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COLLECTION OF 
NINETEENTH CENT|JRY • 
BRITISH SOCIAL HISTORY 


young UNIVERSITY 







































Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2019 with funding from 
Brigham Young University 


https://archive.org/details/bandofhopechroni1887unit 


THE 



andAp Chronicle. 


ISSUED BY THE 


UNITED KINGDOM BAND OF HOPE ONION. 


1887. 


ILonticm : 


United Kingdom Band of Hope Union, 


4, LUDGATE HILL. 














1TB 


IUDEX 


PAGE 

Biographical Sketch. 

Hoyle, William .. .. .. i 


Correspondence. 

A Letter from Australia.. .. 132 

A Pleasant and Useful Variety.. 65 

Bands of Hope in Workhouse 
Schools.. .. .. 11,28,48 

Drum and Fife Bands .. .. 40 

Magic Lantern Slides .. .. 30 

Our Senior Members 30, 37, 6i, 116 

Temperance Teaching in 

Schools.. .. .. 11,19,47 

Workhouse Schools, Bands of 


Hope in.. .. .. 11. 

28, 48 

Dialogues. 


Father has Signed the Pledge. 

. 180 

Two to One 

*3 

What my Father says .. 

. 118 


General Temperance Topics. 

16, 36, 52, 68, 84, 120, 136, 152, 168, 
184. 

Gleanings and Illustrations. 

4, 7, 14, 59, 82, 91, 92, 98, 108, 109, 
123, 124, 126, 127, 131, 138, 143, 
146, 148, 154, 158, 159. 


Music. 


Come, Thirsty Friends .. 


128 

Freedom 


60 

Guardian Children 


26 

-He who Decks the World 


112 

Jubilee Song 


93 

Onward Pressing 


177 

The Temperance Banner 


45 

There is Light Behind the Hill 

144 

To thee, dear Fatherland 


8 


Obituary. 

PAGE 

Affleck, Rev. W. B. 

• • U 3 

Barlow, James, J.P. 

• • 150 

Murphy, Rev. G. M. 

.. 121 

Rains, William .. 

.. 150 

Shirley, Mrs. Stephen .. 

66 


Our Book Table. 

12, 64, 81, 149, 194. 

Outline Addresses. 

Series I.— Temperance Lessons 


from Aesop's Fables, 

1. The Dog and the Shadow .. 3 

2. The Fox in the Well .. 21 

3. The Lion and the Mouse .. 41 

4. The Wind and the Sun .. 55 

5. The Cat and the Mice .. 71 

6. The Fox and the Sick Lion 89 

7. The Countryman and the 

Snake .. .. .. 107 

8. The Fox without a Tail .. 124 

9. The Horse and the Lion .. 140 

10. The Cat and the Fox .. 155 

11. The Two Frogs .. .. 173 

12. The Swallow and the Birds 186 


Series II.— Peeps at Temperance 
Work and Workers. 

1. The Beginnings of Tempe¬ 

rance Work. 

2. The Great Temperance 

Leagues 

3. The United Kingdom 

Alliance ; or, Temperance 
Work amongst the Voters 

4. Women’s Temperance Work 

5. Sunday Closing 

6. Temperance Work by 

Doctors .. 

7. The Temperance Work of 

the Churches. 

8. Temperance Life Assurance 


tage 

Series II. continued — 

9. Temperance Work among 

Young People .. .. 141 

10. Good Templars, Blue 

Ribbonites, and others .. 156 

11. Temperance Benefit 

Societies; or, Tempe¬ 
rance and Thrift .. .. 174 

12. Our Band of Hope .. .. 187 


Series III.— Physiology and 


1. 

Alcohol. 

Introductory 

5 

2. 

Muscles or Fleshy Parts .. 

23 

3 - 

The Brain 

43 

4 - 

The Nervous System 

57 

5 - 

The Heart and large Blood¬ 


vessels. 

73 

6. 

Arteries, Veins, and Capil¬ 


laries 

9 i 

7- 

Description of the Blood : 


Its Use 

109 

8. 

Breathing. The Lungs .. 

126 

9 - 

Digestion. The Mouth and 



Stomach .. 

142 

10. 

Liver andlntestines.Kidneys 

157 

11. 

The Skin. Perspiration, &c. 

175 

12. 

Conditions of Health. Life 


and Death 

188 


Series IV.— Miscellaneous. 


1. Why do I belong to the 

4 Band of Hope ? .. .. 6 

2. Two Sticks .. .. .. 24 

22 3. Lady Nature’s Lessons .. 44 

4. A Legend of Long Ago .. 58 

5. The Nature and Effects of 

42 f Intoxicating Drinks .. 74 

56 6. Habits .. .. .. 92 

72 7. Water .. .. .. no 

8. Lessons from Leaves .. 127 

90 9. A Bit of Coral .. .. 143 

10. The Diver. .. .. .. 158 

108 ir. The Children’s Sword .. 176 

125 12. The Five-barred Gate .. 1S9 












tv. 


INDEX. 


PAGE 


Series V.— Tobacco. 

i. Its Effect upon the Body .. 7 

2 Its Effect upon the Mind .. 59 

3. Its Effect upon Morals .. in 

4. Its Effect upon Society .. 159 


Special Addresses. 

Christmas and New Year’s Col¬ 
lection .. .. .. .. 191 

Our Motto Card for 1888 .. 190 


Papers, Essays, and Address:s. 


A Good Record .. .. .. 85 

A Hundred Years Ago .. .. 139 

A Village Waif, and How he 

Prospered .. .. .. 129 

Are Separate Meetings for J unior 
and Senior Members desirable 115 
Band of Hope Movement .. 169 

Bands of Plope in Workhouse 
Schools .. .. .. 28, 48 

Christian Church and the Band 
of Hope Movement .. .. 170 

Claims of the Band of Hope 
Movement on the Christian 
■s^Church .. .. ..170 

Day Schools, Temperance 

Teaching in .. .. 17, 4G 

How we Manage our Band of 
Hope .. .. .. .. 95 

Leakage, its Cause and Cure .. 13S 

May Meetings ot kindred 
Societies .. .. .. 103 

Music as an Aid to Band of 
Hope Work .. .. 53, 69 

Our Advocacy .. .. .. 137 

Our Senior Members .. 37,61, 116 

Senior Bands of Hope: From a 
Member’s Point of View .. 192 

Prevention better than Cure .. 113 

Speaking to Children .. .. 180 

Summer Work .. ... .. 114 

Sunday Schools, Temperance 
Teaching in .. .. .. 178 

Temperance Lectures in Day 
Schools.. .. .. .. 64 

Temperance Life and Health .. 122 

Temperance Teaching in Day 
Schools .. .. 17, 46 


PAGE 

Papers, Essays, &c., continued —■ 
Temperance Teaching in 
Sunday Schools .. .. 17S 

Temperance Work on the Con¬ 
tinent .. .. .. .. 153 

1 he Band of Hope Movement 169 
The Queen and the Temperance 

Movement .. .. .. 106 

The Queen's Jubilee .. .. 105 

Visitation of Absent Members.. 97 

Why should we join the Union ? 147 

Workhouse Schools, Bands of 
Hope in .. .. 28, 48 


Portrait. 

Hoyle, William .. .. .. i 


Recitation. 

Little Kitty 


Records of Progress. 

15, 35, 5L 67, 82, 98, 104, hi, 119, 
135 , I 5 L I& 7 , 182, 195 

United Kingdom Band of Hope 
Union. 

Adkins, Mr. Frank 33, 66, 166 

Addresses and Examination for 

1888 .1S5 

Anniversary Meetings .. .. 99 

Autumnal Conference 132, 150, 161 

Bell, Mr. William .. 34, 66, 132 
Burgess, Mr. John .. .. 34 

Christmas and New Year's Col¬ 
lection .. .. .. 49 

Chronicle Addresses, 1887 .. jo 

,, ,, 1888 .. 185 

Competitive Examination 

. , . . 34 , b 5 , 75 , 123 

Dissolving View Lectures 34, 160 
Edwards, Mr. Walter N. 34, 89 

Jubilee Address to the Queen 105, 132 
Lectures by Dr. B. W. Richard¬ 
son .. 105, 150, 160, 172 


PAGE 

Band of Hope Union continued — 
Lectures in Provincial Schools 66,192 
National Band of Hope Bazaar 49, 89 
New President of the Union 2 
New Year’s Gathering .. .. 31 

May Meetings, The .. .. 65 

Speaker’s Companion, The .. 160 


Miscellaneous. 

Band of Hope and Sunday 
School Excursions .. .. 107 

Band of Hope Motto Card .. 30 

Bands of Hope and Penny Banks 149 
Bands of Hope in Workhouse 
Schools .. .. 11,48 

Band of Hope Programmes .. 25 

British Temperance League .. 134 

Convention of Temperance 
Workers .. .. .. 47 

Courtenay, Rev. C. .. .. 24 

Crystal Palace Fete .. 106, 133 

Dr. Richardson on Bands of 

Hope.50 

Early Workers .. .. .. 154 

Illustrations for Addresses 131, 146 

International Congress on 

Inebriety .. .. .. 134 

Irish Temperance League .. 25 

Jottings from Jail .. .. 148 

J ubilee Song .. .. .. 70 

Musicat Crystal Palace Concerts 40 
Popular Lectures by Dr. Richard¬ 
son .103 

Prize Essays by the Working 
Classes .. .. ., 30 

Simple Experiments for Bands 


of Hope .. .. .. 47 

Spread of Temperance Litera¬ 
ture .30 

Sunday Reading .. .. 21 

Sunday School Music .. .. 89 

Temperance Convention, Ade¬ 
laide, Australia .. .. 89 

Temperance Festival Music .. 54 

Temperance Sunday .. .. 172 

Temperance as Taught in the 
Revised Bible .. .. .. 24 

Temperance Teaching in Schools 11 
Testimonial to Mr. Robert Rae 133 
The Loss of an Old Friend .. 121 

United Kingdom Alliance .. 173 






THE 

Bronicfe 

Issued Monthly by the United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 




WILLIAM HOYLE. 


One of the Honorary ^Secretaries of the Lancashire and Cheshire Band cf Hope Union, &c. 


ROMINENT in the list of Band of 
Hope workers known throughout 
the country, stands the name of 
William Hoyle, the author of 
numerous temperance hymns, songs, 
and recitations, and one of the 
Honorary Secretaries of the Lan¬ 
cashire and Cheshire Band of Hope 
Union. For the past quarter of a century Mr. 
JANUARY, 1887. 


Hoyle has been conspicuous for his unremitting 
labours, and his musical and literary abilities 
have been of immense value in the spread 
of the movement. 

Mr. Hoyle was born in Manchester on 
September 4th, 1834. His training from the first 
was of a religious character, and his career well 
illustrates the contention that the best work for 
humanity is effected by those who from their 












2 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


youth up have been guided in the “narrow way.” 
His mental powers, when a young man, found 
useful exercise in membership of a Literary 
Society, and at various evening classes he laid 
the foundation of a good secular education. The 
musical ability which proved so great an 
advantage in his later career was developed by 
the Tonic Sol-fa system, and he often speaks in 
terms of indebtedness of his teacher, Mr. Robert 
Griffiths, formerly the conductor of many 
popular classes in Manchester, now Secretary 
of the Tonic Sol-fa College, and for many years 
past a warm friend of the temperance movement. 

The Band of Hope movement spread rapidly 
in Lancashire, but there was wanting that 
vigorous, concerted action which a large and 
well-developed organisation can alone secure. 
This fact was seriously impressed upon Mr. 
Hoyle as he travelled in various parts of the 
two neighbouring counties of Lancashire and 
Cheshire visiting the Societies. Bands of Hope 
did well for a time whilst the first enthusiasm 
lasted, but when this waned a considerable pro¬ 
portion began to decline, and even die away for 
want of timely counsel and support. The workers 
became discouraged, and it was abundantly 
evident that something must be done to bring 
about a better condition of the movement. It 
was at this crisis—the close of the year 1862— 
that a small band of workers met at the resi¬ 
dence of Mr. Hoyle, in Manchester, to consider 
the position of affairs, when a resolution was 
passed affirming the necessity for a Band of 
Hope Union for the two counties. Acting upon 
this resolution, Mr. Hoyle convened a second 
meeting on February 6th, 1863, in Union 
Chambers, Dickinson Street, Manchester, and 
at this meeting was formed the Lancashire and 
Cheshire Band of Hope Union. 

The new organisation soon made its influence 
felt, Sunday Schools were visited throughout 
the district, and Bands of Hope were formed ; 
conferences and meetings of workers were con¬ 
vened, and large numbers of intelligent workers 
were drawn into the movement. 

From the year 1870 the Union exhibits a 
career of great activity and usefulness, and 
to-day embraces 48 Town Unions, 1,014 
Societies, and 159,000 members. The Union 
has held thirty-two great festivals in the Free 
Trade Hall, Manchester; and on each occasion 
Mr. Hoyle has not only trained and con¬ 
ducted the choir, but has also written the 
words and composed the music of many of 
the brightest and best of the pieces. In like 
manner, especially in past years, we have our¬ 
selves been greatly indebted to our friend, in 
making up the programmes for the great 
Temperance concerts at the Crystal Palace ; 
for some of the most popular and taking pieces 


have come from his pen, and many of onr friends- 
wall remember the glee with which the singers 
at the Crystal Palace sung Mr. Hoyle’s “ Merry 
Dick,” “Sober John,” and “Come, join our 
Band of Hope Union.” 

The Lancashire and Cheshire Union has 
now completed the fifteenth volume of “ The 
Onward Reciter,” and the twenty-first volume 
of its own magazine, “Onward,” both largely 
enriched by Mr. Hoyle’s prolific pen,whilst the 
latter owes no small part of its usefulness and 
popularity to his zeal and industry in his 
editorial capacity. Indeed it is almost im¬ 
possible to speak in terms of too high praise of the 
vigor, energy and business ability which have 
characterised this, the first formed of the county 
organisations—the offspring of our friend Mr.. 
Hoyle—which, at any rate, so far as its publi¬ 
cations are concerned, has become not only 
national but world-wide in its influence. We 
rejoice in its prosperity as in our own, and 
commend its enterprise to other workers in all 
parts of the country. 

It is probable that no great modern move¬ 
ment has lacked a musical and poetical 
element. The feelings of a people find readiest 
expression in song. The true poet is he 
who utters in sweet and stirring melody the 
thought which many feel but cannot express. 
The men who took the tax from the people’s 
bread had their songs, so had the advocates of 
freedom for the slave, and it would have been 
strange indeed had it been otherwise with the 
adherents of a cause yet more heart-stirring 
than even these. The temperance movement 
is a wonderful movement; it is founded on 
such hard and dry facts, that the completeness of 
its arguments should delight the soul of a logician; 
but at the same time it appeals very movingly to 
the imagination and those sentiments of love 
and pity which create a longing for poetic 
utterance. For these two phases of the work 
came to the front two men, William Hoyle, the 
statistician,now gone to his reward, and William 
Hoyle, the poet, who will, we trust, long be 
spared to put yet more of temperance truth into- 
living verse, and to assist by his counsel an 
organisation of which his county, and indeed 
his country, may well be proud. 


The new President of the Union.-— Mr. 
George Williams, well-known as the founder 
and treasurer of the Young Men’s Christian 
Association, has consented to become president 
of the Union, in succession to the late Mr. 
Samuel Morley. Mr. Williams is a liberal sup¬ 
porter of all movements for the moral and social 
improvement of the people, and is specially 
interested in promoting the welfare and happi¬ 
ness of young people. 




THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


3 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES.—Series I. 

TEMPERANCE LESSONS FROM ^SOPS 
FABLES. 

■By Rev. CHARLES COURTENAY, Vicar of Upper Artnley, Leeds, 
Author of “ Temperance Home Thrusts,” &c. 

No. i.—THE DOG AND THE SHADOW. 

EARLY every little child likes little dogs, and 
I think grown up people like them too. And 
they are great fun, aren’t they, with their 
pretty ways, their gambols, and their freaks? 
And how clever they are! And what nice 
companions they are ! And how faithful! 
Yes, I think this world wouldn’t be half as 
nice without dogs. And so do you too, I am 
quite sure. 

But then you mustn’t think that little dogs 
are only funny, and only pretty, and only 
friendly. No, no, they are useful too. Don’t 
■they keep our houses safe with their sharp little voices ? 
And don’t they kill the nasty rats ? Of course they do. 
Yes, little dogs are very useful too. 

I wonder what you will think when I tell you that little 
dogs can do little children good, and can teach them nice 
lessons. Well, they can; and I am going to show you 
now how a foolish little dog can help little boys and girls 
to be heaps wiser. 

Well, I want you to think of a certain little dog with a 
-certain bit of meat in his mouth. What sort of a little 
dog it was I am sorry I can’t tell you. It may have been 
a pug dog, or a terrier dog, or any other dog you like. 
And what sort of a bit of meat it was I don’t know either, 
whether a mutton chop, or a beef steak, or something else. 
And where he got his piece of meat from I don’t know in 
the least. I only hope he didn't steal it. Suppose we 
say he had it given him, for we mustn't be uncharitable 
even to a dog, 

Well, this little dog was once crossing a certain stream, 
thinking busily, I expect, of the dinner he would have 
when he got to his own particular little corner at home, 
when happening to look down into the stream, lo, and 
behold, if there wasn’t another dog and another piece of 
meat, ever so much larger than the piece he had. 

But, you know, it was only his own shadow. 

I daresay you know what happened then. If the foolish 
little dog didn’t make a grab at the shadow in the water, 
and in doing so lost his own nice juicy piece, which went 
like a stone to the very bottom. 

Poor wretched little dog ! Can't you imagine him going 
home with his ears all drooping, and his tail between his 
legs, and with quite a mournful look upon his face ? I 
can, and I expect it took him a long time to get over 
?t, too. 

But though he had lost his piece of meat, he gained 
something at any rate. What’s that? you ask. Why, 
experience, to be sure. I think that while he was a 
sadder dog he was a wiser one too. 

Now, dear children, come very close, and I will tell you 
a secret, and mind you keep it well. It is this. I think 
strong drink is like that shadow in the water, and people 
who pursue it are as much losers as that little dog was. 
There, now, that’s something worth knowing, isn’t it ? 

I wonder if you can do what I am going to ask you 
to do. I want you when the little dog thinks aloud, as he 
is now going to do, to change the word “meat,” every 
time he uses it, for the word “drink.” I don’t think you 
will find it very difficult. 

We will suppose ourselves outside our little friend’s 
.kennel, listening to the little dog thinking aloud. 

“ Oh, dear me, what a greedy dog I was , to be sure. Why 
wasn't I content with the nice piece of meat I had ? Why 


was I ever so foolish as to be running after such a 
shadow as that piece of meat in the water was. And a 
lot of good it did me ! If I hadn’t been so greedy, I 
shouldn’t be hungry now, I know. It serves me right, 
quite. I ought to have left well alone, instead of being so 
greedy.” 

(Yes,and why can't people be content with tea,and coffee, 
and such like drinks, instead of longing for the public- 
house shadows, which make them thirstier than ever ? I 
want to know, why indeed. Don’t you too, little ones ?) 

“I wish I hadn't looked down at all. That’s where the 
mischief was. If I had been looking straight on in front 
of me instead of looking into that deceptive stream, why 
I should have been eating a proper nice piece of meat 
now. But, alas! I didn’t. I looked, and looked, and 
looked, until I longed for the meat, and then, of course, I 
lost what I had got. That looking at the meat in the water 
was an awful mistake of mine. Foolish dog that I was.” 

(Why, that is just what the Bible says, isn’t it, little 
ones ? “ Look not at the wine when it is red.”l 

“ Well, there’s one thing I hope I shall never, never for¬ 
get— things are not always what they seem, that’s certain. 
Dear me ! I ought to have known that long ago. But I 
forgot it, I expect. Fancy my taking a shadow for a 
substance. Oh! what a little fool I was. Not every¬ 
thing that looks like meat is satisfactory and feeding. Oh! 
dear no, that piece of meat in the stream wasn’t. I found 
that out to my cost.” 

(Now, dear children, don’t forget that strong drink 
looks better than it is. It looks bright, but it won’t 
make you bright. It looks good, but it won't make yea 
good. It promises much, but it performs nothing. It is 
a piece of deceit, that’s what it is.) 

“ I know this well enough that the next time I’m well 
off I'll stay so. I went further and fared worse, I’m sorry 
to say. A good piece of meat isn't to be picked up every 
day, and it ought not to be dropped into a deep 
stream. Let my jaws be fastened into another piece of 
meat, and I'll not open them again in a hurry for all the 
shadows in the world. At any rate when it does dis¬ 
appear it shan’t disappear outwards. A steak in the 
mouth is worth two in the stream." 

(And a very good resolution too. When you are well 
off, don’t go to strong drink to make you better. Keep 
what you’ve got, it’s much better.) 

“Why, if I’d thought ever so little I must have seen that 
streams don’t yield beef steaks. I don’t know what could 
have possessed me to think that streams grew pieces of 
meat. Bits of stick, stones and mud, if you like, but 
pieces of good meat, never. Dear me, what a deal of good a 
little thinking does ; if you only think in time. I wish 
I’d thought in time, that I do.” 

(I'm sure, dear children, if people thought a bit they 
would see that to expect to find happiness, satisfaction, 
and nourishment in strong drink, is quite as wise as the 
little dog’s expectation that good pieces of beef or mutton 
should be found floating on the top of streams and rivers.) 

u And why should I go and envy other dogs when I'd got a 
nice bit of meat of my own? Suppose it was a bigger bit 
of meat that the other dog had, was that a reason for high¬ 
way robbery? What a little thievish dog I was, to be sure. I 
was going to take meat that didn't belong to me. What a 
thing for a well-bred dog as I to do ! Horrible ! ” 

(A good many people pay for strong drink with other 
people’s money, don’t they, dear children ? They buy 
strong drink with the money they should pay their debts 
with.) 

Never no more, never, never, never. No more shadows for 
me as long as ever I live. Once is quite enough, thank 
you. Other little dogs may snap at them, but not for me; 
oh, dear, no. And even they shall not do it without a 
friendly word. I’ll tell them all that it’s nothing but a 
shadow they’re eyeing, and that they had better leave it 
alone, and go straight home. Never no more, never, 
never, never. 




4 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES.—Series II. 


TEMPERANCE WORK AND WORKERS. 

By Rev. J. P. GLEDSTONE. 

Author of “The Life and Travels of George Whitefield,” “Save the 
Boys," “Clean Lips." 

No. i. THE BEGINNINGS OF TEMPERANCE 
WORK. 

T is very important that Band of Hope 
children, even very little ones, should 
know something of the great temperance re¬ 
formation which has already done so much 
good in England, and which will no doubt 
do a great deal more in the future. But we 
cannot tell them all about it. That would 
require a few big books, and they could 
not find time enough to read them. We can 
only give them peeps at what has been done and 
is being done. And sometimes a peep at a 
thing shows us more than ?. good long stare. We feel that 
we must pay attention, and we do pay attention, and it is 
by paying attention that things are seen, and understood, 
and remembered. 

A peep into the different rooms of a mill and at the 
different things being done there, will often give us a good 
idea of the whole mill and of its general work. That is 
about as much as you can get when you go to a paper 
mill or to a pottery, and yet you obtain thereby a clear 
notion of how paper and pots are made. A peep may 
sometimes save a life, as when a man caught in a mist on 
a mountain gets one brief glimpse through the mist, and 
sees where he is and which way to go. A peep at a good 
thing ought also to make you wish to see it again, and 
examine it carefully. These quick glances at the good 
work of temperance may make our young friends anxious 
to read largely and carefully for themselves when they 
become older. 

When you ask the question—“When and how did tem¬ 
perance work begin ? ” we have to reply that ever since 
alcohol was discovered men have felt that it was a 
dangerous thing to deal with. They might believe that it 
was good for some things, but at the same time they knew 
that using it was as dangerous as trying to handle fire. 
And so some despotic rulers ( e.g ., the persecuting Queen 
of Madagascar,) while using it themselves, would not let 
their subjects use it, for they knew it would destroy them 
and their kingdom. But that was not temperance w’ork 
as we understand it. Temperance work is what the people 
do themselves to put down or to prevent intemperance. 

In later years the dreadful effects of drinking alcoholic 
drinks were so visible in towns and villages, and were so 
alarming, that men felt roused as by a great trouble to do 
something to put drinking down. It is said that about 
125 years ago there was a place in Scotland which was 
reduced to desperate poverty by the drunkenness of the 
people. The barley which should have been used to 
make bread was turned into liquor and wasted. A terrible 
famine then followed, for the corn wanted for food had 
been wasted, and corn was not then bought from foreign 
parts, even if they had had the money to pay for it, which 
many of them had not. While they had the means the 
people had given themselves up to drunkenness, idleness, 
and other vices ; especially was this true of the working 
people. Then when the famine came, they might be seen 
at the top of every street standing in miserable groups 
with dejected countenances and pinched faces, complain¬ 
ing and begging for help. The distilleries which had done 
the harm were closed for want of barley and for want of 
customers. But as soon as things began to mend there 
was talk of re-opening the distilleries. This stirred up 


some of the good people of the place to appeal to their 
fellow-townsmen to try and stop this evil. 

The misery of that one place and the efforts of good and 
wise people to remove it by stopping drinking are just like 
all temperance work elsewhere. The misery and sin of 
drunkards, and the misery of those who suffer with them, 
make the servants of Christ unhappy ; then they begin to 
consider what can be done. Then comes temperance 
work. At the end of last century, and early in this century, 
good men’s minds were stirred in England, in Scotland, 
in Ireland, and in America. 

It is not easy, perhaps not possible, to say which place 
and which man should have the chief honour connected 
with the rise and spread of temperance. Much praise has 
been given to “ the seven men of Preston ” who signed a 
total abstinence pledge on August 23rd, 1832, but they 
were not the first total abstainers who took a pledge 
together to abstain from intoxicating drinks of every 
kind. The fact seems to be that the Spirit of God, from 
whom all good thoughts proceed, was moving many minds 
in many places at the same time. This work has been of 
God from the first, and He should have all the glory. In 
working in it we are working for Him and with Him. 

Some of the early temperance societies had pledges 
which pledged a man only to abstain from distilled spirits, 
whiskey, gin, rum, brandy, not from wine or beer. The 
pledge also was sometimes for a short period, a few weeks, 
or months, or a year. This is sometimes done now, but 
we like persons to take a pledge for life, and to keep it for 
life. The reason why the early pledges left out wine and 
beer was that at that time an idea prevailed that these 
drinks were not very bad, and did not do people much 
harm. Now we know that the alcohol in beer is just as 
bad as that in whiskey. But you see our fathers had to 
find out for themselves, and for us, a great many things 
which we now think are so simple that everybody must 
always have known them. 

Some people were early convinced by their own ex¬ 
perience, that all kinds of intoxicating drinks were 
injurious, and discontinued their use. For example, a 
society was formed in 1817 at Skibbereen, in Ireland, of 
twelve persons, most of whom had been intemperate. 
They had also a benefit society, one of the rules of which 
was this—“No person can take malt or spirituous liquors, 
or distilled waters, except prescribed by a priest or a 
doctor.” 

You should know that the early temperance reformers 
were composed partly of persons who had suffered greatly 
from intemperate habits, and who were anxious to keep 
themselves and others right for the future ; also of persons 
of clear minds and kind hearts, who, seeing how much 
harm drink was doing, determined to stop its use by the 
power of example, by reason, and by love. Among early 
temperance workers were not a few young men, and, 
indeed, God always chooses young soldiers for long, hard 
fights. Thomas Whittaker, Samuel Bowly, Dr. Lees, John 
Andrew, and others, took the pledge in their young man¬ 
hood. Now it is happily common to see men far on in life 
who have never tasted intoxicating drink. Our Bands of 
Hope are giving us men and women who will be able to say 
at the end of a long life, “I have never tasted alcoholic 
drinks n my life.” 


The army work of the Church of England Temperance 
Society in India is most useful and successful. In that 
climate to drink at all freely is to die, and the Society can 
claim to have saved tens of thousands of British lives, 
besides averting an infinity of moral mischief. Lord 
Wolseley, whose sympathy with temperance work is well 
known, took under his patronage an Assault-at-Arms in 
Westminster Town Hall, the proceeds of which were 
devoted to this special phase of effort. This is, we suppose, 
the first time that such a display has been made for such 
a purpose. 









THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


5 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES—Series III. 


PHYSIOLOGY AND ALCOHOL. 

By Dr. KATE MITCHELL. 


No. i.—INTRODUCTORY.* 



N these addresses I shall deal with the subject 
of the human body in a very simple way, 
and show how alcohol affects it. As in the 
title of these addresses I have used two 
rather difficult words, which may puzzle 
the young folks, I will first try to explain 
their meaning. 

Physiology comes from two Greek words, 
Physis (nature), and Logos (discourse). 
Thus the two together mean a discourse, 
or talk about nature. Physiology, however, 
now only means the science relating to animal nature, 
and in these addresses we only use the word as explaining 
■the work of the various organs or parts of the human 
body. When we study the lower animals, such as fish, 
birds, dogs, &c., we call it the science of zoology. 

Alcohol comes from two Arabian words, Al-kohl, mean¬ 
ing a very fine powder that the ladies of the East used 
for dyeing their eyebrows and eyelashes. Then the 
word came to mean a very fine spirit obtained by dis¬ 
tillation, and now it is used for all kinds of spirit found 
in the different beers, wines, and spirits which people 
drink. It is owing to the presence of this alcohol or 
spirit in these liquors that people become intoxicated 
when they drink of them freely. Thus the name of 
“ intoxicating liquors ” has grown up. 

If these drinks did not contain alcohol, people would 
not like them so much, because they would not excite 
the feelings and fancies as they do. The quantity of 
alcohol found in these liquors differs according to the 
beverage. For instance, porter contains only 5 percent, 
of alcohol, whereas sherry and port contain about 17 per 
cent., and whisky and brandy as much as 45 to 48 per 
cent. 

What is percentage ? Let me explain, if I say that a 
person has to pay 5 per cent, when he borrows /hoo, I 
mean that every year he will have to pay £5 until he 
returns the hundred pounds. Now if you take a hundred 
parts of brandy you will find that 48 parts of the xoo, or 
48 per cent., are alcohol and the rest water; and of a 
hundred parts of porter only 5 parts will be alcohol. [To 
make this percentage still clearer to children, two 
glasses of the same size should be drawn upon the black¬ 
board, and the water should be represented by the 
white chalk rubbed into the lower part of the glasses, and 
the upper part, left untouched, will represent the per 
centage of alcohol.] Thus it can be seen that for a 
person to get drunk he must take a much larger quantity 
of the different beers than of the different spirits, which 
are so much stronger in alcohol. 

[It would be well for the speaker at this point to give 
a short account of the various ways in which alcohol is 
produced. The meaning of such words as Fermentation 
and Distillation might also be written down on the board, 
and a slight account given of the process of wine-making 
from the grape, and beer-making from malt, &c. ] 

Our bodies are composed of many different parts, as 
you know, and this is why they perform such a number¬ 
less variety of actions. For instance, when you walk, or 
run, or dance you little think of the enormous number of 
muscles which you have set in motion, and which are 
fastened to the bones. These bones form the skeleton 

The speaker should be supplied with a blackboard, upon which 
explanations of words can be written and diagrams of the different parts 
roughly drawn, unless printed diagrams are available. 


which supports and protects all the softer parts of our 
body ; and this part of the body I will first explain. 

The Skeleton is composed of all sorts of bones—long 
bones, short bones, small rounded bones, curved bones, 
and irregularly shaped bones. The long, straight 
bones are found in the legs and arms, which are each 
divided into two parts—the upper and the lower. The 
upper part of the arm and leg is made by one thick, 
strong bone ; the lower part by two bones of smaller 
size, but still very strong. The upper and lower bones 
are connected by joints, which allow them to move freely 
upon one another. 

The short bones are found in the feet and hands, are 
small and slender, and all connected by joints. The 
hand, not including the wrist, consists of 19 small, 
straight bones, which you can find out for yourselves by 
counting three separate bones for each finger, two for the 
thumb and five for the palm of the hand. The wrist has 
eight small, rounded, irregular bones, which are so 
deeply imbedded in the flesh, and so well protected that 
you cannot feel them, but they give great mobility to 
the joint. The foot has exactly the same number of 
small, straight bones as the hand, but are not so 
moveable. The ankle consists of seven irregular-shaped 
bones, larger than those of the wrist, and forming the 
heel. They are also too well covered by flesh and fat for 
you to be able to feel them. 

The ribs are curved bones. There are twelve on each 
back, and curve round to the front, where the upper 
seven are joined to the flat breastbone in front. 
The lower five on each side are much smaller, and 
are attached to each other by a sort of cartilage, 
excepting the lowest two, which are left free, and are 
therefore called •' floating ” ribs. These ribs enclose 
and contain and protect from external injury the most 
important parts of our body—the two lungs, one on 
each side, and the heart, which is found between them, 
in the centre of the chest. 

The spine or backbone is composed of twenty-four 
distinct bones, small and rounded in shape, with a 
side of the body. They are attached to the spine at the 
hole running down the centre of all of them for 
the spinal cord. These twenty-four bones are separated 
from each other by a thick layer of cartilage, which 
allows them great freedom of movement, as we see in the 
case of acrobats. 

The skull consists of twenty-two bones, fourteen 
which belong to the face and the remaining eight to 
the skull. These last are closely wedged and packed 
together, and are, tor the most part, very strong and 
thick in order to protect the most delicate and beautiful 
structure in the body—the brain. 

The pelvis or basin of the body is a large, irregularly- 
shaped bone, situated at the lowest part of the trunk. It 
is formed by several bones, closely wedged together, of 
which the lower end of the backbone, called the sacrum, 
is one. The projecting part of this structure on each 
side is called the hip-bone. The pelvis supports the 
spine above, and the soft parts contained in the 
abdomen, called the intestines, and the thigh-bones 
below, are inserted into two large, bony hollows or 
sockets on each side. These are the largest joints in the 
body, and are capable of a great deal of movement with 
exercise. 

The bones of the body are composed of salts, called 
salts of lime, and an animal matter like gelatine, which 
keeps the salts together. If a bone is boiled for some 
time it becomes quite soft, because the salts have 
dissolved away, and only the animal matter remains. 
The firmness and strength of the bone depends upon the 
quantity of salts it contains. 

Before I leave the skeleton, I may as well say that this 
is the only structure of the body upon which alcohol 
seems to have little or no effect—probably because bone 
is so hard and resistant. 





6 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES,—Senes IV. 


MISCELLANEOUS. 

No. i.—"WHY DO I BELONG TO THE 
BAND OF HOPE ?” 

E. L. FARRAR. 


<Jjj^ SEE before me 50 or — boys and girls. They 
are looking up at me, expecting a story, I 
suppose. No ! I am not going to tell a 
story ; I am going to ask you a question. 
When answered, you may ask the same of 
me, if you like. Now, listen! Polly, 
Louie, Annie, Tom, Harry ; I ask you 
each and all. Why do you belong to the 
Band of Hope? Why do you come to our 
meetings, and why have you signed the 
pledge ? (Extract answers.) Well, one of 
you says one thing and one another, but I 
want some definite reasons. Suppose I answer my own 
question myself? Then if I am wrong you can correct 
me. Well, I will say that these winter evenings, when it 
is dark and cold, you like to come to a nice bright room, 
and you enjoy the songs and the stories. Am I right ? 
Hands up if I am ! So that is one reason why you 
join. Then, perhaps, you think that if you join you may 
get a good tea at Christmas, or a magic-lantern, or some 
such thing. Hands up again if I am right. Not so 
many hands this time, but still you admit that is a 
reason. Then some of you elder ones think this a fine 
opportunity of learning something of singing. Is not that 
so ? Hands up again ! Some of the little ones, again, 
like Susie and Willie there, like to get a pretty picture 
card or a glittering medal when they have joined long 
enough. What do you say, little ones ? 

Very excellent reasons all of them, as far as they go ; 
but there are better reasons than either of these why you 
ought to join. We have not mentioned the best and 
principal one yet. You know that when you join you 
have to sign a pledge. What does that pledge mean ? 
What do you promise to abstain from ? (Extract answer.) 

Then the only really right reason for joining the Band 
of Hope ought to be that thereby you become a 
temperance boy or girl—one who has promised, if 
possible, all his life to abstain from strong drink. We 
have these meetings, not only to give you a pleasant 
evening, but also to interest you in temperance. We have 
the treats to reward and encourage you for regularity and 
good conduct. We give the pretty cards and bright 
medals that you may have something to keep and point 
to ally our lives. But remember that the first and fore¬ 
most reason of our meetings is to make you all good 
temperance boys and girls. 

Now. we will suppose that one of your little friends 
asks why you have given up beer. Take Jack, there. 
Jack meets Tom. who says, “Why have you signed the 
pledge, Jack? I shan’t, and why should you ? ” What 
would Jack answer? I hope he would be able to give 
several good reasons " I’ve signed the pledge because 
when I’m a man I want to be able to do without drink. 
Drink does a lot of harm to men. It wastes their money 
and destroys their health. I won’t have anything to do 
with it.” Perhaps Tom will say, “ But beer is so nice.” 
"Yes,” answers Jack, "but so are tea and coffee and 
cocoa, and they don’t hurt, and I shall drink them instead 
of beer.” "Ah,” says Tom, " but you’re too young to 
give it up ; wait till you’re a man. There’s no need to 
sign the pledge now. ” Well, children, I will tell you a 
story about that. 

A little boy went into a public-house to buy beer for his 
master. The publican asked him to drink. “ No, thank 


you,” said the boy; "I’ve signed the pledge.” ‘ Pooh 
replied the publican, “ you’re much too young.” “ Pray, 
sir, if I wanted to buy some beer would you sell it to 
me?" "Certainly.” “ Well, then, sir, if I’m not too 
young to buy the drink, I’m surely not too young to give 
it up.” Certainly children are not too young to drink. 
A good many boys of my acquaintance drink more beer 
than is good for them, and beer is very bad for growing 
boys or girls. Much better drink milk or cocoa or even 
pure water, which quenches your thirst and cools your 
throat. Even babies have been known to drink. How 
sad ! In some London hospitals little babies of two and 
three are brought in, who, when given milk, scream for 
the gin to which they are accustomed. Once a little boy 
of three got out of bed in the night and drank all his 
mother’s whisky, and died from its effects. I know one 
case of a mother feeding her baby of two every day with 
beer instead of milk. Of course the child looked heavy 
and unhealthy instead of bright and sweet like other 
babies. Another mother was seen at a railway station 
trying to feed her baby with gin and water, which the 
poor little thing refused, screaming. 

Now we have talked about Tom and Jack, suppose 
Clara and Alice meet. Clara says, ‘‘ I don’t need to sign 
the pledge, for I’m sure I shall never drink too much. 
My mother wouldn’t let me, and when I grow up I 
always mean to be temperate. Why can’t you be the 
same ? ” Perhaps Alice will have to stop and think what 
to answer. If I were her I should reply, " Very likely I 
should never be tempted to take more than is good for 
me, but I like to be on the safe side ; and, most of all, I 
do it to help and encourage others.” " Dear me ! ” cries 
Clara, “what does it matter about other people ? Let 
them look after themselves. I’m sure I shan't give up 
my beer because others drink too much.” 

Now, dear children, this is a very common argument 
with people, but let me answer it by an illustration. 
Suppose you have a dear little sister at home who is 
poorly, and forbidden by the doctor to eat sweet things. 
You go home with a jam tart, and eat it in her sight. Of 
course she cries and wants it. It would hurt her to eat it, 
and it does not hurt you ; but yet how unkind and hard¬ 
hearted it would be to go on eating it then ! Would you 
not rather throw it away than torment her with the sight 
of it ? Would you pet a serpent that was stinging your 
brother to death? Then would you enjoy the drink 
which does others so much harm ? So, for your own sake,, 
and for the sake of others, sign the pledge, and keep it. 
For your own sake and the sake of others be regular and 
faithful members of the Band of Hope. 

Do you think you are only children, and your Band of 
Hope is too small to do much good in the world ? Nev er 
despise small things, for from them spring great results. 
I will give you an illustration of the good that ma y come 
from Bands of Hope. 

(Blackboard illustration.) 

Suppose a Band of Hope of 50 children (many Bands- 
of Hope have 200 or 300 children), and that they marry 
at the age of 21, and have an average of 4 children— 

50 x 4=200 in 25 years. 

In 25 years more.. 200 x 4=800 in 50 years. 

There are more than 12,000 Bands of Hope, averaging 
more than 50 children each. 

%* 800 x 12,000-—9,600,000. 

Nearly ten millions in 50 years; nearly ten millions if 
all Band of Hope children keep their pledges. Even if 
half of this number die or do not marry, that leaves, over 
five millions. All England would be changed. Think of 
that, children, and how important it is that you should 
all keep true to your pledge of abstinence. 





THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


7 


SAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES.—Series V. 


TOBACCO. 

Mrs. AMELIA ARNOLD. 


No. i.—ITS EFFECTS UPON THE BODY. 



E know that the body is a complex and 
wonderful machine, demanding great care 
and attention to keep it in good working 
order. In childhood, this care is taken 
by others; but as we grow older the 
custody of our own bodies devolves upon 
us, and all the responsibilities this entails. 
The body, being the habitation of the 
soul, it is our duty and our interest to 
keep the house in a slate of repair worthy 
of its immortal tenant—our duty, 
because life is the gift of God, and as such we are bound 
to respect and to preserve it as far as possible ; and our 
interest, because physical suffering is sure to follow any 
imprudence or over-indulgence of the body. If, then, we 
would usefully employ our lives, and enjoy health and 
comfort, we must learn how to treat our bodies. We 
must nourish them, while keeping them under subjection 
(i Cor. ix. 27); not yielding to their unreasonable 
■demands, for they are our servants and should not be our 
masters. They are such good servants that if wisely 
treated they may continue to serve us for eighty or ninety 
years; but such bad masters that if we allow them to 
Eave the upper hand they are apt to run down like a watch 
of which the spring is broken. We are careful not to over¬ 
wind our watches lest we should injure them and have 
to pay for repairs, and we know that a human body con¬ 
tains much more delicate mechanism than a watch, and 
if suffered to go wrong for any length of time its lost vigour 
may never be restored. 

Tobacco, whether smoked or chewed, is one of the most 
■common means of injury to the body in which the men 
and boys of England indulge. It is, too, the most inexcusa¬ 
ble form of intemperance because, being comparatively a 
new fashion, nobody can pretend it is necessary. And 
nobody supposes it has any food value—nicotine merely 
stimulating but adding no strength to the system. And 
it stimulates just where it should not, and where this 
effect is most pernicious; it increases the heart's action, at 
the same time it has a “ paralysing effect upon the nerve 
which supplies the lungs and stomach with nerve power.” 
Dr. Edward Smith found by repeated experiments that 
■eleven minutes’ smoking will raise the pulse from 74 beats 
per minute to 112. Those express trains which go at the 
rate of sixty miles an hour soon wear out their machinery 
and this is just what happens to the body when unduly 
acted upon : for when the normal state of the pulse is 
74 per minute, and it is suddenly raised by smoking to 112, 
these 38 beats in excess must be a severe strain on the 
constitution. For though the heart’s action may be 
similarly excited by exercise, the general conditions differ, 
since in the latter case the small vessels of the system are 
allowed to perform their usual and proper functions. 
Dr. Drysdale mentions many cases of painful disease 
caused by smoking which have come under his observa¬ 
tion. He says : “ Cancer of the lip is rarely seen except 
in men who smoke.” Professor Miller,of Edinburgh, says: 
“ As medical men we know that smoking injures the whole 
organism, puts the stomach and frame out of order ; but 
acts mainly, as all these poisons do, on the nervous system. 
Not only is the physical effect most debilitating : it tends, 
in plain language, to paralysis.” Sir Benjamin Brodie, 
the Queen’s late physician, said : “ There is no doubt that 
if we could obtain statistics, we should find the lives 
-of inveterate smokers considerably below the average.” 


Dr. Richardson, F. R.S., says that “ weakness of the heart 
is caused by tobacco ; also injury to the sight, smoker’s 
sore throat, &c.; it gives a doubtful pleasure with a cer¬ 
tain penalty.” Dr. Solly, F.R.S., says that “ smoking is 
one of the causes of general paralysis,” and adds that 
“ French statistics show that tobacco is a great cause of 
insanity.” From theabove it is evident that many terrible 
diseases are directly caused by the pernicious habit of 
smoking now unhappily so prevalent, and we must bear 
in mind that many of the most distinguished medical men 
agree on this subject, and that in condemning a practice 
which brings them so many patients they are speaking 
against the interest of their own profession. 

That smoking impairs the bodily powers cannot be 
denied, for all great feats of strength and agility are per¬ 
formed by abstainers. The Medical Press, of April 17th, 
gave an account of Weston’s wonderful walk of more than 
46 miles daily for 54 consecutive days. His opponent 
was a younger man, but was in the habit of drinking and 
smoking moderately, while Weston has been for many 
years a total abstainer. The Pall Mall Gazette, of Nov. 3rd, 
describes the “remarkable cool-headedness and steady- 
handedness of Mr. Peall, who, in the billiard-room of the 
Royal Aquarium, scored the unprecedented number of 
2,413 points, he also being a total abstainer from smoke 
and strong liquors.” While regretting that these men did 
not employ their powers more usefully, we must admire 
the degree of perfection to which they have trained their 
bodies, and the temperance victory both have achieved. 
The energy, unerring aim and self-denial which made 
them successful, would be sought in vain among weak- 
kneed, loose-limbed slaves of tobacco. 

Boys j ust entering life have no money of their own; they 
have not as yet been any help to their parents; on the 
contrary, their maintenance and education are a great 
expense. Should they, then, waste any of the money 
supplied to them by loving and generous fathers in acquir¬ 
ing a habit which is at once useless and injurious ? When 
so much is necessary why indulge in superfluities, and at 
a terrible cost of future health and comfort ? 

As tobacco impairs the growth, injures digestion and 
affects the heart’s action, it must of necessity be fatal to 
personal beauty. Even smokers acknowledge that it is an 
unmixed evil for growing boys ; but though a young man 
may be well grown and handsome before he begins this 
bad habit, his good looks will depart with the smoke of 
his pipe, for its usual accompaniments are a lethargic 
and indolent walk and manner, decayed teeth, debility, 
impure breath, pallor, trembling of the hands, baldness, 
and imperfect vision. Many of these symptoms declare 
the smoker even if he did not advertise himself by his 
negligent attire and indifference to his own person. And 
if a man is untidy and uncleanly in youth, what will he 
become in age ? But this last may not enter into a smoker's 
calculations; he so frequently takes another step upon the 
downward path ; the pipe is often followed by the bottle, 
and that means premature decay and death. 


4,399 fully-licensed public-houses is a fearful number 
for the area under the jurisdiction of the Middlesex 
Magistrates, but it represents a reduction. A very few 
years ago the number was 6,ooo. 

Teetotalers have usually admitted that] the hops 
with which beer is flavoured might have a use in the 
matter of digestion, and contented themselves with point¬ 
ing out that its bitter could be obtained without the 
alcoholic drawback. It seems, however, that even this 
last poor refuge of the drinker is to be swept away. Accord¬ 
ing to the Lancet , recent experiments by Dr. T. Schelzoff 
has given the theory of the beneficial action of bitters in 
digestion its coup de grace, and with it the last vestige of 
dietetic reason which, apart from appetite, the drinker 
had to show. 







8 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE, 


Cfjce, Beat jfatijalanti! 


Words and Music by William Hoyle, author of Hymns and Songs. By permission. 

Part-Song (or Solo) and Chorus. 



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THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 

STjue, Bear jfatifjeflanti! 

Words and Music by William Hoyle, author of Hymns and Songs. By permission. 


Key C. Part-Song (or Solo) and Chorus. 


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IO 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE, 


ADDRESSES FOR 1887. 


a result of recent efforts to still 
further extend the circulation of the 
Chronicle, we are glad to know that 
the present 'year commences with a 
large number of new subscribers, for 
whom it may be well to repeat the 
announcement made in our last issue, 
respecting the addresses for Band of 
Hopemeetings which will appear during the 
present year—fifty-two in all, one for each 
week. Possibly but few societies will use them 
all, but it is an advantage to have a choice. 
The subjects present a pleasing variety,provid¬ 
ing for the youngest and oldest members, and 
admirably combining sound teaching in funda¬ 
mental temperance principles with material of 
a lighter kind. For the sake of new friends we 
venture to repeat our reminder that the best 
possible way to instruct our young people is for 
each society to arrange to teach its own mem¬ 
bers, securing from its own circle three or four 
ladies or gentlemen to give, monthly, one 
address from each series: or conductors of neigh¬ 
bouring societies, meeting on different nights, 
may arrange this amongst them, each conductor 
preparing a different series, and delivering it in 
turn to the other societies. 

I.—TEMPERANCE LESSONS FROM/ESOP'S FABLES. 

Rev. CHARLES COURTENAY, Vicar of Upper Armley, Leeds. 



2 

3 

4 

5 

6 
7 
S 

9 

10 

11 

12 


January .. The Dog and the Shadow. 
February .. The Fox in the Well. 

March .. The Lion and the Mouse. 

April .. The Wind and the Sun. 

May .. The Cat and the Mice. 

June .. The Fox and the Sick Lion. 

.July .. The Countryman and the Snake. 
. August .. The Fox without a Tail. 
September .. The Horse and the Lion. 

October .. A Trick worth Knowing. 

. November .. The Two Frogs. 

. December .. The Swallow and the Birds. 


IF—PHYSIOLOGY AND ALCOHOL. 

Dr. KATE MITCHELL. 


.. January .. Meaning of Physiology. Skeleton. 

.. February .. Muscles or Fleshy Parts. 

.. March .. The Brain. 

.. April .. The Spinal Cord and Nerves. 

.. May .. The Heart and large Blood vessels. 

.. June .. Arteries, Veins, and Small Blood-vessels. 
.. July .. Description of the Blood. Its Use 

.. August .. Breathing. The Lungs. 

.. September.. Digestion. The Mouth and Stomach. 

.. October .. Liver and Intestines. Kidneys. 

.. November.. The Skin. Perspiration, &c. 

.. December .. Conditions of Health. Life and Death. 


III.—PEEPS AT TEMPERANCE WORK AND WORKERS. 


1. .. January 

2. .. February 

3. .. March 

4. .. April 

5. .. May 

6. .. June 

7. .. July 

8. .. August 

9. .. September 

10. .. October 

11. .. November 

12. .. December 


Rev. J. P. GLEDSTONE. 

The Beginningsof Temperance Work. 
TheGreatTemperance Societies. 

The United Kingdom Alliance; or, Temper¬ 
ance Work amongst the Voters. 

Efforts to Close Public Houses on Sunday. 
Temperance Work among Women by Women 
The Temperance Work of the Churches. 
The Temperance Hospital; or, Temperance 
Work by Doctors. 

Temperance Work amongYoung People. 
Temperance Provident Institution; or 
Temperance Life Assurance. 
Temperance Benefit Societies; or, Temper¬ 
ance and Thrift. 

Good Templars, Blue Ribbonites, and 
others. 

Our Band of Hope. 


IV.—MISCELLANEOUS. 

By VARIOUS WELL-KNOWN WRITERS. 


1. .. January 

2. .. February 

3. .. March 

4. .. April 

5. .. May 

6. .. June 

7. .. July 

8. .. August 

9. .. September 

10. .. October 

11. .. November 

12. .. December 


.. “ Why do I belong- to the Band of Hope ? ”— 

(E. L. Farrar). 

.. “Two Sticks.”—Rev. C. E. Escreet, M.A. 

(Vicar of St. Andrew s, Stockwell , London ) 
.. “Lady Nature’s Lessons.”—Rev. N.Curnock 
(IVesleian Minister, London) 

.. “ A Legend of Long Ago.”—Miss Forsaith. 

.. “The Nature and Effects of Intoxicating 
Drinks.”—Dr. Norman Kerr,F.L.S. 

.. “Habits.”—Rev. J. Grant Mills, M.A. (St. 

Thomas’s Hospital, London). 

.. “ H2 O.” — Rev. Donald Matheson, M.A. 

(Presbyterian Minister, Roehampton). 

.. “The Power of a Leaf.”—Rev. R. H. Lovell 
(Congregational Minister, Bromley, Kent). 

.. “A Bit of Coral.”—F red. Sherlock,E sq. (Edit. 
Sec., C. E. T. S.) 

.. “The Diver.”—Rev. C. Chambers 

tional Minister, Stockwell, London). 

.. “The Children’s Sword.”—Miss S. Ursula 
Gardner (Secretary Juvenile Union, 
C. E. T. S.) 

.. “The Five-barred Gate.”—Rev. W. J. Mayers, 
(Baptist Minister, Bristol). 


V.—TOBACCO. 

Mrs. AMELIA ARNOLD. 

To appear in the Numbers for January, April, July, and October. 

1. First Quarter .. Its Effect upon the Body. 

2. Second Quarter ■■ Its Effect upon the Mind. 

3. Third Quarter .. Its Effect upon Morals. 

4. Fourth Quarter .. Its Effect upon Society. 


Howto obtain “The Chronicle” Regularly. 

A Postal Order for One Shilling and Sixpence sent to 
Mr. Frederic Smith, 4, Ludgate Hill, London, E.C., 
■will secure the regular delivery by post of The Band of 
Hope Chronicle during 1887. Send at once, and thus 
save further trouble. 

Bound Volumes of “ The Chronicle.” 

The Chronicle for 1S87, bound in neat cloth covers, 
may be had post free from the offices at 2s. limp cloth and 
2/6 boards. Those desiring copies should apply early, as 
a comparatively small number remain on hand. Copies 
of any of the numbers for 1886 may also be had, and cases 
for binding ; also the volumes for 1882, 1883, 1884, and 
1885 at 2/- 













THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


ii 


©otmpon'tience. 

BANDS OF HOPE IN WORKHOUSE SCHOOLS. 

To the Editor of the Band of PIope Chronicle. 

Sir,— Bands of Hope are being started in most of our 
towns and in many villages in our land, and I say, God 
bless them ! May they do a good and lasting work ! 
There are, however, numbers of poor children even who 
do not come within the range of any of these societies, 
and amongst the poorest of all, the children in our work- 
houses. I find that there are upwards of 54,000 children 
resident in the workhouse schools of England (the greater 
number of whom are there, I fear, through the drinking 
habits of their parents), to whom a Band of Hope meeting 
would be a great pleasure, and, if well conducted, would 
sow seed that, in after years, would, with God’s blessing, 
bear much good fruit. 

Perhaps a few hints as how I started a Band of 
Hope in one of the largest union workhouses in the 
County of Somerset would be useful to other friends. 

I first went to the chaplain, and was successful in 
obtaining his assistance. Both he and his wufe signed 
the pledge, and promised to help in forming and carrying 
on a Band of Hope in the schools. He then wrote to 
the guardians asking their sanction, which was readily 
given. After mentioning the matter to the master and 
matron, as well as to the schoolmaster and school¬ 
mistress, and having obtained their premise of 
assistance, we held our first meeting, and, for the past 
four years, have continued to bold meetings monthly. 
We carry them on as Band of Hope meetings are usually 
conducted, trying to get a fresh speaker every time. The 
interest the children take in the meetings, and the firm¬ 
ness with which they resist temptations to break their 
pledges when they leave the schools and go out into the 
world, prove that good is being done, and I should like 
to see Bands of Hope the rule and not the exception in 
workhouse schools. 

Allow me to suggest the importance of securing the 
sanction of the chaplain before the formation of a Band 
of Hope in a workhouse, seeing that he has full control 
over the religious training of the inmates of the work- 
house, especially of the young, and he would, of course, 
not be likely to allow uncourteous interference. I feel 
sure, however, that there are few chaplains now who 
would not be very glad to assist in carrying on such a 
work if consulted in the matter first, whilst the guardians 
would be far more likely to grant their permission upon 
the application of the chaplain than of outsiders. 

I am, Sir, yours truly, 

H. T. Henley Lancaster. 

Long Ashton, Bristol. 

[We shall be very pleased to hear of the efforts of other 
friends in this direction. Why should not every Band of 
Hope Union in the kingdom appoint a small sub-com- 
miltee whose business it should be to promote the 
formation, and subsequently co-operate with the work- 
house authorities in carrying on such a society. —Ed.] 


TEMPERANCE TEACHING IN SCHOOLS. 

To the Editor of the Band of Hope Chronicle. 

Dear Sir, —I am glad to inform you that the School 
Board for Bradford have responded most favourably to a 
memorial presented to them by the Committee of the 
Bradford Band of Hope Union, requesting permission for 
the delivery of a series of temperance addresses in the 
schools. For the information of other friends, I subjoin 
a copy of the memorial and the reply, from which it 
will be seen that the proposed lectures are to be given 
by a first-class man. To cover the cost, our Committee 


are inviting contributions towards an “Elementary 
Schools Lecture Fund.’’ About^o is required, to which a 
non-abstainer has already contributed £5, and we have 
no fear of obtaining all we want for this admirable 
object. It may be well to say that, being myself a 
member of the School Board, I had prepared the way by 
conversation 1 with other members, and when the 
subject was considered, to my surprise and pleasure, not 
a single voice was raisod against the proposal. The 
Clerk of our Board, who is an abstainer, has kindly 
undertaken to arrange the visits. I consider we have 
done well, and question if there is another School Board 
in the Kingdom w'hich has conceded more to Temperance 
friends. Yours faithfully, 

Martin Field, 

Hon. Sec. Bradford Band of Hope Union. 

[Memorial.] 

The Chairman, School Management Committee, 
School Board, Bradford. 

Dear Sir,— Some time since the Bradford Band of 
Hope Union, by permission of the School Board, 
arranged for the delivery of a series of addresses, with the 
view of promoting temperance among the young. These 
lectures excited great interest, and were most successful. 

The Union Committee respectfully ask for the renewal 
of the privilege. Mr. F. W. Richardson, F.C.S., F.S.A., 
&c., the Chief Assistant to the Borough Analyst, and. 
Principal of the Bradford School of Chemistry, has 
consented to give short lectures, with experiments and 
diagrams, on “Alcohol; its Influence on the Body and 
Mind,’’ to the higher departments of the schools. It is 
proposed to ask the scholars to take notes of the lectures, 
and afterwards to furnish reproductions; prizes for the 
most successful to be awarded and publicly distributed. 

As only one lecture of the series can be given in each 
department of the schools, the Committee ask that half- 
an-hour be granted previous to the conclusion of the 
morning or afternoon school, as may be most convenient. 

The Committee trust to receive a favourable reply to 
this application, and believe that great good will result to 
the young from the lectures which may be delivered. 

We remain, yours respectfully, 

Fredk. Priestman, President. 
Martin Field, Hon. Sec. 

Bradford, November 12 th, 1886. 

[Reply.] 

Mr. Martin Field, Hon. Sec., Bradford Band of Hope 
Union. 

Dear Sir,— In reply to your letter of the 12th inst., I 
have pleasure in informing you that the School Manage¬ 
ment Committee have unanimously agreed that the 
lecture on “ Alcohol’’ may be given once in each of the 
departments of the Board's Schools (of course excepting 
infants) during the last half-hour of a school meeting. I 
shall be glad to supply you with a list of the schools, and 
to facilitate in every way the making of the necessary 
arrangements. 

Yours respectfully, 

Jno. Arthur Palmer. 

Bradford School Board, 

District Bank Buildings, Market Street, 20 thNov., 1886. 

[This successful effort in Bradford should be imitated 
in other directions. London, Newcastle, and Notting¬ 
ham are also doing well in this important work, and in 
our next issue we hope to call special attention to the 
subject, and to be able to state what is being done by 
other Unions.— Ed.] 



12 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


OUR BOOK TABLE. 


THORS and publishers are certainly working 
right nobly in the literary department of 
the temperance propaganda. Our table 
is crowded with handsome volumes claiming 
attention, and the pressure is so great 
that we are compelled to dismiss in a few 
lines several works which merit far more 
lengthy notices. 

Take one for example, entitled A Christian 
Philanthropist of Dublin : A Memoir of 
Richard Allen, by Hannah Maria Wigham 
■(London : Hodder and Stoughton).—Here is a work 
which can be read and re-read equally with pleasure 
and profit. The self-denying career of one of the Irish 
Temperance pioneers is drawn with a loving hand by a 
.lady who knew him well. With a spirit of self-repression, 
as rare as it is charming, the writer keeps her own 
personality very much in the background, so that the 
vivid portrait of “ as good a man as ever lived,” stands 
■out with life-like power. The portrait and numerous illus¬ 
trations give additional interest to the volume. From the 
same publishers we have also received The Master Hand, 
by Pansy, being a reprint of a telling temperance tale, 
which has been received with great favour in America. 

In Bound by Fetters, by Emily Foster (London : James 
.Blackwood & Co.), a practised writer presents a telling 
impeachment of the drink traffic. There is no beating 
about the bush, no tender covering up of the evil, but 
a merciless exposure of the perils which result from the 
modern great plague. The tale is well-conceived and 
will be welcomed by enthusiastic workers, and perhaps 
as strongly condemned by those of “ the enemy ” into 
whose hands it may fall. 

Dinah Mite, A Story of To-day, by Brenda (London : 
William Isbister & Co.), attracted considerable attention 
■during its appearance month by month in the Sunday 
Magazine. There is a freshness of incident and general grace 
•of expression which cannot fail to gain for this pathetic 
•tale many friends. It would be a capital New Year's gift 
or reward book. 

In Encouraging Experiences of Free Lending Libraries, by 
Lady John Manners (London : W. Blackwood & Sons), 
there is a mass of excellent testimony given in a com¬ 
pressed form, which all interested in this educational 
movement would do well to carefully consider. Tempe¬ 
rance workers will be pleased with the many hearty com¬ 
mendations of their labours and hints as to temperance 
literature. 

Mrs. Ripley (M. A. Pauli) is apparently going the 
round of the publishers, and we can heartily congratulate 
her upon the handsome manner in which Messrs. Cassell 
& Co. have produced Pretty Pink's Purpose ; or, The Little 
Street Merchants. The characters are finely drawn, and it 
will be difficult to persuade some of our juveniles that it 
is not a real sketch of real people. We have every pleasure 
in cordially recommending it. 

The annual volumes of the Animal World and the Band 
Mercy (London : W. Partridge & Co.), splendidly fulfil 
their mission as the official organs of the Royal Society 
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, pictures and 
letterpress being equally satisfactory. 

The National Temperance League, 337, Strand, sends 
us a large parcel. First in order we may mention the 
solid educational volume which contains the report of the 
British and Colonial Temperance Congress. The mass 
of valuable papers contained within the compass of this 
work present a view of the present position of the tempe¬ 
rance movement not to be found in any other volume. 
The book contains a mass of facts furnishing stores for 
hundreds of speeches. The fifth annual volume of the 
Temperance Mirror is equal to the best of its predecessors, 


which is praise indeed. Tales, poems, dialogues, with 
an occasional instalment of something more substantial, 
combine to form a book which is " marvellous good 
value ” for the price at which it is published. The 
National Temperance Reader has reached its fourth volume. 
The present issue contains an admirable collection of 
pieces original and selected, and the reciter must indeed 
be hard to please who doesn’t find something to suit him 
in this comprehensive budget. The League's Annual for 
1887 gives a fine portrait of John B. Gough, with an 
admirable biographical sketch by Dr. Cuyler. The other 
contents include an excellent summary of the British and 
Colonial Temperance Congress, and several interesting 
papers by well-known workers, one of the most valuable 
being that of the Rev. Dr. Burns on “ The Rise and Pro¬ 
gress of Temperance Work among the Young.” Thirteen 
Nuggets of Gold, a tale by J. Woodham, introduces us to 
a writer with whom we have not hitherto met. We have 
been much pleased with this short story, and shall look 
forward to further tales from the same pen. A second 
edition of Lady John Manners’ admirable paper, Total 
Abstinence as a Safeguard, will be heartily welcomed. Con¬ 
ductors of entertainments will be delighted with Look on 
this Picture and on that, a sprightly domestic sketch in nine 
characters, from the pen of W. Alfred Mosley ; while 
Band of Hope Choirs may find a Service of Song to their 
liking in The Beautiful Snow, written by Sinclair Dunn. 

From the Lancashire and Cheshire Band of Hope Union 
we have received the twenty-first volume of Onward, and 
can heartily congratulate our contemporary upon its com¬ 
ing of age. We have so often expressed our admiration 
of this excellent publication, that it is superfluous for us to 
say anything except that those workers who have not yet 
introduced it to their Bands of Hope little know how much 
they have missed. Onward Reciter has now been before the 
public for fifteen years. These little red-backed books are 
very popular with young reciters and well they may 
be. Two new services of song, Little Jamie, based on 
the well-known tale ‘'The Little Captain," and Dick's 
Fairy, compiled from the Rev. Silas K. Hocking’s popular 
story, will no doubt be received with great favour. 

The Church of England Temperance Society (Bridge 
Street, Westminster) have issued Come and Over-come, a 
new series of talks with the children by Miss S. Ursula 
Gardner, whose experience of children’s meetings shows 
to advantage in this delightful little book. Joan 
Carrington's Care and Changed; or. How Will Hope 
broke his Pledge, are two reprints of tales which 
have appeared in the Church of England Temperance 
Chronicle. They will be useful for distribution, the latter 
more particularly in agricultural localities. Twenty- 
Five Years’ Work of the C.E.T.S. : A Retrospect and a New 
Departure, is the title of an eminently interesting and 
thoughtful letter addressed to the Archbishop of Canter¬ 
bury by Canon Ellison, in which a weighty plea is made 
for the extermination of the drink traffic amongst the 
Native Races of our Colonies. The C.E.T.S. Sheet 
Almanack makes an effective broadsheet, with its tasteful 
pictures and generally neat appearance. 

Work and Save; or, A sure way to get out of Debt ,by H. de 
Hochstrasser (London: Elliot Stock), gives a true story 
of a reformed continental village. The kindred virtues of 
temperance and thrift are admirably enforced, and the 
interest is well sustained from first to last. 

The new volume of The Adviser (Scottish Temperance 
League) is a treasury of good things for the little ones. 
We have dipped into it here and there and lighted upon 
several telling illustrations which do not seem to have been 
used much on this side of the border. The verses are in 
many instances above the average. 

The Wesleyan Methodist Sunday School Union send 
us a second edition of Blind Olive,by Sarson C. J. Ingham, 
a charming story which girls will appreciate. From the 
same source we have a delightful book written by the 



THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE , 


13 


Rev. John Telford, in which he traces the history of Tivo 
West End Chapels. 

We cannot do more than mention the third edition of 
On Child Culture by Dr. More Madden, in which there are 
some fearful examples of juvenile drunkenness : the first 
number of a new volume of The Century containing the 
opening chapters of Lincoln’s life; The Voice of Praise, a 
selection of six hundred hymns published by the Sunday 
School Union ; No Scripture Sanction for Intoxicating Drink, 
an exposition and appeal by the veteran reformer, Dr. 
Dawson Burns, marked by all the ripe scholarship and 
keen analytic reasoning for which the author is famous ; 
The Social Results of Temperance in Blackburn, by W. E. A. 
Axon, a reprint from the Manchester Guardian describing 
Mrs. Lewis’ great work; The Christian Safeguard, a new 
periodical edited by H. L. Hastings, which gives a place 
to the temperance question ; the Proceedings of the Society 
for the Study and Cure of Inebriety, which, under Dr. 
Norman Kerr’s energetic lead has rendered such important 
service to the extension of the work in cultured circles; 
and A Pilgrimage of Pleasure ; or, the Story of John Hopeful, 
Junior, edited by S. Sanders, which is a bright little tale, 
evidently based upon fact, published by the Birmingham 
Band of Hope Union. 


RECITATION. 

LITTLE KITTY. 

By H. Major, B.A., B.Sc. 

OYLESS, lone-wandering and lost, 

With wolfish teeth and hungry eyes, 
That opened wide in dumb surprise 
That any stranger should accost 
Poor little Kitty 
In words of pity,— 

Our paths of life at midnight crossed ! 

“Where’s father ? ” “Oh, he’s on the 
drink.” 

“Where’s mother?” “She has run 
away 

'Cos father thrashed her t’other day.” 

I saw the little woman shrink, 

To know that pity 
For little Kitty 

Should in a stranger’s bosom sink. 

II Have you no brother ? ” “ He’s gone home ; 

He couldn’t stand the cold and wet ; 

He wasn’t tough like me, and yet 
He was more pluckier nor some! 

Will God ha’ pity 
On Little Kitty 

And take her, too, to Kingdom come ? 

“ I wonder, if I lives and grows 
A woman, shall I run away ? 

I s'pose it’s very hard to stay 
And get naught but kicks and blows. 

Pr’aps God’ll pity 
Poor little Kitty. 

Do you think He will ? I s’pose you knows ? 

“ I seed a woman t’other night, 

At first I thought ’twas mother, sure, 

For she was just as thin and poor, 

But then she bolted out o’ sight 
From little Kitty, 

And had no pity ! 

She gave me such an awful fright. 


“It’s very late, sir, standing here ; 
I’m used to it, but you'll ketch cold ; 
’Mebbeyou think I’m over bold, 

But, sir, for me you needn’t fear ! 

Nor needn’t pity 
Poor little Kitty, 

She'll get along as good as gold.” 

" Better than gold ! a diamond rare 
To deck, I trust, the Saviour’s crown ! 
Oh, Christ, in tenderness look down 
Upon the sorrows children bear, 

And in Thy pity 
Take little Kitty, 

And let her all Thy mercy share ! ” 


DIALOGUE FOR THREE LADS. 

“TWO TO ONE.” 

By H. Major, B.A., B.Sc., Author of “A Complete 
Physiology .” 

Walter .—Well, Harry, are you going to make one ? 

Harry. —Make one what ? 

Walter. —One of us ? 

Harry. —What do you mean ? 

Walter .—Fred and I and a few more are going to the 
races, and you might as well join us, and make your 
miserable life happy. Hadn't he, Fred ? 

Fred .—I’m going, at any rate. ’Tisn’t often I can get 
off, and I can’t afford to lose a chance. 

Harry .—I’m sorry to disappoint you, if it is a dis¬ 
appointment ; but I can’t afford to run a risk. 

Walter .—Why, you won’t be forced to bet, unless you 
like. 

Harry. —I’m not afraid of that; betting is not in my 
line. I’m neither one of the “ shams ” nor one of the 
“ flats.” I don’t want other folks’ money that I have not 
earned, and I don’t want other folks to have what I’ve 
earned. And if I did want the first I shouldn’t get it : 
I’m not conceited enough to think I am more cunning, 
than those brought up to the trade. 

Fred .—Then what are you afraid of ? 

Harry .—I don’t know that I am afraid of anything. 
But I don’t see much sense in joining a multitude when 
mischief is brewing, just to “treat resolution.” 

Walter .—You don’t want to go because of the drinking- 
booth ! 

Harry. —That would be a reason, if there were no 
others. 

Fred .—Now what harm can there be in taking a glass 
of beer in a booth at the races ? 

Harry .—I never can make you understand that I don't 
want a glass of beer. I don’t want it in either of the- 
meanings of the word “ want.” 

Walter .—Didn’t know there was more than one. 

Harry.—I only mean I don’t require it or need it: it is. 
of no use to me; and I, therefore, don't want it, or wish, 
to have it. 

Fred .— Well, 1 do want it, in both senses, and I shall 
have it. 

Walter .—-And so shall I. I can’t stand cold water. 

Harry. —But the water is not any colder than the beer ; 
and if it is heat you want, you can take the water boiling ! 

I think that excuse is a far-fetched one. I met Jem 
Sykes one day last winter going into a public to get a 
glass of something “ to keep the cold out,” he said, and 
I met him doing the same in summer to make him cool. 
You can’t blow both hot and cold like that. 

Fred .—Don’t you ever feel thirsty, then ? Why, I get 
as dry as a fish. 

Harry .—You mean as dry as a fish out of water. But 
if you’ll stick to water like a fish you won't get dry. You 
won’t ask for “snacks” between your meals. I don't 







THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


14 


want anything to drink between my meals, and I enjoy 
my glass of water with them just as much as I 
used to relish a glass of beer before. It is all habit, and 
an expensive and dangerous one. 

Fred. —Oh ! a fellow wants something to make the food 
go down with relish, and something to help to digest it. 

Harry. —I find my taste has very much improved since 
I have taken water with my meals. And as for beer 
digesting food, if there were no other reason why I should 
give up drinking beer, that would be enough. Beer is 
about the toughest drink to digest that you can take. It 
used to puff me up like a balloon. 

Walter. —I know I could no more go to sleep without 
my supper-beer than I could fly. 

Harry. —And if, like Queen Elizabeth, you were in the 
habit of taking your “supper beer ” at breakfast, you 
would say, “ I could no more eat my breakfast without 
my glass of ale than I could fly.” All habit, lad. You 
want to drink beer because you have drunk; but if you 
take to water, like I have done, you won't want to 
drink (after you have drunk a small quantity) also because 
you have drunk. 

Fred. —All very clever, I dare say ; but there is not 
much fun in it. 

Harry. —Do you know the difference between a beer- 
drinker and a bucket of water? 

Walter. —What is it ? 

Harry. —You can fill a bucket with water, for it has a 
bottom to it, but you very often can’t fill a beer drinker, 
because the more you pour in, the dryer he becomes. It 
always wants bingeing, as the cooper calls it. But a 
teetotaler is sound, without any leaking and tumbling to 
pieces. 

Fred. —I know I want bingeing. as you call it, about eleven 
o’clock in the morning. I look pretty sharp for “ allow¬ 
ance ” time. 

Harry .—That is about the time I feel just “getting in” 
to the work. 

Walter .—I will say that, for you, Harry—I've often 
noticed it. / feel like a gasping cod-fish in a fish-tank— 
all mouth. 

Harry. —Then take my advice, lad. and do as the cod¬ 
fish does—fill your mouth with cold water. That will 
quench your thirst, put money in your pocket, keep your 
hands steady and your heart light, your temper cheerful, 
and make us all glad to see your name down on the roll- 
call. But I must be off. I have promised to take my 
little girl out for a walk, and she belongs to the roll-call 
as well ; so good-night. 

Fred &■ Walter. —Good-night, lad ; good-night. 


GLEANINGS AND ILLUSTRATIONS. 


On the Importance of Visiting Our Members.— 
It is generally admitted that a small Band of Hope well 
taught, and well looked after,is much to be preferred over 
a large society, whose very numbers prevent individual 
care. It should be the aim of every Band of Hope secre¬ 
tary never to allow a member to leave the society without 
having ample reasons for such a loss. Any absence for 
more than a month should be at once inquired into. This 
can be easily accomplished if the children are classified 
into districts, and the ladies of the committee, or some of 
the senior members, are pressed into the service. Visita¬ 
tion excites the interest of both parents and children—it 
makes them feel that the Band of Hope has real life, that 
its members are not an unreadable mass, it increases 
responsibility, and thus makes everybody connected 
more careful. Even young children may assist in this 
work, as the following incident will clearly show. A 
gentleman who, one wet, foggy evening, was vainly 


endeavouring to find the meeting place of a Band of Hope 
to which he had been invited, observed two little girls in 
front of him, hurrying along under an ancient umbrella, 
and obviously intent upon some earnest work. “Come 
along,” said one, “ or we shall be late to the meeting.” 
The gentleman concluded at once that these two were 
going to the place he was seeking, and so prudently 
followed in the rear. Presently, one of the girls hurried 
down a court, and soon after returned with two other 
children. The four now went on ; now they knocked at a 
house, and two more joined the procession. This was 
repeated several times, so that the speaker went into the 
mission hall following nearly twenty children. To his 
surprise he found a large number of children gathered 
together. Congratulating the lady who conducted the 
meeting, she replied, “ Ah, we have some little mission¬ 
aries who look after the half-hearted members.” “ Yes,” 
he said, “ I saw them doing their work, and they little 
think that they were the means of my finding my way to 
the haven.” 

Influence And Example. —After Thomas Carlyle 
had written the second volume of the “French Revo¬ 
lution,” while it was still in manuscript, an un¬ 
fortunate accident happened to it. He lent the manu¬ 
script to a friend, who, after reading it, confided it to 
another friend. This second friend became so engrossed 
in the story that he sat far into the night reading it. 
Suddenly recollecting himself, he put the manuscript 
carelessly on the library table, and went to bed. When 
the servant came in the morning, she wanted some paper 
to light the fire. Looking round the room she saw a heap 
of what she thought waste paper lying on the library 
table. Fetching it, she put it into the grate, carefully laid 
her fire, lit it, and Carlyle’s “French Revolution” was 
soon ascending the chimney. For two or three days 
Carlyle was kept in ignorance ofthe misfortune, but at last 
a whispered rumour reached him. When he knew the whole 
truth hewas almost beside himself with rage and vexation. 
Almost the whole book was destroyed,and all would have to 
be re-written. Several times he essayed the task but he failed 
to be satisfied with the writing. He was almost giving up 
the task in despair when one day he was standing at the 
window. He saw on the opposite side of the road a brick¬ 
layer busy at his work, building the wall of a house, and 
all the while singing or whistling as blithe as a lark. 
Feeling rebuked by the man’s hearty application to his 
daily task, he said to himself, “ Up, then, at thy work and 
be cheerful.” In a few weeks [again applied himself 
to his task, and in course of time “The French Revolu¬ 
tion ” was added to the literature of our country. 

In the supplement to the forty-fifth annual report of the 
Registrar-General contains some important remarks on the 
mortality of brewers, publicans, See. We are told that “ The 
mortality attributed to alcoholism in itself is far higher 
for inn-keepers and publicans than for any industry, and 
more than five times as high as the average; that for 
brewers falls far short of this, but, nevertheless, is the 
next highest to that of inn-keepers, with the single excep¬ 
tion of cabmen. Under the heading, ' Liver Diseases, 
the mortality of inn-keepers is no less than six times as 
high as the average, and more than twice as high as that 
of brewers and of butchers, who come next in order in 
this respect to inn-keepers. The inn-keepers, again, show 
the highest mortality in the table from gout, and putting 
aside trades in which there is lead-poisoning, from 
diseases of the urinary organs. The brewers also show 
great excess of mortality, though in a less degree, under 
these headings. So also is it under the headings suicide, 
diseases of the nervous system, diseases of the organs of 
circulation, phthisis, and diseases of the respiratory 
organs ; there are, in short, no organs apparently that are 
not more or less seriously damaged by the excessive use of 
alcoholic drinks, though the liver appears to suffer most.” 





THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 

a&ecor&s of Progress from So cal g»octettes. 


Eontiort. 

A conference of officers] and leading friends connected with the 
Metropolitan Unions was held in London on Saturday, December 
4th, Mr. Stephen Shirley, Chairman of the Union, presiding. Interest¬ 
ing statements were made as to recent and proposed work, and the 
reports indicated that a large amount of useful work was being carried 
on with thoroughness and success. The most important question dis¬ 
cussed was that relating to the special means adopted for retaining senior 
members. Many methods of instructing and sustaining the interest of 
the young people who are too old for our junior societies were mentioned, 
and whilst it was generally recognised that the elder members presented 
one of the most difficult problems for Band of Hope workers, much satis¬ 
faction was expressed at the success which had resulted from special 
efforts adopted by several of the Unions, whose representatives were 
present at the meeting, by the adoption of Saturday evening entertain¬ 
ments for senior members which had in several instances proved most 
successful, and the plan was strongly recommended for general adoption. 


Bantf of ?$ope Unions. 

Bradford.—The anniversary meetings of this Union, the oldest and 
one of the strongest in the Kingdom, were held on Saturday, December 
nth, in the Temperance Hall- In the afternoon, Miss Capper, of Leeds, 
gave an address on “ Burdens ” to an audience of workers, Mr. Thomas 
Craig taking the chair. After tea a public meeting was held under the 
presidency of Alderman PriestmaD, a strong supporter of the society. 
The Hon. Sec., Mr Martin Field, read the annual report, the thirty- 
fifth, which contained gratifying information as to the past efforts and 
future prospects of the Union. The membership consisted of 137 societies 
in and around Bradford, an increase of nine on the numbers reported 
last year. The number of members was probably 25,000, of whom about 
7,000 were over sixteen years of age. Most of the associated societies 
zealously co-operated with the Committee of the Union in the various 
measures adopted for the advancement of the movement amongst the 
young.. The agent, Mr. James Roberts, still laboured with great and 
increasing success. The Committee has co-operated in the holding of a 
series of open-air meetings during the summer, and in a memorial to the 
magistrates at the Brewster Sessions. Much attention was devoted to 
Public Elementary Schools,and a series of lectures to scholars arranged. 
The balance in hand amounted to ^87. The meeting was addressed 
by the Chairman, Mr. James Hardaker, Miss Capper,and other workers 
in the movement. During the evening a selection of music was given by 
several ladies and gentlemen connected with the society. On the 
following day, Sunday, sermons were preached and addresses delivered 
in a very large number of places of worship and Sunday Schools, and 
important temperance truths were thus brought under the notice of a 
class which temperance reformers are specially anxious to secure. 

Keighley, Yorks. —Sunday, December 12th, was appointed for a 
remarkably successful and useful series of services in connection with the 
anniversary of this Union.The children connected with the various schools 
of all denominations assembled at twelve centres for united services in 
the afternoon, and listened to able addresses by hearty advocates. In 
the evening, after the close of ordinary worship, a‘special gospel tempe¬ 
rance meeting was held in the Mechanics’ Institute. The Mayor was 
present. Mr. J. J. Brigg took the chair,and addresses were delivered by 
Mr. Hector Davidson and Rev. J. Richard Hargraves. At these services 
a collection was taken. 

Mary lebone. —On Wednesday, December 1st, the ninth annual 
meeting of this Union was held at St. Mary’s Hall, Crawford Street. 
The Hon. and Rev. Canon Leigh presided, and there were present 
upwards of 900 members and friends of the Union. A choir of ico 
voices, led by Mr. Green, rendered good service during the evening. 
Among those on the platform were the Rev Septimus Buss, Rev. David 
Davies, Dr. Norman Kerr, Mr. J. G. Chappell, Mr. J. P. Draper, Mr. 
Frederic Smith and Mr. Silas Tucker. The report, read by Mr. G. 
Burton, the Secretary, stated the membership amounted to nearly 7,000, 
and took part in the Christmas and New Year’s Collection. The im¬ 
portance of Band of Hope work was forcibly dwelt upon by the Chairman 
and other friends who took part in the proceedings, and earnest appeals 
made for assistance in the work of the society. 

Nottingham and Notts.—The fifteenth annual meeting was held 
at the Albert Hall, on Monday, December 6th, at which,notwithstand¬ 
ing the unfavourable weather, there was a large attendance. The chair 
was taken by Alderman Griffin, who was well supported by gentlemen 
of local influence. The hon. secretary, the Rev. G. Edgcome, read the 
report, from which it appears that a large increase of membership has 
been secured, not Jess than 13 societies, with 2,800 members, having 
entered into association. The loss of Mr. Samuel Morleyand Admiral 
Sir W. King-Hall, both liberal supporters of the Union, received regret¬ 
ful recognition. Great efforts had been made by the Festival and 
Demonstration Committees, but increased funds were urgently needed. 
The work in the Board Schools had proved specially useful. The 
addresjes were given by the Rev. J. P. Gledstone, and Rev.J. W. Paul. 
Selections of music were given by a choir conducted by Mr. William 
Coplestone. 

Plymouth. —In connection with the Temperance Jubilee in this town 
the children were not forgotten. A great gathering of young people was 
held in the schoolroom of King-street Wesleyan Cnapel, the chair 
being taken by Mr. J. M. Grose, who exhorted to perseverance, with the 
remark that the winner of a prize was not he who started well but he who 


ended well. The Rev. S. Higman and Mr. B. V. Chick, of Bristol, gave 
most useful, amusing, and impressive addresses. Other proceedings in 
connection with the Jubilee were sermons by the Vicar, Rev. J. M. 
Laycock, and the Rev. Samuel Vincent a women’s meeting, at which a 
special address was given by Mr.Ormiston Chant, and a great gatheiing 
in St. Andrew’s Hall, at which the Rev. B. Mills, Vicar of ChristChurch, 
presided.. The local press well reports these various gatherings, and 
gives an interesting history of the rise and progress of temperance work 
during the past fifty years in this important town. 

Portsmouth. —A special meeting for senior members and tem¬ 
perance workers was held in Fuller’s Hall, Landport, on Wednesday, 
November 24th. After tea a concert was given by the Portsmouth 
contingent of the Crystal Palace Choir, conducted by Mr. W. E. 
Green. The Chairman, Mr. Councillor Ward, gave a tel'ing address. 
The Rev. G. S. Smith, President of the Gosport Band of Hope Union, 
pointed out the temptations besetting young people, and urged fidelity 
to the pledge; and Mr. W. E. Green pleaded for more help and 
sympathy from adult abstainers. The hall was crowded by an appre¬ 
ciative audience, which demanded a repetition of several of the pieces 
rendered by the choir. 

Wakefield and District. —A very successful gathering under the 
auspices of this Union took place on Saturday evening, December 4th, 
in the Newton Lane Wesleyan Chapel. In the afternoon a conference 
of workers and Sunday School teachers w’as held. Mr. T. S. Mason, of 
Silcoates, presided, and a paper was read by Mr. J. Carr, of Thornes, on 
the advantage derived from the association of a Band of Hope with 
each Sunday School. After tea a public meeting was held. Capital 
speeches were delivered by the chairman, Mr. Councillor Wade, Rev. 
Sidney Pitt, Rev. H. Walton, Mr. Littlewood (of Barnsley), and Mr. 
Gurney (of Rothwell). Encouraged by the success of this effort, the 
committee have decided to hold similar meetings quarterly in various 
parts of this area. 

Wolverhampton. —The annual meeting of this Union was held 
recently in the Exchange Hall. The president, Mr. J. Phillips, occupied 
the chair, and addresses were delivered by the Revs. C L. Williams, 
C. S_ Lidgett, M.A., W. Harrison (Bordesley), and E. L. Llewelyn. 
Musical selections were given by a choir of 300 voices. Mr. Fawcett, 
the secretary, read the report, which stated that there had been an 
increase of six Bands, with an estimated strength of i,coo members,bring- 
ing the. total strength of the Union to about 5,000 members ; there are 23 
Bands in the Union as compared with 13 in 1884. 


JScttopoittan Banti of =®ope. 

New North Road (Wesleyan).—The annual meeting of this society 
was held on Tuesday, Decembe: 14th The Rev. J. R. Berry presided- 
The secretary’s report showed satisfactory progress in the'numbers joining 
in regularity of attendance, and in finance. Excellent addresses were 
delivered by the chairman Mr. W. Saunders, and Mr. J. W. Morgan, 
chairman of the Hackney Band of Hope Union. Several Temperance 
pieces were sung and recitations given by the members,and in all respects 
the meeting was one of the most successful yet held in connection with 
this Band of Hope. 


Urobincial Bants of $?op z. 

Bradford. —We always receive with much pleasure the annual 
report of the Sion Band of Hope in this Union. It may almost be 
taken as a perfect model of what a Band of Hope report should be. The 
present issue, the thirty-fifth, is no exception to its predecessors, and 
records, in lucid yet ample detail, a large amount of excellent work. 35 
meetings were held, with an attendance of 4,477. There are 645 
members in good standing, this number having been arrived at after 
careful inquiry. 3,317 magazines were sold by 10 canvassers, and much 
useful information thus disseminated. Amongst the special gatherings 
were two dissolving view lectures and a service of song, “ Dan Dabber- 
ton’s Dream.” 

Cambridge(Wesleyan) —The second anniversary in connection with 
the Hobson Street Band of Hope, was held on Monday,December 13th. 
Tea was provided in the schoolroom, and a public meeting was held in 
the Chapel, at which a service of sacred song was given, entitled Lost 
Gip. ” The connective readings were rendered by the Rev. Macdonald 
Munro, B A. The chair was taken by Mr. Neal. A report was presented 
by the sebretary, Mr. H. E. Bunnett, showing the number of members 
to be 122, with an average attendance of 41 at the ordinary meetings.The 
treasurer reported a balance in hand. 

Cheshunt. —A strong and old established Band of Hope is at work 
in this town,and held a most successful anniversary meeting on Friday, 
December 10th, in St. Mary’s Hall, every available seat being occupied. 
The Rev. J.O. Jackson occupied the chair and addresses were delivered 
by Rev. T. T. Lambert, Professor Whitehouse, Professor Todhunter, 
and Mr. Silver, the president of the society. The secretary, Mr. C. 
Archer, who has long and ably sustained that office,lead the report,which 
recorded a large amount of useful work. 

Sheffield. —On Friday, December 10th, the Burnylow-road Wesleyan 
Band of Hope held an interesting meeting. A lecture, entitled “ John 
Tregenoweth ; his mark,” with musical illustrations, was delivered by 
Mr. J. W. Cummins. In the course of his introductory address, the 
chairman, Mr. Councillor Llewellon, stated that he had been for nearly 
for y years a total abstainer. 





THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


16 


GENERAL TEMPERANCE TOPICS: 


HE opposition to a drinking licence for the 
People’s Palace seems to have been, in the 
main, successful. The present state of the 
matter may be gathered from the following 
resolution passed at a great meeting com¬ 
posed exclusively of the working classes in the 
neighbourhood of the proposed Institution— 
“That this meeting, whilst thankful to hear 
the statement from the trustees that intoxi¬ 
cating liquors will not be sold, yet desires 
to know that a proviso to that effect is em¬ 
bodied in the trust deed.” As a result of even the qualified 
promise, Mr. Wilberforce Bryant has increased his hand¬ 
some contribution of ^2,800 bv an additional 000. 

* *" 

■ft 

The evils arising from the introduction of strong drink 
to savage nations, and especially to the African races, 
■continues to receive vigorous exposition and illustration. 
/The Contemporary Review has an able article from 
the pen of Mr. Joseph Thompson, an experienced African 
'traveller, who dwells upon the mischief with great 

■ emphasis. He contends that our contact with the black 
■man has been productive to him of far more harm than 
benefit. He says, “ For every African who is influenced 
for good by Christianity, a thousand are driven into 
■deeper degradation by the drink trade.” It is painful to 
read that the superstition of Mahomet, with its in¬ 
sistence of total abstinence, has actually better met the 

■ case of this class of heathen than the religion of Christ, 

■ combined with the practice of alcoholic drinking. When 
will Christians at home see how wide-reaching is this 

■ curse, and do their duty to the nations which “ sit in 
darkness ? ” 

* * 

* 

It is pleasing to notice the testimony borne to the 
uncrease of teetotalism by Mr. George R. Sims and others 
who just now are trying to sound the depth of the distress 
which is reported to prevail amongst the working classes. 
He found many distressed families in which teetotalism 
had long been the rule, and although, probably, a good 
many false representations were made, it being clearly the 
policy of the people visited to put the best face possible 
on their personal habits, yet the probable cases were en¬ 
couragingly numerous. From one point of view this is 
additionally sad. We are convinced that the bad times 
are chiefly owing to the misuse of the vast sums now 
expended in strong drink, and it does seem hard that 
those who had no share in producing the evil should suffer 
from its effects. On the other hand, we must remember 
that, however distressed the circumstances of an abstainer 
may be, they would be yet worse if he had wasted time, 
money,health and character in drink. 

■ft * 

* 

Every year appears a Blue-book of judicial statistics— 
mere dry figures at a first glance, but of thrilling interest 
to those whose imagination is sufficiently vivid to appre- 
.hend what those figures really mean. We may be thank¬ 
ful that it records a decrease in crime generally, but are 
specially thankful that it shows a check to the growth of 
the number of convictions for drunkenness, the root of 
■so many crimes. Only such as are disorderly, as well as 
■drunken, come under the practical cognizance of the law 
and of such the number last returned is 183,221,as against 
198,274 in the preceding year. 

* * 

_ -ft 

Good reports have been received irom the various 
diocesan branches of the C.E.T.S. That for Winchester 
held a specially successful anniversary last month, and 
secured a notice of eight columns in the most important 
local newspaper. 


We are glad to note in the annual report of the 
Children’s Home and Orphanage, so ably superintended 
by the Rev. T. B. Stephenson, the phrase—“ Of course 
temperance has formed a very strong and leading feature 
of our work," and this we know to really be the case. The 
agents of the Union have been repeatedly placed at the 
disposal of the managers of the institution. It will be 
matter for rejoicing when the advocacy of temperance, of 
course in its full form of total abstinence, shall form 
a branch of every good work, whether of reclamation or 
prevention. 

* * 

* 

A general meeting of the British Medical Temperance 
Association, recently held, elicited from the President,Dr. 

B. W. Richardson, an important address on ‘‘ThePublic- 
house and the Public Health.” The old fact that publicans 
suffer as well as their customers for the drinks they sell 
was further verified and enforced, and the general depres¬ 
sion of health on account of alcoholic stimulation abun¬ 
dantly proved. We are glad to note that a verbatim 
report of the address is bespoken for one of the leading 
medical papers. We shall have them altogether on our 
side before long. 

* * 

The army continues to improve in temperance matters. 
At Walmer, last quarter, out of nearly 1,300 men only 
four were punished for drunkenness. In the corresponding 
quarter ten years ago 97 men were convicted, their fines 
amounting to an aggregate of nearly £50. The last return 
from India gives the number of teetotal soldiers there as 
12,000, a splendid result, and one very largely owing to 
the action of the National Temperance League, both now 
and in bygone times, and the more recent efforts of the 

C. E.T.S. 

■ft * 

* 

The good management of coffee taverns is an impor¬ 
tant item in temperance work. We should recommend to 
all trustees, committees, proprietors or managers of such 
or similar institutions, a paper read at a conference of the 
Coffee Tavern and Temperance Club Protection Society, 
by Mr. F. Kiddle, and published in the Church of England 
Temperance Chronicle for December 4th. Mr. Kiddle writes 
with the force and accuracy which comes of practical 
experience. 

•ft * 

■ft 

The Women’s Temperance Union continues its useful 
work. It is a subject for cheerful reflection that the 
temperance field is now so wide that special attention to 
special classes is not only advisable but possible. Miss 
Haslam, the Secretary, is indefatigable in her labours, 
and is ably seconded by a staff of lady speakers who can 
better understand and combat the difficulties of the 
gentler sex than could we, their differently-experienced 
fellow-workers. 

* * 

* 

At a meeting of the British Association the subject of 
tobacco smoking came up; Dr. Michael Foster contended 
that the practice in question has a bad effect upon the 
eyesight. The large number of Germans, great smokers 
almost to a man, indeed, almost to a boy, who wear 
spectacles, seems to favour this theory. 

* -ft 

* 

The Wesleyan Temperance Sunday was duly and 
profitably observed on December 12th. We wish we could 
have one Temperance Sunday for all bodies of Christians. 
Intemperance is a very undenominational vice, and should 
be as far as possible combated on undenominational prin¬ 
ciples. 




THE 


'§Scm6 of .ij&ope {SBvoutcfe 

Issued Monthly by the United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 


TEMPERANCE TEACHING IN DAY 
SCHOOLS. 



N our January issue, we inserted an 
interesting letter giving particulars 
of the successful steps which the 
Bradford Band of Hope Union had 
recently taken to provide temper¬ 
ance teaching in the schools of 
that important town. We have since 
been favoured with communications 
from friends in various parts of the kingdom, 
giving particulars of steps taken in their 
respective districts, extracts from which we 
now place before our readers. From these, 
it will be seen that not a few of our friends, 
having seriously felt the importance of the 
subject, have held conferences of teachers, 
obtained the introduction of temperance read¬ 
ing books into the schools, arranged for the 
delivery of special addresses to the children, 
and in other ways endeavoured to promote the 
end in view. The subject being of the first 
importance, we trust that those Unions which up 
to the present time have taken little or no action 
in this direction, will give the subject their 
early consideration, and see what can be done. 

Numbers of Children not Reached. 


We need scarcely remind our friends that, 
despite the large numbers now connected with 
Juvenile Temperance Societies, there is still a 
very large number of children who are not at 
present receiving any kind of temperance train¬ 
ing. It may be roughly estimated that, at the 
present time, there are in the United Kingdom 
about 4,863,000 children above seven years of 
age—that is, of an age when they should be 
■at school—the great proportion of whom 
attend the ordinary Elementary Schools. 
Happily, we are now able to estimate the 
membership of Juvenile Temperance Societies 
at 1,546,000, a considerable proportion of whom, 
however, are beyond school age. There are, 
therefore, about 3,317,000 children over seven 
3 7 ears of age who are growing up practically 
with little or no specific temperance teaching. 

Steps to be taken.—Bands of Hope Best 
of ALL. 

Now there are two modes of dealing with 
this state of things, both of which may indeed 
be advantageously carried out simultaneously. 

FEBRUARY, 1887. 


First, by taking steps tc bring a much greater 
number of children into our Societies ; and, 
secondly, by providing temperance teaching 
in the schools. We think the former the more 
efficient mode, because the subject can be more 
thoroughly dealt with in the Band of Hope 
than in the school, even under the most favour¬ 
able circumstances, and in a manner, moreover, 
which will prove more pleasant to the children ; 
for it is undeniable that whatever is taught in 
the school is likely to be looked upon as a 
task, and disliked accordingly by the majorit}-. 
At the Band of Hope meeting, too, that “love 
and enthusiasm for the cause,’’ which it is so 
desirable to foster, can be best developed. 
Our first duty therefore plainly is, to make 
our Bands of Hope still more pleasant and 
attractive, and to provide such interesting 
instruction as will be appreciated by the young 
people of the present day. We must take 
care, too, that the existence of our Societies 
is made well known at every school in the 
neighbourhood. Many of our meetings, which 
are now quite small, might easily be made 
much larger, if they were made more widely 
known, and if, when the young people come, the 
gatherings were found to be full of life and 
interest. 

Abstaining Teachers. 

Despite all we maybe able to do,however,there 
will still be a great number who will remain out¬ 
side the Band of Hope; and it behoves us, there¬ 
fore, to provide, as far as can possibly be done, 
that temperance shall be taught in the school. 
And we may at once make up our minds that 
there is no very expeditious mode of accom¬ 
plishing this ; like ever)fihing else worth 
doing, it will require patience, time, and even, 
perhaps, a little money. It will not do to think 
we have done much when we have presented 
memorials to the School Boards, praying them 
to arrange for temperance teaching in the 
schools. This is, of course, all very well as far 
as it goes, and, as a result, certain recommen¬ 
dations have been adopted in some instances for 
the guidance of the teachers, and temperance 
text books have been purchased as reading 
books ; but, were the members of the Board 
willing to do their very utmost, not very much is 
likely to result, unless the teachers are them¬ 
selves abstainers. For temperance cannot be 
taught like geography or grammar; it involves 
principle, and to be of much real service the 







18 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


teacher must himself be known to be an abstainer. 
Where this is the case, he is pretty certain, 
without any instruction from head-quarters, to 
render us invaluable assistance, and that 
without making temperance a set subject, or 
taking up time which he is compelled to devote 
to other matters ; for he will, almost without 
thinking of it, find abundant opportunity fcr 
temperance remarks in an incidental way—far 
more valuable in this instance than set lessons 
— whilst his own living example will be of even 
greater value than the most exact teaching in 
reading books, good as these may be. 

Teachers’ Conferences. 

Our prime object, therefore, must be to 
induce the teachers to become abstainers. In 
regard to this, we must all note with extreme 
pleasure the admirable work which has for so 
long been carried on by the National Temper¬ 
ance League; for the addresses to the students 
in the Training Colleges, and the many other 
methods adopted by the League have been of 
immense service. A great deal in the same direc¬ 
tion has also been done by our own Society and 
by Local Unions throughout the country, in the 
way of conferences—both in public halls, and 
at the residences of well-to-do friends. These 
steps have undoubtedly produced good results, 
and should be carried out on as wide a scale 
as possible. We recommend drawing-room 
meetings as the best plan of all. In almost every 
town some lady or gentleman would be more 
than willing to invite the teachers of the 
neighbourhood to such a gathering, when 
the matter could be dealt with by short 
addresses and friendly interchange of thought. 
On these occasions, and in other ways, suitable 
literature should be distributed, and we know of 
no better work for presenting to teachers than 
one entitled “ The Religious and Educational 
Aspects of Temperance,” which comprises 
carefully written articles, by some of the first 
men of the day.* It is important to bear in 
mind that on these occasions it is a mistake to 
urge teachers to occupy regular periods of time 
with temperance lessons. They feel that,working 
as they do at high pressure, this is simply impos¬ 
sible. They may, however, be reminded how 
easily and advantageously an abstaining teacher 
may incidentally introduce the subject into his 
lessons on Scripture, arithmetic, physiology, 
domestic economy, and also amongst the 

* This work, price is. 6d.,comprises pamphlets by 
Rev. Canon Wilberforce, Dr. Norman Kerr, Samuel 
Bowly, Rev. Dr. Valpy French, Rev. Alex. Hannay 
and others. Each pamphlet may be had separately 
at id.— National Temperance Publication Depot, 
337, Strand,W.C.; or United Kingdom Band of Plope 
Union, 4, Ludgate Hill, E.C. 


object lessons. Teachers may also be re¬ 
minded how much good may be accom¬ 
plished if they would keep a School Pledge 
Book, in which scholars may be permitted to 
sign. In reference to this we call to mind an 
instance where even a pupil-teacher, being an 
earnest abstainer, secured some hundreds of 
signatures during his five years’ apprenticeship. 
In fact, pressed as the head-masters and 
mistresses are, we shall do well to use our utmost 
exertions for securing the co-operation of the 
assistants and pupil teachers. 

Temperance Addresses in the Schools. 

There will, however, be a great number of 
cases where we shall not induce the teachers 
to become abstainers, and in these instances 
especially, it is important to make arrange¬ 
ments for temperance addresses in the 
schools, It will be seen from the extracts 
which follow that this has been done most suc¬ 
cessfully of all, in Newcastle and Nottingham. 
Now, the same plan should be attempted 
throughout the country, and if a suitable 
person or persons be secured to deliver the 
addresses, we believe there are but few School 
Boards who would refuse the requisite permis¬ 
sion, especially as London and other principal 
places have already set a good example. 

In our last issue we gave the form of the 
memorial adopted by the Bradford Union, 
which could be easily adapted for other places. 
The great thing is, to find the proper person 
to give the addresses. At Bradford, Notting¬ 
ham, and London the agent of the Union is 
accepted for the purpose, and in most cases 
where an agent is employed this plan could 
probably be followed. Whoever is employed 
for the purpose should be thoroughly qualified 
to address the children in an intelligent and 
pleasing manner, respecting alcohol and its effect 
on the mind and body. Of course, a single 
well prepared lecture may be delivered in 
all the schools. At Newcastle, the addresses 
are given monthly, in Nottingham quarterly, 
and in London, all the year round, as often as 
possible. The work requires continual atten¬ 
tion, for the children are constantly changing, 
80,000 children leaving the London schools 
alone during the year. In some cases a clergy¬ 
man or minister who would sufficiently study the 
educational aspect of the question, might be 
induced to undertake the duty, and there is 
now no lack of text-books or appliances for 
supplying all that is needed for providing and 
illustrating addresses of the right character. 

We strongly urge our friends to consider this 
important subject. In each school we have a 
large number of young people under good dis¬ 
cipline, and suitably separated as to age, all 



THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


19 


ready to hand ; whilst it may be borne in mind 
that there is probably no better way of placing 
our question before the minds of the teachers 
themselves, than through these addresses to the 
children. 

EXTRACTS FROM LETTERS, &c. 

Bedford.— Our Union has done nothing to promote 
“temperance teaching in elementary schools. A few of the 
teachers are abstainers-—but not many. I will bring 
your note to the notice of our committee, 

Burnley and District. —Some time since we sent out 
circulars inviting the masters and mistresses of the day 
schools in our district to meet a portion of our committee 
who were deputed to meet them. We brought our influence 
to bear on those masters who we knew were favourable to 
our movement, to be present and take part in any discus¬ 
sion that might arise. At the meeting a paper was read 
bearing on the subject, and showing the great advantage 
it would be to our young people, to get a thorough know¬ 
ledge of alcohol and its action on the system. The paper 
was thoroughly well discussed by a fair number who had 
responded to our invitation, and a decided expression of 
opinion and feeling was evinced in favour of temperance 
teaching through reading books, diagrams, &c. We 
believe a good impression was made, and the head 
masters of five of the largest schools in our district 
are now total abstainers. We also passed a resolution 
and sent a potitien to Mr. Mundella, asking him to bring 
his influence to bear in helping forward the movement in 
favour of temperance reading books being officially 
recognised and recommended to be used in all day 
schools. 

Chester.—On September 28th this Union organised a 
conference to consider the best means for promoting this 
object. Rev. E. Franks, of Wigan, read an admirable 
paper on the subject, and at the close a discussion 
followed in which Mr. Lucas, the master of the Wesleyan 
Schools, took part. He said he quite concurred with the 
remarks of Mr. Franks, and would himself be only too 
glad to introduce temperance in his school. However, he 
had not only to please himself in the matter, but his 
committee and the Government as well. He contended 
that temperance principles could not be taught unless the 
master or mistress were themselves abstainers. In their 
schools they had a certain amount of work to get through 
every day, and if they did not do that work, and his 
pupils did not pass at the rate of 60 or 70 per cent., the 
master or mistress would be thought very little of. In his 
own schools he had been charged with introducing too 
many temperance songs, but he believed the time was 
not far distant when temperance teaching would be a 
part of children’s training. 

Derby. —Last September we held a conference of 
teachers, when a paper was read by Dr. Kate Mitchell. 
As a result a resolution was forwarded to the School 
Board, which is still under consideration. 

Dewsbury. —Our Union took some action a few years 
ago, and Temperance Lesson Books were secured, but 
they remain on the shelf. Nearly all the teachers refuse to 
use them, as it does not help to fill their pockets, and 
■Her Majesty’s Inspectors will not encourage it, and this 
is the difficulty we have to contend with. Our Union is 
willing to move, but although we have friends on the 
School Board, they cannot heip us for the above reason. 

Dublin. —We have obtained entrance into most of the 
leading day schools here. We select as speakers men who 
can give an instructive address in an attractive manner. 
A show of hands asked for at several of the schools indicated 
in every case that the vast majority of the scholars are 
members of the Band of Hope. Just at present we are 


carrying out a series of addresses. I am to speak to about 
300 children at a central national school to-morrow, and 
on the 21st inst. Professor Barrett will speak to the pupils 
at Wesley College. 

Edinburgh.—I regret, as yet, that our Union has done 
nothing in this direction. We realise its importance, and 
hope to be able soon to give it our attention. 

Essex (North). —Whenever we have had agents or 
lecturers visiting in Essex they have frequently given short 
addresses in the schools, although there has been no syste¬ 
matic visitation. Arrangements were also made, through the 
Secretary of the Essex District Union of Elementary 
Teachers, for that body to receive a deputation on the sub¬ 
ject,at their annual meeting. Henry Horsnaill, Esq. ,of Bul- 
ford Mills, chairman of the Braintree School Board, very 
kindly issued invitations to upwards of 100 teachers— 
members of the District Union—and also to the members 
of the Braintree and Booking School Boards, to meet the 
deputation at his house. The party numbered upwards of 
seventy, and after partaking of refreshments, addresses 
were delivered by Mr. Horsnaill, Mr. Robert Rae, of the 
National Temperance League, and Mr. T. M. Williams, 
B. A., Inspector of Schools under the London School 
Board, and by several of the teachers. The latter 
exhibited a cordial interest in temperance teaching, and a 
willingness to promote Band of Hope work amongst the 
scholars. At the close of the meeting a copy of Dr. 
Richardson’s Temperance Lesson Book was presented to 
each teacher. 

Essex(South). —Some time since our Union memoria¬ 
lised the West Ham School Board, requesting the use of 
somewhat similar facilities, &c., to those granted by the 
School Board for London. As the result of this memorial, 
the School Board for West Ham resolved that the free 
use of the schools be granted after school hours for 
illustrated and other lectures on total abstinence, by well- 
qualified lecturers, to children attending the school, but 
that attendance at such be voluntary on the part of both 
teachers and scholars ; the lecturers and their subjects to 
receive the approval of the District Committees. The 
strain upon the teachers is such that none care to intro¬ 
duce an extra subject, so we do not know that any tempe¬ 
rance reading books have been applied for. We have given 
temperance lectures, illustrated with dissolving views, in 
some of the schools, and on several occasions addresses 
have been given in schools under the West Ham School 
Board, and also in some of the outlying districts. We 
held one very successful conference of head teachers in 
South Essex at which we had an admirable address from 
Dr. Ridge. I hope that in the course of a few months 
we may be able to adopt some more systematic work in 
connection with the schools. 

Exeter. —No steps have been taken by this Union in 
the past. I have, however, laid your letter before the 
Committee with regard to steps being taken in the 
future, and they have decided to consider the subject at 
their next meeting. 

Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire. — I regret that 
we have done very little in regard to Band of Hope work 
in day schools ; but at Rushden Board Schools they use 
Dr. Richardson's book, and we have had Mr. Fenn, of 
the National Temperance League, who has given 
addresses in our schools, and prizes were given for the 
best essays on the addresses. Some good papers were sent 
in by the children. 

Irish Temperance League and Band of Hope 
Union. —Our agents, as they visit the different places 
throughout the country to address evening meetings, 
frequently arrange to address the children in the schools 
for twenty or thirty minutes (during school hours), and 
in this way they have been very successful,'and in many 
places the teachers have taken the names of those willing 
to sign the pledge. In some schools, by means of pledge- 


20 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


forms, a few boys have been the means of inducing nearly 
all their school-fellows to become abstainers. We had 
upwards of 1,000 of these forms returned to the office in 
one month this year, duly filled up, and issued pledge- 
cards to the signers through the boys who had induced 
them to sign. 

Isle of Wight. —We have brought the subject of Dr. 
Richardson’s Lesson Book before several School Boards, 
and it has been introduced into one school, if not more. 
The subject demands attention, and must be pressed on 
the attention of the Boards. 

Keighley. —Some time since the Union sent a deputa¬ 
tion to wait upon the School Board to request that 
permission might be given for Mr. W. Waring, agent of 
the Yorkshire Band of Hope Union, to address the 
scholars in the schools under the Board. The request 
was acceded to, and Mr. Waring spent a week in Keighley 
for the purpose, addressing altogether about 2,500 young 
people. The teachers were present,and showed great interest 
in the addresses, which occupied about thirty minutes. 
The subject was “ Natural and Artificial Drinks," with a 
number of very simple experiments. The effort was 
a success, and was highly appreciated by the members 
of the School Board. 

Lancashire and Cheshire. —For three years we have 
not taken any direct action as a County Union, as it is 
impossible for us to approach all the school authorities 
in our two counties. We brought the subject before 
our Manchester and Salford School Board some three 
years ago, and since then I believe our Local Manchester 
and Salford Unions have taken the matter up. We, 
do what we can by means of conferences, and 
also by papers and circulars, to induce our associated 
Unions to take the subject in hand. We have also had 
ministers and gentlemen giving special lectures and 
addresses on the subject, and many of our Unions have 
availed themselves of this means of bringing it before the 
teachers. Other of our Unions have taken more direct 
action—approaching School Boards, guardians, &c. 

Leeds. —In reply to a communication from the Hon. 
Sec. of this Union to a member of the Leeds School 
Board, the following note has been received : — "I 
believe I am correct in stating that Dr. Richardson’s 
temperance text book is taught in our Board Schools in 
the 4th standard and upwards. I can also say, from my 
own personal knowledge, that a considerable number of 
our reading books have direct temperance lessons in 
them. I am not in a position to give you any information 
beyond the above at present, but shall be glad to make 
any enquiry you may desire, as my opinion upon the 
question of temperance being taught in the elementary 
schools is as strong as your own. 

London. —Since 1877, when the School Board for 
London gave permission for the delivery of illustrated 
lectures and temperance addresses in their schools by 
well-qualified lecturers, the Committee of the Union have 
taken full advantage of this concession, and Dr. Paterson, 
who for many years kindly devoted much time to this 
work, delivered 154 lectures to children in the higher 
standards, at which 23,000 young people were present. 
Mr. John Burgess is now giving 100 lectures each year, 
prizes being offered for the best reports of his lectures. 
Each winter, also, the Committee give temperance 
lectures, illustrated by dissolving views, to twenty-five 
of the largest schools, 600 or 700 young people being 
present on each occasion. The Parent Society and the 
Metropolitan Unions, have also held a large number of 
conferences of teachers in day schools, both at the resi¬ 
dences of well-to-do persons in all parts of London, as 
well as in various public places of meeting. On the last 
occasion, when Dr. Richardson presided,fully 800 teachers 
attended. All this is in addition to a very large amount of 
excellent work of a similar character, carried out by the 
National Temperance League. 


Newcastle-on-Tyne. —Our Union took early action 
in this important work, and nine or ten years ago the 
School Board granted permission to the Executive of the 
Union to arrange for an address not exceeding fifteen or 
twenty minutes, in each of the schools once a month. 
1 wenty-one schools are now regularly visited. The 
visits, in the first instance, were received with a little 
coolness in some of the schools, and slight difficulties put 
in the way in two or three instances, but all this has 
long since passed away, and there is now not a school in 
which the speaker does not meet with a hearty welcome 
from masters, mistresses, and assistants, whilst the visits 
have always been popular with the children. The Com¬ 
mittee is satisfied that this is one of the most important 
departments of their work. The visits afford opportunity 
for conversation with the teachers on the subject, and- 
the apparatus used for experiments, the diagrams, and 
specimens, become objects of inquiry, and means of 
temperance instruction to teachers as well as scholars. 
One very gratifying result has been the opportunity of 
bringing the competitive examination before the scholars, 
and the assurance that only Band of Hope members 
could take part has been the means of causing some to 
join. During the month of December the missionary 
gave 38 addresses to fully 5,200 children in explanation of 
the examination, and in the teaching of the “ Text Book,” 
with the result that over 500 books have been sold in the 
schools. 

Nottingham. —Quarterly temperance addresses are 
given during the time devoted to religious teaching by 
approved lecturers, appointed by the Nottingham and 
Notts Band of Hope Union. No fewer than eleven of the- 
fifteen members of the Nottingham School Board are 
teetotalers, 

Portsmouth. —Three years ago our Union appointed 
a deputation to wait on the School Board, to endeavour 
to get the Temperance Lesson Books introduced into the 
schools, and as a result, the books were placed on 
the list of books suitable for prizes. We also held a con¬ 
ference, specially inviting School Board teachers, which 
at least resulted on the formation of a Band of Hope in 
one of the Board Schools. 

Scarborough. —We have arranged to hold a con¬ 
ference of day school teachers during January, when 
two papers will be read by competent gentlemen. The 
meeting promises to be successful. 

Surrey. —The committee have made special efforts to 
promote^ temperance teaching in Board and Elementary 
schools in the county, by the delivery to the children of 
popular addresses, illustrated with experiments, diagrams, 
and specimens showing the composition of food and 
drink. Applications by letter, or personal interview, 
have been made to the managers of a number of schools 
for permission to address the scholars. The lectures by 
the society’s agent are offered free of any charge. In 
case have the applications encountered active opposition 

Tynemouth. —The School Board in this town having 
had considerable pressure brought to bear upon them by the 
temperance organisations of the town, consented to 
permit a short address to be delivered in each school 
quarterly. A small committee was specially formed to act 
on this permission, the result being that fourteen schools 
are now regularly visited by ministers, members of the 
town council, and others, a plan for six months being 
printed in advance. It is a splendid system, bound to pro¬ 
duce excellent results. 

Yorkshire. —A few years ago we offered the services 
of our agent to the managers of the various Boards in the 
county, and lectures were delivered after ordinary school 
hours, &c. Perhaps the time has now arrived to repeat 
this offer. Conferences have also been held with teachers 
in various centres, when papers have been read and 
discussed with useful results. 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


21 


-BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES.—Semes I. 


TEMPERANCE LESSONS FROM JESOP’S 
FABLES. 

Sy Rev. CHARLES COURTENAY, Vicar of Upper Armley, Leeds 
Author of “ Temperance Home Thrusts,” &c. 


No. 2.—THE FOX IN THE WELL. 

UCKS in a well, or fishes in a well, are all 
very well. But a fox in a well is quite a 
different matter,and I fancy he would be just 
as wretched as they would be happy. Can’t 
you imagine him, dear children, hanging on 
to the side.with his nice bushy fur all matted 
with the wet, and looking every bit as grave 
as a judge? His mother even would hardly 
know him in that plight. 

I wonder how he got in. Ah ! I should 
like to know that. But we can guess, can’t 
we? Perhaps he fell in by accident. Perhaps he missed 
his way on some dark night when he ought to have been at 
home in bed. Perhaps he didn’t look where he was going. 
Perhaps he was pushed in. It might be any of these 
reasons. I will tell you, however, something more likely 
than either of these, and, to give it more importance, I am 
going to put it all by itself: 

Perhaps he was having a dvink. Yes, I think this, the 
most likely of all. He was thirsty. The well looked 
tempting. He had tasted its sweet waters before, and, 
perhaps, had a “ nip ” every day for breakfast, and dinner, 
and tea, and supper, and now and then between meals. 
But he went once too often, and—fell in, and there he 
was, poor little foxy, over head and ears in the “ drink.” 

And this brings me very nicely, I think, to somebody 
that poor soused fox is like—somebody who goes to have 
a drink, too, every day ; and, alas ! somebody who “ falls 
in,” too, and gets “over head and ears in drink.” Of 
course I mean the drunkard. So now the secret is out, 
and you little children know what I am going to talk 
about, don’t you ? And so, when you think of the fox in 
the well, you must say to yourself, “Ah! I know who 
that is. That’s the poor man or woman who takes too 
much strong drink, and has fallen in.” 

Well (to go on with my story), the fox made such a 
splash and splutter, and altogether made such a noise, that 
up came a wolf, to see what was the matter. I expect he 
■came up with a trot. 

“ Phew-ew-w, here’s a pretty kettle of fish. Why, if 
my dear brother Fox hasn’t tumbled into a well ! Oh, 
dear me, what a dreadful state of things ! Poor, poor, 

• poor fellow ! ” 

Now, this was an excellent beginning; in fact,it couldn’t 
have been better. I expect the fox’s eyes brightened, and 
his lips said very tenderly, “ Oh ! you dear duck of a 
wolf; you are a friend indeed.” 

But, would you believe it, dear children, if that miser¬ 
able old wolf didn’t take a seat on the edge of the well, 
and begin to lecture the poor drowning fox. 

“Ah, but you are in a proper mess ! You’ll get it when you 
get home. See how wet you are. Why, your coat will 
never look anything any more. You’ve taken all the shine 
out of it, and a pretty cold in your head you’ll get. I 
shouldn’t wonder if you get bad rheumatics, too. Oh, 
dear me, what a spectacle for wolves and foxes you are ! 
/ never saw such a pickle as you are in, in all my born 

• days ; never, no never. 

“And what a regular little fool you must be, to go and fall 
into a well, of all places in the world ! Just as if there 
wasn't enough dry land to walk on ! I never did ! Of 
■course foxes haven’t such good brains as wolves, but I 
■quite think, little foxy, that you’ve even less than an 


ordinary fox. I don't know how you’ve managed to get 
along at all with that poor little shrivelled-up brain of 
yours. You stupid, you ! 

“Of course I feel for you. I’ve got a very feeling heart at the 
bottom. And although I don’t seem to cry much, yet plenty 
of tears go trickling down inside me. And I can t tell you, 
my poor little friend, how deeply I sympathise with you 
in your misery. It must be very uncomfortable to be so 
wet, and to have nothing to rest your poor feet upon, and 
to feel yourself sinking. I think I know what it feels like, 
although I’ve never fallen into a well myself. And I do 
pity you with all my heart. 

“ And I hope you will get out, too. You see, little foxy, I’m 
quite sincere, and I quite mean it when I say that I hope 
you won’t remain in that well much longer. No, the 
greatest delight I know is to see little foxes getting out of 
wells, and if I could see you climbing up the side and 
standing upon dry ground up here my warm heart would 
be glad. You wouldn’t think it perhaps, but I’m a 
wonderful creature for wishing my brother beasties well. 
I don’t know any other wolf that comes up to me for that. 

Don't you feel sorry for tumbling into that well, my little 
friend ? You ought to feel penitent, you know. Because 
it was quite your own fault, for if you hadn’t been hanging 
round that well you wouldn’t have fallen in. If I were 
you, little friend, I would have a good cry. Besides, if 
you cry enough it will bring you nearer the top. I know 
you’ve got ‘ water in your eyes ’ now, but the tears don’t 
come from inside, I’m afraid. I like to see naughty little 
foxes cry. It does me good. 

“ I’d help you out myself, only I'm afraid of getting wet. I’ve 
got a very delicate constitution, the doctor says, and if I 
were once to go about fishing foxes out of wells, I should 
be quite bad. One’s health is a very precious thing, little 
fox, and we mustn’t risk it for anybody. And, besides, I 
mustn’t stoop because my heart is weak, and if I lift any 
heavy weight, the doctor says, I shall suffer for it for ever 
so many minutes. You wouldn’t wish that, I’m sure. 

“ Other wolves wouldn't have taken any notice of you at all. So 
you may think yourself fortunate. But I'm not that sort 
of wolf. I can feel for foxes in a well, and even though it 
will make me late for tea I can’t help speaking a kind word. 

“ So good-bye, little fox, you’re all right so long as you 
keep your head above water. Perhaps somebody will 
come along directly and lend you a hand. I’ll promise to 
do what I can for you. So keep your spirits up, and be 
sure to keep your mouth shut. Ta, ta. ” 

Well, children, and what do you think of all this ? 
Wouldn’t you like to go up to that wretched wolf and tell 
him what you think of him ? Miserable old hypocrite! 
Horrible old sneak. Ugh ! 

But wait a bit. Men and women and boys and 
girls give similar cold comfort sometimes, and especially 
when poor drunkards are in the well. I am sure they do. 
And I think the lessons which this teaches them are clear 
and plain. 

Here is one— The hand is better than the mouth. If all the 
energy that people expend in speaking were expended in 
lifting, how many poor drunkards would be saved! 
Wishes are not half so good as work. 

Here is another— Don't insult the wretched. They have 
plenty to bear without our contribution. They know 
better than we do where the fault lies. It is better to pass 
on than to sit and scowl. 

Here is a third— There is something worse than a wetting. 
A lost life is worse, is it not ? And supposing if in rescuing 
a drunkard we suffer a little ourselves, what is our 
suffering compared with the blessing of a saved life ? 


Sunday Reading. —It gives us pleasure to commend 
Sunday Words, an excellent penny illustrated weekly, 
edited by an old friend of the Union. We feel certain it 
will prove a favourite amongst the masses, and no number 
appears without more or less temperance teaching. 







22 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES.—Series II. 


TEMPERANCE WORK AND WORKERS- 

By Rev. J. P. GLEDSTONE. 

Author ot “The Life and Travels of George Whitefield,” “Save the 
Boys," ‘‘Clean Lips.” 

No. 2. THE GREAT TEMPERANCE LEAGUES- 

E efforts of the first temperance societies 
which did not insist upon a pledge of total 
abstinence from all intoxicating drinks were 
not at all successful. But the men who had 
got hold of the plan of total abstinence had 
no such complaint to make ; they were 
successful beyond all expectation. Success 
fanned zeal; especially were the men of 
Preston, with Joseph Livesey at their head, 
energetic and self-denying in their labours ; 
ime they had founded teetotal societies at 
Bolton, Burnley, Blackburn, Chorley, Todmorden, Man¬ 
chester, Eccles, Oldham, Bradford, Selby, Huddersfield, 
Leeds, Wigan, Chester, and other places. 

The various societies formed in towns and villages began 
to feel the need of fellowship one with another ; and also 
that if their good cause was to triumph they must form 
themselves into larger societies, raise money, pay agents, 
publish tracts and papers, and send the truth all over the 
land. In September, 1835, the first of the great tempe¬ 
rance societies was formed at Manchester, in Oak Street 
Chapel; it was called the British Temperance Association, 
now the British Temperance League. Dr. R. B. Grindrod 
proposed its formation as a national association; Mr. 
Livesey, who had not at first thought it would be wise to 
have a national association, generously supported the 
plan. He set the good example of working harmoniously 
with his friends, and became the society’s first secretary. 
The first agent of this Association was Mr. Ralph Holker, 
and the second Mr. Thomas Whittaker. The manner in 
which Mr. Whittaker became a temperance missionary 
is a remarkable instance of how doing the right may bring 
us into trouble, but will sooner or later bring us out of 
trouble. He tells it in a letter which he wrote to Mr. 
Livesey, and which may be read in his most charming and 
stirring book, called “ Life’s Battles in Temperance 
Armour.” He says:—“I was a cotton-dresser in Black¬ 
burn, and spoke fully in that and the neighbouring towns 
and villages in behalf of teetotalism. This made me some¬ 
what obnoxious to the men of my own trade, so that my 
situation became anything but comfortable, and I deter¬ 
mined to leave. Preston was then (this was in 1835) to my 
mind the model town, and its band of brave teetotalers 
were the men after my own heart, and I felt I could live 
and die among them. Early one morning with a heavy 
heart (for I had become attached to Blackburn, and 
especially to the church with which I had become united,) 
I walked to Preston. On my arrival there I called at the 
temperance hotel to get a little breakfast before applying 
to any of the factories of that town for work. You 
came into the room where I was seated, expressing 
surprise at my early visit, and then your sorrow 
at the occasion for it. You knew some little of me then, 
for at your request I had said a few words in the theatre 
at Blackburn two weeks after I had signed the pledge on 
the occasion of your giving your malt liquor lecture in the 
same place. I had also spoken in the theatre at Preston 
on the occasion of your Whitmonday demonstration, but 
the thought of becoming a public teacher never crossed 
my mind. During the conversation you asked me if I 
would like to go out as a temperance worker. The moment 
you mentioned it the finger of Providence pointed out to 
my mind most clearly and distinctly—‘ This is the way, 
walk in it.’ The result of that conversation was that I 


never asked for another situation, and I walked back the 
nine miles to Blackburn with aheart aslightas a feather.” 
Mr. Whittaker then describes his return home, and the 
thankfulness which his good news created ; also how he 
attended the meetings of the British League, and became, 
through Mr. Livesey’s recommendation, an agent of the 
League, and setoff on his first journey through Westmore¬ 
land,Cumberland, Northumberland, and Durham. It was 
a hard but useful life. In the first letter which Mr. 
Whittaker ever wrote, for he only learnt the art of writing, 
after he became a teetotaler, he said to his good friend Mr. 
Livesey: “I am now in Maryport. I have never gone to 
bed but one night since I left Preston without having a 
meeting. I have to be bellman, chairman, speaker andl 
everything. ... I generally get from ten to forty 
names each night. Though I am in a poor country, I have- 
set the fire of teetotalism a-burning, and I have no doubt 
you will shortly have good news. I travel from seven to 
twenty-two miles a day, and get up a meeting in the even¬ 
ing.” 

Some little idea of the work of this one Association may 
be formed from the fact that in the thirteenth year of its. 
existence its agents had travelled 21,000 miles, chiefly oa 
foot, delivered 1,900 lectures on week-days, distributed' 
thousands of tracts, visited numerous families, andl 
addressed 450 religious and Sunday-school meetings on 
Sundays; they obtained about 7,000 signatures to the 
pledge, and reclaimed more than 400 drunkards. Two 
years afterwards the pledges were as many as 10,758 in 
one year. 

It was more difficult tobegin and carry on temperance 
work in London than perhaps any other part of thekingdom 
Mr. Livesey came to the capital in July, 1834, and after a 
great deal of trouble got the promise of a preaching room 
in Providence Row, Finsbury Square, in which to give his 
Malt lecture. He tried his best to make his lecture known, 
he engaged an old man named Phillips, who was porter 
or messenger to the society which owned the room, to 
procure him barley, scales, weights, &c., but one day this 
man called at Mr. Livesey’s lodgings and left the 
barley, &c., with change out of a sovereign which Mr. 
Livesey had given him, and also this message:—“Tell Mr. 
Livesey I am very sorry, but I dare not do any more for 
him, for the Committee have intimated to me that if I 
give him any assistance it is as much as my place is worth.” 
The chemist who distilled Mr. Livesey a quart of ale 
charged him seven shillings and sixpence for it. Ten days 
were spent in preparing for the lecture, and only thirty 
persons came to hear it. One of the thirty, however, was 
a brewer, and the lecture induced him to give up the use 
and sale of ale. 

With the help of some earnest and resolute men from 
the provinces, London was partly stirred, and in 1835 the 
British Teetotal Temperance Society was formed. After 
several changes of names and societies, the National 
Temperance League was formed on June 1st, 1856,through 
an amalgamation of the National Temperance Society 
and the London Temperance League. The last president 
of the League was good Samuel Bowly.who with his snow- 
white head, persuasive voice, and gentle manner was, 
known from one end of the land to the other. The League 
has had some of the most honoured and useful of men 
connected with it. It is now doing a great work in 
influencing the minds of teachers,of guardians of the poor, 
and others who have the forming of habits and opinions 
in their power. 

The Western Temperance League was formed on June- 
19th, 1S37, at Street in Somersetshire, and has done its 
work well and faithfully in the West of England and South 
Wales. From the West come the family ofthe Carpenters, 
some of whom as medical men have done the temperance 
cause unspeakable service. 

There is an Irish Temperance League for Ireland, and 
Scottish Temperance League for Scotland. 




THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


23 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES—Series III. 


PHYSIOLOGY AND ALCOHOL- 

By Dp. KATE MITCHELL. 

No. 2.-— MUSCLES OR FLESH. 


(Notes for the Blackboard.) 


MUSCLES OR THE FLESH 

1. Made up of minute fibres in bundles. 

2. Attached to the bones by tendons. 

3. Muscles contract and relax. 

4. Very elastic, of deep red colour. 

5. Composed of albumen, water, salts, &c. 

6. Food burnt up in the muscles. 

7. Waste carried away by blood in muscles. 

8. Alcohol hardens muscles, & paralyses them. 

9. Alcohol absorbs water in muscles. 

10. Alcohol prevents waste matter being carried 
away. 


(Each note should be written down on the Blackboard 
as the speaker proceeds to enlarge upon it.) 

HE Muscles are the fleshy parts of our body. 
They are of a deep red colour, owing to the 
presence of blood in the blood-vessels. 
What we call butcher’s meat is muscle, and 
a beef steak is a very good specimen of it. 
Every muscle (of which there are over 400 
in the body, large and small) is made up of 
a number of minute fibres called muscular 
fibres. When all these fibres are collected 
together in a mass they form a thick muscle, 
which is enclosed in a covering or sheath, 
glistening, and strong, called connective 
tissue. Every muscle has a large supply of blood which 
runs in the arteries, veins, and capillaries (these vessels 
■will be explained in the address on the circulation), and this 
blood carries nourishment to the muscles, in order to keep 
them healthy, and takes away the used-up material to the 
lungs, skin, and kidneys. 

The Tendons, or leaders as they are sometimes called, 
connect the muscles with the bones. They are made of 
strong bands of the same connective tissue, which sur¬ 
round the muscles. There is a very strong tendon at the 
back of the heel which can easily be felt in thin persons. 
It feels almost like a bone. 

The great peculiarity of muscle is that it possesses the 
power of contracting and relaxing. By this I mean that 
whenever we move, as in walking, dancing, lifting with 
our arms, &c., we bring into action a large number of 
muscles, each of which becomes shorter and broader, thus 
bringing the two ends to which the muscles are attached 
• closer together. For instance, if you place the left hand 
tfirmly over the front and upper part of the right arm, and 
then raise the right hand up towards the shoulder, you 
will feel a hard mass swelling up under your fingers. 
This swelling is due to the contraction of the muscular fibres 
of the biceps muscle, which is attached by its upper end 
■to the shoulder bone, and by its lower end to one of the 
•bones of the forearm. As the biceps becomes broader 
and shorter, it lifts the lower part of the arm towards the 


upper, and when it elongates and relaxes the forearm 
returns to its original position. 

Muscle is composed of certain proteid materials, like 
albumen (the white of egg) ; some amount of fat; saline 
matters of different kinds, and water. Of these the most 
important is the proteid material, which is supplied by the 
nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon elements of our food. The 
greater part of the meat, milk, bread, &c., which we eat 
goes to form muscle in our body, and it is from such foods 
that nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon are obtained. Thus 
you see how necessary it is to eat good wholesome food 
in order that the muscles of the body should be kept firm, 
strong and healthy. 

What is Oxidation ? This is the process of burning in 
which the gas called oxygen plays the most important 
part. It is owing to this constant process of oxidation or 
burning going on that the temperature of the blood is so 
high (98° 6 Q Fahr.), and that the different organs and 
tissues of the body are kept hot. This oxygen is taken by 
the blood from the air which we breathe into our lungs, 
and from the food which we take into our stomachs. 
The blood carries it over the entire body, to the remotest 
parts, and the oxygen seizes upon certain elements which 
are found in the tissues and structures, and converts them 
into compounds called urea, water, and carbonic acid. 

(Note. The speaker should enlarge upon this subject, 
showing ho%v these materials are waste products of the 
body, and are produced by work and action, and how they 
are carried by the blood to the skin, lungs, and kidneys, 
to be got rid of out of the system.) 

In what manner does A Icohol affect Muscle ? Alcohol affects 
muscular tissue in a variety of ways. For instance, when 
a surgeon wants to keep the flesh of an animal for a long 
time for purposes of study, he puts it into spirits of wine, 
which preserves it and prevents it from becoming putrified. 
But what happens at the same time ? It becomes 
very hard and shrunken. Now, alcohol acts in the same 
manner (only the process is more gradual) on the muscular 
tissues of our body. It coagulates or hardens the albumen 
of the muscle. And it is now known that certain elements 
of the muscles, which can only be seen by aid of the 
microscope, are altered and destroyed by the use of alcohol. 
This alteration may, and does in a good many cases, bring 
on paralysis of the muscles. (Explain paralysis.) 

What is the first thing you notice when you see a 
drunken man in the streets ? That he is reeling about 
from side to side, that his head and shoulders are bent 
forward, and that his legs seem unable to support him, 
that they double up underneath him. In this instance the 
muscles are so flabby and weak, that they cannot contract 
properly, and as the alcohol becomes more powerful in its 
action, they at last refuse to contract at all, and the man 
falls down in a heap. He has also lost the power of 
moving certain muscles together; this is called loss of 
co-ordination. 

Alcohol has another very injurious effect upon the 
muscles. It prevents the waste matter from being thrown 
off in them by seizing upon the oxygen which you have 
seen ought to perform this work. Thus the muscles 
become gradually less strong and healthy by being choked 
up with poisonous material. A total abstaining workman 
can always work longer, and feel less fatigue after his 
work, than one who is continually taking alcohol in some 
form or other. Alcohol also absorbs the water of the 

arts which should always be kept well irrigated, and it 

ardens and destroys the most nutritious part of the 
muscle—the albumen. 

That the muscles should accomplish good work, 
effective work, and hard work, it is absolutely necessary 
they should have a certain amount of oxygen, which can 
be obtained by living as much as possible in the fresh 
air ; that they should be nourished with good wholesome 
food, containing albumen, and that they should rest after 
fatigue, and never have any form of alcohol administered 
as it is a poison to them in every way. 






24 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES.—Senes IV. 


MISCELLANEOUS. 

No. 2. —TWO STICKS. 

Rev. C. E. ESCREET, M.A. 

Vicar of St. Andrew's, Stockwell, London. 


.NY kinds of sticks—sugar sticks, copper 
stick of mothers, the Sunday afternoon 
stick for boys (I beg their pardon, young 
men) out for a walk, the stick that is in 
master’s desk, short sticks, long sticks, 
fat sticks, thin sticks, all sorts; none of 
these. Guess mine. 

Mine must be very sticky sticks; they 
are:— 

A. Stick to your pledge. 

B. Stick together. 

Catch tight hold of them, repeat them after me. Again 
—again. 

Now I will give you some reasons for them. Supposing 
someone says, “ What do you stick to your pledge for ? ” 
It is not enough to say, 1 ‘ Because I do, yah ’’; but a reason. 
Then stick to your pledge because it is (i) Healthy, (2) 
Wealthy, and (3) Wise. 

(A .) I. What is water for (Answer: To drink). Well, I am 
glad you know that; some folk do not drink it because they 
say they want something strengthening, and so they (1) 
drink beer. Now supposing we filled this table with 
tumblers—let me see, we could get on it nicely four rows, 
and ten in a row. How many is that ? Now how much do 
they each hold ? How much is that altogether ? If you filled 
all that with beer there would be less nourishing food than 
you could put on the end of a table knife. Here is our 
first reason— the proportion of nourishment in alcohol is very, 
very small. (2) Again, what is that that flows throughout 
our body? What colour is it? No. Nearly white, 
the red comes from little red pellets. Now if these 
get swollen, and drinking swells them, they cannot 
flow freely. Perhaps some of you boys have played with 
peashooters, you know if two peas go down together 
they stick because they cannot pass. Our little blood 
pellets stick like this. This is how red noses come, 
only remember that red noses do not always come 
from drinking ; sometimes they come from weak hearts 
that are too weak to pump the blood. Here, then, 
is a second reason— alcohol thickens the blood unnaturally ; 
but (3) listen to another. Have you ever seen a pump 
working (illustrate from neighbourhood); how regularly 
it goes up and down, up and down, up and down, 
but suppose sometimes it went very quickly and then 
very slowly, it would soon wear out, and yet this is exactly 
what alcohol makes our hearts do. God has made our 
heart a wonderful living pump, which is always pumping 
the blood through the blood ducts, and nothing wears out 
the heart so much as the quick jerky pumping that alcohol 
creates, so you see alcohol quickens the action of the heart 
unnaturally, and then it is always unnaturally slower 
afterwards. Here is a third reason— alcohol causes irregular 
action of the heart. 

II. Wealthy, (i) I was driving from Brixton to 
Charing Cross on the top of an omnibus, and the driver 
looked down at me and said, " What might you drink, 
sir ? ” I did not tell him all at once I was an abstainer, as 
I wished to see what he meant, and then I found out that 
he was an abstainer, and he told me all about it. He was 
walking, he said, smoking his pipe Sunday morning in the 
New Cut, when he heard someone speaking, and he heard 
him say, “ Working man, a pint of beer a day is fioo in 
twenty years.” “I thought,” he continued, “he was 
speaking to me, and I turned round, but I saw then 
as he was speaking to us all. Well, I walked away, 


but I could not get that out of my head until at last 
I said, ‘ Blowed if I don’t try it.’ I did try it, 
and I don’t mind telling you I have got the £100. 
Ay,” he added, as a gentle look came into his face, 
“I have got something better than that £100, too, for when 
I gave up the drink thoughts came and I learnt to pray.” 
We had just come to our journey’s end and I wished him 
good-bye, but I have never forgotten my friend, you may 
be sure. 

(2) Another little chap I knew, when I held a night 
school in a court of London that used to be called 
“ little Hell ”—it was such an awful place—one boy there 
in particular, Bob, a dustheap boy, I got to sign and keep 
his pledge. Well, one day I met him coming across the 
park, and I saw he looked very important with a watch- 
chain, so I said to him, "What’s the time, Bob?” Well, to my 
surprise, out came a watch. He had bought it, he told me, 
with his savings from what the men gave him to make 
their breakfast, for he always gave his mother his money; 
that is eight years ago, but Bob is still an abstainer and 
doing well. There is no reason that you boys should not 
get watches just like Bob when you go to work if you keep 
clear of the drink. 

III. (1) Wise. By wise I do not mean cute. I mean 
“wise unto salvation,” i.e., Christian. I say Christian 
bcause we must fight in this cause for our own and our 
brothers’ salvation. We have been sealed with the sign 
of the cross in sign that we should be good soldiers and 
fight. When Hannibal was a little boy his father took 
him and made him swear lifelong hatred to the Romans; 
so also must you and I swear lifelong hatred to the drink. 
“ Tremble, tyrants, we shall grow big,” was the motto of 
the little French Marseillaise, let it be ours. 

(2) And then we must try and help others by giving up 
as Christ did, and this we can do by keeping our Band ot 
Hope pledge. 

(B.) I have been so long over our first stick that I must 
cut my second stick very short, but it is a thick stick; 
it is :— 

Stick together. 

Illustrate. (1) The fable of the bundle of sticks, vide 
i£sop. 

(2) The eight oars of a boat going all together in time. 

Stick on after you think you have grown too big for the 
Band of Hope. 

Conclude. Now I want once more, what my “ Two 
sticks ” are. 

The first stick ? Why ? 

The second stick ? 

That is right, hold them fast and you will want no 
crutches in old age. 

The Rev. Charles Courtenay. —Our friends will be 
pleased to learn that the Rev. Charles Courtenay, Vicar of 
Upper Armley, Leeds, and to whom Band of Hope workers 
are deeply indebted, has been preferred to the valuable 
living of Emmanuel, Liverpool. Whilst in Leeds, Mr. 
Courtenay introduced several useful agencies, and gained a 
warm place in the hearts of the people, who much lament 
losing his services so soon. Mr. Courtenay has an all-round, 
knowledge of the temperance movement, and this, com¬ 
bined with his varied experience as a parish worker, gives 
a force and power to his writings which make them in¬ 
valuable for general circulation. 

Temperance as Taught in thb Revised Bible.— 
Some time since we stated that the Rev. J. Compston 
was preparing for the press a small shilling volume under 
the above title. The work is now on sale, and we recom¬ 
mend managers of Bands of Hope to obtain copies. The 
form of the book is most convenient, and it will be found, 
invaluable in enabling our friends to defend our position, 
from the Scriptures. Copies may be had from the 
publication depot of the Union, 4, Ludgate Hill, London* 
E.C. 







THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


25 


BAND OF HOPE PROGRAMMES. 


ANY Bands of Hope are not well attended, 
by those over ten or eleven years of age, 
because there is insufficient variety in the 
meetings. To borrow well-known lines, 

“ They still go on from day to day. 

Just as they always went,” 

and the proceedings become monotonous 
and spiritless. The arrangements for 
each meeting should be made beforehand, 
-even to the selection of the hymns and songs, for it is a 
pity to be always singing the same ten or twelve out of a 
book containing nearly two hundred. Variety, too, 


should be introduced, and though of course the prime 
object of the meeting should never be forgotten, yet 
other subjects of interest may be advantageously intro¬ 
duced, especially for the seniors, many of whom will 
have been listening to weekly temperance addresses for 
seven and even ten years. Thesubjoined programmes, which 
have reached us in letters from friends, present a pleasant 
variety, and are given to show how, with the help of 
the members themselves, and without in the least 
introducing unhealthy excitement, a constant change can 
be provided. On the whole, we think we prefer the three 
months’ arrangement, that being perhaps long enough to 
look beforehand. Quarterly committee meetings held in 
the first weeks of December, March, June and September, 
are sufficient to arrange for the respective quarters com¬ 
mencing on the first of January, April, July, and October. 



gg 

m 

f’ROGRAMME 

< 

JANUARY TO JUNE, 1887 . 

1887. 


Jan. 4.—Recitation Contest (Prize Book).. Mr. Wm. Lightfoot. 

,, 11.—Special Address . 

Mr. F. Pollard. 

,, 18.—Five Minute Addresses by Members 

Mr. G. Bass. 

,, 25.—Annual Tea and Public Meeting. 


(Particulars to be announced .) 


Feb, 1.—Addresses by Ladies Mrs. Johnson & Miss Alton. 

,, 8 —Singing Contest (Hymn 8) 

Mr. F. Tomalin. 

,, 15.—Entertainment by College Street 


Young Men’s Society 

Mr. H Berrill. 

,, 22.—-Boys’ Own Night .. 

Mr. W. Deeley. 

Mar. 1.—Invitation to Compton Street Band 


of Hope 

Mr. H. Elson. 

,, 8.—Temperance Prize Essays by Members Mr. W. Butlin. 

,, 15.—Musical Evening .. 

Mr. J. Mustill. 

,, 22.—Girls’Own Night .. 

Miss Mustill and 


Miss Oliver. 

,, 29.—Dialogues for Prizes (Members only) 


Mr. E. T. Partridge. 

April 5.—Special Addresses. 

Rev. T. Ruston. 

,, 12.—Lessons from Flowers 

Mr. L. Jackson. 

,, 19.—Story and Song 

Mr. H. Wilson. 

,, 26.—Blackboard Address. • 

Mr. E. Atkinson. 

May 3.—Recitation Contest .. 

Mr. R. Wiggins. 

,, 10.—History of the First Band of Hope 

Mr. R. Oliver. 

,, 17.—Prize Book for the Best Report of 


last week’s Subject .. 

Mr. A. Stanton. 

,, 24.—Addresses by Ladies .. Miss S. Goff and others. 

,, 31.—Singing Contest (Hymn 134) 

Mr. F. Taffinder. 

June 7.—Juniors’Evening 

Mr. J. A. Girdler. 

,, 14.—Paper by a Lady .. 

Mr. C. Austin. 

,, 21.—Musical Evening .. 

Mr. G. C. Latimer. 

,, 28.—Special Address. 

Mr. R. Brice. 

Wi 

m 



Pnrgtamnte for Senior Banb -of Popo, 


FIRST QUARTER , 1887. 


The Meetings commence each Evening at 8.30, unless 
otherwise stated. 


Wed. Jan. 5.—Special Address to Young Men and Women by 
W. C. Collyer, of Cardiff - . 

Sun. „ 9.—Temperance Address in the Sunday School by 
George Callcut, and Trayer Meeting at 
4.30 p.m. 

Wed. „ 12.—Entertainment by the Junior Band of Hope. 

Conductor, Edwin Dutch. Chairman, John 
Hilton. 

,, ,, 19.—Special Social Meeting and Reports for Past 

Month- To commence at 8 p.m. This Meeting 
to be held in the Hall. 

,, „ 26.—Sacred Cantata, entitled “Daniel,” by the North 

London Temperance Choir. Conductor, T. G. 
Collins. A collection will be made in aid of 
Funds. 

„ Feb. 2.—Impromptu Speeches and Reports for the Past 
Month. 

,, ,, g.—Entertainment by the St. Olave’s Temperance 

Choir. 

,, ., 16.—Twenty-first Annual Meeting. Full particulars 

will be duly announced. 

„ „ 23.—Entertainment by the Abbey Street Senior Band of 

Hope. 

Sat. ,, 26.—Entertainment at the St. Clement's Temperance 
Society, Lever Street, City Road. 

Wed. Mar. 2.—Reports for the Past Month, Readings, Recita¬ 
tions, etc. 

u , , 9. —Special Address to Women only by Dr. Kate 

Mitchell. Subject : “ Women’s health and 
Temperance.” To commence at 3 p.m. 

,, ,, 9.—Lecture, “Is Total Abstinence safe ?” by Dr. Kate 

Mitchell. Chairman, William C. Allen. 

,, ,, 16.—The Garfield Temperance Entertainers will occupy 

the Platform. 

Thur. „ 17.—Entertainment at Hart’s Lane Senior Band of Hope, 
Hart’s Lane, Bethnal Green Road. 

Wed. ,, 23.—Lecture, “Moderate Drinking. What is it?” by 
W. A. Wilson. Chairman, Wm. Waugh. 

,, ,, 30.—Entertainment by Lady Members. Chairman, 

Robt. H. Catford. 



Rules for a Senior Band of Hope. 

Our object is the promotion of total abstinence from all intoxicating 
drinks. 

Our subscription is 2d. per month, or more at the option of members. 
Any person over 14 years of age may become a member by signing our 
pledge, “I agree to abstain from all intoxicating drinks as beverages,” 
and those unable to attend may become Honorary Members by paying 
. an Annual Subscription of not less than 2s. 6d. 

All members whose subscriptions are fully paid up, are entitled to 
attend two tea meetings held during the year, and to participate in the 
annual excursion. 

Members are entitled to the free use of the books in the Band of Hope 
library. 

A branch of the penny bank is open on Wednesday evenings ; deposits 
from members are received by the Secretaries, and the interest added 
■ quarterly. 


The choir started last October on Thursday evenings will be continued 
during the present quarter. 

Rehearsals for our annual meeting will be held as usual. Full 
particulars to be duly announced. 


The Irish Temperance League held a successful series 
of meetings in Belfast last month. The attendance was 
good, and the spirit excellent. We should have been 
glad if the juvenile work of this organisation had received 
rather more ample recognition at the various meetings. 
There is always a danger of the “ little people’’being 
overlooked, yet where shall we find a class more important 
than they ? 

























20 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE . 


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28 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


BANDS OF HOPE IN WORKHOUSE 
SCHOOLS. 


VERY interesting communication on 
this subject appeared in our last 
issue from a correspondent, and in 
response to a request we then made, 
and to a note which has since been 
issued from the office, a large num¬ 
ber of interesting communications 
have been received, which doubt¬ 
less represent only a small part of 
the excellent work which is being done by our 
friends in this direction. As we cannot possibly 
find space for the whole of the letters, we 
subjoin a summary of them. It is evident 
that some of our friends have for many years 
realised the importance of this work, and had 
discovered, as a rule, that no great difficulty 
existed in regard to it. The Guardians of the 
Poor, better than any other class of persons, 
should be able to realise the close connection 
which exists between drink and poverty, and 
we feel certain that, as a rule, they will be 
found willing to permit the formation of Socie¬ 
ties. If possible, the chaplain or one of the 
guardians should be induced to bring the 
matter forward, pains having been previously 
taken to mention the matter privately to 
some of the guardians, this being done, 
by persons of some local influence. The 
matter, however, must have been well 
thought out beforehand by those desiring the 
formation of the Society, for it would probably 
be of little use to suggest the formation of a 
Society unless it has been previously ascertained 
that the chaplain, one of the guardians, or the 
schoolmaster, would be prepared to carry on the 
meetings; or, failing either of these, that those 
making the proposition would themselves be 
prepared to do so. We think we can scarcely 
do better than repeat the suggestion we 
made last month—viz., that every Band of 
Hope Union in the kingdom should appoint 
a small sub-committee, whose business it 
should be to promote the formation of, and 
if need be, carry on Bands of Hope in the 
workhouse schools of the district. Many of 
the ordinary difficulties of our work would be 
entirely absent. The room would always be 
ready, there would be no absentees, and good 
order would be invariable. The work is as in¬ 
teresting as necessary, and despite what we 
are happy to find is being done, we trust that 
even wider attention will be given to the subject. 

Ashton. —About twelve months ago we endeavoured to 
start a Band of Hope at the workhouse, but were not 
successful. The workhouse master seemed agreeable to 
the project, but the Board of Guardians would not enter¬ 
tain the question. We propose to try again before long. 


[Before making your formal application next time, let 
some of your leading friends confer privately with the 
chaplain and guardians.—E d.] 

Barnsley. —The British Women’s Temperance Union 
established a Band of Hope at the workhouse two or three 
years ago, which now numbers ioo members, and is a 
thorough success. The meetings are held fortnightly. 
A tea and entertainment was recently given to the children. 

[All temperance work amongst the young can be admir¬ 
ably carried out by ladies, but this particularly applies in 
connection with efforts in workhouse schools.— Ed.] 

Birmingham. —There is a splendid Band of Hope at 
the Birmingham Workhouse Homes at Marston Green. 
The meetings are monthly at 4.30, under the management 
of the Ladies’ Temperance Council. The attendance, 
which is voluntary, on the last two occasions amounted 
to at least 400. Gur Birmingham friends have also 
arranged for a course of addresses to be given at the 
Industrial Schools, Boys' Refuge Homes, and the 
Charity Schools. 

Burnley.— We have had a Band of Hope in connection 
with our union workhouse for about two years. The 
master and matron of the house (Mr. and Mrs. Howarth) 
are both teetotalers, and do all they can to further our 
work. The Band of Hope meeting is held monthly, and 
in addition, we frequently give a lantern exhibition. Over 
100 boys and girls are members. I may add that the 
children here are brought up in cottage homes, under the 
care of a man and wife, who are called by the children 
father and mother. I believe that much good is done at 
our meetings, not only to the children, but also to the 
men and women who are inmates of the house, and who 
attend the meetings. We are determined to do what we 
can to help these children to become good men and 
women. 

Dewsbury. —A few years ago, the committee of the 
Dewsbury Band of Hope Union obtained permission from 
the Board of Guardians to meet the children once a 
fortnight. The Band of Hope is now inserted on 
the Union’s speakers' plan, and speakers appointed. 
I consented to take the secretaryship, and the enjoy¬ 
ment I have derived from the meetings is such, that I 
should be reluctant indeed to sever my connection with 
the work. Some of the boys and girls help me by read¬ 
ings and recitations. At last, a new idea struck me, viz., 
I would ask as many Bands of Hope in our Union as I 
could to guarantee one meeting every twelve months, and 
to that appeal I received seventeen favourable responses; 
then I appealed to three other local Band of Hope Unions, 
representing districts situated in our Poor Law Union, to 
give us two evenings a year each, and those were cheer¬ 
fully agreed to, thus leaving us three meetings a year for 
us to have by ourselves, and thus making up a twelve 
months' arrangements beforehand. This arrangement 
has answered exceedingly well, and everybody has been 
pleased with it, and real good meetings have been held. 
Sometimes our meetings have been extended to the 
inmates of the whole house (permission being duly 
obtained from the guardians or the chairman of the 
Board), when services of song and entertainments have 
been very pleasingly rendered. The committee of the 
Union now feels very grateful indeed that such a loving 
work is attached to their institution. 

Huddersfield. —The Huddersfield Band of Hope 
Union, conjointly with the Church of England Temper¬ 
ance Society, have been working a Band of Hope 
very satisfactorily among the workhouse children here 
for two or three years. 

Hull.— There are two workhouses in this borough, 
and a Band of Hope exists in connection with each. Both 
are affiliated with the Hull Band of Hope League, which 
supplies speakers as required. 




THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


29 


Leicester. —Mr. T. Palmer writes:—“I believe we 
were the first in the country to establish a Band of Hope 
at the workhouse ; the doctor being an abstainer and a 
worker, rendered it easy work. The matter progressed 
favourably for years, and the children were allowed to 
join in our great festivals. Ultimately the doctor left, 
and we were afterwards unable to make satisfactory 
arrangements for week night meetings. A children’s 
service was, however, held on Sunday afternoons, and 
we, as often as possible, provided the speakers, making a 
point of thus keeping our question to the front. The 
guardians have now built cottage homes for the children, 
and under this system we are about six or seven miles 
away. Each cottage has its foster parents, who are per¬ 
sonally responsible for the children in their charge. The 
regulations prevent aggregate meetings unless the 
‘‘ parents ” are present. We have given many dissolving 
view lectures as well as ordinary addresses. We also 
give attention to the industrial school, by holding enter¬ 
tainments, giving addresses and dissolving view lectures. 
We have also presented most of the prize tales to the 
library there. 

London, Holborn Union. —Mr. Josiah Leaver, who, 
when elected a guardian fifteen years ago, at once took 
measures to form a Band of Hope which he has 
regularly conducted ever since, has sent us a very 
interesting letter, only a small part of which we can 
insert. He says :—“ At that time we had an excellent 
superintendent of the school, who ultimately lost his 
position through drink, as was also the case with the 
schoolmaster and schoolmistress. This really facilitated 
my work, and even the children themselves could trace 
cause and effect. During the fifteen years, I have con¬ 
tinued to hold the meetings regularly the whole time, and 
with increasing appreciation on all sides. As to the 
children themselves, they like them so much that a form 
of punishment in the school is for the offender not to be 
permitted by the schoolmaster or superintendent to 
attend the meeting, but to be sent to bed instead. We 
are now regarded as an established institution, and for 
some years past the school officers have rendered me 
every possible assistance in preparing the children to take 
part in the Crystal Palace temperance concerts and the 
competitive examinations, at the last of which some forty 
took part, nearly all obtaining certificates of merit. I 
recently told the guardians that our work was a great 
educational advantage to the children. For many years 
past our brass band, and many of the children besides 
the singers,have attended the Palace fete, and I have had 
the pleasure of meeting an increasing number of old 
scholars there, and have been much encouraged by their 
testimony to the benefit our efforts have been to them, 
and of their continued adherence to our principles. I may 
just add that unless a guardian of the union can be induced 
to take up the work, the course suggested by your corres¬ 
pondent, viz., to seek the aid of the chaplain, is most 
desirable, as his influence, if favourable, would be most 
useful, and if hostile very injurious. I have not hitherto 
succeeded in getting any help in this direction, but I now 
hope for a new order of things, as a temperance man has, 
for the first time, been just elected, and I have received 
the promise of his help and that of his wife. In taking 
a retrospective view of these fifteen years of Band of Hope 
labour, I thank God and take courage, feeling confident 
that a work has been done, and is stiil in progress, that 
eternity alone will reveal the full benefit effected.” 

London, Reformatory Work. —Mr. Macqueen writes : 
“ When I lived in the north of London, I found the most 
agreeable part of my Band of Hope and temperance work 
in that section which I had the liberty of carrying on at 
the Field Lane Girls’ School and Women’s Home, and 
now in this district, in Bayswater Orphanage. The 
inmates of such are living as total abstainers, and it is 
most important, and perhaps more easy, to impress the 


benefit of temperance upon them. Many of our Homes 
and workhouses are managed by temperance people, but 
wherever there is found to be no stated existing arrange¬ 
ments for getting the pledge signed, and for holding 
periodical meetings, friends in the neighbourhood will do 
well to follow the advice of your correspondent to offer 
some outside assistance, which is greatly appreciated by 
the inmates, who are very much shut up to themselves. 
Deputations from Bands of Hope to these Homes form a 
useful means of entertainment, and should be cultivated.” 

London, St. George's in the East. —The Band 
of Hope was formed here about three years ago 
at the suggestion of the chaplain, and it obtained the 
ready sanction of the guardians. The working expenses 
are borne by the chaplain and Miss Foster, a teacher, 
who says, “We hold the meetings monthly, and usually 
have a fresh speaker. Once each year the South Essex 
Band of Hope Union gives a dissolving view entertain¬ 
ment. We also often get up recitations, or a service of 
song amongst the elder boys and girls. Each year some 
of the members take part in a written competition, on a 
lecture given the previous month, and they have been 
successful in taking prizes. They seem to like to com¬ 
pete against children in outside schools. I believe with 
the writer in the Band of Hope Chronicle, that a great 
work is being done in workhouse schools by having Bands 
of Hope in them, for I find when the boys and girls go 
out to service, and in many cases where they return to 
friends, they join other Bands; and lately I have had 
several instances of young people, now eighteen or nine¬ 
teen years of age, who have still kept the pledge, and who 
state that they are very glad they joined the Band of 
Hope, as it has saved them from many temptations.” 

London, St. Pancras. —There has been a Juvenile 
Branch of the Church of England Temperance Society 
here for several years, under the presidency of the 
chaplain. It has more than once presented candidates 
for confirmation to the Bishop. 

Newcastle-on-Tyne. —Wc quote part of a specially 
interesting letter from our good friend, Mr. Troup, 
who says :—“ So far as Bands of Hope in public insti¬ 
tutions are concerned, this Union has a good record, 
as for the last five years we have Bands of Hope 
in the Newcastle Workhouse, the Newcastle Ragged and 
Industrial Schools, the Gateshead Workhouse, and the 
Gateshead Industrial School. In each of these institu¬ 
tions the Band of Hope is greatly valued by the children, 
and the meetings looked forward to with interest. The 
officials also have taken a kindly interest in the meetings, 
and given valuable help in conducting the Societies. In 
the workhouses the adult inmates attend in large 
numbers. At the conclusion of a programme some time 
ago, a pauper, rising in his place among the male adults, 
proposed a vote of thanks to the entertainers, and, 
referring to the address, urged the children to follow the 
advice given, concluding by saying, “If we had not 
taken drink, a great many of us would never have been 
here.” At the end of another meeting some three years ago 
a poor mother,who was in theworkhouse withher children, 
sprang forward, and seizing a boy of about nine years of 
age by the hand, said, “ Tommy, you sign the pledge 
to-night, and when you go to bed say, ‘ please God keep 
me from drink, and please God keep father from drink.’ ” 
The mother .and child wept together for some time. 
At these institutions a programme is usually furnished by 
the members of another Band of Hope once a month. It 
is a pleasure to the outside members to go, and a great 
pleasure to those inside to receive them. The members 
in, the institution are allowed, at times, to give pro¬ 
grammes to other Bands of Hope. They also take part 
in summer demonstrations, just the same as other 
members. At the institution of one of the Societies, the 
guardians voted a sum of money to obtain the requisite 
books, pledge cards, &c. In the institution referred to, 


30 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


eacn child signs the pledge on becoming a member, and 
when the time comes for him to leave the house one of the 
Union B. B. pledge cards is presented to him by the 
master. We hope to get a Society started in an orphanage, 
and we are about to move in the matter of a Society for 
the children attending school in the barracks. You see 
we are not far behind.” 

Portsmouth. —We have carried on a Band of Hope at 
the workhouse since 1872, with excellent results; in fact 
it is one of the most flourishing Societies in connection 
with our Union. Permission was obtained from the 
guardians, and the hearty sympathy of the schoolmaster 
was freely given, his daughter being the first to sign the 
pledge. Since then the work has steadily gone on ; 
the workers have changed, fresh children have come and 
gone, but still the Band of Hope flourishes. Our meetings 
are monthly, when all the children in the institution meet 
and spend an enjoyable evening. The meetings are made 
as attractive as possible. Each night a different speaker 
attends. Besides the speaker, we have occasionally a 
gentleman to teach new Band of Hope melodies ; at other 
times, the children themselves engage in a recitation con¬ 
test. We have just concluded a series of competitions ; 
24 children (12 boys and 12 girls) presented themselves 
for trial, and as our president, Mr. Councillor Ward, had 
offered a number of prizes, we divided the children into 
four classes of 6 each ; the first in each class to take a 
prize, and then engage in a further competition. The 
final contest, for which two prizes were offered, took place 
on Wednesday, Jan. 12th. The boys recited ‘‘ The Road 
to Heaven,” and the girls “Billy’s Rose,” acquitting 
themselves remarkably well. A good number of the adult 
inmates attended, and many visitors from the town. Since 
the formation of the Society, 698 girls and 817 boys have 
signed the pledge. There are now in the house 339 children, 
of whom about 280 are pledged abstainers. Many of the 
boys are serving with credit to themselves and their 
principles in Her Majesty’s service, while the girls are 
much sought after. 

Sheffield.— For the past seven years there has been 
an excellent Band of Hope in the Fir Vale workhouse in 
this town. 

Southampton.— Twice a year, we give temperance 
entertainments to the children in our workhouse school 
by means of the magic lantern. 

Thrapstone, Northamptonshire.— The children here 
are allowed to go to the Band of Hope. 

Ulverstone.-— We extract the following from an in¬ 
teresting letter from Mr. T. Kendall, of Ulverstone, who 
has received the permission of the guardians of the 
Ulverstone Union Workhouse to conduct a children’s 
Gospel Temperance Mission therein. He says: “The 
meetings are held every alternate week, and last about one 
hour. We open with singing, Scripture reading, prayer, 
and the repetition of the text given at the previous meeting, 
after which three to four children give suitable recitations. 
Then follows an address by myself, concluding with sing¬ 
ing and prayer. The children not only greatly prize the 
meetings, but are very diligent in contributing to their 
usefulness, whilst the officers of the union have 
taken a deep interest in our work. This winter we have 
given what we term ' Workhouse Nights ’ to the Church 
of England, Wesleyan, and Baptist Bands of Hope. 
These special meetings are times of great enjoyment to 
ourselves and to those children whom we are privileged 
to visit. I earnestly hope the bringing forward of this 
subject in your columns may lead many workers to new 
and renewed efforts with workhouse children.” 

Yorkshire.— Band of Hope work in our workhouses is 
a subject which has often occupied the attention of the 
Yorkshire Union. We have in various towns free access 
at stated periods to hold Band of Hope meetings, the 
guardians having first given permission, and the master 
and matron co-operating with us. 


(ftortcspontinue. 


OUR SENIOR MEMBERS. 

To the Editor of the Band of Hope Chronicle. 

Sir, —We have a capital society of junior members, 
which we formed three years ago. Some of our first 
members, however, are now getting beyond the age when 
they care to attend the meetings with children a few 
years younger than themselves. Many readers of the 
Chronicle must, I am convinced, be similarly situated, 
and it would be a great advantage if any of our 
friends who have been able to deal successfully with 
the older members—those say over thirteen—would give 
us through your columns the result of their experience. 

Yours faithfully, 

A Secretary. 

[We shall be glad to receive any number of tersely 
written letters on this subject, not indicating the diffi¬ 
culties referred to, which all of us fully realise, but giving 
particulars of plans which have been found successful in 
dealing with the difficulty.— Ed. J 

MAGIC LANTERN SLIDES. 

To the Editor of the Band of Hope Chronicle. 

Dear Sir, —It would be a great advantage to small 
country unions and others, if some arrangement could be 
made by which the serious^xpense of purchasing slides 
could be avoided ; or if some arrangement could be made 
for their easy resale, at, say, half price. We have 
purchased various sets, but when they have been shown 
at most twice to the same young people, they become 
dead stock. Any suggestion from yourself, or the readers 
of the Chronicle, will be esteemed a favour. 

Yours faithfully, 

A Union Secretary. 

[To meet cases such as the above, the Committee of 
the Union are prepared to allow half price for certain 
temperance and other slides purchased from them, 
provided that at the time of purchase the invoice be 
endorsed to this effect, that the slides be returned in good 
condition within two years of the date of purchase 
accompanied by the endorsed invoice, and that a second 
purchase be completed equal in amount to the original 
one. It will thus be seen that a person expending, say, 
£1 on slides, may exchange them for new ones, on paying 
10s. in cash. — Ed.] 


The Band of Hope Motto Card. —We are pleased 
to be able to state that this beautiful card has been 
received with such favour that the entire edition of 60 000 
was sold out by the middle of January. It will not be 
reprinted. 

Prize Essays by the Working Classes. —Mr. George 
Sturge offers three prizes of £ 5, £3, and £1 for the three 
best Essays on Intoxicating Drink and its Effect on the 
Body and the Mind. All men and -women earning weekly 
or monthly wages are eligible. This is a capital oppor¬ 
tunity for the senior members of our Societies. The 
conditions may be had of the Manager of “ The Philan¬ 
thropist,” 123, Fulham Road, S.W. 

The Spread of Temperance Literature. —The 
Secretary of the Hackney (London) Band of Hope Union 
has recently taken considerable pains to promote an 
increased sale of temperance literature. He obtained 
sufficient samples from the respective publishers of 
thirteen temperance and other suitable magazines to 
send samples of the whole to 150 societies. The plan 
urged for adoption is that explained by Mr. Hallsworth, 
one of the Hon. Secs, of the Lancashire and Cheshire 
Band of Hope Union, in his pamphlet entitled “ Publica¬ 
tion Departments.” a copy of which we believe Mr. 
Hallsworth would be pleased to send to any friend on 
application. 




THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


3i 


©mteti Itmgtiom Bantr of 0Jmott. 


NEW YEAR'S GATHERING. 



OR some years past it has been customary 
for the Committee of the Union to invite the 
managers of the societies in and near London, 
which now number about a thousand, to 
attend a New Year’s soiree, and the work of 
the present year was inaugurated by such a 
meeting at Exeter Hall on Saturday, Jan. 8th, 
under the chairmanship of Mr. George 
Williams, the new President of the Union. 
K* - The proceedings were partly of a social 
character, tea being provided for those desiring it, and the 
after engagements comprising devotional exercises, a New 
Year's address by the Chairman, by the Rev. Canon 
Barker, Chaplain in Ordinary to the Queen, and by the 
Rev. James Baillie, of Bloomsbury Chapel, varied by 
hymns, songs, solos, harp recitals, and recitations. Under 
these circumstances, it is scarcely necessary to add that 
an agreeable evening was passed by the eight or nine 
hundred workers who were present 

After a hymn and prayer. 

The President said : This is the first time I have had 
the honour and privilege of appearing before you as your 
new President. I am sure we all feel the great loss 
we have sustained in the departure of your excellent, 
steady, long-persevering friend, the President who has 
been taken from us, Mr. Samuel Morley. He did great 
and noble service, not only by his advocacy of this question, 
but by the substantial aid which he was always prepared 
to render to almost every good cause, and especially, I 
might say, to the temperance cause. The Lord 
has been pleased to promote him—if I may say it 
with all reverence—to the “ Upper House.” As you are 
aware, he declined the offer of the Upper House in this 
world ; but a higher authority than that of Her Majesty 
the Queen has given him his promotion, and you and I 
will rejoice that, though he is not with us here to-night, 
as he probably would have been, yet he is yonder in the 
presence of the King, and it is only a matter of time when 
we hope to be there with him—do we not ? And that is 
why we are all met here to-night, in order that we may be 
helpful in doing the will of the Master during the few 
years that remain to us. By the wish of the Committee, 
and against my own judgment, I am here in the place of 
Mr. Morley. I yielded to the desire of the Committee 
because I thought they had some claim upon me. In the 
first place I am in the City of London in commercial life 
very much like Mr. Morley. I employ a number of young 
men very much as he did ; I have long taken an interest 
in Ragged and Sunday Schools of every description, and 
I have long taken an interest in the Band of Hope Union. 
I certainly did not know, until I attended your annual 
meeting last year, the extent of the excellent work you 
have been doing for a great number of years. I had no 
idea of the immensity and variety of the work, or of the 
blessing which attended it. When I was trying to read 
up your papers and reports, and collecting the information 
necessary, I was delighted with what I read, and came to 
the conclusion that in the Band of Hope work lay the 
hope of the temperance question. The President concluded 
by saying that if we could get the boys and girls to under¬ 
stand the true properties of alcohol, they would grow up 
abstainers and gradually leaven society. The great want 
of the public on this question was information, and to 
supply it was our chief business. 

The address was followed by a song by Mrs. Lionel 
Munday, a recitation, ‘‘A Modern Hero,” by Mr. A. R. 
Robbins, and an admirable harp solo, “Rousseau's 
Dream,” by Mr. Edwin Smith. 


The Rev. Canon Barker, who was received with cheers, 
said : It is always a great advantage to us to come 
together once a year, in order that we may compare 
notes, encourage and strengthen each other for the 
campaign that lies before us. The old principle is often 
enunciated—that he who gives most to others gives most 
to himself; and I am quite certain that he who endeavours 
to give encouragement and strength to others acquires for 
himself a great deal more encouragement and strength 
than he may impart to others. Therefore I regard it as a 
great privilege to be allowed to address a band of workers 
like the present upon a subject in which we are all 
interested. I regard the Band of Hope movement as a 
sort of flank movement, and you as the leaders of that 
flank movement. The children are for ever influencing 
indirectly and bringing to bear our temperance principles 
upon the home indirectly. They do not speak—they 
practice, and this is often more eloquent than the most 
refined discourse. This, then, is a most potent factor in 
our propaganda. I asked myself wnen I was considering 
what was best to say to myself—for in speaking to others 
I mostly speak to myself—what do I want to hear most ? 
what would help me most in the battle against intempe¬ 
rance in the Band of Hope movement ? In the first place, 
Band of Hope work is the most difficult work in connec¬ 
tion with the movement. I consider that the United 
Kingdom Alliance has a work all by itself—very grand 
and very magnificent, and in a degree easier than the 
work of the Band of Hope, and the same with all other 
branches into which it is divided. But that which is 
most difficult is generally the best worth doing. You 
can always judge the value of a work by the difficulties 
you have met in doing it. Therefore, I regard this work, 
because it is difficult, as the highest and the most impor¬ 
tant. Now, in order to carry it on there are one 
or two essentials, and you may say that they are 
essentials in all great work, but in our work one is para¬ 
mount, and it is this—that we should have very great 
enthusiasm and belief in the work itself. No merely luke¬ 
warm feeling is sufficient to carry it on. It is often so 
difficult that we need a great deal to encourage and help 
us. In reading, as we often do, comments upon our work 
we discover a great deal that is very weak, a great deal 
that wants backbone; and men who are not very strong 
in their convictions get a little shaken by what other people 
say and what other people write. Now, unless we believe 
thoroughly that our principes are good for every man, 
woman, and child ; that alcohol is of no use to healthy 
persons, and of very doubtful use for diseased persons, 
we shall very soon be driven back from our position 
and get discouraged in our work. I am afraid, for 
instance, that a great number of persons have got dis¬ 
couraged by a certain utterance which has come from 
episcopal lips lately. I hear on all sides that opinion 
and that experience quoted. In the Times to-day 
there is an article which I would commend to 
your serious notice with regard to a recent judgment in 
the County Court. His lordship is quoted as an authority 
on this question. Many persons who are hesitating, 
whose convictions are not firm, are driven from their 
position by the utterances of such persons as these. So 
if we are really to be hard workers we must be satisfied 
that total abstinence is good for all, and that until we 
have carried this conviction home universally we have 
very little chance of effecting that towards which we are 
hastening. Self-devotion, self-consecration, is also wanted. 
There are old and noble workers in the cause here, but I 
would discover if I tried that the most successful of them 
have been also the most consecrated. It is the conse¬ 
crated men and women who succeed in God's work, and 
in proportion as we are consecrated in that proportion 



32 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


shall we too succeed. In this room there are men and 
women who, perhaps for twenty or thirty years, have 
given themselves to Band of Hope work alone. Now, I 
do not know whether you feel it, but I seem to feel it more 
strongly every day, that there are distinct powers and 
forces in declared and virulent opposition to all the forces 
of good. I seem to feel that whenever men are banded 
fora good cause, hundreds of other men band themselves 
to oppose that good cause. It seems to me that the Press, 
that vast portions of society, appear to love to fasten upon 
what is bad, upon what is base,and upon what is disgrace¬ 
ful, and to feast upon it, and expose it, and to make it 
public. My illustration is this—A certain unhappy 
family falls into disgrace; the whole press of London, the 
whole of society thinks of—talks of—nothing else. They 
take no notice of the hundreds and thousands of homes 
where there is purity, where there is Christianity, where 
there is goodness, where there is self-sacrifice. They 
delight in bringing out and exposing and making every¬ 
body know what is bad in society. Now, I look 
upon you as human beings who are elected by God to 
oppose this tendency of evil, for unless there was a 
mighty force, unless there was a great army in the world 
always in arms against every form of evil, our 
world would simply become unliveable; unless it 
were for the persistent efforts of Christian men and women 
I believe society would become utterly corrupt. It seems 
to feast like so many vultures upon the corrupting carrian 
wherever it can pick it up. How we want to be consecrated 
to this work. Do you know what the word ,s consecra¬ 
tion ” means ? It is “ separation ”—that we have given 
our lives to this work. Whilst you and I are in this 
room seeking how best we can do the world this great 
good, there are hundreds and thousands who are set to 
do nothing but evil. Think of the hundreds and thou¬ 
sands of temptations that are being presented to the 
people of this metropolis. Think of the public-houses, 
the gin-palaces, the music-halls, and worse, that are to¬ 
night straining every nerve, and spending thousands of 
money in exhibiting the most lewd and disgusting things. 
Think, my friends, were it not for the souls who hate evil 
and who detest vice, and who love God and all that is 
pure—I say. if it were not for such consecrated souls 
separating themselves from this mass of selfish, sensual 
evil, I repeat, I know not what would become of society. 
Now, then, the consecration. That man is ever the 
strongest intellectually and morally who is able to conse¬ 
crate himself fully and singly upon some one great end. 
The great apostle brought out what I mean—“This one 
thing I do.’’ I press forward towards perfection. I have 
a single end. I have a single object. I have one aim, 
and towards that with all the power of my manhood I 
press, and will press. There is the secret of his success— 
of his power. There is the explanation of his wonderful 
influence upon the world—never greater than to-day. In 
our degree we can achieve the same. Never let us play 
with the thing. I am afraid a great many do. They are 
not in earnest. They do not give their whole heart to it. 
They do not expand themselves into it as they expand 
themselves into other things. If there are leaders of the 
Band of Hope movement here they will know very well 
that it is difficult—almost impossible—sometimes to get 
men and women to keep consecutively to the meetings in 
hand. Now at the beginning of this new year let us try 
with all our might to realise this one great fact that unless 
we really devote and consecrate ourselves, separate our¬ 
selves, to such a work as this we shall never have success. 
Now, unless you have very great faith you will soon get 
weak, and your work will decline. I think sometimes it is 
like working in the dark. You goon slaving. The children 
will not come in numbers. Some seem soon to break their 
pledges. You see no results of all your toil, and in dark 
moments of despondency you are inclined sometimes to 
give it up. If it were not for that we should have no men 


putting their hands to the plough and looking back ; it 
is because they have not faith. One instance of faith is 
always in my mind when I think upon this subject. The 
great discoverer Columbus went on sailing westward, 
never having seen the land—never being sure that there 
was land. He simply kept the helm westward, and on¬ 
ward he went. It is the same with our great movement. 
We toil and do not see the immediate results. We shall 
not see them in our day. We want, therefore, deep 
earnest faith, that work amongst the young in our genera¬ 
tion will indeed show its fruits and results in the genera¬ 
tions that are to come. We want to believe that these 
children to whom we are teaching the principles of total 
abstinence will retain, and act upon them, and propagate 
them in the future, and make the great temperance party 
in the days to come. Hence there are wanted, first, 
enthusiasm ; second, self-consecration; and third, undying 
faith in the strength and reality of our movement. Do 
you want to be enamoured of a thing ? Do you want to 
be really attracted by a thing ? Do you want to have your 
enthusiasm stimulated by a thing ? If so, you must 
realise what that thing is. You must realise what it is in 
itself. It is either real or it is nothing but vapour. An 
enthusiast—I love the word—is an inspired man. An 
enthusiast is a man in whom is breathed the Divine fire. 
Let no man ever speak a hard word against an enthusiast. 
Everything has been and is won by enthusiasts, and were 
it not for the enthusiasts you may be sure that the dying 
embers of the energies of mankind would soon die out. 
Now, how can we get our enthusiasm stimulated ? I can 
easily tell you. There are few men or women who do not 
naturally love their own children and love all children. 
Children are the nearest likeness to heaven that we have 
upon earth. Children are the most attractive, the most 
purifying, the most elevating of all the influences in the 
world. Our homes are what they are because of the 
child life. Our past Christmas was happy and blessed 
because of the presence of young children. No man with 
anything like a heart can feel aught but love and 
sympathy in the midst of a crowd of children. Their 
innocence, their purity, their ignorance of evil, their 
belief in you and their enthusiasm win you. Children 
and childhood were specially attractive to our Lord, 
and the children Christ entrusts to us. The future 
is with them, and you, my friends, are dealing with 
the future. You have to shape and mould the future. 
It depends upon the moral and spiritual education of the 
children of this generation what the next generation shall 
be. Now, what has been the chief suffering of our 
country ? What is the curse of all lands ? I have no 
hesitation in saving that it has been, and is, and will be 
the drink, until it is abolished from the surface of the 
earth. Does it not sometimes make the blood in 
your veins turn when you read such remarks as I 
have read this week poured upon us from all sides 
with regard to this curse, and when you see children 
going to evening parties, being persuaded to drink cham¬ 
pagne, and returning home tipsy ? It is quite true that 
young children cannot consume this liquor without being 
almost immediately affected. My own two children went 
to a party, and the host and hostess implored them to 
take champagne, but, of course, they said, Father never 
takes it, and he wishes us not to take it.” Is it conceiv¬ 
able that educated men and women, mothers who have 
sons and daughters of their own—is it conceivable that 
they can give strong drink to young children from eight 
to thirteen years of age ? I only say is it not a disgrace, 
is it not a shame, and ought it not to bring a blusn upon 
their cheeks when they see what an evil intemperance is ? 
It makes my blood boil when educated persons, who 
ought to know better, encourage young children to take 
strong drink. You and I must keep faithful and never 
lower our flag, but we must, by persistent endeavour, 
persuade every mother and father in England and in 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


33 


the world that strong drink is a most deadly thing to 
give to children, and is the very best means of leading 
them ultimately to a life which they will deplore in 
the future. As earnest men and women we feel that our 
question is the burning one of the day—that it is really a 
question of life and death. We feel that unless we suc¬ 
ceed there is not much hope for our country. You have 
before you the children of England. You have before you 
what they may be—ah ! and what they might be, and 
what they will be if they become drunken. Try and 
foment your own imagination and realise that little child 
sitting before you as a possible drunkard, and if you can 
save that one child from the miseries and the horrors of 
drunkenness, it is worth a life. In conclusion, let me say 
that we have a great deal to encourage us. The movement 
is going on apace. The Band of Hope is the most 
encouraging of all its branches. I believe there are 
millions of children who, at this moment, are total 
abstainers. Then, let us take heart over what has been 
done in the last fifty years. Think of the progress that 
has been made. Think of the change in public sentiment. 
See the host of total abstainers. See how the opinions of 
the doctors have altered. See how the opinion of the 
Church has altered. See how the Legislature is altering. 
See how the Press is altering. See how differently men 
speak of our movement from what they did. I say all this 
is nothing short of a miracle, for there never was a moral 
movement beset with so many difficulties and opposed by 
so many interests as ours. Human nature, the strongest 
factor of all, is opposed to us. Human nature—that is, 
selfishness and self-indulgence—stands across our path. 
Pecuniary interest stands across our path—habit, and I 
know not what; yet, in spite of all this, we have made the 
progress we have, and we are occupying the proud position 
we are doing to-day. Mr. Smith, one of the indefatigable 
Secretaries of this Union, is with us to-night, and he will 
perhaps bear me out when I say there is not a man or 
woman in this hall who is now twenty-five who was not 
once a member of the Band of Hope, and the vast number 
of the total abstainers have come ,-out of the Bands of 
Hope ; nence those who are growing up have sprung from 
the very fountain and root of our movement, viz., the 
Band of Hope movement. Therefore, my friends, there 
is everything to encourage and nothing to discourage us. 
There is everything to fill us with hope, and nothing to 
damp our ardour. There is everything to spur us on to 
greater exertion, and nothing to induce us to lower our 
flag or retreat. There is all the country before us—the 
workers in the juvenile movement—hundreds and 
thousands of children who are waiting to be educated, to 
be trained, to be made moral, and to be made spiritual. 
God has given that work to you and to me. Let us do it, 
and do it with our might, in spite of and in the face of all 
opposition—let us plod on. Children are the hope of 
the world. The children are the flowers of society. The 
star in the horizon to-day is pointing to a cradle, and it 
says to the Church and to the world, 11 There is your hope, 
there is your future, there is your salvation.” Let us take 
heart; let us be encouraged; let us go forward, and we 
will never lay down our heads at last with the aching 
pain that we have neglected our duty. The one thought 
that will give us peace, the one recollection that will give 
us comfort, will be the past memory of having done what 
we could for the childhood of our country, which is the 
cradle of its prosperity and the ground of its hope. 

At the close of this earnest address, the meeting once 
more relapsed into music—Mr. Edwin Smith giving 
another harp solo, “ The March of the Men of Harlech 
Mr. Robbins contributing an affecting recitation, “ The 
Newsboy’s Debt, ” and Mrs. Lionel Mundy a well-rendered 
song, “ Masks and Faces.” 

The Rev. James Baillie, minister of Bloomsbury 
Chapel, and successor to the late Rev. J. P. Chown, 
said it was some thirty years since he first became an 


abstainer. Some of his youthful enthusiasm had failed 
in the light of mature life ; but his faith in total abstinence 
only grew deeper as the years gathered round him, and 
burnt with a more intense flame the more thoroughly he 
was brought in contact with the facts of human life. He 
was asked to give a word of cheer to the meeting, and it 
reminded him of the formal way in which schoolmasters 
used to have presents made them. The boys of a school 
determined to make their master a present of birds. One 
brought a canary, another a linnet, and another a sparrow. 
The donor of the sparrow was chaffed because of the 
poverty of his gift, and because it could not sing. He 
replied, “At least it can say cheer up (chirrup).” It was 
useless to deny it, but men got real pleasure from alcohol. 
He knew his hearers would speak of the dirt, the squalor, 
and the tragedies—no man knew these things better than 
he did, but these were hidden from the young people. 
These were the things that came at the end and not the 
beginning. The beginning was music, flowers, and good 
fellowship. Then there was self-interest operating upon 
the world and the Church alike. A Government must 
consider the opposition it would raise if it touched the 
great and strongly entrenched drink interest. In all sec¬ 
tions of the Christian Church the prophets of the Lord 
were gagged, and many ministers dare not say what they 
thought of the drink unless they had brave hearts 
and were ready to face unpleasant consequences. The 
drink interest had tried to gag him, but had failed. What 
had they to oppose this self-interest ? Disinterested self- 
denial, born out of compassion for the misery of man. 
It was the battle of Christ, and not of man. There 
were four main gates by which human beings went 
to destruction. There was the gate of indifference, through 
which passed the indolent and cold-hearted ; next there 
was the gate of dishonesty, by which the right honour- 
ables, the pious bank-directors and pickpockets, and dis¬ 
honest tradesmen went to perdition ; and then there was 
the gate of lust, through which nameless women and 
accursed men passed to their tragic doom ; and there was 
the gate of drunkenness, which was the gate that we 
had to guard. Not one of the young people under our 
charge might pass through that gate—it was our duty to 
prevent them. Finally the speaker drew an encouraging 
retrospect of the state of public feeling amongst all classes 
in regard to strong drink in 1837 as compared with 1887. 

The duet of “ Excelsior ” was then sung by Mr. and 
Mrs, Mundy. “How Betsy and I fell out ” was admir¬ 
ably recited by Mr. Robbins, and finally there was a third 
harp solo by Mr. Edwin Smith. 

The proceedings closed with a vote of thanks to 
the President, which was proposed by Mr. Axel 
Gustafson and seconded by Mr. J. H. Raper. 


MR. FRANK ADKINS. 

Since the commencement of the present season Mr. 
Adkins has been fully occupied in lecturing, mostly 
with dissolving views, in various parts of the country. 
During October and a part of November Mr. Adkins was 
engaged under the auspices of the Ipswich and Suffolk 
and Northampton Band of Hope Unions, and several 
most important and useful meetings were held in con¬ 
nection with those organisations, His journey also 
comprised visits to the various towns of Norfolk, Herts, 
and the Isle of Wight. During the latter part of 
November the counties of Somerset, Dorset, Devon, and 
Cornwall were visited, and in December a lecturing tour 
was made through Kent and places on the east coast. Mr. 
Adkins has also completed a very successful tour in 
Ireland with the dissolving views, and has found the 
newly-acquired triple lantern of the Union an instrument 
of great power and accuracy. After lecturing to work- 
house children at Ulverstone, and delivering a series of 
five lectures at Barrow-in-Furness, he, on January 10th, 




34 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


crossed to Belfast, where a crowded audience highly 
appreciated both the views and the lecture. At Larne 
the Town Hall could hardly contain the children present 
at the early lecture, and the later lecture was also well 
attended. At Dundalk and Athlone good meetings were 
held, and a series of seven lectures at Dalkey, Kings¬ 
town, Rathgar, and other places in and near Dublin com¬ 
pleted the tour. Mr. Adkins has been engaged to give a 
number of lectures in various parts of Scotland, and is 
now fully booked up to the end of March. Further on 
he will be open to undertake organising work, and 
Unions and Societies will do well to arrange for a 
week or a fortnight of Mr. Adkins’ services during the 
spring or summer months. Secretaries desirous of 
arranging for a visit from Mr. Adkins, either with 
dissolving views or for mission or organising work, 
should make early application to the General Secretary 
for terms and vacant dates. 

MR. WILLIAM BELL. 

Since we last referred to Mr. Bell’s work, he has been 
very actively engaged. Commencing his winter labours 
with an admirably arranged and very successful series of 
meetings under the auspices of the Bradford Union, he 
addressed, during the two following weeks, large and 
enthusiastic meetings at Walsall and Hyde, over 400 
pledges being taken during the week’s mission at the 
latter place. These visits were followed up by a fort¬ 
night’s engagement in Hertfordshire, and three weeks of 
earnest and useful work at Gravesend, Meltham, and the 
Isle of Wight. A specially useful series of meetings were 
held at Crawshawboothand Hebden Bridge in November ; 
and the year’s labours were brought to a close by a 
fortnight’s excellent work under the auspices of the 
Lancashire and Cheshire Union, the Blackburn Union 
also taking a week for its own separate needs. During 
January Mr. Bell was again engaged for a fortnight by the 
Lancashire and Cheshire Union, besides attending a 
week’s meetings in connection with the Queensbury and 
Yorks Union. In addition to his evening lectures, Mr. 
Bell in many instances also gave addresses at schools and 
conference meetings in the afternoons ; and at all the 
meetings he attended special pains were taken to advocate 
the importance of training the young. Thus, although 
a large number of meetings were attended principally by 
adults, the movement was largely helped by the influence 
brought to bear upon teachers and parents. Letters are 
constantly being received testifying to the immense 
benefit resulting from Mr. Bell’s valuable labours; and 
the fact of his being booked up to April testifies to the 
estimation in which his services are held. We regret to 
say that during Christmastide Mr. Bell was severely 
indisposed, but he is now fairly recovered, and con¬ 
tinuing his work with unabated zeal and earnestness. 
Our friends will do well to bear in mind that during 
the summer months Mr. Bell’s services are offered to 
local Unions at nominal rates, when he will be prepared 
to address open-air meetings, as well as to take part in 
ordinary meetings. 

MR. JOHN BURGESS. 

Since our last reference to Mr. Burgess, he has continued 
to deliver his lectures to the children of the upper 
standards in elementary schools in and around London. 
As heretofore his addresses have dealt with the injurious 
physiological effects arising from the use of intoxicating 
drinks, and upwards of a hundred schools have now had 
the advantage of his addresses. Some fourteen thousand 
children have been addressed. The excellent reports sent 
in, and for which prizes are awarded by the Committee, 
are sufficient evidence that the lectures by Mr. Burgess 
are fully appreciated by the young people, and as the 
teachers in every case remain to hear the addresses, it 
may be inferred that they also receive much advantage 


from the valuable instruction given. A meeting in the 
East End of London was especially interesting, when it was 
found that all the teachers were abstainers and nearly 
all the scholars members of Bands of Hope. Mr. Burgess 
has also been busily engaged in attending the usual Band 
of Hope meetings, where his chemical and physiological 
addresses are particularly acceptable. 


MR. WALTER EDWARDS. 

The illustrated chemical and physiological lectures by 
Mr. W. N. Edwards have been increasingly popular, 
and forty-five lectures have been given since the commence¬ 
ment of the season. In several instances societies have 
made arrangements for a series of lectures, so as to have 
the full advantage of consecutive teaching. The Redhill 
and Reigate Band of Hope Union having engaged Mr. 
Edwards to repeat the series of lectures given on a former 
occasion he visited each of the societies in the Union, and 
in every case the entertaining character of the lecture 
made it much appreciated, whilst the instruction conveyed 
will prove permanently useful. A series of large gatherings 
at the Lambeth Baths have also had the advantage of the 
demonstrative teaching of these lectures. In addition to 
this special work Mr. Edwards has been much engaged 
with lectures with the dissolving views, having for the third 
time given the annual series at the aggregate meetings 
arranged by the City and Finsbury Band of Hope Union, 
In connection with this effort reports of the lectures were 
written by many of the young people present, and prizes 
awarded to those making the best reports. 


THE COMPETITIVE EXAMINATION. 

The preparation for the Competitive Examination is 
being heartily carried on by the Unions and societies 
throughout the country, and as heretofore the friends in 
Scotland and Ireland are doing their best to qualify their 
members for the ordeal through which they will have to 
pass on February 25th. All the London Unions have 
entered for the examination, and the following is a list of 
the provincial Unions who have also taken active 
measures to bring the subject before their societies:— 
Bradford, Batley, Birmingham, Bucks and East Berks, 
Cardiff, Cambridge, Cannock Chase, Dumfries and 
Maxwelltown, Derbyshire, Greenwich and West Kent, 
Herts, Hull and district,Halifax, Huddersfield, Hibernian, 
Higham Ferrers, Irish Temperance League. Ipswich and 
Suffolk, Juvenile Temple of Ireland, Keighley, Leicester¬ 
shire, Lancashire and Cheshire, Leeds and district, 
Methodist New Connexion, Norwich, North Essex, New¬ 
castle, Newport (Mon.), Northampton, Nottingham, 
Oxfordshire, Portsmouth, Reading, Sheffield, Scarboro’, 
Surrey, South Essex, Three Towns, West Middlesex, 
Wolverhampton, Walsall, Yorks. Most of the above 
Unions have promised additional prizes beyond those 
offered by the Parent Society, and the total amount to be 
distributed is probably £150. As an evidence of the 
interest taken in the examination it may be mentioned 
that sixty-three thousand copies of the conditions have 
been applied for, whilst nineteen thousand copies of the 
text book have been already issued. 


DISSOLVING VIEWS. 

The beautiful dissolving views possessed by the Union 
have, during the present season, been in greater demand 
than ever, as many as 223 entertainments having been 
already given during thepresent season. The 11 Temperance 
Sketch Book ” continues to be the favourite subject, 
but all the sixteen lectures are in continual demand. The 
pictures afford an admirable means of providing tempe¬ 
rance teaching in a popular and entertaining manner to 
adults as well as children. Those societies which have not 
done so would do well to arrange for one or more lectures 
during the season. Application to be made to the General 
Secretary of the Union, 4, Ludgate Hill, E.C. 





THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


35 


l&ecortrs of Progress 

Banb of J^ope Antons. 

Bradford.— The annual soiree of this Union, always a most enjoyable 
occasion, took place at the Temperance Hall, Leeds Row, on 
Saturday, January 8th. About 200 workers and friends were present 
to tea, and over the subsequent meeting Mr. IVJartin Field,_ who has so 
long lent similar service to the Union, presided. In opening the pro¬ 
ceedings, Mr. Field remarked that the year had been one of growth and 
progress to the Union. There were now 140 societies, with 24,000 
members, 13 new societies having joined during the year. Not less 
than 7,000 of the members were “ seniors”—over sixteen years of age. 
A programme of music was excellently rendered by various talented 
local friends ; and Mr. J. Roberts, the agent of the Union, gave an 
exhibition of some dissolving views. A pleasing item in the entertain¬ 
ment was the presentation of a testimonial to Mr. W. Widdop, in token 
of appreciation of valuable service as pianist and organist, rendered 
during many past years. 

Burnley. —On Saturday, December 18th, the Committee of the 
Union held an entertainment on behalf of a fund for the relief of the 
families of several lifeboat men recently drowned in the neighbourhood 
in an attempted rescue. The effort yielded a profit of ^12. We have 
nothing but commendation for the benevolent intention of our Burnley 
friends, but we wish that it were as easy to obtain pecuniary support 
for our own work of salvation from drink as it is to secure contributions 
for good objects such as this on behalf of which our friends have laboured. 

Dewsbury and District. —This Union issues a remarkably com¬ 
pact, handy, and comprehensive little meeting plan. We are struck 
by one arrangement specially. It seems that a Band of Hope, fostered 
by the Union, meets at the workhouse school, and we see by the plan 
that at each of the weekly meetings one of the ordinary societies from 
without supplies the entertainment, and, we suppose, the address too. 
Of course the plan needs very careful working, but the idea is a good 
one. 

Essex (South). —This Union has completed a series of eleven united 
festivals, held in various localities, with excellent results. At each a 
contest in recitation was held, followed by an exhibition of dissolving 
views, shown by the limelight, entitled “The Young Folks’ Picture 
Gallery.” Special attention is given by this Union to music in con¬ 
nection with the work, special conferences of workers on the subject 
having been held at Plaistow, Upton, Grays, and Walthamstow. At 
each of these meetings Mr. Judson Bonner gave an address on “ Music 
as an Aid to Band of Hope Work.” His remarks were efficiently and 
interestingly illustrated and enforced, by the execution by a Band of 
Hope family—a father and five of his children—of a series of airs on a 
variety of instruments. The musical side of our work is one which it 
would be very unwise to neglect, and in some societies in this respect 
there is much room for improvement. 

Herts.— The New Year’s conference was held in the Council 
Chamber of the Town Hall, St. Albans, on Tuesday, January nth. In 
the afternoon a conference was held, under the presidency of Mr. 
S. G. Sheppard, at which papers were read by Mr. C. Wakely, of the 
Parent Society, on “ Band of Hope Organisation and Management,” 
and by Mr. E. W. S. Royds on “ Notes by the Way, from a Country 
Band of Hope Worker.” In the evening a public meeting was held in 
the Corn Exchange. The Committee of the Union has issued a 
circular letter to the clergy and other persons of influence in the county, 
bringing the Union under their notice, adducing good reasons for 
temperance effort, and proffering every assistance should action be 
taken. 

Newport (Mon.). —The annual festival was held on Dec. 15th and 
16th, followed by a grand industrial loan exhibition on the 17th and 18th. 
In the former prizes were offered for recitations, solos, duets, quartettes, 
piano and harmonium playing,choir singing,sight singing,readings (pre¬ 
pared and at sight),musical harmony and composition,speeches(prepared 
and impromptu),and essays The industrial exhibition was’well supported 
bythe local Bands of Hope, each of which held a separate stall. Prizes,were 
offered for the stall displaying the most taste in its arrangement, and 
also for the stall containing the best collection of exhibits. The former 
prize was taken by the Maendn Wesleyan Band of Hope, whose stall 
was enriched with a background of ferns and shrubs, fairy lights, and 
mirrors ; another was in the form of a rustic bower faced with virgin 
cork : another represented a Barbican tower, 14ft. high, the exhibits 
being displayed under the portcullis. The attractions of the exhibition 
included ^dissolving views, exhibitions, penny concerts, a collection of 
machinery and models in . motion, a telephone and telegraphic 
apparatus, &c. The exhibition was opened on the 17th by the 
Venerable Archdeacon Griffiths, and on the 18th by Sir Arthur Mack¬ 
worthy, Bart. 

Wolverhampton. —The annual meetings of this Union, lately held, 
were of great interest. The business meeting slightly altered some of 
the rules, but the staff of workers remains practically the same. There 
was a large attendance at the Town Hall, under the presidency of Mr. 
James Phillips. A letter of regret for unavoidable absence was read 
frorn the Earl of Lichfield. Addresses were delivered by Rev. C. L. 
Williams, Rev. J. S. Lidgett, and Rev. C. Harrisoa. During the 
evening glees were sung, and recitations, including a sketch, were given 
by the members, of one of the associated societies. We are glad to 
learn that the Union is in a sound financial position. 


from 2,0cal Societies. 

iEfftropciluan Batiks of Hope. 

Avenue Road. —This flourishing society held its ninth annual meet- 
ingand distribution of prizes at the Lecture Hall on Monday, Jan. 17th. 
Mr. E. Price presided, and the meeting was addressed by Mr. Charles 
Wakely (of the Parent Society). An important feature of the evening 
was the excellent musical selections given by the Band of Hope choir. 

Bedford Institute, Wheeler Street, Spitalfields. —This Band of 
Hope, influentially supported and ably conducted, meeting in a 
neighbourhood where such work is of special value, publishes another 
encouraging report. Steady progress has been made, the Committee 
depending more on sustained effort than on the sudden impetus, often 
followed by a corresponding depression, derived from new and eccentric 
departures. . The usual annual and other meetings have been held, 
other societies have been visited and helped, several competitions have 
been arranged, the singing class sustained, the library was well used, 
11,700 publications were sold or given away, the visitation of members 
was systematically pursued, the senior society continues its useful work, 
and the penny bank is well patronised. There are 475 members known 
to be in good standing. The society is chiefly under the direction of 
members of the Society of Friends. 

Belle Isle. —The New Year’s meetings of the junior and senior 
societies were held on January 7th, when Mr. Charles Wakely (of the 
Parent Society) gave an address to the juniors on “A New Leaf,” and 
to the seniors on “ Danger and Duty.” The programme for the quarter 
includes several lectures illustrated with chemicals and other experiments. 

Clarendon Hail, Somers Town. —On Monday, December 27th, 
the members of this society met for a Christmas tea party, and passed 
a very pleasant evening. On Monday, January 3rd, the third annual 
meeting was held. Addresses were delivered by the officers. The 
prizes earned during the year were distributed, and each member 
presented with a new year’s motto card. The programme for the 
coming quarter is very attractive. 270 names are on the books, and 49 
meetings have been held. The balance of funds is on the right side. 

Lambeth. —The annual meeting of the Excelsior Band of Hope, held 
on Jan. 11th, was a great success. G. F. Chapman, Esq., president, 
occupied the chair, and was supported by Rev. J. Miller, and others. 
According to the secretary’s report the membership was 405, 230 of 
whom had joined during the year. The income was ^56 12s. 6d. 
Nineteen books were distributed as prizes for various purposes during 
the meeting, and a handsome writing desk and framed address was 
presented to Mr. Robert Pinder, the secretary, as a token of respect and 
recognition of his services. About 200 parents were present. 

North Bow. —On Monday, Jan. 3rd the annual soiree was held, and 
was largely attended by the members and their friends The entertainment 
consisted of singing and elocutionary selections, but the centre of interest 
was the presentation by the members of the society of an armchair and 
an album to Mr. Schnadhorst, who, for the past twenty years, has 
sustained almost the full weight of one of the most successful societies 
in the metropolis. 


IPtobtncial ISanbs of Hope. 

Dewsbury. —In commemoration of the twenty-first anniversary of 
the Ebenezer Sunday School Band of Hope, a conversazione was held 
in the schoolroom, and lasted three days—Monday, Tuesday, and 
Wednesday, December 27th, 28th, and 29th. In the schoolroom were 
curiosities, paintings, models, and scientific instruments. There were 
also a Christmas tree and a very ingeniously contrived fountain, and a 
refreshment stall. Various amusements were in full operation and 
special entertainments of a vocal and elocutionary character were given 
by various friends. The year’s report shows a membership of 216, and 
an income of £21. A special report of the twenty-one years’ work was 
read at one of the meetings, and recorded results for which there is 
good ground for thankfulness. We are always glad to note these proofs 
of the stability of our work, and should be glad if each society, on 
reaching its twenty-first anniversary, were able to celebrate it as 
extensively and successfully as our friends at Dewsbury. 

Horsham. —On Wednesday, December 8th, Sergeant-Major R. 
Haskett delivered two lectures in the Albion Hall—the earlier to a 
juvenile, the latter to an adult audience. The subject was his 
adventures in many parts of the world in Her Majesty’s service, 
illustrative of the advantages of total abstinence under trying and 
peculiar circumstances. The lecture was accompanied by dissolving 
views. Both audiences were large and appreciative. 

St. Helen’s, Lancs. —The eighth annual meeting of the Park Road 
Band of Hope was held on Tuesday, December 28th. Mr. Councillor 
John Foster presided. Thirty-nine pledges were reported as taken during 
the year. Addresses were delivered by Messrs. Fairhurst and Cood- 
ingly, and songs and recitations were given by the members and friends. 


South Africa. — Band of Hope work in Bechuanaland and. the 
Transvaal is receiving a great impetus from the visit of Mr Schriner, 
and several new societies have been started. This gentleman acts as 
Chief Good Templar for Central South Africa, and is actively and 
successfully at work, both with the tongue and pen. 




36 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


GENERAL TEMPERANCE TOPICS. 


E witty wisdom of Sir Wilfrid Lawson is of 
priceless value to the movement. In these 
days you can do nothing with people unless 
you make them laugh—or cry. The indefa¬ 
tigable baronet has sent a capital letter to 
the editor of The Carlisle Journal on the effects 
of prohibition, elicited by a leader in that 
publication. Incidentally, Sir Wilfrid depre¬ 
cates the light esteem in which the service of 
“paid agents” is held by some shallow 
thinkers. He protests that his chief oppo¬ 
nent, Mr. Danvers Power, loses nothing either personally 
nor argumentatively because he holds a brief from the 
brewers, and claims for temperance advocates alike con¬ 
sideration. Pie says, “The Queen, the Archbishop of 
Canterbury, the Duke of Cambridge, the Lord Chan¬ 
cellor, the editor of the Times are all paid agents, and are 
none the worse for it. Let us all, whether paid agents or 
volunteers, try to get at the truth and see whether there 
is not some plan and some policy which, when adopted, 
will help to make ‘England sober, and England free ! ’ ” 

* * 

* 

More demonstrations of teetotal longevity from insur¬ 
ance offices! This time the Sceptre makes a contribution. 
Last year, we are informed, the number of lives at risk in 
the total abstinence department was 3,901, and the 
deaths 14 only—less than 4 in the 1,000. During the past 
twenty-one years the expected claims in this section 
were 361, and the actual 162, or only 45 per cent of the 
expectancy! Let hard drinkers elect, if they will, to 
spend “ a short life and a merry one,” we water-drinkers 
on the other hand prefer to linger out our full span, and 
fancy that we can do so very enjoyably. 

* * 

* 

The revenue returns are always scanned with interest 
by intelligent abstainers. Those for the third quarter of 
the year are just published. They indicate generally an 
improved condition of national prosperity, but the most 
pleasing feature to us is that whilst almost every other 
branch of revenue has improved, excise exhibits a 
decline. “This,” remarks a London daily paper, “has 
become normal. We no longer as a nation drink our¬ 
selves out of our difficulties ; people eat more bacon and 
drink less beer. ” When will our fiscal magnates see that 
these things stand in the relation of cause and effect ? 
Money saved from drink is not hoarded but expended ; 
lessened excise means simply increased customs and 
stamps. 

* * 

* 

The attempt of the lovers ofliquorin Cardiff to frustrate 
the action of the Welsh Sunday Closing Bill has had 
more success than is desirable, but we are glad to note 
that their efforts have not been left entirely unopposed. 
The favourite device seems to be to form a club more or 
less bogus in its character—generally rather more than 
less—at which members may tipple to the extent, 
of their resources or even beyond them. The tempe¬ 
rance party in Cardiff has taken action in this matter, 
with the result that the worst of these drinking-dens 
have been suppressed, a fate which we sincerely hope 
awaits the rest of the tribe. It must not be inferred from 
this effort at'evasion that the Act is a failure; we are assured 
on good local authority that it has had the good effect of 
making the practice of Sunday drinking disreputable, and 
lo;s of respectability in these intensely respectable times 
is a severe blow to either a person or a practice. 


The same man may sustain two widely different 
characters amidst different surroundings. An accident 
whilst riding, recently caused the death of the head 
of the firm of Mann, Crossman, & Paulin, whose name 
as brewers is so familiar to travellers through the streets 
of the East-end of London. In a Norfolk village, which the 
deceased gentleman owned almost entirely, his care for 
the well-being of the villagers was remarkable and most 
praiseworthy ; he rebuilt tumble-down cottages and let 
them, with garden ground, at little more than a nominal 
rent,and what, is much more remarkable,would not allow 
a public-house on his property. Like many another man 
he was better than his trade, but it certainly strikes one 
as strange that money gained by the degradation of London 
slums should be used for the improvement of a country- 
village, and that not one of the houses from which his 
wealth was derived should be allowed a place near the 
home of its master. 

* * 

* 

The Churches are awaking more and yet more to the 
necessity of grappling with the drink evil. The number 
of abstaining ministers increases year by year. Exact 
returns are impossible, but such as are available are very- 
cheering in their character. The dual basis of the 
C.E.T.S. leaves us in the dark as to the number of 
abstaining clergymen, but their number must be very- 
great. Neither do we know the number of Congregational 
ministers who abstain,but we learn that ofg mewlv-settled 
ministers of this body, 80 declared themse . tsaDetainers. 
The majority of Baptist ministers have adopted our prin¬ 
ciple, and number 1,249. Wesleyans have their own con- 
nexional organisation, and have made steady progress. 
We understand that in the Methodist New Connexion body 
the ministers are abstainers to a man. 

* * 

* 

We learn that the printers are forming a trade Total 
Abstinence Society. We wish them well. The old trade 
traditions in this respect are none of the best. Yet who 
has a greater interest than the printer in clear brains and 
good eyes. Books and beer are ever deadly foes. Let an 
attempt be made to take a vote under the Public 
Libraries Act, and the publicans will oppose it pro¬ 
verbially “ tooth and nail.” We personally saw this 
demonstrated in Lambeth lately. 

* * 

A 

Temperance workers do well to arrange special 
temperance sermons. The best class of abstainers for 
working purposes are the thoughtful, conscientious people 
who occupy pews and teach in Sunday Schools, and these 
can best be got at from the pulpit. No pains should be 
spared to secure them. The sermon should not only be 
preached but printed. We have before us in pamphlet 
from a capital sermon preached by Rev. J. W. Houchin, 
of Ingatestone, to an Essex congregation with excellent 
results. 

* * 

* 

Doubtless this year we shall have many suggestions 
for duly commemorating the Queen's Jubilee. Canon 
Leigh is to the fore, and hopes that temperance people 
will not fail to utilise the occasion. He reminded a meeting 
held at St. Pancras that nearly 50 years ago a petition to 
the Queen signed, he believed by 100,000 people, requested 
her newly-made Majesty to regard favourably the new 
propaganda. He thought there would be now no difficulty- 
in obtaining a million signatures to a similar memorial, 
and that the effort would prove useful. We think it 
would. 




THE 

anb of iI>opc |£0vonicl‘e 

Issued Monthly by the United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 



$an& of jfjopc Cfjromcle, 

MARCH, 1887. 


OUR SENIOR MEMBERS. 


.ETTER appeared in our last issue 
asking for advice on this important 
topic. The subject being of such 
wide-spread interest to our friends, 
we resolved not only to welcome any 
letters which might be sent to us 
on the subject spontaneously, but 
also to take some special pains to 
ascertain what methods are adopted in various 
localities. We have space to insert about 
a third of the interesting communications 
which have come to hand, and these are 
necessarily curtailed, but we shall hope to 
insert others in future issues. Those now ap¬ 
pearing are from the provinces, and are 
inserted alphabetically, so as to avoid any ap¬ 
pearance of supporting any particular view of 
the subject, for there is considerable difference 
of opinion as to the best mode of dealing with 
the question. The subject is one worthy of full 
consideration, and in the end it will probably be 
found that there is no one mode which will 
suit all persons and localities. Where a plan is 
found to succeed, we should do wrong to disturb 
it for any theory, however plausible. In this 
.as in other matters, we consider it a great 
advantage of Band of Hope organization that 
it leaves all workers to act as may best suit 
their special circumstances. Our aim in venti¬ 
lating the subject is not to secure uniformity of 
action, but rather to set those to work who are 
taking no action at all. The extracts which we 
publish indicate that precisely the same ideas 
as to the best mode of conducting societies do 
not prevail in the north and south of England, 
and there may be good reasons why each method 
is best in its own locality. Inthe north, as a rule, 
■separate meetings are not held for different ages, 
whilst in the South, the reverse mode is almost 
invariably adopted. Probably there are advan¬ 
tages in both arrangements, and instead of 
attempting to determine which is best, we would, 
at all events for the present, prefer to let our 
friends mainly judge for themselves. We will 
MARCH, 1887. 


only venture to say, and that as the result 
of a wide experience in dealing with large 
gatherings of children and young people, that it 
does appear to us to be difficult to adapt the 
instruction which ought to be given at our meet¬ 
ings to young people ranging from seven to 
twenty-one years of age, for it is to be borne in 
mind that they are dealt with as one gathering, 
and not as in the Sunday-school, in separate 
classes. If the meetings are mainly to take 
the form of “ entertainments,” the difficulty 
of course is lessened, but if careful instruc¬ 
tion is to be given, we cannot help thinking 
that those under thirteen are best dealt with 
separately. If from seven to thirteen they are 
well instructed, we are not so particular as to 
what is done in this direction afterwards, as the 
young people will then have served a kind of 
apprenticeship, and meetings of a more miscel¬ 
laneous character may then be arranged for, the 
main consideration being that they continue to 
meet as a temperance society. 

We would venture to remind all our friends 
how specially important is the age from thirteen 
to eighteen. Some societies provide for those 
who are actually children, and also for those 
who are young men and women, but it being 
between these ages that so much is done to form 
the ultimate character, we should do our utmost 
to provide for this important period. With these 
few remarks we leave the communications from 
our various friends to speak for themselves. 
Beyond their specific purpose they are especially 
interesting as exhibiting the earnest work which 
is being done in all parts of the country. They 
are all] instructive and suggestive, but if any 
choice may be made we would especially call 
attention to those from Bedford, Edinburgh and 
Manchester. 


FROM CORRESPONDENTS. 

Aberdeen. —Mr. A. M’Kenzie, 126, Craven-street, 
Aberdeen, writes :—This is how we got over the difficulty 
regarding senior members. We called a meeting of all 
those in the congregation who are in sympathy with the 
temperance movement,which was largely attended, both by 
older members of the congregation and those who had just 
recently left our junior Bands of Hope. A resolution was 
passed to form a Temperance Association embracing all over 
fifteen years of age. Though that is only three months ago, 
the membership is already over 100, about one-half of 
whom have come from the Bands of Hope. We have had 
three very successful meetings, short speeches and plenty 
of music, principally from our own members, and are 
looking forward to finishing our season's work with a 
social meeting. 










38 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Bedford.—Mr. Richard Henry Poynter writes:—We 
started the Bunyan senior Band of Hope, Bedford, in 
1880. This was the pioneer society in Bedfordshire, and 
during seven years it has been found to answer admirably 
the purposes for which it was started. Regularly every 
week, both summer and winter, we have met since its 
formation, and the interest in the society has not been 
lost from the beginning. It has, from the first, been 
almost self-managing, and entirely self-supporting. 
The managers of the junior Band of Hope are the vice- 
presidents, and the secretary of the junior society is also 
the permanent secretary of the senior branch. This has 
given ballast to the society, and has also connected the 
two sections pleasantly together. There are many reasons 
why, if possible, the secretary of the one should be the 
secretary of the other. He knows the ages of the children 
belonging to the junior section, and is able to see that 
they join the senior as soon as they are old enough. He 
will also see that the junior meeting is closed in time 
for the senior to begin—(if both be held on the same 
evening, which is desirable)—whilst one secretary for both 
promotes harmony throughout. With these exceptions, 
the remainder of the officers and the committee consist of 
members of the senior Band of Hope, and are elected 
annually. The posts of treasurer, financial secretary, and 
registration secretary are open either to male or female 
members, and the person filling it is elected by ballot. 
The six members on the committee are also chosen from 
among the members, it being a rule that three must be 
male members, and three female. The president, vice- 
presidents, treasurer, the three secretaries, and six mem¬ 
bers of committee form the managing committee of the 
senior Band of Hope. A payment of 2d. per month from 
each member we find amply supplies the funds necessary 
for the working expenses. We arrange a varied four 
months’ programme in advance, which comprises:— 
“ Devotional Evening,” “ Impromptu Speaking,” ‘‘ Short 
Speeches,” ‘‘Question Box,” ‘‘Ladies’ Night,” ‘‘ Gentle¬ 
men’s Night,” “ Banquet Night.” Evenings devoted to 
selections from some poet, author, or temperance speaker, 
prize competitions for reading, or recitation, spelling 
bee, Bible searching and essay writing, evenings 
arranged by some member of the Band of Hope, 
essays on general subjects, debates[on questions affecting 
the temperance cause and of general interest, services of 
song, and public lectures are also introduced. We 
have also paid and received a number of visits from other 
temperance societies. We have found it wise to mix 
pleasure with the more serious work of the society, and 
our annual pic-nic, Band of Hope festival, conversazione, 
annual tea, and public meeting, coffee supper, and social 
gathering are meetings which help to cement our mem¬ 
bers together, and to show that temperance can provide 
some delightful recreation apart from intoxicating drinks. 
Let me give the following hints :—Let the meetings be 
commenced and closed punctually, and with a definite 
programme for each evening; let a religious tone 
permeate the whole; let a good feeling be engendered 
between all the members; let all those who attend feel 
that you desire their best welfare ; don’t be afraid to ask 
the help of friends belonging to other societies, for they 
throw fresh life and thought into the meetings, and be 
ever looking out for something fresh and attractive, but 
pure. 

Bilston, Staffordshire.—Mr. D. Hickmans, Roseville, 
near Bilston, writes :•—I some years ago established a 
singing class (tonic sol-fa) for members over fourteen 
year s of age, which has worked very well up to the present. 
The pieces learned by the singing class are rendered 
occasionally at the ordinary Band of Hope meetings and 
prove a great attraction, and also secure the attendance of 
the senior members at the ordinary meetings. We also 
occasionally hold special meetings of senior members, when 
some subject bearing on the temperance work is brought 


before the meeting, usually a paper on the subject being 
read by someone appointed at the previous meeting. The 
reading of the paper is followed by discussion, and 
generally several suggestions are thrown out which 
prove beneficial to the society. The commencement 
of our singing class was really the result of a meeting of 
this kind, when a paper on “ Singing in its relation to our 
Band of Hope,” was read. We find the singing class very 
useful when preparing for public meetings. I have 
endeavoured to get similar classes formed at neighbouring 
Bands of Hope, but have not been successful, my idea 
being to get a good Band of Hope Union choir, composed 
of the best singers from each class, which could be 
depended upon for any temperance meetings arranged by 
the Band of Hope Union. 

[A singing class or choir is a most valuable adjunct to 
our work. There are, however, many, especially lads and 
young men, who do not care for music. When lessons 
are given, too, it is inconvenient to receive new members. 
—Ed.] 

Bolton, Lancashire. —Mr. J.W. Stevens, secretary of 
Fletcher Street Band of Hope, writes :—We have a com¬ 
mittee of 15 Christian young men, and a large choir of 
young-men and women. At our meetings, which are held 
monthly, we cater both for the children and for the young 
people. We get them to speak, sing, recite, play on the 
violin, and in various other ways to entertain us. We 
well announce the meetings in the school. 

Bradford (Queensbury).— Mr. Frederick Ambler, 
secretary of the Baptist Senior Band of Hope, writes 
We have our meetings every four weeks, and arrange for 
encouraging and educational addresses. Our minister 
presides at our meetings, which we arrange among our¬ 
selves, and which comprise one or two short addresses, 
readings, recitations, and songs. We have a member¬ 
ship of over seventy above fourteen years, although we 
have only been in existence a few months. 

Bradford (Centenary Band of Hope).—Mr. H. J. 

Craven writes:—First, we endeavour to place all 
members over sixteen years of age (both sexes) on the 
general working committee. Second, we have separate 
meetings for senior members, some of which are called 
musical evenings, while at others addresses, impromptu 
speeches on subjects chosen by the members, are given 
We also arrange for entertainments, lectures, and fruit 
banquets. Similar meetings are also conducted by ladies 
only. Our idea is to make the meetings of a thoroughly 
social character. For the summer months we arrange 
for trips to places of interest in the district. 

Brighton.— The Rev. John G. Gregory, M.A.. 
writes :—I am not aware that I have been more successful 
than others in retaining the interest of senior members 
of Bands of Hope. I have a Band of Hope of about 500 
(nominally), and an adult society of some 1,100 members, 
and have no reason to complain of the loss of members 
of the Bands of Hope, for I think very generally, as they 
become sixteen years of age, they request to be drafted 
into the adult society. It might be said that we have no 
rules, and do nothing specially to attract them, yet 
certainly the people come, old and young, and we are, 
perhaps, almost alone in having no committee, no choir, 
allowing no recitations, no solos, no glees, no summer 
outing except for adults, nothing whatever but hymns 
prayers, and addresses. Our meetings for Band of Hope 
and Temperance Society are held monthly, with a tea 
meeting every quarter. We have, in connection with 
our.congregation, a branch of the “Young Abstainers 
Union ” for quite the upper people, and have established 
a “ Juvenile Temperance Society” for the children of 
the upper tradespeople. All these are working well, but 
on the. same simple basis, except that there is a committee 
of ladies, with my wife for president, on behalf of the 
two last named societies. 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


39 


[Here little or nothing is done in the way of what is 
commonly regarded as “Entertainment;” the good 
result should lead some to reflect whether, by making 
their meetings “too entertaining,” they have not found 
it impossible to keep up the excitement.— Ed.] 

Chelmsford. —Mr. J. Stacey Reeve writes :—Some ten 
years since we felt a difficulty respecting the senior 
members. We had been meeting the boys one week, 
and the girls the next ; but we found some of our 
members getting too old to meet with the juniors, so 
we formed a senior division, which has continued to 
work very satisfactorily ever since, and quite justified the 
course we then took. We meet weekly—boys one week, 
girls the next; juniors, 6,30 to 7.30; seniors, 7.45 to 9. 
When the meeting is of more than usual interest, we invite 
the girls to join us. The last meeting but one in the half- 
year we call a business meeting, when we arrange the 
programme for the next six months—the subjects being 
either suggested by the members, or certainly approved 
by the majority present. We open all our meetings with 
singing and prayer. We have a good library, which is 
much appreciated. We have two teas in the year, one in 
connection with the summer excursion, where we usually 
join the County Union at their fete, and the other with 
the Committee. At the winter tea we give the seniors a 
ticket to admit a friend after the tea. The meeting after 
the tea varies in character from year to year. This year 
we divided our programme into two parts—the first con¬ 
sisting of recitations and a dialogue, after which seven 
prizes were distributed to those who had made the best 
attendances during the year. After this a friend exhibited 
a magic lantern with some 70 slides—subject, “ Fifty years 
in the Life and Reign of Queen Victoria.’’ I ought perhaps 
to say that we number, all told, 60 seniors. 

Chelmsford (Broomfield). — Miss A. Florence 
Copland, secretary, writes :—As this is a village society, 
a great many of our senior girls have left their homes for 
distant places of service ; two ladies of our committee 
have for a long time endeavoured to retain their interest 
in the temperance movement by writing {to each one an 
annual letter, the replies to which often lead on to more 
frequent correspondence, and besides this, packets of 
temperance tracts are forwarded to the members three or 
four times a year. Invitations are given to the summer 
festival and the winter public meetings to those members 
who live sufficiently near. The girls are transferred from 
the junior list at the age of fourteen, or before this if they 
have left home for service. Five or six temperance 
meetings, combined with one or two tea meetings, are held 
in the village during the winter, and these are attended 
by many of our senior boys and girls. 

Edinburgh.—Mr. Geo. S. Herschell, President of the 
Dublin Street Temperance Association, writes :—The 
question “ How to Retain our Senior members" is one 
which for many years severely exercised the minds of our 
Band of Hope Committee. We discussed the question 
frequently, and at last determined to do something 
■practical. We accordingly informed those whose sympathy 
and aid we could rely upon, of our intention, and along 
with them called upon and spoke personally to as many 
of our senior members whose addresses we had of our 
intention to start a Temperance Association for young men 
and women, at the same time inviting them to co-operate 
with us in making our intention known. Our first meeting 
took the form of a social gathering,at which between twenty 
and thirty put in an appearance. In fact, it proved to be 
a most happy reunion. Our intentions were fully explained 
and heartily endorsed. One thing we sought to make 
specially clear was that they themselves should take the 
full responsibility of conducting the business of the Asso¬ 
ciation because we were fully persuaded unless this were 
done success would not crown our efforts. Office-bearers 
-were therefore appointed from among themselves, with 
The exception of the president. To this one fact, namely . 


that of throwing the entire responsibility of the affairs of the 
Association upon the members themselves, and giving them to 
understand clearly that if the Association was to be a 
success it remained with them to make it so, we attribute 
the very considerable success which has been achieved. 
We are in the middle of our second session with a mem¬ 
bership of close upon a hundred, which continues to be 
increased almost every meeting night. None are admitted 
to membership under fourteen years of age. Each candi¬ 
date must be proposed and seconded by members of the 
Association one week previous to admission, and if any 
objection be made to the nomination the matter is remitted 
to the Committee to make enquiries. A Committee has 
been appointed to visit members who are irregular in their 
attendance at the weekly meetings. This plan works 
admirably. During the first session the time of the 
meetings was occupied with short temperance addresses, 
which were frequently illustrated by diagrams and experi¬ 
ments. Songs and recitations also formed part of the 
programme. This session the meetings have been 
devoted to Gospel and temperance addresses, lectures and 
musical evenings. This arrangement has proved most 
successful. The best men only are invited to lecture, and 
all dry subjects are avoided. We have succeeded in 
drawing around us a band of young men and women 
from fourteen to twenty-one years of age, whom we 
have every reason to believe are exercising a most 
salutary influence on those around them. Many of 
them have been deeply touched by the Gospel addresses 
which have been delivered, and good results have followed. 
It is not wise, however, to have Gospel addresses too 
frequently, as some of the members may be led to form 
the idea that it is more of an Evangelistic Association 
than one for the promotion of temperance. An 
endeavour should always be made to find out who can 
sing, recite, or play, &c., so that every one possible may 
be led to take an active interest in making the meetings a 
success. Keep them well employed, and you will find 
them to be most active, willing, and obedient soldiers in 
the cause of temperance. In conclusion, I would just say 
if ladies and gentlemen who can thoroughly enter into the 
spirit of young men and women, would only devote them¬ 
selves to the work of such an association as that which we 
have inaugurated, and follow similar lines to those which 
have been indicated, there is little fear but the question, 
“How to retain [our senior members,” will soon be 
solved. 

Exeter. —Mr. Chas. E. Hepping writes: We have four 
evening meetings each week :—Sunday, religious address; 
Tuesday, public meeting ; Thursday, members ; Friday, 
choir practice. We also hold a girls’ sewing class, and 
have occasional concerts. During the summer we hold a 
flower service, and a flower show, and this year we anti¬ 
cipate having a cricket and swimming club. All the 
meetings are carried out entirely by the members of the 
Band of Hope with the exception of Sunday. We have 
also a penny bank in connection with the Band of Hope ; 
members can pay from a penny upwards, and receive 
interest at the rate of five per cent. ; withdrawals being 
made at fourteen days’ notice. Young people from fifteen 
to twenty are employed in most of the offices, and this 
gives them an interest in the work, and prepares them for 
the work of the adult society connected with the Band of 
Hope, to which they are ultimately transferred. We give 
every member as much work to do as possible, and I do 
not find much difficulty in retaining the senior members - 
Our members on joining pay threepence, and a farthing 
a week afterwards, a plan which answers admirably. 
The object is to make the young people as independent as 
possible, not looking to other people for help. Our pianist 
and choir mistress are about eighteen years of age, and 
these make all the musical arrangements in connection 
with our meetings. Each member receives a temperance 
periodical monthly. For my own part, I find that only 


4° 


THE BAND OF CHRONICLE HOPE. 


hard and earnest work is needed to make a Band of Hope 
successful. 

Gloucester. —Miss Edith Sessions writes:—Ours is a 
Mission Band of Hope, so there are other agencies at work 
into which the young people can be drafted, such as a 
‘‘Melodion Band,’’ Saturday night social meetings, adult 
Bible-classes, &c. At one time we adopted a plan which 
I can strongly recommend, that is, the formation of a 
“club,” the privileges of which were dependent on good 
behaviour and regular attendance at Band of Hope meet¬ 
ings. Boys and girls over fourteen were eligible for this. 
They were taught reading, writing, arithmetic, sewing, 
drawing, painting, illuminating, or any special subject in 
which they are particularly interested. A penny savings’ 
bank was attached. An exhibition of work done was held 
once a year, and prizes given. I have found it a good plan 
to give prizes for regular attendance at Band of Hope 
meetings, of sufficient value to be attractive to senior 
members; also of late years membership medals and your 
“ yearly bars ” have been very helpful. 

Lancashire and Cheshire. —Mr. W. P. Ingham, 
secretary of Lancashire and Cheshire Band of Hope 
Union, writes :—Speaking from experience gained from 
about 1,100 societies now in association with our Union, 
I find, as a rule, that senior Bands of Hope are not suc¬ 
cessful. There are in connection with Sunday Schools 
in the north of England too many auxiliaries, &c., of one 
kind and another to allow of separate nights for the two 
sections—we also find that the same staff would have 
to work both sections, or, more properly speaking, both 
Bands of Hope—and between the two they would be apt 
to fall through. Further, our Bands of Hope, to be suc¬ 
cessful, must be on the lines of the Sunday-schools. I 
am aware that we sometimes have junior and senior 
sections in our schools, but generally our Sunday-schools 
are what we term mixed schools, and contain scholars of 
all ages. The most successful Bands of Hope are those 
where they cater for both adults and juveniles in one 
meeting. It is no uncommon occurrence to see at an 
ordinary Band of Hope meeting more persons over thir¬ 
teen years of age than under ; of course there is the diffi¬ 
culty of a suitable programme for such varied ages, but 
this is not so great as the difficulty of working two sec¬ 
tions. The most successful Bands of Hope in our Union 
retain the elder members by employing them; they are put on the 
committee at sixteen years of age—a committee of thirty, 
forty, and fifty, is common enough and works well; they 
are made into district visitors to look after absentees and 
new members; they form the choir, programme com¬ 
mittee, book stewards, publication department committee, 
are pressed into service at each meeting as registrars, 
platform stewards, to maintain order amongst the 
juveniles, and in many other ways assisting in the work 
of the society, and especially, in the extraordinary efforts, 
such as out-door demonstrations, yearly and half-yearly 
tea meetings, summer picnics, flower shows and other 
attractions, all of which find the senior members em¬ 
ployment, except in a few instances, where the committee 
are too conservative and afraid of the senior members 
taking part in the arrangements and work of the society. 
If committees will only study how to employ the senior 
members, and not try to do all themselves the difficulty of 
working the sections will disappear with the need for them. 

Manchester (Chancery-lane).— Mr. T. E. Halls- 
worth, Hon. Secretary of the Chancery-lane Band of Hope, 
and one of the honorary secretaries of the Lancashire 
and Cheshire Band of Hope Union, writes:—The ques¬ 
tion of dealing with our senior members is one that has 
occupied my attention for many years, as you may be 
sure, having been secretary of my own Band of Hope 
since its formation, over twenty-two years ago. 
You ask for a brief account of my plans, and my 
difficulty !is that it is such an extensive subject. We 
have at the present time in the Chancery-lane Band of 


Hope about 250 members over seventeen years of age in 
good standing, our test of membership being the pledge 
and a monthly subscription. We have suffered "in 
common with other societies by our members leaving us 
as they grow up, and many plans have been made to 
keep them. They leave from a variety of causes, and 
not always from a lack of interest in the work. I have 
never found them objecting to the meetings on account 
of younger members being present, and have not yet 
seen the wisdom of forming senior Bands of Hope as 
separate societies ; our present plan, which has been 
adopted at my suggestion, comes as near to that as I 
think is desirable. A separate register is kept of the 
members over seventeen years of age. The whole neigh¬ 
bourhood is mapped out into clearly defined districts, 
and one or two visitors appointed to each. These are 
supplied with books containing the number, name, and 
residence of each member residing in the respective dis¬ 
tricts, with columns for twelve months' subscriptions. 
Every month the visitors call upon the members to 
see if they are keeping the pledge, to speak a word 
of encouragement, to receive the subscriptions, and 
leave a copy of a temperance publication, at the same 
time reminding them of the next meeting. The visitors 
also carry a pocket pledge-book in case any member has 
violated, and to pick up new members. We have two 
meetings per month, on the first and third Monday, the 
latter meeting being specially for adults, the programme 
being arranged to suit the senior members, and the 
meeting well advertised by means of handbills. At these 
meetings we got an attendance of from 500 to 800. 


(Eorrespontonce. 

DRUM AND FIFE BANDS. 

To the Editor of the Band of Hope Chronicle. 

Dear Sir, —As the winter season will shortly be draw¬ 
ing to a close, and the light evenings will then begin to 
thin our meetings, I am puzzling my mind as to what can 
be done to keep the boys together during the summer 
months. Several of our elder lads were very anxious last 
year to have a Drum and Fife Band, and I have an idea 
that some societies have tried this plan with good results; 
but considering the expense incurred, and the dislike of 
the neighbours to the noise, I should like to know the ex¬ 
perience of other workers before taking any steps in the 
matter. If you would kindly invite some testimony on the 
subject, it would probably be useful to others as well as 
to yours faithfully, An Earnest Worker. 

[We have an article in type entitled “ Music as an Aid to Band of 
Hope Work,” which will probably appear next month, and which will, 
interest our correspondent. We shall, however, be glad to hear from 
other friends respecting this rather vexed question.—E d.] 


Music of last year's Crystal Palace Concerts.— 
Despite the fact that many thousands of copies of these 
programmes were printed in excess of those required for 
the use of the 15,000 singers, they have, owing to the 
popularity of the selections, all been sold except a few 
hundreds, in either notation, of those for the morning con¬ 
cert. Sol-fa copies of these are now offered at ten shillings 
per hundred, and old notation at fourpence each. 
Amongst other pieces the selection includes two very 
bright and favourite anthems, entitled, ‘‘Sing Praises,” 
and “All His works praise Thee,” “ A Song to Tempe¬ 
rance,” “The Cuckoo,” Spofforth's famous glee, “Hail, 
Smiling Morn,” “ The Temperance Banner,” a simple 
chorus from Offenbach, “ The Curse of Drink,” “ O come 
to the Grove,” and some new temperance words to 
Brinley Richard’s inspiriting air, “ God Bless the Prince 
of Wales.” It is requested that orders, accompanied by 
cash, be sent early. 






THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


4i 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES.—Series 


TEMPERANCE LESSONS FROM -ffiSOP’S 
FABLES. 

J>y Rev. CHARLES COURTENAY, Vicar of Emmanuel. Liverpool. 
Author of “ Temperance Home Thrusts,” &c. 


No. 3.—THE LION AND THE MOUSE. 



T isn't a lion in a wild beast show that I am 
now going to tell you about, but a great lion 
in the forest, the king of beasts without a 
keeper. I don’t expect you have ever seen a 
lion like that. I know I haven’t, and I don’t 
want to either. 

And it isn’t a mouse in a mousetrap, nor a 
mouse running in and out of a hole, but a 
, mouse in a field that my story is about. 

But first I must tell you about the man that 

Lid a trap. 

He was a hunter, and he wanted to catch a lion. And 
so he got a big strong net, sought out a nice likely spot, 
and laid it. I dare say he took care to put some tasty 
.food somewhere near. He wouldn’t spare any pains, I 
am quite sure, in order to catch a lion, and if the truth 
could be told, I fancy we should find out that while the 
food was easily enough seen, the net wasn’t at all visible, 
and after he had laid his net so nicely, I expect he took 
himself off to be out ot harm’s way. 

Now I don't know what you think, dear children, but I 
think that that hunter is exactly like the devil. What is 
.he but a great hunter ? And doesn’t he try to catch the 
very best of us ? And doesn’t he lay traps, and snares, 
and nets ? I am sure he does. 

Yes, and I think one of his favourite nets is strong drink, 
don't you ? But people don’t see that it is a trap when 
they drink it, nor do they see the devil anywhere near, 
nor do they suspect that he has a hand in it. Ah, people 
don’t know half the tricks that the devil is up to. 

Now let us think of the lion that was caught. Yes, he 
was caught fast enough. Bounding along one dark night, 
trying to get his supper, he suddenly smelt something 
nice. Sniff! Sniff!! Sniff!!! Yes, there was no mis¬ 
take about it. It was a regular supper all nicely laid, but 
of course without any tablecloth. He did not stop long 
to think, depend upon it. In a moment he fell to, tucked 
in, and polished it all off. He didn’t know, poor beast, 
•that he was having his supper in the middle of a net. But 
he soon found out, for the moment he began to “move on,” 
as the policemen say, he found himself stopped, and then 
he knew all. Of course he struggled hard, but the more 
he struggled the worse the fix, for the net closed him in 
and in, round and round, until he couldn’t move at all. 

What a dreadful position, to be sure, for the king of the 
forest to be in ! What an indignity ! It was too dreadful. 
Of course he roared and roared again. It was about all 
that he could do. 

But I know a far more dreadful thing than a lion in a 
net, and that is a drunkard in a net, snared and bound by 
the power of strong drink. It is one of the most awful 
sights in the world, I think. 

We must now be quick and think of the mouse that set 
him free. 

I don’t think lions think much of mice as a rule. They 
probably turn up their noses at them. Indeed, as a 
matter of fact, this very lion once very nearly squeezed 
the life out of this very little mouse. It was a very good 
thing though for him that he didn't, and I must tell you 
why. 

When the lion was roaring away in his net the little 
mouse heard him. When he recognized_the voice he of 


course pricked up his ears. “Why, if that isn’t my old 
friend, Lion; I’ll be off, and see what’s up.” So off he 
scampered, and never stopped until he was by the lion’s 
side. Then he saw what a pretty pickle the lion was in, 
bound and tied. 

Now, I don’t think little mice get credit, as a rule, for 
possessing a big heart. They are supposed to be selfish 
little beasties. But that is because folks don’t know. 
However, this little mouse had a heart big enough for a 
body ten times his size. “ Oh, dear me! ” he said to him¬ 
self, “this is a bad job. I’m dreadfully sorry, I am. I 
feel quite downhearted.” I don’t know whether mice ever 
cry, but if they do our little friend must ha v e shed some 
unusually large tears. 

And besides being very tender-hearted, he was also very 
plucky.lt isn’t every little mouse who would be so familiar 
with a lion, or get so near to one.But our little friend was so 
sympathetic that it didn’t occur to him to be afraid, and 
so, without his heart beating at all faster than usual, he 
trotted up to the lion. 

But besides all this, he was most practical. He saw 
that the most friendly act he could perform was to free 
the lion. Weeping wouldn’t untie a single knot, and so 
he kept his mind fixed on that point only. “It won’t do," 
he said to himself, “to let that lion lie there. If some¬ 
body doesn’t give him his liberty, up will come the hunter 
and kill him, and that won’t do at all.” 

And better than all, he made up his mind to do what he 
could. “ I’m only a little mouse, I know, and my teeth 
are very small, and I soon get tired, but I’ll try. Yes, I'll 
put my little white, sharp teeth to work, and I’ll try to set 
my friend, Lion, free. So here goes ! ” And off he started 
nibbling, nibbling away, as if his own life depended on 
his nibbling. Of course he didn’t get on very fast. How 
could he? But he kept at it; first attacking one mesh, 
and then another, and another, most perseveringly. 

“ It’s no good,” said the lion. “ You can’t do it, you’re 
too small.” But the mouse replied, somewhat cheekily, 
“ Be quiet, and wait, and see if I don’t.” 

“ If I can’t get out with all my strength, what good can 
you do?” still argued the lion. To which the mouse replied, 
“A little mouse that’s free is stronger than a big lion 
that’s bound,” which was very true. Weil, the long and 
short of the matter was, the mouse at last managed to gnaw 
his way through the cords, until the lion with one grand 
shake freed himself. 

“There now,” said the mouse; “don’t go and run 
your head into any more nets, there's a good lion. And don't 
ever despise little mice any more, for what they want 
in size they make up in pluck and perseverance ; and if 
you ever get a chance to help any other beast in distress, 
think of me, and go and do likewise.” 

Now for the moral. That little mouse makes me think 
of little boys and girls, and what that little mouse did any 
little boy or girl can do. For didn’t I say that the lion in 
the net was like a drunkard “ in his cups ” ? Well, then 
I don’t see why you all shouldn’t set to work and nibble 
away at the nets which bind them fast. And if you are 
as sensible and brave and persevering as that little mouse, 
I am quite sure you will set many a bound drunkard free. 

And please remember one or two little facts : 

You must attack the net and not the lion. You mustn’t call 
the poor drunkard hard names, and scold him. But you 
may call the drink as hard names as you like. Pity the 
lion and bite the net—that’s the rule. 

Don't despair .of anybody. You must neither despair of 
yourself nor of the net. Faint heart never freed a lion. 
Keep a brave heart and say, “ What that little mouse did 
for the lion I can do for the drunkard.” Sharp teeth 
will snap the thickest rope— in time. 

Keep out of all nets yourself. It's the free mouse that 
does the work. A snared mouse is useless. Be a good 
teetotaler, and keep from the drink yourself, and nobody 
knows how strong you will be. 





42 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES.—Series II. 


TEMPERANCE WORK AND WORKERS. 

By Rev. J. P. GLEDSTONE, 

Author ot “The Life and Travels of George Whitefie'd,” “Save the 
Boys,” Clean Lips.” 

No. 3.—THE UNITED KINGDOM ALLIANCE; 
OR, TEMPERANCE WORK AMONGST THE 
VOTERS. 

HEN temperance work first began, its 
3 apostles, such men as the good and wise 
Joseph Livesey, thought that everybody 
could soon be persuaded to become total 
abstainers. They had some good reasons 
for such an opinion. They saw and felt 
how great a curse the drink traffic was 
to the country, and like simple, honest- 
minded men they supposed that all good 
people would soon see as they did. They 
knew that people who had suffered from 
intemperance often hated it the most, and tried the most 
earnestly to uproot it; Mr. Livesey attached special value 
to the labours of men who were reformed drunkards, 
because these men spoke with so much practical know¬ 
ledge and with such passionate earnestness. The early 
teetotalers also saw their new cause sweeping everything 
before it—apparently ; immense meetings were held ; rich 
and poor joined the good cause; the workers were full 
of enthusiasm and self-sacrifice. But it was overlooked that 
men and women had acquired certain bad habits ; that 
men want houses of refreshment to go to for their meals, 
and houses of entertainment for pleasure at night; that 
the public-house stood open all the day, and every day 
of the week, Sundays included ; and that the brewer and 
publican have a money interest in enticing persons into 
it. An old woman, whose husband frequented the public- 
house, used to say that she could get him past one public- 
house on his way home, but not past nine houses. Any 
one who has tried to help a drunken man home knows 
how he tries to get into every drinking place on the way. 
So some of the teetotalers came to think, when they had 
been at work about twenty years, that they could not 
hope to succeed if the public-house was allowed to stand 
open and undo all they had done. 

How were they to close it ? At present the magistrates 
have the power to grant a man a licence to sell intoxi¬ 
cating drinks: and unfortunately the magistrates are 
generally too ready to grant it, if it be for a poor district. 
I know a row of poor houses, perhaps not more than 
twenty in number, certainly not more than thirty, which 
has a public-house at each end ; and I know also, not far 
from there, a rich neighbourhood, a mile long, and half 
a mile wide, which has no public house. It is not right 
or safe to leave this question with magistrates. It is 
right and safe to allow the people of a village, or of a 
parish, or of a district, to say whether they will, or will 
not, have a public-house among them. English boys and 
girls can see that that is fair. If poor people cannot 
give a licence for the opening of a public-house at the 
doors of rich men’s houses, rich men ought not to have 
the power to open a public-house at the doors of poor 
men’s houses. Sometimes men go and buy land and build 
upon it with the understanding that no public-house can 
be built there. That ought to be a safe plan, and in some 
happy cases it has succeeded; but there was a case in 
which the magistrates, through some flaw in the deed of 
purchase, set aside the wishes of the people. The estate 
was built on, but unfortunately one man had a strong wish 
to have a public-house. He consulted a solicitor, who 
informed him that it could be done. He then applied to 


the magistrates for a licence, but a majority of one was 
against him, and he did not get it. It was opposed by all 
the rest of the people of the village. He went to his 
friend the solicitor to see what could be done. His advice 
was this : “ Your father was butler for many years to 

Sir -, who is the chairman of the magistrates, 

although he never goes to their meetings. Go to him, 
tell him what you want, and ask him if he will go to the 
magistrates’ meeting and vote for you." In due time he 

went to Sir - and told him his wish, and that 

gentleman promised to help him. At the next meeting 

Sir - was present, and gave the casting vote for 

the public-house; the first and the last time he ever pre¬ 
tended to do his duty as a magistrate. The public-house 
was opened, and in three months it was the cause of a 
terrible tragedy. A young farmer came to it one day, 
and stayed until he was intoxicated and quite unfit to 
return home. But he would mount his horse and go , the 
people tried in vain to dissuade him. He swore a great 
oath, and said he would return. On his way he fell from 
his horse and was killed. It is right to add, and I am 

glad to add, that Sir - afterwards regretted the 

part he had taken in licensing the sale of drink at that 
house. But any boy can see that when a majority of the 
people do not want to have a house near them which 
spreads poverty, disease, and crime among them, no man 
and no body of men ought to have the power to force it 
upon tham. 

This view was deeply felt thirty-four years ago by a 
good, honest, humble Quaker named Nathaniel Card, 
who was born at Dublin in 1805. Mr. Card had always 
been known for his kind and gentle disposition, and was 
an earnest visitor of the charitable institutions of his 
native city. When the cholera visited Dublin in 1831—2, 
he risked his life in his noble exertions to minister to the 
dying and imperilled people. Afterwards he settled in 
Manchester, the city where one of the first teetotal 
societies had been founded—the chief city also of the 
county in which teetotalism has done some of its best work. 
A small number of men who sympathised with Mr. Card 
formed a committee, and on June 1st, 1853, the United 
Kingdom Alliance for the Total and Immediate Suppression 
of the Liquor Traffic was founded. At an inaugural meeting 
held in the October following, a declaration of principles 
was agreed upon containing seven points, the last of 
which was this, viz.; “ That, rising above class, sectarian, 
or party considerations, all good citizens should combine 
to procure an enactment prohibiting the sale of intoxi¬ 
cating beverages, as affording most efficient aid in remov¬ 
ing the appalling evil of intemperance.” The “ General 
Basis ” of the Alliance will show that this part, as all 
other parts of temperance work, owes its power to 
religion ; it is this : “ The Alliance, basing its proceedings 
on broad and catholic grounds, shall at all times recognize 
its ultimate dependence for success on the blessing of 
Almighty God." 

The first president of the Alliance was Sir Walter 
Trevelyan, Bart., of Wallington, Northumberland, a 
public-spirited English gentleman, greatly respected in his 
own country ; a lover of art and science ; above all, a man 
who was not afraid of bearing ridicule and reproach for 
the sake of a good cause. When he died in 1879, at the 
age of eighty-two, a successor was found in the wise, 
witty, humorous, intrepid Sir Wilfrid Lawaon, also a 
north county baronet, who has always had charge of the 
Alliance Bill in the House of Commons. These men 
have been supported by a host of resolute workers in 
every part of the Kingdom, who do what they can to get 
all candidates for Parliament to promise that they will 
vote for a Bill giving the people power to prevent the 
opening of public-houses in their districts. At the first 
only forty members of Parliament voted for such a Bill,, 
but five or six times that number would probably vote for 
it now. 








THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


43 


SAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES—Senes III. 


PHYSIOLOGY AND ALCOHOL. 

By Dr. KATE MITCHELL. 


No. 3.—THE BRAIN. 
(Notes for the Blackboard.) 


THE BRAIN. 


1. Cerebrum, or Great Brain. 

2. Cerebellum, or Small Brain. 

3. Medulla Oblongata, or Oblong 

Marrow. 

Composed of grey and white nervous matter. 


(Each note should be written down on the Blackboard 
as the speaker proceeds to enlarge upon it.) 

:E Brain is the large mass of grey and white 
nervous matter which fills the cavity of the 
skull. It is composed of nerve cells and 
nerve fibres, the former being of very 
minute size, and only visible by aid of the 
microscope ; the latter are different in shape 
from the cells, and are also too minute to be 
seen with the naked eye. The whole 
presents very much the appearance of white 
marrow, with a coating of grey,and tiny blood 
vessels are seen to run in every direction in 
its substance and on its surface. 

The Brain is divided into three distinct parts, viz : The 
Cerebrum, the Cerebellum, and the Medulla Oblongata. 
All these parts are connected by the nerve fibres of which 
I have spoken, and which go from one to the other. 

The Cerebrum, or Great Brain, as it is called, is the 
largest of these three divisions, and fills nearly the whole 
of the skull excepting at the lowest and back part. It is 
divided into two equal halves by a deep sulcus or fissure, 
these halves being called the right and left hemispheres. 
At the bottom of this fissure is seen a bridge of white 
nervous matter which joins the two hemispheres partially 
together, and which is called the Corpus Callosum. 

The cerebrum is made up of grey matter on its outside, 
and of white matter in its centre. The grey matter is 
about half an inch in depth, and forms a quantity of folds or 
convolutions all over the surface of the brain. These are 
more numerous in some individuals than in others, in 
those, for instance, who have exercised their brains more 
than others have done; and also they are more numerous 
in men and the higher animals than in the lowest kind 
of animals who possess very little intelligence. 

It is in this part of the brain, the cerebrum, that the 
highest functions of man are carried on. He thinks, 
wills, feels and acts through the activity and vitality of the 
nerve cells and nerve fibres of the cerebrum ; therefore it 
is all important that this organ should be kept healthy 
and well nourished. 

The Cerebellum, or Small Brain, lies at the back of the 
head just above the junction of the neck with the lower 
part of the skull. It weighs about one-tenth of the entire 


mass of the brain. It cannot be mistaken for it has a 
most peculiar appearance, being marked by a number of 
stripes on its external surface, which is grey like 
the cerebrum. When cut through the middle a 
streak of white matter is seen to go down the centre, 
branching off on each side into the grey matter, thus 
giving the appearance of a trunk of a tree and its branches. 
It is therefore called the arbor vitae or tree of life. 

The functions of the cerebellum are not very well 
understood, but it is supposed to aid us in controlling 
muscular movements and in bringing certain muscles 
to act together as when we walk or dance. Some¬ 
times the cerebellum has been removed from a bird, 
when it has been found that the poor little thing could 
not fly or move about although it was not affected in 
other ways. 

The Medulla Oblongata, or Oblong Marrow, is the contin¬ 
uation of the spinal cord into the brain. The brain and 
the spinal cord are thus in communication with one 
another. There is a large hole in the base of the skull 
which is situated immediately over the hole which goes 
down the centre of the spine. This hole is filled by the 
spinal marrow, or spinal cord, which expands into the 
medulla oblongata when it passes into the brain. The 
medulla is composed of grey and white matter equally 
mixed. Nerve fibres pass from the spinal cord through 
the medulla into the brain, and thus the latter communi¬ 
cates with all parts of the body. If you want to move 
your hand or foot the wish must first originate in the 
brain, and then the nerve fibres carry instantaneously 
the message to the muscles of those parts which then 
move. If the nerve fibres were destroyed or injured in 
any way going to these parts then, however much you 
wished to move them, you could not do so. 

The medulla oblongata is a very important part of the 
brain; if it is injured to the slightest extent, instantaneous 
death occurs. This is the part which is generally affected 
when anybody's neck ^is broken. The cerebrum and 
cerebellum may be a good deal injured without death 
taking place. 

The upper surface of the brain is rounded and smooth 
to fit into the skull, the under surface is very irregular. 
From each side of the under surface twelve large nerves 
come off, which go to give sight to the eyes, the sense 
of smell to the nose, hearing to the ears, taste to the 
tongue, and feeling and action to the muscles of the face 
and neck. 

The Action of Alcohol upon the brain is a very serious 
one, because this organ is such an important one. The 
spirit is carried by the blood to the brain. The small 
fine blood vessels running over the surface, and in the 
substance of the brain, become very much distended with 
blood, and the parts surrounding them are inflamed by the 
alcohol. This causes a person to feel stupid and drowsy, 
or sometimes he becomes mad and violent in his actions. 
In time the smaller blood vessels get hard and brittle, 
and then they may burst suddenly if an extra amount of 
blood is sent through them, as is the case when we run 
to catch a train, &c. The bursting of a blood vessel 
in the brain produces sudden unconsciousness, and 
perhaps it may result in death. This is called a fit of 
apoplexy. When the brain becomes very much damaged 
through the action of alcohol upon it, the character of the 
person becomes injured also, because you know the brain 
is the seat of the character. The person gradually 
loses all ideas of truth, independence and self-control. 
He becomes idle and extravagant, and neglects his 
responsibilities and duties. Thus he gradually loses 
self-respect and decency. Or his brain may be so 
inflamed with the constant use of alcohol that he becomes 
in time insane, and when he is like that he commits all the 
dreadful deeds which fill us with horror and dismay. 
This is the cause of so much crime and unhappiness and 
misery in the world. 






44 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES,—Series IV. 


MISCELLANEOUS. 

No. 3. — LADY NATURE’S LESSONS. 

Rev. N. CURNOCK, F.R.M.S., 

Wesleyan Minister, London; Author of “Nature Musings .” 


ONG ago, when I was a boy, going to 
school was dreaded almost as much as 
taking physic. The only good thing about 
school was the outside of it, and the 
best part of a lesson was its end. The 
reason for this was that Lady Nature 
was not allowed to say a word or to 
exert any influence at all in the educa¬ 
tion of boys and girls. No one ever 
thought of inviting her to the architect’s 
office when plans for school-rooms were being drawn. 
Nor had she much to do with the lesson books, or with 
any of the ways of teaching. But now all that is changed, 
and Lady Nature is head mistress over every master and 
mistress, over every tutor and governess in England. 
Everybody bows to her, and all the children love her. 
Her songs are everywhere, so are her pictures, and 
specimens, and tools. Nobody dares to persecute her, 
and when silly people laugh at her simple ways and 
homely pursuits, they are sure to get frowned down or 
ridiculed into silence. 

Lady Nature is a friend—true as steel—to all sorts of 
good work. When Mr. Gladstone is tired of making 
speeches in Parliament and writing post cards, she slips 
her gentle hand inside his big arm, and leads him away 
to the great park at Hawarden, and shows him a tree 
which she has been watering with rain, warming with 
sunshine, and shaking with storms, these many years, in 
order that it may grow big and useful, and then, the 
great statesman takes off his coat, rolls up his shirt sleeves, 
seizes the sharp axe, and all the woods ring with the 
sound of his blows, and the chips fly, and presently 
down comes the tree. “ Ah ! ” says Lady Nature, “ that 
is good. How fast the old man’s heart beats! How 
swiftly runs the red blood in his veins ! What streams of 
pure, fresh air are rushing into his lungs ! His brain is 
clearer, and his voice less husky, and his soul freer from 
care and worry for this morning’s hard work. Come 
home, Mr. Statesman, eat your dinner, sleep like a top, 
and live the longer, and work for everybody the harder, 
and the more usefully, for having listened to me.” And 
when Lord Salisbury is weary of writing despatches, and 
advising the Queen, and trying to keep the great Imperial 
machine right, Lady Nature carries him away to Hatfield, 
and gives him work of another sort to do—work with 
books of science and chemicals, and he, too, forgets his 
troubles, and gets refreshed and strengthened for another 
round of work for the nation which God has called him 
to govern. So also with nearly all the great men of our 
day—statesmen, preachers, teachers, soldiers, sailors, 
merchants, Lady Nature loves them all, and tries her very 
best to make and keep them healthy, wealthy, and wise. 

You may be quite sure of this, that Lady Nature 
was glad when Mr. Smithies, whom I used to know 
well when I was a little boy, commenced that beautiful 
paper of his, the Band of Hope Review. He never could 
have done the best part of his brave, good work 
had he not loved her, and learned in her schools, and 
played in her fields and woods. Once, when I went to 
see him in his pleasant little office in Paternoster Row, 
he said to me, “ If I go into a dirty, dismal court in 
London, and see a pot of flowers growing in a window, I 
know there is somebody in that house with something 
good, something hopeful, that I can take hold of in his 


or her heart. People who love flowers are not far from 
God. It is easier to bring them to Jesus, if you only go 
the right way to work, than it is to bring folks who don’t 
care for such things.” 

One of Lady Nature's greatest lessons, a lesson which 
she is very fond of teaching, a lesson written on every 
hedge-bank, and in the cool depths of every rock-pool, is 
this, namely, that idleness, and waste, and uselessness, 
are utterly bad. They are things of the devil. They make 
mischief possible. They encourage bad habits, and so 
help into bigness and power all kinds of Bands of Despair. 
Where her Ladyship can have her own way, there is life ; 
and life brings forth abundantly, and there is balance, and 
everything has something to do, and just about as much to 
eat as is right and good. Drunkenness is one of the most 
unnatural things in the world. It makes men and women 
worse, in many respects, than dogs and horses. It turns 
them against one another, and makes them cruel to their 
children, and ruins their power to fulfil the duties of life, 
and to enjoy its highest, sweetest pleasures. Our Bands of 
Hope are busily teaching those who, in a few years, will be 
the men and women of England all this. They wisely teach 
the boys and girls to promise—Jesus helping them—never 
to touch strong drink. But all the teaching and promising 
will be of very little use unless something strong and cap¬ 
tivating takes hold of them, and fills all their young hearts 
and all their budding lives with that which is clean, whole¬ 
some, fruitful of good, and nobly useful. The first thing 
they need, and Lady Nature in one way teaches this, as 
well as the Bible, is life; and the life they need is that 
which comes only from Him who is the Life. One day I 
stood by a rushing stream in which the trout were darting 
hither and thither ; over great slabs of granite poured the 
water. I stooped down and felt the hard, dead granite. 
It was all worn smooth, and I knew that in time the soft 
yielding water would wear all the granite quite away. 
But there was one place, just on the edge of the rock, 
which was covered with tender sprays of moss. Over ran 
the turbulent waters, but though they ground down the 
stone underneath, they could not tear the living plant. 
‘•Ah,” said I, “life makes all the difference. That which 
is dead is helpless; but life resists, and even grows by 
help of the very force which wears away the dead. 
Waves and storms may go over our heads; but if we 
share the life which Jesus gives, they will not hurt us.” 

But another thing we need is something to do, some¬ 
thing that will fill every hole and corner of our life with 
that which is useful, something that will touch every part 
of our nature, and give it healthful and joyful employ¬ 
ment. One way in which the odd moments of life may 
be usefully and pleasantly filled is by having good 
“hobbies.” And Lady Nature is a very Lady Bountiful 
in hobbies. She teaches children—and I think that if 
she has any special pets, they are Band of Hope children 
•—all sorts [of pleasant little hobbies for Saturday half¬ 
holidays and summer evenings, and long winter nights; 
and when Bank Holiday comes round,and father has a day 
off, there's such joy in coaxing him into the country, and 
such pure pleasure for him in learning from his bairnies 
to love Lady Nature’s wonders, and to find out something 
of their meaning. That’s a long way better than going 
to the public-house or to any other bad place. 

Therefore, I say, make love to Lady Nature, give her a 
place in your home. Learn every lesson she teaches., 
get her to give you one of her play-hobbies. And who 
knows? She may make you a naturalist, which, what¬ 
ever else you may be, will be a very good thing indeed, 
provided you are a Christian naturalist. Yes, a Christian! 
That, dear children, is the best, the happiest, the most 
necessary, and the noblest thing of all. A Christian 
naturalist, like Jesus, who knew all about the lilies of the 
field and the sparrows on the house-tops, and who could 
teach people all the lessons of the growing trees and the 
golden corn, 







THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


45 


®lje temperance Banner. 

Wordsl.by Sabah Louisa Moobe. Music by H. Adcock. (From the new Temperance Story with Song, “ Nelly’s Dark Days.’’) 








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4 6 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


TEMPERANCE TEACHING IN DAY 
SCHOOLS. 

E are gratified to know that the 
attention which we gave to this 
important subject in our last issue 
has been suggestive to many of 
our friends ; we trust that it will 
be continuously kept in mind, 
and every opportunity taken both 
of securing the adhesion of 
teachers, and of providing for temperance in¬ 
struction in the schools. Board Schools are so 
much in the mind of the public just now that 
there is a possibility of forgetting what are 
called the Voluntary Schools. As temperance 
workers, we should look after all, especially as 
about two-fifths of the children throughout the 
country attend voluntary—that is, National, 
British, Wesleyan, and other similar schools, 
not aided by the rates. We must, therefore, 
be careful to arrange our plans so that all may 
be included. 

And now whilst the Parent Society has been 
urging others to be at work, its own Committee 
have been anxiously considering how by some 
system of co-operation between themselves 
and the Local Unions, they might still 
further promote this all important end. For 
many years they have arranged for lectures in 
London schools, not only for the good which 
this in itself accomplishes, but, so to speak, by 
way of suggestion to the country generally. They 
have now resolved to bring the subject before 
their subscribers and other friends, and if 
possible, to obtain sufficient to pay two-thirds 
of the expenses of lectures in provincial schools, 
leaving the local Unions to secure the requisite 
permission from the School Boards and other 
local authorities, and to provide the remaining 
third of the cost. The Committee have already 
received offers of assistance, and hope soon to 
have the whole plan in working order. 

By way of example, let us suppose that a 
county or town organisation desires to promote 
this work, by engaging the School Lecturer for 
one, two, three, or four weeks. Assuming that 
the total cost per week, apart from travelling, 
would be the local Union would only be 
asked to pay, say, twenty-seven shillings, an 
additional sum of perhaps tenor twelve shillings 
being charged on each engagement, whether 
long or short, in respect of travelling expenses. 
The lecturer’s services might be used twice a 
day, either in addressing two schools, or one 
school and one evening meeting. Thus for less 
than £2, ten educational addresses would be 
secured, and this sum we are confident could 
be easily obtained for such useful and special 


work. Our friends at Bradford found no diffi¬ 
culty recently in raising a fund of ^50, and 
under the arrangement now indicated, it will 
be seen that fifty lectures given under the 
auspices of the same Local Union, could be 
arranged for about £7. 

In many cases, the work can only be done by 
some such arrangement as this, for the smaller 
Unions especially cannot be expected to find a 
properly qualified lecturer to prepare a special 
illustrated lecture for delivery in a few schools 
only. We give an early intimation of the 
arrangement, but full particulars will in due 
course be issued from the Office. 

We subjoin some particulars of the action of 
the School Board for London, in relation to 
temperance teaching in their schools, and a 
list of school books on temperance, which 
were crowded out from our last is: ue :— 

Action of the School Board for London. 

In 1877 the School Board for London adopted 
the following resolution, and in connection with 
it issued a memorandum to teachers :— 

“ That in view of the prevalent evil of intemperance 
and its serious consequences to the community, 
advantage to be taken, as opportunity offers, of 
imparting special instruction to the children in 
Board Schools as to the dangers arising there¬ 
from.” 

“ (1) That whenever the opening lesson of the day— 
from the Holy Scripture—supplies a suitable opportunity 
for the occasional instruction of children, by examples, 
warnings, cautions, and admonitions, in the principles of 
the virtue of temperance, the teachers should avail them¬ 
selves of it. 

“ (2) That the reading books and copy books for use 
in schools might be rendered largely helpful in this 
direction. Such reading books and copy books are now 
to be had, and might well be placed on the requisition 
form. 

“ (3) The picture cards, diagrams, and wall papers 
illustrative of the subjects of industry, sobriety, and 
thrift may be beneficially exhibited as part of the wall 
furniture of schools. 

“ (4) That songs and hymns, at the selection of the 
teacher, on the subject of temperance, be incorporate 1 
with the musical exercises of the school. 

“ (5) That the Board be recommended to grant, free of 
charge, the use of their schools, after the usual school 
hours, for illustrated lectures, by well-qualified lecturers, 
to children attending the schools, but that the attend¬ 
ance at such lectures be purely voluntary on the part of 
both teachers and scholars, the lecturers and their sub¬ 
jects in each case to receive the approval of the School 
Management Committee. 

‘‘(6) That the Works Committee be instructed to 
supply a drinking fountain in the playground of every 
Board School.” 

These recommendations are excellent, and 
have doubtless served to remind many 
abstaining teachers of the opportunities they 
possess for promoting the movement. The fifth 
recommendation has been very valuable, and 
has been made extensive use of by the 
National Temperance League and the United 




THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


47 


Kingdom Band of Hope Union, Dr. Sinclair 
Paterson, Mr. Frank Cheshire, and Mr. 
John Burgess having, since 1877, delivered 
addresses in all the London schools under this 
arrangement. In the greater number of in¬ 
stances numerous visits have now been paid to 
each school, and whereas at first many of the 
teachers were not very kindly disposed, they 
now evince a real interest in the subject. 

It may be added that the School Board for 
London has also decided to grant the free use 
of its schools for Band of Hope meetings con¬ 
ducted by its own teachers. 

School Books on Temperance. 

The following is a list of school books on 
temperance:— 

Temperance Lesson Book, The. A Series of Short 
Lessons on Alcohol and its action on the body. Designed 
for reading in schools and families. Thirty-fourth 
thousand. By. Dr. B. W. Richardson, F.R.S. is. 6d. ; 
cloth, gilt, for presentation, 2s. 6d. 

Temperance Primer, The. An Elementary Lesson 
Book, designed to teach the Nature and Properties of 
Alcoholic Liquors, and the action of alcohol on the body. 
ByJ. J. Ridge, M.D., &c. is. 

Temperance Reading Book, A ; or, Elementary 
Chapters on Alcohol and Intoxicating Drinks. By John 
Ingham, Ph.C., Jacob Bell Scholar, Double Medalist and 
Prizeman of the Pharmaceutical Society, is. 

Drink and Strong Drink. A Series of Readings for 
Schools and Families. By Dr. B. W. Richardson. Cloth, 
is., also in three parts at 4d. each. 

Temperance Lessons for the Young. By Rev. F. 
Wagstaff, F.R.H.S. 3d. 

First Steps to Temperance. A New Elementary 
Temperance Lesson Book. Now ready, Fcap. 8vo., 
cloth boards, 6d. For young children in schools, 
families, or Bands of Hope. By the author of “Miss 
Margaret’s Stories,” &c. 

Our own opinion is, that ordinary reading 
books, certain portions only being on temper¬ 
ance, are more likely to be generally adopted 
than those wholly devoted to the subject. 
Various publishers have recognised this, and 
we subjoin particulars of such books, although 
we admit that the temperance portions are very 
limited.- 

In Phillips’ Series of Reading Books, Sixth Book, 
about twenty pages of temperance matter will also be 
found, the selections being wisely made. 

Chambers' Fourth Reader. —There are, unfortu¬ 
nately, only five pages referring to temperance out of a 
book of 288 pages, and the subject is only found at all in 
one out of six Readers. 

Chambers’ Moral Class Book, price is. 6d., contains 
also slight reference to the subject. 

A few pages of temperance reading will be found in 
Nelson’s Royal Readers as follows:—Second series, 
No. 5 (2s.), pages 347—351; Third series, No. 4 (is. 3d.), 
pages 176—178; Third series, No. 5 (is. 6d.), pages 
56 — 59 - 

In the School Series published by Messrs. Collins, of 
Glasgow, about 30 pages will be found as follows •— 


Collins’ Illustrated English Reader, Fifth 


Book—- 

The Philosophy of Human Endurance . . 227 

Do., Do., Continued . 232 

Feats of Endurance.236 

Collins’ New Code Progressive Reader, Standard 
VI.— 

Wholesome drink ...... 326 

On Stimulants in Sickness .... 334 


TEMPERANCE TEACHING IN ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOLS. 

To the Editor of the Band of Hope Chronicle. 

Dear Sir, —It is a pleasure to find that the important 
subject of Temperance Teaching in Elementary Schools is 
engaging the interest of Band of Hope workers. Since the 
prominent attention drawn to the matter in the Chronicle 
of the past two months a number of enquiries have reached 
me, to reply to which, and to help those who may be pro¬ 
posing to inaugurate this work in their own districts, the 
following hints are suggested:—1. When the memorial 
asking for permission to arrange for the lectures is sent to 
the School Managers or School Boards, have aname of a 
well-known and able scientific lecturer to submit, one who 
can impress, interest, and instruct young people. 2. Secure 
the hearty and earnest support of several managers or 
members before submitting the memorial. 3. Ofter prizes 
for reproductions of the lectures ; have well-known and 
influential adjudicators ; and have a public prize presenta¬ 
tion. 4. Induce the managers or members to attend the 
lectures. 5. As the lectures and prizes will cost a con¬ 
siderable sum, have a “ Special Lecture Fund.” For this 
work many who are not abstainers will be pleased to con¬ 
tribute. Trusting that every Band of Hope Union will 
take this practical and important work in hand, 

I am, yours truly, 

Bradford. Martin Field, 


In response to the invitation of the United Kingdom 
Alliance, a great convention of temperance workers, com¬ 
prising 1,600 delegates from all parts of the kingdom, met 
at Exeter Hall (London), on Tuesday and Wednesday, 
February 15 and 16, “To suggest and agree upon the 
best methods of united practical action by temperance 
reformers and associations, in order to induce the Govern¬ 
ment to bring forward, and Parliament to enact, without 
further delay, an effective measure giving power to the 
inhabitants themselves to restrain the issue or renewal of 
licenses in their several localities, in compliance with the 
.esolutions adopted by the House of Commons in the 
Sessions of 1880, 1881, and 1883, in terms of increasing 
urgency, and with substantial and advancing majorities.” 
The convention, which was a great success, was most 
influential and representative, and the proceedings will 
undoubtedly greatly strengthen the hands of the 
Alliance. 

Simple Experiments for Bands of Hope. —A friend 
at Wolverhampton writes : “ I have been much interested 
in your advertisement sheets, giving diagrams of cheap 
apparatus for extracting alcohol from intoxicating drinks. 
Although I have been engaged in the work for many 
years, I had never been able to come across such ad- 
junctsto temperance work as you appear to be able to 
supply. I had seen something of the kind in my younger 
days, and have since heard of them, but have not been 
able to get to know where such things might be obtained. 
You have by your attention to this matter supplied a long 
felt want, and if these appliances are made fair use of, we 
shall have as sturdy a race of abstainers in the future 
from our present Bands of Hope, as those of the time of 
dear old Joseph Livesey.” 





THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


48 

BANDS OF HOPE IN WORKHOUSE 
SCHOOLS. 


INCE our last issue, several additional 
communications have reached us 
respecting Bands of Hope in Work- 
house Schools, of which we subjoin 
a summary. We would again urge 
those of our friends who have not 
yet given this department of work 
their attention, to do so without 
delay. The following suggestions as to the 
necessary steps to be taken in the matter may 
possibly be of service, although, of course, 
friends must act according to the special circum¬ 
stances of each case. 

Suggestions. 

1. —Obtain a list of the Guardians of the Poor; also 

the names of the Chairman and members of any 
committee especially appointed to deal with children 
who come under the care of the Guardians. 

2. —Note who are abstainers, or at all likely to assist. Ask 

your own leading friends—persons as influential as 
possible—to speak to the Chaplain, Guardians, and 
other officials likely to be friendly. Make a special 
note of the Chaplain, whose influence in such a 
matter is sure to be considerable. 

3. —Secure the promise of any one, two, or three persons 

(ladies or gentlemen) who would be suitable and 
willing to conduct a mouthly meeting of a Band of 
Hope, in the event of one of the Guardians, the 
Chaplain, Schoolmaster, or other official being 
unable to undertake the duty. 

4. —Ascertain on what date the Board of Guardians 

will meet, and about a week previously forward a 
letter addressed to the Chairman of the Guardians, 
previously having ascertained that two or three 
of those likely to be favourable to the proposal will 
be present to support the request.* 


* The following is suggested as something like the form of letter : — 
To the Chairman 

.Board of Guardians. 

The Committee of the . 

Band of Hope Union desire to see a Band of Hope or Juvenile 
Temperance Society formed for the benefit of the children, 
in the.Workhouse. Such societies, we are in¬ 

formed, have been sanctioned by Guardians of the Poor in London, 
Barnsley, Bradford, Birmingham, Dewsbury, Huddersfield, Hull, 
Leicester, Newcastle-on-Tyne, Portsmouth, Sheffield, and many 
other places, and in all cases, whilst providing pleasant instruction 
and amusement for thechildren, they have tended to foster in them 
habits of sobriety, industry, and thrift. 

In such a pleasant and useful work, the Committee of our Society 
would rely on the sympathy, and if possible, the active co-operation 
of a member of the Board, the Chaplain, Schoolmaster and School¬ 
mistress, or other officers of the establishment. They would be 
pleased to assist any of the officers or any one appointed by the 
Board to carry on the Society, or themselves to carry on the meet¬ 
ings, as the Guardians may prefer. 

A meeting once a month for an hour would be amply sufficient for 
the purpose, and some of our own friends would be happy to attend 
for the purpose on any day in the week, and at any hour that may 
be found to be convenient to the other arrangements in the work- 
house. 

We are glad to know that no excisable liquors are given to the 
children in the workhouse The subject of temperance being brought 
before them by Band of Hope meetings would, however, provide 
in addition regular instruction on the subject, so that the children 
would go into life especially warned respecting the danger of intoxi¬ 
cating drink, which is undoubtedly a chief cause of pauperism 
throughout the country. 

Awaiting a favourable reply, 

I am, Your obedient servant, 

Secretary. 


5-—Perhaps in most cases it would be best in the first 
instance simply to request permission to give a 
temperance entertainment to the children, which 
might be one of the temperance stories with song, 
a dissolving view exhibition comprising temperance 
subjects, or an entertainment consisting of tempe¬ 
rance songs and recitations, with one or two brief 
addresses. Just as much pains, however, should 
be taken to secure a favourable response to this 
simple request, as to the larger one for the forma¬ 
tion of a Band of Hope, and influence should be 
brought to bear on the Guardians individually to 
attend the entertainment, when the subject of a 
Band of Hope for the children in the workhouse 
might be broached. If the entertainment pass off 
satisfactorily, a request, a month or two later, to 
form a Band of Hope, would very likely meet with 
a favourable response. 


EXTRACTS FROM RECENT LETTERS , &c. 

Keighley. —Monthly Band of Hope meetings have 
been held at the Keighley workhouse since 1878. 

Northampton. —A Band of Hope for the children in 
the Northampton workhouse has been carried on for 
many years, under the auspices of the Good Templars. 
The officials and teachers are most friendly. 

London.— As indicated in our last issue there are 
already several good Bands of Hope in connection with 
the workhouse schools in London. In order still further 
to promote the work, a conference of representatives of 
the whole of the ten Metropolitan Unions was held on 
Saturday, February 4th, at which a resolution was 
adopted strongly recommending the Unions to promote 
the formation of societies in all the schools. 

London—Lambeth Industrial Schools, West 
Norwood, S.E.—Some nine months ago, Mr. John H. 
Lile, with the ready consent of his colleagues on the 
Lambeth Guardian Board, established a Band of Hope 
at these schools, and great success has been achieved. 
Mr. Hammond, the master, and his excellent staff of 
teachers have done much to help the good work. Monthly 
meetings have been held, at every one of which Mr. Lile 
has been present. More than four hundred children have 
signed the registers, kindly kept by two or three teachers. 
At each meeting a well-qualified speaker is invited, and 
the programme is varied by excellent singing of tempe¬ 
rance hymns, and selected recitations by the boys and 
girls themselves. A very pleasing feature of the work is 
the fact that the doors of the meeting are opened to all 
who were formerly in the schools and are now in service 
in the neighbourhood. Every month sees a number of 
young girls return to the scene of their school-life to 
enjoy the Band of Hope meeting. The monthly gatherings 
are held in the handsome and commodious dining-hall, 
and the singing is accompanied on an American organ. 

Oldham. —Mr. William Bell, the lecturing agent of the 
Parent Society, recently addressed the children in the 
workhouse school, and as a result of this visit a sub¬ 
committee has since been appointed to deal with the 
whole subject. The chaplain has been an abstainer for 
many years. 

Preston. —The guardians permit a Band of Hope 
meeting to be held here once in three months, and pledge 
books are kindly kept by the schoolmaster and school¬ 
mistress, so that children signing between the meetings 
can be presented with certificates on the next occasion. 
At Christmas time we presented each child with a copy of 
the Parent Society’s illuminated Motto Card for 1887. We 
are hoping soon to arrange for more frequent meetings, 
to be attended by any adult inmates desiring to be 
present. 










THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


49 


SSnitctr Sting&om iSanti of Hope ©tttton. 



NATIONAL BAND OF HOPE BAZAAR. 

ORE than a year ago we inti¬ 
mated that it had been in con¬ 
templation to hold a Bazaar as 
a means of replenishing the 
Union exchequer and raising 
funds for extending its operations. 
Our friends will now be interested 
to know that the Committee have 
decided to make arrangements for 
a National Bazaar to take place in the spring 
of next year, and they earnestly trust that Band 
of Hope Unions, societies, and friends in allparts 
of the country will concentrate their efforts dur¬ 
ing the Jubilee Year with a view to making the 
Bazaar a substantial success. Our movement 
has an urgent claim upon the sympathy of all 
sections of Temperance workers, and we trust 
that our friends will, by at once commencing to 
get promises of goods and contributions, ensure 
for the National Band of Hope Bazaar such 
a success as will place the Union financially 
upon the most satisfactory basis. During the 
present Year two other Temperance organiza¬ 
tions will be making efforts in this direction, viz., 
the Church of England Temperance Society and 
the Good Templars. Both these societies have 
claims upon the hearty co-operation and sup¬ 
port of Temperance friends throughout the 
country, and we trust that to these also a 
liberal share of sympathy and help will be 
accorded. 


THE CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR’S 
COLLECTION. 

ARLY ^1,000 will have been obtained as a 
result of the recent collection in behalf of 
the Band of Hope movement and the 
Temperance Hospital, making a total of 
about ^8,560 since the effort was originated 
ten years ago. This, taking into account 
the many appeals that are now made at 
Christmas time, and the general depression, 
is a very satisfactory result. A few Unions took part in 
the collection which had not previously done so, and we 
have only to regret, and that largely for the sake of their 
own funds and the extension of the movement in their 
own localities, that every Union throughout the kingdom 
did not co-operate. Had this been possible the amount 
obtained might have been trebled. As proof of the 
extent to which local organisations obtain funds by the 
collection for their own local operations, we may mention 
the amounts which will be received in full by a few of the 
county Associations :—South Essex, £60 10s.; West 



Kent, /40; Surrey, £36 5s.; Bedfordshire and Oxford¬ 
shire, £16 each ; North Essex, £13. But for the general 
collection they would in every probability have arranged 
nothing of the kind for themselves. As it is, they have 
each secured a most useful sum for local work, the Parent 
Society receives benefit, and the Hospital, which is greatly 
benefiting every department of temperance work, is aided 
also. 

It is customary to give prizes to those collectors who 
obtain the largest amounts (about eight thousand tempe¬ 
rance books have in this way been put into the hands ot 
young people during the past ten years), and to invite 
them to aspleasant soriee in their respective localities, the 
expenses of which are largely met by admission fees paid 
for admission by other visitors. It will thus be seen that 
every effort is made to keep the expenses of the collection 
down to the lowest point, and that even in the distribu¬ 
tion of prizes the cause of temperance itself is advanced. 

The collectors resident in and near London were invited 
to attend a soriee at the Memorial Hall, Farringdon 
Street, on Monday, January 31st, when about sixteen 
hundred collectors and their friends were present. As 
was fitting for a soiree, an abundance of pure amusement 
was provided, together with refreshments, but care was 
nevertheless taken that plenty of temperance teaching 
was put before those present. The addresses of the Hon. 
Conrad Dillon, who presided, of Lady John Manners, 
who distributed the prizes, and of the Rev. J. P. Gledstone, 
who delivered a special address, provided ample in this 
respect. The proceedings commenced punctually at 
six o’clock, with a hymn, after which the Rev. G. M. 
Murphy offered a prayer. 

The Chairman (the Hon. Conrad Dillon) at once 
succeeded in making his hearers at home. He observed 
that the importance of this Society was daily being better 
appreciated, and the only regret some had was that they 
did not join the cause sooner. A good sign of the times 
was indicated in the returns recently published of the 
consumption of drink in workhouses. In 1885 that return 
was moved for by a good temperance worker, Mr. 
Watson, of Rochdale, and had been carefully compared 
in the pages of the Temperance Record with a similar return 
made in 1881. It was found on comparing the two periods 
that in the workhouses of this country one-fourth less was 
spent on alcohol—the exact sum in the one case being 
^45,000, whilst four years ago it was £60, 000. At the same 
time the number of indoor paupers had increased, showing 
that the present consumption was as five to seven, com¬ 
pared with what it was four years ago. This meant a 
tremendous change of feeling amongst a large number of 
popularly elected bodies—the Boards of Guardians—who 
were essentially the representatives of the people. He 
was sure that the Union was adding enormously to the 
strength of public opinion in this and other directions. 
Any money collected for the London Temperance Hospital 
he could assure them was most carefully spent. They 
were using seventy beds, and sixty more were ready, but 
could not be opened for want of funds. No wonder the 
hospital excited the sympathy of children, for many of 
the patients were themselves children, and not a few 
entered within its walls because of inj uries suffered through 
the drink, this being also the case with other hospitals 
with which he was connected. He closed with a few 
earnest words of counsel to the children, which were 
received with applause. 

After the speech of the Chairman, Miss Nellie Saunders 
sang, with great acceptance, a song entitled “ When the 
heart is young.” We may mention that this young lady 
is a daughter of an old friend of the Union, Mr. William 





5° 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Saunders. Miss Saunders was successful last year in 
winning the Sainton-Dolby prize at the Royal Academy 
of Music. 

The Rev. J. P. Gledstone delivered an address in 
which he pointed out the influence of children amongst 
themselves and even with adults. He illustrated his 
observations by references to the early labours of tempe¬ 
rance workers. He gave instances of their heroism and 
their self-denial, and said that temperance was a broad 
way, in which the poor might travel to honour and 
distinction. He knew not what would have become of 
our country but for the temperance training that had 
been given to its boys and girls. 

Mr. T. Vesey Strong recited ‘‘The Owl Critic,” which 
evidently greatly pleased the audience. Mr. F. W. 
Parish, quite a young performer, exhibited considerable 
capacity in playing a violin selection from “ II Trovatore.” 
The next item was a sketching entertainment by Mr. 
J. Williams Benn, who is always popular with the young 
people, and was never more so than on this occasion. 
His efforts were rewarded with much applause, and his 
pleasant way of inculcating temperance lessons proved 
most remarkable. 

Mr. Charles Wakely, the General Secretary, then 
announced the result of the collection, the largest amount 
beingfrom the South Essex Union(/i22). The individual 
collections were also unusually large. The average of 
the societies in London was £2 18s. iod., the Stockwell 
Orphanage alone contributing nearly ^25, and Avenue- 
road £^0 15s. Mr. Wakely thought the total would not 
be far short of ^1,000, He then proceeded to read the 
following statement:— 


Collectedly Provincial Unions. 


South Essex 

Greenwich &West Kent 

Surrey 

Bedfordshire 

Oxfordshire 

West Middlesex 

North Essex .. 

Irish Temp. League .. 
Ipswich and Suffolk .. 


£ s. 
123 o 
93 9 
72 10 
32 6 

32 o 
27 o 

25 15 

12 11 
8 1 


d. 

o 

0 

I 

4 

o 

o 

7 

6 

4 


S. Bucks & East 
Southampton .. 
Scarborough .. 
Portsmouth 
Cambridgeshire 
Reading 


£ s. d. 
Berks 6 12 6 

•• 4 4 9 

3 8 10 

316 
.. 1 15 6 

.. o 14 o 


£446 11 _8 


Collected by Metropolitan Unions. 


£ s. d. | 

Chelsea & Westminster 104 11 o I Tower Hamlets 

South West London .. 79 2 1 I Lambeth 

Hackney _ .. .. 74 1 4 | Southwark 

City and Finsbury .. 71 14 3 I 

Marylebone .. .. 48 14 3 | 


£ s. d. 
42 4 9 

38 16 8 

2 18 8 


^462 3 o 


The average amount obtained by each London Society 
taking part in the collection is £2 18s. iod., the following 
seventeen Societies having obtained £5 and upwards:— 


Avenue Road, Shepherd’s Bush 
Stockwell Orphanage 
Reeve Mission, East Street, Marylebone 
Finsbury Band of Hope Union Choir 
St. John’s Hill Wesleyan, Wandsworth .. 
Trinity Chapel, Church Road, Brixton 
West Kensington Park Wesleyan.. 

Tottenham Wesleyan 
Gillespie Road Wesleyan, Highbury 
Hinde Street Wesleyan, Marylebone 
East Finchley 

West End Baptist, Hammersmith 
Rams Chapel, Homerton 
Grove Road, Victoria Park 
Tredegar Road Wesleyan, Bow 
Emperor’s Gate, Chelsea 

Prince of Wales Road Wesleyan, Camden Town 


40 15 o 
21 14 4 
16 o o 
14 19 6 
13 18 8 

1164 
10 15 6 

9 5 6 

738 
690 
6 5 4 

S 19 5 



580 
5 7 3 
5 14 


The following is a list of the highest amounts obtained 
by individual collectors : — 


Mrs. Douglas, Finsbury Band of Hope Union Choir.. 
W. Parkinson, Tottenham Wesleyan 
A. W. Steele, West Kensington Park 

Herbert Hicks, Avenue Road . 

Joseph Bowen, East Finchley . 

Francis Duggett, Avenue Road .. .. .. ” 

A. Fitzgerald, Hop Gardens, Mayfair .. .. 

Mrs. Marshall, Avenue Road 

F. Morrison, West End, Hammersmith. 

Helen Barrow, Hinde Street Wesleyan .. 

Annie Curtis, Avenue Road 
Marshall Bennett, Church Road, Brixton 
A. Eldridge, Stockwell Orphanage 
E Cooper, Reeve Mission 
F. Tiffin, Avenue Road 
W. Woolgar, Denmark Place 
Bertie Marsh, Church Road, Brixton 
Beatrice Coe, Avenue Road 


9 15 
690 
4 5 0 


3 10 10 
3 10 o 

370 

3 4 6 

3 5 0 

3 3 11 
3 3 0 

321 

320 

310 

306 

300 

300 


The following are the total amounts obtained since the 
collection was originated, and the amounts paid to the 
Temperance Hospital:— 


Total Amounts. 


Paid to Hospital. 


1875 

£ 

.. 70 

s. 

*3 

d. 

4 

1876 

£ s. d. 

1876-7 

.. 341 

10 

8 

1877 

. . .. 106 12 O 

1878 

• • 335 

4 

7 

1878 

.. 84 0 0 

1879 

. . 406 

11 

3 

1879 

.. 101 16 6 

1880 

• • 523 

17 

O 

1880 

.. 137 15 5 

1881 

.. 727 

1 

3 

1881 

.. 182 13 3 

1882 

.. 906 

11 

3 

1882 

.. 236 4 8 

1883 

1,100 

7 

O 

1883 


1884 

1.039 

981 

7 

5 

1884 


1885 

10 

4 

1885 

.. 246 6 3 

1886 

I, 167 

9 

7 

1886 

333 2 7 

1887 to date • .. 

960 

0 

0 

1887 

Account still open. 


£8,560 

3 

8 


£2,048 3 11 


Lady John Manners, prior to distributing the prizes, 
complimented the young people on the zeal they had 
displayed. Little Jack Horner, we all knew, sat in a 
corner, but the boys and girls of the Band of Hope had 
gone out far and wide, and had collected subscriptions in 
every direction. She pointed out that they might fulfil 
even a nobler mission by using the influence they un¬ 
doubtedly possessed in inducing adults to become 
abstainers. 

The prizes having been distributed, the entertainments 
recommenced with a song by Miss Saunders and a recita¬ 
tion by Mr. Strong. Professor Howard next exhibited 
his conjuring skill, and after the Chairman had been 
thanked for presiding, the singing of a hymn brought^a 
very pleasant evening to a close. 


Dr. Richardson on Bands of Hope and Temperance 
Work generally. —In presiding recently at a tempe¬ 
rance meeting in London, Dr Richardson said : “ He did 
not hope for much from Parliament at present, for Parlia¬ 
ment was fighting away over trifles. Last week he paid 
a visit to the gallery of the House of Commons, and sat 
there till past midnight, and heard speech after speech. 
He had not been in the House for some years, and he 
could not have believed that the time would have been 
thrown away in such a worthless manner. There was 
neither wit nor worth in what he heard, and he was 
saddened at the exhibition. If the teetotalers could do 
nothing in legislation, they must do something in educa¬ 
ting the legislators. Referring to the methods of propa¬ 
gating teetotalism, Dr. Richardson did not attach much 
importance to revival efforts, as converts easily made in 
time of excited feelings were as easily lost, and they 
became the most difficult to win. He looked for a great 
deal of good from the education, on this question, of the 
rising generation. He would rather see a hundred children 
undergoing solid training at a Band of Hope than ten 
thousand people at a revival signing the pledge, only to 
fall back again before long. Seasonable conversation,home 
influence, and efforts by women were other modes of 
work which he esteemed very highly.” 








































Httorirs 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 

of progress from Ho cal ^octettes. 


51 


ISanb of ^ope Simons. 

Birmingham. —The Reporter for this quarter is full of interesting 
facts very helpful to local workers. Band of Hope workers are generally 
interested in learning how fellow labourers in their own neighbcurhccd 
are succeeding, and magazines of this type, when properly conducted, 
help to remove the sense of isolation which is a weight on the 
efforts of many Band of Hope conductors. We are glad to notice an 
announcement that the Union committee have voted a sum for pro¬ 
viding supplementary local prizes in connection with the competitive 
examination of the Parent Society. 

Burtonon-Trent. —The capital of the brewing trade is not without 
its Band of Hope Union, the outcome of a joint effort of the Staffordshire 
Union and the Parent Society, represented by their organising agent, 
Mr. Frank Adkins. We learn from the third annual report that there 
are eight associated societies with 726 members, and 474 members in 
connection with unassociated societies. We hope to learn soon that 
every society in the town has joined, for in no movement is union more 
necessary than in our own, and, w r e should think, in no town more than 
in Burton-on-Trent. 

Cardiff. —We notice on the title page of the seventh annual report a 
prominent line, “ in affiliation with the United Kingdom Band of Hope 
Union,” and this, we believe, is the general custom. Local Unions have 
nothing to lose and much to gain by making clear their connection with 
the national organisation. The year’s work has been earnest and suc¬ 
cessful, and the future outlook is good. There are 46 associated 
societies, with a membership of 6,877, managed by a staff of 396 honorary 
workers. The area of the Union is divided into districts, and more 
detailed attention has thus been possible to the wants of each society. 
A renewed effort is being made to arrange a speakers’ plan. The out¬ 
door demonstration was very successful, the chief feature being the pro¬ 
cession of 5,000 children. The balance is on the right side. A most 
satisfactory report. 

Dumfries and Maxwelltown. —The quarterly social meeting, 
recently held in the South Free Hall, was well attended. Ihe secretary 
presented an encouraging report to the effect that three more societies 
had joined the Union, and that the movement generally was making 
progress. Mr. Hutchen, of Catherinefield, read an earnest and helpful 
pap*r entitled, “Why do we work amongst the young?” Subse¬ 
quently a plan^was adopted for sending deputations to the various 
associated societies. 

Exeter. —A quarterly public meeting was recently held in the Mint 
school-room, under the presidency of Mr. H. B. Varwell. Addresses 
were delivered by the chairman and the Rev. W. H. Hawke, and an 
entertainment well sustained by the members of various associated 
societies. 

Keighley, Yorks. —This Union has recently adopted the excellent 
plan of purchasing a supply of books, diagrams, and chemical 
apparatus for the use of its speakers, and at a conference held at the end 
of January, special attention was given to the value of such appliances 
in conveying temperance instruction to the young. The library of the 
Union also forms a useful adjunct for speakers and other workers. The 
subject of “ Addresses in Sunday and Day Schools” was introduced to 
the conference by Mr. Geo. Taylor, and heartily discussed; “Summer 
work ” and “The Senior Members” were also topics which came in for 
a share of attention. 

Leeds and District. —The annual soiree was held on Friday, Jan. 
28th, in St. James’s Hall, when 200 were present to tea, and an enjoy¬ 
able evening passsd. The annual meeting was held about the same date 
in the Coliseum. Mr. Joseph Walker, Hon. Sec., stated that the Union 
consisted of 81 societies, an‘advance of six during gthe year, and 
that all this useful work had been done with a subscription list of only 
^45. The chair was taken by the president, Mr. Joseph Hepworth, and 
a concert was given by a choir of 350 voices to an audience numbering 
quite 2,000. The meeting was also addressed by Mr. Thomas Watson, 
M.P. for Rochdale, the Rev. John Pickup, Mr. Hector Davidson, and 
others. 

Leeds and District (Wesleyan).—This Union also recently occupied 
the Coliseum on the occasion of the sixteenth annual demonstration. Mr. 

J. W. Crawford presided : a report, showing 56 associated societies, was 
presented, and several addresses delivered. The chief attraction to the 
general public was the rendering of a Temperance cantata, “ St. George 
and the Dragon,” b}'a chorus of 500 voices,the connective readings being 
given with great effect by the Rev. E. H. Sugden, B. A, The effort was 
so successful that a repetition is arranged for at an early date. 

Newcastle, Gateshead and District.— On Friday, January 28th, 
a meeting of teachers in elementary schools was held in South Street 
Board School to consider, in the words of the circular convening the 
meeting, “the great need for training children in the principles of 
lemperance, and what may be done in this direction in schools without 
increasing the burden of the teachers.” The chair was taken by Mr. 
France, the Chairman of the Board, and addresses delievered by Dr. 
Rutherford and Mr. G. Tomlinson,of the North of England Temperance 
League. 


Rugeley, Staffs. —At the second annual meeting of the Rugeley and 
District Union, the chair was occupied by Mr. J. Morecroft in the 
absence of the Earl of Lichfield, president, frcm whom an interesting 
letter was read. The secretary’s report shewed a membership of seven 
societies with 609 members. The Rev. Prebendar}' Grier, vice-presi¬ 
dent, and Mr. J. C. Southerns (of Lichfield) gave addresses, and Bard 
of Hope members contributed a number of songs and recitations. 

Sunderland.— A conversazione was recently held in the rooms of the 
Y.M C A. There was a large attendance. This Union has a most useful 
officer, a Visitation Secretary .Mr. Joseph Taylor, who read a paper entitled 
“1 he Band of Hope Lcoking-glass,” embodying the result of his dis¬ 
coveries, and proving of an encouraging character. Mr. J. P. Beel read 
a paper on ‘‘ Singing in our Bands of Hope, ” and illustrated his points by 
means of a choir of young people. An interesting and profitable discus¬ 
sion on both papers ensued, and during the evening refreshments were 
dispensed. 

Three Towns.—Plymouth, Stonehouse and Devonport. —A 

public meeting in connection with this Union was held recently in 
Wycliffe Sunday-school, Mo-rice Town, under the chairmanship of the 
Rev. Professor Anthony, the new President of the Union, who in his 
opening remarks alluded with sorrow to the loss sustained by the death 
of the late President, Mr. R. C. Serpell. Some spirited addresses were 
delivered by local friends, and an excellent programme of recitations and 
melodies given by members of the Wycliffe and Ford Band of Hope. 


Metropolitan iSanbs of ?$ope. 

Avondale Band of Hope, Peckham. —This society held its fourth 
anniversary meeting on February nth, when prizes for attendance, 
recitations, singing, &c., were distributed to the successful competitors, 
followed by an entertainment consisting of a service of song, entitled 
“Musical iEsop.” Short addresses were also delivered by Dr. J. S. 
Mummery, the minister of Avondale Road Unitarian Church ; by the 
chairman, Mr. G. Jenks; the secretary, Mr. Bredall;and by Mr. Ritchie, 
secretary of the Lambeth Band of Hope Union. 

King’s Cross.— The Committee of this society have taken benevolent 
action with regard to the destitute children of the neighbourhood. A 
sub-committee with a lady secretary arranged for a free tea meeting 
and distribution of clothes, on Wednesday, January 19th. 320 poor 

children were present and enjoyed an excellent repast and an entertain¬ 
ment adapted to their capacity. Oranges were also distributed, and on 
leaving each child received an article of warm clothing, and, in the case 
of the smaller children, a toy. The necessary funds were procured by 
special effort on the part of members and friends, and the reflex influence 
of the proceedings on the workers is said to be of the most excellent 
character. 

St. Giles’s Christian Mission Bands of Hope. —The nineteenth 
anniversary of the above was celebrated on Tuesday, Feb. 8th, at the 
Mission Chapel, Little Wild Street, Drury Lane, when 100 members 
and friends sat down to tea, after ; which a public meeting was held, at 
which about 500 persons were present presided over by Mr. T. Vezey 
Strong, vice-president, in the unavoidable absence through ill-health of 
the president, Mr. George Hatton. The annual report, read by the 
general secretary, Mr. J. Watson, showed that there were 437 on the 
books ; 125 pledges had been taken during the past year in the Band of 
Hope, and thirty at the monthly Gospel Temperance meeting carried on 
by the committee ; 235 meetings had been held, with an average weekly 
attendance of 200 ; .numerous entertainments given, and about 3,000 
temperance periodicals (including Chronicle) distributed during the year. 
The income was £122 us.9d. and the expenditure ^125 3s .—£67 135.3d. 
of which had been expended on the annual excursion. Earnest and prac¬ 
tical addresses were delivered by Mr.Chas. Wakely (United Kingdom Band 
of Hope Union),Mr. Wm. Saunders (National Temperance League), and 
the well-known Richard Weaver. A purse,containing £7 ,accompanied by 
asuitable inscription,subscribed for by the members,was presented to Mr. 
Herbert Hampton, who for many years has conducted the junior society, 
and latterly the senior, in recognition of his earnest labours on behalf 
of the Band of Hope and its members. One hundred prizes having been 
distributed to the members, the meeting closed with prayer. 


iprobtnctal Mantis of i^ope. 

Aberfeldy, Scotland. —The society in this pretty Highland village 
has received much encouragement from a visit by Mr. Frank Adkins with 
the dissolving-view apparatus. The lecture, “ Incidents of Peril and 
Heroism,” was given in the Breadalbane Academy on Friday, February 
10th, the chair being taken by Mr. J. Hunter. The attendance was large 
and enthusiastic, and many villagers who wished to attend were unable to 
do so from want of space. 

Ardwick. —The Chancery-lane Wesleyan Band of Hope has con¬ 
cluded twenty-two years of active labour, and the neatly-arranged report 
which comes to hand testifies to the thoroughness and excellence of the 
work accomplished. In addition to 24 ordinary meetings, at which the 
average attendance was 328 (the largest 815 and the smallest 140) a 
number of special gatherings were held, including services of song, a 
temperance sermon, lecture by Mr. William Bell, winter festival, and 






5 2 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE , 


summer procession. Special attention is given by this society to the 
distribution of temperance periodicals, of which 210,000 have been sold 
during eighteen years, the profits being given to the canvassers as prizes 
to the gross value of nearly £350. The expenditure of the year was 
^105, leaving a deficiency of ;£i 8. 

Ashford, Kent. —The annual meeting was held on Monday, Jan. 
17th, under the presidency of Rev. W. D. Watson. The report was 
read by the secretary, Mr. A. J. Butler. One hundred and forty-two 
pledges have been taken,39 ordinary, and several public meetings held, 
sermons preached, and sound literature well distributed. Mr. Hoad, 
of St. Leonards, and Mr. H. T. Watts, master of the Board School and 
superintendent of the society (an admirable combination of offices), 
delivered addresses. 

Aspley Guise, Beds. —The excellent work ofthe twoladieson whom 
this society relies still goes forward successfully, and, to us, the most 
interesting item in its report, just to hand, is that some of the best 
assistants are those who joined it as children eighte*n years ago. It is 
veiy pleasant to find a society thus growing its own workers. 

Bilston. —Mr. William Bell recently spent a week here on behalf of 
the Total Abstinence Society, the meetings being pronounced as the 
best ever held in the town, hundreds being unable to get in, and 
upwards of 100 pledges being the tangible result. 

Clonmel, Ireland. —This society held its first annual meeting on 
Wednesday, Jan. 26th, the chair being taken by Rev. Thcs. Rothwell, 
who delivered a valuable address on *• The social, physical, and moral 
evil of strong drink.” Addresses were also given by Rev. James Hall 
and Mr. E. Beale. Twenty medals were distributed to deserving 
members, and the secretary read a very satisfactory report. 

Guildford. —The second annual report of the Congregational senior 
Band of Hope gives evidence of life and activity. The membership was 
73, of whom 51 belong to the Sunday-school. Thirty-eight meetings 
were held, and an interesting excursion to Leith Hill iu the summer. 
Programmes were arranged periodically, and we notice that one item 
consisted of “ Members’recollections of their holidays”—apian which 
deserves imitation. The harvest festival of the junior and senior Bands 
realised a profit of ,67 7s. towards the school building fund. 


Northampton. —The fourteenth anniversary 'of 7 the College Street 
Band of Hope was held on Tuesday, Jan. 25th, and was in all respects 
most successful. Two hundred were present to tea, after which Mr. 
Blacklee gave an entertainment entitled, “ Catching a Sunbeam.” The 
secretary read the annual report, from which we learn that 51 meetings 
have been held, attended on the average by 77 members ; 519 members 
were still known to remain faithful to the pledge A good musical and 
elocutionary entertainment occupied the greater part of the evening. 
This society owes most of its success, and, we think, its origin, to Mr. 
Richard Oliver, of Northampton. 

^ North Cheam, Surrey. —The fifth anniversary took place on 
Thursday, Feb. 3rd. After tea the chair was taken by Mr. Hart, of 
Sutton, and addresses were delivered by Mr. Burgess and Mr. Horn. 
The members also contributed melodies and recitations. A practical 
result was that five new pledges were secured. 

Thurso, Scotland —It is a pleasant reflection that the most 
northerly Band of Hope on the mainland of the United Kingdom is asso¬ 
ciated with the Parent Society. The friends in this far away town 
secured the Artillery drill hall, and arranged fora lecture on “India: 
its Cities and People " with dissolving views, by Mr. Adkins. The lec¬ 
ture was given on Monday, February 14th, and great pleasure was ex¬ 
pressed at the beauty of the pictures, and the usefulness of the incidental 
lessons, which these lectures so readily supply. 


©olontal. 

Demarara, British Guiana. —We are pleased to learn that a Band 
of Hope has just been commenced here in connection with the South 
Church Sunday School, Georgetown. The society is managed in accor¬ 
dance with the recommendations contained in the Band of Hope 
Manual, published by the Parent Society, and which has proved one of 
its most useful works. 

Manchioneal, Jamaica. —A useful work is being conducted by Mr. 
J. R. Townsend among the children in connection with the new Friends’ 
mission station at this place, and by the kindness of a friend the com¬ 
mittee of the Union were able recently to send over a small supply of 
pledge cards, which seem to have given great pleasure to the young 
people. 


GENERAL TEMPERANCE TOPICS. 




.. B. W. RICHARDSON, in his capacity of 
President of the St. Pancras Total Absti¬ 
nence Association, expressed the opinion 
that there is just now a “lull,” to use his 
own word, in the temperance movement. 
However this may be with regard to adults, 
and on that subject we shall offer no opinion, 
it certainly is not the case with the children. 
Alone, amongst temperance enterprises, the 
Band of Hope movement has never lost 
ground; every year has witnessed an 
advance on its predecessor, the past year being no 
exception to this rule. The reason, we think, is obvious 
—we work with a minimum of excitement and a maximum 
of continuity ; each individual meeting is small, but it 
is held constantly, and propagates its kind, and thus each 
year the movement stands on a broader base. If this 
fact were fully known and duly appreciated, we should 
never have to complain of lack of support in our efforts 
to teach and organise the young. 

* * 

Dr. Cameron proposes in his Early Closing Bill to 
close all public-houses in Scotland at 10 p.m. instead of 
11 p.m., and of introducing still more stringent provisions 
with regard to grocers, who also sell wine or beer. If the 
statement of Sheriff Campbell Smith, of Dundee, be 
even approximately correct, there is indeed great need for 
short hours in Scotland. He said at a recent trial that 
he never knew anyone who drank Dundee whiskey who 
was not dyspeptic. “ It was,” he went onto say, “about 
the best thing for burning the bottom out of a person’s 
stomach which could be got.” Poor Dundee ! 

* * 

. * 

The Baptist Temperance Sunday was duly observed on 
January 30th, and secured the preaching of 138 sermons. 
This is well, but we must repeat our wish that a general 
Temperance Sunday could be secured by mutual arrange¬ 
ments between the varied branches of the Christian 
church. 


At the Gordon Memorial Boys’ Home, at Portsmouth, 
an interesting incident occurred. A barrel of beer was 
sent by a local publican as his contribution to a Christ¬ 
mas treat for the boys. The authorities were so ill-ad¬ 
vised as to accept the questionable present, but a respec¬ 
table minority of the lads proved themselves, in this 
case, wiser than their superiors ; more than one-third 
declined to drink the proffered liquor. They must have 
been well-taught somewhere outside the home—-better, 
indeed, than we fear they are likely to be taught, in this 
respect, inside it. 

* * 

*. 

The Temperance party in the House cf Commons has 
been reconstructed, and is so numerous as to make it de¬ 
sirable to entrust the management of temperance interests 
as to details to a committee. Sir Wilfrid Lawson will 
act as chairman ; Mr. T. Fry and Mr. T. E. Ellis will 
represent England and Wales ; Mr. MacLagan and Mr. 
Mark Stewart, Scotland ; and Mr. Johnstone and Mr. 
J. E. Redmond, Ireland. What an example of true 

union is thus set to contending political parties. 

* « 

Four hundred grog shops in Cairo, and mostly with 
English names on their doors—such seems to be the out¬ 
come of a series of campaigns costly in money, and more 
costly by far in human life. What must the more 
thoughtful amongst the teetotal Mahommedans think of 
their presumably Christian conquerors ? And what would 
be their reply if invited to adopt a religion so represented? 
We know what ours would be under similar circum¬ 
stances. 

* * 

Melbourne, Victoria, has a gigantic coffee palace ; it 
was commenced four years ago, and has grown by addi¬ 
tions until it now contains 250 bedrooms for travellers 
who wish to rest in quiet and comfort. It cost, with the 
land it stands on, something like £80,000. This is a 
pleasant sign, and augurs well for the future of our most 
flourishing colony. 






• THE 

"ggcmd of $ope gi^i*oitic£e 

Issued Monthly by the United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 


JSantr of Hope Chronicle, 

APRIL, 1887. 


MUSIC AS AN AID TO BAND OF HOPE 
WORK. 

By Judson Bonner, 

Hon. Sec., South Essex Band of Hope Union. 

1.—Vocal Music. 

T has been truthfully said that “ One of the 
most pure and innocent pleasures which we 
can enjoy we owe to music. It possesses the 
power of charming our ears, soothing our 
passions, affecting our hearts, and influencing 
our propensities. How often has music dissi¬ 
pated our gloom, quickened the vital spirits, 
and ennobled our sentiments! An art so 
pleasing and useful well deserves our atten¬ 
tion, and calls upon us to employ it to the 
■glory of our beneficent Creator.” 

The prince of evil knows too well the power exerted by 
music over the human heart, and uses it with untold 
'success in carrying out his fell designs. A celebrated 
preacher is said to have justified his setting of a popular 
operatic air to religious words by the remark that he saw 
no reason “ why the devil should have all the good 
music ! ” And thus, in our warfare with the most power¬ 
ful of Apollyon’s minions, it behoves us temperance 
reformers to wrest this keen-edged weapon from our 
adversary’s grasp, and wield it with careful aim and 
steady hand on the side of God and of truth. 

Music has a higher mission than the gratification of 
inferior passions and the profitless employment of an 
idle moment. As Barry Cornwall so well puts it— 

tc Song from baser thoughts should win us ; 

Song should charm us out of woe : 

Song should stir the heart within us, 

Like a patriot’s friendly blow. 

Pains and pleasures, all man doeth, 

War and peace, and ill and wrong— 

All things that the soul subdueth 

Should be vanquished, too, by song ” 

The mission of song has been by no means neglected 
in the temperance movement; indeed, this grand enter¬ 
prise could not have reached its present important posi¬ 
tion without the kindly aid of music. But it is in our 
own particular branch of the work—in the Band of Hope 
—that the power of song can be most effectively 
utilised. 

What but music can make our meetings so attractive as 
to draw the young people away from other pleasures ? 
What can fire their hearts with zeal in a good cause so 
■surely as an inspiring temperance ode set to good music ? 
Who can measure the influence of the Band of Hope 
melody carolled forth in the home and the street by 
childish lips; or of the simple temperance lay sweetly 
sung by a tiny soloist at a public gathering ? Those who 
have known our work through many years are well aware 
that a carefully-trained choir of children is the best possible 
advertisement of a public meeting. Fathers hardened by 
'the monotonous drudgery of daily toil, and mothers dis¬ 
tressed with the anxious cares of house and family, will 
APRIL, 1887. 



gladly come to hear their children sing, though nothing 
else might induce them to attend a temperance meeting. 
And, thus drawn into the circle of good influences, who 
but the great Master Himself can tell but what the shafts 
of truth shot forth at a venture may find lodgment in 
their hearts, and bring to bay some soul-destroying sin ? 
It is this power of music to impress upon the heart the 
sentiments expressed by its charming voice,which renders 
it of so great value to those who seek to elevate the 
desires and ennoble the lives of their fellow-men. 

“ God sent His singers upon earth, 

With songs of sadness and of mirth, 

That they might touch the hearts of men, 

And bring them back to heaven again,’’ 

Seeing, therefore, how important is this means of 
spreading our principles, it is a lamentable fact that so 
little attention is paid to the systematic teaching and 
practice of music in the Band of Hope. While every 
effort is made to secure the newest recitations and 
dialogues, and to improve the members’ capabilities in 
this respect, very little trouble is taken in many cases to 
render the singing harmonious and attractive. How 
many conductors are content to drudge along with the 
same hymns that have been sung for years, and those so 
few in number that when a speaker desires to select one 
or two pieces appropriate to his subject, he is met with 
the continued response, “ Oh, we don't know that ‘‘The 
children have never sung that piece,” and so on. In 
once visiting a little Band of Hope within six miles of 
London, and enquiring what they could sing, I was in¬ 
formed, “We only know two pieces.” “How, then, do 
you manage ? ” I asked. “ Oh, we begin the meeting with 
‘God bless our youthful band,’ and close with ‘The 
Crystal spring,’and sometimes, by way of a change, we 
reverse the order.” I speedily put an end to such a 
wretched state of things by teaching them a third piece. 
Fortunately such a case of musical barbarism as this is 
not very common, but it is to be feared that the majority 
of Bands of Hope are not systematically taught to sing, 
and that very few are noted for their musical excellence. 

Years ago, persons of cultivated musical taste rightly 
complained of a serious dearth of good temperance songs 
and hymns. Many of the pieces placed in the hands of 
Band of Hope children were lacking in refinement, and 
even in the most elementary qualities of true poetry; 
while the tunes to which they were set gave equal offence 
in consequence of their want of melody or of their crude 
harmonies. One or two selections were better than 
others in this respect, but their contents were so meagre 
as to cause a constant cry for “ more.” Another ground 
of complaint was the absence of pieces expressing 
Christian sentiment, leading some zealous workers into 
the opposite error of adopting for their Bands of Hope 
an ordinary Sunday School hymn-book, or Sankey’s 
“ Sacred Songs and Solos,” which, good as they are for 
their proper purposes, do not possess the essentials of a 
Band of Hope song-book. There was also an entire 
absence of solos suitable for performance at temperance 
meetings, resulting in the extensive introduction of 
doggerel parodies and comic songs into our public enter¬ 
tainments, much to the detriment of their reputa¬ 
tion. While the realm of temperance music is not 
yet an elysium of perfection, it may fairly be claimed 
that an immense improvement has of late years been 
made in all these respects. The United Kingdom Band of 
Hope Union provides a collection of “ Hymns and Songs 






54 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


for Bands of Hope ” far excelling anything previously 
published, in both quality and quantity, and embracing 
the necessary variety of religious, moral, social, and 
temperance subjects, while avoiding coarseness of expres¬ 
sion and weakness of composition. The popularity of 
this book has fully justified its publication, upwards of 
half-a-million copies having been sold in six years. Fol¬ 
lowing this good example,several other organisations have 
issued similar books for their own societies; other col¬ 
lections have been greatly improved, and the old crude 
selections are speedily taking their places amongst. the 
relics of the past. Hoyle’s “ Popular Band of Hope 
Melodist ” is extensively used, but it is apparently more 
acceptable in the north of England than in the south. 

In regard to music for public performances, Messrs. 
Curwen & Sons, the pioneers of people’s music, and old 
friends of the temperance cause, have led the onward march 
of progress in this branch of work, and their “ Tempe¬ 
rance Vocalist,” ‘‘Temperance Choruses,” “Popular 
Temperance Music Leaflets,” and other publications, afford 
abundant scope for the exercise of musical talent on the 
public platform. Among other valuable resources for 
concerts and entertainments may be mentioned the selec¬ 
tions of “Temperance Festival Music,” published by 
the United Kingdom Band of Hope Union; the books of 
music used at Crystal Palace fetes; and the ‘ ‘ Band of 
Hope Melodies for Festive Gatherings,” issued by the 
Lancashire and Cheshire Band of Hope Union. A 
striking advance has been made in respect to temperance 
stories with song, of which there are now so many. 
While some of these are of doubtful quality, being weak 
stories interspersed with old or inferior illustrations (often 
dragged in against their will), others possess considerable 
literary and musical merit, and there is no doubt that 
the judicious selection and careful practice of such enter¬ 
tainments is calculated to render important service to 
every Band of Hope, whether possessing a choir or 
not. The introduction of dissolving views to illustrate 
these stories, and of such a novel accompaniment as the 
Fairy-bells (as in “ Dan Dabberton’s Dream,” and 
“ Plucked from the Burning ”) adds immensely to the 
attractiveness of this style of performance. Some 
ingenious friends have worked up impromptu entertain¬ 
ments of a rather simpler nature, by selecting a story and 
interspersing suitable pieces from the Band of Hope song- 
book. 

So much for the resources of vocal music which we now 
find at our command. But there are, unfortunately, 
many societies which will do as well (or as badly) with a 
poor book as with a good one ; they will, perhaps, take 
some trouble to select the best they can get, but no effort is 
afterwards made to teach the pieces, the best in the book 
often being a sealed letter to the children. Their excuse 
is, doubtless, that they have no musical friend who can 
lend a helping hand. The requests for assistance in this 
direction sometimes received by the Band of Hope Union 
convey an idea that music teachers are (or should be) 
“kept in stock,” just as the music books are. The 
mission of the Union, however, is rather to encourage the 
cultivation of home resources than to supply help from 
outside. It cannot be too freely urged that local help is 
generally to be had for the asking, and “ ye have not, 
because ye ask not.” The solitary Band of Hope worker 
who has to be all the officers combined in one, is frequently 
surrounded by persons able and willing to help if their as¬ 
sistance beproperly sought,and work which they can do be 
put into their hands. In the present age of efficient school 
teaching, when so many School Boards require the Tonic 
Sol-fa system to be taught, there are numerous assistant 
and pupil teachers who—being abstainers (and frequently 
former Band of Hope members)—are quite qualified to 
undertake the teaching of singing in a Band of Hope, and 
would be glad to devote half an hour a week to this good 
work if a certain portion of the meeting be regularly set 


apart for the singing lesson. Fifteen or twenty minutes wil 
prove ample, preventing it from becoming irksome to- 
either teacher or pupils. While so useful a work, this is- 
not such a formidable undertaking as many suppose; the 
teaching at school prepares the way, so that in many 
instances the elements of music need not be taught in the 
Band of Hope, and all that is required is for some friend 
who has a knowledge of Sol-fa to begin with a short drill 
on the modulator or with the manual signs, and then to 
point the tune on the modulator one line at a time, the 
children singing the notes from his pointing, and after¬ 
wards the syllable “la,” until the tune is sufficiently 
familiar to be sung to the words. A new piece may easily 
be taught in this manner in ten or fifteen minutes, and as 
a treble and alto edition of “Hymns and Songs’’has 
recently been issued at 3d. each, in either notation, such 
teaching may be greatly facilitated by the most intelligent 
of the children being supplied with a copy. Where 
the assistance of a qualified teacher is really not 
procurable, some friend or senior member can surely be 
found with sufficient earnestness to master the rudiments 
of the Tonic Sol-fa method for the sake of being able to 
teach the children. Instruction books are plentiful, and 
the task is one of little difficulty, the method being faithful 
to its motto, “Easy, cheap, and true.” 

Where circumstances are favourable, such a simple 
commencement as that j ust described may develope into 
a Band of Hope choir, having a separate practice 
after the ordinary meeting, or on another evening. The 
usefulness of such an institution can scarcely be estimated. 
Choirs of this kind have done most valuable service by 
giving entertainments or providing the musical portion of 
public meetings, both for their own and neighbouring 
Bands of Hope, and in some instances the help thus 
rendered has largely contributed to the continued life and 
success of societies which were in a weak condition. The 
interchange of visits between neighbouring Bands, even 
where there are no choirs—a small party of singers and 
reciters being selected for the purpose—is also a desirable 
proceeding, calculated to promote harmonious and 
efficient work. 

In senior Bands of Hope there is even greater scope for 
the cultivation of musical talent than in junior societies. 
The retention of our members as they outstretch the limits 
of childhood is the most difficult of all Band of Hope 
problems ; but without doubt the judicious use of vocal 
music is a very important factor in its solution. The 
difficulty of conducting a senior meeting is so great, that 
it is a relief to be able to devote a large portion of the 
time to singing, and such a course would probably save 
many senior Bands of Hope from an untimely end. Some 
of the most prosperous senior Bands are those in whose 
programmes singing holds an important place; but, on 
the other hand, it is a serious mistake to let the meet¬ 
ings degenerate into a singing class pure and simple, in 
which no temperance teaching is introduced. 

Friendly contests of neighbouring choirs form a useful 
stimulus, and under proper management they may be a 
source of financial gain as well. Many Bands of Hope 
might also have a solo contest once a quarter, the plan 
of rewarding musical merit in this manner being well 
worthy of support. The prizes need not be of great value; 
musical men can generally be found willing and able to 
adjudicate; and with a little encouragement, boys and 
girls would soon be as ready to sing as they are to recite 
—very much to the advantage of our meetings. 


Temperance Festival Music. —No. 5 of this popular 
series of penny selections of music is now ready. It 
contains a capital collection of pieces in both notations, 
including “The Foe of Home,” “The Hope of our 
Land,” “ To Thee, Dear Fatherland,” “Take Courage., 
Temperance Workers,” &c. 




THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


55 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES.—Series I. 


TEMPERANCE LESSONS FROM ^SOP’S 
FABLES. 

By Rev. CHARLES COURTENAY, Vicar 0/Emmanuel Church, 
Liverpool, Author of “ Temperance Home Thrusts,” &c. 

No. 4.—THE WIND AND THE SUN. 

NCE upon a time, there was a traveller with 
an overcoat on. As ladies don’t wear over¬ 
coats, I suppose the traveller must have 
been a gentleman. He was moving briskly 
along as if he meant business. Whether he 
wanted to catch a train, or was rather late 
for Church, I don’t know. But that doesn’t 
matter a bit. From the fact of his wearing 
an overcoat it must have been winter time, of 
course. But that doesn’t matter either. In¬ 
deed, nothing matters except the fact that he wore an over¬ 
coat. So please, dear children, don’t forget the overcoat. 

Well, it so happened that the North Wind was about 
just at that time, dodgiDg around corners, and playfully 
blowing old gentlemen’s tall hats off. Now, the North 
Wind in those days was most dreadfully conceited. In 
fact, he seemed to fancy that he not only knew everything, 
but could do everything as well. And, happening to have 
rather a bad fit on just then, he took it into his head that 
that traveller should not wear his overcoat any longer. 

Now, I must tell you that the North Wind never could 
keep his tongue quiet, and never did a thing without 
talking a good deal about it first. Well, the Sun, 
although he was behind a cloud at the time, heard 
him, and being, as you know, a jolly, good-tempered 
sort of fellow, burst out laughing. He got quite red in 
the face with laughing. But then I mustn’t forget to tell 
you that he apologised as soon as he saw that he had hurt 
the North Wind’s feelings. Poor North Wind ! It is a pity 
he was so short-tempered. 

“You’re always running me down,” said theNorth Wind 
surlily ; “ you are so envious that you seem to fancy 
nobody can do anything but yourself. But I will get that 
overcoat off, laugh as much as you may.” 

“ Try,” said the Sun, who never wasted a word if he 
could help it. 

So to work the North Wind went. He whistled, he 
blew, he raged, he tore, until you might think that there 
was literally nothing in the world but North Wind. It 
was about the biggest bit of energy the North Wind had 
displayed since he was born. You see he was in 
earnest, and had made up his mind not to be beaten, 
which explains a great deal; and when force was of no 
good, he tried what cold would do, and so, after 
kissing and hugging an iceberg or two, he tried again to 
get underneath the overcoat. But it wasn’t a bit of good ; 
the traveller clung hard to his overcoat, buttoned it up 
to the chin, and wouldn’t have parted with it for 
its weight in gold. 

At last the North Wind got tired, and although he 
wouldn’t give up just yet, he nevertheless seemed quite 
exhausted, and only attacked the overcoat by fits and 
starts. A few more gusts and he gave up altogether, 
looking quite shame-faced. 

“ Now,” said the Sun, “ it's my turn to try.” 

But the North Wind, who had got just enough “ wind ” 
back again to give a scornful laugh, said, “ You’re no 
good.” 

Well, out came the Sun from behind the great bank of 
clouds, and began to shine. That was all. Yes, he just 
looked upon the traveller, and shot the beams of bright¬ 
ness not only upon the traveller, but into him. Up his 
sleeve, down the collar, through the seams, between the 
buttons, the Sunbeams stole. 

‘‘When are you going to begin? ” said the North 
Wind, cheekily. 


“I’ve begun already,” said the Sun, “ Look! 11 

Yes, there was something to look at now. Not a 
man hugging his coat and refusing to let it go, but first 
one button undone, and then another, and another, 
until the coat flapped behind him. Neither was that all. 
Before very long the coat itself was off, and hung over 
the arm of the traveller, who looked hot enough to 
throw it away altogether. 

The Sunshine won the day. 

Now for another story. 

Once upon a time there was a traveller, with an over¬ 
coat on ; only he wore it inside, and called it “ a habit.” 
He moved briskly along, from public-house to public- 
house, as if he meant business. Once he went to “ my 
Uncle’s,” and pawned his outside “greatcoat,” for the 
good of his inside “ habit." 

Now there were many who wished to strip this traveller 
of his “ habit,” and did their best to do so. I will tell you 
of two only—one called “ North Wind,” and the other 
called “Sunshine.” 

North Wind—who, this time, has two legs, and by most 
people would be called “man,” or “woman,” but whom I 
call “ NorthWind ” as a sort of nickname—tried his hand. 

First, he scolded. Dear me ! what a number of bad 
names he did call the poor drunkard (I mean traveller), 
to be sure—“ beast,” “brute,” “dog,” “pig,” “sot,” 
“ wretch,” etc. But scolding didn’t make him loosen his 
“habit.” It seemed to make him cling all the tighter to it. 

Then he threatened. He told him, what was perfectly 
true, what horrors lay in front of him in this world and 
in the next, and drew such dreadful pictures as would 
curdle most peoDle’s blood. But they didn’t have in the 
least the desired effect. The “ habit ” wasn’t locsened a 
single button. 

Then he got into a passion. Oh, dear me, how angry he 
did get! He fairly boiled. I really thought he would 
have hurt himself, he was so angry. But, strange to say, 
all this blustering passion was quite as useless as the 
scolding and the threatening. 

And then he gave him up. “ It’s no good,” he said, “ he's 
too far gone. I wash my hands of him. This ‘ habit ’ is 
too tight for me.” 

“ Let me try,” said the Sunshine, who also had two 
legs. “I think I can make something of him.” But tlfe 
North Wind only whistled in scorn. 

So Sunshine stepped up, and began by looking bright. 
This was a very good opening, because when Sunshine 
looks bright, somehow it makes other things look bright 
too. And do you know, dear children, the poor traveller 
with his “ habit”—which he really did want to get rid of— 
actually unloosed the lowest button. He kept it still well 
buttoned around his throat though. It made the poor 
traveller think of the brightness he once had years ago. 

Then Sunshine went on to look kind. Brightness is for 
everybody, but kindness is for somebody in particular. 
“ Oh, dear me,” said the traveller, “it’s a long time since 
anybody looked kindly at me.” And then he unloosed 
another button. 

After this, Sunshine stole into his heart with kind wishes 
and kind words, and kept lighting up the old corners which 
hadn’t been looked at for years. Why, the traveller had 
almost forgotten that he had a heart, and if Sunshine 
had done nothing else but reveal that, it would have been 
a real victory. The traveller unloosed no less than three 
buttons after this, all at once. 

Then Sunshine lighted up the old “ habit." He lighted 
it up from “ inside ”—the heart-side. The poor man had 
never seen it from the inside before, and quite disgusted 
he was with it, I can tell you. Immediately, there wasn't 
a single button-hole with a button in it, and almost before 
you could say “ Jack Robinson,” the “ habit ” was off. 

Now, dear little ones, which are you going to be ? Are 
you going to attack the drunkard’s bad “habit” of 
drunkenness as the old gusty, blustering, chill and angry 
North Wind, or as the mild and sweet and warming 
Sunshine ? 




5 6 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES.—Series II. 


TEMPERANCE WORK AND WORKERS. 

By Rev. J. P. GLEDSTONE, 

Author of “The Life and Travels of George Whitefield,” “Save the 
Boys," “ Clean Lips.” 

No. 4 —WOMEN’S TEMPERANCE WORK. 

E British Women’s Temperance Association 
is a young Association, but women’s work 
for the temperance cause is as old as the 
cause itself. As long ago as 1829 there was 
a society formed at Mayhill, near Glasgow, 
by Miss Allan and Miss Graham, on what 
was called the American plan, or the plan of 
abstaining from ardent spirits. It was a 
society for ladies only. Of course, all that 
has been done to spread temperance gener- 
done for women as well as for men ; but there 
is a great advantage sometimes in dividing persons into 
classes, and then working for each class in a particular way 
according as there is need. Hence meetings for women 
alone have often been held, and are now quite a feature of 
temperance work. The Bands of Hope were themselves 
formed by Mrs. Carlile, of Dublin,when she came over to 
England in 1845 on a mission to women and children. It 
was not, however, until 1876 that a great Association of 
temperance women was formed for all the kingdom. 

The year 1876 was oneof the darkest in English history, 
for then the expenditure of the British people for intoxi¬ 
cating liquors reached its highest point, viz., one hundred 
and forty-seven millions of pounds. This was equal to 
£4 9s. for every man, woman, and child. Such extrava¬ 
gance and waste was enough to bring trouble on the 
country, and so it did in many forms. It also roused the 
feelings of Christian people in a very powerful manner ; 
and one good woman, Mrs. Edward Parker, is said to have 
asked herself the question—“Cannot something be done 
to stay the tide of sin, disease, misery and crime, and to 
alleviate the suffering of little children whose parents are 
led captive by the destroyer, alcohol ?” A few Christian 
women then met for prayer and counsel,and in their hearts, 
touched no doubt by the Holy Spirit from whom come 
all good thoughts, arose a strong desire to be of use in 
this great work. Thus it came to pass that the British 
Women’s Temperance Association was formed at New- 
castle-on-Tyne, in 1876. Meetings were held, a committee 
chosen, a president and officers appointed, rules made, 
and what is called a “ Constitution ’’ agreed upon; that is, 
the women decided what they should do and how to do it. 
They sought, as their great objects, (1) the union of all 
the women in the British Empire to promote Temperance, 
and, (2) to secure united action in suppressing intempe¬ 
rance. The next suggestion was to have branches of the 
Association in as many places as possible. The plan 
prospered wonderfully, and the Association spread itself 
so far that it was felt needful to remove its offices from 
Newcastle to London. 

The women who are thus associated naturally try to 
benefit other women first; and by benefiting them they 
also do great good to children. And the need is very 
great. It is reported that in one house where forty women 
lodged, thirty-seven of them had suffered from drink, and 
some of them were clergymen’s and doctors’ wives and 
daughters. One doctor’s daughter had been led into 
temptation by having had to mix the whisky and water 
every night for her father ; she yielded to the drink her 
father took, and then “lost her health, love, purity, and 
faith in Jesus.” Her one craving desire was for whisky. 
Well would it be if these cases were exceptional among 
women—women who ought to be gentle, sober, tender, 


loving. So far is it from that, that the report of the 
visiting justices of the Westminster House of Correction 
says that in one year between five and six thousand women 
were convicted of drunkenness in that prison alone. 

The women teetotalers of England have a great work to 
do ; and they have set about it in a most wise as well as 
most zealous way. They have an agent to organise 
societies, and a large staff of lady speakers who work with¬ 
out fee or reward. Thus they speak to large numbers of 
persons in the course of a year. They have a paper 
of their own, called The British Women's Temperance Journal, 
which has a circulation of 4,000. They print and circulate 
tracts and other good literature ; some of the tracts are on 
very useful topics for women; for example, “The use of 
Stimulants in Sickness,’’ ‘‘Ready Remedies in the place 
of Brandy,” “Doctors and Drink.’’ One of the best 
things they have done has been to publish a “Non- 
Alcoholic Cookery Book.” 

This Association has strongly supported the movement 
for the closing of public houses on the Sunday, and is also 
aiding in the endeavour to obtain for the people the control 
of the licensing of public houses. It seeks to stir ministers 
of the Gospel up to preach on behalf of temperance. 
Meetings for prayer are frequently held. 

Another branch of work is that of setting up a coffee 
cart, where it may prove useful to working men and others 
by providing them with refreshment which they might 
otherwise seek at the public house. One locality alone 
has as many as four carts. 

The temperance women have not forgotten to employ 
medical instruction as a means of spreading temperance. 
One branch of their Association has had a course of six 
medical lectures given, which were attended by full 
audiences, who were greatly instructed and interested. At 
Forest Hill they have opened a Home for Intemperate 
Women who wish to be delivered from the power of their 
love for alcoholic drinks. Thus they seem to leave 
nothing undone; they are ingenious in the arts of good¬ 
ness. One of the branches of the Association, that of 
Redruth in Cornwall, sends a report which shows how 
clever and industrious persons can be in doing good when 
their hearts are in the work ; the report says : “ We have 
introduced needlework, the garments to be given to the 
poor, or sent to those engaged in the rescue work, friends 
having given the material. We hold meetings every 
Thursday evening during the winter months. Once a 
month we have a coffee supper given to the poor, when the 
attendance is certainly larger. We have held two meetings 
in country chapels, and are now arranging for cottage 
prayer meetings, at the request of our aged people who 
cannot attend the Thursday evening meetings. We are 
now busy getting petitions signed to Parliament respecting 
the selling of liquor to children.” At Halifax the ladies 
hold monthly cottage meetings in various parts of the 
town ; and in June, when the midsummer fair is held, they 
get up a meeting for the show people. At the last meeting 
as many as fifty-six persons signed the pledge. 

When we speak of women’s temperance work we can¬ 
not forget that much of it, and that the most valuable, 
can never be put into print; God alone has the record of 
it. We can never know to what extent mothers have 
influenced their sons and daughters to adopt temperance 
principles and habits ; nor how far wives have helped 
their husbands to be firm and true. We cannot know the 
aid given to temperance men in their public work by their 
wives, but something may be gathered from what is told 
us of the wife of Dr. Grindrod. It is said that she was 
his amanuensis; that is, she wrote his letters for him ; she 
was also his travelling companion, and went thousands of 
miles with him on his journeys. 

The temperance women of England have lately joined 
the World's Women Christian Temperance Union, so that 
now the temperance women of the world are banded 
together to put down the use of intoxicating drinks. 




THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


57 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES—Series III. 


PHYSIOLOGY AND ALCOHOL. 

By Di\ KATE MITCHELL. 

No. 4.—THE NERVOUS SYSTEM. 
(Notes for the Blackboard.) 


THE NERVOUS SYSTEM. 

j Grey matter inside. 

1 . Spinal Cord ^ White matter outside. 

2. Sensory and Motor Nerves. 

3. Sympathetic Nervous System. 

4. Action of Alcohol upon Nerves. 


HE Spinal Cord, or Marrow,occupies the cavity 
of the vertebral column. It is about the 
size of one of the fingers at its entrance in¬ 
to the brain, but gradually becomes smaller 
as it approaches the bottom of the spine, 
where it is a mere thread. If a piece of the 
spinal cord is cut through transversely, and 
examined with a powerful lens, it will be 
found to consist of white and grey nervous 
matter arranged differently from what we 
saw in the brain. Instead of the darker or grey nervous 
substance being on the outside,as in the brain, it is found 
■in the centre,and the white matter on the outside. The 
cord is divided into two equal halves by two fissures, front 
and back, which run almost down to the centre, where a 
bridge of nervous matter is found connecting the two 
halves together. 

(Either a diagram of the above should be shown, or a 
drawing made on the blackboard.) 

Spinal Nerves. From each side of the spinal cord 
there rise thirty-one nerves,which issue from a series of 
holes that are found at the side of, and between, the 
round bones of the vertebra. When these nerves have 
passed out of these small holes, or foramina, as they are 
called, they enter the muscular substance of the back of 
the thorax and abdomen, and can be traced onwards, 
dividing and sub-dividing until they become so small that 
they are invisible to the naked eye. These nerves are 
white in appearance, rounded, and smooth, very similar 
to a number of white threads bound firmly together by a 
connecting substance. All nerves are made up of bundles 
of these fibres kept close to each other by connective 
tissue, a structure which is found very largely in the 
human body,and whichkeeps all its different parts'together. 
This connective tissue is much finer in some parts than 
in others. If the spinal nerves are traced into the spinal 
marrow they will be found to issue from the grey substance, 
which gives off two branches on each side, one to the 
anterior part of the cord and the other to the posterior. 
These are called the roots of the nerves. Soon after 
passing from the cord they join together to form one 
nerve. On the posterior root is a small swelling called 
a ganglion, which is not to be found on the anterior root. 
The posterior root conveys sensation to the nerve; the 
anterior root conveys motion. For instance, if the 
posterior root of one of the spinal nerves going down to 
the leg were injured or cut through there would be a loss 
of feeling in those muscles to which that nerve went, 
although they would still be capable of moving. If the 
anterior root were injured or cut there would be loss of 
motion in the same part but not loss of action. Thus every 
nerve contains fibres of sensation and fibres of motion. 

All these thirty-one pairs of nerves are in communica¬ 


tion with the brain by means of the spinal cord. The 
whole nervous system, consisting of brain, spinal cord, and 
nerves, might be compared to the telegraph arrangements 
in a country, the headquarters being in a large city like 
London, from which are sent numberless wires to the 
remotest parts of the country. When you wish to move 
either hand or foot, even in the simplest action, the 
headquarters, the brain, must first originate the desire, 
and then the message is sent with the speed of lightning 
alongthe different nerves to those particular muscles which 
are to be moved. 

Decussation of the Pyramids. High up in the spinal cord 
the nerve fibres going to the brain are found to cross one 
another—those on the left side of the cord going to the 
right side of the brain and vice versa ; this crossing of the 
nerve fibres is called the decussation of the pyramids. 
This brings about a peculiar condition of things in certain 
forms of nervous disease. If that part of the right side of the 
brain which controls the movements and sensations of the 
leg becomes injured either by the bursting of a blood-vessel 
there, or a softening of the brain structure, then there is 
paralysis of the left side of the body. If such an injury 
should occur on the left side of the brain, the right side of 
the body will become paralysed,by which I mean that there 
is a loss of sensation and motion in that part. This clearly 
shows that the nerve fibres cross in the way I have explained. 
If there should be an injury to the spinal cord on the right 
or left side below the crossing of the nerve fibres then the 
same side will be affected and not the opposite one. 

Sympathetic nervous system. This is a peculiar arrange¬ 
ment of nervous matter found on each side of the spine in 
the thorax and abdomen. It forms a series of ganglia 
(small swellings of nervous substance), which are connected 
by nerve fibres. Nerve fibres are also found entering the 
spinal cord from these ganglia, and thus the sympathetic 
system is in indirect communication with the brain. The 
province of the sympathetic system is to supply nerves for 
all the internal organs, which thus perform their functions 
and carry on their movements without the direct interfer¬ 
ence of the brain. The heart beats, the lungs breathe, 
the stomach acts on the food by means of these sympathetic 
nerves,and we are unconscious of, and have almost no power 
over, these organs. The whole of the blood-vessels of the 
body are also undeythe influence of the sympathetic system, 
which,by acting on the muscular fibres of the blood-vessels, 
either enlarges them to allow more blood to pass through, 
or contracts them so that less blood passes through. When 
we blush or turn pale the blood vessels are being controlled 
by these nerves. 

Alcohol seems to have a peculiar affinity for nervous 
matter, especially for the sympathetic nervous system. It 
paralyses the action of nerve fibre,and as the use of this drug 
is continued the paralytic action becomes permanent. When 
alcohol has been long indulged in the smaller blood-vessels 
become permanently enlarged because the nerve fibres 
which control them are paralysed,and thus the vessels are 
unable to contract. This condition is often seen on the 
cheeks and nose of alcoholic drinkers, but if the internal 
organs which are under the influence of the sympathetic 
system could be examined their blood-vessels would also be 
found dilated and gorged with blood. Thus the stomach 
gets out of order and indigestion is caused ; the heart beats 
more quickly, and becomes weaker in its action ; the lungs 
are not properly and sufficiently supplied with fresh 
oxygen. When alcohol attacks the spinal nervous system, 
the nerve fibres distributed to the muscles also come under 
this paralytic action, and thus movement is no longer so 
accurate nor sensation so keen. The hand loses its cunning, 
it is seen to tremble, and the lower limbs also become 
unsteady. If a workman is engaged in very fine work with 
his hands, he soon becomes disabled if he indulges in 
alcohol to any large extent. 

(Different occupations might be quoted in which the 
disastrous effects of alcohol upon the nervous system could 
be clearly pointed—Watchmaking, &c.) 






THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


55 

BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES.—Series IV. 
MISCELLANEOUS. 

MISS FORSAITH. 

No. 4 —A LEGEND OF LONG AGO, AND ITS 
LESSON. 

NCE upon a time,” as the story-books say, 
long, long ago there was great distress and 
trouble in the famous city of Rome. A 
dreadful pestilence was raging, and the 
people were dying ; the river Tiber over¬ 
flowed its banks, causing much destruction 
to property; an earthquake shook the city, 
and, worst of all, a yawning chasm opened 
in the Roman Forum, the great place where 
the people assembled for public business. 
The soothsayers declared it would never close until the 
most precious thing in Rome was cast into it. While the 
people were all wondering what this could mean there 
came riding into their midst,upon his beautiful war-horse, 
a noble youth named Curtius, clad in complete armour. 
He told the people that Rome’s most precious treasure 
was her brave citizens, and as he spoke, he spurred for¬ 
ward his noble steed,leaped into the black yawning chasm, 
and was seen no more. The earth immediately closed 
over him and the city was saved. Whether this ever 
happened or not we cannot say, but certainly we may 
learn from it a beautiful lesson. You admire brave Curtius, 
and his deed of heroic self-sacrifice; perhaps you feel you 
would like to do as noble a deed for your country. I want 
to show you how you may do something quite as brave, 
quite as heroic, quite as useful, and that brave youths and 
maidens are as much needed by England to-day as Curtius 
was by ancient Rome in days of long ago. 

This is a time of trouble for dear old England—a pesti¬ 
lence is raging which destroys tens of thousands of people 
every year—men, women and little children. Every five 
minutes ot the day and night some one is dying through it. 
Do you ask what this disease is? It is drunkenness, which 
the Mohammedans call “ the English disease” because 
they have no name for it in their own language. When 
the great plague raged in London in 1665, all the plague- 
stricken houses were marked with a red cross, and the 
words, "Lord have mercy on us!” If to-day those 
English homes which are stricken with the plague of 
drunkenness could be thus marked, how many would they 
be! All over the land, in rich homes, poor homes, 
middle-class homes, the plague is everywhere. (Speaker 
supply illustrations.) Besides this pestilence and the 
death it brings, England is suffering to day from terrible 
poverty. We have all heard of the great distress ; many 
have seen it. What causes it ? The greatest cause of all 
is the love of strong drink. The English people are spend¬ 
ing a vast amount of money, which God gave them to buy 
food and clothing, on a poisonous liquor; nay, they are 
taking the clothes off their backs, the shoes off their feet, 
the bread out of their children’s mouths to buy it. In 
those parts of London where the greatest poverty and dis¬ 
tress abound, we find the most drunkenness and more 
public-houses than anywhere else. Precious grain which 
God has given this country for food is being destroyed by 
brewers to make this poison. Far worse than the Tiber 
overflowing its banks in the days of ancient Rome is this 
torrent of strong drink in England to-day, sweeping away 
the precious golden grain, houses and lands, and happy 
homes, bodies and souls of men. We have heard of late 
much about earthquakes and volcanic eruptions in various 
parts of the world, of the destruction of property and loss 
of life they have caused. In New Zealand one of the 
loveliest scenes in the whole world has been blotted out 
and buried for ever under masses of volcanic mud poured 


from a burning mountain. Terrible it must have been to 
be there! You are glad we are not subjected to such 
shocks in this country; but strong drink is doing much 
more damage in England to-day than any earthquake or 
volcano has ever done. It is burying all that is brightest 
and noblest in men and women, crushing all that is good 
and beautiful, wrecking our homes, changing what might 
be “ the garden of the Lord ” into a wilderness. How is 
the plague to be stayed ? How is the torrent of intempe¬ 
rance to be stemmed ? How is the yawning chasm to be 
closed? Only by personal, individual and combined self- 
sacrifice, energy and courage. Only by each one of us for 
ever burying our selfishness, giving up the use of intoxica¬ 
ting drink, however we may like it, and fighting the battle 
of total abstinence, however hard it may be. You all know 
there is a selfish self within us which likes to have all its 
own way, to please itself in everything, and does not like 
to be disturbed or troubled about other people. We must get 
rid of this Selfish Self, and get unselfish Love in its place. 
How is this to be done ? Ask God to take that ugly self 
away, and to fill your heart with Himself instead. He is 
pure unselfish love, and when we get Him within us we 
shall not mind what we do for others,or what we sacrifice, 
or what we have to bear, for love makes all things easy, 
and it will be impossible for us to touch the poison which 
is causing so much sin and sorrow and destruction. Will 
not the boys and girls of England be foremost in showing 
this unselfish love, by abstaining from strong drink what¬ 
ever temptations or inducements there may be to take it, 
whatever losses may seem to threaten in consequence, by 
spending time, health, energy, in working for the tempe¬ 
rance cause, especially for the Band of Hope, patiently 
trying to win others to join it, and bravely standing true to 
it at all times ? Brave Curtius gave his life for his country. 
We do not want you to die but to live, to save dear old 
England from the curse of intemperance. 

He did his heroic(deed without any reward or even the joy 
of seeing and sharing in the happy result. But with us it is 
very different, for we get a great reward at once. By giv¬ 
ing up the use of strong drink we gain great benefit, (1) 
in our health, for alcohol is injurious to every part of the 
body, it poisons the blood, injures theheart, ruins the diges¬ 
tion, paralyses the brain, and hurries thousands of people 
who are considered “moderate drinkers” to premature 
graves. (2) In our pockets,for we do not waste the money 
for which we perhaps work hard, in buying that which 
can neither feed nor strengthen, but only brings in long 
doctors’ bills ; so we have enough for our own wants and 
something to give away besides. (3) In our characters, 
for one terrible source of temptation is removed, and we 
learn the blessedness of trying to help and save others, and 
in years to come those who are young men will be able to 
rejoice in a happy, sober, prosperous England, delivered 
from the curse of strong drink. Curtius was a heathen, 
knowing nothing of a God of Love. We know of Jesus, 
who loved us and gave Himself for us, andywho is always 
whispering in our hearts this sweet message, “Love one 
another as I have loved you,” and who tells us that for any 
sacrifice we make,or for any service we do, however small, 
for His sake and the sake of others, He will give us a 
glorious reward, “ a hundred-fold more in this present life, 
and in the world to come life everlasting.” Let us be 
“ followers of God as dear children, and walk in love as 
Christ also loved us, and gave Himself for us.” 


The Yomtg Standard Bearer, issued monthly by the 
Church of England Temperance Society for children, at 
one-halfpenny, is admirably suited for circulation in Bands 
of Hope. 

An Audience of Ten Thousand. —Mr. D. Wright,, 
of Nottingham, informs us that he recently exhibited pic¬ 
tures illustrating John Tregenoweth, shown by the lime¬ 
light, in the market-place at Nottingham, a brass band; 
and choir assisting. 






THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE . 


59 


•SAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES.—Series V. 


TOBACCO. 

Mrs. AMELIA ARNOLD: 

No. 2.—ITS EFFECT UPON THE MIND. 


N our first address on Tobacco, we considered 
it with regard to the body, and showed 
by the opinion of several physicians that it 
is decidedly injurious to health, and that 
many diseases are directly traceable to the 
habit of smoking. 

As the body acts upon the mind,a debilitated 
and indolent body will naturally be accom¬ 
panied by a mind of an enfeebled and dreamy 
character. The speech of a confirmed smoker 
is generally low and drawling, his action is languid, his 
step is without elasticity, and a want of tone and vigour 
corresponding to these peculiarities is often observable 
in the writings of smokers, for unfortunately many of our 
literary men smoke, though they would be greater and 
stronger if they abstained. The poison of nicotine acts 
mainly on the nervous system,and the effect of all narcotics 
is evil on the mind as well as the body. Tobacco 
certainly soothes and lulls to rest the mental faculties, 
and this may account for the extraordinary indifference 
with regard to the comfort of others which is so remark¬ 
able in smokers. They will puff into the faces of unoffend¬ 
ing passers-by in the streets, nicotine, carbonic acid, 
and ammonia, without hesitation or compunction ; others 
when engaged in their lawful business are careful; the 
dustman does not shake his basket over you, nor will the 
coal-heaver empty his sack over your boots. So we are 
justified in supposing that the drug which produces such 
an oblivion of common good manners has lowered the 
mental powers. 

Dr. Jolly (association Frangaise contre l'abus deTabac) 
says that when the amount of tobacco sold by the French 
Government was 11,000,000 kilogrammes, there were 
8,000 lunatics confined in French asylums; and when 
the quantity sold was 28,000,000 kilogrammes, 44,000 
lunatics were confined in French asylums. Tobacco 
used by the Germans and other people in Northern 
Europe contains comparatively little nicotine, while the 
tobaccos used by the working classes in France and 
England are conducive to mental derangement,containing 
as much as seven or eight per cent, of nicotine. 

Dr. Bertillon, the most eminent French medical 
statistician, found that at the Polytechnic School of Paris 
the non-smokers stood far higher intellectually than 
smokers, the latter becoming lazy and nonchalant, their 
power of application was lessened, and indifference took 
the place of their former energy. Mr. James Driver, 
R. N., says that “ alcohol and tobacco waste and destroy 
human talents and energy more than war, pestilence and 
famine, which they greatly assist to produce.” “ Tobacco 
is sure to keep boys in a lower class at school when they 
should be in a higher. It tends to dwarf the mind and 
body, and directly leads to the sin of idleness.” Dr. 
Fraser, the late Bishop of Manchester, said at a meeting of 
the Young Men’s Christian Association, that a keen-eyed 
business man would not trust with his ledger or cash box a 
man who smelt of tobacco or strong drink. The late 
Canon Stowell said that smoking blighted young men, 
and inflicted the worst injuries upon growing boys —“ they 
lose the power of their will and are easily decoyed into 
bad company.” 

The Medical Gazette, of Lyons, says—“ Tobacco smoking 
lowers the intellectual faculties in a direct manner by its 
action on the brain, and in an indirect way by pre-dispos- 
ing to idleness, and in transforming the natural desire to 


activity into a desire to remain inert.” Sir Benjamin 
Brodie affirms that “ oil of tobacco acts by destroying the 
functions of the brain.” 

Dr. James Copland, F.R.S., is of opinion that "smoking 
weakens the nervous powers, favours a dreamy, imagina¬ 
tive, and imbecile state of mind, produces indolence and 
incapacity for manly or continuous exertions, and sinks 
its votary into a state of careless or maudlin inactivity 
and selfish enjoyment of his vice.” Dr. H. Gibbons says 
that “ tobacco diminishes the vigour of the intellect, and 
developes the lower and animal nature at the expense of 
the higher.” 

Smokers frequently say that tobacco cannot have any 
ill effect upon the mind, as men who rank high, intellectu¬ 
ally, are smokers. This may be true in some cases, but 
they would probably have attained to better things had 
they been temperate; it has been shown that these 
began to smoke at a late period of life. The great 
German writer, Leopold Von Ranke, perhaps the most 
profound thinker of this century, never smoked, and till 
within a few days of his death, in his gist year, he walked 
two hours and did eight hours’hard literary work per diem. 
None of the great men of France under the first Empire 
smoked, the habit not being then in fashion, and our own 
great men studiously avoid tobacco ; among these may be 
mentioned the late Lord Beaconsfield, Earl Russell, Lord 
Salisbury, Lord Dufferin and Mr. Gladstone, who have 
never sought the soothing influence of narcotics. Those 
whose minds are naturally active, and who have much 
important business, have no time to waste in sleepy 
reveries, fleeting and idle as the smoke itself. The upper 
and more educated classes of the last generation very 
seldom smoked, it is only of late years that this pernicious 
habit has become common, and we have yet to learn what 
these cadaverous youths will accomplish—these lads who 
stroll about with pipes in their mouths, and hands in 
their pockets. We know that the healthy condition of 
a young man’s mind is a state of activity, not of languor, 
and if he tries to lull his working and thinking powers and 
to stupefy himself by any narcotic, he injures his mind 
in the same way as the body is injured when it is over¬ 
come by strong liquor. When the mind is habituated to 
frequent periods of idleness, it loses its natural strength 
and energy as surely as the body becomes debilitated 
when deprived of exercise. 


The Publican’s Gain. —“ I have made two hundred 
pounds during the last three months,” said a publican 
boastfully, to a crowd of his townsmen. “ You have 
made more than that,” quietly remarked a listener. 
“ What is that ? ” was the quick response. “ You have 
made wretched homes—women and children poor, sick, 
and weary of life. You have made my two sons drunk¬ 
ards,” continued the speaker, with trembling earnestness; 
“ you made the younger of the two so drunk that he fell 
and injured himself for life. You have made their mother 
a broken-hearted woman. Oh, you have made much— 
more than I can reckon, but you’ll get the full amount 
some day.” 

Unfermented Wine at the Lord’s Table.— It is 
with no ordinary degree of pleasure that we announce 
the fact, that the magnificent congregation under the 
pastoral care of the Rev. C. H. Spurgeon, is now 
one of the 3,000 British Churches in which unfer¬ 
mented wine is used at the Lord’s Supper. Let us 
pray that the example may be speedily imitated by all 
churches in which the laudable step has not already been 
taken. Then shall there disappear a great injustice to 
juvenile abstainers, a great offence to the consciences of 
enlightened teetotalers, a great danger to reformed 
inebriates, a great moral support to an infernal traffic, and 
a great reproach to the name of Jesus Christ .—Bible 
Temperance Educator, 







6 o 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE, 


JF rceiiom. 


Irish National Air, “Let Erin Remember.’ 


J Yords and Arrangement by A. L. Cowley. 


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THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


61 


OUR SENIOR MEMBERS. 

month we give extracts from a 
jjpptyo number of letters kindly sent from 
London friends on this important 
subject, those inserted last month 
being all from country workers. 
We must crave the pardon of 
many correspondents for sum¬ 
marising so briefly communica¬ 
tions which, but for the limit of our space, we 
should, from their exceptional worth, have in¬ 
serted in full. The summaries presented last 
month and in the present issue are all suggestive, 
and should afford valuable assistance to workers 
who are anxiously enquiring, “ How can we 
retain our elder members ?” 

In the first place, our friends must not be un¬ 
duly discouraged, because after they leave 
school and go to business, their members do not 
attend so regularly as before, especially in the 
case of those engaged in places of business 
where the hours are late. Whilst at school, 
the only evening engagement is at the Band of 
Hope ; afterwards, even if business engage¬ 
ments afford time, there are many other pur¬ 
suits in which young people become properly 
interested. Then, too, it must be admitted, 
that it is easier to find workers who can interest 
children of school age, than at a later period. 
The outcome of these considerations should 
be however, that whilst the young people are 
with us as children, we must so infuse them 
with a love for the cause, and impart such 
sound instruction in its principles, that they 
will not be easily induced to leave our ranks 
when they go out into life. And, happily, 
there is a far greater likelihood of their remain¬ 
ing faithful than in years gone by, for the 
general sentiment is so entirely changed, and 
the abstainer is now not only tolerated, but 
valued and respected. 

Still, whilst bearing all this in mind, it is of 
immense importance that the very utmost should 
be done to retain the young people in active 
association with us, for in this way they are 
strengthened to pass through the most trying 
period of life. From long observation we are 
thoroughly convinced that to do this success¬ 
fully, our modes must differ considerably from 
those pursued towards the juniors ; for success 
will greatly depend upon the members being 
allowed to manage very largely their own affairs. 
Young people from fourteen to twenty-one 
years of_ age are particularly sensitive on this 
point—far more so than at a little later period. It 
is a perfectly legitimate feeling on their part, 
and the superintendent and adult members of 
committee need be under no apprehension that 
their influence will not be sufficiently felt, for 


this is certain to tell, if there be anything like 
wise and judicious treatment. 

We are not disposed to give any positive 
advice as to whether there should be separate 
meetings for juniors and seniors, or whether 
those of every age should all meet together. 
Those who have found either plan to answer 
well in securing and retaining the adhesion 
of young people generally, and of properly 
instructing them in our principles, will do 
well to pursue the mode which has secured 
good results. For those commencing, we should, 
as a rule, be disposed to suggest separate 
meetings, for it appears to us that the sa me 
hour of meeting is not likely to be the best 
for mere children and young people in business; 
nor is the same mode of address and instruc¬ 
tion likely to suit children of eight, ten, and 
twelve, and young people from fourteen to 
twenty-one. Where one meeting is held for 
all, we fear the youngest, for whom indeed the 
Band of Hope was first intended, are likely 
to be largely forgotten ; and then, if in our 
anxiety to cater for the senior members we fail 
to deal faithfully with our junior members, we 
shall indeed have missed our aim. We quite 
admit, however, that in small societies it will 
probably be best to make one meeting do for 
all, bearing specialty in mind the requirements 
both of the junior and senior members. This 
will especially apply in villages and manu¬ 
facturing districts, where the great mass of the 
population leave work at an early hour in the 
evening. 

We subjoin for the information of some of our 
friends, suggested rules for Senior Bands of 
Hope, where conducted as separate societies:— 

CONSTITUTION. 

1. —This Society shall be called the. 

Senior Band of Hope ; its object being the promo¬ 
tion of Total Abstinence from all intoxicating drinks. 

2. —The following pledge to be signed by all officers, 

Members of Committee, and Members of the 
Society :—“ I agree to abstain from all intoxicating 
drinks as beverages.” 

3. —-The affairs of the Society to be managed by a Com¬ 

mittee of twenty (including six females), and the 
following Officers :—President, Treasurer, Secretary 
Registrar, Librarian, and Collector, to be elected by 
Ballot at the Annual Members’ Meeting, at which the 
Annual Report and Balance Sheet shall be presented, 
and such other business transacted as will promote 
the welfare of the Society. 

4. —Any member over sixteen years of age to be eligible 

for any office. 

5. —The Committee to meet on the first. 

in each month. Committee meetings to be opened 
by prayer, the minutes of last meeting to be read and 
confirmed, the business arising therefrom to be first 
discussed, then official business, after which new 
business may be introduced ; all questions to be 
decided by vote,the Chairman to ha ve the casting vote. 

6. —The Accounts of the Society to be audited annually. 

7. —The Annual Meeting of members to be held during 

the.week of. 








62 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


RULES FOR MEMBERS. 

X.—Any person 'over the age of 14 years (or earlier, if 
at work) having signed the pledge: “I agree to 
abstain from all intoxicating drinks as beverages," 
may become a member of the society by payment 
of a monthly subscription of (2d.,) due on the first 

. in each month. All members 

whose subscriptions are fully paid up shall be en¬ 
titled to attend two free Members’ Tea Meetings, 
and to join in the Annual Excursion at a reduced 
rate. 

2. —Any person unable to attend the meetings may become 

an Honorary Member, and shall be entitled to all 
privileges of membership by signing the pledge, and 
paying an annual subscription of not less than (2/6). 

3. —Any member having broken the pledge, or being six 

months in arrears with subscriptions, shall forfeit 
membership, and when wishing to rejoin the Society 
must be formally admitted as a new member. 

4. —The meetings of this Society to be held every 

.Evening, from (8.30 to 9.45.) 

5. —Arrangements for all meetings to be made by the 

Committee, but the first meeting in each month, 
which shall be called the “ Members’ Meeting," to 
be for the transaction of business, receiving Reports 
from the Officers, and for the consideration of any 
phase of the work. 

C.—No Entertainment to be given in connection with any 
other Society unless the invitation has been accepted 
by the Committee. 

7.—No alteration to be made in the Rules, except at a 
Meeting of the Members, written notice having been 
given at the previous Members’ Meeting, signed by 
ten or more Members. 


FROM CORRESPONDENTS. 

Bloomsbury Chapel. —Mr. E. W. Webb, 22, 
Tottenham Court Road, W.C., writes:—Our members all 
meet together, and we try to arrange programmes which 
shall meet the requirements of all ages. We give our 
seniors small offices of one sort or another, and put some 
of them on the committee. We have the advantage of 
access to a first-class gymnasium, and in the summer form 
swimming clubs for boys and girls. The seniors also 
sometimes coach up the juniors in songs and recitations, 
and occasionally undertake the entire programme of the 
meeting. 

Chelsea (Clock House). —A practical worker writes: 
—The growth of our society, reaching an attendance of 
300 per night,necessitated the formation of a senior branch. 
All over 13 are eligible as members ; the meetings are held 
on the same night as those of the juniors, at a later hour, 
from 8 to 9 o'clock. The meetings are never suspended; 
even if-the room be under repair we meet elsewhere. We 
have a large staff of officers, and these we have secured 
by taking every opportunity of pressing the claims of the 
society on the teachers in the Sunday-school and the 
members of the Church. A very useful official is our 
programme secretary, and great care is taken to secure 
freshness and variety. Thus this quarter consists of 
lectures, delivered respectively by a doctor, an architect, 
and a clergyman, a musical evening each month, sup¬ 
ported by the members, an address by an agent of the 
United Kingdom Band of Hope Union, a service of song, 
a deputation from the Church of England Temperance 
Society, a deputation of skippers from the North Sea, and 
other engagements. Subscriptions are optional, but 
general, and entitle subscribers to admission to a tea 
meeting quarterly, and a magazine once a month. We 
have flower shows, a cricket club, a book-stall, and a 
penny bank. Female members do not recite, but they 
take part in the musical evenings, spelling bees, essays, 
competitions, &c. The officers and committee are 


elected annually. Our senior society was formed in 1880, 
and we have had many pleasing tokens of its usefulness. 
Letters have been received from old members now in 
Africa, South America, India, and the United States, as 
well as from the army and navy. We have found the 
"Chronicle” addresses very useful and acceptable in 
the more substantial parts of our work. 

Clapton (Wesleyan). —Mr. H.C. Platt, 39, Alconbury 
Road, Upper Clapton, E., writes :—With regard to our 
male senior members we find a gymnasium class very 
useful. We hold it after the usual weekly meeting, and 
admit members of the Band of Hope from fourteen years 
upwards. We make no charge, as the cost of the clubs, 
dumb-bells, bar-bells (about £3) was collected from 
friends. It has been a decided success, about thirty being 
present every week, and, what is better still, they come 
to the Band of Hope first. I can most heartily recom¬ 
mend a similar class to any conductor or secretary who is 
at a loss to keep the senior boys. Of course it must be 
conducted with a firm hand, and have good definite rules. 

Goswell Road (Spencer Place). —Mr. W. Brandle, 
35, Bevenden Street, Hoxton, N., writes:—Seven years 
ago we formed an “ upper section" of our society to meet 
the requirements of members too old for our junior, 
and not sufficiently advanced for membership of our 
senior (adult) section. Frequent entertainments are given 
by the upper section to the junior in order to keep before 
them the fact that this is to be their own department when 
the prescribed age shall have been reached. Adult mem¬ 
bers also frequently address both the upper and junior 
sections, and thus all are kept in touch with one another. 
The quarterly programme of the upper section includes 
soirees, excursions (with the juniors), extempore speeches, 
singing and reciting contests for prizes, and addresses by 
the Union speakers and workers in the senior Band of 
Hope. Within the last three months twenty have joined 
the senior from the ranks of the upper section. The 
younger members are drafted into the upper society 
without an entrance fee or any formality of election. We 
have 112 senior members, the branch which they have 
left being replenished by the junior society, which 
numbers 250. Much of the success of a senior society 
depends on the ability of the conductors to rightly appre¬ 
ciate and deal with the human nature of young people at 
a critical age ; he will succeed who neither snubs nor un¬ 
duly pets and praises his members. 

Hackney, (Basing Place). —Mr. J. J. Davis, 70, 
Pownall Road, Dalstcn, writes:—Our senior society is 
now eight years old, and has been from the first self-sup¬ 
porting, both financially and otherwise, and thus appeals 
very usefully to the energies of the members, who find 
the money, furnish the programmes, and manage the 
affairs. Sometimes we leave the entire programme of a 
meeting to two or three ; at other times two or three 
seniors give addresses at the junior meetings. We 
exercise our young people in ten minute speeches on 
given topics. An amusing item may be worth special 
mention. On a certain evening the female members 
bring with them various penny articles; these are 
assigned by ballot to the requisite number of male mem¬ 
bers, each of whom is expected tc make a short speech 
on the article thus drawn, and is, if he acquits himself 
well, allowed to retain it as his reward ! On one occasion 
we had 22 articles, and only two were in duplicate. We 
are not simply a singing class, nor yet exclusively a 
devotional society, although once in the quarter we meet 
specially for prayer and an earnest religious address—but 
we open all meetings with singing and prayer. We have 
a very large staff of officers, and a large committee, and 
so keep capital order and full interest at the meetings of 
both branches. Many former members are now steady 
workers elsewhere, some as conductors of other societies, 
and some as honorary speakers on the staff of our local 
Union. 





6 3 


THE BAND. OF HOPE CHRONICLE, 


Kentish Town (Congregational).— Mr.Carreras, 32, 
Oseney Crescent, Kentish Town, N. W., writes:—We found 
the formation of a senior society useful in two ways. We 
not only retained our seniors, but we secured their friends, 
and soon reached a total of sixty regularly attending 
members. We find some difficulty in sustaining the in¬ 
terest, and aim at utilising the abilities of the members 
themselves to this end. Our programme is always based 
on that of a literary society, and consists of essays,debates, 
papers, &c., with but little restriction as to subject. 
Members are represented on the committee by two young 
people of each sex, who are elected by their fellow seniors, 
and called “ representative members,” and the presence 
of these we find to be of much practical use. We have 
a cricket club, and sometimes give entertainments to other 
societies. 

King’s-Cross. — Mr. G. J. Garner writes :—Fifteen 
years age we assembled our members of over fourteen 
years of age, and in conjunction with them formed our 
senior society, which has continued until now. We work 
largely upon the Mutual Improvement plan, sometimes a 
member being deputed to make the arrangements for the 
programme of a certain night. We have had with much 
advantage a MS. magazine, with a capable officer or 
member as editor. This is a capital vehicle of work for 
all who cannot or will not sing or speak. At the less im¬ 
portant of our meetings we make our young men chair¬ 
men. We try to discover all our talent and then to use 
it. Our meetings are weekly and continuous, and this we 
think a matter of much importance. It is also very 
necessary to put the young people at their ease by making 
them feel rather as partners in the meeting than as objects 
of it. We have been favoured during these years with a 
very large measure of success. In April next we shall 
celebrate the twenty-first anniversary of junior society, 
when at one, out of a series of four public meetings, all the 
speeches will be given by past and present senior members 
(two of whom are now ministers). The auxiliary’s list of 
speakers contains two of our members, whilst four others 
are acting as conductors and secretaries of Bands of 
Hope. At a recent public meeting, two and a-half hours 
were easily occupied with miscellaneous items, all of which 
were the compositions of our seniors. 

Lambeth (York Road). —Mr. W. Rowsell, 1, Walcot 
Square, Kennington-road, S.E., writes :— We draw 
largely on our own members in carrying on our senior 
society, and do our best to make our monthly programme 
useful and attractive. We have 43 members; the 
average attendance is 29, and there is every indication of 
increasing success in this part of our work. 

Mile End (Latimer Chapel).— Mr. G. W. Williams, 
101, Antill-road, Bow, E., writes:—I at one time found 
some little difficulty in prevailing on my elder seniors to 
look favourably on juniors who, on reaching fourteen 
years of age, are promoted to their society, and certainly 
think fourteen is the lowest age at which the transfer can 
be made. By a little tact and previous consultation the 
difficulty may, however, be lessened, and has in our case 
been completely overcome. We endeavour to discover 
and utilise all talent, and in this way have filled many 
important offices in the senior society. I find it a good 
plan to bring the elder juniors to the front by means of 
singing and recitations, and thus pave the way to their 
ultimate transfer. The best way out of the whole difficulty 
is to form a senior society, to officer it from amongst the 
members, and to put some of these on the committee. 
Local and special circumstances must, of course, be taken 
into account, but this is the solution which we have found 
the best. 

Plaistow. —Mr.W. Huggett, Caroline Villa, Park-road, 
West Ham, E., writes :—The principles underlying our 
plan of work are (1) the employment of every member, 
and (2) the encouragement of an esprit de corps in the 
various sections into which we have divided our forces. 


T)ur meetings consist of addresses and entertainments 
’^alternately, and the charge of these is undertaken by each 
section in turn, one member of the section thus at work 
acting as leader. New members join the section, con¬ 
ducting the meeting at which their adhesion is secured. 
By this plan we get rid of monotony, divide the labour, 
and encourage a wholesome emulation between the various 
bands of members. I may say that although the programme 
is left to the discretion of the young people, we have not 
once had occasion to object to a single item. The weekly 
pence is collected and the attendance registered by the 
section in charge of the meeting. When wisely and 
vigorously worked by a capable man I think this scheme 
is sure of success. 

Plumstead Common (Wesleyan). —Mr. G. T. Rad¬ 
ford, 56, Vicarage Road, Plumstead, S. E., writes:—We 
have a good senior society of seventy members, with an 
attendance of about fifty, the age running from fourteen 
to twenty-one. We vary our meetings as much as 
possible, but make singing a prominent feature. The 
members take a prominent part in all meetings. We make 
a great point of recognising our members when we meet 
them casually in the street or elsewhere, and look up 
absentees. Our annual social soiree and summer excursion 
help us to retain our seniors. It is a great point also to 
always address senior members in a tone suitable to adults, 
and not in one suitable only for children. 

Plumstead.— Mr. J. Truscott, 17, Park Street, Plum¬ 
stead, S.E., writes:—We started our senior society in 
1885 with 20 members; we now have 120. We meet weekly 
on the same night as the juniors, the contribution being 
one penny per week. We make the meetings as interest¬ 
ing as possible, and conduct them on the same general 
lines as those of the junior society, but more advanced in 
tone, thus meeting the wants and tastes of our older 
members. 

Spitalfields (Friends’ Band of Hope, Wheeler 
Street). —Mr. Edwin Dutch, who has been intimately 
associated for many years with this society, which is one 
of the most successful in London, writes :—I would 
recommend the general formation of senior branches, to 
consist of all those at present in the junior society over 
fourteen years of age, and any under that age who go to 
work, and may be unable to attend the junior meetings. 
For the first few weeks it would be well to let the members 
take an active part in nearly every meeting, and before 
arranging the monthly or quarterly programme some of 
the elder members should be taken into confidence 
and asked what they would suggest. The members 
should be asked to take part in the management of the 
society, either on the committee, or as officers, such as 
registrar, collector, visitor, &c. Let the young people 
see that their help is wanted ; draw them out to assist in 
the work, and as their responsibility increases so will 
their interest in the society. When a competition for 
these offices arises, which is very desirable, an election 
by ballot at stated periods will be found to be advan¬ 
tageous. In working amongst senior lads [and girls, it 
must be remembered that they will not be treated as 
children; they begin to feel their importance, and this 
feeling naturally increases as they become young men and 
women. In my experience of eleven years I may say 
that the best plan we found to keep up the interest of the 
members was to have a very diversified programme, with 
as many entertainments as possible, not forgetting at 
right intervals the more solid matter of our movement in 
the shape of lectures, &c., illustrating the evil effects of 
alcohol. The giving of entertainments to other societies 
we find to be of great help in keeping the members 
interested in the society, and increasing their general 
interest in the movement. [Mr. Dutch has prepared 
a useful and suggestive manual, entitled “Band of 
Hope Work and its Future,’’price 3d., which may be had 
at the office of the Union.] 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


64 

TEMPERANCE LECTURES IN DAY 
SCHOOLS. 


F. W. RICHARDSON, F.C.S., F.S.A., 
has been good 'enough to send us an 
account of his lectures on "Alcohol,” 
in the Bradford Board Schools. He 
says :— 

“ It was with some little temerity that 
I at first entered upon the work. It 
occurred to me that some of the 
principals and teachers might conside 
the lectures an objectionable innovation. To my 
agreeable surprise no tokens of disapproval were 
manifested ; on the contrary, I was welcomed every¬ 
where with much courtesy, and many good wishes 
have been expressed for the influence of the lectures 
on the children’s minds. Many of the teachers are 
acquainted with some science: yet I have not received 
one word of objection to the scientific positions which 
I took up against alcohol. Some of the principals 
have informed me of their wish that this sort of work 
might be continued; chiefly for the good of the scholars, 
and partly as an agreeable change to the everyday routine 
of the school. A particularly pleasing feature was that 
several teachers should make notes for the purpose, as 
they informed me, of giving an account of the lecture to 
their Band of Hope scholars. Thus we may expect the 
fruits of our work to be greater than we at first anticipated; 
for the influence will extend itself beyond the walls of the 
school. Thus much have I said concerning principals 
and teachers ; but what of the scholars ? Well, sir, their 
attention has been most excellent, and the prospect of a 
prize has stimulated many to listen ‘ with all the ears that 
they had.’ It is pleasant to think that the notes those 
dear boys and girls have taken will impress on their minds 
some facts concerning the pernicious qualities of alcohol 
and the drinks that contain it. Then in the evening after 
the lecture, those who have taken notes would sit down 
and scratch their heads, and write down in their ponderous 
juvenile manner all they could remember, in the way of 
illustration, about their skeleton-notes; then when the 
• reproduction 1 was finished they would read it to their 
parents, and brothers and sisters, and thus they would get 
to know something about alcohol, and the essayists 
themselves would impress upon their own minds facts, 
like seeds in good ground, one day to bear fruit. 

“ One schoolmaster spoke thus to me, in effect: ‘ I often 
give my boys and girls lessons on temperance. Ah ! I 
could write many a touching little story concerning drink 
and its influence upon the little histories of some of these 
poor children.’ 

“ It has been a custom with me to take the boys and 
girls into my confidence ; for instance, I have asked, ‘ How 
many of you have heard your parents offering spirits to 
friends, in cold weather, for the purpose of “ keeping the 
cold out ” ? ’ Then up would go some scores of hands 
answering the question with an eager affirmative. Then 
when it was explained to them how that, as they had 
written down—‘Alcohol starves the body’—they would 
listen eagerly, no doubt intending henceforth to teach 
their parents a thing or two. 

"The work has been more pleasant than I at first 
anticipated it would be; because instead of cold looks I 
have found hearty welcomes ; instead of stolid indifference 
I have found the good ground of an earnest receptivity, 
and it is our prayer that, in the course of God’s good 
providence, these seeds of natural truth, may grow to 
sturdy and fruitful plants, to bear rich fruits of sober and 
healthful lives.” 


OUR BOOK TABLE. 


HOSE Bands of Hope which intend to keep 
the Jubilee year by strengthening their 
libraries will have no lack of attractive 
material from which to make their selections. 
Month by month the publishers produce new 
books and new editions of old works, and it 
is a matter for astonishment how they all find 
a market. 

The Wesleyan Sunday School Union is 
apparently giving increased attention to its 
publication department. The Union sends 
us a bulky parcel, the binding and printing of the several 
volumes leaving nothing to be desired, although in the 
matter of illustrations we must confess that we are hardly 
reconciled to the system of outline sketches adopted by the 
Union. Wild Lottie and Wee Winnie; or. Led by a Little Child, 
by Ashton Neill, is a homely tale of the good old-fashioned 
type, winding up with a “ general order ” to all and sundry 
to go and get married and be happy ever after. Mother 
Freeman, by J. W. Keyworth, is a tale which grows upon 
one. The tender pathos, and at times intense dramatic 
interest, of the incidents are especially noticeable. Our 
daughters will be delighted with the record of a mother’s 
love. Soul Echoes ; or, Reflected Influence, by Sarson C. J. 
Ingham, has reached a second edition. The plot shows 
considerable constructive skill, and perhaps we pay the 
writer a compliment when we say that she has by no means 
made as much of her leading idea as she might have done. 
Hagar's Reparation, by Edith Cornforth.is a charming story 
of the home life of a minister’s family. The dainty sketch 
of the young artist is very well done ; indeed, the whole of 
this little book is marked by good workmanship. Harold 
and His Sisters in Norway, by Henry H. M’Callagh, B A., 
gives an interesting glimpse of the ways and doings of the 
inhabitants of " the land of the midnight sun.” The experi¬ 
ences of the travellers are cast in the form of a tale, and 
within the compass of eight chapters the author has con¬ 
trived to pack a fund of interesting information. Echoes of the 
Word, by John Hugh Morgan, is a reprint of a series of 
expository papers contributed to the Wesleyan Methodist 
Sunday School Magazine. They have the merit of keeping 
very close to the sacred text, and should thus prove useful to 
Sunday-school teachers. The author is perhaps not aware 
that he has almost appropriated as a title : the name of a 
popular little book by Frances Ridley Havergal, pub¬ 
lished a few years ago, and has thus laid himself open to 
the charge of infringing somebody’s copyright ! Sarson's 
\Golden Text Stories are a series of little penny books 
attractively written and illustrated. 

Messrs. Cassell & Co. send us The King's Command, A 
Story for Girls, by Maggie Symington. It is a powerfully 
written tale, overflowing with wise counsels, and one 
which will bear reading again and again. The eight 
original illustrations by Hal Ludlow are in this artist’s 
well-known style. Strong to Suffer, A Story of the Jews, by 
E. Wynne, is also from the same publishers. The writer 
shows remarkable aptitude in reproducing the scenes of 
those holy fields nearly two thousand years ago, and although 
the historic element naturally predominates the charm of 
the narrative comes well to the front—indeed, the book 
is a happy illustration of fact and fiction in combination. 
In Perils Afloat and Brigands Ashore, by Alfred Elwes, we 
have a capital book for boys. It is full of healthy adven¬ 
tures described by a pen which seems to hit upon the 
points which rivet a lad’s attention. Here and there im¬ 
probabilities loom rather large, but after all truth is 
stranger than fiction,and the writer may be congratulated 
upon adding a substantial contribution to every boy’s 
library. The illustrations by Mr. Gordon Browne 
greatly add to the attractiveness of the book, which will 
no doubt be in request for birthday presents. 







THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


6 5 


(Kotresponlience. 

A PLEASANT AND USEFUL VARIETY. 

To the Editor of the Band of Hope Chronicle. 

Dear Sir, —I am requested by the Committee of our 
Ladies’ Midland Association for the Promotion of Kind¬ 
ness to Animals to ask if Bands of Hope will give our 
cause a little assistance. There is so much that is in 
harmony in the two subjects that we would like to sug¬ 
gest to Band of Hope conductors to vary their proceedings 
by giving an occasional address on the proper treatment 
of animals, and also to encourage their members to enrol 
themselves as members of Bands of Mercy, taking upon 
themselves the special duty of protecting the helpless. As 
a worker for many years in a large Band of Hope, I 
know that we often found it advantageous to introduce 
other subjects than temperance, and thus give variety to 
the proceedings ; it certainly interested the children ; and 
we are justified in believing that by turning the thoughts 
of young people into care for animals and any creature 
dependent on them we are helping- to develope a noble 
sense of love and duty, which is one safeguard amid the 
temptations of growing boy and girlhood. Thus to unite 
the two subjects is certainly better than forming two dis¬ 
tinct Societies, for while it would not give any additional 
work to those already engaged in training the rising 
generation in the paths of sobriety, it would afford such 
an extended range of subjects to the ordinary meetings as 
would bring, we believe, fresh adherents,and would enlist 
in the work of the Bands of Hope many who feel their 


duty lies in pleading for those who cannot speak for them¬ 
selves, thus obeying the command, “Thou shalt open thy 
mouth for the dumb.” We have heard of one town 
where an annual exhibition of " Pets” takes place, small 
prizes being given for such as give evidence of having 
received the greatest care. That this is worthy of adoption 
in other places there can be no doubt; it is an admirable 
plan for retaining the interest of the older members at a 
time when they may have begun to feel that temperance 
lessons cannot be listened to for long courses of years 
without a desire to have occasionally some other topic 
brought under their notice. If you will kindly insert our 
appeal in the Chronicle our Committee will feel greatly 
indebted to you ; its interesting temperance addresses are 
truly useful, and I believe it only requires your advocacy 
to have the subject of kindness to animals taken up as a 
kindred topic to temperance, and inculcated in many 
towns and villages where Bands of Hope already exist. 

Yours truly, 

Edgbaston, Birmingham. (Mrs.) Caroline C. Barrow. 

[It gives us pleasure to insert this communication from a lady 
who laboured long and successfully in connection with Bands ot Hope. 
We think the suggestion an admirable one. It is, as we have often 
urged, most important to introduce variety into our proceedings, and 
the subject suggested will, we are confident, commend itself to all our 
friends. A few numbers of that excellent periodical “ The Animal 
World,” would supply all that is needed, whilst doubtless the Royal 
Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals would, on applica¬ 
tion, supply a small packet of tracts. Our friends may be reminded that 
the Parent Society, as well as the Bradford Union, have splendid sets 
of dissolving view slides on this subject It may be well for us to 
remember that, even apart horn an}' special instruction on this subject, 
Bands of Hope are doing much to prevent cruelty not only to animals, 
but to unprotected women and children —Ed.] 


ffllmtelr Umcj&om Battti of Hope Onion. 


THE COMPETITIVE EXAMINATION. 

E hope to announce the result of 
the competitive examination in 
the next issue of the Chronicle, 
but in the meantime our friends 
will be glad to know that the 
effort has been very satisfactory. 
Over 3,000 young people entered 
for the examination, this number 
being, however, somewhat reduced through non- 
fulfilment of the conditions, 2,683 papers having: 
been sent in. 

The papers were distributed as follows :—• 


9 years of age 

. 85 

10 

99 

9 9 

224 

11 

9 9 

9 9 

. 398 

12 

99 

9 9 

. 544 

13 

9 9 

9 9 

. 511 

H 

9 9 

99 

. 3 I 9 

15 

99 

99 

195 

16 

99 

9 9 

. 181 

1 7 

99 

99 

. 87 

18 

99 

99 

. 6 3 

19 

99 

99 

. 5i 

20 

9 9 

9 9 

. 25 

Total 2,683 


The papers are now in the hands of the fol¬ 
lowing gentlemen, who have kindly undertaken 
to act as examiners:—Dr. J. J. Ridge; Revs. 
J. Blandford, J. Compston, Charles Chambers, 
R. H. Dugdale, C. E. Escreet, M.A., W. 
Essery, John Farren, John Foster, J. Fletcher, 
G. D. Hooper, David Heath, Thos. Jarratt,T. T. 
Lambert, E. Schnadhorst, M.A., G. S. Smith, R. 
Shaen, J. Capes Story, T. de Vine ; Messrs. 
Thomas Adkins, James Boyer,H.Forbes Clarke, 
Jacob Earnshaw, C. W. Garrard, J. B. George, 
F.L.S., Wm. Hoyle, Rowland Hill, Edward 
Joy, R. Wilson, T. H. Wyatt; Mrs. Arbuthnot; 
Miss Docwra, and Miss Annie Young. 

Whilst the result attained is gratifying• as 
showing a large amount of excellent temperance 
teaching imparted in a systematic and thorough 
way, we cannot help regretting that so large a 
number of those who take up the study of the 
text-book do not continue to the end. It is 
satisfactory, however, to know that all have at 
least acquired an amount of useful knowledge 
which will be helpful to them in after life. 

THE MAY MEETINGS. 

We trust that the present early notification of 
the anniversary meetings, which will be of a 
specially attractive character, will determine 














66 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


our friends not only to be present themselves, 
but to extend the movement by securing tickets 
for persons interested in the young who are not 
yet abstainers, but whose sympathy and support 
it is desirable to secure. Representatives from 
all parts of the country will attend the Council 
Meeting on Tuesday, May igth, at which the 
report of the year’s work will be presented, and 
when friends will compare notes as to the pro¬ 
gress of the work. The Breakfast meetings on 
the Wednesday have always been pleasant and 
useful, and the forthcoming gathering on the 
morning of May nth bids fair to be as important 
and interesting as any preceding similar 
occasion. Lord Mount-Temple will preside, and 
brief addresses will be delivered by Miss Agnes 
Weston, who will give an account of Tempe¬ 
rance work amongst the lads of the Royal 
Navy, Mrs. Ormiston Chant, Dr. Rutherford 
(of Newcastle-on-Tyne), and other well-known 
friends. At the afternoon meeting Major-General 
Desborough, C.B., will preside, and the follow¬ 
ing short papers will be read:—(i) “Do we 
want Separate Meetings for Junior and Senior 
Members? ” by Mr.T. E. Hallsworth,one of the 
Honorary Secretaries of the Lancashire and 
Cheshire Band of Hope Union; ( 2 ) “The 
Visitation of Absent Members,” by Mr. H. 
Martin Sells, of Redhill ; and ( 3 ) “How we 
Manage our Band of Hope,” by Mr. W. T. 
Taylor, of Avenue-road Band of Hope, London. 
The great evening meeting will doubtless be 
crowded and interesting. The President will 
be in the chair, and addresses will be given by 
Rev. W. W. Perrin, M.A. (Vicar of St. Luke’s, 
Southampton), Rev.Dr. Rutherford (Newcastle- 
on-Tyne), Rev. T. B. Stephenson, LL.D. 
(the Children’s Home, London), and others. 
Gratuitous tickets for any of these meetings will 
be sent to friends from a distance on applica¬ 
tion to the General Secretary. 


LECTURES IN PROVINCIAL SCHOOLS. 

Our provincial friends are requested to bear 
in mind the suggestions made in the last issue 
of the Chronicle on the subject of special 
temperance lectures in elementary schools, 
and attention is again called to the plan which 
the Committee propose to carry into effect 
for providing competent lecturers at a nominal 
fee. The Committee are now engaged in raising 
the necessary additional funds for this purpose, 
and they trust to be ready with their complete 
plan in time for the next issue of the Chronicle. 


MR. WILLIAM BELL. 

We trust that our friends will not forget the 
desirability of securing Mr. Bell's services for 


summer work. No temperance advocate is 
more suited for open-air meetings, and pro¬ 
vincial organisations will do well to book him 
for fetes, galas, demonstrations, and, indeed, 
any out-door gatherings. Mr. Bell will also, 
besides lecturing in the evenings, be prepared 
to deliver addresses in Day-schools, and to 
take part in conferences of Sunday-school 
teachers and other Christian workers. During 
May, June, July, and August, the Committee 
have decided to place Mr. Bell’s services at 
the disposal of local Unions and societies at 
a nominal rate, in addition to travelling 
expenses, and an excellent opportunity will 
thus be afforded of accomplishing a great 
amount of good at a small cost. ^Vacant dates, 
and a full syllabus of Mr. Bell’s lectures, can 
be had on application to the General Secretaiy, 
4 , Ludgate Hill. 


MR. FRANK ADKINS. 

During the summer months Mr. Frank 
Adkins’ services will be available for organis¬ 
ing or mission work in the provinces. A 
visit from Mr. Adkins will prove invaluable 
where friends are desirous of forming local 
Unions or establishing societies. In addition 
to organising work during the day Mr. Adkins 
will be prepared to deliver in the evening 
a special lecture, illustrated by diagrams, 
simple experiments and specimens, showing 
the analysis of bread and beer, and entitled 
“False Pretences, or Weighed and Found 
Wanting.’ - This lecture is so arranged as to be 
equally acceptable to adult or juvenile audiences, 
and has been found exceedingly useful. In 
order to bring Mr. Adkins’ services within 
the reach of every Union in the kingdom, the 
Committee are prepared to make a nominal 
charge only, and secretaries wishing to arrange 
for a visit either of long or short duration, should 
make application to the General Secretary for 
terms and vacant dates. 


©bttuatg. 

We deeply regret the severe bereavement which Mr. 
Stephen Shirley, the founder of the Union, and Chairman 
of its Committee, has sustained by the decease of his 
wife in her sixty-eighth year,after a married life extending 
over forty-four years. The event took place at Queen 
Square, London, on Sunday evening, March 20, Mrs. 
Shirley appearing as well as she has done for some time 
past up to within a few days previously, when she caught 
cold, which ultimately culminated in her decease. Mrs. 
Shirley’s name was not widely known in any public way, 
but those who had the pleasure of her acquaintance knew 
how intense was her interest in temperance work, and 
how persistently and intelligently she seconded all her 
husband’s labours in that department with which his name 
has been so long and so honourably associated. We are 
certain that our readers will share in our sincere sympathy 
with our friend in this his last and greatest loss. 







THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE, 


6 7 


Bccortrs of progress from 2.0cal ^octettes. 


Banti of Unions. 

Birmingham. —The annual public meeting took place in the Town 
Hall on Tuesday, Feb. 14th, the president, Alderman White, taking the 
chair, Referring to the good work done by the Union, the president 
said that there were in Birmingham 106 district Bands of Hope, com¬ 
prising between 16,000 and 17,000 members, and that, mainly through 
the action of the Union, twenty new societies had been called into 
existence. A letter was read from the borough coroner, who was 
detained by ill health, expressing his warm approval, founded on 
painful experience of the movement. Addresses were delivered by the 
Hon Conrad Dillon, Rev. G. W. McCree, Rev. Joseph Charles, Rev. 
Councillor Bloor. During the evening solos were sung by a lady, and 
various selections given by the Union choir. Earlier in the day a paper 
on the extension of Temperance teaching by Band of Hope workers 
was read by the Hon. Conrad Dillon at a confeience of friends of the 
Union, and was followed by a useful and appreciative discussion. 

Bradford. —On Wednesday, March 3rd, the annual winter demon¬ 
stration took place in St. George’s Hall. Alderman J. Priestman pre¬ 
sided, and the hall was crowded. We learn from the report—the thirty- 
ninth—of which the chairman gave a summary, that the number of 
societies connected with the Union is 14T, with some 24,000 
members, of whom 7,000 are adults. The principal feature of the 
evening was a lecture by the Rev. Peter Mackenzie on “Daniel and His 
Dietary: or, Help for Hard Times," the subject being handled in a 
masterly fashion. A very efficient chorus of 460 voices, led by Mr. 
James Roberts, did good service, the most amusing feature being an 
“ Alphabeticalogue ” by twenty-six girls. The work of this Union is 
most thorough and far-reaching. It retains a special agent, arranges at 
least three great demonstrations in the year, has a dissolving view appa¬ 
ratus, a speakers’ plan, and devotes special attention to the children 
attending schools under the Board, and to other educational efforts. 

Brighouse and Rastrick —The twenty-fourth annual meeting was 
held in the Town Hall on Tuesday, Feb. 22nd. In the afternoon a 
special lecture was delivered by Mr. William Bell, entitled “ Red Lights 
on a Dark Road,” which was enthusiastically received. In the evening 
there was a full attendance at the public meeting, at which Mr. Henry 
Sugden took the chair. The Union choir of 140 voices took part in the 
proceedings. Mr. Thomas Whiteley read the report, which showed the 
year to have been one of steady progress. The Union had ten societies 
and 2,461 members. The income had been £79, and there was a balance 
in hand of ^26. The chairman gave an excellent address, and good 
speeches were made by Mr. John Parker and Mr. and Mrs. Cass, of 
Castleford. 

Essex (South). —The twelfth anniversary was celebrated at the new 
Conference Hall, Stratford ; the council met on Saturday, Feb. 19th, 
for the reception of [the report, and election of officers, &c., and at the 
conclusion of this business a well attended conference was held under 
the presidency of Councillor Frederic Smith, of Stratford, when Mr. 
Frederick Sherlock, editorial secretary of the C.E.T.S , read a paper 
“ On Keeping the Jubilee.” On the following Tuesday the collectors 
and friends to the number of about 300 had tea together in the Lower 
Hall, and the annual demonstration was afterwards held in the Large 
Hall. Mr. C. Boardman presided, and addresses were delivered by Rev. 
Joseph Fletcher, and Rev. T. T. Lambert. Excellent vocal and instru¬ 
mental music was rendered by a choir of 300 senior members and an 
orchestra, under the direction of Mr. J. Gransden ; prizes were also dis¬ 
tributed to the most successful collectors in the Christmas and New 
Year's collection. The meeting was attended by about 2,000 persons. 

Portsmouth. —Fuller’s Hall witnessed the annual meeting of this 
Union on Wednesday, Feb. 23rd. Councillor Ward, supported by 
Colonel Owen Lanyon, J.P., presided. The Rev. G. Gregson, Major 
Naish, and Mr. W. E. Green, gave valuable addresses. The report 
recorded the membership of 32 societies with 6,415 adherents. Pieces 
were sung by the choir, and a competition in recitation proved a very 
interesting episode in the engagements of the evening. 

Reading. —The first report of this Union has been issued, and records 
the manner of its origin in Febuary, 1886, when Miss Annie Young, hav¬ 
ing read a paper on “County Band of Hope Unions—their Work,” it 
was agreed to form a Union for the town and district. A constitution 
was adopted, and eleven societies speedily enrolled; since then the mem¬ 
bership has increased to 24 societies with 4,500 members. Necessarily 
this first year has been chiefly devoted to the task of organisation, but 
the committee were able to arrange for a distribution of leaflets on 
children and public-houses,for a speakers’ plan, and a conversazione, at 
which a special address was given by Mr. Charles Wakely. 

Reigate and Red hill. —An interesting gathering took place at the 
schools in the Cromwell Road, on Thursday, Feb. 24th, when about 130 
workers in Bands of Hope met for conference and mutual help. Mr. 
W. A. Duncan presided, and in conjunction with Mr. H. M. Sills gave a 
very useful illustrated address on the use of the blackboard. The next 
subject for consideration was the visitation of absentees, the experience 
of Mr. Sells, whose society at St. Matthew's is well worked in this res¬ 
pect, being of special value. Of his 470 members only five have broken 
the pledge throughout the year. The subject of 1 ' The Band of Hope as 
an Adjunct to the Church" was introduced by Mr. J. Lucas, and prac¬ 
tically applied by Mr. C. Wakely. Thirteen societies were repre¬ 
sented at the meeting. 

Scarborough.— On Friday, Feb. 18th, a drawing-room meeting of 
elementary school teachers was held at the Old Bank, in response to 


an invitation from Mr. and Mrs. Blanchhard. The meeting was most 
influentially attended, the leading abstainers in the town being present 
to meet and confer with the teachers. The Rev. J. Robertson read a 
paper entitled “Wanted a Remedy,” and was followed by Mr. E. 
Grubb, M.A., with a paper “A Teacher’s Work in the Temperance 
Cause.” Afree interchange of opinion took place, and the effort will 
doubtless bear good fruit 

Surrey —This Union held their anniversary of the Croydon United 
Bands of Hope on Tuesday, March 15th. The chair was taken by 
Franklin S. King, Esq., who spoke of the advantages of training the 
young up in the principles of total abstinence from intoxicating drinks. 
The meeting was addressed by J. B. Crossfield, Esq., and R. Wilson, 
Esq. Captain Campbell gave.a lecture on his visits to the Red Sea, 
the Nile, the great Pyramid, and other interesting parts of Egypt, illus¬ 
trating his lecture with his limelight dissolving view apparatus. The 
singing was rendered by the united choirs, conducted by Mr. E. Luckett. 
A resolution was passed by the meeting expressing sympathy with the 
family of Thos. 1 Johns, Esq., on the death of his son, Thos. Johns, jun., 
who was for many years superintendent of the Croydon district of the 
Surrey Band of Hope Union, also a very active worker in all temperance 
and Sunday-school work. 

Tower Hamlets. (London) —The eleventh, and most largely 
attended of the demonstrations annually held by this Union took place 
on March 7th at the Great Assembly Hall, Mile End, under the pre¬ 
sidency of the Rev. Canon Fleming, in the unavoidable absence of the 
Bishop of Bedford. The large hall was crowded to excess, and it was 
estimated that there could not have been less than five thousand persons 
present. Assembled on the platform, and in a portion of the galleries, 
were the members of the large and efficient choir attached to the Union, 
under the direction of Mr. G. W. Williams. Mr. W. G. Colbert, secre¬ 
tary, gave an abstract of the annual report, showing the strength of the 
Union to be 82 societies, and 9,420 members ; several conferences and 
aggregate meetings had been held in the various districts, and a con¬ 
versazione for senior members at the Poplar Town Hall; the plan of 
holding quarterly prayer meetings had also been carried out; financial 
progress had been made, the deficit being reduced to 2C1 is. tod. An 
eloquent address was delivered by the chairman, and was followed by 
several part-songs, choruses, and solos, together with an address by Mr. 
Raper, of the United Kingdom Alliance. 

— On Saturday, February 26th, by invitation of the committee, 
a large number of Sunday-school teachers and Band of Hope 
workers met at the Edinburgh Castle, Rhodewell Road, to con¬ 
sider the question of “ The Relationship of the Band of Hope to the 
Sunday-school,” the chair being taken by Dr. Barnardo. The subject 
was introduced by Rev. E. Schnadhorst, M.A., and was followed by a 
brisk discussion. A resolution was adopted urging the establishment of 
Bands of Hope in all Sunday-schools, and pledging the meeting to 
assist every such effort. Votes of thanks were passed to Dr. Barnardo 
for the use of the hall, and to the various friends who had taken part in 
the proceedings. 

Three Towns—Plymouth Stonehouse, and Devonport. —A 

united meeting was recently held in George Street Schoolroom, Ply¬ 
mouth, presided over by Rev. Professor Anthony. Mr. John Ripley 
addressed the meeting and was followed by Mr. Harbord, of Norwich. 
Various songs and solos enlivened the evening. 

West London. —The . London Auxiliary, hitherto known as the 
Chelsea and Westminster Union, has been re-named the West London 
Union. Its area remains as before, and it comprises the boroughs of 
Chelsea, Fulham, Hammersmith, 1, North and South Kensington, St. 
George’s (Hanover Square), Strand, and Hammersmith. 


jffileftopolitan Mantis of i^ope. 

Christ Church, Bermondsey. —Owing to the great success of the 
junior Band of Hope established two years since, some of whose 
members have somewhat outgrown the meetings, it has-been resolved to 
form a senior branch. The first meeting for this purpose was held on 
Thursday, February 17th, when a neighbouring senior society paid a 
friendly visit The proceedings were partly ot the nature of an enter¬ 
tainment and partly of a business character, as rules were adopted,officers 
elected, and a capital programme of future meetings drawn out. The 
Lord Bishop of Rochester has kindly consented to become the president 
of the society. Our friends, therefore, begin their work with every 
prospect of success. 

Kentish Town Congregational. —The twelfth annual meeting 
was held on Friday, February 25th, in the schoolroom, when 420 friends 
were present. Mr. H. L.W. Lawson, M.P., took the chair ; the report 
was read by Mr. A. G. Richardson ; 233 members are on the books, and 
115 pledges had been taken during the year—59 more than the year 
before. Duri»g the evening songs, solos, and recitations were given, 
and addresses delivered by Rev. C. J- Whitmore, Rev. Z. B.Woffendale, 
and the Chairman. The proceedings in every respect were most satis¬ 
factory. 

[Many other interesting reports are crowded out through want 
of space. —Ed.] 



68 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


GENERAL TEMPERANCE TOPICS. 


E transfer of brewing concerns from private 
firms to public companies continues. A 
recent calculation shows that thirteen of these 
businesses, with a capital of nearly twelve 
millions, have undergone this change. The 
vendors have deemed it wise to "limit” their 
■'liability.” This we take to be a significant 
sign of the times, and one of ill augury for 
the brewers’ business. If profits seemed 
likely to increase we may be pretty sure 
so much eagerness would not be shown to invite others 
to share them. 

* * 

* 

In the United States lecturers seldom or ever make 
their own engagements; these are managed through a 
Bureau, an institution for which we have no exact counter¬ 
part on this side of the water. We are glad to notice 
that an office of this kind for the arrangement of temper¬ 
ance lectures exclusively is in operation in New York, and 
is found very useful both to societies and lecturers. The 
managers speak highly of the assistance they find in their 
work from the amount of training in the subject given to 
young people in past years, the talents of many of whom 
are by this means turned to good account. 

* * 

* 

A well sustained as well as a most useful work is that 
carried on at the Great Central Hall, Bishopsgate, London. 
The report just issued shows that during the past year, 
the twenty-sixth of its operation, 260 meetings have been 
held, and 1,700 pledges taken. Mr. W. I. Palmer 
presided at the annual meeting, and Mr. W. S. Caine, 
M. P., was among the speakers. A presentation was made 
in the course of the evening to Mr. George Ling, to whom 
the success of this useful institution is very largely due. 

* * 

Sir Charles Warren has recently borne decisive 
testimony to the value of Band of Hope work, testimony 
all the more valuable because by his own confession he 
was originally prejudiced against these institutions. He 
has, however, been compelled to yield to the irresistible 
logic of facts,as he found them in the army and elsewhere, 
and at the annual meeting of the Derby Band of Hope 
Union very earnestly advocated the extension and mul¬ 
tiplication of these societies. 

* * 

During the last eight years 61,259 seamen, fishermen, 
and bargemen, besides many of their families, signed the 
pledge of total abstinence as members of the Mission to 
Seamen Branch of the C.E.T.S. They have found even 
the bitter cold of the North Sea more bearable in the 
absence of the rum pannikin. Universal abstinence of 
this class would soon put an end to the unholy gains of 
the “ coopers,” or contraband spirit vessels, which con¬ 
stitute the chief moral danger of the fishermen when 
afloat. 

* * 

* 

_ Easter week is utilized by the Good Templar Organisa¬ 
tion for the holding of a series of meetings in the 
metropolis. The Memorial Hall, Farringdon Street, has 
been secured for the various conferences, and it is hoped 
on one of the evenings to fill the Royal Victoria Hall with 
young Good Templars, under the presidency of Mr. 
Conybeare, M.P. We hope our friends will have a “ good 
time.” 


Mr. Shirley, M.P. for Doncaster, has introduced a 
Bill into Parliament for closing public-houses on polling 
days. The terms of the Bill are imperative, and its 
penalties sufficient. Many of us are old enough to 
remember the bad old times of polling booths open for 
a week, no ballot, and public-houses doing a roaring 
trade before, during, and after an election. It was a step 
in the right direction when the Act passed forbidding the 
use of licensed premises as election committee rooms, and 
Mr. Shirley’s measure, if carried, will be a longer step 
still. Men certainly should have clear heads whilst dis¬ 
charging the duties of citizenship. 

* * 

* 

Several publicans have recently been fined for adulte¬ 
rating the beer which they dispense to a credulous genera¬ 
tion. We are glad to find that the adulteration was in 
most cases rather an improvement than otherwise, and 
consisted simply of the addition of water and sugar. In 
some instances, however, ‘‘ body ” and “ head ” were pro¬ 
duced by very objectionable means. Truly the path of even 
the most moderate of drinkers is beset by snares, and we 
more than ever rejoice in our freedom. 

* * 

* 

The Help Myself Society, of which Mr.W. I. Palmer is 
so generous a supporter, had a grand field day at Reading 
recently, when 1,800 members and friends met at the Town 
Hall under Mr. Palmer’s presidency. Mr. Duncan S. Miller 
and his band of hand-bell ringers greatly delighted the 
large audience. The president of the society hardly 
exemplifies its title by his own practice, for he seems to 
prefer the occupation of constantly helping other people to 
that of helping himself. Yet he, and others like him, reap 
a rich reward in the knowledge of good effected through 
his agency. 

* * 

More testimony from the Life Insurance Offices and 
the more the better. This time the Victoria Mutual 
Assurance Society speaks in its report for the past year ; 
we read : “ The claims during the past five years were 
39’25 per cent, of the premiums paid in the general section 
as compared with a percentage of 24-19 in the temperance 
section.” It may, perhaps, interest our C.E.T.S. friends 
if we remind them that these societies are managed on 
the Dual Basis, and serve to show how distinctly the 
teetotalers have the best of it. 

-If * 

* 

A recent parliamentary return shows that the expen¬ 
diture in alcoholic drinks in workhouses in England and 
Wales has been reduced from £60,303 in 1881 to £44,820 
in 18S5. In 1871 it stood at £82,554. If really is too bad 
that hard working teetotalers, who find no small difficulty 
in making both ends honestly meet, should have to pay 
increased poor rates to supply drink to those who chiefly 
through drink have bee ome a burden on the community. 

* * 

A very good suggestion was made at the recent con¬ 
vention held in London. It was proposed to send a packet 
of temperance publications to every elector in the United 
Kingdom. We should very much like to see this done, 
especially if a good word on behalf of the children were 
enclosed. In the meantime we are educating vast numbers 
of the electors of the future to vote the right way when the 
right time comes. 



THE 


'25cm6 of $ope (^Bx-ontcf'c 

Issued Monthly by the United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 


38anli of Hope Chronicle, 

MAY, 1887. ' 


MUSIC AS AN AID TO BAND OF HOPE 
WORK. 

By Judson Bonner, 

Hon. Sec., South Essex Band, of Hope Union. 

II.— Instrumental Music. 

E importance of cultivating the voices of our 
children is so great, and the gift of song is 
so universal, that vocal music deserves the 
best attention of the Band of Hope con¬ 
ductor. The vocal organs form the grandest, 
the sweetest, and the most wonderful of all 
musical instruments, because Divinely con¬ 
structed ; and to a lover of God’s handi¬ 
work it seems a pity, almost amounting to 
a sin, for such an instrument to be allowed 
to rust out, or to be used for anything short of its Creator's 
glory. The voice may often be assisted, however, by an 
instrument, and especially is this the case in a Band of 
Hope meeting, from the well-known tendency of children’s 
voices to flatten, and the absence of heavier parts to fill up 
the harmony. A piano or harmonium, played with judg¬ 
ment, will tend to support the voices, and supply the lower 
parts ; but if played too loudly, it will either drown the 
singing, or tempt the children to shout, thus sacrificing more 
music than it produces. Where a large body of children are 
singing, a cornet or violin may be introduced, instead of, 
or in addition to, a piano or harmonium. The violin, more 
nearly resembling the human voice than any other instru¬ 
ment, is especially suitable for accompaniments. Having 
violins at hand for this purpose, a little instrumental music 
of a rather more novel character than is usually found 
in Band of Hope programmes may be introduced. The 
piano or harmonium, with violins and piccolo, will produce 
a very pleasing combination. If asked, “ Where are we 
to get our performers and instruments from ?” I reply, 
“ From our Bands of Hope. ” In very many societies 
families may be found whose fathers—although perhaps 
only working men—make music something of a hobby, 
and teach their children to play upon various instruments. 
I am intimately acquainted with such a family, the 
members of which, while possessing no extraordinary 
skill, are able to play very creditably upon a number of 
different instruments, as well as to sing and recite. They 
are thus able to conduct complete entertainments of an 
attractive character, and render valuable help in ordinary 
and special meetings of the Band of Hope. Where such 
a case does not exist, however, it is probable that a young 
man possessing musical talent may be seeking a sphere of 
usefulness ; being no speaker, and possibly not ready at 
penmanship, he does not quite see how he can help in the 
Band of Hope. Down upon him, earnest Band of Hope 
conductor, and show him how useful he may be in 
accompanying the singing at your meetings, or in teaching 
a few boys or girls to play upon some favourite instru¬ 
ment ; and you will surely succeed in securing an ally 
whose reinforcements will stand you well in many an hour 
of need! 

The question is often asked, '' Is a drum and fife band 

MAY, 1887 . 


calculated to assist a Band of Hope?” There is no 
doubt that some friends find them useful, especially for 
out-door processions, and under certain circumstances it 
is easy to perceive how this may be—although they can 
very well be dispensed with, especially by those who 
have the misfortune to live near the practise room, as they 
generally produce more noise than music. Three impor¬ 
tant precepts may be urged upon any who are determined 
to run the gauntlet of public indignation, and to start a 
drum and fife band as an auxiliary to the Band of Hope : 
1. Secure a teetotal bandmaster, who will take a real 
interest in what he does for the sake of the cause—not 
merely for the pay he receives. 2. Purchase instruments 
of the best quality from a house of undoubted repute. 
3. Do not run into heavy debt with the manufacturer. 
A drum and fife band in which I once took considerable 
interest was taught by an ex-military band-master—a 
very good man and an able teacher. His constant refer¬ 
ences to army and volunteer bands, however, fired the 
boys with such a spirit of martial emulation that after a 
time they forsook the Band of Hope meeting for the 
portals ot the nearest drill hall, where bad company did 
them more harm than we could do them good ; and in 
the end some of our lads who were apprentices ran away 
from their masters and joined the army. In purchasing 
instruments the cheapest should always be discarded ; a 
trifle more spent on the flutes will sometimes make all the 
difference between harmony and discord, between plea¬ 
sure and pain, between satisfaction and disgust. In 
paying for them, if instalments must be taken, get some 
friend or friends to advance the capital, so that the best 
advantage may be obtained from the maker, the instal¬ 
ments being handed over as received to those who 
advanced the outlay.* 

The following Rules may be suggestive:— 

RULES. 

1. —This Band shall be called the.Band of Hope Drum 

and Fife Band, and it shall consist only of members of the. 

Band of Hope. 

2. —It shall be under the management of a president, secretary, and 
committee of three persons, all of whom shall be elected annually by the 
Band of Hope Committee. 

3. —Two trustees shall be elected annually by the Band of Hope Com¬ 
mittee, in whom all band property shall be invested. 

4. —Candidates for membership must be proposed and seconded by 
members, and will be admitted subject to the approval of the committee 
and officers. 

5. —Each member shall pay an entrance fee of 6d., and a subscription 
of 3d. per week. The subscription must be paid whether the member 
attends or not. 

6. —Any member being in arrear more than two weeks shall be fined 
id. for each week in arrear, except in case of sickness. 

7. —Any member absenting himself from four successive practices 
(except through illness) will be liable to be struck off the roll. 

8. — Any member breaking any of the rules, or using profane language, 
or in any way misconducting himself, shall be fined id. for each offence ; 
and a continuance of such misconduct will render him liable to be expelled 
by the Committee. 

9. —All instruments shall be the property of the Band, and shall be 
used only at practices and marches out, and on no account for any 
other purpose whatever except by special permission of the Committee. 

10. —Any member leaving or being expelled the Band shall at once 
deliver up to the trustees any property of the Band in his possession, 
and failing to do this on request, he shall be dealt with by law. 

11. —Any money received for engagements shall be divided equally 
among the members taking part therein. 


* For the sake of assisting friends to form 'instrumental bands in a 
satisfactory manner, the Publication Department of the United Kingdom 
Band of Hope Union has made an arrangement with one of the most 
reliable manufacturers of drums and fifes, so that the_ outfit may be sup¬ 
plied at greatly reduced cost. The same privilege is also extended to 
all other musical instruments required for Band of Hope purposes.—E d. 












7 o 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


12. —No strangers shall be allowed in the Band-room, except such as 
may be introduced by members with a view to joining, or unless special 
permission be granted by the President or Band-master. 

13. —Strict obedience must at all times be observed during practice 
hours, and members of the Committee are requested to attend the 
practices and assist in preserving order. 

14. —These Rules may only be altered at a general meeting of the Band 
of Hope Committee, 

Our lady coadjutors may reasonably exclaim, “Drum 
and fife bands are very well for boys, but what can we 
give the girls to do ?’’ Some have answered this query 
by forming small parties of concertina players, and one 
with which I was once connected did very useful service 
to neighbouring societies as well as our own. It con¬ 
sisted of from six to twelve girls, and was taught by a 
lady ; German concertinas of good make were obtained at 
wholesale prices, and sold to the girls for weekly pay¬ 
ments. The members, being fairly good singers and 
reciters, were able to give complete entertainments, and 
once paid a visit for this purpose to the soldiers in the 
Tower of London. 

Closely allied to the concertina is the flute harmonica 
—a simple instrument of low price—and its simpler 
cousin, the mouth organ. Any boy or girl with slight 
musical powers can soon learn to play upon these instru¬ 
ments, and thus be able to contribute an occasional 
novelty to the programme. 

Casual mention has been made of the Fairy-bells. This 
sweet-toned instrument I have found an invaluable com¬ 
panion in my Band of Hope travels. My principal 
method of using it is to pause in the course of an address 
and give a short selection, thus making a pleasant change, 
and relieving both speaker and audience. It is of simple 
construction, consisting of ten or more wires in a v/ooden 
case, the tones being produced by the motion of the 
thumbs. It gives an admirable imitation of church bells 
—and thus comes in suitably with occasional pictures in 
dissolving view entertainments, such as a picture of an 
old church, a clock tower, &c. It may easily be applied 
as an accompaniment to a song, such as “ Ring the bell, 
Watchman,’’or, “Ring, Merry Bells ’’ (“ Caller Herrin’.’’) 
It is quite as effective when played in a subdued 
manner to accompany such a recitation as “While the 
Sabbath bells are ringing,’’ and others which may easily 
be selected. A miniature Fairy-bells has recently been 
produced, for the use of young children ; its tone is bright 
and clear, and it is well suited for children to learn upon. 

The Dulcimer-bells is an instrument of a somewhat 
similar character to the Fairy-bells, but of lower price; 
it is a small copy of the Dulcimer, but is played best with 
the fingers instead of the notes being struck (as with the 
Dulcimer). 

The Italian Ocarina is capable of considerable develop¬ 
ment in Band of Hope music. A person possessing 
patience and time might obtain good results from a small 
party of boys and girls playing these instruments. They 
were introduced into this country some years ago by a 
band of Italians styled “The mountaineers of the Appen- 
nines,” who performed with wonderful effect at the Crystal 
Palace, the Brighton Aquarium, and other places. The 
fingering is very similar to that of the flute, and the instru¬ 
ment is easily mastered. It goes well with the pianoforte 
(or harmonium) and violin. 

It might be considered as an attempt at joking to advo¬ 
cate the admission of the shrill tin whistle and the crude 
Jew’s harp into the Band of Hope orchestra ; but without 
encouraging the infliction of discordant or meaningless 
sounds upon an audience, the Band of Hope conductor 
might do worse than allow a lad who has attained some 
proficiency in these common little instruments to give an 
occasional performance in the children’s meeting. In 
music, as in other matters, we must not despise small 
beginnings ; and the boy who possesses sufficient patience 
to master the tin whistle, or to extract a melody from the 
Jew’s harp, must certainly have in him the elementary 
qualifications of a musician, and deserves that his efforts 


should be directed into a more profitable channel. The 
brass flageolot is a respectable cross between the tin whistle 
and the flageolet, giving a more mellow tone than the 
whistle,, and enjoying the qualification of cheapness. 
The triangle adds a good effect to other instruments 
and may be played by quite a small child. 

.Prof. Andre has introduced several novel instruments, 
with such success that he now arranges to supply and 
teach them, thus enabling any friend desirous of employ¬ 
ing his musical talent to the best advantage in Band of 
Hope work, to acquire an effective instrument, and to 
master its difficulties. Their price, however, rather 
hinders the adoption of these instruments for children’s 
use. 

I have now briefly mentioned a variety of ways in which 
the enchantments of music—both vocal and instrumental 
—may be advantageously applied to the work of saving 
the little ones from the tempter’s snares. But even our 
efforts to foster their love of this God-given art may, alas, 
but tend to lead them astray. Cases have been known of 
Band of Hope members trained to sing, recite, and play, 
being drawn by their very love of these arts to the music- 
hall and public-house. This shows us the vital importance 
of.combining sound temperance and religious instruction 
with our lighter engagements, and of never, under any 
circumstances, permitting the latter to overpower the 
former. My great desire is that my fellow-workers shall 
be satisfied with nothing short of the best of everything. 
If they, teach, let their instruction be clear, forcible, and 
true ; if they recite, sing, or play, let their performance 
be as near perfection as their circumstances permit. But 
“ whatsoever ye do, do all to the glory of God,” for it is 
only in so far as we are constrained by this highest of 
motives, and our work is hallowed by the sacred influence 
of Christian love that true and enduring success shall 
crown our efforts. As it is so excellent a quality of music 
to move the heart and refine the nature, let us be careful 
that this shall be the only tendency of our employment of 
the “ Divine art.’’ 

If it be true that the sweet music of golden harps, 
mingling with the songs of saints and angels around the 
throne, shall constitute a large share of the joys of that 
bright home to which we are journeying, and towards 
whose portals it is our highest aim to guide the little ones 
committed to our charge—surely it is natural and wise 
that music in its best forms should contribute to the joys 
of the earthly home, and should be employed in our pre¬ 
paration for the life to come. “ They that turn many to 
righteousness shall shine as the stars for ever and ever.” 
It is our mission by the grace of God co turn the feet of the 
children into the paths of righteousness, and save them 
from the snares of evil. Let song be one of our sweetest 
allurements, and may the voices we now train to sing the 
music of earth one day join in the glorified song of the 
ransomed in heaven. 


The Queen’s Jubilee.— In the belief that many of 
our friends will be glad to have a Jubilee song for their 
societies, having direct reference to our own work, Miss 
Emily Jane Moore has been requested to write special 
words for the purpose, which Mr. Henry Coward has set 
to simple but stirring music. The song will be sung at 
the Annual Meeting of the Union at Exeter Hall, and will 
appear in both notations in our next issue. It may be had 
at once in leaflet form at 4s. per 100. A specimen copy 
post free, id. 

Ulverstone. —Mr. Kendall, J.P., of Ulverstone, asks 
us to state that the excellent Band of Hope at the Ulver¬ 
stone workhouse, referred to recently, was originated 
by Miss Ann Hodgson, eighteen years ago, since which 
time it has been maintained without interruption. 




THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


7 1 


'BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES.—Series I. 

TEMPERANCE LESSONS FROM ^ISOP’S 
FABLES. 

By Rev. CHARLES COURTENAY, Vicar of Emmanuel Church, 
Liverpool, Author of “ Temperance Home Thrusts,” &c. 

No 5.—THE CAT AND THE MICE. 


IE don’t think so highly of cats as boys 
and girls do, I am afraid, so if I say some 
strong things about cats you must remem¬ 
ber that I am thinking only of mice’s 
feelings. 

And if I seem to speak more highly of 
mice than you, boys and girls, fancy is 
their due, well then, if I were you, I would 
forget all about the brown mice, and think 
only of those dear little white ones, with 
pretty little red eyes, which will run up and down your 
sleeve without giving even one little spiteful nip. Fancy 
a great strange black Tom-cat from next door getting into 
your box and eating up some of your dear little tame white 
mice. Ugh! Horrid! So now I think you are prepared 
to hear the story of the cat and the mice. 

Part i.—Death and Destruction. 

Poor little mice! They had a splendid time of it before 
■the old cat came upon the scene. They skipped, they 
frolicked, they nibbled, and they piped all day long. 
There never were happier little mice than were these little 
creatures before the cat walked in and spoiled it all. 

Some of the yoyng ones had never seen a cat before, 
and didn’t try to run away. And so pussy hadn’t much 
trouble in catching these. And even those who knew some¬ 
thing about their old enemy had no idea how cunning and 
quick he was. And of course,not getting away fast enough, 
they were caught too. And some of the old ones too, who 
were old enough to know better, ventured out of their hole 
after a bit, not giving pussy credit for much patience,and 
got captured by the waiting foe. 

Now it was bad enough to be caught, but to be played 
with, and tortured, and let go only to be caught again 
just as one was feeling nicely free, was much worse. And 
then afterwards to be mangled and crushed and swallowed 
was too shocking. 

Poor, pitiful little mice ! There really wasn’t a single 
family of mice that that naughty old Tom didn t carry 
death and destruction into. 

Now, dear children, there is only one thing I can think 
of as bad as that old cat with its sharp teeth and claws, 
and awful appetite, and that is strong drink. Strong 
drink I think is every bit as bad. It tortures and mangles 
and kills people exactly like the cat and the mice. 

Part 2.—An order in Council. 

The mouse world couldn’t be expected to go on like this 
any longer. They must either do something or be doomed. 
That dreadful cat seemed never satisfied, and woke up 
after every nap with quite a new appetite, and nothing 
but mice seemed to suit his dainty stomach. 

So in self-defence they had a meeting, and after electing 
the mouse with the longest head as chairman, and reading 
the minutes of the last meeting, they set to work. One 
-suggested that they should go out in a body and kill the cat. 
But nobody seemed inclined to go first, and so that was 
:given up. 

Another suggested that they should change houses, but 
that was shelved directly, for it was a known fact that 
there was another cat of the very same hungry breed there 
Too. 

A third suggested that they should shorten their hours of 



play , and not venture out except at night, but this was soon 
settled when it became known that pussy slept with both 
eyes open, and kept most irregular hours, and in fact 
was not to be depended upon. 

Of course there were many other suggestions of various 
degrees of wisdom and folly, but none seemed to satisfy 
the council until the old, white-haired chairman said 
that the only certain remedy was to keep out of the way of 
the cat. This immediately took the fancy of the majority, 
each of whomever afterwards claimed the credit for origi¬ 
nating it. And so it was decided,and an order in council 
was issued and posted under the boardings of the floor and 
at the back of the skirtings : 

“ Notice. 

“ Beit enacted that henceforth no mouse shall go down 
below the upper shelf on any occasion, or for any excuse 
whatever, on pain of death.—By Order.” 

Well done, mice ! Well done, men! if you will do the 
same. For if strong drink must exist in the world, and all 
our fighting is onesided and useless, and it is perilous by 
night and day, and isn’t to be trusted, why, then, I think 
we can’t do better than follow the mice and issue a similar 
proclamation : 

“ Notice. 

“Beit enacted that henceforth no man, woman, boy, 
or girl shall enter a public-house, or be found in 
the neighbourhood of strong drink on any occasion, or 
for any excuse whatever, but shall ever hereafter keep 
out of the way of the drink .—By Order.” 

Part 3.—Pussy’s Trick. 

Old Tom’s fast had now begun for the first time. He 
watched and waited as of old, but all in vain, for never a 
mouse’s whiskers were visible below the upper shelf, and 
while Tom’s spirits fell, the mice's spirits rose, and 
they danced and frolicked and nibbled and piped as of 
yore. 

Old Tom’s sides fell in, his ribs stuck out, and he began 
to grow desperate, so he set to to sharpen his wits and 
invent some new device. 

At length he hammered out one which seemed first-rate. 
He would pretend to be dead. He would hang himself by 
his hind legs to a rail. They might even fancy him to be 
a dead hare if he hung limp enough and long enough, and 
kept his eyes shut and his claws tucked in. And so he 
did. 

How innocent and harmless he did look, to be sure, and 
as the little mice peeped over the edge of the upper shelf, 
they all really thought pussy’s days for mischief were over. 
They even felt inclined to set up a shout of triumph, and 
some of the more venturesome youngsters were for run¬ 
ning down and giving master Tom’s whiskers a tweak, 
but the old president came quickly up,and let in some day¬ 
light on the scene. Looking over the edge he cleared his 
throat and squeaked out: “Not to-day, thank you. Oh 
dear no ! Don’t you wish you may get it ? Yah ! ” And 
with sundry other little pleasantries did he mock the 
hungry old cat, who, seeing that it was no good to hang 
there any longer, unhitched himself from the rail and 
sneaked away, with a disappointed mew. 

And then the wise old mouse, thinking it a good oppor¬ 
tunity for instilling some morals into the young minds of 
his little friends, told them that cats’ dodges were beyond 
counting ; that seemingly dead cats were more alive than 
living ones ; that it doesn’t take long for a cat to come 
down from a rail, that a cat mustn’t be trusted under any 
circumstances, and that they really must, if they cared 
for their young lives and wished to live to a happy old age, 
never, never, never, never venture below the top shelf. 

And, dear children, what the old mouse says, so say I, 
never trust strong drink, never fancy it is harmless, 
never believe in its friendship, never put yourself within 
its reach, never, never, never, never get down from the 
top shelf of total abstinence. 




72 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES.—Series II. 
TEMPERANCE WORK AND WORKERS- 

By Rev. J. P. GLEDSTONE, 

Author of “ The Life and Travels of George Whitefield,” “Save the 
Boys,” ‘‘Clean Lips.” 

No. 5.—SUNDAY CLOSING OF PUBLIC-HOUSES. 



VERY reader of the Bible knows that, by 
the fourth commandment of the law of 
Moses, Jews were commanded to observe 
one day in seven as a day of rest from all 
work. Scientists who have studied the 
nature of man deeply, his body and his 
mind, tell us that one day’s rest in seven is 
absolutely necessary for man if he is to be 
vigorous and healthy. The old commandment 
was therefore as kind as it was wise, and as wise 
as it was kind. It does not pay to work either men or 
animals more than six days together. The good old law 
is partly observed in our country, but partly only. While 
the law of the land does not permit the sale of necessary 
articles of food, it permits the sale of intoxicating drinks, 
which are certainly not necessary for life, and even if they 
were they might be purchased on Saturday and kept for use 
on Sunday. One fact alone perhaps explains why the 
friends of temperance have found it so difficult—in England 
impossible—to get the sale of intoxicating drinks on 
Sunday stopped. It is because such a large trade is done 
on that day, and so much profit is made by the brewers 
and publicans. One of the strongest reasons why the 
sale should be stopped is the main reason for its con¬ 
tinuance. A gentleman connected with the trade informs 
us that 5,340 public-houses made £8,000 profit every 
Sunday. It is probable that as much as one fourth of all 
the money which is spent upon intoxicants is spent on 
that day which should be given to rest and to some kind 
of religious work and worship. A certain brewer once 
stated that he had closed thirty-seven of his public-houses 
on Sundays for four months, and that he had thereby lost 
£2,000; the loss for a year would have been £6,000. 

The consequence of this great amount of drinking on 
Sunday is a great amount of crime and misery. Tempe¬ 
rance workers have therefore for many years been striving 
to get this one day in seven freed from the curse of the 
drink traffic. They carried their object in Scotland as 
long ago as 1853, by the passing of the Forbes Mackenzie 
Act, which came into operation at Whitsuntide, 1854. 
This act closed all public-houses in Scotland during the 
whole of Sunday, and on other days from 11 p.m. to 
8 a.m. The happy effects of the law soon began to show 
themselves. The condition of Edinburgh in the year 
1852—3, that is the year before the law came into force, 
shows us that there were 6,047 cases of persons found 
drunk and incapable by the police, but in 1872—3 (the 
tenth year after the passing of the law) only 1,923, a 
decrease of 4,124. The numbers on the Sunday only were 
an average in 1852—3 of 685 ; in 1872—3 of 151 ; a decrease 
of 534. A policeman once said to a Glasgow magistrate 
after the Act was passed—“ We have quiet Sundays now, 
but I can remember before the Forbes Mackenzie Act 
came in, the office went like a fair on Sundays.” 

The next portion of our country to receive the benefit 
of Sunday closing was Ireland. The first trial of it was 
voluntary, that is, it was done without a law to compel its 
being done. Some of the Roman Catholic bishops, 
anxious to save their people from the demoralisation of 
Sunday drinking, succeeded in persuading the publicans 
in their dioceses to close their houses on that day. The 
Bishop of Ferns, writing in 1872, says that the closing of 
public-houses in his diocese dates from 1857; that 
since that time it had been faithfully observed; and 


that the scenes of drunkenness and disorder, which in 
former times had been only too frequent, have altogether 
disappeared. The Archbishop of Cashel said after a 
similar voluntary closing movement had been in operation 
in his diocese for about twelve years—“ A drunken man 
is rarely to be seen amongst us on Sundays. Rioting and 
blaspheming, the inevitable consequence of excessive 
drinking, which, before the introduction of our law ” (he 
means voluntary custom), “prevailed to a lamentable 
extent, have ceased to desecrate the Sunday, and to 
disgrace our towns. The committals to Bridewell for 
drunkenness on Sundays have been reduced to a very low 
figure.” Two evils, it was always foretold by opponents 
of Sunday closing, would follow the adoption of the 
system : (1) unlicensed places would be opened slyly; 
(2) there would be more drunkenness at home. But the 
Archbishop of Cashel said that after twelve years’ trial 
these evils had not sprung up among his people. 

These voluntary arrangements were made by Roman 
Catholic prelates with their own people, and did not affect 
Protestants; neither could they be carried out in large 
towns, which are always more wicked than small ones, 
and more difficult to influence for good. Hence the need 
of a law which should apply to the whole of the population 
throughout the whole country. 

In order to obtain such a law, men of all political 
parties and of all churches united together ; and in 1874 a 
law would have been passed but for the votes of a large 
number of English members ot Parliament; for 42 Irishmen 
voted for the law and only 10 against it; 37 Scotch 
members voted for it and only 4 against it ; but only 50 
English members voted for it while 206 were against it. 
Thus English members of Parliament, backed up by the 
liquor trade, did what they could to keep Ireland a 
drunken country. A very dreadful thing for Englishmen 
to have to answer for. The struggle was continued until 
1878 against all kinds of mean shifts and unprincipled 
obstruction, and at last an Act was passed. The happiest 
results have followed. Before the passing of the Act it was 
said there would be riots and disorder if the people could 
not get drink ; but Sunday closing has not been responsible 
for a single breach of the peace. It was said that there 
would be more drinking, but such has not been the case. 
One fact alone will show how great is the good which has 
been done : in the year before Sunday closing as many as 
4,555 persons were arrested on Sundays ; in the year after 
only 1,840 persons were arrested ; a decrease of 2,715. 
That means that where 100 persons fell into trouble only 
40 do so now. 

On August 25th, 1881, a Sunday Closing Bill for Wales 
received the royal assent. England alone of the countries 
which constitute the United Kingdom is without a Sunday 
Closing Act. A partial Closing Act, called the Wilson- 
Patten Act, was passed in 1854, which did a great deal of 
good ; but unfortunately it was soon repealed. On August 
31st, 1861, a Sunday Closing Association was formed at 
Hull; in 1863 a National Sunday Closing Association was 
formed at Derby. From that time to this the association 
has been striving both inside and outside Parliament to 
obtain its object; but so far nothing has been gained- 
That the English people want Sunday closing is certain, 
and that what they want they will ultimately obtain is 
equally certain. In 1880 as many as 177 members voted 
for it, and only 139 against; and the 177 members rep¬ 
resented the votes of 762,043 voters, while the 139 members 
represented only 460,362 voters. That is to say, if the 
English people had had the deciding of the question there 
would have been 301,681 more persons in favour of it than 
against it. Another way of finding out what the people 
want is to ask them directly by leaving papers at their 
doors ; this has been done, and 687,472 householders were 
for Sunday closing, while only 91,641 were against it, and 
58,528 were neither for nor against. We must labour in 
this good work earnestly and most hopefully. 









THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


73 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES—Series III. 


PHYSIOLOGY AND ALCOHOL- 

By Dr. KATE MITCHELL. 

No. 5.—THE HEART AND LARGE 
BLOOD-VESSELS. 

(Notes for the Blackboard.) 



Right Auricle. 

The Heart consists of 

Right Ventricle. 

four Chambers. 

Left Auricle. 

, Left Ventricle. 

Inferior Vena Cava 1 

Bringing impure blood 

Superior Vena Cava £ 

to Heart. 

Aorta ■ 

Carrying purified blood 
from Heart. 



~ HE Heart is an organ composed of strong 
muscular fibres, which are very thickly 
placed over the lower portion of it, called the 
ventricles. When these muscular fibres 
contract the contents of the heart (the 
blood) are poured into the blood-vessels, 
which open out from the ventricles. This 
contraction of the muscular substance causes 
the heart’s impulse or beat, which is felt 
against the walls of the chest between the 
5th and 6th ribs. A healthy heart beats about 72 times 
every minute. In extreme youth it beats much quicker 
than this, and in old age much slower. Between each 
beat the heart rests for the fraction of a minute to recover 
itself. The whole organ is about the size of the closed fist, 
and can contain about eight ounces of blood at a time. 

The four chambers. —The heart is divided into four 
chambers or cavities, two on each side. There is a 
muscular partition down the centre of the heart which 
prevents any communication between the chambers on 
each side. (A drawing similar to the shape of the heart 
should be made on the blackboard, and the partitions and 
cavities explained.) The two upper chambers are called 
the auricles, right and left; the two lower ones the 
ventricles, also right and left. 

The right auricle communicates with the right ventricle 
■(which is situated immediately underneath it) by an 
aperture protected by a valve. 

The left auricle communicates in the same way with the 
left ventricle. The walls of the two auricles are much 
thinner than those of the ventricles, and fall together when 
not filled out with blood. 

All the cavities are lined with a very fine delicate 
membrane, called the endocardium, and the whole organ 
on the outside is protected by a double membrane called 
the pericardium. 

Venous Blood— In the right auricle are two large 
openings protected by valves. These are entrances to two 
large veins—the superior vena cava, bringing impure 
"blood back from the head and upper part of the body, and 
the inferior vena cava, bringing impure blood from the 
lower part of the body. Venous blood is of a dark 
purplish colour, owing to the presence in it of a poisonous 
gas called carbonic acid. The blood, in its circulation 
throughout the body, has gathered up this poisonous 
material from all the different tissues and organs, and 
has brought it by means of the veins to the right side of 
the heart. From the right auricle the blood pours down 
into the right ventricle, in which is found the entrance to 
a blood-vessel passing to the lungs.The ventricle contracts, 


and the blood passes into this opening and then circulates 
throughout the lungs, where it becomes purified. Its 
colour is changed in the lungs,from dark purple to a bright 
red, and this has been brought about by the carbonic 
acid passing out of the blood into the lungs, and from 
thence into the air, and by the blood taking up in its 
stead a gas called oxygen, which we breathe in with the 
air and which purifies the blood. 

Arterial or Oxygenated Blood. —The blood now returns to 
the left auricle a bright red, and purified of the poisonous 
carbonic acid gas. It passes from the auricle into the left 
ventricle, in which is found the entrance to the largest 
artery in the body, the aorta. The left ventricle contracts, 
and the blood pours into the aorta, which is protected by 
a valve. From the aorta the blood passes all over the 
body to carry the oxygen,which it gives up to the different 
tissues and structures in order to nourish them and keep 
them healthy. 

Valves of the Heart. —These are flaps formed from the 
membrane lining the heart. They are found over every 
entrance in this organ, like curtains before an open door¬ 
way. They are placed in these different situations to 
prevent the blood from flowing in the wrong direction ; 
otherwise, when the heart contracted, it might flow back 
into the place from which it had first come. The valves 
close over the entrance, and thus the blood is forced 
onwards and is prevented from returning. There are 
eight valves in all to the heart, protecting the eight 
different openings of the heart. 

Alcohol and the Heart. —The smallest amount of alcohol 
will increase the beats of the heart, and people generally 
take it in order to produce this effect. As the heart beats 
more quickly the blood seems to circulate more freely 
through the blood-vessels, and there is for the moment a 
feeling of renewed energy and strength all over the body. 
When, however, the effects of the alcohol have worn off 
the heart beats more slowly than it should do, and the 
person feels depressed and languid until some more of the 
same drug is taken. Thus the heart is always doing more 
work than it should do,and never getting enough rest, and 
in time the extra wear and tear begins to tell upon it, and 
it labours hard to do the work which it ought to accom¬ 
plish easily and unrestrainedly. The greater the quantity 
of alcohol taken daily the greater is the injury to the heart. 
As time goes by its muscular fibres become thickened, and 
there is a deposit of fat amongst them (this is called fatty 
degeneration), which prevents a free action of the heart. 
The lining membrane of this organ is also inflamed by 
the continual passage of alcohol over it, and it becomes 
reddened and thickened. The valves also suffer in the 
same way and at last may become so diseased that they 
are powerless to prevent the blood flowing in a wrong 
direction. When this occurs the whole circulation of the 
blood in the body is interfered with and disturbed, and 
death must result because it is impossible to bring the 
heart back to a healthy condition. When once the heart 
is so diseased it is incurable, and even total abstinence 
will not be able to do anything to help it. The best thing 
is to prevent such a terrible state of things from happen¬ 
ing, for prevention is better than cure. 

It must be remembered that the heart, which is a very 
hard-working organ (its work being equal to lifting about 
120 tons one foot in 24 hours), must have rest, and that if 
this rest is shortened,as it is by the use of alcohol, all the 
evils above mentioned will gradually take place, and life 
must inevitably be shortened. 


York. —Good Band of Hope work has been regularly 
carried on for many years amongst the children of the York 
workhouse by Miss Millington, assisted by the school¬ 
master, who is a total abstainer. Many young friends 
have yet to realise how largely this and every other 
department of Band of Hope work can be most successfully 
initiated and maintained by ladies. 







74 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES,—Series IV. 


MISCELLANEOUS. 

NORMAN KERR, M.D., F.L.S., Fellow of the Medical Society 
of London. 

No. 5. — THE NATURE AND EFFECTS OF 
INTOXICATING DRINKS. 

TOXICATING drinks are powerful and 
popular. To what do they owe their power 
and their popularity ? To Alcohol. 

What is this alcohol ? It is an irritating, 
inflaming, narcotic poison. The most un¬ 
prejudiced authorities, such as Thudicum 
and Dupre, both distinguished chemists and 
authors of the standard work on wine and 
wine manufacture, concede that alcohol is 
a poison even in small doses. All reliable 
writers on toxicology class alcohol as a 

poison. 

Alcohol is so irritant and inflaming a poison that we 
could not drink it unless its virulence were sheathed in 
such a mild fluid as water. Unless well diluted with 
water, as it is in every form of intoxicating liquor, it 
would burn the tongue, the throat, and the stomach. 

There are many alcohols, from the fluid ethylic alcohol 
of delicate fermented wine,which so many have drunk, to 
the solid wax-like cetylic alcohol, which no one yet has 
been able to drink, it being a solid. (Explain the family 
of alcohols. See “Encyc. Brittanic,” 9th edition, art. 
“ Alcohol,” or Dr. B. W. Richardson’s Lesson Book.) 

There is a slight difference in the action of some of the 
alcohols. For example, amylic alcohol (fusel oil) causes 
trembling and intense headache. (Explain that in France 
and other countries where spirits are not so highly recti¬ 
fied as with us, fusel oil is more common.) But, whatever 
the unimportant varieties of action, it has been clearly 
made out that all the alcohols are irritant narcotic poisons. 
In this country, where the liquors are comparatively little 
adulterated, the alcohol in the various intoxicating liquids 
is practically the same in kind, though differing in degree 
in proportion to the alcoholic strength, whether it be 
exhibited in expensive wine or in cheap beer or ardent 
spirit. 

Age does not alter the nature of the alcohol. While age 
may mellow the particular drink, the alcohol present in 
the fluid retains its original intoxicating character. I have 
seen Englishmen and Irishmen lingeringly, lovingly sip 
several glasses of nine year old Scotch whiskey, which 
they had tasted for the first time, and declare from the 
mellowness of the liquor that it was as weak as milk, with 
no power to intoxicate. Yet ere many hours had elapsed 
they slept the sleep of the drunken. 

What are intoxicating drinks ? The obvious reply is— 
drinks which can intoxicate. Among them are :—Spirits 
such as brandy, whiskey, rum, and gin ; fermented wines 
such as port, sherry, champagne, claret, tent; malt 
liquors such as stout, ale, and beer ; with cyder, perry, &c. 

Intoxicating drinks differ mainly in the varying propor¬ 
tion of alcohol present in them. Ardent spirits are about 
half water and half spirit. Port and sherry average nearly 
half that alcoholic strength; champagne and claret nearly 
half that again. Beer and cyder have about half the 
alcoholic strength of champagne and claret. 

What are the effects produced by intoxicating drinks ? 

As alcohol is a thirsty spirit, it seizes on the water in 
the various tissues with which it comes in contact till it 
has appropriated sufficient to dilute it to the volume 
necessary to the circulation in the blood. The tendency 
of intoxicants, therefore, though for the moment they may 
relieve thirst owing to their accompanying water, is to 
create and intensify thirst. Hence alcohol drinkers are 
usually thirstier than abstainers. 



Alcohol vitiates the blood and thus tends to build up a 
weakly frame, besides inviting the onset of a train of 
harassing diseases such as gout and rheumatism. 

Alcohol paralyses the nerves (vaso-motor) which con¬ 
trol and regulate the blood-vessels, reducing their power 
of contraction, thus giving rise to congestions and ulcera¬ 
tions. 

Alcohol causes degeneration of substance of the blood¬ 
vessels as well as of the heart, thus inciting apoplexy and 
rupture of arteries and veins. 

Alcohol causes overtaxing of the heart; the number of 
heart beats increase with the amount of alcohol consumed 
owing to the resistance of the organ being reduced, and 
thus disease of the heart and its valves is often brought 
on (Explain that alcohol causes loss of resisting and 
contractile power. This governing, controlling force 
being weakened,the heart beats away with great rapidity, 
like the screw of a screw steamship when a huge wave 
lifts the screw out of the water.) 

Alcohol, as a narcotic, benumbs, deadens, paralyses 
the brain and nervous system, confusing the judgment 
and weakening the moral control. As a narcotic, alcohol 
also tends to create a desire for more of itself or of some 
other intoxicating agent. (Explain how herein lies the 
power of alcohol to induce the diseased condition of the 
dipsomaniac, the truly physical disease which inebriety 
often becomes till all will-power seems to be lost and all 
the moral sense sent to sleep if not apparently obliterated. 
Explain also how, under strict abstinence and appropriate 
treatment, the broken down will-power and moral sense 
may be resuscitated.) 

Alcohol, as a narcotic, is a mocker,deluding us by making 
us feel stronger when we are weaker, warmer when we 
are colder. (Explain difference between sensations and 
actualities, feeling and fact; for example, between the 
feeling of heat and actual heat, as shown by the clinical 
thermometer when a false feeling of warmth is imparted 
by strong drink in cold weather, the thermometer showing 
that the vital temperature is really less.) 

As intoxicating drinks of all kinds contain this deadly 
poison, we should expect them to cause disease and 
premature death. 

So they do. More than half the cases of dyspepsia, 
gout, &c., which I have encountered have been the fruit 
of drinking. Sir Andrew Clark said that at the London 
Hospital 70 percent of his cases entered through drinking. 
The evidence of the poisoning action of intoxicants is all 
around us. 

Premature death is largely due to strong drink. I have 
estimated that 40,000 die directly or indirectly every year 
in the United Kingdom from personal excess,and probably 
double that number indirectly from starvation, accident, 
violence, or disease arising from the excess of others. 

The most serious effect of intoxicating drinks is the 
transmitting to children a marked tendency to become 
intemperate. 

Intoxicating drinks have no claim to be ranked as useful 
or necessary articles of diet, as they supply no legitimate 
natural want of the living healthy body. They are non¬ 
necessities. 

The only rational and philosophical conclusion seems 
to be that, as we can live as well if not better without 
such beverages, our clear and safe course is to totally 
abstain from all such dangerous articles as intoxicating 
drinks. 


REAr ing. —At the district school for the pauper children 
of this town, though there is no regular Band of Hope, the 
children receive frequent instruction on the subject, the 
chairman of the guardians, Mr. W. I. Palmer, J.P., the 
chaplain, the Rev. S. Sturgess, the superintendent, 
matron and family, and some of the officers and servants- 
being total abstainers. 






THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


75 


SEmfelr Uiitgliottt Baittr of Hope Simon. 


THE COMPETITIVE EXAMINATION. 


E arduous task of adjudication on the papers 
submitted in connection with the Competi¬ 
tive Examination is now completed. The 
work, although kindly undertaken by a 
larger number of friends than on any 
former occasion, involved the devotion of 
considerable time and much close attention, 
and the Committee feel that their very best 
thanks are due to these friends, who, al¬ 
though largely occupied in other works of 
usefulness, have so willingly discharged this important 
and onerous duty. 

The prizes awarded by the Parent Society amounted, 
as originally announced, to £50, but this sum was sup¬ 
plemented to the extent of ^10 by the liberality of 
Mr. E. Joy, one of the adjudicators, who expressed 
special satisfaction with the results obtained ; and the 
total was still further increased by the award of local 
prizes by the various Unions and Societies participating 
in the effort. 

Members of Bands of Hope and others between the ages 
of nine and twenty-one were eligible to compete, and of 
these 2,683 presented themselves for examination. The 
competition was held on the evening of Friday, February 
25th, at 238 centres, very widely distributed over the three 
Kingdoms; two hours precisely were allottedjor the work, 
and an official was present at each centre to ensure an 
exact compliance with the conditions laid down to secure 
perfect fairness. 

The text-book was the excellent little work by Dr. J. J. 
Ridge, entitled “ Temperance Teaching for the Young.” 
The Committee feel sure that its valuable contents, 
which deal with every branch of the subject, will be of 
special use to the young people who have, under their 
many teachers, made it the subject of their study. 

Arrangements have been made by which it is hoped that 
the prizes and certificates will be in the hands of the 
respective Secretaries of Unions and Societies before the 
close of the present month. 

On behalf of the Committee, 

Charles Wakely, General Secretary. 



REPORT OF THE ADJUDICATORS. 


We have completed the task of adjudication on the 
answers given by competitors in the examination arranged 
by the United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. The 
2,683 papers submitted to us were arranged in accordance 
with the ages of the writers, the respective numbers being 
as follows: 


Over 9 and under 10 .. 85 

Over 10 and under ix .. 224 

Over 11 and under 12 .. 398 

Over 12 and under 13 .. 544 

Over 13 and under 14 .. 511 

Over 14 and under 15 .. 319 

Over 15 and under 16 .. 195 

Over 16 and under 17 .. 181 

Over 17 and under 18 .. 87 

Over 18 and under 19 .. 63 

Over 19 and under 20 .. 51 

Over 20 and under 21 .. 25 


2,683 

In making the awards the competitors of each year of 
age have been regarded as constituting a separate class, 
.and thus the fair principle has been carried out, that com¬ 


petitors of different ages should not compete against each 
other. This important consideration must be borne in mind 
in comparing the marks awarded in the various classes. 
Weight has also been given to the fact that prizes of the 
same absolute value assume different values in the 
estimation of young people of different ages. It will be 
seen from the subjoined detailed award that as the ages 
advance the value of the higher prizes increases also. A 
very careful final comparison of the best papers in each 
class has also been made, and prizes awarded accordingly. 

In order to secure uniformity in giving marks, a com¬ 
plete standard set of answers was prepared. These 
answers were divided into sections, to each of which a 
maximum of marks was apportioned, and by this standard 
the facts contained in the papers submitted to us were 
judged. 

The highest number of marks obtainable by competitors 
in the senior division (those over 14 years of age) is 
570; the highest for the junior division (those under 14 
years of age) being 410. It will be noticed that even the 
best papers fall considerably below these numbers, but it 
must be borne in mind that the maximum thus fixed 
represents an exhaustive analysis of the text book, 
and consequently an amount of work which it would 
be almost impossible for any competitor to compass in the 
two hours at disposal. In the case of the juniors certain 
portions only of the text book were made the subjects 
of examination, but with these portions the same exhaus¬ 
tive treatment was adopted. We feel, therefore, justified 
in reporting the papers of the prize winners, and more 
especially those of the winners of the higher prizes, as 
very good indeed. 

It is worthy of remark that the seniors have done better, 
proportionately to their ages, than the juniors. The 
reason for this may, perhaps, partly be found in the nature 
of the text book, but it may also be regarded as an indica¬ 
tion of the thoroughness which results from a course of 
Band of Hope training continued through several years. 
In nearly all the papers there is apparent much enthusiasm 
for Temperance, and only too familar a knowledge of the 
home evils arising from indulgence in strong drink. With 
regard to the papers generally, we find that the in¬ 
telligence of the young people as well as their knowledge 
of the subject differs in a remarkable degree, and we are 
led to the opinion that success depended chiefly on careful 
previous training. 

The tokens of thorough teaching are in some of the 
papers very marked, but others would seem to indicate 
that this important requisite to success has not received 
sufficient attention. On the whole, however, it is evident 
that a very large amount of time and effort has been 
bestowed on the work, both by the young people and 
their teachers. We feel sure that the useful information 
thus acquired will be of great service, not only to the 
young friends who have competed—or who, without com¬ 
peting,have studied the text book—but also to the yet larger 
number whom they will meet in after life and influence for 
good. 

(Signed) 

J. J. Ridge, M.D., 

Thomas Adkins, 

M. A. Arbuthnot, 

T. Blandford, 

James Boyer, 

Charles Chambers, 

H. Forbes Clarke, 

J. Compston, 

Lucy Docwra, 

R. H. Dugdale, 

Jacob Earnshaw, 


C. E. Escreet, M. A., 
W. A. Essery, 
John Farren, 

J. Fletcher, 

John Foster, 

David Heath, 
Rowland Hill, 

C. W. Garrard, 

J. B. George, F.L. S. 
G. D. Hooper, 
We Hoyle, 


Thos. Jarratt, 
Edward Joy, 

T. T. Lambert, 
R. Shaen, 

E. Schnadhorst, 
M.A., 

J. Capes Story, 
T. de Vine, 

R. Wilson, 

T. H. Wyatt, 
Annie Young, 




76 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


PRIZE WINNERS IN THE COMPETITIVE EXAMINATION. 


In cases where the same number in the order of merit is given to more than one competitor it will be seen that 
the number of marks is the same. An asterisk under the head of "Local Unions” indicates that the Society is not 
connected with any Local Union. 

No. Name obtained. ^‘prized Meeting Place ofBand ofHope or Name of Society. Local Unions. 

NINE YEARS OF AGE. 


i Thrift, Ethel 


10 

0 

Rathmines Township School, Dublin 




Hibernian. 

2 Burns, Henry 


5 

0 

Agnes-street, Belfast 





3 Heaton, Gertrude Kate .. 

•• 135 • 

2 

6 

Temple-street, Keighley 





4 Harris, Annie Mary 


2 

6 

Market-square Congregational Church, Merthyr Tydvil 

Glamorgan & Monmouth 

5 Bishop, George Henry .. 

•• 113 • 

2 

6 

Temple-street, Wolverhampton .. 





6 Fisher, Charlotte 


2 

6 

Holborn Union Schools, Mitcham, London 



South-West London 

7 Kellett, Fred. 

. . IOI . 

2 

6 

Highbury Hill, Middlesex 

TEN YEARS OF AGE. 




Cityof London& Finsbury 

8 Thatcher, Theresa Agnes 

. . 210 . 

10 

O 

Rendlesham Rooms, Hackney, London 




Hackney 

9 Seager, William Edgar .. 

.. 189 . 

• 5 

O 

Brougham-road, Portsmouth 




Portsmouth 

io Thompson, Mary 

.. 146 . 

5 

O 

Barras Bridge, Newcastle-on-Tyne 




Newcastle and District. 

n Aston, Edward 

.. 144 . 

5 

O 

Mander-street, Wolverhampton .. 




.. Wolverhampton & Dist. 

12 Picken, Catherine Ross 

.. 141 . 

5 

O 

Diana-street, Newcastle-on-Tyne 




.. Newcastle and Gateshead 

13 Wells, Allen 

14 Poyton, Herbert .. 

.. 140 . 

5 

O 

Bletchley, Bucks 




Northamptonshire 

•• 139 • 

S 

O 

Abbey-street, Hackney, London .. 




Hackney 

15 Stalker, William Henry.. 

.. 138 . 

5 

O 

Queen-street, Scarborough . 




Scarborough 

16 Ketcher, Fanny Florence 

137 • 

5 

O 

Ranelagh-road, Paddington, London 




Marylebone 

17 Ball, James Handby 

.. 134 . 

2 

6 

Liverpool 




.. Liverpool 

18 Hawkins, Edith Lilian .. 

•• 132 - 

2 

6 

Shaldon Rooms, Teignmouth 




* 

19 Young, Robert Emerson.. 

.. I29 . 

2 

6 

Falconer-street, Newcastle 




.. Newcastle and Gateshead 

20 Martin, Fannie 

.. I24 . 

2 

6 

Centenary-street, Camborne 




* 

21 Spy, Robert A. 

.. 123 . 

2 

6 

Talbot-street, Newry 




.. Juv. Templars of Ireland 

22 Starkey, William Clement 

.. n8 . 

2 

6 

William-street, Kilkenny .. 





23 Pearson, Harriett Beecher 

.. Il6 . 

2 

6 

Moor-lane, Preston 




Preston. 

23 Thorne, John C. A. 

.. 116 . 

2 

6 

Arundel-street, Portsmouth 




.. Portsmouth 

25 Arundell, Emmeline 

. . 112 . 

2 

6 

British School, Maidenhead 




.. S. Bucks and Berks 

26 Marshall, Eli 

. . 109 . 

2 

6 

Roomfield Board School, Todmorden 




.. Todmorden 

27 Doughty, Lizzie .. 


2 

6 

Oldcastle, Meath 

ELEVEN YEARS OF AGE. 





28 McQuellan, Thomas A. .. 

.. 237 . 

IO 

0 

Bath-lane, Newcastle 





29 Halstead, Thomas Henry 

.. 226 . 

IO 

0 

Roomfield, Todmorden 




.. Todmorden 

29 Carter, Ernest William .. 

. . 226 . 

IO 

0 

Maidenhead 




.. S. Bucks & E. Berks 

31 Bunn, Lewis Richard 

171 . 

• 5 

0 

Broadway, Hammersmith, London 




.. West London 

32 Mowitt, Josephine Phillis 

.. I7O . 

. s 

0 

Pine-street, Newcastle 




.. Newcastle and Gateshead 

33 De Courcy, Robert Beatty 

.. l6o . 

• 5 

0 

Moy, Tyrone .. 




.. Irish Methodist 

34 Houlden, Nora Frances Julia .. 

• ■ 15s ■ 

■ 5 

0 

Jesmond, Newcastle .. 




Newcastle and Gateshead 

35 Ormrod, George Frederick 

. . I48 . 

• 5 

0 

Edgeston-street, Bolton 




.. Bolton and District 

36 Banfield, Albert Ernest .. 

•• 147 • 

• 5 

0 

Victoria-street, Camborne .. 




. . * 

37 Sharman, Harry Richard 

.. I46 . 

• 5 

0 

New-street, Chipping Norton 




Oxfordshire 

37 Heaton, Ida 



0 

Temple-street, Keighley 





39 Reed, Elizabeth .. 

•• *39 • 

• 5 

0 

Tindal-street, Newcastle 




.. Newcastle and Gateshead 

39 McAlister, Jane .. 

.. 139 . 

• 5 

0 

Jocelyn. Dundalk 




Irish Temperance League 

41 Purcell, Frederick Charles 

.. 136 . 

« 2 

6 

Southwark Park Wesleyan, London 




Southwark 

42 Donnavan, Hannah 

•• 13 2 • 

2 

6 

Holborn Schools, Mitcham, London 




South West London 

43 Parmenter, Mabel 

.. 130 . 

2 

6 

Stockwell Orphanage, London 




.. South West London 

44 Alkins, William .. 

.. 125 . 

2 

6 

Oakamoor, Stafford .. 




.. Staffordshire 

45 Fowler, James Robinson 

.. 123 . 

. 2 

6 

Rathmines-road, Dublin 




.. Hibernian 

46 Brown, John Robert 

.. 122 . 

. 2 

6 

Bath-lane, Newcastle 




.. Newcastle and Gateshead 

46 Brookes, William .. 

.. 122 . 

. 2 

6 

Oakamoor, Stafford .. 




Staffordshire 

46 Broadhouse, Nelly 

.. 122 . 

. 2 

6 

Stockwell Orphanage, London 




.. South West London 

49 McCallum, Andrew 

.. 121 . 

. 2 

6 

Crescent-road, Beckenham .. 




.. West Kent 

50 Dodds, Alfred William .. 

.. 120 . 

2 

6 

Dilston-road, Newcastle 




.. Newcastle and Gateshead. 

51 Baker, Theodora Lucinda 

.. 119 . 

2 

6 

Eustace-street, Dublin 




.. Hibernian 

52 Wissett, Frederic Charles 

.. 118 . 

2 

6 

Market House, Dundalk 




.. Hibernian 

53 Allen, Margaret Marriage 

.. 114 . 

. 2 

6 

Eustace-street, Dublin 





53 Pender, Frances .. 

.. 114 . 

2 

6 

Athy, Kildare .. 




Irish Methodist 

55 Marshall, Alexander 

.. no . 

2 

6 

New-street, Chipping Norton 




Oxfordshire 

56 Weir, Annie 

.. 109 . 

2 

6 

Newry, Ireland 




Juv. Templars of Ireland 

57 McElvoy, Catherine 

.. 108 . 

2 

6 

Newry, Ireland 




.. Juv. Templars of Ireland 

57 Snowdon, James Alfred .. 

.. 108 . 

. 2 

6 

Salem, Newcastle 




Newcastle and Gateshead 

59 Moore, Elizabeth 

60 Wrigley, Clara Gertrude 

.. 107 . 

. 2 

6 

Holborn Schools, Mitcham, London 




.. South West London 

.. 105 . 

2 

6 

Toller School, Kettering 




Kettering 

61 Morgan, James Pearse .. 

.. 104 . 

2 

6 

Arundel-street, Portsmouth 

.. 



.. Portsmouth 

62 Smith, William 

.. 102 . 

. 2 

6 

Colne-road, Burnley .. 




Burnley and District 

63 Bishop, Florence .. 



6 

New-street, Chipping Norton 




.. Oxfordshire 

64 Swan, Mary 

.. 98. 


6 

Dalkey, Dublin 

TWELVE YEARS OF AGE. 





65 Birch, Jane 

.. 277 . 

. 10 

O 

Bank Quay, Warrington 




.. Warrington. 

66 Burden, Fred 

•• 2 75 ■ 

. 10 

O 

New-street, Chipping-Norton 




.. Oxfordshire. 

67 Price, Rebecca 



O 

Hawley-lane, Warrington .. 




.. Warrington. 

68 Barrett, Elizabeth Shevington.. 

.. 261 . 

. 10 

O 

New Brighton, Chester 




. Liverpool Wesleyan. 

69 Woodhouse, William John 

.. 237 . 

. 10 

O 

George-street, Limerick 




.. IrishTemperance League. 

69 Bates. Henry 



O 

Cores End 




S. Bucks and E. Berks. 

71 Shackleton, Rebecca Harvey .. 

.. 231 

. 10 

O 

Eustace-street, Dublin 




.. Hibernian. 

72 Kent, Flora 


• s 

O 

Roomfield, Todmorden 




.. Todmorden. 




















































THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE, 


77 


No. Name. 


obtained ^ Pri'-e^ Meeting Place of Band of Hope or Name o_f Society. 


73 Ramsden, Lenda Kate .. 

74 Ludbrook, Stephen Percy 

75 Cole, Hugh Samuel 

76 Bentley, Francis Ralph.. 

77 Ridley, Edith Maud 

78 Hall, Albert F. 

79 Stalker, Alfred. 

80 Ivey, Joseph Henry 

81 Holden, May . 

81 Mitchell, Alice. 

81 Sullivan, Arthur. 

81 Diamond, George Labbett 

85 Lamb, Hannah .. 

86 Barton, John 

86 Dodd, Kate Emily 
88 Gibbs, Annie . • 

88 Goddard, Bernard Richard 
88 Hawkins, Annie Hester Discombe 

91 Smith, Benjamin 

92 Pringle, Nicholas Dunn 

93 Crane, Edward Major .. 

94 Davidson, William 

95 Wheway, George Henry 
95 Whiteley, Arthur Walker 
95 Bailey, Lottie Willson 

98 Higgins, Edith Jane 

99 Smedley, Ed win j.. 

100 Lewis, Gwenllian.. 

100 Mitchell, George Richard 

102 Culley, Aubrey. 

103 Symons, Willie Bartle 

104 Harper, Edith M. 

105 Castle, Ernest Joseph 

106 Grove, Thomas Henry 

107 Bleakley, Edna ... 

108 Harris, Richard William 
108 Wallace, Isabella E. 

no Midgley, Harry. 

no Lamb, Helen Elizabeth .. 

112 Whiteman, James 

113 Glennerster, Walter 


114 Nason, Edwin 

115 Capey, Thomas Wilfred 

116 Allen, Ellen Agnes 

117 Hutchins, Ernest Edward 

118 Waring, Joshua Lamb .. 

119 Lamb, Mary Frances 
119 Bentley, William Arthur 

121 Langley, Ellen 

122 Sikes, Richard Herbert 

123 Bentley, Charles Albert 

124 Olson, Henrietta 

125 Trethowan, William Bonds 

126 Cormack, Lizzie 

127 Sparks, William Charles John.. 
127 Padfield, Mary Hannah 

129 Kemp, May 

130 Johnston, Susan Emily .. 

131 Hieatt. John Henry 

132 Halstead, Samuel 

133 Burns, James 

134 Crossley, Israel .. 

135 Jones, Dorothy. 

136 Blyth, William John 

137 Pardon, Edward Richard Stanley 
137 Harrison, Thomas Henry 

139 Nichol, Bryce Gray 

140 Askew, Frederick James 

141 Fitze, Ida Mary 

142 Cass, Henry Herbert 

143 Graham, George 
143 Crookshank, Sarah 

143 Banfield, Florence Lillian 

146 Vines, William George .. 

147 Fielden, Edgar 

148 Roberts, Harry Parker 

149 Quintrell, Treleaven Charles .. 

150 Gundy, Charles Henry 

151 Halliday, Lilian 

151 Adams, William George 
151 Pickering, William 
151 Williams, James Frederick 
*55 Reeve, Henry Herbert .. 

156 Price, William Joseph .. 


157 Waldegrave, Alfred John 
138 Hawthorne, John William 


.. 227 .. 5 

.. 223 .. s 
.. 220 .. 5 

.. 216 .. 5 

.. 210 .. 5 

.. 203 .. 5 

.. 197 .. 5 

.. 194 •• 5 

.. 192 .. 5 

.. 192 .. 5 

.. 192 .. 5 

.. 192 .. 5 

.. 186 .. 5 

.. 185 .. 5 

.. 185 .. s 
.. I78 .. 2 

. . 178 .. 2 

.. I78 .. 2 

.. 174 .. 2 

.. 173 .. 2 

.. 172 .. 2 
.. I70 .. 2 

. 167 .. 2 

.. 167 .. 2 

.. 167 .. 2 
.. 165 .. 2 

.. 164 .. 2 

.. 163 .. 2 

.. 163 .. 2 

.. 162 .. 2 

.. l6l .. 2 

.. 159 .. 2 

•• 157 •• 2 
.. 156 . . 2 

.. I55 .. 2 

.. 153 .. 2 

.. 153 .. 2 

.. 152 .. 2 
.. 152 .. 2 
.. 151 .. 2 
.. 150 .. 2 


.. 306 .. 15 
.. 28 l .. IO 
.. 269 .. IO 
.. 263 .. IO 
255 .j_ 5 
.. 241 .. 5 

.. 241 .. 5 

•• 237 .. 5 

•• 235 .. 5 

.. 234 .. 5 

•• 232 .. 5 

.. 224 .. 5 

.. 218 .. 5 

.. 211 .. s 
.. 211 .. 5 

.. 200 .. 5 

.. 196 .. 5 

•• 195 •• 5 

.. 191 5 

.. 190 .. 5 

.. 189 .. 5 

.. 184 .. 2 

.. 182 .. 2 

.. 181 .. 2 

.. 181 .. 2 

.. 179 .. 2 

.. 178 .. 2 

.. 177 .. 2 

.. 176 .. 2 

.. 172 .. 2 

.. 172 .. 2 

.. 172 .. 2 

.. 171 .. 2 

.. 170 .. 2 

.. 167 .. 2 

.. 166 .. 2 

.. 165 .. 2 

.. 163 .. 2 

.. 163 .. 2 

.. 163 .. 2 

.. 163 .. 2 

.. 162 .. 2 

.. 162 .. 2 


•• 339 •• 15 
.. 297 .. 10 


o Hyde Park-road, Leeds 
o College-street, Chelsea, London . 
o British School, Maidenhead 
o Chipping Norton 
o St. Nicholas, Newcastle 
o Mander-street, Wolverhampton . 
o Queen-street, Scarborough .. 
o Victoria-street, Camborne .. 
o Hyde Park-road, Leeds 
o Temple-street, Keighley 
o Fillebrook, Leytonstone 
o Con way-road, Cardiff 
o North-road, Preston., 
o West Ham-lane 
o Beechen-grove, Watford 
6 Beechen-grove, Watford 
6 Church-street, Reading 
6 Shaldon, Teignmouth 
6 Holbeck, Leeds 
6 Bath-lane, Newcastle 
6 Water-lane, Radcliffe 
6 Dilston-road, Newcastle 
6 Vicarage-street, Nuneaton .. 

6 Queen-street, Morley 
6 Beechen-grove, Watford 
6 Wolvercote, Oxon 
6 Gt. Bardfield 
6 The Kayes, Cardiff 
6 Saltley-road, Birmingham .. 

6 Highbury-hill, London 
6 Victoria-street, Camborne .. 

6 Victoria-strect, Newcastle-on-Tyne 
6 Chipping Norton 
6 Vicarage-street, Nuneaton .. 

6 Water-lane, Radcliffe 
6 Kent-road, Portsmouth 
6 High-strest, Wallsend 
6 Temple-street, Keighley 
6 Bessbrook 

6 Crescent-road, Beckenham .. 

6 Beechen-grove, Watford *.. 

THIRTEEN YEARS OF AGE. 

o New-steeet, Chipping Norton 
o London-road, Leicester 
o Eustace-street, Dublin 
o Conway-road, Cardiff 
o Molesworth-street, Dublin .. 
o Town Hall, Bessbrook, Armagh . 
o New-street, Chipping Norton 
o British School, Maidenhead 
o Duncan-street, Cork 
o New-street, Chipping Norton 
o Rose-street, Thurso, N.B. 
o Beeston-street, Portsmouth 
o Rose-street, Thurso, N.B. 
o Green-row, Portsmouth 
o Conway-road, Cardiff 
o Stockwell Orphanage, London 
o St. George's-place, Dublin .. 
o New-street,Chipping Norton 
o Temple-street, Keighley 
o Agnes-street, Belfast 
o Berry-lane, Longridge 
6 Roose-road, Barrow-in-Furness . 

6 Boro’-road, Southwark, London . 

6 Beeston-street, Portsmouth 
6 North-road, Preston 
6 Corporation-street, Newcastle 
6 Lancaster-road, Preston 
6 Buckland-road, Portsmouth 
6 British School, Broomfield 
6 Kingsland-park, Dublin 
6 Bandon, Cork 
6 Victoria-street, Camborne .. 

6 Victoria-street, Birmingham 
6 Roomfield, Todmorden 
6 Dalton-road, Barrow-in-Furness . 

6 Victoria-street, Camborne 
6 Waterloo-road, Wolverhampton . 

6 Eustace-street, Dublin 
6 Vicarage-street, Nuneaton .. 

6 Nelson-street, Newcastle .. 

6 Molesworth-street, Dublin 
6 Parish-street, Southwark, London 
6 Honley-lane, Warrington 

FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE. 

o Beeston-street, Portsmouth 
o Peckitt-street, York. 


Local Uniojis. 

Leeds & District. 

West London. 

S. Bucks and E. Berks. 
Oxfordshire. 

Newcastle & Gateshead. 
Wolverhampton & Dist. 
Scarborough. 

Leeds & Dist. Wesleyan 

Keighley and District 

South Essex 

Cardiff and District 

Preston 

South Essex 

Herts. 

Herts. 

Reading 

* 

Leeds & Dist. Wesleyan 
Newcastle and Gateshead 
Radcliffe 

N ewcastle and Gateshead 

Leeds & Dist. Wesleyan 
Herts. 

Oxfordshire 
North Essex 
Cardiff and District 
Birmingham 
City and Finsbury 

Newcastle and Gateshead 
Oxfordshire 

* 

Radcliffe 

Portsmouth 

Newcastle and Gateshead 
Keighley and District 
Irish Temperance League 
West Kent 
Herts. 


Oxfordshire 
Leicestershire 
Hibernian 
Cardiff and District 
Hibernian 

Irish Temperance League 

Oxfordshire 

S. Bucks and E. Berks 

Hibernian 

Oxfordshire 

Portsmouth 

4 

Portsmouth 

Cardiff and District 

S.W. London 

Hibernian 

Oxfordshire 

Keighley and District 

Irish Temperance League 

Preston 

Barrow 

Southwark 

Portsmouth 

Preston 

Newcastle and Gateshead 
Preston 
Portsmouth 
N. Essex 
Hibernian 
Irish Methodist 
* 

Birmingham 

Todmorden 

Barrow 

Wolverhampton 

Hibernian 

Newcastle and Gateshead 

Hibernian 

Southwark 

Warrington 


Portsmouth 

Meth. New Connexion 







































THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


7S 


No. Name. 


Marks Value of 
obtained. Prize. 


Meeting Place of B an d of Hope or Name of Society. 


Local Unions. 


159 Shannon, Annie .. 

160 Richardson, Florence May 

161 Battersby, Francis Edward 

162 Clues, Henry 

163 Clarke, Gerard Benjamin 

164 Kelsey, Kate 

164 Horden, John Mason 

166 Ashton, Margaret 

167 Latham, Arthur 

168 London, Frederick W. G. 

169 Rayner, Maude 
169 Bibby, William 

171 Jay, Minnie Florence 

172 Pulvertaft, Robert George 

173 Geldeard, William 

173 Williams, Bertha Richardson 

175 Bennis, Mary Gertrude .. 

176 Hiscock, Edith Paul 

176 Rogers, Walter Jordan.. 

178 Carty, William Richard 

179 Thorp, James Edward .. 

179 Bradley, John William .. 

181 Roberts, Hetty .. 

182 Baker, Thomas Stanley.. 

183 Coulson, Charles.. 

184 Roberts, John 

185 Shield, Louisa 

186 Halstead, Sarah Ellen .. 

187 Chennell, Frank .. 


188 Barmby, Mary 

189 Black, Robert Wilson .. 

190 Chapman, Annie Margaret 

191 Sargent, Herbert.. 

192 Bentley, James Hargreaves 

193 Thompson, Edith Maria 

194 Sellers, Thomas 

195 Bradburn, Elizabeth Mary 

196 Tonkinson, Frederick John 

197 Priestley, Albert Weston 

198 Bolam, Robert Alfred 
198 Fielding, Vivian Joshua 

200 Thompson, William Herbert 

201 Savage, Sarah Ann 

202 Eagle, Sarah Elizabeth .. 

203 Rook, Flora 

204 Furney, John L. .. 

205 Whitmee, James Thomas 

206 McGuffin, Thomas 

207 Saward, Lydia A. 


208 Chapman, Edith Lucy .. 

209 Fry, Charles Edmund .. 

210 Friel, Alfred R .. 

211 Halliday, Edith Mary .. 

212 Barney, Charlotte 
212 Tomalin, Osborn 

214 Scott, George Lattimore.. 

215 Moreton, Mary Louisa .. 

216 Walker, David Faris 

216 Compston, Florence Evelyn 

218 Smith, Arthur Joseph . - 

219 Richardson, Lilian E. .. 

220 White, Ellen 

221 Austin, Frank Ernest 

222 Adams, Alfred Ernest .. 

223 Jay, Herbert Frank 

224 Burden, Frank Sparks .. 

225 Sayer, Jane 


225 Fortune, John James .. 

227 Webster, Mary 

228 Radnedge, Agnes J. 

229 Hayward, William Abbott 

230 Hewlett, Maud 

231 Carty, Mary H. .. 

232 Higson, Peter 

233 King, Emily 

233 Chappie, John T... 


235 Ruston, Albert Ernest .. 

236 Bousfield, Annie 

237 Dowswell, Harold Clayton 

238 Law, Albert 

239 Groves, Alfred 


290 

279 

276 


271 .. 

5 

264 .. 

5 

249 .. 

5 

249 .. 

5 

248.. 

5 

246 .. 

5 

240 .. 

5 

238 .. 

5 

238 .. 

5 

237 •• 

2 

233 .. 

2 

226 .. 

2 

226 .. 

2 

223 .. 

2 

221 . . 

2 

22T . . 

2 

217 . . 

2 

2l6 . . 

2 

2l6 . . 

2 

214 . . 

2 

213 .. 

2 

212 . . 

2 

211 . . 

2 

206 . . 

2 

205 .. 

2 

203 .. 

2 

43a •• 

20 

367 

15 

344 

10 

385 •• 

10 

333 

5 

325 •• 

5 

324 •• 

5 

298 . 

5 

296 . 

5 

295 .. 

2 

293 • 

2 

293 • 

2 

285 . 

2 

273 . 

2 

252 . 

2 

249 . 

2 

247 . 

2 

246 . 

2 

245 .. 

2 

23B . 

2 

469 . 

2 o 

445 • 

15 

435 • 

10 

43 ° • 

10 

415 . 

5 

415 • 

5 

4°5 • 

5 

365 • 

5 

355 • 

5 

355 • 

• 5 

334 • 

5 

320 . 

2 

3°8 • 

2 

3 °° • 

2 

295. 

2 

291 . 

2 

290 . 

2 


2 

406. 

• 15 

383 • 

10 

. 361 . 

• 5 

• 327 • 

• 5 

270 . 

. 2 

268. 

. 2 

. 242 . 

. 2 

. 241 

. 2 

. 241 

. 2 

. 508 

. 20 



• 47 ° 

. 10 

. 462 

-• 5 

.. 460 

•• 5 


10 o Eustace-street, Dublin 
5 o Turnham Green, Middlesex 
5 o Lancaster-road. Preston 
o Brington-road, Long Buckby 
o St. George’s-place, Dublin .. 
o Chearsley-road, Long Crendon 
o Rathmines Township School, Dublin 
o Sykes-street, Kingston-on-Hull 
o Dalehall, Burslem 

o Horseferry-road, Westminster, London, 
o Walker, Newcastle 
o St. George’s-place, Dublin 
6 Sudbury, Suffolk 
6 Faulkner-lane, Cork .. 

6 North-road, Preston .. 

6 Eustace-street, Dublin 
6 Eustace-street, Dublin 
6 Oxford-road, Reading 
6 George-street, Croydon 
Sandymount, Dublin.. 

6 Hyde Park-road, Leeds 
6 Hyde Park-road, Leeds 
6 Liverpool 
6 Prospect-hill, Lisburn 
6 North-road, Preston .. 

6 Strangeways, Manchester 
6 Archdeacon-lane, Leicester 
6 Roomfield, Todmorden 
6 Stockwell Orphanage, London 

FIFTEEN YEARS OF AGE. 


North-road, Preston .. 
College-street, Chelsea, London 
Eustace-street, Dublin 
Rushden, Northampton 
Chipping Norton 
Eustace-street. Dublin 
Cleckheaton Wesleyan 
Liverpool 

Trentham, Church of England 
Thornton 
Barras Bridge, Newcastle-on-Tyn 
Cotingham-road, Dublin 
Mole^worth-street, Dublin .. 
Greens Norton 
Stockwell Orphanage, London 
Holmes-street, Bradford 
Molesworth-street, Dublin .. 
Newport Pagnell 
Perry-street, Dungannon 
Abbey-road, London 


SIXTEEN YEARS OF AGE. 


Eustace-street, Dublin 
Parish-street, Southwark, London 
Rathmines-road, Dublin 
Eustace-street, Dublin 
Upper Rathmines-road, Dublin 
Brington-road, Long Buckby 
Victoria-street, Portsmouth 
Chapel-street, Cheadle 
Rathmines-road, Dublin 
Fivehead, Taunton .. 

Devonshire Park, Keighley.. 
Turnham Green, Middlesex 
Hinde-street, Marylebone, London 
Castle Hill, Northampton .. 
University-road, Belfast 
Sudbury 

Green Row. Portsmouth 
Lune-street, Preston 


SEVENTEEN YEARS OF AGE. 


o King-street, Wigan 
o Hope-street, Wigan 
o Market-square, Merthyr Tydfil 
o Trinity, Sudbury 
6 Wolvercote, Oxon 
6 Sandymount 

6 Strangeways, Manchester .. 

6 Highbury-hill, London 
6 Fitzroy, London 

EIGHTEEN YEARS OF AGE. 


Brington-road, Long Buckby 
Huddleston-road, Willesden Green, London 
Trinity Presbyterian, Chapel-lane, Wigan 
Sion Baptist, Harris-street 
Vicarage-street, Nuneaton .. 


Hibernian 
West Middlesex 
Preston 

N orthamptonshire 

Hibernian 

Thame and District 

Hibernian 

Hull and District 

Staffordshire 

West London 

Newcastleand Gateshead 

Hibernian 

Ipswich and Suffolk 

Irish Methodist 

Preston 

Hibernian 

Hibernian 

Reading 

Surrey 

Irish Methodist 
Leeds Wesleyan 
Leeds Wesleyan 
Liverpool 

Irish Temperance League 
Preston 

Lancashire and Cheshire 
Leicestershire 
Todmorden 
S. W. London 


Preston 
West London 
Hibernian 

Higham Ferrars & Dist. 

Oxfordshire 

Hibernian 

Bradford 

Liverpool 

Staffordshire 

Bradford 

Newcastleand Gateshead 

Hibernian 

Hibernian 

Bradford 

N orthamptonshire 
South West London 
Hibernian 
N orthamptonshire 
Irish Methodist 
Marylebone 


Hibernian 

Southwark 

Hibernian 

Hibernian 

Hibernian 

N orthamptonshire 

Portsmouth 

Meth. New Connexion 

Hibernian 

Keighley and District 
West Middlesex 
Marylebone 
Northampton 
Irish Methodist 
Ipswich and Suffolk 
Portsmouth 
Preston 


Wigan and District 
Wigan and District 
Glamorgan & Monmouth 
Ipswich and Suffolk 
Oxfordshire 
Irish Methodist 
Lancashire and Cheshire 
City and Finsbury 
Marylebone 


N orthamptonshire 
Wesc Middlesex 
Wigan and District 
Bradford 

* 



























































THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE . 


79 


No. Nairn. 


Marks Vahie of Meeting P lac of Band of Hope or Name of Society, 
obtained. Prizes. 


240 Rushby, William.. 

.. 456 •• 

s 

241 Heal, Dorcas Teletha. .. 

•• 453 - 

2 

242 Tonkinson, Thomas Silvester .. 

445 • 

2 

243 Chapman, Edward John 

• • 43 ° '- 

2 

244 Edgecombe, Frederick T. 

.. 429 . 

2 


245 Hilbert, Frederick A. 

.. 410 .. 

20 

246 Heaton, A B. 

.. 386 .. 

10 

247 Mason, Sarah 

-- 353 

5 

248 Hull, William George 

.. 311 •• 

2 

248 Batey, Mary Ellen 

.. 3 ii .. 

2 

250 Holt, Frederick .. 

.. 294 .. 

2 

251 Pratt, Helen Mary 

.. 279 .. 

2 

252 Way, Arthur William 

.. 274 .. 

2 


o Zion Methodist New Connexion, Commercial-street.. 
6 Green-row, Portsmouth 

6 Church of England, Trentham. 

6 Lake-road, Portsmouth . 

6 Morice-square, Devonport. 

NINETEEN YEARS OF AGE. 

o Sun-street, Keighley. 

o Temple-street, Keighley. 

o Gloucester-street, Newcastle . 

6 Arundel-street, Portsmouth. 

6 Bath-lane, Newcastle . . 

6 Middleton-road, Oldham 

6 Shaldon, Teignmouth . 

6 Lake-road, Portsmouth . 


TWENTY YEARS OF AGE. 


253 Jennings, Ada Elizabeth .. .. 421 •• 20 

254 Blake, Thomas William. 355 •• 10 

255 Heywood, James William .. .. 301 .. 5 

256 Wigham, Leonard .. -. .. 299 .. 5 

257 Caiger, Herbert .. .. . - - - 286 .. 2 


o Trinity Presbyterian, Kentish Town, London 
o Claremont, Pentonville, London 
o Liverpool-street, Preston 
o Eustace-street, Dublin 
6 Highbury Hill, London 


Local Unions 

Batley 

Portsmouth 

Staffs. 

Portsmouth 
Three Towns 


Keighley and District 
Keighley and District 
Newcastle and Gateshead 
Portsmouth 

Ne wcastle and Gateshead 
Oldham 
* 

Portsmouth 


Marylebone 
City & Finsbury 
Preston 
Hibernian 
City & Finsbury 


SPECIMEN ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS. 


The subjoined specimen answers afford most satisfac¬ 
tory proof of the thoroughness with which the teaching 
in Dr. Ridge’s excellent little manual has been grasped by 
the competitors. The answers are given in the words of 
the writers, subject only to a few trifling correction sin 
grammar and spelling. They include one answer to each 
question,and to show that those of every age gave satis¬ 
factory replies, they also include an answer in each year 
from 9 to 21. A large number of other competitors gave 
answers of equal merit, and some even better than those 
subjoined, but the following have been selected as most 
fairly representing the general work of the more diligent 
and intelligent competitors. We may undoubtedly expect 
that the writers of such papers will rank amongst the 
faithful and intelligent abstainers of the future, and 
would remind all our friends that by painstaking effort a 
similar thorough knowledge of temperance principles 
may be imparted to all our members. 

1 .—What takes place during alcoholic fermentation ? How can 
it he prevented ?—During alcoholic fermentation the yeast-cells, 
which have life (vegetable life like that of plants), grow and in¬ 
crease in size and number. Each yeast-cell grows to a certain size, 
and is called a mother cell; upon this two or three tiny cells or 
baby cells are formed, which in their turn grow to the size of 
mother cells,and form other baby cells,until there are millions 
of these cells in the liquid. These cells have the power of 
splitting up the sugar into two poisons—(1) alcohol and (2) 
carbonic acid gas. This gas escapes and forms bubbles on 
the top. If it is wine which is being made, the alcohol dis¬ 
solves the colouring matter from the skins of the grapes, and 
also other substances contained in the grapes which give a 
peculiar taste to the wine. During alcoholic fermentation the 
most nourishing parts of the grape, and the solid part of the 
barley (whichever is being used), is being either destroyed or 
thrown away until there is hardly any left. Alcoholic fermen¬ 
tation may be prevented in several ways, the chief being as 
follows:—(1) If the liquid be put into casks which have had brim¬ 
stone burned in them, and if when nearly full a lighted brim¬ 
stone match be thrust into the bung-hole and the cask then 
tightly corked, it will not ferment. But this method is now 
considered unhealthy. (2) It is put into bottles which are 
placed in hot water until the juice is hot also, and then it is 
tightly corked. It used in ancient times to be preserved in 
skins, which were covered with pitch both inside and out. 
Wine may also be prevented from fermenting by boiling it 
down to a syrup; this, in ancient times, was called peckmez, 
and may be boiled down still more until it is of the consistency 
of jam. It is then called dibs.— Annie Bousfield (age 18), 
Huddlestone Road Band of Hope, Willesden, London. 


2. — Briefly describe malting and brewing. Explain how the 
value of barley as food is altered by malting and brewing. —In 
malting, barley is the kind of seed generally used, but in China 
they use rice,and in many cases millet is the kind employed. The 
barley is wetted and put in a warm place,being turned over every 
day. In two or three days the shoots appear,and when they have 
grown a little, the sprouts are killed by roasting. The barley 
is now called malt; the sprouts are rubbed off and separated 
from the malt. 100 lbs. of barley make 80 lbs. of malt. Then 
the malt is crushed between rollers and put into hot 
water. This water dissolves the sugar out of the malt, and it 
is called sweet-wort. The sweet-wort is strained from the 
grains,which are given to cows and pigs. The water only dis¬ 
solves half the sugar,so that of the 100 lbs. of barley only 4.0 lbs. 
remains in the sweet-wort. Hops are now boiled with the 
wort; then it is allowed to cool and caused to ferment,and when 
fermentation is over only 10 lbs. of solid matter remain in 
about 18 gallons of water. This solid matter contains some 
nourishment, but not much. Malt was used because it was the 
cheapest way to get a sugary liquor,but now sugar is cheaper 
than it was, and most brewers add some to the sweet-wort; 
many do not use any malt at all.— Joseph Henry Ivey (age 
12), Victoria Street, Camborne, Cornwall. 

3. — Describe how fermented wine is made. —The grapes are 
collected when ripe and taken to the press. In olden times 
this was a large tub, with a hole at the side near the bottom ; 
above it there was a beam, to which ropes were attached, to 
which men clung ; they then trod the grapes in the press, and 
the juice ran foaming out at the hole, and was collected in jars 
or skins, and was of a yellowish colour. This press is some¬ 
times used now, but in some cases there is a wooden screw 
which is turned. This wine is called must, or new wine, and 
is, of course, unfermented. If it is to be kept in its unfermented 
state, it is put into barrels, which have had brimstone burned 
in them. When they are nearly full, a lighted brimstone 
match is put in the bung hole, and then the barrels are tightly 
corked. Or if it is to be kept in bottles, the bottles are put in 
hot water until the juice is hot also ; it is then sealed. In olden 
times they had skins with pitch inside and out. If it is to be 
kept in a fermented state the grape juice, stones, stalks and 
skins are left together for a few days. In a few days the yeast 
cells that are in the air, and have been clinging to the grapes, 
attack the juice and sugar, and split it up into two poisons— 
alcohol and carbonic acid gas; this escapes in bubbles as in beer. 
The alcohol present now is able to dissolve the red colouring 
matter in the skins, and makes the wine red. If the grape 
skins are white, of course the wine will be white. The 
alcohol is also able to dissolve a substance out of the grapes 
which gives a funny taste to it. If you have ever bitten a grape 
stone you find it has a rough taste ; this is caused by the 
presence therein of tannin, a substance largely present in oak 
barks, and which is used to make skins into leather. This 
tannin is dissolved by the alcohol. The stuff which forms 
flesh and fluid in the grapes is being driven out until hardly 
any is left. After the fermentation has gone on long enough 

































8o 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


(time varies with heat of weather) it is closely shut up in casks 
It is left a long time in the casks to improve in flavour. The 
object of shutting it up so tightly is to prevent the alcohol from 
turning into vinegar, which it would do if left to the air. In 
this state no one would drink it, but in olden times much of 
this sour vinegar was taken, just as raspberry vinegar is now 
taken; or it can be stopped by putting more alcohol to it. 
This is called fortifying the wine; by adding more alcohol, it 
kills the vinegar plant. After fermentation has stopped there 
are about 17 parts out of every 100 parts alcohol. If then 
there is more you can tell that brandy or alcohol has been 
added to it. Sometimes drugs are mixed with alcohol, and 
called wine.— Ernest Edward Hutchins (age 13), Conway 
Road, Cardiff. 

4 -—Describe the manufacture of “ silent spirit; ” also the com¬ 
position and manufacture of gin and rum. —Silent spirit.—This 
substance is obtained by malting and brewing barley, oats, 
potatoes,&c. The fermented sweet wort is boiled, and the steam 
is made to pass through a tube kept cool by cold water. In 
this tube the steam is changed into drops of water and drops out 
as dilute alcohol. This process is repeated for several times, 
which is called “ concentrating it.” The oftener the process 
is repeated the stronger the alcohol will be. Each time it is 
repeated less water is there. Gin.—A mixture of water and 
alcohol; it is flavoured with juniper berries, coriander seed, &c. 
There is a book called the mixing book, meant only for 
publicans to read, in which receipts are given for diluting gin 
and making it look like undiluted gin. Rum. —A spirit made 
from the refuse of sugar-making in the West Indies. When 
first made it is colourless, but is coloured with burnt sugar. It 
is flavoured with pine-apple. — Annie Shannon (age 14), 
Friends’ Band of Hope, Mountmellick, Dublin. 

3.— What reasons can you give to prove that alcoholic drinks 
are not necessary as beverages ? —The larger monkeys are like 
man except in their brains, and they live and thrive without it. 
All babies are born teetotalers, and their only food is milk, and 
nothing is so weak and helpless as a baby, and they live and 
are well without alcohol. If it were necessary it would have 
been provided for them. Generations before the flood never 
knew of it, and therefore did not drink it, and they lived and 
thrived without it. Nations of the past time and the present 
day lived and thrived without it. Men, women and children 
of all ages and every trade, under every condition of life, live 
and thrive without it.— Ethel Thrift (age 9), Rathmines 
Township School Band of Hope, Dublin. 

6. — What is the effect of alcohol on the mind ? —Alcohol 
opposes temperance or self-control. The word temperance 
comes from a Latin word meaning restraint or control, and 
sometimes means self-control. St. Paul reasoned before Felix 
of “ temperance,” Acts xxiv. 25. He mentions it as one of the 
fruits of the Spirit (Gal. v. 23). Self-control is control over our 
limbs, over our words and actions. A drunken man loses 
control over his limbs and staggers about; over his feelings, 
and will laugh, cry, and get angry over trifles; over his thoughts, 
he cannot fix his attention or study over his words and actions, 
and he is more easily led to commit sin. Self-control is only 
gained by practice.— Mary Barmby (age 15), North Road 
Band of Hope, Preston, Lancashire. 

7. — How does alcohol affect the moral character ?—It makes 
it more easy to do wrong and harder to do right. It does so 
in several ways:—(1) It makes the body less healthy. It often 
causes indigestion and a state of irritability which makes it 
more difficult to keep the body under control. (2) It makes it 
more difficult to watch against temptation. Peter says 
(1 Peter v. 8) : “ Be sober, be vigilant, because your adversary, 
the devil, walketh about seeking whom he may devour.” 
Peter wrote this text in Greek, and the literal meaning of the 
word which is translated “ be sober,” is “ do not drink any wine or 
strong drink.” Alcohol renders a man less vigilant by weak¬ 
ening the judgment, and also by deadening or quieting the 
conscience. He will think, say, and do things that he would 
have shrunk from before. (3) It weakens the will or power of 
self control. If the brain is under the influence of alcohol a 
man must put forth a greater effort to make himself do what 
he knows he ought to do. (4) It often leads people into bad 
society which corrupts them. If you want to find the worst 
people in any town or village you will always find them some 
time or other in the public house corrupting others by their 
wicked words and ways.— Charlotte Barney (age 16,) 
Rathmines Township School Band of Hope, Dublin. 

8 . — In what way does waste occur in making and buying 
strong drink ? —In making and buying strong drink, waste 


takes place. Food, land, time, strength, and money are wasted. 
Beer is made from malt. Since the tax was taken off malt 
in 1881, all kinds of grain are malted. It is calculated that 
every year 80,000,000 bushels of grain are wasted in making 
intoxicating liquors. It is also known that the amount of 
grain used in making food in the British Isles every year is 
180,000,000 bushels. Now although the grain used in making 
drink is chiefly barley (of course if the barley were not grown 
other grains more useful would be grown instead), it is calcu¬ 
lated that it would make 1,200,000,000 loaves, weighing 4 lbs. 
each, enough to give every family of five persons 190 loaves— 
enough to feed them four months. Mr. Hoyle states that if 
these loaves were used as paving stones, they would pave a 
road 10 yards, and 2,000 miles, or 80 times the distance from 
London to Manchester,or if they had to be carted from a baker's 
shop in London and tumbled into the Thames, and one cart 
was employed to do it, taking 500 loaves every half hour for 
10 hours each day, it would take the cart 380 years to do it, 
or it would take 380 carts one year to do it. In making beer 
if 100 lbs. of barley were used, it would only make 80 lbs. of 
malt, and then out of the malt 70 lbs. are thrown away or 
changed into alcohol or carbonic acid gas. Land is wasted. 
The land devoted to growing the grain and the hops is some of 
the best land in the country. The growing of these occupies 
land equal to the whole of the counties of Kent, Essex and 
Suffolk, or one-tenth of the land devoted to growing crops of 
all kinds. The barley takes up 2,500,000 acres and the hops 
60,000 acres. The Hop, when first put into beer was counted an 
adulteration, and an Act of Parliament was passed to prevent 
it. Some people say hops were sent by God to make beer 
with, but it is not true. It is only a weed that has been 
increased and cultivated by the skill of farmers. Time and 
strength are wasted. It is calculated that in the United King¬ 
dom there are 150,000 publicans, beersellers, &c. 100,000 

brewers, distillers, maltsers, and 200,000 pot-boys, bar-maids, 
bar-men, &c. Altogether there are between 400,000 and 
500,000 engaged in the drink traffic. Now the time and 
strength of all these people are wasted because they are not 
put to any good use. It is calculated that £1,500,000 worth of 
drink is produced every year in the Caledonian Distillery, 
Edinburgh. To produce it only 150 men are employed. If 
instead of buying drink to this value they bought boots and 
shoes, it would give work to from 12 to 15 thousand people. 
If all the money spent on drink were spent on manufactured 
goods it would give work to 2,000,000 men and women all the 
the year round. Money is wasted. Every year £140,000,000 
of money is spent on drink in this country. This is all wasted 
because nothing good has been bought with it. When we buy 
clothes, the buyer and seller gain, but in the case of drink 
only the seller gains.— Agnes Jane Radnedge (age 17), 
Market Square Band of Hope, Merthyr Tydfil. 

9. — Give illustrations of the national loss estimated to arise 
from the use of intoxicating liquors. —The loss to the nation is 
twofold—1st, there is a loss to the buyer which costs the nation 
£140,000,000, minus what is returned in the form of revenue ; 
and, 2nd, there is a loss to the nation of £140,000,000 through 
the effects of drink. This is accounted for as follows :— 
£13,000,000, value of land on which barley, &c. is grown ; 
£15,000,000, value of time and money spent on making barley 
into beer; £25,000,000, value of the time of the army of 
publicans, barmaids, potboys, &c., who assist in selling it. Thus 
£53, ooo ,o° o is wasted in the production. The other £87,000,000 
is wasted through its effects. Through the use of intoxicating 
liquor, men lose a lot of time, hinder others from working, and 
when they work themselves cannot do so much work as if 
they did not drink. All this is valued at £50,000,000. £16,000,000 
is wasted through loss of property on land and sea caused by 
carelessness or inattention while drunk, as a ship going on a 
rock through unskilful guidance, fires breaking out through 
the dropping of inflammable articles, and the destruction of 
property by drunken men. £18,000,000 is lost through the 
poverty caused by strong drink. 76 to 90 per cent, of our 
paupers are in workhouses through drink. 70 per cent, 
frequent hospitals through it. 15 per cent, directly, and 
15 per cent, indirectly are insane through drink. All these 
have to be maintained at the expense of the country, while a 
great deal of private charity goes on, which is necessitated by 
drink. £3,000,000 is lost in the building of prisons, support of 
policemen, judges, &c., through breaches of the peace caused 
by men when under the influence of drink.— Thomas William 
Blake (age 20), Claremont Band of Hope, Pentonville, London. 

10. — Mention any facts which show that the use of alcoholia 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


81 


drinks is injurious to the bodies of those who take them. —It is 
known to be a poison—many people have been killed through 
taking it. It is known to be the cause of disease—diseases of 
the brain, stomach, liver, and other organs, are due to alcohol. 
It is known to be the cause of insanity ; the Commissioners of 
Lunacy tell us that 15 out of every hundred become insane 
through drink, and 15 per cent, indirectly. It is known 
to be the cause of poverty—nine-tenths of the crime is 
due to drink. Facts show that a body of men who drink 
alcohol will have most disease; taking the Preston Sick 
Union of Odd-fellows, and the London grand branch of the 
Sons of Temperance, the former were ill on an average eight 
days in the year, while the latter only five. Dr. Andrew Clark 
states that in every 100 cases of disease under his care 70 were 
caused by drink.— Helen Mary Pratt, (age 19), Shaldon 
Band of Hope, Teignmouth, Devon. 

11. —What is meant by Prohibition ? State any arguments in 
its favour. What is a full license ? —Prohibition means that 
no beer shall be sold, except a few small quantities which the 
doctor might order. Prohibition goes on well where it is, and 
most likely would anywhere else. In Bessbrook, in Ireland, 
in Maine, Kansas, and Iowa, it has been tried and 
has profited greatly. A full license is for a publican 
to get a paper from the tax-collectors saying that they may 
sell beer and spirits, to be drunk off and on the premises. A 
license lasts for one year, but the publicans take the license to 
the magistrates, and if the police do not know anything against 
the publican, they get it renewed.— Herbert Payton (age 10), 
Abbey Street Band of Hope, Hackney, London. 

12. — Refer to any passages in the Bible which are in favour of 
total abstinence. —In Lev. x. 8—11 God Himself forbade the 
priests to drink wine or strong drink when going into the 
tabernacle. He also commanded the Nazarites to abstain. 
Solomon says, “ Look not on the wine when it is red ” (the 
colour of the skins having been dissolved by the alcohol), for 
“ at the last it biteth like a serpent and stingeth like an adder ” 
(Prov. xxiii. 31—35). In 1 Peter v. 8 we read, “ Be sober, be 
vigilant,” &c. Paul says, 11 It is good not to drink wine” 
(Rom. xiv).— Ernest William Carter (age 11), Maidenhead 
Band of Hope, Berks. 


OUR BOOK TABLE. 

Golden Links in a Life Chain, by Mrs. Evered Poole 
(James Nisbet & Co.), is a bright story with a running 
current of temperance teaching which will make it useful. 
As might have been expected, it is written in a deeply 
sympathetic strain. Gran, by E. A. B. D. (same pub¬ 
lishers), is a tale of our fisher folk, evidently written by 
one who knows them well. The characters are finely 
drawn, and the quaint turns of thought are very striking 
and refreshing. 

Not Thrown Away, but Given ; the Story of Marion's Hero, 
by Mrs. G. S. Reaney (T. Nelson & Sons), is marked by 
all the excellences which this writer has accustomed her 
readers to expect. As a tale with a purpose it could 
scarcely be better, and we have no doubt it will meet with 
wide popularity. 

Frying Pan Alley, by Mrs. F. West (S. W. Partridge & 
Co.), is a new issue of an old favourite which deals with 
the problem of how the poor live in a thoroughly helpful 
spirit. Those who have not read this touching story have 
a treat in store. 

Dottings of a Dosser, by H. J. Goldsmid (T. Fisher 
Unwin), reveals the grim secrets of the London lodging 
houses 1 his is a brochure which should cause great 
searchings of heart to social reformers. The writer 
earnestly pleads for a strong reforming hand in these low 
dens of squalor, and we are heartily with him : at the 
same time it should be remembered that every blow 
struck for temperance is a nail in the coffin of the fester¬ 
ing sore which Mr. Goldsmid probes. 

The Little One's Text Book, by the Rev. P. M. Eastman 
(W. B. Whittingham & Co.), is modelled on the usual 
plan of a text for everyday. The passages have been 
selected with great judgment, and being printed in bold 
clear type, will be readily mastered by the little ones. 
The unusual feature of the book is an original bit of verse 


for every day echoing the teaching of the text. It would 
have been to much too expect super-excellence in such 
a task, and the best we can say is that the moral of the 
rhymes at times leaves the poetry somewhat in the rear. 
The several illustrations scattered through the text-book 
are very good. 

Temperance Progress; Facts and Figures for Temperance 
Workers (Elliot Stock), gives an admirable report of the 
papers and speeches delivered at the Temperance Con¬ 
gress, held at Croydon last May. As many representa¬ 
tive men took part in the proceedings the preservation of 
their utterances in this form was a happy idea. Those 
who have to take the platform will find many helps in 
this volume. 

The Bible Temperance Educator, edited by the Rev. 
John Piper (Belfast),has reached its sixth annual volume. 
As the organ of the Bible Temperance Association its 
instructive pages are mainly occupied with closely 
reasoned arguments explanatory of textual difficulties. 

The Life of John B. Gough (Morgan & Scott) is a wonder¬ 
ful pennyworth, pictures, printing, and literary workman¬ 
ship being alike excellent. The Century and St. Nicholas 
are splendid magazines, and it says not a little for 
American enterprise that they are now issued simul¬ 
taneously in London as well as in New York. Our home 
workers will have to look closely to business if Brother 
Jonathan is not to beat them out of the field. 

Sharp Showers and Sunshine, by Corney Simmonds 
(National Temperance Publication Depot), is the work of 
an old Band of Hope worker. The author wields the 
pen of a ready writer, and prose and verse come at his 
call without let or hindrance. The recitations and 
dialogues are very sparkling; indeed,there is not a dull page 
from cover to cover. Senior members of Bands of Hope 
will delight in this useful little book, as a means of help¬ 
ing them to take part in brightening up the meetings. 

“ Alcohol; My Own Experience," by Joseph McCorry 
^Ex-Brewer’s Traveller), ought to sell from its title alone. 
It is not every day in the week that a man steps out from 
behind the scenes to lift up his voice against the enemy 
of the race. The pamphlet is published by J ohn Hey wood, 
Manchester, and will well repay perusal. 

The Vegetarian Messenger (F. Pitman) is a monthly which 
shows how much can be advanced in favour of vegetarian 
principles. The “ cause ” is evidently steadily progressing 
and will be much helped by this carefully prepared litera¬ 
ture. 

The Sunday School Union favours us with a selection of 
their Dialogues for week evening entertainments. They 
are by various writers and touch a variety of topics. No. 
7, Britain's Curse, obtained the prize offered by the Band 
of Hope Committee of the Union. It would make a 
capital item for a temperance entertainment. 

The Artizan's Thrift and Temperance Companion, by the 
Rev. W. J. Spriggs-Smith (National Temperance Publica¬ 
tion Depot), contains much in little. It is thoroughly to 
the point, and deserves to be distributed broadcast. 

The Sunday School Helper tor March (Sunday School Asso¬ 
ciation, Essex Street, Strand) contains the com¬ 
mencement of a sympathetic biographical sketch ot 
Father Mathew, written by Frank K. Freeston. 

Lease and Re-Lease, by Sea-Verdure (Chiswick Press), is 
evidently the work of a cultured mind at peace with itself. 
The papers have already seen the light in some magazines. 

The Rechabite Magazine gives some valuable information 
of particular service to members of the Order, and not 
without interest to outsiders. Onward and Onward Reciter 
are as good as ever. In the former, the serial tale,‘‘Among 
the Queen’s Enemies,” is by Mr. F. Sherlock. The Young 
Standard Bearer has enlarged its borders, and is calculated 
to become increasingly popular in C.E.T.S. circles. The 
Methodist Sunday School Record, edited by the Rev. Charles 
H. Kelly, makes a good beginning, and will no doubt be 
appreciated by those for whom it s specially intended. 




82 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


GLEANINGS AND ILLUSTRATIONS. 

First Steps and Results. —Many years ago, in a 
small market town in the North of England, a group of 
five children were returning from school. On the way home 
they had to pass the shop of a tradesman who was known 
to be the secretary of the temperance society, when one of 
them said, “Let’s go and sign teetotal.” They did so 
and went on their way. Time passed on, they grew up, 
and of two of them nothing more is known. One went 
away, wandered for some time in distant lands, and then 
returned and settled in his native town; the other two 
went forth to meet the trials and fight the battle of life 
amid the temptations and surroundings of a large town. 
One bright sunny afternoon during the late autumn a 
small group, consisting of the family residing there and 
some old friends from a distance, sat before a parlour 
window looking out into the street. They had not met 
for years, and as is often the case ‘ ‘ when old friends meet 
together,” they talked of the past, of those who had once 
been schoolfellows and companions. Where were they, 
what had become of them ? And as the name of one after 
another came up, it was sad to learn of the ruin to home, 
and health, and character that had been brought about by 
strong drink. Just then the host observing a person pass, 
said, “ Do you know him ? ” To which one of the others 
replied, “Isn’t it J. ?” “Yes.” Yes it was he, and 
there almost within sight of the very spot where they had 
signed the pledge, were three out of the five—after the 
lapse of nearly fifty years—in good health, members of a 
Christian church, and not one of them had broken the pledge. 
We test the value of theories by their accordance with 
known facts; surely such facts ought to encourage those 
who are striving to train the young in the principles and 
practice of total abstinence. 

Alcohol and the Muscular Sense. — Muscles 
possess a peculiar power known as the muscular sense. 
Speaking of this, Professor Huxley says, “ This muscular 
sensation is the feeling of resistance which arises when 


any kind of obstacle is opposed to the movement of the 
body, or any part of it; and it is something quite 
different from the feeling of contact or even of pressure. ” 
Dr. J. J. Ridge made many interesting experiments to 
ascertain the effect of minute doses of alcohol on the 
muscular sense, with the following result : “That in every 
case the average sensibility to weight and power of dis¬ 
crimination was decidedly diminished by small doses of 
alcohol, the general average indicating that the sensi¬ 
bility is diminished about one-third, or 66'4 per cent.” 

The Fox in the Well. —From an old edition of 
AEsop’s Fables, published in 1669, and edited by Sir Roger 
L’Estrange, we extract the following remarks on the above 
fable :—“ A wise man will debate everything pro and con 
before he comes to fix upon any resolution. He leaves 
nothing to chance more than needs must. There must 
be no bantering out of season.” “ We find in this fox's 
roguery an invention of the wilyness of the crafty people 
we meet abroad, and a lively image of the faith, friend¬ 
ship, good nature and justice that we are to expect from 
them. We cannot, therefore, keep too strict an eye upon 
the life and conversation of all those we have to do with. 
If they be men of fraud, they will never stick at bringing 
their friends and companions into danger, losses, and in¬ 
conveniences ; they will run off themselves, and leave 
those that trust them to pay the reckoning.” 

Receipt for curing Drunkards. —First take a large 
quantity of self-denial; steep this for some time in the 
milk of human kindness ; add to that decoction a few 
ounces of consideration for others. Let these be well 
boiled over the strong fire of resolute determinations. A 
scum may possibly come to the surface called selfishness. 
Let this be carefully removed and taken away, as it is 
poison. This decoction may be given every hour of the 
day to the patient, and so facilitate the cure. Apply to 
the heart a plaster called “ The Pledge.” If this be 
kept constantly on, and the decoction taken, there is no 
fear but that you will completely cure the drunkard. 


i&tcortis of Progress from local ^octettes. 


Ban* of 3$ope Unions. • 

Bedfordshire. —The sixteenth annual conference and public meeting 
of the Bedfordshire Band of Hope Union took place on Tuesday, April 
19th. At the afternoon meeting a paper, on “ Our Work and its 
Difficulties,” was read by Mrs. Edwin Ransom, a Vice-President of the 
Union, after which a discussion was well sustained by the many dele- 
. gates who attended from distant parts of the county. At the evening 
meeting the Rev. Mr. Watts presided, and a special address was delivered 
by Mr. Frederic Smith, of the Parent Society. This Union has 
employed an agent (Mr. Harris) for many years, with the most 
gratifying results, for he is known and beloved throughout the county, 
and, largely as a result of his engagement, the Union is now able to 
state that half the children of school age are members of Bands of Hope. 
Too much praise, however, cannot be accorded to Mr. Rowland Hill, 
the hon. secretary from the commencement, and the active staff of 
lady and other helpers, who hav«* *q long maintained the work in vigour 
and efficiency. 

City of London and Finsbury. —The tenth annual meeting was 
held on Tuesday, March 29th, in Cross-street Lecture Hall, Islington. 
Mr. G. S. Lucraft took the chair, the speakers being Rev. John 
Colwell (since deceased), Rev. J. A. Jones, Mr. J. H. Raper, and Mr. 
Charles Wakely. Mr. G. W. Hardridge conducted several pieces by 
the City and Finsbury Choral Union, with his customary ability, and 
added greatly to the enjoyment of the occasion. 

Dumfries and Maxwelltown —A competitive work exhibition, 
arranged by this Union, was recently successfully held in Greyfriars 
Hall, Dumfries. Much interest was taken in the proceedings, the large 
number of 320 exhibits being submitted to the adjudicators, the quality 
of the work earning much commendation. The cookery class, thanks 
probably to Board School instruction, was specially good, but the 
penmanship proved disappointing. The exhibition was under the 
patronage of Lord Young, the Countess of Aberdeen, and other 
influential personages, the arrangements being well carried out by the 
secretary, Miss Gillies. A subsequent meeting was held for the dis¬ 
tribution of prizes. On the Sunday a special sermon was preached by 


Rev. John Telfer, Glencairn, and on the next evening the quarterly 
social meeting of workers was held. Such efforts as these cannot fail 
to have much influence for good in the South of Scotland. 

Essex (North). —The tenth annual meeting of the North Essex 
Union was held at Chelmsford on Tuesday, March 29th. In the after¬ 
noon the business meeting and conference took place,. when a very 
satisfactory report was presented, which detailed the variety of success¬ 
ful steps taken to promote the movement amongst children, teachers, 
and the public generally. At the conclusion of the business, Mr. 
Frederic Smith, Editorial Secretary of the Parent Society, gave an 
address, entitled ‘ ‘ Thoughts on our Work,” in which, amongst othe 
things, he gave a series of practical hints on speaking. The Shire Hal 
was crowded in the evening, when addresses were delivered by the Rev 
George Thompson, Mr. Frederic Smith, and one of special value by the 
Rev. J. Gelson Gregson. The movement throughout Essex is worked 
with exceptional persistency \ with a population of rather more than 
half a million, there are at least 200 societies, with a membership of 
20,000, or one in four of all the children of school age. 

Essex (South).— The annual demonstration of the Walthamstow 
District was held in the Walthamstow Town Hall on March 21st. Mr. 
J. M Hutchison, of Leytonstone, occupied the chair, and an address 
was delivered by Mr. Charles Wakely. Members of various Bands of 
Hope in the neighbourhood contributed a capital selection of recitations, 
songs, glees, &c. ; and prizes were distributed to the most successful 
collectors in the Christmas and New Year’s collection. About 350 young 
people sat down to tea previous to the meeting, which was very largely 
attended. 

Hackney. —On Saturday, April 18th, the annual conference was held 
in the Wesleyan School-room, Richmond-road, being followed on the 
Tuesday by a meeting at Morley Hall, which, although so large a 
building, could not contain all who desired to be present. The chair was 
taken by the Bishop of Bedford, D.D., and at. a later period of the 
evening by Mr. J. W. Morgan ; addresses being delivered by Rev. 
Joshua Haigh, Rev. George Marshall, B A., Mr. John Hughes, C.C., 
and Mr. Charles Wakely, of the Parent Society. The musical arrange¬ 
ments wers specially good, two cornet solos were given, and pieces 
rendered by a choir of 250 voices, conducted by Mr. C. J. Collins. 




THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


83 


Hertfordshire— We are sorry to learn that, owing to the pressure of 
many matters, Mr. Charles Harvey, of'Redbourne, for so long a time the 
honorary secretary of this Union, has found it necessary to relinquish 
this office. The Union is very deeply indebted to Mr. Harvey’s 
untiring efforts for the excellent position it now occupies, efforts put 
forth during the interval of very engrossing professional duty. Mr. 
Harvey is succeeded by Mr. Boyd, of Broxbourne, who will, we are 
sure, command the cordial support of the workers in the county, and 
under whom, we trust, the Union will make yet further advances. 

Hulme, Chorlton and District. —The half-yearly conference took 
place on Friday, March 25th, when encouraging reports were received 
from the various local societies. An interesting paper was read by Mr. 
J. S. Lilley. entitled, “ The Path to Victory,” and followed by discus¬ 
sion. The President, Councillor McDougall, took the chair, and the 
tone of the meeting was full of encouragement. 

Isle of Wight.—The annual meetings were recently held at Newport, 
Isle of Wight. The business meeting was held at the Vectis Coffee 
Tavern, when the annual report and balance-sheet were presented by 
Mr. W. Herbert, the hon. sec., and adopted, and the officers elected. 
The excellent plan of dividing the Island into districts is carried out by 
this Union, and to each district a secretary is appointed by the Council. 
The public meeting was held in the Borough Hall, the chief incident 
being the delivery of a leGture by the Rev. G. W. McCree. 

Lancashire and Cheshire. —The annual meetings of this impor¬ 
tant Union were held in the rooms of the Y.M.C.A., Manchester, on 
Saturday, March 26th. This organisation now comprises 1,075 
societies, with a membership of over 180,000, or about one-tenth of the 
total juvenile membership of the United Kingdom ; and has branch 
committees in 49 of the principal towns in the two counties. The 
meetings commenced with a breakfast to the delegates, after which 
addresses were delivered by Mrs. Lewis, of Blackburn, on “Woman’s 
Sphere in Temperance Effort by the Rev. Carey Bonner, on “ The 
Music of Temperance and by Dr. Rayner, on “The Medical Aspect 
of Temperance.” An interesting discussion followed on these impor¬ 
tant subjects. The attendance was large and very representative, 
delegates being present from most of the many centres influenced by 
the Union. In the afternoon the business meeting took place, about 
150 representatives being present. Mr. Jacob Earnshaw took the 
chair, and the annual report was read by Mr. W. Hoyle, one of the 
hon. secs. We are glad to learn that progress during the past year has 
been unprecedented, the increase in membership, through the forma¬ 
tion of new societies, being over 22,000. The report also referred to 
work done in various industrial schools and workhouses, to a competitive 
examination, to fourteen conferences of Sunday-school teachers and 
workers, to lectures and addresses by the agent, to several out-door 
galas, indoor demonstrations, and the supply of speakers and deputa¬ 
tions to all parts of the two counties. The report, together with the 
balance-sheet, was adopted, and officers for the ensuing year elected. 
It was resolved to hold the half-yearly meeting at Bolton in September 
next, and several other resolutions bearing on general temperance 
work were also passed. The proceedings were brought to a close by a 
very pleasant conversazione in the rooms of the Y.M.C.A. 

Leeds and District. —A demonstration was held on Friday, April 
8th, in Victoria Square, Leeds, when the attendance, both of children 
and spectators, exceeded that of any past year. The space was filled by 
a mass of children, whose united singing of melodies, previously 
practised, had a very grand effect. A procession was then formed, in 
which 11,869 Band of Hope children, belonging to 54 societies, carrying 
560 flags and banners, and accompanied by 55 decorated vans, marched 
to the music of 13 bands. The streets were lined with spectators, and 
were in some places inconveniently crowded. After the route had been 
accomplished, the societies returned to their respective meeting places 
for a tea meeting, followed by games. The whole of the proceedings 
passed off without hitch or accident of any kind. 

Liverpool. —The twenty-first annual report gives the number of 
associated societies as 124, a net increase of eight during the year. The 
membership is about 27,000, the meetings held number 2,500, the weekly 
attendance averages 7,000, and about 4,000 pledges have been taken, 
45,000 tracts and periodicals have been circulated, annual and other 
special meetings successfully held, and an exhibition fete carried out 
with very satisfactory results. We regret very much to learn, however, 
that the committee have felt obliged, on the ground of economy, to dis¬ 
pense with the services of their agent, and sincerely trust that by a 
special effort they may be able to retrieve that which is very distinctly 
a backward step. 

Northamptonshire. —The spring meetings took place at Long 
Buckby on Wednesday, April 14th. Mr. Partridge read a paper on 
“ Temperance Teaching in Schools and Workhouses,” which was 
followed by the adoption of a suitable resolution. In the evening a 
well attended public meetingwas held, and addressed by Mr. J. Parker, 
of Finedon, Mrs. A. A. Jackson, Rev. J. J. Cooper, and Rev. T. W. 
Pollard, of Northampton. 

Yorkshire. —The annual conference was held at Huddersfield on 
Saturday, March 19th. In the morning the delegates met in the High 
Street schools to transact the necessary business. There was a good 
attendance of delegates from associated sub-unions and kindred societies. 
The record of the meeting held in Bradford last September was sub¬ 
mitted by Mr. George Walker, one of the general secretaries. Mr. 
Edward J. Day, of Dewsbury, treasurer, read the financial statement, 
and explained that for the first time for a considerable period there was 
a small balance in hand. Mr Thomas Troughton, the agent of the 
Union, submitted a general statement of the work done, and consider¬ 
able discussion ensued with regard to its details. We are glad to learn 


that the Union has 31 associated Unions, and 150,000 members. Sub¬ 
sequently, the delegates made reports of the work carried forward by 
the respective societies in different parts of the county, and gave details 
as to the present position of the local Unions represented. The delegates 
afterwards partook of luncheon in the lecture-room of the Young Men’s 
Christian Association, and Mr. G. W. Hellawell, president of the 
Huddersfield Band of Hope Union, gave the delegates ahearty welcome 
to the town, remarking that there was hardly a place of worship in the 
borough without its Band of Hope. After luncheon a conference was held 
in High Street Chapel. Mr. John Saunderson, of York, read a paper, 
entitled, “ The Field, the Work, and the Worker,” which contained 
a number of very useful suggestions for the extension of the work in this 
great county, on which a discussion ensued. In the evening a meeting 
was held in the Town Hall,under the presidency of Mr. James Hartley, in 
the unavoidable absence of Alderman J. Woodhead, M.P. Several 
melodies were well sung by members of the Harmonic Society and of 
various local Bands of Hope. The addresses were delivered by Mr. 
W. B. Stuttle, of Manchester, the Rev. T. G. Davies, Vicar of Batley, 
Mr. J. W. Cummins, of Sheffield, and Mr. Crowther, of the Yorkshire 
Union. 


iUftettopoltfan Cantos of ?§ope. 

East India Road, Poplar. —At St. Stephen’s Church School-room 
a lecture, under the presidency of the Vicar, was recently given by Mr. 
Walter N. Edwards, illustrated by food specimens and by many 
interesting experiments. The lecturer held the attention of his young 
audience to the end, and succeeded in imparting much sound temperance 
teaching in a manner which will not soon be forgotten. 

Highgate. —The Gospel Temperance Society in this district has a 
Band of Hope branch, and we learn from a recent report that the 
membership consists of 106 boys and 117 girls. A Penny Bank is in 
operation, and the young people take a hearty part in all the meetings, 
which are held weekly, and at which the Union speakers have done good 
service. 

Holloway. —On Saturday, March 19th, the second anniversary of St. 
David’s Band of Hope was held, the Vicar taking the chair. The 
secretary, Mr. E. Hooper, stated that 50 meetings had been held, and a 
singing class formed. Addresses were given by Mr. J. H. Cannell and 
Mr.W. J. Watson. 

Little Portland Street, Fitzroy. —The thirty-seventh anniversary 
took place on Tuesday, April 19th, in the Society’s Hall. A number of 
adult friends took tea with the young folk, after which the chair was 
taken by Mr. W. J. Benham, B.A , addresses being given by Mrs. 
Brayne, and Mr. Axel Gustafson. Members of the Band sang several 
choruses, and gave recitations. Mr. Henry Bywaters and Mr. J. H. 
Esterbrook also briefly addressed the meeting. 


^robmetal Bantus of ^ope. 

Chichester. —The Excelsior Society reports 48 meetings, at which 
the tone and discipline exhibit an impi ovement; 20 new members have 
been received, leaving a present membership of 55. 27 members have 

been transferred to the honorary roll being unable to attend the ordinary 
meetings. The society has a library, and has held an annual meeting, 
a miscellaneous entertainment, an excursion, and a service of song. 

Halifax. — Park Band of Hope. —This enterprising society has 
commenced the issue of a little monthly four-page magazine, recording 
its operations, together with a few general temperance items, part of 
the cost being covered by local advertisements. The first number is 
very good, and, distributed amongst the members of the church with 
which the society is connected, will certainly arouse interest and secure 
support. 

Henstridge (Somerset). —A crowded meeting was held in the Oak 
Vale Room on Monday (18th April) evening last, the chair being taken 
by Mr. R. W. Copeman, Secretary of the Gospel Temperance Society. 
A rather lengthy programme was well carried out, the various items being 
above the average merit ; an interesting address was delivered by Mr. 
J. T. Burge, of Templecombe. During the evening prizes were 
awarded by the chairman for attendance and good condnct to several 
members of the Band of Hope. Two pledges were taken at the close of 
the meeting. 

Poole, Dorset. —An interesting competition took place in the Band 
of Hope connected with the Temperance Society in this town. Questions 
selected from Dr. Ridge’s “ Catechism ” were written on a blackboard, 
and answered in writing by the members. Some good results were 
obtained, and the best competitors will be rewarded with prizes. 

Rain ham. —A Band of Hope has been inaugurated in Rainham, 
the opening meeting being held on Wednesday, April 20th, in the Con¬ 
gregational Chapel. The chair was taken by Mr. L. W. Whitehead, of 
Chatham, an address also being delivered by Mr. Frederic Smith, 
of the Parent Society, whose long experience enabled him to give the 
managers of the new society some excellent advice. The society is 
well started, and will, we trust, have a long and prosperous career. 

Shoreham. —The anniversary of the Primitive Methodist Society 
was celebrated on Wednesday, March 30th, by a tea meeting and juvenile 
entertainment, followed on the next day by a public meeting, which was 
very largely attended. The society was commenced so long ago as 
1859, and has enjoyed a successful career. A good year’s work has been 
done, and the balance-sheet shows a small balance in hand. 




8 4 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


GENERAL TEMPERANCE TOPICS 


PRIL was a busy month for the Good Templars, 
the Eighteenth Annual Session of whose 
Grand Lodge of England was held in London 
in the Memorial Hall, Farringdon Street, 
and was accompanied by several other 
interesting and important gatherings. On 
Friday, April 8th, the proceedings were in¬ 
augurated by a mass meeting of children at 
the Royal Victoria Hall, Waterloo Road, at 
which Mr. Conybeare (whose efforts to keep 
children out of public-houses will be fresh in the 
memory of our readers) took the chair. The announcement 
of the chairman that he intended to join the Order, was 
received with enthusiasm, and, that no time might be lost, 
the honourable M.P. was initiated immediately after 
the close of the meeting. Saturday was devoted to 
sight-seeing by country delegates, the evening to the 
holding of District Lodges, and Easter Sunday to sermons 
in the. Metropolitan Tabernacle, St. James’s Hall, 
Piccadilly, the Great Assembly Hall in the East 
End, and some 150 other places of worship. On Easter 
Monday, a reception meeting was held, at which 
Dr. Richardson presided, and addresses were delivered by 
Rev. Canon Barker, Hon. Conrad Dillon, and other 
friends. On Tuesday a procession wound its way, causing 
a temporary suspension of traffic in Cheapside,to St.Paul’s, 
where, after a choral rendering of the evening service, a 
thoroughgoing temperance sermon was preached by Rev. 
Canon Barker. St. Paul's has seldom or never before heard 
such outspoken condemnation of strong drink, and one 
friend informed us that he felt apprehensive for the safety 
of the roof. The joy and thankfulness depicted on row 
after row of Good Templar faces was unmistakeable. 
We are very glad to learn that progress is being made 
towards the completion of the fusion of the two parties 
into which our friends were until lately divided. It is, we 
suppose, inevitable that there should be many small 
points requiring careful arrangement, but we trust that all 
those will be overcome, overruled by the desire to secure 
the extension of the excellent work of this useful order. 

* * 

The Rock has two columns of well deserved eulogy 
of the progress of the temperance movement in Bradford, 
which has always been well to the front in this crusade. 
It had a temperance society as early as 1830; it was the 
second town in the Kingdom to adopt the “Alliance” 
programme; the Good Templars obtained here a strong 
foot-hold, and the Town Band of Hope Union, of which 
the writer of the article was a member in his boyhood, 
was the first in the Kingdom. The writer calls special 
attention to the success of the Coffee Tavern Company, 
with its twenty-seven flourishing branches and dividend 
of ten per cent. The result of all this activity is as marked 
as it is pleasing. During the last four years there has 
been a reduction of licensed houses by no less than 200, 
and the charges of drunkenness at the police courts, not¬ 
withstanding a rapid increase in population, exhibit a 
steady decrease. If these results can be brought about in 
Bradford why not elsewhere ? 

* * 

* 

The Blue Coat boys paid their usual visit to the Mansion 
House on Easter Tuesday, and it is gratifying to know that 
an increased proportion of the lads went in for lemonade 
in preference to an alcoholic beverage. Oh for the time 
when all blue and brown and black coat, aye, and all 
no-coat boys as well, shall be teetotal boys. 



One of the most enthusiastic meetings held lately was 
that which took place at Princes Hall, Piccadilly, for the 
condemnation of the traffic in strong drink with un¬ 
civilized or semi-civilized communities. We have 
seldom heard two more stirring addresses than those 
delivered by the Bishop of London and Archdeacon Farrar. 
According to the latter “ over 200,000,000 or more of our 
fellow subjects in India belongto three great religions; they 
are mainly Buddhists, or Brahmins, or Mahomedans. In 
every one of those religions drink is entirely discouraged. 
We found India sober, and we have made it drunken.” Sir 
Charles Warren and others,who can speak with authority, 
also addressed the meeting. We are glad to learn that a 
Committee of temperance members of Parliament is 
taking up the matter and will watch this infamous traffic 
closely. 

* * 

* 

In the Metropolitan Police courts, the Good Friday 
and Easter Monday" charges” have been somewhat 
under the average. A friend who spent his Easter in 
Belgium tells us that the case was very different both in 
Antwerp and Brussels, where a really fearful amount of 
intoxication was very evident. We wish no harm to our 
neighbours, but we really should not be sorry to lose our 
distinction as the most drunken nation on the face of the 
earth. Indeed, we really doubt whether that charge can 
now be truthfully brought against us. 

* * 

* 

The Second Annual Meeting of the United Kingdom 
Railway Temperance Union was held, the end of last 
month, at a most appropriate place, Willesden Junction. 
The chair was taken by Mr. M. Mclnnes, M.P., a director 
of the L.N.W.R., and all the speakers were connected 
more or less nearly with the railway interest or traffic. 
There are 20 branches of the society, and 1,821 members, 
guards, drivers, porters, and others. This is pleasant 
reading for the travelling public. 

•* * 

* 

The Pope has dispatched an important brief to an 
American bishop of his church,commending in the warmest 
terms the prelate’s endeavours to promote total abstinence 
by precept and by personal example. The brief is full of 
‘‘We” and “Us,” but we suppose that even the 
staunchest Protestant, if a teetotaler, would hardly on that 
account decline assistance from so powerful an ally as 
Leo XIII. Even the papacy has to march with the times 
on the temperance question. 

* * 

■Jr 

Well deserved honour has been done to the memory 
of a veteran worker in South London, Jabez West, who 
some time since went to his rest. A monument has been 
erected in Southwark Park to his memory, and this was 
unveiled on Good Friday in the presence of a large 
company of working men and others, who marched in 
procession to the park. We owe more to these early 
workers than most of us fairly realize. 

* * 

* 

Reading has just celebrated its Temperance Jubilee 
in enthusiastic fashion under the presidency of 
Mr. W. I. Palmer. A Banquet was held in the New Town 
Hall as a fitting close to a whole week of enjoyable and 
useful engagements, including public meetings, children’s 
meetings, entertainments, a conversazione, and a pro¬ 
cession. 



THE 


jggcmd of Jsope ^rontcfe 

Issued Monthly by the United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 


THE 

JSattlr of Hope Chronicle, 

JUNE, 1887. 


A GOOD RECORD. 

E present our readers with an abstract 
of theThirty-second Annual Report 
of the Union, which affords a record 
of very substantial work. It will 
be seen that the present estimated 
number of Juvenile Temperance 
Societies of one kind or other— 
Bands of Hope being by far the 
larger proportion—is 13,232, with a member¬ 
ship of 1,623,000. It is scarcely forty years 
since Mrs. Carlile and the Rev. James Tunnicliff 
field the first Band of Hope meeting, and from 
that time to the present the movement has made 
a sustained and increasing progress unequalled 
by any other form of Temperance work. And 
this is as it should be, for all admit that Tempe¬ 
rance work amongst the young is the best 
foundation for the ultimate success of the 
Temperance enterprise. Despite the grounds 
we have for sincere congratulation, however, 
■it behoves us to remember how much, which 
with adequate resources might be accomplished, 
is still left undone. We have, it is true, fully a 
million and a half juvenile abstainers, but we 
have three and a half millions of children of 
school age still outside our ranks, and these 
are rapidly passing to that age when it will be 
more and more difficult to bring influence to 
bear upon them. Our work during the past 
forty years has undoubtedly had a good deal to 
do with the diminished national drink bill, 
and if the Committee were only supplied with 
adequate means, there is no reason why the 
whole juvenile population of the present day 
should not receive temperance training. We 
feel persuaded that the good account which the 
Committee are able to render of the means 
already placed at their disposal, will induce both 
old and new friends to entrust them with 
greatly increased resources for the work of the 
coming year. 

Introduction. 

One of the most encouraging features in the history of 
the Band of Hope movement is the unbroken success 
which, by the Divine blessing, it has been the pleasant 
duty of the Committee, year by year, to record. The past 

JUNE, 1887. 



year has been no exception to this happy rule ; the various 
departments of the Society’s operations have been well 
maintained, and new departures in various useful direc¬ 
tions effected. The wisdom of dealing with the young 
becomes year by year increasingly apparent. The terrible 
forces of appetite and prejudice make the task of reformation 
in the case of adults, both difficult and uncertain, but from 
these drawbacks childhood is happily free. The Com¬ 
mittee therefore work on virgin soil, they have the first 
word on this momentous question, and they earnestly 
appeal for increased help to all who love the purity of 
childhood, and who wish the coming generation to be 
nobler, stronger, happier, and more holy than that which 
is passing away. 

The Presidency of the Union. 

The Committee record with much sorrow the loss 
sustained in September last by the decease of Mr. Samuel 
Morley, of one of the earliest, staunchest, and most 
generous friends of the Union. Since 1858 Mr. Morley 
acted as President of the Union, and in that capacity 
rendered invaluable service. At the earnest request of 
the Committee, the vacant post was accepted by Mr. 
George Williams, to whom the Committee desire to 
express their indebtedness for the kindness which induced 
him to consent to the addition of yet other duties and 
responsibilities to those which he already sustains. 


Estimated Strength of the Juvenile Movement 
Throughout the United Kingdom. 


No. of Estimated 
Soc. Mem. 

I. Bands of Hope as¬ 
sociated with Local 
Unions 

II. Probable number of 
Societies in the 
Uaited Kingdom 
unassociated with 
Local Unions, or 
for which no Unions 
exist 

III. Juvenile Branches of 


Church of England 
Temperance Society 

3,000 

327,000 

D educt one-fourth pro¬ 
bably included in 
Sections I. & 11 . 

750 

81,750 

IV. Wesleyan Methodist 
Bands of Hope 

3,228 

326,511 

Deduct one-half pro¬ 
bably included in Sec¬ 
tions I. & II. 

1,614 

163,255 

V. Juvenile Temples.. 

*,039 

8?,730 

Deduct one-fifth pro¬ 
bably included in 
Sections I. & II. 

207 

16,546 


VI. Young Abstainers’ 
Union. 


No. of 
Soc. 


6,455 


I i 99 I 


2,250 


I,6l4 


832 

90 


13,232 


Estimated 

Mem. 


*871,425 


268,785 


245.250 


*63,256 


66,184 

8.133 


1,623,033 


Relationship to Christian Work and to Kindred 
Organisations. 

The Committee rejoice in the cordial interest with 
which their work is regarded by fellow labourers 
associated with other phases of Temperance effort. 
With the National Temperance League, the Church of 

♦The Membership is reckoned at an average of 135 for each Society. 
















86 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


England Temperance Society, the Independent Order 
of Good Templars, and the various other organizations 
designed for the development of the movement their rela¬ 
tions are most cordial. Outside distinctively Temperance 
circles they also receive much sympathy and encourage¬ 
ment. The attitude of the Christian Church,and especially 
of Sunday School teachers, towards the Band of Hope 
movement is increasingly favourable, and the Committee 
endeavour, by the presentation of Temperance truth on 
religious as well as on scientific and social grounds, to 
retain and increase a sympathy which they feel it would 
be difficult to overvalue. 

Organization of the Movement. 

The Committee continued to maintain an active corres¬ 
pondence with friends in parts of the country for which, 
as yet, no Local Unions have been formed,and took every 
opportunity for keeping the subject well before the minds 
of workers thus situated. This was effected by articles, 
paragraphs and papers in the Band of Hope Chronicle, 
by epistolary correspondence, and by the Provincial 
Agents, both in conversation with workers and in their 
public addresses. The Committee also arranged that the 
services of the Travelling Secretary and of the Organizing 
Agent should be available during the initiatory stage of 
the formation of a County, Town, or District Union, 
whenever local friends were prepared to sustain such an 
organization. A carefully prepared suggested constitution 
and rules is also at the disposal of friends desirous of 
working in this direction. The workers in Plampshire are 
in correspondence with the office on the subject, and will 
take action as soon as the services of a suitable friend to 
act as secretary have been secured. 

The Committee are happy to know that the parts of the 
Country unprovided with local organization are, judged 
by the test of population, comparatively small ; but they 
purpose to continue their efforts in this direction where- 
ever suitable opportunity offers. 

Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings in the 
Provinces. 

The Committee during the year devoted special atten¬ 
tion to work in the provinces, and representatives of the 
Union attended meetings in almost every part of the 
kingdom. The following list contains the names of a few 
of the principal places visited. With five exceptions 
every English County experienced the benefit of a visit 
from one or other of the Society’s representatives. 

Abercarn (Wales), Aberfeldy (Scotland), Accrington, 
Arundel, Ashton-under-Lyne, Athlone(Ireland),Aylesbury, 
Banbury, Barnsley,Barrow-in-Furness,Basingstoke, Bath, 
Batley, Bedford, Belfast, Belper, Bilston, Birmingham, 
Birstall, Bishop Stortford, Blackburn, Boston, Bourne¬ 
mouth, Bradford (Yorks), Brighouse (Yorks), Bristol, 
Cardiff, Chatham, Chelmsford, Cheltenham, Christ¬ 
church (Hants), Clevedon (Somerset), Clifton, Colchester, 
Cowes (Isle of Wight), Derby, Dewsbury, Dover, Dublin, 
Dunbar, Dundalk, Earlswood, East Grinstead, Edin¬ 
burgh, Elland (Yorks.), Epsom, Faversham, Folkestone, 
Frome, Gloucester,Gosport,Gravesend,Guildford,Halifax, 
Harrogate, Haslingden (Lancashire), Hebden Bridge 
(Yorks), Henley-on-Thames, Hertford, High Wycombe, 
Huddersfield, Hull, Huntingdon, Ipswich, Kettering, 
Kingston-on-Thames, Kingstown (Ireland), Knares- 
borough, Leeds, Leek, Leicester, Leighton Buzzard, 
Leominster, Lewes, Lincoln, Liskeard, Littlehamp- 
ton, Larne (Ireland), Luton, Maidenhead, Manchester, 
Milborne Port, Monmouth, Montrose, Newbury, 
Newcastle-on-Tyne, Newmarket, Newport, Northamp¬ 
ton, Nottingham, Oldham, Ossett, Oxford, Perth, 
Peterborough, Poole, Portsmouth, Preston, Rams¬ 
gate, Rathgar (Ireland), Reading, Redhill, Reigate, Rhyl, 
Ryde (Isle of Wight), St. Albans, St. Leonards-on-Sea, 
Salisbury, Sandwich (Kent), Selby (Yorks), Sheerness, 


Sheffield, Skegness, Southampton, Spalding, Stowmarket, 
Strood, Sudbury, Sydenham, Tewkesbury, Thurso,Tipton, 
Tring, Tunbridge Wells, Ulverston, Wakefield, Watford, 
Weedon, Wellingborough, West Bromwich, Whitstable 
(Kent), Wigan, Winchester, Witney (Oxon), Workington, 
Worthing, Yarmouth, Yeovil. 

Mr. Frank Adkins. 

Mr. Frank Adkins’ services as a lecturer, speaker, and 
organizing agent—chiefly in the provinces—proved most 
valuable. In addition to the instruction and pleasure 
derived from Mr. Adkins’ illustrated lectures, many 
societies, and especially those newly formed or imperfectly- 
organized, derived much advantage from his many years' 
experience regarding the details of Band of Hope work, 
and numerous expressions of thankful appreciation 
reached the office from managers of societies bearing 
testimony to the invaluable advice and help accorded in 
circumstances of doubt and difficulty. The Provincial 
Unions made large demands upon Mr. Adkins’ services, 
and seventy-eight places were visited, many of which 
arranged for a series of lectures. Altogether 177 lectures, 
and addresses were given, attended by 34,000 persons. 

Mr. William Bell. 

A year of excellent service was rendered by Mr. 
William Bell, whose labours extended over a very wide 
area, and whose addresses, while proving exceedingly 
useful among the young, were perhaps equally valuable 
in the case of adult audiences, his powerful and earnest 
pleading in behalf of the children having produced most 
gratifying results. Besides the large public meetings 
which form the main item of Mr. Bell’s work, he 
addressed many gatherings of a special character. 
Amongst these were ten in Workhouse Schools, eight in 
Mills and Workshops, six in Orphan Homes and Indus¬ 
trial Schools, ten Tent Meetings, and twenty meetings 
in the open air. Addresses were also given at Schools 
and Conference Meetings in the afternoons, and at all 
the meetings attended special pains were taken to advo¬ 
cate the importance of training the young. Thus- 
although a large number of meetings were attended, 
principally by adults, the movement was greatly helped 
by the influence brought to bear upon teachers and 
parents. The number of meetings attended was 318; at 
these 99,000 persons were present, and a total of 1,700 
pledges were recorded. 

Lectures in Elementary Schools, 

Mr. John Burgess delivered 100 lectures during the 
year, attended by 14,743 children of the upper standards 
in Board Schools. By means of these lectures a large 
amount of useful information was imparted, at a time and. 
under circumstances peculiarly favourable for its retention. 
To stimulate the attention of the children, prizes were 
offered for the best reports of the lectures, and it is 
gratifying to find that nearly 8,000 papers were written, 
mostly as composition exercises in school time, the 
best of these securing rewards. In addition to the 
service rendered by Mr. Burgess, special evening lectures 
were also delivered by the General Secretary, illustrated 
by dissolving views, and dealing with the Biblical, 
scientific, and moral aspect of the Temperance question. 
The Committee are taking measures to extend this useful 
department of their work to the provinces. 

Children and Public Houses. 

In view of the sad results attendant upon parents send¬ 
ing their children to public-houses for beer and spirits,, 
the Committee, through the kindness of the late Mr. 
Morley and other friends, were enabled to issue over a 
million copies of a special appeal addressed to the working 
classes on this important subject. 

Through the co-operation of Band of Hope workers in 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


8 ? 


all parts of the country, this immense number of leaflets 
was distributed from house to house on Saturday, May 
35th, about ten thousand friends co-operating in the 
work. It is impossible to overestimate the result of 
personal contact between this army of Christian workers 
and a million parents belonging to the working classes. 
In addition to the effort thus made, a large number of 
members of Parliament received communications from 
influential constituents on the subject. The matter was 
also pointedly brought before the attention of hundreds 
•of ministers, many of whom referred to it from their 
pulpits, whilst the appeal also made its appearance in a 
(large number of the London and provincial newspapers. 

The Crystal Palace Fete. 

The National Temperance Fete at the Crystal Palace 
-was held under the auspices of the Union on Tuesday, 
July 13th. Notwithstanding the depressing influence of 
■commercial distress and the absorbing interest of a general 
•election, 42,910 persons took part in this great demonstra¬ 
tion. Every part of the United Kingdom was well repre¬ 
sented, and a very interesting item m the proceedings was 
a reception luncheon given by the National Temperance 
League to Colonial delegates, at which Dr. B. W. 
Richardson, F.R.S., presided, and addresses were de¬ 
livered by representative temperance workers from the 
United States, Canada, Victoriai Natal, and elsewhere. 
The chief feature of the Fete was the holding of 
three Great Choral Concerts, each sustained by 
5,000 singers. The singers came from widely dis¬ 
tant places, and by cheerfully undertaking long 
and toilsome journeys, gave proof of devotion to the 
cause. No intoxicating liquors were sold at the bars or 
an the grounds. 

The Competitive Examination. 

Encouraged by the evident usefulness of similar efforts 
in past years, the Committee arranged for a Competitive 
Examination, open to all members of Bands of Hope, or 
similar juvenile societies, between the ages of nine and 
twenty-one. The text-book was an excellent little work, 
compiled by Dr.J.J. Ridge, entitled “ Temperance Teach¬ 
ing for the Young,” in which every phase of the subject is 
ably treated. The Examination took place on Friday, 
February 25th, at 238 centres widely distributed over the 
■three Kingdoms. The number of competitors was 2,683, and 
the task of adjudication on the papers presented was conse¬ 
quently very heavy. The prizes offered were of the value of 
£50, and were supplemented by the donation of £10 by one 
of the adjudicators,and also by further'amounts contributed 
for local prizes by various Unions and Societies. 
The number of competitors alone does not afford a suffi¬ 
cient indication of the usefulness of the effort, which can 
be better judged by the fact that nearly twenty thousand 
copies of the text-book were sold, all of which were 
doubtless studied by young people who, whilst thus con¬ 
firmed in their principles, yet felt unwilling to face the 
■ordeal of a public examination. 

•Gratuitous Lectures in Charitable Institutions 

In view of the great importance of giving Temperance 
■teaching to the large number of young people in various 
public and charitable institutions, the Committee again 
arranged for the delivery of a series of special lectures, 
mostly illustrated by dissolving views, to the inmates of 
Training Ships, Homes, Industrial Schools, and District 
Parochial Schools. Whilst it is true that in most of 
ffhese institutions the children are brought up without the 
use of intoxicating drink, it is also a lamentable fact that 
when they go out into the world, they are more open to 
temptation than those who have the advantage of kindly 
■home training. To the children in the great parochial 


schools, many of whom are inmates through the drinking 
habits of their parents, the lectures came as a special 
boon, warning them against the evils of drink and at the 
same time presenting a means of exceptional enjoyment. 

The co-operation of the managers was in every case 
readily accorded, and the Committee were greatly 
encouraged by the testimony given on all hands regarding 
the usefulness of the effort, which, with additional funds, 
they would be glad to develope. 

With the view of still further impressing the truths of 
Temperance on the minds of the young people, grants of 
pictorial tracts were made for distribution in the various 
schools, and the Committee were enabled, by the kind¬ 
ness of friends, to present music books and medals to 
about 500 of the children who took part in the Great 
Choirs at the Crystal Palace. 

Publishing and Bookselling. 

This important department of the Society’s operations, 
which, by providing all that is requisite for the efficient 
working of Bands of Hope, does so much to promote the 
rogress of the movement, exhibited a great increase of 
usiness over any previous year. 1,125,383 of the Society's 
publications were sold, besides many thousands of books 
and magazines issued by other publishers. It is impos¬ 
sible to estimate the good results of this very extensive 
distribution of Temperance literature, which has now 
continued for many years. The remarkable sale of many 
of the Union publications proves how well they meet the 
requirements of Bands of Hope. From their first issue, 
106,201 of the Prize Tales have been sold, 1,713,000 of 
the Song Books, nearly a million of the various Tempe¬ 
rance Stories with Song, 2,060,000 pledge cards, and 
other publications in similar proportions. It is estimated 
that four million publications for the promotion of Tempe¬ 
rance amongst the young are now annually sold by various 
societies and publishing houses throughout the kingdom, 
and as this has continued for many years, we may surely 
conclude that it has in a very marked degree contributed 
to the present favourable state of public opinion on the 
Temperance question. 

The development of educational teaching in Bands of 
Hope, and the preparation of necessary apparatus for 
illustrating addresses, has for many years received the 
special attention of the Committee. It is therefore pleas¬ 
ing to note that the past year witnessed an increased 
demand on all sides for text-books dealing with the 
chemical and physiological aspect of the question, for the 
cases containing analyses of foods and drinks, together 
with diagrams, chemical apparatus, dissolving view ac¬ 
cessories, and other appliances which are now supplied in 
every variety, and at the lowest possible cost, by this 
department. 

The receipts from the sale of publications during the 
year were £351 in excess of those for the preceding year, 
making a total of £3 953. The present stock is valued at 
£1,612, and the liabilities to tradesmen are practically 
balanced by amounts due to the Union. The sum of 
£200 was handed during the year to the General Depart¬ 
ment. Mr. Frederic Smith, besides his other duties in 
connection with the Society, continues to act as Editorial 
Secretary, and to manage the publishing and bookselling 
department. 

The Movement in London. 

Under the direction of the London purposes Sub- 
Committee, the services of fourteen gentlemen and one 
lady were placed at the disposal of Societies in London 
and the suburbs for the delivery ot evening addresses, 
illustrated, in many cases, by panorama, diagrams or 
simple experiments. This means of usefulness is highly 
valued by the Societies, and ensures the imparting of much 
sound information in an interesting manner. During the 
year, the Metropolitan agents attended 1,500 meetings, 
at which about 123,000 persons were present. 


88 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Illustrated Lectures. 

In a movement, the chief aim of which is to secure 
the adhesion of young people, it is necessary to present 
the teaching in a very attractive form, and also to provide 
entertainments for festivals and other occasions. The 
Committee now possess a variety of means to carry out 
this mode of usefulness ; the most important of these are 
a series of dissolving views, illustrating popular lectures 
on temperance and other subjects, a well-painted 
panorama, and carefully prepared sets of diagrams and 
analyses of food and drinks in common use. This useful 
branch of the Society’s operations was during the year 
well-maintained, three hundred and fifty-five lectures with 
the Dissolving Views alone being given in London and 
the provinces. The Panorama was also in constant 
demand amongst the Metropolitan Societies, and it is 
estimated that considerably over 100,000 young people 
had during the year the advantage of pictorial Tem¬ 
perance teaching. 

The useful and instructive lectures of Mr. W. N. 
Edwards, on the chemical and physiological aspects of 
the Temperance question, were continued throughout the 
year, eighty-three lectures being given, attended by 
14,000 persons. 

The Autumnal Conference. 

By the invitation of the Committee of the Southampton 
Band of Hope Union, the Autumnal Conference of the 
Union was held in that important town. On Sunday, 
August 29th, the proceedings were inaugurated by a 
special prayer meeting in the Philharmonic Hall, and 
later in the day a sermon was preached by the Rev. 
Canon Wilberforce in St. Mary’s Church to a very large 
congregation. Sermons were also preached in several 
other places of worship, and addresses delivered in many 
Suuday Schools. On Monday a reception meeting took 
place, when the delegates were heartily welcomed by 
many of the leading Temperance workers in the neigh¬ 
bourhood. On Tuesday morning the Rev. Canon 
Wilberforce, M. A., entertained the delegates at breakfast, 
and presided at the Conference which followed, when 
papers were read by the Rev. Dawson Burns, D.D., on 
“ The rise and progress of Temperance work among the 
Young,” and by the Rev. G. S. Smith, of Gosport, on 
“ How to excite public interest in Band of Hope work.” 
In the evening a large and enthusiastic public meeting was 
held, the chair being occupied by the Rev. S. G. Matthews. 
Addresses were delivered by Rev. Newman Hall, LL.B., 
and Mr. J. H. Raper. On Wednesday a Conference of 
teachers in day and Sunday Schools was held. The 
chair was taken by Dr. Aldridge, J.P., Chairman of the 
Southampton School Board. A paper entitled “ Tempe¬ 
rance instruction in Public Elementary Schools” was read 
by Mr. T. Marchant Williams, B.A., and a second paper 
by the Rev. J. Storer Clark dealt with the responsibility 
of Sunday School teachers with regard to the movement. 
The series of meetings was brought to a close on Thursday 
evening by a great gathering of children. 

Bands of Hope and the Temperance Hospital. 

The Christmas and New’s Year’s special effort to secure 
funds for the Band of Hope Movement and the Tempe¬ 
rance Hospital was again repeated, and the Committee 
were greatly encouraged to find that in spite of depressed 
trade and the constant appeals pressing upon the bene¬ 
volent public, the collection yielded the handsome amount 
of ^972 12s. 8d. The assistance thus given was most 
welcome to the Hospital and the Unions amongst which 
the proceeds were divided. Since the origin of the 
collection in 1874 the Committee have had the pleasure 
of handing to the Governors of the Hospital the sum of 
nearly £ 2,600. 


Bands of Hope in the Army and Navy. 

The position of the children of soldiers and s ailors- 
with regard to Bands of Hope is peculiar. Frequent 
changes of locality, and the special sentiment associated 
with the military and naval service interfere to a con¬ 
siderable extent with their membership of ordinary 
civilian Bands of Hope, and indicate the necessity for 
special efforts on their behalf. The Committee, there¬ 
fore, rejoice at the continuance in full efficiency of the 
Juvenile branches of the work of Miss Agnes Weston 
and Miss Robinson. We learn from Miss Robinson 
that regimental Bands of Hope are general, and supple¬ 
mented by others established at the depots of the various 
regiments, include almost all the children in the service. 
The number who keep their pledge and become useful 
and prosperous men is so large as to afford Miss Robinson 
very great encouragement. Miss Weston reports excel¬ 
lent work amoDgst sailors’ children, and finds an interest¬ 
ing field in the lads of the navy. On board every training 
ship there is a society, and quite a half of the lads are 
abstainers, many of them having been Band of Hope boys 
before joining the navy. The Committee are happy to- 
render these ladies every assistance in their power, and 
trust that their useful work will not only continue but 
increase. 

Obituary. 

During the year the Society sustained the loss of its 
President, Mr. Samuel Morley, whose generous pecuniary 
assistance and frequent personal service are greatly 
missed by the Committee. Two vice-presidents were 
also removed by death—Admiral Sir William King- 
Hall having passed away in July last, and in the 
same month a further loss was sustained by the removal 
of the Rev. J. P. Chown, whose kindly words have 
often been heard at meetings of the Union. The move¬ 
ment in Ireland.suffered by the death of Mr. H. Charles 
Knight, the Chairman of the Irish Temperance League, 
and in the South of England, by that of Mr. R. C. 
Serpell, of Plymouth, the influence of both of these gentle¬ 
men extending far beyond the immediate scene of their 
labours. It is sad to lose valued friends and fellow 
workers, but the hope of all must be constantly real¬ 
ized, that from the ranks of the children taught and trained 
in our various Societies will come forth those who shall 
fill the vacant places, and sustain a cause which, although 
its workers fail, can never die. 

Financial Statement. 

The Committee are glad to report that the accounts- 
of the Society are in a satisfactory condition, Consider¬ 
ing. the general depression of trade, it is especially indi¬ 
cative of the growing sympathy felt towards the move¬ 
ment at the present time, that the income from all 
sources has been greater than at any previous corres¬ 
ponding period. 

The nett receipts for the year, including the balance 
brought forward, (apart from the receipts from the sale 
of publications, which are referred to separately on page- 
87), amounted to £2,049 2s. nd., and the expenditure 
to ^2,040 10s. iod., leaving a balance in hand of £8 12s. id. 
The subscriptions and donations amounted to 
£1,606 12 s. 2d., including a legacy of £50 from the late 
Mr. C. A.Windeatt, and also a legacy of £50 paid by the 
residuary legatees of the late Miss Sarah Jane Lewis, the- 
remaining income being made up by the New Year’s 
Collection, and a profit of £200 on the sales effected in 
the Publication Department, 

The Committee have again to thank all the friends who 
thus assisted them, and whilst rejoicing at what they 
have been able to accomplish with the means placed at 
their disposal, they have nevertheless to deplore how 
much remains to be done, and to appeal with deep, 
earnestness for greatly extended help for future work. 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


89 


©AND OF HOPE ADDRESSES.—Series I. 

TEMPERANCE LESSONS FROM -ffiSOP’S 
FABLES. 

By Rev. CHARLES COURTENAY, Vicar of Emmanuel Church, 
Liverpool , Author of “ Temperance Home Thrusts,” &c. 

No. 5.—THE FOX AND THE SICK LION. 


T long ago I told you the story of the lion 
and the mouse. Now I am going to tell 
you a story about a lion and a fox. But in 
my first story the lion was the victim, 
while in my second the lion is the cruel 
enemy trying to catch others. My story 
opens with 

A Shamming Lion. 

Only think of the king of beasts lowering 
his dignity so much as to sham at all; yet 
he did. He pretended to be sick. And he sent messages 
all about among the beasts of the neighbouring forests 
that he was very ill indeed, and so full of pains and aches 
that he didn’t know on which side to lie, and that he had 
never been so bad in all his life before. Moreover, that 
he felt so lonely that his brother beasts’ company would 
be thankfully received. Yes, and that if they would come 
to condole with him he would be their fast friend for life. 
Oh ! crafty old lion, lying there in your den, and playing 
the hypocrite so basely, you ought to be ashamed of 
yourself. Making such promises, too, which you know 
you won’t fulfil! But I think that public-houses and 
strong drink are every bit as bad, for though those who 
keep them don’t pretend to be sick or anything of that 
sort, they do make handsome promises to their visitors. 
“ Come and see us,” they cry, “ and we will make you 
happy, healthy, and wise.” But they are shamming friend¬ 
ship, and pretending to be what they are not. 

And now we will look for a moment at the lion’s 
Credulous Visitors. 

Do you know, dear children, nearly all the beasts 
believed that old lying lion, and trotted off to get into the 
lion’s good graces ? To have a real lion on their side was 
a prospect which delighted them immensely. And so off 
'they went helter-skelter towards the lion’s den to express 
their sympathy and to drop a warm tear or two. And 
their little hearts thumped, and their little breasts heaved, 
with a sense of their greatness in thus visiting a real live 
lion. One by one, after a decent interval, they were 
ushered into the royal presence, one by one they were 
presented to the monarch of the forest,;one by one they 
made their small bow, dropped their small tears, and 

uttered their small squeak of sympathy, and-one by 

■one they-died. Yes, the great jaws of the great lion 

closed in upon them, and one by one they-died. 

Poor little unsuspecting beasties, your dignity didn’t last 
very long, and I am sure you didn’t think so much of the 
lion and his friendship when his great jaws came down 
upon your little bones. What a pity you hadn’t thought 
of that before! 

How many poor drunkards have found this out in the 
same way ! 

They have found that it has been easier to get into 
the clutches of strong drink than to get out again. 

They have found that not a single one of strong drink’s 
promises has ever been fulfilled, and that their trust in 
drink’s promises has been fatal. 

Enquiring Jackals. 

There was one old fox, however, who did not believe in 
the lion, and believed him all the less for his fine 
promises. He of course received as warm an invitation 
as the others. But he declined—with thanks. That old 
fox preferred a whole skin to the proffered friendship of 


a beast king. He believed in keeping as far away as 
possible from lions. 

His absence was of course remarked upon. This was 
considered peculiar in his conduct. And, strange to say, 
the lion himself felt hurt. And so the lion’s jackals were 
sent in hot haste to the fox to make enquiries. 

But the old fox had his answer ready. “ Tell his lord- 
ship how much I respect him ” (then, under his breath, 
“_at a distance”), “ and how I sympathise with him in his 
sickness, (and with the other poor little murdered beasts, 
too), and how much I should like to kiss his paws (but 
for his claws). I have often been on the point of coming, 
tell his lordship, but when I got near the mouth of the 
cave I never could make out why so many of my fellow 
beasties’ footprints pointed forwards, and none pointed 
backwards. And so I felt nervous, and thought the 
better of it.” 

Ah ! dear children, you will come across just such 
jackals as these, too, only they will be human ones—who 
will laugh at you, argue with you, and try hard to allure 
you into the horrible drink dens. But you have your 
answer ready too, haven’t you ? The poor drinkers, it is 
true, do come out again, but not the same as they went in. 
With brains befogged, with legs unsteady, with foul 
tongues, with empty pockets, do the poor drunkards come 
out. The best part of them has been killed by that 
horrid drink beast within. 

So I think our course is plain : 

In the first place, we won’t accept bad invitations to go 
into any den, whether it be the den of lions or the den of 
drink. 

In the second place, we will keep our eyes wide open, 
and see how those fare who do go in. 

In the third place, we will not be persuaded by drink’s 
jackals, even though they call us hard names, and try to 
talk us over. 

And, lastly, we will do what we can to keep other people 
out as well. 


The Proposed Band of Hope Bazaar. —The Com¬ 
mittee, in view of a somewhat improved state of the 
finances of the Union, and having regard to the fact that 
so many of their friends and supporters throughout the 
country will be over-taxed during the present year with 
local and other claims, have decided not to hold the 
Bazaar which had been announced as likely to take place 
during 1888. 

Australia. —In connection with the jubilee exhibition 
at Adelaide, which opens on June 20th, there will be an 
International Temperance Convention in that city, for 
which Mr. Frederic Smith has been requested to prepare 
a paper on “ The Band of Hope Movement.” 

A London Band of Hope Address reproduced in 
China. —An unknown friend has kindly sent us a number of 
The Temperance Union, published at Shanghai. The most 
prominent article is a Band of Hope address given by Mr. 
W. N. Edwards, one of the London agents of the Union, 
which having been printed in a London [paper, had found 
its way to China, and was there reproduced. 

Sunday School Music. —Our friends who are engaged 
in Sunday-school work will find a fund of bright and 
cheerful musical material in The Garland of new Sunday- 
school Music, published by Messrs. Hart & Co., Paternoster 
Row. It is edited by Rev. Carey Bonner, well known in 
Lancashire as an ardent Band of Hope worker. The 
book is designed for special occasions, and the pieces 
may be had in leaflet form at a cheap rate. We have 
from the same hands a seasonable selection entitled The 
Royal Jubilee, and a capital collection of Festival Hymns. 
There is a freshness and vigour about most of this music 
which will ensure its popularity, while at the same time 
it is not of a nature too difficult to be easily mastered 
by young singers. 







go 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES.—Series II. 
TEMPERANCE WORK AND WORKERS. 

By Rev. J. P. GLEDSTONE, 

Author ot “The Life and Travels of George Whitefield,” “ Save the 
Boys,” *■ Clean Lips.” 

No. 6.—TEMPERANCE WORK BY DOCTORS. 


LTHOUGH medical men are only now 
beginning as a body to adopt temperance 
principles in the treatment of disease, we 
know that long before temperance societies 
were formed there were doctors who knew 
and said that alcoholic drinks were in¬ 
jurious. Indeed, in very ancient times 
it was seen by people generally that drinks 
which intoxicate were weakening to the 
strength and degrading to the character. 
Old Herodotus, called the father of history, though he 
lived a thousand years later than Moses, tells a story of 
an Ethiopian prince,the head of a small country,who sent 
a bow to Cyrus, the king of then mighty Persia, with 
this message—‘‘Tell Cyrus that when he can bend this 
bow, which is mine, or can find a Persian to do it, he may 
come and conquer Macrobia.’’ Herodotus says that these 
Macrobians were a head taller than the Persians, were a 
noble race, and were distinguished by drinking nothing 
stronger than milk, whereas the Persians delighted in 
wine. We know that wine had much to do with destroy¬ 
ing Persia. Nations can only be killed by their sins. 

As long ago as 1702 Dr. Bayard said that ales should 
be avoided because they were “ unwholesome and 
dangerous liquors.” He was in favour of prohibiting 
their sale, for he said that “ until this be remedied by the 
magistrates,and it be made criminal to vend such thick and 
unwholesome liquors,the people may drink on and die on.” 
Dr. George Cheyne said in 1725 that total abstinence was 
“ the most natural, healthy, and safe mode of living.” Dr. 
Erasmus Darwin said in 1794 that wine was “ a pernicious 
luxury in common use among thousands.” In 1804 Dr. 
Thomas Trotter spoke of beer as “ a poisonous morning 
beverage ” —I suppose people took it as they now drink 
tea and coffee for breakfast—and said that “ wines 
strengthen neither body nor soul.” He also remarked 
that “ when wine was first introduced into Great Britain 
in the thirteenth century it was confined to the shop of 
the apothecary. It would have been well had it always 
been confined there. ” In 1812 Dr. Thomas Foster con¬ 
demned moderate drinking in these very plain terms—“The 
evils of the moderate use of these liquors are only slower 
and less obvious than when drunk to excess, but are not less 
certain." Dr. Kirk, of Greenock, was a leading tempe¬ 
rance reformer in Scotland as long ago as 1829 ; while 
through the labours of Dr. Daniel Richmond, of Paisley, 
the Paisley Youths’ Total Abstinence Society was formed 
in 1832. At a very early time Scotland gave a large 
number of medical men to the ranks of temperance 
workers. There was a kind of regular medical apostolical 
succession, until we come to Dr. Grindrod, who, in 1839, 
published a book called ” Bacchus,” which made a great 
impression. But Dr. Grindrod did not content himself 
with writing books, and simply carrying on a private 
practice as a temperance medical man; he became a 
preacher and an apostle of temperance. He sacrificed 
money, time, and comfort to go about lecturing and 
debating, thus trying to open theeyesof the English people 
to the folly, wickedness and danger of drinking alcoholic 
drinks. Perhaps persons will sooner take the word of a 
doctor than that of anyone else as to whether drink is 
good or bad—especially good. They feel comfortable in 
drinking if the doctor says they may^ But this doctor 
came, saying that drirfk was neither food nor physic. He 
was not allowed to go unchallenged ; in several towns he 
had discussions with medical men. One of the most 


famous of these took place at Spalding with Dr. Morris, 
who had asserted that “malaria makes horrible havoc 
amongst the abstinence party,” and that ” the mortality 
from typhus fever was greater among them than among 
those who took alcoholic drinks.” Dr. Grindrod went 
down into the fen country, examined the subject on the 
spot, made himself sure that Dr. Morris was in error, 
and then challenged him to a discussion. Dr. Grindrod 
showed that there were twenty-seven deaths from fever 
of every description, and one death lrom malaria; and 
he added, “strange to state, passing strange, not one of 
these was a member of the total abstinence society.” One 
good feature of his work was the reporting of his lectures- 
and discussions in the newspapers ; hundreds of persons- 
must have read them. 

So wonderfully and rapidly did temperance truth spread 
among doctors, that, in 1847, as many as 2,000 of them; 
signed a declaration in favour of it ; and again in 1871,. 
269 leading medical men, members of the hospital staffs, put. 
their hands to a similar document. 

There is now a British Medical Temperance Association,, 
founded by Dr. Ridge, which has a journal of its own. 
We look now to men like Dr. B. W. Richardson, Dr. 
Norman Kerr, and Dr. Alfred Carpenter,]who have spoken 
and written much on temperance from the medical point 
of view, as great authorities and able helpers. 

In 1873 a great advance was made in medical tempe¬ 
rance work by the opening of the London Temperance 
Hospital in temporary premises in Gower Street. On the 
8th of May, 1879, the foundation stone of a permanent 
building was laid in Hampstead Road, by Sir Wilfrid 
Lawson, Bart., M.P. The building as it now stands has- 
accommodation for 124 persons, but the income is only 
large enough to allow of the admission of 70 ; thus 54 more 
poor persons might be aided if the funds were as large as. 
we should like them to be. In this Hospital all kinds of 
diseases are treated without the use of alcohol, but t-he 
“ medical staff have power to prescribe alcohol as a drag 
if they consider a trial of its use needful, and in one case 
during the past year,” says the report for 1886, “ alcohol 
was so prescribed, without any apparent beneficial result 
The last report says that since the hospital was opened, 
3,486 in-patients have been treated, of whom 1,968 were 
cured, 1,272 were relieved, and 183 died; also 22,790 out¬ 
patients have been treated. 

This hospital is having a good influence upon other 
hospitals, and upon the practice of medical men generally.. 
“ The average amount of alcohol used in hospitals and 
infirmaries has decreased, and is still decreasing, with 
evident advantage to the patients. Even in those special 
diseases for the cure of which alcohol was believed to 
be almost indispensable, such as acute pneumonia, 
typhoid fever, small-pox, &c., it is now found, by those 
who are bold enough to dispense with its use, that results 
are obtainable tending to dispose of the assumption not 
only of its necessity, but of its value.” 

Dr. Edmunds, the senior visiting physician, kindly 
allowed me to sit by his side the other day while he saw 
about forty out-patients. It was both sad and amusing to 
see the cases. One middle-aged woman, who complained 
of a pain all over her, admitted that she took two half¬ 
pints of mild ale a day, and a little spirit. “ Give it all 
up,” said the doctor. One man with a suspicious- 
looking nose confessed to “a little drop.” The doctor 
said, “ You must use no beer and no tobacco.” One 
foolish mother was advised to “ get a tombstone ” for her 
daughter if she would not send her to bed early, and feed 
her properly. A silly young woman, who had injured her¬ 
self by picnicingin the east wind, was asked, “ Who can 
find brains for you ? you want gumption in the matter.” 
Most of the patients were told that it was a question of 
feeding themselves with proper food. Oatmeal porridge 
and fat bacon were often prescribed. “ Most of these 
people,” said the doctor to me, “ suffer from want of 
brains.” I thought so too. 





THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


91 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES—Series III. 
PHYSIOLOGY AND ALCOHOL. 

By Dr. KATE MITCHELL. 


No. 6.—ARTERIES, VEINS AND CAPILLARIES. 
(Notes for the Blackboard.) 


Arteries 

Composed of three coats. 

1.—Internal or Membranous 

(red blood ) 

Coat. 

AND H 

2.—Middle or Muscular Coat 

Veins 

(most important). 

(;purple blood). 

3.—External or Fibrous Coat 

Capillaries •< 

' (connective tissue). 

System of tiny vessels joining 

Arteries and Veins together. 


E Bloodvessels of the body are divided into 
three different kinds according to their size 
and structure—those coming directly off 
from the left side of the heart (the left ven¬ 
tricle), and carrying the purified oxygenated 
blood to the different tissues, structures and 
organs, called Arteries ; those which 
return the impure blood to the right side of 
the heart, called veins ; and a vast network 
of exceedingly minute vessels which are found between 
(the arteries and veins called capillaries (from capillus, the 
Latin for hair), which convey the blood from the arteries 
to the veins. 

The Arteries. —The largest artery in the body is 
■called the aorta. This vessel comes off directly from the 
.left ventricle of the heart, proceeds a little way in an 
upward direction, and then turning upon itself runs down 
the back of the body in front of the spine. The turn that 
■the aorta makes upon itself is called the arch of the aorta, 
and in this situation it gives off three large branches to 
carry blood to the head and right and left arms. The 
aorta becomes somewhat smaller as it gets farther from 
the heart, and at last it divides in front of the lumbar 
■spine, into two large vessels, one going to the right leg and 
the other to the left. Before it divides, however, it has 
given off numerous branches to the different organs and 
muscles of the parts by which it has passed. Every artery 
■divides into two smaller arteries,and also gives off branches 
to the parts immediately surrounding it, so that the arterial 
system becomes much more capacious (that is capable of 
holding more blood) the further it proceeds from the heart. 
At last the arteries become so small that they cannot be 
traced with the naked eye, and they eventually lose them¬ 
selves in the capillaries. 

The Structure of the arteries and veins is similar with one 
or two exceptions. They both consist of three different 
coats or coverings. An internal coat formed of a very fine 
and delicate pink membrane. A middle coat, the strongest 
.and most important of all, formed of muscular fibres 
bound together by fibrous and elastic tissue. An external 
coat or sheath of connective tissue which helps to bind 
the whole together. 

On account of the middle coat of the artery containing 
much more muscular and elastic tissue than the middle 
coat of the vein the walls of the artery do not fall together 
or collapse as those of a vein do when it is cut through. 
A good sized artery can also be stretched out like a piece 
of elastic, whereas a vein cannot. The walls of the latter 
are altogether much thinner. 


The Veins. —These originate in the capillaries by very 
small vessels at first. These small vessels branch into 
one another and gradually get bigger until at last they 
form two very large vessels, which go to the right side of 
the heart (the right auricle). One of these comes from 
the head and upper limbs, and the other from the lower 
part of the body and the lower limbs. The veins appear 
to have a different colour from the arteries, and can be 
easily seen beneath the skin, whereas the arteries are deep- 
seated and seldom approach the surface. The difference 
in colour is due to the blood in the arteries being of a 
bright red colour owing to the presence of the oxygen of 
the air in it, whilst the blood in the veins has a deep 
purple tint owing to the presence of the poisonous gas 
called carbonic acid, which is breathed out of the lungs at 
every expiration. 

The Valves of the Veins. —-These structures are peculiar to 
the veins, and are not to be found in the arteries. They are 
projections of the internal lining membrane which lie back 
against the walls of the veins so long as the blood is flowing 
in one direction. But the blood circulates very sluggishly 
in the veins, and has a tendency to flow back into the 
capillary system. But it is prevented from doing this 
by the valves, which fall together so that the blood is 
forced ever onwards towards the heart. Thus in the veins 
this fluid can only flow in one direction from the 
capillaries to the heart, whereas in the arteries where 
there are no valves, it can flow in both directions, but as it 
circulates very quickly through the arteries on account of 
the force of the heart’s beat the blood never has any 
tendency to flow in a backward direction. 

The blood-vessels are controlled by the nervous system, 
by which is meant that they can contain more or less 
blood according to the influence which the nerves exercise 
to enlarge or narrow the calibre of the vessel. The act of 
blushing is due to the nerves enlarging the vessels and 
allowing more blood to pass through them, and the act of 
blanching is produced in exactly the contrary way. (It 
should be explained by the lecturer in what manner 
the nerves act upon the muscular tissue of the arteries 
to produce these changes.) 

Alcohol has a most injurious effect upon these delicate 
nerves. It gradually paralyses them so that in time the 
blood-vessel loses its power of contracting and dilating. 
Thus we see on the faces of those addicted to drink the 
small blood-vessels very much dilated, and a general 
reddened and unwholesome appearance produced. But 
the blood-vessels on the face are not the only ones affected 
in this way, for if the internal organs could be examined 
the same changes would be noted. Alcohol also hardens 
the coats of the blood-vessels, which become brittle and 
inflamed, and lose their elasticity. Very often in this 
condition they will burst, and then the blood streams out 
and produces what is called an apoplectic stroke. This 
occurs most often in the brain, and a severe illness results. 
It is very injurious for the whole body that the blood¬ 
vessels should become so changed and damaged by alcohol 
as the blood does not act so efficiently as it otherwise 
would. It does not flow so swiftly, and may in time, as 
the disease progresses, become less fluid, thus blocking up 
the vessels and interfering with the circulation. 


Alcohol and Muscular Contraction. —“ Alcohol 
acts on the muscular engines in a special manner. It is 
often thought that wine, and beer, and spirits, give 
strength to a man, and that they make the muscles con¬ 
tract with more force, and sustain the action. I have put 
this matter to the test by means of experiment, and I 
have found that the idea of alcohol giving force and 
activity to the muscles is entirely false. I found that 
alcohol weakens the muscular contraction, and lessens 
the time during which the contraction can continue 
active.”— Dr. B. W. Richardson. 









92 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES,—Series IV 


MISCELLANEOUS. 


S.— Sickness. — Intemperate habits produce not only 
A—accidents, but S—sickness. All kinds of diseases of 
heart, liver, kidneys, lungs, and dropsy, &c. 

Let us repeat what intemperate habits produce. 



Rev. J. GRANT MILLS, M.A., Hosfiitaller of St. Thomas's Hospital, 
London. 

No. 6—HABITS. 


LL spell H-A-B-I-T-S. I am going to speak 
to you about them. " Habits ” like many 
other words in the English language comes 
from the Latin, the language spoken by the 
Romans. The word it is derived from means 
to have, to hold. So the word came to mean 
a state or condition of anything, in which 
someholding on to, somecontinuance,orsome 
permanence is implied ; a tendency to con- 
tinually do certain actions, acquired by 
custom or frequent repetition. Habits are formed by 
repeated acts. By repeatedly doing a thing, we get into 
the habit of doing it. There are good habits and bad 
habits. “ A good habit,” said Mr. Gough in 1853, at 
Exeter Hall, ‘‘is harder to attain and easier to give up 
than a bad one—and this, to my mind, is an evidence of 
the deep depravity of the human heart. A good habit 
requires manliness, self-denial, and firm principle to 
acquire; a bad habit is just to yield to the current of 
pleasure without principle, thought, or care.” Amongst 
good habits are temperate habits, and amongst bad habits 
are intemperate habits. Much of the drinking in the 
country comes from habit. Now let us spell habits again. 
All together, H-A-B-I-T-S. First let us see what intem¬ 
perate habits produce. Take the first letter 

H. —It stands for harm. Intemperate habits produce 
harm. Now let us take the other letters and see the harm 
which these habits produce. 

A. — Accidents. —A large number of accidents produced 
by intemperate habits not only of patients, but of others 
whom intemperance deprives of self-control, and who in 
this state cause accidents to others. On Christmas Day 
and Boxing Day one year eight cases of severe fractures 
were reported to have been admitted into St. Thomas’s 
Hospital caused by the patients slipping on orange peel. 
One of the house surgeons cut the report out of the paper 
and asked the patients to read it and tell him if the true 
cause were stated. Two patients said the report was 
true, but six—three times as many—said orange peel had 
nothing to do with it, that it was drunkenness only that 
had caused their accidents. Now take the next letter. 

B. — Beggary.— Intemperate habits over and over again 
produce beggary. Look at ragged, half-starved children. 
Those who visit amongst them know that in many cases 
this is produced by intemperate habits. Why is it 
necessary to have such large workhouses and infirmaries ? 
Because of intemperate habits. Now go on to the next 
letter. 

I. — Idleness. —Who are the loafers in a place generally ? 
Those of intemperate habits. Large employers of labour 
tell us their firms lose thousands of pounds a year. Why ? 
Because so many of the men don’t come to work on 
Monday and Tuesday. But why don’t they ? Because 
they are idle through intemperate habits. But we must 
hurry on. What is the next letter ? 

T.— Troubles. —Yes, what thousands of troubles come 
through intemperate habits. Money troubles, family 
troubles, broken hearts, naked homes, blighted characters, 
ruined souls. Why are so many and such large prisons, 
reformatories, refuges, and asylums wanted ? Because of 
the troubles into which people get through intemperate 
habits—troubles which they make not only for themselves 
but for others. If we walk in our own light we must lie 
down in sorrow (Isaiah 1 . 11). Greatest trouble of all 
(1 Cor. vi. 10). And now we come to the last letter. 


HARM. 

ACCIDENTS. 

B EGGARY. 

IDLENESS. 

TROUBLES. 

SICKNESS. 

And now what do temperate habits produce ? Take the- 
first letter again 

H. — Happiness. —Now take the other letters again in. 
order, and see some of this happiness. 

A. — Assiduity. —Perhaps you never heard this word 
before. It means a great deal. It is another Latin word, 
and means “sitting close at a thing,” so it means indus¬ 
try, perseverance, close application and diligence. It’s 
the very opposite of idleness. No one can be really happy 
who is not assiduous, 

“For Satan finds some mischief still 
For idle hands to do. ” 

B. — Bonds of Union.— Temperate habits draw good 
people together for their own good and that of others. 
Your Band of Hope is one of these Bonds of Union. 

I. — Improvement. —Temperate habits produce improved 
pockets, improved health, improved character, improved 
souls. Room for improvement the largest room in the 
world. 

T.— Triumph over Sin. —When a man has learnt Tempe¬ 
rance, self-control, in the matter of drink, he learns it in 
other things. If roof leaks in one place, then whilst man 
is on roof, you tell him to examine whole roof. So con¬ 
trol over one sin leads to control over other sins (1 Cor. 
ix. 25). 

S.— Salvation. —I don’t mean that taking the pledgesaves 
a man, but a man if sober is better able to receive Gospel 
message. Temperance Societies not merely for making 
men sober, but for saving their souls. Intemperance a 
great barrier between man and God, between the sinner 
and the Saviour. Temperance Societies work to remove 
barrier. So temperate habits produce 

H APPIN ES S. 

ASSIDUITY. 

BONDS OF UNION. 

IMPROVEMENT. 

TRIUMPH OVER SIN. 

S ALVATI ON. 


Many years ago a poor street arab of Dublin was invited 
to attend a night school. The first thing that was done 
to him was to make him clean. His face shone with an 
unwonted brightness, and his hands were clean for almost 
the first time in his life. When lessons were over, he 
went to his dismal, dirty home. The neighbours in the 
court, seeing him coming, hardly knew him, and his 
mother looked at him in astonishment. Thinking a little 
soap and water might also improve her looks, she washed 
herself, and mother and son’s faces for once were really 
visible. By-and-bye, the father came in begrimed with 
dirt. He was some little time before he could make out 
what was the matter with his wife and son. At last, dis¬ 
covering that their altered looks were due to soap and 
water, he thought he must be dirty. So he applied the 
same remedy with the same result. The filthy room next 
attracted the woman’s eye, and next day soap and water 
were freely used, and a transformation was soon effected. 
Thus the quiet influence produced its good fruit. 





THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE, 


93 


gfubtlee Song. 

Words by Emily Jane Moore. Music by Henry Coward. (For this worl ) 


* S>- 

u 

“1 

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1 

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W 

1. Vic 

to - 

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our 

be - 

lov 

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Of 

Bri - 

tain’s 

sov - 

reigns 

no 

- blest 

best! 

No queen 

has 

e’er 

so 

2. No 

sub - 

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thee 

more 

than we : 

In Bands 

of 

Hope 

u - 

nit 

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strong, 

To 

stem 

the 

tide 

of 

3. Re - 

gard 

US 

in 

our 

child-hood’s prime, 

All 

ear - 

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for 

our 

coun 

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weal; 

Liege 

la - 

dy> 

at 

this 



glo-rious been—Oh, may thy Ju • bi - lee be blest! Thro’ fif - ty grand, tho’ change-ful, years Thy king - dom thou hast 

mi - se - ry Fell Drink has mado to flow so long. Vic - to - ria, in thy gra - cious breast Is fer - vour for each 

fes - tive time, Our warm hearts beat with horn - age leal! Still may thy migh - ty king - do m grow In good-ness, knowledge, 



( ruled for good, And thine have been its smiles and tears, Thou pride of vir - tuous wo - man - - hood! 

Chris-tian aim; And, scrv - ing thee, we’ll strive our best Oui fall - en bre - thren to re - - claim, 

truth, and peace; And Heaven on thee, O Queen, be - stow Long life, and joy in full in - - crease! 



li 


Ciiorus 


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i 

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all 


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to 


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Good Queen, and 

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—V- 


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be - lov’d, wc 




















































































































































































































































94 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


jubilee ^ottcs- 


Words by Emily Jane Moore. Music by Henry Coward. (For this work.) 

Key C. 


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THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


95 


HOW WE MANAGE OUR BAND OF HOPE.* 

By W. T. Taylor, Honorary Secretary of Avenue 
Road Band of Hope, Shepherd's Bush. 

UR Band was well started; its founder was 
a man thoroughly acquainted with Band of 
Hope work and a skilful organiser. Besides 
having a fairly strong committee, and a 
competent staff of officers, our society was 
at the time of its foundation, and for several 
years after, amply provided with funds, 
which were obtained by a variety of means 
known to Band of Hope workers generally, 
but which require much thought (especially 
/oir-thought), besides great energy and perseverance, to 
make them yield the large results realised at Avenue Road. 

Finance. 

Sufficient funds being essential to the successful work¬ 
ing of a Band of Hope, it may be well at once to give 
some particulars of how we obtained our money. Cur 
members pay the usual weekly subscription of one half¬ 
penny in the junior division, and a penny in the senior; 
and the committee pay a monthly subscription of sixpence 
each ; but when we have paid for the periodicals and the 
quarterly teas there is not enough left of these subscrip¬ 
tion to defray the cost even of our summer excursion. 
The annual average of contributions from friends outside 
our committee has been but a small fraction of our 
income. 

One of our permanent items of income, and in our 
earlier years, when we had little competition to contend 
with, a very large item, is the proceeds of tradesmen’s 
advertisements on the back page of “Jarrold’s Monthly 
Visitor,” which we localise. Our funds have also been 
helped very considerably by lectures, concerts, and 
services of song. In the year 1879 we got up an outdoor 
temperance fete for the August Bank Holiday, which 
brought us in a sum that the average Band of Hope would 
consider to be a fair seven years’ income in addition to 
members’ payments. It is not, as some have supposed, 
because our Band is connected with a congregation able 
to give more than usually liberal support, that we have 
done so well. The Avenue Road people are not in this 
respect above the average of London suburban congrega¬ 
tions. If there be anything singular or exceptional about 
our income it is not in either the sources from which it 
has been derived, nor the means used to obtain it, but in 
the systematic and thorough manner in which those means 
have been applied—in other words, our income has been 
earned by serious thought and hard work on the part of 
both managers and members. Our first leader taught us 
that the responsible officers of the Band must not wait for 
members nor even committee to take up voluntarily 
and spontaneously the work it is desirable they should do. 
We do not trust even to members of committee bringing 
in their subscriptions, but have a collector, who applies to 
them for their monthly sixpences. 

We find direct personal appeal or encouragement much 
more effective than any kind of reference from the plat¬ 
form. When issuing tickets for a service of song or meet¬ 
ing of any kind, or the cards for the Christmas and New 
Year’s collection, we make many announcements and 
appeals from the desk, but we do not stop there. Some 
members and friends who have done most for the success 
of our meetings by selling tickets, and others who have 
been most successful with collecting cards, would never 
have been induced to do anything by mere platform talk. 
We find some of those who appear to us most likely to do 

* This article was read as a Paper at the May Conference. The 
Society at Avenue Road has produced excellent results. As a proof of 
its vigour, good organisation, and interest in the work, it may be men¬ 
tioned that it is the largest contributor to the New Year’s Collection, on 
the last occasion sending in upwards of £ 40 . 


well do not like to begin for fear of failure which will be 
talked about. We always make an agreement with such 
that if they sell few tickets the number shall not be 
mentioned, or if they get very little on the collecting card 
the sum shall be transferred to the card of another col¬ 
lector and their names shall not appear in the list, and that 
on the next occasion they shall try again, when the experi¬ 
ence gained this time will enable them to do better ; and 
some who in this way were induced to begin, though their 
efforts were timid and feeble at first, have not merely 
learnt to do better, but to do well enough to come into 
the first rank and take prizes. 

These details may, at first sight, appear to some to be 
almost trifling, but in Band of Hope work, as in so many 
other things, success depends on careful attention to 
detail, and we have found that details are not likely to 
receive careful attention unless one’s efforts are guided by 
a plan well thought out beforehand and sufficient time 
allowed to do the work thoroughly. 

Public Meetings. 

Our successful public meetings have always been well 
advertised by bills in windows and on boards outside 
shops, on hoardings, at most places of worship in the 
neighbourhood, and also by a liberal distribution of small 
handbills. We begin sending out the bills a fortnight 
before the meeting, and take care to supply fresh ones to 
replace those taken down or damaged. We have en¬ 
couraged our young people to sell tickets by offering 
prizes for those who sold over a certain number. We have 
taken care not to price our tickets too high so that those 
selling them knew they ran no risk of being reproached 
for inducing people to buy what was not worth the money. 
We have never sent our members out to sell tickets for 
anything they did not understand. Care has been taken 
to thoroughly instruct them beforehand, to rouse their 
interest, and to make them see what it was possible for 
them to do to promote the success of the undertaking 
whatever it might be. 

Exhibitions and Bazaars. 

In the third year after the foundation of our Band, we 
had an industrial exhibition, which was a decided success, 
and we make it a rule to hold one every third year. The 
third of the series was held last December. In connection 
with these exhibitions we have a sale of articles made or 
contributed by members and friends. Those contributors 
to the sale who take the Christmas collecting cards have 
put on their cards the cash obtained by the sale of their 
articles. The proceeds of the sale of things brought in by 
non-collecting members and friends go towards the cost of 
prizes which we distribute liberally to deserving ex¬ 
hibitors. In the years 1884—5, which came between our 
second and third industrial exhibitions, we had sales 
which were so encouraging, that we have resolved to hold 
one annually in December, not only to aid our funds, but 
to help the collection for the Band of Hope Union and the 
Temperance Hospital. We have a party of workers 
already preparing for the sale next December. 

Anniversary Meetings. 

In the month of January we hold our annual public 
meeting, which is always a time of great interest to our 
members because then we distribute prizes for regular 
attendance during the year. All who have attended 
two-thirds of the meetings get a prize. The prizes 
vary from a shilling to a five-shilling book, according 
to the number of meetings attended. The prizes are 
always books, mostly temperance books, except when 
special application is made for some useful article of 
equal value which the prize-winner is in need of. We 
also give prizes for introducing new members ; all who 
have brought in as many as three during the year take a 
prize. Two or more prizes are also awarded for the best 
written accounts of our summer excursion. Besides those 
already mentioned, which-are given regularly, there are 





g6 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


usually some other prizes that have been competed for at 
entertainments, and then every third year there are the 
industrial exhibition prizes, and all the prizes of every 
kind are presented to the winners at the annual meeting. 
Besides these prizes of books we have four silver medals 
of the value of half-a-guinea each, two in the junior 
division and two in the senior, which are given annually 
to the boy and girl in each division who stand first for 
regularity of attendance and satisfactory conduct. Anyone 
who can win a medal three years in succession becomes the 
owner of it. 

Literature. 

By means of the prizes given during the past ten years 
we have distributed a large amount of the most valuable 
temperance literature, much of which has doubtless been 
read by many besides those to whom the books were given. 
A similar remark might be made about the library of 
two hundred volumes with which our Band was supplied 
soon after its formation ; and by means of the monthly 
periodical already mentioned we have sent temperance 
light into many homes which would not have been reached 
by any other agency. The number of these periodicals 
we have distributed amounts to nearly 150,000. 

Assisting other Societies. 

In addition to what w>e have done for ourselves we have 
helped many other societies, adult as well as juvenile, 
sometimes by a donation from our funds, but oftener by 
an entertainment or service of song, occasionally going a 
considerable distance for that purpose. 

Attractive Programmes. 

In making out our quarterly programmes, and in 
arranging for special meetings, teas, and excursions, we 
have endeavoured to give sufficient recognition to the fact 
that a sense of duty or mere intellectual appreciation of 
the claims of temperance and the advantages of Bands 
of Hope will not alone bring many to our meetings. 

We cannot, like the schoolmaster, command attendance ; 
having no compulsory powers, we must of necessity rely 
upon attraction. We, therefore, providegood teas, get up 
attractive entertainments, and have an annual excursion 
that will bear comparison with any other provided for 
young people in our neighbourhood. Our members conse¬ 
quently think and speak of their Band of Hope with some¬ 
what of generous pride. A society which fails to inspire 
its members with a feeling of this kind cannot possess 
much force, cohesive or aggressive. Our quarterly social 
meeting for the senior members has done much to sustain 
their interest in the society. This meeting is a superior 
kind of members’ own evening, when, in addition to the 
readings, dialogues, and recitations, we have good music, 
vocal and instrumental, with intervals for free conversa¬ 
tion during which refreshments are served. The social 
meeting nearest Christmas is known as the Old Members’ 
Meeting, because to it we specially invite members who, 
in consequence of having gone into situations,are no longer 
able to attend our weekly meetings. 

In our various endeavours to retain a hold on our senior 
members we have found it a good thing to have a debate 
once a quarter on some topic of general interest. Recently 
we adopted the plan of giving two evenings to the subject 
selected for discussion. The first evening two speakers— 
the ablest we can secure within or outside our society— 
take opposite sides of the question, each making a speech 
or reading a paper; and at our next meeting we have a 
general debate in parliamentary fashion. This plan 
secures a far more thorough and instructive treatment of 
a subject than is attainable by the ordinary method of a 
single evening’s discussion, when each speaker is limited 
to a few minutes, and no one knows beforehand at what 
stage of the debate he will have to take part. 

The Senior Division. 

As the general question of the division of Bands into 


junior and senior is to be dealt with in another paper, to 
be read at the present conference, I need only say that 
our senior Band is not so entirely a separate society 
as senior Bands usually are. Strictly speaking, ours 
is one Band in two divisions, which generally meet 
separately, the juniors at 6.45 and the seniors the 
same evening at 8.15, except on occasions when we have 
a meeting or entertainment equally suitable for juniors 
and seniors, when we have what we call a united meeting, 
beginning at 7.30. 

We have a superintendent for each division, but there 
is no division of secretarial work, nor are the funds 
divided. Members pass from the junior to the senior 
division at the age of fourteen. 

As already intimated we do not forget members who 
can no longer attend our weekly meetings. For those who 
can come occasionally we issue an annual ticket for which 
they pay 1/- When distributing cards for the Christmas 
and New Year's collection we send to those of the old 
members who when with us proved themselves to be good 
collectors, and they have several times sent in some of 
the largest sums in our list, and this annual effort on their 
part not only materially assists the collection, but at the 
same time, tends to sustain their interest in the cause. 

Abstinence from Alcohol and Tobacco. 

We began our society with the double pledge—the 
pledge of abstinence from alcohol and tobacco, and we 
still maintain this for members, officers, and committee. 
We have at times had to listen to reproof or expostula¬ 
tion founded on the opinion that the tobacco question lies 
outside the sphere of true temperance work, but our Com¬ 
mittee has rarely modified its policy and never swerved 
from its principles, for the purpose of averting opposition 
or securing support. 

A Good Reputation. 

Our Band started with a good reputation, which we 
have carefully endeavoured to preserve. Among the 
means employed for this purpose are some general rules 
relating to readings, recitations, &c., and the appointment 
of a special officer to see that nothing takes place on the 
platform inconsistent with these rules. 

To those who have but recently taken up Band of Hope 
work some account of the meetings and entertainments 
of a special character which we have had would probably 
be interesting, but I have not time to give even a summary. 
We have had nearly all kinds of meetings known to Bands 
of Hope—except those of the negro minstrel class. 

In our earlier years we paid great attention to singing, 
and to this we attribute much of our success. 

Cultivation of Talent. 

We have always, as one of our rules requires, opened 
and closed our meetings with prayer, but, believing that 
the tone and influence of a meeting depend more on the 
spirit in which it is conducted than on the forms observed, 
we have not, as some Bands have, made a practice of 
reading passages of Scripture at ordinary meetings. In¬ 
stead of this, the two divisions of our Band meet together 
on one of the usual meeting nights in the last month 
of each quarter for a prayer-meeting with Bible readings 
and a special address. 

In order to give encouragement to our more usefully 
disposed members, and to develope their talents,as well as 
to make them more readily available for the benefit of our 
own and other Bands, we have recently formed a select 
body which we call “ The Active Circle.” The rules 
of this department of our Band require regular 
attendance at ordinary Band meetings as well as at 
the meetings of the circle, also satisfactory conduct and 
a willingness and readiness to do the;r best in whatever 
direction individual talent enables each member to be most 
useful—whether by assisting at entertainments,taking part 
in services of song, or preparing articles for bazaars. A 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


97 


record is kept of what is done by each member, and faith¬ 
ful service as well as special ability receive due recognition. 
By this recognition, by limiting the number of members 
to about a third of the whole Band, and other precautions, 
membership in the active circle is made as much a privi¬ 
lege as possible. This selection of the fittest, giving them 
special encouragement, and training them to think more 
of the welfare of the Band and the promotion of our 
cause generally than of mere personal interest, may, we 
believe, if discreetly managed, be as great a benefit to 
these members personally as their collective exertions will 
be to the Band of which they form an inner circle. 

I think it will be seen from what I have said that our 
success has not arisen from exceptionally favourable sur¬ 
roundings. I know there are some Bands in our local Union, 
and within the metropolis there must be many, connected 
with congregations larger and wealthier than ours, and 
situated in neighbourhoods equally favourable for Band 
of Hope work, and where methods such as ours might be 
made equally successful. 

We might have done even better if we could have kept 
an efficient system of visitation in regular operation. 
This we have not succeeded in doing. We are about, 
however, to make a fresh start with this department of 
work. 


VISITATION OF ABSENT MEMBERS.* 

By H. M. Sells, 

Superintendent of St. Matthew's Band of Hope, Redhill. 


ISITATION of absent members should 
form part of the work of every Band of 
Hope if the Society desires to prosper. 
Now by visitation we do not mean a visit 
paid to the absent member after the style 
of the dread inquisitor of old, or the more 
^ a ^ modern “ School attendance officer,” with 

OfMflji. threats and summonses,but rather a friendly 

call, at a convenient time, upon the parent, 
with kind and persuasive words. 

The subject is a wide one and may be considered as it 
affects : 

1. —Members absent from two or more meetings in 

succession. 

2. —Members seldom or never able to attend, being at 

work, or otherwise engaged. 

3. —Members in service or in other neighbourhoods. 

In the first case it will generally be found that if a 
member absents himself from the meetings, something is 
wrong. 

a. —He is in danger of breaking his pledge or perhaps has 
already broken it. A child who has broken his pledge is 
generally an absentee from the meetings. He is con¬ 
scious that he has acted unworthily and feels reluctant to 
face his teachers and companions. The meetings have 
lost their charm, almost their meaning for him, and he 
wishes to wash his hands of the whole affair. Now the 
breakage of a pledge is so serious a matter both to the 
society and the member, that the first indication of such 
a probability should never be neglected, and it will usually 
be found that a timely interview will avert the threatened 
danger, and win back the lapsed member to the society. 

b. —It may be that the child is tired of the society and medi¬ 
tates withdrawal. We must not expect too much constancy 
of purpose in young people, especially when we see how 
much it is lacking in adults. We can quite understand 
that in the case of some children the interest even of the 
best conducted society will occasionally flag and require 
the stimulus of a few kindly words and the display of 
some personal interest in the member by the teachers, 
an interest well manifested by a visit to the home. 

* A paper read at the May Conference. 



c. Perhaps some offence has been taken by the parents, and the 
child is kept away. We cannot, even with the greatest care, 
always avoid treading on people’s toes, and mothers are 
proverbially more jealous on their children's behalf than 
on their own. When, therefore, we have unmistakably 
given offence we act both wisely and kindly when we 
devote a little time and attention to putting matters right 
and renewing a good feeling, which may even gather 
increase from its temporary interruption. 

In our own society any member absent from two 
successive meetings is visited. A list of these is made 
out once a month and divided between some four or five 
ladies, who report the results of their investigations to the 
head visitor, who enters them in the visiting list. The 
effect of this visitation may, I think, be seen in the small 
number of broken pledges we have to record ; for during 
the year ending 28th of February last, only five out of a 
total number on the register of 466 proved unfaithful. 

Secondly we come to members unable to attend the 
meetings. This class is perhaps a little more difficult to 
deal with, inasmuch as they are seldom to be met with at 
home, and the visitor must ascertain from the parents 
whether they are remaining faithful to their pledge. 
To supplement this visit, and show that an interest is 
taken in the member, and that he is still regarded as 
belonging to the society, a temperance magazine is left for 
him with a friendly enquiry as to his welfare. The result 
of the visit is sure to be good. The member is told by 
his friends at home that enquiries have been made 
concerning him, and is thus made to feel that he has not 
been forgotten by his former teachers ; the result being 
that he feels stronger to resist any temptations to break his 
pledge to which he may be exposed. We pay these visits 
at quarterly intervals. 

Lastly, we give our attention to members in service —a 
class perhaps allowed by many societies to drift out of the 
Band of Hope net, yet often exposed to much temptation 
and danger, and needing a helping hand, or sympathising 
word to assist them to stand firm. How can we keep up 
a connection with these ? We would suggest the following 
method as one which we have tried and found to answer 
admirably. Each month the temperance periodical 
adopted by the society is sent by post to each of these 
members. It proves a connecting link between home 
associations and their present surroundings, and we have 
often received letters from members saying how much 
they appreciate these magazines, and how they look 
forward to the time when the next copy becomes due. It 
has also this good result, that these members, upon 
returning home, still retain their interest in the society, 
and come to its meetings. 

It may be said with regard to visiting, that the parents 
object to such frequent calls, but we can only say that 
our visitors have found that they are invariably welcomed 
by the parents, who in most cases look forward to the 
visits with much pleasure. And it should be borne in 
mind that visitation acts upon the parents as well as on the 
children. It affords an opportunity for the visitor to tell 
what the Band of Hope is doing for the children, and to 
enlist home sympathy and help. We have found that in 
not a few instances the parents themselves have been 
induced to sign the pledge and enrol themselves in the 
adult society. We cannot possibly over-value the 
influence of the parents of our members. With a hostile 
home influence it is difficult to realise how the pledge 
can be maintained by children who retain any respect for 
the parental character and example. On the other hand, 
where the home influence is favourable, the danger of 
pledge-breaking is but slight. We can do nothing better 
for our members than to win their fathers and mothers, and 
to this end visitation is a powerful means. 

To be successful, a visitor must be possessed of much 
tact and patience, and we have invariably found that these 
qualities are possessed in largest measure by ladies, who 








9 8 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


consequently make the best visitors, and upon whom in 
our society the weight of this department entirely rests. 
Ladies, moreover, possess the advantage of having more 
time than men, and being more in sympathy with the 
mothers, who mostly are the sole occupants of the homes 
in the day time, when the visits should be paid. One 
caution we think is very necessary—care must betaken that 
the visit is not too long, and the work of the house thereby 
hindered, and no visitor can expect to be welcome who has 
not this amount of consideration for the parent visited. 

In conclusion, we would urge on all our friends to adopt 
and maintain a good system of visitation. By this means 
we benefit the society, the parent, the member, and 
ultimately the community. Its results have been proved 
by experience to be good, and therefore we would 
recommend it most earnestly to our fellow-workers. 


GLEANINGS AND ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Victims of Alcohol. —We rejoice in every phase of 
temperance work, and in every successful effort to restore 
the inebriate. The extreme difficulty of the work should, 
however, inspire us to increased earnestness in our own 
blessed work of prevention. To give our readers some 
idea of the power which alcohol secures over its victims, 
we subjoin extracts from a painfully interesting article on 
the subject, which recently appeared in the New York 
Tribune, respecting what is described as a high-toned 
inebriate asylum, where all the patients are wealthy. 
Addressing a visitor, the manager speaks as follows :— 
“The patients are all women. There is only one 
disease treated here, and that is drunkenness. Drunken¬ 
ness a disease ? Undoubtedly, the same as any other dis¬ 
ordered condition of the body. Alcohol is a poison, and 
people who take it habitually suffer from chronic poison¬ 
ing, just as the man does who works in a white lead 
factory for any length of time. The hospital is always 
full, and, in fact, patients have been turned away every 
day. Some of the cases are bad, and the women who 
have formed the habit of taking morphine to quiet the 
nervous condition induced by alcohol are the worst. Some 
are brought here in the wildest paroxysms of delirium 
tremens, after the treatment of the family physician has 
ceased to be of benefit. Are the patients cured ? That is 
hard to tell. The object of the treatment is to break the 
habit. Patients have been sent home seemingly strong 
and all right, who after a time comeback worse than ever. 
But little medicine is given in the plan of treatment, and 
no substitute for the alcohol. Medicine to takeaway the 
appetite for alcohol is nonsense, for by giving something 
for this purpose another habit will usually be formed 
equally as bad. Whatever tends to strengthen the body 
is used, and no patient is safe to discharge until the 
inflammation of the stomach caused by alcohol has been 
removed. There is a class of patients who do not want 
to stop drinking. They spend a few weeks with us, get 
patched up somewhat, and go back to their excesses 
with the vigour of youthful indulgence. All the patients 
are benefited by treatment, unless there is too great an 
organic derangement of the kidneys and liver. I know of 
some absolute cures, but they are but a comparatively small 
percentage of those treated. The trouble is that when they 
leave here, as soon as there is a reaction, they feel 
depressed and take a little stimulant to drive away the 
dulness and counteract the low vitality. When this is 
done once, it is only a question of time when stimulants 
are taken in large quantities. I have had patients under 
my charge whose relatives would willingly pay any amount 
of money to have the habit broken. It is not a question of 
money at all. The patients cannot, asarule.be trusted. 
They will lie about their condition, make themselves 
appear to be well and strong, only that the restraint that 
they are under may be relaxed, so that they may have a 


chance to get something to drink. Even when they are 
brought here, physical wrecks, trembling with shattered 
nerves, wild eyes and wandering minds, they will declare 
that they have not drunk for months, and claim that 
they are persecuted by their family or friends. There 
are many sad cases where the habit of drinking has been 
formed innocently and perhaps under the advice of a 
physician. Then there will usually be an honest effort to 
break away from the grip that is tighter than a band of 
iron, and the mental torture induced by the effort to keep 
straight, and the lack of confidence in the ability to do so, 
is something horrible at times, and can only be appreciated 
by those who have seen cases frequently or undergone the 
agony themselves. There is one striking peculiarity about 
alcoholic patients. They will agree with every state¬ 
ment made concerning the injurious effects of alcohol, and 
will acknowledge that drunkenness is the worst habit that 
could be formed. They will deliver temperance lectures 
to each other by the hour, and weep freely as they 
recount their misery and sufferings. Give the most 
earnest protestor among them a chance to get a bottle of 
whisky, and they will sieze it eagerly. The thought of 
drink starts the machinery of desire going so strongly 
that nothing can resist it, and usually, until a patient’s 
stomach is healed, she will drink if she can get it until 
insensibility is produced.” 

The New Zealand Maories. —Mr. T. W. Glover 
writes that he and Sir William Fox had just visited 
Tawhaio, King of the Maories. Mr. Glover says, 
“ Prohibition is the order of the day throughout the 
King's country.” The King remains true to his 
pledge, and showed his visitors his Good Templar 
regalia. 


RECORD OF PROGRESS. 


^probinctal iSanbs of ^ope. 

Chesham-—On Easter Monday the annual tea and enter¬ 
tainment took place at the Temperance Hall. An interesting 
feature of the evening was the distribution of prizes to the 
successful candidates in a recent competitive examination at the 
Board Schools, in which 116 essays were sent in from children 
in four Board Schools, founded on a lecture given by Mr. 
J. L. Fenn (National Temperance League). The adjudication 
was made by Revs. W. B. Taylor and J. Pither. 

Dundalk, Ireland.—Thisexcellent society is under the manage¬ 
ment of a lady, and issues a good twenty-fifth annual report. 
The roll of members numbers 168, and none of these have 
broken their pledge. The visit of Mr. Frank Adkins, with 
dissolving views, is specially mentioned, and other useful 
meetings have also been held. 

Liverpool.—The St. Luke’s Band of Hope recently celebrated 
its eighth anniversary. 600 members and friends were present. 
The chair was occupied by the Rev. A. E. Barnes-Lawrence, 
and a capital address was delivered by Mr. Alexander Guthrie. 
The report showed good aggressive work ; the society numbers 
763 members, held 20 meetings, distributed 2,825 magazines, 
139 medals, and 132 -five-year badges. 1,846 members have 
been enrolled since the formation of the society, and every 
member has been visited four times a year at his own home. 
The income was £72 and the balance was on the right side. 

Mortlake.—The seventh anniversary was commenced on 
Sunday, April 24th, by a sermon by the Rev. F. Brown, and 
continued at a public meeting held on the following Tuesday. 
At this Mr. Frederic Smith presided. The report showed that 
528 pledges had been taken since the commencement of the 
society, the present number on the register being 74, and the 
average weekly attendance being 55. Several special gather¬ 
ings have been held with marked success, and the financial 
position was favourable. The members contributed by recita¬ 
tion and music to the enjoyment of the meeting, during which 
various prizes were distributed. 







THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


99 


®nitetJ Eing&ont Santi of Hope Simon. 


ANNIVERSARY MEETINGS. 


E Annual Meetings of the Union were held at 
Exeter Hall on Tuesday and Wednesday, 
May ioth and nth, and proved most useful 
and enjoyable. Friends alike in town and 
country look forward to these meetings 
as an opportunity for comparing notes with 
fellow workers, picking up hints for impor¬ 
tant methods of work, and gathering fresh 
enthusiasm from the stirring appeals of the 
leaders in the cause. The meetings are 
threefold in their character, and embrace the transaction 
of business, the discussion of practical aspects of the 
■work, and the enjoyment and stimulus afforded by the 
great public meeting which forms the chief feature on 
these occasions. Each of these departments was well sus¬ 
tained, the deliberations of the Council being distinguished 
by hearty good will, and the conferences by the wise and 
practical nature of the papers and discussions, whilst the 
public meeting was one of the most inspiriting yet held by 
the Union. 

The representative character of the meetings may be 
gathered from the following list, which, although very 
carefully compiled, must, when dealing with so large and 
various an assemblage, necessarily be in some respects 
incomplete. Besides the various Metropolitan Unions 
the following Provincial Unions were well represented :— 
Bedfordshire, Mr. Rowland Hill, Miss Rogers, and Mrs. 
Ransom; Birmingham, Mr. J. T. Bradley and Mr. W. 
Hicken ; Bristol, Mr. W. Long Harris and Miss Carver ; 
Bucks and East Berks, Miss Annie Young (Maidenhead); 
Cardiff, Mr. R. Cory; Essex (North), Rev. G. C. Postans 
and Miss Lucy Docwra; Essex (South), Mr. E. G. 
Burbidge ; Glamorgan and Monmouthshire, Mr. T. S. 
Jones (Cardiff) ; Glossop, Rev. J. K. Kirby ; Gloucester¬ 
shire, Mr. C. B. Bartlett; Hertfordshire, Mr. A. G. Boyd ; 
Hibernian, Mr. William Johnstone, M.P.; Lancashire 
and Cheshire, Mr. Jacob Earnshaw (Manchester), Mr. 
W. P. Ingham (Manchester), Mr. T. Hallsworth 
(Manchester), Mr. G. Mason (Preston), and Rev. J. 
Shipman (Manchester); Leicestershire, Mr. T Lewin 
and Mr. T. Palmer; Methodist New Connexion, Rev. 
D. Heath and Rev. F. H. Robinson; Newcastle and 
Gateshead, Mr. W. E. Bell and Mr. James Troup; 
Northamptonshire, Mr. J. Lightfoot, Mr. A. Stanton, and 
Mr. R. Wiggins; Nottinghamshire, Mr.W. B. Baggaley ; 
Oxfordshire, Mr. A. J. George; Reading, Mr. W. 
Totland ; Southampton, Rev. H. S. Solly ; Staffordshire, 
Rev. T. de Vine; Surrey, Mr. R. Wilson ; Sussex, Mr. 
R. H. Penney (Brighton) ; Willenhall, Mr. John Harper ; 
Yorkshire, Mr. E. J. Day (Dewsbury), Rev. R. H. Dugdale 
(Huddersfield), Mr. Martin Field (Bradford), Mr. J. 
Sanderson (York), Mr. T. Troughton (Leeds). 

AmoDgst kindred societies and the private friends of the 
Union we noticed the followingMr. R. Rae, Mr. J. 
Esterbrook, Mr. J. Leng, Mr. E. Foskett and Mr. J, L. 
Fenn (National Temperance League), Rev. E. Grose 
Hodge, Mr. Charles Wightman and Mr. Frederick 
Sherlock (Church of England Temperance Society), Rev. 
T. G. Crosse, Rev. J. P. Downman and Rev. J. Grant 
Mills (Church of England Temperance Society Juvenile 
Branch), Rev. Dawson Burns, Mr. J. Raper and Mr. 
J. Hilton (United Kingdom Alliance), Mr. C. Pinhorn 
(Independent Order Good Templars), Rev. G. M. 
Murphy (Congregational Total Abstinence Association), 
Rev. Walter Hobbs (Baptist Total Abstinence Associa¬ 
tion), Mr. J. T. Rae (Gospel Temperance Workers’ 
Union), Mr. W. Hind Smith (Young Abstainers’ Union), 


Mrs. Durrant (Working Women’s Temperance Associa¬ 
tion), Mr. Benjamin Clarke and Mr. J. Milton Smith 
(Sunday School Union), Mr. John Hughes, C.C. (London 
Temperance Hospital), Mr. R. P. Edwards (Western 
Temperance League), Mr. Arthur Pease, M.P. (North of 
England Temperance League), Mr. George Ling (East 
Central Temperance Association), Mr. John Mann (South 
London Temperance Society), Rev. A. W. Bennett, Rev. 
C. Chambers, Rev. Storer Clark, Rev. W. A. Essery, 
Rev. Arthur Hall, Rev. Styleman Herring, Rev. T. 
Jarrett, Rev. W. B. Lark, Rev. T. Leaver, Rev. Alfred 
Moon, and Rev. E. Schnadhorst; Mr. W. S Capper, Mr. 
Ebenezer Clarke, F.S.S., Gen. Copland Crawford, R.A., 
Major-Gen. Desborough, C.B., Hon. Conrad Dillon, Mr. 
J. P. Draper, Mr. J. B. George, Mr. Axel Gustafson, Mr. 
B. H. Goulden, Mr. Howard H. Hart, Mr. G. H. Lee, 
Mr. John Lisle, Mr. G. S. Lucraft, Mr. T. McCarnie, Mr. 
T. E. Minshall, Dr. Kate Mitchell, Mr. W. Saunders, 
Mr. Stephen Shirley, Lieut.-Col. T. M. Whale, Mr. 
Frank Wright, and Mr. T. H. Wyatt. 

MEETINGS FOR PRAYER. 

In accordance with a rule obtaining from the commence¬ 
ment of the operations of the Union the series of meetings 
was preceded by prayer on behalf of the movement. 
For this purpose special meetings were arranged by many 
local Unions, some of which prepared and printed hymns 
for the occasion. The meetings took place on Sunday, 
May 8th, and were held, as a rule, in the morning of the 
day, to meet the convenience of the Sunday-school 
teachers who form so strong an element in the working 
staff of our Societies. 

THE COUNCIL MEETING. 

The Council, in which resides the growing power of the 
Union, consists of total abstainers who either subscribe 
a sum of not less than one guinea to the funds, or who 
represent the workers in the various associated Unions. 
The meeting of this Council was held on the evening of 
Tuesday, May ioth, Mr. Stephen Shirley presiding. 
The proceedings having been opened by reading the 
Scriptures and prayer, the annual report and balance 
sheet, which are given in a summarised form elsewhere, 
were presented and adopted. Vacancies in the Executive 
occasioned by the retirement, as provided by the constitu¬ 
tion, of eight members, were supplied. Cordial thanks 
were presented to the Committee and the staff for their 
services during the year, and were suitably acknowledged 
by Mr. Ebenezer Clarke and the secretaries. Mr. 
Saunderson, of York, on behalf of the Union for that city, 
warmly invited the Council to arrange for the holding of 
the autumnal meetings at York, the invitation being 
cordially accepted. After statements by the secretaries 
as to the efforts of the Union in the direction of the 
organisation of the movement, a resolution was adopted 
congratulating the Executive on the large measure of 
success attained in this direction, and expressing the wish 
that it should continue to occupy a full share of attention. 

THE BREAKFAST MEETING. 

The meeting was opened by the Rev. G. M. Murphy 
with reading of the Scripture, and prayer was offered by 
the Rev. F. Storer Clarke, M.A. 

The Chairman, the Right Hon. Lord Mount-Temple, 
who was received with cheers, expressed the great 
enjoyment he felt at being present at this most pleasant 
gathering. He had been delighted to hear, and he 
he thought to see, some form of visible manifestation of 
what the Union was. Here he found a number of people 




IOO 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


°f different characters and pursuits banded in an effort to 
s ave the young from the greatest snare that would beset 
4 heir path. This was an organisation that suggests—not 
that compels. This movement was on the whole the most 
successful of all forms of Temperance effort. It was the 
most interesting because it touched the hearts of all 
human beings. He ventured to say that Band of Hope 
children never lost the recollection of the impressions 
made upon them in their youth, whatever might be their 
course in after life. He congratulated the founders of 
this Union on the success that had attended their efforts 
—a success of which even they could never have 
dreamt when they commenced it. (Cheers.) 

Miss Weston spoke of Temperance amongst the young 
men of the navy, and in passing deplored the sad necessity 
that made many English shipowners prefer the services 
of foreigners to those of our countrymen because of their 
intemperate habits. About one-sixth of the Royal Navy 
were now total abstainers. (Cheers. - ) One-half of Her 
Majesty’s training ship lads were abstainers. There were 
4,000 young fellows training for the navy, and to get at 
these was the kernel of the whole matter, and, as she 
said, one-half of them were now abstainers. (Cheers.) It 
was most interesting to see there the fruits of Band of 
Hope work, for when at her large meetings she asked the 
question, “How many of you have been in Bands of 
Hope ? ” a perfect forest of hands went up. Band of 
Hope workers should therefore be encouraged, for 
their labour was not spent in vain. She encouraged 
the young men to carry on the meetings themselves 
when ashore. They did it well and valued the privilege. 
They did not call the work the Band of Hope, but part of 
the Royal Naval Temperance Society. Some of the 
ages of the lads run from sixteen to nineteen. They 
were not allowed grog untii they were full-rated seamen, 
and they were also forbidden to smoke. Teetotalism and 
the Gospel made up practical Christianity in the navy. 

Mr. Arthur Pease, M.P., quite agreed with thesound- 
ness of the policy of beginning with the children rather 
than first allowing the drink to get a hold of them and 
then beginning the difficult and often profitless effort of 
reclamation. He urged that the Christian church should 
even more than it had done take up this work, and do it 
with a perfectly pure motive, and not for the sake of 
preventing the children from going to other churches. 
(Hear, hear.) 

Mrs. Ormiston Chant spoke on “Bands of Hope in 
the light of the future.” What vexed her soul so much 
as she went about the country—and she attended some 
tive or six hundred meetings every year—was the want of 
hope among the people. Every day she came across 
a number of ladies and gentlemen who were weary of life, 
and who were asking the question, “ Is life worth living ?” 
This pessimism was brought about through their having 
too little or nothing to do. She wanted her hearers to 
take courage, and to remember that hope did not mean a 
perpetual living under present circumstances, but a living 
on yonder. Hope must, she urged, be accompanied by 
love. If it were, then it would be a hope that “ maketh 
not ashamed,” and apparent failures would not dishearten 
them. The future would reveal the fruits of present 
endeavours. This work amongst the children was the 
most blessed and the most everlasting that could be 
undertaken. Referring to the meeting of the Society for 
the Prevention of Cruelty to Children.held on the previous 
day, and at which she had been present, she said how 
deeply moved she had been by the accounts there given. 
She thought there was no country in the world where 
children were treated with such systematic brutality as in 
England, and this not only amongst the very poor, but 
even amongst the upper classes of society. Did her 
hearers think that teetotal fathers and mothers 
would have acted as those had done who had been 
brought under the cognizance of the magistrates ? 


Although it was not true of all, yet she knew that 
many persons held the unchristian doctrine that parents 
might do just what they liked with their children. She 
wanted everyone to remember what the drink was doing 
in keeping this cruelty alive in their midst. She then 
urged, with great earnestness, entire consecration of Band 
of Hope workers to God, if permanent results on the 
children’s lives were to be attained. Unless they had 
received their baptism from the hand of Jesus Christ, 
their work would die. Let them see that this Band of 
Hope work was their crucifixion, their Calvary, and that 
it was to bring them the joy of the Easter morning. There 
was, she maintained, a trinity of elements in the education 
of Band of Hope children. The first of these was 
physiology, including the chemical and theoretical parts 
of the subject; the second was the historical side, as 
showing the evil wrought by drink in the past ; and the 
third was the social aspect of it, as affecting the world 
to-day. There was a danger of making their Band of 
Hope meetings too frivolous. (Hear, hear.) She should 
like them to strike the happy medium.She did not wish to 
hinder laughter—there should be more innocent laughter 
—but if any movement was frivolized, the element of 
death had been brought into it. At least once a month 
the meetings should be educational in character. To 
impart interest and promote effort, prizes should be 
offered, and the whole matter placed on a high level, so 
that the children might see that their teachers did not 
regard it as a trumpery thing. If they could institute 
degrees for this knowledge much would be done to elevate 
Bands of Hope in an educational respect. In conclusion, 
the speaker again strongly urged the workers to hope on. 
There was much in the present time which was very sad, 
but she wished them to remember that the deeper the 
darkness and the pain which ushered in a great renais¬ 
sance the more glorious that renaissance might be. 

The Rev. Dr. Dawson Burns said that he looked 
upon the Bands of Hope as being especially valuable 
because of their educational efforts. He was 
delighted that so many means were being used by 
this Union to stimulate the desires of the young for 
knowledge, thereby enabling them to give a reason 
for the practice they were called on to pursue. He 
thought that the House of Lords needed a great deal of 
education on this subject. (Hear, hear.) If they could 
only get knowledge on this question into the minds of 
those who had so much influence in the land, they would 
be saved an enormous amount of evil. If great statesmen 
who had inflicted infinite mischief on this country had 
been members of Temperance Societies, what a difference 
there would be in England to-day. He did not know 
whether it was too late to begin with some of them, and 
whether they could get Mr. Gladstone, Lord Salisbury, 
Lord Randolph Churchill, the Marquis of Hartington, and 
others to form a class, with Dr. Richardson as instructor. 
(Laughter.) They would be “ old boys,” it was true, but 
still they might be able to receive some information which 
would do them good, and make them do good to others. 
At any rate, it was satisfactory to think that this could 
be done with the children who were to become the future 
legislators. Then there would be hope for the future, 
and this country might become free from the reproach of 
ages, and, being sober, it would be truly glorious. 
(Applause.) 

Mr. Axel Gustafson, who followed, referred to the 
desire young men and young women—-who had grown out 
of their “swaddling-clothes”—always manifested to do 
what their elders did. Therefore those people who stood 
upon temperance platforms as moderate drinkers, and 
said that they had such a great hope of the future race, 
really shirked their responsibilities. (Applause.) There 
was no compromise between truth and falsehood ; and the 
truth alone could make them free. 

The Hon. Conrad Dillon, in moving a vote of thanks 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


IOI 


to the Chairman, observed that the Bands of Hope had 
not been unmindful of their duties to the House of Lords, 
for they invited a large number of them last year to their 
festival at the Crystal Palace, and amongst those present 
was no other than Lord Bramwell, who subsequently 
spoke most graciously and earnestly of the way in which 
he had been impressed by the presence of that large 
gathering, and by the general appearance of the young 
people. Total abstainers had good men in the House of 
Lords,one of whom was the Bishop of London. (Applause.) 
He hoped their numbers might increase,especially amongst 
the laymen of the House. He did not wish people who 
were moderate drinkers to hold aloof from them ; he 
rejoiced to see them in the ranks, but he hoped that very 
soon their education would be complete. He thought 
there was a great work to be done among the higher public 
schools 

The Rev. W. A. Essery, who seconded, observed, in 
speaking of the temperance outlook, that they, of all 
people, were the last who should be despairing, considering 
that there were five millions of total abstainers already 
to be found within the length and breadth of the land, 
and a million and a half of children in the Bands of Hope. 
It was, he thought, for those lower down in the social 
scale to send the light on this question up to the people 
above. 

The motion having been heartily carried, the Chairman 
briefly responded, remarking that at one time he was the 
only person in the House of Lords who wore the blue ribbon. 

The meeting then closed with singing and the benedic¬ 
tion. 

THE AFTERNOON CONFERENCE. 

A General Conference was held in the Lower Room, 
Exeter Hall, in the afternoon, over which Major-General 
Desborough, C.B., presided. 

The Chairman remarked that if this country was to be 
made sober and religious, our only hope was in the rising 
generation. If the scholars and teachers in our Sunday 
Schools could be induced to enlist under the total absti¬ 
nence banner, this drink evil would receive a most 
effectual blow. He fully endorsed the wise words of Mr. 
John Bright when he said, talking about legislative 
changes, “ I believe some useful changes in the laws may 
be made, but I am more disposed to rely on public teaching 
and upon the results of extended education, and of good 
example, than upon anything that Parliament can do.” 
Honours were being scattered broadcast in this Jubilee 
year, but he would like to see such persons as Dr. 
Barnardo, Miss Weston and Miss Robinson decorated 
with the Order of the Good Samaritan. (Cheers.) He 
believed that Her Majesty was greatly indebted for her 
happy and prosperous reign to those pioneers of truth and 
religion who were going about the land out of love for 
precious souls, gathering in the young and leading them 
to the Saviour. (Applause.) 

Mr. Wm.T. Taylor then read an interesting paper upon 
“ How we Manage our Band of Hope,”„which appears 
elsewhere in the present issue. 

In the discussion which followed, the Rev. Storer Clarke 
said he had a great objection to the “ abominable system 
of prizes and rewards ” ; or, in other words, “ paying the 
children for beiDg good.” While denouncing smoking as 
a selfish habit, he knew of one Band of Hope that had gone 
utterly to ruin because they had insisted upon abstinence 
from tobacco. 

Mr. Forbes (Holloway) condemned the system of dis¬ 
continuing themeetings during the summer months. While 
some temperance people were working six months in the 
year, the publicans and the devil’s agents were working 
twelve. 

Mr. Harris and Mr. Wakely also took part in the dis¬ 

cussion. 

A paper was then read by Mr. Hallsworth (Hon. Sec. 


Lancashire and Cheshire Band of Hope Union), his subject 
being, ‘‘Are Separate Meetings for Junior and Senior 
Members Desirable ? ” This Paper will appear in our next 
issue, but on account of the interest manifested m this 
subject at the present time, we give a summary here. 
Twenty years ago, Mr. Hallsworth said, it was suggested 
by one of their oldest and most respected workers, 
as a means of retaining |the senior members, that a 
gradual system of societies or meetings should be adopted, 
namely — (i) the children’s meeting; (2) the senior 
Band of Hope; (3) the Youths’ Temperance Society; 
and (4) the Adult Society ; and since that time many 
methods had been tried to keep those committed to 
their charge from being drawn into the terrible vortex of 
intemperance. After an experience of twenty-three years 
as secretary of one Band of Hope, however, his opinion was 
that to form separate societies, or even to duplicate their 
meetings, would often be a calamity, as undoubtedly the 
labour would fall upon the same staff of workers. He 
took strong objection to the suggestion that the senior 
Band of Hope should be left to the members themselves, 
as he feared that without the oversight, and control, and 
presence of a number of adults, abuses would creep in. 
He also very much questioned the wisdom of allowing the 
young of both sexes to meet together apart from both the 
younger members and adults, as such a meeting would in 
many cases become a rendezvous for nonsense and flirta¬ 
tion. Their primary object was to get hold of the 
children while they were young, to educate and train them 
in their principles ; and to do this successfully they could 
not meet them too often. It had been said that senior 
members objected to attend the meetings of the juniors, 
but he had never found it so. He advocated one meeting 
open to all. Above all they must address themselves to 
the requirements of the times. He had no sympathy with 
those puritanical reformers who shut out all entertain¬ 
ments ; at the same time they must avoid crowding out 
all instruction. It was not enough to show their members 
the social evil; with this they were already familiar. They 
must show that it was bad at all times—as bad when 
handled by the fingers of a lady as when handed over the 
bar of a public-house. Finally, and above all, let them 
seek to lead their members to Christ. If they got them 
converted, and with the grace of God in their hearts, they 
would stand firm, and by-and-bye would themselves carry 
on the work vigorously and successfully. 

Mr. Frederic Smith observed that it was a happy 
thing that workers in the Band of Hope movement were 
left entirely free to adopt those plans which best suited 
their respective circumstances. He thought it possible 
that one meeting for all ages, commencing about half-past 
seven, best suited manufacturing districts, where the 
mills and factories closed about half-past five or six. He 
felt convinced, however, that in other parts separate 
meetings for those under and over thirteen would be found 
to be the best plan, especially as by this mode the teaching 
and engagements of the meeting could be especially 
adapted for those of school age, and those beyond it. He 
also contended that seniors rightly expected to have a 
considerable share in the management of their own 
affairs, and that no harm whatever was likely to result 
from this, if two or thiee wise adult friends shared the 
responsibility with them. He cautioned all present against 
expecting to see the senior members present at the meet¬ 
ings in such large numbers as the juniors. Many circum¬ 
stances satisfactorily explained this, and the proper 
lesson to take to heart was, so carefully to educate the 
juniors during the years they attended the meetings, as 
to render them staunch for life. 

Mr. H. Martin Sells (St. Matthew’s, Redhill) then 
contributed a paper upon ‘‘Visitation of Absent Members.” 
which we print in full in another part of the present issue. 

After a short but interesting discussion, the Conference 
was brought to a close. 


102 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


THE GREAT PUBLIC MEETING. 

In the evening the great meeting took place, the Great 
Hall being crowded from end to end. Mr. George 
Williams, as President of the Union, took the chair, and 
there was an admirable musical programme by a choir of 
five hundred voices, who sang with great acceptance under 
the direction of Mr. G. W. Hardwidge. Mr. F. G. 
Edwards ably presided at the organ. 

The meeting opened with devotional exercises, after 
which an abstract of the annual report was read by Mr. 
Charles Wakely, the General Secretaiy. 

The Chairman, said he desired to show his sympathy 
with this most successful movement, and expressed his 
great delight at the sunny character of the report. It 
seemed to him that all the elements of success had 
attended their work. They had already reached over 
1,600,000 young champions, and they must go on till they 
had reached the remaining 3,400,000 young people of the 
United Kingdom. In 1856 there were only 13 Bands of 
Hope in London, and probably not 500 throughout the 
kingdom ; there were now 13,000. He believed the 
great reduction in juvenile criminals, and the better 
behaviour in the streets, were to no small extent outcomes 
of their institution. He hoped to see the day when the 
work of this Union would be extended on the continent 
in the same way that the Young Men’s Christian 
Association had extended its work there. (Hear, hear.) 

Dr. B. W. Richardson, who appeared almost at the 
last moment as a substitute for Dr. Rutherford, who was 
detained at home by the serious illness of a patient, said 
that those who had been working at this department of 
the temperance question had gone to the root and branch 
of the matter. They were beginning at the beginning, 
and if they only succeeded in a short time the battle 
would be fairly won. He heard since he came into the 
room that the children connected with Bands of Hope 
numbered one million and a half—a stupendous number 
—and the great question for a meeting like the present to 
consider was, What were the ways in which young children 
could be taught not only to accept from our authority that 
which we told them, but to convince their minds that our 
authority rested on the basis of truth, goodness and 
rectitude? Some thought that this could best be done 
by scientific instruction, and he would be the last to say 
this should not be so. , It had been his great privilege to 
help the temperance cause by science. (Cheers.) He 
said—Let simple scientific lessons be taught, but at the 
same time blend them with that which was always 
interesting to the children’s mind—the story of adventure 
and narrative. The child would say that drinks were 
food because he had been taught to think so, and the 
fallacy of this could be shown by showing how the whole 
of animal life was maintained without the least use of 
alcohol. The birds of the air, the beasts of the field, the 
fish of the sea, and the strong animals down to the 
smallest, all lived without strong drink. Then, if the 
child, speaking again from hearsay, should say that they 
were taken for cold, it could be shown clearly and in 
simple words that the direct action of alcohol was to pro¬ 
duce cold. Here the stories of the Arctic travellers 
formed abundant food for illustration, and would rivet 
the attention of the children as all stories of adventure 
did. They might be told the facts of the last expedition, 
and who it was who got nearer to the North Pole than any 
man had ever gone before. The books of Sir John Ross 
and Sir John Richardson might be also referred to. Per¬ 
haps the child would say that people took strong drink to 
keep them strong, and then they could tell the story of 
the camel, “the ship of the desert,” that would walk 
one hundred miles a day across the sand on a simple drink 
of water. All history was on our side. Then the child 
might say it was necessary to take strong drink when 
refined work had to be done. We might then tell them 
that if any great feat of walking or riding were wanted 


those who trained for it always did so on a regime of total 
abstinence, and we could show the absence of any such 
necessity most of all by our own abstinence. (Cheers.) 
This would be the most forceful illustration that could be 
given. More would depend on what children learned 
from the book of our life than from anything they would 
read in books that were printed. All turned not only on 
the force of example but on the solidity of example. Never 
admit that drink was a pleasure under any circumstances, 
and never allow that it was a thing that even wise men 
could use with impunity. There was nothing whatever 
coming down to us from the great Chemist of the skies 
except that which He distilled from the earth, from the 
mountains—sent into the clouds, let fall again in conden¬ 
sation in dew, and stream, and river, and gave to man 
and beast for their natural wants. Lastly, we should 
encourage children to become workers in this great cause. 
Very often men and women lost through the drink came 
to him in despair ; he got them to abstain, and then they 
fell back, but he tried to avoid this by at once setting 
them to work in the cause. This was one way to keep the 
children true : make them not only total abstainers but 
teachers of total abstinence. There was a little army of 
workers in the cause whom he had brought into it in the 
way of suggesting that they should become workers them¬ 
selves. (Cheers) There was nothing like kindling their 
enthusiasm. There was not a living being who did not 
recall something which in childhood acted upon him even 
to the present hour. He was fond of everything in con¬ 
nection with liberty, and traced it to reading the book by 
Miss Jane Procter, “ Thaddeus of Warsaw. ” If we could 
impress upon children that the way to sustain good 
causes was to have implanted in them the love of right and 
goodness we would send them forth a mighty host that in 
half a century would make them the invincible friends 
and lovers of mankind. (Cheers.) 

Rev. W. W. Perrin, M.A., Vicar of St. Luke's, South¬ 
ampton, referring to the Jubilee, hoped all present would 
see that representations were sent to those charged with 
the arrangements for feasting the poor, asking if intoxicat¬ 
ing drink could not be banished from the tables altogether, 
or that at least one table should be kept free from the 
drinK. Amid tremendous cheering, renewed again and 
again, which compelled him to pause for some time till it 
subsided, he said if her Majesty the Queen would but 
consecrate this fiftieth year of her reign with a noble new 
action, and come forward and sign the pledge, what a 
blessed thing it would be ! It was a far cry to Buckingham 
Palace, but one wished indeed that these cheers could 
reach the ears of Her Majesty, and that her woman’s 
heart might be touched, and that she could see with her 
eyes, and know the evil that was being wrought by the 
drink. Even if Her Majesty could not see her way to take 
the step he suggested, he hoped that she would never¬ 
theless see her way to use all the influence in her power 
to help forward the temperance cause. 

The Rev. T. Bowman Stephenson, Principal of the 
Children’s Home, Victoria Park, said he did not 
think the function and place of the Union was by any 
means yet occupied by other organisations. It formed 
one great rallying point for all the workers, irrespective 
of party and creed. This Union was helping and sustain¬ 
ing work that was going down into the depths and crannies 
of the national life, and there winning great victories and 
doing enormous good. As one who had charge of many 
children he felt bound to render it his tribute of thankful¬ 
ness for the aid it was constantly giving him. The boys 
and girls of to-day were going to enter into the 20th 
century and what would be the position of the temperance 
cause then ? He believed it would be vastly stronger than 
it was now, and even now as contrasted with 100 years 
ago the change was marvellous. Hackney coachmen 
used to have boarding houses to which they took drunken 
“gentlemen” for the night, knowing full well that they would 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


103 


be paid in the morning. 100 years ago there was not in all 
England a professedly avowed abstainer, and even our lead¬ 
ing statesmen were not at all ashamed of having it generally 
known that they were in the habit of getting drunk. 
Such a thing would not be tolerated now. We could 
congratulate ourselves on the marked progress in 
medical sentiment, and soon, to a large extent, the force 
of heredity would be on our side. It had been against us 
during the last half century. He was no believer in some 
of the extravagant representations of the doctrine of 
heredity which had been put forward, for logically they 
led to fatalism, but there was a terrible truth in the fact 
that the sins of the fathers were visited upon the children. 
After the experience of children for the last twenty-five 
years, however, he was'of the view that there was no doctrine 
of heredity such as would defy the power of habit and 
education and even of the grace of God to overcome. 
(Cheers.) We were a nation of drunkards ; we had it in 
our blood, but, thank God, the influence of the lives of 
thousands who had been teetotalers during the last half 
century would be felt for good upon the next generation. 
(Cheers.) 

The Rev. Thomas Evans, Minister of Victoria Park 
Congregational Church, claimed to belong to every 
movement that had for its object the doing away of the 
drink. Twenty-five years ago he came to London for 
the first time with money in his pocket to buy instruments 
for a drum and fife band in connection with his Band of 
Hope. (Cheers.) He looked upon total abstinence as 
one of the greatest stays of his life. He firmly 
believed that if he had not been brought up a teetotaler 
he would not have been a minister of religion at this day ; 
he felt such was his temperament that he would have 
made shipwreck of his ministry. He advised the young 
people to deal with strong drink as David did with 
Goliath—keep it at a distance. (Cheers.) Take stones 
from the brook of total abstinence and hurl them with 
might and main. It was often said that ministers should 
be total abstainers, and if they, why not the people ? 
(Hear, hear.) If they could get the church of Christ clear 
of the drink they might soon win the victory. He could 
say with deliberation that the chief workers in connection 
with the movement were those who had been trained in 
the Bands of Hope. He wanted the lads to learn to say 
“ no ” to thediink, and if they were trained in the Bands 
of Hope they would say it intelligently. (Cheers.) 

The Rev. T. T. Lambert proposed a vote of thanks to 
the Chairman. 

Mr. J. H. Raper seconded the motion, and the 
proceedings of an enthusiastic meeting were then brought 
to a close after the benediction had been pronounced. 


MAY MEETINGS OF KINDRED SOCIETIES. 


T will interest our readers to be reminded 
that many other temperance organizations 
> besides our own also hold festival in May. At 
one time our own meetings and those of the 
National Temperance League were the only 
temperance meetings in the May Meeting 
list ; but now, not only has the number of 
Societies greatly increased, but also the 
number of meetings for which each 
arranges. In the space at our disposal we can 
do little more than give a list of the various meetings. 
We need not, we trust, say how glad we are to see the 
temperance field so well-covered, or how cordial is our 
welcome to each new body of organized abstainers. 

The National Temperance League. 



On Sunday, May 1st, the annual sermon was preached in 
the Metropolitan Tabernacle, by the Rev. David Davies, of 
Regent s Park Chapel, and contained an eloquent appeal to the 


Christian Church to join the great crusade against drinking and 
drunkenness. The public meeting took place on the evening of 
the next day, in Exeter Hall, when the President of the 
the League, the Bishop of London, took the chair, and spoke 
with much force and point on the sad topic of British com¬ 
merce in spirits with savage or semi-savage peoples. The Rev. 
Peter Thompson spoke of East-end want and East-end drink ; 
Mr.Thomas Whittaker recalled the “ heroic age ” of teetotalism ; 
Miss Weston told the tale of the rise and progress of total 
abstinence in the navy, and the Rev. J. Gelson Gregson brought 
the latest temperance news from India. 

Church of England Temperance Society. 

The annual meetings were opened by the members and 
friends of the Juvenile Union, who met at the Westminster 
Town Hall, on Saturday, April 23rd, under the presidency of 
the Hon. Conrad Dillon. The event of the meeting, which 
was held in the afternoon, was a speech by Archdeacon Farrar, 
on the fearful apathy of the public conscience on the drink 
question. The Chairman of the London School Board, Rev. 
J. R. Diggle, also spoke, as well as Canon Ellison,whose presence 
is ever welcome. Miss Ursula S. Gardner presented the report, 
which recorded substantial progress. The Women’s Union meet¬ 
ing was held in Exeter Hall, on Wednesday afternoon, 27th. 
Canon Ellison took the chair, and was supported by Mrs. 
Temple, Mrs. Evered Poole, Lady Sebright, and other ladies. 
We learn from the report of Miss Haslam, the Secretary, that 
there are 102 branches well at work. The great meeting of 
the Total Abstinence Section took place in the Large Exeter 
Hall, on Wednesday, April 27th ; the Bishop of London took 
the chair, which by this time must be very familiar to him. 
The attendance was large and enthusiastic, twenty-five years 
having by no means cooled the ardour of, at any rate, this 
section. The Hon. and Rev. Canon Leigh, the Rev. G. C. Fisher, 
of Beverley, and ether leading clergymen and laymen spoke. 
A conference was held the next day at Lambeth Palace, and 
“ Foundation Day,” the following Monday, was celebrated most 
effectively by a sermon in Westminster Abbey, preached by 
the Archbishop of Canterbury to a large congregation, and 
containing truth enough to make anyone a teetotaler, even 
including his Grace himself. 

Baptist Total Abstinence Association. 

Whilst the C. E. T. S. was meeting at Exeter Hall, on April 
27th, this Association was celebrating its thirteenth anniversary 
at the Metropolitan Tabernacle. Mr. Frank Wright, of Bir¬ 
mingham, the son of the first president of the Society, took the 
chair. The Secretary, Mr. J. T. Sears, reported eighty-nine 
societies with 14,000 members, 998 abstaining ministers out of 
1,756, and 211 students out of 236. This is good. Canon 
Fleming showed his brotherly sympathy by one of his 
excellent addresses, and was followed by Mrs. Ormiston Chant 
and the Rev. J. Gelson Gregson. The Stockwell Orphanage 
Choir sang, and the capital hand-bell ringers from that institu¬ 
tion rang out some merry peals. 

Congregational Total Abstinence Association. 

The annual meetings of the Congregational Union bring 
together a goodly array of ministers and laymen from the 
provinces, and this circumstance is very wisely turned to 
account by the Committee of the Association, which holds its 
meetings just about the same time. • The City Temple was the 
scene of the annual meeting, on Monday, May 9th. Mr. Edward 
Crossley, M.P., took the chair in the absence of Mr. E. Baines, 
whose weight of 87 years prevented his attendance. The Rev. 
G. M. Murphy read the annual report, which claimed half the 
ministers as abstainers, and the Rev. J. Ossian Davies delivered 
an address full of force and truth. The Rev. J. A. Macfadyen, 
M.A., also spoke, and the reception given to a capital address 
by Mr. W. S. Caine, M.P., showed how completely temperance 
sentiment can triumph over political differences. 

Young Abstainers’ Union. 

The Young Abstainers met in Exeter Lower Hall, on the 
afternoon of Saturday, May 7th. Mr. S. A. Blackwood, C.B., 
although speaking with considerable difficulty from the 
effects of a cold, took the chair. Miss Andrews read the 
report, and Mr. Hugh Matheson the financial statement, by 
which we are sorry to find that the Union has been unable to 
make both ends meet. Mr. Aukland, Mrs. Reaney, the Hon. 
and Rev. W. Talbot Rice spoke ; a Soudanese Arab gave some 
interesting personal reminiscences; and the Rev. T. L. Johnson 
a coloured clergyman, his sad experiences as a slave. 




104 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


&£cortrs of progress from iLocal Societies. 


Ban'll of ?t?opc 2a.nioti0. 

Birmingham.—The report of the Union for this important 
town has come to hand. The plan of dividing the area of 
operations into districts has been found to answer admirably 
and a ladies’ council has also done good service. The num¬ 
ber of associated societies shows a very remarkable increase, 
having risen from 67 to 106. The list of honorary speakers 
numbers 67. The services of the secretary and an agent are 
very highly esteemed by the committee. The “Reporter” 
still finds much favour, and contains this month a portrait and 
sketch of Alderman White. The Union took part in the appeal 
to parents, the Crystal Palace Fete, the New Year’s collection 
and the competitive examination, and arranged a good 
series of conferences and festivals, besides looking after 
the senior members and the public institutions of the town. 

Bradford. —The tenth flower and song festival was held on 
Saturday, May 7th, in the Mechanics’ institute, which was, as 
usual on these occasions, well filled. The flower-decorated 
platform presented a gay appearance, with its eighty girls 
dressed in white, and bearing bouquets of flowers. The 
necessary firmness was given to the singing by about fifty 
adult friends. Alderman J. Priestman presided, and was 
accompanied by Mrs. Priestman, Rev. S. Lloyd, Mr. Martin 
Field and others. The chief feature of the proceedings was 
the rendering of a cantata, “ The Dawn of Spring,” but recita¬ 
tions were also given, and excellent addresses by the chairman 
and the Rev. S. Lloyd, the latter taking as his subject “ The 
Parable of the Rosebuds." 

East Essex. —United festivals have recently been held at 
Romford, East Ham, Plaistow, Upton, and Forest Gate. At 
some of these gatherings a solo competition of a simple 
character was held, in which the competitors were required to 
sing from memory a piece selected from the melody book in 
use in their Bands of Hope. A dissolving view exhibition con¬ 
cluded each meeting, the views illustrating several recitations 
and songs which were given by various friends. 

Halifax.— The annual conference of the Halifax and District 
Band of Hope Union was held at Halifax on May 7th, when 
between four hundred and five hundred delegates from various 
Unions assembled. In the afternoon the Mayoress of Halifax 
(Mrs. R. Horsfall) presided, and she was supported on the 
platform by the Mayor (Aid. Horsfall), the Rev. W. Whitby, 
the Rev. Enoch Franks, F.S. Sc., Wigan, the Rev. George 
Saunderson, Mr. John Clay, Mr. J. Duerdoth (secretary), Dr. 
Bowman, and others. Mrs. Stroyan, of Burnley, read a paper 
entitled, “ Upward and Onward ”; a resolution was also 
adopted in favour of the Women’s Jubilee Memorial on behalf 
of Sunday closing. After a tea meeting (in which the trays 
were presented by several ladies) a public meeting was held in 
the Dean Clough Institute, the president (the Mayor) Aid. R. 
Horsfall, in the chair, He was supported by the Rev. T. C. 
Hill, vicar of Bolsover; Mr. Henry Hibbert, of Bradford ; Mr. 
J. Smith, of Leeds; Mr. J. W. Ward, Mr. W. Storey, Rev. E. 
Franks, and others. The speaking was interspersed with 
songs by a juvenile chorus, conducted by Mr. Job Sunderland. 
On the following Sunday gospel temperance meetings were 
held in the Dean Clough Institute, and outdoor meetings on 
Cow Green. Each meeting was led by the Stannary Tempe¬ 
rance Reed Band. From the 30th annual report of this Union 
it is evident that its vigour is unabated, the movement being 
actively kept to the front by means of a series of lectures by 
Rev. Thos. Guttery, a ten days’ mission by Mr. J. F. Cook, a 
Band of Hope Sunday, public meetings, conferences, deputa- 
tional work, and the valuable labours of Mr. Lawson, the 
indefatigable agent. The income was £560, leaving a good 
balance in hand. 

Newcastle and Gateshead.— The report of this Union is 
encouraging. The past has been a year of special activity and 
success. Eight more societies are in association than were 
associated last year, and the surrounding villages are being 
reached. During the year 1,350 meetings have been held by 
the Union and its societies. Open-air fetes have been held 
and temperance sermons preached. Mr. Morley’s appeal was 
well circulated. The services of the agent proved very 
valuable, and considerable attention was paid to work in day 
schools 


Scarborough. —We learn from the annual report of the 
Scarborough Temperance and Band of Hope Union, that the 
past year witnessed an increase in membership, the total now 
being 2,220. The Good Friday demonstration and the May- 
day festival are mentioned as being very successful, the latter 
being repeated to meet the public demand. A fortnight's 
mission in August, with Mr. T. Troughton and Mr. H. 
Davidson as chief speakers, was also productive of consider¬ 
able good ; and a petition in favour of prohibiting the sale of 
liquor to children had been presented to the House of 
Commons through Sir George Sitwell, M.P. Special attention 
is devoted to the supply of temperance literature ; and the 
balance-sheet shows a balance in hand of over £91, for which 
the committee will no doubt quickly find a good use. 

South Shields. —We are happy to record the formation of a 
Band of Hope Union for this important centre of population. 
The representatives of the various societies in the town met in 
conference on Friday, May 6th, in the Gospel Temperance 
Hall. Mr. W. J. Heppell, the orginator of the movement, 
occupied the chair. A constitution was adopted and officers 
appointed. The Gospel Temperance Union bore all the 
expenses connected with the inauguration, and offered the 
use of the committee room free for the first year, a kindness 
which was acknowledged with hearty thanks. 

West Kent —The annual meeting was held on Thursday, 
May 5th, in the Royal Assembly Rooms, Woolwich. In the 
absence of the president, Mr. S. A. Blackwood, C.B., through 
indisposition, the chair was taken by Mr. R. A. Burrows, of 
Belvedere; there was a good attendance. During the evening 
members of the Parson’s Hill Gospel Mission Choir 
and a choir of Band of Hope children sang several pieces. The 
Secretary read an abstract of the annual report, which shows 
that considerable advances have been made during the year ; 
there are 98 societies ten more than last year—and a really 
large amount of useful work effected. An address was 
delivered by Mr. Samuel Sims. 


Metropolitan Bantis of $ope. 

Allen Street, Goswell Road. —In one respect this society 
occupies a unique position. It has met weekly in the same 
building and under the same management for the past twenty- 
five years. Its anniversary was therefore appropriately made 
a very special occasion. On Sunday, May 1st, special services 
were held, and a sermon preached by the Rev. Robert 
Maguire, followed on the next day by a great gathering of past 
and present members and friends. The chair was taken by 
the Rev. R. Maguire, and addresses were delivered by the 
Rev. A. S. Herring, M.A., Mr. Frederic Smith and Mr. William 
Winton, a choir of sixty voices giving a selection of music. A 
very pleasing feature of the proceedings was the presentation 
of testimonials to the hon. secretaries, Mr. W. Hackett and 
Mr. E. Collard, in recognition of their long, able and arduous 
efforts on behalf of the society. 

King's Cross.— The Claremont Band of Hope recently cele¬ 
brated its twenty-first anniversary. During its career 3,000 
members have been enrolled, many of whom still do useful 
work in connection with temperance and religious societies. 
The proceedings consisted of a prayer meeting ; a social re¬ 
union of old members, which was very largely attended, many 
coming from distant towns to be present on the occasion ; a 
public meeting, at which Mr. George Williams presided; a 
sermon in Claremont Chapel, by the Rev. T. T. Lambert, and 
an evening concert sustained by some able performers. We 
must congratulate our friends on such a successful series of 
meetings, and on the long years of useful work which they are 
intended to celebrate. 

Peckham Rye and Nunhead —This society has been at work 
twenty-five years, and continues its useful efforts. During the 
year, 179 children’s pledges were taken. The Slate Club has 
been well sustained. The flower show was fairly successful, 
and the library has been enlarged. The society has many 
other useful branches which we trust will continue to yield 
good fruit under the guidance of the indefatigable secretary, 
Mr. H. G. Follett. 



THE 

cm 6 of ibope Cfn-omct'e 

Issued Monthly by the United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 



the 

iSantr of Chronicle, 

JULY, 1887. 


THE QUEEN’S JUBILEE. 


subjoin a copy of the address 
prepared by the Committee of the 
Union, and presented to Her 
Majesty through the Secretary 
of Stateforthe Home Department, 
on the occasion of the Fiftieth 
Anniversary of Her Majesty’s 
accession to the throne. Our 
friends will be pleased that such an opportunity 
has been embraced for the expression of the 
loyal sentiments entertained by Band of Hope 
workers and friends of the movement generally, 
and they will at the same time feel no ordinary 
satisfaction that our important work has been 
thus definitely brought under Her Majesty’s 
consideration. 


May it Please Your Majesty. 

Amongst the many dutiful Addresses which 
will be presented to Your Majesty on the occa¬ 
sion of the Jubilee of Your Majesty’s reign, we, 
on behalf of nearly two million young people 
who are members of Bands of Hope or Juvenile 
Temperance Societies, unite in offering to Your 
Majesty heartfelt congratulations and a humble 
assurance of loyalty and affection, feeling 
devoutly thankful to Almighty God that Your 
Majesty has for so long a period presided over 
the interests of the British Nation, not only for 
the good of that Nation itself, but for the last¬ 
ing benefit of the World. 

We rejoice that from the early age at which, 
by the Providence of God, Your Majesty was 
called to the throne of this Great Empire, Your 
Majesty has ever by earnest piety, noble courage, 
lofty aspirations and womanly virtue, called 
forth the love and gratitude of the people over 
whom Your Majesty has so graciously exercised 
the manifold duties of Sovereign, and in whose 
moral and spiritual welfare Your Majesty has on 
all occasions shown the deepest and most earnest 
concern. 

We especially rejoice in the marked diminu- 

JULY, 1887 . 



tion of intemperance which has taken place 
during Your Majesty’s reign, and regard with 
thankfulness the sympathy which is now 
manifested in all works conducing to strict 
sobriety, a result undoubtedly brought about by 
the efforts which have been made during the 
past forty yearsto impart Temperance Teaching 
to young people, a work which Your Majesty’s 
gracious personal character has done so much to 
advance. 


We believe Your Majesty will be graciously 
pleased to learn that Bands of Hope, which 
were originated by a lady, and in the manage¬ 
ment of which women still largely take part, 
have the two-fold aim of inculcating in young 
people the principle of total abstinence from the 
use of Intoxicating Drinks, and the promotion 
of habits of Truth,Self-control and Thrift, there¬ 
by conducing to the good citizenship of Your 
Majesty’s loyal subjects. 

We humbly pray that in happiness, health and 
peace, amidst the continued love, honour, and 
admiration of the people of this country and of 
the world, and under the choicest benedictions 
of Heaven, Your Majesty’s life and reign may 
long be preserved, and that the Throne of this 
Empire may ever rest upon True Religion—the 
sure foundation of a Nation’s Security, Power, 
and lasting Happiness. 

George Williams, President, United 
Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 


Stephen Shirley, Chairman, 

Ebenezer Clarke, Treasurer, 

Charles Wakely, ) 0 , . 

0 > secretaries, 

Frederic Smith, J ’ 


Popular Lectures on Physiology by Dr. 
B. W. Richardson, F.R.S.—We are pleased to 
be able to state that Dr. Richardson has kindly 
consented to deliver a course of eight lectures in 
London, during October next. The lectures 
will especially deal with temperance in relation 
to physiology, and will be illustrated by beauti¬ 
fully prepared diagrams shown on a large scale 
by the lime-light. Ladies and gentlemen con¬ 
nected in any way with Bands of Hope will be 
supplied with tickets for the course at halt price, 
Thelectures willappear in the Chronicle during 
1888, and may possibly form the basis of the next 
competitive examination for the senior members 
of societies. 









THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


106 

THE QUEEN r AND THE TEMPERANCE 
MOVEMENT. 

MONG the many changes which have taken 
place during the life of Her Majesty for 
which we ought to be thankful, is that con¬ 
nected with the opinions, habits, and cus¬ 
toms connected with intoxicating drinks. 
When the Princess Victoria was born in 
1819, gross ignorance prevailed with regard 
to the nature and properties of such drinks- 
but we are now in a position so to describe their character 
that even the members of our Bands of Hope know more 
about them than the most celebrated of our medical 
men did then. Nevertheless it is interesting to find that 
n the training of Her Majesty, her mother, the Duchess of 
Kent, seemed to have been very careful about what she 
was allowed to eat and drink, for we are told that “ at two 
o’clock exactly the Princess always dined upon the plainest 
and most wholesome fare, and also took her bread and 
milk for supper.” Among other wise counsels her mother 
gave her was this, “ You must act so as never to bring 
your office or rank into disgrace or disrespect.” 

The Queen was the child of many prayers, as well as wise 
counsels,and it is gratifying to know that the prayers have 
been answered and the counsels practised. When about 
twelve years of age she was learning her lessons, and for 
the first time the truth flashed across her mind that she 
might become Queen of England some day, when she 
wisely said, “ How many a child would boast; but they 
do not know the difficulty. There is so much splendour ; 
but there is more responsibility.” Then lifting up her 
hand and giving it to her governess she added, “I will 
be good.” What a grand resolve for a child to make, but 
how nobly has she fulfilled it. When she was awoke from 
her slumbers on the 20th of June, 1837, to be told by 
the Archbishop of Canterbury that she was Queen of 
England, she modestly said, “ I ask your prayers on my 
behalf.” 

Her Majesty’s first State Banquet took place at the 
Guildhall on Lord Mayor’s Day, Nov. 9th, 1837, on which 
occasion,among other things provided, the wine which was 
reserved for the royal table was more than a hundred years 
old. But the Queen, we are told by the newspapers of 
that day, ate nothing but white soup, roast mutton and 
cherry tart, anddrank only iced water. 

Soon after her happy marriage with Prince Albert, we 
find that she and the prince took an active part in putting 
an end to the after-dinner practice of the gentlemen remain¬ 
ing to drink wine, and in this way they helped to abolish a 
custom which had been connected with much evil in former 
days, and which led to the remark, “as drunk as a lord.” 

On another occasion we are told that a distinguished 
nobleman was observed to be drinking only water 
at the Queen’s dinner table, and it was mentioned to Her 
Majesty by a Duchess saying, “Please, your Majesty, 

Lord-declines to take wine at your Majesty’s 

Jtable ” Every eye was turned to the Queen, and not a 


little curiosity was exhibited to see how a total abstainer 
would be treated by the Queen. They were soon satisfied 
by Her Majesty saying with a smile, and in a pleasant 
voice, “ There is no compulsion at my table.” 

She became Patroness of the British and Foreign Tempe¬ 
rance Society, which was started in 1831 with a pledge to 
abstain from distilled spirits and to discountenance the 
causes and practice of intemperance,and when the Church 
of England Temperance Society was organised she con¬ 
sented to become its Patroness. It may also be worth 
noting that at the Great Exhibition of 1851, which 
practically originated with the Prince Consort, no intoxi¬ 
cating drinks were allowed to be sold. 

We may also refer to the expressions used by the late 
Duke of Albany, one of the Queen’s most promising sons- 
When presiding at a meeting in Liverpool, he said, ‘‘I 
should like to see a rapid lift given to the standard of 
cleanliness, and more care in the preparation of food in 
the poorest homes. I should like to see meals which are 
now mere scrambles become points of real family union 
—occasions for showing forethought and kindliness and 
self-respect. And when circumstances make this too 
difficult, I should like to see the family enjoying a cheap 
and decent meal together at the coffee tavern, instead of 
the father being at the ale-house, and the wife and 
children with a crust at home. And I think if we can 
train the children early to see the difference between 
what dirt and waste and selfishness make of a poor 
man’s dinner, and what thrift and care and cleanliness 
can make of it at the same cost, we shall be civilizing 
them almost more directly than by our sums or our 
grammar, and shall be taking in flank our enemy,— 
drink, drink, the only terrible enemy whom England has 
to fear.” 

The Duke of Connaught, it may also be added, ascribed 
his good health during the Egyptian Campaign to his 
abstention from the use of intoxicating liquors. All these 
are signs of progress in the right direction for which we 
feel thankful, as growing evidence of the onward march of 
our movement during the fifty years of Her Majesty’s 
reign, and as pointing to the conclusion that, with the 
present knowledge and varied organisations for extending 
temperance principles, a complete victory- is drawing 
near.— John W. Kirton, Author of “Buy your own. 
Cherries," etc. 


Crystal Palace Fete, 1887.—Our friends are doubt¬ 
less aware that the National Temperance Fete at the 
Crystal Palace during the present year is to be held on 
Tuesday, July 12th, under the direct management of the 
Independent Order of Good Templars, the other leading 
Temperance organisations rendering all possible assistance. 
The programme is of a most attractive character, includ¬ 
ing two concerts by 10,000 singers—5,000 in each choir. 
A thoroughly enjoyable day may be anticipated, but quite 
apart from this, it is of the greatest importance to the 
temperance movement that the Fete should be very- 
largely attended, and the Committee of the Union trust 
that their friends will do all in their power to render it a 
signal success. 






THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES.—Semes I. 


TEMPERANCE LESSONS FROM ^SOP’S 
FABLES. 


By Rev. CHARLES COURTENAY, Vicar of Emmanuel Church , 
Liverpool , Author of “ Temperance Home Thrusts,” &c. 

No. 7.—THE COUNTRYMAN AND THE SNAKE. 



AM going to tell you a story of a man who 
lived in the country, and of a snake which 
lived in the country too. They seem to have 
been neighbours. The countryman was a 
nice, kind man. The snake, however, wasn’t 
a bit nice or kind. I am going to tell you of a 
visit that the man made to the snake, and of 
a visit that the snake made to the man ; and 
how badly their visits turned out. I think it 
will do us all good, dear children, to hear 
And especially if we remember that the snake’s 
-d-y-i-n-k. 

Hard Up. 


It was a wintry day. There was snow on the ground, 
and snow on the trees, and snow everywhere. The pools 
were frozen hard, and the east wind blew right into the 
bones, and stayed there. There was one little creature 
who found it too much to bear, and gave up trying. It 
was the little snake. Finding himself getting stiffer and 
stiffer he just managed to crawl under a hedge, and then 
grew quite stiff. “ It’s all up,” he said to himself, “ I’m 
hard up, and done for.” But his last thoughts of all were, 
“ Oh, dear, dear, I shall never bite anybody any more.” 
And that wasn’t at all a nice thought, I think. 

A Pitiful Heart. 


Now, just about this time there came a countryman 
upon the scene. I expect he must have been a farm 
labourer going to his work. “ Hullo ! What’s this ? ” he 
said, when he saw thestifi snake under the hedge. “ Why, 
I declare, if it isn’t a poor little frozen snake.” His kind 
heart couldn’t stand it. He pitied that poor helpless 
snake. He determined to save its life. And so, taking it 
up, he carried it home. 

Now, dear children, this was all very kind, but I don’t 
think it was very wise. I think his heart was better than 
his head. To my mind, he would have been a wiser man 
if he had let the snake remain stiff, just as I think it 
would be better for the world if strong drink were to get 
frozen, and to keep frozen, too. Frozen snakes and frozen 
drink wouldn’t do so much mischief as they do now, I am 
quite sure. 

Thawing. 

Behold the snake now before a roaring fire being 
thawed. The wife and children look on with pity in their 
eyes. “ Poor little snakey-wakey,” said the children, 
“you’ll soon be all right again.” And now the warmth 
began to tell. Pleasant dreams began to creep through 
the serpent’s mind. The numbness began to disappear. 
First one eye opened, and then another. Soon his tail 
moved, and by-and-bye his whole body, until at last he 
felt as sprightly as in the warmth of summer. But his 
first waking thoughts, I am sorry to say, were as naughty 
as his last ones were. “ I shall be able to bite somebody 
yet. I’m so glad.” 

Confusion. 

First, then, came a hiss, and then several hisses. But 
the children thought it was the kettle boiling over. 


i°7 

Then the awakened snake looked round, waving his 
head about, and taking in all he could through his black 
beads of eyes. “ How pretty ! ” shouted the children. 

Then he began his proper business, and made an ugly 
rush at the inmates with open mouth and protruding 
tongue, as if he would strike them all with one touch of 
his deadly sting. 

Dear me ! it was dreadful. Now they knew everything. 
Their pity was gone, swallowed up by fear. They 
fled with swift foot, and left the snake to keep house 
alone. They fled screaming with horror and dread, which 
was the very best thing they could do under the circum¬ 
stances. 

Ah ! dear children, drink has turned more people out of 
house and home than snakes have ever done—after all. 
And there are thousands upon thousands of homeless men 
and women, and boys and girls, roaming our streets in 
wild winter nights through strong drink in the homes— 
turned out. 

The Last of the Snake. 

When women and children begin to scream he must be 
a very deaf man indeed who does not hear them. And, 
as our countryman was not a bit deaf, and doesn’t seem 
to have been far away, he speedily discovered that there 
was something amiss at home. So off he went at a double 
quick trot, saying, “ Oh, dear, what can be the matter ? ” Of 
course he found out that it was the snake he had brought 
home who was the cause of it. His course was clear. 
Seizing a mattock, he entered his house, sought out the 
snake who wanted to sting him too, and killed it. It hurt 
his feelings a good deal of course to be so ungratefully 
treated, and he told the snake so. “ Is this, vile reptile, 
the reward you make to me for saving your life ? Die 
as you deserve ; though a single death is too good for 
you.” 

And serve him right, I say. Death was too mild a 
punishment for him. And well would it have been for 
that family if he had been killed long ago. 

Parting Counsels. 

No. 1. We mustn't expect much fvom serpents No, nor 
from strong drink either. No doubt serpents and strong 
drink have some purpose to serve in the world. But, 
nevertheless, we mustn’t expect what we shall not get. 

No. 2. We mustn't give serpents house room. A serpent by 
the hedge may be all very well, but a serpent in the home 
is very bad. Drink in the doctor’s surgery may be all 
very well, but drink on the table is far too close. Serpents 
and strong drink are best outside. 

No. 3. Childrenare of more importance than serpents. There 
was nothing wrong in pitying the snake, but that father 
should have pitied his wife and children first. Mistaken 
pity is the worst possible cruelty. Better that the serpent 
should be neglected by the hedgerow, than that its fangs 
should be unlocked for the children's death. Neither 
serpents nor drink are friendly to men, women, or 
children. 


Band of Hope and Sunday School Excursions.— We 
recently inspected some extensive and admirably arranged 
premises and grounds beautifully situated at Epping 
Forest, near Chingford, specially adapted for Band of 
Hope or school excursions, and which, for the benefit of 
our London friends,we consider it our duty to make known. 
Mr. John Riggs, an old abstainer, and whose address is 
Buckhurst Hill, E., has three distinct places in different 
parts of the Forest, and all appear to be exceedingly well 
adapted for their purpose. More than 1,000 often sit 
down together to tea. Mr. J. Earee has also gone to great 
expense in fitting up a large-establishment near Chingfcrd 
station. Here there is a magnificent saloon capable of 
holding 1,400 persons, and every arrangement is most 
complete. 






io8 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES.—Series II. 


TEMPERANCE WORK AND WORKERS. 

By Rev. J. P. GLEDSTONE, 

Author ot “The Life and Travels of George Whitefield,” “Save the 
Boys,” Clean Lips.” 

No. 7.—THE TEMPERANCE WORK OF THE 
CHURCHES. 


ERE is no kind of speaker so often to be found 
on the platform of a Temperance Society or 
Band of Hope as a minister of the Gospel; 
and that is just as it should be. Jesus 
Christ came into the world “ to destroy the 
works of the devil,” and no works of the 
devil are so numerous or so terrible as those 
which he achieves by means of intemperance. 
It is right, therefore, that the ministers of 
Jesus should strive hard against them. Some 
ministers, chiefly Independents, were against the use of 
alcohol from the very beginning of the temperance move¬ 
ment—were, indeed, among the founders of the movement. 
But all were not ofthis mind. Many ofthe first laymen too 
were religious men; but they, again, were not a majority. 
Grieved as we are to say so, it is the truth that the churches 
of Jesus Christ did not know their duty and privilege. A 
few faithful men and women pushed on the good work ; 
and sometimes did so in the teeth of great opposition 
from their brethren. In 1837 a young woman ad¬ 
ministered the pledge to seven persons in the town of 
St. Ives. In February, 1838, Mr. James Tearelectured in 
the Wesleyan Chapel in that town, when 24 more names 
were added to the roll; at a second lecture the number 
became 74, and soon the number reached 1,195. After 
two years’ work the Temperance Society could say: 
‘‘During the past year the Lord has signally blessed this 
town with an extensive revival of religion, and about 1,200 
persons have been added to the churches, during which 
many instances occurred proving the connection of 
teetotalism with the revival of God’s work ; it prepared 
the many for the receiving of the Spirit, and this society 
now numbers upwards of 900 members of Christian 
churches, and of that number 200 are reclaimed drunkards 
who are converted to God, and walking steadfastly in His 
ways. Among our numbers we have enrolled 5 ministers 
of the Gospel, 10 local preachers, 35 class leaders, and 
about 200 prayer readers. Twelve of the vessels sailing 
on the principle, the masters of which are pledged 
members, have daily prayer meetings on board. Besides 
all this, four public-houses have been closed during the 
year.” 

This good work was not allowed to gc on unchecked. 
The Wesleyan Conference in 1841 passed three resolu¬ 
tions relating to temperance, one of which said that no 
chapels should be used for total abstinence meetings. 
Afterwards great differences of thought and of feeling 
appeared. At St. Ives and St. Just the teetotal Methodists 
had to build chapels for themselves. Among some of the 
best and most useful ministers teetotalism had its friends, 
who pressed the truth upon the attention of their brethren 
so wisely and so lovingly that at last open opposition 
gave way. Now there is a Wesleyan Temperance Society, 
and instead of pushing teetotalers into the cold, the 
conference, in its report of 1886, while rejoicing that so 
many Methodists are connected with general temperance 
societies, regrets that in large towns and cities Methodist 
Temperance Societies are not stronger. It is usual now 
for Wesleyan Methodist ministers to preach on one 
Sunday in December sermons in favour of temperance ; 
the day is called “ Conference Temperance Sunday.” 

The Primitive Methodist Connexion has been friendly 
to temperance work from the first; several of the Preston 


teetotalers were Primitive Methodists; and some of the 
founders of the denomination were on the right side of 
this question, such as good and gentle Hugh Bourne, 
whom I once heard preach when I was a boy. According 
to the last published report I find that there were 19,555 
adult members in their Connexional Temperance Society, 
which was an increase upon the previous year of 15,127. 
The influence of their holy work upon some of our 
English people is most beautiful; for example, in the 
little village of Filey, on the Yorkshire coast, most of the 
fishermen are attendants at the Primitive Methodist 
Chapel; and none of them ever go fishing on Sundays, 
nor do you see drunkenness or hear bad language 
among them. 

The United Methodist Free Churches are so powerfully 
influenced by temperance truth that you rarely come 
upon a minister who is not an abstainer, and the most 
active laymen are the same in thought and practice. 
Their foremost ministers have been temperance advocates. 
The connexion now has its own temperance periodical. 

The Salvation Army, which is the latest born of all the 
Methodist Churches, insists upon all its members being 
abstainers, so that it is really a great Temperance Society. 

As I said at the beginning, the temperance cause was, 
at the first, either started by Congregationalists or largely 
supported by them ; and all the way down till to-day 
some of its ablest advocates and most liberal supporters 
have been found among them. In 1873 an association 
was formed mainly for the purpose of influencing 
Independents, which has done some good work. The 
majority of their ministers are abstainers, and the number 
is increasing every year, because nearly all the students 
in their colleges are abstainers. Of 382 students, 337 
were abstainers ; or more than 8 to 1. The state of the 
county of Northampton may be taken as a fair example 
of other counties, and of that it is said : “ There are 33 
Congregational Churches in Northamptonshire, and in 22 
of these temperance work of some kind is being done. All 
have Bands of Hope and some have Temperance Societies 
as well; on the whole a very healthy work is done. 
Temperance work is being carried on in 6 mission 
stations. Out of 26 ministers 18 are abstainers.” 

The Baptist Churches have a Baptist Total Abstinence 
Society, which reports that 998 ministers out of 1,756 are 
abstainers, and that nine-tenths of the students are the 
same. 

The Quakers have one of the oldest religious temperance 
societies called the Friends’ Temperance Union. From 
the very beginning of the movement they have given 
valuable aid, and can always be depended on for support 
and sympathy. 

The Roman Catholics have a Total Abstinence League 
of the Cross, which has branches in the large towns, and 
is doing much good, especially in Liverpool. 

In 1862 a conference of clergymen of the Church of 
England was held in London, to obtain information as to 
the temperance work which was being done by the clergy 
in their various parishes, and to induce all to employ it 
as an aid to religion. Out of this sprang the Church of 
England and Ireland Temperance Reformation Society, 
which in 1873 became the Church of England Tempe¬ 
rance Society. It has now as many as 4,000 parochial 
branches, a weekly paper of its own, a large publishing 
house, and other appliances for spreading temperance 
truth. It has a great work to do, for there are still 
9,000 parishes in which little or nothing is done by the 
clergy to promote temperance; and until the clergy bestir 
themselves there will be no complete victory for tempe¬ 
rance. 


The offences committed in the Indian army by the 
total abstainers, of whom there are 12,000, are declared to 
be as one to 40 compared with those committed by the 
non-abstainers. 







THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


log 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES—Series III. 
PHYSIOLOGY AND ALCOHOL- 

By Dr. KATE MITCHELL. 


ISTo. 7.—THE CAPILLARIES.—DESCRIPTION AND 
USE OF THE BLOOD. 

(Notes for the Blackboard.) 



1' System of minute vessels 

Capillaries 

between the Arteries and 


Veins, 


Arterial = Red. 

Blood. -s 

Venous = Blue. 

Composition 

Serum. 

of \ 

Fibrin. 

Blood. 

Red and White Corpuscles. 


Capillaries. —These are minute vessels that convey the 
blood from the arteries to the veins. They are so small 
that they are invisible to the naked eye, and can only be 
seen under the microscope. These vessels form a network 
throughout all the tissues and structures of the body, and 
are so numerous that if those belonging to the lungs alone 
could be placed lengthwise they would stretch from 
London to New York. Their structure is very simple, 
being composed of only one coat or membrane, which 
is so fine and delicate that fluids and gases can pass 
through it from the blood to the tissues outside and 
vice versa. 

Change of Bhod from red to blue. —When the blood leaves 
the arteries it is red, but after circulating through the 
capillaries it enters the veins blue. This change of colour 
has taken place in the capillaries. Owing to the thinness 
of the walls of these vessels, the oxygen of the arterial 
blood combines with the carbon of the tissues, and thus 
forms the poisonous gas, called carbonic acid gas, which 
colours the blood blue. This is got rid of in the lungs. 
The combining of the carbon and oxygen is called the 
process of oxidation, and is constantly taking place in 
the human body. It is owing to this oxidating process 
that the temperature of the blood is kept at a certain 
height, that life is maintained, that the tissues are kept 
nourished, and that the poisons which are formed in the 
body are eliminated. Every time a muscle contracts 
more carbonic acid is formed, and has to begot rid of, thus 
muscular exercise is very beneficial to the blood and to 
the body. The blood moves very slowly in the capillaries 
because it is spread over such a vast area (although 
flowing through narrow channels), but it is always pro¬ 
pelled forwards by the blood-stream in the arteries. 

Composition of the Blood. —The blood is composed of a 
pale straw-colored fluid called serum, in which floats a string 
like material called fibrin and a mass of minute bodies 
called corpuscles or blood cells. These corpuscles are of 
two kinds, red and white, but the red are by far the most 
numerous. These tiny bodies are invisible to the naked 
eye, and can only be seen under a strong power of the 
microscope, but their number is so great that the blood is 
coloured red by them. It has been calculated that if they 
were strung together they would encircle the earth eight 
times. The size of each one is about to of an 
inch in diameter, and a “ cubic inch could contain 
70,000,000,000 of them (eighty times the number of the 
human population of the globe).” There is about one 
white corpuscle to every two or three thosuand red ones. 


Red Corpuscles. —These minute bodies can be very well 
studied when a drop of blood is placed under a microscope. 
When seen separately they are no longer red but have a 
pale yellow appearance. They are peculiar in shape, 
something like a muffin, flattened in the centre and 
rounded at the circumference. They are sticky, and 
have a tendency to run together. It is these tiny bodies 
which seize hold of the oxygen in the lungs and carry it 
about to all parts, and exchange it for the carbonic acid 
gas. They may be looked upon as the oxygen-carriers 
of the body. If any agent should injure these bodies the 
most important function of the blood would be interfered 
with if not destroyed. 

Coagulation or clotting of the Blood. —As long as the blood 
is in the living body it is in a state of fluidity and has a 
temperature of about ioo° Fahr. But after death, or if 
allowed to flow into a vessel, it undergoes a remarkable 
change. This is brought about by the fibrin and cor¬ 
puscles separating from the serum and thus a red firm 
mass like a jelly is seen floating in the middle of the clear 
straw-coloured serum. The string-like meshes of the 
fibrin entangle the corpuscles and gradually the clot is 
formed. This thickening and clotting of the blood some¬ 
times takes place in the living body when the blood¬ 
vessels are diseased or the blood is impure. Life is 
endangered thereby because the clot may be carried by 
the blood-stream to the heart and suddenly arrest its 
action. 

Action of Alcohol upon the Blood. —Soon after the intro¬ 
duction of alcohol into the stomach it enters the minute 
blood-vessels which are found in the lining membrane of 
that organ. It is thus carried by the blood aver all the 
body. In the last lecture it was seen in what manner 
alcohol affected the blood-vessels themselves. Wherever 
the vessels become thickened and inflamed, the blood 
has a tendency to form a smaller or larger clot according 
to the size and situation of the vessels. This, of course, 
impedes the circulation, and gradually the health of the 
sufferer becomes very much impaired. Again, the blood is 
rendered less fluid than it should be by the tendency of 
alcohol to seize upon and absorb water. The blood is 
largely made up of water, more than two-thirds in a 
hundred parts being water, and the rest fibrin, corpuscles, 
etc. The thicker the blood becomes, the less capable it 
is of performing all its numerous and essential functions, 
as the water, of which it is deprived, can no longer keep 
the tissues properly irrigated, oxygenated, purified and 
nourished. Water is an all important factor of the human 
body and makes up nearly two-thirds of its weight. Any 
agent like alcohol, which absorbs water, either from the 
tissues or from the blood, is doing an irreparable amount 
ot injury to the whole body. Alcohol also has been found 
to injure and destroy the tiny red corpuscles, thus 
preventing them from conveying oxygen to the tissues 
and exercising the most important and useful function 
of the blood, that of carrying away the worn-out, effete 
substances and gases which are the waste material of the 
body. In time the tissues become choked up with 
poisonous matter, and disease gradually invades the 
weakest organ or part. 


The blinding power of prejudice is almost inconceiv¬ 
able. In the report of the Royal Commission on the 
depression of trade there is not one word as to the ill 
results in this connection of the millions of money annually 
wasted in strong drink. Almost every other cause seems 
to have been noticed, down even to details which seem to 
us absurdly peUy—the variety in weights and measures, 
for instance—but this mighty factor in the diminution of 
the purchasing power of the people is ignored. Well, 
there is nothing for it but to patiently educate our boys 
until we have grown a race of legislators capable of see¬ 
ing otherwise than through drink-dimmed spectacles. 







I IO 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES,—Series IV. 


MISCELLANEOUS. 

No. 7.—WATER. 

Rev. DONALD MATHESON, M.A , Putney, London. 

i. Where does it come from ? —In towns we get it from 
taps fixed at the end of pipes that lead from cisterns ; and 
the cisterns are filled every day. or kept full all day, by 
pipes that are laid on by a water company ; and we pay 
the company so much a year according to the size 
of our cistern, or according to their rough guess 
of how much a house that pays so much rent will 
use. Where do the water companies get it ? They go to 
various places ; some go to a river. In London several 
companies go to the Thames, pretty far above London, to 
some place where the water looks clean, and pump up 
water into a large reservoir, and let it filter through sand 
to clean it, and then it runs through pipes down to London, 
and so into our cisterns. Even if there is a hill or a valley 
to cross, the water does not mind. It will run quite well 
in pipes as long as the hill to be crossed is not higher than 
the point the pipe started from. [Illustrate this with 
three feet of rubber piping, a tin funnel, a bottle of water, 
a glass, and a “ hill ” of books on the table.] Some com¬ 
panies pump their water pure and cold out of wells, and 
gather it in reservoirs on hills near London. In some 
towns water is brought in iron pipes from lakes miles 
away. The rivers, wells, and lakes are all fed by rain. 

II. Springs. —We always talk of ‘'rain water” and 
‘ ‘ spring water ” as if they were different, but really all 
water was once rain water. When it falls on the ground 
it soaks down, down, down, till it gets to rock or some¬ 
thing too hard to soak through. Some rocks let water 
through by degrees. When the water reaches something 
hard it trickles along it, working out little channels for 
itself, till it can find some place to escape. Perhaps the 
rock juts out on the side of a hill, or it has a crack that 
lets + he water out. This makes a “spring.” If it can¬ 
not escape it collects. People who know what kind of 
rocks there are in any place can often tell us where to dig 
to find water collecting. We dig a well, and up runs the 
water. The rain keeps filtering down to the bottom of 
our well sometimes from long distances, and so we get a 
constant supply. 

III. Rainfall. —The rain that falls in a year in any 
district is called«its “ annual rainfall.” When we speak 
of an annual rainfall of so many inches we mean that it 
would stand so many inches deep everywhere if the 
ground was all flat and hard, and all the rain came down 
together, and none was allowed to escape. We calculate 
this by measuring with a rain gauge all that falls in a year 
on a particular flat patch, say a square foot. It is nearly 
the same each year in the same place—21 to 24 inches in 
London; 200 inches in one place in Cumberland, 600 
inches in some hills in India ! Rivers are kept going by 
the rainfall of their “basin,” that is, of th e district covered 
by tlieir own and their tributaries' valleys. In each river basin 
all the water used by man, or beast, or plants is the rain¬ 
fall of that district. The rain that falls outside a “ basin ” 
will not soak into it through the hills. No other water 
is to be had unless it is pumped up, or brought over 
artificially from another river basin. In a few cases 
where the ridge between two river basins is low this can 
be easily done. 

IV. Filtering. —In going through the ground the water 
carries away a little of some kinds of soil and even of rock. 
Sometimes it is none the worse for that. There are many 
springs the waters of which are very valuable medicines. 
On the other hand,some soils purify the water a little. But 
most water needs filtering; that is pouring through some¬ 
thing which will act like a very fine sieve and catch all 
impurities, even very tiny ones. Even a sponge will stop 


some, gravel will stop more, charcoal will stop more stilL 
Sometimes water has unwholesome things dissolved in it. 
Strange to say, powdered charcoal, and even sand,will stop 
some of these. Charcoal from burnt bones is best. 

V. Animalcules. —It is a common mistake to suppose 
that all water has tiny animals in it, called “animal¬ 
cules ” (four syllables), or in Latin, “ animal'culae.” Pure 
water has none. But where decaying leaves, or grass, or 
wood, or any part of a plant is in the water, or, worse 
still, where decaying parts of animals, or, worst of all, 
decaying drainage is in the water, even in small quantities, 
there are the animalcules. You could find none in almost 
any drinking water without great trouble. In a vase 
where flowers have stood a few days there are thousands. 
But a strong microscope is necessary—one which makes 
things look 300 times as long, and 300 times as broad as 
they really are (that is, which magnifies 90,000 times),will 
show a great many. Some animalcules need one which 
magnifies 1,458,000 times, or i,Soo times each way, or 
“ 1,800 diameters,” as it is called. Some of the living 
things in water are the seeds, or rather germs, of moulds. 
Some of these are very dangerous, and it is best to kill all 
the germs and animalcules at once by boiling them. Some 
silly people put a little spirit into water to kill the animals, 
but (1) it would need far more spirit than a few drops to 
kill all the harmful things, and (2) the harm is done by 
the decaying matter on which these things feed, and (3) 
it is only an excuse used by people who are ashamed of 
liking spirits. Many people boil all their drinking water 
to be quite safe. But boiling makes water flat. It drives 
out some of the air which is entangled in the water, and 
the water must be poured back and forwards often, or fil¬ 
tered, to mix it with air to make it nice to drink. 

VI. Bad Water. —Good water should be quite clear. 
But the brown tinge in water from a moor is quite harm¬ 
less, unless it is very dark; and sometimes water that 
looks very clear is really tainted. Wells near houses often 
get spoilt by leakage from drains running near them, even 
many feet away. Surface water coming through manured 
ground, or through churchwards, even when these are 
disused, often soaks into wells that are not well-built, or 
into streams. Even a bad smell in a house will get to the 
cistern and be soaked up by the water and make it unfit 
to drink. It is likely to give people bad throats, or 
scarlet fever, or terrible diphtheria, or typhoid fever. If 
you suspect the water, boil it. 

VII. Cisterns should be kept dark, or seeds and germs 
of soft green weed will grow, and then the weed will die 
and decay. The dust should be kept off cisterns and 
water jars as it often contains germs. The cistern should 
be emptied and wiped out every two months as even the 
best arrangement cannot prevent a little sediment in large 
quantities of water now and then. Lead cisterns are not 
very safe, as, unless the water is hard, it is apt to take up 
a little lead in course, of time. If the cistern is of lead 
painted or otherwise protected, it is better not to scrub it 

VIII. Water everywhere. —There is water in almost 
everything—in air, in all living plants, in all living 
animals; our bodies are largely made of water. Dry 
mummies found in Egypt weigh, without their wrappings, 
very little indeed, yet they include almost the whole body 
except the moisture. Salt has water in it; the salt on a 
damp day soaks up so much water from the air that it 
gets sticky. Salt soaks up water whenever it can. In 
your body it soaks up water and leaves less to keep your 
body moist and soft, and you feel thirsty. Glycerine, too, 
soaks up water if it can. On a sore lip, or chapped hand, 
it stings, that is because it sucks out the moisture from 
the skin. Mixed with water it does not sting. Photo¬ 
graphers use gelatine plates and often want to dry them 
quickly. They pour alcohol over the gelatine and it sucks 
out the water and carries it off, and a plate that would 
otherwise take eight hours to dry is ready in fifteen 
minutes. 



THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


hi 


SAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES.—Series V. 



TOBACCO. 

Mrs. AMELIA ARNOLD: 

-ITS EFFECT UPON MORALS. 


and 


XTRACTS from the writings of eminent 
physicians have proved that the use of 
narcotics weakens the power of mind and 
of will, and this necessarily lessens ability 
to resist temptation. For the sentry—so 
to speak—has fallen asleep at his post, 
has left the citadel unguarded. The 


habitual smoker can no longer watch ” lest he 
enter into temptation — watching implies 
activity—and he has placed himself in a position 
which softens his moral fibre and makes him incapable of 
much mental exertion. To withstand the beginning is 
comparatively easy, and every victory over temptation 
strengthens the mind as much as yielding to our passions 
weakens it. A young man who smokes an occasional 
cigar is soon drawn into the society of those who fancy 
tobacco a necessity, and he becomes familiar with their 
modes of thought and expression. Every unprejudiced 
person must acknowledge that smoking is conducive to 
vice, in that it keeps young men out of the refined society 
which will not tolerate it, and induces them to frequent 
places of resort for the lazy and dissolute, such as low 
theatres or music halls, taverns and race courses, where 
no one objects to tobacco or intoxicants. Indeed, a 
craving for drink is one of the many evils of smoking, 
from the parching of the mouth and throat it occasions. 
This seems to be well known to publicans, who always 
sell tobacco, knowing from experience that it is good for 
their other business. The smoker is often fully aware 
of the disreputable appearance he makes with a pipe or 
cigar, and if he wishes to be considered steady, serious, 
and respectable he seldom smokes in public. But if 
while smoking he sees his employer at the end ot the street 
he will fling away his cigar or put his pipe in his pocket, 
'knowing that these appendages will injure him with 
business men. Boys are induced to tell falsehoods to 
hide from their parents that they have been learning to 
smoke, and they are tempted to use many tricks and 
artifices for the same purpose, which naturally tend to 
form a crafty and feeble character. Anything we are 
afraid to have known, or anything of which we are 
ashamed, lowers the moral tone, not only because it is 
wrong in itself, but also because it makes us cunning and 
cowardly, instead of being brave and straightforward. 
That many religious people consider smoking a stumbling 
block in the Christian path, and a hindrance to the 
progress of morality, is evident from resolutions con¬ 
demning the practice which have been passed at public 
meetings by different bodies of Christians, and there is 
probably no educated person in this country who does 
not think smoking unbecoming in the clergy. The clergy 
themselves are of this opinion, for though, unhappily, 
some of them smoke in private, they are never seen with 
a pipe in the streets in England, though a few indulge in 
this way when on a tour on the continent. Self-indulgence 
is inconsistent with the spirit of self-denial which is 
enjoined upon Christians, who should avoid the 
“ appearance of evil,” so that it is a strange anomaly to 
see a professing Christian who tries to smoke away his 
troubles, and to string up his weak nerves with a narcotic, 
just as a drunkard flies to the bottle. 

All human beings have rights, and indifference to the 
claims of others, and any indulgence at their expense, is 
an infringement of those rights, and a breach of duty 
towards our neighbours, which cannot be denied by a 
strict moralist, still less by a Christian. The habit of 
mind acquired by continued inattention to the comfort of 


others is highly injurious to those so offending. In 
sensual gratifications there is often a recklessness as to 
consequences, which nearly approaches an inclination to 
vice—if, indeed, a habit which is at once wasteful and 
uncleanly, which benefits nobody, is injurious to the 
smoker, and highly offensive to many, may not be counted 
among vices. Hoyle’s published figures put the amount 
of money spent on tobacco and pipes in the United 
Kingdom at sixteen million pounds sterling — a sum 
which, if judiciously expended, would feed and clothe 
all our hungry and famishing poor—and five millions in 
excess of that spent on education ! It is true that a great 
deal is wasted on other things, but that is precisely the 
reason why no money should be spent on a plant which 
is neither food nor raiment, and whose legitimate use 
seems to be the destruction of parasites in green-houses. 

Liberty has been defined as the doing what one pleases 
provided no person is aggrieved thereby. And it is just 
this proviso which is ignored by a smoker. He gratifies 
his own inclination, regardless of other people's comfort. 
He may say he does not mean to offend, but, nevertheless, 
he does offend by polluting the air his fellow-creatures 
are compelled to breathe, often to the injury of their 
health, and to the disgust of the cleanly and orderly. 

Those who take the trouble to observe will notice the 
pallid complexions and the want of tone of the children 
of smokers, especially when the father smokes at home, 
and when they live under otherwise favourable conditions. 
In these families there is usually a weakly child, one who 
is ricketty, or who suffers from defective vision. The 
general depression of the system, nervous irritability, and 
feeble circulation, so common among smokers, will 
naturally be communicated—in some degree at least— 
to those with whom they associate, and who are 
compelled to breathe the smoke ejected from these living 
chimneys. 

From these considerations it appears that smoking has 
a bad effect upon morals, because— 

1. It makes a man sickly and indolent, rendering him 
incapable of doing as much mental or bodily work as he 
could otherwise perform. 

2. It entices him into low places and low company, 
exposing him to many temptations which his enfeebled 
will is powerless to resist. 

3. It incites to intemperance in liquor, not only from 
the thirst it occasions, but because it is sold in all drink¬ 
ing places. 

4. It makes young men and boys often resort to deceit 
and cunning, in order to conceal from their employers or 
parents their bad habit of smoking. 

5. It engenders an insensibility to the rights of others, 
which cannot be produced by any other drug, nor even 
by intoxicants. 

6. It wastes sixteen millions of money annually, and 
very much more from the time lost in idle dreaming over 
pipes, and the numerous fires and other accidents it 
occasions. 

7. It makes men weakly lean on tobacco when in 
trouble, instead of trusting in their Creator and going 
about their work manfully. 


Nottingham.—Mr. J. B. Gaytin, Castle Gate Band of 
Hope, writes:—We attribute our success in retaining 
senior members to the fact of so many of them belonging 
to Bible-classes in the Sunday-school and having teachers 
who are abstainers. Moreover, we elect a good many on 
our committee, and confide to each in turn the duty of 
providing a programme. The seniors meet separately 
from the juniors, and have done so for two years. We 
have divided the town into districts, and each of these is 
entrusted to a senior member for looking up absentees. 
The great secret for retaining senior members is to find 
them something to do. 









1X2 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE,, 


?^e inJjci irecfts tljc toorlii. 

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Thro’ whose grace they faithful stood. 


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Aim us, Lord, with heavenly armour, 
Great, victorious war to wage. 

Glory, honour, 

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Shall be Thine from age to age ! 


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*** This piece vitll he sung at the National Temperance Fete at the Crystal Falo.ce, on July 12th, 18S7. 













































































































































































THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


PREVENTION BETTER THAN 
CURE. 



HERE can hardly be a work more 
discouraging than that of attempting 
the rescue of drunkards ; there is no 
work moreeasy,natural and hopeful 
than that of training children in the 
habit of total abstinence. The 
former of these facts is painfully 
illustrated in the report of the 
“Homes for Inebriates Association ” 
for the present year. This report has reference 
to an excellent institution,the Dalrymple Home, 
at Rickmansworth, in which cases of drunken¬ 
ness are received and treated with all the skill 
which modern experience has been able to 
develope. The Home is beautifully situated, 
standing in its own grounds of five acres, 
and commanding a pleasant view. It is truth¬ 
fully described by the Sanitary Record as “ a 
charming country residence, replete with every 
comfort.” Baths and every hygienic appliance 
are piovided, there are workshops for hours of 
labour, and gymnastic and other amusements for 
hours of recreation. The medical skill at the 
disposal ofthepatients is of the highest character, 
and is, moreover, that of men specially qualified 
by the direction of their studies, to adopt the 
best mode of treatment in the cases which thus 
come under their care. There is a good library, 
the moral tone of the establishment is excellent, 
and the truths of religion, which must ever 
afford the strongest and highest motives to 
amendment, are wisely and kindly presented 
whenever suitable opportunity occurs. 

Now we think we shall be right in saying that 
if reformation be possible under any circum¬ 
stances it should be under these. Let us, then, 
see how far the Home has been successful in the 
attainment of its object. The report is admir¬ 
ably complete, and we gather its facts and 
statistics with ease. We find that between 
October, 1883, an d January, 1887,85 cases were 
discharged ; of these 40 were patients under the 
Habitual Drunkards’ Act, the rest being private 
patients. Careful enquiry was made as to the 
subsequent career in these cases, with the follow¬ 
ing result. 


Doing well 

3 6 

Improved 

2 

Unsatisfactory 

26 

Insane 

1 

Dead 

4 

Not heard of 

16 


Over the 36 who are reported as doing well we 
rejoice, but with trembling, knowing how often, 


113- 

even after years of abstinence, the old craving - 
has broken out anew. We fear still more for 
those who are only “ improved.” The desire for 
strong drink does not admit of “ improvement; ” 
it must be entirely quenched or it may at any 
moment break out in full intensity. It is a dis¬ 
couraging circumstance, too, that 16 of the late 
inmates arc lost to view or give no sign. There 
is reason to fear that in many, if not in most, of 
their cases a temporary check only has been 
interposed in the downward career. This leaves 
us face to face with the sad array of 26 still unim¬ 
proved, with the wretched man whose mind is 
gone, and with the four who have exchanged a- 
life of sin and misery for the darkness of death. 

There are only 36 of whom any considerable 
hope can be entertained out of a total of 85, and 
that, too, under circumstances the most helpful 
to reformation. 

The failures are no fault of the Home; they 
arise from the well nigh irresistible power of the 
drink over its victims. They show that he who 
yields to the alcoholic appetite is almost a doomed 
man. The inmates of the Home are all men; 
had they been women the case would have been 
still worse. The consequences of drunkenness 
to a woman are worse,if a worse can be,than to 
a man, and yet women are harder to reclaim than 
men. If, then, so tew men under these most 
favourable circumstances were reclaimed, how 
small must be our hope for the future of the mass 
of drunken women still outside these Homes. 
In their case the fall into habits of intemperance 
is almost tantamount to a sentence of moral and 
spiritual death. Truly reclamation for either 
sex is at the best uncertain and precarious, and 
our greatest efforts, if we are truly wise, will 
ever be to prevent its necessity. 

Whilst reading this report the thought arises, 
how different would have been the history of 
these 85 had they, when children, been properly 
trained in Bands of Hope. How different 
would have been the history of even the 36 of 
whom we may entertain some hope. These 
men, we trust, are saved, but may the next 
generation be spared the battle which they 
had to fight, the sin and misery which they 
endured before they struggled back to light. 
Even were a cure certain, which it is not, yet 
even then prevention is better still. 

Another consideration,not of the highest class,, 
but yet of importance, arises out of this report. 
It relates to money. We see that the cost of 
the Home, including alterations and improve¬ 
ments, amounted to ^5,240. This has been-, 
partly met by liberal subscriptions, but more 
than one-fifth of the sum has still to be raised. 
Now we are not about to appraise the reclama¬ 
tion of drunkards by a money standard. To. 
save even one man would be worth the sum we 




THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


11 4 


have mentioned many times over. We grudge 
no expenditure which lessens human misery or 
sin,but we cannot shut our eyes to the fact that 
this sum of money, wisely expended on the teach¬ 
ing of the young, would have issued, not in the 
more or less problematical reformation of 36 
inebriates, but in the formation, in thousands of 
boys and girls, of habits which would guard 
them against this fearful evil. 

Until every boy and girl in the land has been 
made to feel that strong drink is a useless and 
dangerous thing,to be hated,feared,and shunned, 
there will always be inmates for inebriate 
homes, and the purses of the benevolent will be 
properly taxed on their behalf. The Band of Hope 
movement cuts off the evil at its root. If this 
fact were only adequately grasped a better state 
of things would soon be found. Prevention is 
not only easier and more certain than cure, but 
it is also infinitely cheaper, and this surely is an 
important consideration at a time when depressed 
trade compels the benevolent to closely scrutinize 
the list of their benefactions. 

It is needless to say that we would not on 
any account be thought to write in a hostile 
spirit towards the Association, the report of 
which has given rise to these comments. 
We rejoice in the measure of success which 
has attended its efforts, and should be 
very glad indeed if funds were placed at its 
disposal by means of which it could erect homes 
into which should be gathered every drunkard 
in the Kingdom, But, alas, even were this 
done, there would be next year another crop of 
drunkards ripe for treatment, and so on, a dismal 
ad infinitum. Its labour and expenditure are, 
under present circumstances, literally endless. 
Now the Band of Hope movement contains a 
principle of finality. Its complete success would 
ensure extinction of the race of drunkards,as even 
its partial success has caused a real diminution 
in their ranks. At the cost of curing one drunkard 
we could prevent the creation of probably a 
dozen, and save not the money only—that is a 
small matter—but also the misery,intense and far- 
reaching, which a state of drunkenness implies. 
We would, then, press this truth with the 
greatest earnestness on the attention of all who 
really wish to diminish the greatest curse of 
modern times, and who desire to effectually pre¬ 
vent an evil which proves so terribty hard of 
cure. 


Mr. and Mrs. John Ripley. —Our friends of the Irish 
Temperance League announce that Mr. and Mrs. John 
Ripley (M. A. Pauli) are to visit Ireland in the Autumn 
fora month’s Temperance work. 

Sunderland. —A member of the committee of the 
Sunderland Band of Hope Union has, with the consent of 
the guardians, conducted a Band of Hope at the work- 
house for some years with very good results. 


SUMMER WORK. 



S-'r - HE importance of retaining our hold upon the 
members of our Bands of Hope throughout 
the summer months can scarcely be over¬ 
estimated. If the meetings be suspended 
many of the children fall away, and the 
general experience is that on the resuscita¬ 
tion of the Society considerable difficulty is 
found in bringing them together again. 
We have several communications upon the 
subject which may be suggestive. One 
friend urges that the interest in the 
summer meetings should be quickened by such 
means as the formation of a Band of Mercy, which 
should meet bi-monthly ; a “ Watchword Meeting ” once 
a month, in which a motto text should be given and ex¬ 
plained, with a few short prayers by teachers, &c.; flower 
shows; industrial exhibitions; excursions; taking part in 
the Crystal Palace Fete; special addresses to be reported 
by the members ; spelling or Scripture bees ; recitation or 
singing contests; singing classes; open-air meetings in 
a playground or neighbouring field, and by special atten¬ 
tion being paid to the children's comfort when meeting 
indoors. These are all valuable, most of them, by the 
way, being as good for the winter as the summer. 

Some friends have carried out Fruit Soirees with marked 
success. Describing one held near Manchester a cor¬ 
respondent says :— 11 I proceeded with two youths of the 
school to the wholesale fruit market at Manchester, 
having first ascertained that about 150 tickets had been 
sold at 6d. About half the money was laid out in fruit, 
purchasing, as nearly as I can now remember, about So 
lbs. of apples, 30 lbs. of pears, and 40 lbs. of grapes, one- 
third of which were black. The apples were pretty equal 
in size, and the pears also ; this admitted of placing 
upon each plate two apples and one pear. In order to 
apportion the grapes equally (which must be done if full 
satisfaction is to be given) I borrowed scales and weights, 
and with a large pair of scissors I cut off and placed 
about oz. of black and 3 oz. of green upon each plate. 
The rest of the sixpence was spent in brown and white 
bread and butter, and tea, sugar, and milk.” 

Another friend writes: "About two weeks before the 


date fixed we issued circulars (run off on a cyclostyle) to 
the senior members and some friends of the society, 
inviting them to attend and, if convenient, to bring some 
kind of edible fruit with them. The meeting gathered 
at 8, and from that hour until 9 social games were in¬ 
dulged in, in addition to a display of dissolving views 
kindly provided by one of our members. Each member 
on entering, who had brought fruit, deposited it on a 
table, and between 8.30 and g the officers opened the 
packages and mixed the varied offerings without distinc¬ 
tion of quality; thus all grapes were put together, all 
apples together, &c. They were then put on to plates 
and dishes convenient for handing round, and the mem¬ 
bers and friends seating themselves as best suited, each 
helped themselves, or were helped to the fruit which they 
preferred. There was a large attendance, and all ex¬ 
pressed themselves as having enjoyed a very pleasant 
social evening. The fruits remaining over were—after 
distribution of some for sick members—sold to the 
friends, and the proceeds put to the credit of the funds.” 

In another casea very different plan was adopted:—"We 
allowed to each ticket holder one apple, two hazel pears, 
four plums, a small bunch of grapes, and six conversation 
lozenges (the last item, though not fruit, being in great 
demand). The entertainment was of the usual kind— 
songs, recitations, dialogues, addresses, &c., the distribu¬ 
tion of fruit coming in the middle. We distributed the 
fruit not on plates, but in paper bags, which had pre¬ 
viously had a tiny corner snipped off, thus preventing the 
obnoxious ‘popping’ by juveniles and others.” 




THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE . 


“5 


ARE SEPARATE MEETINGS FOR JUNIOR 

AND SENIOR MEMBERS DESIRABLE? 

By T. E. Hallsworth, '-'Honorary Secretary of the 
Lancashire and Cheshire Band of Hope Union, and of the 
Chancery Lane Wesleyan Band of Hope, Ardwick, Manchester. 


:E fact of our meeting to-day to discuss this 
subject is an evidence of the marvellous 
development of the Band of Hope move¬ 
ment ; an institution established only forty 
years ago for the purpose of training the 
young in temperance principles, it rapidly 
spread and extended until within its opera¬ 
tions were embraced persons of all ages. 
Very soon the important question of retain¬ 
ing the senior members had to be discussed, 
and more than twenty years ago one of our oldest and 
most respected workers suggested a graduated system of 
societies or meetings, viz., 1st, the children’s meeting; 
2nd, the senior Band of Hope; 3rd, the youths’ tempe¬ 
rance society; 4th, the adult society ; and since that 
time many methods have been tried to keep those com¬ 
mitted to our charge from being drawn into the terrible 
vortex of intemperance. 

This advice is very good in theory, but from our own 
experience as secretary of one Band of Hope for nearly 
twenty-three years, and from a careful observation of the 
modes of operation in other societies, we can see many 
difficulties in carrying it into practice. What we want is 
simplicity of organisation, for, as a rule, the workers are 
few ; although there may be an abundance of abstaining 
teachers in our Sabbath-schools, there are comparatively 
few who will devote their time to temperance work, con¬ 
sequently the management of our Bands of Hope is left to 
a small band of devoted but over-taxed workers, who 
have no spare evenings for extra meetings, for as a rule 
their labours are not confined to the Band of Hope, but 
they take an active interest in many other departments 
of Christian work. Under these circumstances, we think 
that to form separate societies, or even to duplicate our 
meetings, would often be a calamity, as undoubtedly the 
labour would fall on the same staff of workers. 

We are aware it has been suggested that the manage¬ 
ment of a senior Band of Hope or meeting should be left 
to the members themselves, but we take strong objection 
to this, fearing that without the oversight and control and 
presence of a number of adults abuses would creep in; 
and we very much question the wisdom of allowing young 
- people of both sexes to meet together, apart from both 
the younger members and adults ; such a meeting would 
in many cases become a rendezvous for nonsense and 
flirtation. 

Our primary object is to get hold of the children while 
they are young, to educate and train them in their prin¬ 
ciples, and to do this successfully we cannot meet them 
too often. Who would ever dream of being content to 
open our Sunday-schools once a month, and perhaps that 
for only six or seven months in the year ? Why, the man 
who would suggest such a plan would be reckoned a fit 
candidate for Colney Hatch. Yet we have Band of Hope 
workers who are quite content to meet their members as 
seldom as this, and then they wonder why they fall away 
as they grow older. Let us hold our meetings as frequently 
as possible; many of us would gladly meet oftener than 
we do, but the inflexible school authorities stand in the 
way, or all the nights are filled up with other branches of 
work. Wherever possible the Band of Hope should meet 
weekly all the year round, but at all the meetings the 
children should be present. 

It has-been said that senior members object to attend the 
meetings with the juniors, but we must say that in all our 


experience we have never met with this objection ; but if 
it is made, and, consequently, it be thought necessary to 
hold separate meetings for members of thirteen to twenty 
years of age, why not carry the principle out to its logical 
conclusion, and adopt the suggestion of twenty years ago, 
and hold four different kinds of meetings ? To our mind 
there would be far more force in the objection, coming' 
from the adults, to meet with the hobbledehoys who so 
frequently poke fun and air their wit at the expense of the 
seniors. It may be urged that these are not Band of 
Hope members, and ought to be handed over to the care 
of some adult temperance society. Not so ; we object to 
part with any of our members at any age, believing that 
we can look after them better than any adult society 
can, and feeling that the time is fast approaching when 
the Band of Hope workers must take up more thoroughly 
the adult work. 

In holding separate meetings there would also be the 
difficulty of selection. At what age do members cease to 
be juniors? We notice in the Chronicle correspondence 
that the age varies from thirteen to seventeen years, a 
period at which there is likely to be much jealousy or 
unpleasantness caused by the separation. 

Again, to hold separate meetings in many cases would 
bean extravagant expenditure of effort, if we may judge 
by the numbers quoted in the correspondence referred to, 
the attendances at the senior meetings ranging from 
twenty-nine to sixty; to set the whole machinery of a 
society in operation for so small a number appears to us 
to be a great waste of energy. 

We have gone to some trouble to collect information 
on this matter from a large number of societies, and only 
two or three are in favour of separate meetings ; some, 
having tried them, have been forced to return to the old 
plan, which we still advocate, viz., one meeting, to be 
held as frequently as possible, and open to all without 
restriction. 

The meetings may be of a simple character without being 
childish ; even the senior members will derive much profit 
from the excellent blackboard and other lessons intended 
for the young, and so amply provided in the pages of the 
Chronicle. 

If a society be but a small one, and the school premises 
be accessible, the class system might be adopted on 
similar lines to our Sabbath-school work, providing a 
sufficient staff of workers can be secured—the juniors to 
meet in classes half an hour before the public meeting, 
using Dr. Richardson's and other class books. These 
classes could also be utilized for preparing the members 
for the Competitive Examinations. 

We might suggest a plan which we act upon ourselves 
with great success ; let the programmes for the meetings 
be arranged to suit junior and senior members alternately. 
It will be found that although a meeting is prepared 
specially for the children, many parents and elder mem¬ 
bers will attend, the efforts of the little folks being 
generally appreciated. We recently arranged a tempe¬ 
rance entertainment by Band of Hope members from 
seven to fourteen years of age, at which nearly 700 adults 
were present, all of whom had paid for admission. 

At the meetings prepared for the seniors a wise speaker 
will not overlook the presence of children, and, like many 
of our most popular preachers, he will always have a 
word for them. 

In all the meetings let us adapt ourselves to the require¬ 
ments of the times ; we confess we have no sympathy 
with those puritanical croakers who would shut out all 
entertainment—our people, young and old, like enter¬ 
tainment, and will have it, either at our meetings or 
elsewhere: let us, then, be wise and provide it for them. 
We have plenty of material at hand—let us provide vocal 
and instrumental music, the stirring or pathetic recita¬ 
tion, and the life-portraying dialogue. But at the same 
time let us avoid the too comman error of crowding out 



THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


116 


all instruction by the entertainment. Never hold a 
meeting without at least one address. 

We certainly have not yet found any necessity for 
holding separate meetings, the object of which, of course, 
is to retain our senior members, believing that that 
object can be better attained by other means, viz.:— 

1. Have a cheerful meeting with a varied and interest¬ 
ing programme. 

2. Have a large committee, including a number of the 
members over seventeen years of age. 

3. Find the senior members plenty of work as monitors, 
doorkeepers, clerks to receive subscriptions, visitors, sub¬ 
committees to prepare recitations, singing, &c. 

4. Have a systematic visitation of absentees, in which 
service the senior members may be well employed. 

5. Form a publication department for the sale of 
temperance literature—in which the senior members may 
'foe employed as canvassers. We have sustained this 
department of work ourselves for nearly twenty years with 
great success, having sold over 218,000 publications, and 
given prizes to the canvassers to the value of over £360, 
purchased with the profits on the sales. 

6. Let the test of membership be the pledge, and a 
monthly subscription. 

7. Don’t let your senior members have to crowd into 
some ante-room with the young children to pay their 
subscriptions, but appoint visitors to wait upon them. 
You will thus keep in touch with them and ascertain if 
'keeping the pledge, and in cases of violation prevent them 
straying far from the fold without an effort to restore 
them. 

8. Don’t fail to keep constantly before the minds of the 
members the temptations to which they are exposed. Warn 
them of their danger as they enter into business engage¬ 
ments—urge them to ]set their faces strictly against the 
pernicious habits of treating and paying footings, and to 
resist them even if they suffer persecution in consequence. 

9. Warn them in respect to their companionships—not 
’hesitating to advise them even in regard to their court¬ 
ships, 

10. Ever keep before them the true nature of alcoholic 
drinks; it is not enough to show them the social evils 
through drink; these, alas,they are painfully familiar with. 
But teach them that the drink is bad—and always bad— 
bad alike when handed to them by the dainty fingers of 
a lady, as when served across the bar of a public- 
house. 

These are the lines upon which we work our own 
society, and we find they act exceedingly well. We 
have a paying membership of about seven hundred, 
nearly three hundred of whom are over seventeen years of 
age, and it is no uncommon occurrence to have at one 
meeting four hundred juniors and two hundred adults. 
Our average attendance during last quarter was 550—- 
the largest attendance at one meeting being 960, and the 
smallest 303. And we are not a solitary society, we are 
surrounded with fourteen or fifteen other Bands of Hope 
in active operation, all of which are within a mile of our 
school. 

With an experience like this it is not surprising that 
we fail to see the desirability of holding separate meetings 
for junior and senior members. 

Our love for this noble movement is stronger than it 
ever was. We have grown older ourselves, and lived to 
see many of our members of twenty years ago grow up 
into manhood, and take their places in this and other 
branches of Christian work. 

Finally, and above all, let us seek to lead our members 
to Christ—if we get them soundly converted we have 
little fear of them breaking the pledge—with the grace of 
God in their hearts they will stand firm, and, by-and-bye, 
when we have passed away, they will take our places and 
carry on our noble work more vigorously and successfully 
than we have ever done. 


OUR SENIOR MEMBERS. 


E desire to call special attention to 
the suggestive paper read by Mr. 
T. E. Hallsworth at the May 
Conference, and which we print 
at length in the present issue. 
Mr. Hallsworth has had a long 
practical experience, and can show 
excellent results—results which 
might doubtless be secured in many other 
districts if a similar course were pursued. As 
we have before observed, it will probably be 
found that one uniform plan will not suit all 
cases in regard to the senior members of our 
societies. We must, however, keep one thing in 
mind, viz., that arrangements calculated to 
retain the interest of members when they 
cease to be mere children should certainly be 
made in some form or other. We subjoin brief 
particulars of plans pursued by friends in various 
parts of the country, and where nothing has yet 
been done in this direction, we would strongly 
urge that the subject receive careful considera¬ 
tion in good time for the autumn. 

FROM CORRESPONDENTS. 

Birmingham.— Mr. H. Scott, 2, Shrubbery Terrace, 
Coralie-street, Bookfields, Birmingham, writes :—About 
eighteen months ago, finding we were losing some of the 
elder members of our Band of Hope, we set to work to 
form a senior society, which has worked well ever since. 
We have between 65 and 70 on the books, with an average 
attendance of about 50; the age is 15 years and over. 
The members pay sixpence a quarter. They have a tea 
at Christmas which takes one quarter’s subscription ; and 
in the summer a Saturday-afternoon trip into the country, 
the entire cost, including tea, being covered by the other 
one shilling-ard-sixpence. The meetings are opened with 
singing and prayer (we make singing a great feature); we 
invite a speaker who generally gives a practical Band of 
Hope address which lasts about fifteen minutes, and the 
rest of the meeting is taken up by the members themselves 
by recitations, readings, songs, and occasionally short 
papers. 

Blackburn. —Mr. W. H. Marsh, secretary of Barton 
Street School Band of Hope, writes :—As a result of my 
work for the benefit of senior members, I would offer the 
following suggestions:—1st. Select one person (not under 
the age of thirteen) from each Sunday-school class and 
form the whole number into a committee. This will lead 
them to talk to their class-mates on the subject, who will 
thus become interested in the work. 2nd. Do not confine 
yourself to one kind of entertainment at the monthly 
meetings, but try to bring something forward which will 
interest both young and old. 3rd. Have, say once a 
month, a temperance address in the Sunday-school. 

Chester. —Mr. John C. Williams, Queen Street Con¬ 
gregational Band of Hope, writes :—In our Band of Hope 
a system has been organised which so far has been ex¬ 
ceedingly gratifying to the members. The neighbourhood 
is divided into wards, which are again divided into streets; 
a ward is placed in the charge of a senior member, whilst 
another member, a little younger, but above the average 
age, has charge of a street. It is the ambition of our 
elder members to get as many members from their res¬ 
pective wards as possible. The Lecture Hall, in which 




THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


the meetings are held, is also divided to correspond with 
the wards, each division being known by a letter; thus 
when a member enters he is directed to his own ward 
place, and throughout the meeting the seniors take charge 
of the wards with which they are severally connected. 
The great feature of this Band of Hope is that it is man¬ 
aged by the members themselves, every member over 15 
years being elected on the board of management, which 
meets at stated intervals, the pastor always presiding, 
supported by the superintendent and secretary. We have 
found from experience that the only way to keep our 
elder members is to seek their help, to find a scope for 
their energy, and to bind them together by co-operation. 

Derby. —Mr. G. Hanson Sale, Christ Church Band of 
Hope, writes :—At 15 we draft our members into the total 
abstinence society, and we find the members look forward 
to this promotion. Our work lies in a very poor district, 
and we aim at making the adult as well as the juvenile 
meetings as bright and attractive as possible, the social 
element entering very largely into the proceedings. 
Members of the adult society may attend the Band of 
Hope meetings, but no member of the Band of Hope 
under 15 may attend the meetings for adults. I think it 
almost impossible to speak so as to interest and instruct 
all ages at the same time, and if adults or senior members 
see children in the room they say, “ This is a children’s 
meeting,” and drift away. The time for junior meetings, 
moreover, is too early for most seniors; we begin at 8, and 
close precisely at 0.45. 

Devonport. —Mr. John Ledby, Ker Street Wesleyan 
Band of Hope, writesA few years ago we found our 
elder members did not care to meet with the children,and 
were fast leaving us. To meet this difficulty we formed a 
senior society to meet on the same night as the juniors, 
and we have found the plan work successfully. We arrange 
a programme for three months in advance, and this com¬ 
prises business meetings, debates, essays, impromptu 
speaking, lectures, addresses, and entertainments. In our 
junior society we have 365 ; in our senior 53 young men, 
and 49 young women members, all the latter over 14 years 
of age. The programme is submitted to a general meet¬ 
ing of the members, which also elects the officers. Members 
pay one penny per month. We give them plenty to do, 
and find that the more the work the larger the attendance. 

Guildford. —Mr. Russell G. Davey, 8 New Road, 
Guildford, writes:—We carry on a senior society, and 
find it works well. We make our meetings (weekly) as 
free and unrestrained as possible, our principal endeavour 
being to let members feel that they are under the control 
of no one except themselves. Anything stiff is carefully 
guarded against. Success depends very much upon the 
ability and adaptability of those who have the first 
formation of a senior branch. They must discourage any 
suspicion as to their coming in the capacity of caretakers, 
and must be on terms of equal footing, familiarity, and 
friendship with every member. 

Higham Fenners. —Mr. B. Vorley, Higham Ferrers 
and District Band of Hope Union, writes :—In our dis¬ 
trict we have no senior societies, but we have in every 
society senior and junior members When the latter 
reach the age of fourteen they are put on the senior list 
and contribute twopence per month instead of one penny. 
Employment is found for seniors as officers, members of 
committee, visitors, and otherwise ; and to them is com¬ 
mitted the task of providing the programme for the 
ordinary meetings. Thus, should a society have sixty 
seniors, they are divided into four bands of fifteen each, 
and each band is responsible for a meeting once in each 
month, and in this way all become workers. It is part of 
the duty of the seniors to rehearse the juniors in their 
recitations and singing before the meeting is held. At 
the annual meeting the seniors join forces and form a 
choir. They are also represented on the Union com- 


11 7 

mittee. I think it a mistake to sever seniors from juniors,, 
and think it is better to employ them somewhat after the 
manner indicated above. 

Keighley, Yorkshire. —Mr. J. W. Frankland, Sun 
Street Wesleyan Band of Hope, writes :—Having been 
connected with Band of Hope work as secretary and 
otherwise for some years, I have found that dividing the 
society into two sections, viz., “junior and senior,” has 
helped in keeping our senior members. In order to aid it 
and help our junior members we have enrolled as members, 
many parents of our children, and also other adult friends, 
who would not join the society as Band of Hope members. 
Separate meetings for seniors are not held, but these are 
taught to look upon themselves an an advanced section 
and to devote themselves to the welfare of the juniors. 

Keighley. —Mr. J. Normington, Eastwood, Keighley, 
writes ;—During the session 1885-6 we asked our young 
lady members to conduct a meeting, and the result was a. 
much larger audience than usual, and a corresponding 
increase of interest in the movement. A few weeks after 
our young men undertook a similar effort with equal 
success ; the scheme has been continued, and by thus 
finding employment, under the stimulus of friendly- 
rivalry, we are much assisted in retaining our senior 
members. 

Leeds. —Mr. H. G. Saville, Hyde Park Road Wesleyan 
Band of Hope, writes :—We have a senior Band of Hope 
consisting of ninety members of fourteen years of age and 
upwards, which is conducted somewhat similarly to a 
mutual improvement society. We take care to bring into 
each meeting some of the principles of temperance in the 
shape of an address limited to fifteen minutes, by one of 
our members, and on this we invite criticism whenever 
opportunity offers, and always secure a fair proportion 
of singing, besides the hymns in which all join. We 
make a free use of handbills and printed programmes, a 
card copy for the session (October to April), with a blue 
ribbon for hanging up, being sold at one penny each. A 
charge of one penny for admission to the meetings is. 
made. Members are invited to contribute sixpence per 
session; this is not compulsory, but is generally done. 
The competitive principle is utilised, and prizes of books 
awarded for the best essays and similar efforts. 

Leeds.— Mr. W. Ainsley, Secretary, Woodhouse Adult 
Band of Hope, writes :—We take care to draft the juniors 
when they reach the age of fourteen into our senior Bands 
of Hope. They elect their own officers and committee. The 
subscription is twopence per month, and we meet weekly at 
eight o’clock. Committee meetings are held fortnightly. 
General business is transacted by the members themselves 
and details by the committee. The programme consists 
of lectures, essays, readings, recitations, impromptu speak¬ 
ing and social gatherings. We have formed a choir and 
find that the rehearsals not only keep the young people 
together, but keep them out of mischief, and enable us to 
give entertainments to other societies in the town. We. 
have opened a reading room for the young men, and are 
about to form a library. The young women meet in a 
sewing classwith a view to a bazaar. We keep all fully- 
employed, and thus have been fairly successful. 

Leicester. — Mr. Arthur George Capley, St. Paul's 
Band of Hope and Gospel Temperance Society, writes :— 
Five years ago we decided to form an adult section com¬ 
prising all members of over fifteen years of age and to add 
to our title “and Gospel Temperance Society.” The 
sections meet separately,the juniors fortnightly,the seniors, 
at least monthly. The plan has worked well. All specia 
meetings are held unitedly, and in many ways the mem¬ 
bers of both sections are made to realize that they belong 
to the same society. The educational element enters less, 
largely into the senior than the junior meetings, but in 
both cases the services of the members are largely called 
into requisition. I find that children well trained in the 


11 s 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


junior society evince but little disposition to forsake the 
meetings, provided they can attend without any surrender 
of the dignity which they consider befits their advancing 
years. At all our junior meetings a fair proportion of 
seniors are present, and these are encouraged to feel that 
they are rendering the committee real and substantial 
assistance. 

Leicester. —Mr. H. O. Bridgewater, superintendent, 
Harvey Lane Band of Hope, writes:—Our plan for two 
years has been to place all our senior members on the 
committee; in fact, all our offices except President and 
Conductor are filled by them; they thus become largely 
responsible for the management and conduct of the meet¬ 
ings ; they sit amongst the juniors and help to preserve 
order. Wishing to improve our weekly programme,it was 
decided, on the suggestion of one of the members of the 
committee, that each one in turn should provide the pro¬ 
gramme for the meeting, excepting chairman and speaker. 
The written programme is placed in the hands of the con¬ 
ductor on the Sunday previous to the meeting, and he has 
the right to strike out any item he deems unsuitable. The 
plan has worked admirably, the interest in our meetings 
has never flagged winter or summer. We have a variety 
in our programmes which I have never seen equalled; the 
circle of those taking part has widened, and, although our 
meetings have been held weekly, the attendance has kept 
up summer as well as winter. It has done our young 
people good, and they are growing up a splendid band of 
intelligent workers for the cause. I shall be pleased to 
give further particulars to any one who will write me, 
together with a copy of notice for the quarter,which is put 
up in each school-room, and a copy of an ordinary pro¬ 
gramme. 

Nottingham. —Mr. William Howitt, 21, Massey Street, 
Nottingham, writes:—We find we most easily keep such 
of our seniors as are connected with the Sunday-school 
as well as with ourselves, and therefore do all we can to 
promote this twofold membership. We also set our 
seniors to work in the usual way, and formed a senior 
branch, retaining the idea that the members should still 
be members of the original society, and this works well. 
We have a special senior meeting monthly, but juniors 
may contribute to the programme. Sometimes we have 
special lectures ; we keep a refreshment stall going, a 
cricket club, a football club, and recently a social guild, 
which is doing well. 

Sundenland. —Mr. John Oates, secretary, Herrington 
Street Band of Hope, writes :—We manage to retain our 
seniors fairly well by finding them employment, and 
placing the most suitable on the committee. They pro¬ 
vide the entertainment at most of the meetings, and are 
held responsible for the good order of the juniors. 


“WHAT MY FATHER SAYS." 

Dialogue For Two Boys. 

By William Rowland. 

George (hurrying on to the ■platform'). —Halloa, young 
teetotaller, have you got any more boys to join your 
band ? 

John. —Well, George, I am glad to say I have ; I do 
wish I could get you to join too. What do you say now, 
coming next Friday night and joining ? 

G. (laughing ).—I should like to see myself among you. 
Why, John, you should only hear what my father sajs 
about the teetotal people. 

J. —-Well, I should not mind hearing what he says, 
but at the same time I should like you to hear, also, what 
my father says about them. Perhaps it would do us both 
good to hear both sides of the question. 

G. —Oh, but your father is one of them ; and my father 


calls teetotallers weak-minded people. Therefore, what 
your father says is not worth listening to. 

J. —Yes, George, it is quite true he is one of the 
teetotallers, but I certainly can't see that they are weak- 
minded people. At any rate, we both of us know that 
there are amongst them some very great men in all 
stations of life—for instance, Archdeacon Farrar, and 
others about whom I have heard your father speak very 
highly. But still, I know it has been the fashion to call 
teetotallers weak-minded people. 

G .—But stay, John, I know what my father says about 
the drink, and I am sure he knows better than your 
father. 

J.— Why ? 

G.—Why 1 Why, because he is more educated. 

J. —Well, educated people ought to know the best, but 
perhaps though your father is more educated than my 
father, he may not have thought about this matter so 
much as my father has. 

G. ( contemptuously ).—Your father think, why, he’s only 
a working man. My father’s a gentleman, and goes to 
business, so he ought to know more than your father 
about anything. 

J. —I hope, George, you are not getting angry with 
me, because I talked about my father thinking. Indeed, 
if you will allow me, I should like to say a little more 
about what my father says, and that is, that he believes 
more people would be teetotallers if they would give 
themselves time to think about it. 

G.—Well, John, my father has thought about it, and 
he contends that beer makes him strong to do his work. 

J. ( surprisingly). —Now, George, if you talk about your 
father saying beer makes him strong to do his work, you 
will admit that my father, who is a blacksmith, and has 
to swing a heavy sledge hammer, certainly ought to be 
able to pass an opinion about that matter much better 
than your father, who, as you say, goes to business, by 
which you mean, he does not have to do hard work. Now, 
my father says he can do more work without beer, than 
he used to do with it. 

G.—But my father says, it is nice to have a glass of 
drink when friends call; and I tell you I am glad when 
they do, I wish they would come oftener, because I 
always get a drop myself, and I like it. 

J .—Ah, George, that is just another matter about 
which I have heard my father say a good deal. He says this 
drinking custom is the ruin of thousands, and when boys 
get their first liking for the drink in this way not a few 
grow up to like it too well, and find “ by-and-bye ” that 
the drink has a firm hold upon them ; and thus they 
become drunkards. 

G.—Ah, John, I see you have been studying the subject. I 
am not prepared to argue, but although you seem to make 
out a very clear case, still I can’t think my father is 
wrong—in fact, I am sure he is not. 

J. —Of course it is quite natural for each of us to think 
his own father is right. I suppose, then, you intend to 
follow your father in all things ; do what he does, say 
what he says, be what he is, drink what he does, and, 
by-and-bye, I suppose, take to his pipe. 

G. (laughing) —Why, John, of course I shall; I have 
already had a whiff. 

J .—Well, George, I am sorry ; I hope, however, you will 
not go further than your father has gone. But you know 
some sons trying to follow their father’s example in 
regard to drink, do not stop where their fathers do Many 
a father’s heart has been broken, and many a mother s 
life has been made sad, through the excesses of their 
children. I do wish I could induce you to be one of us, 
because then you would not be endangering your own 
prospects, and perhaps others’ also. 

G.—Well, really, you are quite persuading ; I am half 
inclined, but I will hear what my father says, and tell 
you when I see you again. 




THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 

J&ccor&s of progress from Uoral Societies, 


Ireland. 

Mr. Frank Adkins has completed a month’s lecturing and 
organising tour under the auspices of the Hibernian Band of 
Hope Union. Amongst the places he visited were Arklow, 
Athlone, Bray, Clara, Drogheda, Dublin, Dundalk, Longford, 
Maryborough, Mountmellick, Navan, New Ross, Tullamore, 
Wexford, and Wicklow, and many smaller towns and villages. 
Notwithstanding the beauty of the weather, and the force of 
outdoor attractions, the meetings were well attended, and 
much appreciation was expressed at the completeness and 
clearness with which the valuelessness of intoxicating drinks 
as foods was demonstrated t>y the lecturer. The whole of the 
lectures were illustrated by diagrams and experiments. The 
membership of the Hibernian Union is almost entirely con¬ 
fined to the Protestant population, but within these bounds 
it occupies a strong position. In many towns visited by Mr. 
Adkins almost every Protestant child is a member of the Band 
of Hope, and the younger clergy of the Church of Ireland 
are almost without exception abstainers. The visit was, 
nevertheless, found to be very useful, as a great necessity 
exists for the confirmation of the members in their principles 
by a wise enforcement of the physiological truths of the 
movement. 


ISanti of Simons. 

Nottingham and Notts. —This Union took advantage of 
Whit Monday for holding one of the demonstrations which 
the Committee know so well how to conduct. This, the six¬ 
teenth demonstration, was held in the beautiful Arboretum 
of this town. It is the great juvenile holiday of the year, and 
the attendance by no means confined to the recognised 
members of Bands of Hope. The processionists fell in at 
seven centres, and marched on a common point accompanied 
by bands of music, and gay with flags and banners. At the 
Arboretum the programme included performances of the 
Lincoln Y.M.C.A. athletes, Mr. Charles Macabe, Mr. Brice 
Bolton (ventriloquist), Temperance entertainments under 
Sergeant Haskett, instrumental concerts by ten bands, and a 
great variety of other amusements. Not less than 12,500 
persons were present, and the effort yielded a profit of £100 
to the funds of the Union. 

Three Towns.— The annual meeting of this Union was 
recently held in Buckland Hall, Plymouth, under the presi¬ 
dency of Rev. Professor Anthony. The report mentioned that 
there were 21 Bands in association ; of these 19 had sent in 
returns showing a membership of 2,604. Six senior societies 
had a membership of 389. The adoption of the report was 
moved by Mr. John Ripley, and Mrs. Ripley also spoke during 
the course of the meeting. At this meeting it was resolved to 
divide the Union into two, and a business meeting was 
shortly alter held by the Plymouth section to formulate rules 
to meet the altered conditions. It was agreed to invite the 
Band of Hope children taking part in the J ubilee procession 
to wear blue ribbon as a distinctive badge. 

York.—The Committee of the society in this ancient and 
important city have issued their fourteenth annual report, 
Their zeal and experience have enabled them to record a large 
amount of really useful work. The numerical position is good, 
there now being thirty-seven societies with 4,400 members or 
associates, an increase of 7 societies and 1,300 children during 
the year. A choral society has been organised and been 
found very useful ; a village mission was conducted ; a local 
magazine, the York Onward , adopted, and the speaker’s plan 
well supported. The principal meetings, besides the anni 
versary meeting, have been the May festival—always a great 
occasion in the city, and the open air demonstration. The 
Committee aided the Parent Society in the distribution of Mr. 
Morley’s appeal, and had the advantage of taking part in the 
Competitive Examination and the Crystal Palace Fete. Several 
useful conferences also were held. Our friends will not 
forget that the Autumnal Meetings of the Union are to be held 
in York. 


Vale of Eden.— The fourteenth annual report of this Union 
has been sent to us. We are glad to know that substantial 
progress has been made, There are 41 societies with 3,881 
members against 35 societies with 3,571 members last year. 
The various committees and workers number 473, and include 
71 friends who from time to time give addresses ; 457 ordinary 
meetings and 150 public meetings have been held, and 365 
pledges taken. About 3,000 periodicals have been sold, and 
36,000 tracts distributed. The annual gala was highly suc¬ 
cessful, as also were the annual and other special meetings. 
The income amounted to £241, the expenditure to £180, 
leaving £61 in hand. 

jffiUtcopoluatt Mantis of %ope. 

Barrington Road, Brixton- —The annual meeting of 
the Gresham Chapel Band of Hope was held on Friday, 
J une 3rd, when the chair was taken by Mr. Charles 
Wakely, and addresses were delivered by the Rev. J. W. 
Ewing and Mrs. Donald Campbell. Recitations were given 
by the members, and the choir sang suitable selections. There 
was also excellent music performed by friends on the violin 
and pianoforte. During the evening there was also a prize 
distribution. Notwithstanding a heavy downpour of rain 
during the whole evening there was a good attendance, and 
the gathering was altogether of a pleasant character. 

Old Kent Road, Oakley Place.— A special meeting of the 
senior and junior societies, presided over by Mr. Charles 
Wakely, was recently held, and there were speeches, solos, 
and a recitation competition. The meeting, which was 
largely attended by parents and friends, was of a very agree¬ 
able character, and likely to conduce to the increased success 
of the society. 

Regent Street, Lambeth.— This society held a very success¬ 
ful quarterly meeting recently. The pastor (Rev. T. Page) 
was present, and the chair taken by Mr. H. W. Street, one of 
the oldest Band of Hope workers in the South of London. 
Capital singing and reciting, with very fair handbell ringing, 
was given by the members, but the most interesting feature 
was a speaking competition, in which the girls were invited to 
reproduce an address by Miss M. Jennie Street, and the boys 
to repeat one given by Mr. Johns, prizes being provided by the 
chairman, pastor, and other friends. Several competitors 
showed considerable talent, especially some of the boys, who 
promise to become useful temperance speakers. 

Starch Green. —A new society in connection with the 
Congregational Church in this neighbourhood was recently 
inaugurated by a public meeting. Mr. G. D. White presided, 
and addresses were delivered by the Rev. H. J. Weatherhead, 
Mr. Frederic Smith, and Mr. J. Morton. The members gave 
proof of their existence and earnestness by contributing 
several recitations and melodies to the programme. 


^tobinctal ilanbs of 

Cardiff.— On Tuesday, May 24th, a flower service was held 
in connection with the Hope Baptist Band of Hope, Canton. 
The chair was taken by Mr. R. Emery, and prizes were given 
for the best and most tastefully arranged bunches of wild 
flowers. Suitable melodies were sung, and appropriate recita¬ 
tions delivered. A ten minutes’ address by Mr. J. B. Clark 
on “ Wild Flowers and their Lessons” was also given. In 
every way the proceedings proved most satisfactory. 

Wembley —The fifth anniversary of the St.John's Band of 
Hope was held on the 14th June, under the most favourable 
auspices. In the afternoon about 300 members and friends 
marched in procession. A large tent meeting was held in 
the afternoon, when a new banner was unfurled by Wm. 
Ambrose, Esq., Q.C., M.P. In the evening an enthusiastic 
public meeting was held, General Copland Crawford 
presiding, and addresses were delivered by the Revs. A. M. 
Maynard, J ,T. Andrewes, J. White, W. Mitchell-Carruthers, 
C. J. Parmenter, Dr. W. A. Perkin, F.R.S., and Mr. Chas. 
Wakely, of the Parent Society. 



120 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


GENERAL TEMPERANCE TOPICS 


editors of temperance papers would some- 
times be at a loss for “matter” but for the 
utterances of opponents. If only the vendors 
and drinkers of intoxicating liquors held 
their tongues their defence would be much 
more complete. The Mayor of Stamford, a 
medical man—albeit, a young man—not only 
took the chair recently at the annual dinner 
of the Licensed Victuallers of that town, but 
ran full tilt at teetotalism, with the result 
that whilst his own arguments were crushingly 
refuted, a wholesome stimulus has been given to tempe¬ 
rance discussion in the local press. Oh, that our leading 
opponents would make speeches or write books ! 
"Opposition is one of the best possible antidotes to 
stagnation. 

* * 

* 

We are sorry to note that intoxicating drinks played 
an important part in the Jubilee proceedings. In many 
towns the magistrates granted permission to publicans 
to considerably extend the hours of sale, and many of 
the workhouse “feeds” are to be accompanied by 
the intoxicants, to which in so large a measure these 
institutions owe their inmates. We do not find any 
suggestion for giving children strong drink at any of 
their treats—we have improved to that extent. Fifty 
years ago even a children's dinner would be considered 
incomplete without a small mug of beer; let us hope that 
in less than fifty years even adult tables may be minus 
that dangerous and useless accompaniment. 

# * 

* 

Our friends will be glad to know that the proposal to 
present the widely-respected Secretary of the National 
Temperance League with a testimonial, in recognition of 
his eminent and long sustained services to the temperance 
■cause, has been heartily responded to. The presentation 
will be made in Exeter Hall, on Thursday evening, July 
yth, by the Lord Bishop of London. Contributions 
towards the object may still be sent to Mr. W. I. Palmer, 
J.P., Hillside, Reading ; or to Mr. John Taylor, 5, Token- 
house Yard, London, E.C. 

* * 

Neal Dow’s fellow countrymen are thoroughgoing 
when they make up their minds. Every workman on the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railways has had to take the total 
abstinence pledge, as a condition of continued service. 
It is thought that the late fearful accident was owing to 
■drink, and this probability is the ground of the imperative 
action thus taken by the directors. 

* * 

* 

The United Kingdom Alliance is losing its treasurer, 
Mr. W. Armitage, whom failing health has compelled to 
resign this post, which he has well occupied for the long 
space of thirty-one years. His successor will be Mr.W. J. 
•Crossley, whom we hope will always have an abundance 
of treasure over which to preside. 

« * 

* 

Following up last year’s International Temperance 
■Congress at Antwerp, this body is next to meet at Zurich, 
on September gth and 10th. No doubt many friends will 
combine a pleasant Swiss holiday with attendance on what 
we hope will prove an interesting and important occasion. 


We hope it is not very wicked to enjoy the following 
extract from the Licensed Victuallers' Gazette :—“What 
mean the one-and-twenty Bills now brought in, all 
threatening the trade ? Our enemies were never stronger 
than they are at this moment. The Trade Defence never 
was so weak as it is now. Look at the ground that has gone 
from beneath the feet of the licensed victualler! Are not 
those who profess to be the leaders of the trade playing 
into the hands of our opponents ? There is yet a tale to 
be told. The teetotaler is now dead sick of using persua¬ 
sion and argument, they are too slow for him. Even the 
march of fanaticism is not quick enough. Lashing himself 
into fury, he has now buckled around him the armoury of 
blasphemy. Dashing on like a maniac, he says, ‘ Down 
with the licensed victualler, down with him even to the 
ground.’ Surveying the scene with the eye of a demon, 
he roars out, ‘What is a fanatic ? ’ ” We think it is this 
Gazette which dishes up with revolting details old accounts 
of bye-gone prize fights. Altogether, therefore, we can 
hardly congratulate our friends the enemy on their 
literary representative. 

* * 

* 

Our English doctors and Americans, who have had 
something like a monopoly of the work of proving the 
uselessness and injurious character of alcohol, will be 
glad to welcome a powerful ally in Herr Bunge, of the 
University of Basel, who, in a work on that poison, 
enforces the truth with admirable clearness, summing up 
his indictment with the statement, “Alcohol strengthens 
no one; it does but benumb the feeling of fatigue.” We 
trust the worthy Herr, who, by the way, is Professor of 
Physiological Chemistry to his University, will soon have 
many like thinkers and co-workers amongst Continental 
medical men, who are, as a rule, sadly behind the times 
on this subject. 

* * 

* 

The annual meeting of the United Kingdom General 
and Temperance Provident Institution, to which 
teetotalers owe their most conclusive argument, so far as 
regards vital statistics, was held on Tuesday, May 24th. 
We learn that the year has been the most prosperous in 
the society’s history, not less than ^658,562 being the 
amount of insurance effected. A proposition was made to 
extend the business to America and the Colonies, but it 
did not meet with much favour. We need not say that in 
the matter of longevity the teetotal members of the 
Institution continue to have the best of it. 

* 

* 

Saratoga Springs, one of the most fashionable of 
American resorts, was on friday, May 27th, the scene 
of the installation of the re-united Grand Lodges of Good 
Templars. The proceedings were most cordial, and cul¬ 
minated in a scene of indescribable but joyous enthusiasm, 
when Brother Malins and Brother Hickman, with hands 
clasped, promised to bury all past unkindness deep in 
oblivion, and to work in future side by side in the good 
cause. The meeting was well called in a press report a 
Good Templar Love Feast. 

* * 

* 

A proof that longevity and vigour are perfectly con¬ 
sistent with total abstinence is afforded by the Hon. Neal 
Dow, who, at the ripe age of eighty-three, has just brought 
to a close a long and successful lecturing tour in Canada. 



THE 

'ggcmb of ^ope ^ronicfe 

Issued Monthly by the United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 


THE 


33atttr of Hope Chronicle, 


AUGUST, 1887. 


THE LOSS OF AN OLD FRIEND. 



I*rv- 


T has seldom been our lot to record a loss so 
keenly felt as that occasioned by the removal 
on Sunday, July 17th, of the Rev. George M. 
Murphy. He was a man with whom one 
never associated the thought of death; his 
activity, cheerfulness, and heartiness, com¬ 
bined with astrong and commanding presence, 
always left the impression that he was destined 
to play for many years an active as well as a benevolent 
part in human affairs. But this was not to be ; his end, 
in accordance with his own often expressed desire, was 
sudden. On Saturday he appeared in even more than his 
wonted health and spirits, taking part in a local meeting 
in the afternoon, and a political meeting in the evening, 
with his usual force and efficiency. He passed a good 
night, but in the morning whilst dressing fell back in a 
chair, and in a few minutes died without recovering 
speech. The sad news spread with wonderful rapidity, 
and was confirmed by an announcement at the Metro¬ 
politan Tabernacle and other places of worship, where it 
was received with many expressions of sorrow. 

Mr. Murphy by birth belongs to the Metropolis, having 
been born in Chelsea, in 1823, and being, therefore, at the 
time of his decease in his sixty-third year. He has been 
for the last seven years the sole survivor of a large family, 
comprising seven sons and four daughters ; two of his 
sisters, by the way, being removed by the hand of death 
as suddenly, or nearly so, as their brother. His experience 
in life has been varied—at seventeen he enlisted as a 
private soldier, and by smartness and good conduct was 
rapidly rising when, on the death of his father, he was 
bought out and assisted his mother in business. Later on 
we find him an officer on board the convict ship “ York,” 
at Portsmouth, and whilst accepting this post, he first 
identified himself with the religious world to which his 
life has since been given. He joined the church at Gosport 
under the care, at that time, of Mr. Meadows. A removal 
to Birmingham brought him into connection with a yet 
more distinguished minister, the Rev. John Angell James, 
with whom he was associated in many a good word and 
work. He soon made his mark as a Sunday-school 
teacher and open air preacher, and was even in those early 
days remarkable for the frequency of his appeals on the 
temperance question. George Murphy was emphatically 
one of the pioneers of the movement, His native London 
AUGUST, 1887 . 


was not long in securing his talent. On the invitation of 
the Rev. Newman Hall, he accepted the post of evangelist 
at Surrey Chapel, and soon demonstrated the wisdom of 
the choice. He found his way to the hearts of the poor 
of Southwark in a wonderful manner, winning a confidence 
which never abated because it was never abused. In 1856. 
when this change was made, the condition of the New 
Cut and the surrounding district was widely different to 
that which it now presents, and the change is very largely 
indeed due to his devoted efforts. The form, although not 
the sphere, of his activity was however destined to change, 
and after ten years of evangelistic work he assumed, with 
the best wishes of Mr.Hall and his congregation, the duties 
of a settled pastorate, having under his charge from 1866 
until the time of his death the Congregational Church in 
the Borough-road, Southwark. His relations with his 
people were close and tender, and his loss is to them a very 
heavy blow indeed. He leaves, moreover, a wife and a 
daughter to mourn his loss, 

Mr. Murphy’s fame, however, is by no means simply 
that of a minister. He was emphatically the representa¬ 
tive of all that is best amongst the working classes and 
poorer classes of South London. In religious matters, on 
social questions, in politics (in their broader sense), and, 
above all, in the temperance movement, he was distinctly 
the man of the people. His efforts to give effect to his 
views were constant, energetic, and well supported, for a 
practical worker like Mr. Murphy can usually find 
philanthropists who will advance the sinews of war. The 
late Mr. Samuel Morley was his constant friend in this 
respect, and by assuming the responsibility for the rent 
of the Lambeth Baths during the winter, enabled Mr. 
Murphy for 26 years to carry on a series of meetings, pro¬ 
bably unexampled in their character and power for good. 
Almost every day during the winter something was doing 
at the Baths, and the Saturday evening newspaper 
readings have been visited by almost everyone practically 
anxious to reach the masses. A series of working men’s 
exhibitions have been a most useful feature of this depart¬ 
ment of his efforts, and have been uniformly successful. 
Mr. Murphy was elected a member of the London School 
Board in 1870, and continued to serve the community in 
that capacity until his decease, rendering important help 
from time to time in the efforts of the Union with regard 
to temperance teaching in the Schools of the Board. Very 
few men have rendered better service to the Union than 
has Mr. Murphy ; he was one of its earliest committee 
men, and always its faithful, laborious, painstaking 
friend. This removal will occasion a gap in the ranks of 
the Union, which it will be almost impossible to supply. 
As a speaker Mr. Murphy was acceptable and inde¬ 
fatigable ; we have known him address four and even 








122 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


five meetings within the twenty-four hours; and it is 
estimated that his last year of work included over 1,000 
lectures, sermons, and addresses. He laid no claim to 
oratory, but by shrewd common sense, vigorous Saxon, 
lively humour, and abundant illustration, managed many 
an audience before which a man more classically correct 
would fail. Loved, honoured, esteemed, lamented, he 
has passed away, and South London is the poorer by the 
loss of the very foremost of her temperance men. May 
our Bands of Hope repair these sad breaches which from 
time to time death makes in our ranks. 

The funeral took place at Abney Park Cemetery on 
Saturday, July’23rd, a service having been previously con¬ 
ducted at the Church in the Borough Road. Around the 
grave was gathered a large and influential company of 
his friends and fellow-workers, anxious to show honour to 
one who, from a lowly station of life, by sheer force of well¬ 
doing achieved a world-wide fame, and won an abiding 
place in the hearts of those who most earnestly desire the 
highest interests of their fellow men. 


TEMPERANCE, LIFE, & HEALTH. 


CCORDING to Thomas Moore, the 
Irish poet, “ the best of all ways to 
lengthen our days” is “ to steal a 
few hours from the night ”—but this 
surely is, to say the least, a very 
Hibernian way of looking at the 
matter, and one which will hardly 
stand the test of actual experience. 
We rather opine that health of body and length 
of life are best attainable by a close compliance 
with nature’s wise and reasonable laws. We 
are confirmed in this view by two reports which 
are always full of interest to temperance 
workers, namely, those of the Temperance 
Hospital and the United Kingdom Temperance 
and General Provident Institution. The former 
of these has special interest for Band of Hope 
officers and members, inasmuch as their efforts 
during the past tvvelve years, in connection 
with the annual collection, has enabled them to 
place nearly two thousand three hundred pounds 
at the disposal of the Board of Management, 
and enabled the United Kingdom Band of Hope 
Union to head the list of contributing Societies. 
A Hospital is from every point of view a good 
Institution. It is sad that there should be 
disease and accident; but since these are evils 
we cannot hope entirely to escape, it is well that 
they should be treated in establishments in 
which varied medical talents can unite their 
efforts for the relief of the suffering. The 
experience afforded by hospital practice, more¬ 
over, is one of great value to the student of 
medicine, for lessons of priceless value are 



learned in the wards of a hospital which 
could hardly be obtained elsewhere. The 
Temperance Hospital, however, has special 
claims on workers in the field of total 
abstinence, for here diseases are treated, 
and, so far as they are curable, cured 
without the aid of alcohol. It is a pleasant 
reflection that should accident or illness over¬ 
take any of our members, there is one Institu¬ 
tion in which they may receive the benefit of 
the highest medical and surgical skill, without 
the drawback of having to partake of drinks 
which their past training has induced them to 
regard as an enemy to be hated and shunned. 
It is, moreover, no small advantage for abstainers 
to be able to affirm that cases of every descrip¬ 
tion may be successfully treated without a resort 
to alcoholic stimulants; that not only the healthy 
and strong but even those brought so low by 
illness as to need hospital treatment thrive best 
as abstainers. A glance at the report will show 
how broad are the grounds on which this state¬ 
ment may be defended. The work of the 
Hospital extends over fourteen years, a sufficient 
time surely to afford a thorough test. During 
this period, 4,160 in-patients, and 25,385 out¬ 
patients have been treated, a number large 
enough to establish a satisfactory average, 
and hardly a form of disease is unrepresented 
by one or another of the patients. 

The rate of mortality over the whole period 
has been scarcely six per cent. A casualty 
ward, into which accidents and urgent cases are 
admitted at any hour and without recommenda¬ 
tion, has recently been added, and this, on 
account of the critical nature of many of the 
cases, has—as was to be expected—increased 
the death-i ate, which, even with this addition, 
amounts only to eight per cent. The number of 
patients has grown year by year, until we find 
that last year 737 in-patients and 2,595 out¬ 
patients received the kind and skilful treatment 
by which this Hospital is distinguished. It is 
interesting to note that just about one-half of the 
patients were abstainers prior to their admission 
to the Hospital, and we may fairly suppose that 
through the existence of this Institution some 
hundreds have been saved from breaking their 
pledge; for it too often happens that strong 
drink taken first as an article of medicine is 
continued as an article of diet. The details of 
some of the cases are very pathetic, and show 
in a strong light the kind-heartedness of the 
management. Thus we find a little girl of ten 
going for her father’s beer falling under a tram- 
car, and undergoing the amputation of both 
legs at the thigh. Through the action of the 
Managers of the Hospital the Tramway 
Company were induced to make a donation of 





THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


123 


^”150, which is invested on behalf of the little 
sufferer. The whole tone of the establishment 
is cheerful, kindly, and Christian. We can 
testify from personal inspection that if recovery 
be possible anywhere, it would be in the 
comfortable wards of the Institution in the 
Hampstead Road. Of the ,£"56,500 necessary 
to complete and furnish the buildings, £"50,000 
has been raised. We are sorry to find that many 
beds are still vacant, the permanent income being 
inadequate to the annual needs. This is a very 
great pity, as applications for admission are 
many, and, moreover, the wider the experience 
of the Hospital the more c onclusive will be its 
testimony to the soundness of our principles. 
We hope soon to learn that the £"6,500 of debt 
has been swept away, and that the 120 beds are 
all filled with patients on their way back to 
health. Let our friends remember these facts 
when we next ask them to aid us in the annual 
collection. 

That teetotalers live longer than moderate 
drinkers is a fact which has become to 
teetotalers almost wearisome by re-iteration, 
and yet we almost every day find some “ out¬ 
sider ” to whom it is a surprising revelation. We 
have plenty of work yet to do in the direction of 
enlightenment. Many Life Assurance Offices 
now give specially advantageous terms to 
abstainers, but none of them supply such clear 
and conclusive evidence of teetotal longevity as 
does the Temperance and General Provident 
Institution. The facts and figures in the report 
before us would be astonishing to anyone un- 
a cquainted with the injurious character of 
intoxicating drinks. For twenty-one years 
abstainers and moderate drinkers have been 
insured in this office, paying the same premiums 
and being in all respects on identical terms, but 
separate accounts have been kept as to the 
mortality, funds, income, and profit of each 
section. The ascertained result is that in the 
moderate section 5,785 of the insured were ex¬ 
pected to die, and 5,621 did die; but in the tempe¬ 
rance section, although 3,655 were expected to 
die, only 2,579 fulfilled this expectation. This 
is a difference of nearly 27 per cent, on the whole 
term of twenty-one years covered by these figures. 
In other words, whilst all the “moderates” who 
were expected to die did so with 144 excep¬ 
tions, the teetotalers who obstinately clung on 
to life were no fewer than 1,076. It seems 
rather too bad of these tenacious individuals 
to upset established tables of longevity in this 
fashion, but perhaps under the circumstances 
we can, on the whole, hardly blame them. A 
teetotal life being usually a happy, not to say a 
merry one, it is not surprising that those who 
enjoy it should desire to make it as long as 
possible. 


Taken together, these two reports constitute 
an unanswerable argument to those who 
fear that their physical well-being will be 
impaired by the disuse of stimulants, and 
serve in a remarkable manner to confirm the 
Band of Hope worker in his belief that the issue 
of his labours will be that the next generation 
will not only be more sober and prosperous, but 
also sounder in health and longer lived than 
that which is passing away. 


Food Reform.—A friend is good enough to send us 
monthly a copy of the Vegetarian Messenger. The paper 
is not only an admirable exponent of vegetarian principles, 
and well edited, but its contents cannot fail to be 
interesting also to the general reader. 

Mr. John H. Esterbrooke, who forty years ago 
formed the first Band of Hope in London, and who is still 
an active temperance worker, has written to one of the 
London papers expressing his opinion that abstinence 
from alcoholic liquors and tobacco will not arrest physical 
suffering and disease brought about by wilful inattention 
to dietetic and hygienic conditions. He is strongly im¬ 
pressed with the importance of a supplementary move¬ 
ment to save the children from non-nutritious and injurious 
foods. He believes that plain articles “On Food; what 
to Eat, and what to avoid, and how to promote health, 
strength, and longevity,” to be studied by parents,teachers, 
and temperance speakers would be very valuable. We 
quite agree with Mr. Esterbrooke, and would remind 
our friends of the articles on such subjects which have 
appeared in the Chronicle. 

Franklin on Temperance. — “Temperance,” said 
Benjamin Franklin, " puts wood on the fire, meal in the 
barrel, flour in the tub, money in the purse, credit in the 
country, vigour in the body, contentment in the house, 
clothes on the bairns, intelligence in the brain, and spirit 
in the constitution.” 

Ever remember, in thy youth, 

That he who firmly tries 
To conquer and to rule himself, 

Is noble, brave and wise.— Eliza. Cook. 

Abstaining Baptist Ministers. — In the Baptist 
denomination there are, including missionaries, nearly 
thirteen hundred abstaining ministers of the Gospel. In 
the same denomination there are 236 students preparing 
for the work of the ministry, and of these 211 are 
abstainers. 

Prizes chosen by Winners in [the Competitive 
Examination. —The choice of articles won in connection 
with the Competitive Examination is always left with the 
prize winners, and the sound discretion with which that 
privilege is used is one of the most pleasant features of the 
effort. On the recent occasion there were 257 prizes, and 
books were chosen in most instances, the greater number 
being various treatises on the Scriptures, chemistry, 
physiology and other sciences, public speaking, music, 
composition, elocution, mathematics, ancient and modern 
history, travel, biography, ancient and modern languages, 
and poetry. Several of the competitors chose microscopes, 
mathematical instruments, telescopes, and water colours. 
The choice of the young people warrants our saying that we 
have in our Bands of Hope some of the elite of British 
boyhood and girlhood. Young people who can choose 
and use such prizes as these are qualifying themselves to 
do useful work in after life, and we rejoice to have them 
on our side in the warfare we wage. 




124 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES.—Semes I. 


TEMPERANCE LESSONS FROM -ffiSOP’S 
FABLES. 

By Rev. CHARLES COURTENAY, Vicar of Emmanuel Church, 
Liverpool, Author of “ Temperance Home Thrusts,” &c. 

No. 8.—THE FOX WITHOUT A TAIL. 


ND he was so proud of it, too. He thought 
all the world of his tail. Other foxes had 
tails, of course, but his beat them all. In 
shape, in size, in colour, and in its droop, it 
was simply perfection. And he knew it. 

Fancy him, dear children, all of a sudden 
caught in a terrible trap, and caught by 
his beautiful tail. Fancy his tail snapped 
right off by the roots. Yes, he looked 
round, and found, like little Bo-peep’s 
sheep, he had left his tail behind him. 

The pain was bad enough. But the disgrace was very 
much worse. Why, I verily believe he would willingly 
have endured double the agony to have had it put on 
again. But that, of course, could never be. 

I will tell you whom I think that poor fox is like. He 
is like a poor drunkard who has lost his home, his 
health, his good looks, and his peace of mind, in the 
public-house trap. I am sure there area good many who 
are exactly like that poor tailless fox. Don’t you think 
so. too ? 

But perhaps I had better tell you bow it all happened, 
how the fox lost his tail, what he did after he had lost 
it, and how he fared. I fancy, dear children, you will 
find out that drunkards act and fare in very much the 
same way. 

How the Fox Lost his Tail 

Well, in the first place, he was taking what did not belong 
to him. He was a thief, that’s what he was. It was the 
farmer’s poultry, not his. And so it served him right 
when he suffered the penalty, don’t you think ? And 
when the drunkard spends the money which belongs to 
his wife and children in the public-house, is he not, too, 
a thief ? I think he is. And he deserves to suffer for it, 
too, just as the fox did. 

In the second place, he lost his tail because he was 
treading on dangerous ground. The farmer was no friend to 
foxes. He hated them like poison, and nothing pleased 
him better than to kill them. Now that fox knew very 
well that this farmer's yard was hostile ground. Never¬ 
theless, he went there, and so lost his tail. So, you see, 
it was quite his own fault. Foxes and drunkards should 
never be surprised at being caught in traps if they venture 
so near them. 

In the third place, he lost his tail because he had such a 
bad memory. It wasn't the first time he had been in peril. 
He ought to have remembered it. Neither was it the 
first time a fox had lost his tail in exactly the same way. 
But it had no effect on this foolish fox. Nothing would 
content him, but to thrust his tail into danger. Like 
the drunkard, he “forgot himself” ; forgot his past 
escapes, forgot other foxes’ sad experiences, and so—lost 
his tail. 

Making the Best of it. 

It is better to make the best of a calamity than to 
make the worst of it, don’t you think so, little ones ? But 
I can’t agree with our friend the fox’s method at all. 

If he had said, “ It might have been worse, it might 
have been my head, and I ought to be thankful that it 
was only my tail,” I, for one, would have agreed with 
him. It would have been a very wise thought. 


But, instead of this, we actually hear him telling his 
brother foxes that he doesn’t mind it a bit, that he is glad 
he has lost his tail, that, in fact, he is better oft than he 
was before. Now, this was a very big lie, and didn’t 
sound at all nice. 

And yet is not this just what many a poor drunkard 
says about his losses ? He, too, tries to make out that he 
is happier in a trap than out of it, and doesn’t feel at all 
worse off for having lost so much through drink. But 
nobody believes it, of course. 

A Proposal. 

A meeting, not of boys and girls, but of foxes; fancy 
that. It was called by our friend without a tail. He 
had a proposal to make, and he made it. It was this— 
“ All you foxes with tails, take my advice, and cut them 
off. You don’t know how nice you will look, how com¬ 
fortable you will be, with what ease you will whisk about, 
if you will only cut off your tails. Tails are ugly, quite 
unnecessary, and in the way. Cut them off, and be 
happy. ” 

Of course we know what it all meant. He wanted 
company. He felt lonely in being the only fox without 
a tail. He felt sure that if he could only induce a few 
foxes to keep him company he would be a happy fox 
again. 

Do you know, dear children, this is just what the 
drunkards do and say ? They laugh at sober folks. They 
say they are sorry for people who keep their money and 
wits. “ Come and drink with us. Come and keep us 
company.” And sometimes they will “stand treat,” 
because they are so lonely. Only they don’t say so. 

No, Sir ! 

Did the foxes cut off their tails ? Was it decided by 
the meeting that they would be better off without tails ? 
Not a bit of it. They all saw through our friend in a 
minute. 

11 1 rather think, my friend,” said one old fox, with a 
knowing smile on his face, “ that you would not have 
advised us to part with our tails if there were any chance 
of recovering your own.” 

How I wish, dear children, that men were as wise as 
these foxes, and instead of cutting off their beauty, and 
their character, and their fortunes, at the proposal of 
some bankrupt drunkard, would put their foot down with 
a decided—“ No, sir ! ” 

But at any rate, we will do it, dear children, won’t we? 
‘‘No, sir!” "No, sir!” “No, sir!" 


Parental Responsibility. —A brother minister told me 
that asafriend of his was being driven home by a gentleman 
in his carriage they began to speak of Mr. Sankey s hymns. 
The minister said, “ I much enjoy the singing of some of 
those hymns; some of them are exceedingly pathetic. 
There is that one—‘Where is my wandering boy to-night?”’ 
The gentleman said nothing. He was silent for many 
minutes, and at last he looked at the minister, and said, 
“ Sir, there is one kindness I would ask of you: my wife will 
be sure to ask you to sing, but whatever you do, do not sing 
1 Where is my wandering boy to-night ? ’ ” “ Why not ? ’ 

exclaimed the minister. ‘ ‘ Ah ! ” he said, 1 ‘ the story is too 
sad to be told at length, but I will tell you briefly. We had 
once a charming little boy; around him clustered our best 
hopes and brightest expectations. We thought we would 
make a man of him. We thought we would teach him to 
do what we did ourselves—take a glass and know when to 
give it up. He did learn to take a glass, but he didn’t 
learn when to give it up; and to-day he is far away, we 
know not where. We know not whether he may be alive 
or dead ; and, sir, if you sing that hymn you will break 
his mother’s heart.”— Rev. David Davies 








THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


125 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES.—Series II. 


TEMPERANCE WORK AND WORKERS. 

By Rev. J. P. GLEDSTONE, 

Author of “The Life and Travels of George Whitefieid,” “Save the 
Boys,” ‘‘Clean Lips.” 

No. 8.—TEMPERANCE LIFE ASSURANCE. 


FEAR you may think that the title of my 
address for this evening is not very interesting. 
“ Life assurance,’’ you say, “what is that? 
O, it’s something about business ; you see 
the name on big brass plates on office doors.’’ 
Yes, it is business : but it is interesting for 
all that. Now we all know that, as a rule, 
people are not very rich, and that when they 
die they generally leave either a small sum of 
money behind or no money at all. Only a 
few persons have the opportunity of making what is 
called a fortune; and it is not a good thing to make one. 
Working men cannot make fortunes, clerks cannot do it, 
soldiers and sailors cannot do it, ministers of religion 
cannot do it. I speak of these classes generally, for it is true 
that some few men belonging to them have made fortunes, 
and probably it will always be so. One of the wealthiest 
members of the House of Commons began life as a collier 
boy, and worked down a coal mine. But, as a rule, men 
have not much more income or wage than allows them to 
pay their way. Many, many thousands have not even 
that. Now the question will keep coming to a kind 
father’s mind—"What would my dear wife and dear 
children do if I were to die ? I have no money to leave 
them. I have no friends or relations who could keep them 
till they could help themselves. What pain and hardship 
they may have to go through.” It was this sort of thinking 
that led men to form what are called Life Assurance or 
Insurance Offices. A number of men agree to pay so 
much money per year on the understanding that when 
they die, their widows, or children, or nearest relations 
shall have so much money. For example, if a man were 
to pay £2 a year, his friends would receive £100 at his 
death ; if he paid £20 a year they would receive £1,000, 
and so on. But then you can see that as there are more 
chances of an old man dying than of a young one—that is 
to say, he will probably die first—it is just and fair that 
he should pay a larger sum per year. If he pays for a 
shorter time he ought to pay a correspondingly larger 
amount. This scale then would be about fair —£2 a year 
when a man is 25 years old, in order to insure £100 at 
his death; £2 15s. when he is 35; £3 15s. when he is 
45 1 £5 13s. when he is 55. This shows the wisdom of 
insuring when you are young, because the payments are 
extended over a long time, and you pay a smaller amount 
each year. It is like a boy having too big a load to carry 
at once, and therefore he takes and divides it, and then 
he gets along easily. When any one insures his life in 
the way I have described, his friends get the money he 
insured for, however and whenever he may die. As 
soon as he has made one payment, the amount insured 
for is safe. You might think it is hardly fair for a man to 
pay only once, and yet for his friends to get as much as 
the friends of another man who has paid fifty times. But 
it is the only way in which life assurance can be con¬ 
ducted. The payments are charged upon an average 
length of life, or number of payments. The men who live 
a long life help to pay for those who live a short life ; 
the society is a help-one-another-society. 

In 1840 Mr. Robert Warner, a gentleman carrying on 
business in London, insured his life, but was obliged to 
pay a higher annual sum because he was a teetotaler! 
This will surprise young abstainers who have always 
been taught that abstinence prolongs life, and is a great 



afeguard from accident. But men did not generally 
think that fifty years ago; indeed, they do not generally 
think it even now. Mr. Warner was a good deal 
astonished at the treatment he had received, and at the 
decision of the directors of this insurance company to 
charge all abstainers a higher premium because they 
thought it so injurious to health not to drink intoxicants. 
He consulted a friend of his named Mr. Compton, and 
they decided to start a Temperance Life Assurance 
Institution. On the last day of December, 1840, its tables 
and rules were enrolled according to Act of Parliament. 
A great many difficulties and discouragements had to be 
faced, as is always the case in good works. All teeto¬ 
tal .v. .verenot favourable to the scheme, and some gave a 
good deal of trouble. Opponents of temperance, of 
course, laughed at it, and were sure it would not prosper. 
The doctors almost unanimously condemned and opposed 
it. Up to 1850 it had a hard struggle for life ; but from 
that time it has prospered wonderfully. 

The lives of persons who are not abstainers are insured 
by this office as well as abstainers, but they are put in a 
different section, and treated in a different way. 
Persons can be transferred from one section to the 
other. Up to 1883 most of the new members were not 
abstainers, but since then many more abstainers have 
been received. You will ask, what is the advantage of 
being a member of the temperance section ? Both 
classes of members pay the same yearly premiums, but 
when there is a division of profits, as there is now and 
again, the teetotalers get a larger share of it than the 
others, because it has been found that their lives are so 
much better. For example, in 1886 two hundred and 
seventy-one teetotal members ought to have died, according 
to the ordinary death-rate of men generally, and the Office 
would have had to pay £64,614 to their relations. But 
instead of that only one hundred and seventy-one died, and the 
Office had only £41,720 to pay. It is only just, therefore, 
that the teetotalers should have the largest share of the 
profits. I ought to tell you that of the non-abstainers it 
was computed that 354 would die, and 337 did die : that 
gives a great difference in favour of the teetotalers. It 
is now proved beyond a doubt that teetotalers live longer 
than non-abstainers.* 

On the whole it was a good thing that Mr. Warner, 
who still lives, and is chairman of the Office he founded, 
was charged an exorbitant premium for his policy by the 
Office he went to. His policy, Number One, has been 
framed, and hangs in the Offices of the United Kingdom 
Provident Institution, r, Adelaide Place, London Bridge. 

This Office which began in such a humble way forty- 
six years ago, has now an accumulated capital of 
£4,001,936 4s. ; it has paid away since its foundation 
£2,600,000; this large sum has gone chiefly to widows and 
orphans. 

The principles of this society have been adopted by the 
Sceptre Life Association, which last year insured 860 
lives, 488 of which were abstainers. It also finds that 
abstainers live the longest. The Whittington and the 
Blue Ribbon Assurance Offices have followed in the wake 
of the Provident Institution. In New Zealand, in Canada, 
and in Australia, its good example is bearing fruit. 


*The following table will give the speaker the figures of both sections 
for twenty-one years at a glance. 


Years. 

Temperance, 

General. 

Expected 

Claims. 

Actual 

Claims. 

Expected 

Claims 

Actual 

Claims. 

1866-70. 

5 Years. 

549 

411 

1,008 

944 

1871-75. 

5 Years. 

723 

511 

1,268 

1,330 

1876-80. 

5 Years. 

933 

651 

1485 

1,480 

1881-85. 

5 Years. 

1,179 

835 

1,670 

1,530 

1886. 

i Year. 

271 

171 

354 

337 

Total— 

-21 Years. 

3,655 

2,579 

5,785 

5,621 

















126 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES—Sepies III. 


PHYSIOLOGY AND ALCOHOL. 

By Dr*. KATE MITCHELL. 


No. 8.—THE LUNGS. 
(Notes for the Blackboard.) 


( Bronchial tubes. 
Lungs -j Air-cells. 

I Blood-vessels. 

Exchange of Gases in Lungs. 
Carbonic acid (C0 2 ) given off. 
Oxygen (O) breathed in. 


E Lungs (right and left) are the organs of 
respiration, and are situated one in each 
side of the thorax or chest. The heart and 
its great vessels, and the trachea or wind¬ 
pipe, separate them from each other. The 
lungs occupy the whole of the chest except¬ 
ing that portion of it taken up by the heart 
and its vessels. The left lung is slightly 
smaller than the right on account of the 
heart being more to the left. The Diaphragm or Midriff 
is a large flat muscle, situated between the chest and the 
abdomen, and separating the lungs and the heart from the 
stomach, liver, and other contents of the abdomen. Its 
circumference is fastened to the last ribs on either side, 
and to the muscular walls of the abdomen, and to the 
breast-plate in front. It has two large openings about its 
centre for the passage of the Aorta and the Inferior Vena 
Cava, the first bringing the arterial blood away from the 
heart to the lower part of the body, and the last carrying 
back the venous blood to the right side of the heart. The 
diaphragm is a very important muscle in the act of 
breathing. It contracts like all other muscles in the body, 
and in so doing presses down on to the contents of the 
abdomen, thus enlarging the chest in a downward 
direction, and giving the lungs more room to expand in. 

(The contraction of muscle should be explained by the 
teacher). It can easily be seen that if this muscle is 
compressed in any way by tight bands or tight lacing, the 
lungs are prevented from acting so freely and so effectually 
as they otherwise would. 

Structure of the Lungs. —These organs are two sponge-like 
masses of tissue pervaded by the bronchial tubes, which 
terminate in the air-cells, and by the large and small blood¬ 
vessels. They are covered with a fine smooth membrane 
called the Pleura. Their colour in new born infants and 
animals is a beautiful pink, but in grown up people, 
inhabiting large cities, is a dark slate-grey. This 
difference in colour is owing to the gradual deposit of the 
carbon pigments in the substance of the lung. The 
atmosphere of a smoky city is full of such particles, and 
we take them in at every breath. They are not 
necessarily detrimental to the health of the lung. 

The Windpipe or Trachea is a wide open tube extending 
from the back of the mouth to about the middle of the 
chest. It there divides into two tubes not quite so large 
as itself, one going to the right lung, the other to the left. 
These are the bronchial tubes,which penetrate the lungs in 
every direction, dividing and sub-dividing until at last 
they terminate in the very smallest and finest tubes. 


These minute tubes eventually are seen to end in an 
expanded sac, called the air-cell. When you press a 
piece of the dead lung between your fingers it gives forth 
a little crackling sound; this is due to the air being 
pressed out of the fine air-cells. 

Air-cells. —These are very small, and cannot be seen in 
the lung with the naked eye. They are minute bladder-like 
expansions of the lung tissue, and really make up the 
greater part of the substance and area of the lungs. They 
are never totally devoid of air, even when we expire our 
hardest, but they expand with every breath we take in. 
The membrane of which their walls are composed is very 
fine and delicate, and contains an immense number of fine 
blood-vessels or capillaries, which bring the blood into 
close contact with the air in the air-cells. These 
capillaries are the minute branches of the large blood¬ 
vessels which leave the right side and enter the left side of 
the heart. Every bronchial tube in its ramifications 
through the lungs is accompanied by a pulmonary artery 
and vein (explain pulmonary), which get smaller and 
smaller as the air-tubes diminish in size, until at last they 
enter the capillaries. 

Changes that occur to the Blood in the Lungs. —When the 
blood leaves the right side of the heart to enter the lungs 
it is of a deep crimson (verging on purple) colour. This is 
due to the presence of the poisonous CO, gas contained 
in it. When it returns to the left side of the heart it is 
a bright scarlet. During its transit through the capillaries 
of the air-cells the blood has come into contact with the 
air we breathe which contains the life-giving gas, oxygen. 
The tiny red blood corpuscles seize upon the oxygen and 
give up the carbonic acid, and thus the blood is rendered 
bright red. This process is always taking place, i.e., 
every time we breathe, and anything which interferes 
with it, such as the head being kept under water, or a 
tight band being tied round the throat, will bring on 
speedy death through carbonic acid poisoning. Thus it 
can readily be seen how very necessary to health is 
plenty of fresh air, which contains this all-essential gas 
called oxygen, deprived of which in proper quantities the 
body can gradually pine away and die (the effect of 
sitting in close ill-ventilated rooms can here be pointed 
out. Headaches, languor, pallor, depression, &c., being 
caused by impure air). 

Effects of Alcohol upon the Lungs. —A great number of 
persons who are addicted to the immoderate use of alcohol 
suffer from bronchitis, which is an inflammation of the fine 
membrane lining the bronchial tubes. This inflammation 
is excited by the circulation of alcohol in the blood-vessels 
of the lungs. But damage is done to the lung by even 
small quantities of this drug. It paralyses the red blood 
corpuscles, and thus prevents them from performing their 
necessary function of oxygen-carrying. The paralysis 
is only a temporary one, and the red blood corpuscles 
soon recover themselves, but when alcohol is persisted in 
the exchange between the gases is made with more and 
more difficulty, and at last the whole body suffers from 
a deprivation of the oxygen upon which it lives and 
flourishes. In time the fine and delicate lung tissue 
itself becomes affected by alcohol, and disease is set up to 
such an extent very often that death results. Alcohol can 
be smelt in the breath of a person who has recently 
partaken of it, and thus we know that it passes through 
the lungs in the blood-vessels, and that its vapour is 
breathed out with the expired air. 


Total Abstinence of Dr. Samuel Johnson.— It is 
mentioned in Robert’s life of Hannah More, that in 
1783 that lady sat next to Dr. Johnson at a dinner party 
at the Bishop of Chester’s house. She says, “ I urged 
him to take a little wine. He replied, ‘ I can’t drink a 
little, child, therefore I never touch it. Abstinence is as 
easy to me as temperance would be difficult.’ ’’ 









THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


127 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES,—Series IV. 


MISCELLANEOUS. 

No. 8.—LESSONS FROM LEAVES. 

By Rev. R. H. LOVELL, Bromley, Kent. 


E man who had but one talent was the man 
who wasted it. Many are in danger of wast¬ 
ing influence in life because they are young, 
or little, or poor. We ought not to think of 
ourselves too highly, but where good is to be 
done we are far more likely to fail from the 
habit of saying, “I have no influence or 
power, I cannot do anything.” 

We all have influence and power ; we all 
can do much, and none are more powerful 
for good than children and young people. Their influence 
and example is most mighty and widespread. I want my 
young readers to go to school to the leaves, and learn from 
them. Let us have a chat with the green leaves, and ask 
them as to their life, influence, and power. 

What is a leaf? It is the little child of the tree. The 
leaves are the large family of the tree. They are the 
life, and health, and beauty of the tree. They make the 
tree. They are the lungs of the great oak by which it 
breathes. They are its mouth by which it largely eats 
and drinks. Every leaf has on its surface hundreds of 
little hairy spires, and through a very ordinary magnify¬ 
ing glass you will find that each of these little spires is an 
apparatus for breathing, and eating and drinking. So 
these leaves are busy all day long, feeding and nourish¬ 
ing and increasing the tree. 

Now think for a moment of all the timber that man has 
ever used. All the ships from the time that Noah built 
the ark down to Nelson’s Victory. Think of all the wood 
used in houses, churches, and for a thousand purposes. 
All wood is only the leaf hardened and made solid. Just 
so all character is only the little accumulated habits of 
daily life, formed and hardened into resolution and prac¬ 
tice, which nothing can finally disturb or overcome. 
Children in Bands of Hope should know that all healthy 
bodies, all vigorous brains, as well as all goodness of life, 
can only be built up little by little, by little daily and 
repeated habits, just as the little leaves increase the acorn 
until it becomes the giant oak. 

Now the leaves do something more beautiful than form 
wood. Young people all like fruit. It is so pleasant to 
look at—so beautiful in colour and shape, and so sweet to 
taste. I never knew any one who did not admire and like 
fruit. All fruit is only the little leaf formed into a beauti¬ 
ful form and substance. You can see in the apple, or the 
top of it, the remains of the twisted leaf. When a tree 
blossoms and bears fruit, the branch and leaf have sacri¬ 
ficed themselves, giving up their special life to form a new 
life of passionate beauty and glory. The law of self- 
sacrifice is the law of fruit-bearing. What lesson is there 
here for young abstainers ? This, my young friends. 
Just in proportion as we give up our likes and luxuries 
to do good to some one else, just in that proportion shall we 
have beautiful characters that every one must admire. We 
cannot bear fruit without self-sacrifice. That is the very 
heart and soul of the total abstinence question. Will you 
try and never forget two or three thoughts on this sub¬ 
ject, most forcibly and beautifully expressed by a great 
German thinker ? He has said this : — 

1. No man has a right to all his rights. 

2. The measure in which he determines to have all his 
rights will be the measure of his selfishness, and then no one 
can love or admire him. 

3. The measure in which he is willing to give up his 
rights for the sake of others will be the measure of his 


nobleness, and the measure in which he will be loved, 
admired, and able to render service to God and man. This 
is the law of the life of the leaf, and it is the law of all 
service and noble living, for every one of us. 

Each leaf has a special shape, and wears its own 
dress of beauty. The lime, sportive with gladness; the 
aspen, timorously bashful; the chestnut, beaming 
with good nature; the silver ash, modest with re¬ 
ticence ; the beech, warm-hearted; the oak, sturdy and 
independent; the pine, grave and stately; the elm, 
thoughtful and reflective; the poplar, always smiling. 
Each leaf helps to form a little family circle, and never 
takes up its brother’s room, or light, or shade, or moisture. 
They never rob each other of sunbeams or dewdrops. So 
we each have our own special character. That will be 
our glory if we cultivate it. Each of us has his place to 
fill, his work to do. Each of us has relations to other 
people we must never forget to discharge with unselfish 
love, and neighbourly kindness. Total abstainers are 
delighted to help, and keep their neighbours in the right 
way. 

The colours of leaves just depend on the soil the tree 
feeds on. If the tree feeds on iron, lime silex, potass, or 
magnesia, these salts and earths go up into the leaves. 
Then when the sun comes to try them, the leaves change 
colour according to what they have been eating. The iron 
in the oak comes out in the rust colour of its dying leaf. 
Is not this true in our life ? What men drink shows 
in their face, often in the nose. What men think and 
what men read and love to read, that is what the brain 
feeds on, and it shows in men’s character and action. 
What we sow, that we must reap. If any of my young 
readers will take some young buds next spring, and with 
their paint-boxes make notes of their tints and colours, 
and in the autumn take some dying leaves from the same 
tree, I think they will find the same tints in the buds as 
in the dying leaves, only, of course, fuller and deeper. 
As men live so they die. What we are in early life we are 
likely to be in after days. This is why it is so important 
to form the habit of abstinence in early life. 

Leaves really never die. They enlarge the tree. They 
leave behind marks on the branches where they have 
grown. And when in autumn they fall to the ground at 
the feet of their mother, they pass into the ground, and 
the old tree reabsorbs them, and so they live again on the 
tree in the coming spring. So if we let love shine on 
through all our life, if we drink in sunbeams of gladness, 
if the rain of duty’s constant influence inspire us, if the 
dews of prayer and sympathy enrich us, and if the law of 
self-sacrifice be the law of our life, we shall never die. 
We shall not only live the endless life in heaven, but we 
shall live in many others whom we have helped, 
strengthened, and saved. We shall live in years to come 
in many a Band of Hope, and in many a vigorous total 
abstinence cause, and we shall live in the life of our 
country, sober, free, and a blessing and example to the 
whole world. 


Slavery of Intemperance.— The sufferings of animal 
nature, occasioned by intemperance, are not to be com¬ 
pared with the moral agonies which convulse the soul. 
It is an immortal being who sins and suffers ; and as his 
earthly house dissolves he is approaching the judgment- 
seat in anticipation of a miserable eternity. He feels 
his captivity, and, in anguish of spirit, clanks his chain, 
and cries for help. Conscience thunders, remorse goads, 
and, as the gulf opens before him, he recoils, and 
trembles, and weeps, and prays, and resolves, and 
promises, and reforms, “and seeks it yet again ! ” Again 
resolves, and weeps, and prays, ” and seeks it yet again ! ” 
Wretched man ! he has placed himself in the hands of a 
giant who never pities, and never relaxes his iron grasp.— 
Lyman Beecher, D.D. 








128 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


©owe, tfjtestj) frienijg! 

Words by Emily Jane Moore. Music by Henry Coward. 





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3. Why stand with such a vacant stare ? 
Has all your courage fled ? 

Your soul’s destroyer lurketh there, 
With cup of poison red ! 


4. Then welcome, friends ! fill up the glass 
With water cool and clear ; 

And ere another moment pass, 

We’ll raise a Temperance cheer ! 


Key C. 


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THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


129 


A VILLAGE WAIF, AND HOW HE 
PROSPERED. 

Story for a Band of Hope Meeting. 

By Mrs. E. R. Pitman, Authoress of “Heroines of the 
Mission Field," “Giles Cornish ," dk. 

HEN a young man I was a member of the 
rural police in Devonshire. In that 
capacity I became acquainted with some 
very strange phases of human life. And 
the story of my “ Village Waif" was one 
of them. 

One night I was patrolling my rounds, 
keeping up my courage as I walked 
by reflections upon the probability of 
meeting with poachers. The rounds of 
the rural police were long, extending for 
miles into the country, past lonely belts of wood, and 
dark plantations, where the screech-owls hooted, and 
poachers laid traps for game. But as each of us had to 
meet a fellow-policeman at some allotted point, every 
night we screwed up our courage and trudged along, 
keeping one hand on the dark lantern, and the other in 
readiness for the bludgeon, which was always strapped 
ready for use on the right wrist. Some of our fellows 
were timid at times, especially after a murder had been 
committed in one of the dark lanes, and would hurry to 
the rendezvous with beating hearts, but others were 
older, and more time-hardened. They had gained experi¬ 
ence and daring in their nocturnal perambulations. 

On the special night to which I refer I was on the alert 
for poachers, because I had reason to believe that a gang 
were infesting that district of the country, and might any 
night make an incursion into the South Warren. The 
lord of the manor had an idea that poaching had been 
going on for some time on this part of his estate. As I 
neared the Warren, I listened,—when, lo ! the sound of 
sobbing broke on the stillness ! What could it mean ? 

I stood still, and listened again, to make sure. The 
winter wind was howling among the leafless branches, a 
touch of frost was in the air, and no moon was visible. It 
seemed to me that such a spot was a very dreary one to 
be adopted as a shelter by any human being in 
trouble. Then I almost decided that I had been mistaken ; 
and then, just as I was moving off, the sobbing commenced 
again. 

I could hesitate no longer, but made my way cautiously 
to the spot from whence the sounds proceeded. As I 
neared the spot I turned on my bull’s eye, and was 
astonished to find a boy, aged apparently about twelve or 
thirteen years of age, crouched within a hollow tree, 
crying as if his heart would break. 

“Halloo! my boy! What is the matter with you? 
What are you out here for—all alone in the woods—at 
this time of night ?” 

" Because, sir, I have no home to go to." 

“ No home ! Then surely you can go to the workhouse 
You should have gone there, boy. They wouldn’t have 
refused you.” 

" But I’d sooner starve than be either a workhouse 
waif or a gaol-bird. I promised my mother I’d be 
neither if I could help it." 

“ But," said I, " you may soon come to be a gaol-bird 
if you go about trespassing in this way. Don’t you know 
that I could take you into custody now, for trespassing in 
Squire Winwood’s cover?" 

“ Could you ?" he replied, starting to his feet, as if he 
would run off. 11 But I didn’t mean any harm by coming 
here, just for shelter ; I’m off again to-morrow morning, 
looking for work. Don’t take me up, please sir." 

“Well, I won’t," I replied, " oncondition that you tell 


me all the truth about yourself. Now, who are you and 
where do you come from ?" 

" Please, sir"—it wasn't often that 'a policeman was 
called sir —“ please, sir, my name is Harry Woodthrope; 
my mother is dead, and my father is transported. The 
people took our goods for the rent that was owing, and I 
was turned out of doors.” 

“ Are you Oscar Woodthrope's son ?—the man who was 
mixed up with that murderous affray with poachers down 
near Plympswell ?" 

“ Yes, sir ; I’m the only child," returned the boy with a 
sigh. 

“ And a good job too," I returned. “ There's the less 
of you to fight the world, and, I’m thinking, that will be 
a difficult thing for you to do singlehanded. I’m not 
sure that I ought not to take you into my charge at once, 
and see you off safely to the workhouse to-morrow." 

" Oh ! don’t, please, sir,” he pleaded. “ I only want a 
bit of shelter to-night. To-morrow I’ll move on further, 
and try to get work. I had some work at bird-keeping, 
but as there were other boys to do it, now harvest is over, 
the farmer discharged me. I won’t hurt anything here.” 

“Then what were you crying and sobbing for, just 
now ?” I asked. 

“ Please, sir, I was so hungry, and it was so cold and 
lonesome here—though I ain’t much afraid. That was all.’ ’ 

And enough, I should think. While I was listening to 
his tale, I stood mutely pondering on all the history of 
the poaching affray, which had ended in the execution of 
one man, and the transportation of two or three others, 
among whom was the father of this stray waif. Oscar 
Woodthrope’s life had been ruined by drink, gambling, 
and evil company. He had run through a large fortune, 
and had committed forgery upon his own father, because 
he knew that thereby he would escape punishment. 
After breaking his father’s heart by his career of crime 
and dissipation, he wooed and married a young lady, who 
in her turn had gone into a premature grave, leaving one 
little boy behind. The family had lived in a small town 
about ten miles distant from my home, but the whole 
history was known to me, as well as to every other mem¬ 
ber of the force for many miles round. I did not re¬ 
member that anybody had troubled their heads about the 
boy, who was quite tall and well-spoken for his years. 
However, it fell to my lot to meet with him on this night, 
ki this lonely plantation, nestling in a hollow tree, which, 
after all, afforded little shelter. Even as he talked to 
me, and protested his ability to fight the world, and his 
bravery in the struggle, his voice quivered, and fresh tears 
dropped down his face. 

I wasn’t a brute, you know, and I had lender feelings 
for little friendless children—the more especially as I 
had only very recently laid my only child to rest in his 
churchyard bed. We men in blue are not supposed to 
be tender-hearted, but that is all a mistake. 

“You must come home with me,” I replied, “ and have 
some food. I am not going to take you into custody, 
neither will I take you to the workhouse to-morrow, if I 
find you can do anything by way of work. What is your 
age?" 

“Please, sir, I’m just fourteen, and a day or two over,” 
he replied. 

“ How did you spend your birthday, then ?" 

" In looking for work, but I couldn't get any. If it 
were spring, plenty of farmers would be glad of a boy, 
but they say they don’t want any fresh hand now. I 
haven't done any work for nearly three weeks, but I’ve 
walked miles to get it; so [that all my money is done, 
Still, I don’t despair ; somebody must need a boy." 

How I wished that the boy had been my son. “ Some¬ 
body must need a boy ”—how the words struck me ! Yes, 
it occurred to me that I would have given the world to 
have seen my dead son as bright, and as determined to 
conquer difficulties as was this lad. But he was lying in 



130 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


the cold grave ; suppose that, for Charlie’s sake, I showed 
kindness to this, waif? I knew my wife well enough to 
feel certain that she would acquiesce in whatever I chose 
to propose. 

“ Come home with me, then,” I said, “ I will give you 
some supper, and a bed, after I have finished my round. 
You can walk with me, and be quick, for I have to go 
some distance yet.” 

Nothing doubting he went with me. In due time, by 
walking very briskly, we arrived at the appointed rendez¬ 
vous, and met the other man whose duty it was to meet 
me that night. Then we turned, and young Woodthrope 
accompanied me to my home. He seemed to have per¬ 
fect confidence in my good faith ; while, for my part, I 
was determined not to disappoint his trust. 

Have you ever seen a hungry growing boy eat, after a 
long time of compulsory fasting ? If you have not, you 
have missed one sight which can only be seen among the 
poorest of our fellow creatures. People who sit down 
every day to luxurious or well-spread tables, and per¬ 
haps fare so sumptuously that they find fault with all that 
is not super-excellent, can have no idea of the ravenous 
style in which my waif devoured his supper. At last I 
judged that he had eaten enough for his benefit, and 
showed him to a little pallet-bed in our'garret, where he 
slept so soundly and confidingly that he was fast asleep 
on the following morning when I went to call him. 

For a few days Harry Woodthrope remained about my 
premises, doing all manner of little jobs in the garden, and 
earning golden opinions from my wife, who quite took a 
liking to him. Then the village shop-keeper, who was 
destitute of an errand-boy, but who had noticed this boy’s 
handiness about my premises, gave him a trial, and, after 
a month’s probation, young Woodthrope became Mr. 
Slater’s “ right hand man.” 

Harry remained with Mr. Slater about eight years, 
becoming known to all in the village as a good, reliable 
young fellow, business-like, and honest. I think that at 
first a few regarded him somewhat suspiciously, with the 
feeling that nothing good could possibly come from Oscar 
Woodthrope’s household. But was it not said in old 
time, ‘‘Can any good come out of Nazareth?”—so the 
folks of our little old-world village might have been excused 
for looking somewhat askance at first upon the son of a 
convict. 

But I felt sure, somehow, that Harry would make his 
way in the world. I fancied I could see in him a steadi¬ 
ness, a promptness, and a principle, which all promised 
to make for him that ‘‘good name” which Solomon said 
was “ more to be desired than great riches.” And, poor 
fellow, he knew quite well that he would have to make 
his own way in the world. Having no father to back 
him in case of failure, nor mother to plead for him, he 
grew very watchful over himself, as if he were determined 
that his career as a self-made man should be without 
stain, and without reproach. 

Those were the early days of the Temperance reforma¬ 
tion. In many villages and towns the word “ teetotalism” 
was a strange one,—in many others it was the signal for 
ridicule or persecution. I did not join the temperance 
ranks until some years of labour and success had passed, 
but I could not help noticing that most of the steady, 
reading, rising young fellows cast in their lots with the 
temperance cause, and among them was my young friend 
Harry Woodthrope. 

How he liked to drop in of an evening and sit at our 
fireside. Very often he had some trouble to tell us, or 
some difficulty to discuss, for it was not a very uncommon 
thing for some unkind or evil disposed person to taunt him 
with something relating to his father. Poor fellow ! it 
was hard enough to have to bear the trial of knowing that 
the only relative he had in the world was a felon,—but it 
was a trifle harder when his conscience bore witness that 
he was trying hard to win a fair position and establish a 


good character, to have the sins of other people cast up at 
him. But such is the world’s amiable fashion. 

The village library, which was established about that 
time, for young fellows who desired mental improvement, 
was made much use of by Harry. Many and many a 
night he continued at his books until morning, snatching 
only two or three hours of sleep, and my wife would 
remonstrate with him for thus risking his health. But he 
would laughingly assure her that all who sought to rise 
in life needed to be intelligent and well-informed, and, 
provided Mr. Slater did not forbid the practice, he was 
determined to devote a portion of every night to study. 
As time went on, the results of this practice became 
manifest in increased [knowledge, breadth of view, and 
mental power. 

As he grew to young manhood he started a Band of 
Hope. Those were the early days of Bands of Hope, but 
Harry was quite abreast of the times. Others joined him, 
but he was the chief moving spirit, and, under his tuition 
boys and girls were trained in the principles and practice 
of temperance, who have since made no small figures in 
the world. And when, after a year of meetings and lec¬ 
tures the village turned out one fine day to attend our 
first temperance fete, Harry was at the head of the boys 
and girls, leading the procession, looking as proud and 
happy as he could possibly look. That day was a remark¬ 
able one in the annals of our little place. We older 
people began to discover that there was more to be taught 
about drink and drinking than we had ever dreamed of 
in our philosophy. 

Soon after this came the news of his father’s [death. 
Oscar Woodthrope died in a convict infirmary, and filled 
a convict’s grave. From that time none ever heard Harry 
breathe his father’s [name, but I think he registered a 
fresh vow to fight with all his powers against [the foe 
that had ruined the father of whom, in happier and more 
honoured circumstances, he might have been proud. But 
manhood was dawning upon him, and, seeking to see more 
of the great world, as well as to gain experience in his 
business, he removed to Bristol. 

From that date Harry Woodthrope’s progress was 
steady and remarkable. Stage by stage he rose—filling 
successfully the positions of shopman, clerk, confidential 
correspondent, and then junior partner. And all this 
without a penny of fortune, or a friend to use influence on 
his behalf. But what was better than all, he became a 
truly God-fearing man. He acknowledged the Lord in 
all his ways, and in return, according to the promise, 
all his steps were providentially directed. He also threw 
himself actively into the social movements of Bristol, and 
became known and respected as a true and valiant worker 
in the good cause of temperance. But we missed him 
sorely. 

Many years have gone by since then, and Harry is in 
his prime, while I am an old man. I have long ago 
abandoned my police work, and besides an annuity from 
the county funds, I enjoy a generous allowance from 
Harry. He is a prosperous man, ruling over one of the 
most flourishing mercantile houses Bristol can boast. 
And while his name is conspicuous in every list of 
charitable contributions, none of them have so much of 
his support as those charities intended for friendless 
waifs. Especially, also, is he at hand when any good 
deed has to be done on behalf of any sufferers from the 
drink traffic, or any impoverished children to be set in 
the way of earning honest livelihoods. In doing this, he 
feels that he is only showing his gratitude to that 
Providence which guided and blessed his own steps at a 
critical period of his history. His past experience has 
taught him pity for others. 

And if I am thankful for any one thing it is that I did 
not obey my first impulse on that dark, wild winter 
night, and arrest the little fellow on a charge of vagrancy. 

I might have done it and have acted strictly within the 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


limits of my duty ; but had I done so, the probability is 
that Harry Woodthrope would have ultimately followed 
in his father’s steps ; oppressed and chased by society’s 
laws, he would have gone from bad to worse, adding 
one more to the ranks of our “ criminal class,” until, very 
likely, he would have developed into a perfect Ishmaelite 
—his hand against every man, and every man’s hand 
against him. Thank God that I obeyed the promptings 
of my better nature, and so rescued a lamb of Christ’s 
fold from the jaws of the wicked one ! 


ILLUSTRATIONS FOR ADDRESSES. 

Drops from the Clouds v. Drops from the Still. 
The drops from the clouds in mercies disperse, 

But drops from the still are fraught with a curse. 

The drops from the clouds our comforts increase, 

But drops from the still engenger disease. 

The drops from the clouds make earth yield its fruit, 
But drops from the still turn man to a brute. 

The drops from the clouds prolong human life, 

But drops from the still cause bloodshed and strife. 

The drops from the clouds fill rivers and pools, 

But drops from the still turn wise mento fools. 

The drops from the clouds our passions control, 

But drops from the still kill body and soul.—T. W. H 
Victims of Domestic Drinking Usages.— “A tea¬ 
spoonful of rum toddy brought me to this,” said a young 
man, a few days before his execution, and on being asked 
to explain himself, continued, “When a child, my father 
was in the custom of taking me on his knee at dinner¬ 
time, and giving me one tea-spoonful out of his glass ; by 
this means the taste for drinking was acquired, under the 
influence of which I committed the crime for which I am 
now about to suffer.” Similar was the saying of a young 
lady of respectable connections, who died the drunkard’s 
death. “ I learned to love it while yet a child,” said she 
to her grandmother; “ when mama retired from the 
room with friends, I used to drink the drops left in the 
glasses ; then, when the opportunity presented itself, I 
took the stopper from the decanter, and drank a 
mouthful, so while yet a child I had learned to like 
it.” And there once came under our notice a case 
which reveals the secret how children acquire a taste 
for the liquor for which they have no natural appetite. 
Calling upon a friend he informed us that four boys in his 
employment, the eldest of whom was not twelve years of 
age, had gone the week before to a tap-room, kept by a 
professing Christian woman, and, joining their pence 
together, had shared in a gill of spirits. To satisfy our¬ 
selves on the point, we requested the boys might be 
brought up. There they stood, like little conscience- 
stricken criminals. “ When did you last taste spirits ?” 
we asked, to introduce the subject. They seemed abashed 
at the recollection which the question suggested, and the 
eldest only would undertake to speak. “ Last Monday 
night,” said he. “Where did you get it?” “In the 

house of Mrs. -." “How much did each of you 

drink ?” “ Less than a glass.” “ Who gave it to you ?” 

“Mrs. B-.” “Did she say nothing about your 

being too young to drink ?” “No; she just showed us into 
a room, and brought in the gill.” “And why did you go 
into such a place ? do you like whisky ?” “No.” “Why 
then did you drink it ?” Here there was a pause. Not 
one of the four could adduce a reason for their conduct. 
But to us it was perfectly plain that they had purchased 
and drunk the liquor from no love to it, but simply under 
the impression that they were acting a manly part in 
going to the place so much frequented by those above 
them in years.— Rev. Wm. Reid. 

An African Chief and the Drink Traffic. —The 
Basutu chief Moshesh issued a proclamation in reference 
to trade with his people. The notice was as follows :— 
“ L Moshesh, write for any trader, whoever he may be, 


I 3 I 

already in my land, and for any who may come to trade 
with the Basutus; my word is this—Trade to me and my 
tribe is a good thing; I wish to promote it. . Further, 
the law that I issued on the eighth day of November, 
1854, I renew this day, that people may be reminded of 
it, and conform themselves to it. The law runs as 
follows :—The brandy of the whites was unknown to 
Matie and Motlomi, and to the ancestors of the tribe as 
far as Monaheng. And Mokachane has attained to an 
old age, drinking only milk and water, for intoxicating 
drinks do not become a good judge. Drink brings in 
contention; it deviates the judgment, it cannot uphold 
the town. The brandy of the whites is fire. Therefore, 
let it be known that it is not lawful to sell it among the 
Basutus, and any man who brings it, whether he be 
black or white, to sell it in the tribe, exposes himself to 
its being spilled on the ground. And that is all—I am, 
Moshesh, X,” his mark, chief of the Basutus. 

The Man and the Beauty. —A man one day wander¬ 
ing about in a beautiful wood beheld a creature, beauti¬ 
fully spotted; it shone in the sun with a glassy bright¬ 
ness. He was enchanted with his prize, and was going 
to take it up, when a friendly voice greeted him, and 
warned him that the creature which looked so beautiful 
was really very venomous, and he ran great risk of 
personal injury if he persisted in taking it home. Heed¬ 
less, however, of the friendly warning, he carefully picked 
it up and put it under a glass shade, and took special 
delight in showing it to admiring friends. On one occa¬ 
sion he made a great feast, and invited many friends, and 
when they were merry he introduced the beauty, lifting 
off the cover with caution, expatiated on its qualities, and 
warned them to be cautious. The creature, however, 
was like the company, somewhat excited, and when the 
people were off their guard, he darted about and stung 
several of the company ; some were scarcely hurt, some 
were made very ill, but some [were mortally wounded, 
and this was the result of the rash man’s folly in intro¬ 
ducing a dangerous reptile into his household. I think I 
need scarcely say that the man in the fable is not more 
foolish than the man who introduces the serpent alcohol, 
which has ruined the peace and blighted L the hopes of 
many a household. 

The Strongest Drink. —Water is the strongest drink 
It drives mills; it is the drink of lions and horses ; and 
Samson himself never drank anything else. Let young 
men be teetotalers, if only for economy’s sake. The beer 
will soon build a house. If what goes into the mash tub 
went into the kneading trough, families would be better 
fed and better taught. If what is spent in waste were 
saved against a rainy day, poor houses would never be 
built. The man who spends his money with the 
publican, and thinks the landlord’s bow, and “How 
do you do, my good fellow?” means true respect, is 
a perfect simpleton. We don’t light fires for the herring’s 
comfort, but to roast him. Men do not keep pot-houses 
for the labourer's good ; if they do they certainly miss 
their aim. Why, then, should people drink “for the 
good of the house ”? If I spend money for the good of 
the house, let it be my own house, and not the landlord’s. 
It is a bad well into which you must put water ; and the 
beerhouse is a bad friend, because it takes your all and 
leaves you nothing but a headache. He who calls those 
his friends who let him sit and drink by the hour together, 
is ignorant—very ignorant. Why, red lions, and tigers, 
and eagles, and vultures, are all creatures of prey, and 
why do so many put themselves within the power of their 
jaws and talons ? such as drink and live riotously and 
wonder why their faces are so blotched and their pockets 
so bare, would leave off wondering if they had two grains 
of wisdom. They might as well ask an elm tree for pears 
as to look to loose habits for health and wealth. Those 
who go to the public-house for happiness climb a tree for 
fish.—C. H. Spurgeon. 







132 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


(•TorrespotvtiettCf. 

A LETTER FROM AUSTRALIA. 

To the Editor of the Band of Hope Chronicle 

Dear Sir, —The March number has just reached us, 
and is quite up to its predecessors in interesting informa¬ 
tion and sterling knowledge. My object in writing now 
is to refer to the subject of Drum and Fife Bands 
introduced by your correspondent “Earnest Worker." 
Out of our Juvenile Tent of Rechabites, about two hundred 
strong, we chose twenty members: the first cost for 
instruments and uniform, which is “ sailors’ dress," was 
^35. which was raised by subscription lists, entertainments, 
&c. ’ We practise in a large room over a tailor’s shop in 
the principal street of one of the most populous 
suburbs of Melbourne, and though now numbering 
sixty playing members, we have no complaints from 
neighbours. ^ Since we started many other bands have 
come and gone, some the outcome of visits we have paid 
to Temperance and Band of Hope meetings. Let me give 
a case in point. About three years ago we agreed to conduct 
a public meeting for the Band of Hope connected with one 
of our Congregational Churches. Pleased with the effort 
and success that attended it, the Band of Hope alluded to 
decided to have a Drum and Fife Band, which was started 
with great promise, and went well for a little while, but 
soon there were signs of decay; the older members 
thought they were too big for a Band of Hope; the 
President and leaders lost interest; the Band of Hope 


became secondary; the band eventually seceded and finally 
broke up, after lasting about twelve months, and leaving the 
Band of Hope much the worse for its having had a Drum 
and Fife Band. Our difficulty re the senior members has 
been got over by making them members of the adult tent, 
to which the juvenile tent in which the Band was started 
belongs. In the Band of Hope work might they not be 
enrolled as assistant teachers and helpers? Make them feel 
that the blowing of the flute and the rattling of the drum 
can be put to good use in the entertaining of the juvenile 
members of the Band of Hope in which they were trained, 
and priding themselves in the thought, you will tide 
them over the most critical time in their lives. The fact 
is, Mr. Editor, this, like every other branch of Temperance 
work, to be successfully maintained, will require earnest 
effort and constant watchfulness. Organize bands by all 
means, get the very best instruments and ablest conductor 
procurable—but whatever is done, keep it as an auxiliary 
only. Here in Australia, thousands of miles from the old 
land, your work and efforts are watched with deep interest. 
Your outline addresses and themes in the Chronicle are 
proving valuable aids and helps to many a struggling 
worker in the Band of Hope, Sunday-school, and Juvenile 
Tent, and although the strongholds of sin and intempe¬ 
rance are many and varied we are looking forward to the 
time when Young Victoria and bright Sunny Australia 
will be free from the drink curse and all its attendant 
evils. 

Faithfully yours, 

Samuel Manger. 

Melbourne, Australia. 


©nifea Eingtrom BaitU of Hop Sintew. 



N our last issue we gave a copy of the 
address which had been forwarded 
to the Home Secretary for presenta¬ 
tion to the Queen on the fiftieth 
anniversary of Her Majesty’s acces¬ 
sion to the throne. Just after we had 
gone to press, and quite unexpectedly, 
an intimation was received from the 
Home Secretary that Her Majesty had expressed 
her willingness to receive the address in person, 
and appointing a time for the attendance of a 
deputation. Accordingly, on Monday, June 
27th, Mr. George Williams, the President, and 
Mr. Stephen Shirley, the founder and present 
Chairman of Committee, proceeded to Windsor, 
when the address was very graciously received 
and acknowledged by Her Majesty. We believe 
that only about a hundred addresses out of more 
than two thousand were received by deputa¬ 
tion, and our friends may therefore feel gratified 
that the Queen has in this way manifested 
her interest in our important department of 
temperance work. 


The sermons and meetings in connection 
with the autumnal conference, which will this 
year be held in York, will take place on Sunday, 
Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, September 


nth, 12th, 13th, and 14th. The committees of 
the York and District Band of Hope Union, 
and of the County Organisation, whose autum¬ 
nal meetings are to be held in conjunction with 
those of the Parent Society, are doing their 
utmost to make the gatherings thoroughly 
successful. Full announcements will be made in 
our next issue, but in the meantime friends will 
be glad to learn that an excellent programme is 
in preparation, and that Canon Fleming, Mr. 
Raper, and Mrs. Reaney are amongst the 
speakers who are expected to take part in the 
meetings. Few English cities are so pleasantly 
situated or so rich in historical and antiquarian 
associations as the ancient city of York, and 
our friends will do well to respond to the hearty 
invitation extended by the local committee, and 
arrange to take their annual holiday at the time 
of the Conference. 


For some time past our well-known and 
esteemed agent, Mr. William Bell, has been 
far from well, and in May last his illness 
assumed such a serious aspect that the com¬ 
mittee arranged for his taking two months’ 
entire rest. At the end of that time, however, 
he was still in a very serious and prostrate con¬ 
dition. It being thought that a return voyage 









THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


I 33 


to Australia would in every probability 
thoroughly restore him, he leaves England for 
this purpose by the Ivanhoe sailing ship towards 
the close of July. We hope to see him again 
early next year, and in common with thousands 
of his friends in all parts of the United Kingdom, 
trust that he will return in perfectly restored 
health, fitted for many more years of active and 
successful service. 


CRYSTAL PALACE TEMPERANCE FETE. 


HE Annual Temperance Fete at the Crystal 
Palace, this year under the management of 
the Good Templars, took place on Tuesday, 
July 12, and was favoured with beautiful 
weather. In this respect nothing better could 
have been desired, and the occasion, besides 
advancing in many ways the temperance 
enterprise, proved a most enjoyable holiday 
to between thirty and forty thousand visitors 
from all parts of the country. The pro¬ 
gramme was, as usual, both varied and 
interesting. Indeed, on occasions such as these, when 
large crowds differing in taste have to be catered for, it is 
almost impossible to have too many items of interest going 
at the same time. Undoubtedly the chief attractions were 
the two great Choral Concerts on the Handel Orchestra, 
each supported by 5,000 vocalists. The earlier of these 
was conducted by Mr. G. W. Williams, and consisted of 
singers from the provinces, many of whom had come long 
distances. The second was led by Mr. G. W. Hardwidge, 
who, appearing for the first time as a Crystal Palace 
conductor, more than justified the choice of the com¬ 
mittee. His singers mostly belonged to Metropolitan 
Societies. Both choirs did well, the strong points being, 
as usual, in the Provincial Concert, fulness of tone, and 
in the Metropolitan, vivacity and expression. Both 
concerts were accompanied by Miss Flora Hickman, who, 
as a child, had frequently taken part as a singer in Band 
of Hope concerts at the Crystal Palace. Another musical 
item was the Choir Contest, at which the first prize was 
taken by the Temperance Choral Society (conductor, Mr. 
J. A. Birch), closely followed by the Cardiff Choir, under 
Mr. Jacob Davies, the Nottingham Tabernacle Band of 
Hope being a good third. An evening ballad concert was 
also arranged for, in which Miss Mary Davies took part. 

Out of doors the engagements were numerous and enjoy¬ 
able. Three cricket matches were watched with con¬ 
siderable interest ; athletic competitions occupied the 
sports grounds, an hour’s “ Go as you please race ” giving 
members of temperance societies the opportunity of 
demonstrating how hard teetotalers can work under a hot 
sun. The procession was an imposing spectacle, gay 
with flags, banners, and regalia, and headed by a good 
band from Rotherham. On such a thirsty day the 
fountains were pleasant to behold, whilst a monster 
balloon, which floated away in the direction of Essex, was 
watched by thousands of interested spectators. Amongst 
the more serious items on the programme were two great 
temperance meetings, under the respective presidency of 
Sir Wilfrid Lawson and Mr. Joseph Malins, at which the 
leading organisations, including, of course, the Band of 
Hope Union, were represented. The Grand Lodge of 
Good Templars held a special session; the Sons of 
Temperance and the Vegetarians utilised the occasion ; 
and open-air meetings were also held. The grounds of 
the Palace were illuminated at dusk, and afforded a 
refreshing promenade after the heat of the day. All the 
arrangements worked smoothly and well, and reflect great 
credit on Mr. W. Parncutt, to whose arduous labours the 


pleasantness of the gathering is so largely due. Owing to 
the prevalence of provincial jubilee festivities and other 
causes, the attendance was hardly so great as the labours 
of our friends deserved, but during the day 32,523 persons 
passed the turnstiles. We subjoin a summary of the 
attendance at each of the Fetes held since 1862. 


Y ears. 

N umbers. 

W eather. 

Years. 

N umbers. 

Weather. 

1862 

.... 19,149 ... 

Fair. 

1876 ... 

•• 33,080 

_ Fine. 

1863 

.... No Fete. 


1877 .. 

.. No Fete. 


1864 

- 16,831 ... 

Wet. 

1878 

.. 60,542 

.... Fine. 

1865 

• ■ • ■ 32,472 • ■ • 

Fair. 

1879 (July) 36,874 

.... Fair. 

1866 

.... 28,052 

Wet. 

1879 (Sept ) 32,166 

_ Fair. 

1867 

.... 30,628 

Wet. 

1880 .. 

.. 64,532 

.... Fine. 

1868 

.. .. 42,877 ... 

Fine. 

l88l 

■ • 48,70s 

.... Fine. 

1869 

.... 53,780 ... 

Fine. 

1882 (July) 26,732 

.... Fine. 

1870 

.... 50,016 

Fine. 

1882 (Sept.) 43,050 

.. .. Wet. 

1871 

- 63,069 ... 

Fine. 

1883 .. 

■ • 66,957 

.... Fine. 

1872 

.... 62,280 .... 

Wet. 

1884 .. 

•• 48,653 

.... Fine. 

1873 

.... 53,090 ... 

Fine. 

1885 .. 

.. 38,248 

.... Fine. 

1874 

.... 31,780 ... 

Fine. 

1886 .. 

.. 42,9x0 

.... Fine. 

1875 

- 35,002 • • • 

Fine. 

1887 .. 

•• 3^,523 

.... Fine, 


TESTIMONIAL TO MR. ROBERT RAE. 


NE of the most pleasant gatherings which we 
have attended in connection with the tempe¬ 
rance cause was that on Thursday, July 7th, 
in Exeter Lower Hall for the purpose of 
presenting a testimonial to the esteemed 
Secretary of the National Temperance 
League. The effort was quite spontaneous 
in its character, and was worked in a very 
quiet manner. This being so, it is gratifying 
to be able to state that the contributions 
amounted to over fifteen hundred pounds. The testi¬ 
monial took the form of a very handsomely illuminated 
address, a silver tea and coffee service, specially presented 
to Mrs. Rae, and a purse containing the above-mentioned 
amount. After a prayer by the Rev. Canon Fleming, and 
a statement by Mr. John Taylor relating to several inte¬ 
resting circumstances connected with the origination and 
conduct of the effort, the testimonial was presented by the 
Bishop of London. In his own peculiarly powerful 
and graceful manner the Bishop expressed his high sense 
of the obligation under which Mr. Rae had placed the 
temperance movement by his devoted efforts. There 
might, said the Bishop, be men whose names were oftener 
in men’s mouths, but nowhere should we find a man more 
naturally the leader of men on such a subject as this than 
Mr. Rae. The presentation was then made amidst 
enthusiastic applause. Several speeches were then de¬ 
livered by representatives of organisations and personal 
friends of Mr. Rae. Dr. Hannay, whom we were glad to 
learn had passed his fiftieth year of teetotalism, referred 
in warm terms to his early friendship with Mr. Rae in 
Scotland,and lamented thefact that the engrossing nature of 
his duties precluded him from taking an active part in tem¬ 
perance work. Mr. William Walker, after referring to the 
pleasant character of the gathering, characterised Mr. 
Rae, in the words of the late Lord Beaconsfield, as “a 
man without a redeeming vice.'’ The Rev. Dawson Burns 
pictured an ideal secretary, and maintained that Mr. Rae 
approached a standard impossible of mortal attainment as 
nearly as man might. The Rev. J. G. Gregson reminded 
the meeting that the work of a good man was really the 
work of God through him, that Mr. Rae had been staunch 
to principle, and had therefore been divinely used for a 
great end. Mr. Robert Stark referred to Mr. Rae’s 
editorial labours in sustaining the responsibility of the 
“ Temperance Record,” “ The Temperance Mirror,” 
“ The Medical Temperance Journal,” and “ The National 
Temperance League’s Annual,” and occasioned some 
amusement by showing a very early specimen of Mr. Rae’s 
editorial skill in one of the first issues of the “ Scottish 
Temperance Register.” Mr. Rae, in thanking his many 


























134 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE . 


well-wishers, spoke of the cordiality of his relations with 
the Committee of the League, paid a graceful tribute to 
his fellow-workers now departed, and defended the wisdom 
of the principle on which he had acted throughout his 
career, that the true remedy for intemperance was to be 
found in individual abstinence and the spread of accurate 
information on the subject. The vote of thanks to the 
Bishop was proposed by Dr.B. W. Richardson, seconded 
by Dr. Martin, supported by Mr. W. I. Palmer,_ who is 
never far away when a liberal or graceful act is to be 
done. The proceedings were rendered additionally 
pleasant by the singing of the Temperance Choral Society, 
under the leadership of Mr. J. A. Birch. 


THE BRITISH TEMPERANCE LEAGUE. 


E good old town of Bradford claims the 
double honour of forming the first Band of 
Hope Union, and of possessing the first hall 
erected directly for temperance teaching. It 
was therefore fitting that the British Tempe¬ 
rance League—the oldest of our national 
temperance organisations—should hold its 
anniversary, the fifty-third, in this important 
and prosperous northern centre. 

The conference meetings, which were held 
in the Technical College, Bradford, on Monday, Tuesday, 
and Wednesday, July 4th, 5th, and 6th, were largely 
attended, and in every respect successful. On the 
Sunday sermons and addresses were delivered in thirty 
four places of worship and in addition, a number of op en 
air meetings were held. On Monday evening Mr, 
Alderman Priestman held a reception in the Hall of the 
Technical College, about 150 representatives being 
present, Mr. Martin Field and Mr. Charles Wakely repre¬ 
senting the United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 
During the evening addresses were delivered by Mr. 
Alderman Priestman, Sir Henry Mitchell, Mr. Alderman 
Barlow, Mr. Alderman Clegg, Mr. J. H. Raper, and Mr. 
Charles Wakely. 

At the conference on Tuesday there was a large atten¬ 
dance of delegates and representatives. The annual 
report was read, and it was interesting to note that in 
the discussion which followed almost every speaker urged 
the paramount importance of giving the young correct 
and systematic temperance teaching. Addresses were 
delivered by delegates from various temperance associa¬ 
tions, and the Rev. T. de Vine and Mr. Charles Wakely, 
representing the Band of Hope movement, referred to the 
work carried on by the Parent Society, making special 
allusion to the usefulness of its publications and to the 
success which had attended its lectures in Board and 
Elementary schools of the Metropolis. The announce¬ 
ment that the committee intended to extend this useful 
branch of its work to the Provinces was received with 
much satisfaction. The morning conference closed with 
a paper by Mr. Thomas Whittaker, of Scarborough, on 
“ Our Position and Prospects,” some of the reflections in 
which, though somewhat severe, are well worth the 
attention of faithful and earnest workers. The paper 
denounced the undue amount of entertainment at 
temperance meetings, which often excluded solid tempe¬ 
rance teaching. If a meeting were called for the promo¬ 
tion of the cause it should not be spoiled by the intrusion 
of comic songs and other vocal inanities. How was it 
possible to teach any good, when between each speech 
there was a song which had not the slightest reference to 
the subject matter before the meeting ? 

After luncheon the conference again met, when an 
interesting paper was read by Dr. Scougall, of 
Pluddersfield, on ‘ ‘ Alcohol [and the Human Body,” and 
the day’s proceedings were brought to a close by a largely- 



attended public meeting, at which addresses were given 
by the Chairman, Alderman Barlow, Dr. F. R. Lees, 
Mr. J. H. Raper, and other speakers. 

The conference was resumed on Wednesday, when a 
number of resolutions were adopted, one “gratefully 
recognising the increased interest taken in Band of Hope 
work, especially in the impartation of instruction to the 
young in the science of true temperance by means of 
lectures and competitive examinations.” The resolution 
was ably supported by the Rev. R. H. Dugdale and other 
speakers. A public Band of Hope meeting was held in 
the evening in the Hall of the Technical College 
Alderman F. Priestman occupied the chair, and addresses 
were given by Mr. T. Whittaker, Rev. J. A. Johnston, of 
Glasgow, Mr. Charles Wakely, and other gentlemen. 
This meeting, which was largely attended, concluded the 
series of events in connection with the annual gathering 
of the British Temperance League. 


INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON 
INEBRIETY. 



N important Congress of a Colonial and Inter¬ 
national character, promoted by the Society 
for the Study and Cure of Inebriety, was held 
in London, onWednesday, July 6th ; the meet¬ 
ing place was the Town Hall, Westminster, 
and the proceedings consisted of two sessions 
of the Congress and a public dinner. The 
circular convening the meeting was an impos¬ 
ing document,presenting amongst the patrons 
a long list of episcopal dignitaries and others 
eminent by talent or by social position. The papers 
were practical and interesting, and gave information as 
to the modes of dealing with inebriates in America, the 
Colonies, and various Continental States. At the morn¬ 
ing sitting, when the chair was taken by Dr. Charles 
Cameron, M.P., the opening address was delivered by the 
President of the Congress, Dr. Norman Kerr, in which 
he strongly insisted that the physical aspect of the 
consequences of strong drink should not be lost sight of in 
the contemplation of the moral evil which it produces. The 
chair was taken in the afternoon by Dr. B. W. Richardson, 
whose thoughtful address, abounding with important fact, 
put in that delightfully clear and fascinating manner of 
which the doctor is so consummate a master, will long be 
remembered by those whose privilege it was to be present. 
At both sittings many papers were read—so many, indeed, 
that we were surprised to find how much could be said on 
the various sides of this painful subject. Besides the papers 
as to the treatment of inebriates, legal and voluntary, were 
others on the pathology of intemperance, its relation to 
insanity and disease, and the fearful influence of heredity 
on many sufferers from the ravages of drink. Occasionally 
and indirectly a word was said in favour of total abstinence 
as a preventive, but the chief object of the Congress, as of 
the Society which convened it, was to make the difficult 
attempt at cure. The dinner, served in the Great Hall, 
was well attended and enlivened by the strains of the 
Anglo-Hungarian band. A long, almost too long a list of 
toasts were drunk, or not drunk, for some of the guests 
were very uncertain as to the right way of drinking a toast, 
in unfermented wine and other harmless beverages. 
Replies were made by various foreign visitors and members 
of the Congress. Two other events in connection with the 
occasion were the reception meeting in the rooms of the 
Medical Society of Dr. T. J. Crothers, Hartford, Conn . 
U.S.A., Secretary to the American Association for the Cure 
of Inebriates, and a visit by several members to the 
Dalrymple Home for Inebriates near Rickmansworth, 
where the methods of the Society were seen in actual 
operation. 









THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


135 


&ecortr» of progress from Hocal gjowttes. 


ISanti of Antons. 

Dumfries and Maxwelltown.— The second annual demonstra¬ 
tion and picnic of this Union took place on Saturday afternoon, 
June nth. Fifteen societies took part. The members present 
numbered considerably over 1,000 children and workers. The 
procession was marshalled on the Dock Park and marched 
through the principal streets of Dumfries and Maxwelltown 
cn route for the farm of Lockside, where a field had been kindly 
granted by Mr. Paterson. After the supply in abundance of 
bread and milk, games were heartily enjoyed until tea time, 
and from then until the homeward start shortly after seven 
o'clock. The procession excited much interest, the streets 
being lined with spectators. 

Hackney and East Middlesex. —This large and influential 
Union has issued its eleventh annual report, which is full of 
interesting and encouraging facts, but commences with an 
urgent appeal for more constant and devoted help on the part 
of workers. It draws attention to the fact that individually 
the societies as a rule are improving their methods of work 
and reaping the reward of increased success. During the 
year, fourteen societies have joined and six have ceased work¬ 
ing, leaving the membership at 136, a net increase of eight. A 
very elaborate and carefully compiled table shows the statis¬ 
tical condition of every society which has made a return, and 
thus affords committees an opportunity for measuring their 
own societies against its neighbours. The speakers’ plan is 
still a useful feature. Amongst the special meetings were the 
annual meetings, a demonstration at Tottenham, prayer 
meetings, a juvenile temperance mission, united gatherings, 
meetings of senior scholars in Sunday-schools, an autumnal 
council meeting, social gatherings, Saturday popular enter¬ 
tainments, and a special gathering of elementary school 
teachers. The income amounted to £i2g, and there is a 
balance—but not a large one—due to the treasurer. 

Lancashire and Cheshire.— A temperance fdte was held on 
Saturday, July 2nd, at the Manchester Exhibition, arranged 
by a joint committee of the various temperance organisations 
of Manchester, including the Manchester and Salford Tempe¬ 
rance Union, the Church of England Temperance Society, the 
Wesleyan District Temperance Society, the Good Templars, 
the Rechabites, the Sons of Temperance, the British Women’s 
Temperance Association, and the Lancashire and Cheshire 
Band of Hope Union. The attendance was 39,085, and repre¬ 
sented organisations from so far north as Barrow and Carlisle, 
and from so far south as Bath and Bristol. No intoxicating 
drinks of any sort were sold in the exhibition during the day. 
Cheap excursions ran from every town on the Lancashire and 
Yorkshire Company’s system. The proceedings opened in the 
morning with a conference of the district vegetarian society. 
A contest of temperance choirs followed, Bacup being given 
the palm out of eight societies competing. In the afternoon a 
united temperance meeting was held in the concert room at 
the far end of the nave, about 8,000 people being present. 
Speeches were delivered by the Rev. Canon Kelly, Dr. F. R. 
Lees (Leeds), Mrs. Chant (London), Mr. J. H. Raper (London), 
and Mr. Joseph Malins (Birmingham). A resolution hostile 
to the sale of liquors on Sundays was passed, and a petition 
to the same effect was adopted for presentation to the Houses 
of Parliament. Following the meeting came a concert by an 
adult choir of 750 voices, Mr. G. W. Lane conducting, and Mr. 
W. H. Whitehead presiding at the organ. A further concert 
was given later in the day by Mr. G. W. Lane’s Manchester 
Temperance Choir, which has twice won the first prize at the 
Crystal Palace contest; and a juvenile choir of 1,000 voices, 
led by the Rev. Carey Bonner, gave a similar entertainment. 
During the afternoon, the members of the Rechabite Order 
held a meeting under the presidency of Mr. Edwin Mansfield. 
The I.O.G.T. also held a special session, presided over by Mr. 
Malins. The fete was brought to a close by brass band and 
fife and drum band contests, a large number of temperance 
bands competing. 

Methodist New Connection.—The Monitor, the organ of this 
Union, contains the annual report, which records a year of 
aggressive work and prosperity, which has greatly encouraged 
the committee and their friends. The associated societies 
have increased by eleven, the number now being 256; the 
respective memberships have increased, and 466 more meet¬ 
ings have been held this year than last. A demonstration was 


held in connection with the conference; instructive lectures 
have been delivered ; Temperance Sunday duly observed ; the 
publication department well sustained. The income was 
£82, and although the expenditure was somewhat larger the 
treasurer had an available balance from last year sufficient to 
more than cover the deficit. 

South Essex.— This well-worked and successful Union reports 
a constituency of 85 societies, with 10,053 members; an 
increase of five societies and 572 members during the year. 
These are officered by 618 workers, and have held 3,532 meet¬ 
ings. The annual meetings were held at Stratford ; a con¬ 
ference of workers at Leytonstone. The eleventh annual 
demonstrations were successful, and united festivals proved 
useful. Band of Hope Sunday was duly observed, and 
autumnal meetings held. Drawing-room conferences proved 
very useful; the speakers’ plan was well worked ; dissolving 
view lectures delivered, and workhouse and industrial schools 
well looked after. The labours of the agent were very highly 
appreciated, and contributed largely to the encouraging suc¬ 
cess of the Union. Income, £156; expenditure, £161. In 
connection with a three-weeks’ Blue Ribbon Mission, held at 
Canning Town during July, three Saturday afternoon meetings 
of children were arranged by the Union, preceded by a pro¬ 
cession, and addressed by Messrs. Wm. Colman, W. N 
Edwards, Charles Wakely, Alderman Phillips, A. F. Hills, 
William Noble, and others. The mission resulted in the 
taking of upwards of 4,000 pledges. 


Hfletcopoltian 33attb of ?$ope. 

Silver Street, Notting Hill— The service of song, “The 
Start in Life,” was given by the members of this society and 
their companions of the Bayswater Orphanage, on Wednesday, 
June 29th. The readings were given by Mr. J. Hardie, M.A., 
the music being conducted by Mr.Wyndham A. Bewes, LL.B 
The success was so encouraging that it has been decided to 
promote a similar one with “ Bart’s Joy.” 


Hibernian. 

An event long looked forward to and fondly remembered 
by the Band of Hope children of Dublin and two hundred miles 
round is the annual fete and flower show at Balls Bridge 
Grounds. The fete for the present year was held on Friday, 
July 1st, with most gratifying success. The fete of last year 
showed somewhat of retrogression in point of numbers, and this 
fact supplied our enthusiastic Irish friends with a determina¬ 
tion to recover, and more than recover, their lost ground. The 
result was an immense gathering, the largest, it was said 
by some, which had ever taken place in the grounds. Exhibitors, 
of whom there were nearly three hundred, and visitors alike, 
came from various parts of a widely divergent area, North to 
Drogheda, West to Oldcastle, and South to Wexford. Prizes 
were given for pianoforte playing, fancy work, needlework, 
knitting, penmanship, recitation, model making, cookery, 
painting, drawing, the cultivation of flowers, and the rearing 
of domestic pets, and in some of these classes there was a 
spirited competition. The grounds were very lively. The 
platforms erected for a recent military tournament were 
utilised for more peaceful purposes, there were donkeys to be 
riden and Punch and Judy to be laughed at, and a host of 
other recreations dear to juveniles. The concerts, two in the 
open-air and one inside the building, were given by a choir of 
a thousand voices. The event of the day, however, was the 
ascent of a balloon, which was successfully accomplished by 
Captain J. A. Whelan. We have to congratulate Mr. James 
Pearson, the Secretary of the Union, and his many co-workers, 
on the signal success of their efforts. 


©olonial. 

Melbourne, Australia. —The Independent Older of Recha¬ 
bites are strong in this city, and have many excellent juvenile 
tents, the “ Rose of Denmark ” being the name of one of the 
most successful. The twentieth anniversary of this institution 
was recently celebrated, and consisted of a procession, and a 
meeting over which the Hon. James Munro presided. We are 
glad to find that this useful branch of the movement has so 
strong a hold. 





THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


136 


GENERAL TEMPERANCE TOPICS 


HE temperance movement is rapidly out¬ 
growing its youth and is settling down into 
the strong steady respectability of middle 
age. We are reminded of this fact by the 
celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the 
Western Temperance League which took 
place last month. The League has hard 
work in the beautiful but somewhat sleepy 
western shires and it does it well. 

* * 

* 

The Queen’s Jubilee has come and gone. Opinions seem 
to vary as to the amount of drunkenness on the occasion. 
The official statement that there was but little to complain 
about in this respect is fairly well supported by outside 
testimony. We have lately conversed with an aged 
friend who remembers the jubilee of George I If,, and who 
drew pictures of what then happened which almost 
horrified us. Our efforts are certainly telling for good. 

* * 

■* 

The pastor of the Metropolitan Tabernacle has lately 
been taking part in some Blue Ribbon Tent meetings which 
for enthusiasm and fruitfulness in pledges, recall the 
early days of the Gospel Temperance movement. We 
were glad to hear his outspoken denunciation of grocers’ 
licenses, delivered with the true Spurgeonic incisiveness. 
Indeed, this evil requires a more vigorous attack than it 
has yet received. There should not be very much diffi¬ 
culty in the matter for in this case we should have the 
cssistanceof the “trade” which would readily aid us in 
driving their competitors out of the field. 

* * 

* 

The Young Man says : “Those who have witnessed the 
skilful and enduring performances of Buffalo Bill and his 
remarkable company have frequently wondered whether 
they were abstainers. We therefore asked Buffalo Bill 
(Colonel W. F. Cody) to enlighten us on this point. The 
vice-president of the Wild West Show, in replying, states 
that the Colonel is atotal abstainer,and adds:—‘Our people 
aie abstainers generally, their hazardous work requiring 
complete self-possession at all times. All the great 
marksmen of the world are abstainers, the use of stimulants 
being fatal to them professionally.’ ” 

* * 

* 

Mr. Justice Wills thinks teetotalers a “ most 
respectable but most melancholy race.” Hume, the 
infidel, once made the same observation with regard to 
Christians,and was very aptly reminded that it was enough 
to make any Christian melancholy to look at him. Justice 
Wills, however, does not make us melancholy, he makes 
us laugh. Surely judges, in this matter, are very bad 
judges, for they see but little of teetotalers, at least pro¬ 
fessionally. Teetotalism is a capital specific for avoiding 
compulsory interviews with Her Majesty’s judicial repre¬ 
sentatives, and the few teetotalers thus honoured are 

hardly fair specimens of the class. 

* * 

* 

For steady persistence in well-doing commend us to the 
early workers in the temperance movement. We have 
just received a record of patient, earnest effort, which is 
pleasant reading, and which affords a useful example to 
some workers who have certainly degenerated from the 
old time standard. Mr. Thomas Cramp, of East Grin- 
stead, has been the Secretary of the Temperance Society 
in this pretty Sussex town since its formation in 1837- 
fifty years ago. Mr. Cramp has celebrated the completion 
of this long period by writing a little brochure in rhyme— 
not by any means his first effort in the poetic direction. 
We don’t often find a fair poet who is also a practical per¬ 
sistent, successful Secretary. 


George Augustus SALA,to whom we do no injustice when 
we say that his interest in the total abstinence move¬ 
ment, is—well, lukewarm, in a recent lecture stated that 
young Australia is, as a rule, teetotal not on moral but on 
physical grounds. The youth of the colony is devoted to 
athletic exercise, and maintains a course of training in 
which total abstinence plays an important part. 

* * 

* 

Sir Wilfrid Lawson, despite a most pathetic appeal 
to the leader of the House of Commons, has been unable 
to obtain a day for his local option resolution. Ireland 
blocks the way. We are not perhaps such enthusiastic 
believers in the efficacy of legislation as some of our friends, 
but we are certainly sorry that the House will lose 
the advantage of one of Sir Wilfrid’s witty speeches on 
this important subject. 

* * 

During his tour in America, Canon Wilberforce 
addressed a large number of meetings, and took over 
6,000 total abstinence pledges. Having closely studied 
the working of the Maine Liquor Law, he has come to the 
conclusion that it is a triumphant success. Thirty years 
ago Maine was the poorest State of the Union, and it is 
now the wealthiest. To get at the truth there is nothing 
like studying the subject on the spot. 

* * 

* 

Ireland, in addition to constituting herself a stumbling 
block in the manner above mentioned, does her full share, 
and more than her full share, of drinking. According to a 
recent return, she spent over ^10,000,000 in this 
mischievous manner. How can Irishmen expect sympathy 
with their inability to pay their rent whilst they indulge 
in this extravagant expenditure. If they will not-/’ evict ” 
their own bad tenant, the drink, they cannot be surprised 

if they are “ evicted ” themselves. 

* * 
df 

Our friends whilst taking their holidays could often cheer 

the heart of some local worker by a friendly visit, and 

possibly, yet further assist by a short address. We once 

heard of a waiter who was asked what he did during his 

holidays. “ Oh,” said he, “ I go to help another waiter.” 

Could professional zeal go further ? We think that in 

our own work, in which so much depends on enthusiastic 

good comradeship, we shall do well in cultivating the 

spirit of this devoted knight of the napkin. 

* •* 

* 

We are informed by men learned in commercial 
matters that the inflated price of shares in Guinness, 
Allsopp, and other breweries, is likely to prove disappoint¬ 
ing for the purchasers. There is a rage just now for 
this class of investments, and brewers and publicans are 
selling freely. This, says an authority, is very amusing, 
but may end in sadness. The owners of the great 
steamship and shipping companies handed over their 
business to the public when their profits were most 

brilliant. It may be the same with beer. 

* * 

Alcoholism, as they call drunkenness in Fiance, has 
increased of late in that country to so serious an 
extent that a special commission to investigate the 
subject has been appointed by the senate. We think 
that we could tell the government of the republic the 
cause of drunkenness, and the cause of the increase of 
drunkenness as well, and that without the trouble and 
expense of a special commission. The cause of drunkenness 
is the belief in, and use of,intoxicating drinks,and the cause 
of the increase is the fact that bad habits grow with 
nations as with individuals. But for the check administered 
by the temperance movement to the drinking customs of 
England where should we have been by this time ? 



THE 


■gSmth of $o:pe (Sftvomcfc 

Issued Monthly by the United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 


the 

of Hope Chronicle, 

SEPTEMBER, 1887. 


OUR ADVOCACY. 


By the late Rev. G. M. Murphy. 



ITHOUT honesty of purpose and purity of 
motive no advocate can really succeed, 
whether he preach, write, or lecture, 
whether he labour indoors or out. The 
hollowness of insincerity will leak out at 
last, to his confusion and shame; the 
cause, alas ! (among the unthinking) bear¬ 
ing no small share of his reproach. To 
deep-seated principle the advocate must 
add steadiness of purpose, intelligent 
conviction, general good sense, and an aptitude to com¬ 
municate truth to his hearers. His facts should be facts. 
His illustrations should bear on his subject, his inferences 
should be logical, his bearing gentlemanly, and he should 
finish speaking when his speech is finished. 

The advocate who cultivates his natural talents and 
abilities, striving to add the charm of elocution to the 
grace of truth, must be powerful. He, like Dr. Watts’ 
busy bee, 

“ Gathers honey all the day 
From every op’ning flower.” 


It is very pitiable when, with the world as a storehouse 
of facts and incidents, the temperance speaker goes on 
year by year ignoring them all, uttering the same plati¬ 
tudes, cracking the old jokes, wearing still more thread¬ 
bare long since “used-up” illustrations. The good 
steward brings out of his storehouse things new and old. 

Naturalism must never be departed from by the advo¬ 
cate who would succeed. It is awkward as a wooden- 
legged elephant to see a man naturally grave striving to 
be grotesque. True, he sometimes creates laughter, but 
at him instead of with him. It is no less a mistake for a 
man whose rough and ready experience would carry con¬ 
viction to every hearer’s heart, to get himself into the, 
to him, fogbank of learned disquisition, using words 
of whose meaning he is himself ignorant, perplexing his 
hearers, shaming his friends, and betraying the cause by 
darkening counsel by words without knowledge. 

Personalities should never be indulged in by the 
advocate. Attacks on individuals, and illiberal invective, 
are suicidal to success. The temperance platform is not 
the arena for the display of personal bitterness, but for 
the enunciation of great principles. Coarseness or in¬ 
delicacy should be carefully eliminated from the speaker's 
address. He who by his advocacy brings a blush to the 
cheeks of modesty, or gives a taint to the youthful mind, 
has sown a seed which may germinate in distrust to the 
cause, and lead to the alienation of many from our ranks. 
Our only hope of success is in the adhesion of the good, 
the wise, the virtuous, and the holy; and he who offends 
one of these little ones throws a stone of stumbling in 
the path of progress. 

Presumptuous predictions of a speedy final triumph are 
a source of weakness to the cause. Prophetic clap-trap 

SEPTEMBER, 1887 . 


may catch the ear, and draw the applause of an ignorant 
or partizan crowd, but sober sense laughs it to scorn ; the 
world will not be made moral at a bound ; and when the 
disappointment comes those who before yoked them¬ 
selves to the prophet’s chariot-wheels receive such a 
shock to their faith that they lose heart and hope. 

Exaggerated statements and overdrawn pictures are 
highly injurious and prejudicial. The evil is fierce enough; 
we need not make it more grim. A skeleton is ghastly 
enough without paint. Besides, if proof be publicly 
demanded, resort must be had to the plea of ignorance, 
or to prevarication, and a damaging exposure is the result, 
the effects of which years will not wipe away from the 
minds of the audience. 

Consistency of conduct must mark the measure of an 
advocate’s success. Who can calculate the power of a 
blameless life ? Who can estimate the mischief done 
by an inconsistent or immoral advocate? We need 
vigilance to mark such that walk disorderly, and whatever 
their rank, station, or standing, to discountenance them 
as far as possible. 

We must prepare to meet objections to our principles ; 
to meet them, not browbeat the objectors. Our replies 
should be truthful, lucid, kind, courteous. We have no 
right to suppose (unless we know to the contrary) but 
that the querist is really seeking for information. It does 
not follow that because we are familiar with the question 
of teetotalism everybody else is ; and even should an 
objection be made from captiousness, it is possible some 
in the meeting may be anxious upon the point mooted, 
though lacking the courage to make the inquiry. 

No advocate should begin and close an address without 
a distinct enunciation of the principles of the pledge. 

No meeting should be held without an opportunity 
being afforded for signing the pledge; in this age of oratory 
this is sometimes forgotten. 

The infusion of denominational differences into tempe¬ 
rance advocacy is destructive of harmony and inimical to 
success. In religion, politics, and other things, we must 
“ agree to differ,” whilst uniting against the common foe. 

Much more might be said on this subject, but we 
forbear, simply saying that of the things of which we 
have spoken this is the sum :—If we would not weaken 
the cause of our advocacy, we must avoid bombast, 
coarseness, dishonesty of quotation, discourtesy, exaggera¬ 
tion, imitation, inconsistency, indelicacy, personalities, 
predictions, sectarianism, and unkindliness of speech and 
manner; while to strengthen and deepen the tide of 
temperance truth, we must cultivate and carry out aptness 
to teach, brevity, clearness of statement, consistency, con¬ 
viction of right, determination to succeed, discrimination 
of character ; we must foster our natural abilities, gather 
and systematise facts; gentlemanly bearing must ever 
prevail, good sense must guide, honesty of purpose must 
be unmistakeable; there must be convincing logic, 
naturalness of manner; principle must ever rule, purity 
of speech and gesture must never be departed from; we 
must store up incidents as they arise for future use ; 
tolerate, and not browbeat opposition ; be truthful at all 
hazards, and urbane under every provocation ; in short, 
add to “temperance patience, and to patience godliness, 
and to godliness brotherly kindness, and to brother'v 
kindness love ; for if these things be in you and abound ” 
ye shall never fail. 









I 3 8 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


LEAKAGE : ITS CAUSE AND CURE. 

By Frederick Sherlock. 

YEAR or more ago a certain Bishop who 
is a total abstainer, and takes an active 
interest in temperance work in general, and 
in Bands of Hope in particular, put to us the 
question, "How is it that with so many new 
pledges taken every year, the aggregate 
membership of temperance societies remains 
practically stationary ? ” “There is a chronic 
leakage, my Lord.” But the Bishop loves 
to get to the bottom of things, and straight¬ 
way propounded the harder saying, “How 
is the leakage to be accounted for ? ” And we could only 
reply, “There are many reasons.” 

Yes, the reasons are as plentiful as blackberries in 
September, but in our judgment there is one reason 
which towers like a monarch of the forest above them all 
—the fact that we give our members nothing to do. 
Recruits are gained, their names are entered in the roll 
book, and in too many cases that is the end of the 
business. No, not quite the end, for of course before the 
annual meeting we punctiliously count up how many 
new members have been enrolled during the year, and 
the figures are trotted out as a delicious morsel in the 
report, and perhaps there is just the trace of an 
impressive pause after we have announced the figures,—a 
pause which gives the friendly listeners the opportunity of 
crowning the delusive figures with applause. 

Band of Hope membership to be worth anything must 
be throughly co-operative. The phrase, “My Band of 
Hope,”—“ My society,”—-“My members,” must be dead 
and buried beyond resurrection if rugged health is to be 
the characteristic of the association. The Band of Hope 
to be really successful must be neither “ mine” nor 
“thine,” but “ours.” The last member entered on the 
roll must be led to feel equally with the member whose 
name stands first in order of joining, that it is a case of 
“ours” to the fullest extent. Where this is thoroughly 
recognised, the call to active participation in the work of 
the Society will of necessity widely prevail throughout the 
entire membership. 

The varied phases of effort which centralise in every 
efficiently conducted Band of Hope have been so often 
discussed in our columns that it is unnecessary to enlarge 
upon them now. Local circumstances must ever largely 
regulate the methods of procedure, but there is one 
cardinal principle equally applicable to town and country 
societies, and that is the work, if to be of permanent value, 
must be done very largely indeed by the members them¬ 
selves. 

It is obviously true that the teaching of the fundamental 
basis of temperance truth must devolve upon adults. 
Speakers there must be to the end of the chapter, but the 
more the addresses are confined to systematic lines, and 
we venture to say that the more they are followed by 
examinations on the plan so often advocated and fostered 
by the United Kingdom Band of Hope Union and its 
auxiliaries, the more surely will the young people grow 
up with an intelligent appreciation of the responsibilities of 
membership. 

Music and recitations, of course, provide the two main¬ 
stays of the “something to do” for every member; but 
there is another department which will well repay cultiva¬ 
tion, and it is a department which strikes deep at the 
root of the great leakage question ; we mean visitation. 

We feel satisfied that this is a work in which the elder 
members of our Bands of Hope might be occupied 
with great advantage to themselves, and no less advantage 
to the progress of the movement generally. 

Block out the district into sections, and apportion 
certain definite streets to certain definite visitors. It is 
well to let the visitors run in couples, for in this work the 


old rule. “Two are better than one,” most certainly holds 
good. Do not give the visitors too wide an area to cover. 
A little done thoroughly is infinitely preferable to much 
done slovenly. The primary work should, of course, be 
to visit absentee members of the Band of Hope; if the 
duty is attended to with systematic regularity the absentee 
list will speedily become a vanishing quantity. “Then 
what becomes of your grand theory of visitation as a 
perpetual means of something to do?” says a quick- 
minded critic. What becomes of it ? Why, assuredly 
it becomes more firmly fixed than ever. The visita¬ 
tion of absentees need not be the beginning and the- 
ending of the whole matter. Supply the visitors with 
leaflets so that they may have something to hand in when 
they knock at the doors, and then start them off on a 
regular house-to-house canvass for new members. A 
special leaflet explaining what the Band of Hope aims at, 
where its meetings are held, and on what nights, and at 
what hour, would be found most useful. If addressed to 
parents so much the better, for experience has shown 
again and again that these printed invitations, left in the 
homes of the people, have often proved the means of 
getting at persons unapproached by any other advocacy. 

Of course a time would come when every house had 
been visited on this recruiting errand, but even then our 
young workers need not be allowed to fold their arms as if 
all were accomplished. The visitors should be well 
utilized as peripatetic advertisements. Say, for instance, 
that a temperance sermon is to be preached on the first 
Sunday in October in the church or chapel with which 
the Band of Hope is connected. What more feasible or 
reasonable than that the visitors should carry the news of 
the coming event into every house in the district. 

The writer recalls the occasion when a hall, capable of 
accommodating over two thousand people, was crowded 
to overflowing at a certain Band of Hope anniversary, 
without the slightest expenditure of money in advertise¬ 
ments or handbills. The order was given by the 
superintendent of the society that every member should 
daily tell somebody else that the annual meeting of the 
Band of Hope would take place on a certain day in a 
certain hall. For three weeks these living advertisements 
did their work right nobly, with the gratifying result 
already stated, 

We have, of course, only touched the fringe of a wide 
subject. There are ways many in which the recognition 
of the principle that the Band of Flope is “ours,” may 
be fostered. 

11 Deeds are better things than words are, 

Actions mightier than boasiings.” 

In a tew months we shall be thinking of our annual 
Christmas collection for the Temperance Hospital. 
London secretaries might manage to take a few of their 
elder members to the Hospital one day, by arrangement 
with the authorities there. A walk through the wards of 
that noble institution would surely touch their young 
hearts, and make them feel that membership in “ours” 
is something to be valued, something worth living for.. 
Perhaps in this way, too, we should show ourselves as 
skilful and practical workers in stopping the grievous 
leakage which we all so bitterly lament. 


Daring swim by a Lady.— Miss Florence Macnaghton, 
of Runkerry House, Bushmills, north of Ireland, has just 
performed a swimming feat under very peculiar circum¬ 
stances. Seeking to persuade a local fisherman to become 
temperate, the latter promised so to do, provided that 
Miss Macnaghton undertook to swim the bay between 
Blackrock and Port Ballantrae, a distance of about one 
mile. The young lady accepted the challenge, and 
accomplished the undertaking in thirty-nine minutes, 
with the result that the fisherman donned the blue ribbon, 
and signed the temperance pledge. 






THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


I 39 


A HUNDRED YEARS AGO. 



HOSE engaged in any great moral reform 
and workers in the temperance enterprise 
especially, must not lose heart because so 
much is not accomplished as they had 
hoped or desired. Indeed, to continue our 
work it is often necessary to contemplate 
what has been accomplished rather than 
what remains to be done. In this way 
temperance workers will find much room 
for encouragement, especially if they bear in 
mind that a great amount of positive good is accomplished 
in each case in which we induce anyone to become an 
abstainer. In some movements we must succeed entirely 
to succeed at all, but in temperance work every fresh 
adherent is the almost certain prevention of so much un¬ 
happiness in the future. Just as we can scarcely realise 
the immense change which has taken place in the general 
habits and tone of the people during the past hundred years, 
because it has been slow, gradual, but certain, so it is 
difficult to appreciate fully the great change which is 
certainly taking place in the minds of a large proportion 
of thinking people as to the value of our movement. The 
great change in the social condition of the country was 
well illustrated in the course of a recent lecture by the 
Rev. Charles Garrett, entitled, “ The Sky is Brightening.” 
He said :—■ 

“ God and man had not been working for ioo years in 
vain, and the world had not been going back, but forward. 
To make this clear, he proposed to compare the present 
with the year 1800, and to indicate some of the changes 
that had taken place in one man's lifetime. In 1S00 it was 
not known how many people there were in the land, and 
the proposal to take a national census was vigorously 
•opposed in Parliament, At length it was ascertained that 
there were nine or ten millions. These had to maintain a 
million of men in arms, and the age was one of oppression, 
poverty, crime, and misery impossible to describe. The 
xoads, which were said to be one of the best tests of 
•civilization, were in most deplorable condition, and 
travelling was of the slowest, most laborious, and danger¬ 
ous kind. The streets were undrained,and pavements were 
only found in London, and they were of the kidney order. 
The houses were very small and dark, and were without 
• drains or ventilation ; but the sky was brightening in this 
respect, for during the last 50 years we had spent 
£500,000,000 in bettering the houses. As for the social 
condition of the country, of course times were very bad 
now. In 1800, thousands of working folk were thankful 
to get is. a day wages, and farm labourers were paid at 
the rate of gd., although everything was very dear, a 
quartern loaf costing is. lod. A fine of £5 was inflicted 
on any man who sold bread that had not been baked 
twenty-four hours, and George III. issued an appeal to 
the well-to-do not to eat pastry, so as to save the food of 
the people. War had been raging ten years, and went on 
for fifteen more, and men who were not born when it broke 
■out died before it was over. The nation was very 
ignorant; there was everything to make it so. It was said 
the only way to keep people loyal was to refuse them 
books and newspapers. A judge on the Bench declared it 
to be wicked to criticise legislation. One in twenty of the 
people could not write, and it cost a shilling to send a 
letter from Liverpool to Manchester. As for newspapers, 
there was a duty of 3d. per pound on the paper, a tax of 
4d. on the newspaper itself, and a taxon the advertise¬ 
ments. Surely the sky was brightening in educational 
matters. No money was better spent than that on educa¬ 
tion. He was a poor man with a large family, and he 
would ride third-class to educate his children. It was 
far better to put a little money into the child than 
save it to leave to one who did not know how to use 


it. In 1800, the people’s pleasures were brutal in the 
highest degree. Prize fights were publicly advertised and 
were patronised by royalty ; bull-baiting was general, and 
was often opened in presence of the Mayor and Corpora¬ 
tion, and the act for its abolition was opposed from both 
sides of the House of Commons: cock-fighting was 
indulged in everywhere, and fights for £1,000 a side were 
advertised. The language of the people was obscene 
beyond measure; ladies swore, judges swore on the 
bench, barristers swore as they pleaded, parsons swore in 
the pulpit, and there was blasphemy on every side. 
Drunkenness was nothing thought of, and men were known 
by the quantity they swallowed, as ‘ two or three-bottle 
men,’ as the case might be. But the sky was now bright¬ 
ening. Drunkenness and swearing were regarded as 
disreputable everywhere, and in the most popular paper 
there was not a line which could not be read in the 
presence of one's children, because the proprietor knew 
that obscenity and blasphemy would not be tolerated by 
the people of this land. The employment of the people in 
1S00,especially in mines and factories, was enough to make 
angels weep. It was held that the law did not reach to the 
bottom of a coal pit, and children were born there, lived 
there, and died there. Little ones of six years had to 
crawl on all fours and drag wagons laden with coal, 
because they could be got for nothing, and an animal to 
do the work must be purchased. The coal was often 
brought to the mouth of the pit on the backs of women. 
Chimneys were swept by climbing boys of tender years, 
who were forced into the flue and not infrequently died 
there because the fires were kindled to hasten the work. 
Operatives in the mills were not protected against the 
oppression of their employers then. Youngsters worked 
from five in the morning till ten at night without 
suspension, and overlookers were furnished with thongs 
and tanks of cold water to keep the children awake and at 
work. Was not the sky brightening ? 

“ At the beginning of the century the laws w’ere made 
exclusively by the wealthy, and they went upon the 
principle that the rich had rights but no duties, and that 
the poor had duties but no rights. £107,000,000 per 
annum was spent on war, and 25,000 French prisoners were 
kept by the country, so that the national debt increased 
on every hand. There were 223 capital offences', such as 
cutting down ayoung tree.killingarabbit, stealing ss.orits 
value, proposing an increase of wages or a shortening of the 
hours of labour, property being protected at every point. 
It made one’s blood curdle to think that the people bore 
it so long. Five hundred persons were hanged in one year. 
Men were pressed into the army and navy, and flogging 
was universal. One soldier was sentenced to a thousand 
lashes for a slight offence against some petty officer, and 
died under the punishment; and the editor of a provincial 
newspaper protested against the cruelty, and was 
sentenced to two years imprisonment for daring to 
question military authority. Neither man, woman, nor 
child accused of any offence were allowed to have an 
advocate. The gaols were farmed by men who paid for 
the privilege, and the criminals had to pay for their 
maintenance, so that after having been proved to be inno¬ 
cent, they were often kept in prison because they could not 
pay what was owing to the gaoler. In the prison there was 
no ventilation, no drainage, and no distinction of sex. 
There was everything to degrade and no organization for 
elevating the people. Religion, it was said, only existed in 
a practical way where the Methodist parson was found ; 
now it was everywhere. There was no missionary society ; 
Carey had not had a convert; there was no Bible Society or 
Tract Society ; Sunday-schools were just feeling their 
way; and teetotalism was unknown. Now there were 
millions of teetotalers, more Sunday scholars in the 
country than inhabitants of London, and more teachers 
than there were people in Liverpool. Surely the sky was 
brightening. ” 


140 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


BAND OF HOPE ADDRESSES.—Series I. 



TEMPERANCE LESSONS FROM -ffiSOP’S 
FABLES. 

By Rev. CHARLES COURTENAY, Vicar of Emmanuel Church, 
Liverpool , Author of “ Temperance Home Thrusts," &c. 

9.—THE HORSE AND THE LION. 

WILL first of all introduce you to a Hungry 
Lion. You know, of course, that wild lions 
have to catch their dinner before they can 
eat it. Little boys and girls can have it all 
got ready for them, and with spoon, and 
fork, and knife, and table-cloth. But lions 
have to forage for themselves; and so 
'/ f) sometimes they get their dinner, and sometimes 
they don’t. 

Of course, like boys and girls, there are some 
things they are especially fond of, and these 
choice dishes they would like for breakfast, dinner, and 
supper, if they could get them. 

Now this particular lion which I have in my mind now, 
and which I want you to admit into your mind too, 
was ravenously fond of colt. He never could have colt 
too often. You see an old horse would be tough, and I 
shouldn’t wonder if the colt’s tenderness wasn’t its chief 
charm. But whatever was the reason, the fact was plain 
enough ; give him colt and he was perfectly satisfied. 

I must not forget to point out that at this particular 
moment the lion was terribly hungry. Words could 
not describe how ravenous he was. He must have 
missed several meals, I fancy (for want of catching them), 
and consequently was craving to make up for past losses. 

Now, as this is a temperance address, I must stay a 
little while here, and tell you what sort of people I think 
this hungry lion is like. He is like those who go about 
and try to lead others astray through strong drink. And 
I will tell you why I think so. 

Because, in the first place, they are trying to kill. Now 
this may sound very hard, but it is quite true. Nothing 
kills like strong drink, and nobody is so dead as a 
drunkard. It may not kill his body straight off, but 
even that it does in time. But strong drink is killing 
character every day. Yes, and peace of mind, and 
respectability, and prosperity, and self-respect too. And 
how dead is a poor drunkard s soul! So you see, dear 
children, he who tempts another to take too much strong 
drink, is really doing his best to kill, like the lion. 

Then, in the second place, they do it for their own 
satisfaction. 

I do not know what other object they can have for 
leading others into the love of strong drink. They 
want the comfort of company : or they want to be kept 
in countenance; or they want to be treated. And so, 
like a lion leaping on his prey, and dragging him down 
and devouring him, do these hungry tempters drag down 
their poor victims. 

In the third place, I think they are specially like the 
lion in that they try and devour the young. It isn't the old, 
tottering men and women upon whom they are so fond of 
springing, but the young and tender ones. The young 
men or the young women are their chief prey. 

A Trick. 

I said this horrid old lion was fond of colt, and had 
set his mind on getting colt. I must now tell you how he 
set to work. 

There was one particular colt not far away on whom 
he had specially set his fancy. He had seen him in the 
distance often, and had not failed to notice his plump 
sides, his glossy skin, and his general beauty. 

But wishing and getting were, unfortunately for the 
lion, two different things. The colt was not at all an easy 


catch, for he ran like the wind. To overtake him when 
once started was simply impossible, so that the lion gave 
up trying to do so. 

“ I will try a trick,” said the lion one day to himself. 
“ He’s got quicker legs, but I have a nimbler brain.” 

This was his trick. He gave out that he was a great 
doctor, and could heal all sorts of diseases. He hid 
picked up his knowledge in foreign lands. Nothing, he 
said, would delight him more than to do his brother 
beasts a good turn. He loved them all, and wished w