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St. Louis: 

KUNKEL BROTHERS. 
Publishers. 



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FABLE. 


A gallant Knight, in search of adventures, meets on his way a young village maiden. Fascinated by her 
budding channs rmd simple grace, he offers her his troth. Bachelette hears him with cruel indifference, - smiles 
at his passion and continues to sing her rustic song. The Knight wages his suit «ith renewed ardor, but neither 
vows of love, nor promises of fortune can conquer the scruples of the beauty, whose joyous song is heard by the 
Noble long after he has left the scene, and vrith sad and confused bearing has once more turned his palfiyinthe 
direction of the Tournament. 


NOTE BY THE AUTHOR. 


The performer of this piece should endeavor to emphasize the iterated design ( repeated notes)of the accom- 
paniment,8o as invariably to convey to the Hstenerthe idea of the ternary rythm_(*. v. _ of | time;m which itis 
written. This observation is particular essential, inasmuch as the melody, in some passages, would seem to indicate 
the bmary rythm,or | time. The effect which this piece is capable of producing, if well played, arises in. a great 
measure,from the antagonism of these two confHeting rymths, one of which, as I have already observed,must be 
subordinate to the other. I would recommend to the performer, the most faithful and srupulous observance of the 
signs: f.f, Rall9 Dim. etc. 

After having been informed of the subject of this“FableJ the listener, if it be performed in an intelligent 
manneii should be enabled to follow the story, .and the entire acUon of the little sentimental drama, which the 
author has endeavored to render mto music. 


1989^12 


S^tion Kunkel, 


Copyright MnrCCCVII by MCunkel Brother:^, 


Entered Sfationere Hall. 


4 


THE GAY SHEPHERDESS 

AND THE 

DISAPPOINTED KNIGHT. 


Edited by CHARLES KUNKEL. 

I 

• Moderate d--8o. 


L. M. G0TT8CHALK. 
Ben misurato (In strict time.) 




Edilioti Kunktl. 


1989 • 12 

Copffright MDCCCCVII by Kunkel Brothers. 


Entered Siationere Halls 




Edition Kunkel. 


1989 - IS 


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fhe Knight wages his suit and with renewed ardor vows his love. 
Agitato. (Agitated.) 





name, his fortune and his life’s devotion, he cannot live without her and unable to control the power of his love 



FMition Kunkt'I. 


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he falls at her feet. 


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Or thus to shorten the piece. If this version is played the entire part in C sharp minor is omitted. 



From here go to 
■0^ page 11. 


Bachelette hesitates; troubled and agitated, she looks regretfully around the fields. Casting her eyes towards the 
Malinconico (fTM sadness) Piu Lento. (Slower.) 






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cottage, she sees her old mother, her beloved affianced and her dear flocks from which she would have to part 




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Kunkel’s Eclectic 

Graded Course of Studies 

FOR THE 

PIANO. 


IN TEN GRADES. 


GRADE I 
GRADE II 
GRADE III 
GRADE IV 
GRADE V 


GRADE VI 
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GRADE VIII 
GRADE IX 
GRADE X 


Each Grade, - One Dollar. 


KUNKEL’S ECLECTIC GRADED COURSE OF STUDIES 

MAY BE USED IN CONNECTION WITH 

KUNKEL’S ROYAL PIANO METHOD. 



Special Notice to Piano Teachers and Students. 


It is with sincere pleasure that we call the at> 
tention of all earnest and ambitious teachers and 
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"Kunkel's Eclectic Graded Course of Studies” and 
acknowledges that here at last is a work which 
meets every expectation. 

Every study in this "Graded Course” is spe* 
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his arduous task and facilitating the progress of 
the pupil. 

"Kunkel’s Eclectic Graded Course of Studies*’ 
for the piano is published in ten grades, at one dol* 
lar per grade. 

The "Course” embraces everything necessary 
to make a first-class pianist. It is a Graded Course 
of Studies which will lead the student from the very 
beginning to the summit of the art of piano playing. 

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piano playing which he will have gained will serve 
him as a "Grand Diploma” which will be ever at 
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every reason to be proud. 


St. Louis : — KUNKEL BROTHERS — Publishers.