior. For this work I 
believe that a s'ailboat, with gasoline engine, would be the most serviceable, being 
better than a larger one, on account of the many harbours in these waters open only 
to the smaller craft. 

The licensed guide has been a success, every one acknowledges that. The Anglers 
and hunters get competent men ; the fish and game get protection they never had 
before, and these being the main reasons why the fee was imposed and the license 
made obligatory, we cannot call it anything but a success. 

There is a widespread opinion among the hunters that the open season for deer 
is too early and if we are going to have as late seasons as this one was no doubt 
it is the case. I am told that a large number of deer were left in the woods, the 
hunters not being able to get them out before they were spoiled, and it appears to 
be the opinion of all the experts that I have met that if the open season was from 
the 15th to the 30th of November it would be an improvement. 

Many reports have reached me of the great destruction of Deer by the wolves 
in the Northern part of the Province. Just what is the best remedy for this is 
hard to determine, our present bounty does not seem to meet the case. There is 
a great difference of opinion as to whether an increased bounty would be of benefit 
or not. 

The prohibition of partridge fhooting for the past two seasons has resulted 
in a large increase in the number of these birds in nearly all sections of the 
Province and I have no doubt that it will be possible to allow the usual open season 
next year. 

I have the honour to be. 

Your obedient servant, 

Wm. W. Holden, 

Inspector. 



GAME AND FISHERY WARDENS. 

Warden Dr. Burt, of Simcoe, reports : 

Speckled Trout. 

These game fish are becoming very scarce in his district. They have so many 
fishermen, and so few fish that, although there are some ideal trout streams in his 
district, the fish are becoming very scarce. 

Bass. 

The bass in Ijong Point Bay are becoming more plentiful. The anglers report 
having better luck this year than in 1908. These bass are larger than were formerly 



12 THE REPOET UPON No. 13 



caught. He is still of the opinion that the prohibition of the sale of bass and the 
enforcement of the law against illegal fishing has made a decided improvement in 
these waters. The experiment of Brantford of placing parent bass in a small pond 
and allowing them to breed was successful. The fish appeared to raise as many 
young as they would in natural conditions. 

Commercial Fish. 

This year has been one of the most successful for whitefish in many years. The 
herring are fully as plentiful as formerly, and the carp are increasing rapidly in 
number. The fishermen are now getting a fairly good price for the latter fish, 
except at certain times when the markets are glutted. There are several fishermen 
in his district who have built carp ponds, and are catching these fish when they are 
numerous, and cheap, keeping them alive and feeding them in the ponds. The 
experiment is in its earlier stages, and he cannot yet say how successful it will be. 

Quail. 

These birds are not as numerous in his district as last year. 

Ruffed Grouse and Partridge. 

These birds have increased slightly in number in the last year, owing to their 
protection. He would recommend that the shooting of quail and ruffed grouse 
be prohibited in his district during the year 1910. 

Woodcock. 

This bird for a great many years has been very scarce in his district, but it is 
reported to have been fairly numerous this year. Largely owing to the flight of the 
northern birds he has heard of few, if any, breeding in the district, but during the 
season, individual guns have occasionally been able to get some six to ten birds in 
a day's shooting. 

Black Squirrels. 

There has been a slight increase in the number of black squirrels in the district, 
owing to the Deputy Wardens enforcing the law more strictly than has been done 
in the past. 

Wild Geese. 

As he had reported in the past, they practically have no wild goose shooting 
in his district. 

Wild Ducks. 

It is reported that along the Niagara River and the Grand River ducks have 
been scarcer than last year, but at Long Point Bay and the marsihes surrounding it, 
they have been more numerous than even the oldest inhabitant ever remembers. 
No very large bags, however, have been made, as the ducks appear to have been 
shot at in the North country before they arrive here, so that they are very shy of 
decoys. 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 13 



FUK-BEAEINQ ANIMALS. 

The muskrat is the main fur-bearing animal in his district, and is reported to 
be fairly numerous this fall, but as the water in the different marshes is very low, 
the trappers anticipate that a great many of them may be killed during the winter 
through inability to burrow out of their houses and secure sufficient supply of food. 
While the law has not been as much broken as in the past, he found some cases 
where muskrats were illegally taken. He would suggest that the killing of muskrats 
in the month of December be prohibited. The fur at that season is not in good 
condition, and the owners of the land upon which the rats breed never attempt to 
trap them until the spring. The consequence is that the only rats taken in this 
district in December are taken by the poaching element. He would again recommend 
that the use of dogs, spears or guns in the taking of muskrats be prohibited for the 
reasons stated in his former reports. The game laws in a great part of his district 
have been well observed. Most of the Deputy Wardens and Overseers have dis- 
charged their duties very efficiently. 

An interesting experiment has been attempted in his district by the Long Point 
Company, who have imported a number of elk and placed them upon Long Point 
Jsland. He regrets to say that one of these animals escaped, and was killed during 
the month of November. He has, however, secured evidence and is prosecuting 
the party who was supposed to have killed this animal. 

Game and Fishery Warden V. Ghauvin, of Windsor, reports that the fishermen 
are very fairly satisfied with their catch. The catch is smaller than last year, but 
especially in herring, the price is much better. There has been more whitefiah 
caught in the Detroit River this fall than there has been for fifteen years past, 
some fishermen caught as high as twelve hundred a day with a seine. Lake St. 
Clair has also been good for whitefish, but not as good as any other year for any 
other kind of fish. Lake Erie has been generally about the same, except Port 
Stanley and up to Port Colborne, they have caught more perch than they used to. 
White bass has been more numerous in Lake Erie. Lake Huron has been about 
the same as any other year. Angling has been fairly satisfactory to the sportsman. 
The fishermen are improving in their shipping of fish and there has been very little 
seized this year. The only trouble there is now, is that they do not address their 
shipments properly. 

In regard to game, quail is about the same as last year ; there have been a few 
quail killed this fall. There is a lot of quail left for breeding purposes. He knows 
a bev}'' that has not been shot at. If there is a good winter and dry spring there 
should be a lot of quail next year. Partridges are scarce this year, also black 
squirrel, in this part of the Province. Muskrats have been as plentiful as ever. 
Wild geese are about the same as last year, there are very few of them shot around 
there. There were more black and grey ducks this fall in the Detroit River than 
there has been for years. The other kind of river ducks have been scarce. In Lake 
St Clair Flats there has been fairly good shooting, also along Lake Erie the game 
law has been fairly well observed in his division. 

Warden Alf. Hunter, of Belleville, reports that fishing of all kinds has materi- 
ally improved in his district. Commercial fishermen report that the past season 
has been the best in the last ten years, and that the laws have been observed 
better. He was glad to report that tiie Province is awakening to the fact that they 
possess a valuable asset in the Fish and Game, and that more attention should be 



14 THE EEPOET UPON No. 13 



paid to it. Game fish are also on thie increase and are attracting the tourists. He 
is glad to note that your Department is taking steps to take the ling out of the 
Rideau waters. He thinks it is a step in the right direction that you are starting 
bass ponds. He had the privilege of visiting the one at Brantf ord lately and found 
it doing good work. He would suggest that another hatchery be constructed either 
in the Bay of Quinte or the Eideau waters. He is also glad to report on the good 
work performed by the patrol boats, the " Navarch " and " Naiad." They certainly 
have a deterrent effect on poachers. He was also glad to report that the overseers 
under his charge, with but few exceptions, are doing good work. He thinks that 
if they were better paid they would accomplish more good. He reports that the 
system of licensing guides is working well, and from his personal knowledge of the 
angling situation he finds that the best rod fishing is in the parts where the Hoop 
Net fishing is licensed. 

In all parts of the Province partridge have increased, ducks are reported fewer 
in number, deer also appear to be either fewer in number or harder to kill. He 
would recommend extending the close season from November 15th-December 1st, 
also to restrict the hujiters to one deer each. He also thinks that muskrat trap- 
pers should be licensed. Mink, he thinks, should be protected by a close season, 
otherwise in a short time there will be none to protect. Beaver and otter are be-* 
coming numerous and he would suggest that tiiey be killed under Government 
supervision of the park rangers or overseers, the skins to be sold for tlie benefit of 
the Province; also that only a limited number of the above be killed each year. A 
number of cases of violation of the Fish and Game Act came before him during 
the year, but on the whole he finds that the Act is fairly wiell observed. 

Warden Geo. M. Paries, of North Bay, reports as follows : 

Anglers during the past season have met with better success than for several 
seasons, more especially in Lake Nipissing and the French Elver districts. 

Speckled trout have been very plentiful in the northern streams! during the past 
season. He has not had any trouble in collecting angling fees from the non-resi- 
dents this season, due to the prosecuting of a number of non-residents during 
the previous year. The licensing of fishing and hunting guides has met with 
great favour among the non-residents, as it helps them to secure a better 
class of guides and no doubt all the fishing and hunting parties would demand a 
licensed guide if their license called for such ; this would also save a great deal of 
trouble with a certain number of guides who try to escape paying their two dollars 
for license. 

Ducks were very plentiful all over the district, more especially in the northern 
sections. 

Wild geese are very scarce in this vicinity, but are very plentiful in the north- 
ern sections. 

Ag to partridge, the close seasons of 1908 and 1909 have had the expected bene- 
ficial effect and nearly every part of the district where he has been travelling he 
finds large numbers of these much valued birds, and he would like to see the open 
season reduced to one month. 

Eegarding deer, judging from the number taken out by the hunters during the 
late season, the natural conclusion would be that they were numerically holding 
their own. The reason for this is that the construction of new lines of railways 
has made the hitherto inaccessible hunting ground easy for the hunters to reach. 
It seems incredible that our northern districts should continue to supply these 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 15 

immense numbers year by year, and he thinks that the time has arrived for the 
hunters to be satisfied with one deer as their limit for at least two years. 

Moose seem to be holding their own. While patrolling many small lakes north 
of there he has seen several small herds of five and six together. A number of moose 
have been reported south and ea^ of there. 

Beaver and otter have increased to a large extent, and the protection of these 
animals is a very difficult matter to contend with. 

Warden J. T. Robinson, of Sault Ste. Marie, reports that speckled trout are 
plentiful in that district. Angling parties camped around the inland lakes and 
rivers. They were well pleased with the catch. The law was well observed by the 
anglers. The fisliermen report that the fishing this season has been fairly good, 
the law has been well observed by the fishermen. There should be a longer close 
season for white fish and salmon trout, say, from the 15th October to the 1st of 
December. He says that rainbow and grey trout should be protected, the close 
season for these fish should be the same as for speckled trout. He says that the 
Department should have all nets lifted out of the water in close season ; pound nets 
in Georgian Bay and Lake Huron should not be allowed in November, 

Partridges are plentiful in that district, and the close season has been fairly 
well observed. He would say that there should be an open season in 1910. Wild 
ducks are plentiful, but owing to the mild weather the hunters have not been able 
to bag many of these birds, as they kept out in the open water. Beaver are plen- 
tiful there, but it is most difficult to protect those animals owing to the high price 
the trappers get for their pelts, and the easy way they have of getting them out 
of the Province. There should be a trapper's license, say, of $50 for a resident and 
$100 for a non-resident. Mink and muskrats are plentiful ; they should be looked 
after, as their skins are valuable. Wild geese are very scarce there, as he has not 
seen one in his division this season. Deer and moose never were known to be so 
plentiful in that north country as they were this season, but owing to the mild 
weather there were not as many shot as in the season of 1908. It is difficult 
to protect the deer and moose there owing to so many lumber camps in that dis- 
trict. The law should be changed so as to prevent men taking guns to the lum- 
ber camps. He would like to see the law changed so as to stop hunters running 
deer with dogs in the open season. Wolves are very plentiful there, and if some- 
thing is not done to get rid of them they will in a few years destroy all the deer. 
There should be a larger bounty given, so as to encourage the people to hunt them. 
If the Department would offer $20 for each wolf, there would soon be a lot of 
them destroyed. 

Warden C. N. Sterling, of Kenora, reports that he has Jbeen over the 
greater portion of his district twice during the year, and is pleased to report that 
he has found a very great improvement in the general state of things,. There is a 
desire on the part of those engaged in fishing, trapping and hunting, as well as 
settlers, to protect game and observe the laws relating to same. Fishing has 
been fully up to the standard of last year, and he has had very little trouble with 
those engaged in it, all doing their best to comply with the law. The transcontin- 
ental work being completed in this portion of his district he will be able to devote 
more attention to the eastern part of it. 



16 THE KEPORT UPON No. 13 

Partridge have increased confeiderably, owing, no doubt, to the wise action 
of the Department in stopping the killing of same, and he is of opinion that 
next season there will be a very large increase. Grouse are fairly numerous. 

Ducks and geese are also very numerous in the western part of his district. Mink 
and muskrats are fairly numerous and fully up to the standard of last year. Otter 
and beaver are increasing every year, but during the past year there is a perceptible 
increase, and, as far as he is aware, there has been no violation of the law. 

Warden J. H. Willmott, of Beaumaris, reports that during the past season 
there has been a marked improvement in angling, both as to quantity and size. 
The presence of the patrol boat "Meenagha," on the Muskoka Lakes, has been the 
means of many more angling licenses being sold, and has also proved a deterrent 
to those who have hitherto disregarded the clause in the Act relative to size and 
number allowed to be taken per day. He may mention that throughout our north- 
ern districts there are many American fishing clubs, some of these owning land 
and having very fine club houses erected thereon. As a rule the members spend 
most of their time fishing, and needless to say, many thousands of our fish are 
annually caught by these men, who, after taking out their licenses are only acting 
inside their rights. As an example, he says we will suppose that a club has a 
membership of thirty men (which is a low estimate, as some have over a hundred). 
We will say that twenty out of those thirty go out fishing and catch their legal 
number, these amount to one hundred and sixty a dky, or 4,160 in a month of 26 
working days. Looking at this matter in the above light, it is apparent that 
many thousands of fish are annually taken by club men. During the season he has 
planted the bass ''fingerlings" from the Brantford hatchery, in Lakes Muskoka, 
Rosseau, Joseph and Gull Lake, also the Lake of Bays. These fingerlings 
carry far better than the adult bass, the mortality in transit amounting to a mini- 
mum. It seems a pity that the Dominion Government does not make a change 
in the close season for lake trout, especially as this has been pointed out to them 
for the last twenty-one years to his knowledge. The close season at present being 
for the month of November, and the facts being thus, these fish come into the 
shoals to spawn about the eighth or tenth of October (and are then caught in num- 
bers), and are through spawning when the close season sets in, thus permitting 
fishermen and others to take these fish indiscriminately just at the time they need 
protection. On account of the Provincial fiscal year ending on the 31st of Oc- 
tober instead of the 31st of December as heretofore, his report will not be so com- 
prehensive as othervfise, as any remarks relative to the results of the coming hunting 
season will necessarily be excluded. Deer are reported plentiful in those sections 
opened up by the C.P. and C.N.O. Railways, through the district of Parry Sound 
and part of Nipissing, but owing to the annual increase in the number of hunters, 
he thinks it is only a question of time before further restrictions are placed on 
hunters as regards the number allowed to each individual. Moose are reported very 
plentiful, forty or fifty miles north of the C. P. R. track, and it would appear im- 
possible to exterminate them, as they will continue to move further back as occasion 
demands. This region being almost inaccessible to sportsmen, very few are killed 
by this class of men, but there is no doubt that some fall to the rifles of prospectors, 
surveyors, etc., for good purposes. Partridges have no doubt profited by the pro- 
tection they have enjoyed during the past two seasons, there is every reason to be- 
lieve that some have been killed by the "non-law-abiding class.'' Should we be 
favoured by good weather during the next breeding season the numbers will be con- 



1909 GAME AND FISHEKIES. 17 



siderably increased. The Order-in-Council compelling settlers in organized town- 
ships to take out the regular deer hunting license has not met with the amount of 
opposition he feared it would. As a further protection to our small game and in- 
sectivorous birds, he feels sure that a general gun license would be the keynote as 
this would put a stop to the foreign element, who at present prove a nuisance to 
this class of bird and animal life. It would also put a stop to farmers' boys and 
others handling firearms and prevent many accidents which frequently occur 
through this cause. 



SPECIAL GAME AND FISHEKY OVEESEEE. 

Overseer Daniel Blea, of Uplands, reports that rod fishing has been good this 
season. 

In regard to deer he would strongly recommend one deer to each man. He 
would also recommend that hunting with dogs be done away with for a few years 
and also to prohibit the sale of venison for a year or so. The protection of bea- 
ver and otter has been the most difficult to contend with, because they have so many 
ways of getting away with it. 

Our partridge is getting quite plentiful again, and if we have a favourable win- 
ter and spring we will have lots of birds again. The game laws have been well 
observed. 



GAME AND FISHEEY OVEESEEES. 
Lake of the Woods and Eainy Eiver District. 

Overseer Fred Blanchard, of Fort Frances, reports that this year has been the 
worst year for some time in regards to the fishing. They have been bothered quite 
a lot with American poachers and sporting parties killing the game, but being on 
the boundary convictions are hard to get. Timber wolves are greatly on the in- 
crease all through the district. 

Fishermen complain of American fishermen stealing their nets and nothing but 
a daily patrol boat will help the fishermen and also stop the poaching. 

Eiver Nepigon. 

Overseer P. A, Leitch, of Nepigon, reports that the number of tourists visiting 
the Nepigon waters this season was slightly in excess of the previous season, not- 
withstanding the fact that we get most of our tourists from the United States, and 
an exposition at Seattle this season attracted a number of our annual visitors. All 
those visiting the Nepigon waters this season invariably reported excellent sport 
and enjoyed themselves thoroughly. Fishing was above the average, many brook 
trout from 4 to 8 pounds being taken during the season. 

The larger game, such as moose, cariboo and red deer, in the country contribu- 
tary to the Nepigon waters, viz., in the Nepigon forest reserves, have increased 
greatly in numbers during the past few years, due principally to the reserve regu- 



THE EEPORT UPON No. 13 



lations, prohibiting firearms to be taken into the reserve during the close season for 
these animals, making this reserve a tourists' paradise, not only for fishing and 
•shooting but also for boating and canoeing of all kinds, with scenery that cannot 
be surpassed in the Dominion. It is, however, surprising to know to how few peo- 
ple of the class who are annually hunting for such sport, the Nepigon attractions 
are known, and more especially to Americans, who form the majority of our visi- 
tors on the Nepigon waters each season. The fish and game regulations were well 
observed this season, no prosecutions being necessary. As the country tributary to 
the waters, particularly Lake Nepigon, is made more accessible, by the building of 
the Transcontinental and Canadian Northern Eailwa}^®, and the attractions of the 
district becomes more generally known, the Nepigon Forest Eeserve will be very 
largely patronized and the land around the shores of Lake Nepigon, also the island 
in the lake itself, will be in great demand for sites for summer cottagers, house 
boats, Btc, by these tourists, who desire to have a permanent place where they can 
spend a few weeks each summer with their families and have good sport in the way 
of fishing and boating and good hunting in season. 

A new and neat hotel, "The Nepigon Inn," was erected and opened this season 
at Nepigon Station, to cater to the tourists and other traffic and has proven a boon 
to the tourists visiting here, and should be the means of bringing a larger number 
of visitors to the Nepigon waters than heretofore, as such an hotel was always 
badly needed here. He feels certain if some Judicious advertising was done by the 
Province to make known the attractions of the Nepigon Forest Reserve, such as 
scenery, boating of all kinds, fishing and shooting, they would greatly benefit and 
thereby increase receipts from angling permits, hunting licenses and rental of sum- 
mer cottages and camp sites. There are some Americans already applying for such 
camp sites and permission to erect and maintain house boats, launches, etc., on 
Lake Nepigon for this purpose, but if these attractions were better known, they 
would have one hundred visitors to every one they have at present. There are a 
number of Sportsmen's Shows held at various points throughout the United States 
each winter and he thinks if specimens of our fish and game, in the way of fish 
skins mounted on birch bark, framed, also moose, cariboo and red deer heads 
mounted, together with a series of photographs of the scenery, were put on exhibi- 
tion at these shows, in charge of some intelligent person who thoroughly under- 
stands the conditions here and who could explain the various means of sport and 
scenery to be enjoyed, excellent results would be obtained in increased revenue. 

Lake Hukon (Noeth Channel). 

Overs&er J. B. Bradbury, of Blind River, reports that there has been no serious 
infringement of the law in his locality so far as he was able to ascertain and he dis- 
posed of only eight angling permits, although he challenged quite a number of 
pleasure boats. He finds nothing to complain of and the people either produced 
their license or satisfied him that they were not fishing and anxious to know the 
law in connection with the Game and Fishery Department. 

With reference to the deer hunting, there was a large number of hunters in the 
woods and many deer and moose shot. He noticed that nearly all the red deer 
shot were bucks this year, very few does. The moose were very plentiful, one party 
of eight, seven non-residents and one resident, brought in eight large moose and 
six deer. As the law is, if there is one or two good shots in the party they stay 
till he fills their license for the whole party. With reference to the clause on license 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 19 

coupons marked " expires on November 21fe't,'^ seem to cause some dispute as to 
when the hunting season is closed ; as it is, the meaning is not understood by some. 
With reference to winter fishing at Thessalon, he is informed that a consider- 
able number of fishermen, those who follow the occupation also continue to make 
their. living by fishing in the winter, and as fome of the fishermen spoke to him 
with reference to a report that it is the intention of the Department not to allow 
fish taken in the winter to be sihipped outside the Province, and as these men claim 
that by selling their fish is tlie only way they have of making a living for their 
families, and as it is claimed that the smallness of the prices to be obtained in the 
local market in the Province is much less than can be obtained in American cities. 

Overseer A. Calheclc, of SauU Ste. Mane, reports that reports from fishermen 
are to the effect that the catch of white fish and lake trout is much larger this 
season than it was for the season of 1908; white fish especially have increased very 
largely this season, as the reports of the fishermen will go to show. The only reason 
he can give for this increase is that they are leaving the protected waters for 
better feeding grounds. The law is fairly well observed among our own fisher- 
men, but a good deal of poaching is being done by Americans in our waters. They 
come over and set their nets in the evening, lift them in the morning, and go 
back to their own shore. He cannot too strongly recommend that a suitable patrol 
boat be put on the waters between the southeast end of St. Joe's Island, in Lake 
Huron, and Richardson's Harbour, Lake Superior. There was a very large in- 
crease in the number of tourists who visited our 'speckled trout fishing grounds 
on the north shore of Lake Superior this season over former seasons. He also 
noticed that there was a much larger increase in the revenue from the game and 
fisheries this season than there was for the season of 1907 and 1908. The rea- 
son of this is that the waters of Lake Superior were better patrolled than formerly. 

During the early portion of the year 1909 he secured six convictions, all for 
the killing of deer during the close season, the costs and fines amounting to $469.80. 
The convictions all resulted from infractions of the laws in jobbers' lumber camps 
on the A. C. R., and he says, in his opinion, that there are as many deer and moose 
killed in the close season in this district as there are in the open season, con- 
sidering the ravages of wolves and man. Deer are becoming more plentiful 
every year, yet he would strongly recommend that the present bounty on wolves 
be increased to $25. This would be an inducement for sportsmen to take means 
to destroy them. Beaver are becoming more plentiful, notwithstanding the fact 
that large numbers of them are trapped every season. He would recommend that 
the season for beaver be extended. Muskrats are becoming more plentiful every 
year. The close season for partridge has been most beneficial, as they are in- 
creasing very rapidly. In conclusion he would say that, on the whole he believes 
conditions are improving with respect to the observance of the law in regard to 
game and fish in that district. 

Overseer Joseph Hembruff, of Maniiowaning, reports that the angling for bass 
was not quite so good as last year, but there have been more tourists than for 
years past. Quite a number of tourist buildings have been built around the lake. 
He thinks when the tourists come that it would be a good plan to stay on the lake 
two or three days each week to keep proper watch and a good boat provided, as it 
gets very rough sometimes on Lake Manitou. 



20 THE EEPORT UPON No. 13 



The Manitou Fish Co. had a very good catch in the first part of the season until 
about the 11th of June, but not much of a catch since. Their hatchery was a 
failure last winter. Regarding game, the partridge are increasing, ducks about the 
same as last year, and deer very scarce. He has had no complaints, and as far as 
known the law has not been broken. 

Overseer WiUiam Hunter, of TehTcummah, reports that there have been no com- 
plaints of any illegal fishing or hunting this season so far. There seems to be a 
scarcity of trout in Manitou River, though there is a fishway wanted at MichaePs 
Bay, and he. is informed by some of the settlers around Providence Bay that the 
close season for fishing in Mindemoya Lake is a month too late, as the fish spawn 
in that lake in October instead of November. The Sandfield Mills' hatchery has not 
been in operation this summer, but he understands the company are going to start 
this fall and run this winter. The Fishery and Game laws have been well respected 
in this part of the Island this year. 

Overseer Thomas Johnson, of SauU Ste. Marie, reports that the Fisheries Regu- 
lations have been well observed in that district, and he believes a good improvement 
over past years. All who came to the Island to fish had their permits this year and 
they report good fishing and seem highly pleased with the method adopted for pro- 
tecting the speckled trout. He thinks it was a good thing to license the Canadian 
guides, and he is quite convinced that the trip of the " Edna Ivan '' along the shore 
had a great effect in stopping illegal fishing. He has heard several say it is not 
safe to try that kind of thing any longer. Fishing this year around the Island 
was a little better than usual; fishermen say it was owing to the nice summer. 
October was very rough, and they lost a great number of nets. Fish of both kinds 
were larger than usual. 

Overseer Richard Oliver, of Little Current, as captain of the patrol boat "Vega,'' 
reports that the "Vega" went into commission May 17th, and he has been able to 
give a fairly good service, though, in his opinion, he has not been able to do 
justice to the amount of territory that she had to cover, as the territory was too 
large. He has found the game plentiful, though he has received several reports of 
deer and moose being slaughtered, which he has not been able to properly inves- 
tigate. The fishing, such as black bass and pickerel, has been extra good. The 
season for tourists has been a good one, and there has been a great number of them 
along the north shore of North Channel, between Penetang and Algoma Mills. He 
finds the guides, or at least the majority of them, have been a great assistance to 
him in the vicinity of Little Current. He finds that the guides farther east where 
the summer hotels are, are handicapped or ruled to a certain extent by the hotel 
keepers. If they do not please the tourists they are not employed as the hotel 
keepers nearly always give the tourist the names of the guides that they wish em- 
ployed, and if they do not please the tourist and work to the interest of the hotel- 
keeper they are not employed, and a great number of the tourists do not take 
guides at all and there is no check on them as to keeping the law. He finds that 
commercial fisheries in the majority of places have not been nearly as good as they 
were last year, though the weather has been fairly good except about six weeks 
in the latter part of the season, when it was very rough. 

The pound net fishing, he thinks, has been very nearly as good as last year, 
although he has not yet received the fishermen's returns so he cannot speak posi- 



1909 GAME AND FISHEEIES. 31 



tively. The prices for whitefish he thinks will average six and a half cents per 
pound. He thinks about seventy-five per cent, of the catch lias been shipped to 
the American markets, while about twenty-five per cent, has been consumed in 
Ontario. 

Overseer Oeorge TJiurlow, of Nairn Centre, reports that the game and fishery 
laws have been better observed during the past year than in the two years previous, 
as no one knew of an overseer in that district, and it was go as you please. Fishing 
on Sunday was common, as well as in closed seasons. He had only on one occasion 
to fine for Sunday fishing and three for hunting on Sunday, although he has visited 
the lakes several times on Sundays. Bass and pickerel are very plentiful in most 
of the lakes in his district. 

As to game, deer and moose are very plentiful both to north and south of 
Nairn Centre on Soo Branch between sixty and seventy (60 and 70) being shipped 
during hunting season in 1908, and most of the settlers having a good supply. 

Partridge are on the increase, but not so plentiful as two years ago, the bush 
fires of 1908 destroying great numbers of them. Ducks are scarce. He has only 
seen 15 of them all summer, although he has travelled for many miles on rivers and 
lake shore. 

Overseer W. J. Wright, of Ice Lake, reports that the black bass in Kagawong 
Lake are, he thinks, on the decrease. There were this season about 75 or 80 people 
from outside here during July and August, and there was certainly a large number 
of fish caught and wasted. When two men go out for a few days' fishing and come 
in with 16 fish it is not so bad, for they have not exceeded the limit; but when 12 
go out in one boat and bring in 96 fish, one, two or three of the party may have 
hooked most of the catch for all he knows. He says that when the waste comes in 
they take them to the hotel; as they can't eat them all, they spoil. He has seen 
them carried out by the hundredweight more than once, but no one had broken the 
law as he understands it, so nothing could be done to prevent it. 

He recommends that the close season be extended until July for black bass, as 
for the last week in June they are still on the shoals and are easily caught. He 
would strongly recommend that every person fishing in that lake except the actual 
settler, pay a license. The law has not been broken as far as he knows. The 
deer around the lake are becoming quite plentiful. A few years ago there were 
very few on the Island. Fur-bearing animals are scarce, except mink and muskrat ; 
there are lots of those. Partridge, thanks to the close season of the last two 
year^, are becoming quite plentiful again, but he would recommend that the open 
season for the next few years be one month, say, from the 15th of October to the 
15th of November. Earlier than the above date partridge are in flocks, so usu- 
ally a man with a gun gets the whole flock. Later on they pair off and stand a 
better chance. 

Georqian Bay. 

Overseer John Beatty, of Old Fort, Midland, reports that the trout fishing has 
not been as good for a number of years as this season. There has been abundance 
of pike and maskinonge caught in Mud Lake and Wye River and the fishermen 
were well pleased with their catch. 

The partridge seem to be increasing very fast. The duck hunters claim they 
never saw as many ducks in twenty-five years as they saw this season. Snipe and 



22 THE EEPORT UPON No. IS 



woodcock do not seem to be so plentiful. By the number of muskrats seen they 
must be increasing very fast. The last report from the deer hunters state deer 
very plentiful. 

Overseer B. A. Dusang, of Fesserton, reports that Angling has been good the 
past season; the game fish as plentiful as the year 1908; and Americans very plenti- 
ful. He sold three hundred and eighteen dollars of permits, about double of any 
year previous. He was on the road all the time between there and Moon Eiver, the 
majority of tourists get their permits before they come up there. Ho has eighteen 
licensed fishermen in his division; whitefish and trout were about the same catch 
as last year, they don't seem to decrease any. About half of the fish is consumed 
in Canada and the rest goes to the United States. The laws have been well observed. 
Partridge are getting pretty plentiful; if they put the winter in they will be very 
plentiful another year. He had forty-six guides in his division that took out license. 
He thinks that there should be some power given to an Overseer, so that when he 
is thirty or forty miles away from a magistrate he could dispose of small violations 
such as catching one or two small fish under size, when it is almost impossible to 
get them to justice. Deer have been scarce; very few killed in that district. He 
travelled about twenty-seven hundred miles with the little boat " Florence '' on the 
north shore this season. Carp were not so plentiful as the year before. 

Overseer J. W. Jermyn, of Wiarton, reports that he regrets to say this season 
has not been favourable for the fishermen. The spring and summer catches were 
very light — not enough to pay expenses. Then this fall the fish were unusually late 
coming on the shoals, and the weather was so rough they could not set or lift nets 
for over a week at a time, many of them lost the greater part of what nets they 
had so that when a fine day came they had nothing to work with, and many were 
forced to cease operations before the close season. He is quite certain the catch 
of fish is not more than one-half as large as other years in this district. He also 
states whitefish was more plentiful this season than on previous years, while the 
trout seems to be less. As the season is just opened for Game he cannot say very 
much on that line. During the season he has made several visits up the Bruce 
Peninsula, and finds there are quite a few deer left in certain localities. Partridge 
is also on the increase, no doubt owing* to the provision in the law protecting them. 
Ducks are very plentiful this season. He is pleased to report that both the Fish 
and Game laws in this division have been fairly well observed, while in some of 
the adjoining divisions there have been several infractions of the Fishery Act; 
however, he got after some of the parties, seized a large quantity of hooks, lines 
and fish, and the offenders had to appear before a Justice of the Peace and were 
heavily fined. This action somewhat broke up a bad gang and he believes had a 
good effect. 

Overseer John Kennedy, of Meaford, reports that summer fishing was fairly good 
as the spring was very backward, the fishermen were later in getting out, there being 
so much ice in the bay. Fall fishing has not been so good as 1908 on account of 
October being so rough; the last few days were fine, they had good hauls in taking 
in their nets, averaging from 3,000 pounds for tugs. He is pleased to report that 
all the nets were in on the first of November. The Carp for the first time were 
seen in Meaford Harbour, and following the Sturgeon. One or two were caught 
weighing 20 pounds. The fishermen are afraid they will be an injury to them — 
that they will take the spawn. 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 23 



Overseer Charles H. Knight, of Byng Inlet, reports that the gasoline launch 
** Charlotte " was put in commission, and proved a great help in the season's opera- 
tions. He has had no complaint from the licensed fishermen. They have been very 
law abiding, and to some extent have been a help to him in keeping down illegal fish- 
ing, as they find it in their interest to do so. The catch of Whitefish and Trout will 
not be as heavy this season as last. He was called to burn nine trap nets at Bad. 
River, but so far he has not been able to learn who the owner is. He has had one 
conviction for fishing nets without license so far this year. Bass and Pickerel were 
plentiful, more Pickerel having been caught by angling in Magnetawan River this 
season than for the three years previous. This is owing to vigilant protection in 
spawning season. Deer are not as numerous in this locality as last year, owing to 
their having been run out with dogs in September. Partridge are on the increase, 
owing to the close season afforded them by the Department. He says that the law 
has been well observed in his division, better than any previous year. He thinks the 
licensing of guides a good move, and believes it has a good effect, and thinks a good 
move would be to license trappers, say, a fee of $5.00. 

Lake Huron (Proper) and River St. Clair. 

Overseer H. A. Blunden, of Sarnia, reports that the season opened fairly early 
with a continuous spell of south and southwest winds enabling the fishermen to set 
their nets without much trouble. Along the St. Clair River, the seine fishermen, 
and Lake Huron from the mouth of the river as far north as Blue Point, the pound 
net fishermen, reported a light catch during the early fishing season, which he thinks 
can be accounted for by the spell of south winds before mentioned driving the fish 
out into deep water and besides he heard the American fishermen were obtaining 
a large haul on their side of the Lake, therefore proving that the winds have an 
effect on the fish. Since the fishermen before mentioned have reset their pound 
nets for the fall trade he understands that they are getting very satisfactory hauls. 
The fishermen operating between Blue Point and Grand Bend reported a more satis- 
factory season so far than the ones to the south of that point, particularly in white- 
fish and trout. He is sorry to say there were more prosecutions for catching and 
offering for sale small or illegal fish this season than usual, probably owing to the 
small catches in the first part of the season, but since the beginning of fall opera- 
tions and the returns have been greater there seems to be no cause for complaint. 
Taking the season as a whole he has found the fishermen taking a deeper interest 
in their own welfare by assisting the hatcheries to collect spawn and otherwise obeying 
the laws. In the immediate vicinity of Sarnia there seems to be no partridge, but 
he learned from his travels through the outlying districts when he was posting 
notices and otherwise looking after the interests of the Department that there were 
a few to be had, and he thinks it was a timely act of the Department in putting on 
a longer close season. Quail do not seem to be as numerous as he would like to see 
them as their covers are gradually being laid low. Geese are already to be seen 
flying south in large flocks. Ducks have been plentiful this season, Mink seem 
to be plentiful, and, owing to their destructive raids on poultry and the ready sale 
for their pelts they are much sought after. Muskrats are very numerous in Sarnia 
Bay if their odd huts are any indication of their numbers, but there does not seem 
to be as much destruction from them in the ditches and watercourses as usual, prob- 
ably owing to the past two seasons being so uncommonly dry, not affording them ag 
much water, for protection as they usually seem to require. 



M THE EfEPORT UPON No. 13 

Overseer D. Kehoe, of Millarton, reports that the fishing law has been well 
observed in his division. The fishermen think it better to keep the law than to 
break it. He had one complaint regarding the game law, but could not get evidence 
to secure a conviction. He had no conviction in his division this year. He is 
satisfied the law is as well observed as could be expected. 

Overseer D. Robertson, of Southampton, reports that the season of 1909 has been 
a poor season for tihe fishermen of his division. In the first part of the season 
they did fairly well; midsummer fishing was very poor; first week in October the 
tugs did very well and fish seemed very plentiful, but after that date the weather 
was very stormy and some nets were out three weeks, the weather being so rough 
they could not be lifted. He has had three convictions this season, one at Allanford, 
viz., a party allowing sawdust and mill refuse to go into the Sauble River, fined 
twenty dollars and costs. Two parties in Carrick township were each fined ten 
dollars and costs for catching speckled trout with nets — nets seized and forwarded 
to the Department. As to game. Partridge is very plentiful and increasing. Hares 
plentiful. Close season has been fairly well observed. 

Lake St. Clair^ River Thames and Detroit River. 

Overseer TUmii Laframboise, of Canard River, reports that the fishermen have 
very well obeyed the laws. He is told that the continual blasting at the Lime Kiln 
crossing in the Detroit River is destroying a large quantity of fish and he has decided 
to go personally and investigate, and will report later on. He has had but one 
case of illegal fishing by parties from the United States, and he has seized their 
minnow net as reported in his report for the month of October. In regard to the 
Game he is much annoyed by the Americans ; they come around Fighting Island in 
great numbers, and it is impossible for one man to reach them with a row boat. He 
came upon five men from the United States shooting off of Fighting Island, and 
with assistance he managed to seize their boats and decoys, but could not get them 
as they took to the marsh. He thinks some means should be taken to put a stop 
to them, and capture them if they keep coming over here to shoot. 

Overseer Richard Little, of Wallacehurg, reports that this has been the banner year 
for Angling, much better than last year, the fishing and shooting laws were well 
observed. He would also recommend doing away with spring fishing, and let them 
set their nets two weeks or a month earlier in the fall, when they would get better 
prices for their fish. All the fishermen in his district are in favour of it. Quail was 
about the same as last year. Woodcock reported plentiful on Walpole and around 
the Sny. Snipe the usual supply, the Marsh Duck, such as the Mallard, are more 
plentiful this. fall. Blue Bill, Red Head and Canvas Back are here in abundance. 
He would recommend shooting only four days in the week, and charging a small fee, 
most of the sportsmen in his district are in favour of it. 

Overseer Henry Osborne, of Dante, reports that the catch so far as the reports 
to hand are concerned show a falling off this year over 1908, owing to the ice in the 
river. It was late before there was any fishing done, which may in part account 
for the falling off. The fishing laws are fairly well observed; there is an Indian 
Reserve in his district and the Indians sometimes put in their nets before getting 
licenses, but axe always willing to pay the licenses. There had been some alleged 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 25 



cases of illegal fishing reported to him, but an investigation failed to find any truth 
in the reports. There are no dams or anything to obstruct the free run of the fish. 

Overseer Theodore , Peltier, of Dover South, reports the following for the year 
ending October 31st. He finds that the catch of fish has been exceptionally good, 
indicating that the fish have been more plentiful this season than for some years 
past. The close season has been well observed, with no violations, so far as he knows. 
There were a few violations of the shipping regulations during the season, which 
were prosecuted. Game in this district is very scarce, with the exception of wild 
ducks, which seem to be quite plentiful. 'Close watch has been kept, and no 
violations of the close season have been observed. 



Lake Erie and Grand Eiver. 

Overseer T. J. Briggs, of Bridgehurg, reports that the angling has been very poor 
in the river at this end of the lake, he cannot tell why or give any reason for the 
poor fishing. He thinks the frogs should be protected in this county and the 
Americans be made to pay a license to hunt them in the County of Welland, for the 
Americans make a good living hunting frogs here. 

One fish trap was set on a farm for the purpose of catching fish in the spring 
of the year; going up the Government ditch the trap was seized and the dam torn 
away. In Millar's Creek, near the Niagara River, he seized one purse seine. These 
seines are used at night by pot. hunters and river pirates. They catch at each haul 
from 50 to 300 pounds of fish called Blue Pike in the spring in Niagara River. 
Three men fishing with seine in Deep Hole ran out into the water and rowed for 
Buffalo. Their seine got caught in some spokes, and it wag captured in daylight 
and destroyed when dry enough to burn, it was burned two days after on the market 
square, in public. On 21st day of May, at 2 p.m., he and two deputies ran on some 
men fishing with seine near Fort Erie, captured the seine and the men escaped to 
Buffalo. On May the 21st at 1 a.m. seized two spears from three men who were 
fishing with jack lights in Mill Race near Fort Erie and fined them each $2.00 for 
violating the law. On June 5th, a party fishing with seine got out in a boat and 
let the seine go, and he brought it ashore and put it on board the " Edna Ivan,'* 
for Mr. Holden to destroy. 

On Sunday, July 25th, while patrolling with motor boat on Lake Erie near Old 
Fort, he seized a rowboat with two men in it fishing without angling permits ; five 
days later the boat was sold. On September 25th he patrolled with motor boat 
** Game Bird," and fined three fellows for fishing without angling permits near 
Black Creek out of an old boat in Canadian "Waters. 

On Sunday, October 3rd, he seized one single barrel shotgun from three Italians 
hunting near Shipyard or Niagara Junction. 

Overseer H. A. Henderson, of Pelee Island, reports that during the past ten 
months the catch of fish has been very light; the same conditions exist as of late 
years, that is, the fishing industry is not so vigorously prosecuted. No pound nets 
are now being fished in this district, and the fall run of fish does not commence until 
November. The season of angling was fairly good. Many availed themselves of this 
exciting sport. The condition of the weather was unfavourable to some extent. No 
abuses exist in his district and no illegal fishing has come to his notice. The game 
is very scarce in that district; for some reason the quail are not doing well; black 



26 THE EEPORT UPOX No. 13 

and grey squirrels are not increasing as would be expected. The pheasants are, 
however, increasing and local sports are of the opinion that the pheasants are running 
the quail out, and this may be so, for since the advent of pheasants there the quail 
seem to have been gradually decreasing. Bevies of from 20 to 35 were common; 
now 5 to 1 dozen are the most seen. The game laws are strictly observed, in this 
he is assisted by the sportsmen themselves, and no pot-hunting or illegal devices are 
tolerated. 

Overseer Henry Johnson, of Brantford, reports that the fishing in his division is 
about the same as last year, all but coarse fish which is not as good as last year. 
Bass and pickerel and trout about the same. There seems to be lots of small bass 
in the river. He has had some complaints which he investigated and there have been 
five fines for illegal fishing and eight for Sunday fishing. With the assistance of 
the new Deputy Game and Fishery Wardens and the telephone in the county it will 
be hard work to do much illegal fishing and hunting. He would be pleased to 
see proper slides in the dams in his division as it is impossible for fish to come up 
in the condition they are in. Black and grey squirrels arc more plentiful than last 
year and also quails and plenty of rabbits. He wants to congratulate the Depart- 
ment on the success of the hatchery here; the amount of young bass taken from the 
pond more than exceeded his expectations. 

What the Department lacks in quantity they have gained in experience and he is 
fully convinced that with the experience and under the able superintendency of 
Mr. Edwards the output next year will be increased by many thousands. 

Overseer Edward Lee, of Low BanJcs, reports as follows : — The catch of White- 
fish by tug fishermen out of Port Maitland shows a marked decrease as compared 
with 1908; Herring a large increase over the last five or six years; Blue Pickerel 
are as plentiful as ever; Pickerel (dore) about same as last season, also a slight 
increase in the catch of perch. The Whitefish taken by pound nets about same as 
last year; an increase in Pickerel (dore), Herring and Perch. Pickerel (Blue), 
better than last year, a decrease in Sturgeon and Caviare. Coarse fish about same 
as last report, with exception of Carp on the increase, and very few taken ; nets 
damaged much by storms. Quail and Partridge are reported more numerous. 
Squirrels owing to the clearing up of land are becoming scarce. Cotton Tail Rabbits 
plentiful. Not so many Hares or White Rabbits, which are only found in some 
of the marshy districts. Wild Ducks reported numerous; while the usual numbers 
of Wild Geese are seen each spring and fall, very few are shot. Woodcock not 
numerous, but still found in some localities, and less Golden Plover seen of late 
years. Muskrats quite plentiful, and an occasional Mink. About 95 per cent, of 
the fish caught in his division are shipped to the United States, the balance used for 
local and home consumption. No abuses exist. The close sea-sons have been well 
observed by licensed fishermen, and nothing irregular except some minor matters 
already reported. The game laws have been well observed by local sportsmen, non- 
residents having very little regard for same. 

Overseer Kenneth McClennan, of Grovesend, reports that he has observed that 
during this season the fish have been quite plentiful in comparison with the catch 
of last season, and the time when the fishermen look for the largest hauls is yet to 
come. The frequent storms on the lake such as have not been seen for years, have 
interfered with the fishing considerably during this, their busiest season. The fisher- 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 



men of Pt. Bruce were unable to get out when there was a better season on account 
of the water in the harbour being so shallow. The quality of fish caught has been 
exceptionally good this year. The close season as well as all Fishery Laws were well 
observed, only one case of illegal fishing coming to my notice. That was a hoop net 
being fished in the Otter Creek, the net was confiscated and shipped to the Depart- 
ment, the party operating it was not discovered, he heard of a great many com- 
plaints from farmers for not being allowed to catch coarse fish such as suckers and 
mullet, for their own use in streams which flow through or near their own property. 
The Game Laws were also well observed. Black fquirrel, about the only game in 
his district, were very numerous this season. 

Lake Ontario and Bay of Quinte. 

Overseer David Conger, of West Lake, reports that the catch of whitefish and 
salmon trout has been good this year; they have increased about 20 per cent, over 
last year. Angling has not been as good as last year on account of so 
many coarse fish in the Lakes. He seized about fifteen hundred yards of 
gill nets in the waters of East and West Lake which he sent to Capt. A. 
Hunter, of Belleville, but could not find the owner of the net?. He has 
been over his territory on different occasions and is satisfied that the licensed fisher- 
men observed the laws. Ee game, there was any amount of ducks in East and 
West Lake in the spring of the year and in the fall of the year. Musk rats are 
very plentiful, trappers got as high as forty-three cents for their skins. Partridge 
are very scarce. Black equirrels are increasing. The game laws have l)oen well 
observed. 

Overseer P. W. Dafoe, of Napanee, reports that having been appointed Overseer 
in March last he cannot speak of the catch in former years, but from all he can 
learn from the fishermen and as he inspected in that town thirty or forty barrels 
per day in the good runs, he thinks fishing was better than former years. Over 
three-quarters were exported, the price was so high in the American market little 
was consumed at home. 

No violations of the Act have come to his knowledge, though he has made several 
midnight searches. The law has been well looked after. His trying time is in 
the spring when the pickerel come up the falls in the town and can go no farther, 
and boys kill them with sticks and stones. In former years there was bad work 
there. He has a plan that he thinks will stop all abuse in the future. 

Salmon River has a greater flow of water than the Napanee River and is much 
more productive of fish; its source is at the foot of Missoga Lake, its mouth near 
Point Ann, Bay of Quints, having a run of about one hundred miles through 
numerous lakes all well stocked with pike, pickerel, bass and nearly all the coarse 
fish. On his first trip up the river he found at Kingsford, western boundary of the 
township of Richmond, dams gone, mills burned, the people grumbling that no fish 
were below. The cheese factory had dumped a quantity of whey in the river which 
hurt the fish below. At Forest Mills there are two dams; at the lower dam the 
fall is eighteen feet. No salmon ever get above the falls. At Roblin there is one 
dam and he does not think there is a proper fishway on this river, but the sawdust 
is well looked after. He thinks at Roblin some illegal fishing has been done. He 
could not get the names but he has set traps. 

Line Lake is some three miles long and half mile wide, and is part of the 
northern boundary of the township of Richmond and has bass, pickerel, pike and 



28 THE EEPORT UPON No. 13 

coarse fish. Many applications come to him for net licenses for the lake and the 
river, but these are the best angling and trolling waters in that part of Ontario. 
Game. — No deer in that part, but they have issued about the usual number of 
hunters' licenses, but partridges are quite plentiful. On his trip, within gunshot of 
Forest Mill he saw about forty and near Roblin there are a great many; if such 
droves of the birds can live so near to a large village the laws must be in force. 
Trapping is good along the Salmon and he thinks there should be a license for 
trapping. 

.Overseer E. B. Fox, of Northport, reports that in the beginning of November 
1909, he found parties fishing without a license, and they claimed they had per- 
mission for catching some fish for their own use which he stopped at once, and 
stopped all net fishing as well for close season was over. He proceeded until the 
spring fishing of hoop nets when he found several fishing across channel and creeks, 
which they had to remove during the winter. He found one man trapping in 
muskrat house and laid information to Mr. Hunter and recommended easy settle- 
ment if possible, which was done. He commenced to patrol with the "Shark" on 
the 25th of May up the bay as far as Belleville for supplies for the " Shark." 

May 31st he patrolled down the bay, and found one man fishing night-lines, for 
which he did not know he had to have a license which he procured for him for the 
month of June. He made some six trips up and down the bay for the Game and 
Fishery Department. In July he made the same number of trips, but found no 
fishing, and for the month of August he made eight trips up and down the bay look- 
ing for non-resident fishing parties, but found very few anglers without permits and 
for the month of September patrolled up and down the bay. He dragged several 
times, but found nothing. The month of October was the hardest month for work 
ns he patrolled over his division some eleven times, measured nets and found them all 
right. For the opening the season was well observed and also the closing for white- 
fish, which were very plentiful, but the season was quite short for there was no 
extension this year for the month of November. He made a seizure of hoop nets. 

He says he might first say that the fish seem to all to be very plentiful and on 
the increase. But for the fishermen, he would suggest that there be no gill net fish- 
ing in the spring as the most they catch would be pike and the price is low, from 
2% to 3 cents per pound, and in the fall they are worth 5 cents per pound. 

In regard to duck — the black ducks were very plentiful, but not as many fall 
duck as usual, but he thinks the season opens a little too early. He would say that 
the open season be not until the 5th of September instead of the first as the duck 
are very poor and full of pin feathers and not fit to eat. There are plenty of ducks, 
but partridge scarce but on the increase. He would suggest that there be a heavy 
fine placed on any one burning the marshes, as the muskrats, when frozen out 
of houses, have no place to go, and freeze to death, also the duck in the spring have 
no place to lay and hatch. 

Overseer I. Glass, of Trenton, reports that he has only three men in his district 
holding license to fish hoop nets, no gill nets allowed in his district, except for 
domestic purposes. The licensed fishermen are apparently obeying the law without 
any trouble. There was a large number of domestic licenses granted last year, and 
some of the parties holding them took advantage of the fact of having domestic 
and caught large numbers of whitefish for commercial purposes. The angling in 
his district was excellent. Bass, pickerel and maskinonge were very plentiful. 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 29 



Pickerel go up Trent Eiver in large quantities in the spring to spawn. He has 
considerable trouble from poachers who catch them with dip nets in the night. 
Caught several parties and had them fined. 

Overseer Henry HoUiday, of Wolfe Island, reports that from what he can learn 
from the fishermen the angling in his district never was better, from about the first 
of August and September and part of October, but the first part of the season bass 
not so large, but plentiful and pike very numerous all season. The fishermen observe 
the law very well in his district. Quite a lot of maskinonge were taken by anglers 
this year, some very large, and the net fishermen also report a good season, and some 
good catches. Bullheads plentiful and good size, but the dog fish very numerous. 
He has seen as many as 17 taken from one net. He thinks they are increasing. He 
does not hear much about carp. He finds the fishermen willing to observe the law, 
there only being one small fine in his district, a man fishing with a net for domestic 
use. 

Overseer H. W. Hayes, of Murray, reports that during the year 1909 the fisher- 
men have observed the law with the exception of three men living on the lake shore 
who fished, but claimed they were informed that it was all right to do so. He notified 
Capt. Hunter who came up and fined them. Since then he has had no trouble as 
this was a warning to others. The catch of bullheads was not as large as formerly 
on account of the heavy west winds which drove them down the bay. 

Very few carp were caught. The law was observed in regard to duck shooting 
in sunken punts being used in his district. 

Overseer E. M. Huffman, of Hay Bay, reports that the spring fishing was excep- 
tionally good, but the fishermen report the fish to be scarce this fall so far. Bass 
were plentiful and a good size, but maskinonge have been scarce, and very few were 
caught by the tourists this season. 

The close season has been well observed for fish. Ducks were very plentiful 
this spring and were a great temptation to the local sportsman. He had four 
parties fined for shooting ducks in close season and more would have been if he 
could have caught them, but they were sly. Muskrats were in abundance and hun- 
dreds were caught. No complaints are made and everything seems all right. 

Overseer John Johnson, of Port Hope, reports that the laws were well observed 
by the fishermen in his district. There have been no complaints made to him that 
the law has been broken, nor has he found any infringement of the law himself. A 
great many people come to him to know when the open seasons are for fishing and 
shooting game. 

Overseer J. H. Murdoch, of Bath,, reports that the past season has not been as 
good as 1908. The weather was unfavourable, there being such high winds the men 
were unable to lift their nets for two or three days at a time. They are not as well 
pleased with their catch as last year. The law was fairly well observed in his dis- 
trict. There was very little angling done there. Bass was plentiful. Tourists 
were fewer there than usual. Game and fur-bearing animals are scarce in his 
district. 

Overseer R. J. Walker, of Port Credit, reports that the game laws have been well 
observed. To the best of his knowledge, there were no complaints made, either, of 



30 THE EEPORT UPON No. 13 

any violations of the game laws. Game is very scarce in that section of the country. 

The fishery laws were well observed, both regarding angling and the lake 
fishing with nets, with the exception of sucker fishing. There were a number of 
complaints about people fishing with nets, which he investigated, and found that all 
of the nets used to fish for suckers were a short net fastened to sticks, and the 
parties had to wade into the water up as far as their waists sometimes. On one 
occasion he seized a short seining net which was* being used to catch suckers, and 
destroyed the same. He cannot give a report as to the quantity of fish caught, but 
from the best information he could obtain, it will be on an average with last year. 
The black bass seemed to be on the increase in the River Credit. 

Overseer FranTc Warden, of Couriice, reports that fish have been very scarce this 
season, and it is thought that it is carp that is killing them. 

Early in the season the marshes were full of pike, ciscoes, and other small fish, 
and in June, when the carp came in, the others' went out. As for game, ducks are 
about the only game that is hunted, and they have been most awfully scarce. He 
has seen them pass over in very large flocks and not stop at the lake front. 

Counties Frontenac, Leeds, Prescott, Russell, Carleton, Renfrew, 

Lanark, Grenville. 

Overseer Samuel Andrews, of MicJcshurg, reports that he has kept a close watch 
in his division and found less infringements of the Game and Fishery Act than in 
previous year. 

Ten licenses were issued for fishing for coarse fish. A very small quantity of 
fish were taken by those to whom licenses were issued, as they were fishing merely 
for their own use. He destroyed two gill nets, which were illegally set, but was 
unable to find the owners. 

Fish are not increasing as they should. He cannot account for this, unless it 
is the large quantity of suckers that frequent the waters and destroy the spawn of 
other fish. Partridge are still scarce, but increasing under the wise protection now 
afforded them, which should be continued for a few years yet. Deer are increasing 
in this county, and are coming down into the settled parts of the country. There 
have been no infractions of the game laws brought to his notice this year, and he 
feels satisfied that the game law is strictly observed, as most of the sportsmen think 
it their duty to help to protect the game, but there is a tract of country lying 
between the County of Renfrew and the Algonquin Park, where pot-hunters gather 
in the fall and forepart of the winter and. slaughter a great number of deer. This 
should be looked after and stopped, as it has been going on for a number of years. 
It is outside of his territory, therefore he cannot bring them to justice. 

Beavers are increasing, and are working their way down the rivers and small 
streams, further into this county. Muskrat and other small fur-bearing animals are 
still scarce, but a little better than previous years. 

Overseer George Barr, of Harrow smith, reports that on March Ist he visited dam 
on Fourteen Island Lake, examined it carefully, and found no fishway; visited 
again on April 17th, found it still closed and no fishways, and from information he 
can get there never has been a fishway there, which he considered an injury to the 
propagation of fish. 



1909 GAME AND FISHEEIES. 31 

He visited Petworth Dam, March 9th, examined the dam as well as possible, found 
it closed, with no fishways, and says there never was any there. He visited 
Burned Mill Dam, at the head of First Depot Lake, near the boundary of Port- 
land and Hinchinbrook. He could not tell much about it, as they are repairing it, 
but he understands there never was a fishway there. 

The following are the lakes in his division, with the kinds of fish inhabiting 
them: 

Napanee Lake — Pike, b'ome bass, a few perch, and abundance of catfish. 

Pond Lily — The same as Napanee. 

First Depot — The same as the Napanee Lake. 

Long and Rock — Pickerel, bass, pilce, suckers, and catfish. 

Silver — Same as Long and Rock Lakes. 

Fourteen Island Lake — Bass, pike, pickerel, suckers, and catfish. 

Mud Lake, near Murvale — Pike, catfish,- and suckers. 

Thirteen Island Lake — Pike, suckers, and catfish. 

Desert — Salmon, herring, bass, and catfish. 

Knowlton — Salmon, a few perch and herring. 

He does not think these lakes contain any more than sufiicient to supply home 
consumption; in his opinion, there is none for export. He finds that it is diffi- 
cult to protect muskrat, as they are much sought after, and slaughtered in and 
during the months of January and February. He found their houses cut open, 
and could not find who did it. He thinks that if the shooting of muskrat was 
prohibited and none allowed to be trapped until the first of March, they would be 
more numerous, and the pelts more valuable, and the officers w'ould be better 
able to protect them. There are a few otter around Napanee and Pond Lilyj 
Lakes, which he finds very difficult to protect, as he picked up four otter traps 
which had been set for them, but found no claimant. There are no deer in his 
locality. Partridge are becoming more plentiful since they have been protected. 
He has done his best to protect all fish and game during the last ten months. 

Overseer W. J. Birch, of Delta, reports that the angling in his division of 
Upper and Lower Bewdley Lakes the past season was excellent, especially through 
the months of August and September. There were more large small-mouth black 
bass taken this season than there has been for years, some weighing as high as 
four and one-quarter pounds, and many large mouth weighing over five pounds. 
They never have many tourists, and had less this year than others. Their cottages 
were all filled, most of the people coming early and staying quite late. He only 
seized one gill net, about ten rods long, and was unable to find the owner. How- 
ever, he was successful in having four parties fined in June for spearing, with 
torch, bass and pike. The fishermen of Upper Bewdley report as good a catch this 
year as previous years. He must say that the black ducks have been more plentiful 
here than they have been for years. They are increasing rapidly, while the wood- 
duck seems to be getting scarcer. Black squirrels have been plentiful this fall, also. 

Overseer J. H. Boyd, of Merrichville, reports that the fish have greatly 
increased in his division in the last year, especially black bass. The people in his 
district are highly delighted to think the fish are becoming so numerous, and he 
expects a great many tourists in his district next year. There have been fourteen 
licenses for dip nets applied for for coarse fish. He has taken a number of trips 
in his district, and has confiscated seventeen nets. He has fined five men — two 
for illegal fishing, three for Sunday shooting of duck. 



S2 THE EEPOET UPON No. 13 

Deer is getting very plentiful, but a number of them have been frightened 
away by dogs. Ducks quite numerous, partridges getting numerous also. On the 
whole, the game and fish have greatly increased these last few years. 

Overseer Oeorge BurTce, of Perth, reports that the law has been much better 
observed in that section this year than formerly. Nevertheless, he obtained six 
convictions, but went to the borders of his district to do so. The borders need 
trimming yet. 

The increased number of partridges proves the wisdom of the restrictions there- 
on, and the added restriction this year will do good, and was needed, 

Reports indicate that deer in this section are holding their own. The wood- 
duck will soon be of the past. 

The other ducks which breed about there are being carefully protected in their 
breeding-places and the good result of such protection is already noticeable. 

The people are becoming educated to the necessity of observing the game laws, 
partly owing to their strict enforcement and partly owing to the efforts of the 
Perth branch of the Ontario Forest, Fish and Game Protective Association. Out- 
siders frequently give assistance of great value, and otherwise show their sympathy. 

Overseer D. E. Burns, of Pembroke, reports that he has issued six licenses for 
fishing and one for hunting deer. He did not issue any angling permits, as there 
was none called for this season. The catch of fish in his district was fairly good 
this season. There have been no violations of the law, so far as he is informed. 

Overseer H. N. Covell, of Lomhardij, reports that there has been no fishing in 
his district, except by farmers living near the lakes, with hook and line. There 
has-been only one license issued in his district, and this was for domestic use only. 
The angling in Otter Lake has been much better than for a number of years, he 
thinks, on account of the number of ling the Department has taken from the 
water of Otter Lalce, and he thinks if they could take as many more from those 
waters there would be a much better class of fish. 

The game law has been very well observed in his division. Partridges and 
black squirrels are increasing. Ducks are scarce this fall. 

Overseer J. IV. Davis, of Sydenham, reports that fishing with rod and line is 
increasing in his district. A greater number of foreigners visited Sydenham this 
summer than any year previous. There are a number of lakes in the Township of 
Loughborough that could be stocked with game fish, which would pay the Depart- 
ment well for the expense. If pickerel and salmon were put in Sydenham Lake, he 
is of opinion they would in a few years greatly add to the number of foreign sports- 
men, and thereby increase the number of angling permits. Pickerel would do well 
in Knowlton Lake and Gold Lake. Both of these lakes have salmon trout. 

The partridge have greatly increased in his district, thanks to the law prevent- 
ing the killing of them. He is sorry that the killing of deer was not prohibited 
for five years in the Townships of Loughborough, Belford, Storrington, and 
North Crosby. 

Overseer W. J. Donaldson, of Donaldson, reports that there has been no license 
issued in his district during the past year. There has been a greater number of 
tourists than in past years, and all report satisfactory results by angling. The 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 33 



law in this respect appears to have been fairly well observed. There were a few 
instances where the law was violated by setting nets, the parties being fined in 
each case. He is pleased to say that the game laws are much better observed than 
they were in past years. Settlers, as a rule, are becoming educated, and realize the 
importance of preserving the game. 

Ee game birds and animals, partridge appear to be getting plentiful, and he 
believes that prohibiting the killing of them last year has had a very gatisfactory 
result. Ducks of different kinds are also plentiful. 

Deer are more plentiful than they have been for a number of years. The 
discontinuance of settlers' permits to kill deer for their own use is by no means 
popular with the people residing in localities where permits were issued. He is of 
the opinion that it would be an improvement to have hunting licenses sold by none 
excepting overseers, deputy game wardens, and other game and fishery officers. 
He has good reason to believe that where irresponsible parties are trusted with 
the selling of those licenses, they sometimes abuse their privileges by carrying a 
license in their pocket while hunting, without being filled up, and, if not challenged, 
they are returned to the Department as unsold. He has been advised that in one 
instance last year a party who was entrusted in this way did not only use a blank 
license himself, but als'o provided his friends with them. By entrusting the sale 
of licenses to officers only, it would enable such officers to know who had obtained 
licenses and who had not. 

Ovevfieer Henry Drew, of Long Lake, reports that it has been a very fine season 
in his* district, as reported by sports. He sold sixty-seven angling permits at 
Sharbot and Eagle Lakes, and believes the law was well observed. He also thinks 
it was a good thing to have our overseer appointed residing at Sharbot Lake, as he 
thinks he will make a good officer. Game is scarce in that vicinity, but he thinks 
it is on the increase the last two years. He would call the attention of the Depart-, 
ment to the matter of herring nets in Eagle Lake. There is abundance of small 
herring or ciscoes, weighing about three to the pound, and they do not grow any- 
larger. They have been getting licences of three-inch mesh extension measure, 
and that is too large for herring; would recommend that it be changed to one 
and one-half inch mesh, as he has never seen any other kind of fish taken in 
herring net<^. 

Gam'' and Fishery Overseer H. Esford, of Barriefield, reports that as to fishing 
in his waters there has been a good catch, and the fishermen have done fairly well. 
Bullheads are plenty and bass are increasing in the drowned lands very fast; there 
are plenty of black bass there now, which never was before. Carp are beginning to 
be caught there, but are small as yet. Dogfish are increasing. They catch them 
as heavy as twenty pounds. There have been four fishermen fined for violations 
of the fishery law. Outside of that, the law has been fairly well kept. Fur has 
been scarcer this season than last season. Muskrats were not so plentiful as last 
season. Mink are scarce. Ducks have been very scarce in his waters this fall, com- 
pared to other years. 

Overseer James Fisher, of Sunbury, reports that the fishing in his district has 
not been better in years. The green and black bass being very plentiful, the 
tourists catching their limit almost every day, also some good catches of salmon 

3 G. P. 



34 THE EEPORT UPON Ifo. 13 

being reported. The fishermen report catfish and other coarse fish as plentiful as 
in former years. 

Wild ducks are plentiful around there. Partridge and snipe are very scarce, 
very seldom one being seen. 

Muskrats are not nearly so numerous as they used to be. Mink are very scarce. 
The mill owners observe the law and there is no sawdust or refuse allowed to go in 
the water. 

The close seasons have been well observed. He caught a few fishing without 
permits, but they were quite willing to buy them. He sold 13,4 permits besides 
as many more having them when they came. 

Overseer Adam Greene, of Diamond, reports that fish are plentiful this season. 
Bass and pickerel were plentiful. Pike is hard to catch, they are too well fed, the 
water abounds with small fish. He would recommend that some means be taken 
to destroy the suckers. It is a great breeding ground for bass, but the suckers 
come in millions Jrom the 24th of May up to the 1st of June, and destroy the 
spawn. He thinks that if there were two weeks open for spearing the latter part 
of May it would check them. 

Overseer William Major, of Woodlawn, reports that the law is well observed 
in his district. There is very little angling done. He seized two old nets and de- 
stroyed them. Pike, pickerel and bullheads are most plentiful. Bass are scarce. 
Game is scarce. Partridge are very scarce; some duck; not much shooting done 
here. He had no trouble this year, the law is well observed; no Sunday shooting 
done. 

Overseer J. H. Phillips, of 8'rmtWs Falls, as Captain of "Navarch," reports 
that he took charge of "Navarch" on May 24th, 1909, and has kept constant patrol 
on the Bay of Quinte waters during the season. He found bass fishing excellent, 
even better than last year. Tourists all report fishing on the Rideau to be excel- 
lent. Illegal fishing was carried on to some extent. He seized about 1500 yards 
of gill net on the Bay of Quinte, also two row boats, and one row boat was seized 
near Gananoque. On the 6th of September he seized six sets of hoop nets on the 
Ottawa Eiver. During the past summer he had nine convictions. He has found 
the " Kavarch " to do excellent work during the season, and has no doubt that 
its use will have the desired effect of putting a stop to illegal netting. On the 
9th of October he seized a gasoline launch at Rideau Ferry, which was being used 
by a party in hunting ducks. He left the " Navarch " on the 1st of October, and 
commenced taking out ling from the Rideau and protecting the salmon. Early 
in the season about 300,000 salm.on fry were deposited in Rideau Lakes. The 
Rideau Lakes are constantly growing in popularity as a holiday resort and fishing 
ground, and the number of tourists who visit them is increasing every season. 
About a dozen summer cottages were erected on their shores during the past 
summer between Portland and Smith's Falls, and the prospects are the next 
season will see many more built. 

Overseer J. C. Raphael, of Mallorytown, reports that the fishing this season 
has been very good. Pike and maskinonge have been very plentiful. The black 
bass fishing is not as good as in former years. He thinks if the close season for 
bass was extended to the first of July it would be better. As late as the first of 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 35 



July you will find some of them full of spawn. The ducks were very plentiful 
last spring and there was very little shooting. There are more ducks in the St. 
Lawrence Eiver this fall than there have been for years and the sportsmen are 
getting good shooting and if the put puts don't close them out we will have good 
shooting all fall. He has found no illegal fishing. 

Overseer William S pence, of Athens, reports that there is an increase in all 
fish over previous years. Salmon are more plentiful and black bass are still better 
and larger. Fishing laws have been well observed, just two cases of illegal fishing 
with nets. He got seven gill nets this season. The laws in regard to game were 
well observed. Partridge are more plentiful and there are a great many more 
ducks than other years. There were few tourists this summer, therefore there were 
not as many permits sold as in previous years. About three years ago fish were 
very scarce and he thinks that is one reason for their not coming to the Lake thi& 
year, as they don't know they are so plentiful. 

Overseer Fred Stanzel, of Carleton Place, reports that he has taken every pre- 
caution in regard to the game and fishery laws and has found no person violating^ 
therefore has collected no fines. He cannot say whether there has been an in- 
crease or decrease in the different kinds of fish during the past year, as this is 
his first year. Black bass were scarce in the fore part of the season, but abundantly 
good during August and September. 

Ducks are plentiful in his district this year, and partridge are increasing in 
number. 

Overseer B. B. Storey, of Escott, reports that the fishery laws in his division 
to date have been well observed as the only fish are suckers, bull-pouts and pickerel, 
and these are only taken by residents for their own private use. He thinks it 
would be a very good thing to have a close season, in his division, for frogs, as they 
are a very good price at the Eiver St. Lawrence, which is only three miles away, and 
therefore they are becoming quite scarce. The game laws have been well observed ; 
he approves of the extended close season for partridge, as he believes that they are 
quite scarce throughout the province. 

He thinks that it would be a very good thing to have a shorter season for musk- 
rats in his division, say, 15th April to Ist May, owing to the scarcity. 

He believes the mere existence of a Fish and Game Overseer in a division is a 
great protection. 

Overseer J. W. Taudvin, of Kingston, reports that he finds that the angling 
in the St. Lawrence Eiver during the fore part of the season was not very good 
and during the latter part much better than usual, bass and maskinonge being 
far more plentiful. In the lower portion of Lake Ontario the bass fishing as a 
whole was not so good. The season for spawning was very late and very few bass 
had spawned before the fifteenth of July. 

There was a lot of windy weather, which interfered with the anglers and had 
a lot to do with a smaller catch. All kinds of fish this year were very fat and 
would not bite as well as usual, showing that they were getting an abundance of 
food. Bass were very plentiful and never in the history of angling in these waters 
were there so many small bass seen and caught as there were this year. There is 
no doubt but the bass are increasing rapidly here. 



36 THE EEPORT UPON No. 13 



The anglers were more particular this year as to their catches, and the credit 
chiefly belongs to the licensed guides. There were not so many non-resident 
anglers as in former years, and h^ thinks the Seattle Exposition and automobiling 
had a good deal to do with that, also some of the Americans who formerly fished 
in these waters went to our inland waters, where the windy weather would not 
interfere with them so much, and the angling is e<iually as good, if not better. 

The prospects are bright for a good season next year, and large catches. 

The game at the opening of the season was more plentiful than usual, but 
has not been so good lately owing to the mild weather, but will be good again 
when the inland waters begin to freeze over. 

Overseer 11. E. Wartman, of Portsmouth, reports that during the first part of 
the season bass were not very plentiful, but later there were some good catches of 
bass, and some very large ones, larger than usual. 

The law was well observed in the section, with the exceptions of two or three 
nets, which were reported but could not be located. Duck shooting is not very 
good so far, but it is rather early, November and December being our best months 
for ducks. 

Partridge in the' north part of his territory are on the increase an4 quite plenti- 
ful; so much for the close season. 

Muskrats were quite numerous this year, and he thinks the law was well 
observed. Would recommend close season until the 1st of March, when the fur is 
the best. 

He would not recommend a close season for mink, as they destroy muskrats 
and all kinds of game. Last year he caught a mink in a pond killing wild ducks 
that were too small to fly. Their fur is fine, but they are one of the most destructive 
animals on game we have. 

Overseer J. R. Wight, of Newhoro, reports that, with the assistance of guides 
and hotelmen and the generally sportsmanlike behaviour of tourists, there has been 
very little illegal fishing in his district during the season of 1909. There was one 
conviction for catching minnows wih a dip-net from a houseboat. The fishing 
has been very good, both as to bass in the lake near Newboro and as to salmon in 
Devil and Buck Lakes. The only falling off has been in the case of small-mouthed 
bass, with which the lakes should at once be re^ocked, else these may soon be 
fished out. The netting that has been licensed has been of good service in thinning 
out to some extent the coarser fish that prey upon those whose preservation is our 
object. 

Two dollars, in his opinion, is a sufficiently high fee for a rod license. While 
some fish quite a while on it, there are others who remain only a day or so. In 
this way a reasonable average of time is kept, which $2 well pays for. The licensing 
of guides he considers to have been a good move for all parties to whom the matter 
could be of any interest. The number of tourists at Newboro this summer was 
considerably in excess of other years, a fact to be attributed to better organization, 
better accommodation, and better advertising on the part of the hotels, together 
with the reputation of the place in past years. With every convenience and vnth 
means of accessibility possessed by few such places, with such fine fishing, and with 
the tourists of so many past years advertising "it, Newboro should have a pretty big 
share of the summer trade. 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 37 



Overseer Hugh Wilson, of Elphin, reports that he had two complaints this . 
year, which were laid before Mr. Taylor, of Perth — one for catching whitefish in 
November, the other for cutting rat houses. In each case a fine was imposed. 

He finds the partridge very plentiful this year. All are satisfied with the game 
laws in that section. 

Overseer F. L. Wornnoorth, of Arden, reports that he has had a great deal of 
trouble with mill owners again this year with sawdust and rubbish going into the 
water. They have had a good number of non-residents again this summer, and he 
does not know of one instance of any one of them breaking the law. He found a 
couple of gill nets in the water, which he lifted, but could not find any owner 
for them; also found one hoop net, but no one would claim it. He only sold one 
license for guides. In reference to partridge hunting, the law was very well kept. 
There have been no complaints. The birds are getting quite plentiful again. One 
of the hotelmen in town has built a large addition to his hotel to accommodate 
the number of tourists which come to that place. In reference to the issuing of 
deer hunting license to settlers, as well as people coming in to hunt, he thinks it 
better than the settlers' permits, as different ones who bought licenses told him it 
was a good thing, as it kept a great number of young lads out of the woods,jand 
there would not be as many accidents as in former years. 

Overseer D. Younghushand, of South March, reports that the ten months just 
past have been very quiet in that district. The fishing was not very good. The 
fish cauglit were pike, suckers, bullheads, perch, sunfish, and a few pickerel (dore), 
and black bass. The ducks have been very plentiful, and he found no illegal shoot- 
irg. It has been a good yean for muskrats. He had occasion to seize acme traps 
which were set out of season. There are no partridge of any account in that 
district. The fish and game laws seem to be better respected now than a few years 
ago. 

Peterborough, Northumberland, Victoria, and Other Inland CotiNTiES. 

Overseer J. R. Boate, of Fowlers Corners, reports that there has been no 
violation of the game laws that he has heard of. 

Ducks have been very plentiful this season. 

Bass and maskinonge were plentiful in July and August and part of September. 

Muskrat and mink — these fur-bearing animals have been very scarce, owing 
to high waters in the spring. 

Hunting on Sunday is entirely stopped there now. The law has been very 
well observed in his district. 

Overseer William Baler, of Byron, reports that the fishing law was well 
observed, as well as the game law. No violations came to his notice. He would 
ask the Department to impose a license fee of $3 per year for carrying a gun. 
Quail are almost extinct around there ; also partridge and black squirrels are becom- 
ing scarcer. Fishing was the same as last year. 

Overseer A. 0. Boynton, of KirTcfield, reports that in this division the fisbmg 
and duck shooting gives ample sport to the local citizens, but none make a business 
of either, and all seem anxious to see the law to protect both game and fish 



38 THE REPORT UPON No. 13 

enforced. No fishing licenses were sold, as tourists all pass through this section 
to either of the lakes — Simcoe to the west, or Balsam to the east. The ducks 
seem to be more plentiful here this year than for a number of years previous. 
Muskrats are decreasing rapidly, there being not half the number taken by trap- 
pers during the month of April of 1909 as there were in the same month of 1908. 
Partridge — Since protection has been given to f^iese splendid game birds they 
are becoming quite numerous, which all are pleased to note. 

An occasional deer is seen wandering through this division during the summer 
or early fall, but they do not seem to make this a stopping place. 

Mink are to be 'had along the waters of this district, but are quickly called 
upon to surrender their lives for the valuable fur at all times. He thinks it 
would be wise to give these little animals some protection. He thinks the law 
has been well observed, although a great many take all the good they can get 
out of both fish and game as far as the law allows. 

Overseer A. Bradshaw, of Lindsay, reports that the catch of maskinonge was 
not as large this season as it was last year. This was owing to the high water in 
Sturgeon Lake and Scugog River, below Lindsay, the water during the angling 
season being so high that the fish were able to keep in the marshes and weedy 
places, where trolling could not be done; but some very large 'lunge were caught. 
Fish of twenty pounds were caught during the summer. Bass were caught in 
large numbers, and anglers had no reason to complain. The spawning season was 
windy, and the fish did not suffer while on their spawning grounds. In Scugog 
Lake bass were very plentiful, and a larger class of maskinonge were caught there 
than had been for many years, and the water has kept high there all summer, 
and this is what is required 'to make Scugog Lake what it used to be — first-class 
fishing grounds. Frogs, in his opinion, should be protected for three years in 
all the waters of the Trent Canal, and in their banding season at all times, as is 
done in the County of Victoria. If frogs were so protected in this way they 
would be of great value to the people who catch them, and also be a valuable 
asset to the Province. Partridge — It is pleasing to know, from authentic sources, 
that the timely protection given these noble game birds is having the desired 
effect. Ducks were to be had in large numbers, and good shooting was in order. 
Sportsmen seemed well satisfied. Shore birds and waders are also on the increase. 
Owing to low water during last winter, muskrats were not as plentiful last April 
as they were in the same month last year. When the muskrats built their Avinter 
quarters in the fall the water was up to its normal height, but during the winter 
it became so low that the muskrats' houses were left high and dry. This pre- 
vented the muskrats from getting their food supply from the water, which is 
lily roots and other water plants, and the animals had to leave their houses in 
order to find food elsewhere. Under such conditions, the catch of muskrats was 
not as large as usual, but prices were higher, and trappers had no reason to com- 
plain of their season's catch. Mink are getting scarcer every year, and trappers 
are desirous of having them protected. The law was fairly well observed in that 
section. Only two breaclies came to his Icnowledge upon which he could take 
action — a case of killing a maskinonge and a breach of the Bird Act of 1897 — 
and these he had before County Police Magistrate P. D. Moore, K.C. A fine was 
imposed in both cases, and the matter reported to the Department at the time. 
Mill owners and others gave no trouble during the year. The new locks and 
dam at Lindsay are under construction, but will not be completed this year. The 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 39 



old fishway in the dam has been removed, as no provision was made for a new 
one in the plan of construction, as it is believed that the fish will be enabled to 
ascend to the upper waters through the locks when locking boats through, which 
will likely be very often, as there are a large number of launches and other small 
boats, which will be going up and down very often during the time that the 
fish are running in the spring. The protective steamer " Naiad " visited Lindsay. 
Capt. Carson and his crew take a great interest in enforcing the law. That duty 
is faithfully done, and no doubt but the presence of " Naiad " will have a deterrent 
effect, and prevent evil-disposed persons attempting illegal acts, which their 
nature might suggest. He would respectfully ^ggest that the following amend- 
ments be added to the Game and Fisheries Act, which he believes are required for 
the better protection of the game and fish: 

(a) That only one-half of the numbers of bass and maskinonge which are 
now allowed to be taken by one person in a day be permitted. 

(6) Winter fishing through the ice or otherwise be not allowed. 

(c) That, the present open trolling season be the only time that bass and 
maskinonge can be lawfully caught. 

{(1) That frogs be protected in all the waters of the Trent Canal, and in their 
banding season at all times, and a close season of say, three years at least. 

(e) That mink be protected from the 1st of May to the 1st of November in 
each year. 

(/) I'liat muskrats be only allowed to be taken in the month of April in each 
year. 

{g) That no artificial light be allowed to be used in hunting or catching any 
game animal or bird protected by the Game and Fisheries Act. 

Overseer Chris. Burtcheall, of Gdhoconk, reports that the fishing in the first 
part of the open season was not very good, but it was better later on, and it was 
good to the last. In the beginning some of the tourists were not satisfied, but 
were greatly pleased at the end over the great 'lunge they were catching. There 
do not seem to be very many ducks this fall in his division, and there are not very 
many partridge around there, and what few there are it seems hard to keep pro- 
tected. He finds it quite difficult to watch that they are not killed, and he thinks 
if the close season were extended for a year or two longer they would soon 
increase. 

In regard to deer, they seem to be very scarce around there, and he does not 
think they are so plentiful anywhere, ^s there are a great many killed every fall. 
A number of the settlers are annoyed at the idea of having to pay for a license, 
but it is a fine thing, as it puts them all on an even footing. They were not 
satisfied before when some had to pay $2 for a license and some would hunt 
for 25 cents. Now, when all are used alike, they are not satisfied. There does 
not seem to be very many small fur-bearing animals around there at present. He 
thinks the mink ought to be protected, as the}^ are scarce. He also thinks it 
would be a good plan to have the city tourists pay for an angling permit, the 

same as non-residents. 

1 

Overseer J. D. Campbell, of Sylvan, reports that the fishing has been on an 
average with former years, excepting whitefish, as the fishermen all report 
decrease in their catch. The law has been well observed, excepting in one or two 
cases. There were no fines imposed. As for the game, there is a scarcity of most 



40 THE REPORT UPON No. 13 



all kinds excepting duck, which are quite plentiful in the District of Lake Smith, 
Grand Bend, and Port Franks, bordering on Lake Huron. 

There is one dam on the Aux Sauble River at Rock Glen, near Arkona, and there 
are a great many complaints from the people living above the said dam of there 

not being a proper fishway, as very few fish frequent the water above the said dam. 

Overseer T. 0. Gaskey, of Blairton, reports that a number of tourists visited 
Belmont Lake. Clear Lake has an abundance of bass, but small. Twin Lake and 
Deer, Lake, bass. Belmont Lake and Crow Lake, bass, maskinonge, and catfish. 

During the past season he has received no money for permits, as tourists 
secure these at Toronto, Cobourg, and different points before arriving there. He 
has not found any person guilty of breaking the law during the past season. 

Overseer G. H. Cassan, of Gampbellford, reports that the first of the season 
fishing was very good — that is, the 'lunge fishing — and the 'lunge this year are 
larger than last year; and he thinks there should be something done in the way 
of stocking the waters, as the Americans were disappointed in the black bass 
fishing. There seems to be more of the yellow bass, as they are just beginning to 
come again, as the hoop-nets pretty nearly cleaned the river of the yellow bass. 
Between Hastings and Healey Falls this spring the water was pretty high, and 
the ^lunge and bass had spawned, and there had been a contract let, and the 
waters were lowered for about three or four weeks, and you could go along the 
shores and see the spawn lying on logs, dying. He thinks this will hurt the 
fishing quite a lot in a year or so if the river is not stocked. It also was a bad 
thing for the ducks, as they had made their nests while the water was low, and 
after the water rose again it drove them off their nests, and the ducks were 
very scarce there this year. He thinks that the guide's license has been a good 
thing, and he would recommend it again, but the fee is high enough. He thinks 
if the fee was $1 it would do just as much good, and there would be more sold, 
as some of those fellows do not care to pay $2 when they only get work for 
about a week or so. He would recommend hatcheries for bass, as they must do 
something to stock the waters; and if they could keep lots of bass in the water, 
the revenue would be a great deal better. If there is good fishing, there will be 
increased revenue. He would also recommend a close season for frogs. 

Overseer William Glarhson, of LakeJiurst,, reports that the bass and maskinonge 
have been very plentiful, anglers having no. difficulty in securing the limit allowed. 
The fishermen report the catch of salmon trout up to the average. Ducks are as 
plentiful as usual; also partridge are getting very numerous. The tourist trade 
has increased fully 30 per cent. The fishery regulations and close seasons were 
well observed. No abuses exist in his district. The mill owners observe the law 
well. 

Overseer Alexander Clunis, of Glaude, reports that the fish, especially the brook 
trout, want a close season, like our partridge are now getting. He feels sure it 
would allow them to become more plentiful. Our streams must be restocked, or 
otherwise a few years will make our speckled beauties extinct about here. 

For the last two years there was quite a lot of hard feeling about the close 
season for black squirrel and partridge by our local sports, but this year they see 
the benefit, as black squirrel are running about all ^over, in the village gardens, and 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 41 

partridge are quite numerous in the woods; but he is glad they are still protected, 
for this year they will get a start on the hunters now. 

In regard to the close season he says they are well kept. He has no reason to 
complain at all. ^ 

Overseer William Collins, of Strathroy, reports that there is one sawmill on 
that ^ream, but the owners do not let their sawdust into it. The catch of fish 
was good thia season. The anglers have had a good season. One man and his son 
caught one hundred and seventy pike and pickerel. This season there is not many 
bass got here, but the carp are in abundance. The quail have had a good season. 
The weather was fine for them. There are a good many partridge in the swamps 
if they are let alone, and there are a good many woodcocks, and squirrels are 
abundant. 

Overseer Arthur Corsant, of Masonville, reports that in his dirtrict there are 
no licenses issued. The fish caught in his division were mostly suckers and rock 
bass. There were not so many black bass caught this season. He notices a 
decided decrease in speckled trout in his district. He would recommend that 
the catching of trout be prohibited for a period of two years, as the streams have 
been overfished from what he can learn, and from his own knowledge the total 
catch in his division would not exceed 2,000 pounds. There is an improvement 
in the fishwa3's in his division since his last report. He would recommend that the 
Government compel mill owners to construct proper fishways. The only game in 
his division are rabbits, muskrats, black squirrels and a very few partridges. The 
closing of this year against shooting of partridge was a good act, and he thinks if 
it was for two or three years it would be better. The close seasons have been very 
well observed. Only one violation of the Fisheries law came to his knowledge, that 
was catching bass under size. 

Ov&rseer J. A. Cunningham, of Maynooth, reports that the catch for the season 
of spucklfd trout was about 1000 lbs., owing to Lake St. Peter being prohibited 
there was a slight decrease. The catch of grey trout was about 500 lbs. No 
abuses exist that he knows of. No fishways in his district. Partridge are doing 
well under the two years' protection. Deer were not so plentiful as in 1908. Ow- 
ing to the large destruction by wolves last winter he made two trips to the Big 
Opeorgo Lake in Algonquin Park; there he saw wolf tracks in every quarter, and 
as people are not allowed to carry rifles or use poison he soon discovered the cause 
of the trouble with the wolves in the upper section of this district. Wolves in the 
park, as well as other animals, increase rapidly, and he understands there are 
22 Townships. He asks if it is any wonder that those brutes are coming down here 
in packs every winter destroying the deer and the settlers' sheep and calves. He 
would offer the suggestion that the Park Rangers be authorized to destroy those 
animals in whatever way they can without bounty, and until that is done those rav- 
ages here will continue. 

Overseer Edward Fleming, of Hastings, reports that the fish were in the marshes 
last spring as early as usual, and he is certain there were not any fish speared below 
Hastings, on the Trent River to- the Narrows, about nine miles dovra. 

In Hastings the law was well observed; there are no nets allowed in the river 
and he thinks it is a good Act, for the 'lunge and bass are more plentiful and much 



42 THE REPORT UPON No. 13 



larger than before. There has been some very fine catches this summer, and in 
general the law was well observed. 

Overseer James Gillespie, of Berkeley, reports that, as stated last year, his 
duties are more particularly confined to the prevention of netting speckled trout 
in the small lakes and streams in the district, and seeing that the close season is 
observed. He has every reason to believe that the law is being fairly well observed, 
no cases of a violation having come to his notice, the people are aware that they will 
be looked after if they break the law. 

Some of the anglers claim that the close season should be changed, so as to 
begin September the 1st and end April 14th, claiming that more spawn is destroyed 
in September than would be in April. No angling permits were sold by him and 
none were called for. He believes the close season for game has been fairly well 
observed. The notices from the Department were as usual distributed through the 
district and were posted up so that most people knew the law. Partridge are 
getting more plentiful and he has not heard of any break of the law with regard 
to them, the people seem to approve of the law protecting them for another year. 
A few deer are reported as being seen in this district this year, and many sportsmen 
think that the killing of them should be prohibited in that county for a couple of 
years at least. Beaver are getting more plentiful and in some cases have become 
a nuisance by backing the water up and flooding the land. He is yet of the 
opinion that a great deal of harm is done to hares in the spring of the year, by 
running them sometimes for the whole day. He is not aware of any fishway in his 
district, nor has he heard of the pollution of any stream by sawdust or mill 
rubbish. 

Overseer F. H. Reneilley, of WarJcwoHh, reports that the fishing during the 
past season in his division from what he can learn from different sources there 
has been a decided improvement. As all fishing in his district is done by ang- 
ling, he would ascribe the cause of such improvement to be, first, the abolishing 
of the use of nets ; secondly, the better observance of the law in regard to Jack 
light fishing. 

All fish are used by the parties who catch them. No abuses exist in his dis- 
trict. The close seasons have^been well observed. He has impressed upon the 
people the object and need of obeying the law" and by so doing has been able to 
obtain a good observance of the law. No violations of the law came to his knowl- 
edge. Mill owners have obeyed the law and he would advise that no mill refuse 
of any kind be dumped into the river. The fish have a free passage, no fish- 
ways in his district. 

Overseer J. H. Hess, of Hastings, reports that the law has been well observed 
in his division from Rice Lake to Trent Bridge, and the fishing has been very 
good, and a fine quality of fish, particularly maskinonge, and visitors who come to 
fish report very good fishing. As to game the law, as far as he can learn, has 
been well observed, and partridge are getting quite numerous now, and he would 
strongly advise the killing of partridge to be prohibited for a longer period. 

Overseer Oeorge Hood, Sr., of Scugog, reports that there were a number of 
maskinonge caught on the west side of Scugog Island this season, some of them 
weighing as much as 17 pounds, some 10 pounds, while others were smaller. 



1909 GAME AND FISHEEIES. 43 

They are coining back into the lake slowly. If the lake can be kept up to high 
water mark, and the fish carefully watched there will be plenty of them in an- 
other year. The bass are more numerous. The laws in regard to fishing have 
been well observed. 

Ducks are very plentiful this fall. There are lots of hunters around, and they 
seem very well pleased that the law is being properly carried out. 

He has examined the hides and seen to it that they are not placed too far out 
in the lake. 

There has been no illegal work going on. 

Partridge are very scarce in this section. They should be protected for a few 
years longer. 

Muskrats are very plentiful and busy building their houses for the winter. 

He will see to it that the law is carried out. 

He has not sold any licenses this season. There are no American tourists 
around there. 

Overseer Jas. Howell, of Bancroft, reports that there are no fishing licenses 
issued in his district, and no fishing done except by settlers for their own use. 
There are no fish exported. The close season has been well observed. He has 
visited the different lakes several times during close season. No violations of the 
Act came to his notice, with the exception of one case. The Act respecting mill 
refuse was well observed. There are no fishways in his district. He would re- 
commend that Baptiste and T7Amable Lakes be closed the first of October instead 
of the first of November, as he finds that the fish in those lakes do their spawn- 
ing in October. 

As regards game, he finds that partridge are greatly on the increase in his di- 
vision. Muskrats are also reported to be on the increase in Baptiste Lake, but 
there is little or no trapping being done for them. 

Overseer Charles Jickling, St. Paul's Station, reports that speckled trout are 
very scarce in some of our streams. He heard a report of 10,000 trout fry having 
been sent to Embro to be placed in Harrington Mill Pond, and here is how it was 
done. They stayed there all night and were brought up by the mail carrier and 
were given to some boys to empty into the pond. He was told by parties who saw 
these that they all lay dead in the bottom of the pond. He hopes if ever there 
are more to be sent, that a more reliable person will be sent to look after them. 

Black bass were very scarce last fall and this summer. The water being low 
they were very nearly fished out, as not many have been caught this summer in 
the River Thames. In William Skiner's pond on Trout Creek, they are quite 
plentiful. He went up twice in spawning season and once after spawn was 
hatched. It would make a sportsman smile to see all the little spawn that were 
hatched, and the farmers for five or six miles along the stream have notices up 
prohibiting the fishing altogether. He thinks the laws are being fairly well 
observed. 

Partridge appear to be very scarce; he has two or three reports from reliable 
parties of finding them under trees dead in the month of March. He himself 
came across one. It appears that there must be some disease amongst them. The 
one he found he examined closely and came to the conclusion it was like cholera 
among fowl. Black squirrels, also grey squirrels, seem to be rather on the in- 
crease. Hare seem to be very scarce, but the cotton tail rabbits are numerous in 



44 THE KEPOET UPON No. 13 



some sections. Muskrats are also numerous in places. He has been approached 
by a number of the local trappers to recommend no shooting of muskrats. 

Overseer Thomas H. Johnston, of Royston, reports that fishing on the Magnet- 
awan and lakes around there has been good. Some tourists told him they could 
catch all they wanted; others there are who kick, and say the fee they pay should 
go to restock the waters. Well, there are always kickers, but certainly he thinks 
trout spawn should go into Horn Lake. It is situated on the north boundary of 
Eyerson; it is a clear spring lake, you could see bottom in deep water; it is so 
clear it is the natural home of the trout; some fine ones have been caught in it, 
but fishing for thirty years has cleaned it out. During the past season the law 
has been well observed there. Partridge, before the close season, were nearly 
extinct. Quite a few families of beaver are noticeable. The cold and late 
spring was very hard on the deer, as they sometimes drop their young on the snow, 
and many perish in this way. He thinks the permits should be issued to the 
settler in order to locate him, to know that he is one. Dogs should be prohibited 
from running deer. 

Overseer David Jones, of Welland, reports that the fishing in the early part 
of the spring and summer was up to the average and bass were fairly good, pick- 
erel fair. Angling fairly good; up to the latter part of October the closed sea- 
son was well observed. He looked frequently after the net fishermen and found 
that they lived up to the law. Seized one net, and got one conviction. Part- 
ridges are more plentiful than for some years and the law is fairly observed and 
nothing irregular except minor matters has occurred. 

Overseer A. J. Kent, of Bewdley, reports that, as his appointment took place 
last April, he can only give a report of the past six months, or a little better ; how- 
ever, he is pleased to state that the close season for fish was very well ob- 
served in his division; in fact, it was considered very risky to attempt killing any 
fish as the territory was pretty well worked- The fishing was not very good this 
past season. They had considerable high winds which was partly the reason, and 
it is his opinion that maskinonge and bass are getting scarce in Eioe Lake. The 
fish in the Otonabee Eiver should have better protection. Muskrats were very 
plentiful last spring at that end of the lake, and he would suggest that trappers 
pay q, license of two dollars. There are a number of trappers in and around Bewdley, 
also a few who carry traps in their canoes for an excuse, but he is of the opinion 
that they are not set very 'often, and if a license were put on, it would do away 
with those make-believe trappers, and make it easier for the overseer. 

Duck shooting has been very good this season, better than it has been for some 
time. 

Black squirrels are plentiful, but partridge are scarce. There is only one saw- 
mill in his division; no mill refuse has been dumped into the water. 

In conclusion he adds that Mr. John McAllister, overseer at Gore's Landing, 
and himself worked together harmoniously, each going on the other's territory, 
and tliey will be pleased to do the very same next season. 

Overseer Jacob F. Kern, of Burford, reports that the fishing in the creek north 
of that village has not been as good as usual. Bass seem scarce and pike is about 
the only large-sized fish found. Around Scotland the fishing has been good and 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 46 

the Cooley pond seems to be practically exhausted. As far as game is concerned, 
there are a few grouse and partridge, but they are scarce: rabbits are very plen- 
tiful. Muskrats are doing much damage to miU dams, being exceedingly num- 
erous. Squirrels seem to be plentiful. ^ As far as violations are concerned, he has 
none to report. He has investigated every point periodically, and when around 
could find no cause for complaint. 

Overseer Newton Langford, of Dorset, reports that last season the number of 
fishing parties were more than usual, but the fishing was fairly good. They are 
getting things in very good shape there now. In many small lakes the fish are 
becoming more plentiful and in a few years they will have better fishing all over 
this part. They have a few outlaws there that are hard to catch. 

Overseer Wellington Lean, of Apsley, reports that he has visited lakes and 
portions of country where game may be found in his district at different times 
during the year, and found no illegal fishing or hunting. Fishing was not as 
good in his district as in former years. Bass were very scarce, especially in Loon 
Lake, He would like to again call attention to the stocking of Crab and Wolfe 
Lakes with bass and trout. These lakes would make admirable summer^ resorts, 
and thus open up new fields for tourists and sportsmen. 

Partridge are very plentiful this fall, and very few are being killed, so in a 
short time they will be as numerous as in former years. Deer are getting very 
scarce here. He has been through the woods a number of times this summer and 
has. seen only a few tracks or other signs of them being around. 

Beaver are getting quite numerous around some of the lakes. He found two 
traps which he thought were set for beaver; these he took and reported to the 
Department, and he has the traps yet. 

Overseer J. R. McAllister, of Gore's Landing, reports that the fishing has been 
very poor for some reason; in fact, there were not half the number of maskinonge 
taken this year that was taken last year, and none of the old. fishermen can ac- 
count for it, as the fish are quite plentiful. 

The law has been well observed in Eice Lake, but he understands that there 
has been some bad poachers at work up the Otonabee Eiver and the harm is done 
mostly by people from Peterboro with gill nets. He got one gill net in Otonabee 
River, but he did not know who set it. 

Ducks are quite plentiful and he has not seen or heaid of any person killing 
any game or fur-bearing animals out of season. But he is sorry to say that those 
who call themselves duck hunters and sports, are building blinds and shooting- 
over decoys out of same, not on his division, but on the north side of Rice Lake 
east of Hiawatha, in all the rice beds. He was down the lake yesterday and he 
destroyed two blinds, one was half a mile, and the other a -quarter of a mile from 
the shore. None of the overseers there try to stop this, so he is told, and those 
who keep within the law come to him and want him to go on this other over- 
seer's division and try and have some of* the offenders fined ;" it makes it very dis- 
agreeable for him. He wishes that catching frogs in the rice beds by those large 
lamps ^as stopped. He saw two of these going up and down the rice bed on 
Monday night the 1st of November, and they are every night at this time of the 
year. It drives the ducks all away, so that they cannot feed at night in the rice 
beds, where they always want to feed at night. 



46 THE REPORT UPON No. IS 



Overseer A. W. Mclntyre, of Keene, reports that there \vias a good catch of fish 
this season in his division, hut he can give no account of what was caught as the 
fishing was done by local men chiefly. He thinks there wias an increase over last 
year. They were nearly all consumed in tjie neighborhood. ' He had no infrac- 
tions of the law to report. There are no dams in his district with fishwiays in 
and he thinks there is no need for them as there are as many fish above as below 
the dams in the Indian River. There is no mill refuse dumped in the water in 
his division. 

Overseer Enoch Merriam, of Harwood, reports that the fishing was not as good 
in Rice Lake this past summer as it was other years. The water was about 
twenty inches higher than he ever knew it to be, and many of the old weed beds 
that served as a guide to fish along never oame to the top of the water, and he is 
of the opinion that the fish were more scattered than when the water was much 
lower in the lake. The weather was very rough and a good many days the fisher- 
men had to stop on sihore, and as Rice Lake is very shallow, only about 12 feet 
on an average, and of mud bottom, it becomes so muddy after a storm that it 
takes some time to settle down again so that the fish can see a bait. The min- 
nows were very plentiful out everywhere on the deepest water, and he thinks this 
supply of food for the large fish helps to spoil the sport of anglers. The water 
was of a good height last spring, so that there was no spawn wasted and the fish 
were as plentiful in the marshes as ever they were. The muskrats were very thick 
and are becoming more plentiful every year. Partridges are very scarce around 
there, owing to the fact that there is not much wood for them to hatch in. Ducks 
were in great quantity last spring and stopped with them till the middle of May, 
but there is not as many fall duck in yet as la?t year; it is a little early for 
them at this present date, October 30th. The shooting is not good, as you can- 
not get at them, since you cannot shoot from the rice beds over decoys. He has 
not seen any traps set for the muskrat and they are putting up their camps for the 
winter. The close seasons have been well observed, with the exception of one In- 
dian. He was caught trolling; he had no fish. He took his line and bait and 
got out a summons for him to appear in court, but instead he left and went to 
some part unknown to him as yet. 

Overseer F. J. Moore, of Lakefield, reports that as regards the Fisheries, the 
law has been well observed in his district this season. He had a few cases in the 
spring with the settlers, but let them off with a warning,, which had a good effect. 
He had one party fined for killing maskinonge in the spring. 

Tourists have had fairly good luck with rod and spoon this year, particularly 
bass fishing; maskinonge has not been so plentiful. He would again strongly 
recommend that Stony Lake be restocked with parent bass, if they could be got, 
RB it is of great importance that the fish supply he kept up. Stony Lake is becom- 
ing a great summer resort for tourists who come from all parts of the United 
States to spend their holidays. He does not think they would mind paying 
more for their permits if the fishing was good. 

He has issued over two hundred fishing permits this year, and there are also 
« number of Americans come here who get their permits on the way over, so that 
these people, with the people of our own Province, use quite a supply of fish. 
He thinks it would be a good idea, if possible, to have arrangements made with 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 47 

the Dominion Government, in regard to the rising and falling of the water in 
Ston}' Lake, in the spring, ae a great part of the spawn is lost through the water 
falling. He has issued about thirty-four guides' licenses and thinks this is a 
great protection to the fish. He has also issued two minnow licenses. He would 
recommend that the close season for bass and maskinonge be from the 1st of April 
instead of the 15th of April, as these fish run immediately after the ice disap- 
pears. 

The law in regard to deer hunting this season has been well observed. Hunt- 
ers and trappers have had a fairly good year. Ducks are not very plentiful in his 
district. Partridge are more plentiful since the shooting and sale of these birds 
has been prohibited. Trappers seem to have had good luck this year catching 
muskrats. Mink is becoming very scarce in this locality and if they are not pro- 
tected in some way, before long they will be a thing of the past. He would sug- 
gest that a close season be put on them as their fur is very valuable, and also when 
trappers are trapping mink they are apt to kill rats before the season opens for 
these animals. 

Overseer J. W. Morton, of St. Ola, reports that the fishing in his district has 
been some better than previous years, as near as he can ascertain. 

He sold more angling permits this year to Americans than last. No net li- 
censes were taken out. The principal fish in these waters are salmon trout, black 
bass and mud cats. 

The close season for fish and game was well observed as far as he had any 
knowledge, and no violations, and consequently, no fines imposed. There are no 
fishways in his division. Ducks are scarce, but partridge are more plentiful than 
for a number of years; no wild geese stay in these waters, at least he has not 
heard of any this year. 

There are lots of red squirrels, deer and numerous bears; foxes are not very 
plentiful. 

Overseer James Myers, of Orchard, reports that there has been no change that 
he can learn of; the catch was about the same as last year, fairly good. No fish 
sold, all used at home, as the chief fish are trout and bass in his district. No 
abuses that he knows of. The close seasons are well observed; he has kept a close 
watch as to this, regarding both the game and fish. No violations of the Act 
came to his notice except one man was fined for fishing on a reserve of the Mount 
Forest Club. No sawdust or other refuse is put into the water where fish are. 
Two fishways in fair repair in his district. He thinks that fish are more plen- 
tiful and larger above the dam than below in some places where there is no fishway. 

Game is getting more plentiful in his district; the red deer are coming back 
as several have been seen in Proton Station and some in Egremont lately. 

Overseer Henry B. Parker, of Bobcaygeon, reports that fishing during the past 
season was good. In the first part of the season it was an easy matter for the 
guides to bring in their number every day, but the latter part of the season was 
not so good, the only reason he can give being the very high water. The catch 
in both maskinonge and bass as to size was good. Tourists who visited there ex- 
pressed themselves as being much pleased with the fishing. His opinion is that 
the close season for maskinonge should begin earlier as he has known them to be 
on their spawning beds on the Ist of April. 



48 THE EEPORT UPON No. 13 

Partridge are on the increase, as small flocks are to be seen wherever there is 
cover for them. Ducks are about the same as in previous years, and some very 
good bags were taken the first part of the hunt. 

Deer are getting scarce, and if the hunting of deer were stopped for three 
years, there would be once more a nuntber of them. Muskrat are plentiful and 
great numberg have been taken in the spring trapping. Mink should be given 
protection, as they are one of the most valuable fur bearers and are becoming 
very scarce owing to the destruction at all times of the year. Beavers are on 
the increase as there are a few colonies on the creeks and marshes and if kept 
protected would multiply very rapidly. 

Overseer Chas. W. Parhvii, of FaZewh'a/ reports' that bass are becoming more 
plentiful. Large numbers of green bass were captured around there 4his season, 
but to his knowledge there was not as many maskinonge taken as there was last 
season. He would suggest that the close season be from December 15th, as that 
would stop fishing through the ice. There is a party consisting of from eight to 
twelve men living near this lake that do considerable fishing through the ice, 
and he was told by two of the party that they took out over six hundred fish last 
winter. He paid them several visits but found no undersized ones. It is to be 
regretted that there was not a fishway provided in the new locks at Lindsay and 
he considers it a great detriment and injustice to this lake. He thinks it would 
be a good thing if every person wishing to angle was required to carry a permit. 

Muskrats were very plentiful last spring and large numbers were taken. 
He had considerable trouble last winter trying to protect their houses. The water 
is very high this fall and they seem to be living in the banks and logs as yet; if 
they remain there they will be more easily protected and will be less liable to lose 
their lives during the winter. He is very sorry that the valuable little mink 
have been neglected so long that they are nearly extinct around this lake, and he 
thinks the taking of them should be prohibited for a number of years and then 
have a close season for them. 

Partridge are very scarce. Ducks are very plentiful, and some good bags have 
been taken. He knows of a number of Red Heads and Blue Bills which hatched 
near there this summer. And he never knew them to hatch there before, which 
goes to show if they receive proper protection during the spring and summer they 
will not need to go away to nest. 

He only sold three fishing licenses this season. Very few Americans come to 
this lake now, as they prefer to go where they can get more sport for their 
money. He travelled over his division as often as he thought it was at all ne- 
cessary, and he is pleased to state that the law has been well observed. The only 
trouble he had was with the muskrat houses, and they are very hard to protect; 
however, there were only eight or ten opened in his division. He could not get 
sufiicient proof to make a conviction. He is doing all in his power to protect 
the fish, song birds and game of every description that make their home around 
here. 

Overseer H. E. Purcdl, of Colehrooh, reports good bass fishing in the several 
lakes in his district with the exception of one violation for spearing with a jack 
light, in which he fined the parties five dollars. Another man he fined twenty 
dollars for killing deer without a license. Another man skipped the country 
who was hunting deer without a license. He seized three illegal nets, which he 



1909 GAME AND FISHEEIES. 49 



destroyed, as there is no net fishing allowed in his district, unless for domestic 
use. He thinks they are very much in need of a hatchery or ponds for the pro- 
pagation of bass or pickerel as there are several good places along the Bay of 
Quinte Eailway. The number of muskrats caught was not many, on account, he 
thinks, of low water in drowned lands. His district is composed of Townships 
of Camden, Sheffield and Kaladar, in County of Addington, and Township of 
Barrie, in the Electoral District of Addington, County of Frontenac. 

Overseer Colin Eohertson, of Hillshurg, reports that fishing for the past sea- 
son has been good. The fish in his division are mostly all brook trout and suck- 
ers. The Caledon Mountain Trout Co. own or control a portion of the waters 
here; members of the company from different parts of Ontario, Quebec and the 
States are here during the fishing season, and a great number of beautiful brook 
trout are caught and taken away. The same company also have a hatching house 
and number of small ponds. The manager tells me that they had over 500,000 
fry this season; quite a number of the above were sold and went to other parts 
of Ontario, the remainder were put into streams leading to their ponds. An- 
other pond here is under the control of the Guelph Fishing Club, and they also 
catch a large quantity of brook trout during the season. There are a few saw- 
mills in his division, and the law regarding the disposition of sawdust, etc., in the 
waters is well observed. With regard to game, rabbits and foxes are plentiful, 
but other game is scarce. No deer in that section. He has been over his ter- 
ritory several times during the season, and finds the Game and Fishery Laws 
have been well observed, not having one complaint during the season. 

Overseer C. St. Charles, of Madoc, reports that during the past months of the 
present year the fishery laws in this district have been very well kept. There 
have been no convictions and very few complaints. 

The fishing in Moira Lake has been fairly good during the past summer. The 
fishing in this lake is done almost wholly by residents of our village of Madoc and 
is carried on more for sport of fishing than for gain. 

Overseer Neil Sinclair, of Qlenarm, reports that there was very little fishing 
done in his district this season, very few bass or maskinonge being taken. The 
laws were well observed, no violations of the law were brought to his notice dur- 
ing the year. 

Wild ducks were not as plentiful as they have been other years; there are no 
wild geese on the lake this fall. There are no deer in his district. Muskrat and 
mink are very scarce. 

Overseer John Small, of Grand Valley, reports that the fishing and game laws 
have been well observed, he having had no complaints this year. Deer are get- 
ting more numerous on account of shooting having been prohibited in Dufferin 
and Wellington, but his opinion is that deer should be protected in Grey County 
too. 

Overseer Williami Smith, of Gravenhurst, reports that there has been a good ob- 
servance of the Game and Fishery Laws in his section, as little or no complaint 
has been made, and he has been unable to detect any violation of the law. For 
two months he was on the lakes in the Government patrol boat continuously, and 



50 THE REPOET UPON No. IS 

was in a better position than ever to detect any infringements. The fishing 
seems to be becoming better. On some of the smaller lakes, splendid catches of 
bass have been reported, and in his opinion the stringent enforcement of the 
laws has had a capital effect. The restocking of the lakes a few years ago has 
also tended to increase the supply. This year two carloads of fingerlings bass 
were deposited in these waters. These will doubtless, if prot<}cted, make a good 
start for future anglers. 

This year for the first time a Government patrol launch has been put upon 
the waters, the effect of this new departure was marked not so much in detecting 
as in suppressing any tendency to infringement of the law. Most particularly, 
he states, has this been noticed in regard to foreigners fishing without license. There 
were six, beside himself, selling permits this year, and they are unanimous in 
attributing the increased sales to the advent of the launch. 

Overseer W. H. Switzer, of Gooderham, reports that the game and fish laws 
were very well observed in his district. He had some parties up for illegal fish- 
ing with a net for suckers without a license, for which, you will find in his June 
report, they were tried before William Fielding, Police Magistrate of Minden, and 
were fined $5 each and costs. There were eight in the party. The majority of 
settlers will tell you that the Government should not interfere with a settler in 
catching what fish he needs for his own use, any time he sees fit to fish and catch 
them any way he can, and there are so many that know the fish laws here better 
than the overseer does, that they will not take any warning, but he finds since 
those parties were fined there is less illegal fishing going on. He found one 
night line set in Pine Lake, in June, which he sank. It contained, he thinks, 
seventy hooks. He is proud to say they have more lakes than one on his dis- 
trict, with bass in. They have three from which there were some fine bass 
caught this season. The salmon trout fishing was better than last season, both 
for size and number; they were all used for home consumption. The Dominion 
Government sent out to some lake in his district a few thousand salmon trout, 
which were placed with care in five lakes. With careful observance^ of the 
fishery laws by the settlers, in a few years they will have the waters well stocked 
with salmon trout and bass. He finds the fur-bearing animals are getting more 
plentiful in* his district. He knows of several beaver houses within one and a 
half miles of his residence. He has seen quite a lot of mink and rats in his travels ; 
the game laws have been well observed as far as he knows. There are no fishways 
in his district. He finds at some of the sawmills the sawdust and refuse were 
allowed to go in the river. He warned the owner not to do so and save trouble. 
He has kept a watch when passing. He finds partridge are more plentiful in the 
last year. He thinks the close season for another year will make the partridge 
hunting number one. He cannot say much about deer in his report, as hunting 
season is not past yet, nor has he seen a deer this summer or fall. He thinks it 
would be a good thing for the settlers if the Government would allow hoop nets used 
for sucker fishing. He tried rod and line for sucker fishing last spring, but 
failed in catching one. Some of the settlers have requested him to ask the Gov- 
ernment if they would kindly prohibit fishing in Horseshoe Lake for two years, 
until June, 1913, as the bass over ten inches is seldom caught any more in the lake, 
the lake in Glamorgan Township. 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 51 



Overseer F. Taylor, of HuntsviUe, reports that bass fishing has been poor this 
reason in the waters adjoining HuntsviUe and vicinity, especially the first part of 
the season. Lake trout was fairly good. No fish are sold or exported at Hunts- 
villa. The only abuse he complained of was the taking of undersized bass. Close 
seasons have, he believes, been fairly well observed. He had some complaints of 
violations, but they fell through on investigation and no fines were imposed. He 
believes the waters are well protected, and the mill owners have been careful this 
year in respect to sawdust. Some people claim sawdust kills the fish, but no proof 
has been brought yet to show that such is the case. 

Overseer Ira Toole, of Omemee, reports that the fishing for maskinonge was the 
best this season that he has seen for some years, and a good size also. Bass fish- 
ing was ver}' good, but there are not maiiy who fish for them there, the fishing is 
mostly done with the trolling line for maskinonge. The catch of muskrat was 
not 60 large last spring as the year before owing to the low water when the ice 
came, which froze them out and they wandered away from the water and died. 
Mink are about the same as last year, pretty scarce. He tliinks it would be a good 
move to give them the same protection as the muskrat, as it is a common thing 
here to see mink traps set in September, which is two months before they are 
prime. Frogs seem to be holding their own pretty well since they were protected 
two years ago, but lie thinks they should get protection for at least two years aU 
over as there are some places where they are cleaned out entirely and it would be the 
same there only there are a few places where it is impossible to get at them on 
account of the marsh and fallen timber. Partridge are about the same as they 
have been for some years here, disappearing as the woods are cut down. The 
duck shooting has been very good there this season; in numbers they seem to be 
about the same as last year. He has had about the usual trouble with poachers and 
law-breakers; a few of them have quit the business, but there are plenty left yet 
to keep an overseer busy. 

Overseer C. Twamley, of Cavan, reports that the speckled trout are becoming 
very scarce in his locality, and he would strongly recommend the close season to 
commence on the 1st day of September. The bass were more plentiful in the 
spawning season than usual. He never saw as many in the creek during the 
months of May and June. In one place he suspected spearing was going on. He 
searched and found a spear, broke the handle and brought the spear home. As 
for ducks, the black species were more numerous all summer than he has ever 
seen before. The partridge are increasing. The people are observing the law very 
well. 

Overseer John Watson, of Gcesarea, reports that he is much pleased to say^fish 
are on the increase and the cold rough weather in the spawning season with his 
close watch has given them good protection during the past season. There have 
been a fine lot of large maskinonge taken out this season, but he would say to re- 
duce the catch to two maskinonge and four bass. He would also advise that the 
close season come in on the first of April, as in years past, when all took fish in 
spawning season. He has some seasons found the killing all over by the fifteenth. 
He also tliinks that fishing for bass in winter should be prohibited, 
as more bass can be killed in one day through the ice than in 



62 THE REPORT UPON No. 13 

a month in the summer time, and this near spawning time. Brook 
trout are getting very scarce; he would also advise to stop the taking of 
them for one year to give them a chance to get a start. Frog lights should also 
be prohibited, as they are used in the fall and spring more for fishing in the spring 
and trapping muskrats in the fall than they are for catching frogs, and the frogs 
can be caught in the day time, and they may just as well use a jack light as a frog 
light. He might say that the Game and Fisheries Laws have been well observed in 
his division as he has not had much reason to complain. Still a close watch pre- 
vents a lot of poaching and trouble. As to Americans, he knows of but two this 
season, they were friends of his and he sold them fishing permits, but all residents 
should have permits at a small fee, so as to locate the Americans. He also tbinks 
that all trappers should pay a license of five dollars a year, and he finds that 
most of the trappers would be pleased with this. With regard to violations, he 
knows of but two and these by outsiders. One lives in Uxbridge and the other in 
Toronto, and they were fined five dollars each and costs. 

Re Muskrats — The past winter was a very hard one on them, as the water was 
so low they got frozen out to a great extent, so that the spring catch was not near 
so good as it was in 1908, and he has found no violations in his division in respect 
to muskrats for the above stated time. Ducks and other game are increasing 
wonderfully, since they have been protected in the spring, but he still maintains 
that the sale of ducks should be cut out in order to give the general public fair play 
or otherwise limit the shoot to fifty dueks per man for the season, and thii is lots 
for any man to kill in one season for his own use or otherwise. Partridges are also 
on the increase since the killing of them has been prohibited, and he would advise 
that this be extended to 1911 at least. Mink in his opinion should be protected 
for the reason given in his report last year. He finds that two hundred yards* 
limit for the duck hides is a good thing. Deer, which have been around his divi- 
sion for the past two years, he has not seen just lately, but he thinks they arc still 
around, six of them, this summer. 

Overseer Charles West, of Holland Landing, reports that there Las been very 
little change in his division from last year. There has not been the amount of 
fishing done this year as farmerly. The Fishery laws have been well o])served 
during close season, except in two cases. These parties were fishing on the east 
shore of Cook's Bay with jack lights and spear. He pursued them, but did not 
catch them. He also found two small gill nets which he destro3'ed. 

In regard to game he has reason to believe that the partridge are on the in- 
crease, thanks to the protection. Not many ducks stop there, as there is no rice for 
them to eat. The carp destroyed it all. 

RiVEE St. Lav^eence. 

Overseer Nassau Acton, of Gananoque, reports that as for fishing on the St. 
Lawrence, there is no license for netting or angling. The angling was up to the 
average. Large quantities were shipped through the Customs Department to Clay- 
ton, N.Y. He thinks perhaps the value of say one thousand dollars. Also a like 
amount taken over in punts and small boats. Of course this means legal angling. 
He is satisfied as far as he knows that there is no illegal fishing to speak of in that 
division, as most all of the fishermen have licenses from the Department to fish on 
Rideau waters, so there are no fishermen there to do illegal fishing. In that vicin- 



1009 GAME AND FISHERIES. 53 



ity they are very law-abiding, as hundreds of working men there have cottages on 
the island, consequently they are interested in better conditions of fisheries, and 
would report any violation of the law, as the river here in the busy season is alive 
with small boats and punts. He has not received one complaint this season. He 
has a store on Main street, has a sign painted outside his place, so they could report 
quite easily. This sign has on it, "N. Acton, Game and Fishery Overseer." He 
also lives on the premises, so reports could be made at any time. Very little fish 
were used for home consumption. 

There was no shooting of any importance for the first three winter months. 
About April 1st there was a little open water there and quite a few ducks came in. 
Some illegal shooting was done by Americans who came over on the heavy ice, but 
that only lasted but a few days. About April 13th the inland waters of Gananoque 
Lake opened up and ducks were there at once, as they always do. This fall there 
was no shooting on the St. Lawrence ; all hunters go to lakes north. There is very 
little of any other game in that vicinity. 

Overseer J as. A. Fraser, of Prescott, reports that the season of 1909 has been the 
best year for fish in the last five years, at least on that part of the St. Lawrence. 
Pike were plentiful, but of a rather small size. Pickerel (or Dore) which were 
rarely caught above the rapids, were caught in small numbers of a fair size, whereas 
east of the rapids, in the vicinity of Cornwall, they are the principal fish, but of 
a smaller size. Perch, rock bass and mud pouts were especially plentiful, the lat- 
ter more especially. Bass, he is sorry to say, are very scarce, although there were 
some fair sized ones caught and he would strongly recommend that this part of the 
St. Lawrence should be replenished with bass or bass fingerlings. He has heard 
a great many complaints about the suckers, which are quite plentiful, eating up 
their spawn. As for game, the only thing in that line on the St. Lawrence is 
ducks. During the spring of this season ducks were very numerous and stayed in 
the St. Lawrence remarkably late, he presumes due to not being shot at, and so far 
this fall are more numerous than they were last year. 

On March 16th he visited Cranberry Lake to inspect some hoop nets. On June 
17th, by order of the Department, he went to Cornwall by train, thence by boat to 
Stanley Island and back to Cornwall, and the next morning took train to Lan- 
caster, 'thence to Williamstown by horse and rig, and played detective, till he got 
a few names of parties who had been illegally fishing, and seized two nets which 
he brought away with him. Tried to get a summons from a local magistrate, but 
finding that it would be useless, he returned home. By orders from Department, 
he laid complaint before Warden Hunter. By appointment with him on July 13th 
they returned to Lancaster, and had four of the same parties tried before him, 
three of whom pleaded guilty; the fourth pleaded not guilty, and, being sworn him- 
self, acknowledged to having caught hard fisih, as also the others had, and all four 
were fined $5 and costs. A fifth man for whom he had a summons, being a young 
man without encumbrance, had skipped. This place in the spring is fished by 
hundreds, principally for suckers, but there is no doubt of their catching hard fish 
also. 

July 7th, on his way up river/ near Jones^ Creek, he seized and confiscated a 
very large gill net. This net he knew existed and was being used two years ago, 
but he could never get it. He says that there are two others he will capture sooner 
or later, which he knows exist the same way. Nothing more of note happened until 
Aug. 10th, when he got a minnow net from an American poacher. This happened 



54 THE KEPORT UPON No. VS 



about 10 o'clock at night ; there being two men he thought the jig was up, but he 
put on a bold front and they simply gave up. August 16th he broke his wheel, and 
had to paddle round the river until the 29th, with a couple of old bent buckets which 
he had. About this time his new hull was launched, when they transferred the en- 
gine and once more got in shape and can make from 2 to 3 miles an hour better. 
Nothing more of note happened until October 9th. He was called up from Sif- 
ton's place by a well known gentleman to decide a question for him. In the con- 
versation he told me there had been some shooting duck from a gasoline launch 
up there. Next morning he went up, but it was too fine a day. Boats were out 
in hundreds and there was no chance for any shooting; nevertheless he inspected 
several boats', and saw two as nice maskinonge as any man could wish to catch. He 
finds that there is more inclination to break the law in shooting than in fishing, and 
he would recommend there be a license for every man who wishes to carry a gun 
to hunt, same. as in New York State. The fee there is $2. 

Overseer James McNairn, of Iroquois, reports an increase in pike and pickerel 
this year compared with last year, the cause of which being the absence of parties 
who did dynamiting. There are no fish exported and about three tons sold for 
home consumption. The close season has been well kept. He has been on the 
lookout to see that they are kept; also all the local fishermen. No violations came 
to his notice. There are no mills dumping refuse, and no fishways in his district. 

Overseer George Slate, of Rochport, reports that this season has been a very sat- 
isfactory one in a good many respects. The amount of illegal fishing in his juris- 
diction has practically been nil, the extent of his confiscations being a couple jof nets. 
There has been a fairly good catch of ])lack bass and pickerel has been most plenti- 
ful, with a liberal catch of maskinonge. The discontinuance of netting indiscrim- 
inately is doubtless responsible for this. In his opinion it would be advantageous 
if it were possible for the Department to re-issue licenses for the use of set lines for 
catching sturgeon. This is being done by the American Government (which is 
considered by some to the detriment of our own citizens) which enables those inter- 
ested to secure a fairly good competency and does good, depleting the river of a 
species of fish that is proving destructive to what game fish we have and at the 
same time increasing the revenue of the Department. With regard to duck hunt- 
ing the season has been somewhat backward, but indications point to a veiy liberal 
Bupply. 

Overseer George Toner, of Gananoque, reports that fishing in the St. Lawrence 
during the past season has been much better than for many seasons past. As high 
as 126 pounds of pike have been caught by one man trolling, in one day. This goes 
to show that the fish are very plentiful in the river. All the guides also report that 
the fishing has greatly improved during the past two seasons. They have had no 
trouble in taking all the bass that the law would allow, besides many very fine perch 
and pike. 

Muskallonge have been more plentiful than for many years, many having been 
caught in this vicinity this fall. In the spring of this year ducks were plentiful. 
In the swift water the river opens up very early in the spring, and many ducks were 
slaughtered liy poachers. He has been informed that many of these poachers used 
four guns. This was before he was appointed to the position of overseer for this 
year. At the present time the ducks seem to be plentiful. 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 55 



Lakes Simcoe, Couchiching and Spaerow. 

Overseer Samuel Coulter, of Gilford, reports that he did not have occasion to sell 
any of the angling permits, as the residents in his district are all Canadian citizens. 

The carp nuisance is still on the increase, as a numher of meadow lands were 
literally flooded with them in the spring, but few good fish were caught^uring the 
season, tlie supply being so small fishermen would not bother trying to catch them; 
in "fact, the catch was much less than in former years. 

He sold but one carp license during the winter, and owing to the early breaking 
of the ice, the party was barely able to meet his expenditure. 

Game this year has also been on the decrease, ducks and geese being very scarce. 
The probable theory among the local sportsmen being the destruction of the rice 
grounds on the river. During the close of the season he had a call from Capt. 
Carson, who has been doing good work on the lake. He has been the means of 
keeping a number of nets out of the lake that. would have been in, had he and his 
men not been patrolling the lake ; this seems to be the only way to prevent netting 
in these waters. The notices received from the Department from time to time were 
placed in conspicuous places, and to the best of his knowledge the laws regarding 
game and fisheries have been carefully observed. 

Overseer Geo. Green, of Bradford, reports as to conditions existing in the Hol- 
land Eiver and marsh, both in game and fish. 

Fish. — The run was very light, and also late. There was practically no illegal 
fishing done, only half a dozen light acts the whole season and never had to go twice ; 
no one was caught. Several good lake bass have been caught in the river, which 
is almost unprecedented. 

Game. — Ducks. — Not more than 10 or 12 pair. Blacks, nested there, and wood 
and summ.er duck, only two flocks were seen this fall. This comprises about all the 
duck there are here. So far this season they have killed only one dozen. Snipe, a 
few local birds, which have afforded very poor sport; not more than 100 birds all 
told have been killed. 

Partridge. — The law is being kept, very few birds having been seen; the rest 
of the list practically none. Squirrels are reported fairly plentiful. 

The direct cause of our tremendous feeding grounds for fowl being destroyed 
is in his opinion the "Carp.*' He has taken the matter up with the Department 
before, and had a call from Mr. Holden on this question, and he earnestly recom- 
mends that some steps be taken to remove the pest, and allow what is naturally one 
of the finest game lands in the Province recover. Why not supply wild rice ? He be- 
lieves if some help were supplied he could get a local man to go at these things. 

Overseer Robert Leadley, of Barrie, reports that bass are plentiful, but very 
Bmall bait is scarce, so that there ha^e been very few white fish and herring 
caught this season. 

Partridge are showing the result of the protection given them during the two 
seasons past. 

Ducks seem more plentiful than two years ago. There are a number of deer 
left in Simcoe yet, and if protected for a few years he thinks they will get quite 
plentiful. Dogs running deer is the only trouble he has had this season. He 
managed to shoot one and that put a stop to the rest. 



56 THE REPORT UPON No. 13 



Overseer H. McDonald, of Beaverton, reports that the law has been fairly well 
observed in the different close seasons, as he has had but one conviction, and that 
was for illegal catching of bass. Bass seemed to be very numerous in the harbour 
this last spring during the month of February. He sold eleven spearing licenses, 
and had some trouble keeping the fishermen in the one-mile limit. He would 
advise a spearing license for salmon and whitefish during the month of August. 
He sold two angling permits to Americans. The tourists seemed to be pretty well 
satisfied with their catches this summer. The law in regard to the length of 
bass should, he thinks, be cut out, as there are so many small ones caught and let 
go that are injured, and there is a lot of damage done. He thinks the bass will 
increase in the lake, as the netting has been stopped more than in former years. 
The ''Naiad" has been quite a help, only it did not stop quite long enough. He 
thinks it has been a very successful year for the fish and fishermen. 

Overseer William McGinn, of Orillia, reports that bass fishing in Lake Simcoe 
has been very poor this season, and what black bass were caught were of a small 
type. Salmon trout this season have been plentiful and of a large size. He has 
seen several caught with a trolling line, weighing from 14 to 22 pounds. Those 
fish were caught by the Rama Indians, at Four-Mile Point, on his portion of the 
lake. This part of the lake is noted for salmon trout. Angling in Lake Couchi- 
ching has been exceptionally good, especially the latter part of the season. He 
has witnessed some splendid catches of black bass caught in the lower part of 
Couchiching in October. Bass are becoming more plentiful every year. We also 
have abundance of herring, carp, perch and catfish; also a small number of 
pickerel. Maskinonge fishing has been extraordinarily good in Couchiching this 
season. * One of Orillia's citizens caught 28 maskinonge during the season, his 
largest fish weighing 30 pounds. 

There has been very little illegal fishing going on — at least, none has come to 
his notice. If there was any netting done in his ground, it was in the middle of 
the night, and it is next to impossible to catch that class of thief or poacher. He 
has spent several nights in search of that class of poachers, and has. never seen 
one en his ground. He has also dragged the shoal and got nothing. 

The close season for salmon trout should start about the 10th of October, 
instead of the 1st of November, as they are all spawned out and ready to leave 
the spawning beds by the 1st of November. 

Game in North Orillia is very scarce. There is an occasional deer in the tovm- 
ship. Partridge are reported much more plentiful this season. That is due to 
the protection over them. If the Department will protect them for at least 
another year, we will have partridges once more. Woodcock are entirely extinct 
in this district. Hares are plentiful. Ducks scarce, as there is no rice on those 
waters. 

Overseer D. McPhee, of Uptergrove, reports that bass were plentiful, but they 
were smaller this year than last year. During the close season for trout the weather 
was so windy that no fish could be got, with the exceptions of one or two days. 
Trout were plentiful in the spring. Whitefish are increasing. Herring are very 
plentiful. Angling was good in Mud Lake this year. 'Lunge, bass and pickerel 
are the chief fish caught there. Carp are very plentiful in Lake Simcoe. He 
wishes the Government would take some steps to try and destroy these fish, as they 
are very destructive, and are very hard on other fishes* spavm and the young fry. 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 57 

Ducks are plentiful in his district. Muskrats are plentiful, mink are scarce, 
and partridge are scarce. There are no sawmills in his district. 

Overseer Harry Mayor, of Painswick, reports that during the ten months of the 
present year there were no violations* of fishery or game laws to his knowledge in 
the division he is appointed to oversee. In regard to the fishing, the conditions 
are much the siame as last year, the trout and bass being reported as scarce, and 
he believes it necessary that Lake Simcoe be restocked with the above-mentioned 
varieties. The coarse fish seem to be increasing. Carp have made their appear- 
ance in large numbers in the lower end of his division and around Weedy Bay. In 
regard to the game, he has not seen a partridge this season, and, upon enquiry, finds 
that only a very few have been seen. Hares and black squirrels are quite numerous, 
especially the black squirrels, which may be seen almost any day. Ducks and 
other small varieties are about as usual. 

Overseer William Rohinson, of Kilworfhy, reports that the fishing has been 
good this season in both Sparrow Lake and Kasheshebogamog, and the tourists 
were all satisfied. There is a pickerel hatchery on Sparrow Lake, and two and a 
half million of young fish were put in from this hatchery this spring, and the 
Department put in two thousand and five hundred bass fingerlings this fall. The 
laws were well observed, with the exception of one case in the spring, when he 
caught parties spearing, and had them fined; also one party with a net. The 
partridge is increasing fast, and ducks are not as good this season as last. Beaver, 
otter and muskrats are increasing fast. Deer seems about the same as last season. 

Overseer II. S. Thompson, of Brechin, reports that bass fishing in that vicinity 
has been middling fair. A considerable number were caught during the season, 
but not as many were to be found as last year. 

Ducks were plentiful in this district, and a considerable number were shot 
during the season. 

Partridge were scarce, owing to the wet weather of last year. 

Trout were rather scarce along the east shore of Lake Simcoe, and very few 
were caught. These fish were less numerous than last year. 

Overseer Robert Tillett, of Roach's Point, reports that there was very little 
illegal fishing done in the spring; was only one case that he heard of. The 
maskinonge appear to be getting fewer every year. There were very few caught 
by the tourists trolling in the summer. The black bass were very late in spaMuiug 
last spring. He saw bass that were caught on the 1st of July that had not spawned. 
In his opinion, it was owing to the cold, backward spring. There were some good 
catches of bass during the summer. There was quite a number of non-residents, 
and they appeared to be quite willing to buy permits. They appeared to be on the 
lookout for the steamer " Naiad.'' He thinks that boat has been a great help to 
Lake Simcoe, especially in October. October was a very windy month, and he did 
not hear of any illegal fishing, and he did not find any nets. If there was ai license 
to spear trout through the ice he thinks every nuan would help to protect the fish 
in close season. The fish laws have been very well observed this year. 

Game is very scarce in and around there. There are very few ducks, a,nd they 
are getting scarcer every year. There is no wild rice for them to feed on, as there 



58 THE EEPOET UPON No. 13 

was years ago. The carp hiave destroyed the rice. Cook's Bay was a good feeding 
ground before the carp got in and destroyed the rice. There were hundreds of 
acres of rice at one time, and now there is not any. 

Partridge are very scarce here; there is no harbour for them. There are no 
snipe or woodcock. 

Overseer M. Timlin, of Atherley, reports that the game and fishery laws in his 
division have been well observed during the year, and no violations of the laws 
came to his notice. 

He posted up notices in various parts of his district. The law regarding mill 
refuse in the waters was also well observed. Bass, pickerel and 'lunge were 
plentiful in the lakes. As to game, muskrats and ducks were plentiful and part- 
ridge scarce. 

NiPISSING. 

Overseer G. L. Bailey, of Callander, reports that the past season for fishing 
has been one of the beet for some time. The bass fishing has been especially good, 
one angler having caught five and six bass in one day within two hours' time, at 
different times of the season. There were also more trolling and still fishing for 
pike and pickerel. The number of Canadian and American tourists has increased, 
and they all complied with the laws. There are no violations by sawmills with 
refuse, as all sawdust and waste are burnt. The trout fishing in streams in sur- 
rounding districts have been equally as good as other seasons. In regard to hunting, 
the laws have been observed, no partridge having been killed. They are becoming 
quite numerous, and by the time the open season arrives will be plentiful. There 
having been no bush fires, there should be as many deer as usual, there having been 
no violations of the law, either in season or otherwise. The marshes and bays on 
Lake Nipissing abounded with more duck than any season for some time. 

Overseer James Dunlop, of Mackey^s Station, reports that he has worked his 
territory faithfully, and is pleased to report the law is being observed to the letter 
as regards fishing. There is no doubt the close season law has accomplished much, 
as the streams and smaller lakes are now well stocked. As regards the deer season 
he has a complaint in the granting of licenses in other places to men coming from 
adjoining districts to hunt there, and it leaves him in an awkward position, not 
knowing how many licenses are granted and by whom. This leaves the overseer with- 
out the necessary grasp on the doings in his own district. This can be overcome 
by compelling the "would-be sport'' to have his license in the district where he 
hunts, otherwise everything is satisfactory in his district. He finds much difficulty 
with the close season law on partridge, as people who cannot read the notices are 
inclined to think the close season law was over. This necessitates considerable 
extra travelling. Duck are plentiful. 

Overseer Phillippe Pilon, of Sudbury, reports that there were no applications for 
licenses for fishing. He has had no occasion to prosecute for infractions of the 
laws relating to game and fisheries. He has made several visits in townships sur- 
rounding Sudbury, and has not found anything contrary to the Act. 

He has received a couple of reports, but, on investigation, he could not find 
any witnesses to make out a case in respect of game-hunting, so did not prosecute. 



1909 GAME AND FISHEKIES. 59 



Fines and Confiscations During the Year 1909, on Account of Fisheries. 

5 Bpears, 2 jack lights; 15 hoop nets, 75 gill nets, 6,145 yards of same; 11 seines; 
8 trap nets; 4 dip nets; 15 night lines; 8 boats; 2 shad nets; 1 drag net; 2 sets 
sweep hooks ; 1 sfnare ; 1 sweep net ; 7 boxes of fish. 

Fisheries, amount of fines and sale of confiscated goods was over $1,600.00. 

Game, amount of fines and confiscations, $3,038.67. 



Biological Department, 

University of Toronto, 

December 13th, 1909. 

E. Tinsley, Esq., 

Superintendent of Game and Fisheries, Toronto. 

Dear Sir, — I beg to report concerning operations carried on during the summer 
of 1909, at the Biological Station, Georgian Bay, as follows: 

In accordance with a plan previously decided upon, it was arranged that the 
time available at the laboratory should be given chiefly to the completion for pub- 
lication of certain studies begun in previous years. Mr. A. D, Eobertson, student, 
of the University, working on the natural history of the fishes, made detailed 
studies of the characters, including measurements and variations, of numerous 
exam.ples of each species with a view to checking over for this region the description 
given for the species in general. He also assisted in completing a series of photo- 
graphs of typical specimens. Mr. A. R. Cooper, also of the University, undertook 
the tracing of the life-histories of the parasites appearing in the young black bass 
from the time of hatching to the third month of growth, and contributed much 
to what had previously been done along this line. Mr. J. B. Williams, of the 
Biological Mueeum, assisted in the collection of specimens and also contributed 
by preparing specimens for exhibition. Mr. L. H. Graham, Science Master of the 
East Toronto High School, spent some time at the laboratory and made a study 
of the effects of exposure on the character of the shore and its vegetation. 

Having, the previous year, equipped the dwelling house of the station so that 
we were able to offer adequate accommodation to workers, more serious efforts 
were made to bring the laboratory to the notice of those interested in biological 
studies. The first results were not as satisfactory as one would like, and it is 
hoped that prospective workers in various parts of the Province will investigate 
for themselves the opportunities which are being offered for doing field-work 
under the best conditions. 

Yours sincerely, 

(Sgd.) B. A. Benslby. 



60 THE EEPOET UPON No. 13 

REPORT OF THE WORK DONE AT THE BRANTFORD BASS POND 
DURING THE SEASON OF 1909. 

To the Superintendent, Game and Fisheries Department, Parliament Buildings, 
Toronto, Ont. 

SiR^ — Herewith I beg to submit my report of the operations in connection with 
the fish hatchery here this season. 

The number of fingerlings transported by myself to the various inland waters 
numbered about twenty thousand (20,000). 

On 4th May last, ninety parent bass were deposited in the pond, supposed to be- 
seventy females and twenty males. It was thought that owing to the small per- 
centage of males good results could not be obtained, so on 25th May a second con- 
signment of eighteen males (supposed) was received here and placed in the pond, 
with the result that the second arrivals caused trouble, as fighting began almost 
immediately, and on Slst May one parent died. 

On 1st June another parent appeared on the surface of the pond. I immediately 
caught him, and treated him with a bath of salt and water, but it was of no avail, 
as he soon died. Two others died on the same date. In all thirteen parents died, 
twelve females and one male. This was due to overcrowding. 

On 22nd May, previous to the arrival of the second consignment, several male 
fish were building nests, but when the trouble began it had the efEect of breaking 
up the work already done. 

From 22nd May to 7th June I did not observe any evidence of spawning, but 
on the latter date I observed one pair spawn. On 11th June I observed a number 
of fry around the shore of the pond. 

On 12th June I observed one bass making a nest, and on 13th June I noticed 
seven nests in the outer sections of the pond. At the instance of the Department 
I installed six shielded nests (and here let me say that I highly recommend these), 
with the result that on 15th June three pairs of bass had taken to them. 

I might also add that the members of the Department are to be congratulated 
for the untiring activity they have displayed in connection with the propagation 
of black bass during the past season of 1909. 

Yours truly, 

J. T. Edwakds. 



REPORT OF THE WORK PERFORMED BY THE PATROL BOAT " EDNA 
IVAN," ON THE GREAT LAKES, DURING THE YEAR 1909. 

Owen Sound, Dec. 13th, 1909. 
E. TiNSLEY, Esq., 

Superintendent of Game and Fisheries, Toronto. 

Sir. — I have the honour to forward you my first annual report, for the season 
of 1909, of the work performed by the chartered patrol boat, " Edna Ivan." 

Owing to ice conditions, an earlier departure could not be made than the 4th of 
May. On that date, with W. W. Holden and D. Irwin on board, left for Meldrum 
Bay. On the 5th, landed D. Irwin on the Duck Island, and returned to Gore Bay. 



1909 GAMELAND FISHERIES. 61 



6th, with J. Fisher on board, left to patrol the Georgian Bay, called at Little 
Current, where Mr. Fisher left. Took on board a gasoline launch, and proceeded, 
calling at most of the ports on the north shore of the bay. On the 8th, at Midland, 
delivered the gasoline launch. On the 10th, in company with Mr. Holden, inter- 
viewed the Indian Agent at Penetang, with reference to reserves of fishing grounds 
for the Indians. 11th, took on board at Collingwood a gasoline launch. Mr. Holden 
left. 12th, arrived at Owen Sound, where a delay of eighteen days occurred by 
repairs to the boiler, and installing a new steam capstan. June 1st, left Owen 
Sound, and at Wiarton, J. W. Jermyn and D. Robertson came on board, called at 
Lion's Head, and on to Tobermory, where Mr. Jermyn left the ship. 2nd, called 
at Stokes Bay, and on to Southampton, where D. Robertson left, and Mr. W. W. 
Holden came on board. 3rd, departed down the lake, calling at Kinciardine and 
Goderich, where Mr. V. Chauvin joined the ship. 4th, proceeded to Walkerville, 
calling at Point Edward. At Walkerville a few days were consumed installing 
gasoline engine in launch. On the 8th, with Mr. Holden and Mr. Chauvin on 
board, made a short run to Big Creek, Lake Erie, where Mr. Chauvin had informa- 
tion that some illegal work was being carried on — did not find any. Returned to 
Walkerville. 11th, Mr. Holden left the ship. At 5.10 a.m. departed, to cruise on 
Lake Erie. Called at Pelee Island, and on to Rondeau. 12th, ran to Port Stanley. 
Officer McVittie, who came on board at Rondea,u, left. 14th, went up the river with 
Mr. Holden, and seized two nets and two strings of hooks. Continued down the 
lake, calling at Port Burwell, Port Dover, Port Colborne, and Fort Erie. Dr. Burt 
had joined the ship and left here. Returning up the lake, called at all the ports, 
Mr. Holden leaving at Port Dover. On the 22nd, placed buoy five miles south of 
Port Stanley for guide to fishermen. 25th, cruised on Lake St. Clair. 29th, landed 
Mr. Holden and Mr. Chauvin aft Point Edward, and on to Goderich and Kincardine, 
where Mr. Holden and Mr. Chauvin left the ship. July 1st, at Southampton, Mr. 
Holden re-joined, proceeded up the lake, calling at Tobermory, Rattlesnake, South 
Baymouth, the Duck Island, Gore Bay, Blind River, Thessalon, Bruce Mines, Hilton, 
Richard's Landing, and arrived at Sault Ste. Marie on the 8th. Proceeded up Lake 
Superior and visited Batchawana, Gargantau, Groscap, Peninsula^ Harbor, Port 
-Caldwell. Rossport, Jackfish, Nepigon, Crow's Nest, Port Arthur. Returning, 
called at the above ports, and Michipicoten Island, where Officer Calbeck joined the 
ship. 22nd, arrived at Sault Ste. Marie, A. Calbeck left. 23rd, at Milford Haven, 
examined creek with launch, found that an American, who had been camping there 
had left the day before. 

Continued cruise, calliug at Cockburn Island, Meldrum and Gore Bays. 27th, I 
drove out to Tobacco Lake, one American there, but didn't want permit. July 28th, 
arrived at Manitowaning, accompanied Mr. Holden to Lake Manitou. 29th, at 
Bedford Island, found an American yacht, at anchor, had guide and permits. 
August 5th, landed on Limestone Island, found that seining had been carried on 
early in the spring. On the 11th, at Wiarton, D. Robertson came on board, and J. 
W. Jermyn, next morning, cruised up the peninsula, to Tobermory. 13th, at South- 
ampton, where they both left the ship. 26th, left Harbor Springs, with A. Kelly 
Evans on board, and cruised up the St. Mary's River to Sault Ste. Marie, where 
Mr. Kelly Evans examined a number of persons with reference to the game and 
fisheries. His secretary joined him here. 29th, at Campement D'Oure, Mr. Evans 
and his secretary left the ship. Sept. 13th, at Sarnia. On arrival of Mr. Holden 
went out on Lake Huron with a party, to locate the place where an American had 
set his nets, and were seized by one of our officers. 14th, at Walkerville, made 



62 THE EEPOET UPON No. 13 



arrangements in" Detroit to dock the ship. 20th, with Mr. Holden and Mr. Chau- 
vin left for Amherstburg. After the failure to sell the tug "Charles F," took her 
in tow to Sandwich, 22nd, left to cruise on Lake Erie; at Eondeau examined 
creeks with Mr. Chauvin. Continued cruise, calling at all fishing stations, and on 
the 28th, arrived at Port Colborne. 30th, returned up the lake. Oct. 4th, arrived 
at McCormick's dock. In company with Mr. Chauvin, visited the Pelee Island Club, 
where we found twenty-two members, who gave us a very warm and courteous re- 
ception; were all pleased with their catch of fish and outing. It gives one great 
pleasure to meet such gentlemen. 5th, cruised up the lake and Eiver Detroit, to 
Walkerville. 7th, cruised up Lake St. Clair and river, to Sarnia. 8th, continued 
cruise up Lake Huron, calling at all ports. Sunday, 12th, arrived at Tobermory, 
were detained for one week by continuous gale. 29th, arrived at Parry Sound. In- 
terviewed Officer Laughington, continued cruise, and on November 1st arrived at 
Gore Bay. 4th, met Mr. W. W. Holden at Cutler, and returned to Gore Bay. 5th, 
at Marksville, (Hilton) where Mr. Holden met and gave instructions to a Mr. 
Eddy. 8th, conveyed D. Irwin from the Duck Island to Providence Bay. 10th, 
at the Bustard Islands, Mr. Holden seized a quantity of fish and I a seine net. 
11th, took fish to Byng Inlet, where fish were shipped. 12th, at Parry Sound, 
where Mr. Holden left the ship. 18th, left Wiarton, with Mr. J. W. Jermyn on 
board. Landed at a fishing shanty on Cape Commodore, found a quantity of her- 
ring, saw some fresh trout spawn, but could not find any fish; landed at another 
shanty, found two bundles of hooks, with short lines attached to them, a large 
quantity of twine used in hook fishing, a box of small mesh nets, and Mr. Jermyn 
got two kegs of trout hid in an old unused house, and I, five kegs hid in the bush, 
an eighth of a mile from the shanty. 19th,' at another fishing shanty on Cape 
Commodore, where seized three more kegs of fish. Afterwards Mr. Jermyn seized 
at Griffith Island one salt barrel of fish, and another half full, and a quantity of 
twine. 23rd, left Owen Sound, calling at all ports between it and Gore Bay. 28th, 
made a trip to John Island and Cutler, and returned. 30th, delivered the boat to 
the owners. 

Eemarks.^ — At nearly all fishing stations, from Fort Erie to Port Arthur, fishing 
was reported very light during the summer, and October was so very stormy that the 
fishermen, as a rule, have had a poor season, but considering the way the fisheries 
have been handled by the Dominion Government, for political purposes, it is sur- 
prising that they have held out as well as they have. Herring fishing, by a certain 
class of fishermen, is used as a blind for trout fishing. I have in former years taken 
up a net buoy and found a herring net, but the rest of the gang would be trout nets. 
I find that the law by the regular fishermen is better observed than formerly, and 
I think trap net fishing is nearly stamped out. During the past season the ship 
has been docked or anchored at seventy-six ports or harbours, and has logged 8,275 
miles. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

E. Dunn. 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 63 

EEPORT OF THE WOEK PEEFORMED BY THE PATROL BOAT "NA- 

VAECH," ON THE EIDEAU WATEES AND BAY OP QUINTE, 

DURING THE YEAR 1909. 

Left Belleville on 24tli of May, after taking on coal. We went to Pieton and 
returned at 6 p.m., cleaned our boat and got ready to go to Kingston, where we 
took on a fresh supply of coal, and proceeded to Gananoque, returning the next 
evening to Kingston, and patrolled to Deseronto and rowed up the bay in search of 
nets. Spent Sunday in Belleville. 

On Monday, May 31, we left Belleville for Brighton and went to Weller's Bay, 
called at Murray to see Overseer Hayes. We held court and fined three men for 
illegal fishing. The next day we patrolled the Bay of Quinte and visited all the 
fishermen between Belleville and Green Point, had them take their nets out, and 
seized one night line west of Belleville Bridge. Left here and patrolled to Deseronto, 
stopped to see Overseer Gault and ran on to Pieton, took Overseer Brisbin and ran 
on to Bath for the might. Leaving here next day at 5 a.m. for Duck Islands, 
stopped at the Island for four hours, found nets measuring 4 1-2 inch mesh. We 
patrolled the small bays with row boats. Spent Sunday in Belleville. 

On Monday, June 7th, we repaired boiler, and this engaged our attention until 
Friday, when we left for Kingston at 5 p.m. Here we seized four night lines 
and patrolled around Simcoe Island and Cataraqui ; took Overseer Taudvin's launch 
and patrolled Cataraqui as far west as Brothers' Island. From here we steamed up 
to Deseronto, stopped for a while and ran on to Belleville, arriving at 5 p.m. Pa- 
trolled the bay as far as Massassaga, returning to Belleville and cleaned our boat 
the rest of the day. Left Belleville at 8 a.m., calling at Deseronto and Pieton and 
on to Bath; arriving at Kingston we stopped for the night. The next day we 
left for Jones Falls, stopped for dinner and ran on to Chaffey's, stopping there for 
the night. The following day we patrolled down to Westport and ran on to Port- 
land and on to Smith's Falls, and on to Oliver's Ferry, to try the Millars for fish- 
ing with gill nets in Otter Lake. Sunday we spent at Smith's Palls. On Monday, 
21st June we steamed up at 7 a.m., and patrolled the waters of the Rideau to Port- 
land and on to Newboro, stopped for a while and on to Jones Falls for the night. 
The following day we patrolled to Kingston, where we had to repair cylinder. Pa- 
trolled around Bell Island with Overseer Taudvin; took Overseer McGuire and pa- 
trolled around Simcoe Island and south side of Wolfe Island ; found nothing wrong. 
With Overseer Taudvin we patrolled Massassaga Bay, grappling for nets, but did 
not get any. The next day we patrolled the Bateau Channel and Sand Bay and on 
out to Pigeon Island and returning on the north shore of Simcoe Lake. 

On Monday, June 28th, we were repairing cylinder a,nd the next day we left 
Kingston at 3 p.m., and patrolled to Weller's Bay and Brothers' Island and on to 
Bath. Seized about one thousand yards of gill nets, which we dried and cleaned 
np. We patrolled up the bay as far as Brighton, seized one gill net and destroyed 
it. Then we sailed up the south shore into port at Belleville, where we stayed for 
Sunday. 

On Monday, July 5th, we steamed up at 5 a.m., patrolled on down to Kingston, 
found nets are all out of the water. Captain Hunter was on board. We ran on to 
Brothers' Island with steamer, went with Overseer Taudvin in launch and patrolled 
Amherst Island, Read's Bay and Sand Bay, and over to Pigeon Island and on to 
Simcoe Island, had to get out and tow Overseer Taudvin's launch into Kingston 
at 3 p.m. We left and went down to Jones Falls, patrolled on down to West- 



64 THE EEPORT UPON No. 13 

port and Portland, calling at Garrett's Eest, arriving at Smith's Falls at 6.30. Here 
we remained until Tuesday, putting in new syphon pipes. 

On Tuesday we patrolled as far as Jones Falls and went with Overseer Mc- 
Guire and patrolled Benson, Indian and Mosquito Lakes, and on to Devil Lake and 
found everything all right ; no complaints of illegal fishing. Left Newboro at 
7 a.m., patrolled on down to the Big Eideau and to Smith's Falls, aiTiving at 7 p.m. 
The next day we were putting in dead lights, and at 6 p.m. ran up the Rideau to Gem 
Island, stopped there for the night. Spent Sunday at Gem Island. 

On Monday, July 19th, we left Gem Island at 5 a.m., patrolled the Rideau waters 
to Kingston, stopped at Jones Falls, arrived at Kingston at 6.30 p.m. Repaired 
pumps at Kingston, met Overseer Brisbin at Bath and patrolled around Amherst 
Island with launch and found no nets set there, steamed on to Picton, leaving there 
the next day at 8 a.m. We patrolled on to Deseronto. Overseer Gault reports no 
netting in the Bay of Quinte. Arrived at Belleville at 6 p.m. We left here 
shortly for Picton, Capt. Hunter on board; no complaint of illegal fishing. Sun- 
day spent at Picton. 

On Monday, July 26th, at 7 a.m., we patrolled down to Kingston and on to 
.Gananoque, stopped there for the night; no reports of illegal fishing. Left Gan- 
anoque at 7.30, patrolled on back to Kingston, arriving at 11.30 a.m. Cleaned up 
boatvthe rest of the day. The next day we patrolled to Amherst Island, left the 
steamer at Stella and took launch and patrolled Amherst Island for the rest of the 
day, found no nets. Steamed up at 7 a.m., patrolled on to Hay Bay, took launch 
and patrolled for three hours. It commenced to rain and had to return to .the 
steamer, ran on to Picton, took on coal and ran on to McDonald's Cove. Stopped 
there for the night. Left here the next day at 6 a.m., patrolled on to Kings- 
ton, arrived at 12 noon, left for Jones Falls at 2 p.m. 

On Monday, August 2nd, steamed up at 7 a.m., patrolled on down to the Big 
Rideau, on to Portland, collecting money for permits sold at Garrett's Rest, on to 
Oliver's Ferry and to Smith's Falls for coal, then back to the Rideau and stopped at 
Murphy Cove for the night. The following day we patrolled back to Westport, 
went with Overseer McGuire and drove out to Wolfe Lake, hired a row boat and 
patrolled the lake thoroughly, collecting $7. Found no complaints, back to West- 
port for the night. The next day we steamed up at 7 a.m., ran to Newboro, took 
launch and patrolled Devil Lake, found everything all right, arrived back at New- 
boro at 8 p.m. The next day we took launch and patrolled Mud Lake, Loon and 
Benson Lakes and then back to Newboro. On Saturday started men to paint deck. 
Paint for the smokestack did not arrive until 4 p.m. On Monday we were stiU 
at the painting and repairing boat. 

Tuesday we steamed up at 7 a.rn., patrolled the Rideau to Portland and over 
to Oak Island, took launch and patrolled German Bar and stopped at Oak Island 
for the night. Patrolled on down to Mabel's Bay, calling at Garrett's Rest and on 
to Oliver's Ferry for the night. The following day we steamed up at 8 a.m., pa- 
trolled on down to Smith's Falls, took on coal and painted smokestack and re- 
paired furnace door and stopped there for the night. The next day we went to 
Gananoque and seized two row boats and arrested three men for spearing with torch 
light. Stopped there for the night with Captain Hunter on board. Left the next 
morning for Broekville, patrolling the St. Lawrence up to Milton Island. The 
weather being rough, we stopped here for the night. 

On Monday, 16th of August, we patrolled on to Kingston, took on coal, stopped 
at Newboro for the night; all the anglers report bass fishing good. At 7 a.m., 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 65 

we steamed on to Portland, stayed for a while and called at Garrett's Eest and on 
to Smith's Falls for the night. Steamed up at 6 a. m., and made for Kingston, 
patrolling Bay of Quinte to Bath, stopped to see Overseer Murdock; we went on 
to Picton to see Overseer Brisbin, then on to Belleville for the night. Spent Sun- 
day at Belleville. 

Monday we spent in repairing boiler, tubes and valves. The next day we 
steamed out at 4 a.m., and patrolled the Bay of Quinte down to Stella and ran on 
to Kingston and took on coal, then we patrolled the Rideau waters down to the Big 
Rideau and stopped at Murphy's for the night. The following day we went to 
Smith's Falls and took on coal, and ran back to Oliver's Ferry, found very few fish. 
Putting on new fenders. Sunday spent at Perth. 

On Monday, August 30th, left Perth and went to Oliver's Ferry, stopped there 
for the night, with Captain Hunter and Mr. Holden on board. The next day we 
patrolled the Rideau to Portland and on to Washburn for the night. Leaving here 
the next day we patrolled to Kingston, took on coal and left Captain Hunter and 
Mr. Holden there and we came back to Newboro. The following days we were 
painting and cleaning steamer. 

On ]\Ionday, Sept. 6th, we steamed up at 7 a.m., patrolled the Rideau to Smith's 
Falls, where we met Captain Hunter, went on to Kilmarnock, took on Overseer Boyd 
and patrolled on to Ottawa, arriving there at 5.30. Here we held court on board 
the boat and the next day we spent there. Leaving the following day we patrolled 
with row boat on the Ottawa River, seized two night lines and patrolled back to 
Ottawa. 

On Monday, Sept. 13, we patrolled the waters of the Ottawa River to Kilmar-i 
nock. Stopped there for the night. The next day we went to Smith's Falls with 
Mr. Kelly Evans on board and Captain Hunter. We patrolled up the Rideau, 
calling at Garrett's Rest and the Angling Inn and Portland, and on to Newboro 
for the night. Tuesday we were busy cleamng the boat. The next day we left 
ISTewboro, patrolled to Chaffey's Locks and stopped there for the night. The fol- 
lowing day we left Chaffey's at 8 a.m., patrolled on to Jones Falls, stopped to hold 
session, patrolled on to Kingston and arrived at 5 p.m. Cruised around the Island 
and Read's Bay and back to Kingston for the night. The next day with two 
launches in tow we patrolled to Belleville. 

On Monday, September 20th, we cleaned up boat and Mr. Kelly Evans held 
a court of enquiry, then we steamed out, with Captain Hunter and Mr. Kelly Evans 
on board; we patrolled down to Bath, stopped for the night. The weather being 
rough we stayed at the Island all day and the next day we patrolled to Picton, 
took on coal and ran back to Belleville, arriving at 7 p.m. Left Belleville at 8 
a.m., patrolled the bay down to Kingston, stopped for the night, but found no fish- 
ing. Steamed up at 7 a.m. on Saturday, patrolled the north side of Wolfe Island, 
Simcoe Island and Sand Bay with row boat, but found no 'sign .of any netting 
going on. Spent Sunday in Kingston. 

On Monday, September 27th, we patrolled to Brothers' Island and around Am- 
herst Island, and on to McDonald's Cove, from here we patrolled to Picton and 
back to the Island for the night. The next day we went to Deseronto and on to 
Belleville. Here we collected accounts and cleaned the boat. 

3 G. F. 



ee THE EEPOKT UPON No. i:i 



EEPOET OF THE "NAVARCH'' CONTINUED, BY CAPTAIN FLEMING. 

On Monday, October 1st, patrolled from Belleville to Glen Island and Adolph- 
ustown and on to Picton for the night. The next day we patrolled from Picton 
to Belleville and Hay Bay and some other bays. Spent Sunday in Belleville. 

On Monday, October 4th, we left Belleville to go to Trenton and Weller's Bay. 
Distance travelled fifty-five miles. Here we seized several thousand yards of gill 
nets, which we turned .over to Captain Hunter. We patrolled a distance of fifteen 
miles. The following day we left Weller's Bay, and went to Brighton and on to 
Belleville, a distance of fifty miles. Here we painted the boat. When the -boat 
was dry we patrolled to Murray Canal and back to- Belleville, a distance of forty 
miles. Spent Sunday in Belleville. 

On Monday, October 11th, went from Belleville to Deseronto patrolling around 
Baker's Island and back to Belleville, a violent windstorm blowing. The following 
day we left Belleville, with Mr. Holden and Captain Hunter. The wind was 
blowing a gale and we remained at Deseronto for the night. We patrolled to 
Napanee and back to Picton, where we remained on account of wind. The next 
day we patrolled from Pictop to Collin's Bay. Distance travelled forty-five miles. 
From Collin'b Bay we went to Kingston and Wolfe Island, where we remained 
until the wind went down. Spent Sunday in Kingston. 

On Monday, the 18th, we left Kingston for Hay Bay and on ta Deseronto, 
seized a large quantity of gill nets, which I have stored. The next day we pa- 
trolled from Deseronto down around Mosquito Bay and patrolled on to Belle- 
ville, then back to Deseronto again, where we spent 'Sunday. 

On Monday, October 25th, we started for Kingston as directed by Captain Hun- 
ter, and patrolled its far as Stella, a distance of sixty-five miles. We had Mr. 
Thompson inspect boiler, then we went on to Kingston and Milton Island and 
Glenora, and on to Picton, going a distance of sixty miles. Friday we patrolled 
from Picton to Belleville, a distance of forty-five miles, and around some other 
bays. Distance travelled thirty miles. Sunday we spent at Belleville. 

On Monday, November 1st, we left Belleville for Murray Canal and back to 
McDonald's Cove. Saw some seine fishing. The following day we patrolled from 
Belleville to Trenton and around Nigger Island and Balser's Island, a distance 
of forty miles. We went on to Weller's Bay and seized about three thousand 
yards of gill nets, four sets of hoop nets and found some fishing without a license. 
The next day we were engaged in stretching and dr}dng nets and storing them. 
We also cleaned the boat. We called at Deseronto to oversee seine fishermen, and 
back to Belleville for Sunday. 

On Monday, November 10th, we patrolled Hay Bay with Mr. Huffman, seized 
2 1-3 set of hoop nets and one night line, then we ran on to Belleville; from here 
we patrolled to Weller's Bay, seized about ten thousand yards of gill nets, 
one net with fourteen ducks in it, one sunken punt, one skiff and decoys, two guns 
and shells. Overseer Cheer and his man was with us making the seizure. Satur- 
day we patrolled to Belleville, hanging up nets and drying them and cleaning the 
boat seemed to occupy the day. The next day we patrolled up west of Belle- 
ville bridge, seized two hundred yards of herring net. 

On Monday, November 15th, we patrolled to Brighton and back to BelleviUe, 
and on to Northport and Deseronto, and back to Belleville, going a distance of fifty 
miles. On account of gale we laid over for a day or so. Here we laid off the 
engineer and mate, and we occupied our time making reels and reeling up nets. 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 67 



On Tuesday, November 23rd, we patrolled from Belleville to Trenton and back 
to Belleville, a distance of thirty miles. Here we started to lay up boat, lifting 
it up into the boathouse, and placed sledge stocks under it, made shutters for the 
windows and put them on. Left Belleville for home in Newboro on December 3rd. 
Everything left in good order. 



REPOET OF THE WORK PERFORMED BY THE PATROL BOAT "NAIAD," 
ON LAKE SIMCOE AND KAWARTHA LAKES DURING THE 

YEAR 1909. 

On Saturday, the 5tli day of June, steamer "Naiad" came from Lakefield to 
Peterboro, spent Sunday at Peterboro, and Monday we were repairing steam joint. 
On Wednesday we started from Peterboro at 6 p.m., and patrolled the waters of the 
Otonabee River aid Rice Lake, in company with Overseer Johnrftn. Miles travelled, 
73. The following day we started from Peterboro at 7 a.m., and sailed from tliere 
to Burleigh Falls, patrolling tlie waters of the 'canal, Clear and Strong Lakes, laid 
over night at Burleigh Falls. Miles covered, 46. The next day we started from 
Burleigh and patrolled the waters of Buckhorn and Lovesick Lakes and Deer Bay 
and Chemong Lake, returning to Lakefield Friday night. Allies covered, 70 miles. 
From Lakefield we started for Peterboro, after washing steamer ; stuck at a boom, 
got steel cable around wheel and had to work in the water for one hour and a half; 
then came to Peterboro, was detained at the different booms on account of logs, 
-arriving at Peterboro at 4 p.m. Spent Sunday in Peterboro. 

On Monday, June 14th, we left Peterboro and went to Lakefield and on the way 
the condenser gave out causing a delay of one hour, after leaving 'Lakefield we pro- 
ceeded to Young's Point, Burleigh, Lovesick, thence to Buckhorn. The fogs very 
bad and "heavy winds. Leaving Buckhorn the next day we proceeded to Chemong, 
from there to Harrong Island and to Gannon Narrows, then to Bobcaygeon, thence 
to Fenelon Falls. We laid up here for the night and took on one-half ton of coal. 
At 6.30 the next morning we set out for Rosedale, and from there to Oobooonk, 
thence to Kirkfield Lift Lock, thence back to Fenelon Falls, took on seventeen hun- 
dred pounds of coal, and laid there over night. The following day we left at 6 
a.m. and went to Lindsay; stuck in weeds at the mouth of the river. From Lind- 
say Me went to Sturgeon Point, thence to Bobcaygeon, and from there to Buck- 
horn. (Stayed there over night, leaving there Friday morning at 7 a.m., and went 
to Lovesick, then to Burleigli, stuck in logs at Lovesick. From Burleigh we visited 
several summer res'orts and cottages, and came to Lakefield, then to Peterboro, and 
broke the flag pole at Lock 3. In the act of coming out of the lock, the wind blew 
the bow around and the pole went against the arm of the gate. 

On Monday, June 21st, we patrolled the waters of Otonabee River and Rice Lake. 
Number of miles travelled, 62. The next day we patrolled the waters of Clear, 
Stoney, Buckhorn Lakes, and laid over night at Buckhorn, leaving the next morn- 
ing we patrolled the waters of Chemong and Sturgeon Lakes and laid over night 
at Lindsay, took on Mr. Clarkson at Buckhorn and took him to Lindsay and next 
day back to Buckhorn. On Friday we patrolled the waters of Stoney, Clear and 
Buckhorn Lakes, calling at Lovesick, Burleigli, Mount J;i]ian, Breezes, Crow's Fiand- 



68 THE REPOET UPON No. 13 

ing. Island Stone, South Beach, and laid over night at Young's Point. The fol- 
lowing day we patrolled the waters from Young's Point to Peterboro, and broke 
wheel between Young's Point and Lakefield, came on to Peterboro and pulled boat 
partly out at McDonald's Mill, and broke off another flange so as to balance wheel. 
Spent Sunday at Peterboro. 

On Monday, June 28th, we patrolled the waters from Peterboro to Burleigh Falls 
and laid over night at Burleigh. Distance travelled, 30 miles. The following day we 
patrolled the waters from Burleigh Falls to Chemong Park and laid over night at 
Chemong. Total miles, 35. From Chemong we patrolled the waters to Burleigh 
Falls and remained there over night. The next day we patrolled the waters to 
Stoney Lake down to Ellis' Creek, Mount Julian and to all the points on the lake 
^down to Peterboro. Had the steamer pulled out at Peterboro and old wheel taken 
•off and new one put on. Remained here for Sunday. 

On Monday, July 5th, we repaired rudder post, had old set screw taken out 
and new ones put :in and left Peterboro at 2 p.m., and ran to Lakefield, patrol- 
sling the waters to Bobcaygeon, and laid over night at Bobcaygeon. The next day 
we patrolled the waters from Bobcaygeon to lock on Kirkfield Canal, had Captain 
Hunter on board as far as Fenelon Falls. Distance run, 45 miles. The following 
day we left Lock 1 at 7 a.m., and proceeded to- Lake Simcoe and called at Beaver- 
ton, sold two angling permits, left Beaverton at 2 a.m. ; from Eoach's Point and on 
the way between Georgina and Fox Island, took two night lines with about forty 
whitefish and one salmon trout. Arrived at Eoach's Point about 7 a.m. Ean 
from here to Jackson's Point and took cars to Sutton West and had trial and fined 
a man for netting fish. Left Captain Hunter there and came to Barrie, leaving 
Jackson's Point at 5 p.m., arriving at Barrie at 7.30. We remained here and had 
steam joint repaired and boiler cleaned out. Spent Sunday in Barrie. 

Monday, July 12th, we finished repairing on steam pipe and set out the next 
day to patrol the waters from Barrie to Eoach's Point and from there to Brad- 
ford and back to Eoach's Point. Laid there over night. Lake Simcoe very rough, 
and heavy sea all the way from Barrie to Eoach's Point, a distance of 45 miles. 
We patrolled the waters of Simcoe from Eoach's Point to Orillia, calling at Geor- 
^na Island for pilot, then ran from Orillia to Eama and saw Indian chief who 
thinks they should sell fish and also thinks the guides' license very unfair. Laid 
at Orillia over night. Miles covered, 43. 

The following day we patrolled the waters of Lake Couchiching, calling at Eama, 
I^pngford Mills, and Washago, also examined the Chemical Mills at Longford, but 
qould find nothing wrong with the water from these works. Laid in Orillia over 
jftighti : Distance travelled, 30 miles. We patrolled the waters of Lake Simcoe 
ifyopi Orillia to Hodge's Wharf, and from there to Georgina Island and left off 
!pilpt,i ftnd the wind became fierce and had to run to Beaverton for shelter. We re- 
jQai9,ined here over Sunday on account of storm, but patrolled the waters of Lake 
Sdmcoe from Jackson's Point to Beaverton. 

, , On Monday, July 19th, we laid at Jackson's Point until 4 p.m., then started for 
Beaverton, ran about four miles in lake and had to run back on account of storm, a 
very heavy sea running, but was anxious to make Beaverton to meet Mr. Cox. The 
next day we patrolled the waters from Jackson's Point to Beaverton, met Mr. Cox 
ig,nd Captain Hunter. Left Beaverton at 8.30 a.m., and ran to Fenelon Falls, a 
distance of 59 miles. From Fenelon Falls we patrolled the waters to Peterboro 
and on to Hastings, calling at Hall's Bridge and Wedlock, travelling about forty- 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 69 

five miles. The next day we patrolled the waters from Hastings to Peterboro, call- 
ing at Idyl Wild, Harwood, Gore's Landing, Jubilee Point and Wedlock. Saturday 
we remained to clean up boat, but could not paint on account of rain. Sun- 
day spent at Peterboro. 

On Monday, July 26th, hoisted out stern at Peterboro to repair stern bearing, 
and did some painting; this engaged our attention on Tuesday and the next few 
days. On Friday we patrolled the waters of Stoney Lake with Overseer Moore, 
and returned to Lakefield'and laid over Sunday there. 

On Monday, August 2nd, we patrolled the waters from Lakefield to Bobcay- 
geon, and laid over night at the latter place, travelling a distance of 53 miles. The 
next day we left for Lindsay and from there to Fenelon Falls, patrolling the waters 
to Beaverton and walked from Lock 1 to Gamebridge, then to Brechin, and from 
there to Lake Simcoe, then back to G.T.E. station, took the train to Gamebridge 
and walked from the station to the boat. Here I met Mr. Thompson. Left the 
lock at 6.30 and ran to Beaverton, a distance of forty miles. The next day we 
patrolled Lake Simcoe from Beaverton to Eoach's Point, then back to Jackson's 
Point, and patrolled the waters to Orillia, to Strawberry island and back to Orillia, 
then on to Barrie, calling at Hawkstone, Big Bay Point and Shanty Bay. Spent 
Sunday in Barrie. 

On Monday, August 9th, we patrolled the waters from Barrie to Beaverton 
and laid there the rest of the day on account of wind. We also walked eight miles 
to see Overseer H. McDonald. Tuesday we remained ashore on account of the 
wind. The following day we patrolled the waters from Beaverton to Eoach's Point, 
from there to Holland Eiver, then to De Grassey Point, thence to Roach's Point 
and from there to Jackson. We also rowed two miles to see Overseer Coulter, and 
walked two miles to see Overseer Tillett. From Jackson's Point we patrolled the. 
waters to Orillia and could not get any farther on account of no coal, and could not 
get away until Friday morning. Walked from G.T.E. swing bridge to see Over- 
seer Timlin. The next day we patrolled the waters from Orillia to Hawkstone, 
thence to Georgina and Fox Island Shoal, but found neither nets nor night line. 
From Barrie to Big Bay Point, then to Jackson's Point and back to Barrie again, 
travelling a distance of fifty miles. Sunday spent at Barrie. 

On Monday, August 16th, we patrolled the waters from Barrie to Orillia, and 
from Orillia to Jackson's Point, with Mr. Holden, Toronto, in charge. We pa- 
trolled waters from Jackson's Point to Eoach's Point and from there to Beaver- 
ton, and on to Coboconk, and from there to Fenelon Falls. Distance, forty-five 
miles. Patrolled the waters from Fenelon Falls to Bobcaygeon and from Bobcay- 
geon to Lindsay. W. W. Holden left us at Lindsay by C.P.R. for Toronto. The 
next day we putrolled the waters from Lindsay to Chemong, had to wait in Lindsay 
until noon. Telephoned Toronto for orders and had verbal orders to patrol to 
Chemong and from there to Peterboro. Sunday spent at Chemong. 

On Monday we patrolled the waters from Chemong to Heron's Island, and rowed 
to Heron's Cottage, on the side of Government boom, examined his sheds and out- 
houses, but found nothing illegal. Patrolled from there to Chemong village and 
laid up for the night about 9 p.m. Capt. Pearson, of the " Manilla," came on board 
and informed me that the steamer was disabled at Herrington Island, and asked me 
to take passengers to Bobcaygeon as they had nothing for them to eat and no place 
for them to sleep. We got up steam and took them to Bobcaygeon. The next day 
we patrolled waters from Bobcaygeon to Buckhorn, calling at Nicholl's Island and 
rowed to Herrington Island, and walked for three hours around the island looking 



rO THE EEPOET UPON No. 13 

for duck poachers, as I was informed by the bridge tender at G-annon's Narrows 
that he had heard gunshots in that direction, hut could see no one, but saw quite 
a number of wild duck and got within thirty yards of them before they flew away. 
Also overhauled two canoes with licensed guides in them, but found everything O.K. 
Americans with license, also bait catchers with license. Then we patrolled the 
waters from Buckhorn to Nicholl's Island, then to Indian Village and back to 
Buckhorn and from there to Deep Bay Creek, laid over night there and in the after- 
noon rowed from there home, water too shallow for steamer. The following day 
we patrolled the waters from Deer Bay Creek to Buckhorn, then to Lovesick, and 
from there to Burleigh Falls ; also rowed from 7.30 until 12 p.m. around Big Deer 
Bay, examined one boat house, but found only two canoes and three tmwlirig lines, 
nothing to indicate illegal fishing. We washed and cleaned brass work on steamer, 
also woodwork. On Fridlay we patrolled the waters from Burleigh Falls to Idyl 
Wild, Eice Lake, where we saw quite a number of wild duck and found the fishing 
to Peterboro, calling at Harwood, Gore's Landing and Jubilee Point, Distance tra- 
velled, fifty-three miles. Spent Sunday at Peterboro. 

On Monday, August 30th, patrolled the waters from Peterboro to Young's Point, 
delayed at Peterboro getting supplies and having oil-feeders repaired. From here we 
went to Fenelon Falls, saw a number of duck which were quite tame, also had conver- 
eation with Mr. Smith, bridge tender at Gannon's Narrows, and he said there was 
less shooting out of season this year than ever before in his recollection. Left for 
Beaverton, where we saw a number of duck; we were also delayed on account of 
logs at Gull and Burnt Elvers. The next day we were laid up for repairs to air 
pump. Eeceived valve from Poison at 7 p.m. The next few days were busy re- 
pairing steamer. 

On Tuesday, September 7th, we patrolled the waters from Beaverton to Orillia, 
from there to Hawkstone and from there to Barrie. Distance fifty-six miles. The 
following day we left for Eoach's Point and then to Trent Canal, patrolling waters 
from Trent Canal to Bobcaygeon, thence to Buckhorn, calling at McCrackin's, land 
ran to Lakefield and on to Peterboro, where we spent Sunday. 

On Monday, the 13th September, we patrolled the waters from Peterboro to 
Gore's Landing, calling at Thompson, also walked out to Plainville to see Capt. 
McCullough, and back to Gore's Landing. Distance travelled twenty-six miles. 
The next day we patrolled the waters from Gore's Landing to Hastings, 
from Hastings to Healey's Falls, and back to Hastings, had on board Over- 
seer Hess, of Hastings. From here we went to Sugar Island and thence to 
Harwood. The following day we patrolled these waters to Kent's Creek and on 
to Peterboro, where we were delayed to clean out boiler. Spent Sunday at Peterboro. 

On Monday, September 20th, patrolled waters from Peterboro to Lakefield and 
Young's Point, and from there we visdted the overseer at Moore's Cottage. We 
left for Stoney Lake that day and went on to Ellis Creek and Jack's Creek, tra- 
velling a distance of forty miles. 

We spent the night lat Overseer Moore's cottage, and left for Burleigh Falls, to 
Lovesick and Buckhorn, and from there to Nicholl's Island, and then to Bobcay- 
geon and on to Fenelon Falls. 

On Monday, September 27th, we laid over at Lindsay. Leaving there Tuesday, 
wp patrolled the waters from Lindsay to Kirkfield Lift Lock, and walked to Kirk- 
field and interviewed A. 0. Boynton, and he told me there were deer within half a 
mile of Kirkfield, one of them being caught by Mr. William Fence. We patrolled 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 71 



the waters from Kirkfield to Beaverton and ran to Beaverton on account of heavy 
wind. Here we were detained for the next few days. 

On Monday, October 4tb, patrolled the waters of Lake Simcoe from Beaverton 
to and around 'Jliora Island and Georgina. Distance iifty miles. The following 
day we went to Eoach's Point, from there to Jackson's Point to meet Mr. W. W. 
Holden, and we went on to Orillia and Barrie, patrolling the waters from Eoach's 
Point to Georgina Island, then to Port Boulster, and from there on to Beaver- 
ton. Mr. Holden left us at Belle Ewart at 7.30. The next day we went from 
Beaverton to Overseer Thompson's and from there to Thora Island, and at Jack- 
son's Point we left ofl' Overseer Thompson, and cnme to Georgina Island and grap- 
pled on shoal, and then ran on to Beaverton. In the afternoon we walked about 
a mile and a half towards Kirkfield Canal and on the way came across a seine 
about two hundred feet long, in fairly good condition and carried it to the steamer 
'•' Naiad," lying in Beaverton harbour. 

On jMonday, October 11th, we patrolled the waters around Thora Island, but had 
to run back to Beaverton on account of a heavy east gale. This laid us up the rest 
of the day, and in fact for the rest of the week, as the wind continued. 

On Monday, 18th October, we patrolled the waters of Lake Simcoe from Bea- 
verton to Thompson's Point, and took on Overseer Thompson, but had to run to 
Beaverton on account of high wind, and we were windbound here all Tuesday. The 
next day we left for the lift lock, arriving there at 6 p.m. We patrolled the waters 
from the lift lock to Nicholl's Island and laid up there for the night. The follow- 
ing day we patrolled the waters from Nicholl's Island to Peterboro and to Eice Lake, 
where we spent Sunday. 

On Monday, October 25th, we patrolled the waters from Jubilee Point to the 
Trent Eiver, from there to Idyl Wild, thence to Harw^ood and to Gore's Landing, 
and to Sugar Island, back to Jubilee Point and on to Peterboro. Distance of 
seventy-two miles. 

Tuesday, October 26th, we started laying up steamer and for the next four days 
we were thus engaged; on Saturday the engineer left for home. 



REPOET OF THE WOEK PEEFOEMED BY THE YACHT "VEGA." ON THE 
NOETH CHANNEL OF LAKE HUEON, DUEING THE YEAE 1909. 

On Monday, the 17th of May, we left Little Current at 8 a.m., and arrived at 
Killarney at 1 p.m., and left there at 1.30 for Bustard's, where we arrived at 9 p.m. 
Here we met Overseer McKenny, travelling a distance of 32 miles. Leaving Bus- 
tard Island at 7 a.m., we arrived at Byng Inlet at 1.30 p.m., a distance of twenty 
miles, and waited there for orders. On Thursday we left Byng Inlet ^^th Over- 
seer Knight, at 5.30, and called at Duck Island clubhouse at 9, then at Point lau 
Baril at 12, and at Shawanaga Bay at 3, and seized a boat steel and seine. Dis- 
tance of 35 miles. Leaving Stoker's Dock at 6 a.m., we cruised around between 
there and Dillian's Port, a distance of twenty-five miles. The next day we left 
Dillian's Port at 7 a.m., arriving at Parry Sound at 3 p.m., and met Overseer Mr. 
Laughington, and travelling a distance of twenty-five miles. We remained in 
Parry Sound all day Sunday. 



72 THE EEPOKT UPON No. 13 

On Monday, the 24th of May, we left Parry Sound for Point au Baril, reach- 
ing there at 4 a.m., Tuesday. Called at Byng Inlet with Overseer Knight and ar- 
rived at Killarney at 7 p.m., a distance of sixty-five miles. The following day we 
left Killarney at 7.30 and arrived at Little Current lat 1 p.m., a distance of twenty- 
five miles. Here we remained all day, awaiting orders. The next day we left 
Little Current at 9 a.m., and called at Kagawong, then to Gore Bay at 5 p.m., a 
distance of forty miles, where we had engine repaired, and left for Spanish at 11 
a.m., and reached the above place at 5 p.m., a distance of twenty-five miles. Here 
we remained all day. 

On Monday, the 31st May, at 6 a.m., we left for Meldrum Bay and arrived, 
at 5 p.m., going a distance of forty miles. The next day we left here at 7 a.m., 
arriving 'at Cockburn Island at 11 a.m. We left this island at 5 a.m., called at 
Duck Island and reached Providence Bay, travelling a distance of sixty miles. 
Leaving Providence Bay at 1 p.m., we arrived at South Bay at 6 p.m., remained 
over night, and at 5 a.m. set out for Fitzwilliam, a distance of ei^ghteen miles. The 
following day we left for Partridge Islfind, reaching there at 9 p.m. We left here 
at 7.30 a.m. for Little Current, remaining here until Tuesday at 8 a.m., and ar- 
rived at Killarney at 4 p.m., where we met Mr. Pitfield. To^al distance twenty-two 
miles. Next day we left Killarney 5 a.m., called at Bustard's, saw Mr. McKenny, 
arrived at Byng Inlet at 5 p.m., and met Overseer, Mr. Knight. Total distance 
travelled, fifty miles. On June 10th, , in company with Overseer Knight, we left 
Byng Inlet at 7 a.m., and went to Shawanaga Bay, reaching there at 1.30 p.m. 
Cruised around the bay and went to Mink Island and Palestine Island and finished 
our trip at 5 p.m. on Friday, making a total distance of thirty-five miles. The next 
day we left Palestine Island at 5 a.m., called at Parry Sound, saw Overseer Laugh- 
ington, reached Muskose at 8.30, and on to San Souci for the night. The next 
day at 8 a.m., we arrived at Penetang, met Overseer Williams and stayed here for 
Sunday and all day Monday in account of storms. 

On Tuesdny, the 15th June, at 5 a.m., we left Penetang, stopping for dinner 
at Musquosh, patrolled around Muskoka Mills with small boats and called at Alex- 
ander Island and arrived at Moose Point at 6 p.m. Total distance, twenty-six miles. 
The following day we left Moose Point at 7 a.m., patrolled in vicinity of Moose River, 
thence to Copper Head, and arrived at Parry Sound at 6 p.m. Total distance, 
forty miles. Leaving Parry Sound at 5 a.m., we arrived at Point au Baril kt noon. 
We patrolled in that vicinity till 6 p.m. Total distance, fifty-one miles. We 
remained all day Friday at Point au Baril on account of storm, and the next day 
we left at noon, the storm blowing hard. We arrived at Byng Inlet at 4 p.m., and 
were obliged to stay there all day with the storm. 

On Monday, 21st June, we left Byng Inlet at 4 a.m., calling at Bustard's and 
Killarney, arriving at Little Current at 7 p.m. Total distance, sixty-eight miles. 
Here we remained all day awraiting orders. The following day we left Little Cur- 
rent at 9 a.m.. called at Kadot's Station, patrolled then to Oak Point. The next 
day we left Oak Point at 4.30 a.m., called at New Port and John Island ; seized 
a net here with 2 1-2 mesh. Then to Algoma and Spragge, and arrived back 
at John Island 6 p.m. Total distance, forty-five miles. Left John Island 7 a.m., 
patrolled the shore down to Hog Island and arrived at 5 p.m. Left here at 7 a.m., 
and patrolled down to Whitefish Eiver, thence out by Swift Current to Little Cur- 
rent, at 6 p.m. Total distance, twenty-two miles. Here we spent Sunday. 

On Monday, June '28th, we stayed at Little Current all day repairing boat and 
engine so that it would not burn the deck ; left there the next day at 8 a.m., pa- 



1909 GAME AND FISHEEIES. 73 



trolled McGregor's Bay and arrived at Squaw Island at 6 p.m. Total distance, 
thirty-five miles. Left Squaw Island the folloAving day at 6 a.m., calling at Club 
Island, arrived at Fitzwilliam's Island at 2 p.m., seized a net and a quantity of 
hooks. Total distance, twenty-two miles. Leaving Fitzwilliam's Island at 8 a.m., 
we called at Noble's Fishing Station, arrived at Little Current at 9 p.m. Total dis- 
tance, forty-five miles. Spent the next day at Little Current awaiting orders, and 
the following day also, on account of s'torms blowing from the northwest. Sunday 
and Monday the storm continued and we were unable to move out. 

On Tuesday, July 6th, we left Little Current at 8 a.m., and rowed to Gore Bay, 
where we stayed till Thursday, repairing engine. Then ran to Bum's Harbour, and 
arrived there at 6.30 p.m. Total distance, thirty miles. Left Burn's Harbour at 
6 a.m., called at Cockburn Island, arrived at Meldrum Bay at 4 p.m. Leaving 
here at 6 a.m., patrolled the shore down to Clapperton Island and arrived 5 p.m., 
and left at 7 a.m. for Little Current, reaching there at noon, where we remained 
all day Sunday. 

Monday, July 12th, gale blowing from the west, obliged to remain in Little 
Current till Tuesday 8 a.m., and reached Killarney at 2 p.m. Total distance, 
twenty-five miles. Left here at 5 a.m., called at Bustard Island and saw Overseer 
McKenny, arrived at Byng Inlet 3 p.m., and left at 6 a.m. Overseer Knight could 
not go. Took his launch and patrolled amongst islands near lighthouse. Could 
not go out in lake on account of storm. The next day a gale was blowing, we pa- 
trolled amongst the islands in vicinity of lighthouse and seized a large seine. Left 
Byng Inlet light at 5 a.nj., called at Point au Baril and several tourists' residences. 
Arrived at Franklin's Island at 5 p.m. Total distance, forty miles. Left here the 
next day, and the strong gale carried away boom of yacht ; we reached Parry Sound 
at 7 a.m., making total distance fifteen miles. 

On Monday, July 19th, we remained at Parry Sound, having boom repaired and 
waiting for Mr. Knight. Left the next day and patrolled half way tO' San Souci ; 
here we were obliged to wait over on account of storms. We left San Souci at 
6 a.m., with Overseer Dusang, and patrolled to about 10 miles from Penetang. 
Then he ran home and we to Penetang, in a severe gale blowing. Total distance, 
forty miles. Saturday we stayed in Penetang on account of rain, and Sunday also. 

On Monday, July 26th, at 9 a.m., we left Penetang and arrived at Parry Sound 
at 6 p.m. The next day we patrolled to jib way Hotel and arrived at 6.30, a dis- 
tance of fifty miles. Left here for Byng Inlet and on reaching here we were com- 
pelled to stay over on account of fog, and left on Friday at 5 a.m., called at Bus- 
tard's and Killarney and arrived at Little Current at 6 p.m., where we sl^ayed 
awaiting orders. Spent Sunday in Little Current. 

On Monday, August 2nd, we set out at 1 p.m., and arrived at Kagawong 5 p.m., 
called at Spanish and patrolled down to Wells Island and Whitefish, arriving at 6 
p.m. Total distance 45 miles. The following day we patrolled McGregor's Bay 
and Big Finn; then to Little Current, arriving at 6 p.m. Total distance, forty 
miles. From here we went to Killarney and called at Bustard's and Point au Baril, 
and arrived at Ojibway Hotel at 7.30 p.m., a distance of sixty-five miles, thence to 
Parry Sound, where we spent Sunday. 

On Monday, Aug. 9th, we patrolled to Ojibway House; then to Point au Baril, 
arriving 6 p.m., a distance of forty miles. The following day we started for Byng 
Inlet, but the wind got u]) so we had to run back, and we went to Parry Sound, 
from here we called at San Souci and Copperhead, where we met Mr. Jones and 
Overseer Dusang. We left for Parry Sound; from there we returned to Copper- 



74 THE REPOET UPON No. 13 

head at 7 p.m. The next day we left for Parry Sound, arrived at noon and got the 
engine repaired, and spent some time getting yawl ready. Sunday spent at Parry 
Sound. 

On Monday, the 16tli of August, we left Parry Sound at 7 a.m., patrolled to 
Ojibway House, then to Point au Baril, and arrived there 4 p.m. Total distance, 
forty-five miles. From here we mailed in the direction of Byng Inlet, and Eed Rock, 
then down to Tibischong Bay, arriving at 5 p.m. Total distance, forty-five miles. 
The next day we left for Depot Harbour, pjatrolled around the bay to Mowatt Is- 
land, then to Parry Sound, went part way to San Souci and back to Rose Point, and 
then to Parry Sound for Sunday. 

Monday, August 23rd, we waited at Parry Sound till one o'clock for Mr. Blea, 
then left and got as far as Depot Harbour and had to lie over on account of wind. 
Next day we left at 6.30 a.m., patrolled to Ojibway House, then to Point au Baril, 
and arrived at 4 p.m. Total distance, forty-five miles. The following day we left 
Point au Baril 7 'a.m. Could not go towards Byng Inlet on account of storm, so 
patrolled back to Parry Sound, then to Rose Point for 7 p.m. Total distance, forty- 
three miles. Left Rose Point 6,30, patrolled to San Souci, then to Copperhead, and 
Arrived at 11 a.m. Left here at 7 a.m., patrolled to Rose Point, then to Parry 
Sound and arrived at 3 p.m. Total distance, twenty miles. Sunday spent at 
Point au Baril. 

On Monday, August 30th, we left Point au Baril at 7 a.m., called at Key River 
and Bustard's, met Mr. McKenny there and steered for Bad River, arriving there at 
6 p.m. Total distance, forty-five miles. Here we remained all day on account of 
gale. The next day we started for Killarney, 6.30, but had to return to Bustard's 
on account of the storm, and we were obliged to remain all the next day. Finally 
we left Bustard's at 8 a.m., Friday, called at Killarney and back to Little Current 
and Bad River, where we had to have the engine repaired. Sunday we spent at 
Little Current, also Monday, on account of storm. 

On Tuesday, September 7th, we left Little Current and arrived at Gore Bay at 
4 p.m. Total distance, thirty-five miles. Left Gore Bay at 10 a.m., called at Burnt 
Island and Spanish River, patrolled to Friends', then to Whitefish, and arrived at 
6 p.m. Leaving here at 8 a.m., we patrolled amongst the islands to McGregor 
Island, and arrived at 6 p.m. Total distance, thirty-five miles. Left McGregor 
Island for Killarney at 7 a.m., but broke wheel of launch, so had to return to Little 
Current for repairs. 

On Monday, September 13th, we left Little Current for Gore Bay and patrolled 
to Spanish, Buswell's and back to Gore Bay, arriving at 5 p.m. From here we 
went back to Little Current and spent the day, as a gale was blowing. The next 
day we went to McGregor Bay, Finn, Eraser Bay, and then to Killarney at 6 p.m. 
Total distance, fifty-five miles. Here we stopped Mr. Labatt from setting nets in 
Eraser Bay, where he has no license. Left Killarney and patrolled to Collin's Bay, 
then returned to Partridge Island, arriving at 6 p.m. Total distance twenty-seven 
miles. The following day we left Partridge Island at 6.30 a.m., patrolled Mani- 
towaning Bay to Sheguiandah, then to Little Current, arriving 3 p.m. Here we 
spent Sunday. 

On Monday, September 20th, we left Little Current at 8 a.m. for Burnt Island, 
patrolled amongst the Islands with small boat till 6 p.m., and we started for Eitz- 
william's Island, but fog got so thick that he had to run back to Partridge Island,- 
and remained all the next day, gale blowing strong. When we started for Eitz- 



1909 GAME AND FISHERIES. 75 



William we saw we could not make it on account of storm, and went to Little Cur- 
rent, where we stayed over till Monday awaiting orders. 

On Tuesday, September 28th, we left Little Current at 8 a.m., and arrived at 
Killarney about noon. Gale blowing too hard to go farther. The next day we 
started for Bustard's, but had to run to Toad Island on account of bad weather, 
and arrived at 12 o'clock, patrolled in small boat in vicinity of Toad Island, then 
we ran to Bustard's and arrived at 5 p.m. Total distance, thirty miles. Left 
Bustard Island and arrived at Byng Inlet, where we were obliged to remain on 
account of storm. The next day we patrolled till noon and then ran to Point au 
Baril, and the following day to Parry Sound, reaching there at 3 p.m. Total dis- 
tance, forty miles. 

On Monday, October 4th, we left Parry Sound 'at 9 a.m., patrolled to Point au 
Baril, arrived there 5 p.m., and from there to Bjoig Inlet, then to Bustard Island, 
arriving at noon and patrolled amongst the Islands till 5 o'clock. Leaving here we 
patrolled around Bad River, and arrived at Killarney at 1 p.m. Total distance, 
thirty miles. The following day we left Killarney at 8 a.m., and patrolled to Little 
Current and arrived at 4 p.m., where we stayed all day repairing engine. Sunday 
we spent at Little Current. 

The week beginning October 11th and ending October 17th we were detained 
at Little Current repairing engine, and then on account of violent snow storm. 

On Monday, October 18th, we left Little Current at 8 a.m., patrolled to Fitz- 
wiUiam's Island, and arrived at 5 p.m. Total distance, forty-five miles. The next 
day we seized a seine, and as it was not much good, burned it. Left Fitzwilliam's 
Island at noon and arrived at Squaw Island 6 p.m. Left Squaw Island at 7 a.m., 
called at Partridge Island, then to McGregor Bay, arriving at 5 p.m. The follow- 
ing day we left for Little Current, where we were held over till Monday on account 
of storms. 

On Monday, October 25th, we left Little Current at 9 a.m., and arrived at Gore 
IBay at 4 p.m., where we stayed till next day, we called at John Island and New 
Port, and at Spanish at 5 p.m. Total distance, thirty-five miles. From here we 
ran to Whitefish River, then to Little Current. Total distance, fiity miles. The 
following day we left Little Current at 9 a.m., and arrived at Killarney at 2 p.m., 
and left there at 9 a.m. the next day. We patrolled Fraser Bay, then to McGregor 
Bay, arriving at 3 p.m. Total distance, twenty-five miles. 

Saturday, October 30th, we left McGregor Bay at 9 a.m., and arrived at Little 
Current at 12 noon. 



76 



THE KEPOET UPON" 



No. 13 



WATERS STOCKED FROM 1901 TO 1909, WITH THE NUMBER AND KINDS OF 

FISH PLANTED IN EACH. 



Waters stocked. 



1901. 
Species. 



Muskoka Lake Bass 

Lake Rosseau Bass 

Lake Joseph Bass 

Fairy and Vernon Lakes Bass 

Lake of Bays Bass 

Thames River at Ingersoll Bass 

Thames River at Woodstock Bass 

Bear Creek at Strathroy Bass 

Thames River at Dorchester Bass 

Lake Couchiching Bass 

Stoney Lake Bass 

Lake Simcoe at Jackson's Point Bass 

Holland River , Bass 

Golden Lake Bass 

Severn River Bass 

Grand River at Cayuga Bass 

Grand River at Brantford Bass 

Kempenfeldt Bay Bass 



1902. 

Waters stocked. Species, 

Muskoka Lake Bass 

Lake Joseph Bass 

Lake Rosseau Bass 

Lake Couchiching Bass 

Bear Creek at Strathroy Bass 

Stoney Lake Bass 

Huntsvllle Lakes Bass 

Winnipeg River Brook 



Number. 

. . 1,205 
700 

. . 1,052 
244 
693 
225 
225 
396 
696 
436 
751 
603 
387 
372 
526 
400 
274 
300 



9,841 



Number. 

246 

256 

227 

285 

395 

330 

265 

trout 55 



2,059 



1903. 

Waters stocked. Species. Number. 

Bear Creek at Strathroy Bass 926 

Lake Rosseau Bass' 1,130 

Lake Joseph Bass ; . 500 

Muskoka Lake Bass 1,002 



Lake of Bays Bass 

Sparrow Lake Bass 

Lake Couchiching Bass 

Long Lake at Rat Portage Bass 

Golden Lake Bass 

Mink Lake Bass 

Clear Lake Bass 

White Lake Bass 

Lynn River at Lake Simcoe Bass 

Grand River at Brantford Bass 

Thames River at Ingersoll Bass 

Thames River at London Bass 

Thames River at St. Marys Bass 

Grand River at Fergus Bass 

Grand River at Grand Valley Bass 

Grand River at Paris Bass 

Musselman's Lake Bass 

Lake of Bays Bass 



371 

650 

258 

460 

100 

85 

85 

100 

355 

425 

75 

200 

205 

ioo 

70 
130 

200 
500 



7,927 



1»09 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



77 



WATERS STOCKED FROM 1901 TO 1909, WITH THE NUMBER AND KINDS OF 
FISH PLANTED IN EACH.— Continued. 



1904. 

Waters stocked. Species 

Credit River Bass . 

Lake Rosseau Bass . 

Green Lake Bass . 

Opinicon Forks! Bass . 

Lake near Barry's Bay Bass . 

Barry's Bay Bass . 

Gorman Lake Bass . 

Golden Lake Bass . 

Mink Lake Bass 

White Lake Bass , 

Clear Lake Bass . 

Snell's Lake Bass . 

Lake Joseph Bass . 

Bass Lake Bass . 

Lake Couchiching Bass , 

Lake Joseph Bass , 

Lake of Bays Bass . 

Lake Simcoe at Jackson's Point Bass , 

Beaver River at Cannington Bass . 

Balsam Lake Bass , 

Lake of Bays Bass 

Oxbow River at Komoka Bass 

Lake Scugog Bass 



Number- 

115. 

Z8(h 
... 135. 

&0 

. . . . 30 
. . . . 100 
. . . . 75 
. . . . 565 
60 
. . . 160 
50 
. . . . 100 

725 
. . . 200 

230 
. . . 415 

530 
. . . 785 

250 
. . . 400 



Fingerlings 5,000 

Fingerlings 1,200 

Fingerlings 1,400 



Waters stocked. 



1905. 



Species. 



12,955 



Number. 



Lake Scugog Bass 

Stoney Lake Bass 

Muskoka Lake Bass 

Thames River at Stratford Bass 

Thames River at Mitchell Bass 

Lake Couchiching Bass 

Gull Lake (near Gravenhurst) Bass 

Lake of Bays Bass 



400 
600 
500 
250 
350 
500 
100 
400 



1906. 

Waters stocked. Species. 

Lake Simcoe Bass . . 

Lake of Bays Bass . , 

Gull River Bass . . 

Grand River Bass . , 

Lake Scugog Bass . . 

Muskoka Lake Bass . , 

River Nith Bass . . 

Lake Simcoe Bass . , 

Bass . , 



3.100 



Number. 
450 
700 
. . . 610 
, . . 575 
. . . 400 
, . . 700 
. . . 600 
, . . 700 
, . . 700 



1908. 

Waters stocked. Species. 

Sparrow Lake Bass 

Haliburton Lake Bass 

Puslinch Lake Bass Fingerlings . . , . 

River vicinity Kenora Trout, Speckled, fry 



5.435 



Number. 
. . . 500 
. . . 620 
725 
. .. 2.000 



78 



THE EEPOET UPON 



No. 13 



WATERS STOCKED FROM 1901 TO 1909, WITH THE NUMBER AND KINDS OF 
FISH PLANTED IN EACH— Continued. 



Waters stocked. 



1909. 
Species. 



Number. 



Mohawk Lake Bass Fingerlings 1,000 

Lake Rosseau Bass Fingerlings 1,500 

Lake Muskoka Bass Fingerlings 1,500 

Lake Joseph Bass Fingerlings 2,000 

Lake of Bays Bass Fingerlings 2,000 

Stoney Lake Bass Fingerlings .3,500 

Gull Lake Bass Fingerlings 200 

Whiteman's Creek Bass Fingerlings 200 

Cooley's Pond Bass Fingerlings 150 

Sparrow Lake Bass Fingerlings. 2,500 



14,550 



LIST OF GAME AND FISHERY WARDENS. 



Name. 


Eesidence. 


District. 


Burt. William 


Slmcoe 


Niagara Peninsula. 


Chauvin, Victor . . . 


Windsor 


Western District. 


Hunter, Capt. A. . . 


Belleville 


Eastern District. 


Parks, G. M 


North Bay . . . 


District of Nipissing. 


Robinson, J, T 


Sault Ste. 
Marie 


District of Algoma. 


Sterling, C. N 


Kenora 


Thunder Bay and Rainy River. 


Willmott, J. H 


Beaumaris ... 


Muskoka and Parry Sound. 



1909 



GAME AND FISHEEIES. 



79 



LIST OF OVERSEERS. 



Name. 



Residence. 



District. 



Acton, Nassau 



Avery, Melzar 



Bailey, G. L. . . 
Barr, George . . 
Beatty, Jolin . . 



Birch, W. J. . 
Blanchard, F. 
Blea, Daniel . . 
Blunden, H. A. 

Boate, J. R. . . 
Boler, William 

Botting, Peter 
Bourgon, J. B. 



Boyd, J. H 

Boynton, A. O 

Bradshaw, A 

Briggs, T. J 

Brisbin, Angus 



Gananoque 



Andrews, Samuel . . ' Micksburg 



Sharbot Lake. 

Callander . . . . 

Harrowsmith . 

Old Fort, Mid- 
land 

Delta 

Fort Frances . 

Uplands 

Sarnia 

Fowler's Cor's. 
Byron 

Fermoy 

Rockland . . . . 



MerrickvlUe . . 

Kirkfield .... 

Lindsay 

Bridgeburg . . 
Picton 



Gananoque River, and for that part of the River 
St. Lawrence lying between Wolfe Island 
and Rockport. 

The Electoral District of North Renfrew, and 
for the Tps. of Clara, Maria and Head, and 
with joint jurisdiction with any other over- 
seers over the Bonnechere River. 

Township of Oso, with joint jurisdiction over 
the Tp. of Hinchinbrook in the Electoral 
District of Addington. 

Lake Nipissing, in the Districts of Parry Sound 
and Nipissing. 

Tp. Portland in Co. Frontenac, with joint juris- 
diction over Desert and Knowlton Lakes. 



With jurisdiction with other overseers over Tps. 
Tay and Matchedash, Co. Simcoe. 

Upper and Lower Beverley lakes and rivers. 

Rainy River and adjacent waters. 

Province of Ontario. 

Co. Lambton, exclusive of Walpole and St. Ann's 
Islands. 

Tp. Emily, in Co. Victoria. 

River Thames, between London and boundary 
line between Townships Delaware and West- 
minster, County of Middlesex. 

The waters in the Township of Bedford in the 
County of Frontenac. 

Counties of Prescott, Russell, Stormont and Glen- 
garry, with jurisdiction over so much of the 
Rivers Ottawa and St. Lawrence as lies in 
front of said counties. 

Rideau River and tributaries, fronting on County 
of Grenville. 

Tp. Eldon, in Co. Victoria. 

Townships Mariposa and Ops, County Victoria. 

County of Welland- 

For the waters of Lake Ontario fronting Tps. 
North and South Marysburg, including all 
waters surrounding islands in said town- 
ships, also Main Duck Islands, and that por- 
tion of Bay of Quinte fronting these town- 
ships, as well as the waters of the Bay of 
Quinte known as Picton Harbor, in Tp. 
[iallowell. 



80 



THE EEPORT UPON 



No. 13 



LIST OF OYERSBERS.— Continued. 



Name. 


Residence. 


District. 


Briscoe, W. L 


Klllaloe Sta'n. 


Townships of Jones, Sherwood, Hagarty, Rad- 
cliffe, Brudenell, Raglan, and Lynedoch, Co. 
Renfrew. 


Burke, George 


Perth 


For the Town of Perth, Tps. of North Bmsley, 
Drummond, North Burgess, and the first two 
concessions of the Tp. of Bathurst, Co. 
Lanark. 


Burns, D. E 


Pembroke 


The waters between Allumette Rapids and Deux 
Joachim. 


Burtcheall, C 


Coboconk 


Balsam and Mud Turtle Lakes, County Victoria. 


Calbeck, A. .' 


Sault Ste. 
Marie 


That portion of the District of Algoma lying 
west of the Village of Algoma Mills, exclu- 
sive of Cockburn and Manitoulin Islands, 
and over the waters lying in front of the 
said district, and with joint jurisdiction over 
the waters lying between said Islands and 
the mainland west of a line due south from 
Algoma Mills. 


Campbell, John 


Sylvan 


River Aux Sauble and tributaries. 


Carson, R. W 


Peterboro' . . . 


Counties Simcoe, Ontario, Victoria, Peterboro', 
Durham, and Northumberland, and York. 


Caskey, T. C. ' 


Blairton 


Townships Belmont and Methuen, County Peter- 
boro'. 


Cassan, C. H 


Campbellford . 


Trent River and tributaries, Co. Northumber- 
land, from Campbellford to Trent Bridge. 


Cheer, T. H 


Brighton 


For the waters of Lake Ontario fronting Co. 
Northumberland, also inland waters tribu- 
tary to said lake in said county. 


Clarkson, William . 


Lakehurst . . . 


West half of Township of Smith, Township of 
Ennismore, west half Township Harvey, 
Townships of Galway and Cavendish, 
County Peterboro'. 


Clunis, A 


Claude 


In and for the Townships of Chinguacousy, 
Caledon and Albion, in the County of Peel. 


Collins, W. B 


Strathroy .... 


Townships of Adelaide, Metcalfe, and with joint 
jurisdiction over Township Caradoc, Co. 
Middlesex. 


Colter, Samuel 


Gilford 


Lake Simcoe, from the 10th concession, Tp. 
Innisfll, to the mouth of the Holland River. 


Conger, David 


West Lake . . . 


Lake Ontario fronting Townships Hallowell and 
Athol, also for the Village of Wellington in 
the Township of Hillier, and for the inland 
lakes and streams in said Townships of 
Hallowell and Athol. 


Cook, H. G. A 


Niagara Palls. 


County Welland. 


Corsant, A 


Masonvllle . . . 


County Middlesex, east of boundary line between 



the Townships of Westminster and Dela- 
ware, London and Lobo. 



1909 



GAME AND FISHEEIES. 



81 



LIST OF OVERSEERS.— Con^inMed. 



Name. 



Residence. 



District. 



Covell, H. N. 
Cox, Matthew 

Crotty, John . 



Cunningham, Jas. A. 

Dafoe, Peter W. ... 

Davieau, H 

Davis, J. W 

Devine, John 

Donaldson, W. J. ... 

Drew, Henry 

Dunlop, James 

Dusang, B. A 

Esford, Henry 

Fisher, James 

Fleming, B 

Fox. Eben R 



Lombardy . . . 
Howe Island . . 

Bothwell 

Maynooth 

Napanee 

Michipicoten I. 
Sydenham — 
Renfrew 

Donaldson . . . 

Long Lake ... 
Mackey's St'n. 

Fesserton 

Barriefleld . . . 



Sunbury 



Fraser, J. A 

Gainforth, Wm. . . 



Hastings , 
Northport 



Prescott . . 
Haliburton 



Township South Elmsley, County Leeds. 

The waters of St. Lawrence River around Howe 
Island. 

River Thames between Village of Wardsville and 
easterly limits of County of Kent, in County 
of Middlesex. 

Townships Bangor, Wicklow and McClure, Co. 
Hastings. 

Township of Richmond, with joint jurisdiction 
over the Township of North Fredericksburg. 

Michipicoten Island. 

Township Loughboro. 

Townships Horton, McNab, Admaston, Bagot, 
Blythfield, Brougham, Griffith, and Mata- 
watchan, in the County of Renfrew. 

Townships of Palmerston, Clarendon, Barrie, 
Miller, North Canonto and South Canonto, 
electoral district of Addington. 

Townships Hinchinbrooke, Oso, Olden and Ken- 
nebec, District of Addington. 

Ottawa River between Deux Joachim and Matta- 
wa, and over waters in townships in Ontario 
bordering on said river. 

Tps. of Freeman, Gibson, Baxter, Wood and 
Morrison in District of Muskoka, also over 
Severn RiVer. 

Rideau waters between St. Lawrence River and 
Brewer's Mills. 

Townships Storrington, including Rideau waters 
from Brewer's Mills to south limit of the 
township with jurisdiction over all of 
Loughboro Lake and the lakes of the Town- 
ship of Storrington. 

Village of Hastings. 

For that portion of the Bay of Quinte fronting 
Township Ameliasburg east of Belleville 
Bridge, and also Township Sophiasburg, and 
over all the inland waters within Township 
Sophiasburg, and with joint jurisdiction 
with any other overseer over all inland 
waters in Township of Ameliasburg. 

St. Lawrence River from the head of Cardinal 
Rapids west to Rockport. 

Townships Stanhope, Guilford, Harburn, Dud- 
ley, Dysart and Minden, District of Hall- 
burton. 



82 



THE EEPOET UPON 



No. 13 



LIST OF OVERSEERS.— Continued. 



Name 



Residence. 



District. 



Gallagher, Hugh 
Gault, T. G 

Gillespie, James 
Glass, Irving . . . 



-Gordon, Walter 
Green, Adam . . 



Green, Geo. G. 



Green, John . . . 
Gunter, Harvey 



Hayes, Henry 



Hembruff, Jos. . 
Henderson, H. A. 
Heneilley, F, H. . 
Hess, James .... 



Hewitt, James . . 
Helliday, Henry 

Hood, Geo., Sr. . 



Eganville 
Deseronto 

Berkeley . 
Trenton . 



Port Arthur 
Diamond . . 

Bradford .. 

Marmora . . 
McRae P.O. 



Murray 



Manitowaning. 
Pelee Island . 
Warkworth . . . 
Hastings 



Honey .Harbor 
Wolfe Island . . 



Scugog 



County of Renfrew. 

Bay of Quinte, East Riding County of Hastings 
and for Moira River and other waters in 
said riding. 

Electoral District of Centre Grey and for Town- 
ship of Gleneig in South Grey. 

Bay of Quinte from City of Belleville west of the 
Trent River and for Trent River from its 
mouth to Chisholm's Rapids and for the 
tributaries thereto. 

In and for the District of Thunder Bay. 

Townships Huntley and Fitzroy, County Carle- 
ton. 

Holland River on the north side in Township 
West Gwillimbury westward to the forks of 
the river in County Simcoe. 

Township of Marmora, County Hastings. 

Townships of Grimsthorpe and Cashel in County 
Hastings, and with joint jurisdiction over 
Townships Tudor, Lake, Wollaston, Limer- 
ick, Faraday, Dungannon and Mayo, in said 
county. 

Bay of Quinte, as lies in front of the East Rid- 
ing of Northumberland, for that portion of the 
River Trent, lying between the Townships 
of Sidney and the Bay of Quinte, and for 
the inland waters of the Townships of Mur- 
ray, Dryden and Cramahe and Haldimand. 

Lake Manitou on Manitoulin Island and the 
streams tributary thereto. 

For Pelee Island and the other islands in Lake 
Erie, south of the County of Essex. 

River Trent and tributaries, in County Northum- 
berland from Percy Boom to Campbellford 
Bridge. 

Trent River and tributaries in County Northum- 
berland, from Trent Bridge to Rice Lake. 

Province of Ontario. 

Township of Wolfe Island and for the islands of 
Simcoe, Garden and Horseshoe, and any 
other islands comprised in the Township of 
Wolfe Island. 

For the Township of Reach in the County of 
Ontario, and for the Township of Mariposa 
in the County of Victoria and over so much 
of the waters of Lake Scugog as lies in 
front of the said townships, and for the 
westerly half of Scugog Island, and over the 
waters of Lake Scugog fronting thereon. 



1909 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



83 



LIST OF OVERSEERS— Continued. 



Name. 



Residence. 



District. 



Howell, James 
Huffman, E. M. 



Hunter, William 
Jermyn, J. W. . . 



Jickling, Chas. 
Johnson, John 



Johnson, Henry 



Johnston, D. 



Johnston, Thos. 



Bancroft 

Hay Bay 

Tehkummah .. 
Wiarton 



St. Paul's Sta- 
tion. 

Port Hope . . . 



Brantford 



Johnston, W. H 

Jones, David . . 
Jones, John . . . 



Kehoe, D. 



Peterboro' . . . . 



Royston 



Harwood 



Kennedy, John 
Kent, A. J. . . . 



Welland 

Fenelon Falls. 

Mlllarton . . . . 



Meaford 
Bewdley 



Townships Faraday, Dungannon and Herschell, 
in County Hastings. 

Townships of Richmond, Adolphustown, North 
and South Fredericksburg with jurisdiction 
over Hay Bay and Bay of Quinte, in 
Counties Lennox and Addington. 

Manitoulin Island in Lake Huron. 

Georgian Bay, County of Bruce, lying east and 
south of Tobermory Harbor, but exclusive 
of the said Harbor. 

County Perth and for Townships East Nissouri 
and Eastand West Zorra, in County Oxford. 

Townships Hope and Cavan, in the County- of 
Durham, with joint jurisdiction with any 
other Game and Fishery overseer or over- 
seers over County Durham. 

That part of Grand River lying between the 
southerly boundary of Town of Gait and the 
boundary line between Tuscarora and Onon- 
daga Townships in County Brant and the 
Townships of Seneca and Oneida in Ilaldi- 
mand County; also concurrent jurisdiction 
with Overseer Kern over Tributaries to the 
Grand River in Burford, Oakland and Brant- 
ford Townships west of Grand River. 

River Otonabee and tributaries, between the Can- 
adian Pacific Railway Crossing in Peter 
borough, and the mouth of the River and 
Rice Lake, Township South Monaghan. 

Townships of Lount, Machar, Laurier, Croft, 
Chapman, Strong, Jolly, Spence, Ryerson, 
Armour, Proudfoot, Monteith, McMurrich, 
Perry and Bethune, District of Parry Sound. 

Rice Lake, in the Townships of Hamilton and 
Alnwick, County Northumberland. 

County of Welland. 

For the north end of Sturgeon Lake, and Cam- 
eron Lake to Rosedale Locks, Burnt River 
and Rosedale River in the County of 
Victoria. 

That portion of County Bruce lying South of 
Indian Reserve and Township of Amabel 
with jurisdiction over Lake Huron in front 
of said county, south of Southampton. 

County of Grey, exclusive of Townships of Pro- 
ton, Egremont and Normandy. 

Rice Lake from Ley's Point on the south shore 
of said lake around the head of Lake to 
Barnard's Bay on the north shore of Rice 
I^ake. 



84 



THE EEPOET UPON 



No. 13 



LIST OF OVERSEERS.— Con«»Med. 



Name. 


Residence. 


District. 


Kern, Jacob 


Burford 


County of Brant, comprising Townships of Bur- 
ford, Oakland and Brantford, west of Grand 
River, but exclusive of said River. 


Kerr, C. J 


Hamilton 


County of Wentworth. 


Knight, C. H. 


Byng Inlet . . . 


For the River Magnetawan, and for the waters 
of Georgian Bay lying between said river 
and French River. 


Kraft, Samuel 


Ridge way .... 


In and for Electoral District of Welland, with 
jurisdiction over so much of the waters of 
Lake Erie and the Niagara River, exclusive 
of the waters of said river north of the 
Niagara Falls, as lies in front of the said 
Electoral District. 


Laframboise, Remi,. 


Canard River. 


Detroit River, fronting Townships of Sandwich, 
West Anderdon and Maiden, and also Cana- 
dian Islands in said River, County Essex.' 


Lambkin, Richard . 


Loring 


Townships of Harrison, Burton, McKenzie, Fer- 
ric, Wallbridge, Brown, Wilson, Mills, Pringle, 
Gurd, Himsworth, Nipissing, Patterson, 
Hardy, McConkey, Blair, and Mowat, in the 
District of Parry Sound. 


Langford, Newton . 


Dorset 


Townships McLean, Ridout, Franklin and Bru- 
nei, District of Muskoka, and Townships 
McClintock, Livingstone, Sherbourne and 
Havelock, District of Haliburton. 


Laughington, Henry. 


Parry Sound . . 


For the Township of Shawanaga, Ferguson, Car- 
ling, McDougal, McKellar, Christie, Foley, 
Parry Island, Cowper and Conger in the Dis- 
trict of Parry Sound. 


Leadley, Robt 


Barrie 


For the Township of Vespra and the Town of 
Barrie, in the County of Simcoe, and over 
so much of the waters of Kempenfeldt Bay 
as lies in front of the said town and town- 
ship; also, that portion of Kempenfeldt Bay, 
lying in front of the Township of Oro. 


Lean, "Wellington . . 


Apsley 


Tps. of Anstruther and Chandos, County of 
Peterboro'. 


Lee, Edward 


Lowbanks 


Townships of Moulton, Sherbrooke and Wain- 
fleet, in the District of Monck and Lake Erie. 


Leitch, P. A 


Neplgon 


River and Lake Nepigon. 


Little, Richard .... 


Walladeburg . 


County of Kent, fronting on Lake St. Clair, 
exclusive of Dover West Township, also Wal- 
pole and Ste. Anne's Islands, County Lamb- 
ton. 


Loveday, E. T 


Ottawa 


In and for the Townships of Nepean, Gloucester, 
North Gower and Osgoode, in the County of 
Carleton, with jurisdiction over so much of 
the River Ottawa and the River Rideau and 
the Rideau Canal as lies in front or within 
said Townships, and over the tributaries to 
the said rivers and canals. 



1909 



GAME AND FISHEEIES. 



85 



LIST OF OYERSEERS— Continued. 



Name. 



McAllister, J. R. . . . 



McClennan, Kenneth 



McEwen, A. 



Residence. 



Gore's L'ndlng 



Grovesend . . 



Aldboro' 



District. 



McGinn, William . . . Orillia 



McGuire, J. 



Jones Palls 



Mclntyre, A. Keene 



McKelvie, D 

McMurray, R. . . . 
McNairn, James 



New Liskeard. 

Ba3^eld 

Iroquois 



McPhee, D i Uptergrove . 



McVIttie, James . . . 

Macdonald, Hector 
Major, William . . . 
Maltby, William . . . 

Mansfield, Thomas 
May, J. C 



Blenheim 

Beaverton . . . 
Woodlawn . . . . 
Nipissing 

Pickering . . . . 
St. Catharines. 



Rice Lake, between Jubilee Point and Lower 
Close's Point and the waters tributary there- 
to, in the Tps. of Hamilton and Alnwick, Co. 
of Northumberland. 

Townships of Yarmouth, Malahide and Bayham, 
with jurisdiction over so much of the waters 
of, Lake Erie as lies in front of the said 
townships and the tributaries thereto. 

Townships of Southwold, Dunwich and Aid- 
borough, exclusive of the River Thames, 
with jurisdiction over so much of Lake 
Erie as lies in front of the said townships 
and tributaries thereto. 

Townships of Orillia, and Oro, in the County of 
Simcoe, and over so much of Shingle and 
Carthews Bays, and Lakes Couchiching and 
Simcoe, as lies in front of said townships 
and over River Severn. 

Rideau River, fronting on the Township of 
South Crosby, County of Leeds. 

Tps. of Otonabee and Asphodel in Co. of Peter- 
boro'. 

Lake Temiskaming and tributaries. 

County of Huron. 

River St. Lawrence fronting on County of Dun- 
das. 

Lake Simcoe, fronting on Tp. of Mara and the 
tributaries thereto, and for Mud Lake, in 
the Townships of Mara and Carden. 

Lake Erie fronting on Co. Kent, together with 
inland waters of said Co. tributary to Lake 
Erie. 

Lake Simcoe and tributaries thereto fronting on 
Tp. of Thorah,, in County of Ontario. 

Townships of March and Torbolton, County 
Carleton. 

South River, and South Bay, with Joint jurisdic- 
tion with any other overseer, or overseers 
who have been or may hereafter be 
appointed. 

Electoral District of South Ontario, exclusive of 
the Township of Reach. 

County of Lincoln and over so much of the 
waters of Lake Ontario as lies In front of 
the said county, and with jurisdiction over 
the Niagara River between its mouth and 
the Falls. 



86 



THE EEPOKT UPON 



No. 13 



LIST OF OVERSEERS.— Continued. 



Name. 



Residence. 



District. 



Mayor, Harry 



Merrlam, Enoch 



Myers, James 



Moffatt, George 
Moore, F. J. ... 



Morton, John . 
Murdoch, John 



Nicholls, Peter . 
Oliver, R. C. ... 
Osborne, Henry 
Ostrom, B. B. . . 

Parker, H. B. . . 

Parkin, C. W. . . 
Patterson, S. . . . 

Peltier, Theo. . . 
Phillips, J. H. . . 

Pierce, J. P. ... 



Painswick 



Harwood . . 



Orchard 



Glencross . . 



Lakefield 



St. Ola 



Bath 



Bridgenorth 



Little Current. 



Dante 

Prankford . . 

Bobcaygeon . 



Valentia 

Dunkerron . .. 

Dover South . , 
Smith's Falls. 

Port Rowan . . 



Lake Simcoe, from Lovers' Creek, near Barrie, 
on Kempenfeldt Bay, to concession 10 of the 
said Township of Innisfll. 

Rice Lake, Townships Hamilton and Alnwick, 
between Close's Point and Rock Island and 
waters tributary thereto. County of North- 
umberland. 

Townships of Proton, Egremont and Normanby, 
County Grey, and Townships Minto, Arthur 
and West Luther, County Wellington. 

Townships of Mulmur, Mono and East Gara- 
fraxa. 

Townships of Douro, Dummer, east part of 
Smith, Tp. of Burleigh and east half of 
Harvey, Co. Peterboro'. 

Townships Limerick, Tudor, Wollaston, Cashel 
Lake and Grimsthorpe, County Hastings. 

Townships of Adolphustown, South Fredericks- 
burg, Ernestown and Amherst Island, 
County Lennox and Addington. 

Chemong Lake, Lovesick Lake and Deer Bay, 
County Peterboro'. 

District of Algoma lying east of Algoma Mills, 
including Cockburn and Manitoulin Islands. 

River Thames, between the Village of Lewis- 
ville and the easterly limits of Kent County. 

The Trent River from its mouth to Chisholm's 
Rapids, and tributaries thereon, and to 
Trenton Junction. 

In and for the Township of Verulam in the 
County of Victoria and the Tp. of Harvey in 
the County of Peterboro'. 

Townships Mariposa and Ops, County Victoria. 

Holland River known as the north and west 
branches in Tps. Tecumseh, and West Gwil- 
limbury, in Co. Simcoe. 

River Thames from Lewisville to its mouth, also 
the tributaries of said river between these 
points; also the Township of Dover West, 
County Kent. 

County Prontenac lying north of the Townships 
of Kingston and Pittsburg, the Townships of 
North and South Crosby, Bastard, South 
Elmsley and Kitely, County of Leeds, and 
the County of Lanark. 

County of Norfolk. 



1909 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



87 



LIST OF OVERSEERS.— ConWnwed. 



Name. 



Residence. 



District. 



Pilon, Philllppe . 

Poupore, Andrew 
Purcell, H. R. . . , 
Raphael, J. C. . . . 

Rivet, Jos 

Robertson, C. . . . 
Robertson, D. . . , 

Robinson, T. W. 

Robinson, Wm. , 
Russell, Wm. . . . 



Sudbury 



Sargent, W. J. . , 

Sinclair, N 

Slate, George . . 

Small, John . . . 

Smith, William 

Spence, William 

Stanzel, Fred. . 



St. Charles, C. 



Westraeath . . . 
Colebrook .... 
Mallorytown .. 

Sturgeon Falls 



Hlllsburg .... 
Southampton . 

Collingwood . . 

Kilworthy . . . 
Cornwall 

Bronte 

Glenarm 

Rockport 

Grand Valley. 

Gravenhurst . 

Athens 

Carleton Place 



Madoc 



For the Townships of McKim, Broder, Dill, 
Neelon, Garson and Blezard in the District 
of Nipissing. 

For that portion of the River Ottawa lying be- 
tween Deux Joachim and Fort Coulonge. 



Townships 
Barrie. 



Camden, Sheffield, Kaladar and 



Townships of Front of Yonge and Elizabethtown 
in the County of Leeds and over the waters 
of the River St. Lawrence fronting the said 
townships. 

That portion of the District of Nipissing lying 
west and north of the Townships of Widdi- 
field, Merrick, Stewart and Osborne, exclu- 
sive of Lake Temiskaming and its tribu- 
taries. 

Townships of Erin and West Garafraxa. 

County Bruce fronting Lake Huron, lying be- 
tween Southampton and Tobermory Harbor. 

Townships Collingwood and Osprey, County of 
Grey, and the Townships of Nottawasaga 
and Sunnidale, County of Simcoe. 

Severn River and Sparrow Lake. 

In and for the Counties of Stormont and Glen- 
garry, with jurisdiction over so much of the 
River St. Lawrence as lies in front of the 
said counties. 

County of Halton, also County of Wentworth 
north of the canal, and Lake Ontario. 

Balsam Lake, County of Victoria. 

River St. Lawrence between Jackstraw Light 
and Mallorytown Landing. 

Townships of Melancthon, Amaranth and East 
Luther, County Dufferin. 

Lakes Muskoka, Rosseau and Joseph, in the 
District of Parry Sound. 

Charlestown Lake and Its tributaries, County 
Leeds. 

Townships Beckwith, Drummond, Ramsay and 
Pakenham in County Lanark, and Town- 
ships FItzroy, Huntley and Goulbourn in 
County Carleton, with joint jurisdiction over 
the waters of the Township Drummond with 
any other overseer. 

Townships Madoc and Huntington, County Has- 
tings. 



88 



THE EEPORT UPON 



No. 13 



LIST OF OVERSEERS.— Con^nued. 



Name. 



Residence. 



District. 



Storie, R. B. . . 
Stuart, D 



Swltzer, W. H. 
Tarry, A. E. . 



Escott 

Codrington . 

Gooderham . 
Toronto 



Taudvin, J. W. . . . 
Taylor, Fred 

Temple, Jas. M. . . 
Thompson, Henry 
Thurlow, George . 



Kingston . . 
Huntsvllle . 

Dorchester Stn 



Brechin 



Nairn Centre. 



Tillett, R Roach's Point. 



Timlin, M. , 
Titus, E. A. 



Atherley . . . 
Wellington 



Toner, George 



Toole, Ira . . 
Townsend, J. 



Gananoque 



Omemee . . . 
Long Point 



Escott Lake, in the Township of Front of Escott, 
County of Leeds. 

Trent River and tributaries, County of Northum- 
berland, from Chisholm's Rapids to Percy 
Boom. 

Townships of Snowdon, Glamorgan, Monmouth, 
Cardiff, and Harcourt, District of Haliburton. 

Townships of Btobicoke, York and Scarboro, and 
for the City of Toronto, In the County of 
York, with jurisdiction over the inland 
waters of said Tps., and also over Toronto 
and Ashbridge's Bays, and so much of the 
waters of Lake Ontario as lies in front of 
the County of York. 

For the City of Kingston, and for the waters 
fronting the County of Frontenac. 

For the Townships of Stephenson, Stisted, 
Chaffey, Sinclair and Brunei, in the District 
of Muskoka. 

Thames River, easterly to the boundary line be- 
tween Oxford and Middlesex. 

Lake SImcoe and tributaries fronting on Tp. of 
Mara. 

For the Townships of Merritt, Nairn, Lorne and 
Baldwin, In DIst. Algoma. 

North York, with jurisdiction over Holland River 
and that portion of Lake SImcoe lying In 
front of North Gwilllmbury and Georgina 
Townships. 

Lake Couchiching and tributaries fronting Town- 
ships Mara and Rama. 

For that portion of the Bay of Quinte fronting 
on Tp. Ameliasburg lying west of Belleville 
Bridge, also for the waters of Lake Ontario 
fronting on Tps. Ameliasburg and HlUier, 
with the exception of Village of Wellington, 
and including Weller's Bay, Consecon Lake, 
and all Inland waters in said townships. 

River St. Lawrence from foot of Howe Island to 
Rockport, and with joint jurisdiction with 
any other overseer or overseers over the 
Gananoque River from Gananoque to Marble 
Rock. 

Township of Emily, County of Victoria. 

Lyndhurst waters south of Lyndhurst; also 
South and Gananoque Lakes. 



1909 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



89 



LIST OP OVERSEERS. — Continuea. 



Name. 



Residence. 



District. 



Traves, J. A., Sr. 



Turner, S. 



Fraserburg 



London 



Twamley, C 


Cavan 


Vokes, James 


Nanticoke 


Walker, R. J 


Port Credit . . 


Wartman, H. E. ... 


- 
Portsmouth . . 


Watson, Hy 


Toronto 


Watson, J 


Csesarea 


Watt, John 


Peterborough . 


West, Chas 


Holland Ldg. . 



West, Geo, W. 



Wight, J. R. . 



Wigle, L. 



Williams, J. T. 



Wilson, H. 



polland Ldg. 



Newboro' 



Leamington 



Penetang 



Elphin 



For the District of Muskoka, with joint juris- 
diction with any Game and Fisheries over- 
seers who have been or may be appointed 
over the District of Parry Sound. 

City of London, with joint jurisdiction over the 
County of Middlesex with any other over- 
seer or overseers who have been or may 
hereafter be appointed. 

Townships Cavan and Manvers. 

Townships Walpole, Rainham, South Cayuga and 
Dunn, County Haldimand. 

Lake Ontario, fronting County Peel, and for 
Rivers Credit and Etobicoke, tributary to 
said lake. 

For the Township of Kingston in the County of 
Frontenac. 

Province of Ontario. 

Townships of Cartwright and Manvers, the 
waters of Lake Scugog fronting on said town- 
ships and the waters tributary to said lake. 

River Otonabee and tributaries lying between the 
Canadian Pacific Railway Crossing In Peter- 
boro' and the Village of Lakefield. 

Joint jurisdiction along the east bank of the 
Holland River, through the Township of 
East Gwillimbury and along the shore of 
Lake Simcoe, through Township of North 
Gwillimbury in the County of York. 

With joint jurisdiction along east bank of Hol- 
land River, through Township of Gwillim- 
bury, and along the shore of Lake Simcoe, 
through Township of North Gwillimbury, in 
the County of York. 

For the Township of North Crosby extending to 
Smith's Falls on Rideau waters, together 
with the inland lakes and tributaries thereto. 

Township of Maiden, North Colchester, South 
Colchester, North Gosfield, South Gosfield 
and Mersea, in the County of Essex, with 
jurisdiction over so much of the waters of 
Lake Erie as lies In front of said Townships. 

Townships of Matchedash, Tay, Medonte, Tiny, 
Floss, County of Simcoe, and over Christian, 
Beckwith and Giant's Tomb Islands. 

Townships of Dalhousie and North Sherbrooke, 
County of Lanark. 



90 



THE REPORT UPON 



No. 13 



LIST OF 0YER8BKRS.— Concluded. 



Name. 



Residence. 



District. 



Wood, John 


Parry Sound . 


Townships McKenzie, Hagerman, Burpee, Bur- 
ton and Ferrie. 


Worden, F 


Courtice 


County of Durham. 


Wornnoorth, F. L.. 


Arden 


Townships Kennebec and Barrie, County Fron- 
tenac. 


Wright, W. J 


Ice Lake 


Kagawong Lake on Manitoulin Island, District 
of Algoma. 


Younghusband, D. . . 


South March . 


Townships March and Nepean, County Carleton, 



1»09 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



91 



Statement of Revenue received from the Game and Fisheries during the year ended 

October 31st. 1909. 



Game. 



Deer Licenses, 1908 

1909 

Moose Licenses, 1908 

1909 

Non-resident Licenses, 1908 
1909 
Game Dealers' " 1909 
Hotel and Restaurant, 1909 
Cold Storage Licenses, 1909 

Guides' Licenses, 1909 

Fines, 1909 

Confiscations, 1909 



177 75 

238 
19 50 

160 15 

125 00 
1,975 00 

356 00 
67 00 

100 00 
1,992 00 
2,408 69 

629 98 



0\X j»ii.n 



tJ-mvf 



8,249 57 



FISHERIES. 



District. 


Name of Overseer. 


Amount. 




Lake of the Woods and Rainy River 


Blanchard, F 


$ c. 

234 00 

1,027 00 


$ c. 


District. 


Sterling, C.N 

Leitch, P.A 

Armstrong, F. C 

Calbeck, A 


1,261 00 
Q$iR on 


River Nepigon 


983 00 


Lake Superior 


14 00 

2,036 00 

2,947 78 

6 00 

4 00 










Gordon, Walter 

Jackson, H. T 

Johnston, Thomas 

Bradbury. J. R 

Craig, T. A 

Dunn, E 


5,007 78 


Lake Huron (North Channel) , . . . 


16 00 
42 50 

2 00 

96 00 

56 00 

38 00 

7.098 25 

191 00 

4 00 
10 00 




Graham, W. J 






Hembruff , Joseph 

Hunter, William 

Oliver, R. C 






Pitfield, George 

Thurlow, George 

Vincer, William 

Dusang, B. A 

Jermyn, J. W 

Kennedy, John 


7.553 75 


Georgian Bay 


512 58 

843 00 

795 00 

983 15 

1.144 50 

4 00 

315 00 

342 00 

92 00 

26 00 








Knight, C. H 

Laughington, Henry.... 
Malcolmson, J 






Robinson, T. W 

Williams, J. T 

Wood, G. A 

Wood, P. V 

Blunden, H. A 

Jack, James 


5,057 23 


Tiake Huron (proper) and River St. Clair . . 


3,842 00 

15 98 

123 00 

389 00 

982 00 

1.358 00 

2 00 




Karr, Richard 






Kehoe. Daniel 






McMurray, R 






Robertson. D . 

Sarvis, A. E 

Carried forward . . 


6,711 98 








26,574 74 



92 



THE REPORT UPON 



No 13 



Statement of Revenue received — Continued. 



District. 



Lake St. Clair, River Thames and Detroit 
River. 



Lake Erie and Grand River. 



Lake Ontario and Bay of Quinte. 



Counties Frontenac, Leeds, Prescott, Rus 
sell, Carleton, Renfrew, Lanark, Gren- 
ville. 



Name of OverseCi'. 


Amount. 




Brought forward. . 

Campbell, J, D 

Chambers, Thomas 

Chauvin, Victor 

Crotty, John 


$ c. 

10 00 

55 00 
1,420 60 

18 00 

151 00 

310 00 

1,283 50 

62 00 
678 50 

52 38 


$ 0. 

26,574 74 


Holman, Benj 

Laframboise, JRemi 

Little, Richard 

Osborne, Henry 

Peltier, T. ,'. 




Weldoa, J. 


4,040 98 


Briggs, T. J 

Buckley. George 

Burt, William 


229 50 

2,056 00 

10 00 

74 00 

85 00 

1,168 00 

16 32 

40 00 

341 50 

1,423 00 

3,150 25 

3,200 00 

6,712 00 

42 00 

216 00 

3,092 00 

140 00 

10 00 

2,935 25 

1,732 00 


Eyers, John 




Greenwood, T, D 

Henderson, H. A 

Johnson, Henry 

Jones, David 




Kraft, Samuel ......... 

Lee, Edward 




McClennan, Kenneth. . . . 
McEwen, A 




McVittie, James ...... 

Moriarity, J. J 

Phemister, George 

Pierce, J. P 

Scott, William 

Staunton, W. F 

Vokes, James 




Wigle, Lewis 






26,672 82 


Brisbin, Angus 

Conger, David 


701 00 
246 00 
783 00 
635 00 
173 00 
121 00 
439 00 
1,045 50 
337 50 
487 32 

64 00 

16 00 

904 00 

8 00 

717 00 

72 00 
323 00 

66 00 
238 00 

19 00 

176 00 

2 00 

56 00 


Fox, E. R 

Gault, Thomas 

Glass, Irvine 

Hayes, Henry 




Holliday, Henry 

Huffman, E. M 




Hunter, Alfred, Capt 

Kerr, C.J 

McGlynn, P. J 

Mansfield, Thomas 

Murdoch, John 




Maughan, W . . 

May, J.C 

Reeves, H. J 

Sargent, W. J 

Telfer, J. A 

Titus, E. A 




Wadsworth, C. . . .• 

Wood, W. R 

Worden, Frank 

Wright, E. P 






7,629 32 


Andrews, Samuel 

Barr, George 


18 00 
20 00 
22 00 
13 00 
102 00 


Birch, W.J 

Botting, Peter 




Bourgon, J. B 








Carried forward... 




64,917 86 



1909 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



93 



Statement of Revenue received — Continued. 



District. 


Name of Overseer. 


Amount. 






Brought forward. . 


$ c. 


$ c. 

64,917 86 


Counties Frontenac, Leeds, Prescott, Rus- 
sell, Carleton, Renfrew, Lanark, Gren- 
V ille — Continued. 


Boyd, J. H 

Briscoe, W. L 


19 00 
5 00 
8 00 

5 00 
1 00 

62 00 

11 00 

15 00 

181 00 

252 00 

316 00 

30 00 

6 00 
104 00 

19 00 
585 45 

52 00 
252 00 

72 00 

62 00 
677 00 
178 00 

11 00 
312 00 

18 00 




Burke, George 

Bums, D. E 

Covell, H. N 

Davis, J. W 






Devine, John 

Donaldson, W. J 

Drew, Henry 






Esf ord, Henry 






Fisher, James 






Fraser, J. A. . . 

Lambkin, Richard 

Langf ord, Newton 

Loveday, E. T 

McGuire, John 

Mallett, W. H 

Phillips, J. H 

Shillington, N 

Spence, William 

Taudvin, J. W 

Townsend, James 

Wartman, H. E 


' 




Wight, J. R 

Womnoorth, F. L 

Bennett E. C 

Best,S. G 

Blea, Daniel 


3,428 45 


Peterboro,"' Northumberland, Victoria and 
other inland counties. 


22 00 

40 00 

55 60 

7 00 

32 00 

166 00 

378 00 

185 00 

16 00 
6 00 

28 50 

6 00 

12 00 

40 00 

10 00 

26 00 

2 00 

2 00 

32 00 

79 00 
6 00 

88 00 
36 00 
134 00 
28 00 
24 00 
18 00 
2 00 

17 50 

80 00 
12 00 

420 00 

54 00 

403 00 

114 00 

21 00 

96 00 




Bradshaw, A 

Burtcheall, C 






Cassan, C. H 






Cheer, T.H 

Clarkson, William 

Crump, C. J. C 

Cunningham, J. A 

Fenety. E. F 

Gaudrie, E. W 

Gouldie, E. J 

Green, John 






Gunter, R. H 






Hess, J. H 

Johnson, W. H. . , 

Johnston, David 

Johnston. T. H 

Jones, John .... 




, 


Kent, A. J 

KJllen, William 

Lean, Wellington 

McAllister, J. R 

McConkey, R 






McDevitt. T. G 

McElwain, S. C 






Mclntyre, A. W 






McLean, A 






Merriam, Enoch 

Mills, W.F 

Moore, F. J. . 

Morton, J. W 






Nichols, Gamer 

Nichols, Peter 






Ostrom, B. B 

Parker. H. B 

Carried forward... 








68,346 31 



94 



THE EEPOET UPON GAME AND FISHEEIES. 



No. 13 



Statement of Kevenue received — Concluded. 



District. 


Name of Overseer. 


Amount. 






Brought forward. . 


$ c. 


$ c. 
68,346 31 


Peterboro, Northumberland, ^Victoria and 


Parkin, C. W 


6 00 

61 00 

38 00 

322 00 

10 00 

124 00 

2 00 

20 00 

24 00 

32 00 

85 00 

4 00 

48 00 

290 00 




other inland counties — Continued. 


Purcell. H. R 






Rice, M. A. 

Robinson,. William 

Simpson, Joseph 

Smith, William 

Small, John 






Switzer, W. H 

Taylor. F 

Toole, Ira 






Watt, John 






Watson, John 

Widdup, J, W 






Willmott, J. H 

Russell, William 

Senecal, John 

Toner, George 


3.714 60 


River St. Lawrence 


8 00 
23 00 
23 00 








Coulter, S 


54 00 


Lakes Simcoe, Couchiching and Sparrow. . 


5 00 

4 00 
13 00 
74 00 
64 00 
16 00 

4 00 
36 00 
12 00 

2 00 


Htnes, John 






Leadley, R 






McDonald, Jlector 

McGinn, William 

McPhee, Donald 

Mayor, Harry 






Tillett, R 






Timlin, Michael 

Thompson, H. S 

McDonald, S.C 

McKelvie, Daniel 

Parks, G. M 

Reid. C. R 

Rivet, Joseph 


23000 


Nipissing. . . . r = 


928 00 
75 00 

178 00 

32 00 

4 00 






.- 


Licenses issued from 
Office ..." 


1.217 00 


Unclassified 


7:i2 25 
113 62 
400 00 








Fines 






Sale of confiscated tug. . 

Total Fisheries 

Total Game 


1,235 87 






♦ 


74.797 78 




Total 




8,249 57 








83,047 35 




m to 

o *. 






Fourth Annual Report 



OF THE 



Game and Fisheries Department 



1910 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




TORONTO : 
Printed and Published by L. K. CAMERON, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

1911. 



Printed by 

•WILLIAM BRIGGS, 

29-37 Richmond Street West* 

TORONTO 



To His Honour John Morison Gibson, 

a Colonel in the Militia of Canada, 

Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario. 

May it Please Your Honour: 

I have the honour to submit herewith, for the information of Your Honour 
and the Legislative Assembly, the Fourth Annual Report of the Game and Fish- 
eries Department of this Province. 

I have the honour to be. 

Your Honour's most obedient servant, 

J. 0. Reaume^ 

Minister of Public Worles. 

Toronto, 15th December, 1910. 



r3j 



Fourth Annual Report 



OF THE 



Game and Fisheries Department of Ontario 



To the Honourable J. 0. Keaume, 

Minister of Public Worhs. 

Sir, — It is again my duty to submit for your consideration and approval the 
Report of the Department of Game and Fisheries for the twelve months ending 
October 31st, 1910. 

The statistics comprising value of fish caught and plants operated by licensed 
fishermen during the calendar year 1909, and other important matters whicli 
could not be computed or prepared for the ten m.onths ending October 31st, 1909, 
appear in this report, which, with other important matters, I venture to hope 
will receive from you the approbation accorded those preceding it. While there 
has been increased expenditure, due to increased remuneration to overseers and 
others to some extent commensurate with the services rendered, also to the purchase 
of boats and cost of keeping them in commission, this increase has been fully 
justified by a large and satisfactory increase of revenue. 

Enforcing of Law^s and Eegulations. 

As a rule the Department has had less difficulty in enforcing the fishery regu- 
lations than in former years, in a large measure due to the more efficient and 
better equipped staff of overseers, who, with few exceptions, have given the Depart- 
ment faithful and effective services. Still I regret to saj^ that there are a number 
of tug fishermen who in their licenses have most valuable privileges, but who 
in their increasing greed persistently ignore the conditions on which their licenses 
are acquired, to the detriment and injury of others. Those having dharge of 
public affairs have from time to time been compelled in the interests of the public 
at large to withdraw or cancel privileges in consequence of their having been most 
grossly abused. The Government will be justified in future in requiring sub- 
stantial bonds from those fishermen who have failed to observe the conditions on 
which their licenses were issued, when applying for renewal of licenses, the bonds 
to be forfeited to the Government in the event of non-observance of regulations. 
This would have a most salutary effect, not only preventing violations, but also 
protecting the rights of those fishermen who act in accordance with the regulations. 

In consequence of the large increase in the number of hunters in the Province, 
and the increased destructiveness of modern firearms, it has been considered neces- 
sary to reduce the number of deer that can be legally killed in one year to one. 
For similar reasons, the open season for several of our most valuable species of 

[5] 



THE EEPOET UPON" No. 13 



game birds has been largely reduced, it being considered better to have short open 
seasons than alternate close ones. Of course these changes have subjected the 
Department to a large amount of unfair criticism. Many of these critics never 
made a success of anything, and, as a rule, having no business of their own, fondly 
believe they could improve other people's, if they had the opportunity. Many 
of these characters have such exaggerated opinions of their own transcendant 
abilities that they fondly believe that, had the creation of the world been en- 
trusted to them, they could have made a better job of it. Well, poor bodies, it 
pleases them and hurts no one. Invidious and unjust comparisons have been 
the stock in trade of some free lances between the Province and the State of 
Maine, no doubt the result of guess work and ulterior designs. If the mythical 
amount alleged to be spent by tourists annually in the State of Maine to the 
disadvantage of Ontario is not mythical, it may be in order to ascertain where 
these tourists hail from. If, as alleged, ninety per cent, of them are from other 
States of the Union, then it is like a man taking money out of one pocket and 
putting it in the other. There are more non-residents of the Province visit 
Ontario every year than there are non-residents of the United States visit Maine. 
This is an undisputed fact, which leads us to wonder what object residents of the 
Province have had in so frequently and persistently fouling their own nests. 

Inspectors, Wardens, Overseers and Deputy Game and Fishery Wardens have 
given the Department faithful and effective services. I extend my warmest thanks 
to the Provincial police s.taff for their valuable assistance; also to the employees 
of the Department of Lands and Mines, who as a rule have done all possible to 
have the game and fishery laws respected. 

In 1906 it was necessary to report to you as follows: "The difficulty of 
effectually enforcing the fishery laws of the Province should be apparent to those 
who have given this important matter any consideration. The principal obstacle 
in the way of effective administration is the divided jurisdiction." The Department 
of Marine and Fisheries have recently furnished a striking proof of the correct- 
ness of the above contention, the Deputy Minister informing me that the Minister 
had decided to abolish the close season for w'hitefish in the waters of Lake Erie 
fronting on the counties of Norfolk and Elgin. You will observe that this act of 
vandalism was carried out without his having the decency to consult you. Those 
responsible for that order in these days of conservation committed an injury to 
the Province of such magnitude that he and his descendants will be unable to 
atone for to the end of the world. Those hundreds of tons of breeding fish that 
(vere destroyed during the month of November in ijake Erie were not owned 
by the Department who issued the destructive order. Conservation of our natural 
productions is a sacred duty. May nature be kinder to those responsible for 
the order than they have been in obeying her laws. 

Four years ago carp were considered a nuisance by a large portion of the 
community, the Department having numerous applications for bonuses for des- 
troying them. It is gratifying to the Department to know that these fish have 
become quite a commercial factor in the fish business, in fact are becoming one of the 
most important species. 

I trust this is the last we shall hear about abolishing close seasons, and that 
all concerned will in future act more in accordance with common sense and 
justice by reverting to nature's perfect plan of reproduction, even if there are 
elections looming up in the near future. 

The appointment of inspectors at the various shipping stations in the Province 
has had a most salutary effect in preventing sihipment and sale of illegal and 



1911 GAME AND FISHERIES. 7 

immature fish. Reports have been circulated that the fishery laws have not been 
enforced in the Province. Of course it is not difficult to find fault when pre- 
disposed and having an equivocal object in so doing. If the fishery laws have not 
been enforced in the Province during the last four years, I would like to know 
what enforcement they received, and for what purpose, during the twenty years 
preceding 1900. Those whose duty it was to collect arrears due previous to 1900 
have concluded fishery protection was a secondary consideration in such appointments. 
It is generally conceded that the forests regulate the flow of water in the water 
(Courses, and ensure a supply during the dry seasons, while they prevent sudden and 
disastrous floods. While there is some doubt as to the extent of the effect that 
forests have on the rainfall, there is no longer any doubt as to the beneficial effect 
that forests have in conserving water resulting from rainfalls. It has been proved 
that the rainfall in forests, as compared with the open country, is in the propor- 
tion of 100 to 92.0, while the evaporation in the forests is only one-third of that 
in the open country remote from forests. It is alleged that failure to conserve 
the forests in Europe has caused most disastrous results, not only from uncon- 
trollable floods, but also from long continued dry weather, resulting in rivers being 
reduced during the dry seasons to a series of death-dealing stagnant pools, resulting 
from evaporation caused by the unwise destruction of the forests. It is conceded 
that the absolute destruction of the forests is a prolific source of drought, and 
frequently disease. The Department is frequently asked by farmers and others 
having spring streams running through their property what should be done to enable 
them to establish trout ponds or stock the streams. To be successful, the banks of 
both should be planted with trees for the two-fold purpose of preventing evaporation 
and providing shade for the fish; any of the species of willow are suitable for the 
purpose. 

Re-Stocking. 

This year's experience with the raising of bass fingerlings with the single pond 
at Brantford was a pronounced success. Over 50,000 of these were placed in the 
various inland waters of the Province, thus ensuring in a few years good angling, 
both to our own anglers and to the thousands of tourists that visit our Province 
each year. I must here mention that much of the success attained was through 
the faithful service rendered by Mr. J. T. Edwards, who was placed in charge. 
The knowledge he has acquired in the two years will fit him well for the service 
required of him in the more extensive work in connection with the series of ponds, 
which are now partly constructed in the village of Mount Pleasant, five miles from 
Brantford, and in which we hope to raise at least 300,000 of these fingerlings next 
year. This place for the erection of breeding ponds was wisely chosen, as water 
in abundance can be had, and it would be difficult to find a more natural place 
for fisih to congregate. These ponds are situated on the T. H. & B. railway, and only 
a mile and a half from the Grand Trunk, which railways will afford the required 
means for transporting these fish when they are ready for re-stocking purposes. 

Angling Permits. 

More angling permits were sold this year than last, notwithstanding the 
unfortunate strike on one of our most important railways during the height of the 
tourist season, necessarily keeping many away that otherwise would have come to 
enjoy the unexcelled fishing which this Province can offer to its annual visitors. 



S THE EBPORT UPOI^ • No. 13 

The observance of the laws and regulations was much better this year, very few cases 
of infractions of the Act being reported to the Department, and I am of the 
opinion that the tourists, who have gone, in many instances, to great expense in 
erecting cottages and improving their surroundings, will realize that the regula- 
tions enacted were solely in their interest — to protect the fisheries for their enjoy- 
ment, not for one or two years, but for all time to come; and when they realize 
this (and they have already done so in some instances) their co-operation with the 
Department in enforcing the laws and regulations will be an assured fact. 

Patrol Service. 

Never in the history of the Province have the fisheries received the protection 
they had this year through the vigilance of the patrol boats of the Department. From 
the early spring, as soon as the waters were navigable, these boats were on constant 
patrol, never ceasing their vigilance night or day, if the occasion required. The 
logs of the boats, published in this report, will show that thousands and thousands 
of miles have been covered during the period they were in commission. The 
" Edna Ivan" patrolled the Great Lakes, and did not go out of commission until 
the first of December, when, in fact, all fishing had practically ceased for the 
season. Her Master was most painstaking in the performance of his duties, pre- 
venting to a great extent illegal fishing that had in former years been carried 
on in a most brazen-faced way. Had such protection been given to the fishing 
in our Great Lakes in former years, they would not have been in the depleted con- 
dition they were in when handed over to the Province. The few years that this 
Government has had tliis service in its charge have shown such a marked improve- 
ment, notwithstanding the inadequate close seasons, that from all sections of tlie 
country reports have been received expressing satisfaction with the result. The 
" Navarch," w'hich operated on the Bay of Quinte and River St. Lawrence, and to 
some extent the Eideau waters, with its competent crew, always alive to their duties, 
did excellent service, and you had the opportunity of witnessing for yourself tlie 
usefulness of its work. Many illegal nets were discovered by it, and promptly 
confiscated. These waters need the most careful protection of the fisheries, in 
the interest both of the net fisherman and the angler. The " Naiad," which 
patrolled the Kawartha Lakes and Lake Simcoe, rendered most excellent service 
to the Department. The officer in charge spared neither himself nor crew night 
or day when duty required. I must especially mention that a particular service on 
Lake Simcoe during the spawning season of salmon trout, when for days and nights 
the crew had but little sleep, and tlie consequence was that, with the assistance 
of the local overseers, illegal fishing at that time (which in former years had been 
carried on so openly in spite of the local officers, who did their best with the 
means at their disposal) was practically stopped, and the result of these fish being 
protected during their spawning season will in the course of a few years be 
apparent to -all. 

I am glad, sir, that you gave your consent to the purchase of the " Ella C." for 
the protection of the Big and Little Eideau, and the experience with this boat 
during last season certainly justified the expenditure, for these lakes as well as 
the remaining Eideau waters are becoming more popular each year. Handsome 
cottages are being erected, as well as club houses, and their annual visitors reluc- 
tantly leave for their homes. 

The "Vega," which was assigned to the North Channel of Lake Huron and 




On Moon River — Muskoka Lakes District. 




Between Lakes Rosseau and Joseph — Muskoka Lakes District. 



•ry^ .fe^"" 



1911 GAME AND FISHERIES. 9 

Georgian Bay^ never ceased her patrol from the beginning of May until the 15th 
November, and much praise is due to the officer in charge for the thorough manner 
in which he performed his duties. 

Mention must be made of the splendid service given by the launch " Mermaid" 
on the Rideau waters. The Muskoka lakes were better protected by the launch 
" Meenagha/' which for nearly three months patrolled these waters. The launch 
" Florence" on the Inner Channel of Georgian Bay did good service from early 
spring until the ice formed. She was on the constant watch for illegal trap 
nets, which through this service were prevented to a considerable extent. The 
officer in charge of the launch "Aggie B." at Picton faithfully discharged 
his duties patrolling those waters in his district of the Bay of Quinte and Laku 
Ontario. Space forbids me mentioning the other launches which were in com- 
mission for this Department, the officers of which discharged their duties in a 
manner entirely satisfactory to the Department. 

Special Officers. 

These officers who have been appointed for the inspection of fish at various 
shipping points to prevent the shipping of illegal and immature fish, did signal 
service in the protection of the fisheries, and the expense in connection with this 
work was justified. 

The thanks of the Department are due to the railway and navigation companies 
for their assistance in making much easier the enforcement of the laws and regu- 
lations, and to the express companies for their co-operation with the Department 
in the enforcement of the Act. 

Deer. 

The number of carcasses of deer carried hy the express companies durinor the 
open season of 1909 was 3,923, and 24 carcasses of moose. This is a slight decrease 
from the number carried in 1908, but this is accounted for by fewer hunters going 
to the woods in 1909. 

All of which is respectfully submitted by 

Your obedient servant, 

E. TiNSLEY, 

Superintendent. 



GAME AND FISHERIES INSPECTORS. 

Toronto, 30th November, 1910. 
E. TiNSLEY, Esq., 

Superintendent of Game and Fisheries. 

Sir, — I beg to submit report for season 1910. 

Commercial Fishing. 

Commercial fishing has not been as good generally as last season; in a few 
localities the catch has been even better, but the result as a whole has not been 
satisfactory. The fishermen give various reasons for this, most of them saying 



10 THE EEPORT UPON No. 13 



that on account of the warm summer the water in the great lakes was later 
in cooling off, and in consequence of this the trout came on the spawning grounds 
later than usual. They did not catch the usual quantity in October, most of them 
securing only a few good catches. If correct, this was a good thing for the trout. 
There is no doubt but that both trout and whitefish are becoming less plentiful 
each year, and something should be done at once. There are three things that 
might be done to save this very valuable fish: 

1st. — Establish enough hatcheries to take care of all the spawn that is now 
destroyed. 

2nd. — Provide a close season that really protects. 

3rd. — Stop all commercial fishing for a number of years. 

As to the first, there is no doubt that the 'hatcheries are a success, as far as the 
hatching is concerned, no matter what becomes of the young fry afterwards; 
and surely they stand a better chance of coming to maturity than the spawn would 
if deposited naturally, this being at the mercy of the weather and all the other 
enemies that abound in the waters of our great lakes. 

Take Lake Erie as an example. It is to-day the greatest producer of fresh 
water fish known, and has been for years, and none of the lakes have been fished 
to the same extent, and in none have so many young fry from the hatcheries 
been planted. We know that Lake Erie is peculiarly adapted for fish life, but I 
cannot give the whole credit to that; if the rest of our waters were as. prolific, 
we would never hear of the scarcity of fish. 

2nd. We all know that the present close season does not protect and no season 
of thirty days will, if applied to the whole Province, the spawning season .varying 
in different localities. We should have a close season suitable to the different 
waters, or one long enough to cover them all. From the 15th October to the 31st 
December would, I believe, protect both trout and whitefish in all the waters of 
the Province. 

3rd. This is something, I hope, that will never be necessary, and is hardly 
worth mentioning at this time, but if something else is not done it will come. 

The much abused carp of a few years ago is coming into his own. It is 
not long since your Department was being urged to offer a bounty for the 
destruction of these fish. To-day more men are willing to pay a fee for the 
privilege of catching them than we have room for, and this change has taken 
place in about five years. The men now engaged in fishing for carp only are not 
making fortunes, but are doing well, especially those who have built ponds in which 
they place these fish when plentiful and hold them until the scarcity, when good 
prices are obtained. Carp are going to be the cheap fish of the future; they in- 
crease very rapidly, are easily caught at certain seasons,, stand shipping well, and 
arrive in distant markets in good condition. 

I know the danger when I start telling fish stories, but here are two that 
you can believe: One haul of a seine in Rondeau Harbour produced twenty-two 
tons; another man on Lake Erie has shipped nearly one hundred tons of carp, 
all out of his pond. If this kind of thing keeps up, the price will never be very high, 
and will be of great benefit in these days of the high cost of living. 

Game Fish. 

Anglers from nearly all parts of the Province report good catches, most of 
the complaints coming from the Muskoka Lakes. I have heard some complaints 
about illegal net fishing, but not as many as in former years. You will no doubt 



1911 GAME AND FISHERIES. 11 

be able to supply these lakes with a great number of bass from your Brantf ord 
pond's, the success of these ponds being now assured, and when the series of ponds 
now being built are finished, you should be in a position to fill all demands. 

I was pleased to learn that the muscalonge catch was extra good' this year, 
especially in Lake Couchiching, no doubt due to the extra protection provided last 
spring, and the careful patrol of the steamer " Xaiad" during the whole season. 

The laws and regulations governing both commercial fishing and angling 
have been fairly well observed, and your officers have been diligent and faithful 
in the discharge of their duties. A few fines have been imposed for infractions, 
but there will always be some who are willing to take a chance, but not often the 
same one the second time — one lesson seems to be enough. 

Some of your officers are handicapped by not having boats suitable for the 
purpose of patrolling their divisions. In this connection I wish again to call your 
attention to the need of a boat on Lake Superior. From Sault Ste. Marie to Port 
Arthur there is no way to protect the shore of this lake except by boat, one that 
would be on duty the whole of the season; not a large boat, but one that would be 
safe and could get into the smaller harbours. The streams coming into this lake 
are the home of the brook trout, and deserve more attention than they have re- 
ceived in the past, and it can only be done by providing a suitable boat. 

Game. 

"We have not had full returns of the number of deer and moose killed this 
season, but they are reported as being plentiful. Partridge very plentiful, the 
close season of two years, and the favourable winters coming together, producing 
this result. Is it not time some limit should be placed on the number of these 
birds that should fall to one gun? We hear of one man getting sixty-eight in one 
day; another kills over two hundred during the season, and was not out the whole 
of it, either. It is a shame to preserve these birds for two years, and then have 
them slaughtered like this. A limited number each day, or a limit for the season,' 
would be an improvement. I know it would be difficult to enforce, but all these 
things help some. We know the limit helps in bass and muscalonge fishing, and 
why not in this? 

From a great many of your officers I hear as to the difficulty they have where 
the open season for two kinds of game frequenting the same grounds or waters are 
not alike; for instance, the open season for snipe and other shore birds opens on 
the Ist September, and that for ducks on the 15th of the same month. The tempta-' 
tion must be great to a hunter if many ducks are around during that fifteen days, 
and of course your officers cannot object to guns being carried in places frequented 
by both kinds of bir^s. 

Trappers. 

I strongly recommend that all trappers, either resident or non-resident, be 
compelled to take out a license. This would not only be a source of revenue, but 
would also be a protection against poachers. Every licensed trapper would be in- 
clined to see that no illegal work was done, and in these times of high prices for 
all kinds of furs a small fee will not be a hardship, in fact a great many trappers 
would be glad to have one imposed. It would also be well to furnish each license 
holder with a blank on which to make returns of his catch ; you would then know 
something about the value of this business. I am told of a man and boy who sold 



la THE EEPOBT UPON No. 13 

I '_ 

over four thousand dollars' worth of furs last spring, and three other men who 
came out with twenty-seven hundred dollars' worth; those were on the north shore 
of Lake Superior. And we know these men go into that country with enough flour, 
salt and tea to last them the winter, and possibly a side of bacon. Can we think 
that the game does not suffer? and why should not the Province get some return 
for this as well as from the fish? 

I have the honour to be 

Your obedient servant, 

Wm. W. Holden, 

Inspector. 



E. TiNSLEY, Esq., 

Superintendent of Game and Fisheries. 

I have the honour to submit my annual report of the Game and Fisheries in 
my division for the fiscal year from the 1st of November, 1909, to the 31st 
October, 1910. In June last you promoted me from the position of Game and 
Fishery Warden to that of Inspector of Game and Fisheries, which position I 
trust I will be able to fill to the satisfaction of the Department. 

I have found that the laws and regulations have been fairly well observed. 
In some instances I have been satisfied with imposing a small fine, knowing that 
would be a sufficient warning to evildoers not to commit a similar offence; but 
in other instances I have felt that it has been necessary to impose a much greater 
fine, and this I have never hesitated in doing when I found the offence justified it. 

In the Bay of Quinte I believe, from my own observation and from the re- 
ports received from the overseers, that the fishermen have obeyed the conditions 
upon which their licenses were issued, and also observed the close seasons, and I 
am satisfied that the fishing in the Bay of Quinte has not been as good for many 
years. This good fishing is accounted for to a great extent by the constant patrol 
of the Government Fishery Protection Cruiser, which has rendered the Depart- 
ment excellent service during the past year. 

I might also mention the patrol boat that operated on Lake Simcoe, as well as 
on the waters of the Trent Canal. The services which she has given have been 
of such a nature that illegal fishing was to a very great extent stopped, and the 
Department must be congratulated upon the excellent crews which were on both 
these boats. 

The angling in the Bay of Quinte is much better this year than formerly, 
due, in my opinion, to the hoop nets, which capture so many of the coarse fish 
that prey upon the bass and maskinonge, which form the chief attraction for 
tourist in the way of fishing during the summer months. 

The number of gasoline launches which the Government have either rented 
or purchased for patrol service in the eastern portion of the Province have been 
on duty during the greater part of the tourist season, and some did patrol work 
as early as May, and continued until late on in October. There is no doubt that 
this patrol service is awakening, not only the resident, but the non-resident, to 
the fact that the Department no longer will tolerate the wilful breaking of the 
laws and regulations that a wise Legislature enacts. 

I would also recommend that a patrol boat be secured for the Muskoka Lakes. 
I know that it would have a deterrent effect on the law breakers of that part of 
the Province. Some years ago these lakes were noted for their excellent angling. 



1911 GAME AND FISHERIES. 13 

but I have been told by those who visit those grounds that angling is very poor, 
caused no doubt by illegal netting. 

I also would recommend that the boats belonging to the fish buyers be 
licensed at a fee of not less than $50. This would prevent a great many illegal 
fish being caught, for the reason that there would be no object in fishermen set- 
ting nets for this purpose if they had no sale for them after they were caught. 
Several buyers have this past season been found trafficking in illegal fish, and, 
in fact, one concealed a maskinonge in the middle of a box of whitefish, thinking 
by that means to elude detection. 

I think that the season for ducks, plover, snipe, etc., should begin on the 
same date, viz., September 15th, and that no winter trapping for rats should be 
allowed, for this cannot be done without injuring their houses. I also recommend 
that the sale of wild ducks be prohibited for a period of three years; also that 
trappers be licensed. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Alf. Hunter. 
Inspector of Game and Fisheries. 



GAME AND FISHERIES WARDENS. 

Warden Wm. Burt, of Simcoe, reports: 

Speckled Trout. 

These fish are still very scarce in his district. He heard of a few good 
catches during the year, but they were very rare. The experiment of planting 
the trout fry last summer has apparently been successful. He has had reports 
from several of the streams where the fry seem to be thriving, and the people 
who report are of opinion that the young fish that are seen are the ones that were 
planted last spring. 

Bass. 

The bass fishing in Long Point Bay has been excellent. When weather con- 
ditions were favourable for fishing, no angler had any difficulty in getting his 
legal number of fish. The Brantford experiment of raising the bass for distribu- 
tion has also been successful. 

Commercial Fish. 

The fishermen report the conditions in regard to commercial fish about the 
same as at the time of his last annual report. The fishermen who have been ex- 
perimenting with carp ponds have not yet demonstrated that this is a successful 
manner of handling the?e coarse fish. The difficulty seems to be that in ponds 
suitable for growing the carp the bottoms are so soft, and the fish root about in 
the bottom so much, that it is impossible to catch them out of the pond when 



14 THE EEPORT UPON Iso. 13 

wanted for the market. Of course, the fishermen take quite a number out of the 
ponds, but he has yet to hear of a single catch in which they have taken anything 
like the quantity that were placed in the ponds. 

Quail and Euffed Grouse. 

The increase in these birds has been practically nil during the year. The 
sportsmen report that the ruined grouse appear not to have increased since- his last 
report. This is attributed by many of them to the fact that the weather condi- 
tions during the breeding season were not favourable for raising the young birds. 
He would again recommend that the shooting of quail and ruffed grouse be pro- 
hibited for another year. 

Woodcock. 

This bird is still very scarce in his district. He has only heard of a few 
being killed. 

Black Squirrels. 

There has been a decided increase in the number of black and grey squirrels 
in his district. It is quite a common thing, while driving along the country 
roads, to see a black or grey squirrel running along the fences. 

Wild Geese. 

He can find no change in the habits of these birds. There are practically 
none of them shot in his district. 

Wild Ducks. 

The district around Long Point Bay report that the wild ducks are more 
numerous even than last year. The weather conditions having been more favour- 
able, large bags have been fairly numerous this year. It is also reported that a 
considerable number of black ducks have bred in the marshes about Long Point 
Bay this season. Before the settlement of the north-west country, the black duck 
was never known to breed in this neighbourhood. It is supposed that their being 
disturbed so much by the country being settled in the North-West, they have 
changed their breeding place, and are now breeding much more numerously in 
the more southern marshes, where they are protected. He is also of the opinion 
that the fact that the marshes about Long Point Bay are all owned by shooting 
clubs, who limit their members' shooting, has had a beneficial effect in the in- 
crease of the number of ducks that visit that vicinity. Where the public have 
free access to the marshes, the ducks have no rest, and it appears to him that, 
owing to the comparatively small amount of shooting done at them in Long Point 
Bay, a number of ducks have changed their line of flight, so that they now get 
the ducks that formerly in their autumn migration pursued another route. 

Fur-bearing Animals. 

The muskrat is the main fur-bearing animal in his district, and is reported 
to be fairly numerous again this fall. The trappers found last spring that a 



1911 ' GAME AND FISHERIES. 15 

great many of the muskrats had been killed during the winter through the low- 
ncss of the waters and their inability to burrow out of their houses to secure a 
supply of food. They very wisely limited their catch in the different marshes 
about Long Point Bay, leaving a sufficient quantity for breeding purposes, so 
that if weather conditions are good there is a possibility of a fair catch next 
year. The purcliasers of fur report tliat the rats killed in this district in the 
month of December do not have a good quality of fur. The consequence is that 
the owners of the land upon which the rats breed never attempt to trap them 
until spring. The few December rats that are killed are taken by the poachers. 
He would, therefore, recommend that the killing of muskrats in the month of 
December be prohibited, and that the use of dogs, spears and guns in the taking 
of muskrats also be prohibited. His reasons for this have been reported to your 
Department in the past. 

He finds that the game laws have been well observed in his district this year. 
The Deputy Wardens and Overseers have been attentive in the discharge of their 
duties, and tihere have been practically no complaints of infringement of the law. 
Warden Victor CJiaiLvin, of Windsor, reports that the fishermen are complain- 
ing of light fishing for the year, but they have just started to catch whitefish 
for the fall fishing, and are expecting them to be very plentiful. The increase of 
herring north of Pelee Island and west of Point Pelee is quite marked in 
pound nets. Last year when the fishing tug was fishing with gill nets along the 
bay and west of Point Pelee, some of the fishermen caught about three to five 
hundred pounds all the fall, so he hears to-day that they are catching three to 
five hundred pounds to a lift. He says the mesh for hoop nets in Lake St. Clair 
should be an inch and a half square. Sturgeon fishing in Lake St. Clair is good 
this year, other fish very light. The fishery law is very well observed, he having 
had only two seizures this year — one of 90 American gill nets in Lake Erie, and 
about 1,400 lbs. of fish, which have been sold for $56, and $150 for the nets; the 
other from Lake Superior, with 800 lbs. of small whitefish, which was donated to 
the Home for the Friendless. There is lots of improvement done by the fisher- 
men in catching and shipping fish. All the overseers in his district have done 
splendid work in the discharge of their duties. 

Re Game. Quails are reported to be very numerous amongst the farmers, 
partridge very scarce, also black and grey squirrels. He thinks that quails, part- 
ridge and squirrels should have the same open season, as the partridge being so 
early this year there has been lots of trouble protecting the quail. Muskrats seem 
to be as plentiful as other years, and he says all trappers who hunt them should 
be licensed for the benefit of their protection. Wild geese are flying and flocking 
for the south. There are a few stopping there, and none of them have been shot. 
Wild ducks of all kinds are there now, and are very plentiful. A good many of 
them have, been shot by sportsmen. In the Detroit Eiver black and grey ducks 
are plentiful, and hardly any other kind of duck shot in the river. There have 
been numbers of redhead, bluebill and other ducks in the waters of Mitchell's 
Bay, St. Clair Flats, Long Point, and Rondeau. The sportsmen claim that ducks 
are more numerous this year on the lakes than in previous years. The game law 
has been fairly well observed in his district. There have been no prosecutions 
He thinks muskrats should not be taken or killed before the 15th day of February 
until the 15th April of the same year. 

Warden Geo. M. Parks, of North Bay, reports that American anglers have 
found splendid fishing in Lake Nipissing and tributaries this season, a marked 

2 Q.Tf. 



16 THE EEPOET UPON No. 13 

improvement being noticed over previous years, due no doubt to the abolition of 
net licenses in these waters. Bass fishing has been especially good, and tourists 
have expressed great satisfaction at the excellent fishing there, which is reputed 
now to be the best in the Dominion. The number of tourists visiting that sec- 
tion is increasing, and very few instances have occurred of law violation in re- 
gard to permits, etc. 

Speckled trout are still plentiful in the northern streams. Guides are begin- 
ning to realize the benefit of taking out guide licenses, and American tourists are 
now asking for licensed guides in preference to those without licenses, realizing 
that the license is a badge of competency and good service. Partridges are very 
plentiful, due to the wise provision of the two years close season, which has per- 
mitted them to multiply very rapidly. 

The revision of the game laws pertaining to deer, restricting each hunter to 
one deer, will, in his opinion, have very good results, as the large number of deer 
shipped out each season, under previous regulations allowing two deer to each 
hunter, was rapidly decimating the species. 

In travelling the northern sections he found that moose were reported as 
plentiful, and be met hunters with some very fine specimens of moose heads. 

There are many flocks of plover and snipe about Lake Kipissing and other 
parts of the district. 

Beaver and otter are increasing very rapidly. 

Ducks are fairly numerous, especially in the northern section of the district. 

Wild geese are seldom seen in the vicinity of Lake Nipissing, but farther 
north can be found in considerable numbers. 

The suggestion made that a general gun license be provided is in his opinion 
a good one, as it would help to check the indiscriminate carrying of guns, shoot- 
ing birds, etc., by foreigners employed on railway construction, and small boys. 

Warden J. T. Robinson, of Sault Ste. Marie, reports that he has been over 
his district twice, and is pleased to say that he finds a very great improvement in 
general. There is a desire on the part of t!iose engaged in fishing, trapping and 
hunting, as well as settlers, to protect the game and fish, and observe the law. 
Violations of the law are not frequent in his district. Some who have tried it 
have been punished, and it seems to be a warning to others to observe the law. 

Commercial fishing has been up to the average. Fishermen say that fish is 
on the increase along the north shore of Lake Superior. The reason for this in- 
crease is owing to the preserve the Department keeps in Lake Superior, which is 
a good breeding ground, and if licenses are not allowed in this preserve for a few 
years the fish will be as plentiful as they were a few years ago. This preserve 
should be protected with a patrol boat. There should be no tug licenses granted 
for Gargantua ; the mesh should be nothing less than five inches, and then the 
small fish would get a chance to mature. The law has been well observed by the 
fishermen in his district. 

Speckled trout is plentiful, and on the inland lakes and streams angling 
parties report good catches. There are complaints in the Soo about the tourists 
getting permits to angle. The anglers have obeyed the laws well, as no violations 
have come to his notice. 

The preserve in Lake Superior is one of the best breeding grounds for white- 
fish and lake trout in the Province, and if the Department refuse to grant fishing 
licenses in the preserve, Lake Superior will be well stocked with fish in a few 
vears. 



1911 GAME AND FISiHERIES. 17 

Deer and Moose are plentiful there, although a great many were shot in the 
season of 1909. It was a good spring for the deer this year, as there was no crust 
on the snow, and the wolves had no chance to catch them. It was a wise move 
on the part of the Government to cut the number down to one deer this season. 
He would like to see the Department stop dogs running deer in the hunting sea- 
son. The law was well observed during the close season. 

Ruffed grouse and partridge are plentiful in that district, and he has seen 
more partridge than for years. The open season for one month is just right. The 
hatching season was fine, so that accounts for the number of birds now. 

Wild ducks are numerous along the north shore of Georgian Bay and Lake 
Huron, but there are not many up in Lake Superior, as there are no feeding 
grounds. The open season for ducks is fifteen days too late there, owing to the 
American season opening on the 1st September. The ducks are driven from our 
waters into American waters, and the Americans shoot them. He thinks it would 
be well to have the season on the border open the same time as on the American 
side. 

He has not seen any wild geese in his district, and quail and woodcock are 
also scarce. Black and grey squirrels are almost a thing of the past in that north 
country. Snipe and plover are not at all plentiful in Algoma. 

Beaver are becoming plentiful in that part, but it is most difficult to protect 
them, owing to the high value of their skins and the easy way to get them out of 
the country. They are smuggled out in freight boats going to Montreal, and can- 
not be detected; but he thinks that stopping all trapping before the 1st December 
will stop a great deal of illegal work. He would like to see the Department put 
a small license fee on Canadian trappers, as a number come from the Province 
of Quebec up there, and it is almost impossible to watch them. Mink and musk- 
rat are plentiful, owing fo the strict watch kept on the trappers. "Wolves are not 
as numerous as some report them, but they have more than is good for the wel- 
fare of the deer. There are not many of them killed in his district. They are 
80 hard to. catch that hunters and trappers do not bother with them. Some 
that do hunt them say that if the bounty was $25, they could make a business 
of hunting them. 

He says that if the department would put a license for carr3dng guns, say 
$2 for each gun, it would be a great belp in preserving the game in the north 
country. 

Warden 0. N. Sterling, of Kenora, reports that in the western portion 
of iiis district the fishermen report a better season than they have had for the 
past eight years, more especially on Lake of the Woods and Shoal Lake. This is 
owing chiefly to the large shipments, during the last three years of coarse fish, 
which prey upon the spawn of the finer and more valuable fish, such as whitefish, 
pickerel and trout. In the eastern portion of the district, the fishermen tell him 
they have had a poorer season than for a number of years — as a matter of fact 
some of the fishermen of Rossport have barely made their expenses. There have 
been a few infractions of the fishery laws in the northern portion of his district, 
and along the boundary line between Minnesota and Ontario on the Lake of the 
Woods. It is a very difficult matter to secure a conviction in these cases owing 
to the difficulties of travel. He respectfully suggests the appointment of more 
deputy wardens, and also the commission of a fast patrol boat on Lake of the 
Woods near the international boundary. He is of the opinion that the Depart- 
ment would be wise in permitting no smaller gill-net than 5-inch mesh, as in the 



18 THE EEPiOET UPON No. 13 



western portion of that district a great many fishermen are using 5I/2 and 6-inch 
and meet with the best results, as they get a larger and better grade of fish. 

Moose are very plentiful in the district, particularly in the western portion. 
He assigns as a principal reason for this increase, the vast forest fires in Minne- 
sota, which have driven the game north. They are very much bunched owing 
to numerous small bush fires in his own district, which have burnt over a lot of 
high land, leaving the green valleys and swamps as the only feeding grounds for 
game. 

Caribou. 

Caribou are not so plentiful in the district this year as in former years. 
Many of the Indians tell him this is owing to the great increase of wolves. He 
learns on the best authority that never before have so many caribou been seen in 
Keewatin district as at the present time. 

Deer. 

Red deer are very numerous all over the district. He would strongly urge 
the Department to prohibit the running of hounds. 

Beaver and Otter, 

So far as he can learn both beaver and otter are increasing in some parts of 
the district, but the high price for their pelts is a temptation which few trappers 
can resist, though it is almost impossible to obtain a conviction. 

Mink AND MusKRAT. 

Eeports and indications show that these animals are fully up to the standard 
of last year. In the western portion of the district he has been very successful 
in preventing the destruction of muskrat houses by the Indians, but with his 
limited help he finds it difficult to keep a watch on them at all times. 

Partridge and Grouse. 

A large number of partridge have been destroyed by bush fires, but in spite 
of this fact they are more plentiful than for a number of years past. Grouse are 
just about the same as last year. 

Ducks and Geese. 

In the western part of the district ducks are very plentiful, but wild geese 
are about as usual. 

Warden J. H. Willmott, of Beaumaris, for the districts of Muskoka and 
Parry Sound, reports re fish that the past season has compared favorably with 
former ones as regards angling. Of course, there is always a hue and cry of " No 
fish*' raised by would-be fishermen, but his personal experience is that, with the 
right bait, one can generally go out and procure his legal number. This refers 
principally to the Muskoka lakes. The planting of bass fry from the Brantford 
hatchery has been most successful, and has met with the approbation of all classes. 
The fry has always arrived in good condition, and carries much better than the 




At head of Lake Joseph — Muskoka Lakes District. 




Ou Lake liosseau — Muskoka Lakes District. 



1911 GAME AND FISHERIES. ID 

adult fish which were formerly sent up. The success with which the experiment 
of propagating bass at Brantford has met with will no doubt justify the Depart- 
ment in going into this to a much larger extent. 

Re Game. — Deer are reported very plentiful in the northern portion of Parry 
Sound, and are also increasing in places which have been depleted in former 
years, and which have had comparative rest for some time. The Department is 
to be congratulated for putting into force the recent amendment, limiting each 
hunter to one deer. This will do away to a great extent with the shooting for 
sale. The prohibition of hounds into the north country will also have a salutary 
effect, as it will no doubt prevent many hunters going north. Whilst sympathiz- 
ing with these men for being done out of their greatest annual treat, it is most 
gratifying to feel that our deer will have one year of semi-protection. 

Partridge. 

In consequence of the close seasons for these birds for the past two years, 
the increase has undoubtedly justified the step. In many places these birds are 
plentiful, whilst in others, owing no doubt to certain conditions, they are reported 
scarce. 

Beaveb. 

These animals have increased to a very great extent in many of their former 
haunts, but in spite of prosecutions he is afraid that many are illegally procured, 
and find their way to the furriers and dealers. 



SPECIAL GAME AND FISHERIES OVERSEERS. 

Overseer Daniel Blea, of Uplands, reports that upon a full and close inspection 
he found that the fish were plentiful, and the sportsmen who visited the district 
were amply repaid for their time and expense in the quality of sport they had, and 
numerous expressions of satisfaction have been made to him. He is sorry to 
report that he has the best of reasons for stating that the law is being violated by 
members of large clubs, by only a portion of their members taking out a license,, 
and at the termination of their visit their license is transferred to other members. 
To overcome this he would suggest that all licenses are made returnaible in person 
by the original licensee. 

"With respect to the partridge, he would say that he has personally covered a 
great deal of ground before and since the season opened, has also made enquiries 
from fire rangers and others, and has but one conclusion to come to, viz., that the 
birds are not as plentiful as is generally expected. Therefore he thinks it would be 
advisable to again proliibit the shooting of them from season to season until they 
become more plentiful. 

He finds upon careful investigation that the deer are holding their own, and 
thinks that if the open season were made fifteen days earlier, good results would 
follow. He would advise the continuance of one deer per man, and would suggest 
that the sale of venison throughout the Province be prohibited. 

As to the fur-bearing animals he is pleased to note that they are increasing in 
numbers, and the law is being better observed by residents and visitors generally. 



20 THE EEPOKT UPON No. 13 

Overseer A. Drouillard, of WalkerviUe, reports that .he is pleased to say that 
there was a general and marked improvenient in the observance of the law, and the 
development of the fisheries in his district, and in consequence he cannot offer 
many suggestions to improve the condition, with but one exception, viz., the 
absence of any regulation dealing with the size of " Blues " and " Perch " which 
he has observed are being shipped from points along Lake Erie, and which are 
unusually small in size, and he would earnestly recommend prohibiting taking 
such small fisih from the waters. 

He has also observed an increase in the catch along Lake St. Clair. 

Overseer Henry Watson, of Toronto, reports that the net fishing in this 
vicinity remains about the same from year to year, with the exception of herring, 
and th^ajt gets worse every year, in fact, only an odd fisiherman sets for them, as they 
have found it does not pay them, and until all the fis'hermen on this side of the 
lake are made to use nothing smaller than three-inch m-esh will it he any different. 
The larger herring from Lake Erie drives our small fish out of the market and 
they have to be turned into ciscoes to be got rid of. 

Lake Erie herrings bring about three times as much per fish as ours. 

Rod fishing around Toronto is a thing of the past, the water being so badly 
polluted that even the carp refuse to live in it, but better things are hoped for on 
completion of the trunk 'sewer. The fishermen live up to the law, very little 
illegal fishing being attempted in prohibited waters by poachers. 

With regard to illegal shipments, some of the dealers and large fish com- 
panies still continue to traffic in illegal fish, but the severe treatment handed out 
to them will no doubt have a salutary effect. 

The game act was never better respected around Toronto than during the past 
season. The motor boat people gave very little trouble, and some of the Island 
poachers have turned game protectors. Not quite as many ducks remained over 
with us through the winter as the year previous, none were killed on this side of 
the lake but w^hen driven to the American side by southerly gales quite a number 
of them were slaughtered; not being molested here they become very tame. 

The illegal shipments seized in transit get less every year. All the express 
companies give every assistance to make the traffic as difficult as possible. 

He interviewed over one hundred deer hunters returning from all parts of the 
northern country with reference to both the deer and partridge. The majority 
report the deer as greatly on the decrease. In proportion the number of fawns 
that passed through the Union Station was greatly in excess of other years. They 
found partridge fairly plentiful in most places in the early part of the season, but 
after the snow came they changed their location and were hard to find. 



GAME AND FISHERIES OVERSEERS. 

Lake of the Woods and Rainy River Distkict. 

Overseer Fred Blanchard, of Fort Frances, reports that he received the patrol 
boat " Wenonah " from Warden C. N, Sterling, of Kenora, at the town of Rainy 
River, proceeded with boat to Fort Frances, and portaged it into Rainy Lake. He 
found the boat very useful in patrolling the international boundary of Rainy Lake. 



1911 GAME AND FISHERIES. 21 



He seized one rowboat Avith two Americans for illegal fishing, and got a conviction. 
He destroyed about 1,000 yards of small mesb nets and a quantity of sturgeon 
hooks on line. Whitefish are getting smaller, but other fish in this lake are holding 
their own. There have not been many tourists this summer, which he accounts for 
by the large number of bush fires in those parts. 

Big game and also partridges are on the increase all over the district. 

River Nepigon. 

Overseer P. A. Leitch, of Nepigon, reports that the number of tourists visit- 
ing the Nepigon Avaters was not quite up to the average this season, yet they all 
invariably reported a very successful and enjoyable trip. A number of 5, 6 and 7 
pounders being taken during the season. 

A shortage of guides at times (owing to so much other work in way of trans- 
porting supplies to construction camps on Transcontinental Railway, and survey 
parties on Canadian Northern Railway) has greatly interfered with the tourist 
traffic the past two or three years. 

This transporting of supplies has given steady employment to a large number 
of Indians, at same wages as they received from tourists, while the tourist traffic 
for them is irregular and uncertain, they thus have taken to this transportation 
work in preference to the tourist work, leaving a shortage of good guides for tourists 

The present method of making the trip on the Nepigon River, requiring two 
guides to each tourist fishing in addition to a cook for the party, makes the trip 
quite an expensive one, and only those of considerable means make the trip, but 
with the completion of the Transcontinental Railway, which is building along the 
north end of Lake Nepigon, and a spur two miles long down from their main 
line to the lake at Ombobika Bay, will give rail connection with the lake. 

The Canadian Northern Railway main line from Port Arthur to Sudbury also 
touches Lake Nepigon along the east shore of Orient Bay according to their line as 
being located by their surveyors. This line will go within four or five miles of 
Virgin Falls, on the Nepigon River. When these lines are in operation it will 
simplify matters, so that so many guides will not be necessiary, and thus greatly 
reduce the cost of the trip, as no doubt proper steamers will be provided on Lake 
Nepigon. This lake will then become the greatest resort for tourists in the pro- 
vince, owing to its magnificent scenery, numerous islands, clear sparkling water, 
and teeming with fi^h of the following varieties, speckled trout, lake trout up to 
25 and 30 lbs., whitefish, pickerel, pike and sturgeon; while many of the rivers 
flowing into Lake Nepigon are well stocked with speckled trout. The White 
Sand River, particularly, is noted for speckled trout up to 2, 3 and 4 pounds. 
This lake in a few years should be the source of a handsome revenue to the 
province both directly and indirectly. 

With regards to the present methods of issuing angling permits for these 
waters he begs to report that at various times they have parties w'ho are passing- 
over the continent from ocean to ocean, who have a few days to spare before their 
steamiship sails, and who stop off there to spend these few days fishing, but when 
they find that a fee of $15.00 is charged for a permit for two weeks, which is the 
shortest period for Av'hich the regulations permit angling permits to be issued, they 
object to paying such a high fee for a few days fishing, and abandon the idea of 
the trip. If it were arranged so that permits might be issued for an,y numiber of 
days from one to seven days at so much per day these parties vrould then make the 
trip, and the province receive the fee besides considerable free advertising among 
the friends of such parties, whereas at present they get neither. 



22 THE KEPORT UPOX No. 13 

The same system should be adopted with regard to resident permits. As the 
residents of Nepigon have no other waters wherein to fish without going consider- 
able distance from home, and would on several occasions during the season, like to 
spend part of a day, or a day, fishing the Nepigon, whereas they cannot spare the 
time to take more than one day off at a time, and under the present system they 
would have to pay $5.00 for permit for one day's fishing, and possibly before they 
•could take another day's fishing their permit for two weeks would have expired. 

These permits should also, he thinks, be issuable for from one to seven days 
at so much per day. 

When Lake ISTepigon becomes in demand as a tourist resort he would point 
out the fact that the present regulations do not permit of issuing angling permits 
for a longer period than four weeks, and he would recommend that permits for 
Lake Nepigon be issuable for three months to enable tourists making a permanent 
•camp or having a summer cottage and spending all summer thereat. This he 
thinks is necessary to make a permanent resort of the Nepigon waters. 

Many cariboo, moose and red deer have been seen during the season. Moose 
and red deer, particularly, are becoming very numerous. 

Partridges also have increased in numbers greatly during the past two or 
three years. 

Lake Superior. 

Overseer A. Calbecl', of Sault Ste. Marie, reports that during the month of 
"Kovember, 1909, he patrolled the waters of the north s;hore of Lake Superior 
between Sault Ste. Marie and Otter Head — 'by the shore line a distance of 150 
miles, in the sail and gasioline boat " Grlen Campbell." At Garrett's Harbor he 
•seized two tugs with nets and fish, and brought same to Sault Ste. Marie, when the 
same was disposed of by the Department ; and at the Lizard Islands he found that 
iihere had been illegal fishing in those waters which have been set apart by the 
Department in which no fishing is allowed. This illegal work was done a'bout the 
first of October before the patrol boat was put on. This patrol boat prevented a 
great amount of illegal fishing by scoop nets in the mouths of the Montreal and 
other rivers. During the month of December, on account of the ice forming, there 
was very little fishing done. 

In January he proceeded to T'heasalon, and seized a quantity of nets and fish 
from several fishermen there who were fishing vtdthout a license; this case was 
•settled by Game and Fishery Warden Hunter. He also visited Goulais Bay dur- 
ing the same month, and stopped the fishing there until the fishermen received 
their license. 

There were 4 tug licenses, 1 gasoline launch, and 31 sailboat licenses issued 
this season; 24 of those boat licenses have been issued between Sault Ste. Marie 
and Batchewana, and as the town of Sault Ste. Marie is depending on these waters 
for their fish supply he would strongly recommend that this number be not 
increased. An effort was made this fall by a party to have the Board of Trade 
there recommend the granting of a tug license in those waters. If this was done 
it would practically deplete those waters in two seasons, as the ohief catch is now 
during the winter months and the early spring. During the summer months 
many of the fishermen cease fishing in those waters and move up the lake, and he 
wx>uld strongly recom^mend that the licensees be compelled to fish in the waters in 
"wfeicih the licenses were first issued, and not be allowed to move on to grounds 
occupied by other fishermen. During the months of July, August and September 



1911 GAME AND FISHERIES. 23 

the local dealers here are unable to obtain any whitelish to supply the hotels 
during tlie tourist season, which, if continued, will place Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., at 
a great disadvantage with Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, where they have whitefish 
daily during the summer months. Local dealers claim that the Dominion Fish 
Co., informed them they were catching no white fish, and could not supply the 
local trade there. As a matter of fact he has gone over the books of the company 
at one station only (Gargantua), and he found that enough whitefish were caught 
to supply the town. 

During a part of this season one of the Dominion Fish Co.'s tugs received a 
license to fish off Gargantua, and was allowed during the latter part of the 
season to move to Michipicoten Harbor. He thinks that, as in the case of sail- 
boats they should be compelled to fish during the season where their license calls 
for. And he would again respectfully recommend that another season this tug 
license be transferred to Michipicoten Island. 

The catch of fish this season, according to reports, is about the same as last — 
that is lake trout. There has been a decrease in the catch of whitefish caused by 
over fishing, and unless the export of this valuable fish is stopped in the eastern 
part of Lake Superior these waters will soon be depleted. 

One hundred and eighteen angling permits at $2 each, and 19 at $5 each were 
sold this season. These anglers employ guides, and their fitting out at S. Ste. 
Marie creates quite a trade, and it also shows the necessity of some supervision 
being maintained on the different streams during the tourist season. 

He was unable to give any definite information in respect to the way the law 
was observed by fishermen and anglers who fish in the different trout streams 
flowing into Lake Superior. During the past season he has been unable to give 
those waters and streams any supervision, and in fact there has been no super- 
vision whatever. Preserves are set apart in which no fishing is allowed, but with 
fishermen fishing around the same, and no officer present at times, it is not to be 
wondered at if they take advantage of his absence. 

About the 1st March he received information that illegal trapping for beaver 
was being carried on along the line of the A.C.E. During the month of April he 
went up the A.C.E. to one of the lumber camps and secured a conviction against a 
jobber who was allowing his dogs to run deer. He also found one beaver skin in 
the possession of a farmer, residing about ten miles from S. Ste. Marie, but as he 
swore he had had this skin in his possession for the last thirty-two years, the 
magistrate gave him the benefit of the doubt. In July he seized a launch, the 
property of an American who was angling in Canadian waters without a permit, 
and who had also a repeating shot-gun in his possession. The launch was 
returned to him by the Department. During the month of August he proceeded 
to Agawa River on information that American tourists were ikilling deer. He 
arrived there at 4 p.m., but this party had left in their yacht that morning. He 
also found a party had left in their yacht that morning. He also found a party of 
five, who eaoh had a rifle, which is not allowed by the Ontario Game and Fisheries 
Act, and which should be strictly enforced. 

Three hundred resident deer licenses were issued, 14 moose licenses, and 8 
non-resident licenses for the month of November, 1909. The law was fairly well 
observed during the hunting season. The hunting season in that district he 
thinks should be fifteen days later, from Nov. 15th to Nov. 30th, as large quantities 
of venison and moose were rendered unfit for use last season on account of the 
warm weather. Deer and m^oose seem as plentiful as in former years, although 



24 THE REPOET UPON No. 13 

large numbers of the former are reported being killed by wolves, which are on the 
increase. During liis recent trip up Lake Superior at Agawa River one party (a 
trapper) had eleven wolf skins which he had killed since August. 

The wisdom of the department in having partridge protected during the last 
three years has been shown in good results^ as they have increased in that district 
to a large extent. 

Overseer W. H. S. Gordon, of Port Arthur, reports that the fisheries of liis 
district has been given special attention this season. 

The fishing of the Thunder Bay section has proved, in some parts, to be much 
better than for some 'years, whilst in other parts of the lake there has been a 
falling off of the catch. 

One of the fishermen, who has been fishing out of Port Arthur for the past 
twenty years, states that this season he has had the best fishing during the past 
five years; in fact, his total catch so far this season has been equal to that of the 
two previous seasons. The weather conditions, it is claimed, has had a good deal 
to do with the fishing. It is not thought that the fishing has played out by any 
means, but it is believed that the fish keep moving to different grounds. The in- 
crease in the fishing has been more especially noted in connection with the 
pickerel. The catch of this class of fish is heavier than ever before. As there 
has never been any fry of this class of fish distributed in Canadian waters by the 
American fish hatcheries, it is, therefore, not thought that the increase of the fish 
is due to the fact that the fry has been set out. It is thought that the fish have 
increased naturally. 

The other fishermen who operate out of Port Arthur report that the fishing 
has been fair, whilst some report that in certain months there has been an increase 
in the fishing. 

This fall, with the tug " Gordon Gauthier," he visited all the fishing stations 
of his district, which extend from Port Arthur to Heron Bay. He inspected all 
the nets between this place and the eastern point. In discussing the setting of 
nets in Nepigon Bay witjh the fishermen, the men state that, in their opinion, 
these grounds should be reserved, owing to the fact that the bay is the natural 
spawning grounds of the fish. Therefore, smaller fish are caught there. After 
fully going into the matter he thinks that it would be wise to discontinue the 
fishing in the Nepigon Bay section. 

At Rossport, the fishing has been fair, and the returns at the end of the sea- 
son will show that the fishing has been almost as good as last year. In fact F. 
Bowman reports that the returns in the Rossport section this summer has been 
a little better than during the past few years. The " Beatrice," owned by Mr, 
Bowman, has been fishing out in the lake this season. This has been an experi- 
ment, but it has proved to be profitable, as much better fishing results than in the 
bays. 

At Port Col dwell, the fishing has been light during the summer, and it was 
not expected that the catch would be equal to that of last season. 

However, it may be stated that the fishermen are doinr bette- throughout 
this district than ever before. From information gleaned, he learned that daring 
the past few years the fishermen from Port Arthur to the east are making money. 
They all have their bank accounts and if the fishing is not quite up to the aver- 
age, still the prices have advanced until now the fishing is carried on at a much 
greater profit to the fishermen themselves. At Rossport, the concern known as the