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QCD thermodynamics with 2+1 flavors at nonzero chemical potential 

C. Bernard 

Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA 

C. DeTar and L. Levkova 
Physics Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA 

66" 

O ■ Steven Gottlieb 

o ■ 

CN ■ Department of Physics, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA 



U.M. Heller 
American Physical Society, One Research Road, 
; Box 9000, Ridge, NY 11961-9000, USA 



5^ . J.E. Hetrick 

Physics Department, University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA 95211, USA 

> 

O : R. Sugar 

cn . 

^ ' Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA 

D. Toussaint 

^ ' Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA 

■ (Dated: February 2, 2008) 

rS 

a : Abstract 

We present results for the QCD equation of state, quark densities and susceptibilities at nonzero chemical 
potential, using 2+1 flavor asqtad ensembles with A', = 4. The ensembles lie on a trajectory of constant 
physics for which niud ~ 0. Im^. The calculation is performed using the Taylor expansion method with 
terms up to sixth order in ju/T. 

PACS numbers: 12.38.Gc, 12.38.Mh, 25.75.Nq 



1 



I. INTRODUCTION 



The equation of state (EOS) of QCD is of special interest to the interpretation of data from 
heavy-ion collision experiments and to the development of nuclear theory and cosmology. The 
EOS at zero chemical potential (jj = 0) has been extensively studied on the lattice. However, to 
approximate most closely the conditions of heavy ion collision experiments (for example RHIC 
has /J ~ 15 MeV [1]) or of the interior of dense stars, the inclusion of nonzero chemical potential 
is necessary. Unfortunately, as is well known, inclusion of a nonzero chemical potential makes 
the fermion determinant in numerical simulations complex and straightforward Monte Carlo sim- 
ulation not applicable. Several methods have been developed to overcome or circumvent this 

nn 

problem. They include the reweighting techniques 121, |3D, simulations with an imaginary chemical 
potential combined with analytical continuation [fl, [s] or canonical ensemble treatment [6], and 
lastly, the Taylor expansion method M>M, which is employed here. In this method one Taylor ex- 
pands the quantities needed for the computation of the EOS around the point /j = where standard 
Monte Carlo simulations are possible. The expansion parameter is the ratio ju/T, where T is the 
temperature. To ensure fast convergence of the Taylor series, the expansion parameter should be 
sufficiently small. Numerical calculations show satisfactory convergence for ju/T (see reviews 
flQ]). 

In our simulations we use 2+1 flavors of improved staggered fermions. In such simulations 
where the number of flavors is not equal to a multiple of four, the so-called "fourth root trick" 
is employed to reduce the number of "tastes". While this trick is still somewhat controversial, 
there is a growing body of numerical 111 ill and analytic nl'M evidence that it leads to the correct 
continuum limit. For simulations at nonzero chemical potential the problems of rooting are much 
more severe [ IbI. However, the Taylor expansion method is not directly affected by this additional 
problem with rooting since the coefficients in the Taylor series are calculated in the theory with 
zero chemical potential. The Taylor expansion method is generally considered reliable in regions 
where the studied physics quantities are analytic. 

The Taylor expansion method has been used to study the phase structure and the EOS of two 

nnn" 



flavor QCD OL HI UJ, M 



1711 . Our work improves on the previous studies by the addition of the 



strange quark to the sea. Our calculations are performed on 2-1-1 flavor ensembles generated with 
the R algorithm [|18,1 and using the asqtad quark action [[191] and a one-loop Symanzik improved 
gauge action [|20|]. These improved actions have small discretization errors of 0{asa^,a^) and 



2 



0{a^a^, a^), respectively. This is very important since we study the Nt = 4 case, where the lattice 
spacing (a = l/{TNt)) is quite large, especially at low temperatures. Our ensembles lie along a 
trajectory of constant physics for which the ratio of the heavy quark mass and the light quark mass 
is niud/nis ~ 0.1, and the heavy quark mass itself is tuned approximately to the physical value 
of the strange quark mass. The determination of the Taylor expansion coefficients, other than 
the zeroth order ones computed already previously, is necessary only on the finite temperature 
ensembles (for our study Nt=4). No zero-temperature subtractions are needed for them. We have 
determined the contributions to the energy density, pressure and interaction measure due to the 
presence of a nonzero chemical potential. We also present results for the quark susceptibilities 
and densities. In addition, we have calculated the isentropic EOS, which is highly relevant for 
the heavy-ion collision experiments, where, after thermalization, the created matter is supposed 
to expand without further increase in entropy or change in the baryon number. All the results are 
obtained with the strange quark density fixed to = regardless of temperature, appropriate for 
the experimental conditions. This requires the tuning of the strange quark chemical potential along 
the trajectory of constant physics. 

II. THE TAYLOR EXPANSION METHOD 

In this section we give a brief description of the Taylor expansion method for the thermody- 
namic quantities we study and as applied to the asqtad fermion formulation. 

A. Calculating the pressure 

The asqtad quark matrix for a given flavor with nonzero chemical potential is: 



Mi,h = Mjf ^+-Tio(x) ^C/„^^^(x)e^'.^5,^6,^-C/o^^^'(x-0)e-«.^5,^^^6 (1) 

where /// = /iiud and = are the quark chemical potentials in lattice units for the light (u and d) 
quarks and the heavy (strange s) quark, respectively. In the above 

3 



1 



with m/ /, the light and strange quark masses. The superscripts F and L on the links Ufj denote 
the type of links, "fat" and "long"; appropriate weights and factors of the tadpole strength mq are 
included in uf^ and U^t^ . The partition function based on the asqtad quark matrix is 

Z= J-DUe^ IndetM/g^^f lndetM„g-5g ^ (3) 

where n/ = 2 is the number of light quarks and = 1 is the number of heavy quarks. The pressure 
p can be obtained from the identity 

^ = M (4) 

where T is the temperature and V the spatial volume. It can be Taylor expanded in the following 
manner 



n / - \ m 



Y4= ^nm{T) l^yj , (5) 

where /i/ is the nonzero chemical potential in physical units. Due to the CP symmetry of the 
partition function, only the terms with n + m even are nonzero. The expansion coefficients are 
defined by 

1 1 Nf d^+'^lnz 



nl ml di/jiNtYdiiJhNt) 
with fjijr = afJi^h and Ns and Nt the spatial and temporal extents of the lattice. All coefficients 
need to be calculated on the finite-temperature ensembles only, except for coo{T). The latter is 
the pressure divided by at /j/ = 0, which needs a zero-temperature subtraction. It should be 



calculated by other means, such as the integral method, which we have already done in n2l\\ . The 
CnmiT) coefficients are linear combinations of observables Slnm and are given in Appendix B. The 
J^nm observables are obtainable as linear combinations of various products of the operators 

_ nj a^lndetM/ 

evaluated at ^ = 0. For the definitions and explicit forms of the Sln^ see Appendix B. 

Figure [H compares the cut-off effects due to the finite temporal extent A'f in the free theory case 
for the coefficients cqo, C20, C40 and cgo for three different staggered fermion actions: the standard, 
the Naik (asqtad) and the p4 action. The results for the first three coefficients are normalized to 
their respective Stefan-Boltzmann (SB) values. The SB value for C6o is zero (and the same holds 
for C06) • In the SB limit, the con coefficients are, of course, equal to half of the SB values of c„o 



4 



for < n < 4. All other coefficients with n,m^O are zero in the SB limit. In the interacting case, 
the coefficients which are zero in the SB limit can aquire non-zero values. Figure [T] shows that 
the asqtad action has better scaling properties than the standard (unimproved) staggered action at 
Nt = 4, but it is clear that a study at larger Nt is important for further reduction of the discretization 
errors. 




4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 



FIG. 1: The expansion coefficients cqo, C20, C40 and cgo for the pressure in the free theory case as a function 
ofA^,. 



B. Calculating the interaction measure and energy density 



The interaction measure / can be Taylor expanded in a manner similar to the pressure 
I 



N^dlnZ 



din a 

where again only terms even in n + m are nonzero and 

1 A/-3 a«+"' 



W,/i=0 



dlnz 
dlna 



(9) 



(10) 



'""^ ^ nlml d{lJiNtYd{iUhNt] 
The derivative with respect to In a is taken along a trajectory of constant physics. The fermionic 
part of considering the form of the asqtad action, is 
/ dSf\_ ^ nf 



\ dlna 



I? 



dimfo) , duf) , \dMf^ 

^ ^ ^ tr(M7^) + -\.x{M-^ ^) 

dlna dlna ■' duo 



(11) 



No volume normalization of the various traces is assumed in the above. The gauge part, taking 
into account the explicit form of the Symanzik gauge action, is 



—dSg 
dlna 



(^) = (6#-/'+12#^^+16fH^C), 



dlna 



dlna 



dlna 



(12) 



where P, R and C are the appropriate sums of the plaquette, rectangle and parallelogram terms, 
respectively (here they are not normalized to the volume). Thus the bnm{T) coefficients become 



d{mfa) 



dlna 



tr 



W./i 



^0 d{^iNtYd{^hNt) 



W,/i=0 



+ 



duQ 



dXna 



tr 



1 



nlmlNf d{piNt)"d{iUhNt] 



(13) 



The explicit forms of the bnm{T) coefficients are more complex than those for Cnm{T) and we save 
them for Appendix C. The SB limit of all bnm coefficients is zero. In the presence of interactions 
their values can become different from zero. For the computation of the bnm{T) coefficients, in 
addition to the derivatives of the fermion matrix and the gauge action with respect to the chemical 
potentials, we have to know the derivatives of the action parameters with respect to In a along the 
trajectory of constant physics. The latter have been determined in our previous work on the EOS 
at zero chemical potential Bill , along with the coefficient bQQ{T), which is the interaction measure 
divided by in that case. The coefficients Cnm{T) can be obtained from bnm{T) by integration 
along the trajectory of constant physics. This can serve as a consistency check of the calculation. 
The energy density e is simply obtained from the linear combination 



£ 

j,4 



/ + 3p 



(14) 



C. Quark number densities and susceptibilities 



The Taylor expansion for the quark number densities can be obtained from that for the pressure. 
For example, the light quark number density, n^d, is 



nud _ ^ / \riZ\ 
and the heavy one, n^, is 

d f \nZ 



= £ nCnm{T) ( 



n=0,m=l 



n—1 / - \ m 



(15) 



n / - \ m— 1 



T \T 



(16) 



6 



Similarly, the quark number susceptibilities are derivatives of the quark number densities with 
respect to the chemical potentials. Thus, the diagonal light-light quark susceptibility becomes 

and the heavy-heavy diagonal one is 

Lastly, the mixed quark susceptibility has the form 

' m)= i "-..(nfiVfi)"'. (19) 



n=L.m=L 



ni. SIMULATIONS 



The asqtad-Symanzik gauge ensembles we use in this study have spatial volumes of 12^ or 16^ 
and Nf = 4, and are generated using the R algorithm. They are a subset of the ensembles in our 



EOS calculation at zero chemical potential 112 ill . The ensembles lie on an approximate trajectory 



of constant physics for which niud ~ O.lm^, and is tuned to the physical strange quark mass 



within 20%. Along the trajectory, the tt to p mass ratio is mjt/mp ^ 0.3. Table I in [|2ll] contains 
the run parameters and trajectory numbers of the ensembles used here. They are the ones that 
have the gauge coupling values of P = 6.0, 6.075, 6.1, 6.125, 6.175, 6.2, 6.225, 6.25, 6.275, 6.3, 
6.35, 6.6 and 7.08. The last column of that table shows the lattice scale. For explanation of the 



scale setting and other simulation details we refer the reader to section in of 112111 . The observables 
that need to be measured along the trajectory of constant physics in order to construct the Taylor 
coefficients in the expansion for the pressure are L„ and defined by Eqs. ^ and dH). For the 
interaction measure determination the following observables have to be calculated in addition: 

a"trM-^ _ a^trM"^ 

in = 5 hm — 1 (20) 



and the gluonic observables P, R and C. In Appendix C we show how they enter in the coefficients 
bnm{T). To sixth order in the Taylor expansion, the number of fermionic observables (L„, H^, 



1 



In, hm, ^n, Xm) that need to be determined is 40. We calculate them stochastically employing 
random Gaussian sources. In the region outside the phase transition or crossover we use 100 
sources and double that number inside the transition/crossover region. This ensures that we work 
with statistical errors dominated by the gauge fluctuations and not by the ones coming from the 
stochastic estimators. 

The ensembles we are working with have been generated using the inexact R algorithm which 
introduces finite step- size errors. In our previous study of these ensembles [12 ill we measured the 
step-size error in both gluonic and fermionic observables. The error was considerably less than 1% 
in the relevant gluonic and fermionic observables, measured on the high temperature ensembles. 
For the EOS at zero chemical potential it is necessary to subtract the high temperature and zero 
temperature values. In the difference the effect of the step- size error becomes somewhat more 
pronounced. The contributions to the EOS due to nonzero chemical potential, computed here, do 
not require zero temperature subtractions. Thus, based on the observations noted above, we expect 
any step-size errors in these contributions to be considerably smaller than our statistical errors. 



IV. NUMERICAL RESULTS 

Figure [2] shows our results for the temperature dependence of the c„o{T) and the com(r) coef- 
ficients. They all show rapid changes in the phase transition region and relatively quickly reach 
the Stefan-Boltzmann (SB) ideal gas values around l.5Tc - 2Tc. Unsurprisingly, the errors of the 
higher order coefficients are larger than the ones for the lowest order coefficients. They are worst 
for the sixth order coefficients C(,o{T) and co(i{T). Although the magnitude of the coefficients 
decreases with each order in the Taylor expansion, for /i/T ~ 1 the sixth order terms contribute a 
great deal of noise in the thermodynamic quantities at the present level of statistics. Very similar 
conclusions can be made about the general behavior of the rest of the pressure coefficients, Cnm{T) 
with both n.mj^O, shown in Fig.[3l By comparison with the c„o{T) and CQm{T) coefficients, they 
are smaller and so are their contributions to the various thermodynamic quantities. 

Figures |4] and [5] show the coefficients in the Taylor expansion of the interaction measure. Here 
again we see the rapid changes/large fluctuations around the transition region, the fast approach 
to the SB limit at high temperatures and the increase in magnitude of the errors and the decrease 
in magnitude of the coefficients with each successive order. In principle, each Cnm{T) coefficient 
could be obtained from b„,n{T) by integrating the latter along the trajectory of constant physics. 



8 




200 400 600 
T [MeV] 



200 400 600 
T [MeV] 



200 400 600 
T [MeV] 




200 400 600 
T [MeV] 



200 400 600 
T [MeV] 



200 400 600 
T [MeV] 



FIG. 2: Taylor expansion coefficients Cno{T) and com{T) for p/T^. 

For example, in Fig. |6]the C2o{T) coefficient obtained directly using Eq. (5) is compared to its 
value calculated by integrating b2o{T). The comparison shows that within the statistical errors the 
two results are the same. Similar calculations were done for the rest of the coefficients and the 
consistency between the results from the two methods was satisfactory considering the large errors 
on the values obtained by integration. 

Having determined the Cnm{T) and bnm{T) coefficients we can now calculate the EOS to sixth 
order in the chemical potentials. We also determine the quark densities and various susceptibilities 
to fifth and fourth order, respectively. Since we want to work at strange quark density = to 
approximate the experimental conditions, we tuned Jih/T along the trajectory of constant physics 
in order to achieve that condition within the statistical error. Figure |7] (left) shows, for several 
values of /i//r, that with Jih/T = a slightly negative is generated due to the nonzero c„i(r) 
terms. After the introduction of an appropriate nonzero iih/T for each studied temperature and 



9 




FIG. 3: Taylor expansion coefficients Cnm{T) with n,m^O for p/T . 

lii/T, Fig. |7] (right) shows our approximation of the condition = 0. The effect of the tuning 
on thermodynamic quantities, other than ris/T^ itself, is small, because of the smallness of the 
"mixed expansion coefficients" Cnm{T) and bnm{T) for n,m ^ 0. For our level of statistics the 
typical effect is within the statistical errors on the studied quantities. 

Figures [8] and ID show the corrections to the pressure, interaction measure and energy density 
due to the presence of a nonzero l^i/T. The correction to the pressure, for example, is the dif- 
ference Ap/T"^ = p{m,h 7^ 0)/r'^ — = 0)/r^, which is Eq. (5) minus the zeroth order term 
^00(7^) = i^lw./j = 0)/T^. Similarly for the interaction measure and energy density, the correc- 
tions are M/T^ = + 0)/T^-I{^iuh = 0)/T^ and Ae/T^ = £{pij, ^ 0)/T^-£{^i,h = 0)/T\ 
which means again that the zeroth order terms are subtracted from the Taylor expansions for these 
quantities. Qualitatively, our EOS results are similar to the previous two-flavor studies iQ]. The 
corrections to the thermodynamic quantities grow with increasing j^i/T and so do the statistical 
errors. The latter is due to the increasing contributions from higher order terms, which are noisier 



10 





200 400 600 
T [MeV] 




200 400 600 
T [MeV] 



200 400 600 
T [MeV] 




200 400 600 
T [MeV] 



1 <> 


1 ' 1 


' 1 


a 


• 

> 


SB- 


1 


- 1 1 


1 1 



0.05 


0.05 
-0.1 
0.15 



1 <l 


1 ' 1 


' 1 _ 


1 




SB " 


— 1 






l~ - 


I , 1 


1 1 - 



200 400 600 
T [MeV] 



200 400 600 
T [MeV] 



FIG. 4: Taylor expansion coefficients bno{T) and bom{T) for I/T^. 

than the lowest order terms. Figures [TO] and [TT] show that similar observations are true for the rest 
of the studied quantities: the light quark density and the light-light, heavy-heavy and light-heavy 
quark susceptibilities. Of these, the weakest dependence on ^i/T is shown by the heavy-heavy 
susceptibility %„. A clear peak structure at the accessible lii/T in the flavor diagonal light-light 
quark susceptibility would be a sign of reaching the critical end point in the fi — T plane. Our 
result does not show such a peak. Considering the significant errors for larger values of fii/T, it 
is difficult to say whether such a structure could be revealed with higher statistics or if the critical 
^jj/T has not been reached here. In any case, reducing the statistical errors and probably adding 
higher orders in the Taylor expansion would be the way to resolve that important problem. 



11 




FIG. 5: Taylor expansion coefficients bnm{T) with n,m^O for I/T^. 



A. The isentropic EOS 



The AGS, SPS and RHIC experiments produce matter which is expected to expand isentrop- 
ically, i.e., the entropy density s and baryon number hb = Uud/'i both remain unchanged during 
the expansion. This implies that s/ng remains constant. For the experiments mentioned, s/ub is 
approximately 30, 45 and 300 [IITII . respectively. In this subsection we present our results for the 
EOS and other thermodynamic quantities as calculated at nonzero chemical potential on trajecto- 
ries in the/i — r space with s/ns fixed at the values relevant to these experiments. Figure [12] shows 
the trajectories in the {pi, fJh, T) space, obtained by numerically solving the system 

— {m,IJh) = C (22) 

HB 

^(w^Wi) = 0, (23) 



12 




T [MeV] 



FIG. 6: Comparison between two different methods for calculating C2o{T). The direct method uses Eq. (5) 
and the other method integrates b2o{T) along the trajectory of constant physics. The integral method pro- 
duces significantly larger errors than the direct one. 



0.01 



H -0.01 



-0.02 




400 

T [MeV] 



— 0.1 
0.2 

- 0.4 
- 0.6 



500 



0.02 ■ 



0.01 



0- 



-0.01 - 



-0.02 - 




0.1 
0.2 
0.4 
0.6 



600 



200 



300 400 

T [MeV] 



500 



600 



FIG. 7: The strange quark density njT^: left - results with Hh/T = 0; right - tuned results. Different Une 
styles denote different values of jUi/T. 

with C = 30, 45, 300 for temperatures at which we have simulations. The tuning of the parameters 
/Ji and /Jh is done until the deviations from C and zero are no bigger than the statistical errors of 
s/ns and ns/T^, respectively. After mapping the isentropic trajectories we use them to calculate 
the EOS, the results for which are shown in Figs. [I3] and [Ml For comparison, we also include the 
EOS result with s/ng = oo, which is the zero chemical potential case (/j/ = /j/^ = 0). From the 
EOS results we conclude that in the studied range of s/hb the differences between the isentropic 
trajectories are not very large, with the interaction measure least affected by the change in s/ns. 
Our results are again qualitatively very similar to the two-flavor isentropic EOS study from [|l7|] . 



13 



0.5 



0.4 



0.3 



0.2 



0.1 



— 0.1 
0.2 

- 0.4 

- 0.6 



1.5 



0.5 




0.1 
0.2 
0.4 
0.6 



200 



300 400 

T [MeV] 



500 



600 



200 



300 400 

T [MeV] 



500 



600 



FIG. 8: Corrections to the pressure (left) and interaction measure (right) at several values of /ui/T. jUh/T is 
tuned such that ris = along the trajectory. 



2.5 
2 



-^1.5 
< 1 



0.5 




0.1 
0.2 
0.4 
0.6 



1" i 



200 



300 



400 



T [MeV] 



500 



600 



FIG. 9: Corrections to the energy density at several values of /ui/T. /Uh/T is tuned such that rig = along 
the trajectory. 

The isentropic results for riud, Xuu, Xus and Xss are shown in Figs. [15] and [161 It is interesting to 
note that does not develop a peak structure on any of the isentropic trajectories. This means 
that all of the experiments work in the ranges of ^/ng far from the critical end point, if such an end 
point exists at all for physical quark masses ||22|] . The light quark density n^d looks most affected 
by the value of s/ns, and Xss is practically independent of it. 



V. CONCLUSIONS 



We have calculated the QCD equation of state for 2+1 flavors along a trajectory of constant 
physics and at nonzero chemical potential using the Taylor expansion method to sixth order in the 



14 




0.1 
0.2 
0.4 
0.6 



300 400 

T [MeV] 



300 400 

T [MeV] 



500 



600 



FIG. 10: Light quark density (left) and the light-light susceptibility (right) at several values of ^//T. ^ih/T 
is tuned such that = along the trajectory. 




200 



300 400 

T [MeV] 



500 



600 




400 

T [MeV] 



600 



FIG. 11: Heavy-heavy (left) and heavy-light (right) susceptibilities at several values of /ui /T . /Uh/T is tuned 
such that Hs = along the trajectory. 

chemical potential. The Taylor expansion coefficients for the pressure and the interaction measure 
were determined directly by measuring a set of fermionic and gluonic observables on the finite 
temperature ensembles along the trajectory. We used Gaussian random sources in the calculation 
of the 40 fermionic observables. The higher the order of the coefficients the noisier they proved to 
be. Although the higher order coefficients have smaller magnitudes, for increasing values of the 
chemical potential they contribute significantly to the statistical errors. We tuned the heavy quark 
chemical potential at each temperature studied in order to keep a vanishing strange quark density 
and have determined a number of thermodynamic quantities at different values of the light quark 
chemical potential for which the ratio Jji/T < 1 . Our corrections to the EOS due to the nonzero 
chemical potential grow with the increasing values of jui/T. However, not all thermodynamic 



15 



0.8 



0.6 



0.4 



0.2 



cP 
o 
o 
o 

o „ ° 



o 


30 


□ 


45 


o 


300 



o ^ 
□ □ 



I , I , I , I 

200 300 400 500 

T [MeV] 




600 



200 300 400 

T [MeV] 



500 600 



FIG. 12: The isentropic trajectories for different s/ns. 



7 
6 
5 

4 

H 

3 
2 
1 




A 




= 30 


<> 




= 45 


□ 




= 300 









H 3 







1 1 1 






A s/ng = 30 








O s/Hg = 45 




zls - 




□ s/Hg = 300 












M 














« 








K 






A 






















1,1 





200 



300 400 

T [MeV] 



500 



600 



200 



400 



300 

T [MeV] 



500 600 



FIG. 13: Isentropic version of the interaction measure (left) and pressure (right) dependence on temperature 
at different finite values s/bB as described in the text. The case of zero chemical potential {s/hb = °°) is 
also shown. These are the full results for the quantities, not only the correction due to the nonzero chemical 
potential. 

quantities are equally affected by the addition of a chemical potential. Indeed, the heavy-heavy 
quark susceptibility is practically independent of it. 

We also have determined the isentropic versions of the EOS, the light quark densities and quark 
number susceptibilities, which are supposedly most relevant for the current heavy-ion collision 
experiments. We found that the EOS is not strongly affected by changes in the ratio s/ng, which 
is in agreement with previous two-flavor results [jlTI] . 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 
This work was supported by the US Department of Energy under grants number DE- 



16 



1.5 - 



H 

G' 



0.5 - 




600 



T [MeV] 

FIG. 14: Isentropic versions of the energy density dependence on temperature. 



A 




= 30 


O 




= 45 


□ 




= 300 









2.5 - 



il.5- 



A s/llg 


= 30 




= 45 


□ s/iig 


= 300 







200 



300 400 

T [MeV] 



500 



600 



200 



300 



400 



500 



600 



T [MeV] 

FIG. 15: Light quark density (left) and Ught-hght susceptibility (right) for different s/hb. 

FG02-91ER-40628, DE-FC02-06ER-41446, DE-FG02-91ER-40661, DE-FC02-06ER-41443, 
DE-FC06-01ER-41437, DE-FG02-04ER-41298 and DE-FC02-06ER-41439 and by the US Na- 
tional Science Foundation under grants number PHY05-555235, PHY04-56691, PHY05-55243, 
PHY05-55234, PHY04-56556, PHY05-55397 and PHY07-03296. Computations were performed 
at CHPC (Utah), FNAL, FSU, lU, NCSA and UCSB. 



[1] P. Braun-Munzinger, D. Magestro, K. Redlich, and J. Stachel, Phys. Lett. B518, 41 (2001), hep- 
ph/0105229. 

[2] I. M. Barbour et al., Nucl. Phys. Proc. Suppl. 60A, 220 (1998), hep-lat/9705042. 
[3] Z. Fodor and S. D. Katz, Phys. Lett. B534, 87 (2002), hep-lat/0104001. 



17 



1.25 r 




200 



300 400 

T [MeV] 



500 



600 



200 



300 



400 

T [MeV] 



500 



FIG. 16: Light-heavy (left) and heavy-heavy (right) susceptibilities for different s/hb- 



600 



[4] M.-P. Lombardo, Nucl. Phys. Proc. Suppl. 83, 375 (2000), hep-lat/9908006. 
[5] P de Forcrand and O. Philipsen, Nucl. Phys. B642, 290 (2002), hep-lat/0205016. 
[6] M. G. Alford, A. Kapustin, and F Wilczek, Phys. Rev. D59, 054502 (1999), hep-lat/9807039. 
[7] C. R. Allton et al., Phys. Rev. D66, 074507 (2002), hep-lat/0204010. 
[8] R. V. Gavai and S. Gupta, Phys. Rev. D68, 034506 (2003), hep-lat/0303013. 
[9] O. Philipsen, PoS LAT2005, 016 (2006), hep-lat/05 10077. 
[10] C. Schmidt, PoS LAT2006, 021 (2006), hep-lat/0610116. 

[11] S. Durr and C. Hoelbling, Phys. Rev. D69, 034503 (2004), hep-lat/03 11002; E. Follana, A. Hart, 
and C. T. H. Davies, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 241601 (2004), hep-lat/0406010; S. Durr, C. Hoelbling, 
and U. Wenger, Phys. Rev. D70, 094502 (2004), hep-lat/0406027; A. Hasenfratz and R. Hoffmann, 
Phys. Rev. D74, 014511 (2006), hep-lat/0604010; C. Aubin et al. (MILC), Phys. Rev. D70, 114501 
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[12] Y. Shamir, Phys. Rev. D71, 034509 (2005), hep-lat/0412014 and Phys. Rev. D75, 054503 (2007), hep- 
lat/0607007; C. Bernard, M. Golterman, and Y. Shamir (2007), arXiv:0709.2180 [hep-lat]; C. Bernard, 
Phys. Rev. D73, 114503 (2006), hep-lat/0603011. 

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18 



[18] S. Gottlieb et al., Phys. Rev. D35, 2531 (1987). 

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878 (2000), hep-lat/9909087. 

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[22] P de Forcrand and O. Phihpsen, PoS LAT2006, 130 (2006), hep-lat/06 11027. 



APPENDIX A: PROPERTIES OF THE QUARK MATRIX DERIVATIVES 

We use the following identities for the fermion matrix and its derivatives: 

Mt(/i)=Y5M(-/i)Y5, and -^(^) = (-1)«y5-^(-^)Y5. (Al) 

Then, at // = 

„fM-'?^M-'?M„-....y = (_i)",«.. „fM-'^M->|!^M-'...V (A2) 

Because the terms in the n-th derivative satisfy n\+n2-\ = n, we obtain 

a«lndetM\* , ^,„a"lndetM _ 

i. e. all even derivatives are real and all odd ones are purely imaginary. This means for example 
that 

Re (L2L1L1) = - (Re(L2)Im(Li)Im(Li)) , (A6) 

and the real part of any observable containing odd number of odd derivatives is zero. 
Explicitly the derivatives of the asqtad fermion matrix are 



a"M 1 



+(3)«C/o^^\x)e3^5,+36,,- (-3)"C/o^^^^(x-36)e-3''5,^^^3o] . 



19 



APPENDIX B: ALGEBRAIC TECHNIQUES FOR THE PRESSURE 



The nonvanishing Cnm{T) coefficients from second through sixth order are: 



ld^{p/T^ 

C20 = 



C40 = 



C60 = 



CQ2 



CQ6 



Cn = 



C31 = 



C13 = 



C22 



C42 = 



C24 



C5l 



Cl5 



C33 



2 ^{^^l/TY 
1 d\p/T') 



4! a(/i//r)4 

1 d\p/T^) 



^20 

1 1 



6! a(////r)6 

U\p/T^) 



«=o 



w=o 



1 1 



^^^^(-^60 - 15^40-^20 + 30j^2o) 



_ 1 Nt 



1 d^{p/T^) _ 1 1 
1 d^{p/T^) _ 1 1 

1 a^b/r^ 



(Jl04 - 3^ 



02) 



(j?06- 15^04-^^02 + 30j?^2) 



UV.diiJi/T)d{iJh/T) 
1 d\p/T^) 



w./,=o 



3\l\d\pi/T)d{ph/T) 
1 d\p/T^) 



3\V.d{pi/T)d\nh/T) 
1 a4(;./r4) 



2!2!a2(^,/r)a2(p,/r) 
1 a6(p/r4) 



W,A=0 



^11 
1 1 

3!l!A^3A/f 

1 1 
3\V.N]Nt 
1 1 

1 1 



4!2! d^{^ii/T)d\iih/T) «,,=o 4!2! ATSat/ 

+24j?20-i??i + 6Jlo2-^?lo) 

1 ^Hp/t^) 1 1 



(;l31 -3j?20-i^ll) 
(;1i3-3J?02.!?1i) 

(JI22 --^^20-^^02 -2.il n) 

(.^42 - 6Sl2Q^22 - '&^n^3l - Mo^02 



4!2! d^(jui/T)B\iUh/T) «,,=o 4!2! 

+24.^02-!l?i + 6^^20-^02) 

1 a6(p/r4) 1 1 



(;l24 - 6.Jl02-!l22 - ^^n^l3 - ^QA^2Q 



1 a6(p/r4) 1 1 



5\V.d'ijUi/T)d5{ph/T) «,,=o 5!1!A^3^3 
1 d^P/T^) 1 1 



3!3! d\ixi/T)d\iXh/T) «,,=0 3!3! 

+ 18jl20-^02-!lll + 12.illl) 



(;l51 - 10^31^20- 5 J^aqAw+^OAurIq) 
- 10;li3.^02 - 5j^QA^n + 30JAnJ^l2) 
{J^33 - 3JA31^02 - 3^13^20 - 9-^11-^22 



20 



To generate the above expressions for Cnm we follow closely the technique given in u6\ . Let 

^^""^ ^ ^io = (Li) (Bl) 



It can be shown that 



^ - -^oi = (//i). (B2) 



= ^n+l,m--^W-^nm (B3) 

m 

nm 5 \"^J 



where 

(3 = / p-^Of,-Ho'_ 

M M 

Higher order derivatives of In Z at ^h,i = are zero if n + m is odd, which can be shown to mean 
that, in this case, Slnm = 0. An example for getting a higher order derivative using either Eq. (Bl) 
or Eq. (B2): 

Once an expression for Cnm is obtained it is easy to get Cmn by just interchanging n and m in the 
former. The observables in terms of the operators 

n/a'nndetM/ n/, a'^lndetM,, 

^"=4^^ and ^^ = ^ . (B7) 



are 



^20 = {L2) + {L\) 

^40 = (L4)+4(L3Li) + 3(L^>+6(L2Lf) + (Lt) 

^60 = (L6)+6(L5Li) + 15(L4L2) + 10(l2) + 15(L4L2)+60(L3L2Li) 

+15 (L^) + 20 (LaL^ > +45 (L^L?) + 15 (L2Lt) + (if^ 
^02 = m + {Hl) 

sio4 = {H4)+4{H3H,) + 3{Hi)+6{H2Hf) + {Ht) 

^06 = {He)+6{H5Hi) + l5{H4H2) + l0{H^) + l5{H4H^)+60{H3H2Hy) 

+ 15 (Hi) + 20 (//3^i > + 45 (HiHf) + 15 {H2H^) + (//f ' 
^11 = (LiHi) 



21 



^22 = {L2H2) + {L2HI) + {L\H2) + {L\hI) 

R31 = {L3Hi)+3{L2LiHi) + {LlHi) 
J?l3 = {H3Li)+3{H2HiLi) + {HfLi) 

J?42 = {L4H2)+4{L3LiH2)+3{LlH2)+6{L2LjH2) + {LjH2) 

+ (UHf) + 4 (LiLiHf) + 3 (LlHf) + 6 (LjL?//? > + (L^^H^) 

J?24 = {H4L2) +4 (//3//1L2) + 3 (//|L2> + 6 {H2HIL2) + (//fL2> 

+ (//4L?> + 4 (//3^l^i > + 3 (//|Lf > + 6 {H2HIl\) + (Hi^Lf > 
= {L5Hi)+ 5 {L4LiHi) + 10 {L3L2Hi) + 10 {L3LjHi) + 15 {4UHi) 
+ 10{L2LIHi) + (^lIHi^ 

Jli5 = {H5Li)+5{H4HiLi) + 10{H3H2Li) + 10{H3HfLi) + l5{HiHiLi) 

+\0{H2hIli) + (hIl,'^ 

^33 = {{L3 + 3L2Li+Ll){H3 + 3H2Hi+Hf)). 



The observables L„ and Hm include the quark matrix M(= M/ /,) derivatives with respect to //(= 

jU/ ft), which have the following form: 
BlndetM /.,_i9M 



3/1 

a^lndetM 
B^lndetM 



a^lndetM 



tr M" 



3/ 



B^lndetM 



tr 



tr ( M"i— M"i — 

0;U 



-3tr M 



a^M , a^M 



a/j' 



-M 



aA/2 



,dM ,dM ,d^M 
+ 12tr ( M^i— M^i— M"^^^ 
a^ d/i d/<^ 



/ ,aM ,aM ,dM ,dM 
\ ofi ofi on ofi 

-lOtr ( M^i^^M"^^^ 1 +20tr M"i— M"i— 



a/y2 



.a^M. ._ia2M 



a^i 3/1 3/1^ 



3A/ 



+30tr f M^'-^M" 
-60tr —M~^ —M~^ —M~^ 



)M 



3/|2 



(B8) 
(B9) 



(BIO) 



(Bll) 



22 



/ ,dM ,3M ,3M ,dM ,dM\ 
+24tr M"'— M"'— M"'— M"'— M"^— (B12) 
y dfj o/j o/j o/j 0/7 y 

/ ,aM ,aM .a^MX / ,aM ,a2M .a^MX 

■\-mx\M-^—M-^—M-^—r +60tr M"'— M^^^^M"'^^ 

\ a/7 a^i ) \ d/Li d/Li^ d/Li^ J 

( .a^M ,aM ,a^M\ / ,d^M .a^M .a^A 

\ a/j^ a^f a/j^ y \ a/j^ a/^^^ a^/' 



/ ,aM ,aM ,aM .a^M 

-120tr M-^ —M-^ —M-^ —M-^ 

\ o^i o^i ofj dfj^ 

,dM ,dM ,d^M ,d^M 
-180tr M^^—M^^—M^^^^M^^ 



„^ / ,aM .d^M ,dM ,d^M\ 
-90tr M-^—M-^—-M-^—M-^—- 
\ dfi diT' d/u d^^ J 

( ,dM ,dM ,dM ,dM ,d^M 
+360tr ^ — ^ — ^ — ' — ^ ^— 5- 

\ dfi dfi dfj dfj d^-'- 

( ,dM ,dM ,dM ,dM ,dM .dM\ 
-120tr M-^—M-^—M-^—M-^—M-^—M-^— . (B13) 

\ dfi dfi dfi dfi dfi dfi 



APPENDIX C: ALGEBRAIC TECHNIQUES FOR THE INTERACTION MEASURE 

Eq. (13) for the coefficients bnm{T) contains three types of derivatives of the fermion matrix 
with respect to the chemical potentials. We tackle them separately in the following. 

1. First type of derivative 



Here we give the method [,161 for calculating the derivative 



^{^ilNtY^{flhNty 

IJi.h=0 

A convenient place to start in this case is by defining the observables 



(CI) 



- { 4, ) (C2) 

, / , H 5"e^" a'"(trM,7ie-^o) , 



23 



The above means 



®oo = (trM; 



(C4) 
(C5) 



It follows that 



^n,m+l -^01 ®nm 



®n+l,m--^10«. 



(C6) 
(C7) 
(C8) 
(C9) 



Using the above and then applying /// /j = we get 



M 

aVtrM: 



M 

I ixM, 



32 / trMr 



34 / trMr 



a^ / trMr 



a^ / trMr 



MM 
a^ <^trM;- 

MM 



®20- -^20^500 

«40 - ^^IQ'BlQ + 6j?20^00 - -!^40«00 

S60 - -^60^00 - 15^20^40 - 15^40^20 + 30j?20-^^40«00 + 90j?|o!S20 - 90j?|o«00 
!S02--i?02!S00 

«04 - 6J1o2®02 + 6J?o2^00 - -^^04® 00 

!Bo6 - -^^oe^OO - 15^02 !S04 - 15^^04^02 + 30^02-^04!200 + ^^^ll'^Ql - ^Q^li'Sm 
!Bil-Jlll!S00 

«22- -^22^00 + 2!B00-^^02-^20+4!B00-i^?l - 4!Bll J^n - ^02«20 - -!^20®02 
!Bl3 - Jli3«00 - 3^02!Sll - 3^ii«02 + 6;lii^02®00 



24 



aVtrMr^ 



•321 - JI3I «00 - 3Jl20«ll - 3^ii!S20 + 6Sln^2Q'S(Xj 



UxMJ 



-6J1o2«22 + 6J?o2®20 " 6j?22«02 + 48^02-^11 «11 + 12;?22-^?02®00 + 1 2^^20-^02^02 
+24j1i2i !Bo2 - 72j^iVo2«00 - 18J120-;?02!S00 + 2j^20-i^04«00 

= !S42 - ■^^42«00 - 8.!?ll!B31 + 16j?31 SoO - 8.)?31 Sll - ^40«02 - -^02«40 

-6^20!S22 + 6^20^02 -6^22!S20 + 48j^20-^^11!Si1 + 1 2 J^22-^^20 ^^00 + 12^02-^^20 !»20 
+24j^ !S20 - 72j? 1^20^00 - 18j?02-^?20®00 + 2j^02-^^40«00 

= !Si5 - -!^15«00 - 10j?02!S13 + 20j?13J1o2«00 - 5j?04!Si1 - 10j?13!Bo2 - 5j?ll?Bo4 

+30;i^2®ii +60.Jiii.Jio2«02 + 10^11^04^00-90^11-^^02^00 

= ^51 -^5i!B00-10.!?20!S31+20J?31-^20®00-5.!?40®11-10-^?31«20-5.!?11!S40 

+30ji|o^2ii +60.!^ii-^20«20+ 10-i^ii-^?40«oo -90;^ii-!^lo®oo 

= !S33-Jl33!BoO- 3-^20^13 -3-il02«31 - 9j^ii !S22 - 9^22^11 - 3^13^20 - 3.il31«02 

+36j?n Sii - 36j?ii!Boo + 6j?i3J?20®oo + 6j?3i j^o2«oo + l^^Qi^io'Bn 

+ 18jliiJl22!S00 + 18j^02-*^11!S20 + I^SIuSIiQ-Bqi - 54^ 1 1^102-^20 «00- 

Replacing S with in the above we get the expressions for the derivatives of (ixM^^^. Let 

a"trMri 

In = —^ih (CIO) 
a«tr Mr 1 

hn = , (CU) 



a^^JtrM;-! 



a^ ^trM-i 

MM 



a^^trMfi 

MMh 



then explicitly we have 



«oo = (^0) = (trM^ ^ 



/ 

«10 = (/l) + (/o^l) 

®20 = (/2)+2(/iLi) + (/oL2) + (/oL?> 



25 



(/3) + 3 (/2L1) + 3 (/1L2) + (/0L3) + 3 (/iLf > + 3 (/0L1L2) + {IqLI) 

(k) + 4 (/3L1) + 6 (/2L2) + 4 (/1L3) + (/0L4) + 6 (/2/^f > + 12 (/1L1L2) + 3 {loll) 
+4 (/0L1L3) + 4 (/iL3 > + 6 (/oL?L2> + (/oLt > 

(/s) + 30 (/2L1L2) + 30 (/iL?L2> + 20 (/1L1L3) + 10 (/oL?L2> + (/0L5) + 5 (/iL^ > + 10 (/2L3) 
+5 {I4L1) + 10 (/3L2) + 10(/3L?) + 5 (Z1L4) + 15 (hLl) + 10 (hLl) + (/q^^) 
+10 (/0L2L3) +5 (/0L1L4) + 15 {loLiLl) + 10 (/oL?L3> 

(/e) + 60 (/1L2L3) + 15 {loL^} + 20 {IoLIl^} + 90 (/2L?L2> + 90 (ZiLiL^) + (/oLg) 
+6 (|/iLf ^ +45 (/2L1> + 15(/2Z^t) + 20(Z3L3) + 15 {I2L4) + 6 {I5U) + 15 (/4L2) + 15 (kLj) 
+20 (/3L^> + 10 (loll) + 15 (loll) + 6 (/1L5) + 60 (/3L1L2) + 60 (/2L1L3) + 60 (/iL?L3> 
+30 (/1L1L4) + 60 (/iLf L2> + 45 (/oL?L^> + 15 (/0L2L4) + 6 (/0L1L5) + 15 (/oL?L4> 
+60(/oLiL2L3) + ^/oL6|) 

(/0^2) + (/0^l'> 

(/0//4) + 4 (/o^3^i) + 3 (/oH|> + 6 (/oH2Hi2> + {IqHI) 

(loHe) + 6 (/o//5^i) + 15 {I0H4H2) + 10 (/o//f > + 15 (/o/f4/^f ) + 60 {I0H3H2H1) 

+15 {ml) +10 (loH^Hf) +45 (/o/^l/Zi^) + 15 </o^2//0 + (/o^f ) 

+ (/0L1//1) 
{{12 + 2/iLi + /0L2 + loLl) {H2 + Hl)) 

ihHi) + 3 ihLiHi) + 3 (/1L2//1) + ikL^Hi) + 3 (/iLf/Zi) + 3 (/0L1L2//1) + (/o^^//i> 
((/i + /oLi)(//3 + 3//2^i+//i3)> 

( (/4 + 4/3L1 + 6/2L2 + 4/1L3 + /0L4 + ehlj + I2/1L1L2 + 3/oL^ 

+4/0L1L3 + 4/iL3 + 6/oLf L2 + loLt) {H2 + hI)) 

( {h + 2/iLi + /0L2 + kL\) {Ha + 4//3//1 + 3hI + 6//2^i2 ^ ^4^ 

(/5//1) + 30 {I2L1L2H1) + 30 {hLjL2Hi) + 20 (hLiL^Hi) + 10 (/o^i^2^i> + (/o^-sii^i) 

+5 (/iL{//i) + 10 (/2L3//1) + 5 {I4L1H1) + 10 {I3L2H1) + 10 (/3^1i^i> + 5 {hUHi) 

+15 {kLlHi) + lO{l2LlHi) + (^IqLIHi^ + 10 {I0L2L3H1) + 5 {IqLiLaHi) + 15 {kULlH^) 

+10(/oL?L3//i> 

(^{h + loLi){H5+5H4Hi + lOH3H2+lOH3Hf + 15//|//i + IO//2//1 +^1 )) 
((/3 + 3/2L1 + 3/1L2 + /0L3 + 3/iL? + 3/0L1L2 + /oL?) (H3 + 3//2^i +Hf)). 



26 



From the above expressions it is easy to get the expressions by substitutions 



'B'^„ = 'Bnm{l^h,L^H). (C12) 
Explicitly /„ and hn are the derivatives below with M — M[^h and jj — jui^h. 



3// 



a^trM- 



3/1 \ d/u 



'2 

( ,3M ,32m a / ,3M ,3M ,3M 
+3tr M^'^M^^^^M"^ -6tr M"l^M"^^M"'^M" 
y 3/j 3/7^ / y 3/j 3/y 3/y 

-tr (m-^M-i) +4tr (m-^M-^M-) (C16) 

/ ,32m ,32m ,\ / |3M ,33m ,\ 
+6„(^„-._«-._„-.j+4tt(^«->^M->^M-'j 



/ ,32m ,3m ,3m , 
-12tr M-^ —-M-^ —M-^ —M-^ 

,3M ,32m ,3M , 
■12tr M-^ —M-^ —rM-^ —M-^ 



3/7 3/(2 3// 

/ i^M,^ i3M,^ i32m,^ 1 
-12tr ^M~^ ^M~^ ^:-^M~^ 



3/1 3/1 3/|2 

/ ,3M ,3M ,3M ,3M , 
+24tr M" 1 — M" ^ — M" ^ — M" ^ — M" ' 

\ djJL djJL OfJ OfJ 

-tr (m-i0M-i) +5tr (m-^M-^M-) (C17) 
/ ,3M ,34m ,\ / ,32m ,33m ,\ 

\ 3/1^ 3/1^ / \ 3/1 3/i"^ 3/1^ / 

/ ,32m ,32m ,3m ,\ / ,32m ,3M ,32m ,\ 

-30tr M-i^^M-i^^M-i— M-i -30tr M"'^— ^M"'— M"'^— ^M"' 
\ 3//^ 3//^ 3// / \ 3//^ 3// 3//^ / 

-20tr M ^— M"^— M"i^--5-M"' -20tr M"'— M"'— -^-M^^— M"M 
\ ofi 3/( 3/(^ / \ 3/( 3//-' 3/( / 

/ ,33m ,3M ,3M ,\ / ,32m ,3M , 3M , 3M ,\ 

-20tr M-i^;-5-M-i^M-i^M-i +60tr M-^^^-^M-i^M-^^M-i^M-i 
\ 3/i^ oj^ oju J \ ojj^ a/u a/u a/u J 

_ / ,3M ,32m ,3M ,3M ,\ _ / ,3M , 3M ,32m , 3M ,\ 
+60tr M-^—M-^—-M-^—M-^—M-^ +60tr M"^— M^i— M"^— ^-M^i— M^^ 
\ 3/y 3/y^ ofi J \ 3/i 3/i 3/i^ 3/i / 

/ ,3M ,3M ,3M ,32m ,\ 
+60tr M"'— M"'— M"'— M"'^— ^M"' 
\ 3/( 3/( 3/; ofj'^ J 

i9M,^ ,3M,^ ,3M,^ i3M,^ ,3M,^ , 
-120tr M~^—M~^—M~'-—M~^—M~^—M^^ 
\ an 3/1 3/1 3/1 3/y 



27 



-tr M" 



-r^M" +6tr M^'^M"'^^ 



+6tr ( M^^^-^M-^—M 



M~ 



+ 15tr (m- 
-30tr I 



+ 15tr 



-M 



-M 



-1 



-30tr M 



-60tr ^M" 
-60tr ( M" 



-90tr M 



^M-^M-5?M-^ -30tr fM-^M-S^M 



a/7 a^/"* 



aM, 



, aM , dM , 

M M M 

d/r d/i d/i 



60tr (^M 



, aM , a^M , 



M 



-1 



a^y a^y^ 

dM ,d^M .a^M A / .a^M , a^M 

d;U a/u^ d;U^ / \ d//^ d//^ 

a^M .a^M ,aM A / .a^M ,aM 

^M-i— ^M-i— M-i -60tr M-1— ^M-1— M- 
d/i"' d/i^ an J \ ojj^ d/i 



a^M 



a^M^^^^a^M^^^i 

■M ^^r^M ' 



+120tr M 



aA/2 
a^M 



+120tr I^M" 
+120tr (m- 
+120tr ( M" 



+180tr l^M- 
+180tr ( M" 



+180tr (m- 
+180tr I^M" 
+180tr ( M" 



+180tr I^M" 
-360tr ( M" 



-360tr M 



-360tr M" 



dM 



d/ii 



a^M 

aAi 
a^y 



■M" 



-60tr (M-i^M-i|^M 
d/i^ d/i 



a^f 
^a^M 

a;;? 

_ia^M 

a;;? 



M" 



M" 



,aM ,aM ,aM , 
.a^M ,aM ,aM , 

^M" 1 ^^M" 1 — M" 1 — M" 1 
d;U d;U^ a/u ojji 

dM ,dM .a^M ,aM , 

d/i d/i d/i^ d/i 



laM ,aM .a^M , 

^M"^ ^M-i ^M-i ^r-^M-i 

d/i a/i a^/ a^/-* 



aM 
a^M 



.a^M ,aM ,aM , 

^M" 1 „M- ' — M- ^ — M- 1 
d;U^ d;U^ d/( d/( 

a^M ,aM .a^M ,aM , 

^M- 1 — M- 1 ^M- 1 — M- 1 
d/i^ d|i air- an 

a^M ,aM ,aM .a^M , 

^-^M-^ —M-^ —M-^ —^M-^ 
ajr a/j d/j an 

.d'^M .d'^M ,dM . 
-^M ^^M ^r-r^ ^^M ' 
d/y d/y^ an an 

dM .a^M ,aM .a^M , 

^M-i ^M-i ^M-i ^M-i 
d// an an an 



dM 

a^M 






dn dn 



dn^ 



,aM laM ,aM ,aM , 

^M-1 ^M-1 ^M-1 ^M-1 ^M-1 
d/i^ d/i d/i dn dn 



dn dn dn dn dn 



dM 

dH 

dM 



,dM .d^M ,dM ,aM , 
^M" 1 ^M" ^ ^r-^M- ^ ^M" 1 ^M" ^ 
d/i d/i d/i"' d;U dn 



28 



/ ,aM .bm .a^M ,aM 

\ O/l O/l O/l O^"^ O/J ^ 

/ ,aM laM ,aM ,aM la^M , 

\ a^u a^u a^u a^ a^^ 

/ ,aM ,aM ,aM ,aM ,aM ,aM 

\ an ojj^ ojj^ ojj^ ajj^ ojj^ 



2. Second type of derivative 



The next term we are concerned with is the derivative 



a(///M)«a(//;,iv,)' 

Here we start start from the definitions 



Cn 



C 



e --^e"^" 



a«e^oa'»[tr(M,i^)e^o] 



From the above 



Coo 



^00 = 



The following can be proven true 



dm 

dCnm 



Cn+l,m ^\oCnm 
Cn,m+1 -^OlCnm 



The derivatives 



29 



have the form of the derivatives of ^tr {Mf^ ) J in the previous section with the substitutions 'Bmn 
Cnm and Cnm- The explicit forms of Cnm and are the same as for 'Bnm and with the 

substitutions /„ — > ?i„ and /i„ — > %„, where 



— 



duQ 



(C29) 
(C30) 



These derivatives have the form below with M — Mi^ff and /u — /uiy. 



a2tr(M-ig) 



tr 



tr 



9^ duQ dju duQ 



= tr 



) 



3// 

35tr(M-i£) 



= tr 



dM-^ d dM dM\ 

■ +2 \-M^ 

d/u^ duQ dfj dfA duQ dffi duQ J 

d^M-^ dM ^d^M-^ d dM ^^^-^ 3^ dM 3^ dM\ 

d/Li^ duQ 3/j2 d/Li duo 3/7 d/iP- duQ d/u^ duo J 

34m- 1 dM d^M-^ 3 dM d^M-^ 3^ dM dM-^ 3^ dM 
1_4 1_5 ^4 

3;U'* Jmq 3;U-' 3/7 Jmq 3/y2 3/y2 duo 3/y 3/y-^ Jmq 



+ M-1 — — ^ 
3// <iMo / 



3/|5 



3/y6 



tr 



35M-1 3'^M-i 3 dM dM'^ dM 
1_5 1_5 

d/j^ duf) 3//* 3/i duo 3/1 3// <iMo 



10 



33m- 1 32 ifM 
3/|3 3/|2 Jmq 



dfp- 3//3 duo 3//^ Jmo / 



tr 



d^M-^ dM ^d^M-^ 3 t/M g3M-i 3^ dM ^^^^M"^ 3^ t/M 
3//^ Jmo 3//^ 3/( (iMo 3/( 3//^ Jmo 



3//* 3//2 duo 



+15 



32M-1 34 JM _„33m-i 33 JM 3^ dM\ 



+ 20- 



+ M" 

3//^ 3//^ duo 3//^ <iMo / 



In the above the derivatives of M^^ can be taken from the previous subsection. The derivative of 
M with respect both to the chemical potential and the tadpole factor for the asqtad action, is 



3" dM 



1 



dUo ^+0'^ 



-(-1)"^ 



(x-O) 



J Mo 



e-^5 



(C31) 



+(3)«^e3.5. 
a Mo 



, J^(^)'(x-30) 3 

Jmo ^'^+36 



(-3) 



30 



3. Third type of derivative 



The third type is the gauge derivative 



d{niNtYd{nhNtY 



In this case let 



and similarly as before 



Gn 



with 



- Gn+\,m — -^wGnm 

- Gfi fn-^\ - -JlOlGnm, 

Goo = {g). 



(C32) 
(C33) 

(C34) 
(C35) 



This means that the necessary derivatives g^^^jy )"d(p.fiN 



(C36) 

have the same form as the deriva- 



tives 



a«+'"tr(Mj') 



with ®. 



Gnm- The Gnm observables have very similar form to the 



J^nm observables, but with an additional multiplication by g inside the ensemble average brackets 
of each term in them. For example: 



— G20 — -^ioGqo 



MLh=0 



and 



etc. 



G2o = {gL2) + {gLi), 



(C37) 



(C38) 



For example, combining the three types of terms for each flavor, one of the simplest of the 
Taylor coefficients in the interaction measure expansion, b2o, becomes 



1 d{mid) 



+ 



2 dlna 
1 d{miia) 



, , 1 duQ 

(!B20--;?20%o) + 7: 



PLh=0 



2 dlna 



{C20- -^loCoo) 



4 dlna 



(!B^0--^20«00) + 



1 dUQ 



m,h=o 

+ G20 — .^?2oGoo] • 



4 dlna 



(<^20--^20<^00) 



(C39) 



31