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THE ART COLLECTION OF 
THE LATE 

J. W. KAUFFMAN 


ON VIEW DAY AND EVENING AT 
THE AMERICAN ART GALLERIES 
FROM SATURDAY, JANUARY 28th 
UNTIL THE MORNING OF THE 
DAY OF SALE, INCLUSIVE 


SALE AT MENDELSSOHN HALL 

FORTIETH STREET, EAST OF BROADWAY 

FRIDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 3rd 

BEGINNING PROMPTLY AT 8.15 O’CLOCK 


! 


CATALOGUE OF 

MODERN PAINTINGS 

AND SCULPTURE 

COLLECTED BY 

THE LATE 

J. W. KAUFFMAN 

> % • 

OF ST. LOUIS 


TO BE SOLD AT UNRESTRICTED PUBLIC SALE BY ORDER OP 
MRS. N. B. KAUFFMAN, EXECUTRIX, ON THE 
DATE HEREIN STATED 


THE SALE WILL BE CONDUCTED BY 
THOMAS E. KIRBY 

OF THE AMERICAN ART ASSOCIATION, MANAGERS 

NEW YORK: 1905 


Copyright, 1905, by 

THE AMERICAN ART ASSOCIATION 


Press of J. J. Little & Co. 
Astor Place, New York 


CONDITIONS OF SALE 


1. The highest Bidder to he the Buyer, and if any dispute arise 
between two or more Bidders, the Lot so in dispute shall be im- 
mediately put up again and re-sold. 

2. The Auctioneer reserves the right to reject any bid which is 
merely a nominal or fractional advance, and therefore, in his 
judgment, likely to affect the Sale injuriously . 

3. The Purchasers to give their names and addresses, and to 
pay down a cash deposit, or the whole of the Purchase-money , if 
required, in default of which the Lot or Lots so purchased to be 
immediately put up again and re-sold. 

4. The Lots to be taken away at the Buyer’s Expense and Risk 
within twenty-four hours from the conclusion of the Sale, and the 
remainder of the Purchase-money to be absolutely paid, or other- 
wise settled for to the satisfaction of the Auctioneer, on or before 
delivery; in default of which the undersigned will not hold them- 
selves responsible if the lots be lost, stolen, damaged, or destroyed, 
but they will be left at the sole risk of the Purchaser. 

5. While the undersigned will not hold themselves responsible 
for the correctness of the description, genuineness, or authen- 
ticity of, or any fault or defect in, any Lot, and make no War- 
ranty whatever, they will, upon receiving previous to date of 
Sale trustworthy expert opinion in writing that any Painting 
or other Work of Art is not what it is represented to be, use 
every effort on their part to furnish proof to the contrary; fail- 
ing in which, the object or objects in question will be sold 
subject to the declaration of the aforesaid expert, he being 
liable to the Owner or Owners thereof, for damage or injury 
occasioned thereby. 

6. To prevent inaccuracy in delivery, and inconvenience in the 
settlement of the Purchases, no Lot can, on any account, be re- 
moved during the Sale. 

7. Upon failure to comply with the above conditions, the money 
deposited in part payment shall be forfeited; all Lots uncleared 
within one day from conclusion of Sale shall be re-sold by public 
or private sale, without further notice, and the deficiency (if any) 
attending such re-sale shall be made good by the defaulter at 
this Sale, together with all charges attending the same. This Con- 
dition is ivithout prejudice to the right of the Auctioneer to en- 
force the contract made at this Sale, without such re-sale, if he 
thinks fit. 

8. The undersigned are in no manner connected with the 
business of the cartage or packing and shipping of purchases, and 
although they will afford to purchasers every facility for em- 
ploying careful carrieri and packers, they will not hold them- 
selves responsible for the acts and charges of the parties engaged 
for such services. 

The AMERICAN ART ASSOCIATION, Managers 
THOMAS E. KIRBY, Auctioneer. 


/ 


BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES 


AND IN 


1 ~yr t - 

'jX 


BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES AND INDEX 


ANDERS (E.) 


Germany 


A painter of genre subjects. Studio in Munich. 


MOTHER AND INFANT 


9 


BARNSLEY (J. M.) 

Contemporary. 

A FRENCH VILLAGE 


United States 


50 


BERNE-BELLECOUR (ETIENNE) 


France 


Etienne Berne-Bellecour was born at Boulogne-sur- 
Mer on the 28th of July, 1838. At the age of nineteen he 
became a pupil in Paris of Picot, supporting himself while 
he studied by working as a photographer. In 1868 the 
painter Vibert, who had become his brother-in-law, induced 
him to give up photography and devote himself entirely 
to painting, and his success was almost immediate. He 
abandoned landscape, took to figure subjects, and com- 
menced to paint the military pieces on which his future 
reputation was to rest, making a voyage to Algiers in quest 
of motives. The war with Prussia recalled him to France, 
and he served in a regiment of franc-tireurs, receiving a 
military medal for gallantry under fire. At the end of the 


war he surrendered himself entirely to the painting of 
military subjects, with which he took medal after medal, 
travelled in England, resided in Russia as the guest of the 
Czar Alexander II., practised with success as a sculptor 
and an etcher, and was made a member of the Legion of 
Honor in 1878. 

EARLY MORNING IN THE REDOUBT 61 

BOEHMER (G.) Germany 

Pupil of the Diisseldorf Academy. Studio in Munich. 
A genre painter of repute. 

THE PARK 43 

BONNAT (LEON JOSEPH ELORENTIN) 

Born at Bayonne in 1833. He first studied under 
Madrazo in Madrid, and after some time with his Spanish 
master he went to Paris and became a pupil of Leon 
Cogniet. In the competition for the Prix de Rome he 
took the second prize, Avhich did not entitle him to a full 
scholarship. His friends, however, came to his assistance, 
and he spent four years studying in Italy, where he painted 
a good many Italian subjects, chiefly studies of peasant life. 
He has received many honors in his profession, the chief 
of which are medals at the Salon in 1861, 1863 and at the 
Exposition of 1867, and a medal of honor at the Salon 
in 1869. He was made Chevalier of the Legion of Honor 
in 1869, Officer in 1874, Commander in 1882, and Grand 
Commander in 1897. Member of the Institute of France. 


A LITTLE ROMAN GIRL 


21 


France 


BOUDIN (LOUIS EUGENE) 

It was Boudin who advised Monet, disgusted with his 
brief experience in the studio of Gleyre, to paint only from 
nature. Among the marine and landscape painters of 
France he occupies a foremost rank. Whether painting 
the coast of France, or glimpses of her ports, or frag- 
ments of river scenery, he displays an intuition of the main 
characteristics of the scene, and renders them in fashion 
spirited or impressive, as the occasion needs. Few painters 
have ever rivalled him in the skill with which he depicted the 
animation of wharves and shipping; his atmospheric effects 
are particularly good; he could saturate the scene with 
fresh moisture or enliven it with breeze. His ability to 
express in broad simplicity a lattice-work of masts, spars 
and rigging, or an ample stretch of sky and pasture, is 
equally admirable. His studies of cattle also rank among 
the best. He was born at Honfleur in 1824, and died at 
Deauville, August 8, 1898. 

COWS IN THE VALLEY 15 

THE BEACH AT ETRETAT 88 


BROWN (JOHN LEWIS) France 

Born at Bordeaux, the 16th of August, 1829, of a 
family originally English. He became known by his 
studies of horses and dogs, sporting scenes and military 
subjects. He gained medals in 1865, 1866 and 1867, and 
a gold medal at the Exhibition of 1889. Mr. Brown was 
decorated with the Legion of Honor in 1870. He died in 
Paris the 14th day of November, 1890. 


THE MORNING OF THE HUNT 


2 


CALLCOTT (SIR AUGUSTUS W.) England 

Born In Kensington, London, in 1779. Brother of Dr. 
Callcott the musician, and himself began life as a chorister 
in Westminster Abbey. Studied at the Academy under 
Hoppner; first exhibited portraits; after 1803, landscapes, 
chiefly river and coast scenes. Later visited Italy, and 
painted “ Italian ” landscapes ; also executed two subj ect- 
pictures, “ Raphael and the Fornarina ” and “ Milton Dic- 
tating to his Daughters.” Appointed Surveyor of the 
Royal Pictures. Died in Kensington in 1844. 

CLASSICAL LANDSCAPE 77 


CAZIN (JEAN CHARLES) France 

Born at Samar, in Picardy, and a pupil of Lecoq de 
Boisbandrau, Jean Charles Cazin won his first medals at 
the Salon in 1876 and 1877, by figure subjects. Eventu- 
ally turning his attention to landscape, he speedily secured 
recognition as the creator of a new and distinct school, in 
which are combined poetic sentiment and broad, free and 
simple treatment, but with close adherence to the organic 
facts of nature. He had been a Member of the Legion of 
Honor since 1882. In 1894 he visited the United States, 
and made an exhibition of his works at the American Art 
Galleries with great success. His wife and son are also 
artists of ability. Cazin died at his country seat near Paris 
in 1901. 

“ M. Jean Charles Cazin is one of the most original 
and fascinating personalities in contemporary French art. 
For this man painting is not a commerce, but an inspira- 
tion ; he does not sit down with the commonplace purpose of 


making a mere literal transcript of reality "but rather uses 
nature as the means of expression, and, as it were, the 
vehicle of an intimate ideal; possessing superabundantly 
that intricate combination of intuitive perceptions, feel- 
ings, experience, and memory which we call imagination, he 
dominates nature, and manifests in harmonious creations 
the enthusiasm, the passion, the melancholy, the thousand 
shades of joy or grief, which he feels in his communion 
with the great sphinx.” — Theodore Child in Harper's 
Magazine. 

THOBNFIELD CASTLE . 72 


CHASE (HARRY) United States 

Born at Woodstock, Vermont, in 1853. He was a pupil 
of the school of the National Academy of Design, of the 
Bavarian Royal Academy in Munich, of Soyer in Paris, 
and of Mesdag at The Hague. He was an Associate of the 
National Academy of Design, and a Member of the Amerh 
can Water Color Society. Died 1889. 

FLOWERS 62 

FRUIT 63 

ANSWERING THE SIGNAL— OFF THE FRENCH COAST 79 


CHIALIVA (LUIGI) Italy 

One of the Italian colony of painters in France, 
Chialiva has chosen the neighborhood of Ecouen, in Nor- 
mandy, for many of his pictures. He shows a preference 


for pastoral scenes with a glimpse of river, and is fond of 
introducing shepherdesses and goose-girls with their flocks. 

A SHEPHERDESS 18 

THE GOOSE GIRL 48 

GIRL TENDING TURKEYS ■ 84 


COROT (JEAN BAPTISTE CAMILLE) France 

Born in Paris, 1796. The son of a court modiste, 
Corot was destined for trade, but at length was permitted 
to study art by his father, who allowed him an annuity 
of twelve hundred francs. From the studio of Michallon 
he passed to that of Bertin, with whom he also made his 
first visit to Italy. With figure subjects and landscape in 
the classical manner he made his entrance at the Salon and 
obtained sundry honors. In 1843, hoAvever, after his re- 
turn from his third visit to Italy, he came under the in- 
fluence of Rousseau, and was led by him to recognize the 
beauty of French landscape. Though nearly fifty, he set 
to work as a student, and during the next eight years 
gradually reached that style of delicate truth to nature 
and of exquisite poetry in which he is unapproachable. 
Twenty-five years were still in store for him, and during 
these he produced his masterpieces. Devoted to music and 
to his friends, Pere Corot retained his youth to the end, 
which came peacefully in 1875. 

“ On his death-bed his friends brought him a medal 
struck to commemorate the jubilee of his seventy-ninth 
birthday, and he said : £ It makes me happy to know that 
one is so loved ; I have had good parents and dear friends. 
I am thankful to God.’ With these words he passed away 


- — the sweetest poet-painter and the ‘ tenderest soul of the 
nineteenth century.’ ” 

LANDSCAPE 

20 

LA TOUR D’ESBLY 

33 

ITALIAN MAIDEN 

58 

CUVILLON (R. DE) 

Prance 

1 

Contemporary. 


THE ROUNDELAY 

1 


DAGNAN-BOUVERET (PASCAL ADOLPHE JEAN) 

This artist was a pupil of Gerome and made his debut 
in the Salon in 1877, and in 1878 he received a medal for 
his “ Burial of Manon Lescaut.” In 1880 M. Dagnan- 
Bouveret received a first-class medal; in 1885 the Legion 
of Honor, and in 1889 the medals of honor at the Salon 
and the Universal Exposition. More his own country could 
not do for him, except to support him with her patronage, 
and this she has honestly done. Commencing on the foun- 
dation of neo-classical art which characterizes the Gerome 
school, M. Dagnan has created a school of his own, in which 
he has many followers. He is absolutely free from any 
of the mannerisms or conventionalities of academic train- 
ing and equally free from any personal affectations of 
technique. Bastien-Lepage, himself an artist of a very 
similar type, held him in the highest esteem, and since the 
death of his friend, M. Dagnan comes closer to taking his 
place than any other artist of the day. M. Dagnan takes 
his surname, Bouveret, from his mother, in order to distin- 


guish himself from another artist of the name now deceased. 
He is a native of Paris, where practically his entire life has 
been spent in the studies and the labors of which his works 
are the rich if not numerous fruit. 

THE WATERING TROUGH 66 


DAUBIGNY (CHARLES FRANCOIS) France 

Born in Paris in 1817. After studying with his father, 
Edme Francis, he visited Italy, and on his return spent 
some time in the studio of Delaroche. From 1838 he was 
a constant exhibitor at the Salon, and became identified 
with subjects drawn from the Seine, Marne and Oise, 
navigating these waters in a floating studio. He had 
spent much of his childhood in the country near L’Isle 
Adam, and, as an artist, turned unreservedly to nature 
study. The youngest of the Barbizon group, he entered 
into the harvest of recognition won by the older men. His 
art was delicately individual. He saw T everything with the 
curiosity and love of a child, and despite his dexterity his 
work always retained a delightful spontaneity and fresh- 
ness. His death occurred in 1878. 

“ It is quite probable that other men of the Barbizon 
school at times were greater artists than he ; they may have 
possessed a livelier poetic fancy ; they may have displayed 
a nobler creative genius and wrought with a more intense 
dramatic power; they may have been better craftsmen and 
attained greater heights in the pure domain of art; but 
for close, daily companionship, year in and year out, all 
true lovers of the beautiful in nature must have somewhere 
in their secret heart a snug little corner of affection for 
this frank, sincere, lovable painter of the 4 Orchard,’ the 


‘ Riverside,’ and the 4 Borders of the Sea.’ ” — Extracts 
from biographical notes on Troyon and Daubigny, by the 
late W. H Fuller. 

BANKS OF THE OISE 14 


DEFREGGER (FRANZ) Austria 

Born on a farm at Stronach, in the Tyrol. In 1857, 
when he was twenty-two years of age, the death of his 
father made him master of the farm, and the first use he 
made of his inheritance was to sell it and go to Innsbruck 
to study the art of sculpture under Professor Stoltz. His 
master advised him to undertake the stud}" of painting in- 
stead, and he took his first lessons at Munich under Profes- 
sor Anschutz. Ill health sent him to Paris for a time, 
whence he returned to his native village, continuing his 
studies from nature till, in 1866, he entered the Piloty 
school at Munich. His reputation progressed from city 
to city, and from exhibition to exhibition throughout Eu- 
rope. He received medals at Paris, and honorary member- 
ships of the academies of Munich, Vienna, Berlin ; the great 
gold medal of Munich, the first prize of Berlin, and finally, 
in 1883, his patent of nobility. 

LOVE-MAKING 32 


DELACROIX (FERDINAND VICTOR EUGENE) 

Born at Charenton in 1799. He made his debut as a 
painter at the early age of twenty-three with his 44 Dante 
and Virgil,” when he was still a pupil of Guerin. But he 
did not long follow the banner of the classicists, for he 


broke new ground for himself, travelled in England, Spain 
and North Africa, and, although always in feeble health, 
produced a marvellous number of pictures, covering a great 
range of subjects and notable for wonderful richness of 
color and boldness of execution. He received medals at 
Paris in 1824 and 1848, and the Medal of Honor at the 
Exposition in 1855. He was made Chevalier of the Legion 
of Honor in 1831, Officer in 1846, and Commander in 
1855. He was a Member of the Institute of France. Died 
in 1863. 

AN ARAB FANTASIA TO 


DE NEUVILLE (ALPHONSE MARIE) France 

Born at St. Omcr, Pas-de-Calais, 1836. Originally a 
law student in Paris, but later adopted art. Pupil of Picot 
and Pils. Made a specialty of military subjects. Medals, 
1859 and 1861. Legion of Honor, 1873. Officer of Le- 
gion, 1881. Died in Paris, 1885. De Neuville was the 
founder of the powerful and modern school of military 
art which has succeeded that of his masters. Pils and 
Yernet. 

“ That France accepted the death of De Neuville, in 
1885, as a national misfortune was the most splendid trib- 
ute that could be paid to the artist and the man. His 
whole life had been a romance. Out of his love of art he 
had surrendered, at its beginning, the material advantages 
of the career for which his family had destined him. It is 
said that upon his bed of death he thought himself once 
more on fields of battle, and imagined, in his last hours, 
the reality of the pictures in which he had made his coun- 
try’s heroism immortal. Before his fading sight floated 


the smoke of Magenta ; in his dull ears roared the cannon 
of Buzenville; he heard, in the echoing chambers of his 
memory, the crackling fusillade of Le Bourget, and the 
shouts of victory in the German tongue. Born at St. Omer 
in 1836, De Neuville had in less than fifty years of life 
created a new military art for France. No man has made 
so much out of the dramatic incidents of war as he. The 
tragic episodes of battle, the individual events of the cam- 
paign, were his themes, for the human appeal they made 
to him was repeated by him on the canvas. Where Detaille, 
his great successor, is a thorough realist, De Neuville al- 
ways remained with a vein in him of that poetry which ele- 
vates the artist above mere materialism.” 

THE HEADQUARTERS FLAG 4ti 


DETAILLE (JEAN BAPTISTE EDOUARD) France 

Born at Paris, 1848. Favored pupil of Meissonier. 
First exhibited at Salon, 1868. Medals, 1869, 1870, 1872. 
Legion of Honor, 1873. Officer of Legion, 1881. Grand 
Medal of Honor, 1891. Detaille, at his present early age, 
already leads the military painters of France, and has re- 
ceived the highest honors for his patriotism-inspiring pro- 
ductions. 

“ Detaille was one of the few pupils of Meissonier whom 
the master ever took into his studio, and the one whom he 
loved above all others. Meissonier it was who influenced 
him to make military painting his forte, both because he 
had a talent for it and because that line of art would be al- 
ways popular among the martial people of France. The 
finest portrait of Meissonier ever painted is in one of De- 
taille’s pictures. The master is shown standing at the curb- 


stone, in a vast crowd, watching ‘ The Passing Regiment,’ 
and is depicted to the life. The picture was Detaille’s first 
great success, and now belongs to the French Government.” 

R K CONNOISSA NCE FROM THE WINDMILL 52 


DE THOREN (OTTO) Austria 

Born in Vienna in 1828. Animal and landscape painter. 
Studied in Brussels and Paris, taking up painting in 1857, 
after having served in Austrian army in the campaigns of 
1848-49; returned to Vienna in 1865 and afterwards settled 
in Paris. One of the best of living animal painters. Mem- 
ber of the Vienna and St. Petersburg Academies. 

Medals: Paris, 1865; Munich, 1869; Vienna, 1882. 
Chevalier of the Order of Francis Joseph. Russian Order 
of Vladimir. 

POLLARD WILLOWS 24 

HUNGARIAN MARKET 71 

ON THE ROAD TO MARKET 85 


DIAZ DE LA PENA (NARCISSE VIRGILE) 

France 

He was born in 1807 at Bordeaux, whither his parents, 
who were Spanish, had taken refuge from the Revolution 
across the Pyrenees. Losing his father early, he was 
brought to Paris by his mother, who supported herself by 
giving lessons in Spanish and Italian. Through the bite 
of a poisonous insect he lost his leg and stumped the streets 
of Paris as a lame errand boy until he obtained employ- 
ment in the porcelain factory at Sevres. But his inde- 


pendence cost him his position and, thrown upon his own 
resources, he painted little figure subjects of nymphs. 
Finally he met Rousseau, whose influence drew him to Fon- 
tainebleau and to landscape. Now commenced the art on 
which his fame endures — subjects drawn from the recesses 
of the Forest, where the play of light was most enchanting, 
and rich harmonies of tone called forth his brilliant powers 
as a colorist. Often he would people them with figures, 
glowing masses of hue set amidst the verdure. In 1876 he 
was attacked with an affection of the chest and sought 
Mentone, but only to die there. 

THE LAP DOG 19 

THE MARSH 26 


DUPRE (JULES) France 

Born at Nantes, 1812. Learned to paint on porcelain. 
Studied from nature and the old masters in the Louvre. 
Exhibited at the Salon, 1821, and won the favor of the 
Duke of Orleans. First Salon medal, 1833 ; Legion of 
Honor, 1849; Officer of Legion, 1870. Died near Paris, 
1889. 

“To a purchaser who was teasing him to finish a pic- 
ture in a few hours, with the aid of that sureness of hand 
and eye which he has acquired, Jules Dupre replied in my 
presence : 

“ ‘ You think, then, that I know my profession? Why, 
my poor fellow, if I had nothing more to find out and to 
learn, I could not paint any longer.’ 

“ In these words is his whole life of search and study. 
Truly, the day when self-doubt should vanish from an 
artist’s mind, the day when he should not feel before his 


canvas the trouble which throws the brain into fever — on 
that day he would be no better than a workman taking up 
in the morning the task of the evening before, ploddingly 
and without hesitation, but also without mobility. The day 
when Jules Dupre should open his studio without a thrill 
and leave it without discouragement, he would consider that 
he had arrived at the end of what he could do — and he 
would be right.” — Extracts from Notes sur les Cent Chefs- 
d'QVuvres, by Albert Wolff. 

LANDSCAPE 17 

THE VILLAGE ROAD 23 

A WINDY DAY 39 


GALLEGOS (J.) Spain 

A Spanish painter who has w r on fame for his technique 
and brilliant harmony of color, Gallegos resembles For- 
tuny, and he delights to depict processions and assemblies, 
scenes to which he can give infinite color and life. 

TIIE MARRIAGE CONTRACT 16 


GOUBIE (JEAN RICHARD) France 

Born in Paris, 1842. Pupil of Gerome. A painter of 
animals, and also of ladies and gentlemen in gay costumes. 
He has a wide reputation, being well known in different 
countries, and his works have found a ready sale among 
amateurs. 


A RIDING PARTY 


80 


France 


GREUZE (JEAN BAPTISTE) 

Born at Tournus, near Macon, in 1725. After study- 
ing with Grandon at Lyons, lie entered the Academy School 
in Paris, 1755, and the same year exhibited “ Father 
Reading the Bible to His Children.” It was greatly ad- 
mired, and at the close of the year he was taken to Italy 
by the Abbe Goujenot. After his return he exhibited at 
the Salon until 1767, when he retired from Paris, indignant 
that he should have been received into the Academy not as 
a painter of historical but of genre subjects. He returned, 
however, and exhibited in his studio, his pictures attract- 
ing all Paris. The times were witnessing a reaction from 
the previous licentiousness of the Court, and it was Greuze’s 
metier to paint the beauty of virtue, the sentiment of a 
happy and innocent bourgeoisie. Thus he was the father 
of French genre painting, though he lives to-day mainly 
through his ideal heads of girlish beauty. He amassed a 
large fortune, which, however, was lost at the Revolution. 
He died, neglected and in poor circumstances, in 1805. 

TETE DE GAR QO X 25 


GRISON (JULES ADOLPHE) France 

Jules Adolphe Grison is a native of Boi'dcaux, and he 
is a pupil of Lcquien. His subjects, almost entirely drawn 
from the life of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, 
exhibit him as an artist of infinite humor, acute judgment 
of character, and technical skill of a rare order. His color 
is gay and brilliant, his touch rapid and clear, and he pos- 
sesses the faculty, once unique with Meissonier, of impart- 


ing to his minutest cabinet compositions the solidity and 
breadth of works of the largest scale. 

THE STIRBUr CUP 3 <> 


HAMZA (J.) Spain 

Contemporary. 

A QUIET GAME 3 

HART (WILLIAM) United States 

William, the elder of the two brothers Hart, was born 
in 1822. His parents, emigrating from Kilmarnock, Scot- 
land, settled in Albany, New York, in 1831, and in time 
apprenticed their sons to a local carriage builder. But 
both had spent their spare time in studying art. In 1853 
William Hart opened a studio in New York, and five years 
later was elected an Academician. During 1870-1873 he 
was President of the American Water Color Society. He 
died in 1894. 

CATTLE AT WATERING PLACE 6 


ILARPIGNIES (HENRI) France 

“We confront a passionate lover of art in Henri Har- 
pignies. His birthplace was Valenciennes; his advent, July 
28, 1819. Equally in oil and water colors he has taken 
highest rank. He studied with Achard, visited Italy, and 
made his manners to the Salon in 1853, since which date 
he has exhibited regularly. His 4 Evening in the Roman 
Campagna ’ received a medal in 1866, which was so cor- 


dially granted that it repaired somewhat the neglect of the 
year preceding. This picture is at the Luxembourg. He 
was medalled in 1868 and 1869 ; Second Class, 1878 ; Legion 
of Honor, 1875 ; Officer, 1883. Harpignies came of a 
wealthy family of merchants, who restrained his tendency 
to art. He was twenty-seven years old when he appeared 
in the studio of Achard, who was the dignified embodiment 
of academic methods. In the foreground of our time, his 
figure, tall, robust, square-shouldered, groups naturally, 
though much younger, with Diaz, Rousseau, and Dupre. 
His productions affirm that landscape art was not buried 
when Corot died.” 

THE BRIDGE AT SAINT DRIVE 59 

THE WILLOW NEAR THE RIVER (>8 


HENNER (JEAN JACQUES) France 

Born at Bernwiller, Alsace, 1829. Pupil of Drolling 
and Picot. Won the Grand Prize of Rome, 1858. Medals, 
1863, 1865, 1866, 1878; Legion of Honor, 1873; Officer 
of Legion, 1878. Studio in Paris. 

“ No painter since Titian and Correggio had suc- 
ceeded in securing in the rendition of the nude such charm 
of color and purity of expression, and he was not long in 
creating a unique place for himself in his art. His ‘ Susan- 
nah,’ in 1861, carried the day for him in Paris, and was 
purchased for the Luxembourg Gallery, of which it is one 
of the masterpieces. Among his nymphs and magdalens 
Henner produced also a number of paintings on religious 
subjects, of a grand style of execution and a noble elevation 
of feeling. One of his most original and dignified works 
of this order is his ‘ John the Baptist,’ the head of the de- 


capitated saint being shown on a salver, and being a mas- 
terly portrait of one of the artist’s friends.” 

INNOCENCE 13 


HOWE (WILLIAM H.) United States 

Born at Ravenna, Ohio, 1846. Pupil of Otto von 
Thoren and Vuillefroy, Paris. One of our best and most 
widely known cattle painters, William H. Howe was for 
ten years a successful exhibitor at the Salon, and besides 
being the recipient of a long list of medals, is a Chevalier 
of the Legion of Honor. Elected a National Academician, 
1897. 

RETURN FROM PASTURE 47 


ISRAELS (JOSEF) Holland 

Born at Groningen, North Holland, in 1824. As a 
boy he wished to be a rabbi, but on leaving school entered 
his father’s small banking business, and in 1844 went 
to Amsterdam to study under the fashionable portrait- 
painter, Jan Kruseman. But it was the ghetto of the city, 
swarming with life, that affected his imagination. The 
following year he proceeded to Paris and worked under 
Picot and Delaroche, entering the latter’s studio shortly 
after Millet had left it. Like Millet, he had no inclination 
for “ grand painting,” and, though he tried to practise it 
upon his return home, it was in the little village of Zand- 
foord, whither he went for his health, that he discovered 
his true bent. Again, like Millet, he found his inspiration 
in the lives of the poor; but, unlike the French master, in- 


vests his subjects with intimate peace and lyrical melan- 
choly, veiling his figures in an exquisite subtlety of sub- 
dued atmosphere. Amongst the moderns he is “ one of the 
most powerful painters and at the same time a profound 
and tender poet.” 

THE SEAMSTRESS 49 


JACQUE (CHARLES EMILE) France 

Born in 1813, he was by turns a soldier and a map en- 
graver; later practising engraving upon wood, and etch- 
ing. In these mediums his first exhibits were made at the 
Salon, and they received awards in 1851, 1861 and 1863. 
His influence had much to do with the revival of interest in 
the art of etching, and examples of his plates are held in 
high esteem by collectors. Meanwhile, from 1845 he had 
been training himself to paint, although it was not until 
1861 that his pictures received official recognition. His 
sympathies were with rustic life, and particularly wdth ani- 
mals. The pig attracted him as a subject; he not only 
painted the barn-door fowls, but bred them and wrote a 
book about them. Yet it is for his representation of sheep 
that he is most highly esteemed. His experience with the 
burin and needle had made him a free and precise draughts- 
man, while his profound study of animals gave him com- 
plete mastery over construction and details, as well as the 
power to represent their character. His fondness for them 
saves him from any possibility of triviality; he selects the 
essentials and fuses them into a dignified unity. His pic- 
tures have much of the poetry which characterized the Bar- 
bizon school, and found ready patrons during his life. 
After his death, which occurred in 1891, the sale of his 


studio collection produced the noteworthy return of over 
600,000 francs. 


THE SHEEPFOLD 22 

SHEEP UNDER THE TREES 55 


JACQUET (JEAN GUSTAVE) France 

Born at Paris in 1846, Jacquet has always been a thor- 
ough Parisian in his art. He commenced to exhibit at the 
Salon before he was twenty years of age. In 1868 he 
gained his first medal, and for a period produced pictures 
of a historical character, the subjects being usually drawn 
from the past. It was not until his admission into the Le- 
gion of Honor, in 1879, that he began to give his atten- 
tion to modern life. 

THE FIRST VISIT 38 


JONGKIND (JOHAN BARTHOLD) Holland 

Born June 3, 1819, at Yatrop, near Rotterdam; came 
to France when yet very young, and entered the studio of 
Eugene Isabey. For many years his talent was ignored, 
and the Jury of the Salon ruthlessly rejected his pictures. 
From 1872 onward Jongkind ceased to exhibit at the Salon, 
which had always shown itself averse to recognizing his 
merits, its one and only reward to him being a third-class 
medal given in 1852. Jongkind lived in retirement at his 
country retreat Cote St. Andre (Isere), and here he died, 
February 9, 1891. 

“ Like the old Netherlandish painters, Jongkind is most 
at ease in regions connected with humanity. Houses, ships, 


windmills, streets and villages, market-places, and all spots 
that have any trace of human labor, are dear to him.” — 
Muther. 

A DUTCH CANAL 5 


KAEMMERER (FREDERIK HENDRIK) France 

Born in Ghent, Belgium. He became a pupil of 
Gerome in Paris, and his pictures, which are strongly in- 
dividual, were generally painted from motives suggested 
by Parisian life during the Directory. He has been the 
recipient of numerous medals. Died in 1901. 

THE BATHER 83 


KAUFFMANN (HUGO) Germany 

Born in Hamburg, 1844 ; son of the painter Hermann 
Kauffmann, and pupil of Stadel Institute, Frankfort ; now 
a resident of Munich. 

WAKING HIM UP 29 


KNAUS (PROF. LUDWIG) Germany 

Born in Wiesbaden, 1829. Pupil of Jacobi, and of the 
Academy of Diisseldorf under Sohn and Schadow. After- 
ward he allied himself with Lessing, Leutze and Weber. 
Member of the Academies of Berlin, Vienna, Munich, Am- 
sterdam, Antwerp and Christiania, and Knight of the 
Order of Merit. Medals: Paris, 1853, 1855 (Exposition 
Universelle), 1859. Medal of Honor, 1867 (Exposition 


Universelle). Legion of Honor, 1859; Officer of the same, 
1867. Medals: Vienna, 1882; Munich, 1883. Professor 
in the Academy at Berlin. Medal of Honor, Antwerp, 
1885. 

“ Ludwig Knaus enjoys the unique distinction of being 
accepted by Germany as her chief painter of genre, and by 
the world as one of the leading masters in that art. He 
was a pupil at the Diisseldorf Academy and of Sohn and 
Schadow, but his graduation in art, after a couple of visits 
to Italy, occurred in Paris, where he spent eight years 
studying the methods of the French painters.” 

PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AND IIIS FAVORITE 

DOG 8 


KAULBACH (PROF. HERMANN) Germany 

Born in Munich, July 26, 1846. Historical genre 
painter, son of Wilhelm Kaulbach, the celebrated historical 
painter, and pupil of Piloty. Medals in Vienna and 
Munich. Honorary Member of the Munich Academy, 
1885. 

MADONNA AND INFANT 10 

LAMBERT (LOUIS EUGENE) France 

Born in Paris, September 25, 1825. Pupil of Dela- 
croix. Genre and animal painter; especially noted as a 
careful and humorous painter of cats and dogs. Medals: 
1865, 1870; Third Class, 1876, 1886. Legion of Honor, 
1874. 


A CAT FAMILY 


67 


LEADER (BENJAMIN WILLIAM) England 

Born at Worcester, England, in 1831. He showed 
early in life a decided talent for painting, and, after some 
preliminary studies, went to London and entered the schools 
of the Royal Academy. Figure painting and sculpture 
alone are taught in this school, but he was not diverted 
from his purpose to become a landscape painter, and in a 
short time began to exhibit. His exceptional skill and his 
choice of subjects soon made him popular, and he has long 
been a most successful painter of domestic landscapes. He 
was elected an Associate of the Royal Academy in 1883 
and a Member in 1896. 

EVENING ON THE THAMES AT MARGRAVE 74 


LEFEBVRE (JULES JOSEPH) Contemporary 

Lefebvre, “ probaby the most pronounced in academic 
methods ” among contemporary French painters, was born 
at Tournan, Seine-et-Marne, in 1836. He became a pupil 
of Leon Cogniet at the Beaux Arts, and made his debut 
at the Salon with a portrait in 1855, since which year he 
has been a regular contributor. In 1861 he secured the 
Prix de Rome with a “ Death of Priam,” and five years 
later a Salon medal for his “ Nymph and Bacchus,” which 
was purchased for the Luxembourg. His long list of hon- 
ors includes the Grand Prix at the Exposition of 1889. 
He is a Member of the Institute, a Commander of the Le- 
gion, and at this last Exposition was Hors Concours. His 
pictures figure in the Museum of the Luxembourg and in 
the great galleries of France and foreign countries. 


PSYCHE 


87 


France 


LEPINE (J.) 

J. Lepine was a native of Caen, and Avas a pupil of 
Corot. His works, however, give no indication of the 
influence of that master, either in style of treatment or 
selection of subject. He was an able and original artist, 
and his position in modern French art was amply assured. 

ST. OUEN 45 


LHERMITTE (LEON AUGUSTIN) France 

Born at Mont St. Pere, France, in 1863. Pupil of the 
Ecole des Beaux Arts and of Lecoq de Boisbaudran. Mem- 
ber of the Legion of Honor. Widely known as designer 
and draughtsman before he became a painter. Also ex- 
cels in etching and pastel. Studio in Paris. 

“ He is the most expert of living charcoal draughtsmen, 
and as a draughtsman in pastel has no peer. His color 
grows more forcible and ripe as he gets farther away from 
his many years’ devotion to graphic art, and as a water 
colorist and an etcher he has won the highest honors. He 
adheres to the rustic subjects Avith which his youth made 
him familiar, and it has been said of him that the mantle of 
Millet could not fall on worthier shoulders.” 

THE BLAZE OF NOONDAY 78 

LINNELL, SR. (JOHN) England 

Born in London, 1792. He became a pupil of John 
Varley, but learned more from his fellow-pupil, Mulready, 
than from his master. His progress was so rapid that in 
1807 he contributed to the Academy exhibition “ A Study 


from Nature ” and “ A View near Reading.” Like the 
ablest of his contemporaries, he could paint a panorama or 
a miniature, or engrave a portrait. He was the recipient 
of many honors. In 1852 Linnell retired from London to 
Redhill, where he died in 1882. 

MILKING TIME 44 

MADRAZO (RAIMUNDO DE) Spain 

Born in Rome, 1841. First instructed by his father 
Federico, head of the Spanish Academy in Rome, he after- 
wards entered the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, and also 
studied under Leon Cogniet. In 1878 he was awarded a 
medal of the first class and the Ribbon of the Legion. A 
brother-in-law of Fortuny, he exhibits much of the latter’s 
skill in scintillating color, and can lavish on his pictures a 
captivating rococo grace, or introduce with taste and deft- 
ness symphonic schemes of color, as in the “ Girl in Red,” 
exhibited at Munich in 1883, or in the “ Pierrette ” of the 
Exposition Universelle of 1889. 

DRESSING FOR THE BAL MASQUE 28 

LA PIERRETTE 5G 

MARIS ( JACOB ) Holland 

Born at The Hague, 1837. Pupil of the local academy, 
Strobel, Van Hove, De Keyser, Van Lerius and Hebert. 
Died, 1899. 

“ Jakob Maris is the second, in point of age, of three 
brothers distinguished as painters of the modern Dutch 
school, and the strongest of them. He turned by natural 
selection to landscape painting, although equally strong in 


his treatment of the figure, and the works by which he is 
best known are of the former order of subjects. Jakob 
Maris worked partly in Brussels and partly at The Hague, 
but his chief studio and home was at the Belgian capital. 
His pictures both in character and choice of subject 
are thoroughly representative of the Netherlands: rivers, 
canals, quaint villages that doze under the shelter of the 
earthen ramparts which defend the land from the encroach- 
ments of the sea ; wide reaches of farm and pasture land, 
spreading under gray and humid skies. They are kept low 
in tone, and are in the most powerful schemes of subdued 
color, painted with great breadth and a massive vigor of 
handling and effect, and rank their creator at the head of 
the Dutch landscape painters of our time.” 

LOADING A SAND BARGE 57 

MAUVE, ANTON Holland 

“ It was truly said when Anton Mauve died that Hol- 
land had sustained a national loss. Though comparatively 
a young man, he had made a powerful impression on the 
art of his country, and did more than any of his contem- 
poraries to infuse into the minds of his fellow-artists higher 
aims, and to lead them toward that close sympathy with 
nature which was his own inspiration. He loved the Dutch 
farms, dykes and heaths, and he painted them lovingly and 
tenderly in a direct, simple way. To him his country was 
not always dull, gray and damp, as other artists would have 
us believe. He saw and felt, and shows us, its light and 
sunshine, too. Through his pictures we may know Hol- 
land as it is, with its peaceful peasant life in both field and 
cottage- — not that life of hard and hopeless toil that Millet 


so often painted, but the life of peaceful and contented 
labor, which, happily, is, after all, the peasant’s more fre- 
quent lot. 

“ Mauve was born at Zaandam, September 18, 1888, 
and died at the house of his brother at Amheim, February 
5, 1888. 

“ Though he was for a short time in the school of P. F. 
Van Os, he was mainly a self-taught artist. 

“ His pictures are well known in this country. Less 
than five years ago the artist’s works were easily obtained 
and at very moderate prices, while to-day they are both 
scarce and costly.” — W. Macbeth. 

GOING TO PASTURE— EARLY MORNING 40 

RETURNING FROM PASTURE— EVENING 42 


MEEKER (J. RUSLING) United States 

Born in Newark, New Jersey, on the 21st of April, 
1827. Landscape painter. Pupil of the National Acad- 
emy of Design. For some time a resident of St. Louis, 
where he now has his studio. 

A SOUTHERN SWAMP 53 


MEYER VON BREMEN (JOHANN GEORG) 

Germany 

Called, from his birthplace, Meyer von Bremen. Born 
October 28, 1818. Pupil of Sohn. Member of the Am- 
sterdam Academy. Gold Medal of Prussia, 1850. Medals 
at Berlin and Philadelphia. Died in Berlin, 1886- 

“ When young Jean George Meyer emerged from the 


Diisseldorf Academy in 1842 to install himself in the dig- 
nity of a studio of his own, it was as a painter of religious 
works of the largest size that he aspired to fame. It was 
not long before he discovered that his talent had mistaken 
its direction. His heart was not in these academic and 
artificial compositions, while all around him nature — and, 
above all, human nature — invited him to more congenial 
fields. So the painter of tradition soon became the painter 
of fact, and his exquisite little cabinet pictures of domes- 
tic scenes and homely episodes of every-day life were not 
long in securing favor.” 

EXPECTATION 54 


MONET (CLAUDE) France 

“ All his life intolerant of restraint, Monet in his art 
has been rigidly self-disciplined. As a boy he skipped 
school on fine days, and as a young man found Gleyre’s 
studio impossible for him ; was acquainted with the pictures 
of the Louvre, but never tried to draw them, and in every 
way sought to emancipate himself from the traditions of 
the old masters and the influence of contemporaries. On 
the other hand, from the day that Boudin directed his at- 
tention to nature he never deviated from the study of it. 

“ Monet is a ‘ Parisian from Paris,’ born there March 
2, 1840. But five years later his family moved to Havre, 
where his boyhood was spent. His earliest efforts in draw- 
ing were caricature portraits, for which, by the time that 
he was fifteen, he began to find purchasers at prices rang- 
ing from ten to twenty francs. 

“ In 1865 he exhibited two marines at the Salon, and 
the following year ‘ The Woman in Green,’ which, upon 


the opening day, many took to be a work of Manet’s, con- 
gratulating the latter, much to his chagrin. This was Mo- 
net’s last appearance at the Salon. By 1867 his man- 
ner had shaped itself — it was plein air; but, though he 
was beginning to experiment with effects of light and color, 
he had not yet adopted the principle of the subdivision 
of colors. In 1869 he met Manet, and became one of the 
group of younger men who gathered round Manet in a 
cafe at Batignolles. There he associated also with Degas, 
Fantin-Latour, Sisley, Renoir, Cezanne, Whistler, Zola, 
and others, who formed what the members called ‘ l’Ecole 
des Batignolles.’ ” 

SNOW EFFECT 69 


MORLAND (GEORGE) England 

Born in London in 1763. The son of a portrait- 
painter, he received instruction from his father, studied at 
the Academy schools, and assiduously copied the Dutch 
and Flemish pictures. As early as 1779 his sketches were 
exhibited at the Academy. His pictures, distinguished by 
truthfulness of representation, skilful technique, and quali- 
ties of color and light, were prized during his own life and 
are still sought by connoisseurs. Died October 29, 1804 

ON THE COAST , ISLE OF WIGHT 27 

MUNKACSY (MIHALY DE) Austria 

In 1846 the rude village of Munkacs, in Hungary, was 
the birthplace of a child of poverty who was christened 
Michael Lieb. He had no future but one of misery, such 
as had preceded him in the experience of his progenitors, 


and he commenced, almost as soon as he could handle a tool, 
to earn his meagre living as a carpenter’s apprentice. He 
taught himself to draw, and, in a crude way, to paint. 
Then a good-natured, poor portrait-painter of Guyla took 
him up and taught him a little more. From this master 
he passed into the hands of the Vienna Academy, and, by 
a supreme effort, finally secured admission into the Munich 
Ecole des Beaux Arts, where Professor Adam became his 
friend and instructor. Here the young artist made such 
strides in advance that he was enabled, by the winning of 
several prizes, to set himself up at Diisseldorf in 1869 as a 
painter. The works of Knaus and Vautier inclined him to 
genre painting, and in 1869 his “ Last Day of a Con- 
demned Man ” made him famous. His style was so origi- 
nal and so unlike the conventional methods of German art 
that it attracted attention in Paris, and in 1872 he was 
emboldened to settle in that city. He had received a medal 
at the Salon in 1870, and so was not unknown there. In 
1877 he was received into the Legion of Honor, of which 
he had been an Officer since 1878. Munich and Vienna have 
made him a member of their Academies, and the whole 
world in which art finds patronage has accepted him. His 

case is an illustration of the triumph of artistic genius 
over apparently insurmountable difficulties almost unique 
in the history of modern art. Died May 1, 1900. 

STUDY OF A HEAD 35 

COURTSHIP 82 

NICZKY (C.) Germany 

Medals: Munich, Vienna, Moscow, and St. Petersburg. 


IN EXPECTATION 


65 


OEDER (GEORG) Germany 

Student in Munich. Has won considerable reputation 
as a painter of Dutch coast scenes. 

IN THE SAND DUNES 34 


PASINI (ALBERTO) Spain 

Among living painters Tasini is unrivalled in his de- 
lineation of Oriental scenes. He is a native of B.usseto, 
near Parma, and enjoyed the instruction of three great 
masters. “ From Ciceri he acquired his firm draughtsman- 
ship, from Isabey his color and bold and fluent execution 
of the brush, and from Rousseau the deep feeling aijd 
sentiment of landscape.” For he is a master of landscape, 
and introduces into them such animated groups and figures 
that they become, as well, charming examples of genre. It 
was his good fortune to visit the Orient early in his artistic 
career, and during several years’ residence in Turkey, 
Arabia and Persia he accumulated a vast store of impres- 
sions, and thoroughly absorbed the color, atmosphere and 
animation of the East. 

He is an honorary professor of the Academies of 
Parma and Turin, a medallist at the great exhibitions, 
and since 1878 an Officer of the Legion of Honor. 

THE DESPATCH BEARER T 


PEARCE (CHARLES SPRAGUE) United States 

Was born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1851. He 
studied in Paris under Bonnat, and has resided in France 
for many years, painting genre subjects which have met 


with much popular appreciation. Medal of Paris Salon, 
1883. Gold medals in Boston, Philadelphia, Ghent and 
Munich. Diploma of Honor, Berlin ; Chevalier of the 
Legion of Honor, 1894; Order of Leopold (Belgium); 
Order of Red Eagle (Prussia). 

THE LITTLE HOUSEKEEPER 8G 


PENNE (OTTO DE) France 

Born in Paris, January 11, 1831. Landscape and 
animal painter. Pupil of Leon Cogniet. Second Grand 
Prix de Rome, 1857. Medals: Third Class, 1875; Second 
Class, 1883. 

HOUNDS IN LEASH 51 


RENOIR (AUGUSTE) France 

Renoir, who was born in 1840, early determined to be- 
come a painter, and, as his parents were not rich, he worked 
in a porcelain factory in his native town of Limoges, 
painted pictures in the cafes, and sold little subjects to the 
stores, until he had gained sufficient to enable him to study 
in Paris. Arriving there in I860, at the age of nineteen, 
he entered the studio of Gleyre, having Sisley and Bazille 
as fellow-pupils, and remained for four years, until, at 
Monet’s prompting, they all abandoned it. During this 
time he was seen at the Salon in a portrait of Sisley’s 
father, which procured him several other commissions. He 
was working then in an ultra-romantic vein, scoring his first 
success at the Salon with a picture entitled “ Esmeralda.” 


Before the beginning of hostilities in 1870 he shared a 
studio with Bazille, whose death during the war cut short 
a career of great promise. Meanwhile, since leaving the 
studio of Gleyre in 1864, he had been the intimate of 
Monet, and the two friends, under each other’s inspiration, 
made rapid progress. In 1868 he exhibited at the Salon 
“ The Woman in White,” which showed a tendency to- 
wards his new style of painting; timid enough, yet at the 
period sufficient to arouse hostility and to secure his ex- 
clusion from the Salon until 1880, when his “ Portrait of 
Madame Charpentier ” was accepted. But long before this 
he had ceased to concern himself with official honors. 

THE BATHER 31 


RICO (MARTIN) Spain 

A native of Madrid, he received his first lessons in 
drawing from a cavalry captain, and then passed to the 
Madrid Academy, gaining a living in the intervals of 
study by drawing, and engraving on wood. During the 
summers he would wander off on foot into the country con- 
sorting with gypsies and herdsmen; living a free, happy 
existence, and laying by a store of memories. He won the 
Spanish Prix de Rome, never before awarded for excellence 
in landscape, and chose Paris for his place of study in 
preference to Rome. Here he was kindly received by his 
countryman Zamacois, who introduced him to Daubigny 
and Meissonier. Later he became the intimate friend of 
Fortuny, with whom he spent much time in Italy. In 1878 
he was awarded the Cross of the Legion of Honor. 


A SIDE CANAL IN VENICE 


4 


France 


ROBERT-FLEURY (TONY) 

Born in Paris. Chevalier of the Legion of Honor. 
Son of Joseph Nicolas Robert-Fleury. Pupil of Delaroche 
and Cogniet. Received his first medal in 1866 for his 
“ Varsovie, the 8th of April, 1861.” 

" THAIS ” 12 

ROUSSEAU (THEODORE) France 

Born in Paris, 1812. He had an early taste for mathe- 
matics, and is said to have intended to become a pupil of 
the Polytechnique, but entered instead the studio of Le- 
thiere. Failing to secure the Prix de Rome, he repaired 
to the Plain of Montmartre, and his first picture, exhibited 
in 1826, “ The Telegraph Tower,” proclaims his nature 
study. In 1833 he made his first visit to Fontainebleau, 
and the following year painted his first masterpiece, 
“ Cotes de Grandville.” He received a third-class medal 
at the Salon, but for the following fourteen years was re- 
jected from the exhibitions. Even after the Revolution 
of 1848 his green pictures were hailed as “ spinach,” and 
it was not until the Exposition of 1855 that the world 
acknowledged him as belonging to the class of Ruysdael, 
Hobbema and Constable. His last years were darkened 
by domestic calamity. He had married a 3 r oung woman of 
the Forest, and when she was seized with madness, he spent 
his strength in tending her. When finally the officership 
of the Legion, which was his due for serving as President 
of the Jury at the Exposition of 1867, was denied him, 
he succumbed to the bitterness of his chagrin. He lies 
buried near Millet, in the churchyard of Chailly. 


LANDSCAPE 


30 


SCHAEFER (H. THOMAS) Germany 

A German artist, who for many years had a studio in 
London. His genre pictures have won him considerable 
reputation. 

ROMAN MAIDENS 81 


SCHREYER (ADOLF) Germany 

There is no suggestion of the German in the art of 
Schreyer, yet it was in that most German of cities, Frank- 
fort-on-Main, that he was born in 1828. He travelled 
much, and painted as he went. In 1855, when his friend, 
Prince Taxis, went into the Crimea, he accompanied the 
prince’s regiment, and at this period he began producing 
those battle scenes which gave him his first fame. Wan- 
derings in Algiers and along the North African coasts 
into Asia Minor resulted in those pictures of Arab life 
which are so popular, while visits to the estates of his 
family and his friends in Wallachia provided him with 
another of his familiar classes of subjects. Until 1870 
Schreyer was a resident of Paris, but since that time he 
divided his life between that city and his estate at Krom- 
berg, near Frankfort, where he lived surrounded by his 
horses and hounds, practising his art with an energy that 
advancing years was unable to impair. He was invested 
with the Order of Leopold in 1860, received the appoint- 
ment of court painter to the Duke of Mecklenburg in 1862, 
is a member of the academies of Antwerp and Rotterdam, 
and received first medals at all the important European 
expositions between 1863 and 1876. Died 1899. 


TRAVELLING IN RUSSIA 


64 


SOUZA-PINTO (JOSE JULIO) Portugal 

Born in the island of Teneira, Portugal, and at an 
early age began the study of art in his native country. 
After some preliminary work he went to Paris and entered 
the Ecole des Beaux Arts under Cabanel, at the time when 
that master’s studio w r as in the height of its popularity 
and success. He devotes his attention to modern domes- 
tic and social genre, and his w r ork is characterized by great 
refinement of color and by accurate rendering of effect. 
His motives are chiefly found in out-of-door incidents, 
which he paints with distinct charm and appreciation. He 
was awarded a silver medal at the Universal Exposition at 
Paris in 1889, and received the Cross of the Legion of 
Honor in 1895. 

THE BATHERS 60 


TROYON (CONSTANT) France 

Born at Sevres, 1810. He worked as a boy in the por- 
celain factory, where Riocreus, the flower painter, taught 
him to draw. Roqueplan, whom he met on one of his 
sketching tours, gave him advice and encouragement, but 
it was Rousseau and Dupre who established firmly his own 
predilection for nature study. He migrated to Fontaine- 
bleau, and from 1836 commenced the series of his master- 
pieces in landscape. To these he added, after a visit to 
Holland in 1847, the painting of cattle, in which he stands 
unapproached. He died in 1865, and a long list of honors 
was crowned at the Exposition of 1878 by the Diploma 
to the Memory of Deceased Artists. 

“ He had the true pictorial sense, and if his lines are 
often insignificant and ill-balanced, his masses are per- 


fectly proportioned, his values are admirably graded, his 
tonality is faultless, his effect is absolute in completeness. 
His method is the large, serene, and liberal expression of 
great craftsmanship ; and with the interest and the grace 
of art his color unites the charm of individuality, the rich- 
ness and the potency of a natural force. His training in 
landscape was varied and severe; and when he came to his 
right work he applied its results with almost inevitable 
assurance and tact. He does not sentimentalize his ani- 
mals, nor concern himself with the drama of their charac- 
ter and gesture. He takes them as components in a gen- 
eral scheme; and he paints them as he has seen them in 
nature — enveloped in atmosphere and light, and in an 
environment of grass and streams and living leafage. His 

work is not to take the portraits of trees, or animals, or 
sites, but as echoes of Virgilian music to suggest and 
typify the country, with its tranquil meadows, its luminous 
skies, its quiet waters, and that abundance of flocks and 
herds, at once the symbol and the source of its prosperity.” 
— William Ernest Henley. 

THE WATERING PLACE 11 

ETUDE DE BCE UP 37 

VAN MARCKE (EMILE) France 

The most distinguished pupil through whom Troyon 
bequeathed to the succeeding generation a reflection of his 
own genius was Emile van Marcke. Van Marcke was born 
at Sevres in 1827, of artistic stock. He was employed in 
the porcelain works as a decorator when he attracted the 
attention of Troyon. The latter was in the practice of 
making a w r eekly visit to his mother, who resided at Sevres, 


and so the young decorator and the elder artist were fre- 
quently in contact. The constant sermon of Troyon was 
that the gifted youth should go to nature, and Van 
Marcke, in the time spared from his trade, obeyed the in- 
junction. Van Marcke’s early pictures betray strongly 
the feeling and influence of Troyon. While more care- 
ful in drawing and more elaborate in detail, their color 
and technique show the association of the master. But 
with increasing confidence and experience, Van Marcke 
created a style with which he is now thoroughly identified. 
He was a master draughtsman, equally a master of compo- 
sition, and the grouping and modelling of his cattle are 
always pictorial and true. His landscapes are of an equal 
degree of excellence, and are replete with the charm of a 
joyous and smiling nature. Effects of midsummer mid- 
day and of showery skies over pastures enriched by a 
humid soil find particularly happy rendition at his hands. 
Van Marcke appeared first at the Salon in 1857, and was 
repeatedly medalled in 1867, 1869, 1870, and at the Ex- 
position Universelle of 1878 he received a medal of the first 
class. He was invested with the Legion of Honor in 1872, 
and since then he received many additional medals of honor. 
Died January 7, 1891. 

RETURN FROM PASTURE 73 


VIBERT (JEHAN GEORGES) France 

One of the strongest individualities among the artists 
of Paris is Vibert. He was not only a painter, but a sat- 
irist of drastic power and an author of pointed excellence. 
A Parisian by birth, and if he may be said to be a pupil 
of any one, his master must be considered to be Barrias, 


although he also did some early work under Picot. He 
first exhibited at the Salon of 1863, and made a virtual 
failure. His active intelligence gave a new direction to 
his art, and seven years later, at the age of thirty, he was 
decorated with the Cross of the Legion for his 44 Roll Call 
after the Pillage.” His good-humored satires on the hy- 
pocrisy and self-indulgence of monkish and ecclesiastical 
life did much toward advancing him in popularity, and one 
of the latter, 44 The Missionary’s Story,” may be recalled as 
having been sold in this city, at the sale of Mrs. Morgan’s 
collection in 1886, for $25,000. Vibert was not content 
with triumphs in oil alone, but, spurred by the exploits of 
Fortuny in water color, he began in it a series of experi- 
ments that have placed him among the first aquarellists of 
the world. He was the leader in the movement that resulted 
in the formation of the now powerful Society of French 
Water Colorists, a society that, by its lofty standard, really 
forced the Salon into a marked reform in the character, and 
improvement in the quality, of the pictures it accepted for 
exhibition. Died July 28, 1902. 

THE CHURCH IN DANGER 76 


VOLKHART (MAX) Germany 

Son of Georg Wilhelm Volkhart, historical and por- 
trait painter, Max Volkhart was born at Diisseldorf, and in 
time entered its Academy, studying under Eduard von 
Gebhardt. Later he studied in Brussels, Antwerp, Bruges 
and Ghent, also visiting Italy. His reputation is based en- 
tirely on genre subjects- 


THE PROPOSAL 


75 


WORMS (JULES) France 

Born in Paris, 1837. Pupil of Lafosse. First ex- 
hibited at the Salon in 1859. He spends much of his time 
in Spain, where the subjects of most of his pictures are 
found. Medals: 1867, 1868, 1869, 1878; Legion of 
Honor, 1876. One of the founders of the French Water 
Color Society. * 


A FLIRTATION 


41 


CATALOGUE 


SALE AT MENDELSSOHN HALL 
Friday Evening, February 3d, 1905 

BEGINNING PROMPTLY AT 8.15 O’CLOCK 


No. 1 

R. DE CUVILLON 

y 

THE ROUNDELAY 

Water Color 

A cayalier in rich costume of the seventeenth cen- 
tury is seated in a tapestry-draped room playing on 
a quaint violin, and opposite him, perched on a 
broad window-seat, a maiden sings from an open 
music book. The lady wears a brilliant red bodice, 
with galoon-trimmed petticoat and skirt. Through 
the open window is a view over a broad expanse of 
water. 

Signed at the lower right, R. de Cuvillost. 

Height, 12 inches; width, 9 inches. 


Purchased from G. Reichard & Co., New York, 1889. 


No. 2 



JOHN LEWIS BROWN 
THE MORNING OF THE HUNT 

Water Color 

On a broad roadway, which leads to a village half 
hidden by large trees, is a group of four horsemen 
and a dogcart with three ladies. Two of the riders 
are in pink coats, top hats, white breeches and 
patent leather boots. A black dog in the foreground 
stands alert. 


Signed at the lower right , John Lewis Brown, 1881. 

Height, 10 inches ; length, 14 inches. 


J\J 




Purchased from Durand-Ruel, Paris, 1896. 



No. 3 


JOHN HAMZA 


A QUIET GAME 


In a simple interior with a window, through which 
is seen the houses of a city, three men are playing 
cards at a table, while a fourth looks on with in- 
terest. The costumes and accessories are of the eigh- 
teenth century. 


Signed at the lower right, J. Hamza, Wien, 1887. 

Height, 10^ inches; length , 14*4 inches. 


Purchased from M. Knoedler & Co., New York, 1889. 


No. 4 







MARTIN RICO 





A SIDE CANAL IN VENICE 

This is a view in one of the many quiet and nar- 
row waterways of Venice, with a variety of archi- 
tecture on either side, gondolas moored at the water 
steps, and a single one in motion. The roofs and 
gables are in silhouette against a clear blue sky. 

Signed at the lower left, Rico. 

Height, 13^ inches; width, 9 inches. 

Purchased from William Wilds, New York, 1894. 



L/7 


JOHAN D. JONGKIND 


A DUTCH CANAL 


A broad waterway covers the foreground and ex- 
tends straight away to the remote distance. On 
either side of the canal is moored a square-rigged 
vessel, and on the quay on the right is a group of 
red brick houses behind a row of trees. In the dis- 
tance a drawbridge crosses the canal, and beyond 
it looms up a tall windmill. 

Signed at the lower left, Jongkind, 1870. 

Height, 13 inches ; length, 17 inches. 


Purchased from Durand-Rltel, Paris, 1896. 


WILLIAM HART, N.A. 

CATTLE AT WATERING PLACE 

Two spotted cows, standing half-knee deep in a 
small pool, are struck by the full sunlight, which 
brings them into strong contrast against the shadow 
on the landscape beyond. On the right a tall group 
of trees half covers the sky. 

Signed at the lower left, Wm. Hart. 

Height, 16 inches; width, 12 inches. 

Purchased from M. Kxoedler & Co., New York, 1889. 

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No. 7 

ALBERTO PASINI 

THE DESPATCH BEARER 

A rider on a dark bay horse is about to deliver a 
letter to the armed attendants at the doorway of a 
Moorish palace. Strong sunshine casts the shadow 
from a deep cornice over the wall, with its decora- 
tion of colored tiles, and against the sky. 

Signed at the lower left, A. Pasixi. 

Height, 16 inches; width, 12^ inches. 


Purchased from M. Kxoedler & Co., Paris, 1896. 


No. 8 



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LUDWIG KNAUS 


/u'V'L isyS^ist 


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PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AND 

HIS FAVORITE DOG 


This is a study of the half-length figure of Pro- 
fessor Knaus in brown velveteen and corduroy cos- 
tume with his favorite greyhound by his side, 
standing near a lake in some well-kept park. His 
arms are folded, and in his left hand he holds a 
partly consumed cigar. 

Signed at the lower left, L. Knaus. 

Height, 15% inches; width, 11 inches. 

Purchased from F. A. Ackerman, Munich, 1890. 


No. 9 

ri I i — 

E. ANDERS 

MOTHER AND INFANT 

A young mother in a seventeenth-century gray 
mauve satin low-cut dress, with lace cap and broad 
collar, is seated on a carved oaken settle, holding in 
her arms a tiny infant. She gazes at the chubby face 
with an expression of affectionate pride in her first- 
born. 

Signed at the upper right , E. Anders. 

Height, 16 inches; width, 13 inches. 

Purchased from Muenchener Kuenstler-Genossenschaft, Munich, 
1890. 


No. 10 

PROF. HERMANN KAULBACH 


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MADONNA AND INFANT 

Seated in the angle of a rough wall the Madonna 
is suckling the Infant with tender solicitude. Above 
her head floats a slender halo, and in the distance 
the full moon is just rising over a line of wooded 
hills. In the right foreground a shallow dish is sup- 
ported on a low tripod over a small fire. 

Signed at the middle right, H. Kaulbacii. 

Height , 15% inches; width, 11% inches. 

Purchased from E. A. Fleischman & Co., Munich, 1890. 



No. 11 

CONSTANT TROYON 
THE WATERING PLACE 

In the shallows of a broad river f armers are water- 
ing their cart-horses at noonday. In the distance, 
across the river, is a town dominated by a hill 
crowned with an imposing fortress. On the left, in 
the middle distance, a rank of stately poplars rises 
on the grassy bank. Near the zenith small areas 
of blue show between the clouds. The effect is of 
strong sunlight with vivid contrasts of light and 
shade. 

Signed at the loicer left, C. Troyon. 

Height, 15% inches; length, 33 inches. 

Purchased from Durand-Ruef, Paris, 1896. 

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No. 12 


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TONY ROBERT-FLEURY 
“ THAIS ” 

The head and shoulders of a young woman with a 
chaplet of flowers in her hair, and her bust half 
covered with white and orange drapery. The head 
is seen in profile, and the light, which is somewhat 
diffused, falls from above. 

Signed at the upper left, T. Robert-F usury. 

Height, 16 inches; width, 13 inches. 

{Champs Elysees Salon, 1896.) 

Purchased from M. Knoedler & Co., Paris, 1896. 


No. 13 

JEAN J. HENNER 
INNOCENCE 

The head and undraped arms and shoulders of a 
young girl with a mass of waving auburn hair. She 
is in full face, with the eyes turned toward the spec- 
tator. A strong light from the upper left casts 
strong shadows on the flesh and accents the blue 
drapery, which is thrown over her lap and around 
her waist. 

Signed at the upper left, J. Henner. 

Height, 16 inches; icidth, 12 inches. 

Purchased from Boussod, Vaeadox & Co., Paris, 1886. 


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No. 14 


CHARLES FRANCOIS DAUBIGNY 

a 

BANKS OF THE OISE 

The placid surface of the pleasant river extends 
across the foreground and reflects the forms and 
colors of a great clump of trees on the left, the 
grassy bank, the houses, and the quiet tones of 
the simple summer sky. Two skiffs are moored to 
the bank under the trees, and in one of them is the 
figure of a man in a white shirt. 

Signed at the lower left, Daubigny, 1865. 

Height, 10 inches; length, 18 inches. 


Purchased from M. Knoeduer & Co., Paris, 1896. 

1 K V S» 

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No. 15 

EUGENE BOUDIN 

COWS IN THE VALLEY 

A large herd of spotted cows is assembled on the 
low, irregular bank of a broad stream. In the dis- 
tance are farm-houses surrounded by trees and a 
line of low hills, with a church spire rising above 
the tree-tops. The sky is covered with light clouds. 

Signed at the lower right, E. Boudin. 

Height, 16 inches; length, 22 inches. 


Purchased from Durand-Ruel, Paris, 1896. 


JOSE GALLEGOS 

THE MARRIAGE CONTRACT 

In the sacristy of a large cathedral are assembled 
a youthful Spanish couple and a number of friends, 
all in rich costumes of silk, satin, laces and em- 
broidery. Grouped around a table in the middle of 
the picture are three priests engaged in drawing 
up the marriage contract. A fourth ecclesiastic is 
reaching down an old volume from a carved book- 
case at the back, and a choir-boy brings others from 
another part of the room. Rich carvings, orna- 
mental metal work, and sumptuous furniture de- 
note that the cathedral is an important one. 

Signed at the lower right, J. Gallegos, Roma. 

Height, 15 inches; length, 24 inches. 


Purchased from E. A. Fleischman & Co., Munich, 1886. 


No. 17 

JULES DUPRE 


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LANDSCAPE 

A narrow strip of farming country under a wide 
and lofty sky. On the right is a clump of trees with 
dense foliage and a group of farm buildings, and 
on the left is a view across a level stretch of land to 
the low line of the horizon. In the foreground is a 
small pool, beside which stand two cows, and the 
figure of the cowherd is seen seated in the pasture 
just beyond. The lower part of the sky is filled with 
cumuli vividly illuminated by sunlight. 

Signed, at the lower right, Jules Dupre, 1872. 

Height, 16 inches ; length, 27% inches. 

Purchased frobi Edward Brandus, New York, 1899. 

/ * y ** 

No. 18 

LUIGI CHIALIVA 
A SHEPHERDESS 

Seated in full sunshine on the top rail of a stile is 
a young peasant woman busily engaged in sewing, 
while her flock of sheep and lambs repose near by. 
In the middle distance is a broad stream with a vil- 
lage and wooded hillside beyond. 

Signed at the right, L. Chialiva. 

Height, 18 inches; width, 14 inches. 




Purchased from M. Kkoedler & Co., Paris, 1896. 


N. V. DIAZ DE LA PENA 


THE LAP DOG 

A young girl in a pink dress trimmed with black is 
seated on the grass in full sunlight holding a small 
white poodle in her lap, clasping him in her arms. 
From beneath a white petticoat peeps out her tiny 
foot in a pink silk slipper. The background is deep- 
toned foliage against a blue sky. 

Signed at the lower left, N. Diaz. 

Height, 13% inches; width, 10% inches. 

Purchased from Durand-Ruee, Paris, 1896. 

£ 

No. 20 

, / s • 

JEAN BAPTISTE CAMILLE COROT 

« 

LANDSCAPE 

On the left a large pollard and a slender birch 
grow from a pasture on the edge of a lake and rise 
against a simple summer sky. On the right is a 
clump of tall trees, with a single white birch in con- 
trast against the soft foliage. A red cow, tended by 
a peasant woman, stands knee-deep in the grass. 
Beyond the lake is a chateau standing on a low 
elevation. 

Signed at the lower right, Corot. 

Height, 14 inches ; width, 9 inches. 


Purchased from M. Knoedler & Co., Paris, 1896. 


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No. 21 

LEON BONNAT 

A LITTLE ROMAN GIRL 

The full-length figure of an Italian peasant child 
in the customary brilliantly colored costume, a 
white chemise with red sleeves and sash, blue petti- 
coat and yellow figured apron. She stands, her 
hands clasped in front of her, facing the specta- 
tor in a strong light from the upper left side. 

Signed at the loicer left, Lh. Bonnat, 1880. 

Height, 21 inches ; width, 14 inches. 

Purchased from Boussod, Valadon & Co., Paris, 1886. 


No. 22 

CHARLES EMILE JACQUE 
THE SHEEPFOLD 

Two sheep are feeding from a small trough in a 
straw-littered barn. A shaft of sunlight strikes 
full upon them and casts deep shadows upon the 
ground. In the shadow poultry search for food in 
the straw, and behind the sheep is a narrow, open 
door. 

Signed at the lower left, Ch. Jacque, ’73. 

Height, 6 inches ; length, 8*4 inches. 


From Collection of L. Lefebvre of Roubaix, 1896. 
Purchased from M. Knoedler & Co., Paris, 1896. 


No. 23 
JULES DUPRE 
THE VILLAGE ROAD 

A pool of water bordering a winding, sandy road 
occupies the foreground. In the middle of the com- 
position two gnarled and sturdy oaks overshadow 
a thatched cottage. Masses of cumuli cover the 
larger part of the sky. 

Signed at the lower left, Jules Dupre. 

Height, 8% inches ; width, 6y 2 inches. 

Purchased from M. Knoedler & Co., Paris, 1896. 



No. 24 


OTTO DE THOREN 
POLLARD WILLOWS 



On the bank of a small brook, which is half hidden 
by a rank growth of weeds and water plants, two 
old pollard willows lean over the stream, and their 
foliage is rich with autumn tints. The foreground 
is in shadow, and beyond the trees there is an area 
of sunlit meadow. 


Signed at the lower right, O. de Thoren. 

Height, 10 y 2 inches; length, 13 V> inches. 


Purchased from the Artist, Paris, 1886. 


JEAN BAPTISTE GREUZE 


TETE DE GARCON 

a 

The study of the head and shoulders of a fair- 
haired boy, his face turned to the right and inclined 
downwards. He wears a brown jacket, open to 
show a full shirt, which is unbuttoned at the neck 
and chest. The background is a broken tone of 
gray. 

Height, 18 inches; width, 14 inches. 
Purchased from Durand-Ruei,, Paris, 1896. 

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No. 26 

N. V. DIAZ DE LA PENA 
THE MARSH 

A rough and broken stretch of open country, with 
here and there a clump of trees. In the near fore- 
ground is a broad pool reflecting the adjacent trees 
and the concentrated light in the sky. A single fig- 
ure of a peasant woman is seated on the left. 

Signed at the lower right, N. Diaz. 

Height, 6 inches; length, 10 % inches. 


Purchased from Durand-Ruel, Paris, 1896. 


No. 27 


GEORGE MORLAND 

ON THE COAST, ISLE OF WIGHT 

In the foreground a road crosses an area of broken 
ground. Beyond is a pleasant country with fields 
and woods. A blue-coated farmer with his doer 
strides along the road, and two other figures are 
just disappearing around the turn beyond. 

Signed at the right, G. M. 

Height, 10 inches; length, 18V 2 inches. 
Purchased from Arthur Tooth & Sons, London, 1890. 


' 



No. 28 


RAIMUNDO DE MADRAZO 

DRESSING FOR THE BAL MASQUE 

A young woman in fancy dress of red and white 
striped satin, black bodice, red cap and pink stock- 
ings rests one foot on a couch, while she puts on her 
slipper. Her mask lies on the floor near by. 


Signed at the lower right, R. Madrazo. 

Height, 4 y 2 inches; length, 7y 2 inches. 


Purchased from Boussod, Valadon & Co., Paris, 1886. 


HUGO KAUFFMANN 


WAKING HIM UP 

The old innkeeper has fallen asleep, with his 
back comfortably supported against the green-tiled 
stove. The postman, whip in hand, leans over the 
sleeper to blow a blast from his bugle in his ear, 
while the serving maid watches the farce with 
amusement. 

Signed at the loxver left, Hugo Kauffmasn, ’90. 

Height, 14 inches; length, 17^ inches. 

Purchased from E. A. Fleiscifman & Co., Munich, 1886. 


No. 30 

THEODORE ROUSSEAU 
LANDSCAPE 

It is twilight, and the warm glow of the evening 
sky is reflected in a small pool near the foreground, 
where cattle are drinking. Near the middle of the 
composition a tall, rounded tree rises high above its 
neighbors, and beyond, on the right, is a wooded 
hillside. The sky is covered with cloud masses, and 
the light is concentrated near the horizon. 

Signed at the lower left, Th. Rousseau. 

Height, 7% inches ; width, 9*4 inches. 


Purchased from Durand-Ruel, Paris, 1896. 


No. 31 


J / # 

AUGUSTE RENOIR 
/THE BATHER 

A female figure with scant drapery, turned back 
to the spectator, with her head in profile turned 
over the right shoulder. She is sitting near the edge 
of a pond or a river, and as a background to the 
head is a mass of f oliage overhanging the water. 

Signed at the lower left, Rexoir. 

Height, 16 inches; width, 13 inches. 


Purchased from Duraxd-Ruel, Paris, 1896. 


No. 32 




FRANZ DEFREGGER 
LOVE-MAKING 

A dairy-maid engaged at her daily task of churn- 
ing is agreeably interrupted in her monotonous oc- 
cupation by a young sportsman who, accompanied 
by his dog, has invaded the dairy. The lover throws 
his right arm around his sweetheart’s neck, and 
rests his left hand on hers. The dog is interested in 
the cream which trickles from the dasher of the 
churn. 





Signed at the upper right, F. Defregger, 1889. 

Height, 20^4 inches ; width, 18 *4 inches. 


Purchased from Edward Schulte, Berlix, 1890. 


No. 33 


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JEAN BAPTISTE CAMILLE COROT 
LA TOUR D’ESBLY 


The dominating mass of a great church tower with 
buttressed corners rises high against a simple sky 
from among surrounding trees. The sun strikes 
across the turf on the right and the left, and in the 
foreground, which is in shadow, an artist is seen at 
work on a canvas near a large clump of bushes. 

Stamped at the lower right, Vente Corot. 

Height, 10 inches; length, 12^ inches. 


Purchased from Durand-Ruel, Paris, 1896. 

(C A? i 

No. 34 
G. OEDER 

IN THE SAND DUNES 


It is a stormy day on the Dutch coast, and the sky 
is gray and threatening. Gulls fly screeching about, 
and the smoke from a tile-roofed cottage, which 
stands in the shelter of a great sandhill, is whirled 
down by the force of the gusts. In the distance, 
across a stretch of shimmering water, is a line of 
dunes against the gray sky. 

Signed at the lower right, G. Oeder. 

Height, 18 inches; length, 24 inches. 


Purchased from Wm. H. Howe, Paris. 


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No. 35 

MIHALY DE MUNKACSY 

> * 

STUDY OF A HEAD 

The “ Last Moments of a Condemned Man ” was 
probably the chef d’oeuvre of this artist. The head 
is the study of type and expression for the princi- 
pal figure in the large picture. 


Signed at the loicer right, M. de Muxkacsy. 


Height, 13 inches; ividth, 10 inches. 


Purchased from F. A. Acicermax, Muxxch, 1890. 



No. 36 


JULES ADOLPHE GRISON 
THE STIRRUP CUP 


An eighteenth-century cavalier leans against his 
horse in the courtyard of a picturesque inn, and a 
serving maid holds a pewter tankard on a tray near 
by. Hens and pigeons feed on the stone pavement. 
In the background an old man watches the scene, 
and an old woman looks out of the casement of a 
latticed window. 

Signed at the lower right, Grisox. 


Height, 9 */£ inches; ividth, inches. 


Purchased from Boussod, Valadox & Co., Paris, 1886. 


No. 37 

CONSTANT TROYON 


J 

) 

ETUDE DE BOEUF 

A mottled red and white cow is standing in full 
sunlight near the door of a thatched building. She 
is in profile, facing the right, and beyond the cor- 
ner of the building is the dark mass of a forest and 
a gray sky above the tree-tops. 

Stamped at the lower right, Vente Troyon. 

Height, 18 inches; length, 22 inches. 


Purchased from Durand-Ruel, Paris, 1896. 



AY> / 


No. 38 


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J. G. JACQUET 
THE FIRST VISIT 

A young lady in an ample dress of figured bro- 
cade is seated on a gilt sofa in a rich salon. Through 
an open door behind her comes a youthful beau in a 
rich costume of blue and silver. The dresses and ac- 
cessories are of the early part of the eighteenth 
century, and on the wall behind the young lady is a 
painted decoration in the style of the time. 


Signed at the lower right, G. Jacquet. 

Height, 21^ inches; width, 19^ inches. 

Purchased from M. Knoedler & Co., New York, 1889. 



No. 39 

JULES DUPRE 
A WINDY DAY 

A thatched cottage with sheltering trees forms 
the principal feature of the composition. On the 
right is a wide stretch of level ground with a wind- 
mill in the middle distance, and in the foreground 
is a narrow pool reflecting the building, the sky, 
and the figure of a woman in a red petticoat who 
is struggling against the wind on her way to the 
cottage. The clouds are tossed and whirled by a 
strong gale. 

Signed at the lower right, Jules Dupre. 

Height, 21 ^ inches; length, 26 inches. 


Purchased from G. Reichard & Co., New York, 1889. 


ANTON MAUVE 


GOING TO PASTURE— EARLY 

MORNING 

A large flock of sheep, herded by a blue-clad shep- 
herd and an alert black sheep dog 1 , browses its way 
pastureward across a rough, flat country, where the 
grass is broken by sandy patches. On the right a 
line of low bushes and a single slender tree rise 
against the gray morning sky. 

Signed at the lower right , A. Mauve. 

Height, 15 y 2 inches; length, 27*4 inches. 

Purchased from M. Knoedler & Co., Paris, 1896. 

No. 41 

JULES WORMS 
A FLIRTATION 

In the courtyard of a Spanish house a young girl 
is busy sewing on a gay-colored costume, which is 
thrown over a kitchen chair. She is interrupted at 
her task by the chat of a young gallant dressed in 
jaunty costume, who twirls his stick as he stands 
close at hand in an attitude of conscious assurance. 

Signed at the lower left, J. Worms. 

Height, 14 inches; width, 10y 2 inches. 

Purchased from William Wilds, New York, 1894. 


No. 42 

ANTON MAUVE 




S RETURNING FROM PASTURE- 

EVENING 


A peasant woman is driving a herd of spotted 
cattle along a deeply rutted, sandy roadway, which 
has been worn by long use below the level of the 
fields on either side. The flash of the disappearing 
sun sparkles on the edges of clouds high in the 
heavens, and gives a rosy glow to the vapor forms 
near the horizon. 


Signed at the lower right, A. Mauve. 

Height, 15 inches ; length, 27 inches. 

Purchased from M. Knoedler & Co., Paris, 1896. 


No. 43 

G. BOEHMER 






THE PARK 


A wood road winds between tall beeches in the fore- 
ground past a great clump of trees, and is lost in 
the sunlight beyond. Two deer are crossing the 
road in the middle distance. On the left is a pool 
bordered by a rank growth of tall weeds, and be- 
yond it is a cultivated low hillside surrounded by 
trees and bushes. 


Signed at the lower right, G. Boehmer. 

Height, 19 inches; length, 27 inches. 

Purchased from H. C. Hempel, Dusseudorf, 1890. 




? 

No. 44 

JOHN LINNELL, SENIOR 
MILKING TIME 

In the near foreground a country road winds over 
the brow of a hill. The richly cultivated fields be- 
yond are flooded with the warm light of a late after- 
noon sun. A farmer and a milkmaid accompanied 
by an old man are driving four cows toward the 
distant farmyard. Great rolling cumuli cover all 
the lower part of the sky, and the foreground is in 
shadow. 

Signed at the lower right, J. Lixxell, Sr. 

Height, 17y 2 inches; length, 26 inches . 



Purchased from Arthur Tooth & Soxs, Loxdox, 1890. 


No. 45 
J. LEPINE 


ST. OUEN 




The placid Seine shimmers in the warm light of a 
summer afternoon. On the right two boys wade in 
the shallow water under a dense clump of trees, and 
a single boatman is paddling his skiff to the near 
shore. Across the river the smoke from factory 
chimneys slowly drifts in the warm air, and the 
fa9ades and gables of large buildings are strongly 
accented by the sunshine. 

Signed at the lower right, J. Lepine. 

Height, \4dfa inches; length, 21 inches. 


Purchased from Durand-Ruel, Paris, 1896. 


i 


No. 46 



ALPHONSE M. DE NEUVILLE 

THE HEADQUARTERS FLAG 

A bugler., mounted on a dark-brown artillery 
horse, holds in his left hand, with the staff resting 
on the ground, a small blue and white flag, which 
apparently is the one which marks the headquarters 
of a commanding officer. In the distance are seen 
the flash of guns and, here and there, the shadowy 
forms of men in the clouds of smoke. 

Signed at the left, A. de Neuville, 1882. 

Height, 18 inches; width, 15 inches. 


Purchased from M. Kxoedler & Co., Paris, 1896. 


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No. 47 



WILLIAM H. HOWE, N.A. 

RETURN FROM PASTURE 

A Dutch peasant woman is driving her three cows 
along a sunlit, sandy road, which runs out of the 
foreground. On either side are moderately high 
banks covered with grass and a profusion of 
flowers. 

Signed at the lower left, William H. Howe, Paris, ’87. 

Height , 18 inches; length, 23 x / z inches. 

Purchased from the Artist. 


No. 48 

LUIGI CHIALIVA 
THE GOOSE GIRL 

A half-grown country girl, in a straw hat and 
brown dress, stands with a basket on her arm in the 
middle of her flock of geese and ducks, which are 
scurrying around in the grass for the food she has 
just thrown down. Beyond is a quiet, broad river, 
full of shallows, and in the distance are seen a brick 
bridge with a single arch and a village among the 
trees. 

Signed at the lower right, L. Chialiva. 

Height, 10 inches; length, 14 inches. 


Purchased from Boussod, Valadon & Co., Paris, 1886. 


JOSEF ISRAELS 


7 P 


THE SEAMSTRESS 

A Dutch peasant girl is busy sewing a white gar- 
ment near a window, the light from which floods 
the humble interior. Sbe wears a white cap, a gray- 
pink jacket, and a black petticoat. A few simple 
accessories are seen in the background, and through 
the window is a glimpse of a sunny landscape. 

Signed at the lower right, Josef Israels. 

Height, 21 inches; width, 16 inches. 

Purchased from Arthur Tooth & Soxs, Loxdox, 1896. 

I iV 

No. 50 J 
J. M. BARNSLEY 

A FRENCH VILLAGE 

A grass-bordered road leads from the foreground 
to the middle distance, where it disappears behind a 
clump of trees. Two peasant women stand gossip- 
ing in the sunlight. On the right are cottages and 
gardens, and the tower of a churbh is seen among 
the trees. 

Signed at the lower right, J. M. Barxsley, 1887. 

Height, 21 inches; length, 28 x /o inches. 



Purchased from the Artist. 







No. 51 


OTTO DE PENNE 


HOUNDS IN LEASH 


Three couple of foxhounds leashed together and 
fastened to a tree are grouped together in various 
attitudes of repose and watchfulness. They are in 
full sunlight and in strong contrast against an au- 
tumn landscape. Beyond the group is a view across 
a broad meadow to low hills. Two trees with sparse 
foliage extend out of the top of the picture against 
a soft autumnal sky. 

Signed, at the lower left, Ot. de Pexne. 

Height, 21 inches; width, 17y 2 inches. 

Purchased from Boussod, Valadox & Co., Paris, 1886. 




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No. 52 




EDOUARD DETAILLE 

RECONNOISSANCE FROM THE 

WINDMILL 


An incident of the Franco-Prussian War. Two of- 
ficers with their orderlies have ridden up to a large 
wooden windmill, and both of them stand on the 
stair leading to the mill door and search the land- 
scape for signs of the enemy. The mill with its lat- 
ticed arms extends out of the picture at the top, and 

a bit of well-worn road occupies the foreground. 

/ 

Signed at the lower left, Edouard Detaii.le, 1877. 

Height, 26 inches; ividth, 22 inches. 

Purchased from M. Kxoedi.er & Co., New York, 1889. 



No. 53 


JOHN R. MEEKER 



A SOUTHERN SWAMP 


The half-decayed moss-grown trunk of a large 
tree stands on the shore of a broad stretch of water. 
Beyond it is a jungle of tall trees with festoons of 
moss hanging from the branches. White and pink 
water lilies dot the surface of the water, and bril- 
liant-colored flowers grow along the bank. 

Signed at the lower right, J. R. Meeker, 1876. 

Height, 27 inches; width, 22 inches. 


Purchased from G. M. Hardy, St. Louis, 1876. 


MEYER VON BREMEN 


EXPECTATION 

A barefooted peasant girl has reached the ap- 
pointed rendezvous sooner than her lover, and, hav- 
ing laid her bundle and sickle aside, has been sit- 
ting on a plank supported between the trunks of 
two large beech trees. At the sound of footsteps she 
rises, and, half hidden by the tree, watches with 
eager anticipation. 

Signed at the lower right, Meyer von Bremen, 1886. 

Height, 26^ inches; width, 19*4 inches. 


Purchased from M. Knoedler & Co., New York, 1889. 


No. 55 


CHARLES EMILE JACQUE 

SHEEP UNDER THE TREES 

A flock of sheep, accompanied by a shepherdess 
and her dog, browse in the rough pasture under a 
row of large, old trees, which are partly denuded 
of foliage, their rugged trunks and branches in 
contrast against the sunlit clouds of a turbulent 
sky. Some of the sheep have strayed apart from 
the flock, and the alert dog watches them from be- 
tween the tree trunks. On the left is a vista across 
a level country to low hills in the distance. The 
shepherdess and the animals are brought into prom- 
inence by a flash of sunlight, which has broken 
through the screen of clouds. 

Signed at the lower right, Ch. Jacque. 

Height, 25 inches; width, 21 inches. 

From the Jacque Sale, 1894; Illustrated in Catalogue No. 30. 


Purchased from Edward Bkaxdus, New York, 1899 . 



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No. 56 


RAIMUNDO DE MADRAZO 
LA PIERRETTE 

A fair young maiden in dress of late eighteenth 
century, with powdered hair, cocked hat, stiff 
bodice, yellow velvet jacket, and white silk skirt, 
is seated on a marble bench in a rich garden. Two 
red roses lie in her lap, and she fastens a third in 
her corsage. 


Signed at the lower right, R. Madrazo. 

Height, 25y 2 inches; width, 19 inches. 


Purchased from G. Reichard & Co., New York, 1889. 


No. 57 


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JACOB MARIS 

^LOADING A SAND BARGE 

An intimate corner of that most paint able country, 
Holland, where the skies are soft and the color is 
deep and rich. In the middle of the composition is 
a pool of water, evidently an arm of a canal or 
stream, with low, sedgy banks on either side. A 
single tree stands in the foreground on the left, 
and near it is moored a rude barge piled up w r ith 
sand. A peasant wheels a load down an inclined 
plank while his comrade trims the cargo. A few 
birds are seen against the cloud-covered sky, and a 
tiny patch of blue shows through the luminous gray 
vapor. The pyramidal form of a straw stack just 
beyond the canal breaks the simple line of the low r 
horizon. 



Signed at the lower right, J. Maris. 

Height, 20 inches; width, 15*4 inches. 


Purchased from Arthur Tooth & Sons, London, 1896. 



No. 58 


JEAN BAPTISTE CAMILLE COROT 
ITALIAN MAIDEN 

The seated figure of a young peasant girl in Ital- 
ian costume holding a mandolin on her lap with 
both hands. She is dressed in a white chemise and 
apron, with a red petticoat and dark blue overskirt 
trimmed with braid. The background is a character- 
istic wood landscape with vibrating diffused light 
from a simple sky. 

Signed at the lower left, Corot, 1870. 

Height, 21 ^4 inches; width, 15 inches. 


Purchased from Durastd-Ruel, Paris, 1896. 



No. 59 

HENRI HARPIGN1ES 

THE BRIDGE AT SAINT PRIVE 

A sluggish waterway, leading from the right fore- 
ground to the middle of the picture, is crossed by a 
stone bridge with a single low arch, beyond which 
it disappears in the irregularities of the ground. 
On the right rises a clump of willows dominated 
by the tall slender point of a poplar, and in the 
middle distance on the left is a tall rank of elms 
leading the eye to the distant horizon, where low 
hills and tree-tops meet the sky. A few tiny clouds 
float in the warm summer atmosphere, and a broad 
flood of sunshine illuminates the landscape. Figures 
of peasants here and there give a human interest to 
the motive, which is a characteristic bit of the rich 
farming country of France. 

Signed at the lower left, H. Harpigxies, ’70. 

Height, 24 inches; ividth, 19 inches. 


Purchased from Arxold & Tripp, Paris, 1896. 



No. 60 

J. SOUZA-PINTO 
THE BATHERS 

In the foreground, erect on the grass, which is 
flecked by strong sunshine, is the figure of a young 
girl, her back to the spectator. She is about to join 
a companion who is disporting herself in the re- 
freshing water of a small stream on the left. The 
horizon is high, and only a small area of sky is seen 
on either side of a clump of trees and bushes. 

Signed at the lower right, J. Souza-Pixto, 1895. 

Height, 32 inches; xcidth, 25 inches. 

(Champs Ely sees Salon, 1896.) 

Purchased from M. Kxoedler & Co., Parxi, 1896. 


No. 61 



E. BERNE-BELLECOUR 

EARLY MORNING IN THE REDOUBT 

The motive is found in one of the German earth- 
works in the suburbs of Paris, at the moment when 
the glow of sunrise brings the distant hillsides into 
relief against the sky. In the immediate foreground 
is a section of field artillery with the two guns 
pointed over a low breastwork. An officer, support- 
ing himself against the wheel of one of the guns, 
gazes at the sunrise. Near by are the three soldiers 
who are on duty in the battery, one of them asleep 
on a pile of sandbags, one warming himself at a 
tiny fire, while the third, with cap in hand, leaning 
over a row of gabions topped with sand bags, ap- 
parently curious to know what his superior is think- 
ing about, watches the officer. 

Signed at the lower right , E. Berxe-Bei.i.ecour, 1885. 

Height, 21 inches; length, 28% inches. 


Purchased from M. Knoedler & Co., New York, 1889. 


HARRY CHASE 


FLOWERS 

A slender copper ewer with oxidized ornamenta- 
tion is placed near a basket of roses and other flow- 
ers and plants, in front of a wall of deep-toned 
blue. 

Signed at lower right , H. Chase. 

Height, 24 inches; width, 14 inches. 

Purchased from Pettes & Co., St. Louis, 1880. 


No. 63 

HARRY CHASE 

FRUIT 

Bunches of different varieties of grapes and two 
pears are arranged with ornamental glass vases on 
a polished table with a background of figured 
damask. 

Signed at the lower right, H. C., ’76. 

Height, 24 inches; width, 14 inches. 


Purchased from Pettes & Co., St. Louis, 1880. 


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No. 64 

ADOLF SCHREYER 

TRAVELLING IN RUSSIA 

A single fur-clad traveller sits half covered with 
skin robes in the box of a clumsy sledge with his 
rifle at his side ready to be used if needed. A double 
troika driven by two postilions, is harnessed to the 
sledge and the ponies scamper at full speed over 
the snow-covered ground. In the middle distance 
on the left is a sparsely wooded declivity under a 
wintry sky, and on the right a single horseman 
canters along the snow-covered road. The land- 
scape is wild and inhospitable. There are no signs 
of habitation, and the traveller is evidently on the 
alert, anticipating an attack by wolves. 

Signed at the lower right, Ad. Schreyer. 

Height, 20 inches ; length, 32% inches. 


Purchased from William Schaus, New York, 1889. 


No. 65 





C. NICZKY 


IN EXPECTATION 

Two young dames standing on the walled terrace 
of a chateau are apparently watching for some one 
in the village, the roofs of which are seen below. 
One of the ladies is dressed in white satin, and the 
other in a gown of the same material in black over 
a petticoat of yellow and gray brocade. The towers 
of the chateau, with steep pitched roofs, rise against 
the sky on the left. 

Signed at the lower right, C. Niczky, Mchn. 

Height, 25 inches; width, 19 inches. 


Purchased from Messrs. Wixmer, Muxich, 1890. 



No. 66 

P. A. DAGNAN-BOUVERET 

THE WATERING TROUGH 

In the immediate foreground is a young peasant 
standing beside his cart-horse, which he has led to 
drink at a stone watering trough, the corner of 
which is seen on the left. Both man and horse are 
looking out of the picture, as if watching the ap- 
proach of some one along the road, and both seem 
not unwilling to rest a while from their labors. Be- 
hind the group is a piece of cultivated ground, and 
beyond it a line of trees bordered by a rude paling. 
The small area of sky at the top of the picture is 
covered with light clouds. 

Signed at the lower left , P. A. Dagnast-B., 1884. 

Height, 31 inches; width, 19 inches. 


Purchased from M. Kftoedler & Co., Paris, 1896. 


No. 67 

L. EUGENE LAMBERT 



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A CAT FAMILY 

Two old cats have sought refuge from three 
troublesome kittens on the base shelf of an ormolu- 
mounted side table, where a pile of plates, a crum- 
pled napkin and other articles show that a meal has 
just been eaten in the room. On the left is a dull 
green velvet curtain or portiere, and behind the side 
table is a white panelled dado. 

Signed at the lower right , L. Etjg. Lambert. 

Height, 15 inches; length, 19 inches. 

Purchased from Boussod, Valadon & Co., Paris, 1886. 


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No. 68 

HENRI HARPIGNIES 

THE WILLOW NEAR THE RIVER 

In the foreground, which is in broad, luminous 
shadow, a great pollard willow stands near the 
shore of a broad river, in vigorous contrast against 
the sunlit landscape beyond. A narrow winding 
path follows the river bank, and in the middle dis- 
tance are seen two or three figures on the gently 
sloping bank, where the trees cast broad shadows 
on the grass. Across the river is a line of wooded 
hills, and near the water’s edge is an irregular 
clump of trees, which are reflected in the smooth 
surface of the water. 

Signed at the lower left, H. Harpignies, ’93. 

Height, 23% inches; width, 20 inches. 


Purchased from Arxoi.d & Tripp, Paris, 1896. 


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No. 69 

CLAUDE MONET 


SNOW EFFECT 


A deeply rutted path through a woodland leads 
from the foreground to the middle distance. A thin 
layer of snow partly covers the ground, and above 
the trees is a wintry sky, rosy with the light of late 
afternoon. A single figure near the foreground 
moves along the path away from the spectator. 


Signed at the lower right, Claude Monet. 

Height, 22 ^ inches; length, 24 inches. 


Purchased from Durani>-Ruel, Paris, 1896. 


EUGENE DELACROIX 


AN ARAB FANTASIA 

Four Arab riders mounted on spirited horses dash 
across the rough ground, firing their long guns as 
they go, the horses’ hoofs throwing up a cloud of 
dust as they scamper along, urged by the wild gest- 
ures of the men. In the immediate foreground a 
seated figure, enveloped in a burnous, stolidly 
watches the horsemen as they rush past. The land- 
scape is sombre, and the chief vegetation is the cac- 
tus, which here and there shows its uncouth shapes 
in the arid earth. Beyond the group is a stretch 
of desert-like country, broken by low hillocks or 
ridges, and the angular lines are unbroken by trees 
or softened by herbage. The simple tone of the sky 
is broken by the lines of a lofty cirrus, and against 
it the cloud of smoke from the guns contrasts in a 
mass of light. 

Signed at the lower right, Etxg. Delacroix, 1833. 

Height, 23 inches; length, 28% inches. 

Described in A. Robaut, Page 125. Von Isacker Sale, Paris, 1852. 

San Donato Sale, 1870. Lefebvre ( of Roubaix) Sale, 1896. 


Purchased from M. Knoedler & Co., Paris, 1896. 


OTTO DE THOREN 


HUNGARIAN MARKET 

The composition represents a market in a village 
of the Hungarian plains, where the peasantry as- 
semble at stated intervals to sell their produce. A 
broad road, which runs out of the foreground, is 
lively with horses and carts and picturesque farm- 
ers in the jaunty Magyar dress. In the middle dis- 
tance are seen the village houses with a screen of 
low trees behind them, and everywhere is the busy 
activity of trading and gossiping. 

Signed at the lower right , O. de Thoren. 

Height, 24 inches; length, 32 inches . 


Purchased from Bousson, Valadon & Co., Paris, 1886. 


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No. 72 

JEAN CHARLES CAZIN 

THORNFIELD CASTLE 

The castle is simple in form, with two large, round 
towers at the corners of the structure, and stands 
on level ground with a rank of trees on either side 
and a broad lawn in front. In the left foreground 
are a few trees and shrubs on a low hillside partly 
concealing one side of the castle. The moon, high 
in the heavens, throws a flood of cooi light on the 
t roof and towers, and casts a deep shadow on the 
lawn. The windows of the facade between the two 
round towers are illuminated by a ruddy light. A 
single thin cloud floats in the sky, and stars glim- 
mer here and there. 

Signed at the lower right, J. C. Cazix. 

Height, 25y 2 inches; length, 32 inches. 

( From the Salon Champs de Mar, 1894.) 



Purchased from M. Iyxoedler & Co., Paris, 1896. 


No. 73 


EMILE VAN MARCKE 

RETURN FROM PASTURE 

A shallow stream flows across the foreground 
from the right, and cows wander across it, drink- 
ing the water or browsing on the rich grass. Other 
cattle preceded by a horse approach along a path, 
which leads over a slight eminence just beyond the 
brook. In the distance is a sunlit landscape w r ith a 
rounded hill on the right, and above it a sky full 
of cumuli, with a small spot of blue showing near 
the zenith. 

Signed at the lower left, E. Van Marcke. 

Height, 29% inches; ividth, 23% inches. 


Purchased from M. Knoeduer & Co., New York, 1889. 


No. 74 



BENJAMIN W. LEADER 

EVENING ON THE THAMES AT 

MARGRAVE 

The winding river with low banks overgrown by- 
sedge and rushes leads from the foreground to the 
middle distance, where it bends to the south, to 
wind away again under the distant hills. On the 
left, in a small backwater, is seen a punt with two 
figures and a pile of freshly cut grass, and far- 
ther away, on a point of land, an irregular line of 
poplars and other trees rises above farm buildings 
near which cows graze in the meadow. On the right 
in the middle distance are one or two houses and a 
large herd of cattle. The glow of sunset touches 
with warm light the edges of a low stratum of 
clouds, contrasts their forms with the distant cirrus, 
which veils the sky high above, and the river reflects 
the whole with mirror-like accuracy. 

Signed at the lower left, B. W. Leader, 1895. 

Height, 24 inches; length, 36 inches . 


Purchased from Arthur Tooth & Softs, London, 1896. 






No. 75 


MAX VOLKHART 
THE PROPOSAL 

A youth and a maiden have been passing their 
leisure with music, and the expected result has fol- 
lowed. Resting his guitar on the floor, the lover 
leans forward from his chair and clasps the hand 
of the maiden who stands by his side. The figures 
are in the costume of the seventeenth century, and 
the interior is finished with articles of the period. 

Signed at the lower left, Max Volkhart, Op. 120. 

Height, 36 inches; width, 26 '/•> inches . 


Purchased from Edward Schulte, Beri.tx, 1890. 


JEHAN GEORGES VIBERT 


THE CHURCH IN DANGER 

In a sumptuous interior filled with rich furniture 
and choice bibelots, an elderly cardinal in full ec- 
clesiastical robes is engaged in a game of cards 
with a comely young lady, who pauses a moment 
in her play to chat with a companion who is lean- 
ng over her shoulder. On all sides are evidences of 
wealth and luxury, and the objects displayed have 
been assembled from all over the world. A broad- 
spreading fan palm in a huge Chinese bronze tem- 
ple-piece receives the light from a high window, 
which falls full upon the cardinal and throws the 
two ladies partly into shadow. A rare Persian rug 
covers the floor, kakemonos and Japanese masks 
decorate the walls, and a curious cabinet with or- 
molu mounts and a clock as a final stands behind 
the card table. 

Signed at the lower right, J. G. Virert. 

Height, 23 inches; length, 28% inches . 


Purchased from M. Kxokdeer & Co., New York, 1889. 



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No. 77 

SIR AUGUSTUS W. CALLCOTT, R.A. 

CLASSICAL LANDSCAPE 

A composition inspired by the study of Poussin 
and Claude, with a wide view over a populous coun- 
try, where a shimmering river winds between banks 
crowned with temples and other large edifices, until 
it is lost in the haze of the distance. On the right 
and left are fragments of ruined buildings and tall 
trees against the sky, and in the foreground classic 
maidens fetch water in earthen jars from a cool 
and quiet pool. 

Height, 28 ^ inches; length, 43 inches. 


Purchased from Arthur Tooth & Soxs, Loxdox, 1896. 


LEON LHERMITTE 


THE BLAZE OF NOONDAY 

A favorite motive of the artist, chosen in the sea- 
son he best loves to paint — harvest time. The great 
wheat field has been partly cut, and it is the hour 
of midday rest. A weary reaper half reclines on a 
fallen sheaf near a large stook of wheat sheaves, 
and his wife, carrying an infant on her left arm, 
drags along a sheaf, apparently to form a pillow 
for herself. In the foreground is the habitual lunch- 
eon of the French workman, bread and wine, with 
the sickles which are laid aside for the noon rest. 
The sun, glowing from behind masses of vaporous 
clouds, strikes sharply but broadly on the distant 
field of uncut grain and fills the foreground, 
which is in a cloud shadow, with an infinitude of 
reflections. 

Signed at the lower left, L. Lhermitte. 

Height, 29 inches; width, 23 inches. 


Purchased from Arthur Tooth & Sons, London, 1890. 


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No. 79 

HARRY CHASE 


ANSWERING THE SIGNAL- 

OFF THE FRENCH COAST 

A brig with main-topsail aback and signals flying 
lies off the end of a pier, where groups of fisher- 
folk are assembled. A small tugboat wallows in the 
sea to approach the brig, and the distant horizon is 
dotted with sail. The sky is covered with cumuli, 
and tiny spots of blue show near the zenith, pos- 
sibly giving hope of clearing weather. 

Signed at the lower left, H. Chase, 1876. 

Height, 24 inches; length, 42 inches. 


Purchased from Pettes & Co., St. Louis, 1880. 



No. 80 

RICHARD GOUBIE 
A RIDING PARTY 

A riding party of ladies and gentlemen, some of 
whom have dismounted, is gathered near the 
thatched stable of a chateau on a pleasant summer 
afternoon, apparently resting for a few moments 
on their excursion. In the foreground a gentleman 
and two ladies are engaged in earnest conversation, 
and beyond, nearer the stable, a number of others 
are equally interested in each other. Hens and 
ducks seek their food in the grass here and there, 
undisturbed by the crowd of people and horses. A 
groom in a yellow jacket is unhitching the horses 
from a carriage at the left, and his companion is 
bringing a bucket of water. In the distance are the 
tall trees of the chateau grounds rising high above 
a stone gateway, and in the foreground on either 
side are other trees. 

Signed at the lower right, R. Goubie, 1888. 

Height, 26 inches; length, 39^2 inches . 


Purchased from M. Knoedeer & Co., New York, 1889. 


H. THOMAS SCHAEFER 


ROMAN MAIDENS 

On a marble terrace, high above the sea, are two 
maidens in diaphanous white tunics and colored 
mantles, decorating themselves with flowers. One 
of them, seated on a leopard skin thrown upon a 
marble bench, is attaching a bunch of roses to the 
long garland which hangs from her companion’s 
shoulder. 

Signed at the lower left, H. Thomas Schaefer, 1S90. 

Height, 37 inches; width, 23*4 inches. 


Purchased from Arthur Tooth & Sons, London, 1890 . 


No. 82 




7 . 




MIHALY DE 


MUNKACSY 


COURTSHIP 


A maided of the Vandyck period is seated at her 
embroidery in a room, which is lighted by a leaded 
window on the left. The strong light which falls on 
the embroidery sends a searching reflection into the 
shadow of her head, which is held modestly down, 
disclosing an expression of pleasure at the words 
of her lover, who is evidently urging his claim for 
her hand. He nervously sits on the edge of a high 
chair, and shyly draws near to his lady love as he 
speaks. A decanter and a wineglass occupy a table 
on the right, geraniums stand near the window, 
and in the background on the right is an oak cabi- 
net with a vase on top. 


Signed at the lower right, M. de Mtjkkacsy. 

Height, 37 % inches; length, 51 inches. 


Purchased from Edward Braxdus, New York, 1899. 


No. 83 




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F. H. KAEMMERER 
THE BATHER 

A young girl has partly disrobed herself in the 
shelter of large rocks by the seaside, where she has 
found a nook which promises security from inter- 
rujition. But she is suddenly startled by the sound 
of conversation, and turns her head to discover a 
couple walking along the beach not far away, all 
unconscious of the neighborhood of the fair bather. 
The foreground is in shadow, and the landscape 
seen beyond the high screen of rocks is in a full 
flood of sunshine. The shelving beach with its bath- 
ing houses curves away to the right in the middle 
distance, and beyond is a stretch of sunlit dunes 
and cliffs. 

Signed at the lower right, F. H. Kaemmerer. 

Height, 42% inches; width, 25% inches. 


Purchased from Boussod, Valadon & Co., Paris, 1SS6. 


No. 84 



LUIGI CHIAL1VA 

GIRL TENDING TURKEYS 

A flock of turkeys of various colors and ages are 
gathered around a young peasant girl, who is 
seated on a gentle slope in full sunlight. Behind her 
struts a large gobbler with spreading tail, at her 
feet three or four young birds are in the care of 
their fussy mother, and the remainder of the flock 
busily seek their food among the weeds and in the 
short grass which is scorched by the summer sun. 
In the distance is a farm-house with white gable in 
contrast against the remote low hillsides. The sky, 
which occupies scarcely a third of the picture, is 
. simple in tone and somewhat modified by a summer 
haze. 

Signed at the lower left, L. Cfiialiva. 

Height, 31 inches; length, 40 inches. 


Purchased from Botjssod, Valadon & Co., Paris, 1886. 


No. 85 




OTTO DE THOREN 

ON THE ROAD TO MARKET 

A Hungarian country wagon, drawn by three 
horses, two harnessed to the pole, and the other, ac- 
companied by her foal, hitched to the body of the 
vehicle, occupies the immediate foreground. Be- 
hind the driver a peasant girl is seated on a bunch 
of hay, and with one arm around his shoulder whis- 
pers in his ear. Other vehicles are moving along the 
broad and dusty road, and on the left, in the dis- 
tance, is a characteristic church spire and a sugges- 
tion of the houses of a small village. 

Signed at the lower left, O. de Thoreh. 

Height, 26 inches; length, 51 inches. 


Purchased from the Artist, Paris, 1886. 




No. 86 

CHARLES SPRAGUE PEARCE 

THE LITTLE HOUSEKEEPER 

A pretty young girl absorbed in her task of po- 
tato-peeling sits on a high stool with her back to 
the wall of the kitchen, while her feet rest on an- 
other stool in front. In her lap she holds a green 
glazed earthenware bowl, on the stool in front of 
her is a plate of freshly peeled tubers, and a basket- 
ful ready for her hand stands beside her. In the 
background is the corner of a fireplace with kettle, 
bellows, warming pan and the smoke curtain. The 
floor is covered with hexagonal tiles in a variety of 
colors. The light comes strongly from the left, 
throwing the figure into strong relief against the 
plaster wall behind her. 

Signed at the lower left, Charles Sprague Pearce, Anvers. 

Height, 29*4 inches; length, 42 % inches. 


Purchased from the Artist, Paris, 1886. 


JULES LEFEBVRE 


PSYCHE 

On the edge of a rough rock, her slender figure in 
strong light and in vivid contrast against a deep- 
toned sky and sombre expanse of water, is perched 
a slender maiden, holding on her lap an ivory 
casket. A brilliant star hovers over her forehead, 
spirit forms flash across the sky on the left, and a 
serpent writhes out of a crevice in the rock below. 

Signed at the lower right, Jules Lefebvre. 

Height, 46 % inches; width, 31 inches. 


Purchased from Boussod, Valadon & Co., Paris, 1886. 


No. 88 


/ 


EUGENE BOUDIN 



THE BEACH AT ETRETAT 


The curve of a gently shelving beach sweeps from 
the left foreground to the right, and along the base 
of the tall chalk cliff* of a huge promontory which 
projects into the sea in the middle distance. The 
shingle of the beach is covered with nets and lob- 
ster pots, and near the line of the water numerous 
fishing craft are drawn up in close array. Two 
fishermen at work on one of the boats give life to 
the scene. Great rolling cloud forms cover a large 
part of the sky, and are touched here and there by 
strong light, which also throws the chalk cliff into 
contrast against a mass of gray vapor which drifts 
across its summit. On the left of the chalk cliffs is 
the expanse of the sea meeting the sky in a line 
broken only by a single sail in the remote distance, 
and a belated fishing boat has just rounded the 
point of rocks of the promontory. 

Signed, at the lower right, E. Boudin, ’91. 

Height, 31 inches; length, 43 inches. 

Baroness de Castro Sale, Catalogue No. 7. 

Purchased from M. Knoedler & Co., Paris, 189G. 


/ 



7l 


SCULPTURE 


# # #THE COPIES FROM THE ANTIQUES ARE BY THE 
SCULPTOR, L. GALLANDT, OF ROME, AND ARE EXACT 
REPRODUCTIONS, IN CAREFULLY SELECTED MARBLES 
AND NOT OF THE COMMERCIAL TYPE 


SCULPTURE 


No. 89 

CHARLES SUMMERS 

Bust, Modesty 


No. 90 


L. GALLANDT 


Bust, Apollo 

With Yellow Antique Marble Pedestal 


No. 91 

L. GALLANDT 

Bust , Antinous 

With Yellow Antique Marble Pedestal 


; f 

Rome 

Rome 

ID 

Rome 


No. 92 


I/O 


f ! 


QA/ 

s' 


- 


Statuette of Venus de Milo 

With Green Marble Pedestal 


No. 93 

Statuette of Venus de Medici 

With Green Marble Pedestal 


No. 94 

Statuette of Venus of the Capitol , Rome 


v> 


A 


•V 




No. 95 
Bust , Cicero 

Copy from the Antique by L. Gallandt of Rome 




U 




No. 96 

Bust of Demosthenes 


Copied from the Full-length Statue in Rome by L. Gallandt 


No. 97 


Veiled Cupid 



From Andruni, Rome 


No. 98 

Crouching Venus 



l 


Copy of Figure in the Vatican, reproduced by L. Gallandt, Rome 


No. 99 

Venus Callipygus 

Copy in Original Size of Figure in the Naples Museum 
From Andruni, Rome 

With Revolving Pedestal 





No. 100 


L. GALLANDT Rome 

Punishment of Cupid 

Original Subject of the Artist 
With Fine Paronazetto Pedestal 


BRONZES 



No. 101 

Vigneuse 


An Original by Moreau, signed Math. Moreau. Hors Concours 
Purchased from Godeau & Lapointe, Paris, 1886 


No. 102 

LARGE GROUP 

Immortality 

An Original by Math. Moreau 
Purchased from Godeau & Lapointe, Paris, 1886 


AMERICAN ART ASSOCIATION, 

Managers. 


THOMAS E. KIRBY, 

Auctioneer.