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I 1, 1S72 




lewsweekly for pharmacy 



X.89 



® 



CAPSULES 




ORAL GERIATRIC THERAPY 

counters the morphological changes 
of ageing 



30 capsules 



£1-44 

Retail Price inc. P.T. 
(one month's treatment) 



150 capsules £6 30 

Retail Price inc. P.T. 

(recommended 5-month course) 



A rewarding counter product 
distributed only through retail Pharmacists 

Display material available Supplies direct or through Wholesalers 

PAN-AMERICAN 
PHARMACEUTICALS LTD. 

ROSS HOUSE, BURGES ROAD, LONDON, E.6. 01-472 2839. Cables: Panpharma E.6. 





B. H. Smith 
resigns Guild 
presidency 

The case 
against 'IMP' 
labelling 

Pharmacists 
and drug 
information 

Medicated 
skin products 
reviewed 




434— Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1972 




An artist's impression of 
an early surgical operation 
under ether anaesthesia. 



125 YEARS OF ANAESTHESIA 




The use of ethyl ether for anaesthesia was demonstrated publicly for the 
first time 125 years ago by a dentist, Dr. W. T. G. Morton, in Boston, U.S.A. 
on October 16th, 1846. News of the historic experiment reached Britain 
two months later by the wooden paddle-steamer "Arcardia" which docked 
at Liverpool on December 16th, 1846. 

Three days afterwards the first surgical operation in Britain under ether- 
induced anaesthesia was performed at the Dumfries & Galloway Royal 
Infirmary by Dr. William Scott, subsequently confirmed in his letter to The 
Lancet published on October 19th, 1872. A similar operation took place on 
December 21st at University College Hospital, London, when Professor Robert 
Lister amputated the right lower limb of Frederick Churchill, a Harley Street 
butler. 

The immense advantage of performing major surgery under a general 
anaesthetic was quickly recognised. Even more important perhaps was the 
fact that no longer did helpless patients have to endure the terrible appre- 
hension and suffering which had previously been their lot. 

Since those pioneer days, manufacture of ether has been carried out in 
Edinburgh, the names of Duncan Flockhart and J. F. Macfarlan being well 
known in this connection. Today, the former interest of these two com- 
panies, now no longer trading, is maintained by their associates Macfarlan 
Smith Ltd. who manufacture Anaesthetic Ether and other grades for 
laboratory and industrial use. 

MACFARLAN SMITH LTD 



Head Office: Wheatfield Road, Edinburgh EH11 2QA. Telephone: 031-337 2434 
Sales Office : 891 -995 Greenford Road, Greenford, Middlesex. Telephone : 01 -422 3434 



Chemist & Druggist April 1 1972—435 



'(0 
















i 







no 
Ifllj 



113th year of publication Vol. 197 No. 4803 



The newsweekly for pharmacy 



CONTENTS 



B. H. Smith resigns Guild presidency 



437 



Infusion fluids inquiry opens 



437 



Tights: 'as good as support hose' 



437 



Firearms case: pharmacist to be struck off 



438 



International conference on training? 



438 



The cost of VAT 



438 



Fisons' growing profits from pharmaceuticals 



439 



The Xrayser column: Price instability 



440 



Company Profile: Chas Zimmermann & Co Ltd 



449 



Comment □ Diverting the flow 
□ Dispensary blues 



451 



NP' — a curse in disguise? 



452 



Scope in skin — and its problems 



455 



Development of the drug information role 



BNF amendments effective April 1 



WEL L HOMF INftTITl 8T 



456 



LIBRARY 



458 



Col!. 



Coll. 
No. 



WelMOmec 



Appointments 
Bonus Offers 
Business Briefly 
Coming Events 
Company News 
Deaths 
Letters 

Market News 



439 New Products 

445 News in Brief 

439 On Television Next Week 

459 People 

439 Prescription Specialities 

440 Promotions 

458 Trade News 

459 Classified Advertisements 



443 
440 
446 
440 
444 
446 
445 
461 



Editor Arthur Wright, FPS, DBA 

Deputy Editor R. E. Salmon, MPS 

Markets Editor W. S. Bowman, MPS, 
MIPharmM 

News Editor Stephen Hatcher 
Technical Editor P. J. Merry, BSc, MPS 
Information Services I. H. Cotgrove 
Advertisement Manager James Lear 

Advertisement Executives 

J. Foster-Firth, MPS 
John C. Jackson 

Production K. Harman 

Published every Saturday by 
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Subscription Home and Overseas £8 pa; 
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Contents © 
A Benn Group Journal 



Member Audit Bureau 
of Circulations 




Mrs Kathleen O'Sullivan has been co- 
opted to the Council of the Pharmaceu- 
tical Society of Ireland (see p 440) 



A 



436 — Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1972 



What Johnson Wix have been up to 

for the past two years. 

Two years ago, we had a brainwave: a unisex anti-perspirant deodorant. 
Not just a family deodorant, but a deodorant specially made for young 
people, male and female. 

We developed an advanced formulation. 

We gave it a unique perfume. One that would be acceptable to both sexes. 
We designed a distinctive (to say the least) new pack. 
We called the product US. 

Because it was so different, we decided to test-market it first. We chose 
the London and Southern TV areas. 

After just 12 months, US became No. 3 brand in the aerosol anti- 
perspirant market. 

Then we had another idea. 

A herbal bath additive. Also unisex. Also called US. 

Again, we tested it before rushing into the market. 

82% of everyone we asked said it was as good as, or better than their 
normal brand. 

Which brings us to today. 

After two years, US is going 
national. 

WeVe made two commercials, 
one for each product. 

The campaign, which runs 
from April through to September, is 
costing us £320,000. 

A lot of people are going to 
see those commercials. 

Be prepared. Order US 
either direct from Johnson Wax, or 
through your wholesaler. 

For every twelve cases you 
buy, we'll throw in three. Free. 

Thank you. 

Johnson Wax Limited, Personal Care Division, 
Frimley Green, Camberley, Surrey. 




Chemist & Druggist April 1 1972—437 



B. H. Smith 
resigns Guild 
presidency 

Mr B. H. Smith has resigned from the position of president 
of the Guild of Hospital Pharmacists. The Guild Council 
dissociated itself from views expressed by Mr Smith at the 
Scottish hospital pharmacists' conference in Dunblane 
recently and appointed Mr T. D. Clarke president in his 
place. 



Mr Smith had said at the con- 
ference that he envisaged the 
regional pharmacist becoming 
a power in the land. 

Following re-organisation of 
the hospital pharmaceutical 
service the Guild would be- 
come more important since it 
would be the only body 
representing the opinions of 
rank and file hospital pharma- 
cists. 

He thought the Pharmaceu- 
tical Society's hospital prac- 
tice subcommittee would 
become unnecessary. In 1974 
the appointment of area health 
board pharmacists responsible 
for both hospital and general 
practice pharmacy would 
create even greater opportuni- 
ties for the hospital man. 

The Council was meeting in 
London on March 25 and 26. 
Council members also con- 
sidered the lack of progress 
in implementing the Noel Hall 
report in Wales and Northern 
Ireland. Council decided to 
write again to the Welsh Hos- 
pital Board urging the appoint- 
ment of a regional pharmacist 
and to the Northern Ireland 
Hospital Authority to ask for 
a meeting in which representa- 
tions could be made about the 
policy to be adopted there. 

The salaries secretary repor- 
ted that the latest salary claim 
would be discussed at a meeting 
of the Pharmaceutical Whitley 
Council on April 19. 

The panel which is to decide 
the grading of chief pharma- 
cists in teaching hospitals has 
met twice. 

Proposals had now been 
made at the Whitley Council 
for Staff Commissions for Eng- 
land, Scotland and Wales and 
these had been circulated to 
staff organisations. Mr G. H. 
Preston Robinson intended to 
re-state the case for the pre- 
sent grade of senior pharma- 
cist to be one of the specified 
grades. 

The general secretary repor- 
ted that the Guild had com- 
mented to the Monopolies 
Commission on the proposed 



mergers involving Glaxo 
Laboratories Ltd and either 
Boots Ltd or Beeoham Group 
Ltd. A further request for 
examples of items which had 
been unobtainable or difficult 
to obtain after previous mer- 
gers would now be replied to. 

Council considered a report 
of the working party set up to 
consider the position of the 
Guild following the enactment 
of the Industrial Relations Act. 
Informal discussions had taken 
place with various unions and 
the Pharmaceutical Society. A 
statement of the position is to 
be made at the General Meet- 
ing and a special meeting will 
be held later this vear to dis- 
cuss the future of the Guild. 

Infusion fluids 
inquiry opens 

The inquiry into the use of 
contaminated infusion fluids 
at Devonport Hospital will not 
be concerned with civil liability 
or moral blame. 

Mr C. M. Clothier, QC, who 
is leading the inquiry, said on 
Monday at the first meeting 
that the purpose was to ascer- 
tain the circumstances which 
led to the use of the con- 
taminated solution. It was 
most unlikely that any pro- 
ceedings would be held in 
private. 

It was arranged that the 
next meetings should take place 
at Church House, London 
SW1 from April 4-7 commenc- 
ing at 10.30am and thereafter 
as notified. 

Counsel requested to repre- 
sent Evans Medical Ltd, Ves- 
tric Ltd and Mr Brian Devon- 
port, pharmacist in charge of 
manufacture of 5 per cent dex- 
trose at the Speke factory. 

Activity in 
chemical industry 

Output of pharmaceutical 
chemicals and preparations, 
fertilisers and photographic 
chemicals continued to increase 




Dr L. B. Hunt, Wellcome Foundation's marketing manager for 
medical biologicals, and product manager Brian Hinners are 
pictured looking at a Certificate of Educational Commendation 
awarded to the Foundation by the British Life Assurance Trust 
for a film, "Progress in Prevention", which describes the use of 
cells of human origin in the manufacture of vaccines and, in 
particular, discusses the production of Almevax, Wellcome's 
rubella vaccine 



rapidly in the third quarter of 
1971, according to the latest 
figures published by the 
Department of Trade and 
Industry. 

Compared with the third 
quarter of 1970, pharmaceuti- 
cals were up by 9.4 per cent. 
Toilet preparations, however, 
showed little change and 
against the second quarter of 
1971 were down by 6 per cent. 

For the chemical industry as 
a whole output was slightly 
lower than in the second 
quarter but was 2 7 per cent 
ahead of 1970 for the compar- 
able nine-months period. 

Pharmacists' 
Union registers 

The Salaried Pharmacists' 
Union was officially transferred 
to the permanent Register of 
Trade Unions under the Indus- 
trial Relations Act on March 
24. 

Medicine cabinet 
plan rejected 

Kilmarnock's housing com- 
mittee last week rejected a 
Scottish Development Depart- 
ment recommendation that local 
authorities should build into 
every new house a lockable 
medicine cabinet, reports The 
Scotsman. 

The committee agreed that 
it was the duty of parents to 
ensure that medicines were out 
of the reach of children. The 
burgh architect, Mr James 
Rowtledge said it was difficult 
enough meeting the costs of 
houses without such an extra 
cost. 



Tights: 'As good 
as support hose' 

"Technically nonsense" — that 
is the reply of Mr Oliver King- 
don, managing director of 
Elbeo Ltd, to the suggestion 
by Mr Michael Alison, Under 
Secretary of State at the 
Department of Health, that 
support tights are incapable of 
doing a medically correct job 
(C&D March 18, p 374). 

Mr Kingdon says the Sec- 
retary of State's information is 
five years out of date, because 
the problem of "slipping down" 
has been solved by the use of 
special knitting techniques and 
elastomeric yarn. 

"Today we would guarantee 
that our tights work at least 
as well and probably, in fact, 
a little better than any equiva- 
lently priced support hose on 
the market. Whereas a support 
stocking only protects the 
wearer from ankle to approxi- 
mately six inches above the 
knee, a support tight also aids 
the transmission of fluid in the 
upper thigh area which is vul- 
nerable to the conditions which 
demand the wearing of support 
hosiery." 

Mr Kingdon adds: "We 
realised early on that we were 
breeding a generation of 
women who in their grown up 
lives had never considered any 
other garment but tights. I 
am convinced that were sup- 
port tights such as our own 
not commercially available, 
such women might, at peril to 
their health, abandon support 
hose altogether. 



438 — Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1972 



Firearms case: 
pharmacist to 
be struck off 



A notebook found at the home of a pharmacist who admitted 
sending arms to friends in Ulster contained plans for fighting 
the "Orange pogrom" and assassinating Ulster leaders. 
But they were "a glamorisation 



of small germs of reality", the 
Pharmaceutical Society's Statu- 
tory Committee was told on 
Tuesday. 

The Committee ordered that 
the name of the pharmacist, 
James Patrick McFadden, who 
has a pharmacy in Hammer- 
smith Grove, Hammersmith, 
London, be struck off the 
Register. 

Mr McFadden, Paddenwick 
Road, Hammersmith, appeared 
before the Committee, having 
served a two-year sentence of 
imprisonment for five firearm 
offences. He had been convicted 
at the Old Bailey in March 
1971, of conspiracy to procure 
the supply of firearms and am- 
munition, conspiracy to supply 
firearms and ammunition to 
himself, and being in unlawful 
possession of firearms, ammu- 
nition, and a prohibited wea- 
pon. 

Mr McFadden told the Com- 
mittee that he had supplied " a 
few arms" to four friends in 
Ulster, after the troubles started 
there in August, 1968. The 
cache of arms found by the 
police in the flat above his shop 
in the summer of 1970 were 
destined for shipment to 
Greece, not Belfast, he said. 

He was storing them for a 
friend who had helped him 
obtain "the few weapons" he 
sent to Ulster. He understood 
that this friend was waiting for 
the arrival of a ship and he 
continually asked him to re- 
move them. 

Mr McFadden who came to 
Great Britain in 1952 after 
having a shoo in the Shankhill 
district of Belfast, said that the 
notebook contained ideas for a 
book he wanted to write — it 
was fiction mixed with fact. 
The background was fact, and 
it was all written six months 
before his arrest. 

Mr McFadden 's counsel, Mr 
Piers Herbert, said that it was 
his contention that the note- 
book contained a fictional ac- 
count, a glamorisation of small 
germs of reality. 

Mr Herbert submitted a let- 
ter from nine doctors saying 
that over the years he had built 
up a reputation second to none 
as a chemist. 



International 
conference 
on training? 

Support for an international 
conference on post-graduate 
education for the retail phar- 
macist came from Mr J. C. 
Bloomfield, a member of 
Council of the Pharmaceutical 
Society at the Western Phar- 
macists Association annual 
dinner in London on March 23. 

He said that the dental pro- 
fession had organised such an 
event with the aid of the World 
Health Organisation and hoped 
that pharmacists would too. 

Referring to the introduction 
of "NP" labelling, Mr Bloom- 
field said that it was being 
introduced with the idea of 
improving the safety of medi- 
cines for the community. 

It was also learnt at the 
dinner that steps were being 
taken to examine possible 
links between the International 
Pharmaceutical Federation and 
the equivalent student body, 
the International Pharmaceuti- 
cal Students' Federation. 

The cost 
of VAT 

Customs and Excise will need 
about 6,000 extra staff to ad- 
minister value added tax, said 
Mr Terence Higgins, Minister 
of State, Treasury, during last 
week's Commons debate on the 
Budget. 

"The precise number is still 
difficult to give because we 
do not know until registration 
takes place exactly how many 
taxpayers there will be," he 
added. 

Introducing 
VATman 

"Meet VATman" is the title of 
a 32-page, illustrated booklet 
prepared by the Distributive 
Industry Training Board which 
will be sent, free, to all DITB 
levy payers, following publica- 
tion on April 14. 

Principal character in the 
booklet — VATman — is a trader 




Cow & Gate Baby Foods, the newly restructured company made 
up of the two Unigate baby foods brands — Cow & Gate and 
Trufood — held their first annual combined sales conference last 
week at the Excelsior Hotel, London Airport. Pictured above 
are, left to right: Sir James Barker, chairman of Unigate Ltd, 
Mr Philip Turnbull, chairman, Unigate Foods, and Mr Chris 
Daniell, marketing director, Unigate foods 



fully-equipped to meet the 
introduction of VAT in April 
1973. He will have studied the 
regulations, revised accounting 
systems and trained his staff 
so that his business can face 
the change without disruption 
or loss or profit. 

The booklet has been 
designed not only to explain 
what VAT is, but also to 
advise on training for VAT in 
retailing and wholesaling busi- 
ness. Accounting methods, the 
problems of goods on which 
purchase tax has been paid, 
and the records Customs and 
Excise will require are among 
subjects covered. 

Drug, toiletry 
sales compared 

Sales of medicines and toiletries 
in the United States during 
1970 totalled £2,909m out of 
which pharmacies accounted for 
just over 40 per cent. Four 
years earlier their market share 
was 42-90 per cent. Sales by 
supermarkets also fell from 
27-90 to 26-94 per cent and 
department stores from 8-20 to 
7-47 per cent. 

The gain was made by the 
discount stores — from 13 to 
16-21 per cent. 

These figures were given by 
Mr H. J. Welzel, manager, ad- 
vanced management system of 
National Cash Register Co, 
Dayton, Ohio at a seminar in 
London recently. 

Mr R. G. Towsey, manager, 
MMM department of NCR in 
the UK, said that in the same 
four-year period in Britain 
household spending had gone 
up by an average 28 per cent. 



That spent on medicinal and 
toiletries went up by 35 per 
cent. 

A "breakdown" of the 35 per 
cent increase in medicines and 
toiletry sales gave multiple 
pharmacies as having a 33 per 
cent gain while independents 
only had 16 per cent. Depart- 
ment stores apparently showed 
the biggest increase of well 
over 50 per cent. 

Cephalasporin C 
patent extended 

Marketing cephalosporin — "the 
most significant antibiotic intro- 
duced since penicillin" — has 
already brought the National 
Research Development Council 
a profit of nearly £500,000 in 
Britain, a High Court judge 
said last week. 

But today that could not be 
said to be an adequate 
remuneration for an invention 
of such great importance to 
medicine. "Commercial firms 
who take out patents for medi- 
cines are sometimes criticised 
for receiving through patents 
sums of money which seem 
very large," said Mr Justice 
Whitford. "But such criticisms 
not infrequently come from 
people who have very little 
idea of the amount of money 
which has to be spent on un- 
successful research before a 
life-saving drug is produced." 

The judge granted the 
Council a six-year extension of 
its patent on cephalosporin C, 
which is due to expire shortly. 
Normally patents are granted 
for a seven-year period initi- 
ally, and lapse unless any 
extension of time is sought. 



Chemist & Druggist April 1 1972 — 439 




The board of Unichem last week gave a luncheon in honour 
of Mr J. Howard Evans who retired in January after serving six 
years as chairman of the group. During the luncheon, Mr Evans 
(left) was presented with a gold watch, on behalf of Unichem, 
by the current chairman, Mr Tom Reid 



COMPANY 
NEWS 

Fisons' growing 
profits from 
pharmaceuticals 

The growing turnover of and 
profits from the pharmaceuti- 
cal division of Fisons Ltd are 
clearly shown by the accounts 
for 1971 published this week. 

Turnover of -the division, 
which includes scientific appa- 
ratus, was £18,204,000 (against 
£14,893,000 in 1970) and pro- 
fit £3,297,000 (£2,430,000). The 
group's turnover was £90 09m 
(£87'69m) from which the 
trading profit made was £7 70m 
(£6-30m). Group profit, after 
tax was £7-48m (£5-28m). 

A final dividend of 6| per 
cent is recommended which 
will lift the total distribution 
to 11| per cent from 104 per 
cent for 1970. 

Two associate directors, Dr 
J. S. G. Cox and Mr J. S. 
Kerridge have been appointed 
to the board. Dr Cox, 40, is 
research and development dir- 
ector of the pharmaceutical 
division. 

New terms 
anger dealers 

Johnsons HPL, now a subsi- 
diary of Hestair Ltd, have 
taken a lease on property at 
Radlett, Herts and expect to 
begin moving their plant and 
offices from Hendon Way in 
August and have the transfer 
completed by December. 

This was announced to a 
meeting of photographic retail- 
ers in London on March 27 
by Mr Stuart Slattery, newly 
appointed managing director, 
who also outlined future 
trading plans. 

The company intended to 
bring in a new discount struc- 
ture which would give larger 
discounts for volume purchases. 
This, said Mr Slattery, would 
help their customers to meet 
price competition. 

When questions were called 
for, many retailers expressed 
strong disapproval of the 
change which, they said, 
would lead to unnecessary 
price cutting. 

The dealers were also 
angered by the company's 
announced change in settle- 
ment terms — 2\ per cent in 



seven days against the previous 
one month. 

On the day following the 
meeting the company issued a 
statement which said that the 
settlement period discount 
would revert to one month. A 
pledge also was given that they 
would not offer greater quan- 
tity discounts on any of their 
goods than currently offered in 
a schedule dated January. 

'Plusses and 
minuses' of S&N 

The 1971 results of Smith & 
Nephew Associated Com- 
panies Ltd show "a good 
spread of plusses but rather 
more minuses than previously", 
says the chairman, Mr S. N. 
Steen. 

An analysis of sales and pre- 
tax profit show that medicines 
contributed £24-09m and 
£2-67m respectively (£22-82m 
and £2 44m in 1970); hygiene, 
baby and paper products 
£13-48m and £208m (£12-95m 
and £l-7m) cosmetics and 
toiletries £ll-85m and £L01m 
(£11 09m and £849,000). 

Improvement by 
J & E Sturge 

Turnover of John & E. Sturge 
Ltd rose from £4-56m in 1970 
to £5 3 lm in 1971 and profit 
from £278,473 to £642,343, sub- 
ject to tax of £250,782 
(£103,117). 

Mr Arthur Foxall will retire 
from the chairmanship on 
April 15, and will be suc- 
ceeded by Dr E. R. S. Winter. 

In brief 

Photo-Scan Ltd has been 
formed by the merger of the 
two anti-pilferage equipment 
franchise holders in the UK, 
Photo-Scan (London) Ltd and 
Photo-Scan (Central) Ltd. The 
headquarters are at Upper 
Halliford Road, Shepperton. 
Middlesex. 

Inveresk Paper Ltd made a 
loss of £848,000 in 1971. 
against a profit of £103,000 
in 1970. Included is a loss of 
£285,000 — the company's share 
of the loss sustained by British 
Tissues Ltd. 

Wilkinson Sword Ltd had 

group profits of £2,081,614 in 
1971 against £1,798,213, before 
tax. An unchanged final divi- 
dend of 10 per cent makes 15 
per cent for the year (same). 
Lofthouse Chemical Products 
Ltd are moving on April 17 
to Copse Road Industrial 
Estate, Copse Road, Fleet- 
wood,, Lanes FY7 7LP (tele- 
phone: Fleetwood 2435). 




1 



\ , ,<A 



Mr John G. Sutherland, MPS, 

has acquired the pharmacy at 
172 Upper Elmers End Road, 
Beckenham. Kent, previously 
owned by Mr S. Hamer, MPS. 
Edward Gurr Ltd have moved 
to Michrome Laboratories, 
Coronation Road, Cressex 
Industrial Estate, High 
Wycombe, Bucks (telephone 
High Wycombe (0494) 32761). 

Inner London Executive Coun- 
cil has moved to Addison 
House, 32 Chart Street, Lon- 
don Nl 6EF. 



ll ^tSIPlf 1 

i. . X ... * 



Nu-Syte Laboratories Ltd have 
appointed Mr J. V. Fox, 
MPS their field sales manager. 
Unichem Ltd: Mr C. Victor 
Hammond, MPS, ARIC, has 
been elected to the board. 

Mr Hammond (54) is chair- 
man and managing director of 
a firm of retail pharmacists in 




Hertfordshire and Essex. He is 
chairman of the Hertford 
Branch of the Pharmaceutical 
Society. 

Eli Lilly & Co, Indianapolis, 
have appointed Dr Frederic R. 
Lloyd a vice-president of 
Elizabeth Arden Inc in addi- 
tion to his present position as 
a vice-president of Eli Lilly 
International Corporation. Dr 
Lloyd, a former managing 
director of Dista Products, 
Liverpool, will move from the 
London office of Lilly Interna- 
tional to the company's cor- 
porate headquarters in Indian- 
apolis. 

Burroughs Wellcome & Co 

have appointed three new area 
managers for the medical sales 
division. They are: Mr Stewart 
Stanley (central southern 
England): Mr Ray Crabtree 
(eastern England from The 
Wash to Sunderland, and also 
Westmorland); and Mr Mervyn 
Winston (counties due north 
of London from the Thames to 
Peterborough). 

Bellair Cosmetics Ltd: Follow- 
ing the acquisition of the com- 
pany by Barclay Securities 
Ltd, Mr Peter Haddon has 
been appointed managing direc- 
tor for Bellair. 

Garsalle Ltd have appointed 
Nicholas Hall their marketing 
manager. Garsalle are a 
division of Richardson-Merrell. 

Jeyes UK Ltd, have appointed 
Mr William C. Harding their 
sales director. 

Rockware Group Ltd: Mr R. E. 

Lynam has been appointed 
managing director of the 
group's subsidiary, Blewis and 
Shaw (Plastics) Ltd. 



440 — Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1972 



Topical reflections 
by Xrayser 




Mrs Kathleen O'Sullivan, Kil- 
brogan Hill, Bandon, co Cork, 
has been co-opted to the 
Council of the Pharmaceutical 
Society of Ireland to fill the 
vacancy created by the resig- 
nation of Mr J. B. Murphy. 
Mrs O'Sullivan qualified in 
1946 after an apprenticeship at 
MacSweeney's pharmacy, Pat- 
rick Street, Cork. Shortly after 
qualifying, she opened her own 
pharmacy in Main Street, 
Bandon. A cousin of Mrs 
O'Sullivan, Kitty O'Mahony, is 
a pharmacist in the Rotunda 
hospital, Dublin. Mrs O'Sulli- 
van's co-option means that 
there are now two ladies on 
the Council, the other being 
Miss Teresa Landers of 
Galway. 

Mr F. Holden, MPS, manag- 
ing director, Rodmill Ltd, 
Liverpool, is retiring this 
month after 50 years of active 
business life. Mr Holden quali- 
fied in 1937 and practised in 
retail pharmacy in Liverpool. 
He then gradually developed 
the manufacturing company 
of Rodmill Ltd. His original 
activities were directed towards 
insecticides and rodenticides. 
He had published a paper in 
Chemist and Druggist in 1945 
on the "Action and Uses of 
DDT". Later he was responsible 
for introducing the rodenticide, 
alpha - naphthyl - thiourea 
(ANTU) into Britain which 
was eventually registerd as an 
approved product by the 
Ministry of Agriculture and 
Fisheries. 

He further developed Gee's 
linctus pastilles, and was suc- 
cessful in having them listed 
as an official preparation in the 
British Pharmaceutical Codex. 

Councillor Alexander T. 
Brodie, MPS, in business in 
St Mary's Street, Stamford, 
Lines, has accepted the invita- 
tion of Stamford borough 
council to take office as mayor 
for the coming year. 

Mr E. B. Robinson, chairman 
of Robinson & Sons Ltd, 
Wheatbridge Mills, Chester- 
field, is to be High Sheriff of 
Derbyshire for the coming 
year. 

Mr Peter Fulham, a former 
member of the Council of the 
Pharmaceutical Society of Ire- 
land, has disposed of his 
pharmacy in Naas, having 
retired from practice. 



Mr V. H. Freemantle. MPS, 

The Manor Pharmacy, Horam, 
Sussex, will have been fifty 
years in pharmacy on April 30. 

Mr T. W. Bell, MPS, Market 
Street, Kirkby Stephen, has 
been elected unopposed to 
Westmorland County Council. 

Deaths 

Barclay: On March 13 Mr 
George Barclay, MPS, the 
Mount Hotel, Clarendon Road, 
Leeds 2. Mr Barclay qualified 
in 1921 and was for many years 
with Allen & Hanburys. 

Fogarty: On March 7, Mr 
Jerome A. Fogarty, MPSI, pro- 
prietor of the Rexall Pharmacy, 
Sarsfield Street, Kilmallock. 
Mr Fogarty, who qualified in 
1941. was formery of Bally- 
hobin, Caherline. 

Murray: On March 5 Mrs Rose 
Anne Murray, MPSI, Farrell 
Street, Kells, co Meath. Mrs 
Murray, who qualified in 1933, 
conducted her own pharmacy 
in Kells for many years. 

Rush: Recently, Mr William 
Charles Rush, MPSI, Barrack 
Street, Kilkenny. Mr Rush 
qualified in 1933 and conducted 
his own pharmacy in Kilkenny 
up to the time of his death. 





□ The official index figure 
which measures changes in the 
average level of retail prices 
was 159.8 on February 22, 
1972. This compares with 150.0 
on January 18. 

□ During the months of Janu- 
ary and February 31 additions 
and 67 deletions were made to 
the Pharmaceutical Society's 
register of premises. 

□ The Portsmouth symposium 
on the "Commercial utilisation 
of seaweeds" which was to 
have been held on April 11-12 
has been cancelled due to lack 
of support. 

□ The Secretary of State for 
Wales has now published the 
Draft Order under the New 
Towns Act designating a pro- 
posed New Town at Llantrisant, 
in Glamorgan. Plans, covering 
10.800 acres, will give a popu- 
lation of 75,000 by 1991. 

□ The London Borough of 
Hammersmith has published a 
100-page guide to its health and 
social services. Chemists are 
listed with their telephone num- 
bers plus a symbol to denote 
oxygen equipment stocked and 
"urgent" prescriptions dis- 
pensed. 



Price instability 

I have remarked on previous occasions that a simple 
announcement in the House of Commons on Budget Day 
has effects of a much more comprehensive nature than might 
generally be imagined. Our concern is naturally with our- 
selves, and the retail pharmacist is again a ship without 
rudder or compass, reaching the haven of the correct price, 
for the most part, by dead reckoning. 

Once more it is brought home to us that the beacon 
provided by the Quarterly Price List has momentarily been 
extinguished, and that the crew has no alternative but to 
resume what is fast becoming a permanent condition of 
make-do and mend. The golf-course will see them not, the 
gardens will become overgrown with weeds, and wives and 
families will count themselves fortunate if they are granted 
a brief glimpse of a loved one staggering home under a 
load of documents — but he is merely in process of ex- 
changing one treadmill for another. 

I hope that all who rely on the price-list have even a 
glimmering of all that is involved in the gigantic task. It is 
my earnest hope that Bouverie House will eventually have a 
breathing space before VAT bursts upon us. 

But, as in previous years, the public is likely to find its 
hopes less than fulfilled by the promised fall in purchase 
tax. Already the familiar letters are beginning to arrive 
pointing out that costs of labour, services, raw materials 
and sundry other factors necessitate price increases. One 
firm, with the greatest consideration, states that it has timed 
its price increases to tie up with the Budget and thus save 
us time in that only one repricing need be done instead of 
two. Such increases, at a time like this, are as predictable as 
the incarceration of the staff at Bouverie House. Three such 
letters arrived by one mail, but it is unlikely that the public 
will ever learn the extent of its windfall, for changes of tax, 
alterations in price and decimal coinage have conspired to 
confuse the issue for all time. 

Co-operation 

The plea by Mr J. P. Kerr (vice-president, Pharmaceutical 
Society), for more co-operation between pharmacists working 
in hospital and those serving the public need outside is timely. 
It has seemed to me, over the years, that the one thing they 
had in common was a certificate of registration, and indeed 
the fact has to be faced that the daily round of each is so 
dissimilar that it is not a simple matter to find common 
ground. 

There are certain basic duties common to both, but the 
environment is so different and the conditions of employment 
so contrasted that it is quite understandable if, at pharma- 
ceutical gatherings, the herd instinct supervenes and the 
two elements seem to be immiscible. Yet both started out 
on the same path, both are an important cog in the Health 
Service, and both have the same aim to provide a first-class 
pharmaceutical service. 

Concerted action 

Having said that, one must remember that conditions of 
service and terms of service bear little relation to each other, 
and that the wholly "professional" hospital pharmacist has 
not had his due reward. But, despite the differences, Mr Kerr 
is correct that on every appropriate occasion a concerted view 
must be put forward representing pharmacy as a whole. 



Chemist & Druggist April 1 1972—441 



If you're self-employed, 
this pension plan will save you 
an awful lot of tax. 



45 next 
birthday 




Working for yourself has 
its rewards. 

Butithasitspenalties,too. 

Tax concessions, for ex- 
ample, seem to be few and 
far between. 

And while your employ- 
ees are covered by the firm's 
pension scheme, you aren't. 

So a pension plan that 
contains enormous built-in 
tax concessions and has been 
created specifically for any- 
one ineligible for a company 
pension scheme should com- 
mand your interest. 

The Abbey Investment 
Annuity Bond is just such a 
plan, providing not only se- 
curity with tax free growth 
but also a hedge against in- 
flation. 

You can invest up to 1 5% 
of your earnings each year, 
to a maximum of £1,500, in the scheme. Your 
entire contribution will be eligible for full tax relief, 
and therefore comes off your income before Income 
Tax or Surtax is calculated. Which means that if 
you're paying tax at no more than 30P in the pound 
the real cost to you of an annual contribution of 
£500 would be £550. 

But the tax savings don't stop with your 
contributions. 

Your investment will accumulate completely 
free of Income Tax, Surtax and Capital Gains Tax, 
and when you decide to take the benefit of your 
investment, which may be at any age between 60 
and 70, you will receive a tax free cash lump sum 
and a pension, which will be taxed as earned income. 

An added attraction of the Abbey Investment 
Annuity Bond is its flexibility. 




contributes 

£500 
each year 



total contribution 
£10,500 



equivalent to net 
of £7350 at 

30% tax rate 



?t 



ISiffi 



assuming an investment gr 



at 65 he 
receives £8,479 
tax free 



plus 



For example, aithougn 
the minimum total contri- 
bution for the first year is 
£100, from then on how 
much you put in is up to 
you. You can contribute 
more some years, less in 
others. You can even pay 
nothing one year and start 
again the next. 

There is a unique flexi- 
bility about where your con- 
tributions are invested, too. 

You may choose whether 
they are allocated to units of 
the Abbey Pensions Pro- 
perty Fund or the Abbey 
Pensions Selective Bond 
Fund, or to any combination 
of both. 

And you can convert all 
or part of the accumulated 
investment at any time from 
one Fund to the other. 
Again, there is a flexibility about how you take 
your pension, which may be fixed, escalating or 
unit-linked. 

In addition there is a guarantee that the value of 
the benefits payable to you on retirement, or to your 
family if you should die before retirement, will 
never be less than the contributions you have made. 

To find out more, fill in the coupon and mail 
it to us. No stamp is required — we pay the postage. 



£2,753 

each year 
for life 




I'm self-employed and interested in the Abbey Investment 
Annuity Bond. Please let me have details. 



1 



Name 



_Age_ 



Address 



Send to: M. C. Bell, Abbey Life Assurance Company Limited, 
Freepost, London WC2R 1BR. CD/1/4 




Abbey Investment Annuity Bond 



442 — Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1972 




■ 




Berk Representatives mean busin 



BERK Representatives do not make "Courtesy Calls" or just "look in 
while in the neighbourhood." They know how busy you are. The BERK 
Representative gets down to business. He calls to keep you informed about 
important developments in our range of speciality products and to encourage 
your wider use of BERK Economy Brands to meet the large volume of "open 
prescriptions." 

The BERK Representative means friendly service, regular calls, outstanding 
speciality products, quality Economy Brands and better business. BERK 
Representatives work for us but they take their orders from you. 




Approved Name 


Berk Brand Name 


Presentation 


Packs 


Bendrofluazide tablets BP 


BERKOZIDE ® 


Tabs 2.5 mg 6- 5 mg 


1 00 & 1 000 


Erythromycin tablets BP 


ERYCEN ® 


Tabs 250 mg 


1 00 & 500 


Imipramine tablets BP 


BERKOMINE ® 


Tabs 1 mg 
Tabs 25 mg 


250 & 1000 
200 & 1 000 


L-dopa tablets 


BERKDOPA * 


Tabs 500 mg 


1 00 & 500 


Methyldopa tablets BP 


DOPAMET « 


Tabs 250 mg 


250 & 1000 


Nitrofurantoin tablets BP 


BERKFURIN ® 


Tabs 50 mg & 100 mg 


1 00 & 1 000 


Oxytetracycline tabs/caps BP 
and syrup 


BERKMYCEN ® 


Tabs & Caps 250 mg 
Syrup 1 25 mg/5 ml 


1 00 & 1 000 
500 ml 


Penicillin V tablets BP 


ECONOPEN ® V 


Tabs 250 mg 


100 & 500 


Phenylbutazone tablets BP 


FLEXAZONE ® 


Tabs 100 mg 
Tabs 200 mg 


250 & 1000 
250 


Quinidine sulphate tablets BP 


AURIQUIN « 


Tabs 200 mg & 300 mg 


100 & 500 


Tetracycline tabs/caps BP 
Tetracycline mixture BPC 


TETRACHEL ® 


Tabs 250 mg 
Caps 250 mg 
Syrup 1 25 mg/5 mi 


1 00 & 1 000 
100 & 500 
500 ml 


Tetracycline hydrochloride BP 
with nystatin BP tablets 


SILTETRIN « 


Tabs 250 mg 


100 



BERK PHARMACEUTICALS LIMITED • GODALMING & SHALFORD • SURREY 



® Regd. Trade Mark 



: Trade Mark 



J. 3842 



Chemist & Druggist April 1 1972—443 




7r 



Cosmetics and toiletries 

Cool Foot from Beecham 

Beecham Products have launched a com- 
plementary line to their Cool underarm 
deodorant, Cool Foot (£0-39), which is 
designed to refresh hot tired feet and 
destroy and prevent the further develop- 
ment of the skin bacteria responsible for 
odour. The product, presented in 130g 
green aerosol cans, can be sprayed through 
stockings and socks. To back the launch, 
an advertising and promotional campaign 
will take place through television, women's 
magazines and the national Press and the 
distribution of display material, including 
dump-bins, shelf liners and price cards 
(Beecham Products (UK), Beecham House, 
Great West Road, Brentford, Middlesex). 

Creme rinse with protein 

Rosedale have introduced a creme rinse 
with protein (£0-19) available with two 
different extracts, herbal being recom- 
mended for dry or normal hair and lemon 
for greasy. 

This preparation, packed in a HOcc 
bottle, should be applied after the hair is 
towelled dry, and worked evenly through. 
Two capfuls are the amount advised. 
After application, the hair should be well 
rinsed before setting (Fassett & Johnson 
Ltd, 19 Radford Crescent, Billericay, 
Essex). 

More Hoodwinks 

Cardinelli have introduced to the Hood- 
wink range of false eyelashes three new 
lines (£0-55) all available in black or 
brown. Double Cross, a natural looking 
human hair top lash is said to be knotted 
in a most revolutionary way, while the 
lower lash selection is increased by the 
arrival of Extra Long Understatement, 
also in human hair. 

In addition, there are six Wash and 
Wear lashes, made from Kanekalon fibre 
and claimed to be ideal for wearing on 
the beach and swimming because of the 
waterproof adhesive. The names of the 
six are Fables, Flappers, Sloopies, Toppers, 
Lashings, and Blinkers (Cardinelli Beauty 
Products Ltd, 339 Green Lanes, Haringey, 
London N4 1EA). 



Air Spun range extended 

Coty have launched their Air Spun Eye 
range and Air Spun Avacado Skin Care 
Collection. 

The eye make-up includes powder 
shadow (£0-45), which comes in a small 
glass bottle and is lightly frosted in a 
choice of six shades, Teal Green, Teal 
Blue, Snow Violet, Pink Mauve, Silver 
Green, Silver Taupe. The Fluid Eye liner 
(£0-50) in a small square bottle is said to 
be a new formula that will not thicken or 
separate and gives a smooth non-smearing 
line. This is available in Black, Brown, 
Blue and Green as is the Automatic 
Mascara (£0 50). 

The brow creme styler (£0 65) is de- 
signed to give the hair and skin a soft 
sheen and comes in Blonde, Soft Brown, 
Auburn and Charcoal Black, while the eye 
accent (£0-55) in Peach Lustre, Rose Lus- 
tre and Amber Lustre is a creamy blusher 
for cheeks and temples. 

The Avocado skin care collection, is 
formulated with the three major skin types 
in mind from natural organically derived 
ingredients, including the oil of the Avo- 
cado fruit. The collection comprises 
cleansing creme in 2oz (£0-50) and 4oz 
(£0-80) packs for dry and normal skins; 
milk cleanser in 4oz pack (£0-55) for nor- 
mal and oily skins, freshener (£0-60) in 
4oz containers for dry and normal skins; 
lotion toner (£0-60) in 4oz pack for oily 
skin; creme moisturiser (£0-70) in 2oz for 
dry skin; conditioning moisturiser (£0-80) 
in 2oz for normal and oily skins, recom- 
mended especially as a night treatment for 




the latter; night creme in 2oz (£0-90) and 
4oz (£135) containers and hand and nail 
care creme in 3oz size (£0-65). All these 
are to be on sale from May 1 (Coty Ltd, 
Great West Road, Brentford, Middlesex). 

Glossies and Fruti-Face 

Dorothy Gray have launched a range of 
three fruit-fragranced creamy facial 
cleansers, called Fruti-Face (£0-49), and 
packed in containers similar in appearance 
to yoghourt pots. The "flavours" are 
lemon, lime and strawberry. 

In addition, Glossies (£0-45) have been 
announced. These are a range of different 
shades of gel, presented in pots. The 
preparation for cheeks comes in Glossi 
Gleamy (no-colour), Glossi Peachy, Glossi 
Rosy and Glossi Sunny (fake tan), while 
for lips there are Glossi Brown, Glossi 
Pink, Glossi Plum and Glossi Red and 
for eyes Glossi Copper, Glossi Greeny- 
Grey, Glossi Olive and Glossi Silver-Blue 
(Gray Products Ltd, 2 Marshall Road, 
Hampden Park, Eastbourne, Sussex). 

Aronde protein shampoo 

Aronde Laboratories have introduced a 
protein shampoo (£0-22) in a 375cc bottle. 
This is the twelfth in their range of sham- 
poos and is expected to be "one of 
their most popular as it contains the valu- 
able and health-giving proteins that are 
currently so fashionable" (Aronde Labora- 
tories Ltd, Sherbourne Avenue, Binstead, 
Ryde, Isle of Wight). 

Innoxa's new spray 
The Innoxa newcomer is Free and Easy 
dry spray anti-perspirant and deodorant 
(£0-62) (Innoxa (England) Ltd, 436 Essex 
Road, London Nl). 

Sundries 

Trimma support tights 

Scholl have announced Trimma support 
tights, (£2-95), described in their advertis- 
ing as "The Support Hose that outdares 
support hose", because they say they have 
developed a unique knitting process enab- 
ling production of tights with compression 
graduated correctly according to the vary- 
ing shape of ankle, calf and thigh. The 
panty section of the sheer lycra run 
resistant micromesh is gussetted, and the 
Continued on p 444 

B 



444— -Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1972 



Continued from p 443 

product is available in two shades, Glow 
and Ash, and in four sizes. 

Scholl have also introduced a deodoriser 
for shoes (£0-39), designed to kill the 
odour-producing bacteria and decrease 
destructive fungi present in leather linings. 

The product, presented in an aerosol 
containing 140g, is said to last for at least 
four weeks for two three-second bursts 
every day. East pack of six cans comes 
in a display outer with the banner "Keeps 
shoes fresh" (Scholl (UK) Ltd, 182 St 
John Street, London SC1P 1DH). 

Passport sunglasses 
A range of sunglasses, combining fashion- 
able frames with ophthalmically correct 
lenses, is now being distributed to chemists 
by M. Bender (Northern) Ltd, Newcastle- 
upon-Tyne. 

The range, to be called Passport by 
Martinelli, consists of 19 designs which 
retail from £4-75-£6-25, and are manufac- 
tured in Sydney, Australia by Martin 
Wells Pty Ltd. 

Each style is available in a choice of two 
fashion colours and lenses blend with the 
colours of the frames, 14 being plastic 
and five metal. 

Lenses are manufactured from CR 39 
resin which gives approximately 70 per 
cent absorption, is half the weight of glass 
and four times as strong (M. Bender 
(Northern) Ltd, Byker Village, Welbeck 
Road, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE6 2DY). 

PRESCRIPTION 
SPECIALITIES 

BRGCADOPA Temlabs 

Manufacturer Brocades (Great Britain) Ltd, 
Trend House, Pyrford Road, West Byfleet, 
Surrey 

Description White double-scored sustained 
release tablets each containing 500mg 
levodopa 

Indications, etc As for Brocadopa capsules 
Notes The product is said to have a release 
pattern over three hours and to give a 
substantial reduction in the incidence and 
severity of side effects 

Pack Securitainers of 100 Temtabs (£4-46 
trade) 

Supply restrictions PI, S4B 

Issued Hospitals : March. General practice : 

during April 1972 

ONDONID tablets 

Manufacturer Roussel Laboratories Ltd, 
Roussel House, Wembley Park, Middlesex 
HA9 ONF 

Description Tablets each containing cyclo- 
fenil lOOmg and marked with the letter "O" 
on one side and "RL" on the reverse 
Indications Anovulatory infertility, sub- 
fertility due to oligo-ovulation, amenorrhoea 
and oligomenorrhoea 

Contraindications Liver disease or a history 
of liver dysfunction 

Dosage Beginning three days after the onset 
of natural or progesterone induced bleeding, 
two tablets twice a day for 10 days followed 
by 20 davs without treatment, If menstrua- 
tion should occur during this interval treat- 
ment should recommence on day 3 of the new 
cycle. Treatment should be continued for a 



minimum of three months unless pregnancy 
is achieved 

Side effects Said to be insignificant. Mild 
intestinal disturbances and general malaise. 
Rarely cholestatic jaundice 
Pack 60 tablets (£4-95 trade) 
Supply restrictions TSA. Use is restricted to 
hospitals and clinics studying and treating 
infertility and menstrual dysfunction ; to 
prescriptions originating from those sources 
and from consultant practices with access to 
laboratory facilities 
Issued March 1972 

TANDERIL eye ointment 

Manufacturer Geigy Pharmaceuticals, Hurds- 
field Industrial Estate, Macclesfield, Cheshire 
SK10 2LY 

Description Eye ointment containing oxyphen- 
butazone 10 per cent in a fatty base, with 
phenyl ethyl alcohol 0-5 per cent 
Indications Conjunctivitis, blepharitis, kerato- 
conjunctivitis, episcleritis, keratitis and disease 
of the anterior uveal tract. Also following 
surgical procedures and for inflammation 
following trauma 

Method of use Should be applied to the 
affected eye two to five times a day 
Precautions Should be used with caution in 
cases of glaucoma secondary to injury or 
infection. In purulent inflammatory condi- 
tions anti-infective therapy should be given 
concurrently 

Side effects Intolerance may develop after 
continued use exhibited as oedema of the 
eyelid, epiphora Cminimal), redness of the 
palpebral and bulbar conjunctiva 
Pack Tubes of 5g (£0-48, trade) 
Supply restrictions PI, S4B 
Issued April 1972 

STOMAHESIVE 

Manufacturer E. R. Squibb & Sons Ltd, 

Moreton, Wirral, Cheshire 

Description A protective plaster, made from 

gelatin, pectin, carboxymethyl-cellulose and 

polyisobutylene. It is coated one side with 

an impermeable polythene film and on the 

adhesive side with a parchment release paper 

Indications Peristomal skin-care in ileostomy, 

colostomy, ileal conduits and fistulae of the 

uDner gastro-intestinal tract 

Method of use A cutting guide is provided 

to facilitate the fashioning of a centre hole 

which will fit closely to the stoma — complete 

instructions are included in the pack 

Storage Store in a cool place 

Pack Box of five 4in X 4in squares (£2-75 

trade) 

Issued April 7. 1972 



TANDERIL ALKA tablets 

Manufacturer Geigy Pharmaceuticals, Maccles- 
field, Cheshire, SK10 2LY 
Description Light beige compression coated 
tablets each containing oxyphenbutazone 
lOOmg, dried aluminium hydroxide gel lOOmg 
and magnesium trisilicate 150mg 
Indications Rheumatic and allied conditions 
including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis 
and ankylosing spondylitis 
Contraindications Oedema or hypertension 
where there is a danger of cardiac decom- 
pensation, also in renal and hepatic disease ; 
history of dyspepsia, peptic ulceration or 
hlood dyscrasia 

Dosage Initially 2 tablets two or three times 
daily, with meals, for two to three days, 
then 1 tablet three or four times daily or 
as required for maintenance therapy 
Notes The coated tablets consist of a mantle 
of the two antacids surrounding a central 
core of oxyphenbutazone. Incidence of gastric 
upset may be significantly reduced with 
Tanderil Alka 

Precautions May potentiate coumarin type 
anticoagulants indicating prothrombin level 
estimation during concurrent therapy. Poten- 
tiates certain oral hypoglycaemic agents and 
sulphonamides 

Side effects Gastric irritation and oedema 
due to sodium retention 
Pack Of 100 (£1-69 trade) 
Supply restrictions PI, S4B 
Issued April 1972 

SUSPAL injection 

Manufacturer Omega Laboratories Ltd, 
Montreal, Canada 

Distributor L.R.B. Pearce Ltd, 125 High 
Holborn, London WC1V 6QJ 
Description Rubber stoppered vials of 
pyridine-extracted, aluminium-absorbed, aller- 
genic extract 

Indications Treatment of allergy disorders, 
eg hay fever, asthma, rhinitis, etc 
Dosage Usually 10-14 injections followed by 
a maintenance dose every 4-8 weeks 
Precautions The usual precautions in the 
administration of allergenic extracts should 
be observed 

Side effects Severe local or systemic reactions 
are rare 

Storage Below 4°C 

Diluent A special buffered saline diluent is 
available 

Packs Sets of 3 X 5ml vials 100, 1,000 and 
10,000 PNU (£4-50 trade), also bulk con- 
centrates available 
Issued February 1972 




& 



ON THE 
MOVE 
AGAIN 

Alfred Franks 
Bartlett Co. Ltd. 




Take pride in announcing the opening of their combined 
new modern offices, showrooms and warehouse at 

BARTEX HOUSE 
Tel. No.: 01-960 0922/8 167-185 FRESTON ROAD 

Telex No.: 923223 LONDON W10 6TH 

Office opened 27th March, 1972. 



Chemist & Druggist April 1 1972 — 445 





New design for Houbigant 

A redesign for the packaging of the 
Monsieur Houbigant range has been 
carried out for Houbigant Ltd, 76 City 
Road, London EC1. The outers now in- 
corporate a black and brown design with 
brand names blocked in gold or silver on 
a black background panel. In addition to 
the seven new packs, there are two new 
wrap-round aerosol can labels for the 
spray talc and spray deodorants. 

Wilkinson alterations 

Wilkinson Sword Ltd, Sword Works, 
Southfield Road, London W4, have an- 
nounced that their aerosol shaving soap 
will be launched in an 8oz can, with a 
special cap including two razor blades. In 
addition their razor carton has been re- 
designed, incorporating the traditional 
black and gold colours with transparent 
panel to show the razor. 

To support these moves, there are two 
new display units — one holding six cans 
of the soap and six razors, backed by a 
slot-in showcard, and the other is tiered 
and designed to contain six soap aerosols, 
plus a slot-in card drawing attention to 
the new size. The bonded shaving system, 
which won a Council of Industrial Design 
Award, is also being supported with new 
point-of-sale material. 

Ster-Zac not reformulated 

Hough, Hoseason & Co Ltd, Levenshulme, 
Manchester M19 3PT, ask us to point out 

Faberge Inc, Ridgeway, Iver, Bucks SLO 
9JG have introduced a hand size Xanadu 
extra-strength 1oz Cologne (£0-85), 
packed in a silver box with see-through 
front. 






that their Ster-Zac bath concentrate is not 
to be reformulated (as was incorrectly 
stated in last week's Babycare supplement, 
p 5). It is, they point out, a prescription 
only product. It is not widely used for the 
bathing of babies but is mostly used in 
hospitals and against prescriptions for the 
treatment of chronic and recurrent furun- 
culosis. 

Nor is it their intention to reformulate 
Ster-Zac, DC, which is primarily a surgical 
scrub and is not advertised to the public. 
Its use by the public is predominantly 
under medical advice. 

Ster-Zac powder is a prescription-only 
product and will not be reformulated. 

Retail pharmacists throughout the coun- 
try will be receiving instructions in rela- 
tion to exchange of stocks of Zac baby 
cream and Zac baby powder during the 
next few days. These two products, which 
are chemist only lines, have been reformu- 
lated and stocks are available from 
chemists wholesalers. 

Metanium new size 

Bengue & Co Ltd, Mount Pleasant, Alper- 
ton, Middlesex HAO 1TX announce the 
introduction of a 35g jar presentation of 
Metanium ointment (£0-32). Available 
this month. 

Beecham use Confravision 

To introduce AH Fresh clean up squares 
to sales managers, Beecham Products 
used the Post Office's inter-city television 
link, Confravision. 

This enabled a panel of sales and mar- 
keting executives at the Euston Tower 
studio in London to make an hour long 
call to the audience in Bristol, thus saving 
transportation costs and valuable executive 
time. This medium provides the oppor- 



tunity for a two-way discussion to take 
place between any of five cities — so far, 
London, Glasgow, Birmingham, Manches- 
ter and Bristol. 

Commenting on the success of the 
presentation, a Beecham spokesman said : 
"We were highly delighted with the whole 
operation. We were able to deliver a 
detailed briefing to people who would 
not normally be able to participate due to 
office commitments. 

"We found that rather than diminishing 
the effect of a marketing presentation, 
the medium provided ideal conditions for 
a far greater degree of concentration by 
both sides." 

Distribution change 

The Kaylene Division of Dearborn 
Chemicals Limited have announced that 
from May 1, 1972 their agency arrange- 
ment with Vestric Ltd will be concluded 
and all orders for their products should 
be sent to Dearborn Chemicals Ltd, Wid- 
nes Lancashire. 

It is proposed to operate a 15 per cent 
wholesalers discount from chemists' prices 
and a minimum order value of £10 at ex- 
works prices with carriage charged extra 
will be operative, or alternatively a mini- 
mum order value of £15 carriage paid, will 
apply. 

Deb alteration 

Deb Chemical Proprietaries Ltd, Forfar 
Works, Belper, Derbyshire are again assu- 
ming responsibility for sales of their 
Swarfega hand cleanser to retail outlets 
from April 1, when the three year arrange- 
ment with the agency, Cooper, McDougall 
& Robertson Ltd ends. Therefore, Deb 
ask that all orders should be sent direct 
to Belper. 



; HifllFH 

iy| 1 II iiii iUI 

Vacco Ltd, Grosvenor Gardens, London 
SW1. Vacco models VMS, VMSQ, VBB 
and VBBQ 50 per cent discount on cost 
(extended to April 30). 

Winthrop Laboratories, Winthrop House, 
Surbiton-upon-Thames, Surrey. Hayphryn. 

24 invoiced as 20 (through wholesalers 
during April). 

Antibiotics & Vitamins Ltd, 43 Worship 
Street, London EC2. Oralcer. 2 tubes of 

25 pellets on a 2 dozen display outer. 
Offer to continue until May 1. 

Menley & James Laboratories, division 
of Smith Kline & French Laboratories 
Ltd, Welwyn Garden City, Herts. Triso- 
novin 13 invoiced as 12. 54 invoiced as 
48. [Corrected note.] 

Cuxson, Gerrard & Co Ltd, Fountain 
Lane, Oldbury, Warley, Worcs. Zinc starch 
and talc dusting powder BPC. Fourteen 
invoiced as 12 (for three months from 
April 1 obtained direct and for April 
only through wholesalers). 

Parke, Davis & Co, Usk Road, Pontypool, 
Mon NP4 8YH. Caladryl. Offers for 
cream, lotion and aerosol ranging from 

26 invoiced as 24 for cream and lotion to 
120 invoiced as 96 for cream and lotion. 
Soladryl. 14 invoiced as 12 in display outer 
and packed in new plastic tubes. 




446 — Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1972 




Signal 2 number two 

The latest AGB analysis shows that Signal 
2 toothpaste has been the second fastest 
selling brand for the past three months, 
with a volume share of 15 per cent of the 
market, according to Gibbs. 

This they attribute to having begun 
building last year the brand image of be- 
ing suitable for the entire family and 
caring for children's teeth, backed by 
national television advertising. Signal 2, 
they add, is the only really success story 
for a fluoride toothpaste in the UK, and 
big expenditure both above and below 
the line is planned for this year also (Elida 
Gibbs Ltd, PO Box IDY, Portman Square, 
London Wl). 

Lempak change tactics 

The advertising campaign for Christy's 
Lempak range of skin care products is to 
be directed through mass circulation 
magazines, instead of television and 
national newspapers. The publications 
involved in the campaign, between the 
beginning of April to the end of July and 
from October to November, are Honey, 
19, She, Annabel, Flair, Jackie, Woman 
and Home, Cosmopolitan, My Weekly, 
Woman's Realm and Petticoat (Thos. 
Christy & Co Ltd, North Lane, Aldershot, 
Hants). 

Airwick solid advertising doubled 

A record £100,000 advertising campaign 
for Airwick Solid, the "24-hour-a-day 
freshener", breaks this montih, and Jeyes 
are predicting the product will become 
" undisputed brand leader in only the 
second year of its life". There are to be 
whole page advertisements in Woman, 
Women's Realm, Woman's Weekly, Good 
Housekeeping, Family Circle, My Weekly, 
Woman and Home, She, TV Times, 
Homes and Gardens and Ideal Home to 
reach 82 4 per cent of its target housewife 
audience (Jeyes UK Ltd, Brunei Way, 
Thetford, Norfolk). 

Ronson display units 

Ronson have announced two new display 
units for their range of shavers and 
accessories. 

The SM 119 has been designed to hold 
the complete range, and is finished in 
white polyurethane with aluminium top 
and base trim. Fully illuminated by 
fluorescent lighting, the interior has a 
glass shelf and displays the shavers against 




a bright blue background. It is lockable, 
measures 18|in high x 20in wide x 12in 
deep and is available to Ronson stockists 
at £5. 

The shaver accessory wire dispenser 
unit SM 104, is supplied free against bulk 
orders for spares. In addition, the com- 
pany has announced a Press advertising 
campaign for the battery shaver running 
from April to June, spearheaded by the 
Daily Express and followed by Camping 
and Caravanning, Caravan, Practical 
Caravan, Yachting World, Motor Sport, 
Motor Boat and Angler's Mail (Ronson 
Products Ltd, Randalls Road, Leather- 
head, Surrey). 




Chesebrough-Pond's new counter unit 
for Spray 'n Stay 

Hermesetas 'money-ofi' 

Until the end of April Hermesetas are 
flashed with 5p off for the 650 pack and 
2p off the 300 pack. In order to preserve 
retailers' margins, trade prices per dozen 
are reduced by £018 for 300 packs and 
£0-45 for 650 packs (Crookes Anestan Ltd, 
Telford Road, Houndmills Estate, Basing- 
stoke, Hants). 

Bathtime Boutique 

Jean Sorelle have introduced a Bathtime 
Boutique, designed to promote toiletries 
for gifts. This is in the form of a metal 
display unit with header-board, and holds 
six different combinations of products all 
at £0-30. The packs include three miniature 
bubble baths; two bath cubes, one guest 
soap, one shampoo; three bath cubes, two 
guest soaps; two bubble baths, one guest 
soap (Jean Sorelle Ltd, 117 Great Portland 
Street, London WIN 6AH). 

Faberge counter units 

Three new counter display units have just 
been introduced by Faberge. One, in 
amethyst, holds 12 of the new Xanadu 
loz handbag size sprays. 

Kiku loz Cologne is reintroduced in a 
black unit which hold six bottles, boxed in 
yellow, while Eau de Parfum sprays of 
the same fragrance comes in a yellow and 
gold merchandiser (Faberge Inc. Ridge- 
way, Iver, Bucks SL0 9JG). 



A to Z of dental health 

A new alphabet leaflet which examines 
dental health is now available from Punch 
and Judy toothpaste. Designed to attract 
parents as well as children, points raised 
include the fact that some two-year-olds 
have been known to need dentures because 
they have eaten too many sweets without 
teeth having been cleaned (Reckitt & 
Colman toiletries division, Sunnydale, 
Derby). 

Boldest campaign yet 

LR Industries have launched what they 
describe as the boldest consumer adver- 
tising campaign yet for their Durex contra- 
ceptives, due to run until the end of July. 

Among the publications in which the 
product will appear are Hers, Honey, 19, 
Nova, True Magazine, Woman, Woman's 
Own, Petticoat, Reader's Digest, Student, 
Brides, Daily Mirror, Sun, News of the 
World, People and Sunday Mirror. The 
theme of the campaign is "Which contra- 
ceptive should we choose?", because, say 
the company, their research has shown 
there is a lack of information about the 
subject in the 16-44 age group (LR Indus- 
tries Ltd, North Circular Road, London 
E4). 

All Fresh on television 

Due for June and July is a £100,000 
national television advertising campaign 
for All Fresh clean up squares. 

This boost, covering 95 per cent of the 
target, will be supported by a 3p off cou- 
pon being incorporated in a holiday plan- 
ning booklet issued through tour operators 
and redeemable against one box of the 
product through stockists. The booklet will 
also contain an editorial feature on All 
Fresh, reaching an estimated L35 million 
holiday makers (Beecham Products (UK). 
Beecham House, Great West Road, Brent- 
ford, Middlesex). 

New Complan slogan 

Packets of Complan now carry the flash 
"Brimful of Nourishment", and it is 
reflected in the modified floor display unit 
for the product which holds two cases of 
Complan and carries a three-dimensional 
headboard (Glaxo Laboratories Ltd, 
Greenford, Middlesex). 




In '= London; M = Midland; Lc = Lancashire; 
Y = Yorkshire; Sc = Scotland; WW = Wales 
and West; So = South; NE = North-east; A = 
Anglia; U = Ulster; We = Westward; B = 
Border; Q = Grampian; E = Eireann; CI = 
Channel Islands. 

Anadin: All except G, E 
Andrews Liver Salt: All except U, E 
Astral: M, Y, Sc, NE, A, B, G 
Dry Action Shield: All except E 
Harmony hairspray: All except E 
Protein 21: All except E 
Silvikrin hairspray: All except E 
Sunsilk shampoo and hairspray: All 
except E 

Tegrin medicated shampoo: All except 
So, E 

Twice as Lasting: All except E 
Wilkinson Sword bonded shaving 
system: All except E 



Chemist & Druggist April 1 1972 — 447 



If you're not cashing in 
on Britain's top selling 
anti-perspirant deodorant 



you should 
be ashamed 
of your shelf 



When more than one brand 
claims brand leadership, 
someone's got to be kidding. 

We wouldn't fool you about 
New Body Mist. 

Continuing audits over the 
years have always shown Body Mist 
as the most popular brand. 

Nearly twice as much New Body Mist s 
is bought in grocers and chemists 
than any other anti-perspirant deodorant. 

So, in your business as well as ours . . . 




It pays to take care 
of Number One 




When quality 
really counts 




And when does quality not really 
count ? 

Regent Laboratories are meticulous 
about quality control. It is rigidly 
applied as a continuous process 
ensuring every product is made to the 
very highest standard. 
Regent offer a personal service, 
custom manufacturing, private 



labelling, export service and delivery 
from stock, to the wholesale trade only. 
Send for complete details of the range 
of generic tablets, capsules and custom 
manufacturing services to 

Regent Laboratories Ltd 

Cunard Road Park Royal London NW1 

01 -965 3637/9 Cables: Vitakap London 




REGENT LABORATORIES LTD 



'Contac400' 
for 12 months 
continuous profit! 




lement to Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1972 



HEMIST & DRUGGIST 

rice service 



MULATIVE AMENDMENT 
FEBRUARY 
ARTERLY PRICE LIST 



W TAX-INCLUSIVE RETAIL PRICES 



BERTO CULVER CO 

aerosoL 40g £0.26; 60g £0.30; 
20g £0.43 
issues £0.22 

Fresh antiperspirant £0.40; deo- 
orant £0.40 

Sethairspray 120g £0.24; 303g 

:o.39 

hampoo sachets £0.03; 560cc 

£0.44 
5 hairdressing £0.33 
iairspray 130g £0.42; 220g £0.60; 
landbag £0.30; salon £0.82 

DRE PHILIPPE LTD 
sr shave lotion 103 £0.34 
h essence 9 £0.44 
)ble bath 

ubble bottle 25 £0.28 

andlestick 7 £0.37 

ocktail 30 £0.73 
:ontinental 35 £0.95 
iecanter 8 £0.70 
iimple 2 £0.12 
)iggy bank 21 £0.30 

ing bottle 28 £0.28 
slim diamond 14 £0.50 

wan dimple 3 £0.28; baby 1 £0.12 
wist bottle 6 £0.18 
lnicorn 16 £0.97 
logne 

jubble bottle 38 £0.28 

iimple 37 £0.12 

ring bottle 29 £0.28 

slim diamond 24 £0.50 

3wan dimple baby 36 £0.12; 23 

£0.28 
wist 27 £0.18 
onicorn 18 £0.97 
logne/lavender 34 £0.95 
ip guest ovals (6) 31 £0.35 
let water decanter 26 £0.70 
poleon Desiree perfume lOcc £2.25; 
L8ec £3.30; 30cc £4.25; Cologne 
48cc £2.75; 96cc £4.30; 175cc 



£6.70 

hi eau de parfum 48cc £2.75; 94cc 
£4.30; 195cc £6.95 

ARNOLD HAIR & SKIN INSTITUTE 

Gralac £0.591; £1.01j 

Safoin colour gloss oil £0.59l; glamour 

rinse £0.59! 
Youthexa 

after hair lotion £0.59! 

astringent cream £0.59j; £1.01j 

cleansing cream £0.591; El.OlJ 

easy hair tint £0.59! 

eyelash tonic cream £0.52! 

hair Grokair £0.59i 
tinting crayon £0.52! 
remover stick £0.52! 

pine shampoo £0.35 

powderstone hair eraser £1.0lJ 

skin food £0.59l; £1.0l| 

wrinkle cream £0.59l; £1.0l! 

BURROUGHS WELLCOME & CO 
Tineafax £0.17! 

Wellcome aspirin tablets 100 £0.17! 
phenacetin tablets 25 £0.101; 100 
£0.24! 

CALMIC LTD 

Alusac tablets 40 £0.44; 200 £2.01 
Cerevon tablets 100 £0.33 
Cicatrin aerosol £1.07; cream 15g 

£0.591; 100g £2.62l; powder 15g 

£0.591; 50g £1.49 
Laevoral 250ml £1.14 
Laevoral C 100ml £0.59l 
S7 cream £0.38l; jelly £0.241; 

powder 15g £0.15; 75g £0.77 

D.R.COLLINS LTD 
Aqua Manda 

after shave £0.42 

anti-perspirant £0.40 

fragrance 28cc £0.36; 104cc £0.63; 
210cc £1.00; spray £0.50 

golden body rub £0.50 



hand lotion £0.34 

herbal bath oil sachet £0.07; bottle 
£0.50 

foam bath sachet £0.07; bottle 
£0.44 

oatmeal beauty soap £0.14 

shampoo sachet £0.07; bottle £0.34 

talcum £0.31 
Care hand cream £0.20 
Cedar Wood for men 

after shave £0.36 

antiperspirant spray £0.40; stick 
£0.32 

Cologne £0.41 

foam shave £0.44 

hair cream £0.29; spray £0.40 

pre-electric shave £0.36 

shave cream brushless £0.24; 
lather £0.24 

shaving bowl £0.53; refill £0.31 

talcum £0.27; £0.40 
Goya 

bath blossoms £0.27 
Cologne £0.30; stick £0.30 
foam bath £0.07 
fragrance spray £0.47 
hand lotion £0.30 
perfume phial £0.30 
spray set £0.38; unperfumed £0.42 
splash fragrance £0.50 
talcum £0.27; £0.40 
Meadows ong 
bath oil sachet £0.07; bottle £0.50 
foam bath sachet £0.07; bottle 
£0.46 

fragrance 28cc £0.39; 96cc £0.62; 

190cc £1.08; spray £0.53 
green milk massage E0.50 
hand lotion £0.35 
scrub soap £0.14 
talcum £0.30 
Sombrero cream £0.23 

G BARKER (LIQUID OF LIFE) LTD 
Barker's antiseptic cream £0.25 
Liquid of Life £0.20; £0.50; tablets 
£0.50 

BDH PHARMACEUTICALS LTD 

Almacarb tablets 40 £0.26l; 200 £1.05 

Baumol soap E 0.081 

Colliron 150ml £0.39 

Entair capsules 30 £0.53 

Entair-A capsules 30 £0.53 

Locan suppositories £0.26 

BENGUE & CO LTD 
Agocholine granules £0.37 
Anaxeryl £0.281 

Antalby suppositories adults £0.39l; 

children £0.39l; tablets £0.39! 
Bengue's balsam original £0.201; 

greaseless £0.201 
Magnogene tablets £0.79! 
Neo-Rhinamid £0.20l 



Nestosyl anaesthetic oil aerosol £0.56; 

ointment £0.22! 
Opobyl pills £0.32 
Passiorine 100ml £0.32 
Pulmo Bailly £0.28! 
Pyorex £0.19 

Trinuride tablets 100 £2 . 08 
Veltis unperfumed £ 0.201; perfumed 
40g £0.14; 70g £0.20! 

BOOTS COMPANY LTD 
Ardinex 100 £0.84 

Dijex liquid £0.15!; tablets 30 £0.14; 

300 £1.37 
E45 cream 50g £0.20l; 500g £0.52! 
Mycota spray £0.27! 

H.BRONNLEY & CO LTD 

after bath Cologne travel £0.17: lOoz 

£0.58; Japonica £0.68 
antiseptic lotion £0.37 
baby coffret £0.99; lotion £0.27; 

powder £0.22; soap £0.20 
bath crystals 0074 £0.55; 0402 £1.10; 

0438 £0.60; cubes 0066 £0.06; 

essence £0.65 
bubble bath 5oz £0.44; lOoz £0.62; 

travel £0.17; herb £0.55; Japonica 

£0.59; sachets £0.06 
deodorant £0.22; £0.38 
hand and body lotion 5oz £0.37; lOoz 

£0.50; travel £0.17; Japonica £0.50 
Happy bath day £0.32 
Happy Hands £0.32 
Happy lemon day £0.35; bath day 

£0.35 

soaps antiseptic £0.17; bath ball 
£0.70; herb bath £0.31; herb 
visitors £0.11; herb 1143 £0.31; 
de luxe £0.25; fruit punnets £0.18; 
hearts visitors; lemon toilet £0.18; 
bath £0.29; on rope £0.46; jumbo 
on rope £0.60; orange toilet £0.18; 
rainbow £0.15; eggs 12 £0.30; 
basket of 5 £0.38; pre-make up 
£0.17; sponge £0.50; sea shell 
£0.55; turtle oil visitors £0.10; 
toilet £0.15; bath £0.23; bath in 
container £0.26 

ARTHUR H. COX & CO LTD 
Calazean cream £0.16! 
Conquerors £0.38 

Entroquin tablets 20 £0.19l; 80 £0.63 
Vanispot £0.38 

CROOKES LABORATORIES 
Emetrol 150ml £0.6l! 
Iodine oil 28ml £0.171; 100ml £0.39! 
Karvol capsules 10 £0.15 
Maalox suspension £0.571; tablets 
£0.66 

CUSTOM SYNTHETICS LTD 
Acderm £0.50 



specify vVellcome If nsu I i ns 

Soluble • Lente • Protamine • Globin ■ Isophane and 'Nuso' Neutral Insulin 

Wellcome Burroughs Wellcome & Co. (The Wellcome Foundation Ltd.) Dartford, Kent * Trade Mark 



2 



Supplement to Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1 



Dantrol £0.50 

Canadian healing oil £0.26 

DEARBORN CHEMICALS LTD 
Kaylene £0.21 

Kaylene-oil £0.42; with phenolphtha- 

lein £0.42 
Magsorbent powder 50g £0.15; 150g 

£0.29; tablets £0.20 

FBA PHARMACEUTICALS LTD 
Bayer aspirin tablets 100 £0.26 

FULFORD WILLIAMS INTERNA- 
TIONAL LTD 
Bablets £0.134 

Barret Swiss hand treatment £0.31 
Bilax £0.164 

Cutipen £0.29; refill £0.21 

Doans ointment £0.17; pills £0.164; 

£0.32; £0.49 
Handjoy £0.15 
lockvox £0.29 

Nutrinal £0.29; refill £0.21 
Prodan £0.37 

GOLDEN LTD 
Ambre Solaire 

Apres Soleil £0.554 

creme 50g £0.384; lOOg £0.59 

duo tan aerosol £0.67; bottle 
£0.644; tube £0.384 

lait hydratant £0.554 

mousse aerosol £0.67 

non greasy aerosol £0.67 

oil 60cc £0.384; 120cc £0.59 

aerosol £0.67 

oil free lotion £0.554 
Belle argent £0.38 
Belle color £0.39 
Color Glo £0.25 
Color Match £0.42 
Dop shampoo mini £0.06; (5) £0.18; 

(10) £0.33 
Elnett satin 75g £0.34; 130g £0.50: 

245g £0.72; 300g £0.81; 500g £1.24; 

special £0.59 
L'Oreal bleach £0.28 
Reban setting lotion 1 dose £0.124; 

95cc £0.50; shampoo sachet £0.084; 

95cc £0.40 
Recital £0.79 
Tintette £0.49 
Tress £0.27 

Twice as Lasting £0.094; £0.33; with 
colour £0.09 4 

HARVEY -SCRUTON LTD 
Nurse Harvey's 

baby powder 4oz £0.12; 8oz £0.184 

gripe mixture £0.17 

INTERFRAN MANAGEMENT LTD 
anti-perspirant cream £2.12; liquid 

£2.12; spray £2.12 
Blanchair £2.15 

Esoterica cream original £1.49; facial 
£1.49; fortified £2.10; special 
£2.15; hand lotion £1.12 

Hermerex beauty serum loz £1.27 
soap (3) £1.65 

INTERNATIONAL LABORATORIES 
LTD 

Aero dry shampoo £0.18 

Balm Dalet £0.22 

Carmil £0.184 

Crampex £0.17 

Damaskin leg make up £0.19-4 

Denelen £0.18 

Do-Do linctus £0.30; tablets 8 £0.10; 

24 £0.24; 100 £0.824 
Linco-Beer shampoo sachet £0.05; 

2oz £0.15; 8oz £0.51 
Migraleve duo pack 12 £0.39; 24 

£0.69-|; pink tablets 12 £0.42; 

yellow tablets 8 £0.20| 
Mu-cron liquid £0.21; tablets 12 

£0.18j; 30 £0.33 
Relaxa-Tabs 18 £0.184; 36 £0.294 
Respaton lozenges 48 £1.26 
Turns £0.07 



JOHNSON WAX LTD 

Us antiperspirant 6oz f 0.41; 

8oz £0.50 

bath additive f 0.47 



ELI LILLY & CO LTD 
Cologel £0.63 

Histadyl EC syrup 450ml £0.90; 

2.251 £3.94 
Sedatussin 450ml £0.55; 2.251 £2.28 
Vortel Pulvules 100 f 1.18; syrup 

120ml £0.49; 450ml f 1.49 

MILES LABORATORIES LTD 
Alka -Seltzer 12 tablets £0.15 
Gluca-Seltzer £0.20 

NICHOLAS PRODUCTS LTD 
Aspro 60's £0.32; 120's £0.55 
Norsebad 60cc £0.45; 120cc 
£0.87 

Radox £0.17: £0.26; footspray £0.48 
Rennie 100's £0.31 
Trugel standard £0.22; economy 
£0.35 

NORGINE LTD 

Carbomucil £0.53 

Enzypan 40 £0.39; 120 £0.88 

Glucanal £1.40 

Muripsin £0.63 

Normacol antispasmodic lOOg 
£0.39; 250g £0.88; 500g £1.58; 
special lOOg £0.35; 250g 
£0.79; 500g £1.45; 2k £5.60; 
standard lOOg £0.35; 250g 
£0.79; 500g £1.45; 2k £5.60 

Peralvex £0.53 

Spasmonal f 0. 53 

Ulceal £0.47 

PARKE DAVIS Si CO 
Alophen pills 50 £0.174; 

500 £0.964 
analgesic balm 25g £0.23 
Bardase tablets 50 £0.37; 500 

£3.20| 
Benylets 24 £0.14 
Benylln expectorant 125ml £0.274 
Benylin with codeine 125ml £0.314 
Caladryl lotion 125m £0.21; 

2.251 £2.59; aerosol spray 

£0.394; cream 42g £0.184; 

500g £1.364 
Capsolin 38g £0. 174 
Cascara Evacuant 42m £0.2l4; 

125ml £0.51; 500ml £1.734 
Cltralka liquid 500ml £0.40| 
Cosylan 125ml £0.28 
Desibyl Kapseals 50 £0.49 
Elase 30ml £1.154; ointment lOg 

£0.98; 30g £1.784 
Euthymol toothpaste standard 

£0. 144; large £ 0.214 
Geriplex Kapseals 25 £0.734; 

100 £2.80 
Kaogel 150ml £0.3l4; 360ml £0.58 

£0.58 

Metatone 250ml £0.264; 500ml 
£0.454 

Glanta liquid 150ml f0.3l4; 

360ml f O.685; tablets 24 £0.264; 

100 £0.93 
Mylocan drops 30ml £0.524; tablets 

100 £0.874 
Neko soap £0.10j 
Skrub Kreme 300ml £0.6l| 
shaving cream brushless £0.174; 

lather £0.174 
skin balm liquid £0.35; tube £0.23 
Soladryl suntan cream standard 

£0.21; large £0.30 
Taka-Diastase liquid 125ml £0.314; 

500ml £1.10|; 

powder 25g £1.00; tablets 

150mg 100 £0.70; sedative 

elixir 500ml £1.19 
Taka-Diastase, pepsin and 

pancreatin tablets 100 £0.93 
Takazyma 50g £0.3l|; 500g E2.01J; 

lozenges 30 £0.23; 100 £0.58; 

1000 £4.8li 
Vi-Siblin 500g £1.33 
Kaogel 41 £5.83 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

SPECIALITIES (MAY & BAKER LTD) 

Phytodermine cream 25g £0.23; 

powder £0.23 
Zephrol cough syrup £0.17-2 

POLAROID (UK) LTD 
cameras Big Shot £15.30; 



Colorpack 80 £16.95; 
Colorpack III £23.30; model 
320 £35.95; model 340 
£54.95; model 350 £81.95; 
Square Shooter 2 £13.30; 
Super Swinger f 7.30; 
Swinger II £5.95 
films types 20 £0.70; 87 £0.93; 
88 £1.59; 107 £1.13; 108 
£2.05; 42 £1.36; 47 £1.45 

RADIOL CHEMICALS LTD 

Aradolene £0.25 

Bone Radiol liniment £0.80; 

£1.58; £6.51 
BR healing jelly £0.23 
Colic Radiol £0.494 
Dianimol syrup 25ml £0.20; 

50ml f0.29; 100ml £0.394; 

450ml £0.97; 21 £2.93 
Radian A 25ml £0. 194; 50ml 

£0.294; 450ml £2.06 
Radian B 50ml £ 0.204; 100ml 

E0.28J; 200ml £0.40; 450ml 

£0.81; 21 £3.46 
Radian bath salts 450g £0.26; 

3kg 1.48; massage cream 40g 

£0.22; lOOg £0.32; 450g £0.81 
Radiol fly repellent £0. 22 

colic £0.494; 4 oils 350ml 

0.95; 21 £3.93; electuary 120g 

£0.424; 560g £0.99; leg wash 

£0.244; spirit dressing £1.32; 

liniment £0.75; f3.46 
Stevens ointment £0.494 

RIMMEL INTERNATIONAL LTD 
H.E. after bath talc £0.33 

after shave freshener £0.33 

after shave Cologne £0.62 

anti-perspirant deodorant £0.49 

hair groom £0.39 

silky shave £0.51 
Rimmel r 

base coat £0. 13 

beauty glove hand cream f 0. 17 

blush stick pearly £0. 29 

cleansing milk £0.17; pads £0.14 

cold cream £0. 22 

Cologne floral £0. 22; classic 
£0.33 

compressed powder £0. 14; 

compact £0.29; antishine 

£0.18; translucent £0.22 
cuticle remover £0. 13 
eyelid gloss £0.22 
eyeliner brush 0.15; cake £0.13; 

liquid £0.18 
eyelash outfit £0.70; adhesive 

refill £0.17 
eye make-up cabinet £1.02; 

removing lotion £0.18 
eye pencils £0. 13 
eye shadow applicator £0.18; 

brush £0.22; compressed £0.14; 

cream f0.13; frosted £0.17; 

frosted collection £0.50; shadow 

and eyeliner frosted £0.55; 

palette £0.32; stick £0.13; 

duo brush £0.33 
Grey -away shampoo £0.14 
hair colourant shampoo £ . 14 
herbal face mask £0.24 
hide and heal stick f 0. 17 
lip brush £0.30 
lip and lid gloss f 0. 18 
lip glosser £0. 17 
lip glow pearly £0. 18 
lipstick push up £0. 14; twist up 

£0.22; moisturised £0.27 
liquid make-up £0.13 
make-up brush £0.32; stick 

f0.24 

mascara block £0.14; brush -on 

£0. 29; lash thickener £0. 22; 

original £0.33; roll-on £0.15; 

wipe off pads £0. 14 
medicated make-up cake £0.18; 

liquid £0.27 
moisturised make-up f0.24; 

skin food £0.27 
nail lacquer £0.13; frosted opal 

£0.29; Pearlised f 0. 17; 

remover £0.17; remover pads 

f0.17; strengthened £0.17 
oatmeal pack £0.18; soap £0.14 
pat -on-translucent blush £0.48 
perfumes f0.22; classic £0.33 



powder puffs velour (2) £0.17 
rouge compressed £0.14; creaj 
£0. 13 

skin toning lotion £0. 17 
spot clearing face wash £0.27 
talcum f0.17 
toilet vinegar £0.55 
translucent blush £0. 15 
violet oatmeal f0.55 

RUTIN PRODUCTS LTD 
Rutin-T £0.52; £0.98 
Rutivite tablets 90 f 0.52; 

1000 f4.55 
SCHOLL (UK) LTD 
Clear Jade £0.34 
corn and callous files £0.25 
foot sprays 

anti-perspirant £0.40; 

deodorant £0.40; refresher 

handbag size £0.23; 

standard f 0.40; powder larg 

£0.24 

hard skin reducer £0.10 

nail clippers £0.44 

Smooth away £0.34 
SINCLAIR PHARMACEUTICALS 
LTD 

Visclair aerosols 6 £3.08; 
nasal spray £0.82; tablets 
100 £4.10 

SMITH KENDON LTD 
Benoids £0.124 

Brompton hospital lozenges £0.13 
bronchial pastilles £0.134 
catarrh pastilles £0. 134 
Cyphoids £0.084 
Geeps pastilles £0. 134 
iodised blackcurrant pastilles 
£0.134 

linseed, liquorice and chlorodyne 

lozenges f 0.134 
red gum and menthol pastilles 

£0.134 

STAFFORD MILLER LTD 
Amm-i-dent £0.13; £0.18 
Dentu-creme £0.15; £0.204; 

f 0.274 
Sensodyne £0.264; £0.38 
Tegrin shampoo f0.36 

STIEFEL LABORATORIES (UK) 
LTD 

Acne-Aid £0.35 
Brasivol £1.10 

Oilatum application £0.524; bar 
£0.35; emollient 150ml f 0.734; 
1000ml £3.50 

Polytar liquid 65ml £0.834; 150ml 
£0.63; 1000ml £3.15 

Spectraban £0.874 

Zea-sorb powder 60g £0.49 

SYNTEX PHARMACEUTICALS LTI 
Syntex deep cleanser £0.63 
nourishing night cream £1. 17 
protecting dry cream 24g £0.67; 

48g £1.17 
skin freshener £0.63 

WHITE LABORATORIES LTD 
Aspergum 50 £0.33 
Correctol 25 £0.18; 50 £0.32 
Cushion Grip £0.35 
Diafrutes £0. 124 
Feenamint £0. 134 
Lobron £0.63 

Meggazones £0. 15; tins £0. 18; 

junior £0.14 
pastilles catarrh, cherry cough, 

glycerin of thymol, glycerin 

and blackcurrant, glycerin, 

lemon and honey, menthol and 

encalyptus £0.134 
Rinstead gel f 0. 184 pastilles 

f 0.144 
Smokies 0.134 
tablets dyspepsia 50 £0. 144; 

100 f0.30 

JOHN WYETH & BROTHER LTD 
Algipan £0. 2l4 
Endrine 25ml £0.17-4; 100ml 
£0.45 

Petrolagar 200ml £0.214; 
500ml £0.42 



plement to Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1972 

EMULATIVE SECTION 



DEW PRODUCTS AND 
THOSE TAXED AT LOWER RATES 



3 



IDS (671 Jeyes) 
JDS (193 Brobat) 
fectant 210 ml 
340 ml 
570 ml 

p.v.c. 



Trade 

CP 



0.74dz 
0.95dz 
1.35dz 



Tax 

C.p 



[OMYCDN (746 Lederle) 
sules 250 mg 20 0.45 
pack of 1 6 

[OMYCIN V (746 Lederle) 
sules 250 mg 20 0.56 



ILAWN(818 M&B) 
pack of 1 6 
dkiller 4 oz 



2.40dz 
4.48dz 



i (208 BW) 
iber bulb 

!OSOL(17 Agprolin) 
lets 100 0.33 

250 0.75 

1CK(67! Jeyes) 
osols, alpine, lilac 
le, springtime 

283 g 1.89dz 
ttleswick 2.38dz 
refill 1 .98dz 

id 2.54dz 
ERTO CULVER (24 ACC) 
t Set shampoo 

495 cc size 
3NAL(29 Alfonal) 
l-O-Saf safflower oil 

!4pt 1.60dz 
1 pt 2.76dz 
1 gal 1 .695 

izy biscuits plain 
or ginger 7 oz 

:cheese spread 3Vi oz 



corn oil 



with alphium 



1 pt 
1 qt 
1 gal 
1 pt 
1 gal 



1.32dz 
2.45dz 
(2dz) 
2.62dz 
4.96dz 
1.56 
2.68dz 
1.63 



ow Queen instant skimmed milk 



I lb 
m-O-Life 

sun flower seed oil 

'/ipt 
1 pt 
1 qt 
1 gal 

ast savoury spread 

6 oz 

INSON (40 Allinson) 
ied yeast 4 oz 



5.79 
(2dz) 



1 44dz 
2.43dz 
4.59dz 
1.43 

4.£3 
(2 dz) 

4.34 
(3dz) 



PYRALO460 Dome) 
aintenance therapy 
10,000 units vial 

10 ml 7.50 
in testing solutions 

vial 0.30 
PYRAL-M1TE ( 1 460 Dome) 
rtified maintenance therapy 

vial 14.50 
in testing solutions 

vial 3.15 
'DROX(1352 Wyeth) 
blets 

compound 48 
PHOSO530 Fisons) 
1 150ml 1.33dz 

1 70 ml 
IILHAR(262 C1BA) 
blets 500 mg 20 0.735 
r IX(8l8 M&B) 

250 ml 



2%l 

4'/; I 
22'/; 1 



imposite pack 
(per 



2.16dz 
1.05 
1.97 
7.54 
2.40dz 
7.68dz 
2.30 
9.25 



I I 
4.5 1 
22'/: 1 
rTOMET (180 BEP) 
■"LOMET ( 1 345 Woodward ) 
)RE PHILIPPE (48 AP) 
lir dressing for men 1 04 
tir lacquer aerosol 
medium 8 oz II 
refill 1 2 

lir spray aerosol 17 
EK (328 CCC) 

25 ml 
100 ml 

11NINE-SORBITOL (Egic (1123 SLD) 
4.20 

500 ml 
1AC ( 1 303 Wander) 
iblets 50 
IR1N0599 Winthrop) 
itire entry 



1.05 
3.71 



4.20 



0.23 



Retail 

CP 



o.os 

OlO'/j 
0.15 



0.6S TS 
d 



Trade 

ip 



Tax 

£.p 



ASTRAL (333 Cupal) 
air fresheners 

general purpose blocks 

junior 
bubble-pack blocks 
apple blossom, 
carnation, 
free si a, 

wild honeysuckle, 
lavatory bowl 
mimosa 



Retail 

£.p 



0.05% 



0. 10! j 

o.i m 



Trade 

£.p 

BROBAT (1 93 Brobat) 

bleach 30 oz 0.85dz 

40 oz 0.96dz 

suds 28 oz 0.9Sdz 

fresh disinfectant 1 2oz 

BROMURALI86 Barclay) 

tablets 20 0.26 

BRONCHI LATOR ( 1 599 Winthrop) 

measured-dose nebuliser 

12 5 ml 0.78 
BRUFEN (147 Boots) 



Tax 

£.p 



Retail 

C.p 

0.09 

0.1014 

0.10'/ 



0.34 



1.17 ts4B 





rose 




0.1 OH 


suspension 200 nil 


0.70 




1 05 


0.S4 TS 


magnolia 






d 


BUTOMETO80 BEP) 






(I 




aerosols 








BUTOMET ( 1 345 Woodward) 










car freshener 




1 ~" 




tablets packs of 50 & 1000 






j 


d 


Touch of Spring 








CAFERGOT ( 1 098 Sandoz 1 








0.30 


freesia 




0. 23 




tablets packs of 20 and 500 








0.56 


Grace *n' Charm 




11. 2 s 




CALCIUM-SANDOZ ( 1 098 Sandoz) 






honeysuckle, 








ampoules 10?; 10 ml pack of 20 








mimosa 




0.23 




5 ml pack of 10 






d 


Nice 'n' Fresh 




32 




vitamin C 10 ml pack of 20 
















CALMIC ( 2 1 8 Culmic) 






d 




AUREOMYCIN (746 Lederle) 








CALM1C (1610 WCSD) 






i 




capsules 250 mg 20 


0.68 


1.02 


TS 


CALPOL (218 Calmic) 






d 




pack of 1 6 








CALPOL (1610 WCSD) 






i 




AURORA (243 Ccrnelle) entire entry 




d 


paediatric suspension 


















70 ml 


I.56dz 




0. 20 




AURORA (243 Cernelle) 






i 


CAMEO (1073 Robinson) 








0.1 8'A 


baby foods 








tampons 10 


2.957 




0.1 6 


0.23'A 


five fruits, orange and 










(2 dz) 






0.20 


rusks, cereal with carrots. 






40 


5.2(>6dz 




57 


0.27 


cereal with spinach. 








CAlNlNUiN ( __4 Cannon ) 










cereal with mixed vegetables 






Baby safe 










7oz 


2.43dz .. 


0.27 




nurser cap, disc and teat 


0.60 




0. 90 


d 


cereal with chocolate. 








polycarbonate 402 


0.1 2 




0. 1 S 




cereal with honey 








902 


0. 14 




Q ->] 




7 oz 


1.62dz .. 


OAS 




with Dormal cap 








{J. IS 










4 oz 


0.14 




nil 


0.31 


AVISOL(971 PSMB) 








9 oz 


0. 1 53 




0.23 


2.2a 


8 oz 


0.40 


0.60 




teat/mini teeder 


0.04 




n fit, 

'/. I/O 




35 oz 


1.50 


2.25 




triple pack 


0.093 




14 


UN 


80 oz 


2.67 


4.00 




smooth neck feeder set 


0.28 




4~* 


0.1 3 'A 










soother (all rubber) 


008 




it 1 1 

U. 1 _ 


BACTRIAN (776 J ML) 








teat narrow neck 


0.033 




0. 05 


0.29 


crea m 


1.44dz .. 


0.18 




universal 


054 




0.08 


II b5 


BARBER (85 BES) 








teething ring 


0.047 




u. u 1 


2. US 


health lamps 








hot water bottles 








0.30 


infra-red and luminous 








1 1 1 


0.375 




0.56 


2.17 


heat table popular 


3.37 


4.50 




222 


0.38 




0.5S 




infra-red and luminous 








333 


040 




0. 60 


0.32 


table 596 


2.61 


3.47 




444 


0.375 




0.56 




BEAR BRAND ( 1 449 R & CFD) 






555 


038 




0.5S 




tub honey 1 lb 


2.10dz .. 


0.21 




666 


0.42 




63 




BEAUCA1RE(430 Eucryl) 








777 


0.38 




0.58 


0.16 


cleaning fluid smalt 


I.345dz .. 


0.1 h 




888 


0.77 




1 15 


0.27 


BELLADEN AL ( 1 303 Wande 


) 






999 


0.40 




0. 60 


0.51 


tablets packs of 20 and 500 






d 


Baby safe 


0.375 




0.56 


1.90 


retard packs ot 20 and 500 




d 


Babycot 


0.37 




0.55 


BELLERGAL ( 1 098) 








Dolphin 


0.38 




0. 58 


25 


retard packs of 20 and 1000 




d 


Fleurs de Lis 


0.535 




80 




BELTUX (243 Cernelle) 








Noah's Ark series 


0.535 




0.80 




multi-vitamin tablets 








Radiator 


0.52 




0. 75 


0.14V2 


100 


8.28dz .. 


0.98 




Regal 


0.60 




0. 90 




packs of 30. 250, 500 and 1 000 




d 


Ripple 


0.47 




0. 70 




BEMAXU03 Beecham) 








Superb 


052 




0. 78 




10 oz 


2.035dz 






Velvetex 


0.535 




O.SO 




20 oz 


3.60dz 






hot water bottles (covered) 








10.00 


BENORAL ( 1 599 Winthrop) 








888 


0.77 




1 15 




capletsO.Sg 100 






d 


Baby safe 


0.77 




115 


0.40 


suspension 20% 300 ml 






d 


Glenroyal tartan 


0.77 




I 15 




suspension 40^ 300 ml 


3.43 






Montrose tartan 


0.77 




1 15 




BENZOCA1NE PHASAR (972 


Pharmax) 






Royal Scot tartan 


0.77 




1 15 


19.33 


lozenges 1 5 


0.20 






Trossack tartan 


0.77 




1 15 




200 


2.48 






Velveteen 


0.83 




1 25 


4.20 


BISKS (1530 Fisons) 








Imperial 






d 




bacon flakes 








Ribbed 






d 




4 meal 


2.49dz .. 


0.27 




CAPRIN (1 143 SPL) 








d 


cheese and celery 








tablets 100 


0.34 




0.51 




4 meal 


2.49dz .. 


0.37 




500 


1.64 




2.46 


0.16 


chicken flakes 








1000 


2.94 




4.41 


d 


4 meal 


2.49dz .. 


0.27 




CARNATION (33° CG) 










chocolate creams 








bunion rings tfiin 


0.9Adz 




0.12 


111) 


4 meal 


2!49dz .. 


0.37 




thick 


0.96dz 




0. 12 


- 


coffee creams 4 meal 


2.49dz „ 


0.37 




corn rings 


0.06 




0.12 


0.27 


cream crackers 


2.42dz .. 


0.35 




CASCADE (818 M&B) 








1.5 714 


custard creams 4 meal 


2.49dz .. 


0.37 




photographic wetting asent 








2.95'/: 


digestive sweetmeal 8 oz 


2.67dz .. 


17 




25 ml 


0.27 




0.40'6 


11.31 


instant coffee 








500 ml 


0.54 




0.81 


0.30 


4oz 


8.93dz .. 


0.99 




CEDILANID ( 1 098 Sandoz) 








0.96 


orange creams 4 meal 


2.49dz .. 


0.37 




ampoules 2 ml 5 


0.19 




0.30 si 


3.45 


savoury beef 


2.49dz .. 


0.37 




packs of 6 and 30 






d 


13.S7'/ 


sweeteners 








CERN1DENT (243 Cerndle) 








d 


200's 


1.33dz .. 


0.15 




- 75 


2.64dz 




0.32 


i 


500's 


3.20dz .. 


0.36 




CHAPPIE (976 Petfoods) 










water biscuits 4 oz 


1.75dz .. 


0.18 




large 


2.58 


0.41 


0.07% 


d 


AVi oz 


I.92dz .. 


0.30 






(4 dz) 


(4 dz) 






7'A oz 


2.57dz .. 


0.36 




CHEKWATE (103 Beecham) 








d 


15 oz 


4.52dz .. 


0.47 




mixed flavours 


1.57dz 


0.285dz 




d 


sandwich biscuits 






d 


CHIEFS (702 KC) 








d 


BISMA-REX (848 Minnesota) 








handkerchiefs 3-ply 


1.35 


0.15 






packs of 40 and 100 tablets 




d 




(6 dz) 


(6 dz) 




1.40 


BREV1D1LE(971 PSMB) 








CHLORACTIL(1548 DDSAt 








4.95 


powder, ampoules 








tablets 25 mg 500 


1.15 




t s 4B 




I50mg 10 


0.80 


1.20 


ts4B 


50 mg 500 


2.20 




■i-s4B 


d 


multi-dose container 








100 mg 500 


4.10 




is4B 


i 


750 mg 


0.37 


0.55'/ 


.ts4B 


CHROM1UM-SANDOZ ( 1 098 Sandoz) 








BRICANYL (68 Astra) 








capsules 250 


7.50 




11.25 


0.34 fsls4A 


syrup 200 ml 


0.75 






CINDICO(264 Ciiidico) 










BRINALDIXO098 Sandoz) 








pelican 


0.23 






d 


tablets pack of 25 






d 


Bouncette 


3.12 







4 



Supplement to Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1 972 I 





Trade Tax 


Retail 






Trade 


Tax 


Retail 




Trade Tax 


Retail 




£.p £.p 


£.p 






£. P 


£.p 


£.p 




f.p £.p 


£ 


1 


CIROTYL (938PD) entire entry 


d 


chest & back protector 








CESALI1609 CO 








(""i r»\/nTnv (oi o lis n< 
LLUVUI Ua ( 5 1 8 M&d) 








4 


0.80 


0.09 


1.30 


lawn food 2'/ : lb 




0.4 




4 OZ 


2.80dz 


0.24 




4a 


0.90 


0.10 


1.47 


51b 




0.7 


) 


8 oz 


3.44dz 


0.43 


elbow cap 


5 


0.50 


0.06 


0.S1 


101b 




1.4 


J p 


1 qt 


1.07 


1.60 


footlets pr. 


6 


0.30 


0.03 


OAS 


201b 




2.6 


f I 








knee caps 


7 


0.50 


0.06 


0.SI 


+3 2'/ilb 




0.5 


i 1 


( ~T\ H R 1 ( ft 1 Si \A 8. D i 
IVDKUL 15 1 O MOLD) 






outsize 


7c 


0.55 


0.06 


0. 90 


Sib 




0.9 


J 1 


liquid to make 250 ml 


0.20 


0.30 


lower back protector 








101b 




1.6 


; 1 


1 1 


0.45 


0.6 T/j 




8 


0.60 


0.07 


0.9 7 


201b 




3.0 


5 1 


2 1 /; I 


0.85 


1.27'i 


outsize 


8a 


0.65 


0.07 


1.06 


plant spray 150 cc 














rub cream 




1.56dz 


0.47dz 


0.24 


Sequestrene sachets 1 




0. 1 




pai\c \ 4 on iNt i i £. in wir-c r\\ 
CUUfcJVlrKliN ( 1 o ] U Wt bu ) 




i 


shoulder cape 


9 


1.05 


0.11 


1.70 


5 




0.5 




tablets 






outsize 


9a 


1.15 


0.12 


1.90 


25 




2.0 


/ ■ 


100 


0.42 0. 1 26 


0. 71, 


Spyncol 


1 1 


0.60 


0.07 


97 


GLEN (331 C of C) 
















1 la 


0.65 


0.07 


1. 06 


fly killer 14 oz 


1.80dz 


01 


Q 


COLDREXU190 SHP) 






Warmer-Wear 


















cough syrup 


1.535dz ., 


0.16 


adaptable sections 








GLUCOPHAGE ( 1 077 Rona) 














13 x 14 in 


12c 


0.32 


0.03 


0.52 


tablets 500 mg 50 






d 


COL1VAC (328 CCC) 






9 x 28 in 


12b 


0.36 


0.04 


0.60 


GLUMORIN (452 FBA) 








vet 100 ml 


1.91 


2.55 


17 x 28 in 


12a 


0.60 


0.07 


1.00 


tablets 30 bu 100 






d 








36 x 28 in 


12 


1.10 


0.12 


1.S0 


GODDARDS (522 Goddard) 








COMPLAN (518 Glaxo) 






by the yard 










long term silver polish 








. 1 lb 


3.36dz .. 


0.35 


13 x 14in 




0.25 


0.03 


0.42 


2 oz 


2-9:5 


1 


6 J 


CONRAY 325 (971 PSMB) 






9 x 28 in 




0.30 


0.03 


0.50 




(2 dz) 






ampoules 20 ml 10 


4.00 


6.00 


18 x 28 in 




0.55 


0.06 


0.09 


4 oz 


2.475dz .. 


o.: 


7'A 


CONTACTASOAK (1553 ContaUasol) 




36 'X 28 in 




1.00 


0.1 1 


1.65 


.-. 8_£>Z 


4.39dz ' 


0.4 


V 1 


solution lOcc 


0.085 


0.12K 


reviver 




1.78dz 


0.53dz 


0.2 7 


plate powder 


I 35dz .. 


1 


5 i 


COOLENEI682 KCL) 






DOME-CORT (1460 Dome) 








silver foam 15 size 






J 


(distributors 1530 Fisons) 


i 


cream 1 


00 g 


0.65 




0.98 TS 


GOLDEN BABE (761 Lilia-White) 







COOLTAN (682 KCL) 

(distributors 1530 Fisons) 
COOPERS (295 CM&R) 

Controla-Pac flykiller 

Fresh-aire Solid-Pae 

Moth-Pac 

N.C.A. worm drench 

6 x 10 oz 6.30 



0.15 
0.32 
0.35 



DROXYCHROME (8 1 8 M&B) 

25 g 5.16dz 



DRUMMER ( 1 068 Roberts) 

dyes .. l.OOdz .. 



DRUMMER ( 1 368 Chiswick) 



COPPATAN(682 KCL) 




air fresheners 






(distributors 1530 Fisons) 




minor 




0.39dz 


CORIBAN (208 BW) 


d 


plastic holder 




0.59dz 


CORIBAN(295 CM&R) 


i 


senior 




0.615dz 


2 1 8.46 


11.28 


lavatory sanitiser 




0.735dz 


1 gal 18.60 


24.84 


pine disinfectant 






CORlMlSTdlll Corionel) 






small 


0.455dz 


hair spray 3 oz 2.34dz 


a 38 




med 


0.715dz 


3.58dz .. 


5li 




large 


1.02dz 


5.10dz .. 


0.S3 




gal 


6-90dz 



02 Iclz 



spray tonic conditioner 

HOg 3.58dz 
CORT1SPORIN (208 BW) 
lotion 10 ml 

CYCLOMETO80BEP) 
CYCLOMET ( 1 345 Woodward) 

tablets pack of 50 
CYCLOSAN (818 M&B) 
4 oz 



0.5.S 



DALIVIT(930 P&B) 
syrup 



8oz 
1 lb 



1 1 



DEBS (1073 Robinson) 
cotton wool balls 

coloured 50 
DECORPA(896 NL) 

375 g 

DELROSA (1190 SHP) 
small 
medium 
large 

DELSEY (702 KC) 
facial tissues 



mansize 



toilet tissue 



150 
100 
twin roll 



flat pack 
DENTESI VE (843 MLl 



twin 



2.00dz 
3.00dz 
4.20dz 

1.00 



0.667dz 
0.63 

1.63dz 

2.975dz 

4.13dz 

1.97 
(2 dz) 
2.26 
(2 dz) 
1.02 
(lUdz) 
1.85 
(2 dz) 



0.25 
0.37' 1 
0.52* 



0.08% 
0.95 

0.17 
0.31 
0.43 



!dz) 

25 

;dz) 



DYGON (816Mayborn) 

colour and stain remover l.OOdz 
2.00dz 

DYLON(8l6Mayborn) 

cold fix 0.20dz 

dyes multi-purpose l.OOdz 

carpet 3.40dz 

cold water 1 .00dz 

Fabspray waterproofer 

liquid 3.00dz 

tie and dye kit 

wash'n dye 3.20dz 

EFCORTELAN-N (578 Glaxo) 
cream 1 5 g 

ointment 1 5 g 

EMBAZIN (971 PSMB) 
solution 10.32% 8 oz 

35 oz .. .. 
1 gal 

premix 22.5% 21 * lb 
EMP1RIN (208 BW) 
compound 

100 

EMTRYL (971 PSMB) 

premix 22.5% 2Vi lb .. .. 
ENTERO-VIOFORM (262 C1BA) 



23'/; g 1.28dz 
49 g 2. OOdz 
DESERILU098 Sandoz) 

tablets packs of 25 and 250 
DEXTRAVEN 70 ( 1 530 Fisons) 
D1AMOX (746 Lederle) 
sodium parenteral 

500 mg 1.33 
DICOTOX(818 M&B) 

8 02 

20 oz 

qt 



0.16 
0.25 



gal 

DIREMA(378 Dista) 

tablets 25 mg pack of 500 
DISPAS1C (503 G) entire entry 
DISTAQUA1NE-V (378 Dista) 

tablets 250 mg 500 
D1STIVIT(378 Dista) 

tablets 20 megm 100 
100 megm 500 
DOLSU608 S&W) 

back protector adjustable 



2.56dz 
4.56dz 
8.28dz 
I7.60dz 



2.00 

0.32 
0.57 
1.03 
3.20 



tablets 0.25 g 16 
48 
100 

EP0M0L0259 Unichem) 
cream 

EQUAN1LI 1352 Wyeth) 
tablets 400 mg pack of 20 

EUVALEROL B (34 A&H) 
entire entry 

FELIX (455 Felix) 

FELIX ( 1396 ABL) 
canned 



1.60dz 
4.40dz 
8. OOdz 

1.14dz 



2.68 
(4 dz) 



FEMERGIN (1098 Sandoz) 

tablets pack of 50 
FERRO-MANDETS 1746 Lederle) 
100 4.00 
FLAMBEAU (446 Fl) entire entry 
FLORET (1037 Reckitt) 

standard size 1.72dz 
FORCEVALU367 Unigreg) 
protein 

FORCEVAL-PROTEIN (1367 Uniqreg) 



0.47 
(4 dz) 



outsize la 
body belt 3a 'b 

outsize 3c 
chest protector adjustable 



0.60 
0.65 
1.20 
1.30 

0.60 
0.65 



0.07 
0.07 
0.13 
0.14 

0.07 
0.07 



0.97 

1.06 

1.80 
2. 00 

0.97 
1.06 



8 x 15 g sachets 
FRESH (193 Brobat) 
disinfectant 1 gal 

12 oz 

FUNGILUN ( 1 1 76 Squibb) 

in Orabase 
GALE'S ( 1449 R&CFD) 

honey set and clear lb 
1 lb 

GARDENAL (971 PSMB) 
powder 



0.45 



0.52 



0.40 



.40dz 
!.30dz 



0.1216 



0. 04' j 
OOT/i 
0.07 'A 
09 

0.05 
0.08 
Oil 
0.70 



0. 12'd 
0.25 



0.02' j 
0. 12'i 
0.42* 
0.12'/i 

d 

0.37' j 



0.62* 
2.31 
10.00 
3. 75 



3. 75 

0.20 
0.55 
1 00 

14 



d 
d 



0.20 

d 

0.60 

0.69 

d 

0.60 TS 

0.14 
0.23 



Bouncer baby pants 
cotton wool standard 
economy 
disposable napkin 10 

20 
48 

Snuggi pants 
GOOD BOY (1396 ABL) 
choc drops for dogsl oz 

5 oz 

9Vi oz 

26 oz 
3'/j lb 



0.93dz 
0.63dz 
1.73dz 
l.3ldz 
2.56dz 
6.06dz 
1.92dz 

1.91 
(6dz) 
3.69 
(4 dz) 
2.99 
(2 dz) 
3.76dz 
2.63 
(V,dz) 
2.50 
(2 dz) 



chocolate yeast tabs 



(2 dz) 
5'/; lb 2.08dz 
GORDON MOORE (1038 R&C) 
GORDON MOORE (67 Ashe) 
HEALTHCRAFTS (29 Alfonal) 



Eleven Plus 




(minerals) 




Super 




brewer's yeast 250 


1.84dz 


halibut oil 100 


1.92dz 


rose hips 100 


3.52dz 


wheat germ oil 1 6 day 


2.03dz 


32 day 


3.8 Idz 


64 day 


7.22dz 


Super 




Bl 25 mg 100 


5.60dz 


B2 10 mg 100 


4.80dz 


B6 10 mg 100 


6.72dz 


C 200 mg 100 


8 OOdz 


E 100 iu 100 


8.82dz 


Sustain 




Bl 25 mg 100 


5.60dz 


B2 10 mg 100 


4.80dz 


B6 10 mg 100 


6.72dz 


C 200 mg 100 


8. OOdz 


E 100 iu 100 


8.82dz 


Vita-Mines chewable 




84 day 


5.84dz 


120 day 


8.48dz 


300 day 


1.65 


HEINZ (593 Heinz) 




toddler foods 




vegetable broth with 




steak and kidney 




lime creamed dessert 




with peaches 




lemon creamed dessert 




with pears can 1% oz 


1.163 




(2dz) 


HEXAPHEN (295 CM & R) 




1 gal 


4.32 


HIPREX (1061 Riker) 




tablets 100 


2.00 


HONEYPOTI1605 BPL) 




fly catcher 


2.75 




(gross) 


HORLICKS(!03 Beecham) 




Vi lb 


1.36dz 


'/: lb 


2.28dz 


1 lb 


3.905dz 


3 lb 


5.23 




(!• dz) 


5 lb 


1.455 


10 lb 


2.865 


tablets (rolls) 


1.735 




(6 dz) 


chocolate flavoured 




6 oz 


1.83dz 


12 oz 


3.32dz 


51b 


1.455 



0.34 

(6dz) 

0.65 

(4 dz) 

0.52 

12 dz) 

0.66dz 

0.46 

C/,dz) 

0.44 

(2 dz) 



0.14 
27 
1 1, hi 



i) 114 

0. 12 I 

aim 

U45 
li 94 

ft 15li 

0.1 OH 
0.26 



i) :.< 

II. 24 

44 
ft 25 
I) 46 
ft ,S7 

ft 7ft 

0.601 

0. 54 

1 Oil 

1. lot 
a 7ij\ 

ft 60 

ft.sv ; 

1 oo 

1.10 

ft 73 
1.06 

2 4.1 



0.06 

5.76 
3.00 



lement to Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1972 








Tax 


Retail 




Trade 


Tax 


Retail 




Trade 


Tax 


Retail 




T Lp e 


£.p 


£.p 




£.p 


£.p 


£.p 




t-P 


tP 


£.p 


HDS(732 LI) 








toilet Hats 








KLEENEX (702 KC) 








tol powder 500 g 


0.33 




0.43 


babysoft single 


2.12 




0.06 


towels 


1.69 


0.19 




cks of 6 oz and 1 6 oz 






d 


double 


(4 dz) 

2 02 




11 


twin pack 


(2 dz) 
2.53 


(2dz) 
0.28 




[328'CCO 










(2dz) 








(l'/idz) 


(l'/:dz) 




lion 100 ml 


1.86 




2.48 


manilla single 


3.14 




0.08 


Flair 


2.64 


0.30 


22 


400 ml 


4.13 




5.50 


double 


(4 dz) 
2.90 




0.15 


pretty patterns 


(lWdz) 
2.53 


( 1 !':dz) 

0.28 




IGINEO098 Sandoz) 










(2 dz) 






holders 


( 1 dz) 


( 1 '/; dz) 




ts sublingual pack of 30 




d 


toilet fittings 








2.92 


0.33 












plastic white 


2.84dz 


0.32dz 


0.39 




(4d~z) 


(4dz) 




XJORTISYL(I087 Rousscl) 






porcelain white 


0.79 


0.09 


1.29 


tissues Silk Soft 








n/ointment 








coloured 






d 


boutique 


1.96 


0.22 


0.12 


i% 15 g 






d 












(2 dz) 


(2 dz) 




rops \% 3 ml 






d 


JEYP1NE(671 Jeyes) 








handy 72 


3.24 


0.36 


0.06% 


itntment Vi% 3 g 






d 


disinfectant 










(6dz) 


(6dz) 




7}/i% 3 g 






d 


340 ml 


1.1 ldz .. 




11 


regular 100 


3.75 


0.42 


0.11% 


solution Vi% _U ml 






d 


570 ml 


1.60dz 




0.16 




(4dz) 


(4dz) 




t pt /mi nc urn 
\ST (971 PSMd) 






d 


1 gal 


0.84 




1.01 


150 


2.29 


0.26 


0.14 








5 gal 


3.54 




4.21) 




(2 dz) 


(2dz) 




(67 1 Jeyes) 








200 ml 






d 


pocket pack 


1.89 


0.21 


0.02 


fectant 340 ml 


1 . 1 1 dz 




11 


JIF0 449 R&CFD) 






0.07% 




( 1 gross) 


( 1 gross) 




570 ml 


1.60dz 




0.1b 


lemons 


0.7 ldz .. 




for men 


1.35 


0.15 


0.03 


200 ml 






d 


JOHNSONS (672 Johnson) 










(6dz) 


(6dz) 




tra 1 gal 


0.84 




1 01 


bandages w.o.w.B.P.C. 








100 


2.59 


0.29 


0.16 


5 gal 


3.54 




4.20 


1 in x 4 yd 


0.27 ldz .. 




0.0 3%a 




(2 dz) 


(2 dz) 










2 in x 4 yd 


0.439dz .. 




0.05 


toilet tissues 








D(645 Ilford) 








3 in x 4 yd 


0.61 7dz .. 




0.07 


twin pack rolls 


1.68 






licals 








4 in x 4 yd 


0.79dz .. 




0.09% 




(l'/idz) 






romophen developer 








bandages crepe B.P.C. 


1.597dz .. 




o.im 


KOTEXI702 KC) 








2'A\ 


0.40 




0.60 


2 in 




sanitary towels 








80 oz 






d 


3 in 


2.296dz .. 




0.25 


size 1 1 2 


5.69 




0.1 6% 


ypam fixer 1 1 


0.65 




0.97% 


4 in 


3.074dz .. 




0.34 




(4dz) 






80 oz 






d 


6 in 


4.466dz .. 




0.50 


size 2 1 2 


3.30 




0.19 


2 developer 








cellulose wadding B.P.C. 










(2dz) 






80 oz and 1 gal 






d 


16 oz 


2.308dz .. 




0.26 


New Freedom 








1 developer 80 oz 






d 


cotton wool B.P.C. 








panties 


3.10dz 


0.35dz 


0.42 


.3 fixer 5 1 


0.75 




1.12% 


1 oz 


0.598dz .. 




0.06% 


towels 


2.88 




0.16% 


1 gal 






d 


4 oz 


1.673dz .. 




0.1 8Vz 




(2dz) 






ophen developer 








16 oz 


5.569dz .. 




0.62 


KWELLS(893 Nicholas) 








13.5 1 


1.10 




1.65 


cotton wool 








tablets 


1.625dz 




0.18 t 


3 gal 






d 


hospital 4 oz 


1.354dz .. 




0.15 










eptol 1 1 






d 


16 oz 


4.302dz .. 




0.48 


LAEVOTON1NE (218 Calmic) 






jniversal developer 








dressing pack sterilised 


M8Sdz .. 




0.1 3% 


entire entry 






d 


5 1 


1.43 




2.14% 


gauze B.P.C. 1 yd 


0.903dz .. 




0.10% 


LASTONET (733 Lastonet) 








80 oz and 1 gal 




d 


3 yd 


1.985dz .. 




0.23 


aeronet 








3, darkroom 








6 yd 


3.625dz .. 




0.40 


knee caps 


0.46pr 




0.69 


No 7 


3.93 




5.89% 


12 yd 


7.069dz .. 




0.77 


ankle supports 


0.46pr 




0.69 


No 8 


3.93 




5.89% 


gauze and cotton tissue 








arch binder 


0.1 6pr 




0.24 . 


junior 


3.65 




5.47% 


B.P.C. 16oz 


6.60dz .. 




0.70 


bandage clips 3 


0.45dz 




0.06 








Drug Tariff 16oz 


5.544dz .. 




0.61 


6 


0.85dz 




0.11 


*M(1352 Wyeth) 








incontinence pads 1 2 


4.604dz .. 




0.53% 


crepe bandage (Lastoyarn) 








ules 100 






d 


lint B.P.C. 1 oz 

4 oz 


0.917dz .. 

2.936dz . 




0.1 OH 
0.32% 


2 in 
2Vi in 


1.44dz 
1.80dz 




0.18 
0.23 


IN(1314Weddell 








16 oz 


10.584dz .. 




1.17 


3 in 


2.04dz 




0.26 


nits 5 ml 


0.08 




0.10 ts7 


lint boric 1 oz 


0.96dz .. 




O.U'/j 


3'A in 


2.40dz 




0.30 


10 ml 


0.14 




19 ts7 


4oz 


3.106dz .. 




0.34 


4 in 


2.76dz 




0.35 


nits 5 ml 


0.14 




0.19 ts7 


multiple pack dressing 








5 in 


3.36dz 




0.42 


10 ml 


0.25 




0.33 + s7 


No.l 


2.68dz .. 




0.30 


6 in 


4.08dz 




0.51 


nits 5 ml 


0.25 




0.33 + s7 


N0.2 


5.468dz . 




0.60 


elastic band trusses N.H.S. 








10 ml 


0.46 




0.62 ts7 


N. A. dressings 


0.346dz . 




0.04 


inguinal single 


1.70 




2.55 


in zinc 








sterilised lint dressings 








double 


2.74 




4.11 


3 units 5 ml 


0.14 




0.19 +s7 


small 


0.41 2dz . 




0.06 


scrotal single 


1.85 




2.78 


3 units 5 ml 


0.28 




0.38 + s7 


medium 


0.601 dz . 




0.06 


double 


2.89 




4.34 


amine zinc 








large 


0.93 ldz . 




0.12 


metatarsal pad 


0.40pr 




0.60 


3 units 5 ml 


0.14 




0.19 +s7 


triangular bandage 


1.36dz . 




0.15 


maternity tights elastic net 


4.28 




6.42 


10 ml 


0.28 




0.38 ts7 


JORDAN ( 1 339 Wilkinson) 








Lastolita 


2.80 




4.20 


3 units 5 ml 


0.28 




0.38 ts7 


toothbrush adult 


1.54dz . 




0.19 


wrist supports 


0.1 6pr 




0.24 


10 ml 


0.58 




0.77 ts7 


child 


1.13dz . 




0.14 


LEDERMYC1N (746 Lederle) 






Sane 








JULIAN JABLON (1 548 JJ) entire entry 




d 


capsules 150 mg 20 


0.88 




1.32 TS 


units 10 ml 


0.28 




0.38 + s7 


KATK1NS (967 Petfoods) 








100 


4.10 




6.15 TS 


units 10 ml 


0.58 




0.77 ts7 


handy 


2.32 
(6dz) 


0.37 
(6dz) 


0.04% 


1000 
pack of 1 6 


39.54 




59.31TS 
d 


VLIPID(930P&B) 








KILNET (818 M&B) 








300 mg 20 


1.72 




2.58 TS 


100 ml 


2.50 






weed killer 4 oz 


2.24 




0.28 


100 


8.18 




12.27 TS 


125 ml 






d 


8oz 


3.76dz 




0.44 


500 


39.54 




59.31 TS 


\VAL(971 PSMB) 








KENT (693 Kent) 








pack of 1 6 






d 


>oules5% 0.25 e 








tooth brushes 








drops 1 ml 


0.30 




0.45 TS 


win pack 5 g 






d 


"De Luxe" 


3.84 




0.48 


syrup 1 00 ml 


0.44 




0.66 TS 


tidose 5 x 5 g 


2.65 




3.97!Wsls4A 


"Classic" 


2.40 




0.30 


500 ml 


1.98 




2.97 TS 


SON'S (662 EJ) 








"Wessler" machine 








tablets 150 mg 








ose confectionery 








made bristle 


1 .68dz . 




21 


20 


0.88 




1.32 TS 


arley sugar drops 








nylon 


1.20dz 




0.15 


100 


4.10 




6.15 TS 


4 oz 


0.79dz 


0.1 4dz 


0.11 


"Park Lane" 


l.68dz 




0.21 


500 


19.76 




29.64 TS 


arley sugar sticks 








ex. hard 


1.84dz 




0.23 


iooo 


39.54 




59.31 TS 


10 


1.04 


0.18 


0.10 


"Contour" 


1.76dz 




0.22 


pack of 16 






d 




(l'/idz) 


(l'/:dz) 




"Pedigree" 


1.52dz 




0.19 


300 mg 20 


1.43 




2.14H7S 


evon butterscotch 








ex. hard 


1.76dz 




0.22 


pack of 1 6 






d 


4oz 


0.79dz 


0.1 4dz 


0.11 


"Smokers" 


1.92dz 




0.24 


LEDERSTATIN (746 Lederle) 






lixed fruit drops 








"Stoutheart" 


1.60dz 




0.20 


capsules 1 50 mg 








4 oz 


0.79dz 


0.14dz 


0.11 


Super 


3.20dz 




0.40 


16 


0.78 




1.17 TS 


nges 








"Harley Street" 


l.52dz 




0.19 


100 


4.66 




6.99 TS 


uskies sachet 


0.57 


0.09 


0.0214 


ex. hard 


1.76dz 




0.22 


500 


22.46 




33.69 TS 




(3dz) 


(3dz) 




"Shorthead" nylon 


0.88dz 




0.11 


LEXTRON(413 Lilly) entire entry 




d 


now fruits 


0.57 
(3 dz) 


0.09 
(3 dz) 


0:0216 


soft 

"Longhead" nylon 


0.96dz 
0.88dz 




0.12 
0.11 


LIFEGUARD (893 Nicholas) 
disinfectant 








ets 








"KBH2" badger 


3.04dz 




0.38 


large 


1.145dz 




0.J 2% 


ON (1606 Jaycon) 








"Junior" 


0.80d/ 




0.10 


LILIAI761 Lilia-White) 








ar free soft drinks 








"Baby" 


0.72dz 




0.09 


sanitary belts 








emonade and cola 


0.61 dz 


0.1 ldz 


0.08 


denture brushes 








adjustable 


l.OSdz 


0.1 2dz 


0.13 


ITH(672 Johnson) 








"K45" 


1.36dz 




0.17 


towels standard 6 


0.79dz 




0.08 


6 


1.286dz 


0.145dz 


0.15% 


"Olympic" nylon 






d 


12 


l.50dz 




0.15 


12 


2.24 ldz 


0.252dz 


0.27 


KIM ( 1396 ABL) 








LIL-LETS(761 Lilia-White) 








S (67 1 Jeyes) 








hamster and gerbil food 


1.31 


0.23 


0.10 


regular 10 


1.26dz 




0.13 


freshener blocks (Whiz) 




d 




(20 pkts) 


(20 pkts) 




20 


2.29dz 




0.24 


d 284 ml 


l.OSdz 




0.10% 


hamster nibble 


0.87 


0.15 


0.06 


super 10 


1.32dz 




0.14 


570 ml 


1.70dz 




0.1S 




(2 dz) 


(2 dz) 




20 


2.49dz 




0.26 


1.14 1 


3.04dz 




0.32 


KINXO073 Robinson) 








super plus 10 


1.44dz 




0.15 


1 gal 


0.81 




1 06 


roll 


3.33 






20 


2.67dz 




0.28 


5 gal 


3.44 




4.05 




(l%jdzj 






LI-LO (308 Cow) 






d 



6 



Supplement to Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1972 



LI-LO ( 1 603 Li-Lo) 
LIPCOTE (137 Blakoe) 



Trade 

t-P 



Tax 



Retail 

£.p 



LIPCOTE ( 1 345 Woodward) 
LIQUIBARINE (896 NL) 

diagnostic 20 x 1 kg 17.00 
LOMODEXI1530 Fisons) 

existing entry 

LOMODEX40U530 Fisons) 
10% saline 540 ml 2.00 
10% salt free 540 ml 2.00 

LOMODEX 70 ( 1 530 Fisons) 

6% saline 540 ml 1.075 

6% salt free 540 ml 1.075 
10% salt free 540 ml 1.475 
LOREXANE (649 Id) 

dusting powder lOOg 1 .49dz 
LUCOZADE (103Beecham) 
small 



1.38* 
(2dz) 



0.185 
(2 dz) 



large 
* Includes 
M & B (818 M&B) 
horticultural products 
Bordeaux mixture 
to make 2 l A gal 
5 gal 

slug killer 8 oz 



worm killer 



M&B (971 PSMB) 
patent blue V 



36 { 
72 s 



I.865dz* 0.285dz 
0.30dz bottle deposit 



2.40dz 
4.00dz 
l.OOclz 
1.80dz 
3.20dz 
5.20dz 



MATTHODORM (809 M&W) 
MATTHODORM ( 1 345 Woodward) 
MAWS (810 Maw) 
Nursery products 
pants triple pack 

328.01/02/03/04; 1.56dz 
Tufty Tails 



10 

20 
30 
newborn 



356.1 1 
356.12 
356.13 
356.14 



MA YBELLINE ( 1 377 R&A) 
M AYBELLINE (1333 WL) 
MAZDA (903 NPU) 

magicube 
MEDOMET ( 1 548 DDSA) 

tablets 250 
MEG1MIDE (894 Nicholas) 

ampoules 10 ml 6 

vial 100 ml 

MENE(1073 Robinson) 

sanitary towels size 

size 1 



size 4 



1.63dz 

2.69dz 
3.75dz 
2.69dz 



0.205 



1.83 
1.52 . 

5.914 
(4dz) 
6.283 
(4 dz) 
7.392 
(4dz) 
7.069 
(3dz) 
6.098 
(2 dz) 



MENNEN (1506 Mennen) 

shampoo P2 1 enitre entry 

Mepacrine Hydrochloride (649 1CI) 

tablets 0.1 g 100 0.27 

1000 1.64 
MEPHINE (1352 Wyeth) entire entry 
MERTHIOLATE (41 3 Lilly) 

tincture 450 ml 

MESONTOIN ( 1 098 Sandoz) 

tablets pack of 1000 
METHERGIN ( 1 098 Sandoz) 

ampoules 1 ml 100 

tablets pack of 25 
MICK (967 Petfoods) 



MILTON-AID (1055 RM) 

MILTON-AID (890 Newton) 
(distributors 1556 Farillon) 

MOORLAND (751 LL) 

MOORLAND (325 C-A) 

MOTHER SE1GELS (195 B&SL) 

MOTHER SEIGELS (727 Lane) 

MOTIVAL(1176 Squibb) 

tablets 100 1.68 

MUSTEROLE (255 Chembro) 

MUSTEROLEU333 WL) 

MYCIL079 BDH) 

ointment 30 g 0.12 

powder 55 g 0.12 



3.00 
3.00 



1.61 
1.61 

2.21 

0.18 



0.30 

0.50 

0.1 2'A 

0.22V- 

0.40 

0.65 



ampoules 2 ml 5 


0.80 




1.20 


MARIGOLD (774 LR) 








house gloves 








Chic 


1.67dz 


0.1 7dz 


0.21 


Suregrip 


2.00dz 


0.2 Idz 


0.26 


Husky 


2.86dz 


OJOdz 


0.J8 


MARVICU091 Rybar) 








inhaler 


0.70 




1. 00 



0.18 

0.17 
0.28 
0.39 
0.28 



0.29 

2.74'A 
2.28 

0.16 

0.17 

0.20 

0.2516 

0.33 



40 
2.45 



ts4P 



handy 


1.03 


0.16 


0.08 




(VA dz) 


( 1 'A dz) 




large 


1.29dz 


0.20dz 


0.15 


carry home pack 


1.38 


0.22 


0.48 




CAdz) 


CAdz) 




MILDAN (818 M&B) 








garden fungicide 4 oz 


2.40dz 




U.30 


8 02 


3.70dz 




0.47 



2.52 



0.18 
0.18 



N ATROD ALE ( 1 5 1 3 Rodale ) 
bone meal tablets 150 



300 
650 

100 
250 
100 
225 



garlic and parsley 
capsules 

tablets 

hand lotion 

Hi-Pro liver tablets 200 
iron and molasses 
tablets 175 
350 

Lacto-Flora capsules 

125 

lecithin capsules 100 
225 

marrow bone tablets 

100 
200 

pollen tablets 100 
250 

Protein Plus tablets 300 
Pro-Vitamin A capsules 
150 

pumpkin seed oil 

capsules 50 
125 
225 
I lb 



sunflower seed 



vitamin E tablets 
50 iu 



40 
150 
300 

wheat germ oil capsules 
75 
200 

NEUTRAPHYLLINE (311 C) 

ampoules 3 ml 6 
NEW DEW (751 LL) 

NEW DEW (325 C-A) 
NIKINK 1073 Robinson) 
sanitary garment pink 

NIVEMBIN (971 PSMB) 
tablets 50 
500 

NORGOTIN (896 NL) 

ear drops dp 16 ml 
N. P. U. (903 NPU) 
vacuum Nu-flask 

refills 8 oz 

16 oz 
26 oz 
36 oz 

stoppers 8/16/26 oz 

36 oz 

NU-FRESH(903 NPU) 
aerosol air freshener 

14 oz 

fly killer 14 oz 
vaporising fly killer 

size I 
size 2 

NU-GUARD (903 NPU) 
anti-freeze 1 pt 

1 qt 

NUJOL (255 Chembro) 
NUJOL(1333 WL) 
NU-LOOK (903 NPU) 
sunglasses 



Trade 
C.p 

3.20dz 
4.80dz 
0.80 

4.00dz 

0.75 

3.60dz 

0.65 

2.40dz 

1.00 

3.60dz 
6 40dz 

1.05 

5.20dz 

0.85 

3.60dz 
6.00dz 
6.80dz 

1.35 
1.05 

1.00 

400dz 
0.70 
1.20 
6.00 
( 1 Jidz) 

4.00dz 

1.30 

2.00 

4.40dz 

0.85 

0.35 



Tax 
tP 



4.951 dz 0.557dz 



0.32 
3.08 



0.184 



2.40dz 

2.625dz' 

4.15dz 

4.15dz 

0.675dz 

0.79dz 



1 .5 1 dz 
1.76dz 

2.96dz 
6.00dz 

3.02 
(2 dz) 
2.85dz 



Nl 



N3 



N4 



N5 



N6 



black, sherry 
dark shell 
black, sherry 
dark shell 
black, sherry 
cool white 
dark shell 
light shell 
black, cool white 
crystal, mauve shadow 



1.36 
1.41 
1.05 
111 



1.05 



sherry 
dark shell 
black, sherry 
cool white, crystal 
dark shell 
black, sherry 
cool white, crystal. 



1.05 
I.I I 



1.05 
1.11 



Retail 




Trade 


Tax 


Retail 


C.p 




£.p 


£ P 


£.p 


dark shell, metal sides 






0.40 




1.38 




2 -30 3 


0.60 


N17 smoke, black 


1.32 




2.20 3 


1.05 


silver 


1.38 




2.30 ] 




N18 dark shell/gold 








0.50 


silver/chrome 


1.38 




2.30 1 


1.00 


heliodor/chrome 


1.32 




2.20 i 


0.45 


N19 heliodor, smoke 


1.38 




2.30 j 


0.85 


silver 


1.44 




2.40 \ 


0.30 


N20 heliodor, black 


1.14 




1.90 . 


1.35 


dark shell 


1.20 




2.00 


N21 black/gold 








0.45 


crystal/silver 


1.41 




2.35 1 


0.80 


N22 gold framed 










rimless 


1.38 






1.40 


N25 gold 


1.50 




2.50 ] 


0.65 


N26 nickel 


1.50 




2.50 \ 


1.10 


N27 nickel flip-clip 


1.05 




1.75% 




B 1 black 


0.60 




1.00 , 


0.45 


B2 black, sherry 


0.60 




1.00 . 


0.75 










0.85 


NU-SOFT (903 NPU) 








1.80 


Hanx 100 


2.18 


0.245 


0.12H 


1.40 




(2 dz) 


(2 dz) 




1.35 


NUWEIGH (902 NPU) 








bathroom scales 








0.50 


standard 


1.12 


0.125 


1.80 


0.95 


de luxe 


1.65 


0. 185 


2.65 


1 60 


OLIVE (131 5 HW) 








0.50 


nail pliers 69001 


5.20dz 




0.65% 




OMNIPED(656 1FA) 










foot cushions pah- 


8.16dz 




0.98 


50 


renewal bands 


1.85dz 




0.22 i 


1.70 


health sandals 








3.00 


Capri pair 


2.44 


0.27 


3.75 




Grace pair 


3.00 


0.34 


■ 4.65, 


0.55 


Sorrento pair 


2.44 


0.27 


3.75- 


1.15 


health sandals 






3.40 



0.60 



0.48 
4.62 



0.26'A 

0.29 

0.46 

0.46 

0.07'A 

0.09 



0.18 
0.21 



0.37 
0.75 



0.18 
0.34 



2.26 
2.35 
1.75 
1.85 

1.75 

1.S5 



1.75 
1.85 



1.75 
1.85 



mauve shadow 


1.05 


1. 75 


dark shell 


1.11 


1.85 


N7 flip-clip 


0.78 


1.30 


N8 gold framed 






rimless 


1.38 


2.30 


N9 with rim 


1.44 


2.41) 


N10 black, sherry 


1.05 


I. 75 


dark shell 


1.11 


1.S5 


N 1 1 black, mauve shadow 






1.05 


\ 1. 75 


dark shell 






silver 


111 


1.S5 


N12 black, metal sides 


1.44 


2.40 


N13 nickel 


1.48 


2.46 


N14 silver satin 


1.50 


2.50 


N 1 5 gold 


1.48 


2.46 


N16 heliodor, metal sides 






1.32 /.if.: . 


: 20 



ORASTREP (378 Dista) 

tablets 500 
ORBITOL(818 M&B) 

250 ml 

454 1 
22'/: 1 



2.40dz 
1.25 

5.65 



ORTHO-NOVIN 1/50(922 Ortho) 
tablets 

unipak 21 0.23 

OVALTINE ( 1 303 Wander) 
4 oz 



16oz 
24 oz 

baby rusks 8 oz 

chocolate time extra 

8 oz 
16 oz 

chuckles 8 oz 

drinking chocolate 8 oz 
16 oz 
instant non-fat-milk 

7 oz 
12 oz 



malted milk 



teething rusks 



16oz 
small 
large 



1.17dz 
2.15dz 
3.69dz 
4.69dz 
0.97dz 

2.15dz 
3.69dz 
0.97dz 
1.3 ldz 
2.38dz 

1.76dz 

2.69dz 

2.225dz 

3.78dz 

0.625dz 

1 . 1 8dz 



OXATETS(311 C) 

tablets packs of 100 and 1000 
PADDI (1073 Robinson) 



pads 

pleats 
roll 



10 



30 



3.641 

(3 dz) 

3.348dz 

3.744 

(3dz) 

3.60 

(3dz) - 



0.36 
(2 dz) 
0.71 
(4dz) 



cotton wool balls 
coloured 
PAL (967 Petfoods) 

large 2.25 
(2dz) 
4.47 
(4 dz) 

PAN ALEVE ( I 335 Wigglesworth) 
elixir 56 ml l.43dz 

tablets 25 0.97dz 

50 1.70dz 
100 2.75dz 
Pancreatin (1335 Wigglesworth) 

granules 226 g 23.00dz 

PANETS(690Keldon) 

baby syrup 
PARABAL0143 SPL) 

tablets 100 
PARAZONE(671 Jeyes) 
750 ml 
1 1 
1 gal 

PARISILON (1061 Riker) 
tablets 2.5 mg 100 
7.5 mg 100 
tablets 2.5 mg and 7.5 mg packs of 30 and 300 
PEDIGREE CHUM (967 Petfoods) 
large 4.63 
(4 dz) 

PEKSOL (328 CCC) 
soluble vitamins (vet) 

20 oz 3.45 



2.02dz 
0.58 

0.79dz 
0.94dz 
0.335 

1.08 
2.48 



0.73 
(4dz) 



0.30 
1.87Yi i 
S.4TA 



0.13 



0.36 
0.1 3 'A 



0.13 



0.13 
0.13 



0.18 
0.12'/! 
0.22'A 
037'A 

2.88 



0.08 
0.10 
0.39 



0.1 3'A 



4.60 



lent to Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1972 



7 



Trade Tax 

£.p £.p 
> (971 PSMB) entire entry 
5 isethionate (971 PSMB) 

:00mg 10 0.60 
one sodium (971 PSMB) 
100 mg 500 2.32 
S(746 Lederle) 

100 1.56 
(809 M&W) 
(1345 Woodward) 

dp 1000 2.70 
,ITY(1377 R & A) 



\N(971 PSMB) 

25 g 0.14 
500 2 1.20 
r(180 BEP) 
r (1345 Woodward) 
JNE IODIDE (1370 Ayerst 
ig 

.BL) 
i guinea 

■d 



;echam) 
ice 



Includes 0.30dz bottle deposit 
S (243 Cernelle) 

100 7.56dz .. 
250 15.96dz .. 
Dt'30, 500 and 1000 
rRIN(218Calmic) 

15 g 
)UR(721 LC) 
)R(721 LC) 

)UR LIGHTER (721 LC) 
:(721 LC) 
<(1123 SLL) 

pack of 1000 
160 Solport) 



Retail 
£.p 



0.90 

3.48 tsIs4A 
2.34 

d 
i 

3.94 



0.21 
1.80 



ROTO (331 CofC) 
wrapped block 

ROTOCUBES (331 C ofC) 



ROTOFRESH (331 C ofC) 

complete 
ROTOPAN(331 CofC) 

toilet fitting 
ROTOSAN (331 C of C) 

channel block (3) 

discs 

juniors 

superfume crystals 
RUTHMOL(180 BEP) 
RUTHMOL ( 1 345 Woodward) 

50g 0.10 
200 g 0.30 



Trade 

f.p 

0.50dz 

0.78dz 

1.48dz 

0.78dz 

0.92dz 
0.72dz 
1 .3 ldz 
1.36dz 



Tax 
£.p 



0.07dz 



0.90 
1.90 



ool 
inces 

encils 
ase 
ushes 



'/2 0Z 



D60 



D180 
loose 



carded 10 
and lotion brushes 



0.04 

0.76 
0.08 
1.44 

0.026 
0.32 

0.024 
0.032 



1.14 
0.12 



0.04 
0.05 



0.04 
0.05 



4(1370 Ayerst) 
5 mg 30 
005 Price) 
its 

ineStar (10) 



0.86 



6.35 
(4dz) 



2.26 
10.30 



0.18 
0.40 



0.52 



7 Furman) 
aion entire entry 
055 RM) 
90 Newton) 
NU17BPL) 
)0mg 100 : 
500 

12 Toni) 
"m complete 
5L (818 M&B) 
ike 600 ml 

2'/; 1 

er 

make 2VS 1 
G(1393 BRL) 
try 

INE(1098 Sandoz) 
s i ml 6 0.60 

100 

ID (1098 Sandoz) 
ack of 200 
,-I-D(328 CCC) 

100 ml 2.63 
68 Trentham) 
[568 Trentham) 
Y- (1176 Squibb) 

30 g 0.10 
)3 Beecham) 
emon. lime, 
me, orange/ 
e, grapefruit/ 
e. lemon barley, 

tropical fruit 1.47dz 0.265dz 
(1022 Racasan) 

548 DDSA) 

100 2 
[ ARD (5 14 Gillette) 



is4B 



3.39 
16.20 



0.27% 
0.60 



3.50 



0.15 



1.80dz 



!43 Cernelle) 

ksules 96 7.80dz .. 

JS ( 1 449 R&CFD) 

aters 25'/j oz 1.5 ldz 0.27dz 

20 oz 0.905dz O.I65dz 

35'/ 4 oz 1.6 ldz 0.29dz 
uit drinks 

25% oz 1.36dz 0.245dz 



No.O 



No.l 



No.2 



soluble 



5.76 
(4 dz) 
6.15 
(4dz) 
6.94 
(4 dz) 
5.60 
(4 dz) 



san-belts 

side-fastening 
SANILAV (671 Jeyes) 

425 g l.OOdz 
738 g 1.66dz 

SANOID(339 CG) 

baby cream 

dusting powder 
SAQUADIL (97i PSMB) 

8 oz 

35 oz 
1 gal .. .. 
SCHOLL'S(1108 SMC) 

shoe deodoriser spray 3.28dz 
SCORVITE (1335 Wigglesworth) 

tablets 14 1.45dz 

SCRUBBS(671 Jeyes) 

ammonia 540 nil 1.30dz 

SEA & SKI (682 KCL) 

(distributors 1530 Fisons) 
SECTO (333 Cupal) 
aerosols 

biting insect repellent 
green fly and 

aphid spray 

plastic puffer 

insecticide powder 

Vap fly killer 

giant size 
super size 
superfast fly killer 

mothproofer 

liquid ant and wasp 
ant killer 



Retail 

£.p 

0.07 

0.10 

0.19 

0.10 

0.12 
0.09 
016 
0.17 



0.15 
0.45 



0.79 




1.19 tsl 


400 g 0.50 
RYBARI1091 Rybar) 

inhaler 10.20dz .. 


0.75 
/.27 


2.31 


0.41 


0.1 2'4 


with mask 10.20dz 


1.68 


(2'Adz) 


(2V,dz) 




special 10.20dz .. 


1.18 


2.21 


0.39 


0.21 


SACSOL(1335 Wigglesworth) 




(liidz) 


(lUdz) 




tablets 200 0.97dz 


0.12 


1.79 


0.31 


0.42 


SALAZOPYRIN ( 1497 PGBL) 




(V:dz) 


C/:dz) 




(distributors 1556 Farillon) 
suppositories 10 1.01 


1.52 


1.85dz* 


0.28dz 




SAN ELL A (903 NPU) 




2.92d/* 


0.475dz 




sanitary towels 





0.15 
(1.16 
0.1,1 
0.1414 



0.10 
0.16 

d 
d 

0.65 
2 40 
6.75 

0.59 

0.18% 

0.13 t 

i 



0.33 

0.29 
0.15 

0.23 
0.4S 
0.26 

6.26 

0.15 



SOF'DOWN (1349 LW) 
nappy liners 50 
100 



Trade 
£.p 

1.54dz 
2.75dz 



Tax 
£.p 



SOFRA-TULLEU087 Roussel) 
tins 10 x 10 cm 0.40 

tins 1 strip 

100 cm x 10 cm 0.50 
SOLPRO ( 1553 Contactasol) 

solution 15 ml 0.30 

SO-SOFT (1 227 THP) 
SO-SOFT (193 Brobat) 

hankies 100 1.65 

(20 pkts) 
rolls twin 1.02 

(l'Adz) 

SPRAYMARK AEROSOLS (328 CCC) 

marking fluid 6xl72g 2.82 
STRFSNIL (328 CCC) 

injection (vet) 50 cc 2.06 
STRIKE (818 M&B) 

rooting powder 30 g 1.68dz 
SULPHAMEZATHINE (649 ICI) 

powder 100 g 

SUNPURE(903 NPU) 
fruit drinks 

orange, lemon I . I 3dz 

lemon barley 1.235dz 
lime 1.35dz 
SUPER PLENAMINS (848 Minnesota) 



15 
30 
60 
150 

SUPERTOX(818M&B) 
lawn weed killer 8 oz 
1 Pt 

1 gal . 

SUSPAL (Omega (946 Pearce)) 
allergenic specific 

treatments 10,000. 1.000 
and 100 NPU 5 cc vials 
3 

SUSTAMYC1N (824 MCP) 

capsules 250 mg 50 
SWEETEX(751 LL) 
SWEETEX (325 C-A) 
SYNALAR (649 ICI) 

ointment 
TABLOID (208 BW) 

cascara sagrada 

ephedrine HCI 

30 mg pack of 25 
TAKA-D1ASTASE (938 PD) 

tablets 

pepsin compound 100 
TAMPAX(1211Tampax) 
regular 



2.60dz 
4.54dz 
8.30dz 
17.64dz 



2.24dz 
4.48dz 
:7.60dz 



4.50 
1.68 



1 S i 



100 



super 



TEDRAL(1310WW) 

linctus 300 ml 

TEDRAL EXPECT (1310 WW) 



1.37dz 
4.85dz 
I S ldz 
5.40dz 



0.52 



0.375 
2.26 
19.87 



0.19 

(20 pkts) 



0.205dz 

0.22dz 

0.245dz 



linctus 300 ml 

TETRALYSAL (227 Erba) 
capsules 1 6 

100 
1000 

THE BLUE TRAIN (981 Picot) entire entry 
THEREXU055 RM) 
THEREX (890 Newton) 

(distributors 1556 Farillon) 



Retail 

£.p 

0.24 
0.43 



TS 
TS 



0.12 
0.07 

3.75 

2. 75 
0.21 



0.1314 

0.15 

0.17 

0.31 
0.54 
0.99 
2.10 

0.28 
0.56 
3.20 



TS 

d 



0.59 TS 

d 
d 



15 
0.53 
0.16% 
0.59 



0.78 ts2s4A 

0.56 TS 
3.39 TS 
29.80 TS 

d 
d 





killer 




0.26 


THIODET(818M&B) 










Sectovap 300 cc 




0.17 


test kit 


0.70 


1.05 






16 oz 




0. 23 


THYLIN0143 SPL) 










32 oz 




0.37 


tablets 250 m 100 


2.34 


3.51 




d 


128 oz 




1.15 


500 


11.16 


16.74 






minispace 




35 


THYRODEX ( 1 556 Farillon) entire entry 




d 




greenhouse strip 




0.60 


TINKER (455 Felix) entire entry 




d 


d 


Vap lantern Mk III 




078 


TOLOCHROME (818 M&B) 










SECTO-KIL(333 Cupal) 






25 g 


3.96dz .. .. 


0.49% 


d 


house and garden 






TONSILLIN ( 1 599 Winthrop) 








powder 7 oz 




0.20 


TOOTHY (236 CTA) 










SENNALAX (3 1 2 AC) entire entry 




d 


disposable toothbrushes 


25.00 






d 
i 


SENNA-DISCS (312 AC) 
standardised senna 






TOPILAR(1584 Syntex) 


(1000) 








tablets 100 0.19 




0.28 


cream 500 g 


6.25 




ts4BTS 




SENOKOTO037 Reckitt) 






ointment 500 g 


6.25 




+ S4BTS 




granules 50 g 1.335dz . 




0.16 


TORECAN (1098 Sandoz) 










56 g 




d 


ampoules 10mg/l ml 










SEPICHLOR(1335 Wigglesworth) 






5 


0.24 


0.36 


+s4B 




lozenges 20 0.99dz . 




0.WA 


pack of 6 






d 




SERADIX (818 M&B) 






TR1-ADCORTYL ( 1 1 76 Squibb) 








B powder No 1 1.68dz 




0.21 


cream 30 g 


1.33 


2.00 


TS 




No 2 1.68dz . 




0.21 


ointment 30 g 


1.33 


2.00 


TS 




No 3 1.68dz . 




0.21 


TRIDESILON (1460 DOME) 










LIS 10 gm 4.00 




0.50 


cream 0.05% 1 5 g 


0.50 


0.75 


TSA 


TS 


SHLOERU03 Beecham) 

liquid apples small 1.56* 


0.22 




30 g 

TRIOGES1C (1303 Wander) 


0.90 


1.35 


TSA 


d 


(2 dz) 


(2 dz) 




elixir 150 ml 


0.23 


0.34 




d 


* Includes 0.36 (2 


dz) bottle 


deposit 


tablets 1 2 


0.13 


0.19 


ts7 




large 1.83dz 


0.33dz 




250 


1.76 


2.64 






grape juice large 2.085dz 


0.38dz 




TRUFORD ( 1 249 Trufood) 










SILMI8I8M&B) 113 ml 0.40 




0.60 


junior foods jar 


0.77dz .. 


o.os 






1 1 2.35 




3.52% 


Spoonfoods jar 


0.53dz .. 


0.05% 




SMITH KEN DON (1152 SK) 






toddler meals 


I.06dz .. 


0.11 






glucose tablets 






TRUST (103 Beecham) 










Mocca coffee flavoured 






dog or cat treats 


1.635 0.295 








7oz 1.57dz 


0.285dz 


0.19 




(6 dz) (6 dz) 







8 



Supplement to Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1972jj 



TTTTI T J - L Perl Ltd 

W~ |~i i r~\ lii 8 Esterbrooke Street 
J- -I — J JL yJ^Li London SW1 

SOLE UK DISTRIBUTORS FOR: 
Sauna Toiletries < Lubin Perfumes 
XZ Hair Nutrient • Scherk Face Lotion 
Samsar Manicure Implements 
and the genuine 

Diamon-Deb, Kurlash and Twizzors 




At last the original 



G Diamoti- c Deb 



The nail file with countless thousands of tiny diamond crystals forming 
the unique abrasive surface . . again available in the U.K. only from 
J. L. Perl Ltd. 

For illustrated brochure and details write or telephone 01-834 8843 




Trade Tax 


Retail 




Trade Tax 




Retail 


922 


Ortho 


= Ortho Pharmaceutical Ltd. 


£p £.p 


£.p 




£.p £.p 




C.p 






Saundcrlon. High Wycombe. 


TUSSOBRON ( 1335 Wigglesworth) 




WOODWARD'S (1346 Woodward 1 










Bucks. 0240-24 3541 


56 ml 1 . 1 Odz .. 


0.14 t 


baby cream 220 gm 


2.6ldz .. 




ft. 29 


945 


Payot 


= Payot Ltd. 139A New Bond 


114 ml I.76dz .. 


25 * 


WRIGHT'S (1351 WLU) 












Street, London W.I. 


packs of 2 oz and 4 oz 


d 


vaporiser 


0.56 




0.7 S t 






01-499 4353 


UNICAN (1391 MHB) 




vaporising liquid 














for sauternes. sweet sherry. 




50 ml 


1.17dz .. 




0.13 f 


946 


Pearce 


= L.R.B. Pearce Ltd, 125 High 


port, burgundy, hock. 




200 ml 


3.60dz .. 




0.40 f 






Holborn. London WCI V 60 J. 


sweet mead, dry mead. 
















01-405 7722 


claret, Beaujolais. dry 


















sherry, liebfraumilch, 




AMENDMENTS TO KEY TO SUPPLIERS 






971 


PSMB 


= Pharmaceutical Specialities 


graves, rose, chablis. 
















(May & Baker) Ltd. Daecnhan 


red vermouth, royal ruby 




4 Abdine 


- Abdine Ltd. 110 Commerce 






Essex RM10 7XS. 


as: 


0.7$ 




Street. Glasgow 


G5 8DR. 






01-592 3060 








Scotland. 041-4 


29 1696 










VALLEDRINE (971 PSMB) 




67 Ashe 


= Ashe Laboratories Ltd. 




1061 


Riker 


= Riker Laboratories. Morley 


linctus 125 ml 0.17 


0.25iits4BDDI 




Ashetree Works. Kingston 






■ Street. Loughborough. 


21 2.08 


3.12 "fs4BDDI 




Road. Leatherhejd, Surrev 






Leicestershire. 05093 681 81 


VARIOTIN (747 Leo) 






Lcatherhead 76151. 










ointment 10 g 0.52 


0.78 


76 Atkinson 


= J & E Atkinson Ltd. 26 




1159 


WSHL 


= Wilfred Smith (Horticulture) 


VASODEX(61 APC) 






Conduit Street. 


London 








Ltd. Gemini House. High 



ophthalmic solution 

5 ml 

VASOSULPH (61 APC) 
ophthalmic solution 

10ml 
15 ml pack 
VASOZINC(61 APC) 
ophthalmic solution 

10ml 
15 ml pack 
VERMIPELS (328 CCC) 
in feed wanner 2 lb 
8 lb 

VESAGEX ( I 335 Wigglesworth) 
antiseptic ointment 

60 g 
500 g 

V1-MINEROL(1023 Radiol) 
canine 450 g 

extra bone 25 kg 

standard 25 kg 

VITATHONE(333 Cupal) 
tablets 50 

VIULES (147 Boots) existing entry 

VIULES (147 Boots) 
streptomycin sulphate 

6 



0.40 



0.25 



0.25 



2.48 
8.62 



l.92dz 

0.67 

0.30 
5.80 
9.20 

1.80 



0.75 g/1.5 ml 

1 s/2.0 ml 

Streptoduacin 
0.5 g/2.0 ml 



100 
6 
100 

6 
100 



0.38 
5.90 
0.45 
5.97 

0.45 
7.30 



V. P D. (328 CCC) 
pre-digested feed 

(vet) 12xloz 1.65 

WANDER (1303 Wander) 
diabetic chocolate 

drink 1 lb pack 

WAXSOL (896 NL) 

ear drops 1 6 ml 0. 1 84 

WEEDEX (1609 C-G) 

sachets I 
4 

'/ 2 lb 
1 '/• lb 
super sachets 2 

5 

10 



0.60 TS 



OSS vs4BTS. 
d 



0.38 



3.30 
11.50 



0.24 
1.00 

0.42 
7. .TO 
//. 96 

0.22 



95 Baxter 



147 Boots 



151 Boutique 



TS 
TS 
TS 
TS 

TS 
TS 



0.26 

0.14 
0.45 
1.05 
2.75 
0.35 
0.S5 
1.60 



536 GPL 

566 Hanovia 

647 lllingworth 

669 Sorelle 

814 Maxicrop 

816 Mayborn 

890 Newton 



WIR9TA. 01-493 0307 
= Baxter Division. 

Travenol Laboratories Ltd. 

Caxton Way. Thetford. Norfolk. 

Thetford 4581 
= Beautishape International Ltd, 

45 Berners Street. London 

WIP 3 AD. 01-580 1544 
= Boots Company Ltd, 

Thane Road. Nottingham 

NG2 3AA. 0602 561 I 1 
= Boutique 77 Ltd. 209 Vale Road. 

Woolton. Liverpool. 

051-428 4087 
= Casey Tregaard Associates Ltd, 

20 Blacktriars Lane. London 
E.C.4. 01-248 0489 

= Du Barry International (UK) 

Ltd. 45 Berners Street. London 

W1P3AD. 01-580 1544 
= Gray Prodncts Ltd, 2 Marshall 

Road, Hampden Park, 

Eastbourne. Sussex. 

0323 27871 
= Hanovia Lamps Ltd. 480 Bath 

Road. Slough, Bucks. Burnham 

4041 . 

= lllingworth Snuffs Ltd, Aynani 

Mills. Kendal. Westmorland. 

Kendal 21898 
= Jean Sorelle Ltd. 117 Great 

Portland Street. London 

WIN 6AH. 01-580 1312 
= Maxicrop Retail Sales Ltd. 

21 London Road. Great Shelford. 
Cambridge. Shelford 3391 

= Mayborn Products Ltd 

139 Sydenham Road, 

London SE26. 

01-650 4801 
= Newton Chemical Ltd, 139 

St James' Drive. London 

SWI7 7RP 



1345 Woodward 



1530 Fisons 



1578 Vernon 



1602 Kelts 



1603 U-Lo 



1608 S&W 



1610 WCSD 



Street. Edgware. Middlesex. 
01-952 6655 

G O. Woodward & Co. Ltd. 

225 Putney Bridge Road. 

London S.W.15. 01-870 0971 
: Wright. Layman & Unincy 

(Sales) Ltd. 43 Clapham Road, 

London S.W.9. 01-735 2801 
; Fisons Ltd. Pharmaceutical 

division, 12 Derby Road, 

Louahborough. Leics. 

0509 63113 
: Vernon-Carus Ltd. Penwortham 

Mills. Preston PR I 9SN. 

0772 44493 
: Ketts Laboratories. 1 7 Canowie 

Road. Bristol 6. 

0272 36355 
: Li-Lo. Ltd. Liverpool Road 

Trading Estate. Slough, Bucks. 

Slough 20333 
: Inter-Pan. Ltd. 169 Regent 

Street. London W1R 8HE. 

01-734 7495 

Bee-Ply Ltd. 74 Rose Lane, 
Liverpool LI 8 8DH. 
051-724 2261 
: Jaycon Soft Drinks Ltd. 
102 St PancrasWay. N.W.I. 
01-485 581 1 
Johnson Wax Ltd. 
Frimley Green, Camberley, 
Surrey. 0276 63456 
Smith & Walker Ltd. Linby 
Street. Bulwell, Nottingham. 
0602 278835 
CIBA-Geigy IUKI Ltd.. 
Simonsway. Manchester 
M22 5 LB. 061-437 5252 
Wellcome Consumer Sales 
Division. Crewe Hall. Crewe. 
Cheshire. 0270 3251 



THIS WEEK'S CHANGES 





20 






2.95 














WELLCOME (208 BW) 












Trade Tax 


Retail 




Trade 


aminophylline BP 












£.p £.p 


£.p 






£.p 


intravenous 0.25 g 










ANTHISAN (971 PSMB) 








NORADRAN (897 NO 




in 10 ml 


5 






d 


cream 2% 25 g 


0.14 


0.21 


a 


inhalant 




louping ill vaccine 










AVOMINE(971 PSMB) 








PANTURON (897 NO entire entry 


(Moredum type) 










tablets 25 mg 10 


0.11 


0.16' 


ifsla 


PHENSEDYL (97 1 PSMB) 




20 ml 


4.50 




6.00 


BROLENE (971 PSMB) 


0.20 


0.30 


a 


linctus 1 25 ml 


0.18 


WHISKAS (967 Petfoods) 






eye drops 




SCHOLLS(1108 SMC) 




cat litter 




2 OOdz 




0.22'A 


eye ointment 


0.13 


0.19' 




Trimma tights 




WHITE'S. DR. (761 Lilia-White) 














SECTO(333 Cupal) 




Koronet briefs 




2.77dz 


0.29dz 


0.3 3'A 


BRULID1NE(971 PSMB) 








Slug-kil pellets 




pads 




1.09dz 




0.1 IK 


cream 0.15% 25 g 


0.13 


0.19' 


'za 


SYLVIA (339 CG) 




sanitary towels 





l.48dz 




0.15 










sanitary towels popular 


1.54dz 




1 


l.55dz 




0.16 


FORCEVAL-PROTEIN (1367 Unigreg) 






size 1 


1.66dz 




2 


1.74dz 




0.1S 


300 g 


0.73 


0.97 


i 


size 2 


I.92dz 




3 


1.85dz 




0.19V: 


CEGROV1TE (Grossman) (163 Bramwell) 






size 3 


2.30dz 




El 


0.76dz 




0.08'A 


effervescent tablets 10 


0.22 


0.34 


a 


maternity 


2.64dz 


belt-. 




1.05dz 


0.1 2dz 


0.13 


GONADOTRAPHON (930 P&B) 






TABLOID (208 BW) 




Carefree 


1 


1.55dz 




0.16 


L H ampoules 








cascara 125 mg 25 and 100 




*> 


1.74dz 




o.im 


100 iu 50 


4.50 




•fs4Bo 


TIXYLIX(971 PSMB) 




sanspenders 




0.83dz 


0.1 Odz 


0.10 


GONADOTROPHIN (930 P&B) 






linctus 1 25 ml 


0.17 


WHIZ (671 Jeyes) 










FSH ampoules 








TRISONOV1N (835 M&J) 




air freshener blocks 




1.41 
(3 dz) 




0.04V- 


400 iu 50 
M&BI971 PSMB) 


11.00 




+s4Bc 


cream 25 g 
VANISH (1037 Reckitt) 


0.27 


WOODHUE (446 Fl) entire entry 




d 


antiseptic cream 25 g 


0.13 


0.19 


iu 


fly killer 


7.15dz 



Tax 
£.p 



Retail 

C.p 



0.27 ■fslfB 



ft/5 

0.16 d 
0. 1 7K 
0.20 
0.24 
0.27% 



\ 



0.0675 



0.25':s7DH 

• 9 

0.46 j ■ 
0.S5 H 



rient to Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1972 



f REFERENCES TO MANUFACTURERS' LISTS 



§ 



ulver Co 

lippe Ltd 

ur & SKin Institute ... 

> Wellcome & Co 

d ..>.. 

ins Ltd 

(Liquid of Life) Ltd 

maceuticals Ltd 

Co Ltd 

npany Ltd 



H. Bronnley & Co Ltd 1 

Arthur H. Cox & Co Ltd 1 

Crookes Laboratories 1 

Custom Synthetics Ltd 1 

Dearborn Chemicals Ltd 2 

FBA Pharmaceuticals Ltd 2 

Fulford Williams International Ltd 2 

Golden Ltd 2 

Harvey-Scruton Ltd 2 

Interfran Management Ltd 2 



International Laboratories Ltd 2 

Johnson Wax Ltd 2 

Eli Lilly & Co Ltd 2 

Miles Laboratories Ltd 2 

Nicholas Products Ltd 2 

Norgine Ltd 2 

Parke Davis & Co 2 

Pharmaceutical Specialities 

(May & Baker Ltd) 2 

Polaroid (UK) Ltd 2 



Radiol Chemicals Ltd 

Rimmel International Ltd 

Rutin Products Ltd 

Scholl (UK) Ltd 

Sinclair Pharmaceuticals Ltd ... 

Smith Kendon Ltd 

Stafford Miller Ltd 

Stiefel Laboratories (UK) Ltd 
Syntex Pharmaceuticals Ltd.... 

White Laboratories Ltd 

John Wyeth & Brother Ltd 



TAIN THIS SUPPLEMENT 



ontains infotmation 
t will not be repeated 



10 



Supplement to Chemist & Druggist April 1, ] 



Put Classified advertisements where 
you get maximum reader-interest 



THE LOGICAL WAY 
OF REACHING THE 
REQUIRED READERS 
IS IN THE TECHNICAL 
OR TRADE PRESS, 



1 



FOR THESE REASONS: 



For Classified" selling all forms of 
supplies, services and equipment, 
the trade press gives you well-defined 
and concentrated reader-interest, and 
provides the recognized sales and 
wants sections familiar to all readers 
of trade journals. 



For RECRUITMENT ADVERTISING, 
the short cut to reach the 
man you want is a dominating 
display in his technical, trade or 
professional journal. 



An important appointment should be 
advertised in a big space, double-page 
or whole-page, according to the size of 
the job. If he exists, this man you want 
is sure to see it — and you will probably 
save hundreds of pounds. 




ABC 15,879 — read throughout the industry home & overs] 



FOR recruitment advertising and 

SPECIALISED CLASSIFIED 



BENN BROTHERS LTD ■ BOUVERIE HOUSE • 154 FLEET ST LONDON EC4A 2DL Tel 01-353 3212 



rely on the 




Printed in Great Britain by BISHOPSGATE PRESS LIMITED, 21 New Street, London, EC2M 4UN, and published by BENN BROTHERS LTD., at I 
Hm.se 154 Fleet Street, London, EC4A 2DL. Registered at the GPO as a newspaper. © all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be repr 
stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without t 



permission of Benn Brothers Ltd. 



Chemist & Druggist April 1 1972 — 449 



COMPANY 




Chas Zimmermann & Co Ltd 



Success 
demands 
a move 



With all departments "bulging at the 
seams" and the problem of finding space 
becoming increasingly difficult, to cope 
with the continued expansion of their 
business, Chas Zimmermann & Co Ltd 
have decided to mark their 70th annivers- 
ary by moving out of London later this 
year to new purpose-designed premises at 
Milton Keynes, Bucks. 

At this new satellite town, the com- 
pany's offices and factory will occupy 
almost double the space of present Peri- 
vale headquarters. Additional land will 
be acquired on which further develop- 
ment can take place when required. This 
will not be Zimmermann's first move, 
for they went to Perivale in 1948 to new 
premises which were then more than 
adequate for them. 

When they first began trading in 1902 
they occupied premises at St Mary at Hill 
in the City of London, trading in phar- 
maceutical chemicals under the title of 
Charles Zimmermann & Co. 

Early days 

Charles Zimmermann broke away from 
his father's firm A. & M. Zimmermann, 
chemical merchants to set up on his own. 
Within a year he had produced a 40-page 
brochure informing the trade that the 
new firm had acquired the sole agencies 
of seven continental principals which 
included Boehringer & Reuss of Cann- 
statt, Germany for pharmaceutical chemi- 
cals; Isdahl of Bergen for cod liver oil; 
and Schulke & Mayr of Hamburg the 
original makers of the then newly dis- 
covered disinfectant lysol. The opening 
of a photographic goods department was 
also announced and the sole agency for 
Ernemann cameras of Dresden proudly 
proclaimed. 

The 1903 brochure mentions approxi- 
mately 400 items many of which such as 
quinines, lactose, glycerophosphates and 
papain are still important lines in the 
Charles Zimmermann range today. Among 
many items that have long since dis- 
appeared from the firm's list is heroin 
hydrochloride quoted at 16s 3d per oz 
bottle. This may perhaps be one of the 
reasons for the firm's telegraphic address 
at that time being "poisonable". 

It was not long before essential oils 
were added to the Zimmermann range, 
and the catalogue issued in 1912 contains 
a special section under the heading, 
"Synthetic Perfumes and Essential Oils 
for making Perfumes and all kinds of 




A rural scene near Bletchley where the 

Flavourings in Soaps, Confectionery, 
Tobacco, etc." Among the agencies 
obtained in these early days by the new 
essential oil department were those of 
Pilar Freres of Grasse, Petko Orozoff of 
Kazanlik, Bulgaria, and S. & G. Pasquale 
of Messina. 

In 1913 Charles Zimmermann & Co 
became a limited liability company, 
Charles Zimmermann being chairman. 
With the outbreak of war in the following 
year and the consequent disruption of 
continental connections also the absorp- 
tion of staff into the armed services the 
company was faced by its biggest chal- 
lenge. The difficulties were overcome by 
the establishment of connections with 
American suppliers, and valuable relation- 
ships were also formed with British manu- 
facturers which have lasted to this day. 

In 1917 Charles Zimmermann changed 
his name by deed poll to Charles Bell, 
but the company continued under its old 
title. After the war continental connec- 
tions were quickly re-established, and 
the executive staff was strengthened by the 
addition after demobilisation from the 
army of Mr Maurice Bell, cousin of 
Charles. The interwar years, despite the 
difficulties of world trade depressions saw 
the continued development of the com- 
pany. The founder died in 1939 and the 
direction of the company then devolved 
on Maurice Bell and William Beckley. 
The latter, who had served the company 
sinc« its inception in 1902, retired because 
of ill-health in 1947 and in that year 
R. F. Tomlinson, R. F. Gillham, S. E. 
Sadler and O. W. Jarvis joined the board 
with Maurice Bell as chairman. 

Soon after the move to Perivale, the 
chairman died and was succeeded by Mr 
Gillham. In 1956 the board was joined 
by Dr C. I. Bell, son of the founder. 

A new generation of directors, J. Bruce, 
F. Drought. F. Rutt and E. Robinson 
were appointed to the board in 1968 to 
serve with Mr Gillham and Dr Bell. 

The pharmaceutical and fine chemicals 
section has retained the representation for 
many years of several well-known con- 
tinental suppliers including Buchler & Co 
of Brunswick, Germany, and Givaudan- 
Lavirotte of Lyon. France. Recently the 



new town of Milton Keynes is being built 

firm obtained exclusive representation in 
the UK of C.S.R. Chemicals Ltd of 
Australia for mannitol, and DMV of 
Holland for lactose. 

The essential oils section holds several 
exclusive agencies for continental pro- 
ducers and among them the French co- 
operative Sicalav de Haute Provence, said 
to be the largest producers in the world 
of lavender and lavandin oils. 

Distillation of many oils is carried out 
by a battery of modern stills in the fac- 
tory at Perivale, an important part of 
this activity being the rectification of 
peppermint oil for export particularly to 
the developing countries of Africa. 

An original process for the redistilla- 
tion of essential oils and isolates at low 
temperatures has recently been perfected 
and patented by Zimmermann. This 
process enables perfumery and flavour raw 
materials to be manufactured with a 
minimum disturbance of odour and colour 
suoh as occurs with the high temperature 
normally required for distillation. The 
oils thus produced cover a wide range 
and are offered under the name of Koldist 
products. 

The perfumery department with Mr 
Douglas Clark as chief perfumer operates 
in laboratories well equipped to ensure 
technical perfection. Tailor-made perfumes 
to the individual requirements of custom- 
ers are produced and technical advice is 
available to all clients with perfumery 
problems. Much research has been devoted 
to the production of perfumes specially 
designed for aerosols. Zimmermann were 
among the earliest pioneers in this field, 
and the products elaborated by them for 
this purpose are known as the Aeroflor 
range of aerosol perfumes. At the same 
time much successful effort has in recent 
years gone to the development of their 
flavourings section. 

Zimmermann have always been export 
conscious especially as regards their per- 
fumery and flavouring materials which 
are now well-known under the registered 
name of Dega. A special export depart- 
ment has been formed in recent years to 
manage this increasingly important side 
of the business and agents have been 
appointed in the more important markets. 



450 — Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1972 



PETRONET & SULPHONET 
TULLE DRESSINGS 



TUBIPAD 

SACRAL BANDAGES 




ZINC PASTE 
RANGE OF 
MEDICATED 
BANDAGES 



LESTREFLEX ELASTIC 

DIACHYLON 

BANDAGES 



VARICO 

LEG BANDAGES 
& BLUE LINE 
WEBBING 



TUBIPAD BANDAGES FOR PREVENTION OF 
PRESSURE SORES. 




ton 

have the subject 
well covered . . . 

... by a wide range of Surgical Dressings and 
appliances. They are now being regularly prescrib- 
ed by General Practitioners, and can be obtained 
through any Wholesale Chemist. 
Trade Price Lists and further information regarding 
these and other products will be supplied upon 
request. 

© BATEMAN -JACKSON 

Distributors of Seton Specialised Surgical Dressings and Appliances. 

Tubiton House. MerJIock St.. Oldham. Lancashire, England. a membe r of the. 

Telephone: 061-652 2222 (5 lines) Telegrams 'Tubiton' Oldham. Kra^Til Group 



THE MOST UNBELIEVABLE OFFER EVER MADE 
IN THE CASH REGISTER BUSINESS 

BRAND NEW MACHINES 

Mat* m**h 60mtt& 



To A FREE SERVICE CONTRACT 
fOR 1 YEAR 




SPECIAL OFFER PRICE 



MANUFACTURERS 
RETAIL SUGGESTED 
SELLING PRICE 



£385 



the REGNA ELECTRIC 4 total Itemiser 
CASH REGISTER 

WITH 15 SPECIAL STAR FEATURES 

1. Note Holder 9. Signal Lamp 

2. Clutch Key 10. Accumulator Lock 

3. Chart Holder 11 .Sub-sum Key 

4. Accumulator Keys1-4 12. Total Key 

5. Key for main switch 13. Correction Key 

6. Paper Release Handle 14. Itemiser Bar 

7. Date Change Key 1 5. Proprietors private 

8. Ticket Giver Till Roll for audit. 

No Charge for POSTAGE 




4 ROCHDALE RD. MANCHESTER4 



Chemist & Druggist April 1 1972—451 



COMMENT 

Diverting the flow 

The long accepted marketing principle in the pharmaceu- 
tical industry of concentrating on the doctor and virtually 
side-stepping the pharmacist may be changing. For some 
time now the medical profession has been stressing that 
it is over-taxed and one thing that many doctors will 
admit is that they have difficulty in assessing the value of 
different pharmaceutical products. 

Replying to criticism about large scale and costly 
mailings to the medical practitioner, the industry says 
that a large proportion of doctors want mailing to con- 
tinue, but what section of the community will say no to 
something that is free? 

Last weekend in Leeds (page 456), representatives of 
several pharmaceutical companies expressed interest in 
a change in present practices. They now appreciate more 
the pharmacist's information role — one would hope not 
merely because it makes economic sense. 

If the pharmacist is to fulfill that role more effectively 



he must rationalise his own information systems to provide 
an effective service. Also information from the industry 
must be made more readily obtainable. 

There are promising indications about the supply of 
data sheets, but the process of supplying fuller information 
must be clarified. It is not sufficient for individual com- 
panies to offer to put pharmacists on their mailing lists 
by request — the hospital and retail pharmacist should be 
there by right. If it is a matter of cost, the pharmacist will 
be very willing to forego all the promotional "glossies"— 
just so long as he receives the fullest technical data, 
updated as necessary. 

As the industry and hospital pharmacists admitted at 
Saturday's symposium, there is an underlying suspicion 
that maintains a gulf between the two sides. The obvious 
remedy is a closer relationship. The hospital pharmacist 
must do more than extend his horizons to the wards, 
where the patients, the people who really matter in the 
Health Service, are. Those horizons must stretch as far 
as the industry, the basic source of his products. 



Dispensary blues 

(With apologies to Walt Whitman) 
O Doctor! my Doctor! this fearful script is done, 
The problem that you set is solved, the grim solution won, 
The label firmly fixed (NP), the patient, all exulting, 
Heads happily for home and hardly stops to be insulting. 

But the heart! heart! heart! 

(That seemed to cause the pain) 

I can't equate with Betnovate — 

And he'll be back again! 

O Doctor! kind Doctor! look at this EC 10— 
Rise up and gaze upon this script for RendelPs Norolen. 
For you no medals and no flowers — for you no bugle trills, 
For once again you've written it as pessaries, not pills! 

O Doctor! good Doctor! 

How could you be so blind? 

Your cavities are sadly mixed — 

Was something on your mind? 

O Doctor! dear Doctor! I don't begrudge the fun 
You have each night with Mims at hand when once the 
day is done. 

For Daricon and Doriden are certain to confuse, 
And Paraban and Panadol, Antas and Antabuse. 



But Doctor! O Doctor! 
Why send such scripts to me, 
When you have started on your rounds 
And won't be home till tea? 

Our Doctor does not answer — he's many miles away; 
"Refer to the receptionist" he'd very likely say. 
But as for the receptionist (just seventeen last week) 
Two minutes on the 'phone with her will drive you up 
the creek. 

Pray, Doctor! dear Doctor! 
When will it be the norm 
To write a hand we understand 
And not use Cuneiform? 

Have pity on us, Doctor dear, who save your patients' lives 
By asking them their symptoms, or by questioning their 
wives; 

Who find that Mr Potter, since last Sunday on the loo, 
Is down for dimethisterone — and Baby Potter, too! 

So Doctor! my Doctor! 

Just do two things for me. 

Please check what you have written down — 

AND READ YOUR BPC! 

John Camp 




Obstetric Analgesia by The Caudal 
Approach. Verity Films, sponsored by 
BDH Pharmaceuticals Ltd, Birkbeck 
Street, London E2 6LA. 16mm Eastman- 
color with optical sound track. Running 
time 23 minutes. 

Following the film preview at the Royal 
College of Obstetricians and Gynaecolo- 
gists, high praise was given to this film 
both for the content and the technical 
presentation. The film demonstrates the 
technique of caudal anaesthesia using 



Mareain (bupivaoaine), and shows how in 
childbirth the procedure gives relief of 
pain without narcosis, benefiting mother 
and baby. Intra uterine manipulations 
are made easy without causing patient 
any pain. 

The aim of the film, which it achieves 
so successfully, is to show that caudal 
anaesthesia with Mareain is a technique 
that can be quickly and safely taught to 
young obstetricians. 

The film is designed for medical and 
nursing audiences. 

The Swirling Safeguard. Cooper, Mc- 
Dougal & Robertson Ltd, Berkhamsted, 



Herts. Colour. Sound. 16mm. Running 
time 20 minutes. 

The film shows the application of a new 
technique of flying insect control by out- 
door "fogging", and was shot on location 
in the Arabian Gulf, Sudan, Spain and 
the UK. Special mobile equipment has 
been developed to apply a fog of recently- 
synthesised insecticides — some based on 
the active principles of pyrethrum — which 
are safe enough to be sprayed even in 
market environments where food is on 
open display. The film demonstrates how 
this technique is now being used in public 
health programmes in parts of the world 
where insect-borne disease is a problem. 



452 — Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1972 



W— a curse 
in disguise? 



A personal view 
by R. Jackson MPS 

In retrospect, with so many in favour of 
proper-name labelling and so few against, 
it seems to have taken a long time to 
arrive at the imminent reversal of the 
convention of not naming dispensed medi- 
cines. Everyone, except apparently a pro- 
portion of pharmacists in general practice, 
and a few cautious doctors, are in favour 
of this change, for which not one argu- 
ment has in my opinion been put forward 
that unselfishly considers the wider issues 
for the public good. 

It is significant that the pressure from 
doctors in general practice has grown since 
the change in grant-aid, allowing expenses 
for secretarial help. This enables the bur- 
densome chore of writing repeat prescrip- 
tions to be delegated. It is also felt by 
many doctors that the obligation of keep- 
ing records, and adequate instructions can 
be replaced by general naming of medi- 
cines on labels. "NP" is entirely unneces- 
sary for this if accurate records of treat- 
ment are kept, and the quantities pres- 
cribed are tailored more carefully to a 
specific course of treatment. I would ques- 
tion the need for repeat prescriptions at 
all, except for the chronically sick, and 
this distinction is officially recognised in 
the guide-lines for allowing exemption 
from the charges. 

Industry's part 

Pressure has come from the industry of 
course, since it is in their interests to get 
greater recognition for a particular name. 
The name is rightly coined for the purpose 
of protecting the good name and reputa- 
tion of the medicine; it is also un- 
ashamedly for the promotion of sales. As 
manufacturers have discovered to their 
cost, adding their name to a generic title 
is no protection against the day when their 
exclusive rights are lost. 

The patient has added his voice to the 
plea for "NP", because of the greater 
convenience, and because of the gratifica- 
tion of being entrusted with the means by 
which, by implication, the choice of treat- 
ment has been transferred from the doctor 
to him. I shall return to this last point, 
because it is the crux of my view. 

Many pharmacists have seen much in 
favour of "nomen proprium"; most of 
those in hospitals, and industry (if not all), 
and many in general practice. To me, 
there is a world of difference between the 
type of patient encountered in hospitals, 
and those in general practice. If the name 
on the container is considered essential to 
the smooth running of hospitals, then so 
be it. It is wrong to assume that it would 
do no harm outside them. 

In hospital, a patient is frankly ill — he 



is there in essentially a submissive capa- 
city; a state of mind enforced by the 
routine, and rightly so. Subject to a 
person's normal rights, being sick in hos- 
pital means accepting the decisions and 
treatment involved in attempts to cure 
him, successful or not. Once outside that 
environment, a patient reasserts himself; 
he is in the position once more of being 
able to take the initiative. 

I am not saying that this is a trans- 
formation that takes place at the exit ot 
the wards, or even out-patients, but it 
takes place nonetheless, and it should be 
realised that the dangers of "NP" lie in 
the power that this gives to the patient. It 
is not merely that the convention has 
changed — it is an attitude of mind. It can- 
not be assumed that the patient knows 
best. 

Doctors' views 

The doctor in the everyday conditions 
of the Health Service is not prepared to 
spend time in curing a large proportion 
of his patients. The acceptance of repeat 
prescriptions, with greater or lesser safe- 
guards depending on the organisation of 
the practice, and the responsibility given 
to the secretarial help, is in itself accepting 
that there is no end-point in treatment. As 
long as the patient is happy taking the 
treatment, then there is nothing to worry 
about. It is not considered important that 
there is a disincentive in the system for the 
patient to be supervised by the doctor; that 
positive harm can be done ,and that im- 
portant and useful forms of treatment can 
be brought into disrepute by inadequate 
supervision and lax supervision of "re- 
peats", eg asthma aerosols. 

Time saved, quicker and more efficient 
throughput of patients are considered to 
be paramount. It is not realised that a 
superficial attitude by doctors breeds a 
casual contemptuous one on the part of 
the patients? Is it desirable that certain 
preparations should acquire the status of 
a panacea, to be used for casual treatment 
of conditions positively contraindicated in 
therapy? A casual approach to drug treat- 
ment will engender the same response. 

The public cannot be expected to have 
a training in the handling of drugs, which 
would induce respect. Why then should 
there be this clamour for "NP", when it 
only serves to encourage the opposite? 

As I have already indicated, the protec- 
tion of the trade name is as indispensable 
to a manufacturer of prescription medi- 
cines, as to one of shoe polishes or sham- 
poo. While the promotion of a medicine 
was confined to the medical profession, 
the public interest could be protected by 
persons equipped to judge, but that pro- 
motion is now being widened by the 
more general use of "NP", to include 



the untrained and very malleable public. 

It seems to me to strike at the very 
heart of the methods by which the drug 
is judged. The well-designed "double- 
blind" clinical trial is now accepted to 
constitute the best method of assessment. 
Complete anonymity is essential in order 
that all the statistical criteria can be met. 
If then this procedure is desirable, why 
should a manufacturer want the name 
disclosed to the patient? It is possibly be- 
cause having failed to convince as many 
doctors as they would like, drug firms 
want to widen the potential sales appeal 
to a larger audience. 

Having now achieved success in this 
field, the next move is towards " original 
pack" dispensing. It is already quite com- 
mon for instruction leaflets for such 
packs to include a eulogy on the medicine 
in addition to the directions, which display 
a determination to mention the name as 
many times as possible. There is little 
difference between some leaflets and ad- 
vertisements put out to promote general 
proprietary medicines. Is this sort of abuse 
going to be tolerated after the acceptance 
of "NP"? It is after all, turning the screw 
a little more in the promotion game. 

The patient in all this is quite pleased. 
Medicine "X" has done the trick. He can 
ask for more by name, knowing that a 
visit to the doctor isn't really required; he 
could send a stamped addressed envelope. 
There is no need for an interview; he 
might have mentioned that headache or 
the tingling (or whatever), if the doctor 
had been available, but he forgot to make 
an appointment, and he needn't bother 
him. Besides "X" was marvellous for his 
sister, and she suggested he should try it. 

This attitude is not fiction; it is in- 
creasingly prevalent. A contemptuous dis- 
regard for the dangers inherent in drug 
therapy is not what we want from the 
public. This is not the way to encourage 
mothers to lock drugs away; by degrading 
prescription medicines to the level of a 
"patent"; do we not want the reverse to 
be true? 

Pharmacists' role 

Lastly, the pharmacist, who has had 
more training and experience than any- 
one in the handling and use of medicines, 
is as usual torn between placating a cus- 
tomer and acting in the most responsible 
and professional manner. The method of 
dosage, or the dangers of mixing "A" 
with "B" can be discussed, still preserving 
the anonymity of the treatment. 

I am not advocating the restoration of 
a mystique in medicines, but rather cau- 
tion in the process of enlightenment. The 
legal controls are based on the concept of 
abuse, and this abuse has been minimised 
by lack of familiarity with the treatment. 
There are many medicines which are not 
subject to control, simply because there 
are no grounds for restricting the avail- 
ability. It follows that a much greater 
degree of control would have to be placed 
on certain drugs as "NP" takes effect. 

I do not regard the public as being 
sufficiently well trained, and responsible, 
to take the unfettered initiative in drug 
treatment. If that day ever arrives, the 
pharmacist can pack up and go home. 



Chemist & Druggist April 1 1972—453 



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Radox Footspray is formulated to cool, soothe, refresh and 
deodorise hot, aching, tired, perspiring feet at once, 
It also contains anti-bacterial and anti-funga 
ingredients which help prevent 
and control "athletes foot". 
Radox Footspray is supported by 
sustained consumer advertising 
stressing both these benefits in national 
dailies, Sundays and specialised sports 
and athletics media. 

You will sell Radox Footspray readily to 
those who are in urgent need of speedy 
relief. You will go on selling Radox 
Footspray steadily to those who have a 
regular need to care for theirfeet. 

The advertising begins in April. Order now 
through your wholesaler or direct from: 



NICHOLAS PRODUCTS LIMITED, 225 BATH ROAD, SLOUGH, BUCKS. 




A Nicholas (N) Product 



454 — Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1972 



Excuses to give 
your customers 
when you can't give 
them Clearasil: 



Blame Richardson-Merrell 
when your Clearasil supplies 
run out unexpectedly. 

They're spending almost 
£400,000 nationally to 
advertise Clearasil Cream 
Medications (Skin tinted 
and White vanishing), 
Clearasil Cleansing Lotion 
and Clearasil Soft Shampoo. 

So naturally stocks are 
selling out faster. , 

And all your 



calculations are being upset. 

It's all Richardson-Merrell's 
fault really. 

Which is why we felt we 
owed you this gentle reminder. 

Check your Clearasil stocks 
-and get in touch with your 

wholesaler today, 
j Or if you have any 

queries about Clearasil 
write to David Young, 
Richardson-Merrell Ltd., 
20 Savile Row, 
London W.l. 



si! 



Clearasil 

soft shampoo 1 

fortheregulartreatment | 
Ik ofoilyhsirandsr^' 



oohr- 



Chemist & Druggist April 1 1972 — 455 



Scope in skin 
and its problems 



by A. F. L. Deeson, MA, PhD, DSc 

The market for medicated skin treatments 
may not be large at the present time — but 
nor is it subject to the whims of fashion. 
Furthermore, it is growing steadily. About 
80 per cent of the male population, it is 
estimated, suffer from acne at some point 
in their teens and in a relatively few 
cases it extends into later life. In girls it 
is less common but affects perhaps 20 per 
cent of them. 

The broad area of medicated skin 
treatments can be broken down into 
creams, lotions and cleansers or liquid 
soaps. It is very difficult to put a figure 
to the overall market but £2-£2 2 million 
at rsp, including prescription sales, seems 
reasonable. Of this, perhaps £| million 
preparations are sold on the NHS. Creams 
may account for around £1 million. 

This is clearly a chemist's market, with 
around 95 per cent of total sales, of 
which an estimated 52 per cent go to 
independent pharmacists and the remainder 
to Boots and other chains. 

There is considerable evidence that the 
acne preparations market is growing quite 
dynamically in real terms and that this 
process has accelerated over the last two 
or three years. Possibly there is a growing 
emphasis on lotions at the expense of the 
more traditional creams but at the present 
time creams probably hold around 40 
per cent of the total market, with 25 per 
cent to lotions and 35 per cent to liquid 
soaps or cleansers. 

The expansion of the market may well 
be due to the increasing income of young 
people and a better knowledge of the 
treatments available for acne. Certainly 
Richardson-Merrell (Clearasil) have found 
it pays to put over clearly the three-way 
action of their products, and pharmacists 
might usefully study the various formulas 
of the preparations available and their 
relationship to the symptoms of custo- 
mers, particularly as a large number of 
sufferers ask for recommendations. 

Brand leaders 

It is very difficult to arrange the products 
in this area in any meaningful order but 
certainly the Clearasil range is high in the 
league table with about 35 per cent of 
the cream market and 86 per cent for 
lotions. Their position in liquid soaps is 
too early to determine because the Cleara- 
sil medicated wash was only put in the 
test market (in Lancashire) in November 
1971. Bearing in mind that Clearasil 
cleansing lotion was only in the test mar- 
ket in 1970 the dynamic marketing policy 
of Richardson-Merrell certainly seems to 
have paid off. 

The well-established Valderma balm 
(Reckitt & Colman) is another leader 
among the creams and is probably neck- 



and-neck with Clearasil cream medications 
— the trade variously gives them between 
33 per cent and 40 per cent of the cream 
market while Nielsen suggests 32 per 
cent against Clearasil's 35 per cent. 

Other important cream products in- 
clude Eskamel, which is an "ethical" sold 
only to chemists — though 80 per cent of 
sales are over-the-counter. It is certainly 
one of the largest selling "ethicals" avail- 
able; the leader, Neo-Medrone (Upjohn), 
being a restricted product, available on 
prescription. 

Other creams include DDD (DDD Co) 
which sells 100 per cent to chemists; Nox- 
zema, a general-purpose skin cream, and 
Thera-Blem, a specific acne cream (both 
Noxzel Corporation), comparatively little 
known in this country but household 
names in the United States; Dome-acne, 
an "ethical", also available over the 
counter and supplied to chemists only; 
Benoxyl (Stiefel Laboratories), another 
"ethical" available over the counter; and 
Acnil and Medac (Fisons) both sold only 
through chemists. 

A number of manufacturers believe that 
lotions and "skin cleansers" will eventually 
overtake the well-established cream pro- 
ducts. Of the lotions, Clearasil has 86 per 
cent of the total market. DDD and Dome- 
acne are manufactured as lotions as well 
as creams. Acderm (Custom Synthetics) is 
a liquid acne treatment, an "ethical" pro- 
duct also available over-the-counter 
through chemists only. Benoxyl is also 
available as a lotion. 

There are also one or two gels such as 
Salaphene, another "ethical" which has 
over-the-counter sales. PhisoHex (Win- 
throp) has caused a considerable amount 
of interest as a liquid antibacterial skin 
cleanser specifically intended as a trea- 
ment for acne and similar skin problems. 
First introduced in 1961 on a prescription- 
only basis, it is now sold over-the-counter 
through chemists, and sales have expanded 
considerably — so much so that the manu- 
facturers believe it may be a leader over 
the whole market in sterling terms, bear- 
ing in mind that it is a relatively expen- 
sive product. 

Perhaps one of the most important 
recent introductions has been Neo-Me- 
drone acne lotion (Upjohn) which is avail- 
able on prescription only. Reported to be 
remarkably effective, it combines Medrone 
to suppress the inflammatory process, 
neomycin to combat bacterial infection, 
sulphur for healing, and aluminium chlor- 
hydroxide as an astringent and antipers- 
pirant agent. Several manufacturers believe 
that its proved effectiveness, combined 
with the apparently growing concern with 
acne on the part of the younger genera- 
tion, could encourage a continuously 
growing section of the market to approach 
their doctors for specific prescriptions 



rather than relying on their chemist's 
recommendations. 

Advertising and promotions for these 
products are, as one might expect, gener- 
ally low-key. 

Richardson-Merrell (Clearasil) are cur- 
rently by far the largest spenders (£264,000 
for 1971-2). They also offer display trays 
and excellent informative brochures, both 
for pharmacists and the general public. 

Winthrop are spending around £100,000 
a year on PhisoHex and offer display 
packs, show cards, window cards and 
booklets. 

The Noxzel Corporation (Noxzema and 
Thera-Blem) advertise only "lightly" in 
women's magazines. They offer the chemist 
display cards, counter displays and book- 
lets. 

DDD Co spend £3O,O0O-£5O,O0O a year, 
mostly in the teenage magazines but also 
in the national and women's Press. Stickers 
and show cards are available. 

The remainder of manufacturers, with 
the exception of Valderma, who are re- 
ported to spend well in excess of £65,000. 
promote minimally or not at all. Here, 
of course, it should be borne in mind that 
a number of the products discussed are 
prescribed medicines. 

Customer profile 

This is undoubtedly a young market (12- 
24), a point worth remembering in plan- 
ning retail promotions. Most manufac- 
turers report very few, if any, seasonal 
variations, but Clearasil have peaks during 
September /October and January /March 
which they believe are influenced by the 
return to school and the start of the party 
season respectively. A good summer may 
tend to reduce sales marginally because 
of the beneficial effect of sunlight on acne. 

Products appear to sell equally over 
the socio-economic groups and most 
manufacturers find no obvious regional 
variations. Noxzema and Dome report a 
slightly higher level of sales in the South, 
but one or two manufacturers find better 
sales for products in heavily industrial- 
ised areas, perhaps on the basis that while 
dirt does not cause acne it certainly does 
not help it. As an interesting side point 
Noxzema sales are notably higher where 
there is a large coloured population, 
possibly because of the popularity of the 
product in the United States. 

Increasing sales 

Medicated skin preparations are very 
much a chemist's market and will remain 
so. Nevertheless, special effort can in- 
crease the individual chemist's shares and 
I make no apology for recommending the 
pharmacist to know the products thor- 
oughly and to gain customer confidence by 
making thoughtful recommendations. 
Make sure, too. that you take advantage 
of the high-standard informative bro- 
chures available in this field both for 
yourself, your staff, and your customers. 

Three chemists, two in London and one 
in Liverpool, have told me they have 
dramatically increased their sales by set- 
ting up a permanent medicated skin pre- 
parations "bar" — one actually calls it 
"The acne bar". On these displays they 
firmly stick to chemist-only products. It's 
worth a thought. 



456 — Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1972 



PROFESSIONAL NEWS 



Development of the drug 
information role 

Support for the developing role of the pharmacist as a drug information specialist 
came from a multidisciplinary symposium held in Leeds last Saturday. 
Pharmacists, representatives of the phar- 
maceutical industry, nurses and doctors 
all contributed to the discussion on how 
that role should be fulfilled. The meeting, 
attracting 140 participants, was organised 
by the Yorkshire Branch of the Guild of 
Hospital Pharmacists. 

The subject of drug information was put 
into perspective by Mr. N. Blacow, editor 
of the Extra Pharmacopoeia, who was 
invited to talk on the Pharmaceutical 
Society's publications. 

He said that until about 15 years ago 
pharmacists could commit to memory all 
they needed to know. He illustrated how 
the size of the Extra Pharmacopoeia had 
increased over the years. For the 26th 
edition due out in July his staff had 
collected 33,000 abstracts over the last 
five years. 

Two speakers from the audience de- 
scribed present difficulties. A hospital phar- 
macist suggested that all his colleagues 
collected drug information but the prob- 
lem was getting that information out 
quickly and successfully. "At the moment 
the majority cannot get the information 
out of their cupboards," he said. 



Effort replication 

A participant from the industry drew 
attention to the present "colossal" replica- 
tion of effort. There was a lack of 
definition of objectives in drug informa- 
tion work. 

A consensus thought that there should 
be basic drug information available in 
each hospital ward and kept up to date by 
the pharmacist. It should take the form 
of a card index or loose-leaf folder system. 
It was agreed that on another level more 
detailed facts should be available from 
a particular source. 

Many speakers suggested the setting up 
of a national drug information centre but 
the need for some form of information 
service within each hospital group was also 
recognised. 

Outlining the problem from the medical 
angle Dr M. Segal, a consultant psychia- 
trist, said that a 1970 survey had shown 
that about 50 per cent of people did not 
take their drugs. It might be a very useful 
exercise to try to educate people about 
drugs on a national level and to retrieve 
those medicines not used. 

Patients expected magic rather than a 
normal solution to illness. They looked 
not only for a cure from their medicines 
but for them to have perfect therapeutic 
properties. 

As regards information within the pro- 
fession drug trials were often upset by the 
interruption of new staff taking over. Con- 
sultants found difficulties in continually 



having to train newcomers about drugs. 

When a patient had been given pro- 
longed action drugs, did the next physician 
who saw the patient know what they had 
taken? 

Dr Segal recognised the usefulness of 
drug data cards to both doctors and nurses 
and thought that all the different health 
practitioners had to work together. He 
criticised the old feeling of "them and 
us" and understood that at certain times 
the pharmacist's work was made harder by 
a sudden deluge of prescriptions, for 
instance, just before doctors went on leave. 

Serious problems for nursing staff, con- 
cerning drugs, were outlined bv Mr G. D. 
Stakes, a principal nursing tutor from 
York. He made the point that it was the 
patient that most mattered and nurses had 
the greatest contact with them. 

He believed that they should understand 
what they were doing at all times and not 
just ask for instructions. After qualifying, 
as far as knowing about drugs was con- 
cerned it depended entirely on a nurses's 
own initiative. He was not aware of any 
hospital policy on drug information. 

He had found that sisters and charge 
nurses within his hospital group had all 
agreed that information was hard to ob- 
tain and depended on the ingenuity of 
nurses and relationships with the various 
professions. 

As reference literature both Ml MS and 
the National Formulary were not ideal for 
nurses and MIMS was not always avail- 
able. He had established that night staff 
were rarely given full details about their 
patient's medication and information was 
not left out for them. 

Ward visits 

Mr Stakes advocated visits by the phar- 
macist to the ward and the use of a 
loose-leaf folder system on wards to pro- 
vide basic pharmacological information. 
That would help for instance in the present 
situation where a nurse was warned to look 
out for the side effects of a drug but she 
found she did not know what she was 
looking for. 

Miss S. E. Brooker, information phar- 
macist for the United Leeds Hospitals, 
described her work. She illustrated the 
layout of filing cards used at Leeds and 
said that several bodies were now develop- 
ing drug code systems for rapid retrieval. 
She expected that a British drug code 
would be developed shortly. 

Hospital staff had to know that the 
facility was available. Once they had con- 
tacted her they tended to approach her 
again with other queries. 

Miss Brooker said that the Guild were 



currently studying the feasibility of intro- 
ducing a card index system nationally. 

In the discussion which followed the 
system introduced at Shotley Bridge 
General Hospital, Co Durham was de- 
scribed. Consultants there had agreed that 
a drug list should be displayed on a panel 
in each ward and that drug usage should 
be controlled by it. 

Doctors found it quite easy to rational- 
ise their use of drugs and when coming 
into the hospital found the lists useful to 
indicate those drugs that were being em- 
ployed. Requisition cards were arranged 
on each panel and behind those was the 
information on each drug. 

Mr J. F. Fulford, of G. D. Searle & 
Co Ltd, put forward the pharmaceutical 
industry's viewpoint. He invited open dis- 
cussion on his theme. With a little en- 
couragement from Professor A. Wilson, 
University of Liverpool, who chaired the 
day's proceedings a spirited debate 
developed. 

Fewer new products 

Mr Fulford spoke of the recent decline 
in the number of new products coming 
onto the market, but suspected that there 
would be an increase again. He thought 
that more medicaments from the EEC 
would be marketed here as links increased 
and anticipated "a flurry of new products" 
when several patents expired. 

The industry was engaged in consider- 
able work on diagnostic products too and 
he predicted rapid developments in this 
field. Another change he anticipated was 
a rapid decline in the number of pharma- 
ceutical companies within the next ten 
years. 

When asked why companies did not 
publish information more often he ad- 
mitted that a considerable proportion of 
the records just dealt with failures. Com- 
puter data was now available and could 
be distributed. 

In responding to some criticism of the 
need for bioavailability studies Mr Ful- 
ford said that there was a tendency for 
such studies to become over sophisticated. 

In summing up for the industry he said 
that companies welcomed the start of 
"information pharmacy." It was a logical 
link in the process of communication. He 
saw no reason why data sheets should not 
be widely distributed to both pharmacists 
and nurses. 

Other speakers from the industry ad- 
mitted that the present relationship with 
hospital pharmacv was poor. Too much 
was spent on mailings and not enough on 
other information and again too much 
attention was given to doctors and not 
enough to pharmacists. There was suspi- 
cion on both sides and undue secrecy 
from the industry. 

Aware of the mass of information 
collected for the Extra Pharmacopoeia Mr 
W. G. Smith, Nottingham General Hospi- 
tal, said that it was unfortunate that that 
information could not be taped. 

Mr Blacow said that it was up to 
hospital pharmacists to point that out. In 
response to such a request, if hospitals 
were prepared to pay for it, abstracts 
could be circulated. More staff would be 
required to perform that function. 



Chemist & Druggist April 1 1972 



— 457 




WAS P- RE TIME 

ALREADY? 

Holidaymakers going overseas have cottoned on to the tip of taking Wasp-eze 
with them — they've been bitten too often before ! But with a Wasp-eze aerosol 
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'nasties' that can do so much to wreck a holiday. 

Stock Wasp-eze now, before customers flock abroad. Benefit from our extensive 
advertising campaign, being seen by over 1 1 ,000,000 readers. 

Retail bonus available until April 29 

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458 — Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1972 




Thanks for waiting 

Following a fire which gutted our dis- 
pensary on December 16 1971, we wish 
to thank all our suppliers who, with one 
exception, responded so magnificently 
and sympathetically to our request to sus- 
pend accounts prior to the fire until our 
insurance claim had been met. Our claim 
for material loss has now been met, and 
accounts have been or are being met as 
quickly as possible. H. P. Radnan 

director, Radnan (Chemists) Ltd 
Salford M5 3QX 

Drug safety 

Xrayser, who never seems to miss the 
chance of a snide dig at the Office of 
Health Economics, takes me to task for 
criticising excessive demands for safety 
in respect of medicines. I fear, however, 
he misunderstood what I was saying. 

First, he is merely agreeing with me 
when he says that we may be too un- 
critical about some risks associated with 
other forms of medical care. I specifically 
drew attention in my lecture to our un- 
reasonable acceptance of the perhaps 
avoidable risks in some surgical opera- 
tions. Second, on the subject of medicines, 



I would never complain that safety stan- 
dards were too high in absolute terms. 

My point was that we must strike a 
balance between the possibly lifesaving 
benefits of new medicines and the 
inevitable risks inherent in their use. If 
we make unreasonable demands for safety, 
as the Americans now seem to be doing, 
the public are likely on balance to suffer. 

G. Teeling-Smith 
Director, OHE 

BNF amendments 
effective April i 

The following amendments to the British 
National Formulary 1971 become effective 
on April I. 

p. 23 The address of the Northern Ireland 
Chief Medical Officer is now Dundonald 
House, Belfast, BT4 3SF. Any inquiries 
about the Northern Ireland Regulations or 
addicts should be made to the Ministry of 
Home Affairs, also at Dundonald House, 
telephone number 0232 650111, Extn 239 or 
258. 

p.28 Iron Salts. Last line, after "body 
weight" add "per hour". 

p.29 First line, after "80mg" add "per kg". 

pp. 58 and 59 Transpose the two pages. 

p. 159 Line 6, amend "5 per cent" to "0-5 
per cent". 

p. 199 Phosphates Enema. Delete the mono- 
graph and add : 

Phosphates Enema, B.P.C. (Page 46) 

Sodium Acid Phosphate . . . . 100 g 

Sodium Phosphate . . . . . . 80 g 

Purified Water, freshly boiled and cooled 

to 100 ml 

A suitable preservative may be included. 

If no volume is stated, dispense 128 ml in a 

disposable pack fitted with a rectal nozzle. 



p. 201 Cyclopentolate Eye-drops. Line 2, 
delete "2 per cent". Line 6, amend "10 ml" 
to "5 ml". 

p. 202 Physostigmine and Pilocarpine Eye- 
drops. Line 4, after "sodium metabisulphite" 
add "and benzalkonium chloride". 

p. 213 Diazepam Injection. Delete "B.P." 
from title. 

p. 252 Coal Tar and Salic v elk Acid Oint- 
ment. Add "B.P.C." to title. 

p.270 Cephalexin Tablets. Line 2, add 
"Keflex Tablets". 

p. 276 Dydrogesterone Tablets. Lines 3 and 
7, amend "5 mg" to "10 mg". 

p.286 Norethisterone Tablets. Line 2, delete 
"SH 420 Tablets". Line 3, delete "10 mg". 

p. 351 Norethisterone. Transpose "SH 420" 
to the entry "Norethisterone Acetate". 

pp. 362 and 363 Dental Practitioners' 
Formulary. Delete from the lists : "borax, 
boric acid, potassium bromide, sodium per- 
borate". Add "Chlordiazepoxide Capsules, 
B.P." After "Carboxymethylcellulose Gelatin 
Paste, D.P.F." Add "whether or not con- 
taining amphotericin". 

Strengths of Preparations 

The following preparations appear to be 
no longer available in the strengths listed : 

p. 216 Gentamicin Injection: 40,000 Units 
in 1 ml. 

p.218 Hyroxyprogesterone Injection: 125 

mg in 1 ml. 

Not applicable to Scotland 

The amendments also give effect to the 
recent nomen proprium agreements 
(C&D. March 11 and 25). 

Included is a paragraph that 'NP' must 
be initiated by the prescriber for items 
requiring an entry in the Dangerous Drugs 
register, but it must be noted that this 
arrangement is not applicable in Scotiand. 
Northern Ireland is to follow Scotland. 



IMPORTANT TO ALL CHEMIST RETAILERS 



Lotion for the 
treatment of 
acne spots 
and pimples 

DOES NOT CONTAIN 

HEXACHLOROPHENE 





You may continue 
to display, sell 

PROPA PH . backed by 

heavy national 
advertising. 



BIO PRODUCTS (PROPA PH) LTD 
VESTRIC LTD.. RUNCORN, CHESHIRE. 



Chemist & Druggist April 1 1972—459 



MARKET NEWS 

Budget fails to 
supply stimulus 

London, March 29 : Last week's Budget 
has failed so far to stimulate the buyers 
of pharmaceutical chemicals, drugs or 
essential oils into any kind of activity. 
Business during the week, therefore, 
remained at the low level of previous 
weeks. There were the usual price fluctua- 
tions among the crude drugs, among them 
camphor powder which was significantly 
lower than previously in both positions. 
The forward rates for cascara, jalap, 
Brazilian menthol and celery seed were 
lower. Podophyllum Emodl unquoted for 
months came on offer for September- 
October shipment. Dearer were Curacao 
aloes, balsam Peru and Canadian senega. 

Among essential oils Ceylon citronella, 
bois de rose and Chinese spearmint were 
dearer while Bourbon geranium and 
lemongrass were easier. 

Pharmaceutical chemicals 

Acetic acid: In 12-ton lots, delivered, per metric 
ton, BPC glacial £87-50; 90-5 per cent technical 
E81; 80 per cent grades pure £76-50; technical 
£69-50. 

Acetomenaphthone: 100-kg lots £5-62i kg. 
Alcohol: (Per proof gal). Ethyl fermentation in 
2,500 bulk gal lots — SVR doubly rectified 96-1 
per cent £0-303; absolute 99-9 per cent £0-315. 
In drums 900 gal minimum respective prices are 
£0-317, £0-329; Synthetic grades are 96 per cent, 
£0-233 and 99-9 per cent, £0-245 in tank wagon; 
£0-247 and £0-259 in drums for 900-bulk gal; 
industrial grade 95 per cent £0-164 in bulk and 
£0-178 in drums. 

Ascorbic acid: £2-36 kg; 5-kg £2 33 kg; sodium 
ascorbate plus £0-23; coated plus £0-10. 
Benzoic acid: One-metric ton lots £30-42 kg. 
Borax: BP grades, per metric ton, in paper bags 
delivered; granular £75, crystals £100; powder 
£82; extra fine powder £86. Technical grades 
less £20 per ton. 

Boric acid: BP grade per metric ton: granular 
£99; crystals £140; powder £110; extra-fine powder 
£114 in paper bags, carriage paid. Technical is 
£20 per 1,000 kg less than BP grades. 
Calcium carbonate: BP precipitated £49 per 
10,000 kg. 

Calcium gluconate: 250-kg lots £0-63 kg. 
Calcium lactate: 250-kg £412 per metric ton. 
Calcium pantothenate: £5-23 kg; 25-kg, £5-18 kg. 
Calcium sodium lactate: metric ton. £709 for 
50-kg lots. 

Carotene: Suspension 20 per cent £16-73 kg. 
Citric acid: BP granular hydrous per metric ton 
50-kg lots, £337; 250-kg £325; 1 ,000-kg £313. 
Anhydrous £358, £346, 334 respectively. Pre- 
mium for powder £10. 
Cortisone: acetate £0-25 per g. 
Cyanocobalamin: up to 200-g lots £2 per g. 
Ether: Anaesthetic BP — 2-litre bottles £0-87 each 
for under 350 litres; £0-81 for over 350 litres; 
32-kg drums £0-41 kg for 500-kg lots. Solvent BP 
— per metric ton in drums from £294 for 500-kg 
lots in 16-kg drums down to £266 in 130-kg 
drums; 250-kg from £304 to £276. 
Ferrous gluconate: £628 mertic ton in 50-kg lots. 
Ferrous phosphate: In kegs £0-46 kg. 
Folic acid: 1-kg £32; 50-kg £28-29. 
Gallic acid: 1,000-kg lots £1-62 kg. 
Hydroxocobalamin: £5-25 per g. 
Iron ammonium sulphate: 100-kg £205 per metric 
ton. 

Iron and ammonium citrate: (per metric ton) 
granules, 50-kg lots £650 1-ton £620. Scales 50-kg 
£820; 1-ton £790; green £830. 
Iron phosphate: £470 for metric ton 50-kg lots. 
Lactic acid: £570 metric ton for 50-kg lots. 
Methylated spirits: in 45-gal drums minimum 
900 gal, delivered, industrial 66 op £0-308 per 
bulk gal; perfumery quality £0-359; mineralised 



64 op, £0-322. In tank wagon, 2,500-gal, the 
rates are: £0-308, £0-359. and £0-30 respectively. 
Nicotinamide: (Per kg) 1-kg £2-12; 25-kg £2 07; 
50-kg £2 02. 

Nicotinic acid: (Per kg) 1 kg £1-93; 50-kg £1-83. 

Oleic acid: BP is £206 per metric ton delivered. 

Oxalic acid: 20-ton lots about £170 metric ton. 

DPanthenol: £9 kg; 5-kg £8-50 kg. 

Pyrogallic acid: Pure 500-kg lots £4-73 per kg. 

Salicylic acid: per metric ton 5-ton lots £405; 

1-ton £425; 250-kg £470. 

Stilboestrol: BP in 25-kilo lots £33 kg. 

Tannic acid: 500-kg fluffy £1-35 kg; powder £1-33. 

Tartaric acid: (Per metric ton) 50-kg lots £422; 

250-kg £417; £408 ton. 

Thiamine: Hydrochloride and nitrate £7-55 kg; 

5-kg £7-52 kg; 25-kg £7-50. 

Thymol: In 1-ton lots £2 per kg. 

Vitamin D: Powder for tableting 850,000 iu per g, 

£17-81 kg; 5-kg £17-75 kg. 

Crude drugs 

Aloes: (metric ton) Cape primes £270 spot; £215 
cif. Curacao £785 spot; £750 cif. 
Balsams: (lb) Canada: £1-80 spot; shipment £1-75 
cif. Copaiba: BPC £0-50; Para £0-40. Peru: £1-20 
£1-15, cif. Tolu: BP £0-70. 

Camphor: BP natural powder £1 kg spot; £0-90, 
cif. Synthetic BP £0-57 kg in 500-kg lots. 
Cascara: Spot £325 metric ton; shipment £300, cif. 
Ginger: (ton) Cochin £210, cif. Jamaican 
No. 3 £1,050 spot; £850. cif. Nigerian split £160, 
cif; peeled £300 spot; £245, cif. 
Menthol: (kg) Chinese spot £6; shipment £5-95, 
cif. Brazilian spot £4-35; April-May £3-90, cif, 
Pepper: (ton) Forward Sarawak black £380 spot; 
£327-50, cif; white £480; £440, cif. 
Podophyllum: Emodi £360 metric ton cif, Sept-Oct 
shipment. 

Seeds: (ton) Anise: China star £175, spot; 
shipment (125, cif. Caraway: Dutch ex wharf 
£390. Celery: Indian £360; shipment £280, 
cif. Coriander: Moroccan £77, cif. Cumin: Indian 
£260, cif. Dill: Indian £23, cif. Fennel: Indian 
£163, cif. Chinese £120, cif. Fenugreek: Moroc- 
can for shipment £63, cif. Mustard: £60-£120. 
Senega: Canadian £1-65 lb spot and cif. 
Turmeric: Madras finger £165 ton; £157-50, cif. 

Essential and expressed oils 

Almond: Drum lots £0-60 kg. 

Amber: Rectified spot £0-33 kg. 

Anise: Chinese £1-40 kg spot; £1-30 cif. 

Bay: £5-95 spot, shipment £5-85, cif. 

Bergamot: £9-35-£11-55 kg as to grade. 

Birch tar: Rectified £2-35 kg. 

Bois de rose: Brazilian £1-75 kg spot. 

Buchu: English distilled, £255 kg. 

Cade: Spanish £0-42 kg. 

Cajuput: £1 20 kg on spot. 

Camphor white: Spot £0-36; £0-30 kg cif. 

Cananga: Java £5 kg, cif. 

Caraway: Dutch £6-50 kg; English £18 kg. 

Cardamom: English distilled £45 kg; Indian 

£46-50. 

Cassia: Chinese 90 per cent, 85 per cent £2 05; 
£2-20 kg, spot. 

Celery: English £27 kg; Indian £19. 
Cinnamon: Ceylon leaf £1-30 spot, £1-24 cif, Sey- 
chelles leaf rectified £2-75; bark, English distilled 
£88. Chinese £1-10 spot; £0-95, cif. 
Citronella: Ceylon spot £1-05 kg; £0-93, cif. 
Chinese; £1-10; £0-93, cif. 

Clove: Madaqascar leaf £1-16 kg; £1-11. cif. 

English distilled bud £17-60. 

Cod-liver: BP in 45-gal lots £31-50 naked. 

Coriander: £9-35 kg spot. 

Cubeb: English, £13 kg. 

Dill: £5-75 kg spot. 

Eucalyptus: Chinese 80-85 per cent £0-66 kg in 
bond £0-59, cif. 

Fennel: Spanish sweet £2 09 kg. 

Geranium: (kg) Bourbon £16-50 kg; Congo £13-75, 

cif. 

Ginger: English distilled £39 kg; Indian £22-50. 
Juniper: Berry £3 08 kg; wood £0-55. 
Lavandin: £2-76 kg spot. 
Lavender: French from £4-40 kg. 
Lavender spike: In 1-metric ton lots £2-90 kg. 
Lemon: Sicilian £3-£6 kg as to quality. 
Lemongrass: £2-15 kq spot; May-June £1-90, cif. 
Lime: West Indian £7-70 kg spot; £7-15, cif. 
Mandarin: £5 kg. 

Nutmeg: East Indian £4-95 kg. English distilled 
from West Indian £12-75; from E Indian £13-15. 
Olive: £330-£338 metric ton, fob, Spain, spot 
£390 long ton, duty paid ex wharf. 
Orange: Sweet £0-54 kg spot; bitter from £3-15. 



Palmarosa: £7-50 kg spot, £6-50, cif. 

Patchouli: Spot £3-86-£4 kg. 

Pennyroyal: £2-50-£2-70 kg to arrive. 

Pepper: English distilled ex black £32-50 kg. 

Peppermint (per kg) Arvensis Chinese. Spot 

£2-50; £2-30 cif. Brazilian £1-67 spot; April-May 

£1-60 cif. American Piperata from £3-85. 

Petitgrain: £2-80 kg spot; £2-65, cif. 

Pine: (kg) Abietis £3-75, pumilionis £6; sylvestris 

£1-62. 

Rosemary: Spanish £1-55 kg. 

Sage: Spanish £1-85 kg spot. 

Sandalwood: Mysore spot £13-50. East Indian 

for shipment £13-40 kg, cif. 

Spearmint: American £5 kg, cif; Chinese spot 
£3-55 kg; shipment £3-50 cif. 



COMING EVENTS 



Tuesday April 4 

South Eastern Region, Pharmaceutical 
Society, Varley Hall of Residence, Coldean 
Lane, Brighton, at 6pm. "Progress in bio- 
pharmacy with special reference to cardio- 
vascular drugs'* (Three-day symposium). 
Wednesday April 5 

Scottish Department, Pharmaceutical Society, 

36 York Place, Edinburgh, at 7.45pm. Mr D. 
Macmurray and Mrs M. Lakie on "A 17th 
century poisoning case?" and Mr L. G. Cook 
on "Before Fleming". 

West Metropolitan Branch, Pharmaceutical 

Society, Great Western Hotel, Paddington 
Station, London W2 at 7.45pm. Mr A. 
Aldington on "The effect of the Common 
Market on pharmacy". 
Thursday April 6 

Ayrshire Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 

Savoy Park hotel at 8pm. Wine and cheese 
evening, and Detective-Sergeant Lorimer on 
"Drug addiction in adolescents and its asso- 
ciated problems". 

Harrogate Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 

Malborough Cafe, 3 Oxford Street, Harro- 
gate, at 8pm. Annual meeting. 
Hastings Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 

Granville hotel, Bexhill, at 8pm. Business 
meeting. 

Huddersfield Branch, Pharmaceutical Society, 

Spotted Cow hotel, New Hey Road, Salen- 
dine Nook, Huddersfield, at 8pm. Annual 
meeting. 

Society for Drug Research, Chelsea College, 
Manresa Road, London SW3, at 9.45am. 
One-day symposium on "Availability of drugs 
from medicines." 



Information! 

Who is the Chief Pharmacist 
of Ashington Hospital? 

You will find the 
answer in 

CHEMIST & DRUGGIST 
DIRECTORY 1972 

Special offer to C&D 
Subscribers only 

£3.00 plus 40p postage and handling. 
Order from : 

CHEMIST & DRUGGIST 

Bouverie House, 154 Fleet Street 
London EC4A 2DL 



460 — Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1972 




International Chemical 
Company Limited 



announce the following prices effective from 22nd March, 1972 





Retail 
Sellinq 


Retail 
packs 


Std. 
pack 


Std. Prices ex- 
Wholesaler 


Trade Prices per doz. ex. P. Tax 


P. Tax 
per doz. 


PPOnilPT 

r T\ \J U \J\* 1 9l4,t/rH^f\ 


Price* 

per 
retail 
pack 


terms 
unit 
value 
(t.u.) 














per 
std. 
pack 


Pric^ 

per doz. 
(Exc. Tax) 


P. Tax 
per doz. 


(50-250 

t.u. 
Rate A 


251-500 

t.u. 
Rate B 


501-750 

t.u. 
Rate C 


751 + 
t.u. 
Rate O 


on Rate 
A-D 




p 






£ 


£ 


£ 


€ 


£ 


£ 


£ 


Anadin 4's 


4 


48 


8 


0-30 


008 


0-28 


0-27 


0-27 


0-26 


007 


Anadin 8s' 


7 


48 


13 


0-50 


0-13 


0-45 


0-44 


44 


0-43 


12 


Anadin 20' s (shrink wrapped) 


17 


24 


17 


1-30 


0-33 


1-17 


1-14 


1-14 


1-13 


0-30 


Anadin 20 s (display outer) 


17 


24 


17 


1-30 


0-33 


1-17 


1-14 


1-14 


1-13 


0-30 


Anadin 20' s (shrink wrapped) 


17 


48 


34 


1-30 


33 


1-17 


1-14 


1-14 


1-13 


0-30 


Anadin 50 s (shrink wrapped) 


31 


6 


7 


2-37 


0-60 


2-14 


209 


208 


2-07 


0-54 


Anadin 50' s (shrink wrapped) 


31 


12 


15 


2-37 


0-60 


2-14 


209 


208 


2-07 


0-54 


Anadin 100 s 


51 


6 


13 


3-90 


0-98 


3-52 


3-44 


3-43 


3-41 


0-88 


Anadin Composite Pack (Per Unit) 




1 


60 


9-12 


2 28 


8-29 


8-10 


804 


7-98 


2-08 


Anadin Cold Treatment 


18 


12 


9 


1-33 


0-34 


1 -20 


1-18 


1-17 


1-16 


0-30 


Anbesol for mouth ulcers 


21 


12 


11 


1-63 


0-41 


1-47 


1-44 


1-41 


1-38 


0-37 


Anne French Cleansing Milk small 


14 


12 


7 


1-01 


0-26 


0-92 


0-90 


0-89 


0-88 


0-23 


„ medium 


24 


12 


11 


1-75 


0-44 


1-59 


1 -55 


1-54 


1-53 


0-40 


,, large 


44 


6 


11 


3-17 


80 


2-89 


2-83 


2-81 


2-77 


73 


Anne French Moisture Crm. Cleanser Tube 


19 


12 


9 


1-39 


35 


1-26 


1-23 


1-22 


1-18 


0-32 


,; Jar 


30 


6 


7 


2 20 


0-55 


200 


1 95 


1-93 


1-87 


0-50 


Anne French Golden Tan Tubes 


19 


12 





1-39 


35 


1-26 


1-23 


1-22 


1-18 


0-32 


Bismag Powder standard 


13 


12 


7 


1-02 


0-26 


0-92 


0-90 


0-90 


0-89 


0-23 


large 


25 


12 


13 


1 -91 


0-48 


1-75 


1-70 


1-69 


1-67 


0-44 


Tablets 75 s 


15 


12 


8 


1-12 


0-28 


102 


100 


99 


0-98 


0-26 


,. 1 65's 


25 


12 


13 


1-91 


0-48 


1-75 


1-70 


1-69 


1-67 


0-44 


B i sod o 1 Powder standard 


13 


12 


6 


1-02 


0-26 


0-92 


0-90 


0-90 


89 


0-23 


large 


25 


12 


12 


1 -91 


0-48 


1-75 


1-70 


1-69 


1-67 


0-44 i 


Tablets 30's 


14 


12 


7 


1-06 


0-27 


0-96 


0-94 


0-93 


0-92 


0-24 


.. 100's 


32 


6 


8 


2-42 


0-61 


2-20 


2-14 


2-13 


21 1 


0-55 


Rollmints 


6 


12 


3 


0-46 


0-12 


0-42 


0-41 


0-40 


0-40 


0-1 1 


Compound W Wart Remover 


17 


12 


8 


1-30 


0-33 


1-17 


114 


1.-13 


1-10 


0-30 


Concern Feminine Deodorant Aerosol 


35 


12 


17 


2-50 


0-63 


2-28 


2-22 


2-19 


2-12 


0-57 


Dristan Tablets 24's 


26 


12 


16 


2-35 


— 


2-11 


205 


203 


1-99 




Nasal Mist 


22 


6 


7 


1-98 


— 


1-78 


1-74 


1-72 


1-68 




Fibrosine Balm 


20 


12 


10 


1-55 


39 


1-40 


1-37 


1-36 


1-35 


0-35 


Freezone Corn Remover 


161 


12 


8 


-1-23 


0-31 


114 


1-11 


1-10 


1-07 


0-29 


Glow 5 Beauty Mask Sachet 


10 


24 


9 


0-75 


19 


0-68 


66 


0-65 


0-63 


0-17 


3 Sachet pack 


22 


12 


11 


1 -60 


0-40 


1-46 


1-42 


1-40 


1-36 


0-37 


Immac Cream Sachets 


9 


24 


9 


0-65 


0-17 


0-60 


0-58 


0-57 


0-55 


0-15 


standard 


24 


12 


11 


1-76 


0-44 


1-59 


1-55 


1-53 


1-49 


0-40 


large 


38 


6 


9 


2-75 


0-69 


2-52 


2-44 


2-40 


2-33 


0-63 


Lotion 


33 


6 


8 


2-40 


60 


2-18 


2-12 


2-10 


2-04 


0-55 


Aerosol 


110 


6 


27 


7-93 


1-99 


7-24 


7-04 


6-92 


6-74 


1-81 


Kolynos Super White Dental Cream standard 


121 


12 


7 


0-95 


0-24 


0-87 


0-84 


0-84 


83 


0-22 


large 


171 


12 


9 


1-33 


0-34 


1 -21 


1-18 


1-17 


1-16 


0-31 


Chlorophyll Toothpaste 


121 


12 


7 


0-95 


0-24 


0-87 


0-84 


0-84 


0-83 


0-22 


Fluoride 


121 


12 


7 


0-98 


0-25 


0-87 


0-84 


0-84 


0-83 


0-22 


Denture Fixative standard 


14 


12 


9 


1-25 




1-13 


1-10 


1-10 


1-09 




large 


22 


12 


14 


1 98 




1-78 


1-74 


1-74 


1-73 




Pineate Honey Cough Syrup 


18 


6 


5 


1-38 


0-35 


1-24 


1-22 


1-22 


1-20 


0-31 


Powerin Tablets 12's 


15 


12 


8 


1-19 


0-30 


104 


103 


1-02 


1-01 


26 


., 30's 


29 


6 


7 


2-20 


55 


202 


1 -95 


1-93 


1-87 


0-51 


Preparation H Ointment standard 


25 


12 


13 


1-90 


0-48 


1 -72 


1-68 


1-66 


1-61 


0-43 


large 


43 


6 


11 


3-25 


0-82 


2-96 


2-88 


2-84 


2-76 


0-74 


,. Suppositories 6's 


20 


12 


10 


1-51 


0-38 


1-37 


1-33 


1-32 


1-28 


0-35 


12 s 


37 


6 


9 


2-83 


0-71 


2-56 


2-50 


2-48 


2-40 


0-64 


Sek Ointment 


24 


6 


6 


1-81 


0-46 


1 64 


1-60 


1-58 


1 -54 


0-41 


Targon Oil & Tar Remover 


15 


12 


9 


1 -36 




1 22 


1-18 


1-17 


1-15 





'Fixed price for medicinal products, recommended price for other goods. 



All retail prices and tax rates shown above are operative from March 22nd. However, for your convenience, we are charging trade prices at the 
November 1 st level up to and including March 31 st, 1 972 to clear orders in the pipeline. Our new trade prices, therefore, will apply from 

April 4th, 1972. 

INTERNATIONAL CHEMICAL CO LTD 1 1 CHENIES STREET, LONDON WC1 E 7ET. 01 -636 8080 



Chemist & Druggist April 1 1972 — 461 



Classified Advertisement Rates 

Display: E4-50 per s.c.i. min. 1" s.c. (1" x 1§"); i page (4J" x 
3i") £40; i page (4J" x 7") or (9" x 3i") £70; 1 page 
(9i" x 7") £120. 

Screen: 100 

Lineage: 35p per line, min. 5 lines @ £1 75 
Box Numbers: 25p extra 

Series Discounts: 5% discount on 3 insertions and over; 
15% discount on 13 insertions and over 

Headings: All advertisements appear under appropriate head- 
ings 

Copy Date: 4 pm Tuesday prior to publication date: Advertise- 
ments should be prepaid 

Publication Date: Every Saturday 

Post to: Classified Advertisements, Chemist & Druggist, Bouverie 
House, 154 Fleet St., London, EC4A 2DL 

Telephone: 01-353 3212 

Circulation: A. B.C. January/December 1971, 15,167 



FIRST CLASS Representative re- 
quired for London area by well 
known wholesale Chemist Sundries- 
man. Distributors. Existing connec- 
tions. Must be young and plenty of 
initiative. Top salary and commis- 
sion. Car owner preferably. Reply 
Box No. 1906. 



EXPERIENCED PHARMACEUTICAL 
dispensing assistant wanted for 
dispensing doctor. Box No. 1914. 



LADIES required with experience in 
retail or wholesale pharmacy for 
position in Market Research Organi- 
sation. No Statistical work involved. 
Good salary, Luncheon Vouchers. 
No Saturdays. Phone Mrs Quigg, 
01-242 5029. 



PHARMACIST required, full time or 
possibly part time. Abnormal hours 
in a very interesting environment at 
London Airport. Tel: Superintendent 
Pharmacist, 01-759 1283 or 959 3105. 



Hospital appointments 



Situations vacant 



MINISTRY OF DEFENCE 
ROYAL NAVY MEDICAL SERVICES 

Registered 
Pharmacists 

Vacancies for Senior Pharmacists exist at Royal 
Naval Hospital, Haslar (Hants), and the RN 
Medical Store, Greenock. Also for Deputy Chief 
Pharmacist (Category II) at Haslar. 
Interesting and rewarding careers open to 
successful candidates with opportunities for pro- 
motion. 

Salary, conditions of service and superannuation 
are linked to those of National Health Service. 
Applicants (Male or Female) should apply to: 

Ministry of Defence, CM(S)in, 

Lacon House, Room 314, Theobalds Road, 

London WCi 8RY. 



Roundway Hospita) Management Committee 
Mid-Wilts. Hospital Management Committee 

Applications are invited for the newly created 
post of 

Chief Pharmacist 

Category IV 

for a joint appointment to the above two Groups 
controlling a total of ten hospitals providing 
psychiatric, acute and geriatric services in the 
Mid and North Wilts, area. 

Whitley Council conditions of service, salary 
scale £2,013 to £2,781 per annum. 

Applications stating age, qualifications and 
experience, together with names and addresses 
of two referees, to the Group Secretary, Round- 
way Hospital, Devizes, Wiltshire SN10 5DS, by 
the 28th April, 1972. 



Basic 
Grade 
Pharmacist 

Commercially minded ambitious 
young Pharmacirt willing to work 
on own initiative for small but 
rapidly expanding firm of manu- 
facturing chemists in Glasqow. 
Excellent prospects with position 
of hioh importance as company 
progresses. 

Box No. 1917 



S.W. London Manf. 

PHARMACEUTICAL CO. 

with large and expanding Export 
market — require Chemist / Tech- 
nician to Organise and Control 
Lab. testing / Powders / Packing / 
General assembly, etc. Must have 
practical experience in pharma- 
ceuticals. Good salary and pros- 
pects. 

Halewood Chemicals Ltd. 

Stanwell Moor, Staines, 
Colnbrook 2402 



HIGH WYCOMBE & 
DISTRICT HMC 

Wycombe General Hospital, 
High Wycombe, Bucks 

PHARMACY 
TECHNICIAN 

required for this modern Pharm- 
acy. Good working conditions 
and opportunity to gain wide 
experience in a busy general 
hospital. Applicants must possess 
a recognised pharmacy certifi- 
cation. Salary within scale £894 
to £1,254 per annum. Further 
details from Group Chief Pharma- 
cist, High Wycombe 26161 Ext. 
250. 



HAMMERSMITH HOSPITAL AND 
THE ROYAL POSTGRADUATE 

MEDICAL SCHOOL 
DU CANE ROAD, LONDON W12 

Pharmacist required for newly 
created post in large general 
postgraduate teaching hospital 
(category v). Post offers excel- 
lent experience. Department 
actively involved in research pro- 
jects of Hospital, School and 
Research Units. Development 
taking place to improve ward 
stocks service and to introduce 
ward pharmacy. Very pleasant 
working conditions. Salary scale 
£1 ,431 -C1 ,797 plus Higher Quali- 
fications Allowance (where ap- 
plicable) and London Allowance 
£90. Accommodation available 
for single person (female). 

Applications stating age, ex- 
perience and naming two referees 
to Chief Pharmacist. 



HAMMERSMITH HOSPITAL AND 
THE ROYAL POSTGRADUATE 
MEDICAL SCHOOL 
Du Cane Road, London, W.12. 

Senior Pharmacist required at 
above general postgraduate 
teaching hospital (category V). 
Rotation of duties, or mainly 
full-time Sterile Products Labora- 
tory if preferred. Post offers 
excellent experience; very wide 
range specialist and other work 
including active involvement in 
research projects of Hospital, 
School and Research Units 
and in Quality Control. Develop- 
ments taking place to improve 
ward stocks service and intro- 
duce ward pharmacy. Very 
pleasant working conditions. 
Salary scale £1 ,653-£2,034 per 
annum, including London Allow- 
ance, plus Higher Qualifications 
Allowance (where applicable). 
Accommodation available for 
single person (female). 

Applications stating age, ex- 
perience and naming two 
referees, to Chief Pharmacist. 



Please address Box No. 
replies to: 

Box No 

CHEMIST & DRUGGIST, 

Bouverie House, 
154 Fleet Street, 
LONDON, EC4A2DL. 



462 — Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1972 



Trade Marks 



The Trade Marks set out below were assigned on the 30 September 1970 by BAYWOOD 
CHEMICALS LIMITED now known as BAYER AGROCHEM LIMITED of Eastern Way, Bury 
St Edmunds, Suffolk to FARBENFABRIKEN BAYER AKTIENGESELLSCHAFT of Leverkusen- 
Bayerwerk, Germany, WITHOUT THE GOODWILL OF THE BUSINESS IN WHICH THEY 
WERE THEN IN USE. 



Registered 




No. 


Trade Mark 


735451 


BAYWOOD 


735452 


BAYWOOD 


831949 


Leaves and 




triangle device 


831950 


Leaves and 




triangle device 


834371 


ERITHANE 


834372 


MILFARON 


834373 


THORADEX 


836776 


LOSINOL 


840582 


BULPRON 


840819 


FAZYLON 


841598 


LOMNITOX 


892176 


ELVITOX 


892774 


LEKUSIT 


893263 


DRAZA 


893264 


SEDANOX 


893265 


XYTOX 


895336 


LEKTAN 


931737 


HORMASOL 


935166 


DRAZA 


937014 


PARDEVIT 


939325 


VASLEDON 



Goods 

Chemical products included in Class 1 for 
cultivation of agricultural crops and flowers. 
All goods included in Class 5. 
All goods included in Class 1. 

All goods included in Class 5. 

All goods included in Class 5. 
All goods included in Class 5. 
Insecticides and fungicides. 
All goods included in Class 5. 
All goods included in Class 5. 
All goods included in Class 5. 
All goods included in Class 
Insecticides, fungicides and 
fungicides and 
fungicides and 
fungicides and 
preparations in 
fungicides and 



use in the 



herbicides, 
herbicides, 
herbicides, 
herbicides, 
granular form, 
herbicides. 



Insecticides, 
Insecticides, 
Insecticides, 
Weed killing 
Insecticides, 
Herbicides. 

Molluscicidal preparations and preparations for destroying 
vermin. 

Pharmaceutical preparations and substances for human use 
and for veterinary use. 

Pharmaceutical and veterinary preparations and substances 
but not including petroleum products and petrolatum products. 



THE TRADE MARK No. 755912 con- 
sisting of the word GASTRI-NOL and 
registered in respect of pharmaceu- 
tical preparations for use in the 
treatment of disorders of the gastric 
and digestive systems was assigned 
on the 10 August, 1971 by Peptinol 
(G.B.) Limited of 80. Elswick Road. 
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, to De-Nol 
Limited of 151, Fog Lane, Disbury 
Manchester. WITHOUT THE GOOD- 
WILL OF THE BUSINESS IN WHICH 
IT WAS THEN IN USE. 



Situations 
wanted 



Holiday 

accommodation 



PHARMACEUTICAL Representative, 
fully experienced, ethicals-toiletries 
and cosmetics. Conscientious, keen 
worker. Own car. London — Home 
Counties. Box No. 1909. 



Shopfittings 



WOOLACOMBE, DEVON 
COMBES HOTEL 

75 bedrms — 60 with pte. bath/ 
radio/intercom, baby-listening. 
Lift. Licnd. Fully C. Htd. 3 miles 
golden sands. Magnifi. surf-coast. 
Choice of 4 beaches facing 
south. Sea, country views. Heated 
indoor swim pool. Games room. 
Cocktail bars. Film shows. Danc- 
ing. Hairdressing salon. Roof 
gdn. Parking. Colour brochure, 
Dept. CD. Tel. Woolacombe 491. 



Low Cost 
Unit 

Shopfronts 

600 Designs 



36 

Months 
To Pay 



# InAnodised Aluminium 
Utr Built in Illuminated signs 
4t Available from stock 

# Installed in 2 Days 
on most sites 

UNIT SHOPFRONTS LTD 

9 Aintree Road Perivale Middlesex 

PHONE=01-997-9943/7 



Trade 
services 



ONE-DAY REFITS. No trade loss 
arrangements. Your shop replanned 
free. Cash. Rental. Credit. S. G. 
Clark, Kytes House, Watford, WD2 
6NT. Tel: 01-935 0892. 9 am— 5 pm. 
Tel: Garston 79151. after 5 pm. 



Business 
opportunities 



ADVERTISER with idea for a new 
innovation involving a simple phar- 
maceutical compound seeks imagina- 
tive manufacturing chemist to 
develop and market. No finance 
available. Box No. 1919. 



Agents 



AGENTS REQUIRED 
LONDON AREA 

To assist with introduction of 
new Pharmaceutical line. Must 
have well established connec- 
tions. 

APPLY BOX NO. 1908 



AGENTS REQUIRED 

Fast growing company with estab- 
lished lines seek agents in all 
j areas with good connections with 
chemists, department stores and 
hairdressing salons. 

Apply Box 1898 



ANALYTICAL AND RESEARCH 
FACILITIES 

Complete Chemical, Biochemical, 
and Micro-Biological investiga- 
tions, for all branches of the 
Food, Pharmaceutical, and Drug 
Industries, using the latest tech- 
niques of Chromatography, Infra 
Red, U/V, and Atomic Absorp- 
tion Spectroscopy, in addition to 
all standard Analytical proce- 
dures. 

Highest resolution Black/White, 
and Colour Photo-Microscopy. 
Our qualified staff, will be pleased 
to discuss any problem, from a 
simple analysis, to a full scale 
Research and Development Pro- 
ject. 

In the first instance, please write 
or telephone our Technical Direc- 
tor. 



^LABORATORIES, 
tiNGTON^^k 
:CLESFIELDf»Cheshire. 

*mmr 4/50 or 2777 - 



For sale 



King TB4 Electronic Tablet 
Counter. Under one year old, in 
absolutely first class condition. 
Cost £840, will accept £550. 

Frank Sammeroff Limited, 110 

Commerce Street, Glasgow, G5 
8DR. Tel: 041-429 3274. 



DENTYRBLEACH 

The Perfect Denture Cleanser 
15p per bottle, inc tax. 
Order now from your Wholesaler. 
Sole Manufacturers: 

Oakes & Co. Ltd., 
Ropley, Hants. 
Tel: 01-398 4650. 



ONE-SIZE TIGHTS. Perfect. 
Popular brands from £1-60 doz. 
Tax paid. Carriage free. Price 
list: Edward Kaye Ltd., Coventry 
House, South Place, London 
EC2. 



Wanted 



WANTED: Surplus cameras, enlarg- 
ers, cine-cameras and projectors, 
photographic equipment of every 
description. Surplus and outdated 
film and paper, large or small 
quantities. Phone, write or call. 
Spears (Dept. CD), back Watling 
Street, Shudehill, Manchester, 4. 
Telephone: BLAckfriars 9432 (5 
lines). Bankers, Midland Bank, Ltd. 

C 613 



WE PURCHASE surplus and redun- 
dant stocks of every description, 
especially packing material. Spot 
cash settlement. Reliance Trading 
Company, 23-25 Charles Lane, St. 
John's Wood, London, N.W.8. Tel.: 
JUNiper 0701. C 599 



Miscellaneous 



SHOWCARDS! 



INEXPENSIVE! 
PERSONALISEDI 
FROM ONE UPWARDSI 
Sample and Details 
Primapak Showcard Service, 
74, Briar Street, Nottingham, 
NG2 1FS. Telephone: 85125 



MANLY MAN'S BELT. Nationally 
advertised "obtainable from chem- 
ists". £2-68. Full trade terms. Order 
by waist measurement from Manly 
Co., 23 Freshwater Parade, 
Bishopric, Horsham, Sussex. Tele- 
phone: Horsham 5426. 



Printed in Great Britain by BISHOPSGATE PRESS LIMITED, 21 New Street, Loni 
House, 154 Fleet Street, London, EC4A 2DL. Registered at the GPO as a newspapef 
stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronn 

permission of Benn Brothers 



r and published by BENN BROTHERS LTD., at Bouverie 
its reserved. No part of this publication may be produced, 
Tanical. photocopying, recorling or otherwise without the prior 
Ltd. 16i/15i/10S 



Chemist & Druggist April 1 1972 — 




right 
again ! 



UNICAN are right again with 
the timing of their advertising 
campaign currently appearing 
in the national press ready 
for the Spring and Summer 
seasons - and remember 



UNICAN have the right varieties 

-6 types of BEER & 16 types of WINE 

UNICAN have the right quality 

— laboratory controlled production 

UNICAN have the right distribution 

— through over 40 leading wholesalers 
throughout U.K. 

UNICAN have the right profit margins for you 

— second to none 

MAKE SURE YOU GET YOUR STOCKS 
OF UNICA N- RIGHT NO W 

ready for the increased demand which is coming 

New stockists are invited to write for details 

of special introductory off er. 

Monks" Home Brews Ltd., Nordrach House, Staple Hill, 
Bristol BS16 4QF. Telephone Bristol (0272) 657241 

The associated company of Grey Owl Laboratories Ltd. 



I 



I Another Once in a Lifetime Offer I 



theADWELC 16 ELECTRIC 

Calculating Machine 



ri 



With a free 12 Months 
maintenance agreement 




SPECIAL OFFER PRICE 





WITH 10 SPECIAL STAR FEATURES 

1 . Adding/Subtraction with Credit Balance. 

2. Positive and Negative Multiplication with or 
without production retention. 

3. Negatives in red print. 

4. Automatic Back Transfer Switch for Products 
and Totals. 

5. Automatic Squaring. 

6. Non-Add Key for reference. 

7. In-put Indicator. 

8. Multiplication Control Indicator. 

9. Repetition and Automatic Clearance. 

10. Fully motorised keys — three with dual functions 
for ease of operation. 

No Charge for POSTAGE 



ym macs' 
oepta to 







T 




TRADE WAREHOUSE 



telephone: 

061 832 9081 



4 ROCHDALE RD.MANCHESTER4 



464 — Chemist & Druggist April 1, 1972 



- ■ ■ j t ' - * >' '.- 

Help with the 

latest 
retail census. 



The work of compiling the results of the third Census 
of Distribution can't start until you supply the facts. 

If this latest Retail Census is to help you, it needs your 
help. Now. 

The results of the census will assist you to see your 
business in perspective - how it compares, in broad terms, 
with others of a similar size and type. 

Please help by returning your form now. Don 't forget you 
are required by law to make a return. If exact figures are not 
available, give the best estimates you can. 

Your return will be treated as highly confidential and 
will never leave the Business Statistics Office. 

No figures will ever be published that will reveal the 
affairs of any individual business. 

If there is anything about the census or the form that is 
■ not clear to you, don't hesitate to ask. We'll be glad to help. 

Ring Newport 56111, ext. 100. Or write to: Business 
Statistics Office, Department of Trade and Industry, Cardiff 
Road, Newport, Mon.NPT 1XG. 

THIRD OFFICIAL CENSUS OF DISTRIBUTION. 

Retail Census 71 

Getting the facts that will help us all.