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Full text of "A select collection of drawings from curious antique gems; most of them in the possession of the nobility and gentry of this kingdom; etched after the manner of Rembrandt"

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SELECT COLLE 

O F 

R A W I 

FROM 

CURIOUS ANTI QJLT E 


T I O N 


N G S 


GEMS. 







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A 


SELECT COLLECTION 

O F 

DRAWINGS 

FROM 

CURIOUS ANTIQJJE GEMS; 

MOST OF THEM IN THE POSSESSION OF THE NOBILITY 
AND GENTRY OF THIS KINGDOM; 

ETCHED AFTER THE MANNER OF REMBRANDT. 

BY T. WORL1DGE, PAINTER. 


LONDON: 

PRINTED BY DRYDEN LEACH, 

FOR M. WORLIDGE, GREAT QUEEN STREET, LINCOLN’S-INN-FIELDS; 
AND M. WICKSTEED, SEAL-ENGRAVER AT BATH. 


MDCCLXVIII 














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. — 




LIST 

OF 

SUBSCRIBERS. 


THE KING. 

% 

THE Q^UEEN. 

His Royal Highnefs the Duke of York. 

His Royal Highnefs the Duke of Gloucefter. 

His Royal Highnefs Prince Henry. 

His Royal Highnefs the Duke of Cumberland. 

His Serene Highnefs the Prince of Mecklenberg Strelitz. 

b 


HIS 






/ 


SUBSCRIBERS. 


A. 

H IS Grace the Duke of Ancafter. 

His Grace the Duke of Argyll. 

The Right Honourable the Earl of Aftiburnham. 
The Right Honourable Lord Abergavenny. 

The Honourable Mr. Anfon. 

Sir John St. Albans. 

Sir George Armitage, Bart. 

Sir Edward Aftley, Bait. 

Mr. Afhley, Junior. 

Mr. Atkins. 

B. 

His Grace the Duke of Bedford. 

The Right Honourable the Earl of Belborough. 
The Right Honourable the Earl of Blefinton. 
The Right Honourable Lord Bruce. 

Sir Henry Bridgman, Bart. 

Sir Charles Bunbury, Bart. 

Sir Charles Burnaby. 

Sir Robert Burdett. 

Mr. Berdoe. 

Mrs. Berry. 

Mr. Blount. 


C. 

The Right Honourable the Earl of ClanbraflilL 
The Right Elonourable Lord Cardigan. 


» 


/ 


The 


% 




SUBSCRIBERS. 


The Marquis of Caernarvon. 

The Right Honourable the Earl of Cork. 

Lord Courtney. 

Right Honourable Henry Seymour Conway, Efq. 
Mr. Colcraft. 

Mr. Caflon. 

Mr. Child. 

Mr. Clarke. 

Mifs Clarke. 

Mr. Colebrook. 

Capt. Cornwall. 

Mr. Cox. 

Mr. Cox. 


D. 

• ( v ^ / , 

His Grace the Duke of Devonfhire. 

His Grace the Duke of Dorfet. 

The Right Honourable the Earl of Dartmouth. 
The Right Honourable the Earl of Donegall. 
Sir Laurence Dundafs, Bart. 

Mr. Dundafs. 

Mr. Duane. 


The Right Honourable the Earl of Exeter. 
The Right Honourable the Earl of Eglinton. 
M. Ernft. 

Mifs. Eycles. 


F. Dr. 


SUBSCRIBERS. 


F. 

Dr. Fothergill. 

Mr. Fuller. 

Mr. Full wood. 

G. 

His Grace the Duke of Grafton. 

The Right Honourable Lord Gray. 

The Right Honourable Lord Grofvenor. 

The Marquis of Granby. 

Lord Grey. 

Mr. Gaddes. 

Mr. Grofe. 

Mr. Godfrey. 

H. 

The Right Honourable Earl Harcourt. 

The Right Honourable the Countefs of Harrington. 
The Right Honourable the Earl of Home. 
Honourable Mr. Hamilton. 

Mifs Hart. 

Mr. Hume. 

Dr. Hunter. 

Mr. Hope. 

Mr. Hopegood. 


K. Lord 


% 


SUBSCRIBERS. 


K. 

Lord Kelly. 

Mr. Keck. 

Mr. Kentifh. 

Mr. Kenrick. 

L. 

His Grace the Duke of Leeds. 
Mr. Lafcelles. 

Mr. Leigh. 

Mr. Lethieullier. 

Mr. Lowth. 


M. 

His Grace the Duke of Manchefter. 

His Grace the Duke of Marlborough. 
Her Grace the Dutchefs of Marlborough. 
Lord Montague. 

Sir William Evan Morice, Baronet. 

Mr. Mackey. 

Colonel Mafterton. 

Mr. Maffingbed. 

Dr. Maty. 

Mr. Meyley. 

Mr. Murray. 


N. The 


SUBSCRIBERS. 


N. 

The Right Honourable the Earl of Northumberland. 
The Right Honourable the Earl of Northington. 
Lord Vifcount Newnham. 

General Napier. 


O. 

The Right Honourable Lord Offory. 
The Reverend the Dean of Offory. 
Colonel Oughton. 

Mr. Offley. 


P. 

s . | * 

* 

His Grace the Duke of Portland. 

Her Grace the Dutchefs Dowager of Portland. 
The Right Honourable the Earl of Pembroke. 
The Right Honourable the Earl of Peterborough. 
Lord Pigott. 

Sir Richard Phillips* Baronet. 

Mr. Parker. 

Mr. Pocklington. 

His Grace the Duke of Queenfberry. 


4 


R. His 


\ 


I 


SUBSCRIBERS. 

t 

R. 

His Grace the Duke of Roxborough. 

His Grace the Duke of Rutland. 

The Right Noble the Marquis of Rockingham. 

The Right Honourable the Earl of Radnor. 

The Honourable Mr. Robinfon. 

Mr. Reynous. 

Mrs. Riggs. 

Mr. Rofoman. 

S. 

The Right Honourable the Earl of Scarborough. 

The Right Honourable Lord Seaforth. 

The Right Honourable the Earl of Shaftefbury. 

Lord Strange. 

Lord George Sackville. 

Lord Seaford. 

Sir John Seabright, Baronet. 

Sir Simon Stuart, Baronet. 

The Honourable Mr. Stuart. 

Mr. Sabatier. 

Mr. De Santhune. * • ■ 

Mr. Sergifon. 

Mr. Seymour. 

Mr. Simmonds. 

Mr. Snell. 

Mr. Spillbury. 

Mr. Steevens. 

Mr. Strode. 

T. T 


d 




SUBSCRIBERS. 


T. 

The Honourable Lord Vifcount Townfend. 
The Right Honourable Lord Trevor. 

The Marquis of Taviftock. 

Lord Thomond. 

Sir Charles Kemys Tynte, Bart. 

The Honourable Mr. Townfhend. 

Mr. Thirkle. 

Mr. Tomlinfon. 

Mr. Thomas Townfhend. 

Captain Tucker. 

Mr. Tuckfield. 

V. 

Mr. Vaughan. 

The Right Honourable the Earl of Warwick. 
The Right Honourable Lord Warkworth. 
Mr. Walcott. 

Mr. Webb. 






■ ■■ --. 



PREFACE. 


TP H E want of more frequent opportunities of feeing and admiring 
the beautiful remains of Antiquity hath been long a fubjed of regret to 
the lovers of the fine arts. The diftribution of thofe valuable relicks 
through the feveral countries of Europe, and the confervation of many 
of them in the private cabinets of the curious, render indeed the diffi¬ 
culties attending the gratification of the publick tafte this way almoft 
infurmountable. 

To obviate thefe difficulties, however, in fome degree, there have 
been occafionally publifhed, in France, Italy, and Holland, various 
drawings and engravings of valuable Antique Gems and Sculptures; but 
the manner in which they have generally been executed, hath been fo 
greatly inferior to that of the original, and fo derogatory from the merit 
of the refpedive artifts, that they appear rather to be defigned as mere 
fketches, calculated for gratifying the curiofity of the antiquarian, than 
as fpecimens of ancient art, intended to delight the eye and improve the 
tafte of a modern fpedator. 

This at leaft is certain, that, if we except the colledion of De Stofch, 
executed by Picart, with one or two other publications, there are hardly 
any engraven deligns of Antique Gems that do not give difguft, inftead 

B of 






( 2 ) 


of pleafure, to the eye even of the mofl fuperficial connoifleur. Thofe 
of Faber, taken from the cabinet of the Urfini, are very indifferent; and 
the numerous colledion of Leonard Auguftin (till worfe; ferving neither 
to give a juft idea of the artift’s defign, nor the merit of his execution. 


There is a more popular curiofity alfo, common to the fcholar and 
the gentleman, independent of the views either of the artifb or the anti¬ 
quarian ; the gratification of which greatly depends on the fimilitude of 
the feveral defigns to the celebrated perfonages they are intended to re- 
prefent, and of whom it is juftly to be prefumed many Antique Gems 
prefent us with a lively and ftriking likenefs : the exquifite and mafterly 
execution of the whole piece, leaving no room to doubt of the artift’s 
ability to take an exad pidure of his fubjed. 

This circumftance, it is true, may feem as little momentous to fome, 
as it appears dubious to others; it being impoflible at prefent to make 
any comparifon between the copy and the original: it will probably afford 
fome pleafure, however, to the claflical and philofophical obferver, to 
compare the features and images as delineated by the painter and fculp- 
tor, with the charaders and perfons, as they are defcribed by the poet 
and hiftorian. 

But while only fuch defedive copies exift of thefe inimitable mafter- 
pieces of ancient art, little fatisfadion can arife from them even to the 
mere antiquarian. In the mean time they can give none, either to the 
connoifleur or the philofopher, and muft appear in general as frivolous 
as ufelefs to the fcholar and the gentleman. 

In regard to the art itfelf, it is related to have flourifhed among the 
Egyptians, long before it was cultivated and brought to that perfedion, 

which 


s 


I 


( 3 ) 

which it afterwards acquired in Greece. A proof of this may be deduced 
from thofe monuments of the former nation which are ftill extant: fuch 
are thofe enormous mafles of done, their obelifks, which are covered 
with hieroglyph icks; their ftatues of porphyry, black marble, gran ate, 
and other hard ftones; monuments, much more ancient than the times 
in which the Greeks firft adopted this art. Nay, the Egyptians pretend, 
according to Pliny, that the art of painting was known among them, 
upwards of five thoufand years before it was conveyed into Greece. It 
is obfervable alfo, that the figure of a beetle, which infeed was among 
the number of the Egyptian divinities, has been found on feveral An¬ 
tiques. Plutarch relates, that it was the cuftom of that nation to engrave 
fuch figures on ftones, to ferve by way of amulet or charm for foldiers 
going to war, who ufed to wear them on their arms, as marks both of 
valour and diftindion. The Egyptian method of defigning, indeed, 
was for fome time adhered to by the Greeks, who, in like manner, en¬ 
graved on ftones, the figures of their deities, fome of them totally un¬ 
known to the former nation. At the fame time the artifts of the latter 
fometimes whimfically engraved the figures of Egyptian divinities on 
one fide of their ftones, on which they engraved thofe of their own heroes 
on the reverfe. 

The art of defign, however, foon received amazing improvement in 
Greece; and meeting with all that encouragement which is neceflary to 
the flourilhing ftate of the polite arts, arrived at a degree of perfedion 
unknown to former or fucceeding times. 

With refpecd to the Art of Engraving on Gems, in particular, there 
are indubitably divers antique agates, cornelians and onyces, that excel 
any thing of the kind that hath been produced by the moderns. The 
moft famous artift we read of in this way among the Greeks, was Pyrgo- 

teles, 


( 4 ) 

teles, who alone was permitted to engrave the head of Alexander on 
Gems, in the fame manner as Apelles was exclulively privileged to draw 
his pi£ture, and Lyfippus to carve his ftatue. 

This art was cultivated alfo with no little fuccefs among the Romans; 
Diofcorides, under the firft emperors, being reported to have engraven 
the head of Auguftus in fo mafterly and beautiful a manner, that the 
fucceeding emperors preferred it to the honour of being the imperial 
lignet. 

Engraven Gems, indeed, were early applied by the Greeks to the 
fubfequent purpofes of ufe and ornament; to which end they were either 
worked hollow, or raifed in relief, and worn in rings or bracelets as m 
modern times. 

Hence, the harder and more beautiful the {tone, the more valuable 
the gem; as it was lefs liable to be defaced by accident, and might be 
fafely exhibited by frequent wear, the pofleffors piquing themfelves no 
lefs on the publick admiration of them, than the artifts themfelves. The 
emperor Heliogabalus was indeed ridiculed by Lampridius, for wearing 
them on his flioes and {lockings, as if, fays the fatirift, the works of the 
moft celebrated engravers could be admired in feal-rings worn upon 
the toes. 

At prefent, the brilliance of the naked Hone hath eclipfed the beauties 
which ancient art bellowed on it; or rather, the latter is juftly thought 
too great a curiofity to be exhibited, where the luftre of a limple diamond 
hath a much greater effedl on the beholder. 


With 


( 5 ) 

With regard to the defigns engraved or fculptured upon antique gems, 
they ufually reprefented the figures of gods and heroes, or the heads of 
philofophers. Thefe defigns, however, notwithftanding many of them 
were executed with the greateft Ikill and accuracy, were not all origi¬ 
nals: on the contrary, moft of them were copies of the works of the 
moft excellent ftatuaries. Thus the famous Saurodtonon mentioned by 
Pliny, and again by Martial, as having been executed by Praxiteles, 
was copied on an emerald. The famous ftatues alfo of Meleager, Lao- 
coon, Venus de Medicis, and others, have been copied on various 
ftones, and that undoubtedly by the hands of ancient artifts. 

Not that all fuch copies are to be depended on, as the work of the 
Ancients; and it may poffibly requ : e much greater Ikill, than moft con- 
noififeurs are pofiefled of, to make die diftin&ion. To thofe, however, 
who do not admire thofe monuments of art merely for the fake of their 
antiquity, certain it is that a modern copy, executed with that afto- 
nifhing accuracy and beauty which charafterife fome of the real antiques, 
would be as great, if not as valuable, a curiofity as any of thofe which 
are genuine. 

It hath been falfely imagined by fome, that fuch works of antiquity 
as bear the artift’s name or device, carry with them greater authenticity 
than others; and this feems to have influenced the celebrated De Stofch, 
to feledt only fuch in his own publication. But we may learn from fome 
paflfages in hiftory, that however vain the ancients were of their per¬ 
formances, and however fond of fetting their names * to their works, 

they 

* A remarkable inftance of this is related by Lucian of Softrates, who having built the 
famous light-houfe in the ifle of Pharos, was refufed by king Ptolemy the fatisfacuon of 
fetting his name to the work. This, however., the artift effected, by cutting an infcrip- 

tion 


( 6 ) 

they were fometimes induced to afcribe them to other perfons; fo that, 
though the name might authenticate its antiquity, it might not ferve to 
identify the artift. At lead, fuch a fad is related of Phidias, who is faid, 
in order to oblige Agoracrites his pupil, to have fet his name to feveral 
of his own performances. 

This circumdance, it mud be confefled, is lingular, and argues a 
very extraordinary partiality in the mailer for his fcholar; but admitting 
it to be the only in dance of the kind, certain it is, that there is a greater 
facility in merely copying an artid’s name or device, than his work; nor 
can it be fuppofed, that any perfon who fhould attempt the one, fhould 
fcruple to effed the other. 

Nothing, therefore, but an application to the lludy of the manners, 
and an intimate acquaintance with the works of the ancients, can qualify 
the connoiffeur to determine with any degree of certainty of thefe valu¬ 
able remains, about many of which the bed judges mud dill entertain 
a doubt. 

-s i 

As to the fubdances on which the ancients exercifed this curious art, 
the Greeks employed did: the agate, the fardonyx, and the red cornelian. 
In proportion as luxury increafed, and the artids by fuccefs grew bolder, 
they made ufe of the amethyd, beryl, and other precious dones, not 
excepting even the emerald. After the invention of glafs, alfo, by the 
Phoenicians, the ancients made ufe of factitious dones; fuch was the 


tion on a block of marble, encrufted over with a factitious ftone, on which was engraven 
another pompous one, in honour of the reigning prince; the external cruft decaying in 
a few years, and leaving the infcription in honour of the artift fair and indelible. 


vitrum 


( 7 ) 

vitrum obfidianum of Pliny, called by the modem Italians the antique 
pafte ; and which the ancients manufadtured of various colours. 

All the polite arts falling with the ruins of the Roman empire, that of 
Engraving on Stones fhared the common fate of the reft ; lying buried 
in oblivion till the beginning of the fifteenth century, when it began to 
revive in Italy, and was profecuted with great affiduity and fuccefs; the 
diamond itfelf not only fubmitting to incifion, but a great improvement 
and variety being introduced into the feveral materials of cryftalline and 
other paftes, the more fufceptible of incifion, as incapable of duration. 

But however fuccefsful the moderns have been in improving the me¬ 
chanical part of this art, they have hitherto fallen greatly fhort of the 
beauty of ancient defign; as, it is prefumed, may be fufficiently gathered 
from the following colledtion of drawings accurately delineated from the 
fculptures themfelves, or impreffions taken from fuch as could not be 
obtained. 

It was defigned to have given with this colledtion a particular account 
of the nature and workmanlhip of each gem ; but the death of Mr. Wor- 
lidge, and the indifpenfible avocations of the gentleman who intended to 
furnifh materials for fuch accounts, have created the neceffity of annexing 
only a popular explanation of the feveral fubjedts: which, though not 
fo fatisfadtory as could be wilhed to the artift and antiquary, it is hoped 
will give amufement and fatisfadlion to many of thofe who have honoured 
this work by their fubfcription and encouragement. 

The reader will fee the fize of the gem, with the name of its fub- 
jedt, and alfo that of the colledtion in which it is preferved, 
engraved on the refpedtive plates. 


CATALOGUE 


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C A T A L 


O 


G U E 


O F 

% 

DRAWINGS 

FROM 

ANTI U E GEMS. 


N° i. THE DOG-STAR. 

•• - ' ' V 

TPH E Dog-ftar, Sirius, otherwife named Ltelaps, is fabled by Ovid 
to have been placed among the ftars. He was given by Procris, daugh¬ 
ter of Hyphilus, king of Athens, to Cephalus, her hufband, in order to 
go hunting with ; a gift that in the end proved inftrumentally fatal to 
herfelf: for having, in a fit of jealoufy, followed Cephalus into the 
woods, and hid herfelf in a thicket, her lurking place was difcovered by 
this fagacious hound ; when her hufband, miftaking her for a wild beaft, 
threw a javelin at her, and killed her on the fpot. 

C 


N°2. 






( 10 ) 


N° 2. A YOUNG HERCULES. 

Hercules, according to the poets, was the fon of Jupiter and Alcmena, 
the wife of Amphytrion, a nobleman of Thebes. It feems there were 
many perfonages who bore this name ; but as Hercules was pointed out 
by the Ancients as their great model of virtue, it is probable many of 
thofe perfonages were fymbolical, and not hiftorical. But, however this 
be, the Egyptians laid claim to the birth of the firft Hercules, pretend¬ 
ing that the reft were fo called, becaufe of their refembling him in mag¬ 
nanimity and virtue. It is not improbable that Antiquity gave this 
name to as many perfons as they reckoned diftinft labours, which, though 
effected by different men, were imputed to the moft ancient Hercules. 


N° 3. AN OLD HERCULES. 
See N° 2. 


N° 4. HERCULES BINDING CERBERUS*. 


Cerberus was a dog, which, according to the poets, was door-keeper 
of Pluto’s palace in Hell. Hefiod reprefents him as having fifty heads, 
and Horace as having an hundred. He is generally reprefented, how¬ 
ever, as having three heads and three necks. Hercules is reported 
to have bound, and dragged him from the regions of darknefs to light. 
See N° 2. 


* Diofcoridis opus. 


N° 5. 


( II ) 


N» s- MEDUSA’S HEAD*. 

Medufa is fabled to have been a beautiful Nymph, with golden hair, 
who was deflowered by Neptune in the temple of Minerva : for which 
crime that goddefs converted her hair into fnakes, and all thofe who 
looked on her into ftone. Perfeus is faid to Jiave furprifed her fnakes 
afleep, and cut off her head. 

N° 6. A LION’S HEAD. 

N° 7. PLATO. 

Plato was a philofopher at Athens, and held to be the moft learned 
and eloquent of his countrymen. He was bred the fcholar of Socrates, 
and became the chief of the Academics. He ftudied afterwards under 
Pythagoras in Italy, and travelled into Egypt, where it is thought he 
read the books of Mofes. He was the mafter of Ariflotle, whom he 
ufed to call a mule, for fetting up a fchool againft him. It is related of 
him, that a fwarm of bees fixed on his mouth while he was in the cradle, 
as a prefage of the fweetnefs of his elocution. He lived to a great age, 
and was the founder of a numerous fedt. 

N° 8 . A BACCHANT. 

One of the female votaries of Bacchus. 

* Solonis opus. 

C 2 N® 9. 


( *2 ) 


N° 9. A YOUNG HERCULES*. 

See N° 2. 


10. HERCULES STRANGLING A LION. 

This defign is not intended to reprefent Hercules’s engagement with 
the Cleonaan lion, the fird of his twelve labours : for in that he is repre- 
fented killing the bead by tearing his jaws afunder, agreeable to the 
manner in which Silius relates this action to have been reprefented on 
the folding doors of Hercules’s temple at Gades in Spain; whereas in 
this figure he appears to be firangling him, being all the while expofed 
to his fangs and claws. It is, therefore, mod likely defcriptive of one of 
his youthful exploits; probably his killing an enormous lion in a valley 
near his native city, Thebes, one of his earlied adventures. 

N° 11. A FAUN. 

The Fauns were accounted by the Ancients the gods of the fields and 
groves, as alfo the tutelar deities of the fowlers. 


N° 12. PSYCHE. 

A nymph, the peculiar favourite of Cupid. 


* Onefae opus. 


N° 13. 


( *3 ) 


N° 13. NARCISSUS. 

A handfome youth, who, flighting the courtlhip of Echo and other 
amorous nymphs, fell in love at laft with himfelf, on feeing his own 
face in a fountain. He is reprefented in this defign in the attitude of 
looking into the water poured into a bafon. He is fabled to have pined 
away, and to have been changed into a flower of the fame name. 

N° 14. A BOAR. 


N* 15. A MASK. 

> 

• ^ ' 4 # V. f 4 

N° 16. SOPHONISBA. 

A Queen of Afric, of whom the hiftorians and poets relate many 
adventures, though none applicable to the prefent defign, except it be 
that of her drinking poifon, as reprefented by dramatic writers. 


N° 17. LEANDER. 

A youth of Abydos, on the Afiatic fide of the Hellefpont, oppofitc 
to Seftos, where his miftrefs. Hero, lived, and in his vifits to whom, 
fwimming acrofs the fea, he at length was drowned : in confequence of 
which the lady threw herfelf oft' an high tower into the fea after him. 


N° 18. 






( 14 ) 

N° 18. SILENUS AND A GOAT. 

Silenus was the fofter-father and fchoolmafter of Bacchus; a drunken, 
deformed, old fellow, though accounted, notwithftanding, the god of 
abftrufe knowledge and profound myfteries. This figure, however, 
notwithftanding it is called Silenus, appears, by the concomitant goat’s 
head, to be rather one of the Sileni, or Satyrs, mentioned by Ovid. 


N? 19. A LION. 


N° 20. MERCURY. 

The god of trade; alfo of mufic, wreftling, dancing, fencing, and 
ceremony. He was likewife accounted the god of thieves, for his dex¬ 
terity. He was alfo the guide to travellers, and the herald and mefien- 
ger of the gods. He was farther made conductor or difpofer of the 
dead : and, in Ihort, had fo many profefiions, and fo much bufinefs on 
his hands, both above and below, that Lucian reprefents him as com¬ 
plaining that he hath no reft day nor night. 


N° 21. LI VI A. 

The wife of Auguftus Caefar, the fecond emperor of Rome. 


N Q 22. 


( i5 ) 


\ 


N° 22. AMPHITRITE. 

Amphitrite was the daughter of Nereus, or Oceanus, by the nymph 
Doris. Being very beautiful, Neptune is fabled to have been enamoured 
of her; but fhe, being defirous of continuing {till a maid, fled from 
him, and fecreted herfelf on mount Atlas; whither Neptune fent a dol¬ 
phin to look for her: by the powers of whofe perfuafion fhe was in¬ 
fluenced to yield up herfelf in marriage to the god of the fea. 


N° 23. IOLE. 

Iole was the daughter of Eurytus, king of Ochalia. Hercules falling 
in love with her, fhe tyrannically put him to all the fervile and menial 
offices of the houfehold ; all which that tremendous hero very tra&ably 
performed. At length, however, he killed her father, and gave her in 
marriage to his fon Hyllus. 

* , 

N° 24. A BACCHANT. 

A votarift of Bacchus. 


N° 25. FAUSTINA. 

A Roman lady. 

N 9 26. 


( >6 ) 


N° 26. A MASK. 

A double mafk, reprefenting in profile the heads of Socrates and his 
wife Xantippe. 

N° 27. PLATO AND SOCRATES. 

For Plato fee N° 7.-Socrates was an Athenian philofopher, and in 

the judgement of the oracle at Delphos the wifeft man living. He was 
of low birth, being the fon of one Sophronifcus, a man of mean fortune, 
and Panarete a midwife. He has been called the fountain and prince of 
philofophers, having been the mafter of Xenophon and Plato, who have 
given us an account of him, for he left nothing behind him in writing. 
He taught his fcholars gratis, and chiefly applied himfelf to ethics, as 
the moll ufeful branch of philofophy. In his old age he was turned into 
ridicule by Ariftophanes, and accufed by Anytus, Melitus, and Lycon, 
his enemies, of defpifing the gods, and endeavouring to introduce a new 
religion, becaufe he faid he had a genius whom he confulted in all his 
affairs. He was upon this accufation condemned to death, which he fuf- 
fered moft heroically, by drinking a cold poifon prepared for that pur- 
pofe; during the operation of which he delivered precepts of virtue to 
the byftanders, even to the laft moment. 

N° 28. A FAUN. 

See N° 11. 

I 


N° 29. 



C 1 7 ) 


NS 29. MARC ANTONY. 

The colleague of OCtavius and Lepidus in the Roman triumvirate : he 
was the principal fomenter of the civil war; for, during his tribunate* 
he privately left the city of Rome, and Retired to Csefar in Gaul. He 
next invaded the province of Brutus, but was beaten by the two confuls 
Hirtius and Panfa. On his entering into a league with OCtavius and 
Lepidus, after the death of Julius Csefar, he vanquifhed the forces of 
Brutus and Caflius at Philippi in Macedonia. He divorced his wife 
Fulvia, in order to marry OCtavia, the filler of OCtavius. Her he neg¬ 
lected alfo, for the fake of Cleopatra, queen of Egypt; which OCtavius 
refenting, made war upon him, and defeated him in a fea-fight at Ac- 
tium; whence he forced him to fly to Alexandria, where, being befieged, 
he fell into defpair, and killed himfelf with his own fword. 

- 1 

N° 30. VIRGIL*'. 

The moll celebrated of the Roman poets. In his youth he ftudied in 
various places, particulary at Mantua, Cremona, Naples, and Rome; 
to which laft place he was driven by the forfeiture of his lands, which 
were confifcated, on account of the Mantuans having taken part in the 
civil wars. They were rellored to him, however, by means of the interell 
of Pollio and Mecamas, his friends at court. It is faid that Pollio urged 
him to write his Eclogues, Macaenas his Georgies*' and Augullus himfelf 
his ^£neis. The laft work he did not live long enough to correft, and 
therefore ordered it to be burned: but Augullus, after his death, com¬ 
manded it to be corrected by Varius and Tucca, who were at the fame 


* Diofcoridis opus. 

D 


time 


( i8 ) 

time particularly charged not to add a fyllable. He was born at Mantua, 
on the fifteenth of O&ober, in the confulate of Pompey and CrafTus, and 
died at Brundufium the twenty-third of Auguft, at the age of fifty-two. 

9 

N° 31. HERCULES AND IOLE* 

See N° 2 and 23. 


N° 32. LYSIMACHUSf. 

Lyfimachus was the fon of Agathocles, the preceptor and treafurer of 
Alexander the Great, whofe refentment he excited on the following oc- 
cafion :—Callidhenes, the philofopher, having oppofed the inclination of 
the people to worfhip that prince, he was thrown into prifon, where 
Lyfimachus, being fond of knowledge, daily attended him; and at 
length was prevailed on, by his earned entreaties, to bring him a cup of 
poifon to put him out of his pain. This action fo incenfed Alexander, 
that he ordered Lyfimachus to be devoured by a lion : but, being a man 
of invincible courage, he wrapt the fkirt of his garment round his arm, 
and when the furious bead came roaring to dedroy him, he thrud his arm 
down its throat, and pulled out its heart. For this heroic adtion he was 
immediately taken into favour by the king, and was, after Alexander’s 
death, one of the captains who divided his dominions among themfelves. 
It was the lot of Lyfimachus to become king of Thrace; in the defence 
of which he was afterwards flain in battle by Seleucus, another of Alex¬ 
ander’s captains, who had feized on Syria. 


* Teucri opus. 

+ Pyrgotelis opus. 


N° 33- 


( >9 ) 


» 


N° 33. NERO. 

A Roman emperor, furnamed Claudius. He was moft infamous for 
luft, cruelty, rapine, facrilege, and ingratitude. He murdered his own 
mother, and by that means acquired the empire. He murdered alfo his 
brothers and relations; his wives O&avia and Poppaea, his preceptor 
Seneca, and his favourite poet Lucan. He fet fire to Rome, and then 
charged the fad on the Chriftians; for which he tortured and killed 
them publicly on the ftage in the day-time, and, ordering them to be 
wrapped up in coats befmeared with pitch, lighted up their bodies for 
torches in the night.— His foldiers, at length, revolting, chofe Galba for 
their emperor; on the hearing of which, Nero wanted fomebody to dif- 
patch him out of the way; but none could be found to do him that fa¬ 
vour, and he wanted courage to do it himfelf. He fled therefore to a 
cave, where he was afterwards found dead, but by what means he made 
his exit is not related. 


N° 34. A YOUNG HERCULES*. 

See N° 7. 

N° 35. ARISTOPHANES. 

A Grecian comic poet, born at Lindus, a town of Rhodes. He was 
the prince of the old comedy, as Menander was of the new; a perfect 
mafter of all the copioufnefs, acutenefs, and graces of attic eloquence. 
He wrote thirty-four comedies, eleven of which only remain : in one of 

them. 


* Cneii opus. 

D 2 


( 20 ) 

them, entitled the Clouds, he hath endeavoured to turn Socrates into 
ridicule, as a corrupter of youth. He was a profeffed enemy to that 
great man, and is fuppofed by his buffoonery to have contributed not a 
little to his fatal end. 


N° 36. JULIUS CAESAR*. 

The firft of the Roman emperors; a great orator in the fenate, and 
commander in the field. He was alfo the hiflorian of his own a&ions ; 
his Commentaries containing an-account of his foreign expeditions, as 
alfo of the civil wars, in which he fubdued Pompey at Pharfalia, and 
routed the remainder of his forces in Afric and Spain. Being thought to 
govern too abfolutely, even fome of his belt friends turned againfl him, 
and, with other affaffins, ftabbed him in the fenate houfe. 

N° 37. APOLLO AND DIOMED. 

Diomed was one of the Grecian warriors at the fiege of Troy. Apollo 
is here reprefented as flepping in between him and AEneas, who, being 
worfted in the fight, retired into the gate of Troy. 

N° 38. SAPPHO. 

A celebrated Greek poetefs of Lefbos. She is faid to have been ena¬ 
moured with Phaon, and to have leaped off the Leucadian rock, in 
order to get rid of her pafiion. 


* Diofcoridis opus. 


No 39. 


( 21 ) 


N° 39. NEPTUNE. 

The god of the fea, and father of rivers and fountains. He is 
defcribed by the poets as bearing a trident for a fcepter, riding in a 
chariot drawn by fea-horfes. 


N° 40. JUPITER. 

The fupreme deity among the heathens. 


N° 41. MARC ANTONY CROWNED BY CLEOPATRA. 

See N° 29. 

N° 42. A BULL*. 

i ■ '• 

N° 43. MEDUSA-}*. 

See N° 5. 

* Taurus Dionyfiacus Hylli opui, 

+ Sofoclis opus. 


N® 44. 


( 22 ) 


N° 44. SABINUS. 

Flavius Sabinus was the brother of Vefpafian; and was llain by 

,1 ■ • ■ -• ■ 1 

Vitellius. 

N° 45. MINERVA. 

The goddefs of wifdom and the liberal arts. She is fabled to have 
fprung from the brain of Jupiter; and, under the name of Pallas, 
prefideth over arms and the events of war. 


N Q 46. JULIUS CAESAR. 
See N° 36. 


N° 47. HERCULES. 
See N° 7. 


N° 48. SEMIRAM IS. 

The wife of Ninus, king of Affyria. After the death of her.hulband, 
fhe put on man’s apparel, and perfonated her own fon : in which difguife, 
having done many wonderful exploits, (lie difcovered herfelf, and Was 
held in admiration by her people. She conquered ^Ethiopia, and pene¬ 
trated 


/ 


( 2 3 ) 

trated into India; but, entertaining an inceftuous paffion for her own 
fon, fhe was fiain by him after reigning forty-two years. 

N° 49. S C I P I O. 

There were feveral men of rank and eminence of this name in Rome : 
particularly Africanus Major, who conquered Hannibal; and Scipio 
iEmilianus or Africanus Minor, who fubdued Numantia, and deftroyed 
Carthage. There was alfo a Scipio Nafica, a very popular man, and 
adjudged by the Roman fenate to be the bed man in Rome. This is 
probably the head of the latter. 

• ' 1 • . ’ * * r . . , 

N° 50. APOLLO. 

* 

The god of phyfic, mufic, divination, and poetry. In heaven he is 
called Sol, on earth Bacchus, and below Apollo. He is alfo called 
Phoebus. 


N° 51. GANYMEDE. 

The fon of Tros, king of Troy. The poets fable that Jupiter, in the 
form of an eagle, carried him up to heaven, and made him his cup¬ 
bearer. This fable is evidently pointed at by the figure. 


52. 


( 24 ) 


N° 52. THE ZODIAC AND QUADRIGA. 

The twelve figns of the zodiac round the conftellation of quadriga. 
The quadriga was frequently put on the reverfe of medals, ftruck by the 
Romans on occalion of their victories. Here it is the goddefs Victory 
herfelf, who hovers over the car. Sometimes the conqueror was placed 
in it. 


N° 53. jESCULAPIUS. 

The fon of Apollo, fabled to be fo Ikilful in phyfic, that he raifed 
people from the dead: on which account Pluto is faid to have com¬ 
plained of him to Jupiter, who thereupon ftruck him with a thunderbolt. 

No 54. SOCRATES*. 

See N° 27. 

No 55. ANTINOUS. 

A favourite of the emperor Hadrian, whom the Greeks, in order to 
pleafe that prince, confecrated, and ftruck medals in his honour. 


* Agathemeri opus. 


N° 56. 


C 25 ) 


N° 56. SAPPHO. 
See N° 38. 


N° 57. MERCURY. 

The god of mufic, wreftling, dancing, fencing, good breeding, tra¬ 
ding, thieving, and many other arts. Indeed he is faid to have fo much 
bufinefs on his hands above and below, that he is without reft day or 
night. His more particular office, however, is that of herald or mef- 
fenger to the gods. 


N° 58. CICERO. 

Marcus Tullius Cicero was the moft celebrated of all the Roman orators. 
His talents railing him early to the office of conful, he was the firft who 
was honoured with the title of Father of his country : he was a zealous 
defender of the public liberty, and the beft advocate for private property. 
—During the time of Catiline’s confpiracy, he was banifhed the city by 
Claudius the Tribune : he was foon after honourably reftored. In the 
civil wars he lided with Pompey, and was put to death by order of Marc 
Antony, in the fixty-third year of his age. 


E 


N° 59- 


( 26 ) 



N° 59. AN INFANT HERCULES. 

Hercules is here reprefented as ftrangling two ferpents which attacked 
him when he was in his cradle. 


N° 60. MINERVA. 

% _ f 

See N° 45. 

N° 61. A MASK OF SILENUS. 

See N° 18. 

N° 62. A LION. 

.■K , 

N° 63. JULIA. 

There were feveral Roman emprefies and ladies of rank fo called; 
the moft remarkable were the daughter and grand-daughter of Auguftus, 
both women of ill, diffolute character. 


N° 64. NEPTUNE. 
See N° 39. 


N» 65. 


( 2 7 ) 


N» 65. MESSALINA. 

The daughter of Meffala and wife of Claudius Ceefar : a moft aban¬ 
doned proftitute, put to death, by order of her hulband, for marrying 
Silius her gallant. 


N° 66. A PHILOSOPHER. 

N° 67. MEDUSA. 

See N° 5. 

I 

N° 68. CUPID AND A BOAR. 

\ 

See N° 176. 

N° 69. HERCULES, 

See N° 2. 

N° 70. A SOW. 


E 2 


/ 


71 


( *3 ) 


N° 71. DEA DELLA SALUTE. 

The goddefs of health. 

N° 72. APOLLO. 

See N° 50. 

N° 73. CAIUS MARIUS. 

A Roman of mean birth and extraction, but raifed by his valour to the 
higheft offices of the date. He overcame Jugertha in Numidia, the 
Cimbri in Gaul, and the Germans in Italy; but quarrelling afterwards 
with Sylla, who took part with the nobles againft the plebeians, the 
greateft outrages were committed by both parties. Being at length over¬ 
come, however, Caius was compelled to fkulk in the marfhes of Min- 
turnte, where he was at length difcovered and imprifoned. In this fitua- 
tion a common foldier was fent to kill him ; but the fellow was fo terrified 
by his ftern looks and fpeech, that he durft not attempt it: fo that he 
efcaped from prifon and went into Africa, where he lived in banifhment 
till recalled by Cinna ; when he was made conful the feventh time, and 
died in his confulfhip at the age of fixty-eight years. 


N° 74. MEDUSA. 
See N° 5. 


N° 75- 


( 2 9 ) 


N° 75. CLEOPATRA. 

A queen of Egypt, filler and wife to the laft Ptolemy. She had an 
amour with Julius CaTar, and afterwards with Marc Antony, who di¬ 
vorced his wife Odtavia, filler to Augullus, on her account. This fo 
irritated Augullus, that he declared war againll him, and overcame him 
in a fea-fight at Adlium. On this, Antony defpairing, killed himfelf, 
and Cleopatra fled to Alexandria; whither being porfued, and finding 
there was ho hope of meeting with any favour at the hands of Augullus, 
flie put two afps to her breads, and expired on the tomb of Antony. 

N° 76. HERCULES BIBAX*. 

Hercules drinking. See N° 2. 

N° 77. SILENUS. 

See N° 18. 

N° 78. DIOMED. 

See N° 37. 

N° 79. AN URN. 


* Adononis opus. 


N° 80.. 


( 30 ) 

N° 80. JUPITER. 

See N° 40. 

N° 81. A HORSE, 

✓ 

N° 82. LEPIDUS, 

There were feveral Romans of this name.—The moft celebrated is he 
who joined with Marc Antony and Octavius C$far, to conftitute that ad- 
miniftration of government which was thence called the triumvirate. 


N° 83. A BACCHANAL. 
See N° 24. 


N° 84. AGRIPPINA. 


The daughter of Germanicus, mother of Nero, and filter to Caligula, 
firlt married to Domitius, and afterwards to Claudius, whom Ihe poifoned, 
that Hie might make her fon Nero emperor. 



/ 


( 3 1 ) 


N® 85. PHILIP OF MACEDON*. 

The king of Macedon, and father to Alexander the Great. 

N° 86. MERCURY. 

See N° 20. 

N° 87. ALEXANDERS 

Surnamed the Great; a prince of moft extraordinary fpirit; educated 
under Callifthenes and Ariftotle : fond of learning and learned men, but 
more of military glory. He began his enterprifes in the twentieth year of 
his age, and in about twelve years conquered Greece, Perfia, and almoft 
all the Eaft, comprehending the great eft part of the then known world. 

N° 88. TIBERIUS. 

The third emperor of Rome. A diffolute and cruel tyrant. 

N° 89. MARCUS BRUTUS. 

An acute Roman orator, and good civilian; an intimate friend to 
Cicero, and author of three books on jurifprudence. 

* Pyrgotelis opus. 

t Pyrgotelis opus. 


N° 90. 


( 3 2 ) 


N° 90. PTOLEMY. 

The general name of the Egyptian kings, after the time of Alexander 
the Great. The molt confiderable among them was Ptolemy Philadel¬ 
phia, a man of great learning, who furnifhed the great library at Alex¬ 
andria with feven hundred thoufand volumes, and, at the inftance of 
Demetrius, caufed the Old Teftament to be tranflated into Greek. 


N° 91. j‘U PITER AMMON. 

Jupiter was worfhipped at his temple in the deferts of Lybia under the 
form of a ram; the horns of which animal is affixed to the head in the 
figure. 

N° 92. VACCA. 

A Cow. 

N° 93. PTOLEMY. 

See N° 90. 

N° 94. LUC ILL A. 


95 . 


( 33 ) 


N° 95. CARACALLA. 

M. Aurelius Antoninus, who was fo called on account of a Gaulifh 
garment he ufed to wear in war. He was declared CaTar, and made 
partner in the empire with Geta, his brother by the father’s fide, whom 
he afterwards killed that he might have no competitor to the throne. He 
beheaded alfo the great lawyer Papinian, becaufe he refufed to excufe or 
juftify the murder of his brother. He was a dififolute prince, much 
addifted to wine and women, and was killed by one of his own centu¬ 
rions in the forty-third year of his age. 


N° 96. IOLE. 

See N° 23. 

N° 97. PLUTO. 

The king of Hell, according to the poets. 

* 

N° 98. HANNIBAL. 

A politic and valiant general of Carthage, who carried on a war againft 
the Romans for fixteen years together; during which time he won many 
battles : but, being at laft defeated, and reduced to great extremities, he 
took a dofe of poifon, which it is faid he kept in a ring for that purpofe. 

F N Q 99, 


( 34 ) 


N° 99- METRODORUS. 

An Athenian philofopher, fcholar to Carneades, or perhaps Metro.* 
aorus Melicus, inventor of an art of memory. 

/ 

N° ioo. SAPPHO. 

See N° 38. 

1 

N° 101 • BACCHUS. 

The inventor, and therefore called the God of Wine, 

N° 102. JUPITER. 

' V 

K 

See N° 91. 

N° 103. A FAUN’S HEAD, 

See N° 11, , 

PI A. 


-N<> 104. JULIA 
See N° 63. 


N° 105. 


( 35 ) 


N° 105. SCIPIO AFRICANUS. 
Africanus Major. See N° 49. 


N° 106. A PHILOSOPHER. 

Suppofed to be Carneades. 

N Q 107. SABINA.. 

/ 1 ' 

The daughter of Poppteus Sabinus, a noble Roman of confular dignity.- 

• % \ 

N° 108. A SATYR. 

A fiditious being, whofe upper part refembles a man, except that it 
has horns on its head. Its lower part refembles the form of a goat. 
The fatyrs are feigned to be inhabitants of the woods, and are the con- 
Rant attendants on Bacchus and the nymphs. 


N° 109. HOMER. 

An ancient Greek poet, fo famous that feven of the greateft cities of 
Greece contended for the honour of being his birth-place, which is molt 
generally aferibed to Smyrna. The poets called him frequently Masonides, 

Fi 




as 


( 36 ) 

as being the fon of Mseon. His Iliad and Odyffey have been translated 
into all the modem languages, and are univerfally known. 


N® no: A BACCHANAL. 
See N° 24. 


in. HERCULES. 

See N Q 2. 

■ * 

N° 112. EPICURUS. 

A philofopher of Athens; the fcholar of Xenocrates and Ariflotle. A 
man very different from his followers, who, by miftaking his dodrines, 
fell into thofe exceffes which difgraced his fed; he himfelf being remark¬ 
ably temperate, and placing his fummum bonum in the tranquillity of the 
. mind. 


N° 113. VITELLIUS. 

\ ^ . 

The ninth Roman emperor, a mifer and glutton. His army deferting 
him in favour of Vefpafian, he was put to death in the moft ignominious 
maimer, in the fifty-feventh year of his age; both his brother and fon 
perifhing with him,. 


N° 114. 


( 37 ) 


N° 114. A MASK. 

N 5 1x5. DIOMED AND ULYSSES*. 

Diomed was king of AEtolia, and one of the Grecian worthies in the 
Trojan war. Ulylies was king of the iflands of Ithaca and Dulichium. 
He was efteemed the moft eloquent and politic commander of all the 
Greeks who went to the liege of Troy : to which, however, he was fo 
much averfe, that he feigned madnefs to be excufed from going; prefa- 
ging the hardlhips he Ihould undergo. 

N° 116. A FAUN. 

See N° 11. 

\ 

N° 117. A CHIMERA. 

N° 118. JUPITER AMMON. 

See N° 91. 

N° 119. JUPITER AND ISIS. 

Ifis, or Io, a goddefs, who is faid to have changed Iphis, the daughter 
of Telethufa, into a man, that fhe might prove a hulband to Ianthe. 

* Felicis Calpurnii Severi opus. 


N° 120. 


( 38 ) 


N° 120. CENTAURS. 

The Centaurs were a people of Theflaly, near mount Pelion, who firft: 
broke horfes for war : hence, being feen on horfeback at a diftance, they 
were fuppofed to be creatures that had the upper part of their bodies like 
the human fpecies, and the lower part like that of a horfe. 

N° 121. A GRIP PA. 

The fon-in-law of Auguftus Czefar ; the firft of the Romans that was 
honoured with a naval garland, which he received of that emperor for 
his naval vidory over Sextus Pompeius. There are feveral medals of 
this Agrippa to be met with in the cabinets of the curious. 

N° i22. OMPHALE. 

A queen of Lydia, with whom Hercules being in love, he became 
her Have; changing with her his club and lion’s Ikin for a fpindle and 
diftaff, and fullering pidures and ftatues of himfelf in that fituation, 

N° 1*3. A LION. 


N° 124. JUPITER SERAPHI. 

1 

See N° 40. 


N° 125. 


( 39 ) 


N® 125. MERCURY. 
See N° 20. 

N° 126. I OLE. 

See N° 23. 


N° 127. GERMANICUS. 

< _ __ 

The Ton of Nero Drufus, a youth of great courage and courtefy; 
being univerfally beloved, and therefore defigned by Auguftus for his 
fucceffor. He was adopted by Tiberius; but was fufpe&ed to be poi- 
foned at about thirty years of age. 


N® 128. HERCULES. 

See N° 2, 


N° 129. HORACE. 

/ . . 

« 

The prince of Roman lyric poetry, born at Venufium, a town of 
Apulia, in mean circumstances. He went thence to Rome, where he 
lirft learned to read, but afterwards ftudied philofophy at Athens; at¬ 
taching himfelf, however, to no particlar fed;. Getting acquainted 

with 


\ 


( 4 ° ) 

V 

with Mecamas, he was recommended to Auguftus Ctefar, with whom he 
was in great favour. 

N° 130. ANTIOCHUS. 

A king of Syria, furnamed the Hawk; and alfo called Antiochus the-* 
Great. 

N° 131. POMPEY. 

A valiant commander of the Romans, who gained many victories; 
but was at laft overcome by Crefar, and Plain in his flight in Egypt. 
There were feveral other Romans of rank fo called ; but this was diftin- 
guifhed by the title of Pompey the Great. 


N° 132. VICTORY. 

Viftoria, the goddefs of Vidtory ; in whofe honour the Romans ftruck- 
abundance of medals. 

N° 133. A GIRL. 


N° 134. AUGUSTUS AND LIVIA*. 

The fecond emperor of Rome, nephew to Julius Casfar by his fifter.. 
A prince fo beloved by the Romans, that all the fucceeding emperors, 
for the fake of good luck, affumed his name. See N° 21. 


< • 
v 


* Diofeoridis opus. 


N° 135. 


( 41 ) 


N° 135. SILENUS. 

The fofter-father of Bacchus. He is ufually reprefented as a little, 
flat-nofed, bald, fat, tun-bellied, drunken, old fellow, riding on an afs. 
Notwithftanding his external deformity, however, he is accounted the 
god of abftrufe myfteries and profound fcience. See N° 18. 

N° 136. THE APOTHEOSIS OF FAUSTINA. 

The deification of Fauftina; a cuftom begun among the Romans in 
the time of Auguftus. 

N° 137. P O P E A. 

A Roman lady, the wife of Rufius Crifpus, but introduced to Nero 
by the recommendation of Otho. 


N° 138. PTOLEMY. 

See N° 90. 

N° 139. HELIOGABULUS AND JULIA PAULE. 

1 

Heliogabulus was a Roman emperor, remarkable for his high and 
luxurious living. Julia Paule, a Roman lady, his miftrefs. 

N° 140. A WOMAN'S HEAD. 


G 


N° 14T. 


( 42 ) 


N° 141. HERCULES WITH A BULL*. 

This figure is fuppofed by Tome rather to reprefent Milo, who at the 
Olympic games would carry an ox a furlong without breathing. 

N° 142. JUPITER AND LEDA. 

Leda was the daughter of Theftius, and wife of Tyndarus, king of 
Laconia. The poets feign that Jupiter embraced her during her preg¬ 
nancy, in the fhape of a fvvan : in confequence of which fhe laid two eggs, 
the one yielding Pollux and Helena, the other Caftor and Clytemneftra. 

N° 143. SALVATOR MUNDI. 

N° 144. THE TRAGIC MUSE. 

N° 145. DISCOBULUS. 

A famous quoit player at the Olympic games. 

N° 146. APOLLO. 

See NS 50. 

N° 147. ANTINOUS, 

See N° 55. 


* Anterotis opus. 


N* 148.. 


( 43 ) 


N° 148. CICERO. 

♦ 

See N° 58. 

N° 149. SAPPHO. 

See N° 38. 

N« 150. HERCULES REPOSING. 

See N° 2. 

N° 151. ACHILLES*. 

The fon of Peleus, king of Theffaly, and, as the poets fay, Thetis the 
goddefs of the fea. His mother is fabled to have dipped him in the 
Styx when a child, to render him invulnerable; but negledled bathing 
that part of the foot by which fire held him. He was tutored by 
Chiron, the Centaur, to learn to ride the great horfe, and play on the 

lyre, agreeable to the attitude in which he is here reprefented.-His 

mother was told by the oracle, that if he went to the wars of Troy, 
with the other Grecian princes, he fhould be hain there. In confe- 
quence of which fhe difguifed him in women’s apparel, and concealed 
him among the daughters of Lycomedes; one of whom, Deidamia, the 
mother of Pyrrhus, he got with child. But it being prophelied, that 
unlefs Achilles joined the 'befiegers Troy could not be reduced, the 
crafty Ulyffes difeovered him. His armour, at the requeft of Thetis, 
was made by Vulcan, and fo tempered, that it could not be penetrated 

* Pamphili epus. 

G 2 by 



i 


( 44 ) 

by human force ; a needlefs incumbrance after his mother’s precaution, 
as he only wanted armour for his heel. 

N° 152 and 153. TWO HEADS. 

N° 154. CERES. 

The goddefs of corn and tillage. 

0 f * .. p yfoteL', 

N° 155. APOLLO. 

See N° 50. 

N° 156. A BULL DRINKING. 

N° 157. LAOCOON. 

The prieft of Apollo at Troy, who pierced the Troian horfe with his 
fpear, and made the arms within to clafh : at which violence offered to 
Pallas, fire fent two ferpents out of the fea, who deftroyed him and his 
two fons. 

N° 158. SABINA. 

N° 159. A PHILOSOPHER, 

N° 160. SILENUS. 

See N° 135. 

N° 161. 


/ 


( 45 ) 


N° 161. JUPITER TONANS. 

See N° 40. 

N° 162. ALEXANDER SEVERUS. 

The twenty-firft emperor of Rome, who, by his virtue and prudence, 
reflored the Roman flate, which had been fo difordered by his prede- 
ceffor Heliogabulus. He took the name of Alexander from his being 
born at Arctena, in a temple dedicated to Alexander the Great. 


N° 163. DO MI TI AN. 

The twelfth emperor of Rome, fon to Vefpafian, and brother to> 
Titus: a prince of a cruel difpolition, and a great perfecutor of the 
Chriftians. It is faid he amufed himfelf in private with killing flies, by 
running them through with a needle ; a circumftance that occafioned 
Crifpus, when afked who was with the emperor, to reply, u Not fo 
tf much as a fly.” 

N° 164. MINERVA. 

See N° 45. 

I 

N° 165. A SOW. 


\ 


N 9 166. AESCULAPIUS. 
The god of phyfic. See N° 53. 


N° 16^. 


( 46 ) 


N° 167. A FEMALE FIGURE. 

/ • ■ * 

N° 168. A CHIMERA. 

/ 

N° 169. BACCHUS. 

See N° no. 

N° 170. A TYGER. 

1 

\ * 

N° 171. ENDYMION. 

A fhepherd, the fon of Athlus, with whom, becaufe he found out the 
courfe of the moon, the poets feign Cynthia to have fallen defperately in 
love. To obtain a kifs of him, they fay, {he threw him into a profound 
fleep on mount Latmus, agreeable to the figure. 

N° 172. PERSEUS. 

The fon of Jupiter and Danae; to whom, when he grew up, Mercury 
gave a faulchion, Jupiter a pair of wings for his feet, and Minerva 
a fhield. Thus accoutered he attacked Medufa, when her fnakes were 
afleep, and cut off her head, which he is reprefented here as holding in 
his hand. 


N rt 173. A WASP. 


N° 174. 


C 47 ) 


N° 174. HERCULES. 

See N Q 2. 

N° 175. A COCK. 

N° 176. CUPID. 

The god of love. He is here reprefented as having laid his bow and 
arrows afide, and in purfuit of a butterfly. 

N° 177. APOLLO. 

See N° 50. 

N° 178. OMPHALE. 

See N° 122. 

N° 179. ULYSSES. 

See N° iic . 

N Q 180. CYRUS. 

An eaftern emperor, the founder of the Perfian monarchy. He was 
the fon of Cambyfes by Mandane, the daughter of Aftyages. It was 
foretold at his birth, that he fliould rule over Afia, and drive Aftyages 
from his kingdom; which the latter took many ineffe&ual means to 

prevent,. 



I 


( 4S ) 

prevent. He firft united the Medes and Perfians, fnbdued the Afly- 
rians, took Babylon, overthrew the Lydians, and took their king Crtefus 
prifoner. After this he fet the Jews at liberty who had been detained in 
captivity at Babylon, and fent them to their own country, with leave to 
rebuild the temple pf Jerufalem. He was a prince greatly admired for 
his perfonal qualifications, but particularly for his extenfive memory. 
Being engaged, however, in a war with the Scythians, he was flain, 
with two thoufand of his men, in an ambufh laid for them by queen 
Tomyris, who, in revenge for the death of her fon, caufed the head 
of Cyrus to be cut off, and thrown into a veffel full of blood, faying, 
(i There, now drink your fill of what you haVe fo long thirfted after.” 


FINIS. 



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