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COLLECTION OF 
NINETEENTH CENTURY 
BRITISH SOCIAL HISTORY 


BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 


.1155 







































v 








Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2019 with funding from 
Brigham Young University 



https://archive.org/details/bandofhopechroni1904unit 


THE 



ISSUED BY THE 

UNITED l(IN!jDOM BAND OF HOfE UNION. 


1904 . 


Onward, Brothers, March still Onward!' 


London: 

UNITED KINGDOM BAND OF HOPE UNION, 

59 & 60, ©LD BHILEY. 





















UPB 







INDEX. 



> < 


PAGE 

Outline Lessons. 

I.—Mankind in the Marring 
and Mending. 

T. N. Kelynack, 31. D., M.R.C.P. 


1 The Making of Men .. 5 

2 Drink and Decay .. .. 20 

Alcohol and its Action .. 35 

The Upward Climb .. 51 

The Downward Hurry .. 68 

The Alcoholic Environ¬ 
ment .. .. .. 82 

7 Alcohol and—the Child .. 98 

8 Alcohol and—the Man .. 116 

9 Alcohol and—the Woman 133 

10 The Arrest of Alcoholism 148 

11 The Manner and Method 

of Mending .. .. i65 

12 Lines of Advance .. .. 178 


II. Simpee Science Chats. 
Charles Harvey. 


1 A Chat about Drinks .. 6 

2 The Great Enemy .. .. 21 

3 Some of the Enemy’s 

Secrets .. .. .. 36 

4 More about the Enemy .. 52 

5 “ The Temple ol the Living 

God” .. .« .. 69 

6 “ No Admittance except on 

Business ” .. .. S3 

7 Three Kitchens and Three 

Cooks .. .. .. 99 

8 The Ventilators and the 

Pump .117 

9 The Living Stream .. 134 

ic Five Hundred Little 

Friends .. .. .. 149 

11 The Watchmau .. 167 

12 P'ive Wonderful Windows 179 


III. —Aecohoe and History. 
Charles Wakely. 

1 Drink in Bible Times .. 7 

2 Drink amongst the 

Ancients .. .. .. 37 

3 Drink and our Saxon 

F'orefathers .. .. 70 

4 Drink in Feudal Times .. 100 

5 Drink and Modern History 135 

6 Drink and Continental 

History.16S 


PAGE 

IV.— Bibee Ceass Taeks. 
Rev. David Heath. 


1 Is it Right ? (Conscience) 8 

2 Idols (Worship) .. . . 38 

3 Leaves (Uses of) .. .. 71 

4 LivingWater (Movement) 101 

5 Little Foxes (Habits) .. 136 

6 Dogs (Friends and Foes) 169 


V.—Yarns with Young Peopee. 
Thomas Palmer. 

1 Liquor Trade Marks .. 22 

2 “ Keep to the Right ” 53 

3 Who’s to Blame ? .. .. 84 

4 Seaside Lessons .. 118 

5 The Foe of Home .. 150 

6 “This Hill is Dangerous” 180 


VI.— Take Care oe “Number 
• One.” 

IV. N. Edwards, F.C.S. 


1 The Life-Giver .. .. 23 

2 Friends and Foes .. .. 54 

3 Policemen and Burglars .. 85 

4 Phre and Force .. 119 

5 How to Win.. .. .. 151 

6 Best and Second Best .. 181 


VII. — Smoking. 

J. Cadwallader. 

1 A Boy’s Greatest Tempta¬ 


tion .. .. .. 9 

2 A Lesson from a Spider .. 55 

3 Self or Duty .. . . .. 102 

4 Cigarette or Sugar— 

Which? .. .. .. 152 

Special Addresses. 

M >tto Card f 'r 1905 . . .. 182 

Hospital Collection .. . . 183 

Recitations, Dialogues, &c. 

A Hat)py Family .. .. 156 

Are Y T ou Down-hearted ? 132 


PAGE 


At the Sign of John .. .. 157 

Aunt May .. . . . . 29 

Band of Hope Fiscal Policy.. 30 

Buy my Laces, Stout and 

Strong .. .. .. 124 

Child Messengers’ Act . . 61 

Children’s Cry .. .. .. 61 

Collection Speech .. .. m 

Father Christmas .. .. 183 

First Situation .. .. .. 142 

Holiday Lesson.. .. .. 78 

Pay your Footing . . .. 175 

Sam Strong’s Snuggles 

(Reading) .. .. 58 

Sunday Taverns and Sunday 

Topers .. .. .. 127 

Temperance Fiscal Policy .. 47 

The Battle is the Lord’s .. 47 

What about To-day ? .. .. 13 

Where Father’s Palace Lies.. 42 


Music. 


Drink Water 

137 

The Crusaders 

24 

The Noble Life.. 

103 

The Start in Life 

121 

Correspondence. 


Benefit Societies for Boys and 


Girls 

155 

Encouraging Facts 

34 

Good News from Germany .. 

hi 

How to Mane Bands of Hope 


Successful 

12 

Push the “Chronicle”—and 


Pray 

34 

What a Suuday School 


Superintendent did .. 

16 

Workhouse Band of Hope .. 

81 

Home=Goings. 


Campbell, Capt. 

47 

Hoey, Thomas 

94 

Marshal], J. H. 

47 

Palmer, J. 

188 

Smith, F. (Kettering; 

122 

Smith, Thomas.. 

47 

Sterling, Mme. Antoinette . . 

19 














INDEX. 


PAGE 


Editorial Mems. 

Churches of Christ .. .. 138 

Doctors .. .. .. .. 50 
Gambling .. ., .. 105 

Harrison Dee (Mrs.) .. .. 50 

Health Conscience .. .. 161 

Justice Grantham .. .. 18 

Kirkaldy’s Union .. .. 19 

Mitchell, Mrs. Tom .. 33 

Morgan’s (Robert) Address .. 33 
New Zealand .. .. .. 50 

North Essex Leaflets .. .. 161 

Roberts (Lord) on Smoking.. 138 

Rodger’s “ Story Leaflets ” .. 161 

Scottish Annual .. .. 18 

Temperance Island .. .. 138 

Vecsey and the Queen .. 105 

Wesleyan Progress .. .. 138 


United Kingdom Band of Hope 
Union. 

Anatomical Models .. .. 78 

Annual Report .. .. .. 106 

Autumnal Conference 158, 170 

Band of Hope Review .. 1S8 

City of London’s Gift.. .. 11 

Collectors’ Soiree .. .. 40 

How our Secretary began .. 75 

New Hymn Book .. 142, 173 

New Year’s Gathering .. 26 

Our P’orty-ninth Anniversary 86 
School Scheme Reports .. 113 

Social Gathering ot Agents.. 12 

Temperance by Postcard .. 14 

Village Work .. .. 10, 72 


School Scheme and Education. 

Abstract of Year’s Report .. 113 

Conference at Nottingham .. 173 

Conference in London . . 186 

General Booth's Methods .. 74 

Irish Teachers’ Conference .. 73 

Medical Men’s Petition .. 39 

Renewal of Scheme .. .. 1 

Sailor Boy’s Paper .. .. 31 

Subscribers .. 3, 17, 57, 73, 97 

Suggested Developments .. 145 

Summer School at Nottingham in 
Teaching Teachers .. .. 19 

Temperance Scholarship . . 4 

Views of Mr. Yoxall, M.P. .. S8 
Work on Training Ships .. 3 


Records of Progress. 

General 15, 32, 4S, 64, 79, 96, 

112, 128, 143, 160, 176, 188 
Australia.. .. .. 29,160 



page 

Birmingham .. .. 79, 

125, 176 

Bradford .. 

48, 95 

Cambridgeshire .. 32, 

112, 126 

Derby 

95 

Devonshire 

96, 98 

Dublin 

95 

Dundee .. 

34 

Edinburgh 

79 

Edmonton 

04 

Hackney and East Middlesex 


63, 123 

Halifax.11, 32, Q3 

Hants and Isle of Wight 

• • 177 

India 

• • 125 

Kent 

96 

Manchester 

21, 94 

Newcastle 

32 

Nottingham .. .. 13,82,93 

Sheffield .. 

75 . 79 

South Stoneham 

• • 132 

Sunderland 

127, M3 

Surrey .. .. ., 15 

22, 128 

Sussex 

96 

Swansea .. 

93 

Valparaiso 

122 

Walgrave 

.. 82 

West Loudon 

.. hi 

Yorkshire 

.. 48 

Miscellaneous. 


Alexandra Palace P'estival 

.. 123 

Anti-Cigarette 12, 31, 34, 53,141, 152 

Awful Indictment 

78 

-Banner Competition .. 

• • 57 

Best Books for Busy Brains 

• • L 39 

Bradford’s Annual Meetings 

4 

Buffalo Bill 

■ ■ 147 

Col lard F'und .. 

.. 80 

Competitive Meetings 

127 

Counter-attractions 

62 

Cursed by Drink 

.. 46 

Diamond Wedding 

19 

Dove Row Record 

31 

Drink Bill for 1903 

•• 77 

Drink Curse and Sunday 

Schools .. 

6.3 

Dundee Union “ Of Age ” 

• • 34 

Ethics of the Movement 

162 

Football and Drink . . 

.. 81 

Forty Years Ago 

13 

Gloucester Education Scheme 137 

Golden Wedding 

13 

Hampshire Examination 

14 

Hibernian Union 

46 

Hidden Danger 

ID 

Houldershaw’s Manual 

9 

Hoyle’s (Wm.) Memorial 

14 

Industrial Exhibitions 

67 

Irish Temperance League 

.. 46 

Jottings .. 

.. 63 


PAGE 

Kempster’s (John) Pamphlet 57 
Lancashire and Cheshire 45, 94, 174 


Life Brigades .. .. .. 49 

May Festivals .. .. .. 95 

Orillia .. .. .. .. 14 

Post Card Hints .. .. 164 

Programmes 11,32, 33, 63, 73, 103 
Proverbs .. .. .. 62 

Pulpit and Sunday School .. 108 

Queries .. .. .. .. 77 

Rechabite Order .. .. 11 

Remembered Fifty Years .. 13 

Sad Story .. .. ,. 115 

Sand and Beach Missions 126, 153 
Saxon Legacy .. .. .. 102 

Sceptre Life Statistics .. 60 

Ship Aground .. .. .. 97 

Signs of the Times .. .. 130 

Sir George White .. .. 9 

Temperance Sunday .. .. 4 

“The Trade” .. .. .. 122 

Thrift .. .. .. .. 44 

To Whom shall we turn ? .. 129 

Wee Mary .. 62 

Whitley’s (Mr.) Address .. 11 

Work in Institutions .. .. 154 


Speakers, Essayists, &c. 


Adkins, F. 

65 

Baynes, Bishop. . 

.. 170 

Belsey, F. F. 

.. 89 

Benn, J. Williams 

88 

Black, A. W. 

• • 159 

Boden, Mrs. 

■ • 159 

Bonner, Rev. W. Carey 

108 

Bruce, W. G. 

■ • 154 

Caine, Mrs. 

.. 171 

Carty, W. 

■ • 43 

Casley, J. H. 

.. 44 

Davies, Rev. T. Eynon 

28 

Blccles, Dr. McAdam . . 

.. 86 

Gorst, Sir J. 

.. 177 

Harvey, C. 

.. 89 

Hereford, Dean of 159, 170, 171 

Hunt, Rev. T. H. 

.. 172 

Lansdown, Rev. M. 

40, 171 

Livesey, Sir G. . . 

.. 87 

Mowll, Rev. W. R. 

26 

Ritchie, Rev. D. L. 

QO, 172 

Rothera, Coroner 

• • 158 

Royds, E. W. S. 

.. 158 

Sharpies, T. 

•• 173 

Sloan, T. H., M.P. .. 

92 

Souttar, Dr. Robinson 

Ib2 

Wakefield, Rev. H. R. 

89 

Wakely, C. 

• ■ 173 

Wood, Edward.. 

26 

Yorke, Hon. Mrs. Eliot 

. . 171 

Yoxall, Mr. 

88, 177 



























Proposed Renewal of the School 
Scheme. 


7 OUR thousand pounds have been already 
promised by a few generous friends 
towards a new fund of ^10,000 for 
Temperance work in Elementary Schools, 
provided the remaining ^6,000 can be 
obtained. By far the greater part of the 
,£4,000 has been promised by friends who 
have been the largest contributors during the 
last five years. The fact that these are pre ¬ 
pared to continue, and in some cases very 
substantially to increase, their support, affords 
the best possible proof of their conviction 
that the work is urgently needed, and that it 
is most important that it should be main¬ 
tained. It is, however, only right that a brief 
review of the five years’ operations should be 
given, especially for the sake of those to 
whom an appeal is made for the first time. 


The fund raised five years ago has been 
wholly devoted to the advancement of Tempe¬ 
rance teaching in day schools, this having 
been chiefly effected by the delivery of brief 
interesting addresses on the nature and effects 
of alcoholic drinks, to scholars in the upper 
standards, the lecturers of the Union having, 
day by day, and in every part of the country, 
been continuously carrying on this work. 
They have been furnished with every appli¬ 
ance for efficiently illustrating their lectures, 
which have been entirely educational and 
scientific in their character, and capable of 
delivery as an ordinary school lesson. The 
services of seven fully-qualified gentlemen to 
act as lecturers were, in the first instance, 
secured, and the number has since year by 
year been augmented, till at the present time 
there are seventeen lecturers engaged in this 
work as an outcome of the School Scheme, 
five being wholly engaged by the Parent 
Society, and the remainder conjointly with 
local Band of Hope Unions. 


These lecturers have during five years 
addressed no fewer than 20,421 schools, at 
which upwards of 2,196,017 scholars and over 
73,772 teachers have been present. To have 
delivered so many thousands of illustrated 
lectures, each of forty minutes’ duration, to 
scholars and teachers in the chief elementary 
schools up and down the land, has been in 
itself a great achievement; but when, in 
JANUARY, 1904. 


addition, it is mentioned that 56 per cent., or 
1,237,431, of the children have produced writ¬ 
ten reports of these lectures, it will be more 
fully realised what a splendid engine has thus 
been put into motion for the advancement of 
Temperance education throughout the 
country. Nearly 50 per cent, of these young 
people have secured certificates or prizes—a 
constant reminder to them of the good teach¬ 
ing which they have received. 


Schools in every county in England and 
Wales have been visited, as well as in 
Ireland. The following summary shows the 
class of schools and institutions at which the 
lectures have been given. 


Board Schools 

10,402 

National Schools 

5 , 95 i 

British, Wesleyan, Presbyterian, Friends, Ro¬ 
man Catholic, and other voluntary Schools 

2,487 

Training Ships, Army Schools, Charitable 
Institutions, Industrial, Reformatory, and 
District Workhouse Schools 

408 

Higher Grade Schools 

832 

Evening Schools .. 

180 

Conferences ofTeachers andTrainingColleges 

161 

Total .. 

20,421 


Subscribers to this Fund will be glad to 
learn that, recently, the War Office has 
sanctioned Temperance Teaching in all Army 
Schools, and that the Fords Commissioners 
of the Admiralty have given permission for 
the Fecturers of the Union to visit all the 
Training Ships of His Majesty’s Navy. 


An indirect, but important, result of the 
work has been, whilst instructing the children, 
to also place the subject of Temperance in 
the most favourable light before the teachers, 
and in this task the lecturers have been 
signally successful, teachers in some cases 
purchasing charts and appliances similar to 
those used by the lecturers, and promising 
to carry on the subject in the form of object 
lessons from the point at which it had been 
left by the lecturers. 


A most valuable impetus has been given to 
the work by 161 specially convened confer¬ 
ences of day school teachers, in many cases a 
typical Temperance address being delivered 
to a class of school children. Comments and 
criticisms have been invited, and a friendly 
interchange of opinion has been found very 































2 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


helpful in conveying a right impression as to 
the object and methods of the work, securing 
in many cases admission for the lecturers to 
schools which would not otherwise have been 
opened to their reception, and influencing the 
teachers themselves in the direction of the 
practice of total abstinence. 


Similar advantages have been derived by 
the discussion of the subject—consequent 
upon the lecturers’ requests for permission to 
visit the schools—by School Boards and 
Management Committees. Many Boards and 
Managing Committees have not only officially 
sanctioned the lectures, but have made the 
entire arrangements themselves, the Birming¬ 
ham, Hull, and Leeds Boards taking special 
pains in this direction. The new Educational 
Authorities under the recent Education Act 
are generally manifesting the same friendly 
attitude towards the work. 


A further pleasing feature, and one indica¬ 
ting an increasing desire to forward this work, 
is that, in many instances, School Board 
Members and Managers, His Majesty’s 
Inspectors, medical men, and lepresentatives 
of the Press have been present at the lectures 
and at the public distribution of prizes and 
certificates. 


Many of the homes of the children have 
been materially benefited by the School 
Scheme, cases repeatedly coming to light in 
which the reports, verbal or written, of the 
lectures, carried home by the children, have 
been instrumental in inducing the adoption 
of the habit of total abstinence on the part of 
parents. Numerous public meetings have 
also been held for the purpose of distributing 
the certificates and prizes won by the 
children, and these have been generally 
attended by large numbers of parents, whose 
interest has thus been more thoroughly 
enlisted in behalf of the work. The illumi¬ 
nated certificates, too, with which the 
children’s efforts have been rewarded, finding 
a place of honour at home, have kept the 
subject constantly under the notice of the 
family and friends. 


Great pains have been taken to influence 
the students in Training Colleges, and by 
means of numerous and varied appliances 
and illustrations to convey Temperance 
truth to the minds of this most important 
class, from whom, perhaps, more than from 
the teachers of advanced years and settled 
habits, helpful results may be anticipated. 


Permission has been given in many cases 
for the collective gathering of pupil teachers, 
employed by the various School Boards, in 
order that a more advanced lecture than that 
given in the schools might be delivered to 
them. Some thousands of young teachers 
have been present at these lectures, many of 


whom have gained special certificates, and i:i 
other cases prizes for written reports. 


Outside this regular work of lecturing in 
schools and colleges, the Committee, through 
literature on the subject handed to the 
teachers by the lecturers, have endeavoured to 
promote the incidental teaching of Tempe¬ 
rance in the schools. In a suitable pamphlet 
they have pointed out to the teachers tha 
within the scope of their ordinary duties, and 
in the daily lessons of the school, they may 
find many opportunities for inculcating 
Temperance principles. This has been 
specially urged in regard to domestic 
economy, geography, history, arithmetic, 
dictation and composition, and especially in 
connection with object and reading lessons. 


A correspondence has also been conducted 
with the leading Educational publishing 
firms on the subject of the further intro¬ 
duction of Temperance teaching into ordinary 
reading books, it being suggested that every 
reading book should have some admixture of 
such teaching. The Committee have also 
furnished teachers and managers as well as 
Educational Committees with lists of school¬ 
books which would be of service to teachers 
disposed to refer to this subject, and it has been 
pointed out that where these could not be used 
as Readers, they would be helpful to teachers 
who might be preparing object lessons on the 
Nature and Physiological effects of Alcoholic 
Liquors. 


In addition, the various diagrams and 
apparatus of the Union for conveying Tern • 
perance teaching, as well as the beautiful 
series of Wall Pictures, entitled, “Abstinence 
and Hard Work,” have been submitted to 
Boards, managers, and teachers, and in 
many cases these have been adopted, thus 
ensuring, apart from the lecturers’ visits, a 
continuance of correct and thorough Tempe¬ 
rance instruction in the schools. 


The Committee feel sure that the foregoing 
brief outline of the work carried on during 
the past five years under the School Scheme 
will prove most satisfactory to the friends 
who so generously enabled them to undertake 
this branch of effort—probably the richest in 
important and far-reaching results that has 
ever been formulated by the Union. 


The results already accomplished have far 
exceeded the expectations entertained when 
the scheme was originated. An immense field, 
unparalleled in its prospects of rich results, 
has been well entered upon, and laboriously 
and skilfully worked, yet the labourers are too 
few. The year ending March 3 r, 1904, closes 
the quinquennium of the School Scheme 
effort, and the Committee earnestly hope that 












THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 3 


the five-year period on which they will soon 
be entering, will see much larger funds placed 
at their disposal, which will allow them to 
give, at shorter intervals, and over the whole 
School area of the Kingdom, that systematic 
instruction as to the nature and effects of 
intoxicating drinks which is so necessary for 
the future physical and moral well-being of 
the rising race. 

The sum of ^10,000 to be spent at the rate 
of two thousand pounds a year for five years 
commencing in April next, has been mentioned 
as the least possible amount with which any 
substantial good may be effected. But why 
should not the fund be made up to ^15,000, or 
even ^20,000 ? 


The Committee trust that means not only 
for the continuance, but for the wide exten¬ 
sion of this most useful effort may be freely 
and spontaneously placed at their disposal. A 
good example has been set by those generous 
friends who have together contributed the 
first ^4,000 towards the new fund, and the 
Committee trust that to the following list will 
be added those of a host of friends who recog¬ 
nise in the right training of the young the 
most sensible and effective means for attain¬ 
ing national sobriety. 


The following is a list of the amounts 
already promised : — 


(.Payable in April in five yearly instalments A) 



£ 

s. 

d. 

Sir George Williams 

750 

0 

0 

Sir George Uivesey. . 

500 

0 

0 

Mr. George Cadbury 

250 

0 

0 

Mr. Henry Holloway, J.P. 

250 

0 

0 

Mr. John Thomas, J.P. 

250 

0 

0 

The Hon. Mrs. Eliot Yorke 

250 

0 

0 

Mr. Ernest E- Cook 

125 

0 

0 

Mr. F. FI. Cook . 

I2 5 

0 

0 

Mr. Josiah Beddow. . 

100 

0 

0 

Mr. Stephen Collins, E-C.C. 

100 

0 

0 

Mr. J. B. Crosfield. 

100 

0 

0 

Mr. Frederic Smith 

100 

0 

0 

Mr. Thomas Smith 

100 

0 

0 

Mr. T. R. Ferens, J.P. 

50 

0 

0 

Mr. Thomas Holloway 

50 

0 

0 

Mr. Lionel Mundy 

50 

0 

0 

Mr. Joseph Peters 

50 

0 

0 

Mr. Joseph Rank 

50 

0 

0 

Mrs Hannah Knight 

50 

0 

0 

Mr. H. J. Wilson, M.P., and Mrs. 




Wilson 

40 

0 

0 

Alderman G. H. Baines 

26 

5 

0 

Mrs. J. E. Backhouse 

25 

0 

0 

Mrs. W. S. Caine (in memory of 



the late W. S. Caine) 

25 

0 

0 

Mr. William Harvey 

25 

0 

0 

Mr. Joseph Hep worth, J.P. 

25 

0 

0 

Mr. F. J. Hughes . . 

25 

0 

0 

Mr. R. Murray Hyslop 

25 

0 

0 

Mr. Isaac Milner, J.P. 

25 

0 

0 

Mr. E. B. Mounsey.. 

25 

0 

0 



£ 

s. 

d. 

Mr. John Pearce 

25 

0 

0 

Sir Thomas Pile, D.L- 

25 

0 

0 

Mr. W. N. Rook, LL-B. .. 

25 

0 

0 

Mr. Isaac Teasdale 

25 

0 

0 

Mr. James Wakely 

25 

0 

0 

Mr. J. Wycliffe Wilson, J.P. 

25 

0 

0 

Mr. Edward Wood, J.P. . . 

25 

0 

0 

Mrs. Frank Wright. . 

25 

0 

0 

Mr. F. Barnett-Smith 

20 

0 

0 

Mr. Thomas Harris, J.P. . . 

20 

0 

0 

Mr. Herbert Knott, J.P. . . 

15 

15 

0 

Mr. Joseph Lingford, J.P.. . 

15 

x 5 

0 

Mr. Harrison Mudd 

15 

15 

0 

Mrs. Wintringham 

15 

15 

0 

Other sums . . 

• • 350 

0 

0 


Work on Training Ships. 


S the result of a correspondence between 
the Lords of the Admiralty and the 
Committee of the Union, permission 
has been given for the delivery by the 
lecturers of the Union, under the School 
Scheme, of illustrated lectures on board the 
training ships of the Royal Navy, and 
already a number ot most useful lectures have 
been thus delivered. The details were arranged 
by the Chaplains of the vessels visited, in 
conjunction with their respective commanding 
officers. 

Mr. G. A. Roff, the Ueeturer for the 
Southern Counties, reports addresses on board 
H.M.S. Boscawen, H.M.S. Minotaur , and 
H.M.S. Agincourt at Portsmouth; and on 
board H.M.S. Impregnable and H.M.S. Lion 
at Devonport. At these lectures 1,884 boys 
were present and 50 officers, whose attendance 
during the giving of so much sound Tempe¬ 
rance teaching it was of great advantage to 
secure. After the lecture many of the boys 
wished to sign the pledge, and Mr. Roff 
communicated with Miss Weston in .order 
that this might be done in connection with 
the work of the Royal Naval Temperance 
Society. Further lectures on board ship by 
Mr. Roff are arranged for February next. 

Mr. A. Jolliffe lectured on board H.M.S. 
St. Vhicent and H.M.S. Iris in Portsmouth 
Harbour to 450 boys with a good staff of 
officers. Some of the boys claimed Mr. 
Jolliffe as an old acquaintance, on the 
ground of having heard his lectures in 
earlier days. As showing the goodwill of the 
ships’ officers, it may be stated that, as there 
was no blackboard on the Iris, the carpenter 
was instructed to prepare one forthwith. 

Mr. A. Barker Wells lectured on board 
H.M.S. Black Prince at Queenstown Harbour, 
Ireland, to 300 boys, with their officers, and 
was requested to deliver a second lecture in 
February. 

Mr. Joseph Addison lectured on board 
H.M.S. Caledonia at Dalmenjq Scotland, his 
audience consisting of 350 boys, and 50 of the 
crew who desired to be present, besides the 
usual officers. 













4 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Commenting on this visit The Naval and 
Military Record of December 3rd says : 

“H.M.S. Caledonia, the Queensferry training 
ship for boys, was visited on Thursday by 
Mr. Joseph Addison, of Leeds, who delivered, 
in connection with the United Kingdom 
Band of Hope Union, an interesting, in¬ 
structive, and profitable lecture on ‘ Alcohol 
and the Human Body.’ The lecture was 
illustrated with simple experiments, notes on 
the blackboard, and diagrams. The chaplain, 
Rev. Arthur G. Yates, M.A., R.N., presided. 
On the Chairman’s initiative, hearty thanks 
and cheers were accorded the lecturer, who 
was listened to with marked attention. Three 
prizes were offered for the best essays on the 
lecture, and many boys will, it is expected, 
take the opportunity, under the superin¬ 
tendance of the head schoolmaster, Mr. C. 
Mason, R.N., of writing these at an early date. 
The results and prizes are to be awarded before 
the Christmas vacation.” 

Mr. J. Barnett reports a lecture on board 
H.M.S. Ga?iges, at Harwich, where he was 
heartily welcomed by the officer in command. 
Two hundred and thirty boys with their 
officers were present; twenty-three of them 
being already holders of the Union’s certificate 
awarded for reports of earlier lectures given 
on shore. The interest and attention were, 
as usual, excellent, and the usual cheers 
greeted the lecturer at the close of the 
address. 

The success of this department of the work 
is, we think, assured, the attitude of the 
officers towards the effort being in every case 
highly satisfactory. Entire approval of the 
lectures was expressed, and the boys were 
allowed to signify by hearty applause their 
appreciation of the service so pleasantly and 
efficiently rendered by the representatives of 
the Union. 


BtradfoPd’s Annual meetings. 

T HE annual meetings of the Bradford Union were 
held on Saturday, December 5, in the Annesley 
Wesleyan Schoolroom. In the afternoon a 
well-attended conference was held, presided 
over by Rev. John Wright. Mr. Wright referred to the 
necessity of upholding the work of the magistrates and 
doing all that was possible to diminish the facilities 
for drinking. Mr. W. N. Edwards, F.C.S., then gave a 
most interesting and instructive address on “ The 
Use and Abuse of Alcohol.” The value of alcohol to 
the scientist, and to the man of commerce, wai 
emphasised, but Mr. Edwards clearly showed how 
injurious it is to the human system, because of its 
action upon protoplasm, its destruction of the cells of 
the body. Alcohol was not a food, because it possessed 
no nitrogenous matter. The discussion was opened 
by Mr. F. W. Richardson, F.I.C., F.C.S., F.R.M.S., 
the Bradford City analyst, who showed the folly of a 
man judging of the soundness of his condition by his 
feelings. Other speakers joined in the discussion, 
asking questions which were satisfactorily answered 
by the lecturer. 

A well-attended Public Tea followed, after which 
the annual meeting was held, Mr. Frederick Priest - 
man, J.P., presiding. The Annesley Young People’s 
Choir rendered musical selections. The annual 
report, presented by the hon. secretary, showed an 
increase of seven societies, making 177 in the Union, 


a record number. The Speakers’ Plan had proved of 
great service, 160 speakers having fulfilled 2,607 
appointments. The Union had co-operated with the 
United Temperance Council in opposing the applica¬ 
tions at Brewster Sessions for increased facilities for 
drinking. Mr. Jas. Roberts, the late Agent of the 
Union, had given twenty-four lectures in the day 
schools, attended by 106 teachers and 2,986 scholars; 
1,432 reproductions were received for which the Com¬ 
mittee had awarded 456 prizes and 1,396 certificates. 
The year would be memorable for closing, as it did, 
the twenty-one years’ faithful service of Mr. Jas. 
Roberts. In him the Union possessed a faithful, 
energetic, and enthusiastic Temperance worker, whose 
noble work would never be forgotten. Mr. F. Collin- 
son, the late office assistant, had been chosen agent 
to the Cambridgeshire Union, whilst Mr. Heyworth, 
who for many years had served on the executive, and 
lately as hon. secretary, had retired. 

The Chairman most ably appealed for earnest, 
strenuous effort on the part of all to make the Union 
more efficient, and its work more aggressive. Rev. 
Jno. J. Wall, in an admirable address, dwelt on the 
protective forces of life, conscience, home, Sabbath 
School teaching, and the Temperance Pledge, urging 
in a forceful manner all the young men to avail them¬ 
selves of the protective force of the Temperance 
Pledge. Mr. W. N. Edwards, F.C.S., followed, and 
greatly delighted the audience with his address. The 
greatest discovery of the last century had been the 
child, said the speaker, and while heredity was of 
great importance, environment was even more 
important. Child-life must not be repressed, but 
attracted. All must co-operate to secure the highest 
possible advantage for each and every child. Mr. 
Edwards urged upon all “moderaters” to become 
total abstainers. The supreme question in the great 
day would be, What good have you done? And 
though the moderate drinker might persuade himself 
he did no harm, that was not enough ; he failed to do 
good. 

Mr. C. J. Whitehead, of the Yorkshire Union, pro¬ 
posed a vote of thanks to the chairman, speakers, 
choir, the Annesley trustees and friends for their 
assistance and help, and dwelt upon the splendid 
work done in the villages by the Yorkshire Union. 
Mr. A. E. Lancaster seconded the proposition, which 
was carried with enthusiasm. On Sunday, December 
6, in the Annesley Wesleyan Chapel, Mr. Edwards 
gave an address, which was greatly appreciated, on 
“The noble art of self-defence,” Mr. W. H. Cockcroft, 
treasurer of the Union, presiding. 


Temperance Sunday was generally recognised 
throughout the United Kingdom on the last Sunday 
in November, and it seems that more Temperance 
sermons were preached than in previous years. Brad¬ 
ford again appeared to lead the way, but other places 
are increasing in the number of ministers and speakers 
they have pressed into this noble work. In the 
Hackney and East Middlesex district, for instance, 
the local Union reported 141 sermons, 107 addresses, 
and 30 prayer meetings; these did not include 
addresses at P.S.A. services and the like. 

Temperance Scholarships for PupieTeachers. 
—The Sunderland and District Band of Hope Union, 
in view of former successes in this direction, have 
decided to hold another competitive examination, and 
to that end have ordered 1,500 copies of the “Temper¬ 
ance Manual for the Young.” As an adjunct to this 
examination the Union has decided to again offer, 
for competition, scholarships to pupil teachers of the 
respective values of ten guineas, five guineas, and two 
guineas—two of each value. The Parent Society 
has agreed, in response to a special request, to set 
the questions both for the scholars’ and the pupil 
teachers’ examinations. The Committee are very 
anxious that work on the above lines for the impor¬ 
tant class of pupil teachers and students should be 
taken up in every part of the country in connection 
with the various competitive examinations that are 
being set on foot, and recommend the example of 
Sunderland in this respect for general adoption. 





THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


5 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series I. 


MANKIND IN THE MARRING & MENDING. 

SERIOUS TALKS WITH SENIOR MEMBERS. 


By T. N. KELYNACK, M.D., M.R.C.P., 

Hon. Secretary of the Society for the Study of Inebriety . 


No. i.—THE MAKING OF MEN. 


ty'N the opinion of many people the most popular 
] column in a newspaper is that which is concerned 
I with what a somewhat vulgar cynicism has 
r termed “ the hatching, matching, and dispatch¬ 
ing ” of mankind. And, correctly viewed, this is 
but right and rational. If it be true that “ the proper 
study of mankind is man,” everything dealing with 
his coming and going and his conduct in life, must 
afford material for endless patient research. 

Man—His Dignity and Duty. 

It is well that with the unfolding of our modern 
conceptions of evolution there has developed a reve¬ 
rence for the mysteries ot being, and a clear recogni¬ 
tion of the dignity of man and the high destiny of our 
people. The past is the property of Eternity; the 
future lies in the grasp of Divinity; the present only 
is ours, shaping and being shaped. 

The Evolution of Man. 

The present is the product of the past. Every 
individual tends to recapitulate in his own develop¬ 
ment the history of the race. The records of the 
upward climb are indelibly marked. Elevating forces 
and degrading influences play their part in the 
moulding. Man is still in the making. Evolution is 
yet in process. The Recording Angel is still busy :— 

“ The Moving Finger writes ; and, having writ, 

Moves on ; nor all thy Piety nor Wit 
Shall iure it back to cancel half a Line, 

Nor all thy Fears wash out a Word of it.” 

—(Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam ). 

Alcohol and the Evolution of Man. 

Among the many influences which have played a 
leading part in directing the life-history of man, 
alcohol must be accorded an important place. The 
use and abuse of intoxicating drinks affords subject 
for serious study. [The student would do well to read 
“Alcoholism, a Study in Heredity,” by G. Archdall 
Reid, M.D., 1901; and to see also “The British 
Journal of Inebriety,” for January, 1904.] Alcoholism 
is an ancient evil. The drunkard is a hoary sinner. 
The progress of races may be expressed in some 
measure in terms indicative ot their relation to 
alcohol. 

Alcoholism and the Making of Englishmen. 

England has been accorded a prominent place 
among the drunken nations of the earth. Much in 
our past has been marred by intemperance. [Graphic 
accounts of this sad story will be found in “ Nineteen 
Centuries of Drink in England,” by Dr. Valpy 
French.] Efforts to restrict the evil have been of 
little avail. We know that as long ago as the sixth 
century attempts were made to limit drunkenness. 
[Facts on this point are given in “ Drink, Temperance, 
and Legislation,” published in 1902.] It is not long 
since “retailers of gin were accustomed to hang out 
painted boards announcing that their customers 
could be drunk for a penny, and dead drunk for two¬ 
pence, and could have straw for nothing.” [This is 
mentioned in Professor Lecky’s “ History of England 
in the Eighteenth Century.” Fifth Edition, Vol. I., 
P- 479 -J 

The late Sir Walter Besant, in his fascinating work 
on life in the Metropolis in not far distant years, 
showed that “ County squires, the clergy, ministers, 
lawyers, craftsmen, tradesmen, and indeed all classes 
of society were alike given to strong drink.” [“ London 
in the Eighteenth Century,” by Sir Walter Besant, 
1902.] 

Times, customs, conditions have changed, but 


widespread addiction to dangerous alcoholic 
indulgence still continues. [Useful facts on this 
point will be found in “The Foundation of Death; A 
Study of the Drink Question,” by Axel Gustafson ; 
published in 1884.] 

As a recent writer has told us the end of Britain’s 
history must depend on the ethical condition of her 
people, on their energy, knowledge, honesty, and 
faith. [“ Britain and the British Seas,” by H. J. 
Mackinder, 1902.] 

Alcohol and Racial Deterioration. 

Alcohol must be accorded a foremost place among 
influences making for individual degeneration ana 
national decay. [See “ The Temperance Problem 
and Social Reform,” by Rowntree and Sherwell.] 
Manifestations of alcoholism are only too evident on 
every side. The evils dependent on, or inseparably 
connected with, intemperance are everywhere 
apparent. We live and move and have our being in 
an alcoholic en vironm ent. [In proof of this see the last 
volume of “ Life and Labour in London,” by Charles 
Booth, 1902.] Drink is marring mankind. All civilised 
people are awaking to the importance of the problem. 
The growth of anything like a strong Temperance 
sentiment in this country, especially in relation to the 
problem of chdd life, is but of recent date. [The 
Union’s popular volume, “ The Jubilee of the Band of 
Hope Movement,” edited by Mr. Frederic Smith, 
affords abundant proof.] 

The Scientific Study of Alcoholism. 

During the last few years much serious study has 
been devoted to an attempt to investigate the per¬ 
plexities of the so-called alcoholic question. The 
result is that much light has been thrown on the 
causation, nature, and various manifestations of 
alcoholism, and clear indications afforded for its pre¬ 
vention, arrest, and control. [Consult “Inebriety: 
its Etiology, Pathology, Treatment, and Juris¬ 
prudence,” by Norman Kerr, M.D. See also “Pro¬ 
ceedings of the Society for the Study of Inebriety,” 
“The British Journal of Inebriety,” “The Medical 
Temperance Review,” and “The American Quarterly 
Journal of Inebriety.”] Already practical remedial 
measures have been secured as the result of an appli¬ 
cation of the scientific method to the solution of the 
problem. [See reports of the Inspector under the 
Inebriates’ Acts; also “A Collection of British, 
Colonial, and Foreign Statutes relating to the Penal 
and Reformatory Treatment of Habitual Inebriates,’ 
being a Supplement to the Report of the Inspector 
under the Inebriates’ Acts for the year 1901. It is 
published by Eyre & Spottiswoode.] 

Results of the Scientific Study of Alcoholism. 

We purpose in this series of addresses presenting 
the more important results of recent scientific investi¬ 
gations into the problem of intemperance, and, while 
indicating the manner of the marring which alcohol 
produces, we shall endeavour to point out measures 
by which satisfactory mending may be accomplished. 
But our chief purpose will be to afford such definite 
knowledge as may afford armament for a sure defence, 
and material such as shall provide an inducement to 
undertake a serious and personal study of the 
scientific aspect of the problem. 

Senior members, to whom these addresses are de¬ 
livered, should do their utmost to study the matters 
referred to for themselves. The works mentioned 
should be consulted. It is only by patient investiga¬ 
tion that truth can be revealed in all its simplicity 
and beauty. Ignorance, apathy, and prejudice have 
done much to confound knowledge regarding the real 
significance of “The Drink Question.” Arguments 
in favour of temperance, and evidences of the disasters 
wrought by intemperance, may be found in works on 
travel, history, biography, as well as in books dealing 
with morals, science, and religion. The intelligent 
abstainer will do well to draw water from all wells, 
provided that the spring is pure. It is sometimes 
necessary to agitate; it is always right to educate. 
With all our getting, let us get understanding regard¬ 
ing the principles which should guide our action. 






6 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series II. 


SIMPLE SCIENCE CHATS. 

By Charges Harvey, 

Secretary , Kent Band of Hope Union . 


No. i.—A CHAT ABOUT DRINKS. 


BLACKBOARD SUMMARY. 


WATER. —The only Perfect Drink. 

WATER. —Taken pure or in Foods, 
Fruits, and various Drinks, 
as Tea, &c. 


INTOXICATING 


1. MALT LIQUORS. 

2. WINES. 

DRINKS. 3. SPIRITS. 

INTOXICATING means POISONOUS. 


Water the only Necessary Drink. 


OME drink is a necessity of life. The only 
drink it would be impossible to do without is 
JUj Water. This is a life-giving drink. Why ? 
Our bodies are made up of different substances. 
Were we to pull them to pieces (analyse them), 
we should find a large quantity of water. The average 
weight of a man is about 154 lbs., of which about 109 
lbs. are water. A man of 154 lbs. weight would 
require about five-and-a-half lbs. of water each day to 
keep him healthy. 


Water Supply. 

Britons live in a country well supplied with nature’s 
pure drink. There are places, such as the Great 
Sahara desert of Africa, devoid of water; and we read 
of the terrible sufferings of poor travellers who, 
unhappily, have exhausted their water supply. No 
suffering is greater than dying of thirst. It is one of 
the first duties of civilised authorities of towns and 
villages to see that the inhabitants are abundantly 
supplied with pure drinking water. Waterworks 
exist in many places, and it is interesting to trace 
where the water we drink comes from. Some of our 
large towns have spent millions of pounds in getting 
good water for the inhabitants. The lovely Loch 
Katrine, in Scotland, is described in Scott’s “ Lady of 
the Lake.” Well, it is from this beautiful lake that 
the people of the huge cit}' of Glasgow get their 
water. Thirlmere, at the foot of Helvellyn mountain, 
in Cumberland, gives of its delicious water to satisfy 
the thirst of the people of Manchester. Liverpool’s 
authorities actually made a lake among the Welsh 
mountains so that its people might enjoy the blessing 
of pure water. Let us thank God for His gift. 


Water in Foods. 


There are many other ways besides drinking pure 
water by which we take it into our bodies. We can¬ 
not eat food without, at the same time, taking water, 
for water forms part of ordinary foods. It is difficult 
to give exact figures of how much water each food 
contains. It varies, but these figures are reliable:—- 
Quantities of Water in 100 ubs. of Foods. 
[The figures represent the weight in lbs., and, there¬ 
fore, also give the per centage.]—Lettuce, 96; onions, 
91; cabbages, 89 ; apples, 83 ; parsnips, 81; herring, 80 ; 
potatoes, 75 ; lean meat, 73 ; eggs, 72, mutton, 71 ; 
bread, 37 ; cheese, 34; bacon, 22; rice, 15; peas, 14; 
flour, 13 ; butter, 10; oatmeal, 5. 

Fruits. 


There is another form of taking water that is most 
excellent, it is by eating fruits. In this beautiful way 
God has supplied us with a delicious drink as well as 


food. It is well to remember that in every 100 lbs. o 
fruits, like grapes, plums, pears, apples, strawberries, 
cherries, peaches, currants, blackberries, &c., between 
eighty and ninety of these lbs. are water. Therefore, 
be willing to eat ripe fruit when offered you. 

Other Drinks. 

Somehow the drinking of simple water is not very 
popular. People call it “cold,” and “comfortless,” 
and are always looking after some more fascinating 
and enticing drink. But, after all, we must remember 
that no matter what name may be given to the drink, 
it must largely consist of water. It is well for us, as 
Band of Hope members, to know that there are many 
popular drinks ready at hand, such, for instance, as 
tea, coffee, cocoa, and the various mineral waters. 
One day in a school a teacher asked the class which 
they thought was the best part of a cup of tea. One 
little fellow called out, “The sugar.” But, after all, 
nice as the sugar is, it is nature’s good water that 
forms the best part even of a cup of refreshing tea. 
The habit of tea drinking is growing in this country, 
and it is quite a product of our Temperance move¬ 
ment to see, in our large towns especially, a well- 
appointed tea-room. 

Intoxicating Drinks. 

No chat on drinks would be complete without our 
thinking about that important class of drinks known 
as “Intoxicating.” There has undoubtedly grown up 
in our midst a habit of drinking these drinks. They 
are not taken for the purpose of causing sin and 
misery, but the object of the drinker of them is to 
quench his thirst—either real or supposed. The 
whole aim of the Band of Hope is to teach its 
members to avoid drinking this particular class of 
drinks. This is a difficult task, for the custom has 
become so universal. 

Let us learn all we can about these drinks. Know¬ 
ledge dispels ignorance and makes intelligent to us 
the reason why we should adopt a certain course. 
First, why are the drinks called “Intoxicating”? 
The name is not applied to tea, coffee, cocoa, or even 
to mineral waters, which are so often described as non- 
(not) intoxicating. Well, what is the meaning of the 
word “Intoxicating”? It comes from the Greek 
language. The ancient Greeks, once the most power¬ 
ful nation in the world, used to arm their soldiers 
with bows and arrows. They desired that the arrows 
should be as deadly as possible, so they tipped every 
arrow with a poison. 

What is a poison ? There are many things that you 
put into your body that are for its good—things, 
indeed, that you could not do without. But there are 
other things which you are warned not to touch, 
because they will injure the body. Anything that is 
seriously injurious to the body may be described as a 
poison. These Greeks had discovered a deadly poison 
that they named “ Toxicon.” It was this poison that 
they used to tip their arrows with. From this word 
“ Toxicon ” comes the word “Intoxicating,” which, 
therefore, means poisonous. This is an important 
fact to remember, and really gives us the reason for 
abstaining from all intoxicating drinks. No matter 
under what name these drinks go, they all contain a 
poison, the property of which is to intoxicate. 

In this first lesson we must content ourselves with 
just learning the names of the classes into which 
these intoxicating drinks are usually divided. 

1. Ales and beers, or malt liquors. 

2. Wines, usually made from juices of fruits. 

3. Spirits or distilled liquors. 

The first class includes such drinks as porter, stout, 
pale ale, strong ale, and many more. 

The wine class is a large one, as may be expected 
from the great variety of fruits. It includes cider or 
apple wine, perry or pear wine, the great number 
made from the varieties of grapes, such as port, sherry, 
burgundy, champagne, claret, &c. 

The spirits are brandy, whiskey, gin, and rum. 

Whether we know much or little of the nature of 
intoxicating drinks, we already know enough of them 
never to touch them. 










THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


7 


Band of Mope Addresses.—Series Hi. 

ALCOHOL AND HISTORY. 

By Charges Wakeey, 

Secretary , United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 


No. i.—DRINK IN BIBLE TIMES. 


I N the pages of history we learn that wherever 
people have taken intoxicating drinks, whether 
in ancient or modern times, drunkenness and 
degradation have accompanied their use. 

Bible Warnings. 

Now, the Bible, which contains the most ancient 
histories with which we are acquainted, gives us 
many instances to serve as warnings against the use 
of such drinks. 

In these Bible narratives we have pointed out to us 
the dire results of drinking. We are shown, indeed, 
in the very first instance (Genesis ix. 20, 21;, in the 
case of the righteous Noah, that drink is no respecter 
of persons. “ And Noah began to be an husbandman, 
and he planted a vineyard : and he drank of the wine, 
and was drunken.” 

The degradation that followed the use of wine in 
this and other cases probably led the Jews of old 
to imagine the fable that when Noah planted the 
vine, Satan watered the roots of it with a mixture 
composed of the blood of a lamb, a lion, an ape, and a 
pig; so that when men drink wine they are at first 
quiet as a lamb, then bold as a lion, then noisy and 
foolish as an ape, and at last filthy as a pig. 

When the Israelites were in the wilderness, and 
Aaron and his sons had been created priests, we learn 
that two of these, Nadab and Abihu, suffered a terrible 
death for burning “ strange fire ” upon God’s altar. 
When they did this it appears that they were in a state 
of intoxication, for there immediately follows this 
command to Aaron : “ Do not drink wine nor strong 
drink, thou, nor thy sons with thee, when ye go into 
the tabernacle of the congregation, lest ye die.” 

Strong drink in this case blunted the perceptions 
and obscured the judgment of the priests, and it 
must have been so in many other cases, for, in 
Isaiah xxviii. 7, we learn that priests and prophets 
were made unfit for their work by strong drink : “They 
err in vision, they stumble in judgment.” 

In 1 Samuel xxv. we read that David, with his men, 
wanting food, sent for help to Nabal, who was at the 
feast of the annual sheep washing. But Nabal was 
drunk, and bereft of his wits, and he sent such a coarse 
and rude answer that, if it had not been for Abigail, 
his wife, who quieted David, and gave him what he 
wanted, he would have been killed. As it was he died, 
most likely of fright, a few days after ; for we are told 
that when his wife let him know of the danger he 
had escaped, “his heart died within him, and he 
became as a stone.” 

In this case, as in so many others, the drunkard, 
through stupefying his brain with alcohol, not only 
endangered his own life, but put that of his wife and 
household in peril also. No wonder that Solomon, 
mindful of this story, and of all the train of evils flow¬ 
ing from the use of strong drink, should say to his 
son, “Look not thou upon the wine when it is red, 
when it giveth its colour in the cup, when it ruoveth 
itself aright. At the last it biteth like a serpent and 
stingeth like an adder” (Proverbs xxiii. 31, 32). 

No history is more graphic and awful than that 
which tells of Belshazzar’s feast, of the king drinking 
with his nobles, and the terrible judgment which 
followed. Add to this the story of Ahasuerus drinking 
with his men, and acting foolishly; of the Atnale- 
kites, who drank and were overcome in battle; and 
of Benhadad and fhe thirty-two great kings who, 
through drink, met with the same fate. What a 
list of drunkards, whose reason was overturned, 
whose lives were sacrificed, whose families were 
ruined, whose cities were destroyed, and whose 
battles were lost through the effects of strong drink ! 


Bible Examples. 

In view of the debasement and disaster caused by 
the use of wine and other strong drinks, it is not to 
be wondered at that when the Nazarites were specially 
set apart for the service of God, their vow of 
self- denial and consecration should include the 
practice of Total Abstinence, In Numbers v. 1—6 the 
command is given: “Speak unto the children of 
Israel, and say unto them, When either man or 
woman shall separate themselves to vow a vow of the 
Nazarite to separate themselves unto the Dord; He 
shall separate himself from wine and strong drink.” 
The observance of this command no doubt resulted in 
moral and physical excellence, for the prophet Jere¬ 
miah says:—“ Her Nazarites were purer than snow, they 
were whiter than milk, they were more ruddy than 
rubies, their polishing was of sapphire.” This 
figurative language implying that these Nazarites 
had a bright, clear complexion, and a perfect measure 
of health and vigour. 

Samson, whose wonderful exploits are recounted in 
the Book of Judges, was a Nazarite from birth. He 
was raised up as the deliverer of Israel, and was by 
God’s special command,brought up a Total Abstainer. 

Milton, in his poem of “Samson Agonistes,” speaks 
of the madness of people thinking wine and strong 
drink necessary, when God had “ raised His mighty 
champion, strong beyond compare,” without it. 

Samuel, too, was a Nazarite, and dedicated to the 
service of God from his earliest years. He became a 
great seer and ruler, reached a very advanced age, 
and kept his wonderful faculties to the last without 
the use of intoxicating drinks. 

The Rechabites, whom we read about in Jeremiah 
xxxv., like the Nazarites, abstained altogether from 
the use of strong drinks. When on one occasion the 
prophet offered them wine on their visit to the Temple, 
they boldly and firmly refused it. We are told 
(ver. 19), that their constancy was acceptable to God. 
“Therefore thus saith the Lord of Hosts, the 
God of Israel; Jonadab the son of Rechab shall not 
want a man to stand before Me for ever.” This 
blessing still continues in operation, for the Recha¬ 
bites are still a well-known tribe, and are known 
to be faithful to their pledge of old. In the year 
1829, Dr. Wolff found some of this Arabian tribe 
near Mecca, and, asking them whose descendants 
they were, they answered by reading from an Arabic 
Bible Jeremiah xxxv. 2; adding, “Come, and you 
will find that we number sixty thousand.” 

When the people of Judah were carried away into 
Babylon, and their young princes exposed to the 
temptations of the king’s court, Daniel and his three 
companions, who had been chosen to undergo a 
process of training during three years so that they 
might be fitted to wait upon the king in his palace, 
were offered meat and wine from the monarch’s 
table. These they boldly refused, requesting the 
prince of the eunuchs, who had charge of them, to 
allow them pulse for their food, and water for their 
drink. At first he declined, for fear that their health 
should be affected, and he should be punished with 
death on that account. But the young Hebrews 
persisted, aud the deputy, Melzar, agreed to an 
experiment extending over ten days. At the end of 
that time “their countenances appeared fairer and 
fatter in flesh than all the children which did eat the 
portion of the king’s meat.” The result was so 
satisfactory that the wine was taken away. 

All these Bible narratives, and many others, witness 
to the evil of Strong Drink, and the value of Total 
Abstinence. On the one hand we find that Bible 
abstainers were greatly honoured and blest of God ; 
and on the other that judgment fell upon those who 
gave way to drunkenness. On the one hand we see 
that these abstainers were improved in personal 
health and beauty, and helped towards a good and 
holy life ; on the ether that patriarchs, prophets, 
priests and people, were degraded and destroyed by 
Strong Drink. And thus we realise the truth of what 
the wise man taught 3,000 years ago: “ Wine is a 
ruockei , strong drink is raging , and whosoever is 
deceived thereby is not wise." 





8 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series IV. 


BIBLE CLASS TALKS. 

By the Rev. David Heath, oj Derby. 
No. i.—IS IT RIGHT? 


[Lesson from Proverbs xxi.—Verse 8, R.V., reads thus : “ The 
way of him that is laden with guilt is exceeding crooked; but as for 
the pure, his work is right.”] 

Is it Right? 

HIS is a far more important question than, is it 
convenient ? or, is it fashionable ? or, will it pay ? 
We believe every young person in his heart says 
that this is the most important question to ask 
about any act or word or habit—is it right? 
When our conscience says, “ Yes, right,” we are happy, 
especially if we have determination enough to carry 
out our conviction. But if conscience says, “ No, it is 
wrong,” and we still do it, we are miserable, and are 
going down the scale of life instead of up it. 

A Boy sold some Berries 

to a lady, but did not go in to see the lady measure 
them. She said he might have lost by her cheating 
him. “No,” he replied, “you would have been the 
loser, for you would have lost your conscience, but I 
should only have lost my berries.” 

It is a good thing to have a question like this fixed 
in the memory and always ready for use. For some¬ 
times we are in a fix, as if we came to a door that we 
could not open ; then this question will be like a key 
to open it; or, as if we came to diverging roads, or 
cross roads, and then this question is like 

A Finger Post to Guide us. 

And if this question be fixed in the mind early in 
life it will remain there all through life and be a 
wonderful help, for we believe every child in his 
heart really wishes to “Keep to the right,” as the 
tablets on so many lamp-posts say. A youth had 
promised to do a certain questionable thing for his 
master, but he was uneasy about it, and asked his 
father what he should do. The father simply said, 
“What does your conscience say?” That youth 
requested his master to excuse him from his promise; 
the master was good enough to do so, and the youth 
found his father’s question like a guiding star through 
life. 

There is no greater victory than to be in the right 
and to stick to the right. 

He is the Coward 

who knows the right, yet for fear or favour or profit 
does the wrong. Such a youth loses the respect and 
confidence of his friends, and he loses self-respect and 
becomes the dupe and slave of evil people, or of his 
own evil inclinations. There is a well-worn phrase 
from Shakespeare, “ Conscience doth make cowards 
of us all,” but I venture to say that it is still oftener 
true that want of conscience makes cowards of us all. 
Conscience makes heroes, want of conscience never 
made a hero yet. 

There is another well-worn quotation from Shake¬ 
speare which shows how strong is the case of one 
who can say it is right, or it is true: —“ Thrice armed 
is he that hath his quarrel jnst.” The same thing 
will hold good of arguments and rival schemes; if 
you 

Have Truth and Justice on your Side 

you are sure to win if you will persevere. That must 
have been what Mahomet meant when he said, “ God 
and one are a majority.” There is no sword with so 
keen an edge, no shot surer of reaching its mark, than 
this question—Is it right ? There was once a little 
illustration of this on one of those grand hill-sides of 
the West Riding of Yorkshire. Two boys had been 
quarrelling, and one of them had done the other an 
injury. As they w 7 alked slowly along, the guilty lad 
slunk behind as his accuser turned round again and 


again and threw at him, not stones, or threats, or 
blows, but this question, in the dialect of the district ) 

“Is it reet, is it reet?” 

A passer-by who saw it all, well remembers the 
silence and evident shame of that lad; he wriggled 
like a whipped puppy dog. The incident impressed 
him with the fact that there is no weapon like the 
truth, and no appeal so mighty as that to the con¬ 
science, even among young people. Oh ! how much 
better a way this is than using fists and spears and 
gunpowder, which never proved the right or the 
wrong of a quarrel since the world began. 

If there is one thing above all others which the 
Bible and the religion of Jesus Christ are intended to 
do for us it is to fix this question as the practical tes: 
in all the concerns of life. 

“What would Jesus do?” 

is only another form of the question, “ Is it right ? ” 
because we are sure Jesus, our great Example, would 
do only what is right. From beginning to end the 
life of Jesus was a witness to the truth, or to what is 
right. And there is no better or more Christlikc 
service than to oppose the wrong and “ dare to do 
right.” 

The Apostle Paul goes so far as to say that we 
should not only consider what may be right for our¬ 
selves, but also what it is right for us to do in the 
presence of, and for the sake of, people 

Morally Feebler than Ourselves. 

“ It is good not to eat flesh, nor to drink wine, nor to 
do anything whereby thy brother stumbleth ” 
(Romans xiv. 21). Paul is referring to things th it had 
been offered in idolatrous worship, but his words con¬ 
vey a great principle which will apply to us all, viz., 
it is right that we should set an example which any¬ 
one may follow. 

Band of Hope boys and girls will know how to 
answer the question, is it right ? 

In regard to Strong Drink 

and the drink traffic, but to make quite sure about 
that, let us ask the question in several ways, and 
speak out your answer, yes or no. 

First—when it has been found out how dangerous a 
poison alcohol is, is it right for people to go on using 
it ? 

Second—from 25 to 50 per cent, of the whole 
number of paupers in the country are caused by 
drink, and they cost ^13 10s. each per year. Is it 
right that 

Sober and Thrifty People 

should have to pay for all these ? 

Third—the prisoners that go to prison through 
drink cost the country two-and-a-quarter millions of 
pounds a year; besides, the nation is spending at the 
rate of 

£180,000,000 a Year on Drink. 

Ought not the nation to stop this cause of crime and 
waste ? 

Fourth—It is estimated that 

1,600,000 Illnesses 

occur annually through the use of alcohol. And Dr. 
Norman Kerr says 

120,000 Persons Die 

every year through drink. Is it right that all this 
terrible havoc should go on when it might easily be 
stopped by people and Parliament fighting the drink ? 

Pifth—it is now quite certain that without drink 
people can think better and work better, and be 
better; and earn more and spend more, and save 
more and give more. Then do you think total 
abstinence is 

Right or Wrong? 

Then will you all stand up and repeat the pledge 
with me—“ I promise by the help of God to abstain 
from all intoxicating drinks as beverages.” 

[Sing the Hymn 68 in Hymns and Songs —“ Dare to 
do right! dare to be true.”] 





THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


9 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series VII. 

TALKS ON SMOKING. 

By J. Ca mv a lyr, a nER, Birmingham. 


No. i.—A BOY’S GREATEST TEMPTATION. 


Avoid all Slavery. 

J N my talk to you to-night, I want to speak to you 
of a boy’s greatest temptation, and why it should 
be resisted. Some of you older ones may think 
I am going too far in saying that smoking is the 
greatest temptation, but even you, if you think 
about it, will admit that it is a most severe temp¬ 
tation to boys, possessing, as it does, such a fascina¬ 
tion that even boys of an older growth admit the 
power the habit has over them. It changes free men 
into slaves, and places them in a slavery from which 
it is not easy for them to escape. 

Don’t Ape. 

It gives boys an idea that it is manly to strut about 
the streets with a cigarette stuck between their lips, 
imagining that by doing so they are imitating men. 
No boys ; not imitating, but aping. Imitate all that 
is good and true, but don’t ape. 

Look at Bill. He thought smoking made a man of 
him. What an idea. Once you could see him as 
bright and promising a lad as you ever saw ; and 
now you see a big cigarette with a little boy 
dragged at the end of it. Manly, indeed! No, not 
manly; monkeyish. Oh ! boys, don’t ape. Leave 
that for the monkey tribe. 

Jim Garfield. 

You all, no doubt, have read the story, “ From Log 
Cabin to White House,” the wonderful romance of 
the upward climb of the boy who eventually became 
President of the United States. You remember how 
Jim Garfield—as he was called in his early days—set 
his face against smoking, when, as a driver on a 
canal barge, thrown among a set of rough men, he 
kept his colours flying. Did they think any the 
worse of him? No, indeed. “Jim,” said one of the 
boatmen to his mate, “ is a great fellow ; the way he 
rates me up and down about drinking and smoking is 
a caution. Just think of it; a canal boy as does not 
drink rum or fight or swear or smoke! I like him, 
though I always do like a man who shows his colours 
as Jim Garfield does.” It greatly strengthened young 
Garfield’s character so resolutely refusing to smoke 
when all around him were smoking. 

Don’t Yield to Temptation. 

You are all acquainted with the old saying, it is no 
sin to be tempted, the sin is in yielding to the temp¬ 
tation. And among the many reasons why we should 
resist this evil, is the fact that cigarettes contain a 
poison called Nicotine, which is a most deadly foe to 
health, and when used in any form wages war on all the 
vital parts or organs of the body. Again, it never gives 
strength ; it cannot make muscle or bone, but on the 
other hand it dwarfs growth, very often gives the boy 
a weak, decrepit appearance, especially if he carries 
the habit to excess. It weakens both youth and age, 
discolours and destroys the teeth, and undermines 
the whole system, body, mind, and soul. 

What do I hear some of you sayq that I am going 
too far in saying these things, and that you know men 
who have lived to a ripe old age who have been 
smokers ? True. 

Sewer Jack. 

We had, a short time ago, a man in Birmingham’ 
who, for fifty years, had been in the habit of going- 
down our sewers day by day, from one year’s end to 
another, and had never been absent from his employ¬ 
ment through illness, but surely you would not argue 
from that, that it was healthy work and pne to be 


recommended to anyone who wanted to live long. It 
was owing to “Sewer Jack” being blessed with a 
good constitution to start with, that what would have 
been injurious and even fatal to many, seemed to be 
but little inconvenience to him ; and so you may find 
men, who, being possessed of great vitality, can use 
the weed for a long time before any severe results are 
noticed. On the other hand how many are injured, 
their physical health destroyed, and they shut out 
from all real and pure enjoyment of life because of the 
power the weed has over them. I know one who is 
such a slave to it, whose health has suffered to such 
an extent that he cannot open his letters in a morning 
till he has had a cigarette. He cannot sit down to his 
dinner or any other meal without first smoking a 
cigarette or cigar, and then, after all, he cannot enjoy 
the meal put before him, however tempting or 
appetising it may be, simply because he has been 
smoking. 

No Relish for Food. 

Think of it, boys, and ask yourselves if you would 
like to be brought to that position not to be able to 
enjoy your meals. If you would not like to be in that 
condition, don’t be led away by the seductive but 
poisonous weed. You want to grow up strong and 
well; to be able to run ; many of you to take part in 
healthy exercises; then 

Don’t Smoke. 

Remember that every athlete that goes in training 
for a contest of any kind, no matter how much he may 
be in the habit of using tobacco under ordinary 
circumstances, always avoids it while training. Why ? 
Because it lessens one’s endurance ; if you use tobacco 
you cannot run a long distance without stopping ; you 
get “.winded ” easily; you tire out quickly; and while 
it is harmful to a grown man, it is many times more 
harmful to a growing boy. We want our teetotal boys 
to be strong, bright, healthy, happy and true, with no 
taint of tobacco on their lips, with bodies clean and 
free from the taint. 

Instead of drawing at a cigarette, draw into your 
lungs plenty of fresh air—God’s precious gift—which 
will purify your blood and help to keep it pure, and 
the deeper you breathe, the more your chest will 
expand, your health and vigour be strengthened and 
increased, your enjoyment of everyday life will be 
more, and the less you will long for or crave after any 
such a ne’er-do-well and deceiver as tobacco in any 
shape or form. 


Mr. A. HouedeRSHaw, F.C.S., has just issued the 
fourth edition of his penny manual, “Alcohol as a 
Guest in the Human House.” It is published by the 
North of England Temperance League, at the Tem¬ 
perance Institute, Rutherford Street, Newcastle-on- 
Tyne. In about twenty-eight pages it compresses a 
great amount of information, broken up into short sen¬ 
tences, such as would prove useful in adapting the 
lessons to Band of Hope meetings. Although the 
subject is not illustrated, the manual cannot fail to be 
useful, for it is thoroughgoing in its advocacy of 
total abstinence. 

The Defender of Ladysmith and Temperance. 
—Speaking at Gibraltar recencly, Sir George White, 
the Governor, addressed the combined Temperance 
Societies on “the Rock” on the moral and financial 
ruin wrought by drink. The gallant officer use! the 
political topic of the hour to enforce the lesson of 
Temperance. He said that one of Mr. Chamberlain's 
arguments was the loss of employment to the work¬ 
ing classes caused by the present system, “but,” said 
Sir George, “ for every family that has lost employ¬ 
ment from this cause, I believe there are a dozen out 
of employment from habits of intemperance ; they 
have not only been reduced to a state of impecu- 
niosity, but also to a state of moral degradation.” Sir 
George also commended the idea of total abstinence 
places of recreation to wean them from old bad 
habits and haunts. 






IO 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


UNITED KINGDOM BAND OF HOPE UNION. 


President —Sir GEORGE WILLIAMS. 


Vice-Pm 

The Archbishop of Dublin. 

The Bishop of Chichester. 

The Bishop of London. 

The Bishop of St. Albans. 

The Bishop of Stepney. 

Rev. Canon Barker, M.A. 

Lady Biddulph. 

George Cadbury, Esq. 

Mrs. W. S. Caine. 

The Earl of Carlisle. 

The Countess of Carlisle. 

Rev. J. Clifford, M.A., LL.D. 
Richard Cory, Esq., J.P. 

T. A. Cotton, Esq., J.P., C.C. 
James Edmunds, Esq., M.D. 


idents. 

Rev. Canon Fleming, B.D. 

The Dean of Hereford. 

Rev. R. F. Horton, M.A..D.D. 
Sir W. Lawson, Bart., M.P. 

Sir George Livesey, C.E. 

Rev. F. B. Meyer, B.A. 
Alderman F. Priestman, J.P. 
Frederic Smith, Esq. 

Lady Henry Somerset. 

Miss Agnes Weston. 

George White, Esq., M.P. 

The Venerable Archdeacon 
WlLBERFORCE, D.D. 

Mrs. H. J. Wilson. 

The Hon. Mrs. Eliot Yofke. 


Executive Committee. 
Chairman— Lionel Mundy. 
Vice-Chairman —John Wills, F.S.Sc. 
Treasurer —John Thomas, J.P. 

London Members. 


Mrs. W. S. Caine. 

William Bingham. 

Rev. F. Storer Clark, M.A. 
Charles W. Garrard. 

G. S. Lucraft. 


J. I. Morrell. 

A. Newton. 

Sir Thomas Pile, Bart., D.L. 
Walter N. Rook, LL.B. 
Edward Wood, J.P. 


Provincial Members. 


William E. Bell, Newcastle. 

A. A. Bryan, Cardiff. 

Howard F. Chaplin, Cambs. 
George T. Cooke, Bristol. 

E. J. Day, Harrogate. 

Miss Docwra, Kelvedon , Essex. 
Jacob Earnshaw, Manchester. 
T. E.Hallsworth, Manchester. 


Rev. David Heath, Derby. 

J. A. Herrick, Birmingham. 
Henry Holloway, J.P .. Surrey . 
R. Murray Hyslop, Kent. 

Rev. J. Thornley, Sheffield. 

C. J. Whitehead, Sheffield. 
William Wilkinson, Belfast. 
The Hon. Mrs. Eliot Yorke. 


Secretary —Charles Wakely. 

Trade Manager— Judson Bonner. 

General Lecturers. 

Frank Adkins. Walter N. Edwards, F.C.S. 

School Lecturers. 

Joseph Addison, Nth'n Counties I G. Avery Roff, S'th'n Comities. 
John Burgess, F.C.S., London. I W.T. Stanton, Midlands. 

R. Prys-Jones, Wales. 


Offices 59 and 60, Old Bailey, London, E.C. 
Bankers: London, City & Midland Bank, Ludgate Hill, 
London, E.C. 


THE 

$ attbof i) ope® ijtron tele 

JANUARY, 1904. 


The usual New Year’s meet- 
New ing of Band of Hope workers 
Year’s will be held in Exeter (Lower) 
Gathering. Hall on Saturday, January 2. As 
in former years, the Committee 
have spared no effort to make the gathering 
both attractive and useful, and they hope 
that the occasion will prove one that will 
cheer the workers and prove an inspiring 
commencement to the work in the New Year. 
The Rev. W. Rutley Mowll, the popular and 
earnest vicar of Christ Church, Brixton, will 
give a New Year’s address, and an address 
will also be given by the Rev. Eynon Davies, 
of Beckenham, whose voice has so often 
been heard eloquently speaking on behalf 
of our movement. No one who is within 
easy distance of Exeter Hall should fail 
to be present at this rally of workers. The 


programme will include songs by Miss Dora 
Gibson; recitals by Miss Katie Banfield 
(Guildhall School of Music); handbell solos 
by Mr. Hany Tipper; and part-songs and 
glees by the Criterion Glee Singers. Alto¬ 
gether, a most happy and useful gathering is 
anticipated. 


The annual soiree for the 
New young people who participate in 
Year’s the Christmas and New Year’s 
Soiree Collection will be held in the 
Exeter (Large) Hall on Monday, 
January 25, when Sir Thomas Pile, Bart., D.L., 
will preside, and the prizes will be awarded 
by Lady Pile. A full programme of entertain¬ 
ment will be provided, including, besides a 
special address to the young, instrumental 
and vocal music of a unique character by Mr. 
Duncan S. Miller and his party; drill displays 
by friends from Camberwell Green Band of 
Hope ; an exhibition of magic and mystery ; 
and a set of cinematographic representations. 
It is hoped that the Large Hall will be, as on 
so many former occasions, filled to its fullest 
capacity with a crowd of happy young people, 
who have done good for the Temperance 
Hospital, as well as for their own movement. 


Mr. Frank; Adkins has been 
The very busy in the villages during 
Village the first half of the winter. The 
Campaign, work, which is carried on free of 
any expense to the local friends, 
has been pursued in Cambridgeshire, Dorset¬ 
shire, Gloucestershire, and Somersetshire, 
and a very interesting tour in Jersey. His new 
apparatus was found very useful in the many 
villages where gas was a minus quantity, and 
where bright pictures on dark nights proved 
very attractive. The village schools were also 
freely open to Mr. Adkins, and useful lessons 
were given. The places visited numbered 54, 
the schools addressed, 52 ; the lectures given, 
74 ; and the total attendance of young villagers 
and their friends, 14,044. Mr. Adkins is now 
fully booked up until the end of the season 
in April next. 

A Hidden Danger. 


■yf T this season of Christmas parties and 
tt other gatherings for young people we 
* ^ feel it necessary to call special and 
pointed attention to a danger of a very 
insidious character which threatens the well¬ 
being of the younger members of our families. 

It is now known that sweets and chocolates 
containing alcohol in various forms—brandy, 
liqueurs, and so forth—are frequently sold, 
for the consumption chiefly of ladies and 
children. It must be apparent to all that 
the consumption of alcohol in this attractive 
form would have very deplorable results, 
which it is not necessary now to particularise, 
beyond the general statement of the undesira- 













THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


ii 


bility of allowing young people to make their 
first acquaintance with alcohol in such a 
pleasant garb, and the graver danger that 
some spark of tendency, possibly the result 
of heredity, may be fostered—with fatal 
results to the after career of the unconscious 
child. 

Some time since, upon receiving informa¬ 
tion that mischief of this kind was on foot, 
we called attention to the subject in the pages 
of the Chronicle. This has now been fol¬ 
lowed up by a searching inquiry, and the fact 
that such sweets are obtainable, in various 
parts of Tondon and in the provinces, is fully 
established. The proportion of alcohol in 
each specimen is not large, but yet large 
enough to produce the harmful results indi¬ 
cated above. 

Further enquiry establishes the gratifying 
fact, that these pleasantly disguised poisons 
are not of English manufacture. The great 
sweet and chocolate manufacturing firms, 
such as Messrs. Cadbury, Fry, Pascal, Rown- 
tree, and others, have no complicity, either by 
way of manufacture or import, with this evil 
traffic, which is, so far as we can ascertain, 
confined to foreign firms, notably French and 
Swiss. To be sure, some English firms do 
produce an article termed “ liqueur sweets,” 
but the “ liqueur ” in these cases is said by 
these firms to be a simple fruit essence of a 
harmless character. It is a great pity that the 
term “ liqueur ” should have been used in these 
cases, but otherwise the English productions, 
so far as we are aware, afford no ground for 
complaint. 

The legal aspect of the question is, we are 
informed, very simple, viz. : That the Excise 
takes care that these articles pay duty upon 
importation ; that only licensed persons may 
sell them ; and that the keeper of an ordinary 
sweetstuff shop who vends such articles is 
liable to punishment. 

If any Band of Hope workers, Sunday 
School teachers, or indeed any friends of the 
young, come across any of these objectionable 
sweetmeats, and find that they do actually 
contain alcohol, it will be well worth the 
while of such friends to ascertain where the 
sweets were purchased, and if the seller has 
no licence, to call the attention of the Excise 
authorities to the matter. 

Much may also be done in the social direc¬ 
tion to check this form of alcoholic con¬ 
sumption. The dangerous character of the 
sweets may be courteously pointed out to 
parents or others who may have inadvertently 
bought them. Indeed, we would recommend 
that no sweets with names indicating a 
relationship to alcoholic drinks should be pur¬ 
chased for children. It is well to have nothing 
to do either with wolves in sheep’s clothing, or 
with sheep who assume the role of the wolf. 
The matter might also be referred to in Band 
of Hope meetings, and in casual conversa¬ 
tions, whilst the voice of the Press is always 
available to give public warning in cases of 
danger such as this. 


With these and'similar measures duly taken, 
it may well be hoped that it will soon cease to 
pay foreign firms to export such wares as these 
to this country, and that our young people 
will no longer be subject to the danger of 
making the acquaintance of alcohol in such 
an attractive and insidious guise. 


R QuaFteFly Ppogpamme. 


The programme for the first three months of 1904 
issued for the South Shields Band of Hope, runs 
thus:— 

Jan. 4—Temperance Catechism. 

,, 11—“ Chalk Talks ” on the Blackboard. 

„ 18—Foods and their Uses. 

,, 25—Intoxicating Liquors as Foods. 

Feb. 1—*Lantern Night. 

,, 8—Temperance Catechism. 

„ 15—Effect of Alcohol on Foods. 

,, 22—Band of Hope Union Representative. 

,, 29—Do Intoxicating Liquors give Strength ? 

Mar. 7—^Lantern Night. 

,, 14—Temperance Catechism. 

,, 21—“Chalk Talks” on the Blackboard. 

,, 28—The Fiery Giant, and how to Kill Him. 

* Admission, Lantern Nights id.. Adults 2d. 

This programme is printed as a folding card, giving 
officers, “ Objects of the Band of Hope,” “Thoughts 
for Thinkers,” and a little American poem on the 
evils of “ The Bar.” Mr. J. W. Travis is superinten¬ 
dent of the Society. 


The Rechabite Order has had a most successful 
year. In the United Kingdom alone they have 
opened 96 new branches for Adult Members and 92 
new branches for Juveniles, in all 188 New Tents. 
The Adult Membership is now 195,000, and the 
Juvenile Membership 125,000, while the funds now 
reach ^1,375 000. During the year Ibe Tents in 
Johannesburg and Pretoria have been formed into a 
District for the Transvaal, and the Order has got a 
footing in Germany. 


IT is welcome news that the Court of Common 
Council of the City of London have made a grant of 
^50 to the United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 
Such recognition of our work as this implies is not to 
be valued merely according to the cash represented; 
it is more than that. It suggests that the Corpora¬ 
tion of the first city in the Empire—the first City in 
the world—is becomi ng aware of the need of those moral 
agencies which are striving to promote the permanent 
welfare of the nation’s greatest treasure—its children. 
We, therefore, acknowledge the gift with gratitude. 


The Halifax Band of Hope Union has reprinted 
and widely circulated the report of the address 
delivered by Mr. J. H. Whitley, M.P., at its recent 
conference. It forms a splendid tract, and, not being 
in the form of a tract, is, perhaps, all the more likely 
to be read. Showing the need of scrupulous economy 
in mills and factories, the speaker went on to indicate 
the frightful waste caused by the use of intoxicating 
drinks, and called upon the nation to look at the 
matter from a business point of view, and to stop the 
leakage at once. The power to consume had gone in 
the wrong direction. Let them not forget to see that 
the stopper was in the bunghole. Mr. Whitley strongly 
urged public houses being turned into people’s 
houses lor rest, recreation and refreshment, without 
alcohol. 







12 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Anti«Cigat*ette. 


Gloucestershire; Alert. 

T the annual gathering of the Gloucestershire 
Band of Hope Union, held in the Friends’ 
Meeting House, at Gloucester, Sir William 
Wedderburn, Bart., presided. Mr. T. B. Fox, 
J.P, read a valuable paper on “ Cigarette 
Smoking,” showing that it stunted growth, produced 
torpidity of the nervous system, lowered the moral 
tone, tended to the degeneracy of the race, and also 
to the increase of certain diseases—notably insanity, 
consumption, cancer and throat complaints. He 
urged adults to set an example of non-smoking. The 
chairman, who said he disliked tobacco, entirely 
sympathised wdth Mr. Fox. Mr. Frank Adkins pointed 
out that though the Parent Union did not insist upon 
the double pledge being taken, yet strongly repre¬ 
sented to the children the great unwisdom of 
smoking. 

Australia also. 

Ballarat is famous for its energetic interest in the 
welfare of its young people, and in accordance with 
its traditions held a conference of Band of Hope 
workers last year presided over by Archdeacon 
Tuck. A number of able papers were read and 
vigorously discussed. One, which excited consider¬ 
able attention, was on the “Nicotine Evil among 
Children,” by Miss Brentnall, of Queensland, who had 
been visiting friends in Ballarat tor a few weeks. It 
is evident that public opinion is at last greatly stirred 
on the question of juvenile smoking, and that many 
persons have the uncomfortable conviction that, 
example being better than precept, some of the older 
smokers ought to lead the way in reform. The debate 
showed, also, that legislative enactment is needed to 
check the evil, especially in the form of cigarette 
smoking. 

Poisoned by Tobacco. 

The growing evil of the tobacco habit among the 
young was painfully illustrated at an inquest held a 
little time since at Tredegar, on the death of a boy 
fifteen years of age. The boy’s father said the lad was 
a victim to tobacco chewing. He even took it to bed 
with him, and the father had occasionally to get up 
and pull the tobacco out of his mouth. He had been 
unable to break him of the habit. Dr. Isaac Crawford 
said he found the lad in a very low condition, and 
revived him somewhat by an injection of strychnine, 
but he relapsed and died. The symptoms indicated 
nicotine poisoning from chewing tobacco. Dr. Craw¬ 
ford said this was the second death from tobacco 
poisoning in Tredegar. At present it was common 
for boys about fourteen years of age to be brought to 
him suffering from the effects of smoking. The 
amount of damage arising from tobacco poisoning 
was extraordinary. A verdict of “ Death from mis¬ 
adventure from tobacco poisoning” was returned. 

A Letter to the Editor. 

Dear Sir, —I very strongly believe the time has come 
when a more definite and decided stand must be 
taken by the various Unions against the pernicious 
habit which is so constantly growing, permeating and 
corrupting our youth by the use of narcotics. Your 
space may not permit of detail re the disastrous 
effects constantly accruing both to body and mind. 
The Press supplies these in grave abundance ; what I 
and others (with whom I have frequently interchanged) 
earnestly desire is, that, through the medium of your 
exceedingly valuable journal, this matter shall be so 
laid before leaders and speakers everywhere, that for 
the children’s sake, consistency’s sake, and (not least) 
for Christ’s sake, their influence in the direction of 
“ whatsoever things are pure, lovely, of good report,” 
these (and only these) may thenceforward characterise 
every worker in the noble and blessed work of saving 
the children from forming those sensual habits which 
deprave and degrade, and end in ruin and death. 

W. E. K. 

(a V.P. of B. of H. U.) 


OQeetinct of Secretaries 
and Agents. 


B Y a pleasant custom of long standing, the secre¬ 
taries of the Metropolitan Band of Hope Unions 
and the evening agents of the Parent Society 
were invited to meet each other and the Com¬ 
mittee for friendly and helpful intercourse. 

The gathering was held in Exeter (Lower) Hall on 
Saturday evening, December 12. Mr. Lionel Mundy 
made a genial chairman, and a programme of music 
and elocution was rendered by a party of talented 
friends under the direction of Mr. W. R. Hart, sup¬ 
plemented by items from members of the audience. 
An address was given by Mr. Frederic Smith, who 
is never so much at home as when addressing 
the workers in the good cause. Mr. Smith pointed 
out the great change which had taken place in the 
personelle of the speakers and other workers since 
these gatherings were instituted some twenty-seven 
years ago. “ Much,” said Mr. Smith, “ had been done, 
and great successes achieved, but the demands on their 
zeal and devotion showed no signs of growing less, 
and he trusted that the coming year would witness 
great advances in the movement to which secretaries 
and speakers were alike devoting so much of their 
time and the best of their energies.” 


(Xlhat about To-day ? 


E shall do so much in the years to come, 

But what have we done to-day? 

We shall give our gold in a princely sum, 
But what did we give to-day ? 

We shall lift the heart and dry the tear, 

We shall plant a hope in the place of fear, 
We shall speak the words of love and cheer : 
But what did we speak to-day ? 

We shall be so kind in the after awhile, 

But what have we been to-day ? 

We shall bring to each lonely life a smile, 
But what have we brought to-day ? 

We shall give to truth a grander birth, 

And to steadfast faith a deeper worth, 

We shall feed the hungering souls of earth ; 
But whom have we fed to-day ? 

We shall reap such joys in the by-and-by, 
But what have we sown to-day ? 

We shall build us mansions in the sky, 

But what have we built to-day ? 

’Tis sweet in idle dreams to bask, 

But here and now do we do our task ? 

Yes, this is the thing our souls must ask, 

“ What have we done to-day ? ” 


Covresponbence. 


HOW TO MAKE BANDS OF HOPE 
MORE SUCCESSFUL. 

Sir,—B eing a staunch believer in Band of Hope 
work, and also believing that it could be made more 
successful, I write to say that I think what is needed 
is that there should be much more scientific instruc¬ 
tion in Bands of Hope. To merely amuse the children 
will not do ; but if they are well grounded in scientific 
Temperance, and are taught all that they ought to 
know about the poisonous effects of intoxicating 
drink on the body and the mind, they will not be 
likely to leave our ranks when they become young 
men and women, as so many are doing a: the 
present day. In the second place, I think it is high 
time that food reform was taught in every Band of 
Hope, and that the children should be made to know 
that natural diet will prevent all desire for strong 
drink.—Yours truly, J- NtjGEnT. 

Leeds, December 30. 




Yorkshire. 








THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


i3 


H Band of Hop 6 of popty 
Years Ago. 


Q UITE recently I re-visited my native town, after 
an absence of over twenty years, and, among 
many memories awakened by the sight of old, 
familiar scenes of childhood’s days, none were 
more vivid than those aroused by the infant 
schools, where the Band of Hope meetings were held 
in those days, before the Churches took up this 
important work. 

It seems strange to-day, when there is a Temperance 
Society, with its Band of Hope, in connection with 
almost every Church, to look back to this one of forty 
years ago, which was carried on so bravely amidst so 
many hindrances, at a time when it was decidedly 
unfashionable to be a teetotaler. 

My dear father was an enthusiast, and he loved the 
Temperance cause and lived for it. His Band of Hope 
was his hobby, and we—my brothers and sisters and 
I—were all enrolled as members, and helped at the 
meetings as soon as we could write our names. May 
I give just one or two memory pictures as they occur 
to me ? 

It is a cold, dark, winter evening, and there is some 
fear that it may be decreed that we children are not 
to go to the meeting. But, well wrapped up and with 
cautions to run all the way, off we go. Arrived at the 
schoolroom we find it all in darkness—I do not know 
why ; my father, being a non-smoker, has no matches, 
so I am sent to purchase some. When I return I find 
about fifty children have arrived, and to keep them 
from mischief my father has started them singing, 
“Nay, John ! ” While he lights the gas, which is a 
work of some difficulty, through frost or water in the 
pipes—I do not just remember what—I go to the 
infant school mistress, and beg some wood and coal, 
and we light a fire, and very merry we are over it, too. 
Then the names are called, and pledge cards and 
medals are given out to those who signed the pledge 
at the last meeting. After which we all sing, “Sadly 
the Drunkard’s Wife,” my father playing the violin. 
A short prayer follows, which the children repeat after 
him. Then, as it is a cold night, he drills them in 
marching, clapping hands, &c. A short, bright little 
address comes next, and then a dialogue between a 
boy and girl, written for them by my father, and 
another song or two, and the meeting closes. A few 
of the boys and girls stay behind to take recitations, 
to learn new songs, &c.; for we have a Temperance 
meeting in prospect, and we want to get the mothers and 
fathers to come and hear the children sing and recite. 
Bills about the meeting are distributed among us, to 
be taken round the town, and shown in the shop- 
windows. 

Happy, informal meetings were these Band of Elope 
gatherings, but they bore splendid fruit; and many 
were the interesting letters my dear father received in 
after years from men and women in all parts of the 
world, who looked back with gratitude to the teaching 
received there. Some of these men are now leaders 
of Bands of Hope, and Temperance workers. 

How much easier it is to be an abstainer nowadays 
than it was in my childhood, when it was thought 
quite peculiar. “Oh, she’s a teetotaler!” I used to 
hear said, with a shrug of contempt or pity as the case 
might be, at the Christmas parties when the wine 
went round. If no other advance has been made, 
surely it is much that so many parents have learnt the 
folly of giving wine to their children, even though 
they do not abstain from it themselves. All honour to 
the brave pioneers who laboured so earnestly in 
the midst of much ridicule and opposition. How 
delighted they would be if they could see the rapid 
strides the Temperance cause has taken. The time 
has come, as they believed it would, when to be an 
abstainer is no longer considered fanatical, and when 
the Churches have begun to recognise their responsi¬ 
bility, and to take up the work in earnest, so that a 
Band of Hope is considered almost as essential as a 
Sunday School. Our meetings used to be held in 


rooms quite unconnected with any Church, and I 
never remember any heT or encouragement being 
given by the Church officially at the time of which I 
write. 

For the annual meetings we sometimes secured the 
Town Hall, and I remember some of the speakers we 
invited were the Revs. Paxton Hood, James (then 
Sergeant) Rae, Messrs. Jabez Inwards, T. B. Smithies, 
George Howlett, John Plato, Noah Bailey, and others 
whose names I do not recall just now. Sergeant Rae 
I have good cause to remember, for on one of his visits 
to our house, our dear mother was ill, and he talked 
so kindly and helpfully to her, and sang that beautiful 
hymn, “ One there is above all others, Oh, how He 
loves! ” Our dear mother felt so much better and 
from that day she began to get well. She always 
attributed her recovery to this visit and the prayer of 
Sergeant Rae. Now I should like to say, that he will 
always be gratefully remembered in many homes, 
which perhaps may be a blessing and comfort to him 
in his old age. T. M. D. 


I^emembeFed fop Fifty Yeaps. 


T IIE Irish Times, of November 23 last, contained 
a letter from our friend Mr. Carty on the care¬ 
less throwing of banana skins and orange peel 
upon the footpaths, and he makes a practical 
suggestion on the matter, which we heartily endorse. 
As the letter is especially interesting from our point 
of view, we give it in full. Even a ha’porth of teach¬ 
ing is not in vain. The letter ran thus:— 

To the Editor of the Irish Times. 

Sir, —This evening, nearly opposite my door in 
Grafton Street, a lady had a very serious fall by slip¬ 
ping on a banana skin, thoughtlessly thrown upon the 
footpath. It is a mercy the accident was not fatal. 

In order to help to prevent the repetition of such 
accidents, I take the liberty of appealing through the 
columns of your widely-circulated journal to all 
parents, day and Sunday School teachers, to warn 
the children in their charge of the serious con¬ 
sequences that may follow thoughtlessly throwing 
orange or banana skins on the footpath. It is more 
than fifty years ago that my attention as a little lad 
was called (through reading a story in the Band of 
Hope Review ) to the case of a man who lost his life by 
slipping on an orange skin, carelessly thrown on the 
footpath ; and, as a result, it has been the habit of my 
life never to pass by an orange skin without removing 
it to the roadway. It is only a “little thing,” but as 
important and serious results often flow from trifling 
causes, I respectfully and affectionately urge all who 
have the management of children to band them 
together in a crusade never to throw an orange or 
banana skin upon the footpath, and if another should 
do so, to remove it. Relying on your help in this 
matter,—Yours, &c. Wieeiam Carty. 

84, Grafton Street, Dublin, 

November 19, 1903. 

P.S.—Would it not be in the power 01 the corpora¬ 
tion to pass a by-law to make the throwing of orange 
or banana skins on the footpath punishable by law ? 


A Worker’s Golden Wedding. —At Blisworth, 
in Northamptonshire, on November 23, Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Ploughman celebrated their golden 
wedding, amid many proofs of the esteem of their 
neighbours and friends. Mr. Ploughman is an ardent 
abstainer, and was one of the founders of the Blis¬ 
worth Band of Hope; for thirty years he has been a 
prominent Good Templar, and both he and his wife 
keep particularly hale and hearty. They were enter¬ 
tained to tea in the Uecture Hall by their fellow 
parishioners, and received many compliments on the 
happy occasion. Having been sent to earn his living 
at nine years of age, he yet made the best of his 
opportunities, and educated himself to a really re¬ 
markable degree. 






THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


H 





[The above is reprinted by permission from “ The 
Sunday Companion ,” whose chatty articles on Tempe¬ 
rance topics are always good , and calculated to sei ve the 
movement well.~\ 


be obtained, post free, for sixpeuce-half-pennyfrom the 
Union Publishing House, 59-60, Old Bailey, London, 
E.C. No doubt many postcard collectors will add these 
effective Temperance specimens to their albums. 


Tempgpanee by Posteaird. 


THE LATEST NOVELTY IN SPREADING THE 
PRINCIPLES OF TEMPERANCE. 


-HAT is called by some people the postcard 
craze is one of the most pretty and in¬ 
structive hobbies of the present day. The 
collection of picture-postcards is even more 
popular than that of stamp-collecting, and 
thousands who indulge in it declare it to be quite 
as entertaining. 

Knowing how widespread is this hobby of postcard 
collecting, the United Kingdom Band of Hope 
Union has hit upon a clever device to forward their 
principles. They have issued a series of twelve 
Temperance picture-postcards, and here are three 
reduced specimens of them. The design on each 
postcard is very pretty aud striking, as may be 
inferred from the three cards here shown. The first 
is “Temperance at the Helm,” with the words, “ It is 
not the will of your Father which is in heaven that 
one of these little ones should perish ” ; the second is 
called “ A New St. George,” and shows the champion 
slaying the dragon 
Alcohol; aud the third is 
entitled, “ Seed-Sowing 
and Harvest,” showing 
two children outside a 
public house learning to 
drink intoxicants, while 
at the side a drunken 
woman is being marched 
off to the station by two 
policemen. 

There is a different 
design on each card, and 
the packet of twelve can 


A recent Number of the Daily News contained 
a sketch of the memorial stone erected above the 
remains of Mr. William Hoyle, one of the founders of 
the Lancashire and Cheshire Union, and compiler of 
“Hymns and Songs,” issued by that Union. We 
vividly recall our friend conducting the Band of 
Hope choir in the Free Trade Hall in Manchester. 
He passed away in 1895 at the age of 61. 

Competitive Examination in Hampshire.— 
Close upon a thousand members of Bands of Hope 
took part in a Competitive Examination, which was 
held on December 13. at twenty-one centres through¬ 
out the county of Hampshire. The arrangements 
were made by the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Band 
of Hope Union. The text-book for competitors under 
thirteen years of age, was prepared by Mr. A. Jolliffe, 
the secretary of the Herts Union, that for the seniors 
by Mr. Walter N. Edwards, of the Parent Society. It 
is an encouraging circumstance that 152 of the com¬ 
petitors were over fifteen years of age. 


AT Orieeia, an important towm in Canada (in the 
province of Ontario), the Temperance cause seems 
thriving. Its newspaper, the Orillia Packet , which 
some friend there has been good enough to send to us, 
contains several items we have read with interest. 
O11 one page is a letter from Mr. Wm. Livesey, of 
Fulwood, near Preston, who is in his 88th year, and 
who is a son of “The Father of Teetotalism.” The 
venerable abstainer recalls the origin of the move¬ 
ment 71 years ago, and congratulates the Orillia 
people on their holding weekly Temperance meetings. 
The weekly visitation of members he also holds to be 
important in a really living society. There need 
be no talk of self-sacrifice in abstaining, because 
“ intoxicating liquors beyond all question are 
injurious, always injurious—the extent of the injury 
being in proportion to the alcohol taken into the 
system.” In another part of the paper an abstract of 
a lecture by the Rev. Mark Guy Pearse contains a 
scathing indictment of alcohol. 











THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


*5 



“Through Strange Paths,” by Ursula Temple 
(Gall & Inglis, London and Edinburgh).—This is a 
capital tale by a new writer, whom we may sincerely 
congratulate upon having produced a most interesting 
story, romantic, healthy, stimulating, in good homely 
English, and with a purpose which is none the less 
effective because it is not obtrusive. It cannot be 
technically called a Temperance tale, though, in 
fact, it is one, and is admirably suited to be a Band 
of Hope prize. There are also several illustrations, 
so that altogether a more excellent gift-book for the 
holiday season it would be difficult to name. The 
tale opens in the Wild West, where a young couple 
leave behind them an infant son, heir to an English 
title, their reason for being so far from their ancestral 
property being clearly explained in the course of 
the story. The father dies, the mother practically 
dies of a broken heart; and the rest of the book tells 
of the strange paths through which the orphan boy 
is led on his journey through life to the old home 
which was rightfully his own. It would spoil the 
reader’s pleasure were we to summarise the story; 
all we need do is to assure him that it is remarkably 
well told, that it holds the interest from first to last, 
and that it may be recommended to the most 
fastidious. Moreover, although it is good, it is not 
goody-goody. The character sketches it contains are 
often exceedingly clever—poor old Sallie, for instance, 
is drawn to the life; but the centre of interest is 
certainly the boy and his dramatic progress through 
slum-dom, only just avoiding tragedy, up through 
the Grammar School to the position which was his 
destined lot. His fight with the bully in the school 
ground will appeal to all boys, his pluck and 
endurance in his fight with difficulty after difficulty 
to every reader, old and young. But we have said 
enough to show that we strongly commend the book 
to our readers, hoping that in the second edition the 
few printer’s errors we have observed will be weeded 
out. 



of Ifoope TUrnons. 


Nottingham and Notts. —On November 30 the 
Annual Meeting of the Nottingham and Notts Band 
of Hope Union was held in the Mechanics’ Hall. The 
chair was taken by Mr. W. Lee, J.P., supported by 
the Rev. G. Edgcombe, Rev. J. K. Bryce, Rev. W. 
Pedr Williams (deputation from the United Kingdom 
Band of Hope Union), Dr. Sarah Gray, Mr. Briscoe, 
Mr. A. G. Whitworth (hon. sec.), and Mr. E. G. 
Leighton (financial hon. sec.). The Chairman said 
he thought that the Churches did not give sufficient 
attention and sympathy to Temperance work. It was 
an integral part of religious duty, and a stronger 
realisation of that fact was much to be hoped for. 
The hon. secretary read the Thirty-second Annual 
Report, which stated that they were able to look back 
upon a year in which much successful work had 
been performed. In the beginning of the year took 
place the bazaar in the Mechanics’ Hall, which 
exceeded the highest expectations of the committee. 
The total amount realised was ^1,046. During the 
year Mr. W. T. Stanton had given sixty-six lectures in 
schools throughout the city and county ; 7,345 elder 


pupils and 28T teachers were present. Their secretary 
had recovered from the serious illness by which he 
had been laid aside, and had resumed his work of 
organisation. The financial hon. secretary presented 
the statement of accounts, which were very satisfac¬ 
tory. Dr. Sarah Gray devoted an interesting address 
to supplying answers to the question : “ Why is it that 
so many Band of Hope children fail to become teetotal¬ 
ers in later life ? ” The chief reasons she assigned were 
the absence of helpful and encouraging surround¬ 
ings at home and in their daily life; the insufficiency 
of Temperance work in church institutes and evening 
homes, the want of enthusiasm on the part of workers, 
and the one-sidedness of a good deal of Temperance 
teaching. An address was also given by the Rev. W. 
Pedr Williams, and madrigals and Temperance 
choruses were sung by the Tabernacle Temperance 
Prize Choir, under Mr. C. E. Riley. 

South=West London. —A series of aggregate meet¬ 
ings, for senior members only, is arranged each year 
by the committee of this Union in districts, ancl on 
November 25 a very successful one was held for 
the societies in Brixton and Stockwell, in the Large 
Memorial Hall at the Stockwell Orphanage, by kind 
permission of the trustees of the institution. Cards 
of invitation had been issued through the secretaries 
of the societies, and about 130 responded. After 
refreshments had been served at 7.30, the chair was 
taken by Mr. Howard H. Hart, of Putney, and a most 
enjoyable musical programme was carried out by the 
Orphanage Boys’ Special Choir, under the direction 
of Mr. T. W. Partridge, and the Bellringers, under the 
direction of Mr. R. W. Iverson. The chief feature 
of the evening was an address by Mr. Frederic 
Smith, whose earnest and genial speech, exhorting 
the young people to hold fast to their Temperance 
principles all through life, will not soon be forgotten. 
A large number of those present are in situations 
where they are surrounded by much temptation, and 
for these such meetings are specially useful. 

Surrey. —The Autumnal Meetings of the Surrey 
Union weie held at Dorking Public Hall. A confer¬ 
ence was held early in the evening under the chair¬ 
manship of Mr. C. J. Peirson ; and Mr. C. Wakely, of 
the Parent Union, gave an interesting address to Band 
of Hope workers on “ The Essentials to Success in 
Band of Hope work.” The discussion which followed 
was carried on by representatives from various parts 
of the county. The following resolution was pro¬ 
posed by Mr. H. Norris, of Godaiming, and seconded 
by Mr. J. W. Robins, of Guildford:—“ That this meet¬ 
ing of the Council of the Surrey Band of Hope Union 
hereby protests against any measure being passed 
giving compensation out of the public funds for 
licences not renewed.” A copy of it is to be sent to 
each Member of Parliament in Surrey. After the 
meeting of the Council a large public meeting was 
held under the presidency of Mr. F. H. Harding, who 
said he had been a total abstainer for thirty-five years, 
and he had never once been sorry for the step he had 
taken; on the other hand, he had every cause to be 
thankful, as it had been a great blessing to him, 
especially during the twenty-five years he had spent 
in India. Earnest and interesting addresses were 
given by the Rev. W. Mottram and Mr. Wakely, both 
of whom had been total abstainers forty-six years. 
Mr. J. Y. Henderson gave his experience of the 
Temperance movement in all parts of the world over 
which he had travelled, stating that the Temperance 
movement was making great progress in all directions. 

West Middlesex. —Several capital aggregate meet¬ 
ings were held by this Union at the end of November 
and early in December in different parts of the area 
covered by this Auxiliary. On November 19, the Rev. 
F. L. Ricnes Lowe presided at the Providence Congre¬ 
gational Schoolroom, Uxbridge, and the speaker was 
Mr. Cordrey, of the Parent Union. On November 25, 
Newton Avenue Church, Acton, was the scene of the 
gathering; the Rev. 'F. Martjn, was the announced 
chairman, and Mr. R. Turtle the speaker of the even¬ 
ing. Other meetings were at Ealing, Brentford, and 
Southall, and the programmes were made attractive 
by action songs, recitations, and other items. Mr. 
W. J. Venn is the active secretary of the Union. 



















i6 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Banfcs of Ibope. 

Dewsbury. —The forty-first annual lestival of the 
Springfield Band of Hope was held on November 7th, 
the president, the Rev. Henry Wallace, being the 
chairman, and the Rev. James Ellis, of Mirfield, being 
the announced speaker. The programme was full of 
interest, not the least so being the children’s medley 
of song. The healthy condition of this Society testi¬ 
fies to the excellent way in which it is managed by a 
good band of working officers, of whom Mr. James 
Carter is the energetic secretary. 

Edmonton.— A festival demonstration was held in 
the Town Hall on December 10, when a choir of 200 
Band of Hope singers gave a capital programme of 
part-songs, choruses, and action songs, to the delight 
of a large audience. The pieces included “ Four-and- 
twenty Blackbirds,” and “Storm and Sunshine,” and 
there were also some good recitations. '1 he 
chairman was Councillor T. Burnell, who was well 
supported by representative abstainers. The choir 
was under the able conductorship of Mr. J. D. 
Turner. 

Leicester Square, Orange Street.- The annual 
meeting of this society took place on November 17. 
The Rev. F. Hastings was in the chair, and the 
speakers were Mr. D. Haines and Mr. Ketchin, of the 
West London Band of Hope Union. Miss Heywood, 
the active secretary, gave an encouraging report; the 
brass band played some good selections. Carrying 
on this society is hard work in such a neighbourhood. 
The Band of Hope took the platform at Orange Street 
Sunday School on November 22, in the afternoon. 
The afternoon included some good singing and recita¬ 
tions, and a solo by Miss J. Taylor. The superin¬ 
tendent of the school, Mr. W. Garnett, spoke on 
Daniel, and the address was given by Mr. G. B. 
Taylor (Sunday School Union district visitor), on 
“Memory Aids to Temperance,” with blackboard 
illustrations. Councillor C. U. Heywood closed with 
prayer. Books and tracts were circulated among 
teachers and scholars, and the pledge and Band of 
Hope membership was earnestly advocated. 

WHAT A SUNDAY SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT 
DID. 

LEXTER TO THE EDITOR. 

Sir,—I am greatly pleased at seeing that you are to 
have a series of lessons against the smoke-habit in 
next year’s Band of Hope Chronicee. It is im¬ 
portant that we should fight it to the utmost, seeing 
that it has a real bad result on the personal character 
of the boys who indulge in it. It makes them less 
quick to" answer the dictates of conscience, and 
renders it harder for them to listen to the gospel of 

self-denial and to the voice of duty. 

I wish you could say something that would influence 
Sunday School teachers. It grieves me to see them 
indulging in the habit which, I believe, is hurtful to 
themfand deplorable in its influence on their boys. 

You will be gratified to hear of a fact that came 
under my own observation not so very long ago. A 
Sunday School teacher, an old friend of mine, saw a 
boy smoking in the street. He spoke to him about 
the foolishness of the habit. The boy said, “Web, 

r _, the superintendent of our Sunday School, 

smokes, so it can’t be very bad.” My friend went off 
to that superintendent and told him of the incident. 
“ If that is so,” he said, “ I will never smoke again.” 
And he threw awav the cigar he had begun. This is 
a fact which cheered me, and may help others in 
dropping a word in season.—Yours gratefully, 

December 12, 1903. . . An Oed Teacher. 

InvaeidS need a Pleasant and Invigorating Tonic, 
a Tonic which, instead of leaving bad effects, im¬ 
parts Strength and Energy. “ Nonalton,” the non¬ 
alcoholic Tonic, is the one which may be absolutely 
relied upon. It is made from Grapes and Bark. 
Nothing else will do for those who know “ Non¬ 
alton.” Sample bottle, 2s. 6d. Particulars free.— 
F. Wright, Mundy & Co., 27, Merton Road, Ken¬ 
sington, London, W.— [Advt .1 


Outline Lessons for 1904. 


I.—HANKIND IN THE HARRING AND 


MENDING. 


2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

io 
i r 
12 


By T. N. KELYNACK, M.D., M.R.C.P., 

Hon. Secretary , Society for the Study of Inebriety. 


. . January 
February 
March 
A pril 
May .. 
lune .. 

■. July .. 

.. A ugust 
■. September 
October 
November 
December 


The Making of Men. 

Drink and Decay. 

Alcohol and its Action. 

The Upward Climb. 

The Downward Hurry. 

The Alcoholic Environment. 

Alcohol and—The Child. 

Alcohol and—The Man. 

Alcohol and-The Woman. 

The Arrest of Alcoholism. 

The Manner and Method of Mending. 
Lines of Advance. 


II.—SIMPLE SCIENCE CHATS. 


2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

10 

11 

12 


By CHARLES HARVEY, 

Secretary , Kent Band of Hope Union. 


January 
February 
March 
A firil 
M ay .. 
June 
July.. 

A ugust 

September 

October 

November 

December 


A Chat about Drinks. 

The Great Enemy. 

Some of the Enemy’s Secrets. 

More about the Enemy. 

“The Temple of the Living God.” 

“ No Admittance except on Business.” 
Three Kitchens and Three Cooks. 
The Great Pump. 

The Living Stream. 

Five Hundred Little Friends. 

The Watchman. 

Five Wonderful Windows. 


III.-ALCOHOL AND HISTORY. 

By CHARLES WAKELY, 

Secretary , United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 

1 .. January .. Drink in Bible Times. 

2 .. March .. Drink amongst the Ancients. 

3 .. May .. Drink and our Saxon Forefathers. 

4 .. July.. Drink in Feudal Times. 

s . September .. Drink and Modern History. 

6 November .. Drink and Continental History. 


IV.—BIBLE CLASS TALKS. 

By Rev. DAVID HEATH, of Derby. 

1 .. January .. Is it Right? (Conscience.) 

2 .. March .. Idols. (Worship.) 

2 May.. .. Leaves. (Uses of.) 

4 . July.. .. Living: Water. (Movement.) 

5 .. September .. Little Foxes. (Habits.) 

6 November .. Dog:s. (Friends and Foes.) 


v._YARNS WITH YOUNG PEOPLE. 


3 

4 

5 

6 


By THOS. PALMER, 

Leicestershire Band of Hope Union. 

February .. Liquor Trade Marks. 

Afril .. “ Keep to the Right.” 

June .. Who’s to Blame? 

August ■■ Seaside Lessons. 

O^’ober .. The Foe of Home. 

Deumber .. “This Hill is Dangerous.” 


VI —TAKE CARE OF “ NUMBER ONE.” 


By W. N. EDWARDS, F.C.S., 

Science Lecturer, United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 


2 

3 

4 

5 

6 


February 
A pril 
June ■. 

A ugust 
October 
December 


The Life=Giver. 

Friends and Foes. 
Burglars and Policemen. 
Fire and Force. 

How to Win. 

Best and Second Best. 


2 

3 

4 


VII.—SMOKING. 


By J. CADWALLADER, Birmingham. 


January 
April 
July.. 
October 


A Boy’s Greatest Temptation. 
The Spider’s Lesson. 

Self and Duty. 

Cigarette or Sugar—Which? 




























The New School Scheme Fund. 

A Further ^r,ooo Promised. 


E are glad to say that since the appeal 
in our last issue for help in raising a 
new fund of at least ^10,000 towards 
work for another quinquennium in 
Day Schools, a further f 1,000 has been 
promised. This makes up the amount of the 
promises already secured to ^5,000—just half 
the sum required. 

We trust that our friends who have not yet 
expressed their intentions on the subject will 
do so as early as possible, so that the remain- 
ing ^5,000 may be raised before the close of 
the present financial year, March 31. 

It will be realised that the second half of the 
amount required will be the most difficult to 
secure, as most of the friends who could 
contribute largely to the work have been 
communicated with. The Committee hope, 
however, that new friends will come forward, 
and that amongst these may be found many 
who may be inclined, in view of the magni¬ 
tude and importance of the work, to contribute 
substantial sums. It is to be borne in mind 
that the payment of the sums mentioned 
below is spread over a period of Five Years. 

The Committee make a very earnest appeal 
to all believers in the value of early training 
to co-operate with those who have already 
generously promised contributions, so that 
the excellent work of giving sound Tempe¬ 
rance instruction to the young in Day Schools 
may at least be continued for another 
quinquennial term. 

The following is a list of the additional 
amounts promised :— 


(■Payable in April in five yearly instalments .) 



£ 

s. 

d. 

Mr. Barrow Cadbury 

• • 125 

0 

0 

The Misses Deaf .. 

• • 125 

0 

0 

Mr. Wm. A. Cadbury 

100 

0 

0 

Sir James Reckitt & Sons 

50 

0 

0 

Mr. J. W. Shorthouse 

25 

0 

0 

Mr. J. E. Taylor 

25 

0 

0 

Mr. G. Ernest Clarke 

15 

15 

0 

Mr. Herbert Crosfield 

15 

0 

0 

Alderman Agar, J.P. 

10 

10 

0 

Mr. G. F. Armitage 

10 

10 

0 

Mr. Kirby Banks 

10 

10 

0 

Mr. F. S. Bennett 

10 

10 

0 

Mr. Bertram Carr 

10 

10 

0 

Mr. Henry Carr 

10 

10 

0 

Mr. W. T. Carr 

10 

10 

0 

Mr. Howard F. Chaplin .. 

FEBRUARY, 1904. 

10 

10 

0 



£ 

s. 

d. 

Mr. E. Dawson, J.P. 

10 

IO 

0 

The Misses Eskholme 

10 

IO 

0 

Mr. G. F. Grant 

10 

IO 

0 

Lady Gray 

10 

IO 

0 

Mrs. M. Gray 

10 

IO 

0 

Mr. E. T. John 

10 

IO 

0 

Mr. G. Somerville Letten 

10 

IO 

0 

Mr. Wm. Parkin Moore, J.P. 

10 

IO 

0 

Alderman G. Pyman 

10 

IO 

0 

Mr. Henry A. Short 

10 

IO 

0 

Alderman W. T. Small 

10 

IO 

0 

Councillor W. Taylor 

10 

IO 

0 

Mr. H. Tennant, J.P. . . ' .. 

10 

IO 

0 

Mr. R. W. Tweedie 

10 

IO 

0 

Mr. Thomas Williamson 

10 

IO 

0 

Mr. E. S. Bramwell 

10 

0 

0 

Mr. Joel Cadbury 

10 

0 

0 

Mr. W. J. Cudworth 

IO 

0 

0 

Mr. Richard Field 

10 

0 

0 

Mr. Benjamin Greene 

IO 

0 

0 

Miss Lawson.. 

IO 

0 

0 

Mr. G. S. Lucraft 

IO 

0 

0 

Mrs. Lionel Mundy 

IO 

0 

0 

Mr. John Piggott, L.C.C. 

IO 

0 

0 

Mr. Alfred Ransom 

IO 

0 

0 

Mr. Wm. Ransom 

IO 

0 

0 

Mr. Fielden Thorp, B.A. 

IO 

0 

0 

Mr. C. J. Whitehead 

IO 

0 

0 

Mr. John E. Whiting 

IO 

0 

0 

Mr. Wm. Whiting .. 

IO 

0 

0 

Mr. Wm. Whitwell, J.P. 

IO 

0 

0 

Miss R. M. Whitwell 

IO 

0 

6 

Mr. H. E. Wood. 

IO 

0 

0 

Mr. J. W. Procter 

7 

17 

0 

Mr. J. R. Anderson, M.A., J.P. . . 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. G. M. Archibald 

5 

5 

0 

Alderman R. Archibald 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Baker 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. C. H. Baldwin. 

5 

5 

0 

Mrs. Bedford. . 

5 

5 

0 

Mrs. F. Bennett 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. A. Birks 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. Joseph Calvert 

5 

5 

0 

Mrs. James N. Carr 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. C. F. Carter 

5 

5 

0 

Alderman T. Carter, J.P. . . 

5 

5 

0 

Rev. W. L- Carter, M.A., F.G.S... 

5 

5 

0 

Mrs. W. L. Carter 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. Wm. Carty 

5 

5 

0 

Mr, F. W. Chance, J.P. 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. E. J. Davis 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Farrow 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. Wm. Finnemore 

5 

5 

0 

Alderman T. Furness 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. H. Gallimore, J.P. 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. L. Stileman Gibbard, J.P. . . 

5 

5 

• 0 

Mrs. Godsmark 

5 

5 

0 










































I 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


£ s- d. 


Mr. Stephen Gravely 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. T. E. Hallsworth 

5 

5 

0 

Messrs. Herskind & Co. . . 

5 

5 

0 

Mrs. Edward Hill 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. J. R. Hill, J.P. 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. Amos Hinton 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. J. Howson 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. Charles D. Llolmes 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. Thomas Jones 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. W. R. Makepeace 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. Wm. McGowan, J.P. . . 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. W. W. Morrell 

5 

5 

0 

Dr. Petch 

5 

5 

0 

Miss M. Phillips 

5 

5 

0 

Lady Cecilia Roberts 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. I. J. Robinson, F. A.I.. . 

5 

5 

0 

Dr. A. E. Rook 

5 

5 

0 

Mrs. H. Sharpley 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. S. E. Short, J.P. 

5 

5 

0 

Mrs. Slack 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. C. C. Smith 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. W. Garland Smith 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. T. W. Smyth 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. W. H. Somervell 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. Wilfrid Southall 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. J. A. Sprason 

5 

5 

0 

Alderman N. Strange 

5 

5 

0 

Mrs. F. Thompson 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. PI. Vine, Sen. 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. L- D. Wakely 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. Wm. Walker, J.P. 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. Charles Wardlow 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. Francis Webb 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. George Winn 

5 

5 

0 

The Misses Bilbrough 

5 

0 

0 

Miss Buck 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. A. J. Cudworth. . 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. E. J. Day 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. George Day 

- 5 

0 

0 

Mrs. Fordham 

5 

0 

0 

Miss Hebden 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. R. G. Heys, B.A. 

5 

0 

0 

Mrs. H. Hodge 

- 5 

0 

0 

Mirs. Hornor 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. Charles E. Jacob J.P.. . 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. H. W. Langsford 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. Wm. Lee, j.P. 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. C. Marwood 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. Arthur Newton 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. T. C. Parkin 

5 

0 

0 

Mrs. H. Pease 

5 

0 

0 

Miss Jane Ransom 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. P'rederick Sessions 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. J. B. Shawyer 

5 

0 

0 

Sir Charles T. Skelton, J.P. 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. John Somervell 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. Joseph H. Taylor 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. Arthur Wakel}' 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. E. W. Wakely 

5 

0 

0 

Other amounts 

35 

0 

0 


Dudley, SedgSey, and District.— The annual 
gathering of workers on January 8 was well attended. 
The president described the work of the year, and a 
capital address was given by the Rev. E. Hall. A 
bright programme was well rendered. 


Editorial Mems. 


HE “Scottish Temperance Annual ” for 
1904 (the sixth year of publication), is 
a credit to Scotland as well as to the 
Editor, Mr. Tom Honeymati. It is pub¬ 
lished at is., at 40, St. Enoch’s Square, 
Glasgow (the Grand Eodge of Scotland, 
I. O. G. T.), and comprises 240 pages of most 
interesting material, much of it drawn together 
in handy form for the first time. Several 
articles in it we should like to reproduce in 
these columns, had we but the space at our 
command. It is well printed, and though 
some of the information is only of local use, 
there is enough of it of general value to the 
Temperance worker to make it a desirable 
possession in any part of the world. About 
the middle of page 24 the word “ epitaphs ” 
should be “ epithets.” 


Mr. Justice Grantham, in the North of 
England recently, had so many terrible crimes 
before him arising through drink that he 
severely commented from the Bench on the 
evil alliance between drink and crime, and 
he spoke severely of those publicans who 
inflamed already drunken men with liquor. 
Those who know how crime does spring from, 
or become aggravated by, the tap, were not 
at all surprised at his Lordship’s remarks, and 
the Press generally concurred in lamenting 
that the publicans are not more stringent in 
using the powers they possess to refuse 
serving a drunken man with liquor. 


The Licensed Victuallers of Croydon, how¬ 
ever, felt keenly aggrieved by the Judge’s 
remarks about these reckless northern publi¬ 
cans, and, foolishly enough, allowed them¬ 
selves to admit that all publicans were in the 
same boat. They took the matter up because, 
nearly twenty years ago, before he became a 
Judge, Mr. Grantham was Croydon’s M.P., 
and they helped largely to secure his return. 
They thereupon sent a scolding letter to his 
Lordship, regretting what they called the 
“vile aspersions” he cast upon persons 
“ engaged in a lawful and respectable trade.” 


They must be sorry that they sent that 
letter now. Their growl roused the Judge, 
who gave them a blow from which they must 
be reeling still. He told them how the 
Assizes he had just concluded had brought 
before him “ the most heart-breaking crimes 
that it is possible to imagine—husbands mur¬ 
dering their wives, wives their husbands, 
fathers their sons, friends their own best 
friends—all through the maddening influences 
of excessive drinking.” There were twelve 
murders, eighteen attempts at murder, and 
woundings without numbers through the 
drink. If the trade do not help in stopping 
such crimes caused by reckless publicans, the 










THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


19 


law will likely step in and curb both the good 
and bad alike. We are all much obliged to 
Judge Grantham for his firm words. 


The political world is seething as we go to 
press. Scores of subjects are being discussed, 
and Parliament is being looked at by reformers 
of every hue. We must not, however, allow 
ourselves to be lured off the path of our duty, 
which is to carefully, diligently, and cease¬ 
lessly train up the children so that a dozen 
years hence they shall have a firmer grip of 
the Temperance Question than have the 
electors of the present day. The evils arising 
from drinking are only to be stopped by the 
people ceasing to indulge in alcohol in any 
form. Our duty is, therefore, quite clear. 


The Kirkaldy Band of Hope Union made 
its Christmas Social Gathering special as a 
means of recalling the old days when (and 
before) the Union was formed. Mr. Alex. 
Beattie, described as the Grand Old Man of 
the Temperance Cause in Kirkaldy, presided. 
Though nearly four score his heart seemed 
still young, and his faith in the cause is as 
great as ever. He signed the pledge sixty-six 
years ago. Many speakers took part in tne 
meeting, Mr. P. Suttie representing the Band 
of Hope section. The veterans sang and 
recited as though life was still before them, 
and Miss Mary Gibb touched the hearts of all 
with a piece descriptive of the first soiree held 
under the auspices of the society more than 
sixty years since. 


Teaching the Teachers. 


GENERAL, meeting in connection with the 
Leicester and District Teachers’ Association 
was held at Leicester on Saturday afternoon, 
October 31. Mr. C. Adams (President) took the 
chair, and there were present a good number of 
the members of the Association. Forty-seven new 
members were elected. 

An address was given by the President, and later on Mr. 
W. N. Edwards, F.C.S., gave his interesting lecture on 
alcohol, exposing some popular errors, and treating 
the matter purely from the scientific standpoint. He 
pointed out that one of the most common errors was 
that alcohol was necessarily a very hurtful thing ; on 
the contrary, it was, after water and sulphuric acid, 
one of the most useful liquids known. It had various 
commercial and scientific uses, and, like everything 
else, it was useful in its right place. It was not the 
substance, but the application of it. that was wrong. 
Another popular error was that because certain 
intoxicants were obtained from good material they 
were necessarily good, too. The fact was, that from 
a food standpoint intoxicating liquors were practically 
valueless, and it had been shown by repeated experi¬ 
ments that alcohol had an inimical effect on 
protoplasm, the basis of cell life. The lecturer 
performed a number of interesting experiments, 
showing that alcohol was in practically all its 
properties the exact antithesis of water. 

Mr. Edwards answered a number of questions, and 
a hearty vote of thanks was accorded him. Tea was 
afterwards provided. 


The Hate Antoinette Sterling. 


O N Sunday, January 10, just before 8 a.m., Madame 
Antoinette Sterling passed to that “ Rest in the 
Lord ” of which she had so often and so ten¬ 
derly sung. The great contralto singer was 
specially bound to us, because it was at our 
great meeting in Exeter Hall on May 11, 1892, that 
she signed the pledge. She had been staying with a 
friend at Bedford the night before, and he accompanied 
her to London on the nth. “Where are you going 
to-night?” said she. “To a great Band of Hope Annual 
Meeting,” was the reply. “May I come, too? I 
should just love to come, and I am free this evening.” 
She came, and sang, and spoke a few burning words 
of love and sympathy, and formally signed the pledge 
at the close. Mr. Wakely took that pledge home, 
and said he should keep it with some of his other 
treasures. The songs were “ Light and Darkness” 
and “ The Lord is my Shepherd,” both given with 
wondrous magnetic power, which held the audience 
spell-bound. Ln January, 1895, the distinguished 
singer came to the Collectors’ Soiree in the same hall, 
and, yielding to the impulse of the moment, sang 
three pieces—“ The Days of the Years that are gone,” 
“ There’s nae luck aboot the house,” and a little 
melody on the love of God, as shown in the birds 
and flowers, written by her own little daughter. The 
great singer also said a few words as to the value of 
Total Abstinence, as she had proved by her own 
experience. Yet once again she came. It was to the 
great meeting on May 11, 1898. She sang, and always 
without being in the programme and without accom¬ 
paniment ; her choice was the pathetic negro ballad, 
“ De Massa ob de Sheepfol’,” and “ O, Rest in the 
Lord.” The audience was fairly thrilled, as she, 
in prophetic tones, boldly sang “Fret not thyself 
because of evil-doers, and He shall give thee thy 
heart’s desires. Amen.” Greatly stirred, the audience 
rose and cheered to the echo. The singer bowed; 
again she went to the front, and then urged the 
audience not to talk so much about religion, but to go 
out and live it. They should give themselves to the 
world, and love back those who had strayed—by their 
own tenderness and sympathy. It was burned into 
her heart by God Himself, “Love thy neighbour as 
thyself.” Now the sweet singer has gone from us— 
to the rest that is eternal life and full of joy. The 
divine thoughts she sang sustained her, and made 
her a messenger of comfort to many souls. 

The last song she sang was “ Crossing the Bar,” 
and at her cremation, on January 13 it was sung by 
her friends. Mr. Coward, the great organist, played 
Chopin’s “ Funeral March.” The Rev. John Bradford 
gave an address, recalling the singer’s favourite 
thought, m two lines adapted from Shelley : — 

“ Peace, peace, she is not dead, she doth not sleep, 

She hath but wakened from the dream of life. 3 ’ 

The “Lost Chord” was played during the service- 
A pathetic sight among the mourners was the presence 
of the venerable Manuel Garcia, who taught Madame 
Sterling, and who is within two years of a hundred. 


Diamond Wedding. —Mr. John Parnum, of Sand¬ 
wich, Kent, celebrated ' his diamond wedding on 
January 15, having been married at the Bloomsbury 
Wesleyan Chapel on January 15, 1844. He was born 
at Canterbury in 1817, and his wife was born in the 
same city in 1819. He himself made his three wedding 
cakes on his marriage and golden and diamond 
wedding days. He is a leading abstainer and a non- 
smoker. On an average Mr. Parnum walks over 
sixty miles a week. At the age of eighty-four he 
commenced to learn French. He has been an ardent 
Band of Hope worker, and years ago escorted singers 
many miles to attend Crystal Palace rehearsals at 
Ramsgate. 









20 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series 1. 


MANKIND IN THE MARRING & MENDING. 

SERIOUS TALKS WITH SENIOR MEMBERS. 


By T. N. KELYNACK, M.D., M.R.C.P., 

Hon. Secretary of the Society for the Study of Inebrie ty. 


No. 2.—DRINK AND DECAY. 


Ebb and Flow. 

HERE is an ebb and flow in the tide of human 
affairs. In the life history of every individual 
development is inevitably followed by decline. 
Each unit might well say, with the poet Lyte, 
“ Change and decay in all around I see.” Translation 
is a necessary characteristic of vitality. Death is 
essential to life. The process of decay is natural and 
unavoidable. The art of man cannot stay the advance 
of timely decadence. Old age is not to be abhorred; 
but, rightly viewed, should be welcome. Night comes 
but to complete the day’s work. But while we cannot 
hinder the slow and silent oncoming of natural decay, 
much may be done to hasten the advance of an un¬ 
natural, wasteful, premature decline. The hands of 
ignorance and folly may ring down the curtain long 
before Life’s noble play is completed. 

Racial Decadence. 

On all counts it is but prudent to consider the 
influence and manner of action of the many factors 
which make for racial decadence and individual retro¬ 
gression. 

This all important matter of national and domestic 
deterioration has recently attracted much attention. 
[Consult “ Proceedings of the Third International 
Congress for the Welfare and Protection of Children,” 
1902. See also “The Children and the Drink,” 
London, R. Brinsley Johnson, 1901.] Considerable 
discussion in regard to this question is now in pro¬ 
gress. [See .Series of articles on “ Physical Degenera¬ 
tion,” “British Medical Journal,” November 21, T903, 
etseg. See also Report of the Royal Commission on 
Physical Training (Scotland), T903.] 

Sir Frederic Maurice has recently very truly re¬ 
marked that “it is to the condition—mental, moral, 
and physical—of the women and children that we 
must look, if we have regard to the future of our land.” 
It is but seemly that every unit should contribute of 
its best towards the general weal. 

Human Waste. 

And yet the wide prevalence of human waste is 
deplorable. On all hands we are surrounded by mani¬ 
fold evidences of national inefficiency, physical dege¬ 
neracy, mental deterioration, and moral decadence. 
[Consult such readily accessible works as Charles 
Booth’s “ Life and Labour of the People in Loudon,” 
particularly the final volume; and “ Poverty—a Study 
of Town Life,” by B. Seebohm Rowntree.J 

We, indeed, live and move and have our being in an 
environment making for decay, surrounded by morbid 
manifestations, and with the stigmata of degeneracy 
everywhere all too apparent. 

There are, of course, many agencies which, through 
the long ages, have opposed national progress and 
barred individual advance. Man has oftentimes wil¬ 
fully hampered his own upclitnbing. 

Drink and Decay. 

It is very desirable that every rational Temperance 
reformer should be thoroughly acquainted with the 
manner of action of the numerous forces tending to 
undermine human happiness and aiming at racial 
overthrow. Foremost, however, among the enemies 
of mankind must be placed that subtle foe—the arch¬ 
deceiver “ Drink.” From earliest days Drink and 
Decay have been inseparables. The most ancient of 


literatures testif}' to the prevalence of intemperance. 
The early pages of history have been blotted by the 
records of drunkenness. [Consult “The Bible and 
Temperance,” by Rev. Thomas Pearson.] 

It is of deep interest to study the part played by 
intemperance in the passing of ancient empires and 
the decay of powerful races. 

All students of the human race are forced to recog¬ 
nise the eliminating effect of alcohol. Its action, 
when brought in contact with primitive people and 
native races, can be readily watched even in the pre¬ 
sent day. But we are slow to realise the silent action 
of natural law in our ver3' midst—among our own 
people, at our firesides, in ourselves. 

From earliest times we have apparently rightly won 
the distinction of being considered a drunken people. 
The Early Britons were certainly much addicted to 
the excessive use of intoxicating liquors; the Saxons 
were far-famed as mighty drinkers ; the Danes 
delighted in their potations; and the gifted Normans, 
too, were lovers of the cup. And so all down the 
years 

Alcohol 

has been blighting our fair fame and laying waste our 
fair country. [See “ Drink, Temperance, and Legisla¬ 
tion,” by Arthur Shadwell, 1902; “The History of 
Liquor Licensing in England, principally from 1700 
to 1830,” by Sydney and Beatrice Webb, 1903.] And 
still our “ drinking usages ” remain such as to seriouslj' 
threaten our national supremacy. [See “TheNation’s 
Vice,” by the late R. B. Grindrod, M.D.; “ The Drink 
Peril in Scotland,” by Arthur Sherwell, 1903.] 

To-day, in spite of a wide-spread Temperance 
sentiment, training in the principles of physiology 
and hygiene, and much enlightenment of conscience 
and intelligence, the “curse of drink” still abides, 
and all too visible appear its results—decay and 
death. [For much statistical information consult 
“ National Temperance League’s Annual,” 1904.] 
What is true of a race remains, in great measure, 
true for an individual. Alcohol works for racial over¬ 
throw by producing degradation of the units. In 
our future studies we shall have to study how this is 
brought about. 

Meanwhile, in all our approach to a serious investi¬ 
gation of the so-called “ alcohol question,” we do well 
ever to seek to apply the laws of biology, and be 
guided by the principles of evolution. [See articles 
in “British Journal of Inebriety,” Januar}', 1904. 
Consult also “ Brief Notes for Temperance Teachers,” 
by Sir Benjamin Ward Richardson, M.D., F.R.S., 1883.] 

The Practice of Total Abstinence. 

If the practice of Total Abstinence be morally right, 
it cannot be scientifically wrong. It is essential that 
such practice should be firmly based upon a clear re¬ 
cognition of facts and sound perception of arguments. 
[See Dr. J. James Ridge’s “ Guide to Temperance for 
Young Abstainers and More Advanced Students, and 
for Use in Bands of Hope,” 1903.] 

I would insist, however, that in a study of this 
matter no room should be found for paralysing 
pessimism. Progress is secured by the advance of the 
optimists. Evil must pass. Right shall enter. Hope 
and knowledge can light the darkest night. 

“ Ring - out the want, the care, the sin, 

The faithless coldness of the times . 

X x- -x 

“ Ring out old shapes of foul disease ; 

Ring out the narrowing lust of gold. 

X- X X 

“ Ring in the valiant man and free, 

The larger heart, the kindlier hand ; 

Ring out the darkness of the land, 

Ring in the Christ that is to be.” 

And to this end— 

“ Let knowledge grow from more to more, 

But more of reverence in us dwell .’ 7 

In our future articles we shall hope to indicate 
clearly the grounds on which the practice of Total 
Abstinence can be recommended; and we shall 
endeavour to point out the why and the wherefore of 
the action of alcohol, in producing decay and hasten¬ 
ing death. 







THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


21 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series II. 


SIMPLE SCIENCE CHATS. 

By Charges Harvey, 

Secretary, Kent Band of Hope Union. 


No. 2.—THE GREAT ENEMY. 


BLACKBOARD SUMMARY. 


“ALCOHOL,” OB “SPIRIT OF WINE,” 

Discovered by Casa about the year 1066. 

1 PINT (ALES contains 1 to 2 ozs. 

« op- WINE „ 1 „ 4 „ 

20 OZS. ( SPIRITS „ 6 .,10 „ 

“Beware of this Enemy of the Race.'' 


resson CONNECTED. 

O UR last lesson was a “Chat about Drinks,” and 
we finished by alluding to a class of drinks well 
known as “intoxicating.” This long word 
means “poisonous.” The next time you see a 
man intoxicated, think to yourself that he has 
poisoned himself. You can see this by his unsteady 
walk ; he shows it by his talk ; his looks betray him ; 
his body is injured, i.e., poisoned; and the damage 
has been caused by the drinking of some form of 
intoxicating drinks. Ret us proceed now to examine 
these drinks. 

Alcohol. 

You have, probably, ali seen a glass of ale, or wine, 
or spirits. [If possible, show some ] The drink looks 
to you one liquid. It can be poured easily from one 
vessel to another. The chemist, however, whose work 
it is to analyse things, tells us that in all these drinks 
there are two liquids. It is impossible, by simply 
looking, to distinguish the two—they are so closely 
united. Indeed, for hundreds of years, nobody sus¬ 
pected the presence of two liquids. It will be in¬ 
teresting, therefore, to learn who it was that made 
the discovery. 

Alcohol^its Discovery. 

If we think of our Bible stories we know that the 
only intoxicating drink there mentioned is “wine.” 
Even this term did not always mean a drink that 
intoxicates. “Wine” is a general name given to a 
large class of drinks made from fruit juices. Now, in 
“fruit juices” there is nothing to intoxicate. If, 
however, the juice be allowed to ferment (a term to 
be explained in another lesson), then the intoxicating 
property appears. What this “ intoxicating property” 
was was not discovered until about the close of the 
eleventh century, about the year 1066, a date so well 
known in our English history. It appears an alche¬ 
mist living in Arabia, named Casa, was trying to find 
a water, which he believed existed somewhere, known 
as “ the Water of Rife.” In his search he was experi¬ 
menting on some fermented wine. Boiling some, he 
discovered that directly he touched the steam that 
came first from the wine with a light it caught fire, 
and continued to burn for a little while. The flame 
at last disappeared, and the rest of the steam would 
not light. [It will add interest if the simple experi¬ 
ment can be worked before the children.] 

The Still. 

In this way Casa discovered that in fermented wine 
there are two liquids. Now came this difficulty : how 
was he to separate them ? He made a very clever 
invention, so well known as “the still.” [Show one.] 


Something like a bottle with a long curling pipe, called 
the worm, in the centre. The bottle was filled with 
cold water, and the steam from the wine made to pass 
down the long pipe. The cold water condensed 
(steam becoming liquid) the steam, and it ran out in 
its liquid form. This, Casa collected, aDd was thus 
the first to discover the intoxicating property in 
wine. 

“ Spirit of Wine.” 

He found out a good deal about this new liquid, 
much of which we shall hope to learn in these lessons. 
His first care was to give it a name. The liquid was 
in appearance exactly like water [show some], but in 
reality it was lighter than water. In the wine it boiled 
the quicker (172° F., water, 2128 F.). If exposed it 
evaporated quicker. So he gave it the name of 
“ spirit,” and as he discovered it in wine, he called it 
“spirit of wine,” a name it is known by to this day. 
He also gave it its other name by which it is so well 
known to us—“alcohol.” It appears he possessed a 
very fine powder, which because of its fineness was 
called “alcohol.” It is an Arabic word. “Al,” in 
English, means “the,” and “cohol,” “fine or light.” 
So the word “ alcohol ” means “ the fine.” 

Amount of Alcohol in Intoxicating Drinks. 

We have now to remember that all kinds of intoxi¬ 
cating liquors contain some “alcohol.” But the 
amount found in them varies very much, indeed. Ret 
us learn the following figures : A pint of any liquid 
weighs 20 ozs. Now, take the three classes of intoxi¬ 
cants. First, malt liquors, ales, and beers. In a pint 
(20 ozs.) of these there will be between 1 and 2 ozs. 
of alcohol, the other liquor being water. Second, 
wines. The amount varies very much, but between 
1 and 4 ozs. out of 20 ozs., or 1 pint. Third, spirits. 
These are much stronger, and people usually before 
drinking them add water. In spirits, between 6 and 
10 ozs. out of every 20 ozs. are alcohol. 

The Great Enemy. 

This lesson is headed “ The Great Enemy.” The 
late Duke of Albany, brother to our present King, 
called intoxicating liquors “the only enemy England 
has to fear.” Sir Andrew Clarke, a very clever doctor, 
called them “ the enemy of the race.” We must all 
of us have learnt that these drinks are doing untold 
harm, causing sorrow, misery, and death. We must 
now remember that the part of the drinks that does 
the mischief is “alcohol; ” we may call it “The Great 
Enemy.” Ret us, therefore, 

“Beware op' this Enemy of the Race.” 


Knott Mill Congregational, Manchester.— 

special series of meetings have been held in celebra¬ 
tion of the Band of Hope coming of age. These 
have included a lantern entertainment, “ Christie’s 
Old Organ,” by Mr. T. Sykes, Jun.; programme by 
Vine Street Congregational Band of Hope; and 
gramaphone selections by Messrs. G. and H. Knight, 
with ventriloquial sketch by Mr. W. Plant. The 
whole were concluded with the “ Celebration Meet¬ 
ing.” Mr. S. Constantine, the president, occupied 
the chair. He said there was a society in existence 
prior to the present one, as forty-one years ago he 
gave to it his first Baud of Hope address. However, 
the society had either died, or was dying, when 
friends from Russell Street Congregational Band of 
Hope re-organised this Band of Hope in 1882. It was 
pleasing to find that friends from that society were 
again helping them that evening. During the 
twenty-one years they had had five secretaries, the 
present one, Mr. A. W. Constantine, having held the 
office nearly fourteen years. An excellent programme 
was then given by the Russell Street Congregational 
Band of Hope, the songs of Mr. Chappell being spe¬ 
cially appreciated. The address was delivered by 
Mr. J. A. Maddock. The secretary read a letter of 
congratulation, wishing the society much success in 
the future, from Mr. C. A. H. Carter, 


) Of 
j ALCOHOL 














22 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series V. 


YARNS WITH YOUNG PEOPLE. 

By Thomas Palmer, 

Leicestershire Band of Hope Union. 


No. i.—LIQUOR TRADE MARKS. 


Trade Marks. 

S PRING the past lew years there has oeen a 
great development in the use of “Trade 
Marks.” [Explain what “ Trade Marks ” are]. 

Manufacturers in almost every kind of 
business have their peculiar devices calling 
special attention to the excellence of their goods. 

Those engaged in the liquor “trade” have also 
adopted this method, though how far their “Trade 
Marks” fittingly describe the liquor sold we may, 
perhaps, soon be able to see. 


Trade Marks may be Inappropriate. 

Two have specially attracted attention recently, 
which appear quite inappropriate, in one way, for the 
purposes for which they were intended. 

Health, home, aud happiness, we, as Baud of Hope 
members, value much, and the Trade Marks I now 
introduce to your notice touch these points very 
closely. 

A Doubtful Liquor Sign. 



This is the first, and evidently 
intended to convey the idea that 
the beverage advertised would 
contribute to health, and con¬ 
sequently to the well-being of 
those who used it. 

What a priceless boon is 
health ! How easily those who 
are in ignorance of the effects of 
alcohol may be drawn into the habit of taking 
alcoholic beverages when they are out of health, in 
pain, depressed, and feeling life to be somewhat a 
burden! 

Those of us who have had the advantage of a train¬ 
ing in the Band of Hope know how futile, how use¬ 
less, it is to search for health in the products of the 
brewery and distillery. Alcohol and health! How 
incompatible! 


Health without Alcohol. 

I. We associate health with good food, pure water 
and fresh air, exercise and cleanliness. 

The taking of alcohol and the associations of drink¬ 
ing are utterly opposed to these. These never did, 
and science tells us, unmistakably, they never can, 
promote the health and well-being of any creature. 

Ill Health and alcohol. 

II. We are accustomed to associate alcoholic liquors 
with vats, cellars, stuffy bars, reeking vaults, and 
public houses, where the air is laden not with the 
pure oxygen of the atmosphere, but with the germs 
of disease and death. 

The whole trade in alcoholic liquors seems to be a 
compact with disease and death. 


Alcohol shortens Life. 

III. (a) Note the death-rate of those whose lives are 
spent in “ the trade.” Where 1,000 people in ordinary 
trades die, 1,521 die who are employed in the drink 
traffic. 

[b) vSee the testimony of the sick benefit societies. 
Where the abstaining Rechabites have seven-and-a- 
half days per member sick, other societies (non¬ 
abstainers) have twelve-and-a-half days per member 
sick. A clear gain in health ! 


Alcohol hinders Recovery. 

IV. Alcohol not only produces disease, but hinders 
a return to convalescence when sick. 


The medical officer of health for Leicester intro¬ 
duced non-alcoholic treatment of the patients in the 
Leicester Hospital during the latter part of 1901, with 
the following results: — 

Percentage of fatal cases : — 

1900— Treated with alcohol, 13 8. 

1901— Treated part of year with alcohol, 9 o. 

1902— Treated without alcohol, 3'5. 

This plainly showed that as the alcoholic treatment 
was reduced, so was the death-rate of the patients. 

Three Neighbours. 

It is most interesting, instructive, and encouraging 
to find the teaching we have received is being 
corroborated in such a remarkable way. We shall do 
well to remember that Drink, Disease, and Death are 
near neighbours. 

“ If health and long life you wish to obtain, 

From all alcoholics be sure to abstain ” 

Is Drink a Dragon? 

The second “Trade 
Mark” is the Dragon and 
Castle. 

See how accurately this 
depicts the effect of strong 
drink in the home! 

The Castle represents the 
home, and the Dragon 
represents strong drink 
The repulsive - looking 
monster has taken posseF- 
sion; his huge body leaves 
no room for anything else 
(comfort, &c.), his merci¬ 
less jaws are prepaied to 
take anything (clothing, 
&c.), whilst the spear-like 
tongue suggests mischief 
(wounds, pain, &c.) 

The Castle is rent at the 
top—the home is being wrecked, and the long, slimy - 
looking tail bars all entrance. 

What Drink Produces. 

When drink takes possession of the home there is : — 

I. Hunger, the waste of wages, the empty cupboard, 
the pinched, emaciated faces. 

II. Hopelessness, the woe-begone, dejected, down¬ 
cast, despairing aspect. 

III. Hatred; this replaces love, solicitude, and 
affection. 

IV. Helplessness; helpless because of physical, 
financial, moral, and mental ruin. 

The stories fiom police courts, town missionaries, 
and homes for the outcast, too plainly denote the 
wide-spread devastation caused by the “ Dragon — 
Strong Drinks 

[Quotations from well-known poems on home, and 
the storv of St. George aud the Dragon, might be 
effectively used at various points of the address.] 



St. John’s, Westcott, Surrey.— On December 17 
the Misses Marsh held an At Home for past members 
of the Band of Hope. About fifty- responded to the 
invitation, and a most enjoyable evening was spent. 
The chair was taken by the minister, Rev. L. 
Llewelly n, and stirring addresses were given by Mrs. 
Llewellyn and Mr. S. Trowell, of Guildford. There 
was a programme of music, recitations, &c.; aud 
cocoa and cake were much enjoyed. Most of those 
present testified that they had kept their pledge, and 
thirty names were given in to form an Adult Temperance 
Society. This will be the first organised Adult Total 
Abstinence Society ever conducted in the village, and 
great hopes are entertained of it. 













THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE.- 


23 


Band of Mope Addresses.—Series VI. 


TAKE CARE OF “NUMBER ONE.” 

By W. N. Edwards, P.C.S., 

Science Lecturer , United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 


No. THE LIFE GIVER. 


Some of 

the Advantages of 

FRESH 

STRONGER FRAME. 

HEALTHIER BODY. 

AIR. 

GREATER RESISTANCE. 

HAPPIER MIND. 


LONGER LIFE. 

Don’t neglect the LIFE GIVER. 


Plan of Blackboard at Close of Address. 


T AKE care of “Number One.” That seems like 
the doctrine of selfishness, and, no doubt, 
there are very many people who think of little 
else in life than looking after “ Number One.” 
There is a right way and a wrong way of doing 
most things. If we are selfish and greedy, and only 
thinking of pushing ourselves forward and grasping 
all that we can lay hold of, that is certainly the wrong 
way of looking after Number One. If we" are trying 
to live the most wholesome and the sweetest kind of 
life, by following Nature’s laws and by obeying her 
commands, then we are looking after “Number One” 
in the right kind of way. 

Number One is worth looking after. 

If we had some rare and costly jewel, what great 
care we should take of it. How we should try to find 
some safe place for it, where it would be preserved 
from any chance of damage. How frequently we 
should be thinking about this jewel, and inventing 
new ways of taking care of it. Yet our bodies are 
worth more than a.l the jewels of the universe. The 
newly-discovered substance, radium, is the most 
costly thing in the world, its value being about 
^700,000 per ounce. What extraordinary care we 
should bestow upon this, supposing we were the 
possessors of an ounce or two. Yet, if we had a ton 
of this rare and costly material, it could not add a 
day to our span of life, or give health and strength 
10 the diseased, or bring back youth to the aged. 
There is nothing in the world one-half so wonderful 
as the body that God has given into our keeping, 
with all its power of mind and will. 

People Live longer now 

than they did formerly. On the average, the length 
of the life of men has been increased three years, and 
that of women five years, since public health became 
a science, seventy years ago. It is said that there aie 
600,coo persons living in this country who, had they 
been born before the science of public health was 
known, would have died before they were a year old. 
In the days of good Queen Elizabeth the death rate 
of the people was 80 per 1,000 per year; in the days 
of good King Edward, in which we are privileged to 
live, the death rate is only 18 per 1,000 per year. As 
all the wealth of the world cannot purchase a single 
day or even a single moment of life, it is well that we 
should ask the question, How has this increased 
length of life been brought about ? Tne answer is, 
by a knowledge of Nature’s laws, and by an obser¬ 
vance of those laws. 


Fresh Air 

is one of the most important agents in giving length 
of days. It is not the only one. A man may live in 
the purest of air, and yet by excesses he may ruin 
both mind and body. We may speak of fresh air, 
however, as the life-giver, because no matter how 
well off we may be, or what other advantages we 
may have, the absence of fresh air is bound to bring 
ill-health and diseased conditions. It is now known 
that the dreadful disease—consumption—can be 
cured by fresh-air treatment. Plenty of good food, 
plenty of warm clothing, but absolute fresh air day 
and night. There is no doubt that fresh air is our 
best friend in keeping the body healthy when it is 
well, and our best friend in bringing the body back 
to health when it is ill. 

A Strong Frame. 

What has fresh air to do with this? A great deal. 
Let us think of one little fellow being born and 
brought up in some court or back street, living in 
a small close room, and only some alley to play in. 
There he is—stunted, pinched, and pale-faced. Poor 
little fellow ! he has no chance to get fresh air. On 
the other hand, we think of some sturdy baby boy in 
the country, plump and fat and rosy-cheeked. The 
chief difference between the two is, that one has no 
chance of fresh air and the other has plenty of it. 
The one who has plenty, develops a strong frame, 
and, therefore, has a much better chance in life than 
the one who is weak. Let us get all the fresh-air 
exercise that we can, and our bodies will become 
strong in proportion. 

A Healthier Body 

will be the result, and this is something worth having. 
A millionaire offered some time since an immense 
sum of money to anyone who could give his little boy 
good health, but that great blessing could not be 
purchased. What has fresh air to do with good 
health ? A great deal. Every moment of time the 
heart is beating, and, as it does so, it sends blood to 
ever}' part of the body. If we could see this blood 
we should notice that its colour was bright red. It 
is called arterial blood, for two reasons : first, because 
it is sent into the arteries; and, second, because it 
contains a certain amount of fresh air. We breathe 
air into our lungs, and the fresher this air is, the more 
of it is absorbed by the blood, and the quality of the 
blood is improved accordingly. If we could follow 
this blood we should find it gradually losing its 
bright red colour and changing into purple, until at 
last, by the time the blood had passed from the 
arteries to the veins, it would be quite purple in 
colour. What has happened ? The blood has parted 
with its fresh air in building up and repairing the 
body, and in keeping it well and strong, and has 
gathered up impurities which can only be got rid- of 
by new supplies of fresh air. 

Greater Resistance to Disease 

is another of the good effects of fresh air. The poor, 
weak, pale-faced boy from the stifling rooms of the 
courts and alleys, does not stand anything like, the 
same chance of a healthy body as the boy who lives 
in good surroundings. Good blood means less disease, 
and we cannot have good blood without fresh air. 

A Happier Mind and Longer Life 

are the results of a healthy body. It has been said 
that length of life is determined by lung capacity; 
that is, the one who has the broadest chest and the 
largest limgs will live the longest; the reason being 
that such a person can get better supplies of fresh 
air than the one who has a narrow chest and small 
lungs. Teetotalers, as a rule, live longer than others, 
the rea-on being that their bodies are less liable to 
disease. This results, in some measure, from the fact 
that alcohol lessens the capacity of the blood for 
absorbing fresh air, and so the vitality of the body is 
not so good as it might be. At any rate, the lesson 
we have to learn is, that plenty of fresh air, plenty of 
exercise, simple food and abstinence from strong 
drink, will bring to us healthy bodies and long life. 
















24 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE 


%\)t Crusatiers. 

Words by Austin Cecil. 


Alla marcia . J = 124. 

14 g 

Intro. 

I 



Music by Arthur J. Jamouneau. 

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THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE, 


25 


Cljc Cntsafltrs. 

Words by Austin Cecil. Music by Arthur J. Jamouneau. 


Key C. Alla marcia. M. 124. 

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26 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Oup J4exxt Year’s Gathering. 


O N Saturday evening, January 2, a crowded 
audience occupied Lower Exeter Hall, workers 
from many societies within reach assembling 
together to encourage one another for the 
New Year, and to hear the helpful addresses 
which the Parent Union had been good enough to 
provide. The chair was taken by Mr. Edward Wood, 
J.P., who was supported by members of the Com¬ 
mittee and the speakers of the evening. After the 
open hvmn, “God, Who in boundless ways,” prayer 
was offered by the Rev. F. Storer Clark, Vicar of 
St. Peter’s, Greenwich. 

CHAIRMAN’S ADDRESS. 

The Chairman said: My first words are to wish 
you all a Happy New Year. And I don’t know of 
any audience to whom a wish of this kind could be 
expressed with greater probability of its fulfilment 
than to a meeting of Band of Hope workers, because 
you have really discovered some of the great secrets 
of securing happiness. (Applause.) I believe that a 
life of usefulness, given up to the promotion of the 
happiness and the well-being of other people, is one 
that is sure to bring to itself a large share of the 
happiness it tries to bring to others. (Hear, hear.) 
The work in which we are engaged, and the most 
important branch which is your special mission, is 
one which is most likely to be very fruitful of results. 

I suppose there is no one who will call into question 
the statement that the future of our real greatness 
will depend to a great extent upon the formation of 
the characters of the boys and girls of to-day. That 
is precisely the kind of work you are carrying on 
now. I seldom look upon a group of young people 
without thinking of the almost limitless possibilities 
before them. To make my meaning clear, let me 
take you to one of our public elementary schools. 
Try to imagine that you are accompanying me into 
the playground of one of these. There we shall see 
a large number of young people, full of the joyous¬ 
ness, the light-heartedness, and the freedom from 
responsibility, of youth. Then let us try to imagine 
what these young people will become hereafter—a 
very solemn thought. A good many of the lads you 
see have a great future before them. That some of 
them, though they are the sons of working men, 
will rise to high positions is almost a certainty, 
for the ladder of education is now so complete that 
the son of the humblest workman, assuming that he 
possesses the necessary ability, industry, and 
character, can rise stage by stage till he reaches the 
highest position in the Church or in the State. But 
while you may be gladdened by the contemplation 
of the bright prospects of some, you will be sad¬ 
dened by also contemplating that amongst all these 
light-hearted children are others who will sink to the 
lowest depths of degradation. Indeed, the future of 
someofthoseboysandofsomeof those girls will depend 
entirely upon whether they are total abstainers or not. 
Many of them will go perfectly straight so long as they 
don’t touch strong drink. But if they once acquire 
the habit of drinking, some of them are so con¬ 
stituted physically that they will become its victims, 
and so will sink and sink. Therefore it is 

Your Great Privilege 

to offer to all of them the protection or the total 
abstinence pledge which you holdout to them week 
by week in your Bands of Hope. (Applause.) Bear 
this in mind, too, that it all will have an influence for 
good; remember that while some of them will rise 
high and some will sink low, the majority will move 
along a fairly even plane. The majority of them will 
probably marry, and have children, anrithe influence 
you are communicating to them now will be imparted 
to their children hereafter, so that you are workinv 
not alone for to-day, but for the future. (Applause.*) 
And if you do not see the results of your labour now, 
be satisfied they will come—possibly in generations 
yet unborn. In other words, it is the seed-time; 
the harvest is yet to come. But you do not always 


have to wait. There are occasions when you can see 
the results of your labour even in these days. Shall 
I give you an instance drawn from my own ex¬ 
perience ? Thirty years ago or more I was the 
treasurer of a small Temperance Society in Wands- 
-worth. It was called the “ Good Intent Teetotal 
Society,” so that there could be no misunderstanding 
as to its meaning. We met in a small room which 
probably would not hold more than 70 or 80 people 
when fairly packed. Yet there have been some 
grand and useful meetings held in that little room in 
connection with the Band of Hope conducted by an 
elderly lady. I remember on one occasion an enter¬ 
tainment was to be given by the children, and 
amongst those who were to recite was a little girl of 
eight or nine years, the daughter of a heavy drinker. 
On this particular evening the father went to hear 
his child, and whether it was something in the 
recitation, or seeing his child upon the platform, that 
touched the noblest part of that man’s character, one 
could not say, but he signed the pledge, and not only 
became a total abstainer, but induced his wife to 
become so, and all his children. The little girl died 
while quite young, but the father lived for a quarter 
of a century or more, and was one of the most devoted 
workers in the Temperance movement I have ever 
known. Some few years ago I lost sight of him, and 
one morning received a letter from their son saying 
that both father and mother had passed away within 
two days of each other, and that they were both to 
be buried on a certain day. I attended the funeral, 
and saw them laid side by side in their last resting 
places. But what I want to impress upon you is that 
these twenty-five years’ work was the result of 
bringing that little girl into the Band of Hope. And 
I say that if the lady who conducted it never accom¬ 
plished anything else, she has one very bright jewel 
in her crown. So that you see you cannot measure 
the influence you are exercising. You may not see 
the result now, but I believe that honest effort 
intelligently applied is never absolutely fruitless. 
Therefore, work on, brothers and sisters, and I am 
satisfied that good results will follow your labours. 
(Applause.) 

Mr. Harry Tipper, the veteran bell-ringer, then 
gave a performance, on his silver bells, of “ The 
Gates of the West,” which was most delicately played 
and much enjoyed. The Royal Criterion Glee 
Singers followed with two part songs, “Lovely 
Night,” and “ Summer Eve,” both well given. 

NEW YEAR’S ADDRESS. 

The Rev. W. Rutley Mowll, M.A., Vicar of 
Christ Church, North Brixton, who was heartily 
received, began by half humorously wishing we had 
more opposition to our work, and then went on thus: 
This evening, at any rate, we are united in interest by 
the one thing that brings us together, namely, a 
desire to promote by every means in our power the 
great principles of total abstinence from strong drink. 
I was very much impressed by listening to an illus¬ 
tration a short time ago. The speaker was a man 
who had certainly endeavoured to do a little towards 
the amelioration of the condition of humanity, and he 
said that standing sometimes on the sea shore on a 
calm day, you will see away on the horizon a barque 
with every stitch of canvas set, going gently before a 
very soft breeze. But night comes on, the wind rises, 
and the sea is lashed into foam. Presently you will 
observe the barque in distress; the bell is rung, the 
gun fired, the lifeboat’s crew hasten together. The 
boat is put off in a heavy sea, and after a struggle with 
wind and wave, the lives of the imperilled sailors are 
rescued. Next morning in the Press half-a-column 
at least appears, and the brave deeds of the lifeboat- 
men are sounded aloud through the land. But, 
he added, little is seen in the Press about those watch¬ 
men, afloat and ashore, who are trimming the lamps 
or seeing that the lamps in the lighthouse are burning 
brightly, and who prevent thousands of shipwrecks 
every year. Now I take it that all our friends in this 
Hall are very like the lighthousemen, or it may be 
that vie are afloat and on the lightship. We in the 
Bands of Hope believe in prevention ; we hold and 



THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


27 


maintain that prevention is better than cure. As 
regards this great question none of us are satisfied 
with the condition of things. Is our country more 
sober than she was ? Some say, yes, certainly! 
Perhaps I am not in a position to give a verdict. But 
one thing is certain; the condition of things is 
alarming in the extreme, and for this obvious reason, 
that our women have taken to drink, and are doing 
untold mischief among the youug people whom we 
desire to see on the side of total abstinence. As I 
stand on this platform as a minister and as a worker 
in the cause of Christ through a godly mother, I ask 
myself where I should have been and what 1 should 
have been if that mother had been a drinking woman, 
and I dread to think ofit. The influence of women on 
children is untold ; we men are not in it. All that 
they expect us to do is to come in with our strong 
arms sometimes and handle the young rascals when 
they' get beyond control. (Laughter.) But, my friends, 
I cannot to-night look upon this great question and 
face the figures that have been placed before us in 
the public press without grievous misgiving. You all 
saw it, but let us hear it again, that out of ninety 
arrests of habitual drunkards, eighty-nine were 
women. As the minister of a large parish in South 
London, I have to confess that that statement appeals 
to me. There is a cry abroad again and again that it 
is the women now they are arresting for drunkenness. 

Young Women Victims. 

Not the elderly women, but the young. One was 
carried past my church the other day, scarcely sixteen 
years old, yet helplessly drunk, strapped to the 
stretcher. There was another case in which a man 
was earning ^800 a year. He was as kind as any man 
could be to His wife ; poor thing, my heart bleeds to 
think of it. She had children who were good to her ; 
a son who stood by her nobly. But, poor thing, she 
gave way to intemperance and was carried on the 
stretcher to the station not many weeks ago. The 
family is now broken up; the children have gone one 
way, the husband another; and she, poor thing, came 
staggering up to my door not a month ago, so far 
gone in the afternoon after all this trouble that she 
could not even get out my name. When she left the 
door she fell down hopelessly drunk on the pavement. 
It is not the depraved, ragged, and the starving 
women who are drinking now, but the educated and 
in other respects refined women who have had every¬ 
thing done for them to make life happy. And yet 
through the curse of these grocers’ licences our 
womenkind of the middle classes are drifting towards 
the precipice of eternal ruin. Having, then, before us 
sue hfacts as these we should pull ourselves together ; 
and I charge you who are women to do it more 
earnestly than ever, to persuade, to entreat little girls 
never to touch stimulants lest they drift, as so many 
are doing, and are lost. I want to give the real secret 
of success in our work. - To my mind this (holding up 
his pocket Bible! is not only our Magna Charta, but 
our book of instruction. Drunkenness and the sin of 
intemperance have been known to the earliest ages. 
The God who made us and has given us this Book, 
has instructed us what to do with regard to the sin of 
drunkenness and every other sin. The first is to see 
the sin, and then to know the Saviour who saves from 
its punishment and from its power. In a word the 
Gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ is the one sure and 
certain method by which we can hope to obtain 
victory. Ignorance on the drink question is as rife as 
ever. It was only the other night when I was trying 
to draw a doctor’s attention to this subject, and when 
I cited the well-known figures of lasc year’s drink 
bill, when I told him that we as a nation spent in 
st imulants a sum which works out at ^A ios. 2jd. P er 
head of the population, said the doccor, “Repeat 
those figures to me again.’’ I did so, for he is a very 
intelligent man. He replied, “Well, I am not a 
teetotaltr myself, but those figures make a man 
think.” Ignorance concerning the awful monetary 
loss to this country every year is found on every hand ; 
ignorance as to the effect of drink on the system is 
equally found, ignorance which affects the medical 
faculty in a lemarkable degree. The chief trouble 


found in regard to that grand profession is 
found in connection with the wrong use of strong 
drink. Think of the medical students who 
go to the dogs through it ; look, alas, at the 
doctors who have gone down to a drunkard’s doom, 
men who have had the body on the post mortem 
table, who have read the history of human diseases, 
who have learnt of the awful effects of alcohol on the 
brain, the blood, the nerves, and the whole system. 
Yet they drift. It was not a long while ago since 
I received a little pencilled note, “ Dear Sir, do come 
at once.” I was in the middle of a meeting on the 
subject of total abstinence. I did not know what it 
meant, but the moment I could get away' I went. 

A Sad Sight. 

Going to the door, I saw by the plate that it was a 
doctor’s house. All sorts of thoughts flashed through 
my mind; perhaps, it was a terrible case of sudden 
illness. The moment the door was opened I heard 
coming from the dining-room language which told 
me that somebody was mad drunk. As I looked down 
the hall there came towards me a woman, well dressed, 
with two little children hanging to her skirts. 
The tears were running down the children’s cheeks, 
and the lady, who turned out to be the doctor’s wife, 
said, “ I’m so glad you have come.” In the dining¬ 
room was this poor fellow, who in the madness of his 
drunkenness had hit the friend who had been called 
in to him in the mouth so that he bled freely. I 
looked at the poor fellow and he looked at me. I 
ofttn wish I was not a minister of the Gospel, and 
that I could thrash some fellows I have to meet. 
(Hear, hear.) Perhaps, it is as well that I cannot do 
it. Well, he ordered me out and told the servant to 
fetch the police. I waited till his poor brain had 
steadied a nit, and then I told him who I was; and 
though we had never met before, the name 
seemed to come to him. He looked ashamed, and 
then I said, “ Upstairs with you at once.” I took 
him upstairs, undressed him, and got him to bed, 
and then found that he had been drinking brandy, 
and that it was in a cupboard downstairs. I went 
down and sticking the brandy bottle into my coat 
pocket, went away home, and when I got home—- 
well, you can all understand what became of the 
brandy—I put it down the sink. (Applause.) I 
followed the poor fellow up; he is gone now. He 
was a member of a Church, and had a splendid 
testimonial hanging on his consulting room wall. 
W 7 hen he was sober, pointing to it, I asked, “Is it 
true?” Lie replied, “ Yes.” Then said J, “ My poor 
fellow, God help you.” Though a young man, it was 
an old habit with him. He has gone now into 
eternity. 

A Warning to Us. 

I put it to you to-night that if the" medical man 
will go wrong with all his knowledge, what an 
incentive to us to redouble our efforts to dispel the 
ignorance in regard to the great principles we 
advocate. We are, too, face to face with another 
point which presses upon all of us as workers, 
namely, the lack of interest among the ministers of 
our Churches. As a rule, in our Church meetings the 
subject is tabooed, put aside, as much in our Free 
Churches as in the Establishment. When you bring 
it up, unless your ministers and y'our Church officers 
are teetotalers, you are told too often that it is no 
part of their work. (Shame.) If it is no part of the 
work of the ministry and of every religious society 
to promote the well-being of the people, then I don’t 
know what our work really is. (Hear, hear.) If we can 
only get the Churches to stir, and get the ministers 
and deacons and leaders and churchwardens to say, 
“ While we have liberty we hold that we must not 
allow that liberty to degenerate into license, and 
for Christ’s sake we must put aside our liberty that 
we may advance these principles,” then next time 
we meet it will not be in the lower hall, but we shall 
have the great hall crowded. My last few sentences 
shall be centred in the Word of God. I give you 
four “w’s” as workers in this cause. Remember 
Psalm xxvii. 14: “ Wait on the Lord ; be of good 


28 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


courage, and He shall strengthen thine heart. Wait, 
I say, on the Lord.” Let 1904 be a year of prayer. 
We cannot trust God too much : the lamentable fact is 
that we trust Him so little. My second little word is 
Witness for God: Acts i. 8, “Ye shall be witnesses 
unto Me.” A witness must know the facts; he cannot 
go on hearsay evidence; he must bear cross-examina¬ 
tion. Fellow workers, bear cross-examination by our 
opponents, and if only you get the facts at your 
fingers’ ends you can silence every opponent. We 
cannot exaggerate the evils of intemperance; but 
when we are speaking on the subject let us be 
careful to tell the truth concerning the result of sin, 
the punishment of it, if it is not repented of. I 
believe what a man said the other day. He said he 
didn’t object to Pleasant Sunday Afternoons, but he 
would like a few more Painful Sunday Evenings, for he 
thought that the conscience wanted arousing. Then, 
witness to your minister, there is nothing like it. 
When you meet him in the street, say, “Ah, you 
might mention our Band of Hope from the pulpit, it 
might create an interest among the congregation.” 
Stir up your ministers, tackle them wherever you 
meet them ; write nice little notes to them—“ Dear 
sir, a very happy new year, but would you kindly 
oblige us this vear by referring to the Band of Hope 
a little oftener?” (Laughter.) Then let me ask you to 
witness by wearing “ the blue.” (Hear, hear.) Many 
times in the street a man noticing mine will say to 
another, “ He looks well 011 it, don’t he.” (Laughter 
and applause.) I was sitting opposite an old Cambridge 
Professor some time ago, who was noted for his love 
of port wine and red nose, when, looking across the 
table, he said, “I see you wear the blue ribbon.” 
“Yes,” I said, “better in my button-hole than on my 
nose.” (Laughter.) He laughed, but did not pursue 
the subject. Witness, then, bv wearing the blue. 
Wait on the Lord, witness for Him, then Watch for 
Him. I always think Mark xiii. 37 is good: “And 
what I say unto you I say unto all, watch.” I believe 
mv Lord Jesus Christ is coming again; that is my 
faith, and I want to watch for Him. There is nothing 
like keeping that before you; the Master is coming — 
“Surely, I come quickly.” May we all be read}', and 
say, “Come, Lord Jesus.” My last word is Work. 
Let us pull off our coats—I wish often I could pull off my 
coat and waistcoat and talk in my shirt sleeves. “We 
must work the work of Him that sent us while it is 
day; night cometh when no man can work.” May we 
work wisely, regularly as the clock, on the tram, on 
the ’bus, in the street, in the church, in the chapel. 
Then let us work kindly, for we know that what we do, 
moved by the power of the Spirit and the love of 
Christ, and for the honour of Plis name, will be 
successful work, and will merit the “ Well done, 
enter thou into the joy of thy Lord.” (Applause.) 

Miss Dora Gibson sang Liddle’s “Abide with me,” 
in a sweet and reverent manner; and Miss Katie 
Banfield, of the Guildhall School of Music, gave a 
dramatic recital of “The Women of Mumbles Head,” 
as told by Clement Scott. Mr. W. J. Harvey’s 
trustful hymn, “ Praise to Thee, Eternal Father,” 
was then sung with rare spirit. 

SECOND NEW YEAR’S ADDRESS. 

The Rev. T. Eynon Davies, of the Beckenham 
Congregational Church, gave the next address. After 
a humorous introduction, he went on to say that the 
future of England was bound up with the childhood 
of the laud; the cradle would rule the world. 
Roughly speaking, there were about 6,000,000 children 
in the land, and of these 3,000,000 were in the Band of 
Hope. What a pity that they could not reach the 
noble Band of 700,000 Sunday School teachers, and 
make every one of them a Temperance soldier. 
(Applause.) There never had been m the history of 
this country a time when the ravages of drink were 
so apparent as now. Yet this was the time when the 
Prime Minister patted it on the back. (Shame.) 
Never was the Bench of Judges more outspoken; 
never was the pulpit so feaness; never had the labour 
leaders spoken out with grander eloquence than had 
John Burns of late. (Applause.) ludeed, it was a 
sign of the time when a rising young statesman like 


Mr. Winston Churchill had opened his eyes to the 
enormity of this great curse. Yet this was a time 
that the Prime Minister and the Lord Chaucellor had 
chosen for pronouncing a benediction on the drink 
traffic. Would the Church of God allow it to go on ? 

Our Duty. 

Now that the Government had unfurled the brewers’ 
flag it was the duty of all Baud of Hope workers to 
give them a long, long holiday, and not only this 
Government, but any other that would allow itself to 
become the tool of the “trade.” In Temperance work 
they must always begin with home, and therefore he 
would appeal to fathers and mothers that it should be 
carried ou at home. Yet he would say, “ Do not be 
for ever nagging with regard to the teetotal question, 
or the children might get sick of it.” It was food 
they wanted, not medicine. Roughly speaking, the 
public houses of the land, if brought together, 
would make a street from Cape Wrath to Lind’s End, 
and what glorious palaces, what beautiful mansions 
some of them were, reminding the world of the 
Biblical description of the whited sepulchre—glorious 
without, but within full of dead men’s bones. 
When talking to young fellows he never lost 
the opportunity of quoting the figures compiled 
for a former Under-Secretary of State, showing 
how much of ,£5 spent on the manufacture 
of strong drink was squandered. Of £5 spent on 
shoes, £1 17s. went for labour; of £5 spent on liuen, 
£1 went for labour; of £5 spent on earthenware, 
£2 ns. went for labour; of £5 spent on clothes, 
£3 4s. went for labour ; yet 01 £5 spent on strong 
drink only 2s. 6d. went for labour. Guinness’s 
Brewery, with its tremendous sunk capital of 
millions, employed 3,000 men; whereas if such a 
capital were sunk in the linen business of Belfast, it 
would employ 103,000. The huge profits made from 
the trade had made also millionaire brewers, called 
by the newspapers, forsooth, 

“Eminent Brewers!” 

What was there eminent about brewing a lot of this 
vile broth ? (Hear, hear.) Lord Burton once said 
that the loss to the revenue would be something 
appalling if things were disturbed, but he (the 
speaker) hoped the country would soon become 
ashamed of enriching the national treasury out of 
the profits of the drink traffic; at any rate, the 
country could afford to lose from one pocket the 
^30,000,000 mentioned by Lord Burton if into 
tne other they could put a saving of £130,000,000 
which the abolition of the drink would bring about. 
(Applause.) Some men were said to get into the 
Peerage because they hewed their way there; the 
brewers might be said to get there—-to the Beerage— 
because they brewed their way. But the time had 
now about come when this abominable traffic should 
be called by its right name. The brewers, however, 
were not alone, for there were 172 Peers of the Realm 
who had a direct interest in the liquor traffic, and in 
Guinness’s list of shareholders were 178 reverend 
gentlemen—God forgive them ! The promoters of 
the drink traffic not only wanted the nation’s money 
for selling the driuk, but now they claimed it for 
not selling it. He hoped that if the question of 
compensating the “trade” did come before Parlia¬ 
ment there would be such a protest that it would be 
withdrawn in double quick time. (Applause.) It 
must have made the blood of all those present boil, 
as it did his, to read the impertinent letter that was 
sent to Mr. Justice Grantham, though for once in a 
way they found the tables turned 011 them. In 
Birmingham, too, they would if they could turn Mr. 
Arthur Chamberlain out of the vice-chairmanship of 
the Brewster Sessions. (Shame.) They hai now 
become bold enough for anything, and it was but 
recently that they claimed thaL the “trade” was 
entitled to direct representation in the House of 
Commons. Their argument seemed to be if Oxford 
aud Cambridge had each its own representative, why 
should not the “ Pig aud WLnsde,” or the “ Green 
Man ” ? Truly, human folly could not well go 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


further. Yet now was the time when the Govern¬ 
ment proposed to give to the liquor traffic 
a permanent lease of life. (Shame.) 

A Baronet’s Witty Story. 

Sir Wilfrid used to tell a story to the effect 
that something having gone wrong with a man’s 
brains, he went to a specialist. The latter having 
shut the patient up in a room, took out his brains in 
order to clean them, leaving them on a dish. Some¬ 
one called him from the room, and he was horrified 
on returning to find that the brainless fellow had 
walked out of the room. (Laughter.) In dread and 
terror the specialist hunted high and low, but never 
found him till some months afterwards. Astonished, 
he demanded, “Why on earth did you leave your 
brains behind?” To which the other replied, “Oh, 
I am in a place where I want no brains; I am in a 
Government office.” (Laughter.) Did it not seem to 
them that people who proposed to re-endow the 
drink traffic and increase the value of its property by 
hundreds of millions of money, didn’t it seem "that 
they had taken leave of their senses? Mark Twain 
told of the man who, when drunk, explained to his 
wife that it all arose from the fact that he had mixed 
his drinks. “Yes,” said she, “but when you have 
drunk all the whisky you want, you drink sarsaparilla” 
(Laughter.) “ But when I have drunk all the whiskey 
I want, I cannot say sarsaparilla,” said he. (Laughter.) 
What he would say to parents was, “ Train up a child 
in the way he should go, and when he is old he will 
not depart from it.” A famous Scotch divine told of 
a young student who reaching his ordination morning 
was leaving his mother’s cottage. As he left the 
good woman said, “James, you will hear grand 
sermons and you will be told a great many things 
that you ought to do as a minister of Jesus Christ; 
but there is one thing you may not be told. Remem¬ 
ber this, that each time you place your hand as a 
minister upon the curly head of a little child, you 
place it at the same time upon a mother’s heart.” 
They might well extend the beautiful truth and say 
that when they placed a kindly hand upon a little 
child in the Band of Hope or Sunday School, they 
were not only also placing a hand on the heart of a 
parent, but also upon the heart of Jesus Christ 
Himself. And what a grand thing it would be in the 
days when Britain was sober and Britain was free for 
them to know that they had had some part in 
bringing the sunshine of heaven down upon this 
earth. (Loud cheers.) 

Mr. Tipper gave another delightful haudbell solo, 
the Glee Singers two part-songs (one with rich 
humour), Miss Gibson sang, and Miss Banfield gave 
an amusing recitation on “ Up-to-date Shopping,” 
which provoked an encore, for which she gave an 
Irish courting anecdote. 

Mr. Bingham proposed a vote of thanks to the 
chairman, speakers, and performers, and this being 
seconded by Mr. Wakely, was carried with 
acclamation. 


Australian ISlexxts. 


(jHfROM Geelong we are cheered to learn that a 
Band of Hope Union has just been established 
-*■ for Geelong and District. The promoters of 
the Union have secured an efficient executive 
committee, with Mr. G. M. Hitchcock, one of the 
largest merchants in Geelong, as President. With 
them we trust that much good may be achieved by 
the new Union. The committee have already com¬ 
menced a personal canvass of all Sunday Schools, 
with the object of getting Bands of Hope formed at 
once. The energy shown by the Abstainers has roused 
the liquor trade to form a Liquor Trades’ Defence 
League. The Geelong Advertiser tells how the pub¬ 
licans and brewers are going to send out lecturers to 
controvert teetotalism. Our friends are ready for 
the fray. 


Aunt may. 


HILTP on a holiday 
Oft would go to see Aunt May; — 

Aunt May, who was fond of boys, 

And complained not of their noise; 

But from whom a welcome kind 
He was always sure to find. 

Phil’s own home was not a cot, 

Built in a sequestered spot 
As this house was, but a hall 
Old and grand, with chimneys tall. 

Yet he thought this place the best, 

And liked well to be its guest. 

For, alas ! within the gate 
Of the mansion, with its state, 

Discord brought by strong drink’s sway, * 
Marred the joy from day to day ; 

And the only son and heir 
Was exposed to many a snare. 

Did the father, as he drank 

I'roui the glass which spares no rank, 

But which led him in its might, 

This, his one fair boy, to slight, 

Think not how example tells, 

And is louder far than bells ? 

Did he wish his son to go 
In the path which leads to woe? 

Did he wish to see him sink 
Like himself, o’ercome by drink ? 

Nay ! p’raps not, yet careless, wild, 

Naught of good he taught his child. 

Philip had no mother sweet, 

She had reached the Golden Street, 

Had no friend save Auntie May, 

Mother’s sister—aught to say 
Of those better, brighter ways 
Which will end in Heaven’s praise. 

No ; but Aunt May understood, 

What is bad and what is good, 

Knewy from God’s Book, and from life, 
What, brings peace and what brings strife ; 
And she sought by love’s blest charm, 
Philip’s soul to keep from harm. 

She it was into whose ears, 

Poured he all his hopes and fears, 

She it was whose gentle tone 
Made the Gospel message known, 

And it was through her strong plea 
He had promised drink to flee. 

Yes, Aunt May it was who led, 

Phil in safety’s path to tread, 

She, who, where the father failed, 

Through her love and faith prevailed, 
Sowing in these quiet hours, 

Seeds to grow to oeauteous flowers. 

Philip now in manhood stands, 

Owner of his father’s lands. 

Yet not in his father’s ways 
Treads he, nor drink’s spell obeys, 

But he, and his servants, too, 

Walk in paths of Temperance true. 

And sometimes, in Sabbath hours, 

By a grave kept fair by flowers, 

Is the Temperance Squire oft seen,— 

Aunt May’s grave, so fresh and green : 

And he prays that at life’s end, 

He again may meet this friend. 

Faith Chirtern. 


Copies of the Band of Hope Chronicre can be 
had for a year, post free, for is 6 d., from 60, Old 
Bailey, London, E.C. 







THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


30 



The Band of Hope Fiseal Policy. 

A DIALOGUE FOR TWO BOYS. 

By Alfred J. Grasspoor. 


[Enter Janies, wearing an orchid in his coat, and eye¬ 
glass in his right eye, and carrying two loaves of 
bread, one a two-pound loaf, the other weighing 
two ounces. He places the loaves on a table, and 
looks at them caiefully through his eye-glass.) 

Janies. — Fiscal policy indeed! or physical policy, 
or anything you like to call the new sensation. I’m 
no politician, and don’t want to be, but it strikes me 
these loaves can be used for quite a different object, 
and to teach a few simple but important lessons much 
needed by some of my fellow-countrymen. Let me 
see—how shall I begin ? Ladies and gentlemen, the 
Fiscal Policy is occupying at the present moment 
much of our conversation, many columns in our 
newspapers— {a noise heard as of someone coming up¬ 
stairs) — there—I declare a visitor is coming to 
interrupt the rehearsal of my little speech. 

[Enter John.) 

John. —Hullo ! what’s all this masquerading— 
loaves of bread—eyeglass—orchid? Well, I declare! 
are you going to represent Fiscal Policy at a fancy 
dress ball, or what does all this mean ? Allow me to 
pay my respects to Mr. Chamberlain in miniature. 
(Bows ) 

Janies. —Really, John, I must apologise for my 
get-up, but don’t you think it grand? (Strutsabout.) 
The fact is, I was just rehearsing a little speech I 
intend giving at the annual meeting of our Band of 
Hope. I call it “ the Band of Hope Fiscal policy.” 

John. —What a capital idea ! I shall be most happy 
to listen while you continue your rehearsal, perhaps—• 
if you will allow me—I may be able to throw a little 
light 011 the subject. Certainly, I am sure to get 
good myself. Begin quickly ; I want to hear you. 
(1 Sits down.) 

Janies. —You won’t laugh. 

John. —No, certainly not. I promise you I will be 
as sober as a judge. 

Janies. —And you won't judge me harshly, if I 
should make a slip, or say something very foolish ? 

John. —On my honour, I will be as quiet as a 
tortoise when he buries himself in the earth in 
winter time. 

James. —Very well, then ; let me commence afresh. 
Ladies and gentlemen, there has been much dis¬ 
cussion on the weight and value of the free-trade 
loaf, and the protection loaf. Of all this I know 
little; but I am not too young to know that the 
loaves of bread on many tables are not half so 
numerous as they ought to be, and I think I have 
found out the cause. 

John. —You only think, sir, do you, on this subject ? 
I tell you there is no need to think more on the 
matter; the cause has been proved over and over 
again. 

James. —Thank you very much for interrupting me, 
but I thought you intended to be as quiet as a buried 
tortoise. I have never heard a tortoise make a 
speech. 

John. — I beg your pardon. I am so deeply interested 
in this subject that 1 can hardly keep quiet. Do 
forgive me, and I will try not to be so ungentlemanly 
again. 

James (taking up loaves ).—These loaves represent 


the amount of nourishment obtained when money is 
spent in the purchase of bread and of beer. In bread 
we have material to build up the skeleton, to make 
muscle, to increase the brain, and, in fact, generally to 
help the body develop; in beer we have a drink 
which is nearly all water, and a poison called alcohol. 

John. —Excuse me saying a word here. Really, I 
cannot act the tortoise, although I promised to do 
so. Your comparison is good, but suppose we take a 
glass of beer and a glass of milk. In the milk there 
are four whole parts of flesh-forming matter; in the 
beer there is only one five-hundredth part. In milk 
there is fat to give warmth, in beer there is no fat; in 
beer there is a deadly poison ; in pure milk there is no 
poison. So you see the teetotaler gets much more 
value for his money when he buys milk than the 
drinker when he buys beer. 

James.— This loaf, ladies and gentlemen—( holding 
up the two pound loaj)— represents the physical and 
mental strength of the abstainer, and this—( holding 
up the two ounce loaf )—that of a drunk ard. 

John. —Bravo ! that’s a good hit. But look here, my 
friend, put a few good opinions in your speech. 
Here’s something for you— (taking paper from 
pocket). — Read this, my boy, it will prove a powerful 
argument. 

Janies (reads) —The following is an extract from a 
Medical Manifesto on Alcohol. It is signed by 274 
British and Irish medical practitioners, and by 229 
foreign doctors. 

“Total abstainers, other conditions being 
similar, can perform more work, possess greater 
powers of endurance, have on the average less 
sickness, and recover more quickly than non- 
abstainers.” 

John. —Splendid! If anybody ought to know the 
doctors ought. 

James. —What a noisy tortoise you are. 

John. —Very sorry, I promise not to speak another 
word—till the next time. 

James. —Ladies and gentlemen, this large loaf 
shows the amount of crime committed as one result 
of drinking intoxicating.liquors ; this the amount of 
crime associated with drink. 

John. —It’s no good, I’m changed from a tortoise 
to an inquisitive monkey. Have you read Mr. 
Justice Grantham’s letter on the subject of crime and 
drink ? 

Janies. —Of course, I have. 

John — Then why don’t you read an extract ? It is 
a striking testimony to the evils produced by drinking 
alcoholic liquors. 

James. —The lact is, I haven’t a copy of the letter 
with me. 

John. —Here is one— (handing the letter). Read the 
passage marked. 

James (reads )— 

“I have lately been brought face to face for 
weeks with the conduct of publicans in the 
carrying on of their business, which has resulted 
in the most heart-breaking crimes that it is 
possible to imagine; husbands murdering their 
wives, fathers their sons, friends their own best 
friends—all through the maddening influence of 
excessive drinking.” 

John. —You see, all the advantage is on the side of 
the abstainer, you get more bread on the table, more 
strength in the muscles, more goodness in the heart. 
Now, then, yotr have said nearly enough ; make your 
peroration, and have done, or your audience will wish 
you at Jericho. 

Janies. —Ladies and gentlemen, as I understand the 
Fiscal Policy as now being discussed, it is suggested 
that such an alternative will give more work to the 
worker, better wages, more food, and, consequently, 
greater prosperity. I am not able to say yes or no 
to these propositions; but this I know, the man who 
adopts the teetotal policy will have more power to 
work, better brains to study, and he will be saved 
from many temptations. Surely for these reasons it 
is a good practice to train up children never to touch 
any kind of intoxicating drink. 

[Exeunt.) 



'THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


3i 


R Sailor* Boy’s Paper*. 


O UR readers might like to see a sample of the 
abstracts given by sailor boys after lectures 
in Training Ships by our School Lecturers. 
Last month we referred to the good results 
already attained in various ships in the home 
waters. At Harwich, Mr. J. Barnett, of the North 
Essex Union, visited H. 31 . S. Ganges, and gave a 
lecture, as authorised by the Lords of the Admiralty. 
That the effort was not in vain the following abstract 
by T. C. Robinson (No. 7,110) abundantly proves. 

ALCOHOL AND THE HUMAN BODY. 

1. The human body is composed of fourteen 
elements. The four chief elements are oxygen, 
hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen. The body requires 
food and air to build up, to repair and warm the body. 

2. What we require to build up, to repair, and 
warm the body is a perfect food. Perfect foods are 
those which contain (a) minerals, (b) nitrogen, 
(c) carbon, ( d) water,—such as eggs, lean meat, 
vegetables, &c. Water is a very important food. 
If a man is weighed it is supposed, if his weight is 
ninety pounds, sixty pounds will be water; therefore 
two-thirds of a man’s weight are water. 

3. Alcohol is not a food. If we go to a chemist 
and ask him if there are any minerals in alcohol, he 
will say “No.” There are no minerals, no nitrogen, 
only a little carbon, no water in alcohol. Dr. Bintz 
took a lot of interest in finding out the effects of 
alcohol on the human body by 126 thermometer 
tests. He took the temperature of persons who did 
not take alcohol, of those who only had a little, and 
those who took large quantities of it, and he found 
that the temperature 111 those who did not take 
alcohol was higher those who did. The experiences 
of Arctic explorers teach us that the less we have to 
do with alcohol the better it is for us. Alcohol 
makes them colder; it does not make them warmer. 

Alcohol does not give strength or energy. Dr. 
Parkes, an army doctor, proved this by his experi¬ 
ments with two gangs of mowers. He Bad five men 
in each gang, and one gang had to drink beer, and 
the other had to be abstainers ; they both had to 
start at the same time and leave off at the same time. 
The doctor measured the work done every night, and 
he found that the abstainers always did more than 
the gang that drank beer. When he reversed the 
gangs, and those who had been abstainers had to 
drink beer, it was the same. The abstainers always 
did more mowing than the others. 

Baron Liebig also made a lot of experiments, and at 
last he came to the conclusion that as much flour 
that he could get on the end of a table-knife had as 
much nourishment in it as nine quarts of the best 
Bavarian ale. 

4. Alcohol is a poison, (a) This was proved bv 
two soldiers in Paris, who had a wager between them 
which was to see which of them could drink the 
most brandy—which is composed largely of alcohol. 
The soldiers drank seven pints of brandy each, and 
one of them fell down dead on the spot, and the 
other died on the way to the hospital, (b) Doctors’ 
books on poisons always luclude alcohol. 

5. Digestion, (a) The first part of digestion takes 
place in the mouth. The saliva in the mouth does 
the first part of digestion, (b) The food next passes 
into the stomach, and is softened a bit more oy the 
gastric juice, (c) It next passes into the intestines, 
and is then turned into a liquid. The names of the 
two juices in the intestines are the bile and pancreatic 
juice. 

(6) Alcohol hardens food and hinders digestion. 
This is proved by putting beef, bread, and sugar in 
alcohol for ten years, and, instead of softening them, 
it hardens them. It is also proved in the case of a 
man whose name was Alexis St. Martin. He was a 
man who lived in America, and earned his living by 
shooting animals for their fur and skin. He was out 
shooting one day when his gun missed, and when he 


was examining it, it went off and hit him in the side. 
He was taken to Dr. Beaumont, who took great care 
of him, and at last got him better. While he was 
nursing him he often examined his stomach—and 
he always examined it after he had been drinking 
alcohol -and he found that his stomach, after he had 
been drinking, instead of being pink the same as any' 
ordinary person’s, was red and inflamed. All these 
examples show that alcohol is a poison, and also 
hardens food and hinders digestion. 

-——- 

Juvenile Smoking. 


AN APPEAL TO PATRIOTS. 

HE frequency with which any casual observer is 
obliged to notice the growing habit of tobacco 
smoking by those of tender years, and which 
must have an injurious effect on the stamina of 
our future generations, is rightly receiving the 
attention of religious, of medical, and of athletic 
writers and speakers, as well as words of strong con¬ 
demnation from stipendiary and other magistrates 
who are brought face to face with the immediate 
results. 

The question of how to suppress this condition of 
things is one of great urgency, and cannot, in the 
interests of the nation, be longer delayed. 

The Executive of the British Anti-Tobacco League, 
therefore, appeal to true patriots to join with them in 
an effort to prevent the use of tobacco by juveniles, 
such efforts to include—- 

1. The passing of a Bill prohibiting the sale of 
tobacco to children under sixteen years of age. Mr. 
Richard Rigg has charge of the Bill, and will intro¬ 
duce it into Parliament early next Session, and will 
be supported by a number of influential Members of 
Parliament. 

2. By the arrangement for competent agents to visit 
day schools, and organise conferences in various 
localities where influential friends may discuss the 
best means to adopt. 

3. By enlisting the co-operation of Sunday School 
Teachers and Superintendents in showing the harmful 
effects of tobacco upon undeveloped lives; and 

4. By the distribution of suitable literature. 

--♦>•>•>- 

R Good f^eopd. 


T HE Dove Row Band of Hope, to which we have 
called attention on previous occasions, is main¬ 
tained with an efficiency which speaks well for 
its persevering workers. The statistics for last 
year’s series ol meetings are worth noting, and 
in calling attention to them, we may remind our 
readers that meetings are held every Tuesday and 
Wednesday throughout the year. The attendance in 
the summer fully justified all the efforts that were 
made to make the meetings bright and attractive. 
The figures may be tabulated thus :— 

Aggregate Weekly’ 

r. tt„ , Attendance. Average. 

Band of Hope— s 


Juniors (Children) . .• 

26,628 

• 512 

,, (Workers,/ 

Seniors 

1,146 

22 

2,796 

54 

Adult Total Abstinence Society 

7.674 ■ 

147 


38,244 

735 


For five weeks before Christmas the average attend¬ 
ance was just over 1,000 a week. The number of new 
pledges taken at the Junior Band of Hope during the 
year was 193. Our readers will join with us in offering 
our congratulations to Mr. G. H. Simmons, the hon. 
superintendent, on such cheering statistics. 











3 2 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 



Banb of Ibope Unions. 


Cambridgeshire. —The annual meetings of this 
Union were held at Cambridge on January u, a large 
number of Bands of Hope being represented. Mrs. 
Henderson, the secretary, in the report, showed a 
good year’s work, and that the Union was in a live 
condition. A visit of some days from Mr. Frank 
Adkins, of the Parent Union, had stirred them up 
both in towns and villages. On Mr. Pay retiring 
from the agency, it was accepted by Mr. Frank Col- 
linson, who came from the North. Mr. H. P'. Chaplin, 
treasurer, presented the balance-sheet, showing a 
few pounds in hand with which to begin the new 
year. The new agent also presented his report, and 
all were adopted. Professor Sims Woodhead was 
re-elected president with acclamation, and the various 
officers were duly appointed. After luncheon several 
items of business were transacted, and then service 
was held in Zion Chapel. It was conducted by the 
Rev. J. W. Upton and the Rev. C. K. Charlesworth, 
and the sermon was preached by Mrs. Jennie Walker, 
“the Yorkshire Nightingale,” who also sang the solo, 
“ Lo, at Thy feet.” After tea a public meeting was 
held, the Rev. W. Bampton Taylor presiding, as an 
old Band of Hope boy. Addresses were given by 
Mrs. Sims Woodhead, Mrs. Jennie Walker, the Rev. 
J. W. Upton, and others. Mr. Upton moved, and Mr. 
Chaplin seconded, a resolution in favour of the magis¬ 
trates retaining the discretion they had hitherto 
possessed in regard to the issue of licences. 

Halifax. —The secretaries, speakers, and lady 
workers connected with the Halifax and District 
Band of Hope Union had a successful social re-union 
on Saturday, January 2. The Harrison Road Con¬ 
gregational Schools, laid out as a winter garden, made 
an exceedingly pretty meeting-place. After giving a 
welcome to the workers, the president briefly 
reviewed the present position of the movement, both 
locally and nationally. The agent gave a short 
sketch of his five years’ work with the Union, which 
represented attendance at 1,564 meetings, including 
300 open-air meetings, 236 lantern lectures, 200 Sun¬ 
day services, and 50 day-school lectures. Mrs. G. H. 
Smith effectively summarised Mr. Sydney Webb’s 
work on the licensing question, and Nurse Paul 
addressed the gathering on the excuses for drinking, 
and the need of women workers in the movement to 
counteract the temptations of drinking amongst 
women. Alderman G. H. Smith, Mr. J. R. Swaine, 
and Mr. G. H. Wadsworth also took part in the meet¬ 
ing. Musical selections were contributed by members 
of the Harrison Road Church, and Miss Haigh, of 
Greetland. 

Hulme, Chorlton and District. —The third series 
of papers which have been arranged by this Union 
for the monthly meetings of secretaries, representa¬ 
tives and speakers, has now commenced, the following 
having already been given :—“Why we should Teach 
the Young to avoid Tobacco,” by Mr. A. W. Constan¬ 
tine, hon. sec.; “The Temperance Aspect of To-day, 
with Hints to Advocates and Workers,” by Mr. 
Rdward Neild, a vice-president of the Union; and 
“ Gambling,” by Mr. W. H. Spong. The sixty-first 
plan has jirst been issued, and four papers have been 
arranged for coming meetings, titles of which are 
placed prominently on same. It has been decided to 
form a District Choir in connection with the Great 
Free Trade Hall Festival of Bands of Hope on Feb¬ 
ruary 20. Mr. Bedford Pollard is the conductor, Mr. 
Sydney Cross accompanist, and Mr. A. W. Constantine 
secretary. 


Newcastle, Gateshead, and District.— ThisUnion 
has adopted a plan for carrying out a Band of Hope 
examination on the lines suggested from head¬ 
quarters. The executive is asking the societies to 
take up the definite teaching of the principles of 
Total Abstinence with more vigour, and the volun¬ 
tary speakers of the Union are being asked to base 
their addresses on the subject chosen. Mr. Crabtree 
is arranging for district gatherings of those who will 
go in for the examination, and is also forming a 
workers’ class at the Union offices, with especial 
reference to qualification to teach. This promises to 
be a most useful means of equipping the teachers for 
the special work the Union has taken in hand. 


A Year’s Ppogpamme. 


H"* ROM time to time we print copies of programmes 
Ja. issued by societies, as suggestive of the ad van- 
L tages to be derived by the introduction of more 
systematic teaching into Band of Hope meet¬ 
ings. These have generally been arranged for 
three or four months; only once or twice have we 
received programmes for a six months’ series of 
meetings. Now, however, we have received one for 
the twelve months of this year, and we are glad to see 
that the Band of Hope Chronicle addresses are to 
be largely utilised by our friends; no less than 
twenty-four of the outlines we provide being in the 
programme. To give the whole would occupy more 
space than we can spare, but we will try and find 
room for the programme for the first half of the year. 
It is thus issued by the Stratford Road (Baptist) Band 
of Hope, at Sparkbrook, Birmingham 

Jan. 7—President’s New Year Address. 

,, 14—Historical Chats: (i) “The Drink in Bible Times’ 

Mr. H. Cross. 

,, 2r—Address: Mr. W. Glaser. 

,, 28—Talks with young People: (i) “Is it right?” Mr. C. 

Chambers. 

Feb. 4—District Rally : South Birmingham Band of Hope Union. 

,, 11—Yarns for the Youngsters : (i) “ Liquor Trade Marks.” 

Mr. H. Young. 

,, 18—Lantern Evening: “ Scene, Song and Story.” 

,, 25—“Take care of No. i”: (t) “The Life-giver.” Mr. 

C. S. Revel 1 . 

Mar. 3—Reciting Contest: Senior Girls. 

,, 10—Historical Chats : (2) “ The Drink among the Ancients.’ 

Mr. H. Cross. 

,, 17 —Our Own Annual Festival. 

„ 24—Talks with young People: (2) “Idols.” Mr. C. 

Chambers. 

,, 31—Speaker from South Birmingham Band of Hope Union. 

Apr. 14—Yarns for the Youngsters: (2) “Keep to the right.’’ 

Mr. H. Young. 

„ 21—Address: Mr. 

,, 28—“Take care of No. 1”: (2) “Friends and Foes.” 

Mr. C. S. Revell. 

May 5—Address: Mr. 

,, 12—Historical Chats : (4) “ The Drink and our Saxon Fore¬ 

fathers.” Mr. H. Cross. 

,, 19—Address: Mr. 

June 2—Talks with young People: (3) “Uses of Leaves.” 

Mr. C. Chambers. 

,, 9—Yarns for the Youngsters: (3) “Who’s to blame?” 

Mr. H. Young. 

,, 16—Address: Mr. 

,, 23—“ Take care of No. t ”: (3) “ Burglars and Policemen.” 

Mr. C. S. Revell. 

,, 30—Speaker from South Birmingham Band of Hope Union. 

A footnote says that the programme of each ordi¬ 
nary meeting includes five melodies, two prayers, 
two Temperance recitations (by girl and boy), selected, 
planned, and satisfactorily rehearsed; a five minutes’ 
Bible Temperance Lesson from the desk; the Address; 
the Pledge, orally given by a member; and the secre¬ 
tary’s notices. Doors open at 6.30. Meeting to com¬ 
mence at 7, and close at 8.15, punctually. 


Fever. — During Convalescence after Typhoid, 
Scarlet and Rheumatic Fever, nothing is so accep¬ 
table and invigorating as “Nonaltou,” the non¬ 
alcoholic Tonic. “ Nonalton ” is made from Grapes 
and Bark, and is recommended and prescribed by 
Physicians. It leaves no bad after-effects. Sample 
bottle, 2S. 6d. Particulars free.—F. Wright, Mundy 
& Co., 27, Merton Road, Kensington, London, W.— 
[Advt.] 















Editorial Mems. 


Mrs. Tom Mitchell, of Bradford, lias been 
organising deputations to the licensing magis¬ 
trates of Bradford, Reeds, Huddersfield, 
Halifax, and the West Riding, in reference to 
the employment of barmaids. The movement 
originated with the British Women’s Tempe¬ 
rance Association, and it is being brought to 
the notice of magistrates by private interviews 
with the various licensing authorities. The 
first interview was with the Bradford City 
Riceusing Justices on January 12, and the 
second with the Bradford West Riding 
Justices, on January 21. The request made 
commends itself to the public, because it is not 
extreme ; it does not ask for the abolition of 
barmaids at once, because that would throw 
many girls out of work, but that, when grant¬ 
ing licences, they would impose a condition 
that the licensees should engage no women 
who are not already barmaids. The inter¬ 
views were private, but it is rumoured that the 
deputations in each case were sympathetically 
received by the justices. 


The Belfast Christian Advocate , in a recent 
issue, contained a clever and particularly 
striking Band of Hope address by Mr. Robert 
Morgan, of Dublin, on “ My Christmas Dinner 
to the Dublin Statues.” It is an address quite 
out of the beaten track, and imagines the chief 
statues of the Irish capital coming to life on 
Christmas Day and accepting invitations to a 
dinner given by Mr. Morgan. As Father 
Mathew was one of the party, it was to be a 
dinner on Temperance principles, and was 
held away from licensed premises. It was, 
therefore, set out on sumptuous lines, in Mr. 
Carty’s X. D. Temperance Cafe in Grafton 
Street. After dinner Oliver Goldsmith is made 
to hanker after something alcoholic for a 
moment or two, but a whisper that it would be 
distasteful to Father Mathew has its due 
effect, and Oliver is satisfied with simpler 
drink. We may find room for the address in 
our columns before long. 


Mr. G. C. Gardner, of 7, Barton Street, 
Tewkesbury, hon. sec. of the Baptist 
“ Onward ” Band of Hope in that quaint 
western town, hast sent us a number of leaflets 
issued by his committee. They are varied in 
form, and novel, showing that brains are 
MARCH, 1904. 


married to enthusiasm in their production. 
Systematic teaching is evidently provided, as 
twelve meetings are given to twelve addresses 
on “The House I live in.” The warning 
notices to absentee members are good ideas 
and so are the invitations. 


We were recentlj’ amused at reading that at a 
certain Band of Hope meeting in the Fmerald 
Isle, the chair was taken by a boy of eight (!), 
that he delivered “ a racy address,” and 
carried out his duties efficiently. The choice 
of so youthful a president is doubtless on the 
principle of “ Train up a child in the way it 
should go.” 


We note with interest that a large number 
of influential medical men are making an 
effort to have lessons on hygiene and Tempe¬ 
rance officially introduced in all schools under 
the Education Department. Whether all the 
signatories would accept our definition of 
Temperance or not, the effort is a sign of the 
times that is encouraging. We are still making 
headway in inducing teachers to become 
abstainers. That is a sure way to have “ true 
Temperance ” taught. 

-**♦>- 

fl Quarterly Programme. 


St. George’s Mission Band of Hope at Croydon 
had the subjoined syllabus for the first quarter of this 
year:— 

Jan. 4—Address by the Secretary,—“ Our Motto for 1904 ” 

,, 11—Annual Tea and Entertainment in St. George’s Hall, 

,, r8—No Meeting. 

,, 25—Entertainment —arranged by Mr. F. W. Bailey. 

Feb. r—Address by Mr. H. G. Cottrell—" Tale of a Frog.” 

,, 8—Illustrated Address by Mr. W. J. Evans—“ Wilful 

Waste.” 

,, r5—Lantern Entertainment—“ Little Goldie.” 

Reading by Miss H. Lambert. 

,, 22—Annual Public Meeting—Chairman, Rev. Dr. Carter 
Entertainment by Band of Hope Choir. 

Distribution of Medals and Rewards. 

,, 29—Address by Superintendent,—“ What I saw in Switzer¬ 
land.” 

Mar. 7—An Evening with Members of London Road Wesleyan 
Band of Hope. Address by Mr. W. Ford. 

,, r4—Address by Mr. S. Stevens. 

,, 21—Lantern Entertainment,—•“ Hump and All.” 

,, 28—Entertainment by S. Norwood Congregational Band 

of Hope. Address by Mr. Atkins. 

BAND OF HOPE CHOIR ENGAGEMENTS. 

Feb. 11, Th.—London Road Wesleyan Band of Hope. 

,, 25, Th.—Thornton Heath Pond Band of Hope. 

Mar. 29, Tu.—Clyde Road Band of Hope. 


Tickets of admission to Lantern Evenings one half-penny , 
Parents specially invited to Annual Meeting . 




































34 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Corresponfcence. 


ENCOURAGING FACTS. 

Sir, —There are some people who seem to be very 
sceptical of the good done by the dissemination 
of Temperance literature. If there be any such 
amongst your readers let them take note of the 
following incident. Fast week I delivered a lecture 
at a village in North Essex, and afterwards had a 
chat with the Vicar at whose house I was staying. 

He told me that one of the elder members of his 
Band of Hope, a farmer’s daughter, had given him 
an interesting fact in reference to the “ Motto Card ” 
of the United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. (And 
here let me say, Mr. Editor, that I think the 
beautiful “ Motto Card ” for 1904 is one of the best that 
has been issued.) 

This young lady told the Vicar that quite recently 
two young farmers were visiting at her home, and 
that the “ Motto Card ” on the mantelshelf in one 
of the rooms caught the eyes of the young men, who 
admired the picture, and then read the excellent 
teaching on the reverse side. She then heard them 
say that the statements there made were quite true, 
and to prove their conviction on this point they both 
agreed to try Total Abstinence for a month. Whether 
or not these young farmers were rivals for the hand 
of the young lady I did not enquire, but let us hope 
that this Total Abstinence “ for a month" will prove 
so beneficial that they will decide upon Total 
Abstinence for life. 

Turning to another matter, you may be interested 
to know that last evening my second visit was paid 
to H.M.S. Ganges, off Harwich. I mentioned your 
kindness in inserting T. C. Robinson’s paper in this 
month’s issue of the Band of Hope Chronicee, and 
showed the boys a copy. This created a good deal of 
interest, and at the close of the lecture Robinson 
came up and begged for a copy to “send to his 
mother.” I handed him mine, and in a few minutes 
about a dozen sailor boys were eagerly scanning the 
printed words of their successful comrade. 

Who can estimate the influence of the “Motto 
Card ” and “ The Sailor Boy’s Paper ” ? 

Yours truly, 

Colchester, February 10, 1904. J. BARNETT. 


PUSH THE “CHRONICEE”—AND PRAY. 

Dear Sir,— It is encouraging to the workers and 
friends to learn of the progress of Temperance. 
Adult and juvenile societies and membership are 
increasing, and the community is being educated and 
persuaded to become abstainers, and personally aid 
in furthering the cause. 

These results might be largely increased if all the 
Temperance friends got your valuable periodical 
regularly, carefully perused it, and afterward kept it 
circulating so as to increase the knowledge and 
enthusiasm inside the societies, and to reach, 
persuade, and secure large numbers of others who 
do not otherwise see Temperance literature or attend 
Temperance meetings. 

I would also strongly recommend that daily 
prayer should receive that attention which its great 
necessity and importance demands. God is more 
powerful than all our enemies, and is able and willing 
to largely bless all proper efforts, if we do our part 
fully and faithfully. 

Prayer moves the hand that moves the world, and 
God can guide and bless our work more than is in the 
power of all local and national authorities. If we 
really desire rapid and substantial progress, surely 
such is worth asking and working for with all the 
earnestness and enthusiasm that is in our power. 

Much past success has been gained by the adoption 
of these and all other good methods, and if we 
continue and increase the same we need never 
despair. 

With best wishes for God’s richest blessing on all 
your noble efforts, 

I am, yours respectfully, 

A. P. B. 


Dundee Union “ Of flge.” 


T HERE was a large gathering on Feb. 5 in the 
Kinnaird Hall in connection with the celebra¬ 
tion of the Coming of Age of the Dundee and 
District Band of Hope Union. Nearly 1,800 
children were oresent, accompanied by the 
mission workers and friends. The chair was occupied 
by Mr. C. W. Scrymgeour, President of the Union, 
who said that twenty-one years ago the Union was 
formed, although long before that time—indeed, fifty 
years ago—a Band of Hope was started in Dundee, so 
that this meeting had a double significance. It 
demonstrated the fact that a Band of Hope had been in 
existence in Dundee for fifty years. The matter was 
taken up at that time by a kinsman of his own, Mr. 
James Scrymgeour, and there were about 1,000 mem¬ 
bers. But there was only one Band of Hope. By-and-by 
there were eight of them, and in 1883 the Union was 
formed. Now sixty Societies existed in Dundee 
and neighbourhood, and the children under their 
care numbered about 12,000. That was a splendid 
record. At the weekly meetings not only did they try 
to teach the children some Temperance truths, but 
tried to give them some harmless entertainment. 
He believed that Band of Hope night was the 
happiest night in the week for some boys and girls. 
Indeed in one Baud of Hope they sang: — 

“ There’s nae nicht like Friday nicht, 

There’s nae nicht ava : 

For since we joined the P»and o’ Hope, 

We canna’ bide awa’! ” 

The chairman said he had received a number of 
letters of apology for absence from Sir John Feng, M.P., 
Professor Sutherland, Mr. J. C. Higgins, Mr. Robert 
Calder, Bailie Henderson, Councillor Fongair, Mr. 
Charles Duncan, Rev. G. W. Howie, and Mr. 
Archibald Fawson. Altogether twenty-seven ministers 
had sent letters expressing regret at their absence, 
and wishing the F T nion “ God speed.” 

Mr. W. H. Buist, on behalf of the Executive of 
the Union, presented the chairman and ex-Bailie 
Mathers with photographic groups of the Executive 
in recognition of their valuable services. He said 
ex-Bailie Mathers had been treasurer of the Union 
for twenty-one years. The recipients of the gifts 
briefly expressed their thanks. Addresses were also 
given by Rev. J. Forsyth, Rev. George Christie, and 
Mr. J. H. Smith, Glasgow. Mr. Christie remarked 
that fifty years ago, at a meeting of the Band of Hope, 
Rev. Dr. Peter Grant gave an address on the forma¬ 
tion of habit, which was a very good subject for such 
an occasion. The Union choir, conducted by Mr. 
R. C. Robertson, contributed a selection of vocal 
music, Miss Arthurson playing the accompaniments. 

-- 

Parliament and Soy Smokers. 


YN the House of Commons, on February 18, Dr. 
] Macnamara asked the Home Secretary whether 
1 his attention had been called to the increase in 
' cigarette smoking amongst boys; and whether, 
in view of the effects of this practice, he would 
consider the desirability of taking steps to prohibit 
smoking by boys in Government employment; to 
invite the co-operation of employers of juvenile 
labour in putting down the practice, and to call the 
attention of all school authorities to the matter 
through the agency of the Board of Education. 

Mr. Akers-Douglas said that he had no power to 
take the action suggested, but he was disposed to 
think that the public attention directed to the ques- 
tion would be of effect. There was, as the hon. 
member knew, a Committee sitting on the physical 
question, and he would bring that question under 
their notice. Possibly they would consider the points 
raised by it. 








THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


35 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series I. 


MANKIND IN THE MARRING & MENDING. 

By T. N. KELYNACK, M.D., M.R.C.P., 

Ho>i. Secretary of the Society for the Study of Inebriety. 

'No. 3.—ALCOHOL, AND ITS ACTION. 


T HE evils which collectively we designate 
Alcoholism are dependent on the pernicious 
influence of alcohol on human tissues. It is 
well to remember, also, that associated with 
alcohol in intoxicating drinks there are often other 
deleterious constituents. The drinker frequently 
falls a ready prey to other disease-producing 
influences. Alcohol is not only an excitant of morbid 
conditions, but leads to such conditions as are pre¬ 
disposing \.o disease. The scientific study of alcoholism 
necessitates a broad outlook, keen analytical insight, 
patient research, and absolute truthfulness. The 
problem is highly complex. All exaggeration of 
language, looseness in expression, and unscientific 
dogmatism must be studiously and strenuously 
avoided. The extent of the evil is widespread and its 
manifestations are manifold; and while the terrible 
results are hidden, neglected, or forgotten, it is 
essential that instruction should be given in 
simplicity and completeness. Apathy and ignorance 
must be overcome by sound knowledge. 

Alcohol and Cell Life. 

The material basis of life, as far as we know it, 
consists of a highly complex substance termed 
protoplasm. The unit of animal and vegetable life is 
the cell. Numerous researches have clearly demon¬ 
strated the fact that alcohol exerts a poisonous action 
upon all protoplasm. The more highly developed 
the cell, and the more differentiated the protoplasm, 
the more detrimental is the toxic action of the 
alcohol likely to prove. Teachers should be 
acquainted with the results of recent investigations 
into the action of alcohol on various forms of animal 
and vegetable tissue. [See Professor G. Sims Wood- 
head’s Eees-Raper Lecture, The British Journal oj 
Inebriety , January, 1904, price is.] 

Alcohol and Human Tissues. 

It has long been known that the bodies of 
drunkards manifested characteristic evidences of 
disease, gross lesions as they have been termed. 
Modern methods of research have now shown that 
alcohol, even when taken in quantities usually 
considered harmless, is capable of producing much 
derangement in the function of many of the cells of 
man’s body. [See various papers in The Medical 
Temperance Review. ] 

Individuals vary considerably in their susceptibility 
to alcohol. Some offer a refractoriness which is a 
powerful protective influence, while others are 
peculiarly predisposed to re-act to the alluring action 
of alcohol. Either through natural or acquired 
conditions the tendency to fall victims to alcoholism 
varies greatly : some teetotalers are doubtless practi¬ 
cally immune to the inducements to indulge, while 
not a few individuals have such low powers of 
resistance that the enticements of alcohol readily 
exert such influence as rivets the fetters of a life-long 
thraldom. [Consult Sir Dander Brunton’s article on 
“The Influence of Stimulants and Narcotics on 
Health,” in Cassell’s “ Book of Health.”] 

In studying the action of alcoholic drinks many 
actors must be considered—the form of beverage, its 
concentration and dilution, its toxicity, the quantities 
imbibed, and the time and manner in which it is 
taken. It is well to remember that a great part of the 
deterioration of body, degradation of mind, and over¬ 
throw of morals, arises from the actions of conditions 
associated with or dependent upon alcoholism, that is 
to say much of the evil is indirectly caused by alcohol. 
It is essential to bear this very clearly in mind when 


dealing with the various phases of the drink problem. 
[See “ Drink, Temperance, and Legislation,” by 
Arthur Shadwell, M.A., M.D. London : 1902.] 

Alcohol—A Narcotic. 

In the popular mind alcoholic drinks are still 
viewed, and, indeed, called “ stimulants.” 

Many well-educated persons continue to believe in 
the old-time teaching that in spirits a safe, ready and 
reliable “stimulant” is available in case of sudden 
illness. This misconception has resulted in much 
disaster. There is no need to discuss here the place 
of alcohol in medicine, but it is necessary to clearly 
state that a self-administration of alcohol, with a view 
to supply such an effect as is designated “stimula¬ 
tion,” is fraught with danger, and is to be most 
strongly deprecated. In these days of stress and 
strain, the warning is much needed. Many women 
are becoming entangled in the maze of inebriety, from 
which escape is difficult and sometimes seems almost 
impossible. Alcohol, in the light of modern science, 
must be considered a narcotic poison. 

Alcohol —not a Food. 

It is remarkable how long-lived error is. The 
unthinking worker pays but little heed to the findings 
of science, and still in many circles the belief 
remains that alcoholic beverages are of service as 
nutrients, that, in short, alcohol is a food. Alcohol has 
no claim to be given a place among foods. As a 
matter of fact in most drinkers it would seem to 
interfere with the oxidation of tissues, and the 
building up of the body is consequently interfered 
with. It certainly does much to derange the natural 
mechanism for the excretion of waste products. And 
recent research has gone far to show that its action 
on the intestinal tract is often such as to seriously 
impair the protective arrangements of the body, and 
offer facilities for the invasion and action of disease- 
producing agents. 

Alcohol and Human Life. 

Alcohol tends to produce deranging conditions, 
whereby the activity of almost all the essential tissues 
is impaired. 

The heart and vessels suffer; morbid changes 
occur in connection with the respiratory system ; the 
alimentary tract becomes the seed of morbid pro¬ 
cesses ; and practically all the energies of the body 
are depreciated. And most important of all, the 
highest, most essential, and most elaborate of man’s 
tissues—the nervous system, usually suffers most. 
The bearing of this on the making and marring of 
men I shall have to deal with later. 

The drunkard is generally a short-lived sinner. 
The publican has an uninsurable life. Even the care¬ 
fully selected, medically examined, and strictly 
moderate drinkers, compare disadvantageously 
with the total abstainer, as recent researches into 
assurance statistics abundantly proves. [See recent 
paper by Mr. T. P. Whitaker, M.P., on “ Alcoholic 
Beverages and Life Assurance: The Comparative 
Mortality of Abstainers and Non-Abstainers.”] 

Alcoholism and Predisposition to Disease. 

Under present conditions of life everyone is 
constantly exposed to the attacks of influences 
making for disease. It is well, therefore, that it 
should be clearly understood that while alcohol is 
capable of initiating disease processes , alcoholism is 
a most important influence in pre-disposing to 
disease and;aecidents. [See British Journal of Inebriety , 
January, 1904, p. 140, el seq.~\ Unfortunately, even the 
total abstainer cannot well escape from some of the 
dangers threatening all members of the community 
from the prevalence of an alcoholic environment. 

In the development of the individual, and in the 
upbuilding of the race, alcohol hampers and hinders. 

G. F. Watts, the great picture-preacher, tells us 
that his motto has long been, I he Utmost for the 
Highest, and it well enforces a lesson which all 
teachers of temperance should ever be ready to 
present in a spirit of sincere sympathy and with 
strict scientific precision in manner and method of 
expression. 






3 6 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series II. 


SIMPLE SCIENCE CHATS. 

By Charxks Harvey, 

Secretary , Kent Band of Hope Union. 

No. 3.-SOME OF THE ENEMY’S SECRETS. 


BLACKBOARD SUMMARY. 


PRODUCTION OF ALCOHOL 


THINGS NEEDED- 

SUGAR. WATER. YEAST. 


Yeast changes Sugar into Alcohol. 
Hops make Beer taste bitter. 


Lesson connected. 

E are here assembled as a Band of Hope. 
There is one thing common to all of us. 
Each one has promised to abstain from all 
kinds of intoxicating drinks. We have 
already learnt that we cannot live without 
drinking, and that water is “nature’s beverage.” In 
our last chat we found that all kinds of intoxicating 
drinks contain some proportion of a liquid called 
“Alcohol ” or “Spirit of Wine.” This is the reason 
why they are called “Intoxicating” or “Poisonous.’' 

Production of Alcohol. 

Children are often puzzled to knowhow the alcohol 
gets into these intoxicating drinks. It is no un¬ 
common thing for them to say “ that the brewer puts 
the alcohol into the beer.” Now the brewer does 
nothing of the kind. Let us, then, learn exactly how 
the alcohol is produced.- We must here remember 
we are talking about the alcohol found in intoxicating 
drinks. There are many other kinds, but they need 
not now concern us. We want to know how alcohol 
gets into ales, beers, wines and spirits. The name 
given to this alcohol is Ethylic Alcohol. To produce 
this, three things are necessary : sugar and water and 
yeast. [It must be understood that in these chats 
simplicity and clearness are aimed at, and a lot of 
technical points that would confuse children’s minds 
are purposely omitted.] 

Sugar. 

The first thing wanted to make ethylic alcohol is 
“sugar.” This, of course, may be easily obtained by 
buying the well known sugar of commerce. Some¬ 
times the brewer does this; he must also remember 
that sugar is found in many things—sugar of milk, 
grape sugar, beetroot sugar, and so forth. All things 
with sugar in them may be employed in the pro¬ 
duction of ethylic alcohol. That is why “wines ” can 
be made from the juices of fruits. These juices 
contain sugar. The brewer usually obtains his sugar 
in a rather roundabout way. 

Barley. 

He goes to the farmer and buys from him barley. 
But is there any sugar in barley? No. This sounds 
rather funny; the brewers buy barley to get sugar, 
and it contains no sugar. Well, examine a grain of 
barley. It is composed principally of starch, little 
cells packed full of it; but, besides this, each grain 
contains a little germ of life, and, given proper 
conditions, this germ begins to grow. Heat and 
moisture are the two chief conditions : given these, 
germination is set up; and, as it grows, it needs 
sugar. It has not any, only starch, but the wonderful 
thing is the starch changes into sugar. We might 


ask, “Why did not God make the barley grain of 
sugar to start with ? ” If He had, directly the grain 
was placed in the ground and the rain came down, 
the sugar would have been all dissolved and run 
away, leaving the little germ helpless. Starch does 
not dissolve in cold water. So God’s wisdom is 
right. In growth the starch gradually changes into 
sugar. 

Malting. 

The brewer knows this. So he buys the finest 
barley. This he will soak in a tank of water for 
about forty-eight hours. Then, taking it out, he 
puts it into heaps about twenty to thirty inches deep, 
for about twenty hours, and heat is generated. These 
warm, damp grains now begin to grow, and the work 
of changing the starch into sugar is begun. If left in 
such big heaps, the growths would be too rapid. So 
the grains are spread on the malt-house floor, first to 
the depth of about twelve inches, and this is reduced 
day by day to five or six inches. The grains are 
constantly turned over with wooden shovels so as to 
be equally exposed to light, heat, and moisture. The 
growth is thus uniform. This process lasts from ten 
to fourteen days, at the end of which time little buds, 
sometimes half an inch long, may be seen on the 
grains. The starch of the grains has now all 
disappeared and sugar has taken its place. If allowed 
to go on growing, the sugar would he consumed. So 
the brewer has to stop growth. He does this by 
frying the grains over a kiln. The shoots, called 
maltcombs, soon drop off, and the brewer is left with 
his malt. It is well-known that ales and beers are of 
different colour. If the brewer wants pale ale, he 
fries his malt very little, just to give it a light colour; 
if porter or stout are needed, then the malt is made 
black in colour. 

Sweet Wort. 

The brewer has now to get the sugar out of the 
malt. This he does first by crushing the malt and 
then placing it in a huge vessel called a “ mash tun.” 
Hot water (not boiling) is then added, and two things 
occur ; first, the sugar is washed out of the malt and 
also the colour of the malt is given to the water. 
This process usually takes about four to six hours. 
The liquid is now drawn off and is called “ sweet 
wort.” The grains, which you may often see coming 
from a brewery iu cart-loads, are taken away to feed 
the pigs. It is not nourishing food the brewer 
wants, but sugar. You must have all heard of hops 
in connection with brewing. It is at this point that 
they come in. They are boiled with the “ sweet 
wort,” and impart to it a bitter flavour. This is the 
chief reason hops are used; but, if hops are scarce, 
then other bitter flavours are used. 

Fermenting. 

The “sweet wort” is now cooled, and then 
run into large square vessels, about three feet 
deep, called fermenting vats. There the last im¬ 
portant process takes place. When the vats are 
full, yeast is added. Yeast is really a little live 
plant, very tiny, about part of an inch 

across. It is this yeast plant that works the wonder¬ 
ful change. Iu the “sweet wort,” now a warm 
sugary liquid, the little yeast cells begin to multiply 
at a very rapid rate. They feed upon the little 
albumen found in the liquid, and at the same 
time split the sugar into two poisons—(x) Carbonic 
acid gas ; (2) Alcohol. The alcohol being 

liquid, and nearly as heavy as water, and very 
fond of water, clings to it and so stays with it, 
the carbonic acid gas passes away as bubbles. 
The fermentation must not go on too long or the 
alcohol will change into vinegar. So it is stooped, 
and the liquid, now known as beer, is drawn off into 
casks, and the object of the brewer is gained—the 
alcohol is produced. 

[Any friend, wishing to give this address, is recom¬ 
mended to send 3s. 3d. to the Trade Manager, 
Temperance Institute, Newcastle-ou-Tyne, for ten 
glass tubes in case, prepared by Mr. A. Houldershaw, 
F.C.S. They form a good illustration of the various 
processes.] 















THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


37 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series III. 


ALCOHOL AND HISTORY. 

By Charles Wakery, 

Secretary, United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 


No 2.—DRINK AND THE ANCIENTS. 


Y OU will learn from this address that ancient 
nations, even those famous for learning and 
refinement, fell, as some modern peoples have 
done, under the baneful influence of strong 
drink. 

The Egyptians. —Early records show that the 
simple juice of the grape or unfermented wine, was in 
use amongst the Egyptians, and that the use of 
intoxicating wine was unlawful. We are told that 
the Kings of Egypt, who held the Sacred Office of 
Priests, abstained altogether from its use. A certain 
King, however (Psammeticus), about 640B.C., learned 
to take intoxicating wine, but historians tell us that 
he and his successors were only allowed a small 
quantity at their meals. 

The Persians. —The Persians, in their primitive 
state, likewise refrained from the use of wine, except 
at festive entertainments. Even on those occasions 
the excessive use of it was forbidden by the law. 

The Romans. —During the first stages of their 
national existence the Romans were very simple and 
temperate in their manners. During the existence of 
the Republic, drunkenness was almost unknown 
amongst them, and wine did not come into general 
use until about 600 years after the foundation of the 
Commonwealth. The regulations of the Romans at 
this period, in relation to the use of intoxicating 
liquors, were very severe, and strongly enforced. 
“Amongst the Romans it was a strict law, that no 
woman (bond or free) should drink wine; nor any 
male until he had attained to the age of thirty years.” 
Fatua Fauna, the wife of Faunus, was scourged to 
death with myrtle rods by her own husband for 
drinking a pot of wine. 

The Greeks. —The Greeks, during the earlier and 
more prosperous part of their career, were temperate 
and sober in their habits. Solon, the law-giver, 
enacted that “ Any Archon (or Chief Magistrate), who 
should be seen overcharged with wine, should suffer 
death." Amongst the Greeks Wine Taverns were held 
in such bad repute that we are told “ No person, not 
even a servant, who pretended to any regular morals, 
durst be seen to eat or drink in such houses." To have 
been sitting in a tavern or public-house was a 
sufficient reason to deny an Archon admission into the 
Senate. 

The Spartans. —These remarkable people looked 
upon intemperance with great detestation, and their 
laws specially enforced the virtue of sobriety. Plutarch 
relates that the Spartans were in the habit of exhibiting 
their slaves, or helots, in a state of drunkenness to 
their children, in order to excite in them a disgust of 
indulgence in wine. One law-giver, Zaleucus the 
Locrian, made it death for any man to drink wine 
unmixed with water, unless prescribed by a physician. 

National Decadence. 

In course of time, unhappily, the laws against 
drinking became lax, and the nations, one by one, 
sank under the advances of luxury and intemperance. 
A few wise and upright leaders opposed this evil 
tendency, and one ruler, Dycurgus, even went so far 
as to have all the vines in his kingdom destroyed, but 
the love of strong drink had got the upper hand, and 
the degradation of public morals and the decline of 
national prosperity followed. 

The Worship of Bacchus.— Festivals were held 
amongst the Greeks and Romans in honour 


of Bacchus the “ God of Wine,” and at these 
the greatest drinkers were rewarded with a 
crown of gold and a cask of wine. Even the 
Archons or Chief Magistrates joined in the pro¬ 
ceedings and had a share in their management. 
These festivals always closed with drunken, dis¬ 
gusting scenes, in which the populace joined. Plato 
informs us that, during the Bacchic festivals he 
witnessed the whole of the city of Athens drunk. 
Similar practices existed at the festivals held in 
honour of Comus the god of feasting and revelry. 
This deity was usually represented as a young man, 
in a state of intoxication, and crowned with the 
drunkard’s garland. 

Severus, the historian, relates a sad example of the 
degradation and vice of the youth of these times. 
“The Roman youths,” he says, “would commit the 
most dreadful crimes in order to have their palates 
gratified ; and most of the people would come drunk 
to the public assemblies, where they had to advise ou 
matters of great consequence to the state.” 

Royal Drunkards.—And not only the common 
people, but kings and emperors gave way to the vice" 
of drunkenness. Aristotle tells us that Dionysius the 
younger, tyrant of Sicily, would sometimes continue 
in a state of intoxication for ninety days at a time, a 
habit, the frequent recurrence of which reduced him 
at last to total blindness. The Flmperor Zeno daily 
drank himself into a state of insensibility. Finally, 
when he was in one of these fits of inebriety, his 
consort, Ariadne, got rid of him by haviug him buried 
alive. 

Ancient Examples of Abstinence. 

Fortunately, ancient history gives us many examples 
of those who, in spite of national drunkenness and 
demoralisation preserved their integrity and sobriety. 
Cyrus, for instance, who was early trained in sober 
habits, refused, when arrived at more mature age, to 
depart from the frugal practice of his early years. 

Cyrus and the “ Poison Cup.”—Xenophon relates 
how when on a visit to his grandfather, Astyages, 
Cyrus was asked by the King why he did not 
swallow some of the wine of which he himself, the 
King, had drunk. “Because, truly,” replied the 
youth, “I was afraid there had been poison mixed 
with the cup ; for when you feasted your friends upon 
your birth-day, I plainly found the slave had poured 
you out all poison. ’ “And how, child,” replied 
Astyages, “ didyou know this ? ” “Truly,” said Cyrus, 
“ because I saw you all disordered in body and mind; 
for first, what you do not allow us boys to do, that 
you did yourselves: for you all bawled together, aud 
could learn nothing of each other, then you fell to 
singing very ridiculously; and without attending to 
the singer, you said he sang admirably; then every 
one telling stories of his own strength, you rose and 
fell to dancing, but without all rule and measure, for 
you could not so much as keep yourself upright, then 
you all entirely forgot yourselves; you, that you were 
king, and they that you were their governor; and 
then for the first time, I discovered that you were 
celebrating a festival, where all were allowed to talk 
with equal liberty, for you never ceased talking.” 

Homer’s Praise of Sobriety.—The sobriety^ which 
ennobled Cyrus and helped him to live to an advanced 
age, full of vigour, and in the enjoyment of health 
aud prosperity, is thus praised by Homer, who makes 
Hector, one of his heroes, say 

“ Far hence be Bacchus' gifts (the chief rejoin’d', 

Inflaming wine, pernicious to mankind, 

Unnerves the limbs, and dulls the noble mind. 

Let chiefs abstain, and spare the sacred juice 
To sprinkle to the gods, its better use.” 

How well if all ancient Kings and Chiefs had sho wn 
this wisdom ! But, alas ! leaders and peoples learned 
to love “inflaming wine.” Persia, Greece, aud Rome 
came under the spell of the destroyer, and fell from 
their high aud proud estate among the nations. It is 
one of the objects of the Band of Hope to make sure 
that England shall never fall from the same evil 
course. 





THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


58 

Band of Mope Addresses.—Series IV. 

BIBLE CLASS TALKS. 

By the Rev. David Heath, oj Derby. 

No. 2.—IDODS. 

[Read Isaiah xi. 18—25; Romans i. 18—23; Psalm cxxxv. 15—18.] 

N idol is an image used in worship. Some ot 
these idols are large, and require lofty buildings, 
others are very small, and may be easily carried 
in the pocket or purse. Some idols are 
carved out of great pieces of timber or stone, 
and others are made of metal—gold, silver, brass, or 
iron. We are told that many of these metal idols are 
made in Birmingham ! The place where they are 
made does not matter. Neither is it of importance 
what they are made of. The use to which they are 
put is the principal thing. 

Some idols are elaborate and wonderful in their 
design, such as the Goddess of Mercy, which the 
girls and women of China think so much of. Other 
idols are horrible and even disgusting looking objects. 
It may be supposed, however, that they all appeal 
in one way or another to the worshippers. 

The more intelligent of the worshippers would say 
they do not worship the image that is set up, but the 
supreme being who is invisible, and who ruleth in 
heaven and on earth ; but for the most part, isolators 
think of these images as their gods. 

To us who have been born and brought up in 
a Christian land, with the Christian idea of God put 
into our minds in so many ways, it is as sad as it is 
strange that the human mind can ever fall so low as 
to “change the glory of the incorruptible God for 
the likeness of an image of corruptible man, and of 
birds, and four-footed beasts and creeping things.’’ 

With such ideas in their minds, and such objects 
before their eyes, it is no wonder the worshipper 
becomes ignorant and debased. In the Psalm 
referred to above it is written—“They that make 
them shall be like unto them.” A great truth under¬ 
lies this sentence. 

It is therefore not surprising th^t “ the idols of the 
nations,” which are dumb, and blind, and deaf, and 
dead, but which in so many instances represent the 
animal passions, and help to make these passions 
masterful, lead their worshippers to great cruelties or 
to great immorality, e.g., physical torture, the 
sacrifice of human life, vice and intemperance. This 
shows the wisdom of the second commandment, 
which forbids bowing down to, or serving the like¬ 
ness of, any form that is in heaven, or earth, or water 
(Deut. v. 8). There was great need for such a com¬ 
mandment, for the hearts of men were prone to this 
evil, as the history in the Old Testament shows. In 
Jeremiah 1 . 38, Babylon is described as “a land of 
graven images, and they are mad upon idols.” 

Before the Corinthians, to whom Paul wrote, be¬ 
came Christians they were idolators, and their 
meetings and festivals were little better than occasions 
of licentiousness and intemperance. When the great 
change took place in their faith they had hard work 
to break off their former evil habits. (1 Cor. xi.) 
When they came to “ the Eord’s Supper ” they used in¬ 
flaming intoxicating wines such as they used in idol 
worship, instead of the pure juice of the grape 
which the Christian Church generally used ; and they 
drank to excess, so that a solemn act of remembrance 
of Christ became an occasion of intemperance. 

This shows the power of habit, and the hold which 
alcohol has upon those who use it. It shows, also, 
that alcohol acts just the same upon people, though it 
be used in connection with the most sacred service; and 
therefore that the Church should in no way sanction 
its use. We have known people who have been freed 
lrom the drink tyranny who have refused the cup 
when intoxicating liquor has been used in the 
Sacrament, and we could not blame them. Every 
Church should act more wisely and more charitably 
than to place such temptation to the lips of any. 


Is there any other form of idolatry than an image 
made of wood, stone, or metal? The Apostle John 
(ijohn v. 21), says, “Tittle children, keep yourselves 
from idols.” lie may have meant the heathenish 
ido’s. It is more likely that he meant keep your¬ 
selves from putting anything in God’s place in your 
thoughts: never allow any physical interest or 
pleasure to hinder the progress of your mind ; and 
especially never let these things interfere with duty. 
If you do any of these, you set up an idol in your 
heart [see Ezekiel xiv. 7], and whatever gets there 
will be a great controlling force in life, and will be 
hard to dislodge. “Covetousness is idolatry” 
(Eph. v. 5). The pursuit of anything that is in its nature 
evil, is, from the Christian point of view, idolatry; 
so is excessive attention to any object which is in 
itself right though of secondary importance. A young 
man “went mad ” over athletics; it seemed as if he 
could think and talk of nothing else. But one day a 
friend who had observed this, quietly said to him, 
“ Don’t you think there is something better worth 
living for than that ? ” The question was like an 
arrow that found its mark. 

The idolising of the playthings of life is having a 
serious effect upon the character and even the worldly 
prospects of great numbers of young men. It is 
robbing them of the grit that stalwart and master 
minds are made of, and hence in the earnest race of 
life they are being left behind. A large employer of 
labour said recently, that notwithstanding the better 
educational process through which youths now-a- 
days go, he found it increasingly difficult to find 
capable and reliable young men to fill the higher 
positions of responsibility as they became vacant, and 
he attributed it to the fact that their minds are pre¬ 
occupied with outside interests to such a degree that 
their office and factory work becomes irksome to 
them. 

What is it but idolatry of a very coarse type indeed 
that fastens a man to the use of strong drink ? 
“ Woe unto them that tarry long at the wine.” The 
horrors of heathen idolatry are exceeded by those of 
intemperance. What a wretched slavery it is when a 
man feels irresistibly drawn to the drink. Is there 
any human object more degraded or more pitiable ? 
How mercilessly the drink acts on men ; rich and poor, 
educated and illiterate alike, robbing them of their 
will power (which is perhaps the greatest moral 
disaster that can come upon a man), destroying self- 
respect, hindering all progress in life, and in many 
thousands of instances, in a year bringing its devotees 
to premature death and a drunkard’s grave. And 
yet there are people who resent all suggestion that 
they should give up the custom. Two lads were at a 
Boarding School away from home, and in one of 
their chatty letters to their parents, they said they 
never had beer given them to drink. On reading 
it the foolish mother said, “ Our lads shall not stop 
in that school if they cannot have their beer.” Those 
boys grew to be men , but in middle life the}' were 
both buried in drunkard’s graves; their children 
became drunkards; and their grandchildren “sup” 
beer as if it were water or milk. 

“ The Worship of Bacchus ” was the title of an 
excellent book written years ago by Mr. Ebenezer 
Clarke, an old and true friend of the United Kingdom 
Band of Hope Union, and for many years its 
Treasurer. And some of you may have seen a great 
picture bearing the same title, “The Worship of 
Bacchus,” which depicts in striking details the ways 
in which strong drink captivates and then destroys. 
At births and funerals, at weddings and anniversaries, 
at holiday times and at business, in secret and at 
public assemblies, the drink is represented as if it 
were an oblation to the gods. But as it used to be 
said that all the great roads led to Rome, so all these 
drinking customs lead to disgrace and crime, to 
disease and premature death. 

We hope to destroy the temples of this god, and 
turn the people to better ways. We have a hard 
task, but we are succeeding, for alreadj' seven 
millions of people in our land have forsaken the 
worship of Bacchus. 




THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


39 


Medical Men on Temperance 
Teaching in Schools. 


T HE following important petition has 
already been signed by about 15,000 
medical men, and signatures are still 
flowing in :— 

We, the undersigned members of the medical pro¬ 
fession, having constantly before us the serious 
physical and moral conditions of degeneracy and 
disease resulting from the neglect and infraction of 
the elementary laws of hygiene, venture to urge the 
Central Educational Authorities of the United King¬ 
dom (the Board of Education of England and Wales, 
the Scotch Education Department, the Commissioners 
of National Education in Ireland and the Inter¬ 
mediate Education Board of Ireland) to consider 
whether it would not be possible to include in the 
curricula of the public elementary schools, and to 
encourage in the secondary schools, such teaching as 
may, without developing any tendency to dwell on 
what is unwholesome, lead all the children to appre¬ 
ciate at their true value healthful bodily conditions 
as regards cleanliness, pure air, food, drink, &c. 

In making this request we are well aware that at 
the present time pupils may receive teaching on the 
laws of health, by means of subjects almost invariably 
placed upon the Optional Code. By this method 
effective instruction is given to a small proportion of 
the pupils only. This does not appear to us to be 
adequate. We believe that it should be compulsory, 
and be given at a much earlier age than at present. 

It may, perhaps, be useful to call attention to what 
is being achieved in this direction by English-speaking 
nations. In reviewing the steps taken it wdll be 
noted that one of the most prominent subjects with 
which the various countries have found it necessary 
to deal, is the question of the nature and effects of 
alcohol. 

In the Army schools of this country and of all our 
foreign stations west of Aden, teaching in elementary 
hygiene is compulsory; such teaching including 
Temperance, health and sanitation, special attention 
being drawn to the deleterious effects of alcohol. 

In Canada, with the exception of two provinces, 
hygiene and scientific instruction on the effects of 
alcohol are compulsory subjects in all public 
elementary schools throughout the Dominion. In 
the two excepted provinces (Quebec and Prince Ed¬ 
ward’s Island) teaching on Temperance is given. In 
the Protestant primary schools of the Province of 
Quebec lessons upon Temperance and health are com¬ 
pulsory, while in the Catholic schools instruction in 
hygiene is compulsory, beginning with the fifth year 
of school work. In the books on hygiene authorised 
in the Catholic schools the ill effect of the excessive 
use of alcohol is mentioned, but no special prominence 
is given to Temperance instruction. 

In Victoria (Australia) teaching on health and 011 
the nature and effects of alcohol, is placed on the list 
of compulsory subjects taught in all the public 
elementary schools. 

In South Australia teaching on Temperance is 
regularly carried out. 

Iu Natal instruction is given in the primary schools 
on the laws of health and Temperance, these being 
included in the list of optional subjects. 

The whole question is dealt with still more com¬ 
pletely in the United States of America. There the 
teaching of physiological hygiene, with special refer¬ 
ence to the effects of alcohol and other narcotics, is 
compulsory in all schools under State or federal con¬ 
trol. About twenty-two million children are being 
educated under this system. 

Thus we have shown that in many English speaking 
countries, definite attempts are being made to train 
the rising generation to appreciate from childhood 
the nature of those influences which injure physical 
and mental health. 


Having regard to the fact that much of the de¬ 
generacy, disease, and accident with which medical 
men are called upon to deal, is directly or indirectly 
due to the use of alcohol, and that a widespread 
ignorance prevails concerning not only the nature and 
properties of this substance, but also its effects on the 
body and the mind, we would urge the Board of 
Education of England and Wales, the Scotch Educa¬ 
tion Department and the Irish Education Authorities 
to include in the simple hygienic teaching which we 
desire, elementary instruction at an early age on the 
nature and effects of alcohol. 

We gladly recognise (1) the value of the teaching 
on this subject given in some schools iu Ireland and 
in a proportion of the schools of Great Britain, by 
means of reading primers, moral-instruction talks, 
etc., and (2) the excellence of the occasional Temper¬ 
ance lessons provided in certain schools by voluntary 
organisations : but until the four Central Educational 
Authorities of the United Kingdom include this sub¬ 
ject as part of the system of national education, it 
appears to us that the mass of the pupils must fail 
as at present to receive tbat systematic teaching of 
hygiene and of the nature and effects of alcohol, 
which alone we consider adequate to meet the 
national need. 

Finally, we would venture to urge the necessity of 
ensuring that the training of all teachers shall include 
adequate instruction in these subjects. 

The following are the 

Committee of Distribution. 

Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, M.D. 

Sir Thomas Barlow, Bart., K.C.V.O., M.D. 

Byrom Bramwell, M.D., F.R.C.P., F.R.S.E. 

Sir William Broadbent, Bart., K.C.V.O., F.R.S. 

Sir Lauder Bruuton, M.D., F.R.S. 

William Carter, M.D., F.R.C.P. 

Prof. John Chiene, C.B., LL D., F.R.S.E. 

Mr. Andrew Clark, F.R.C.S., Chairman of Council, 
British Medical Association. 

T. S. Clouston, M.D., Pres. Roy. Coll. Phys., Eldin. 

Prof. D. J. Cunningham, M.D., F.R.S. 

Julius Dreschfeld, M.D., F.R.C.P. 

Prof. Finlay, M.D., F.R.C.P. 

Mr. A. Pearce Gould, F.R.C.S. 

T. Dryslwyn Griffiths, M.D., President British 
Medical Association. 

Sir Victor Horsley, F.R S., F.R.C.S. 

Sir Henry Littlejohn, M.D., P'.R.S.E. 

Mr. Jordan Lloyd, M.S., F.R.C.S. 

Sir William Macewen, M.D., F.R.S. 

Sir John William Moore, M.D., President Royal 
College of Physicians, Ireland. 

Mr. A. W. Mayo Robson, F.R.C.S., Vice-President, 
R C S 

Robert Saundby, M.D., F.R.C.P. 

Prof. C. Hunter Stewart, M.D., F.R.S.E. 

Sir Henry Thompson, Bart., F.R.C.S. 

Sir William Thomson, C.IL, P'.R.C.S. 

Mr. Charles S. Tomes, F.R.C S., F.R.S. 

Sir William Turner, K C.B., P'.R.S., Pres. Gen. 
Med. Council. 

Mr. John Tweedy, F.R.C.S., Pres. Roy. Coll. Surg. 

Sir Samuel Wilks, Bart., M.D., F.R.S. 

Dawson Williams, M.D., F.R.C.P. 

Prof. Windle, M.D., F.R.S. 

Prof. Sims Woodhead, M.A., M.D., F.R.S.E. 


The Committee of the United Kingdom 
Band of Hope Union cordially welcome this 
action of the British Medical Society, and they 
will rejoice if the educational bodies respond 
in any proper sense to the appeal, which is a 
strong one, and which is supported by just the 
class that would influence high educational 
opinion. If soundTemperance teaching should 
be adopted in the schools as a result of this 
special pressure brought to bear on the Educa¬ 
tional Boards, it cannot but be a matter of 
general satisfaction. 




40 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


The action of the British Medical Society 
seems to be full of hope, and every wise step 
should be taken to secure its full success, 
including the forwarding of sympathetic 
expressions from local educational authorities 
to the central bodies. In all action that is 
taken, however, it must be borne in mind that 
the teaching needed by our school-children, 
and the only teaching that can be of real value 
to them, is that alcohol, so far as health is 
concerned, is unnecessary and hurtful, and that, 
its use being physically, socially, and morally 
pernicious, the only safe position in regard to 
it is that of Total Abstinence. If the present 
Education Boards formulate a scheme providing 
such teaching regularly in the schools the re¬ 
sult will be such as will fill the hearts of all 
Temperance reformers with thankfulness and 
gladness. This happy consummation may, 
perhaps, not be speedily reached, but let us 
hope for the best. In the meantime we must 
not for a moment think of dropping any part 
of the work which has been proved to be of 
such value under the “ School Scheme,” and 
in other ways during the past few years, nor 
must we relax in any degree, but carry on 
with more earnestness and zeal than ever, the 
good work of the Band of Hope. 

The Union is prepared to send to any 
friend, free of cost, on application, copies of a 
list of school-books—readers, text-books, &c. 
—in which suitable teaching is given on the 
nature and effects of alcohol. 


Collectors’ Annual Soiree. 


M ONDAY, January 25, saw the great Exeter Hall 
more crowded than usual on the occasion of 
the annual soiree, held by the United King¬ 
dom Band of Hope Union for collectors for the 
Temperance Hospital and the Band of Hope 
movement. Very early in the evening, in fact just 
after the commencement of the proceedings, the 
authorities of the Hall exhibited boards at the Strand 
entrance announcing that the place was quite full, 
and that the doors were closed. The young people 
had been assembling from five to six, and as they 
entered they received bags containing apples, oranges, 
almonds, raisins, andbiscuits. It was just six o’clock 
when the proceedings were begun by Sir Thomas 
Pile, Bart., D.L , taking his position as Chairman in 
the north gallery, accompanied by Uady Pile, Mr. 
Wakely, and several members of the Committee. 

After prayer, and the first hymn, “ Hail, friends of 
Temperance, brothers all,” 

Mr. Wakety mentioned that the Chairman of the 
evening was, during the late Queen’s visit to Ireland, 
the Lord Mayor of Dublin, and, representing the 
Corporation, acted as her host on that occasion. He 
then read a telegram which had just come from the 
Hibernian Band of Hope Union:—“Your Irish 
offspring sends greetings and best wishes, hoping our 
Vice-President (your Chairman to-night) will be of 
great help to the Cause in Blngland.” 

Sir Thomas Pits, who was received with loud 
applause, and who addressed the audience as “ M3 7 dear 
boys and girls,” reminded the children that the 
meeting was theirs, and said that he had no intention 
whatever of addressing the grown-up people on the 
occasion. He came as a Band of Hope boy, and it 
was a very great honour and a very great pleasure for 
him to preside over them. Lady Pile came as a 
Band of Hope girl. (Cheers.) He proceeded: I can 
say for myself that when 1 signed the pledge my 


writing was very round, and, from what I have seen 
of the writing of Lady Pile on the pledge slip, I 
should say that she has improved considerably in her 
caligraphy since that time. We are both proud of the 
two old pledge cards which have found a place on the 
walls of our house. So, you see, we both belong to 
the Band of Hope, heart and soul. (Cheers.) Some¬ 
times, boys and girls, you will be told that the work 
you are doing is not of any great moment. I have 
heard this said, and you will hear it by-and-by. 
When I hear such things as these I always think of a 
passage in a speech made by one of the greatest 
of statesmen at a large meeting of Band of Hope 
workers many years ago, who wound up his speech in 
these words. “ God prosper you,” said he, “you are 
helping to fill up the cracks and crevices in the 
foundation of the country.” But you are doing more 
than that ; you are making the nation free and sober. 
May I ssy to you, boys and girls, “ stick to it ” ? Do not 
be put off or discouraged. No one will ever regret 
having signed the Band of Hope pledge or having 
been connected with Band of Hope work. 

You will find a great many people who say that 
Temperance work is not progressing, but this is not 
true. I can remember when drink was found on the 
table of nearly every respectable family, when it was 
a fixed custom to take wine, and when the use, even, 
of Sunday School rooms was refused to Bands of 
Hope; whilst to-day, in my country, there is not one 
minister in the community to which I belong who is 
not a pledged teetotaler; and there is, I think, not a 
single Protestant Church in Ireland without a Band 
of Hope. If it is not the case, also, in England, it 
ought to be. Then, again, when we remember that 
the present Parliament has passed a Bill for Ireland 
refusing to issue new public-house licences, we may 
well say that we have made a step forward. What is 
good for Ireland in this matter would certainly be 
good for England, too. Whether we be Conservatives 
or Liberals we should not give any Government which 
tries to interfere with the will of the people and with 
the will of the magistrates in this matter any support. 
No more retrograde step could be taken to foist on 
the people and bolster up a trade which was ruining 
and cursing so many of our homes. 

I can heartily congratulate you on your great work, 
and very specially because of the Temperance 
Hospital which you are helping and which is a noble 
witness—demonstrating the fact that alcohol is not 
indispensable even in serious cases of disease. As a 
lady said in Ireland, the doctors had a great deal to 
answer for. I can only say in closing, God prosper 
you in your work. Enlist every man, boy, and girl in 
your ranks. Try and get other people to join you. 
Remember that the opportunities you have at present 
for getting good and doing good are daily getting 
fewer. When you, yourselves, have gone, let it be 
said that you have well doue your duty to your Cause 
and your country. Therefore, with hearts aglow with 
enthusiasm, let us every one be up and doing, 
remembering that too soon the night will come 
when no man can work ; and then may it be said of 
each one, “ He hath done what he could.” (Loud 
applause.) 

Mr. William Hayward, the Lightning Manipulator, 
then played a lively galop on his Xylophone 
(made of pine-sticks), and Mr. J. D. Saul played 
“Killarney,” as a solo on the handbells. Then 
came the 

SPECIAL ADDRESS TO THE CHILDREN. 

The Rev. Mathias Lansdown, of Trinity Congrega¬ 
tional Church, Brixton, at once arrested the attention 
of the vast crowd of young people by the cheery and 
jubilant tone in which he told them that the next 
quarter of au hour belonged to them and to him, 
and, said he, we mean to have it to ourselves. It 
was his privilege to speak to the young folks; let 
who would speak to the old fogies ; but, for himself, 
he preferred young lambs to old sheep, and so did 
everybody else. Kittens were much more interesting 
than cats, and j 7 oung folks than old folks. Now that it 
was clear that the young people were the most 
important part of all audiences, he went on to say that 





THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


4 1 


those of them who would become ministers and 
speakers would find it a good thing to start with a 
text. So would he now. It should be short and 
simple, one word: a word they were very familiar 
with; one they could easily remember, one they 
ought never to forget; the word was “ Pledge.” He 
would not keep them very long; but they might 
think of the text for a moment or two. In spite of 
all the Education Acts, they could all spell the word 
(and the whole audience spelt it in clear and decisive 
tones). There were six letters in the word, and each 
one would suggest a word. 

P for Protection. 

The pledge will always be a splendid protection. 
Those who read the newspapers knew that there was 
a good deal of talk going for and against the 
advantages of Protection; but, in another sense, that 
great hall was then full of Protectionists (laughter); 
all were Protectionist there, to protect themselves 
from the scourge of strong drink. Then Mr. 
Lansdown showed how the pledge was a protection to 
them. Suppose those stupid Japanese and Russians 
were to go to war, and when one side began to fight, 
the others were able to say—“ No thank you, we don’t 
take any,”—they would be protecting themselves and 
their families in a way. So when we grow up, and 
people ask us to take wine or beer, we must say, ‘‘No, 
thank you; we don’t take it.” The reason was that 
alcohol was as great a foe as shell and shot. They 
would, therefore, have nothing to do with it. They 
would be thorough-going, and have no shilly-shally 
hesitation about the matter. (Applause.) They 
would speak out plainly and say, “No, we have 
signed the pledge.” Then those who offered them 
the drink, if they were fair-minded people, would 
not tempt them any more. So now it was plain that 
the Pledge meant Protection. 

E FOR TEVER. 

Their pledge was a splendid lever. They knew what 
a lever was. A lever had been described as that 
which they used when they pressed one thing on 
another to lift a third. Did they know the name of 
the man who discovered it ? He was born about 300 
years before Christ, and was named Archimedes. 
When he had made the great discovery, though he 
only first used it on a small scale, he said, “ Lookhere, 
if I could only find somewhere to stand onto work 
the lever, I would move the world.” This was our 
lever—the pledge ; and we might say what old 
Archimedes said. The world is in the mud ; and if 
they were to ask what kept it there, and what would 
lift the poor old world out of the mud, he would 
answer, “The pledge of total abstinence from all 
alcoholic liquors.” (Cheers.) Boys and girls, forget 
not the value of the lever of the pledge. If they 
would only be true to the pledge they had taken, 
they would soon be able to lift up the old world from 
bad to better, and from misery to peace and pros¬ 
perity. What was the next letter ? 

E for Explanation. 

So many big people were so stupid. As Thomas 
Carlyle had once said, people are mostly fools. But 
whether that was too severe or not, it was evident 
even to boys and girls, that a great many big 
people were much excited just now about some 
subject that filled a large space in the papers. They 
called one another names, and had some difficulty to 
speak calmly. What did they want to do ? It seemed 
as though they wished to turn little loaves into big 
ones, or some such thing ; to find work for those who 
had no work; to make the land yield more, and so on. 
That was the very thing the Band of Hope was trying 
to do: our pledge was the explanation. We wanted 
little loaves turned into big ones ; we wanted to find 
plenty of work for those who were out of work ; and 
we wanted to see those who were starving, because 
their money was wasted in drink, stop the drinking 
and have bread enough to eat. (Applause.) Archi¬ 
medes discovered more than the principle of the lever. 
The King of that time had ordered a golden crown, 
and artificers set to work to make it. When it was 
brought to the King, his Majesty thought it was not 


all pure gold. He was puzzled to know what to do ; 
that was how to test the metal of which the crown 
was composed. He sent round to the wise men to 
seek a plan of testing it. They, too, were sorely 
puzzled. At length, Archimedes, the philosopher, 
who had been thinking deeply on the matter, 
discovered how to make the test. He was in his 
bath when he found it out; the thought so 
excited him that he rushed out, and shouted, 
“Eureka!” (I have found it.) Some people who 
thought they had found a remedy for some of the 
national evils a few months ago were something like 
Archimedes in his bath; at any rate, they had been 
in hot water ever since. (Daughter.) But he (Mr. 
Dansdown) wanted these young people to understand 
who has the right to call out “ Eureka.” It was the 
teetotalers. (Applause.) They knew the secret. 
They knew the way to find work for those who had 
no work; they knew how to save money from the 
intoxicating cup. They wanted good sound commerce 
and trade, and the way to get more was to send the 
money they had into the best channels. (Applause.) 
Then they went to the next letter. 

D was a Declaration of War. 

When David, the Shepherd Boy, came down into 
the valley of Elah, he heard his brothers talking 
about the challenge which Goliath the giant had 
sent to the armies of the living God. They were 
alarmed: but they did not frighten him. He did not 
say, “Please, I am not on their side; lama little 
chap, and have not taken sides; don’t hurt me.” He 
soon let them know that he was not on the giant’s 
side, he said, “ This is my country, and these people 
represent my God; this is my cause ; and, in the name 
of the Dord of Hosts, I am going out to fight against 
this enemy of the nation.” That was his brave 
declaration of war; and they who were in the Band 
of Hope also made a declaration of war against the 
cruel giant Alcohol. By that pledge they had taken, 
they had enlisted, and they were bound to be brave 
and to bear their part in the great fight in which they 
had engaged. What the next letter taught them was 
quite plain. 

G meant Great Gain. 

They gained many good things by keeping true to 
their pledge. It was good for them in every way; it 
would be hard to put down everything they did gain. 
But among the more prominent were such as these : 
they gained health, as the Temperance Hospital, for 
which they had been so diligently collecting, showed. 
They avoided much waste of money, and so gained 
wealth, with the avoidance of the degradation caused 
by drink ; they maintained their self-respect; they 
learned wisdom ; they obtained comfort, which the 
drinker lost; they secured peace of mind and prepared 
for happiness. Therefore the pledge was a great 
gain. 

E suggested Example. 

As the children grew older they would notice that 
not everybody who drank intoxicants gave way to 
excess. There were many in the habit of drinking, 
who did it without getting drunk. They said it did 
not harm them. But it did harm them, although 
they did not know it. True, they did not stagger 
about the streets, they were never known to fall 
down through drink; they were never taken before 
the Bench, and they managed to keep themselves 
steady to the end. But, what about their example ? 
He knew a Congregational Minister fort5 r years pastor 
of one church who was highly esteemed by everybody. 
But yet, all that time he took his liquor, and never 
helped the cause of Temperance. He was, on the 
other hand, rather fond of snubbing and sneering at 
those who were abstainers. At length he went down 
to an honoured grave. He had never compromised 
himself in the matter of excess—not once. But, Mr. 
Lansdown said, he could tell of some young men who 
tried to follow his example of moderation, and who 
broke down in the attempt, and who at last went 
down to a drunkard’s grave. It was very sad ; 
and all through their trying to do what the good 
minister had just succeeded in doing. Let that 


42 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


terrible example teach them a lesson. The pledge is 
a safe example, and one which everybody, ministers 
and all, might safely set before other people. 
(Applause.) The reverend gentleman concluded by 
telling a pathetic story of a little child who died, and 
whose sister was taken to see the quiet little body 
in the coffin. The hands were so pale and so motion¬ 
less. “ Mother,” said the weeping child, “ that hand 
never struck me.” What a thought for Band of Hope 
boys and girls that the hand that lifts the liquor to 
the lips may often do harm to dear ones without ever 
intending to do so. But the hand that signs the 
pledge hurts no one, but helps many. 

“ Then, never forget the pledge, boys, 

Wherever you may be ; 

Unfurl the Temperance flag, girls, 

Whether on land or sea. 

Life’s duties are before you, 

Trials will sure to come ; 

Never, never forget the pledge, 

Wherever you may roam.” 

(Loud and prolonged applause.) 

A capital display of Musical Drill was then given 
by over a dozen girls from the Camberwell Green 
Band of Hope, under the direction of Mr, W. Rowland 
Hart. The happy girls, clad in Navy blue serge 
gymnastic dresses, trimmed with yellow, went through 
their exercises on the large platform to the eager 
delight of the audience, who cheered them repeatedly; 
the drill included wand exercises, figure marching, 
and ring drill—each done to music, Mr. Kilburn 
presiding at the piano. Later in the evening the same 
squad did further exercises, including dumb-bell 
drill, a flag race, and Indian club drill. Mr. Duncan 
S. Miller delighted and amused the youngsters with 
American airs on his sleigh bells, which he played in 
his famous blanket costume; his colleague, Mr. J. D. 
Saul, performed on the handbells, with which he gave 
snatches of such favourite airs as “The Vicar of 
Bray,” “The Bailiff’s Daughter of Islington,” and 
“ Old Towler,” the latter with an echo effect worked 
from the farthest gallery. Mr. W. Hayward gave two 
selections on the dulcimer, a “ Mikado” hotch-potch, 
and a selection when he was blindfolded, these both 
winning hearty applause. Mr. Miller and Mr. Saul 
also performed a duet with sleigh bells and handbells, 
“ Little Fisher Maiden,” this, also, being loudly 
cheered. Perhaps the item the smaller members of 
the audience most enjoyed—and possibly their 
elders might be included—was Professor Studd’s 
veutriloquial interlude ; with automata of a man and 
woman, he kept the interest of everybody for twenty 
minutes, showing a mastery of his art which is seldom 
equalled. In musical skill he would rank very well, 
wnile his humorous sallies, and clever management 
of his lifeless images, were simply delightful. 

The prizes to the collectors were presented by Lady 
Pile from the large platform, to which she was accom¬ 
panied by Sir Thomas Pile, Mr. Wakely, Dr. Kely- 
nack, Mr. Fdward Wood, J.P., Mr. Rowland Hill, 
Mr. Frank Adkins, and Mr. Rdwards. 

Mr. Wakely thanked the collectors for the splendid 
results they had achieved, and read out the chief 
items as given below'. 

After her Ladyship had handed the last of the 
prizes, Mr. Wakely publicly thanked her for so kindly 
assisting in this great effort which the children had 
made. 

The hymn, “On this day of gladness,” was then 
sung with great fervour and splendid effect. 

When the lights were turned down, the Rev. G. 
Hrnest Thorn’s fine twentieth-century bioscope was 
shown, this grand display of animated photographs 
concluding the programme. Among the most popular 
views were those illustrating the amusing side of life, 
but all were excellent and won prolonged applause. 

“ God bless our youthful band,” was the last hymn, 
and with it ended another of these delightful annual 
gatherings. 


Collected by Metropolitan Unions. 


£ s. d. 

South-West London .. 128 16 10 

Marylebone .. 97 1 10 

Lambeth .. .. 85 19 11 

West London .. .. 70 10 o 


£ s. d. 

City and North London 63 11 5 

Southwark .. .. 43 2 11 

North-West Middlesex 20 5 9 

Tower Hamlets .. 18 o 5 


Collected by Provincial Unions. 


£ s. d. 

South Essex .. .. 7000 

North Essex .. .. 65 o o 

Surrey .. .. .. 46 6 o 

South Bucks and East 

Berks .. .. 40 11 1 

Oxfordshire .. .. 30 o o 

Bedfordshire .. .. 28 6 o 

Metropolitan Kent .. 27 10 6 


Hampshire and Isle of 

£ 

S. 

d. 

Wight 

2S 

O 

O 

Sussex .. 

18 

O 

O 

Ipswich and Suffolk .. 

15 

8 

IO 

Derbyshire 

13 

12 

4 

Darlington and District 

IO 

O 

0 

Reading and D.istr ct.. 

IO 

O 

0 

Cambridgeshire 

9 

7 

2 


Two hundred and fifty Societies have taken part in 
the London Collection, obtaining on the average 
£1 os. 4 d. each; the following twenty-five Societies 
have obtained £5 and upwards-- 

Stockwell Orphanage 
St. Michael’s, Pimlico 
Heath Street, Hampstead 
Victoria Baptist Chapel, Wandsworth Road 
Fulham Baptist 

Kenyon Baptist Chapel, Clapham 
Studley Road Wesleyan .. 

Bloomsbury Chapel 

City and North London Band of Hope Union Comm 
Camberwell Green Congregational 
Henry Stieet, St. John’s Wood 
Centenary Memorial, Newington 
St. Marys, Fulham 
St. Paul s, Postman Square 
Gospel Oak Wesleyan 
East Hill Baptist, Wandsworth 
Christ Church Senior, Bermondsey 
Horbury Chapel, Kensington 
Church Road, Battersea .. 

Gillespie Road Wesleyan.. 

Hinde Street Wesleyan .. 

Queen’s Road Wesleyan, Wandsworth Roac 
Hornsey Rise Baptist 
Northcote Road, Battersea 
Queen’s Road Congregational, East Dulwich 


individual Collectors:— 

Miss Annette Hill, Bedford Afternoon Band of Hope 
Mrs. Douglas, City and North London Band of Hope Union 
. Miss E. Read,Camberwell Green 
Miss Mundy (Private Collector.) 

Miss F. Wellicome, Great Marlow 
Miss M. Sly, Victoria Chapel, Wandsworth 
Mrs. Minns, Henry Street, St. John’s Wood 
Mrs. Marnham, Heath Street, Hampstead 
Miss D. Vardill, Stockwell Orphanage 
Miss Richardson, Queen’s Road, East Dulwich 
Miss Green, Kenyon Baptist, Clapham 
Miss Henderson, Victoria Chapel, Wandsworth 
Mr. G. F. Ramsay, Christ Church, Bermondsey 
Mr. Edgar Norris, St. Michael’s, Pimlico 
Miss L. Hotting, Victoria Chapel, Wandswoith 
Mr. J. E. Canned (Private Collector) .. 

Miss E. Evans, Stockwell Orphanage.. 

Miss Gwladys Hill, Bedford Afternoon Band of Hope 
Mrs. Cooper (Private Collector) 

Mr. W. Woolgar, Denmark Place, Camberwell 

The following are the total amounts obtained since 
the Collection was originated, and the amounts 
handed to the Temperance Hospital:— 


£ 

s. 

d. 

27 

0 

3 

20 

6 

8 

19 

2 

11 

14 

7 

2 

IO 

4 

8 

IO 

3 

3 

9 

15 

0 

9 

11 

3 

9 

0 

0 

8 

IO 

0 

8 

IO 

0 

8 

2 

6 

8 

2 

0 

8 

0 

7 

7 

15 

4 

7 

8 

4 

6 

II 

0 

6 

0 

0 

5 

14 

0 

5 

10 

11 

5 

7 

6 

5 

6 

11 

5 

4 

8 

5 

2 

0 

5 

1 

0 

ned by 

£ 

s. 

d. 

15 

11 

6 

9 

0 

0 

8 

IO 

0 

7 

IO 

0 

5 

15 

0 

5 

13 

0 

4 

7 

5 

4 

3 

6 

4 

2 

0 

4 

0 

0 

3 

IO 

6 

3 

3 

0 

3 

3 

0 

3 

2 

0 

3 

1 

0 

3 

0 

9 

3 

0 

0 

3 

0 

0 

3 

0 

0 

3 

0 

0 


Total Amounts. 



Handed to Hospital. 



£ 

s. 

d. 


£ s. 

d. 

1875 

.. 70 

13 

4 

1876 

.. 64 3 

4 

1876—7 .. 

..341 

10 

8 

1877 

. . 106 12 

0 

1878 

■■335 

4 

7 

1878 

84 O 

0 

1879 

.. .. 400 

j 1 

3 

1879 

. . IO[ 16 

0 

1880 

•• 523 

17 

0 

1880 

•• 137 15 

5 

1881 

. . 727 

1 

3 

l88l 

.. 182 13 

3 

1882 

. . 906 

ji 

3 

l882 

.. 236 4 

8 

1883 

1,100 

7 

0 

1883 

.. 293 1 

6 

1884 

1)089 

7 

5 

1884 

.. 262 8 

5 

1885 

. . 981 

10 

4 

1885 

.. 246 6 

3 

1886 

1,167 

9 

7 

1886 

• ■ 333 2 

7 

1887 

■ ■ 972 

12 

8 

1887 

.. 23619 

10 

1888 

1.057 

3 

3 

1888 

.. 267 15 

7 

3889 

.. 963 

2 

5 

I889 

.. 243 0 

6 

1890 

■ • 953 

14 

9 

189O 

.. 238 10 

5 

1891 

■ ■ 941 

>3 

3 

189I 

•• 133 17 

11 

1892 

1,081 

10 

7 

1892 

.. 286 16 

4 

1893 

• •975 

4 

I 

1893 

.. 24t 9 

0 

1894 

,.86 3 

2 

I 

1894 

.. 208 7 

10 

1895 

1,076 

13 

6 

1895 

■ • 264 4 

10 

1896 

1,224 

11 

2 

1896 

■• 303 *5 

TO 

1897 

1,206 

5 

I I 

1897 

..301 2 

3 

1898 

• • 715 

! 9 

I 

1898 

.. 161 5 

I 

1899 

1,025 

U 

I 

1899 

.. 252 11 

5 

1900 

1,064 

II 

9 

1900 

.. 254 17 

IO 

1901 

i, T 4 ° 

5 

5 

1901 

.. .. 278 15 

7 

1902 

..969 

19 

2 

1902 

.. 238 12 

9 

1903 

..969 

I 

8 

1903 ■■ 

■■ 238 7 

10 

1904 (say) 

••950 

O 

O 

1904 (say) 

. . 2^0 O 

0 


^25.745 

II 

6 


£6,428 H 

3 



































THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


43 


Can Sands of Hop® be made 
moire efficient by being moirked 
on Sunday School lines? 

By Wm. CarTY, of Dublin. 


OR years the question has occupied my mind, 
“ Can Bands of Hope be made more efficient by 
being worked on Sunday School lines?” 
Several developments in connection with the 
work have strengthened my convictions on this 
matter. They are as follows: — 

(1) The fact that many Bands of Hope have been 
conducted for the most part as “mere amusement 
associations for the children,” through the introduc¬ 
tion of comic songs, frivolous readings, and objection¬ 
able instrumental selections. These, alas! too 
frequently have formed the principal items in many 
Band of Hope programmes, and are frequently ren¬ 
dered by friends of the secretary, many of whom 
possibly have no sympathy with Total Abstinence. 
Such programmes tend to a demoralising influence, 
likely to unfit those present from receiving any benefit 
from the address, which is often restricted to ten 
minutes’ length, and if by chance a speaker attends 
and exceeds that time his services are in the future 
not required. 

( 2 ) The difficulty of procuring suitable secretaries 
(for I maintain that the success of the Band of 
Hope largely depends on the efficiency of the secre¬ 
tary). A Band of Hope secretary (lady or gentleman 
—the former to be preferred) should possess a decided 
Christian character, marked by tender love for 
children, having largely-developed bumps for order, 
patience, and initiative; possessed of an intense 
hatred against the children’s most terrible enemy, 
“ strong drink,” and a burning enthusiasm that will 
surmount all difficulties and discouragements that 
would stand in the way to prevent the ultimate success 
of the society. 

( 3 ) Of late years the great increase of school duties 
compels the children to give longer and closer time to 
study. This frequently interferes with the attendance 
of the children at the Band of Hope meetings, together 
with the fact that many parents are unwilling to allow 
their children out at night. 

( 4 ) Satisfactory as is the scientific teaching of Tem¬ 
perance in the day schools (so efficiently conducted 
under the auspices of the Hibernian Band of Hope 
Union through their lecturer, Mr. J. Barker Wells), 
by which “the heads” of the scholars are being 
thoroughly educated on the nature and effects of 
intoxicating drinks on the human body and mind, 
there still remains a further important step to be 
taken, namely, the education of the children on the 
moral and spiritual side of the question, for we have 
to guard against training a nation of selfish Total 
Abstainers, who are content to be safe themselves 
from the effects of alcohol, but who give little or no 
heed, either by effort, time, or money to help to save 
others; for if we are to expect stability and per¬ 
manency to the Total Abstinence pledge on the part 
of our members, the heart must be educated as well 
as the head. 

Now, where can the moral and spiritual aspect be 
better imparted, apart from the home, than in the 
Sunday School class, in association with the instruc¬ 
tion of God’s Holy Word and the atmosphere of 
prayer ? 

For these reasons I suggest - (First) That our Bands 
of Hope be conducted as part and parcel of the Sunday 
School, and that the teaching staff be the committee 
of management, who will appoint from their number 
a sub-committee, together with the Band of Hope 
secretary, to be responsible for its conduct. (Second) 
That each class (the teacher being a pledged total 
abstainer) be worked as a “ miniature” Band of Hope, 
the teacher to be responsible for the visitation of the 
members in their own homes, and urging every house¬ 
hold to be teetotal. (Third) That the Band of Hope 


Catechism form a part of the instruction imparted in 
every class, and that, wherever possible, the time of 
the Sunday School be extended from one hour to one 
hour and a-quarter; thus the direct Bible teaching 
need in no way be interfered with. (Fourth) That on 
one Sunday in the mouth the superintendent shall 
catechise the scholars on the review of the past 
month’s Temperance lessons. [It is suggested this 
address should not exceed fifteen minutes.] (Fifth) 
That four quarterly meetings be arranged for, viz., on 
the first and third quarter a special week night Band 
of Hope service be conducted in the church, when a 
short sermon or address should be delivered; and on 
the second and fourth quarter a public Band of Hope 
meeting be held, when Temperance songs and recita¬ 
tions be rendered by the members, and a special 
address given, care to be taken to maintain the 
religious character of the meeting. 

I am convinced, after thirty-four years’ working as 
honorary secretary of Sandymount Band of Hope, 
that success is not to be gauged by large meetings. 
God has granted us much success, but largely the 
outcome of small meetings, where direct teaching was 
imparted ; but care must be taken to eliminate every 
feature that does not bear directly on Band of Hope 
work, and to patiently, lovingly, intelligently, and 
prayerfully instruct the children in the truth “that 
intoxicating drinks are a poison and not a food,” an 
enemy to God and a terrible enemy to little children. 
For we urge the children, not only for their own sakes, 
to abstain, but earnestly to labour to enlist other 
children to do likewise, and as “ the children of to-day 
will be the men and women of to-morrow,” we are 
imperatively called upon by our Ford and Saviour, at 
all costs, to “save the children, and thus save the 
nation.” 

-■*>♦>♦>- 

UUhePe Father’s Palace LiiesT 


^ STOOD outside a churchyard lone, 

The night was dark and still; 

1 And, gazing on the shadowed graves, 

' My spirit felt a chill. 

When, lo, I heard a bounding step, 

And, with a cheerful smile, 

A little girl came to my side, 

To cross the churchyard stile. 

Then, by a sudden impulse led, 

Her onward course I stayed ; 

“ My little girl,” I kindly said, 

“ Say, are you not afraid ? 

I know the dead can work no harm— 

This fact my soul assures— 

Yet gloomy tombs might well alarm 
E’en braver hearts than yours.” 

High, from the ivied belfry 
Came showers of rustling leaves ; 

Dow, tangled grass and weeds and ferns 
Day in ungathered sheaves. 

And drifting clouds obscured the moon, 
And scarce one star was seen, 

While passing wind-gusts weirdly waved 
Yew trees and willows green. 

But the wee hand my own still clasped, 
Shrank not with sign of fear ; 

The small foot tapped half playfully, 

The childish voice rose clear. 

“ Why should I be afraid ? ” she cried, 

With eager, trustful eyes, 

“ For just across this churchyard, sir, 

My father’s cottage lies.” 

The little maiden bounded on, 

A welcome glad to find ; 

The little lesson which she taught, 

Thank God, remained behind. 

Why should my heart and courage fail 
When near the home I prize ? 

For just outside death’s shadowy vale 
My Father’s palace lies! 

H. A. B., in the “ War Cry." 







44 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


On Thrift and out* Eldep 
OQembePs.* 

By John H. Caskey, of the Rechabite Order. 


AM conscious that I have before me busy meu 
and women, and those who, as Temperance and 
Sunday School workers, are fully alive to and 
realise the great importance of work amongst 
the young. I will, therefore, endeavour to be brief 
in introducing our subject for your consideration and 
discussion. I do not deem it necessary to apologise 
for bringing a question which I assume you have 
at heart, namely, the welfare of our children. As 
Sunday School and Band of Hope workers, we have 
been again and again perplexed and saddened at the 
great leakage and falling away from the principles 
and truths we nave been teaching. The retention of 
members when they reach the age of fourteen to 
sixteen has been a matter of more than anxious 
thought. The Sunday School, the Christian Church, 
and the Band of Hope worker alike have been looking 
and praying for some connecting link that will keep 
our boys aud girls throughout life to the Church and 
the Temperance cause. I need first mention the evil 
of drink itself. In the September letter to teachers 
by the Liverpool Sunday School Union Morals of 
Youth Committee, it says: “Strong drink is at 
the bottom of excessive infantile mortality and of 
cruelty, neglect, and diseases that make life for many 
a child a hopeless struggle ; the health and character 
of youths and maidens are destroyed, and sober and 
thrifty habits undermined by intoxicants, whose 
whole tendency is dead against our work. No class 
of a Christian worker should be more aroused to the 
dangers of the drink traffic and of drinking habits 
than the Sunday School teacher. There should be 
direct teaching on the physiological effects of alcohol, 
and this should also be made the regular duty of day 
school teachers; we must warn our senior scholars 
from the public-house and loose companions, and 
make it clear that total abstinence is a part of the 
complete ideal life.” 

With these proposals I feel sure we all agree, when 
we remember that thousands of parents, not them¬ 
selves Abstainers, are yet willing for us to teach 
their children the principles of abstinence, aud are 
anxious to see their boys and girls staunch teetotalers; 
this gives us encouragement, yet at times brings 
sadness to our hearts, in our fear that our teaching 
and influence may be (as it often is) destroyed by the 
inconsistent example of seeing the drink on the 
parents’ table at home. 

Quoting Mr. Charles Wakely’s statistics, the writer 
went on to say:—“This is cheering, but there is a 
sad side to this, for he further tells us that the Sunday 
School barely embraces two-thirds of the population 
of school age, and only one-third of the children in 
Sunday Schools are found in Bands of Hope; intoxi¬ 
cating drink and the corruption of the public-house 
do more harm than any other cause to retard the 
work of the Sunday School. BeLween three and four 
millions of Sunday School scholars are without the 
safeguard which teetotalism affords. It is said that 
45,000 yearly are swept into the vortex of intem¬ 
perance who have been Sunday School scholars. This 
must be to all of us appalling; but when we re¬ 
member that so many of our Sunday and other school 
scholars are the victims of a hereditary craving for 
alcohol transmitted by intemperate parents (of these 
there may be a boy or girl in your class with this 
awful tendency), it increases our duty and responsi¬ 
bility.” Dr. Thomas Herbert, a very eminent physician 
of Liverpool, speaking of the evils of drink in this 
relation, says that “ the evil is not in the individual 
who drinks, nor the individual who sells, but in the 
drink itself .” [With this opinion I think we are all 
agreed.] He further says: “The creation of an 
habitual drunkard, epileptic, idiot, lunatic, pauper, 


Read at a Workers’ Conference at Exeter on December 19, 1903. 


of disease of the liver, of the kidneys, of the blood¬ 
vessels, &c., depends mainly upon the inherited 
constitution.” 

Mr. Hugh R. Jones, M.A., and late hon. assistant 
surgeon to the Liverpool Infirmary for Children, and 
Mr. Davis, M.A., B.S., state that “7,700 died in ten 
years who would have lived if they had enjoyed the 
average chance of life which prevails throughout the 
country. The slaughter of the innocents by Herod, 
about which so much is heard, was a very small affair 
compared with this wholesale sacrifice.” Mr. Cham¬ 
berlain has said, “Drink is the curse of the country; 
if I could destroy to-morrow the desire for strong 
drink, we should see our gaols aud workhouses 
empty.” Mr. Charles Buxton, who was a brewer, said 
that “ There were 500,000 homes in this country where 
happiness is never felt, where the mother never 
smiles, and where the children are brought up in 
misery. Why? Because of intemperance.” Surely 
the State might, with such an evil in her midst, insist 
upon definite and systematic Temperance teaching 
in all our schools. This is done in the United States 
of America in all but four States. Dr. Bickerton, an 
eminent authority, says: “Along the educational 
path I believe is to be found the true way in which 
our country can be permanently freed from this great 
evil; it may be slow, but sure.” On physical dege¬ 
neracy, Dr. Kerr, Medical Officer of the London School 
Board, says : “ There is no room for further deterio¬ 
ration of physique of London children.” Mr. 
Charles Booth and Mr. Rowntree have shown that 30 
per cent, of our population are receiving less food 
than has been proved to be necessarv if physical effi¬ 
ciency is to be maintained. Mr. Rowntree gives 
figures as an illustration, plainly indicating that in 
the poorest section of the working classes, where 
under-feeding exists, sickness and death and crime 
were greater in proportion to drunkenness of the 
parents. In York, of children at school, three sec¬ 
tions are given as bad, medium, or good, according to 
their being ill or well-fed; in the poorest 51 per cent, 
were bad, in the middle section 18 per cent, were 
bad, in the highest or best-fed class only 11 per cent, 
were bad; the deaths in the poorest were 247 per 
1,000, in middle 184, in highest 173; examination of 
physical condition of boys leaving school at the age 
of 13 showed of poorest they were 3J inches less 
in height and nibs, less in weight than boys better 
fed. Dr. William Hall, of Leeds, in the Yorkshire Post, 
speaks of an examination of 600 Board School 
children, which entirely confirms Mr. Rowntree’s 
conclusions. He had compared 300 Jewish children 
and 300 Gentile children, the former being nearly all 
of teetotal or very abstemious families. The differ¬ 
ence was of boys twelve years of age, who weighed 
85 lbs., as against an average of 67J lbs. to 77 lbs.; 
and in stature measuring 57! inches in height, as 
against 50J inches among the drinkers’ children; of 
the drinkers’ children, seven to twelve years, 45 per 
cent, were ricketty, of the Jewish children only 27 
per cent.; as a matter of fact, the parents of the Jews 
earned less wages than the drinking parents; so that 
the others could, but for drink, have been the best 
fed. These are terrible figures, and show that with 
this state of things existing how difficult is the work 
of the Sunday School teacher and Band of Hope and 
other workers among the young. The evil exists in 
a larger or lesser degree in all our cities and towns. 
Speaking of the drink curse, Rev. D. J. Hiley says: 
“I say the Church of Christ knows all these things, 
and has known them for a long time, but it is not 
considerably disturbed by it ; it does not appear to 
give it sleepless nights ; and if the Universal Church 
did but express itself, all that politics and legislation 
could do would be done ; the fact is, the drink exists 
by permission of the Universal Church.” 

I would now like to call your attention to the 
value of each Church having as part of its work 
Teinperauce teaching. A paper prepared by Mr. 
Charles Wakely, of the Band of Hope Union, shows 
that of schools with no Bands of Hope, having 
22,777 scholars, 48S joined the Church as members, or 
11% per cent.; and schools having Bands of Hope, 
with a membership of 41,389, no less than 1,202 joined 




THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


45 


the Church, or 51 per cent,, and this over a period of 
six years. 

I need say no more as to our duty as Christian 
workers, but the question that I want to bring home 
to our hearts is, what can be best done for the children 
when they are of an age when they leave our schools 
and Bands of Hope ? Some national or international 
society, whose system of working provides for a con¬ 
tinuous membership or connecting link between 
juvenile and adult membership, with a provision for 
transfer of membership to any other part of the 
country or civilised world, is what is wanted, and 
would supply the golden bridge over which juveniles 
pass into the adult ranks. This happy provision is 
provided by the Independent Order of Rechabites. 
The Order was started in 1S35, and has at present 
about 200,000 adult and 130,000 juvenile members, 
with branches all over our Colonies and theHJnited 
Kingdom. Its funds are ^1,500,000. Children of 
members are admitted to benefits from birth up to 
three years of age; any child, if an abstainer, is 
admitted from three years of age, and at fifteen is of 
age to transfer to the adult branch. The benefits 
offered to juveniles are generally medical attendance 
and medicine when ill, and a sum payable in case of 
death ranging up to £10, according to the length of 
membership, and the contribution is one penny per 
week. A few tents also provide sick benefits, for 
which a small sum extra is charged. The meetings are 
conducted similar to Bands of Hope, with sound Tem¬ 
perance teaching; recitations, dialogues, bright 
singing and music, and in addition the children con¬ 
duct the business themselves, taking the minutes of 
meetings, enrolling members, keeping the account of 
all contributions, under the guidance and supervision 
of one or more superintendents. In this way they are 
trained in business habits, and better fitted for the 
struggles of life ; the pledge is short, but thorough, 
and all members on admission repeat aloud the 
pledge they take. This generally makes a good and 
lasting impression upon them ; the whole of the 
members remain standing as witnesses of this profes¬ 
sion of faith. There is also a pledge against tobacco, 
but at present it is optional as to accepting this 
pledge. Any member in arrears, or absent for any 
considerable time, is visited by one of his fellow- 
members; thus the interest is kept up. Care is taken 
to prevent any careless or thoughtless prescription of 
alcohol to the members by the medical attendant 
when ill; if such is ordered, the medical men are 
requested to supply and duly label it as other medi¬ 
cines. The meetings of the Order can never be held 
where intoxicating drinks are sold. The death rate 
in the Rechabite Adult or Juvenile Society is lower by 
one-third than any non-abstaining society, and 
the number of those who fall away or break their 
pledge is less than 1 per cent, in the adult, and even 
a smaller percentage than this in the juvenile ranks. 
The habits of thrift taught, and the investment of 
capital, with the adoption of Temperance principles, 
has put the brake on, places around the members a 
bond of protection, and places them in a harbour of 
refuge that keeps them faithful to the cause. The 
Order is transferring annually from Juvenile to Adult 
Section some 5,000 members, and the thrift side of the 
Order has a tendency to make the juveniles feel (with 
pardonable pride) that they have made provision 
for themselves and removed the anxiety of their 
becoming a burden to their friends, and they are inde¬ 
pendent of any State aid. 

Juvenile tents may be formed with ten or more 
candidates, and can be, as is often the case, worked 
in connection with existing Bands of Hope. We are 
co-workers with and not rivals of Bands of Hope, and 
school teachers and workers. Sometimes a meet¬ 
ing of the Rechabite portion of a Band of Hope 
follows the Band of Hope meeting; in other cases it 
is an entirely separate meeting, while, when more 
convenient, it may be worked conjointly. Adult 
abstainers can become honorary members on payment 
of one shilling per annum or more, and that is placed 
in the management funds of the tent for extension 
work. 

Mr. Frederick Smith, who was for many years 


Editor of the Band of Hope ChroniceE and Chair¬ 
man of the United Kingdom Band of Hope Uniou, 
speaking at the Autumnal Conference of that well- 
known organisation at Cardiff, said : “ I know of no 
more perfect safeguard for retaining our senior mem¬ 
bers to total abstinence principles than the Independent 
Order of Rechabites, and I very cordially recommend 
the Order to all Band of Hope workers and others 
who are interested iu the welfare of the young.” 

Mr. Charles Wakely, the well-known Secretary of 
the United Kingdom Band of Hope Union, writes : 
“ There can be no doubt that a monetary interest in a 
society is a strong inducement to faithfulness on the 
part of its members, and when this is followed up, as 
it is by our Rechabite friends, with good, sound 
teaching on the advantages of total abstinence, the 
result can be no other than most gratifying.” 

Miss Eucy Docwra, of the N. Essex Band of Hope 
Union, speaking of fifteen Unions with 712,782 mem¬ 
bers, and the need of some connecting link, says : “ It 
would seem as though, just when our young people 
are leaving school and going to their employment, 
they specially need safeguarding, as they can no 
longer attend the meetings regularly, and the severing 
of this connecting link, which has been the joy of 
their childhood, and such a help in the formation of 
character, acts as a great discouragement and a 
hindrance to their keeping the pledge.” 

I think I need say nothing further to commend the 
Rechabite method of thrift and Temperance, as the 
society that can, and does, supply the connecting link 
to hold our older juvenile members. A Band of Hope 
sometimes collapses, but this cannot be with a tent 
(or is almost impossible); there is too much at stake 
and too much interest involved. 

The Times says : “ The public-house degrades, 
demoralises, and brutalises a large proportion of our 
population.” The Standard says : “ The public-house 
tends to aggravate the public rates aud create disorder, 
and it also causes an additional necessity for the 
police.” 

The Rechabite system is never to meet at a public- 
house or take its liquors. Hereiu is our safety aud 
superior health and longevity, and a great aid to 
keeping the pledge. 

-❖ v v- 

Ltaneashipe and Cheshire Union. 


T HE fortieth annual meetings of this Union took 
place in Manchester on February 20, being 
heralded by special gatherings, which spread 
over the previous week. On Monday there 
were Band of Hope “ Rallies ” in Manchester, Sal¬ 
ford, and surrounding districts. On Wednesday there 
was a most encouraging Sunday School Teachers’ 
Conference, to which we may refer again in our next 
issue. On Thursday a conference of Endeavourers 
and Guild Workers was held to discuss the relation¬ 
ship between them and the Band of Hope movement. 
On Friday there were private gatherings with Day 
School Teachers and Educationists, and all these 
gatherings were full of inspira iou and hope. 

On Saturday the annual meeting of the Publishing 
Department was held, with Mr. Hallsworth, as 
announced, chairman. At 11 the executive committee 
met, with Mr. Thornton, M.P., as chairman. The 
report was agreed to. In the afternoon the annual 
council meeting was held, and at night a great fes¬ 
tival meeting took place in the Free Trade Hall. 

The report is an elaborate and interesting docu¬ 
ment, and showed a splendid year’s work. It showed 
that the Union is dealing with 270,000 children a year, 
and that it does it on a very small income. The 
record of the year is of import, because it shows that 
the Union is on the alert in every direction. Its 
vigilant secretary aud officials lose no opportunity 
to educate the public on the great work of Bands 
of Hope, and they secure a great deal of aid from 
many sources. The School Scheme is welcomed in the 
whole district, and the four lecturers made a splendid 
record of 878 lectures to nearly 90,000 hearers. 





46 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Hibernian Band of Hope Union. 


T HE Annual Meeting of the General Council of 
the Hibernian Band of Hope Union and Band 
of Hope Conference was held on January 28 
in the X. L- Cafe, Dublin. The President, Mr. 
Thomas Edmondson, occupied the chair, and there 
was a large attendance. 

The Secretary (Mr. J. Barker Wells) submitted the 
annual report, which stated that the secretary and 
school lecturer had been kept busy during 1903, the 
number of lectures and addresses given by him being 
323, to 27,400 people. The following counties were 
visited:—Antrim, Armagh, Donegal, Cork, Cavan, 
Derry, Deitrim, Longford, Louth, Kerry, Meath, Sligo. 
In addition to these, Mr. Wells delivered lectures and 
addresses to man} of the city and suburban Bands of 
Hope, speaking also at children’s services, Sunday 
Schools, &c. The general account of the Union closed 
with a debit balance of ^11 8s. 6d. The Jubilee Fund 
showed a credit balance of ,£162 13s. 3d. The School 
Scheme Fund closed with a debit balance of 
^15 16s. 7d. 

Mr. Dawson, T.C., moved the adoption of the 
report. 

Rev. H. B. Kennedy, in seconding the motion, said 
he desired, on behalf of the Church of Ireland Tem¬ 
perance Society, to tender hearty thanks to the Union 
for the lectures which Mr. Wells had delivered in and 
around the city. 

On the motion of Mr. Arthur Webb, seconded by 
Mr. M'Cullagh, the President, Mr. Edmondson, was 
re-elected, and the vice-presidents and committee 
were also elected. 

Rev. John O. Park, B.A., delivered an address on 
“Should Bands of Hope be conducted on Sunday 
School lines ? ” He said there would be no genuine 
and far-reaching work done in the Temperance direc¬ 
tion, either among young or old people, if it did not 
rest where all moral work and all spiritual work must 
rest—upon the broad bed rock of reverence. He 
made a number of suggestions for the better working 
of Bands of Hope, and expressed the opinion that 
the Sabbath School afforded the best leverage for the 
successful carrying on of the work. 

Rev. Charles Dowse, in opening a discussion on 
the subject, said they had all realised the almost 
impossibility of rescuing those who had already fallen 
victims to the drink evil, and they turned with hope 
to the children, to save them from becoming in their 
turn victims of the terrible habit of intemperance. 
To reach the children they had the Sunday School, 
the day school, and the Band of Hope. They should 
try and make the very most of these three means. 
He thought the day school was the proper place to 
have Temperance facts taught, rather than in the 
Sunday School. Band of Hope meetings might be 
made interesting and be well attended, if the children 
were asked to supply the programme themselves. 

Mr. Alfred Crawtord, I.S.O., Mr. A. Gray, Mr. Wm. 
Carty, and others, also spoke on the subject. 

On the motion of Mr. J. B. MoriarTy, seconded 
by Rev. Dr. PrEnTER, the following resolution was 
adopted : “ Whereas the Prime Minister has declared, 
on behalf of the Government, that it is their inten¬ 
tion to promote, in this Session of Parliament, a 
measure designed to create a vested interest not 
hitherto recognised in licences for the sale of 
intoxicating liquors by restricting the discretionary 
power of the magistrates; and whereas this discre¬ 
tionary power was conferred on the magistrates for 
the purpose of safeguarding the interests of the 
public ; this annual meeting of the Hibernian Baud 
of Hope Union, convinced that such an enactment 
would create a vested interest in licences, and prevent 
a reduction in the excessive number of public-houses, 
emphatically protests against any such retrograde 
legislation, and calls upon the Irish Members of Par¬ 
liament to vote against it.” 


Itfish Tempepance Lieague. 


T HE third week in January witnessed the various 
meetings in Belfast which formed the forty- 
eighth annual meetings of this vigorous League. 
Gatherings on Saturday and Sunday preceded 
the annual social meeting, which was held in the 
Ulster Hall on January 18. After tea, Sir Robert 
Anderson (High Sheriff) presided, and said the League 
had never been in a more flourishing condition. Mr. 
Isaac Holden urged the members to cultivate and 
educate public opinion. The Rev. John Macdermott 
(Moderator of the General Assembly) echoed the 
wish, as he did not lay much emphasis on the political 
aspect of the question. He hoped all the Churches 
would stand to their guns in the cause of Temperance. 
Sir James Haslett, M.P., said the cause was dear to 
his own heart, as it had been the practice of his life. 
He held that men could be jolly and sociable without 
alcohol, and urged the leavening of society with 
sound Temperance sentiment. Other speakers'fol¬ 
lowed. 

The business conference took place in the Chamber 
of Commerce on Tuesday, Sir Algernon Coote, 
H.M.L., presiding. The report, read by Mr. John 
Malone, showed a year’s work of exceptional activity, 
especially amongst the young. Various sects had 
employed special lecturers to the young people, and 
the report also stated that young people belonging to 
the Roman Catholic Church took the pledge of 
total abstinence rrntil they are twenty-one years of 
age. The report was adopted. A resolution was 
carried against curtailing magisterial discretion, and 
then a lively debate ensued on a proposal to form a 
“ Voters’League,” to fight the liquor trade. It was 
carried by a small majority. Other resolutions fol¬ 
lowed, and the day was closed with a great public 
meeting in the Ulster Hall, Sir Algernon again pre¬ 
siding. A comprehensive address was given by Mr. 
J. A. Stewart, author of “Wine on the Lees,” and 
shorter addresses by the Rev. W. M’Alpine (of 
Glasgow), Mr.T. H. Sloan, M.P., Mr. Mitchell, M.P., 
and others. 

At the annual breakfast meeting next morning, Mr. 
Kerr presided; and among the speakers were Mr. C. 
J. Whitehead, who represented the United Kingdom 
Band of Hope Union on the occasion. A women’s 
conference was held on Wednesday afternoon, when 
Mr. Whitehead was again one of the speakers. 

The whole proceedings were full of encouragement. 

-- 

Cursed by Df?ink. 


YN Minneapolis, U.S.A., the 330 saloons are limited 
I to one-twelfth of the City. In the eleven-twelfths, 
I where there are no saloons, twenty-eight police- 
r men are found sufficient for patrol duty. In the 
one-twelfth, where the saloons are, 147 policemen 
are required. 

Dr. Clark, of Rome, says that the vice of drunken¬ 
ness is corrupting the Latin races. He said that 50 
per cent, of the applicants for service in the French 
army are rejected on account of physical disabilities 
caused by alcohol. 

The most successful stockmen of Texas, U.S.A., 
will not employ a man on their ranches who drinks. 
They find such help is too expensive, as they are not 
careful enough with the stock. The Texas cowboy 
must be a sober man—at least while at work on the 
plains. And thus the Temperance cause advances, 
and in quarters we least look for it. 


Copies of the Band of Hope Chronicle can 
be had for a year , post free , for is. 6 d., from 
60, Old Bailey , London , E.C. 









THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


47 


The Temperance Fiscal Home Goings. 

Policy. - 

- Mr. THOMAS SMITH, of Enfield. 

RECITATION. - 


OU talk of fiscal policy, 

And of the nation’s need, 

Of foreign competition ; 

And how it does succeed, 

That all our English Colonies 
Must help the Mother-land, 

And, shoulder unto shoulder, 

One glorious phalanx stand. 

That work should be more plentiful, 

And children not unfed, 

That none go unshod through the streets 
Or supperless to bed— 

A hive of great prosperity, 

For rich and poor alike, 

When every man shall own a house 
And every child a bike. 

Awake! awake! ye working men, 

Arise, ye sad and poor ; 

How much of all this misery 
Is laid at your own door ! 

Where is the thrift in buying that 
Which makes not flesh or brain— 

That weakens every faculty, 

And deepens every pain ? 

Why are the children’s faces wan ? 

Why are their clothes so thin ? 

Look on the table, j'ou will find 
Poisonous beer, or deadly gin. 

The fiscal argument to me 
Is like mysterious Greek ; 

I know that drink is Plngland’s curse, 

Of this I well can speak. 

The children know why father oft 
Can find no work to do; 

They know why mother often weeps, 

Why shillings are so few. 

Thevknow the prosperous man is he 
Who tries to do the right— 

Who, bold against each evil deed, 

Wages a manly fight. 

This is our fiscal policy— 

Reduce the drinking bill; 

Buy bricks and books, buy food and clothes, 
The children’s hearts pray fill 
With peace, and hope, and merriment; 

Love be the fairy queen 
To change this world of sin and want 
To what it should have been. 

A. J. G. 


The Battle is the Ltotfd’s.” 

(i Samuel xvii. 47.) 

f HE battle is the Lord’s,” 

Faint heart, oh, courage take, 
Remember, it’s the Lord’s. 

Fight on for His dear sake. 

“ The battle is the Lord’s,” 

Victory is sure for you, 

The blessing of the Lord our God 
Is yours, if you are true. 

“ The battle is the Lord’s,” 

Don’t doubt, but faithful be, 

Gird on the armour, take thy sword, 

A crown awaiteth thee. 

Walter Marivoire. 


O N Monday, February 8, Mr. Thomas Smith, of 
Bycullah House, Enfield, and 100, Fleet Street, 
passed away quite suddenly at the early age of 
fifty-seven, to the deep regret of a large circle 
of friends, and to the loss of many humane move¬ 
ments. Mr. .Smith had been at a meeting at St. 
Albans, speaking in favour of Mr. Bamford Slack, 
the candidate for Mid Herts, and shortly afterwards 
was taken seriously ill. It was a brief illness, but it 
was fatal, and the strenuous worker almost suddenly 
passed to the eternal rest. The very large attendance 
at his funeral on February 12 showed the influence 
for good he had exerted, and the value of one true 
life well spent. In his business, which owed every¬ 
thing to his energy, he will be keenly missed; and 
among the many branches of exterior work in which 
he was interested, none will miss him more than the 
Band of Hope movement. He was President of the 
North London Union, and for years not only took the 
chair at chief meetings, but encouraged the young 
people to take an intelligent interest in the work by 
offering prizes for abstracts of notable addresses given 
at those meetings. On one occasion he presided at the 
Collectors’ Soiree in large Exeter Hall, and there told 
the children how deeply he was indebted to the Band 
of Hope movement for saving him from the tempta¬ 
tion of drink. He was also interested in the Jubilee 
Building, attending the opening ceremony, and giving 
another large donation on that day that it might be 
freed from debt at the outset. He also subscribed 
generously to our School Scheme Fund. There is 
little doubt that he shortened his life by the very 
eagerness with which he threw himself into the battle 
of life, struggling for the good, and trampling down 
the evil. The Council of the Union was represented 
at his funeral by Mr. C. W. Garrard, and at its next 
meeting passed a sincere vote of condolence with Mr. 
Smith’s bereaved family. 


CAPTAIN CAMPBELL, of Guildford. 

On Tuesday, February 9, Captaiu Charles Dugald 
Campbell passed peacefully away at his residence, 
Oakside, Guildford, at the venerable age of ninety. 
He was a vice-president of the Surrey Union for a 
quarter of a century, and was an enthusiastic abstainer, 
having signed the pledge in 1836. Once he was a 
great smoker, but he saw his mistake, and in 1875 
joined the Anti-Tobacco Association. His naval 
achievements were by no means slight, and his 
knowledge of seamanship and naval construction was 
comprehensive and practical to a degree. Some of 
his deeds in the East, at the time of the Burmese war 
of 1852, and on other occasions, were officially 
notified 011 account of the endurance and personal 
gallantry he showed. The captain was a popular 
lecturer on many subjects, and a “ handyman ” 
to numerous good causes. At his funeral on February 
13, a large company of mourners and friends 
witnessed to the useful aud helpful life of the good 
sailor who had “gone aloft.” 


Mr. J. H. MARSHALL. 

We are sorry to announce the recent death of Mr. 
J. H. Marshall, for many years a leading worker of 
the Band of Hope movement in the Metropolis, and 
for a considerable period Secretary to the West 
London Band of Hope Union. Our friend was ouly 
forty-seven years of age at the time of his removal. 
The funeral, which took place at Hanwell Cemetery", 
on Wednesday, February 3, was conducted by the 
Rev. Dr. Clifford, who spoke in terms of deservedly 
high praise of the zeal and devotion of the friend 
who has been taken from us. 












4 8 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


JSanb of Ifoope 1111110119. 


Bradford. —A crowded audience assembled on 
January 13, in Somerset Parlour, at the monthly 
general meeting, to heai an address from Mr. Sam 
Pilling, of Leeds, on The New Temperance Manifesto. 
Mr. W. Lumby, of Yeadon, presided. Mr. Pilling 
congratulated the Union on its splendid record of 
work, and Mr. Rowles, the new agent, on his appoint¬ 
ment to so important a sphere. He emphasised the 
need of adherence to first principles. After reading the 
manifesto issued in the name of Mr. T. P. Whittaker, 
M.P., he pointed out two grave features, which 
struck at the root of the principles of true 
Temperance reformers. The first was Compensation. 
It had been abundantly proved that there was no 
legal right to compensation ; ancj, certainly there was 
no moral claim, because of the^ evil influence and 
effects produced by the trade. Temperance sentiment 
was most strongly against compensation in any and 
every form. The second point of the manifesto 
which could not be accepted, was the wide Public 
Control tbat was to be given. Muuicipalisation in 
every form, and even as advocated by Mr. Arthur 
Sherwell, would be detrimental to the well-being of 
the community. Public control would dry up the 
springs of philanthropy and prove a barrier to 
further reform. The Temperance party, in its desires 
to bring gladness and prosperity to the people, had 
been thwarted by the alliance of liquordom with one 
of the great political parties, but it nevertheless still 
pressed forward and would undoubtedly triumph. 
The address was well received, and an interesting 
discussion followed, in which a number of friends 
took part. Mr. E. Wagstaff, in moving thanks to the 
lecturer, referred to the days when Mr. Pilling was 
himself associated with the Bradford Band of Hope 
LTnion. Mr. George Tomlinson, in seconding the 
resolution, mentioned the fact that 82 per cent, of 
licensed property is insured, and the remaining 18 per 
cent, the insurance companies would not accept. 
There was no objection to the trade compensating 
itself, but the public should leave it to manage its own 
financial matters. The resolution was unanimously 
carried, and Mr. Pilling suitably replied. 

Bradford’s New Agent. —Mr. Albert J. Rowles has 
been appointed Agent to the Bradford Union in suc¬ 
cession to Mr. James Roberts, who has most ably filled 
the position for the last twenty-one years. Mr. Rowles 
was educated at the Westminster Training College, and 
left there to be head teacher in the Darwin Primi¬ 
tive Methodist Day School. During that time he 
was honorary secretary of the Darwin Band of Hope 
Union, leaving Darwin in 1893 to take up the head 
mastership of the Colne Primitive Methodist Day 
School. In Colne Mr. Rowles took an active part in 
Temperance work, and in connection with his own 
school trained a choir of 500 children annually. In 
1898, owing to the closing of the schools, Mr. Rowles 
became organising secretary in the North Eastern 
District of the Sunday Closing Association, which 
position he now leaves to take up the Union’s work in 
Bradford. He is a local preacher, and goes to 
Bradford with the highest credentials. The committee 
believe that in Mr. Rowles a worthy successor to Mr. 
Roberts has been found, and one who will enhance the 
honourable position the Union holds throughout the 
country. Mr. Rowles commenced his duties on 
February 1. 

Gloucester. —The Baptist Free Church Band of 
Hope held their annual tea and entertainment in 
Gloucester Corn Exchange in January, when a large 
gathering showed the hold this Society possesses on 
the sympathies of the public. After tea the Rev. W. 
Hogan, President, occupied the chair, and in an 
interval presented a number of books and medals to 
those who had done good work in recruiting the 
ranks of the Society. One girl, Edith Aston, had 
obtained thirteen new members, and one boy, Alfred 
Bullock, ten. Another boy received a book for 
obtaining three new members for the Anti-Cigarette 


League. A most interesting programme included 
two action songs, which greatly pleased the audience. 
There was a fine exhibition of lantern views by a 
triple lantern, which was worked by the Secretary, 
Mr. W. H. Phillips, jun. 

Tower Hamlets. — The twenty-eighth annual 
council meeting was held onjanuary 16, at the Royal 
Victoria Seamen’s Rest. At the afternoon meeting, 
Mr. William Groves, Chairman of the Executive 
Committee, presided, and, after devotional exer¬ 
cises, reports were presented by a number of 
district secretaries, showing the operations of 
the Union sustained throughout this difficult 
East London area. The officers and committee for 
the ensuing year were elected; the Hon. Mrs. Eliot 
Yorke being heartily thanked for the splendid service 
she has rendered the Union as its President, and 
being unanimously re-elected to the position. After 
an interval for tea, the company was shown over the 
Seamen’s Rest, by the Rev. David Roe, who is at the 
head of this important branch of Wesleyan Mission 
work. He also presided at the subsequent meeting, 
and testified to the vast importance of early Temper¬ 
ance training, if we are to avoid the fearful physical 
and moral wreckage with which his special work 
daily brings him in contact. The annual report 
and balance sheet were read by Mr. William Biffen, 
the recently appointed secretary, in succession to 
Mr. G. II. Biggs, who has taken up an 
appointment under the National Deposit Friendly 
Society. The report showed steady progress during 
the year, with an increase in the number of affiliated 
societies, and in the membership, which now stands at 
79 societies, with a membership of about 11 000. The 
balance-sheet showed the finances of the Union to be 
in a healthy condition, the personal and societies’ 
subscriptions having been well maintained during the 
year just ended. The special feature of the meeting 
was a New Year’s address by Mr. Frederic Smith (of 
the Parent Union), who heartily commended the 
workers upon their excellent record of work accom¬ 
plished, and eloquently enforced the necessity of 
continued effort and painstaking care, so that 
even greater results may be achieved in the 
future. 

York and District. —The annual meeting of the 
York and District Band of Hope Union was held on 
January 27, in the Victoria Hall, York, Mr. R. G. Heys 
presiding. The business meeting was preceded by a 
tea. The annual report, submitted by Mr. T. Alison 
Booth (hon. general secretary), gave an account of 
the annual meeting and carnival, which they described 
as one of the best in the history of the Union. The 
success of the industrial exhibition and the annual 
gala were also referred to. Special missions had been 
held, in addition to much valuable work accomplished. 
The Bands of Hope were in a flourishing condition. 
The number of societies was now over fifty, with a 
membership of about 7,000. Amongst the losses by 
death mention was made of Mr. J. Bellerby. The 
financial statement, submitted by Mr. F. J. Stephen¬ 
son, showed total receipts ^181, and the expenditure 
^167, leaving ^14 on the right side. Mr. Heys was 
re-elected president. After the committee had been 
elected by ballot, and arrangements for the May 
Festival made, Mr. W. H. Clarkson read a paper on 
the work of the Union from its formation in 1872. 
He advocated five minutes’ addresses at the rehearsals 
for May Day Festival. Pleading for more enthusiasm 
in the work on Temperance Sunday, the speaker 
urged the increased carrying on of the work in the 
open air between June and October. 

- "I* *»* ♦♦♦- 

Indigestion, Debility and Neuralgia have a 
powerful enemy in “Nonalton,” the non-alcoholic 
Tonic. “Nonalton” is not a new thing. Time and 
customers have proved that it is the most reliable, 
because it leaves no Bad After Effects. Sample 
bottle, 2s. 6d. Particulars free. — F. Wright, 
Mundy & Co., 27, Merton Road, Kensington, 
London, W.—[Advt.] 





On Avoiding “Idle Hands.” 

A WORD FOR THE “LIFE BRIGADE.” 

E have several times in the Band of 
Hope Chronicle called attention to 
the Boys’ and Girls’ Fife Brigades, but 
we fear our readers do not realise the immense 
value of such an adjunct to Band of Hope and 
Sunday School work. We would again, there¬ 
fore, point out some of the prime advantages 
which Rife Brigades secure. 

They come just at the critical time when 
boys and girls, but more especially boys, 
think they are too old to belong to a “thing 
for kids,” as they term both a Sunday School 
and a Band of Hope. Often the boy, who 
has been useful, and amenable to kindly 
influences up to the time he has reached 
the age of thirteen or fourteen, undergoes 
a reaction in his mind. He has left 
school and begun to associate with men and 
with boys a year or two older than himself. 
Their influence is not always healthy; some 
of them frequent haunts where boys should 
never go. Home influences become relaxed, 
though, as a result of this deteriorating 
influence. Now the question as to whether 
something really helpful and attractive cannot 
be put into the scales to keep the growing on 
the side of what is right and pure, may be 
largely answered by the formation of a Boys’ 
Rife Brigade. 

It encourages order, self-control, and various 
other good habits, and it is also endowed with 
several particularly attractive features—and 
it has no drawbacks, unless learning to blow 
a bugle is one. It does not cultivate the 
military spirit, which often makes light of 
human life, but it does not neglect the advan¬ 
tages of drill, regularity, system, responsibility, 
and obedience to orders. These are features 
which are prominent in all Rife Brigades. 
They are inculcated by means which are of 
practical utility as well as of continuous and 
varying interest. That they are endowed 
with the latter characteristic was clearly 
manifested at the Crystal Palace last summer. 
The Rife Brigades which took part in the 
Festival Display at Sydenham drew together 
a large number of spectators who keenly 
watched the various items illustrating the 
teaching given to the boys. Among the life¬ 
saving feats which the lads accomplished, the 
most exciting and popular was the rescue 
of boys from the top of a burning house, the 
youngsters holding a receiving blanket taut, 

APRIL, 1904. 


and the supposed victims jumping from the 
roof with a courage that knew no fear. 

The better to indicate the varied methods 
by which life-saving is taught as the main 
principle of the Brigade, we insert an outline 
of a programme as recently given in a town 
where the young people nave been well 
drilled. It began with a selection by the 
boys’ band, a section that soon became self- 
supporting, when wisely managed. Then 
came: — 

( 2 ) Musical Drill. 

13 ) Swimming Rescue Drill. (One boy endeavours 
to save another from drowning, adoptiug 
the proper means to prevent the victim from 
dragging his rescuer down with him. Having 
been brought to the shore, the apparently 
drowned person is resusc : tated by means of 
artificial respiration.) 

(4! Marching Drill. 

(5) Exposition of “First Aid’’ (A variety of 

injuries being dealt vVitb.) 

( 6 ) Stretcher Drill. 

(7) Fire Drill. (An imitation house has been fitted 

up. An alarm of fire is given, and clouds of 
smoke are seen issuing from the house. Four 
boys enter on their knees, with mouths 
bandaged, and rescue two of the inmates in 
danger of being asphyxiated. Unable to proceed 
to the upper storey, the remainder of the 
inmates are saved by jumping from the window 
into a carpet held by their comrades below. 
Having saved the inmates, the property now 
receives attention. A hose pipe and jet are 
brought into play, the firemen in charge 
creeping into the burning house. Two squads 
come into action with a Bucket Drill, keeping 
up a constant stream of water by the methodical 
passing of buckets under supposed difficulties, 
one squad doing the double work of sending 
full buckets forward with the right, and passing 
empty ones back with the left, hand.) 

The official publications of the Brigade show 
how strikingly practical the teaching has 
proved ; for, in several instances, lives would 
have been lost had not these well-trained life- 
savers been at hand, both in water disasters 
and in inland towns in emergencies. The 
whole of the work of the Brigades is full of 
interest for growing boys and girls ; and it is 
as useful as it is attractive. That is its great 
charm ; for it thereby commends itself to the 
support of all enlightened persons. 

But we have said enough to show that the 
scheme is worth not only thinking about, but 
also putting into actual effect; and we feel 
sure our workers would do w^ell to obtain 
further information from the Brigade Secre¬ 
tary, at 56, Old Bailey, Rondon, E.C. 

We shall be glad to hear that our friends are 
taking up the matter, as we feel sure it will be 
a great help in keeping our senior members 
faithful to their Band of Hope principles. 



























50 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Editorial Mems. 


S showing how Temperance principles 
are gaining, a pleasing illustration came 
under Mrs. Harrison Lee’s personal 
observations during the past winter. 
She was staying in a home where the son had 
been trained for the sea. He had passed all 
his examinations, and been appointed captain 
at about twenty-five years of age —surely one 
of the youngest captains in the English ser¬ 
vice. When applying for a berth on the 
White Star and Cunard Lines, his father said 
to him, “ Write across your application ‘ I am 
a total abstainer.’ ” He did so, and from both 
lines received offers of engagement. He 
accepted one on the Cunard Line. 


A great National Protest is going up from 
all parts of the country against the announced 
intention of the Government to take away the 
discretionary power of Licensing Justices in 
regard to refusing to grant licences. Whether 
it succeed or not, it is evidence of the in¬ 
creasing hold of Temperance upon the minds 
of the more thoughtful part of the population. 
We all have to try to increase that number. 


New Zearand has been feeling the benefit 
of the “No Licence” decree where it has 
been put in force. In five or six districts the 
required three-fifths majority was secured to 
carry No Licence into effect. The verdict of 
the people took effect on June 30, 1903, when 
the licences expired. The result, as seen by 
six months’ trial, ending December 31, was 
investigated by the Lyttleton Times, as far as 
it could be seen in the district of Ashburton, 
in the province of Canterbury. Two investi¬ 
gators were sent, and asked to state the facts 
impartially. They reported that Ashburton 
is a “cleaner, more orderly, and more respect¬ 
able town than it was under the old regime "; 
and they added, “Ashburton is not dissatisfied 
with its present experience, and is apparently 
not prepared to revoke it when occasion 
offers.” 


Presumably the first six months of such an 
experiment would generate some friction, and 
might not give such good results as may be 
expected in a year or two. But they showed 
a marked improvement, although home drink¬ 
ing was still allowable. The police admitted 
that the town had never been more orderly—- 
perhaps partly owing to the clearance of dis¬ 
orderly characters from the district. “The 
chronic street-corner drunkard had fled.” At 
the police-court there had been nine convic¬ 
tions for drunkenness, as against forty-four in 
the corresponding six months of 1902. Nine 
is still too many. New Zealand must learn 
to train up a generation who will drink no 
alcoholic liquor at all. Then the tail of the 
9 can be cut off; for there will be o convic¬ 
tions, because there will be no drinking. 


One other good feature is worth noting. 
Though drinking decreased—or, should we 
not say because drinking decreased?—trade 
i mproved. Mr. Alcorn, a large draper, reported 
a turnover twenty per cent, greater than 
before. Fruiterers, booksellers, cabinet¬ 
makers, and others, all testified to the im¬ 
proved business done through the diversion 
of money from the alcohol drain. 


The Medical Temperance Review is delighted 
that so many medical men have signed the 
petition to Educational Authorities which we 
printed in our last issue. It says: “ So long 
as alcoholic liquors are used in moderation, 
and their use is regarded as harmless, so long 
shall we have the evils which are all around 
us. Children must be taught—and taught to 
abstain. There is no other safe position.” 
That is the very reason why Bands of Hope 
exist. 


The Review rejoices that so many medical 
men advocate this clear and strong position, 
even though it be “ splendidly inconsistent” ; 
and then it adds these significant words : “It 
would be even better if, for the sake of the 
children, they would resolve to abstain them¬ 
selves. What a revolution in the habits of the 
country would soon follow if 15,000 medical 
men were to declare that henceforth they 
would abstain from the use of alcoholic liquors 
as a beverage ! It is a grand thing, without 
doubt, that so many should say, ‘ Save the 
children from drink,’ but it would be grander 
if they would publicly denounce the common 
use of alcohol and lead the way.” And so say 
all of us! 


We firmly, and with good reason, hope that 
as the years go by, more and more doctors 
will join the ranks of those who obey the 
teachings of science'in ceasing to use that 
which, more than anything else, hastens the 
degeneration of the race. They are a noble 
and self-denying body of men, and, before 
long, we fully believe they will take their 
proper place as the leaders—not only in 
curing disease, but in preventing disease ; and 
then they will courageously set the example 
which it is always safe to follow—the ex¬ 
ample of total abstinence from all alcoholic 
liquors. 


We are deeply indebted to those medical 
men who act up to the high principle which 
their scientific researches indicate as best. 
When Sir Benjamin Richardson began to study 
the nature of alcohol, he was by no means un¬ 
friendly to its use. But he resolved to follow 
the teachings of science, and resolutely erased 
the use of alcoholics from his own dietary. 


Copies of the Band of Hope Chronicle can 
be had for a year, post free, for is. 6 d., from 
60, Old Bailey, London , E. C. 












THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


5 r 


Band of hope Addresses.—Series i. 


MANKIND IN THE MARRING & MENDING. 


By T. N. KELYNACK, M.D., M.R.C.P., 

Hon. Secretary of the Society for the Study of Inebriety. 


No. 4.—THE UPWARD CLIMB. 


Life a Ladder. 

ERIOUS study of that great but mysterious 
force which men call Evolution, has revealed 
Life to be a ladder on which ascent and descent 
are ever in progress. The multiplication and 
differentiation of cells is but the upward climb 
to the complete body; the unfolding and development 
of brain and nerve secure elevation for the mind; the 
struggle for existence rightly met and fairly con¬ 
ducted wins for the individual distinction: with 
the progress of the units comes a raising of the race. 
Crowds gather round the base of the ladder; there 
is always room at the top. 

Alcohol a Protoplasmic Poison. 

Among the foremost of agencies hindering individual 
and national upclimbing, hastening personal descent 
and tending to public retrogression, stands the 
malevolent influence of what men call—Drink. It is 
well to recognise the physical foundation of intempe¬ 
rance. The human unit is a complex of microscopic 
elements termed cells, the vital basis of which is a 
peculiarly elaborate substance termed protoplasm. 
Alcohol forms so fatal a foe to human upclimbing 
because it attacks this fundamental material of life. 

Alcoho! Lowers Life. 

“ Protoplasm, whether the basis of animal or plant 
life, is injuriously affected even by small quantities 
of alcohol, aud under certain conditions, there is 
such a marked interference with nutrition, power of 
movement, and reproductive functions, that even 
where immediate death of the organism as a whole 
does not supervene, marked degenerative changes 
result, the animal or plant under these conditions 
living on a lower plane as regards power of move¬ 
ment, nutrition, aud reproduction, than does the 
healthy organism into which no alcohol has been 
introduced.”—(Professor G. Sims Woodhead’s Lees- 
Raper Lecture on “ Recent Researches on the Action 
of Alcohol in Health and Sickness.”— The British 
Journal of Inebriety, January, 1904.) 

Alcohol and Individual Inefficiency. 

Alcohol hinders the development and maintenance 
of the highest vitality of the individual cell. The 
more elaborate, complex, differentiated, and necessary 
the tissue, the greater the injury wrought by alcohol. 
This toxic body tends to reverse the march of evolu¬ 
tion. The latest and most desirable acquirements are 
first to fall. And when the hampering and deterio¬ 
rating influence of alcohol is brought to bear on the 
developing life, permanent impairment is likely to 
occur. 

Young Life. 

Alcohol is to be considered a virulent poison to 
all young life. The days of growth must be free 
from all restraining and deteriorating agents. The 
alcoholic mother may exert a dire pre-natal influence. 
The offspring of the inebriate, and the children 
reared in an alcoholic environment, oftentimes furnish 
the dregs, the dross, the derelicts of the community, 
and supply large portions of the social burden of 
dangerous parasites, degenerates, deficients, and 
unreliables. 

Alcohol the Handicapper. 

The child the product of alcoholic parentage, and 
reared in an alcoholic home, is in danger of starting 


life handicapped, with lower powers of resistance, 
with impaired physical force, with tendency to 
nervous irritability, and is oftentimes predisposed to 
lapse into moral obliquity. 

Abstinence the Helper. 

The testimony of workers in every form of life’s 
activity stands witness to the value oftotal abstinence 
in preserving strength and protecting life. The evi¬ 
dence of the biologist, the physician, the sociologist, 
the moralist, all agree, and the economist expresses 
the result in definite financial form.—(Consult recent 
Paper by Mr. R. M. Moore, on the “ Comparative 
Mortality among Assured Lives of Abstainers aud 
Non-Abstainers from Alcoholic Beverages.”) 

Alcohol and Racial Deterioration. 

Alcoholic indulgence stands as the great barrier to 
national progress. The love of Drink, and the lust for 
that state of mental derangement which it brings, 
is fruitful for much evil. Alcoholism, directly and 
indirectly, is causing widespread racial decadence. 
History affords abundant evidence of the degrading 
force of intemperance. 

Much lias been accomplished in the elevation of the 
people. [See “The Causes of the Improvement in the 
Health of London towards the end of the Eighteenth 
and the Beginning of the Nineteenth Centuries,” in 
H. Russell Wallace’s “Wonderful Century: its 
Successes and its Failures.” London, 1899.] But the 
Curse of Drink still blights and blasts. 

The races of the earth in regard to their relative 
positions on Life’s Great Ladder must count on 
Alcohol as a far-reaching factor. The national loss to 
Great Britain through alcoholism is appalling, and 
mere statistical expression is altogether inadequate.— 
(Consult “ The Economic Aspect of the Drink 
Problem,” by T. P. Whittaker, M.P.) 

Alcohol and Mental Disturbance. 

In every phase of human activity the deteriorating 
influence of alcoholism is apparent. Dr. Robert 
Jones has recently shown that of the patients admitted 
to the London County Asylums during the ten years, 
1893—1902, inclusive, their insanity was assigned to 
drink as a cause in 21 °/ 0 of the men, and of 11 °/ 0 of 
the women. (“ Physical and Mental Degeneration.”— 
r Qurnal of the Society of Arts, March 4, 1904.) 

Alcohol predisposes to and aggravates various forms 
of disease. Accidents of many kinds arise from 
alcoholism. Especially among many sections of the 
lower classes, intemperance is producing marked 
physical deterioration. 

No rankof society escapes from the vi'iating influence 
of the curse. There is urgent need that every unit of 
the nation should recognise the danger threatening 
the weal of the commonwealth, and by taking steps 
to secure individual protection, do something to safe¬ 
guard the highest interests of the community as a 
whole. 

Abstinence and Life’s Ascent. 

He who would climb highest must not be hampered 
by self-selected hindrances. For long experience has 
gone to show that the best mental work can be done 
without alcohol. (“Study and Stimulants,” edited by 
A. Arthur Reade. London, 1883.) Experimental 
psychology has furnished means w 7 hereby accurate 
registration testifies that alcohol, even in com¬ 
paratively small quantities, may depress and derange 
mental function. (See Mr. Theodore Neild’s article 
on “Psychometric Tests of the Action of Alcohol.” — 
British Journal of Inebriety, October, 1903.) 

Renounce Alcohol. 

All those who would climb to the high table¬ 
land of ethical righteousness had best disburden 
themselves of alcoholic intoxicants. In all varieties 
of physical labour, in every form of trying work, in 
feats of endurance, in times of stress and strain, trial 
and examination, both experience and experiment 
have demonstrated the advantage which comes from 
abstinence. 







52 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series 11. 


SIMPLE SCIENCE CHATS. 

By Charees Harvey, 

Secretary, Kent Band of Hope Union. 


No. 4.—MORE ABOUT “ THE ENEMY.” 


BLACKBOARD SUMMARY. 


ALCOHOL.- A CLEAR, 

COLOURLESS, TRANS- 

PARENT LIQUID, IN APPEARANCE LIKE WATER. 

WATER. 

ALCOHOL. 

Boils at 212 p . 

Boils at 172°. 

Puts fire out. 

Burns. 

Quenches Thirst. 

Creates Thirst. 

Tasteless. 

Hot, burning taste. 

Smelless. 

Strong, sweetish smell. 

Softens Food. 

Hardens Food. 

Freezes. 

Does not Freeze. 

ALCOHOL.— AN IRRITANT, NARCOTIC POISON. 


Lesson connected. 

have now learnt that the drink absolutely 
necessary for sustaining life is water; and 
that many people, not content with nature’s 
beverage, have formed a habit of drinking 
various kinds of intoxicating liquors which 
contain alcohol, the cause of all the trouble these 
drinks bring upon the nation. It is our duty as Band 
of Hope members to take no drink containing alcohol. 
Onr last lesson informed us how this alcohol is pro¬ 
duced : not put into the liquors, but formed in the 
oourse of manufacture. We are now to go further 
and enquire the nature of this liquid alcohol so well 
called ‘‘ The great enemy.” 

Alcohol.—A Description. 

(A two ozs. or four ozs. bottle of alcohol or spirit of 
wine should certainly be procured from a chemist’s 
shop.) 

There is no difficulty in describing alcohol, for in 
appearance it is exactly like good, pure water. It is 
a clear, colourless, transparent liquid. It is well called 
“A deceiver.” By drinking it in the various intoxi¬ 
cating drinks it has deceived thousands, promising all 
kinds of good things but really fulfilling none. So to 
start with, its appearance might almost lead us to 
imagine it was pure water. Let us, however, compare 
the two liquids. 

Alcohol and Water Compared. 

First, we find on weighing them both that alcohol 
is the lighter, and, if some coloured alcohol is poured 
gently into a glass of water, it will be seen to float on 
the top for some time. It, however, with a slight 
shake readily mixes with the water. Alcohol boils at 
172 0 , whereas the boiling point of water is 212'L It 
throws off the pressure of the air more easily, and thus 
boils quicker. Again, it is well known to everyone 
how water is used to extinguish fire; but alcohol 
directly it is touched with a light begins to burn. 
Indeed, it is a rough way of testing that alcohol is 
present in beer; for if beer be thrown on the fire you 
will be able to see a flame. Place some alcohol in a 
saucer, and you will have uo difficulty in setting it 
alight. It burns without any black smoke. Many 
years ago a ship named the Kent was coming from the 
West Indies, and part of its cargo consisted of barrels 
of rum. When it reached the stormy Bay of Biscay 
some of these barrels got displaced and broke, the 
rum spilling. A man who was sent down accidentally 
dropped a lighted candle into the rum, the alcohol in 


which caught fire, which spread rapidly until at last 
the whole vessel was enveloped in flames and many 
lives were lost. 

Alcohol and Thirst. 

Everyone looking at alcohol for the first time would 
think that, like water, it ought to quench thirst. But 
it has no such power, indeed exactly the opposite, it 
creates thirst. Here lies one of the dangers of drink¬ 
ing intoxicating liquors. The more people drink 
them the more thirsty they become. The mouth 
becomes dry and parched, and often inflamed. Ifyou 
follow this, you will learn how it is men are able to go 
on drinking pint after pint of beer. The water in the 
beer is hindered from doing its work by the presence 
of alcohol, which has the effect of creating thirst. 

Other Differences. 

There are many other differences, indeed, we may 
say that the nature of alcohol is the very opposite of 
water. Water is tasteless, but alcohol may be 
described as having a hot, burning taste, making it 
impossible to drink it pure. Again, water is without 
smell, i.e., pure water; but alcohol has a decided smell, 
a strong, sweetish kind of smell. It is well known to 
everyone how water softens all kinds of foods, no 
matter whether it be meat, fish, or bread; indeed, some 
foods, like sugar and salt, readily dissolve in water. 
But in alcohol all foods, including both sugar and salt, 
are hardened by their contact with it. Indeed, one of 
the uses of alcohol is to preserve things. Go to 
museums and see rows and rows of specimens in 
bottles. The preserving liquid used is alcohol. 

Uses of Alcohol. 

Not only may alcohol be used for preserving, it has 
many other valuable properties. We have already 
seen that it burns, and that, too, without smoke or 
disagreeable smell. It would be rather nice if more 
of the numerous motor cars going along our roads use 
it; for the petrol they use leaves behind anything but 
a pleasant smell. Of course, its burning property may 
be used in many ways, as spirit lamps, &c., &c. Then 
again, although alcohol hardens foods, there are many 
things it readily softens and dissolves, such as 
camphor, resin, sealing wax, paints, &c. Here is 
another use. You know that water in the cold 
weather freezes and becomes a solid known as ice, but 
alcohol does not freeze, and this fact makes it useful 
iu thermometers, particularly for cold climates. 
Indeed, we must remember that probably alcohol is 
one of the most useful liquids known. It is a pity it 
cannot be left to its proper uses, one of which is 
certainly not in supplying a drink for man. 

Alcohol—a Poison. 

But there is one more comparison we must make 
between water and alcohol. Water is life-giving, 
reviving, and refreshing to us, causing the drooping 
plant to renew its vigour; but alcohol is described as 
an irritant narcotic poison. It is called an irritant 
because it irritates our nerves, and a narcotic because 
it deadens them. It must not be thought, as young 
people so often do, that the only property of a poison 
is to kill life. That depends on the strength and 
quantity of the poison taken. A poison, however, 
not only kills, but injures life. In the future lessons 
of this series we shall learn some of the injuries that 
alcohol is inflicting upon the human body; but 
let us conclude this lesson by learning what Sir 
Andrew Clarke, a great physician (at one time the 
head doctor of the large London Hospital), said about 
alcohol and its effect upon his patients: ‘‘In this 
hospital there are upwards of 800 beds, on all or most 
of which lie every day some poor sufferers.” After 
walking round his hospital one day he declared that 
no less than seven out of every ten of the patients 
owed their illness to drinking alcohol in some form 
of intoxicating drink. This is a large proportion. 
It means 560 out of every 800. There is no doubt 
of the harm that alcohol is doing. Therefore let us 
once more remember to be aware of 

“The Enemy of the Race.” 









THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


53 


Band of Mope Addresses.—Series V. 


YARNS WITH YOUNG PEOPLE. 

By Thomas Palmer, 

Leicestershire Band of Hope Union. 


No. 2.—KEEP TO THE RIGHT. 


Similes of Life. 

IFE is sometimes compared to : — 

i. A Warfare— where two conflicting armies 
are engaged—one fighting for, and the other 
against, the right. 

2. A Garden, wherein weeds and flowers grow. If 
the garden be neglected, the “ Weeds grow apace.” 
Flowers need cultivation. 

3. A Crock, which runs down each day, and needs 
winding up. The body runs down, and rest is taken, 
that it may be wound up to perform the duties of 
another day. 

4. A Vapour, which quickly fades away, teaching 
that life is short, transient and fleeting. 

We are now about to consider life as 

A Pathway. 

Our subject or title is a familiar notice to be seen 
in the crowded thoroughfares of our large towns, 
telling the pedestrians to keep to the right-hand side 
of the pathway, to facilitate orderly movement. 

We see, then, that 

Keeping to the Right 

promotes order and saves commotion. 

(a) A well ordered brain (or mind) seeks order in 
life, work, duties. A well ordered man, or boy, or 
girl is reliable. A disordered brain fails to grasp the 
rightness or wrongness of things. Men when under 
the influence of a temporary or slight disorder often 
speak and act in such a way as would at other times 
cause them much grief and remorse. 

A Well-Ordered Road. 

(b) A well-ordered thoroughfare, as we have noted, 
saves commotion. The policeman on “point duty” 
directs the traffic so as to facilitale easy and regular 
movement. A well-ordered home savours of happiness. 
A well-ordered workshop of business. A well-ordered 
machine works smoothly. 

A Block. 

( c ) One vehicle or pedestrian neglecting the rule 
of the road causes commotion and delay. In a busy 
thoroughfare a long line of traffic had come to a stand¬ 
still, showing that something was amiss at the front. 
An enquiry was passed on from vehicle to vehicle, 
“What’s the matter at the front?” “What’s the 
matter at the front ? ” By-and-by the reply came— 
“A brewer’s dray is in the road.” “Ah,” said a 
cabman, “that’s it; the brewers are always in the 
road of everything good.” The one vehicle had 
caused the commotion and delay. 

Alcohol, a Disorderer. 

This is exactly the case with strong drink. The 
taking of even small quantities produces disorder. 
Angry words are spoken, and violent deeds are done. 
The brain loses its perfect balance, the point duty is 
neglected, and then how easily is mischief done ! 

Commotion is caused in the home, indolence reigns 
in the workshop, the machinery of life gets out of 
gear, because a disturber (alcohol) has been permitted 
to enter the domain of life. “Keep to the right” 
must be the motto if we would have an evenly- 
balanced mind and well-ordered life. 

Keeping to the Right 

helps to make the best use of money. Someone has 
said that “Englishmen work like horses and spend 
like asses.” We know what this means, though it is 
not complimentary to the asses. Doubtless this is 
true of very many. It is wise to get full value for 
hard-earned money. To spend money in furniture 


and clothing is very different to spending it in drink. 
In the first place a man has value for money—he has 
something to show for his spending. Whereas the 
drink-purchaser has nothing. But, has not he 
something? Yes, he has! He has ill-health, 
an excited brain, an over-taxed heart, and many 
other undesirable things. So that money spent 
in drink is not only wasted, but it brings many ills 
in its train, which cannot be said of other things 
useful and good. “Keep to the right” in >our use 
of money. “ Spend not to spare, but spare to spend.” 

Keeping to the Right 

makes it safe to travel. Suppose two railway com¬ 
panies carried passengers to a certain town, and on 
one of the lines fifty passengers were killed, and a 
number injured, every year, and on the other no 
accidents happened, no passengers were killed or 
injured. Suppose you had to travel to that town, 
you would not be long determining upon which 
line you would go. 

One part of the community chooses to travel 
through life as takers of Intoxicants, and how sad are 
the results!—the inevitable results—of this practice. 
No one knows in starting who will be the victims : 
that a number will be killed, that others will be 
injured, is certain. 

On the other hand, who ever heard of anyone 
being killed or injured through practising abstinence 
from alcoholics ? It would be a curious verdict for 
any jury to find “ Died through Teetotalism.” That 
it is unsafe to travel along the Drink road is certain : 
and it is equally certain that it is safe to go through 
life as a total abstainer. “ Keep to the right” if you 
wish to travel through life safely. 

Keeping to the Right 

secures sobriety. One step wrong is dangerous to 
take. What great calamities have resulted from little 
mistakes! That one step out of the straight path ! 
How often is heard the excuse, “ It is only this—or 
that,” and yet from these small matters lives have 
been ruined. “Only a sip,” “only a glass,” only 
the mischievous idea that a little wine will give 
strength and add to enjoyment, but—but what 
results do we see! 

Let us “keep to the right,” not even take one 
little step wrong, if we would be perfectty sober 
and safe. 

Keeping to the Right 

secures a good character. Money and health are 
valuable, but a good character is priceless ! It cannot 
be purchased; it must be built up. It takes a long 
time and much care to build a good character, but it 
can be spoiled in a moment. 

Drink ruins more characters than any other agent; 
It is so insidious, crafty and deceitful. 

Whatever you do or leave undone, “Keep to the 
right” in this matter, and never take even the least 
step wrong. Total abstinence is the only way to 
ensure sobriety. 


A PERSONAL Note. —We would like to offer our 
congratulations to our valued helper, Dr. T. N. 
Kelynack, on his approaching marriage to Dr. Violet 
McLaren, a lady who is a member of the Council of the 
Society for the Study of Inebriety, of which the 
learned Doctor is the leading spirit, and for which 
he edits “ The British Journal of Inebriety.” 

Cigarette Smoking. —In addition to the public 
“ Appeal to Patriots,” referred to in a recent issue, 
another manifesto against the b’.neful habit of 
cigarette smoking amongst the young has just been 
signed by a number of influential gentlemen, including 
eleven peers, Justice Grantham, Gen. Baden Powell, 
five bishops, and the headmasters of thirty-six public 
schools. Many medical men have also signed the 
document, which also has the approval of the Duke 
of Fife, the Archbishop of Canterbury, and the Bishop 
of London. The manifesto especially emphasises the 
evident duty of parents to control their boys in regard 
to this habit. 








54 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series VI. 


TAKE CARE OF “NUMBER ONE.” 

By W. N. Edwards, F.C.S., 

Science Lecturer, United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 


FRIENDS AND FOES. 


GOOD FOODS. 

GRA’N 

GRAPES 

CORN 

APPLES 

SUGAR 


m 


r\ 




BAD DRINKS. 

MALT LIQUORS, 
wine. 

WHISKEY, 
CIDER. 
ALCOHOL. 


STICK TO FRIENDS. AVOID FOES. 


(Plan of Blackboard at close of Address.) 


J N taking care of “numberone” we shall find that 
there are many helps and many hindrances. 
These may be called friends and foes. Very large 
numbers of people play into the hands of their 
enemies simply because they do not know friends 
from foes. 

Impure air, poor food, want of cleanliness, bad 
habits, and many other things are our enemies, 
because they tend' to ill health and shortening of life. 

In ancient days when men went into battle against 
their enemies, they clothed themselves in armour. 
They knew that the enemy would do them all the mis¬ 
chief it could; they therefore prepared themselves 
accordingl}', and as far as they could rendered 
themselves proof against the attacks of their foes. In 
looking after “number one” from the hygienic and 
health standpoint coats of mail, helmets of steel, 
battle-axes and shields are of no avail. We must have 
an entirely different kiud of armour. We must 
provide ourselves with the armour of knowledge. If 
we are willing to learn, we may easily know friends 
from foes, and this knowledge will help us to avoid 
the things that could harm us. An old proverb says, 
“ To be forewarned is to be forearmed.” If we know 
that an evil exists, our knowledge may lead us to 
avoid it. 

A Common Mistake 

that many people make is to suppose that beer, wine 
and spirits, are foods. It is quite true that these 
things are used by enormous numbers of people, but 
it is equally true that such use results in a vast 
amount of evil that it is quite impossible to calculate. 
If so much evil results from the use of intoxicating 
liquors, it may be asked, Why do people still continue 
their use? The answer is that habit, custom, 
ignorance, and appetite all have their hold upon 
people, so that in large numbers of cases, although 
people know that the use of alcoholic liquors is 
hurtful, they still continue to use them. Many 
people from sheer force of habit would sooner live 
in courts and alleys than in good streets and better 
houses. The gipsy prefers nis ragged tent to the 
nicely furnished and comfortable room. Habit proves 
a very hard taskmaster, and when once he lays hold 
of us it is very difficult to shake him off. Probably 
every one of us is a slave to some habit or another. 
Most people, for instance, in putting on a coat, put 
their right arm into the sleeve first. It has become 
a habit, and we don’t notice it. Next time you put 
your coat on, try putting your left arm in first, and 
you will soon learn how strong habit is. You have 
cultirated the habit of writing with your right hand. 
Try penning a letter with your left hand. It will not 
be very well done. We need not be surprised, then, 
that people who have formed the habit of drinking 
intoxicants do not see the need for breaking off such 
a habit. 


We must be Wiser, 

and let our knowledge of things help us to form right 
habits, for good habits are just as easy, and far more 
pleasant to cultivate than bad ones, and, like the bad 
ones, when once formed they stick to us pretty 
closely. Let us learn, then, that good foods may be 
turned into bad drinks. Because a food itself maybe 
good, it does not follow that anything produced from 
it is good, too. We must always remember that 
whenever intoxicating drink is produced, chemical 
changes have taken place, and we may learn that 
whenever chemical changes occur, new properties 
are assumed, and new constituents may appear, that 
are quite different from the article originally used. 

For Example, 

we might take a handful of corn—a very good food— 
and by placirrg it in a red hot vessel we may burn the 
corn to a cinder. The burning of the corn was a 
chemical change, and the cinder is the result of that 
change. The corn was a good food, but the cinder 
would not be so. The changes that occur when 
grain is made into beer, and grapes into wine are as 
great a chemical change as that of corn into a cinder. 
Again, we know that fat is a wholesome food. We 
find it in milk, butter, cheese, and meat, but by a 
chemical change fat is easily converted into soap. 
We don’t mind the fat as a food, but we should rather 
decline the soap. In these illustrations we are 
establishing the principle that because a thing in 
itself is good, it does not follow that after chemical 
changes the product will also be good. Very com¬ 
plete evidence of this is seen when things are said to 
go bad, such as milk turning sour, butter becoming 
rancid, and meat becoming putrid. All these are 
examples of chemical changes acting upon good 
foods. 

The Thing that Happens 

when grain is converted into malt liquor, grapes into 
wine, corn into whiskey, and apples into cider, is that 
a large part of the nourishment of the corn, grape and 
apple is destroyed, and alcohol is formed in its place. 
The alcohol is the result of the chemical change, and 
to produce it good and useful stuff has had to be used 
up. Ifwe contrast foods with strong drinks we shall 
see how great the contrast is. For instance : — 

J lb. bread contains about 286 grns. of muscle formers. 
h. pt. milk ,, ,, 176 ,, ,, 

2 pt. beer ,, ,, 20 ,, ,, 

J pt. wine „ ,, 18 ,, ,, 

The bread and the milk are good foods, and come 

to us direct as it were from the hand of Nature. In 
the case of the beer and wine a great deal of skill, a 
great deal of money, and a great deal of labour are 
devoted to their manufacture, and the result is that 
food qualities are lost, and alcohol is produced in 
their place. 

The Change is Wonderful. 

Grain when malted contains sugar. Grapes, apples, 
and indeed most fruits and many vegetables contain 
sugar, or starch that can easily be changed to sugar. 
Everyone knows what sugar looks like, and everyone 
knows something about its sweet taste. It is one of 
the foods that help to keep the body warm, and is 
therefore called a heat-giving food. If I mix some 
sugar with water, and add a little yeast, and let it 
stand for a few days the sugar will disappear. It will 
now be impossible to find it. It has gone once for 
all, but something else that was not in the sugar and 
water and yeast when first mixed, is now there. 
What is it ? Alcohol. Where did it come from ? The 
yeast acted upon the sugar, destroying it, and pro¬ 
duced a^ohol. There was no alcohol in the sugar, 
any more than there was a cinder in the corn, or soap 
in the fat, or putrid matter in the » holesome meat. A 
chemical change has occurred, and good food has been 
destroyed in order to produce alcohol. When alcohol 
is used in intoxicating beverages, it is our foe and 
not our friend. That is the reason we sign the pledge 
against it. Fet us take care of “ Number One ” by 
sticking to our good foods and avoiding bad drinks. 














THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


55 


FSand of Hope Addresses.—Series VII. 

TALKS ON SMOKING. 

By J. Cadwat.ladkr, Birmingham. 

No. 2.-A LESSON FROM A SPIDER. 


Despise him not. 

HO did I hear say—“ a spider’s a horrid dirty 
insect; I don't like them” ? 

I did not ask you to like them. At the same 
time you are wrong in three particulars. 
Firstly, the spider is not horrid; secondly, 
neither is he dirty ; thirdly, nor is he an insect, as you 
will see. If you look at a spider you will notice that 
he has eight legs, while an insect has only six. Do 
you know that it is an easy thing to tame one of these 
spiders, so that he will eat out of your hand ? It is 
about one of these that I want to talk. His web, say, 
is in our little back garden, and I want you to 
watch him and see how he acts when anything 
injurious to him gets caught in his web. 

His Carefulness. 

Look ! there is a wasp, ah ! and see he has alighted 
on his web; yes, he is caught right enough, and Mr. 
Spider, hiding away in his den, feels the tug of the 
thread, comes out to seize his prey and finds it is 
some object much too big for him. Remember, he 
cannot see it, for his eyes are on the top of his head, 
therefore he has to find out what it is by the pull on 
the thread of his web. Finding it will be dangerous 
for him to get too near, and too big and strong fol¬ 
ium to encircle with his threads, what does he do? 
Listen. No matter how hungry he is, even though he 
may have had no food for days, he will not risk 
injury to himself by getting too near to the wasp ; and, 
failing in his attempts to bind it with his thread, will 
actually cut away that part of the web, to which the 
wasp is attached, and allow it to escape. 

Tobacco Injurious. 

What has this to do with smoking? I’ll tell you. 
That tobacco is injurious to health every boy or girl 
may know (if they do not already) with very little 
trouble. You all know that a person in health may 
partake of food without any injurious effects, pro¬ 
viding that he does not eat too much or too 
frequently. But let one start to use tobacco for the 
first time and you know what happens ; the ill-effects 
much upset the smoker, and something unpleasant 
happens. 

Learn from the Spider. 

If the spider, not possessed with the power of 
reason, as we boys and girls are, will shun that 
which is injurious, how much more careful should 
we be in avoiding those things which are injurious to 
11s, seeing that these bodies of ours are, or should be, 
Temples of the living God. The fear on the part qf 
the spider was that he might be injured if he 
approached too near the wasp. 

A Danger. 

Is there danger of our bodies being injured if we 
use tobacco ? Yes, not only by the nicotine contained 
in the tobacco, of which I told you in my last, but the 
smoke is more injurious even than the nicotine, 
because it is given off in greater quantities and 
contains carbon monoxide, which acts in the same 
way as nicotine by causing dizziness and stupor, 
trembling of the limbs, palpitation, feeble pulse, &c. 
[See Lancet for December, 1903.] One ounce of 
tobacco will give off no less than one-fifth of a pint of 
pure carbon monoxide gas when smoked in the form 
of cigarettes, and probably as much or more in the 
form of pipe or cigar. 

Experiment. 

As an experiment two or three mouthfuls of tobacco- 
smoke from a cigarette were shaken up with a few 


drops of blood diluted with water in a bottle. Almost 
immediately the blood assumed the pink colour 
characteristic of blood containing this gas, and 
further observations with the spectroscope confirmed 
the fact of the presence in the blood of carbon mon¬ 
oxide. Similarly, a few mouthfuls of smoke from a 
pipe and cigar were tried, and the results were even 
more marked. In this experiment we have some 
explanation in particular of the evil effects of 
cigarette-smoking; for it is chiefly cigarette-smoke 
that is inhaled. This effect of tobacco-smoke 
upon the blood appears to be of considerable signifi¬ 
cance. [These facts were given in the Lancet. the 
chief medical paper.] 

What the Doctors Say. 

But let us look at it from the standpoint of medical 
men, those who have given the subject any thought, 
and they will tell you how it injures the sight. 

Dr. Priestley Smith (January, 1904) says, “ Medical 
men, and especially those of us who have to do with 
disorders of the eye, are constantly meeting with 
people who have injured themselves by tobacco¬ 
smoking. I have not the slightest doubt that 
children and young people, during the period of 
growth, are more easily injured by tobacco than full- 
grown men. I regard the growing frequency of 
cigarette-smoking by boys as a serious menace to the 
national physique.” 

A Serious Evil. 

Dr. Jordan Lloyd, another of our best-known doctors, 
says, “The habit that you are waging war against 
(juvenile smoking) is serious and increasing, and unless 
it is checked must result in evils of great maguitude.” 
These are the testimonies of two of the best-known 
medical men of Birmingham. Shall we give heed to 
them, and follow the little spider in shunning that 
which is injurious to our bodies ? 

Rugby School. 

In Rugby School no smoking is allowed, and I 
suppose no school stands higher in health. So strict 
is the rule that if a scholar is known to smoke on his 
way home for vacation, he is expelled from the 
school. 

Employers and Smokers. 

America is far in advance of us in their rules with 
regard to smoking, and many firms will not employ a 
boy who smokes, if the}' know it ; and many of our 
own employers of labour speak most strongly against 
the habit. Sir Richard Tangyesays, “My experience 
tells me that the habit takes the edge off a lad’s 
energies, it tends to make him indolent, aud induces 
dryness of throat, leading to drinking.” 

Boys ! never Smoke. 

There can be no doubt that juvenile smoking is an 
unmitigated evil from every point of view. My 
advice to boys is never to smoke till they are twenty- 
five, and then to consider when they get to that age 
whether it is worth while to begin. 

Let us be determined, boys, not to be outdone by 
a spider. As he shuns that prey which might injure 
him, so let us shun those things that are harmful to 
our physical well-being, so that we may grow up 
with characters that shall be pure, strong, and good. 

What a Boy is Doing. 

This is a boy’s question, and more can be done 
by boys than by those of us who are older. A boy, 
aged nine, in Llanelly, in South AVales, cut a pledge 
form out of a Weekly Post (January, 1904), containing 
a report of one of our meetings, signed it, and sent it 
to our Secretary, who sent him a dozen more, which 
he returned duly signed and filled up and properly 
vouched for. He also asked for another 100 cards, 
which were sent him; that was not bad for a boy, eh ? 
Then let us go aud do likewise. 

Let us shun tobacco ourselves, and then do all in our 
power to get others on our side. By so doing we 
shall not only be helping ourselves, but be doing 
something to rid our country of what is acknowledge d 
on all hands to be amongst our greatest evils. 






56 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


UNITED KINGDOM BAND OF HOPE UNION. 


President-SiR GEORGE WILLIAMS. 
Vice-Presidents. 


The Archbishop of Dublin. 
The Bishop of Chichester. 

The Bishop of London. 

The Bishop of St. Albans. 

The Bishop of Stepney. 

Rev. Canon Barker, M.A. 
Lady Biddulph. 

George Cadbury, Esq. 

Mrs. W. S. Caine. 

The Earl of Carlisle. 

The Countess of Carlislf. 
Rev. J. Clifford, M.A., LL.D. 
Richard Cory, Esq., J.P. 

T. A. Cotton, Esq., J.P. , C.C. 
James Edmunds, Esq., M.D. 


Rev. Canon Fleming, B.D. 

The Dean of Hereford. 

Rev. R. F. Horton, M.A..D.D. 
Sir W. Lawson, Bart., M.P. 

Sir George Livesey, C.E. 

Rev. F. B. Meyer, B.A. 
Alderman F. Priestman, J.P. 
Frederic Smith, Esq. 

Lady Henry Somerset. 

Miss Agnes Weston. 

George White, Esq., M.P. 

The Venerable Archdeacon 
Wilberforce, D.D. 

Mrs. H. J. Wilson. 

The Hon. Mrs. Eliot Yorke. 


Executive Committee. 
Chairman— Lionel Mundy. 
Vice-Chairman —John Wills, F.S.Sc. 
Treasurer —John Thomas, J.P. 

London Members. 


Mrs. W. S. Caine. 
William Bingham. 
Rev. F. Stoker Clark, 
Charles W. Garrard. 
G. S. Lucraft. 


M.A. 


J. I. Morrell. 

A. Newton. 

Sir Thomas Pile, Bart., D.L. 
Walter N. Rook, LL.B. 
Edward Wood, J.P. 


Provincial Members. 


William E. Bell, Newcastle. 

A. A. Bryan, Cardijff. 

Howard F. Chaplin, Cambs. 
George T. Cooke, Bristol. 

E. J. Day, Harrogate. 

Miss Docwra, Kelvedon, Essex. 
Jacob Earnshaw, Manchester . 
T. E. Hallsworth, Manchester. 


Rev. David Heath, Derby. 

J. A. Herrick, Birmingham. 
Henry Holloway, J.P Surrey 
R. Murray Hyslop, Kent. 

Rev. J. Thorn ley, Sheffield. 

C. J. Whitehead, Sheffield. 
William Wilkinson, Belfast. 
The Hon. Mrs. Eliot Yorke. 


Secretary— Charles Wakely. 

Trade Manager—J udson Bonner. 

General Lecturers. 

Frank Adkins. Walter N. Edwards, F.C.S. 

School Lecturers. 

Toseph Addison, Nth'n Counties I G. Avery Roff, S’th’n Counties. 
John Burgess, F.C.S., London. I W.T. Stanton, Midlands. 

R. Prys-Jones, Wales. 


Offices : 59 and 60, Old Bailey, London, E.C. 
Bankers: London, City & Midland Bank, Ludgate Hill, 
London, E.C. 


THE 

$ cmb of gj opi'djvonicU' 

APRIL, 1904. 


Arrangements have been 
The May made for the anniversary meetings 

Meetings. of the Union, to be held on 
Tuesday and Wednesday, May 
io and n ; and we trust that this early 
notification will determine large numbers 
of our friends to be present at the meetings, 
which will be of a specially attractive character. 
The programme will include meetings for 
prayer on Sunday morning, May 8 ; the 
business meeting of the Council on Tuesday, 
May io, at Kxeter Hall ; and the following 
public meetings at Exeter Hall on Wednesday, 
May ii A Breakfast Meeting at nine 
o'clock for specially invited guests, at which 
Sir George Livesey will preside, and at which 
addresses will be given by Sir Victor Horsley, 
Mr. J. Williams Benn, Chairman of the London 
County Council, Mr. J. H. Yoxall, M.P., and 
others on the subject of the importance of 


Juvenile Temperance Effort. At half-past 
two a conference of workers will be held, 
when the Rev. Carey Bonner, Secretary of 
the Sunday School Union, will read a 
paper on “How can the Pulpit and the 
Sunday School be made more helpful to 
the Band of Hope ? ” to be followed 
by a Model Bible Temperance Address 
to Children by Mr. Charles Harvey of the 
Kent County Band of Hope Union, and dis¬ 
cussion. At seven o’clock the great public 
meeting will take place in the Large Hall, at 
which Sir George Williams will preside, and 
addresses will be given by the Rev. H. Russell 
Wakefield (Rector of St. Mary’s, Bryanstone 
Square, London), Mayor of Marylebone, the 
Rev. D. L.^ Ritchie, of the Congregational 
Institute, Nottingham, and Mr. T. H. Sloan, 
M.P. A choir of400 Senior Band of Hope mem¬ 
bers will render a selection of music during 
the evening. Gratuitous tickets for any of these 
meetings will be sent to friends at a distance 
on application to the General Secretary. 


Our friends and delegates from 
Autumnal the respective Unions are re 
Gatherings. quested to make a note of the 
date of the Autumnal Meetings, 
which will be held at Nottingham in the week 
commencing Sunday, September 18. 


Friends of the School Scheme 
The School will be interested to know that 
Lectures the school lecturers have been 
ou Trainiog paying a second visit to the 
Ships. various Training Ships of the 

Royal Navy, where their lectures 
to the young sailors have been greatly appre¬ 
ciated. I11 relation to the Temperance propa¬ 
ganda amongst the boys of the Navy, it is 
interesting to learn that, according to the Daily 
Express of March 14, “ The Prince of Wales 
paid a surprise visit to the first-class cruiser, 
Crescent, the vessel which he commanded 
as captain on the cruise to Scotland, which 
qualified him for rank as rear-admiral. 
He also inspected the girls of the Marine 
Orphanage and the boy artificers of the Asia , 
and in a short speech he advised the boys 
whatever they did always to be teetotalers.” 
This endorsement of the teaching we have 
so long been giving, is another evidence of the 
interest shown by members of the Royal 
Family in the progress of the Temperance 
movement. 


The New School Scheme Fund. 

U PWARDS of £6,000 have now been pro¬ 
mised towards the Ten Thousand Pounds 
• Fund, but still many of our friends 
have not yet expressed their intentions 
on the subject. It is of the first importance 
that the total sum should be promised within as 
short a time as possible, as the Committee are 
anxious not to drop one jot or tittle of this im¬ 
portant work, but rather to largely increase it ; 

















THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


57 


and they earnestly hope that the great useful¬ 
ness of this Scheme for conveying to the young 
mind sound teaching as to the nature and 
effects of alcoholic drinks will constrain those 
who have not already promised assistance to 
communicate with the Secretary without delay. 
They would like to be able to announce at che 
May Meetings that the whole ^10,000 had 
been guaranteed, thus assuring the con¬ 
tinuance of this most excellent work for 
another five years. 

The following is a list of the additional 
amounts promised :—- 


(Payable in April in five yearly instalments.') 


Miss Priscilla H. Peckover 

• • fiU 5 ° 

0 

0 

• Mr. Arthur Backhouse 

100 

0 

0 

The Duke of Bedford, K G. 

100 

0 

0 

Mr. J. H. Fox, J.P. 

100 

0 

0 

Mr.J. B. Braithwaite, J tin. 

50 

0 

0 

Mrs. T. A. Cotton 

50 

0 

0 

Rev. Robert Dawson, B.A. 

50 

0 

0 

Mr. G. B. Hunter, J.P. . . 

50 

0 

0 

Mr. Alexander Peckover, ILL- 

50 

0 

0 

Mr. F. T. Eason 

25 

0 

0 

Miss M. C Martineau 

25 

0 

0 

Mr. J. J. Norton, J.P. 

25 

0 

0 

Mrs. R. II. Penney 

25 

0 

0 

Mr. R. A. Penney 

25 

0 

0 

Mr. J. W. Turner 

25 

0 

0 

Mr. P\ E. Duckham 

*5 

0 

0 

Mr. G. Franklin, J.P. 


0 

0 

Mr. Wm. Bingham 

to 

10 

0 

Miss Mary Kemp 

10 

10 

0 

Mr. W. McMullen 

10 

10 

0 

Mr. John Carr. . 

10 

0 

0 

Mr F. A. Moillet 

10 

0 

0 

Mrs. Tiieodore M fillet 

10 

0 

0 

Mr. C. W. Sears 

10 

10 

0 

Mr. W. Bacon 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. J. M. Cable 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. R. Reynolds Fox 

5 

5 

0 

Mrs. Livens 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. J. E. Lucas 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. Alan Paul 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. Thomas Penny. . 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. C. L. Rothera, B.A. 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. G. B. Rothera 

5 

5 

0 

Mrs. Hannah Salter 


5 

0 

Mr. Aid. J. T. Sears, J.P. . . 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. W. W. Thompson 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. Charles Tite 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. H. B. Varwell, J.P. 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. W. Rowland Waller . . 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. W. Winsford 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. G. Bywaters 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. T. Hugh Fox 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. Thomas Fox 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. & Mrs. W. T. Hailes . . 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. Edward Little 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. T. S. Penny 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. Thomas Piper 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. W. B. Redmayne 

5 

0 

0 

Miss Maude Robinson 

5 

0 

0 

Mrs. Bernard Roth 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. Joseph Wates 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. W. Willett 

5 

0 

0 

Mr.^Oliver C. Wilson 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. Douglas Young 

5 

0 

0 


The “Band of Hope Review” 
Banner Competition. 

AST year the Editor of the Band of Hope 
Review offered five handsome Banners 
and five small Libraries for a competi¬ 
tion among Bands of Hope. The idea 
was to provoke the members to make them¬ 
selves diligent recruiters for new members, 
and the prizes were arranged so as to make 
the competitions as fair as they could possibly 
be. Class A was for small societies having 
less than 40 members; Class B, from 40 to 70; 
Class C, from 70 to 120 ; Class D, from 120 to 
200; and Class E, all societies having over 200 
members. 

The societies competing were also bound to 
sell or distribute to half of their members at 
least a monthly copy of the Band of Hope 
Review. A large number of societies entered 
into the contest, and, though some dropped 
out during the year, it was officially reported 
to the Editor that the new effort, even when 
it failed in securing a prize, had proved of 
great service in promoting an increase of 
membership. It encouraged a loyal, earnest, 
and aggressive spirit among the members. 

The awards were made to the following 
societies :— 

A Banner. —Ripley Wesleyan Band of Hope. 

Library. —Brentford Congregational Band of 
Hope. 

B Banner. —Maidenhead Wesleyan Band of Hope. 

Library. —Acton Wesleyan Band of Hope. 

C Banner. —Marsh St. Band of Hope, Walthamstow. 

Libraries. —Ashford Baptist Band of Hope, and 
Southminster United Baud of Hope. 

D Banner. —No award. 

E Banner. —St. George’s Mission Band of Hope, 
Workington. 

Library. —Rushden Independent Wesleyan Baud 
of Hope. 

We may add that the banners were supplied 
by the Publishing Department of the United 
Kingdom Band of Hope Union, and that they 
gave great satisfaction. 


“ Stirring Scenes in Temperance Work,” was 
the title of the opening article in the March number 
of The Quiver. It proved to be an interesting con¬ 
tribution from the pen of Hugh B. Philpott. The 
references were to events in the lives of Father 
Mathew, Dan O’Connell, John Dunlop. J. B. Gough, 
the late Archbishop Temple, and Sir Wilfrid Dawson. 
Several illustrations aided emphasis to the facts re¬ 
told in the article. 


“ The Bibee, the Teetotae Text-Book,” by John 
Kempster, has just been published in a penny 
pamphlet form by Richard J. James, at the Central 
Temperance Book Room, 3 and 4, Rondon House 
Yard, E C. It is a clear, calm, brief, and most admir¬ 
able statement of the case for Total Abstinence from 
the Scriptural point of view, and would prove verv 
useful to those who often hear the conventional 
defences of alcohol-drinking based on a superficial 
use of texts. Mr. Kempster’s modest tractate is 
worth many a bulky v ilume; it supplies much in a 
little space, and that is a strong recommendation in u 
busy age like this. 










THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Sam Strong’s Struggles 

AN ORIGINAL READING.* 

By John Rhodes, C.M. 

1 “Sam Strong! do you think you will ever be able 
to govern your tongue, my boy? It is ofcen wagging 
at the wrong time,” said our teacher, Mr. Wright, one 
morning in school, during the Bible Lesson. 

Mr. Wright did not like us boys to speak to each 
other when he was teaching us; and, of course, he 
was quite right when he said it was rude conduct, to 
begin with, and, another thing, we should get into 
a bad habit of discussing among ourselves some point, 
instead of listening to what was being said to us, and 
allowing the whole class to join and help with the 
difficulty. 

“ Please, sir,” said Tom Browne, who sat next to 
him, “ Sam wants to know what the word ‘utmost’ 
means.” 

“Ah!” responded the teacher, “why caunot Sam 
put up his hand and ask the question aloud, then we 
will see who can give him the best answer ? 

“ Now, Sam, what is it that is puzzling you ? ” 

“ I’m very sorry I spoke to Tom, sir,” was Sam’s 
response, “ but I should like to know the full meaning 
of the word ‘ utmost.’ Is it the same as ‘ uttermost ’ ?” 

In our Bible Lessons just lately we were studying 
the twenty-first verse of the twenty-third chapter of 
Proverbs: “ For the drunkard and the glutton shall 
come to poverty, and drowsiness shall clothe a man 
with rags.” 

Mr. Wright had been telling us what a lot of money 
was spent on beer, wine, and spirits. He had shown 
us that for ordinar} drinking they were so expensive 
that they kept people who drank them every day so 
much poorer than they otherwise would be. 

In our Science Lessons he had been showing us 
that alcohol has great and good uses for certain 
things outside the body; but when put inside the 
body, in the shape of beer, wine, or spirits, as so 
many people were doing, it was not a food—it was 
not only doing no good, Out was doing the body great 
harm. He showed how it affected the important vital 
organs and nerves of the body ; he also reminded us 
about the men and women we see who come reeling 
out of the public-houses, unable to speak sensibly or 
to walk straight. 

We knew he was trying to make us feel and know 
that it would be best for us not to touch any of these 
drinks any time. 

Mr. Wright had written this on the Black-board: 

“Temperance Peedge. 

“ I promise, by God’s help, to abstain from all intoxi¬ 
cating liquors as beverages, and will do my utmost to 
induce others to do the same. 1 ’ 

We had all read it over very slowly and carefully, 
and had been talking about the long words when Sam 
Strong spoke to his neighbour, just as we got to that 
word “ utmost.” 

“Now,” said teacher, “let us see who can give the 
best and fullest answer to Sam’s question.” 

“Please, sir,” said Harry Gray, “ it means to do a 
lot.” 

Tom Browne said “ It means to do all.” 

One boy said it meant ever so much, and another 
said it meant something about B the end, because we 
rtad of the utmost parts of the earth. 

“ Well, Sam, which is the best answer so far ?” asked 
our teacher. 

“ I think, sir, Tom Browne’s goes farthest, because 
he says it means to do all, but I want to know when 
has anyone done all?" 

“ Right, Sam ; his answer is the nearest. Let me 
add, that it means to do all that is possible to gain 
success, never to stop till we have succeeded. Do you 
now see what it means, Sam ?” 

“ Yes, thank you, sir,” was the ready reply. 

In the writing lesson the monitors gave us pieces 

*N.R—This Reading is copyright, and cannot be reprinted without 
permission from the Unitea Kingdom Band of Hope Union 


of paper, and Mr. Wright said we might copy the 
pledge very carefully, take it home, read it over to our 
parents, and ask them if we might put our address 
and the date, sign the pledge and keep it, if we were 
not already Baud of Hope boys. 

After school was over, Tom Browne and Sam were 
going home together, as they were next-door neigh¬ 
bours, when Sam said to Tom, “ I shall not sigu that 
pledge. I always have a drop of father’s beer, and it 
has not hurt me yet. What do you think ?'” 

“Well,Sam,” respondedTom, “ I am already a Band 
of Hope boy, as you know. I have signed the pledge 
and mean to keep it, by God’s help, same as my father 
does.” 

“That’s just it,” said Sam, “your father does not 
drink and mine does.” He sighed heavily as he 
thought of his own home, and mentally contrasted it 
with his companion’s home. 

“Do you feel that it is true what Mr. Wright says 
about drink making people poor, becaise they spend 
so much money on it ? ” asked Sam. 

“Why, of course,” replied Tom, “if I have only a 
penny to spend, and want a drawing pencil and a top, 
and each costs a penny, if I buy the top I cannot buy 
the pencil as well.” 

“ Wbat do you mean by that?” asked Sam. 

“ I like spinning a top,” laughingly replied Tom, 
“ as well as any boy, but I can manage to live without 
one. A pencil is really necessary for me, because I 
must have one to draw with. So, people can and do 
live without drinking these intoxicating drinks; but 
the people who spend their money on these drinks 
have so much less to spend on food and clothes, and 
are not as well fed, or well-dressed, or comfortable as 
they might be, and their children suffer, too.” 

Sam looked at Tom, and then at himself, and said, 
“You are right there, as we can easily see by looking 
at each other. I never thought of it in that way 
before ; I must think about it.” 

“ Let us talk it over with Mr. Wright when we get 
back to school,” said Tom, “and ask him; he is 
always ready to help, you know.” 

The two boys entered their own homes. What a 
contrast! Tom was lovingly greeted by his mother, 
and, after washing his hands and face, he sat down to 
a well-spread table. Sam’s first greeting was an order 
to be sharp and fetch the dinner beer. He took up 
the jug and the coppers and started on his errand. 

“ If it were not for this beer,” thought he to him¬ 
self, “we might have a better dinner, better clothes, 
better everything. My father works at the same place, 
and used to get as much money as Tom’s father did 
when they were both workmen, and now Mr. Browne 
is a foreman.” 

He reached the “ Ring o’ Bells,” entered the door, 
put his jug and money on the counter. No need for 
him to say what he wanted, for the landlord knew 
him and his jug very well. 

The boy glanced round with awakened senses, and 
saw what had never struck him before—good clothes, 
good food, behind the bar, poverty and rags in front 
of it. 

“What did that verse say ? ‘ The drunkard shall come 
to poverty.’ That’s just it,” thought he. 

“ Here, wake up, Sam, and take the beer home ; 
you’re getting drowsy, my lad,” said the landlord. 

Sam started, for he was busily thinking of the 
lessons he had received in school. He took up the 
jug and started for home again. 

That man had said he was drowsy, and he thought 
of the rest of the verse, “ Drowsiness shall clothe a 
man with rags.” 

“That’s just it,” he murmured to himself, as he 
went along home. “ Father is always too drowsy to 
go to work before breakfast Monday mornings, because 
lie has done so much drinking on the Sunday. I 
wonder how it could be altered.” 

He reached home and sat down with the family to 
dinner. The beer was poured out as usual for father 
and mother, and the meal proceeded. 

“ What’s the matter, Sam ? ” asked his father, “ I’ve 
asked you to have a drop of beer twice, and got no 
answer. Are you ill or dreaming.” 

“ No, father ; I’m not ill, nor dreaming, thank you ; 




THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


59 


but I was busy thinking over something we had at 
school this morning,” was the response. 

“ Put your lessons out of your mind while you are 
having dinner, lad; think of them as much as you 
like at school,” was the father’s advice. 

“You’ve missed your beer, my boy,” continued Mr. 
Strong, “just through bothering over your lessons.” 

“ Well, father,” was Sam’s reply, “shouldyou mind 
if I did not have any ?” 

“ Oh! I don’t mind at all,” laughingly replied his 
father, “ there’ll be all the more for me.” 

* * * * 

Sam and Tom went together to school that after¬ 
noon, and Tom noticed that the former trudged along 
in deep thought, scarcely saying a single word till he 
got near the school, when he suddenly broke the 
silence by saying, “ I’ll talk to Mr. Wright about it.” 

He was very quiet all the afternoon ; in fact, he 
was so very quiet that teacher also thought he must 
be unwell, and asked him what was the matter. 

“Please, sir,” said Sam, “ I should like to ask you 
something after school, if you don’t mind.” 

“ Very well, Sam, I’ll stop as long as you like.” 

When the rest of the boys were dismissed, Sim 
came to the teacher’s desk, and they had a good talk 
together. The boy had to tell the master about his 
experiences and thoughts while fetching the beer; 
how he had often tasted it, and thought, of course, it 
was good to drink, because his father and mother and 
many more men and women drank it every day ; yet, 
after the lessons he had learned in school, and the 
new thoughts that had come into his mind, he would 
not only like to sign the pledge himself, but to get 
his sister and both parents to do the same. Some of 
his puzzled thoughts were these : If he signed the 
pledge, would it be right for him to fetch the beer ? 
What would be the consequences if he refused to 
letch it ? Would he ever be able to get father and 
mother to sign ? 

“ Now, Sam.” said Mr. Wright, “ take one step at 
a time, and prepare hopefully for a good struggle. 
If you sign the pledge, and do not fetch the beer, who 
would have to do it ? ” 

“ Either mother or little Mary,” was' the reply, 
“ and Mary never has fetched any.” 

“ Did you ever drink any when you fetched it ? ” 

“ Oh ! yes, sir, when it was a very hot day, and 
father and mother knew I did, for I told them. They 
said if I drank it before dinner I could not expect any 
with my dinner, but now I never mean to touch it 
again.” 

“ Does Mary have any ? ” 

“ No, sir; mother says she is too little yet.” 

“ Well, my boy, we must do all we can to prevent 
Mary fetching it lest she should be tempted to taste 
it. Would you like mother to have to go for the 
beer ? ” 

“ Oh ! no, sir. I should not like her to get like 
some of the poor women I saw there to-day.” 

“ I think the course is clear now, Sam,” said his 
teacher. “ You need not touch any beer, even if you 
do not sign a pledge, but it is always a help and a 
protection when anyone does sign. You have a copy 
of the pledge—get father and mother to let you sign 
it, and you must go on fetching the beer though you 
will not like doing so. Then we will both think and 
pray to God about the matter of dealing for the best 
with the position before you.” 

“ I’ll ask father if I may sign it to-night, sir.” 

“ No time like to-day, lad. Is there anything more 
you would like to know ? ” asked Mr. Wright. 

“ Yes, sir,” boldly said Tom ; “ if I try to get father 
and mother to sign, will you please help me ? ” 

“ Of course I will,” was the ready reply ; “ does not 
the pledge make us promise to keep it, and do our 
utmost to induce others to do the same ?” 

“What is the best for me to do first, sir ? ” 

“ Get father to let you sign the pledge ; then we’ll 
paste it on a piece of cardboard, and you can hang it 
up in your bedroom, read it over every morning, and 
pray God to help you to keep it yourself, and show 
you some way to get both father and mother to sign 
one.” 

Mr. Wright cordially shook hands with Sam as they 


bade each other “ good afternoon.’ The boy bounded 
along home, longing and hoping. The master pro¬ 
ceeded home slowly, thinking over Sam’s case, and 
wondering how he could help for the best. 

The next morning Sam’s face was beaming with 
delight, as he rushed to meet his teacher coming to 
school. 

“ Oh ! sir, I’m so happy, father has let me sign the 
pledge ; here it is ” 

They entered the school, the pledge was duly 
affixed to the card-board, and put to dry till going- 
home time. 

A sudden thought occurred to the teacher. “ Have 
you many pictures at home, Sam ? ” 

“ No, sir,” was the reply. 

“ Here,” said Mr. Wright, reading it, “ is a frame aud 
glass which I used to have for a picture ; we will cut 
the card-board to fit the frame, and perhaps father 
will let you hang it in the kitchen, where you all cau 
see it every day.” 

That night Mr. Wright was walking round by Sam’s 
house, and saw that there was a largish garden at the 
back of it in a very rough state. The following day 
he asked Sam if they ever made any use of the 
garden. 

“No, sir,” replied Sam, “not since father took to 
going to the public every night and Saturday after¬ 
noons.” 

The master suggested that Sam should dig it up, 
and try and get his father’s old interest in gardening 
awakened, also promising to help with seeds and 
plants to put in. 

Tom Browne offered to help with the digging, 
and that very evening the two lads commenced opera¬ 
tions. A night or two after, when tea was over, just 
as Mr. Strong was off to his usual evening haunt, 
“The Ring o’ Bells,” Sam said to him, “Will you 
come for a minute and see what we have been doing 
in the garden, please, father?” 

“No time, lad,” replied the father, and he lounged 
away. 

Sam turned sorrowfully away with a deep sigh, and 
stood for a moment wondering whether it would 
be of any use him trying to stop his father’s down¬ 
ward career. But his teacher’s oft-repeated maxim 
came into his head, “ If at first you don’t succeed, try 
again and he buckled to his work with such a will 
that by nightfall the two lads had cleared the garden 
of the roughest weeds, and had dug up a decent sized 
piece of it. 

They set to work again the next evening ; and this 
time, just as father was lighting up his pipe prepara¬ 
tory to setting off, Sam again said- - 

“ Will you come for a minute and see what we have 
been doing in the garden, please, father ? ” 

“Yes, lad,” said Mr. Strong. He entered the gar¬ 
den, aud was surprised to see what they had done. 
He laughed as he saw Tom struggling with the fork. 

“ Wouldn’t it be nice to have a good garden again, 
father, same as we used to have?” queried Sam. 

“Yes, lad, it would; but where shall we get the 
things to plant it with ? ” 

“ Oh ! father, Mr. Wright says he will help me with 
some plants and seeds; he is so fond of gardening, 
and has such a nice garden himself. Isn’t that kind 
of him ? ” 

“Yes,” replied the father, “but look here, Tom, 
hold your fork like this,” and he took the fork into 
his hands. 

Mr. Strong was really fond of gardening, aud had 
once been as proud of his piece as anyone could be, but 
that demon “ drink’’ got him in his clutches, aud he 
neglected his garden, his home, and sometimes even 
his work. 

A quick thought flashed through Sam’s mind, as 
he saw the fork in his father’s hands. Perhaps, heie 
and now was the chance of getting his father inte¬ 
rested in the garden and home again. 

“ B’ather,” said the lad, “could you spare a little 
while and help us with this last piece? You could 
show us the way to dig then, and it would be done so 
much better than Tom and I can do it.” 

Strong took off his coat, turned up his sleeves, and 


6o 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


began to dig. In twenty minutes be was tired, and 
thought he had done enough, but his son had brought 
a chair into the garden, and said, “Now, father, you 
have a rest, and watch me dig for a bit.” 

The father laughingly sat down, threw his coat 
across his shoulders, and said, “Begin.” Sam dug 
away till the sweat poured down his face. As the 
father watched the lad at work, his thoughts went 
back to the time when his garden had been a pride 
aud pleasure, a healthy recreation, and a profitable 
hobby; for he had grown vegetables in plenty, and 
had won several prizes for the lovely flowers and 
plants he had cultivated. What had he given it up 
for? He looked at his boy, w'orking so hard and so 
heartily, and a feeling of anger with himself took 
hold of him; then he said, “Now let me have a 
turn, aud you aud Tom can rest, or pull out the 
weeds.” 

At it they went, and in another half-hour they found 
they had finished the digging, and got the ground 
fairly ready to be plauted. 

Mr. Strong said, “ How tired I am ; I’m off now.” 

Sam felt it better not to try for too much at present, 
so he said, “Thank you, father, we havj got on well 
to-night, with your help.” 

He reported progress to Mr. Wright, and asked, 
“ When could you let me have the plants and seeds, 
please, sir?” 

“ If you think father would not mind, I'll come and 
bring them to-night, and have a look at your work, 
then you could introduce me to him, and we might 
have a chat together.” 

“Thank you, sir; that will be grand,” said Sam, 
who cheerfully set about his school work. 

* * * * 

When afternoon school was over, Sam eagerly 
watched for his father’s return from work ; and, while 
they were having tea, he mentioned that his teacher 
hoped to bring the plants and seeds, and see how they 
had got on- When tea was over, Mr. Strong took up 
his cap to go off again to the public-house, but Sam 
cheerfully said, “Now, father, come and see if we 
can do anything in the garden before teacher comes,” 
and, seizing his father by the hand, he coaxed him 
into the garden. 

They looked round, carefully digging, or raking a 
bit here and there, and Sam said, “ Wouldn’t it be 
nice, if we had a nice garden ? ” 

“There’s no reason why we should not, lad, if I 
could find the money to spend on it,” replied the 
man. 

It was on the tip of the lad’s tongue to say, “What 
about the drink money?” but again he felt it would 
be better, perhaps, to be silent; and just then up came 
Mr. Wright. 

The lad introduced the two men to each other, and, 
having shaken hands, they all fell to examining the 
seeds and plants, and discussing where best to put 
them ; then came the marking out of the various 
plots, and tne planting. 

How busy they were! They worked and chatted, 
and the minutes slipped by till a couple of hours had 
gone, and still there were some left to be planted. 
Sam slipped into the house, and, after an earnest talk 
with mother, popped off to the shop where they 
bought groceries, speedily returned, and helped 
mother to set the table ready for supper. 

Mother seemed to be infected with the boy’s 
earnestness, and at 8.45 she went into the garden, 
delighted to see her husband spending a whole even¬ 
ing at home, and asked Mr. Wright if he would kindly 
join them at supper. He was going to beg to be 
excused, as he did not feel like intruding, but, catch¬ 
ing sight of Sam’s pleading eyes, he accepted. 

As they proceeded indoors Mr. Strong thought of 
their usually bare table, aud felt ashamed for his new¬ 
found friend being invited to nothing; but he was 
very pleased when they entered to find the table 
nicely laid, and a decent supper for them. 

There was one thing missing, and he asked, 
“Where’s the supper beer?” His wife replied, “I 
thought, perhaps, you would not mind having some 
lemonade to-night, as we have a teetotaler with us.” 

They were so thirsty, aud the lemonade was so good, 


that they enjoyed their supper heartily, chatting 
earnestly on gardening and other things, not quite 
forgetting Sam and his pledge. 

“Ah!” said the father, “the lad will want us to 
sign next, I suppose ? ” 

“Yes,” quietly responded Mr. Wright, “ and I hope 
he will succeed in his desire.” 

Mr. Wright glanced at the clock. “ Why, look,” 
exclaimed he, “it is nearly ten o’clock.” 

Mr. Strong said it was a long time since he had 
had such a nice evening, and hoped that it would not 
be the last they would have together. After a word of 
prayer they all shook hands, and the guest departed. 

Next morning, at school, Satn told his teacher that 
father had not gone to the public at all that night, 
and in the morning he had said he had not slept so 
well for a long time, nor felt so well on arising, as 
he had done that morning. 

* *- * 

Time went on. Sam talked over with his father the 
points he had learned at school on the drink question ; 
the two became good companions, working in the 
garden or going for rambles together. Mr. Strong 
went less and less to the public, aud spent most of 
his spare time in the garden and the home. Sam still 
fetched the dinner beer, and was hoping and longing 
for the day to come when this hateful errand would 
be ended. 

Mr. Strong found himself better in health aud 
better in pocket with his exercise, and having less 
beer, as he said, it was like having a rise in wages. 
Now he could afford better clothes for his family and 
himself, their home became most comfortable, and 
their garden was a beauty spot again. 

It was not always easy work for Sam. Some of his 
father’s evil companions tried hard to induce him to 
rejoin them, and it often caused the lad many a sigh, 
as he struggled to keep his father on the upward 
path from drink to abstinence, but he never lost 
patience, never lost hope, for he could talk over his 
difficulties with his kind teacher. Yes, and there was 
their Heavenly Father’s help to be counted on. 

Finally, his loving, persistent efforts conquered. 
First Mary signed the pledge, and they both joined 
the Band of Hope. Then there came a day when 
Sam, on arriving at school, said, “Please, sir, may I 
copy out the pledge for father and mother? They 
want to sign it, and would like jou to come round to¬ 
night and see them do it.” 

“ Bravo ! Sam,” was the quick response; “ of course 
I’ll come, with pleasure. Now, boys,” said he, “you 
know what Sam has been trying for. He has done 
his utmost, and, thank God, he has succeeded. As 
Sam Strong’s struggles are over, let’s all give a hearty 
cheer for Sam, who has won his parents for the Tem¬ 
perance Cause, and see how many more of you can get 
others to join, especially your own friends and rela¬ 
tives.” 

Then they made the room ring with their “ hip, 
hip, hurrah!”; and the Master thanked God that Sam 
had been so faithful, and that his patience was now so 
pleasantly rewarded. 

-- 

The Sceptre Life Association, in its 39th annual 
report, adopted on Feb. 25, again produces strong 
proof of the value of total abstinence in promoting 
longevity. In the General Section (very moderate 
drinkers), of 145 expected deaths only no occurred, 
being 75‘86 per cent. In the Abstainers’ Section, ot 
112 expected, only 70 occurred, or 62^ per cent. The 
Society is growing, also in the same direction, for 
of 502 new policies issued, 373 were on the lives of 
total abstainers, aud of these 266 were life abstainers. 
We note, too, that Dr. Kelynack has been appointed 
one of the examining medical officers of the society. 

Temperance F'riends in the south of Fugland 
will note with pleasure that Mr. T. A. Cotton, J.P., 
of Hastleigh, a Vice-President of the Union, was 
elected to the County Council of Hampshire, by a 
majority of three to one over his opponent. Mr. 
Cotton, it will be noticed, is to preside at the After¬ 
noon Conference at the May Meetings of the Union. 




THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


The Child messengers Act. 

By M. A. Pauli, (Mrs. John Ripley), 

Author of" Tim's Troubles," “ Bart's Joy," 

George ... . A Band op hope Boy. 

Polly. Child of Drunken Parents. 

Sam Norton... ... ... ... Polly's Father. 
Lizzie. George's Sister. 


Polly. —George, I want to tell you something. 

Geovge. —Go ahead, Polly; I’m listening. 

P .—It’s not Lizzie I’m speaking to. 

Lizzie {laughing )—1 can’t help hearing, Polly; but I 
won’t interrupt. You and George may go on talking 
and not take any notice of me. 

P ,—Things are so different to what they were. 
It’s bad for me. 

G .—How’s that, Polly? I thought they were a bit 
better. They don’t get drunk quite so often, 
do they ? 

P.—l don’t mean that. It’s about what I have to 
suffer. 

G.— Poor Polly! 

P .—I never get any sweeties now, George, ’cause I 
never get a chance to fetch any beer, 

G. —Here, Polly, don’t trouble about that; it’s the 
best thing that could happen— (gives her a half¬ 
penny) . 

P.— You may think so, George, but I don’t. 

G. —Public-houses are bad places for little girls 
to go to. 

P. —Not when they give you money for going, and 
sweets and all sorts. 

G .—Oh! yes, Polly, they are; now just listen. 
When you went in, didn’t you see old Bill and Ned 
there ? 

P .—Yes, but they didn’t hurt me. 

G .—When they talked, did they say nice words ? 

P .—They swore a bit, and so does father. 

G.— But, Polly, it hurts you and me and all of us 
when we have to listen to bad words. All the 
publicans ever gave you could not do you so much 
good as hearing bad words and seeing bad sights did 
you harm. 

P.— Couldn’t they, George ? 

G .—Of course, they couldn’t; and if you mean to 
be a good and a happy girl you will be thankful that 
the law was made to prevent your going into the 
public-house and seeing bad sights and hearing bad 
words. 

P .—Did they make a law about it, George ? 

G .—Indeed, they did, Polly; a law to save you and 
me and all of us children from going to the public- 
houses, and I wish the law could reach your father 
and mother, Polly, and keep them outside, too. Then 
your father would buy you toys and sweets better than 
any the publicans gave you. 

P .—Shall I tell him what you say, George ? 

G. —If you like, Polly; but, perhaps, he would get 
vexed. Suppose, instead, you ask him to our Band 
of Plope Festival next week, and to take you. I can 
get a ticket for you for 4 r i. and he would get one for 
6 d. for himself. Perhaps, he would if you spoke very 
pleasantly. Lizzie will go with you, if you would 
rather ; she has tickets to sell. 

/_.— Oh ! yes ; I will go, if you like, Polly. 

P .—Yes ; I’d rather have somebody to help me. 

C.-You can say you’re a Child Messenger from the 
Band of Hope to invite him. 

L .—So we will, George. .Oh! you do think of 
capital ways. 


PART II. 

Polly’s Home—A Bare Room. 

(Sam Norton within. Lizzie knocking.) 

Sam. — Come in, who’s there ? 

{Enter Lizzie and Polly.) 

S. —Why, Polly, what’s come to you to knock at 
your own door? 

/..—Please, sir, she’s come with me. 

A.—And’s who’s me ? 


61 

L .—I am a Child Messenger from the Band of Hope 
to ask you to buy a ticket for our Festival next week, 
and one for Polly, also, if you will be so kind. 

A. ( laughing )—Kind? kind? I’m not kind. I’m a 
horrid, drunken brute, don’t you know that ? Didn’t 
Polly tell you ? 

L .—No, sir. 

.V.—Bless me! what do you call me “sir” for? 

L .—Because I hope you will do as I ask, and they 
tell us at the Band of Hope always to speak respect¬ 
fully to our elders. 

S. —Well, I suppose I am your elder, but I doubt 
whether I’m your better, child. What’s the price ? 

L. —Only sixpence, sir, for you, and fourpence for 
Polly. Here are my tickets, oh ! and I’ve got a pro¬ 
gramme. You see it will be a very nice meeting, and 
may Polly join the Band of Hope, please, sir? 

A.—Oh! I suppose she will join if she likes. She 
doesn’t ask me about everything she does. 

L .—We couldn’t let her join without your leave or 
her mother’s; that’s our rule. 

A'.—And it ain’t a bad rule, neither. Yes, she may 
join if she wants to. 

L .—And you will buy tickets for our Festival ? 

G .—You see, Mr. Norton, we’re Child Messengers 
only. We come not to fetch beer, but to fetch jou 
to our meeting. 

A'.—Ha! ha! not bad, boy. I’ve heard there’s an 
Act of Parliament about not sending the kids to the 
public-houses, and so you’ve come to ask me to your 
treat. Well, I’ll go, I think; it will be a change 
for me anyway, and may my missus go, too ? How 
much for her? 

L. —Sixpence, sir; I’ve got the tickets, please : two 
adults and one juvenile, one and fourpence altogether. 

A'.—You’re a smart, business woman; but suppose 
I haven’t got the money ? 

L .—I expect you have, Mr. Norton- 

A.—But I haven’t till to-night. It’s pay night, you 
know, and the publican has my last shilling in his 
fob, or in his cash-box. 

L .—Then I’ll come again to-morrow morning 
before school, but you won’t disappoint me, will 
you ? 

A.—Should you be disappointed ? 

L. —Of course I should; and so would your own 
little girl. 

A.—Trust me for once, I will pay you; or give my 
missus the price of the tickets. I like your persever¬ 
ance, and I promise you that I will come to your 
Band ot Hope Festival. 

[. Exeunt. ] 

-—- 

The Children’s Cry. 

f HPl little ones are crying 

In many a drunkard’s home, 

And some of them are dying 
In want and pain alone ; 

And some of them are learning 
To tread the paths of sin : 

God fill our hearts with yearning 
For Christ their souls to win. 

Toil on, toil on. 

To save the children from the drink. 

Pray on, pray on, 

Ere they unaided sink. 

Oh listen ! Christ is calling ; 

Oh come and join our Band, 

And aid His children, falling 

Throughout our dear homeland. 

For some are poor and friendless, 

And all are prone to fall, 

But Christ’s great love is endless, 

He died to save us all. 

Toil on, toil on, 

To save the children from the drink. 

Pray on, pray on, 

Ere they unaided sink. 

Edith C. Edwards. 








62 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE . 


Proverbs. 


ARRANGED AND SELECTED BY 
MRS. HARRISON LEE. 


“ a a 1 HISKY drinking is risky drinking.” 

“ Don’t let the public-house swallow your 
]/\[ private house.” 

1 r “ The people propose, the publicans 
oppose.” 

“ Drink like a fish—water only.” 

“ If you get ‘ the best whisky ’ it will get the best 
of you.” 

“ At the sign of ‘ The Angel ’ beware of the devil.” 
“ Better wear the blue than bear the blues.” 

“ The best side of the public-house is the outside.” 
“ Put less in a pewter pot, more in the iron pot.” 

“ If Jack drinks the wages, Jill cannot save them.” 
“ A drunkard’s mouth dries up his pocket.” 

“ Grape juice kills more than grape shot.” 

“ Purses shrink while workmen drink.” 

“ Pots of beer cost many a tear.” 

‘‘Blue ribbon is better than black ruin.” 

“Good wine ruins the purse, aud bad wine the 
stomach.” 

“ Drink injures a man externally, internally, and 
eternally.” 

“ No gift on earth pure water can excel; 

Nature’s the brewer, and she brews it well.” 

-- 

LUee TDapy. 


PATHETIC STORY OF CITY LIFE- 


M ANY readers of the Weekly News will scarcely 
credit the following story, but nevertheless it 
is true. It was told me by an earnest 
Christian worker who is one of the officials of 
the Glasgow Band of Hope. 

This gentleman regularly visits the various families 
represented at his meetings, and, wondering what 
had become of a bright little girl who was a regular 
attender, he determined to pay a visit to her home in 
the east end of the city. 

On reaching the house he knocked at the kitchen 
door, and was admitted by a young girl of about 
fifteen years of age. He asked for her mother, aud 
was told she was in the room. He next inquired for 
the little girl, and was told with a sob that slm was 
dead, and had been placed in a little coffin, which 
was on the kitchen bed. 

Thinking that the poor mother would be weeping 
out her grief alone in the room, the gentleman 
knocked and entered with a view to consoling her. 
What a sight met his gaze ! 

There in the corner lay the half-unconscious 
mother in a helpless state of intoxication, clutching 
wildly in her right hand a half-mutchkin bottle 
with some whisky in it. 

My friend, overcome by the spectacle, gently 
closed the door and returned to the kitchen. 

“Where is your father? ” he asked the girl. 

“ Father has been down at So-and-So’s public- 
house at the corner since eight o’clock this morning. 
And,” continued the now sobbing girl, “the under¬ 
taker has been here, and has threatened to take 
away Wee Mary and bury her in the poor’s ground.” 

Just at that moment the undertaker returned. My 
friend entered into conversation with him, and ended 
by asking him to procure a mourning coach. The 
undertaker did so, and they lifted the little coffin and 
placed it in the coach. They also got in, and were 
about to depart when a very small boy came forward 
and said, “ Please, sir, take me.’ 

They lifted the poor little chap into the conveyance, 
and my informant wrapped the rug round his bare, 
hacked feet. “ It will keep you warm,” he said. 


While on the way to Janefield Cemetery the gentle¬ 
man turned to the lad and said, “ But why did you 
want to come, my lad ? ” 

“ Please, sir, she was ma sister,” the little fellow 
replied, with tears streaming down bis face. 

Not a word more was said on the way; for both my 
friend and the undertaker were deeply touched. 

On their arrival at the cemetery a place was soon 
found for the little coffin, which was gently lowered 
to its last resting-place. Then the sexton filled up 
the grave. 

After all was completed the boy almost broke 
down, his sobs being heartrending even to the 
listeners. 

Taking from his pocket two common playing 
marbles he placed them tenderly on the grave. 
Asked his reason he replied, “ Please, sir, it’s a’ I hae. 
and when ma faither is sober and ma mither is aff 
the spree they will want to ken the place where Wee 
Mary is buried, and I will ken it by the t'va bools.” 

“ Can this have happened in Scotland—in Glas¬ 
gow ? ” I almost hear you ask. 

“ Yes,” I replv. “ and that only a few weeks ago.”— 
Dundee Weekly News. 

-♦>♦:♦♦>- 


R Counter Attraction for the 
Bar. 


MEMBER of the Australian Victorian Alliance, 
who is a commercial traveller, writes :— 

“Anyone who desires an object lesson as to 
the practicability of keeping young men off 
the street and out of hotels can have a very 
good example in the Young Men’s Club at Wangaratta. 

“This club was started about eight months ago 
by Mr. Hutton, a resident of Wangaratta, and a 
member of the Victorian Alliance, and is carried on 
absolutely at his own expense. The premises 
occupied consist of a pretty D.F. brick villa of five 
rooms in the very heart of the towm, plainly but 
comfortably furnished with chairs and tables. There 
is a reading room, stocked with the latest illustrated 
journals and other papers ; a committee room, where 
members of cycle, cricket, and football clubs may 
transact their business, without having afterwards to 
call for ‘drinks all round’ to pay for the room; a 
general sitting room and kitchen, where in the winter 
months Mr. Hutton used once or twice a week to 
provide the young men with tea, coffee, cake, etc. 

“The rooms are opened every week evening from 
7 till io by a caretaker, who keeps the club rooms in 
good order. The club is open to all male persons 
over the age of sixteen years. No questions are 
asked, and there is no charge of anv kind whatever. 
The only rules are, ‘ No Drinking, No Gambling, No 
Bad Language,’ on the premises. Regular atten¬ 
dants usually sign their names in members’ book, 
which contains about 120 names. The average 
nightly attendance is about 30. Those who do not 
read may pDy cards, draughts, dominoes, or other 
games. During the winter months fires were kept 
going in all rooms, and the place is also well lighted. 

“ As the summer months are already here, Mr. 
Hutton ha; brought a first-class filter, and is having 
a supply of towels put into the bathroom so 
that members may have a plentiful supply of pure 
water within and without, during the hot months, at 
any time of the day. 

“ Mr. Hutton deserves great credit for his splendid 
work, and it is such that many men might follow 
who have a little spare cash; or perhaps several 
Temperance men could unite in an effort of this kind 
to form a ‘ club ’ in their own town. 

“ The management of the place is left practically 
to the young men themselves, and a visit to their 
rooms shows that they are well behaved, and that 
they can have a ‘good time’ together, without 
having recourse to the intoxicating cup.” 












THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


6 3 


“ Jottings from my fiote Book.” 


Under this heading, the Rev. W. H. Booth, who 
founded the Hackney Wick Wesleyan Baud of Hope 
a quarter of a century ago, sent a few suggestive 
extracts he had made from his diary, to the Silver 
Jubilee meeting of the society referred to in another 
column. They tell their own tale-—and that, on the 
whole, a sad one—of what he himself had seen in that 
poor neighbourhood when he started the Band of 
Hope. From them we think a few extracts will be 
read with interest by Chronicle readers. Here they 
are:— 

“ Drink the curse of the neighbourhood.” 

“ Landlord of Victoria boasted that he took one- 
third of all working men in the district. Took ^400 
a month; another said he had taken ^650 in a 
month.” 

“ Saw seven women outside door one Saturday night, 
all drunk together—some with babies in arms.” 

‘‘One man, a shoemaker, had got through ^14,000; 
was living in a single room. Another, a gardener, had 
spent los. a week in drink for 30 years.” 

“ Filtered one house, found children in rags, crying 
for food and fire. Went to find both father and 
mother. Both were drinking in public house. When 
remonstrated with, said, ‘ Talk about giving it up ? 
If you knew what it is to have the “ swag ” (thirst), 
you wouldn’t say that. I can’t give it up.’ ” 

“ In another case, at 10 p.m., tound children crying. 
Father had left them ; mother been drinking, and had 
gone to drown herself. Husband and wife fought 
daily; almost always drunk. One of the children 
came home one day with head cut, and covered with 
blood. Mother took him in, cursing all the time, and 
beat him most unmercifully.” 

“ One man spent £5 in drink in one week, before he 
was converted. In Percy Terrace there were six 
women who broke out periodically, and pawned 
everything they had.” 

“ One boy, nine years of age, when dying, would not 
take medicine except out of a brandy bottle. His father 
was drunk on the sofa. ’ 

“ Amongst the first workers in the Band of Hope 
were Miss May Stevenson, daughter of Mr. J. G. 
Stevenson (of hymn-book fame); a beautiful Christian 
and a grand worker.” 

“ One day somebody turned the gas out and we were 
in the dark. The mat was stolen from the front door. 
Soon after the iron Chapel was opened, 105 square 
feet of glass were broken, and we had to cover the 
windows with wire netting. There were frequently 
300 present at the Friday night Band of Hope meet¬ 
ings. We had to dismiss the boys and girls separately 
because of their rudeness. On one occassion, 1 opened 
my eyes during prayer, owing to a strange noise, and 
when I looked they were all on the floor, creeping 
under the seats towards the door. The children were 
often dreadfully poor, and their clothes were both 
scanty and ragged. On one occasion Mr. Bohn shook 
a boy, who was unruly, rather violently, and he 
actually dropped out of his hands quite naked, leaving 
his ragged clothes behind.” 

“We gave a free tea to 300 or 400 poor children at 
the opening, and when the piles of cake were brought 
out ot the Vestry, they made a bolt (a rush) for it, 
and—before we realised what had happened—it had 
all vanished! ” 

-- 

Archdeacon Eyre, of Sheffield, has done a service 
to speakers by inventing a new phrase to apply to 
drinkers. He styled them “ throat worshippers.” It 
was a drinker who said he wished he had a throat as 
long as a giraffe that he might enjoy the sensation of 
drinking longer than he could with the short human 
throat of Nature. It must have been this drinker’s 
first cousin who said that he wished his throat were a 
mile long—for the same reason. These all belong to 
the glorious company of throat worshippers. Thanks, 
Mr. Archdeacon, for the word. 


R Six LUeeks’ Programme. 


E are always glad to see that the model outline 
addresses which appear in the Chronicle 
are appreciated. We have printed about 1,500 
different outlines during the past quarter-of-a-century, 
and our tap is not yet dry. In fact the latest are 
amongst the best. Last mouth we showed how a 
Birmingham society had planned to use twenty-four 
of this year’s Addresses during the present twelve 
months. Here is a fragment of a programme for a 
York Band of Hope, that at Tockwith, showing the 
lessons arranged for six weeks :— 

Jan. 8 New Year’s Lesson, followed by Fruit and Biscuits. 

,, 15 “ A Boy's Temptation.” 

,, 22 “ Drink in Bible Times.” 

,, 29 Concert. 

Feb. 5 “ Pitchers and Brains.” Illustrated by both. 

,, 12 “ Is it right ?” and ” Fresh Air.” 

,, 19 ‘‘Noah’s Ark.” Illustrated. 

A Scripture Lesson is read at every Meeting by a Boy and Girl 
alternately. 

-- 

Summer School. —The Women’s Total Abstinence 
Union is arranging to hold another “ Summer School ” 
for Temperance Workers. It is to be held at Notting¬ 
ham in June, and the Committee is making it as 
attractive and useful as possible. 

Programmes, Flower Show Lists, &c. —The 
Secretary of St. George’s Mission Baud of Hope, 
Croydon, would be pleased to exchange programmes 
and schedules of Flower Shows, with other Secre¬ 
taries. Address, W. E. Cullingford, 6, Arundel Road, 
Croydon. 

Ahem ! —A correspondent has called our attention 
to the fact that a well-known racing horse of this 
season (well-known to some people, perhaps, but not 
to us), is named “ The Band of Hope.” What does it 
mean ? It may be a joke; it may be that there is a 
teetotal racing man ; but we cannot account for the 
fact, and there is no reason that we can see why we 
should regret it. 

Hackney and East Middlesex. —Following the 
suggestions on the subject many vears ago at one of 
the Autumnal Conferences, this Union has made a 
special point of work in Poor Law Schools, and at 
the present time is responsible for the conduct of 
monthly meetings at the Chase Farm Schools,Enfield ; 
Shoreditch Cottage Homes, Romford, and Strand 
Union Schools, Edmonton. With the kind assistance 
of a number of friends interested in this special 
work, a treat was recently given in connection with 
the Bands of Hope at the schools named. The pro¬ 
gramme comprised cinematograph exhibitions, with 
conjuring and ventriloquial entertainments, vocal and 
instrumental music, &c. At each meeting oranges, 
apples, buns, sweets and crackers were liberally dis¬ 
tributed, and in this matter the children in the sick 
and receiving wards were not forgotten. All the 
meetings were very successful and enjoyable, and 
helped to strengthen the hold of the Band of Hope 
on the children and officers of the establishment. 
They were well reported in the various local papers. 
Nearly 3,000 mounted and varnished pledge cards 
have been presented to children, members of these 
Poor-Law Schools Bauds of Hope, and the Secretary 
(Mr. C. W. Garrard) frequently receives letters from 
former members, in various parts of the world, testi¬ 
fying their fidelity to the pledge and interest in the 
Temperance cause. 

--*>♦>•>- 

Invalids need a pleasant and Invigorating Tonic, a 
Tonic, which, instead of leaving bad effects, imparts 
Strength and Energy. “Nonalton,” the Non-alco¬ 
holic Tonic, is the one which maybe absolutely relied 
upon It is made from Grapes and Bark. Nothing 
else will do for those who know Nonalton. Full 
Particulars and List of Agents post free.—F. Wright 
Mundy & Co., Merton Road, Kensington, London, W. 











64 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


iJEanfc of Ibope mnions. 

Lincoln.—The Band of Hope Union and Tempe¬ 
rance Society in this Cathedral city engaged Mr. 
Walter N. Edwards, F.C.S , of the United Kingdom 
Union, to give three lectures this spring in the 
beautiful new Central Hall belpnging to the Union, 
and good audiences attended oh each occasion. The 
subject was “ The Chemical and Physiological Aspect 
of the Temperance Question,” and each lecture was 
illustrated by chemical experiments, diagrams, 
specimens, &c. As the course proceeded the audience 
increased in numbers, and as was fitting the three 
chairmen were Mr. Gravely, President of the Band of 
Hope Union, Mr. John Richardson, J.P., President of 
the Temperance Society, and Dr. F. S. Lambert, a 
highly esteemed medical man. The Committee made 
a great effort to interest Ministers, Christian Fn- 
deavourers, workers generally, and all kinds of 
Temperance Societies and Orders, and they were not 
only completely successful, but they were particularly 
pleased with the amount of solid information so 
pleasantly conveyed to the large audiences by Mr. 
Edwards. 

Maidstone and District.— The annual meeting of 
the Maidstone and District Band of Hope Union was 
held in the Bentlif Room of King Street Church, on 
Wednesday evening, March 9. The president, 
Councillor Styles, occupied the chair. In his address 
the president asked when would our statesmen learn 
the importance of this Temperance work ? and said 
that to neglect the children would lead to lawless 
citizenship. The president spoke of the help he had 
received from Mr. Jollitte, the secretary; and afterwards 
Mr. Abbott, superintendent of the Maidstone Elemen¬ 
tary Schools, expressed his willingness to do what he 
could for the Temperance cause. Mr. Jolliffe read the 
treasurer’s report, which showed a balance in hand of 
6s. 4jd., and also the secretary’s report, which again 
disclosed a decrease in the number of affiliated 
societies, there being now fifteen against seventeen 
last year. Both reports were adopted. Mr. Harvey, 
secretary to the County Union, referred to the benefits 
to be derived from the Union, and said that as many 
in Maidstone had no opportunity of signing the 
pledge, he hoped they would arrange a children’s 
Temperance mission. The officers were then elected—• 
Mr. W. Hoar, president ; the Revs. T. R. Archer, 
W. A. H. Legg, and D. Mace, and Messrs. G. H. King, 
W. Brownscombe, C. Thomson, and the retiring presi¬ 
dent (Mr. Styles), vice-presidents. Mr. Jolliffe -was 
again asked to accept the offices of hon. secretary and 
treasurer, but was unable to do so. Miss Wells was 
then elected hon. secretary, and Mr. Wells, treasurer, 
A hearty vote of thanks for his past services was 
accorded to Mr. Jolliffe. 

Nantyglo. —This Welsh Union, for the fourth time, 
made a special collection towards keeping up a Band 
of Hope Cot in the Monmouthshire Hospital. Each 
society in the Union collected, and the whole amount, 
£11, was received in a purse by Lady Llangattock, at 
a grand function on March 9. This was the largest 
contribution of the kind made at that time. The 
Union also promoted the use of Temperance Readers 
in the day schools. At a conference of workers Mr. 
Leonard Page, of the Cardiff Union, addressed the 
members on organisation. Other useful work was 
done, and the year ended with a small balance in hand. 

St. Neots. —The Rev. Sydney Phillips has been 
actively at work during his residence in this border 
town in reviving Temperance work in the circuit 
of which he has oversight, and he has especially striven 
to promote Band of Hope work. In the autumn he 
arranged a conference, addressed by the Rev. Arm¬ 
strong Bennetts, Mr. Rowland Hill, and Miss 
Edwards, and this year he has secured the services 
of Mr. Frank Adkins as an eight-day missionary, to 
look up workers, and gather the children together. 
This brief mission proved exceedingly useful, and 
now Mr. Phillips thinks of joining the Bedfordshire 
Union, as, unfortunately, there is no Union in 
Huntingdonshire. We feel sure that our Bedfordshire 
friends will help him to the utmost. 


Tanrworth.—On Saturday afternoon, March 12, 
the Tamworth and District Union made a great effort, 
which was as successful as it was useful. They 
secured Mr. Walter N. Edwards, F.C.S., by arrange¬ 
ment with the Parent Society, and hired the large 
Assembly Rooms to accommodate the audience who 
wished to hear the lecturer whose renown had pre¬ 
ceded him. At four o’clock a mass meeting of children 
was held, the galler}’being occupied by friends; and 
at 5-3° a public lecture for workers and supporters 
was given, the Chairman being Mr. Councillor Allton, 
President of the Union. The chemical experiments, 
and the bright character of the addresses, charmed 
both audiences, who were amply repaid for their 
attendance. 


3Banbs of ibope. 

Brixton. —At the annual meeting of the Church 
and congregation at Trinity Congregational Church, 
Brixton, held on February 16, the Band of Hope 
received its due position in a programme which gave 
each department of work an opportunity to show its 
character and worth. The Rev. Mathias Lansdown 
is now the pastor there, and he has gone very heartily 
into our work. After social intercourse the meeting 
was begun by an illustration of Sunday .School work ; 
then came physical drill by the Girls’ Guild; and 
then the curtain rose upon the Band of Hope item. 
Miss Winnie Snoswell, one of the very small members, 
admirably recited a short piece prepared for the 
occasion. Three verses will indicate its character: — 

“ We belong to the Band of Hope, 

We would have you understand ; 

Our object is, to banish drink, 

And make a sober land. 

“ The work is great, and we are small; 

Come, lend a helping hand ; 

The Church of Jesus Christ should be 
One grand teetotal band. 

“ So cease to help the enemy, 

Renounce your little drop ; 

When all have ceased their drinking, 

Why, drink itself will stop.” 

The whole philosophy of our movement is summed up 
in the last two lines, which we may hope carried con¬ 
viction to many minds on this interesting occasion. 
After the recitation, the children sang that most 
appropriate melody, “Come, friends, the world wants 
mending; Let none sit down and rest.” 

Hackney Wick Wesleyan. —The twenty-fifth year of 
the existence of the Hackney Wick Wesleyan Band of 
Hope was celebrated on Monday, Feb. 22, in good style. 
The proceedings commenced with a re-union of old 
workers, many of whom came long distances. The 
chapel and schoolroom were decorated, and a public 
meeting was presided over by Mr. Frederic Smith 
(of the United Kingdom Band of Hope Union). After 
a thanksgiving prayer by the Rev. G. W. Angwin 
(pastor), the secretary, Mr. F. J. Skinner, gave his 
report, showing 150 members, and an outline of the 
year’s work. Letters were received expressing regret 
at their inability to be present from many friends. 
Most interesting of these was one from the Rev. W. 
H, Booth, F.R.G. S., the first minister of the chapel, 
who founded the Band of Hope twenty-five years ago. 
He sent a copy of the second Annual Report, and 
some interesting “Jottings from My Notebook.” Mr. J. 
Fuller, treasurer and superintendent, reported a small 
balance in hand, after which the Chairman gave a 
very encouraging address. Mrs. Pettifer, from 
Australia, presented 32 medals and prizes to the 
members for regular attendance, and also gave a short 
address. A special recitation by Ethel Wheatfill was 
followed by the collection. The Rev. R. Heslam and 
Mr. Gambles spoke, the latter giving interesting 
reminiscences. Mr. Shepherd led a capital choir. The 
Pastor moved thanks to the chairman and speakers ; 
Mr. H. Davis, an “ old boy ” who signed on the first 
night, seconded; and Mr. Dyke, the veteran home 
missionary, supported the vote. The joyous meeting 
is now a happy memory. 




The Dtdnk Cutfse 

“HOW CAN THE SUNDAY SCHOOL BEST 
OPPOSE IT?” 


By Frank Adkins. 


T HE Sunday School should stand in the forefront 
of every battle of the Lord ; audit is well, in this 
connection, to bear in mind the dictum of Mr. 
Charles Buxton, a leading brewer, that the 
struggle of the School, the Library, and the 
Church, against the beerhouse and the gin palace, is 
but one development of the war between heaven and 
hell. 

This drink evil, like Apollyon in Bunyan’s match¬ 
less allegory, “straddles right across the whole 
breadth of the way.” There is not a good work 
which it does not hinder, there is hardly a vice which 
it does not intensify. Its numerous and intricate 
roots go down into the very subsoil of society, finding 
their nourishment in the appetite of the buyer and 
the greed of the seller, in customs centuries old, and 
in a vast commercial interest the like of which pro¬ 
bably the world has never hitherto seen. 

It would be superfluous in addressing an audience 
such as this for me to dilate on the extent and 
intensity of the evils caused by drink. They are 
generally admitted, but, alas! they are by no means 
so adequately realised ; long use has dulled the edge 
of appreciation even of tender-hearted men and 
women in this regard, and we hear with resignation, 
if not with equanimity, tales of horror which, if due 
to any cause other than drink, would sting us into 
energetic action. Our business, however, this morn¬ 
ing is not so much to discuss the extent and gravity 
of the disease, as to ask what, in the strength of the 
Great Father, we may do in the direction of its cure. 

Opportunity—Responsibility. 

Now I claim for the Sunday School exceptional, 
almost unique, opportunities for combating the evil 
of intemperance. I would remind both myself and 
my hearers that with opportunity comes responsi¬ 
bility, responsibility which, as good soldiers of the 
Lord Jesus, we dare not shirk or evade. 

As teachers of the young we have to do with man¬ 
kind in the making. A considerable percentage of 
the nation, in its most plastic stage of development, 
passes through our hands. These young people come 
under our influence virgin as regards the appetite for 
strong drink, and it behoves us to preserve them, as 
best we may, in that virginity to the end of their 
days. 

Long experience shows that, next to the mighty 
influence of the home, the best way of training 
children as total abstainers is to gather them into 
societies formed for that very purpose ; to induce 
them, of course, with the parents’ consent, to sign 
the pledge, and to give the children thus secured such 
instruction as shall convince them that the use of 
intoxicants is alike useless and dangerous. In these 
societies the spirit of comradeship will be fostered, 
and the young people trained to become valiant 
soldiers in the combat against this great foe of God 
and of man. In a word the Band of Hope is the best 
of all agencies for the promotion of individual and 
national sobriety. 

* Read at a Conference of Sunday School Teachers at St. Mary 
Cray, Kent. 

MAY, 1904. 


Now the Sunday School can render to the Band of 
Hope service of the greatest possible value, and by 
doing so it will help rather than hinder its own 
special spiritual work. Christianity in action is the 
proper complement to Christianity in doctrine ; and 
the action of teachers in taking part in such work as 
this will certainly tell upon their scholars, who, child¬ 
like, are more keenly impressed by action than by 
word. Every Sunday School teacher should, I take 
it, be, according to the measure of his opportunity 
and ability, also a worker in the Band of Hope. 

By far the larger number of Sunday Schools 
now have Bands of Hope connected with them, but it 
is a constant grief to me, attending, as I do, many 
scores of meetings annually, to notice the frequent 
disproportion between the membership of the School 
and the membership of the Society, and I have no 
doubt that the experience of very many of my 
friends will coincide with my own in this respect. 
Now this great disproportion ought not to be. It is, 
perhaps, a little too much to hope that every Sunday 
scholar shall be also a member of the Band of Hope ; 
there will be special difficulties in special cases, but 
surely the disproportion should not be so great as it 
now is. My first appeal, therefore, to my brothers 
and sisters is to make the Band of Hope, already 
associated with their school, the effective agency 
which it ought to be in view of the pricelessly 
important work which it is called upon to perform. 
For instance, take this matter of membership to 
which I have already alluded. The most effectual 
way in which the membership of the Band of Hope 
can be increased is for every class in the school to 
become a recruiting agency for the Band of Hope. 
“Why do not you—and you—and you—belong to the 
Band of Hope?” asks the teacher who is in 
earnest in this matter. This enquiry should be 
repeated, and the subject pressed, until every'enlistable 
child has been enlisted in the ranks of the Juvenile 
Temperance Army. 

But numbers alone do not constitute efficiency in 
the Band of Hope any more than in other matters. 
It is necessary that the meetings of the Society 
should be made so attractive as to secure the 
attendance of the children, and so instructive as to 
benefit them when secured. In this work Sunday 
School teachers may also assist. I know how fully 
occupied, on week evenings, is the time of many of 
our friends, perhaps of most of them, but I 
cannot think that Sunday School teachers, as a class, 
have by any means done all that they might do by 
speech, by song, by preaching, by the discharge of 
necessary, if routine duties, to increase the interest 
and the usefulness of the gatherings of their own 
Band of Hope. No good work can be done without 
some measure of self-denial, even of self-sacrifice ; 
and it is for the exercise of these virtues on behalf of 
this great movement that I confidently appeal. 

Belated Schools. 

There are, however, some belated schools which 
even now have no Band of Hope associated with 
them; and in case any such should be represented 
here this morning, I have brought a supply of a little 
pamphlet entitled, “Howto Form a Band of Hope,” 
together with a suggested Constitution and Rules for 
Members. Copies of this I shall be happy to hand 
to any friends who may see their way to take action 
in this matter. Really, it is a most serious thing that 
our children should be allowed to go forth from our 
midst without that safeguard which the Band of 

































THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


65 

Hope can so well supply. Temptations meet our 
young people on every Hand. The invitation of the 
sharper or the profligate when they wish to ensnare 
a young man or a young woman, usually takes the 
form of “ Have a drink ? ” Now if the intended victim 
has been trained to hate and fear the drink, and to 
regard its offer as a mingled menace and insult, there 
is but little hold which the sharks of society can 
have upon them. On the other hand, if they hesitate 
they are lost, and a career bright with promise may 
close in gloom and darkness. Bad companionship is 
the very worst enemy to a worthy career, and drink¬ 
ing comradeship is the worst of comradeship. By 
training our young people to associate, practically, 
with abstainers only, we are doing them a service of 
inestimable value. Friendship of some sort is a 
mental and social necessity, and friendships of 
the best class are to be formed in the Band of Hope 
and the Temperance Society. I trust, therefore, that 
teachers will see to it that no school in this Union is 
without this means of usefulness, a well-equipped, 
well-sustained Band of Hope. 

May I venture on another suggestion ? Tt is that 
you should associate your School Band of Hope with 
the local Band of Hope Union for your district, and 
thus through the County Union become an acknow¬ 
ledged and efficient branch of the National Organisa¬ 
tion for the Promotion of Juvenile Total Abstinence ; 
rendering service to the central body, and receiving 
such help as that body may be able to afford; not 
joining the Union merely for the sake of getting from 
it that which there is to get, but rather that you may 
both help and be helped in the noble enterprise for 
which Unions and Societies alike exist. 

If from any cause—although it would be a cause 
hard to imagine—a Band of Hope is not practicable, 
something may yet be done by making each class in 
the school a separate, although informal, Temperance 
Society. Pledge books for use in this way, such as the 
one which I hold in my hand, are to be obtained both 
from the Sunday School and the Band of Hope 
Unions; and the subject may be referred to with 
advantage, as opportunity offers, in the course of the 
ordinary lesson. This teaching should not, of course, 
be dragged in by the head and shoulders, nor yet 
be repeated, as it may be, ad nauseam, but should be so 
suitably introduced and pressed home that the 
scholars will, with their parents’ approval, adopt and 
retain as their rule of life the safe and salutary 
habit of total abstinence. A further help in this 
direction would be the occasional gift or sale in the 
class of temperance literature, the perusal of which 
would be, in some cases, eveq more permanent in 
its effect than the spoken word, besides possessing 
the contingent advantage which arises from the 
fact that these publications, when taken home, are 
frequently read by parents and friends. 

Ihere is, of course, no possible objection to class 
work of this kind, even if a Band oi Hope is asso¬ 
ciated with the school, only in this latter case it is 
advisable to receive the pledges of the children in 
the books or on the forms of the Society, rather than 
in the private pledge book of the teacher. When no 
Society exists then the teacher’s pledge book comes 
most advantageously into play. 

Occasional Opportunities. 

The ordinary exercises of the school also afford 
opportunity tor advancing the good cause of 
Temperance. A periodical Temperance address could 
well be given, and, of course, the very fullest use 
should be made of Temperance Sunday by the holding 
of meetings for prayer, the singing of suitable hymns, 
and the delivery of addresses by the best advocates 
available. 

The library and magazine department of the school 
may also be utilised for the desired end, especially 
as the literature of the Temperance Movement is now 
more than respectable, both in extent and quality. 

Advice as to the selection of books and magazines 
will be cheerfully given by the Trade Manager of the 
Union which I represent. 

Something may also occasionally be done by 


approaching public bodies and the legislature, or at 
any rate the legislators, when any measure likely to 
promote the interest of sobriety, such as the 
Children’s Bill, requires support; or when legislation 
of an opposite character calls for opposition. But 
work of this kind needs to be undertaken and con¬ 
ducted with the greatest possible caution. The 
political phase of effort should be strictly subordi¬ 
nated to the educational and the spiritual, both in the 
Sunday School and the Band of Hope. Our work 
is rather the formation of character by loving 
reasonableness than reformation by the clumsy arm 
of the law. Yet there are occasions when we have to 
stand to our arms against legislation likely to hinder 
our work. The sword must sometimes be used as 
well as the trowel. This being the case it is com¬ 
forting to remember that the Sunday School 
teachers and their supporters in any given Parlia¬ 
mentary area constitute a body to whose wishes local 
M.P.’s do well to take heed. 

But, dear friends, the main stress of my appeal is to 
you personally and individually. Methods are of far 
less importance than men. Convinced and enthusias¬ 
tic total abstainers will soon find means to advance 
the cause of total abstinence. Modes of working 
must, necessarily, differ in different neighbourhoods 
and under varying conditions, but in every case love, 
if love there be for the children and their highest 
interests, will find out the way. 

The Prime Need. 

The prime need, from our point of view, is that the 
fact of a man or woman being a Sunday 7 School 
teacher shall imply, without further question, that he 
or she is also a total abstainer. Indeed, I am at a loss 
to understand how any man or woman, having so 
much of the love of the Master in the heart that he 
or she devotes time, thought, and effort to training 
the young in His love and in His service, and 
knowing the snares spread alike for old and young 
by the prevalent custom of taking intoxicants—it is, 
I say, a constant wonder to me how such a man or 
woman, so excellent and well-intentioned, can sup¬ 
port that custom by their influence and example. 
For this custom is necessarily supported by all who 
observe it in any degree whatsoever. A few grains of 
incense sprinkled on the altar of a Greek or Roman 
idol endorsed and perpetuated the custom of wor¬ 
shipping the deity it was intended to represent; and 
the consumption, even the most moderate and 
guarded consumption, of alcohol, endorses and 
perpetuates the custom of using alcohol. In this 
matter a side must be taken by the very force of 
circumstances. “Thou mayest not hide thyself,’’ 
said the old Mosaic law in relation to a neighbour’s 
ox or ass going astray. “ Thou canst not hide thy¬ 
self,” says the logic of every-day fact. Every man or 
woman, in the exercise of his and her gift of free-will 
must be, cannot escape being, an advocate either of 
the use, or of abstention from the use, of alcoholic 
drinks. The habit of every one of us speaks trumpet- 
tongued, to all whose lives touch ours, and to whom 
that habit is known. Therefore, dear friends, I am 
sure you will agree with me that it becomes us to 
consiuer very carefully and prayerfully 

Our Attitude 

in this matter. The fate of some of the scholars who 
sit around us may be resting upon our decision. In 
proportion to our success in winning their love and 
confidence will be the effect of our attitude upon 
them in this as well as in other regards. To 
produce the impression that these drinks may, with 
due caution, be taken without harm, possibly even 
with some slight benefit, may be of fatal conse¬ 
quence to some bright boy or some highly-strung girl 
whose very excellencies of nervous constitution may 
render them specially susceptible to the allurements 
of this fascinating drug. Let us not destroy with our 
drink those for whom Christ died. Surely it is better 
that we should try to remove this stone of stumbling 
out of the way of the children than that we should 
add to its perilous mass our personality and our 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


67 


Christianity, and thus (by a kind of devil’s alchemy) 
cause our very virtues to become influences hostile to 
the best interests of those whom we are striving to 
serve. 

In a word, as the use of drink is the cause of the 
curse of drink, as use and abuse are so closely 
related as to be practically inseparable, as the drink 
evil is intolerable, both in extent and magnitude, as 
the progress of the Kingdom of God demands that 
that evil shall be swept from its path, as in this 
cleansing process the Sunday School has alike the 
opportunity and the responsibility of playing a most 
important part, I appeal for the adhesion of every 
teacher to the principle and practice of total absti¬ 
nence, and for the adoption of such wise and well- 
considered action in every school as shall safeguard 
every scholar against the ravages of this foe to every¬ 
thing that is pure, lovely, and of good report. To 
you, as God-fearing men and women, desiring to do 
His work in the world, I commend these thoughts 
and suggestions. May they prove helpful in the 
ceaseless strife which it is our duty to wage against 
the powers of darkness, the forces of evil, of which 
strong drink is so potent an ally. 

-—>❖♦>- 

Industrial Exhibitions. 


TAMWORTH. 

M ORE than creditable was a competitive In¬ 
dustrial Exhibition at Tamworth Assembly' 
Rooms on March 23 and 24, under tbe auspices 
of the Tamworth and District Band of Hope 
Union, which now embraces 23 societies. 
Although most of these societies are small, and many 
members refrained from sending in articles lest they 
should not be worthy, there was a most creditable 
variety of exhibits, which were highly commended 
not only by the adjudicators, but also by the public 
who visited the exhibition. About a dozen local 
firms also had stands of goods, and these added to 
the attraction of the show. 

Mr. F. G. Allton, President of the Union, officiated 
at the opening ceremony. After prayer by the Rev. 
Carey Hood, 

Mr. J. Hampton, the energetic secretary of the 
Union, explained that the object of the exhibition 
was to encourage amongst children who belonged to 
their societies a desire to do something more than 
attend tlieir Band of Hope gatherings and Temperance 
demonstrations. The exhibits, perhaps, were not so 
large as they might be, considering that they had 
twenty-three societies; but that was their first effort, 
and it was not always that first efforts went with a 
great swim. They were hoping, however, so far as 
the competitive portion of the exhibition was con¬ 
cerned, if there was a desire to continue it, that it 
would grow to a large extent. He thanked those 
friends, the tradesmen of the town, who had taken 
stands at the exhibition—(applause)—and thushelped 
to make it a success. Everybody in the town bad 
the same opportunity of obtaining a space, and he 
hoped it would be distinctly understood that no one 
was shut out by the promoters of the exhibition. 
They were anxious to make the exhibition very 
successful, because most of their work existed among 
the young people, and at the present time there was 
a balance due to the treasurer instead of a balance in 
hand. They were desirous of wiping the balance off. 
In conclusion he solicited annual subscriptions to the 
Union. (Applause.) 

Mr. Allton said it had fallen to his lot to open the 
exhibition. He believed Temperance had made 
great strides in Tamworth during the past two years. 
They were grateful to all helpers, and assured them 
that they were in need of help, and they would see 
that the money' was well spent. He had great pleasure 
in declaring the exhibition open, and hoped it would 
be very successful. (Applause.) 

Mr. W. E. Purves moved a vote of thanks to Mr. 
Allton for opening the exhibition, and referred to the 


great interest which Mr. Allton manifested in the 
work of the Band of Hope Union. The Rev. A. S. 
Massey seconded the vote, which was carried with 
acclamation. Mr. Allton briefly acknowledged the 
vote. 

There were classes for fretwork, hand-writing, 
illuminated texts, needlework, doll-dressing, knitting, 
crochet, mapping, drawing, baking, patchwork, 
postcard arrangement in albums, crewel work, 
photography, singing, reciting, and also for original 
Temperance hymns. (We should like to see those 
hymns.) 

The Judges included the Editor of the Photographic 
News , the President, the Rev. A. S. Massey, Mr. H. 
Rose, organist of the parish church, and other 
friends. ^Concerts were given at intervals, and there 
were interesting curios on view, as well as a burlesque 
Art Gallery. The effort cannot fail to help the 
movement as a whole, and to encourage the in¬ 
dividual members of the societies. 


HEMSWORTH. 

ORKSHIRE does very good Band of Hope work 
in its large towns, some of which are as 
populous as whole counties in other parts of 
the country. It also does good work in less 
known and smaller towns. For instance, at 
Hemsworth, on April 2, the Shafton and District 
Band of Hope Union carried out a really excellent 
little exhibition in the Primitive Mission Hall, all the 
exhibitors being members of the Band of Hope in the 
district. 

Mrs. Henry Taylor, the minister’s wife, presided, 
and Mrs. George Oakland, of Cudworth, opened the 
exhibition with a neat speech. She was cordially 
received, and, in the course of her interesting address 
(which was reported in the Barnsley Chronicle), she 
said that she felt it an honour to be associated with 
any good work, and Baud of Hope work was one of the 
best. She believed in total abstinence. The old 
Bible word, “Temperance,” had a much wider 
meaning than ours. It signified self-control in 
relation to everything. Christianity still stood for the 
old meaning—perfect control in everything; but it was 
important to emphasise control in relation to drink, 
for to surrender oneself to drink was to surrender 
everything. It appeared to her that the Shafton and 
District Band of Hope Union was giving a wider 
meaning to its Temperance. As she looked on those 
works of art, she thought that those who had done 
them must have learnt to control their fingers, their 
eyes, and their heads, and the idea of holding such an 
exhibition was a very good one. She wished it every 
success. Let them seek to emulate the best, and to 
make the Union increasingly useful. She had the 
greatest pleasure in declaring the exhibition open 
(applause). 

The tables were laden with fruits of the industry 
of Band of Hope members, and the walls were 
covered with pictures, illustrating the relation of 
Temperance to health, hard work, &c., which, with a 
large assortment of Band of Hope requisites, had been 
kindly lent by the United Kingdom Band of Hope 
Union, and other agencies and friends. 

After an excellent tea, the evening meeting was 
held, presided over by Mr. Henry Taylor. A pro¬ 
gramme of novel contests of a very interesting 
character—reciting, singing, mouth organ, whistle, 
pianoforte, needle threading, pea-wrapping, &c.— 
was thoroughly enjoyed by the large and appreciative 
audience, who were gathered from all parts of the 
district. The Exhibition was attended throughout 
with the greatest enthusiasm, and cannot but be a 
souice of help and instruction to all connected 
societies. Mrs. Oakland kindly distributed the prizes, 
which were valued at £7. Although the expenses 
were rather heavy, the receipts about equalled them, 
and the primary object of the committee has been 
achieved; it was to give a renewed interest to the 
members, and to call public attention to the work of 
the Band of Hope. Mr. David Moore was the efficient 
secretary and organiser. 







68 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Band of Mope Addresses.—Series I. 


MANKIND IN THE MARRING & MENDING. 


By T. N. KELYNACK, M.D., M.R.C.P., 

Hon. Secretary of the Society for the Study of Inebriety. 


No. 5.—THE DOWNWARD HURRY. 


Life: Ascent and Descent. • 

SCENT is usually arduous; descent is often 
easy. The upbuilding of vigorous tissues is 
slow, and necessitates much expenditure of 
energy. The dethronement of cells and the 
destruction of tissues may be sudden and 
irretrievable. The fixing of right habits, and the 
establishment of reliable mental processes, necessitates 
constant repetition of impressions; but overthrow 
may sometimes come with swiftness, and irrecoverable 
damage may be wrought by a single act. To under¬ 
stand the decadent drinker aright much study should 
be devoted to the psychology of inebriety. (See British 
Journal of Inebriety, April, 1904.) 

Remarkable Testimony. 

At a meeting of the Society for the Study of 
Inebriety, held on January 12, a remarkable paper 
was read by Dr. W. Ford Robertson, Pathologist to 
the Scottish Asylum. It was concluded in these 
terms—terms serious enough to arouse the attention 
of the Empire :— 

“ My study of the question forces me to the 
conclusion that the effects of alcoholic intemperance 
upon the people of this country are much more grave 
and far-reaching than has generally been suspected. 
Most people have seen with any degree of clearness 
only its more immediate effects. The influence it has 
upon the race has only been dimly suspected by a 
few, and they have been derided as ignorant and 
unscientific. The evidence of science is, I maintain, 
entirely on their side. Chronic alcoholic intoxication, 
with all the secondary bacterial intoxications that it 
entails, is, in my judgment, one of the most potent 
causes of genetic variation among the people of this 
country at the present day. As the result of this 
genetic variation, a large number of individuals are 
born who are less perfectly adapted to the existing 
conditions of life than their parents were. The general 
disease-incidence in the community is in consequence 
being increased far beyond the limits it would 
otherwise reach. 

“If these views are in accord with the facts of 
science, it is obvious that chronic alcoholism is a 
serious menace to our national welfare. I think the 
remedy lies broadly in the development of what Dr. 
Clouston has aptly termed ‘ the health conscience ’ 
of the nation. When this has been more fully 
accomplished, it will be realised that we cannot 
afford to allow an influence like that of chronic 
alcoholic poisoning to work its effects upon the race. 
In the national interests it must be checked by some 
means or other.” 

Alcohol and Degradation. 

Alcohol is a protoplasmic poison. It attacks the 
most essential tissues of the human system. Recent 
researches have clearly demonstrated the deteriorating 
influence of this narcotic on the delicate cells, which 
form the most important elements of the nervous 
system. (See “ The Pathology of Alcoholism,” 
by Professor Sims Woodhead.— The British Medical 
Temperance Review, March, 1903.) 

Under the influence of alcohol the mental and 
moral faculties suffer impairment. Every degree of 
degradation may be apparent, from the precipitate 
fall of the “dead drunk” to the almost imperceptible 
derangement of the slight, and, it may be, secret 


drinker. Mental science is much concerned with 
the influence of alcohol as an agent productive of 
individual deterioration and opposing racial improve¬ 
ment. 

Alcohol and Lowered Resistance. 

Many forces assail the human citadel. The natural 
resistance of the healthy individual is considerable. 
.AJcohol acts detrimentally by lowering the powers of 
the protective mechanism. The alcoholic subject, as 
is well known, readily falls an easy prey to many 
diseases, oftentimes possesses but little recuperative 
power, and when met by accident frequently becomes 
a victim when he should have risen a victor. Both 
directly and indirectly, indulgence in alcohol hastens 
the downward journey. Drink produces disease and 
predisposes to disease. Alcohol can be an open 
enemy or a hidden traitor. It exercises its pernicious 
influence as a powerful degenerator chiefly because 
it is a subtle deceiver. Its access and action should 
be studied with minute care. Careful distinction 
must be made between objective and subjective mani¬ 
festations. (See article by Mr. T. P. Whittaker, M.P.,on 
“ Alcoholic Beverages and Longevity,” Contemporary 
Reviezv, March, 1904.) 

Alcohol and Disharmony. 

Life in its ascent and descent should be a crescendo 
and diminuendo. Alcoholic beverages hamper the 
unfolding of the mental powers, and hinder the firm 
fixing of physical vigour ; and in the period of natural 
decline they are unnecessary and oftentimes harmful. 
Alcohol interrupts the rhythm of vital processes. It 
makes for derangement; this may be a mere temporary 
disturbance, or it may be such as to interfere with 
human existence and precipitate death. Alcohol 
makes for disharmony. 

Alcohol and the Down=Grade of Mind. 

Alcohol tends to reverse and may arrest mental 
evolution. The highest and most necessary acquire¬ 
ments are first to fall. The most essential of the moral 
faculties oftentimes first suffer derangement. Self- 
control is impaired. Judgment becomes confused. 
The critical powers are blunted. The will is weakened. 
The emotions run riot. And from the heights of 
divine-like altruism a headlong stumble may pre¬ 
cipitate to the depths of devilish egotism. 

Shakespeare, with truly scientific precision, has 
well shown the downward path along which alcohol 
hurries the drinker, when he makes Cassio utter that 
bitter denunciation of wine: 

“ O! thou invisible spirit of wine, if thou hast no 
name to be called by, let us call thee Devil. O! that men 
should put an enemy to their mouths to steal away 
their brains; that we should with joy, revel, pleasure, 
and applause transform ourselves into beasts. . . . 
It has pleased Devil Drunkenness to give place to 
Devil Wrath; one imperfection shows me another; 
to make me frankly despise myself. To be now a 
sensible man, by-and-by a fool, and presently a beast. 
O! strange ! every inordinate cup is unblessed, and 
the ingredient is a devil.”—( Othello, Act ii. Scene 3.) 

Racial Deterioration. 

Alcohol stands foremost among influences making 
for natural decadence. The drink-soaked brain 
cannot but be lessened in efficiency, the intoxicated 
muscles suffer impairment in power ; as a machine, as 
an animal, and as a man, the human is degraded. The 
bearing of this on economic and social and moral 
problems dealing with the well-being of the common¬ 
wealth is abundantly clear. (Consult “The Economic 
Aspect of the Drink Problem,” by Thomas P. 
Whittaker, M.P.) 

Arrest and Prevention. 

The downward hurry may sometimes be arrested, 
but the practice of abstinence should be advocated 
and practised as offering a reasonable and reliable 
preventive measure; and here, at least, “ Prevention 
is better than cure.” 







THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


69 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series II. 


SIMPLE SCIENCE CHATS. 

By Charles Harvey, 

Secretary , Kent Band of Hope Union. 


No. 5.—“THE TEMPLE OF THE LIVING GOD.” 


BLACKBOARD SUMMARY. 

MTOflUTL'E' / Money wasted, £175,000,000a year. | 

HOWllM 1 tit Sickness, health lost. I 

/ fV, Crimes, character spoilt. 

HfiNT I % Raijpers, homes ruined, 

l/uillt. \ x Lunatics, intellects gone. 

THE CONNECTING LINK.—DRINKING. 

“The Dragon in the Castle.” 

Lesson connected. 

E have in our first four lessons learnt some¬ 
thing about intoxicating liquors. We have 
never to forget that they all contain some 
proportion of a liquid called alcohol. We 
have found out something of the nature of 
this liquid that is doing so much mischief in our 
country, that it has been described as “The only 
enemy England has to fear.” We must ever remem¬ 
ber that the drinking of intoxicating liquor has made, 
is making, and will make the difference, in thousands 
of lives, between success and failure in life, or between 
happiness and misery. We have now to consider 
what is the effect of these drinks upon our bodies, 
called in the title of this lesson “ The Temple of the 
Living God.” 

A Statement of the Harm done. 

Let us first try to gain some idea of the enormous 
amount of harm these drinks are doing. Last year 
no less a sum than ^175,000,000 was spent on them, or 
over jC20 per family. No one of you can understand 
what these huge figures mean. Their weight in 
sovereigns would be 1,366 tons; and if taken by rail 
would need six trains of thirty-five waggons each, 
every waggon carrying six and a-half tons. This 
expenditure means that numbers of people went 
without things that would have helped to produce 
joys, comforts, health and happiness. They were 
short of food, many actually starving ; instead of good 
clothes, poor clothing, sometimes rags. Homes, the 
dearest spots in all the world to most of us, robbed of 
everything that makes the home a real home. Then, 
as we have already learnt, something like seven- 
tenths of all the sickness in our nation is traced to 
the result of drinking these drinks. It is a joyous 
thing to be full of health, a precious gift, that should 
make us careful to do everything to retain it. We 
cannot look down the columns of any newspaper 
without seeing how case after case in our police 
courts tells the story of the mischief drink is doing. 
It is sad to feel that our prisons are filled with drink- 
made criminals ; that our hospitals are crowded with 
sufferers whose pains are attributed to alcohol; that 
our workhouses are the homes of numerous paupers 
brought to poverty by the drink habit, and that our 
asylums contain among their inmates many whose 
brains have been ruined by drink. This is a statement 
of some of the harm done ; but it is impossible for us 
to realise what mischief is being wrought among us. 

The Connecting Link—Drinking. 

We have, however, to remember that all this harm 
is caused by the drinking of these drinks. A young 
man one day approached a clever doctor with this 
question : “I say, doctor, will this glass of ale do me 
any harm ? ” “ Oh, no,” replied the doctor, “ if you 

do not drink it.” It was a witty reply, but how per¬ 
fectly true. We are not obliged to drink intoxicants. 
This brings us to the connecting link between our 
first four lessons and the rest that will follow this one. 


We want to learn some of the harm these drinks 
cause the bodies we all possess. But before the harm 
is done the drinks must be put into our bodies, and 
this is an act that we ourselves would have to 
perform. 

“The Temple of God.” 

St. Paul gives us this very beautiful idea that our 
bodies are “The Temple of the Living God.” A 
temple is a building, often a dwelling place. And in 
these wonderful bodies God dwells. God is good, and 
goodness is found in every one of us ; therefore every 
good thought and action shows the presence of God. 
Anything that robs us of this goodness is an injury to 
our temple, and we have no right to injure what after 
all is not ours, but God’s. Now drink injures, and 
should, therefore, be avoided. But do people when 
they drink intend doing harm to themselves ? No, it 
is taken at first without thought of harm, but listen 
to a story. 

“The Dragon in the Castle.”* 

A certain king had a great country, and, for the 
protection of his kingdom, he had castles built. To 
take charge of one very important one, in a remote 
part of his country, he sent a bold and fearless captain 
named Captain Careless. This brave officer was told 
to let nothing into the castle without first sending a 
message along the telephone wires asking the king’s 
advice and guidance. The captain went to his castle, 
and for a time everything went well; he obeyed 
orders and was in constant touch with his master. 
Now we must think of the castle in the story as our 
bodies; “The Temple of the Living God ” ; the king, 
as our Heavenly Father, and the telephone wire as 
prayer, that wonderful power by which we can always 
speak to our King. 

The captain was one day walking outside his castle 
when he saw a small lizard that pleaded to be allowed 
to enter the castle, promising to amuse the captain 
and be a constant companion. The captain, remem¬ 
bering his orders, for a time refused, but did not 
think it worth while to ask the king’s advice about 
letting in such a trifling thing as a little lizard. Again 
and again the tiny thing pleaded to be allowed to 
enter the castle, saying that such a little chap as he 
could not possibly do any harm. This little lizard is 
just like the intoxicating drinks. They promise all 
manner of good things, we cannot see how they can 
possibly harm us; and for a long time, perhaps, there 
is apparently no harm. 

Well, the fable says, that at last the captain was 
persuaded to let the lizard into the castle. I hope 
none of you will ever allow alcohol —of course, at first 
only in very tiny quantities—to enter your living 
temples. For many a long day the captain had 
nothing to complain of in the lizard’s conduct. But 
gradually, without seeming to, the lizard grew more 
familiar, he became of more and more importance 
about the castle, and took to ordering the servants 
about. He grew, too, in size, and refused to go out 
when requested, became snappish and disagreeable, 
indeed he grew into a great dragon, and, as such, 
destroyed both Captain Careless and his castle. This 
is just what alcohol has so often done. Innocent, and 
apparently harmless at first, it grows until it becomes 
difficult of control, and sometimes ends in completely 
spoiling the wonderful and beautiful “Temple of the 
Living God.” 

Beware of the First Glass. 

If we are to be sure of avoiding ruin from drink we 
must beware of the first glass. There lies our diffi¬ 
culty. When the temptation to drink first comes it 
will be in some pleasant way. It may be offered by 
friends, with no thought of harm coming in the 
future. Parents may offer it to their children, or it 
may be provided on some happy holiday. No one 
can be quite sure that, like the lizard in the story, the 
liking for drink may not grow until “At last it biteth 
like a serpent and stingeth like an adder.” Never 
start the drinking 1 habit. 

* A picture or diagram of Gilbey s well-known trade mark, ‘‘ The 
Dragon in the Castle,” should be used. The fable illustrating it is by 
Rev. H. Martin, M.A., published bv S. W. Partridge & Co. 
















yo 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series III. 


ALCOHOL AND HISTORY. 


By Charges Wakeey, 

Secretary. United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 


No 3.—DRINK AND OUR SAXON FORE¬ 
FATHERS. 


H ISTORY does not tell us much about the drink¬ 
ing habits of our country before the time of our 
Anglo-Saxon forefathers, but we are told that 
the Ancient Britons were a hardy and healthy 
r^ce, muscular, swift of foot, and handsome, 
and that their food was simple, consisting chiefly of 
flesh, wild fruits, roots, leaves, milk and water. 

England’s Earliest Intoxicating Drink. 

But even this ancient people made use of a species 
of strong drink, Metheglin , or, as the Saxons after¬ 
wards called it, Mead , a fermented drink made of 
water and honey. Cider was also a common drink, 
and it is probable that a drink was manufactured of 
the nature of Ale. When the Britons were conquered 
by the Romans they became acquainted in a measure 
with the use of Wine, but it is unlikely that they 
knew anything of its use up to that period, for 
Boadicea, when going to battle against the Romans 
to avenge her wrongs, in addressing her troops, com¬ 
pared the simple habits of her countrymen with 
those of the invader. “ To us,” she said, “ every 
herb and root are food, every juice is our oil, and 
water is our wine." 

Anglo-Saxon Drinks. 

Britain was, as you know, after the time of the 
Romans (410) conquered by the Saxons, and then by 
the Danes, after which the Saxon power was again 
established. Saxons and Danes were both addicted 
to the love of Strong Drink, and many of our 
most common drinking customs come down to us 
from them. Besides Ale and Beer, the names of 
which we get from the Saxon, our Saxon forefathers 
drank mead, cider, and wine, together with other 
drinks called piment and morat. The former was 
made of honey, wine, and spices ; the latter, of honey 
diluted with the juice of mulberries. 

Ale is mentioned in the laws of Ina, King of 
Wessex, in the seventh century, and was one of the 
items of a royal banquet provided for Edward the 
Confessor about the middle of the eleventh century. 

Of course the use of wine, which was expensive, 
was restricted to those who were rich. 

“ Wassail.” 

One of the most common, as well as most baneful 
customs of the Saxon, was the “ drinking of healths,” 
the idea being that, by wishing a person “good 
health ” over a bowl of strong drink, all bad effects 
of taking the liquor would be prevented. 

The word “ Wassail,” or “ Wa’as-Heil,” was a com¬ 
mon term of civility, as the word “ heil ” or “hail" 
implies; and when it used to be uttered over strong 
drink, the answer to it in those times was “ Drink- 
Heil!" 

At a feast given by Hengist about the year A.D. 450 
to Vortigern the British King, Rowena, the beauti¬ 
ful daughter of the Saxon chief, is represented with 
a golden goblet filled with wine, drinking to the 
health of the monarch; and this is regarded as the 
first recorded instance of drinking healths in Britain. 

This ancient and harmful custom is continued to 
the present time, and in some parts of the South of 
England is publicly observed on a particular da}', and 
a form of rhyme still lingers, which probably was used 
by our Anglo-Saxon forefathers. It is sung over a 
wooden bowl of ale : — 

“ Wassail, Wassail to our town, 

The bowl is white and the ale is brown, 

The bowl is made of the oaken tree. 

And so is the Ale of good barley.” 


Pledging. 

This health-giving, or “pledging,” is said to have 
originated as a guard against the treachery shown by 
the savage northern peoples one to another. In those 
times it was the custom to get rid of dangerous rivals 
by first making them drunk, and then setting fire to 
the banqueting hall, or otherwise causing their 
destruction. You have read in your histories 
how Elfrida offered drink to her step-son, King 
Edward (A.D. 978), and how, when he had received 
the horn of claret, and while he was drinking, the 
^ a gg er °f an attendant pierced him through. And 
thus it came about that the “health ” given by the 
Danes or Saxons to their guests, captives, or depen¬ 
dants was a pledge, that is to say, an engagement or 
promise that they might drink without fear of any 
artful or cruel advantage being taken of them. 

Drinking Festivals. 

The Anglo - Saxons, after their conversion to 
Christianity, were remarkable for their hospitality, 
and the kings of England devoted immense sums of 
money for the purpose of celebrating with splendour 
the various church festivals which were held at 
Christmas, Easter, and Whitsuntide. The monas¬ 
teries, too, formed a species of public houses, where 
entertainment was provided for travellers of all 
descriptions, giving countenance to the habit of 
intemperance. The practice of excessive drinking 
even extended to the religious festivals, on which 
occasions the monks and guests are described as 
drinking large draughts of liquor in honour of the 
various Saints. This frequently led to scenes of riot 
and bloodshed, such as is described in an early 
Saxon poem :— 

“ One shall die by the dagger, 

In wrath, drenched with ale, 

Wild through wine on the mead bench, 

Too swift with his words ; 

Through the hand that brings beer, 

Through the gay born companion.” 

Thus, at a Saxon feast, an Archbishop was 
put to death, in the excitement of a drinking bout; 
and in the year 946 King Edmund the Elder was 
murdered by the outlaw Leof at a feast held in 
honour of St. Augustine at Buckle Church, Gloucester¬ 
shire, where the king and his nobles and courtiers 
were in a state of intoxication. 

The fact that the monks themselves were given to 
intemperance is proved by a law of St. Gildas the 
Wise, who (A.D. 570) decreed, “If any one through 
drinking gets thick of speech, so that he cannot join 
in the Psalmody, he is to be deprived of his supper” ; 
and by a letter of St. Boniface, the “ Apostle of 
Germany,” who in the eighth century wrote to St. 
Cuthbert: “It is reported that in your dioceses the 
vice of drunkenness is too frequent, so that not only 
certain Bishops do not hinder it, but they themselves 
indulge in excess of drink, and force others to drink 
till they are intoxicated.” 

St. Dunstan, Archbishop of Canterbury, did his 
utmost to prevent the excessive drinking not only of 
the religious orders, but also of the common people. 
King Edgar, at the Prelate’s instigation, put down 
many ale houses, suffering only one to exist in each 
village or small town ; and he also further ordained 
that pins or nails should be fastened into the 
drinking cups, or horns, at stated distances, so that 
whosoever should drink beyond these marks at one 
draught should be liable to a severe punishment. 

Drink and Defeat. 

Your histories will tell you how the Saxon power 
was eventually overthrown in England, and how the 
Saxons made their last stand at the Battle of 
Hastings. Historians agree in saying that the 
Anglo-Saxons, and amongst them the soldiery, were 
at this time greatly given to drunkenness. These 
men thought to fortify themselves for the battle by 
the use of strong drink. They passed the previous 
night in drinking and revelry, and when the morning 
came they found themselves no match for the sober 
Normans, who destroyed them with a great slaughter. 
Their King Harold was slain, and England fell into 
the hands of the Conqueror. 






THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series IV. 


BIBLE=CLASS TALK. 


By the Rev. David Heath, oj Derby. 


No. 3.—REAVES. 

{Read Psalm i. and Ezekiel xlvii . 12.) 


O NE of the first of the welcome signs of coming 
spring and summer is the appearance of the 
leaves. On great trees, on hedge-rows, and on 
house plants it is cheering to see the sealed li ttle 
packets which nature only can make up; and, 
as we watch them day by day, they become brighter 
and larger, until some fine morning we find the seals 
beginning to break, and in a few weeks we rejoice in 
the beautiful fresh verdure in which the world is 
once more clad. Some people prefer to see the 
leaves in autumn with their varied and rich colours. 
The one sad thought about this glorious display is 
that it signifies decay, and tells us that the rigour of 
winter is at hand. So leaves are the earliest and 
latest sign of 

Nature’s Beauty and Nature’s Bounty. 

When all the trees are in full verdure, what a 
prodigious number of leaves there must be ! No one 
was ever mad enough to attempt to count the leaves 
in a single orchard or wood ; no one silly enough to 
guess. They may be said to be innumerable as the 
sands of the seashore. In every part of our land there 
are delightfully shady woods, and great forests and 
parks, containing mighty oaks, and chestnuts, and 
beeches. Some of our young people will have romped 
in Epping Forest, or Trentham Park and wood, or 
the Dukeries (that Continent of palaces and parks), 
or Bolton Woods. And there are more leaves out of 
the woods than in them, in the “leafy lanes” not 
only of Devon, but of every county of England. 

How Leaves Differ. 

Yet each leaf is true to its own nature and 
character, and is, in its way, perfect. John Ruskin, 
whose writings we hope our young people will know 
a good deal about when they grow older, has 
answered for us the question : What is beauty ? or in 
what does beauty consist ? He says it consists first 
of colour and second of form. The beauty of the 
diamond is in its splendid lustre and the shape to 
which it is cut. The beauty of flowers and leaves is 
in their colour and form. And, speaking particularly 
of leaves, he says their most distinguishing feature is 
their form : their shades of colour may be found in 
many another kind of leaf, but each kind of leaf is in 
its own form, and never makes a mistake by being 
after the pattern of another tree or plant. It is a 
pleasant little fancy or hobby to collect a sample of 
each kind of forest leaf, fastening one on each leaf of 
a book for the purpose, and it is pleasing to find how 
many there are aud how different they are, from the 
broad spreading chestnut leaf to the trembling little 
leaf of the silver-birch. 

A Lonely Leaf. 

And yet one of the most helpless things we cau 
think of is a leaf fallen from the tree. Iu his 
wretchedness Job pleads with God and asks Him if 
He will “break a leaf driven by the wind?” 
(Job xiii. 25). There is, however, one thing even 
more helpless than a lonely leaf. It is spoken of in 
the first Psalm, where it says, “ The wicked are like 
the chaff which the wind driveth away.” That is a 
very striking way of saying, bad principles and bad 
habits make people morally feeble, so that they 
cannot stand against trouble or temptation, but are 
driven about hither and thither as the wind blows; 
and very often the spoiling of life is so completely 
disastrous that not only is self-control lost, but also 
character and reputation, and one’s best friends, and 
health, and business, and hope. 


If we turn to the first verses of that Psalm we shall 
find a very different life and experience described. 
The man who walks not in the counsel of the 
ungodly, nor standeth in the way of sinners, nor 
sitteth in the seat of the scornful, but who delights 
in the law of God, which makes life beautiful by 
making it pure, and strong by making it righteous— 
that man is the happy man. This is true in regard to 
the particular matter with which the Band of Hope 
and Temperance Societies concern themselves; the 
pleasures of the pledge of total abstinence are greater 
than the pleasures of the intoxicating cup. Whoever 
signs the pledge under the idea of making a sacrifice 
in doing so, will find in the reckoning up that he has 
made no sacrifice at all, but has gained a good deal in 
health and comfort of life, in power of service and 
rational enjoyment in all that makes life worth 
living. 

But if you go a little further down that first Psalm 
there is a remarkable 

Declaration about the Good Man. 

He is compared to “ a tree planted by the rivers of 
water,” just where it will like to be, where it can 
drink of what is to it, the water of life : “ His leaf also 

does not wither ” ; as long as the tree lasts it bears its 
foliage of beauty aud usefulness, for “ whatsoever he 
doeth prospers,” he is able to turn everything to good 
account. We can understand better now how it is 
that the good man is the happy man. And we may 
see further into the meaning of those verses in 
Ezekiel noted above, “Wherever the river went there 
was life,” the fruit from the trees growing on its 
banks was fooR and “their leaves were for the 
healing of the afflicted nations.” 

Leaves not Useless. 

“ Nothing but leaves,” is a phrase that is often 
used as a reproach. A famous hymn writer appears to 
have fallen into this mistake in a hymn in which 
occur the words: “Nothing but leaves, the Spirit 
grieves over a wasted life.” But if every boy or girl 
and man and woman gave as much pleasure to others, 
and did as much actual good, and in every way were 
as true to their real nature and the purpose of the 
Creator as the leaves are, there would be no wasted 
lives. It is a libel upon the leaves to make them the 
symbols of uselessness and waste. Jesus smote the 
fig-tree, not for the leaves that were on it, but for the 
want of figs that should have been on it. In its own 
way the tree pretended that it had figs, and it had 
not, so Christ blighted it and gave a warning for all 
time against all shams. 

Little Chemists. 

Clever scientific men like Mr. Edwards, who writes 
addresses in the Band of Hope papers, and gives 
wonderful lectures to large audiences, have told us 
that leaves are cunning little chemists, who all the 
summer through do a great service to man, and at 
the same time do a good turn to themselves. In the 
heat of summer there may be too much carbonic acid 
gas in the atmosphere. There is no such danger in 
winter, so the leaves can then be spared. A very 
little larger proportion of this gas than is ordinary 
would poison us, and some morning when the sun 
rose there might be no human eyes to see its light. 
But the leaves save us. In the day-time they take up 
the surplus gas, and at night, in the silence and 
darkness, they break up this gas into its two parts, 
carbon and oxygen ; they keep the carbon and make 
more timber of it, and they give back to the atmos¬ 
phere the oxygen, which freshens the morning air 
and is essential to life. And in this process every 
little leaf does its share. 

Then let us give the leaves the praise and attention 
they deserve, and in our own way try to serve the 
great purposes of our existence, as the leaves serve 
theirs. We may be only as leaves, small parts of a 
great whole, each one insignificant, and easily lost 
sight of in the crowd, but for all that we may help to 
increase the gladness of the world and its well¬ 
being. 






72 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


UNITED KINGDOM BAND OF HOPE UNION. 


Presldent- 


-Sir GEORGE WILLIAMS. 
Vice-President®. 


The Archbishop of Dublin. 
The Bishop of Chichester. 

The Bishop of London. 

The Bishop of St. Albans. 

The Bishop of Stepney. 

Rev. Canon Barker, M.A. 
Lady Biddulph. 

George Cadbury, Esq. 

Mrs. W. S. Caine. 

The Earl of Carlisle. 

The Countess of Carlisle. 
Rev. J. Clifford, M.A., LL.D. 
Richard Cory, Esq., J.P. 

T. A. Cotton, Esq., J.P., C.C. 
James Edmunds, Esq., M.D. 


Rev. Canon Fleming, B.D. 

The Dean of Hereford. 

Rev. R. F. Horton, M.A.,D.D. 
Sir W. Lawson, Bart., M.P. 

Sir George Livesey, C.E. 

Rev. F. B. Meyer, B.A. 
Alderman F. Priestman, J.P. 
Frederic Smith, Esq. 

Lady Henry Somerset. 

Miss Agnes Weston. 

George White, Esq., M.P. 

The Venerable Archdeacon 
WlLBERFORCE, D.D. 

Mrs. H. J. Wilson. 

The Hon. Mrs. Eliot Yorke. 


Executive Committee. 
Chairman— Lionel Mundy. 
Vice-Chairman— John Wills, F.S.Sc. 
Treasurer —John Thomas, J.P. 
London Members. 


Mrs. W, S. Caine. 

William Bingham. 

Rev. F. Storer Clark, M.A. 
Charles W. Garrard. 

G. S. Lucraft. 


J. I. Morrell. 

A. Newton. 

Sir Thomas Pile, Bart., D.L. 
Walter N. Rook, LL.B. 
Edward Wood, J.P. 


Provincial Members. 


William E. Bell, Newcastle. 

A. A. Bryan, Cardiff. 

Howard F. Chaplin, Cambs. 
George T. Cooke, Bristol. 

E. J. Day, Harrogate. 

Miss Docwra, Kelvedon , Essex. 
Jacob Earnshaw, Manchester. 
T. E.Hallsworth, Manchester. 


Rev. David Heath, Derby. 

J. A. Herrick, Birmingham. 
Henry Holloway, J.P., Surrey 
R. Murray Hyslop, Kent. 

Rev. J. Thornley, Sheffield. 

C. J. Whitehead, Sheffield. 
William Wilkinson, Belfast. 
The Hon. Mrs. Eliot Yorke. 


Secretary —Charles Wakely. 

Trade Manager —Judson Bonner. 

General Lecturers. 

Frank Adkins. Walter N. Edwards, F.C.S. 

School Lecturers. 

Toseph Addison, Nth'n Counties I G. Avery Roff, S’th’n Counties. 
John Burgess, F.C.S., London. 1 W.T. Stanton, Midlands. 

R. Prys-Jones, Wales. 


Offices : 59 and 6o, Old Bailey, London, E.C. 
Bankers: London, City & Midland Bank, Ludgate Hill, 
London, E.C. 


F.R.S., J. Williams Benn, Esq. (Chairman of 
the London County Council), J. H. Yoxall, 
Esq., M.P., and the Rev. A. W. Jephson, M.A. 
(Vicar of St. John’s, Walworth). This will be 
followed by a General Conference, at which 
T. A. Cotton, Esq., J.P., C.C., will preside. A 
Paper will be read on “ How can the Pulpit 
and the Sunday School be made more helpful 
to the Band of Hope ? ” by the Rev. Carey 
Bonner (Secretary of the Sunday School 
Union), and a Model Bible Temperance 
Address to Children will be given by Mr. 
Charles Harvey (Secretary of the Kent County 
Band of Hope Union). A discussion will 
take place on this interesting subject. There 
is every reason to hope that Sir George 
Williams, the beloved President of the Union, 
will take the chair at the Great Annual 
Meeting in the Large Hall, when he will be 
supported by the Rev. H. Russell Wakefield, 
Rector of St. Mary’s, Bryanstone Square, and 
Mayor of Marylebone ; the Rev. D. L. Ritchie, 
Principal of the Congregational Institute, 
Nottingham; and T. H. Sloan, Esq., M.P., 
Belfast. For some time past a choir, consisting 
of about 400 Senior Members of Bands of 
Hope, representative of the movement in the 
Metropolis, has been busily rehearsing, and 
will render a good account of itself under the 
skilled leadership of its trainer and con¬ 
ductor, Mr. Herbert West. A noteworthy 
“ new departure ” of the present year is 
the abolition of the two shilling numbered 
seats; arrangements having been made for 
bringing the shilling seatholders well to 
the front of the platform and speakers. 
Friends should apply early for these tickets, 
as the Hall is likely to be, as usual, very full. 
Personal subscribers and representatives of 
Associated Unions and Societies will be 
provided with free admission tickets on 
application. 


THE 

$ ctnbof %) ope® Ijtmntde 

MAY, 1904 . 


There is every reason to hope 
The for an exceptionally bright and 
Anniversary useful series of meetings in con- 
Meetings. nection with the forthcoming 
Anniversary—the Forty-ninth— 
of the Union. In accordance with the custom 
of the institution, unbroken from its com¬ 
mencement, meetings to invoke the Divine 
blessing on the work and workers will be held 
throughout the kingdom on Sunday morning, 
May 8. The Council will meet for business 
on the evening of the following Tuesday ; and 
on the Wednesday, Exeter Hall will be in 
possession of the forces of the Juvenile Tem¬ 
perance Movement during the whole of the 
day. The first function will be a Breakfast 
Meeting in the Lower Hall, presided over by 
Sir George Livesey, one of the earliest and 
staunchest friends of the Union. Short 
addresses will be given by Sir Victor Horsley, 


With the advent of the long 
Village Work, light evenings, when meetings in 
rural districts become difficult, 
the Village Campaign has, for the time being, 
come to a close. The success of the past 
season’s effort has been noteworthy. Mr. 
Frank Adkins, the lecturer, has visited no 
fewer than 124 places scattered throughout 
the counties of Bedford, Berks, Bucks, 
Cambridge, Devon, Dorset, Glamorgan, 
Gloucester, Hereford, Huntingdon, Lincoln, 
Somerset, Wiltshire, and the Island of Jersey. 
The lecturer found his way into 121 schools, 
giving the children an interesting illustrated 
object lesson, and delivered 109 lantern 
lectures, all of a thoroughly educative 
character, to audiences numbering, in all, 
16,180. Sunday services, P.S.A., and Sunday 
School addresses and other engagements 
filled up Saturdays, Sundays, and odd nooks 
of time; and the record stands at 124 places 
visited, 278 engagements fulfilled, and 31,542 
villagers, adult or juvenile, addressed. Such 
work as this is bound to produce good results, 
both immediate and in days to come. 













THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


73 


We have to thank the good 
The New friends who have enabled us, by 
School Scheme their generous promises of con- 
fund. tributions for the forthcoming 
five years, to bring the School 
Scheme Fund up to the sum of £ 6 , 700. Two- 
thirds of the ,£10,000 required having thus 
been promised, it will surely not be too much 
to hope that very shortly the remaining £3,300 
will be forthcoming. 

The following is a list of the additional 
amounts promised :— 


( Payable in April in five yearly instalments ') 




£ 

g. 

d. 

Mr. W. A. Albright 

■ • 5 ° 

0 

0 

Mr. A. F. Bobbett 

• • 50 

0 

0 

Alderman J. H. Lloyd 

• • 50 

0 

0 

Mr. J. E. Ellis, M.P. 

25 

0 

0 

Mr. Samuel Roberts 

• • 25 

0 

0 

Mr. Walter Sturge 

25 

0 

0 

Mr. Henry Grace 

15 

15 

0 

Mr. E. Chitty 

15 

0 

0 

Mr. G. T. Cooke 

10 

10 

0 

Mr. James Gregson 

10 

10 

0 

Mrs. Colin Mackenzie 

10 

0 

0 

Mr. John J. Allen 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. H. A. Bowker 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. John Claridge, J.P. 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. Alderman Wm. H. Davies, J.P. 5 

5 

0 

Mr. Frederick Harper 

5 

5 

0 

Colonel Sheffield 

5 

5 

0 

Miss M. A. Ansell 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. Alexander Bobbett 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. J. Winter Bobbett 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. & Mrs. W. Smallwood Capper 5 

0 

0 

Mr. Francis J. Clark, J.P. . . 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. James Clark 

5 

0 

0 

Mrs. Finlay 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. & Mrs. F. H. Fox 

5 

0 

0 

Miss Hooper. . 

5 

0 

0 

Miss C. Sturge 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. Joseph Sturge 

5 

0 

0 

Oiher amounts 

8 

10 

0 


R Useful Book.* 


anybody desires to make himself master of the 
I leading points in relation to licensing matters, 
I and to do so with a minimum expenditure of 

' time and effort, he, or she, cannot do better 

than purchase, read, mark, learn, and inwardly 
digest Dr. Robinson Souttar’s newly-published work, 
“ Alcohol: Its Place and Power in legislation.” The 
subject is treated from the legal, historical, social, 
and moral points of view with sufficient fulness, yet 
tersely and interestingly. Our readers will remember 
Dr. Souttar as one of the M.P.’s in charge, fwr a time, 
of the Children’s Bill, and leading advocate of the 
Temperance movement in many of its phases. Unlike 
some other writers on this subject, whose point of 
view is that alcoholic liquors are not intrinsically bad, 
but only need judicious commercial handling on the 
part of the community, Dr. Souttar starts from the 
position that these drinks are useless, harmful, and 
dangerous; and that the only justification for regu¬ 
lating, and, therefore, in a measure sanctioning, their 
public sale, is the ignorant, prejudiced, and altogether 
unreasonable determination of a majority of the popu¬ 
lation to have these drinks—in varying quantities, 
certainlv, but still in one quantity or another—by fair 

* “Alcohol: Its Place and Power in Legislation.” (Hodder & Stoughton, 
27, Paternoster Row, London, E.C. Price, 3s. 6d.) 


means, if possible, if not, then by foul. The simple 
fact is that the drink habit has conquered bulk of the 
the citizens, and in this country a majority of these 
citizens make the laws; thus it follows that laws are 
made which pander to the desire for drink, whilst 
professing and endeavouring in some feeble sort of way 
to restrain excessive drinking on the part of individuals. 
Nothing effective, therefore, can be done until we have 
converted the majority of the citizens to our side by 
opening their eyes to the true nature and inevitable 
effect of intoxicants. This work is, presumably, that 
of the Band of Hope enthusiast who, if he does that 
work properly, will be the means of training scores, 
if not hundreds, of future voters, whose enlightened 
suffrages will vote this abominable thing out of 
legislatively-recognised existence. 

This fact is well within the consciousness of Dr. 
Souttar, who says, “There is no hope for the masses 
short of Total Abstinence,” the national adoption 
of which the Band of Hope can do more than any 
other human agency to bring about. 

-♦>❖•>- 

Qaapteply Programme. 


The East Hill Baptist Chapel Band of Hope, at 
Wandsworth, issued this programme for the current 

quarter: — 

ALCOHOL 

IS NOT A FOOD.—The idea that alcohol is nourishment makes 
half the drunkards we have.”—Dr. Cummins. 

LESSENS MUSCULAR POWER.—“The idea of alcohol giving 
force and activity to the muscles is entirely false.”— 
Dr. K. W. Richardson. 

LESSENS MENTAL AND MORAL POWER.—“ Of all people 
I know who cannot stand alcohol it is the brain 
workers ”—Sir Henry Thompson. 

OBSTRUCTS HEALTHY GROWTH.-“ The influence of alcohol 
is never to stimulate life growth, but always to hinder 
and depress it.”—Dr. J. Ridge. 

HINDERS DIGESTION.—“ The moment a man loses his stomach 
the citadel of his life is taken.”— Beecher. 

OVERWORKS THE HEART.—“ The belief that alcohol produces 
warmth is one of the most common of popular 
errors.”—Dr. Greenfield. 

LEADS TO DISEASE.—“I hardly know any more potent cause 
of disease than alcohol.” — Sir W. Gull. 

— From “ Alcohol and the Human Body." 


PROGRAMME. 

1904. 

April 5.—Address by Rev. Robert Glennie. Distribution of Members’ 
Certificates. 

,, 12.—Band of Hope Union Speaker. 

,, 19.—Distribution of Tickets for the Quarterly Tea. Girls, 7.30. 
Boys, 8. 

,, 26.— Quarterly Tea, to be followed by the Anniversary 
Meeting, to be held in the Chapel at 7.30 p m The 
Programme will include an Address by the President, 
singing by the children, and a splendid exhibition of 
Animated Photographs, entitled, “An Evening in 
Pictureland,” described by Mr. R. H. Parsons, of the 
Sunday School Union. 

May 3.— Address by Mr. Bobart. 

,, 10.—Entertainment arranged by Mr. Ben Avis, to include the 

Dialogue, “ Beer and the Bailiffs.” 

,, 17.—Band of Hope Union Speaker. 

,, 24.—Evening arranged by the Christian Endeavour Temperance 
Committee, under the direction ot Mr. Middleton. 

,, 31.—Evening arranged by Miss Daisy Risdon and friends. 

June 7.—Members’ Evening, arranged by Senior Girls. 

,, 14.—A visit from Mr. Featherstone, Elocutionist. An Address, 
Music, and Recitation. 

,, 21.—Band of Hope Union Speaker. 

,, 28.—Meeting on Wandsworth Common, weather permitting. 
Particulars to be announced. 

-•:•♦>♦>- 

Teachers and Temperance. —When the Irish 
Congress of National Teachers met in Belfast on 
April 7, the Irish Temperance League invited them 
to a delightful reception in the Exhibition Hall, 
which wore a festive appearance on the occasion. 
After refreshments, Sir Robert Anderson welcomed 
the teachers, and spoke of the great influence they 
might exert on the children in the interests of 
abstinence. Mr. John Malone echoed the welcome, 
and Mr. J. M. Thompson, on behalf of the teachers, 
replied. He said they were in entire sympathy with 
the work the League had set before them. A choice 
musical programme was given during the evening. 














74 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


On Teaching Children about 
Strong Drink. 

W HATEVER some people may think about 
the Salvation Army, it can always be 
commended for its thorough-going 
teaching on the importance of total 
abstinence from alcoholic drinks. A third 
edition of General Booth’s manual on the 
“ Training of Children ” is now ready, price 
6d. It contains some particularly incisive 
teaching on the subject of alcohol, and we 
have no hesitation in introducing it to our 
readers. The chapters which are more theo¬ 
logical are rather outside our province, but 
there is an immense amount of common-sense 
teaching throughout the volume, which 
comprises 259 pages. We venture to quote 
Chapters XXVII. and XXVIII. in full. 

Strong Drink. 

1. Ought not children to be instructed in the 
evils attendant on the use of intoxicating liquors? 

Yes. As soon as children can understand anything 
at all, they should be made to understand the evil 
consequences which follow the use of strong drinks, 
and the importance of abstaining from them 
altogether. No parent can tell how soon his children 
may be tempted on this subject, and to be forewarned 
is to be forearmed. Therefore, the children should 
be instructed in this matter very early in life. Parents 
will not find any difficulty in explaining this evil in a 
simple fashion to their children, and they will readily 
aud sincerely pledge their little hands and hearts 
before God not to use that which they see to be 
the wicked drink. 

2. How can children be trained up most 
effectively in total abstinence? 

(1.) Never allow them to touch or taste a drop op the 
accursed liquor. Multitudes have been ruined after 
the fashion ot the drunkard, who, on his death-bed, 
attributed his destruction to the taste created for 
strong drink when, though only a child, he was 
allowed to drain the brandy-glasses that came from 
his grandfather’s table. Should ever any of your 
children get into this terrible predicament, which 
God forbid, take care that they are neser able to say 
that they had either the opportunitj or the encourage¬ 
ment to acquire this terrible damning appetite at 
your table or in your home. To this end never let a 
drop of intoxicating liquor be used as a beverage in 
your house for any reason whatever. 

(2.) Never allow your children, so far as you have the 
power to prevent it, to see anyone for whom they have 
any esteem touch or taste strong drink. Of course, this will 
shut your children out of much company, and keep 
them away, perhaps, from visiting many friends and 
relations; but you cannot help that. If sacrifices are 
to be made, you had better make these than run the 
risk of the peace and virtue and salvation of those so 
dear 10 you. Keep the children’s eyes from beholding 
iniquity, or from being influenced in its favour by 
those for whom, for other reasons, they may have 
great respect, and who will be likely so much the 
more to influence them in the use of that which has 
proved the ruin of thousands, 

(3.) Make the children understand that the thing; is an 
evil in itself. Show them that it is manufactured by 
man—that God never made a drop of alcohol. To 
sav that alcohol is a good creature of God is one of 
the devil’s own lies fathered on foolish and ignorant 
people. It is a man-manufactured article. The 
earth nowhere produces a drop of it. The good 
creatures of God have to be tortured and perverted 
before any of it can be obtained. There is not a drop 


in all creation made by God or that owes its existence 
to purely natural causes. 

I got, myself, a clear view of the controversy when 
but seven years of age. A schoolfellow was a teetotaler, 
and wore a medal. I asked the meaning of it. He 
explained that ale and wine made people drunk, and 
that when they were drunk they clid foolish and 
wicked things, for which they were very sorry when 
they became sober. Of the truth of this statement I 
saw plenty of illustrations all about me. In my 
young heart I felt that drink must be very bad to 
make people do such things; and, when pressed by 
my schoolfellow, I promised that I would not touch, 
taste, nor handle it any more. We then went 
together to a certain shop where was a pledge-book. 

1 wrote my name in it, purchased a medal, and 
although tempted continuously, and strongly urged 
to break that pledge by those whom I loved, I kept it 
until thirteen years of age, only breaking it then 
when urged for my health’s sake to do so by one who 
had much influence over me. In conjunction with 
my beloved wife, I have acted in this way with my 
children, and from their babyhood they have been 
made to feel and to look upon all intoxicating liquor 
as the wicked drink, and for many years they knew it 
only by that name. Show the children the evils that 
attend upon its use, and their own tender and 
unsophisticated hearts will tell them their duty with 
regard to it. An ordinary child of six years of age, 
on being shown a drunken man or woman, or upon 
having some of the consequences following the use 
of strong drink set before him, will voluntarily and 
cheerfully refuse to take it. 

(4.) 7 each the children that health and strength and 
happiness are altogether independent of its use. Make 
this plain to them, so that neither the advice of 
doctors nor opinions of friends shall deceive them 
in the future, by leading them to think that intoxi¬ 
cating liquors are in any way necessary to their 
well-being. 

(5.) Show the children that no one can take intoxicating 
drink without personal danger. Describe to them 
what beautiful and noble spirits have fallen through 
it, and they will detest it immediately. As facts 
illustrating this come under your notice in the daily 
papers, in your own neighbourhood, or in vour own 
Corps, describe them to your children. By these 
means will their hatred for it be increased, and they 
will come to feel a moral pleasure in refusing it—a 
pleasure far greater than any gratification which the 
use of it could possibly bring them. 

(6.) Show the children how hypocritical they will be, 
if, while professing to imitate Jesus Christ, they should 
refuse to give up the use of intoxicating drink, because 
of any little personal gratification they might derive 
therefrom. Jesus Christ sacrificed not only His own 
comfort, but His own life to save the world from sin 
and misery and hell. 

(7.) Make your children understand that it is not 
safe for them or anybody else to take strong drink in 
what is called “ moderation,” and that even if it were, 
their example would be sure to induce others to take it, 
some of whom would be almost certain to go to excess. 
Explain to them that of the millions of drunkards 
who have found their way down to the bottomless 
pit, not one of all the ghastly band ever intended to 
go on to drunkenness. They all began with “ modera¬ 
tion,” and purposed to stop there. Therefore, the 
only way of safety for your children as regards 
themselves, and the answer of a good conscience with 
respect to others, is total abstinence from the evil. 

(8.) Of course all that has been said sternly forbids 
your allowing your children to engage in any trade, 
profession, or calling, zuhich, by the sale of intoxicating 
drink, makes a profit out of the miseries, vices, and 
crimes of men. 

Tobacco. 

It is necessary to warn the children against 
the common habit of using tobacco. 

We think that, in view of the widespread prevalence 
of smoking, especially amongst boys, parents ought 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


75 


to make children understand the enormous evils of 
this practice. Of course, in Salvationists’ families 
this may seem unnecessary, seeing that by precept 
and example the habit will be condemned and 
avoided by everybody about them. But even here it 
may be necessary to make children thoroughly 
conversant with the evil character of the usage. 
Among other things make your children understand 
that:— 

(i.) Eminent medical men say that smoking injures 
the brain, and, consequently, the entire nervous 
svstem. It also affects the lungs, the stomach, and the 
digestive organs generally, and often injures the 
eyes very seriously. The earlier the age at which 
this practice is acquired the more injurious will be its 
effects. 

(2.) The use of tobacco means a shameful waste of 
money which might be so much better employed. 

(3.) Smoking is an unnatural habit. All who have 
ever practised it know how nature revolts at the 
commencement of the use of tobacco in any form, 
whether that of smoking, snuff-taking, or chewing; 
and h as to be compelled at the expense of considerable 
suffering to allow it. 

(4.) Smoking is an unclean practice. It corrupts the 
breath, poisons the atmosphere, and makes its votary 
a nuisance in a small way to everybodv about him who 
is not likewise given up to the same selfish indulgence. 



Horn I Beeame a Band of Hope 
UJorkep. 


a recent issue of the Band oj Hope Review, Mr 
| Charles Wakely,Secretary of the United Kingdom 

1 Band of Hope Union, told the story of how he 
r became a Band of Hope worker. As there may 
be some of our readers in Iceland or Patagonia 
who do not read, or assist in circulating, the Review, 
we are finding room for the interesting narrative in 
these columns. Mr. Wakely’s story ran thus:— 

‘“We are going to have a Band of Hope,’ said my 
Sunday School teacher, ‘ will you join ? ’ 

“ That was many, many years ago, when I was a 
small boy of eight; and, although I didn’t know 
exactly what a Band of Hope was, I knew it must be 
a good thing if teacher recommended it, and so I 
joined and signed the pledge on the first night of 
meeting. 

“There were not many of us at first, in dear old 
Trinity Band of Hope, but we got to like the meetings 
so much that we persuaded our school companions to 
join. Of course some called us ‘tea-pot suckers,’ and 
all that sort of thing, but we soon got to feel quite 
sure that we were on the right side, so w r e stuck to 
our guns, and by-and-by a lot of boys and girls came 
and joined us. 

“ The Band of Hope Union, which is now so large 
and covers the whole country, had not long been 
formed when I joined the Band of Hope. At that 
time all the societies the Union could get together in 
London was sixteen. That was not many, but it was 
a beginning, and now how the Union has grown ! In 
London, alone, we have about fourteen hundred 
societies, and some of them ten or twenty times as 
large as the society I joined forty-five years ago. 

“What good times we used to have in that little 
vestry where we first met, and how rejoiced we were 
when we got into the big schoolroom and had it full 
of boy and girl abstainers! 

“ People, you know, even Band of Hope conductors 
and speakers, were not nearly so clever then as they 
are now, and we had to be content with much simpler 
ga herings than we get now-a-days; but our meetings 
were very nice for all that. 

“We had rather a scarcity of good Band of Hope 
hymns and songs, and many of these were verv sad and 
mournful. The great favourite in those times was :— 


u 1 There goes a drunkard, 

Stiggering, reeling to and fro, 

Do you wish to b° like him ? 

N o ! No / NO!’ 

“We used to sing that No ! No! NO! so heartily 
that I am sure it made us firmer to our principles and 
helped us to stick to the p^dge. 

“ I remember the first recitation I learned, and how 
I got a prize, and how, when I said my piece at the 
Annual Meeting I got so red in the face and so shaky 
on my legs that I was glad when it was all over. Have 
you ever felt like that ? 

“ It was a grand day for us, and how proud we were, 
when W’e went for the first time to sing at the great 
Band of Hope Fete at the Crystal Palace, and formed 
a part of Mr. Smith’s famous choir! The siDgers 
mustered fifteen hundred strong then, but in later 
years they increased to fifteen thousand—just think, 
three choirs of 5,000 each ! How carefully we were 
drilled and how we had to learn all the pieces by 
heart! I wonder if any of my readers ever got a 
bright threepenny-piece for doing their part extra 
well ? 

“Ah ! those were good times, longed for from vear 
to year, and remembered even now with the liveliest 
pleasure. 

“ When I was about twelve or thirteen years of age 
I helped to form one or two other Bands of Hope in 
South London, and especiallv one in Kent Street, 
Southwark—now Tabard Street,—the road through 
which the Canterbury pilgrims of old used to pass 
long ago. In this densely-populated district the 
people were poor and ignorant and dirty, and the 
children, for the most part, greatly neglected. 

“There was a real pleasure, however, in working 
amongst these rough children, and when, every week, 

I went down, half an hour before meeting-time, to 
build up the platform and hang up pictures and texts 
and otherwise make ready, I had a real sense of being 
of use quite as much as when, later on, I got to teach¬ 
ing the children singing and reciting, and helping 
occasionally as a speaker. And this, all, is how I came 
to be a Band of Hope worker! 

“ That time, you know, was years before the School 
Board got hold of the young life of the country, and 
we had tough material to deal with in our young 
street arabs. 

“ I remember, one night, how a very mischievous 
and troublesome boy managed to get to the gas meter 
and contrived to put the place in darkness. What a 
howling, and whirling, and screeching there was to 
be sure. Bedlam broken loose! I guessed who was 
the boy, and seized him in the lobby as he was 
escaping. In his anger at being caught, he bit right 
through my coat into my arm—a veritable little 
savage ! Poor boy ! he was very sorry for it afterwards, 
and he grew up to be very helpful to us in the Band 
of Hope. 

“We used, at ‘Sweep’s Alley’—for that was the 
place of our meeting-^-to be pelted occasionally with 
mud and stones as well as snowballs. Once or twice 
we were badly handled by roughs, but, by-and-by, 
the people got to know us and let us alone, and before 
many years, by the help of the Sunday School and the 
Band of Hope, there was a great change for good in 
the neighbourhood. 

“ Since those far-away days I have attended many 
thousands of Band of Hope meetings in all parts of 
the country, and have spoken for the cause in France, 
Germany, Holland, Switzerland, Austria, Denmark, 
Norway and Sweden, as well as in Canada and the 
United States, but I am glad always to look back to 
the time when I sat, a simple child, in the Band of 
Hope—I am afraid not always the most orderly 
member, — and learned those Temperance truths which 
I have been trying to teach others ever since.” 

-•>•>•!♦- 

Band of Hops Jubilee.— Allen Street Methodist 
New Connexion Band of Hope at Sheffield celebrated 
their Jubilee on March 21. The president, Mr. F. V. 
Wolstenholme (son of the founder) and the treasurer, 
Mr. J. T. Roberts, were among the first members, and 
have maintained unbroken connection. 







76 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 




Anatomical models. 


T HE United Kingdom Band of Hope Union is 
now supplying a splendid series of Anatomical 
Models illustrating in a most realistic manner 
tbe effects of alcohol upon the heart, liver, and 
kidneys. They have been prepared by Professor 
Curt Wallis, M.D., Professor of Pathological Anatomy 
at the Medical Institute, Stockholm, and 
can be obtained for two guineas at 60, 

Old Bailey. Professor Wallis has kindly 
supplied the following descriptive 
remarks:— 

In our struggle against intoxicating 
drinks, instruction concerning the 
noxious effect of these drinks is of the 
greatest importance. In order to ad¬ 
vance such instruction, models have 
been prepared, showing the effect of 
alcohol on several organs necessary for 
life in the human body—the liver, heart, 
and kidneys. They are perfectly true 
copies, in natural size and in the natural 
colours, of such diseased organs, and 
when compared with similar models of 
health}' organs, anybody can clearly see 
the enormous damage which alcohol is 
capable of causing, resulting in manv 
cases in death. 

It is necessary, when producing such 
models, in the first place to make them 
as true to nature as possible; and, 
secondly, to make them as demonstrative as possible, 
for which reason only the most fully diseased organs 
have been used for producing the models. 


dextrine: this is carefully painted to match the 
original. The model is, therefore, a perfectly true 
copy as to size, form, and colour. For the purpose 
of comparison, copies are f’made, in a similar way, of 
the same organs obtained from dissected persons who 
were perfectly healthy. 

Such copies have been made of the gin-drinker’s 
liver, of fatty hearts, and of fatty and shrivelled 
kidneys. The following illustrations are from photo¬ 


Fig. 2. Healthy Liver 

(seen from below). 

The method adopted is as follows:—A diseased 
organ (for instance, a drunkard’s liver, which has been 
found when dissecting a drunkard) is preserved, and 
a cast is taken in a mixture of plaster of Paris and 


Fig. i. Healthy Liver. 

(seen from above). 

graphs of the models thus produced, and are one- 
third of the natural size. 

The liver, the largest gland in the human body, 
is placed close under the right-hand part 
of the diaphragm, furthest up in the cavity 
to the right. Its upper surface is convex, 
altogether smooth; on it is seen a white 
cord going from the front to the back, to 
which the ligament is attached that fastens 
the liver to the diaphragm. The lower 
surface is somewhat concave; in the 
middle of it is seen the place where the 
portal vein enters and the gall-duct leaves 
the liver. The gall-bladder is also seen on 
the lower surface; its bottom protrudes a 
little over the foremost border of the liver. 
The colour of the liver is a reddish brown. 

Figures 3 and 4 show the upper and 
lower surface of what is called a shrivelled 
liver, also known as a gin-drinker’s or 
cirrhotic liver. The liver is very much 
diminished ; the surface is not even and 
smooth, but knobby and rough. On the 
upper surface the bottom of the gall¬ 
bladder is seen to protrude a little over the 
edge of the liver, and on the lower surface 
one can see the gall-bladder and the place 
where the portal vein enters and the gab- 
duct leaves the organ. The colour of the organ is 
not of a reddish-brown, but pale with brown places 
corresponding to the highest parts of the knobs and 
rough places. The considerable changes have been 



Fig. 3 {seen from above). Fig. 4 (seen from below). 

GIN=PRINKER’S (CIRRHQTIC) LIVER. 



THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


77 



Fig. 5. Front. Fig. 6. Back. 

HEALTHY HEART. 


produced by the alcohol irritating the tissue of the 
liver, so that a connective tissue was formed. This 
develops in streaks comprising smaller parts of the 
tissue of the liver, and when this connective tissue 
gradually contracts, as it is the nature of this tissue 


the openings to the great veins which lead the 
blood back to the heart. 

The differences between the two hearts appear 
clea-ly. The fatty heart is very much enlarged, 
and on it the red colour of the muscles of the 
heart is only seen here and there, because it is 
hidden by the layer of fat. The enlargement takes 
place both in consequence of the great quantity 
of fluid which is led into the blood by drinking 
beer immoderately, and in consequence of the 
action of the alcohol on the heart. The formation 
of fat contributes also to the enlargement. 

In Fig. 9 a healthy kidney is shown, in Fig. 10 
a so-called shrivelled kidney, and in Fig. ir what is 
called a fatty kidney. The differences between the 
healthy and the diseased organs are apparent. The 
shrivelled kidney is very much diminished and rough 
on the surface; the fatty kidney somewhat enlarged, 


to do, some parts will sink, corresponding with the 
newly-formed contracted tissue, and the protruding 
parts will form the remaining part of the still healthy 
liver-tissue. The diminution of the organ is a conse¬ 
quence of the pressure of the contracting of the 
connective tissue on the tissue of the liver, which 
causes it to shrivel—hence the name, “shrivelled 
liver.” The name “gin-drinker’s liver” has been 
given because the changes are only found in the 
livers of drunkards. This change not only occasions 
a lowering of the activity of the liver, but also 
hinders the course of the blood through the liver by 
the drawing together of the ramifications of the 
portal vein caused by the connective tissue. This 
hindrance, together with the formation of a greyish- 
white tissue, and a thickening of the serous mem¬ 
brane (peritoneum) which covers the organ, are the 
cause of the pale colour of the liver, as the organ 
becomes bloodless. 

Figures 5 and 6 show the healthy heart; in 
Fig. 5 seen from before, in Fig. 6 from behind. 
Figures 7 and 8 show what is called a fatty heart; 
in Fig. 7 seen from before, in Fig. 8 from behind. 

In Figures 5 and 7, consequently on the fore¬ 
parts of these hearts, are seen the protuberance 
of the ventricle of the heart, called the right 
(a) and the left (6) auricle of the heart; also the 
beginning of the pulmonary artery (r) and of the 
aorta (d\ On the back of these hearts are seen 


Fig. 7. Front. Fig. 8. Back. 

FATTY HEART OF DRUNKARD. 

and its colour is the pale yellow of fat, whereas the 
healthy kidney, as is well-known, has a dark-red 
colour. The two changes of the kidneys produce 
different forms of the dreaded Bright’s disease. Both 
forms are very often found in drunkards. 

It should be observed that the models of the healthy 
organs will be found very useful in the ordinary 
teaching of Physiology. 



Fig. 9. HEALTHY KIDNEY. 



Fig. 10. SHRIVELLED KIDNEY. 


Fig. 11. FATTY KIDNEY. 


The Dp ink Bill for 1903. 


Dr. Dawson Burns has again conferred a boon on 
all who care for facts, by making public in the 
columns of The Times the figures which show the 
British Drink Bill for last year. On the new basis, 
which he adopted last year, the figures work out 
thus:— 

Gallons of alcoholic liquor consumed 1,329,021,467 
Cost of same .. .. .. .. ^174,445,271 

The one cheering fact is that the amount spent is 
over ^5,000,000 less than in 1902 ; but it is still about 
^170,000,000 too much. 


Quepies. 


Do the British Public know that the vast amount of 
money spent on alcoholic drinks (see paragraph 
above) produces, among other evils, some of the 
diseases indicated by the illustrations on this and 
preceding page. Could answers be ,found to these 
questions ? 

1. How much does each gin-drinker’s liver cost ? 

2. How much each drink-enlarged heart ? 

3. How much each shrivelled kidney ? 

4. When will the nation be wise, and spend its 
money more carefully ? 









78 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Cannot me Stop this fimful 
Indictment from being True ? 


THE DRINK CURSE. 

EFERR 1 NG to the devastating ruin brought 
upon native tribes by the introduction of 
intoxicating liquors on the part of Christian 
nations, the Rev. Mark Guy Pearse says : 

“We Flnglishmen, so proud of our country, 
must bow down with an awful shame at the thought 
of it. All that England has done and is doing to 
advance the welfare of the nations, is undone, and 
worse than undone, by the curse of strong drink. It 
hurts one indeed to think of it, but it is just the awful 
and terrible truth that, in spite of our Bible societies 
and of all our great missionary societies, the world 
would be better to-day if there were no England. 

“In India it is said that for every native converted 
to Christianity, one hundred natives are made 
drunkards. When the natives see a drunken man, 
they are accustomed to say : ‘ He has left Mohammed 
and gone to Jesus.’ ‘ Now that Burmah is annexed,’ 
says a missionary, ‘it has become a place of cheap 
drink and great crimes.’ 

“ I have only once been near a Mohammedan town, 
and this is what I saw : I had not landed five minutes 
befjre I was surrounded by a group of Arab boys 
carrying bottles of spirits—Mohammedan lads whose 
religion forbids them to drink strong drink—and we 
were assailed with cries in broken English : ‘ Master, 
buy bottle brandy—three-six.’ ‘ Miss, nice bottle 
brandy—three-six.’ My heart prayed God that these 
lads might be kept sober Mohammedans rather than 
become such ‘ Christians’ as they are accustomed to 
see. Little wonder that one of the most enlightened 
Brahmins cried : ‘ Oh, that we had never seen a 

European face! oh, that we had never tasted the 
bitter sweets of your civilisation ! rather than that it 
should make us a nation of drunkards and brutes.’ 

“Thus writes Arnold White, who has lived amongst 
the natives: 

“ ‘ The Indians of America and Hindostan, the wild 
races of Australia, the Kaffirs, the debased Hottentots, 
the West Coast negroes, the effeminate Cingalese, and 
the sinewy aborigines of Canada, have bitter reasons 
to rue the first day of their communication with 
the Anglo-Saxon race. England has polluted with 
drink and honeycombed with foul disease the lives of 
those races who still survive a contact all unsought 
by them. When our countrymen return from Eastern 
lands, they tell us that for every missionary sent out 
there go also some 3 000 gallons of rum; that it is 
better to carry out Mohammedanism than Christianity 
because Mohammedanism is temperate and Chris¬ 
tianity is not.’ 

“ Mr. Mackay, of the Njanza Mission, writes : 

“ ‘Oh! how often shall I write in my journal as I 
pass through many tribes, “ Drink is the curse of 
Africa” P Go where you will, and you will find men, 
women and children reeling from the effects of 
alcohol. The vast West of Africa is ruined with 
rum.’ 

“ Few men had such opportunities of seeing the 
world as Sir George Grey. His life has been spent in 
constant contact with savage races in Africa, with 
Zulus and Kaffirs, in New Zealand with the Maoris, 
xie declared that when he came home to London he 
saw in a single week sights more shameful than he 
had seen during all those years among the savages, 
and it was all through strong drink. 

“Rev. P. J. Ritchie, of Queenstown, in an address 
delivered as chairman of the Congregational Union, 
said: 

“ ‘ Is it not clear that the spread of drinking habits 
amongst the natives must inevitably tend to render 
them unfit for any useful service, to deprive them of 
the means of honest livelihood, and consequently to 
drive them into criminal courses, until they are good 
for nothing but to be cast out and trodden under feet 
of men ? The voice of their blood will cry from the 


ground unto heaven against their white destroyers. 
Our boasted civilisation has given them the Bible with 
one hand and the brandy bottle with the other. It 
brings all heaven before their eyes in the mission 
Church, and opens hell for them in the canteen. It 
gives the missionary the opportunity to put upon 
them the pressure of moral suasion for their salva¬ 
tion, whilst it gives its legislators power to take off 
the excise duty on Cape brandy for their damnation-’ ” 


R Holiday Iiesson. 


W E’VE been into the country, 

Ruthie, and Maude, and I: 

The country, with its nice green lanes, 
And beautiful, big sky. 

We spent our holidays- three weeks— 
With aunt and uncle there, 

And that we could have stayed a year 
We all of us declare. 

What did we do ? Oh, lots of things ; 

We used to gather flowers, 

And decorate the rooms, till they, 

Aunt said, were just like bowers. 

We helped to feed the ducks and geese, 
Yes, and the pretty chicks, 

And tossed the hay—it smelt so sweet ! — 
And watched the men build ricks. 

We coaxed our uncle, too, to tie 
A swiDg up on a bough, 

And how delightful ’twas ! I wish 
That I were swinging now. 

While aunt and uncle, when they went 
Out driving, took us too. 

But there ! we did so many things, 

I can’t tell half to you. 

Were there no drawbacks—none at all 
The whole three weeks, you say ? 

Well, yes—a few; the worst of all 
Occurring the first day. 

We’d got—not knowing they would sting— 
Among some nettles there, 

And when we found they did, we cried, 

For pain is hard to bear. 

But uncle, he’s so kind ! he found 
Us soon another thing— 

Some plant—I quite forget its name— 
Which quickly cured ihe sting. 

And what do you suppose he said ? 

But there ! you’d never think ; 

He told us nettles seemed to him 
A fitting type of drink. 

Yes, drink—the brewer’s drink—you kuow, 
Which makes men tipsy here, 

And said he hoped we snould beware 
Of whiskey, wine and beer, 

As well as of the stinging plants 
We found in field or lane, 

Bor that the nettle alcohol 
Brings far more bitter pain. 

He spoke so very gravely, yet 
So very gently, too; 

We did not laugh as I at first 
Felt half inclined to do ; 

But listened to him, and we each, 

Promised—Maude, I and Ruth, 

We’d be like him—teetotalers ; 

We told him so for truth. 

Yes, and we mean to keep our word. 

And then this nettle strong. 

Old Alcohol, can’t make us wince, 

Nor lead us to do wrong. 

And if we’re ever asked to drink, 

“ No, thank you ! ” we will say, 

And think about our uncle’s words, 

And of our holiday. 



Faith Chii,te;rn. 






THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


79 



RECORDS 
Y of PROGRESS 




Bant) of Ibope “turnons. 


Birmingham and Midlands.— The annual meeting 
of this Union took place in the Assembly Room, 
Ruskin Chambers, Corporation Street, on Saturday 
night, March 26. The president (Mr. Arnold E. 
Butler) occupied the chair, and there was a large 
attendance. The report of the treasurer showed a 
total indebtedness of ^136. In the report it was 
claimed that real and continuous progress had been 
made. Mr. Tawson pointed out that the Band of 
Hope Institute was now an accomplished fact. It 
had been the dream of some of them for a great 
number of years. He had also to record a very in¬ 
fluential series of meetings last year at the Council 
House, where they were entertained by the Lord 
Mayor and Lady Mayoress—a thing which in his 
early days they dare not have dreamt about. Mr. 
Lawson, having expressed satisfaction at other events 
of the year, referred to the success of the president’s 
banner scheme. A number of Bands of Hope entered, 
but some did not continue to the end. Those who 
did get to the end had not regretted their efforts. 
They were able to say confidently that the banner 
scheme had served as a lever to uplift the movement 
absolutely in every department of Band of Hope work. 
Reference was made to the retirement, through ill- 
health, of Mr. W. Thackeray, treasurer, and Mr. 
Bourne, hon. secretary. The financial report, said 
Mr. Lawson, was not so dark as it was painted. He 
did not doubt that they owed the money, but con¬ 
tributions to clear off the deficit had been received. 
The Chairman announced, amid applause, that he 
believed ^100 would be secured; so that only ^36 
would remain, and he hoped to see this wiped off. 
A great responsibility rested upon them. Miss Helen 
Cadbury presented the prize banners, awarded under 
the president’s prize banner scheme, to the four 
winning Bauds of Hope, viz. ; Stratford Road, Farm 
Street Friends, Coventry Road Baptist, and Redditch 
Wesleyan. Songs were given by the Rev. J. D. 
McCready and Miss McCready. 

Edinburgh. —The Anniversary Gatherings of the 
Edinburgh Band of Hope Union passed off success¬ 
fully on April 10 & 11. An earnest and appropriate 
sermon was preached on Sunday evening, by 
the Rev. Thomas S. Dickson, M.A., of Argyle Place 
United Free Church, to a congregation of some 
i,600 persons. On the following night the spacious 
Central Hall was well filled with many Temperance 
friends eager to see and hear the Union’s juvenile 
Choir. Several choruses and part songs were rendered 
in a pleasing way, and variety was imparted to the 
proceedings by a fine display ot action songs, plaiting 
the maypole, &c. The Chairman, Bailie Hislop, in 
moving the adoption of the annual report, an abstract 
of which was read by the secretary, Mr. W. G. Bruce, 
commented on the good work the Union had done for 
the past twenty-eight years, and pleaded for greater 
support being given to it. Mr. James Guthrie, J.P., of 
Brechin, followed with a racy and witty speech. 

Hulme, Chorlton and District. —The third series 
of papers arranged by this Baud of Hope Union for 
the monthly meetings of secretaries, representatives, 
and speakers has just been concluded with the fol¬ 
lowing—“ Encouragements in Band of Hope work,” 
by Mr. Aid. Constantine (hon. sec.); “The Liquor 
Traffic and the Compensation Question,” by Mr. J. 
Harrison ; “ What our Bands of Hope should be—or 
how they ought to be conducted,” by Mr. W. Breen ; 
and “ Habits,” by Mr. S. Cross. This Union, at the 
Great Free Trade Hall Band of Hope F'estival of the 


Counties Union was represented in the choir by 
several young men and women, the latter being 
dressed in white. The twentieth annual conference 
of Sunday Schoolteachers and Band of Hope workers 
took place on Friday evening, March 18, in the York 
Street Baptist Meeting House, Hulme. Mr. J. Allau 
Jamieson presided, and Mr. Robert Lewis (secretary 
of the Manchester, Salford and District Temperance 
Union) gave an excellent address on “The Question 
of the Hour.” Choruses were rendered during the 
evening by the Knot Mill Congregational Band of 
Hope Choir, and recitals by Messrs. Garner and Heath, 
the former giving an original poem, entitled “ Our 
Union.” There was a large attendance. The 
eighteenth annual report has recently been printed 
and circulated. It records 37 societies as helping the 
Counties Union in their effort to raise ,£15,000 for 
Temperance teaching, and the erection of New Band 
of Hope Union Offices, &c., in Deansgate. It also 
gives statistics of Band of Hope members, committees, 
periodicals distributed, meetings held, average at¬ 
tendance, pledges taken, and annual expenditure of 
the various Bands of Hope constituting the Union. 

North Woolwich. The People's Hall, North 
Woolwich, and the Woolwich Tabernacle Bands of 
Hope held their first conference for Baud of Hope 
workers in the Tabernacle schoolroom, Beresford 
Street, Woolwich, on March 9. The meeting was a 
great success. There were representatives from a 
good number of the local societies. The most inte¬ 
resting and helpful event of the evening w r as the 
paper read by Mr. Menzies, U.K.B.H.U., and dis¬ 
cussion which followed, this being led off by the 
Pastor (Rev. John Wilson). Mr. G. T. Radford 
occupied the chair. The musical portion of the pro¬ 
gramme was left entirely to the Tabernacle Sunday 
School Choir. 

Sheffield. —Anniversary services in connection 
with the Sheffield Sunday School Band of Hope 
Union, were held in the Albert Hall on Sunday, 
March 27, by permission of the Sheffield Wesleyan 
Mission. The preacher in the morning was the Rev. 
Philip Nume; evening, Rev. J. Sadler Reece. In 
the afternoon Mr. Joseph Ward presided, and Mr. 
Richard Nicholson spoke ; at this and the morning 
service a large choir of young people sang (and by 
invitation repeated their selection on the lollowiug 
Sunday afternoon); conductor, Mr. F. Shepherd; 
organist, Mr. Sydney Lamb. On Monday, March 28, 
the Annual Conversazione was held in the Temperance 
Hall, when the chairman was Mr. Isaac Milner, J.P., 
and the speaker Mr. J. J. Hatch, of Hull Instru¬ 
mental and vocal items w^re provided by Miss 
Beatrice Kaye, Miss Kate Wragg, and Mr. W. A. 
Hamer. Curio and other exhibitions by Messrs. W. 
Cosker, G. R. Vine, E. G. Draper, C. H. Lea, and 
J. W. Tomlinson. 

Yeadon. —On Plaster Monday this lively Yorkshire 
township was gay for the annual Band of Hope pro¬ 
cession and demonstration, and though the wind was 
keen the success achieved surpassed all previous 
efforts. The procession past the Town Hall Square 
was an imposing one, and the six decorated waggons 
proved very attractive. One represented H.M.S. 
Hope , a capital device, and another popular one showed 
two house interiors as object lessons—one the home 
of a drunkard, and the other that of an abstainer. 
At fixed points the children halted and sang, and 
temperance shots were fired by popular speakers. 
The tea in the Town Hall was a rare sight, and the 
evening meeting was enthusiastic. Mr. H. Penning¬ 
ton, of Bradford, occupied the chair, and said he did 
not think the value of Bands of Hope could be over¬ 
estimated. Three members having died during the 
year, Bibles were presented to their parents. Mr. 
Bowles, of Bradford, and Mr. Sam Pilling gave 
vigorous addresses, the latter also paving a high 
tribute to the memorv of the Rev. W. B. Affleck, whose 
body was buried in Yeadon Cemetery, and who did 
such a wonderful work as agent of the United Kingdom 
Band of Hope Union. Some capital singing was 
supplied by the choir, and by some good soloists. 
The day’s proceedings were a complete success. 









8 o 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Banfcs of Ifoope, 


Dudley. —On March 23, the twelfth anniversary of 
the Salop Street Wesleyan Band of Hope was held 
at Dudley, and it proved more than usually interesting 
owing to the somewhat unique presentations made 
by the society to the congregation. After tea the 
President (Mr. R. Turner) delivered his presidential 
address, in the course of which he said they had some 
of the most enthusiastic working young men and 
women in the country ; and this remark was approved 
by the audience and justified by what immediately 
followed. Mr. J. Witcombe (treasurer of the Band of 
Hope) then presented the trustees of the chapel with 
200 cups and saucers, 200 tea plates, 36 bread and 
butter plates, 18 bowls, and 12 cream jugs. It was a 
very valuable set of china purchased for the use of the 
Church, and he hoped the articles would often be 
used. He felt sure the trustees would appreciate the 
effort. He was pleased to see the good feeling that 
existed between the present trustees of the chapel 
and the Band of Hope. He could only wish that 
they had more adult members in their Band, but, 
nevertheless, they had a good number of young 
people. This Band of Hope had done much good for 
the locality. He had great pleasure in asking Mr. 
G. S. Partridge to accept the presentation on behalf 
of the trustees. Mrs. Price next presented 200 spoons 
to the trustees on behalf of a number of friends. She 
expressed a birthday wish that every member of the 
Band of Hope would prove as good and sound as the 
spoons. In acknowledging, Mr. Partridge said it was 
with very great pleasure that he accepted the pre¬ 
sentations on behalf of the trustees. In the Dudley 
Circuit there were 12 or 13 chapels, and he believed 
that Salop Street stood about fifth as regarded con¬ 
gregations, but in the question they were advocating 
that day he believed they stood No. 1. He had been 
a teetotaler for forty years, and he was pleased that 
he had a wife who had never tasted alcoholic drink. 
At the evening meeting Mr. Alex. Young presided, 
and Mr. James Price (secretary) reported 248 members. 
Vigorous addresses were given by the Chairman, Mr. 
John Dawson, Mr. Arnold Butler (President of the 
Birmingham and Midlands Union), Mr. J. T. Price 
and Mr. F. Baker. The choir sang splendidly. 

-- 

Northamptonshire. —The spring meetings of this 
Union were held at Wolverton on April 11. At the 
afternoon Council Meeting, Mr. John Claridge pre¬ 
sided, and the Rev. F. C. Dusty read an elaborate 
paper on “Our Jubilee,” which is due in 1906. He 
suggested the infusion of immense enthusiasm into 
the celebration they were sure to keep, and mentioned 
various methods of aggressive work for the considera¬ 
tion of the delegates. A lively discussion ensued, in 
which Mr. Wakely expressed his surprise that 
Northamptonshire possessed fifty-four villages with¬ 
out a Band of Hope. After tea a public meeting was 
held under the chairmanship of Mr. Rennie Wilkin¬ 
son, J.P., a good audience being addressed by the 
Chairman, the Rev. T. Ruston, the Rev. Arthur 
Harvie, and Mr. Wakely. Musical selections added 
to the interest of the proceedings. 

The “Edward Collard” Testimonial Fund, 
for which we appealed some time ago, has now been 
closed. It was promoted by the Vicar of St. Paul’s, 
Goswell Road. The Vicar says that the love and 
kindly feeling manifested by the donors, was keenly 
appreciated by our old friend during the remainder 
of his life, and also by his family since his removal 
last year. 

Fever. — During Convalescence after Typhoid, 
Scarlet and Rheumatic Fever, nothing is so accep¬ 
table and invigorating as “Nonalton,” the non¬ 
alcoholic Tonic. “Nonalton” is made from Grapes 
and Bark, and is recommended and prescribed by 
Physicians. It leaves no bad after-effects. Sample 
bottle, 2S. 6d. Particulars free.— F. Wright, Mundy 
& Co., 27, Merton Road, Kensington, Rondon, W.— 
[Advt.] 


-FORTY-NINTH- 

Anniversary Meetings, 

SUNDAY, TUESDAY, and WEDNESDAY, 


May 8, 10, and 11, 1904. 



-33* Programme of Hrrangemeitts. .(=$*- 


Sunday, May 8 . 

On Sunday morning, May 8, Meetings for Prayer 
on behalf of the Band of Hope Movement will be 
held throughout the Kingdom. 

Tuesday , May lO- 

6.30 p.m. Meeting of General Council in 
Council Room. Tea at 5.30. At this meeting, the 
attendance at which is strictly limited to Members of 
the Council, the Annual Report and Audited Accounts 
of the Union for 1903-1904 will be presented, the 
necessary Officers and Members of the Executive 
Committee elected, the time and place of the Autumn 
Meeting of the Union for 1905 decided, and other 
necessary business transacted. The Council consists 
of Representatives of Associated Unions, and Annual 
Subscribers of 21s. and upwards, who are abstainers. 

Wednesday , May 11. 

9.0 a.m. Breakfast Meeting and Conference in 

Dower Hall. Sir GEORGE DIVESEY will preside. 
Short addresses will be given by Sir Victor Horsley, 
F.R.S.; J. Williams Benn, Esq., D.C.C.; J. H. 
Yoxall, Esq., M.P., and Rev. A. W. JEPHSON, M.A., 
on the subject of “The Importance of Training the 
Young in the Principles of Total Abstinence.” The 
proceedings will terminate at about a quarter-past 
Eleven o’clock. 

2.30 pm. General Conference in Dower Hall- 
T. A. COTTON, Esq., J.P., C.C., will preside. A 
Paper will be read on “ How can the Pulpit and the 
Sunday School be made more Helpful to the Band of 
Hope ? ” by the Rev. Carey Bonner (Secretary of the 
Sunday School Union), to be followed by a model 
Bible Temperance Address to Children, by Mr. 
Charles Harvey (Secretary of the Kent County 
Band of Hope Union). Ample opportunity will be 
afforded for the full discussion of the above important 
subject. 

7.0 p.m. GREAT EVENING MEETING 

IN THE 

LARGE HALL. 

Chairman - Sir GEORGE WIDDIAMS 
(President oj the Union). 

While the audience is assembling an Organ Recital 
will be given by Mr. Alfred J. Hawkins, Organist 
and Musical Director of the City Temple. Addresses 
will be given by the Rev. H. Russell Wakefield, 
Mayor of Marylebone; Rev. D. D- Ritchie, Principal 
of the Congregational Institute, Nottingham ; and 
T. H. Sloan, Esq., M.P.. of Belfast. A Choir of about 
400 Senior Members of Bands of Hope, representative 
of the movement in the Metropolis, will sing a 
selection of pieces. Conductor, Mr. Herbert West. 


Reserved Seat Tickets for the Great Evening 
Meeting: One Shilling. May be had at 59 & 60, Old 
Bailey. 












Out* Annivepsapy. 


Our long' report of the forty-ninth Annual 
Meetings of the Band of Hope Union occupies 
nearly all our space. Our readers in all parts 
of the world will be glad to read what was 
said, and thus share the inspiration which all 
who attended the gatherings experienced. 
The address of Dr. McAdam Eccles, at the 
Breakfast, may perhaps be specially noted, 
and with it may be bracketted those by the 
Chairman of the London County Councie, 
and Mr. Yoxale, M.P. The evening speeches 
will also be found to be very vigorous and 
refreshing. The important paper read at the 
afternoon Conference will be given in our 
next issue. 

-- 

Correspondence. 


A WORKHOUSE BAND OF HOPE. 

Dear Sir, —I am enclosing Report of our own 
Local Union for last year, from which you will see 
the general character of our work. If ever you should 
be in this district and could spare an hour to visit our 
Union Workhouse Baud of Hope, you would be 
delighted with it. Those of us who were instru¬ 
mental in starting it, and have worked it all along, 
are very proud of it. It was practically the outcome 
of the paper read at the Manchester Conference, on 
“ Bands of Hope in connection with our Workhouses.” 
I brought the matter before our Union on my return 
as a delegate, and after due consideration we were able 
to get all we desired, and considerably more than we ex¬ 
pected, from the Guardians, &c. We have full control, 
no one interferes with our arrangements. We get the 
best men we can outside our Union. Many help us 
in this way who cannot speak for us regularly. Our 
report referred to the Society in these terms The 
Baud of Hope held fortnightly at the Workhouse is 
carried on as efficiently as ever, and the children 
thoroughly appreciate the efforts made in their behalf 
in the cause of true sobriety. It has been decided to 
set apart one night in each quarter to be conducted 
entirely by the children. The first of these meetings 
was held in November. The Chairman was selected 
by the boys from among themselves, and short 
addresses of a few minutes each, interspersed with 
songs and recitations, were given by the boys and 
girls. The address on “ Three reasons why I am a 
Band of Hope Boy,” by one of the lads, showed that 
our teaching had not been in vain. Their Annual 
Outing, thanks to the generous donations of friends 
outside the Union, was again held at Kinver, and it is 
not too much to say that it was one of the brightest 
days in the lives of these lads and lasses, who, we 
trust, will in the future take their places as useful 
citizens in this or other towns.” 

I will send you an outline of our next quarterly 
meeting there, with extracts from the speeches. It is 
really a most encouraging work, and were it not that 
I know how full your interesting pages are just now, 
I could give you many details which would show how 
earnest the boys and girls are in this good work. 

I am, &c., T. J. YOUNG. 


F'ooTball and Drink. —The tenth annual meet¬ 
ings of the Cumberland Union were held at Wigton, 
on April 16, 17, and 18, and were very successful. At 
the opening conference a lively debate took place on 
football, and the meeting agreed that efforts should 
be made to free the game from public house influence. 
Mr. Kelly, secretary, reported progress, with a 
membership of 19,000. The receipts were £366 and 
payments ^371. Mr. Hawkins, the agent, presented a 
good report. The officers were elected, aud a public 
meeting was held at night. Sermons and addresses 
were given on Sunday, and a closing meeting held on 
Monday. 

Dr. Souttar in England. —At the Herts annual 
meetings, held in the Town Hall, Great Berkhamstead, 
during April, there was a conference at which these 
subjects were considered: “Suggestions for Bettering 
Bands of Hope,” and “the Success or Otherwise of 
the Child Messenger Act.” The President of the 
Union (Mr. S. G. Sheppard) was chairman of the 
conference, and also of an evening meeting, when 
an address was delivered by Dr. Robinson .Souttar, 
who, whilst M.P. for Dumfries, introduced the 
Children’s Bill; and “Uncle Edward” (Mr. Edward 
Royds) gave incidents of his work among children in 
the county. 

WeslEyanism and Bands op Hope. —In a 
secretarial report presented at the Bedford and 
Northampton Wesleyan Synod, lately held at Luton, 
the Rev. Sydney Phillips (of St. Neots) stated that 
there were 179 Bands of Hope in the district, showing 
a total membership of 13,754. Most of those organisa¬ 
tions were connected with the Sunday School, but in 
many cases they were undenominational, and he had, 
therefore, reason to believe that the returns showed 
a smaller number of children than was actually to be 
found at meetings of the Bands of Hope. The 59 
adult Temperance Societies showed an increase of 
12, but he was convinced in that case, also, that 
the figures did not represent the number of Tempe¬ 
rance people in the district. There were thousands 
of good teetotalers who were not connected with any 
Temperance Societies at all, and who might, by 
adding their names, help to strengthen the cause of 
Temperance in the Connexion. 

Battersea Chapel Band op Hope had a success¬ 
ful gathering at the Battersea Town Hall on May 10, 
the occasion being their annual entertainment on 
behalf of the Band of Hope funds. Mr. R. Hayward 
presided, and songs and recitations were given by 
Miss Lily Mills, Mr. Arthur Mills, aud Miss Alice 
Haile, with Mr. C. E. Paragreen, L.R.A.M., at the 
piano. The principal part of the entertainment was 
a fine display of musical drill and physical exercises 
by the Battersea Chapel Physical Drill Class, thrice 
winners of the Drill Competitions at the Battersea 
Sunday Scholars’ Exhibition, Crystal Palace Final 
Competition (1903), &c. The members of this Drill 
Class all belong to the Band of Hope, which is 
fortunate also in possessing among its workers so 
thoroughly qualified an instructor as Mr. E. 
Bartholomew, who, with his wife as accompanist, 
devotes a great amount of time and energy to this 
useful work. The drill included dumb-bells, wands, 
clubs, scarf drill, angle steps, parallel bars, and high 
jump, interspersed with games, and concluding with 
a tug of war between boys and girls, the whole being 
excellently given. During the evening the challenge 
cup and medals, won at the annual competition among 
the members, were distributed. A delightful evening 
was spent, and about £5 realised for the Band of 
Hope funds. 


JUNE, 1904. 





























82 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


frand of hope Addresses.—Series I. 


MANKIND IN THE MARRING & MENDING. 

LESSON FOR SENIOR MEMBERS. 


By T. N. KELYNACK, M.D., M.R.C.P., 

Hon. Secretary of the Society for the Study of Inebriety. 


No. 6.—THE ALCOHOLIC ENVIRONMENT. 


Influences: Within and Without. 

E LEMENTS innumerable go to the making of 
the human. Agencies beyond computation are 
ever silently and secretly working for his 
marring. But forces, energised by unconquer¬ 
able powers, are always ready to maintain and 
to restore. Marring and mending may result from 
influences which arise within the individual, or may 
accrue from influences brought to bear from without. 

The Alcoholic Habit. 

The laws governing habit are obscure and but 
dimly apprehended. The enslavement of the drinker 
may be gradual and almost imperceptible. The fetters 
of tne alcoholic habit are oftentimes rivetted, and the 
prisoner secured, ere he realises the manner and 
method of his enslavement. The evolution of the 
alcoholic habit merits the most careful study. 
Individual investigation of cases is absolutely neces¬ 
sary if the personal equation is to receive the con¬ 
sideration which is all essential. The so-called 
alcoholic “craving” calls for much patient study if 
the physical and psychological constituents are to be 
made clear. Every parent should with loving insight 
seek to understand the constitr.tion of the offspring, 
for many a child through thoughtlessness, ignorance, 
or neglect, is exposed to agencies tending to initiate 
and to maintain an alcoholic habit. It is well that all 
growing life should be free from any taint of an 
alcoholic indulgence. Total abstinence from all 
intoxicants is an essential condition for the highest 
degree of healthy development of mind and bod}'. 

The Alcoholic Environment. 

Alcoholism is so widely prevalent that it is almost 
impossible to escape fiom exposure to the pernicious 
action of an alcoholic environment. Whatever 
individual procedure may be followed, everyonemore 
or less of necessity has to live and move and have his 
being in an environment essentially a’coholic. We 
become habituated to the morbid. Drunkenness is to 
many little more than a comic incident in life. 
Tradition, custom, habit and inclination, all tend to 
perpetuate the unwholesome surroundings. The 
alcoholic atmosphere is about both the drinker and 
the abstainer, and each is influenced consciously or 
unconsciously. Teachers and parents should realise 
the mighty moulding force of environment, and by 
explanation and warning seek to safeguard the young 
life from the degrading and deteriorating action of 
that all pervasive influence which forms perhaps the 
most mightv force in perpetuating alcoholism in this 
country. The multitudinous inducements to adopt 
drinking customs act in accordance with the physio¬ 
logical law of the summation of stimuli, and finally 
overthrows even when considerable powers of resis¬ 
tance have at first been manifest. Band of Hope 
workers especially should seriously study the action 
of environmental forces which only too frequently 
avail much in the undoing of their work. 

A Marring Environment. 

Much in modern surroundings makes for marring. 
The life of to-day tends to develop decadence in 
unstable individuals. Luxury oftentimes induces 
dangerous drinking habits. Poverty commonly pro¬ 


vides conditions under which alcoholism exercises 
devastating influence. 

Healthy Surroundings. 

With the morbid seed of an unstable personality, 
and the unhealthy soil of an unnatural environment, 
little wonder is it that a harvest of despair results. 
By the removal of a predisposed subject from an 
undesirable environment, and its substitution bv 
healthy surrounding, powers of resistance both mental 
and phjsical can be developed. It is well to remember 
that some Temperance workers have tended through 
ignorance to exaggerate the influence of an inherited 
craving. [For much information on this all impor¬ 
tant aspect of Temperance work, see The British 
Journal of Inebriety , Vol. I. 1903-4.] 

A Mending Environment. 

A morbid environment may accomplish untold ill, 
but a healthy environment may secure unlimited 
good. To prevent the ill the utmost effort should be 
made to secure the good. Prevention must be ever 
better than cure. Prophylaxis is the great aim of the 
scientifically directed Temperance worker. This can 
only be obtained by ever bearing in mind the directing 
force of causal factors. The prevention of |ilcoholism 
can only be accomplished by clearly recognising all 
that goes to make for the causature of alcoholism. 

Later we shall have to speak of the ways and means 
by which sobriety may be re-established, but for the 
present it will suffice to affirm that through the wise 
modification of environment much may be accom¬ 
plished to rectify derangement in the individual, and 
arrest a perpetuation of wrong in those dependent. 

[See address by Sir William Collins on “The 
Intellectual Treatmeut of Inebriety.” — The British 
Journal of Inebriety, Vol. I. page 97.] 

——♦>♦:♦♦>—- 

Nottingham. —The Annual Festival in connection 
with the Sherwood Wesleyan Band of Hope, the in¬ 
auguration of which proved such an unqualified 
success in 1902, was held recently, and occupied tw^ 
days. It was originally the intention to only hold 
the Festival once, but, owing to the zeal displayed by 
the children, coupled with the interest taken in the 
Band of Hope by the people in the village and Church, 
the tickets sold made it uecessarv that another 
evening should be allotted. The children, 
both great and small, are to be commended 
for their regular attendance at the rehearsals. 
Mr. E- Barker, Mr. Ricks, and Misses A. & K. Ricks, 
undertook the training, and they are to be congratu¬ 
lated on the eminent success of their work. The 
first part comprised a Choral March by the Band of 
Hope Choir, solos, stave drill by the boys, recitations, 
violin selection, and drills and action songs by the 
girls. The second part was opened by the crowning 
of the Temperance Queen, which was followed by the 
rendering of a cantata, “ The Children’s Garden.” 

Walgrave and District. —The spring meetings of 
the Walgrave and District Baud of Hope Union were 
held at Moulton at the end of April. Mr. H. Richardson 
(of Overstone Grange) was re-elected as President, 
and Mr. S. N. Walker as vice-president. Mr. W. 
Coleman, who was appointed as secretary (on the 
resignation of Mr. J. A. Mackness, through leaving 
Moulton), read to ihe delegates a paper, “How to 
Retain our Senior Members,” which was afterwards 
discussed by Mr. E. W’alker, Mr. J. Siddons (County 
Councillor), Rev. G. S. Fasham, Mr. T. Birch, and 
the President; Mr. J. Brown seconding a vote of 
thanks to the essayist, that was moved by a speaker 
previously named. Mr. B. Mather (treasurer^ pre¬ 
sented a satisfactory financial statement. Mr. T. 
Singlehurst (of Northampton) presided over a public 
meeting, at which reports were given by branch 
secretaries, and addresses delivered by Mr. Craven 
(Wellingborough) and the Rev. T. Ruston (Long 
Buckby), prior to the passing of a resolution con¬ 
demning the Government’s Licensing Bill. Music 
and recitations interspersed the proceedings. 








THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


83 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series II. 


SIMPLE SCIENCE CHATS. 

By Charles Harvey, 

Secretary, Kent Band of Hope Union. 

No. 6.—“NO ADMITTANCE EXCEPT ON 
BUSINESS.” 


| FOODS.— THREE KINDS. j 

I. NITROGENOUS. 2. CARBONACEOUS. 3. MINERAL, j 

GOOD FOODS.-BREAD, EGGS, MILK. 

Intoxicating Liquors Bad for Building. 1 

ALCOHOL-USELESS - 

T HE; heading lo this lesson reminds us of notice 
boards we constantly see. We can all under¬ 
stand how necessary it is to keep out of build¬ 
ings, workshops, factories, and such like places, 
all those who have no business. It is equally impor¬ 
tant that, as far as we can manage it, we should 
allow nothing inside our bodies, our “Houses in 
which we live,” that has no business there. 

We must first remember that our bodies need 
water. This we have already learnt. But water is 
not the only thing necessary to keep us alive. No, 
we must have beside water three different kinds of 
foods. Their names are long ones : (1) Nitrogenous 
foods ; (2) carbonaceous foods; and (3) mineral foods. 
Nitrogenous Foods. 

None of us, in the ordinary way, call our food by 
this long name, and the butcher or baker would stare 
at us if we asked for threepennyworth of nitrogenous 
food. No, but we all buy bread, for instance. Well, 
bread contains some nitrogenous food. We some¬ 
times give it the name of gluten. If we take bread 
and analyse it, we see that eight parts out of every 
hundred will consist of nitrogenous substance. Then 
eggs have fourteen and a-half parts out of every 
hundred ; milk four parts, and such well-known foods 
as lean meat, fish, cheese, and even vegetables, con¬ 
tain this needed foodstuff. Let us turn to intoxicating 
drinks to find out whether these contain this necessary 
food. We will take each class separately : (1) Ales. 
If we take 100 ozs. of the very best ale we can pur¬ 
chase, only about J- oz. will be nitrogenous in its 
nature; (2) wines, say, port wine. Here we find less 
still, for only about a x oz. out of every 100 will con¬ 
sist of this good food; (3) spirits, say, brandy. What 
do you think we find here? There is not a single 
trace of nitrogenous food. 

Use of Nitrogenous Food. 

We must now enquire what work this nitrogenous 
food has to do in the body. These living houses of 
ours consist partly of flesh. We call these fleshy 
parts muscles, and when we learn that in our bodies 
we have 500 muscles, all of them doing useful work, 
we shall understand how important is the work of 
keeping them healthy and strong. Well, the nitro¬ 
genous foods are the flesh-forming foods. Can alcohol 
build up our muscles ? No. Why not ? Because in 
alcohol there is no nitrogenous food. 

Carbonaceous Foods. 

The second kind of food we have to learn about is 
called carbonaceous foods, because of the carbon 
they contain. Which foods are carbonaceous foods ? 
Well, there are three kinds all well known to us: 
(1) Eat; and by fat we do not mean only the fat of 
meat, but all kinds of fat, such as butter, dripping, 
lard, nuts, fat in cocoa, and other common foods. 
(2) Sugar. Most of us like sweets, a very pleasing 
way of taking carbon, but we must remember that 
sugar is found in many kinds of foods—fruits, beet¬ 
roots, carrots, for example. (3) Starch. We must 
learn that such common foods as potatoes, bread, rice, 
and all grain foods consist largely of starch. In the 


mouth the starch, by the action of the saliva, is con¬ 
verted into sugar. So all starch foods are carbon- 
rceous. Let us learn a few figures. More than half 
of our bread, 52! parts out of every 100, is carbon¬ 
aceous food. Milk has 9 parts in every 100, eggs 13, 
cheese 32, and potatoes 21. Now turn to intoxicating 
drinks. (1) Ale. Here vs e shall find only half apart 
out of 100. There is beside this a stick}', gummy 
substance known as dextrine, and this is of little or 
no value. (2) Port wine, 35 out of every 100. In wines 
there is generally more or less sugar or sugary sub¬ 
stance. (3) Spirits, like brandy. These contain only 
a trace which is not worth considering, and spirits 
may be said, therefore, to contain none at all. 

Use of Carbonaceous Foods. 

If we think of our homes we know how we have to 
keep them warm. In the cold weather we light fires, 
that is, burn carbon in the form of coal, and thus 
obtain heat. Now our human houses must always be 
kept at one regular heat. If we happen to be ill, one 
of the things the doctor often does is to put a little 
thermometer under our tongue. What for? He is 
taking our temperature. If he finds the heat to be 
983 degrees he knows that is the proper temperature ; 
if it rises higher he knows our body is too hot and we 
are feverish. If it falls below 983 degrees, we are too 
cold. Our bodies must always, to be healthy, be the 
same temperature, even in the hottest day in summer, 
or the coldest in winter, whether we are travelling 
towards the North Pole or going to the Equator. 
How is this required heat maintained ? Why, by the 
slow and gradual burning of the carbon we have taken 
into our bodies in the form of carbonaceous foods. 
Now turn to the figures, and we see at once that 
bread, milk and such like substances are able to 
supply material for giving warmth to our bodies. But 
with the little any of the intoxicating liquors possess, 
they must be poor heat producers. But what about 
alcohol? This liquid does contain carbon. There 
seems to be no doubt that part, at any rate, of this 
carbon is burnt up in the body. But there are other 
poisons that contain carbon. Ether and chloroform 
do. Shall we therefore take these? No. Neither 
must we take alcohol, for the harm it does completely 
outweighs the small amount of heat produced, par¬ 
ticularly when we can obtain a better supply' of heat 
from foods that do not hurt the body in other ways. 
Arctic explorers, such as Dr. Nansen, tell us that 
intoxicants are of no use for supplying heat to the 
body. After drinking them the temperature is 
lowered, and,therefore, we are far better without them. 

Mineral Foods. 

The third kind of food we must learn about is 
mineral food. It seems rather strange on first 
thoughts that our bodies should require minerals. 
We take mineral substances into our bodies in several 
different ways. We often call the water we drink 
“Hard” water. The drinking water of Kent, for 
example, flowing as it does mostly through chalky 
soil, is very hard, that is, it contains a good deal of 
mineral. Therefore, our drinking water supplies us 
with minerals. Then in bread we shall find 2 oz. out 
of every 100 will be mineral substances, such as salt, 
&c. Milk contains 1 oz. in every 100, eggs ozs., 
and minerals are found in all kinds of vegetables. 
Now turn to intoxicating drinks : (1) Ales contain x % 
oz. out of every 100 ozs. (2) Port wine, J oz. is 
mineral out of every 100; and (3) brandy, none at all. 

Use of Mineral Food. 

We all know we possess a bony skeleton. If we 
count we shall find we possess 240 bones in our bodies. 
The chief use of the mineral food is to build up this 
bony structure. Intoxicating liquors can share verv 
little in this building process. Can alcohol do it? 
No, because it contains no mineral. 

This is a very useful lesson, and if thoroughly 
learned will help us to keep all kinds of intoxicants 
out of our bodies because they have no business 
inside. “No Admittance Except on Business.” 


The Chart on “ Comparison of Foods/’ as well as an analysis of foods 
like bread, milk, ale, &c., would be useful in illustrating the lesson. 
They can be purchased at 60, Old Bailey. 











8 4 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


band of Hope Addresses.—Series V. 


YARNS WITH YOUNG PEOPLE. 

By Thomas Palmer, 

Leicestershire Band of Hope Union. 


No. 3.—WHO’S TO BLAME ? 


A Chied Run Over. 

H ERE is a crowd of people, and great excitement. 
Something unusual has occurred, what is the 
matter? A child has been run over and 
killed. One question is on everyone’s lips; 
“ How did it happen ? Who’s to blame ? ” the 
object being to locate the responsibility. 

A Raiiavay Accident. 

Here are groups of people on a railwav platform, 
engaged in earnest conversation. An- accident has 
occurred a short distance away: valuable property 
has been destroyed, several people have been killed, 
and many injured. A similar question is asked: 
“ How did it happen ? Who’s to blame ? ” 

When we think of the ignorance still prevailing 
upon the Temperance question—how many there are 
who believe that alcoholic drink possesses peculiar 
virtues ; that it contributes to the physical, moral, and 
spiritual health and well-being of those who take it; 
we, too, ask the question, “ Whose fault is it? Who’s 
to blame ? ” 

In considering and answering this, we shall see 
that several causes have been, and are at work. 

I. False Teachers of the Past have been to 
Blame. 

Less than sixty years ago there were no Bauds of 
Hope, there was no scientific Temperance teaching 
in day schools; hence young people grew up in 
ignorance of the uselessness and danger of taking 
alcoholic drink as a beverage. Men and women in 
those days (as some do in these) believed alcohol to 
be indispensable to health and life, and handed down 
these ideas to the children. Drink was praised 
when it should have been blamed, and thus the evils 
resulting from its use were perpetuated. 

How thankful ought we to be for these better days, 
when boys and girls are able—if willing—to learn in 
their thousands of Bands of Hope the true nature of 
alcohol, and thus to fortify themselves against euor, 
and the mischievous results which spring from 
erroneous ideas. 

II. Some Doctors have been to Blame. 

Even otherwise intelligent people imagine that 
alcohol has powers which it does not possess. 
Advertisements in newspapers (and in some Christian 
magazines, too), are sometimes backed up by medical 
men, who little think what mischief is being wrought 
in this way, what impressions are being made on 
people’s minds in favour of taking alcohol. Who 
has not heard of “Stout to give strength, Whiskey to 
promote digestion, Brandy to give warmth, and Wine 
to make blood ” ? Some doctors still prescribe these 
drinks in such a way as to foster the idea that they 
are extremely useful and good. How careless, how 
unscientific it is to send patients to the public-house 
for their physic ! Through this practice, some 
abstainers, rather weak in their faith, and who did 
not trouble to understand the subject, have been led 
to use alcoholic drink, sometimes with very sad and 
sorrowful results. 

The Temperance Hospitae, &c. 

We should be grateful for the light thrown on 
this matter by the Temperance Hospital, the Recha- 
bites’ Sick Benefit Society, and other societies of a 
similar character: also for the valuable figures 
recently given by Dr. Millard, the Medical Officer of 
Health for Reicester, as well as other medical men 
who have specially studied the effects of alcohol in 
sickness and in health. 


These facts will do something to counteract the 
mischief done by medical men who are too prone to 
prescribe drink to their patients, and put us upon 
our guard against being misled by an unscientific use 
of a dangerous drug. 

III. Some Christian People have been to 
Blame. 

(a) Alcoholic drinks have often been referred to as 
“ Good creatures of God,” as though whiskey, wine, 
and beer were furnished for our use in the same way 
as water and other “good creatures.” See the varied 
forms in which water is supplied ; as rain, hail, snow, 
dew, spring, brook, river, &c. Wherever we turn we 
come into contact with that “ God-given beverage,” 
water. Who ever heard of a River of Rum, a Brook 
of Beer, or a Spring giving Whiskey? No one. 
These are purely manufactured, artificial, and 
poisonous drinks, and cannot by any reasonable 
means be considered “ good creatures of God.” Yet 
how many Christian people still cling to the false 
notion that in some way or other the “ Giver of all 
Good ” has provided these liquors which produce so 
much mischief. 

Vain Deeusions. 

(b) How many, too, imagine that the Bible 
sanctions the use of the abominations known in 
these days as “wine.” that Temperance is simply 
a matter of the quantity which one may take, and 
that quality has no connection with the question. 
In short, that Temperance consists in pleasing one’s 
appetite with small quantities of an unwholesome 
drug as a beverage ! The sooner we clear away these 
absurdities the sooner shall we get rid of many 
difficulties which surround the Temperance question 
from the Christian standpoint. 

Indifference. 

(c) The indifference with which some Christian 
people sometimes regard drunkenness is deplorable, 
and is a cause of much mischief. How often we 
hear intoxication covered up by such terms as 
“ fresh,” “merry,” or “jolly.” We must regard this 
hideous disease, or vice, in its true aspect, and never 
forget the truism, that every drunkard has become 
what he is through trying to be a “ moderate 
drinker.” 

We must be on our Guard. 

The foregoing facts teach us several things : 

1. To keep a strict look-out, to be on the watch- 
tower, to be on the alert; for temptation comes in so 
many ways, and often from unexpected quarters. 

2. To be on our guard against false ideas, though 
they may have the merit (?) of being old. A few 
years ago it was a common belief in a Midlaud town 
that there was poison in everything but carrots, aud 
even to-day some of the people believe it. A false idea 
handed down from the dark ages ; just as are many of 
the falsities respecting alcoholic drink. 

3. We have to be on our guard against false ideas 
of the present day, such as that Port Wine or Stout 
make blood, keep us in health, or aid in recovery 
from sickness. Ever remember that abstinence will 
aid in securing a rosy cheek, a bright eye, a clear 
brain, a steady nerve, a strong muscle, a light heart, 
and a heavy pocket! 

4. And, lastly, bear in mind that the spiritual life 
is always imperilled by taking spirituous drinks. No 
one loves more, or understands better, the teaching 
of the Bible because the} - drink beer. 

Water is God’s beverage to us : whiskey is of man’s 
making. 

From whatever point we regard the taking of 
alcoholic beverages, whether physically, morally, or 
religiously, there is danger, and, as wise people, we 
shall shun it. No one will then be able to point 
at us aud say, “ You were to blame for teaching me to 
drink a beverage that is— 

DANGEROUS, 

DECEPTIVE, 

and DESTRUCTIVE.” 





THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


85 


Bund of M Addresses.—Series VI. 

TAKE CARE OF “ NUMBER ONE.” 

By W. N. Edwards, F.C.S., 


Science Lecturer, Untied Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 


| POLICEMEN & BURGLARS. 

PROTECTION. 

INVASION. 

EYES, 

BEER, 

EARS, 

WINE, 

NOSE, 

SPIRITS, 

MOUTH, 

CIDER, 

HANDS, 

HOME-MADE WINE, 

GONSGIENGE. 

ALCOHOLIC LIQUORS, 

In any Form. 

By Signing the Pledge we chain up the Burglars. 


(Plan of Blackboard at close of Address.) 

W E can all of us choose between taking care of 
ourselves and doing ourselves harm. It is a 
question of knowledge and of will power. 
Many people do themselves harm from 
ignorance; therefore, we should get all the 
knowledge we can, both of ourselves and of those 
things that are good for us. Others do themselves 
harm from carelessness. They know that some 
things are good and that others are bad, but they 
don’t trouble themselves: they are indifferent and 
won’t exercise will power, and say “ No ” to the bad 
things, and “ Yes ” to the good ones. 

Policemen 

exist for our protection. They are supposed to be 
wide awake when we are fast asleep. The very 
reason lor their existence is the presumption that 
they will keep order; that they will watch over our 
interests ; that they will see that we are not wronged, 
and that the}’ will quickly punish the evil-doer. In 
olden times when there were no policemen, everyone 
was in fear and dread. People could seldom venture 
out after dark, and if they did so, they went in 
numbers and fully armed. The people of that time 
were without protection, aud they were often at the 
mercy of the strong and powerful who oppressed and 
robbed them. The policemen stand, therefore, for a 
protective force. But there are also 
Burglars 

who live upon robbery and destruction. They prey 
upon society, they don’t work and get an honest 
living, but in the night when men are sleeping, by 
stealth they break into houses and invade the home, 
and steal whatever they can lay their hands upon. 
Nobody likes burglars. We set the police to catch 
them, and, if we can, we put them into prison where 
for a time they are out of harm’s way. We don’t like 
the burglar because he lives upon doing the people 
an injury. He represents the invading force. We 
don’t want him. He always does harm and not good, 
and, therefore, we are not sorry when the burglar is 
caught and punished. But now, we want to speak of 
policemen and burglars of a very different type. Eet 
us think of our bodies as houses. In some respects 
they are like houses. The soul is the tenant dwelling 
in the body just as we dwell in an ordinary house. 
There are protective forces looking after the welfare 
of the house. There are destructive forces that would 
injure and destroy the house. The protective forces 
may be called policemen, and the destructive forces 
we may liken to the burglars. 

Our Eyes 

act as policemen. By means of them we can see the 
misery and evil caused by strong drink. We see the 
uncared-for children, the squalid homes, the dirty 


courts and alleys, the ragged and unwashed men and 
women resulting from the use of strong drink. We 
see the gay and flaunting gin palaces aud the ever 
swinging doors of the public house, and the wretched 
drunken men and women. These policemen of 
ours are always saying to us, If you want to take care 
of “number one ’’ avoid the public house, and leave 
strong drink alone. 

Our Ears 

act as policemen, too, for they tell us of quarrels and 
brawls, of bad deeds done under the influence of 
strong drink. Anyone who keeps eyes and ears open 
cannot fail to see the tremendous evils arising from 
strong drink. If we judge of it by what it does, then 
we cannot fail to hear these two policemen say very 
emphatically, Have nothing to do with it. 

Tasting and Smelling 

are two more of the policemen guarding this house of 
ours. As a rule, things that smell nasty and that taste 
nasty are things to be avoided, and so we get protec¬ 
tion from things hurtful. On the other hand some 
things that taste nice and smell nice may be hurtful; 
therefore, we want to use common sense and judgment 
and not trust entirely to our policemen. There is 
nothing attractive about beer, wine, and spirits in 
themselves. When, however, taste and smell have 
been bribed by bad habit, and have got used to these 
things, they are off guard, and instead of being effective 
policemen they are ready to admit these foes into the 
house. We must, therefore, look well after both nose 
and mouth, and see that they are not enticed from 
their duty. Whilst we keep the ivory gate of the 
mouth always closed against strong drink we are safe. 

Our Hands 

and the sense of feeling are another great protection 
to us. Were it not for this sense, we might walk into 
the lire and be burned, and, indeed, we should fall 
into all kinds of danger. With our hands we can put 
away from us all sorts of bad things: with our hands 
we can sign the pledge against strong drink. With 
our hands we can display a fine sense of touch and of 
perception. What hundreds of things we can do 
with these wonderful hands. They are certainly 
among the protective agents for this body of ours. 

Above All These 

there is one great superior officer whose name is Con¬ 
science. He is always telling us right from wrong. 
He speaks with a small, still, inner voice, and we 
should never fail to listen to it. If we obey the voice 
of conscience we shan’t go very far wrong. If we tell 
a lie we know it at once. If we do a wrong action we 
know it immediately. Who is it that tells us these 
things. It is this voice, Conscience. We have, then, 
all these agents, our five senses, and our inward con¬ 
science watching over our interests and helping us to 
seek our best welfare. 

The Burglars 

have many ways of working. Sometimes they corrupt 
a servant by bribery, and so they get into the house 
to steal. That is something like strong drink. We 
are justified in speaking of beer, wine, spirits, cider, 
home-made wine, and all alcoholic liquors as burglars. 
They steal away a man’s brains. They are able to do 
this because they contain the spirit alcohol, which is 
a brain poison. As the brain controls all the senses, 
it follows that, if the brain is injured, the senses must 
all suffer to some extent. Supposing a man gets 
quite intoxicated, he is then spoken of as being 
“dead-drunk.” What has happened to him -he can¬ 
not see, hear, feel, taste, smell, or think? All the 
policemen are off duty. He can’t protect himself. A 
cart may come along and run over him ; he won’t be 
able to get out of the way. The burglars—strong 
drinks—have stolen away his brains, aud he is less 
able to take care of himself than a little child. 

The Bad Work 

these burglars do is not always the same in quantity, 
but is always the same in kind. The only wise course 
is to keep the burglars out by bolting and barring the 
door (signing the pledge). 













S6 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Out* popty-j'linth Rnnivet*sat*y. 


B EAUTIFUL weather favoured the forty-ninth 
Auniveisary gatherings of the Union, of which 
historic Exeter Hall was again the scene. The 
delegates assembled from their respective 
spheres of labour, some of them very far away, 
fall of hope and enthusiasm, and all the functions 
were of a most helpful and encouraging character. 

Numerous meetings for prayer were held at various 
centres on Sunday, May 8, and the proceedings 
of the following week were thus most fittingly 
inaugurated. 

On Tuesday the Council assembled in the Council 
chamber, Mr. Lionel Mundy, Chairman of Committee, 
presiding. The Chairman commented on the leading 
features of the Annual Report, which, on his motion, 
was adopted, and ordered to be printed and circulated. 
The officers, Committee, and staff of the Union were 
thanked for their services, and the retiring officials 
re-elected to their several posts. The re-election of the 
retiring members of Committee was moved by Mr. F. 
Smith. A contest for the honour of entertaining the 
Union on the occasion of the Autumnal Conference 
of 1905 took place between the Unions for Oxford¬ 
shire and Newport and Monmouthshire respectively, 
theinvitalion of the first-named Union, tendered bv Mr. 
R. R. Alden, and supported by Mr. Amos George, 
being accepted. The Monmouthshire friends were 
warmly thanked for the invitation they had offered. 
A strong protest against the Government’s Licensing 
Bill was unanimously adopted, and sent to members 
of the Government, the leaders of the Opposition, 
rhe local Members of Parliament, and to the public 
Press. 

Amongst the many friends present at the various 
gatherings—besides those whose names appear else¬ 
where—were the following: Hon. Mrs. Eliot Yorke, 
Mrs. Caine, Mr. W. Bingham, Mr. F. Dymond 
(Friends’ Temperance Union), Mr. W. B. Harvey, 
Mr. Duncan Miller, Dr. R. ILramore, Mr. J. T. Rae, 
and Mr. J. Y. Hendeison (National Temperance 
League), Mr. and Mrs. Hind Smith i Young Abstainers’ 
Union), Miss Jennie Street. Mr. W. A. McMullen, 
Mr. Robert Roy, Rev. Dawson Burns (United 
Kingdom Alliance) Miss Grav (Independent Order of 
Good Templars), Rev. T. F. Tou/.eau, Rev. H. J. 
Tompkins, Rev. F. Smith, M.A., B.Sc., Rev. W. P. 
Hodge, Rev. G. A. Wilson, Mrs. Eynon (Women’s 
Total Abstinence Union), Mr. Walter P. Reavell, J.P., 
Miss Violet Byse (Switzerland), and Mr. J. A. Tray 
(Riga, Russia.) 

The London and Suburban Unions were well re¬ 
presented, and the following County, Town, District, 
and Denominational Unions sent delegates to the 
various gatherings: — 

Bedfordshire, Miss Laws, Mr. Rowland Hill, Mr. 
John Harris; Birmingham and Midlands, Mr. John 
Lawson, Councillor Herrick; Bucks (South) and 
East Berks, Mr. John Thomas, J.P., Mr. Alex. Browne ; 
Cambridgeshire, Rev. J. W. Upton, Mr. Howard F. 
Chaplin; Derb) shire, Mr. Llewellyn M. Cooke, Mrs. 
Cooke; Durham and Northumberland, Mr. W. E. 
Bell, Mr. W. Brackenbury ; Essex (North), Mr. J. 
Barnett; Hampshire and Isle of Wight, Hon. Mrs. 
Eliot Yorke, Mr. T. A. Cotton, J.P., C.C., Mrs. T. A. 
Cotton, Mr. A. Grigsby, Mr. A Jolliffe, Mr. W. Miller; 
Hertfordshire, Mr. H. C. Francis, Mr. E. W. S. Royds, 
Mr. H. W. W. Russell; Kent, Mr. Charles Harvey, 
Mr. F. H. Jefferies; Lancashire and Cheshire, Mr. J. 
Crompton, Mr. J. Dixon, Mr. T. E. Hallsworth, Mrs. 
T. E. Hallsworth, Mr. G. Mason, Mr. R. A. Pott 
and Mr. W. Chandos Wilson (Manchester); Leices¬ 
tershire, Rev. T. Scowby, Mr. E. North Lewis, Mr. 
Thomas Palmer; Monmouthshire, Mr. William Blow, 
Mr. E. PI. J. Evans, Mr. F. J. Heyb^rne ; Northamp¬ 
tonshire, Miss Sale; Nottinghamshire, Mr. E. Dawson 
King, Mr. G. H. Perry; Oxfordshire, Mr. R. R. Alden, 
Mr. Amos J. George, Mr. J. G. Wiblin; Suffolk, 
Mr. Lot Whitworth ; Surrey, Miss King, Mr. J. Y. 
Henderson; Sussex, Miss M. Robinson, Mr. E. G. 
Burbidge ; Yorkshire, Mr. S. Crawshaw, Mr. E-J. Day, 


Mr. W. Snowden, Mr. C. J. Whitehead; Bristol, Mr. 
G. T. Cooke, Mrs. G. T. Cooke, Mr. Joseph Tavlor ; 
Cardiff, Mr. A. A. Bryan, Mr. W. Jones, Mr. L- Page ; 
Methodist New Connexion, Rev. David Hea.h, Rev. 
W. Matthews, Rev. S. T. Nicholson, Mr. A. Edwards ; 
Free Methodist League and Band of H >pe Union, 
Rev. T. Rees Bott, Rev. II. Codling, Rev. A. Crombie, 
Rev. J. Thornley; National Unitarian Temperance 
Association (Juvenile Section), Mr. F. A. Edwards, 
F.R.G.S. ; Young Abstainers’ Union, Miss Salmon, 
Miss Willans ; Irish Temperance League and Baud of 
Hope Union, Mr. William Wilkinson. 


THE BREAKFAST MEETING. 

The early Breakfast Meeting on Wednesday 
morning was most successful. Sir George Livesey 
presided over a large audience, and the proceedings 
were begun as early as possible, as some of the 
speakers had to leave. 

The Chairman having announced that Sir Victor 
Horsley was at the last moment prevented from 
attending, at once called on Dr. McAdam Eccles, 
M.S., F.R.C.S. 

A Medical View. 

Dr. McAdam Eccles, after a few preliminary 
remarks, said : The subject of alcohol is one which 
has been before us in the profession since there was 
such a thing as the profession, and the subject will 
be before us until alcohol is banished as a beverage. 
To banish alcohol altogether, as some of our friends 
are kind enough to wish, would be to the medical 
man one of the greatest deprivements he could 
possibly experience. I say that clearly, because I 
wish it to be thoroughly understood that alcohol— 
and I use that term to denote a large number of 
substances—is a material of which the medical 
profession has to make considerable use. 1 am 
absolutely convinced in my own mind that from the 
physiological standpoint alcohol is not needed by the 
human body, it is not needed bv the healthy animal 
cells of which we are severalty and individually 
composed. On the other hand, alcohol in its various 
forms is of immense service in increasing our know¬ 
ledge of certain morbid processes. Without alcohol 
the medical man in his training would be in an 
extremely difficult position. But its use to the 
medical profession is entirety outside the human 
body. (Applause.) I am not inclined in the least 
to wage war against my professional brethren who 
believe that the physiological action of alcohol is of 
some use in certain particular diseases. That is not 
my department; and, if members of my profession 
have a carefully thought-out belief that alcohol is 
useful in such cases—though I verily believe there 
are but few who have confidence in its use in healthy 
conditions,—then I think they have a perfect right to 
use it in the same manner as they would use any 
other drug. I leave that to them and their knowledge. 
Personally it is extremely tare that I consider that 
alcohol is of any use, and from the point of view in 
which it is generally thought to be of use by the lay 
public—and I lay stress upon the words lay public — 
that is to say, in the form of a stimulant, I am 
absolutely certain from experiment and observation 
that it is one of the worst of drugs to use in such cases. 
We have in the present day—thanks to chemists, 
physiologists, and experimentalists—a host of other- 
drugs which are not only real stimulants, but which 
are of greater power, drugs which need to be used in 
a very careful manner because of their very strong 
action. Science has shown us that alcohol has a 
deterrent effect upon the cells—(hear, hear);— 
experience is showing that alcohol the world over, 
even in moderate quantities, has a deterrent influence 
upon human cells, and this is extremely marked 
when one has to deal with the growing cell in the 
child. (Applause.) I cannot venture to leave this 
hall this morning without a note, shall I say, of 
encouragement to us as members of this Baud of 
Hope Union, because it is when we get hold of the 
young life of the nation and prevent the action of 
alcohol upon that young life, that we shall win great 




THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


87 


victories and end in the production of a nation of 
physique and full of power mentally. (Hear, hear.) 
One of the great difficulties of the present day is not 
to keep the young child from alcohol while with us in 
our own families, but to keep the child when emerging 
into womanhood and manhood. Nor can I help 
thinking that we are partly to blame, and I am here 
speaking to fathers and mothers who are themselves 
total abstainers, because we have not taught our 
cnildren the scientific fundamentals of the alcohol 
question. There seems to be a certain amount of 
prevalence in putting this duty on to the shoulders 
of others. (Hear, hear.) I would even venture to 
hint that there might not be so many sad incidents of 
the children of total abstainers becoming addicted to 
drink, if we had taught our own children on the right 
lines. May I, then, venture to throw out this as a 
suggestion from a member of the medical profession : 
Learn about it, and tell your children ? (Applause.) 
But there is a larger view. It is a note of encourage¬ 
ment to know that no less than nearly half of the 
members of the medical profession have signed a 
memorial that the childhood of the nation should be 
compulsorily taught in our schools the effects of 
alcohol. (Applause.) I look upon it as a sign of 
great encouragement that there is a large number of 
the members of my profession, too, who are not only 
convinced that alcohol is not only not good, but that 
it does harm, and that the children of this nation 
should be taught this fact from their earliest days. 
One word more, and I have finished. If we are going 
to have a nation of those who will be free, not only 
from the effects of alcohol because they have not 
taken it themselves, but who will be free from the 
desire to have alcohol, there is no doubt whatever 
that alcohol must be limited in its production, and it 
must be limited in the way in which it can be 
obtained. (Applause.) It is no good, to my mind, 
to teach the facts of science and medical knowledge, 
and then, as it were, to thrust under the very eyes 
and nose of those who may be the ones who may fall 
under its influence, this fatal drug. (Applause.) The 
subject of the banishment of alcohol is a difficult one, 
and one of the most stupendous of all problems, but 
I do verily believe that there is arising in our nation 
at the present time a very widespread desire to see 
that this drug—I prefer to call it a drug—should be 
placed under efficient control. This desire is in your 
hands, and it is lor you to foster it, for you to push it 
forward with all the enthusiasm of which you may be 
capable. And now I thank you for giving me this 
opportunity of expressing my views, partly on behalf 
of Sir Victor Horsley, but earnestly on my own behalf, 
because I believe that this subject is one we ought to 
have, if not in the first place, certainly in the second 
place, in all our endeavours in this work. (Loud 
applause.) 

The Chairman’s Discontent. 

The Chairman, in the course of a pointed address, 
said:—Unfortunately I have not been able to take 
an active part in the Band of Hope work for many 
years, but I did at one time, and those days are 
amongst the pleasantest recollections of my life. 
(Applause.) I am glad to be supported here to-day 
by my old friend “Fred” Smith, He was one of the 
supporters of the Baud of Hope Movement in the Old 
Kent Road, and he and others signed a petition to 
the superintendent and teachers to ask them to form 
a Band of Hope in their midst. I was a member of 
the Church of England, but they asked me to join the 
Committee, and in that way began my connection 
with the Band of Hope and its work. (Applause.) 
Most of us had our business to attend to, so that the 
only time we could meet was at six o’clock in the 
morning. In those days it was a very small thing. 
Now you have in the land 29,000 Juvenile Temperance 
Societies, and a great body of workers ali over the 
land engaged in spreading the great truths of total 
abstinence. It is a cause for thankfulness all this, 
though the work was never more needed than it is 
to-day. Fifty years ago those who were earnest in this 
work, thought that as we had truth on our side it 
was only necessary to make it known and all the 


people would come. But where are we now ? This 
is the discouraging side ; for there seems to be as hard 
work before us as we have done in the past. The 
love of pleasure has enormously increased amongst all 
ranks, and there is an increasing love of indulgence, 
which makes life different from what it used to be. 
Yet, while looking at all this, one is rejoiced by the 
vast number of our people who are self-denying and 
who devote themselves to the amelioration of the 
state of the people of our land. In nothing could 
this be done more fittingly than in the cause of the 
children. (Applause.) Talking about teaching in the 
schools, it is a thorough disgrace to Old Fngland 
that with our public school system there is no 
organised method of teaching Temperance. I think 
it was Mr. Harnar Greenwood whom I heard say 
that in Canada a Temperance text-book or catechism 
had been adopted. The book is by the late Sir 
Benjamin Ward Richardson, which was written 
twenty years ago, and I am told that now we need 
something better than that. It is more necessary that 
people should know how to live than how their 
ancestors lived. In the United States something is 
done, and one of the efforts of this Union might well 
be in that direction. The local and national Govern¬ 
ment have neglected their duty, and the Band of 
Hope has taken it up and formulated their own 
school scheme, so that for fifteen years they had been 
engaged in doing what tne nation ought to have 
done - . Let us then persevere, for there is a great 
work before us. Little did I think that a Government 
of this country would ever introduce a Bill such as that 
now before the House of Commons. You will, there¬ 
fore, perhaps, excuse me while I say a few words on 
this subject as I feel strongly upon it. As an old 
teetotaler I have made myself acquainted with the 
circumstances, and have always hel 1 that there is no 
just claim to compensation. (Applause.) A licence 
is granted for one year only, and not for the benefit 
of the publicau, but for the supposed benefit of the 
public. If, therefore, it is for the benefit of the 
public, the magistrates have the right, and it is their 
duty, to refuse a renewal. That is my view, though 
at the same time we cannot ignore the fact that there 
are vast numbers of people who do not believe with 
us. They say, Why should the publican be deprived 
of his living? He is engaged in a useful and legiti¬ 
mate trade, supposing he is conducting his business 
properly - , and to rob him of it would be an act of 
injustice. 1 think we must recognise that sentiment 
on the part of the great bulk of the British public. I 
have been a member of the Alliance as long as I have 
been connected with the Band of Hope movement, 
and I have urged upon our friends the necessity of 
recognising this fact. When I have suggested a time 
limit, I have always been met by “it is not practicable.” 
Still, I am convinced that this is the only satisfactory 
way in which the thing can be done. As for com¬ 
pensation, if a time limit is granted, leave that to the 
trade. I would be quite willing to give a liberal 
time limit, and to add that there should be no refusal 
by the magistrates to renew licences except for mis¬ 
conduct. Magistrates now refuse many on that 
ground, and if they were in earnest they could reduce 
the number more effectively. The Royal Commission 
put the number of years at seven ; I have always 
thought that seven was too short. I would be quite 
willing to extend it to ten or twelve. If we could get 
it settled in that way, the thing might be done satis¬ 
factorily to all parties. I am an old Liberal, but parted 
with Mr. Gladstone over the Home Rule question, 
and since then have not supported the Liberal 
Party. But now the present Government have gone 
over in this way to take up the trade against the 
nation they will have no more of my support. 
(Applause.) I have stood a lot of nonsense, but this is 
too much. (Laughter.) Now one word in conclusion. 
Let us remember that this England of ours is repre¬ 
sented as a God-fearing nation, though the Lord’s Day 
is not kept as it used to be. If, then, we could get the 
people of England to take to heart those words of 
Solomon to David :—“And thou, my son, know thou 
the God of thy fathers, aud serve Him with a perfect 
heart ”—if, I say, we could get the people of England 


88 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


to take this to heart, then would our battle be easier 
than it is to-day. (Applause.) 

Worry your M.P.’s. 

Jlr. Lionel Mundy, with the Chairman’s per¬ 
mission, announced that it had been suggested 
that every gentleman present should send a telegram 
from the meeting at its close to his Member of 
Parliament, asking him to oppose this Bill and to vote 
against it, a suggestion which was taken up with 
enthusiasm. 

What Mr. Benn Thinks. 

Mr. J. Williams Benn, Chairman of the London 
County Councd, was the next speaker. In an address 
full of life, he said : I find myself here this morning 
in a double capacity, and of the two I almost prefer 
to find myself here in my old character of a Band of 
Hope boy and worker. (Hear, hear.) I came here this 
morning as a pick-me-up. (Laughter.) I managed 
to get a few minutes to look at my paper by such 
earlv rising as you, Mr. Chairman, have mentioned. 
(A voice : We had to get up at five, then.) Well, that 
early rising which is so surprising (laughter), accounts 
for the remarkable object lesson we have in the 
Chairman. When Sir George told us that, I had a 
double look at him, and if we want any advertise¬ 
ment we could not have a better. (Hear, hear.) On 
reading some of the speeches made in the House of 
Commons last night my heart was heavy (hear, hear); 

I thought where shall we look for help, and then I 
was reminded of the gracious goddess entrusted with 
the box containing all the opportunities of life. She 
left the box unlocked and the lid came open, so that 
everything, save one, came out. The remaining one 
was Hope, and I said to myself, Still, at all even's, we 
have the Band of Hope Union. (Applause.) It was 
truly delightful to listen to the admirable address 
from the accomplished doctor. Some of us remember 
the doctors of thirty and forty years ago, and I 
remember coming across an old lady who was taking 
drink under the doctor’s orders. She said her doctor 
was very- particular in the matter, and only allowed 
her it under two conditions, namely, when she had a 
sinking feeling—and when she had not. (Laughter.) 
That was a type of the advice given years ago, but 
now we have this splendid testimony as to the truth 
on the physical side. From the citizen s point of 
view it seems to me that the London County Council, 
on whose behalf I have the honour to speak, is more 
closely than ever allied to your sacred work. For 
some time we have been near relatives. We have done 
tomething to keep our dear young people from the 
emptations of drink in connection with our parks 
and open spaces, and by the provision of places where 
they can change their garments without going to the 
nearest public house, where they had to have a driuk 
‘■for the benefit of the house” ; we have done some¬ 
thing in setting up the great principle that the places 
of amusement in our city, at all events new places, 
shall be innocent of driuk. (Hear, hear.) We have 
done something to sweep the drink out of the great 
asylums. At first people said, “ Monstrous, these 
poor people! their affliction is surely enough ; why 
deprive them of comfort ? ” But we have found that 
the removal of this alcohol has not only tended to 
contentment and general happiness, butit haslargely 
increased the number of recoveries. (Applause.) So 
this has brought us into contact with your movement. 
But now we have a new relationship—no seeking of 
ours—the responsibility for the education of the 
children. And this brings me to the new relation¬ 
ship. We are responsible for the education of all 
these children. We may be able to make clever 
children, fully equipped both with regard to head and 
hand for the struggle oflife ; we may be able to turn 
out an article unrivalled the world over; and then 
this drink may' come and destroy the whole lot, we 
know that full well; and it seems to me that the 
cleverer the man the more liable he often is to this 
terrible temptation. We look to you and join hands 
with you to make our children free from this terrible 
temptation. (Applause.) I have no doubt that those 
total abstinence principles which you love will be 


encouraged in connection with the education of our 
children. (Applause.) London has discouraging 
signs, filth, misery, drink and crime; yet there is 
evidence that the people, whether they drink or leave 
it alone, are anxious to reduce the driuk traffic here. 
(Applause.) Acting upon the instructions of those 
who elected us we had the courage to sweep away 
from the City 150 liquor licences which cost the 
citizens a quarter of a million. In all the charges 
against the London County Council of extravagance 
—and they are many—I have come across hardly any¬ 
body who has ventured to say that was a mistake. In 
fact we were sent back last March to do more of it. 
(Loud applause.) In the face of all this it does seem 
a shame that we should have a Government 
endeavouring to fasten these licences upon us. At first I 
thought there was absolutely no redeeming features 
about that iniquitous Bill; but I have discovered one — 
it has had the result of bringing Sir George Livesey 
over to the Liberal side. (Loud applause and laughter.) 
I wont say he is the prodigal son, but I can assure you 
that we shall be quite prepared to kill the fatted calf 
or any other animal in his honour. (Laughter and 
applause.) I am glad to have had the opportunity of 
showing your relationship to our great London 
governing body. When the London County Council 
want a great building erected we have a way of 
dividing the work. We first of all put out a contract 
for the foundations, because there are special people 
who confine themselves to putting these iu. It seems 
to me that in building up our brighter and better 
London we cannot do better than place the contract 
for the foundations with the Band of Hope Union. 
(Loud applause.) I had the privilege of going to 
Lincoln with the great and good Archbishop Temple 
once—would to God he was living now to speak in 
connection with the Temperance movement. Liucoln 
Cathedral crowns the hill, and as I was looking about 
for some new way of putting our old story, I remem¬ 
bered the legend that when Bishop Hugh, of Avalon, 
was building the Cathedral he was so concerned in 
his work that he not only busied himself with the 
design and with the getting of the money, but filled 
up his leisure by helping to carry stone and mortar. 
One day while he was thus engaged, a cripple entered 
the building. Inspired by the Bishop's zeal, he, too, 
tried to lift a stone, and lo, as he did so, his paralysis 
left him. It is but a legend; yet there is a great 
lesson. And maybe that while you iu this great cause 
are carrying the bricks aud the mortar, there shall 
come some who will be fired by your enthusiasm, aud 
who, in imitating you, shall get rid of their disease 
•—the drink curse—and become capable men and 
women anxious to assist in the building of this truly 
noble work you have in hand. (L,oud applause.) 

The School Point of View. 

Mr. J. H. Yoxale, M.P., who was the next 
speaker, said he was hopeless neither of killing the 
Bill, nor of drawing a good many of its teeth. It 
might piss its second reading that night by 150 
majority, but they need not be hopeless on that 
account. He had seen a Bill which had passed its 
second reading by a majority of 250 cast to tne winds, 
and abandoned in the Committee stage. If popular 
opinion, manifested by innumerable petitions, letters, 
and telegrams, were made known unmistakably to 
Members, there were not a few who would vote 
against the Bill, even though they personally 
favoured it. Coming to the educational work of 
the Bind of Hope, the hon. member said: For fifteen 
years the Band of Hope Union has been carrying on 
most beneficent work in many public elementary 
schools. You have spent ,£30,000—money well in¬ 
vested—upon it, and you employ at present 17 
lecturers, who, during the last year, paid 3.S92 visits, 
and gave addresses to 400,000 children. Of these, 
250.000 sent in written accounts of what they had 
heard, and all this was done in the presence of 
13,000 teachers, who showed friendliness and 
sympathy. That I hope will continue. But let me 
utter one or two words of warning against what some 
enthusiastic workers may suggest—I mean the ex¬ 
tension of that voluntary work into a compulsory 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


89 


and universal service. A Government that can 
propose this Licensing Bill is a power to reckon 
■with. A suggestion that Temperance principles 
must be taught in every school would inevitably 
arouse antagonism on the part of the trade, and it 
would attempt to get introduced teaching on the value 
of alcohol. Therefore, my counsel is to persevere 
in the voluntary work. (Hear, hear.) Another reason 
is this—that in doing it in this way you will have the 
teachers on your side if you make it a voluntary 
matter; against you, if you make it a compulsory one. 
Every group of faddists in these days hastens to the 
Board of Education, and says, You must put down 
our subject. The result is that the teachers, having 
no time to deal with half the subjects mentioned, 
meet them with opposition. In conclusion, Mr. 
Yoxall said : Mr. Benn has referred to himself as an 
old Band of Hope boy. (Hear, hear.) I am convinced 
that I can work harder, with a clearer head, with less 
need for rest, and with more success, because I am a 
teetotaler. Physical, worldly, and mental success are 
greatly enhanced by that habit of Total Abstinence. 
I just wanted, in conclusion, to bear that testimony, 
and to offer to the Band of Hope Union that helped 
me in my boyhood’s days my real and sincere thanks. 
(Applause.) 

A Sunday Schooe Representative. 

Mr. F. F. Betsey, J.P., Chairman of the Sunday 
School Union, followed with a brief address. He 
alluded to their recent visit to Jerusalem to bring out 
the fact that among the Mohamedan population 
drunkenness was unknown. The Mohamedans were 
brought up Band pf Hope members—(applause)—and 
those who attended the Convention came back 
imbued w 7 ith the wish that this great feature of the 
Mohamedan faith (whatever faults it had) might also 
become an essential feature in the faiths of Christian 
England. Speaking of the Bill now before the 
House of Commons, he said that whatever might 
happen, they need not be deterred in pursuing the 
steadily-growing Band of Hope and other movements 
which were steadily checking these bad habits on the 
part of the public. In this connection he could not 
help recalling the hackneyed lines : 

“ There is one little public house 
That everyone may close, 

That is the little public house 
Just underneath the nose.’' 

Going back to the early days of the movement, 
Mr. Belsey pointed out that then Church officials 
and ministers alike, teachers, and all the rest took 
their glass of this, or glass of that; but now the 
exception was not the man thatdidn’t take intoxicants, 
but the man who did. 

Votes op Thanks. 

Mr. WyctiFEE Wieson, Sheffield, proposed briefly 
a vote of thanks to the Chairman and the speakers; 
in seconding which, Mr. Frederic Smith gave some 
interesting details of the pioneering of the School 
Scheme, and told how he was able to announce 
donations of ^750 from their present Chairman, and 
£500 from the veteran Sir George Williams. Ampli¬ 
fying what Mr. Belsey had said about the old days, he 
averred that in those times even Sunday School 
workers looked not askance, but rather coldly on the 
formation of the Baud of Hope. Fifty years ago 
there were not twenty teetotal ministers in all 
London; now how many were there ? And all the 
success they had achieved was without a vestige of 
law. The fact was that there existed no royal road 
to success in this movement; for shutting up half the 
public houses simply meant double the trade going 
to those that remained. They should not be dis¬ 
couraged at what was going on in Parliament, but 
they should see to it that they should educate those 
who, in the days to come, were to enforce legislation 
which would have public opinion at its back. 
(Applause.) 

The motion was unanimously adopted, and with 
another hymn the proceedings closed. 


AFTERNOON CONFERENCE. 

Mr. T. A. Cotton, J.P., C.C., presided at the 2.30 
Conference, when a most vigorous and suggestive 
paper was read by the Rev. Carey Bonner, secretary 
of the Sunday School Union, on “ How can the Pulpit 
and the Sunday School be made more helpful to the 
Band of Hope?” This created a deep impression, and 
the Conference jumped at the suggestion of Mr. 
Chandos Wilson that it should be widely circulated 
among ministers and Sunday School teachers ; it was 
above criticism, and could undoubtedly give a great 
impulse to the work by a very extended circulation. 
We propose to print it in full in our July number, 
and to have it ready in elegant booklet form during 
the summer. Orders should be sent to our Trading 
Department as early as possible, as a large edition 
will be prepared. 

Mr. Charles Harvey, secretary of the Keut Union, 
then gave a model Bible Temperance address to a 
class of girls from the Brixton Orphanage. His 
subject was “ Drink Deceives,” founded on Prov. xx. 1. 


EVENING MEETING. 

The great Evening Meeting drew a crowded and 
enthusiastic audience to the Large Hall, where Mr. 
Hawkins played some choice organ music prior to 
the entrance of the speakers. The large choir of 
senior members sang delightfully under the direction 
of Mr. West, who mav be warmly complimented on 
the result achieved. When the President, Sir George 
Williams, entered, leaning on the arm of Mr. Wakely, 
he was loudly cheered. After a hjmn, and prayer by 
the Rev. T. Nicholson, 

Mr. Wakeey gave an abstract of the annual report. 

The venerable Sir GEORGE said that as in the past 
so in the future they should say the thing that was 
right, and do the thing that was just, without fear. 
They knew what a dreadful curse the drink had been 
to the country in the past, and they should therefore 
not abate their zeal in the work of destroying its 
power. (Cheers.) 

The Mayor of Maryeebone. 

The Rev. H. Russeee Wakefieeb, M.A., 
Rector of St. Mary’s, Bryanston Square, the first 
speaker, said: I think the first thing one would like 
to do at a meeting like this is to congratulate it upon 
its Chairman. (Hear, hear.) It is well for us even to 
look into the face of the veteran workers now and 
again. It stirs us up and makes us inclined to say 
this, that, God helping us, the example they set we 
will not be unworthy of. I am not sure, that in the 
opinion of a good many people who have to do with 
the Government, I am not one of a great number of 
criminals. I happen to be a magistrate (laughter), 
and it requires a certain amount of courage to 
acknowledge the fact. We are supposed to be 
dangerous individuals who have been wilfully taking 
away the rights and privileges of honest and free-born 
Britons. I have not noticed any very violent action 
on our part up to the present; indeed, 1 think we 
might have done our spiriting—or our taking away of 
the spiriting—(laughter)- a little more energetically 
and not less than we have done. At any rate, what¬ 
ever has been done has been done in response to the 
demand of public opinion. Public opinion is greatly 
waking up in these matters, and that reflects itself in 
the action of people in authority up and down the 
land. (Hear, near.) Thank God it is so, and the 
moral of it all is this, to give them a little more public 
opinion. There is no single thing that moves a 
Member of Parliament so much, not even the 
eloquence of the leaders of his own party, as a con¬ 
tinual bombardment from his electorate, who send up 
to him and say we want this done, and we shan’t 
return you again if you don’t help us. (Laughter.) A 
word, therefore, to the wise : Keep on pegging away. 
One feels as if one were bringing to the Baud of Hope 
Union a message of welcome from a sister work being 
done in the Church of England in this diocese 



go 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


(applause), because it is only an hour or two ago that 
I was presiding over a meeting of the workers of the 
Guild of Hope in connection with the Band of Hope 
work in the Church. Only last Saturday we took 
down 21,000 small people, all very zealous members of 
the Church of England Band of Hope, and they 
would like to greet you to-night if they could be pre¬ 
sent. (Applause.) This work is the most important 
work that the Temperance party has now to consider. 
If we only had the Band of Hope work properly sup¬ 
ported up and down the country we might stop all 
other agencies. It is simply because we are not all 
members of the Band of Hope that we have all these 
agencies which are the pride, no doubt, of the Tempe¬ 
rance cause. But prevention is better than cure. 
If tnere be one tiling that the Temperance worker 
ought to be keen upon it is the protection and safe¬ 
guarding of the young, and the giving to them of 
strong and noble impulses for their grown-up life. I 
congratulate you upon the report read to-night, and 
which shows a continued progress. I always look 
upon this question as a matter of citizenship. I am, 
myself, an intensebelieveriu thedutyof teachingyoung 
persons a sense of the responsibility they have to their 
Motherland. You cannot do a better thing than let 
them know in the early part of their lives that the 
name of Englishman and Englishwoman is a thing 
which should be deserving of respect; and that not 
one of us ought to do a single thing which would 
lower that name in the sight or hearing of anybody. 
(Applause.) I hope, therefore, that in the new phases 
of education there will not be forgotten the fact that 
though you may teach your children and your people 
certain isms, there is one thing above them all that 
you should teach, namely, character. (Applause.) 
Hence those who are responsible for the education of 
our young will do well to take care that in our 
elementary and secondary schools there should be 
text books telling them what are the rights and 
privileges of citizenship of this great country. We 
are supposed to move rather slowly, to be some¬ 
what conservative. But without incurring any grave 
danger, and without doing anything startling, we 
might have this Temperance teaching. There is 
another thing about our Band of Hope which is 
delightful, and that is the way in which it brightens 
the lives of some of our children, who have but very 
dull lives at home. If you want to make people 
behave themselves, do not make them dull nor keep 
them dull. And even when you are teaching them 
these things, you should teach them in such a manner 
that their lives are happier and brighter for the 
teaching. So one rejoices that there are all sorts 
of jollifications in the Bands of Hope. Why, even 
this “boy” here (pointing to the Chairman, and 
being received with loud cheering), see how jolly he 
is ; why a jollier person you won’t find. (Hear, hear.) I 
heard the other day a story, told at first by Lady Henry 
Somerset, of how, being down in Whitechapel and 
close by a big public-house, she saw a little child in 
rags, looking very tired, and with those great tired eyes 
that some of our London children unhappily have. It 
was eleven o’clock at night, and she asked, “ Why are 
younotat home ? ” Looking up, he enquired, “ What 
time is it, lady? ” She answered, “ Why, it is eleven.” 
To which he replied, “Then there’s no going home 
yet for me ; I have got to wait for closing time, and 
then lead mother home from the public-house.” My 
irieuds, it is a pitiable thing, it is a deadly thing to 
the land that young children should have to learn in 
early days to lead drunken mothers home from 
the public houses. That is one side, but I will tell 
you how the Band of Hope, through the agency of a 
crippled child, was able to save her drunken mother. 
This little one, brought by another child, came from 
a home where the parents were very drunken. At 
last the mother came one day to the clergyman of the 
parish, who took the Baud of Hope, and said she 
wished to sign the pledge. “But what has led you 
to this ? ” asked the clergyman. She replied, “ It is 
what my little crippled child has told me.” (Applause.) 
Then I want you to think of the Band of Hope from 
another point of view, namely, how it makes those who 
are later to serve us in many capacities fit for their work. 


Take the great railway service, for instance, and just 
think what a difference sobriety means. Take, again, 
the Army. We are proud of our great services, the 
Army and the Navy, but we are especially proud of 
having read in the papers that yesterday it could be 
announced at the meeting of the Army Temperance 
Association that there were about 50,-000 total ab¬ 
stainers in it—(applause)—-50,000 radiating influences, 
helpful to how many more thousands in the Army, 
keeping how many more thousands sober, doing how 
much good work in all respects. We notice, again, 
the same thing in our Navy. I have more oppor¬ 
tunities of hearing about that service now than about 
the other; and I hear that the change which has 
taken place in the Navy during the past ten or twenty 
years is quite marvellous ; how, practically, every ship 
afloat has its Temperance Society, and how, to-day, if 
you let a man go away for forty-eight hours’ leave he 
comes back sober and in time, while years ago he 
would come back often late and unfit for work. 
(Applause.) I asked a Captain commanding one of 
our ships how he accounted for it. He said, “ I know 
you have to do with Temperance work, but I tell you 
honestly, and without any desire to bolster up any 
society jou may represent, I know that a great many 
of my sailors were members of Bands of Hope before 
they came to sea, and that is the influence which is 
keeping them sober now.” (Applause.) There is yet 
another side to the work among the young. I am 
glad we are dealing with the children in institution 
schools, who have come to poverty through no fault 
of their own, but, may be, through the drunkenness 
of one or both of their parents, who have very likely 
some taint of heredity, or who have, at any rate, all 
the taint of early environment. ‘These want help 
given to them, and they now get it through the 
lectures given in our institutions, our workhouse 
schools, aud so 011. And I may tell you the interesting 
fact that the society of which I am the Chairman has 
only lately received sums from three or four Boards of 
Guardians towards our work in lecturing in these 
institution schools, because they recognise the benefit 
and the blessings of it. (Hear, hear.) That, after all, is 
a helpful fact, and we do say that these children want 
special care, because we say, in effect, “ You have 
difficulties which other children have not; therefore, 
you shall be specially cared for in this Temperance 
work.” If there is anybody here who still wants a 
little comforting, I can assure him that if he will only 
just speud one evening visiting any one of a hundred 
streets that I could recommend, he would do nothing 
but Band of Hope work for the rest of his life. But 
if there be any here who have a feeling of safety 
through God’s mercy and God’s grace, let them go 
on to say, “ It is my bounden duty, as I have been 
protected and cared for, to see what I can do for 
those who have not been.” Once a vessel was sinking; 
a man was going off from it to the laud which was 
uear, and had taken his money, which he had tied 
round him. There was a little child on board the 
ship, who, looking round, asked, “Can you swim?” 
The man replied, “Yes, my lad, I can.” “Then 
won’t you save me?” said the child, whereat the man 
took off the belt of money and said, “ Of course, I 
will.” Arrived on land he became exhausted, aud on 
coming to himself saw the little child tending him 
back to life. Again, my friends, can you swim ? If 
you can, there are lives that want saving. I promise 
if you save them, then in your hour of difficulty you 
shall see bending, helping, and caring for you the 
faces of many a child saved by your exertions. 

A Carr to the Churches. 

The Rev. D. L. Ritchie, Principal of the Congrega¬ 
tional Institute, Nottingham, expressed the pleasure 
which being present afforded him, and went on to 
say : Not long ago we had a distinguished statesman, 
who, in speaking to the whole nation, said that the 
time had come when we must "think imperially'.” 
(Laughter.) But the fact of the matter is that the 
Bands of Hope have been thinking imperially for 
many a decade now. (Applause.) We may not have 
been thinking in the same manner as some of our 
statesmen, but we have had this clearly before us, 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


9i 


that you can never build an empire on a drink- 
sodden ground—(hear, hear)—and that you can 
never rear an imperial race in the public house. 
(Lou 1 applause.) And so we, who have been placing 
before the nation the necessity of training our young 
people up to the true character of citizenship, of which 
we have heard to-night, have since long, long ago 
been thinking imperially, and have been thinking in 
the highest and in the deepest sense. But. of course, 
politicians are always behind the times. (Laughter.) 
Why, Mr.Chairman, if they were not hopelessly'belated, 
if they were not fifty years behind the times, we could 
not have such a Bill before the House of Commons 
as we have to-night. (Applause.) They seem to be 
in a sleep that overtook the nation half-a-century 
ago ; it is our business to wake them up, and the 
sooner the better. Now, in connection with any 
great nation there are always two factors to be taken 
into account. The first is material greatness, the 
second national character. Of these two, national 
character is by far the more important. It is national 
character that makes and saves a people. If that be 
so, how is it that our statesmen are so slow to 
recognise that after all the best investment that any 
people can make is investment in citizenship and 
character ? They look at things with a squint. They 
will not see the truth ; they will not listen to the 
voices crying aloud on every side. A great mistake 
may be made this very night simply because our 
statesmen fail to see that material greatness is 
nothing apart from the character of the people. I 
read something in a newspaper one day in connection 
with some boys who were playing at cricket in the 
street. At the wicket there was a young Bobbie Abel, 
and as he played his admiring father was looking 
out at the window. All at once away went the ball, 
and hit the father in the eye ; and what do you think 
he said? (Laughter.) It was, “You little rascal, I 11 
give you a thrashing if you don’t take care ; you will 
be breaking a window next.” Having a bulging eye 
was nothing, breaking a window was a much more 
important thing. (Laughter.) There are a great many 
people who look at a nation in that way ; they seem to 
think that the window is more important than the eye. 
But as is the eye to the window, so is the national 
character to material greatness. However, many 
windows you may have I care not, if you put out the 
eyes. I am not a pessimist, it would be a shame to 
be in the presence of such an optimistic veteran as 
Sir George; but it seems to me that at the present 
time our great towns, if not our whole country, has 
lost moral resiliency. We appeal to them from the 
highest grounds, they don’t seem to answer. They 
are not capable of the moral indignation they' once 
had. We have this sleep still. If there was only 
moral indignation in the community they' would get 
up and say, It must not be; you must not put out the 
e es of the people. (Applause.) We fight and 
strain, yet we seem to make so little headway. I 
trust that the day' is not far distant when there will 
be such an awakening in this grand old England of 
ours that we may say that in the pathway of our boy s 
and girls you shall no longer put these temptations; 
you must clear them out in the name of citizenship, 
in the name of manhood and womanhood, and in the 
name of the Lord Jesus Christ. (Applause.) I am 
satisfied that the first speaker was right when he 
said that the Band of Hope work is the most im¬ 
portant part of Temperance work to which we can put 
our hand. The old will die, but it depends upon the 
training we give to the young whether will die with 
them the evils, vices and shames which w 7 e deplore. 
We want to be careful about nothing so much as this, 
that while preserving all the virtues of those who 
are passing away, we shall put into a big grave all 
that makes character lower and everything that 
degrades life. How are you to do it ? Only by 
training the young. Is it not true that at the present 
time nearly every' good cause is suffering because we 
are not able to bring up behind the fighting line the 
moral support 'which is necessary ? The Baud of 
Hope is an institution which is bringing up the 
moral support, training the young soldiers to fight 
the battle of righteousness. If at present we cannot 


carry the citadel, let us go on training the young 
soldiers, inspiring them with a love of their cause 
and of their country. Then the time will come when, 
in spite of the fortifications of the enemy, we will 
carry the battlements in the name of Temperance, 
in the name of Englaud, and of Christ. (Loud 
aoplause.) Our friends the Jesuits tell us that if you 
want to make anything of a boy you had better get 
him between the ages of four aud seven. The Jesuit 
is wise in his day and generation, and if you go over 
to our American friends, who are always up-to-date, 
they will tell you, “ Be^in with the boy at four! 
No, Sir, you must begin with him when he is 
born.” If you ask me to choose between the 
Jesuit and the American, I take the American. 
Especially in connection with Band of Hope work 
y'ou want to begin with them when they are born. 
It is a thing I am proud of that I have never had 
anything to do with it, and I never mean to. 
(Applause.) We want to begin with the children as 
soon as we can, so please never despise the little 
toddlers. It is true they are not able to understand 
your scientific lectures, but you may train them up 
in paths of virtue. The hour which you gave to 
entertaining the little ones is not wasted; you were 
doing splendid work for the children and for your 
country, and you were doing no harm to yourself. 
There are three ways in which we may do it. 
The first is by the home. This England of 
ours was made at the firesides of our cottagers. 
Purity is a grander defence of our country than 
all our battleships and our armies. It is for the 
home-life of our country that I appeal to-night to you 
who have homes, and to you who are soon to have 
them. (Laughter and applause.) Of course, if any 
one wants a good wife he will go to the Band of Hope 
worker. (Applause.) Begin in the right way ; make 
your home an educational institution of the highest 
order; so that those whom God gives to you will be 
brought up protected against the drink, aud so be 
built up in everything that goes to make high aud 
holy character. Ttien we want to come to the school ; 
for one of the best bits of work done by the Band of 
Llope Union is the instruction it has given for 
fifteen years in our day schools. I have had to do 
with two of the largest School Boards in the country, 
and 1 am speaking of what I know when I say after I 
had fought the battle of the Union there, that within 
three or four years the School Boards I belonged to 
became convinced that it was one of the best bits of 
work done in our schools, and after two y'ears there 
was no debate as to the desirability of having the 
lectures there. (Hear, hear.) More than that, gladly 
did the teachers co-operate; a co-operation of that 
sort is full of promise for the future. My third 
point is the Church ; for, after all, the teaching of 
righteousness and truth is the business of the 
Church. If only the Churches would stand up and 
get into line, neither Parliaments nor associated 
brewers, nor all the federated hosts of evil would be 
able to stand against our protest. (Applause.) This 
Temperance business ought to be the first business of 
the Church, and if the Church understood her 
business she would make it so. Why, it is a burden 
on the Church’s back, keeping her from doing her 
best work. It is a stumbling-block in the Church’s 
way, so that the chariots ot the Kingdom of God 
cannot go forward; it is a crime at the Church’s 
doer; it ought to be a stain upon the Church’s 
conscience. If only those who call themselves 
Christians would speak out during the next month, 
then even this Bill, which threatens to put back 
progress, would not go through the House of 
Commons. If it does go through, it is of no use to 
blame politicians; they are waiting for signals. Nor 
is it of any use to blame the brewers. Let us put the 
blame on the proper shoulders—on those who, calling 
themselves Christians, will not take off their coats to 
go and fight their Master’s battle in a great crisis like 
this. It is sometimes said that these are times of 
national crises through which we are passing. So be 
it. Then it behoves us at such a time to bear our¬ 
selves as those who realise the peril. I remember 
that the Duke of Argyll, one of the best patriots to 


92 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


tread upon Scottish soil, the night that he was doomed 
to death because he had a conscience that would not 
bend, said: “ It seems to me, gentlemen, that the 
time has come when we must either sin much or • 
suffer much. I prefer to suffer, rather than to 
sin.” So he took his way to the scaffold, aud laid 
down his life for what he believed to be true. In 
this England of ours the time has come when we 
must either sin much or suffer much—it may be 
suffer financially and suffer socially. But once 
having seen that this drink traffic is a sin against 
man and a sin against God, we should be prepared to 
suffer rather than to sin, and to stand stoutly and 
bravely in our places, bearing good witness for the 
children’s sake, for our country’s sake, and for the 
Redeemer’s sake. If we are prepared to suffer rather 
than to sin, we will never lose our battle, for the 
men who go forth in that spirit have never lost a 
battle yet, and neither will we. (Applause.) 

Mr. T. H. Sloan, M.P., who had an enthusiastic 
reception, moved the following resolution: — 

“That this meeting of 3,000 members aud supporters 
of the United Kingdom Band of Hope Union 
assembled in Exeter Hall, strongly protests 
against the proposals contained in the Govern¬ 
ment Licensing Bill by which much of the power 
of local licensing magistrates would be transferred 
to Quarter Sessions, and by which the payment 
of compensation would be made an essential con¬ 
dition of the refusal to renew licences. That the 
meeting considers that the proposals, if passed 
into law, would give practical permanence to a 
very large number of licences which should, in 
the public interest, and chiefly in the interests of 
the coming generation, be allowed to lapse. That 
in the opinion of the meeting the aforesaid Bill 
increases the drawbacks and anomalies of the 
licensing system, and that it should be met in all 
its stages with the most strenuous opposition.” 
Mr. Sloau said,—Sir, I have been told by the Prime 
Minister of this country that the three days which 
have just ended in the British House of Commons, 
are days in which a great Temperance reform was 
being instituted, and that I have been unaware, by 
the manner in which I have viewed the great measure 
of Temperance reform brought in by the present 
Government, of the benefits that it will convey to the 
working classes of this country ; and that there is no 
reason for my opposition, or the opposition of any 
man to the Bill, other than that he is an extreme 
fanatic, aud that he is not interested a little bit in 
justice to his fellow men. Well. Sir, it is very hard to 
think you are right and to be told by the Prime 
Minister that you are wrong. But the argument that 
Mr. Balfour adduced to prove that those who sup¬ 
ported the rejection of this wicked and iniquitous 
Bill (hear, hear, and applause), was that there are a 
number of poor publicans to whom the licensing 
magistrates at Brewster Sessions had not been very 
favourable, and that by reason of their discretionary 
power they were left on the billows of starvation and 
poverty, and put out of their legitimate business. 
Sir, try aud imagine Lord Burton a pauper. 
(Laughter and applause.) The House of Commons, 
led by Mr. Balfour, assumes to be anxious to mete out 
equal justice to every man, and it is claimed that the 
Bill wnich has just passed its second reading, whilst 
this meeting was going on, by a majority of 157 (cries 
of “ Shame ”), is a just one. Mr. Baliour claims that on 
the discharge of a publican, who owns a public house 
only in name, compensation for the refusal of the 
non-renewal of the licence is going to the publican, 
but according to the Bill, which has passed its second 
reading, it goes to the brewer. 

Then I think a law which is anxious to mete out 
justice to every man ought to have a clause in it to 
provide for compensation to those who are thrown 
out of employment by means of the non-renewal of 
a licence. If you are going to give compensation at all, 
why should not the barman get compensation ? Why 
should ten thousand j'oung women who are occupied 
behind the bars where alcohol is sold in this country, 
the victims and the subjects of obscene language from 


men who have lost their manly control by reason of 
over indulgence in liquor,—why should they be 
deprived of hope when their employer may be refused 
his licence? They have been in that occupation for 
a long number of years; must they go and seek 
employment somewhere else ? An Act of Parliament 
which gives to the rich as an act of justice, and takes 
from the poor, is a disgrace to the Government that 
passes it. (Cheers). 

Now, Sir, I hear a tremendous lot of talk at the 
present time about the great indignation that is all 
over the country in regard to the proposals to make 
the brewers’ interest an endowed one; I have also 
heard the arguments in favour of it, and I have, with 
my limited ability, tried to follow them. I have oflen 
got into troubled waters, and wondered when I 
should be safely landed at a port I could understand. 

I have listened to the recitals of the multitude of 
grievances that these men suffer under, but I have 
only heard from two speakers in the three days’ 
debate a plea for the sufferings and the deprivations 
of the widows aud the orphans that have been left in 
that state through the trade. 

If there is any person in the world to-day that 
requires compensation, it is the ratepayer of this 
country. (Loud cheers.) We have been taxed, 
and have paid our taxes without a grumble, for the 
keeping up of infirmaries, aud for the keeping up of 
—I was going to call them gaols—I think 1 had better 
call them prison houses, it is more parliamentary, 
aud it will not be so much taken exception to. If 
you call a spade a spade now, you are considered 
vulgar ; you are requested to call it an agricultural 
implement. (Laughter.) 

But, Sir, I am afraid that we as Temperance 
reformers, if we are worthy of the name, will have to 
unloose every button of our coat and go forth like 
men, bringing to the front our backbone -and we 
have plenty of it, but it is away at the back—(laughter 
aud applause)—and resolving that by God’s help we, 
individually, will not only preach Temperance, but 
will practise Temperance, and that we will not only 
practise it at our dinner tables and in our social 
gatherings, but that, independent of other assertions 
and independent of party politics, we will practise it 
with a vengeance at the ballot box. (Hear, hear, 
and applause.) 

Just as I came into this meeting, before I came 
on the platform, the last speaker was affirming that 
we should begin with the child and teach him total 
abstinence aud Temperance, and it reminded me of a 
story I heard of the late Charles Iladdon Spurgeon, 
who will always be remembered in this country. 
When a young mother went and asked him when 
would be the proper time for her to teach her child 
the path of righteousness; he asked the mother, 
“What age is the child ? ” She said, “ Nine months.” 
“My dear woman,” he said, “you are nine months 
too late.” 

We may go on, Sir, with the machinery we have at 
the present time, aud as long as the people keep the 
wheels from clogging; but I do believe, I sincerely 
believe, it is my whole-hearted belief, the salvation, 
the sobriety, and the elevation of our fellows in this 
good old country and all over the United Kiugdom, 
are embedded in the formation of character in the 
young. Though difficulties attend the work of the 
Sabbath School teachers, and though difficulties 
attend the work of the Band of Hope managers, if 
they keep plodding on aud try to live before the child 
they teach that life which is in practice aud which is 
in common with the teaching they give it, we mav 
hope that the coming generation will be more alive 
to the interests of godliness and sobriety than the 
generation which now exists. 

I agree that it is one thing to go on to the public 
platform and talk Temperance ; it is one thing to mix 
amongst Bauds of Hope and hold annual meetings ; it 
is a very nice thing to have a beautiful choir 
to render such beautiful music as we have been 
listening to; it is very nice to have a warrior like 
our Chairman to preside over us—(applause) ; it 
is proper and it is right that such a common-sense 
resolution as I have had the honour of moving should 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


93 


be put to a common-sense, intelligent people, but, Sir, 
that is only the surface of our work. I hold to-day 
that if the Christian Church were alive to the 
uecessity of fighting this great dragou of drink, the 
brewers of to-day would not have increased the value 
of their shares by almost ^t, 000,000 sterling. We 
have to be consistent. Whether he be a man who 
wears broadcloth or no. he is the man who receives 
the votes of the people that is sent to represent them 
in the House of Commons ; and that man must not 
take it for granted that, because he has arrived at a 
place and at a stage where the power is left in his own 
hands, he can be dishonest with the people who put 
their trust in him ; he must do their work. 

Our Temperance Societies will be asking a 
tremendous lot of questions from candidates for 
Parliamentary honours during the coming Election. 
Well, I am going to suggest to you one. We are 
asked about local veto, and all that kind of thing. 
The answers are almost entirely in the affirmative, 
with a footnote, “ Please don’t publish.” Now, a 
question I think it would be a proper thing to ask 
every Member of Parliament—and now I am con¬ 
vinced that such a question is necessary, and that it 
ought to be asked in the meeting in which the 
candidate seeks the votes of the people—is this: 
“ Is the candidate warranted not to shrink ? ” 
(daughter.) 

There never was a time, Sir, when the cause of 
Temperance demanded men ; there never was a time 
when the political world more demanded honesty; 
there never was a time when the call was given louder, 
that we should consolidate our forces, and band our¬ 
selves together; and see that the time will never 
come again to the country in which we give ourselves 
away, body, soul, and spirit, to a number of men who 
will accumulate a majority for the passage in the 
House of Commons of such an iniquitous measure 
with such an overwhelming majority. (Applause.) 

Sir, I am a Band of Hope boy,—(applause)—and I 
am an extreme Band of Hope boy, and I hope that 
the lectures that have been given to us. and the 
sermons that have been preached to us within the last 
three days will not lessen our desires as Temperance 
reformers, that our language will not be modified, 
and that we shall not try to bring our ideas into line 
with the Prime Minister’s ideas of Temperance. May 
we still see the absolute necessity of being extreme 
Temperance men, because to be extreme is to oppose 
the brewers. 

This is the message I have for you this evening, 
and I am very glad of the privilege and the honour of 
being asked to move the resolution. It is a great 
relaxation from what 1 have heard. (Laughter.) I 
must confess I was somewhat disappointed, and 
somewhat disheartened, but I do not see why we 
should lie underneath the weight that seems to fall 
upon us now. But a short time, and you will have 
the opportunity of enjoying that beautiful policy of 
reciprocity, and you will be able to play tit- lor-tat, and 
unto them who have betrayed your trust you will be 
able to say, “ Because you have done this, you are 
discharged, all wages being paid in full.” (Laughter 
and cheers.) 

Sir, may the Temperance cause all over our land go 
on; may the public houses be decreased, and, perhaps, 
after all, the first and second reading of this Bill may 
not be an evidence of its true passage through the 
House. It is not too late, even yet, to worry and 
harass, and torment, and become a nuisance to your 
Member, and during Committee we may be able to 
overthrow the decision of the Prime Minister this 
afternoon. It will be a battle, and I hope that we 
shall be on the side of the Japanese in that battle. 
We may come out a little wounded, but I do not 
think we shall have to gather up many of our dead. 

A certain Member voted for the first reading of the 
Licensing Bill. I had several conversations with him. 
I was amazed at his opinions. His constituents got 
to know about it. (Laughter.) At the dinner table 
he got telegrams; at the lunch table he got telegrams; 
in the House he got telegrams; in the lobb} r he got 
telegrams—until the man was almost driven mad. 
But it had one good result. It drove him into the 


right lobby this afternoon. (Applause.) He was 
good enough to do what the people desired him to 
do. Pie showed me one of the telegrams ; I will read 
it to you. I have it here; it is a good one. I think 
the fellow that sent it meant it. It was this: 
“Stick to your principles, man.” “ What would you 
think of getting that?” he asked me. I said, “I 
would just say what the Methodists say in a 
testimonv meeting, ‘Amen’” (Loud applause.) 

Now, I reiterate those words, and I say to this 
large representative body, “Stick to your principles,” 
though the dark cloud may hover over us, for to every 
dark cloud there is a silver lining. (Prolonged 
cheers.) 

The resolution was at once put, and carried. 


The final function of the Conference was an excur¬ 
sion to Southend, to which the London Members of 
the Council invited their provincial friends. The day 
was beautifully fine, the tide was high, and the expedi¬ 
tion proved very enjoyable in every respect. A party 
of the friends visited the P^arm Colony of the Salva¬ 
tion Army at Hadleigh, and were greatly interested 
in the successful efforts made by the Army to give 
new heart, hope, and life to the downtrodden and the 
degraded. 


Swansea.— Band of Hope Day early in May offered 
a wondrous sight in Swansea. Some 10,000 members 
took part in the procession, with five bands and 
nearly a dozen waggons. It all went off in grand 
style. 

Halifax and District. —The annual meeting of the 
Union this year created a record in the history of the 
Union in point of attendance, and interest. Over 
2,000 persons gathered in the Victoria Hall on April 
30 to listen to Mr. Arthur Henderson, M.P., and 
Alderman Joseph Autv, of Batley. The children 
had a share, too. in the success of the gathering, the 
presentation of purses to Mrs. G. H. Smith, in 
connection with the Central Hall P'und, and the 
Boys’ Choir with action songs from one of the 
Juvenile Tents of the Rechabites. being a special 
feature of the entertainment. The Halifax and 
Huddersfield District of the I. O. R., having won the 
challenge shield for the highest proportionate in¬ 
crease of membership in the kingdom, having 
commenced 1903 with 90 members and closed with 
369 in the juvenile section, the Tents, which are all 
affiliated with the Union, had the pleasure of having 
the shield presented publicly at this annual meeting. 
An influential gathering of the public men of the 
town supported the president; Mr. J. H. Whitley, 
M.P., and Mrs. Whitley being specially pleased with 
the singing of the boys and the speech of Mr. 
Henderson. The hon. secretary (Mr. A. Pickard) 
submitted an encouraging report of the year’s work, 
showing 179 societies, with a membership of 27,750; 
320 meetings had been attended and addressed by the 
agent during the year.—May Sunday is always a great 
day in the Halifax districts, as Temperance reformers 
for miles around make it a gathering place for the 
morning meeting at Shibden Spa, where 3,000 
persons met at seven o’clock to unite in their protests 
against the Licensing Bill, and to tell over agaiu the 
story of their love for the Temperance cause. Messrs. 
Sugden, Lund (of Burnley;, E. J. Johnson (of Derby), 
Alderman J. Auty (of Batley), William Haigh (of 
Birkenshaw), Samuel Kellett (of Wyke), Fred 
Topharn (of Halifax), and J. Metcalf (of Scarborough) 
were the speakers at this wonderful gathering, 
which was followed by a Temperance love-feast, or 
Washingtonian meeting, where reclaimed drunkards 
were able to give stirring testimonies of the advantage 
they had reaped rom Total Abstinence. Other 
meetings followed during the day—in the open air at 
Savile Park, at Square Chapel P. S. A., where the 
fruit of former labours is beginning to appear in the 
formation of a P. S. A. Temperance Society, the busy 
day’s programme ending with a striking sermon 
given by Mr. Henderson, M.P., in the King Cross 
Wesleyan Church. The seven meetings and services 
had an aggregate attendance of over 7,000 people. 





94 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


R NeuJ “Home” for CDanehestep. 


W E heartily congratulate our northern friends 
on the successful stone-laying ceremony at 
Manchester on May 7, of the new building 
which is to be the “ Home ” of Band of Hope 
and Temperance work as carried on in the 
large district covered by the Lancashire and Cheshire 
Union. The site secured is in Deansgate at the 
corner of Bootle Street, and the design is a handsome 
one. The Lord Mayor (Mr. Shann) laid the first 
stone, the City thus recognising the noble work done 
by the Bands of Hope. There was a large attendance 
and the ceremony was most effective. 

Canon Hicks occupied the chair as President of the 
Lancashire and Cheshire Band of Hope Union. While 
the people were assembling the Manchester District 
Band of Hope Choral Union sang, and musical 
selections "were played by the Central Hall prize 
band. The Lord Majmr was accompanied by the Lady 
Mayoress (Miss Shann). Amongst others present 
were the Dean of Manchester (Dr. Maclure), Mr. PI. 
Thornton, of Warrington (chairman of the Executive), 
Mr. J. S. Iligham, of Accrington (honorary treasurer), 
Sir James Hoy, Mr. John Royle (Deputy Lord Mayor), 
Canon J. Davenport Kelly, See. Apologies for absence 
and expressions of sympathy with the Union’s work 
had been received from the Bishop of Manchester 
(Dr. Knox), the Bishop of Liverpool (Dr. Chavasse), 
the Bishop of Salford (Dr. Casartelli), the Earl of 
Derby, Earl Egerton of Tatton, Lord Shuttleworth, 
Sir John T. Hibbert, Sir W. H. Houldsworth (who 
sent ^50), Sir W. H. Badev, Mr. Balfour, Colonel 
Pilkington, M.P., Mr. C. P. Scott, M.P., Mr. Winston 
Churchill, M.P., and many others. 

The President said that was a happy day for all 
who were engaged in the work of the Union, for, like 
the dove out of Noah’s Ark, they had been long 
looking for a firm place on which to rest their feet 
and found none, and now they had found in the 
heart of that great City a spot where they hoped 
Temperance work might go on and abound for many 
generations to come. It was a happy day to them, 
therefore, but also, he thought he might say, for the 
whole of the population of this great district, for in 
laying the foundation of offices for the work of the 
Union they were laying broad and deep the foundation 
of national sobriety, on which so much of the national 
well-being and happiness depended. 

Mr. Higham made a short statement as to the work 
of the Union and the financial position of this under¬ 
taking. In naming some of the contributions, he said 
that Mr. Samuel Lamb had given £50, and told them 
when they had got to the first floor to come again, 
and again when the building was completed. The 
Union was non-political and non-sectarian. It com¬ 
prised nearly 1,800 societies, and nearly a quarter-of- 
a-million members. The new buildings would meet 
a long-felt want. They would be a centre for 
Temperance work. There would be a council-room 
and committee-rooms, a library, a room for reading, 
writing, and conversation. They needed ^15,000, 
and towards that sum they had jf8,ooo in promises 
or in cash. The chairman of tue Executive, Mr. 
Thornton, had promised ^1,000—^500 unconditionally 
and ^500 if the full sum wanted is raised this year. 

The Lord Mayor laid the first stone, and expressed 
his appreciation of the Union’s work. I would like, 
the Lord Mayor continued, to say a few words 
regarding a branch of your work in which I take 
particular interest. I have long b^en associated with 
public elementary education in Manchester, and I 
am fully acquainted with the work that has now 
for many years been carried on in the day schools, 
first with the hearty approval of the School Board 
and managers of Voluntary Schools, and latterly with 
the entire sympathy of the Education Committee 
which now controls the education of the City. In the 
work of the schools you employ the services of four 
most efficient lecturers, all of whom are certificated 
teachers, and consequently able to secure the atten¬ 
tion of the children and present to them information 
in the most effective manner. The lectures are given 


to the children in the upper standards, and deal with 
the nature and properties of alcohol. The children 
write essays on the lectures, and the Union presents 
certificates of merit to all puoils who display in those 
essays an intelligent grasp of what the lecturers have 
told them. Last year 878 such lectures were given to 
more than 90,000 children, &c.; of these 39,000 wrote 
essays, and nearly 19,000 certificates were awarded. 
It is satisfactory to note that an increasing number 
of education authorities welcome the assistance 
offered by the Union. Quite recently the War Office 
issued an order that similar teaching must now be 
provided in Barrack Schools, and lecturers on this 
subject are now admitted to the training ships of the 
Royal Navy. The same thing is true of the United 
States, several Continental countries, and a number 
of our own Colonies. It will thus be seen that it is 
now becoming recognised that children should have 
special instruction in the nature and properties of 
alcohol, and, irrespective altogether of what our 
views maybe on the general question of Temperance, 

I thmk it will be admitted by the great bulk of the 
people that your Union is doing a good work in pro¬ 
moting this kind of instruction amongst the children 
attending our public Elementary Schools. It is 
gratifying to know that similar work is carried on 
by the Church of England Temperance Society. In 
conclusion, I would again like to express my sym¬ 
pathy in your work, and to draw public attention to 
the fact that the whole expense of the Union has to 
be met by voluntary subscriptions, including, of 
course, the special coff this year of the provision of 
this building. Your Executive, members, and many 
friends have come forward in a most generous spirit, 
and subscribed handsomely. It now remains for the 
general public to come forward and show a like 
appreciation of the good work of the Union. 

Another stone was laid by Mr. H. Thorntou, a 
third (called the “Children’s Stone”) by a son of the 
treasurer, a fourth by Mr. Arthur Haworth, a fifth by 
Mr. H. J. Whitehouse, of High Lane, a sixth by Mr. 
Thomas E. Hallsworth, hon. secretary of the Union, a 
seventh by Mr. J. Davies, on behalf of the Cadet Council 
and Sons of Temperance, and an eighth by Mr. W. 
Chandos Wilson, general secretary of the Union. An 
interesting feature of the proceedings was the pre¬ 
sentation of “ stone - laying gifts” to the Lady 
Mayoress by children representing various Bands of 
Hope, and adult friends representing various Unions. 
The building will have two frontages, one in 
Deansgate and the other in Bootle Street, and there 
will be five storeys, inclusive of the basement. It will 
be constructed of brick with terra cotta facings. At the 
top will be a meeting hall with room for 500 people. 
Below that will be a suit" of offices for carrying on 
the work of the Union. On the ground floor will be 
the publishing department and shops. Over ^700 
was received at the stone-laying function. 

- ***- 

Ibome <3omos. 

Mr. THOMAS HOEY, of Sowfrby Bridge;. 

One; of the most active Temperance and social 
reformers of the Halifax district passed awav on 
Thursday, May 12, in the person of Mr. Thos. Hoey, 
of Sower by Bridge. Although he had only just 
attained to full manhood, he had crowded into his 
forty-one years more public service than falls to the 
lot of the average social reformer. He was a good 
all-round advocate, with a tolerant mind and a 
winning personality which always tempered his 
strenuousness on the Temperance and political 
platform. He will be greatly missed in his native 
town, as his activities were spread over most of the 
public institutions of the district. 

-vva—— 

Edmonton.— The Lower Edmonton Baptist Band 
of Hope held its twenty-first annual meeting on 
Wednesday, April 20, when there was a good 
attendance, and encouraging reports were presented 
by the secretary and treasurer. A varied programme, 
consisting of songs, recitations, and drill, was given 
by the members. The Rev. D. Russell presided. 







THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


95 


Olay Festivals. 


Bradford. 

The twenty-fourth flower and song festival under 
the auspices of the Bradford Band of Hope Union 
was held on Monday, May 2, in the Mechanics’ 
Institute. 

Mr. Frederic Priestman, J.P., President of the 
Union, who presided, said that it was two years since 
the Bradford Band of Hope Union gave a welcome 
to the merry month of May. Past year this interesting 
event was omitted owing to the Jubilee celebrations 
of the Union. Now that they had begun again he 
hoped that the May Day Festival would continue for 
a long time to come. He then alluded to the recent 
changes that had taken place in the Union, and 
referred to the retirement of Mr. Roberts from the 
agency. They had secured a worthy successor in 
Mr. A. J. Rowles, who appeared before them that 
night for the first time in Mr. Roberts’ place. They 
had a new secretary also in Mr. Percy Heap. The 
Union now consisted of 176 societies, with 27,000 
members, the highest numbers yet attained. 

The Rev. D. T. Mann delivered an address, in the 
course of which he said that the country was in the 
midst of a great crisis. 

During the evening a pleasing cantata, entitled, 
“The White Garland,” was performed by a select 
choir of iod girls, who were daintily attired in white 
costumes, and adorned in many cases with flowers. 
A few boys assisted, and the choral items, which were 
rendered in excellent time and tune, were accom¬ 
panied by an orchestral band of fifteen performers. 
Miss Eveleen Bentley gracefully rendered the part of 
Queen, and the other principal soloists were Misses H. 
Dobson, L. Robertshaw and Alice Dixon, and Master 
Leonard Ward. Mr. Rowles displayed considerable 
ability as conductor, and Mr. H. Matley accompanied 
the soloists on the pianoforte. The band also played 
selections, and Miss Ethel Mortimer sang a couple of 
songs very efficiently. 

Derby. 

The May Festival was held in the Drill Hall on 
Monday and Tuesday, May 2 and 3. The festival 
opened with an overture, “ Marionetten,” by a well- 
trained orchestra. The conductor was Mr. F. J. 
Bonas, who had with him Mr. Charles Morris at the 
organ, Miss Bernice Woods as pianist, and Mr. 
George Matthews as assistant. A full chorus, “ The 
Forest Festival,” by the choir, was followed by a 
pretty scarf drill and action song, “The Braiders,” 
after which there was an action song, “ The White 
Cross Knight.” The action song, “ The Pigtail and 
the Fan,” was one of the most acceptable in the enter¬ 
tainment. The solo was taken by Miss Annie Heapy, 
the May Queen, and deserved the encore it gained. 
St. Andrew’s Band of Hope were responsible for 
“ Work and Play ” ; and a full chorus, “ Cornin’ thro’ 
the Rye,” by the choir of five hundred voices was 
again interposed. Miss Winnie Russell was success¬ 
ful in “The Mischievous Child,” which gained a 
recall, and, before the crowning of the May Queen 
commenced, the choir rendered “Fairy Whispers.” 
The presentation of garland, crown, and sceptre was 
made by one of the fairies, Cissie Ridge, and both her 
requests of acceptance to the May Queen, and the 
May Queen’s responses, were sung to music composed 
specially for the festival by Miss Ethel Cutts, of 
Derby. The words were by Mr. J. W. Avery, secre¬ 
tary of the Union. “The Call to the Flowers,” was 
a solo sung by Miss Elsie Parker, and just before the 
whole of the court was presented to the May Queen, 
there was the entrance of the guards. After the 
presentation there was a cradle song and chorus, the 
solo being sung by Miss Ethel Bullock, and following 
three more short items, there was the processional 
grand march round, and presentation of a bouquet 
to Miss Boam, who received it in the absence of the 
Mayoress. 

The Mayor expresed the pleasure he had had at 
witnessing the entertainment. He trusted that the 
Temperance movement would prosper in Derby, and 


that the annual festivals promoted by the Band of 
Hope Union would continue to be given. 

The braiding of the Maypole, a prettv and inte¬ 
resting operation, was a great success. “ The Singing 
Coon,” was sung by Master James Wilde. This song 
was possessed of additional interest by reason of the 
fact that the words were by Mr. J. W. Avery, and the 
setting by Mr. W. F. Wills, a son of the President of 
the Union. A skipping competition was introduced 
between Band of Hope children, and pupils of the 
Royal Deaf and Dumb Institution. The other items 
were “Busy Bees,” by the Rose Hill Wesleyan Band 
of Hope, a musical chairs’ contest, and “There was an 
old woman who lived in a shoe.” The skipping 
competition was a decided novelty, and the prizes, 
given by Mr. R. Hudson, J.P., were presented by the 
Mayor. 

On the second night Mr. Averv expressed the in¬ 
debtedness which was lelt by the Union to Miss 
Clarke and Miss Woods, and asked Mrs. Wills, wife of 
the President, to present them each with an elegant 
gold bracelet on behalf ot the Union, as tokens of the 
appreciation of their valuable assistance. Mrs. Wills 
performed her duty in a graceful manner, amidst 
hearty applause. 

Nottingham. 

Notts Baud of Hope Union had a most effective 
May Festival at the beginning of May. The enter¬ 
tainment delighted over 400 performers, and thousands 
of spectators crowded into the Mechanics’ Hall, 
Nottingham. Mr. C. E. Riley was the conductor of 
the children, and was enthusiastically cheered on the 
exhibition of the Morecambe Shield, won just 
previously by his select choir. Miss Hilda Marshall 
was a charming little May Queen, with a sweet voice; 
and her maids of honour, Misses Louie Bamford and 
Elsie Mellors, looked very pretty and sang well. 
Infants of Carrington Council School afforded much 
amusement with Kindergarten games, and various 
other pleasant items were included in the programme, 
among these being the playing of the Temperance 
Sax-Juba Band under the direction of Mr. W. Hames. 
Mr. J. F. Blasdale was the organist, and Miss Alice 
Kent the accompanist, whilst valued aid was rendered 
by Mr. E Dawson King (the secretary) and Mr. G. 
Sadler. The profit was about ^85. 

Dubgin. 

On May 2, the Eighth Annual May Festival, 
arranged by the Hibernian Union, was a brilliant 
success. A vast audience in the Metropolitan Hall 
was presided over by Mr. Edmondson, and the choir 
of 400 voices acquitted themselves most admirably 
under Mr. Robertson Coade. The programme was 
varied and exceedingly attractive, all the action 
songs being given with rare precision and spirit. A 
resolution against the Licensing Bill was carried on 
the motion of the President and Mr. Carty. 

Northampton. 

Northampton Corn Exchange was an extremely 
pretty scene two nights last month, when a choir of 
500 children belonging to Bands of Hope in that town, 
with thirty from the neighbouring parish of Milton 
(trained by Mr. J. T. Beeson), participated in the 
crowning of a May Queen and dances around a May- 
pole. Mr. J. Rogers, a musician of great experience, 
had full control of the festival; the Mount Pleasant 
String Band (under Mr. W. J. Grant) constituted the 
orchestra, and Mr. P. L- Kitchen was pianist. The 
first portion of the programme comprised, among its 
diverse attractions, a storming of King Alcohol’s fort 
by lads of the Boys’ Life Brigadq, instructed by Mr. 
L. Toselaud. Mr. W. C. Hollowell, secretary of the 
Northampton Temperance and Band of Hope Union, 
provided for the second part an original cantata, 
“ The Choice of a May Queen.” This was delight¬ 
fully rendered by 100 children, who had been taught 
it to perfection by Miss E. Butler. Temperance had 
the honour of being chosen in preference to Drink 
and War ; and these three ideals were respectively 
personated by Misses Ethel Leach (a niece of the 
Mayor of Northampton), Daisy Whitbread, and Susan 
Butler; Misses Edith Barratt and Nellie Smith repre¬ 
senting, also, the Spirits of Night and Day. 



96 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Records of Progress. 


Banfc of Ifoope Tuitions. 

Bedfordshire. —The thirty-third animal meetings 
of this Union were held at Howard Church, Bedford, 
on April 19. Lady Battersea, who was re-elected presi¬ 
dent, occupied the chair at both meetings, and gave 
two exceptionally able and helpful addresses, both of 
which were keenly enjoyed by large audiences. Her 
Ladyship also presented the prizes to the collectors 
who had taken part in the Christinas and New Year’s 
Collections for the Temperance Hospital and the 
Baud of Hope movement. Although Bedford is a 
small place, one of the collectors there had secured 
the highest amount obtained this year—between 
fifteen and sixteen pounds. At the afternoon 
meeting the report was read, and the Treasurer 
(Miss Rogers) and the Secretary (Mr. Rowland Hill) 
were each elected—for the thirty-fourth time. At 
the evening meeting, in addition to the President’s 
inaugural address, Miss Laws and the Rev. A. Garland 
spoke, and Madame Jessie Strathearne sang sacred 
solos, winning enthusiastic applause for each one. 
The whole proceedings were eminently useful, 
hopeful, and inspiring. 

Devon and Cornwall. —Formed at Plymouth in 
1899, the Devon and Cornwall Band of Hope Union 
has made satisfactory progress, and its annual meet¬ 
ing in Plymouth Corn Exchange, on May 2, provided 
a fitting culmination to the preliminary gatherings 
held in the Three Towns during April. Mr. R. 
Reynolds Fox, president, occupied the chair, and the 
singing was led by Stonehouse Bible Christian Band 
of Hope Choir, under Mr. C. H. Trounce. Mr. J. 
Hayne Pillar, secretary, presented the annual report, 
which gave the total number of societies in affiliation 
as 206, with a membership of 20,000. The secretary 
had visited workhouses and industrial homes, and 
given lectures. The Chairman said all parties were 
agreed as to the benefits to be derived from the train¬ 
ing of the juveniles in the way of sobriety. Mr. T. H. 
Hicks, of Looe, in a forcible address, said they under¬ 
estimated the result of Band of Hope work. He 
believed it to be one of the best possible preparations 
for living the life of men and women, for it awakened 
a sense of responsibility and became a prelude to a 
thoroughly active and useful life. 

South West London. —This Band of Hope Union 
held their annual meeting at Battersea Town Hall on 
April 18, when a large and representative audience 
was present. Mr. Henry Holloway, J.P., presided. 
The chairman of the executive committee (Mr. A. 
Newton) gave a brief resume of the report, which 
showed an increase in all departments—in the number 
of societies, of members, and workers, and average 
attendance, all being larger than in the previous 
year. The Rev. Mathias Lansdown gave a most 
effective address. An excellent programme of music 
was given by the Clapham Young Abstainers’ Union 
Choir. The Battersea Chapel Band of Hope gave a 
display of musical drill, and the champion reciter in 
the Union gave the recitation which had won the 
first prize in the annual competition among the 
societies of the Union. The gathering was one of 
the best held in recent years, and was full of 
encouragement. 

Kent. —The eleventh annual meetings of the Kent 
Union were held from April 18 to 25, the culminating 
gatherings being at Deal on the last three of the 
days named. The preliminary gatherings were held 
at Eythorne, Sibertswold, Deal, Woodnesborough, 
Finglesham, Eastry, Sandwich, Sholden, and 
Kiugsdown. At Deal, on April 23, an Eisteddfod 
took place, the Rev. C. L- Tabraham presiding over 
an eager audience of competitors and spectators. 
Prizes were awarded for reciting, singing, drill, &c.; 
recitals were given by Mr. Plamar Greenwood, and a 
striking address by Mr. Walter Edwards, of the 
Parent Society. Sunday was a full day, as about 
forty special sermons and addresses were given by 
clergymen, ministers, and special friends. At night 


three after-service Temperance meetings proved of a 
most attractive character. On Monday the executh e 
met at 9.30, and a capital conference was held at 
11 a.m. Mr. Murray Hyslop presided, and read a 
capital paper 011 “ The Opening Service in our Band 
of Hope Meeting ” ; Mr. P'. H. Jeffries gave “ Hints on 
Programmes” ; Mr. Nation, on “ Management ” ; Mr. 
C. Harvey, on “Discipline”; Mr., Barratt, on 
“Visitation”; and the Rev. J. Beeby, on “Pledge 
Signing.” The Council met at 3, and elected the 
officers for the year; and at its close a second con¬ 
ference was held, Mr. Joshua Cox, the re-elected 
President, in the chair. Mr. Walter Edwards gave 
his popular lecture, exposing erroneous ideas of the 
nature of alcohol. Tea was provided at the close, 
and then the great demonstration was held in the 
Oddfellows’ Hall. Mr. Murray presided, and a large 
choir led some capital singing. Magnificent 
addresses were given by the Rev. Canon Horsley, 
Rev. W. A. Legg, and Mr. Hamar Greenwood. 

Lancaster and District. —This Union has had 
another visit from Mr. Peter Tavlor. Northern Agent 
of the Lancashire and Cheshire Band of Hope Union. 
On April 18, Mr. Taylor gave a capital address on 
“ Alcohol and Food ” to a large gathering at the 
Wolsley Independent Methodist Band of Hope. A 
Workers’ Rally was held in the Primitive Methodist 
Lecture Hall on April 15. The Rev. H. W. Smith, 
President of the Union, took the chair, and enter¬ 
tained the workers to light refreshments. Mr. Taylor 
gave a stirring talk on “ What is our Work ? ” A free 
parliament followed, in which Messrs. H. Wright, 
Simpson, Kirby, Stirzaker, and Close took part. It 
was the best workers’ meeting held in Lancaster for a 
long time. On April 20, Mr. Taylor addressed three 
Band of Hope meetings on “Alcohol and F'ood,” in 
the New Church of Christ Sunday School, Primitive 
Methodist School, Scotforth, and the Bulk Street 
Mission Room ; and, on April 21, he had two meetings, 
ill the Primitive Methodist Lecture Hall, and the 
Templar Room (Friars Passage) of the “Duke’s Own” 
Temple. On April 22, Mr. Taylor visited the High 
Street Congregational Band of Hope, and gave an 
interesting talk on “Digestion.” All his talks, 
excepting Tuesday evening’s, were illustrated by 
diagrams and chemical experiments, and the argu¬ 
ments were well driven home by his wonderful 
experience. Interest has been aroused, workers 
encouraged by Mr. Taylor’s visit, and a wish was 
expressed that he should soon come again. 

Sussex. —The ninth annual meetings of this Union 
came off with great success at Lewes, on April 27, 28, 
and 29. At the opening Council meeting, Mr. Snow, 
of St. Leonards, presided, supported by Miss Maude 
Robinson, honorary secretary, and a large number of 
friends. Mr. Burbridge read the report, which 
showed that a local Union had been formed for 
Hastings, Bexhill, and district. The Union now 
comprises 150 societies, a gain of 3, with 12,300 
members and 1,000 adult workers. The year’s receipts 
were ^175, and the payments ^(iSo. The report was 
adopted, and the officers re-elected. A resolution 
against the Licensing Bill was adopted. I11 the even¬ 
ing the Mayor gave a reception at the Assembly 
Room and Corn Exchange, the function being most 
enjoyable and successful. The annual public meet¬ 
ing was held on Thursday, Mr. Wainwright presiding, 
and addresses being given bv Mr. Frederic Smith, of 
the Parent Society; Dr. Vickerman Rutherford, 
Councillor Lloyd, and others. A good musical pro¬ 
gramme was provided. On the last night a great 
United Band of Hope Festival was held, Councillor 
Verral presiding. 


Indigestion, Debility and Neuralgia have a 
powerful enemy in “ Nonalton,” the non-alcoholic 
Tonic. “Nonalton” is not a new thing. Time and 
customers have proved that it is the most reliable, 
because it leaves no Bad After Effects. Sample 
bottle, 2s. 6d. Particulars free. — P'. Wright, 
Mundy & Co., 27, Merton Road, Kensington, 
London, W.— [Advt.] 






The New School Scheme Fund. 


INCH the last reference to this subject in 
the Band of Hope Chronicle, some 
£600 have been further promised to the 
New School Scheme Fund, making the 
present total up to ^7,300. There is thus a 
remainder of ^2,700 to be contributed before 
the ^jio.ooo required for the next five years’ 
work will have been secured. May we appeal 
for, say, two hundred friends of this excep¬ 
tionally good educational work, who have not 
yet contributed, to come to the rescue ? 

If five good friends will give ^jioo, ten ^50, 
thirty £25, fifty £10, and a hundred £5, the 
thing will be done. May this consummation 
be speedily realised! 

The following is a list of the additional 
amounts promised, in some cases “subject to 
life and ability ” :— 


[Payable in April in five yearly instalments.) 


Mr. Joseph Storrs Fry 

jL 

125 

s. 

0 

d. 

0 

Mr. James H. Vanner 

IOO 

0 

0 

The Duke of Westminster.. 

5° 

0 

0 

Mr. W. S. Clark . 

25 

0 

0 

Sir Frederick Howard 

25 

0 

0 

Mr. Thomas Walker, J.P. 

25 

O 

0 

Miss Margaret Crosfield 

15 

0 

0 

Mr. Charles Farly, J.P. 

15 

0 

0 

Mr. J. Vanner Farly 

15 

0 

0 

Mr. J. G. Addison, J.P. 

10 

10 

0 

Mrs. Buckton 

10 

10 

0 

Mrs. Backhouse 

10 

0 

0 

Mr. T. W. Backhouse 

10 

0 

0 

Mr. J. Herbert Roberts, M.P. 

10 

0 

0 

Mr. J. W. Walker. 

10 

0 

0 

Miss Winsford 

10 

0 

0 

The Rev. J. Estlin Carpenter, M.A. 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. Thomas Cooksey 

5 

5 

0 

Miss A. Florence Copeland 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. James Harold Early 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. B. Harding 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. R. Ring 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. Josiah Messent 

5 

5 

0 

Mr. J. I. Myatt 

5 

5 

0 

Miss Margaret Bragg 

5 

0 

0 

Mrs. Charlotte Chick 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. S. P. Derbyshire 

5 

0 

0 

Mrs. T. H. Greene. 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. Samuel Maw 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. Walter P. Reavell, J.P. 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. J. C. Robinson 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. J. D. Snow 

5 

0 

0 

The Misses Southall 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. E. Stevens 

5 

0 

0 

Mr. A. F. Taylor. 

5 

0 

0 

Other amounts 

17 

13 

0 

JULY, 1904. 



The Ship Aground. 

By M. A. PauiUv (Mrs. John Ripley), Author oj 
“ Tim's 1 roubles," &c. &>c. 


UBLIC HOUSE signs are sometimes like 
Proverbs, they embody great truths, and only 
need a little close observation and examination 
to teach valuable lessons. Amongst such is one 
to be seen in the town of Neath in South Wales, 
“The Ship Aground.” 

Those of us who live by the sea have probably seen 
a ship in that sad position. Some years since, at that 
small but favourite watering place in North Cornwall, 
called Bude, whose shores are washed by the mighty 
Atlantic, and whose rocky coast has caused the 
destruction of many a vessel, we saw a ship aground, 
which had been driven ashore in a storm and was 
gradually being broken to pieces. There is something 
pathetic in such a sight, and alas ! it is only too 
typical of a life given over to a habit or to passions 
which work its destruction. 

And, perhaps, the career of the drunkard is most of 
all synonymous with the fate of the Ship Aground. 
For men and women are not real drunkards at once ; 
very slowly, very gradually, the temptation increases 
in power and fastens its hold upon its victim, so that 
many of these when first they yield to the insidious 
charm of strong drink, may justly be compared to the 
fair ship starting on its voyage, the sunlight catching 
its white sails, its appearance smart and trim, “youth 
at the prow, and pleasure at the helm.” 

But, wanting in the ballast of principle, when the 
storm arises they drift at the mercy of the waves, 
careless of rudder or anchor, until the furious winds 
and waters dash them to the shore, far, indeed, from 
“the haven where they would be,” and the Ship is 
Aground. 

It is one of the saddest facts connected with the 
drink plague, that so many young men in their vigour, 
so many blooming girls are tampering to-day with 
what is able, more than almost anything else, to bring 
a blight upon their fair prospects, and destruction 
upon their career. Young men of good education 
acquire a liking for wine, and, as one told me a short 
time since, it is almost impossible to go to a dinner 
party and not take it; fashion, like the strong wind, 
drives him against the rock-bound shore, and danger 
threatens, though he seemed really desirous that he 
could keep the pledge. It is just here that stedfast 
teetotalers, especially the young, may help each other, 
and more particularly help those who are falling into 
danger, very materially. Young professional and 
business men, unknown to themselves may be towers 
of strength, lighthouses to ward off the reefs and 
currents their young companions who are in danger 
of becoming “ Ships Aground.” 

Just as nothing is more beautiful than a ship 
holding its onward and appointed course, well-cap¬ 
tained and manned, well-laden and well-ordered, 
so there is no sadder sight than a wreck, or than its 
initial stage, the ship aground, destruction imminent, 
fair promise marred or altogether extinguished. 

May every Band of Hope member and every 
Christian Eudeavourer strive to use the influence 
with which God has entrusted him to help his com¬ 
panions to avoid the peril of strong drink, to abstain 
entirely from those dangerous beverages which may 
lead to their becoming Ships Aground. 

































THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


98 

Band of Hope Addresses.—Series 1. 


MANKIND IN THE MARRING & MENDING. 

LESSON FOR SENIOR MEMBERS. 


By T. N. KELYNACK, M.D., M.R.C.P., 

Hon. Secretary of the Society for the Study of Inebriety. 


No. 7.—ALCOHOL AND THE CHILD. 


T HE child is father to the man. The secret and 
success of the future lie hidden in the young 
life of the present. A healthy child is the most 
valuable of national possessions. No country 
can maintain dominant power which neglects 
the care of its coming race. The first duty of a people 
is to protect its children from all inimical influences, 
and secure conditions for their perfect development. 
Deterioration of the race necessarily follows on a 
neglect of the children. The surest guarantee for 
future greatness is afforded in the widespread and 
still increasing interest in all that relates to child¬ 
hood. Many agencies are at work hampering and 
hindering the normal evolution of the child. One 
only is now under our consideration : Drink in its 
direct, and even more important indirect, influence 
stands foremost among forces making for derange¬ 
ment of conditions essential for the upbuilding of the 
healthy individual. The culture of the child demands 
completeness of knowledge as to the how and why of 
human growth, physical, mental and moral, and a 
persistent application, in accordance with scientific 
principles, of protective measures and truly educa¬ 
tional influences. Only by knowledge and reverence 
can we secure the perfecting of childhood and the 
fullest development of the human. 

Alcoholism and Parentage. 

The promise and perfection of the future are wrapt 
in the mystery of the unborn. Our ancestors have 
much to answer for. The laws of heredity are as yet 
but dimly understood. Considerable evidence is 
available to show that the offspring of the alcoholic 
starts life heavily handicapped, and oftentimes mani¬ 
fests lowered powers of resistance and predisposition 
to derangement which may render deterioration 
rapid. The child may be alcoholised from the initial 
stages of its evolution. Maternal influences count 
for much. It is necessary that every mother should 
realise that a perfect development of the child can 
only be secured by wise and watchful precaution. 
The environment taken in its widest significance 
should be strengthening for body and invigorating 
for mind, and such as shall build up moral powers 
and fortify religious forces. The custom of 
administering alcohol in various forms to the young 
mother still lingers as evidence of ancient error, born 
of prejudice and ignorance. Individual and collective 
action is required to secure the protection and per¬ 
fecting of the coming race by serious instruction of 
the parents,—particularly by the safeguarding of the 
mother from the pernicious action of alcohol or the 
stunting influence of an alcoholic environment. 

Alcohol and the Infant. 

The early period of life calls for special care. 
Among the ignorant and neglectful little thought is 
taken concerning the protection of the infant. Health 
laws are broken, and the little aches and pains, often¬ 
times the product of folly, are met by a resort to 
agencies highly prejudicial and oftentimes extremely 
dangerous. Among certain sections of society, 
alcoholic drinks in some of their common forms, 
whiskey, brandy and gin, are frequently given to 
children with a view to correct temporary derange¬ 
ments or obviate minor ailments. Parents require 
systematic instruction regarding the stunting action 
of alcohol on young life. Every mother should 
understand that alcohol is a poison to the healthy 


infant, and even in case of severe illness its employ¬ 
ment is becoming much restricted, and calls for the 
most discriminating care. 

Many a nursing mother still believes that her 
maternal duties may be better carried out by a resort 
to alcoholic beverages, and from the persistence of 
this ancient practice much harm not infrequently 
results both to mother and child. The woman for 
her own sake, as well as for the benefit of her off¬ 
spring, would do well to adopt the practice of total 
abstinence, and rigorously comply with all hygienic 
procedures. 

Alcohol and the Adolescent. 

Although the importance of abstinence for the 
child is generally admitted even by those who defend 
the habitual use of alcoholics by the adult, among all 
sorts and conditions of men and women there exists 
an idea that at certain periods in the evolution of 
the human, artificial assistance should be afforded to 
nature’s powers in the establishment of impoitant 
physiological processes. Mere meddlesomeness 
oftentimes mars the silent, secret yet perfect adjust¬ 
ments ever occurring in the healthy subject, fhe 
practice of administering certain forms of alcoholic 
drinks to girls on the threshold of womanhood still 
lingers ; and there is reason to believe that a foolish 
procedure thoughtlessly advocated for delicate youth 
may do much to rivet fetters on the freedom of 
maturity. The adolescent should be systematically 
instructed in the scientific principles which underlie 
the practice of total abstinence, if a firm foundation 
is to be afforded for life’s action. The want of clear 
views as to the action of alcohol and the nature of 
inebriety, is undoubtedly accountable for much of 
the lapse which now so conspicuously discourages. 
And added to knowledge there is need for the 
strengthening and sustaining force of an environment 
which shall make for the maintenance of Temperance, 
and a public opinion and general practice which shall 
approve abstinence. 

Alcohol and the Marring of Child=Life. 

Alcohol in its direct action may stunt and stultify, 
but alcoholism in its indirect effect mars and shatters 
much that goes to the making of perfect childhood. 
The wide prevalence of intemperance in manifold 
ways lessens and limits the opportunities for healthy 
upbuilding. Parental neglect, domestic wrongs, 
educational deficiencies, and lack of harmonious 
environment oftentimes have their source in alcoholic 
intemperance. Much of the disaster which so 
commonly overtakes child-life arises from the 
alcoholism of those who as parents or friends, should 
religiously shelter and reasonably nourish the unfold¬ 
ing life. Accident in many shapes and some forms of 
disease, not infrequently blight, because alcoholism 
has been the agency which has brought about 
exposure. 

Drink does much to hinder development, and is 
ever working for deterioration. The protection of child¬ 
hood necessitates strenuous scientifically-directed 
effort to secure the prevention of alcoholism. 


A Devonshire Object Lesson.-— On May 25, the 
Tavistock and District Band of Hope Union held 
a demonstration which deserves special mention. 
Although the youngest district Union in the counties 
of Devon and Cornwall, it is now the largest, 
numbering 45 societies, with 4,631 members. The 
town of Tavistock was at its best on this festival day, 
the decorated waggons presenting a grand spectacle. 
They were covered with flowers, most artistically 
arranged, and taught Total Abstinence both by 
symbolism and mottoes. Prizes were given for the 
best. A Temperance centenarian, Mrs. Metherell, was 
in a carriage between two bright children, and she 
enjoyed the day as much as did the public. There 
were sports and gigantic tea parties, and in the 
evening two enthusiastic meetings, Mr. Jewers, the 
unwearied president, moving a resolution against the 
Licensing Bill. Colonel Barker, R.A., seconded it, 
and it was cordially carried. 








THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


99 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series 11. meat and other flesh-forming foods, and so may be 
r _ described as Cook No. 2. 


SIMPLE SCIENCE CHATS. 

By Charges Harvey, 

Secretary , Kent Band of Hope Union. 


No. 7.—THREE KITCHENS AND THREE 
COOKS. 


DIGESTION. 

(Foods becoming Liquid.) 


3 KITCHENS. 3 COOKS. FOODS DISSOLVED. 

1. Mouth. 1. Saliva. 1. Starch Foods. 

2. Stomach. 2. Gastric Juice. 2. Flesh-Forming Foods. 

3. Intestines. 3. Bile. 3. Fats. 


ALCOHOL HINDERS DIGESTION BY 

1. Injuring Kitchens and Cooks. 

2. Tends to Harden Foods. 


YT is easy to learn hard scientific truths by using 
I illustrations. We have called the human body 
I a temple or a building. The last lesson described 
' the building material—our foods. Such foods 
as meat, eggs, bread, and milk contain good 
building materials; while intoxicating liquors possess 
very little, and alcohol is useless for building our 
bodies. 

Digestion. 

Our bodies, then, are built of the foods we eat. In 
the body these foods have to be cooked, and solids 
have to be changed into liquid foods. In your homes 
cooking usually takes place in the kitchen. Now, in 
our living houses we may be said to have three 
kitchens, and in each kitchen there is a cook. The 
work of these kitchens and cooks is to change the 
solid foods into liquid foods. This process is called 
Digestion. 

First Kitchen and Cook. 

Now, what may be called the first kitchen in our 
bodies ? It is the mouth. Here two things occur. 
The food is chewed (masticated) by means of 
teeth, that may be described as a mill for grinding 
the food. At the same time it is mixed with a liquid 
called saliva. This saliva is poured out of glands that 
are in the mouth. Saliva consists largely of water, 
but in it there is a peculiar property called ptyalin. 
This ptyalin acts upon starchy matters in the food, 
changing them into sugar. Bread, potatoes, and rice 
contain starch. This does not dissolve in water, but 
by being converted into sugar by the saliva it is 
dissolved. So we may call the saliva the first cook. 
How important is the saliva ; smoking wastes it. 

Second Kitchen and Cook. 

After masticating the food in the mouth, it is 
swallowed. It passes down a long pipe, called the 
gullet. This pipe lies at the back of the wind-pipe. 
It is about nine inches long, and the food is conveyed 
into the stomach—Kitchen No. 2. This is a large 
pear-shaped bag, capable of holding about two 
quarts of liquid. Here the food will stay for some 
hours, the length of the stay depending on the kind 
of food. It cannot go out until it is properly dissolved; 
for just at the aperture where it leaves the stomach 
is a wonderful little gatekeeper, called the pylorus. 
What is there in the stomach for dissolving foods ? 
Gastric juice, which comes pouring out of millions of 
little pits in the lining of the stomach. It is calculated 
that from three to four quarts of this juice are poured 
into the stomach of a man every twenty-four hours. 
It is this juice that has the power of dissolving lean 


Third Kitchen and Cook. 

After leaving the stomach the food passes along 
some tubes called the intestines, which we call 
Kitchen No. 3. The length of these tubes is about 
five times the length of the body. Two small pipes 
or ducts enter the first part of the intestines, and two 
juices are poured in. One of these is called the bile; 
and, as it dissolves the fat part of foods, it is 
Cook No. 3. The bile is prepared in the liver, an 
important organ. The other juice is called pancreatic 
juice. This maybe called a maid-of-all-work, for it 
appears to have the power of dissolving anything the 
three cooks have left undissolved. Thus all our food 
is digested, and becomes absorbed into the blood, and 
in this “ river of life ” builds up the body. 

Alcohol and the Mouth. 

If we drink alcohol in intoxicating drinks, does it 
help to digest our foods—to make them liquid ? No, 
it does not. People often drink intoxicants supposing 
they are good for helping digestion. This is a 
mistake; in reality they hinder digestion. Let us 
follow alcohol through the digestive system. If it 
be taken, it enters the body through the mouth. 
Although it does not stay here long, yet it stavs long 
enough to do mischief. The harm done will be in 
proportion to the amount taken. After a man has 
been drinking a quantity of intoxicating liquors, his 
mouth becomes parched, and the more he drinks the 
drier it gets. Why is this ? Because alcohol is fond 
of water, and will absorb it, and, taking the moisture 
with it, will leave the mouth dry. The mouth is often 
inflamed through the drinking of alcohol. This 
cannot be helping digestion. The saliva, too, is 
easily hindered in its work. Alcohol is an enemy to 
both Kitchen and Cook No. 1. 

Alcohol and the Stomach. 

Wherever alcohol goes in the body it carries with it 
its baneful influence. From the mouth it passes 
down the gullet into the stomach. Here it does 
harm. It is constantly irritating and inflaming it, 
rendering it less able to do its work. It also touches 
the little gatekeeper. It deadens its nerves, thus 
making it a sleepy gatekeeper, and as such it cannot 
do its work of regulating the food so well. Alcohol 
also injures the gastric juice, making its useful part 
less effective. There is no doubt that while alcohol 
is present in the stomach it hinders the digestion 
that ought to go on there. This has been proved by 
many experiments. 

Alcohol and Food. 

There is another injury that alcohol is doing. It 
has its effect on the foods themselves. Digestion is 
the process of foods becoming liquid, but the tendency 
of alcohol is to harden foods. It does not matter 
what food is mixed with alcohol, it affects it by 
hardening it. If bread, sugar, salt, &c., are put into 
alcohol they will never dissolve. Water does soften 
all kinds of foods, even dissolving some, and so helps; 
but alcohol only hinders. 

Alcohol and the Liver. 

Alcohol does harm to the liver, which prepares the 
cook called the bile. Heavy beer drinkers find that 
the effect of alcohol upon the liver is to enlarge it, 
and thereby cause disease; while spirit drinkers, 
particularly gin drinkers, often find that the liver 
becomes shrivelled and hard and lumpy, so that the 
doctors have got into the habit of calling such a liver 
a “ hob-nailed ” or gin-drinker’s liver. All these 
injuries hinder the work of digestion. 


[Speakers giving this lesson would do well to 
exhibit the Diagrams on the subject issued by the 
United Kingdom Band of Hope Union, 60, Old Bailey, 
London, E.C.] 








IOO 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series HI. 


ALCOHOL AND HISTORY. 


By Charles Wakery, 

Secretary, United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 


No. 4.—DRINK IN FEUDAL, TIMES. 


W E liave learned that the conquest of England 
by the soldiers of William of Normandy was 
largely owing to the intemperance of the 
Anglo-Saxons and the greater sobriety of 
their conquerors. We must not, however, suppose 
that the Normans were entirely free from the vice of 
drunkenness. 

Conspiracy and Drink. —So early as the reign of 
William I. when Waltheof conspired with the Dukes 
of Norfolk and Hereford to depose the king, the con¬ 
spiracy took place on the occasion of a banquet where 
the guests were heated with wine. The morrow 
brought sober reflection. Waltheof confessed and 
craved forgiveness from the king on the ground that 
the excess of his drinking had prevented him knowing 
what he was doing; but his repentance was of no 
avail, and he was publicly beheaded as a traitor. 

Hereward the Wake and Rufus the Red. —The 
pictures in manuscripts of feudal times present many 
scenes of banquets which bear witness to the drink¬ 
ing habits of the people. Such a scene is portrayed 
in the life of Hereward the Wake, where the hero, 
disguised, enters King William’s kitchen. The free 
drinking of ale and wine causes a quarrel to arise 
between the cooks and Hereward, and whilst the 
former seize tridents and forks for weapons, Hereward 
takes the spit from the fire and uses it to defend him¬ 
self from their savage attack. 

When William Rufus came to the throne the vice 
of intemperance prevailed unchecked amongst the 
nobility, and he himself was a hard drinker. 
Historians tell us that his death in the New Forest, 
when he was pierced to the heart by the arrow of 
Walter Tyrrel, resulted after he had taken an 
excessive quantity of wine. 

Cultivation of Vines in England. — During the 
Norman period, whilst ale and mead were the com¬ 
mon drinks of the people, wine was increasingly used 
by their conquerors, who imported it chiefly from 
F'rance. In course of time, however, vines were 
planted in various parts of the country, and vineyards 
were attached to many of the abbeys, especially at 
Ely, St. Edmundsbury, Peterborough, Westminster, 
Canterbury, and Windsor. The making of wine 
entered largely into the monastic life, and even priests 
sometimes became addicted to drinking to excess. 

Peg Drinking. —When, as you will remember, 
Dunstan ordered that pins or pegs should be fastened 
at stated distances in the drinking cups, it was with 
a view to stop excessive drinking, but his rule really 
brought about increased drinking, through the 
custom of challenging to pin drinking or pin nicking. 
Thus a peg tankard held two quarts and had eight 
pegs—a half-a-pint between each peg, and each per¬ 
son under challenge had to drink a peg measure or 
more, as the case might be. That this peg drinking 
was not confined to the laity is clear from the fact 
that in the reign of Henry the First in 1102, St. 
Anselm, in his canons, decreed at Westminster, “That 
priests go not to drinking bouts nor drink to pegs.” 

The Loss of the White Ship.— In this reign a very 
melancholy circumstance happened through intempe¬ 
rance. King Henry had an only son, a youth of great 
promise. This son, William by name, was returning 
from Normandy to England in a vessel called the 
White Ship. By his command three casks of wine 
were given to the ship’s crew, who drank to intoxica¬ 
tion, until they were unable to manage the vessel. 
F'itzstephen, the captain of the boat, was hastening to 
overtake the rest of the fleet ahead of him, when the 


vessel struck upon a rock. The prince, with his 
sister and some nobles, were escaping in a boat, but 
crowds jumped in, and it sank, and all, numbering 
forty of the nobility, and about two hundred and sixty 
attendants and crew, perished! Only one man, a 
butcher of Rouen, escaped to tell the sad tale. 

French Wine and British Beer.— The story of 
Ralph Flambard, Bishop of Durham, shows how rife 
drinking was during the Norman period. He was 
imprisoned in the Tower of London, from which he 
escaped by a clever stratagem. Stores of wine were 
regularly supplied for the Bishop’s use, and one day a 
cask was sent into the prison by a friend, filled, not 
with wine, but with a coil of stout rope. The wily 
bishop plied the jailors with wine till they were 
drunk and incapable, and then, by means of the rope, 
made good his escape. 

Henry II., by his marriage with Eleanor of 
Aquitaine, brought about a trade in the wines of 
Bordeaux; and we are told that when Thomas a 
Becket was sent to France to arrange for a royal 
wedding, two of his waggons were laden with beer 
in iron-bound casks, for presents to the French. 
Thus English intoxicating drink became known 
across the Channel. 

Drunken Crusaders. —It is recorded of Richard I., 
who met his death by the arrow which struck him 
at the siege of Chaluz, that his intemperance helped 
to inflame the wound, which was dressed by an un¬ 
skilful surgeon. The chronicler of the acts of 
Richard I., speaking of the drinking habits of the 
Crusaders, records the “remarkable custom of the 
English,” who “at the notes of clarions or the 
clanging of the trumpet or horn, applied them¬ 
selves with due devotion to drain the goblets to the 
dregs.” The chronicler further says, “the band of 
the Lord fell upon these enervated soldiers,” who 
“ consumed three times as much bread, and a hundred 
times as much wine,” as the people of some other 
nations. 

Wine Duties and Ale Feasts. —In the reign of 
King John we have the earliest laws on the foreign 
wine trade ; and we learn that the king claimed out 
of every ship’s cargo of wine “one tun before the 
mast and one behind it.” By the introduction of 
these wines, says a historian of the times “the land 
was filled with drink and drinkers.” King John’s 
death was brought about by a surfeit of peaches and 
new ale—or cider. D’Aubigne says that he died of 
drunkenness and fright. 

Merrymakings called Easter ales, Whitsun ales, 
Midsummer ales, Church ales, Bride ales, Weddyn 
ales, and Scot ales—where ale was the predominant 
drink—were characteristic of the Plantagenet period. 
The Scot ales were gatherings at which the company 
paid their share, or Scot of the drinking expenses. 

The Poet’s Wine Pitcher 1 .— The story of drink in 
feudal times would not be complete without a refer¬ 
ence to the great poet who wrote the “Canterbury 
Tales,” and who tells us therein much about taverns 
and drinking customs. Chaucer, who was the son of 
a wine merchant, won the patronage of Edward the 
Third, and was made controller of wine and wool in 
the Port of London, receiving a pitcher of wine daily 
lrom the royal table. It is interesting to find, how¬ 
ever, that even in those times, there were good water 
drinkers, for in Chaucer’s “ Rime of Sir Thopas,” we 
learn that Sire Thopas 

“ Himself drank water of the well 
As did the Knight Sire Percivell. ’ 

Publicans’ Licences in Feudal Times. —Drink 
shops had already become such a public nuisance, 
that in the reign of Edward III. publicans were 
subject to special restrictions, and, unlike other 
traders, were compelled to put up a sign under 
penalty of the “ forfeiture of their ale.” In this 
reign only three taverns were allowed for the whole 
of London. Licences were taken away, as they should 
be now, whenever ihe interests of the public required 
it, and this without compensation. The taking away 
of a publican’s licence was accompanied by the 
removal of his sign. 






THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


IOI 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series IV. 


BIBLE=CLASS TALKS. 

By the Rev. David Heath, of Derby. 


No. 4.-LIVING WATER. 

(Read Ezekiel xxxi. 4 — q; John iv. 15 ; Revelation xxii. 77.) 


Water. 

E speak the praise of water, and sing, “ Give 
me a draught from the crystal spring.” It is 
God’s great gift, and the universal need of all 
living things—water, bright water, both 
beautiful and bountiful. One of the figures 
by which Jesus Christ, our Great Teacher, sets forth 
the joy and plentifulness and constancy of the 
blessings of His Gospel, is—“A well of water springing 
up into eternal life.” 

We are told that seven-eighths of the human body 
consist of water—that is to say, if a boy weighs eight 
stones, seven of them are water. Eight stones is a 
hundred and twelve pounds weight, ninety-eight of 
which are water and fourteen solid substances. So 
we need a good deal of water to keep us alive day by 
day ; and nature provides us with the supply in a 
variety of ways—we breathe it and drink it, and in our 
so-called solid foods, even “ dry bread,” there is a 
large proportion of water. 

A Necessity. 

All living things find water an absolute necessity. 
“A fish out of water” is a wretched and expiring 
creature. But the land creatures are nearly as 
dependent upon it as the fish. Your beautiful plant 
bearing its fragrant rose will soon wither without 
water. The crops in the fields and gardens would 
never grow to perfection without water. The insect 
finds the juicy nectar that it loves. The lark and 
throstle and nightingale must moisten their little 
throats if they are to keep on singing. The horse, 
the ox, the cow, the sheep, the dog, and all other 
tamed creatures, are water drinkers, and would soon 
die if they could not have water to quench their thirst. 
And the wildest and strongest and swiftest animals, 
the elephant, the lion, the tiger, the shy little mole, 
and the impudent little mouse refresh themselves at 
the brook—or somewhere. 

Living Water. 

The water must be living water to do the good that 
is needed. Stagnant, putrid water would soon spread 
disease and death everywhere. So by its constant 
movement water becomes fit for vital service. The 
order of its movement is wonderful, but it is in that 
way it renews its freshness and continues its whole¬ 
some ministry. As soon as it ceases to move it ceases 
to live. The ceaseless tidal movement of the Sea; 
the gathering together of the misty particles from 
Sea and Land, forming Clouds, that are carried 
hither and thither by the wind ; the falling rain and 
snow and hail; the flowing brooks and rivers; the 
little and big Niagaras that are found in all the hill 
regions of the world, the unchangeable law of its owu 
nature to flow downward and onward until it finds its 
way again into the great sea—all this is the marvellous 
process by which water cleans and renews the world, 
and is itself cleaned and renewed. 

A Dew=Drop’s Career. 

What a charming little story it would make if the 
history of a tiny particle of dew could be traced from 
the moment the sun kissed it from the sea until the 
moment it again crossed the bar of the river and was 
iu the vast ocean once more. One wonders how many 
times since the world began that wee liquid gem has 
taken that journey ; and one wonders still more how 
many thiugs iu God’s great world it has helped to do 
in its course from sea to sea. It could not do much 
of itself, and all the particles might say the same; 


but together they each and all help to keep all living 
things alive. 

“ The sun may raise the grass to life, 

The dew the drooping flower ; 

And eyes grow bright and watch the light 
Of autumn’s opening hour ; 

But words that breathe of tenderness, 

And smiles we know are true, 

Are warmer than the summer time, 

And brighter than the dew. 

Gentle words ! Loving smiles ! 

How beautiful are gentle words and loving smiles.” 

What is Water? 

Analysts tell us that water is composed of hydrogen 
and oxygen in the proportion of two parts to one 
(H s O). By an electric shock these elements may be 
separately' collected in phials or bottles. And, again, 
by an electric shock the two gases mav again be 
united as a liquid. Hydrogen is the lightest of 
the gases, yet it is an important constituent of the 
tissues of both animals and plants. Oxygen gas is, 
indeed, the vital element of the air we breathe. We 
breathe most of it in cold weather, on hills and 
mountains. People go to the country and seaside to 
breathe, as they say, the ozone, without knowing 
what ozone is ; we are now told that it is an unique 
thing in nature, being nothing more than oxygen, 
the atoms of which unite (three atoms forming one 
molecule), and tbus become wonderful ozone, that 
pale-faced people from the factories and warehouses 
expect to enrich their blood, and give colour to their 
cheeks in a brief holiday of a few days. 

We, therefore, drink oxygen and hydrogen as well 
as breathe them; and so we can understand better 
why water should be so precious in its uses as a life 
sustainer. Drinkers of the old time used to say that 
beer was both meat and drink; the saying is truer of 
water, since the water has no alcohol in it—an 
element that destroys the value of water when it is 
mixed with it, and turns a wholesome beverage into 
an injurious and destructive drink. 

Plentiful Water. 

A great duty of all local governing bodies, like 
Town Councils, is to bring a plentiful supply of good 
water within easy reach of all the people. The health 
of the community largely depends upon it. And the 
people should use it, not wastefully, but still 
copiously, for all cleansing purposes. For drinking 
purposes there is, after all, nothing to beat a draught 
of fresh water. 

It has been said that we should die of thirst sooner 
than of hunger. May we die of neither, but have the 
promise to the righteous fulfilled in our life—“ He that 
walketh righteously and speaketh uprightly ... he 
shall dwell on high ; his place of defence shall be the 
munitions of rocks; his bread shall be given him; 
his waters shall be sure ” (Isaiah xxxii. 15, 16). And 
may all our young people get so much true knowledge 
into their minds and goodness into their hearts, 
that Christ’s words shall be true of them, having in 
themselves the well of water springing up into 
eternal life—an inner spring of life and gladness and 
serviceableness which shall never fail-them. 


A JSloFth Coantpee Programme. 


HERE is a programme issued by the South .Shields 
Committee for the Band of Hope for the first quarter 
in 1904 : — 

Jan. 4.—Temperance Catechism. 

,, 11.—“ Chalk Talks ” on the Blackboard. 

,, 18.—Foods and their Uses. 

,, 25.—Intoxicating Liquors as Foods. 

Feb. 1.— x Lantern Night. 

,, 8.—Temperance Catechism. 

,, 15.—Effect of Alcohol on Foods. 

,, 22.—Visit of Representative of Band of Hope Union. 

,, 29.—Do Intoxicating Liquors Give Strength ? 

Mar. 7.—*Lantern Night. 

,, 14.—Temperance Catechism. 

,, 21.—“Chalk Talks” on the Blackboard. 

,, 28.—The Fiery Giant, and How to Kill him. 

* Admission on Lantern Nights, id. ; Adults 2d. 










102 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series VII. 

TALKS ON SMOKING. 

By J. Cadwaeeader, Birmingham. 

No. 3.—SELF OR DUTY. 


W E lake for our subject to-night two words, each 
containing but four letters, so that they will 
neither be hard nor difficult to remember. 
The first is one which no boy or girl here will 
be able to get away from as long as he or she 
remains in this world; it is the little word 

Self. 

Some of you think you know something about it. 

I hope you do. The more you know, the more 
interesting will be our little talk together. Now, Mr. 
Self, let us hear what you have to say that will be 
for our good, and enable us to grow up good and 
noble men and women. Can we, as boys and girls, 
learn to become such ? 

“Y r ou can,” says Mr. Self. “ But how ? ” we ask. 
Will you please add to that little word Self another 
word of four letters, viz., 

Duty? 

What is my duty to myself? (1) It is to obey 
the laws of God. The first I wish you particularly to 
notice is the law of Health. If we are ill we impose 
a weary task upon our friends, and unfit ourselves for 
the doing of our duty both to ourselves and friends. 
It is astonishing how a little care keeps us in health, 
and a little folly will make us ill. 

Mind Injured. 

We have seen, in our former talks, how smoking 
injures the sight, shortens the breath, &c. Now 
I want to show you that the mind is injured by 7 
tobacco smoking. That means that our best self 
is less fitted for the race of life by its use. I will not 
tire you with figures, knowing how very dry and 
uninteresting they seem to be; but will say here 
that tests have been made in various schools and 
Universities, both in our own country and (more so) 
in America, on smokers and non-smokers. In these 
tests it has been clearly shown that the smokers show 
a lower average scholarship. 

Bad Mentally and Morally. 

For instance, out of 20 boys who were smokers, 
18 were of bad mental condition; only one of the 
20 non-smokers came under this heading. Then, 
again, 14 of the 20 smokers were of bad moral 
condition, and not one out of the 20 non-smokers 
had that bad character. 

Bad Memory. 

Then notice next that 12 of the smokers had poor 
memories, and only one of the non-smokers had a 
bad memory. These boys were taken out of our great 
public schools; the 20 non-smokers were chosen by 
ballot, so that there should be no favouritism ; while 
the smokers were taken from among those who were 
known to be addicted to the cigarette habit. Now, 
boys, if these things be true—and we have no reason 
to doubt their truth—do they not show us that 
mentally and morally we are better without the weed 
than with it? Of course we are. 

Irritability. 

Again, smokers and others tell us that it makes 
them less irritable—that it “soothes” them. Let us 
look at it for a minute. 

Let us take a young man working in a shop, who, 
if he is debarred from his pipe for a couple of hours, 
bt comes sulky and careless, and then refuses to do 
his work properly. His master calls a halt, and 


allows him to go outside the workshop for a few 
minutes; out comes the cigarette, and he puffs at it 
as though his life depended upon it. He goes back 
to his work smiling. Is it the tobacco that has 
worked the wonder? No; for there are others at 
work in the same shop who are not smokers doing 
the same kind of work, and doing it through the day 
cheerfully and well; while he whose temper ought 
to be sweeter if tobacco soothes us has shown such 
a bad spirit; he became as ill-tempered as a monkey 
disappointed of a nut. Why ? For the reason that 
the habit has so much power over him that he 
cannot deny himself of it even for a short time. No, 
boys, it is not smoking that makes one less irritable, 
but in this case (which is not imaginary) the tobacco 
that has so destroyed the nerve centres that, without 
its indulgence, the craving becomes so great that bad 
temper and irritability are caused. 

Self=Reverence. 

(2) My duty to myself is self-reverence, or self- 
respect. Now, boys, how can one have that reverence 
for oneself one ought to have when indulging in the 
use of a weed, which, whatever pleasure it may give 
to one, is a constant nuisance to some, at any rate, of 
those around ? How can one rise step by step to the 
higher ideals, which, in every rank and every con¬ 
dition in life, give us gifted natures, which guide the 
world to higher things, and so help to form noble 
men and noble women ? 

Sir Philip Sydney. 

Sir Philip Sydney, dying on the field of Zutphen, 
handed over the cup of water to a wounded soldier, 
because his soul, nourished on noble thoughts, had led 
him to conceive an ideal of a perfect life. Shall we, 
imitating his example, not give up such a selfish 
habit as that of smoking ? 

Self=ControI. 

Again, we would not forget another duty we owe 
to self—that of self-control, which will enable us 
to refrain from selfish indulgence, either in the 
use of tobacco or other narcotics, will help us to 
control our passions, restrain our tempers, and so 
become the boys and girls the twentieth century 
needs. It is certain that the use of tobacco will not 
help us in this duty. Let us remember that life is 
beset by so many temptations that both boys and 
girls of to-day need to have a keen sense of right and 
wrong, with their minds ever on the alert, with none 
of the senses with which we are endowed blunted or 
injured by the use of the cigarette, cigar, or pipe. 

Now, boys, I have tried to show you our duty to 
ourselves. Shall we try and follow in this course, or 
shall we, yielding to our selfish desires, live only 
for our selfish gratification, be classed among the 
commonplace folk of every-day life ; or living in the 
constant remembrance that “ the lives of great men 
oft remind us, we may make our lives sublime,” and, 
in dying, leave behind us “ footprints 011 the sands of 
time ” ? 


A Saxon Legacy Lasting to Modern Times.— 
The Saxon and the Norman races have now merged 
into one, and we are proud of the name of English¬ 
men ; but much of the intemperance of our Saxon 
forefathers still lingers with us, as well as many of 
their absurd drinking customs at births, christenings, 
weddings, funerals, and feasts. Against this drinking 
and these old bad customs we who are Band of Hope 
boys and girls are pledged to fight, just as “Beowulf,” 
the Saxon champion, was pledged, as the poet tells 
us, to fight the monster Grendel. This monstei came 
by night to the hall of King Hrothgar—the hall of 
wine and feasting—in order to ravage and destroy, 
and, being met by Beowulf, after a terrible fight 
received his death-wound. Let us, in our warfare 
against alcohol, show like strength and courage, so 
that this evil monster, the bane of Auglo-Saxon times, 
and the curse of our own, may be finally overcome. 







THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


103 


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3. How blessed the nation whose people we see 

In virtue and Temperance abiding ; 

From fetters of vice and of passion set free ; 

Their children to God ever guiding ! 

4. Give me, Lord, that life with its noble ideal ; 

My home keep from Drink’s desolation ; 

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104 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


UNITED KINGDOM BAND OF HOPE UNION. 

President— Sir GEORGE WILLIAMS. 
Vice-Presidents. 


The Archbishop of Dublin. 
The Bishop of Chichester. 
The Bishop of London. 

The Bishop of St. Albans. 

The Bishop of Stepney. 

Rev. Canon Barker, M.A. 
Lady Biddulph. 

George Cadbury, Esq. 

Mrs. W. S. Caine. 

The Earl of Carlisle. 

The Countess of Carlisi.f. 
Rev. J. Clifford, M.A., LL.D. 
Richard Cory, Esq., J.P. 

T. A. Cotton, Esq., J.P.,C.C 
Jamps Edmunds, Esq., M.D. 


Rev. Canon Fleming, B.D. 

The Dean of Hereford. 

Rev. R. F. Horton, M.A..D.D. 
Sir W. Lawson, Bart., M.P. 

Sir George Livesey, C.E. 

Rev. F. B. Meyer, B.A. 
Alderman F. Priestman, J.P. 
Frederic Smith, Esq. 

Lady Henry Somerset. 

Miss Agnes Weston. 

George White, Esq., M.P. 

The Venerable Archdeacon 
WlLBERFORCE, D.D. 

Mrs. H. J. Wilson. 

The Hon. Mrs. Eliot Yorke. 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 
Chairman— Lionel Mundy. 
Vice-Chairman— T. E. Hallsworth, Manchester. 
Treasurer —John Thomas, J.P. 

London Members. 


Mrs. W. S. Caine. 

Wiliiam Bingham. 

Rev. F. Storer Clark, M.A. 
Charles W. Garrard. 

G. S. Lucraft. 


J. I. Morrell. 

A. Newton. 

Sir Thomas Pile, Bart., D.L. 
Walter N. Rook, LL.B. 
Edward Wood, J.P. 


Provincial ALembers. 


William E. Bell, Newcastle. 
A. A. Bryan, Cardiff. 

Howard F. Chaplin, Cambs. 
George T. Cooke, Bristol. 

E. J. Day, Harrogate. 

Miss Docwra, Kelvedon, Essex. 
Rev. David Heath, Derby. 

J. A. Herrick, Birmingham. 


Henry Holloway, J.P ..Surrey- 
R. Murray Hyslop, Kent. 

R. A. Pott, Manchester. 

Rev. J. Thornley, Sheffield. 

C. J. Whitehead, Sheffield. 
William Wilkinson, Beljast. 
John Wills, F.S.Sc., Derby. 
The Hon. Mrs. Eliot Yorke. 


Secretary— Charles Wakelv. 

Trade Manager —Judson Bonner. 

General Lecturers. 

Frank Adkins. Walter N. Edwards, F.C.S. 

School Lecturers. 

Joseph Addison, Nthln Counties I G. Avery Roff, S'th'n Counties. 
John Burgess, F.C.S., London. I W.T. Stanton, Midlands. 

R. Prys-Jones, Wales. 


Offices : 59 and 60, Old Bailey, London, E.C. 
Bankers: London, City & Midland Bank, Ludgate Hill, 
London, E.C. 


the; 

$ ant* c*f 

JULY, 1904 . 


The Band of Hope Union, as a 
The non-political body, seldom takes 

licensing any very active part in Parlia- 
J 3 ill. mentary matters. But a standing 

Committee exists for the purpose 
of taking cognizance, and action if necessary, 
with regard to any legislative proposals affect¬ 
ing children which may be before the country. 
It was by the action of this Committee that 
the Children’s Bill was introduced, which 
subsequently became the law of the land. 
This Committee has carefully considered the 
Government Licensing Bill, and has unani¬ 
mously come to the conclusion that, should it 
become law, it would place very serious 
impediments in the way of reducing the 
number of licensed houses, and as such a 
reduction is imperatively needed in the inte¬ 
rests of the coming as well as of the present 


generation, the Committee recommend that 
the measure should be strenuously opposed. 


In accordance with the above 
Resolutions, recommendation, resolutions hos¬ 
tile to the Bill were passed at 
the Annual Council Meeting and the Annual 
Public Meeting of the Union, and forwarded 
to members of the Government, leaders of 
the Opposition, the local M.P., and the public 
Press. 


The Union was represented on 
Hyde Park the committee which arranged 
Demonstra- for the great Demonstration 
tion. against the Bill in Hyde Park on 
Saturday, June 25, and which is 
in progress whilst we go to press. A circular 
was issued to all Metropolitan Societies 
inviting the committee and adult workers and 
friends to join the procession and demonstra¬ 
tion, and a special request sent to the secre¬ 
taries of all Metropolitan senior Bands of 
Hope to form marching parties of members 
over sixteen years of age, to join the pro¬ 
cession on the Victoria Embankment, on 
which a special station, No. 6, opposite the 
Temple Pier had been assigned to promoters 
of the juvenile Temperance propaganda. It 
was recommended that Committees, workers, 
friends, and marching parties, should join the 
local contingent, if any, and thus reach the 
general rendezvous in procession. The Union 
and its allies thus make their influence felt 
at this crisis in the legislative history of the 
movement. 

It is to be feared that the 
Open-Air, possibilities and advantages of 
Sand, open-air work are not always 
and Beach adequately realised by workers 
Missions, in the Baud of Hope. A break 
in the continuity of the meetings 
is, from every point of view, a grave dis¬ 
advantage, and the expedient of avoiding it 
by means of open-air gatherings deserves the 
very best consideration of the friends and 
workers of the movement. Efforts in this 
direction are undertaken by some Unions, 
chiefly in the provinces, and there is no 
reison why the experiment should not be 
tried by every Union in the kingdom. 
Unions in seaside resorts might very well hold 
Sand and Beach Missions, and to such Unions 
may be commended the successful efforts of 
the Kent Band of Hope Union. Meetings 
have been held almost continuously during 
the prime of the summer months on the sands 
at Margate and other Kentish watering places. 
The gatherings have been of an educational 
character, and so well illustrated as to attract 
a large number of young people and their 
friends. P'urther information as to methods 
was given in our October issue of last year, 
and this would be willingly supplemented by 
the secretary of the Kent Band of Hope 
Union, Mr. Charles Harvey, 44, Strood Hill, 
Rochester. 














THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


105 


Editorial Mems. 


F are glad to notice that in the Juvenile 
Rechabite, the organ of the Temperance 
Benefit Society for young people, there 
is a cordial recommendation from the head 
official that every Juvenile Tent should be 
affiliated with the local Baud of Hope Union. 
Of course ; for we are all one in this great 
Temperance army, and we will help one 
another all we can. 


The same number contains a very kindly 
paragraph about the “ good, solid, fruit-bear¬ 
ing work” of the Band of Hope Union, and 
says that our Annual Report (of which we 
give an abstract in another column) should 
encourage all who are interested in young 
life. 


We are glad to see that our columns are 
read in all parts of the world. A Chinese 
paper, published at Shanghai, recently 
reprinted from our pages Mr. Fred. Topham’s 
outline address on “The Messengers.” A 
Swiss publication, L'Ancre, the organ of the 
Swiss Band of Hope, has published transla¬ 
tions of some of the outline addresses by Mr. 
Wakely and the Rev. David Heath, for use 
among French and Swiss children. When 
one casts a stone into a lake, it is impossible 
to tell where its influence will end. 


These papers all quote the source whence 
this interesting matter is obtained—the Band 
of Hope Chronicle. But one Fnglish publi¬ 
cation, which used large quantities of our 
original contributions recently, quite forgot to 
acknowledge to whom its editor was indebted. 
Perhaps he will take this friendly hint next 
time. 


A Fetter in another column from our good 
friend Mr. Fielden Thorp, reports progress 
among young students in Germany. To preach 
total abstinence in the Fatherland is a task 
which might well daunt a brave man ; but, 
headed by the gallant son of the courageous 
Dr. Forel, of Zurich, the work is steadily 
going on—and slowly spreading from town to 
town. 


We have not been able to note details of 
any of the anniversaries of the many and 
varied Temperance organisations that now 
exist, but we record with pleasure the fact that 
they all seem to be making progress. A more 
hopeful tone prevailed this year than last— 
the flagrant Ficensing Bill notwithstanding. 

Is gambling closely allied to drinking? 
Evidence, given by those who have closely 
studied the matter, supports the idea ; and the 
War Cry of June 4 endorsed it, after personal 
inspection, in these words:—“ Epsom Race¬ 
course on Derby Day is but a huge public 


house about two miles in length, aided by 
betting stands that cater for the gambling 
hordes that assemble there from mansions 
and slums.” 


There may possibly be exceptions to this, 
but, if so, the exceptions prove the rule. The 
whole atmosphere is saturated with pagan 
devotion to the Goddess of Chance. Any¬ 
thing we can do to save our boys from this 
danger should be done. Penniless boys, 
hundreds of miles from Fondon, have hidden 
themselves under the seats of trains lately in 
order to see the scenes of excitement which 
they had been told a Derby Day affords. 
“ Improvement of horses ! ” is the cry, indeed ; 
it is “ the inveiglement of flats ” ; it is the 
ruin of thousands! 


Some of the Fondon papers 011 June 13 
showed that Temperance workers among the 
young are keenly alert at the present time. 
In one column was an article headed 
“ Juvenile Teetotalers,” telling of the children 
in the Fondon parks. In the next column 
between 20 and 30 lines were devoted to the 
Silver Jubilee meeting of the Young Ab¬ 
stainers’ Union, held at the Mansion House, 
under the chairmanship of Aid. Vezey Strong. 
On another page was nearly half a column 
headed “The Band of Hope Army.” All this 
is excellent. It reminds us of the old French 
motto carried by the children during the 
Reign of Terror : — 

“ Tremble, Tyrants ! 

We are growing up.” 

The same paper showed that Adult Tempe¬ 
rance workers are also increasing their energy 
in face of the foe we and they have to fight.” 


It is interesting to note that the Bishop of 
Fondon has become President of the West 
Fondon Band of Hope LTnion, in succession 
to Canon Fleming, who has already served it 
so well. We note, too, that His Fordsh'p has 
lent his beautiful grounds at Fulham Palace 
for the Bank Holiday Fete of this Union on 
August 1. 


When young Franz Vecsey. the eleven- 
year-old violinist, played before Queen 
Alexandra a week or two ago, the Archduke 
Frederick of Austria asked if he would like 
some champagne, and he said he was not 
allowed to have it. “ Of course not,” said the 
Queen ; “ Come with me, Franz, and I will 
give you some oranges,” and as she said so 
the wise Queen handed him an orange. We 
should like the boy to know that oranges are 
far better than champagne. 


She : “ These potatoes are so rotten, even the pigs 
won’t eat them.” 

He : “ Never mind, thej’h do for making whiskj'.” 















io6 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Annual f^epofrt. 


T HE Report presented at the annual meeting of 
the United Kingdom Baud of Hope Union has 
been printed, and occupies twenty-eight pages, 
in addition to statements of the accounts and 
lists of subscribers. From it we cull the more salient 
paragraphs:— 

The Committee thankfully report another year of 
successful work in the interests of Temperance and 
the young. 

The: Statistics of the Movement. 

In a movement so widespread, and with such 
diversities of development as the Band of Hope and 
its kindred institutions, the difficulties in the way of 
obtaining exact statistical information are very con¬ 
siderable. 

The strength of the Juvenile Temperance Move¬ 
ment, as estimated, stands at 340 Baud of Hope 
Unions, 29,189 societies, and 3,363,973 members, an 
increase of one Union, 682 societies, and 33,743 mem¬ 
bers on the returns of the preceding year. 

Organisation of the Movement. 

The records of the Parent Society show: 4 National 
Band of Hope Union®, 31 County Baud of Hope 
Unions, 301 Town and District Band of Hope Unions, 
4 Denominational Band of Hope Unions. A total of 
340—as stated before. 

During the past year the Committee, conjointly 
with the Leicestershire Band of Hope Union, made 
arrangements for the addition of Rutland to its area 
of operations. A large number of workers were 
visited and interviewed 011 behalf of the Committee 
by Mr. Frank Adkins; a conference was held and 
the proposed extension agreed to. Similar work was 
also carried out in the Counties of Hereford and 
Huntingdon and in the Island of Jersey. The South 
Bucks and East Berks Union also decided to extend 
its operations throughout both the Counties 
mentioned in its title. Thus the areas still without 
the advantage of Unions are steadily decreasing, and 
the Band of Hope Movement bids fair, in the early 
future, to completely cover the country with a net¬ 
work of juvenile Temperance effort. 

Lectures, Conferences and Meetings. 

The public advocacy of the Movement has been 
zealously promoted by the Committee. The lecturers 
of the Union have been fully engaged, and the 
honorary services of a goodly number of other earnest 
friends have been utilised. Amongst others, the 
Committee feel that special thanks are due to the 
Bishop of Winchester, Canon Barker, Canon Fleming, 
Canon Horsley, Rev. Arthur Hall, Rev. D. G. Cowan, 
Rev. Walter Hobbs, Rev. M. Lansdown, Rev. R. 
Harris Lloyd, Rev. A. J. Palmer, Rev. G. Ernest 
Thorn, Rev. H. Russell Wakefield, Rev. W. Pedr 
Williams, Sir John McDougall, Sir Wilfrid Lawson, 
Captain R. Rigg, M.P., Dr. T. N. Kel} nack, Dr. V. H. 
Rutherford, Dr. G. Sims Woodhead, Mr. William 
Bingham, Mr. Henry Holloway, J.P., Mr. Lionel 
Mundy, Mr. Lewis Paton, M.A., Mr. Frederic Smith, 
Mr. Tomlinson, M.P., Mr. C. J. Whitehead, Mr. T. P. 
Whittaker, M.P., Mr. II. Wells Smith, Hon. Mrs. 
Eliot Yorke, Miss Violette Byse (of Lausanne), Mrs. 
T. A. Cotton, Mrs. Harrison Lee, and Mrs. Burnett 
Smith (“ Annie Swan ”). The Union did direct work 
in thirty distinct counties at least. 

The Schooi, Scheme: is described in a special report, 
of which we propose to give an abstract in our next 
issue. 

Work in Vieeages. 

The important work of safeguarding the children 
resident in villages and rural districts again yielded 
excellent results. The lecturer, Mr. Frank Adkins, 
visited the Counties of Bedford, Berks, Bucks, Cam¬ 
bridge, Devon, Dorset, Glamorgan, Gloucester, 
Hereford, Huntingdon, Lincoln, Somerset, Wilts, and 
the Island of Jersey. 

The plan of proceeding included a visit to the 
village school, and to such schools in neighbouring 


villages as time permitted, and in the evening the 
free delivery of a lecture, illustrated by limelight 
views. 

Places visited, 124; engagements fulfilled, 278; total 
attendance, 31,542. Other and more general meetings, 
apart from village work, addressed by Mr. Adkius, 
numbered 73, with an attendance of 7,842, making 
his full return for the year, 351 meetings, with 39,384 
juveniles and adults in attendance. 

Special Scientific Lectures. 

Mr. Walter N. Edwards, F.C.S., continued during 
the year his valuable scientific and educational 
lectures to workers and others. An organised .Science 
Class, extending over eight weeks, was held at Green¬ 
wich, and for the tenth year in succession a class of 
eight weeks’ duration was held by the Reading 
Temperance Societv. Mr. Edwards also conducted 
shorter courses at Whitby, Chelmsford, Birmingham, 
Lincoln, Sheffield, and in London, for the Committee 
of the Homes for Working Girls. 

Mr. Edwards also attended special conferences aud 
meetings for workers in many parts of the kingdom. 

Altogether, Mr. Edwards fulfilled 147 engagements, 
besides the onerous duties devolving upon him at the 
headquarters of the LTnion. 

The Movement in London. 

The movement in the Metropolis has been well 
maintained, and the number of societies shows an 
increase. This work is under the charge of a Sub- 
Committee, upon which each of the Metropolitan 
Band of Hope Unions is represented. 

A very encouraging New Year’s Meeting of London 
workers was held in Exeter Hall, in the month of 
January, and the Collectors’ Annual Soiree in the 
same building met with the usual success. 

The interests of the children in Poor Law Schools 
and in various public institutions again engaged the 
attention of the Committee. 


Evening Agents. 


Name of Agent. 

Meetings 

Attended. 

No. of Persons 
present. 

Mr. A. Allen . 

100 

9,334 

Mr. |ohn Burgess, F.C.S. 

203 

18,270 

Mr. I ames H. Cannell.. 

196 

19,671 

Miss S. R. Carr .. 

123 

9,200 

Mr. W. G. Colbert 

IOI 

10,654 

Mr. W. A. Cordrey 

70 

5> 8, 4 

Mr. Frank C. Dennett 

156 

12,989 

Mr. John FRiwards 

77 

6,178 

Mr. W. J. Evans 

337 

12,025 

Mr. H. S. Gare. 

89 

6,849 

Mr. M. Kingham . . 

61 

5 > 43 1 

Mr. Thomas Menzies .. 

134 

12,926 

Mr. E. G. Rose. 

115 

9,385 

Mr. G. Hawkins .. 

98 

8,524 

Occasional Agents 

531 

39,607 

Total .. 

2,191 

186,857 


The Metropolitan Unions. 

The Movement in the Metropolis is well organised 
in fourteen Unions, with a membership of 1,411 
societies. 

Illustrated Lectures and Addresses. 

The Committee again devoted special attention to 
the supply of appliances by means of which Bind of 
Hope speakers and lecturers could impart instruction 
by means of the eye as well as by the ear. 

Somewhat similar in character to the lantern slides 
are the Panoramas of the LTnion, which, with the 
services of skilled lecturers were placed at the 
disposal of societies. 

Other appliances, for use by representatives of the 
LTnion, include wall pictures, charts, and diagrams, 
analyses of foods and drinks, aud apparatus far per¬ 
forming simple and instructive experiments. 

Trading Department. 

Active operations were maintained in this important 
department of the LTnion’s work. The needs of the 
movement were carefully studied, aud special efforts 













THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


107 


made to provide publications and appliances calcu¬ 
lated to promote efficient teaching. 

A number of new publications were introduced, 
which are likely to be of considerable benefit to the 
movement. 

Special efforts were made with a view to en¬ 
couraging local Unions and individual Bands of Hope 
to promote competitive examinations of the young 
people. Full instructions how to proceed were given 
in a pamphlet by the Secretary, on “ How to work 
Competitive Examinations.” The series of Text 
Books already issued, was increased by four booklets 
to sell at one halfpenny each, dealing with the 
foundation principles of the Temperance movement 
in simple and concise language. These were: “Alcohol 
and Health,” by W. N. Edwards, F.C.S.; “Alcohol 
and Thrift,” by Charles Wakely; “Foods and Drinks,” 
by Judson Bonner; and “The Bible and Strong 
Drink,” by Rev. John Macdonald, M.A. 

Arrangements were made for setting questions on 
the various Text Books, also for supplying the requisite 
forms and materials for working the Examinations, 
and Certificates of Merit. 

The New Year’s Motto Card proved one of the 
most popular ever published, the edition being 
quickly sold out. Three Button Badges—distinctive 
signs and rewards of punctuality and regularity— 
proved useful. 

Arrangements were made with the Sunday School 
Union for the joint issue of a little book by Mr. W. N. 
Edwards, F.C.S., entitled “ How to be Well and 
Strong: the Boys’ Book of Health.” It gives sound 
Temperance instruction. 

The needs of speakers were further met by the 
introduction of a valuable set of anatomical models, 
showing the effects of alcohol on the heart, the liver, 
and the kidneys. 

The supply of Lantern Slides and Apparatus con¬ 
stituted a large and important section of the Trading 
Department’s work. 

The number of the Society’s own publications 
disposed of amounted to no fewer than 896,359, 
besides large commission sales of other publishers’ 
productions. The receipts amounted to ,£4,309 13s. 6d. 

The “ Band of Hope ChroniceE.” 

The monthly'organ of the Union, the Band of 1 
Hope Chronicee, maintains its useful character. 
Long experience has enabled the Editor to provide 
exactly the matter required by Band of Hope workers. 

So highly is the Chronicee esteemed that various 
local Unions arrange for its gratuitous distribution 
amongst their workers, and many copies find their 
way to foreign countries, to India, and the Colonies. 

The “ Band of Hope Review.” 

The continued success of the periodical proves how 
well it suits the taste of its young readers. 

Many societies localise it for their own purposes, 
filling up blank pages of the wrapper, partly with 
their own society news and announcements, and 
partly with advertisements which help considerably 
10 defray the cost. 

Work Abroad. 

Every effort was made to develop friendly and 
helpful relations with workers in other parts of the 
globe. 

The Ninth International Anti-Alcohol Congress 
was held in Bremen during Easter week, 1903. It 
was under the patronage of the German Government, 
and several European Governments were represented, 
whilst delegates were present from most of the 
countries of Europe. The Union was represented by 
the Secretary and Trade Manager. 

Mr. Wakely contributed a paper on “Education 
in the School and Band of Hope as a means of 
Combating Intemperance,” and took part in the 
discussions. 

The following list of places to which packets and 
letters were sent will show the universality of the 
Union’s operations :—Austria, Belgium, Denmark, 
France, Germany, Switzerland, Finland, Norway, 


Sweden, Holland, Canada, Newfoundland, Gibraltar, 
Western Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, Bermuda, 
Florida, Buenos Ayres, Cape Colony, Transvaal, 
Orange River Colony, West Africa, Egypt, Chili, 
Ceylon, Rangoon, Lahore, Dehra Dun, Madras, and 
Japan. 

It is interesting to note that the facilities offered 
by the Trading Department are considerably made 
use of by various Missionary enterprises throughout 
the world. Thus diagrams, slides, and apparatus were 
supplied for use amongst the soldiers at Gibraltar 
and in India, and the sailors in Scandinavia; to the 
missionaries in the New Hebrides ; to the American 
Mission in Japan ; and to the same Society’s Training 
College at Assiiit, Egypt, where nearly 600 young 
natives are being trained as teachers for the 200 
schools of Egypt. Large consignments of lanterns 
and slides were forwarded for use by the school 
teachers in Finland. Banners and badges were made 
for use at the Cape, and several parcels of various 
requisites went to various places on the West Coast 
of Africa. 

The Annuae and Autitmnae Conferences 
were referred to in detail. 

The Union’s Lending Library. 

Good use was again made of theTemperance Lending 
Library, collected and maintained by the Lfnion. The 
Library consists of 597 volumes, and is probably 
unique as a collection of standard Temperance works 
of an educational character. No works of fiction are 
placed in the Library, but its shelves are replenished 
annually with the latest and most authoritative works 
on the religious, scientific, historical, and social 
aspects of the question, which have appeared during 
the year. The use of the Library is available for 
subscribers to the Union, and to all friends engaged 
in juvenile Temperance work, free of charge. The 
gift of suitable works not already in the catalogue 
would be welcomed by the Committee. 

Interviews and Correspondence. 

The importance and usefulness of the Union as the 
headquarters of the juvenile Temperance movement 
is evident from the number of interviews with the 
official staff sought by practical workers, and by the 
very large amount of correspondence which, day by 
day, reaches the office. 

Temperance Sunday. 

The Committee again took willing part iu the 
observance of that excellent institution, Temperance 
Sunday. 

Bands of Hope and The Temperance Hospitae. 

A Christmas and New Year’s Collection was again 
taken by members and friends of societies on behalf 
of the Band of Hope movement and the Temperance 
Hospital, and the large sum of £ 4 ,021 16s. Sd., or £50 
more than the amount of the preceding year, was 
obtained. 

Home Goings. 

The losses of the year include those of Mr. W. Blrnest 
Sears, a life abstainer, an indefatigable worker, and a. 
most acceptable speaker on the Evening Staff of the 
Union ; Mr. Thomas Smith ; Madame Antoinette 
Sterling, who signed the pledge at one of its 
meetings; Sir John Hutton, L. C. C. ; Captain 
Campbell, of Guildford; Lady Jane Ellice; Mr. 
Edward Collard; and Mr. J. H. Marshall. 

Financiae Statement. 

The net receipts, apart from the School Scheme, 
together with the balance brought forward, were 
£2,016 3s. 2d. The expenditure amounted to 
£2,025 2s. id., leaving a debit balance of £9 is. nd. 
The receipts during the year, on account of the 
Jubilee (Building) Fund, including the balance 
brought forward, amounted to ,£1,542 5s. iod., the 
expenditure amounted to ,£1,528 4s. 3d., leaving 
a balance of £(14 is. 7d., which has been transferred 
to the General Account. Liabilities iu the General 
Department to the amount of £"214 12s. 2d. still have 
to be met. 


io8 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Hou-t ean the Pulpit and the 
Sunday School be made mope 
Helpful to the Hand of Hope ? 

An Address delivered at the Annual Conference of the 
United Kingdom Band of Hope Union , Exeter Hall , 
on May n th, 1904, by Rev. Carey Bonner (General 
Secretary of The Sunday School U?iion ). 


cH*-OR the purposes of this Conference I have 
JU turned myself into a peripatetic note of 
A interrogation ! With needful persistency the 
' 'wandering question-point went from secretary 
to secretary of the various denominations, and 
then to secretaries of the various Band of Hope Unions 
throughout the Kingdom. The query addressed to 
the denominational officials concerned the proportion 
of Clergy and Ministers who were personal abstainers, 
and the result of the catechising is embodied in the 
following diagram : — 

SCHEDULE A. 




Ministers. 

Students. 



Total. 

Abstainers. Total. Abstainers. 

I. 

Church of England .. 

No returns. 

No return^. 

2. 

Wesleyan Methodist 

No returns. 

Almost all. 

3- 

Congregational 

2,894 

2,573 

(Est.) 220 210 

4 - 

Baptist .. 

2 500 

2,235 

217 208 

4. 

Primitive Methodist* 

1,085 

1,074 

60 60 

6. 

U. M. F. C. 

4°3 

39° 

2 c 21 

7 - 

Independent Meth. .. 

293 

282 

No returns. 

8. 

Meth. New Connexion 

2 11 

197 

13 *3 

9 - 

Bible Christian 

231 

201 

13 13 

10. 

Wesley. Reform Union 

19 

19 

No returns. 

11. 

Presbyterian .. 

352 

270 

19 16 

12. 

JVi oravian 

No returns. 

No returns. 


( Evang. Co-operation 




i3- 

•j ot Church of Christ 

35o 

34° 

No returns. 


(,Christian Association 

15 

15 



Totals 

8,323 

7,596 

563 541 

* Local Preachers 

16,074 

12,860 



My note of interrogation was multiplied when 
knocking at the doors of the Baud of Hope Union 
secretaries, for, desirous of getting facts and figures 
first-hand, I asked them three questions : 

1. In your district do you generally find the Clergy, 
Ministers, and Sunday School Officers in practical 
sympathy with the Band of Hope ? 

2. Can you give any example of special interest 
evinced either by Church or School, that in your 
judgment might be generally followed ? 

3. Can you supply approximate figures as below : 

(a) Total Churches with Sunday Schools in your 
district. 

(b) Total Bands of Hope connected with them. 

(c) Total number unconnected. 

Here is the result: — 

SCHEDULE B. 


Band of Hope; Union Returns. 

I11 reply to Query 1, concerning Clergy and 
Ministers being in practical sympathy. 


“ Yes.” 

“No,” or “Few.” 

Mixed or Modified. 

•10 Y. 

3 -S'. 

8 Y.—Small Unions, containing 
1 to 10 Bands of Hope. 

12 If. 

10 M. 

18 Af. —Medium, containing it to 
20 Bands of Hope. 

22 L . 

16 L. 

61 L. —Large, containing 21 and 



upwards to 240. 

44 

29 

87 


In reply to Query 3, asking for figures concerning 
Churches and Bands of Hope :—■ 

Churches with Schools .. .. .. .. .. 7,169 
Bands of Hope Connected with these .. .. .. 5,223 
Bands of Hope or Juvenile Societies unconnected .. 857 

The replies concerning the total abstainers amongst 
Ministers have come from all the chief Denominations. 
The particulars asked from Band of Hope Uuion 
secretaries have been given by half the total number 
in the Kingdom, but as this half includes those con¬ 
nected with the largest Unions, the answers will be 
sufficiently representative for our purpose. Here, 
then, we have reliable material from which to draw 
conclusions that will help dealing with the subject 
assigned to me. 


Two or three general statements may safely be 
made. 

1. To-day the Churches are Rendering More 
Efficient Heep to the Band of Hope and 

Temperance Movement than they did Thirty 
years Ago. 

The leaven of sacrifice for the sake of others is 
spreading, and the appalling modern growth of the 
drink curse has happily called forth a corresponding 
quickening of the Christian conscience; and Christ’s 
preachers to-day stand side by side with the great 
preacher of old in declaring their conviction, “ It is 
good neither to eat flesh, nor to drink wine, nor any¬ 
thing whereby thy brother stumbleth or is made 
weak.” Great is the army of preachers who proclaim 
this fundamental Christian principle: 7,596 out of a 
total return of 8,323. Still more significant is the 
attitude of the coming preachers, for out of a given 
number of 563 students 541 are abstainers; and if the 
Primitive Methodist figures may be taken as repre¬ 
sentative, there is great hopefulness in viewing the 
position taken up by the large and noble band of 
unordained preachers, for in that Church out of 16,074 
local preachers, 12,860 are avowed abstainers. 

Two specific instances may further be adduced in 
support of our statement. 

In the case of the Congregational body, twentv-nine 
years ago only 500 Ministers out of a total of 2,000 
were returned as abstainers. To-day, out of 2 S94 
Ministers there are 2,573 abstainers. Take another 
typical fact. Thirty years ago, at the opening 
ceremonies of a leading Nonconformist Chapel in 
London, beer, stout, and various wines were supplied 
at the luncheon table as a matter of course. To-day 
such a thing would not be thought of, so changed 
is the general attitude of the Church towards the 
drinking customs. 

A second conclusion based upon the figures is: 

2. The Band of Kobe Movement to-day Owes 
its Maintenance to the Christian Church. 

The figures in Schedule B show that out of a given 

total of 7,169 Churches with Schools, 5,223 have Bands 
of Hope, whilst only 857 organisations are reported 
as unconnected with Churches, these figures including 
Juvenile Rechabite Societies and Juvenile Templars. 

Ezekiel, the seer of ancient days, saw that the pure, 
healing waters flowing through the land issued forth 
from under the door of God's holy House. To-day, as 
of old, the truth of the vision is exemplified. The 
fact that the Band of Hope movement sprang from 
the Christian Church has its true complement in the 
present-day figures showing that the vast majority of 
Bands of Hope are still maintained by Christian 
organisations; and if ever the hour comes when 
Bands of Hope are worked on economic and social 
lines alone, it will mean an immense loss of power 
and of unseen but intensely real influence. There is no 
motive force so great as love, and our only inspiration 
in maintaining the strife, and in saving and trainiug 
the young, is this: "Thelove of Christ constraineth ns." 

But when every value has been given to these two 
general conclusions, there is a third calling for most 
careful consideration. It is this : 

3. “There yet Remaineth much Land to be 

Possessed.” 

The returns of Schedule B are sufficiently startling 
to give us pause if we imagine that the work is 
finished. Here are 160 Unions of varying sizes. Out 
of these, 116 either answered “No,” or gave halting 
and mixed replies to the question concerning Clergy, 
Ministers, and Sunday School Officers being ^ in 
practical sympathy with Band of Hope work. The 
fact is more significant when we note that 105 out of 
these 116 Unions are larger organisations. It is clear 
from this testimony of Temperance workers that 
there are still large numbers of leaders in the 
Church of Christ who entirely hold aloof from 
Temperance work amongst the y 7 oung, some of 
them even being opposed to it. It is equally clear, 
therefore, that there is still a call for appeal to 
Christ’s men and women on behalf of the children 





THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


109 


for whom Christ died. In other words, there is need 
io re-state the case for the Band of Hope, and with 
affectionate urgency to seek that the Christian 
leaders shall give their earnest attention to the 
restatement. 

Permit me briefly to attempt the task. 

Face the facts concerning the relation of strong 
drink to Juvenile criminality and to crimes against 
children. Miss Barrett, of Dublin, has studied this 
phase of the problem for years, and I take my 
figures from her Papers read before the Royal 
Statistical Society, and before the Statistical and 
Social Enquiry Society of Ireland. 

Det me state the bare facts : 

(a) In Great Britain and Ireland during one year 
out of 141,000 convicted criminals, 2,700 were boys 
and girls. 

(b) The official Government returns show that 
one-fifth of the juvenile crime in England is due to 
drink. 

(c) The wider statistics for Britain and Europe 
prove that nine-tenths of the juveniles filling 
reformatories, industrial schools, and prisons, are the 
children of drunken parents. 

(d) Of offences against children, from thirty to 
ninety per cent, in various districts are due to drink. 
In Manchester, Liverpool, and Dublin, out of the 
convictions brought about through the National 
Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, 
ninety per cent, of the cruelty cases were the result of 
strong drink. Take three concrete instances from 
those reported day by day in the public Press. 

A mother when drunk at the burial of one child, 
dropped another of her children two years old, upon 
the red hot bars of the grate. 

A father and mother gained the insurance money 
on the death of their child, kept the corpse uncoffined 
and unburied for seven days, while they caroused in 
drink, and their other children starved. 

Many of you will have noticed in yesterday’s paper 
the case of the farmer at Oswestry who acknowledged 
at an inquest that he frequently gave beer and 
spirits to all his children. He took a boy, four 
years of age, to the fair, dosed him with whisky, 
and the child was seized with convulsions and died. 

See how strong drink is still more closely related 
to the destruction of child life. Consider the awful 
fact of child-drunkenness. Sir Thomas Barlow gives 
instances of infants dying from gin-poisoning; of 
children under two years old plied daily with beer 
and spirits. In one of our hospitals a boy of eight 
was treated for delirium tremens, and a week or two 
since a Dublin doctor had a child fourteen months 
old who was spirit soaked, and in delirium tremens. 

“AndJesus said, Suffer the little children to come unto 
Me, and forbid them not." 

Is it not clear to all observers that the drinking 
customs of Christian Britain turn the Divine music 
of that call into a mockery ? 

“ The young, young children, O my brothers, 

They are weeping bitterly ! 

They are weeping in the playtime of the others, 

In the country of the free.” 

Is it nothing to the Churches of Christ and the 
Ministers of Christ ? These young children for whom 
the Saviour died—ought not the Church to put forth 
helping hands to save them ! In view of the child¬ 
suffering brought about by drink, is not that saving 
best effected by training the child from the outset of 
life to keep altogether from the cause of the 
suffering ? 

The nation that neglects its youth is blind to its 
highest interests; but the Church that neglects to 
rescue the children denies its Lord and puts Him to 
open shame. 

Some may think this plea superfluous, urging that 
the necessity of safeguarding the child life of the 
nation is a truism of social, moral,' and especially of 
Christian teaching. If so, I fear it is of all truisms 
the one chiefly neglected. Turn for a moment to the 
reason for the apathy of at any rate a section of 
the Ministers holding aloof from the rescue and 
training work for the young in Temperance princi¬ 
ples. All thoughtful readers must have been pro¬ 


foundly impressed by the figures given in the current 
number of The Daily News. To that paper not only 
Temperance reformers, but all social and Christian 
workers owe an incalculable debt; for it is one of the 
great moral factors in the nation’s life of to-day. 

With those published figures before me I declare 
my conviction that the most damaging attacks upon 
the Christian religion are not found in pamphlets 
and papers avowedly anti-religious, but in the official 
share-lists of brewery companies, where are found 
the names of hundreds of Christian Ministers having 
financial interests in a trade both degrading and 
destructive in its results upon national life. 

From the lists of Brewery Companies, excluding the 
Public House Trust Companies, the following 
numbers of clerical shareholders are taken: — 

Church of England .. 940 

Roman Catholic .. 104 

Church of Scotland .. 16 

Wesleyan Methodist .. 5 

Congregational .. .. 2 

Baptist .. .. .. 2 

Other Denominations .. 85 

making a total of .. 1,154 Clergymen and 
Ministers who hold personal shares in Brewing 
Companies. 

In addition to these there are 516 who hold shares 
as trustees for others. The share lists further reveal 
the fact that there are 466 women shareholders whose 
addresses are at a “ Rectory ” or “ Manse ” ; and the 
total value of the clerical shares is ^810,257. 

Am I not right in saying that nothing nullifies 
the work of saving the child like the complicity of 
Christ’s Ministers with the traffic which destroys the 
child ? I can hardly hope that any words of mine 
will reach the ears of the clerical shareholders, but 
were this audience composed of them, then, neither 
judging nor condemning, nor interfering with personal 
liberty, I would beseech them to weigh well the fact 
of the drink traffic’s blighting influence upon child 
life; and beholding afresh the vision of the Lord who 
gave Himself to save others, ask them to consider 
whether they, as followers of Him, should any longer 
have part or lot in that which ruins and destroys the 
child for whom Jesus died. “What concord hath Christ 
with Belial?" “Be ye clean that bear the vessels oj 
the Lord." 

Turn now to another class in the Church and 
School—I mean, those who, theoretically, are in 
sympathy, but who do not practically evidence it. 

Here are 7,496 abstainers out of a total of 8,323 
ministers. Here are also 7,169 Churches and Schools, 
having 5,223 Bands of Hope connected with them. 
Judging from the figures, one would imagine that this 
was an ideal state of affairs; and yet the majority of 
Band of Hope workers testify that they feel the lack of 
practical sympathy upon the part of the Church and 
Sunday School leaders. From the figures, clearly the 
Ministers are for us ; but are they with us as fully as 
they might be ? I think there is need of a plea for 
Organised Temperance Work amongst the young. 
I recognise thankfully that the Sunday School and 
Christian Endeavour lists of topics periodically 
include the subject of Temperance. It is a sign of 
advance; but is it enough for fighting the drink? I 
submit that an evil so deep-rooted and continuous calls 
for safeguards correspondingly strong. Speaking as 
a Sunday School man, and as one who, from the first, 
has been identified with Christian Endeavour, I 
would urge that the Church needs to face this matter 
of safeguarding the young from drink fairly and 
fully. A lesson now and then, or a bit in a meeting 
now and then, will not suffice. “These things ye 
ought to do, and not to leave the other undone." When a 
vessel is gliding down a stream, which soon will rush 
in rapids over cruel snags of rock and through 
treacherous whirlpools, it is not enough to holloa 
now and then from the banks, “ Beware of dangers 
ahead.” You must put a Pilot in charge of the boat, 
whose cool judgment and strong arm will guide that 
barque into deep, calm waters of safety. The Church 
will never effectively save the children till, in 
addition to all other methods of influence and 




no 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


teaching, each Church and each Sunday School has 
its own Band of Hope. 

We come now directly to consider “ How the 
Church leaders can render more efficient aid to the 
Baud of Hope.” 

Reading through the 160 replies from Band of 
Hope Union secretaries, it was soon evident that my 
first question touched the very core of Band of Hope 
work. It is not simply that the Church must come 
to a right judgment on the problem. The problem 
judges the Church. Soon the question will be, not 
“ Do the Ministers and leaders of Churches use their 
influence for saving the young ? ” but “ Will they have 
any influence with thinking men if they hold aloof 
from the work ? ” It is easy for a preacher to live in a 
fool’s paradise of theological abstractions, remote from 
life, but a Minister of the Saviour must ally himself 
with the saving influences of to-day. 

If I read the replies aright, Band of Hope workers 
feel the fret and strain of being left to work too 
much in the cold. They do not want simply to be 
tolerated, they ask to be welcomed. Our reasonable 
plea is general!v, “Recognise us; work with us.” 
We do not ask to be patted on the back, but to be 
allowed to work hand in hand. An ounce of 
co-operation is worth a ton of patronage. We say to 
Christian men and women, Come nearer to us, and 
let us get nearer to you. 

“We are not divided, 

All one body we.” 

Ret us attempt now in detail to answer the 
question, “ How can the Church and School render 
more efficient help to the Band of Hope ? ” I throw 
out a few simple suggestions. Here is an announce¬ 
ment copied word for word from the notice board of 
a certain Church : 

“The; Band of Hope; Connected with this 
Church meets Every Thursday at 7 o’ceock.” 

A phrase, golden in its significance to the Band of 
Hope, is, “ The Band of Hope cotinected with this 
Church .” By that simple sentence the Church in 
question gives full and deserved recognition to 
Temperance work amongst the young. 

1. Would it be an unreasonable thing to ask that a 
similar notice should be placed upon every Church 
and Chapel notice board in the Kingdom ? 

2. Could not a notice such as this be inserted in the 
Church Manual, adding a brief report of the Band of 
Hope work and its balance sheet ? 

3. Ret a notice, with occasional reports of meet¬ 
ings, be found in the Church or local magazine. 

4. Would it not be a simple matter, also, that in the 
officially recognised list of announcements from the 
pulpit, and from the Superintendent’s desk, the 
ordinary Band of Hope meeting should find a place ? 

5. At the annual meeting of the Church, when its 
varied operations are considered, let room be made 
for a brief, bright account of what is done in the Band 
of Hope or Juvenile Temperance Society. 

6. Upon the occasion of the Sunday School 
anniversary meeting, five minutes given to the 
Superintendent or some suitable representative of 
the Band of Hope, would be greatly appreciated, and 
might be used for a concise, telling account of the 
Temperance work amongst the young. 

7. From time to time in the teachers’ meeting let 
Band of Hope progress be reported. 

8. Will Church and School officers make it easy for 
the Band of Hope to find a meeting place ? 

Will they listen also to the plea—“ Do not place so 
small a value upon the Band of Hope as to imagine 
that, on any pretext, it can give up its meeting to 
make way for some other gathering ” ? At least 
ensure that a regular meeting-place shall be found. 

I do not claim novelty for these plans, and cheer¬ 
fully recognise that some of them are already followed 
in many Churches and Schools. Ret it be also 
granted that the Band of Hope workers, on their side, 
must be prompt to supply the needful information to 
the Church officers. 

Simple as these suggestions appear, I believe that 
if these things alone were universally carried out to¬ 
morrow, the Christian Church would hearten, and 


send the good cheer of Jesus Christ to, countless 
bands of faithful workers throughout the world- 
What more can be done ? A certain secretary reports 
(and we can hear his “Eureka” as he writes the 
sentence)—“ One Minister in our district regularly 
attends the Band of Hope as an ordinary individual! ” 
Others tell of Ministers who superintend their own 
Bands of Hope. 

It would neither be wise nor reasonable to expect 
that these examples should be universally followed. 

Ret me counsel Band of Hope officers to bear in 
mind that hardly any life is more filled with labour 
than that of a conscientious clergyman or Minister. 
The very zeal of a Christian worker who concentrates 
his attention upon one phase of service may prevent 
his recognising the fact that a Minister, in respond¬ 
ing to the multitudinous calls upon time and thought, 
is unable to give more than partial attention to the 
ordinary social and religious activities. When all 
this is taken into account, I would yet say to my 
ministerial brethren, tfi^t nothing more helps faith¬ 
ful labourers than personal interest and personal 
visitation. One of the busiest Christian leaders I 
ever knew was the late Rev. Dr. Macfadyen, of Man¬ 
chester. When speaking to his Band of Hope 
some years ago, I remember that he came into the 
meeting, and when chatting with him afterward, and 
expressing surprise at his attendance, he said to me, 
“I do not stay long at the Band of Hope, but / always 
lookin' ’ If this course was possible to so prominent 
a minister as Dr. Macfadyen, it could be followed by 
others in ordinary Church life. A Christian worker 
loves and looks up to the minister who “ looks in.” 

I note that several of the replies report the obser¬ 
vance of Band of Hope Sunday or Temperance Sun¬ 
day. Sometimes one or both services are appropriate 
to the occasion, and sometimes three, an afternoon 
one being held;—the offertory, either wholly, or the 
balance over the average contributions, being devoted 
to Band of Hope work. 

Remembering the deep interest in juvenile sobriety 
taken by many teachers who are yet unable to be 
active Band of Hope workers, I would suggest that 
either the Sunday School Union or the United King¬ 
dom Band of Hope Union should issue a Teacher’s 
Pledge Book, in which the Sunday School teacher 
would endeavour to get the signatures of all scholars, 
and, through the scholars, of their companions and 
friends. 

Such sympathetic teachers might be urged to do a 
little recruiting for the Band of Hope, both in the 
class and when visiting the scholars. 

Above all, and beyond all other efforts, let Sunday 
School officers and teachers heed the injunction— 
“ So walk yourself that your scholars may find no 
occasion of stumbling in placing their feet where you 
place yours.” 

My last plea is addressed to all of us, Sunday School 
and Band of Hope workers alike, and it is a plea for 
renewed belief in the value ofour work amongst the young. 
Both in religious and Temperance work we are 
becoming more and more educational. That is well, 
if we do not forget the inspirational. Neither Church 
nor nation has a more valuable asset than the soul of 
the child. It is difficult to maintain this high 
enthusiasm when face to face with the drudgery of 
our labour. For example, you are in an ordinary 
Band of Hope meeting, and have 100 or more not 
over-clean boys and girls gathered in a stuffy atmo¬ 
sphere. You have tried to inculcate moral teaching 
in song, and here is your cheery philosophy :— 

“ Work and win, work and win, 

Shall our watchword be; 

With a will onward still, 

March to victory.” 

You note some boys giggling, and some convulsed, 
all covertly watching one ringleader who is singing 
with tremendous gusto. You make a strategic move¬ 
ment when the chorus next comes on, and are shocked 
to hear him gravely leading off in this original per¬ 
verted version of the chorus:— 

“ Take some gin, good old gin, 

In your cup of tea ; 

When you’re ill, take a pill, 

And march to victory ! ” 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


hi 


What will you do with him? Turn him out as 
incorrigible ? Nay. Keep him, lay hold of him, 
have faith in him. Some day he may be a William 
Hoyle, a Paxton Hood, or a Charles Wakely. 

bet me pass on to you a revised version of lines 
that are very poor poetry, but yet very sound common 
sense. 

“ A diamond in the rough is a diamond sure enough, 

Though by dirt and grit surrounded, yet ’tis made of diamond stuff! 
Of course, till someone finds it, it never can be found ; 

And, of course, till someone grinds it, it never can be ground. 

But when 'tis found, and when 'tis ground, and polishing is done, 
Then every diamond facet flashes forth the glory of the sun ! ” 

Give us more faith, God ! Not only in Thee, but 
faith in the possibilities of young humanity; faith 
“ in the imperial value of a child ” ; faith that we are 
not repairing ruins, but laying foundations; faith, 
that the world does not belong to the Evil One. “ The 
Lord is King” ; faith that no man who serves God 
can ever be on the losing side. Give us also to know 
amid all discouragements and difficulties, that “ this 
is the victory that overcometh the world, your faith ! ” 


Correspondence. 


GOOD NEWS FROM GERMANY. 

Sir, —I have just heard with no little pleasure that 
the son of our good friend, Dr. P'orel, has been 
successful in establishing in Germany a Union of 
abstaining students in secondary schools, which now 
numbers about 300 members. It was begun in 1902 
at the Haubinda, an expensive upper-class boarding 
school in Saxe-Meiuingeu, where the boys are trained 
in habits of great simplicity and abstemiousness; and 
in a few mouths several other local associations of 
the kind were established, all under the presidency 
of young Forel; who has, however, now left Germany. 
The movement is, nevertheless, extending among 
students in Hamburg, Wiirtemberg and elsewhere ; in 
spite of the fact that in many places the school 
authorities refuse permission to establish these 
societies. 

Yours truly, FIEEDEN THORP. 

18, Blossom Street, York. 

-*♦>♦:»-- 

Summer Schoor at Nottingham. —A most help¬ 
ful Temperance Summer School for workers was 
held by the W. T. A. U. from June 6 to 15. Its object 
was to fortify workers concerning the nature and 
obnoxious effects of alcohol, and to fit them for more 
efficient advocacy. The lectures were of a varied and 
very interesting character; Mr. Walter N. Edwards, 
F.C.S., gave three on the scientific aspects of the 
question, as well as a public lecture; Mrs. Moore- 
wood, A.N.H.S., gave three on Hygiene, and also 
spoke at a special meeting for nurses ; Dr. Vickerman 
H. Rutherford gave three on alcohol—in health, in 
the production of disease, and in the treatment of 
disease; Mr. Rowland Hill gave two on literary 
subjects, “ Essays among British Essayists” (dealing 
with the period of Addison and Steele), and “Art and 
Alcohol”; he also gave one of his popular evening 
readings to a crowded audience; and Mr. Spence 
Hodgson gave two on elocution. In addition to these 
the Nottingham friends gave a Welcome Reception, 
which was a pleasant function ; there were one or two 
Garden Parties, and a number of private At Homes, 
as well as special meetings for women. At the Nurses’ 
meeting the Hon. Mrs. Eliot Yorke presided, and 
made an effective speech. At a public meeting in 
Circus Street Hall Mr. Rothera presided, and Prin¬ 
cipal Ritchie gave a powerful address. A United 
Meeting was held on Sunday evening at theU.M.F.C. 
chapel, the speakers selected being Mrs. Brooks, the 
President, and Mrs. Walters. Eady Laura Ridding 
was president of a junior meeting, and there were 
drives, visits to collieries, factories, museums, &c., and 
bright June weather prevailing nearly all the time. 

National Unitarian Temperance Association. 
—In connection with the proceedings of the eleventh 
annual meetings of this Association, on May 27, a 
conference was held in the afternoon, over which 


Mr. Pallister Young, B.A., LL-B-, presided, and Mr. 
Judson Bonner, of the United Kingdom Band of 
Hope Union, gave an address on “The Use of 
Literature and Illustrative Appliances in Band of 
Hope Work.” The address was replete with the 
results of wide experience and practical skill, and as a 
description of the vast stores of illustration the Union 
is able to provide, was perfect. The model addresses 
and other instructive matter in the Band of Hope 
Chronicre provide subjects for speakers and superin¬ 
tendents in a liberal measure, and is unsurpassed as a 
Temperance workers’ journal. A useful discussion 
followed the address, and the following among others 
took part: Rev. W. G. Tarrant, Rev. Frederic Allen, 
Rev. Alex. Webster (who spoke of the work of the Lily 
League in connection with his Church in Scotland), 
Rev. A. Amey, Mr. F. A. PRlwards, F'.R.G.S., and Mr. 
P'red Maddison. The business meeting took place 
at seven o’clock, the Earl of Carlisle (president) in 
the chair. The speakers were unanimous in their 
opposition to the Licensing Bill, and a strong resolu¬ 
tion condemning it was unanimously carried with 
enthusiasm, and a petition to the Government was 
signed. A forward movement in the work of the 
Association was reported by the hon. secretary, Mr. 
J. Bredall, F.R.G.S. Among those who spoke to the 
large gathering, beside the noble chairman, were the 
Rev. R. A. Armstrong, Rev. J. H.Wicksteed, the Mayor 
of Woolwich (Rev. L. Jenkins Jones), Rev. C. J. 
Street, Dr. Charles Read, Mr. Frank Adkins, Rev. 
E. O. Jenkins, Rev. T. Lloyd Jones, and Rev. Frederic 
Allen. This is a comparatively new association, 
representing 86 Bands of Hope and Temperance 
societies. 

West London Demonstration.— On June 4, a 
successful demonstration was held by the West 
London Band of Hope Union in Ravenscourt Park, 
the organisation of the procession and festival having 
been well arranged by Mr. G. S. Kaye, secretary of 
the Union. A large number of Societies took part 
in the processions which started from different parts, 
the rendezvous being reached by way of Ravenscourt 
Square. A decorated coal waggon formed a platform, 
whence vigorous addresses were delivered by the 
Rev. A. R. Shrewsbury, chairman, Rev. J. C. Adlard, 
Rev. John Conway, and Rev. H. C. Mander. A 
resolution strongly condemning the Licensing Bill 
was passed with enthusiasm. The West Ham 
Crusaders’ Band played good music, and action songs 
and musical drill added to the interest of the occasion. 


Collection Speech. 

FOR A SMALL BOY OR GIRL- 

Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen, 

It gives me great delight 
To speak to you to-night 
On behalf of our worthy cause, 

And I ask you all to pause 
To consider our humble claim, 

And then to support the same. 

We believe in a Band of Hope, 

For we feel it is best to cope 

With our nation’s curse, strong drink. 

And you will agree, I think, 

While the boys and girls are small, 

They should be abstainers all, 

That a future generation 

May behold a Temperance nation. 

It is quite within propriety 
To tell you that our society, 

Like every other community, 

Is not without immunity. 

Expenses must all be met, 

P'or a Band of Hope in debt 
Is a sight that is most appalling. 

So you will excuse my calling 
For your sympathetic aid. 

The Correction wire now be made. 

Kate kersey. 









112 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Cambridgeshire. —On May 26 the spring assembly 
of this Union was held at Waterbeach, in C. H. 
Spurgeon's Tabernacle. The Rev. Sydney Milledge 
presided at the afternoon meeting, and urged the 
workers to make the coming of age of the Union next 
year memorable. After preliminary business the Rev. 
C. E. Charlesworth read a suggestive paper on the 
history of the Union, and its prospects in connection 
with its twenty-first anniversary. His proposals 
included raising more money and carrying on several 
forward movements. Might their coming of age 
herald the coming of power. A hopeful discussion 
followed the paper. After tea in the schoolroom, a 
largely attended evening meeting was held, presided 
over by Mr. Charlesworth. The speakers were Mrs. 
Sims Woodhead, the Rev. F. H. Benson, the Rev. 
Henry Bennett, the Rev. Howard Usher, Mr. George 
Apthorpe, and Mr. W. Baxter. A resolution condemn¬ 
ing the Licensing Bill was passed; MissLegerton gave 
a recitation ; “ Fred,” the converted drover, sang a 
solo ; and the choir gave several pleasing selections. 
There was a large attendance during the day of repre¬ 
sentatives of county Bands of Hope. 

Dunfermline.— The annual business meeting of 
this Union was held in the Congregational Church 
Hall, the Rev. James Foote (president) in the chair. 
The Chairman said there was never a time when 
Band of Hope work was more needed than the pre¬ 
sent. The secretary, in his annual report, said they 
had added during the year two new Bands of Hope 
and one senior section, making in all twenty Bands of 
Hope and three senior sections, giving the total 
membership 2,554, a gain of 508 in the year. A local 
paper,in noticing the meeting, said,among other things, 
“ How comes it that the Dunfermline Churches do 
not make a better show in connection with such a 
good cause ? ” All the old officers were re-elected. 

Huddersfield and District. —Whit-Tuesday is 
undoubtedly the “ great ” day of the year in 
Huddersfield—it has been for more than a quarter-of- 
a-century— and this year was no exception. The 
thousands of people who thronged the streets and 
crowded the windows to see the fine procession of 
the Huddersfield and District Band of Hope Union 
gave ample proof that this great demonstration is 
growing in popularity year by year, and it is a 
striking testimony to the energy of the great army 
of voluntary workers that for thirty-five years this 
great event has held its unrivalled sway, until it has 
now become recognised, not merely as the event of 
the “ day,” but of the “ year.” Fifty Bands of Hope, 
ten bauds of music, nearly ten thousand boys and 
girls, about a dozen beautifully-decorated waggons, 
hundreds of banners and bannerettes, scores of well- 
groomed horses, and many well-known workers in 
the cause, combined to make the procession an 
imposing one, and caused a well-known agent of the 
B.T.L. to remark, ‘‘This is Huddersfield’s answer to 
Mr. Balfour and his Licensing Bill.” Greenhead 
Park, in all its summer glory, was again lent by the 
Corporation, and a six hours’ programme of events, 
interesting to old and young, was gone through. 
A display of fireworks, introducing the motto, “Pro¬ 
tection for the Children,” concluded the day’s 
proceedings. 17,837 persons paid for admission to 
the Park ; over ^400 was received in gate money, 
and although the expenses were heavy, the Union 
is enabled by its annual demonstration to carry on 
its work year after year. 

Kingsgate Baptist, Southampton Row.— On 

Saturday, June 4, the Band of Hope of the above 
Church gave their Midsummer entertainment. The 
children did their part exceedingly well. The pro¬ 
gramme consisted of recitations, solos, Temperance 
drill, and a cantata, entitled, “The White Garland.” 
The meeting was well attended, and an enjoyable 
time was spent by all. 

Reading and District. —The eighteenth annual 
meeting of this Band of Hope Union was held in the 
Palmer Hall, Reading, on May 18. The chair was 
taken by the president, Mr. T. Waite. Mr. W. N. 
Edwards, F.C.S., gave one of his interesting and 
popular lectures, “ A Chat about Candles,” illustrated 


by brilliant chemical experiments. The lecture was 
keenly enjoyed by all who heard it, and contained 
many Temperance lessons. Mr. Waite’s family pro¬ 
vided the musical part of the programme, consisting 
of solos, duets and part songs, which were effectively 
rendered and greatly appreciated by the audience. 

Tower Hamlets. —The annual meetings of the 
Union have been successfully held. The series opened 
with an excellent Temperance sermon preached to 
an audience of 3,000 people at the Edinburgh Castle 
by Rev. W. J. Mayers. By the kindness of Dr. 
Barnardo, the Hall was freely given, and a collection 
taken for the work of the Union. The twenty-ninth 
annual demonstration was held at the Great Assembly 
Hall, kindly lent by Mr. F. N. Charrington. The 
chair was taken by Mr. Edward Wood, J.P., and 
eloquent addresses were delivered by the Hon. Mrs. 
Eliot Yorke (who also presented prizes to winners of 
singing and reciting competitions), Mr. J. Williams 
Benn, Chairman of the London County Council (once 
a Band of Hope boy in the district of St. George’s), 
and Mr. William Bingham. A choir rendered action 
and other Temperance songs exceedingly well. The 
Secretary, Mr. William Biffen, read the annual report, 
which showed an increased membership in the 
Union, the total now being 79 societies, with an 
estimated membership of nearly 11,000. A petition 
to Parliament against the Licensing Bill, and a strong 
resolution of protest was unanimously adopted, on 
the motion of Mr. William Groves, chairman of the 
executive. The May Festival was held in the 
People’s Palace on May 19, and consisted of action 
songs, physical drill by boys and girls, tableaux— 
“Living Pictures of Child Life”—and a spectacle 
contributed by Devons Road Band of Hope—the 
Crowning of the May Queen—and sports on the 
Village Green. The whole performance was most 
ably conducted. 

Warrington. —Acting on the suggestion given in 
the Band of Hope Chronicee about eighteen 
months ago in an article bearing upon the advisa¬ 
bility of organising an annual festival, the above 
LTnion held on May 5 and 6 their second annual Band 
of Hope festival, which has again proved a great 
success, though not quite so good financially as last 
year owing to the great depression of trade. The 
performance consisted of a presentation of the 
spectacular cantata, “The Band of Plope Queen” (by 
permission of Messrs. Hayward and Son) and other 
miscellaneous items, in which the young people 
acquitted themselves very creditably. The scene in 
Parr Hall, which seats upwards of two thousand, was 
a very pretty one, the spacious platform being 
crowded with gaily-dressed children, in the centre of 
which was erected the throne, which was occupied 
by the new Band of Hope Queen, who was accom¬ 
panied by the Lord Chancellor, Lord Chamberlain, 
Maids of Honour, &c. The beautiful floral crown, 
studded with electric lamps, worn by the Queen, and 
the charming colours of the costumes presented a 
pleasing spectacle which will not soon be forgotten. 
The chair was occupied by the president of the 
Union, Mr. R. A. Naylor, who had made a special 
journey from London in order to be present. He 
stated, however, that it was well worth coming so far 
to see, and congratulated all connected with the 
demonstration upon the success which had attended 
their endeavours. He urged all to remain firm to 
the Total Abstinence pledge, as the Band of Hope 
movement was the great sustaining endeavour of the 
Temperance movement for the promotion of national 
sobriety. If they could only prevail upon the 
children to learn the ways of Temperance, and 
encourage them to stick to them, they would soon 
have a sober community. Special mention should 
be made of the following members of the committee, 
who had trained the children to such a high state of 
perfection: Mesdames Davenport and Whitmore, 
Misses Wood, Ward and Wilson, Messrs. T. Dale, 
G. Whitefield, R. Pierce Williams, and ex-Private 
Smith, and also of the talented orgauist, Mr. Fred 
Podmore, M. I. U. M., the musical conductor, Mr. 
A. Spruce, Mr. F. Gaudy (hon. sec.), and Messrs. 
W. Worley and R. E. Jones (hon. assistant-secs.). 



The School Seheme. 


ABSTRACT OF REPORT, MAY, 1904. 


[Copies of the complete Report may be had on application to 60, Old 
Bailey, E.C.] 

IFTEEN years have passed since the remarkable 
work carried on under the School Scheme was 
inaugurated, and there has been continued and 
growing success. The teaching given by the 
lecturers of the Union in Day Schools has met 
with an acceptance and made progress beyond the 
anticipation of the originators of the Scheme, and 
last year’s record worthily closes the third quin¬ 
quennium of strenuous endeavour to instruct the 
school population as to the nature of alcohol and its 
deleterious effects on the human body. 

Lecturers. 

The services of the following lecturers were 
retained: Mr. Joseph Addison (Northern District), 
Mr. John Burgess, F.C.S. (South of Thames. London 
and Suburban District), Mr. W. T. Stanton (Midlands), 
Mr. G. A. Roff (London North of Thames and Eastern 
and Southern Counties), and Mr. R. Prys-Jones 
(Wales). To these may be added Mr. C. E. Frank, 
teacher of science, who delivered special lectures 
to teachers and others in upper and middle class 
schools. 

In addition to these, and appointed conjointly by 
the Parent Society and the respective Local Unions, 
the services of the following gentlemen were retained : 
Mr. J. A. Hutchin, B.Sc. (Lond.), and Mr. J. Morris, 
Ph.D., F.C.S., under the direction of the Lancashire 
and Cheshire Union; Mr. L. M. Cooke, Derbyshire 
Union ; Mr. J. Barnett, North Essex Union ; Mr. J. S. 
Chippendale, Newcastle and District Union; Mr. 
Charles Harvey, Kent Union; Mr. Thomas Palmer, 
Leicestershire Union; Mr. J. A. Jolliffe, Hampshire 
Union; Mr. E. W. Pike, Yorkshire Union; Mr. C. 
Dain, Sunderland and District Union ; and Mr. J. 
Barker Wells, Hibernian Union. 

Other lecturers are also locally employed under the 
Diocesan Branches of the C.E.T.S., Irish Temperance 
League, North of England Temperance League, 
Bradford, Halifax, Northampton and Suffolk Band 
of Hope Unions, and Liverpool Temperance Union. 

The Nature and Sphere of Operations. 

A point of special interest in connection with the 
School Scheme is the widespread character of its 
operations. Schools of every class, Board and Council 
Schools, Army Schools, Voluntary, Industrial, 
District or Workhouse Schools, Orphan Asylums and 
Institutions of every kind have been visited by the 
lecturers, no class or sectarian peculiarities being 
allowed to interfere with the free offer of their 
services. This unsectarian character of the Scheme 
has proved greatly in its favour, and has thrown open 
the doors of Roman Catholic, Jewish, and other 
Schools not easy of access. 

During the year the Lords of the Admiralty granted 
permission for the lecturers to visit the Training 
Ships of the Navy. 

The lecturers, in addition to the actual work of 
visiting the Schools, carry on a heavy correspondence 
with Clerks of School Boards and Managing Com¬ 
mittees, Head Teachers and others, besides examining 
the immense number of reports of lectures submitted, 
and awarding the Certificates for proficiency. 

AUGUST, 1904. 


The Year’s Record. 


Lecturers. 

Lectures 

given. 

Children 

present. 

Reports 

written. 

Teachers 

present. 

Mr. Joseph Addison 

307 

33,058 

20,193 

1,194 

564 

Mr. John Burgess 

i »7 

19,023 

16,542 

Mr. R. Prys-Jones 

287 

27,903 

1 ->347 

970 

Mr. G. A. Roff. 

311 

30,967 

19,439 

1,263 

Mr. W. 1. Stanton 

333 

43,562 

27,118 

1,712 

Mr. T. Barnett. 

174 

11,261 

8,722 

468 

Mr. J. S. Chippendale... 

440 

50,741 

46,250 

1.005 

Mr. L. M. Cooke 

458 

48,209 

40,508 

1,224 

Mr. C. Dain 

222 

15,637 

6,531 

378 

Mr. C. Harvey ... 

i 99 

28,710 

12,2 0 

985 

Mr. J. A. Hutchin, B.Sc. 

106 

16,261 

9 > 73 r 

500 

Mr. P. A. Tolliffe 

62 

6,620 

3,562 

287 

Mr. J. Morris . 

265 

28,236 

* 9>454 

803 

Mr. J . Palmer ... 

104 

IC713 

2,736 

285 

Mr. E. W. Pike 

11 

1,27c 

734 


Mr. J. Barker Wells ... 
Mr. C.E. Frank and other 

210 

15,882 

2,475 

504 

special Lecturers ... 

126 

9,667 

1,662 

696 

Total ... 

3,892 

398,721 

251,204 

12,869 


Some of the lecturers only give partial time to the 
work. In the case of those who are fully engaged it 
should be noted that the wide difference observable 
in the number of lectures given is due to various 
causes. 

The Schools visited, including those for the deaf 
and dumb and blind, may be classified thus :— 

Board and Council Schools .. .. .. .. 1,889 

National Schools .. .. .. .. .. 1,082 


British, Friends, Wesleyan, Presbyterian, Roman 

Catholic, Jewish and other Voluntary Schools 324 
Regimental Schools, H. M. Training Ships, 
Charitable Institutions, Industrial, Reforma¬ 
tory, and District (Workhouse) Schools .. 86 

Higher Grade Schools .. .. .. .. iSr 

Evening Continuation Schools .. .. .. 18 

Training Colleges, and Conferences of Teachers 10 


3 . 59 ° 

The difference in the number of Lectures given and 
of Schools visited is accounted for by the fact that 
certain of the Schools and Training Ships received 
several visits. 

The Children’s Opinions. 

Various Head Teachers have written thus: — 

“The children are very keen on this lecture.” 

“Thank you for the lecture. Some of these 
children came over two miles through the rain in 
order not to miss the lecture.” 

“ It is wonderful how the interest in these lectures 
never seems to flag.” 

“The children were delighted when they heard 
you were coming.” 

“You have given the children a very effective 
lesson, and they have been intensely interested.” 

“ Modee Lessons.” 

The large total of 12,869 teachers were present at 
the ordinary lectures, or an average of three or four 
at each. 

At the close of a lecture in a large School, where 
the lecturer had addressed 135 pupils and 13 teachers, 
the Head Master said, “We thank you for this 
interesting lecture. We teachers have learned some¬ 
thing in the art of teaching.” 

The Area of the Work. 

Thework embraced almost every county in England 
and Wales, whilst a number of centres in Ireland and 













































THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


114 

in Jersey were visited, and special visits paid to 
H.M. Training Ship Impregnable at Oueensferry in 
Scotland. 

The; Children’s Work and Rewards. 

Many of the papers revealed a remarkable grasp 
of the subject, and the knowledge thus acquired by 
the children cannot fail to bear fruit in days to come. 
The Certificates are highly appreciated and preserved. 

Friendliness of Teachers. 

The increasing cordiality of teachers greatly added 
to the success of the lecturers’ visits. The Head 
Master of a “ High School for Boys” said at the close 
of the lecture, “ We have this morning listened to 
what I consider the most important lesson of the 
year.” 

Extracts from letters of Head Teachers testify to 
their hearty goodwill:— 

“ I have enjoyed taking the children in this little 
bit of Temperance education.” 

“We shall be glad to make your time ours for 
Object Lesson suggested. I remember last time your 
lesson was good both for scholars and teachers.” 

“ I am of opinion that these lessons are a most 
valuable educative force, and I shall be glad for you 
to visit my school next year in May or June if your 
arrangements will allow. ... I am not quite an 
abstainer, but these Model Lessons have taught me 
that alcohol, either as a medicine or as a beverage, 
requires handling with the greatest caution,” 

“You are always welcome here. The only complaint 
I have is that you do not come often enough. The 
boys and myself are always delighted to see you.” 

The Lecturers report that it is becoming quite a 
common occurrence for them to meet teachers, pro¬ 
moted to headships, who have heard the lectures 
several times, as assistants, and who had formerly to 
superintend the reports of the pupils. These give an 
exceptionally enthusiastic welcome to the teacher’s 
lesson and frequently request the repetition of some 
telling point or experiment, which they remember as 
having made a deep impression on former occasions. 

Teachers say :— 

“ I have very pleasant recollections of visits paid to 
my school in London by one of your fellow lecturers 
and I shall be very pleased to welcome you to my 
school when it is convenient for you to arrange your 
proposed lecture,” 

“ Whenever you are coming this way, you will have 
the warmest of welcomes. I have very vivid recollec¬ 
tions of your very helpful lectures at H-, where I 

was assistant master for several years. Kindly 
remember that my school will always be ready to 
receive you on the shortest notice.” 

“ I am so much in sympathy with the work that 
this year I am giving one lesson weekly on Physiology 
in order to make more intelligible the lessons given 
on ‘ Drink.’ ” 

A Typical Programme of School Lectures. 

The continued friendliness of Local Educational 
Authorities is shown by the lact that they sometimes 
print the Lecturer’s programme of School visitation, 
and also arrange by their clerks the dates and times 
of visits. The circular, issued by the Bristol Educa¬ 
tion Committee, is a sample of similar arrangements 
made in other parts of the country. The lectures are 
given during school hours, the only stipulation being 
that an entry shall be made in the Log Book, an 
arrangement in strict accordance with the require¬ 
ments of the Education Department relating to any 
exceptional interruption of the ordinary curriculum. 

[Copy.] 

Education Offices, Guildhall, Bristol, 

November 24th, 1903. 

Dear Sir or Madam,—In pursuance of an offer of 
the United Kingdom Band of Hope Union, the Board 
granted permission to Mr. W. T. Stanton to give 
another series of Science Lessons on “ Alcohol—its 
Chemical and Physiological Effects.” They will be 
given to the children in Standards IV.—VII. The 


Union are awarding Certificates for the fullest reports 
of the lessons. 

Mr. Stanton would be obliged by your arranging for 
the Pupil Teachers to be present at the lessons if they 
are at the School. 

Mr. Stanton will be at your School on. 

.at.. 

It will be simply necessary to make an entry in Log 
Book of the deviation from Time Table.—Yours truly, 
WM. AVERY ADAMS, Secretary. 
The Head Teiacher, 

.School. 

Influence Outside the School. 

Outside the School the Scheme has been of the 
greatest service. The home influence of the Scheme 
has been of the most valuable character. Many 
instances have come to hand of the children being 
the instruments of persuading drunken parents to 
become abstainers as the result of the teaching given ; 
whilst the illuminated certificates, with which the 
children’s efforts have been rewarded, have kept the 
subject constantly under the notice of the family and 
friends. One lecturer reports that he is continually 
meeting with young men and women who thank him 
for lectures heard ten and twelve years ago. A married 
couple invited him into their home to show him the 
framed certificates won by them in the days gone by. 

Co-operation of Temperance Organisations. 

Local Temperance organisations heartily co-operated 
in the arrangements made. In some cases these 
organisations gave prizes, and held public meetings 
for the distribution of the prizes and certificates, thus 
bringing the Scheme before the public in a prominent 
way. 

An Interesting Development. 

One of the most notable and encouraging features 
of the year’s work was the permission given by the 
Lords of the Admiralty for the Lecturers to visit all 
the Training Ships. 

Recognition by Educational Authorities. 

Great advantage has been derived by the discussion 
of the subject—consequent upon the Lecturers’ 
requests for permission to visit the schools—by School 
Boards and Management Committees. Many Boards 
and Managing Committees have not only officially 
sanctioned the Lectures, but have made the entire 
arrangements themselves, the Birmingham, Hull, and 
Leeds Boards taking special pains in this direction. 

The new Educational Authorities are manifesting 
the same friendly attitude toward the work. 

In a number of instances as an outcome of the 
Lectures, Education Committees have adopted regular 
teaching by their own staff of teachers on the subject 
of the nature and physiological effects of alcoholic 
liquors, a typical case being that in which a Tempe¬ 
rance lesson is given once a week with an examination 
once a quarter. 

The Government Inspectors with whom the 
Lecturers have come in contact, have been, as a rule, 
most sympathetic. 

The following comment by an Inspector of Schools 
is encouraging. 

“ I have hau many opportunities of observing how 
efficiently you carry on Temperance work among the 
children. Teachers have testified tome over and over 
again the practical value of your Lectures in this con¬ 
nection. Your rare teaching gifts and your good 
store of sound common sense have certainly enabled 
you to secure the cheerful co-operation and unquali¬ 
fied praise of those most interested in the schools.” 

The most interesting portion of the Report is the 
summary which gives a review of the past 

Five Years’ Work. 

The School Lecturers have during this period 
addressed 20,421 Schools, 2,196,017 scholars, and 73,772 
teachers were present. 

Fifty-six per cent., or 1,237,431, of the children pro¬ 
duced written reports of the Lectures. 






THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Nearly fifty per cent, of those who wrote reports 
received certificates or prizes. 

The following summary shows the class of schools 
and institutions at which the lectures were given :— 


Board Schools .. .. .. .. .. 10,402 

National Schools .. .. .. .. .. 5 , 95 * 

British, Wesleyan, Presbyterian, Friends’, 

Roman Catholic, and other Voluntary 
Schools .. .. .. .. .. .. 2,487 

Regimental Schools, Training Ships, Chari¬ 
table Institutions. Industrial, Reformatory, 
and District (Workhouse) Schools .. .. 4 °S 

Higher Grade Schools .. .. .. .. 832 

Evening Schools .. .. .. .. .. 180 

Conferences of Teachers and Training Colleges 161 


Total .. .. 20,421 


The War Office sanctioned the School Lectures, and 
subsequently arranged for regular Temperance teach¬ 
ing in all Army Schools. 

The Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty gave 
permission for the Lecturers of the Union to visit all 
the Training Ships of His Majesty’s Navy. 

One hundred and sixty-one specially convened Con¬ 
ferences of day school teachers were held. 

Many School Board members and managers, His 
Majesty’s Inspectors, medical men, clergymen, and 
representatives of the Press have been present at the 
Lectures. 

Numerous public meetings have been held for the 
purpose of distributing the certificates and prizes won 
by the children, attended by large numbers of parents, 
whose interest has thus been more thoroughly enlisted 
in behalf of the work. 

Great pains have been taken to influence the 
students in Training Colleges, and by means of 
numerous and varied appliances and illustrations to 
convey Temperance truth to the mind of this most 
important class. 

Thousands of young teachers have been present at 
collective gatherings of pupil teachers to hear special 
Model Temperance Lessons. 

Literature has been handed to the teachers by the 
Lecturers with a view to promoting the incidental 
teaching of Temperance in the schools. 

A correspondence has been conducted with the lead¬ 
ing educational publishing firms on the subject of the 
further introduction of Temperance teaching into 
ordinary reading books. 

The Committee have furnished educational 
authorities with lists of school books which would be 
of service in view of the giving of regular teaching in 
schools on the subject of “The Nature and Physio¬ 
logical Effects of Alcoholic Liquors.” 

The various diagrams and apparatus of the Union 
for conveying Temperance teaching, and the beautiful 
series of wall pictures entitled “Abstinence and Hard 
Work,” have been submitted to boards, managers, 
and teachers, and in many cases these have been 
adopted, thus ensuring continuance of correct and 
thorough Temperance instruction in the school. 

Conclusion. 

The Committee feel sure that the foregoing brief 
outline of the work carried on during the past five 
years under the School Scheme will prove most satis¬ 
factory to the friends who so generously enabled them 
to undertake this branch of effort—probably the 
richest in importance and far-reaching results that has 
ever been formulated by the Union. 

The results already accomplished have far exceeded 
the expectations entertained when the scheme was 
originated. An immense field, unparalleled in its 
prospects of rich results, has been well entered upon, 
and laboriously and skilfully worked; yet the labourers 
are too few. Another quinquennium of work has 
closed, and the Committee earnestly hope that the 
five-year period on which they are now entering will 
see much larger funds placed at their disposal, which 
will allow them to give, at shorter intervals, and over 
the whole school area of the Kingdom, that systematic 
instruction as to the nature and effects of intoxicating 


115 

drinks which is so necessary for the future physical 
and moral well-being of the rising race. A good 
example has been set by those generous friends who 
have together contributed the £ 7,000 already secured 
towards the new fund, and the Committee trust that 
to the list will be added the names of a host of friends 
who recognise in the right training of the young the 
most sensible and effective means for attaining 
national sobriety. 

-*♦>♦>- 

FL Sad Story. 

By Miss Lucy Page Gaston, Chicago. 

(i Superintendent of the Anti-Cigarette League.) 


SPLENDID-LOOKING, well-dressed young 
man came into my office the other day. At 
first I supposed him to be a reporter, but he 
had only talked with me a minute before he 
began this touching story. 

“ I am on my way to California to die,” were his first 
words. “ Galloping consumption has fastened itself 
upon me, but I am going West in the hope that my 
life may be prolonged for a time. I have travelled all 
the way from New York, and I stopped here in 
Chicago especially to tell you my story, that jou 
might use it as a warning to thousands of others who 
are doing the same thing I did. I came from an 
honoured and respected family, had a good Christian 
home and everything that money could procure, 
including the best education the schools and colleges 
of this country afford. Up to the time I left home to 
go to college, I had never tasted a drop of liquor or 
had any bad habits. When I entered college, I found 
that in order to be a ‘good fellow,’ not only was I 
supposed to drink but also to smoke. It was tnere 
that the cigarette habit took hold of me, aud it is for 
that reason that I am now dying by inches. At first 
I did not notice any ill effect from smoking, but after 
a time it disturbed me not a little. I thought I could 
master it, and I did stop several times but would 
always begin again. This went on for some time, and, 
in spite of the habit, my sound physique enabled me 
to hold out and I was graduated with honours. After 
graduating I began work in a morning newspaper 
office, but became more and more addicted to the use 
of liquor and cigarettes. I was going from bad to 
worse, but at this time at the tearful entreaties of my 
mother, I gave up the use of liquor and have never 
tasted it since; but I could not give up cigarettes. 
My associates were cursed with the same habit that 
was killing me, and before we would begin our day’s 
work we would each roll sixty cigarettes and lay them 
near at hand on our desks. By the time our work 
was done we would have them all smoked up. This 
practice soon began to have its effect. I could not 
study, I could not sleep, I could not enjoy life. 

“At this stage I was sent to interview a prominent 
man. After he became acquainted with me he offered 
me a position such as any young man in this country 
would have been glad to accept. The arrangements 
were all completed, but his final words were, ‘ I notice 
that you smoke cigarettes. If you accept this position 
it must be on condition that you stop.’ I gladly 
accepted the position, determined never to smoke 
again, but soon began to suffer the agonies of the 
damned. I finally had to give up the position and 
went back to my newspaper work and my cigarettes. 
A young fellow who had not a tenth of the education 
and ability I possessed, but who was a non-smoker, 
took the position and will probably make a grand 
success of it.” 

Tears were flowing down his cheeks as well as mine 
and he could not continue. 

“ That is what cigarettes have done for me,” he said 
between sobs, “and they are ruining the lives of 
thousands of others in just the same way. Why do?i't 
somebody do something for the boys in our schools and 
colleges f” I could only say—“If God will give me 
the strength and the means, I shall never rest till it is 
done. I am glad that I believe the Lord will provide 
both.”— Life BoaL 







n6 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


band of Hope Addresses.—Series I. 


MANKIND IN THE MARRING & MENDING. 

LESSON FOR TEACHERS AND SENIOR MEMBERS. 


By T. N. KELYNACK, M.D., M.R.C.P., 

Hon. Secretary of the Society for the Study of Inebriety. 


No. 8.—ALCOHOL AND THE MAN. 


T HE mature man is the ripest product of evolution. 
To him it is given to stand as lord and ruler 
of creation. He has almost limitless powers 
for development. His capacity for grasping 
and moulding matter, and directing the forces 
of nature is practically boundless. The glory of the 
Creator and the majesty of the Divine mind stand 
revealed in the Human. His physical powers may be 
small, but in intellectual vigour and moral dignity 
he would seem to be lettered by no restrictions. 
Man’s duty is clear: the attainment of the highest 
and the dedication of his best. 

The ideal man is he who, perfect in development, 
is also perfect in the fulfilment of duty. 

The actual man is oftentimes marred in the making, 
and is hampered and hindered in service. 

The fatal flaws are being clearly recognised. The 
evidences of decadence are all too apparent. The 
marks of degeneracy are branded on vast numbers of 
our fellow countrymen. Deterioration is indelibly 
written on the frames of a large section of the com¬ 
munity. The question is now seen to be one of 
pressiflg national importance. 

[Consult such recent works as “Alcohol: its Place 
and Power in Legislation,” by Dr. Robinson Souttar 
(Hodder and Stoughton, 1904); “Physical Deteriora¬ 
tion : its Causes and the Cure,” by Mrs. A. Watt 
Smyth (Murray, 1904.) Valuable evidence on “ The 
Relationship of Alcohol to Physical Deterioration” 
was recently collected by an influential committee of 
medical men, and presented to a special committee 
appointed by H.M. Privy Council, but is not yet 
published.] 

Alcohol and the Maintenance of Vigorous Life. 

Alcohol has long been considered an agent rich in 
benefits. Alcoholic beverages have until recently had 
a place in most men’s dietary. Drink has been, and 
perhaps still is, viewed by the majority as a definite 
nutrient. In health it has been considered a desirable 
food, and in disease a preserver and builder-up of 
tissues. The dangers of indulgence have oftentimes 
been minimised, and in not far distant days the 
disasters thought likely to accrue from abstinence 
were tabulated in all seriousness. Tradition, custom, 
prejudice, and ignorance still do much to perpetuate 
the ancient misapprehensions. Of recent years the 
investigation of alcohol and the study of its action 
have afforded a sure basis on which sound common- 
sense practice may be founded. Alcohol has been 
proved to be a poisonous agent to the physical basis 
of life. [See Professor Sims Woodhead’s “ Recent 
Researches on the Action of Alcohol in Health and 
Sickness,” the British Journal of Inebriety. Vol I., 
page 116.] 

And for the individual life, when considered as a 
whole, the most reliable statistical studies go to show 
that total abstinence may afford distinct advantages. 
Alcohol, instead of assisting in the maintenance of 
vigorous life, as was formally claimed, has been 
proved to be prejudicial, even when used in quantities 
which, until recently, were almost without exception 
admitted to be strictly moderate, and thought by the 
majority of persons to be altogether harmless. 

[For valuable evidence on this point see The Medical 
Temperance Review, published by Richard J. James, 
3 & 4, London House Yard, Paternoster Row, E.C.] 


Alcohol and Physical Endurance. 

Man is oftentimes viewed as a machine. It is a 
useful although limited aspect. The healthy man 
has considerable powers of physical endurance. He 
possesses a large reserve fund. A reasonable amount 
of work makes for physical well-being. With a 
robust body rest speedily rectifies and readjusts. The 
sense of fatigue is nature’s safeguard. Alcohol tends 
to lower bodily powers in many ways. The vitality 
of the individual tissues may be lowered. Powers of 
resistance and means making for recreation are 
lessened. The calls of the body for a restoring rest 
are in danger of being silenced. The controlling 
mechanism suffers derangement. 

The athlete and sportsman speedily learn that 
alcohol is an agent to be shunned. Time after time 
it has been shown that the alcoholised labourer is 
placed at a serious disadvantage when competing 
with the abstaining workman. 

Man can accommodate himself to the widest varia¬ 
tions in climatic conditions, and the greatest difference 
in character of work and conditions of life, for he 
possesses almost limitless power of adjustment; but, 
generally speaking, alcohol does much to lower this 
power of regulation and adaptation, and thereby 
limits greatly working power, and the means of 
maintaining bodily health. 

Alcohol and Mental Activity. 

Although alcohol is commonly spoken of as a 
stimulant, it is more correctly described as a narcotic. 
It exercises a very distinct action on the highest 
centres of the brain. It tends to remove the 
restiaining influences of the judgment and will, 
and by relaxing inhibitory powers may permit a 
greater freedom for the expression of emotions and 
feelings. It is probably due to this fact that many 
still have the impression that alcohol favours mental 
activity. Many brain-workers, however, from personal 
experience have arrived at the conclusion that their 
best work is done without resort to alcohol; and 
investigations, carried out in accordance with modern 
psycho-physiological methods, and in which delicate 
instruments of precision allow of a reliable graphic 
record being taken of mental action, go to show that 
the brain can act best without alcohol. The student 
and teacher, the writer and speaker, and he who in 
whatsoever sphere of life’s activities has to depend on 
quick and accurate brain action, should realise that 
experiment and experience both support the attitude 
of the abstainer as rational and desirable. And 
particularly in these days of incessant mental activity, 
when exposure to stress and strain seems inevitable, 
intellectual workers should shun all that makes 
for physiological overthrow and psychological 
deterioration. [See “The Relation of Inebriety to 
Mental Diseases,” by Dr. Robert Jones, The British 
Journal of Inebriety, July, 1904.] 

Alcoholism and National Progress. 

Alcoholism is undoubtedly a most important cause 
of much of the widespread morbidity which so greatly 
hinders national advancement. 

The effects of alcoholism in the individual canuot 
be limited to the affected unit. The so-called Tempe¬ 
rance question, therefore, becomes one of general 
importance. Rightly viewed it is but a part of 
national hygiene; and in all matters concerning the 
weal of the State, the State should have the right to 
control. 

The working man, in whatsoever form of labour he 
may be engaged, and in whatever social sphere his 
lot may be cast, needs to be taught the nature of 
alcohol’s influence, and must learn the scientific 
principles on which his conduct should be based. 
But he should abstain not only to avoid personal 
danger and gain individual advantage, but in order 
that, in so far as lies within him, he may assist in the 
advancement of his people, and the secure upbuilding 
of a mighty empire by a truly imperial race. 






THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


117 


Band of Mope Addresses.—Series M. 


SIMPLE SCIENCE CHATS. 

By Charges Harvey, 

Secretary, Kent Band of Hope Union. 

No. 8.—“THE VENTILATORS AND THE 
PUMP.” 

THE LUNGS ARE THE VENTILATORS. 
THE HEART IS THE PUMP. 

ALCOHOL HINDERS VENTILATION. 

1. Lessens Oxygen going in and Carbonic Acid 

coining out. 

2. Injures the Lungs, causing Disease. 

ALCOHOL WEAKENS THE HEART. 

1. By adding to its Work. 2. By covering it with Fat. 


O UR last lesson taught us about digestion, and 
how the alcohol hinders the process by which 
solid foods become liquid. 

Let us now turn to another part of our bodies. 
I11 the chest we shall find two important 
organs—the heart and the lungs. It would be 
impossible to live v/ithout these organs, and hence 
injury to either of them means much suffering and 
ill-health. Now, what effect does alcohol have upon 
these vital organs ? 

Ventilation. 

How necessary it is that houses, schools, churches, and 
all rooms should be properly ventilated. This simply 
means letting in fresh air, and getting rid of foul air. 
Let us learn the difference between these two kinds 
of air. Good, fresh, and pure air consists of two 
gases—nitrogen and oxygen. If we take 100 parts of 
such air, 79 will be nitrogen and 21 oxygen. It is this 
latter gas that supports life. Without oxygen we 
could not live. Before going down a disused well 
men first lower a lighted candle. If the light burns 
it shows the presence of oxygen ; but if it goes out it 
would be dangerous to descend it. What is meant by 
foul air ? It means air with impurities in it, the 
chief of which is a poisonous gas called carbonic acid. 
The composition of bad air reads something like 
this: nitrogen 79, oxygen 17, carbonic acid 4—100. 
The presence of carbonic acid in the air is soon 
detected. We get heavy and sleepy; we say the room 
is “ stuffy.” We remember about the Black Hole of 
Calcutta. It was on June 19, 1756, when a cruel 
Indian Prince ordered his soldiers to put 146 
English prisoners into a small military prison. The 
cell was only about eighteen feet square, and had two 
small windows. The uight was very hot What an 
awful scene that must have been—146 human beings 
struggling to breathe. When the door was opened in 
the morning, 123 were dead ! 

The Lungs, or the Ventilators. 

The windows and other means are used for ventila¬ 
ting our rooms, houses, &c. ; and in our wonderful 
living houses our lungs are the ventilators. We need 
a great deal of fresh air each day. We breathe 17 
times every minute, or about 1,000 times each hour, 
or 24,000 times each day. Every time we breathe 
we take in nearly a pint of air. In a day, then, we 
require something like 20,000 pints of a'ir, or 2,500 
gallons. The air passes into our bodies through our 
nostrils or mouth. It travels down a hard pipe into 
our throats called the wind-pipe. This divides into 
two pipes, one conveying the air to the right lung, 
and the other to the left lung. These two pipes, 
called bronchus, sub-divide into a vast number of 
pipes known as bronchial tubes, and then end in 
small air cells, which thus form the lungs. It would 


take sixty or seventy of these air cells placed side by 
side in a straight line to measure an inch. It is in 
the little air cells that the exchange goes on. The 
good oxygen is passed through into the blood stream 
to be carried by the tiny red corpuscles of the blood 
to all parts of the body. It is the same little 
corpuscles that bring back to the lungs the bad 
carbonic acid. This is passed through the air cells, 
and, conveyed by the pipes, is thus breathed out of 
our bodies. 

Alcohol and the Lungs. 

Even in the work of the lungs we find that alcohol is 
a hinderer, an enemy. By putting some clear lime water 
into a tumbler, and then, breathing through a tube 
into the lime water it becomes of a milky appearance. 
This is proof of the presence of carbonic acid gas. If 
a person who has been taking alcohol breathes into 
the lime water it becomes less milky, thus showing 
that less carbonic acid has been breathed out. This 
also indicates that less oxygen has been taken in. 
Alcohol lessens oxygen going in and carbonic acid 
coming out. Alcohol is a cause of injury to the lungs 
themselves, and people who are in the habit of 
drinking it are much more subject to catching colds, 
which may develop into such serious diseases as 
bronchitis, inflammation, congestion of the lungs, and 
pneumonia. Thousands of people die of these 
diseases who should either have pulled through or 
missed them altogether. Alcohol injures the lungs. 

The Heart, or the Pump. 

The blood vessels all over our bodies are kept full 
of blood by means of a great pump—the heart. 

The heart is situated in the centre of the chest, 
surrounded by the lungs. It is very important. 
Although we could live without an arm, or leg, or eye; 
yet should the heart cease its work we should die. 
In shape it is something like a pear, and its size is 
about equal to the closed fist of the one to whom it 
belongs. It is divided into two parts by a fleshy 
partition—a right and left side. The right side pumps 
blood to the lungs ; while the left side pumps it to 
all parts of the body. Each part is divided across; 
therefore, the heart is like a small house with four 
tiny rooms. Think of the enormous amount of work 
the heart is called upon to do. In twenty-four hours 
it beats 100,000 times, and each beat means work 
done, the force used sends out two or three ounces 
of blood, besides pressing forward all the blood in our 
blood vessels. Although the heart is called upon to 
do so much work, yet between the beats it does get 
some slight rest. During the night, when we are 
sleeping, the heart’s beats are not so rapid, and it is 
therefore getting rest. This resting is of the utmost 
importance, and anything that increases the action 
of the heart must cause injury. 

Alcohol and the Heart. 

All extra exertion will increase the heart’s action. 
This we cannot always avoid. Alcohol has the effect 
of increasing the beating of the heart. This is un¬ 
necessary exertion. The heart-beats in twenty-four 
hours are 100,000. But if one ounce of alcohol be takent 
in, say, a pint of common ale, the beating of the heart 
in twenty-four hours is found to be 104,000. A pint 
of strong ale will contain about two ounces of 
alcohol, and if this be taken in a day the heart is 
found to beat about 10S ooo times, an increase of 
8,000 beats. Although this increased action would 
not cause much harm if it only occurred now 
and then, we must remember that drinkers of 
alcohol drink it every day. Thus in the long 
run, the heart becomes enormously overworked, 
and must result in a shortening of life. There 
is another injury doctors find alcohol does to the 
heart. It causes fat to accumulate on it. This fat 
will sometimes completely cover it. If the heart has 
this extra weight of fat on it, its muscles have to do 
extra work, and so again an injury is caused. Alcohol 
weakens the heart (1) by overworking it, and (2) by 
loading it with fat. 

[Friends using’ this lesson are recommended to use with it the 
Diagrams, which maybe purchased at 60. Old Bailey, E,C.] 







Ii8 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series V. 


YARNS WITH YOUNG PEOPLE. 

By Thomas Palmer, 

Leicestershire Band of Hope Union. 


No. 4.—SEASIDE LESSONS. 


HO does not enjoy a seaside holiday? especially 
if they live in the heart of the country—in 
the Midlands! 

What varied sights one meets with ! How 
delightful is the fresh sea air, how interesting 
are the life-boat, life buoys, lighthouse, sea gulls, 
bathers, children on the sands, and a hundred other 
objects! Yes, these are all interesting, but they are 
suggestive also. Think of a few lessons which these 
and similar objects teach. 

The Lighthouse, 

with its revolving light, warning the mariner against 
the sand banks, sunken rocks, and other dangers of 
the sea. Looking across the dark, deep waters, one 
is thankful for the warning light which had prevented 
so many noble vessels and brave-hearted men from 
becoming the victims of wreckage. 

The lifeboat is a magnificent thing, and the men 
who “ man ” it are brave and strong; it is a grand 
work to rescue people from a wrecked ship; we are 
thankful for the life-boat. 

But the lighthouse is better, as it prevents wreck¬ 
age, and this is to be preferred. It is wiser and 
better to prevent an ill than to let the ill be done and 
then try to mend it. 

The Band of Hope is a Lighthouse. 

It is noble to try to save the drunkard, but it is 
better to prevent people ever becoming drunkards. 
It is wiser to keep boys and girls sober, than to let 
them become wrecks on the sea of life and then 
try to rescue them. Thank God for the Band of Hope 
Lighthouse! 

The BelLBuoy. 

A large buoy,which when rocked by the waves gives 
out a sound like the ringing of a bell. This buoy is 
moored to the rocks, and 011 a dark night when the 
mariner is making for the harbour, this bell sounds 
out its note of warning, so that the vessel may keep 
clear of the danger. 

Here is the warning voice of danger ahead. It is 
little use warning one ajter the mischief is done. 

This is the work of the Band of Hope, too. It 
gives warning to boys and girls of the risks they run 
if they take strong drink. It tells of the rocks, 
shoals, and quicksands of the liquor traffic, and says, 
“ Beware, lest your life become a wreck.” 

Sea Hulls. 

See how the gulls follow the vessel. Some of the 
passengers throw biscuits into the sea and then the 
gulls swoop down and pick them up out of the water. 
A man once thought he would play a trick with the 
birds. He wrapped up a piece of paper so as to 
resemble a biscuit and he threw this out, but the eye 
of the sea gull was too keen to be deceived. It knew 
that w'hich was good from that which was worthless, 
and so passed the paper by. 

How wise would men and women be if they acted 
in like manner. There would be no drinking of 
intoxicants then, as they are worse than worthless 
beverages and valueless as foods. A teacher, giving 
a lesson upon milk and beer, pointed out what a lot 
of valuable material was to be found in milk. Said 
he, “ If I put a gallon of milk into a pan and evapo¬ 
rate the water, I have flesh-forming, bone-buildmg, 
and heat-giving foods left behind. Now boys, suppose 
I put a gallon of beer in a pan and evaporate the 
w'ater what should I have lelt ? ” and a sharp lad 
answered, “ The pan.” He was not far wrong, as beer 
is almost destitute of food material. 

The Band of Hope is a school in which you learn 


the true value of alcoholic drinks, and how wasteful 
is the expenditure upon them. Be like the sea gull, 
keep your eyes open, be on the alert, shun the worth¬ 
less, and hold fast to that which is good. 

Castle Building on the Sands. 

Perhaps some of you have engaged in this occupa¬ 
tion. What fun it is! How eagerly the children 
watch the incoming tide which threatens to demolish 
the results of their labour. Look! One little fellow 
has taken special pains with his castle. Besides 
building a much larger one than the rest he has taken 
the precaution of putting a wall and a deep moat 
round it. When finished he proudly looks upon it, 
evidently thinking that it might survive the encroach¬ 
ment of the sea! But, by-and-by, the returning tide 
comes nearer, and at last a larger wave makes a breach 
in the wall and floods the moat. Before long not even 
the shape of the castle is to be seen. 

Is not this a picture of the life of many boys and 
girls who have tried to build up a character on what 
is called “moderation”? They pride themselves on 
their safety and firmness. The flowing tide of drink¬ 
ing will not touch them, they will be all right, and so on. 
But alas! there comes along a stronger wave of tempta¬ 
tion, and once having made a breach in the wall by 
partaking of drink, the castle of their character is 
unsafe, and ere long becomes a ruin in the face of so 
strong an enemy to which they have given quarter. 

Moderate drinking is an unsafe—a sandy—founda¬ 
tion on which to build. 

How different from the 

Strong Sea Wall, 

which is built of huge blocks of stone, against which 
the waves boom for years, but which keeps back the 
incoming tide. Take the rock of total abstinence on 
which to build your character for sobriety; none other 
is safe. 

It is always interesting to watch good swimmers 

Taking their Morning Dip. 

One bright, fresh morning everything looked 
lovely, and people bathed in the early sunlight. The 
sea was calm, and the shimmering light made it 
appear like liquid silver. All was quiet save now and 
then the beating of the wings of some stray gull or 
the splash of the water caused by the bathers at the 
foot of the cliff. 

Beware ! 

Look! all, save one, kept within the shelter of a 
jutting rock. The one exception was a massive, 
muscular man, an expert swimmer, and he seemed 
not to care about keeping so near the shore. His 
movements in the water were the admiration of all 
the onlookers, and with a powerful stroke he swam 
out to sea. By-and-by there came the sound of a 
voice over the still, calm water, and, looking out in 
the direction of the swimmer, we could see him throw 
up his hands, evidently calling for help. “Oh,” said 
one, “he is seized with cramp.” “No,” said a native, 
“that isn’t it, he’s got into the undercurrent. 
Outside there is a strong undercurrent; you can’t see 
it, but it’s there ; and it’s strong enough to carry any¬ 
one out to sea, and then there’s no hope for them.” 
A boat was pushed off and the man was ultimately 
rescued in an exhausted condition. 

Be Not Drawn Away. 

This is symbolic of the public house. Of its tinsel 
glitter and glare, of its polished mahogany counters 
and bars, its gay decorations, its music, its apparently 
jovial company. All these are on the surface, but 
beneath, often unseen, but ofiener felt, is the “ under¬ 
current ” ; strong enough to carry anyone out into the 
sea of drunkenness and despair if they but place 
themselves within its influence by taking alcoholic 
drink. 

Boys! girls! beware of the undercurrent. Keep 
well within the shelter of the rock—your Band of 
Hope pledge. Keep that, and let no tempter prevail 
upon you to throv yourselves into the dangerous 
undercurrent of the public house. 






THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series VI. 


TAKE CARE OF “ NUMBER ONE.” 

By W. N. Edwards, F.C.S., 

Science Lecturer, United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 

FIRE AND FORCE. 


EFFECT. 

HEAT. 

STEAM. 
ELECTRICITY. 
HYDRAULICS. 
VITAL FORCE. 


Alcoholic Liquors are False Heat-Givers 


K UMBER ONE ” has not only to be fed, 
nourished, and protected, but he has to be 
warmed. The thermometer will tell us that 
whilst the body is healthy heat is maintained 
at a regular fixed point of about 9S degrees. 
When we see a fire burning we are witnessing a 
rapid form of combustion. Burning really consists 
of a chemical change in which the carbon of the 
material is uniting with oxygen to form carbonic 
acid gas, and the flame, smoke and heat are the 
outward and visible signs of the chemical change 
that is going on. 

If combustion is very slow, as it is in the body, 
then no flame will be seen, and the amount of heat 
will be comparatively small; when the combustion 
is quick, as in a fire, the flame is seen and the heat is 
greater, but when the combustion is very rapid, such 
as is the case with gunpowder, then there is only a 
flash and an explosion, with the rapid evolution of 
.heat. Combustion goes on within the human body, 
but it is a slow combustion, with a gradual and 
regular production of heat. 

Heat 

is one of the greatest forces of which we know. The 
most ready way of obtaining heat is to make a fire 
of some material that will burn ; but, of course, we 
may get heat in other ways. When we rub our hands 
together they begin to feel warm, and in this case 
heat is obtained by friction. If we increase the 
friction then the heat becomes greater. Meteors and 
other brilliant bodies falling through the air give off 
both light and heat because of the friction developed 
in their exceedingly rapid fall through the atmo¬ 
sphere. The word 

Cold 

simply signifies the absence of heat. The more heat 
a substance loses, the colder it becomes. For 
instance, a glassful of hot water gives off heat, but it 
gradually becomes colder until it reaches the tem¬ 
perature of the surrounding air, but it still contains 
some heat, for if we now stand the glass in a freezing 
mixture, the water loses more heat and gradually 
becomes frozen. 

It is the heat of the greatest of all fires, the sun, 
that warms the world in which we live, and clothes 
it with all its wondrous beauty. • Even rain would be 
impossible were it not for the heat of the sun drawing 
up water as vapour, which presently condenses into 
clouds, and fails to the earth as rain. The world 
could not continue to exist for a moment were it not 
for the immense volume and immense heat of the 
sun. What a mighty and important force heat is. 
Steam 

is a great force ; for by its aid we keep the world’s 
wheels moving, but steam is only water at a high 
temperature. When water takes up a certain amount 
of heat (212 degrees), it can no longer remain in a 
liquid condition, but at once turns into a vapour, 


119 

occupying, however, very much larger space. A 
pint of water produces 1,728 pints of steam. When 
this steam is confined within the small limits of the 
boiler, it exerts great pressure, and it is the force of 
this pressure that gives it the power to work the 
engine. But heat is the great power behind the 
steam, for if the fires are allowed to go down, then 
the water cools and there is no more steam. We 
can now see the connection between fire and force. 
Electricity. 

It may be said by some young folks that electricity 
is a great force, and that, perhaps, steam will one day 
be a thing of the past. That may be so, but many 
great discoveries and wonderful advances will have 
to be made before that is the case. There is a close 
association between heat and electricity, but we 
must always remember that the electric fluid is a 
very different thing from fire. With our present 
knowledge the readiest way to get a large current of 
electricity is by means of a dynamo, and as a rule the 
dynamo is necessarily driven by steam power, and 
the steam is obtained by heat, so that once again we 
see that fire is behind the force of electricity. But, 
says some one, could we not drive the dynamo by 
water power ? Certainly that could be done, but a 
moment’s reflection shows us that heat and fire are 
still behind, as the primary agents. Fast flowing 
rivers are the result of melting ice or snow, or of 
falling rain. None of these could be obtained 
without the heat of the sun, and so our friend the fire 
is still the active force. 

Hydraulics 

offer a wonderful exhibition of force and power. 
Hydraulic force is obtained by water pressure, and is, 
like that of electricity, of great service to man. As a 
rule, however, the pump by which the water pressure 
is gained is worked by steam, and so once again we 
see that to develop hydraulic force to any extent the 
steam and fire and heat are necessary, and so we can 
safely say that fire is behind hydraulic force. We 
see, then, that this wonderful thing, heat, is behind 
all these other great forces, and, indeed, it would not 
be difficult to show that heat and the absence of heat 
accounted in a large measure for all the great 
physical changes that are going on every moment of 
time. There is, then, a great connection between 
heat and energy, or, in other words, heat and force. 

Vital Force. 

Everyone knows that our bodies are capable of 
exhibiting force. We can move, walk, run, lift, work, 
and in all these things we are liberating energy, and 
so using up material that heat is produced as a result. 
When our bodies can no longer produce heat, they 
will be cold and dead, and unable to do any further 
work. There is a very close connection between the 
heat of the body and vital force. Vital force is the 
power by which we live a healthy, vigorous, and long 
life. One of the first things the doctor does when he 
comes is to take the temperature of his patient 
because he knows that any variation from the 
regular 9S degrees will indicate that something is 
wrong. There are certain parts of our foods, such as 
sugars, starches, fats, and oils, that are slowly burned 
in the body, and thus keep up the temperature to 
ts proper condition. Such foods are called car¬ 
bonaceous foods, because they contain carbon in a 
form that can be utilised by the human body. A 
man in the Arctic regions eats plenty of oil and fat, 
because his surroundings are so cold, that his bod}' 
loses heat quickly, and so such a man must take 
plenty of heat-giving food. A man in India or the 
tropics avoids such foods, and lives upon material 
that does not supply a large amount of carbon. Itr 
his case, the body is losing less heat, and he, therefore, 
requires less ofthe warmth-giving foods. The lesson 
that we must learn is that wholesome foods and 
exercise or work are necessary to maintain the body 
in good condition, and to get all the force that we can 
out of it. All kinds of intoxicating liquors lessen force 
and lower vitality, whilst alcohol itself is a heat reducer 
instead of a heat giver The great lesson is, stick to 
good food, and avoid alcohol in any form whatever. 











120 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE 


J^tart tit S.tfe. 

Music by IT. A. Ashton. 







r .n |f :n .r 


rife. This world is a stage of ex - cite - ment,. There's dan - ger wlier ev - er you 

flee. The gain - bling halls are be - fore you. Their lights how they dance to and 

sin. Temp - ta - tions will go on in - creas - ing. As streams from a riv - u - let 
















































































































































































































































































































THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


121 



Chorus (ist time Solo, 2nd time Harmony). 
Have cour -agfe, my boy, to say “No!' 


‘No! ” 


If 


















































































































































































































































































































122 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Ifoome Oomo. 


A NORTHAMPTONSHIRE VETERAN. 

O N June 27 there passed away at Kettering one of 
the noblest workers in our cause the Midland 
Counties ever produced—Mr. Frederick Smith, 
a man with a courage and devotion as rare as 
they were inspiring. The Rev. F. C. Lusty, of 
Kettering, has sent us an interesting sketch of the 
life-work of our friend, and only the exigencies of 
space prevent us from using it in full. He tells us 
that he passed away “ full of years, and crowned with 
the glory of a stainless fame, and the affectionate 
regard of numberless friends. His was a singularly 
noble life, unselfish, kind, helpful, devoted to good 
works, and for more than half-a-century consecrated 
to the Temperance cause, with an intelligence, zeal, 
and enthusiasm which won universal respect and 
admiration, and exercised an unparalleled influence 
in the town and district. Mr. Smith was the sole sur¬ 
vivor of an earnest band of workers who founded the 
Northamptonshire Band of Hope Union in 1856.” He 
served it well, became its President, and rejoiced in 
its growth. His chief work was at Kettering, where 
he became superintendent of the Band of Hope fifty- 
two years ago, and he worked it wisely and well. 
The young people were united, interested, and 
inspired with zeal by his earnest example ; many of 
them have become Temperance men, and have 
helped the world as merchants, manufacturers, town 
or county councillors, guardians and ministers of 
religion. One of the latter recently wrote to him, 
saying, “I thank you for the interest you took in me 
in my younger days; I owe my present position more 
to you than to any other man; for it was on the Band 
of Hope platform I first learned to speak, and 
probably but for that I should not to-day be a 
preacher.” Mr. Smith secured nearly 5,000 pledges ; 
at his suggestion Kettering Temperance Hall was 
built, and he helped in the adult movement as well in 
various ways. He patiently strove for unfermented 
wine at Communion, and at length won that long 
fight. He knew his subject through and through, 
was a keen debater, and overwhelmed all opposition. 
When he was three-score-and-ten he still went out 
speaking, even on wet, wintry nights. At length he 
sank under a painful illness, and his funeral drew 
crowds to witness to the value of his helpful life. 
“Our urgent need to-day is more men of his noble 
type.” May his brave example bring many young 
people into the front line: for the battle has still to 
be fought—and won ! 

- ♦:♦♦>♦> - 

“ The Trade I” 

By the Rev. C. E. Stanley Thomas, of Hull. 

HE TRADE! Need we say, What trade? 
Alas, there is one trade pay excellence , which 
is too well known to require explanation. 
“Licensed to sell beer, wines, spirits, and 
tobacco.” This sign is w T ell known. These 
shops are all about. We need not run far. 
Most street corners are monopolised by them. And 
vie might well call them Co-operative Drug Stores. 
Woe to the man who is thirsty, for he will soon be 
magnetically inclined to enter in and quench the 
thirst, which requires so many glasses to do it 
properly. The proprietors of these premises are 
called brewers and publicans, and doubtless they may 
believe their business is legitimate, even though it is 
carried on at the expense of all the vilest crimes that 
human nature is capable of. But I do not wonder 
that many true and tender-hearted men and women 
regret the day they ever consented to serve at a 
bar where men make themselves worse than the 
beasts of the field. For surely this traffic in strong 
drink is not suitable for that growth in spiritual 
grace and salvation which is necessary tor the 
Christian. 


The man who is drunk in the streets and disturbs 
the neighbourhood is locked up by the guardians of 
the law, but what about those who disturb the sacred 
privacy of home, and show a cursed example to wife 
and children ! These miserable drunkards bring ruin 
and desolation wherever they come, and turn the 
otherwise peaceful household into a wretched bear¬ 
garden. Such moral and spiritual wreckage is not 
recorded in the daily press; and it is as true of this 
cursed social and domestic shame as it was true of 
the blessed things that Jesus did, that “if they 
should be written every one, I suppose that even the 
world itself could not contain the books that should 
be written.” Truly the volumes of “ The Story of 
England’s Degradation by the Traffic in Strong 
Drink” would be appalling in their size and pathos 
and despairing testimony. But who dare attempt to 
write them ? Only the Recording Angel himself, 
only One who can pierce through the hidden mazes 
of human hearts and lives, and to whom there is no 
secret thing in all creation. 

A great outcry is being raised against the present 
Licensing Bill, and its active opponents tell us in 
plain language that this Government solution will 
but strengthen the hands of the publican and the 
brewer, which God forbid ; for their hands are strong 
enough already, and their mighty influence is felt 
throughout the whole community. If it is so, then 
let us hope that the amendments to this Bill will so 
weaken their hands that good may once more come 
out of evil; and those who. like the Bishop of 
Norwich, are ho vied down by disorder from bearing 
witness to their faith on this question, may rejoice at 
a true and national Temperance Reformation, which 
is so grievously needed at this present time. 

We will not despair. Scotland is helping the 
movement by closing her public houses one hour 
earlier, and in our own beloved England, Liverpool 
has not shunned the facing of this crying evil by 
diminishing the number of licences, and in this 
way the witness for Temperance reform is being 
strengthened and encouraged, even while it is being 
weakened and discouraged in others. Therefore, let 
us do what we can by example and precept—the 
former is the more forcible—and, as far as in us lies, 
let us become total abstainers from that which 
medical science teaches is no essential requisite of a 
healthy body and vigorous mind. 

And let us do all we can to help forward the Band 
of Hope movement in the land. “Tremble, thou 
tyrants, we are growing up for God,” must be the 
watchword of this juvenile army of Temperance 
advocates. And as we watch their bright young 
faces, and hear their voices ringing out the pure 
properties of “Water bright, from the crystal 
spring,” and as we welcome many a child from the 
families of publicans themselves, we look forward to 
a future full of promise for our drink-enslaved 
England, when, encouraged by these youthful and 
healthy teetotalers, and freed from the bias that 
alcohol is necessary to physical well-being, she 
shall throw off the yoke of bondage, and not allow 
the multitudinous increase of public houses in the 
busy thoroughfares and quiet bye-streets of our 
otherwise prosperous and progressive cities. 

-♦>♦>*-- 

Valparaiso. —We are frequently cheered by messages 
from this distant part of the world recording the 
progress of the Band of Hope movement. In The 
Record, issued by the Rev. Dr. Inglis in connection 
with Union Church, the Band of Hope is regularly 
notified to meet on Saturdays at 3 p.m. In a recent 
issue a long extract appeared from Mr. Edward 
W’ood’s speech at our workers' meeting in January, as 
reported in the Band oe Hope Chronicle for 
February. Mr. C. Jenkins, who wrote the article in 
which the quotation occurs, rejoices at the work 
done in England, though he does not forget that 
much remains to be done. He gives several en¬ 
couraging facts concerning Valparaiso, and says there 
are in their Gospel Temperance Union and Band of 
Hope 190 members. 









THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


123 


Alexandra Palaee Festival. 


O N Saturday, June 18, the Alexandra Palace to the 
north of London—a place which was built to 
rival the Crystal Palace in the south—was 
thronged with thousands of people, old and 
young, on the occasion of the annual Summer Festival 
arranged by the Hackney and Fast Middlesex Band 
of Hope Union. The weather was fine, and the affair, 
managed with great care, was very successful. The 
Hackney Mercury of July 2, crowned the work by 
giving nearly a whole page to a detailed description 
of the fete. 

At 11 a.m. Old English sports began on the plateau 
facing the lake, and as there were over 500 entries, the 
stewards had plenty of work, and the competitors and 
spectators plenty of fun and excitement. The events 
comprised flat races for boys and girls ; skipping races 
for girls ; three-legged races for boys ; potato races for 
boys and girls; high jumping and long jumping; 
girls’ egg and spoon race ; pick-a-back races for boys ; 
sack races; blindfold races for boys ; obstacle race for 
boys: wheelbarrow race for boys; needle-threading 
race for girls, and tug-of-war for boys. 

At noon competitions in vocal music took place in 
Room No. 7, the Judges being Mr. H. G. Johnson, 
Mr. J. Litt, B.A., and Mr. O. Thoday. Mrs. S. Rawson 
was accompanist, and the contests included solo 
singing, duets, and trios. At the same hour the instru¬ 
mental competitions took place in the Tower Room in 
the West Corridor, the Judge being Miss Edith 
Swepstone, A.G.S.M. The classes were piano solos, 
violin solos, instrumental playing at sight, instru¬ 
mental quartettes, and piano duets. 

Very popular features were choral contests. Some 
took place in the Bijou Theatre, the first prize for 
three-part choirs being the silver-plated challenge 
shield, to be held for one year; Mr. G. William 
Williams was the Judge. The shield, value ^7 7s., 
was won by Excelsior (Shoreditch Cottage Homes) 
Band of Hope, conducted by Mr. G. R. Stothard. 
The Gibraltar Mission Society from Bethnal Green 
won honourable mention. The choirs had to 
number not more than thirty and not less than twenty. 
In the two-part choral contest, the choir of Wood- 
berry Down S. S. Band of Hope won first prize, 
conducted by Miss Rhoda Stutter; the ‘•Richard 
Bragg ” Juvenile Temple took second, conducted by 
Mr. George Jewels; and St. James’s Presbyterian, 
Wood Green, third, conducted by Mr. McEwen. 
Each choir had to sing three pieces, including one 
of their own selection. 

Junior choirs (unison songs) competed in the 
Londesborough Hall, Woodberry Down, beating 
Hilcot Street, Haggerston. 

At 1.30 the contests in physical drill drew a great 
crowd of spectators to the Central Hall. Mrs. Wight- 
man, of the Princess May School, and Mr. Huggett, 
of Monnow Road School, were the judges. The 
senior decorated shield was awarded t'o the Gibraltar 
Mission Band of Hope from Bethnal Green, the drill, 
under Mr. Walsby’s direction, being excellent. For 
the juniors the challenge shield fell to Morning Lane, 
Hackney, Band of Hope, with Miss Hetty Hall as 
Instructor. The Friends’ Hall, Barnet Grove, received 
a decorated shield, and two other societies were com¬ 
mended. There were special prizes for Institutional 
Bands of Hope ; the shield fell to the Hackney Train¬ 
ing Schools, under Miss Kate Baker ; “ The Onward ” 
Band of Hope (Chase Farm Schools) won the decorated 
shield, and the “ Excelsior (Shoreditch Cottage 
Homes) received a certificate of merit. 

The Angel Road Mission did some Maypole drill 
well, and received a certificate of merit; and there 
was also some combined plain and fancy skipping. 

But perhaps the “ Grand March Past and Review ” 
was one of the most striking features of the day’s 
proceedings. The prize was a decorated shield to the 
Band of Hope arranging the best procession, and 
there were twenty-one entries. The judges were the 
Mayor of Hackney (Capt. H. Wells-Holland, J.P.) and 
Mr. Charles Wakely (Secretary, United Kingdom 
Band of Hope Union), who, supported by Mr. F. 


Sherlock (Chairman of the Union), and other leading 
friends, assembled at the saluting poiut marked by 
flag. The procession was ably arranged by Mr. 
William Ashton, Chief Marshal. The general appear¬ 
ance of the young people, headed by the handsome 
banners of the Union, was excellent, and one could 
but earnestly hope that not one would ever fall a 
victim to the drink curse of the country. The 
terraces were thronged with visitors, who were loud 
in their applause. The order of procession was 
settled by ballot. 

First came the Wood Green Congregational, with 
large anchor and banner, and children cairving 
festoons of roses—the effect being very pretty. After 
the Bush Hill Park Congregational came four lads 
representing soldiers of the time of David. O11 their 
shields was inscribed “ The pen is mightier than the 
sword.” For spears they had gilt pens. Next came 
David, with an escort on each side carrying banner¬ 
ettes, and a boy carrying Goliath’s head. A large 
bottle represented the “Giant” Temperance workers 
have to fight. Following were girls dressed as 
dancing girls, rejoicing over the defeat of their foe, 
with a banner, fhe entire set were faithful copies of 
actual dresses. In some instances they were the real 
ones from Palestine. Nasmith Hall boys and girls, 
from Hoxton, carried mottoes, arranged in arcaded 
floral perspective. The “Abney,” in pretty uniform 
dresses, carried thirteen scarlet bannerettes, a letter 
on each spelling the words “ Dare to do right.” The 
Hoxton Christian Mission had the biggest contingent, 
and was led by the band of the Mission. Hackney 
Wick Wesleyaus looked well, the girls in green and 
amber, and the boys in sailor suits. Mayes Hall was 
a pretty summer group, representing “June roses.” 
Richmond Road Wesleyan represented a village 
wedding, about ninety members taking part. The 
bride, Miss Daisy Prideaux, won all hearts; she 
looked charming in her elaborate wedding dress, 
under a beautifully-decorated canopy, festooned with 
roses, and borne by four pretty girls with sun hats ; 
whilst before and behind were boys and girls with 
agricultural implements, pikes, garlands of flowers, 
wands, and Japanese sunshades, which added very 
much to the beauty of the group. Practically all £he 
decorations were made by the members of the 
society, and it is to be congratulated on its success in 
winning the first prize. Amhurst Park Wesleyan 
gave a floral display; St. James’ Presbyterian, Wood 
Green, had sixty sailors with a lifeboat; Ponders 
Bind Congregational also had a lifeboat, “The Friend 
of All Nations,” drawn with ropes of roses. The 
Woodberry Down motto was “ God bless our work,” 
and others were equally effective. Many of these 
received prizes and certificates. 

After them came the Competition Banner Display. 
Amhurst Park Wesleyan took first place, closely 
followed by Castle Street and Wood Green. During 
the afternoon and evening some good meetings were 
held in the Park, and resolutions condemning the 
Licensing Bill were passed. 

At 5.30 came the Grand Concert bv 2,000 members 
of the Union. The hon. conductor, Mr. A. L- Cowley, 
F.T.S.C., and Mr. C. D. Cunningham, F.R.C.O., who 
ably presided at the organ, received a hearty greeting 
from the audience of over 3,00c people, which 
included the Mayor of Hackney and many members 
of the various local authorities. 

Prior to the concert, an excellent photograph of 
the choir was taken by Mr. A. J. \~oung, of Drayton 
Road, Tottenham. The programme was above the 
average, and included several new pieces, one bearing 
on the Government Licensing Bill, to the music of 
“ The Soldiers’ Chorus,” from Faust, words and music 
specially composed by Mr. Cowley. “When the 
heart is young ” (specially arranged) and other pieces 
were enthusiastically encored. If the choir could have 
been taken to Parliament, they might almost have 
converted Mr. Balfour before any more harm is done. 

At 7.30 the results of the Competitions were made 
known, and the several trophies presented by Mr. 
F. Sherlock. 

We congratulate Mr. Garrard and the committee on 
a most successful festival. About 15,000 were present 



124 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


“Buy my Liases, Stout and 
Strong.” 

A TRUE STORY. 


CHILE and raw December day, 

With labour scarce and meagre pay, 

And Christmas looming large in view— 

With thrifty clubs, and turkeys too : 

The shops transposed into bazaars, 

Exciting children’s wild hurrahs. 

On such a day, a boy of ten, 

Limped through the streets, and now and then, 
As Christmas presents met his eye, 

He wiped the salt tears, moaning, “ Buy, 

Buy, buy my laces, stout and stroug ; 

Buy, buy my laces, stout and strong! ” 

His piteous cry and haggard face, 

Wild staring eyes, and limping pace, 

For many an hour had passed along 
The crowded streets of life and song ; 

And sadly knelled his death-like plea— 

“ Will no one buy a lace off me ? ” 

Night’s shades were falling o’er the town, 
Rough winds were rustling dead leaves down, 
And noiselessly the snowflakes fell— 

AloDg the road came William Bell. 

He thought of wife, and crackling fire ; 

He thought of Heaven, amongst whose choir 

His cherub boy, released from pain, 

Echoed with them a glad refrain. 

The good man hummed a Christmas song.- 

“ Buy, buy my laces, stout and strong ! ” 

He stopped his song, and looked around, 
Where, lying huddled on the ground, 

With shivering limbs and chattering teeth, 

This little lad so near to death, 

Again essayed his deatn-like plea— 

“ Please, master, buy a lace off me ! 

I haven’t sold a pair to day, 

And father says I only play! 

“ I’m frightened, master, please don’t go 
Without a pair, he’ll beat me so ! 

I’ve not had any food to-day, 

He says I’m lazy—only play. 

I’m aching, master, feel so ill— 

He’s in that pub, they call ’im Bill! ” 

Now, William Bell, with woman’s heart, 

Could not pretend a Levite’s part, 

A cry of pain meant giving aid ; 

No long enquiry, half afraid 
A want expressed would melt away 
The little saved for rainy day. 

He raised the chattering, starving child, 
Half-clad, his eyes deep sunken, wild, 

And led him to a shop hard by, 

Regaling him with tea and pie. 

“ Eat well, my lad,” said William Bell; 

“ Missis, the boy could sleep a spell.” 

His coat he threw around the lad. 

“ Now for this Bill—the youngster’s dad ! 

We’ll rout him up, the lazy scamp, 

A-guzzling while the boy can tramp.” 

He pushed the heavy, swinging door, 

And, snoring on the sawdust floor, 

The dad called Bill, mouth open wide, 

A pewter beer-mug by his side, 

In drunken slumber whiled his hours, 

Until at night he fiercely glowers 
On his frail offspring, shivering, come 
To lead the drunkard, swearing, home. 

“ Bill, Bill, wake, man, you’ve got a son— 

Hast seen him since the day begun ? ” 

Bill made no answer, only snored, 

Half oped his eyes, then closed them, bored, 


And settled back to dream again 
Of boy-life on the wide, wide main. 

The landlord smiled: “You’ll have a job 
To waken Bill, I’d bet a bob ! ” 

Time was when William loved the “ pub,” 

The landlord’s grin was like a snub; 

He felt his blood rush surging hot,' 

And snatching up Bill’s pewter pot, 

Said he, “ With sovereigns I could fill 
This mug when I once drank like Bill! 

“ He’s got a lad—poor, wretched child— 

Say when he wakes the boy’s all right, 

He’s with a man whom beer made wild, 

And in a bed he’ll sleep to night! 

My name ? It matters not; tell Bill 
The child’s alive he tried to kill.” 

“A queer’un that! ” the landlord said ; 

“A ‘ tote ’ got touched soft in the head ! 

I know that fellow, yes, quite well— 

A ramping, roaring chap called Bell. 

Well, p’raps Bill’s boy won’t miss his dad; 

He treats his offspring shocking bad! ” 

The white snow crunched beneath their feet, 
As Bell and boy tramped many a street: 

The lad’s step slackened, while his head 
Grew heavy, aching; fearsome dread 
His frail young body shook with fright, 

Lest Bill should miss his guide to-night. 

“ Thanks, Guv’nor, you’ve been kind to me! 

I must not come no further, see, 

When dad wakes up, he can’t walk far, 

He calls me his lone guiding star. 

I wouldn’t mind ’is gettin’ tight, 

But, O, he’ll beat me so to-night! ” 

Hand tightened on the boy’s light grip, 

Bell checked the anger on his lip— 

“ My lad, no father is your Bill, 

You’ll be my son, and mother will 
Tuck you up snug in bed to-night, 

We’ll make your young life just all right.” 

“ Why, William, lor’ a mercy me ! 

How late a-coming home you be. 

What’s this wrapped up in your old coat ?” 

“A boy,” said Bell; “ we’d better not 
Make too much fuss, he wants a clean, 

And a cosy bed he’s seldom seen.” 

Bell’s wife was brisk, a happy soul, 

Since William shunned the frothing bowl; 

His wages many a comfort earned, 

And both had many a lesson learned. 

’Twas doing to-day, not thinking to-morrow, 
Would lighten sad hearts of care and sorrow. 

The nameless child, sure ne’er had slept 
In palace so grand, and o’er him crept 
A shrinking dread, lest, all too true, 

The bed was a cheat, and on his view 
The heavy swinging ale-house door 
Reveal to him a well-known snore. 

Lulled into slumber sweet and sound, 

Their little waif, the good folks found, 

On each glad cheek a glistening tear, 

Swift fleeting smiles, for angels near 
Hovered with peace o’er the sleeping boy, 
Attuning his spirit with love’s employ. 

Husband and wife gazed long on the lad, 

Then at each other ; their eyes grew sad. 

Each was expressing a oneness of though 1 , 
Born of past memories, vividly fraught 
With pain, for five years ago to the day 
God summoned their darling boy Willie away. 

In a trunk was folded a suit of grey, 

Their little laddie had worn at play ; 

Beneath was a sailor’s complete outfit. 

Mrs. Bell’s eyes with a light were lit, 

As one by one, with loving care, 

She laid them out on the tiny chaff. 





THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


125 


And William’s eyes were moist with tears 
At sight of the suits laid by for years ; 

Preserved from harm, quite as new as then, 

They clothed this waif from a drunkard’s den. 
Down by the crackling, leaping fire 
Husband and wife bore the clothes to admire. 

The days ran round : ’twas Sunday morn, 

The roads were alive with bell and horn ; 

And church bells ringing their gladsome notes, 
Called the devout, where upward floats 
Gratitude’s praise to the Throne of Heaven, 

For mercies and blessings freely given. 

And William Bell with his new-found son, 

Clad in the garb of his spirit boy, 

Trudged o’er the frost-bound roads to one 
Yoked to the devil and drink’s employ. 

Swinging the door they entered in 
Where demons dance in flasks of gin. 

The man called Bill was lifting his glass 
In a pledge of love to some strange lass, 

When a hand gripped hard the upraised arm : 

Bill looked around with a wild alarm, 

“ It’s all right, Guv’nor, what have I done ? ” 
“Lots. Come, no nonsense, say, where’s your son?” 

“ Now look ’ere, mate, he’s give me the slip, 

Gone stowaway, p'raps, on some grand ship— 
All’s well, they say, and one less to keep ! 

That’s a smart boy there ; let’s have a peep ! 

I thought I should know that nose and hair— 

It’s Jimmy, my offspring—I declare ! 

“ Here, landlord, look, here’s the boy quite smart 

Jimmy, I’m proud of you; never depart-” 

“ You’ve done with the lad,” said Honest Bell; 

“ He’s mine, till you dress yourself as well. 

Come, rouse yourself, man, have done with the 
drink ; 

You’re sober just now, put your cap on, think ! ” 

“ God knows how I loved the fatal mug, 

A toddy of rum, and the old brown jug ; 

Out at elbows, week in and week out; 

Drunk on the Sunday, ready to spout; 

Ready to box, would turn from a friend, 

U nless for my booze he’d something to lend. 

“I’ve paid for this drink, see, landlord, here goe s 
Your stuft in the sawdust—light in me grows! 
You, mate, can thrive on the water-pot plan, 
You’ve proved it conclusive by being a man. 

I’ll try the same dodge, and, Jimmy, stick fast 
To the man who, helping you, wakens my past. 

“ I promised your mother to work for her boy : 
Good God ! I’m a sot, no one will employ ! 
Landlord, good-bye! If I can—but I will, 

Win my former good name of ‘honest old Bill.’ 
Shake hands with me, Guv’nor, I’ll get off to sea, 
P’raps water and work will be makin’ of me! ” 

* * * * * 

Six months passed away, and June’s glowing sun 
On Bill a new creature in revelry shone, 

With Jimmy, good Bell and his loving wife, 
A-holiday hunting, and basking in life. 

This story would fail if its meaning was dark; 

To him that hath ears, let him hear, and mark! 

E. E. Hopwood. 


The Birmingham Union. 


HE above Union from time to time have had 
under consideration the question of retaining 
in active association the senior members, and 
have now prepared an attractive and unique 
pledge and badge, also a district branch of 
service under the title of “The Amethyst 
League.” The objects are to prevent the enormous 
leakage from the ranks of the Bands of Hope, by 
enrolling all senior members over fourteen years of 
age, of both sexes, and arranging for united action of 


such members, either in sections or central meetings, 
to provide for transfers from one part to another, so 
that the leakage from removals may be minimised, 
,&c. The pledge differs slightly from the ordinary, 
and is as follows 

“ Believing God has given me the power to abstain 
from evil and to choose good, I promise to 
abstain from all intoxicating drinks, and to 
render such help as may be within my power 
for the overthrow of the causes that lead to 
intemperance.” 

The pledge card is printed in blue, red, and gold, 
and the badge is a really artistic production. The 
Birmingham Union is arranging a series of lectures 
by well-known ministers and doctors in the Band of 
Hope Rooms, and will commence earnest aggressive 
work in the early autumn. A special choir is also to 
be formed, and the promoters hope for useful results 
to the movement by this step. The badge costs 6d., 
and the pledge card id. 

Banner Competition. 

The same Union has now had twelve months’ 
experience in regard to a Banner Competition, and as 
a consequence have discovered weaknesses, which 
resulted from causes within their power to retnedv. 
Some Bands kept a home-made register. This could 
not be fairly compared with the official register, so 
the judges (three schoolmasters) advised one uniform 
register, so as to put every Baud on the same level, 
and enable the judges to be absolutely fair. Again, 
it was felt that visitation should all be by one person, 
so our president set out Mr. Cadwallader as official 
visitor, and right well is he doing his work; and 
though excellent work was done last year it will be 
better this. 

These are Birmingham’s two special items of work 
this year, in addition to a series of conferences, 
competitive examinations, public meetings, and the 
establishment of a really good reference library, so 
that their hands are fairly full. Their alertness may 
suggest forms of work to their brethren in other 
districts. Their new register is excellent, well 
thought out, and neatly printed. 

-♦>♦>*- 

fl Band of Hope in India. 


BKARI, the organ of the Temperance movement 
in India, gives an interesting account of a 
native Band of Hope meeting, which our 
readers will be glad to see. It runs thus — 
“THE GWALIOR BAND OF HOPE. 

“ A meeting of the Gwalior Band of Hope came off 
on Friday, May 6, at 9 a.m., in the Central Hall 
of the A.V.M. School, Gwalior. It was attended by 
nearly two hundred members. In the absence of Mr. 
Shri Lall, B.A., Mirija Ibrahim Beb Chugtai, head 
master of the school, was unanimously voted to the 
chair. The President, in his opening speech, very 
ably stated the advantages of such meetings, and 
referred to the excellent work done by Mr. R. S. 
Mathur (the founder of the Band) in organising and 
helping this and like institutions in and out of 
Gwalior State. Babu Omrao Behari Mathur, an 
energetic student, was elected Secretary. At the 
request of the members of the Band, Mirza Ibrahim 
Beg Chugtai very kindly accepted the patronship 
of the institution. The following students recited 
English and Hindu poems: (1) Chaken Behari 
Mathur, (2) Ram Dial, (3) Birj Mohan, (4) Shanker 
Pall Sinha, (5) Md. Hussain, (6) Ram Nath, 
(7) Mhadho Rao, (8) Samalya, (9) Perma Nand, 
(10) Gayashi Ram. Mr. R. S. Mathur kindly 
delivered a vernacular speech on “ The Educational 
and Moral Responsibilities of Young Men,” which 
was much admired by hearers. He further showed 
his kindness by promising three prizes to the best 
reciters in the next meeting, to be held on Saturday, 
May 14, 1904. A vote of thanks to the chair and 
Mr. R. S. Mathur brought the meeting to a close. 

“ Omrao Behari Mathur, Secretary." 










126 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Sand and Beach CQissions. 


EADERS of the Band of Hope Chronicle 
Iv' are not likely to forget the paper published' 
J y, last October, in which Mr. Charles Harvey, of 
the Kent Band of Hope Union, described the 
successful Temperance Missions conducted by 
himself at Dover, Margate and Ramsgate. So great 
was the interest manifested on every hand, that the 
Kent Union have arranged to carry on the work this 
holiday season, and to extend it as tar as they can. 

Accordingly, Herne Bay and Deal are to be added 
to the list, the former being allotted a half-week’s 
mission, and the other places a week each. Mr. 
Harvey will again be in command of the Temperance 
forces, and he will have as lieutenants Mr. L. M. 
Cooke, of the Derbyshire Union ; Mr. Edward Royds, 
of the Hertfordshire Union; and Mr. Newton Jones, 
the evangelist of the Sunday School Union. As some 
of our friends may like to visit Kentish seaside resorts 
while the missions are in progress, we give the dates 
as arranged :—■ 

Herne Bay .. .. .. Aug. 3, 4, 5. 


Margate 
Ramsgate 
Dover 
Deal .. 


Aug. 6 to 13. 

Aug. 13 to 20. 
Aug. 20 to 27. 
Aug. 27 to Sept. 3. 


Band of Hope workers willing to lend a helping 
hand will be glad to have the opportunity, and we 
know that Mr. Harvey will gladly welcome such 
occasional helpers. If they would like to communi¬ 
cate with Mr. Harvey beforehand, his address is 
Hillside Avenue, Frindsbury, Rochester. 

Last year 42 meetings were held, the aggregate 
attendance being about 15,000 children and adults, 
and 76 pledges were taken. 


Ouf Book Table. 

“Climb, Boys, Climb!” is the title of a really 
charming little book published by Partridge, and to 
be had at the Band of Hope Union office, 60, Old 
Bailey (price is.). The hundred pages are by E. E. H., 
a lady who certainly has the knack of giving straight 
talks to boys that will interest them to a degree. 
Without being in the least degree effeminate—for 
they are most manly in tone and ennobling in 
tendency—they yet show a woman’s deep sympathy 
for the growing lads, and an earnest desire to help 
them to place their feet upon the Rock before the 
temptation of the world shall have got hold of them. 
Dr. Townsend, the vicar of St. Mark’s, Tunbridge 
Wells, gives a prefatory commendation to the little 
book; but it needs it not, though it richly deserves 
it; for it is almost an ideal book either to give a 
young fellow on the threshold of life, or for a 
conductor of a young men’s Bible Class to use as a 
handbook. The title is taken from the circumstance 
that the first talk was written at Chamonix, beneath 
the shadow of the greatest mountain in Europe. 
Upon this the helpful authoress pleads with the 
young to fight bravely against evils and difficulties 
generally, and urges them to climb to higher levels 
of manliness and courage, and also to be quick to 
stretch out hands to help others over the dark 
crevasses of temptation and sin. New ground is 
broken by several of the best old Greek legends 
being re-told in every-day language, and made to 
teach the present non-reading age. The book 
deserves special commendation for its outspoken 
disapproval of both drinking intoxicants and tobacco 
smoking. One or two trifling errors of the press will 
doubtless be corrected in a second edition. We 
unhesitatingly and gladly commend the book to all 
whom it may concern—the boys of to-day, the men of 
to-morrow. 

-vvv- 

WE congratulate not only the Lancashire and 
Cheshire Union on its Treasurer, Mr. Higham, being 
elected M.P.witha splendid majority, but also all Band 
of Hope workers. Mr. Higham is a stalwart abstainer, 
the sort of man who some day may be at the head 
of some future Government’s Education Department. 


Against Alcoholic IiiquoFS. 

cE - • 1 RST, there are the bad effects of over-drinking, 
which are not confined to what we know as 
1 drunkenness. Excess of alcohol may remove 

' control, and without control man in his 

behaviour is below the beasts. “Excessive 
drinking will make the speech thick and hesitating, 
the emotions easily excited, the judgment impaired, 
the muscles no longer under mastery, the sight 
double,” and so on. Beside this, habitually to take 
alcohol makes alcohol, by nature an expensive luxury, 
a still more expensive necessity. The expense is all 
the greater if we are slaves to the habit, and the 
expense falls on the nation as well as on the individual. 
So much grain, &c., is used for producing genuine 
alcoholic drinks, and not for producing nourishment, 
and the crimes prompted by excess bring the nation 
a heavy bill annually. If, on the other hand, the 
alcohol be cheap, the chances are that it is adul¬ 
terated. Alcohol is seldom an absolute necessity. 
The extremists say that it is never a necessity at all. 
It does not become an integral part of the human 
body, like proteid, &c. Masses of people have thrived 
without it. It is doubtful whether there is any function 
of alcohol that cannot be performed by something 
else, either by the mind, or by water, or by massage 
and exercises, or by rest, or by diet, or by light and 
air and breathing. In hot climates, it is urged, alcohol 
is bad ; in cold climates, it is useless. So far from 
warming us, it drives the blood to the surface, and 
thus gets rid of heat faster than it makes it. Hence 
Arctic travellers do not drink alcohol if they wish to 
preserve their animal heat. Nansen did not include 
it in making up his list of the Pram's equipment. To 
take the other extreme, the hot climate, Kitchener’s 
marches across the desert in the Soudan campaign 
were most successful when the troops had no 
alcohol .—From “ Cassell's Physical Educator " for 
May. 


A Successful Counter Attraction. —The 
licensing magistrates of Cambridge granted no less 
than nineteen licences for the Midsummer Fair, held 
from June 22 to 25. In order to counteract the evil 
thus created, the local B.W.T.A. branch, along with 
Band of Hope LTnion workers and Good Templars, 
formed themselves into a committee and decided to 
have a Temperance refreshment tent. Two booths 
were erected on the fair ground opposite the drink 
saloons, and refreshments were served at popular 
prices. Gospel Temperance meetings were held in 
the open air every evening, and amongst the speakers 
were the Revs. W. T. A. Barber, D.D., W. Bradfield, 
B.A., II. Bennett, W. B. Taylor, H. Clark, and W. 
Humphreys, Messrs. F. Collinson (agent Cambridge¬ 
shire Band of Hope Union), W. Coplestone (organising 
secretary C.E.T.S.), J. Gillings, H. Gatliffe, and W. 
Hackelton. Solos were .sung each evening, the 
following taking part, Messrs. Wood and Latnrope, 
Misses Throssell and Bailey. Accompanists, Misses 
Norman and Bittou. The Government Licensing Bill 
came in for a share of criticism and denunciation. 
Literature bearing upon this and other aspects of the 
Temperance question was well distributed. Twenty - 
six pledges were signed. The show people greatly 
appreciated the work, and some of them have joined 
the Travellers’ Total Abstinence Association. The 
“ Counter Attraction ” paid its own way. 

Our readers will be glad to know that our friend 
and colleague, Mr. Frederic Smith, who was taken 
seriously ill about a month ago when at Harrogate, is 
very much better than he was. He was removed to 
his home at Hendon, under the care of Mrs. Smith 
and a trained nurse, and his abstaining habits largely 
enabled him to make the recovery it is our pleasure 
to record. We hope he has many years before him, 
in order that he may see the progress which his 
beloved work—the Band of Hope movement—may 
make during the next quarter-of-a-century. 












THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


127 


Competitive Band of Hope 
meetings. 

T HE Heeley District Committee of the Sheffield 
Sunday School Band of Hope Union have 
just carried to a successful issue a scheme of 
Competitive Band of Hope Meetings amongst 
the Bands comprising the District, 
hast September two sets of judges began a series ot 
visits to each of these Bauds. The points they 
noted were: 

1. Reciting and other Entertainment Items, 

2. General Singing, 

3. Programme Arrangement, &c., 

4. Conduct, 

and for each of these a maximum of ten marks was 
given. One set of judges visited the Bands 
unexpectedly, catching them at a regular meeting 
when an average programme might be expected. The 
other set were duly announced to visit the Bands, 
who were thus given the opportunity of providing a 
special programme, being put on their mettle to do 
their very best. In making the award, the judges 
have compared notes, and taking both meetings into 
account, have decided accordingly. 

The results have been well worth the effort made. 
The Committee are now in possession of information 
which shows them the comparative strength and 
efficiency of each Band covered by its operations. 
Special methods of work peculiar to one or other of 
the Bands have been noted, as have Bands in need of 
help and encouragement, and those in a position to 
assist in meeting those needs; and all the Bands have 
been inspired to make at least one effort to put before 
its members an ideal programme, and in many cases 
to keep up to the mark in view of a “ surprise ” visit. 
The benefit to such Bands is not temporary, for, 
seeing what can be done, the workers are trying to 
raise and keep up the general level of their 
programmes. 

The report of the judges was given at the meeting 
of the Committee on June 15. The Committee at the 
commencement offered prizes of 10s., 7s. 6d. and 5s., 
but as four Bands were fairly close together it was 
decided to make two awards of 55., in addition to the 
10s. and 7s. 6d. Carter Knowle Primitive Methodist, 
Ann’s Road Primitive Methodist, Meersbrook Bank 
Wesleyan, and Ecclesall Children’s Homes (Board of 
Guardians) were adjudged winners respectively. 

At the same meeting it was decided that next 
winter’s effort should take the form of another visit 
to each Baud, this time to conduct a “Model” Band 
of Hope meeting. “ Model ” speaker, conductor, 
entertainment and all will be provided by the Com¬ 
mittee, aud all the Bands will be included in the 
scope of the scheme. Acting, however, on the results 
of the competition an effort will be made to set before 
the Bauds more particularly that in which they 
appear most in need. 

It might be mentioned that this District Committee 
distributes the Band of Hope Chronicle gratis 
amongst its workers. 

-♦>♦>♦>- 

Sunday Tavepns and Sunday 
Topers. 

Come, come to the window, our boudoir is snug, 

And see them pass by, as with can or with jug. 

The time’s Sabbath morn, church service just o’er, 
And crowds are besieging the publican’s door. 
Suggestive tableau, with its lights and its shades, 

Its broadcloth and fustian, its housewives and maids, 
The latter, encumbered with prams, puff and blow, 
Bairn-laden the top, bottle-freighted below. 

“ Good storage for bottles ” (we heard the remark), 
And the bar looked so bright, while the home was so 
dark. 

Black bags of all sizes swing past to the inn, 

With flasks for “ encore,” or the ruinous gin. 

There’s a comical side, as wags often say, 


There’s a very thin line ’tween the grave and the 

gay—. 

There’s a comical side both in brute and in man, 

And we saw her pass by, nor with jug nor with can. 
She wore a large cape—’twas her mother’s, no doubt, 
Too big “by a mile,” just to cover the stout 
Or the cooper ; ’twas black, but we cannot define, 
Still we think it was malt—much too frothy for wine. 
Now Wind played a prank, blew the cape open wide, 
Exposing the bottle held close to her side. 

Then—fizzle and pop—dark liquor arose 

Like a fountain, and sousing the girl to her toes ! 

And we dubbed her Miss Squelch, as she threaded 
the street, 

With her frock all a-dripping, and soddened her feet. 
And we laughed at the fun, which was scarely devout, 
When Cork cleared the way, then Cooper cleared out. 
And both of them played—at least in a sense— 

They played pop and fizzle at Bottle’s expense. 

Now, reader, reflect, no respite have we, 

As Sunday comes round, from one until three. 

Come, come from the window, there’s a mist on the 
pane, 

Dry the tears that are falling, nor look there again. 
Some shells of the ocean recall to the uiind, 

When applied to the ear, the surges and wind. 

From bacchanal haunts, as shells hymn the gale, 
Come sounds that appal us, commingle and wail— 
The sobs of the orphan, the cry of despair. 

The libertine’s jest and the maniac’s prayer, 

The shriek of demented whom spectres affright, 

Lost souls aud lost brains in the orgies of night.*' 
Imprecations, lewd laughter, the drunkard’s refrain,! 
Slaves forging their fetters and cursing the chain. 
What the storms of the ocean, what the thunder- 
rocked peak, 

To the voices coming up from the bacchanal deep ? 
Oh, send forth your VETO from shore unto shore— 

7 his day is the Lord's—shut the publican's door ! 
Kilburn. H. Beecher. 

* Delirium Tremens. + “ Rule, Britannia.’’ 

-- 

Sunderland and District.—The annual Band of 
Hope Union demonstration and festival were held on 
June iS. The weather had been threatening during 
the morning, but turned out more favourable during 
the afternoon, so that the fete went off successfully. 
It will perhaps be remembered that last year the 
proceedings were marred by the unfavourable 
weather, and the demonstration had to be postponed. 
There were forty-six societies composed of nearly four 
thousand children taking part, including three 
societies from Hylton and Coxgreen. The children, 
accompanied by their teachers and friends, met in 
Tunstall Terrace West at two o’clock. From there, 
headed by the Boys’ Industrial School Band, a band 
from Sunderland Street Mission also being present, 
they marched in procession, with flags and banners 
flying, to the field where the fete was held. Mr. P. 
McKenzie acted as chief marshal, assisted by Messrs. 
J. M. Nicholson, J. G. Laver, F. W. Service, and J. J. 
Crinson. The other officers of the Union also worked 
assiduously lor the success of the event, under the 
directions of Mr. C. Dain, organising secretary, who 
had made all the arrangements. On reaching the 
field, which presented an exceedingly gay appearance, 
the children were provided with tea and cakes. Three 
excellent programmes of drills, games, balloon ascents, 
and music were afterwards gone through. During the 
festival the field was thronged with people, the tram- 
cars, which ran close to the scene of festivities, being 
well patronised. The tete was throughout a big 
success. 

“Aecohoe and Longevity.” —The valuable paper 
on “ Alcohol and Longevity,” by Mr. T. P. Whittaker, 
M.P., which recently appeared in the Contemporaiy 
Review ; has been reprinted in pamphlet form. It 
will be sent gratis to anyone who will send his name 
and address to Mr. Johnson Brooks, United Kingdom 
Temperance and General Provident Institution, 
i, Adelaide Place, London Bridge, London. 







128 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 



JSanfc of Ibope mntons. 


Bedfordshire. — This Union carried out two 
excursions to the seaside in July, both of which 
were eminently successful. The first was to Yarmouth 
—it required two long traius to take the merry party; 
and the second was to Cromer. 

Cambridgeshire. —The Union required two trains 
to take nearly 1,500 members and friends to 
Hunstanton for the annual seaside trip. Mr. George 
Apthorpe invited a party of workers and friends to 
luncheon during the visit. On July 8, a conference 
of workers was held at Cambridge. After ordinary 
business, resolutions were passed condemning the 
Licensing Bill, and also censuring the local magis¬ 
trates for granting extra drinking iacilities at the fair. 

Colne and District.— A useful week’s mission in 
the open-air has recently been held by the above 
Union, chiefly in the villages near Colne, viz., Cotton 
Tree, Trawden and Foulridge. The meetings were 
arranged as follows: Cotton Tree, Monday, (chairman, 
Mr. Councillor Riley); Trawden, Tuesday, (chairman, 
Mr. Jas. Hartley); Foulridge, Wednesday, (chairman, 
Mr. Wm. Williamson; Thursday, the meeting was 
held in Windy Bank, Colne, Mr. F. Stoddart presiding; 
and Friday, in the Y.M.C.A. Rooms, Mr. Ambler pre¬ 
siding. Mr. Peter Taylor, Northern District Agent of the 
Lancashire and Cheshire Union, was the Missioner, 
and by means of his diagrams and chemical experi¬ 
ments he, at Cotton Tree, Trawden and Windy Bank, 
drove home his address on “Alcohol and the Blood.” 
At P'oulridge he explained the proposals of the 
Licensing Bill, and petitions were adopted and signed 
on behalf of the meetings by the chairmen at Cotton 
Tree, Trawden and Foulridge, and sent to Mr. D. J. 
Shackleton, M.P., for presentation to the House of 
Commons. On Friday, to the members of the 
Y.M.C.A., Mr. Taylor appealed strongly for help in 
the training of the young in the principles of true 
Temperance. A conference of workers was held in 
the Bethel Independent Methodist School, Burnley 
Road, Colne, on Saturday, June 11, at 3 p.m., Mr. 
A. D. Myers presiding. Mr. Taylor gave an address 
on “What is our Work?” in which he pleaded for 
more definite teaching at our meetings, better 
organisation, more unity of action, open-air Band of 
Hope meetings, systematic visitation of absentees, 
exchange of platforms, and conversation with parents. 
Mr. T. Baldwin, secretary of the Union, opened the 
discussion, enlarging upon the need for more definite 
teaching. Mr. T. Dean, of Cotton Tree, Mr. Hartley, 
Mr. Ambler, Mr. Ryecroft and the chairman also 
took part in the discussion. This was followed by a 
public tea and an open-air meeting near the market, 
in Dockray Street, Colne, Mr. Wm. Smith presiding; 
Mr. Taylor giving an address on “Pills,” in the 
course of which he criticised the Licensing Bill, Mr. 
Massey’s wonderful letter to the Mayor of Burnley, 
and some of the fallacies of drinkers. There was a 
very large attendance. At the Thursday meeting in 
Windy Bank a blind girl sang a solo, and thereby 
made a very great impression on the meeting. 

Eastleigh and Bishopstoke.— The fifth annual 
demonstration in connection with the Eastleigh and 
District Band of Union took place on the last 
Saturday in June, and was attended with great 
success. A procession of twelve Bands of Hope, three 
bands, and a number of decorated vehicles paraded 
the town, and afterwards proceeded to The Mount, 
the route being thickly lined with spectators. The 
sight was a very imposing one, and elicited much 


admiration, the decorations being very effective. At 
The Mount, amusements, tea, and music were 
provided, whilst there were also ambulance, musical 
drill, and singing contests, and sports for the 
juveniles. The prizes for these, and also for the best 
decorated society vehicle, and tableau, and the best 
marshalled society, were distributed by Mrs. Cotton, 
who was accompanied by Mr. T. A. Cotton, the latter 
having just returned from a tour in America. He 
received a hearty welcome, which he acknowledged 
in appropriate terms, and thanks were also accorded 
Mrs. Cotton for distributing the prizes. The East¬ 
leigh Temperance Band, conducted by Mr. W. J. 
Hedges, afterwards rendered selections of music. 
The arrangements for the festival, which were 
reported at length in a local paper, were admirably 
carried out, thanks to the indefatigable labours of 
Mr. E- J. Gamblin, the hon. sec. 

Salford. —The annual demonstration and fete in 
connection with the Salford County Borough Band 
of Hope and Temperance Union took place on the 
David Lewis Recreation Ground, adjoining Peel 
Park, on Saturday, June 18, and was a magnificent 
success from every point of view. The weather was 
all that could be desired, and the huge demonstration 
helped to further make known the existence of the 
Union, and advance its objects. The sunny afternoon 
brought out a great deal of colour in dress, and this 
was an attractive feature when the enormous 
assembly had gathered on the recreation ground. 
Three lodges of Sous of Temperance, Good Templars 
and Rechabites, in addition to the members of fifty 
Bands of Hope and Temperance societies, took part, 
the total exceeding 7,000. The Union has in Mr. 
A. H. Bimrose, the general secretary, an experienced 
and excellent organiser, and his efforts were ably 
supplemented by those of the general committee— 
Messrs. C. B. Buckler, T. Bull, G. H. Butterly, 
J. Connolly, T. Lewis, J. W. Stockdale, H. Watters 
and R. Wood. Crowds watched all along the route, 
and enjoyed the sight of the children as they 
marched smartly to the ground to the inspiriting 
strains of the bands. An imposing feature of the 
procession was furnished by a number of tableaux 
arranged on lurries. The one that was subsequently 
awarded the first prize represented a Japanese tea 
garden, arranged by the Charlestown Band of Hope. 
The second prize went to Richmond Congregational 
Band of Hope for a tableaux of boys as footballers, 
cricketers, &c., the idea, as conveyed in mottoes 
festooned round the vehicle, being that healthy, 
physical development was easily possible without 
the use of intoxicants. After sports and tea, 
Salford’s Mayor presided over a great meeting held 
in the evening. Vigorous addresses were given by 
Canon Hicks, Rev. G. H. McNeal, Mr. Hallsworth, 
Mr. Richardson, and others. 

Surrey. —The twenty-sixth annual meetings of the 
Surrey Union were held at Godaiming. The meet¬ 
ings were commenced with a tea to the delegates and 
friends, which was followed by a Conference of 
workers. Mr. R. G. Davey (of Guildford) gave an 
address on “How to make Band of Hope meetings 
interesting.” The paper contained many practical 
suggestions, and a useful discussion upon it was taken 
up by many of the delegates. The annual business 
meeting was then held, when the honorary secietary, 
Mr. F. L. Redford (of Kingston) read the annual 
report. This showed that a good year’s work had 
been done. Over 800 addresses had been given by the 
honorary speakers, 63 by the evening agents of the 
United Kingdom Band of Hope Union, and 220 by 
Mr. Luskers, and 75 lectures in the day schools. A 
large public meeting was held in the Borough Hall, 
the Mayor of Godaiming (Councillor H. F. Holden) 
presiding. The speakers were Mr. C. Roberts, M.A., 
J.P., and Lady Cecilia Roberts, whose special address 
to the children was greatly appreciated. The singing 
was well rendered by a choir of 100 children and 
workers of the Bands of Hope in the locality, under 
the able conductorship of Mr. J. H. Norris, the 
Borough surveyor. 









“To Whom, then, shall we 
Turn ?” 


Ur not your trust in Princes,”—nor in 
politicians. Pet the new Licensing 
Act lead us anew to the only source of 
eternal help; let us turn from dis¬ 
appointing governments to the only wise 
governor, the Lord of Eternar Righteous¬ 
ness. The very folly of the new Act, which 
has filled men’s hearts with sorrow, may be 
over-ruled by God to make us trust Him more, 
and to rely upon those principles that are 
founded upon a rock rather than on those 
which are founded upon the treacherous sands 
of political partisanship. 

It cannot be that our principles are mate¬ 
rially injured by a man-made statute. They 
are not so weak as that. They were planted 
in the hearts of a few faithful men and women 
two or three generations ago, when they had, 
humanly speaking, no likelihood of success. 
The early pioneers of total abstinence were 
poor, ill-cultured, struggling men, and yet 
they did not fail! They had obstacles to 
encounter and enemies who opposed them 
worse than any we have to meet in the 
present day. They were treated as outcasts 
and infidels by the Church in only too many 
cases ; they were scorned as ignorant and mad¬ 
brained fanatics; they were ill-treated and 
pelted out of towns and villages ; churches and 
chapels were denied to them; they were 
maligned to a degree we can scarcely imagine, 
and yet they held firmly to their principles— 
with .what result ? 

Nearly all the Churches have been won to 
espouse their then-despised principles; Educa¬ 
tion has adopted the policy they struggled to 
teach ; Science has come to the rescue of the 
cause that was trampled in the mire, and a 
hundred Statesmen are declaring that the 
method of total abstinence has proved so bene - 
ficial to themselves that they would fain ex¬ 
tend it to the whole nation. 

That has all come out of the unrecognised 
and lowly work of self-sacrificing abstainers— 
with no aid from the Raw and no help from 
Parliament. The new Act thwarts our hopes 
of reducing the evils of alcohol drinking by 
heroic measures ; high-handed legislation has 
proved itself a broken reed. 

Ret us go back to first principles. If we 
cannot use the State hammer to destroy the 
beer barrels, let us continue to do what our 
fathers did—let us teach our children with 
SEPTEMBER, 1904. 


more devotion and patient perseverance to 
refuse to drink the fruit of the barrel, and let 
us teach them why we think it wrong to have 
anything to do with the evil thing. 

The Act, which became law on August 10, 
will not have been in vain—Mr. Barfour calls 
it a “Temperance measure” !—if it should but 
send back all abstainers to their homes up and 
down the land more determined than ever to 
accomplish the end they long to attain by the 
old-fashioned weapon of argument and per¬ 
suasion. Nearly all Bills in Parliament that 
have been supposed to help Temperance have 
done harm rather than good. Mr. Gladstone’s 
Grocers’ Licence Bill is an apt case in point, 
for though it was to wean men from spirits, it 
failed to do that, and it has led women to wine 
in countless numbers. Ret us trust nothing 
but God and His divine methods. By slow and 
sure degrees does the oak spring from the sap¬ 
ling, as the sapling sprang from the acorn. 
The work of centuries cannot be crowded into 
a couple of generations. Neither can a world 
that has long in darkness lain be lifted into 
the light of Temperance and self-denial by 
sudden State decrees. Seventy years ago our 
grandfathers planted the acorn of total absti¬ 
nence ; they have tended it with their toil and 
their tears, and now at the beginning of the 
twentieth century Temperance has become a 
healthy sapling. It has grown in strength 
and vigour; but its roots are not yet deep 
enough. Our work is to water the roots ; to 
plant the habit deep in the homes of the 
people; we have to cultivate Temperance 
households. Thank God there are many such 
up and down the empire. But not enough. 
They want multiplying ten fold. Then our 
work will triumph. Brewers’ Bills will then 
be in vain ; compensation will have come in 
another way—by diversion of hard-earned 
money into honest trades. No Prime Minister 
will then dare to advocate the iniquitous pro¬ 
posals which this year have made men’s 
hearts sick. The game will be won without 
the help of Parliament and in spite of any 
hindrances Parliament may set up. Ret us, 
therefore, go on our way without fear, trusting 
in God’s sublime help, and working in har¬ 
mony with His Divine will. For in spite of 
Lords and Commoners, and in face of the 
cruellest trade the world has ever seen, it 
must still be true that the children are too 
precious to be sacrificed to a heathen Bacchus. 
Jesus said that “ It is not the will of your 
Father in heaven that one of His little ones, 
should perish.” Ret us really believe that 
and then we shall work accordingly. 

























130 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Signs of the Times. 


T HOUGH so many appearances in the 
political world seem to indicate a retro¬ 
grade movement in regard to Total 
Abstinence principles, we believe it is only 
a case of appearances, and that there is really 
a great deal of encouragement to be gained 
by a wide survey of the situation at the 
present time. True enough, the Licensing 
Act—as it must now be called—-has been a 
disappointment to all of us; but even in the 
struggle, which has seemed so hopeless, there 
have been many indications of a solid base of 
Temperance sentiment, not only among the 
electorate, but also in the House of Commons, 
and even in the House of Lords—as the noble 
and statesmanlike speech of Viscount Peel, 
and the sympathetic addresses from the 
Episcopal benches—notably by the Primate 
and the Bishops of London and Hereford— 
most abundantly proved. Or, if the feeling 
of the country is to be tested by resolutions 
and petitions, we may take consolation from 
the fact that nearly all those sent to Members, 
to the Premier, and to the House itself, were 
against the brewing interest. Never have 
there been more “demonstrations” against 
an unpopular Bill, although it is also true 
that never have such powerful demonstrations 
been so ruthlessly and persistently ignored. 
However, there will come a day of reckoning 
with the electorate in regard to the Bill, and 
there will some day come a Rectification Bill, 
by whatever name it may happen to be called. 
So that even if it be a poor result we have to 
chronicle in the British world of politics, it is 
not quite so bad as it might have been if no 
fight had been made and no arguments 
uttered against the Bill. 

But while the British Parliament has been 
trying to put the hands of the clock of time 
backward, there are many indications of an 
awakening to the true facts of the case both at 
home and abroad. 

The; Chirdrrn and Drink. 

The very remarkable Memorial to the 
Education Authorities, drawn up by medical 
men, we have reprinted in a previous issue. 
It was signed by over 14,918 leaders in the 
profession, and, in itself, was of great value 
both in character and in emphasis of the evils 
it pointed out as resulting from the use of 
alcohol. Its value was further increased by 
the way in which it was presented to the 
President of the Government’s Education 
Department, Lord Londonderry, on July 11. 
His Lordship could not say very much of a 
hopeful character, being a member of a 
Government which has carried the terrible 
Licensing Bill through Parliament. But 
though he did not promise much, he had to 
listen to some striking statements made by 
the medical men who waited upon him. They 
included the most eminent physicians and 
surgeons of the day, and it is satisfactory 
to us to know that most of those who formed 


the deputation were personal abstainers. A 
medical M.P. introduced the doctors to the 
President of the Board of Education, and the 
speakers, who enforced the demand of the 
Memorial for authorised teaching in all 
schools of sound principles of hygiene and 
Temperance, included Sir Thomas Barlow 
(one of Queen Victoria’s physicians), SirVictor 
Horsley, Sir Lauder Brunton, Dr. D. Griffiths, 
Dr. Hutchinson, M.P., Prof. Sims Woodhead, 
and Dr. Mary Scharlieb. The latter spoke 
with special reference to women and children ; 
but nearly every speaker placed the most 
emphasis on the need of the teaching to the 
children of the dangers of the use of alcoholic 
drinks. The excuse Lord Londonderry gave 
for not promising more definitely to yield to 
the wish of the Memorialists was that the 
Commission which was considering the 
alleged physical deterioration of the people 
had not yet reported ; but he plainly said that 
he himself was favourable to the request. 

Since then there was published on July 28, 
after our August issue was printed, the Report 
of the Inter-Departmental Committee on 
Physical Deterioration. While holding that the 
reports of such deterioration have been some¬ 
what exaggerated, the Committee yet admits 
the charge to some extent. In discussing the 
causes, it puts some blame on the modern 
tendency to crowd into towns and cities, and 
points with regret to the way the young 
people of villages leave the fresh air and 
sunshine of the rural parishes, for the impure 
air and stuffiness of towns. This is a decided 
evil. The report then refers to 

Arcohorism 

in these terms :—“ Next to the urbanisation of 
the people and intimately associated with it, 
as the outcome of many of the conditions it 
creates, the question of ‘ drink ’ occupies 
a prominent place among the causes of 
degeneration. The close connection between 
a craving for drink and bad housing, bad 
feeding, a polluted and depressing atmo¬ 
sphere, long hours of work in overheated and 
often ill-ventilated rooms, only relieved by 
the excitements of town life, is too self-evident 
to need demonstration, nor, unfortunately, is 
the extent of the evil more open to dispute.” 

The evidence laid before the Committee 
teems with testimony as to the disastrous 
operation of these causes. Dr. Scott put 
alcohol first among the influences that retard 
improvement. He said: “They are living on 
it, some of them, and the lower you go the 
worse it is.” 

Mrs. Mackenzie expressed the general view 
when she said : “ I think that if the drink 
question were removed, three-fourths of the 
difficulty and the poverty and degradation 
altogether would go along with it.” 

As to a remedy for this dangerous tendency, 
the Committee believe that more maybe done 
to check the degeneration resulting from 
“drink” by bringing home to men and women 
the fatal effects of alcohol on physical 
efficiency than by expatiating on the moral 



THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


131 


wickedness of drinking. To this end they 
advocate the systematic practical training 
of teachers to enable them to give rational 
instruction in schools on the laws of health, 
including the demonstration of the physical 
evils caused by drinking. At the same time, 
the Committee cannot lose sight of the 
enormous improvement which has been 
effected in some countries, and might be 
effected in this country, by wise legislation. 

Juvenile Smoking. 

Many of our readers will read with interest 
that part of the report dealing with juvenile 
smoking. On this the Committee observe : — 

“ The evidence submitted on the point 
represents a practically unanimous opinion 
that the habit of cigarette smoking among 
boys is a growing one, and that its con¬ 
sequences are extremely deleterious. No 
actual testimony was forthcoming to prove 
that early smoking diminishes growth, but 
Prof. Cunningham mentioned it as one of the 
causes of physical deterioration, and Dr. 
Scott was of opinion that scarcely two per 
cent, of cases of undergrowth had not been 
habitual cigarette smokers.” 

As a remedy, the Committee recommend 
that a Bill should be brought before Parlia¬ 
ment at an early date, having for its object: 
(1) To prohibit the sale of tobacco and 
cigarettes to children below a certain age ; (2) 
To prohibit the sale of tobacco and cigarettes 
in sweet shops and other shops frequented by 
children. 

We might leave the various members of 
this Government to consider this Report 
during the vacation, but instead of doing so, 
we commend it to our own readers, and ask 
them if this may not be taken in some way as 
a set-off against the reactionary Bill we all 
deplore ? 

Public Health. 

But there has been another important Con¬ 
ference where our subject came to the front. 
This was the congress of the Royal Institute 
of Public Health, which was held at Folke¬ 
stone in the last week in July, and was 
attended by a large number of officers of City 
Councils and Town Councils, Medical Officers 
of Health, Sanitary Inspectors, Town Clerks, 
and others. It is an important body and may 
have much influence for good when wisely 
directed. At the sitting on July 26, an inte¬ 
resting paper, with the title of “Alcohol and 
Children,” was read by Dr. George Carpenter, 
of Dondon. He said the benefit of alcohol to 
children in health, as well as in disease, was 
open to great doubt. Alcohol should never 
be used except under the strictest medical 
supervision. The outcome of experimental 
work tended to show that alcohol was a toxic 
drug even in small quantities, and that there 
was no scientific justification for its employ¬ 
ment in medicine. Any evidence, therefore, 
in favour of such employment was empiric, 
and rested on a clinical foundation. 


Sanitary Science. 

Glasgow was another place where an impor¬ 
tant Congress was held by the Sanitary 
Institute, the meetings being held in the 
University at Glasgow, also in the last week 
in July. 

A paper by Dr. T. Oliver, of Newcastle-on- 
Tyne, dealt with “The Effects of Fatigue, 
Alcohol, and Tubercle upon Wage-earners.” 
Work made for health, if it be not overwork ; 
prolonged overwork was bad, and often led to 
a craving for stimulants, as well as for other 
unhealthy excitement. Dr. Oliver showed by 
his paper that he was not an extremist, and 
the members paid great heed to his remarks 
on the alcohol question. He said it was still 
a debatable point whether alcohol was food, 
but the ravages caused by it far outweighed 
any advantages that could be claimed for it in 
the way of food. It was impossible to estimate 
the amount of ill-health and family distress 
created by the immoderate use of alcohol. 

The Doctors in Council. 

Yet another Conference was held in the 
same week. The British Medical Association 
met at Oxford. At its concluding meeting on 
July 29, Dr. Haldane presided at a discussion 
in the State Medicine Section. Mrs. Helen 
Bosanquet spoke on poverty and ignorance in 
regard to public health, and incidentally 
shov ed how charity lessened self-reliance. She 
held that ignorance, not poverty, was mainly 
responsible forthe evils that existed. The great 
majority of the poor might lead healthy lives 
if they knew how and cared to do so, for some¬ 
times, in cases of exceedingly small incomes, 
the homes were clean and the children 
healthy and well cared for, and the iamily 
sober and industrious. She cited the way the 
poor did not use milk as a food, and said this 
is a proof of their ignorance. 

Mr. T. P. Whittaker, M.P., was unable to 
be present, but a paper which he had pre¬ 
pared was read. He ascribed poverty largely 
to the consumption of alcoholic beverages. 
The working-classes spent one-seventh of 
their income on alcohol. They could not 
afford to do so, and this was the reason why 
money was not available for comforts, such 
as decent housing and good food. The 
working-class spent on drink as much per 
head as would provide them with old age 
pensions of £2 per week from the age of sixty- 
five to the end of their lives. Many of the poorer 
class lived like animals. They married early, 
had large families, and the poor little waifs 
died off like flies. People did not drink 
because they were poor; they were poor 
because they drank. 

Dr. Cleary (Medical Officer of Health, 
Battersea) agreed with Mrs. Bosanquet that 
there was a tendency amongst poor people to 
look upon milk as a medicine and not as a food. 
The reason was that they could not afford to 
buy it. Education was not everything. There 
appeared to be a tendency to have education 
on the brain. Medical officers made a great 
mistake when they tried to shift their own 


132 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


duties ou to the shoulders of the schoolmaster. 
How was it possible for a working man 
earning 25s. a week to afford 2s. 4d. per week 
for milk for one baby alone? He dissented 
from Mr. Whittaker’s theory that poverty was 
the result of alcohol, and not vice ve?'sa. 

Mrs. Bosanquet, replying to the discussion, 
thought that as the average expenditure of 
the working man on alcohol was 6s. a week, 
he ought to be able to spare 2s. 4d. a week to 
provide milk for his baby. 

Doctors at Breakfast. 

During the Oxford meeting, many members 
of the profession interested in Temperance 
met at breakfast, and Dr. Kelynack read a terse 
and pointed paper on “The Medical Profession 
and the Use and Abuse of Alcohol.” Our 
learned contributor showed that many doctors 
now acknowledged the practice of complete 
abstention from alcoholic drinks to be a sound 
and highly scientific prophylactic measure. 

The conduct of the Government has very 
likely helped to make the subject of alcoholism 
a topic at almost every conference when the 
public health has been recently discussed 

-- 

Fete at South Stoneham. 


T HE annual fete under the auspices of the South¬ 
ampton and District Temperance Council and 
Band of Hope Union held in July was probably 
the most successful on record. Sir Samuel and 
Lady Montagu again lent their splendid grounds at 
South Stoneham—a kindness appreciated by the 
. large number of visitors, numbering 3,000. Two 
bands were in attendance—the South Hants Tempe¬ 
rance Band (under Mr. W. Wheeler), and the 
musicians from the training ship, Mercury (conductor, 
Mr. Gavin). Mr. Duncan Miller’s concertists gave 
three entertainments, which were very popular. The 
boys from the training ship Mercury contributed 
gymnastic displays and physical drill, which were 
highly creditable to the conductor, Sergeant Trott. 
Children’s sports and tugs-of-war were also held 
during the evening. The secretarial duties were 
carried out by Messrs. G. London Ward and T. 
Holmes, who are deserving of special praise, and the 
committee worked well. In the evening a large 
gathering assembled around a platform from which 
speeches were made. The Hon. Mrs. Eliot Yorke 
occupied the chair, supported by Mrs. R. Andrews, 
Mrs. Goodman, the Dean of Hereford, Mr. John 
Newton (of London), Mr. W. Bone, J.P., Mr. J. R. 
Smith, J.P., &c. 

The President said the call to arms sounded more 
strongly now than ever before. They must fight with a 
good will, and they would have to labour unceasingly 
before they could get what they longed for. The 
indignation roused by the Licensing Bill, and the 
manner it was being rushed through the House, 
would help to swell the ranks ofTemperance workers. 
She proposed that a telegram of protest be sent to 
the Prime Minister and the Archbishop of Canterbury. 
Convocation was then sitting, and the great Tempe¬ 
rance question was to be discussed on the morrow, 
and it would be right for the clergy to hear the voice 
of Southampton on this matter. The wording of 
the telegram was — “ Large demonstration 
at Southampton earnestly entreats Convocation 
to support Bishops in insisting upon time 
limit for Licensing Bill being removed before it 
reaches the Lords.” (Applause.) They were also 
going to send a telegram to the Prime Minister:— 
“ Large demonstration at South Stoneham House, 


Southampton, strongly and indignantly protests 
against so revolutionary a measure as Licensing Bill 
being forced through the House by closure.” (Loud 
applause.) The President said they were also going 
to send to their own Members telling them how they 
would like them to vote, and they intended to send 
a message to Mr. Asquith, who was so ably cham¬ 
pioning their cause. (Applause.) 

The Dean of Hereford, in seconding the resolu¬ 
tion, said he was in the House on Monday from two 
o’clock until nearly midnight, and came away sick at 
heart and much distressed at the manner in which 
the business of the country was transacted, how free 
speech was almost put a stop to, and how the voice 
of the country was utterly ignored. He came away 
firmly of the opinion that the biggest tied house to 
the brewery interest was the House of Commons 
itself. They were gathered together that evening to 
loudly protest in the name of justice against what he 
would call an infamous Bill. (Applause.) When the 
Prime Minister talked in a light manner, as he was 
accustomed to do, of the wretched doings of the 
drink traffic, he must indeed have lowered himself. 
The Prime Minister would seem to suggest that they 
should act as the Levite, and pass by on the other 
side; but rather they would act the part of the Good 
Samaritan, and rescue those who had fallen among 
thieves. (Applause.) The brewers might intimidate 
the Prime Minister and his followers, and try to 
intimidate the Church, but the clergy who had put 
their hands to the plough were determined on this 
question. As far as he knew, pretty nearly all the 
clergy were against the Licensing Bill—excepting 
those who held shares in brewery companies, and 
there were a good many such. (Shame.) With 
regard to the “ respectability ” of the Trade, he could 
not understand respectable men and women holding 
shares in the most pernicious instrument of degrada¬ 
tion there was. The Dean paid a high tribute to the 
resolute manner in which the labour members stuck 
to their work, and made an eloquent appeal in behalf 
of the cause. 

Mr. John Newton also made a strenuous speech. 
The resolution was carried with acclamation. Mr. 
J. R. Smith proposed that the thanks of the meeting 
be given to the Dean and Mr. Newton for their able 
speeches, to Sir Samuel and Lady Montagu for 
allowing the Council to hold the fete in their grounds, 
and to Mrs. Eliot Yorke for presiding. Mrs. Andrews 
ably seconded the motion, and, in acknowledging it, 
Mr. Newton said that in the three principal divisions 
on the licensing question, Southampton had given 
five votes in the wrong lobby. 

-♦>♦>♦♦♦- 

Rpe You DoumheaPted ? 


SPIN CHEERFULLY. 

Spin cheerfully, 

Not tearfully, 

Though wearily you plod ; 

Spin carefully, 

Spin prayerfully, 

But leave the thread with God. 

The shuttles of His purpose move 
To carry out His own design ; 

Seek not too soon to disapprove 
His works, nor yet assign 

Dark motives when, with silent dread, 

You view each sombre fold ; 

For, lo! within each darker thread 
There twines a thread of gold. 

Spin cheerfully, 

N ot tearfully, 

He knows the way you plod; 

Spin carefully, 

Spin prayerfully, 

But leave the thread with God. 

Emma L. Runck. 








THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


133 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series I. 


MANKIND IN THE MARRING & MENDING. 

LESSON FOR TEACHERS AND SENIOR MEMBERS. 


By T. N. KEEYNACK, M.D., M.R.C.P., 

Hon. Secretary of the Society for the Study of Inebriety . 


No. 9.—ALCOHOL 'AND THE WOMAN. 


ECOHOEISM is a wide-spread eviE Directly 
and indirectly it hinders and hampers all 
sorts and conditions of mankind. Its most 
serious and far-reaching action is manifest 
when it touches the life of the woman. No 
nation can be great which neglects the protection of 
its women, or forgets to foster and develop all that 
makes for their upbuilding. Alcohol is a peculiar foe 
to all that is highest and best in the constitution of 
woman. The evolutionist in his study of heredity 
and other problems connected with the life of the 
human recognises that alcohol in its deteriorating 
influence on women is a factor in the rise and fall of 
nations, and the ebb and flow of families. The 
sociologist, in his search for a solution of the 
problems which encircle human affairs speedily dis¬ 
covers that inebriety in the female is a fruitful source 
of social disorder and domestic derangement. 

The sanitarian, in his efforts to inculcate hygienic 
principles soon perceives that much of the ignorance, 
indifference and neglect which go to the making and 
maintenance of disease arises from the prevalence of 
drinking habits among women. 

The physician in the hospital ward, the out-patient 
department, and the privacy of his own practice, finds 
that much of the minor ailments, many of the serious 
diseases, and no little of the nervous irritability and 
mental breakdown—all too common among women 
in every rank of life—arises in great measure from, 
or is associated with, a dangerous indulgence in 
alcoholic drinks. 

For long women in this land have been victimised 
by drink. [See "Drink, Temperance, and Legislation," 
by Arthur Sherwell, M.A., M.D. London, 1902.] There 
is also reason to believe that inebriety is on the increase 
among females. [For much evidence in regard to this 
question see various papers in 7 he British Journal of 
Inebriety, Vol. I., 1903-4.] Measures to secure the 
arrest of inebriety and amelioration of the female 
inebriate are at present all too inadequate. [See 
Annual Reports of H M. Inspector of Retreats; also 
“A Collection of British, Colonial, and Foreign 
Statutes relating to the penal and reformatory treat¬ 
ment of Habitual Inebriates.” London, 1902.] 

Alcohol and the Female Adolescent. 

During girlhood alcohol in all its forms should be 
withheld. The developing body and the unfolding 
mind must be kept free from all toxic influences. At 
puberty, when oftentimes evidences of instability of 
body and excitability of mind are apparent, tradition 
oft suggests resort to alcohol. It should be clearly 
taught that alcohol is unnecessary, and may be ex¬ 
ceedingly harmful when administered to the 
adolescent. In the establishment of every normal 
physiological process alcohol in all its forms should 
be withheld. And the passage from girlhood to 
womanhood is a period which should be particularly 
safeguarded from the action of narcotic or other 
toxic agents. Habits of alcoholic indulgence then 
induced may rivet fetters on the opening life which 
death alone may be strong enough to shatter. 

Alcohol and the Woman Worker. 

Women now come from all ranks of life to join the 
workers. Some toil in what we are accustomed to 
consider lowly forms of labour ; others undertake the 
stress and strain of prolonged mental effort. Intel¬ 
lectual work, as well as heavy physical exercise, 


makes great demands on the strength and staying 
power of many women. There is oftentimes great 
temptation to mask fatigue and stifle the sense of 
anxiety by a resort to alcohol. Worry and weariness 
cause many to turn to the narcotising agent which 
deadens the senses to the finer adjustments and 
more delicate adaptations of life. Every woman, 
whatever may be the form of work she is engaged in, 
should shun the allurements of drink, and protect 
herself by a strict obedience to the laws of Nature. 

Alcohol and the Non=Worker. 

Work, worry and want plunge many women into 
alcoholism. The inebriety of poverty is a clearly 
defined form. But indolence and extravagance may 
also lead to the establishment of like habits. There 
is a variety of inebriety which in great measure is the 
outcome of luxury. 

Alcohol and the Mother. 

A mother holds the most sacred and responsible of 
trusts. It is hers to mould and nourish the developing 
life. The laws of heredity are imperfectly understood. 
Experiment and experience seem to indicate that 
there is no definite transmission of a distinct alcoholic 
craving, but there can be no doubt but that the 
unborn may be prejudicially influenced through the 
mother, and many a new life is alcoholised ere it starts 
on its individual career. The woman preparing for 
the duties of motherhood should regulate her life in 
accordance with strict hygienic requirements; and 
alcohol should be given no place. In days not long 
gone by, the birth of a child was considered clear 
indication for the administration of alcohol to the 
mother. Many ignorant nurses even sought to 
assuage the aches of life’s little ailments by giving 
intoxicating agents to the infant. Alcohol is a par¬ 
ticularly virulent poison to the young, and it is an 
altogether unnecessary and oftentimes highly pre- 
j udicial agent for the nursing mother. The old views 
still mislead, ignorance continues to prevail, and 
disaster only too frequently follows. 

Women and the Alcoholic Environment. 

The mother is the chief force in securing protection 
and training for the child during its earliest years. 
Unfortunately, the alcoholic environment is all 
pervasive. The young readily become habituated 
to the morbid. Drunkenness is reckoned but a 
comic incident in life. Many a child from earliest 
days is accustomed to witness parental indulgence in 
alcohol, and see drink entering into all the festivities 
and functions of home life. Parents would do well 
to study the constitution of their children before 
subjecting them to the risks of an alcoholic con¬ 
tamination. Precept and practice in this matter may 
wisely be indissolubly associated. 

The Inebriate Mother. 

The physiology and psychology of the inebriate 
mother requires much study. Drunkenness in the 
mother is answerable for much of the disease and 
disaster which overtakes so large a proportion of the 
children. An alcoholised parent is rendered in¬ 
different and neglectful of the fundamental needs 
of the child. Alcoholism in the mother is a most 
important factor in the production of that ignorance 
and apathy which makes for physical deterioration, 
mental poverty, and moral decadence in the child. 

Women and the Study of Intemperance. 

Drunkenness is a state altogether repugnant to the 
delicate-souled woman. But alcoholism widely pre¬ 
vails under conditions which cloak much of the 
repellant features of intemperance. Inebriety is met 
with among women in all ranks of life. The subject 
is one which stirs the emotional side of the feminine 
nature, but it is very necessary that every thinking 
woman should seriously and thoroughly study the 
matter, and be convinced that she is following a 
practice which is scientifically safe and ethically 
sound, and one which while protecting herself will 
also do much to protect her offspring, and so go far to 
secure protection to the State from an evil which now 
threatens both individual well-being and national 
prosperity. 







134 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series II. 


SIMPLE SCIENCE CHATS. 

By Charges Harvey, 

Secretary , Kent Band of Hope Union . 


No. 9.— THE LIVING STREAM. 


The Blood, or the Living Stream. 

1. The Liquid Part j (a) Serum I 2. The ) (a) Red. 
(Plasma) J (b) Fibrin I Corpuscles J (b) White. 

1. Alcohol weakens Fibrin, hinders growth. 

2. Alcohol injures and destroys Corpuscles. 

3. Alcohol stretches Blood-vessels. 


O UR last lesson was about “ The Lungs and the 
Heart,” or “The Ventilators and the Pump.” 
It is the heart that pumps the blood to all parts 
of the body. Let us now talk about the blood 
itself. 

Blood=vessels. 

In our bodies we have a number of pipes, some a 
fairly good size, but others so fine that they are called 
capillaries, that is, hair tubes, because they are as fine 
as one of our hairs. The larger pipes are called 
arteries and veins. The arteries contain the good 
blood, that is, blood with oxygen in it, and are there¬ 
fore conveying the blood from the heart, while the 
veins contain the bad blood, or blood with carbonic 
acid in it, and, therefore, convey the blood to the 
heart. If we cut one of these tubes, out flows blood. 
Blood is found all over our bodies. What is this 
blood ? We have called it “ The Living Stream.” 
It is a stream because it does not stand still in the 
pipes, but is ever flowing. This fact was discovered by 
the celebrated Dr. W. Harvey, a statue to whom is set 
up on The Leas at Folkestone. We call it the living 
stream because without it we should not live. 

The Blood. 

Of what does the blood consist ? Well, it may be 
divided into two parts : 1, the liquid part called 
Plasma ; 2, the Corpuscles , a name we must 

remember. The liquid portion consists largely of 
water which is now called serum. We all drink 
water, and here is one of its great uses. It forms the 
stream which carries the good building materials all 
over our bodies. But besides the water there is 
another liquid part flowing along with the serum. 
This second part is really the food we have eaten, 
which, as we have learnt, turns into a liquid state. It 
is now called fibrin ; and, as this part builds or repairs 
our bodies, we may say that fibrin is the busy builder 
of the body. 

Corpuscles. 

The Corpuscles consist of two kinds, red and white. 
What work have these to do ? First, red corpuscles. 
These.are the more numerous; indeed, there are so 
many ol them that they give the well-known colour 
to the blood, its bright red hue. Scientists tell us 
that something like a million of these red corpuscles 
die every second and a fresh million are made. There 
must, therefore, be millions of them in the blood. 
They are so tiny that it is impossible to distinguish 
them with the naked eye, but when seen under a 
microscope, they are found to be round in shape. 
Indeed, they are so small that 3,000 of them would 
lie side by side across a halfpenny. It is hard to 
imagine that such small things are called upon to do 
any work. But they have a most important office to 
fulfil. We have learnt how necessary ogygen is. The 
red corpuscles are the ogygen carriers. But more 
than that, the ogygen burns up the carbonaceous 
foods (sugars and fats), and thus causes heat. That 


is how our bodies are always kept at one temperature, 
985°. This joining of oxygen to carbon forms another 
well known gas, called carbonic acid gas. This is 
poisonous, and must, therefore, be brought out of the 
body. So the little red corpuscles bring this bad gas 
to the heart, which pumps it to the lungs, and we 
breathe it out. The work of the red, corpuscles is a 
most important one. 

White Corpuscles. 

The white corpuscles are nothing like so numerous 
as the red ones. They are, however, just a trifle 
larger, and they vary in shape. They are curious 
little things. And what is the work of these white 
corpuscles ? We may call them the little policemen 
of the blood. Remember the policemen of our streets 
are dressed in blue, but the policemen of our blood 
are white. The work of a policeman is to look after 
naughty people, and our little white corpuscles look 
after the little enemies that enter our blood. 

Microbes. 

In the world around us there are vast numbers of 
tiny living germs, so small that it is impossible to 
discern them with the naked eye. The microscope, 
however, reveals them to us. That is why they are 
called microbes. The largest of these tiny beings 
would not measure 1-20,000 part of an inch, and we 
could get 400 million of them in the space of a square 
inch, and there would be no crowding. Of recent 
years clever men have studied these microbes, and 
found that they are doing very important work in 
the world. Some of them are our friends, while some 
are our enemies. Fancy little things like these 
microbes hurting us ! Listen to this list of diseases: 
typhoid fever, cholera, tetanus or lockjaw, consump¬ 
tion, scarlet fever, measles, small-pox, diphtheria, 
&c., &c.; these diseases, and many others, are caused 
through poisonous microbes getting into our blood 

Typhoid Microbes. 

There are a great variety of microbes, but they are 
all simple in their construction. They are living cells 
or germs. Let us learn a little about the microbe 
that causes typhoid fever. It lives and flourishes in 
milk or water. Under a microscope it appears 
something like a piece of thread. It is very rapid in 
its movements. One characteristic of all microbes is 
that, under favourable conditions, they increase in 
number very rapidly. The typhoid germ, for example, 
in twenty minutes grows to double its length, and 
then divides into two. At the end of the next twenty 
minutes the two become four. By the time an hour is 
reached there are eight. Now if we go on doubling every 
twenty minutes, we shall find in the course of twenty - 
four hours they have increased to millions. That is 
what may occur if they unfortunately enter the blood 
stream. They attack the stomach and intestines, and 
cause typhoid fever. But here comes the work of the 
white corpuscles—the little policemen. They see 
these poisonous germs floating along in the blood, and 
they attack them and destroy them, carrying them 
along and expelling them in some little pimple or 
gathering. 

Alcohol and the Blood. 

Suppose we drink intoxicating liquors, does the 
the alcohol enter the blood ? Yes, very rapidly. It 
is already liquid, so it passes quickly out of the 
stomach and into the blood-stream. When there, 
what does it do ? It does a great deal of harm. First, 
it weakens the fibrin which is the busy builder of the 
blood. If taken by young children, this means 
stunted growth. Then it injures the corpuscles, both 
red and white ones. All scientists are agreed that 
if we are attacked by poisonous germs, and alcohol 
is present in the blood, we are more likely to be ill, 
and certainly take a longer time to recover. The 
blood is much better when quite clear of alcohol. 
One more injury. Alcohol causes the iblood-vessels 
to stretch, and are, therefore, more liable to burst. 


[Friends using this lesson are recommended to purchase the 
diagram, “Alcohol and the Circulation,” from 60. Old Bailey, E.C.] 







THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


135 


Band of Hope Addresses.—Series III. 


ALCOHOL AND HISTORY. 


By Charges Wakeey, 

Secretary, United Kingdom Band of Hope Union. 


No. 5.—DRINK AND MODERN HISTORY. 


URING the Plantagenet and Tudor periods the 
love of strong drink abounded. Excess pre¬ 
vailed even at religious and State festivals. 
Thus we find that when William Warham was 
enthroned as Archbishop of Canterbury in the reign 
of Henry VII., a feast was given at which 3,276 gallons 
of wine and 7,560 gallons of ale were provided, whilst 
in 1533, when Anne Boleyn came to Eondon, a 
fountain ran all the afternoon at the great conduit in 
Cheapside, pouring out at one end white wine, and 
at the other claret. 

The Times of “Good Queen Bess.” In Queen 
Elizabeth’s reign drinking greatly increased amongst 
the common people, and her minister, Lord Cecil, 
complained that “ England spendeth more in wines 
in one year than it didin ancient times in four years.” 
Beer, however, was the common beverage, taken even 
at breakfast, and this by the Queen as well as by 
her subjects. Strong beer at this time was re¬ 
tailed at a penny a gallon, and table beer at less than 
a halfpenny. Foreign wines were sold at from eight- 
pence to a shilling a gallon. The quantity of wine 
consumed at the feast given to Queen Elizabeth at 
Kenilworth Castle by the Earl of Leicester was 
enormous, in addition to 365 hogsheads of strong 
beer. 

The Stuarts and the Stocks. The habit of 
drinking became more pronounced during the 
Stuart period, and a very bad example was set to the 
people by James the First and his nobility. Bishop 
Taylor, a writer of the time, said: “We strangle 
ourselves with intemperance—we quench our souls 
with drunkenness.” Burton, too, gives a description 
of the people flocking to taverns as if eating 
and drinking were their only aim in life. An attempt 
was made to stop this excess by fining drunkards 
and by placing them in the stocks, but the habit of 
drinking had got too great a hold to be rooted out. 

Twenty Shillings or a Whipping! A writer of 
the time of Charles I. speaks of whole streets where 
every house was an ale-house, and the Lord Keeper 
Coventry, referring to such places, says : “ I account 
ale-houses and tippling houses the greatest pests in 
the kingdom. I give it you in charge to take a course 
that none be permitted unless they be licensed ; and 
for the licensed ale-houses, let them be but few, and 
in fit places; if they be in private corners or ill 
places, they become the den of thieves: they are the 
public stages of drunkenness and disorder.” Later, in 
1627, a fine of twenty shillings or whipping was 
imposed for keeping ale-houses without licence. 

The Drunkard’s Cloak. When Cromwell became 
Protector he strove to repress drunkenness by’ severe 
fines and penalties. A very notable form of punish¬ 
ment employed at Ihis time was the “drunkard’s 
cloak.” It was a cask with a hole at the top, through 
which the drunkard’s head could be seen, and a hole 
on each side for his hands. His legs were free, and 
he used to be marched through the town carrying the 
tub wherever he went, exposed to the jeers and gibes 
of the populace. 

“The King's Health!” The common people, 
however, resented being punished for their favourite 
vice, and at the Restoration, when Charles the Second 
was made king, it became the fashion to drink more 
than ever. When the king entered London the 
fountain in Cheapside was filled with wine, and the 
people drank almost as much as they pleased. Those 
who would not pledge the king’s health were 


often badly treated, as drinking was thought 
to be a proof of affection for the cause of the 
king. Sober people were ridiculed and persecuted. 
The king himself was frequently intoxicated, and 
history tells how he took pleasure in making his 
Dutch guest, William of Orange, drunk, upon his 
visit to England as the suitor of the king’s niece. 

Plague, Fire, and Drink. —The dissipation of the 
King, Court, and people was rudely interrupted by 
the Great Plague in 1665. At this time the mad 
assion of the masses for alcohol was exhibited, 
hey broke into the houses of the rich who had fled 
from the city and drank the wine in the cellars. 
Then many of these unhappy creatures were seized 
with the plague in the midst of their intemperance, 
and died miserably in the streets. When, in the 
following year, the Great Fire was raging, the people 
again showed their lust for strong drink. Many, in 
order to get it, ventured into the smoking ruins and 
perished in the attempt. Others went into houses 
not yet aflame, and drank till they were unable to 
leave, and perished miserably. 

Royalty and Gin.—In 1689 an Act of Parliament 
was passed which allowed the business of making and 
selling distilled spirits to be carried on by anyone 
who was willing to pay the Government duties. The 
making of gin and other similar liquors thus 
received a great impetus, and the passion for spirit 
drinking spread like a plague. William the Third, who 
began his reign in this year, is known in history as 
the most celebrated gin-drinker of his time, and his 
banqueting house at Hampton Court was called 
“ The Royal Gin Temple.” As for the common people, 
gin was hawked to them in the streets of London at 
sixpence per quart, and retailers of liquor used to hang 
out painted sign-boards, one of which said, “ Here 
you can get drunk for a penny, dead drunk for 
twopence, and have clean straw for nothing.” 

The Gin Act. —The abundant facilities afforded by 
Government for the manufacture and sale of spirits, 
and the cheapness of these pernicious liquors, 
resulted in scenes, the hideous details of which are 
portrayed in Hogarth’s Gin Lane, and other similar 
pictures. In 1736 the magistrates of Middlesex 
petitioned Parliament for some restrictive measures. 
The House took the subject into serious considera¬ 
tion, and passed the Gin Act , and a heavy sum, 
amounting almost to a prohibition of its sale, was 
affixed to the taking out of a licence. Yet even this 
enactment was productive of little good, and the 
people immediately resorted to illegal expedients to 
obtain a supply. Extensive smuggling was carried 
on, and drunkenness raged as much as ever, until 
certain Acts, passed in 1751 and 1753, made the traffic 
a less profitable pursuit. 

“When George the Third was King.” —Happily 
George the Third, who was very abstemious, set a 
better example than some of his predecessors. Well 
had it been for the great statesmen and other men of 
genius of this and preceding reigns if they had adopted 
an equally simple course of life; but, alas! some of 
the most distinguished politicians and literary 
characters of the eighteenth century—Fox, Sheridan 
and Pitt; Addison, Coleridge and Lamb; Dryden, 
Burns and Byron—were the victims of drinking habits. 
Such, too, was the Prince Regent, “the first gentle¬ 
man in Europe,” afterwards George the Fourth, whose 
career of unrestrained indulgence is well known. 

The Dawning of a Better Day. —When William 
the Fourth became king, a marked change began to 
take place in the habits of society. It was then that 
the first dawnings appeared of the Temperance Re¬ 
formation. In 1831 the first national Temperance 
organisation, “ The British and Foreign Temperance 
Society,” was formed; and in 1832 the earliest Total 
Abstinence Society, instituted by the “ Seven Men of 
Preston.” Their history, and the history of the 
Band of Hope movement, is known to all well- 
instructed young abstainers, and need not be re¬ 
peated in this address. Suffice it to say that now, 
instead of “The Preston Seven,” there are estimated 
to be Seven Millions of abstainers in the country. 







THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


136 


Band of Mope Addresses.—Series IV. 


BIBLE=CLASS TALKS. 

By the Rev. David Heath, oj Derby. 


No. 5.—UTTLR FOXES. 


“ Dittle foxes that spoil the vine.”— Solomon's Sotig, 
ii. 15. 

Read also Psalm Ixiii. 10; Mark vi. 14.; Duke 
xiii. 32. 


T HE fox is not much seen or heard of in this 
country except as the object of sport, and for 
that purpose his presence is rather encouraged 
by country gentry who like that form of amuse¬ 
ment. Fox hunting is followed not as a means 
of ridding the land of a pest, but as a pastime for 
people whose feeling finds pleasure in hounding poor 
Reynard to distress and death. To exterminate foxes 
may be a public benefit, but to make a sport of it is 
coarse and cruel. 

Intelligence and Cunning. 

The fox is one of the most intelligent creatures. 
No doubt his troubles have sharpened his wits. The 
pity is when a high degree of intelligence becomes a 
means of mischief; it is then like the sharpened edge 
of the knife, the power of evil being in proportion to 
the keenness of the edge. It is a greater pity still 
when this high intelligence becomes demoralised by 
cunning, craft, and cruelty. But this is the fox’s 
nature; he knows no better and does not want to 
know better, and the worse parts of his character 
have doubtless been developed by the kind of life he 
has had to lead—prowling about at nights catching 
mice, eating eggs and the hens that lay them, and 
making himself the terror of ducks and geese all the 
country round. No wonder he should be afraid to 
show himself, and that he should not live a happy 
and undisturbed life. 

The fox knows nothing about conscience or mend¬ 
ing his manners or turning his powers to better use. 
It is his nature, and we do not blame him as we blame 
youths and men who are gifted with intelligence yet 
live cunning and mischievous lives. They know 
better and could do better. And just as we protect 
ourselves against foxes and other wild creatures, so 
society has to protect itself against people of evil dis¬ 
position and habits. What a good thing it would be 
if all the wild forces of nature could be tamed and 
used for the true service of life ! Still better if wasted 
human power were well directed. 

A Lesson from Foxes. 

We may learn something even from the wily foxes. 
They do, after all, learn how to protect themselves 
against their enemies and pursuers. They learn from 
one another what is meant to entrap them. Of course 
they can talk to one another in their own way about 
guns and traps, and when they see one of their 
brethren fast in a trap, they notice that trap and 
know other traps like it when their sharp eyes see 
them, hence not many foxes are caught in the same 
place, and, what is more wonderful, not many are 
caught in the same place by the same kind of trap. 
We have read similar things about birds. Dong since 
Solomon said—“In vain is the net spread in the 
sight of any bird.” And we are told that when tele¬ 
graph wires were first stretched along the roads a good 
many birds were killed by the electric currents, but 
that now it seldom happens because the birds have 
learnt to be cautious. So I suppose it is with all 
other creatures: they learn what endangers and 
destroys them, and their instinct of self-preservation 
protects them. 

S Momon makes that reference to the bird and net 
for the purpose of teaching that the common sense 9f 


human beings ought to make them as wise as the 
birds, but that often it does not. Yes, it does teach 
them, but somehow their sense is overmastered by 
some other power that leads them to do the wrong 
though they know the right. That is the worst 
wrong-doing of all. 

Men Know Strong Drink Injures 

their health and their power of will. They know the 
public house, the hotel parlour, the club with liquor 
licence, are like traps to catch the unwary, yet they 
still drink and help to keep up “ the trade.” The 
foxes and even the birds show better sense; their 
instinct is of more use to them than intelligence is to 
these men and women. So again, youths know that 
tobacco hinders growth and injures the heart’s action ; 
yet still they smoke, and in that respect their school 
knowledge and superior intelligence are of less 
practical use than the simple instinct of the fox or 
the bird. 

There are not many of the fiercer-blooded animals 
that like fruit; their taste is for savouries rather than 
sweets. But the fox seems to have a liking for grapes. 
In that he shows good judgment and a refined taste, 
does he not ? AJsop’s fable of the Fox and the 
Grapes will be remembered by all, and the amuse¬ 
ment we had when the old fox could not reach the 
grapes, and so he comforted himself by believing 
that they were sour! I think that showed sourness 
of disposition in the fox : they would have been sweet 
enough if he could have got at them. It is a poor 
way of comforting oneself, and it is not true; for there 
are many things in life beyond our reach, as beautiful 
and sweet as any we ever enjoy. 

Dittle foxes like grapes, and the cunning little 
things know how to hide themselves in the vineyard 
and watch and wait until the grapes are ripe. Dittle 
foxes can hide where bigger ones cannot, and so the 
keeper of the vineyard has to keep a sharper watch 
against the little foxes than against the full-grown 
ones; they are more easily driven out or caught than 
the old ones, for the older ones have become more 
savage, more daring, more cunning, and swifter 
runners. Besides, these little foxes wdl grow bigger 
and worse as they grow older. If any of us had a 
vineyard in a place where foxes lived, we would be 
careful to keep the foxes out by the best fence we 
could put around the vineyard; and, if through any 
gap in the fence, a little fox crept in, we would lose 
no time in catching the fox and mending the fence. 
It would be better to catch the fox and kill him than 
simply drive him out, lest he give trouble another 
day, or rather another night, when we are not watch¬ 
ing. 

Alcohol, the Fox. 

Now do you not perceive at once that the little 
foxes we have to guard against are little habits of 
evil ? Our life is like a vineyard planted well with 
vines, which, if taken care of, will yield rich fruit in 
due time. But we must bestow upon it much time 
and skill and watchfulness, else when we grow older 
and really need the grapes—the fruit of industry—we 
shall find nothing but fruitless stalks. Evil habits 
are the mischievous things we have to watch against 
and get rid of, and the sooner the better. F'or little 
tempers and little vices have a way of growing worse 
and worse, if they are not conquered. These little 
evils are not always easy to notice. There seems no 
harm in having one glass of wine or beer, then two 
glasses, then three, then—ah, who shall tell the 
excess and mischief that have so often followed the 
first glass ? The pledge is a capital fence round our 
vineyard, and this fox called Alcohol will never get 
into our garden so long as we keep that fence good. 
It is much easier to be rid of evil habits at the 
beginning than later in life. Boys and girls may form 
good habits instead—habits of Temperance, virtue, 
and religion; these also will grow stronger, but 
instead of spoiling life they will protect and enrich it; 
and when the autumn and winter of life come we 
shall have the fruit—the fruit God meant that we 
should eat, and not the foxes. 






THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


137 


Brink SUater! 

Words by Austin Cecil. Music by Arthur J. Jamouneatt. 




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Beware the wine-cups’s subtle spell ; 

Beware the tempter’s wile ; 

Beware the downward path, and shun 
False friendship’s evil smile. 

Beware ! take care ! the social glass,— 
"Just one, you know; no more!" 
May prove the step that leads to death, 


Then drink, drink only water good, 

And you shall walk secure ; 

To every tempter firmly say—• 

“ I take but water pure ! ’’ 

Then sing in praise of Temperance, 

Come sing this song with me : 

“ Temp’rance shall be our watchword still, 



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THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE . 


138 


Editorial Mems. 


Lord Roberts, in a recent letter to a lady, 
said : “ My opinion is that everyone would be 
better without smoking, and that, so far as 
boys are concerned, it is a pernicious and 
injurious habit.” 


The Swiss magazine L' An ere for July, gave 
a model lesson for Swiss Band of Hope 
workers founded on Mr. Walter Edwards’ out¬ 
line address on “ Policemen and Burglars,” 
in our June issue, and in August another 
founded on the Rev. David Heath’s bright 
outline address on “ Living Water,” which 
appeared in the Band of Hope Chronicle in 
July. The same organ calls attention to the 
interesting biographical sketch of the late 
Pastor Arnold Bovet, who has passed away 
during the past year. M. Bovet was an ardent 
supporter of L’Espoir, and his loss is deeply 
regretted. “He being dead yet speaketh.” 


At the Wesleyan Conference at Sheffield, 
the report of the Temperance Committee gave 
the number of Bands of Hope in the Con¬ 
nexion as 5,047, with a membership of 458,254, 
an increase of 58 societies, and 11,780 members 
during the year. The number of Temperance 
societies was 2,160, an increase of 154, with a 
membership of 126,590, an increase of 12,182. 
Among the speakers at the great meeting in 
the Albert Hall, were Mr. Bamford Slack, M.P., 
and Bishop Hoss, of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church of the Southern States of America. 
The Bishop said one of the things that were 
absolutely certain was that the promiscuous 
sale of ardent spirits was an offence to both 
God and man. He also delighted the gathering 
by stating that all the Methodist ministers in 
the States were teetotalers. 


At the Temperance Conference in connec¬ 
tion with the 59th Annual Gathering of the 
“ Churches of Christ,” held at Wigan from 
August 1 to 4, a considerable increase in the 
number of Bands of Hope in the Connexion 
was reported. The secretary stated that much 
literature had been circulated, and that success¬ 
ful conferences and public meetings had been 
held. Mr. Walter Crosthwaite read a vigorous 
and comprehensive paper on “ Reasons why 
some Christians are indifferent in regard to 
Temperance work.” An animated and useful 
discussion followed the reading of this very 
excellent paper. These Churches now 
possess 71 Bands of Hope with a membership 
of 6,576, an increase ot 531 since last year. 


At the 29th Annual Meeting of the Good 
Templar and Temperance Orphanage, held in 
July, Mr. Edward Wood, J.P., the chairman 
of the Institution, again presided. He has so 
zealously devoted himself to this noble work 
that he has not missed attending a single 
meeting. About seven hundred people sat 
down L to the tea before the meeting, which 


was held on the lawn of the Orphanage. The 
report showed that the Home had been 
retained at its wonted high state of efficiency, 
under the parental care of Mr. and Mrs. 
Chappell, the esteemed Master and Matron. 
The receipts for the year were about ^1,467, 
and the expenses about £1,632. Fifty-five 
children, from all parts of the county, were 
enjoying the advantages of the Home, and 
the visitors could see that the place had, 
indeed, proved to be a happy home to them. 


Miss Kate Marsden, the writer, has been 
travelling in Siberia, where the cold weather 
was very trying, and long journeys very 
fatiguing. In the preface to her new book 
she says that the record of her exertions, 
without the aid of stimulants, may prove 
beneficial to all who read it. She made it 
a rule to take no alcohol throughout the 
journey. Yet on two occasions, when greatly 
exhausted, she was persuaded to take some; 
but, she said, they only made her worse, 
adding, ‘‘I have, therefore, good grounds for 
recommending abstinence from alcohol where 
much physical endurance is necessary. 
Humanly speaking, I believe I owe my life to 
this abstinence.” So do we. 


The Quivei , while keeping all its old and 
admirable characteristics, is growing to be a 
valuable ally in Temperance work. In July, it 
gave an illustrated account of the Tempe¬ 
rance Island which Mr. Charrington has 
bought off the Essex coast—the island of 
Osea. Most entertaining is the experiment 
to all abstainers, who wish it complete 
success. The same magazine also gives two 
pages every month on ‘‘Temperance Notes 
and News.” In July, the article included a 
portrait of the Rev. Leonard Isitt, and the 
interior of a Danish Good Templars’ Lodge 
room. In August it gave an account of the 
Young Abstainers’ Union, with a portrait of 
Miss Hooker, its secretary. This lady gained 
her experience at the famous Dove Row Band 
of Hope. 


Messrs. Jarvis & Foster, of Bangor, have 
issued a handy cheap Book-Marker made of 
thick paper, so contrived as always to keep 
the place when properly used. On the back 
is a blank space for the reader’s notes—a 
capital idea. The reader who takes notes is 
the one who reads to the best advantage. 


Dr. Legrain, of Paris, has been making a 
tour in Norway and Sweden, for the study of 
the methods adopted by those countries to 
restrain the evils of alcoholism. He has 
also given a series of addresses in important 
centres. His conclusion is that the drinking 
habits of the people are rather worse than we 
are apt to believe. For, though in Sweden 
there are 300,000 total abstainers, a large 
proportion of the remaining population are 
completely contaminated by alcohol. 











THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE . 


139 


The 

Best Books fot* Busy Bpains.* 

(Scientific Temperance.) 


By Walter N. Edwards, F.C.S. 


T HE difficulty that the busy worker has to 
contend with in these days, is not the lack of 
literature on the scientific phase of our im¬ 
portant subject, but how to keep pace with 
what is produced, and to be constantly up-to-date 
with the results of new investigations, and the 
expression of the latest views. 

The purview of the scientific aspect of the Tempe¬ 
rance question is a very wide one, embracing as it 
does the chemistry of brewing and of alcohol, 
necessitating some knowledge of the laws of ferments, 
of chemical changes, and of food values. It also 
includes at least some knowledge of general chemistry, 
physiology, biology, and hygiene, and if taken in its 
widest significance, the pathology of the subject 
must also be well understood. 

The watchwords of all who attempt scientific 
teaching must be, thoroughness and accuracy. Our 
contention is that as Temperance advocates we 
assume the position of teachers, and as such we ought, 
first of all, to be able to state our case with exactitude, 
and, secondly, to be able to support it with un¬ 
impeachable authority. To do this, one must be well 
versed in what has been written both pro and con. on 
the subject. 

There are, of course, many books in which scientific 
facts are reduced to their simplest forms, and pre¬ 
sented to the busy worker rn a way that with 
ordinary intelligence should be very helpful. But 
after all, in many cases, even these simple forms of 
statement, unless the advocate has some groundwork 
of scientific training, are apt to be misleading, 
because of the tendency to read more into them than 
they are really intended to convey. 

We live in an age when tit-bits and scraps and 
siftings are all well to the front, but these afford a 
very poor stock-in-trade for the advocate of scientific 
Temperance. A few standard books well mastered 
will be of infinitely greater service. 

The Text Book 

by the late Dr. F. R. Lees is one which reaches an 
ideal level. It covers the ground of the whole 
philosophical and scientific argument in a way that 
renders controversy almost impossible. Of course, 
new light is continually being shed on every scientific 
study, and our question is no exception. Experi¬ 
ments and researches since Dr. Lees’ time have given 
us new information, but still the backbone and bulk 
of the work of Dr. Lees remain, and, I suppose, will 
remain, unanswerable. Any man who absorbs the 
gist of such a work, if he is capable of utilising 
material at all, must of necessity become a first-rate 
exponent of Temperance principles, and be in him¬ 
self a perfect arsenal of exact information. In a 
simpler form, and of a more elementary character, 
yet in an extremely useful way, there is much in¬ 
formation on the simple chemistry and physiology of 
the subject in such works as Cheshire’s “Scientific 
Temperance Handbook,” “The Methodist Tempe¬ 
rance Manual,” by Rev. Wm. Spiers, M.A., “ The 
Temperance Science Reading Book,” by John 
Topham. The little manuals published by the Lan¬ 
cashire and Cheshire Band of Hope Union, entitled 
“ Temperance Science Lessons,” Nos. 1 and 2, in the 
first of which details are given for working over one 
hundred simple experiments are excellent, as also 
is the book entitled “ Science Chats for Boys and 
Girls,” published by the Wesleyan Book Room. 

The Physiology of the Question 
has given rise to a copious literature, and it is in 
dealing with this phase that a general knowledge 

'Read at the Annual Conference of the National Association of 
Official Advocates at Cardiff. 


of physiology is so essentially useful. Ter merely read 
of certain physiological action of alcohol, and to 
mechanically repeat what is read, is but of little 
service, but if some knowledge of pure physiology 
has been attained, the speaker can himself appreciate 
the value of what he reads, and can put it before his 
audience with much greater authority and lucidity. 

There is a capital book containing the very best 
information against the use of alcohol as an aid 
to intellectual power. Its author was that great 
man, whose qualities, I think, have never been 
sufficiently appreciated, Sir B. W. Richardson, 
and the title of the book is “ Researches into the 
Action of Alcohol on the Mind.” For an all¬ 
round purview of alcohol itself, and its physiological 
action, I should think there has been no finer or 
clearer statement than that contained in the Cantor 
Lectures, delivered by Sir B. W. Richardson before 
the Society of Arts, and published by Messrs. Mac¬ 
millan and Co. A very good summary of some of the 
chief points, but, after all, only a summary, is con¬ 
tained in “Brief Notes for Temperance Teachers,” 
also by Sir B. W. Richardson. This is only of real 
value where definite knowledge has been already 
attained, and its chief excellence is the summarised 
form in which the matter is presented. 

A most excellent resume of ascertained results and 
the opinions of some of the foremost medical and 
scientific men is very clearly stated in Axel Gus¬ 
tafson’s painstaking and laborious work, “The 
Foundation of Death.” In my opinion, there has 
never within the compass of any one book been pre¬ 
sented so complete a statement of our case as that 
given in this work. One of the most noteworthy 
features of it is the very complete Bibliography, in 
which more than 1,500 books are mentioned, all of 
which deal more or less with our question. It is 
the most complete catalogue of Temperance books 
extant. 

A Very Remarkable Book, 
and one that has been of unique value to the 
Temperance propaganda, is “The Experiments and 
Observations on the Action of Gastric Juice,” by Dr. 
Wm, Beaumont, of America. This physician had the 
extraordinary case of Alexis St. Martin under his care. 
The open fistula in the stomach of his patient afforded 
to medical science the only opportunity that has ever 
occurred for a long-continued series of experiments 
and observations on the direct action of stomach 
digestion. The experiments extended from 1825 to 
1833, and have been accepted as one of the best and 
most valuable contributions to the literature of the 
subject. None the less valuable is the preface to the 
English edition by Dr. Andrew Combe, who was 
phjsician extraordinary to the late Queen, and also 
to the King and Queen of the Belgians. 

Another Noteworthy Book, 
and one that should be well known to all students of 
the subject, is “ Recent Researches on Alcohol,” 
published in 1878 by Dr. Richardson. Although the 
date carries us back more than twenty-five years, the 
main facts are still of the highest value, and have 
never been controverted. The same author, as the 
last piece of work that he accomplished before his 
death, gave to the world “Vita Medica,” a wonderful 
book, which deserves to be read by all interested in 
the well-being of mankind. The work does not deal 
with Temperance matters alone, but is full of wise, 
useful suggestions on hygeia and sanitation/and is 
intended to be a contribution dealing with the better 
physical qualities of the race. In it, however, there 
is a very striking chapter, entitled “The Battle with 
Alcohol,” in which we have the account of the 
reasons which induced the great doctor’s own 
abstinence, and some outline of the researches that 
confirmed his views. The chapter has been reprinted, 
and appears in the “ National Temperance League’s 
Annual ” for 1903. 

Handy Books 

on Temperance physiology have from time to time 
appeared, and of these we may mention some that 
are very reliable and full of information. “Alcohol 





140 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


and Science,” by Dr. William Hargreaves, of 
Philadelphia, is a very full and very clear statement 
of the case. It was a prize essay, which gained the 
award of 500 dollars offered by the Seventh National 
Temperance Convention at Saratoga. A very concise 
and reliable statement of the case is also presented in 
“ Temperance Physiology,” by Dr. John Guthrie, and 
published by the Scottish Temperance Deague. 
Another book of the same description, and one that 
is very often quoted, is “The Physiology of Total 
Abstinence,” by Dr. Win. B. Carpenter, P'.R.S. It is 
a book that will repay close study, and almost 
deserves to be committed to memory. 

A Book, 

published quite recently, by Dr. H. H. Mann, of 
Brooklyn, entitled “ Alcohol in the Human Body,” 
deals with the physiological aspect in a fresh and 
original manner. The book is not written for 
students, but is a collection of short chatty articles, 
originally contributed to the “ International Maga¬ 
zine.” It is free from technicalities, and contains 
much useful matter in a most readable form. One 
cannot afford to be unacquainted with the very 
clear statement of the case presented in the hundred 
guinea prize essay by Dr. H. A. W. Coryn. This 
prize was offered by the British Medical Temperance 
Association, and out of thirty-nine competitors 
Dr. Coryn’s essay on “The Moral and Physical 
Advantages of Total Abstinence ” was selected as the 
best. One other little book must be mentioned in 
this section, and that is “A Primer of the Physio¬ 
logical Action of Alcohol,” by Dr. E. J. Norris, of 
Portsmouth. The information given is brief, but it 
is of a first-class character, some of it being the result 
of original research. The book is well illustrated, 
and has a commendatory introduction by Dr. 
Clifford. 

Inebriety 

is a subject in the study of which quite a literature of 
its own has come into existence. This question is 
investigated quite apart from that of total abstinence, 
but the experience and teaching gained invariably 
leads to the conclusion that total abstinence is 
philosophically sound and physiologically advan¬ 
tageous. The most complete, and certainly the most 
important work on this subject, is that published in 
1S94 by the late Dr. Norman Kerr, entitled 
“ Inebriety: its Etiology, Pathology, Treatment, and 
Jurisprudence.” Every phase of the subject is dealt 
with in the most exhaustive manner, and the book 
affords a mine of information. A very interesting 
brochure is that issued in 189S by Dr. W. L. 
Brown, entitled “Inebriety Amongst the Ancients: 
how they Cured it.” The book is certainly not in 
favour of total abstinence principles as we know 
them, but still it is one which should be read by 
every advocate, and it contains much very useful 
material, and much that is suggestive. There are 
two other books of great interest, and which well 
repay perusual: one entitled “ Non-Heredity of 
Inebriety,” by Dr. Keeley, of Chicago, published in 
1896; and another, published in the same year, 
entitled “Inebriety: its Source, Prevention, and 
Cure,” by C. F. Palmer. Those who wish to keep up 
with the times on this question should see “ The 
American Journal of Inebriety,” edited by Dr. T. D. 
Crothers, of Connecticut; and “The British Journal 
of Inebriety,” edited by Dr. T. N. Kelynack. Both 
these are issued quarterly. 

The Pathoeogy 

of the Temperance question is also a phase that is 
getting its own special literature. Those who want 
some little insight into this study would do well to 
read “ Diseases in Modern Life,” by Sir B. W. 
Richardson, published in 1876, in which the close 
relationship of drink and disease is very clearly 
established. The successful treatment of disease 
without alcohol is a point that is worth making a 
note of, and some capital information is supplied in 
“ Successful Treatment without Alcohol,” being a 
report of 129 surgical operations treated without 
alcohol by Dr. James Edmunds, published in 1S89; 


also by Dr. Edmunds, “ Cases at the Temperance 
Hospital,” published in 1876. A very clear and concise 
little work is “The Non-Alcoholic Home Treatment of 
Disease,” by Dr. J. J. Ridge, and another under the 
same title by Dr. Henry Mudge. The accountrof 
some original research, which well repays perusal, 
is given in “The Pathology of Drunkenness,” by 
Dr. Charles Wilson, of Edinburgh; but probably, 
as this was published some sixty years ago, it could 
only be seen at the British Museum, and possibly 
in the libraries of some of the older Temperance 
organisations. Although published so long since, it 
is a book replete with information and of considerable 
value, even to the student of the present day. Another 
Edinburgh doctor of the same name, Dr. G. R. 
Wilson, Assistant Physician at the Royal Asylum, 
Morningside, Edinburgh, has much more recently 
(1893) given us a useful book on the “ Physiology and 
Pathology of Drunkenness,” in which the matter is 
fairly discussed. On the other side of the question 
—and it is always an advantage to know both sides—a 
book entitled “The Use of Wines in Health and 
Disease,” published by Dr. Anstie in 1877, says all 
that the medical practitioner who believes in the use 
of alcohol can say. 

For a Generae Statement 

of scientific facts regarding alcohol there are a 
number of useful little works, amongst the best being 
“The Role of Alcohol,” by Dr. MacDowel Cosgrave, 
of Dublin, Professor of Biology, Royal College of 
Surgeons, Ireland ; published in 1899, which gives in 
a plain straightforward way an up-to-date summary 
of ascertained fact. An equally valuable contribution 
to scientific literature is “The Scientific Valuation of 
Alcohol in Health,” by Dr. Patrick W. O’Gorman. 
The information given is authentic and convincing. 
Not the least valuable part of the book is the preface 
by Professor Sims Woodhead. Perhaps the most 
important recent contribution to this subject is 
the Alcohol number of the Practitioner, published 
November, 1902, in which several eminent men 
contributed their views in the following articles: 
“ Alcohol as a Beverage and a Medicine,”by Sir Samuel 
Wilks, F.R.S., Consulting Physician to Guy’s Hos¬ 
pital; “Alcohol as a Medicine,” by SirW. H. Broadbent, 
F.R.S., Physician to the King and Consulting 
Physician to St. Mary’s Hospital; “Notes on the 
Pathology of Alcoholism,” by Dr. Sims Woodhead, 
Professor of Pathology, Cambridge University; 
“Alcoholic Beverages,” by Dr. James Edmunds, Con¬ 
sulting Physician to Eondon Temperance Hospital; 
“Alcohol in Surgery,” by Mr. Pearce Gould, Surgeon 
to the Middlesex Hospital; “ On the Treatment of 
Dipsomania by Hypnotic Suggestion,” by Dr. J. 
Milne Bramwell ; “ Alcohol Irom a Sociological 

Standpoint,” by Dr. J. J. Ridge; and “Mortality 
from Alcoholic Excess in England and Wales,” by 
Dr. Francis Vacher :—a symposium of medical opinion 
that is of the utmost value, possessing weight and 
authority that cannot be gainsaid. For current 
information every advocate, of course, should use the 
Medical Temperance Review, so ably conducted by 
Dr. J. J. Ridge; the price of which is within the 
reach of all. It affords a mine of information that it 
is culpable to neglect. The scientific summaries in 
the 7 empei ance Record and in the “ National Tempe¬ 
rance League’s Annual” are also very helpful in 
calling attention to current points of interest. 

Specialisation 

is the order of the day in nearly all scientific studies, 
and it would not be difficult to begin to specialise in 
regard to scientific Temperance. Take, for instance, 
the subject of brewing. A vast industry, carried out 
on absolutely scientific lines, has been built up, and 
it becomes a question whether the advocate of to-day 
knows much of modern methods and principles in the 
great brewing industry. If information is wanted on 
this point, it can well be got in a condensed form by a 
perusal of the Cantor Lectures on brewing, delivered 
before the Society of Arts by Dr. Charles Graham in 
1873. Within the last few years, since the science of 
brewing has been honoured with a chair at one of 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


I 4 I 


our universities, several manuals have been issued 
which give much information. We may mention 
“The Manual of Brewing,” by 15 . G. Hooper, F.C.S., 
F.I.C., published in 1891; “A Handy Book for 
Brewers,” by H. E. Wright, M.A., published in 1892; 
and “The Manual of Alcoholic Fermentation,” by 

E. C. Matthews, F.C.S., F.I.C. 

The Food Question 

is another phase of specialisation. One of the earliest 
books on this particular subject is that by Dr. 
Ezra M. Hunt, of New Jersey, entitled, “Alcohol as 
a Food and a Medicine,” published in 1877, in which 
the author shows that it has a very poor place indeed in 
either capacity. The book is now a little out of date, 
although it contains some very useful information. 
For a general study of foods and their values Dr. 
Lancaster’s “Lectures on Foods,” published in 1861, 
give some valuable details, although like many others 
he sees some value in alcoholic liquors. A much 
more up-to-date work is that entitled, “ Foods,” by 
Dr. Edward Smith, F.R.S., published in 1890, in 
which the information given is of a very complete 
and valuable character. There is also a little work 
which certainly should not be neglected, entitled, 
“Diet in Relation to Age and Activity,” by the late 
Sir Henry Thompson, published in 1901. Of a very 
much more ambitious character, and forming, ot 
course, a standard work, accepted all the world over, 
is, “ Foods: their Composition and Analysis,” by Dr. 
Winter Blyth, F.C.S. For authentic information as 
to composition and value of any food in common use 
there is no better book existing. Another work of 
great value is that entitled, “The Natural History 
of Digestion,” by Dr. Lockhart Gillespie, published 
in 1898. 

Hygiene 

forms another phase of specialisation, and has a very 
close relationship to our question. There is still 
room for a book to be written, dealing specially with 
“Temperance and Hygiene.” The nearest approach 
to it is a work by Dr. C. H. Stowell, of Chicago, 
entitled, “A Healthy Body,” in which elementary 
physiology and hygiene are taught with special 
reference to the action of alcohol. There are two 
little books published in this country both of which 
approach this subject. The first, “ How to be Well 
and Strong,” gives a great deal of information on 
hygiene and food values, and deals specifically with 
the matter of alcohol. The second, entitled, “The 
Beverages We Drink,” gives a very complete account’ 
of the various beverages in common use and their 
values. 

Of course, the ambitious student will not be 
content with anything less than the very best, and in 
such a case we would refer him to the great standard 
work on the subject entitled “ Practical Hygiene,” by 
Dr. Edmund Parkes, P'.R.S. On the other side 
there is a little primer written for the man in the 
street by Dr. W. S. Greenfield, entitled, “Alcohol: its 
Use and Abuse,” in which the author, whilst agreeing 
that Total Abstinence is the safest course, does not 
object to a limited use not exceeding half-an-ounce 
of absolute alcohol per diem. 

Poisons 

may form another phase of specialisation, and know¬ 
ledge on this subject is useful in helping one to meet 
successfully the discussion on the subject of alcohol 
a food or a poison. Much, of course, has been written 
on the subject, and it is well, where there is time and 
opportunity, to look into the matter thoroughly. A 
standard work on the subject is “Poisons: their 
Effect and Detection,” by Dr. Winter Blyth, F.C.S., 
in which a very complete account of the poisonous 
effects of alcohol occurs. An older work, but one 
which has held a premier place, and which is often 
quoted, is “On Poisons,” by Dr. A. S. Taylor, F.R.S. 
In this, again, alcohol looms largely as a poison. 
There is also a useful little work by Dr. T. H. Tanner, 

F. L.S., entitled, “Memoranda on Poisons.” 

Technique 

is a word very much used now, and there is all the 
difference between a general and a technical know¬ 


ledge of a subject. It would, perhaps, be a good 
thing if we could acquire more of the technical 
and less of the generalisation. For some greater 
knowledge, for instance, 01 physiology there are books 
to which it would be quite worth our while to devote, 
say, a twelvemonth’s study, such as “ Physiology,” 
by Sir Michael Foster, or “Kirk’s Handbook of 
Physiology,” by Drs. Baker and Harris. For a 
technical knowledge of brewing and wine and spirit 
manufacture, there is, perhaps, no better book than 
“ Wagner’s Manual of Chemical Technolog}",” edited 
by Sir William Crookes, F.R.S; whilst for an article 
dealing with the very latest information on alcohol 
there is, perhaps, none better than that occurring in 
the recent issue of the “ Encyclopaedia Medica.” 

On the Other Side 

much also has been written, and possibly, the charge 
that as a rule, Temperance advocates only look at 
one side of the question is nearly true. Those who 
would like to see what our opponents say, will find 
interesting matter and considerable food for reflection 
in Morewood’s “ Plistory of Inebriating Liquors,” a 
book that although out of print, can be referred to at 
the British Museum. “Brain and Body,” a suggestive 
little work by Dr. Andrew Wilson, who believes in the 
physiological limit. “The Liquor Problem,” by Albert 
Deane, published in 1900, in which quotations from 
eminent men, scientists and others, in favour of alcohol 
are given. “Alcoholism: a Study in Heredity,” by Dr. 
C. Archdall Reid, in which teetotalism is alleged to be 
a failure in dealing with the drink question. “Wines 
and other Fermented Liquors,” by J. R. Sheen, in 
which it is shown that wines are absolutely a necessity 
of civilised life. Mulder’s “Chemistry of Wine,” 
edited by Dr. Bence Jones, F.R.S., in which the good 
and useful properties of wine are demonstrated; and 
finally, “The Brewers’ Almanack,” in which much 
scientific and other data is given in support of the 
trade. 

Beyond are This, 

there is a mass of information appearing in scientific 
journals and papers and in the current press, which 
every advocate should seize upon as it comes under 
his notice, and transfer to his commonplace book. 
Such a method I have found extremely useful, and 
by a system of indexing can readily turn to every 
phase of scientific Temperance, and thus easily find 
all that has been written on any particular point. By 
study and by system let us get the very best that can 
be obtained, and give to our audience the very best 
that is possible. 


Death in Cigarettes. 


A VERDICT of “ Death from Nicotine Poisoning 
through Smoking Cigarettes ” was returned at an 
inquest held on August 4, at Halifax, on thq body of 
Patrick Snee, eleven years of age, son of James Snee, 
of Dalby Hall. Deceased, after smoking cigarettes, 
fell ill and died. Dr. Madden, who was called in, at 
once diagnosed the ailment as nicotine poisoning. 
He said the lad could receive sufficient poison to 
cause death by smoking cigarettes. 

The Coroner: If he inhaled the smoke, would it be 
worse ?—Yes, it would be more serious. 

A juror pointed out that they saw many boys 
smoking every day, and yet they heard of very few 
being injured by it. 

The Coroner said that, although the effects might 
prove fatal in but very few cases, yet they had to 
take into account the injury to the nerves, physical 
deterioration, etc., which resulted. The evidence 
showed that partial paralysis had set in after the 
attack from which death took place. 

Ought not this to be a warning to boys ? 


A farmer, named John M’Grath, recently died in 
Co. Meath in Ireland at the age of 105. He was a life 
abstainer and a non-smoker. 







142 


THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


The pipst Situation. 

dialogue; for two boys. 

By Amy Prtrie. 


Harry. —Well, Fred, how did you get on last night? 
Did Mr. Collins engage you ? Jack Hill told me he 
met you going up for an interview, dressed in your 
Sunday suit, “absolutely regardless of cost,’’ and he 
said they would make you a partner in the firm on 
the spot, for you looked much too grand for the 
errand boy. 

Fred. —Jack’s nonsensical chaff again! Did he 
expect me to go up in my old jacket ? However, it is 
errand boy I am to be, and I am to start with six 
shillings a week. I consider myself lucky. 

Harry. —I should think so, indeed ! And you only 
left school last week. I only hope I may get on as 
well when my turn comes. 

Fred. —I hope so, too. But let me give you a hint. 
Mr. Collins asked me, almost directly, if I ever 
smoked cigarettes. It was a good thing I could say 
“No,’' for he says he never employs a boy who 
smokes. 

Harry .—What a particular man he must be ! I 
don’t see that it makes any difference to him what a 
boy chooses to do in the evenings when his work is 
done. 

Fred .—Well, he says it makes a boy dull and stupid 
and generally good-for-nothing, and he prefers to 
employ smart, brisk, business-like people. But you 
don’t smoke, do you, Harry ? 

Harry .—No, not at present, because my father has 
strictly forbidden it; but I don’t say I shall not in a 
few years’ time, when I can please myself. 

Fred.— Better leave it alone. It is expensive, and 
does no good, and the best people say it does much 
harm. 

Harry .—Well, if the employers follow Mr. Collins’ 
example the boys will be obliged to give up their 
cigarettes. And after all they may be right, for I 
have noticed that the fellows who smoke are never 
much good at cricket and football. But on the 
whole, I don’t envy you your job, Fred. There must 
be a good deal of hard work in a furniture shop, and 
plenty of heavy things to lift about, I should think. 

Fred .—No doubt whatever about that. But do you 
think I am afraid of work ? Ret the weak little 
fellows take the soft jobs, I say, and give me the 
place where muscles are of value. 

Harry .—Well, Fred, no one can accuse you of 
laziness. Speaking for myself, I am not quite so fond 
of work. 

Fred .—Don’t run yourself down, old man. I know 
you will work with the best of them when your turn 
comes. But that reminds me, I have something to 
discuss with you. I met Tom Hole this morning, 
who, you know, has worked for Mr. Collins about five 
years. He asked if I had got the situation, and when 
I said I had, he told me that this would be the end of 
my Band of Hope principles, for I should never be 
able to do the work without beer. Now, of course, 
you and I believe that to be all nonsense. We have 
all our lives been taught that intoxicating drinks are 
not strengthening. Yet how is it that so many people 
have such faith in beer, stout, etc., and do really seem 
to think that they could not work without them ? 

Harry .—Well, I got a little light on that head last 
Saturday. Ret me tell you about it. You remember 
that father took me to London for the day, and as we 
were coming home in the evening, Mr. Harris, our 
Band of Hope leader, and Tom Hole, got into the 
same compartment. As we had it all to ourselves, the 
conversation grew confidential, and Mr. Harris asked 
Tom how total abstinence answered in business life. 
Tom acknowledged that he had given it up, because 
the work was hard, and beer made him feel stronger. 
Then Mr. Harris explained to him how alcohol 
stimulates but does not strengthen, and that the feel¬ 
ing of excitement which it produces is mistaken for 
strength. When the excitement dies down, as it very 
quickly does, it leaves one duller and weaker than 
before. 


Fred .—I see. I remember reading that it is some¬ 
thing like poking away at a fire to make it burn 
better. The best plan is to put on good wood and 
coal. And our best fuel is milk, cocoa, and good, 
wholesome food. 

Harry .—That’s it exactly. And you and I will be 
true to our Temperance pledge, and show the world 
that a man can work better without- beer than with 
it. 

Fred .—So we will. Good-night. 

Harry. —Good-night. And good luck to you. 


Hytnns and Songs fop Sands 
of Hop®. 


O UR friends will doubtless be pleased to know 
that this popular book has now been revised 
and enlarged. It originally appeared in 1881, 
its compilation having been entrusted to Mr. 
Frederic Smith, whose long acquaintance with 
the movement and successful conductorship of the 
great Band of Hope Concerts at the Crystal Palace, 
admirably fitted him for the task, in which he was 
most ably assisted by Mr. W. Harding Bonner, 
especially in the musical arrangements. Popular 
favour was accorded to the book from the first, and 
more than 2,800,000 copies of the original edition 
were sold. 

After nearly a quarter-of-a-century the Committee 
felt that it would be desirable to add to the collection 
some of the excellent hymns and songs which had 
appeared since the book was originally published. 
The work of revision was placed in the hands of a 
Sub-Committee, consisting of Mr. Lionel Muudy 
(Chairman of Committee), Rev. Carey Bonner (Secre¬ 
tary, Sunday School Union), Messrs. Rowland Hill, 
Arthur Newton, Herbert West, Charles Wakely 
(Secretary), and Judson Bonner (Trade Manager). 

Some of the original pieces have been omitted in 
favour of others likely to be more popular, and the 
number increased from 176 to 203. Many of the tunes 
have been reset in a lower key, it being found that 
the compass of children’s voices is less than it was 
twenty-five years ago. The expression is marked by 
the printing of the words to be sung softly in italics, 
and those to be sung loudly in smarr capitals. 

The pieces are arranged under the following 
sections: Opening Hymns and Songs, Religious 
Hymns and Songs, Moral and Social Songs, Tempe¬ 
rance Hymns and Songs, and Closing Hymns and 
Songs. In addition to this general classification, 
there is an index in which the pieces are grouped 
according to their subjects, the headings being as 
follows: Anniversaries and New Year’s Meetings, 
Banner Songs, Dangers of Drinking. Firmness and 
Courage, Kindness and Helpfulness, Marching Songs, 
Meetings of Workers, Patriotic Songs, Rounds, 
Signing the Pledge and Recruiting, Sorrow and 
Suffering Caused by Drink, and Water. Pieces which 
are suitable for senior as well as junior meetings are 
marked with an asterisk, both in the classified and 
the alphabetical index. 

The greatest care has been taken to select hymns 
and songs of the most suitable character, and special 
attention has been devoted to their literary and 
musical merits. 

Although the book has been considerably enlarged 
the prices will remain the same. It will be supplied 
in the following editions : Words Only, paper covers, 
id., cloth, 2d.; Words and Music, old notation, limp 
cloth, 23., cloth boards, 2s. 6i.; tonic sol-fa, limp 
cloth, 2S.; Treble and Alto and Words, in either 
notation, limp cloth, 4d. It is hoped that all these 
editions will be ready for sale at the beginning of 
October. 

In order to make room for the new stock, the 
remaining copies of the old edition will be sold off at 
reduced prices particulars of which will be found in 
our advertisement columns. 







THE BAND OF HOPE CHRONICLE. 


143 



Bant> of Ibope mnions. 


Ashton=under=Lyne. —On one of the bright 
Saturdays in July, Mr. Herbert Knott, of “ Aingarth,” 
gave a hospitable reception to the speakers connected 
with the district Union. Tea was served in the 
picturesque grounds, and an exceedingly pleasant 
time was spent by the enthusiasts who are holding 
the Temperance banner aloft in this district. This is 
the branch that held so successful a bazaar last year, 
and voted ^100 of the profits to the Uancashire and 
Cheshire Union’s new building fund. 

Bristol. —A great demonstration took place on 
Saturday, July 23, when a huge procession made a 
picturesque display through the streets of this impor¬ 
tant city. It included nine bands, decorated vans 
illustrative of Temperance principles, and thousands 
of happy-faced members of Bands of Hope, gay with 
banners and flags. The afternoon was a busy one, 
and from all parts the children were marched into 
Portland Square, whence at a given signal they pro¬ 
ceeded to large fields which adjoined the gaol at 
Horfield. That gaol was an object lesson indeed, for 
it might be almost in ruins but for the evil against 
which these children were enlisted to fight. In the 
fields games of every kind were provided, and the 
whole day’s amusements were wound up with a fine 
display of fireworks provided by Brocks, of Crystal 
Palace fame. 

Cambridgeshire. —As a prelude to the celebrations 
which are to take place in October to mark the 21st 
anniversary of