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URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL: 


BANSTEAl 


ANNUAL REPORT 


of the 

Medical Officer of Health 
For the Year 1938. 


William Pile, Lid., Printers, 46-50, High Street, Sutton. 





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i 


ANNUAL REPORT 
of the 

MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH 
for the Year 1938. 


PUBLIC HEALTH OFFICERS OF THE AUTHORITY. 

Medical Officer of Health : 

ENEAS J. MACINTYRE, M.D., D.P.H. 

Chief Sanitary Inspector : 

JOHN W. GALE, A.R.S.I., M.S.I.A 

Holds Meat Inspector’s Certificate of Royal Sanitary Institute. 

Additional Sanitary Inspectors: 

A. R. E. JARMAN, A.R.S.I., M.S.I.A. 

Holds Meat Inspector’s Certificate of Royal Slanitary Institute. 

J. M. JEFFERY, A.R.S.L, M.S.I.A. 

Holds Meat Inspector’s Certificate of Royal Sanitary Institute. 

(From 1 :11 :38.) 

Assistant Inspector : 

W. J. EDWARDS. 

Clerical Staff : 

W. C. BAKER. 

(From 28:11:38.) 


1 


To the Chairman and Councillors of the Urban District 
of Banstead. 

Mr. Chairman, Madam, and Gentlemen, 

I have the honour to present to you the Sixth 
Annual Report since the constitution of the Urban District 
of Banstead. 

The health of the district maintained its usual high 
standard during the year 1938. The general incidence of 
infectious disease in the district was low, but there was an 
increase in the notifications of mild Dysentery from insti- 
tutions. The prevalence of Scarlet Fever showed no change. 
Five of the eight cases of Diphtheria occurred in institutions. 

The Death Rate at 6'8 per 1,000 of population was 
lower. The Birth Rate was also lower at 13T per 1,000 of 
population. 

The sanitary circumstances of the area were satisfac- 
torv, and the sanitarv work was efficiently carried out 
under the direction of the Chief Sanitarv Inspector (Mr. 
J. W. Gale). 

The housing scheme for the housing of 53 families at 
Walton-on-the-Hill was nearing completion at the end of 
the year. The pleasing design and lay-out of these houses 
preserve the amenity of the district, and the adequate and 
hygienic accommodation provided is a valuable contribu- 
tion to the health of the inhabitants. 

The Council’s service of refuse collection has continued 
to give satisfaction, and in November a service for the 
collection and disposal of trade refuse was commenced. 

Further progress was made in the reduction of cesspools, 
and preliminary steps were taken to obtain loan sanction for 
the scheme of main drainage in the parishes of Chipstead 
and Kingswood. 

I should like to thank members of the Council for 
their helpful advice during the year, and to express my 


2 


appreciation of the co-operation of the Officers of the 
Council and of the medical practitioners of the Urban 
District. 

I am, 

Mr. Chairman, Madam, and Gentlemen, 
Your obedient Servant, 

ENEAS J. MACINTYRE, 

Medical Officer of Health. 


3 


BANSTEAD URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL 


ANNUAL REPORT, 1938. 


STATISTICS AND SOCIAL CONDITIONS OF THE 


AREA. 

Area 12821 acres. 

Registrar-General’s Estimate of Resident 

Population, 30th June, 1938 ... 27500 

Number of inhabited Houses (end of 1938), 

according to Rate Books ... ... 7662 

Rateable Value (31-12-38) and sum represented £341588 
by a Penny Rate (1938-39) ... ... £1388 


Social conditions, including the chief industries, carried 
on in the area : — 

The district embraces the beautiful parishes of Banstead, Woodman- 
sterne, Walton-on-the-Hill, Chipstead and Kingswood, and is mainly 
residential and agricultural in character. There is only one factory of 
any size in the district, i.e., a Publishing Works at Kingswood. 


EXTRACT FROM VITAL STATISTICS FOR THE 




YEAR 

■ 

■ ' * • 


Live Births : 

Total 

. M. 

F. 


Legitimate 

.... 360 

180 

1801 

Birth-rate per 1,000 of the 

Illegitimate 

... 10 

5 

5J 

estimated resident popula- 
tion, 13T. 

Stillbirths : 





Legitimate 

... 12 

5 

7 

Rate per 1,000 total (live 

Illegitimate 

... 1 

1 

— 

and still) births, 33-9. 





Death-rate per 1,000 of the 

Deaths 

... 193 

96 

97- 

estimated resident popula- 
tion, 6-8. 


Deaths from Puerperal causes (Headings 29 and 30 of 
the Registrar-General’s short list) : — 

Rate per 1,000 total 
Deaths, (live and still) births. 

No. 29. Puerperal Sepsis ... 1 258 

No. 30. Other Puerperal causes 1 2 58 


Total 2 5T6 


4 


Maternal Mortality. — There was one death from 
Puerperal Sepsis. The one death from other causes was due 
to Syncope during Caesarean Section. 

Death-rate of Infants under one year of age: — 

All infants per 1,000 live births ... ... 24'3 

Legitimate infants per 1,000 legitimate births 22 2 
Illegitimate infants per 1,000 illegitimate live 

births ... ... ... ... ... 1000 

Deaths from Cancer (all ages) ... ... 36 

Deaths from Measles (all ages) ... ... 0 

Deaths from Whooping Cough (all ages) ... 0 

Deaths from Diarrhoea (under 2 years of age) 1 

Infantile Mortality. — There were nine deaths of 

children under one year of age. Seven of these were due to 
congenital debility or premature birth, one to gastro- 
enteritis and one to pneumonia. 

For purposes of comparison I give the following 
figures : — 

Rate per 1,000 Births. 


Birth Rate. 

Death Rate. 

Diarrhoea. Total Deaths 
Under 2 yrs. Under 1 yr. 

England and Wales 15T 

11-6 

5-5 

53 

143 Smaller Towns 15‘4 

no 

3-6 

51 

London ... ... 13 4 

11-4 

13T 

57 

Banstead U.D. ... 13T 

6-8 

2-7 

24 


These figures are .satisfactory, and emphasise the healthy 
state of the district. 


5 




CAUSES OF DEATH, 1938. 


Ref. 

No. 

Cause of Death. 

Malec. 

Female. 

6 

Influenza 


1 

9 

Tuberculosis of Respiratory System 

14 

3 

10 

Other Tuberculosis. . 

— 

1 

11 

Syphilis 

1 

— 

13 

Cancer, Malignant I 'isease 

16 

20 

14 

Diabetes 

2 

2 

15 

Cerebral Haemorrhage, etc. 

3 

8 

16 

Heart Disease 

28 

23 

17 

Aneurism 

— 

1 

18 

Other Circulatory Diseases 

4 

4 

19 

Bronchitis .. 

3 

2 

20 

Pneumonia (all forms) 

3 

2 

21 

Other Respiratory Diseases 

— 

2 

22 

Peptic Ulcer 

4 

1 

23 

Diari'hoea, etc. (under 2 years) . . 

1 

— 

24 

Appendicitis 

1 

1 

26 

Other Diseases of Liver, etc. 

1 

1 

27 

Other Digestive Diseases .. 

1 

3 

28 

Acute and Chronic Nephritis 

1 

1 

29 

Puerperal Sepsis 

— 

1 

30 

Other Puerperal causes 

— 

1 

31 

Congenital Debility, Premature Birth, 
Malformations, etc. 

3 

4 

32 

Senility 

1 

4 

33 

Suicide 

2 

— 

34 

Other Violence 

2 

2 

35 

Other defined diseases 

5 

9 


Totals 

96 

97 


GENERAL PROVTSION OF HEALTH SERVICES 
FOR THE AREA. 

LABORATORY FACILITIES. 

Samples of water and of milk were examined by The 
Clinical Research Association, Ltd., Watergate House, 
York Buildings, Adelphi, W.C.2: Messrs. Rideal, Rideal & 
Sciver, of 28, Victoria Street, Westminster, S.W.I., and 
E. Hinks, Esq., County Analyst, 16, Southwark Street, 
S.E.l. 

The bacteriological and pathological examinations of 
specimens were carried out at the Sutton and Cheam 
Hospital and the East Surrey Hospital, Redhill. 


6 


The Food and Drugs Adulteration Act is administered 
by Surrey County Council. 

AMBULANCE FACILITIES. 

In respect of street accidents, the under-mentioned local 
authorities allow the use of their ambulances by arrange- 
ment in the Parishes as set out : — 


Sutton and Cheam B.C. 
Coulsdon and Purley U.D.C. 

Reigate Borough Council 
Epsom and Ewell B.C. 


Parish of Banstead. 

Parishes of Chipstead and Woodman- 
sterne. 

Parish of Kingswood. 

Parish of VValton-on-the-Hill. 

The Council propose providing (in conjunction with 
the provision of a Fire Brigade service) an Ambulance 
service for the whole district. 

Ambulances for the removal of cases of infectious 
disease are provided by the Cuddington Joint Hospital 
Board. 

HOSPITALS— PUBLIC AND VOLUNTARY. 

Cuddington Isolation Hospital, which is under the 
control of the Banstead, Sutton, Carshalton and Leather- 
head Joint Hospital Board, makes excellent provision for 
the treatment of infectious diseases. 

There is no General Hospital within the District. 

An L.C.C. Mental Hospital at Banstead, a Children’s 
Convalescent Hospital (Great Ormond Street Hospital, 
London) at Tadworth, and several private convalescent 
homes are in the District. 


SANITARY CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE AREA. 

W.ATER Supply. 

The area is supplied with water for domestic purposes 
from the deep wells of the Sutton District Water Company 
and of the East Surrey Water Company. The water is 
softened to 9 degrees or le.ss of hardness. Both Companies 
submit .samples of water for examination by their Consul- 
tant Analysts at monthly intervals. The Sutton Dis- 


7 


trict Water Company have their own laboratory at the Sut- 
ton Works, where samples of water from all their wells are 
examined daih^ by their Chemist and Bacteriologist. 
Routine samples are taken by the District Councils in the 
area of supply at monthly intervals. Chlorination is applied 
to all sources of supply. The supply has been satisfactory 
in quality and quantitv during the year, and the following 


are average analyses from the several sources : — 


(a) Chemical. 


Reaction pH 

Total Solid Residue at 180°C. 
Free Ammonia 
Nitrogen as Nitrates 
Nitrogen as Nitrites 
Oxygen absorbed in 4 hours at 

80° F. 

Chlorine as Chlorides 
Total Flardness 
(h) Bacteriological. 

No. of Bacteria on Agar per 
c.c. for 3 days at 20°C. 
No. of Bacteria on Agar per 
c.c. for 1 day at 37°C. ... 
Presence of B. Coli 


JVoodnran- 



Leather- 

s'cerne. 

Ptirley. 

Kenley. 

head. 

7-5 

7-9 

7-8 

7-9 

12-4 

13-7 

14-0 

15-5 

0-0034 

0-0002 

0 

0-004 

0-34 

0-43 

0-32 

0-40 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0-005 

0 

0 

0-008 

0-86 

1-54 

1-48 

2-02 

7-3 

7-8 

8-3 

7-4 

4 

3 

3 

4 

1 

1 

1 

1 

0 

0 

0 

0 


Drainage and Sewerage. 

The Parishes of Banstead, Walton-on-the-Hill and 
Woodmansterne are provided with main drainage systems. 
There are no sewage disposal works in the District. A 
portion of the sewage gravitates to the Croydon Borough 
disposal works, and the remainder by means of two pump- 
ing stations and by gravitation to Sutton and Cheam B.C. 
disposal works. 


Progress has been continued in the preparation for a 
scheme of main drainage for the Parishes of Chipstead and 
Kingswood. It is expected that tenders for the work will be 
obtained early in 1939. 


Extensions of existing .sewers were carried out during 
the year in the following roads : — 


.South Drive, Woodmansterne 
Cross Road, Tadworth 
Holly Lane, Banstead 
Housing .Site, Walton-on-the-Hill 


514 yards. 


90 

60 

75 


» 1 
» » 
1 « 


8 


The drainage of nine liouses, previously connected to a 
defective septic tank, was connected to the public sewer. 

Rivers and Streams. 

There are no rivers or streams within the District. 

The Mere Pond at \\"alton-on-the-Hill was cleaned out 
during the summer. 

Closet Accommodation. 

Water closets are the general rule, but there are a 
number of pail and tub closets still in use. 

Twenty pail closets were converted to water closets 
(Banstead 2, Chipstead 14, Kingswood 4). 

PUBLIC CLEANSING. 

Cesspools. 

The emptying of cesspools in the Parishes of Chipstead 
and Kingswood is undertaken by and at the cost of the 
Council, as also is the emptying of cesspools which are not 
on the lines of sewers in the Parishes of Banstead, Walton- 
on-the-Hill and Woodmansterne. 

Closets. 

The contents of the pail and tub closets in the Parish 
of Kingswood (total 66), together with some of those at 
houses not on the line of sewers in the Parish of Banstead 
(total 12), are collected by the Council once a week. In some 
cases the receptacles are emptied twice a week. 

House Refuse. 

Collection. 

The refuse from the whole of the district is collected 
weekly by the Council. Four vehicles of rear loading 
moving floor type, each of 15 cubic yards capacity, are used 
for collection and direct labour is employed. The service is 
under the control of the Council’s Surveyor. There has been 
general satisfaction with the service. 


9 


Disposal. 

All the house refuse is disposed of at the Incinerator 
of the Reigate Corporation under agreement with that 
Authority. 

Trade Refuse. 

A service for collection and disposal of trade refuse was 
commenced in November. All traders were circularised as 
to the terms, as follows :■ — 

Dry Trade Refuse, 6d. per bin. 

Wet Trade Refuse (Fish, etc.), 2s. per bin (Bins provided). 

The response has been di.sappointing, only 11 traders 
having made application for the service at the end of the 
year. It is hoped there will be an improvement in 1939, 
with consequent saving of annoyance to ratepayers from the 
burning of refuse and nuisance from rats. 


SANITARY INSPECTION OF THE AREA. 


The following report has been supplied 

by the 

Chief 

Sanitary Inspector : — 

Air Raid Precautions' — Visits 


424 

Bakehouses — Inspections 


15 

Butchers’ Shops — Visits 


208 

Complaints received and investigated 


228 

Cowsheds?, Dairies and Milk Shops — Inspections 


169 

Disinfestation — Visits ... 


74 

— Rooms Fumigated 


— 

— Rooms Sprayed (Bugs, 13 ; Fleas?, 1) 


14 

— Wasp Nests Destroyed 


3 

Drainage of Premises — Inspections 


188 

Employment Agencies — Inspections 


2 

F'actories — Inspections 


54 

Food — Unsound — Visits 


12 

Food Shops and Premises 


59 

Housing — Inspection of Dwellings 


202 

— Re-Inspections 


378 

• — Arranging Re-housing Displaced Persons — Visits 

134 

— Official Counts — Visits 


— 

— Surveys for Clearance Area Plans ... 


12 

Infectious Disease — Visits 


242 

— Rooms Disinfected 


138 

— Schools Disinfected 


1 

Informal Notices — 

Repairs to Houses 


48 

Complied with 


42 

Works in hand 


8 

Outstanding 


8 

Nuisances 


94 

Complied with 


88 


10 


Disinfestation ... ... ... ... ... ... 3 

Complied with ... ... ... ... ... ... 3 

Cowsheds and Dairies ... ... ... ... ... 8 

Corn|3lied with ... ... ... ... ... ... 6 

.Slaughterhouses ... ... ... ... ... ... 4 

Complied with ... ... ... ... ... ... 4 

Petroleum Spirit ... ... ... ... ... ... 7 

Complied with ... ... ... ... ... ... 7 

Factories ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 1 

Complied with ... ... ... ... ... ... 1 

Meat Regulations, 1924 ... ... ... ... ... 6 

Complied with ... ... ... ... ... ... 6 

Shops .Act. 1934 1 

Complied with ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 

Bakehouses ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 

Complied with ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 

Overcrowding ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 

Complied with ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 

Interviews in District ... ... ... ... ... ... 109 

l^egal .Actions ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Nil. 

Milk Meat, Ice-Cream, etc., Vans and Vehicles ... ... 30 

Miscellaneous Visits ... ... ... ... ... ... 183 

Nuisances — Inspections and Re-Inspectiong ... ... ... 308 

Outworkers? — Inspection ... ... ... ... ... — 

Overcrowding — Visits made ... ... ... ... ... 84 

— Visits since Survey for purposes of obtaining 

information for Rent Books ... ... 85 

Petroleum and Carbide Stores ... ... ... ... ... 72 

Piggeries, Stables, etc. — Inspections .. ... ... ... 20 

Rats — A’i'sits to Premises ... ... ... ... ... 38 

•Sampling — Water — Dome.stic — Chemical 11, Bacteriological 19 30 

Water — .Swimming Pools — Chemical 2, Bacterio- 
logical 2 ... ... ... ... ... 4 

Milk — Ordinary ... ... ... ... ... 59 

Milk — Graded ... ... ... ... ... 21 

Schools — A’isits ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 56 

■Shops’ .Act — Inspections ... ... ... ... ... ... 11 

SIaugTterhouse.s — A’isits ... ... ... ... ... ... 535 

Smoke Observations ... ... ... ... ... ... 11 

Statutory Notices — Surrey C.C. Act, 1936 — 

Section 121 — Petroleum ... ... 1 

Complied with . ... ... ... 1 

.Swimming Pools — A’isits ... ... ... ... ... 7 

Tents, A'ans and .Sheds — A’isits ... ... ... ... 196 

AA’aler .Supply — A'isits ... ... ... ... ... ... 70 


Shops Act, 1934. 

The County Council administer the Shops Acts in the 
district, and bA’ arrangement the officers of such Council 
notify any contraventions of tlie Act in relation to ventila- 
tion, temperature and sanilarv conveniences found in the 
course of their duties. 

One complaint was received as to the temperature in a 
shop and Avas being investigated at the end of the A'ear. 


11 


SMOKE ABATEMENT. 

A complaint was made of the excessive emission of 
smoke from the chimney of a hospital. 

Eleven observations were made, but no nuisance was 
observed. 

Complaints w^ere received as to smoke and fumes from 
the burning of trade refuse at the rear of shop premises. 

It is hoped that the scheme for collection and disposal 
of trade refuse wull remedy this trouble. 

SWIMMING POOLS. 

There are no public pools or baths in the district, but 
there are two privately owned pools open to the public. 

These two pools are visited and inspected regularly and 
the water is sampled every season. 

The bacteriological condition of the water w'as 
satisfactory. 

ERADICATION OF BED BUGS. 

The number of houses found to be infested and dealt 

with during the year were : — 

Council houses ... ... ... ... ... 1 

Other houses ... ... ... ... ... 2 

Thirteen rooms were sprayed wuth “Zaldecide” insecti- 
cide, such work being carried out by the Sanitary Inspectors. 

Up to the present time, it has not been found necessary 
to employ any special methods for ensuring freedom from 
vermin of the furniture, etc., of prospective Council house 
tenants. 


SCHOOLS. 

Fifty-six visits were made to Schools in the district. 

The County Council have provided a new drainage 
system with water closets at the Chipstead Elementary 
School, connected to a septic tank. 

One Elementary School was disinfected followintr cases 
of Diphtheria. 


12 


GENERAL MATTERS. 

Tents, Vans and Sheds. 

Encampments of moveable dwellings, occupied by 
gypsies, continue to trespass upon undeveloped building 
land in the district, and stay for varying periods, until moved 
on by the owner of the land. 

Estate owners endeavour to prevent such encampments 
b)' removing the vans and by temporary fencing of open 
land. 

Immediately before, during and after the Epsom race 
meetings there were a large number of caravans in this 
district. 

One hundred and ninety-six visits were paid to gypsy 
encampments during the year. The supervision of these 
unauthorised encampments cannot produce effective results 
in control owing to the primarily illegal nature of the 
encampment, the type of persons involved, and the facility 
of migration from one site to another. The most satisfactory 
solution of the problem in certain areas has been the fencing 
of land by owners to prevent trespass. The breach of 
amenity from begging and hawking of the immediate district 
abutting on such encampments is evident, but no public 
health nuisance has been observed owing to the temporary 
nature of the encampments. 

Offensive Trades. 

There are no such trades in the district. 

Bakehouses. 

There are five bakehou.ses on the register, and 15 visits 
were made. 

Complaints. 

The under-mentioned complaints were received during 
the year : — 

■Animals — Burying of ... ... ... ... ... ... 1 

.Animals — Damage by ... ... ... ... ... 1 

Animals kept so as to be a nuisance ... ... ... ... 8 

.Animats — Noise from ... . . ... ... ... ... ... 3 


13 


Ants ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 1 

Bakeliouse — Condition of ... ... ... ... ... ... 1 

Bonfires — .Smoke from ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 

Biirninf^ of Animal Fur ... ... ... ... ... ... 1 

Butchers’ Premise.s — Odours from ... ... ... ... ... 1 

Cesspools — Full or Overflowing ... ... ... ... ... 9 

Dairy — Condition of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 1 

Deposits — Offensive ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 9 

Drainage — Defective ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 7 

Drains — Choked ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 22 

Drain — Offensive Odour from ... ... ... ... ... ... 5 

Dustbins — Lack of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 4 

Fencing — Lack of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 1 

Flies 11 

Gypsies ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 10 

Houses — Condition of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 14 

Houses — Dampness of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 10 

Infectious Disease Contacts ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 

Milk Bottles left in Streets ... ... ... ... ... ... 3 

Moles ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 1 

Nuisance from Dust ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 1 

Odours — Offensive ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 12 

Overcrowding ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 

Rats ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 49 

Refuse — Accumulations of ... ... ... ... ... ... 8 

Refuse — Burning of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 

Road — Condition of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 1 

Shop — Condition of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 1 

Shops — Temperature in ... ... ... ... ... ... 1 

Smoke Nuisance ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 1 

L^nsound Food ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 3 

Vermin ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 5 

Wasps ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 5 

Water Supply ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 3 

Weeds 6 

228 

Employment Agencies. 

There are two reg’istered Agencies in the district. 

Factories and Workshops, 

There are 67 factories on the register, excluding bake- 
houses. 

Conditions were satisfactory. 

Petroleum (Consolidation) Act, 1928. 

Forty-three licences were issued for the storage of petro- 
leum spirit, 25 of which related to petrol stored for sale and 
18 for storage of petrol for private use only. 

The fees for such licences amounted to £32 10s. Od. 


14 


One licence was issued for the storage of Carbide of 
Calcium, for purposes of sale, and two for storage for private 
use. 

The fees in respect of these three licences amounted to 

15s. 

Seven Preliminary Notices and one Statutory Notice 
(Section 121 of the Surrey County Council Act, 1936) were 
served. All were complied with. 

Rats and Mice (Destruction) Act, 1919. 

This Act is primarily administered by the County 
Council, and complaints are forwarded to the County Rat 
Officer. 

Thirty-eight visits were paid to premises in the district 
and advice given to the occupiers. 

HOUSING. 

1. Inspections of Dwelling-houses during the year: — 

(1) (a) Total number of Dwelling-houses inspected for hous- 


ing defects (under Public Health or Housing Acts) 202 

(h) Number of Inspections made for the purpose ... 202 

(2) (a) Number of Dwelling-houses (included under sub-head 

No. (1) above) which were inspected and recorded 
under the Housing Consolidated Regulations, 1925 

and 1932 65 

{b) Number of Inspections made for the purpose ... 65 

(3) Number of Dwelling-houses found to be in a state so 

dangerous or injurious to health as to be unfit for 
human habitation ... ... ... ... ... 23 

(4) Number of Dwelling-houses (exclusive of those referred 

to under the preceding sub-head) found not to be in all 
respects resonably fit for hum.in habitation... ... 51 


2. Remedy of Defects during the year 

without service of Formal Notice: — 

Number of defective Dwelling-houses rendered fit in con- 
sequence of informal action by the Local Authority or 
their Officers ... .. ... ... ... 42 

3. Action under Statutory Powers during the 

year : — 

(d) Proceeding's under Sections 9, 10 and 16 of the Housing 
Act. 1936 

(1) Number of Dwelling-houses in respect of which notices 

were ser\-ed requiring repairs .. ... ... ... Nil. 


15 


(2) Number of Dwellinj^-houses whi h were rendered fit 
after service of formal notices : — 

(a) By Owners ... ... ... ... ... Nil. 

(b) By Local Authority in default of owners ... Nil. 

(H) Proceedings under Public Health Acts ; — 

(1) Number of Dwelling-houses in respect of which notices 

were served requiring defects to be remedied ... ... Nil. 

(2) Number of Dwelling-houses in which defects were 

remedied after service of formal notices : — 

(a) By Owners ... ... ... ... ... Nil. 

(b) By Local Authority in default of owners ... Nil. 

(C) Proceedings under Sections 11 and ]3, Housing Act, 1936: — 

(1) N, umber of Dwelling-houses in respect of which 

Demolition Orders were made ... ... ... ... Nil. 

(2) Number of Dwelling-houses demolished in pursuance 

of Demolition Orders ... ... ... ... ... Nil. 

(D) Proceedings under Sec [ion 12 of the Housing Act, 1936 : — 

(1) Number of separate tenements or underground rooms 

in respect of which Closing Orders were made ... 1 

(2) Number of separate tenements or underground rooms 

in respect of which Closing Orders were determined, 
the tenement or room having been rendered fit ... Nil. 

Housing Act, 1936 — Part IV : Overcrowding. 

(a) (i) Number of dwellings overcrowded at the end of the year 34 


(ii) Number of families dwelling theiein ... ... ... 36 

(iii) Number of persons dwelling theiein ... ... ... 227 

(b) Number of new cases of overcrowding reported during the 

year ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 9 

(c) (i) Number of cases of overcrowding relieved during 

the year ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 16 

(ii) Number of persons concerned in such cases ... ... 100 


(d) Particulars of any cases in which dwelling-houses have 

again become overcrowded after the Local Authority 
have taken steps for the abatement of overcrowding Nil. 

(e) Any other particulars with iespect to overcrowding con- 

ditionsi u[X)n which the Medical Officer of Health may 
consider it desirable to report ; — 

Tlie relief during- the year of the 16 ca.ses noted above 
was due in three cases to the occupiers finding other accom- 
modation, and in the other 13 to a decrease in the number 
of units, owing either to members of the families living away 
from home or the occupiers or lodgers finding other accom- 
modation . 

Nine new cases of overcrowding were recorded, of which 
six were due to age increase of children, two being contra- 


16 


ventions and the remainin<T one was a case tliat was actually 
overcrowded before the appointed day. 

Of the above-mentioned six cases, one became 
decrowded during the vear by decrease in the number of 
persons, and the overcrowding in the two cases of contra- 
ventions were abated after informal notice to the owners and 
occupiers. 

Overcrowding — Re-housing. 

The Walton-on-the-Hill Housing Scheme (53 houses 
and flats) was nearing completion at the end of the year. For 
the abatement of overcrowding, the following houses are 
included in this Scheme : — 

One 3 Bedroom — small type. 

One 3 Bedroom — large type. 

Six 4 Bedroom Non-Parlour type. 

Two 4 Bedroom Parlour type. 

Three 5 Bedroom type. 

Housing Act, 1936 — Slum Cle.ar.ance. 

Progress was slow during the year in the matter of 
Slum Clearance, owing to increasing duties of Air Raid 
Precautions. Official representations and reports in respect 
of 20 houses were submitted during the year, but final deci- 
sion was adjourned pending submission of reports dealing 
with a further 18 dwellings. 

One Closing Order was made by the Council as to part 
of a dwelling. 

Seven Clearance Orders (27 houses) were submitted to 
the Minister of Health and a Public Inquire was held on 
March 8th. Six Orders were confirmed and the four houses 
of the seventh Order were the subject of negotiations with 
the owner as to conversion into one dwelling or demolition 
at the end of 1938. 

The 16 hou.ses for re-housing displaced persons, in the 
Walton-on-the-Hill Ward, were completed in December and 
re-housing was being arranged to take place earl}- in 1939. 

In connection with the Kingswood Housing Scheme (38 
dwelling.s), tenders for the erection of the houses were 


17 


obtained during- 1938, but the works bad not been commenced 
at the end of the year. 

The position at the end of 1938 as to the numbers of 
houses noted under paragraph 1 (3) abcn-e in the Annual 
Reports since tlie formation of the Council in 1933 are as 


follows : — 



No. of houses 


Veal'. listed as being unfit. 

Position to date. 

1933. 14. 

6. 

Demolished (Clearance .Area 3, Demoli- 



tion Order 1). 



(2 without formal action). 


2. 

Clearance Order Confirmed. 


4. 

Repaired on Undertaking. 


2. 

To be dealt with. 

1934. 7. 

7. 

Demolished (Clearance .Areas). 

1935. 22. 

2. 

Demolition Orders made. 


16. 

Clearance Orders (3) Confirmed. 


4. 

Clearance Order not Confirmed. 

1936. 16. 

12. 

Clearance Orders (4) Confirmed. 


1. 

Demolition Order made. 


3. 

Clearance .Area in abeyance. 

1937. 31. 

9. 

Clearance Orders (3) Confirmed. 


1. 

Closing Order made. 


18. 

Reports receiving consideration. 


3. 

To be dealt with. 

1938. 23. 

1. 

Consideration as to Closing Order. 


2. 

Reports receiving consideration. 


20. 

To be dealt with. 

Byelaws. 



Byelaws made under Section 6 of the Housing Act, 1936, 

as to (1) houses occupied bv 

persons of the working classes 

and (2) houses let in lodgings or occupied by members of 

more than one fam 

ily, are 

in operation in respect of the 

whole of the Urban 

District. 


Council Houses, 



The number of 

Council 

1 cottages in the district are as 


follows : — 


follows : — 

Nork Ward ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Nil. 

North-East Ward ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 42 

.South-East Ward ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 26 

Tadwortli Ward . . ... ... ... ... ... ... 46 

('hipstead Ward ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 16 

King'Swood Ward ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 32 

Walton-on-the-Hill Ward ... ... ... ... ... ... 12 

Woochiiansterne Ward ... ... ... ... ... ... 36 


210 


18 


INSPECTION AND SUPERVISION OF FOOD. 


MILK SUPPLY. 

Premises in the 

1937. 1938. 

26 27 

27 27 

19 21 

Totals ... ... ... ... ... 72 75 

Eight informal notices were gi\cn to occupiers of cow- 
sheds and dairies in respect of cleansing, storage of manure, 
drainage and storage of emptv milk bottles. In respect of 
the cowshed and dairy at one farm, the occupier has been 
requested to carry out improyements, but the works had not 
been commenced at the end of the year. 


MILK (SPECIAL DESIGNATIONS) ORDERS, 

1936 & 1938. 

Number of licences issued : — 



Dealers. 

Dealers 

BoMing. 

Supplementary. 

Tuberculin Tested” 

5 

1 

11 

.A.ccredited” 

2 

1 

— 

Pasteurised” 

5 

— 

8 


— 

— 

— 


12 

2 

19 






The total fees paid in respect of the licences issued in 
1938 amounted to £9 2s. Od. 

There are four cowkeepers in the distrii't licensed by 
the Surrey County Council to produce “Tuberculin Tested” 
milk and four for production of “Accredited” milk. 

MILK SAMPLING. 

Fifty-nine samples of Ordinary milk and 21 .samples of 
Graded milk were obtained during the year. 

Of these .samples, 34 were of milk supplied to elementary 
schools in the district, and the results of the bacteriological 
examinations were as follows : — 


Number of Registered Persons and 
District : — 

Cowkeepers 

Retail Purveyors of Milk 
Retail Purveyors of Milk whose premises 
are outside the District 


19 


Ordinary Milk — (15 Samples). 

Maximum Bacteria per c.c. ... ... 197'330 
Minimum Bacteria per c.c. ... ... 4700 

Bacillus Coli — Absent in 10 Samples. 

Bacillus Coli — Present in 4 Samples 1/lOOth c.c. 

Bacillus Coli — Present in 1 Sample 1/lOOth c.c. 

In one sample a small number of Acid Fast Bacilli, 
indistinguishable in appearance from Tubercle Bacilli, were 
found by microscopical examination. Biological examina- 
tion gave negative results. 

Pasteurised Milk — (19 Samples). 

.Maximum Bacteria per c.c. ... ... 40500 
Minimum Bacteria per c.c. ... ... 2‘560 

Bacillus Coli — Absent in all Samples. 

When the bacteriological report of a sample of milk is 
unsatisfactory, steps are taken to ascertain the cause, by 
investigations at the dairy and by repeat sampling. 


The following is a summary of the results of the examinations of milk samples : 



Q 

OQ 

l-H 

« 

» 

H 

c» 





to 


oo 


> 


cd 

bC 


C 



21 


Microscopically examined for presence of T.B. : — 45 Ordinary Milk samples. Two samples contained Acid- 

fast Bacilli resembling T. Bacilli — Neither confirmed 
on Biological Examination. 

20 Pasteurised Milk Samples — No positive results obtained. 


MEAT AND OTHER FOODS. 

There are two registered and three licensed slaughter- 
houses in the Urban District, all of which are in use for 
slaughtering animals for human food, and all the animals 
slaughtered therein were inspected. There was no slaughter- 
ing other than in slaughterhouses. 

'I'he majority of the inspection tak'es place in the even- 
ing owing to the slaughtering being carried (nil generally 
in the late afternoon and onwards. 

C.ARCASES Inspected and Condemned. 



Cattle, 

excluding 

Cows. 

Cows. 

Calves. 

Sheep 

and 

Lambs. 

Pigs. 

Number killed 

47 

— 

86 

479 

i029 

Number inspected . . 

47 

— 

86 

479 

1029 

All diseases except 

Tuberculosis. 






Whole carcasses con- 
demned 

— 

— 

1 

— 

2 

Carcasses of which 
some part or organ 
was condemned 

4 

— 

2 

12 

138 

Percentage of the 
number inspected 

affected with disease 
other than tuber- 
culosis 

8-6% 

— 

3-48% 

to 

13-5% 

Tuberculosis only. 






Whole carcasses con- 
demned 

— 

— 

2 

— 

1 

Carcasses of which 
some part or organ 
w’as condemned 

1 

_ 

1 

__ 

27 

Percentage of the 
number inspected 

affected with Tuber- 
culosis 

•2-12% 

— 

3-48% 

— 

2-72% 


22 


\ ery little ante-mortem inspection is ctirried out, owing 
to time not being available for this work. 

Five hundred and thirty-five visits were made to 
slaughterhouses. Informal notices were given in respect of 
the provision of bins for offal, etc. (3), and repairs to 
paving (1). These notices were complied with. 

Two hundred and eight visits were made to butchers’ 
shops. Six notices were given as to cleanliness, and .same 
were complied with. 

Eighty-nine inspections of food premises, and vans and 
vehicles of milk, meat, ice cream, etc., were made. 

Animals Insbecied and Meat Condemned. 


Beasts 

Calves 

Sheep and Lambs 

Pigs 

Totals 

Condemned Meat. 

Animal Part. 

Beasts. 1 Mesentery 

2 Livers 

1 Spleen 

2 Lungs 

Pigs. 1 Carcase and Organs 

22 Heads and Tongues 
5 Mesentery 
1 Carcase and Organs 
1 Carcase and Organs 

1 Head and Tongue 
33 Hearts 

66 Lungs 
47 Lungs 

2 Lungs 

3 Lungs 
19 Lungs 

4 Lungs 
11 Livers 

9 Livers 
8 Livers 
18 Livers 
1 Kidney 

1 Kidney 
4 Kidneys 
7 Mesentery 
1 Mesentery 
4 Trotters 
1 Flare 


1937. 

1938. 

10 

47 

33 

87 

154 

481 

1105 

1034 

1302 

1649 


Reasons. 

Tuberculosis. 

Distomatosis. 

Inflammation. 

Pleurisy. 

Generalised Tuberculosis. 

Localised Tuberculosis?. 

Localised Tuberculosis?. 

Pyaemia. 

Emaciation due to Pleurisy. 
Abscess. 

Pericarditis. 

Pleurisy. 

Congestion. 

Cystic. 

Abscess. 

Pneumonia. 

Strongyluis Paradoxus. 

Cholongitis. 

Necrosis. 

Inflammation due to Pleurisy. 
Cirrhosis. 

Degenerated cystic condition due 
to injury. 

Nephritis. 

Cystic. 

Cystic. 

Fatty F'ibrosis. 

Rheumatism. 

Bruising. 


23 


Animal 


Reasons. 


Shkep. 


Calves. 


Part. 

1 Loin, Flank, Stomach 
and Intestines. 

1 Back Fat 

2 Livers 

12 Lungs ... ... . . 

3 Mesentery 
2 Lungs 

1 Heart 

2 Carcases and Organs ... 
1 Carcase and Organs 

1 Liver 

2 Kidneys 


Peritonitis. 

Urticaria. 

.Strongylus Rufescens. 

-Strongylus Rufescens. 

Strongylus Rufescens. 

Pleurisy. 

Pericarditis. 

Congenital Tuberculosis. 

Fevered condition of Carcase due 
to injury. 

Localised Tuberculosis. 
Onchronosis. 


The following statistics relating to the slaughtering of 
pigs are of interest : — 


Year. 

Pigs 

examined. 

No. in which 

T uherculosis 
foiDid. 

Percentage. 

1933 (9 months) 

452 

49 

10-8% 

1934 

797 

81 

10-2% 

1935 

901 

73 

8-1% 

1936 

1026 

56 

5-4% 

1937 

1105 

42 

3-8% 

1938 

1034 

28 

2-72% 


Thirteen slaughtermen’s licences were issued, and the 
fees received in respect of these amounted to 14s. 


ADULTERATION OF FOOD, ETC. 

The various Acts dealing with this matter are admini- 
stered by the Surrey County Council, and I have received 
from that Authority the following information on work 
carried out in the Banstead Urban District during 1938 : — 



Samples. 

Adulterated or 

to 

C 

o 

3 

to 

C 

o 

VJ 

Articles. Formal. 

Informal. 

Deteriorated. 
Formal. Infortnal. 

Cl 

li, 

C 

o 

o 

Milk 

28 

— 

3 

— 

— 

— 

Meat 

1 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

Butter 

1 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

Chocolate 

Roll 

1 

— 

1 

— 

— 

— 

Lard 

1 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

Dripping 

1 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

Lemon 

Squash 

1 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

Totals 

34 


4 












24 


PREVALENCE OF, AND CONTROL OVER 
INFECTIOUS DISEASES. 


The table below shows the prevalence of notifiable 
infectious disease (except Tuberculosis) during 1938 : — 


Disease. 

Total Cases 
Notified. 

Case Rate per 
1,000 of Pop. 

Institution 

Cases. 

1 

District Cases. 

District Case 

Rate per 1,000 

of Population. 

Case Rate per 

1,000 of Pop., 

Eng. & Wales. 

Scarlet Fever . . 

49 

1-73 

9 

40 

1-45 

2-41 

Diphtheria 

8 

0-29 

6 

3 

0-11 

1-58 

Erysipelas 

Enteric Fever (including 

15 

0-54 

7 

8 

0 29 

0-40 

Para-Typhoid) 

2 

007 

— 

2 

007 

0-03 

Puerperal Pyrexia 

6 

0-22 

— 

6 

0-22 

— 

Pneumonia 

14 

0-50 

8 

6 

0.22 

1-10 

Dysentery 

37 

1-34 

37 

— 


— 

Anterior Poliomyelitis 

1 

0-04 


1 



Total 

132 

— 

66 

66 

— 

— 


The total number of cases of infectious disease notified 
was 132. This is an increase of 25 cases over the number 
notified in 1937, but is mainly accounted for by an increase 
in institutional cases. Outside the numerous institutions in 
the Urban District of Banstead, cases numbered 66, an 
increase of only one, and a low incidence of infectious 
disease. The general prevalence of Scarlet Fever and of 
Diphtheria remained low and there was no mortality. Two 
sporadic cases of enteric infection occurred during tlie year. 
Outbreaks of mild Dysentery in two institutions accounted 
for the increased notifications of this disease. Recoverv has 
been almost complete in the one case of Anterior Poliomye- 
litis reported. 

Scarlet Fever. — There were 49 cases of Scarlet Fever, 
and of these nine were institutional cases. Tlie case rate 
was 1.71 per 1,000 of population, compared with 2.05 per 
1,000 of population for England and Whiles. There were 
three secondary cases arising after removal of patients to 


25 


hospital and two “return” cases arising; from patients dis- 
charged from hospital. Immediate isolation of suspected 
cases is necessary to prevent secondary cases and patients 
discharged from hospital should be guarded against chills 
likely to cause catarrh and revive infection in the throat or 
nose. Convalescent patients who show any evidence of dis- 
charge from the nose or throat should be retained under 
medical observation at home. 

Diphtheria. — There were eight cases of Diphtheria. 
The case rate was 0.29 per 1,000 of population, compared 
with 1.90 per 1,000 of population for England and Wales. 
No death from Diphtheria was recorded. 

As TO THE Prompt Use of Anti-toxin'.- — Diphtheria 
Anti-toxin administered early and in adequate doses is the 
safeguard against mortality. There should be no delay by 
parents in securing medical attention for suspected cases, 
and medical practitioners should not hesitate to give Diph- 
theria Anti-toxin while awaiting bacteriological confirmation. 

Artificial Immunisation against Diphtheria. — The 
response to the provision of facilities for immunisation has 
been slight. During the year 25 children received three 
injections of Toxoid Anti-toxin Floccules. The Council’s 
scheme provides for the immunisation free of cost of the 
children of necessitous persons, either through their own 
medical practitioner or through the Medical Officer of Health, 
who is available each Monday afternoon at 2.15 p.m. at the 
Council’s Offices. 


The following table shows the distribution of the child- 
ren receiving three injections of 1 c.c. (T.A.F.) in age 
groups : — 



Enteric I'ev er. — There was one case of Tvphoid Fever. 
Investigation did not reveal the source of infection, but the 
case was probably of “carrier” origin. One case of Para- 


26 


typhoid Fever was also nolihed. The “carrier” of infection 
was detected. 

Dvsentkrv, — In November, 13 cases of mild Dysentery 
of the Sonne d'ype were reported from one institution. The 
cases were generally mild and only one was removed to 
isolation hospital for treatment. The spread of infection 
was terminated by rigid ward quarantine. 

Anterior Poliomyelitis. — There was one acute case 
notified. Recovery has been almost complete, except for 
slight residual paresis. 

Pneumonia. — Fourteen cases were notified. Fhght of 
these were institutional cases. Of the five deaths occurring 
from all types, one was notified previous to death. 


27 


The following table shows the age distribution of all 
cases of Infectious Disease notified : — 


Notifiable Diseases during the Year 1938. 








Case 

s Notifie 






Qj 


Disease 

1 Under 1 

1 

1 to 2 

2 to 3 

3 to 4 

4 to 5 

5 to 10 

10 to 15 

15 to 20 

20 to 35 

35 to 45 

45 to 65 

65 and over 

At all ages | 

Cases admitt 

to Hospital 

’Deaths 

Smallpox 
















Scarlet Fever 

— 

— 

2 

3 

4 

2.5 

6 

2 

3 

2 

2 

— 

49 

37 



Diphtheria 

Enteric Fever 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

3 

3 

1 

— 

1 

— 

— 

8 

7 

— 

(inc. Paratyphoid) 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

1 

— 

— 

1 

— 

— 

2 

1 

— 

Puerperal Pyrexia 

— 

_ 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

3 

3 

— 

— 

6 

1 


Pneumonia 

— 

— 

— 

— 

1 

— 

1 

— 

1 

1 

8 

2 

14 

2 

5 

Dysentery 

— 


— 

2 

2 

7 

2 

— 

3 

6 

11 

4 

37 

1 


Erysipelas 

Anterior 

1 

— 

— 

— 

— 

1 

— 

— 

— 

4 

6 

4 

15 

4 

— 

Poliomyelitis 



] 










1 

1 


Totals 

1 

— 

3 

5 

7 

36 

13 

3 

10 

18 

26 

10 

132 

54 

5 


*Under Column “Deaths” all deaths, whether notified in the District or 
outside it, or not notified at all, are included. 


Distribution of Infectious Diseases in Wards. 


Ward 

Chipstead 

Kingswood 

Banstead 

Nork 

Banstead 

N.E. 

Banstead 

S.E. 

Tadworth 

Walton-on- 

the-Hill. 

Woodman- 

sterne. 

"3 

.4.3 

o 

H 

*P0PDI.ATI0N 

1497 

3130 

6803 

5259 

2333 

3040 

1841 

3597 

27600 

Scarlet Fever 

2 

4 

10 

5 

9 

5 

2 

3 

40 

Diphtheria 

Enteric Fever (including 

— 

— 

1 

— 

— 

2 

— 

— 

3 

Para-Typhoid) 

— 

1 

— 

— 

— 

1 

— 

— 

2 

Puerperal Pyrexia 

— 

1 

1 

3 

1 

— 

— 

— 

6 

Pneumonia 

1 

2 

— 

— 

— 

1 

2 

2 

8 

Erysipelas 

8 

— 

1 

2 

1 

— 

— 

1 

8 

Anterior Poliomyelitis . . 








1 

1 

'J'otal 

6 

8 

13 

10 

11 

9 

4 

7 

68 


*Based on inhabited house figure — Decemoer, 1938. 


28 


Non-Notifiablk Infectious Diseases. — .School teachers 
reported five cases of Mumps, 165 cases of Measles, 13 cases 
of Whooping Cough and 51 cases of Chicken Pox. No 
death from Measles or from Wdiooping Cough was recorded. 
School notifications form a basis for consultation with the 
School Medical Officer. 


TUBERCULOSIS. 

The following table is drawn up in accordance with the 
instructions of the Ministry of Health. It shows the age and 
sex of all new cases of Tuberculosis notified in the Banstead 
Urban District during 1938. It gives also the number of 
deaths due to Tuberculosis and the age and sex distribution 
of these cases. 


New Cases and Mortality during 1938. 




New 

Cases. 


Deaths. 

Age Periods. 

Pulmonary. 

Non- 

Pulmonary. 

Pulmonary. 

Non- 

Pulmonary. 


M 

F 

M 

F 

M 

F 

M 

F 

0 

1 

5 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 1 1 1 

— 

— 

— 

15 

1 

1 

— 

— 

1 

— 

— 

— 

25 

4 

— 

— 

— 

1 

2 

— 

1 

35 

1 

1 

1 

1 

6 

1 

— 

— 

45 

1 

1 

1 

— 

4 

— 



— 

55 

65 and above . . 

1 




2 




Totals 

9 

4 

3 

3 

14 

3 

— 

1 


Respiratory forms of death : — 6 out of 12 were notified before death. 


This table shows that Pulmonary Tuberculosis caused 
12 deaths, and Non-Pulmonary one death, during 1938. 

The total Tuberculosis death rate was therefore 0.65 per 
1,000 of population, compared with 0.65 per 1,000 of popula- 
tion for England and Wales. 


29 


URBAN DISTRICT OF BANSTEAD. 


Clinics controlled by the Surrey County Council. 

MATERNITY AND CHILD WELFARE. 

(1) Banstead: 

Church Institute, 

High Street. Every Thursday, 2 p.m. 

(2) Lower Kingswood : 

Women’s Institute, 

Brighton Road. 1st and 3rd Monday, 2 p.m. 

(3) Walton-on-the<Hill : 

Congregational Schoolroom, 

High Street. 1st and 3rd Tuesday, 2 p.m. 

(4) Tadworth : 

Church Hall, 

Station Approach Road. 2nd and 4th Wednesday, 2 p.m. 

(5) Chipstead: 

(Clinic controlled by Coulsdon and Purley U.D.C.) 

St. Francis’ Church Hall, 

Rickman Hill, Coulsdon. Every Tuesday, 2.30 p.m. 


TUBERCULOSIS. 


The following dispensaries serve the district as a whole : — 


Public Hall, 

Church Road, 

Sutton. 

WhyteclifTe Road, 

Purley. 


la, Cecil Road, 

Redhill. 

44, Waterloo Road, 

Epsom. 


2 p.m. Wednesdays, except 3rd 
Wednesday at 5.30 p.m. 

2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th Mondays, 
2 p.m. 

1st Monday at 5.30 p.m. 

2nd and 4th Tuesday at 10 a.m. 

2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th Thur.sdays 
at 2 p.m. 

1st Thursday at 5.30 p.m. 

1st, 2nd, 3rd and 5th Tuesdays 
at 2 p.m. 

4th Tuesday at 5.30 p.m. 


Clinic controlled by Banstead U.D.C. 

DIPHTHERIA IMMUNISATION. 

The Public Health Department, Every Monday at 2.15 p.m. 
The Council House, 

Brighton Road, 

Banstead. 


30 




. f . , ^