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1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



TOWN OF LEYDEN MASSACHUSETTS 

Established March 12, 1784 
Incorporated February 22, 1809 
Population U.S. Census 1980 - 498 
First Congressional District 
Franklin-Hampshire Sen&torial District No. 11 
Second Franklin Representative District 

United States Senators 

Paul Tsongas 
Edward M. Kennedy 

Representative in Congress 
Silvio O. Conte 

Governor 
Michael Dukakis 

State Senator 
John Olver 

Representative in General Court 
Bill Benson 

County Commissioners 



Everett Hatch 
Margaret H. Herlihy 
John F. Bassett 



ANNUAL REPORTS 

OF THE 
TOWN OFFICERS 



THE TRANSCRIPT PRESS 

Printers — Publishers 
ATHOL, MASSACHUSETTS 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



ELECTED TOWN OFFICERS 1983 - 84 



Terms are for one year unless otherwise noted. Terms expire 
as of Annual Town Meeting in the year noted. 

Moderator 

George Howes 1984 
Town Clerk 

Ruth Sevene 1984 
Treasurer 

George Howes 1984 

Collector of Taxes 

Laurence Hamilton 1984 

(resigned 9-19-83) 
Marcia Provost 1984 
(elected 9-19-83) 

Selectmen - 3 year terms 

Paul Zimmerman, Chairman 1984 

Thomas Luck 1985 

Edgar Collis 1986 

Assessor - 3 year terms 

Winfield Peck, Chairman 1985 

Wilheim Glabach 1984 

Elwin Barton 1986 

School Committee - 3 year terms 

Katherine DiMatteo, Chairman 1984 

Sandra Facey 1985 

Margaret Kaeppel 1986 

PVRS School Committee - 3 year terms 

Laurel Glocheski 1984 

(resigned 9-30-83) 
Mary Lou Heselton 1984 

(appn't 11-15-83) 
Sandra Facey 1985 
Robert Tracy 1986 

Auditor 

Davis Bates 1984 

Tree Warden 

Arthur Beaudoin 1984 



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1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



Library Trustee - 3 year terms 
Sandra Facey, Chairman 
Lois Peck 
Doris Glabach 



1984 
1985 
1986 



Planning Board - 5 year terms 
Peter Tusinski, Chairman 
Kenneth Spatcher 
Wendell Barton 
Claire Cobb 
Warren Facey, Jr. 



1987 
1984 
1985 
1986 
1988 



Board of Health - 3 year terms 
Anthony Creamer, Chairman 
Richard Allis 
Michael Saracino 



1985 
1984 
1986 



Constables - 3 year terms 
Richard Canedy 
Robert Snow 
Arthur Dobias 



1984 
1985 
1986 



Town Officers elected from the floor at the Annual Town Meeting 
of May 21, 1983 under Article 1 (for 1 year terms) were: 

Fence Viewers 

Philip Zimmerman 
Casper Zimmerman 
Warren Facey, Jr. 

Field Drivers 

Roland Johnson 
Harold Johnson 
Robert Croutworst 

Pound Keepers 
Arthur Dobias 
Edwin Damon, Jr. 
Harold Johnson 

Surveyors of Wood & Timber 
David Baker 
Austin Dobias, Jr. 
Edward Caron 



(6 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



SELECTMEN'S APPOINTMENTS 1983 - 84 



Terms of office are for one year unless otherwise noted. The 
date following each name is the year their term expires. 

Arts Council - 2 year terms 

Patti Spatcher 1984 

Laura Timmerman 1984 

Laurie Meyer 1984 

Richard DiMatteo 1985 

Kenneth Stinson 1985 

Building Inspector 

Norman Barton 1984 

Civil Defense Director 

Edgar Collis 1984 

Conservation Commission Members - 3 year terms 

Michael Saracino, Chairman 1986 

Edwin Howes 1984 

Trish Crapo 1985 

Richard DiMatteo 1985 

Charles Olchowski 1986 

Associate Members 

Martin Cohen 1984 

Joan Ainsworth 1984 

Laura Timmerman 1984 

Dog Officer 

Ann Hermanson 1984 

Election Officer 

Ruth Sevene 1984 

Energy Coordinator 

Pamela Brown 1984 

Energy Resource Committee 
Selectmen 
Building Inspector 

Fire Chief (Acting) 

Edward Johnson 1984 

Assistant Chiefs 

ARthur Beaudoin 1984 

Ronald Barton 1984 



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1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



Franklin County Advisory Board 

Thomas Luck 1984 

Franklin County Energy Task Force 

Pamela Brown 1984 

Franklin County Planning Board 
Planning Board's Representath e 

Kenneth Spatcher 1984 
Selectmen's Representative 

Thomas Luck 1984 

Hazardous Waste Coordinator 

Pamela Brown 1984 

Highway Superintendent 

Edmund Ross 1984 

Historical Commission - 3 year terms 

Edith Fisher, Chairman 1984 

Marjorie Pochus 1984 

Ruth Sevene 1984 

Katherine Ainsworth 1985 

Robert Snow 1985 

David Bates 1986 

Jessie Glabach 1986 

Inspector Barns & Animals 

Edward Glabach 1984 

Plumbing Inspector 

Paul Dahowski 1984 

Police Department 

Arthur Dobias, Chief 1984 

Richard Canedy 1984 

Robert Snow 1984 

Emergency Call Officers 

Russell Denison 1984 

Russell Curtis Denison 1984 

Carl Herzig 1984 

Duane Scranton 1984 



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1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



Special Dog Officers 

Norman Barton 1984 

Lewis Muka 1984 

Philip Zimmerman 1984 

Edwin Damon, Jr. 1984 

David Baker 1984 

Recreation Committee 

Arthur Beaudoin, Chairman 1984 

Joan Ainsworth 1984 

Elwin Barton 1984 

Robert Croutworst 1984 

Wayne Fisher 1984 

Anne McCarthy 1984 

Robert Snow 1984 

Registrars of Voters - 3 year terms 
Ruth Sevene, Town Clerk 

June Damon 1984 

Edith Fisher 1985 

Marcia Provost 1986 

Town Counsel 

Trudel Bartlett Barry Filler & Wilson 1984 

Veterans 1 Agent 

Donald Vetterling 1984 

Wells Trust Representative - 5 year term 

Laurel Glocheski 1987 

Zoning Board of Appeals Members - 3 year terms 

Katherine DiMatteo 1984 

Raymond Ainsworth 1985 

Robert Snow 1986 

Associate Members 

Robert Provost 1984 

Robert Saline 1984 



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1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



MODERATOR APPOINTMENTS 

Finance Committee - 3 year terms 



Edwin Damon, Jr., Chairman 1986 

Bernice Brooks 1985 

Austin Dobias, Jr. 1984 

Theodore Rosenberg 1985 

Henrietta Blabach 1986 



Vocational Education Study Committee 
Ernest Landin 
Mary Lou Heselton 
Larry Smith 
Gerald McCarthy 

School Committee Representative 
Katherine DiMatteo 



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1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



- SELECTMEN'S REPORT - 



This year has been one both of accomplishment and of exaspera- 
tion. 

The accomplishments include the completion of the new Town 
Garage, a boon in the trying times of a particularly severe winter 
when equipment problems were unusually frequent. 

Resurfacing of West Leyden Road saved us from the break-ups 
which were common in recent winters; however, the cost of re- 
surfacing greatly depleted our Highway Maintenance budget just 
prior to the expenses of winter. Meanwhile, the reconstruction 
of a half-mile of Greenfield Road is 95% complete and will be 
finished in the summer of 1984. 

Finally, and this is the excellent news, the Town will be receiv- 
ing a grant from the State to build a salt shed to keep our salt and 
sand under cover. With this new building we shall be able to pre- 
vent salt contamination of nearby wells, as well as prevent the gen- 
eral contamination of groundwater near the Town Hall. 

We wish to thank the citizens of Leyden for their assistance, 
their faith and their patience in this difficult and trying year. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Paul C. Zimmerman 
Thomas J. Luck 
Edgar Collis 

Leyden Selectmen 



(n ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



- LEYDEN IN RETROSPECT - 



As this 1983 Town Report goes to the printer in the spring of 
1984, the Town of Leyden is planning a June celebration marking 
our 200th Anniversary of the establishment of the District of Leyden 
on March 12, 1784. In honor of this historic event, we have included 
excerpts from former Town Reports for your edification and enjoy- 
ment. 

"Fellow citizens; 

Our expenditures for the past year have nearly all been kept within 
the appropriations. 

The cost of maintaining our poor has been an unusually large for 
the number we had, but when you take into consideration the long 
and severe sickness of some of them, and also the burial expenses, 
you will not be surprised at the cost. 

It has been the purpose of your overseers to practice economy in 
all their expenditures in this matter and at the same time to be just 
towards their fellowmen. 

We have been heavily burdened with expenses of this kind for a 
long time, but we can say today, what we have not been able to say 
for neraly a half century, the town has no dependents. But we must 
not fail to make an appropriation for the support of the poor, for we 
cannot tell how soon some of us may be oblidged to eat the bread of 
charity." 

Selectmen's Report, year ending March 1, 1898. 

"By the will of the late Maria F. Barstow, wife of the late Jervis 
Barstow, residents of Guilford, Vt., the town has come into posses- 
sion of $1,735.59, it being the residue of her estate, after paying 
certain expenses therein stipulated. This money is given to the town 
to be held in trust, the income of which is to be used for the support 
of the poor. 

A peculiar significance attaches to this transaction from the fact 
that Mrs. Barstow was never a resident of our town and her acquain- 
tance with the people was very limited. We trust that the receipt of 
this legacy will in a measure soothe the indignation aroused among our 
townsmen at the act which led to so worthy a deed by this noble 
woman." 

Selectmen's Report, year ending February 15, 1901. 



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1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



"Fellow Citizens, 

We submit our report of our labors, incident to our position as 
Selectmen, Assessors and Overseers of the Poor, without any very 
extended remarks, simply placing before you, in an intelligible form, 
for your inspection, the whole record of our doings, from which re- 
cord you can see where all this stream of money, annually wrung 
from your incomes, through the instrumentality of taxation, lows 
to. A great part' of our outlay on the Highways has been for keep- 
ing open the roads in the winter of 1 888, nearly $400. This unlooked 
for, unusual outlay, has prevented uur cutting down the Town debt 
as we had hoped for. 

Annual Report of the Selectmen, 1889. 



"By the will of Quintus Allen this town, together with several 
others, becomes the recipient of a sum of money each year to be ex- 
pended for the public schools. It was, doubtless, the intention of the 
donor of this fund that the towns benefitted by it should have some 
advantage in its public schools not possible otherwise; if the town 
should decrease its expenditures from taxation because of this in- 
come, the purpose of the donor would be defeated, entirely or in 
part. 

Supt of Schools Report, year ending Feb. 15, 1904. 



School Expenditures were Salaries, $873.00; books and supplies, 
$170.88; fuel, $46.49; Building fires & care of houses, $15.30; 
Tuition & transportation of pupils, $76. 00; Miscellaneous, $33.42; 
for a total of $1,215.09. 

Town Report, year ending March 1, 1898. 



"Our experience this winter in the Center school-house goes to 
prove that it pays to keep our buildings in good repair. Before it 
was repaired it took three cords of wood every winter to keep that 
schoolhouse warm, where the other school required but two. This 
winter the usual amount of wood was put in, but one cord has been 
left over and yet the schoolroom has been more than usually com- 
fortable." 

School Committee Report, 1899. 



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1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



Spent on the Town Vault was $4.35 to W.N. Potter for lim and 
cement and $14.85 to M.L. Mowry for brick. 

Town Report, year ending March 1, 1898. 

"Our Expenditures for the maintenance r f the highways have been 
unusually large. It required quite an outlay to make the road safe 
for travel at the basin hole." 

Selectmen's Repor + . year ending February 15, 1906. 

"Highway Work at Basin Hole. Andy Park, Brooks, Erving Brothers, 
James Campbell, Harry Ryan, J.W. Black. J.W. Black was paid for 
land damages, labor, lumber and services. Total $349.70." 

Town Report, year ending February 15, 1906. 

"We received the sum of $20 from the Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Dumb Animals, the same to be expended in aiding to erect 
drinking fountains and watering troughs, and in accordance to their 
wish, two troughs were erected at an expense of $19.75." 

Town Report, year ending February 15, 1906. 



"Fellow Citizens; - At the close of this fiscal year we find that 
while expenses have been heavier in proportion than last year, yet the 
outlook is better than a year ago. The two chief burdens out of the 
ordinary of the year have been the snow bills of $366.00 and the fact 
that we were forced by the state to buy a duplicate set of weights and 
measures at a cost of $93.00. Both are items which will not appear 
against us in the coming year. 

An agreement has been reached with the selectmen of Colrain, and 
the State Harbor and Land Commission, establishing the much dis- 
puted boundary between Leyden and Colrain, upon the line which Ley- 
den has long understood was its actual boundary." 

Selectmen's Report, year ending February 14, 1911. 

"Article XIV. To see if the Town will concur with the Board of 
Harbor and Land Commission in the proposed change in the boundary 
line between the town of Leyden and Colrain, so the same shall run as 
fellows: The boundary line between Colrain and Leyden shall be the 
west bank of Green River; from the northerly boundary of the town of 
Greenfield to the line between the states of Massachusetts and Ver- 
mont." 

1910 Town Meeting 



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1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



"Article IX. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money for the purchase of guide boards." (signposts?) 

Town Report, year ending February 14, 1911. 

"The town was very fortunate indeed in receiving from James 
Robertson the gift of the Robertson Memorial Library, which was 
dedicated September 7th, and fortunate, also, in the fact that Mr. 
Robertson gave $1,000, the income to be used in the care of the 
building, and his generosity was further shown in the gift of a new 
catalogue. 

This simulated the State Library Commission to help in the work 
of cataloguing and arranging the books, and the State Commission 
further showed its interest by the gift of 104 new books, which in- 
cluded an encyclopedia of 24 volumes." 

Report of Library Trustees, 
year ending January 1, 1915. 

"Also to bring in their votes on the same ballot with their votes 
for town officers, "Yes" or "No" to the question, "Shall this town ac- 
cept the provisions of section forty two of Chapter five hundred and 
fourteen the Acts of the year nineteen hundred and eleven, which 
provides that eight hours shall constitute a day's work for city or 
town employees." 

Town Report, year ending February 14, 1914. 

"Our expenses have exceeded our income this year largely on ac- 
count of the flood of Aug. 4, which cost between $700 and $800. This 
however, is but a slight cost compared with some of our neighboring 
towns, where the cost was from $6,000 to $8,000. Another item of 
expense for which there was no money raised was the town hall addi- 
tion, costing $249.13, and the highway accident, costing $128.86." 

Selectmen's Report, year ending January 1, 1916. 

There were 93 children in the town's schools in 1915. 

The Board of Health paid out $50.60 for fumigating houses, for 
supplies for a family while under quarantine, and to Dr. J.W. Cram 
for medical aid in Diptheria cases. Snow bills were $203.20. Select 
men recommended appropriating $150 for gravelling state road. 
Teacher's salaries total $1,960.00 and five schools were in existence. 

Town Report, year ending January 1, 1917. 



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1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



"At the Center School an attempt is being made to do a year of 
high school work and one boy comes from West Leyden and another 
from Beaver Meadow to take advantage of this opportunity. It is 
hoped that none of the class doing advanced work will be content to 
complete his school life here but that each will soon enter upon op- 
portunities and advantages for education not possible for Leyden to 
offer." 

Town Report, year ending January 1, 1917. 

Selectmens Recommended Budget for 1935 totaled $16,165: in- 
cluded was $9,000 for schools, $25 for the library, and $500 for snow 
removal. 

"During the present year the number of schools has been reduced 
to three. The East School was closed becuase of the decrease in the 
number of pupils and the school transferred to and united with the 
Beaver Meadow School." 

"The census showed 14 pupils each at South and Center Schools and 
12 at Beaver Meadow. At area high schools Leyden had 15 pupils at 
Greenfield, 5 at Powers Institute, 1 at Northfield, and 4 at Arms 
Academy." 

Supt. of Schools, Report, 1934. 

"Article 9: To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to paint the Green River Bridge. 
($60 was appropriated, it cost $49.) 

Article 17: To see if the town vote to accept the new highway on 
East Hill as laid out by the Selectmen, or raise and appropriate a sum 
of money to build the same. 

Article 19: To see if the town will vote to transfer its interest 
in the East Hill cemetery to the East Hill cemetery corporation. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting two attested 
copies thereof one on the town house and one at the West Leyden Post 
Office." 

Town Report, year ending February 14, 1914. 

"Our expenses have been more than the ordinary the past year, which 
accounts for the inroad upon our surplus. There are several causes for 
this. The state oblidged us to put a cement floor and steel shelving in 
the vault which made a net cost of $272 and an extra appropriation of 
$280 was made for the new school house. 



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1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



The most exceptional event in our school history during the past 
year is the completion of the- new building at Beaver Meadow and I 
believe that the town is wholly to be congratulated upon its accomp- 
lishment. 

Not only is the building itself and its location satisfactory and a 
credit to the town, but it sets an example to other similar towns in 
the matter of comfort and sanitation. The basement, the furnace, 
the foot-warmer in the hall, the \eit-flue, the new furniture, and the 
slate blackboards, of modern type and as good as money could procure 
— all testify to the public spirited enterprise of the building commit- 
tee who had the matter in charge and to the progressive character of 
the citizens who appropriated the money to make such a building pos- 
sible." 

Selectmen's Report, year ending Feb. 14, 1917. 

"We retain the same three teachers as last year. Their work is 
praiseworthy and above criticism. They should be supplied with 
every modern device and the best textbooks available. They make 
most excellent use of all we have given them. The pupils show de- 
finite and uniform progress and are showing creditable progress in 
High School. 

Supt. of Schools Report, 1935. 

In 1936 only two farms were listed in the Assessor's Report as 
having more than 30 cows, three residents were raising a total of 5 
swine, and only one farm kept sheep. Many had one or two horses, 
most had fowls, a cow or two and one or two heifers. The average 
dairy farmer had between 15 and 25 cows. 

Yes, there was a person named George Lamb and he paid a total of 
$149.68 in taxes on 1 horse, 13 cows, 3 heifers, 1 bull and real estate 
valued as follows: House $400, barn $600, other buildings $100 and 
140 acres of land $2,700. 

Assessor's Report, 1936 

In 1937, a fishing or hunting license cost $2 each, dog license 
cost from $2 to $5 each, a slaughtering license cost $1, auctioneer's 
license $2 and peddler's license cost $3. 

"In spite of few numbers and widely scattered houses, there is a 
civic pride felt by all the people of the town characteristic of some 
towns but absent in most. This civic unity is an attractive element 
in the life of the town as I have felt and seen it during the years I have 
been connected with the school. It is an admirable condition and 
should be fostered as no doubt it will be. 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



On behalf of the pupils of Leyden, your children, I make the plea 
that definite action be taken in 1946 to bring about centralization of 
the Leyden schools. The School Committee has no authority on 
school housing beyond reporting deficiencies. This has been done. 
What action is to be taken rests w'th the citizens themselves. This 
decision must be theirs. 

Supt. of Schools Report, 1945 

"The annual physical examination of the school children was made 
an elaborate but efficient affair this year. All the children were 
taken to the Town Hall by the school buses and the regular physical 
examination and the new eye tests which require a place wired with 
electricity were given the children the same morning. The new eye 
tests were avery valuable addition to the examinations, and far more 
accurate than older methods in find the pupils needing glasses. 

A few more defects were found this year than last, but the general 
health of the children is good. 

School Physician's Report, 1944 

"An epidemic of whooping cough made it necessary to close the 
Beaver Meadow School early in December and the School Commit- 
tee voted not to reopen this school until after the Christmas holiday. 
This proved to be a wise decision since no new cases developed and 
no pupil in either of the other schools caught the disease. This time 
will be made up during the April vacation and in June. 

Supt. of School Report, 1944. 



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1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



- WARRANT - 



FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

FRANKLIN, ss: 

To Richard Canedy, Constable of the Town of Leyden 

Greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are herby directed to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said Town, who are qualified to 
vote in elections and in Town affairs, to meet in the Town Hall, 
Monday the twenty-first (21st) day of May next at 7:00 p.m., then 
and there to act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1: To choose all necessary Town Officers for the 
ensuing year. 

One Moderator for one year 
One Town Clerk for one year 
One Treasure for one year 
One Collector of Taxes for one year 
One Selectman for three years 
One Assessor for three years 
One School Committee for three years 
One PVRS School Committee for three years 
One Auditor for one year 
One Tree Warden for one year 
One Library Trustee for three years 
One Planning Board member for five years 
One Board of Health member for three years 
One Constable for three years 
Three Fence Viewers for one year 
Three Field Drivers for one year 
Three Pound Keepers for one year 
Three Surveyors of Wood & Timber for one year 
and fill any vacancies that may occur, 

ARTICLE 2: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 
Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow from time 
to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning 
July 1, 1984, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes as may be given 
for a period of less than one year in accordance with the General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 



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1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



ARTICLE 3: To see if the Town will vote to accept the report of 
the Town Officers for the year 1983, or pass any votes in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 4: To see if the Town will vote to accept the list of 
jurors as posted by the Selectmen: 

Theresia Beswick Cornelia Reid Cornelius Kennedy 

Edith Fisher Richard Canedy Jacqueline Tracy 

Harold Johnson William Zimmerman Ann Zimmerman 

Hugh Sloane Alan Johnson Anna Johnson 

David Mowry John Chapin Laurie Cohen 

ARTICLE 5: To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and 
compensation of all elective officers of the town as provided by 
Section 108, Chapter 41 of the General Laws as amended; and to 
raise and appropriate or otherwise provide the following sums 
therefore, or take any vote or votes in relation thereto. 

Moderator - Annual Meeting $15.00 

Special Meetings (2) $5.00 each $ 25.00 

Town Clerk & Registrar 650.00 

Selectmen - Chair 550.00 

Other Members (2) 1 ,000.00 

Assessors - Chair 400.00 

Other Members (2) 700.00 

Treasurer 1 ,800.00 

Collector of Taxes 1,200.00 

Constable 55.00 

Auditor 100.00 



$ 6,480.00 



ARTICLE 6: To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate or otherwise provide the following sums of money for the 

necessary expenses of the town, or take any vote or votes in re- 
lation thereto. 

Town Clerk's Expense $ 800.00 

Selectmen's Expense 1,000.00 

Assessor's Expense 800.00 

Treasurer's Expense 600.00 

Tax Collector's Expense 600.00 

Planning Board Expense 200.00 

Fianance Committee Expense 25.00 
School Committee Travel 

PVRS 300.00 

Elementary 240.00 

Dog Officer Wages 6c Expenses 500.00 

Inspector of Barns & Animals 50.00 



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1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



Building Inspector $ 750.00 

Tree Warden Wages & Expenses 800.00 

Printing 1,200.00 

Legal Expense 7 00 .00 

Visiting Nurse Expense 300.00 

Memorial Day Expense 100.00 

Cemeteries 150.00 

Conservation Commission 200.00 

Board of Health 50.00 

Selectmen's Clerk 1,200. 00 

Selectmen's Administrative Assistant 3,040.00 



S 13.605.00 



ARTICLE 7: To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate or otherwise provide the following sum for the operation 
and expenses of the Police Department, or take any vote or votes 
in relation thereto. 

Salaries: 

Chief S 2,000.00 

Others 800.00 

Telephones 30 0.00 

Fuel, Oil & Vehicle Maintenance 550.00 

Materials & Supplies 100.00 

Training & Equipment 150.00 



3,900.00 



ARTICLE 8: To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate or otherwise provide the following sum for the operation and 
expenses of the Fire Department, or take any vote or votes in re- 
lation thereto. 

Vehicle & Equipment Maintenance $ 1.000.00 

Utilities, Heat, & Building Maintenance 1.300.00 
Equipment & Supplies 1,000.00 
Training & Memberships 200.00 



3,500.00 



ARTICLE 9: To see if the town will vote to appropriate from 
the Quintus Allen Money the sum of $3400.00. and raise and appro- 
priate or otherwise provide the sum of S96.281.00 for the main- 
tenance of the School during FY 85. or take any vote or votes in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 10: To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate or otherwise provide the sum of S27.800.00 for the students 
attending the Franklin County Technical-Vocational School, or 

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1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



take any vote or votes in relation thereto 

ARTICLE 11: To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate or otherwise provide the sum of $99,866.68 as Leyden's 
share of the Pioneer Valley Regional School District budget for 
FY 85, or take any vote or votes in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 12: To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate or otherwise provide the sum of $62,000.00 for Maintenance 
and Construction of the Town's Roads, or take any vote or votes 
in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 13: To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate or otherwise provide the sum of $21,000.00 for the 
Machinery Account, or take any vote or votes in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 14: To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $5,000.00 for the Stabilization Fund, or take 
any vote or votes in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 15: To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
the sum of $1,394.00 from the Library Incentive Grant Fund, 
and raise and appropriate or otherwise provide the sum of 
$2,106.00 for the Robertson Memorial Library Account, or take 
any vote or votes in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 16: To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate or otherwise provide the sum of $3,500.00 for the Town 
Building Account, or take any vote or votes in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 17: To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate or otherwise provide the sum of $2,350.00 for the regular 
highway employees Vacation and Holiday Pay, or take any vote 
or votes in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 18: To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate or otherwise provide the sum of $18,250.00 for insurance 
coverage on Town Vehicles, Town Buildings, Workmen's Compen- 
sation Insurance, Town Liability Insurance, Life & Health 
Insurance, Unemployment Compensation Insurance, and Employee 
& Town Officials Indemnification Liability Insurance, or take 
any vote or votes in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 19: To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate or otherwise provide the sum of $2,000.00 for the Notes and 
Interest Account, or take any vote or votes in relation thereto. 



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1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



ARTICLE 20: To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate or otherwise provide the sum of $3,000.00 for the Reserve 
Account, or take any vote or votes in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 21: To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate or otherwise provide the sum of $150.00 to be paid to the 
Western Massachusetts Coalition of Governments and Institutions 
for the purpose of supporting an effective legal challenge to rate 
increase requests filed by the Western Massachusetts Electric 
Company with the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities, 
or take any vote or votes in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 22: To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate or otherwise provide the sum of $1,500.00 to the Conser- 
vation, Recreation and Scenic Land Acquisition Fund, or take any 
vote or votes in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 23: To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate or otherwise provide the sum of $1,500.00 for the Recrea- 
tion Committee, or take any vote or votes in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 24: To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate or otherwise provide the sum of $45,800.00 to purchase 
a new Highway Truck, or take any vote or votes in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 25: To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate or otherwise provide the sum of $1,500.00 to purchase a 
Copier, or take any vote or votes in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 26: To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate or otherwise provide the sum of $12,000.00 to purchase a 
parcel of land on South Schoolhouse Road, or take any vote or 
votes in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 27: To see if the town will vote to authorize a formal 
petition for admission of Leyden to the Franklin County Voca- 
tional Technical Regional School District, said petition to request 
appropriate costs for the Fiscal Year beginning July 1, 1985, such 
costs to return at a subsequent regular or special town meeting 
for any vote or votes in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 28: To see if the town will vote to accept the pro- 
visions of Section 5, Chapter 653 of the Acts of 1982, which 
creates Clause 41B (property tax exemptions for the elderly), 
or take any vote or votes in relation thereto. 



(23 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



ARTICLE 29: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for Construc- 
tion, Reconstruction and Resurfacing of the Town Roads, or take 
any vote or votes in relation thereto. 

The Polls will be open at 11:45 a.m. and will be closed at 8:00 p.m. 



And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attest- 
ed copy thereof on the Town House seven days at least before the 
time of said meeting as directed by vote of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon to the Town Clerk at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands the second day of April in the Year of Our 
Lord one thousand nine hundred and eighty-four. 

Paul C. Zimmerman 
Thomas J. Luck 
Edgar A. Collis 

Selectmen of Leyden 



( 24 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



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1983 

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1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



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1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



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( 30 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



- TOWN TREASURER - 

General Ledge Balance Sheet, June 30, 1983 

ASSETS 
Cash 

Invested $ 80,000.00 

On Hand & In Bank 63,219.84 

$143,219.84 

Accounts Receivable 

Tax Real Estate 1982 389.16 
1983 23,383.36 
Personal Property 1983 3,358.80 27,131.32 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

1982 25.26 

1983 1,138.83 1,164.09 
Farm Excise 1982 ~"~ 232.00 
Tax Title 6,748.35 



Total Assets $178,495.60 

LIABILITIES 
Revenues 

Motor Vehicle Excise $ 1,164.09 

Farm Excise 232.00 
Tax Liens 6,748.35 



$ 8,144.44 



Reserved For Appropriation: 

Machinery Earnings $ 20,331.91 

State Aid to Libraries 1,650.00 

School Lunch 214.63 

Quintus Allen Legacy 5 , 540 . 00 

Overlay 

1982 $ 389.16 

1983 8,463.89 



$ 27,736.54 



$ 8,853.05 



Overlay Surplus $ 16,593.30 

State and County Over-Estimates 

County Tax 478.90 
State Assessments 517.25 

$ 996.15 



( 31 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



LIABILITIES (continued) 

Appropriation Balances: 
Assessor's Valuation 
Land Acquisition Fund 

Payroll Deduction 
Surplus Revenue 

Total Liabilities and Surplus Revenue 



$ 4,850.00 
1 ,500.00 



$ 6,350.00 
214.46 
109,607.66 
$178,495.60 



DEBT LEDGER 
Balance Sheet, June 30, 1983 



Balance, June 30, 1983 

Highway Equipment Notes 

No. 247, Due 3/1/84 
Authorized A.T.M., May 20, 1976 
Interest at 6.5% 



$ 2,650.00 



2,650.00 



$ 2,650.00 



2,650.00 



TRUST FUND LEDGER 
Balance Sheet, June 30, 1983 



Balance June 30, 1983 
Stabilization Fund 
Marie Barstow 
Principal $1,000.00 

Robertson Library 
Principal $1,000.00 

Davenport Library Book 
Principal $1,000.00 

Davenport Poor & School 
Principal $1,100.00 

Beaver Meadow Cemetery 
Principal $390.00 



$ 40,644.53 



$ 33,064.57 
2,382.12 

1,594.11 

2,031.07 

1,100.00 

472.66 



$ 40,644.53 $ 40,644.53 



George Howes, Town Treasurer 
(32 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



Federal Revenue Sharing Account 

Fiscal year July 1, 1982 through June 30, 1983 

Balance July 1, 1982 $ 32,373.77 

Receipts: 

Entitlements $ 7,774.00 

Interest 3,530.38 

11,304.38 

Receivable: 

July 1 entitlement 1,922.00 

$ 45,600.15 

Expended: 

Police Cruiser $ 732 . 56 

Town Garage Construction 3,148.76 
Recreation 1 ,346.12 



5,227.44 

Balance, June 30, 1983 $ 40,372.71 

Shawmut-Franklin County Bank $ 74.91 

Mass. Mutual Depositary Trust 38,375.80 
Federal Entitlement Due 1 ,922.00 

$ 40,372.71 

Appropriations Not Spent: 

Garage Construction 

ATM 5/15/82 $ 18,851.24 

STM 4/18/83 16,000.00 

Recreation 

ATM 5/21/83 1,500.00 

$ 36,351.24 

Available for Expenditure $ 4,021.47 



George E. Howes, 
Treasurer 



(33 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



Statement of Income and Expenditures 

Fiscal year July 1, 1982 through June 30, 1983 



Balance Forward, July 1, 1982 
RECEIPTS: 

Adjustment, July 
Taxes 

Interest on taxes 
Costs recovered 

Total from Tax Collector 



$272,372.55 
1,427.37 
17.00 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts: 

School Lunch $ 

School Aid. Ch. 70 

Transportation, Ch. 71 & 74 

Tuition 

Loss of Taxes 

Reimbursement, Abated Taxes 

Local Aid, Ch. 58 

Aid to Libraries 

DPW Construction Contracts 

Ch. 825, Maint. & Construction 

Ch. 335 Pothole Grant 

Total, Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Franklin County 
Fines 

Dog Refund 

Elementary School Lunch 
Interest, General Funds 
Machinery Earnings 
Dog Licenses 
Building Permits 
Other Licenses 
Sale of Town Property 
Chapter 61, Stumpage 
Quintus Allen Legacy 
Refunds: 

Insurance 

School Expense 

Town Clerk Expense 



3,401.78 
10,276.00 
13,630.00 

2,860.00 
391.37 
811.36 
31,953.00 

1,250.00 
22,636.00 
22,936.00 

6,279.00 



95 
201 



00 

33 



451.58 
286.18 
9.10 



$110,745.79 



573.05 



$273,816.92 



$116,424.51 



296.33 

1,661.66 
7,106.21 
1,187.27 
356.60 
585.00 
262.00 
325.39 
250.48 
3,400.00 



746.86 



(34 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



Receipts: (continued) 

Miscelaneous 
Payroll Deductions 
Davenport Poor & School Fund 
Energy Audit Grant, Balance 
Interest 

Total Receipts and Cash On Hand 
LESS: 

Payments per Warrant 
Cash on Hand, June 30, 1983 



$ 85.00 
16,960.80 
62.61 

210.00 

5.07 215.07 



$535,061.55 



391,839.84 
$143,221.71 



George E. Howes, 
Treasurer 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



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1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 





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( 37 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



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(38 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



-REPORT OF THE TAX COLLECTOR- 

July 1, 1982 to June 30, 1983 

Real Estate Personal Prop. 





1982 


1983 




1982 


1 98*3 


Balance Fwd. $ 


15,640.07 


$ 0.00 


$ 


61.20$ 


0.00 


Committed 


0.00 


269,346.60 




0.00 


11,583.40 


Refunds 


0.00 


0.00 




0.00 


0.00 


Total 

Collectable 


15,640.07 


269,346.60 




61.20 


11,583.40 


Collected 


13,162.91 


239,972.32 




54.00 


8,224.60 


Abated 


0.00 


3,670.72 




7.20 


0.00 


Tax Title 


2,088.00 


2,320.20 




0.00 


0.00 


Balance 
Uncollected 


389.16 


23,383.36 




0.00 


3,358.80 




Farm Animal Motor Vehicle Motor Vehicle 




1982 


1981 




1982 


1983 


Balance Fwd. $ 


232.00 


$ 63.33 


$ 


1,267.79 $ 


0.00 


Committed 


0.00 


0.00 




2,645.70 


8,379.00 


Refunds 


0.00 


0.00 




48.31 


*121.24 


Total 

Collectable 


232.00 


63.33 




3,961.80 


8,500.24 




0.00 


6.00 




3,766.30 


7,186.42 


Abated 


0.00 


57.33 




170.24 


174.99 


Tax Title 


0.00 


0.00 




0.00 


0.00 


Balance 
Uncollected 


232.00 


0.00 




25.26 


1,138.83 


Tax Collected: 




$272,372.55 








Interest: 




1,427.37 








Costs Recovered: 




17.00 









$273,816.92 Paid To Treasurer 

Fees Retained $449.00 

*1983 MVE to be refunded $29.63 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Laurence Hamilton, Tax Collector 



(39 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



-TOWN CLERK'S REPORT- 

Massachusetts Division of Fisheries & Wildlife for 1983 



15 


Resident Citizens Fishing 


@ 


$12.50 




$187.50 


21 


Resident Hunting 


@ 


12.50 




262.50 


39 


Resident Sporting 


@ 


19.50 




760.50 


6 


Non-Resident Alien Fishing 


@ 


17.50 




105.00 


3 


Non-Resident 7 Day Fishing 


@ 


11.50 




34.50 


1 


Resident Trapping 


@ 


20.50 




20.50 


1 


Duplicate 


@ 


2.00 




2.00 


4 


Non-Resident Hunting (Big Game) 


@ 


48.50 




194.00 


10 


Resident Sporting (over 70) 


@ 


Free 




Free 


1 


Resident Fishing (paraplegic) 


@ 


Free 




Free 


1 


Resident Hunting (paraplegic) 


@ 


Free 




Free 


3 


Resident Fishing (65-69) 


@ 


6 . 25 




18.75 


z 


Resident Sporting (65-69) 




9.75 




19.50 


20 


Archery/Primitive Firearms Stamps 


@ 


5.10 




102.00 


1 


Mass. Waterfowl Stamp 


@ 


1.25 




1.25 








Total 


$1 


,708.00 


95 


Licenses Sold - 95 Fees Retained 




@ .50 


= $47.50 


20 


Archery Stamps Sold - 20 Fees 




@ .10 


= $ 


2.00 


1 


Waterfowl Stamp Sold - 1 Fee 




@ .25 


= $ 


.25 



Total Fees Retained $ 49.25 



Sent to Commonwealth $1,658.75 

Audited 3/10/84 Ruth L. Sevene, 

Davis R. Bares, III Town Clerk 



( 40 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



- Dog Licenses - 

January 1 to December 31, 1983 



47 Males 

12 Females 

40 Spayed Females 

7 Kennel Licenses 



106 Licenses Sold 

Fees Retained, (106 @ .75) 

Sent to Town Treasurer 



@ $ 3.00 
(8l 6.00 
@ 3.00 
@ 10.00 
Total 



$141.00 
72.00 
120.00 
70.00 

$403.00 



79.50 



$323.50 



Audited 2/10/84 
Davis R. Bates, III 



Ruth L. Sevene 
Town Clerk 



-Vital Statistics for the year 1983 
Marriages 



June 18th, 1983 



David E. Brooks and Susan L. Holmes 



Deaths 



February 2nd, 1983 
Edith Y. Snow 

March 14, 1983 

Ruth M. Herron 

May 3rd, 1983 

George E. Hastings 

December 18th, 1983 
Wavne L. Fisher 



Silver Springs, Florida 



Greenfield, Mass. 



Greenfield, Mass. 



Levden, Mass. 



(41 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



Births 



Date / Child / Parents 

February 13th - Emily Ann Gronich Glocheski Rosenberg 
Theodore Rosenberg 
Laurel Ann Glocheski 

February 25th - Stephanie Lynne Pollen 
Michael Pollen 
Noreen Dobias Pollen 

June 19th - Jonathan Michael Scott Garfield 
Scott Garfield 
Nola Beswick Garfield 

July 22nd - Rae Moore Cohen 
Martin Cohen 
Laurie Moore Cohen 

July 27th - Patrick George Hall 
Jeffery Hall 

Gayle Elizabeth Davis Hall 

July 31st - Brooke Mary Brown Saracino 
Michael Saracino 
Pamela Brown 

August 26th - Kevin Phillip Bruso 
Kevin Bruso 
Lorraine York Bruso 

August 27th - Nathan Robert Avery 

Robert Avery 

Debra Maguire Avery 
October 3rd - Tasha Lee Larochelle 

Duane Larochelle 

Rozann Bocuzzo 

October 6th - Samantha Lynn Barton 
Elwin D. Barton 
Mary Lou Johnson Barton 

October 23rd - Jillian Irene Baker 
James C. Baker 
Vickie G. Baker 



(42 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



-POLICE DEPARTMENT REPORT- 



During 1983 motor vehicle accidents were down slightly and the 
same for housebreaks and larceny. Acts of vandalism were way up. 
We fingerprinted 41 children for indentification at three sessions 
and expect to do more this year. 

Again we wish to thank residents for their cooperation. 



Motor Vehicle accidents 9 

Motor Vehicle complaints 2 

Breaking & Entering 2 

Larceny 2 

Suspicious persons & vehicles 16 

Vandalism 12 

Shooting near dwelling 2 

Dogs chasing deer 4 

Fireworks complaints 2 

Burglar Alarm calls 5 

Missing persons 4 

Summons delivered 3 

Persons arrested 2 

Citations issued 3 

Assistance to other towns 5 

Pistol permits issued 11 

I.D. cards issued 4 

License to sell firearms & ammo 2 



Respectfully submitted, 

Arthur J. Dobias, 
Chief of Police 



(43 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



-FIRE DEPARTMENT REPORT- 



The volunteer fire department responded to ten calls during 
1983: 

4 Brush Fires 

5 Chimney Fires 

1 Mutual Aid call to Guilford, VT. 

with the tanker for a residential fire. 

Three reconditioned Scott Air Packs and 500 ft. of li" hose were 
purchased. The Firemen's Association donated an 1,100 gallon dump 
tank. 

Eleven people successfully completed the CPR and first aid 
course qualifying them as "First Responders". Two volunteers com- 
pleted the Protective Breathing and Search and Rescue course given 
by the Mass. Fire Academy. We also had several well attended 
pumping and water handling practices with the Bernardston Fire 
Department. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Edward Johnson, 
Acting Fire Chief 

-ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FRED W. WELLS TRUSTEES- 



The Fred W. Wells Trust adopted a fiscal year 1983-84 budget 
of $109,753 to benefit residents in the participating towns. 

Education grants of $69,700 were awarded to assist 136 area 
students toward a variety of career goals. The most difficult task 
of the trustees has been to divide limited funds among the large 
number of highly qualified applicants. 

The budget included $34,750 for Medical-Health Care. Grants 
were made to Mohawk Valley Medical Center, Visiting Nurse Associ- 
ation, Hospice Program, The Alcohol Program of Franklin County, 
Adult Foster Care and Franklin County Medical Health Association. 

Mr. Wells, in his will, required the Trustees to award prizes for 
agricultural accomplishments. This year, $5,303 was awarded 
through the Franklin County Fair, Heath Fair, and Franklin County 
Technical School 

Respectfully submitted, 
Laurel Ann Glocheski, Trustee 



(44 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



-VOCATIONAL STUDY COMMITTEE REPORT- 



Committee meetings were held from October T 83 through 
March '84. Material studied included, but was not limited to: 

— review of historic vocational attendance, tuition and trans- 
portation costs; 

— projections through 1990 of tuition and transportation costs as 

a non-member vs. operating and capital assessments as a mem- 
ber. 

'buying in' costs for initial membership and source monies for 
effecting such; 

a review/projection of Revenue Sharing monies as possible sup- 
plement to 'buying in' factors; 

a review of process and timetable for requesting membership 
and subsequent District votes; 

— characteristic of the program and student service space as a 
non-member. 

At the final meeting on March 14th, attended by all committee 
members, all Selectmen and Supt. of Schools Harrington, the Com- 
mittee voted to recommend petitioning the Franklin County Voca- 
tional School District for admission as a member town. An article 
to that effect is to be placed on the annual town meeting warrant. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Katherine DiMatteo 
Mary Lou Heselton 
Ernest Landin 
Gerald McCarthy 
Larry Smith 

Study Committee Members 



(45 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



-REPORT OF THE LIBRARY TRUSTEES- 

Books and records circulated in 1983 totaled 4,920 as listed: 
Adult 3,062 
Juvenile 1,679 
Records 179 

Books borrowed from the Bookmobile totaled 774. The library 
purchased a total of 125 new books, most of which were juvenile. 
Included in these were books covering the summer "Read A Rainbow" 
program initiated by the Western Regional Library System on Chan- 
nel 57. 

For many years Henry and Jessie Glabach have mowed the grass 
around the Library Building during the summer, and in the winter 
have shoveled the snow and turned on the furnace before library 
hours. For all of this, we thank them sincerely. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sandra Facey 
Lois Peck 
Doris Glabach 

Trustees 

-REPORT OF THE VISITING NURSE- 



The Visiting Nurse & Health Services in Franklin County, Inc. 
continues to provide a comprehensive array of health services to 
residents in their homes. In 1983, the following services were rend- 
ered in Leyden. 

Skilled Nursing Visits 95 
Physical Therapy Visits 39 
Home Health Aide Hours 694.5 

The Agency has a large component of homemakers whose ser- 
vices are available to help the frail elderly to remain independent at 
home by assisting with light housekeeping, personal care, shopping, 
and errands. Referrals for any of the above services are accepted 
from physicians, hospitals, patients, and/or families. Call 774-2302 
for services. 

In addition, the agency provides for the Women's, Infant's, and 
Children's Supplemental Food Program (WIC) for all of Franklin 
Countv fro m our office at 50 Miles Street in Greenfield. To enroll 
call 774-2302. 



( 46 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



(47 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



School Committee 

Mrs. Katherine DiMatteo, Chairperson Term Expires 1984 

Mrs. Margaret Kaeppel, Secretary Term Expires 1986 

Mrs. Sandra Facey Term Expires 1985 

Superintendent of Schools 

Edwin F. Harrington 
Westfield State College - B.S.E., M. Ed. 
Springfield College - CAGS, Administration 
Office - Route #10, Northfield - Tel. 498-2911 

Administrative Assistant 

David E. Zellmer 
University of Wisconsin - B.A. 

Union Secretaries 

Mrs. Michelle Curtis 
Mrs. Eleanor Rafuse 

Central Office Hours 

School Days - 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 
School Vacation - 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

Teaching Principal 

Miss Pearl Rhodes - B.A. 

School Physician 

William R. Buchanan, Jr., M.D. 

School Nurse 

Mrs. Pollyanna Davis, R.N. 



School Calendar 

School Opens Sept. 1, 1983 
School Opens Nov. 28, 1983 
School Opens Jan. 3, 1984 
School Opens Feb. 27, 1984 
School Opens Apr. 23, 1984 



Close Nov. 24, 1983 
Close Dec. 23, 1983 
Close Feb. 17, 1984 
Close Apr. 13, 1984 
*Close June 19, 1984 



*Subject to State Requirements 



(48 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



To the School Committee and the Citizen's of Leyden: 

The Leyden Elementary School opened its September, 1983, doors to 
48 students, an increase from 39 of the prior year and a return to 
averages of more recent school years. The full time staff of Pearl 
Rhodes, Teaching Principal, Grades 5 and 6, Doreen Carlson, Grades 
3 and 4, and Jeanette Allard, Grades K, 1 and 2, Cafeteria Manager, 
Ruth Tuller, and Custodian, Nan Rolstad, reflects the departure of 
Gail Healy to Greenfield. The support of shared personnel, Patrice 
Sweeney (Speech), Mary Pat Knowlton, (Title One), Polly Davis 
(School Nurse), Lucinda Howes Parmenter (Adjustment Counselor) 
and William O'Connell (Special Needs Adminsitrator/School Psy- 
chologist) represents funded grant and budget positions, all compli- 
mented by the administrative functions of School Union #18. 

School year 1983-84, represents the third consecutive year that 
classroom staff has assumed the expanded responsibilities of art, 
music, and physical education - a direct result of Proposition 2\ 
percent action shared within system schools. Vocational education 
concerns resulted in appointment of a (5) person study committee 
currently in process, results to be made known to citizens at the Town 
Meeting, May 1984. We are appreciative that a comparison of cur- 
rent and projected costs are receiving attention and will be weighed 
against non-membership tuition, program access and committee re- 
presentation. 

As we move to a larger educational arena, we find that the spotlight 
on education has never been brighter, fueled by countless reports and 
assessments which in themselves generate rebuttal, design for change, 
and blueprint for upgrading the state of education in this nation. Al- 
though the glare may produce tension, anxiety, and defensiveness; it 
also produced investigative study and deliberation - - in short, it has 
placed education on the agenda of politicians, educators, statesmen, 
and the general public alike. We in education need to welcome such 
attention, remains open to discussion and forum, and willing to ac- 
cess our role, current status and future plans. We need to do this in 
the context of societal claims, student needs, and economic change, 
and to do it in an era of transition that is taking place in the home, 
school, and workplace. 

Historically, public schools were to be secular and dedicated to the 
training of loyal citizens. The 'common school' was conceived as a 
device for welding a diversity of people into a single nation. Public 
education was so successful that American's began to look to educa- 
tion as the solution to immediate and long-term social problems. The 
public school has been an active instrument for social change in the 



(49 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



past 30 years, yet in hindsight, it seems unreasonable for the public 
to expect, and for the school to promise, to solve all problems 
against a backdrop of changing social values, single parent homes, 
drugs, teenage pregnancy, abortion, student rights, and television 
serving as the centerpiece of many homes. 

At the same time, negotiated salaries, state, and federal mandates 
began to impact on school budgets, declining enrollment became 
fact, and critics begin questioning outcome and expenditure. The 
opinion polls were echoed in coffee shop, across board meeting and 
conference table - - the public was losing confidence in public 
schools. 

The schools, in the midst of all this confusion, are asked to be the 
center of more traditional values and to return to a kind of educa- 
tion parents experienced. The conflicting economic and social pres- 
sures make it impossible for the school to relieve the frustrations 
borne by such events. Confusion abounds, technology soars, and 
people seem not to know what to do or where to turn for help. Most 
people, however, are sure about one thing, that the schools need to 
get back to the basics. 

The phrase "Get Back to the Basics" has many meanings, from the 
fundamental position of the 3 R's, to broader definition resembling 
a liberal arts education. Given this background of confusion, inter- 
national tension, nuclear holocaust, and technological change, is it 
any wonder that the schools, along with other institutions, are the 
target of attack and are being asked to be more traditional? Easy 
solutions cannot be found for complex problems and learning is a 
complex problem. 

Part of the promise of the schools - to provide universal education 
- has been fulfilled. Fewer students drop out of school today than 
ten years ago and people today have completed more years of 
schooling. Illiteracy has steadily declined in this century. Public 
schools have also expanded their offerings and services, by provid- 
ing programs for exceptional children, expanded health services, 
vocational training, career guidance, food services, adult and com- 
munity education. Those who were historically underserved, blacks, 
hispanics, and the handicapped, are being brought into the educa- 
tional mainstream. 

This expansion has been in response to, and has been a reason for 
increased state and federal mandates and incentives. Today, how- 
ever, there is a feeling that this investment has not provided what 
really counts, the high levels of academic achievement as deter- 
mined by commercial tests. The results of the National Assessment 



(50 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



of Educational Progress, the decline in SAT scores, and the results 
of basic skills testing have provided critics with what they consider 
as ample evidence to document their charges. Educators have been 
slow to react and respond to critics - - we need a game plan. We 
need to acknowledge that many programs have been added to a 
school day and year that has remained basically unchanged. We, as 
educators, failed to tell the public that not all demands could be 
met without change in forms, focus, and curriculum. The public, 
not being told, and educators not requesting change to meet expect- 
ation, fell back on old recipes - hence a 'back to basic' cry emerged. 
We now need to assess whether back to basics responds to and ans- 
wers the question and the needs of our changing society. 

While the response in Massachusetts was focused upon reading, writ- 
ing, mathematics, listening, and speaking, this has not satisfied what 
is really needed. The Massachusetts response to the negative per- 
ceptions about education seemed to be more of a political response 
to the dilemma, rather than an educational assessment of the total 
problem. Both subject matter, content, and the process of education 
will need to be readdressed and redirected if the credibility public 
schools seek is to be realized. 

It is often easier to identify problems than to solve them, yet schools 
need to recognize and deal with: 

•the demand of public and private employers on schools to pro- 
duce higher levels of literacy and more mature behavior in high 
school graduates; 

•the development of student integrity, work ethic, respect for 
law and the rights of others; 

•to control costs and provide a financial efficiency and effect- 
iveness in education; 

•to provide access and equity in education for a growing minor- 
ity constituency. 

There are many other claims but these constitute a homily, yet 
basic agenda. The pressures on efficiency will continue to grow, 
cost savings on things and the larger costs of people will raise de- 
bate on differentiated pay, redefined roles, and structuring of or- 
ganizational patterns. Minorities, constituting more than 50 per- 
cent of school enrollment in the year 2000, will demand fair treat- 
ment in the nation's schools. 

Students needs also demand a high priority, summarily they include; 

•an increasing need and capacity to meet new situations, solve 
unexpected problems and deal with unforeseen circumstances 



(51 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



growing from new technology and accompanying change in in- 
stitutions and organizations serving students; 

•being served by schools with a concern for the quality of stu- 
dent life while in school - a rethinking of the schools role as a 
human institution responsible for the processes of maturing and 
intellectual growth; 

•recognition that education is stimulated outside the school by 
television, home computers, part-time jobs, and special family 
experiences, and (they) will seek recognition of these out-of- 
school achievements. 

The re-thinking of curriculum, the retooling and modification in 
teaching methods, the increasing introduction of the computer, a 
new emphasis in science, math, the humanities, and social sciences, 
will be predicaated on the fact that technological change is so rapid, 
that training for a present vocation likely to be obselete, can be 
served by emphasizing fundamentals, and letting the workplace ex- 
tend skills developed at school in students adaptable to change and 
capable of solving problems within the field of change. 

While schools need open and honest self-examination of climate, they 
need not be bombarded by media attention to perceived shortcomings, 
nor blamed for national dilemma not always in fact, at local or area 
levels. Although careful not to evoke a 'not me' syndrome, it is im- 
portant to note that public schools are still the great equalizers. 
Political realities notwithstanding, it is still possible for a student 
from the poorest of families to rise up through the public school sys- 
tem and achieve personal intellectual satisfaction and accomplish- 
ment, as well as rise to the top of the socio-economic ladder. There 
is no other institution that translates the American values of hard 
work and the intrinsic worth of the individual into hard realities and 
opportunities. Education preserves traditions especially during times 
of rapid change and innovation. Our current society is probably 
changing faster than at any time in the past. It is the school that 
acts as a stabilization force amid all "future shocks" and confusing 
realities. Public education, despite the complexity of current pro- 
blems, is still the underpinning institution of a free American 
society. 

Returning to specific events and happenings within our system schools, 
we become aware of the following: 

Basic Skills Improvement: We are in our forth year of competency 
testing in regulated areas of Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, and 
Listening, grades 3,6,8, and 9. Our results continue to be excellent 
at the elementary level, progressively competitive at the secondary 
level, and exceed state reported medians, At the state level, a pro- 



( 52 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



pcsal has been introduced to mandate state-wide standards, test in- 
struments and publised performance. Attached to this proposal are 
financial incentives for systems exceeding such levels and for those 
in need of remedial support to reach prescribed standards. Com- 
panion state curriculum proposals, especially at the high school level 
are much a part of the political financial, educational atmosphere 
and at leat a year from any compromise implementation. In the in- 
terim, described testing will continue, we will disseminate local re- 
sults and confer with parent, effect signaled remedication and ful- 
fill our report mandate, as before. 

Pre-Kindergarten Developmental Program - Screening Process: We 
have completed five years of developmental screening of entering 
students, supported by a September 1 entrance age policy. We have 
also completed three years of a successfully funded and implement- 
ed Pre-Kindergarten program under Title IVC. Less visible, but of 
lingering value, are the by-products of a K-3 Developmental Cur- 
riculum, staff in-service, research and publication, and an increas- 
ed awareness of child growth and development. Our new kindergar- 
ten report card displays such awareness and the project will leave 
an indelible mark on future screening process. We, as a small rural 
system, bask in area and state recognition and feel badly that finan- 
cial restriction must terminate our program, at least for the immedi 
ate future. Parents may feel secure that proven features of our in- 
volvement with many field professionals will continue in on-site pro- 
gram characteristics and strategies. 

Advanced Programs: Project Explore, in its fifth year at Northfield 
Elementary School, and fourth at Bernardston Elementary School, 
has served well over one hundred students, inclusive of tuition mem- 
bers from system towns of Leyden and Warwick. At the secondary 
level, Creative Enrichment Program, a modification of TAG, con- 
tinues in its fourth year of operation. Both programs have been re- 
viewed, display some modified criteria and format, and continue to 
serve referred and screened students, grades 4-12, whose creative 
and academic capacities deserve challenge and expansion. Our low 
cost program profile responds to the needs of our small community 
student population and remains receptive to assessment and modifi- 
cation, deemed necessary. 

Enrollment - Resource - Staff Alignment: System-wide, 1983-84 
enrollment remained comparative to levels of the past (3) years, al- 
though entering kindergarten displayed the first resurgence of a pre- 
dicted return to numbers of the late 70 T s. A projection of future 
student population reveals steady, modest growth at the elementary 
level coupled with steady decrease at grades 7-12, through 1990, as 
a small grade total works its way through the student population pro 
file. As a system of (4) towns, we continue to feel the lingering 



(53 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



effects of a limited birth rate, transfer to private and alternative 
schools, on-going operation of the Franklin County Technical School 
(1976) and the alignment of Gill with the Gill-Montague Regional 
District (1981). We are also appreciative of students who have re- 
turned from alternative school settings to the public schools after 
a 1-2 year hiatus. Realistically, we will remain at current student 
totals through 1990, although there will be movement from the 
secondary to the elementary within our system population. Individu- 
al system schools will need to respond to shifting assignment needs 
within respective buildings and to tailor staff, building, and program 
to restricted financial resources in a rapidly changing world - - one 
that will impact on the educational setting in the immediate future. 
Three years of stringent financial action has been offset by a re- 
sourceful committment of staff and community, yet for some, Fis- 
cal Year 1985 will require difficult Committee and Administrative 
decision as the cumulative effects of delayed maintenance and re- 
placement become obvious. 

Most citizens are aware that recent school years witnessed reduction 
of staff, merging of position, space reduction, and increased assign- 
ment responsibility. Schools are not immune to fluctuating federal 
and state support nor do our service functions, transportation, and 
lunch programs escape scrutiny and responsive action during these 
restrictive times. At this writing, a number of legislative proposals 
effecting educational support rest in committee, the ultimate finan- 
cial compromise as yet unknown. 

Our counter effect has emerged - - energy (fuel) consumption has 
steadily decreased in volume and cost and is a direct result of cumu- 
lative efforts that include insulation, storm windows, weather strip- 
ping, computer monitoring system (PV), and a staff consciousness 
that has released energy dollars to educational areas. Surprisingly, 
fuel costs are at or lower than electrical budgets in some of our 
member schools. We now need to look closely at either reduced uti- 
lization of school buildings and or multiple public use, the latter po- 
tentially benefical to total town fiscal expenditure levels. 

T echnological Future: We are not insulated to the impact of com- 
puters on our society, its schools or places of work and have respond- 
ed via grant funds and limited budget monies to provide some (14) 
computers at Pioneer Valley, (4) at Northfield, (2) at Bernardston, 
and one each in Warwick and Leyden. They are utilized in the com- 
puter laboratory media center, guidance area, business department 
and in the classroom centers at the elementary schools. Staff in- 
service and workshops on-site has promoted attendance at area 
courses and our student participation will expand as we grow in 



(54 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



literacy has become in our changing society, we remain alert to a 
need for balanced curriculum. 

Secondary Issues: Pioneer VAlley Regional has completed a year 
of self evaluation followed by a visiting accreditation process; the 
positive results and recommendations to be reflected in a follow-up 
report, September 1984. This year the master schedule, an ever 
present specter in secondary schools, displayed an eight day cycle, 
inclusive of periodic activity periods in an effort to provide maxi- 
mum course flexibility and student participation. Our athletic pro- 
gram has gained stature and recognition on a number of activity 
levels and has a resultant positive effect on student morale, self 
worth, and school pride. 

Future Concerns: We are beginning to see the visible edge of a pre- 
dicted teacher shortage, especially in math, science, computer back- 
ground, and the special certification areas required within our special 
need assignments. Historically, smaller systems, geographically re- 
moved from population centers, and not highly competitive of salary, 
are the first to witness such change. On a larger scale, we know that 
fewer students are being enticed into the teaching profession for ob- 
vious, known, and much discussed reason. 

A second area will appear in greater magnitude at the secondary 
level as a smaller, projected student population pose course and class 
enrollment concerns in the immediate years ahead. The size and scope 
of course offerings and curriculum boundaries will require support of 
modest enrollment levels if we are to provide a viable education pro - 
gram to member students. 

Financially we have delayed serious Proposition 2? impact during its 
initial (3) year reign - - we now face decisions that follow exhaustive 
alternative action and will be pressed to meet the demands of numer- 
ous constituencies existing within the total population of member 
town. Cooperative planning, sharing, and educated utilization of re- 
imbursement revenue by responsible parties aware of short and long 
range needs of our educational program, is imperative. 

In summary we continue to feel supported by volunteers, parents, 
staff, and system communities in our educational effort. We are so- 
bered by the existing realities of our time and concerned by the pend- 
ing implication of arapidly changing society. The public school, with 
its long-standing traditional, stability, and potential for meeting the 
challenge of change will test your support and your willingness to meet 
the need of our youth. 

For the Committee, 

Edwin F. Harrington, 
Superintendent of Schools 



(55 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



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( 56 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



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(57 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



Leyden Enrollment Report 

October 1983 



Grade 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


K 


6 


3 


9 


1 


4 


3 


7 


2 


2 


0 


2 


3 


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1 


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4 


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3 


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5 


8 


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3 


4 


10 1 


2 


3 


11 1 


2 


3 


12 1 


2 


3 


11 


17 


28 


Franklin County Technical School: 




7 


Northfield Mt. Hermon School 




2 


Full Circle School: 




0 


Holy Trinity School: 




5 


Bement School: 




0 


Eaglebrook: 




0 


Winston Prouty: 




0 


Franklin County Educational Collaborative: 




0 


Greenfield Center School: 




1 


Deerfield Academy: 




0 


School Lunch Program - 1983 




Opening Cash Balance - January 1, 1983 


($-217.75) 


Receipts $4,957.37 






Transfer from Contigency Acct. $1,032.67 


$5,990.04 






Disbursements 


$5,584.33 


405.71 


Closing Cash Balance - December 31, 1983 


$ 187.96 



(58 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



Pioneer Valley Regional School District 
1983 - School Committee 



Mrs. Carol Haskell, Chairperson 

Mr. Roger Doiron 

Mrs. Linda Franklin 

Mr. Robert Tracy 

Mrs. Mary Lou Heselton 

Mrs. Sandra Facey 

Mrs. Patricia Shearer 

Mrs. Suzanne McGowan 

Mrs. Mary Llewelyn 

Mr. Robert Foote 

Mr. Mark Maynard, Vice Chairperson 
Mrs. Joyce Ray, Secretary 
Mrs. Sharon Finnell, Treasurer 



Bernardston 
Bernardston 
Bernardston 



Northfield 



Northfield 
Northfield 
Northfield 



Warwick 
Warwick 
Warwick 



Leyden 
Leyden 
Leyden 



Annual Report of the Principal - 1983 



To the Superintendent of Schools and the Pioneer Valley Regional 
School District Committee: 

I herewith submit my third annual report as Principal of Pioneer 
Valley Regional School. 

Education was certainly the topic of much conservation in 1983. 
Spurred by several national reports, education received a lot of at- 
tention ranging from a concerned public to professional educators. 
Politicians soon jumped on the band wagon and before you knew it 
everyone had a plan for turning things around. While it is beneficial 
to be in the spotlight, we must proceed cautiously to ensure that in 
our efforts to rid ourselves of what is wrong with our institutions we 
do not also discard what is right - and much is right. 

We at Pioneer take great pride in the quality of educational ser- 
vices offered to the young people of our communities. Since the New 
England Association's visit to Pioneer in 1982, we have taken steps 
to make what they classified as an excellent school, even better. For 
example, we have established a number of committees which provide 
opportunities for faculty involvement thus enabling on-going review 
and evaluation of courses, programs and activities. Some of the com- 
mittees also included students where their perspective is needed. 
The standing committees which make monthly reports to the entire 
faculty are as fellows: 

1. Curriculum 

2. Special Events 



(59 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



3. Talented & Gifted 

4. Student Affairs 

5. Principal's Advisory 

6. Superintendent's Advisory 

7. Peer Counseling 

8. Basic Skills 

9. New and Emerging Ideas 

The year 1983 brought many positive additions/changes to our 
curriculum and co-curricular programs as well as in-service projects. 
Following is a summary of many of them. 

A. Federal/State Project Grants written by staff members were 
approved and funded for the 1983-1984 school year. 

1. Block Grant (Secondary) made available $5,059.00 in 
funds enabling us to purchase, among other things, two 
additional computers. 

2. Special Needs - Grant awards enable us to continue to 

a. Title I tutor of remedial math services 

b. Speech Therapy (part time) 

c. Adjustment Counselor (part time) 

3. Occ. Ed. Grant (Business Dept.) $2,999.00 continua- 
tion of Computer Literacy in Business Program. 

4. Commonwealth In-Service Grant - $1,799.00 - Culture 
and Survival: An Interdisciplinary Approach. 

B. Curriculum 

Modification of our master schedule has provided an oppor- 
tunity for students to enroll in more classes by reducing 
course conflicts. 

C. Other Changes 

1. New and/or Reintroduced Courses for 1983 - 1984 

a. Shorthand 

b. Chorus 

c. Speech 

2. Modifications 

a. Social Studies - Shift in emphasis to geography and 
the History of the United States in Grade 8 

b. Social Studies - World History gr. 9 replaces Mod- 
ern European History. 

c. Math - strengthrened credit requirements 

3. Adult Education - Six courses were offered in Spring "83 

4. Parent/Teacher Conferences were introduced and were 
very successful. 



(60 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



5. Activity Period - introduced to minimize class disrup- 
tion by class meetings, assembles, etc. 

6. Athletics - Pioneer's teams bring a lot of pride to the 
school. Especially noteworthy are the accomplishments 
of the Cross Country and Boys Basketball teams who 
won Division Titles during school '82 - T 83. 

7. Energy Conservation Projects - 

a. Window quilts in two classrooms 

b. Introduction of plan to replace glass (when broken) 
with insulated panels. 

c. The computerized Energy Management System and 
the insulated roof continue to help us save on energy 
costs. 

Enrollment 

The Enrollment as of December 1, 1983 were as follows: 



Grade- 


Boys - 


Girls- 


Northfield- Bernardston- Leyden- 


Warwick-Total 


7 


33 


46 


39 


24 


7 


9 


79 


8 


41 


39 


33 


31 


9 


7 


79 


9 


19 


32 


27 


17 


4 


3 


51 


10 


25 


33 


31 


19 


3 


5 


58 


11 


24 


31 


25 


21 


3 


6 


54 


12 


29 


23 


24 


22 


_3 


__3 


50 




171 


204 


179 


134 


29 


33 


375 



This figure reflects an increase of 7 students over the previous 
year; 14 students more than December 1, 1981. 

Chosen Careers 

The _52 members of the class of 1983 made plans for the future 
as follows: 

4 - year college 14 27% 

2 - year college 15 29% 

Short-term - 

other schoolings 2 4% 60% to further education 

Military 7 12% 

Work 14 27% 



(61 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



1983 marked the 25th Anniversary Year for five of our staff 
members: 

Mr. John Trumbell - Social Studies 

Mr. William Messer - Athletic Director/Assistant Principal 

Mr. John Callahan - Science 

Mrs. Nellie Barber - Cafeteria 

Mrs. Beryle Hammond - Home Economics 

These five dedicated people are representative of the high 
caliber personnel staffing Pioneer Valley Regional School. They 
and their colleagues are what makes Pioneer the excellent educa- 
tional institution that it is. As long as we are fortunate enough to 
have teachers willing to work as hard for the interests of our stu- 
dents as these, we will continue to provide quality programs which 
graduate quality students. If all the schools in the country were 
like Pioneer, we would not be a "Nation at Risk". 

My sincere thanks to Superintendent Harrington, my School 
Committee, my faculty and staff, our students, and the parents and 
citizens of our school district for their unselfish and untiring efforts 
on behalf of their school and its students in 1983. 

Thank You for providing me with the opportunity to serve. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Evrett H. Masters, 
Principal 



(62 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



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1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



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(64 ) 



1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



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1983 

ANNUAL REPORT 



- INDEX - 



Fire Department Report 44 

Pioneer Valley Regional School District 59 

Police Department Report 43 

Selectman's Report 11 

Selectmen's Financial Report 25 

Leyden in Retrospect 12 

Leyden School Report 47 

Library Trustees Report 46 

Tax Collector's Report 39 

Town Clerk's Report 40 

Town Officers - Appointed 5 

Treasurer's Report 31 

Visiting Nurse Report 46 

Vocational Study Committee Report 45 

Warrant 19 

Fred W. Wells, Trustees Report 44 



5/18/2009 
PT 166745 1 106 00