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Galactic Rotation Described with Thin-Disk Gravitational Model 



James Q. Feng and C. F. Gallo 
March 4, 2008 

Abstract 

The measured rotation velocity profiles of mature spiral galaxies are successfully described with 
a gravitational model consisting of a thin axisymmetric disk of finte radius. The disk is assumed 
uniformly thin but with variable radial mass density. The governing integral equation is based on 
mechanical balance between Newtonian gravitational and centrifugal forces (due to galaxy rotation) 
at each and every point in a finite set of concentric rings. The nondimensionalized mathematical 
system contains a dimensionless parameter we call "galactic rotation parameter" which concisely 
crystallizes perspective. Computational solutions are obtained for the radial mass distributions 
that satisfy the measured rotational velocity profiles. Together with a constraint equation for mass 
conservation, the galactic rotational parameter is also determined from which the total galactic 
mass is calculated from measured galactic radii and maximum rotation velocities. These calculated 
total galactic masses are in good agreement with data. Our deduced exponentially decreasing mass 
distributions in the central galactic core are in agreement with almost all others. However our mass 
distributions differ toward the galactic periphery with more ordinary baryonic mass in these outer 
disk regions which are cooler with lower opactiy/emissivity (and thus darker). 

1 Introduction 

1.1 Galactic Rotational Velocity Profiles from Observational Data 

The data on galactic rotational velocity profiles (Refs.[T]-[6]) of mature spiral galaxies may be 
idealized as 

V(r) = 1 - e- r/Rc , (1) 

where V(r) denotes the tangetial velocity and r the radial coordinate from the galactic center. 
The parameter R c is a description of the various radii of the "cores" of different galaxies. Typical 
galactic rotational profiles described by ([!]) are displayed in Fig 1. As indicated by the measurement 
data, the rotation velocity typically rises linearly from the galactic center (as if the local mass was 
in rigid body rotation), and then reach an approximately constant (flat) velocity out to the galactic 
periphery. 



1.2 Historical Background: Keplerian Dynamics and Dark Matter 

The observed galactic rotation curves described above and in Fig.l are very different from the 
Keplerian rotation of our solar-planet system in which the orbital velocity decreases inversely with 
square root of the radial postion. This Keplerian rotation comes from the orbital velocity law 
M r = rV 2 (r)/G, where G is the gravitational constant and M r is the integrated mass enclosed 
within a spherical surface of r (called orbital distance). This orbital velocity law is based on a simple 



1 



spherically symmetric gravitational field (e.g., from a dominant central solar point mass). It was 
often applied to the dynamics of a galaxy system, where the mass appears to be distributed without 
the obvious spherical symmetry, to calculate the galactic mass distribution from the measured 
galactic rotation curves (Ref. [7] ) . Such a practice led to the conclusion that the galactic mass must 
increase with radial position. 

By contrast, the measured galactic luminosity curves decrease exponentially from the galactic 
center. Employing the concept that mass and light are directly relate via mass-to-light ratio, the 
exact opposite conclusion is reached (Ref. [7]) that the mass decreases with radial position. 

It is this sharp discrepancy between these two opposite conclusions that has led to the concept 
of Dark Matter (Ref. [7]), which inspired considerable research efforts in modern cosmology. To 
summarize this situation, ordinary baryonic matter decreases exponentially from the galactic center 
(as deduced from measured light profiles), whereas Dark Matter increases from the galactic center 
to the periphery to explain the rotational profiles (Eq.l and Fig.l). 

Different aspects of the applicability of Keplerian dynamics will be discussed in more detail in 

§ 7. 

1.3 Prior Gravitational Disk Models with Assumed Mass/Light Ratio 

The internal gravitational aspects of galactic disks are very different than Keplerian (Ref. [8]), de- 
pending upon mass distribution and the interior locations under investigation. In most previous 
research employing appropriate gravitational disk geometry (Refs.[8]-|26]). it is assumed that the 
galactic density decreases exponentially with radius analogous to the measured light distribution 
(Refs.[27J-|32j). With this assumption, these prior models do not describe the measured velocity 
profiles, and recourse is again made to Dark Matter or gravitational deviations (Ref.|33j) to com- 
pensate. More specifically, the Dark Matter is assumed to be distributed in massive peripheral 
spherical halos around the galaxies. 

1.4 Prior Gravitational Disk Models with Mass Distributions Determined by 
Computation from the Measured Rotation Profiles 

Again note the interior gravitational aspects of galactic disks is very much different than Keplerian 
(Ref. [8]). Other previous research employing disk models (Refs.[34j-[58j) avoid assumptions re the 
unknown galactic density and computationally solve for mass distributions that satisfy the measured 
rotational velocity profiles. They assume only Newtonian gravity/ dynamics or General Relativity. 
They successfully describe the measured rotation velocity profiles of mature spiral galaxies without 
any need for gravity deviations or massive peripheral spherical halos of Dark Matter. All the 
deduced mass distributions are perfectly reasonable and rational. The details utilized in these 
numerous studies vary, but the overall computational approach, guided by verified physical laws 
(Newtonian gravity /dynamics or General Relativity), is the common feature that yields successful 
description of the measured galactic rotational velocity profiles. Our approach is in this vein. 

1.5 Thin Disk Model with Mass Distribution Determined by Gravitational 
Computation 

Attention is focused on the internal gravitational aspects of galactic disks as influenced by the radial 
mass distribution (Ref.[8j). This disk model avoids assumptions re the unknown galactic density 
and computationally solves for mass distributions p that satisfy the measured rotational velocity 
profiles. Only Newtonian gravity /dynamics is assumed. This model utilizes a finite axisymmetric 
disk of uniform thickness but variable radial density. The results successfully describe the measured 



2 



rotation velocity profiles V(r) of mature spiral galaxies (Refs.[T]-[6]) without any need for gravity 
deviations or massive peripheral spherical halos of Dark Matter. All the deduced mass distributions 
are perfectly reasonable and rational. Prior modeling efforts have struggled to describe the rapid 
linear velocity rise in the galactic "core" and simultaneously describe the constant rotational velocity 
beyond the core and to the periphery. Our efforts have succeeded. Ordinary baryonic matter is 
found within the galactic disk but distributed more towards the galactic periphery which is cooler 
with lower opacity /emissivity (and therefore darker). Our total galactic mass determinations are 
also in good agreement with data. There are no mysteries in our approach or conclusions. 



2 Mathematical Formulation and Computational Techniques 

Our model consists of a finite axisymmetric thin disk of uniform thickness (h) but variable radial 
density (p) . Newtonian gravity and Newtonian mechanics are assumed. The gravitational forces 
are balanced against the centrifugal forces at each and every point. The goal is to determine a 
physically meaningful radial mass density distribution within the disk to satisfy a given target 
rotational velocity profile. 



2.1 Governing Equations 

In the steady state, the gravitational forces are balanced against the centrifugal forces at each and 
every point in the finite series of concentric rings as follows. 



o 



2tt 



(r cos <p — r)d(j) 



o 



^yi2 j ,^>2 



2fr cos (j)) 3 / 2 



p(r)hfdr + A 



V(r) 



0. 



(2) 



where all the variables are made dimensionless by measuring lengths (ex., r, r, h) in units of the 
outermost galactic radius R g , disk mass density (p) in units of M g /R 3 with M g denoting the total 
galactic mass, and velocities [V(f)] in units of the maximum target galactic rotational velocity 
V max . The disk thickness h is assumed to be constant and small in comparison with the galactic 
radius R g . Our results are insensitive to the exact value of this ratio as long as it is small. The 
present model determines the effective surface mass density on the disk, i.e., the combined variable 
(ph). The gravitational forces of the finite series of concentric rings is described by the first term 
(double integral) while the centrifugal forces are described by the second term. 

We have extracted/consolidated the relevant variables into a convenient transparent dimension- 
less "galactic rotation parameter" A given by 



A = 



"max 

M g G 



(3) 



where G denotes the gravitational constant, R g is the outermost galactic radius, and V max is the 
maximum asymptotic rotational velocity. This convenient parameter A schematically displays the 
balance between the gravitational and centrifugal forces. For typical galactic values of R g , V max , 
and M g we have A ~ 1.5 as will be discussed in detail later. 

The total mass of the galaxy M g is determined by the constraint 

l 

2n I p(r)hfdf = 1. (4) 



o 



The integral with respect to <j) in ([2]) can be written as 



2tt 



r cos 



<fi — r)d(J) 



(f 2 + r 2 



2fr cos (j)) 3 / 2 



E(m) 
r(f — 7 



K(m) 
r(r + r) 



(5) 



3 



where K{m) and E{m) denote the complete elliptic integrals of the first kind and second kind, with 



m 



^.yy 

(f + r) 



2 ' 



Thus, ([2]) becomes 



E(m) K(m) 



r + r 



p(f)hrdr + —AV(r) 2 



0. 



(6) 



(7) 



Equations ([7]) and @ are used to determine the mass density distribution p(r) in the disk, the 
galactic rotation parameter A, and the total galactic mass M g , all from measured values of V(r), 
R c , R g and V max . This is a completely defined problem deducible from the input data. 

NOTE: Some previous researchers (Ref.[8j) take the disk-appropriate elliptic integrals from 
the galactic center to infinity. We believe this approach is contrary to reality and tends to make 
the rotational velocity incorrectly decrease towards the galactic edge. By contrast, our research 
assumes that beyond the "galactic-rim-edge" the mass density drops quickly to the INTER-galactic 
level which is roughly spherically symmetric (not disk-shaped) and thus does not affect the galactic 
rotation. 



2.2 Discretization 



The governing equations ((7J) and @ can be discretized by dividing the one-dimensional problem 
domain [0, 1] into a finite number of line segments called (linear) elements. Each element covers 
a subdomain confined by two end nodes, e.g., element i corresponds to the subdomain [rj,rj + i], 
where n and r r+ \ are nodal values of r at nodes i and i + 1, respectively. On each element, which 
is mapped onto a unit line segment [0,1] in the ^-domain (i.e., the computational domain), the 
unknown p is expressed in terms of the linear basis functions as 



(8) 



where pi and pj+i are nodal values of p at nodes i and i + 1, respectively. Similarly, the radial 
coordinate r on each element is also expressed in terms of the linear basis functions by so-called 
isoparameteric mapping: 

r(0 = n{i-0+n+iti, o<e<i. (9) 

The N nodal unknowns of pi = p(ri) are determined by solving N independent residual equations 
over N — 1 element obtained from the collocation procedure, i.e., 

N-l 



E 

n=l 



E(rrii 



K( mi ) 

f(0 +n 



with 



dv 



4r(£)rj 



-AV(n 



o. 



+ n] 2 ' 



The values of A and M„ are solved by the addition of the constraint equation 



7V-1 
n=l 







1 Ay 



1 = 0. 



(10) 



:id 



(12) 



Thus, we have + 1 independent equations for determining N + 1 unknowns. The mathematical 
problem is well-posed and completely determined. 

With Rc in (1) as an adjustable parameter, linear equations (10) and (12) for N + 1 unknowns 
can be solved with a standard matrix solver, e.g., by Gauss elimination (Ref.[62j). 



4 



2.3 Treatments of Singular Elements 

The complete elliptic integrals of the first kind and second kind can be numerically computed with 
the formulas (Ref.|63j) 



K (m) = a l m i ~ k>g( m i) h^A 



and 



where 



=o 
1 



1=0 

1 



E{m) = 1 + c i m i ~ log(mi) dim[ 



i=i 



mi = 1 — m 



r — r 



r + r 



(13) 



(14) 



(15) 



Thus, the terms associated with K{m,i) and E(rrii) in (|1U|) become singular when f — > r, on the 
elements with n as one of their end points. 

The logarithmic singularity is treated by converting the singular one-dimensional integrals into 
non-singular two-dimensional integrals by virtue of the identities (Ref. 



i-i [-1 r-i 

/ /(6iog^ = - / / 

Jo Jo Jo 



/(0 log(l - « 



11 f(l-frl)d V dt 



JO 



(16) 



where /(£) denotes a well-behaving (non-singular) function of ^ on < ^ < 1. 

But a more serious non-integrable singularity l/(f — r^) exists due to the term E(rrii)/(r — rj) 
in (I10p as f — > r%. The l/(f — r») type of singularity is treated by taking the Cauchy principle value 
to obtain meaningful evaluation. In view of the fact that each n is considered to be shared by two 
adjacent elements covering the intervals [rj_i,rj] and [r^ri+i], the Cauchy principle value of the 
integral over these two elements is given by 



lim 

<E^0 



Ti-l 



p(r)rdr 



r — n 



+ 



n+i p(f)fdf 
n(i+e) f-n 



(17) 



In terms of elemental £, (|17p is equivalent to 

[ ft _!(l - £) + ftC][ri-i(l - + rtfR 



lim 







1 \pi{\ -0 + p i+ i(}[ri(l -0 + r i+ im 



Performing integration by parts on (|18p yields 

1 d{\fH-i(l - + - o + ne]} 



o 



io g (i - « 



+ 



d{[ Pi (l - Q + Pi+ig]h(l - Q + r m £]} 



log£d£ 



(18) 

(19) 
(20) 



where all the terms associated with log e are either cancelling out each other or approaching zero 
at the limit of e — * 0. 



5 



At the galaxy center rj = 0, 

i-n+i p[r)fdf l''" 1 



p(f)df . 



Thus, the l/(f — rj) type of singularity disappears naturally. 

When rj = 1, it is the end node of domain. We can either impose a boundary condition for 
p{\) or still imagine another element extending beyond the domain boundary covering an interval 
[r^ Ti+i], because it is needed to provide useful Cauchy principle value. However, this extra element 
can be assumed to cover a diminishing physical space, namely, r^+i — > v% and Pi+\ — * p% (in this 
extra element) such that its existence becomes numerically inconsequential. Thus, we can safely 
have 

1 d{[p t (l-0+p i+1 (}[r t (l-0+r t+ ^}} 

5e log ^ 

r 1 

= (Pi+i ~ P 



[ r(0 log £d£ + (r l+l -n) f p(£) log ^ -» . 



Now that only logarithmic singularities are left, (|16p can be used to eliminate all singularities in 
integral computations. 

In addition, to avoid cusps in mass density at the galactic center, continuity of the derivative 
of p at the galaxy center r = is applied. This boundary condition is imposed at the first node 
i = 1 to require dp/dr = at r = 0. In discretized form 

p( n ) = p(r 2 ) . (21) 



3 Computational Results for Galactic Mass Distributions 

The computed galactic mass distributions that satisfy the target galactic rotational velocity curves 
(Eq 1 and Fig 1) (idealized from measurements) are shown in Fig 2. From the galactic center, 
the mass density tends to decrease steeply. However, beyond R c , the mass density distributions 
decrease more slowly towards the galactic periphery. This is reasonable since both the temperature 
and opacity/emissivity are lower towards the periphery and we would expect the light distribution 
to decrease more quickly towards the periphery. The mass density distribution does not look like 
a simple exponential function, as that deduced from the luminosity data. This is the fundamen- 
tal inaccuracy of the assumption (invoked by others) that the mass distribution follows the light 
distribution exactly. Our computational technique avoids that inaccurate assumption and yields 
rational reasonable mass distributions that yield agreement with the measured galactic rotational 
profiles. 

4 Ordinary Baryonic Matter versus Dark Matter 

To theoretically describe the measured rotational velocity curves of spiral galaxies, there are two 
very different approaches and conclusions. 

(1) Ordinary Baryonic Matter. We assume Newtonian gravity /dynamics and computationally 
solve for successful mass distributions that duplicate the measured rotational velocities. These 
mass distributions decrease roughly exponentially from the galactic center, but then decrease more 
slowly (inversely with radius) towards the periphery. This decrease is slower than the measured light 
distribution. Thus there is ordinary baryonic matter within the galactic disk distributed towards 



6 



the cooler periphery with lower emissivity/opacity and therefore darker. There are no mysteries in 
this rational scenario based on verified physics. 

(2) Dark Matter. By contrast, others inaccurately assume the galactic mass distributions follow 
the measured light distributions (approximately exponential), and then the measured rotational 
velocity curves are not duplicated. But this assumption of a simple direct relationship between 
light intensity and mass is very inaccurate. This so-called Mass/Light ratio is inaccurate since both 
the temperature and opacity /emissivity are important but ignored variables. These deficiencies are 
clear from edge-on views of spiral galaxies where a dark galactic line is obvious against a bright 
galactic background, revealing the substantial radial temperature gradient across the galaxy. There 
is no simple direct relationship between mass and light. 

With this inaccurate assumption, the discrepancy between measured and calculated veloctiy 
profiles are particularly severe beyond the galactic core. To alleviate this discrepancy, speculations 
are invoked re "massive peripheral spherical halos of mysterious Dark Matter" But no significant 
matter has been detected in this untenable unstable gravitational halo distribution. This spec- 
ulated Dark Matter is "mysterious" since it does not interact with electromagnetic fields (light) 
nor ordinary matter except through gravity. This Dark Matter must have other abnormal (non- 
baryonic) properties to maintain its peripheral spherical shape against the galactic rotation and 
gravitational attraction of ordinary matter. Many unverified "mysteries" are invoked as solutions 
to real physical phenomena. 

(3) Modified Gravity. Re possible deviations from Newtonian gravtiy/dynamics, there is no 
independent experimental evidence of these deviations. Our use of Newtonian gravity/dynamics 
with computational techniques has proven successful. 

Conclusion. We conclude our approach utilizing Newtonian gravity /dynamics and computation- 
ally solving for the ordinary baryonic mass distributions within the galactic disk simulates reality 
and agrees with data. 



5 Total Galactic Mass 

The measured rotational velocity profiles V(r) (which includes knowledge of V max and R g ) are used 
to compute the galactic rotation parameter A. From this information, the total galactic mass M g 
can be calculated via ([3j) as follows. 

M 9 = . (22 ) 

To check viability we investigate the idealized rotational velocity profile V(r) of our own Milky 
Way galaxy shown in Fig 1 with R c = 0.015. From data, the parameters appropriate to Milky Way 
galaxy follow. 
R c = 0.015 

Vmax =2.5 x 10 5 {ml a) 

R g = 10 5 (light-years) = 9.46 x 10 20 (m) 

Our analysis yields the appropriate Milky Way mass distribution (Fig 3) and the galactic rota- 
tion parameter A with the following value. 
A = 1.57. 

Then from Eq [22] we find the total galactic mass of the Milky Way as 
M g = 5.65 x 10 41 {kg) = 2.8 x 10 11 (solar-mass) 

This value is consistent with Milky Way star counts of 100 billion. Although this is very 
reasonable agreement, there is additional dust, grains, gases and plasma in our galaxy, so this 
deduced M g is on the low side. This deficiency is corrected by employing sphere+disk models as 
will be discussed in a subsequent companion publication. Sphere+Disk models are more compatible 



7 



with visual observations of spiral galaxies and yield higher values of M g more compatible with star 
counts plus dust, grains, gases and plasma. However, we emphasize the essential physics of galactic 
rotation is gravitationally controlled by the ordinary baryonic matter within thin galactic disks. 

Incidently note the deduced values of A are typically within a small range around 1.6 despite 
an order-of-magnitude variation of the galactic core radius R c . 

6 Limitations and Strengths of Thin Disk Model 

Our simple thin disk model does not address many important features such as spiral structure, 
plasma effects, galactic formation, galactic evolution, galactic jets, black holes, relativistic effects, 
galactic clusters, etc.. 

It is well known (Ref.[8j) that the internal gravitational behavior of a thin disk is much different 
than a sphere. This distinctly different behavior enables our thin disk model to describe the 
rotational dynamics of mature spiral galaxies, and the total galactic mass. 

Our thin disk model has finite radial extent. Beyond the galactic radius, we assume the density 
has dropped to the inter-galactic level, which is approximately spherically symmetric and thus no 
longer affects the galactic dynamics. We mention this because some others (Ref.|8j) have taken the 
relevant integrals to infinity, which we think is inappropriate. 

In our thin disk approach, we balance the gravitational forces against the centrifugal forces at 
each and every point. Thus, our solutions for the mass distributions and total galactic mass satisfy 
the measurements and ensure stability within the same context as similar calculations for our Solar 
System and Earth satellites. Some previous authors obtain solutions that are not gravitationally 
stable because they obtain incorrect mass distributions and incorrect galactic masses and do not 
satisfy the measured rotational profiles. Thus, their solutions are unstable, whereas our solutions 
are stable within the Newtonian context. 

Plasma effects are certainly active in the formation and evolution of galaxies from the original 
hot plasma (Refs.|59j-[61j). However, for the mature spiral galaxies we are addressing, the free 
plasma density has dropped to levels sufficiently low that plasma does not affect the predominantly 
gravitational galactic dynamics. This is evidenced in our own Solar System in which gravitational 
dynamics dominate even in the presence of solar wind, coronal mass ejections, comet tails, etc. The 
plasma in our Sun is stabilized by gravitational forces, even though plasma effects are very active 
within the Sun itself. Since our Solar System is approximately 2/3 distance from our Milky Way 
galactic center, we have our Solar System evidence for the dominance of gravitational forces within 
our own Milky Way galaxy, at least out to these radial distances. 

Again, we repeat, our thin disk model is sufficient to describe the rotational dynamics of mature 
spiral galaxies and the total galactic mass. 

7 Applicability of Keplerian Dynamics? 

In our solar system, the orbital velocities of the planets decrease inversely with the square root of 
their radial distance r -1 / 2 from the Sun according to the orbital velocity law 

M r = rV 2 (r)/G 

where G is the gravitational constant, and M r the integrated mass enclosed within a spherical 
surface of r (called orbital distance). This Keplerian approximation is based on a simple spherically 
symmetric gravitational field. One can conveniently calculate the (spherically symmetric) mass 
distribution from a simple equation with a given rotation curve V(r). 



8 



However, the internal gravitational dynamics of a galactic disk behaves very differently (Eq.2) 
(Ref.[8j). The mass (density) distribution cannot be easily calculated from a simple equation; 
rather, it must be computed numerically by solving complicated equations ([2]) and Moreover, 
the constraint of mass conservation Q enables the calculation of the galactic rotation parameter 
A as part of the numerical solution. Thus, the total galactic mass M g can be determined from the 
given V max from the measured rotation curve, R g , and the value of A. 

The experimental fact that galaxies exhibit constant (flat) veloctiy profiles (beyond the core) 
(Eq.l and Fig.l), immediately indicates that Keplerian dynamics is not generally applicable within 
the disk out to the periphery. The reason is that these locations interior to the galactic disk are 
strongly influenced by the adjacent matter within the disk as we have found. Note that it is the 
total galactic mass M g and outermost galactic radius R g that are critical. This is another way 
of expressing the concept that dynamics within the disk are strongly influenced by the adjacent 
matter within the disk. Thus, Keplerian concepts should not be applied to the interior dynamics 
of a galactic disk. 

8 Conclusions 

The measured rotation velocity profiles of mature spiral galaxies are successfully described with 
a thin disk gravitational model. Our approach utilizes Newtonian gravity/mechanics to computa- 
tionally solve for radial mass distributions that satisfy the measured rotational velocity profiles. 
Our deduced exponential mass distributions in the central core are in agreement with almost all 
others. However our mass distributions differ out toward the galactic periphery with more mass 
located in these outer regions which are cooler with lower opactiy/emissivity (and thus darker). 
Most previous research assumes a galactic density decreasing exponentially with radius out to the 
galactic periphery, analogous to the measured light distribution. But this assumption (by others) 
is inaccurate since both the temperature and opacity /emissity are important but ignored variables. 
There is no simple relationship between mass and light. These prior models do NOT describe the 
measured velocity profiles, and speculations are invoked re halos of mysterious Dark Matter or 
gravitational deviations to compensate. The Dark Matter must have "mysterious" (non-baryonic) 
properties because there is no evidence of its existence and it is not responding to gravitational, 
centrifugal and electromagnetic forces in any known manner. By contrast, our results indicate 
no massive peripheral spherical halos of mysterious Dark Matter and no deviations from simple 
gravity. Our total galactic mass determinations are also in reasonable agreement with data. 
The controversy is summarized as follows. 

We believe there is ordinary baryonic matter within the galactic disc distributed more towards 
the galactic periphery which is cooler with lower opacity/emissivity (and therefore darker). 

Others believe there are massive peripheral spherical halos of mysterious Dark Matter surround- 
ing the galaxies. 

Acknowledgements 

We enthusiastically acknowledge Louis Marmet whose intuition and computational technique con- 
vinced us that galactic rotation could be described by suitable mass distributions of ordinary bary- 
onic matter within galactic disks. We also gladly acknowledge Ken Nicholson and Michel Mizony 
whose similar approaches confirmed our beliefs. Anthony Peratt originally sparked our interest with 
his plasma dynamical calculations re the formation and evolution of galaxies. Ari Brynjolfsson has 
energetically supported our efforts. 



9 



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13 




Figure 1: Velocity profiles V(r) according to (HJ) for R c = 0.015, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.1. 



14 




Figure 2: Disk mass density distributions p(r) corresponding to the velocity profiles V(r) according 
to J!} for R c = 0.015, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.1 with A = 1.5703, 1.5718, 1.5762 and 1.5984. 



15 




Figure 3: Milky Way mass density distribution p(r) corresponding to the velocity profiles V(r) 
according to (0} for R c = 0.015 with A = 1.5703. 



16