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Full text of "Asher's picture of Berlin and its environs containing a copious account of every object worthy of inspection in the metropolis of Prussia, in Charlottenburg and Podsdam : to which is added: a list of German classic authors and of their preeminent works"

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AS HE It'S 

PICTURE OF BERLIN 

A N 1) 

ITS ENVIRONS; 


CONTAINING 

A COPIOUS ACCOUNT OF EVERY OBJECT 
WORTHY OF INSPECTION IN THE METRO¬ 
POLIS OF PRUSSIA, IN CHARLOTTENBURG 
AND POTSDAM. 












.20, Linden, Berlin, 


Keeps constantly on Sale a very extensive 
Collection of Books and Prints published in 
all parts of Europe and will be happy to af¬ 
ford any information and assistance in his 
power to Englishmen visiting Berlin. Mr. A. 
having an Establishment in Town (158 Fleet 
Street) is in the Habit of sending parcels 


twice a week to London of which arrange¬ 


ment such gentlemen may profit which intend 
making purchases in Berlin or have any thing 






















CONTENTS. 


Page 

Academy of Aids .58 

Alphabetical List of remarcable objects .... 10 

Arsenal.55 

Baths.10 

Botanic Garden .70 

Brandenburg Gate.20 

Charlottenburg .72 

China manufactory.00 

Churches.23 

Coliseum.04 

Concert Room .02 

Confectioners.05 

Custom House.56 

Droskies. 0 

Environs .09 

Gewerbe Schule .00 

Inns. 7 

Iron Foundery.58 

Kings private Residence.33 

Kunst Cabinet.26 

Monuments.21 

Museum, new.34 

— Vases and Bronzes.35 

— Sculpture.36 

— Pictures.i.37 

— of Natural History.49 

— Anatomical.50 

— Egyptian.51 








































Page 

Music, Sing Academy.63 

Palaces, Prince William’s.57 

— Charles’s.57 

— Albert’s.57 

Park.71 

Passports. 7 

Post office. 8 

Peacock Island.76 

Potzdam.75 

Tomb of Frederick the Great.SO 

Palace.81 

Sans Souci.82 

New Palace .86 

Russian Colony.88 

Restaurateurs.64 

Review.72 

Royal Library.46 

— Palace.24 

Shops, best.67 

Society in Berlin.17 

Studios of Artists .61 

Theatres.61 

Tegel .69 

Tivoli and Krcutzberg.70 

University.48 

Unter den Linden.19. 20 

Winter Gardens.64 




































PASSPORTS. 

Every traveller who arrives in Berlin is ob¬ 
liged to enter his name SCc. into a Book kept 
for that purpose and to deliver his passport 
to the Landlord of his inn, who forwards it 
to the Police Office in order to get a „Per¬ 
mission of Residence.“ This Permission is 
granted for the term of a fortnight and must 
be regularly renewed if a prolonged stay be 
intended. The passport office is at No. 1, 
Alte Leipziger Strasse. Persons proceeding 
from hence to Austria, Bavaria or Russia must 
have their passports signed by the Ministers 
of the respective courts, the residence of which 
varying, almost every year, may be inquired 
for at Mr. Asher’s, 20, Linden. 

Inns: Hotel de Russie, near the Schloss- 
briicke; — Stadt Rom, Unter den Linden; — 
H. de Petersbourg, do.; — H. de Brandenbourg, 
a good and quiet house, Charlottcnstr., No. 42: 











— Hotel de Saxe, good bachelor’s quarters, 
Burgstrasse. A tariff, officially revised by the 
police, fixes the price of lodgiug and enter¬ 
tainment. A copy of it ought to be hung up 
in every room of an inn. 

Average charges in an inn of the better class: 


dol. sgr. pf. 

Bed-room, per diem, from. 2 10 0 


to 10 or 12 sgr. 


The rooms in the lower stories 
and in the front of the house are 
the dearest. 

Dinner at table-d’hdte (4 dishes) . 

Ditto, in private. 

A portion of coffee or tea . . . . 

A wax candle. 

Bread and butter (a portion) . . . 
A carriage hired for the day, within 

the town. 

A warm-bath. 


0 15 0 
0 17 6 
0 5 0 

0 5 0 

0 16 

4 25 0 
0 12 0 


The Post SC. Schnellpost-ojyicc, No. 60, Ko- 
nigsstr., are open from seven, a.m. to eight p.m. 


























9 


Letters for England leave Berlin: 

Sunday evening by 6 o’ Clock via Holland. 

- 9 - Hamburg. 

Monday - - 7 - Antwerp 

and Ostend. 

Wednesday evening by 6 o'Clock via Holland. 

- 9 - Hamburg. 

Thursday evening by 7 o’Clock via Antwerp 

and Ostend. 

The Letters sent via Harnbro’ are due in 
London the 5th, those by the other mails the 
8th day following, the former route therefore 
is much preferable. Letters must be deliver’d 
one full hour before the mails start, viz. re¬ 
spectively by 5, 6 and 8 o’ Clock, p.m. 

Open Hackney-coaches, drawn by one horse , 
called droschkics, from their similarity to the 
Russian carriages of that name, ply for hire in 
the principal streets. They are placed under 
the strict inspection of the police: the fares 
vary, according to the number of passengers, 
as well as the time; and they may be hired 






10 


at the following' rate, for one person: | hour, 
5 sgr.; £ hour, 10 sgr.; § hour, 15 sgr.; 1 
hour, 20 sgr. Two persons pay for \ hour, 
7 1 sgr.; i hour, 15 sgr.; ? hour, 22 sgr. Every 
person hiring a drosky is presented by the 
driver with a printed ticket, bearing his num¬ 
ber, and the date of the month; an excellent 
regulation. A valet de place receives 20 sgr. per 
diem; 10 sgr. for half a day; 5 sgr. for an hour. 

The best baths are at No. 1, am Neuen 
Packhof, and 19, Neue Friedrichsstrasse. 

An alphabetical List of the most remar¬ 
kable objects in Berlin, with the days and 
hours of Admission. 

Academy of Arts. Casts of ancient Statues. 
Daily. Tickets at the Keepers Lodge, in 
the Academy. 

Anatomical Museum, University, Wednesdays 
and Saturdays, 4 to 6 in Summer, 2 to 4 
in Winter. Tickets at the Museum, the 
days previous from 11 to 12. 

Arsenal , Apply to Captain Jost, Mulacsgasse 
No. 1. 








11 


Botanic Garden. Wednesdays. Strangers also 
at other Times. 

China Manufactory. Leipzigerst. No. 4. Every 
day except Sunday. Apply at the sale-room 
where a guide is appointed to show* the 
whole process. Admission 10 sgr. 

Churches. For Admission apply to the Sex¬ 
tons which generally live close by. 

Coliseum, alte Jacobsstr. No. 49. Tuesday, 
Thursday and Saturday evening. Admission 
10 sgr. 

Egyptian Museum. Thursday from 10 to 4. 
Tickets to he had the day previous from the 
Keeper in the Palace of Monbijou. 

Iron Foundry , Royal, Invalidenstrasse No. 38. 
Daily from 9 to 12 and from 2 to 7. Cast¬ 
ing from 4 to 7 daily. Admission 5 sgr. 

Library . Royal, Behrenstr. No. 40. Wednes¬ 
days 10 to 12. The Reading Room is open 
daily in Summer from 2 to 4, in W inter 
from 2 to 5. p.m. 

Music, Academy of, Thursday Evening; apply 
to Mr. Rungenhagen in the Academy. 






12 


Museum, in the Lustgarten, daily from 10 to 3. 

— Vases, Wednesdays, tickets to be had Tues¬ 
days from the Keeper of the Museum. 

Mineralogical Cabinet, University. Wednes¬ 
day and Thursday afternoon. 

Observatory, Lindenstr. No. 103, apply there, 
to Professor Encke. 

Palaces . King’s Private Residence. Apply to 
Mr. Ising, Obenvallstr., in the yard on the 
left hand side. 

— Royal (Schloss). Apply to Mr. Richter in 
the Schloss No. 4. Fee: about 3 Thalers. 

— of Prince Charles, Wilhelmsplatz, apply to 
Mr. Guhlike. 

— of Prince Albert, Wilhelmsstrasse No. 102, 
apply to Mr. May. 

Studios, Kruger’s (Portraits), Dorotheenstrasse 
No. 25. Rauch’s (Sculpture), Klosterstr. No. 
76. TieckiC Wach’s (do.), kl. Wallstr. No. 11. 

Views. Berlin is seen best from the tower 
of St. Mary’s Church within and from the 
Krcutzberg from without the City. 












BERLIN, the capital of Prussia, stands on 
the Spree, a small stream with a very slug 
gish current; which, however, by means of 
canals, communicates with the Oder and the 
Baltic on the one hand, and the Elbe and 
German Ocean on the other. The population 
in 1835, was 265,000; of whom 16,600 were 
soldiers of the garrison; 5000 Jews; and 
5,300 descendants of the French prptestants 
driven out of France by the religious intole¬ 
rance of Louis XIV. It is the residence of 
the king, and of the foreign ambassadors, 
among them of an English minister, and the 
seat of government. The great number of 
soldiers gives to Berlin almost the air of a 
camp. 

The city is situated in the midst of a dreary 
plain of sand, destitute of either beauty or 

B 














fertility. It is surprising that the foundation 
of a town should ever have been laid on so 
uninteresting a spot; but it is far more won¬ 
derful that it should have grown up, notwith¬ 
standing, into the flourishing capital of a great 
empire. Its rise and increase date not many 
years before the commencement of the last 
century. Previous to the reign of Frederick 
William I. it was an unimportant small town, 
confined to the left bank of the Spree, and 
to the island on which the Palace and Mu¬ 
seum now stand. Since that time its popula¬ 
tion has increased four-fold, and the limits of 
the town have extended until its walls are 10 
or 12 miles in circumference. Frederick the 
Great being ambitious to possess a capital 
proportionate to the rapid increase of his do¬ 
minions, at once enclosed a vast space with 
walls, and ordered it to be filled with hou¬ 
ses. As the population was scanty, the only 
mode of complying with the wishes of the 
sovereign was by stretching the houses over 











15 


as wide a space as possible. In consequence, 
some of the handsomest hotels are only two 
stories high, and have as many as twenty 
windows on a line. The streets are necessa¬ 
rily broad, and therefore generally appear 
empty. 

Berlin has been justly termed a city built 
for effect, all that is beautiful being concen¬ 
trated into one focus. Owing to the want 
of stone in the neighbourhood, the larger part 
even of the public buildings are of brick and 
plaster. The flatness of the ground and the 
sandy soil produce inconveniences which the 
stranger will not be long in detecting. There 
is so little declivity in the surface that the 
water in the drains, instead of running off, 
stops and stagnates in the streets. In the 
Friederichsstrasse, which is two miles long, 
there is not a foot of descent from one end 
to the other. In the summer season the heat 
of the sun reflected by the sand becomes in¬ 
tolerable, and the noxious odours in the streets 

B 2 







16 


arc very unwholesome as well as unpleasant. 
A third nuisance is, that most of the sheets 
are unprovided with trottoirs, and are infa¬ 
mously paved with sharp stones, upon which 
it is excruciating pain to walk. 

The mere passing traveller in search of 
amusement will exhaust the sights of Berlin 
perhaps in a fortnight, and afterwards find it 
tedious, without the society of friends. The 
stranger coming to reside here, provided with 
good introductions, may find an agreeable li¬ 
terary society composed of some of the most 
talented men in Germany, whom the govern¬ 
ment has the art of drawing around it in an 
official capacity, or as professors of the uni¬ 
versity. The names of Humboldt the travel¬ 
ler, Savigny the Jurist, Raumer the historian, 
and Ritter the geographer, all residents of 
Berlin, enjoy a European reputation. The so¬ 
ciety of the upper classes is on the whole not 
very accessible to strangers, nor is hospitality 
exercised to the -same extent among them as 









17 


in England, chiefly because their fortunes are 
limited. The Hotels of the diplomatic corps 
are an exception, and in them the most agree¬ 
able soirees are held in the winter season. 
That excessive military exclusiveness which 
originated at the Court of Frederick the Great 
has not entirely disappeared — a uniform, espe¬ 
cially if it be Russian, is still, to a certain ex¬ 
tent, a passport to the fashionable circles of 
the Prussian capital. 

As the society in a capital cannot but take 
its tone from the Court, the following infor¬ 
mation will not be misplaced. 

The king of Prussia has no civil list, his 
annual income is derived from crown domains 
and exceeds his expenditure; and though the 
most powerful monarch in Germany, lie takes 
no pleasure in the display of royal pomp and 
the glitter of a court. He is economical, 
though not from parsimony, as there is no 
more liberal patron of art and talent, particu¬ 
larly if it belong to his own dominions, no 






18 


more charitable patron oi distress and misfor¬ 
tune. He dines at two o'clock, his repast is 
of the most simple character, the carriage 
in which he drives out is even plainer than 
the private carriages of the Berlin Gentry; 
and half the people in his dominions sleep on 
a softer and more luxurious couch than his 
majesty’s simple narrow camp bedstead. At 
his court there arc few fetes and grand en¬ 
tertainments. 1 he disastrous events which oc¬ 
curred in the early part of his reign, both to 
his country and domestic circle, appear to have 
given a serious turn to his mind, and in fact 
it appears painful to him to emerge from his 
retirement. He holds his levees and diaw'ing¬ 
rooms at the Schloss, not at his own private 
palace: the majority of persons who attend 
them arc either military or civil officers, who 
are e.vpccled to appear and need no pi esen- 
tations; ladies must be specially introduced, 
but have no occasion now, as in former times, 
to show proofs ol nobility bclorc they can 


























3^.1^ ur^d. JSonäon,. vcn,A.Ashsr, August, JS3S 
















obtai rin* rv.avc \ etiqurt; * 

J • "jit 

. 

' a 

*i -v y 

■ 


hi .••" Hü 

-tul the grts-*- t:i i-.n ming 


Oütt« on :• J, . • < v > churches 

mam • : these bnihlij * 

* : in »<i- ; * -• • * •>. . 





















19 


obtain the entree: indeed the ancient etiquette 
is not at all kept lip in the Prussian court. 

Notwithstanding the disadvantages of si¬ 
tuation, and the want of stone as building ma¬ 
terial, Berlin is certainly one of the finest ci¬ 
ties in Europe. Some of the most splendid 
buildings are concentrated in a very small 
space between the Palace (Schloss) and the 
Brandenburg gate, or very near it. Few Eu¬ 
ropean capitals can show so much architectu¬ 
ral splendour as is seen in the colossal Pa¬ 
lace, the beautiful colonnade of the new Mu¬ 
seum, the chaste Guardhouse, the Italian Opera, 
and the University opposite. These with the 
Arsenal, the most perfect specimen of archi¬ 
tecture in the city, and the Academy of Arts, 
are all within a stone’s throw of one another, 
and the greater part may be seen by turning 
round on one’s heel, while the two churches 
and theatre in the Gens d’Armes Platz are not 
many paces off. Most of these buildings are 
situaded in the street named Unter den Lin - 




20 


den, from a double avenue of Lime Trees, 
which form a shady walk in its centre, while 
on each side of it runs a carriage road. It 
is the principal and most frequented street in 
this city. The view along it, terminated by 
the magnificent Brandenburg Gate, is scarcely, 
if at all, surpassed even by the celebrated pro¬ 
spect from the quay of the Louvre at Paris. 

The Brandenburg Gate, the chief architec¬ 
tural ornament of the city, and probably the 
most splendid portal in Europe, is built after 
the model of the Propylaeum at Athens, but 
on a larger scale. The car of victory on the 
top was carried to Paris as a trophy by Na¬ 
poleon, but it was recovered by the Prussians 
after the battle of Waterloo, who bestowed 
upon the goddess after her return the eagle 
and iron cross which she now bears. A 
French authority (Malte Brun) describes it 
thus: — „Le quadrige de cuivre qui fut cn- 
leve par les Francais lors de la premiere Cam¬ 
pagne de Prusse, et qui a ete a Paris depuis 









21 


1806 jusqu’ä 1814, ne decora jamais aucun 
des monumens de cette capitate; — chef-d’oeu¬ 
vre de patience plutot epic de Part, il fut exe¬ 
cute par un chaudronnier de Berlin; ce n’est 
point un ouvrage de ciselure, mais un simple 
releve en bosse sur du cuivre lamine.“ 

The Prussians have exhibited their grati¬ 
tude and respect to the memory of the wor¬ 
thies of their country, (with the exception of 
Frederick , the greatest of them all, to whom 
as yet no monument has been set up,) in the 
statues of them erected in the streets and squa¬ 
res of the capital. Those to whom this ho¬ 
nour has been paid are, without exception, 
military heroes. On the long bridge leading 
from the Königs Strasse to the Schloss Platz, 
is the equestrian statue of the Great Elector , 
Frederick William* in bronze, designed by 

* This is the order of succession of the Kings of Prussia: 

Frederick I., Elector of Brandenburg, made king of Prus¬ 
sia by the Emperor Leopold, 1701. 

Frederick William L, father of Frederick the Great, 1713. 

Frederick (II ) the Great, 1710. 

B 3 








22 


Schlüter, and possessing considerable merit as 
a work of art. 

Opposite the Grand Guardhouse (Haupt- 
wache) stands the bronze statue of Blücher , 
and facing him, on each side of the Guard¬ 
house, are the marble statues of Bulow von 
Dennewilz and of General Scharnhorst , the 
reformer of the prussian army after the battle 
of Jena, and the founder of the present ad¬ 
mirable military system of Prussia. These 
three statues are by the Sculptor Bauch . 

In the square called Wilhelms Platz, near 
the Potzdam Gate, are the statues of six he¬ 
roes of the seven years’ war, the Prince of 
Anhalt Dessau, Generals Ziethen, Schwerin, 
Winterficld, Keith, and Seidlitz. They are 
for the most part of little merit as works of 
art, and the classical togas and armour in 
which they are dressed out, are in a high de¬ 
gree incongruous and in bad taste. 

Frederick "William II., 1786. 

Frederick William III., 1797, the reigning king. 














































smog»** 




Mr» 


. 


23 

r 

house w«re br<-w (■’• nor* 

tai^* n■ w> \ t* • < •. ■;•' . • ia 

n* are the fello^vs of - •• 

•» - Park, Th. camion origi- 

d>e French in 1806. 
j Churches a?v. nv tb v • it 

‘ h»ias. in flic old t<v^u f * i«r : . < 


• tv Urn. and iodge 
• 4 « > en, Elector of 

>«:* , net m et 1 the Palace 










• ail*. <ti a he.e:v tfuiJ a ».hurch. 
the burial-place of the royal family, and 
*>u -u)s the remains of the Great Elector mid 
Frederick I., king of Prussia, in u;Med 


It- The bronze effiir. o- th» 








































23 


The cannon and mortars behind the Guard¬ 
house were brought from Paris, 1816; the mor¬ 
tars were cast in France, to be employed in 
the siege of Cadiz, and are the fellows of the 
one in St. James’s Park. The cannon origi¬ 
nally came from Lübeck, and was carried off 
by the French in 1806. 

The Churches are not the objects which 
will attract the most notice in Berlin. In St. 
Nicholas, in the old town, is the tomb of 
Puffendorf, who died here in 1690. He was 
historiographer, privy counsellor, and judge 
at the court of Frederick William, Elector of 
Brandenburg. 

The Cathedral, Dorn, between the Palace 
and the Exchange, a modern building, has noth¬ 
ing imposing in its exterior, and within has 
more of the air of a theatre than a church. 
It is the burial-place of the royal family, and 
contains the remains of the Great Elector and 
of Frederick I., king of Prussia, in gilded cof¬ 
fins. The bronze effigy of the Elector John 



24 


Cicero, cast by a Burgundian artist, in 1540, 
— that of the Elector Joachim, made by one 
Adam Yischer of Nuremberg, — and a mosaic 
of St. Peter, given by Pope Pius VII. to the 
king, on one side of the altar, deserve notice. 

The Catholic Church of St. Hedewich , on 
the plan of the Pantheon, and the two chur¬ 
ches in the Gens d’ Annes Platz, arc admired 
for their architecture. The Garnison Kirche 
is attended by the soldiers of the garrison: 
the music is good. It contains paintings bv 
Bode of no great merit, and very inappro¬ 
priate to a church, representing the death of 
some of the generals of the seven years’ war. 
Against the walls are hung tablets bearing the 
list of names of those who fell in the war of 
liberation, 1813 —15: a similar memorial will 
be found in almost every parish church in 
Prussia, with the simple inscription, „They 
died for their King and Fatherland.“ 

The Royal Palace or Schloss is indebted 
to its vast size for a certain air of grandeur 




























^ •*->>' bv a Burgundian hi !7i J»h ‘ S; 

/ ■-•••«* of the lUector Joachim, made by one 
Ar.nm * • >•- ' M-^'herg,— and a mosair 

of •* v • * ? • ? MI. to the 

. 

' **' ^ n> 

Vi ! Panthm.o • 

: r. - t j :v d’ Ann es Plata. a tv ; käntiä##' 
itr nirc. The (Sami&oh Kirvht' 

■ • ->•' , y the Soidtar* oi : : ,v. T -' SSOTi : 

o oiuM is {rood. It contains paintings In . 

. • . \ ih representing the death oi* 

■ ; ?* !' of the seven year- - 

list of iiMiU'Ä of ho:- ' ho fell in th» >vi*r of 
liberation, *813 — IS*.-a itmiaj ml: 

ouhd in almost every parish 7 ditnrch 
be simple inscription; 

m" and Fatherbm! 


Scklu 










































25 


which its exterior possesses. Within, it is 
sumptuously furnished; the state apartments 
are shown by the castellan , who lives in the 
second court, on the second floor. In the 
Rittersaal (Knights’ Hall), a splendid apart¬ 
ment, is the throne and a sideboard covered 
with massive old plate of gold and silver. 
The most interesting rooms are those inhabi¬ 
ted by Frederick the Great, at the corner of 
the building facing the Schloss Platz and nea¬ 
rest to the long bridge, on the first floor. The 
best paintings have been removed by the king’s 
permission to the Museum: among those that 
remain are Charles I. and his Oueen, Hen¬ 
rietta, by Vandyk — Marriage of St. Cathe¬ 
rine by Julio Romano — Virtue quitting the 
Earth, Mars and Venus, by Rubens — Napo¬ 
leon crossing the Great St. Bernard, by Da¬ 
vid — and in the White Hall a portrait of 
the King of Prussia, by Sir T/ios . Lawrence , 
a present from Geo. IV. 

In former times, according to vulgar be- 

C 







26 


lief, this building was haunted by a ghost cal¬ 
led the White Lady , who appeared only to 
announce the death of a member of the royal 
family. 

In the attic story of the palace, on the 
side towards the Lustgarten, is the Kunstca- 
binet , (Cabinet of Art.) Its collections arc well 
worth seeing; they are shown on Tuesdays 
and Fridays from eleven to one, by tickets, 
and as only 30 arc issued each day, it is ad¬ 
visable to apply for them a few days in ad¬ 
vance. One room is occupied by a collection 
illustrative of the manners and customs of dif¬ 
ferent parts of the world, especially of savage 
nations; such are a cloak of feathers, presen¬ 
ted by Tamehameha, King of the Sandwich 
Islands, with a complimentary letter to the 
kins* of Prussia, in return for which he recei- 

o 

ved the full uniform of the 2d Regiment of 
Prussian Guards — a model of a Chinese la¬ 
dy’s foot to show the manner in which they 
are pinched and contracted — a filigree silver 












'"mauum hiiiikH 



27 


case, like a claw, nearly three inches long, 
worn by ladies of rank in China, to protect 
their finger-nails, which it is the fashion to 
let grow' to that length — coloured pieces of 
paper used instead of napkins at dinner — a 
variety of Chinese dresses, among them the 
military uniform of a captain — a lasso from 
South America — a cigar smoked by the la¬ 
dies of Lima, 1£ foot long and thick in pro¬ 
portion — large disks of wood inserted by the 
Botocudos Indians in their cars and under¬ 
lips — tattooed head of a New Zealander — 
weapons brought from Africa by Ehrenberg 
the traveller — an Australian necklace of hu¬ 
man teeth — Staves covered with Runic in¬ 
scriptions carved on them, and a Runic Al¬ 
manac cut on 12 tablets of wood — the co¬ 
stumes of Mexico, in a scries of coloured wax 
figures — copies of two of Northcote’s pictu¬ 
res, by Chinese native artists, very w r ell exe¬ 
cuted — a vast assortment of Chinese musical 
instruments: the modern invention of the mouth 


C 2 







28 


harmonica was taken from one of them — Ja¬ 
panese weapons, one of the most formidable 
is a sort of scythe fixed vertically upon the 
ends of a long pole — saddle of the Turkish 
Pasha of Sliumla, strangled for having yielded 
that fortress to the Russians in 1828. The 
Asiatic collection was chiefly formed by Kruger. 

A model of the mines of Freiberg. The 
head and horns of a stag in the centre of the 
trunk of a tree, which has grown around them 
so that the points of the antlers alone project. 

The Historical Collection is highly inter¬ 
esting, and for the most part undoubtedly au¬ 
thentic: it contains — the model of a windmill 
made by Peter the Great with his own hands, 
while working as a ship-carpenter in Holland. 
— The Pvobes of the Orders of the Garter 
given by George IV., and of the Holy Ghost 
given by Louis XVIII. to the present King of 
Prussia; between the two is the scarlet dress 
of a Doctor of Civil Law, given to him by 
the University of Oxford, on the occasion of 




















29 


his visit in 1818. In showing the diploma 
which accompanied it, care is taken to point 
out the blunder of the Oxford Savans, who 
have styled the king in it Frederick William II. 
instead of III. The huzzar dress, and cap sur¬ 
mounted with a black eagle’s wing, worn by 
the Prussian General Ziethen — two cannon 
balls, each with one side flattened, are said 
to have been bred by opposite parties in the 
siege of Magdeburg, and to have met together 
in the air! 

Some of the relics here preserved are pe¬ 
culiarly national, such as — a cast taken after 
death from the face of Frederick the Great; 
— the bullet which wounded him in the battle 
of Rossbach, 1760, — a wax figure of him, 
clothed in the very uniform he wore on the 
day of his death; the coat is rusty and tar¬ 
nished, the scabbard of the sword is mended 
with sealing wax by his own hand; his books 
and walking-cane and the favourite flute, his 
solace in hours of relaxation, are carefully 







30 


preserved here along with his pocket hand¬ 
kerchief which lie used to the last it is a dirty 
rag*, very tattered though patched in many pla¬ 
ces. This confirms the description of Dr. 
Moore, who visited the palace in Frederick’s 
lifetime. „The whole wardrobe consisted of 
two blue coats, faced with red, the lining* of 
one a little torn; two yellow waistcoats, a 
good deal soiled with Spanish snuff; three 
pair of yellow breeches, and a suit of blue 
velvet, embroidered with silver for grand oc¬ 
casions. I imagined at first that the man had 
got a few of the king’s old clothes and kept 
them here to amuse strangers; but upon in¬ 
quiry, I was assured that what I have mentio¬ 
ned, with two suits of uniform which he has 
at Sans Souci, form the entire wardrobe of 
the king of Prussia. Our attendant said he 
had never known it more complete.“ 

Opposite the figure of Frederick is placed 
a glass case containing the stars, orders, and 
decorations presented to Buonaparte by the 


















31 


different sovereigns of Europe, one of the 
most conspicuous being the Prussian black 
eagle: England alone, it appears, did not hum¬ 
ble herself by contributing thus to his vanity. 
They were taken by the Prussians after the 
battle of Waterloo, in his carriage, from which 
lie escaped so narrowly, that he left his hat 
behind him, which is also presen ed here. Not 
far off arc Blüchers orders; not so numerous, 
but certainly more hardly earned. A cast in 
wax from the face of the beautiful queen Louisa 
of Prussia. A cast of Moreau’s face taken af¬ 
ter death. The camp chair of Gustavus Adol¬ 
phus. Frederick the Great's father’s collection 
of tabacco pipes; most of them are such as 
a Billingsgate fishwoman would disdain to use. 
The cap worn by the Great Elector at the 
battle of Fehrbellin. 

A white dress that belonged to Murat is 
as fantastic in shape and gaudy in gold lace, 
as the costume of an itinerant equestrian. 
Two executioners’ sword, remarkable on ac- 












32 

count of the persons whose heads have been 
cut off by them. 

A rich and elaborately ornamented cabi¬ 
net called the Pomeranian chest. A great va¬ 
riety of articles made of amber, and many 
specimens, rough and cut, of this mineral, which 
is found in great quantities within the Prus¬ 
sian dominion. 

Among the iporks of art in this museum 
are a head carved in wood, by A . Durer . x\n 
ivory crucifix attributed to M. Angelo, A 
large basin with bas-reliefs in ivory. An ex¬ 
tensive collection of carvings and reliefs in 
ivory, gold and silver plate, cups and vases 
enriched with bas-reliefs and precious stones. 

Baron Trenck’s drinking cup, engraved by 
him while in prison. Luther’s beer jug, very 
large measure. A very beautiful series of mi¬ 
niature portraits: among them Gustavus Adol¬ 
phus, and his daughter Christina. A detailed 
account has been given of the Kunstcabinet, 
because no catalogue of it has been printed. 

















■■■I ■■ 


ü 




33 

The King’s Private Residence. — The king 
of Prussia, averse to all display and unneces¬ 
sary expense, resides not in the palace, which 
he resigns to the Crown Prince, but in a mo¬ 
dest mansion hard by, opposite the arsenal. 
In its interior decoration it displays the sim¬ 
plicity and good taste which characterize its 
possessor. The furniture and decorations, pic¬ 
tures, <Slc., are the productions of native ma¬ 
nufacture, or of national art and talents. In 
the principal apartment, called Vaterländische 
Saal, are very good copies of Raphael’s best 
pictures, by Prussian artists. There arc seve¬ 
ral works of Canova, among them his Hehe, 
and a bas-relief in rosso antico, a present from 
the Pope. 

The king’s bedroom is fitted up in the 
plainest manner; he sleeps on a little narrow 
bed of painted wood, without curtains: few 
of his subjects can sleep on a less luxurious 
couch. Adjoining it is the bedroom of the 
late <|ueen; it remains just as she left it, with 

C 3 


mm 


f 















H ii i mi i 'in 11 mi . l üM j n i i mm 


34 

her toilette spread out, and her Bible upon 
it. An archway thrown across the street con¬ 
nects the king’s residence with that of the prin¬ 
cess of Licgnitz, to whom his Majesty is uni¬ 
ted by a left-handed or Morganatic marriage. 

The New Museum. — This very handsome 
edifice, founded by the present king, was 
finished in 1830, from the designs of the dis¬ 
tinguished architect Schinkel; its foundations 
arc laid on many thousand piles, as the spot 
on which it stands was, not many years ago, 
a branch of the Spree, which has been fil¬ 
led up. 

Before the entrance to the Museum is a 
gigantic basin of polished granite ? 22 feet in 
diameter. The block out of which it was lor- 
med w r as a vast isolated boulder, known as 
the great Markgrafenstein, and lay at Fursten- 
wald, nearly 30 miles from Berlin. It was 
conveyed thence in a fiat-bottomed boat along 
the Spree to Berlin, and there polished by 
means of a steam-engine. 





















35 


Admission. — It is most liberally thrown 
open to the public every day but Sunday; in 
Summer, from 10 to 4; in Winter from 10 
to 3, without any other formality than that 
of writing the name in a book at the en¬ 
trance. 

The collections which it contains consist 
of—1. Yases and bronzes on the ground 
floor — 2. The Sculpture Gallery, and collec¬ 
tion of old china, and painted glass on the 
1st floor — 3. The Picture Gallery on the 
upper story. 

1. Collection of Vases and Bronzes. — 
Entrance at the back of the Museum. — Ad¬ 
mittance, Wednesday. 

Among the most remarkable objects in 
bronze, the following seem to deverse to be 
particularized: — An extensive series of Roman 
Penates, or Household Gods; Roman arms, 
armour, spears, back and breast-plates, grea¬ 
ves for the legs, and various utensils; a sa¬ 
crificial axe, a large circular shield, a small 









36 


statue of an Elephant of good workmanship. 
There are numerous articles in terra cotta, 
and various inscriptions on stone and metal. 

The Vases amount in number to 1600. 
They are exceedingly well classified, accor¬ 
ding to country and shape, and arranged upon 
tables of looking-glass. 

The contents of this portion of the Mu¬ 
seum are principally derived from the collec¬ 
tions of Bartholdy, von Kollar, and from that 
formerly in the Palace. From its nature, it 
is better calculated to interest the antiquarian 
than the general observer. 

2. The entrance to the Sculpture Gallery 
is through a grand circular hall extending the 
whole height of the building, and very im¬ 
posing from its size and proportions. The 
antiquities are principally composed of the 
collection of the Card. Polignac. It may be 
premised, that few of them are obove medio¬ 
crity as works of art, and that a large part 
of them are much indebted to modern resto- 






































HMH 


37 

rers. There is, however, at least one excep¬ 
tion. The Boy praying is one of the finest 
antique bronze statutes in existence; it was 
found in the bed of the Tiber, 19. Apollo 
restraining Hercules from carrying* away the 
Delphic tripod, a bas-relief, 81 — A Venus , 
113 — Niobe, 123 — A Wrestler, 129 — A 
Bacchante, 130 — The procession of Bacchus 
and Ariadne, 116 — are almost the only others 
worth notice. 

In side apartments leading out of the Sculp¬ 
ture Gallery are the collection of china — of 
Majolica, from the year 1519 — together with 
works in baked clay, glazed: among them is 
a large altar-piece by Luca della Robbia, and 
some painted glass. 

3. The Picture Gallery , on the upper 
story of the building, is divided into nume¬ 
rous small compartments, by partitions or 
screens extending from between the piers of 
the windows nearly to the opposite walls. 
This is an excellent arrangement for dispos- 

D 




i 


55SW 








38 

ing the pictures in advantageous lights, though 
the effect of a long perspective is lost by it. 

The collection is composed of, 1st, a se¬ 
lection from the paintings formerly in the Ro¬ 
yal Palaces of Berlin, Sans Souci, and Char- 
1 ottenburg, which the king has allowed to be 
removed to the Prussian National Gallery. 
They are marked in the Catalogue K. S. The 
Giustiniani collection, (marked G. S.) from A c- 
nice, and the pictures of Mr. Solly, an English 
merchant, (marked S. S.) both of which have 
been purchased by the Government. Many 
of the paintings in the Solly collection are 
referred to by Lanzi in the History of Pain¬ 
ting. The collection is augmented from time 
to time by pictures of merit bought at the 
public expense. 

The Berlin Gallery ranks below the Gal¬ 
leries of Munich and Dresden in the number 
of celebrated master-pieces and works of first- 
rate excellence, but it has this particular re¬ 
commendation, that it has good specimens of 










3 <> 


a greater number of masters, especially of the 
early German and Italian schools, than almost 
any other Gallery. For those who are desi¬ 
rous of studying the history and progress of 
the art, from its Byzantine origin, through the 
schools of Florence and Sienna to its period 
of excellence, and thence to trace its gradual 
decay, there can be no better opportunity than 
is here afforded them. 

The Director Waagen has prepared an ad¬ 
mirable catalogue with a short introduction to 
explain the origin and character of each school. 
His arrangement, combining the chronologi¬ 
cal order with the classification according to 
schools, is very perfect. 

The gallery is divided into 37 cabinets or 
compartments, each distinguished by a number 
over the entrance. In the 4th cabinet on the 

i 

left of the entrance begin the Italian schools; 
on the one next to it, i. c. the 5the from the 
entrance, begin the Flemish schools. These 
two rooms therefore may be considered as 

D 2 






40 


points of departure. If the spectator continue 
on to the left, lie will pass in succession 
through the cabinets devoted to Flemish Art, 
commencing with the Van Eyck's and ending 
with the followers of Rembrandt and Rubens; 
if he take an opposite direction, to the right, 
he will find in regular order the works of 
the schools of Venice, Lombardy, Rome, Bo¬ 
logna, <SCc. 

The gallery is by no means deficient in 
fine works of the great Italian masters, but 
it is particularly rich in the Flemish and Dutch 
schools. Among the pictures which appear 
most deversing of attention are the follo¬ 
wing: — 

ITALIAN SCHOOL. 

Andrea Montagna / Angels weeping over 
Christ. Francisco Francia ; the Virgin in 
Glory worshipped by six Saints. Giovanni 
Sand (Raphael’s father); Virgin and Child on 
a throne, at their feet St. James the elder and 
James the less. Pinluricio; the adoration of the 
Magi. Titian ; portrait of his daughter Lavinia. 















41 


Raphael; Virgin and Child, called Ma¬ 
donna di Casa Colonna, in his best manner. 
Another holy family, called Madonna Anca- 
jani, is the largest picture by Raphael in Ger¬ 
many, after the San Sisto at Dresden but un¬ 
luckily it is half destroyed; in many places 
the colour is so far gone as to show the out¬ 
line and contour of the figure, and the va¬ 
rious layers of colouring in proportion as they 
are worn away. Instead of retouching the 
defective parts, by which the original compo¬ 
sition would have been entirely obliterated, a 
finished copy has been made by a skiful ar¬ 
tist, to give an idea of what the picture was 
when perfect. 

Correggio; Leda and the Swan — Io and 
the Cloud, a repetition of that at Vienna, but 
inferior to it, as the flesh seems to have fa¬ 
ded and the shadows to have become black. 
These two pictures came from the Orleans 
Gallery, both the original heads were cut out 
of the canvas, and have been replaced by co¬ 
pies made by Prudhommes, a French artist. 










Fra. Bartolomeo; the Assumption of the 
Virgin. Sabbaltini da Bologna; the Virgin 
on a throne with three Saints. Guido Beni: 
the Hermits Paul and Antony discoursing. Lu¬ 
dovico Caracci; Christ feeding the 5000. Mi¬ 
chel Angelo Caravaggio; Christ in the gar¬ 
den. Sassoferralo ; Joseph and the Infant 
Christ. Carlo Dolce; St. John the Evange¬ 
list. Luca Giordano; the Judgment of Paris. 

FRENCH SCHOOL. 

JVicolas Poussin; the Education of Jupiter; 
Landscape with the story of Juno and Argus. 
Le Sueur; St. Bruno. 

SPANISH SHOOL. 

Murillo; St. Antony of Padua embracing 
the Infant Christ. 

FLEMISH AND DUTCH SCHOOLS. 

John and Hubert Van Eyck; twelve paint¬ 
ings which formed the side wings or shut- 












43 


tors of the famous altar-piece, known as „The 
worship of the spotless Lamb,“ in the church 
of St. Bavon at Ghent, where the central por¬ 
tion still remains. — They are decidedly the 
finest works which the Berlin Museum posses¬ 
ses. They represent, 1st, The just Judges; 
the man on the white horse is the painter 
Hubert Van Eyck , the figure on the black, 
looking round, in his brother John. 2d, The 
soldiers of Christ: here are introduced por¬ 
traits of Charlemagne and St. Louis. 3rd and 
4 tli, Angels singing and playing. 5th, The 
Holy Hermits. 6th, The Holy Pilgrims. At 
the back of the above six pictures are painted 
the six following — once every day the shut¬ 
ters arc reversed by the guardians of the mu¬ 
seum, so that those which were exposed in 
the morning are turned to the wall in the af¬ 
ternoon, and visiters have an opportunity of 
seeing both: — 7th, John the Baptist. 8th,Por¬ 
trait of Jodocus Vyds, Burgomaster of Ghent, 
for whom the picture was painted; the expres- 









44 


sion of piety and devotion in the countenance 
is most truly expressed. 9th and 10th, The 
Annunciation, the Angel Gabriel and the Vir¬ 
gin. 11th, Elizabeth, wife of Jodocus Vyds. 
12th, St. John the Evangelist. These admirable 
pictures were finished 1432. — Hans Hemling , 
a series of paintings lately obtained from a 
convent in Mechlin. — The birth of Christ. 
— The Sibyl of Tibur announcing the birth 
of Christ to Augustus. — The three kings ador¬ 
ing the Saviour. — Elijah fed by Angels. — 
The Crucifixion, — nothing can exceed the 
softness and minute finish of the female faces, 
while the expression of grief in the Virgin 
and Magdalen is most true to nature. 

Lucas Cranach ; portrait of Melancthon; 
portrait of Luther, with mustachios, as the Jun¬ 
ker (Squire) George, taken while he was con¬ 
cealed in the castle of the Wartburg — very 
interesting. 

Hans Holbein ; portrait of George Gyzen, 
a merchant of London. 
























45 


Christopher Amberger; portrait of the geo¬ 
grapher Sebastian Münster; Quentin Jflatsys, 
Virgin and Child. 

Rubens; the Resurrection of Lazarus; — 
the daughter of the painter. St. Cecilia, — 
Helena Forman. The Entombment of Christ. 

Van Dyk-, portrait of Prince Thomas of 
Carignan. — Portrait of a daughter of Char¬ 
les I. in a blue dress, with a white lace apron 
beautifully painted. Had Sir Joshua known 
this picture, the Blue Boy of Gainsborough 
need not have been painted. — St. John Bap¬ 
tist and St. John Evangelist. — Portraits of 
the children of Charles I. with a dog. — Three 
Penitent Sinners before the Virgin and Child. 

Teniers; Peasants in an ale-house. The 
Temptation of St. Anthony, a very humorous 
picture: there is a great deal of whim and 
drollery in the devils. Under the figure of 
the Saint, Teniers has protrayed himself; the 
younger woman is his wife, with a little bit 
of a devil’s tail peeping from under her gown; 

1) 3 




46 


the old woman was his mother in-law, a more 
decided devil with horns and claws. 

Rembrandt; Portrait of Duke Adolph of 
Gucldrcs, shaking his clenched fist at his la¬ 
ther— a master-piece of the artist: a power¬ 
ful representation of uncurbed passion. 

Jacob Ruisdael: a sea-piece. Jan Roth; 
a landscape with a hunting party. De lleem; a 
flower and fruit piece. Frans Snyders; a bear 
hunt, j Balthazar Denn er ; portrait of a man. 

Two considerable divisions of the gallery 
are occupied with works of the earliest period 
of art, which may be regarded as the antiqui¬ 
ties of painting, and are almost exclusively 
interesting, in an historical point of view, as 
illustrating the progress of the art. They con¬ 
sist of Byzantine, Italian, and early Flemish 
works. 

The Royal Library , a tasteless building, 
which owes its shape, it is said, to a whim 
of Frederick the Great, who desired the ar¬ 
chitect to take a chest of drawers for his mo- 








47 


del, stands near the Opera House, and con¬ 
tains about 500,000 vols. and nearly 5000 
IMS. It is shown to strangers on application 
to the Librarian. Among its curiosities arc — 
Luther’s Hebrew Bible, the copy from which 
he made his translation, with marginal notes 
in his own hand. The MS. of his translation 
of the Psalms, with his corrections in red ink. 
The Bible and Prayer-book which Charles I. 
carried to the Scaffold, and gave before his 
death to Bishop Juxon, who has attested the 
fact in his own hand-writing: Gut temb erg's 
Bible of 42 lines, (on parchment, date 1450- 
55,) the first book on which moveable type 
was used. The Codex Wittekindii, a MS. of 
the four Gospels, given, it is said, by Charle¬ 
magne to Wittekind. It is of the 9th or 10th 
century, and the ivory carvings in the binding 
are in the style called Byzantine. A series 
of beautiful miniature portraits by Luke Cra¬ 
nach; among them are his friends Luther, Me- 
lancthon, and the Elector of Saxony. — 36 











48 


vols. of engraved portraits of distinguished 
men of various times and countries, accompa¬ 
nied by autographs in alphabetical order. Two 
hemispheres of metal, on which Otto Guericke 
made the experiments which led him to dis¬ 
cover the air-pump, are also preserved here. 
Whern he had exhausted the air between them, 
he found that the force of 30 horses was un¬ 
able to separate them. 

The Public Reading-room of the Library, 
where books may be consulted, is open daily. 
Inhabitants of Berlin, and even resident stran¬ 
gers properly recommended, are allowed to 
take books home with them, under certain re¬ 
strictions. There is a private reading-room 
on the ground-floor, in which the new books 
and principal journals of Europe are deposi¬ 
ted. Admission can be obtained by a ticket 
from one of the head Librarians, which is only 
given to persons known to them. It is open 
daily from ten to twelve. 

The University , established in 1809, al- 




















49 


ready possesses a high reputation, from the 
talent of its teachers, and the wise system of 
discipline introduced among the students, who 
differ widely, in consequence, from the wild 
and insolent Burschen of Jena and Heidel¬ 
berg. In most other university towns the stu¬ 
dents are the most important class and the 
townspeople depend on them; but they are 
lost in Berlin, and become insignificiant in the 
midst of the population of a metropolis. It 
ranks among the first academical establishments 
in Germany, especially as a medical school, 
and is the most numerously attended (after 
that of Vienna), the students amounting to 
1800. The Museum of Natural History is 
within the building of the University. The 
Zoological Collection on the second floor is 
open Tuesdays and Fridays, from twelve to 
two, with admission tickets which arc given 
out the day previous by the Director of the 
Museum. This collection is one of the richest 
and most extensive in Europe, especially in 

E 







— . . . . 



the department of Ornithology: it includes the 
birds collected by Pallas and Wildenow, and 
the fishes of Bloch. The whole are excee¬ 
dingly well arranged and named for the con¬ 
venience of students. 

The Minerals are only shown to indivi¬ 
duals who interest themselves in this branch 
of science. The director resides in the house. 
Among: the curiosities of this collection are a 
piece of amber weighing 13 lbs. 15 oz., and 
said to be worth 40,000 dollars. It was found 
in a field, at a place called Schlappacken, 20 
German miles from the Baltic. A mass of pla- 
tina, weighing 1088 grains, and a splendid 
fiery opal, both brought from South America 
by Alex, von Humboldt. A large portion ol 
the collections made by him during his travels 
in America and Asia are deposited here. 

The Anatomical Museum will be highly 
appreciated by the medical student; it is one 
of the best in Europe, particularly rich in pre¬ 
parations of human and comparative anatomy. 


























51 


It is shown Wednesdays and Saturdays, from 
four to six in summer, — three to four in win¬ 
ter, by tickets. The Botanic Garden , belon¬ 
ging to the University, outside of the town, 
is described further on. 

The Egyptian Museum , in the palace of 
Montbijou. Here Peter the Great resided 
while at Berlin, much to the loss of the reign¬ 
ing queen, to whom it belonged, as the filthy 
and violent habits of her Russian guest greatly 
injured it. The collection of Egyptian anti¬ 
quities now placed in it was formed by M. 
Passalacqua and General Minutoli, and is one 
of the most curious in Europe. Admission is 
given to the public, by tickets, every Thurs¬ 
day. Strangers and men of science can ob¬ 
tain access at other times, on applying to M. 
Passalacqua. 

In addition to mummies, scarabaei, statues 
of Apis, coins, SCc. <SCc., which may be found 
in other cabinets, there exists here a collec¬ 
tion of arms, implements used in various arts, 

E 2 




















52 


utensils of all sorts, Slc. highly illustrative of 
the whole household economy of the Egyp¬ 
tian nation, as it existed some thousand years 
ago, all in such perfect preservation as to give m 
a wonderful insight into the state of arts, and 
condition of the Egyptians, at that remote 
period. 

Specimens of the produce of a great many 
trades are here to be seen. Garments nearly 
as fine as muslin; a pair of braces! said, by 
Champollion, to have belonged to an Egyp¬ 
tian monarch (?); sandals; a medicine-chest 
filled with drugs, in alabaster phials, is also 
supposed to have belonged to one of the 
kings. 

The whole is well arranged. By the side 
of the figures of the various Egyptian deities 
are placed the symbols belonging to each, 
worn, it is supposed, as amulets on the per¬ 
son. Among them is a beetle with the head 
of a sphinx. An assortment of the various 
kinds of cloth and linen found upon the mum- 





























53 


mies shows great perfection in the art of spinn¬ 
ing and weaving. 

The objects for the decoration of the per¬ 
son include mirrors of brass, pins of brass 
and ivory, necklaces, one of which was bor¬ 
rowed by the Duchess of Berry to wear at 
a Parisian fancy ball. Specimens are shown 
of the various balsams and asphaltum used in 
embalming. It is a curious fact that mummies 
are now imported into Europe for the use of 
apothecaries and painters, on account of the 
bitumen they contain. The instruments used 
in embalming, — the Ethiopian knives of shar¬ 
pened flint, and the brass hooks with which 
the brain was extracted through the nostrils, 
are perhaps peculiar to this collection. It would 
be tedious to give more than a slight enume¬ 
ration of other objects, such as arms, spears, 
bow and arrows, £c.; a plough; a spindle; 
distaff, and comb for llax; measures of rope 
and of wood divided by knots, or notches; a 
painter’s palette and paint-box, with sliding 














54 


lid. Seven different colours are preserved 
here. Herodotus mentions only four. Part 
are placed in small shells, as in the modern 
practice. Writing materials, architect’s appa¬ 
ratus, dice, weights; sandals and shoes of lea¬ 
ther and palm leaves; fishing-nets, with floats 
formed of calabashes; musical instruments; the 
flute and sistrum; mummies of the sacred ani¬ 
mals worshipped by the Egyptians, as cats, 
fish, serpents, young crocodiles, frogs, ibises, 
lizards, all embalmed and wrapped in cloths; 
a human monster, without a head, embalmed. 
It has been described by Geoffroy St. Hilaire. 
Perhaps the most curious objects in the whole 
collection are the contents of the tomb of an 
Egyptian high-priest, discovered and opened 
by Passalacqua in the Necropolis of Thebes. 
The body was enclosed in a triple coffin. By 
the side of it were deposited the sacred wand 
or priest’s rod, the scull and leg-bones of an 
ox, branches of sycamore, and two models of 
Egyptian vessels, (such as navigated the Nile 
























3000 years ago,) neatly finished, and comple¬ 
tely rigged, having on board a dead body, 
and a party of mourners accompanying it to 
the tomb. 

The Arsenal (Zeughaus), esteemed a build¬ 
ing of almost faultless architecture, was erec¬ 
ted in 1695. 

Above the windows round the inner court 
are twenty-two masks, admirably carved in 
stone by Schlüter, representing the human face 
in the agonies of death. On the ground-floor 
are cannon and artillery of various kinds, such 
as, two leather guns, used by the great Gu- 
stavus in the 30 years’ war; a field-piece na¬ 
med die Schöne Taube (beautiful dove); a da¬ 
masked cannon; 2 Turkish pieces; a standard, 
and the key of Adrianople, taken from the 
Turks by the Russians in the last war, and 
and presented by their Emperor. Here also 
may be seen models of 18 French fortresses, 
brought from Paris by the Prussians, in 1815. 
On the first floor are arranged 70,000 or 














5 6 


80,000 stand of arms. These apartments form 
a kind of military museum , and produce a 
most imposing* effect. They are very taste¬ 
fully arranged and specimens of the aims and 
accoutrements used in every army in Europe 
are deposited here. There arc fire-arms, from 
those used at the first invention of gunpow¬ 
der, to the most perfect made in the present 
day. Many ancient weapons and suits of ar¬ 
mour— one suit belonged to Francis I.; se¬ 
ven bunches of the keys of captured fortres¬ 
ses — some taken from the French. Against 
the walls and pillars are hung nearly 1000 
stand of colours, chiefly French, and bearing 
the dates and emblems of the Revolution. They 
were captured by the Prussians in Paris, 1815. 

Days of Admission , Wednesdays and Sa¬ 
turdays, from three to five, r.M. Tickets may 
be had at a house behind the Arsenal. 

The Custom House, behind the Museum 
is a building newly erected and worth inspect¬ 
ing in consequence of the beautiful Reliefs 




























;>7 

with which it is adorned; they are executed 
by Kitt the Scuptor after designs by the cele¬ 
brated Schinkel. 

The Palace of Prince William (Son of 
the king), Unter den Linden No. 39, is a 
new building just erected after the designs 
and under the Direction of Langerhans, the 
rival of Schinkel. 

The Palace of Prince Charles . Wilhefms- 
plat z No. 9, formerly belonging to the Knights 
of St. John, has been most splendidly arran¬ 
ged after Schinkel’s Designs. It contains a 
most exquisite collection of arms of all times 
and nations of which the Prince is said to be 
one of the first connoisseurs in Europe. 

The Palace of Prince Albert , Wilhelms¬ 
strasse No. 102. A very splendid building', the 
first view of which makes an impression like 
that of an old Castle of the feudal times. It 
was built in 1735 and after passing through 
several hands and serving for a variety of pur¬ 
poses Schinkel arranged it for its present des- 

E 3 














58 


filiation. The Talent of this gifted architect 
here „shines forth in all its glory“ and if he 
had even produced nothing else, this building 
alone would bear sufficient proof of his emi¬ 
nent Genius, worthy of the acknowledgment 
and admiration of all Europe. 

The Academy of Avis , Unter den Linden, 
instituted 1699, destined to afford instruction 
to young Painters, Sculptors &!c. This Insti¬ 
tution possesses an excellent collection of casts 
of the most famous works of antiquity; of all 
statues which once formed the Musec Napo¬ 
leon and of the works preserved in the Bri¬ 
tish Museum. It is continually enriched and 
no Expence spared to make it as complete as 
any other similar Collection. In its Rooms 
arc also exhibited the works of the modern 
artists of geimany This Exhibition which ge¬ 
nerally takes place during the months of Sept., 
Oct., Nov. and part of Dec. is visited by ama¬ 
teurs from all Parts of Europe. 

The Iron Foundry (Eisengiesserei), outside 

































«. The Talent of this gifted architect 
re ..shir h ii ail its glorr and if In 

v •• • •*A • Wf*- * of ‘.is cmi- 

tiitioK pr>: 1 > an * ccjlcnt collection of casts ? 

of •*' . .m fan.*' ■oris of ant fy , of all 

i.'d the fftädt \ * >- 

1, .»uxn 1* roi‘-n.n.i.tv enriched and 

no 1 pence spa red to m aß complete as 

aiiy utke faailar Cli>Jli x crinu. lr koo> 

a tv also 4« * 










































































■HBi 


MflPP 


59 

of the Oranienburg- gate. The well-known 
black iron trinkets, usually called Berlin ware, 
are cast here; and a great variety of other 
articles, as busts, statues, bas-reliefs, copies of 
pictures, monumental slabs, joints, beams and 
rafters for houses, and even bells. The time 
of casting is usually in the evening, when 
strangers are readily admitted. The castings 
produced here, of all kinds, from a colossal 
statue down to the most minute filigree-like 
ornament of a lady’s toilet, cannot be equal¬ 
led in delicacy and fineness of impression in 
any other part of Europe. This excellence 
has been attributed to the quality of the Si¬ 
lesian iron; it is more likely that it depends 
on the care bestowed on the moulds. They 
are formed of very fine sand, mixed with a 
small portion of clay. 

At the time when the final struggle com¬ 
menced between Prussia and Napoleon, the 
patriotism of the Prussian ladies was particu¬ 
larly conspicuous. ith the noblest gencro- 















sity they sent their jewels and trinkets to the 
royal treasury to assist in furnishing funds for 
the expense of the campaign. Rings, crosses, 
and other ornaments of cast iron, made in this 
manufactory, were given in return to all those 
who had made this sacrifice. They bore the 
inscription „Ich gab Gold um Eisen“ (I gave 
gold for iron), and such Spartan jewels are, 
at this day, much treasured by the possessors 
and their families. 

The black varnish with which the iron ware 
is covered, to prevent rust, is made of amber 


dissolved, and mixed with lamp black. 

The China Manufactory was founded by 
Frederick the Great; the painting is very good, 
but the porcelain is rather thick and heavy. 

The Taub -Stummen-Institut, Institution 
for instructing the deaf and dumb, situated in 
the Linien Strasse, Nos. 81 and 82, is a very 
interesting establishment. 

The Gewerbe Schule 9 School for Trade, ) 

is an establishment of a kind not yet introdu- 





























61 


ced into Great Britain; it is a school for in¬ 
structing gratuitously promising young arti¬ 
sans, in drawing, modelling and other bran¬ 
ches of fine arts calculated to be of practical 
use in their trade, with a view of improving 
the designs of articles of furniture and pat¬ 
ters in stuffs of all sorts, and the like. 

An Architectural Academy (Bau-Academie) 
has recently been established under the direc¬ 
tion of Schinkel. 

The Studios of some of the Berlin artists 
deserve to be visited, particularly those of 
the sculptors Rauch and Tieck, in the Lager 
Hauss. 

Theatres begin at six o’clock. 

The Italian Opera House is a regular and 
noble structure near the Linden. In it, Ger¬ 
man and Italian operas, the national drama, 
and tragedy and comedy are performed, ge¬ 
nerally three or four times a-week alternately 
with the Schauspielhaus, though in winter the 
Opera is generally open every day. 

F 












62 


The Box-office of flic Opera House is not 
in that building, but in the lower story of 
the Schauspielhaus, where tickets are given 
out for bolli theatres. 

The New Play House (Schauspielhaus) lies 
between the two churches in the Gens d’Ar- 
mes Platz. The performances consist of Ger¬ 
man and French plays alternately; an excel¬ 
lent French company resides here permanently. 
The stage is on the second floor of the build¬ 
ing, so that it is necessary to go up stairs 
even into the pit; adjoining it, is 

The Concert Room , much admired for its 
architectural proportions, and the taste of its 
decorations. It is large enough to admit 1200 
or even 1500 persons, and may be called one 
of the noblests Saloons in Europe. It is 107 
feet long, 44 broad and 42 high. The Niches 
one adorned by Busts of Mozart, Gluck, 
Haydn, Graun, Handel and other „masters of 
the melodies.“ A splendid Gallery runs round 
the whole Saloon and the Royal Box, very 





















63 

handsomely fitted up, occupies a large space 
on the left side of it. 

Besides Concerts 9 a certain number of Sub¬ 
scription Balls take place here in winter. The 
king and royal family are often present. 

The Koenigsstaedtsche Theatre, situated 
at the farthest end of the Koenigsstrasse, is 
open every Evening. It is licensed for per¬ 
formances of all classes, except only great 
tragedies. The present Campany vies- success¬ 
fully with that of the Royal Theatre and even 
surpasses it in the „opera buffa“. The best 
comic actors of Germany are generally enga¬ 
ged at this House and the manager spares no 
pains to fill it continually. 

Music. — A more correct taste for music 
may be said to prevail here than in Vienna, 
at present. 

The Sing Academy is a private associa¬ 
tion of from 200 to 300 amateurs, male and 
female, of the respectable and upper classes, 
who meet together to practise, every week 

F 2 












64 


during the whole year, and give annually se¬ 
veral delightful concerts, to which the public 
are admitted, in the tasteful bui/dhig of the 
Academy behind the grand Guardhouse. The 
performance of sacred vocal music is probably 
not carried to greater perfection in any part 
of Europe; the strength of the chorus and the 
perfect precision and unity of so many voices 
is very striking. 

The Coliseum , Alte Jacob’s Strasse, No. 
51, is a very handsome Ball-room designed 
principally for the Bourgeoisie to dance in, 
but often visited by the upper classes, as loo¬ 
kers-on. 

The Winter Gardens are coffee-houses 
under glass, conservatories filled with exotic 
plants, provided with tables for refreshments, 
news-papers, and a band of music; they are 
opened on winter evenings, but are not much 
in vogue. 

Restaurateurs , where dinner and supper 
are served ä la carte. The best are Jagor’s, 



























65 


No. 33, and Cafe Royal, No. 44, Unter den 
Linden. In general it may he said that the 
art of cookery (except in the above two esta¬ 
blishments) is but imperfectly understood here; 
to see it carried to perfection, the traveller 
must repair to Vienna. A peculiar delicacy 
of the Berlin cuisine are Tel tower Rüben, 
(parsnips from Teltow r , a neighbouring vil¬ 
lage); 3 or 4 is the fashionable hour of din¬ 
ner in Berlin. 

There is no club at Berlin, to which pas¬ 
sing strangers can readily obtain access to 
read the papers; but the loss is to a certain 
extent supplied by the Confectioners' shops 
(Conditoreien), which become the general 
lounge and resort about 1 or 2 o’clock, it 
being a usual practice here to take a cup of 
chocolate in the middle of the day. The best 
are Stehely’s , at a corner of the street behind 
the Schauspielhaus, where a large assortment 
of Journals, Grench, Ferman, and English, in¬ 
cluding the Times, and Galignani’s Messen- 














66 


ger, arc taken in. Fuchs's, No. 8 and Aranlz- 
lerSy 24, Unter den Linden, both handsomely 
fitted up; and JostVs 1, Stechbahn, opposite 
the palace. 

The lower classes resort to the wine and 
leer houses , which, in splendour, may vie w ith 
the gin palaces of London, and are nearly as 
much crowded, and as injurious to public 
health and morals. 

At A. Asher s, Linden 20, the cnglish tra¬ 
veller will find himself at home in every re¬ 
spect. It is an establishment very much like 
Galignanfs at Paris and may be called the 
Rendezvous of the fashionable world of Ber¬ 
lin. Mr. A. has about 100,000 volumes of 
different Sorts of Books on sale and by his 
extensive Correspondence is enabled to get 
abmost any w ork which may be desired. Being 
the Bookseller to the „ Corps diplomatique “ 
he is enabled and gladly does furnish any 
information necessary to travellers visiting Ber¬ 
lin. Having an Establishment in Town under 

























67 


his own firm (158 Fleet Str.) he is in con¬ 
stant correspondence with England and for¬ 
wards Books Slc. to and fro’ with the grea¬ 
test dispatch and security. Circular notes 
and cnglish coin is taken at the highest ra¬ 
tes of Exchange and every facility afforded 
to English Gentlemen who may intend avail¬ 
ing themselves of the comparatively low r prices 
at which Books, prints Sic. may be purchased 
in Germany. 

An cxellent English* french and Italian 
circulating Library , at Zedners, Linden 53. 

Schropp 9 map-seller, 24, Jägerstrasse, pu¬ 
blishes a good travelling map of North Ger¬ 
many; a geological map of Europe, a chart 
of the moon, and many others of great ex¬ 
cellence. 

The best shops are in the Unter den Lin¬ 
den, Schloss-Platz, Breite Strasse and Behren 
Strasse. Among the articles peculiar to Ber¬ 
lin, and best worth purchasing, are the trin¬ 
kets, ornaments, busts, bas-reliefs, Sic. of cast 










68 


iron; they may be purchased at Geist’s, 31, 
Behren Strasse, and Lehman’s, Schloss Freiheit. 

The office (Meldezimmer) of the Mails, 
Schnei Iposten, in the inner court of the Post- 
office, is open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. 

Schnellposts go' from Berlin to all parts 
of Germany. 

To Petersburg once a week, taking 9 days 
to the journey, but the time will be shorte¬ 
ned by improvements in the roads now in 
progress. In 1835 the Emperor Nicolas tra¬ 
velled post in 5 days, without stopping, from 
Petersburg to Berlin, A schnellpost goes to 
Warsaw by Posen in 4 or 5 days: this road 
will also be soon much improved. 

Travellers wishing to return to London 
from Berlin by the public conveyances, may 
leave Sunday or Wednesday Evening by the 
Hamburg mail. They reach Hamburg in 36 
Hours, have 12 hours time to see every thing 
worth inspecting in that City and leave the 
same evening for London. Thus a traveller 

























69 

who avails himself of this conveyance and 
starts from Berlin Sunday evening at 9, rea¬ 
ches Hambro on Tuesday morning at 9, leaves 
it late in the evening and gets to London by 
friday afternoon. 

Environs of Berlin. 

The gates of the city were originally na¬ 
med after the places to which they led, but 
the great lines of high roads have been so 
much changed that it is not now the Halle 
Gate, but the Potzdam Gate, which leads to 
Halle, nor the Hamburg Gate which leads thi¬ 
ther, but the Brandenburg Gate; and to pro 
ceed into Silesia you issue out of the Frank¬ 
fort, not the Silesian, Gate. 

At Tegel , a little way outside of the Ora¬ 
nienburg Gate, is the seat of the late William 
Von Humboldt. In the garden is a monu¬ 
ment to his wife, a statue of Hope upon a 
pillar, the work of Thorwaldsen . 

About £ mile outside of the Potzdam Gate 

F 3 
















70 


is the Botanic Garden , near the village of 
Schöneberg*. It is one of the finest in Europe, 
well arranged, and contains an extensive col¬ 
lection of plants. The Conservatories and 
Palm-houses are on a large scale. It is open 
to the public on Wednesday. Strangers may 
obtain admission at other times. 

About - a mile beyond the Halle Gate is 
a low sandhill called the Krentxberg , almost 
the only eminence near Berlin, and command¬ 
ing a tolerable view of it. It is named from 
a Gothic Cross of cast iron upon its summit, 
called Yolks Denkmal (People’s Monument), 
erected by the king of Prussia to the memory 
of his subjects who fell in battle during the 
war. Schinkel designea it, and Rauch and 
Tieck executed the statues of Prussian war¬ 
riors in the niches, and the bas-reliefs repre¬ 
senting the principal victories gained by the 
Prussians — as Gross Görschen, Leipzig, Katz- 
bacli, Paris, Belle Alliance. The whole was 
cast in the Royal Iron Foundry. 

Upon the slope of the Kreutzberg is Ti- 


























71 


voll , a sort of Vauxhall Garden including a 
Russian Mountain ? down which visiters des¬ 
cend in cars; a ball-room for waltzing, and 
numerous boxes in which the crowd may be 
seen taking refreshments, but it is not much 
resorted to at present. 

Immediately beyond the Brandenburg Gate 
commences the Park ( Thiergarten ), an ex¬ 
tensive but gloomy plantation, chiefly of fir- 
trees, with open spaces here and there, stag¬ 
nant ditches and ponds, coffee-houses, SC c., 
among them, not unlike the Champs Elysees 
at Paris, and equally dull, except whem thron¬ 
ged with people on a fine Sunday afternoon. 

The two excursions which must on no ac¬ 
count be omitted\ are that to Charlottenburg , 
described below, which will not take more 
than three hours, and that to Potsdam on the 
road to Leipzig and Wittenberg; one day will 
scarcely suffice to see Potzdam and the Pfauen- 
Insel thoroughly. It is about 19 miles off, 
and Schnellposts go thither six times a-day. 

On the 24th of August, on St. Bartholo- 









72 


mew’s day, a popular festival takes place at 
Stralow, a small village on the left bank of 
the Spree, and right of the lake of Kümmels- 
burg. It is called the Fishery (Fischzug), and 
originated in the practice of dragging the wa¬ 
ters with nets on that day three times; 1st, 
for the benefit of the Magistrates; 2ndly, for 
the Minister; 3rdly, for the Elders of the vil¬ 
lage. It is a favourite excursion with the Ber¬ 
liners to proceed by water to the scene of 
action, where a great fair is held on the ri¬ 
ver banks, and to dine on fish. 

In the course of the autumn, generally in 
September, a grand review of the garrison 
takes place in the neighbourhood of Berlin; 
20,000 troops are sometimes collected, and the 
manoeuvres last several days. 

CHARLOTTENBURG, a small town on the 
Spree, about three miles beyond the Branden¬ 
burg Gate, made up chiefly of villas and ta¬ 
verns, the summer residence of the rich, and 




































tv, a popular festival J pla» 
a small Tillage on the left bank of 
{he Spree, and right of ihe lake of lluimnefe* 
bur ; It - • • . e: v (Fischzug), and 

'» ‘i/'i , •• -V.. U\;l the \va- ■ 

1st, 

for the «.»; * • 

bae, ' It iv a favourite eveursiou vnfh the Ber¬ 
liners to proceed bv water to the scene of 
action, where a great fair is held on, the ri- 
• nd to J n fish. 

i r . of in : :«-rr;n, ^eiicraHv if« 

. i •;* a^ami > er < of tii gajrh a 
takes place in (he jjoglibourhdod of Berlin; 
20,000 troop s are sometimes collected, and the 
manoeuvres h.. ! *<••. eral d* 

' 

4 OTTI NW. ffe? kin d! town ot 

: < s beyond i- 

verflS, tb* ns „ * More the rnh, ^nd 







































































73 


the summer resort of the humbler classes from 
Berlin. The Palace , (Schloss,) built by Fre¬ 
derick the Great, is the favourite abode of 
the present King of Prussia. The build¬ 
ing itself is not very remarkable, either ex¬ 
ternally or internally. The Gardens behind 
it are exceedingly beautiful, and are at all ti¬ 
mes open to the public. The entrance to 
them is through the Orangery, at the extre¬ 
mity of wich is the Theatre, where the Ber¬ 
lin Company performs generally twice a-wcek, 
in summer. The gardens are the great resort 
of Sunday strollers from Berlin. They are 
prettily laid out, varied by the windings of 
the Spree, and by sheets of water, abounding 
in carp of large size and great age. Visiters 
are in the habit of feeding them with crumbs, 
and collect them together by ringing a bell 
at the sound of which the fish may be seen 
in shoals, popping their noses out of the 
water. 

The object of greatest interest at Charlot- 

G 








74 


tcnburg is the monument of Louisa , Queen of 
Prussia ? the most beautiful and amiable, and, 
at the same time, unfortunate princess of her 
day. She is buried within a small Doric 
temple at the extremity of a shady walk, in 
a retired part of the garden. The Castellan 
residing in the palace keeps the key, and will 
show r the monument to strangers. It is uni¬ 
versally allow ed to be the masterpiece of the 
sculptor Rauch, and is perhaps not surpassed 
in excellence by any modern work of art. 
The figure of the queen, as large as life, re¬ 
poses on a marble sarcophagus. It is a from 
and face of the most exquisite beauty, but, at 
the same time, a most perfect resemblance. 
„The expression is not that of dull cold death, 
but of undisturbed repose. The hands are 
modestly folded on the breast; the attitude is 
easy, graceful, and natural. Only the coun¬ 
tenance and part of the neck are bare, the 
rest of the figure is shrouded in an ample 
and extremely well-wrought drapery. The 


































75 


great charm of the figure is the decent, simple, 
tranquil air, without any striving after effect. 
I observed no inscription — no pompous ca¬ 
talogue of her titles — no parading eulogy 
of her virtues; the Prussian eagle alone, at 
the foot of the sarcophagus, announces that 
she belonged to the house of Hohenzollern, 
and the withered garlands, which still hang 
above her, were the first offerings of her chil¬ 
dren at the grave of tlieir mother.“ — Russel's 
Germany . 

The road from Charlottenburg to Berlin 
is a straight avenue, bordered by many coun¬ 
try-seats of the citizens. On the right hand, 
before entering the town, lies the park, Thier¬ 
garten, a sort of Champs Elysees; and on 
the left is the exercising-ground, on which 
troops are drilled and reviewed. 

POTZDAM. The road to Potzdam quits Ber¬ 
lin by the Potzdam Gate, and proceeds along 
an avenue of country-seats, taverns, and cof- 

G 2 





76 


fee-houses, the resort of the citizens, past the 
Botanic Gardens and through the village of 
Schöneberg*, in sight of the iron cross on the 
Kreutzberg on the left, to 

Zehlendorf. — Beyond this the road pas¬ 
ses through a wood of firs, from which it 
emerges on approaching the banks of the Ha¬ 
vel, which here spreads out into a fine broad 
lake, at the extremity of which appear on the 
right the towers of Spandau. About two mi¬ 
les before reaching* the bridge over the Ha¬ 
vel, a road striking* off to the right, leads to 
The Peacock Island (Pfauen-Insel), surroun¬ 
ded by the Havel, about 1~ mile distant. It 
is a favourite summer retreat of the king* of 
Prussia — what Virginia Water was to George 
IV. Though originally a rabbit-warren, it has 
been converted by taste and art into delight¬ 
ful pleasure grounds, ornamented with trees, 
gardens, shrubberies, and lawns, filled with rare 
plants and animals, while the scenery of the 
lake itself is highly picturesque, more espe- 





















77 


dally when contrasted with the monotonous 
sandy plains round Berlin. The following- 
clear and useful description of the spot was 
written by a lady who visited it recently: — 
„A day should be dedicated to the Pfauen- 
Insel. Tuesday and Thursday are the public 
days, but strangers are admitted at all times, 
unless the Royal Family are there. The di¬ 
stance from Potzdam is about 4.7 miles. A 
road on the left (in coming from Potzdam) 
leads from Glienicke to a Ferry: it is sandy 
and heavy, hut a chausse'e was in contempla¬ 
tion in 1834, and is already (1836) comple¬ 
ted from Berlin. A boat starts from the is¬ 
land as soon as you arrive at the ferry, and 
three minutes convey you to the shore. The 
island is the king’s hobby, and lie has made 
it an enchanting spot; an Oasis in the midst 
of a wilderness of sand and firs. You land 
at a picturesque cottage covered with cree¬ 
pers, and almost concealed by the number of 
beautiful liot-house plants with which it is or- 












78 


namented. The Schloss is a kind of fancy 
building like a decoration des Theatres, con¬ 
taining small but comfortable apartments, fur¬ 
nished with great simplicity. The king’s bed¬ 
room contains his tentbed, and just above it 
the most perfect copy of the lovely bust of 
his deceased queen, taken from Rauch’s sta¬ 
tue. The hot house is superb, so lofty as to 
contain some of the finest and highest palm- 
trees in Europe, so large as to boast a spe¬ 
cimen of almost every rare plant.“ 

„In a circle of about three miles, there is 
every variety of building which enlivens Eng¬ 
lish or French gardens; menageries, pavilions, 
and farm yard and dairy, lawns adorned with 
clumps and groves of the most beautiful oaks, 
elm, beech-trees, and limes. I never saw a 
spot laid out with more taste. The king has 
employed 20 years in bringing it to perfec¬ 
tion. It is to be regretted that travellers are 
often unconscious of its existence, and do not 
visit it. The Havel often expands into little 
lakes, and this island is in one of these lakes. 


























79 


The Frigate given by our king to the king 
of Prussia is most appropriately placed here. 
Its miniature proportions suit well with the 
lake scenery by which it is surrounded. The 
English sailors who accompanied it over to 
Germany were appointed to do the honours 
to their countrymen, and were highly amusing 
in their remarks on the royal family, who are 
very kind to them.“ (L.) 

Returning to the high road from Berlin; 
— on the borders of the Havel, close to the 
bridge leading into Potzdam, is the little villa 
of Glienecke, once the residence of the mini¬ 
ster \ on Hardenberg, now belonging to the 
Prince Karl, and tastefully fitted up in the 
English fashion. 

POTZDAM, Inns: — Der Einsiedler (the 
Hermit); Das Rothe Haus (the Red House). 

Potzdam, the Prussian Versailles, lies on 
(lie right bank of the Havel, which here ex¬ 
pands into a lake with finely wooded pictu¬ 
resque, sloping banks; in has 33,255 inhabi¬ 
tants including a large garrison. It may be 











80 


called a town of palaces, not only from the 
four royal residences in and about it, but be¬ 
cause even the private houses are copied from 
celebrated edifices, one of wich comprises with¬ 
in it the dwellings of many families. The 
dullness of the streets, indeed, often contrasts 
singularly with the splendour of their archi¬ 
tecture. The principal buildings are, The Gar¬ 
nison Kirche (Church of the Garrison). Fre¬ 
derick the Great is buried beneath the pul¬ 
pit, in a plain metal sarcophagus above ground. 
His sword, originally laid upon it, was car¬ 
ried off by Napoleon, and all traces of it are 
lost; but over the tomb, on each side of the 
pulpit, now hang the eagles and standards ta¬ 
ken from Napoleon’s armies by the Prussians; 
a fitting retribution, and as it were an atone¬ 
ment to the shade of the hero for this paltry 
theft. Around the walls of the church, tablets 
inscribed with the names of the brave soldiers 
who distinguished themselves, and perished du¬ 
ring the War of Liberation, are suspended. 



















81 


The Royal Palace within the town con¬ 
tains little worth seeing-, except the apartments 
of the great Frederick, which remain nearly 
as they were when he was alive. Here are 
shown his writing-table, blotted all over with 
ink, his ink-stand, music-stand, book-case fil¬ 
led with French works, and the chairs and 
sofa which he used, their silken covers nearly 
torn off, propably by the claws of his docs. 
The truck bed on which he slept, despising 
any more comfortable couch, stood behind the 
silver balustrades, but has been, removed be¬ 
cause it was worn out, and almost pulled to 
pieces by relic hunters. Adjoining the bed¬ 
room is a small cabinet with double doors, 
provided with a table which ascends and'de- 
cends through a trap door in the iloor. Here 
the monarch could dine tete-a-tete with a friend, 
without being overheard or overlooked, while 
the dinner was served without requiring the 
presence of a servant. 

The design of a New Church in Potzdam 

G 3 











82 


is said to be copied from St. Paul's in Lon¬ 
don. Potzdam is the birth-place of the pre¬ 
sent king of Prussia, and of the distingui¬ 
shed traveller and philosopher, Alexander von 
Humboldt. 

Sans Souci. — The Gardens begin a few 
hundred yards outside of the Brandenburg 
Gate, to the west of Potzdam. They are laid 
out in the stiff formal French taste, with al¬ 
leys, cut hedges, statues, basins, Slc., but at 
present exhibit marks of decay and neglect. 
A broad avenue runs through them, at the ex¬ 
tremity of it lies the New Palace. Near to 
Potzdam, and on the right of the avenue, is 
the Palace of Sans Sonci . on the top of a 
flight of step like terraces. They are fronted 
with glass, beneath which grow vines, olives, 
and orange-trees. Frederick, who took much 
pride in his gardens and hot-beds, complained 
once to the Prince de Ligne of the climate 
and soil under which his orange-trees and vi- 

o 

nes were pining. „Sire“ replied the courtier, 
















































Potsdam is the birth-place of the pro 

‘shed i> i and : r ilosonh^r. 4J< tau der von 

1 . \ 

S,m,v So fid, Tu*' 4*0},*'- w jin a. fen 
hundred ds <* .' o [ r liranc nburg 
' e*\ u^the.-^v.rac i;< : il 

1 c ; • .yes statue out ar 

' present exhibit marks of decay and neglect. 

\ broad*avenue u;o them h dunn, at the c\* 

• - / j 

; tr r tic* lk v* Kear tc 

the Valin e of Sarin Sottt t . u: ‘he top of a 
flight •>{ (cn-lik«- te.mocs, They arc fronted 
with glass, beneath which grow vn. y olives, 

?d *»rane*« » j .> l ^ ho • k n ., . 

t 

* 

• nes wer*' *pr<± ' i ■« courtier. 




















































































83 


„it appears that with you nothing thrives but 
your laurels.“ The Palace stands on the 
highest terrace; it is a low and not a hand¬ 
some building*, but the colonnade behind is 
fine. At the extremities of this terrace are 
the graves of Frederick’s favourite dogs and 
of his horse, among whom he desired, in his 
will, he himself should be buried, an injunc¬ 
tion which was not complied with. This spot 
was the favourite resort of the old warrior: 
here he was brought out in his armchair, sur¬ 
rounded by his dogs, a short while before his 
decease, to bask in the sun. „Je serais bien¬ 
töt plus pres de lui“, were nearly his last 
words. Within the building may be seen his 
bed-room where he breathed his last; a clock, 
which he always wound up with his own hand, 
but which being forgotten at last, stopped at 
the moment of his death, and still remains 
with its hands pointing to the hour of his 
decease, 20 minutes past 12. A portrait of 
Gustavus Adolphus hangs on the wall, its sole 







84 


ornament; the bed and arm-chair of Frederick 
have been removed. Voltaire’s apartment is 
also pointed out, at some distance from that 
of his Royal Host. In the gallery hang* some 
paintings by Watteau. On the right and left 
of the palace, but in separate buildings, are 
the state apartments, and the Picture Gallery; 
but as all the best pictures are now removed 
to Berlin, much time need not be wasted 
upon it. Among those that remain is one to¬ 
lerable picture, a Virgin and Child, by Ru¬ 
bens, and there are many by his pupils and 
imitators, Van Tulden and the like, of infe¬ 
rior merit and value. 

Frederick the Great was not satisfied with 
his reputation as a general, he must be con¬ 
sidered a man of taste and a judge and pa¬ 
tron of art, and as lie knew nothing about 
it, and still would possess a picture gallery, 
he was most egregiously cheated, and impo¬ 
sed upon by the agents and picture dealers 
whom he employed; paying enormous sums 






















85 


for worthless pictures, and rejecting others of 
very high merit. Thus a painting of Lot and 
his Daughters, sold to him for 30,000 ducats, 
as a Raphael of the highest excellence, turns 
out to be the work of a second rate Flemish 
master, Floris, and worth not more than £50. 
Me rejected the Holbein now in the Dresden 
Gallery, which is esteemed the best work of 
that master. Isaac blessing Jacob, attributed 
to Vandyk, is a picture of no value, and Ti¬ 
tian's Venus is so seriously damaged and re¬ 
paired as to have no traces of the painter 
whose name it bears. 

The famous Mill of Sans Souci stands 
close behind the palace, and still belongs to 
the descendants of the miller who refused to 
yield it up to Frederick, when he wanted to 
pull it down and include the ground in his 
own gardens, which are rather confined on 
that side. Some years ago adverse circum¬ 
stances compelled the owner of the mill to 
make up his mind to part with it. He in con- 

11 









86 


sequence offered it for sale to the present 
king, who instead of availing himself of the 
opportunity, generously settled on the miller 
a sum sufficient to extricate him from his dif¬ 
ficulties, and enable him to maintain himself 
in his property, saying that the mill now be¬ 
longed to Prussian history, and was in a man¬ 
ner a national monument. 

The broad walk, before mentioned, leads 
from the foot of the terraces of Sans Souci 
to the New Palace (Neue Palais), about two 
miles from Potzdam, a vast building erected 
at enormous cost by Frederick, by way of 
bravado, at the end of the seven year’s war, 
to show his enemies that his finances were 
not exhausted. It was built in six years, bet¬ 
ween 1763 and 1769, on a spot previously 
a morass. It contains 200 apartments, but is 
not now inhabited; it exhibits many remains 
of gaudy magnificence; marble has been most 
profusely lavished on the walls and floors; 
and one large apartment is lined entirely with 


















87 


shells and minerals, in very bad taste. There 
arc still some tolerable paintaings by Schnei / - 
decs, and one or two very excellent Luca 
Giordano's . In the small library is a copy 
of the works of Frederick the Great, „Les 
Oeuvres Melees du Philosophe de Sans Souci, 
avec privilege d’Apollon.“ This copy is a cu¬ 
riosity, as it contains many notes in the hand¬ 
writing of Voltaire, some of them severe and 
cutting criticisms. Thus, finding the word plat 
in three or four consecutive lines of the same 
poem, he writes „Void plus de plats que dans 
un tres bon souper.“ At another place he 
writes, „S’il faut conserver cette epigramme il 
faut le tourner tout autrement.“ He points 
out a piece of false grammar thus, „On ne 
dit pas louer ä “ In the same work, however, 
at the end of one of Frederick’s letters, is 
written „Que d’esprit! de grace, ^imagination! 
qu’il cst doux de vivre aux pieds d’un tel 
homme! “ 

The Gardens abound in temples, pagodas, 

H 2 












88 


SC c. In the building called the Antique Temple 
is a copy of the beautiful statue of the queen 
of Prussia at Charlottenburg; the view from 
the Chinese Tower on the height is extensive 
and pleasing. 

To the north of Potzdam lies still another 
palace, called the Marble Palace, from the ex¬ 
tensive use of marble in its decorations, upon 
which however it is not worth while to waste 
much time. More deserving of notice is the 
Russian Colony , or village, situated nearly in 
the same direction. It consists of about a do¬ 
zen houses, built entirely after the Russian 
fashion, and given by the king with a piece 
of land to a party of Russians sent hither by 
the emperor. The little church belonging to 
the colony is beautifully fitted up and adap¬ 
ted to the Greek church service, with paint¬ 
ings, silk curtains, and silver plate. The tra¬ 
veller who visits Potzdam on his way to Ber¬ 
lin should not omit to see the Peacock Island. 




























PRUSSIAN MONEY, 

Reduced to its Value at par in the Money of 


Prussian Dollars 
courant of 30 
Silver Groseben. 

So.ro »t/. 

Rix-dollars 

of 

2-1 £ood 
Groseben. 

Frankfort, 

liar aria fee. 

Florins of 
60 

Kreutzers. 

France. 

Francs 

containing 

100 

Centimes. 

Sirizcrland. 

Francs of 
10 

Bntz. 

England. 

Pound Sterling 
of 

20 Shillings, 
or 

210 Pence. 

Th. 

G. 

Rt. 

G. 

FI. 

Kr. 

Fr. 

c. 

Fr. 

n. 

£. 

8. 

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— 

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life c 

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calculated 

at 3 

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Sterling. 








Gold C 

o i n s. 





1 

Fred erics (Tor is worth . . 


. . 5 

Tli. 20 Ssrr. = 

17s. 


l 

Ducat is worth . . . . 



. . 3 

* 

5 - 

— 

9s. 6d. 


























































A 

LIST 

OF THE MOST CELEBRATED 

GERMAN AUTHORS 

WITH THE TITLES 

OF THEIR PRE-EMINENT WORKS, 

AND 

THE PRICES AT WHICH THEY ARE PUBLISHED 
AND TO BE HAD 


OF 


A. ASHER. 

BOOKSELLER, BERLIN. 










GRAMMARIANS, PHILOSOPHERS AND 
ANTIQUARIANS. 


No. 2. Adelung. 4. Ancillon. 11. Becker. 15. Boettiger. 16. Bonstetten. 25a. 
Eberhard. 26. Engel. 29. Fichte. 32. Fuelleborn. 33. Garve. 38. Goerres. 41. 
Grimm. 44. Hamann. 49. Hegel. 52. Herhart. 62. Humboldt. 63. Jacobi. 67. 
Kant. 91. Mendelssohn. 94. Moritz. 121. Schelling. 124. Schiller. 126. Schle¬ 
gel, A. W. v. 127. Schlegel, Fr. v. 128. Schleiermacher. 134. Solger. 135. Stef¬ 
fens. 154. Winkelmann. 155. Wolf. 


Historians and Geographers: 

No. 6. Archenholz. 10. Becker. 30. Forster. 45. Hammer. 48. Heeren. 61. Hum¬ 
boldt. 87. Luden. 88. Manso. 92. Menzel. 95. Mueller. 99. Niebuhr. 100. Ranke. 
112. Raumer. 115. Ritter. 117. llottek. 146. Wackier. 156. Woltmann. 159. 
Zscliockc. 


The authors marked * rank highest in „polite Literature.“ 




* 































1. Abbt, Th., lorn 1738, died 1767. 

Vom Tode für das Vaterland .... 1780. 

Vom Verdienste. 1770. 

Vermischte Werke. 1790. 

2. Adelung, J. Ch., horn 1792, died 1806. 

Versuch eines vollständigen grammatisch 
kritischen Wörterbuchs . . . 1793 —1801. 

Lehrgebäude der deutschen Sprache . . 1782. 

Uebcr den deutschen Styl. 1800. 

Mithridatcs, od. allg. Sprachenkunde 1806 —17. 

3. Alexis, W. (Häring), lorn 1798. 

Wal la dm or .......... 1825. 

Ilerbstreise durch Skandinavien . . . 1827. 

4. Ancillon, J. P. F., lorn 1766. 

Zur VermiUluug der Extreme in den 
Meinungen.. . 1831. 

5. Abel, I. A., lorn 1778, died 1816. 

Cicaden.1810. 

Gespensterbuch.1810. 

Metrik.1814. 

6. Archenholz, I. W. v., I. 1745, d. 1812. 

England und Italien. 1787. 

Gesell, des 7 jährig. Krieges in Deutschi. 1830. 

7. Arndt, E. M., lorn 1769. 

Gedichte.1818. 

Geist der Zeit. 1806 —18. 

Reise durch Schweden. 1804. 

8. Arnim, L. A. von, lorn 1781, died 1832. 
Armutli. Reichthum« Schuld und Bufsc 

Die Kroncnwäclitcr.1817. 


Date. of vis. Size. 




























*8a. Arnim (Bettina von). 

Goethe’s Briefwechsel mit einem Kinde 1835. 


Date. of tls. Size. £. s. 

3 vol. 8. — 15 


9. Baggesen, J., born 1764, died 1826. 

Gedichte. 1803. 

Parthcnais, od. d. Alpenreise, idyll. Epos 1819. 

10. Becker, K. Fr., Lorn 1777, died 1806. 

Erzähl, aus d. alten Welt f. d. Jugend 1825. 
Weltgeschichte ( Continued Ly YVoll mann 

and Menzel) . 1836. 

11. Becker, K. F. L. 1775. 

Deutsche Sprachlehre. 1827 — 29. 

Schulgrammatik der deutschen Sprache 1832. 
Das Wort in seiner orgau. Verwandlung 1833. 

12. Benzel Sterxlau, C. E. v., L. 1767, d. 1835. 

Gespräche im Labyrinth.1S05. 

Das goldne Kalb. 1804. 

Lebensgeister a. d. Klarfeldischen Archive 1805. 

13. Blumauer, J. A., L. 1755, d. 1798. 

Gedichte. 1787. 

Virgils Aeneis travestirt .. 1788. 

Sämmt liehe Werke. 1827. 

*14. Boerne, L., L. 1786. 

Gesammelte Schriften.1S29 

15. Boettiger, K. A., h . 1762, d. 1836. 

Sabina, oder Morgenscenen im Putzzim¬ 
mer einer Römerin.. 

Amalthca, od. Museum d. KunstmytL 

16. Bonstetten, K. V. v., b. 1745, d. 

Neue Schriften. 

17. Brentano, €., b. 1777. 


Des Knaben Wuuderhorn, alle deutsche 
Lieder.1S06 — 8. 


I 

I 

* 


2 

2 

3 

14 

2 

1 

1 

3 

4 
4 

2 

3 

4 


8 . — 14 
8 . — 8 

8.-9 
8 . 1 8 


8 . 


12 — 


- 8 . — 2 — 


8 . 

S. 

8 . 

8 . 

8 . 

8 . 

16. 


5 — 


12 

13 

12 


— 13 6 


— 46 

— 3 — 

— 9 — 


-31. 12 - 8. 1 14 — 


5 — 


. . 1806. 

2 

- 8. — 

»L 1820 — 25. 

3 

- 8. 1 

1832. 

1709 — 1801. 

4 

- 8. — 

. . 1803. 

1 

- 8. — 

. . 1804. 

1 

- 8. — 


8 . 1 1 — 










































Date. J\\ of rfo. Size. £. 

18. Bronner, F. X., born 1758. 

Der erste Ki’icg.1810. 2 vol. 8. — 

Eignes Leben .1810. 3 - 8. — 

Schriften (Fischergedichte). 1794. 3 - 8. — 

*19. Buerger, G. A., b. 1748, d. 1794. 

Leonore, in 12 Umrissen, mit deutschem 

und englischem Texte. 1827. 1 - fol. — 

Sämmtliclie Scluiften . . . * . 1817—20. 4 - 8. — 

Dieselben. 1825. 7 - 12. — 

Dieselben in one vol . 1835. 1 - 8. — 

20. Buesciiing, J. G., b. 1783, d. 1829. 

Volkssagcn, Mährchen und Legenden . 1S12. 1 - 8. — 

Die Nibelungen, metrisch übertragen . 1815. 1 - 8. — 

21. Campe, J. II., b. 1746, d. 1818. 

Die Entdeckung von Amerika .... 1831. 3 - 12. — 

Sämmtliclie Kinder- und Jugendschriften 1832. 37 - 8. 1 

Robinson der Jüngere. 1833. 1 - 8. — 

Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache 1807 —11 5 - 4. 2 

Allgem. Revision des gcsainmten Scliul- 

und Erziehungswesens .... 1785—91. 16 - 8. 2 

*22. Chamisso, L. A. von, b. 1781. 


Gedichte.1831. 1 - 8. — 

Peter Schlcmihl. 1827. 1 - 8. — 


Sämmtliclie Werke. 1836. 4 - 8. 

23. Claudius, M., b. 1740, <7. 1815. 

Sämmtl. Werke d. Wandsbecker Boten 1829. 4 - 8. — 

24. Collin, II. J. von, b. 1772, d. 1811. 

Trauerspiele. 1820. 3 - 8. 

Sämmtliclie Werke.1812—14. 6 - 8. 2 

25. Contessa, K. W. S., b. 1777, d. 1825. 

Sämmtliclie Schriften.IS26. 9 - 8. 1 

25a. Eberhard, J. A., b. 1793, d. 1809. 

Neue Apologie des Sokrates .... 1788. 2 - S. 

Versuch einer allgemeinen deutschen Sy¬ 
nonymik . 1826—30. 6 - 8. 1 


s. 

10 

9 

8 

6 

12 

16 

10 

6 

5 

6 

13 

4 

11 

7 

6 

4 

13 

14 

11 

5 

8 

8 

13 


















6 


26. Engel, J. J., b. 1741. d. 1802. 

Fürstenspiegel. 1802. 

Ideen zu einer Mimik. 1804. 

Philosoph für die Welt.1801. 

Herr Lorenz Stark. 1806. 

Sämmtliche Schriften.1S01—6. 

27. Falk, J. D., b . 1770, d. 1826. 

Die Gräber zu Kom. 1799. 

Satyrische Werke. 1826. 

Goethe aus näherem persönlichen Um¬ 
gänge dargestellt. 1832. 

28. Fessler, J. A., b. 1756. 

Aristides und Thcmistoklcs.1818. 

Die Geschichten der Ungarn . . 1815 — 25. 

Mark-Aurel . . . . .. 1799. 

Versuch einer Geschichte von Spanien . 1810. 

29. Fichte, J. G., b. 1762, d. 1814. 

Sonnenklarer Bericht an des größere Pu¬ 
blikum .1801. 

Die Bestimmung des Menschen . . . 1825. 


Versuch einer Kritik aller Offenbarung 1793. 
Fried. Nicolai’s Leben und Meinungen . 1801. 

Reden an die deutsche Nation .... 1808. 

Grundlage d. gesammt. Wissenschaftslchrc 1802. 

30. Forster, J. G. A., b. 1754, d. 1794. 

Ansicht, v. Niederrhein, Brabant etc. 1800 — 4. 
Erinnerungen aus dem Jahre 1790. . . 1793. 

Kleine Schriftcn. 1789—96. 

*31. Fouque, Fr. de la Motte, b. 1777. 

Gedichte.1816—27. 

Undine, mit 20 Umrissen.1816. 

Der Zauberring.1816. 

32. Fuelleborn, G. G., b. 1796, d. 1S03. 

Beiträge zur Gescb. der Philosophie 1791—99. 
Kleine Schriften zur Unterhaltung . . 1797. 


*r.< 

') f rla. 

Sizi 

? . £. 

s. 

d. 

1 

Yol 

. 8. 

_ 

3 

_ 

2 

- 

8. 

— 

15 

6 

1 

- 

8. 

— 

7 

6 

1 

- 

8. 

— 

4 

6 

12 

- 

8. 

1 

16 

— 

2 

; 

12. 

- 

4 

6 

7 

- 

16. 

— 

13 

6 

1 

- 

12. 

— 

4 

6 

2 

_ 

8. 

. 

12 


10 


8. 

4 

10 


4 


8. 

— 

18 


2 

- 

8. 

— 

13 



1 

- 8. 

— 

3 

— 

1 

- 8. 

— 

2 

— 

1 

- 8. 

— 

3 

— 

1 

- 8. 

— 

1 

9 

1 

- 8. 

— 

5 

6 

1 

- 8. 

— 

4 

6 

3 

- 8. 

_ 

13 

6 

1 

- 8. 

— 

2 

—. 

6 

- 8. 

1 

4 

6 

5 

- 8. 

1 

10 

6 

1 

- 4. 

1 

— 

— 

3 

- 8. 

— 

7 

6 

3 

- 8. 

1 

_ 


2 

- 8. 

— 

5 

— 





































7 


33. Gar VE , Ch., b. 1742, d. 1798. 

Versuche über vcrscliiedne Gegenstände 
Cicero, von den Pflichten . 

34. Gellert, Ch. F., b. 1715, d. 1769. 


35. Gesstner, S., b. 1730, d. 17S7. 

Sämmtliclie Schriften . . . . 

36. Glatz, J., b. 1776. 


37. Gleim, J. W. L. b. 1719, d. 1803. 

Sämmtliclie Werke . 

38. Goerres, J. J., b. 1776. 
Mythengesch. der asiatischen Welt 


Alldeutsche Volks- und Mcisterlicder 

*39. Goethe, J. W. v., b. 1749, d. 1832. 

Die Leiden des jungen Wertlicr 
Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre 
Die Wahlverwandtschaften . 

Wilhelm Meisters Wanderjahre 

Egmont. 

Faust. 

Westöstlicher Divan . . . 

Gedichte. 

Ilerrman und Dorothea . . 

Uebcr Kunst und Altcrthum . . 1S16 

Propyläen. 1798 — 

Sämmtl. Werke in 55 Bänden, verschie¬ 
dene Ausgaben.1S30 

Sämmliche Werke in 2 Bänden . . . 

Briefwechsel zw. Goethe u. Schiller 1828 

- Zelter 


Date. 

JF.t 

tftls. Size. £. 

j. 

1821. 

6 

vol. 8. 1 

2 — 

1819. 

2 

- 8. — 

12 — 

1829. 

2 

- 8. — 

5 — 

1784. 

10 

- 8. — 

14 — 

1825. 

3 

- 16. — 

4 6 

1629. 

2 

- 8. — 

5 — 

1817. 

6 

- 8. — 

15 — 

— 13. 

7 

- 8. — 

12 — 

1810. 

2 

- 8. — 

12 — 

1827. 

1 

- 8. — 

3 — 

1820. 

2 

- 8. — 

16 6 

1817. 

1 

- 8. — 

6 — 

1824. 

l 

- 16. — 

2 — 

1836. 

2 

- 8. — 

7 6 

1S10. 

2 

- 8. — 

7 — 

1821. 

1 

- 8. — 

6 — 

1788. 

1 

- 8. — 

1 6 

1830. 

1 

- 12. — 

4 — 

1S19. 

1 

- 8. — 

11 — 

1829. 

2 

- 8. — 

10 — 

1833. 

1 

- 8. — 

6 — 

;— 32 . 

6 

- S. 3 

14 6 

1601. 

3 

- 8. — 

15 6 

— 33. 

55 

- 16. 2 

11 — 

1836. 

2 

- gr.4. 2 

2 — 

—29. 

6 

- 8. 1 

14 — 


6 

- 8. 1 

16 — 


























■ 






8 



Grabbe, 6. 1801, (1. 1836. 

Date. 

»V. r 

rls. Sizt 

’. £. 

*. 

ii. 

39a. 







Dramatische Dichtungen.... 

. . 1827. 

2 

vol. 8. 

_ 

10 

6 


Don Juan und Faust. 

. . 1829. 

1 

_ 

8. 

_ 

4 

_ r 


Die Hohenstaufen. 

. . 1830. 

2 

_ 

8. 

_ 

8 

_ 


Napoleon, oder die 100 Tage . . 

. . 1831. 

1 

_ 

8. 

_ 

5 

_ 


Hannibal . 


1 

- 

8. 

— 

3 

— 

40. 

Gkies, J. D., b. 1775. 

Gedichte. 


2 


8. 


7 

6 


Aristo’s rasender Roland .... 


5 


12. 

_ . 

13 

_ 


Calderon’s Schauspiele .... 

1815 — 28. 

7 

_ 

8. 

2 


6 


Tasso’s befreites Jerusalem . . . 

. . 1824. 

2 

- 

8. 

— 

7 

6 

*41. 

Grillparzer, H., b. 1790. 

Die Almfrau. 

. . 1832. 

1 


8. 


2 

9 


König Ottokar’s Glück und Ende 

. . 1825. 

1 

_ 

8. 

_ 

3 

6 


Sappho . 


1 

_ 

8. 

_ 

2 

9 


Das goldne Vlicfs. 

. . 1S22. 

1 

- 

8. 

— 

5 

6 

41a. 

Grimm, J. L., b. 1785. 

Deutsche Grammatik. 

1819—31. 

3 


8. 

1 

18 

3 


Altdeutsche Wälder. 

1813 — 16. 

3 

_ ■ 

8. 


18 

i 


Kinder- und Ilausmährchen. . . 

1819 — 22. 

3 

_ 

8. 


16 

_ 


Deutsche Sagen. 

1816 — 18. 

2 

_ 

8. 


11 

_ 


Deutsche Rechtsalterthünier . . 

. . 1828. 

1 

- 

8. 

— 

13 

6 

42. 

Hagedorn, Fr. von, b. 170S, d. 1754. 








Poetische Werke. 

. . 1825. 

5 

- 

8. 

— 

6 

i 

43. 

Haller, A. von, b. 1708, d. 1777. 
Gedichte. 


1 


8. 


4 

_ j 

44. 

Hamann, J. G., b. 1730, d. 1788. 
Schriften. 

1821 — 25. 

7 


8. 

2 

2 

6 

45. 

Hammer, J. von, b. 1774. 

Geschichte der Assassinen 

. . 1818. 

1 


8. 


3 

6 


des Osmanischcn Reiches 

. 1833. 

4 

_ 

8. 

1 

10 



der schönen Redekünste Per- 






siens. 


1 

_ 

4. 

1 

1 

— f 


Geschichte der Türk. Poesie Rd. 2. . 

. 1836. 

1 

- 

8. 


10 

6 




























9 


Date. »V. of tIs. Size. £. s. il. 

46. IIaüff, W., b. 1802, d. 1827. 

Sämmtliche Schriften . 1830 — 31. 36 vol. 16. — 18 — 

47. Hebel, J. P., b. 1760, d. 1826. 

Allemanisclic Gedichte . 1827. 1 - 12. — 1 6 

Sämmtliche Werke . 1832—34. 8 - 8. 1 1 — 

48. Heeren, A. II. L., b. 1760. 

Historische Werke . 1821-30. 15 - 8. 4 10 — 


49. Hegel, G. W. F., b. 1770, d. 1831. 


Sämmtliche Werke . 1832 — 36. .. 

Phänomenologie . 1807. 1 

50. Heine, II., b. 1797. 

Das Buch der Lieder . 1827. 1 

Keisebildcr. 1830—31. 4 

Französische Zustände. 1833. 1 


*51. Heinse, W., b. 1749, d. 1803. 

Laidion, od. d. Eleusinischcn Gelicinm. 1799. 1 

Ardinghello u. d. glückseligen Inseln . 1821. 2 

Hildegard v. Hohenthal. 1804. 3 

Anastasia und das Schachspiel.... 1831. 2 

52. Herbart, I. II., b. 1776. 

Allgemeine Pädagogik.1S06. 1 

Metaphysik .... 1828—29. 2 

*53. Herder, J. G. von, b. 1744, d. 1803. 

Der Cid.. . , 1832. 1 

Vom Geist der cbräischen Poesie. . . 1825. 2 

Volkslieder. 1825. 2 

Sämmtliche Werke. 1827—30. 60 

*54. Hippel, Th. G. von, b. 1741. d . 1796. 

Ueber die Ehe. 1825. 1 

Lebensläufe nach aufsteigender Linie 1778 — 81. 3 

Sämmtliche Werke. 1827—28. 12 


8. 4 10 — 
8. — 12 — 

8. — 3 — 
8. 1 1 — 
8. — 6 — 

8. — 3 — 
8. — 5 - 

8. — 11 6 
8. — 4 — 

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8. 1 2 6 

16. — 5 — 

8. — 12 — 
16. — 6 — 
16. 2 15 — 

8. — 3 — 

8. — 19 — 
8. 1 10 — 


55. IIoelderlin, J. Cli. Fr., b. 1770. 

Hyperion, od. d. Eremit in Griechenl. 
Gedichte. 

56. IIoelty, L. II. C., b. 1748, d. 1776. 

Gedichte .. 


1822. I - 
1826. 1 - 

1833. 1 - 
A3 


8. — 3 8 

8. — 3 6 

8. — 3 6 





















10 


*57. 


Date . 

.V. c 


Size . £. 

Hoffmann, E. T. A., b. 1776, d. 1822. 

Die Scrapionsbriider. 1827 

4 

vol. 8. — 


Erzälilcndc Schriften . 

. . 1832. 

IS 

- 

12. — 

58. 

Holbein. Fr. J. yon, b. 1779. 
Theater. 


2 


8. — 


Neustes Theater. 


5 

- 

8. — 

59. 

Horn. Fr., b. 1781. 

Die Poesie und Beredsamkeit der Deut¬ 
schen . 1S22 29 

4 


8. 1 


Shakespeare’s Schauspiele erläutert 

1822—31. 

5 

- 

8. 1 

60. 

IIouwald, €. E. von, b. 1778. 

Buch für Kinder. 

1819—24. 

3 


8. — 


Das Bild. 


1 

- 

8. — 

61. 

Humboldt, F. II. A. von, b. 1768. 
Ansichten der Natur. 


2 


16. — 


Heise nach den Tropenländern 

. . 1807. 

1 


4. 1 


Reise in den Acquinoctialgcgendcn 

1S15—32. 

6 

- 

8. 2 

62. 

Humboldt, W. von, l . 1767, d . 1835. 
Acsthclischc Versuche.17.99. 

1 


8. — 


Ueber die Urbewohner Ilispaniens 

. . 1821. 

1 

_ 

4. — 


Acschylos Asaiuemnon .... 

. . 1816. 

1 

_ 

4. — 


Briefwechsel mit Schiller . . . 

. . 1830. 

1 

_ 

8. — 


Ueber die Kawisprache .... 

. . 1836. 

1 

- 

4. 1 

63. 

Jacobi, Fr. H., b. 1743, d. 1819. 
Woldemar. 


1 


8. — 


Sämmtlichc Werke. 

1812 — 24. 

6 

- 

8. 1 

61. 

Jahn, Fr. L., b. 1778. 

Die deutsche Turnkunst .... 

. . 1816. 

1 


8. — 


Werke zum deutschen Volkstimm 

. . 1833. 

1 

- 

8. — 

65. 

Iffland, A. W., b. 175.9, d. 1811. 
Thcalralische Werke, Auswahl 

. . 1828. 

11 


16. — 

66. 

Immerman, K. L., b. 1796. 

Sä mint liehe Werke. 

. . 1835. 

4 


8. 1 


*. <1 


10 6 
9 — 


10 6 
9 9 


2 6 
4 6 


15 6 
4 — 


5 — 
8 — 
10 6 


5 n- 
7 — 
3 — 

6 — 
7 6 


4 — 
10 — 


3 — 

4 — 


15 — 


4 — 

































67. Kant, J., b. 1724, d. 1804. 

Kritik der reinen Vernunft .... 

- praktischen Vernunft . . 

Urtheilskraft. 1799. 

Vcrniisclitc Schriften .... 17i 

68. Kerner, J., b. 1786. 

Gedichte.1S26. 

Die Seherin von Prevorst .... 


69. 

70. 

71. 

72. 
*73. 

74. 

*75. 

76 . 


Kleist, E. Ch. von, b. 1715, d. 1759. 

Sämmtliclie Werke. 1830. 

Kleist, II. von, b. 1776, d. 1811. 

Gesammelte Schriften. 1826. 

Klingemann, b. 1777, d. 1831. 

Dramatische Werke.1817. 

Klinger, Fr. M. von, b. 1753, d. 1831. 

Sämmtliclie Werke. 1832. 12 


Klopstock, F. G., b. 1724, d. 1803. 

Der Messias. 1799. 

Sämmtliclie Werke.1 

Knebel, K. L. von, b. 1744, d. 1834. 
Sämmtliclie Werke. 

Koerner, Th., b. 1791, d. 1813. 

Sämmtliclie Werke in one volume . 

Koeppen, J. F., b. 1775. 

Philosophie des Christenthums . . 

Vertraute Briefe üb. Bücher u. Welt 1820 — 23. 

Kotzebue, A. F. von, b. 1761, d. 1819. 
Sämmtliclie dramatische Werke . 182 

Krummacher, F. A., b. 1768. 

Apologien und Paramytliien. 

Fcstbüclilein. 1828—32. 

Parabeln.1830 


Date . *V. of th. Size . £. 

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vol. 8. — 

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- 8. 1 

1S26. 1 

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1832. 2 

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1830. 1 

- 12. — 

1826. 3 

- 8. — 

1817. 2 

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1832. 12 

- 8. 1 

1799. 4 

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\ —30. 18 

- 16. 1 

1S35. 3 

- 8. — 

1833. 1 

- 4. — 

1825. 2 

- 8. — 

— 23. 2 

- 8. — 

— 32. 44 

- 16. 2 

1809. 1 

- 8. — 

—32. 3 

- 8. — 


- 8. — 


14 — 

























12 


79. Lafontaine, A. H. J., b. 1758, d. 1831. 

Klara du Plessis und Clairaut .... 
Quinctius Heymeran v. Flemming . . 

80. Laube, II., b. 18 . . 

Moderne Charakteristiken. 

81. Lavater, G. K , b. 1711, d . 1801. 

Physiognomische Fragmente, new Ed. . 
Nachgelassene Schriften.1801. 

*82. Lessing, G. E., b. 1741, d . 1801. 

Von dem Zwecke Jesu u. s. Jünger. 

Laokoou, od. über die Grenzen der Ma 

lerei und Poesie. 

Nathan der Weise. 1826. 

Sämmtliche Schriften. 1825 — 28 

*83. Lichtenberg, G. C., b. 1742, d. 1799. 

Erklärung d. Hogarth. Kupferstiche 1794 —1816. 
Vermischte Schriften.1800 


84. Lichtwer, M. G., b. 1719, d. 1783. 

Schriften. 1828. 

85. Liskov, C. L., b. 1701, d. 1759. 

Sämmtliche satyrische Schriften . . 

86. Loeben, O. H. von, b. 1786, d. 1825. 

Gedichte.1810 

Rosengarten.1817. 

87. Luden, II., b. 17S0. 

Geschichte des deutschen Volkes . 1825 

87 a. Ludwig, König von Baiern, b. 1786. 

Gedichte. 1829. 

88. Manso, J. K. Fr., b. 1759, d. 1S26. 

Geschichte des preußischen Staates 1819—21. 

*89. Matthisson, Fr. von, b . 1761, d. 1831. 

Gedichte. 1830, 

Sämmtliche Schriften. 1825 — 29. 


Date . JWofvh . Size. £. 

8 . 

1801. 1 

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2 

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18 

0 — 5. 9 

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2 

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12 

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10 

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6 

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— 21. 3 

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2 


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2 

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- 12. — 

19 






























90. Meissner, A. G., b. 1753, d. 1807. 

Sammtlichc Werke .1811 —12. 36 

91. Mendelssohn, M., b. 1729, d. 1786. 

Phädon, oder über die Unsterblichkeit 

der Seele.1821. 1 

Sämintlickc Schriften.1819 — 25. 12 

92. Menzel, K. A., b. 1784. 

Die Geschichten der Deutschen . 1815 —• 23. 8 
Geschichte unserer Zeit. 1829. 3 

93. Menzel, W., b. 1798. 

Geschichte der Deutschen, in one vol. 

Die deutsche Literatur. 


1834. 1 
1828. 2 

1832. 1 
1815. 1 


1828. 3 
1826. 6 


94. Moritz, K. Ph., b. 1757, d. 1793. 

Göttcrlehre. 

Versuch einer deutschen Prosodie . . 

95. Müeller, J. von, b . 1752, d. 1809. 

24 Bücher der allgemeinen Geschichte . 

Geschichte der Schweizerischen Eidge¬ 
nossenschaft . 

Sämmtliche Werke. 1831—33. 40 

96. Mueller, W., b. 1795, d. 1827. 

Lieder d. Griechen (neue u. neueste) 1822—24. 5 
Vermischte Schriften. 1830. 5 

97. Müellner, A., b. 1774, d. 1829. 

Die Schuld. 

Dramatische Werke, in one vol . . . . 

97a. Mündt, Tli., b. 18 . . 

Madonna, Unterhaltungen mit einer Hei¬ 
ligen . 

Charlotte Stieglitz, ein Denkmal . . . 

Die Kunst der deutschen Prosa . . . 

98. Musaeus, J. K., b. 1735, d. 1787. 

Volksmahrchen der Deutschen . . . 


1820. 

1832. 


1835. 

1835. 

1837. 


1826. 5 
B 





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f tla. 

Size, £. 

8. 

d. 

vol. 8. 5 

8 

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15 

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6 


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6 


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6 


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6 

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8. 



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16. — 

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6 































14 


99. Niebuhr, B. G., ä. 1777. <7. 1831. 

Date. 


)/i Is. Size . £,. 

s. 

«7. 


Römische Geschichte. 

1828—32. 

3 

vol. 8. 1 

14 

6 


100. Niemeyer. A. II.. 1. 1754, <1 1828. 

Grundsätze d. Erziehung u. d. Unterrichte 1825. 

3 

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16 

6 


*101. Novalis (Fr. v. Hardenberg) b. 1772, <7.1801. 

Schriften. 1826 

2 

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5 

6 


*102. Oehlensciilaeger, A. G.. b. 1779. 

Schriften. 

1829—30. 

18 

- 16. 1 

8 

__ 


103. Pestalozzi, II., b. 1716. d. 1827. 

Lienhard u. Gertrud, c. Buch fürs Volk 1804. 

3 

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Sämmtlichc Schriften. 

1820 — 26. 

15 

- S. 3 

5 

6 


104. Pfeffel, K. G., b. 1736, <7. 1809. 

Poetische Versuche. 

1817—18, 

10 

- 8. — 

15 

_ 


105. Platen, A. von, b. 1796, <7. 1835. 

Ghaselen (und neue). 

1S21—24. 

2 

- 8. — 

2 

2 


Der romantische Oedipus . . . 

. . 1829. 

1 

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1 

6 


Gesammelte Schriften. 

. . 1837. 

1 

- 8. — 

6 



106. Püekler-muskau, Fürst von. b. 1785. 
Briefe eines Verstorbenen 

. . 1832. 

4 

- 8. 1 

7 


r 

Tutti Frutti . 

. . 1834. 

4 

- 8. 1 

4 



Semilasso . 


9 

- 8. 3 


_ 


107. PüSTKUCHEN, F. W., b. 1793. 

Mcister’s Wanderjahre .... 

1823 — 28. 

5 

- 8. — 

16 

6 


108. Pvrker, J. L.. b. 1772. 

Tunisias, ein Heldengedicht . . . 

. . 1S26. 

1 

- 8. — 

6 



Sämmtliche Werke . 

1832—34. 

3 

- 8. — 

16 

6 


109. Rarener, G. W., b. 1714. d. 1771. 

Satirische Schriften . 

. . 1777. 

6 

- 8. — 

9 

_ 


110. Ranke, F. L. b. 1796. 

Die serbische Revolution ... 

. . 1829. 

1 

- 8. — 

4 



Die Päbsle . 

1834 — 36. 

3 

- 8. 1 

4 


) 

111. Ramler, K. W., b. 1725, (7. 1898. 
Poetische Werke .... 

. 1826. 

2 

- 8. — 

3 


u 







































113. 

*114. 

115. 

116. 
117. 

*118. 


Raumer, Fr. von, b. 1781. 
Geschichte der Hohenstaufen 
Briefe über England . . . 

Raüpacii, E., 

Dramatische Werke . . . 

Richter, J. P. Fr., b. 1762, d. 
Hesperus 

Summt liehe Werke 




1824. 

1835. 


6 vol. 8. 
2 - 8. 


1829—32. 

1819. 
1827 — 28. 

1S22—35. 



*120. 

121 . 


Ritter, K., b . 1779. 

Die Erdkunde u. s. w. . . 

Rochlitz, Fr. b. 1760. 

Auswahl aus seinen Schriften 

Rotteck, K. von, b. 1775. 

Allgemeine Geschichte . . 

Ruecicert, Fr.; b. 17S9. 

Ocstliche Rosen 

Die Verwandlungen des Ebu Seid 
Gesammelte Gedichte . . 

Rumohr, K. von. b. 1785. 

Italienische Forschungen . 

Deutsche Denkwiirdigkci ten 

Schefer, L., b. 17 . . 

Neue Novellen 
Laienbrevier 

Schellihg, F. W. J. von, b. 1775. 

Ideen zu einer Philosophie der Natur . 1803. 

Von der Weltscele. 1809. 

Schenk, E. von, b. 17 . . 

Schauspiele. 1829. 

Sciienkendorf, M. von, b. 1783, d. 1817. 
Poetischer Nachlaß. 1832. 

Schiller, Fr. von, b. 1759. d. 1S05. 

Sämmtliche Werke. 1827. 






























Date . %T. of rh . Size . 

Sämmtliclie Werke .1836. 12 vol. 8. 

. 1834. 1 - 8. 

Schilling, Fr., b. 1766. 

Sämmtliclie Schriften . 1828. 


£. 

1 10 
1 — 


50 - 8. 3- 


*127 

128. 


Schlegel, A. W. von, b. 1867. 

Gedichte . 1811. 2 

Vorlesungen über dramatische Kunst . 1817. 3 

Spanisches Theater. 1805 — 0. 2 

Shakespeare übersetzt. 1825 — 30. 9 

Schlegel, Fr. von, b. 1772, d. 1829. 

Sämmtliclie Werke. 1822 — 25. 10 

Sciileiermabher, Fr., b. 1768, d. 1834. 

Plato übersetzt. 1836. 6 

Sämmtliclie Werke. (now publishing) 

129. Spindler, K., b. 

Sämmtliclie Werke. 

Der Jude. 

130. Schulze, E.. b. 1789, d. 1817. 

Sämmtliclie poetische Schriften 

*131. Schwab, G., b. 1792. 

Gedichte. 

132. Schwarz, F. II. C., b. 17 . . 

Erziehungslehrc. 

133. Seume, J. G., b. 1763, d. 1810. 

Sämmtliclie Werke in one vol . . . 

134. Solger, K. W. F., b. 1780, d. 1819. 

Sophocles Trauerspiele übersetzt . 

Erwin, über das Schöne und die Ku 
Nachgelassne Schriften .... 

*135. Steffens, H., b. 1773. 

Anthropologie. 

Die vier INorwcgcr. 

(Malkolm. 


8 . 

8 . 

8 . 

8 . 

S. 

8 . 


— 11 

— 15 

— 12 
— 14 

2 10 

2 2 


. . 1827. 

3 

- 8. 

— 

15 

6 

. . 1822. 

4 

- 8. 

— 

IS 


1828—29. 

o 

- 8. 

— 

12 

— 

. . 1829. 

3 

- 8. 

1 

4 

— 

. . 1834. 

1 

- 8. 

— 

9 

— 

. . 1824. 

2 

- 8. 

__ 

8 

6 

inst 1815. 

2 

- 8. 

— 

8 

3 

. . 1826. 

2 

- 8. 

— 

18 

— 

. . 1824. 

2 

- 8. 

_ 

16 

3 > 


6 

- 8. 

— 

17 

6 


2 

- 8. 

— 

12 

— 






































r mmrt 



136. Stieglitz, H., b. 1803. 

Bilder des Orients. 

Dato. *V. of vis. Size. £. 

1831—33. 4 vol. 8. — 

r 

Dionysosfest . 

. . 1S36. 1 

- 

8. — 


137. Strauss, Fr., h. 1786. 

Glockentönc . 

1821 — 26. 3 


8. — 


llelon’s Wallfahrt nach Jerusalem 

1820—23. 4 

- 

8. — 


138. Streckfuss, K., b. 1779. 

Gedichte . 

. . 1823. 1 


8. — 


Ariosi’s rasender Roland . . . . 

1818—20. (> 

- 

8. 1 


Dante’s göttliche Comüdie . . . 

1824—26. 3 

- 

8. — 


Tasso’s befreites Jerusalem . . . 

. . 1822. 2 

- 

8. — 


139. Staegkmans, Fr. A. von, b. 17 . . 

Ilistor. Erinner. in lyrischen Gedichlen 1828. 1 


8. — 


Kriegsgesänge . 

. . 1816. 1 

- 

8. — 


*140. Tieck, L., b. 1773. 

Gedichlc. 

1821 — 23. 3 


8. — 


Phantasus. 

1812 — 16. 3 

- 

8. 1 


Schriften . 

1828 — 29. 15 

- 

S. 2 


141. Tiedge, C. II., b. 1752. 

Werke . 

1827—29. 8 

_ 

16. — 

L 

*142. Umland, L., b. 1787. 

Gedichte . 

. . 1836. 1 


8. — 

Der Mythus von Thor . . . . 

. . 1836. 1 

- 

8. — 


*143. Varnhagen von Ense, b. 17S3. 

Biographische Denkmale .... 

1824 — 30. 5 


8. 1 


Zur Geschichte und Literatim . . 

. . 1833. 1 

- 

8. — 


Rahel . 


- 

8. — 


Gallerie zu Rahel . 


- 

8. — 


144. Velde, K. F. van der, h. 1779, d. 
Säinmlliclic Scliriftcn . 

1824. 

1831—32. 27 


16. 1 


— n — 


*145. Voss, J. II., b. 1751, d. 1825. 

Poetische Werke, in one vol . 1835. 1 

Translations of Homer, Ovid, Virgil, 

Hesiod, Orpheus, Horace, Tibullus, Thco- 


2 6 


10 — 
























18 



Dale. JWoftls. Size. £. 

S. (1. 

kritus, Bion, Moschus. Aristophanes, Slia- 



kespeare . 

. . 24 

vol. 8. 4 

15 — 

146. Wachler, L, b. 1767. 




Handbuch der Literatur .... 

. . 1833. 4 

- 8. 1 

11 6 

Lelu'buch der Geschichte . . . 

. . 1828. 1 

- 8. — 

4 6 

Lclu’buch der Literaturgeschielite . 

. . 1830. 1 

- 8. — 

6 — 

147. Wagner, E., b. 1758, d. 1812. 




Sämmtliche Schriften. 

1824 — 28. 12 

- 16. — 

15 — 

148. Waiblinger, F. W., b. 1804. 




Blüthcn der Muse aus Rom. . * 

. . 1829. 1 

- 8. — 

4 — 

Taschenbuch a. Italien u. Griechen! 

1828— 29. 2 

8. — 

3 6 

149. Weber, C. J., b. 1767, d. 1831. 




Sämmtliche Werke. 

1835 — 37. in the press. 


150. Weissflog, C., b. 1780, d. 1828. 




Phantasiestücke und Historien . . 

1824 — 28. 12 

- 8. 2 

2 — 

151. Werner, Z., b. 1768, d. 1823. 




Der 24ste Februar. 

. . 1819. 1 

- 8. — 

3 — 

Martin Luther *. 

. . 1807. 1 

- 8. — 

8 6 

*152. Wieland, C. M., h. 1733, d. 1813. 




Oberon . 

. . 1819. 1 

- 8. — 

3 — 

Sämmtliche Werke. 

1818—28. 53 

- 16. 2 

10 — 

Translations of Cicero, Horace, Lucian. 



153. WlLHELMI, II. 




Wahl und Führung. 

. . 1826. 2 

- 8. — 

8 — 

Die Seefahrer. 

. . 1824. 3 

- 8. — 

18 — 

154. Winkelmann, J. J.. b. 1717, d . 1768. 



Sämmtliche Werke. 

1808 — 20. 8 

- 8 3 

10 — 

155. Wolf, Fr. A., b. 1759, d. 1824. 




Aristophanes Wolken. 

. . 1811. 1 

- 4. — 

2 — 

Literarische Analckten .... 

1817—20. 4 

- 8. — 

12 — 

156. Woltmann, K. L. von, b. 1770. d. 1817. 



Memoiren des Freiherrn von S — a. 

. . 5 

- 8. — 

13 6 

Sämmtliche Werke. 

1818—21. 12 

- 8. 3 

3 6 


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Date . JT . of vis . Size . 

157. Zedlitz, J. C. von, b. 1790. 

Todtenkränze .1831. 1 vol. 8. 

Dramatische Werke . 1-12. 

Ueber die Einsamkeit .1784. 4 * 8. 

Fragmente über Friedrich den Grofsen . 1790. 3 - 8. 

*159. Zschocke, J. II., b. 1774. 

Ausgcwäiiltc liistorische Schriften . . 1830. 16 - 16. 

Dichtungen, Erzählungen u. 

Novellen . 1830. 10 - 16. 

Dieselben in one vol . 1830. 1 - 8. 



















BERLIN: A. VT. SCHADE, PRINTER. 



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Universitätsbibliothek Johann Christian Senckenberg 

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