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Astronomy & Astrophysics manuscript no. h3661 


February 2, 2008 


(DOI: will be inserted by hand later) 





A catalog of warps in spiral and lenticular galaxies in the 

Southern hemisphere 

M. L. Sanchez-Saavedra^ , E. Battaner^, A. Guijarro^, M. Lopez-Corredoira^ and N. Castro-Rodriguez.^'^ 



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^ Dpto. Ffsica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Avd. Fuentenueva, E-18002, Granada, Spain 

^ Centro Astronomico Hispano Aleman, E-04080, Almen'a, Spain 

^ Astronomisches Institut der Universitat Basel, Venusstrasse 7, Binningen, Switzerland 

* Instituto de Astroflsica de Canarias, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain 



Abstract. A catalog of optical wa rps of galaxies is presented. This can be considered complementary to that re- 
ported by Sanchez-Saavedra et al. (1990), with 42 galaxies in the northern hemisphere, and to that by Reshetnikov 



& Combes (1999), with 60 optical warps. The limits of the present catalog are: logr25 > 0.60, Bt < 14.5, (5(2000) 
< 0°, -2.5 < t < 7. Therefore, lenticular galaxies have also been considered. This catalog lists 150 warped galaxies 
out of a sample of 276 edge-on galaxies and covers the whole southern hemisphere, except the Avoidance Zone. 
It is therefore very suitable for statistical studies of warps. It also provides a source guide for detailed particular 
observations. We confirm the large frequency of warped spirals: nearly all galaxies are warped. The frequency and 
warp angle do not present important differences for the different types of spirals. However, no lenticular warped 
galaxy has been found within the specified limits. This finding constitutes an important restriction for theoretical 
models. 

Key words, catalogs - galaxies: structure - galaxies: spiral - galaxies: elliptical and lenticular, cD 



1. Introduction 

As peripheral features, disc warps are better observed in 
21 cm. This has been the preferre d obse rvational technique 
since their discovery by Sancisi (1976) and the study by 
Bosma ( 1981 ) until more recent samples such as those 
analyz ed by Garcia- Rui'z (2001) and Garcia- Rufz ct al. 
(2000). Optical observations provide an important com- 
plementary tool. Even if the relation between optical and 



radio warps remains unclear (Garcfa-Rufz 2001), the great 
advantage of optical observations lies in the much larger 
samples available. Catalogs of warped galaxies have been 
useful to establish observational restrictions to explain 



"Differential precession wraps any warp" , in contrast with 
the large frequency of real warped galaxies. 

Reshetnikov & Combes ( 1999| ) studied 540 edge-on 
galaxies, from which a sub-sample of 60 warped galax- 
ies was presented. One of the most noticeable new results 
reported in their work was that warps were more frequent 
in denser environments. They also found that the warping 
mechanism is equally efficient in all types of spirals. 

Detailed studies of particular warped galaxies in the 



warps. Sanchez-Saavedra et al. (199C) first produced a cat- 
alog of 42 optical warps in the northern hemisphere out 
of a sample of 86 galaxies analyzed. The most noticeable 
result was that, taking into account the probability of non- 
detection of warps when the line of nodes lies in the plane 
of the sky, nearly all galaxies are warped, confirming the 



suggestion made by Bosma (1981) for HI warps. Warps are 



therefore a universal feature, common for nearly all spiral 
galaxies. Even this large frequency is a severe restriction 
for theoretical models. As Reshetnikov and Combes said : 



Send offprint 
malusa@ugr.es 



requests to: M. L. Sanchez-Saavedra, 



optical, such as those by Florido et al. (1991) and by de 
Grijs (1997), the latter including 44 galaxies, are also of 
great interest, evidently , but the production of catalogs 
has greater statistical power. 

Here, we have examined all the galaxies contained 
in LEDA, with logr25 (loglO of axis ratio (major/minor 
axis)) > 0.60, Bt (total B-magnitude) < 14.5, (5(2000) < 
0°, -2.5 < t (morphological type code) < 7. The number of 
galaxies fulfilling these requirements is 276, which is our 
basis for this work, in which the galaxies were analyzed 
by means of the DSS. Only discs with a warp angle wa 
(measured from the galactic center to the last observable 
point with respect to the galactic plane) larger than 4° 
are considered to be warped. 

To determine the warp angle, wa, and other geomet- 
rical parameters of a warp, or even the very existence of 



2 



M. L. Sanchez-Saavedra et al.: A catalog of warps in spiral and lenticular galaxies 



a warp, subjective criteria were used in previous catalogs 
and are in turn used in the present one. Objective proce- 
dures (Jimenez- Vicente 199^ , Jimenez- Vicente et al. 1998) 
present some problems when applied to a very large num- 
ber of galaxies and were disregarded. More specifically, 
in some galaxies it was necessary to apply the automatic 
star removing procedure to an excessively large number of 
stars, rendering the map highly distorted. Also the sepa- 
ration of real warps and spiral arms was difficult to define, 
even for galaxies where this separation is clear to the hu- 
man eye. 

Our work presents 150 warps extracted from 276 edge- 
on ga l axies . The recent study by Reshetnikov & Combes 
(|1998| , |1999D extracted 60 warps from 540 edge-on galaxies. 
It is evident that these authors used stricter criteria to 
define when a galaxy is definitely warped. Our sample 
and scope are complementary. The Reshetnikov & Combes 
sample is limited by coordinates O'^ < a (1950) < 14'', 6 
(1950) < -17.5° ; ours by (5(2000) < 0° only. That implies 
that the study by Reshetnikov & Combes covers 17% of 
the whole sky, whereas ours covers 50%. This, however, 
is not strictly true because a large part of the Southern 
Sky is covered by the Zone of Avoidance due to the large 
extinction near the galactic plane. Taking into account this 
Avoidance Zone (-15° < b < 15°) our sample would cover 
about 40% of the whole sky. Even if based on a smaller 
number of edge-on galaxies, this large coverage renders 
the present study more useful for certain statistical tasks, 
such as the distribution of the orientation of warps. 

Another important difference between the work by 
Reshetnikov & Combes and the present study is that the 
former only pays attention to the discs of spiral galax- 
ies while ours includes lenticular galaxies. This inclusion 
is very important from the theoretical point of view be- 
cause, roughly speaking, lenticulars have a disc but not 
gas; in other words, the distribution of stars in lenticu- 
lars is very similar to that in spiral galaxies. This is an 
overgeneralisation, because even if the amount of gas in 
lenticulars is less than in even late-type spirals, lenticulars 
do process some gas in the outer parts. Another impor- 
tant difference between lenticulars and spirals is that the 
former have a dominant bulge. This fact makes analysis 
less simple, as huge bulges could in principle affect the 
formation of warps. In any case observations of warps in 
lenticulars have yet to be made and may introduce decisive 
restrictions on the mechanisms behind warps. 

A large number of theories can be found in the liter- 
ature: non-spherical dark halos misaligned with the disc 



(Sparke & Casertano 1988; Dubinski & Kuijken 1995), gas 



infall into the dark matter halo (Ostriker & Binney 11989 
Bi nney |1992 ) or directly into the disc (Lopez-Corredoira et 
al. |2002|), interactions with companions or small satellites 



(Weinberg 19981 ), intergalactic magnetic fields (Battaner 



et al. 1990), etc. Kuijken & Garcia- Ruiz (2001) recently 



presented a concise review summarizing several mecha- 
nisms proposed to explain warps. 

The large fraction of warped galaxies seems to exclude 
one of the most obvious models, based on interactions, but 



this hypothesis has been reconsidered by Weinberg (1998), 
assuming a strong tidal amplification by the gravitational 
wake of a satellite, although this fact was not confirmed 
by Garcia-Rui'z ( |200l| ) who also argued that the warp of 
the Milky Way induced by the Magellanic Clouds should 
have been predicted to have a very different orientation 
from that observed. Warps are common in merging sys- 
tems (Schwarzkopf & Dettmar 2001) but it remains un- 
clear whether mergers or interactions can explain all, or 
at least most, warps. 

Warps are more frequent in denser environments 
(Reshetnikov & Combes 1999| ). Early z w 1 warps were 
considered by Reshetnikov et al. ( p002 ). Early warps were 
larger, which favors the interaction model. Other mod- 
els cannot be completely excluded from the observation of 
early z ~ 1 warps. Magnetic fields were also much stronger 
and the rate of i nfall o f matter onto a galaxy was higher. 

Garcia-Ruiz ( 2001 ) observed that, even if galaxies with 
extended discs may be warped, extended discs are less 
frequent in denser environments. 

The observational study of warps in lenticular galaxies 
is crucial. If warps are absent or are less common in lentic- 
ular galaxies which are gas-poor, those models based on 
gravitation alone would have difficulty in explaining this 
fact. Models in which a permanent torque acts on the 
gas of the galaxy would have the preference. For instance, 
models like that by Kahn & Woltjer (1959) or its more 
recent version by Lopez-Corredoira et al. ( 2002 ) would be 
favored. Note that neither model requires the assumption 
that galaxies have a large dark matter halo. The mag- 
netic model, in which intergalactic magnetic fields main- 
tain the warp structure, would acquire additional support 
from this fact. 

It therefore seems that the compilation of large sam- 
ples of warped galaxies, even if they contain just a few 
parameters about their position, the parent galaxy and 
the magnitude and shape of the warping, contributies as 
much as the detailed examination of the HI maps of a few 
galaxies. 

2. The new catalog 

The catalog presented here is shown in Table 1. Col. 1 
gives the pgc number. Col. 2 the galaxy-name or the al- 
ternate name. Cols. 3 and 4 the source position for the 
epoch J2000, the right ascension (al2000, hours decimal 
value) and declination (de2000, degrees decimal value). 
Col. 5 the loglO of apparent diameter (d25 in 0.1'), Col. 
6 the loglO of the axis ratio (major axis/minor axis) and 
Col. 7 the morphological type code (t), (directly adopted 
from LEDA). Cols. 8, 9, 10 and 11 are the result of our 
analysis, with the following meaning: 

Col. 8, labelled N/S, specifies the apparent warp ro- 
tation, S clockwise, counterclockwise. The A^ and S 
shapes are really two sides of the same galaxy. This differ- 
ence is therefore completely unimportant from the phys- 
ical point of view. However, we have kept the entries in- 
formation because it is needed when studying the distri- 



M. L. Sanchez-Saavedra et al.: A catalog of warps in spiral and lenticular galaxies 



3 



-y wa X y 


N-shaped warp 


U-shaped warp 


S-shaped warp 


L-shaped warp 



Fig. 1. Definitions of angles and types of warps. 

bution of warps in space, for instance, when considering 
the orientation of warps in a cluster of galaxies (see for 
instance, Battaner et al. 1991) L means that only one of 
the two sides of the galaxy is warped. V means that the 
two warps are not antisymmetric, i.e. that the apparent 
warp rotation on the two sides of the edge-on galaxies has 
opposite directions. In this column, "-"means unwarped 
and "?" unclear. 

Col. 9, labelled (wajE-W, gives the warp angle, de- 
fined as the angle between the outermost detected point 
and the mean position of the plane of symmetry, as de- 
fined by the internal unwarped region. E indicates the 
side of the galaxy closer to the east. W, the side of the 
galaxy closer to the west. In this column, c indicates the 
presence of noticeable corrugations, and b means that the 
observed apparent warps could actually be arms. These 
are not included as true warps. 

The angle /3 in Col. 10 is the angle between the outer- 
most detected point and the point where the warp starts 
(see Fig. 1). 

Finally, Col. 11 gives a^, the degree of asymmetry, de- 
fined as 



\wa{E) -wa{W)\ 
wa{E) + wa{W) 



(1) 



The catalog for lenticular galaxies is presented inde- 
pendently in Table |^. In this case, we have considered 
26 galaxies with the same limits as those used for spi- 
ral galaxies. In addition, galaxies with logr25 > 0.57 were 
considered. This enlarged the sample by another 12 lentic- 
ulars. This sample is complete with the above-mentioned 
limits. 




Fig. 2. Distribution of types of warped spiral and lentic- 
ular galaxies. Lined shadow area represents all galaxies 
(warped and unwarped). Squared shadow area represents 
warped galaxies 



(0 





1 1 1 1 


K 
















X 




X 


X X 


^ X>C< X 


X XX 






XX )Oi X X 










X X X X 


X 


X X 


X XX X X>00< X XXXxX 


XXX X 




XX yyx. 


XkXX >0<«<XX XXX 


X X X X 




X XX 


>oooc< X X x>; XK xx>o<xx 


X X XX X X 




X 


XX X XX X >C< X 






XX X 


XX XX >0O< X XXK 








XX X >X X 


XX X XX 




J 1 







3. Basic results 



Fig. 3. Warp angle versus type. 



Fig. 2 gives the distribution of types of warped spiral 
galaxies, together with the distribution of types for the 
complete (warped -I- unwarped) sample. Neither differs 
significantly from the general distribution of all spirals. 
The two distributions are so similar, differing only in the 
size of the sample, that it can be clearly concluded that 
for spiral galaxies the frequency of warps is completely 
independent of the type. 

The degree of warping is independent of the type, both 
as defined by the warp angle (wa) (see Fig. 3) and the 
angle (3 (see Fig. 4) . This important property was pointed 
out by Reshetnikov & Combes (1999). 



In the case of lenticular galaxies, the result is notice- 
ably different, however. None of the 38 lenticular galaxies 
in our sample is warped. Warping distorts discs with a 
similar frequency and amount for t > 0, but the transi- 
tion at t=0 is very sharp for this feature. This fact could 
be interpreted in two ways. 

Firstly, the lenticular dominant bulges could hamper 
the formation of warps. There is no obvious theoretical 
argument favoring this interpretation. On the other hand, 
the fact that all types of spirals have the same warp fre- 
quency and as the size of the bulge is a decreasing function 



4 



M. L. Sanchez-Saavedra et al.: A catalog of warps in spiral and lenticular galaxies 




Fig. 4. Angle f] versus type. 



Fig. 6. Asymmetry coefficient versus type. 



found in early types, but as the frequency of these early 
types is much lower, this result cannot be considered sig- 
nificant. 

The frequency of warps is summarized in the following 
table: 



< X X X X X 



(wa)E-W 

Fig. 5. Relation between wa and f3. 



Total frequency of warped spiral galaxies 



Total frequency of warps, 60% 
Within warped galaxies, the frequencies are: 
N S L U 
50% 38% 5% 7% 



The N and S frequencies are similar, as expected, as 
these characteristics depend on the observer rather than 
on the galaxy. The difference, 50% and 38%, is not signif- 
icant (it is within the statistical errors). The frequency of 
U warps is a parameter of theoretical importance, how- 
ever, the different scenarios predicting different values. As 



stated by Castro-Rodriguez et al. ( |2002| ) an L warp, or 
even any asymmetric warp can be interpreted as a (N+U) 
or as a {S+U) warp. 



of type, the bulge mass seems to have a small influence on 
the magnitude of the warp. Therefore, it might be sug- 
gested that for a galaxy to be warped it must have large 
amounts of gas. 

Fig. 5 shows the relation between wa and which 
gives some geometrical characteristics of the warp. For 
moderate warps, there is a clear correlation between wa 
and /3, as expected. However, for very large values of /3, 
wa remains constant. Actually, a threshold value for wa 
seems to exist at around 14*^. The farther away the warp 
starts, the steeper it rises. Theoretical work should pay 
attention to this fact. 

Asymmetry seems to be unrelated to the morphologi- 
cal type. Fig. 6 shows that no large asymmetric warps are 



4. Conclusions 

1. This catalog contains a large sample of warped galax- 
ies (150), covering the complete southern hemisphere. 
We present the whole sample of 250 spirals and 26 
lenticulars, with limits logr25 > 0.60, Bt < 14.5, S < 
0°, -2.5 < t < 7. It is especially suitable for statistical 
analysis and, indeed, has already been used to study 
the relation between intrinsic parameters and warps 
by Castro-Rodrfguez et al. (2002). The catalog may 
obviously be used to choose which galaxies are to be 
observed in detail. 

2. There is the unavoidable problem of the existence of 
other contaminant effects that could present the ap- 



M. L. Sanchez-Saavedra et al.: A catalog of warps in spiral and lenticular galaxies 



5 



pearance of warps. Reshetnikov & Combes (1998) es- 
timated that about 20% of the features assumed to be 
warps could actually be spiral arms. This value could 
be applied here. This effect introduces small errors into 
our calculated frequencies, which should be taken into 
account in statistical studies. 

We confirm that warps appear to be a universal feature 
in spiral galaxies. The frequency of warps is very high 
(60%), and because of the difficulty (or impossibility) 
of detecting warps with the line of nodes in the plane 
of sky, it is concluded that most (if not all) galaxies are 
warped. Bosnia (1981), Sanchez-Saavedra et al. (1990) 
and Reshetnikov & Combes ( 1999| ) previously reached 
this conclusion. 

We also confirm, by means of a larger amount of data, 
the finding by Reshetnikov & Combes ( 1999 ) that 
warps are equally present in all types of spirals. The 
distribution of warps for the different types of spirals 
coincides with the distribution of galaxies with type. 
The maximum observed warp angle either from the 
center (wa) or from the starting radius of the warps 
(/3) has no relation with the type of spiral. We have 
observed that very large values of /3 do not correspond 
to large warp angles of wa. Shorter warps are steeper. 
We found no warped lenticular galaxies at all among 
the 26 galaxies within our limits, with logr25 > 0.60. 
We enlarged the sample to reach logr25 > 0.57 and 
again, none of the 38 lenticulars was warped. There is 
a sudden transition at t=0. All spirals are warped; no 
lenticular is warped. The main difference between spi- 
rals and lenticulars is probably that the former are gas 
rich and the latter gas poor. Gas seems to be a neces- 
sary ingredient in the warp mechanism. Models based 
on gravitation alone would have serious difRculties in 
explaining this. 



Jimenez- Vicente, J., Porcel, C, Sanchez-Saavedra, M.L., & 

Battaner, E. 1998, Ap&SS, 253, 225 
Kahn, F.D., & Woltjer, L. 1959, AJ, 130, 705 
Kuijken, K., & Garci'a-Rm'z, I. 2001, Galaxy Disks and Disk 

Galaxies, Vol. 230, ed. J.G. Funes, S.J. and E.M. Corsini, 

p. 401, ASP Conference Serie 
Lopez-Corredoira, M., Betancort, J. A., & Beckman, J. 2002, 

A&A, to be published 
Ostriker, E.G., & Binney, J.J. 1989, MNRAS, 237, 785 
Reshetnikov, V., & Gombes, F. 1998, A&A, 337, 9 
Reshetnikov, V., & Gombes, F. 1999, A&A, 138, lOlR 
Reshetnikov, V., Battaner, E., Gombes, F., & Jimenez- Vicente, 

J. 2002, A&A, 382, 513 
Sanchez-Saavedra, M.L., Battaner, E., & Florido, E. 1990, 

MNRAS, 246, 458 
Sancisi, R. 1976, A&A, 53, 159 

Schwarzkopf, U., & Dettmar, R.J. 2001, A&A, 373, 402 
Sparke, L., & Gasertano, S. 1988, MNRAS, 234, 873 
Weinberg, M.D. 1998, MNRAS, 299, 499 



Acknowledgements. W e acknowledge the use of the 
LEDA database (http://leda.univ-lyonl.fr) and the 
Digitized Sky Survey (DSS ) of NASA's SkyView facility 
(tittp://skyview. gsfc.nasa.gov) located at NASA Goddard 
Space Flight Genter. 



References 

Battaner, E., Florido, E., & Sanchez-Saavedra, M.L. 1990, 
A&A, 236, 1 

Battaner, E., Garrido, J.L., Sanchez-Saavedra, M.L., &Florido, 

E., 1991, A&A, 251, 402 
Binney, J.J. 1992, ARAA, 30, 51 
Bosma, A. 1981, AJ, 86, 1791 

Gastro- Rodriguez, N., Lopez-Gorredoira, M., Sanchez- 
Saavedra, M.L., & Battaner, E. 2002, A&A, in press 
Dubinski, J., & Kuijken, K. 1995, ApJ, 442, 492 
Florido, E., Prieto, M., Battaner, E., Mediavilla, E., & 

Sanchez-Saavedra, M.L. 1991, A&A, 242, 301 
Garci'a-Rui'z, I. 2001, Ph. D. Thesis, Groningen University 
Garci'a-Rui'z, I., Kuijken, K., & Dubinski, J. 2000, MNRAS, 



submitted. Preprint astro- ph/0002057 



de Grijs, R. 1997, Ph. D. Thesis, Groningen University 
Jimenez- Vicente, J. 1998, Ph. D. Thesis, Granada University 



6 M. L. Sanchez-Saavedra et al.: A catalog of warps in spiral and lenticular galaxies 

Table 1. Sample of Spiral Galaxies: In the 8th column "-"means unwarped and "?" unclear; in the 9th column "b' 
means arms, "c" means corrugated and "0" means unwarped. 





galaxy-name 


al2000 


de2000 


lo2-d25 


logr25 




N/S 


(wa)E-W 1°) 






43 


ES0293-27 


00817 


-40 48400 


1.32 


0.60 


3.9 


LS 


? 






474 


MCG-7-1-9 


0.10585 


-41.48350 


1.53 


0.62 


6.0 


N 


7-7 


30-31 





627 


NGC7 


0.13899 


-29.91700 


1.39 


0.67 


4.9 


U 


7-7 


31-31 





725 


ES0241-21 


0.17223 


-46.41940 


1.34 


0.62 


3.1 


N 


11-10 


39-24 


0.05 


1335 




fl 34Q1 8 


-63 85740 


1.34 


0.79 


4.3 


s 


6-9 


17-31 


0.2 


1851 


NGC134 


0.50616 


-33.24550 


1.92 


0.64 


4.0 


N 


11-8 


22-31 


0.16 


1942 


ES0473-25 


0.53050 


-26.72010 


1.41 


0.84 


4.9 


N 


5-7 




0.17 


1952 


ES079-3 


53390 


-64 25240 


1.45 


0.72 


3.1 


N 


9-7 


27-21 


0.13 


2228 




62067 


-22 58500 


1.31 


0.72 


4.0 


s 


7-7 







2482 


NGC217 


0.69267 


-10.02120 


1.45 


0.65 


0.5 


N 


9-10 


- 


0.05 


2789 


NGC253 


0.79252 


-25.28840 


2.43 


0.66 


5.1 


N 


7-9 


22-27 


0.13 


2800 


MOG-2-3-15 


79624 


-9 83460 


1.24 


0.64 


3.1 


u 


7-7 







2805 


MCG-2-3-16 


0.79641 


_q «QQ7n 


1.48 


0.82 


6.7 


s 


14-10 




0.17 


2820 


NGC259 


0.80091 


-2.77630 


1.46 


0.65 


4.0 


s 


7-9 


45-45 


0.13 


3743 


NGC360 


1.04763 


-65.60990 


1.57 


0.89 


4.3 


N 


8-7 


22-17 


0.07 


4440 


IC1657 


1 23536 


-32 65060 


1.41 


0.65 


3.8 


s 


7-11 


21-39 


0.22 


4912 




1 354Q9 


-99 80050 


1.29 


0.61 


3.9 


N 


10-14 


27-34 


0.17 


5128 


NGC527 


1.39947 


-35.11520 


1.23 


0.62 


0.1 


N 


7-7 


22-22 





5688 


NGC585 


1.52839 


-0.93300 


1.34 


0.66 


1.0 


N 


5-3 




0.25 


6044 


F,S02Q7-16 


1 63329 


-40 06770 


1.20 


0.61 


5.9 


N 


9-7 


17-16 


0.13 


6161 


F,S0413-16 


1 66594 


-28 6971 


1.29 


0.67 


3.9 


s 


8-7 


17-16 


0.07 


6242 


ES03-4 


1.69266 


-83.21210 


1.28 


0.70 


4.1 


s 


7-7 


22-27 





6966 


MCG- 1-5-47 


1.88028 


-3.44720 


1.48 


0.87 


4.8 


s 


2-7 


- 


0.56 


7298 


F,SO245-10 


1.94570 


-43 97350 


1.34 


0.61 


3.2 


? 


? 






7306 


IC176 


1.94814 


-2 01910 


1.29 


0.68 


5.1 


N 


7-7 


22-22 





7427 


ES0297-37 


1.97033 


-39.54460 


1.27 


0.67 


4.1 


N 


3-7 




0.4 


8326 


ESO30-9 


2.17801 


-75.03880 


1.40 


0.61 


4.8 


S 


4-5 


- 


0.11 


8581 


MOG-1-6-77 


2 24055 


-7 36840 


1.36 


0.78 


2.7 


? 


? 






8673 


IC217 


2 26957 


-11 92660 


1.34 


0.67 


5.8 


u 


5-6 




0.09 


9582 


NGC964 


2.51835 


-36.03420 


1.33 


0.60 


1.9 


s 


3-6 


- 


0.33 


10645 


ES0546-25 


2.81346 


-19.97110 


1.16 


0.73 


3.6 




0-0 


- 


- 


10965 


NGC1145 


2 90931 


-18 63550 


1.47 


0.74 


5.1 


N 


?-4 






11198 


MOG- 2-8-33 


2 96379 


-10 16720 


1.45 


0.63 


0.2 


N 


14-11 


22-16 


0.12 


11595 


ES0248-2 


3.08523 


-45.96350 


1.47 


0.69 


6.9 


S 


10-10 


18-18 





11659 


NGC1244 


3.10866 


-66.77640 


1.26 


0.63 


2.1 


S 


6-6 


9-9 





11851 


TCI 898 


3.17224 


-22 40440 


1.53 


0.77 


5.8 


N 


5-3 


23-11 


0.25 


11931 


NGC1247 


3 20399 


-10 48070 


1.54 


0.82 


3.8 


N 


4-5 




0.11 


12521 


NGC1301 


3.34317 


-18.71590 


1.34 


0.66 


4.2 


N 


9-6 


17-11 


0.2 


13171 


IC1952 


3.55728 


-23.71280 


1.40 


0.66 


4.1 


N 


8-6 


18-13 


0.14 


13458 


NGG1406 


3 65626 


-31 32200 


1.59 


0.70 


4.4 


s 


3-5 


20-11 


0.25 


13569 


NGC1422 


3 69191 


-21 68240 


1.36 


0.63 


2.4 




0-0 






13620 


NGC1421 


3.70818 


-13.48830 


1.54 


0.60 


4.1 


? 








13646 


MCG- 2-10-9 


3.71559 


-12.91570 


1.50 


0.90 


5.0 


N 


7-5 


27-18 


0.17 


13727 


NGC1448 


3.74221 


-44.64400 


1.88 


0.65 


5.9 


S 


9-8 


45-25 


0.06 


13809 


ES0358-63 


3.77189 


-34.94240 


1.69 


0.64 


4.7 


LS 


3-0 




1 


13912 


IC2000 


3.81879 


-48.85810 


1.63 


0.74 


6.1 


N 


5-5 







13926 


ES0482-46 


3.82835 


-26.99350 


1.55 


0.82 


5.1 


? 


c 






14071 


NGC1484 


3.90487 


-36.97110 


1.40 


0.69 


3.5 


S 


5-5 








M. L. Sanchez-Saavedra et al.: A catalog of warps in spiral and lenticular galaxies 7 



Table 2. (Table 1, continuation) 



DKC 


galaxy-name 


al2000 


de2000 


logd25 


logr25 


t 


N/S 


(wa)E-W (°) 


n 




14190 


NGC1495 


3.97255 


-44.46650 


1.46 


0.73 


5.1 


s 


4-9 




0.38 


14255 


NGC1511A 


4.00542 


-67.80730 


1.28 


0.63 


1.3 


s 


7-7 







14259 


ES0483-6 


4.00724 


-25.18150 


1.43 


0.79 


3.2 


s 


5-7 


- 


0.17 


14337 


ES0117-19 


4.04233 


-62.31570 


1.31 


0.76 


3.9 


- 


0-0 


- 


- 


14397 


NGC1515 


4.06748 


-54.10270 


1.72 


0.62 


4.0 


N 


5-8 


10-10 


0.23 


14824 


IC2058 


4.29847 


-55.93440 


1.49 


0.94 


6.6 


s 


4-6 




0.2 


15455 


ESO202-35 


4.53769 


-49.67520 


1.44 


0.81 


3.3 


N 


5-5 


16-11 





15635 


NGC1622 


4.61015 


-3.18920 


1.52 


0.73 


2.0 


S 


5-10 


13-21 


0.33 


15654 


NGC1625 


4.61841 


-3.30340 


1.37 


0.64 


3.1 


s 


6-6 


11-? 





15674 


NGC1628 


4.62671 


-4.71480 


1.27 


0.64 


3.1 


N 


8-9 


11-17 


0.06 


15749 


ESQ 157-49 


4.66038 


-53.01200 


1.28 


0.66 


4.1 


S 


11-11 


21-21 





15758 


IC2103 


4.66323 


-76.83680 


1.28 


0.76 


4.9 


? 


b 


- 


- 


16144 


IC2098 


4.84561 


-5.41870 


1.35 


0.87 


5.9 




0-0 






16168 


MCG- 1-13-22 


4.85739 


-3.12210 


1.22 


0.60 


3.0 


s 


4-4 







16187 


IC2101 


4.86165 


-6.22970 


1.23 


0.66 


5.0 


? 


? 


- 




16199 


ES0361-15 


4.86601 


-33.17860 


1.44 


0.68 


6.1 


s 


7-7 


9-17 





16239 


NGC1686 


4.88184 


-15.34620 


1.25 


0.71 


4.0 


N 


4-7 


-16 


0.27 


16636 


MCG- 1-13-50 


5.05475 


-2.93560 


1.39 


0.82 


3.0 




0-0 






16849 


NGC1827 


5.16768 


-36.95890 


1.48 


0.76 


5.9 


? 




- 


- 


16893 


MCG- 1-14-3 


5.19493 


-3.09160 


1.16 


0.67 


3.1 


N 


7-5 


- 


0.17 


17027 


ES0362-11 


5.27748 


-37.10210 


1.68 


0.75 


4.1 


N 


6-4 


11-6 


0.2 


17056 


IC407 


5.29517 


-15.52370 


1.24 


0.70 


4.9 


s 


6-6 







17174 


NGC1886 


5.36352 


-23.81260 


1.51 


0.77 


3.9 




0-0 


- 




17248 


MCG-2-14-16 


5.41515 


-12.68870 


1.28 


0.77 


2.0 


- 


0-0 


- 


- 


17433 


NGC1963 


5.55355 


-36.39980 


1.46 


0.78 


5.8 


? 


? 






17969 


ES0555-2 


5.84077 


-19.72620 


1.34 


0.74 


3.9 


s 


6-6 







17993 


ESO160-2 


5.85418 


-53.57480 


1.26 


0.63 


3.0 


? 


? 


- 




18394 


ES05-4 


6.09456 


-86.63220 


1.58 


0.68 


2.9 


- 


0-0 


- 


- 


18437 


ES0121-6 


6.12505 


-61.80710 


1.60 


0.75 


5.1 


s 


3-3 







18765 


ES0489-29 


6.28479 


-27.38620 


1.52 


0.72 


3.9 




0-0 






18833 


NGC2221 


6.33750 


-57.57740 


1.33 


0.66 


1.1 


u 


7-6 


18-11 


0.08 


19996 


ES0491-15 


7.01183 


-27.36820 


1.35 


0.68 


5.0 


N 


3-3 


- 





20903 


ES0428-28 


7.39406 


-30.05070 


1.39 


0.84 


5.3 


u 








21338 


ES0257-19 


7.58538 


-46.92470 


1.40 


0.74 


6.2 


? 


b 






21815 


ES0311-12 


7.79281 


-41.45170 


1.57 


0.74 


0.1 


s 


3-3 


6-8 





21822 


ESO560-13 


7.79774 


-18.74840 


1.48 


0.77 


4.0 


N 


10-4 


18-8 


0.4 


22174 


ES035-18 


7.91809 


-76.41310 


1.53 


0.65 


4.9 




0-0 






22272 


ES0494-7 


7.94852 


-24.90810 


1.45 


0.63 


4.3 




0-0 






22338 


ESO209-9 


7.97080 


-49.85160 


1.80 


0.83 


6.0 


N 


5-5 


9-17 





22910 


ES089-12 


8.16682 


-64.93620 


1.41 


0.86 


4.1 


N 


7-7 


15-17 





23558 


ES0495-12 


8.39769 


-25.83820 


1.27 


0.67 


3.0 


s 


11-11 


14-17 





23672 


IC2375 


8.43881 


-13.30300 


1.28 


0.70 


3.0 


s 


17-14 


40-27 


0.1 


23992 


ES0562-14 


8.55493 


-17.95650 


1.15 


0.64 


3.0 


N 


9-10 


34-45 


0.05 


23997 


NGC2613 


8.55626 


-22.97330 


1.85 


0.62 


3.2 


? 


c 






24225 


ES0563-3 


8.62196 


-20.93980 


1.21 


0.65 


0.4 




0-0 






24479 


ES0563-14 


8.71596 


-20.05070 


1.38 


0.66 


6.5 


7 


c 






24685 


ES0563-21 


8.78801 


-20.03590 


1.48 


0.81 


4.1 


S 


3-5 




0.25 


25400 


ESO60-24 


9.04451 


-68.22650 


1.46 


0.78 


2.9 


S 


2-5 




0.43 



8 M. L. Sanchez-Saavedra et al.: A catalog of warps in spiral and lenticular galaxies 



Table 3. (Table 1, continuation) 



DKC 


galaxy-name 


al2000 


de2000 


logd25 


logr25 


t 


N/S 


(wa)E-W (°) 






25886 


MCG- 1-24-1 


9.18087 


-8.88820 


1.63 


0.63 


3.3 


s 


5-5 







25926 


ES0564-27 


9.19844 


-20.11760 


1.65 


0.94 


6.1 


s 


2-2 







26561 


IC2469 


9.38368 


-32.45070 


1.75 


0.68 


1.9 


N 


6-6 


11-15 





26632 


ES0433-19 


9.40089 


-28.17720 


1.15 


0.76 


0.8 


- 


0-0 


- 


- 


27135 


ES0373-8 


9.55577 


-33.03250 


1.76 


0.81 


6.0 




0-0 






27468 


ES0373-13 


9.63908 


-33.86110 


1.13 


0.81 


0.2 


u 


4-4 


8-8 





27735 


MCG- 1-25-22 


9.70339 


-4.71400 


1.28 


0.66 


4.0 


N 


7-7 


16-16 





27982 


NGC2992 


9.76169 


-14.32750 


1.56 


0.62 


1.0 


? 


? 


- 


- 


28117 


ES0499-5 


9.78709 


-24.84040 


1.41 


0.64 


5.0 


s 


10-15 


31-17 


0.2 


28246 


IC2511 


9.82372 


-32.84200 


1.50 


0.65 


1.5 


N 


8-10 


18-22 


0.1 


28283 


IC2513 


9.83403 


-32.88580 


1.49 


0.60 


2.2 




0-0 






28308 


MCG- 2-25-20 


9.83718 


-12.05720 


1.25 


0.78 


6.8 


LS 


7-0 


18- 


1 


28778 


ES0435-14 


9.96341 


-28.50670 


1.40 


0.86 


4.9 


N 


5-5 


11-14 





28840 


ES0435-19 


9.98502 


-30.24980 


1.53 


0.86 


4.7 


u 


4-5 


8-8 


0.11 


28909 


IC2531 


9.99880 


-29.61540 


1.83 


0.96 


5.0 




0-0 






29096 


ES0316-18 


10.04541 


-42.09030 


1.40 


0.85 


4.9 


s 


5-6 


- 


0.09 


29691 


NGC3157 


10.19515 


-31.64220 


1.35 


0.62 


5.0 




0-0 






29716 


ES0263-15 


10.20551 


-47.29430 


1.49 


0.91 


5.8 




0-0 






29743 


ES0436-1 


10.21327 


-27.83950 


1.50 


0.80 


4.3 


N 


5-5 


- 





29841 


ES0567-26 


10.23436 


-21.97680 


1.32 


0.72 


4.1 


- 


0-0 


- 


- 


30716 


ES0375-26 


10.45064 


-36.22700 


1.30 


0.74 


4.1 




0-0 






30887 


NGC3263 


10.48691 


-44.12300 


1.78 


0.64 


5.9 


? 


? 






31154 


ES0436-34 


10.54559 


-28.61290 


1.35 


0.65 


3.0 


- 


0-0 


- 


- 


31426 


IC624 


10.60427 


-8.33410 


1.41 


0.61 


1.2 


S 


6-3 


11-11 


0.33 


31626 


ES0437-22 


10.63830 


-28.88600 


1.22 


0.63 


4.0 


? 








31677 


ESO437-30 


10.65422 


-30.29910 


1.50 


0.73 


4.0 


LN 


6-0 


9- 


1 


31723 


NGC3333 


10.66387 


-36.03610 


1.32 


0.63 


4.3 


LN 


6-0 


14- 


1 


31919 


ESO501-80 


10.71052 


-23.93550 


1.36 


0.67 


5.0 


- 


0-0 


- 


- 


31995 


ES0318-4 


10.73068 


-38.26280 


1.45 


0.63 


5.1 


N 


5-5 


18-18 





32271 


NGC3390 


10.80110 


-31.53260 


1.54 


0.73 


2.7 


N 


3-4 




0.14 


32328 


ES0264-43 


10.81209 


-45.42020 


1.30 


0.64 


3.1 




0-0 


- 




32550 


ES0569-14 


10.85682 


-19.88890 


1.54 


0.72 


6.3 


LN 


8-0 


14- 


1 


35539 


NGC3717 


11.52557 


-30.30770 


1.78 


0.64 


3.1 


? 


V 






35861 


NGC3749 


11.59794 


-37.99470 


1.53 


0.60 


1.0 


u 


14-14 


27-27 





36315 


ES0571-16 


11.70260 


-18.16960 


1.21 


0.66 


3.9 


N 


6-3 


11-8 


0.33 


37178 


NGC3936 


11.87235 


-26.90650 


1.60 


0.73 


4.4 


- 


0-0 




- 


37243 


ES0379-6 


11.88444 


-36.63820 


1.42 


0.90 


4.9 


N 


3-2 




0.2 


37271 


ESO440-27 


11.88987 


-28.55320 


1.64 


0.83 


6.7 


s 


4-3 


11-11 


0.14 


37304 


IC2974 


11.89692 


-5.16780 


1.36 


0.69 


4.7 


s 


5-5 


9-9 





37334 


ESO320-31 


11.90167 


-39.86450 


1.42 


0.88 


5.1 


- 


0-0 


- 


- 


38426 


MCG- 2-31-17 


12.11402 


-11.09900 


1.31 


0.77 


6.0 


s 


7-6 


16-10 


0.08 


38464 


IC3005 


12.12049 


-30.02330 


1.38 


0.76 


5.6 


N 


3-5 


6-9 


0.25 


38841 


ESO321-10 


12.19502 


-38.54850 


1.31 


0.83 


0.8 




0-0 






40023 


ESO380-19 


12.36725 


-35.79230 


1.50 


0.76 


5.8 




0-0 






40284 


NGC4348 


12.39832 


-3.44330 


1.49 


0.70 


4.1 


N 


10-11 


18-21 


0.05 


42684 


ES0268-33 


12.70824 


-47.55780 


1.32 


0.71 


4.9 




0-0 






42747 


UGC7883 


12.71593 


-1.22940 


1.42 


0.61 


6.0 


N 


7-11 


13-27 


0.22 


43021 


ESO507-7 


12.76168 


-26.24320 


1.41 


0.82 


4.0 




0-0 







M. L. Sanchez-Saavedra et al.: A catalog of warps in spiral and lenticular galaxies 9 



Table 4. (Table 1, continuation) 





galaxy-name 


al2000 


de2000 


logd25 


logr25 


t 


N/S 


(wa)E-W (°) 


n 

r' \ J 




43224 


ESO507-13 


12.80150 


-27.57800 


1.25 


0.62 


4.1 


N 


6-6 


11-11 





43313 


IC3799 


12.81658 


-14.39910 


1.40 


0.88 


6.7 




0-0 






43330 


NGC4700 


12.81883 


-11.41060 


1.47 


0.75 


4.9 


N 


8-9 


11-18 


0.06 


43342 


NGC4703 


12.82187 


-9.10850 


1.39 


0.69 


3.1 


- 


0-0 


- 


- 


43679 


MCG-1-33-32 


12.87411 


-9.75390 


1.39 


0.92 


6.7 




0-0 






44254 


UGC8067 


12.95337 


-1.70690 


1.28 


0.66 


3.5 




0-0 






44271 


NGC4835A 


12.95364 


-46.37780 


1.43 


0.62 


5.8 


- 


0-0 


- 


- 


44358 


MCG- 1-33-60 


12.96300 


-9.63360 


1.51 


0.94 


6.7 


- 


0-0 


- 


- 


44409 


NGC4835 


12.96883 


-46.26320 


1.67 


0.69 


4.0 


? 


b 






44931 


MCG- 1-33-71 


13.03043 


-8.33620 


1.45 


0.85 


4.9 


N 


8-7 


8-9 


0.07 


44966 


ES0381-51 


13.03531 


-33.11870 


1.19 


0.70 


2.8 




0-0 






45006 


MCG-3-33-28 


13.04054 


-17.67920 


1.42 


0.92 


4.9 


N 


5-7 


11-21 


0.17 


45098 


ES0443-42 


13.05827 


-29.82900 


1.46 


0.83 


3.1 


N 


7-5 


17-14 


0.17 


45127 


MCG- 1-33-76 


13.06291 


-5.13370 


1.27 


0.61 


4.9 


N 


6-6 


11-11 





45279 


NGC4945 


13.09060 


-49.47090 


2.31 


0.67 


6.1 


N 


8-8 


18-18 





45487 


ESO508-11 


13.12910 


-22.85680 


1.48 


0.79 


6.7 


- 


0-0 




- 


45911 


ES0576-11 


13.21811 


-19 97810 


1.47 


0.79 


5.7 




0-0 






45952 


NGC5022 


13.22530 


-19.54800 


1.38 


0.69 


3.4 




0-0 






46441 


NGC5073 


13.32241 


-14.84440 


1.54 


0.79 


5.0 


S 


6-6 


17-15 





46650 


ESO40-7 


13.36095 


-77.53510 


1.46 


0.80 


5.1 


N 


2-9 


4-14 


0.63 


46768 


IC4231 


13.38707 


-26.30050 


1.25 


0.65 


4.3 




0-0 






46928 


ES0382-58 


13.42014 


-33.65550 


1.41 


0.73 


3.9 


? 


c 






47345 


ES0383-5 


13.48987 


-34.27190 


1.52 


0.72 


3.8 


N 


4-8 


11-27 


0.33 


47394 


NGC5170 


13.49692 


-17.96620 


1.91 


0.84 


4.9 


- 


0-0 




- 


47948 


ESO509-74 


13.59484 


-24.07400 


1.40 


0.72 


4.7 


N 


5-5 


II II 





48359 


ESO220-28 


13.67018 


-51.14220 


1.31 


0.75 


4.2 




0-0 






49106 


IRAS13471-4839 


13.83850 


-48.90490 


1.25 


0.72 


3.6 


S 


25-25 


? 





49129 


ES0383-91 


13.84225 


-37.28920 


1.41 


0.81 


6.7 


N 


5-9 


11-17 


0.29 


49190 


ES0384-3 


13.85615 


-37.62870 


1.23 


0.67 


3.0 


s 


10-9 


22-14 


0.05 


49586 


NGC5365A 


13.94436 


-44.00730 


1.45 


0.68 


3.0 


N 


5-5 


11-8 





49676 


IC4351 


13.96504 


-29.31490 


1.76 


0.69 


3.2 


N 


6-7 


11-14 


0.08 


49750 


NGC5365B 


13.97766 


-43.96420 


1.21 


0.65 


2.0 


- 


0-0 


- 


- 


49788 


ES0325-42 


13.98897 


-40.06910 


1.21 


0.63 


3.2 


s 


5-5 







49836 


ES0221-22 


14.00347 


-48.26770 


1.37 


0.69 


6.8 


s 


2-6 


4-8 


0.5 


50676 


NGC5496 


14.19388 


-1.15890 


1.64 


0.69 


6.5 


s 


8-9 


39-45 


0.06 


50798 


ES0271-22 


14.22487 


-45.41360 


1.41 


0.73 


5.9 


- 


0-0 


- 


- 


51288 


IC4402 


14.35379 


-46.29830 


1.68 


0.69 


3.2 






17-11 




51613 


ESOl-6 


14.45741 


-87.77160 


1.48 


0.64 


5.9 




0-0 






52410 


IC4472 


14.66980 


-44.31610 


1.35 


0.66 


5.0 


- 


0-0 


- 


- 


52411 


ES0512-12 


14.66983 


-25.77610 


1.45 


0.82 


3.2 


N 


5-5 


16-16 





52824 


ESO580-29 


14.79267 


-19.76510 


1.34 


0.80 


4.9 


N 


6-6 


11-11 





52991 


ESO580-41 


14.84346 


-18.15090 


1.30 


0.70 


4.3 




0-0 






53361 


ES0327-31 


14.92637 


-38.27700 


1.36 


0.74 


5.0 




0-0 






53471 


MCG-7-31-3 


14.96256 


-43.13190 


1.18 


0.70 


4.4 


? 


V 






54348 


ES0581-25 


15.22503 


-20.67680 


1.54 


0.70 


6.9 


? 


c 






54392 


ES0274-1 


15.23711 


-46.81250 


2.05 


0.76 


6.6 




0-0 






54637 


ES0328-41 


15.30663 


-38.50690 


1.40 


0.69 


3.1 


S 


5-7 


9-11 


0.17 


56077 


IC4555 


15.80448 


-78.17830 


1.30 


0.64 


5.9 




0-0 







10 M. L. Sanchez-Saavedra et al.: A catalog of warps in spiral and lenticular galaxies 



Table 5. (Table 1, continuation) 



DKC 


galaxy-name 


al2000 


de2000 


logd25 


logr25 


t 


N/S 


(wa)E-W (°) 


C) 




57582 


UGC10288 


16.24027 


-0.20780 


1.68 


0.94 


5.3 




0-0 






57876 


IC4595 


16.34586 


-70.14160 


1.49 


0.75 


5.0 




0-0 






58742 


ES0137-38 


16.68135 


-60.39340 


1.48 


0.60 


4.4 


? 




- 


- 


59635 


ES0138-14 


17.11666 


-62.08300 


1.57 


0.80 


6.7 


- 


0-0 


- 


- 


60216 


ES0138-24 


17.40184 


-59.38210 


1.30 


0.65 


4.9 


s 


9-9 


17-17 





60595 


IC4656 


17.62894 


-63.72950 


1.39 


0.61 


5.0 




0-0 






60772 


ES0139-21 


17.73619 


-60.97850 


1.32 


0.60 


3.0 


- 


0-0 


- 


- 


62024 


IC4717 


18.55492 


-57.97400 


1.22 


0.61 


3.0 


- 


0-0 


- 


- 


62529 


ES0281-33 


18.88273 


-42.53750 


1.24 


0.61 


3.0 


? 


? 






62706 


IC4810 


19.04974 


-56.15860 


1.57 


0.91 


6.6 




0-0 






62722 


NGC6722 


19.06100 


-64.89480 


1.46 


0.67 


2.9 


s 


5-5 


8-8 





62782 


IC4819 


19.11826 


-59.46550 


1.47 


0.73 


6.0 


s 


5-2 


8- 


0.4 


62816 


ES0231-23 


19.14551 


-51.04600 


1.25 


0.67 


3.0 


u 


6-6 


11-14 





62922 


IC4827 


19.22261 


-60.86010 


1.47 


0.68 


2.0 


LN 


4-0 


8-0 


1 


62938 


IC4832 


19.23426 


-56.60900 


1.37 


0.64 


1.3 


N 


9-9 


17-17 





62964 


IC4837A 


19.25435 


-54.13250 


1.62 


0.73 


3.1 


N 


7-7 


15-15 





63161 


ES0184-63 


19.39455 


-55.06580 


1.36 


0.72 


2.9 


N 


7-6 


21-22 


0.08 


63297 


ES0184-74 


19.50854 


-57.28420 


1.25 


0.70 


2.9 


7 


b 






63395 


IC4872 


19.59511 


-57.51840 


1.51 


0.76 


6.7 


S 


2-3 


-11 


0.2 


63509 


ESO142-30 


19.67763 


-60.04800 


1.26 


0.67 


4.9 


? 


b 


- 


- 


63577 


IC4885 


19.73113 


-60.65150 


1.29 


0.64 


4.9 


s 


7-7 


11-11 





64180 


ESO105-26 


20.15782 


-66.21610 


1.18 


0.64 


4.2 


? 


? 






64240 


NGC6875A 


20.19888 


-46.14380 


1.47 


0.70 


4.2 


? 


b 


- 


- 


64597 


IC4992 


20.39088 


-71.56520 


1.34 


0.88 


5.1 


s 


3-3 


8-8 





65665 


IC5054 


20.89587 


-71.02410 


1.32 


0.62 


1.1 


? 


? 






65794 


ES0286-18 


20.96403 


-43.37390 


1.42 


0.79 


3.8 


u 


6-2 


9-3 


0.5 


65915 


IC5071 


21.02221 


-72.64490 


1.53 


0.67 


4.8 


N 


6-6 


39-23 





66064 


ES0235-53 


21.08624 


-47.78900 


1.39 


0.67 


3.0 


N 


9-9 


22-22 





66101 


ES0235-57 


21.10602 


-48.16920 


1.37 


0.69 


3.9 




0-0 






66530 


IC5096 


21.30611 


-63.76130 


1.50 


0.71 


4.0 


N 


8-4 


18-11 


0.33 


66545 


ES0145-4 


21.31419 


-57.64030 


1.34 


0.61 


5.0 


? 


b 






66617 


ES0287-9 


21.35448 


-46.15240 


1.25 


0.73 


4.3 


- 


0-0 


- 


- 


66836 


NGC7064 


21.48398 


-52.76610 


1.52 


0.76 


5.3 




0-0 






67045 


NGC7090 


21.60794 


-54.55740 


1.89 


0.77 


5.1 




0-0 






67078 


ES0287-43 


21.63656 


-43.93260 


1.30 


0.77 


6.1 


- 


0-0 


- 


- 


67158 


ES0531-22 


21.67475 


-26.52590 


1.44 


1.02 


4.4 


S 


?-4 


-11 


- 


67782 


ES0288-25 


21.98822 


-43.86700 


1.40 


0.90 


4.1 




0-0 






67904 


NGC7184 


22.04401 


-20.81320 


1.78 


0.65 


4.5 


N 


3-3 


9-9 





68223 


IC5171 


22.18238 


-46.08210 


1.38 


0.61 


3.8 


N 


6-6 


11-11 





68329 


NGC7232A 


22.22810 


-45.89360 


1.33 


0.70 


2.0 


N 


6-6 


14-14 





68389 


IC5176 


22.24848 


-66.84810 


1.64 


0.82 


4.3 


N 


3-3 


6-6 





69011 


IC5224 


22.50824 


-45.99330 


1.19 


0.61 


2.2 




0-0 






69161 


NGC7307 


22.56463 


-40.93330 


1.55 


0.61 


5.9 


N 


11-10 


31-22 


0.05 


69539 


NGC7361 


22.70498 


-30.05800 


1.60 


0.65 


4.6 


S 


5-5 


14-14 





69620 


IC5244 


22.73710 


-64.04230 


1.46 


0.73 


3.0 


N 


3-2 


8-4 


0.2 


69661 


NGC7368 


22.75876 


-39.34150 


1.48 


0.75 


3.1 


N 


9-6 


18-14 


0.2 


69707 


IC5249 


22.78511 


-64.83150 


1.59 


1.07 


6.8 




0-0 






69967 


NGC7400 


22.90582 


-45.34670 


1.41 


0.63 


4.0 




0-0 







M. L. Sanchez-Saavedra et al.: A catalog of warps in spiral and lenticular galaxies 



Table 6. (Table 1, continuation) 



DEC 


galaxy-name 


al2000 


de2000 


logd25 


logr25 


t 


N/S 


(wa)E-W (°) 


P (°) 




70025 


NGC7416 


22.92829 


-5.49650 


1.50 


0.68 


3.0 


s 


4-4 


9-9 





70070 


IC5269B 


22.94356 


-36.24970 


1.58 


0.72 


5.6 




0-0 






70081 


IC5264 


22.94796 


-36.55430 


1.39 


0.72 


2.4 


N 


5-5 


16-16 





70084 


MCG- 2-58-11 


22.94754 


-8.96760 


1.31 


0.67 


4.7 


S 


7-4 


16-8 


0.27 


70142 


IC5266 


22.97244 


-65.12970 


1.24 


0.61 


3.1 




0-0 






70324 


NGC7462 


23.04623 


-40.83400 


1.62 


0.71 


4.1 




0-0 






71309 


ES0291-24 


23.39472 


-42.40210 


1.22 


0.61 


5.0 


? 


? 






71800 


IC5333 


23.58140 


-65.39590 


1.24 


0.71 


3.4 


LN 


7-0 


22- 


1 


71948 


ESO240-11 


23.63039 


-47.72630 


1.74 


0.92 


4.8 




0-0 






72178 


ES0292-14 


23.70990 


-44.90460 


1.43 


0.88 


6.5 


N 


2-5 


6-11 


0.43 



12 M. L. Sanchez-Saavedra et al.: A catalog of warps in spiral and lenticular galaxies 



Table 7. Sample of Lenticular Galaxies 



pgc 


galaxy-name 


al2000 


de2000 


logd25 


logr25 


t 


N/S 


5210 


NGC530 


1.41159 


-1.58770 


1 


.24 


0.58 


-0 


.3 


5430 


NGC560 


1.45706 


-1.91310 


1 


.30 


0.57 


-2, 


.4 


6117 


NGC643 


1.65349 


-75.01100 


1 


.22 


0.60 


-0, 


.2 


12662 


ESO301-9 


3.38191 


-42.18790 


1 


.30 


0.69 


-1, 


.7 


13169 


NGC1355 


3.55654 


-4.99880 


1 


.20 


0.61 


-2, 


.1 


13241 


ES0548-47 


3.57875 


-19.02900 


1 


.40 


0.60 


-0, 


.8 


13277 


IC335 


3.59187 


-34.44660 


1 


.37 


0.58 


-1, 


.6 


14495 


NGC1529 


4.12195 


-62.89900 


1 


.10 


0.58 


-2, 


.2 


15388 


IC2085 


4.52344 


-54.41690 


1 


.35 


0.64 


-1 


.2 


19811 


NGC2310 


6.89821 


-40.86220 


1 


.62 


0.74 


-1 


.9 


24195 


ES0562-23 


8.60971 


-20.47010 


1 


.36 


0.61 


-0, 


.9 


24966 


ES0371-26 


8.90906 


-32.93740 


1 


.49 


0.68 


-1, 


.5 


25202 


ESO90-12 


8.97290 


-66.72830 


1 


.34 


0.62 


-1, 


.8 


25943 


ES0433-8 


9.20360 


-30.91120 


1 


.32 


0.66 


-1, 


.9 


30177 


NGC3203 


10.32623 


-26.69820 


1 


.45 


0.65 


-1, 


.3 


30792 


NGC3250D 


10.46610 


-39.81490 


1 


.24 


0.71 


-1, 


.9 


30938 


IC2584 


10.49771 


-34.91160 


1 


.16 


0.57 


-2, 


.0 


31369 


MCG- 2-27-9 


10.59093 


-14.12990 


1 


.32 


0.58 


-1, 


.0 


31504 


ES0437-15 


10.61611 


-28.17810 


1 


.33 


0.58 


-2, 


.0 


36417 


NGC3831 


11.72187 


-12.87700 


1 


.38 


0.60 


-0 


.8 


37326 


NGC3957 


11.90028 


-19.56820 


1 


.49 


0.64 


-1, 


.0 


42486 


NGC4603C 


12.67865 


-40.76350 


1 


.24 


0.59 


-2, 


.0 


43929 


NGC4784 


12.91030 


-10.61300 


1 


.19 


0.60 


-1, 


.8 


45650 


MCG-3-34-4 


13.16221 


-16.60210 


1 


.35 


0.59 


-1, 


.0 


46081 


NGC5038 


13.25063 


-15.95170 


1 


.19 


0.62 


-1, 


.9 


46150 


NGC5047 


13.26347 


-16.51940 


1 


.43 


0.71 


-2, 


.0 


46166 


NGC5049 


13.26648 


-16.39550 


1 


.28 


0.64 


-2 


.0 


46525 


NGC5084 


13.33799 


-21.82700 


2 


.03 


0.60 


-1 


.8 


49006 


ES0445-42 


13.81359 


-31.15510 


1 


.14 


0.74 


-0, 


.4 


49300 


ES0445-65 


13.87963 


-29.92950 


1 


.18 


0.62 


-2, 


.2 


49840 


ES0384-26 


14.00407 


-34.03760 


1 


.19 


0.57 


-1, 


.9 


50242 


IC4333 


14.08889 


-84.27290 


1 


.20 


0.62 


-1 


.8 


62692 


NGC6725 


19.03230 


-53.86470 


1 


.36 


0.65 


-2, 


.0 


63039 


ES0184-53 


19.30533 


-53.47730 


1 


.10 


0.60 


-1, 


.8 


63049 


NGC6771 


19.31105 


-60.54560 


1 


.37 


0.64 


-1, 


.0 


65055 


ES0234-53 


20.60682 


-49.25780 


1 


.28 


0.59 


-2, 


.0 


66908 


ES047-34 


21.52875 


-76.48040 


1 


.21 


0.66 


-2, 


.0 


69638 


NGC7359 


22.74651 


-23.68700 


1 


.35 


0.58 


-1, 


.8