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1938 


(No. 16.) 



TASMANIA 


DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC 

HEALTH 


REPORT 

OF THE 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC HEALTH 

TASMANIA 


FOR THE 

YEAR ENDED 31st DECEMBER, 1938 


Presented to both Houses of Parliament by His Excellency’s Command 



Tasmania : 

H. H. Pimblett, Government Printer, Hobart 


99227 


1939 
















































































TABLE OF CONTENTS. 


PAGE 

Introduction . 5 

Local Health Administration . 5 

Notifiable Infectious Diseases . 5-10 

Venereal Diseases . 10-12 

Hospitals Act . 12 

Maternal and Child Welfare and Infantile Mortality 12-14 

Food and Drugs Act . 14 

Bush Nursing. 14-15 

Government Medical Services 15-16 

Conclusion . 16 

TABLES. 

A—G. Notifiable Infectious Diseases . 8-10 

H—I. Venereal Diseases . 11-12 

J. Private Hospitals . 12 

K—N. Infantile Mortality . 13-14 

O. Bush Nursing . * . 15 

P. Government Medical Services . 16 

APPENDICES. 

I. Report of Government Pathologist . 17 

II. Report of Government Analyst . 17-18 

III. Report of Chief Health Inspector. 19-20 

IV. Child Welfare Reports . 20-21 

V. Report of Nurses’ Registration Board . 21-22 

VI. Vital Statistics . 22 

VII. Report for Lachlan Park Hospital 25-33 

Millbrook Psychopathic Home . 34 

VIII. Report of St. John’s Park. 35 

IX. Mental Deficiency Act: Statistical Information . 36 

X. Report of the Home for Invalids, Launceston . 36 















































































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(No. 16 .) 



Salus Populi Suprema Lex. 


ANNUAL REPORT, 1938 


Department of Public Health, 

Hobart, 10th July, 1939. 

Sir, 

I HAVE the honour to present the Annual Report 
of the Department of Public Health for the year 
ended the 31st December, 1938. 

National Health and Medical Research Coun¬ 
cil. —The fourth and fifth sessions of this Council 
were held at Brisbane on the 25th and 26th May, 
and at Canberra on the 15th and 16th November 
respectively. I was in attendance at each of these 
sessions as the representative of Tasmania. In 
addition to other important business transacted, 
resolutions under the following headings were 
passed at these meetings:—Maternal Morbidity 
and Mortality; Hygiene of Childhood, Prevention 
of Blindness; Nutrition; Establishment of Insti¬ 
tute of Food Research; Demineralisation of Flour; 
Public Health Education; Travelling Fellowships; 
Undulant Fever; Hydatid Disease; Physical Fit¬ 
ness; Leprosy; Australian Tuberculosis Associa¬ 
tion. 

School Medical Inspection and Dental Ser¬ 
vices. —During the course of the year, a decision 
was arrived at by the Government that the admin¬ 
istration of these services should be vested in the 
Department on and from the 1st January, 1939. 

Office Accommodation. —During the month of 
May, the Department transferred to commodious 
office accommodation provided in the new Public 
Buildings. Needless to say, officers greatly 
appreciated these facilities after occupying offices 
which lacked space, comfort, and convenience. 

Lachlan Park Hospital, New Norfolk; St. John’s 
Park, New Town; and Home for Invalids, Laun¬ 
ceston. —Reports in respect of these branches of 
the Department are contained in Appendices. 


Local Health Administration. 

So far as local health administration is con¬ 
cerned, the position to-day is very little different 
from what it has been in past years, and it will 
ever be so whilst local authorities fail, on account 


of economic and/or other reasons, to appreciate 
what is necessary to promote health and what is 
involved in the prevention of disease. Under such 
circumstances, I am a strong advocate for central¬ 
ised control in the interests of the social and 
physical welfare of the people. Under such a 
scheme, the State could be divided into health 
districts, comprising adjacent local authorities, 
arranged chiefly by consideration of facilities for 
communication. A district generally should not 
be so large that the district medical officer of 
health could not visit any part of it and return to 
his centre in one day. Each health district should 
be under the control of the Department of Public 
Health; a whole-time district medical officer being 
provided, with a whole-time and efficient inspec¬ 
tor, and, if necessary, a clerical officer. Expert 
supervision would thus be available at any time to 
act quickly and effectively, at the same time pro¬ 
viding for the application of human knowledge to 
the prevention of disease through close contact 
between the health officer and the people. The 
appointment of Government medical officers to 
various municipal districts, and the fact that 
school medical and dental services are to be con¬ 
trolled by the Department of Public Health, pave 
the way for the establishment of centralised and 
co-ordinated services, which will eventually 
become important units of health administration. 

I would point out that in nine municipal dis¬ 
tricts in which Government medical officers 
already function, an agreement made between the 
Government and individual councils provides that 
the Minister will relieve the council of all its 
functions and duties under the Public Health Act 
in consideration of a specified health rate being 
levied and collected by the council and paid to the 
Treasurer . 


Notifiable Infectious Diseases. 

Tables A and B (appended) contain statistical 
information under this heading. 

Diphtheria. —Of the 343 cases notified, 136 were 
reported from the City of Launceston, and 82 
from the City of Hobart. There were 10 deaths* 
making a fatality rate of 29-2 per 1000 cases, with 
a mortality rate of -4 per 10,000 of the population. 










(No. 16.) 


6 


It is worthy of record that there was a total 
absence of the disease in no less than 13 municipal 
districts. 

The value of immunisation for the prevention 
of the disease is gradually becoming recognised 
in practice in various centres throughout the 
State. The most important result, however, is 
on the individual child who has been rendered 
immune. A knowledge of its security will have 
a marked effect on the child’s parents, giving 
them a feeling of freedom in the presence of an 
epidemic which they would not otherwise have. 
The child itself will be able to continue its school 
career with little interruption because of an out¬ 
break of diphtheria, and, most important of all, 
the risk of being affected by this grave disease 
will be eliminated. 

It is because I think parents would request 
immunisation for their children even more readily 
than they do at present, if they realised the real 
dangers of diphtheria and the advantages of 
immunisation, that I appeal to all those who come 
into contact with parents officially in connection 
with their children to use their influence with the 
parents by putting the case frankly before them. 
There is no need to make exaggerated claims. 
What the parent needs is a brief but accurate 
statement of the dangers of diphtheria, some 
slight knowledge of what the process of immunisa¬ 
tion involves, and an indication of the benefits 
which may be expected if it is carried out. 

Scarlet Fever .—It is gratifying to record the 
marked reduction in the incidence of .:his disease 
during the year. The cases notified, viz., 123, are 
the lowest recorded since 1927. There was no 
mortality associated with the disease. 


Typhoid Fever .—Of the cases notified, viz., 15, 
five were reported from the New Norfolk district, 
and four from the City of Launceston. 

Tuberculosis (All Forms ).—The total number 
of new cases of tuberculosis notified was 173 
(including 15 non-pulmonary). Deaths from the 
disease totalled 123, giving a death rate of 52 per 
100,000 persons living. Of the 158 cases of pul¬ 
monary tuberculosos, 51 per cent received institu¬ 
tional treatment. At the Tasmanian Sanatorium, 
bed accommodation is available for 81 patients 
(43 males and 38 females). Admissions num¬ 
bered 112 (59 males and 53 females). Statistical 
information with respect to these cases and to 
those which were in residence at the beginning 
of the year is set out hereunder:— 

Male. Female. 

Remaining in on 1.1.38 . 27 21 

Admitted during year . 59 53 

86 74 


Discharged— Male. Female. 


Much improved 

1 

— 



Improved . 

33 

24 



Stationary . 

11 

10 



Worse . 

3 

2 






48 

36 

Died. 



16 

14 

Remaining in on 31.12.38 


22 

24 




86 

74 





7 


(No. 16.) 


Chest Clinics .—The chest clinics established at in a most satisfactory manner. Particulars of the 
the Royal Hobart and Launceston Public Hospitals work performed at each of these clinics are 
during the preceding year continued to function detailed hereunder:— 




Chest Clinic, Hobart. 



Chest Clinic, Launceston. 



Over 14 Years. 

Under 14 Y ears. 

Total. 

Over 14 Years. 

Under 14 Years. 



M. 

F. 

M. 

F. 

M. 

F. 

M. 

F. 

total. 

Number of New Cases Applying 

76 

64 

6 

2 

148 

26 

34 

3 

3 

66 

New Cases taken on at Clinic for 
Observation and Treatment . 

102 

126 

54 

49 

331 

40 

63 

20 

29 

152 

Re-attendances... 

355 

356 

83 

77 

871 

126 

369 

67 

76 

638 

Re-examinations . 

254 

244 

33 

15 

546 

32 

52 

13 

9 

106 

Clinic Cases Transferred to Sana¬ 
torium. 

27 

27 


o 

56 

5 

5 

1 


11 

Sanatorium Cases Transferred to 
Clinic for Special Treatment ... 

5 

2 

... 

... 

7 

... 

• • • 

... 


... 

Patients Discharged after Treat¬ 
ment at the Clinic :— 

Markedly Improved. 

1 

1 

1 


3 




• • • 


Improved . 

... 

... 

... 

• • • 

... 

... 

... 

... 

• • • 

• . . 

In statu quo . 

... 

2 

. • • 

... 

2 

2 

1 

• • • 

. « • 

3 

Worse . 

... 

••• 


..r 

... 

... 

... 


... 

... 

Patients Found Non-Tuberculous 

25 

25 

7 

3 

60 

... 

. . • 

. . • 

... 

• • • 

Contacts : — 

Number of Infecting Cases... 

65 

22 



87 

59 

27 

2 


58 

Number of Contacts Ex¬ 
amined . 

28 

62 

47 

47 

184 

14 

29 

17 

26 

86 

Number of Contacts Re-Ex¬ 
amined . 

15 

51 

60 

71 

197 

2 

10 

23 

12 

47 

Number of Contacts Found 
Tuberculous . 


4 


3 

7 

1 

3 

1 


5 

Number of Contacts Under 
Suspicion Tb . 

• • • 

3 

... 

1 

4 

... 

2 

2 

4 

8 

Number of Invalid Pensioners 
Seen . 

12 

8 

... 

... 

20 

12 

15 

... 

... 

27 

Home Visits : — 

Medical Officer. 

1 

3 


1 

5 

] 




1 

Nurse’s First Visit . 

. . • 

• . • 

. • • 

... 

115 

47 

75 

... 

• •• 

122 

Nurse’s Re-Visits. 

... 

... 

• • ■ 

• • . 

642 

364 

540 

5 

4 

913 

Special Visits in Connection with 
After-care . 

... 

6 

... 

... 

6 

• •• 

... 

... 

... 

... 

Pneumothorax Refills . 

3 

4 



7 

42 

18 

• •• 


60 

X-Ray Examinations (Films) .... 

80 

100 

40 

40 

260 

28 

52 

25 

28 

133 

X-Ray Examinations (Screen) ... 

2 

4 

2 

... 

8 

5 

3 

... 

. . . 

8 

Sputum Examination . 

... 

... 

... 

. . • 

229 

12 

25 

5 

• • . 

42 

Total Attendances, Old and New 
Cases .. 

... 

... 

... 

... 

2012 

182 

579 

92 

110 

963 
























































































































































(No. 16.) 


8 


Mantoux Test and X-Ray of Nurses. —In 
accordance with a recommendation received from 
the Tuberculosis Committee of the National 
Health and Medical Research Council, each public 
hospital was requested to make arrangements for 
its nursing staff to be tested by the Mantoux Test 
and X-Rayed before commencing nursing duties 
and annually thereafter. 

Investigation of Tuberculosis in Young 
Women. —The Department took steps to provide 
for the collection of necessary data, in accordance 
with an enquiry form circulated by the National 
Health and Medical Research Council, in con¬ 
nection with the investigation of Tuberculosis 
among young women. 

Acute Anterior Poliomyelitis. —This disease, 
which manifested itself in epidemic form early 
in November, 1937, continued with severity until 
the end of May, 1938. During the course of the 
epidemic, a total of 1006 cases were notified, 
whilst the deaths from the disease numbered 81. 
The preventive measures instituted by the Depart¬ 
ment were detailed in the Annual Report for 1937. 


The after-care treatment of cases was pro¬ 
vided for at the Royal Hobart Hospital, St. John’s 
Park, and “ Vaucluse ” Hospital in the southern 
portion of the State; and at the Launceston Pub¬ 
lic Hospital and a home purchased by the Crippled 
Children’s Society, in the north. During the 
year, there was a daily average of 202 in-patients 
and approximately 135 out-patients for all insti¬ 
tutional treatment, which has been carried out by 
a large staff of masseuses, with special experience 
in infantile paralysis work. The society estab¬ 
lished for the care of crippled children has played, 
and still is playing, an important part in provid¬ 
ing essential services at the various treatment 
centres. 

For the year 1937-38, the total expenditure in¬ 
curred (State departments and public hospitals) 
was £33,481. 

In-so-far as public hospitals are concerned, it 
is anticipated that there will be a considerable 
increase in expenditure for next year at least, as 
a result of the recent outbreak. 

Tables C-G (appended), contain statistical data 
with respect to the disease. 


Table A. 

Return showing Number of Cases of each Notifiable Infectious Disease Reported to the 
Department of Public Health during the Year 1938, together ivith Comparative 
Figures of the Aggregate of all such Diseases for the Years 1937 and 1938. 


Municipality. 

Diphtheria. 

Typhoid 

Fever. 

Scarlet 

Fever. 

Tubercu¬ 
losis (All 
Forms). 

Puerperal 

Fever. 

A cute 
Anterior 
Poliomye¬ 
litis. 

Cerebro- 

Spinal 

Meningitis. 

Bacillary 

Dy sentry. 

Amoebic 

Dysentry. 

Total, 

| 1938. 

Total, 

1937. 

1 Beaconsfielcl ... 

1 



4 


14 




19 

18 

2 Bothwell. 

... 

... 

... 

■ • • 


5 

... 



5 

3 

3 Brighton. 

4 

• • • 

1 

3 


4 

... 

... 


12 

9 

4 Bruny . 

... 

... 

• . . 

. . . 

... 

1 

• • . 



1 

... 

5 Burnie.. 

14 

• . • 

... 

3 

1 

52 

... 

... 

... 

70 

22 

6 Campbell Town 

... 

L 

2 

l 

, . . 

1 

... 



5 

23 

7 Circular Head . 

2 

• * . 

1 

... 

1 

14 

... 

« . • 


18 

5 

8 Clarence . 

5 

• • • 

6 

1 


12 

... 

... 


24 

15 

9 Deloraine. 

5 

... 

5 

5 

1 

29 

... 


... 

45 

21 

10 Devonport . 

1 

• . • 

... 

5 

... 

9 

1 



16 

11 

11 Esperance . 

4 

2 

2 

• . • 

... 

27 

... 


... 

35 

28 

12 Evandale. 

3 

. • • 

• . • 

... 

... 

5 

... 



8 

12 

13 Fin gal. 

6 

. . . 

2 

1 

... 

24 

... 



33 

25 

14 Flinders . 

... 

• • . 

... 

1 

... 

4 

... 



5 

4 

15 George Town ... 

3 

. . . 

. .. 

2 

• • . 

7 

... 



12 

4 

16 Glamorgan. 

... 

... 

... 

. . . 

. . . 

... 

. . . 


... 

... 

1 

17 Glenorchy. 

7 

... 

6 

5 

1 

36 

«... 


• .. 

55 

52 

18 Gormanston ... 

] 

... 

1 

. . . 

... 

6 

... 

... 


8 

2 

19 Green Ponds ... 

• • . 

• • . 

... 

1 

... 

1 

... 



2 

10 

20 Hamilton. 

5 

... 

3 

o 

... 

3 

... 

... 

... 

. 13 

13 

21 Hobart. 

82 

2 

25 

54 

1 

134 

2 

... 


300 

276 

22 Huon . 

2 

... 

... 

1 

1 

20 

... 

... 


30 

5 

23 Kentish . 

4 

, . , 

3 

2 

... 

10 

. . 

... 

... 

19 

37 

24 Kingborough ... 

6 

• • . 

1 

3 

... 

20 

... 



30 

1 

25 King Island ... 

... 

• . . 

8 

1 

... 

... 

. • . 


... 

9 

• •• 

26 Latrobe . 

1 

... 

2 

8 

... 

4 

• . • 



10 

11 

27 Launceston. 

136 

4 

29 

29 

4 

37 


1 

1 

241 

415 

28 Leven . ... 

2 

• • . 

1 

6 

... 

11 

... 


... 

20 

12 

29 Lilydale .. 

3 

... 

... 

. . . 

• • . 

4 

... 


... 

7 

15 

30 Longford. 

2 

. . . 

. • • 

2 

1 

8 

• • • 



13 

13 

31 JNew Norfolk ... 

2 

5 

1 

8 

... 

38 

• . t 

... 


54 

28 

32 Oatlands . 

1 

... 

7 

2 

... 

2 



... 

12 

12 

33 Penguin . 

1 

• • • 

... 

... 

... 

19 

... 

... 


20 

1 

34 Port Cygnet ... 

... 

. . > 

2 

o 

• • . 

16 

... 



20 

5 

35 Portland . 

1 


1 

... 

... 

16 

... 



18 

1 

36 Queenstown ... 

6 

• . • 

1 

8 

... 

12 

... 


... 

27 

54 

37 Richmond . 

1 

... 

1 

2 

... 

7 

... 

... 


11 

5 

38 Ringarooma ... 

11 

. . • 

1 

3 

... 

20 

• • • 

... 


35 

34 

39 Ross. 

• • • 

... 

... 

• % • 

... 

1 

... 

... 

. .. 

1 

2 

40 Scottsdale . 

3 

1 

... 

1 

... 

6 

. . • 



11 

8 

41 Sorell . 

2 

... 

... 

1 

, . 

11 




14 

3 

42 Spring Bay. 

3 

... 

• •• 

1 

... 

] 

... 



5 

8 

43 St. Leonards .. 

5 

. • • 

3 

1 

1 

7 

... 



16 

8 

44 Strahan . 

• • • 

. . • 

1 

... 

1 

1 

. M 



3 

2 

45 Table Cape. 

7 

... 

1 

3 

... 

8 

• • • 



19 

6 

46 Tasman . 




3 


1 




4 

1 

47 Waratah . 



3 



12 




15 


48 Westbury . 

1 

• • . 


2 

... 

8 

... 



11 

6 

49 Zeehan . 

t • • 

... 

3 

1 

2 

. 13 


... 

... 

19 

7 

Totals . 

343 

15 

123 

173 

14 

707 

3 

1 

1 

1380 

1254 































































































9 

Table B. 


(No. 16.) 


RETURN showing Notification of Each Type of Infections Disease Received by the Department 
of Public Health for Each Month of the Year 1938, together with Comparative Figures of 
the Aggregate of all such Diseases for the Years 1937 and 1938. 


Month. 

Diphtheria. 

Typhoid 

Fever. 

Scarlet 

Fever. 

Tuberculosis 

(All Forms). 

c3 . 
u u 
a) a; 

<D 

Qh 

Acute 

Anterior 

Poliomye¬ 

litis. 

Cerebro¬ 

spinal 

Meningitis. 

Bacillary 

Dysentery. 

Amoebic 

Dysentery. 

Total, 1938. 

Total, 1937. 

January . 

19 


15 

« 

2 

242 




291 

97 

February . 

17 

2 

7 

7 

1 

171 

1 



206 

57 

March . 

10 

2 

8 

13 

1 

146 

... 



180 

62 

April .. 

41 

4 

6 

17 

1 

80 

. . • 


1 

150 

81 

May. 

62 

2 

4 

13 

... 

42 

... 



123 

97 

June. 

36 

• • • 

4 

18 

1 

12 

... 



71 

125 

July . 

38 

1 

12 

15 

4 

7 

. . . 



77 

112 

August . 

30 

1 

15 

22 

1 

. 5 

1 



75 

94 

September . 

24 


20 

13 

1 

2 

... 



60 

73 

October . 

19 

1 

14 

15 

2 

. . • 

. . • 



51 

41 

November . 

30 

1 

10 

20 

. • • 

. . . 

• • • 

1 


62 

148 

December . 

17 

1 

8 

7 

... 

... 

1 

... 


34 

267 

Totals. 

343 

15 

123 

173 

14 

707 

3 

1 

1 

1380 

1254 


Table C. 

Acute Anterior Poliomyelitis. 

RETURN showing Cases Notified each Month, during the 1937-38 Epidemic. 



1937 

1938 

Totals. 

Nov. 

Dec. 


Feb. 

March. 

■c 

< 

May. 

J line. 

►“5 

hi 

0> 

to 

Cases. 

85 

214 

242 

171 

146 

80 

42 

12 

7 

5 

2 

1006 


Table D. 

Acute Anterior Poliomyelitis. 

RETURN showing Cases and Deaths by Age-Groups, during the Months of November 

and December, 1937. 


— 

Cases. 

Deaths. 

Males. 

Females. 

Total. 

Males. 

Females. 

Total. 

Under 5 years . 

53 

33 

86 

2 

2 

4 

5 to 9 ,, . 

69 

54 

123 

8 

5 

13 

10 to 14 ,, . 

34 

20 

54 

1 

1 

D 

15 to 20 „ . 

7 

8 

15 

2 

1 

3 

21 to 25 „ . 

4 

5 

9 

2 

... 

2 

26 to 30 „ .. 

2 

• • • 

2 

1 

... 

i 

31 to 40 „ . 

2 

6 

8 

1 

2 

3 

Over 40 ,, . . . 

1 

i 

2 

... 

... 

... 

Totals . 

172 

127 

299 

17 

ii 

28 


































































































































(No. 16.) 


10 ' 


Table E. 


Acute Anterior Poliomyelitis. 

RETURN showing Cases and Deaths by Age-Groups, during the Twelve. Months 

ended 31st December, 1938. 


— 

Cases. 

Deaths. 

Males. 

Females. 

Total. 

Males. 

Females. 

Total. 

Under 5 years . 

Ill 

69 

180 

2 

2 

4 

5 to 9 „ .. 

143 

112 

255 

6 

5 

11 

10 to 14 „ .. 

76 

59 

135 

6 

5 

11 

15 to 20 „ . 

25 

30 

55 

3 

8 

11 

21 to 25 „ . .. 

24 

10 

34 

4 

1 

5 

26 to 30 „ . 

18 

8 

26 

3 

2 

5 

31 to 40 „ ... 

. 9 

5 

14 

4 

1 

5 

Over 40 „ . 

2 

6 

8 

1 

... 

1 

Totals . 

408 

299 

707 

29 

24 

53 


Table F. 

Acute Anterior Poliomyelitis. 


RETURN showing Cases and Deaths by Age-Groups, during the 1937-38 Epidemic. 


— 

Cases. 

Deaths, 

Males. 

Females. 

Total. 

Males. 

Females. 

Total. 

Under 5 years ... . 

164 

102 

266 

4 

4 

8 

5 to 9 „ . 

212 

166 

378 

14 

10 

24 

10 to 14 ,, . . 

110 

79 

189 

7 

6 

13 

15 to 20 „ . 

32 

38 

70 

5 

9 

14 

21 to 25 „ . 

28 

15 

43 

6 

1 

7 

26 to 30 „ . 

20 

8 

28 

4 

2 

6 

31 to 40 „ . 

11 

11 

22 

5 

3 

8 

Over 40 „ . 

3 

7 

10 

1 

... 

1 

Totals . 

580 

426 

1006 

46 

35 

81 


Table G. 

Acute Anterior Poliomyelitis. 
Condition of Cases as at 31.12.38. 


Cured. 

Cured with 
Time. 

Moderate 

Permanent 

Cripples. 

Severe 

Permanent 

Cripples. 

Died. 

Total. 

443 

266 

137 

79 

81 

1006 

(Paralytic ... 164) 




(Paralvtic ... 79) 

(Paralytic ... 725) 

(Pre-paralytic 279) 




(Pre-paralytic 2) 

(Pre-paralytic 281) 


Venereal Diseases. 

Whilst the cases notified, viz., 415, are much 
lower than those reported (485) during the 
previous year, the view is held that notification 
cannot be regarded as reliable evidence of the 
annual incidence of these diseases, as it is known 
that many sufferers evade medical treatment and, 
consequently, notification. 

No less than 31 orders were served upon per¬ 
sons who failed to continue treatment in accord¬ 


ance with the law. The premature discontinuance 
of attendance by patients is an important obstacle 
in the way of combating these diseases. Needless 
to say, the Department spares no effort to enforce 
compliance as soon as it is in possession of the 
requisite advice from medical practitioners. 

Statistical information with respect to the noti¬ 
fications received during the year is appended 
(Tables H and I). 






















































































RETURN showing Sex and Age Distribution and Location (Metropolitan or Extra Metropolitan) of Cases of Venereal Diseases Reported to the 

Public Health Department for the Year 1938. 


11 


(No. 16.) 


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(No. 16.) 


12 


Table I. 


RETURN showing Marital Status of Cases of 
Venereal Diseases reported to the Department 
of Public Health for the Year 1938. 



Male. 

Female. 

Total. 

CC 








er* 


T3 




"d 


■73 


Qj 

© 

o> 


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V 

a 


Fh 

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33 

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m 

s 

33 


Gonorrhoea . 

77 

136 

21 

34 

98 

170 

268 

Syphilis . 

39 

21 

37 

29 

76 

50 

126 

Gleet . 

1 

6 

• • • 

... 

1 

6 

7 

Gonorrhoea and Syphilis . 

3 

2 

... 

1 

3 

3 

6 

Ophthalmia & Neonatorum .. 

... 

2 

... 

5 

... 

7 

7 

Chancre. 


i 

... 

... 

... 

1 

1 

Total . 

120 

168 

58 

69 

178 

237 

415 


Hospitals Act. 

Public Hospitals. 

Management and Maintenance of Public Hos¬ 
pitals. —During recent years, there has been a 
progressive increase in the cost of management 
and maintenance of these institutions, a corres¬ 
ponding liability devolving upon the Government 
as a consequence. This is due to several reasons, 
among which the following may be mentioned:— 

(1) The provision of specialised and other 

additional services. 

(2) The added cost of hospital commodities, 

such as equipment, drugs, dressings, 
and foodstuffs. 

(3) The payment of higher salaries to 

doctors, nurses, and domestic staff. 

(4) The employment of increased personnel, 

due to specialised services and shorter 
working hours. 

(5) The progressive increase in the number 

of patients who avail themselves of 
the facilities provided. 

Each year the problem associated with the 
financing of public hospitals becomes more com¬ 
plex. At these institutions, particularly those 
which serve metropolitan areas, procedures in 
connection with treatment are innumerable and 
constantly changing. This generally involves 
increased expenditure, making costing, in the com¬ 
mercial sense of the word, an item of major 
importance. As every change, extension, or 
development in treatment re-acts in some way 
upon administration, the importance of adjusting 
machinery to meet these altered circumstances 
must be realised to obviate the necessity for still 
greater support to meet annual expenditure. 

Conference of Hospital Executives —In order 
to discuss hospital administration in general, and 
particularly uniformity in regard to accounts, 
records, and central buying, a conference of the 
executive officers of the major public hospitals in 
the State was held on the 5th and 6th May. Reso¬ 
lutions were passed under the following head¬ 
ings :— 

(1) Standardisation of accounts, with special 

reference to dissection of expenditure. 

(2) Central purchasing and standardisation 

of equipment. 

(3) System of medical records. 

(4) Interchange of trainee nurses between 

metropolitan and extra-metropolitan 

hospitals. 


Apart from any other result which the con¬ 
ference achieved, the beneficial and instructive 
interchange of information on hospital matters 
was helpful to all those who participated. 

New Hospitals. —The erection of the new Royal 
Hobart Hospital was sufficiently advanced to¬ 
wards the end of the year to admit of the accom¬ 
modation of patients in various sections thereof. 

The construction of a new public hospital and 
nurses’ home at Wynyard, at a cost of £27,990, 
was also proceeded with. 

Private Hospitals. 

Routine inspections revealed that the general 
standard of these establishments is quite satis¬ 
factory. Particulars regarding licences issued 
under this heading during the year are appended. 


Table J. 

RETURN of Private Hospital Licences Issued 
during the Year 1938. 



N o. of 
Licences 
Issued. 

Medical, 
Surgical, & 
Lying-in. 

Medical & 
Surgical 
Only. 

Lying-in 

Only. 

Hobart. 

9 

2 

2 

5 

Launceston . 

8 

... 

3 

5 

Country . 

42 

13 

2 

27 


59 

15 

7 

37 


Maternal and Child Welfare and Infantile 

Mortality. 

Maternal and Child Welfare. 

The appointment of Government medical 
officers in various country centres has been 
responsible for an extension of maternal and child 
welfare services. Maternity cases are attended 
by these doctors, free of charge, during regular 
consulting hours, if ante-natal treatment be 
availed of by the fifth month of pregnancy, and 
at monthly intervals thereafter, and patients 
arrange for their accommodation during the 
lying-in period at an approved hospital located 
within ten miles of their place of residence. 

The provision of a bush nursing hospital in 
most of the districts in which Government medi¬ 
cal officers are functioning also provides the 
means for an organised and co-ordinated service 
of definite value to the welfare of mothers and 
young children. 

Various voluntary organisations throughout the 
State continue to take a keen and practical inter¬ 
est in all measures providing for the welfare of 
motherhood and infant life. 

Infantile Mortality. 

There were 195 deaths of infants under one 
year, giving an infantile mortality rate for the 
year of 39-7, the lowest recorded for the State. 
The outstanding causes of death were those 
usually noted. 

The gradual reduction in the infantile mor¬ 
tality rate during recent years is mainly due to 
the steady and cumulative effect of the various 
methods employed to save infant life and, in 
particular, to the education and enlightenment 
first of the mother, and, secondly, of the general 
public in matters relating to infant care and 
management. 






















































13 


(No. 16.) 


Tables K-N, containing statistical data in regard to infantile mortality, are appended. 


Table K. 

INFANTILE Mortality. 

Number of Deaths under One Year in Tasmania for the last 20 Calendar Years. 


Year. 



o> 

o 



CO 

Th 

lO 

co 


00 

05 

o 

rH 

<N 

CO 


lO 

co 


00 


H 

Cl 

Cl 

Cl 

Cl 

Cl 

d 

Cl 

Cl 

Cl 

C) 

CO 

CO 

03 

CO 

CO 

CO 

CO 

CO 

CO 


05 

05 

05 

05 

C5 

05 

05 

05 

05 

05 

05 

05 

05 

05 

05 

05 

05 

05 

05 

05 


r—1 

r—1 



rH 

rH 

i-H 


i— 1 


r-H 

rH 

rH 

rH 

»-H 

. ' l 

rH 

rH 

rH 

f— 1 

Deaths. 

343 

374 

451 

324 

326 

296 

287 

232 

256 

300 

255 

242 

219 

185 

187 

189 

231 

227 

202 

195 


Infantile Mortality Rate (Deaths per 1000 Births.) 


Year. 

Tasmania. 

N.S.W. 

Victoria. 

Queens¬ 

land. 

South 

Australia. 

Western 

Australia. 

New 

Zealand. 

North. 

T’torv. 

Aust. 
Cap. Ter. 

Aust. 

1925. 

55-0 

55-0 

57-0 

45-2 

46-1 

56-6 

40-0 



53-4 

1926. 

46-5 

57-6 

55-7 

50-7 

44-3 

49-3 

39-8 

• • • 

... 

54-0 

1927. 

53-0 

54*9 

56-1 

54-5 

53-4 

45-9 

38-7 

• • • 

... 

54 • 5 

1928 . 

63-9 

54-9 

55*6 

45*5 

47-5 

48-1 

36-2 

60-2 

116-7 

53-0 

1929. 

53-1 

56-6 

47-2 

46-1 

40-9 

56-2 

34 • 1 

18-9 

19-6 

51-1 

1930. 

50-6 

49-8 

46-5 

40-2 

48-3 

46-7 

34-5 

70-4 

24-4 

47-2 

1931. 

46'0 

43-5 

44-5 

36-6 

36-5 

41-5 

32-2 

83-3 

37-3 

42-1 

1932. 

41-2 

41*1 

43-0 

40-3 

36-6 

44-6 

31-2 

75'9 

26-5 

41-3 

1933. 

41 1 

39*3 

40-4 

42-6 

31-9 

36-8 

31-6 

94-6 

53-4 

39-5 

1934. 

42-3 

46-4 

44-6 

40-6 

35*6 

40-9 

32-1 

68-18 

7-46 

43-6 

1935. 

51-8 

39-4 

41-2 

37-8 

34 9 

40-2 

323 

83-3 

47-3 

39-8 

1936. 

49-6 

43-5 

42-3 

36-3 

31*1 

42-2 

31-0 

26-6 

25-3 

41-1 

1937. 

41-7 

40-7 

36-7 

35-6 

33-1 

37-5 

31-2 

30-3 

14-5 

38-1 

1938. 

39’ 7 

41*8 

34-2 

41-3 

30-5 

33-8 

35-6 

58-8 

35-0 

38-3 


Table L. 


TABLE showing the Principal Causes of Deaths of Children under 1 Year of Age in Tasmania 

in each Year from 1929 to 1938. 


Causes of Deaths. 

1929. 

1930. 

1931. 

1932. 

1933. 

1934. 

1935. 

1936. 

1937. 

| 

1938. 

7. 

Measles . 







1 

1 

1 


8 . 

Scarlet Fever, &c .. 











9. 

Whooping Cough . . 

11 

3 

8 

3 

4 

7 


7 

4 


10 . 

Diphtheria and Croup . 


1 

• • • 



... 


1 


1 


Other Epidemic Diseases . 

2 


1 

1 

1 


4 

4 

1 

2 

22 . 

Tetanus . 





1 

1 





24. 

Tubercular Meningitis . 

1 

1 

2 

1 

• • • 

2 

1 




34. 

Syphilis. . 

2 

1 

1 

1 

... 

1 


2 

2 

3 

86 . 

Convulsions . 

1 

2 

3 

3 

2 

5 

5 

5 

1 

5 

106. 

Bronchitis. 

1 

3 

1 

2 


1 

2 

2 

... 

1 

107. 

Broncho-pneumonia . 

12 

4 

13 

20 

18 

17 

22 

22 

17 

24 

108,109. 

Pneumonia . 

27 

12 

8 

4 

3 

3 

g 

6 

4 

4 


Other Diseases of the Stomach . 

2 

1 

1 

1 


1 

1 

3 


4 

119. 

Gastro-Enteritis, Diarrhoea, and Enteritis . 

21 

23 

12 

8 

9 

19 

10 

4 



157. 

Congenital Defects . 

31 

28 

23 

14 

24 

11 

24 

28 

11 

22 

159, 160. 

Premature Birth and Injury at Birth . . 

72 

100 

86 

69 

73 

64 

90 

89 

93 

70 

158. 

Debility, Marasmus. 

31 

25 

16 

20 

13 

21 

16 

15 

oo 

17 

161. 

Other Diseases of Early Infancy. 

17 

20 

14 

20 

20 

11 

20 

23 

29 

27 


Other Causes . 

25 

18 

30 

18 

19 

15 

27 

15 

17 

15 


Total . 

256 

242 

219 

185 

187 

189 

231 

227 

202 

195 


Infantile Mortality Rale (per 1000 Births) . 

53-4 

50-6 

46-0 

41-2 

41-1 

42-3 

51-8 

49-6 

41 -7 

39-7 


Total Births . 

4797 

4785 

4762 

4491 

4553 

4470 

4456 

4581 

4841 

4907 





























































































































































































f 


(No. 16.) 


14 


Table M. 


Food and Drugs Act. 


{Showing Ages and Causes of Death under 
One Year —1938.) 


Causes of Death and 
Classification Number. 


*4 

<b 

a 




10. Diphtheria. 

lib. Influenza without specified 
Respiratory Complications 

16- Acute Polioimyeltis . 

23. Tuberculosis ot the Res¬ 
piratory System . 

34. Syphilis .... 

44b. Other Infectious or Parasytic 

Diseases. 

70. Haemorrhagic Disease . 

79a. Simple Meningitis. 

85. Epilepsy . 

86. Convulsions. 

90. Pericarditis . 

106a. Bronchitus, Acute. 

107a. Broncho-Pneumonia. 

107b. Capillary Bronchitis. 

108. Lobar Pneumonia. 

110. Pleurisy . 

115a. Diseases of the Buccal Cavity 

and Annexa . 

119. Diarrhoea and Enteritis . 

122a. Hernia. 

130. Acute Nephritis. 

152. Cellulitis (Acute Abscess). 

153. Other Diseases of the Skin 

ahd Annexa and Cellular 
Tissues . 

157. Congenital Malformations ... 

158. Congenital Debility . 

159. Premature Birth . 

160. Injury at Birth . 

161a. Atelectasis . 

161b. Icterus Neonatorum . 

161d. Sclerema and others . 

182. Accidental Mechanical Suffo¬ 
cation . 


1 


1 


10 

13 

45 

17 

9 

3 

12 


Total 


113 




go 



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-H 

G 

+-» 

G 



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CD 




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rH 


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a> 

G 

CD 

g 

• 


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CD 

r T3 

G 

c 


G 

G 

G 

G 

G 


G 

'G 

G 

S3 


G 

pH 

H3 

G 

G 

cc 

GO 

CO 

U 

CD 

G 

H 

rC 


G 


-H 

G 


G 

p 

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o 

O 

C3 

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o 

& 

£ 

£ 

£ 

rH 

pH 

eo 

CD 

E- 1 

... 

... 

... 

l 

1 




1 

1 

1 

... 

... 

... 

1 




1 

1 

1 

I 

i 

... 

3 




l 

1 

• • • 

• • • 

• •. 

• • • 

1 

... 

1 

... 

l 

2 

1 

5 

1 

1 


l 


• . . 

... 

1 

1 

... 

1 

,,. 

,., 

1 

4 

5 

5 

9 

23 

K •» 

. . . 


1 

I 

1 

1 

, . , 

2 

4 

... 

1 


... 

1 

1 




1 

• • . 


2 

2 

4 

1 

... 

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,,, 

1 

... 

... 

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1 

4 

4 

2 

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22 

1 

2 

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17 

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53 

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... 

. . . 

17 

1 



, . . 

10 

1 



• .. 

4 

1 



... 

13 

1 

... 

1 

... 

2 

28 

18 

12 

24 

195 


Table N. 

Comparative Figures of Principal Causes of 
Deaths under One Year during 1934-1938. 


Causes of Death. 

1934. 

1935. 

1936. 

1937. 

1938. 

Whooping Cough. 

7 

,,, 

7 

4 

• • • 

Convulsions . 

5 

5 

5 

1 

5 

Bronchitis . 

1 

2 

2 

• • • 

1 

Broncho-Pneumonia. 

17 

22 

22 

17 

24 

Pneumonia. 

3 

8 

6 

4 

4 

Diarrhoea and Enteritis ... 

19 

10 

/ 4 


4 

Congenital Debility _..... 

16 

16 

15 

22 

17 

Syphilis . 

1 

• •• 

2 

2 

3 

Malformations . 

11 

24 

28 

11 

22 

Prematurity and injury at 
Birth . 

69 

90 

89 

93 

70 

Other Diseases of Early 
Infancy . 

21 

20 

23 

29 

27 


Amendment of Regulations .—An amending 
regulation prescribing a standard for diabetic or 
sugar-free chocolate came into force on the 7th 
September, 1938. 

Food Standards Committee. —The Committee 
met on one occasion during the year for the pur¬ 
pose of considering various matters calling for 
decisions by this body. 

Chemical Laboratory. —The erection of a new 
chemical laboratory, which has been sanctioned 
by the Government, will provide for the amalga¬ 
mation of the prevailing disjointed services, which 
have proved a serious handicap to general effici¬ 
ency. 

Food Sampling. —Detailed references to the 
work performed under this heading are contained 
in Appendices II. and III. 

Taking into consideration the duties demanded 
of departmental inspectors during the epidemic 
of infantile paralysis in the early months of the 
year, very effective work in food sampling has 
been accomplished. Milk received special con¬ 
sideration, in an endeavour to maintain its purity; 
the total number of such samples examined being 
104 more than those for the previous year. 

Offences. —Five prosecutions were instituted 
against traders for selling adulterated foods. The 
fines and costs amounted to £16 5s. 8d. 

General. —Regular supervision has been exer¬ 
cised over food products in wholesale and retail 
stores, bulk stores, auction rooms, and elsewhere; 
appropriate action being taken to deal with any 
product found to be unfit for food. 


Bush Nursing. 

The appointment of Government medical 
officers in the municipal districts of Tasman, 
Bruny, Esperance, Hamilton, Glamorgan, and 
Flinders, has increased the efficiency and stability 
of the bush nursing centres in these areas. Dur¬ 
ing the course of the year, the financial liability 
for bush nursing devolving upon the local authori¬ 
ties of Tasman and Flinders was taken over by 
the Government. The local committees in charge 
of the centres at Southport and Bruny were also 
relieved of a similar liability. The Government 
has undertaken to establish a centre at Triabunna, 
in the Spring Bay District, and to erect bush 
nursing quarters and a hospital. Similar accom¬ 
modation will be provided at Flinders Island. 

During the course of the year, the living con¬ 
ditions of many of the nurses have been improved, 
and further improvements are contemplated. 
This may be the means of inducing bush nurses to 
remain in the service for a longer period than 
hitherto. 

By maintaining a close relationship with the 
activities of individual nurses, and affording 
information and advice as required, the Depart¬ 
ment has done its utmost to promote the Bush 
Nursing Scheme. Ths Bush Nursing Associa¬ 
tions, by their co-operation and support, have also 
played an important part in this field of service. 

Table O gives detailed information of the work 
performed in each centre during the year. 
















































































15 


(No. 16.) 


Table O. 

SUMMARY of Work Performed in Bush Nursing Centres during the Year ended 

31 st December, 1938. 


Centre. 

Visits to 
N urse. 

Visits to 
Patients. 

Nursing 

Days. 

Maternity 

Cases. 

Ante-natal 

Visits. 

Child 

W elf are 
Visits. 

School 

Visits. 

Mileage. 

Fees Earned. 

Ward 

Beds. 

Adamsfield .... 

305 

341. 

8 


6 

3 


200 

£ s. 

d. 

2 

Avoca. 

221 

363 

92 

5 

31 

63 

28 

2735 

52 17 

0 

... 

Bruny Island.... 

64 

121 

146 

8 

33 

45 

6 

2081 

113 12 

8 

2 

Burnie. 

11 

457 

19 

28 

81 

2117 

12 

6481 

92 0 

6 

... 

Cygnet . 

259 

723 

5 

14 

88 

423 

5 

6578 

128 8 

0 

... 

Flinders Island 

115 

146 

40 

4 

38 

61 

8 

1929 

29 1 

2 

... 

Lily dale . 

235 

411 

16 

6 

95 

554 

30 

3453 

120 0 

0 

• . . 

Marrawah . 

274 

235 

48 

3 

31 

53 

4 

1540 

77 16 

0 

2 

Ouse . 

141 

81 

152 

13 

55 

134 

• • • 

919 

84 4 

5 

1 

Ringarooma ... 

710 

866 

5 

8 

75 

166 

• • • 

1677 

148 3 

5 

. . . 

Rosebery . 

4207 

965 

89 

21 

165 

473 

. . • 

774 

... 


2 

Rossarden . 

447 

917 

23 

3 

90 

203 

4 

1115 

... 


• ■ • 

Southport. 

127 

54 

198 

8 

6 

29 

8 

992 

88 18 

3 

2 

Swansea . 

263 

239 

132 

15 

54 

269 

2 

793 

152 4 

5 

2 

Tasman . 

98 

126 

380 

23 

29 

6 

,,, 

4337 

202 10 

9 

4 

Tullah. 

2187 

1533 

28 

• • • 

76 

233 

3 

647 

. . • 


2 

Ulverstone. 

42 

581 

40 

13 

126 

2107 

24 

11,828 

71 7 

0 

. . • 

W aratah. 

1701 

507 

125 

13 

73 

259 

... 

913 

... 


1 

Total. 

11,407 

8666 

1546 

185 

1152 

7198 

134 

48,992 

1361 3 

7 

20 


Government Medical Scheme. 

The hardship suffered by the people living in 
remote country districts, owing to the difficulty 
of obtaining medical aid, has been a marked 
feature of our country life for many years, and 
one that imposes not only suffering, but also 
danger arising out of delay in obtaining adequate 
medical attention. In addition to this disability, 
the question of expense has always been a serious 
factor in securing the services of a doctor, and it 
has been well established that many people became 
worse physically because they could not pay to 
be made better. This unsatisfactory state of 
affairs played an important part in the establish¬ 
ment, early in the year 1938, of the Government 
Medical Scheme, which provides for the free 
access of all persons to medical advice, and affords 
the best opportunity for the detection and treat¬ 
ment of physical defects. 

At the 31st December, 1938, the Government 
Medical Service was in operation in eleven muni¬ 
cipal districts, and other local authorities are now 
negotiating with the Government for a similar 
provision in their municipalities. 

The following details with regard to the scheme 
were made available for the information and guid¬ 
ance of the people resident in those districts 
served by the doctors appointed to function in this 
field of service:— 

With the inauguration of the scheme, it is 
desired to intimate to the people that the free 
access of all persons to medical advice provides 
the best opportunity for the early detection and 
notification of those conditions which, by their 
infectious nature, are a direct menace to the pub¬ 
lic health. The Government medical service 
rightly, therefore, takes its place as one of the 
most effective branches of the public health ser¬ 
vice. 

It is also pointed out to the people that, in order 
to provide for the maintenance of a high standard 
of practical work by the medical practitioners 
appointed under the scheme, the Government is 
making facilities available to enable each of these 
officers to undertake a refresher course of train¬ 


ing for a certain period each year, so that he may 
apply his mind anew to a study of the most 
modern methods of treatment given under the best 
conditions. 


Directions for Guidance of the People in Con¬ 
nection with Free Medical Services. 

It has already been mentioned that the doctor 
is to render medical service free of charge, to the 
people. This free service, however, must be 
availed of in accordance with the following 
directions:— 

(1) At the doctor’s surgery at his place of 
residence between the hours of 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. 
on the week-days (Monday to Friday), and 
between the hours of 9 a.m. and 12 noon on Satur¬ 
day, statutory holidays excepted. 

(2) At the home of a sick person living at the 
place of residence of the doctor between the hours 
and on the days mentioned under item (1). 
(Either a message left at the doctor’s surgery or 
a telephone call will ensure his visitation to the 
home of the patient.) 

(3) At each centre of population in his district 
away from his place of residence on a certain day 
or days each week. The doctor may be seen at 
his consulting room at each of these centres in 
accordance with a notice displayed locally for the 
information of the public. Arrangements will 
also be made at each centre for the receipt of mes¬ 
sages requiring a visitation to the home of a sick 
person resident at any such centre. A telephone 
message requiring a visitation to the home of any 
such sick person will also be received at the 
doctor’s residence for attention. 

(4) Maternity cases will be attended by the 
doctor, free of charge, during his regular con¬ 
sulting hours, if ante-natal treatment be availed 
of by the fifth month of pregnancy and at monthly 
intervals thereafter, and patients arrange for 
their accommodation during the lying-in period at 
an approved hospital located within ten miles of 
their place of residence. 

























































(No. 16.) 


16 


t 


Note.—It should be noted in connection with 
Directions (1) and (2) that, on the day or days 
when the doctor is absent from his place of resi¬ 
dence on circuit in other parts of the district, a 
notice giving detailed information in this regard 
will be posted at his surgery, so that persons in 
need of his services may become familiar with the 
hours of the doctor's absence on any day, thus 
enabling them to make arrangements to see him 
either before his departure or on his return. 

Directions for tine Guidance of the People in those 

Cases where the Doctor is Entitled to Make a 

Charge for Medical Services. 

(5) As a means of enabling the doctor to 
function in the best interests of the people, it is 
essential that the demands upon his services 
should be restricted, as far as possible, to his 
regular consulting hours, either at his place of 
residence, or whilst on circuit in the district. In 
the event, therefore, of his services being required 
outside these hours, or at any time on a statutory 
holiday, the doctor is entitled to charge a fee of 
10s. 6d. if consulted at his surgery, and a fee of 
£1 Is. and motor mileage (both ways) at the 
rate of 6d. per mile for medical attendance else¬ 
where. The fee of £1 Is. will also be charged if 
a call for the doctor’s services is lodged within his 
consulting hours, but not in time to admit of his 
reaching the patient’s residence within such con¬ 
sulting hours. Should the doctor be required to 
render a service within his consulting hours at a 
centre of population away from his place of resi¬ 
dence on a day that he does not visit such centre 
on circuit, motor mileage (both ways) at the rate 
of 6d. per mile will be charged. 

(6) The doctor is entitled to charge a fee of 
£3 3s. in respect of his attendance upon a mater¬ 
nity case at the home of any patient who resides 
within ten miles of an approved lying-in hospital. 
Motor mileage is also chargeable in accordance 
with the immediately preceding direction— 
No. (5). 

In the absence of any such hospital, this fee will 
not be demanded if ante-natal treatment has been 
availed of by the fifth month of pregnancy, and at 
monthly intervals thereafter, and the patient be 
attended in her own home during the doctor’s 
consulting hours at either his place of residence 
or when on circuit. Outside his consulting hours, 
the doctor is entitled to charge as for ordinary 
medical attendance, viz., a fee of £1 Is. and 6d. 
per mile motor mileage. If the service be ren¬ 
dered in his consulting hours at a location away 
from his place of residence, on a day when the 
doctor does not visit on circuit, motor mileage 
(both ways) at the rate of 6d. per mile will be 
charged. 

Workers’ Compensation Act. 

(7) Fees, as hereunder, will be charged for 
attendance upon any case coming under the 
Workers’ Compensation Act, whether the service 
be rendered within or outside consulting hours:— 

A fee of 10s. 6d., if patient consults the 
doctor at his surgery; and a fee of £1 Is., 
plus 6d. mileage, if the service be rendered 
elsewhere. 

Drugs, &c., Supplied to Patients. 

The doctor is entitled to make the following 
charges under this heading:— 

(a) For each bottle of medicine, 2s., plus any 
freight: 


( b ) For each bottle or box of tablets, bottle 
of lotion, and for proprietary medi¬ 
cines and dressings, actual cost, plus 
any freight. 

Miscellaneous. 

The doctor is entitled to charge a fee of 10s. 6d. 
for the examination of a person for admission to 
a friendly society’s'lodge. 

Although the scheme has been in operation for 
some few months only, the facilities provided 
thereunder have been availed of by the people in 
large numbers, and the results achieved have been 
most satisfactory. In addition to the perform¬ 
ance of routine medical work, Government medi¬ 
cal officers are carrying out the following ser¬ 
vices :— 

(1) Regular and systematic inspection of all 

school children for physical diseases 
and dental defects. 

(2) Maternity hygiene, including the super¬ 

vision of pre-natal and post-natal 
clinics. 

(3) Child welfare work. 

(4) Control of infectious diseases by early 

diagnosis, with the aid of laboratory 
methods, active immunisation of con¬ 
tacts, and detection of carriers in cer¬ 
tain diseases. 

(5) Prevention and control of tuberculosis, 

by encouraging the use of facilities 
available at chest clinics and sanatoria. 

(6) Supervision of private hospitals. 

(7) Educating the public in the principles of 

public health and personal hygiene. 

A summarised statement of the work performed 
by each Government medical officer is set out 
hereunder:— 

Table P. 

Government Medical Services. 


SUMMARY of Services from Inception thereof 
to 31st December, 1938. 


District. 

Date of Com¬ 
mencement of 
Service. 

Total No. of 
Attendances 
upon Patients. 

Mileage 

Covered. 

Esperance . 

11.3.38 

2,055 

6,121 

Flinders Island . 

1.5.38 

1,010 

4,462 

Glamorgan-Spring Bay 

18.5.38 

851 

6,706 

Hamilton . 

1.5.38 

1,684 

4,196 

Kingborough-Bruny .... 

1.3.38 

1,347 

5,960 

King Island . 

1.6.38 

721 

2,032 

Penguin . 

13.7.38 

1,911 

3,386 

Sorell . 

1.12.38 

109 

739 

Tasman . 

21.4.38 

952 

4,744 

Totals . 


10,640 

38,346 


Conclusion. 

I desire to express my thanks to the members 
of the staff for the loyal and efficient service that 
they have given during the past year. I acknow¬ 
ledge also the courteous assistance and co-opera¬ 
tion rendered to me on many occasions by officers 
of other departments. 

I have, &c., 

B. M. CARRUTHERS, 

Director of Public Health. 
The Hon. the Minister for Health. 


V 

















17 


(No. 16.) 


APPENDICES. 


Appendix I. 

REPORT OF GOVERNMENT PATHOLOGIST 

Pathological Laboratory, 

Royal Hobart Hospital, 

Hobart, January, 1939. 

Sir, .• 

The staff consists of— 

C. Duncan, M.B., B.S., Pathologist. 

G. Haddow, Bacteriologist. 

R. Prouse, Assistant. 

During the year, the laboratory continued to perforin 
pathological work for the Government Departments, the 
Royal Hobart and other hospitals, and private prac¬ 
titioners—all infectious disease work being done free of 
charge for the latter. Research work on tissue culture 
was concluded, and then work was begun to determine 
the type of bacillus causing extra-pulmonary tuberculosis 
in Tasmania. 

Statistical data, under the appropriate headings, regard¬ 
ing the work performed during the year is appended 
hereto. 

No. 1 .—Examination of Material for Infectious and 


Contagious Diseases. 

. No- of Posi- 

Diphtheria— Specimens. fives. 

Culture of swabs . 4,869 336 

Virulence test . 1 1 

Gonorrhoea— 

Smears . 749 216 

Urine . 2 — 

Gonococcal fixation test . 92 33 

Syphilis— 

Dark-ground illumination . 2 — 

Kline test . 1,028 150 

Wassermann reaction (blood) . 190 59 

Wassermann reaction (C.S.F.) . 44 6 

Tuberculosis— 

Sputum . 1,326 319 

Pleural fluid . 8 — 

Urine . 37 — 

Cerebro-spinal fluid . 6 1 

Faeces . 2 — 

Miscellaneous . 12 1 

Cultures . 10 6 

Typhoid and paratyphoid fevers— 

Blood agglutinations . 39 5 

Faeces for culture . 13 — 

Urine for culture . 12 — 

Milk for culture . 1 — 

Miscellaneous for culture . 1 — 

Dysentery—Faeces for culture . 46 11 

Vincent’s angina—Smears . 30 10 

Undulent fever—Blood agglutinations .... 5 — 

Trichomonas vaginalis—Smears . 40 8 

Sputum for hydatid material . 5 1 

Smears for other bacteria . 52 — 

Typing of pneumococci . 1 — 

Other cultures— 

Routine swabs for streptococci . 538 10 

Urine . 34 25 

Blood cultures . 27 7 

Pus . 31 24 

Cerebro-spinal fluid . 14 5 

Pleural fluid . 25 5 

Eyes . 56 26 

Other body fluids . 22 8 


Total . 9,370 


No. 2.—Pathological Examinations. 


No. of 

Blood— Specimens. 

Red cell count . 185 

White cell count . 188 

Haemoglobin estimation . 222 

Film . 140 

Differential count . 13 


No. of 
Specimens. 


Sedimentation rate . 47 

Fragility of red cells . 3 

Reticulocyte count . 9 

Typing and grouping . 74 

Coagulation and bleeding time . 9 

Sulph haemoglobin . 1 

Urea . 172 

Sugar . 60 

Calcium . 2 

Fouchet . 3 

Van den Beryh . 7 

Cerebro-spinal fluid— 

Cell count . 218 

Chemical content. 95 

Urea estimation. 5 

Sugar estimation . 2 

Tryptophane test . 2 

Urine- 

Microscopical examination . 737 

Chemical examination. 12 

Urea estimation 56 

Diastase . 3 

Pleural fluid — examination . 35 

Microscopic sections . 328 

Frozen sections . 5 

Faeces— 

Microscopic examination . 11 

Occult blood . 263 

Test meals . 144 

Vaccines . 7 


Total . 3058 


No. 3.— Food, Water, &c. 

Water—Bacterial content . 73 

Milk—Bacterial content . 101 

Carbolic coefficient . 3 


No. 4 .—Autopsies and Court Attendances- 
Autopsies for— 

Hospitals . 15 

Coroner . 49 

Attendances at— 

Coroners’ Court . 11 

Criminal Court . 1 


I have, &c., 

C. DUNCAN, M.B., 
Government Pathologist. 


The Director of Public Health. 


Appendix II. 

Government Analyst’s Laboratory, 

Hobart, 21st March, 1939. 


Sir, 

I enclose reports by Mr. Johnstone and myself on the 
work of the Chemical Laboratories for the year 1938. 

It is gratifying to know that the new laboratory is 
about to be built, and it is hoped that the end of this year 
will see us installed therein and the amalgamation with 
Mr. Johnstone completed. 

This should give an opportunity for the provision of 
several facilities which are not now available, and should 
lead to a consequent increase in the general efficiency of 
the Branch. 
































































(No. 16.) 


18 


With regard to equipment, much is still required to 
bring this up to modern requirements, for instance, a new 
microscope is badly needed, as the present one is approach¬ 
ing 50 years of age and is practically worn out. This will 
cost with full equipment £80 to £100, and it does not seem 
possible to spare this sum out of the present annual pro¬ 
vision, which is barely sufficient for our ordinary routine 
needs. 

The amount debited the Federal Government during the 
year for work done for the Customs Department was 
£334 18s. 8d. 

Fees from municipalities and private firms and persons 
amounted to £128 12s. 6d. 

Samples Examined in the Government Analyst's 
Laboratory during the Year 1938. 

No. of 
Samples, 


Baking powder and self-raising flour . 5 

Beer and cordials . 5 

Bitumen . 4 

Butter . 252 

Cereals . 4 

Confectionery, honey, and sugar . 9 

Cream and condensed milk . 16 

Drugs and chemicals . 31 

Essences . 6 

Fertilisers and sprays . 33 

Fish and meat products . 62 

Fruit and jam . 8 

Hydrometers . 9 

Kerosene and turpentine . 37 

Milk, cows’ . 463 

Milk, human . 17 

Minerals and metals . 5 

Motor spirit . 132 

Oils and fats, edible . 8 

Oils, mineral . 229 

Paints . 6 

Poisons and other tests for Police Depart¬ 
ment .,. 46 

Sauces and condiments . 3 

Spirits and wines . 21 

Tea, coffee, and cocoa . 14 

Textiles and paper . 6 

Thermometers . 11 

Vinegar . 11 

Water and effluents . 60 

Miscellaneous . 40 


Total . 1,553 


Return showing the Sources of Samples Examined in the 
Government Analyst's Laboratory during 1938. 

No. of 
Samples. 


Customs Department (Commonwealth) .... 639 

Public Health Department . 203 

Railway Department . 73 

Police Department . 18 

Other Government Departments . 151 

Hobart Local Authority . 218 

Other municipalities . 78 

Hospitals and clinics . 89 

Private firms and persons . 84 


Total . 1,553 


Air. 

Several samples of air were taken in the Railway Work¬ 
shops, Launceston, where several open fires were burning. 
The presence of carbon monoxide was suspected but none 
could be detected. 

Butter. 

Thirty-three samples for export contained over 16 per 
cent of water, and two contained boric acid. One for home 
consumption contained 18-5 per cent of water. 

Chocolate. 

The regulation under the Food and Drugs Act was 
altered to permit the manufacture of a/special chocolate 
tor diabetics, containind d. sorbitol. 


Coffee and Chicory. 

Two samples contained a slight excess of chicory. 

Coins. 

Three “ silver ” coins were found to be counterfeit, in 
each case a different method had been used. 

Cream. 

One cream contained only 29 per cent of milk-fat and 
another 30-4 per cent. A third sample contained a small 
excess of boric acid. 

Fish, Tinned. 

Seven samples of sild contained over two grains per 
pound of tin. 

One tin. of shrimps had deteriorated and also contained 
excess tin. 

Milk. 

Forty-six samples, almost 10 per cent of the total 
received, were deficient or adulterated. This increased 
number is due largely to tests of one dairy herd, which 
was found to include 17 cows which were giving milk below 
the minimum standard. The owner, after receiving advice 
from the dairy officer, reduced this number to four in a 
fortnight. 

Of the remaining samples, only six were found to con¬ 
tain added water, seven were deficient in solids (not fat), 
and 13 were deficient in fat. 

The total number examined was 104 more than for the 
previous year. 

Mud. 

In connection with a sewerage investigation, 12 samples 
of mud from the River Derwent were examined. A large 
amount of work was involved and the total number of 
determinations made being over 150. 

Poisons. 

Arsenic (from spraying) in excess of the limit of one- 
hundredth grain per pound was found on some pears. 

Ground glass was found in chaff which had been given 
to an animal. 

Caffeine was found in the stomach of a dog, and 
strychnine in another. 

Water. 

Eleven samples were found to be unfit for human con¬ 
sumption. 

Laboratory at the Model School. 

The following samples were examined at the Model 
School Laboratory. Most of these were forwarded by 
officers of the Department of Agriculture for examination 
and report to assist them in the technical side of their 
field work. The other samples were from farmers, and 
from dairymen, and from merchants dealing in agricultural 
supplies:— 


Soils . 92 

Waters . 30 

Milk and cream . 41 

Inspections of milk . 5 

Insecticides . 35 

Inspections of insecticides . 25 

Veterinary . 22 

Limes . 26 

Stock foods . 18 

Fertilisers . 10 

Miscellaneous . 10 


Total . 314 


Twenty-five samples were taken by inspectors under the 
Pest Destroyers Act and showed that the trade is supply¬ 
ing very good quality insecticides to the orchardists and 
farmers. 

The veterinary samples show less poisoning of stock 
by plant toxins and probably, more care is being taken to 
check the growth of the poisonous plants. 

I have, &c., 

E. WARD, Government Analyst. 
The Director of Public Health. 


















































19 


(No. 16.) 


Appendix III. 

Department of Public Health, 

Hobart, 13th June, 1939. 

Sir, 

I have the honour to submit the following report of 
work performed by the inspectorial staff of the Depart¬ 
ment during the year 1938. 

Staff. 

Stationed at Hobart—Chief Inspector J. Riley, F.R.S.I.; 
Inspector H. H. Parker, M.R.S.I.; Inspector H. T. D’Alton, 
A.R.S.I. 

Stationed at Launceston—Inspector D. S. Clark, Cert. 
R.S.I.; Inspector T. Orr, Cert. R.S.I. 

Infantile Paralysis. 

During the months of January, February, and March 
the whole of the staff were engaged in various duties, i.e., 
enforcing isolation of home-contacts, closing of schools, 
policing of places of public entertainment, distribution of 
pamphlets, and other measures designed to prevent the 
spread of infantile paralysis. . The officers of the City 
Health Department, Hobart, following on the lines adopted 
by the City Council of Launceston, co-operated with the 
Central Department in every possible way. Inspectors of 
every local authority in the State also assisted in a 
practical manner to enforce all measures recommended by 
the Director of Public Health. 

Routine Sanitary Surveys and General Inspections. 

Owing to the staff being almost continuously employed 
for three months in connection with the epidemic of 
infantile paralysis, the work in connection with routine 
sanitary surveys and general inspections was limited. 

During this period, visits were made to the majority of 
municipalities throughout the State. In the course of these 
visits, work of an educative and practical character was 
carried out. This included reports on water supplies, 
drainage work, offensive trades, public buildings, sanitary 
and garbage services, dairies, boarding-houses, licensed 
premises, &c. Working on these lines, the sanitation of 
each municipal district or local authority is noted and 
recorded for future reference, and action taken as the 
circumstances required. 

The State inspectors have invariably been welcomed by 
the local health authorities, who generally expressed the 
desire to work in harmony with officers of the Department- 
Instruction and information given by State officers on 
various problems connected with drainage, sanitation, and 
hygiene, have been productive of much improvement. 

Special inspections, at the request of local authorities, 
have also been undertaken throughout the year. 

Details of inspections, made in the course of sanitary 
surveys, &c., are set out hereunder:— 

No. of Improve- 
Inspec- ments 


tions. Required. 

Bacteriolytic tanks, sites, and plans 264 48 

Butchers’ shops and other food premises 317 31 

Plans of public entertainment and public 
buildings, including plans of new build¬ 
ings and alterations to existing build¬ 
ings . 159 41 

Hotels and licensed premises . 162 26 

Factories Act . 177 45 

Slaughter-houses (private) . 149 41 

Dairying premises . 121 23 

Schools (public and private) . 216 28 

Bakeries . 168 34 

Water-supplies and pollution of same .... 18 1 

Drainage work . 93 26 

Race-courses, showgrounds, &c. 76 21 

Offensive trades . 130 35 

Garbage depots and services . 51 10 

Sanitary depots and services . 46 10 

Hospitals (public and private) . 77 4 

Cemeteries and burial-grounds . 2 — 

Inspections disease outbreaks (exclud¬ 
ing infantile paralysis) . 18 — 

Municipal abattoirs . 8 — 

Cattle sale-yards . 21 4 

Sewage disposal in rivers and streams 

(also outfalls) . 10 2 

Water samples . 13 1 

Wharves, jetties, and river frontages 

(not under control of local authority) 10 1 

Boarding-houses . 36 10 

Insanitary buildings and condemned dwel¬ 
lings . 13 6 

Hop-pickers and small fruit orchards .... 1260 huts 60% 

Miscellaneous . 125 30 


Royal Sanitary Institute Examinations. 

During the month of August examinations were held 
by the Royal Sanitary Institute Examination Board to 
enable candidates to qualify for the Meat and Food Certi¬ 
ficate and the Sanitary Inspectors Certificate. The follow¬ 
ing persons were recommended for diplomas:— 

Meat and other Foods Certificate.— 

Sydney Burton, City Council, Hobart. 

John W. Davies, City Council, Hobart. 

Keith M. Hickman, Beaconsfield. 

Henry H. Parker, Public Health Department, 
Hobart. 

Sanitary Inspectors Certificate.— 

V. J. W. Austin, Launceston. 

W. J. Bradford, Launceston. 

G. F. Brown, City Council, Hobart. 

J. J. Mahony, Glenorchy. 

Miss F. G. McDonald, Child Welfare Association, 
Hobart. 

Robert R. Rex, Sorell. 

H. O. Stephens, Launceston. 

H. A. M. Stuart, City Council, Hobart. 

S. R. Taylor, Hobart. 

W. C. White, Glenorchy. 

Inspection of Hop-Fields and Small-Fruit Orchards. 

Prior to the opening of the hop and small-fruit seasons, 
a complete survey of the huts occupied by hop and small- 
fruit pickers within the State was made by an officer of 
the Department to ascertain if the accommodation pro¬ 
vided complied with the by-laws regarding condition of 
huts, general cleanliness, sanitary accommodation, water- 
supplies, and protection of food supplies were being 
observed 

Altogether there were 334 orchards visited, and 1260 
huts inspected. Orders were issued for alterations, 
additions, and improvements in 60 per cent of the huts. 

Food and Drugs. 

Two hundred and ten (210) samples of food and drugs 
were purchased in various parts of the State and for¬ 
warded to the Government Analyst for examination. Six¬ 
teen (16) or approximately 8 per cent were found to be 
adulterated. Prosecutions were undertaken in 5 cases; 
fines and costs amounting to £16 5s. 8d. Warnings were 
issued in nine cases following the usual procedure in regard 
to first offenders, or where some reasonable doubt existed. 

A complete list of the samples taken is shown here¬ 
under:— 


Salmon and lobster paste . 1 

Milk . 41 

Butter . 22 

Tonic food . 1 

Sild . 19 

Pepper . 1 

Hydrogen peroxide . 1 

Vinegar . 11 

Coffee and chicory . 5 

Tea . 1 

Cream . 11 

Bloater paste . 2 

Ground rice . 1 

Maizena corn flour. 1 

Sausage . 18 

Margarine . 3 

• Beefine . 1 

Tincture of iodine . 2 

Paraffin oil . 1 

Cream of tartar. 3 

Essence of lemon . 1 

A.P.C. tablets . 3 

Imitation cordial extract .... 1 

Sausage and vegetable. 1 

Soup cubes . 1 

Curry powder . 1 

Cocoa . 2 

Bisto . 1 

Mace . 1 

Veal and ham paste . 1 

Cocoa essence . 2 

Coffee . 3 

Pilchards . 1 

Breakfast food 1 

Potted meat . 1 

Throat pastilles . 1 

Soap . 2 

Aspro . 1 

Reduced cream . 1 

Honey . 4 

Vegemite . 1 























































> 


(No. 16.) 


20 


Salmon. 

Macaroni and cheese . 

Condensed milk . 

Self raising flour . 

Baking powder . 

Saveloys . 

Fish paste . 

Meat paste . 

Arrowroot . 

Milk (Reductase Test) 

Olive oil . 

Beans . 

Fresh herrings . 

Pixi shrimps . 

Mixed fruits . 

Custard powder . 


5 Students from the Mothercraft Home have attended the 

1 centres to gain experience in district work during their 

2 course of training. 

Milk has been given to 60 mothers with young babies. 

2 I have, &c. 

1 C. BONNILY, Sister-in-Charge. 
The Director of Public Health. 

2 

2 _ 

1 

{ Baby Health Association, 

1 Launceston, 15th March, 1939. 


Total No. of samples . 210 

Varieties of samples . 57 


Municipal Abattoirs, Devonport. 

It is pleasing to report that the Devonport Council are 
alive to their responsibilities in regard to protection of 
food supplies by their action in erecting a modern muni¬ 
cipal abattoir. The building is in every respect hygienic, 
and the facilities provided are second to no other build¬ 
ing of its kind in the State. 

Conclusion. 

In concluding this report, I desire to thank council clerks 
and local inspectors for their co-operation and assistance. 
The inspectorial staff passed through a strenuous year, 
mainly due to the epidemic of infantile paralysis. 

I have, &c. 

J. RILEY, Chief Health Inspector. 
The Director of Public Health. 


Sir, 

The following is a report of our work for the twelve 
months ended 31st August, 1938:— 


Number 

of 

attendances 

at the Launceston 


Clinic 

Number 

of 

attendances 

at 

the 

Invermay 

10.129 

Clinic 

Number 

of 

attendances 

at 

the 

Newstead 

1,074 

Clinic 

Number 

of 

attendances 

at 

the 

Sandhill 

1,669 

Clinic 

Number 

of 

attendances 

at 

the 

Westbury 

422 

Clinic 






69 


Total attendances at clinics . 

13,363 

Number 

of 

new babies 

at the Launceston 


Clinic 

Number 

of 

new babies 

at 

the 

Invermay 

440 

Clinic 

Number 

of 

new babies 

at 

the 

Newstead 

66 

Clinic 

Number 

of 

new babies 

at 

the 

Sandhill 

57 

Clinic 

Number 

of 

new babies 

at 

the 

Westbury 

21 


Clinic . 28 


Appendix IV. 


Total new babies at clinics . 612 


Child Welfare Association, 

Hobart, 13th June, 1939. 
Sir, 

The following report gives a brief account of the work 
of the nurses for the year 1938:— 


Number of visits paid to homes by the sisters 3,568 
Number of new babies visited in their homes 884 
Number of expectant mothers at the clinics 208 
Number of expectant mothers visited at their 

homes . 80 


Summary of the Work of the Nurses. 


Centre. 

Visits to 
Individual 
New-born 
Babies. 

Subsequent 
Visits to 
Mothers. 

Visits to 
Expectant 
Mothers. 

Individual 

Babies 

Attending. 

Total 

Attendances 
by Babies. 

Total 

Attendances 
by Expectant 
Mothers. 

Hobart . 

515 

4676 

85 

1047 

8142 

144 

North Hobart . 

364 

1239 

48 

540 

4719 

173 

Moonah 

180 

1292 

82 

453 

3350 

80 

Glenorchy. . 

43 

391 

4 

86 

669 

1 

Bellenve ... 

36 

237 

14 

76 

922 

14 

New Norfolk 

112 

289 

— 

156 

1116 

4 

Geeveston ... 

3 

7 

— 

86 

385 

5 

Huonville ... ... . . 

7 

20 

2 

75 

316 

— 

Sandy Bay, 28.6.38 to 31.12.38. 



" 

67 

471 


Total 

1260 

8151 

235 

2586 

20,090 

421 


Correspondence. 

One hundred and forty-three letters were received from 
country mothers. Printed leaflets on “ Advice to Mothers ” 
were posted to those living beyond the visiting area. 

Broadcasting. 

A weekly talk on “ Details of the Feeding and Care of 
Baby ” has been given from Radio Station 7 HT. 

Classes. 

Eight classes of girls from the State schools have 
attended the clinics for a course of lessons in Mothercraft 
and Infant Hygiene. 


Letters and Literature. 

Two hundred and thirty-seven letters have been written 
to country mothers who have sought out advice about the 
feeding and care of their babies, and suitable literature 
has been forwarded therewith. An article dealing with 
child welfare has been published weekly in the “ Examiner” 
and quarterly in the “ Tasmanian Journal of Agriculture.” 
Literature has been distributed where necessary. 

Mothercraft Lectures. 

With the fact in view that mothercraft should form an 
essential part of a girl’s education, the senior girls of the 
various State schools are instructed in this art. The 














































































21 


(No. 16.) 


arrangement made through the Director of Education for 
the holding of weekly classes at the clinic is an outstand¬ 
ing feature of our work. Students from the various col¬ 
leges have also been included in this important section, 
besides groups of girl guides. The headmasters of the 
various schools have shown increased co-operation in this 
feature, and are anxious to extend the opportunity to the 
country schools. Ninety-four certificates have been issued 
during the twelve months. 

General. 

Milk from a dairy approved by the health authorities 
has been supplied continuously to necessitous cases, 
averaging 15 mothers daily, and kariol and karilac have 
been given gratis when an urgent need has arisen. 

Various organisations have again generously donated 
baby clothing, which has been distributed to mothers in 
poor circumstances. 

The year has been a difficult one in many respects. 
The epidemic of infantile paralysis, entailing the closing 
of the suburban clinics, and the curtailing of the work in 


the central clinic, has affected our number of attendances, 
and increased the outdoor work. In spite of these set¬ 
backs, a study of the figures given above will show proof 
of steady progress. 

The suburban clinics have all been very busy since their 
reopening, and other districts are urgently asking for 
clinics of their own. Had we a larger staff our work 
would extend rapidly in this direction. We are proud of 
our new Sandhill clinic erected during the year, and the 
work is gradually progressing there. 

There is great need, too, for extension to that scattered 
area beyond the suburbs. It is impossible for the sisters 
to reach these mothers and babies, and in some instances, 
it is equally difficult for the latter to attend any of the 
clinics. Extension of our work is certainly needed, and is 
being constantly asked for. 

4 

I have, &c.. 

OLIVE M. GREEN, Sister-in-Charge. 
The Director of Public Health. 


Devonport Child Welfare Association—Report for Year 1938. 



which 

en. 

Total Attendances. 


rjj 

CD 


GO 

Referred to 
Doctor, 

Sh 

05 

G 

O 

Visits by Nurse to Homes. 


No. of Days on 
j Clinic was op 

Daily Average. 

Individual Babi 

First Visits. 

Ante-Natal Visi 

Babies. 

Mothers. 

Advice by Lette 

P- 

<d 

H 

CO 

O 

> 

"O 

Effective. 

Ineffective. 

Pre-Natal. 

Newly-born 

Babies. 

Total Visits. 

January ... 

23 

90 

3-9 

42 

13 

2 


2 

1 

3 

40 

3 

1 

3 

43 

February . 

24 

114 

4-7 

42 

7 

1 

2 

3 

• • • 

9 

39 

3 

• . • 

6 

42 

March . 

27 

124 

4-6 

44 

7 

1 

5 


1 

5 

50 

4 

1 

7 

54 

April ...... 

22 

133 

60 

60 

13 

2 

2 

2 

1 

2 

30 

4 

1 

2 

34 

May . 

26 

137 

5’2 

52 

5 

3 

2 

2 

2 

6 

39 

2 

• • • 

3 

41 

June . 

25 

144 

5-7 

59 

9 

4 

3 

3 

3 

5 

33 

5 

... 

8 

38 

J uly . 

26 

144 

5-5 

67 

7 

1 

4 

3 

3 

9 

34 

4 

1 

6 

38 

August ... 

27 

149 

5-5 

64 

10 

3 

4 

1 

2 

3 

35 

6 

4 

7 

41 

September 

26 

124 

4-7 

61 

11 

1 

4 

• • . 

1 

2 

40 

1 

• • • 

6 

41 

October ... 

25 

133 

5-3 

61 

13 

2 

o 



1 

56 

6 

• • • 

12 

62 

November 

23 

175 

7-6 

79 

17 

o 

2 

2 


2 

48 

1 

• • • 

10 

49 

December 

23 

170 

7-3 

75 

11 

2 

o 

... 

... 

1 

39 

5 

... 

8 

44 

Totals for 
Year... 

297 

1637 

5-5 

706 . 

123 

24 

32 

18 

14 

48 

483 

44 

8 

78 

527 


THELMA R. CONNORS, Sister-in-Charge. 


Appendix V. 

Department of Public Health, 

Hobart, 1st July, 1939. 

The Nurses’ Registration Act, 1927. 

Sir, 

We have the honour to submit the annual report of the 
Nurses’ Registration Board for the year 1938. 


Personnel of Board. 

Chairman: Dr. B. M. Carruthers, Director of Public 
Health. 

Dr. D. W. L. Parker, Surgeon-Superintendent of the 
Royal Hobart Hospital. 

Dr. J. C. Fulton, Medical Superintendent of the Laun¬ 
ceston Public Hospital. 

Dr. T. C. Butler (appointed as from 6th February, 
1938). 

Miss M. McGrath, Matron of the Royal Hobart Hos¬ 
pital (to 12th September, 1938). 

Miss R. A. Cockayne, Matron of the Royal Hobart 
Hospital (in succession to Miss M. McGrath). 

Miss C. I. Skirving, Matron of the Launceston Public 
Hospital. 

Miss I. E. Macfarlan, Matron of the Devon Public 
Hospital. 

Board Meetings. 

The Board held one special and three ordinary meetings. 


Training Schools. 

Training schools registered.—General, 14; milwifery, 4; 
mental, 1 . 

Applications for Training. 

Approved.—General, 130; mental, 30, midwifery, 32. 
Refused.—General, 14. 

Trainees. 

General, 342; mental, 93; midwifery, 42. Resigned, 
&c.—General, 49; mental, 23; midwifery, 2. Completed 
training.—-General, 41; mental, 1; midwifery, 30. 

Examinations. 


Educational Test for Intending Trainees. — 

Applications . 43 

Passed examination . 16 

Failed . 23 

Applications withdrawn . 4 

Examinations for the Registration of Nurses. — 
Candidates: 

General . 44 

Mental . 1 

Midwifery . 30 

Results: 

Passed Failed 

General nurses . 42 2 

Mental . 1 — 

Midwifery . 28 2 


\ 














































































(No. 16.) 


22 


Registration of Nurses. 

General, 99; mental, 1; midwifery, 56. Renewed regis¬ 
tration.—General nurses, 379; mental, 5; midwifery, 261. 

An agreement with the Nurses and Masseurs’ Board 
of Queensland for the reciprocal registration of mental 
nurses has now been concluded, and it is hoped that the 
Board will be able to come to a similar arrangement with 
other States of the Commonwealth. 

At the Board’s suggestion, Section 34 of the Registra¬ 
tion of Births and Deaths Act, 1895, has been amended to 
provide for compulsory certification of infantile deaths 
by a medical practitioner. 

As a result of representation by the Board, Cabinet has 
decided to insert an amendment to the Public Health Act, 
which will enforce notification to the Department of Public 
Health of<maternal deaths. The amendment will also pro¬ 
vide for a board of enquiry where investigation is deemed 
necessary. 

Negotiation for legislation which will provide a wider 
measure of protection for general nurses is still pro¬ 
ceeding. 

We have, &e., 

B. M. CARRUTHERS, Chairman. 

E. J. TUDOR, Secretary. 

The Hon. the Minister of Health. 


Appendix VI. 

VITAL STATISTICS. 

Statistical and General. 

Population: 

Estimated on the 31st December, 1938— 

Males . 122,098 

Females . 119,309 


Total . 241,407 

Mean population, 1938 (for whole year) — 

Males . 119,604 

Females. 116,074 

235,678 


Mean population, 1937 for the whole 


year) . 233,951 

Increase for the year . 1,727 


The population of the State, as shown by the figures, 
reveals an increase of 1727 


Australian Birth-rate for the Year 1938 per 1000 
Persons Living. 


(As compared with previous year and a year in the 
previous decade.) 




1022. 

1937. 

1938. 

New South Wales . 


25-67 

17-63 

17-39 

Victoria . 


23-10 

16-01 

16-25 

Queensland . 


25-59 

19-36 

18-98 

South Australia . 


23-71 

15-25 

15-88 

Western Australia 


23-94 

18-95 

19-87 

Tasmania . 


27-08 

20-69 

20-82 

Northern Territory .... 


19-16 

18-30 

17-81 

Australian Capital Territory .... 

11-37 

20-30 

17-98 

Australia . 


24-69 

17-43 

17-46 

Death Rates for 1938 Per 

1000 Persons Living. 

(As compared with 

the previous year 

and a 

year 

in the 

previous 

decade.) 





1922. 

1937. 

1938. 

New South Wales . 


8-92 

9-36 

9-59 

Victoria . 


9-65 

10-03 

10-15 

Queensland . 


9-16 

9-10 

9-19 

South Australia . 


9-11 

8-91 

9-35 

Western Australia . 


9-32 

9-51 

9-20 

Tasmania . 


9-30 

8-95 

9-71 

Northern Territory ... 


16-42 

11-64 

12-05 

Australian Capital Territory .... 

2-13 

4-12 

5-39 

Australia . 


S-22 

9-44 

9-64 


Total 












































23 


(No. 16.) 


Deaths in Relation to Disease. 

The following return, from data supplied by the Deputy- 
Commonwealth Statistician, shows the number and causes 
of deaths during the year 1938, also the death-rate per 
10,000 persons living (mean population 235,678), as con¬ 
trasted with the previous year, 1937 (mean population 
estimated at 233,951). 


Cause of Death. 

Number of 
Deaths, 1937. 

Death Rate per 
10,000 persons. 

Number of 
Deaths, 1938. 

Death Rate per 

10,000 persons. 

General Diseases— 

Typhoid Fever . 

3 

•1 



Malaria . 

• • • 

• • • 

• • • 

• • > 

Smallpox. 

. . . 

... 

• •• 

. . • 

Measles. 

3 

•1 

1 

• • • 

Scarlet Fever . 

2 

•1 

• • • 

• • • 

Whooping Cough . 

5 

•2 

1 

... 

Diphtheria and Croup . 

12 

•5 

10 

•5 

Influenza . 

5 

•2 

4 

*2 

Dysentery . 

3 

•1 

• • 

. . • 

Syphilis . 

9 

•4 

14 

•6 

Tubercular Diseases . 

120 

5-1 

123 

5-2 

Rheumatic Fever, Rheuma¬ 
tism, and Gout . 

16 

•7 

18 

.8 

Cancer, all forms . 

288 

12-4 

255 

10-8 

Dietic Diseases and Industrial 
Poisoning . 

2 

•1 



Other General Diseases. 

103 

4-4 

143 

6-1 

Total General. 

571 

24-4 

569 

24-2 

Local Diseases— 

Diseases of Nervous System... 

150 

6-4 

180 

7-6 

Diseases of Circulatory System 

616 

26-3 

638 

27-1 

Diseases of Respiratory 

Organs. 

224 

9-6 

227 

9-6 

Diseases of Digestive Organs 

99 

4-2 

92 

3-9 

Diseases of Genito-Urinary 
System. 

158 

6-8 

187 

79 

Diseases of Puerperal Origin.. 

19 

•8 

18 

•8 

Diseases of the Skin. 

11 

•5 

6 

•3 

Diseases of Bones and Mal¬ 
formations . 

18 

•8 

39 

1-7 

Diseases of Early Infancy. 

144 

6'2 

114 

4-8 

Total Local Diseases. 

1439 

61-6 

1501 

63-7 

Deaths Produced by External 
Causes— 

Accident or Negligence. 

136 

5-8 

112 

4-7 

Homicide . 

4 

•2 

2 

•1 

Suicide. 

20 

•8 

16 

*7 

Total External Causes ... 

160 

6-8 

130 

5-5 

Ill-defined—Not Specific Dis¬ 
eases — 

Old Age . 

53 

2-3 

80 

3-4 

Ill-defined Diseases. 

o 

•1 

8 

•3 

Total Ill-defined Diseases 

55 

2-4 

88 

3-7 

Total Deaths, All Causes 

2225 

95-1 

2288 

97-1 



during the last Ten Years. 


DEATHS from Tuberculosis 


Number. 



1929. 

1930. 

CO 

35 

1932. 

1933. 

1934. 

1935. 

1936. 

1 1937. 

1938. 

1929. 

1930. 

1831. 

1932. 

1933. 

1934. 

1935. 

1936. 

1937. 

OO 

CO 

05 

rH 


6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

. 

o 

d 

O 

o 

O 

o 

d 

O 

O 

O 

O 

O 

o 


z 

£ 

Z 

Z 

Z 

Z 

z 

z 

z 

Z 

z 

Z 

Z 

z 

Z 

Z 

Z 

Z 

Z 

z 

Tuberculosis of Respiratory 





















System (No. 23) . 

96 

111 

98 

106 

112 

93 

105 

112 

86 

107 

44 

50 

43 

47 

49 

41 

46 

48 

37 

45 

Other forms of Tuberculosis 





















(Nos. 24-32) . 

30 

18 

24 

26 

15 

19 

25 

23 

34 

16 

14 

8 

11 

11 

7 

8 

11 

10 

14 

7 

Totals. 

126 

129 

122 

132 

127 

112 

130 

135 

120 

123 

58 

58 

54 

58 

56 

49 

57 

58 

51 

52 


Death Kale per 100,000 Persons Living. 












































































































































































































































































(No. 16.) 


24 


* 


Typhoid Fever. Diphtheria. 

Year, 1938. Year, 1938. 

Number of cases notified . 15 Number of cases notified . 343 

Number of deaths, year 1938 (calendar)— Number of deaths, year 1938 (calendar) — 

Males . — Males . 5 

Females . — Females . 5 


Scarlet Fever. 


Year. 

Cases. 

Deaths. 

Death rate per 
10,000 popu¬ 
lation- 

Cases per 1000 
persons liv¬ 
ing 

Deaths per 

1000 cases 

notified 

Death % of 

Cases. 

1923 ... 

604 

3 

•1 

2-79 

5-0 

0-5 

1924 . 

376 

3 

•1 

1-74 

8-0 

0-8 

1925 . 

288 

3 

•1 

1-34 

10-4 

1-0 

1926 . 

188 

1 

•05 

•88 

5-3 

0-5 

1927 . 

91 

2 

•1 

•43 

22-0 

2-2 

1928 . 

190 

1 

•05 

•88 

5-3 

0-5 

- fion 

JLi7£dU . 

314 

2 

•1 

1-44 

6-4 

0-6 

1930 . 

485 

8 

•4 

2-20 

16-5 

1-6 

1931 . 

265 



1-18 



1932 . ... 

417 

5 

•2 

1-84 

12-0 

1-2 

1933 . 

370 

4 

•2 

1-61 

10-9 

1-1 

1934 . 

362 

4 

•2 

1-58 

11-0 

1-1 

1935 . 

302 

1 

•05 

1-32 

3-3 

0-3 

1936 . 

478 

6 

•3 

2-07 

12-6 

1-3 

1937 . 

412 

2 

•1 

1-76 

4-9 

0-5 

1938 . . 

123 

! ' 


•52 




Diphtheria. 


Year. 

Cases. 

Death s. 

Death rate per 

10,000 popula¬ 

tion. 

Cases per 1000 

persons liv¬ 

ing 

Deaths per 

1000 cases 

notified. 

Death % of 

cases. 

1923 . 

870 

32 

1-5 

4-02 

36-8 

3-7 

1924 . 

597 

20 

•9 

2-76 

33-5 

3-4 

1925 . 

473 

13 

•6 

2-19 

27-5 

2-7 

1926 . 

347 

6 

•3 

1-62 

17-1 

1-7 

1927 . 

507 

10 

•5 

2-38 

19-7 

2-0 

1928 . 

908 

18 

•8 

4-21 

19-8 

2-0 

1929 . 

488 

18 

•8 

2-24 

36-9 

3-7 

1930 . 

573 

20 

•9 

2-59 

34-9 

3-5 

1931 . 

589 

19 

•8 

2-62 

32-3 

3-2 

1932 . 

455 

17 

•8 

1-96 

37-4 

3-7 

1933 . 

706 

16 

•7 

3-14 

22-3 

2-2 

1934 . 

491 

22 

•9 

2-14 

44-8 

4-5 

1935 . 

537 

24 

1-0 

2-34 

44-7 

4-5 

1936 . 

575 

20 

•9 

2-49 

34-8 

3-5 

1937 . 

305 

12 

•5 

1-30 

39-3 

3-9 

1938 . 

1 

343 

10 

•4 

1-46 

1 

29-2 

2-9 


/ 














































































25 


(No. 16.) 


Appendix VII. 


ANNUAL REPORT OF THE LACHLAN PARK HOSPITAL. 


Lachlan Park Hospital, 
New Norfolk, 6th July, 1939. 
Sir, 

I have the honour to submit the annual report of the 
Lachlan Park Hospital for the year ended 30th June, 1939, 
together with the statistical returns. 

General Statistics. 

On the 1st July, 1938, the number of patients on the 
register was 310 males and 325 females. During the year 
82 males and 68 females were admitted, making the total 
under treatment 392 males and 393 females. The number 
discharged was 107, of these, nine left the institution as 
recovered, 85 as relieved, and 13 as unimproved. The 
number of deaths was 47. The number of patients remain¬ 
ing on the register on the 30th June, 1939, was 313 males 
and 318 females, a total of 631, which was four less than 
at the commencement of the year. The daily number of 
patients was 640-67 compared with 633-78 the previous 
year. The proportion of certified insane to the general 
population of the State on 31st December, 1938, was 1 : 
363-83 as compared with 1 : 379-95 at the end of the same 
month last year. 

Admissions. 

The number of patients admitted was 150, as compared 
with 121 the previous year. Of these, 94 were new cases 
and 56 readmissions. The majority of patients admitted 
was again between the ages of 20 and 30 years, and 35 
and 50 years, the average being 41 years. A greater num¬ 
ber of males was again admitted between the ages of 20 
and 30 years, viz., 23 males against 11 females. Between 
the ages of 35 and 50 years, 16 males and 25 females were 
admitted. The chief causes of insanity were heredity and 
senility. 

Discharges. 

The number of patients discharged as recovered was 
nine, calculated on the number of admissions the recovery 
rate was 6-00, which was higher than that recorded for 
last year, when it was 5-78. The number of patients dis¬ 
charged as improved was 85, calculated on the number of 
admissions the improved rate was 56-67 as against 55-37 
last year. Thirteen patients were discharged as un¬ 
improved as against seven the previous year. Seven of 
these patients were transferred to the Royal Hobart Hos¬ 
pital for treatment and later readmitted, six being dis¬ 
charged to the care of their relatives. 

Deaths. 

The number of deaths was 47, being four less than the 
previous year. The death rate, calculated on the average 
number of daily residents was 7-34, this rate being slightly 
lower than last year, when it was 8-04. The average age 
at death was 63 years. The greater percentage of deaths 
were due to senility, broncho-pneumonia, and cardio¬ 
vascular diseases. 

General Health and Treatment. 

The general health of the patients has been very satis¬ 
factory, in spite of the fact that so many of them are very 
old and enfeebled. There has been no outbreak of 
infectious diseases during the year. Attention is drawn 
to the fact that more patients have been discharged this 
year than in any year previously. This is largely due to 
the results of insulin, cardiazol, somnifaine, and induced 
malarial therapy. The total number treated by one or other 
of these methods was 68, of whom 27 have already been 
discharged. 

The detailed results are as follows:— 


The X-ray plant referred to in last year’s report has 
been purchased and installed in a portion of one of the 
old wards specially renovated and converted for the pur¬ 
pose. It is reported that 281 X-ray examinations have 
been made, including 48 patients and 193 staff routine chest 
examinations. It has proved a most useful adjunct to 
diagnosis, and in many instances has done away with the 
necessity of having patients transferred to other hospitals 
for X-ray examinations. Excellent progress has been 
made along the lines of occupational therapy. The male 
class has been responsible for many particularly fine 
pieces of pottery. This year the artisan staff constructed 
a coke kiln for the baking of pottery to replace the electric 
kiln kindly lent us last year by Miss Poynter of Hobart. 

The female occupation therapy class has been under the 
direction of Miss McCullock of the Education Department. 
It is pleasing to note that there is now a greater tendency 
to place more importance in the therapeutic value of the 
work, rather than in the quality and quantity of the end 
result, and to approach the problem with a clearer and 
better understanding of the individual patient. Another 
important advance has been the introduction of organised 
classes in several of the female wards, where the more 
troublesome and demented patients are being instructed 
in basket-making and wickerwork. At the present moment 
groups of patients are mending wicker chairs, which they 
themselves helped to destroy a few months ago. 

As anticipated, the appointment of a female hairdresser 
and manicurist to the staff has proved to be of immense 
value in improving both the appearance and self-respect 
of the patients. One of the rooms adjoining the female 
occupational therapy room was specially converted into a 
hairdressing saloon, and was completely equipped by dona¬ 
tions from the Launceston branch of the Lachlan Park 
Auxiliary. 

Recently a special room in the men’s main building has 
has been renovated and equipped for use as a barber’s 
shop. 

Dental Work. 

The dental work of the patients has been carried out 
by the visiting dentist, Mr. H. B. McChristie. 

Religious Services. 

The various religious bodies have again conducted their 
good work and have held regular services throughout the 
year. They are of great help to the staff, and their work 
is much appreciated by the patients and also their rela¬ 
tives. 

Amusements and Recreations. 

The patients entertainments have been for the most 
part in the nature of regular dances, concerts, and moving 
pictures. Early in the year a fund was opened in order 
to raise a sufficient sum of money for the purchase of a 
modern talking machine. The machine and apparatus 
will be installed at the completion of the new recreation 
hall. 

The annual Christmas party for the patients was held 
on 20th December in the presence of many official visitors 
and patients’ relatives. 

The annual picnic, which was to have been held in 
February, had to be abandoned on account of unsuitable 
weather conditions. 

The new sports oval was officially opened by the late 
Premier, the Hon. A. G. Ogilvie, on 6th November, 1938. 
The oval has been leased to local football clubs for Satur¬ 
day afternoon football matches. This provides entertain¬ 
ment for the patients as well as a source of revenue for 
their entertainment fund. The artisan staff is now erect¬ 
ing a pavilion at the northern end of the sports ground. 


Type of Treatment. 

N umber 
Treated. 

Improved and 
Discharged. 

Improved 
but not 
Discharged. 

Still under 
Treatment. 

Not Improved. 

Insulin . 

15 

7 

4 

2 

2 

Cardiazol . 

35 

14 

10 

4 

7 

Somnifaine. 

14 

5 

5 

2 

2 

Marlaria. 

4 

1 

1 


2 





















* 


(No. 16.) 


26 


Hospital Auxiliaries. 

I must again express my deepest appreciation to the 
members of the Lachlan Park Hospital auxiliaries and the 
Country Womens’ Association, who, during the past year, 
have rendered valuable service to the hospital by providing 
comforts for the patients. 

Both the auxiliaries and Country Womens’ Association 
have held dances and other forms of entertainment, and 
have donated the proceeds of such functions to the appeal 
made to the public for funds to purchase a talkie picture 
machine for the hospital. 

I should also like to express my sincere thanks to the 
members of the Tasmanian Public Service who subscribed 
£24 towards the appeal. The total amount collected at 
30th June last was £211 14s. 8d., which is regarded as 
highly satisfactory. 

Buildings and Grounds. 

Since the completion of the new male buildings, there 
has been a rearrangement of wards. The female division 
has taken over what was formerly known as the boys’ 
cottage. This ward is now being used as a female 
infirmary. The female division, consisting of six wards, 
is now, for administrative purposes, subdivided into three 
subsections of two wards each, each subsection being in 
the charge of a fully trained sister. 

The male hospital and observation ward has been trans¬ 
ferred to one of the new buildings, where the accommo¬ 
dation is of the most modern type. The advantages of 
these new wards have been much appreciated by patients 
and staff. The former male hospital is now being used 
as a cottage for the imbecile type of patient. Since this 
rearrangement, the present male division consists of seven 
wards. The new lodge and iron entrance gates were com¬ 
pleted last November. 

The laundry has been refloored and this, to a limited 
extent, is somewhat improved. However, until accommo¬ 
dation and certain new machinery is provided, the laundry 
cannot possibly function as an efficient unit. 

It is pleasing to note that the buildings comprising the 
new administrative block, recreation hall, and staff dining¬ 
rooms, are well under construction, and should be ready 
for occupation early in 1940. It is then proposed to con¬ 
vert the present nurses’ dining-hall into a number of 
bedrooms in order to increase the accommodation in the 
home, as under the existing conditions a number of junior 
nurses are compelled to occupy most unsuitable temporary 
quarters in close proximity to the patients’ dormitories. 

Finance. 

The expenditure during the year for the Lachlan Park 
Hospital, exclusive of repairs and alterations, amounted 
to £65,018 6s. lid., as against £64,104 11s. the previous 
year, being an increase of £913 15s. lid. for the period 
under review. 

The principal factors contributing to this increase 
were:— 

(1) Salaries.—The expenditure against this item 

increased by £871 7s. lid. during the past 
financial year, the cause of the increase being 
partly due to automatic increases granted the 
junior members of the staff, the appointment to 
the staff of a female hairdresser, and also 
due to the fact that, during the past year, the 
nursing staff was nearly always at full strength, 
whereas for a considerable time during the 
previous year vacancies existed. 

(2) Provisions (Drugs, Stores, &c.).—This item, when 

compared with the previous year, shows an 
increase of £381 11s. 7d., which is accounted 
for by additional expenditure in connection with 
the treatment of patients by somnifaine, 
cardiazol, insulin, and malarial therapy. 

The revenue collected during the financial year was 
£8790 6s. 2d., as against £8196 19s. the previous year, being 
an increase of £593 7s. 2d. The nett daily cost of medical 
treatment and maintenance of patients was slightly lower 
than the previous year, the cost this year being 4s. 10-73d., 
as against 4s. ll-03d. the previous year. 

Staff. 

During the year 31 nurses resigned. This represents 
six more than last year when mention was made of the 
large numbers of resignations in the course of the year. 
There appear to be two main contributing factors:— 

1 . The unsuitability of the present accommodation for 

junior nurses. 

2. The difficulty in getting to and from Hobart in their 

off-duty hours. 


Nine members of the staff are at present on six months’ 
long-service leave. 

The results of the nursing examinations, 1939, were as 
follows:— 



N o. of 
Candidates. 

Passed. 

Failed. 

First Year Attendants . 




„ ,, Nurses . 

13 

6 

7 

Second Year Attendants .... 

5 

5 

— 

,, ,, Nurses. 

6 

6 

— 

Third Year Attendants. 

14 

7 

7 

„ „ Nurses . 

8 

7 

1 

Totals . . 

46 

31 

15 


Farm. 


The hospital farm again produced an adequate supply of 
milk, eggs, poultry, and vegetables. The total value of 
these products was greater during this year than that 
of the previous 12 months, as is revealed from the follow¬ 
ing figures:— 

Value of Production. 


Milk . 

Eggs and poultry 
Vegetables . 


1937-38. 

£ s. d. 

1525 9 0 

740 14 5 

752 7 5 


1938-39. 

£ s. d. 

1661 13 4 

763 6 1 

700 11 2 


Totals 


£3018 10 10 £3125 10 7 


Milk and eggs were again supplied to St. John’s Park, 
and vegetables donated to the Royal Hobart Hospital. 

It is with regret that I have to report that a very 
disasterous fire took place at the farm on 14th May last, 
when the barn, chaff-house, and stables were totally 
destroyed. A horse was burned to death, harness, imple¬ 
ments, and a large quantity of hay were also destroyed. 
The book value of the assets destroyed totalled £755 16s. 
Id. Insurance amounting to £558 12s. 3d. being recovered; 
therefore a loss of £197 3s. lOd. had to be charged against 
the profit and loss account for the past year’s operations. 

A departmental inquiry was held as to the cause of the 
outbreak, but, unfortunately, it was not possible to arrive 
at any conclusion as to the origin of same. 

During the past year one of the farm assistants met 
with an accident whilst on duty, which necessitated the 
engagement of a temporary hand for a period of approxi¬ 
mately four months. Two other farm assistants were 
granted long-service leave, which also required the engage¬ 
ment of relieving men. This additional expenditure, 
together with the loss from the fire, was the means of a 
nett loss of £121 14s. 4d. being revealed in the accounts for 
the period under review. These were factors over which 
I had no control; had they not taken place, a substantial 
profit would have been earned. 

I am very pleased with the work done on the farm 
during the past year, which should be the means of return¬ 
ing greater profits in the future. In addition to the farm 
being self-supporting, it gives healthy employment for 
several patients of the hospital, and would afford most 
congenial occupation for idiot patients now housed at 
St. John’s Park. 

Millbrook Psychopathic Home. 

The admissions to the home totalled 94 as against 79 
the previous year. Ninety-two patients were discharged, 
showing an increase of 17 over the number discharged 
the previous year. 

One patient committed suicide. Of those admitted, 22 
were convalescent patients transferred from Lachlan Park 
Hospital. 

Although not to the same extent as in previous years, 
there is still a number of unsuitable patients gaining 
admission, as is evident by the fact that 10 were subse¬ 
quently certified insane, and transferred to Lachlan Park. 
The general health of the patients has been satisfactory, 
37 patients received specialised treatment in the form of 
either cardiazol, insulin, somnifaine, or induced malarial 
therapy, in the majority of cases, with most gratifying 
results. Undoubtedly the availability of these modern 
modes of therapy has been directly responsible for the 
large increase of admissions this year. 


























27 


(No. 16.) 


Since the inception of the home in 1934, there has been 
a rapid increase in the number of admissions, and, con¬ 
sequently, the number of discharges annually. The home 
has proved itself to be, beyond expectations, a most 
valuable asset to this State, and this fact must be most 
gratifying to its pioneers who were largely responsible 
for its conception. 

It is now apparent that, in the very near future, further 
accommodation will be necessary. Two four-bed wards, 
an occupational therapy room, and a small operating 
theatre for minor surgery are urgently needed. 

As in previous years, occupational and recreational 
therapy have played a most important role in bringing 
about necessary psychological readjustments. Dances, 
concerts, and community singing were arranged by various 
auxiliary members for the benefit of the patients. 

Further improvements have been made to the ornamental 
gardens and golf-links. The whole of the buildings have 
keen recently repainted throughout. 

Finance. 

The expenditure during the year of the Millbrook 
Psychopathic Home amounted to £3123 4s. 5d., as against 
£3153 13s. 4d. the previous year, being a decrease of 
£30 8s. lid. The revenue collected amounted to £1231 
5s. 7d., as against £679 12s. 9d. the previous year, being 
an increase of £551 12s. lOd. Due to the extra revenue 
collected, I am pleased to be able to state that the nett 
daily cost of medical treatment and maintenance of 
patients was considerably lower this year, being 5s. 9-05d., 
as against 7s. 6-46d. the previous year. 


I should like to place on record my appreciation of the 
assistance rendered me by the members of the Millbrook 
Home Board, who, during the past year, have worked 
unceasingly for the advancement of the home, and a large 
measure of its success is due to these gentlemen. 

The staff, both at Lachlan Park Hospital and Millbrook, 
have rendered me excellent service during my third year of 
office, and I congratulate them on the efficient manner in 
which they have carried out their arduous duties. 

Before closing my report I should like to make reference 
to the Lunacy Act at present in force in this State. For 
some years it has been recognised as being most inade¬ 
quate, but it is now hoped that, in the near future, either 
a completely new Act will be drafted or that important 
alterations and additions be made to the existing Act. At 
present there is no legislation covering reception houses 
or licensed houses, no provision for voluntary boarders, 
nor is there any section authorising certified patients to 
be allowed out on parole without the authority of the 
official visitors. 

Important alterations are also needed in certain sections 
dealing with certification. 

I have, &c., 

C. R. D. BROTHERS, Medical Superintendent. 
The Director of Public Health. 


(No. 16.) 


28 


* 


Table 1. 


Table showing Admissions, Re-admissions, Discharges, and Deaths during the Year 1938-39. 


In Hospital on 30th June, 1938 . 

Admitted for the first time during 1938-39 
Re-admitted during the year 1938-39. 


Total under care during the year 1938-39 

Discharged and died during year 1938-39— 

Recovered. 

Improved... 

Unimproved . 

Died . 


Total discharged and died during the year 

Remaining in Hospital on 30th June, 1939 . 

Average daily number resident during 1938-39 . 


Males. 

Females. 

Total 

Males. 

Females. 

Total. 

... 

... 

... 

310 

325 

635 

54 

40 

94 




28 

28 

56 

82 

68 

150 





... 

... 

392 

393 

785 

5 

4 

9 




43 

42 

85 




8 

5 

13 




23 

24 

47 




... 

... 

... 

79 

75 

154 

... 

... 

... 

313 

318 

631 

... 

... 

... 

316-28 

324-39 

640-67 


Table 2. 

Table showing the manner in which Patients were admitted during the Year 1938-39. 


Private Orders. 

Justices’ Orders. 

Police Magistrates. 

Governor’s Warrant. 

Total Admissions. 

a! 

Females. 

Total. 

Males. 

Females. 

Total. 

Males. 

cn 

5 

53 

r-. 

Total. 

Males. 

Females. 

Total. 

Males. 

Females. 

1 

Total. 

23 

24 

47 

45 

38 

83 

14 

5 

19 

... 

1 

1 

82 

68 

150 



Males. 

Females. 

Total. 

First Admission .. 

54 

40 

94 

Second ,, .. 

15 

15 

30 

Third „ . 

4 

7 

11 

Fourth ,. . 

1 

2 

3 

Fifth „ . 

3 

1 

4 

Sixth „ . 

1 

• • • 

1 

Seventh ,, . 

• • • 

... 

... 

Eighth „ . 

1 

• • • 

1 

Ninth „ . 

1 

1 

2 

Tenth / „ . 

1 

• • • 

1 

Eleventh „ . 

1 

• • • 

1 

Thirteenth „ . 

• • • 

1 

1 

Fourteenth,, . 

... 

1 

1 

Total . 

82 

68 

150 












































































































29 


(No. 16.) 


Table 3. 


Table showing Probable Causes of Insanity in Patients admitted during 1938-39. 



Predisposing. 


Exciting. 


Total. 


Causes of Insanity. 

Males. 

Females. 

Total. 

Males. 

Females. 

Total. 

Males. 

Females. 

Total. 

M oral— 










Domestic Troubles and Bereavements 



... 

3 

3 

6 

3 

3 

6 

Business Worries . 



... 

4 

2 

6 

4 

2 

6 

Anxiety and Overwork . 



... 

5 

4 

9 

5 

4 

9 

Fright and Shock . 



... 

. • • 

1 

1 

• • • 

1 

1 

Love Affairs . 



... 

... 

1 

] 

••• 

l 

1 

Phvsical — 










Alcohol . . . 



• • • 

2 

3 

5 

2 

3 

5 

Venereal Diseases . 


... 


4 


4 

4 

t a • 

4 

Accident and Injury . . 



... 

2 


2 

o 

a a • 

2 

Puerperal . 



... 

... 

2 

2 

•. • 

2 

2 

Lactational . . 




... 

1 

1 

... 

1 

1 

Other Bodily Diseases . 

4 

3 

7 

1 

• • • 

1 

5 

3 

8 

Congenital Defect . 

• * . 

. . • 

. • . 

14 

12 

26 

14 

12 

26 

Puberty . 

9 

2 

11 

• • • 

• • • 

... 

9 

2 

11 

Climateric . 

1 

10 

11 

... 

... 

... 

1 

10 

11 

Senility . 

12 

4 

16 

... 

... 

... 

12 

4 

16 

Previous Attacks .... . 

9 

15 

24 

• •• 

... 

... 

9 

15 

24 

Hereditary Influences . 

6 

4 

10 

• •• 

. . • 

... 

6 

4 

10 

Epilepsy (acquired) . 

... 

... 


6 

... 

6 

6 

... 

6 












Table 4. 


Table showing the Form of Mental Disorder on Admission for 1938-39, and the Form of Mental Disorder 

of the Patients remaining on the Books on June 30th, 1939. 


Form of Mental Disorder, 

Admissions. 

Total. 

Remaining on Books. 

Males. 

Females. 

Males. 

Females. 

Total. 

I. Congenital Mental Deficiency (Idiocy or Imbecility) : 

1, Intellectual— 

(a) With Epilepsy . 

1 


1 

8 

9 

17 

( b ) Without Epilepsy. 

13 

7 

20 

94 

64 

158 

2. Moral. 

... 

5 

5 

3 

6 

9 

I. Insanity occurring late in Life : 

1. Insanity with Epilepsy .. 

5 


5 

7 

8 

15 

2. Dementia Paralytica . 

4 

... 

4 

3 

... 

3 

3. Gross Brain Lesions . 

1 

... 

1 

3 

1 

4 

4. Alcoholic Psychoses . 

. . • 

2 

2 

L 

1 

2 

5. Confusional or Exhaustive Psychoses. 

3 

4 

7 

... 

1 

1 

6. Mania— 

i. Recent . 

4 

1 

5 

1 

1 

2 

ii. Chronic. 

... 

... 

... 

6 

14 

20 

iii. Recurrent. 

2 

7 

9 

2 

1 

3 

7. Melancholia— 

i. Recent . 

2 

5 

7 

- 

2 

2 

ii. Chronic. 

... 


... 

4 

11 

15 

iii. Recurrent. .. 

2 

1 

3 

... 

1 

1 

8. Alternating Insanity . . 

6 

1 

rr 

i 

5 

11 

16 

9. Involutional Melancholia . 

1 

7 

8 

1 

4 

5 

10. Schizophrenia . 

19 

12 

31 

32 

30 

62 

11. Parephrenia. 

3 

10 

13 

26 

27 

53 

12. Paranoia . . 

1 

... 

1 

3 

6 

9 

13. Dementia— 

(a) Senile . 

12 

2 

14 

14 

14 

28 

(6) Secondary or Terminal . 

3 

4 

7 

100 

106 

206 


82 

68 

150 

313 

318 

631 






















































































































Table 5. 

Table showing the Number of Admissions, Re-admissions, Discharges and Deaths, and the Number of Patients Remaining in the Hospital on 30th June, 1929-1939, 


4 


(No. 16.) 


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Percentage of 

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•sajBjtf 

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Remaining 
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30th June, 
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31 


(No. 16.) 


Table 7. 


Table showing the Conjugal Conditions of Patients Admitted, Discharged, Died, and Remaining within 

the Hospital on 30t,h June, 1939. 


Conjugal Condition. 

Admissions. 

Discharges. 

Deaths. 

Patients 
on Register 
on 30th June, 
1938. 

Recovered. 

Relieved. 

Uni 

mproved. 

M. 

F. 

Total. 

M. 

F. 

Total. 

M. 

F. 

Total. 

M. 

F. 

Total. 

M. 

F. 

I Total. 

M. 

F. 

Total. 

Never married. 

56 

34 

90 

4 


4 

28 

19 

47 

7 

3 

10 

13 

9 

22 

243 

194 

437 

Married . 

21 

26 

47 

1 

4 

5 

14 

17 

31 

1 

1 

2 

6 

7 

13 

58 

105 

163 

Widowed . 

5 

8 

13 

, , 

. . 

•» • 

1 

6 

7 

, . 

1 

1 

4 

8 

12 

. . 

19 

19 

Unknown .. 
















12 


12 

Totals . 

82 

68 

150 

5 

4 

9 

43 

42 

85 

8 

5 

13 

23 

24 

47 

313 

318 

631 


Table 8. 

Table showing the Length of Residence of those Discharged and those Died during the 

Year 1938-39. 


Length of Residence. 


Under 1 month. 

1 month and under 3 months 
3 months 
6 
9 


55 

55 


51 

55 

55 


6 55 

9 „ 

1 year 


1 year and under 2 years. 


2 years 

3 
5 


7 

9 

12 

15 

20 

25 

30 

40 

50 

60 


55 

55 

55 

55 

55 

55 

55 

55 

55 

55 

55 

55 


55 

55 

55 

55 

55 

55 

55 

55 

15 

55 

55 

55 

55 


3 

5 

7 

9 

12 

15 

20 

25 

30 

40 

50 

60 

70 


55 

n 

99 

9> 

99 

9> 

99 

9i 

99 

99 

99 

99 

99 


Discharges 


Recovered. 

Relieved. 

Unimproved. 

Total 

Discharges. 

Deaths. 

M. 

F. 

Total. 

M. 

F. 

Total. 

M. 

F. 

Total. 

M. 

F. 

Total. 

M. 

F. 

Total. 

1 


1 

5 

2 

7 

3 


3 

9 

2 

11 

6 


6 

3 

3 

6 

16 

11 

27 

. . . 

1 

1 

19 

15 

34 

3 

... 

3 




10 

8 

18 

1 

. .. 

1 

11 

8 

19 

3 

1 

4 




2 

6 

8 


. •• 

t . . 

2 

6 

8 

... 

2 

2 

1 

1 

2 

2 

i 

3 


, . , 


3 

2 

5 

2 

1 

3 




4 

3 

7 


... 

. . . 

4 

3 

7 

2 

2 

4 




• • • 

5 

5 


... 

. . . 

... 

5 

5 

... 

1 

1 




... 

3 

3 


1 

1 

* . • 

4 

4 

2 

4 

6 




1 

... 

1 

1 

... 

1 

2 

• •• 

2 

... 

1 

1 




1 

1 

2 

1 

• • • 

1 

2 

1 

3 

... 

2 

2 




1 

• • • 

1 

• • • 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

3 

4 




• • • 

1 

1 

... 

2 

2 

. . , 

3 

3 

1 

1 

2 




• • • 

1 

1 

• • • 


• • • 

• . • 

1 

1 

... 

1 

1 

• • • 



... 


• • • 

. . . 


... 

... 

. . . 

... 

1 

... 

1 




• • • 


... 

1 


1 

1 

. * • 

1 

... 

1 

1 




l 


1 

1 


1 

2 

. * * 

2 

2 

3 

5 

... 


• • • 

... 


... 

... 


... 


... 

... 


1 

1 

5 

4 

9 

^ 1 

CO | 

42 

85 

8 

5 

13 

56 

51 

107 

23 

24 

47 




































































































































































(No. 16.) 


32 




Table 9. 


Table showing in Quinquennial Periods the Ages of those Admitted, Discharged, and Died during 
the Year 1938-39, and those Remaining within the Hospital on 30th June, 1939. 







Admitted 

• 

Discharges. 


Patients on 
Register at 



Ages- 

• 


Re¬ 

covered. 

Re¬ 

lieved. 

Unim¬ 

proved. 

Total 

Discharged. 




30th June. 
1939. 






Males. 

Females. 

Total. 

Males. 

Females. 

Total. | 

ff. 

Qj 

1 Females.; 

| Total. 

| Males. | 

| Females. 

| Total. 

j Males. 

Females. 

Total. 

| Males. 

1 

Females. 

Total. 

j Males. 

Females. 

j Total. 





2 

2 

4 
















3 

2 

5 




















5 

1 

6 

" J 

10 

15 

20 

25 

30 

35 

40 

45 

50 

55 

60 

65 

70 

75 

80 

85 

90 



15 

20 

25 

30 

35 

40 

45 

50 

55 

60 

65 

70 

75 

















1 


1 

3 

4 

7 

15 

51 

11 . 

5 

2 

7 




2 

1 

3 




2 

1 

3 

1 


1 

13 

7 

20 

11 

15 

11 

11 

11 . 

15 . 

15 

8 

11 

8 

7 

6 

5 

21 

13 
20 

14 

15 
12 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

2 

13 

7 

3 

3 

16 

10 

12 

7 

3 

... 

3 

17 

8 

3 

4 

20 

12 

1 


1 

18 

10 

15 

11 

33 

21 

11 

11 

11 

51 

11 . 

11 . 

9 

6 

8 

11 

5 

6 

4 

2 

1 

1 

7 

6 

2 

5 

1 

l 

1 

2 

8 

7 

8 

1 

16 

8 

1 

2 

2 

3 

2 

25 

31 

19 

21 

44 

52 

15 

11 

11 . 


6 

8 




3 

6 

9 


1 

1 

28 

32 

60 

11 

11 

1? . 

1 



12 

12 


2 

2 

14 

14 


1 

1 

39 

36 

75 

11 

55 

11 

11 

15 

51 

11 . 

.9 . 

15 . 

3 

2 

6 

8 

8 

10 

1 

i 

1 

1 

5 

1 

4 

4 

1 

4 

9 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

6 

2 

5 

4 

2 

6 

10 

1 

1 

1 

4 

1 

1 

5 

2 

2 

32 

21 

26 

33 

38 

28 

65 

59 

54 

1 1 

11 

51 . 

2 

1 

1 

3 




1 


1 




1 


1 


3 

3 

17 

35 

52 

11 

15 

11 . 

7 

8 





2 

2 

2 


2 

2 

2 

4 

5 

3 

8 

21 

17 

38 

55 

15 

80 

85 

90 

95 

11 . 

o 

1 

3 







1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

2 

6 

4 

10 

13 

9 

22 

51 

11 

11 . 

3 

3 













2 

4 

6 

7 

6 

13 

’1 

11 

15 . 


1 

1 













1 


1 

1 

3 

4 

55 

11 

15 . 

... 















.. 



1 

1 

15 

51 

15 . 

... 



















_ 



Totals . 



82 

68 

150 

5 

4 

9 

43 

42i85 

8 

5 

13 

56 

51 

107 

23 

24 

47 

313 

318 

631 










1 














Table 10. 


Table showing the Causes of Deaths during the Year 1938-39. 


Causes of Deaths. 

Males. 

Females. 

Total. 

Diseases ot the Nervous System— 

General Paralvsis of the Insane. 

2 

1 

3 

Enilensv. 


1 

1 

Cerebral Softening . 




Cerebral Haemorrhage. 

1 


1 

Diseases ot the Cardio-Vascular System - 

Arteriosclerosis. 

5 

1 

6 

Auricular Fibrillation . 


1 

1 

Coronary Disease . 

1 


1 

Chronic Myocardial Degeneration . 

1 

3 

4 

Valvular Disease of the Heart . 


1 

1 

Diseases of the Respiratory System — 

Lobar and Broncho Pneumonia. 

2 

7 

9 

Pulmonary Tuberculosis. 

2 

1 

3 

Other forms of Pulmonary Disease . 

1 

1 

2 

Diseases of the Digestive System — 

Diseases of the Genito-Urinary System .. 



Chronic Nephritis. 

1 

o 

2 

3 

General Diseases— 

Dysentery . . 


2 

Malignancy . 

1 

i 

o 

Senility . 

5 

2 

7 

Hodgkins Disease . 

1 


1 

o 



23 

24 

47 





































































































































33 


(No. 16.) 


Table 11. 


Table showing Expenditure and Receipts for the Year ended 30th June, 1939, together with Cost of 
Maintenance of Patients for the same Period and the previous Ten Years. 


Lachlan Park Hospital— 

Salaries . . 

Dentist . 

Travelling Expenses, including Official Visitors . 

Provisions, Clothing, Fuel, Drugs, Stores, Incidental Expenses, &c.... 

Repairs and Alterations. 

Expenses Relieving Stokers on Leave. 

Temporary Assistance. 

Wages of Stokers .. 

Gross Expenditure . 


Millbrook Psychopathic Home— 

Salaries. 

Expenses of Board. 

Provisions, Clothing, Fuel, Drugs, Stores, Incidental Expenses, &c... 

Repairs and Alterations. 

Temporary Assistance. .. 


Total Gross Expenditure 
Repairs and Alterations. 


Total Ordinary Gross Expenditure 


Fees for Medical Treatment and Maintenance— £ s. d. 

Lachlan Park Hospital . 8636 10 2 

Millbrook Psychopathic Home. 1231 5 7 

Miscellaneous, Lachlan Park Hospital . 


Total Nett Expenditure 



£ 

s. 

d. 

£ s. 

d. 


40,952 

19 

6 




52 

0 

0 




51 

8 

4 




22,675 

15 

11 




998 

10 

10 




3 

2 

8 




1013 

15 

10 




269 

4 

8 




66,016 

17 

9 

66,016 17 

9 


1905 

0 

4 




152 

2 

7 




893 

0 

1 




112 

16 

11 




60 

4 

6 




3123 

4 

5 

3123 4 

5 





69,140 2 

2 



•• 


1111 7 

9 



•• 


68,028 14 

5 

1 

s 

9867 

15 

9 



153 

16 

0 

10,021 11 

9 

... 

58,007 2 

8 


Lachlan Park Hospital. 

On Gross On Nett 
Expenditure. Expenditure. 


Millbrook Psychopathic Home. 

On Gross On Nett 
Expenditure. Expenditure. 


Cost per head per day for year 



33 

33 

33 

55 

33 

33 

33 

55 

33 

33 

33 

55 

33 

33 

33 

55 

33 

33 

33 

55 

33 

33 

33 

33 

33 

33 

33 

33 

33 

33 

33 

33 

33 

33 

33 

33 

33 

33 

33 



s. 

d. 

s. 

d. 


s. 

d. 

s. 

d. 

1928-29. 

5 

1-22 

4 

4-80 

1935-36. 

7 

2-34 

3 

9-49 

1929-30. 

5 

2-00 

4 

3-93 

1936-37. 

8 

10-75 

5 

4-23 

1930-31. 

4 

904 

3 

11-02 

1937-38. 

9 

7-31 

7 

6-46 

1931-32 . 

3 

11-85 

3 

1-16 

1938-39 . 

9 

5-99 

5 

9-05 

1932-33 . 

3 

11 -oo 

3 

2*27 






1933-34 . 

3 

11-21 

3 

3-22 






1934-35 . 

4 

7-46 

3 

10-31 






1935-36 . 

4 

8-86 

4 

1-14 






1936-37 . 

5 

515 

4 

9-45 






1937-38 . 

5 

7-53 

4 

11-03 






1938-39 . 

5 

7-75 

4 

10-73 







Table 12. 

Table showing the Rate of Certified Insane and Admissions to the Population for the Year 

ended 31st December, 1938. 


State. 

Population at 31st December, 1938. 

Proportion of Insane per 
1000 of Population. 

Proportion of Admissions 
per 10,000 of Population. 

Males. 

Females. 

Total. 

Males. 

Females. 

Total. 

Males. 

Females. 

Total. 

Tasmania. 

119,046 

115,261 

234,307 

2-67 

2-83 

2-75 

5-96 

4-95 

5-46 

Queensland . 

525,271 

478,879 

1,004,150 

3-91 

3-07 

3-51 

6-39 

6-03 

6-22 

New South Wales . 

1,379,962 

1,355,733 

2,735,695 

4-37 

4-11 

4-24 

6-44 

5-96 

6-20 

South Australia . 

297,549 

297,560 

595,109 

3-13 

2-75 

2-94 

4-27 

4-13 

4-20 

Victoria . 

922,887 

944,931 

1,867,818 

3-76 

4-08 

3-92 

4-80 

4-91 

4-86 

Western Australia . 

243,559 

218,902 

462,461 

3-75 

2-53 

3-19 

3-66 

2-1 

2-91 






























































































4 


(No 16) 


34 


Table 13. 

MILLBROOK PSYCHOPATHIC HOME. 


Statement showing Form of Mental Disorder on Admission for year ended 30th June, 1939 



Males. 

Females. 

Total. 

Neurosis— 




(1) Anxiety Statisis. 

6 

10 

16 

(2) Obsessional Neurosis .,. 

— 

1 

1 

(3) Hysteria. 

— 

3 

3 

(4) Neurasthenia. 

4 

3 

7 

(5) Adolescent Instability .. .. 

— 

1 

1 

(6) Traumatic Neurosis. 

1 

— 

1 

Early and Mild Psychosis — 




(1) Epilepsy. 

1 

1 

2 

(2) Cerebral Syphilis (including General Paraivsis of the Insane) 

7 

— 

7 

(3) Mental Disorders associated with grosser brain lesions.... 

3 

1 

4 

(4) Tonic and exhaustion state. 

2 

1 

3 

(5) Schizophrenia . 

11 

9 

20 

(6) Manic depressive state.. 

4 

2 

6 

(7) Simple Melancholia .. 

4 

6 

10 

(8) Involutional Melancholia . 

2 

7 

9 

(9) Early Paranoidal state . 

1 

1 

2 

(10) Post Alcoholic Psychosis. 

2 

— 

2 


48 

46 

94 































35 


(No. 16.) 


Appendix VIII. 


ANNUAL REPORT OF ST. JOHN’S PARK. 


Sir, 


St. John’s Park, New Town, 

29th August, 1939. 


I have the honour to submit the annual report govern¬ 
ing the activities of St. John’s Park during the year 
1938-39. 


Admissions. 

There were 289 persons admitted into the institution, of 
whom 219 were males and 70 females. These figures 
show a decrease over those for the previous year, when 
251 males and 93 females were admitted. 


Discharges. 

The number of persons discharged was 228 (186 males 
and 42 females). These figures also show a decrease over 
those for 1937-38 when 190 males and 62 females were 
discharged. 

Mortality. 

Deaths totalled 70 (40 males and 30 females), as com¬ 
pared with 88 (58 males and 30 females) during the 
previous year. The average age of the people who died 
in the institution was 75-54 years. 

Daily Average. 

The daily average number of ordinary inmates in the 
institution was 312-35 (201-06 males and 111-2S females), 
a decrease of 2-27 over the preceding year, when the 
figures were 314-62 (201-53 males and 113-09 females). 
The daily average number of resident after-care patients 
was 44-8, compared with 39-4 for 1937-38. 

The daily average for the whole of the institution was 
357-23, an increase of 3-17 over the previous year. 

Average Age. 

Excluding the after-care patients the average age of 
persons residing in the institution was 50-32 years. 

Revenue. 

The revenue received from all sources totalled £6198 
11s. 7d., being an increase of £623 15s. Id. compared with 
the previous year. 

Expenditure. 

The expenditure on the upkeep of the institution 
amounted to £23,064 18s. 7d. 

Number of Diets. 

There was an increase of 10,049 diets over the previous 
year, the total figures being as follows:—Ordinary 
inmates, 114,110; after-care patients, 16,383; making a 
total of 130,493, as against 120,454 the previous year 
(114,814 ordinary and 5640 after-care diets). 

Gross and Net Cost of Maintenance. 

There was a slight increase in the gross and net cost 
of maintenance, the figures being as follows:—Gross cost 
for the year 1938-39, 3s. 6-42d. per day as against 3s. 5-8d. 
the previous year, whilst the net cost for 1938-39 was 
2s. 7-79d., compared with 2s. 6-7d. in 1937-38. 

General Observations. 

During the year 1937-38 a plan for general improve¬ 
ments to the wards and buildings was inaugurated, and it 
is very gratifying to be able to record the fact that 
this work has been kept well up to schedule, several of the 
renovations and improvements being commented upon most 
favourably by the many visitors to the institution. 

A modern electric bread and meat cutting machine was 
purchased during the year, and its installation has 
resulted in a considerable saving being effected, as it 
eliminates all waste. 


Gellibrand House. 

It is extremely gratifying to place on record the fact 
that the Tasmanian Veteran’s Trust have, during the past 
year, erected a splendid building of 37 beds, two spacious 
lounge rooms, a dining-room and two luxuriously 
equipped bathrooms for the housing of War Veterans and 
others at St. John’s Park, and it is very fitting that it has 
been named “ Gellibrand House,” in honour of Major- 
General Sir John Gellibrand, who has been very closely 
connected with the Tasmanian Veteran’s Trust since its 
inception. 

At the end of the year the furnishing of the building 
was well under way, and it will be ready for occupation 
early in the current financial year. 

Library. 

The institution library has been equipped with a suffici¬ 
ently large number of modern books of fiction, &c., to meet 
the requirements of the large number of inmates who 
patronise its facilities. Although most of these volumes 
were purchased, our grateful thanks are extended to all 
those donors whose generous gifts of books and papers 
helped considerably in bringing the library up to its 
present satisfactory position. 

As the library is furnished also with very comfortable 
lounges, easy chairs, and a billiard-table, the leisure hours 
of the inmates pass very happily indeed. 

Grounds. 

The grounds of the institution, formerly used as a 
vegetable garden, have been laid out in lawns. This con¬ 
stitutes the foundation of a plan which is under con¬ 
sideration for their ultimate conversion into park grounds 
for the greater comfort and pleasure of the inmates. 

Thanks for Donations. 

It is my pleasing duty, on behalf of the inmates of St. 
John’s Park, to convey very grateful and sincere thanks 
to all those kind persons who once again sc generously 
made various donations during the year. 

Government Medical Officer. 

During the absence of the Medical Superintendent, Dr. 
J. A. Oliphant, who took charge of the Zeehan District 
hospital at the beginning of January last, the sick folk 
in the institution received every attention from Drs. 
Chalmers, Shatin, and W. J. Freeman, and our thanks 
are extended to them for the kindly interest they dis¬ 
played in their well-being. 

Devotional. 

The spiritual welfare of the inmates has received every 
attention by the various denominations, regular services 
being held in the institution. 

Staff. 

I regret to announce the resignation at the end of the 
year of the Medical Superintendent, Dr. J. A. Oliphant, 
who accepted the position of Medical Superintendent of 
the Zeehan District Hospital. 

During the period Dr. Oliphant was in charge at St. 
John’s Park, he performed extremely valuable and useful 
service, and many improvements to the institution and 
the welfare and comfort of the inmates were put into 
operation by him. 

In conclusion, I desire to express sincere thanks to the 
members of the staff for their loyal co-operation, and the 
manner in which they carried out their duties during the 
year. 


I have, &c., 

L. WOODHOUSE, Secretary. 
The Director of Public Health. 



(No. 16.) 


36 




Appendix IX. 


MENTAL DEFICIENCY ACT. 

Government Institution for Defectives at St. John’s Park, New Town. 


TABLE showing classes of Mental Defectives in the 
Institution on 30th June, 1939. 


Idiots . 

Males. 

. 1 

Females. 

Total. 

1 

Imbeciles . 

. 10 

14 

24 

Feebleminded . 

. 45 

19 

64 

Moral defectives . 

. 1 

1 

2 

Note.—Seven persons 

57 

are under 16 years 

34 

of age. 

91 


Forty-six defectives (numbering 30 males and 16 
females) originally placed in the Government Institution 
for Defectives at St. John’s Park, New Town, are under 
guardianship or supervision in the community. 

Twenty-seven mental defectives, originally placed In 
either the Government Institution for Defectives at St. 
John’s Park, New Town, or in the Government Institution 
for Defectives at His Majesty’s Gaol, Hobart, and trans¬ 
ferred under Section 35 of the Mental Deficiency Act, 1920, 
to the Lachlan Park Hospital, New Norfolk, are inmates 
of the Lachlan Park Hospital. 


Appendix X. 


ANNUAL REPORT OF THE HOME FOR INVALIDS. 


Home for Invalids, 

Mulgrave-street, 
Launceston, June 5th, 1939. 
Sir, 

I have the honour to submit the annual report concern¬ 
ing the Home for Invalids for the year 1938. 

Admissions. 

Admissions for the year were 36, of whom 22 were 
males and 14 females, in comparison with the preceding 
year, when there were six males admitted and two females. 

Discharges. 

The number of persons discharged was 12 (nine males 
and three females), being nine more than the previous 
year. 

Mortality. 

The number of deaths was 20 (13 males and seven 
females), whereas for the preceding year the number was 
two males. 

Daily Average. 

The daily average for the year was 34-8, the average 
age being 6L8. 

Improvements. 

It is gratifying to note that the wards have been painted, 
and therefore give a more cheerful aspect. The wooden 


benches in the patients’ sitting-rooms have been removed 
and replaced by leather chairs. Much pleasure has been 
afforded the patients by a radio set, which was bequeathed. 

Entertainments of Inmates. 

During the year frequent concert parties were given, 
which were much appreciated by the inmates. Outings to 
the country and seaside were arranged for those able to go. 

The management of the Star and the Princess Theatres 
have generously made it possible for the patients to see 
several programmes. 

Donations. 

The Northern Tasmanian Trotting Club liberally 
donated 12 bed-tables, two armchairs, and four garden- 
seats. The Apex Club was responsible for the acquisition 
of new china. 

Special thanks are due to the Exton and Ravenswood 
Branches of the Country Womens’ Association for their 
tireless and unceasing work and interest during the year. 

Devotional. 

Regular church services have been held by the clergy 
and laity of the different denominations. 

I have, &c., 

B. CAMPBELL, Matron. 

The Director of Public Health. 





H. H. Pimblett, Government Printer, Tasmania.