Skip to main content

Full text of "bits :: Xerox :: Ventura :: doc :: Lubow Publishing Power With Ventura 2ed 1989"

See other formats


DESKTOP POWER SERIES 



PUBLISHING POWER 


Second Edition 


]9H 


The Complete Teaching Guide 
to Xerox Ventura Publisher 


Martha Lubow and Jesse Berst 


Supports Version 2 























DAVID A. RICHARDS, CPA 
1627 First Avenue 
York, Pennsylvania 
17403-1945 

PUBLISHING 

POWER 

WITH VENTURA 

The Complete Teaching Guide to 
Xerox Ventura Publisher 

Second Edition 


Martha Lubow and Jesse Berst 


New Riders Publishing 
Thousand Oaks, California 



PUBLISHING POWER WITH VENTURA 


The Complete Teaching Guide to Xerox Ventura Pub¬ 
lisher 

Second Edition 

by Martha Lubow and Jesse Berst 

Published by: 

New Riders Publishing 
PO Box 4846 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 
U.SA. 

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced 
or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or 
mechanical, including photocopying, recording or by any in¬ 
formation storage and retrieval system without written per¬ 
mission from the authors, except for the inclusion of brief 
quotations in a review. 

Copyright © 1988 and 1989 by Martha Lubow and Jesse 
Berst 

Second Edition 1989 

Printed in the United States of America 


Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data 


Lubow, Martha, 1952- 

Publishing Power with Ventura 


Includes index. 

1. Desktop Publishing. 2. Xerox Ventura 
Publisher (Computer program) I. Berst, Jesse. 

II. Title. 

Z286.D47L8 1989 686.2'2 88-33034 

ISBN 0-934035-61-X 



About the Authors 


MARTHA LUBOW has been teaching and writing about 
computer graphics and design since 1979. A graduate of 
Stanford University, Martha first got hooked on computer 
graphics at Bucks County Community College, where she 
designed one of the country’s first computer art exhibits. 
Since then she has taught and developed computer 
graphics teaching guides for university-level and Fortune 
500 training programs. She is the author of the popular 
training guide, Working Out with AutoCAD. 

Martha is the co-author of two other New Riders books 
about Ventura, Style Sheets for Business Documents and 
Style Sheets for Newsletters: Advanced Designs for Xerox 
Ventura Publisher. She has also written articles on com¬ 
puter-aided-design and desktop publishing for trade publi¬ 
cations. Martha is a design and editorial consultant in 
Bucks County, PA. 

JESSE BERST was Executive Editor of MicroPublishing 
Report , the nation’s first desktop publishing newsletter. He 
has authored or co-authored seven books on desktop 
publishing and other computer topics, including the 
bestselling Inside Xerox Ventura Publisher. He has written 
hundreds of magazine articles for publications such as PC 
World , Personal Publishing, Publishers Weekly, Small 
Press and many others. 


Production 

Lead Editor: Keith Thompson 
Director of Production: Carolyn Porter 
Production Manager: Todd Meisler 
Cover design: Jill Casty 

Page design: Jesse Berst, Keith Thompson, and Martha 
Lubow 

Drawings and illustrations: Martha Lubow, Todd Meisler, 
Keith Thompson, and Melanie Powell 
From a Concept by: Harbert Rice 


Warning and Disclaimer 

This book is designed to provide information about Xerox 
Ventura Publisher. Every effort has been made to make it 
as complete and as accurate as possible. 

However, no warranty of suitability, purpose or fitness is 
made or implied. The authors and New Riders Publishing 
shall have neither liability nor responsibility to any person 
or entity with respect to loss or damages in connection with 
or arising from the information contained in this book. 

If you do not agree with the above, you may return this 
book for a full refund. 


Acknowledgments 

The authors and New Riders Publishing wish to express 
their grateful appreciation to all the people who con¬ 
tributed their expertise, support, and inspiration to the 
creation of this book: 

To John Meyer and Michelle Polliard (Ventura Software), 
Ellen Brout (Oracle Corporation), Lainie Howard (Relation¬ 
al Technology), Richard Katz and the UCLA PC Users 
Group, Dorothy Kent (Synergis Technologies), Ivy Strickler 
(Drexel University), Lisa Kirk, Mark Hirsh, De Winchell, 
and Linda Yoder. 

Many thanks to Jon DeKeles for his technical assistance, 
support, and troubleshooting. 

Special thanks and appreciation goes to Robert E. Sturmer 
of WordCraft Publishers, Yardley, PA, whose invaluable 
comments and thorough review and testing of the tutorials 
made this a better book for everyone. 

Heartfelt appreciation goes to Carolyn Porter and Todd 
Meisler for their relentless hard work and their skill and 
talent in production; and to Keith Thompson for his im¬ 
aginative suggestions and indispensable contributions to 
the design, review, and production of this book. 

Martha would like to express her thanks to Jerry Waxier 
and Katherine Sharp for their enduring love, patience, and 
understanding during the writing of this book; to her 
parents, Oscar and Miriam Lubow, for their unconditional 
encouragement and support; and to Mac, whose love and 
companionship has given new meaning to life after work. 

And finally, to Harbert Rice, whose vision brought us all 
together. 

Special thanks from Jesse to Lori White for encourage¬ 
ment, assistance, and understanding. 

Our appreciation to the companies and individuals who 
provided software or hardware for the project: Randi 
Doeker and Xerox Corporation, Annie Barfuss and Hill & 
Knowlton, Digital Research, Executive Systems, Inc., 


Microsoft Corporation, Moniterm, Symsoft, Verticom, Z- 
Soft Corporation. 

For the design of the directory in Chapter Seven, many 
thanks to Jim Cavuoto, micropublishing Report. 

For permission to reprint the computer drawing from Chap¬ 
ter Five, Digital Research, Inc. 


Trademarks 

Ventura Publisher is a registered trademark of Ventura 
Software, Inc. 

Xerox is a registered trademark of Xerox Corp. 

IBM is a registered trademark of International Business 
Machines 

Illustrator and PostScript are registered trademarks of 
Adobe Systems. 

AutoCAD is a registered trademark of Autodesk, Inc. 

WordStar is a registered trademark of MicroPro Interna¬ 
tional Corp. 

MS-DOS, Microsoft and Word are registered trademarks of 
Microsoft Corp. 

LaserWriter is a registered trademark of Apple Computer, 
Inc. 

LaserTorq is a registered trademark of LaserTools Corpora¬ 
tion. 

Lotus 1-2-3 is a registered trademark of Lotus Develop¬ 
ment Corp. 

PC Paintbrush is a registered trademark of Z-Soft, Inc. 



Contents 


Introduction 




Becoming a Power Publisher / 

Goals and objectives / 

How to use this book /V 

The Ventura Formula x 

Chapter One 


A Single-Column Report 

1-1 

Report on Installation and 

Implementation of \fentum 

Planning the report 1-7 



Ventura prep 1-15 



Text 1 -20 



Style 1-30 


Un of Ventura Company-WM* 

Pictures 1 -57 


as^aau55aatt^53 

Chapter 1-62 


Chapter Two 




A Two-Column Proposal 

Planning the proposal 2-8 

2-1 

Consulting Proposal to ABC Company 

froimtl Dmoiftkm • 

Ventura prep 2-10 



Text 2-15 


SsS5£S55 SSHSjSrs 

Style 2-22 


StatuHatofWirk i^,ay n.-^ n. 

Pictures 2-41 



Chapter 2-54 









Chapter Three 


The Newsletter 




A Two-Column Newsletter 

Planning the newsletter 3-13 

Ventura prep 3-13 

Text 3-16 

Style 3-17 

Pictures 3-58 

Chapter 3-61 


3-1 


Chapter Four 



An Invoice 

Planning the invoice 4-12 
Ventura prep 4-13 
Text 4-17 
Style 4-17 
Pictures 4-47 
Chapter 4-53 


Chapter Five _ 

An Advertising Flyer 

Planning the flyer 5-10 
Ventura prep 5-12 
Text 5-13 
Style 5-14 
Pictures 5-36 
Chapter 5-52 


The Ventura 
Makeover 


TkkaagraatUaa ... and make H greater 





4-1 


5-1 














Chapter Six 



A Three-Column Newsletter 6-1 

Planning the newsletter 6-6 
Ventura prep 6-7 
Style 6-11 
Pictures 6-51 
Chapter 6-59 


Chapter Seven 

A Directory 7-1 

Planning the directory 7-6 
Ventura prep 7-7 
Text 7-7 
Style 7-8 
Pictures 7-25 
Chapter 7-38 



Chapter Eight 

A Book 8-1 

Planning the book 8-3 
Ventura prep 8-4 
Text 8-5 
Style 8-17 
Pictures 8-32 
Chapter 8-32 







Chapter Nine 



A Technical Manual 

Planning the manual 9-5 
Ventura prep 9-6 
Style 9-7 
Pictures 9-38 
Chapter 9-50 


9-1 


Chapter Ten 


J L 



1 ' 


r 


The Professional Extension 10-1 

Ventura prep 10-16 
Text 10-17 
Style 10-23 
Chapter 10-39 


Appendix A 


Appendix B 

Text Files 

A-1 

Appendix C 

Tag Tables 

B-1 

Appendix D 

Installing the Power Disk 

C-1 


Colophon 

D-1 


Index 






Introduction 


Becoming a Power Publisher 


P lease don’t skip this introduction. Yes, we know that many 
authors use the introduction just to say hello. Many 
readers, therefore, skip to Chapter One so they can get right 
to business. 

This introduction, however, has several crucial functions. 
First, it explains the most productive, efficient way to use 
Publishing Power with Ventura. Second, it explains how to 
prepare your computer system so you can work along with the 
projects. Third, it contains a key formula you will use over and 
over again. The Ventura Formula explained at the end of this 
introduction is the foundation for the rest of the book. 


Goals and objectives 

Publishing Power with Ventura will help you tap the full 
potential of Xerox Ventura Publisher. 

It’s no secret that Ventura has more horsepower than ordinary 
page layout programs. Ventura can create virtually any type 
of document, from one-page ads to 500-page directories and 
anything in between. 

With Ventura, you have the power to create almost any docu¬ 
ment. The samples on page ii were all created entirely with 
Ventura. 



E 


INVOICE 


Goals and objectives 

















































































Why this Book is different 


iii 


Yet with all that power at their disposal, some users complain. 
They feel like a beginning driver who hasn’t learned to shift 
into high gear. They can get Ventura up and running, they can 
point it in the right general direction, but they can’t seem to 
fine-tune its performance for maximum productivity. 

This book will move you into the fast lane. Best of all, it will 
show you how to stay in control the whole time. You’ll know 
where to start and where to go next, no matter what kind of 
document you are preparing. In short, you will always be in 
the driver’s seat. 

How do we plan to accomplish these goals? First, we put you 
behind the wheel right from the start. In every chapter, you 
“test drive” Ventura by creating an actual business document. 
There’s no better way to acquire skills than with hands-on 
practice. Second, you start with simple documents before 
moving on to difficult ones. For example, Part One teaches 
fundamentals. You can follow along even if you are new to 
Ventura. Part Two, on the other hand, shows how to rev up 
your publishing with advanced techniques. 

Don’t be too impatient. Ventura Publisher is one of the most 
powerful applications ever written for the IBM PC. It will take 
some time before you reach expert status. To make the journey 
easier, we start each project with a roadmap, a before-and- 
after look at the document that shows where you are starting 
and where you are going. As we proceed, we provide you with 
signposts to check your progress. Simply check your results 
against the sample screens and printouts. You will always 
know if you’re on the right track. 

Why this Book is different 

Publishing Power with Ventura differs from other books and 
tutorials. First, it is not just a beginner’s session. It is a 
complete training course in Ventura, from novice to advanced. 
Second, it takes you step-by-step through real-life applica¬ 
tions. If you complete all the chapters, you will have a per¬ 
sonal library of industrial-strength business documents and 
style sheets. You will also have the skills to modify those 
documents to fit the unique requirements of your business. 
Third, Publishing Power provides more than how-to skills. It 




IV 


How to use this book 


also teaches you strategies, systems, techniques, and for¬ 
mulas for working through design problems. 

We believe that if you follow the examples in this book, you 
will be able to gain full control over Ventura’s sophisticated 
capabilities. You will be able to create virtually any kind of 
document — books, ads, newsletters, manuals, forms, reports 
— right on your desktop. 

Now that’s true publishing power. 


How to use this book 

Publishing Power with Ventura contains two sections. Part 
One, Getting Started, teaches basic skills. Part Two, Ad¬ 
vanced Documents, teaches advanced techniques as they 
apply to specific business applications. Part Two also includes 
a chapter that teaches the advanced features of Ventura’s 
Professional Extension. We recommend that everyone com¬ 
plete Part One (Chapters One, Two, and Three). Even ex¬ 
perienced Ventura users should skim Part One, because it 
does more than clarify basic features. Part One also provides a 
systematic plan for using Ventura. The advanced chapters in 
Part Two assume that you understand the building blocks 
explained up front. 

How to use part two 

Although Part One is essential, not everyone needs to go 
through all of Part Two. The method you use for the second 
half will depend on your needs. If you are an occasional user, 
produce only one type of document, or are short on time, select 
chapters that teach the skills you need right now. If you later 
expand to different documents, return to Part Two to learn 
more. Table 1 suggests an abbreviated curriculum based on 
the type of document you produce. 




How to use part two 


v 


Table 1. An Abbreviated Curriculum 


Document to Produce 

Chapters to Study 

Key Skills 


Part One 

Basic skills 

Books 

Chapter Eight—A Book 

Multi-Chapter, footnotes, indexing, 
table of contents, equations, update 
counters, chapter templates 


Chapter Nine — A Technical Manual 

Frame anchoring, auto-numbering, 
figure numbering, spot color 


Chapter Ten — Using the Profes¬ 
sional Extension 

Advanced typography, cross refer¬ 
ences, tables 

Corporate 

Part One 

Basic skills 

Documents 

Chapter Four—An Invoice 

Box Text 


Part One 

Basic skills 

Directories, 

Chapter Seven—A Directory 

Preformatting text, databases and 
Ventura, chapter templates 

Catalogs 

Chapter Eight—A Book 

Multi-Chapter, footnotes, indexing, 
chapter templates 


Chapter Nine — A Technical Manual 

Frames and anchoring, auto-number- 
ing, figure numbering 


Part One 

Basic skills 

Marketing 

Chapter Four—An Invoice 

Box Text 


Chapter Five — An Advertising Flyer 

Advanced graphics and typography 


Chapter Nine—A Technical Manual 

Spot color 


Part One 

Basic skills 


Chapter Three — A Two-Column- 
Newsletter 

Newsletter-style layout, captions 
sizing and scaling images 

Newsletters, Magazines 

Chapter Four—An Invoice 

Box Text 


Chapter Five—An Advertising Flyer 

Advanced graphics and typography 


Chapter Six — A Three-Column- 
Newsletter 

Advanced newsletter-style layout, 
captions, table of contents,calendar, 


Chapter Ten — Using the Profes¬ 
sional Extension 

Advanced typography 




























































VI 


How to use this book 


On the other hand, if you plan to use Ventura for many 
different documents, try to finish Part Two from start to 
finish. Completing all ten chapters guarantees that you will 
understand Ventura’s full range of features. 

If you have installed the Professional Extension 

If you have installed Ventura’s Professional Extension, your 
screen will show several more dialog box options than the 
sample screens in this book. Do not be concerned if your 
screen looks slightly different. It will not effect your ability to 
complete the step-by-step instructions. 

We suggest you master the basics in Chapters One through 
Nine before you tackle the advanced table editing and typo¬ 
graphic features of the Professional Extension explained in 
Chapter Ten. 

How each chapter is organized 

Each chapter is divided into four sections: skills checklist, 
theory, tutorial, and tips. The skills checklist at the beginning 
gives you an overview of learning skills and key words. A 
glance at the list tells you what you will learn. 

The theory section discusses the concepts and principles be¬ 
hind each chapter. Take the time to read the background 
information before you start the hands-on project. That way 
you will understand why you are making specific selections. 

The tutorial section includes detailed instructions in bite-size, 
easy-to-follow steps. Usually, you can produce the desired 
result just by imitating the sample screens. 

Finally, the tips section summarizes and expands on the tech¬ 
niques mentioned throughout the chapter. Some people like to 
skim through these tips before starting. 

A note to instructors 

If you are using Publishing Power for classroom instruction, 
you should know that each chapter has one or more stopping 
points. If you have time for extended sessions, ignore them 
and proceed straight through. However, if you want to pause 




The ground rules 


vii 


periodically, you will find clearly marked break points, with 
instructions on how to stop and resume. 

Instructors may also want to assign advance reading. We 
suggest that students prepare by reading the theory section at 
the beginning and skimming the tips section at the end. 

A final tip for instructors: If you want to focus on certain 
techniques, you can confine the classroom session to one por¬ 
tion of a chapter. Step through the project yourself up to the 
point at which you wish to begin. Save your work and dis¬ 
tribute this partially completed chapter to students on floppy 
disks (or via network). Have the students load up the partially 
completed project at the beginning of the session. That way 
you and they can concentrate only on the specific skill you 
wish to present. 

The ground rules 

While we are explaining how to use this book, we should 
acquaint you with a few ground rules. The checklist that 
follows spells out six conditions. These are the assumptions 
that operate during the self-paced publishing projects. Before 
starting with Chapter One, make sure that your system 
matches all six. 


WARNING: You may have difficulty recreating the examples if you do not meet all the 
assumptions explained below. 


1. You are using Ventura 2 or higher. The sample projects in 
this book use Ventura 2 features. If you have installed the 
Professional Extension, your screen will include Table mode 
(in the Side-Bar) and several additional dialog box options. 
The slight variations you see between your screen and ours 
will not affect your ability to follow along. 

The sample style sheets on the accompanying Publishing 
Power software disk will not work with version 1 or 1.1 Con¬ 
tact your local dealer or Xerox for upgrade information if you 
are working with the older version. 

2. Ventura is located on drive C:. If you use a different letter 
for the hard disk containing Ventura, substitute that letter 





How to use this book 


viii 


whenever you see C:. Consider, for example, an exercise that 
asks you to move to the C:\POWER subdirectory. If your hard 
disk is D:, you would type D:\POWER instead. 

3. You have the original Ventura examples intact on the 
C:\TYPESET subdirectory. If you have moved these style 
sheets or picture files, or if you have modified them in any 
way, copy the originals from the Ventura installation disk 
labelled '‘Examples.” The command “COPY A: &*. STY 
C: \TYPESET” will copy all the style sheets you will need for 
this book. The commands “COPY A: *. IMG C: \TYPESET” and 
“COPY A:*.GEM C:\TYPESET” will copy all the picture files 
you will need for the book. You do not need to copy these files 
unless 1) you have erased the examples or 2) you answered 
“no” during installation when Ventura asked if you wanted to 
install the examples. 

*+NOTE: If you have modified the example style sheets in any 
way, delete or move them from the 1 TYPESET subdirectory 
and recopy the originals from the installation disk. 

4. You have a Hercules-compatible graphics adapter. The 
sample screens in this book were created from a Hercules- 
compatible monitor. If you have a VGA, an EGA, a CGA, or a 
big-screen monitor instead, your display may look slightly 
different than the illustrations. This should not affect your 
ability to follow along. 

5. You use a mouse. To gain the maximum productivity from 
Ventura we recommend a mouse. If you do not have a mouse, 
refer to the section “Operation without a mouse” in the Xerox 
Ventura Publisher Reference Guide. 

6. (Optional) You have installed PostScript as one of your 
printer choices. Although you can follow along without install¬ 
ing a PostScript printer, a few of your dialog boxes will look 
slightly different from the examples. You may want to install 
PostScript as a second printer while you work through the 
projects. That way your screen will match our examples. You 
can quickly and easily install PostScript as a printer choice 
even if you do not own a PostScript printer and even if you 
have already installed Ventura. Simply reinstall the program. 
When it asks if this is the first time you are installing, answer 
No. Then select PostScript as one of your printer choices. 




Rules for Ventura prep 


IX 


printer choices. When you load Ventura, select Set Printer 
Info from the Options menu and change to a PostScript 
printer. Before you print at the end of each chapter, switch 
back to your original printer. 

Rules for Ventura prep 

Each chapter contains a section called Ventura prep. This 
section explains the file management operations to create the 
sample document. These operations include loading and 
renaming text files, loading and renaming style sheets, load¬ 
ing graphics files, and saving chapters. What you do in this 
section depends on whether or not you own the Power disk. 

The Power disk 

The optional Power disk contains the sample text files from 
Appendix A, thereby saving you the trouble of typing them in 
yourself. In addition, it has style sheets and, in a few cases, 
sample chapters, for the advanced documents in Part Two. 
These samples give you a headstart. You can order the Power 
disk with the postage-free card at the back of the book, or by 
phoning New Riders’s toll-free number. 

If you own the Power disk 

If you already own the Power disk, go to Appendix C to learn 
how to install it on your hard disk. During the tutorial, turn to 
the Ventura prep subsection marked with the disk icon: 

| O | 


If you do not own the Power disk 

Appendix A gives a complete print out of all the text files and 
the style sheets used in the book. If you do not own the Power 
disk, turn to the subsection in Ventura prep displaying the no 
disk icon: 




X 


The Ventura formula 


This section will tell you which text file and style sheet to copy 
from Appendix A. 


The Ventura formula 

One important task remains before you are ready for Chapter 
One: a brief explanation of the strategy that forms the founda¬ 
tion for this book. Every Ventura document, no matter how 
complex, is made up of just three parts: text (the words), a style 
sheet (the format), and pictures (the illustrations). Typically 
the text comes from word processing files and the pictures 
from graphics files, while the style sheets are created with 
Ventura Publisher. This formula helps explain how the 
software operates. It also becomes a good model for working 
with Ventura Publisher: 

Text + Style + Pictures = Chapter 

This formula illustrates not only the components, but also the 
best order for building a document. As we will show you, this 
simple idea is a powerful tool. It can serve as a blueprint for 
any document, long or short. Table 2 illustrates how the For¬ 
mula will guide the construction of our projects. 


Table 2. Using the Ventura Formula 


Text 

Load the text file(s) 

Style 

Load a style sheet 

Apply it to the text file 

Pictures 

Create the frame(s) for the picture(s) 

Load the graphics file(s) into the frame(s) 

Chapter 

Save the chapter 

Print the chapter 


As Ventura authors and consultants, we’ve talked with 
hundreds of users. Most have similar troubles. When con¬ 
fronted with the complexities of page design and the power of 
















The Power disk 


xi 


Ventura, they don’t know where to start. They flounder be¬ 
cause they don’t have a systematic approach. When they do 
get underway, they get lost among the menus. Or they forget 
key steps and have to redo the document. In short, they’re 
often a bit confused. 

It doesn’t have to be that way. As you will see in the next three 
chapters, the Ventura Formula can rescue you from confusion. 
No matter how complex the project, you can always fall back 
on the Formula. As you grow proficient, you may decide to 
modify the Formula or abandon it entirely. As you are learn¬ 
ing, however, it should be the foundation for everything you 
do. We have used it throughout this book. 

Rather than belabor the theory, let’s see it in practice by using 
the Formula to prepare a business report. Turn to Chapter 
One for your first hands-on Ventura project. 




Chapter One 
Skills Checklist 


Theory 

□ How Ventura manages files and 
builds chapters 

□ Renaming and relocating files with 
Ventura prep 

□ The Ventura user interface 

□ Multi-Chapter — a built-in copying 
function 

Text 

□ Loading and placing text 

□ Renaming and relocating text 

i 

Style 

□ Loading a style sheet 

□ Renaming and relocating style sheets 

□ The Ventura Formula — easy rules 
for faster formatting 

□ The secret of the “Big Three” dialog 
boxes 

□ Why you should always start 
formatting with Body Text 

□ How to create a standard spacing unit 

Picture 

□ Adding a frame 

□ Using padding to separate text from 
pictures 

□ Loading and placing a picture 

Chapter 

□ Saving and printing 

□ How to back up Ventura chapters 




Chapter One 


A Single-Column Report 


R eady to start putting Ventura through its paces? This first 
chapter provides a solid grounding in Ventura fundamen¬ 
tals. It also demonstrates how the Formula guides you step- 
by-step through a work session. The checklist to the left sum¬ 
marizes some of the skills you will acquire. You will find a 
similar list in every chapter. 

A few preliminaries before we begin. All the projects in this 
book start with a before-and-after look at the document. In 
other words, we start by showing you where you are going. 
Then it’s on to the sample project. In most cases, you can 
produce the results just by imitating the screens on the page. 
When you see an explanation followed by an illustration, 
simply make your dialog box match the one in the book. 

That’s all there is to it. Merely by following along, you will 
learn to handle Ventura like a pro. 


Theory 

We know you are eager to get started. Before you get behind 
the controls, however, you need to understand a few fun¬ 
damentals. The hands-on practice will make more sense if you 
understand how Ventura manages files. 

Parts of a chapter 

Most other programs do all their work in one large file. By 
contrast, Ventura works with many different files. A master 
file, called the chapter file, stores pointers to other files, plus 
instructions on how to assemble these files onto the page. 
When you format on screen or print on paper, the chapter uses 



1 -2 


v. 


Theory 


instructions on how to assemble these files onto the page. 
When you format on screen or print on paper, the chapter uses 



Figure 1-1. Ventura chapter files contain pointers that specify the 
location of the other component files. 


its pointers to find the files it needs, and then uses its instruc¬ 
tions to put the document together (Figure 1-1). 

What kinds of files go into a document? The Ventura Formula 
provides the answer: 

Text + Style + Pictures = Chapter 

As Ventura builds a document, it creates additional files on its 
own if it needs them. For instance, if you put captions on the 
page, Ventura creates a separate caption file. If you use the 
drawing tools, Ventura opens a graphics file. When it opens 
these files, Ventura uses the same name as the chapter, but 
with a different extension. Thus, if the chapter is called 
SAMPLE.CHP, the caption file becomes SAMPLE.CAP and 
the graphics file SAMPLE .VGR. Table 1-1 gives a more in- 
depth look at the components of a typical Ventura chapter. 

Renaming and relocating files 

One more bit of theory about Ventura’s file management and 
you will be ready to start the project. Ventura permits you to 
rename and/or relocate most of the files that make up a chap¬ 
ter. Ventura doesn’t care where you store those files, as long as 
you tell it where to find them. 




Renaming and relocating files 


1-3 


Table 1-1. Typical file names for a Ventura chapter 


File Type 

File Name(s) 

File Contents 

TEXT 

SAMPLE.TXT 

Text file created with word proces¬ 
sor and imported into Ventura (can 
be more than one) 

SAMPLE.CAP 

Caption file created and named by 
Ventura to match the chapter 
name 

STYLE 

SAMPLE.STY 

Style sheet with format instruc¬ 
tions 

PICTURE 

PICTURE.IMG 

Picture file created with outside 
graphics program and imported 
into Ventura (can be more than 
one) 

SAMPLE.VGR 

Ventura graphics file for drawings 
created inside Ventura to match 
the chapter name 

CHAPTER 

SAMPLE.CHP 

Chapter file containing pointers to 
all other files 

SAMPLE.CIF 

Chapter information created and 
named by Ventura to match the 
chapter name 


In Ventura’s eyes, the location of a file is part of its name. The 
four files below are completely different as far as Ventura is 
concerned: 


A:\SAMPLE.TXT 
C:\SAMPLE.TXT 
C:\TEMP\SAMPLE.TXT 
C:\POWER\SAMPLE.TXT 


Renaming and relocating are accomplished in the same 
fashion (in fact, we use the word rename to mean either 
function). Although the procedure is slightly different for dif¬ 
ferent files, the principle is the same. By entering a new name 
and/or a new location, you tell Ventura where to find it in the 
future. 





1-4 


Theory 


• You make a copy of the file under the new name at the new 
location (you will have to delete the old one if you don’t 
want it anymore). 

• You change the pointers in the chapter file. From then on, 
Ventura looks for that file under the new name in the new 
location (Figure 1-2). 



Figure 1-2. When you save and rename a file, you change 
the pointers in the chapter file. From then on, Ventura looks 
for that file under the new location. 


WARNING: Do not use standard DOS functions to move Ventura chapters. Use 
Ventura’s Multi-Chapter function instead, as taught at the end of this chapter. 


DOS is able to copy files, but it does not change the pointers 
inside the chapter file. If you reopen the chapter at the new 
location, Ventura will be unable to reassemble the document. 
It will look for the files in their old locations, because the 
pointers were never changed. 

By contrast, Ventura’s built-in copying function not only 
moves the files, but changes the pointers as well. In addition, 
it moves all the files at once. By telling Ventura to copy a 
chapter, you are telling it to copy not only the chapter file, but 
also every other file associated with that document. You do not 
have to specify the individual files. Ventura remembers them 
for you, finds them on the disk and copies them to their new 


















Renaming and relocating files 


1-5 


location. This copying function is located in the Multi-Chapter 
dialog box. 

^ TIP: Even though the name Multi-Chapter implies that it is 
intended only for multiple chapters, you can also use Multi- 
Chapter to copy a single chapter. You will have several oppor¬ 
tunities for hands-on practice with Multi-Chapter in both Part 
One and Part Two. 

So much for your first exposure to the principles behind Ven¬ 
tura Publisher. You will need to learn additional theory before 
you’re ready to strike out on your own. In the meantime, 
however, we suggest concentrating on the project that follows 
without worrying too much about the wherefores and whys. 
We will present more fundamentals in Chapters Two and 
Three. 




1-6 


Theory 


Report on Installation and Implementation of 
Ventura Publisher 

Executive Summary _ 

XYZ Corporation has embarked on a program to implement Vertura Publisher software on 
existing IBM AT-compati blc computers as needed thro ughouttbe company. TheKViketing 
Communications department will overate and supervise thin project Marketing Com- 

♦ Use of Ventura in every department for all pubtiahing/eommunicataona taaka 


• A company-wide training program to teach baaic VeoUs-a skills 

• Advanced workshop* as needed to teach specialized skills 

Use of Ventura Company-Wide 

The three-month pilot program undertaken by Marketing Comnsmkstioos haa determined 
that Ventura Publisher can be used for every type of document currently produced by the 
company. Company-wide useof Ventur* will reduce publiahing/prin ting cotta by 131b over 
the next two years (see chart next page). It will reduce the confusion and dupii cati on of effort 
now in evidence, whereby every department had developed different (and often incom¬ 
patible) solutions to publishing problems. It will also permit the company to establish and 
enforce appearance and image standards. Since Ventura Publisher uses style sheets to store 
for matting i nfo rmstion, the company can create a t> hrary of approved deai gnt and code them 
into stylo sheets. Every document produced with these style sheets will automatically meet 
mini mum standards for graphic design and quality; and aO documents seen by the public 
will reinforce the same imago. 


Accounting Department: 

Creation and maintenance of electronic forms, including purchase orders, invoices, col lec¬ 
tion notices, plus formatting of financial statements and reports. 

Advertising Department: 

In-house creation cf direct mail ft yen, brochures and, resulting in improved turnaround time 
and reduced fees from outside agencies and service bureaus. 

Marketing Communication*: 

Company newsletters, both internal and these intended for customers, plus brochures and 
product specification sheets. 









Renaming and relocating files 


1-7 


Planning the report 

The first step in producing a business document is to consider 
its purpose and audience. Your goal is two-fold: (1) to make the 
appearance appropriate to the readership and (2) to make the 
document easier and more efficient to use. Ventura’s vast 
array of capabilities can help you achieve both goals. 

Our first project is a business report. We use the word “report” 
to refer to a simple, straightforward document, usually in¬ 
tended for internal use (as opposed to proposals and annual 
reports, which often go outside the company). Target readers 
are other members of the company, usually at your own level 
or higher. Since reports often summarize difficult or dull infor¬ 
mation, they must use page design to make that information 
easily accessible. They should include charts, graphs, and 
other illustrations when possible, to help get the message 
across. 

Because a report is an internal document, it does not demand 
high-end, cutting-edge graphic effects. At the same time, be¬ 
cause most reports go up the ladder to management, they 
need a professional image: clean, simple and uncluttered 
without being loud or flashy. Look at the “before” example of 
the report. It is a typical report from the days before desktop 
publishing. Here are a few ways to enhance its effectiveness 
and appearance: 

• An easy-to-read line length 

• Bullets to make lists stand out 

• A header and page numbers to help readers find their way 
around 

• Prominent headlines and subheads 

• Spacing based on a uniform, standard unit 

• Additional white space for an open look 
You will implement these ideas in this project. 



1 - 8 


Before you start 


Before you start 

We assume that you are sitting in front of your computer with 
Ventura Publisher on the screen. If you have not already 
powered up Ventura, type: VP at the DOS prompt (VPPROF if 
you are using the Professional Extension). 



If you have the Power disk 


If you are using the optional Power disk, you should have 
installed it already following the instructions in Appendix C. 
If not, stop and do so now. 



do not have the Power disk 


You do not need to do anything special yet. Read on. 

If you just started Ventura, the screen will be empty. If not, 
and there is a previous document active, select New from the 
File menu to clear the screen. Do not worry about what file 
names appear at the top of the screen. You will be changing 
the files you use anyway. 


The Ventura user interface 

Your screen should look similar to Figure 1-3. If it does not, 
select the View menu and Reduced View. If you are new to 
Ventura, take a moment to familiarize yourself with the key 
features of the Ventura user interface as shown in Figure 1-3. 

The Menus at the top of the screen drop down when you point 
to a name with the mouse cursor. Move the cursor over the 
menu you want until it is displayed in reverse video (white on 
black). Then click the left button on your mouse to select an 
option. Menu options displayed in gray are not available for 
selection. 

The Title Bar displays the current chapter and style sheet. As 
you step through the projects in this book, check to make sure 
the names of the chapter and style sheet in the Title Bar 
match the ones we show in the sample screens. 





The Ventura user interface 


1-9 



The Mode Selector shows four pictures at the top of the Side- 
Bar. Each picture represents one of the four major modes in 
Ventura: (from left to right) Frame, Paragraph, Text, and 
Graphic mode. In Figure 1-3, Frame mode is enabled. Each 
mode allows you to perform a group of related tasks: 

• Frame mode lets you create new frames on the page and 
place text and pictures inside. You can also cut, copy, paste, 
or delete frames. 

• Paragraph mode lets you define, change, and apply a set of 
formatting rules, called tags, to individual paragraphs. 

• Text mode lets you add or delete text on-screen, as well as 
change its font and attributes (for example, bold or italic). 

• Graphic mode lets you add, delete, copy, size, or paste 
graphic lines, rectangles, circles, and Box Text (text inside 
a box). 

The Addition Button lets you add a frame, tag, or text at¬ 
tribute, depending on which mode is enabled. Click on the 
Addition Button to choose the action (or function) specified in 
the Addition Button. 

The Assignment List displays an alphabetical listing of items 
that you can choose for Frame, Paragraph, and Text mode. (In 
the Professional Extension, items are listed for Table mode.) 









1 -10 


Before you start 


L 


The Current Selection Box shows the name of the selected file, 
tag, graphic, or text attribute. 

The Page Number shows the number and side (Right or Left) 
of the page. 

The Sizing Buttons (also known as “handles”) show the frame 
that is currently selected. 

The Column Guides display the borders of the columns. You 
can turn them on or off. They do not print out. 

The Page (referred to as the Underlying Page in earlier ver¬ 
sions of Ventura) is the blank frame that appears when you 
first start Ventura or when you select New from the File 
menu. You define the size and orientation of the Page in the 
Page Size & Layout dialog box from the Chapter menu. You 
can place text and pictures directly onto the Page, or you can 
put text and pictures into frames on top of the Page. 

*+NOTE: If you are using the Professional Extension , you have 
a fifth mode called Table mode. See Chapter Ten. 

The other key feature of Ventura’s user interface is the dialog 
box. Let’s take a moment to review the major controls inside 
(Figure 1-4). 


Pop-up menu 


Button controls 


SIZING R SCALING 



_ Off 

Upper Left X: 

Frane Width: 20, E 
Horiz. Padding: 01,00 


Picture Scaling: 
Aspect Ratio: 


Fit in Frane 


Upper Left V: 29,E 
Frane Height: 14,E 
Vert. Padding: 00,E 


By Scale Factors 


Haintained 


Distorted 


X Crop Offset: 01,08 
Scale Width: 26,06 


|0 V Crop Offset: 82,01 
Scale Height: 16,09 


0 

BH 

picas R points 


!□ 


Cancel 


Help menu 


Measurement 


Figurel-4. 



Our starting configuration 


1-11 


Pop-Up menus appear when you place the cursor over an 
option followed by the double up-down arrow symbol. The 
pop-up menus show you all possible choices available for one 
option. To make your choice, place the cursor on the arrow 
symbol and click the left mouse button. Now hold down the 
button and drag the cursor up or down until you highlight the 
option you want, then release. 

*+NOTE: For easier viewing, we’ve chosen to hide the up-down 
arrows in all our illustrations. 

Help menus are included in each dialog box. To get on-line 
help, click on the question mark inside the square and follow 
the prompts. 

At any point you can cancel a dialog box choice by pressing 
Ctrl-X. To save your choices in a dialog box, press the Enter 
key or click the OK button. You’ll get plenty of practice using 
dialog boxes as soon as you begin the tutorial section. 

Our starting configuration 

Ventura Publisher is easier to work with if you use the Op¬ 
tions menu to make the selections shown in Table 1-2. There’s 
nothing that says you can’t configure Ventura differently. 
However, our experience has shown that these settings make 
page design easier and more accurate. 

As you progress, you may decide to use other settings that you 
find more suitable to your own working style. In the begin¬ 
ning, however, we suggest that you follow these suggestions. 
Otherwise, your display and your results may differ slightly 
from ours, making it more difficult to follow along. 

Take a moment now to make sure all your settings in the 
Options menu match those shown in Table 1-2. Select the 
Options menu and choose each option in turn. 




1 - 12 


Before you start 


Table 1-2 Suggested settings for use with this book 


Option 

Setting 

What It Does 


Generated Tags: Shown 

Displays tags created by Ventura at the bottom of the 
Assignment List 


Text to Greek: 6 

Speeds screen redraw by showing unreadably small 
text as blocks 

Set Preferences 

Keep Backup Files: Yes 

Ventura automatically makes a backup copy of all 
related chapter files each time you save 


On-Screen Kerning: None 

Speeds up screen drawing by eliminating screen 
kerning 


Auto-Adjustments:None 

Does not automatically adjust the inter-line spacing 
when you change the font size 


Pop-Up Menu Symbols: Shown 

Displays arrow symbol next to choices that offer 
pop-up menus in dialog boxes 


Horizontal and Vertical Units: 
Picas 

Displays ruler in picas to match the units we use in 
this book 

Set Ruler 

Horizontal Zero Point: 00,00 picas 

Sets the zero point at the upper left corner of the 


Vertical Zero Point: 00,00 picas 

Page 

Set Printer Info 

Device Name: PostScript 

(Optional) Can be used even if you do no have a 
PostScript printer so font dialog boxes match those 
in the book 


Width Table: 

\VENTURA\OUTPUT.WID 

Uses the default width table so style sheet can be 
interchanged between systems with different printers 

Show Side-Bar 

Menu reads “Hide Side-Bar” 

Displays Side-Bar on left side of screen 

Show Rulers 

Menu reads “Hide Rulers 

Displays rulers on top and left side of the Page 

Show Column 
Guides 

Menu reads “Hide Column 
Guides” 

Displays lines to show the boundaries of the 
columns. Makes it easier to line up frames on the 
Page 

Show Tabs & 
Returns 

Menu reads "Hide Tabs & 
Returns” 

Displays on-screen the visible marks in the text 
denoting tags, returns, line breaks, footnotes, etc. 
Makes text editing easier 

Turn Column 
Snap On 

Display reads “Turn Column Snap 
Off” 

Forces frames to align with the edges of the column 

Turn Line 

Snap On 

Display reads “Turn Line Snap 
Off” 

Forces the frame to align vertically with the inter-line 
spacing of Body Text 














































Our starting configuration 


1-13 


When you are finished, cheek that your settings in the Set 
Preferences dialog box and in the Options menu match ours in 
Figure 1-5 and Figure 1-6: 


Options 


Set Preferences... 
Set Ruler... 

Set Printer Info... 
Add/Remove Fonts... 


Hide Side-Bar 
Hide Rulers 
Hide Column Guides 
Hide All Pictures 
Hide Tabs R Returns 
Show Loose Lines 


Turn Column Snap Off 
Turn Line Snap Off 


1 Multi-Chapter.. . 

Figure 1-5. 


SET PREFERENCES 

m 

Generated Tags: Shown 

Text to Greek: 6 

Keep Backup Files: Ves 

Double Click Speed: 3 

On-Screen Kerning: None 
fluto -Adjustments: None 

Pop-Up Menu Symbols: Hidden 

Menu Type: Drop- Down 


Decimal Tab Char: 046j (ASCII) 

1 OK 1 

Cancel 




Figure 1-6. 


If you cannot duplicate the results in a project, check to see 
that you are configured as shown in Figure 1-5 and Figure 1-6. 

*+NOTE: You will learn more about these settings as you work 
through the projects in the book. 









1 - 14 


Before you start 


Step one — file maintenance 

If you don’t tell Ventura where to put a file, it defaults to the 
location used last. The original default location is the 
C:\TYPESET subdirectory. Many beginners continue to store 
all their files in that one single directory. It soon becomes too 
crowded. 

If you installed the optional Power disk for this book, you 
created a subdirectory called C:\POWER. This subdirectory 
stores sample documents and style sheets — the starting 
points for your documents. As part of this first project, you will 
create a subdirectory to store the results. From now on, you 
will always place your documents into this new subdirectory. 
Although you can create subdirectories in DOS, you can also 
do so within Ventura. Let’s try it right now. Follow the step- 
by-step instructions below at your computer to create a sub¬ 
directory called C:\TEMP. 

^ Select DOS File Ops from the File menu. 


New 

Open Chapter... 


Save 

Save As... 

bbamdon, , , 


Load Text/Picture.. 
Load Diff. Style... 
Save As New Style.. 


To Pr int... 
Quit 


DOS File Ops 


Move the cursor to the File Spec line and click once. Then 
press the Esc key to clear the line. Type: C : \TEMP 

^ Choose Make Directory and Done. 








Step one — file maintenance 


1-15 


DOS FILE OPERATIONS Q] 

File Spec: 

C:\TEMP| 

Operation: 

| Select Different File Specification | 






| Delete Matching File(s) 




| Done | 


If you already have a C:\TEMP subdirectory, choose another 
name. In future chapters, substitute that name whenever you 
see C:\TEMP. 

*+T!P: The best way to organize the hard disk is to create a 
separate subdirectory for each project, and use it to store all 
the files for that project — text, style, pictures, and chapter. 


Ventura prep 

File management is one of the most difficult aspects of 
desktop publishing. Novice users sometimes encounter 
problems: 

• They can’t find files when it comes time to load them into 
Ventura 

• They use the DOS copy command improperly and cannot 
get the chapter to load 

• They make permanent, unwanted changes to original text 
files 

• They destroy new versions by copying the old one on top 

• They forget to save and thereby lose their work 

To avoid such problems, you will start every project with a 







1 - 16 


Ventura prep 


Ventura prep section. You will load, rename, relocate, and 
save all the files for the exercise before you begin working. 
After you practice this file maintenance a few times, we hope 
it will become a habit. 

By taking these steps at the beginning of every document, you 
can avoid losing work. In addition, you can easily take a 
break. Because all the files you will need are already loaded 
and renamed, all you have to do is save the chapter and quit. 
When you are ready to resume, you simply load Ventura, open 
the chapter and start where you left off. 


WARNING: Renaming and relocating files does not take effect until you save the 
chapter. If you quit without saving, you lose the benefit of the Ventura prep process. 


You will step through the Ventura prep section in the same 
order as the Ventura Formula: text, style, pictures, chapter. If 
you are used to working with DOS, it may take you a few 
times before you are comfortable with Ventura’s methods. 
Although you can type in paths and file names, as in DOS, it 
is usually faster to navigate with the mouse. 

We will step you through the Ventura prep process the first 
few times until it becomes second nature. It may seem lengthy 
at first, but with experience you can perform the entire 
process in a few moments. 


If you have the Power disk 

Follow the steps outlined below to load, place and rename a 
text file called 1RPRT.TXT. This text file is provided on the 
optional Power disk. If you did not purchase the disk, skip to 
the section below titled “If you do not have the Power disk.” 

When you load text, Ventura retrieves the original word 
processing file. It does not make a separate copy. It temporari¬ 
ly places hyphens in this file, then makes it a permanent part 
of the chapter by storing a pointer. This pointer tells Ventura 
where to find the text file the next time the chapter is loaded. 

si Select Load Text/Picture from the File menu. 






Step one — file maintenance 


1-17 


File 


Open Chapter... 


Save ^S 

Save As... 

Abandon,,. 


Load Text/Picture... 


Load Diff. Style... 
Save As New Style.. . 


To Print... 

DOS File Ops... 
Quit 


Choose Type of File: Text, Text Format: ASCII, # of Files: 
One, Destination: List of Files, and OK. 


LOAD TEXT/PICTURE 


0 


Type of File: 
Text Format: 


8 oF Files: 
Destination: 


| Generated ] lilOTll | WordStar 3 j | WS 4.B/5.B | 
| MS-Word 1 | WordPerfect | 1 XyWrite | | B-Bit ASCII | 
p)CA~] j HultiHate I 1 PRH-to-Table 1 [ WordPerfect 5 
1 Writer | 

[]J3| | Several [ 


List of Files 


Text Clipboard 


Text Cursor 


■P |Cancel | 


The Item Selector dialog box appears. Its listing shows both 
file names and subdirectories. Subdirectories are distin¬ 
guished by a diamond in front of the name. 

In the next section, you will practice moving around the hard 
disk with the mouse. To move “backward,” you click on the 
Backup button in the upper lefthand corner of the listing box. 
To move “forward” to a given subdirectory, click on the 
diamond that precedes its name, or the subdirectory name 
itself (Figure 1-7). 












1 - 18 


Ventura prep 


Directory line — 
Backup button — 
Subdirectory name 

Filename - 


ITEM SELECTOR 


Directory: C:\TVPESETy*. 


File filter 


BUSINESS 
NEWSLET 
TECHDOCS 
8B00K-P1.STV 
8B00K-P2.STV 
8BR0-L2 .STV 
8BR0-P3 .STV 
8INU-P1 .STV 
8LSTG-P2.STV 


Selection: 


Scroll bar 


g OK 


■ Scroll arrow 


Cancel 


Selection line 


Figurel-7. The Item Selector lets you locate any file on your 
hard disk. Use the Backup button to move to the next 
higher level of subdirectories. Open a subdirectory by click¬ 
ing on the diamond or the subdirectory name. 


To move to a new subdirectory, click on its name: 

II Click on the Backup button until the C:\POWER subdirec¬ 
tory appears on the list (preceded by a diamond). Click once 
on the diamond or the name to move to that subdirectory. 
The Directory line now reads C:\POWER\*.TXT. 

To find the file you need, click on the scroll arrows to move 
down or up one line at a time. Click on the gray area to move 
one screen at a time. To move a distance you select, press and 
hold the mouse button to drag the scroll box in the direction 
you want to move. 

I Use the scroll box and arrow to scroll through the list of text 
files until you see 1RPRT.TXT. 

II Select the file 1RPRT.TXT by clicking once on 1RPRT.TXT 
and once on OK. 




Place the text file 


1-19 


ITEM SELECTOR 

Directory: C:\POWERV.TXT 


■| ; *.TXT 


1RPRT .TXT 


2PR0P0S .TXT 
3NEWSHED.TXT 
3MEWSLG0.TXT 
3MEWS0f1E.TXT 
3NEWSTW0.TXT 
SAD .TXT 
6NEWSLT1.TXT 
6NEWSLT2.TXT 


Selection: 1RPRT .TXT 


m 

Cancel 


t 


*+NOTE: Once you click on a file, its name appears on the 
Selection line. You can also select a text file by typing the 
name directly onto the Selection line and clicking OK or press¬ 
ing the Enter key, or by double-clicking on the file. 

Ventura loads the file and the name 1RPRT.TXT appears in 
the Assignment List. If the Underlying Page is selected when 
you load a text file, Ventura automatically places the file on 
the Page. 

^ NOTE: If you are in Paragraph, Text, or Graphic mode when 
you load a file, Ventura will not place the file on the Page. 



If you do not have the Power disk 


To follow along, you will exit Ventura and load a word proces¬ 
sor. You will type the text 1RPRT.TXT from Appendix A and 
save it in ASCII file format under the name and location 
C:\P0WER\1RPRT.TXT. Then you will return to Ventura 
and follow the steps in the section above for loading the text 
file. 


Place the text file 

After you load a text file you must place it — that is, tell 
Ventura where you want it to appear. You can place text onto 





1 -20 


Ventura prep 


the Page, or into separate frames on top of the Page. For this 
business report, you will place the text onto the Page. 

NOTE: Ventura may have already put the file on the Page 
without your intervention. If you select an empty frame or a 
Page before loading a single file, Ventura assumes that you 
want the file in that location, and places it without being asked. 
If Ventura placed the file for you, read through the following 
section without doing anything. 

Select the Page 

^ Enable Frame mode by clicking on the Frame button in the 
Mode Selector. 

II Select the Page by clicking once anywhere on the Page. 

Notice the eight black handles, known as sizing buttons, 
around the border of the Page. They show you what has been 
selected and where Ventura is going to place the text. 

1! Click once on the file name 1RPRT.TXT in the Assignment 
List to place the file onto the Page. 

The text fills the Page. The text file name is displayed in the 
Current Selection Box (Figure 1-8). 



Figure 1-8. 












Rename the text file 


1-21 


Don’t worry if your screen differs slightly from the example 
shown here. You may have started the project with something 
other than the DEFAULT. STY style sheet. That other style 
sheet may have different margins and columns. You will soon 
load a different style sheet. 

Because you placed the file on the Page, Ventura continues to 
make new pages until the entire file is placed. If you were to 
press the PgDn key to move ahead in the document, you would 
find the additional pages already created. 

Rename the text file 

Once the file is on the Page you can change its name and/or its 
location. When you make changes to text they are reflected 
back to the original file. If you do not want the original to be 
permanently modified, you must rename it before you save the 
chapter. 

H Select File Type/Rename from the Edit menu. 



Move to the New Name line and press Esc to clear the line. 
Then type in the new location and name: 

C:\TEMP\1REP0RT.TXT 

Click on ASCII and OK to close the dialog box. 








1-22 


Ventura prep 


FILE TYPE / RENAME Q] 

Old Name: C:\P0WER\1RPRT.TXT_ 

New Name: C:\TEMP\1REPORT.TXT_ 


Text Format: Generated 


WordStar 3 WS 4.0/5.0 


■ 

XyWrite 


8-Bit ASCII 


| DCA | | MultiMate~| | PRN-to-Table ] [ WordPerfect 5 


Writer 


Cancel 


WARNING: If you did not make a C:\TEMP subdirectory, Ventura will not know where 
to relocate this file. Go back to the section “Step one — file maintenance" to learn 
how to make the C:\TEMP subdirectory. 


*+ TIP: You can correct typing mistakes by pressing the Back¬ 
space key to delete one character to the left, or the Del key to 
delete one character to the right. Use the Esc key to clear the 
line. 

If you prefer, you can save the file in your favorite word 
processing format instead. Follow the steps above and choose 
the text format you want rather than ASCII. 

Load a style sheet 

To continue the Ventura prep, you will load one of the original 
style sheets included with the Ventura software package. 


WARNING: If you have moved or changed the style sheets in any way since buying 
Ventura, reload the originals as explained in the Introduction to this book. 


II Select Load Diff. Style from the File menu. 























File 


New 

Open Chapter... 

Save A S 

Save As... 

Abandon... 

Load Text/Picture... 


Load Diff. Style... 


Save As New Style. . . 

To Print... 

DOS File Ops.. . 

Quit 


Use the Backup button to find the C:\TYPESET subdirec¬ 
tory. The Directory line reads C:\TYPESET\*.STY. Now 
select the style sheet &PRPT-P1.STY and click OK. 


ITEM SELECTOR 


Directory: C:\TYPESET\*.STY_ 


8NEWS-P3.STY 
8PH0N-P2.STY 
8PREL-P1.STV 


t "B8PRPT-P1.STY ,1 


8TBL-P1 .STY 
8TBL2-L1.STY 
8TCHD-P1.STY 
8TDQC-P1.STY 


Selection: 8PRPT-P1.STY 





If you cannot find the style sheet, check that you are in the 
correct subdirectory. Scroll down the listing until &PRPT- 
Pl.STY appears. 


*+NOTE: You can move from subdirectory to subdirectory either 
by clicking on the Backup button and the diamonds, or by 
typing the desired subdirectory onto the Directory line and 
pressing Enter. 

















1 -24 


Ventura prep 


Rename the style sheet 

If you save a chapter without renaming the style sheet, you 
will permanently change the original. It’s better to leave the 
original intact for future use, and rename the new version. 

11 Select Save as New Style from the File menu. 


File 


New 

Open Chapter... 


Save A S 

Save As... 

Abandon... 


Load Text/Picture... 
Load Diff. Style... 


Save As New Style... 


. * 

To Print. . . 

DOS File Ops... 

Quit_ 


H Move the cursor to the Directory line, press Esc and type: 
C: \TEMP\*. STY and press Enter. 

The Item Selector searches the C:\TEMP subdirectory for 
files with the .STY extension. Because you haven’t put any 
here yet, the list is blank. 

^ Move to the Selection line and type: 1REPORT and click OK. 
Ventura stores the style sheet as C:\TEMP\iREPORT.STY 
(Figure 1-9). 

*+TIP: Ventura automatically assigns a .STY extension to style 
sheets and .CHP extensions to chapter files. You do not need 
to type them in. 

The new style sheet name appears in the Title Bar at the top 
of the screen. 








Load a picture file 


1-25 



Figure 1-9. 


Load a picture file 

Loading pictures is very similar to loading text. In fact, you 
use the same option from the File menu: Load Text/Picture. As 
with text, you first load the file onto the Assignment List and 
then place it where you want it. 

II Select Load Text/Picture from the File menu. 

II Select Type of File: Line-Art, Line-Art Format: GEM, # of 
Files: One, and OK. 




























1 - 26 


Ventura prep 


Ventura displays the Item Selector, which you will use to 

choose a picture file to load. 

§i If you are not already in the C:\TYPESET subdirectory, 
click the Backup button until C:\TYPESET shows on the 
list (preceded by a diamond). Click once on the name to 
move to that subdirectory. The Directory line now reads 
C:\TYPESET\*.GEM. 

1 Scroll down until you see NOZZLE.GEM. 

^ Select NOZZLE.GEM and click OK (Figure 1-10). 


ITEM SELECTOR 

Directory: C:\TVPESET\*.GEM_ 

Selection: NOZZLE .GEH| 


OK 

Cancel 


I 

1=1 *.GEM 

♦ BUSINESS 

♦ NEWSLET 

♦ TECHDOCS 
COLUMBIA.GEM 

t 


Figure 1-10. Selecting NOZZLE.GEM from the Item Selector. 


Ventura loads the file. The name NOZZLE.GEM appears in 
the Assignment List. Do not place the picture for the moment. 
Later in this chapter you will draw a frame and place this 
picture inside it. 

*+NOTE: Although you can rename text files and style sheets 
with Ventura, you cannot rename picture files. You must exit 
Ventura and use the DOS Rename command to rename a 
picture file or use a third-party utility like Desktop Manager. 

Save the chapter 

When you save a chapter for the first time, use Save As from 
the File menu to specify the new name and location. 









Save the chapter 


1-27 


Select Save As from the File menu. 


Mew 

Open Chapter 


Save 
Abandon... 


Load Text/Picture 
Load Diff. Style. 
Save As New Style 


To Print... 

DOS File Ops... 
Quit 


H Move the cursor to the Directory line and press Esc. Type in 
the new location C: \TEMP\*. CHP and press Enter or click 
OK to move to that subdirectory. 

H Move to the Selection line and type in the name: 1REPORT 
and click OK. 


ITEM SELECTOR 
Directory: C:\TEMP\*.CHP 



|| *.CHP 

Selection: 1REP0RT[_._ 



t 









■Pi 


..‘— 

1 

Cancel 


*+NOTE: If you lose a chapter through a computer malfunction , 
you may be able to restore it from the backup files. 

Ventura maintains backups of all key files, provided you 
choose Keep Backup Files: Yes from the Set Preferences dialog 

















1 -28 


Text 


box in the Options menu. Each time you save a chapter Ven¬ 
tura renames the backup files with a $ extension. Thus the 
backup filename for SAMPLE.CHP is SAMPLE.$HP. 

The backups represent files as they were the last time you 
saved the chapter. To restore the backups, you must return to 
DOS. Delete the original files. Then rename the backups to 
their original names. Thus, you would rename SAMPLE.$HP 
to SAMPLE.CHP. SAMPLE.$TY would become 
SAMPLE.STY, etc. Be sure you delete and rename all the 
chapter files, including those with the extensions CHP, STY, 
VGR, CAP, and CIF files. 



Stopping point 


You have reached the first of our recommended breaking 
points for Chapter One. Before you do anything else, save 
what you have done so far. 


H Press Ctrl-S (or Select Save from the File menu). 


At this point you can stop and shut down the computer if you 
do not have time to continue. To restart, load Ventura and 
open the sample chapter, C:\TEMP\1REP0RT.CHP. If you 
have the time, you should simply go straight to the next 
section without stopping. 

Even if you plan to continue on without stopping, we recom¬ 
mend that you save your work to prevent loss in the event of a 
power surge or computer malfunction. 


Text 

Even though you haven’t yet started to work on the actual 
document, you have already acquired a collection of valuable 
Ventura skills. Most Ventura users learn about file main¬ 
tenance the hard way — by accidentally destroying or losing 
some of their work. The Ventura prep section you just com¬ 
pleted is the key to avoiding such disasters. 




What to do if you make a mistake 


1-29 


What to do if you make a mistake 

If you’ve never made a mistake and don’t ever plan to, you can 
skip this next section. Otherwise, you may want to know what 
to do in the event of a major error. If you goof and can’t recover, 
you can always choose Abandon from the File menu. Abandon 
reverts to the previous version — that is, it goes back to where 
you were the last time you saved the file. For this reason, you 
may want to save fairly often. If you make a serious mistake, 
it may be simpler just to go back to the previous version with 
the Abandon option. 

Now you are going to step through the construction of the 
sample document. In case you don’t have time to finish the 
entire project in one session, we will suggest another stopping 
point about halfway through. 

The normal progression through a Ventura document follows 
the Formula: Text + Style + Pictures = Chapter. You already 
have a head start on the text portion, since you loaded and 
placed a text file during Ventura prep. Normally you would do 
some text editing at this stage. However, to prevent this first 
project from dragging on too long, we will postpone teaching 
you about text editing until the next chapter. Instead, you will 
take a quick look at moving around and viewing the Page. 

Move around the page 

Before proceeding to the style section of this sample project, 
take a moment to practice getting around. To move a few lines 
at a time, click on the arrows at the ends of the scroll bars at 
the far right of the screen. To move one screen at a time, click 
on the gray area. To move a distance you determine, drag the 
scroll bar (click and move while holding the mouse button 
down). 

To move to the next page, use the PgDn key on the numeric 
keypad. Use the PgUp key to move to the previous page. Press 
the Home key to move to the first page of a chapter and the 
End key to move to the last. 




1 - 30 


Style 


WARNING: If the keys on the numeric keypad do not work, it’s likely that you 
accidentally enabled keyboard mode. You can turn it off by pressing the Ctrl and the 
right Shift key (you will hear a beep). 


View the page 

Ventura provides four views of the page. You will experiment 
with three of them in this exercise. 

• Use the View menu to cycle between Enlarged, Normal, and 
Reduced Views (Figure 1-11). 


View 


Facing Pages View 


Reduced View A R 
Normal View (lx) A N 


J Enlarged View (2x) A E 


J Frame Setting A U 

Paragraph Tagging A I 

Text Editing A Q 

Graphic Drawing A P 

Figure 1-11. To zoom in, press Ctrl-E 
or select Enlarged View from the View 
menu. 


You can also use keyboard shortcuts to cycle between different 
views. Press Ctrl-E, Ctrl-N, and Ctrl-R to change from En¬ 
larged to Normal to Reduced View. 

^ TIP: To zoom into a selected area, place the mouse cursor 
where you want the upper left corner of the magnified view. 
Then press Ctrl-E (or Ctrl-N). 


Style 


In accordance with the Formula (Text + Style + Pictures = 
Chapter), the next section is concerned with style. More 









Rules of thumb 


1-31 


specifically, you will load an existing style sheet and modify 
some of its tags. 

A style sheet contains formatting rules. Some apply to the 
overall Chapter — margins, columns, vertical rules, and so 
forth. Others, called tags, apply to individual text elements. 
Style sheets are the key to Ventura’s power. In fact, they are so 
powerful and so sophisticated they can intimidate a beginning 
user. Ventura has so many options you may have trouble 
knowing where to begin or remembering where you’ve been 
already. Fortunately, there are several easy ways to make 
sense of style sheets. 

Rules of thumb 

Three rules of thumb can help keep you from becoming disor¬ 
ganized and forgetting important steps. 

*+TIP: Concentrate on three key menus during the style phase: 
Chapter ; Frame, and Paragraph. 

*+ TIP: Format the overall chapter before the individual text para¬ 
graphs. 

** TIP: Work from left to right (from Chapter to Frame to Para¬ 
graph) and from top to bottom (from Font to Alignment to 
Spacing, etc.) in the menus. 

These three suggestions are guidelines only. You will find 
occasional exceptions to these rules as you work through the 
publishing projects. Nevertheless, they work well together. 
Most chapter formatting occurs in the Chapter and Frame 
menus. Most of the individual text formatting occurs in the 
Paragraph menu. Thus, if you move from left to right (Chap¬ 
ter to Frame to Paragraph), you automatically perform chap¬ 
ter functions first. 

When we say to work from top to bottom, we do not mean that 
you must open each and every dialog box in a given menu. In 
the very beginning you may indeed want to do so, as a way of 
learning your way around. As you grow more accomplished, 
you’ll soon know which menu options to ignore. But even if 
you skip menu options along the way, it’s best to work from the 




1-32 


Style 


top to the bottom of the menu. If you work randomly you’re 
likely to overlook an important menu choice. 

You will follow these rules of thumb while in the style section 
of this first document. You will concentrate on the Chapter, 
Frame, and Paragraph menus. You will start with the design 
choices that affect the entire document — margins, columns, 
headers, footers, and so on. These layout decisions are applied 
to all the pages of the chapter. 

You will begin with the first option in the Chapter menu. 

Open the Page Size & Layout dialog box 

ii Select Page Size & Layout from the Chapter menu. 

H Choose Orientation: Portrait, Paper Type & Dimension: 
Letter, Sides: Single, Start On: Right Side. Click OK to 
close the dialog box. 




PAGE LAYOUT 

T 

■ 



Orientation: 

Portrait 

Paper Type 8 Dimension: 

Letter, 8,5 x 11 in, 

Sides: 

Single 

Start On: 

Right Side 


WM Cancel 


Page Size & Layout contains several options that affect the 
size of the Page and how pages are printed. Figure 1-12 
summarizes the effects of some of these choices. 

Single sides applies to documents that are printed on only one 
side. Later in the book you will work with double-sided docu¬ 
ments, where print appears on both sides and such things as 
headers and footers and margins may be different for the left 
and right versions of the page. 







Create a header with page numbers 


1-33 


8.5x11 in. 
Portrait size 


5.5x8.5 in. 
Half size 


11x17 in. 
Landscape 


Figurel-12. Letter, Half and Landscape are the most common 
paper size options. 


Create a header with page numbers 

Our rule of thumb says that you should work from top to 
bottom in the Chapter menu. In this document, you will not be 
concerned with the Chapter Typography dialog box, or with 
any of the counting options. You can, therefore, move down to 
the Headers & Footers option. 

Although we are using a header as an example, most of the 
concepts you are learning apply equally to footers. You can 
achieve similar effects in footers instead of headers, or you can 
combine both headers and footers on one page. For example, 








1 - 34 


Style 


you could place the document title in the header and the page 
numbers in the footer. In this example, however, you will place 
both a descriptive title and a page number in the header. 

If Select Headers & Footers from the Chapter menu. 


Chapter 


Page Size & Layout... 
Chapter Typography... 


Update Counters... 
Auto-Numbering... 

Renumber Chapter 

Re-Anchor Frames... 


Headers & Footers, 


Turn Header On 
Turn Footer On 
Footnote Settings... 


Insert/Remove Page... 
Go to Page, . . _^G. 


H Select Define: Right Page Header, Usage: On. 

H On the line labeled Left, type: 

Ventura Implementation 

This action positions the report title (“Ventura Implementa¬ 
tion”) on the left side of the page. 

H Move the text cursor to the line labeled Right (click once 
next to the word “Right”). Now type: Page followed by a 
blank space. 

H Choose the Page # button from the bottom of the dialog box. 
The page numbering code, [P#], appears on the line. Then 
click OK. 








Create a header with page numbers 


1-35 


0 


Center: _ 

Right: Page [PS]: 


Inserts: | Chapter ~5~| | Page 5 | | 1st Hatch"! [ Last Match | 
| Text flttr~l 1 Copy To Facing PagT] 


OK |\ 

_L'w 


HERDERS S FOOTERS 


Define: 

| Left Page Header* | 






1 Left Page Footer | 

| Right Page Footer 

Usage: 

|2J |~Qff1 



Left: Centura Implementation. 


When you enter the page numbering code [P#] in the Headers 
& Footer dialog box, you tell Ventura to display the current 
number of each page in the header. If you prefer, you can also 
enter such codes into dialog boxes by typing them directly. 
Most people, however, prefer to use the buttons, thereby 
eliminating the need to memorize codes. 

As soon as you close the dialog box, the header you created 
appears at the top of the page. (Since you are working with an 
existing style sheet, the format of the header has already been 
defined. Later you will change its style.) However, most 
reports do not include headers and footers on the first page. 
Let’s turn the header off for the first page only while permit¬ 
ting it to remain on the following pages. Move further down 
the Chapter menu. 

II Check to make sure you are on page one. If not, press Home 
to return to the first page of the document. 

H Select Turn Header Off from the Chapter menu. 

NOTE: When you turn the header (or footer) off, the Chapter 
menu displays “Turn Header On” or “Turn Footer On.” This 
menu option affects the current page only. 





1 - 36 


Style 


Chapter 


Page Size R Layout... 
Chapter Typography... 


Update Counters. . . 
Auto-Numbering . . . 

Rvrambvp Chapter 

Re-Anchor Frames... 


Headers R Footers... 


Turn Header Off 


Turn Footer Off 
Footnote Settings... 


Insert/Remove Page... 
Go to Page. . . _ ^G 


Change the margins 

Since you are finished with the Chapter menu, the rule of 
thumb says you should now move to the Frame menu. 
Proceeding top to bottom, you come first to Margins & 
Columns. You will use this option to increase the margins 
from their original setting. 

!! Enable Frame mode (click the Frame button in the Mode 
Selector) and select the Underlying Page by clicking the 
mouse cursor anywhere on the workspace. 

li Select Margins & Columns from the Frame menu. 

If the dialog box shows measurements in units other than 
picas & points, place the mouse cursor anywhere on top of the 
unit measurement (e.g. inches or centimeters) and click until 
“picas & points” appears. If you are unfamiliar with picas and 
points, simply enter the settings for the time being. We will 
explain this measurement system in Chapter Two. 

II Leave the top and bottom margins at 06,00 picas & points. 
Move the cursor to the Left line, press Esc to clear the line 
and type: 09,00. Then move to the Right line, press Esc 
and type: 09,00. Then click OK. 








Reset the header to the new margins 


1-37 


MARGINS R COLUMNS 


m 

# of Columns: 

HIECDElCEItllEIE] 

Settings For: 

| Left Page | 


Widths 

Gutters 

Margins 

Column 1: 

33,00 

00,00 

00,00 

00,00 

00,00 

Top: 86,00 picas R points 

2: 

m,m 

Bottom: 06,00 

3: 

m,m 

Left: 09,00 

4: 

m,m 

Right: 09,00| 



00,00 


7: 

03, BB 

00,00 

00,00 

Calculated Width = 51,00 

8: 

m,m 

Actual Frame Width = 51,00 

Inserts: 

| Make 

Equal Widths | | Copy To Facing Page | | 








1 Cancel | 


Reset the header to the new margins 

Take a moment to look at the header on page two. It is aligned 
with the old margin settings. That’s because Ventura sets the 
margins of the header equal to the margins of the Page. 
Because you built the headers before you changed the margins, 
the header margins remain at the old value. Therefore, you 
must now reset the header to match the new margin settings. 
Here’s how. 

i§ Select Headers & Footers from the Chapter menu and turn 
Usage: Off for both the right and left page header. Click OK. 

This turns the header off for the entire document. Your set¬ 
tings are retained even though the header is no longer active. 

li Now reselect the same dialog box and turn Usage: On. 
When you return to the document you will discover that the 
headers have been reset to match the current margins. 

TIP: In actual practice, you may want to want to vary our 
left-to-right rule of thumb, and change the margins before 
creating the header. This way you can eliminate the extra step 
of changing the header margins. 

If you are feeling overwhelmed about now, remember this: you 
are learning valuable tips and techniques at the same time 
that you are learning basic skills. If you meet a concept that 
confuses you, don’t stop. Go on to the next section. Come back 





1 - 38 


Style 


to the trouble spot later. Then you will see things from a new 
(and calmer) perspective. Believe it or not, everything will 
begin to fall into place. 

Modifying tags 

That’s all the chapter formatting you will do for this first 
document. Now let’s take a look at formatting individual para¬ 
graphs. 

To Ventura, a paragraph is any line or lines of text that ends 
with a carriage return. A paragraph may be a single letter, a 
word, or several lines of text — as long as it is ended by 
pressing the carriage return (Figure 1-13). 


Paragraphs 



Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


llllllllliii C:\TVPESET\1PRGHII1G.CHP (1PRGHIMG.STV) • . . 


Report on Installation and Implementation of Ventura Publisher* 


XYZ Corporation has embarked on a program to implement Ventura Publisher 
software on existing IBM AT-compatible computers as needed throughout the 
company. The Marketing Communications department will oversee and supervise 
this project Marketing Communications makes the following recommendations:!! 

Use of Ventura in every department for all publishing/communications tasks* 


Figure 1-13. Ventura considers every line that ends with a Return as a 
separate paragraph, even “empty” lines. 


You can make Ventura treat two or more sentences as one 
paragraph if you end a line with a line break (press Ctrl- 
Enter) instead of a carriage return. The line break appears as 
a backward arrow on the screen. Line breaks are useful when 
you want to break up information on separate lines, but you 
don’t want to change the format (Figure 1-14). 

For the most part, the formatting of individual paragraphs 
occurs in (surprise!) the Paragraph menu. The bad news: the 
Paragraph menu gives some users headaches because it packs 
so much power into so little space. The good news: we have a 
suggestion to make it simpler. 


























Modifying tags 


1-39 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


C:\TEMP\IREPORT.CHP (1REP0RT.S1V) ill 


Report on Installation J 
and Implementation of J 
Ventura Publisher I 


K 


E 


Line breaks 


Paragraph 

return 


Figure 1-14. Line breaks let you start a new line without ending the 
paragraph. 


^ TIP: Roughly 75% of all paragraph formatting is done in the 
first three dialog boxes: Font, Alignment, and Spacing. 

If you follow our previous suggestion to work from top to 
bottom, you’ll soon make a discovery. By the time you finish 
with Font, Alignment, and Spacing, you’ve probably ac¬ 
complished most of what you needed to do. In the beginning, 
concentrate your efforts on the “Big Three” dialog boxes and 
you’ll soon gain a sense of control. 

Let’s pause for a moment to remind ourselves where we’ve 
been and where we’re headed. You’ve completed the text por¬ 
tion of the report and now you’re working on style. You’ve 
completed the chapter formatting and you’re ready to start 
formatting the individual paragraphs. As you proceed 
through the rest of the style section, you will assign tags to 
individual paragraphs. Tags include attributes such as font 
type and size, alignment, spacing, and so forth. The style 
sheet you loaded at the beginning of the chapter comes with 
pre-defined tags. 

Assigning a tag begins by enabling Paragraph mode and 
selecting a paragraph. While the paragraph is still high¬ 
lighted, you tell Ventura which tag you want by clicking on a 
name from the Assignment List. The Assignment List in¬ 
cludes all the style sheet’s tags in alphabetical order. 

































1 -40 


Style 


*+NOTE: The tags that begin with a “Z” are generated by Ven¬ 
tura. You will learn about generated tags in Chapter Two. 

Your next question might be “Which paragraph should I work 
on first?” Here’s a guideline that applies to all documents: 


** TIP: When you are ready to start working on individual para¬ 
graphs, format Body Text first. 

As you will discover later in this chapter, the choices you make 
for Body Text affect the rest of the document. Thanks to 
Ventura’s style sheet approach, the changes you make to the 
first Body Text paragraph are automatically reflected in each 
and every Body Text paragraph throughout the document. 
There is no need to format each one individually. Any format 
change to one tag affects them all. 


Change the Body Text font 

II Enable Paragraph mode (click on the Paragraph button 
from the Mode Selector). 


Change to Normal View to select the first Body Text para¬ 
graph “XYZ Corporation has embarked...” (Figure 1-15.) 



Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


' ' ' 1 C:\IEMP\1REP0RT.CHP (1REP0RT.STV) 


Chanji 
HiOfl ll 


Tit 


Z.CAPTICM 
Z.FOOTEft 
Z.HEOOEA 
ZJ.A8EL FIS 


■ 

iEEBMEEl 

m 

EEma 

n 



, l',', 


jReport on Installation and Implementation of Ventura Publisher 

[Executive Summary 


Z Corporation has embarked on a program to implen||t Ventu 
oftware on existing IBM Al-compatible computers as needed Ira 
company. The Marketing Communications department will oversee a 
his protect Marketing Communications makes the following re comm 


•Use of Ventura in every department for all publishing/commuracatiom 


•Designation of an in-house desklop publishing specialist with respj 
training, maintenance and standards 




Figure 1-15. 


m Select Font from the Paragraph menu. 

II Choose Face: Helvetica, Style: Normal, Color: Black, and 
Size: 012.0 points. Click OK (Figure 1-16). 




















"Body Text" FONT [T| 



Custoa Size: 0i2,0 points 


Overscare: OFF 
Strike-Thru: OFF 
Underline: OFF 
Double Underline: OFF 



Figure 1-17. The Font dialog box for the Hewlett-Packard LaserJet. 


All of the documents in the first section are constructed with 
the two basic fonts: Times and Helvetica. If you have a non- 

































1 -42 


Style 


PostScript printer, you know these fonts as Dutch and Swiss. 
As you may recall, we recommend that you install PostScript 
as one of your printer options even if you do not have a 
PostScript printer. You can switch to a PostScript printer 
during the projects with Set Printer Info from the Options 
menu. By selecting PostScript as your printer your screens 
will match the ones in the book. Then you would switch back 
(using Set Printer Info again) to your actual printer when it’s 
time to print. 

However, if you prefer not to install or use PostScript, you can 
use another printer. When you see instructions to use Post¬ 
Script fonts, substitute your own font names instead. When 
you see Times, substitute Dutch. When you see Helvetica, 
substitute Swiss. (As an aid to remember which is which, it 
may help to recall that Helvetica is another name for Switzer¬ 
land.) 

^ TIP: If you did not install a PostScript printer, substitute Dutch 
whenever you see Times; substitute Swiss whenever you see 
Helvetica. 

Change the Body Text alignment 

Most dialog boxes have multiple choices. We do not have the 
time to discuss every choice for every dialog box the first time 
we encounter it. For the moment, make the choices we suggest 
and leave the others unchanged. Rest assured that almost 
every choice in every dialog box is covered somewhere in the 
ten chapters of Publishing Power with Ventura. 

II With the Body Text paragraph still highlighted, select 
Alignment from the Paragraph menu. 

11 Choose Horz. Alignment: Justified and click OK. 




Change the Body Text spacing 


1-43 


"Body Text" ALIGNMENT 


m 

Horz. Alignment: 

Justified 


Vent. Alignment: 

Top 


Text Rotation: 

None 


Hyphenation: 

USENGLSH 


Successive Hyphens: 

2 


Overall Width: 

Column-Wide 


First Line: 

Indent 


Relative Indent: 

Off 


In/Qutdent Width: 

00,00| picas 8 

points 

In/Outdent Height: 

001 lines 


In From Right to Decimal: 

00,00 


Maximum Rotated Height: 

00,00 



■m [ 

Cancel | 


Change the Body Text spacing 

The Spacing dialog box is one of the most complex, so take a 
deep breath. We need to spend a few paragraphs to get you 
started in the right direction. If you bear with us for a few 
minutes, you will have an easier time from now on. 

The Spacing dialog box controls both vertical and horizontal 
spacing. Vertical spacing is handled in the top half (Above, 
Below, Inter-Line, Inter-Paragraph) and horizontal spacing is 
handled in the bottom half (In From Left, In From Right). 

Vertical spacing has four variations: Above, Below, Inter-Line, 
and Inter-Paragraph. Above, Below, and Inter-Paragraph add 
space between paragraphs. Inter-Line puts space between 
lines (Figure 1-18). 

^ TIP: Use Inter-Line Spacing for all tags. Use Above Spacing if 
you need additional space above the paragraph. Do not use 
Below unless you cannot get the effect you want with Above 
and/or Inter-Line. Avoid Inter-Paragraph. 

In other words, for additional space between two paragraphs, 
add Above Spacing to the lower paragraph. For instance, 
Figures 1-19 and 1-20 show what two paragraphs look like 
before and after you add Above Spacing. 

Limiting spacing to Above and Inter-Line has advantages. 
Above spacing can be suppressed when a paragraph starts at 





1 -44 


Style 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Fnane Paragraph Graphic Options 


iHfillIlf!! C:\TEMP\1REP0RT.CHP (1REP0RT.SIV) 


Report on Installation and 
Implementation of Ventura 
.Publisher 


AboeSpacing 


"Executive Summary 


hErineSpac'ng 


BetawSpacing 

-XYE Corporation haS embarked on a program to implement 
_Ventura Publisher software on existing IBM AT-compatible 
computers as needed throughout the company. The Marketing 
Communications department will oversee and supervise this 
project, Marketing Communications makes the following 
recommendations: 

• Use of Ventura in every department for all publishing/com- 


E 


IF 


Figure 1-18. 


Body Text - 
Head level 1 



Desk File Edit View Chapter Fnane Paragraph Graphic Options 


ill!|Il!H§l!I!l| : ! C:\TEIIP\1REP0RT.CHP (1REP0RT.S1V) 


sheets. Every document proouceo with these style sheets will automatically 
meet minimum standards for graphic design and quality; and all documents: 
seen by the public will reinforce the same image. 

We have identified potential uses infive departments; more will be developed! 
as users become more proficient with Ventura and discover new applies*, 
lions. 

Accounting Department: 


Creation and maintenance of electronic forms, including purchase orders, 
invoices, collection notices, plus formatting of financial statements and 
reports, The creation of direct mail flyers, brochures and, resulting in im 
proved turnaround tim e and reduced fees from outside agencies and service! 
bureaus. 


Figurel-19. Here are two paragraphsbefore adding Above 
Spacing. 


the top of a column by choosing Add in Above: When Not at 
Column Top. What’s more, if two paragraphs have conflicting 
Above and Below spacing, Ventura uses the larger value of the 
two. If Body Text had 18.00 fractional pts Below Spacing and 
Headl had 24.00 fractional pts Above Spacing, Ventura would 
use the 24.00 fractional pts from Headl to add space between 
the paragraphs (Figure 1-21). 

If you start by setting Below to zero, you don’t have to worry 






















Change the Body Text spacing 


1-45 


Body Text 
Head level 1 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 
■ fy d l! jj j: " ; j H jj f C~\TEMP\TREPORf ~UV " (iREPORT' STV) i:: 1= =: == = : jj 


:^ertsr'£wery""doc'u"f«entVr"©dLiee'd"^rh''these st^eTshelrt^v^irauto'iriincai^e 
■meet minimum standards for graphic design and quality; and all documents! 
jseen by the public will reinforce the same image,f 

;We have identified potential uses in five departments; more will be developed; 
las users become more proficient with Ventura and discover new applies 
itions, f 


Accounting Departments 


Creation and maintenance of electronic forms, including purchase orders, 
■invoices, collection notices, plus formatting of financial statements and; 
reports,t 


Figurel-20. With Above Spacing you add extra space above 
the Headl paragraph to separate it from the Body Text. 


Desk file Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


C:\TEMP\1REP0RT.CHP (IREPORT.STV) 


24ffactional pts 
Above Spacing 
Headlwell — 


□ 


We have identified potential uses in five departments; more will 
be developed as users become more proficient with Ventura 
and discover new applications. - ? —■ Body Text 

IBfractional pts 


BelowSpacing 


Accounting Department: 


3 


Creation and maintenance of electronic forms, including pur¬ 
chase orders, invoices, collection notices, plus formatting of 
financial statements and reports. 


Figure 1-21 . When conflicts arise between the spacing values of tags, 
Ventura chooses the largest value. 


about one tag overriding another, and you always know where 
your spacing effect was created. 

It is important to be consistent when working with Ventura. If 
you follow the tip above you will minimize the confusion some 
beginners experience with the Spacing dialog box. It’s a 
simple system for first-time users. Nevertheless, there are 
exceptions to this rule. We’ll explain the exceptions as you get 
to them. In general, however, you can get the look you want 
about 80% of the time using just Above and Inter-Line. 





























































1 - 46 


Style 


Let’s put this rule of thumb into practice with the paragraph 
you were working on previously. 

II With the paragraph “XYZ Corporation has embarked...” 
still highlighted, select Spacing from the Paragraph menu. 
Click on the unit of measurement until it reads fractional 
pts. 

II Move the cursor to Above, press Esc to clear the line, and 
type: 14 

There is no need to type the .00. Ventura treats blanks as 
zeros. Thus, 14.00 and 14._are the same. 

11 Move the cursor to Below. Press Esc to clear the line. Leave 
it blank. 

Since Ventura treats blanks as zero, leaving the line blank is 
equivalent to entering 00.00. 

il Move the cursor to Inter-Line. Press Esc and type: 14 

!i Move to Inter-Paragraph. Press Esc to clear the line. Leave 
it blank. 

I! Choose Add in Above: When Not At Column Top. Click OK. 

When Not at Column Top eliminates the above spacing if the 
paragraph occurs at the top of a page or column (Figure 1-22). 


"Body Text" SPACING 

Above: 14. fractional pts 

Below: _._ 

Inter-Line: 14. fractional pts 

Inter-Paragraph: j_._ 


m 


Add in Above: 
Settings For: 


Always 


When Not at Column Top 


Left Page 


Right Page 


In From Left: GQ,QB picas 8 points 
In From Right: GO,00 

Inserts: | Copy To Facing Page | 


IS [ Cancel ~| 


Figure 1-22. 







Change the Body Text spacing 


1-47 


Here’s a second tip on vertical spacing: 

^ TIP: Spacing values should be an integer multiple of the inter¬ 
line spacing of Body Text. 

You create a more pleasing page design by using standard 
vertical spacing, including spacing above headings, captions, 
subtitles and padding around pictures. That unit should be 
equal to or a multiple integer of Body Text’s inter-line spacing. 
With consistent vertical spacing you can be assured that text 
will align across columns (Figure 1-23). 



Figure 1-23. To align across columns, make spacing 
an integer of Body Text spacing. 


In the example above, Inter-Line was 14.00 points, and we 
chose 14.00 fractional pts for Above. Other good choices might 
have been 07.00 fractional pts, 28.00 fractional pts, 42.00 
fractional pts or other multiples of 14.00. If the inter-line 
spacing had been 12.00, then 06.00, 24.00 and 36.00 would 
have been valid options. 














































1 - 48 


Style 


About horizontal spacing 

Hang in there. You’re halfway home. You’ve covered vertical 
spacing. Stick with it for a few more paragraphs as we explain 
the horizontal spacing options in the Spacing dialog box. 

*+TIP: Treat In From Left and In From Right as “extra” margins 
when the original margins set in the Frame menu are not 
enough. 

In certain cases, you want an overall margin for most of the 
document, but different, smaller margins for other text ele¬ 
ments. In such a case, use the Spacing dialog box to create 
secondary margins with In From Left and In From Right. 

Create a secondary margin for Body Text 

Try creating a secondary margin for the Body Text tag with In 
From Left. Shortening the line length will make the text 
easier to read. 

II Select Spacing from the Paragraph menu or press Ctrl-X to 
bring up the last dialog box. If necessary, change the unit 
measurement. (Put the mouse cursor on top of the measure¬ 
ment units next to In From Left spacing and click until 
picas & points shows.) 

H Make In From Left spacing 06,00 picas & points. Click OK. 


"Body Text" SPACING 

m 

Above: 

14.00 

fractional pts 

Below: 

00.00 


Inter*-Line: 

14.00 

Fractional pts 

Inter -Paragraph: 

00.00 


Add in Above: 

When Not at Column"TnrT"Ml 

Settings For: 

j Left Page | f 

In From Left: 

06,00| 

picas & points 

In From Right: 

00,00 


Inserts: 

1 Copy 

To Facing Page | 



| Cancel | j 






Change the Title tag 


1-49 


*+NOTE: In From Left is measured from the edge of the margin 
not from the edge of the paper. 

When you return to the document, the Body Text now starts 
six picas & points from the original left margin (Figure 1-24). 



Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


Body Text 
Bullet 

Head level 
Head level 2 
Base Break 
Title 
2_CAPTICN 
Z.FOOTCR 

HEADER 
Z_LftBEL FIG 


R Pg tt0001 | ud 


*1111*11 C:\TEMP\1REP0RT.CHP (1REP0RT.STY) 


Report on Installation and Implementation of Ventura Publishert 


Executive Summary 

XYZ Corporation has embarked on a program to implement 
Ventura Publisher software on existing IBM AT-compatible 
computers as needed throughout the co mpany. The M arketing 
Communications department will oversee and supervise this 
project, Marketing Communications makes the following 
recommendations: ; 

Use of Ventura in every department for all publishing/comf 
munications tasks 


Figure 1-24. 


You have already used the Big Three: the Font, Alignment, 
and Spacing options. Since there is nothing more that needs to 
be done to Body Text, you are ready to move to another text 
paragraph. 



Stopping point 


You have reached another recommended stopping point. If 
your time is limited, save your work and exit Ventura. Return 
to complete the project when your schedule permits. 


Change the Title tag 

If you are restarting after leaving Ventura, select Open Chap¬ 
ter from the File menu to open C:\TEMP\1REP0RT.CHP. 

If Body Text should always be the first tag you modify, what 
should be the second? We recommend starting at the top and 
marching through in order. The next paragraph is the title. In 
the next few steps, you will apply the Title tag. Then you will 
modify it by changing its font, alignment, and spacing. 








































1 - 50 


Style 


H Select the paragraph “Report on Installation and Im¬ 
plementation of Ventura Publisher.” Select Title from the 
Assignment List to apply the tag (Figure 1-25). 



Desk File Edit Vie* Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


C:\TEMP\1REP0RT.CHP (1REP0RT.STV) 


iReport on Ins tallation and Impl ementation ot| 
/entura Publisher I 


Executive Sum unary 

XYZ Corporation has embarked on a program to implement 
Ventura Publisher software on existing IBM AT-compatiblei 
computers as needed throughout the company. The Marketing 
Communications department will oversee and supervise thisj 
project. Marketing Communications makes the following 
recommendations: 

Use of Ventura in every department for all publishing/com-i 
munications tasks 



Figure 1-25. 


II Select Font from the Paragraph menu. Make the Size: 
024.0 points and click OK. 


Change the Title alignment 

H Select Alignment from the Paragraph menu. Choose Horz. 
Alignment: Left and Hyphenation: Off. Leave the remain¬ 
ing settings unchanged. Click OK. 


"Title'' ALIGNMENT 13 

Horz. Alignment: Left 
Pert. Alignment: Top 
Text Rotation: None 
Hyphenation: 0 ff 

Successive Hyphens: Unlimited 

Overall Width: Column-Wide 
First Line: Indent 
Relative Indent: Off 

In/Outdent Width: 00.00j inches 
In/Outdent Height: 001 lines 


Irs Frc«:S Right; to Decimal: 00.00 
Maximum Rotated Height: 00.00 


















Adjust the Title spacing 


1-51 


The title appears flush against the left margin. 

Notice that you turned off hyphenation. Titles and display 
type over 18.00 fractional pts. should generally not be 
hyphenated. 

Adjust the Title spacing 

II Select Spacing from the Paragraph menu. Verify that the 
units of measurement are displayed as fractional pts. 

II Move to Above, press Esc to clear the line and type: 42.00 

^ Move to Below and press Esc to clear the line. Leave it 
blank. Move to Inter-Line, press Esc and type: 28.00 

II Move to Add in Above and choose Always. Click OK. 

As you can see, the settings in the Spacing dialog box adhere 
to the rule of thumb. You set Below Spacing to zero and 
created the space between paragraphs with Above Spacing. 
Because the Body Text inter-line spacing is 14.00 fractional 
pts, you used a multiple of 14 for the inter-line and above 
spacing in the Title tag. 


WARNING: As you proceed through the additional tags, your results may not match 
the book unless you select Auto-Adjustments: None from Set Preferences in the 
Options menu (Figure 1-26). 


SET PREFERENCES 

□ 

Generated Tags: Shown 

Text to Greek: 6 

Keep Backup Files: Ves 

Double Click Speed: 3 

On-Screen Kerning: None 

Auto-Adjustments: None 

Pop-Up Menu Symbols: Hidden 

Menu Type: Drop-Down 


Decimal Tab Char: 046| (ASCII) 

1 0K 1 

Cancel 




Figure 1-26. 










The Auto-Adjustments setting in the Options menu affects the 
settings you use in the Spacing dialog box. If Auto-Adjust¬ 
ments is set to Styles, Ventura will automatically adjust the 
inter-line spacing of a tag each time you change its font size. If 
you increase the font size by 20%, Ventura will increase the 
inter-line spacing by the same percentage. This automatic 
adjustment may seem like a convenience. In practice, how¬ 
ever, it usually results in hard-to-use fractional spacing. We 
recommend spacing related to the standard unit of the Body 
Text. Auto-Adjustments throws off this standardization. For 
these reasons, we recommend working with it off. Instead, you 
will manually adjust spacing as necessary. 

In addition, as you get further along, we will not tell you each 
and every choice to make in each and every dialog box. In¬ 
stead, we will mention only the changes. You will leave every¬ 
thing else unchanged. If you have Auto-Adjustments set to 
Styles, the inter-line spacing may differ from what we expect 
you to have. 


The Head level 1 tag 

Now that you are finished with the Title tag, you are ready to 
move on to the next paragraph down the page. Tag it as Head 
level 1 and then change the way it looks. 

II Select the next paragraph “Executive Summary.” Select 
Head level 1 from the Assignment List (Figure 1-27). 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


IrSSliHiMffSl 



§ 

Bods/ Text 

Bullet 

Chonge Bor 

1 

Mcod level i\J 

0 

Poge Breok 

Title 

Z_C OPTION 

Z_F00TEft 

Z_HE0DER 

ZJ.0BEL FIG 


iisaraii 


Report on Installation and 
Implementation of Ventura 
Publisher 


lExecutive Summa 


XYZ Corporaiion has embarked on a program to implement: 
Ventura Publisher software on existing IBM AT-compatiblei 
computers as needed throughout the company. The M arketingj 
Communications department will oversee and supervise this 





















Change to the abbreviated format 


1-53 


The format that appears is part of the original style sheet that 
you loaded at the beginning of the project. For instance, the 
ruling line below was created by selecting the Ruling Line 
Below option in the Paragraph menu (you’ll learn more about 
ruling lines later in the book). 

**NOTE: If you are curious to know how a format was created, 
look for clues in the Paragraph menu options. Exploring on 
your own can lead to discoveries. But before you start to 
experiment, save the chapter. Then, if you make a mistake, 
you can choose Abandon to return to the last saved version. 

Change to the abbreviated format 

Now that you have assigned the Head level 1 tag, you can go 
through the “Big Three” — Font, Alignment, and Spacing—to 
change its appearance. 

To speed the process, we will use a shorter method to note 
changes. For example, to change the Head level 1 font we will 
use: 

H Font Size: 018.0 points 

This abbreviated format means that you should open the Font 
dialog box, change the point size to 018.0 points, leave every¬ 
thing else unchanged , and click OK to close the dialog box. 

*+NOTE: Make only the changes indicated. Leave anything not 
listed the way you found it when you opened the dialog box. 
After making the indicated changes, click OK to close the 
dialog box. 

Change the Head level 1 spacing 

You will use Above Spacing to add extra space between the 
Head level 1 and the Title tag. 

il Spacing Above: 42.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 28.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: When Not at Column Top 




1 - 54 


Style 


The Bullet tag 

ii Select the paragraph “Use of Ventura in every depart¬ 
ment...” and tag it as Bullet (select Bullet from the Assign¬ 
ment List). (Figure 1-28.) 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 




Bullet | 

R 

Pg ft 8881 1 

3 



Hill C:\TEf1P\1REP0RT.CHP (1 REPORT.STV) I! ..I - 


Publisher 


Executive Summary 


XYZ Corporation has embarked on a program to implement 
Ventura Publisher software on existing IBM AT-compatibls 
computers as needed throughout the company. The Marketing 
Communications department will oversee and supervise this 
project Marketing Communications makes the following 
recommendations: 


Use of Venta in every denattmert for all mitilishine/communication 
ask 


Designation of an in-house desktop publishing specialist with 


E 


Figure 1-28. 


*+NOTE: You may have to scroll up or down the page to find the 
paragraph to select 

The attributes from the original style sheet are applied to the 
paragraph. 

To change the tag, you will step through Font, Alignment, and 
Spacing. Since you have already encountered these dialog 
boxes several times, we will list the changes in abbreviated 
form. 

11 Font Face: Helvetica 

^ Spacing Above: 07.00 fractional pts 

Below: 00.00 fractional pts 
Inter-Line: 14.00 fractional pts 
Add in Above: When Not at Column Top 
In From Left: 06,00 picas & points 
(or 72.00 fractional pts) 

When you are finished, the Bullet tag should look similar to 
Figure 1-29: 



































Select multiple paragraphs 


1-55 



Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


C:\1EMP\1REP0RT.CHP (1REPORT.STV) i 


Head Jiaal 2 
Plje Irtak 
Title 
Z_COPTION 
Z_FOOTER 
Z.HEfiOER 
Z.LOBEL FIG 


r 

— 

fcy 

9 It 0091 S 


Executive Summary 


XY2 Corporation has embarked on a program to implemenf 
Ventura Publisher software on existing IBM AT-compatible 
computers as needed Ihroughoutthe company. The Marketing 
Communications department will oversee and supervise this 
project. Marketing Communications makes the following 
recommendations: 

• Use of Ventura in every department for all publishing/co m-i 
munioations tasks 

Designation of an in-house desktop publishing specialist witfj 
responsibility for training, maintenance and standards 

A company-wide training program to teach basic Ventura skills 


E 


Figure 1-29. 


Select multiple paragraphs 

Next, you will tag three more paragraphs as Bullet using the 
Shift-Click technique. Shift-Click lets you tag several para¬ 
graphs at one time. Click on the first paragraph as you would 
normally. Then hold down the Shift key while clicking on the 
additional paragraphs. All the paragraphs are highlighted 
simultaneously and the Current Selection Box shows the word 
Multiple. 

*+TIP: Use Shift-Click whenever possible when giving several 
paragraphs the same tag name. 

H Select the paragraph “Designation of an in-house... ” While 
holding down the Shift key , select the paragraph “A com¬ 
pany-wide... ” Without releasing the Shift key , select the 
third paragraph “Advanced workshops....” 

il When all three paragraphs are selected, release the Shift 
key. Then choose the Bullet tag from the Assignment List. 

When you have finished, your document should look like Fig¬ 
ure 1-30. Now you will finish the page by assigning the Head 
level 1 tag to the paragraph immediately below the bullets. 




















1 - 56 


Style 



Desk File Edit View Chapter Frawe Paragraph Graphic Options 


C:\TEMP\1REPORT.CHP (1REPORT.STV) il Bililllll l 


XYZ Corporation has embarked on a program to implement 
Ventura Publisher software on existing IBM AT-compatible 
computers as needed throughoutlhe company. The Marketing 
Communications department will oversee and supervise this! 
project. Marketing Communications makes the following 
recommendations: 

• Use of Ventura in every department for all publishing/com 
munications tasks 

• Designation of an in-house desktop publishing specialist 
with responsibility for training, maintenance and standards I 

• A company-wide training program to teach basic Venturer 

skills : 

• Advanced workshops as needed to teach specialized skills: 

Use of Ventura Company-Wide 


11 


Figure 1-30. 


Select the paragraph “Use of Ventura Company-Wide” and 
tag it as Head level 1 (Figure 1-31). 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



illiliUllillllllij C:\IEMP\1REP0RT.CHP (1REPORT.STV) 111! 


IIP 

rmmi I 

lii 


D 



Advanced workshops as needed to teach specii 


Use of Ventura Company Widen 


The three-month pilot program undertaken by Marl 
munications has determined that Ventura Publis 
used for every type of document currently prodr 
company. Company-wide use of Ventura will red: ^ 
ing/printing costs by 35% over the next two year 
next page). It will reduce the confusion and duplica 
now in evidence, whereby every department hac 
different (and often incompatible) solutions to 
problems. H will also permit the company to e: 
enforce appearance and image standards. Since V| 


E 


Figure 1-31. 


The Head level 2 tag 

Next go to page two, where you will assign the Head level 2 
tag and change its attributes. 

§1 Press the PgDn key to go to page two (if necessary, scroll to 
the top of the page). 







































Complete the tags 


1-57 


Select the paragraph “Accounting Department:” and tag it 
as Head level 2. 

With the paragraph still highlighted, make the changes 

shown below in abbreviated form. 

^ Font Size: 014.0 points 

^ Spacing Above: 28.00 fractional pts 

Below: 00.00 fractional pts 
Inter-Line: 14.00 fractional pts 
Add in Above: When Not at Column Top 
In From Left: 06,00 picas & points 

H Use Shift-Click to assign the Head level 2 tag to the follow¬ 
ing paragraphs: “Advertising Department,” “Market Com¬ 
munications,” “Internal Publications,” and “Engineering.” 

Complete the tags 

You have made all the changes to tags. All that remains in the 

style section is to assign these tags to a few more paragraphs. 

II Select the paragraph “In-House Desktop Publishing 
Specialist” and tag it as Head level 1. 

Because of the tag’s Above Spacing, the paragraph is forced 

onto the next page. 

^ Press PgDn to go to the next page (page three). 

11 Select the two paragraphs at the bottom of the page that 
begin “It will explain...,” and “It will teach... ” and tag them 
as Bullet. 

11 Now select the paragraph “Company-Wide Basic Training 
for Ventura” and tag it as Head level 1. 

^ Press PgDn to go to the next page. 

H Select the paragraph “Advanced Workshops” and tag it as 
Head level 1. 


Pictures 

Congratulations. You have finished the style portion of this 
document. By now you should already be seeing some im- 




1 - 58 


Pictures 


provement in the appearance of the report. Before you finish 
this first project, you will add a picture by drawing a frame on 
the page and placing a picture file inside. 


Add a frame 


Before placing a picture, you must add a frame to contain it. 
Check to make sure the rulers on the top and left side of the 
screen are displayed in picas. If not, use Set Ruler from the 
Options menu to change the units. Click once on the 0,0 
square in the upper left corner. This sets the zero point to its 
original position and ensures that your rulers match ours 
(Figure 1-32). 



Figure 1-32. 


Now you will go to the second page and add a frame. 

H Select Go to Page from the Chapter menu. Choose Selected 
Page: 0002 and click OK. 

Ventura takes you to page two. 

II Enable Frame mode. 

H Click on the Addition button from the Side-Bar. The words 
Add New Frame are highlighted (Figure 1-33). 











Add a frame 


1-59 


Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


□1 


1 

. i*. . t? . t'.*. . i 84 . t“ . i s .‘ 

♦ 

T 

ilia 

ill 

Add 

jgmiF 

Men Frame 

i 

Venturalmple mentation* » 


II 




_ 

NOZZLE.GEM 



lisher uses style sheets to store formatting infor 

■ 





company can create a library of approved desigr 






them into style sheets. Every document produce 






style sheets will automatically meet minimum st 






graphic design and quality; and all documents 






public will reinforce the same image t 






We have identified potential uses in five departmen 


_ 


m 


be developed as users become more proficient 




i 


and discover new applications. 1 


□ 


l 


Accounting Department:! 

4 

□1 


0 ! 


Figure 1-33. 


II Place the corner of the cursor where you want the upper left 
corner of the frame to appear. Use the ruler to position the 
frame cursor so it lines up with the left margin of the Body 
Text and the top of the column guide (Figure 1-34.). Perfect 
accuracy is not important for this first attempt. 


Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



illI|!!POP! C:\TEIIP\1REP0RT.CHP (IMPORT.SIV) Hill 


R Pg tt 8082 


Jll 


Ventura Implementation 


|fiher uses style sheets to store formatting infoi 
company can create a library of approved desigr 
them into style sheets. Every document produce* 
style sheets will automatically meet minimum st. 
graphic design and quality; and all documents 
public will reinforce the same image. 

ye have identified potential uses in five depart men| 
be developed as users become more proficient 
and discover new applications. 


Accounting Department: 


Figure 1-34. 


It may help to position the frame if you change to Normal 
(Ctrl-N) or Enlarged (Ctrl-E) View. 

II Press and hold down the mouse button. When the cursor 
changes to a picture of a pointing finger, drag the lower 
right corner of the frame downwards and to the right mar¬ 
gin. Release the mouse button when you reach the 21-pica 
































1 - 60 


Pictures 


position on the vertical ruler and position 42 picas on the 
horizontal ruler (Figure 1-35). 



Desk 

file Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


7 ] 

II 

11 

C:\TEMP\1REP0RT.CHP (1REP0RT.S1V) 


z 



Position 21 picas 


Usher uses style sheets to store formatting information, the 
company can create a library of approved designs and code 
them into style sheets. Every document produced with these 
style sheets v.-ll au'omaticailv meet minimum standards for 


E 


Figure 1-35. 


Ventura’s column snap and line snap force the new frame to 
line up properly. Column Snap forces the frame to align with 
the margins. Line Snap, which is automatically set to Body 
Text’s inter-line spacing (14.00 fractional pts), makes the the 
frame an integer relationship to the other page elements. 

If you have a problem placing or sizing the frame use one of 
the following tips: 

• To delete a frame, select it and press the Del key (or select 
Cut Frame from the Edit menu). 

• To adjust the size of the frame, point to one of the black 
sizing buttons around the frame. Then press and hold down 
the mouse cursor until the pointing finger appears. Then 
push or pull the frame into shape. 

• To move a frame, place the cursor anywhere inside the 
frame (not on one of the sizing buttons) and hold down the 
mouse button. When the four-way arrow appears drag the 
frame to a new location. 

Add padding to the frame 

After you set the location of the frame, you should add some 
padding — extra breathing space that keeps surrounding text 




















Place the picture 


1-61 


from touching the border of the frame. In the following ex¬ 
ample, you will set vertical padding to 14.00 fractional pts — 
the standard spacing unit derived from Body Text. 

The vertical padding option places a white space buffer both 
above and below the frame. Thus, in the example above, the 
frame will have 14.00 fractional pts of padding at the top and 
14.00 fractional pts at the bottom. Text will not be allowed to 
come within 14.00 fractional pts at top or bottom. 

M With the frame still highlighted, select Sizing & Scaling 
from the Frame menu. 


SIZING 8 SCALING 


a 

Flow Text Around: 

On 


Upper Left X: 

BE 

Upper Left V: 72.00 □ FI 

Frane Width: 


Frane Height: 

Horiz. Padding: 

60.00 

Uert. Padding: 14.00| fractional pts 

Picture Scaling: 

| fit in Fraae j 

| By Scale factors ! 




Aspect Ratio: 

[ Maintained \ \ 

Distorted j 

X Crop Offset: 

oojx) Fin 

V Crop Offset: 00,00 FIR 

Scale Width: 

00.08 

Scale Height: IK!.00 



| Cancel | 


Choose fractional pts as the unit of measurement. 

Is Move to the Vert. Padding line, press Esc to clear the line, 
type: 14.00 and click OK. 

The frame now has a 14-point cushion of white space above 
and below it. 

Place the picture 

II With the new frame still selected, select the picture file 
NOZZLE.GEM from the Assignment List. 

The picture appears inside the frame (Figure 1-36). 





















1-62 


Chapter 



Figure 1-36. 


Chapter 

With text, style and picture finished, you need only complete 
the chapter portion of the report. 

Print the chapter 

The only real test of a document is how it looks on paper. In 
the chapter section of this project, you will print the report 
you just created. Then we will show you how to back it up on 
a floppy disk using Ventura’s Multi-Chapter function. 

H Press Ctrl-S to save the chapter. 

H Select To Print from the File menu. 


WARNING: If you installed PostScript as your printer for the purposes of this project, 
but you do not have a PostScript printer, use Set Printer Info to switch back to your 
original printer. Chapter Three contains a detailed explanation of the Set Printer Info 
dialog box. 


Choose Which Pages: All, Printing Order: 1st to Last. Leave 
all other settings alone. The Configuration line should 
match the default printer you selected when you installed 
Ventura. Click OK to print a single copy of the four-page 
report (Figure 1-37). 

































Back up a chapter 


1-63 


PRINT INFORMATION (POSTSCRIPT - Ultimate) |T| 

Which Pages: 

All 

From Page: 

00011 

Through Page: 

9999 

Number of Copies: 

01 

Collated Copies: 

Off 

Printing Order: 

1st to Last 

Paper Tray: 

Default 

Crop Marks: 

Off 

Spot Color Overlays: 

Off 

WultiChp, Print Files: 

Combined 

Device Name: 

POSTSCRIPT 

Output To: 

C0M1: 


KHJ 1 Cancel | 


Figure 1-37. 


Ventura displays a message that it is printing. If you need to 
cancel the printing command, press Esc. Ventura will then 
give you the choice of stopping or continuing. 

Back up a chapter 

As explained earlier, Ventura uses pointers to keep track of 
the files in a chapter. If you use DOS to back up a chapter with 
the COPY command, you will move all the files to a new 
location but the pointers will still be set to the old location. The 
chapter will load from the new location, but when the chapter 
looks for the text, style, and picture files it needs it will be 
unable to locate them. The chapter will still be looking for 
them at the old location. 

To solve this dilemma, use Multi-Chapter from the Options 
menu to back up chapters. This utility not only copies the 
files, it automatically changes the pointers to correspond to the 
new locations. 

Ventura permits you to create a publication , which can be a 
collection of many chapters. You can then copy or print all of 
the chapters in the publication with a single command. You 
will practice this skill in Chapter Three. But you don’t have to 
create a publication just to copy a single chapter. Here’s how it 
works: 

1! Place a formatted floppy disk in the A: drive. 





1 -64 


Chapter 


1! Select Multi-Chapter from the Options menu. If you 
haven’t already saved the chapter, Ventura will ask you if 
you want to Save or Abandon your changes. Choose Save. 
The Multi-Chapter dialog box appears and the name of the 
current chapter, C:\TEMP\1REP0RT.CHP is highlighted 
in the list (Figure 1-38). 


MULTI-CHAPTER OPERATIONS Q] 

liliSilliiil C:\TVPESET\imiTLED.PUB i|jr.j. I f. l\ 


C:\TEMP\1REP0RT.CHP 


| Done*^ 

Figure 1-38. 


New 

Open 

Close 


Save,,, 

Save As... 


Add Chapter*... 
Remove Chap 


Print.,, 

Hate TOC,,, 
Hate Index,,, 
ReniMier,,, 

Copy All... 


II Select Copy All. 

The Copy All dialog box appears (Figure 1-39). 


COPY ALL 



SOURCE (from this file) 
PUB or CHP: C:\TEMP\1REP0RT.CHP_ 


DESTINATION (to these directories) 


PUB & CHPs: A:\l 
STYs 8 WIDs: A:\_ 
Text Files: A:\_ 
Graphic Files: A:\_ 
Image Files: A:\_ 


Command: | Make All Directories the Same As the First* 


| OK | | Cancel | 


Figure 1-39. 
















Back up a chapter 


1-65 


The name of the chapter is displayed at the top of the dialog 
box. The destination lines show the disk drive and subdirec¬ 
tory to which each file will be copied. When you first select 
Copy All, Ventura will “guess” where you want to copy the 
files. You will change this guess to the actual destination (the 
A:\ drive). 

II Move the cursor to the line PUB & CHPs. Press Esc to clear 
the line and type: A: \ 

As you can see, you have the option to copy different kinds of 
files to different subdirectories. In this case, however, you will 
copy all the chapter files to the A:\ drive. Luckily, Ventura has 
a feature that makes it unnecessary to type A:\ on each line. 

M Choose Command: Make All Directories the Same As the 
First. Click OK. 

Ventura copies all the files to the A:\ drive. When the copy 
function is complete, you return to the Multi-Chapter dialog 
box. 

§§ Choose Done to close the Multi-Chapter dialog box. 

If Ventura asks you if you want to abandon or save changes 
made to the publication, click on Abandon to return to the 
work area. 

Once you have completed printing and backing up the chap¬ 
ter, you can go onto the next project or exit from Ventura. To 
exit: 

H Select Quit from the File menu. 

If you haven’t saved recently, Ventura will ask you if you want 
to Save or Abandon. Choose Save. 

You made it. You created a business document with Ventura. 
Although some of the new concepts and theory may have been 
tough going for beginners, you have already learned many of 
the basics — basics you will reuse again and again. Along the 
way, you made a big improvement in the appearance and 
efficiency of the sample report. 

And you can do even more to enhance basic business docu¬ 
ments. Turn to Chapter Two for more ideas and techniques for 
power publishing with Ventura. 




1 - 66 


Chapter 


Tips and techniques 


Text tips 

□ Use File Type/Rename from the Edit menu to relocate text 
files (copy them to a new subdirectory) or to convert them to 
a different word processing format. 

□ Do as much editing, changing, adding, and spell checking 
as possible in the word processor before bringing the file 
into Ventura. Text editing in Ventura is slower and less 
efficient. 


Style tips 

□ Always rename the style sheet at the beginning of the work 
session to avoid corrupting the original. 

□ To avoid confusion, many users give the style sheet the 
same name as the chapter (for instance, SAMPLE.CHP and 
SAMPLE. STY). 

□ Perform the Chapter formatting first, then move to in¬ 
dividual paragraph formatting. 

□ You will feel less confused if you concentrate on the Chap¬ 
ter, Frame, and Paragraph menus during the style phase of 
a document. 

□ Work from left-to-right and from top-to-bottom in Ventura’s 
menus to avoid overlooking important operations. 

□ When working in the Paragraph menu, focus on the Font, 
Alignment, and Spacing menus. 

□ Use Inter-Line spacing for every tag. Use Above spacing if 
necessary to provide additional separation from the preced¬ 
ing paragraph. Use Below spacing only if you cannot get the 
effect you want with Inter-Line and Above. Use Inter-Para¬ 
graph only as a last resort. 

□ If possible, make all vertical spacing an integer multiple of 
Body Text’s inter-line spacing. This applies to spacing 
above and below headlines, subheads and bullets, as well as 
to frame sizes and frame padding (white space around 
pictures). 




Back up a chapter 


1-67 


□ For faster tagging, use Shift-Click to select several para¬ 
graphs at once. 

Chapter tips 

□ Use Save As to rename (and/or relocate) the chapter at the 
beginning of every work session. Once you have renamed 
the chapter you can save it as you go along simply by 
pressing Ctrl-S. 

□ Create a separate subdirectory for each project. If the docu¬ 
ment is very large, subdivide the hard disk even further. 

□ Never use DOS copy to move chapters and associated files. 
Use Multi-Chapter so the internal pointers are changed to 
match the new location. Exception: You can use DOS to 
move files between two identically configured computers. 
For instance, you could move SAMPLE.CHP from the 
C:\TEMP subdirectory of one computer and put it on the 
C:\TEMP subdirectory of a second computer. As long as 
each and every file is found in the same location on both 
computers, the chapter will load properly on the new com¬ 
puter. 

□ You can type the new subdirectory location on the Directory 
line and move to it by pressing Enter (or clicking OK). 
However, the easiest way to navigate around the hard disk 
is with the mouse and the backup button. 




Chapter Two 
Skills Checklist 


Theory 

□ Understanding picas and points 

□ Preformatting text in your word 
processor 

□ Inserting special characters with 
bracket codes 

Text 

□ Ventura’s editing tools 

□ Adding text attributes with Text mode 

Style 

□ The benefit of a two-column page 
format 

□ Adding and changing tags 

□ Creating a title page 

□ Creating a page break tag 

□ Setting off lists with bullets 

□ Using horizontal tabs to make a table 

Pictures 

□ Placing text inside a frame 

□ Adding a ruling line around a frame 

□ Attaching captions to frames 

Chapter 

□ Print the current page 



Chapter Two 


A Two-Column Proposal 


A lthough you may not realize it yet, you have already 
acquired a solid grounding in Ventura fundamentals just 
by completing the first chapter. Chapter Two reinforces these 
basics while teaching the new skills summarized in the check¬ 
list to the left. 

Why you should not get discouraged 

This may be a good time to reassure novice users. If Ventura 
seems a bit intimidating during the first few weeks, remember 
that you are really tackling two things at once. First, you must 
learn the software, not a trivial task considering that Ventura 
is one of the most powerful packages ever written for a per¬ 
sonal computer. At the same time, you must learn about 
layout and design, a separate (and complex) discipline of its 
own. This dual struggle frustrates some beginners. The best 
solution is to keep practicing. 

After each chapter, you may want to apply what you’ve 
learned to a real-life project. If you get stuck, go back to the 
book for guidance. Remember, mastery of Ventura is a matter 
of hands-on experience over a period of time. The more docu¬ 
ments you work on, the sooner you’ll gain confidence and 
reach true proficiency. If you continue to follow along with the 
projects in the book, things will soon fall into place. 


Theory 

In this section, we will introduce you to the measuring system 
the professionals use when working with Ventura. The second 



2-2 


Theory 


half of the theory section discusses how to preformat text with 
your word processor to save production time in Ventura. 

Picas and points 

Most Americans are comfortable with inches. But for desktop 
publishing, the method called printer’s measure or the point 
system is superior. Since type sizes are always specified in 
points, it makes sense to use printer’s measure for everything 
on the page so you don’t waste time converting back and forth. 
In addition, the point system has units that are much smaller 
than inches, so it is rarely necessary to complicate things with 
fractional units. By contrast, using inches requires you to 
make many fractional computations. 

For these reasons, printer’s measure is the easiest way to talk 
to a page layout program. (Most programs let the user choose 
between inches, centimeters or printer’s measure.) The two 
most important units in printer’s measure are points and 
picas. 

Points are very small unit, about V72 inch. They are used to 
measure type sizes and rules. The point size of a typeface is 
roughly the measurement from the highest ascender (the top 
of a “b” for instance) to the lowest descender (the bottom of a 
“g”). This is only an approximation, since point sizes originate 
from the metal body used to carry type in the days before 
phototypesetting. The best way to get familiar with point sizes 
is by example. You’ll soon develop an eye for the most common 
sizes. 

Picas are a larger unit. Don’t confuse them with the 
typewriter style of the same name. They are equal to 12 points 
(about l /& inch). Printers and typographers use picas to 
measure lines, margins and columns. Table 2-1 will help you 
convert common sizes from one system to the other. 




Preparing text for Ventura 


2-3 


Table 2-1. Conversion table for common measurements. 


Inches 

Picas & Points 

Fractional Pts. 

H in. 

1 pica & points 

12 fractional pts. 

14 in. 

01,06 picas & points 
(1 pica and 6 points) 

18 fractional pts. 

VS in. 

02,00 picas & points 

24 fractional pts. 

VS in. 

03,00 picas & points 

36 fractional pts. 

1 in. 

06,00 picas & points 

72 fractional pts. 

5 VS in. 

33,00 picas & points 


8 VS in. 

51,00 picas & points 


11 in. 

66,00 picas & points 



Preparing text for Ventura 

You can make life with Ventura a lot easier if you learn how to 
prepare text files for Ventura in advance. All the sample files 
that you use for the publishing projects in this book are al¬ 
ready prepared for you, so you won’t have to worry about 
doing it now as long as you have the Power disk. Still, we want 
you to understand the theory so you can use it for files you 
create on your own. Preformatting text files can save you time 
in Ventura. 

You’ve probably heard the expression “less is more.” When 
creating text files for Ventura, however, less is less when it 
comes to inserting global formats such as indents, centering, 
page numbering, and so forth. The less you format with the 
word processor — the less formatting, the less extra spaces, 
the less extra carriage returns — the less work you will have 
when you bring the file into Ventura. At best, global format¬ 
ting from a word processor is ignored by Ventura. At worst, it 
creates extra spaces, tabs, or characters that must be manual¬ 
ly removed. 




2-4 


Theory 


** TIP: Do as little global formatting as possible with the word 
processor. Perform global formatting in Ventura instead. 

Here are some of the things you should not do with the word 
processor. Do not: 

• Center text 

• Justify text 

• Indent the first line of a paragraph 

• Create temporary (secondary) margins 

• Put more than one space after a period, colon, or 
question mark 

• Put more than one carriage return between paragraphs 

• Put more than one tab stop between columns 

As you can see, we recommend only one carriage return be¬ 
tween paragraphs. Although this reduces the time spent 
deleting extraneous returns in Ventura, it does make the file 
hard to read in the word processor. Luckily, Ventura has a 
built-in feature to handle this problem: the ©PARAFILTR ON 
= code. By using this code you can put an extra carriage return 
between paragraphs and Ventura will filter it out for you. 

The @PARAFILTR ON = code must be inserted as the very 
first line of the document and it must be typed correctly, or 
Ventura will ignore it. Make sure you place a space before and 
after the word “ON” and a space before and after the equals 
sign (Figure 2-1). 

One advantage a word processor has over Ventura’s current 
version is an easy search and replace function. For instance, 
you could use search and replace to remove all extra spaces 
after periods. Likewise, if you make a text change throughout 
a document — for example, substituting one name for another 
— do it with search and replace before starting Ventura. 

We said that ‘less is less” for global formatting. When it comes 
to formatting individual paragraphs, however, we could say 
the opposite: more is more. The more individual formatting 
you do in the text file, the more efficient you’ll be. 



Individual formatting in text files 


2-5 


!*=[••.1.2.3.4.5. ].........7 .-|| 

0PARAFILTR ON = H 

Consulting Proposal to ABC CoMpanyll I 

n 

XVZ Corporation!! I 

A 

September 1, 1989!! 
n 

Consulting Proposal to ABC Conpang!! j 

n 

Project Description!! 

!! j 

XVZ Corporation proposes to aduise ABC Ctmpany on all 
aspects of desktop H 

publishing systeMs, including needs analysis, product and 
Market surueys, specifications H 
and purchase, and systen inplenentation. Tl 
H 

The initial short-tem goal is to coMputerize the production 
of ABC's !I 

l L.. an — - - ZPROPOS. TXT=iJ| 
COMMAND: Copy Delete Format Gallery Help Insert Junp Library 

Options Print Quit Replace Search Transfer Undo Uindou 
Microsoft Uord Uersion 4.0 <S^N 034099-400-0037706) 

Pgl Co50 ° O ? CL Microsoft Uord 


Figure 2-1 . Place the @PARAFILTR ON = code as the first line of a 
document to filter out double carriage returns between paragraphs. 


Individual formatting in text files 

Individual formatting falls into two categories. The first is 
text attributes: boldface, italics, underlines, etc., when applied 
to a few words within a paragraph. The word italics in this 
sentence is an example of individual formatting (if the entire 
paragraph was in italics, it would be considered global format¬ 
ting). The second category is typographic characters. Ventura 
Publisher provides the capability to insert true typographic 
characters, including characters that don’t appear on the com¬ 
puter keyboard, such as the em dash (—), the copyright sym¬ 
bol (©), and so on. 

** TIP: You can enter text attributes and typographic characters 
with Ventura, but it’s faster with a word processor. 

Bracket codes 

Some people use the search and replace to convert standard 
keyboard characters into true typographic characters. For 
instance, after typing the text file, they search and replace 
characters such as “ or — with the bracket code that repre¬ 
sents true open (“) and closed (”) quotes and an em dash (—). 
When Ventura encounters the bracket code, it substitutes the 
correct typographic character and displays it on-screen. 











2-6 


Theory 


Other people use keyboard macros instead of search and 
replace. They program the keyboard to insert the proper 
bracket codes as they go along. Thus, they might program the 
key combination Alt-C to insert the code <189>. When Ven¬ 
tura sees this bracket code, it inserts the copyright symbol 
( © ) onto the page. Figures 2-2 and 2-3 show a coded para¬ 
graph from a word processor and the same paragraph in 
Ventura. 



Figure 2-2. Bracket codes are used to insert true typographic 
characters in Ventura. 


i"We Initially thought that desktop publishing would only have advantages for: 
tone or two departments," said President Zygniewski, "but our study revealed; 
ithat it could save time and money throughout the company while improving; 
Jhe appearance and effectiveness of cur documents.”! 

□ 


Figure 2-3. Ventura displays the bracket codes as true typographic 
characters. 














Bracket codes 


2 - 


Table 2-3 provides the proper substitutions and codes for the 
most common typographic characters not available from the 
keyboard, as well as their keyboard shortcuts (if any). You can 
use this table as a reference whether you use the search and 
replace method or the keyboard macro method. 


Table 2-3 Common Typographic Characters 






















































2-8 


Planning the proposal 


TIP: If you set Auto-Adjustments to “ and — in the Set 
Preferences dialog box (Options menu) Ventura will automat¬ 
ically convert all standard keyboard quotes (”) and hyphens 
(—) to true open and closed quotes and em dashes when it 
loads a text file. 

The next time you begin a project with Ventura, try preparing 
the text files with the guidelines we give in this chapter. Look 
through the text files in Appendix A for examples of how to 
prepare text in advance. 


Planning the proposal 

In the first chapter you prepared an in-house document. Now 
you will work on a document that you might send to a prospec¬ 
tive customer outside your company. 

The typical proposal serves as a sales document. Sometimes it 
goes to another department in the same company, or to upper 
management. Often, however, it is sent to customers. Since a 
proposal may go to the outside world, it must represent your 
company in the best light. The graphic design should work 
together with the words to reinforce the image your company 
wishes to project. 

Although we kept our example short to conserve time and disk 
space, a real-life proposal may be many pages long. It may 
also incorporate graphics and/or financial tables. The docu¬ 
ment needs headers or footers for easy reference, plus cap¬ 
tions to help readers correlate the visuals with the text. 

Take a look at the “before” and “after” pictures of the proposal. 
Here are some of the effects you will work on in this chapter to 
improve its appearance: 

• A separate title page 

• A banner headline 

• A two-column format to get more information on the page 
while enhancing readability 

• A spreadsheet file integrated with the text 



Bracket codes 


2-9 


Before 



After 


Consulting Proposal to ABC Company 


XYZ Corporation 

September 1, 1989 


Consulting Proposal to ABC Company 


Project Description 

XYZ Corporation propose* to advise 
ABC Company on all aspects of draklop 
publishing systems, including needs 
analysis, product and market surveys, 
specifications and purchase, sad system 
implementation. 

Tbs initial short-term goal is to com* 
puterize the production of ABCs internal 
and external publications using personal 
computers and deaktop publishing 
software. This dbort-term goal must be sub¬ 
stantially completed before tbe end of 
ABCs fiscal year six months from now. 
Tbe long-range objective is to integrate all 
of ABCs publications into a compmy- 
wide system with common procedures, 
databases and shared output devices. 


Statement of Work 

XYZ proposes to accomplish and com¬ 
plete this project in five phases, as 
described in more detail: 

Evaluate Needs. XYZ will gain an in- 
depth knowledge of ABCs computeriza¬ 
tion needs through on-site and telephone 
interviews. We win consider such areas as: 

• Word processing and editorial re¬ 
quirements 

• Graphics requirements 




• Laser printer requirements 

■ Ease cf learning and use 

• Speed and throughput requirement 

Market Reserck. XYZ will analyze 

suitability. Phase One will culminate in an 
in-depth report outlining alternatives and 
isoo mm a ada tiona. 

Installation. Once ABC makes it pur¬ 
chase decision, XYZ will oversee installa¬ 
tion, setup and conversion. This will in¬ 
clude integration of hardware, software and 
peripherals,plus tbe initial setup. Setup will 
include the creation of electronic formats, 
style dtccti and document templates for 
reuse by ABC personnel. 

Data Conversion. Once the system is 
installed, XYZ will supervise the convtr- 
sion of current databas e s and publications 
to an electronic form. Ibis will include the 
use of optical character recognition when¬ 
ever possible to minimize the time and ccet 
of data entry. Where it is not possible to 
optically read existing information, XYZ 
will supervise data entry personnel who 
will rekey tbe data into the computers. XYZ 
win design and implement custom key- 


rogoi 







2-10 


Ventura Prep 


Ventura Prep 



If you have the Power disk 


For the purposes of this publishing project, we will assume 
that you have prepared a text file (2PROPOS.TXT) and a 
spreadsheet file (LOTUS.TXT) in accordance with the prefor¬ 
matting tips given in the theory section. (In actual fact, the 
sample text files on the Power disk have been preformatted 
for you.) Now they are ready to be loaded into the Assignment 
List. 


Loading multiple files 

In Chapter One you learned how to load one file at a time. 

Now we will show you how to load several files at once. 

II If you are continuing from the last project, select New from 
the File menu to clear the work space. 

NOTE: You can only use the New option after you have 
opened an existing chapter. It is not available when you start 
Ventura for the first time. If you are starting from the DOS 
prompt, Ventura begins with an untitled chapter and you do not 
need to select New from the File menu. 

II Select Load Text/Picture from the File menu. 

M Select Type of File: Text, Text Format: ASCII, # of Files: 
Several, Destination: List of Files, and OK. 

M If necessary, use the Backup button to find the C:\POWER 
subdirectory. Click on the diamond to go to the POWER 
subdirectory. The Directory line should read 
C:\POWER\*.TXT. (If the Directory line reads differently, 
press ESC to clear the line, type C:\POWER\*.TXT, and 
press Enter.) 

Scroll through the listing until you see the file 

2PROPOS.TXT. Select the file by double-clicking on the name 

or by typing the name on the Selection line and pressing 

Enter. This action loads it into the Assignment List. 



Renaming the document files 


2-11 


After the first file is loaded, the Item Selector reappears and 
you can continue to load the next file. 

Ii Scroll through the file listing again to locate the text file, 
LOTUS.TXT. To return to the document select the file name 
and choose OK, or double-click on the name, which has the 
same effect. 

H Click OK to return to the work space. 

*+NOTE: From this point on, when we ask you to select an item, 
use whichever selection method you prefer—typing the name 
on the selection line, double clicking, or clicking on the name 
and then OK. 

If the Page is selected when you load a file, Ventura immedi¬ 
ately places the file on the Page. When you load several files 
at once, Ventura can’t judge which files should be placed 
where, so it doesn’t place any of them. When you are ready to 
place a file, first select the Page, then select the text file from 
the Assignment List. 

Renaming the document files 

We want you to get in the habit of renaming text files, style 
sheets, and chapters immediately to avoid making permanent 
changes to the originals. Start by renaming the text files. 

To rename the text files, you must place them one at a time 
onto the Page. Once they are placed, use File Type/Rename to 
rename them and relocate them to a different subdirectory. 

ii Select the Underlying Page. When the sizing buttons are 
visible around the border of the Page, select the text file 
name LOTUS.TXT from the Assignment List. 

Ventura places the text on the Page. Now rename and relocate 
the file. 

ii Select File Type/Rename from the Edit menu. 

^ Move to the New Name line, press ESC, and type: 
C : \TEMP\TABLE. TXT Choose ASCII and OK (Figure 2-4). 




2-12 


Ventura Prep 



Figure 2-4. 

The new file name, TABLE.TXT, appears in the Assignment 
List (Figure 2-5). 



Next you will remove the first file and place the second text 
file on the Page. 

II Select Remove Text/File from the Edit menu. 

Ventura displays the file name, TABLE.TXT in the dialog box. 
il Choose Remove from: Frame and click OK. 



























































Load and rename a style sheet 


2-13 


** TIP: You can also remove a file from the Page by selecting 
another file from the Assignment List Ventura automatically 
replaces one text file with the other. 

Now place the proposal text on the Page. 

H Select the file name 2PROPOS.TXT from the Assignment 
List. 

Rename the second text file. 

11 Select File Type/Rename from the Edit menu. 

It Move to the New Name line, press ESC to clear the line, 
and type: C : \TEMP\PROPOSAL. TXT 

It Choose ASCII and OK. 

Leave the file on the Page. 

*+NOTE: File Type/Rename works for text files only Use the 
DOS command Rename to rename picture files before or after 
the Ventura work session. 

Load and rename a style sheet 

After renaming the two text files, load the style sheet. 

M Select Load Diff. Style from the File menu. Use the Backup 
button to locate the style sheet &PRPT-P1.STY in the 
C:\TYPESET subdirectory. Then load it into the document. 

Now save the style sheet with a new name. 

§1 Select Save as New Style from the File menu. Locate the 
C:\TEMP subdirectory with the Backup button. At the 
Selection line type: 2PROPOS and click OK. 




2-14 


Ventura Prep 


ITEM SELECTOR 

Directory: C:\TEMP\*.STV_ 

Selection: 2PR0P0S|_. 


MM 

I Cancel I 


‘ *.STV 


1 REPORT .STY 


Rename and save the chapter 

Now save the new chapter with the new text and style sheet. 
i§ Select Save As from the File menu. 

H Find the C:\TEMP subdirectory. Move to the Selection line 
and type: 2PROPOS. Click OK. 


If you do not have the Power disk 


^ Use your favorite word processor to type in the two text 
files PROPOSAL.TXT and TABLE.TXT from Appendix A. 
Save them (or copy them) in the C:\TEMP subdirectory. 
Then follow the steps explained above to load the text files, 
and to load and rename the style sheet and chapter files. 


*+NOTE: If you want, you can use any text file in place of the 
ones we include in Appendix A. However, it will be harder to 
follow along and match your screen with our sample illustra¬ 
tions unless you use the same text 

Now that you’ve organized the chapter files, you are ready to 
begin. Where to start? As you know from the previous chapter, 
the Ventura Formula (Text + Style + Pictures = Chapter) 
helps with that question. As always, therefore, you will begin 
with text. 

















Ventura’s editing tools 


2-15 


Text 

Ventura’s editing tools 

Although it is usually easier to edit large sections of text with 
a word processor, Ventura provides a text editing toolkit for 
last-minute changes. You can cut, copy, and paste text or 
change the attributes of selected words within a paragraph. 

Change text attributes 

Before you begin, check to make sure the zero point is set 
correctly. Click once on the 0,0 square in the upper left corner 
of the Page. You may also want to use Normal or Enlarged 
View so you can easily position the text cursor. 

is Enable Text mode (click on the Text mode button in the 
Mode Selector). When you click on the work space, the 
mouse cursor turns into an “ I-beam” (Figure 2-6). 



When you enable Text mode, Ventura displays attributes — 
Normal, Bold, Italic, Small, and so forth — in the Assignment 
List and the words Set Font in the Addition Box. 

In Chapter One you changed the font using Paragraph mode. 
But as you can see, Ventura also allows you to change text 
attributes in Text mode. What’s the difference? 





















2-16 


Text 


*+ TIP: Use Text mode to change one or two words within a 
paragraph. Use a paragraph tag to change the text attributes 
of an entire paragraph. 

Let’s use Ventura’s text-editing tools to italicize several key 
words in the proposal. The italics will add emphasis and set 
them off from the rest of the paragraph. To italicize the text, 
first select the text then select the attribute. 

^ Change to Normal (Ctrl-N) or Enlarged View (Ctrl-E). 

II Move the cursor in front of the “M” in the word “Market 
Research” near position 38 picas on the vertical ruler. Press 
and hold the mouse button as you drag the cursor to the end 
of the word “Research.” The selected text appears in reverse 
video. Release the mouse button (Figure 2-7). 


Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


C:\TEMP\2PR0P0S.CHP (2PR0P0S.STV) i 


; 

et Font 

t 

* 

Nornol 

laid 

Italic 

Small 

Superscript 

Subscript 

Underline 

Double UndrLn 

Strike-thru 

Overscare 

Upper Case 


|T 

Pg g 8891 l 

3 

"m 


: pCYZ proposes to accomplish and complete this project in five phases, as described ir more: 
: detail! 


. Phase 

[One will culminate in an in-depth report outlining alternatives and recommendations II 
«; [Phase Two! 

[Evaluate Heeds XYZ will gain an in-depth knowledge of ABC's computerization reeds 
[through on-site and telephone interviews We will consider such areas as! 

[Word processing and editorial requirements!! 

;Graphicsrequirements! 

: [Laser printer requirements! 




Figure 2-7. 


*+NOTE: The traditional rule is not to italicize punctuation. 
Therefore, try not to select periods and commas when italiciz¬ 
ing (or bolding) a phrase. 

Now make the text italic. 

I! Select Italic from the Assignment List. The words “Attr. 
Setting” appear in the Current Selection Box (Figure 2-8). 


















































In Ventura, however, the markers are invisible on the screen. 
Nevertheless, you can locate them using the left and right 
arrow keys and the Current Selection Box at the bottom of the 
Side-Bar. 























2-18 


Text 


** NOTE: Ventura places the hidden text attributes immediately 
before and after the word or phrase that was italicized, bolded, 
underlined, etc. 

11 Place the cursor between the “M” and the “a” in Market 
Research and click once. Press the left arrow key on your 
keyboard several times until the words “Attr. Setting” ap¬ 
pear in the Current Selection Box. This shows the location 
of the hidden marker. 

*+ NOTE: To remove the text attributes, select the text then select 
Normal from the Assignment List. Or, use the arrow key to find 
the hidden marker (the words "Attr. Settings” appear in the 
Current Selection Box) and press the Del key. 

Dragging the mouse is one way to select text. However, there 

is a more accurate way called the “Shift-Click” method. 

!! Place your text cursor before the “E” of “Evaluate Needs” 
(two paragraphs down from “Market Research” near posi¬ 
tion 44 picas on the vertical ruler) and click once. While 
holding down the Shift key, move the text cursor to the end 
of the phrase (after the “s”) and click again. Now release the 
Shift key. 

!1 Now select Italic from the Assignment List. 

*+NOTE: You can change the amount of text selected by moving 
the cursor to another position and clicking again while holding 
down the Shift key. You can move forward or backward. 

11 Press PgDn to go to the next page and scroll to the top of the 
page. 

H Use the Shift-Click method to select the three following 
phrases and make them italic as explained above: “Installa¬ 
tion,” “Data Conversion,” and “Training and Implementa¬ 
tion.” 

When you are finished applying text attributes, your screen 

should look like Figure 2-10: 




Edit text 


2-19 



Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


lillSflililiiiiilli C:\TEMP\2PROPOS.CHP (2PROPOS.S1Y) figjljilllilliilljlll 


NorHOl 

told 

Italic 

SfMll 

Superscript 
Subscript 
Underline 
Double Uhlan] 
Strike-thru 
Overscore 


: Instillation. Ore? ABC makes il purchase decision, XYZ will oversee installation, setup] 
]and conversion. This will include integration of hardware, software and peripherals, plus; 
ithe initial setup Setup will include the creation of electronic formats, style sheets and; 
idocument templates for reuse by ABC personnel,! 

•Phase Pour! 

[Data Conversion Once thesystem isinstalled, XYZ will supervise the conversion of current: 
databases and publications to an electronic form. This will include the use of optical character: 
recognition whenever possible to minimize the time and cost of data entry. Where it is not; 
jpossibleto optically read existing information, XYZ will supervise data entry personnel who; 
iwill rekey the data into the computers. XYZ will design and implement custom keyboard; 
macro programs to facilitate data enfry.! 






Upper Cue 





: ’'.Training an/ Implementation. With the system up and running and data converted tec 


L Pg # 8002 

; electronic form, XYZ will train ABC personnel in proper computer procedures, use of the; 

i 

♦1 ' 

Iflilll* 

K 


Figure 2-10. 


Edit text 


Now use Ventura’s cut and paste tools to rearrange the copy in 
the proposal. It works like this: First you select the text you 
want (by dragging or by using the Shift-Click method). With 
the text highlighted, you then select Cut Text or Copy Text 
from the Edit menu. After you cut or copy text, Ventura stores 
it in temporary memory, called the Text Clipboard. To insert 
text from the Clipboard onto the page, select Paste Text from 
the Edit menu. 

*+ TIP: Use keyboard shortcuts to speed text editing. Press Del to 
cut, press Shift-Del to copy, and press Ins to paste. 

H Press PgUp or Home to go back to page one. Select the 
paragraph starting with “Market Research” as shown 
below. Make sure you include the end of paragraph mark 
(1) in the text selection by dragging the cursor down to the 
beginning of the next paragraph (Figure 2-11). 

** NOTE: If the paragraph symbol is not displayed on-screen, 
select Show Tabs & Returns from the Options menu (or press 
Ctrl-T). 











































2-20 


Text 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


C:\TEMP\2PROPOS.CHP (2PR0P0S.STV) 


ID 

jggFextg 

I ME3B5BH 


ffll 


Statement of Work! i 

iXYZ proposes to accomplish and complete this project in five phases, as described in more; 
detail:! 


I Market Research XYZ will analyze commercially available products for suitability. Phascj 
One will culminate in an in-depth recoil outlining alternatives and recommendations, til 


•yjjhaselwc! j 

j Evaluate Needs XYZ will gain an in-depth knowledge of ABC's computerization needs: 
ithrough on-site and telephone interviews We will consider such areas as:! • 

4jj|Word processing and editorial requirements! 


Figure 2-11. 

H Press the Del key. 

^ NOTE: If you delete the wrong text, press the Ins key immedi¬ 
ately to paste the text back on the page. Then try again. 

The text is cut from the document and placed on the Clip¬ 
board. Now you can paste it into a new location: 

11 Place the cursor before the word “Evaluate.” Click the cur¬ 
sor once. 

il Press the Ins key (Figure 2—12). 


Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


C:\TEMP\2PROPOS.CHP (2PRDP0S.STY) 


Market Research XYZ will analyze commercially available products for suitability, 
One will culminate in an in-depth report outlining alternatives and recommendations 


valuate Needs XYZ will gain an in-depth knowledge of ABC's computerization needs 
■through on-site and telephone interviews We will consider such areas as:! : 


QjgHjaM I 


•Word processing and editorial requirements! 
iGraphicsrequirements! 


Figure 2-12. 




























Edit text 


2-21 


*+NOTE: Text remains in the clipboard until something else is cut 
or copied. 

^ Select the text starting with “Evaluate Needs” and ending 
with “Speed and throughput requirements” as shown in 
Figure 2-13. (Be sure to include the end of paragraph mark 
in your selection. If you have trouble, move the cursor down 
below the line and to the beginning of the next paragraph.) 



Figure 2-13. 


Press the Del key. 

Now paste the text back into the document below the para¬ 
graph “Phase One.” 

H Place the cursor in front of the “P” of “Phase Two” and press 
Ins. 

After you rearrange the text, click once anywhere on the work 
space to deselect the text. Your screen should look similar to 
Figure 2-14: 

*+NOTE: Do not be concerned if the italics change or disappear 
during cut and paste. Sometimes when you move text in a 
document, you also move a text attribute. Use Normal and 
Italic from the Assignment List to get the text looking the way 
you want again. 






































2-22 


Style 



Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


iilfilliiiiilllillii! c :\te«p\2propos . cup apropos . siv) 


Set Font 


Italic 

snoll 

Superscript 
Subscript 
underline 
|Double UrtdrLnj 
Strike-thru 
Overscpre 


I 

Upper Case 1 

r 

I 

EEHSII 

□1111 

m 


JhiseOno! 

Evaluate Heeds XYZ will gab an in-depth knowledge of ABC’s computerization needs: 
through on-site and telephone interviews We will consider such areas as:! 

Word processing and editorial requirements!! 

Graphics requirements!! 

L aser printer requirements!! 

JEase of learning and usel! 

Speed and throughput requirements! 

•Phase Two! 

~\-MaiietReseaich XYZ will analyze commercially available products for suitability. Phase; 

■iirill mlroinatn in *r. in-dnnth rnnnri ruillininn altnrrvaHura and tnnnn\rr>f>!vi.>liiwg.ft. 1 - * 

. - I r 


Figure 2-14. 


Nice work. With just a little practice, you’ve learned the basics 
of text editing. 


Style 

You will begin the style portion of this project by completing 
the chapter layout. Then you will add tags to a style sheet and 
use a special tag named Page Break to isolate text on a page. 
These steps may save you some of the mistakes and confusion 
we experienced as first-time Ventura users. 

Page layout strategy 

Let’s take a moment to review the formatting strategy we 
introduced in Chapter One, a strategy that helps you stay on 
course when working on the style of a document. First you 
make the global changes to the chapter. Then you tag in¬ 
dividual paragraphs, starting with Body Text. As you make 
changes, you step through the menus from left to right, and 
from top to bottom. 

Change the page layout 

si Select Page Size & Layout from the Chapter menu. Choose 
Sides: Single and Start On: Right Side. Click OK. 
















Build the footer 


2-23 


Build the footer 


Next, build a footer that includes the name of the proposal and 
the page number. 

§1 Select Headers & Footers from the Chapter menu. 

H Choose Define: Right Page Footer, Usage: On. Move to the 
Left line and type: ABC Proposal 

^ Move to the Right line and type: Page followed by a space. 
Then choose the Inserts: Page # button. The [P#] code 
appears on the line, instructing Ventura to insert page 
numbers in the footer. Click OK to close the dialog box. 


HEADERS R FOOTERS \J} 


Define: | Left Page Header | 

| Right Page Header | 


| Left Page Footer | 



Usage: E9 l~orf~| 
Left: ABC Proposal 


Center: _ 

Right: Page [P#]|. 


Inserts: 


| Chapter ~5~| | Page tt | | 1st Hatch"] | Last Match | 

| Text Attr~1 [ Copy To Facing Page") 

HOI | Cancel | 


Now turn off the footer for the first page only. 

Verify that you are on page one. If not, press Home. 

P Select Turn Footer Off from the Chapter menu. 

Change to two-column format 

After making the footer, you’re ready to change the page 
margins and columns. As we explained earlier, a two-column 
page layout lets you fit more text on a page and enhance its 
readability. When you change from one to two-column format, 
watch how easily Ventura reflows the text. 


1 Enable Frame mode. 




2-24 


Style 


II Click the cursor anywhere on the work space to select the 
Underlying Page. 

!1 Select Margins & Columns from the Frame menu. Choose # 
of Columns: 2. Make the top and bottom margins 06,00 
picas & points and the left and right margins 07,06 picas & 
points. Do not press OK yet. 

After you set the page margins, you enter the column and 
gutter widths. To make the columns equal widths, enter the 
first column width, then enter the gutter width (the space 
between columns), then choose Make Equal Widths. Do things 
in this order to ensure that Ventura accurately calculates the 
columns. 


*+NOTE: The Make Equal Widths button does not stay high¬ 
lighted after you choose it. 

11 Move to the Column 1 line, press Esc to clear the line, and 
type: 1700 

il Move to the first line of the Gutters column, press Esc and 
type: 0200 

H Choose Make Equal Widths. Click OK. 


MARGINS 8 COLUMNS 

# of Columns: m h m m s s m ra 
Settings For: | Left Page | 


m 


Right Page 



Widths 

Gutters 

Margins 

Column 1: 

17,00 

02,00 

00,00 

00,00 

00,00 

00,00 

00,00 

Top: 06,00 picas 8 points 

2: 

17,00 

Bottom: 06,00 

3: 

H0,BB 

Left: 07,06 

4: 

5: 

6: 

7: 

ee,Be 

Right: 07,06 

Calculated Width = 51,83 

8: 


Actual Frame Width = 51,00 


Inserts: 1 hake Equal Widths"! | Copy To Facing Page | 

_Bag ' 


Cancel 








Turn column balance on 


2-25 


Turn column balance on 

To balance the text in adjacent columns, turn Column Balance 
on in the Chapter Typography dialog box. Without Column 
Balance on, Ventura fills the first column with text before 
starting the second. With Column Balance on, Ventura fills 
both columns equally. (You will notice the effects of column 
balance on page two.) 

m Select Chapter Typography from the Chapter menu. 
Choose Column Balance: On and click OK. 


CHAPTER (DEFAULT) TVPOGRAPHV SETTINGS [7] 

Widows (Min Lines at Top): 

2 

Orphans (Min Lines at Bottom): 

2 

Column Balance: 

On 

Move Down To 1st Baseline By: 

Cap Height 

Pair Kerning: 

On 


Cancel 


Modifying individual tags 

Since there are no more overall changes to make, you can 
begin to tag individual paragraphs. Start with Body Text, 
because its inter-line spacing is the basis for all other tags. 
Once you complete Body Text, proceed systematically through 
the document from top to bottom. You can achieve most of the 
effects you want with the Font, Alignment, and Spacing op¬ 
tions in the Paragraph menu. In this section, you will build up 
your tagging repertoire by learning about the Breaks menu. 
But first let’s modify the Body Text tag. 

Change the Body Text tag 

The only change you need to make to Body Text is in the 
Alignment dialog box. 





2-26 


Style 


H Enable Paragraph mode. 

H Select the paragraph that begins “XYZ Corporation 
proposes to advise...” (Figure 2-15). 



Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


lill!iSilSl!IillI«i|;! C:\TEMP\2PR0P0S.CHP (2PROPOS.STY) . 




September 1,1983 

Consulting Proposal to ABC Company 


iProject Description 


YZ Corporation proposes to advise ABC 
ompany on all aspects of desktop publish- 
ng systems, including needs analysis, 
product and market surveys, spejfications 
nd purchase, and system implementation. 


Jhemitialshort-teimgoaiisto computerize; 

Jhe production of ABC's internal and exter-! 

rial publications using personal computers: 

land desktop publishing software. This; 

short-term goal must be substantially com-; 

pleted before the end of ABC's fiscal year; 


Speed and throughput retp 
Bhase Two 

'•tfaiietKeswick XYZ w| 

jmertially available producj 

jPhase One wiD culminati 

ireport outlining altemati' 

imendations. 

Bhase Three 

Instilhtion, Once ABC m 
decision, XYZ will over 

setup and conversion. Thi: 

iegration of hardware, 

peripherals, plus the initial 

include the creation of eld 


E 


Figure 2-15. 


The tag name Body Text appears in the Current Selection 
Box. Make the following changes: 

H Alignment 

In/Outdent Width: 01,00 picas & points 


*+NOTE: Ventura measures indents from the left margin of the 
column, not the left edge of the page. 

II Spacing 

Inter-Line: 14.00 fractional pts 
Inter-Paragraph: 00.00 fractional pts 


Change the tags on the title page 

Now that you’ve finished changing the Body Text tag, you can 
change the other tags on the title page of the proposal. 

II Select the first paragraph “Consulting Proposal to ABC 
Company” and tag it as Title (Figure 2-16). 









































Change the tags on the title page 


2-27 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



i!!i!l!lililli!l!l!i C:\TEHP\2PROPOS.CHP (2PR0P0S.STV) Iljljilf jiSlljBgiljlijl 


JL 


Miff 


jBIS 


XYZ Corporation 
September 1,1989 

Consulting Proposal to ABC Company 
Project Description 

XYZ Corporation proposes to adviser 
ABC Company on all aspects of desktop; 
publishing systems, including needs 
analysis, product and market surveys, 
specifications and purchase, and system; 
implementation 


i Phase Three 
• Instillation. Once ABj: 
ichase decision,XYZ will 
tion, setup and conversiol 
;dudeintegra1ion of hardwf 
peripherals, plus the initial 
include the creation of el^ 
istyle sheets ard documei 
reuse by ABC personnel. 

; Phase Four 
: Data Conversion. Orel 
installed, XYZ will super) 
isior of current databases 
Jto an olofifanwlc^cuacuXb ij 


Figure 2-16. 


*+ TIP: If you tag the wrong paragraph, just retag it as Body Text 
and select again. 

The current format of the Title tag is part of the original style 
sheet you loaded at the beginning of this project. Now you will 
modify its design to better suit the new page design. You will 
make the Title tag stand out on the page by centering it 
frame-wide, enlarging its type size, and adding extra space 
above and below. When you are finished the paragraph will 
look like Figure 2-17. 



Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 

111111111110:\TEMP\MaP0S7CHP"(2PR0PQS~. §W) ' * _=' I ♦ I 


I R Pg 8881 

I <■ iiiiir 


Consulting Propoialito ABC Company | 


XYZ Corporation 
September 1,1989 

Consulting Proposal lo ABC Company j 
Project Description 
XYZ Corporation proposes to advise; 
ABC Company on all aspects of desktop; 


Speed and throughput requirements 
Phase Iwo 
Market Desearch XYZ will analyze!: 
commercially available products fo i 
suitability. Phase One will culminate in art ; 
in-depth report outlining alternatives and; 


Figure 2-17. 








































2-28 


Style 


Face: Times 
Size: 024.0 points 

Overall Width: Frame-Wide 

Above: 98.00 fractional pts 
Below: 28.00 fractional pts 
Inter-Line: 28.00 fractional pts 

A note about spacing: In Chapter One we said that (1) you 
should avoid using Inter-Paragraph spacing and (2) you can 
do without Below spacing about 75% of the time. The Title tag, 
however, is an exception to the rule. Because it is a banner 
headline — a headline that stretches across two or more 
columns — it usually requires extra space below to separate it 
from the following text. 

After changing the attributes of the Title tag, apply it to the 
next paragraph. 

$$ Select the paragraph “XYZ Corporation” and tag it as Title 
(Figure 2-18). 


Font 


Alignment 

Spacing 



Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


MiBBlllllllllllll C:\TEMP\2PROPOS.CHP (2PR0P0S.STV) 


Consulting Proposal 


to ABC Company 


E533HB 


September 1,1969 

Consulting Proposal to ABC Company 


Enltiate Weeds XYZ will gain an in-j 
jicptli knowledge of ABC's computeriza-i 




Figure 2-18. 


Add a new tag 

f 

The next paragraph to tag is the date. To make it better match 
the Title tag, you will center it frame-wide and make it 12- 
point Times Bold. Since there are no tags in the Assignment 
List with these attributes, you will add a new tag. 


































Add a new tag 


2-29 


To make a new tag, Ventura copies the attributes from an 
existing tag to the new one. Then you add or subtract at¬ 
tributes to the new tag name until you get the right effect. 
Here are the steps to add a new tag. 

1. Enable Paragraph mode. 

2. Select a paragraph with attributes similar to the tag you 
want to add. 

3. Select Add New Tag from the Side-Bar. 

4. Type in the name of the new tag. 

5. Go through the Paragraph menus and add or subtract 
attributes to achieve the right effect. 

Don’t worry if this sounds confusing at first. You will get the 
hang of it as soon as you work through a few examples. So let’s 
get started. Create a tag named “BodyCenter” and apply it the 
date paragraph. 

li Select the paragraph “September 1 , 1989.” 

H Select Add New Tag from the Side-Bar. 

H Move to Tag Name to Add and type: BodyCenter and click 
OK to close the dialog box. 



Ventura copies the attributes of Body Text — its Font, its 
Alignment, its Spacing, etc. — to the new tag. 




2-30 


Style 


Modify the new tag 

Now that you’ve added a new tag, you can change its at¬ 
tributes. Simply work through the Paragraph menu from top 
to bottom until you achieve the right effect. 

H Font Style: Bold 

11 Alignment Horz. Alignment: Center 

Overall Width: Frame-Wide 
In/Outdent Width: 00,00 picas & points 

^ Spacing Add in Above: When Not at Column Top 

Add a page break 

With the first three paragraphs tagged, the title page is com¬ 
plete. Now you must separate the title page text from the rest 
of the document. To do this you use a special Page Break tag. 
The Page Break tag includes a Page Break: After (Breaks 
menu) that pushes everything after it onto a new page. The 
Page Break tag was already defined in the original style sheet 
with the Breaks options from the Paragraph menu. 

Here’s how to use the Page Break tag to create a separate title 
page. 

Make sure that Show Tabs & Returns is turned on from the 
Options menu (the menu will read “Hide Tabs & Returns”). 
This allows you to see an on-screen display of all the text 
symbols (tabs, returns, line breaks, etc.). 

H Enable Text mode. Place the text cursor after the “9” in the 
word “1989.” The words “Paragraph End” appear in the 
Current Selection Box. Now press the Enter key once. This 
action creates an empty paragraph, that is, a paragraph 
containing an end of paragraph symbol (1) and no text 
(Figure 2-19). 



Add a page break 


2-31 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



lll«8IllIllillHli|||j C:\TEMP\2PROPOS.taff (gPftOPQS.STVl ilBiailllllliilllillijfg 


XYZ Cojfpbration! 


September 

j I 

Consulting Proposal (o ABC Company!; 
Project Description! j 

XYZ Corporation proposes to advise; 
iABC Company on all aspects of desktop; 
publishing systems, including needs; 
•analysis, product and market surveys,; 
specifications and purchase, and system; 
implementation I 


Ij, 198911 

j Evaluate Feeds. XYZ will gain an in-| 
depth knowledge cf ABC's computeriza-j 
lion needs through on-site and telephone- 
interviews. Wewill consider such areas as:!j 
: Word processing and editorial require-; 
fnentsl 

Craphicsrequireraentsl 
Laser printer requirements! 


pu 


Figure 2-19. 


** TIP: You can apply tags to empty paragraphs as well as to text 

Now tag the empty paragraph as Page Break, just as you 
would tag any other paragraph. 

II Enable Paragraph mode. 

i§ Select the empty paragraph (click on the symbol) and tag 
it as Page Break (Figure 2-20). 



Figure 2-20. 


The remaining text is pushed on to the second page. To under¬ 
stand this effect, leave the empty paragraph highlighted and 




































2-32 


Style 


select Breaks from the Paragraph menu. There you see that 
the Page Break: After option was specified (Figure 2-21). 


"Page Break" BREAKS 

Page Break: 1 Ho 1 | Before 


0 


Before 8 After 


1 Before/Until Left] [ Before/Until Right 
Colunn Break: (JQI 1 Before | [ After | [ Before 8 After 
Line Break: | No] E3S3I I After 1 | Before 8 After 


Next V Position: 

Allow Within: 
Keep With Next: 


Beside Last Line of Prev. Para 


Htol 

es | HQ| 


Cancel 


Figure 2-21. 


The page break effect is an important one. Use the Page Break 
tag whenever you want to start text on a new page. Try to 
avoid the common mistake of entering a string of carriage 
returns to force text to another page (Figure 2-22). 



tesk File 

Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


il 



♦ 




t 

IS 




i 

Ijpx.jj 



■ 


XYZ Corporation! 


rr 




V 


3 — : 


■ 

Italic 

September 1,19891 

■ 

■ 

Small 

I 

1 

■ 

Superscript 

I 


■ 

Subscript 

I 

R 

■ 

Underline 

3£ i I 

1 

■ 

Double Undrln 

( 

■ 

m 

Strike-thru 

1 

n 

n 

overscore 

* 

. 

11 

Upper Cose 

; * 

1 


1 

n 

U2EKZJI 

1 

D 

□ 

msm 


□ 


Figure 2-22. Wrong. To create a page break, use a page break tag — 
not a string oi carriage returns. 


This is not the right way to make a page break. If you later 
add text, or change the attributes of a tag, some of the extra 
carriage returns will “float” onto the next page causing every- 


















Add a page break 


2-33 


thing in the document to be pushed out of place. Remember to 
use the Page Break tag instead. 




Stopping point 


You have finished page one and reached a stopping point for 
Chapter Two. Continue on to page two if time permits. If not, 
you may wish to save the chapter, then print out page one. 
Check that your document matches Figure 2-23. 







2-34 


Style 


Apply a tag to multiple paragraphs 

If you are beginning fresh, open the chapter 
C:\TEMP\2PROPOS.CHP and start from where you left off. 

Go to page two to continue tagging. 

H Press PgDn to go to page two 

§1 Tag the paragraph “Consulting Proposal to ABC Company” 
as Title. 

Next you will change the Head level 1 tag. Since there are 
several Head level 1 tags on the same page, you can use the 
“Shift-Click” selection method to tag multiple paragraphs at 
one time. 

II Select the paragraph “Project Description.” 

^ While holding down the Shift key, select the paragraph 
“Statement of Work.” Tag both paragraphs as Head level 1 
(Figure 2-24). 


Des k F ile 

iliil 


Edit View Chapter Franc Paragraph Graphic Options 


iliillill! C:\TEMP\2PR0P0S.CHP (2PROPOS.STV) [j ♦ 




Odd Men Tag 


Body Text 
BodyCenttr 
Bullet 
Chanje Bar 
Heed level I 

P«9C Break 
Title 
Z..COPTION 
Z_FOOTtR 
Z_HE0DCR 
Z.LABEL FIS 


MULTIPLE 


R Pg h 0002 


reject Desaiifcrl 


XYZ Corporation proposes to adviser 
ABC Company on all aspects of desktops 
publishing systems, including needs 
analysis, product and market surveys,; 
Notification* and purchase, and system: 
Implementation.!! ; 

i The initial short-term goal is to cora-j 
puterize the production of ABC's internal: 
and external publications using personal’; 
computers and desktop publishing; 
software, This short-term goal must be sub-; 
stantially completed before the end of; 
ABC's fiscal year six months from now.; 
The long-range objective is to integrate alii 
;«f ABC's publications into a company-; 
wide system with common procedures,; 
databases and shared output devices.! i 


Statement of Woikl! 


i Muie/ Research XYZ will analyze 
commercially available products fori 
suitability. Phase One will culminate in an; 
jirdepth report outlining alternatives and; 
recommendations.!! ; 

i Phase Three I! 

j InstilMon Once ABC makes it pur¬ 
chase decision, XYZ will oversee installs-; 
jtion, setup and conversion This will inti 
jeludeintegration of hardware, software and; 
peripherals, plus the initial setup. Setup will; 
include the creation of electronic formats,; 
style sheets and document templates fori 
Arise by ABC personneLfl 
; Phase Pour!! 
i Dili Conversion Once the system is 
installed, XYZ will supervise the conver-i 
sion of current databases and publications! 
to an electronic form This will include the! 


EK 


Figure 2-24. 


Change the Head level 1 tag 

With the two paragraphs still highlighted, change the tag. 
First remove the ruling line below that was specified in the 
original style sheet, then change its Font, Alignment, Spacing, 
and Breaks. 









































Change the Head level 1 tag 


2-35 


Select Ruling Line Below from the Paragraph menu. 
Choose Width: None and click OK. 


"Head level 1" RULING LINES BELOW 

m 

Width: 

None 





Color: 

Black 





Pattern: 

Solid 





Dashes: 

Off 










36.00 

Space Above Rule 1: 

00.00 





Height of Rule 1: 

01.98 

Custom Indent: 

00.00 

LuL 

* j 

Space Below Rule 1: 

00.00 

Custom Width: 

00.00 



Height of Rule 2: 

00.00 





Space Below Rule 2: 

00.00 

Dash Width: 

00.00 



Height of Rule 3: 

00.00 

Dash Spacing: 

00.00 

fractional ptsl 

Space Below Rule 3: 

00.00 

l *\i -j 




Overall Height: 

01.98 








■ 

S. 

Cancel| 


11 Font Face: Times 

Size: 018.0 points 

H Alignment Horz. Alignment: Center 

II Spacing Above: 28.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 28.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: When Not at Column Top 

When you are finished, the tag should look like Figure 2-25: 

To keep Head level 1 from becoming isolated at the bottom of 



Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


C:\IEMP\2PROPOS.CHP (2PR0P0S.STV) 


Consulting Proposal to ABC Company! 


Project Description! 

XYZ Corporation proposes to advise: 
ABC Company on all aspects of desktop 
publishing systems, including needs 
Analysis, product and market surveys,: 
specifications and purchase, and system- 
implementation! i 


Ease of learning and use! : 

Speed and throughput requirements! • 
Phase Two! i 

Market Research XYZ will analyze 
commercially available products for: 
suitability. Phase One will culminate in art 
jn-depth report outlining alternatives and- 
recommendations.! : 


■D 

m 

























2-36 


Style 


a column or page, use the Breaks option Keep With Next. 
Keep With Next guarantees that a tag stays next to the para¬ 
graph that follows it. 

H Select Breaks from the Paragraph menu. Choose Keep 
With Next: Yes and click OK. 


"Head level 1" BREAKS 
Page Break: 


□ 


Before After Before 8 After 



| Before/Until Left| iBefore/Until Right 
Column Break: [ Before | [ After j | Before 8 After 

Line Break: [ No | | After | | Before 8 After 

hext V Position: 

Allow Within: 

Keep With Next: 


Beside Last Line of Prev. Para 


Cancel 


^ NOTE: Headlines, headings, and subheads should have Keep 
With Next set to Yes to keep them from becoming isolated at 
the bottom of a page or column. 

The Head level 2 tag 

Now tag each paragraph on page one that begins with the 
word “Phase” as Head level 2. You may want to change to 
Reduced View so that all four paragraphs are visible at once. 

H Select the first paragraph “Phase One.” Then use Shift- 
Click to select the paragraphs, “Phase Two,” “Phase Three,” 
“Phase Four.” and “Phase Five” (Figure 2-26). Tag them as 
Head level 2. (If you select the wrong paragraph, simply 
click on it again to deselect it.) 







Change Head level 2 tag 


2-37 



Figure 2-26. 

^ NOTE: Because of the above spacing in the Head level 2 tag, 
the phrase “Phase Five" will move to the next page as soon as 
it is tagged. 

Change Head level 2 tag 

Now change the attributes of the Head level 2 tag. 

H Font Face: Times 

II Spacing Above: 14.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 14.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: When Not at Column Top 

Like Head level 1, Head level 2 includes a Break: Keep With 
Next to prevent it from becoming isolated at the bottom of a 
page or column. 

H Breaks Keep with Next: Yes 

Check that the tag you just completed looks like Figure 2-27. 

Select the Bullet tags 

The next tag you encounter is the Bullet tag. You will make 
the bullet size larger and you will reduce the Above and In 
From Left Spacing. 


































































2-38 


Style 



Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


iiillllliljiiiHiiBiH I C:\1EMP\2PROPOS.CHP (2PROPOS.STY) — j—M ♦ 


Add Hew Tag 


Body Text 
BodyCenter 
Bullet 
Chanje Bar 
Heed level 
Heed level 2 
Peje BreaU 
Title 
Z..C&PTIOH 
Z..FOOTER 
ZJIEftOER 
Z_LABEL FIG 


R Pg 8 8802 


computers snd desktop publishing: 
software. This short-term goal must he subrj 
stantially completed before the end ofj 
3 i^ jABC's fiscal year six months from now^ 
Ihe long-range objective is to integrate alt 
of ABC's publications into a company-; 
wide system with common procedures, 
databases and shared output devices.I 


Statement of Work! 

XYZ proposes to accomplish and com-j 
jrlete this project in five phases, asi 
described in more detailrf 

iPhaseOnelf 

Evaluate Needs. XYZ will gain an irrj 

I Honth VniMifloitcc r,l A TV”. COmiUllfliaXa: 


pEhase Three! 

; Installation Once ABC makes it pur 
ichasedeci$ion,XYZ will oversee install* 
jion, setup and conversion. This will in-i 
icludeintegration of hardware, software and; 
peripherals,plusthe initial setup. Setup will: 
include the creation of electronic formats, 
style sheets and document templates fori 
peuse by ABC personnelII 

Thase Tourlf 

: Data Conversion Once the system isj 
installed, XYZ will supervise the conver¬ 
sion of current databases and publications! 
lo an electronic form. This will include the 
juse of optical character recognition when-j 
jever possible to minimize the time and cost; 
jef data entry. Where it is not possible td 
imli ca lhi re»H evistine i nf<um a Ii<n .., Xy7? 


Figure 2-27. 


H Select the following five bullet paragraphs using the Shift- 
Click method and tag them as Bullet. 

“Word processing and editorial requirements” 

“Graphic requirements” 

“Laser printer requirements” 

“Ease of learning and use” 

“Speed and throughput requirements” 


** TIP: /Is long as you keep the Shift key depressed, you can 
scroll up and down the page to select multiple paragraphs. 
Select the first bullet at the bottom of the first column, hold 
down the Shift key, then scroll to the top of the second column 
and select the rest of the bullets. 


Change the Bullet tag 

With the paragraphs still highlighted, you can change the 
attributes. 

11 Spacing Above: 00.00 fractional pts 

Below: 00.00 fractional pts 
Inter-Line: 14.00 fractional pts 
Add in Above: When Not at Column Top 
In From Left: 01,00 picas & points 




























Increase the Bullet size 


2-39 


*+NOTE: If you tend to confuse Spacing/In From Left with Align¬ 
ment/Indent, remember this rule of thumb: Alignment/Indent 
affects only the first few lines of a paragraph. Spacing/In From 
Left affects every line. 

^ Breaks Keep With Next: No 

Setting the Keep With Next option to No allows Ventura to 
split a list of bullets across a column or a page. Otherwise, if 
the list is too long, Ventura pushes all the bullets to the next 
column or page, leaving a big, empty gap in the document. 

Increase the Bullet size 

To change the size of the bullet itself, use the Special Effects 
dialog box in the Paragraph menu. 

^ Select Special Effects from the Paragraph menu. Choose 
Set Font Properties. 


"Bullet" SPECIAL EFFECTS 

Special EfFect: | Hone | | Big First Char 1 

“ maos* 


0 


Space For Big First: j Horttai | I Custom j 000 line 


sho«BuiietAs-. pnnnnnrnrnrnr°~i 

□ El □ c Hallow Bo7| | Filled BoiT] | Other ( 
Bullet Char: 195) (ASCII) 

Indent AFter Bullet: 01,60 picas & paints 


ran [ Cancel | 


The Set Font Properties dialog box looks familiar, doesn’t it? 
It’s the same Font dialog box you’ve seen before. You simply 
got here a new way. The changes you make in this dialog box 
will affect only the bullet, not the rest of the paragraph. 

H Enter Size: 014.0 points. Then click OK to return to the 
Special Effects dialog box. Click OK again to complete the 
effect and return to the document. 









2-40 


Style 


Change the Footer tag 

Footers are among the special tags that Ventura creates on its 
own called “generated” tags. These tags are given names that 
begin with the letter Z (for instance, ZJHEADER for the 
header, Z_FOOTER for the footer, and so on) to distinguish 
them from others in the Assignment List. As with all tags, you 
can change the attributes of a generated tag simply by work¬ 
ing through the options in the Paragraph menu. Let’s change 
the font of the Z_FOOTER tag so it matches the rest of the 
proposal. 


*+NOTE: If you do not see any generated tags in the Assignment 
List, check to make sure that Generated Tags: Shown is 
selected in the Set Preferences dialog box in the Options 
menu. 

11 Select the footer on page two. 

il Font Face: Times 

Style: N-Italic 
Size: 010.0 points 

When you are finished, the footer should look like Figure 

2 - 28 : 



Edit View Chapter frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


iiiiliiliiiiii l c:\temp\2propds.chp (2propos.stv) ♦ 




j • XYZ proposes to accomplish and com-; 
.aj’jilete this project in five phases, asi 
' described in more detail! '■ 

jBnseOnef 

• Evaluate Needs, XYZ will sain an in-j 
jiepth knowledge of ABC’s computerisa-; 
iion needs through on-site and telephone; 
interviews. W ewill consider such areas as:lf; 
| ‘Word processing and editorial re 
; guirementsfl 

i....t...Q!>RW«r?gurietnents|. 


ABC Fropostb 


' Jrivase'ioiri. .' ■ 

i Data Conversion. Once the system is! 
installed, XYZ will supervise the convert 
sion of current databases and publications; 
jo an electronic form. This will include the; 
rise of optical character recognition wheni 
'ever possible tominiraiie the time and cost 
iof data entry. Where it is not possible toe 
•optically read existing information, XYZ? 
jwill supervise data entry personnel whs 
will rekey the data into the computers. XY2 
Will design and implement custom key-! 


♦ K 


Figure 2-28. 
































Finish tagging the document 


2-41 


Finish tagging the document 

After you change the footer, finish tagging the remaining 
paragraphs in the document. 

H Press the End key to go to the last page of the document. 

H Tag the paragraph “Project Costs” as Head level 1. 


Pictures 


Now that you’ve completed the text and style sections of this 
project, let’s continue with pictures. 

To add a picture to a document, you load a picture file and 
place it in a frame. You can make a frame any size or shape to 
fit with the page design and the artwork. 

In Chapter One, you added a frame to hold a picture. How¬ 
ever, frames can also contain text. One common example is a 
spreadsheet file. Instead of retyping a worksheet from 
scratch, you can load it into Ventura and place it in a frame. 
Once you have it in the frame, you can format it into a table. 
In this section, you will learn how to place and format a simple 
spreadsheet file. 

For this project, you will place and format the TABLE.TXT file 
from the Power disk, which has already been prepared for you. 
If you don’t have the Power disk, you can type in the file from 
Appendix A. 

Add the frame 

Before you place a text file, you must add a frame to contain it. 

*+NOTE: Placing text files in frames allows you to place several 
different text files on the same page. 

To make frame placement easier, make sure Column and Line 
Snap are turned on (Options menu). If they are on, the Op¬ 
tions menu will read “Turn Column Snap Off’ and “Turn Line 
Snap Off.” These snap-to functions ensure that frames align 
with the margins and the inter-line spacing of Body Text. 




2-42 


Pictures 


^ Switch to Reduced View (press Ctrl-R). Then make sure you 
reset the zero point to the upper left comer of the Page 
(click once on the 0,0 square). 

M Enable Frame mode. 

^ Select Add New Frame from the Side-Bar. 

M Starting at position 29 picas on the vertical ruler, place the 
upper left comer of the frame next to the left margin. Then 
hold down the mouse cursor until it turns into a pointing 
hand. 

II While holding down the mouse button, drag the lower right 
corner of the frame downwards and to the right. When the 
bottom of the frame aligns with the right margin of the 
page and reaches about 50 picas on the vertical ruler, 
release the mouse button (Figure 2-29). Don’t worry about 
exact placement yet. 



Resize the frame 

Now that you put the frame in the approximate position, you 
can fine-tune its placement. The Sizing & Scaling dialog box 
allows you to precisely control the placement and size of 
frames. The dialog box uses the terms “Upper Left X” and 
“Upper Left Y.” Upper Left X shows the horizontal distance 
from the edge of the page to the upper left corner of the frame. 


































Resize the frame 


2-43 


Upper Left Y shows the vertical distance from the edge of the 
page to the upper left comer of the frame (Figure 2-30). 



Figure 2-30. Upper Left X is the horizontal distance from the edge of 
the page to the upper left corner of the frame. Upper Left Y is the vertical 
distance. 


Select Sizing & Scaling from the Frame menu. Make sure 
the unit measurements are set to picas & points. Make the 
Upper Left X: 07,06 picas & points (if this is not the current 
value, press Esc to clear the line and type in 07,06 picas & 
points). Make the Upper Left Y: 29,00 picas & points. Make 
the frame width 36,00 picas & points and the frame height 
21,00 picas & points. 













































2-44 


Pictures 


Place the spreadsheet file 

After you position and size the frame, place the sample 
spreadsheet file. 

II Switch to Normal View (press Ctrl-N). 

H With the frame still highlighted, select the text file name 
TABLE.TXT and place it in the frame (Figure 2-31). 


Desk file Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



C:\TEMP\2PR0P0S.CHP (2PR0PCS.STV) l lBlIil l 


|-Mu¬ 


table, ixt 


R Pg B 8983 


i* ^JAinJAKY«IEBRUARY^MAKCHII 
Hi»se0e*5000. 00*2750,00* 1225,001! 
HiaseTw cr»2500.00* 1175 00*695. OOK 
Btas?Tte<>*1600.00«1600.00<00* 

Phase F our*1500.00*1500.00*3750. OOlf 
Bias?Five*2SOO, 00*2500,00*2500.0011 
IOTALSCt310000*69525,00*69370,00q 


Figure 2-31. 


Add margins to the frame 

To center the spreadsheet text within the frame, add margins 
to the frame. These margins will affect only the selected 
frame. They will not affect the Underlying Page beneath the 
frame. 

*+NOTE: Frames that you place on top of the Page can have 
their own margins and columns , independent of the Page. 

II Margins Top: 02,00 picas & points 

& Columns Bottom: 02,00 picas & points 

Left: 02,00 picas & points 
Right: 02,00 picas & points 






































Place a box around the frame 


2-45 


Place a box around the frame 

Next visually separate the frame from the above text by 
making a ruling box around the frame. 

H Select Ruling Box Around from the Frame menu. 

H Choose Width: Frame. Make sure the unit measurements 
are set to fractional pts. Give Rule 1 a height of 00.50 
fractional pts. Click OK. 


RULING BOX GROUND 


m 


Width: 

Frane 

Color: 

Black 

Pattern: 

Solid 

Dashes: 

Off 

Space Above Rule 1: 

00.001 

Height of Rule 1: 

00.50 

Space Belou Rule 1: 

00.00 

Height of Rule 2: 

00.00 

Space Belou Rule 2: 

00.00 

Height of Rule 3: 

00.00 


J 36.00 

Custort Indent: 00.00 F* ij - I 
Custon Width: 00.09 .."'" i 


Dash Width: 00.00 
Dash Spacing: 00.00 Fractional pts 


Space Belou Rule 3: 
Overall Height: 


00.00 

00.50 


DB 


| Cancel 1 


When you are satisfied with the appearance of the frame, you 
can continue to format the table. 


Format the table 

There are several ways to format tabular material, but the 
easiest and simplest way is to use horizontal tabs. 

TIP: Use horizontal tabs for tables that do not exceed one line 
per entry, and vertical tabs (explained in Chapter Eight), for 
more tables with multiple lines. If you require very complex 
table formats, we recommend using the Table Editing feature 
in the Professional Extension (explained in Chapter Ten). 

Ventura allows up to sixteen tab positions per paragraph, 
with left, right, decimal, or center alignment. The sample 
table uses both right-aligned and decimal tabs. To format the 








2-46 


Pictures 


table properly you need to create two new tags — one for the 
table heading and one for the table listings. 

Format the table heading 

First you must add a new tag for the table heading and modify 
its Font, Alignment, and Spacing. 

ii Enable Paragraph mode and select the paragraph 
"JANUARY, FEBRUARY, MARCH.” 

^ Select Add New Tag from the Side-Bar. Move to the Tag 
Name to Add line and type: TblHead 


ADD NEW TAG [7] 

Tag Name to Add: TblHead]_ 

Tag Name to Copy From: Body Text_ 



Cancel 


Face: Helvetica 
Style: Bold 
Size: 010.0 points 

Horz. Alignment: Left 
In/Outdent Width: 00,00 picas & points 

*+NOTE: We changed the alignment of the tag to Left because 
tabs will not display when text is justified. 

Set the first tab stop 

Now you will place tab settings at 15,03, 23,03 and 29,03 picas 
& points from the left margin of the frame. One at a time, you 


II Font 


Alignment 







Set the second tab stop 


2-47 


will choose the number of the tab, select the tab alignment, 

and enter the tab location. 

*+NOTE: Tab locations are measured from the left margin. Be¬ 
cause the left margin of the frame is 02,00 picas in from the 
frame edge, Ventura begins measuring each tab location 
02,00 picas in from the edge. 

H Select Tab Settings from the Paragraph menu. 

Tab number 1 is already selected for you. 

il Set the unit measurement to read picas & points. 

II Choose Tab Type: Right, Tab Shown As: Open Space. Move 
to the Tab Location line, press Esc, and type: 15,03 

Do not choose OK yet, since you still have more tabs to set. 


"TblHeacT TAB SETTINGS 


0 

Tab Number: 

♦ 

1 

♦ 


Tab Type: 
Tab Shoun As: 
Tab Location: 

Right 

Open Space 

15,B3| picas R points 

Leader Char: 

Spaces 


032 (ASCII) 

Leader Spacing: 
Auto-Leader: 

0 

Off 







| OK | | Cancel 







Set the second tab stop 

^ Choose Tab Number: 2 by clicking once on the right arrow 
next to the Tab Number line. Choose Tab Type: Right, Tab 
Shown As: Open Space. Move to the Tab Location line, 
press Esc, and type: 23,03 






2-48 


Pictures 


"TblHead" TAB SETTINGS [7] 

Tab Number: 

1*1 2 | + | 

Tab Type: 

Right 

Tab Shown As: 

Open Space 

Tab Location: 

23,03| picas & points 

Leader Char: 

Spaces 032 (ASCII) 

Leader Spacing: 

0 

Auto-Leader: 

Off 


| OK | | Cancel 


Set the third tab stop 

i§ Click again on the right arrow again to choose Tab Number: 
3. Then choose Tab Type: Right, Tab Shown As: Open 
Space. Move to the Tab Location line, press Esc, and type: 

29,03 


u TblHead” TAB SETTINGS [7| 

Tab Number: 

1*1 3 |+| 

Tab Type: 

Right 

Tab Shown As: 

Open Space 

Tab Location: 

29,03| picas & points 

Leader Char: 

Spaces 032 (ASCII) 

Leader Spacing: 

0 

Auto-Leader: 

Off 


I OK | | Cancel 


Click OK to close the Tab Settings dialog box. 








Format the listings 


2-49 


Format the listings 

If tab settings seem confusing at first, don’t worry. The more 
tables you format, the easier tabs will become. You’ll get more 
practice with tabs right away by formatting the table listings. 

^ Select the paragraph “Phase One ...” and tag it as TblHead. 

M Select Add New Tag from the Side-Bar. At the Tag Name to 
Add line type: TblList then click OK. 


ADD NEW TAG [?] 

Tag Mane to Add: TblListj_ 

Tag Nane to Copy Fron: TblHead_ 

■nil Cancel 


When creating a new tag, Ventura starts by copying the at¬ 
tributes of an old one. It makes sense, therefore, to copy from 
the tag that is most similar to the new effect you want. In this 
case, TblHead is nearest to the final format. 

** TIP: When adding a new tag, always copy from the tag that is 
nearest in appearance and format. 

Since you copied from TblHead, the listing tag should be 
pretty close to the correct style. To finish the tag, change the 
font style to Normal and change the Above Spacing. 

H Font Style: Normal 

II Spacing Above: 14.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: Always 





2-50 


Pictures 


Set the tab stops 

Since the font, alignment, and spacing are already correct, 
you need only modify the tab settings to get the new TblList 
tag to look the way you want. When you choose tab settings 
this time, use decimal tabs to line up the numbers with the 
decimal character in each column of the table. 

H Tab Settings Tab Number: 1 

Tab Type: Decimal 

Tab Shown As: Open Space 

Tab Location: 14,00 picas & points 

Tab Number: 2 

Tab Type: Decimal 

Tab Shown As: Open Space 

Tab Location: 22,00 picas & points 

Tab Number: 3 

Tab Type: Decimal 

Tab Shown As: Open Space 

Tab Location: 28,00 picas & points 

Check the appearance of your tag with Figure 2-32. 



Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


iiliEllllllIlllilillli C:\TEMP\2PRQP0S.CHP (2PR0P0S.STV) IllliilBElil 


Text 
BedyCenter 
Bullet 
Chanje tor 
Heed level 
Heed level Z 
Pejc Breok 
TblHeod 
TblList 
Title 
Z.CaPTICH 
Z_FO0TtA 


R Pg It 9883 1 4, 


♦ JANUARY* 

Phase One* 5000.03* 

BaseTwo+2500,00+1175,00*635,001! 
rhascThrep*1600.00»1600.00+0. OH j 
Jhas*Joui+1500,00*1500,00*3750,0011 
PhassPive-+2500.00*2500.00*2500.0QS 
IOIAlS6l310a 00+53525,00+S3370i00O 


FEBRUARY. MARCH! 

2750.00* 1225.001 


E 


Figure 2-32. 


NOTE: If your table doesn’t match our illustration, check the 
tab locations for the TbIHead and TblList tags. 


















































Apply TblList to the other paragraphs 


2-51 


Apply TblList to the other paragraphs 

Now that you’ve completed the attribute and tab settings for 
the new tag, apply it to the remaining paragraphs in the table. 
Remember, you can select multiple paragraphs using the 
Shift-Click method. 

H Select the five paragraphs shown in Figure 2-33 and tag 
them as TblList. 





4 

Title A 

Z_Cftl>TION 

Z^FOOTER 

"" 

MULTIPLE 

R 

Pg tt 0003 

5 



Figure 2-33. 


Add a caption 

To put the final touch on the spreadsheet, attach a caption and 
label to the frame. 

H Enable Frame mode and select the frame that contains the 
spreadsheet. 

I! Select Anchors & Captions from the Frame menu. 

H Choose Caption: Below and OK. 




























2-52 


Pictures 



A blank caption frame appears below the existing frame. 

Enlarge the caption frame 

§1 Click in the caption frame so the sizing buttons appear. 

11 Place the cursor on any handle at the bottom of the frame. 
Press and hold down the mouse cursor until the pointing 
hand appears. Drag the frame downwards about 3 lines 
and release the cursor. You should see an end of file marker 
(□) in the middle of the frame. If the marker is not visible, 
stretch the caption frame downwards a few more lines. 

The caption frame should look like Figure 2-34: 

Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options _ 

i i|||j|j|li!lililll||i^\TE>ff^PDs:wl2PR^si^liliiiillilllliiililg|| ♦ 





























Add the caption text 


2-53 


Add the caption text 

m Enable Text mode. Place the cursor in front of the end of file 
marker in the caption frame. Type: Project Costs for 
Desktop Publishing Implementation 

Format the caption text 

You’ve just created your first caption. Now you can change its 
format just as you would change any other tag. Notice that the 
caption paragraph is another one of Ventura’s generated tags, 
as signaled by a name beginning with Z_ — in this case, 
Z_Caption. 

^ Enable Paragraph mode. Select the caption paragraph 
“Project Costs for Desktop Publishing Implementation.” 

^ Font Style: Bold 

Size: 012.0 points 

Alignment Horz. Alignment: Center 

Overall Width: Frame-Wide 
In/Outdent Width: 00,00 picas & points 

M Spacing Inter-Line: 14.00 fractional pts 

Your caption should look like Figure 2-35: 



Figure 2-35. 



















2-54 


Chapter 


*+NOTE: If the caption text disappears from view, do not be 
concerned. Simply enable Frame mode, select the caption 
frame, and stretch it downward until the text appears. 


Chapter 

Now that you’ve completed text, style, and picture, it’s time to 
complete the chapter part of the proposal. But first take a 
breather and save your work. 

H Select Save from the File menu (or press Ctrl-S). 

Print the current page 

To evaluate the editorial and stylistic changes you’ve made on 
screen, and to determine if you’ve achieved a more pleasing 
page design, print out the proposal. This time we will show 
you how to print the current page of a chapter. 

II Select To Print from the File menu. 

!i Choose Which Pages: Current and OK. 


PRINT INFORMATION (POSTSCRIPT - Ultimate) 

m 

Which Pages: 

Current 


From Page: 

00031 


Through Page: 

0003 


Number of Copies: 

01 


Collated Copies: 

OFF 


Printing Order: 

1st to Last 


Paper Tray: 

Default 


Crop Marks: 

Off 


Spot Color Overlays: 

Off 


Multi - Ohp, Print Fiies; 

Combined 


Device Name: 

POSTSCRIPT 


Output To: 

Filename 




|Cancel| 


Ventura prints out the current page. 

To print out the entire report, press Ctrl-X to bring up the To 
Print dialog box, choose Which Pages: All and click OK. Ctrl-X 
is a keyboard shortcut that recalls the last dialog box. 





Print the current page 


2-55 


In the first two chapters you have learned how to build a 
report and a proposal using basic Ventura techniques. In the 
next chapter, you will polish off the remaining fundamentals 
while learning how to construct a new and important type of 
document — the newsletter. 


Tips and techniques 


Text tips 

□ Use a word processor to globally search and replace double 
spaces before loading a text file into Ventura. 

□ When you prepare text in your word processor for Ventura 
follow these guidelines. Do not: center or justify text; indent 
the first line of a paragraph; create temporary margins; put 
more than one space after a period, colon, or question mark; 
put more than one carriage return between paragraphs; or 
put more than one tab stop between columns. 

□ Use the @PARAFILTR = ON code to filter out extra carriage 
returns in a text file. It must be inserted as the very first 
item in the document and it must be typed accurately or 
Ventura will ignore it. 

□ If you want to load a single file into Ventura without it 
automatically being placed on the Page, select Load 
Text/Picture from the File menu while you are in Para¬ 
graph, Tfext, or Graphic mode. 

□ Rename text, style sheet, and chapter files before you make 
any changes to the document. Renaming files eliminates 
the possibility of permanently changing the originals. 

□ Use a word processor to make changes to large sections of 
text. Use Ventura's text-editing tools to make small, last- 
minute changes to text. You can cut, copy, or paste text or 
change text attributes of selected words within a para¬ 
graph. 

□ Use Text mode to change one or two words within a para¬ 
graph. Use a paragraph tag to change the attributes of an 
entire paragraph. 

□ Keyboard shortcuts can be used to speed up text editing in 




2-56 


Chapter 


Ventura. Press Del to cut text, Shift-Del to copy text, and 
Ins to paste text. 

□ When you cut or copy text, it remains on the Clipboard 
until something else is cut or copied. This feature allows 
you to insert text from one chapter to another. Simply copy 
or cut the text, close the current chapter, then open another 
chapter. Press Ins to insert the text into the new chapter. 

Style tips 

□ To make column widths equal, enter the value of the first 
column width, then the first gutter width, then choose 
Make Equal Widths from the bottom of the Margins & 
Columns dialog box. Use this order so that Ventura makes 
the column widths equal. 

□ Turning Column Balance on from the Sizing & Scaling 
dialog box tells Ventura to fill all columns on the page 
equally. Without Column Balance on, Ventura fills the first 
column before starting the next. 

□ Ventura measures the In/Outdent Width from the left mar¬ 
gin of the column. 

□ When you create a new tag, always copy from the tag that 
is nearest in appearance and format the new tag to the 
effect you want. 

□ To isolate text on a page, use a Page Break tag instead of a 
string of carriage returns. If you change a tag or add extra 
text, the carriage returns will “float” to the next page and 
push everything in the document out of place. 

□ You can use the Shift-Click method to tag multiple para¬ 
graphs. 

□ Headlines, headings, and subheads should include a 
Breaks: Keep With Next: Yes to keep them from becoming 
isolated at the bottom of a page or a column. 

□ Headers, footers, and captions are tags that are automat¬ 
ically generated by Ventura. Like all tags their attributes 
can be changed by working through the paragraph menu 
options. Generated tags have names that begin with a Z to 
distinguish them from other tags in the Assignment List. 



Print the current page 


2-57 


Picture tips 

□ The Sizing & Scaling dialog box allows you to precisely 
control the position and size of a frame. 

□ Use horizontal tabs to format a table that does not exceed 
one line per entry. Use side-by-side paragraphs (see Chap¬ 
ter Eight) to format more complex tables. 

□ The tab location is always measured from the left margin. 

□ Turn off all tabs you do not use in a tag definition. Unused 
tab settings just take up extra memory. 

□ The caption labels you type directly into the Anchors & 
Captions dialog box can only be edited through that dialog 
box. For longer captions, type text directly into the caption 
frame. 



Chapter Three 
Skills Checklist 


Theory 

□ Frames versus the underlying page 

□ Newsletter-style layout 

Text 

□ Typing text inside a frame 

□ Creating a text file inside Ventura 

□ Faster tagging with function keys in 
Text mode 

Style 

□ Double-sided page format 

□ Vertical rules 

□ Renaming and removing tags 

□ Flow to create leader dots 

□ More effects with ruling lines 

Pictures 

□ Sizing and scaling an image 

□ Creating caption labels 

Chapter 

□ Manually inserting a page 

□ Creating a publication 

□ Backing up multiple chapters with 
Multi-Chapter 

□ Printing selected pages 

□ Switching printers properly 




Chapter Three 


A Two-Column Newsletter 


N ow that you’ve gained some momentum with Ventura, are 
you ready to step up the pace? In Chapter Three, you will 
create a newsletter, a document with different design require¬ 
ments than business reports and proposals. This project will 
introduce you to some of Ventura’s most powerful features. 
The checklist on the left lists some of the techniques you will 
learn. 


Theory 

By the time you’ve finished with Chapter Three, you’ll have 
been exposed to all of Ventura’s fundamental skills. You’ll be 
equipped with the basic tools to construct virtually any type of 
document. You are not ready to graduate, however, until you 
understand the difference between frames and the Underly¬ 
ing Page, and how to use this difference to build newsletter- 
style layouts. 

Understanding frames 

Ventura uses frames to contain text and pictures. You can 
draw frames anywhere on the page. 

To work on a frame — to change its size or to place something 
inside — you must first select it. To select a frame, enable 
Frame mode, then click once anywhere inside the frame 
boundary. Black sizing buttons appear around the edges (Fig¬ 
ure 3-1). 

You can use these sizing buttons to change the size of the 
frame. Place the cursor on top of a button and press the mouse 
button until the pointing finger appears (Figure 3-2). Now 



Theory 



Figure 3-1. The black sizing buttons show which frame you 
selected. 


drag the mouse — that is, move the mouse while holding the 
button down. When the frame is the proper size, release the 
button. 



Figure 3-2. A pointing hand appears when you resize a 
frame. 


You can also move frames with ease. Place the mouse cursor 
anywhere inside the frame. Press and hold the button until 
the four-way arrow appears (Figure 3-3). Then drag the frame 
to the new location (move the mouse while holding the button 
down). 

























Understanding frames 


3 - 3 



Figure 3-3. A four-way arrow appears when you move a 
frame 

You can copy a frame onto the frame clipboard (also called 
temporary memory) and then paste as many copies as you 
want onto the Page. Initially, the copy is invisible because it 
appears on top of the original. When you move the copy away, 
you will see the original underneath. You can also overlap 
frames (Figure 3-4). 



Figure 3-4. You can overlap multiple frames on the Page. 


All frames have a boundary. That boundary can be invisible. 
Or, if you prefer, you can put a ruling line above, below or 
around the frame. The thickness of the ruling line is up to you. 
























a - 4 


Theory 


As you can see in the Figure 3-5, the boundary acts as a 
container. You can place text or pictures inside. 



Figure 3-5. A frame acts as a container to hold text or pic¬ 
tures. 


Suppose, that you pour a long file into a small frame. Ventura 
fits as much of the text as it can, then waits. You can draw 
additional frames to contain the rest of the text file. You can 
link these frames so the text file chains from one to the next. 
Frames can have margins and columns inside their boun¬ 
daries. For instance, you might place a margin inside a frame 
to keep a picture from butting up against the edge (Figure 
3-6). Or, you might create two columns within a single frame. 


Frames can have 
their own margins 


Frames can have 
their own columns 



Figure 3-6. 






















































Understanding frames 


3 - 5 


If you place a frame on top of the Page, the margins and 
columns of the frame will override the margins and columns of 
the Page. For instance, in Figure 3-7, a three-column frame 
has been placed on top of a two-column Page. 


Desk File Edit Vie* Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Figure 3-7. Frames can have different columns and mar¬ 
gins from the Underlying Page. 


You can also create a caption for any frame. This caption is a 
separate, smaller frame attached to the original. If you move 
the original frame, the caption moves with it. The text of the 
caption is contained within the caption frame (Figure 3-8). 


Caption frame 


Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Figure 3-8. A caption frame is a separate frame attached to the 
original. 































































3 - 6 


Theory 


Understanding the Page 

When you first learn Ventura, it is easy to become confused by 
Ventura’s Page (referred to as the Underlying Page). Think of 
the Page as a large frame. Its boundaries equal the edges of 
the page (for instance, 8.5x11 in. for standard letter-size 
paper). Even though you can’t see the boundaries, they are 
there, just as for smaller frames. In most respects, the Page 
acts like any other frame. For instance, you can change its size 
with the Sizing & Scaling dialog box. And you can give it 
margins and columns just like a frame (Figure 3-9). 



Figure 3-9A. The Underlying Page at normal size 



Figure 3-9B. The Underlying Page can be reduced in size. 






























Frames versus Pages 


3 - 7 


*+NOTE: You cannot change the size of the Underlying Page 
interactively with the sizing buttons. You must change its size 
through the Sizing & Scaling dialog box. 

But the Page differs in one key aspect. When you place a text 
file into a frame, Ventura fits as much as possible, then waits 
for you to tell it where to put the rest. When you put text onto 
the Page, on the other hand, Ventura fits as much as possible 
onto the first page, then automatically creates as many pages 
as necessary to accommodate the rest of the file. 

Frames versus Pages 

You have placed text on the Page in the previous two chapters. 
Placing text on the Page is the method of choice when most of 
the chapter is made up of a single text file. But some docu¬ 
ments contain many different text files. Newsletters are a 
prime example. Theoretically, you could combine all the copy 
for a newsletter into one large file, and then format that file on 
the Page. In practice, however, it is much easier to keep each 
article as a separate text file. 

But how do you keep the articles separate when you bring 
them into Ventura? Simple: you draw frames on top of the 
Page. Then you place the articles into those frames. 

By the way, you can combine both frames and pages in the 
same document, as we did in Chapter Two. The bulk of the 
proposal was in a single text file on the Page. The worksheet, 
however, was a separate file that resided inside a frame. That 
frame had been drawn on top of the Page. 

Newsletter-style layout 

Let’s summarize what we’ve learned. Frames create boun¬ 
daries that separate files. You can use frames to place one text 
file into the left column and a second file into the right column 
(Figure 3-10). When you put text into a frame, it flows to the 
end of that frame. Even if there is text left over, Ventura does 
not create additional frames. Instead, it remembers where it 
left off, and waits for you to place the remainder. You can put 
part of a file into column one on the page one, and continue the 
rest of it onto page two (Figure 3-11). 




Figure 3-10. Frames allow you to place different files on 
the same page. 




























Newsletter-style layout 


3 - 9 


Ventura remembers this path. As you make editing changes, 
the text automatically flows back and forth between page one 
and page two. In addition, articles can “leap-frog'’ one another. 
This automatic link between frames on different pages is 
sometimes called “chaining.” 

TIP: When building newsletter-style documents composed of 
several different text files , put the text into frames , not onto the 
Page. 

How do you know where to position the frames? Simple: for¬ 
mat the Page with the correct margins and columns. Then use 
the Page as a guideline. Thanks to Ventura’s snap-to features, 
your frames will automatically align with the columns on the 
Page. 

TIP: Use the Page to create a snap-to grid for positioning 
frames in a newsletter-style layout (Figure 3-12). 



Figure 3-12. To create a newsletter-styie layout, 
first create a snap-to grid by formatting the 
Underlying Page (A). Then stretch frames over 
the Page (B,C,D). You will place your text and 
pictures inside the frame. 





























3 -10 


Theory 


There is one more crucial principle you need to know before 
you are ready to start building a newsletter: Ventura can only 
flow text in a “forward” direction. 

We put quotes around the word forward, because it means 
different things to Ventura than it does ordinarily. On a page- 
by-page basis, the meaning is straightforward. Ventura can¬ 
not flow text backwards to a previous page. 

The “forward-only” restriction also applies on a single page 
with several frames. On a single page, however, the flowing 
order depends on which frame was drawn first. Ventura can 
flow text from the first frame to the second frame, but it 
cannot flow “backward” from the second frame to the first. 

The position on the page makes no difference. Ventura deter¬ 
mines text flow strictly on the basis of the order the frames 
were placed on the page. For instance, in Figure 3-13, Ven¬ 
tura can flow text from frame #1 to frame #2 — not the reverse 
(Figure 3-13). 


Desk File Edit Vim Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



g ._..:... iek 


Figure 3-13. Since frame #1 was drawn first, text can flow from frame 
#1 to frame #2. Text cannot flow in the reverse direction. 


WARNING: The sample project in this chapter uses numbered frames. Draw these 
frames in the order shown. If you draw them in a different sequence you may be 
unable to flow the text properly. 


Fortunately, Ventura provides a simple method for changing 
the order of frames. To make a frame the “last” one, simply 
























Newsletter-style layout 


3 -11 


select the frame, delete it, and reinsert it again. In Ventura’s 
eyes, it is now the last frame on the page. If you accidentally 
draw frames out of order, use this method to correct the 
problem. 

You will use the principles explained above to construct the 
newsletter in this chapter. First you will format the Page. 
Then you will draw frames on top, using the margins and 
columns of the Page as your guide. Finally, you will put text 
into the frames. 




3 -12 


Theory 
































































Newsletter-style layout 


3 -13 


Planning the newsletter 

The goal of a newsletter is to provide timely information to a 
specialized audience. This chapter’s example is a corporate 
newsletter, an in-house organ for the fictitious XYZ Corpora¬ 
tion. 

Most newsletters are 8.5x11 in. The simplest design consists 
of two pages stapled together or printed on both sides. Even 
the most complex newsletters rarely exceed 24 pages or so. 
Overall design should be informal and relaxed to help convey 
a sense of timeliness. The best design is simple, open and 
uncluttered. 

Look at the “before” picture of the newsletter. Below is a list of 
the methods you will use to enhance its appearance and effec¬ 
tiveness. 

• Large type for a logo 

• Rules to separate and define different sections 

• A kicker and a banner headline 

• A table of contents 

• Two-column format 

• Uniform spacing to align text across columns 


Ventura prep 

As you did in the previous two chapters, you will start the 
project by loading and renaming the text, style, picture and 
chapter files. 


® If you have the Power disk 

For this project you will load four files at once. Later in the 
chapter, you will place them into frames — one for the logo, 
one for the headline, and two for articles. The text files are 
provided on the Power disk and should have previously been 
copied to the C:\POWER subdirectory according to the direc¬ 
tions with the disk. These files have been preformatted with 



3 - 14 


Ventura prep 


tag names and non-keyboard character codes. (Refer to Chap¬ 
ters Two and Seven for more on preformatting.) 

*+NOTE: If you did not purchase the Power disk, skip to the 
section below entitled “If you do not have the Power disk. ” 

H If you are continuing from the previous chapter, select New 
to clear the last project from the screen. Ventura removes 
the text files and frames but keeps the style sheet. 

^ Select Load Text/Picture from the File menu. 

^ Choose Type of File: Text, Text Format: ASCII, # of Files: 
Several, Destination: List of Files, and OK. 


LOAD TEXT/PICTURE 
Type of File: 
Text Fornat: 


tt of Files: 
Destination: 


□ 


Line-Art | | Inage 


Generated 


WordStar 3 [ I WS 4.6/5.0 


MS-Word | WordPerfect | XyWrite | | 8-Bit ASCII 


DCA MultiMate Pfffl-to-Table WordPerfect 5 


Writer 


List of Files 


Text Clipboard | j Text Cursor 


M 


Cancel 


II Find the C:\POWER subdirectory and scroll through the 
list until you find the file 3NEWSHED.TXT. Select the file. 

After you select the first file, Ventura loads it, then redisplays 
the Item Selector so you can load more files. 

M Load the files 3NEWSLGO.TXT, 3NEWSONE.TXT, and 
3NEWSTWO.TXT. When you are finished, choose Cancel or 
OK to close the dialog box. 












Rename the text files 


3 - 15 


Rename the text files 


In Frame mode, you will place each of the text files on the 
Page in turn. 

H Using File Type/Rename from the Edit menu, rename the 
files as shown below: 

Load from C:\POWER Save to C:\TEMP 


C:\POWER\3NEWSHED.TXT 

C:\POWER\3NEWSLGO.TXT 

C:\POWER\3NEWSONE.TXT 

C:\POWER\3NEWSTWO.TXT 


C:\TEMP\3HEAD.TXT 

C:\TEMP\3LOGO.TXT 

C:\TEMP\3NEWS-1.TXT 

C:\TEMP\3NEWS-2.TXT 


Use Remove Text/File from the Edit menu to remove the 
last text file from the frame. Remember to remove them 
from the frame but not from the list of files. 


Load and rename a style sheet 

As before, you will be modifying one of the style sheets 
provided with the Ventura program disks. 

^ Select Load Diff. Style from the File menu. 

II Use the Backup button if necessary to go to the 
C:\TYPESET subdirectory. Load the style sheet named 
&NEWS-P2.STY. 

H Select Save as New Style from the File menu. 

^ Go to the C:\TEMP subdirectory and save the new file as 
3NEWS.STY. Then click OK. 


Load a picture 

H Select Load Text/Picture from the File menu. Choose Type 
of File: Image, Image Format: GEM/HALO DPE, # of Files: 
One, and OK. 

H Move to the C:\TYPESET subdirectory and load 
CHANEL.IMG. 




3 - 16 


Text 


If the picture is placed on the Page, use Remove Text/File to 
remove it from the frame (not from the list of files). 

*+NOTE: CHANEUMG was copied to the \TYPESET subdirec¬ 
tory during Ventura installation. If you have deleted or moved 
this file, use DOS to copy it back from the original Ventura 
examples disk. 

Rename the chapter 

When you have finished loading and renaming the text and 
style sheet files, save the chapter with a new name. 

H Select Save As from the File menu. Go to the C:\TEMP 
subdirectory and type in the new chapter name, 3NEWS, 
and click OK. 


If you do not have the Power disk 

^ Exit from Ventura. 


li Use your word processor to type in the text files 
3HEAD.TXT, 3NEWS-1.TXT, 3NEWS-2.TXT and 
3LOGO.TXT from Appendix A. Copy them to the C:\TEMP 
subdirectory. 

II Then load Ventura and proceed through the Ventura prep 
section starting at “Load and rename a style sheet.” 


Text 


Normally you would place the text files at this point. However, 
since you will be putting those files into frames, and not onto 
the Page, you must deviate slightly from the Ventura For¬ 
mula. The only change is to delay placing the text files until 
you build frames to contain them. To build these frames, 
proceed to the Style section. 





Change to double sides 


3 - 17 


Style 

Your goal is to create frames of the right size and position to 
hold the text files. To make this job easier, first construct the 
Underlying Page. Then you can use the Page as a guide for 
placing frames. 

*+NOTE: Remember our rule of thumb: complete the chapter 
formatting before the individual text paragraphs. This rule is 
even more important when using newsletter-style layout. 

Change to double sides 

The in-house newsletter will be printed on both sides of the 
paper, so you must switch to double-sided page layout. Ven¬ 
tura then makes a mirror image of headers, margins, etc., 
from the right to the left page. For instance, the page number 
format on the right side of a right-page header will be copied 
to the left side of the left-page header. 

§i Select Page Size & Layout from the Chapter menu. Choose 
Sides: Double, and Start On: Right Side. 

Change the margins 

Now increase the size of the page margins and the gutter 
margin. You are altering the original style sheet to make the 
columns shorter and to add more white space around the 
edges of the page. 

P Enable Frame mode. 

H Select Margins & Columns from the Frame menu. Make 
the top and bottom margins 04,06 picas & points, the left 
and right margins 06,00 picas & points. Make the Column 
1 width 18,06 picas & points and the first gutter 02,00 picas 
& points. Make the Column 2 width 18,06 picas & points. 
Choose Copy to Facing Page and click OK. (The Copy to 
Facing Page button does not stay highlighted after you 
choose it.) 




Create a vertical rule 

Vertical Rules creates a ruling line between columns. The rule 

is always the same height as the columns. 

II Select Vertical Rules from the Frame menu. 

II Place the cursor on the Rule 1 Width line and change the 
unit measurement to fractional pts. 

H Select Settings For: Right Page, Inter-Col. Rules: On, 
Width: 00.25 fractional pts. Choose Copy to Facing Page to 
mirror these settings to the opposite page. Click OK to close 
the dialog box. 


VERTICAL RULES 


0 

Settings For: 


Inter-Col. Rules: 

On 

Width: 00.25| 

Rule 1 Position: 
Rule 1 Width: 

0B,G0 

00.00 

picas 8 points 
fractional pts 

Rule 2 Position: 
Rule 2 Width: 

00,00 

00.00 


Inserts: 





1 OK | | Cancel | 







Add a header 


3 -19 


Add a header 

To complete the chapter format, add a header that includes 
the newsletter’s name, the page, and the month of the issue. 

^ Select Headers & Footers from the Chapter menu. 

H Choose Define: Right Page Header, Usage: On. Move to the 
Left line and type: The Newsletter, move to the Center 
line and type: Page [P#] , and move to the Right line and 
type: Fall/Winter 1989 


'NOTE: You can also use the Inserts: Page # button to insert 
the [P#] code. 

Choose Copy to Facing Pages to mirror the header settings 
to the left page. Click OK to close the dialog box. 


HERDERS 8 FOOTERS 
Define 


B 


Right Page Header 


Left Page Header 
| Left Page Footer ] | Right Page Footer^ 
Osage: EH [og] 

Left: The Newsletter_ 


Center: Page [P#]_ 


Right: Fall/Winter 19891 


Inserts: | Chapter~5~1 | Page H | [ 1st Match*] | Last Hatch | 

eshmb* 

» 


OK 


Cancel 


Now turn the header off for the first page only. 

H Select Turn Header Off from the Chapter menu. 

Fine-tune the chapter format 

Now that you are warmed up, we’re going to pick up the pace 
and show you how to use some special typographic techniques 
to fine-tune the chapter format. 





3 - 20 


Style 


H Select Chapter Typography from the Chapter menu. 

There’s a lot to the Chapter Typography menu. We will ex¬ 
plain only those options you need for this project — so don’t 
panic. The other options we will leave for later chapters. 
Because Chapter Typography is complex, you may want to 
read through this section more than once. 

Let’s start with the option: Widows and Orphans. 

A widow is a single line of text at the top of a frame or column. 
An Orphan is a single line of text at the bottom of a page or 
column. The Widows and Orphans option lets you control the 
number of lines you will permit on a page. 

Normally, the default setting for both widows and orphans is 
2. However, for a newsletter-style document, we suggest that 
you disable Widows and Orphans completely (by setting both 
values to 1). With Widows and Orphans turned off, Ventura 
can place a single line of text at the top or bottom of a frame. 
This makes it easier for text files to reach the bottom of the 
frame and reduces the change for a white-space gap at the 
bottom. 

II Move to the Widows (Min Lines at Top) line and choose 1. 
Move to the Orphans (Min Lines at Bottom) line and once 
again choose 1. 

Next, verify that Column Balance is off. With Column Balance 
on, Ventura fills all the columns on the Underlying Page 
equally with text. In a newsletter-style document, however, 
you achieve balanced columns by placing text files in in¬ 
dividual frames on the Page. 

^ Choose Column Balance: Off. Do not close the dialog box 
yet. 

The next option, Move Down to 1st Baseline By, lets you 
control the position of text at the top of a column or page. You 
can choose either Move Down to 1st Baseline: By Cap Height 
or Move Down to 1st Baseline: By Inter-Line. 




Fine-tune the chapter format 


3-21 


Move Down to 1st Baseline by Cap Height places the baseline 
of the first line of text so the tops of capital letters touch the 
top of the column guide. On the other hand, Move Down to 1st 
Baseline by: Inter-Line, positions the baseline a distance 
equal to the tag's inter-line spacing. Both methods affect the 
way that Ventura will flow the text on the page (See Figures 
3-14 and 3-15). 


library oi protessionai-quality style sheets. The st) 
library will consist of over fifty different business 
cal documents including reports and proposals, foi 
house flyers, newsletters and manuals for XYZ’s 
documentation. Using one of the pre-defined temp 
XYZ employees can obtain the benefits of graphic 
and typesetting. All they will need to do is select a 
propriate style sheet and use it to process their doc 
“The average consumer is becoming increasing 
to high-quality graphic design,” said President Zyj 
“They have come to expect it. In the future, comp; 

Continued on page 2 


Figure 3-14. Although the differences between By Cap Height and By 
Inter-Line are not obvious at first glance... 


library will consist of over fifty different business 
cal documents including reports and proposals, foi 
house flyers, newsletters and manuals for XYZ’s 
documentation. Using one of the pre-defined temp 
XYZ employees can obtain the benefits of graphic 
and typesetting. All they will need to do is select a 
propriate style sheet and use it to process their doc 
“The average consumer is becoming increasing 
to high-quality graphic design,” said President Zyj 
“They have come to expect it. In the future, comp; 
do not produce attractive documents will be at a d 
vantage. We are determined that the documents w 
Continued on page 2 


Figure 3-15. ...they can add up in a multi-column document.The only 
change between these two examples is that the top one is By Cap Height 
and the bottom is by Inter-Line. 





3 - 22 


Style 


The position of the text baseline affects the alignment of text 
across columns. For best results in a newsletter, we suggest 
that you 1) choose Move Down to 1st Baseline By: Inter-Line 
and 2) make all vertical spacing an integer multiple of Body 
Text. That way you get 

• an integral number of Body Text lines per page 

• a more uniform-looking page 

• text that is aligned across multiple columns 

Now go ahead and change the baseline position of the text. 

H Choose Move Down To 1st Baseline By: Inter-Line. Then 
click OK to close the dialog box. 


CHAPTER (DEFAULT) TVPOGRAPHV SETTINGS 


Widows (Min Lines at Top): 
Orphans (Min Lines at Bottom): 

Column Balance: 
Move Down To 1st Baseline By: 

Pair Kerning: 


1 

1 

Off 

Inter-Line 
On 


0 



Cancel | 


You made it. You got through the hardest part of the Chapter 
Typography menu. Now catch your breath and take a moment 
to save your work. 

** TIP: Save every 15 minutes or less to reduce the risk of losing 
work due to a computer glitch, software crash, or power out¬ 
age. 





Add frames 


3 - 23 


From now on, we will not remind you to save. We will assume 
that you are regularly pressing Ctrl-S as you progress through 
the chapter. 


Add frames 


With the structure of the Underlying Page complete, you can 
draw frames on the Page. 

Before you start, go to the Options menu and confirm that 
Line Snap and Column Snap are turned on (when Column 
and Line Snap are on, the Options menu displays “Turn 
Column Snap Off’ and “Turn Line Snap Off’) and that the 
column guides are visible (the Options menu displays “Hide 
Column Guides”). 

These snap-to features help line up frames properly. Thanks 
to Column Snap, frames automatically snap to the column 
guides on the Page. Use the ruler to gauge the approximate 
height. 

^ TIP: Before you place any frames, check that the zero point is 
reset to the upper left corner of the Page (click the 0,0 square 
in the upper left corner). Otherwise, the ruler settings on your 
screen will not match ours. 

il Enable Frame mode. Select Add New Frame from the Side- 
Bar. Place the frame cursor at the upper left corner of the 
dotted column guides on the Page. 

H Press and hold down the mouse button. Drag the lower 
right comer of the frame downwards and to the right. 

^ Release the button when the bottom of the frame reaches 
the right margin and lines up with position 16,06 picas on 
the vertical ruler (Figure 3-16). 




Figure 3-16. 


H Repeat the step above to place all the frames on the page. 
Place the frames in the numeric order (1 through 6). Use 
Figure 3-17 as a guide before you fine-tune the frame size 
as explained in the next step. 

Try to get the frame sizes approximately right, but don’t worry 
about precise placement yet. Some users prefer to make the 
initial placement in Reduced View, before switching back to 
Normal View for fine-tuning. 

^ NOTE: If you place a frame in the wrong position, delete it and 
try again, or move it with the mouse cursor. 

After drawing the frames, you can use the Sizing & Scaling 
dialog box to make sure they match the values shown in 
Figure 3-17. 

§i Select each frame in turn. 

H Select Sizing & Scaling from the Frame menu. If necessary, 
change the frame height, width, or upper left X,Y position. 

TIP: You can use Ctrl-X to bring up the Sizing & Scaling dialog 
box again. Ctrl-X is the shortcut for “recall the last dialog box. ” 












Add frames 


3 - 25 


Frame #1 

Upper Left X: 06,00 picas 
Upper Left Y: 04,06 picas 


39,00x11,00 picas 


Frame #2 

Upper Left X: 06,00 picas 
Upper Left Y: 15,06 picas 

39,00x08,00 picas 


Frame #3 

Upper Left X: 06,00 picas 
Upper Left Y: 23,06 picas 


18,06x20,00 picas 


Frame #4 

Upper Left X: 26,06 picas 
Upper Left Y: 23,06 picas 


18,06x37,00 picas 


Leave a one-pica space 
between the frames 


Frame #5 

Upper Left X: 06,00 picas 
Upper Left Y: 44,06 picas 


18,06x 7,00 picas 


Frame #6 

Upper Left X: 26,06 picas 
Upper Left Y: 60,06 picas 


18,06x01,00 picas 


02,00 picas 


Figure 3-17 














3 - 26 


Style 


For instance, Figure 3-18 shows the correct Sizing & Scaling 
settings for frame #1. 


SIZING 8 SCALING Q] 

Flow Text Around: On 


Upper Left X; 66,00 Q0 Upper Left V: 04,06 QQ 
Frame Width: 39,00 Frane Height: 11,00j 

Horiz, Padding: 00,00 Vert. Padding: 00,00 picas & points 


Picture Scaling: j Fit in frase I I B y Sca le factors 


Aspect Ratio: 


i Maintained ! 


Distorted I 


X Crop Offset: IX),GO Uj[-j V Crop Offset: 00,IX) {*]{«> 
Scale Hidth: IX),00 Scale Height: 00,IX) 



Cancel 


Figure 3-18. 


NOTE: Don't be concerned if the small “jump text frame ” at the 
bottom of the page overlaps the frame above it. Later, when 
you change the Body Text inter-line spacing, you will make the 
frame line up with the bottom column guide. 

Add a ruling box around the TOC 

Before you place the text, add a Ruling Box Around the frame 
reserved for the Table of Contents (frame #5). This box will 
visually separate the TOC from the adjacent articles. 

H Select frame #5. 

1$ Ruling Box Width: Frame 

Around Height of Rule 1: 00.25 fractional pts 

Place the text tiles 

With the frames in place and correctly sized, you are ready to 
place the text files. Since the text files were pretagged, they 
will be partially formatted as soon as they are placed. You will 
do the rest of the formatting later. 

H Select frame #1, then place the file 3LOGO.TXT by select¬ 
ing its name from the Assignment List (Figure 3-19). 
















Place the text files 


3 - 27 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Figure 3-19. 

M Select frame #2 and place 3HEAD.TXT inside of it (See 
Figure 3-20). 



Figure 3-20. 

H Select frame #3 and place 3NEWS-1.TXT inside. 

Ventura fits as much of 3NEWS-1.TXT into the frame as it can 
and then stops. To continue placing the text file, select 
another frame and click again on the file name in the Assign¬ 
ment List. 


I Select frame #4 and select 3NEWS-1.TXT again from the 
Assignment List. 

















































3 - 28 


Style 


Ventura picks up where it left off and flows more of the file 
into frame #4. It stops again when the frame is filled. Later 
you will place the remainder of the article on page two. Before 
going on, check to make sure your first page resembles the one 
we show in Figure 3-21. 



Figure 3-21 . After placing the text on the first 
page, your page should look like this 
illustration. 


Create a table of contents 

To create a table of contents, you will type text directly into a 
frame. The text you enter will be treated as a separate file 
when you save the chapter. 

** NOTE: Text typed into a separate frame is saved as part of the 
caption file unless you rename it as shown below. 

II Enable Tfext mode. Change to Normal or Enlarged View. 
Make sure Show Tabs & Returns is selected from from the 
Options menu. Click the cursor anywhere inside frame #5. 

The end of file marker appears at the top left corner of the 
frame. 












Create a table of contents 


3 - 29 


** TIP: Remember, you can zoom into a selected area on the 
page by placing the mouse cursor at the spot which will be the 
upper left corner of the magnified view and pressing Ctrl-N or 
Ctrl-E. 

Wi Place the text cursor in front of the marker and type: Table 
of Contents [Enter] 

Now type the TOC entries, line by line. Press the tab key once 
between the text and the page number (Figure 3-22). 



Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


!!!!!!l!!!!!!!!!!!lll|y c:\temp\3HEWS.chp onews.stv) iIIIIiii!iiHiiiiiiilil ♦ 


Italic 

Smell 

Superscript 
Subscript 
Underline 
|Couble UndrLn] 
Strike-thru 
Overscore 


Q 


E 



R Pg B 9881 


X 


jitibte computes Italy in place it XYZ Many of th^ 
jrthar softvwi packages would have required the pur-j 
phase of new or incompatible computers. Mr. Zyg-> 


Table of Contentsl 

President approves desktop pubbshing-lf 

XYZ hies specklist«2ff 

Hew plant eomes on*line«3ll 

People on the move*51l 

Letters to the editor ■»&! 

Ofendar-ep 


-bV-W 


4* 




fomplished electronically on 1h{ 

puter.l 

! These time and cost savings 

o adoption of desktop pubb'shij 

pnty benefits. “We are firmly 

desktop publishing program w 

|he look and the impact of XY( 

t>epthorne. M If you want a docui 

lance, it must look important Ve| 

Sever/ department Vie ability 

jpages.'l 

] The new desktop publishing 
^ library of professional-qua 
Employees an obtain the benefil 
typesetting even if they have no I 
jvill need to do is select an a.pp] 
be it to process their document 

Including business, technical d 

|ers will be developed for m*hou| 
Corporation, f 

I “The average consumer is b| 

tuned to high-quality graphic 


lEII 


Figure 3-22 


President approves desktop 
publishing[Tab]1[Enter] 

XYZ hires specialist [Tab] 2 [Enter] 

New plant comes on-line [Tab] 3 [Enter] 

People on the move [Tab] 5 [Enter] 

Letters to the Editor [Tab] 6 [Enter] 

Calendar[Tab]8[Enter] 


■NOTE: If you make a mistake you can delete a letter by 
pressing the backspace or Del key 



























3-30 


Style 


Once you type text into a frame, you can give it a name and 

save it in the text format of your choice (Figure 3-23). 

M Enable Frame mode. Select the table of contents frame 
(frame #5). 

The default file name, “FRAME TEXT,” appears in the Cur¬ 
rent Selection Box. 

H Select File Type/Rename from the Edit menu. 

^ Move to the New Name line. Press Esc to clear the line and 
type: C : \ TEMP\3NEWSTOC. TXT 

m Choose Text Format: ASCII and click OK to close the dialog 
box. 



Figure 3-23. 


This saves the table of contents text as the file 
3NEWSTOC.TXT in the C:\TEMP subdirectory and displays 
the new file name in the Assignment List. 

There’s one thing left on the first page: the jump text at the 
bottom of the page. You will create it just as you created the 
TOC text: by typing directly into the frame. This time, how¬ 
ever, you will not give it a new file name. Because you are not 
renaming the file, the text you type will be stored in the 
chapter’s caption file. 







Insert a page 


3 - 31 


Enable Text mode and click anywhere inside frame #6 (See 
Figure 3—24). Then type: Continued on page 2 


Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



ii!ll!!i!!i|!!i!il!iil c:\iemp\3MEWs.chp omews.stv) liiijilllllll 


Nornol 

•♦Id 

Italic 

Smell 

Superscript 
Subscript 
Underline 
|DouDla UrtdrLnj 
Strlke-thn 
Overscore 


\E 


Id 





t*t? 


in irmVf ccnvmccA thatthi nW 

Itskiop publishing prograin Mill substantially improve 

look and tht impact of XYZ’s docuiraits," said Mr! 
ptpthcm*. “If you wint i document trated with impor-j 
bnct, it must bok impertint Venturi Publisher will give 
kvtry depirtment the ability to creite grut-kokingj 
fijes.'f j 

j The new desktop publishing specialist will be miking 
« library of profcsaml-quabty style sheets, XY« 
employees on obtain the benefits of graphic design ind 
typesetting even if they hive no special training. All they* 
hill need to do is select in appropriate style sheet ini 
use it to process their document. Libraries of style sheets 
including business, technical documents, and newsletj 
tars will be developed for in-house use throughout XY^ 
corporation, f i 

1 The average consumer is becoming increasingly it-j 
pined to high-quality gnphx design," said President 

1 n*4n*r.~w«T.'r.r. -.-.r.„.-..-r.r.- rJ. 


IT 


Figure 3-24 



Stopping point 


Are you keeping up with the pace? If not, take a moment to get 
out of your chair and stretch. When you’re recharged, sit back 
and review what you’ve done and what remains to be com¬ 
pleted in the style section. First you made format changes to 
the overall chapter. Then you laid out page one by adding 
frames and placing text inside. 


Now you are ready to tackle page two. Once this layout work 
is complete, you can begin to format the text by working 
systematically through each paragraph in each frame. 

If you must stop now, save your work by pressing Ctrl-S, then 
select Quit from the File menu. Return to this spot in the text 
when you are ready to resume the project. Otherwise, move on 
to the next section now. 


Insert a page 

If you are starting up again, load Ventura and open the chap¬ 
ter C:\TEMP\3NEWS.CHP to begin where you left off. Once 












































3 - 32 


Style 


you are on page one of the document, you are ready to proceed 
with the instructions that follow. 

When you place text in frames (as opposed to putting it on the 
Page), Ventura does not create new pages automatically. 
Therefore, you must manually insert a new page. 

II Select Insert/Remove Page from the Chapter menu. Choose 
Operation: Insert New Page After Current Page. Click OK. 


INSERT/RBIOVE PAGE [7] 

Operation; 

Insert New Page Before Current Page 




Insert New Page After Current Page 1 




Remove Current Page 


Cancel 


Ventura inserts the new page and moves you to it. 

At this point, you can add frames to the new blank page as you 
did earlier on page one. Use Figure 3-25 to gauge the ap¬ 
proximate positions and sizes. 

You can use several strategies for placing frames on the page. 
One idea is to draw the frames in approximate position, then 
return to each frame one by one to check its position with the 
Sizing & Scaling dialog box (as explained below). In that case, 
we recommend that you press and hold the Shift key as you 
click on the Add New Frame button. As long as the Shift key is 
depressed, Ventura will let you continue to draw frames 
without the need to choose the Add New Frame button each 
time. 



Insert a page 


3 - 33 


Frame #8 

Upper Left X: 06,00 picas 
Upper Left Y: 06,06 picas 


18,06x16,00 picas 


Frame #9 

Upper Left X: 06,00 picas 
Upper Left Y: 22,06 picas 


18,06x39,00 picas 


Frame #7 

Upper Left X: 06,00 picas 
Upper Left Y: 04,00 picas 


18,06x02,00 picas 


Frame #10 

Upper Left X: 26,06 picas 
Upper Left Y: 04,06 picas 


18,06x34, 00 picas 


Leave a two-pica space 
between frames for the caption 


Frame #11 

Upper Left X: 26,06 picas 
Upper Left Y: 40,06 picas 


18,06x21, 00 picas 


Figure 3-25 













3-34 


Style 


If you prefer, you can draw and position each frame as you go. 
First, draw the frame as closely as you can. Then, with the 
frame still highlighted, choose Sizing & Scaling, you can 
return to this dialog box for the next frame by pressing Ctrl-X, 
a keyboard shortcut that tells Ventura to bring up the last 
dialog box again. 

*+NOTE: If you make a mistake , you can always delete a frame 
by pressing the Del key or selecting Cut Frame from the Edit 
menu. 

Finally, you can also create frames by drawing the first one, 
then copying it to the clipboard. Create new frames by press¬ 
ing the Ins key to put a copy on the page. Move the copy into 
position and change its size. This is particularly useful when 
creating multiple frames of the same size. 

Size and scale the frames 

After adding the frames, check the dimensions one by one 
with Sizing & Scaling from the Frame menu. Use Figure 3-22 
as your guide. 

Place the text 

Finish placing the text files by selecting the frame, then 
choosing a file name from the Assignment List. At this stage, 
don’t worry whether or not the text fits perfectly inside the 
frame. 

H Select frame #8 and place the remainder of text file 
3NEWS-1.TXT inside. 

^ Select frame #9 and place 3NEWS-2.TXT inside. 

^ Select frame #10 and place 3NEWS-2.TXT inside. 

When you have finished, change to Reduced View to check 
that your screen looks similar to Figure 3-26: 



Add jump text on page two 


3-35 


Desk file Edit Vie* Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Figure 3-26. 


Add jump text on page two 

^ Enable Text mode. 

H Change to Normal or Enlarged View. Place the text cursor 
anywhere in the small frame (frame #7) at the top of the left 
column (Figure 3-27). Type: Continued from page 1 



Desk File Edit Vie* Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


11 -= = C:\TEK>\3MEWS.CHP (3NEKS.SM 




FilVWmter 1389* 


ifT 


Continued from page 1] 

^ygniewskiThey have come to expect it In the future! 
pompanies that do not produce attractive documents wil| 
$>e at a disadvantage. We are determined that the docu-j 
Jnents we produce at XYZ, both internal and external* 
kill demonstrate the same commitment to quality that 
bis always set this company apart from the crowd.** j 
| According to President Zygniewski, the desktop* 
publishing project is the first step toward total com* 
fcuteriaationitXYZ.D j 


jhis library to create documents 
jext and graphics files into the 
| U A style sheet defines the nil 
Continued Belden. “Once these] 
lypesetters an quickly achieve 
pimply by tagging the paragraph 
is a Headline, Sub-Head, etc. Sty 
^ers achieve a typeset look, a \ 
Results that previously required 
by high-priced professionals.** 

I Ms. Belden will be institut 
help XYZ personnel get up to s] 
Jbe completing approximately fo 
$veek from a list compiled 
kninigers. Once completed and 
kill be available for reuse! 
j Belden will also be leading 
pasic workshop for beginners inf 
feower users. In addition, she 


E 


Figure 3-27. 


As before, the text you type into the frame is automatically 
saved to the caption file the next time you save the chapter. 




























































3 - 36 


Style 


Mission accomplished. Since frame #11 is reserved for a pic¬ 
ture file (to be added later), you have finished the basic layout. 
Now you can start tagging. As always, you should start with 
Body Text and then step through the document from begin¬ 
ning to end. 

Format the Body Text 

You may want to change to Normal View (Ctrl-N) as you tag 
the document. 

P Press the Home key to return to the first page of the 
document. 

H Enable Paragraph mode. 

i§ Select the paragraph in frame #3 that begins “We initially 
thought... ” (Figure 3-28). Refer back to Figure 3-17 if 
necessary to recall the frame numbers and positions. 


Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



!|ii!i||iiij(|i(i|!ii!lill! C:\TEHP\3NEWS.CHP (3NEWS.STV) Hi! 


sss-ssssj 


s* 

Address 

11 

Body Text 

■ 

Bullet 


Byline 


Credo 


DATE 

■ 

Deckheod 

■ 

Headline 

1 

Hosthcod 

i 

Subhead 


TOC entry 

LL 

TOC Title 


□ 


□j 

■■i 


j President Xavier Y. Zygniewski announced today his 
approval of a 12-month pton to install desktop publishing 
Workstations in key departments throughout XYZ Cor 
poration. The announcement follows a three-month pilot 
■study conducted by the Marketing Communications 
Department!_ 



Several technological advances make the company-; 
Wide strategy feasible. First, XYZ was ible to stand-: 
Wdize on a single software program for all applications.: 
•This standardization will reduce startup, training and; 
•support costs. Second, the selected software, Xerox Ven-; 
Win Publisher, will run on the IBM XT* and AT-torrr; 
gabble computers akeidy in place it XYZ Many of the] 
pther software packages would have required the pur: 
jrhase of new or incompatible computers. Mr. Zyg-: 


jniewsld confirmed that the new:] 
tin over a 12-month period on ]] 
iment basis, beginnmg with Mir ]: 
: “We are delighted to be p: 
desktop publishing for XYZ,’ 
•Manager of Marketing Comm 
jpassing on what we learn in thi 
•seminars for employees in o 
Marketing Communications I 
jlesktop publishing specialist 
•training and support [see relate 
• Mr. Depthome said the pile 
■that XYZ can expect cost saving: 
ithe manual meins now used t( 
documents. In addition, turnaro 
icut by 50% as well, since the d< 
Ho be sent to an outside com 
•typesetting and pasteup. Thes 
•complished electronically on th 
iputer.1 

: These fame and cost savings 
of desktop puV:sh; 


) adoptio 


Figure 3-28. 

11 Alignment Horz. Alignment: Left 

ii Spacing Inter-Line: 12.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: When Not At Column Top 












Format the Logo 


3 - 37 


*+NOTE: From this point on, any spacing values not specified 
should be set to 00.00 fractional pts (or 00,00 picas & points). 
In the example above, for instance, you would set Above, 
Below, and Inter-Paragraph to 00.00 fractional pts. 

Format the Logo 

A newsletter’s nameplate, or logo , should be the dominant 
element on the page. It should be easy to read and large 
enough so it doesn’t vie for attention with the credo or the 
headlines. 

^ Go to frame #1. Select the paragraph “The Newsletter,” 
which has been defined as the Masthead tag in the original 
style sheet. Let’s change some of its attributes. 

^ Font Size: 072.0 points 

*+NOTE: Your printer may not be capable of 72-point type. 

You have several choices if your printer cannot produce 72- 
point type. First, you can use the Set Printer Info dialog box to 
switch to PostScript just for the on-screen examples. Switch 
back before printing. When you switch back, Ventura will 
make an attempt to substitute font and font sizes. 

Second, you can simply use your original printer, and sub¬ 
stitute the largest font available in place of 72-point type. 
Keep the line spacing and other selections the same so your 
screen will match the book’s as closely as possible. Your ex¬ 
ample will not look quite as good at printout time, but you 
should be able to follow along for learning purposes without 
any problems. 

Third, you can add a 72-point font to your system, either by 
buying it from a third-party vendor, or by generating it with a 
font building program. 

Don’t worry yet about the way the logo looks (Figure 3-29). In 
a moment you will adjust it to fit. First work through the 
Paragraph menu and change the Alignment and Spacing. 




3 - 38 


Style 



Figure 3-29. 


Overall Width: Frame-Wide 

Below: 12.00 fractional pts 
Inter-Line: 48.00 fractional pts 

The logo is too large for the current frame. You could reduce 
the font size, but that would diminish the impact of the logo. 
Instead, you can use one of Ventura’s typographic functions to 
tighten up the spacing between individual characters. This 
technique, called tracking, has two benefits: It fits the word 
into the frame and it enhances its readability. Tracking is 
most often used to improve the look of large banner headlines. 
Headlines tend to appear loose if spaced with the same 
proportion as sub-heads or Body Text. Figure 3-30 shows how 
different tracking values affect the apperance of a headline. 

By changing the tracking of the Logo tag you can make it fit 
into the frame without changing the font size or the frame 
size. 


Alignment 

Spacing 













































Format the Logo 


3 - 39 


Very tight The Newsletter 
Tight The Newsletter 
Normal The Newsletter 
Loose The Newsletter 
Very Loose The Newsletter 

Figure 3-30 

11 Select Paragraph Typography from the Paragraph menu. 

^ Choose Automatic Pair Kerning: On, Letter Spacing: Off. 
Choose Tracking: Tighter. Press Esc to clear the tracking 
line and type 0.048 Ems. Click OK. 


■Masthead" TVPOGRAPHV SETTINGS 


Automatic Pair Kerning: On 
Letter Spacing: Off 
Tracking: Tighter 


Up to: 0,100 Eat? 

0.048j Ems 


Grow Inter-Line To Fit: On 


0 


Minimum Space Uidth; 
Normal Space Width: 
Maximum Space Width: 


0.600 * (space width) = 0,167 Ens 
1.000 * (space width) = 0.278 Ens 
2.000 * (space width) = 0.555 Ens 



Cancel 








3-40 


Style 


*+NOTE: Don’t worry if the text overlaps on-screen. When you 
print out the document, the text will appear correctly. 

There’s a lot of power in the Paragraph Typography dialog 
box. For now, we’ll talk about tracking and leave the other 
features for later. Tracking controls the space between letters. 
It is measured in ems. An em space is equal to the point size of 
the type. For 10-point type, an em space is 10 points, for 
18-point type it is 18 points, and so on. 

*+TIP: Standard spacing is generally too wide for display type 
larger than 24.00 fractional pts. To make your pages look more 
professional, use tracking to tighten display type. 

Once you adjust the tracking, the logo should fit neatly into 
the frame on one line. If not, use tracking to tighten it further. 


Change the Credo paragraph 


If you continue with our suggested top-down order, the next 
paragraph you should format is the credo. You will change the 
font and increase the width of its ruling line. 

i! Select the next paragraph in frame #1 starting with “News 
and Information....” 

$$ Confirm that it is tagged as Credo. 


Font 


Alignment 

Spacing 


Face: Times 
Style: Normal 

Overall Width: Frame-Wide 
Inter-Line: 18.00 fractional pts 


Now add a ruling line below. Notice that when you widen the 
rule, you also add extra space above it. The extra white space 
helps visually separate the rule from the text. 

H Select Ruling Line Below from the Paragraph menu. 
Choose Width: Frame. Make Space Above Rule 1: 06.00 
fractional pts and Rule 1:10.00 fractional pts. 




Create a dateline 


3 - 41 


"Credo" RULING LINES BELOW 



1 

0 

Width: 

Frane 






Blank 





Pattern: 

Solid 





Dashes: 

Off 










36.00 

Space Above Rule 1 : 

06 . eel 





Height of Rule 1 : 

io.ee 

Custon Indent: 

00.00 

<■ s j 

71 

Space Below Rule 1 : 

0Q.ee 

Custom Width: 

00.00 



Height of Rule 2: 

QQ.ee 





Space Below Rule 2: 

QQ.ee 

Dash Width: 

00.00 



Height of Rule 3: 

00.00 

Dash Spacing: 

00.00 

fractional pts 1 

Space Below Rule 3: 

00.00 

BQ 




Overall Height: 

16.00 








BBS 

3 _ 

Cancel | 


When you are finished the frame should look like Figure 3-31: 



Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


- C:\TEMP\3NEWS.CHP (3MEWS.STV) 


News and Information for Eniplojees of the XYZ Corporation! 


Cost savings prtdxMl I j 

President approves desktop publishing 
oompany-wideD 


Figure 3-31. 


Create a dateline 

Next you will create a dateline that puts two different tags — 
Date and Volume — on the same line. 

II Select the next paragraph “Fall/Winter 1989.” 

Since this paragraph was already pretagged, the tag name 
(DATE) appears in the Current Selection Box. However, since 
the format for this tag doesn’t yet exist in the style sheet, 
Ventura displays it with Body Text attributes and in all caps 
















































3 - 42 


Style 


in the Assignment List. You will adjust its font, alignment, 
and spacing and add a rule below. 

Size: 008.0 points 

Horz. Alignment: Left 
In/Outdent Width: 00,00 picas & points 

Inter-Line: 12.00 fractional pts 

H Select Breaks from the Paragraph menu. Confirm that Line 
Break is set to Before. 

Now add a frame-wide rule below the tag. 

H Select Ruling Line Below. Choose Width: Frame. Enter 
06.00 fractional pts of Space Above Rule 1, and give Rule 1 
a height of 00.25 fractional pts (Figure 3-32.) 


"DATE" RULING LINES BEL0N 



□ 

Width: Frane 
Color: Black 




Pattern: Solid 




Dashes: Off 



36.00 

Space Above Rule 1: 06.00 




Height of Rule 1: 00.25| 

Custon Indent: 

00.00 f <• i! 


Space Below Rule 1: 00.00 

Custon Width: 

00,00 


Height of Rule 2: 00.00 
Space Below Rule 2: 00.00 

Dash Width: 

00,00 


Height of Rule 3: 00.00 

Dash Spacing: 

00,00 fractional ptsl 

Space Below Rule 3: 00.00 

D H 



Overall Height: 06.25 





| Cancel | 


Figure 3-32. 


Font 

Alignment 


Spacing 


Change the Volume tag 

Now you will select the paragraph pre-tagged as Volume. To 
allow it to reside on the same line as the Date, make it 
right-justified and set the Line Break after the tag instead of 
before. (A Line Break Before would cause a break between the 
date and the volume paragraphs.) 

i! Select the last paragraph in frame #1, “Vol.l No. 4.” 

^ Font Size: 008.0 points 









Add the Kicker tag 


3 - 43 


Horz. Alignment: Right 
In/Outdent Width: 00,00 picas & points 

Line Break: After 

Check that your screen resembles Figure 3-33 (if you do not 
see the tab and end of paragraph symbols, make sure Show 
Tabs & Returns is turned on in the Options menu). 


Alignment 

Breaks 


Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


C:\TEMP\3MEWS.CHP (3NEWS.STV) 


,12 ,« ,24 ,22 


i.i J : 


Th^Jewsletterf 


News jnd Information for Employees of the XYZ Corporation! 


Cost savings predxtalfl 

4 President approves desktop publishing 
company-wideO 


Figure 3-33. 


You’ve just learned a valuable skill: How to make two different 
tags reside on the same line. As you saw, the trick is to give the 
first tag a line break before and the second tag a line break 
after. 

You have to be careful when putting two paragraphs on the 
same line or the text will overlap. In the example above, you 
kept them separate by making one flush left and the other 
flush right. You could also have used In From Left and In 
From Right spacing to separate the two. 


Add the Kicker tag 

A kicker is a lead-in heading that introduces a headline. Since 
the tag name and format does not exist in the current style 
sheet, you will add a new tag. 

§i Select the paragraph “Cost savings predicted.” 

II Select Add New Tag from the Side-Bar. 









































When the dialog box appears, move to the Tag Name to Add 
line and type: Kicker (Figure 3-34). 



Figure 3-34. 


Format the Kicker tag 

§! Font Face: Helvetica 

Style: N-Italic 
Size: 012.0 points 

11 Alignment Overall Width: Frame-Wide 

H Spacing Above: 12.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 24.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: When Not at Column Top 

Now you will add a ruling line below the kicker to separate it 
from the headline. 

H Ruling Line Width: Text 

Below Space Above Rule 1: 03.00 fractional pts 

Height of Rule 1: 00.25 fractional pts 

By selecting Text in the Ruling Line Below dialog box, you are 
telling Ventura to make the ruling line exactly as long as the 
text. If you write a longer kicker, the rule will automatically be 
lengthened. For a shorter kicker, the rule will be shortened. 







Change the Headline tag 


3 - 45 


Change the Headline tag 

To make the headline in frame #2 easier to read, increase its 
size and its inter-line spacing. 

H Select the paragraph “President approves desktop publish¬ 
ing company-wide” in frame #2. 

^ Font Size: 030.0 points 

H Spacing Below Spacing: 00.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 30.00 points 

Add in Above: When Not at Column Top 

^ Paragraph Tracking: Tighter 

Typography Ems: 0.035 

When you are finished making these changes, the headline 
should look like Figure 3-35: 


Desk File 

Edi 

Vie* Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Dptions 


0,0 

.1*..f*.1".1“.I 3 ".1“. t 



Body Text 

' Bullet 

Byline 

-L 

Tti&lews letter 

Credo 

DATE 

12- 

I News and Information foi Eniplojees of the XYZ Corporation! ■> 

Decfchcdd 

Headline 


19690 { • VeSS:- 

__ Kicker 

Masthead 

su&tiead 


i Cost savings predidedf i | Ki 

TOC entry 
* TOC Title 

R Pg tt 0001 

] 

President approves desktop 
ipublishingcompkny-wideG m 


Figure 3-35. 


Are you beginning to notice improvements? By enlarging the 
logo and the headline and adding rules, you have made the 
front page easier to read and less cluttered. 

We realize you are working very hard in this chapter. You are 
duplicating the steps you must go through in real life to 
construct a professional-looking newsletter. Although taking 
the “real-life” approach means spending a few extra minutes, 
it pays off. By the end of this chapter, you will be familiar with 
all of Ventura’s basic functions. Stick with it. 




















































3-46 


Style 


Add a BodyFirst tag 

To distinguish the lead-in paragraph from Body Text, you will 
create a tag called BodyFirst. The tag will be aligned flush left 
with no first-line indent. 

11 Select the paragraph that begins “President Xavier Y. Zyg- 
niewski announced...” in frame #3. 

H Add New Tag Tag Name to Add: BodyFirst 

M Alignment In/Outdent Width: 00,00 picas & points 

The first paragraph should look like Figure 3—36: 



Body Text 
BodyFirst 
Bullet 
Bylin* 
Credo 
DATE 

Deckhcad 
Headline 
Richer 
Hasthead 
Subhead 
TOC entry 




111 



President approves desktop 
ipublishingcompdriy-widen 


•President Xavier Y. Zygniewsld announced today his 
approval of i 12-monlh plan io instill desktop publish¬ 
ing workstations in key departments throughout XYZ 
Corpontion. The announcement follows i three- 
Imonth pilot study conducted by the Marketing Com- 
jmunications Department! 

• “We initially thought that desktop publishing would 
jonty have advantages for one or two departments,” 

-aid President Zygniewski, "but our study revealed 
jihat it could save time and money throughout the com¬ 
pany while improving the appearance and effective¬ 
ness of our documents."!! 


would have required the purchase of m 
■ patible computers. Mr. Zygniewski conf| 
hew software will be phased in over a 
•period on a departmenMy-department 
jning with Marketing Communxabcns,!] 

• “We are delighted to be pioneering 
desktop publishing for XYZ," said John 
jManiger of Marketing Communication: 
•passing on what we learn in the form ol 
and seminars for employees in other de \ 
The Marketing Communications Depart i 
a desktop publishing specialist to overs 


Figure 3-36. 


Change the TOC Title 

The last frame (frame #5) on the page includes the text for the 
table of contents. To format the TOC, first tag the text, then 
change the tag attributes. 

^ Select the paragraph “Table of Contents” and tag it as TOC 
Title, which was already defined in the original style sheet 
(Figure 3-37). 

II Font Face: Times 

!! Alignment Horz. Alignment: Left 
























Figure 3-37. 


Use the In From Left spacing option to move the TOC Title in 
from the left margin of the frame. 

H Spacing Above: 12.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 12.00 fractional pts 
In From Left: 01,00 picas & points 

P Ruling Line Width: Text 

Below Height of Rule 1: 05.00 fractional pts 

Space Below Rule 1: 30.00 fractional pts 

After adding the ruling line below, the TOC Title should look 
like Figure 3-38 



Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


C:\TEMP\3f1EWS.CHP (3MEPS.STV) 



Table of Contents! 


President approves desktop publishing* 1 1 

XYZ hires specialist* 

2f 

New phnt comes on-line* 

3f 

People on the move* 

51 

Letters to the editor* 
Calendar* 80 

51 


microcomputer! 

: These tin* and cost siring* provided 
'spur to adoption of desktop publishing, 
inot the only benefits. “We are firmly 
the new desktop publishing program 
improve the look and the impart of 
Jnents^sud Mr. Depthome. If you 
greeted with importance, it must look 
•tun Publisher will give every departm 
■create great-looking piges."l 
• The new desktop publishing speeafy 
faking a library of professional-quality 
]XYZ employees an obtain the benefits 
jdesign and typesetting even if they havr 
itraining. All they will need to do is seler 
jpropnate style sheet and use it to process 
:...Continued. an.pLgt.2D. 









































































3 - 48 


Style 


** TIP: We used Below Spacing to visually separate the Title of 
the TOC from the following TOC entries. 

Modify the TOC entry tag 

Hi Select the paragraph “President approves desktop publish¬ 
ing... ” and tag it as TOC entry. 

Face: Times 
Style: Bold 

Above: 18.00 fractional pts 
Inter-Line: 06.00 fractional pts 

You will use Tab Settings to create leader dots. As the name 
implies, these dots help lead the eye across the page. They are 
useful for indexes, tables of contents, and other lists. 

II Select Tab Settings from the Paragraph menu. Choose Tab 
Number: 1, Tab Type: Right, Tab Shown As: Leader Char., 
Tab Location: 17,00 picas & points. Then choose Leader 
Char: (...) and Leader Spacing: 1. 


HI Font 
M Spacing 


u T0C entry" TAB SETTINGS 


m 

Tab Number: 


♦ 


Tab Type: 

Right 



Tab Shown As: 

Leader Char 1 

Tab Location: 

17,00| 

picas & points 

Leader Char: 

... 


046 (ASCII) 

Leader Spacing: 

1 



Auto-Leader: 

Off 






Cancel 


i! Tag the remaining paragraphs in the table of contents as 
TOC entry. (Hint: use the Shift-Click method to tag them 
all at once.) 

The finished TOC should look like Figure 3-39. 







Add the Jump tag 


3-49 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



|g iiaiiilllilii ialil5ircT\fD«Aaiiiisjaf'?3NalsTV)'liiililili iiiil iiilililg ♦ 


i*..i 1 *.I”. 


Tableo^oatentsff 

IVtsifcni approves desktcp publishing*_Iff 

XTZhres specialist*.2f 

Ho* pint (ims 3f 

ftoapte an the mavr*..51 

Letkrsto Iht editar*.61 

Calendar*.SI 


'deoir.pisntA Medronicilly on 'ihe \ 


L fr 

microcomputer! 

: These time and cost savings provided 
spur to adoption of desktop publishing, 
inot the only bnebts. “We ire irmly coif 
the new desktop publishing program wi' 
improve the took and the impart of XYl 
merits,” said Mr. Depthome. If you wai|: 
•treated with importance, it must took im 
■tura Publisher will give every department 
•create great-looking pages’ll 
■ The new desktop publishing spedabi 
jmikmg a library of professional-quality 
•XYZ employees an obtain the benefits 
idesign and typesetting even if they hard 
;training. AH they will need to do is setoc 
jpropr&te style sheet and use it to procesj 
:...Contiiui«daii.pige2fl. 


E 


Figure 3-39. 


Add the Jump tag 

There’s only one more paragraph to tag on page one: the jump 
text. 

li Select the paragraph "Continued on page 2.” 

H Add New Tag Tag Name to Add: Jump 

M Font Style: N-Italic 

Size: 010.0 points 

H Alignment In/Outdent Width: 00,00 picas & points 

^ NOTE: If necessary, adjust the frame size so the text aligns 
with the bottom of the column guide. 

After you finish making these changes, your screen should 
look similar to Figure 3^40. 

Do not be concerned if your screen doesn’t match ours exactly. 
Different monitors and slight differences in frame sizes can 
vary the position of elements on the page. The important 
thing is to understand how to adjust for these differences. You 
may have to experiment with font size or frame size to make 
the small jump text appear correctly. Remember, we are 
giving you guidelines, not a rigid structure for creating docu¬ 
ments. You should feel free to explore on your own if you don’t 
like the way something turns out. 
















































Stopping point 


With only a page to go, take a break and admire your work. 
(Hint: Save what you've done so far before you start patting 
yourself on the back.) Your efforts have paid off: The newslet¬ 
ter is really shaping up. If you must pause, you can quit now 
and resume at a later time. Otherwise, continue on to the next 
section. 


Assigning function keys 

If you are starting up anew, load Ventura and open the chap¬ 
ter C:\TEMP\3NEWS.CHP. Before you go to page two, we 
want to introduce another time-saving Ventura feature that 
speeds up tagging. 

Until now you have always tagged text with the mouse while 
in Paragraph mode. You can decrease formatting time by 
assigning tag names to Function Keys in the Update Tag List 
Option (Paragraph menu). By assigning key tags to each of 
the 10 function keys, you can edit and tag simultaneously, 
without switching back and forth between Text and Para¬ 
graph modes. Here’s how: 

II While you are in Paragraph mode, select Update Tag List 
from the Paragraph menu. 
























Assigning function keys 


3 - 51 


^ NOTE: You can also bring up the Assign Function Keys dialog 
box by pressing Ctrl-K. If you press Ctrl-K while you are in 
Paragraph mode, Ventura displays the Update Tag List dialog 
box. Then you choose Assign Func Keys button to view the 
function keys. If, however, you press Ctrl-K while you are in 
Text, Frame, or Graphic mode, Ventura automatically displays 
the Assign Function keys dialog box. 

H If Ventura asks you if you want to Save or Abandon your 
work, choose Save. 

H Choose Assign Func Key from the dialog box. A list of ten 
function keys appears. 

M Move to the F2 line and type: BodyFirst 

H Now complete the dialog box as shown in Figure 3-41. 
Make sure you match the existing tag names character for 
character and space for space. Click OK to return to the 
dialog box. Click OK again to return to the document. When 
Ventura asks if you want to Save, Save As, or Abandon the 
changes to the style sheet, choose Save. 


ASSIGN FUNCTION KEVS Q] 


FI: 

Address 

F2: 

BodyFirst 

F3: 

Bullet 

F4: 

Byline 

F5: 

Credo 

F6: 

Date 

F7: 

Deckhead 

F8: 

Headline 

F9: Junto 

F10: 

Body Text! 



Cancel 


Figure 3-41. The Assign Function Keys dialog box. 


Notice that we have listed the tags in the same alphabetical 
order as they are found in the Assignment List. Alphabetical 
order makes it easier to remember which tags are assigned to 
which function keys. However, feel free to use any order that 
makes sense to you. For instance, you might choose to assign 







3 - 52 


Style 


Headl to FI, Head2 to F2, and so on. Many people reserve the 
F10 key for Body Text, to follow the convention established 
with the style sheets that come with Ventura. 

TIP: It is generally best to assign tag names to function keys in 
the same alphabetical order as they appear in the Assignment 
List. If you have more tags than function keys, assign the most 
commonly-used tags to the ten keys. 

Now go to page two and try out the new function key assign¬ 
ments. 

!! Press End to go to the last page of the document. 

^ Go to frame #9. Enable Text mode. Place the text cursor 
anywhere within the paragraph “By Joe Smith.” Press the 
F4 key to tag it as Byline (See Figure 3-42). 



File Edit Vie* Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


IHIIIIII c:\temp\3mews.chp (3NEHS.STV) ilililiililliiillililil ♦ 


Jhat the documents we produce it X?Z, both internal 
jnd external, will demonstrate the sure commitment 
jo quality thit his always set this company ipirt from 
jhe ffowiTf 

| According to President Zygniewsld, the desktop 
publishing project is the first step toward total com¬ 
puterization at XYZ.D 


| XYZ hies DTP speckfctl 

IfoanBelden joins Marketing Comminici- 
fcore teamff 


; The Marketing Communxabons Department his 
jired in experienced desktop publishing pTP) 
specialist to help XYZ mike the transition to the new 
technology. Ms. Belden, formerly the president of her 
t>wn consulting firm, is i noted authority on electronic 
publishing in general, ind Ventun Publisher software 
In partxular.f 


layout " continued Belton. “On 

Refined, non-typesetters an 

ijuility results simply by tigginj ;i 

jheir own document as a Headl 

fctyle sheets let even beginners 

ind let professionals get results 

Juired typesetting and paste-up 

fcionals. , 1l 
| Ms. Belden will be institutij 
fielp XYZ personnel get up to s] 
jvill be completing approximate! 
Sheets per week from a hst coi 
departmental managers. Once 
proved, these formats will be a] 

i Belden will also be leading 

Itusic workshop for beginners 

for power users. In addition, sh 

jy “newsletter" of tips, tricks, te| 

ind news of interest to XYZ' 

Wll be distributing the first edH| 

bed month □ 


EH 


Figure 3-42. 

Now you will use the function keys again to tag the first 
paragraph of the article as BodyFirst. 

Place the text cursor anywhere in the paragraph “The 
Marketing Communications Department...” Press F2 to tag 
it as BodyFirst. 














































Change the Z_Header tag 


3 - 53 


** TIP: If you forget which tags are assigned to which function 
keys while you are tagging in Text mode, press Ctrl-K to bring 
up the Assign Function Keys dialog box and review the key 
assignments. When you are finished, click OK to close the 
dialog box. 

H Go to small frame (frame #7) at the top of the page. Move 
the text cursor to the paragraph “Continued from page 1.” 
Press F9 to tag the paragraph as Jump. 

*+NOTE: You can use function keys to apply tags, but you must 
switch to Paragraph mode to change or add tags. 

Change the Z Header tag 

Now you will continue to format page two by adding a ruling 
line below the header text. As you will see, you can change the 
appearance of the header just as you can change any other 
paragraph on the page. The difference, however, is that any 
changes apply to all the headers throughout the document. 

is Enable Paragraph mode. Select the header paragraph 
“Fall/Winter 1989 Page 2 The Newsletter,” (Figure 3-43) 


,$ .12 . 1 $ .24 

■ 1 i ■ ' ■ i ' i ' ' i i * ' ' ' ' i i i i ' ' i 1 i i i i ' ' 1 ' ' ' ' I ' ' i i i ' i ' ' 


■Fall/Winter 1989- I 

3 aee 2- 



Continued from pigs W 


Ibe a gr 



design 

ment. Libraries of style sheets including business, tech¬ 


jstylesb 

nical documents, and newsletters will be developed for 


tinyone 

in-house use throughout KYZ Corporation, ff 


|task of 

l The average consumer is becoming increasingly at¬ 


■KYZ. I 

tuned to high-quality graphic design, 11 said President 


J:hoose 


Figure 3-43. 


Alignment 


Overall Width: Frame-Wide 
In/Outdent Width: 00,00 picas & points 








3 - 54 


Style 


Ruling Line Overall Width: Frame 
Below Space Above Rule 1: 02.00 fractional pts 

Height of Rule 1:10.00 fractional pts 


Add a Headline2 tag 

Since the original style sheet contained only one tag for head¬ 
lines, you will add a second tag to achieve a different look. The 
new Headline2 tag will include a rule with a custom width. 

Hi Select the paragraph “XYZ hires DTP specialist” in frame 
#9. 

Tag Name to Add: Headline2 

Face: Helvetica 
Style: Bold 
Size: 024.0 points 

Overall Width: Frame-Wide 
In/Outdent Width: 00,00 picas & points 

Above: 24.00 fractional pts 
Inter-Line: 24.00 fractional pts 
Add in Above: When Not At Column Top 

Select Ruling Line Above. Choose Width: Custom. Make the 
Height of Rule 1: 06.00 fractional pts and the Space Below 
Rule 1: 06.00 fractional pts. Now switch from fractional 
points to picas & points by clicking on top of the unit 
measurements several times. Next move to Custom Width, 
press Esc to clear the line and type: 14,00 and click OK. 


il Add New Tag 
Font 

II Alignment 
M Spacing 




Change the Deckhead tag 


3 - 55 


"Headline2" RULING LINES ABODE 



0 

Width: 

Custon 



■ 


Color: 

Black 





Pattern: 

Solid 





Dashes: 

Off 










03,00 

Space Above Rule 1: 

00,00 



. 


Height of Rule 1 : 

00,06 

Custon Indent: 

00,00 

nm 

Space Below Rule 1 : 

00,06 

Custon Width: 

14,00| 



Height of Rule 2: 

00,00 





Space Below Rule 2: 

00,00 

Dash Width: 

00,00 



Height of Rule 3: 

00,00 

Dash Spacing: 

00,00 

picas ft points 1 

Space Below Rule 3: 

00,00 

DQ 




Overall Height: 

01,00 








E 


Cancel | 


Change the Deckhead tag 

Only two more tags to change. Then we will show you how to 
rename and remove tags and you will be ready to move on to 
the picture section. 

A deckhead is a short lead-in paragraph that follows the 
headline and introduces the body copy. Change the format of 
the deckhead paragraph. 

H Select the paragraph “Joan Belden joins Marketing Com¬ 
munications... ” in frame #9. 

Face: Helvetica 
Style: B-Italic 

Above: 12.00 fractional pts 
Inter-Line: 12.00 fractional pts 
Inter-Paragraph: 00.00 fractional pts 

The finished tag looks Figure 3-44: 


Font 

Spacing 






3 - 56 


Style 


Desk File 



Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


ililiiliilillil c:\temp\3«ews.chp onews.stv) 


Cr«Ja 

DATE 

Osckhead 

Headline 

Headlines 

KKker 

Subhead 
TOC entry 
TOC Title 
VOLUME 


L Pg * 0062 


£hit the documents we produce it XYZ, both internal 
jind external, will demonstrate the same eommitment 
■b quality that his llways set this company apart from 
■the crowd. 11 

i According to President Zygniewslri, the desktop 
publishing project is the first step toward total com¬ 
puterization at XYZ. 


jXYZ hires DTP 
Specialist 

\Joan Bet den joins Marketing Com 
Imunicaiions team 

&y 3oe Smith 

The Marketing Communications Department his hired j 
an experienced desktop publishing (DTP) specialist to : 
help XYZ make the transiticn to the new technology. • 


choose from this library to treat 
»wn by pouring text and graphi^ 
precoded formats. 

“A style sheet defines the 
layout," continued Bolden. "On 
lefined, non-typesetters can q\ 
quality results simply by tagging 
[hear own document as a Head.1 
Style sheets let even beginners 
ind let professionals get results 
paired typesetting and paste-up| 
siojials." 

Ms. Belden will be institute 
help XYZ personnel get up to sj 
will be completing approximate! 
sheets per week from a list con 
departmental managers. Once 
proved, these formats will be i 

Belden will also be leading 
basic workshop for beginners a 
for power users. In addition, sh 
ft "newsletter" of tips, tricks, te 


E 


Figure 3-44. 


Change the Byline tag 

H Select the Byline paragraph “By Joe Smith.” 

H Font Style: N-Italic 

Spacing Above: 12.00 fractional pts 

Below: 00.00 fractional pts 
Inter-Line: 12.00 fractional pts 


Rename a tag 

After tagging the text, take a moment to clean up the Assign¬ 
ment List. Remove tags you don’t need, and rename tags with 
unclear names. When you rename and remove tags, the 
results are reflected in the current style sheet and in every other 
document that uses that style sheet. If you do not want to 
rename or remove a tag in every document, remember to 
choose Save As and enter a different style sheet name when 
you close the dialog box. 

In this section you will rename the tag “Masthead” to “Logo.” 
Then change the DATE and VOLUME tags from all caps to 
upper and lower case. Since this is the only document so far 
that uses the style sheet 3NEWS.STY no other documents will 
be affected by these changes. 


















Rename a tag 


3 - 57 


*+NOTE: The masthead is a listing of the staff and publisher of 
the newsletter that is normally placed on the inside or last 
page. People commonly confuse the terms logo and mast¬ 
head. 

^ Select Update Tag List from the Paragraph menu and 
choose Save. 

Scroll through the tag name list at the top of the dialog box 
until you see the name Masthead. Click once on the name 
to highlight it. 

^ With the name selected, choose Rename Tag. Move to the 
New Tag Name line and type: Logo then click OK. 



H Scroll through the list again and highlight the tag name 
DATE. Choose Rename Tag. Then move to the New Tag 
Name line and type: Date 

II Repeat the step above to rename the VOLUME tag to 
Volume (from all caps to initial capital only). 

*+NOTE: Do not use Ctrl-X to bring up the Rename Tag dialog 
box again. This will cancel the Update Tag List dialog box 
without saving your changes. 









3-58 


Pictures 


Remove a tag 

H While you are still in the Update Tag dialog box, scroll 
through the tag name list until you see the name Address. 
Click once on the name to highlight it. Choose Remove 
Selected tag, then click OK. The Remove Tag dialog box 
appears. 


REMOVE TAG [?] 

Tag Name to Remove: Address]_ 

Tag Name to Convert to: Body Text_ 



Cancel 


H Click OK again to close the dialog box and choose Save to 
save your changes. 

*+NOTE: When you remove a tag, Ventura converts all occur¬ 
rences of this tag to Body Text unless you tell it otherwise. 


Pictures 


Give yourself another pat on the back. You’ve completed the 
style portion of this document. With text and style complete, 
you’re ready to add a picture to your newsletter. In this section 
you will load and place a picture, and then add a caption. 

Make sure you are on page two. 

H Enable Frame mode. Click anywhere on the empty frame 
(frame #11). 

H Select CHANEL.IMG from the Assignment List. 





Remove a tag 


3 - 59 


The picture is placed into the frame. Now size the picture to 
fill the frame. 


*+NOTE: If the picture is not visible, select Show This Picture 
from the Options menu. 

Hi Select Sizing & Scaling from the Frame menu. 


§ Choose Fit in Frame and Aspect Ratio: Maintained. 


SIZING 8 SCALING [7] 

Flow Text Around: On 


Upper Left X: 26,06] HQ Upper Left V: 40,06 OH 
Frame Width: 18,06 Frame Height: 21,06 

Horiz. Padding: 00,00 Vert. Padding: 00,00 picas 8 points 


Picture Scaling; 
Aspect Ratio: 



| By Scale Factors 



| Distorted | 


X Crop Offset: 06,00 OH V Crop Offset: 00,06 OH 
Scale Width: 18,06 Scale Height: 21,(MI 


jgm | Cancel 


Choosing Fit in Frame and Aspect Ratio Maintained fits the 
picture in the frame and maintains the same horizontal and 
vertical proportions. 

Once the picture has been placed, you can add a caption to the 
frame. In the previous chapter, you created a caption by 
typing directly into the caption frame. This method allows you 
to create long captions and edit them in text editing mode. 

This time you will create a caption label. Caption labels are 
entered and edited in the Anchors & Captions dialog box. They 
cannot be entered or changed in text editing mode. Chapter 
Nine explains how to use caption labels for automatic num¬ 
bering. Right now, however, you will simply use this feature to 
add a short, unnumbered label. 

H Select Anchors & Captions from the Frame menu. 

H Choose Caption: Above. Move to the Label line and type: 
Ms. Joan Belden and then click OK. 







3 - 60 


Pictures 



*+NOTE: If the caption frame overlaps the frame above it, don’t 
worry. Later you will resize the frame to fit the space. 

At this point you can change the attributes of the caption label 
you just created. 

H Enable Paragraph mode. Select the paragraph “Ms. Joan 
Belden.” 

Notice that the Current Selection Box displays a generated 
tag name: Z_LABEL CAP. Ventura automatically assigned 
this tag to the label when you typed it into the Anchors & 
Captions dialog box. You can change this tag in Paragraph 
mode as you would any other. 

Style: B-Italic 
Size: 010.0 points 

Above: 06.00 fractional pts 
Inter-Line: 10.00 fractional pts 
Add in Above: Always 

After you change the attributes, shorten the caption frame 
one line length so the caption text is visually separated from 
the text above. 

H Enable Frame mode. 

11 Select one of the sizing buttons on the caption frame menu 
and reduce the frame by one line snap unit (Figure 3-45). 


Font 

Spacing 













Print selected pages 


3 - 61 



Figure 3-45. 


^ NOTE: If you make the frame too small, select Sizing & Scal¬ 
ing from the Frame menu and make the frame height 02,00 
picas & points. 


Chapter 

Print selected pages 

Having added a picture, you are ready to print the newsletter 
to see the results of your changes. The To Print option (File 
menu) lets you specify which pages to print and the order in 
which to print them. 

P Save the chapter (press Ctrl-S). 

H Select Tb Print from the File menu. 

^ Choose Which Pages: Selected. Move to Through Page, 
press Esc, and type: 0002 

^ Choose Printing Order: 1st to Last and click OK. 































3-62 


Chapter 


PRINT INFORMATION (POSTSCRIPT - Ultimate) 

m 

Which Pages: 

Selected 


From Page: 

0B01 


Through Page: 

0002 


Number of Copies: 

01 


Collated Copies: 

Off 


Printing Order: 

1st to Last 


Paper Tray: 

Default 


Crop Marks: 

Off 


Spot Color Overlays: 

Off 


Huiti■ Chp, Print Files: 

Combined 


Device Name! 

POSTSCRIPT 


Output To: 

C0M1: 




|Cancel| 


Ventura prints both pages of the newsletter. 

*+NOTE: Because of the image on page two of the newsletter, 
the document will take longer to print. 

Understanding set printer info 

This is a good point to introduce you to the Set Printer Info 
dialog box. This selection from the Options menu allows you to 
change printers. Take a moment to glance through the sample 
dialog box in Figure 3-43. 


SET PRINTER INFO (POSTSCRIPT - Ultimate) 

□ 

Device Name: 

I HP LJ+, 300 dpi | ■lUMKiiilliM 


Screen Fonts: 

EGfi| (Use those Hatching this File extension.) 


Output To: 

| LPT1 j| LPT2 II LPT3 | —ifcONn | Directl | 

Filename | 

Width Table: 

C:\UENTURA\0UTPUT.WID 


Cownand: 

| Load Different Width Table (i.e., Font Metrics) | | 


ran 

I Cancel j 


Figure 3-46. 









Understanding set printer info 


3 - 63 


Let’s consider each line and its function. At the top is Device 
Name. As you can see from the example above, this line 
permits you to choose between different printers. If you in¬ 
stalled only one printer during VPPREP then only one printer 
name will appear on the Device Name line. 

** TIP: To add a new printer after installing Ventura, insert Ven¬ 
tura Disk #1 into the A: drive and type vpprep, just as you did 
when originally installing the program. Answer No when 
VPPREP asks you if you are installing for the first time so you 
will not have to redo the entire installation. 

Switching printers is not as simple as making a choice from 
the Device Name line. You must also confirm that the width 
table matches the printer. The width table is a separate file 
that tells Ventura how much space to allow for each character. 
The last line in the dialog box, Quality, signals whether or not 
the width table matches the printer. If Quality says “Ul¬ 
timate,” then you have a correct match. If Quality reads 
“Draft,” you have a mismatch. 

Suppose you choose a new device name and notice that 
Quality says “Draft.” lb switch to the correct width table, click 
on the Load Different Width Table button. Ventura will dis¬ 
play an item selector. Width tables are clearly labeled with 
names similar to printer names. Pick the one that matches 
your printer, then click OK. When you will return to the Set 
Printer Info dialog box, the Quality line will read “Ultimate.” 

^ TIP: Use Draft quality to mimic one printer with another. For 
instance, you could use a LaserJet Plus to imitate a PostScript 
typesetter for proofing purposes. Select the LaserJet device, 
but use the PostScript width table. Although the output will not 
be very attractive, the line endings will be accurate. 

The Screen Fonts line enables you to add screen fonts that 
more closely mimic printed fonts. Adding screen fonts is out¬ 
side the scope of this project. The Output To line lets you 
change the printer port. For example, if you switch your 
printer from COM1 to COM2, there is no need to reinstall 
Ventura. Just make the correct selection on this line. From 
then on, Ventura will send its output to the COM2 serial port 
instead. 



3 - 64 


Chapter 


The Width Table line enables you to confirm which width 
table is in use. It is originally set for the default width table, 
called OUTPUT.WID. Under most circumstances, OUT- 
PUT.WID is the best choice for the documents you create. 
Ventura saves the name of the width table with the style 
sheet. As long as a style sheet specifies the default OUT¬ 
PUT.WID, it can be used on another system, even if that 
system has a different printer. OUTPUT.WID automatically 
matches the printer in use on that particular computer. 

Back up a publication 

You have already encountered Multi-Chapter, which you use 
to back up individual chapters. You can also combine chapters 
into what Ventura calls a publication. The chapters that make 
up a publication can be copied or printed as a group. 

Create a publication 

You will use Multi-Chapter to create a publication called 
PART_ONE. You will use this publication to back up all three 
of the chapters you created in the first section of this book. 

H Place a formatted floppy disk in the A: drive. 

H Select Multi-Chapter from the Options menu. If you 
haven’t saved recently, Ventura asks you to Save or Aban¬ 
don your changes. Choose Save. 

The Multi-Chapter dialog box appears and the current chap¬ 
ter, C:\TEMP\3NEWS.CHP appears highlighted in reverse 
video at the top of the list. 

^ Choose Add Chapter. 

Ventura displays the Item Selection box. 

li With the Backup button, locate the C:\TEMP subdirectory 
and scroll through the listing until you find the 
1REPORT.CHP chapter. Select the chapter. 

Ventura returns you to the Multi-Chapter Operations Box. 
Use the same Add Chapter function to add 2PROPOS.CHP to 
the publication list. 

11 Choose Add Chapter. Select the chapter 2PROPOS.CHP. 




Save the publication 


3 - 65 



Save the publication 

H While still in the Multi-Chapter dialog box, select Save As. 

H Use the Backup button to find the C:\TEMP subdirectory 
and enter the name PART_ONE (notice the underline char¬ 
acter between the “T” and the “O”). Click OK. 



Copy the publication 

^ Make sure that none of the chapters is highlighted. 





















3-66 


Chapter 


If a chapter is highlighted, you will copy just that chapter 
instead of the publication. To deselect a chapter, click 
anywhere inside the dialog box. 

H Select Copy All. 

The name of the publication is displayed at the top of the 
dialog box. The destination lines show the disk drive and 
subdirectory to which each file will be copied. Tell Ventura 
which disk and subdirectory you want to use. 

Hi Move the cursor next to the PUB & CHPs: line, press Esc to 
clear the line and type: A: \ 

H Choose Make All Directories the Same As the First. The 
click OK. 


COPV ALL 

m 


SOURCE (from this file) 

PUB on CHP: 

C:\TEMP\PART ONE.PUB 


DESTINATION (to these directories) 

PUB 8 CHPs: 

A:\j 

STVs 8 WIDs: 

A:\ 

Text Files: 

A:\ 

Graphic Files: 

A:\ 

Image Files'. 

A:\ 



Command: 

1 Hake fill Directories the Sane As the First HbRI 




| OK | | Cancel | 


Ventura copies all the files for all three chapters to the A: 
drive. When the copy function is complete, you return to the 
Multi-Chapter dialog box. 

Hi If you have the time, print the publication by selecting 
Print from the Multi-Chapter dialog box. 

H' Choose Done. When Ventura asks you if you want to aban¬ 
don or save changes made to the publication, click on Aban¬ 
don to return to the work space. 

Congratulations — you made it through Ventura boot camp. 
Getting started from scratch is always the hardest part. Now 
that you’ve completed basic training you’re in shape for al- 




Copy the publication 


3 - 67 


most any assignment. You’ve got the know-how to make docu¬ 
ments more professional, more pleasing, and more effective. 

In the next section of this book, you will use this fundamental 
knowledge as the jumping off point. Part Two will teach you to 
put Ventura through its paces by creating a series of special¬ 
ized, high-performance documents. 

Some of you may not plan to go on to Part Two immediately. 
We recommend that you skim the theory sections of the ad¬ 
vanced chapters even if you can’t take the time to complete the 
exercises. Chapter Four, for instance, introduces the impor¬ 
tant concept of thumbnail sketches. Thumbnail sketches are 
such time-and-trouble-savers that some Ventura instructors 
won’t let their beginning students start a document until they 
have completed a sketch. 


Tips and techniques 

Frame tips 

□ To select a frame, click once anywhere inside its boundary 
while in Frame mode. 

□ To resize a frame, place the cursor on a sizing button on the 
edge of the frame and drag with the mouse to the new size. 

□ To move a frame, place the mouse cursor anywhere inside 
the frame. Hold down the mouse button until the four-way 
arrow appears. Then drag the frame to a new location. 

□ Once you copy a frame into the clipboard, it stays there 
until you replace it with another frame (or until you exit 
Ventura). 

□ You can copy several frames into memory at once. Use 
Shift-Click to select the frames, then delete them or copy 
them to temporary memory. 

□ You can move frames and their contents from one chapter 
to another using temporary memory. Open the first chapter. 
Place the frames you want to move onto one page, then copy 
or delete them to put them into temporary memory. Now 
open the second chapter. (Abandon the changes to the first 
chapter so it will revert to its original form.) Enable Frame 



3 - 68 


Chapter 


mode and press Ins. The frames will appear inside the new 
chapter. 

□ If you will be drawing many frames with similar attributes 
(frame backgrounds, ruling lines, etc.), use the clipboard to 
speed the process. Draw one frame and change its at¬ 
tributes. Copy it to memory. Now paste copies for the suc¬ 
ceeding frames. This is faster than changing line and back¬ 
ground attributes one by one for each frame as you draw it. 

□ Ventura can flow a long text file from one frame to another. 
Select the first frame and click on the file name in the 
Assignment List. Now select the second frame and click on 
the file name again. If you make additions or deletions to 
the text, it will flow back and forth between the frames. 

□ Ventura cannot flow text “backwards.” It cannot flow text to 
a previous page. In addition, it cannot flow text to a pre¬ 
vious frame (one that was drawn on the page first). 

□ Use sizing & scaling from the Frame menu to fine-tune the 
size and position of frames. 

□ Think of the Page as a page-sized frame that automatically 
repeats itself if necessary to accommodate large text files. 

□ You can change the size of the Page with Sizing & Scaling 
just as if it were an ordinary frame. 

□ For documents with several text files, such as newsletters, 
place text into frames rather than placing it on the Page. 

□ When creating a newsletter-style document with frames, 
format the Page first and use it as an invisible snap-to grid 
for drawing frames. 

Text tips 

□ You can type text directly into frames while in Ventura. 

□ Text typed in frames is stored in the caption file unless you 
specify otherwise. To save to a different file, select the 
frame, then use File Type/Rename from the Edit menu to 
specify the file name and format you want instead. 

□ Use the function keys to tag paragraphs while in Text 
mode. First assign tag names to different function keys 
using Assign Function Keys from the Update Tag List 




Copy the publication 


3 - 69 


dialog box (Paragraph menu). Then you can retag any para¬ 
graph in Text mode just by pressing a function key while 
the cursor is anywhere within that paragraph. 

□ You can assign a tag to multiple paragraphs in Text mode. 
Drag the cursor through (or use Shift-Click) the para¬ 
graphs you want to tag. When all the text is highlighted 
press a function key. 

□ Assign function keys alphabetically, or in any fashion that 
makes the assignments easy to remember (for example, FI 
for Headl, F2 for Head2, etc.). 

□ If you cannot remember which tags are assigned to which 
function keys while you are in Text mode, press Ctrl-K to 
bring up the Assign Function Keys dialog box. Click OK to 
close the dialog box. 

□ If you press Ctrl-K while you are in Paragraph mode, Ven¬ 
tura displays the Update Tag List dialog box. Choose As¬ 
sign Function keys to review the function key assignments. 
Then click OK twice to return to the work space. If you are 
in Text, Frame, or Graphic mode, Ventura automatically 
displays the Assign Function Keys dialog box. 

Style tips 

□ To place two tags on the same line, give the first tag a line 
break before. Give the second tag a line break after. 

□ There are two ways to keep two tags on the same line from 
overlapping. First, you can align one flush left and the 
other flush right. This method is satisfactory as long as the 
text is short enough that the tags will not meet in the 
middle and overlap each other. Second you can use In From 
Left and In From Right (Spacing, Paragraph menu) to 
confine each tag to a specific area. 

□ Create leader dots with the Tab Settings dialog box. In¬ 
stead of showing the tab as an open space, show it as leader 
dots. The dialog box also lets you vary the spacing between 
the dots. 




3 - 70 


Chapter 


Picture tips 

□ Use Ventura’s caption label function for brief captions, or 
captions that must be numbered (for example, “Figure 1- 
1”). Use the Anchors & Captions dialog box to type them in 
or to edit them. Longer captions are typed directly into the 
caption frame in Text mode. 

□ Caption labels are automatically tagged by Ventura and 
Can be modified in Paragraph mode like any other para¬ 
graph. 

Chapter tips 

□ Use the Last to 1st print option if your printer produces 
pages face up. If it puts out pages face down, use the 1st to 
Last option. 

□ You can install additional printers by reusing the VPPREP 
installation program. You will not have to go through the 
entire process. Ventura will only copy over the new fonts 
and drivers you need. 

□ Use Set Printer Info from the Options menu to switch from 
one printer to another. Be sure to change width tables at 
the same time. 

□ You can mimic one printer with another by using a different 
width table. The most common use of this capability is to 
use a non-PostScript laser printer to preview pages that 
will ultimately be sent to a PostScript typesetter. 

□ To copy or print several chapters at once, place them into a 
publication using Multi-Chapter from the Options menu. 
Then copy or print the entire publication. 





Chapter Four 
Skills Checklist 


Theory 

□ How Graphic mode works 

□ Easy drawing with the snp-to grid 

□ When (and when not) to use Box 
Text 

□ Modifying generated tags 

Text 

□ Typing and editing Box Text 

Style 

□ Adding text attributes to the header 

□ Line and fill attributes 

□ Using leader dots for a tear off line 

□ Creating an underscore 

□ Number lists with decimal alignment 

Pictures 

□ Enhancing graphic shapes with line 
and fill attributes 

□ Adding lines and arrows 

□ Showing graphics on all pages 

Chapter 

□ Updating page counters 

□ Inserting a page 

□ Printing multiple copies 





Chapter Four 


An Invoice 


W elcome to Chapter Four, where you will learn a simple 
but highly effective strategy for creating a standard 
business form. In this first advanced chapter, we will be show¬ 
ing you a lot of new techniques and features. The checklist on 
the left lists some of the skills you will learn. 

Like all of the advanced section, Chapter Four assumes that 
you understand the basics from Part One. We will move faster 
than we did before. We will assume you can handle standard 
functions such as loading and placing files, adding and chang¬ 
ing tags, etc., with a minimum of instructions. We will save 
step-by-step explanations for techniques you haven’t seen 
before. 


Theory 

Most of this chapter’s sample document is built using 
Ventura’s Graphic mode. You will find it easier to follow along 
if you understand these three important concepts: 

• How Graphic mode works 

• The snap-to grid 

• Box Text 

Graphic mode 

Ventura has tools for building lines, circles, rectangles, and 
Box Text (text inside a rectangle). You can use these shapes to 
draw simple artwork, create tables, add crop marks, annotate 
illustrations from other programs, or to build forms. Once 
you’ve learned to operate these tools, you’ll find important 



4-2 


Theory 


uses for them in many kinds of documents. Nevertheless, we 
recommend using a specialized, stand-alone graphics program 
to create complex illustrations, just as we recommend using a 
stand-alone word processor to create more than a paragraph 
or so of text. 

How graphic mode works 

The five key points explained below will help you understand 
how the Graphic mode operates. We use the term shape(s) to 
refer to lines, boxes, or circles created in Graphic mode. 

*+ Key Point #1:Every shape is attached to a ‘‘parent, ’’ which can 
be a frame or the Page. 

If you move, copy, or delete the parent, the shapes are moved, 
copied, or deleted as well. 

*+Key Point #2: The parent is the frame or Page that is active 
when you select a graphic shape. 

The parent can be the Page itself, or a frame on top of the 
Page. Anything you draw is attached to that parent. In both 
Frame and Graphic mode, look for the sizing buttons that 
indicate which frame is active (Figure 4-1). 



Figure 4-1 . Sizing buttons are displayed around the edge of the active 
frame or Page. 




































How graphic mode works 


4 - 3 


Parent frame of _ 

graphic shape below 


Key Point #3: Shapes do not have to be near the parent frame, 
but they must be on the same page. 

There is no restriction on the placement of shapes on a page. 
They can be inside the parent frame; touching the parent 
frame; or completely removed from the parent frame, as long 
as they are on the same page. For instance, you could place a 
tiny frame in the upper left comer of the page, and then draw 
a shape in the lower right comer. That shape would still be 
tied to the parent, even though the two are nowhere near each 
other on the page (Figure 4-2). 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Figure 4-2. You can place a graphic shape anywhere on the page. It 
doesn’t need to be near the parent frame. 


*+Key Point #4: Different shapes can have different parents even 
if they are on the same page. 

To choose a new parent frame, select a new frame in Graphic 
mode. The new frame will be the parent to any shapes you 
draw from now on. 

** Key Point #5: You can make a shape repeat on all pages of the 
document. 

Normally, when you draw a shape on the Underlying Page it 
appears only on that page. If you want to make the shape 
appear in the same position on every page of the document, 
you select Show On All Pages from the Graphic menu. 
























4-4 


Theory 


^ NOTE: In earlier versions of Ventura , the shapes you attached 
to the Underlying Page automatically repeated on every page 
in the document. In Version 2, you must select Show On All 
Pages (Graphic menu) to make the shapes display throughout 
the document. 

The five points above are the major factors to consider when 
using Graphic mode. There are additional tips at the end of 
the chapter. If you have never used Graphic mode before, you 
may want to read through the tips now. Then, after you’ve had 
some practice drawing shapes, you can review the list again. 

The snap-to grid 

The most important part of graphics drawing is getting 
shapes the right size and position. Ventura’s Column Snap 
and Line Snap functions do not work in Graphic mode. For¬ 
tunately, Graphic mode has its own snap-to grid function. 

The snap-to grid is the secret to working painlessly and 
productively in Graphic mode. If you know how to set up a 
good grid, Ventura does the hard work for you. The Grid 
Settings feature is found in the Graphic menu. It allows you to 
turn the grid snap on and off, and to set the horizontal and 
vertical grid spacing. 

The invisible grid starts from the upper left edge of the page, 
dividing it into horizontal and vertical units. Take a look at 
Figure 4-3, which shows how a typical grid would appear if its 
lines were visible. Figure 4-3 has both horizontal and vertical 
units set to six picas. The tick marks on the ruler show that 
the first grid lines begin six picas from the left edge of the 
paper and six picas from the top edge of the paper, and con¬ 
tinue in six-pica increments. 

The grid acts like a magnetic field. Any shape you place on the 
Page snaps to the nearest invisible line. You cannot misalign a 
shape; Ventura won’t let you. With the grid shown in Figure 
4-3, for example, you can draw a box that is six picas on each 
side; or 12 picas; or 18 picas — or any shape with measure¬ 
ments in units of six (Figure 4^4). You cannot, however, draw 
a 10-pica box. To do that, you would have to change the grid 
settings to 2, 5, or 10. 



Planning the grid 


4 - 5 


Desk File Edit Viet* Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Figure 4-3. If you could make the snap-to grid visible, you would be 
able to see how it divides the page into horizontal and vertical units. 



Figure 4-4. Any shape you place on the page automatically snaps to 
the nearest grid unit. (Grid made visible for illustration purposes only.) 


Planning the grid 

Once you understand that the grid is measured from the 
upper left corner of the page or frame no matter what the 
margin settings are , then you can plan the grid settings to 
coordinate with the overall page design. 

First you must consider the size of the grid setting. With a 
large grid setting it is harder to make mistakes. If you want to 











































4-6 


Theory 


draw six-pica boxes and you set the grid at six picas, it will be 
hard to go wrong. 

Next consider the margin settings. For instance, to draw a 
row of six-pica boxes across the page, you might set your page 
margins and your grid settings to six picas. The grid would let 
you line up the shapes with the margin. But if you were 
drawing those same boxes on a page with four-pica margins, 
the boxes would not line up with the margin. The grid would 
allow the shapes six picas from the edge of the paper, or 12 
picas, or 18 picas — but not four picas (Figure 4-5). 



Figure 4-5. The six-pica shapes will not align with the four-pica margin 
in this illustration. To line up boxes with the margins, make the grid 
setting a common denominator of the shapes and the margins. 


To line up boxes with the margins, set the grid to the common 
denominator of the shapes and the margins . For instance, you 
might choose two picas for the grid setting in the example 
above. Two picas is the lowest common denominator between 
the six-pica boxes and the four-pica margins. You could even 
turn the grid off and align the boxes by eye. However, you will 
never be as accurate manually as Ventura’s automatic grid. 

In some cases, you might want to change the grid as you go 
along. For instance, you might select six picas to draw six-pica 
boxes, then switch to two picas to draw narrower boxes. Be 
careful, though. If you change the size of the boxes you have 
already drawn, they will automatically snap to the new grid 
settings. 







Box Text 


4 - 7 


*+NOTE: Each frame can have a different grid setting, if you are 
working inside multiple frames , make sure they alt have the 
same grid settings to avoid confusion. 

You will learn more about how to use the snap-to grid by 
following along with this chapter’s project. 


Box Text 

Box Text is the third and final concept you should understand 
before tackling the invoice. Box Text is a special type of 
graphic shape. It is drawn, placed, and sized just like an 
ordinary rectangle. But when you release the mouse key, the 
end of file marker ( □ ) appears inside the rectangle. Then you 
can switch to Text mode to type your own text directly into the 
box (Figure 4-6). 



Figure 4-6. Type your own words into the Box Text shape. 


The name Box Text leads some users to believe that the text 
must always appear inside a visible rectangle. In fact, you can 
make the rectangle “invisible” so the text is the only thing that 
shows. This is a convenient way to stick a word or two 
anywhere on the page without regard to the margin or frame 
boundaries. Box Text, like all shapes, can appear anywhere on 
the same page as the parent frame (or Page). 

You can vary the lines and the background shading of Box 
Text to create a variety of effects (Figure 4-7). When combined 
with Ventura’s line drawing function, Box Text is a handy way 































4 - 8 


Theory 



Figure 4-7. By changing Box Text’s line and till attributes, you can 
create a variety of effects. 

to create callouts — labels that point to a particular feature of 
an illustration. 

WARNING: Not all of the effects shown in Figure 4-7 are available with all printers. 

i 

\ You may have to test your printer to see just how well it 

. performs at overlapping one graphic shape with another. With 

many PostScript printers, for example, you cannot place Box 
Text with a white background over a frame with a pattern 
background. The Box Text will show on screen, but it will not 
print out. Here’s how to trick most PostScript printers into 
printing overlapping graphics: First draw a solid white rec¬ 
tangle shape over the frame background. Then place a white, 
hollow, transparent Box Text shape on top of the rectangle. 
This double overlap effect allows you to print out Box Text 
shapes on patterned backgrounds. 

Box Text versus frame text 

In some ways, Box Text resembles text in small frames. In¬ 
deed, there are many situations when you can create the same 
effect with frame text as with Box Text. Perhaps the easiest 
way to distinguish between them is to say that frame text can 
be a separate file (if you want it to be). Box Text, by contrast, 
must always be typed by the user directly into the chapter, 



















Box Text versus rectangles 


4 - 9 


where it is stored in the caption file. As a general rule, you 
should use frames to place more than two dozen words or so. 
Use Box Text to place smaller amounts of text. At the end of 
the chapter we give you more tips on when to use frames and 
when to use Box Text. 

Box Text versus rectangles 

A final point about Box Text: Sometimes you should use it 
instead of the standard rectangle drawing tool. If you simply 
want a box without any words inside, the rectangle tool is fine. 
But if you think that you might want to place text inside at 
any time, use the Box Text tool instead. You will be able to 
type text into this rectangle at a later time. 

For example, when creating the form in this chapter, we used 
Box Text to build all the empty boxes and columns. Because of 
this, an operator could fill in the form on-screen (Figure 4-8). 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


11 

1 C:\fWESET\iUSlHESS\ltW0ICE2.CiP (IMUDfCC.STV) !iiilH1111111- ♦ 

l‘ .. 1” . 1 * 


i Order No. 


Order Date 

Customer No. 11 

#1234 

11/488 

345009-90 


Qy. Ordered 

Unit 

Item No. 

Hem Description 


1 

1 

23409 

41/4" Cedar Table 

30 _ 







I Mew Fra 


E 


Figure 4-8. Use Box Text instead of a rectangle if you plan to enter text 
inside a shape. 


The Z_BOXTEXT tag 

Now that you understand the graphic capabilities of Box Text, 
let’s take a closer look at the “text” part of Box Text. Box Text, 
like headers, footers, and captions, is a generated tag (ZJBOX- 
TEXT). You can format it with the attributes in the Paragraph 

























4 - 10 


Theory 


menu, rename it to another tag, or remove it from the Assign¬ 
ment List. In this chapter’s invoice, for example, all the text is 
created via Box Text, then formatted with different tags from 
the style sheet. 

After reading the theory behind Graphic mode, you’re ready to 
put the theory into practice. While you work on the invoice, 
you may find it helpful to refer back to this theory section or 
refer ahead to the tips at the end of the chapter. 



The ZBOXTEXT tag 


4 - 11 



G>t/A/t=R d>OL0 

■itfit Heiver 

CeuTefieo A& c APi 

) 

~^o%5cfie6hJ 


I.ZftfA Holc 


• l2fit Heu/£TICA 8o<-0 ITALIC 
LeprJiKTifiiBP 


XYZ 

CORPORATION 

123 Main Street 
Lae Angeles. CA 90000 
(213) 555-1111 


Ship to: 

International Paper Co. 
1701 Broad Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19000 


Peaae Return Top Portion Win Payment Amo uni of Payments _ 



XYZ CORPORATION 
123 Umm Street 
Lot AngtbB, CA OOOOO 






4 -12 


Planning the invoice 


Planning the invoice 

An invoice is a standard business form for billing information. 
Its goal is to present separate categories of information in an 
orderly fashion, while making the most important numbers 
stand out. For example, you want it to be very easy for your 
customers to spot how much they owe you. Our example uses 
boxes, lines, and shading to differentiate and clarify informa¬ 
tion. 

There are other design considerations. For instance, many 
invoices are divided into two parts so customers can return 
one portion with their payments. The design should include a 
place for the company address on both halves of the form, so 
customers know where to write or call even if they have 
already sent off the other half. In addition, the customer’s 
mailing address should be positioned to show through a stand¬ 
ard-size window envelope. 

The method of fill-in must also be part of your planning. If the 
form will be filled out with a typewriter, make the (Body Text) 
inter-line spacing in increments of one pica, so it matches the 
standard line spacing of typewriters. If it will be filled out by 
hand, make sure the blanks and boxes are large enough for 
easy writing. 

The invoice you make can be used as a camera-ready master 
and sent to a printer, or it can be filled in on-screen on an “as 
needed” basis. 

A thumbnail sketch 

It is easier to work with Ventura if you draw a simple 
thumbnail sketch before starting. In the first three chapters, 
the “after” versions of the sample documents have served this 
role. As you begin creating documents of your own, spend a 
few moments planning the design with pencil and paper 
before loading Ventura. Creating a thumbnail sketch forces 
you to do some hard thinking and decision-making up front. 

The suggestion to “start with a thumbnail sketch” is probably 
found in more books on page design than any other piece of 
advice. Certainly, advance planning can speed the process of 



Start a new chapter 


4 - 13 


producing pages in Ventura. Here are a few of the elements to 
consider as you draw the sketch: 

• Margins 

• Columns 

• Gutters 

• Size of frames or Box Text 

• The upper left starting position of frames or Box Tfext on the 
page 

Do as many of the calculations as possible while preparing the 
sketch. Jot down dimensions and positions of key page ele¬ 
ments. While you’re at it, figure out the horizontal and verti¬ 
cal grid units by finding a common denominator between the 
margins and the size of the shapes. It is much easier to do 
calculations on paper than in your head while staring at a 
dialog box. 

Look at the pictures of the thumbnail sketch and the final 
version of the invoice. Here are some of the techniques you 
will use to achieve these effects: 

• Snap-togrid 

• Black type on a patterned background 

• Lines and line attributes 

• Box Text, rectangles, and tint screens (fill patterns) 

• Automatic invoice numbering in the header 

• Dotted tear line 


Ventura prep 

As always, prepare for the project by loading and renaming 
files to their proper location. 

Start a new chapter 

If you are continuing directly from Chapter Three, select New 
from the File menu to start a new chapter. Selecting New 




4-14 


Ventura prep 


removes the current chapter and text from your screen, but 
retains the current style sheet. 

£8 Select New from the File menu. 


If you have the Power disk 

If you have the Power disk, complete the next two steps, then 
skip to the text section. 

li Use Load Diff. Style to load the style sheet 4FORM.STY 
from the C:\POWER subdirectory. Then select Save As 
New Style to save and rename it as C:\TEMP\4IN- 
VOICE.STY. 

Save and rename the chapter so you can safely save your 
progress under the correct name just by pressing Ctrl-S. 

H Select Save As and save the chapter as C:\TEMP\4IN- 
VOICE.CHP. 


^NOTE: Save As makes a copy of the files (.CHP,. VGR, .CIF, 
etc.) linked to the chapter. It does not make a copy of the 
picture files. 

Since all the text for this document is created with Box Text 
shapes, you do not need to type in a separate text file for this 
project. 



If you do not have the Power disk 


You will find it a bit more difficult to follow along without the 
Power disk in the advanced section. The Power disk includes 
sample style sheets, text files and (in a few cases) sample 
chapters with most of the basic work done already. You need 
only work on advanced techniques and skills to complete the 
document. 


Nevertheless, with just a bit more work on your part it is 
possible to complete all the sample documents without the 
disk. In general, you must take these four steps: 



Start a new chapter 


4 - 15 


1. Type in the text file for that chapter from Appendix A using 
a word processor. Then load it into the \TEMP subdirectory. 

2. Load one of the style sheets that come with Ventura instead 
of the style sheet from the Power disk. In each advanced 
chapter, we give you brief suggestions on which style sheets to 
use and what modifications to make. 

3. Modify the columns and margins as necessary to match the 
Power style sheet using the illustrations provided. 

4. Find the tag table in Appendix B and change or modify the 
tag attributes. The tag table describes the style sheets that 
come with the Power disk. If you don’t have the disk, you must 
enter these attributes manually before you start the project. 

For this chapter, we recommend starting with the &INV- 
Pl.STY sheet from the \TYPESET subdirectory. (If you can¬ 
not find it, then copy the style sheet from the original Ventura 
Examples Disk.) 

ii Load the &INV-P1.STY style sheet into the new chapter 
and then save it under the new name C:\TEMP\4IN- 
VOICE.STY. Change the margins and columns to match 
Figure 4—9. 

If you do not have the Power disk, manually format your Page 
as shown in the Figure 4-9. 

H Change the tags to match the attributes provided in the tag 
table in Appendix B. 

All the text in this chapter is created with Box Text. You do not 
need to load a separate text file. 

After loading and renaming the style sheet, save and rename 
the chapter file. 

H Select Save As from the File menu and save the chapter as 
C:\TEMP\4INVOICE.CHP. 





Figure 4-9 The margins and column settings for the Invoice. 




Build the header 


4 - 17 


Text 


The Ventura Formula provides a solid strategy for completing 
most documents, but you must vary it slightly for documents 
where you place text in frames and boxes. In Chapter Three, 
for example, you placed text files after building frames to 
contain them. Similarly, to create this chapter’s invoice you 
will add text after building boxes. Here’s the order to follow: 

• Format the Page 

• Build a snap-to grid 

• Draw the Box Text shapes 

• Add your own text to the boxes 

After you enter the text to the boxes you can proceed with the 
rest of the Ventura Formula. 

^ NOTE: The Ventura Formula is a handy rule of thumb to get 
you started. As you become more proficient, you will discover 
new strategies to fit your personal style. 


Style 

Whether you loaded the style sheet from the Power disk or 
recreated it on your own, you should have the correct values 
for the paper size, starting page, and margins and columns. To 
complete the chapter layout you only need to enter the header 
text. Header text is not stored in the style sheet (although the 
header format is). 

Build the header 

Since you learned how to create basic headers in Part One, we 
are now going to show you some advanced techniques. 

You already know that you can change the attributes of the 
header text using the Paragraph menu. In this example, you 
will learn how to make similar format changes using text 
attribute codes in the Headers & Footers dialog box. By using 
the dialog box, you can make part of the header display in one 



4 - 18 


Style 


format (which you set in the dialog box) while another part 
displays a different format (which you set with the Paragraph 
menu). 

If you refer back to the “After” picture earlier in this chapter, 
you will notice that the “Invoice No.” portion of the header 
displays in 14-point Times, but the “1001” portion is in 18- 
point Courier Bold. Now we will show you how to achieve this 
effect. 

Change text attributes in the dialog box 

In the instructions that follow, you will change text attributes 
in the Headers & Footers dialog box. To do so, you will make 
use of the buttons at the bottom of the dialog box to enter a 
generic code. After you choose a button, you must then erase 
part of the code and put in the information you want to use. 
For instance, choosing the Text Attr. button inserts the code 
<D>, which is the code to turn off all text attributes. To turn 
on the text attributes you want, you must substitute another 
code inside the brackets. For instance, you could substitute 
the letter B inside the brackets to specify bold or I for italic. 
Keep in mind that all the buttons in the dialog box merely 
serve as a shortcut. You could just have as easily typed <B> or 
<I> right from the start. However, most people find that it is 
faster to use the buttons, since they eliminate the need to 
memorize the correct codes. 

*+NOTE: The buttons at the bottom of the dialog box are for 
convenience only. If you prefer ; you can type in the codes 
without using the buttons. 

H Select Headers & Footers from the Chapter menu. Choose 
Define: Right Page Header, Usage: On. Move to the Right 
line and type: No . followed by a space. 

II Choose the Text Attr.button and delete the letter “D” (do not 
delete the right and left brackets). Then type the following 
codes inside the brackets: BF1P18 



Change text attributes in the dialog box 


4-19 


You have just inserted the codes for three text attributes. Let’s 
look at each one in turn. 

• B tells Ventura to make the following text bold. 

• FI tells Ventura to switch to font #1, which is Courier. 
(Ventura assigns numbers to fonts. The Xerox Ventura Pub¬ 
lisher Reference Guide lists the font number codes). 

• P18 tells Ventura to change the point size to 18 points. 

Now you will tell Ventura to display the current page number 
after the word “No.” As you will see, Ventura’s page counter 
will then automatically number the invoices in sequence when 
you add a new page. 

HI Move the cursor after the right bracket and choose Inserts: 
Page #. The page numbering code [P#] appears on the line. 

To complete the header dialog box, turn off the attributes at 
the end of the line. 

H Choose Inserts: Text. Attr. 

The last <D> symbol tells Ventura to return the font to nor¬ 
mal. 

Make sure the dialog box looks like Figure 4-10: 


Right Page Header 


HEADERS » FOOTERS 
Define: | Left Page Header ] 

| Left Page Footer"] | Right Page Footed 
Usage: Q HofTI 

Left: _ 

Center: _ 


m 


Right: No. <BF1P1B>[P«]<D>L 


Inserts: | Chapter B~| | Page tt 1 1 1st Natch"! | Last Hatch | 
| Text Attr~] | Copy To Facing Pag^l 


Cancel | 


Figure 4-10. 







4 - 20 


Style 


After you close the dialog box, the header appears at the top 
right comer of the page (Figure 4-11). 



Figure 4-11. 


Change the page number 

Right now the header displays the number 1. With Ventura’s 
Update Counters feature, you can make a document begin on 
any page number. For example, let’s make the first page start 
at 1001. 

§i Select Update Counters from the Chapter menu. Choose 
Which Counter: This Page, Update Method: Restart Num¬ 
ber, Restart Number: 1001, and Number Format: 1,2. 



























Reset the zero point 


4 - 21 


When you select Which Counter: This Page, you change the 
numbering starting with the current page only. On the other 
hand, when you select Which Counter: Initial Page, Ventura 
resets the numbering starting with the first page in the docu¬ 
ment. In both cases, the subsequent pages follow sequentially. 

Since the invoice number is based on the current page num¬ 
ber, it will change as soon as you click OK and return to the 
page (Figure 4-12). 


Desk File Edit View Chapter frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



C:\TEMP\4IIW0ICE.CHP (4IIW0ICE.STV) 


No. 1 0 0 1 


II 


Figure 4-12. 


Once you finish the header, the chapter layout is complete. 
Now you can begin to add the boxes, starting with the lower 
half of the form and then continuing with the top half. The 
dimensions in Figure 4-13 will help you gauge the size of the 
shapes. 


Reset the zero point 

IPs easier to draw the invoice shapes if you reset the zero point 
of the ruler so it lines up with the upper left corner of the 
column margin. Here’s how: 

H Change to Reduced View (press Ctrl-R). 































4 - 22 


Style 



















Select grid settings 


4 - 23 


Place the cursor on the zero point square (0,0) in the upper 
left comer of the Page. Press and hold the mouse button 
until the four-way arrow appears. Drag it downwards until 
the horizontal and vertical crosshairs line up with the 
upper left corner of the column margin. Then release the 
mouse button. Notice that “0” on the horizontal and vertical 
rulers now lines up with the upper left corner of the column 
margin (Figure 4-14). 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Figure 4-14. 


WARNING: If you do not reset the zero point as we explained above, your horizontal 
and vertical rulers will not match the rulers we show in the project’s illustrations. 


Select grid settings 

After you reset the zero point, you are ready to draw. 

To help you accurately line up graphic shapes, you should use 
Grid Settings from the Graphic menu. You will set the 
horizontal and vertical spacing to the largest common meas¬ 
urement between the margins and the graphic shapes. In this 
example, we recommend that you set the horizontal spacing to 
01,06 picas & points and the vertical spacing to 03,00 picas & 
points. 

il Enable Graphic mode (click on the Graphic button in the 
Mode Selector). 

H Select the Box Text tool from the Side-Bar. 





























4 - 24 


Style 


Now select Grid Settings from the Graphic menu. Change 
the unit measurements tp picas & points. 

Choose Grid Snap: On. Make the Horizontal Spacing: 01,06 
picas & points and Vertical Spacing: 03,00 picas & points. 
Click OK. 


GRID SETTINGS 

□ 

Grid Snap: On 


Horizontal Spacing: 01,06 

picas R points 

Mertical Spacing: 03,00 


Cancel 


Draw Box Text 


H Place the upper left corner of the Box Text 21 picas down 
from 0,0 so it lines up with the left page margin. 

H Drag (press and hold down the left mouse button) the box 
downwards and to the right until it lines up with position 
51 picas on the vertical ruler and 6 picas on the horizontal 
ruler. Release the mouse button (Figure 4-14). 

The end of file marker ( □ ) appears inside the shape. 

*+NOTE: You may have to change to Normal or Enlarged View 
to see the end of file marker. 

If you need to change the dimensions of a shape after it is 
drawn you can resize it with the cursor. Place the cursor on 
one of the black sizing buttons around the outside of the 
shape. Then press and hold the mouse button until the point¬ 
ing hand appears. Stretch the shape to the new size and 
release the mouse button. Ib delete a shape, select it and press 
the Del key (or select Cut Graphic from the Edit menu). 




Change line attributes 


4-25 


End of file marker 


Figure 4-15. 

P Now move the shape until it snaps to the horizontal and 
vertical grid. 

Change line attributes 

When you are satisfied with the size of the first Box Text, save 
the line and fill attributes so they will automatically apply to 
the other Box Text shapes you draw. 

il Select Line Attributes from the Graphic menu (or press 
Ctrl-L). 

^ Choose Thickness: Thin and Color: Black. Make both End 
Styles: Square. Choose Save To and click OK. 

LINE ATTRIBUTES Fon BOX TEXT [7] 

Thickness: Thin 00,06 fractional pto 

Color: Black 






















4-26 


Style 


^ NOTE: The Save To button does not stay highlighted after you 
choose it in the dialog box. 

Save To stores these line attributes as default values. Ventura 
remembers your choices the next time you draw a Box Text. 

Let’s take a moment to explain Ventura’s application of end 
styles, which can be confusing. Ventura doesn’t care which 
end is left or right. It only cares which end was drawn first. 

Look again at the Line Attributes dialog box. The End Styles 
field on the left applies to the starting point. The End Styles 
field on the right applies to the ending point. This holds true 
whether you draw from left to right, from right to left, from 
top to bottom, or from bottom to top. 

Change fill attributes 

H With the Box Text still selected, select Fill Attributes from 
the Graphic menu (or press Ctrl-F). Choose Color: White, 
Pattern: Hollow, Result: Transparent, and Defaults: Save 
To. Now click OK. 


FILL ATTRIBUTES fop BOX TEXT [7] 


Color: White 
Pattern: Hollow 


Result: 


Opaque [ 


Transparent 


Defaults: | Load From, 


r~QK i 


Cancel 


Copy the Box Text 

Now that you’ve made one Box Text, we will show you a 
shortcut for the next four. Instead of using the Box Text tool to 
draw each shape, use the copy and paste commands to 
reproduce four copies of the original. 



Paste the Box Text 


4-27 


M With the first Box Text still selected, press Shift-Del (or 
select Copy Graphic from the Edit menu). 

You have just copied the Box Text onto the Graphic clipboard. 

*+NOTE: Ventura uses the same copy and paste procedures for 
Graphic, Text, and Frame mode. Since Ventura treats all three 
independently, you can copy or delete to three clipboards at 
the same time. 

Paste the Box Text 

^ Press the Ins key (or select Paste Graphic from the Edit 
menu). 

You will see the screen redraw itself, which is your sign that 

Ventura has pasted a new Box Text onto the Page. Otherwise 

you might not know for sure, since Ventura pastes the copy 

directly on top of the original. 

Move the copy 

Once you paste the copy, you can move it to a new position. 

H Press and hold the cursor anywhere in the middle of the 
Box Text until the four-way arrow appears. With the mouse 
button still depressed, move the Box Text to the right of the 
original as shown in Figure 4-16. 



Figure 4-16. 




































4-28 


Style 


Repeat the above step by pasting and moving three more 
Box Text shapes into place. The snap-to grid should make 
aligning the shapes easy (Figure 4-17). 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Figure 4-17. 


*+NOTE: Once you copy a shape onto the clipboard, it remains 
there until replaced by something else. To insert another copy, 
simply press the Ins key again. 

Stretch the last Box Text 

Now you will stretch the last Box Text so it lines up with the 

right edge of the right page margin. 

M Select the last Box Text (the one on the far right). 

ii Place the cursor on any black sizing button on the right 
side. Press and hold down the mouse button until the point¬ 
ing hand appears. 

H Stretch the Box Text until it lines up with the right page 
margin. Release the mouse button. The Box Text is now 
twice the size as the other shapes (Figure 4-18). 

Resize Box Text 

You will shorten four of the Box Text shapes to make room 

above for the next Box Text shape. 















Draw Box Text 


4-29 



Figure 4-18. 


^ Click on the right-most shape. Then as you hold down the 
Shift key select the three shapes to the left (the left-most 
Box Text is not selected). The word MULTIPLE appears in 
the Current Selection Box. 

*+NOTE: If you accidentally click on the wrong graphic shape, 
while holding down the Shift key, click on the shape again to 
‘deselect” it. Then choose another shape. 

After all four shapes are selected, you can resize them 
together. 

11 Place the cursor on the black sizing button at the upper 
right corner of the right-most Box Text. Press and hold the 
mouse button until the pointing hand appears. Drag the 
boxes downwards one snap grid unit (Figure 4-19). 

See how quick and easy it is to draw when you use a grid? Now 
that you’ve resized the four boxes, you’re ready to draw the 
next Box Text shape. 

Draw Box Text 


Select the Box Text tool from the Side-Bar. 


































4 - 30 


Style 



Figure 4-19. 


*+NOTE: You can draw several shapes, one after another, by 
holding down the Shift key while you draw. The cursor stays in 
the current shape drawing mode (Box Text, rectangle, line, or 
ellipse) and you can draw a second shape without reselecting 
a graphic tool from the Side-Bar. 

M Line up the Box Text cursor with the upper right corner of 
the first rectangle. Stretch it down one snap grid unit and 
all the way over to the right so it lines up with the right 
column margin (Figure 4—20). 



Figure 4-20. 




































Draw more shapes 


4 - 31 


Draw more shapes 

Now that you have the basics of Graphic mode under your 
belt, you can draw the bottom section of the form. 

H Select the Box Text tool. 

H Align the cursor with the bottom left corner of the right¬ 
most box. Stretch the Box Text down one snap grid unit and 
over to the right margin (Figure 4-21). 



Figure 4-21. 


Now you will add another Box Text shape immediately below. 

H Select Box Text. 

H Align the cursor with the lower left corner of the Box Text 
just drawn. Stretch the shape down one snap grid unit and 
over to the right column margin. The bottom of the shape 
extends below the column guide (Figure 4-22). 

^ NOTE: You could also copy and paste the graphic to create 
the second shape. 


Draw the final shape 

Only one more shape and you are finished with the lower half 
of the form. 


Select the Box Text tool. 



































4 - 32 


Style 



Figure 4-22. 


II Align the cursor with the lower left corner of the left-most 
column. Stretch the shape down two grid snap units (06,00 
picas & points) and over two columns to the right, as shown 
in Figure 4-23. 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Figure 4-23. 



Stopping point 


Good work. You’ve already completed more than half of the 
invoice. Now that you’ve learned how to draw and resize 
shapes, the second part of the invoice should be easy. Take a 
moment to evaluate your progress. You may want to change to 




















Draw the final shape 


4 - 33 


Normal or Enlarged View to make sure each shape is correctly 
placed. Check that your screen matches Figure 4-24. 


No. 1001 



Figure 4-24 Check to make sure your form matches this illustration 
before you continue. 

This is a good point in the exercise to take a break and save 
your work (press Ctrl-S to save). If you’re short on time, quit 
now and start again later. If your schedule permits, continue 
on to the next section without stopping. If you’re in a real 
rush, you can simply read through the next few pages without 
actually drawing in the rest of the box text, and skip to the 
section titled “ReCap,” where we show you how to type in your 
own text. However, we highly recommend that you complete 
the entire project if you possibly can. The more time you 
devote to practice now, the easier it will be to do your own 
projects later. And drawing the last shapes should only take a 
few more minutes. 







4 - 34 


Style 


If you are starting again after a break 

If you are starting fresh, reload Ventura and open the chapter 
C:\TEMP\4INVOICE.CHP. Continue to the next section 
where you will finish drawing the invoice. 

Change grid settings 

To create the narrower boxes in the top portion of the form 
(refer back to Figure 4-12), make the vertical spacing smaller. 
The horizontal grid spacing stays the same. 

11 Make sure you are in Graphic mode with the Page selected. 

H Grid Settings Grid Snap: On 

Horizontal Spacing: 01,06 picas & points 
Vertical Spacing: 01,00 picas & points 


Draw Box Text 

You will now draw the next five box shapes, which will contain 
the words Date, Invoice #, Charges, Credits, and Balance. Use 
the same shortcut you did to create the first set of boxes — 
draw one shape, then copy and paste it to make four more. 

*+NOTE: Depending on your display screen, you may find it 
easier to draw these smaller shapes if you change to Normal 
(Ctrl-N) or Enlarged (Ctrl-E) View. 

11 Select Box Text. 

II Starting at position 19 picas on the vertical ruler, draw a 
Box Text shape that is 02,00 picas high and 06,00 picas 
wide. Since the vertical spacing is 01,00 picas & points and 
the horizontal spacing is 01,06 picas & points, the box is 
two snap grid units high and four snap grid units wide 
(Figure 4-25). 

You will now copy the Box Text to the clipboard and paste it 
back onto the page. 

II With the first Box Text still selected, press Shift-Del to 
place a copy into the clipboard. 




Paste and place the copies 


4 - 35 


Desk File Edit Vie* Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Figure 4-25. 


Paste and place the copies 

H Press the Ins key to paste a copy back onto the page. 

H Insert three more Box Text shapes to the right of the first 
ones and move them so they line up side-by-side as shown 
in Figure 4-26. Then stretch the last Box Text so it snaps to 
the right page margin. After you make the copies, the in¬ 
voice should look like this: 



Figure 4-26. Here's what your invoice should look like at this stage. 






























4 - 36 


Style 


Add Box Text for the tear off line 

You will add another Box Text above the five just drawn. You 
will use it later to contain the dotted tear off line. (The dotted 
line itself will be created with the Tab Settings option from the 
Paragraph menu.) 

H Select the Box Text tool. 

H Starting at position 17 picas on the vertical ruler, stretch 
the Box Text shape so it measures 02,00 picas high and the 
width of the entire column (Figure 4-27). 

*+NOTE: If your monitor won’t allow you to draw the Box Text the 
entire column width, stretch it as far as you can to the right 
Then scroll to the right side of the page and stretch the Box 
Text to the right margin. 



Figure 4-27. 


Add two Box Text shapes 

Now you will add two more Box Text shapes to contain the text 
“Please Return Top Portion With Payment” and “Amount of 
Payment $.” Initially, these shapes will overlap the Box Text 
shapes below them by one pica. Later, when you change the 
line and fill attributes, the overlap will become “invisible.” 

H Select Box Text. 

H Starting at position 16 picas on the vertical ruler, draw a 
Box Text shape that measures 02,00 picas high and 21,00 

















Draw the final shapes 


4 - 37 


picas wide. Draw a second shape next to the first and make 
it 02,00 picas high and 15,00 picas wide. It will automat¬ 
ically snap to the right page margin (Figure 4-28). 


Desk F 

ile Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 

_ 

1 IliliSSH 

21 picas IS picas 


Jt 

2(*u f 


J 2 picas 





a 

a 

a 

a 

□ 


1 


a 

a 


1 



□ 

□ 

D 

□ 


1 

D 

♦111 



■■■ 

■i^B 


■HD 

□ 


Figure 4-28. Draw the two shapes that appear shaded in the above 
illustration. 


*+NOTE: The shading in the Figure 4-27 is to help you distin¬ 
guish the shapes on-screen. Do not fill them in with a pattern. 

Draw the final shapes 

Only six more shapes to go. Now that you’ve had some prac¬ 
tice, you’re ready to step out on your own. For the last part of 
the layout, refer to Figure 4-29 for placing and drawing the 
final shapes. 

Here are some tips to help you get started: 

^ TIP: Reset the zero point to line up with the upper left corner of 
the Box Text that will contain the word "DATE” (Figure 4-29). 

^ TIP: Use the zero point and rulers to align and measure 
shapes. Simply place the zero point of the ruler on one corner 
of the shape. Then count off the tick marks to measure the 
width and height of the shape. 



















4 - 38 


Style 



Figure 4-29. Finish by drawing the six shapes that are shaded in this 
drawing. 

^ TIP: If you draw a Box Text that is too small for the text size 
inside it, Ventura displays the message, ‘This frame has text 
which won’t fit on any page..." To cancel the message, choose 
OK. Then draw a larger Box Text or make the Box Text font 
smaller. 

When you finish, your screen should look like Figure 4-30: 

A Recap 

At this point, you have built a header and added Box Text. 
Now you are ready to add text. As explained earlier, you will 
type this text directly into the Box Text shapes. You will use 
Text mode to enter your own words. (You may want to change 
to an Enlarged View while you type.) 

Add the logo text 

Start at the top of the page and work downwards. Do not be 
concerned yet with appearance of the text, which you will 
later reformat with tags from the style sheet. 

I! Enable Text mode. 

il Place the cursor in front of the end of file mark in the 
top-most shape (Figure 4-31). 











































Add the logo text 


4 - 39 




Figure 4-31. 




















4-40 


Style 


II Now type: 

XYZ [Ctrl-Enter] 

CORPORATION [Enter] 

The line break (hold down the Ctrl key and press Enter) tells 
Ventura to treat the first two sentences as the same para¬ 
graph even though they are on separate lines. Line breaks are 
useful when you want information on separate lines, but you 
don’t want to bother retagging each line. 

Add the logo address 

H With the text cursor still in the first box, type: 

123 Main Street [Ctrl-Enter] 

Los Angeles, CA 90000 [Ctrl-Enter] 

(213) 555-1111 

Add the shipping address 

When typing the shipping address, make a line break after 
each sentence so Ventura treats all the lines as one para¬ 
graph. 

M Place the cursor in front of the end of file mark in the 
shipping address box (immediately below the top box) and 
type: 

Ship to: [Ctrl-Enter] 

International Paper Co. [Ctrl-Enter] 

1701 Broad Street [Ctrl-Enter] 

Philadelphia, PA 19000 

Add the amount of payment 

Now place the text cursor in the Amount of Payment box 
(Figure 4-32). Type: Amount of Payment [Space] $ 

Add the remaining text 

To add the rest of the text, remain in Text mode and reposition 
the text cursor from box to box. Use Figure 4-33 as your guide. 
Don’t worry about matching the font of the illustration. 





Figure 4-33 Use this illustration to finish adding text. 






































4 - 42 


Style 


Tag the text 

The style sheet loaded at the beginning of the chapter already 
includes pre-defined tags. This will make formatting go fairly 
fast — all you need to do is apply the right tag to the right 
text. Once you apply the pre-defined tags, we will show you 
how to create the tear off line with a new tag. Otherwise, the 
tags we provide in the style sheet will create the effects you 
need without modification. (If you did not purchase the Power 
disk, you must build the tags on your own from Appendix B.) 

Apply the first tags 

Start at the top of the document and work down. Although 
Box Text starts as a generated tag, you can retag it as any 
other tag name. 

11 Enable Paragraph mode. Select the paragraph “XYZ COR¬ 
PORATION” and tag it as Logo. 

H Select the company address paragraph and tag it as Logo- 
Address (Figure 4-34). 



Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


iilill C:\TEMP\4IIW0ICE.CHP (4INU0ICE.STV) f| 


XYZ«J 
ICORPORATIONfl 


Ship to:J 

International Paper Co.J 
1701 Broad StreetJ 
Philadelphia, PA 190000 


No. 1001B 


ACCOUNTO 

DATED 

0 

□ 


I1 


Figure 4-34. 


11 Select the “Ship To” address paragraph and tag it as Body 
Text. 

11 Use Shift-Click to select the next three paragraphs, “AC¬ 
COUNT,” “DATE,” and “Please Return Top Portion With 
Payment,” and tag them as Label. 






























Apply the first tags 


4-43 


In the Label tag, we used Vert. Alignment: Middle to vertically 
center the text within the Box Text shapes. As a general rule 
use Middle alignment to center text within Box Text or 
frames. Figure 4-35 shows the alignment settings for the 
Label tag. 


"Label" ALIGNMENT 



m 

Hor*z. Alignment: 

Center 



Uert. Alignment: 

Middle 



Text Rotation: 

None 



Hyphenation: 

OFf 



Successive Hyphens: 

2 



Overall Width: 

Column 

Wide 


First Line: 

Indent 



Relative Indent.’ 

Off 



In/Outdent Width: 

oo, ool 

picas 

8 points 

In/Outdent Height: 

001 

lines 


In From Right; fco Decimal; 

00,00 



Maximum Rofcafced Height;; 

00,00 




c 

“ok | 

| Cancel | 


Figure 4-35. The alignment settings for the Label tag. 


Select the paragraph “Amount of Payment $” and tag it as 
LabelLine (Figure 4-36). 


Desk File Edit View Chapter frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



lilliisiiiiilliiiiiil c:\temp\4inijoice.chp (4 invoice.stvj mil 


ACCOUNT 

DATE 

□ 

□ 





Am ountof Pay m erit $ 



Figure 4-36. 
























4 - 44 


Style 


Create an underscore 

Let’s pause for a minute to show you how we got the under¬ 
score effect in the LabelLine tag above. Open the Tab Settings 
dialog box so you can see what we did. 

^ With the “Amount of Payment” paragraph still selected, 
select Tab Settings from the Paragraph menu. 


'’LabelLine" TAB SETTINGS 

m 

Tab Number: 


♦ 


Tab Type: 

Off 



Tab Shown As: 

Leader Char 

Tab Location: 

00,00| picas & points 

Leader Char: 

— 


095 (ASCII) 

Leader Spacing: 

0 



Auto-Leader: 

On 






| OK | Cancel 


To make the solid line, we turned Auto-Leader on in the Tab 
Settings dialog box. Auto-Leader creates a leader line from the 
end of the paragraph all the way to the right margin. The 

leader character itself is a series of small straight lines (_) 

with no space between. In other words, the solid line was 
created by placing small underline characters side-by-side 
with no spaces between them. 

*+NOTE: Do not be concerned if the lines appear dashed on¬ 
screen. When you print out the invoice , the lines will be solid. 

Create the tear off line 

You will use the Auto-Leader technique to construct the 
dotted line in the next Box Text shape. First you will add a tag 
named TearOff. Then you will turn Auto-Leader on to create a 
line to the right margin. In this case, however, the leader 
character will be a dotted line instead of a solid line. 






Create the tear off line 


4 - 45 


^ Select the end of file marker ( □ ) just as you would select 
any other paragraph you wanted to tag (Figure 4-37). 


End of file 
marker 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



iiiiiiili c:\temp\4ihvoice.chp c^iiwoice.sty) i 


tody Tftxt 
Label 

LabelBlacK 

lobelLeft 

LabelLlne 

ll*tD«clnal 

l*fO 

losoAddres* 

Z.BOXTEXT 

Z_HEA0Cft 


Z BOXTEXT 


R Pg t* 0001 


E 


Figure 4-37. 





Please Return Top Portion With Payrt 

“0-- 

DATED 

INVOICE #□ 

CHARG 

□ 

PREVIOUS BALANCI 

□ 

150.0011 


^ Add New Tag Tag Name to Add: TearOff 

To create the dotted tear line effect turn Auto-Leader on in the 
Tab Settings dialog box. 

II Select Tab Settings from the Paragraph menu. Choose Tab 
Number: 1, Tab Type: Off, and Tab Shown As: Leader Char¬ 
acter. Then choose the Leader Character (...) with 1 Leader 
Spacing and choose Auto-Leader: On. 


"TearOff" TAB SETTINGS 


m 

Tab Number: 

♦ M 

♦ 


Tab Type: 

Off 



Tab Shown As: 

Leader Char 

Tab Location: 

18,00] 

picas & points 

Leader Char: 

... 


046 (ASCII) 

Leader Spacing: 

1 



Auto-Leader: 

On 






U9j^ Cancel 


The dotted line extends across the Box Text to the margin. 































4 - 46 


Style 


Tag the remaining text 

Now finish tagging the invoice using the pre-defined tag 
names from the Assignment List. Change views as necessary. 

M Select the paragraphs “DATE,” “INVOICE #,” “CHARGES,” 
“CREDITS,” and “BALANCE” and tag them as Label. 

II Select the paragraph “PREVIOUS BALANCE” and tag it as 
LabelLeft. 

H In the Balance column tag “50.00, 150.00, and $200.00” as 
Balance. Then tag “150.00 and 150.00” in the Charges 
column and “100.00 and 00.00” in the Credits column as 
ListDecimal. 

M Select the paragraph “PLEASE PAY THIS AMOUNT” at 
the bottom of the page and tag it as LabelBlack. 

II Select the paragraph at the bottom of the page that begins 
“XYZ CORPORATION, 123 Main Street...” and tag it as 
Address. 

Number lists with decimal alignment 

If you work with lists of numbers on a regular basis, you may 
want to know how we got all the numbers to line up in the 
columns. (If you do not work with tables, feel free to skip to the 
next section.) The trick is to use Ventura’s Decimal Alignment 
feature (Alignment, Paragraph menu). With Decimal Align¬ 
ment you tell Ventura how far from the right margin you want 
to position the first decimal point of the paragraph. For the 
Balance tag in the example above, we specified In From Right 
To Decimal spacing as 05,06 picas & points. Then all the 
paragraphs tagged as Balance line up under the decimal 
point. Figure 4-38 shows the Alignment dialog box settings 
for the Balance tag. 



Change fill attributes 


4 - 47 


"Balance'’ ALIGNMENT 



m 

Harz. Alignment: 

Decimal 


Uert. Alignment: 

Top 



Text Rotation: 

None 



Hyphenation: 

Off 



Successive Hyphens: 

2 



Overall Width: 

Column- 

Wide 


First Line: 

Indent 



Relative Indent: 

Off 



In/Outdent Width: 

bb,bq| 

picas & 

points 

In/Outdent Height: 

001 

lines 


In From Right to Decimal: 

05,06 



Maximum Rotated Height - : 

00,00 




c 

OK | [ 

Cancel | 


Figure 4-38. The Alignment settings for the Balance tag. 


Pictures 

With Tfext and Style behind you, you can look ahead to the 
next part of the formula: Pictures. Now that you’ve placed and 
positioned the shapes, you can modify the line and fill at¬ 
tributes of the shapes to create new effects. In this section you 
will create a gray pattern (tint screen) effect and make the 
border lines around selected Box Text invisible. 

Change fill attributes 

Start by selecting the shapes you want to fill with a pattern. 
11 Enable Graphic mode. 

H Use Shift-Click to select the boxes that will be shaded. Use 
Figure 4-39 as your guide. (You may want to change to 
Reduced View to select the shapes.) 

*+NOTE: If you click on the wrong box, simply click it again to 
deselect it. Then select another shape. 

H Select Fill Attributes from the Graphic menu (or press 
Ctrl-F). Choose Color: Black, Pattern: 2, and Result: 
Transparent and click OK (Figure 4-40). 







Figure 4-39 Select the boxes that are shaded in this illustration. 


FILL ATTRIBUTES for BOX TEXT 


Color: Black 
Pattern: 2 


Result: 



| Opaque “ 


Transparent 


Defaults: I Load From... I I Save To... 


Figure 4-40. 


Cancel 
















Change line attributes 


4 - 49 


Change line attributes 

Now you will remove the lines around selected shapes. 

H Use Shift-Click to select the Box Text shapes highlighted in 
Figure 4-41. 



Figure 4-41 . Select the Box Text shapes shown in this illustation. 


*+NOTE: Make sure you select the Box Text shapes, ‘‘Please 
Return.“Amount of Payment, ” and the tear off line. 

M Select Line Attributes from the Graphic menu (or press 
Ctrl-L). Choose Thickness: None. Click OK. 

























4-50 


Pictures 


If any of the Box Text still have borders, simply reselect the 
box and change its line attributes to none. 

Check that the invoice resembles Figure 4-42. 


No. 1001 


XYZ 

CORPORATION 

123 Main Street 
Los Angeles, CA 90000 
(213) 555-1111 


Ship to: 

International Paper Co. 
1701 Broad Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19000 


a Return Top Portion Wllh Payment Amount of Payment $ _ 




PREVIOUS BALANCE 




XYZ CORPORA VON 
123 Main Street 
Los Angeles, CA 90000 


PLEASE PAY THIS AMOUNT 


Figure 4-42 After shading some of the boxes, and removing some lines, 
the invoice should look like this. 


Add line and arrow 

To add the finishing touches to the form, you will add an arrow 
after the words “Previous Balance.” 

H Select the line tool from the Side-Bar. When the slanted 
pencil appears, place its “point” after the e in the word 
Balance. You may want to change to Enlarged View to draw 
the line (Figure 4-43). 










Figure 4-43. 


H Press the Alt key as you drag the line to the right. (The Alt 
key keeps the line perfectly straight as you draw.) Stretch 
the line until it lines up with the letter “B” in the word 
BALANCE on the line above. 

Use the Line Attributes dialog box to put an arrow at one end 
of the line. 

II Select Line Attributes (or press Ctrl-L). Choose Thickness: 
Thin, Color: Black and choose the arrow in the right column 
of End Styles. 

LINE ATTRIBUTES for LINE [7] 

Thickness: Thin 00.06 Fractional pfctv 


Color: Black 




























4 - 52 


Pictures 


Show the graphics on all pages 

To create more numbered invoices you will add pages and tell 
Ventura to repeat the graphics on all pages. Because the 
header includes the page numbering code ([P#]), when you 
add a page the invoice number will increase by one. 

You must select all the graphic shapes before you tell Ventura 
to repeat them on all pages of the document. 

^ Choose Select All from the Graphic menu (or press Ctrl-Q). 

§1 Select Show On All Pages from the Graphic menu. 



PW04RPTG.IMG 

To see the shapes repeated, you will insert a new page. 

*+NOTE: When you use Box Text as the only text in the docu¬ 
ment, Ventura doesn’t automatically create a new page for 
you. Therefore, you must insert one manually. 

^ Select Insert/Remove Page from the Chapter menu. Choose 
Operation: Insert New Page After Current Page and click 
OK. 

Ventura adds a page and moves you to it. Because you in¬ 
serted a page manually, you must update the page counter so 

that the invoice number will change. 

il Select Update Counters from Chapter menu. 

11 Choose Which Counter: This Page, Update Method: Pre¬ 
vious Number + 1, Number Format: 1,2 and click OK. 







Show the graphics on all pages 


4 - 53 


The header now reads “1002.” Now every page you insert will 
increase the page number by one (Figure 4-44). 



Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


C:\TEMP\4IIW01CE.CHP (4IHUOICE.STV) 


no. ioo 2 n 


XYZ+i 

CORPORATION1 

123 Main Street 
Los Angeles, CA 30000J 
(213)555-11110 




ISiUHIII 

□ 

□ 



Figure 4-44. 


Chapter 

Now that you’ve seen the invoice on the screen, let’s see how it 
looks printed out. Ventura’s print option allows you to print 
multiple copies of a document. When you print this time, tell 
Ventura to make three copies of the form. 

H To Print Which Pages: Current 

Number of Copies: 3 

Ventura prints out three copies of the invoice. Incidentally, 
once a laser printer has processed one copy of a single page, it 
takes less time to make additional copies, because the fonts 
are already in memory. 

In this chapter, you learned how to create a graphics-intensive 
document using Ventura’s graphic tool kit. In the next chap¬ 
ter, you will learn how to create another document that relies 
heavily on graphics to convey a message: an advertising flyer. 

















4 - 54 


Chapter 



Tips and techniques 


When to use Box Text 

Use Box Text to contain text if you want to: 

□ Quickly place less than two dozen words. For longer selec¬ 
tions, consider using a frame so the text can be placed into 
a separate file if desired. 

□ Attach the text to something else. If, for example, you wish 
to create callouts for an illustration, you want the text to be 
tied to that frame. When you move the frame, the Box Text 
automatically moves with it. And since you can anchor a 
frame to a text reference, the graphics attached to the 
frame will move according to the text reference. 

□ Move Box Text shapes as a group. Box Text can be grouped 
by attaching them all to the same parent frame. When you 
move the parent you automatically move all the Box Text. 
Frames, on the other hand, cannot be permanently linked 
(although you can temporarily group them using shift-click 
to select several at a time). 


When to use frames 

Use a frame to contain text if you want to: 

□ Import a file. You cannot load a file into Box Text. You must 
always type Box Text directly onto the page. 

□ Rename the text to a separate file. Even if you originally 
type the text into the chapter, you may sometimes want to 
rename text into a separate file. A stand-alone text file can 
be easily edited or updated with a word processor. 

□ Create more than one column inside the rectangle. You can 
create multiple columns inside a frame, but not inside Box 
Text. 

□ Flow text around the rectangle. Text can flow automatically 
around a frame. By contrast, Box Text coexists with 
whatever else is in the same space. 

□ Put more than one ruling line around the rectangle. Box 



Show the graphics on all pages 


4 - 55 


Text can have only a single ruling line around. Frames can 
have up to three. 

More graphic drawing tips 

□ Align Box Text shapes along a grid. The snap-to grid avail¬ 
able in Graphic mode is more versatile than the eolumn- 
and line-snap available in Frame mode. 

□ When you draw a shape it appears on that page only. To 
repeat graphic shapes on all pages of the chapter select 
Show On All Pages from the Graphic menu. 

□ When selecting the parent, make logical groupings so all 
related shapes can be moved as one by moving the parent. 
For instance, if you were constructing a two-part form 
using frames instead of the Page, you could attach all the 
shapes on the top half to one parent, and all the shapes on 
the bottom half to a different frame. That way the two 
halves could be adjusted independently. 

□ Ctrl-Q is the keyboard shortcut for Select All from the 
Graphic menu. This graphics command operates even in 
Frame mode. (It is the only one that works in this manner. 
To use any other graphic commands, you must switch to 
Graphic mode.) 

□ Establish snap-to grid settings before you start to draw. 
There may be a few exceptions where you wish to turn grid 
settings off for complete freedom in placing a shape. In 
most cases, your drawings will be more accurate and attrac¬ 
tive if you establish a snap-to grid in advance. 

□ Set the grid as large as possible. The larger the units of the 
grid, the smaller the possibility for error. 

□ Consider the margin when setting the grid. If possible, 
make the snap grid units an integer multiple of the mar¬ 
gins so the shapes can also snap to the margin. 

□ To move a very small shape, attach it to a larger frame. 
(The frame can be “invisible” if you do not want it to print.) 
Then move the frame. The shape moves with it. 

□ To draw several shapes at once, hold the Shift key down 
while dragging the mouse. The cursor stays in shape draw¬ 
ing mode and you can draw a second shape immediately. 




4 - 56 


Chapter 


□ To speed the creation of identical shapes, use the Save To 
button in the Line Attributes and Fill Attributes dialog 
boxes. This saves the attributes you have just chosen. From 
then on, every shape you draw is identical to the previous 
one. 

□ To select several shapes at once, use the same Shift-Click 
method that operates in Paragraph mode. Once you have 
selected more than one shape, you can move, resize, or 
change the attributes of these shapes as a group. 

□ To select a shape that is underneath another, hold down the 
Ctrl key while clicking on the shape with the mouse. Each 
time you Ctrl-click, Ventura selects the next lowest “layer,” 
no matter how many shapes are piled one on top of the 
other. 





Chapter Five 
Skills Checklist 


Theory 

□ How Ventura manages pictures 

□ Line-art versus bit-mapped images 

□ Encapsulated PostScript 

Text 

□ Improving headlines with manual 
kerning 

□ Entering non-keyboard characters 

□ Understanding letter spacing 

□ Reducing loose lines 

Style 

□ Combining two page formats in one 
document 

□ Improviing display type with 
interactive tracking and kerning 

□ Adding columns to frames 

□ Adjusting the vertical spacing in 
frames 

□ Rotating text 

Pictures 

□ Sizing and scaling pictures 

□ Cropping pictures 

□ Loading and placing PostScript files 

□ Creating text runarounds 

□ Adding drop shadows to frames 

Chapter 

□ Printing to a disk file 

□ Creating PostScript files 

□ Printing hidden pictures 




Chapter Five 


An Advertising Flyer 


A dvertisements and flyers are invaluable promotional 
tools. In Chapter Five, you will learn how to create a 
self-mailing ad. Although we constructed this project as a 
direct mail piece, many of the techniques apply equally well to 
print advertisements. In essence, we will show you the basics 
of creating an ad plus the added techniques to turn that ad 
into a self-mailing flyer. The checklist on the left lists some of 
the special skills you will learn. 


Theory 

In Chapter Four, you learned how to use Ventura’s built-in 
graphics to create simple box, line, and rectangle shapes. 
These basic shapes are useful for forms, annotations, and 
simple artwork. But for the sophisticated graphics required of 
an advertisement, you need dedicated, stand-alone graphics 
programs. Programs like AutoCAD, Adobe Illustrator, and PC 
Paintbrush provide specialized drawing and painting tools for 
creating high-quality images. Fortunately, Ventura makes it 
easy to import these complex images into a document. 

The advertising project you will complete in this chapter 
depends heavily on graphics effects. You will find it easier to 
follow along if you understand these three key concepts: 

• How Ventura manages picture files 

• The two kinds of pictures 

• How to change the size and position of pictures inside the 
frame 



5-2 


Theory 


How Ventura manages pictures 

After you create a picture, you load and place it in a frame. 
However, the chapter file doesn’t store the image itself, it 
stores a pointer to the picture file with information about how 
to display and assemble the picture in the chapter. Picture 
files cannot be changed from inside Ventura. 

Two kinds of pictures 

Ventura accepts two kinds of picture files: bit-mapped images 
and line-art. Paint programs, scanners, and screen capture 
utilities create bit-mapped images. These images are a collec¬ 
tion of thousands of individual dots (or bits). As you draw, the 
computer makes a map of the screen and figures out which 
dots to turn on and off (Figure 5-1). 



Figure 5-1 . With a bit-mapped image, the picture is made up of 
individual dots. 


Since an image is a map of the screen, the final quality of the 
picture is only as good as the screen’s resolution. Few screens 
can match the 300 dots-per-inch resolution of a laser printer. 
Therefore, at print time, bit-map curves and diagonals appear 
jagged. Despite this trade-off in quality, a paint package can 
provide subtle, artistic effects, shades and shadows that are 
difficult to achieve with line-art. 

By contrast, line-art programs such as AutoCAD, MacDraw, 
and GEM Draw do not use bit-maps. They combine basic 





Encapsulated Postscript files 


5-3 


geometric shapes to build up pictures. Shades, surfaces, and 
planes are rendered as lines, arcs, circles, and other geometric 
objects. Hence the term “object-oriented” graphics. 

These objects are stored as mathematical expressions. A circle 
is described as a center point and a radius, a line is described 
as a starting and ending point, an arc as three consecutive 
points, and so forth. Line-art has several advantages. When 
you print an object-oriented picture, the computer sends its 
description to the printer. The picture is then printed at 
whatever resolution the printer or phototypesetter is capable 
of — 300, 600, 1200, or 2500 dots per inch. As a result, lines 
and curves appear smooth (Figure 5-2). 



Figure 5-2. When you print an object-oriented picture, you send its 
mathematical description to the printer. The picture is printed at the 
resolution of the printer or typesetter. 


Line-art has another advantage. You can enlarge or reduce it 
without losing picture quality. You don’t have to worry about 
creating it at the same size as the final version. 

Encapsulated Postscript files 

If you have a PostScript printer you can also use a special kind 
of line-art. With the Encapsulated PostScript (EPS) format 
you can create a small facsimile of each of your Ventura 
documents and insert them as line-art in a frame. For in¬ 
stance, we used the EPS format to produce the “after” pictures 




5-4 


Theory 


near the beginning of each chapter. When you place a Encap¬ 
sulated PostScript file created in Ventura, the picture is not 
displayed on screen. Instead, the picture appears as a large 
“X” (Figure 5-3). The picture, however, is visible when you 
print. You will have a chance to use Encapsulated PostScript 
to build the sample advertisement in this chapter. 


Desk file Edit Mie« Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options _ 

C 7\ fVPES ET \ E US \ ftD RTlLPGT C HP ~~(MF0LLP6.S~Ty) IlllJljlilHI: 



Figure 5-3. Encapsulated PostScript files generated by Ventura 
appear on-screen as a large X. 


*+NOTE: Programs that embed TIFF image or Windows metafile 
representations of PostScript within the EPS file will be visible 
on-screen. 

Sizing and scaling pictures 

Both line-art and images can be scaled and cropped through 
the Sizing & Scaling dialog box (Figure 5-4). 

For many beginners, Sizing & Scaling is one of the most 
difficult Ventura functions to grasp. We will present you with 
basic concepts here in the theory section, but don’t be too 
surprised if you don’t understand all the ins and outs until 
you’ve had some hands-on practice. 

The dialog box gives you two options: Fit in Frame and By 
Scale Factors (Figure 5-5). Fit in Frame enlarges the picture 
until it fills the entire frame. (If you’ve set margins, Ventura 
will fill the frame up to the frame margins.) 



















Sizing and scaling pictures 


5-5 


SIZING 8 SCALING 




0 

Flow Text Around: 

On 




Upper Left X: 

M □□ 

Upper Left Y: 

13,0B □ 

□ 

Frane Width: 

17,08 

Frane Height: 

22,00 

Horiz. Padding: 

00,00 

Uert. Padding: 

00,00 picas & points 

Picture Scaling: 


By Scale Factors 


Aspect Ratio: 

Distorted 



X Crop Offset: 

00,80 □□ 

V Crop Offset: 

00,00 □ 

□ 

Scale Width: 

17,00 

Scale Height: 

22,00 




HH 

Cancel 



Figure 5-5. Fit in Frame enlarges the picture to fill the frame up to its 
margins. 


When you fit a picture into a frame, you can instruct Ventura 
whether to maintain or ignore the original aspect ratio. By 
setting Aspect Ratio: Maintain Ventura enlarges the picture 
as much as it can without changing the original horizontal 
and vertical proportions. This may leave some extra white 
space around the image. Aspect Ratio: Distorted, on the other 
hand, stretches the picture as necessary to fill the frame even 
if it has to distort the proportions (Figure 5-6). 

Remember when we warned you earler that Sizing & Scaling 
can be confusing at first? Here comes the part that trips up 

















5-6 


Theory 


Aspect Ratio 
Maintained 


Aspect Ratio 
Distorted 



Figure 5-6. You can maintain or distort the aspect ratio to achieve the 
desired effect. 


many beginners. When you choose Fit in Frame, Ventura 
scales (resizes) the picture for you. If you want to resize the 
picture manually, you must choose By Scale Factors. 

Maybe it’s the name that puzzles people. By Scale Factors is a 
fuzzy phrase that doesn’t really explain what’s going on. Per¬ 
haps it will be easier for you to grasp if you think of it as 
Manual Resizing or Changing Dimensions. Here’s the idea in 
a nutshell: Ventura displays the old dimensions. You type in 
the new ones. Simple, isn’t it? Now let’s examine the operation 
in more detail. 

When you choose Picture Scaling: By Scale Factors, Ventura 
displays the picture’s original size (on the lines Scale Width 
and Scale Height). To change the size, you enter a new width 
or height (or both). Suppose you start with a picture 06,00 
picas & points wide by 08,00 picas & points tall. To double the 
picture’s width, you would choose Picture Scaling: By Scale 
Factors and then enter 12,00 picas & points as the new width. 
After you enter the new width, you can choose whether or not 
to keep the original proportions. Aspect Ratio: Maintain calcu¬ 
lates the height to maintain the same proportions as the 
original. In the previous example, if you entered a new width 
of 12,00 picas & points, Ventura would double the height to 
16,00 picas & points to maintain the original width and height 
ratio. With Aspect Ratio: Distorted you can choose any com¬ 
bination of widths and heights (Figure 5-7). 














Cropping pictures 


5-7 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 

iliiaiilligiilililliI1^pISEf\umlTLEif^'~TDM!:s1W' , illllS|jlllilllilllilT 


06£0 picas 12,00 picas 01,00 picas 



Originalsize ByScale Factor. ByScale Factor 

Aspect Ratio M aintain Aspect Ratio Distorted 


3 mcii 

Figure 5-7. When you increase the size of a picture By Scale Factors, 
you can maintain or distort the aspect ratio. 

** TIP: When working with scale factors, the height and width in 
the Sizing & Scaling dialog box represent the current size of 
the picture. To change the dimensions of a picture, enter a new 
height and width. 

Cropping pictures 

While scaling enlarges or reduces a picture, cropping moves it 
up, down, right, or left within the frame to display selected 
portions of the picture. 

With both bit-mapped and line-art images, you can crop inter¬ 
actively by moving the picture within the frame with the 
mouse cursor. Here’s how: In Frame mode, you select the 
frame containing the picture to crop, and place the mouse 
cursor somewhere in the middle of the frame (or picture). 
Then you hold down the mouse button while pressing the Alt 
key. A picture of a hand appears. You hold the mouse button 
down and drag the hand to move the image (Figure 5-8). 

If you need more precision, you can crop the picture by enter¬ 
ing a positive or negative X or Y offset. The offset is the 
distance the picture moves from its original position. Imagine 
a horizontal and vertical axis starting at the upper left corner. 
You can slide the picture along the horizontal (X) axis or the 
vertical (Y) axis. A positive X offset moves the picture left; a 










































5-8 


Theory 



Figure 5-8. You can crop bit-mapped and line-art pictures interactively 
by pressing the Alt key and holding down the button as you move the 
mouse inside the frame. 


negative X offset moves it right. A positive Y offset moves the 
picture up; a negative Y offset moves it down. 

If you want to practice cropping, try changing one variable at 
a time: enter a positive X offset only, then a positive Y offset, 
and so forth. Then try combining a positive X and a positive Y 
offset; a negative X and a Y. The more you practice, the better 
you’ll be able to visualize the position of the picture in the 
frame. Figure 5-9 shows one example. 



Figure 5-9. You can also crop pictures by entering numbers into the 
Sizing & Scaling dialog box. 





























Cropping pictures 


5-9 


Before 


3,oO 


r 


he Ventura' 
Makeover 




'/*** , 



\ 




| PA&lNATlOA/Sj ^ 


1 

1****'»*'> V '-*AA- ^ 

JBS-r 

b 

g = —- 




i 


V T»:hr^nr l in,mnm 




Wt*Pt*l4**U+t*- 
*W4+444** /t ** r 

**t 4+wH*** 
*U****4* t/t ***s> 
4HMA****** 


ti/i^r^yyy^yyyu**^ 



tt4A*yU~*+<4*V 1< 00 % , 
m*i/ti*n***l* , +& 

*uAA*1/iaA*' 


' ^ TfpJ /fsute-acA £>oco 
TXALK ,C4oeM$ TjeMfEA 


~Xopk tieufeTiCA 

tfAUC Socv 


pRo/ $n*Qou) 
£o% ScKGGN 


Cftjf 

?irt& Jvtf'FGP 

"Text RunAmohd 

(PICTURE 


% £ TirAes 

t Shire m p 


Introducing a cure for the common document... 


jdopjsap jno/f uo jq8u 
— sjuauinaop 8ui5|oo|-]Euoiss9jcud ‘paqsqod 
oju; scapi Jno/f ujnj oj Avoq uaeaq 


XYZCd^snlwn 
IUMmSim 
L o« Aaf«lM.CA 90000 



_ After 

The Ventura 
Makeover 


Take a great idea ... and make it greater 



PAGINATIONS 


Training WorUuqta Udrrwy 

8 B 3 E 5 Egglfi = 3 ggjj| 
BSBS3 mnMu gK“H 
|p£^ iigs ggp 
K^tSl igKKJS jS=“| 

e 55§H SStES WMM 

W ai r^wirn _ ,_i r . II 

sggg llil jilS 


Now you eta give an ordinary per¬ 
sonal computer the power of a pro¬ 
fessional print shop. With 
Xerox Ventura Publisher and 
expert training from the 
people at XYZ Corporation, 
you can learn to create 
professional- quali ty 
documents using a per¬ 



sonal computer and an inexpensive 
laser printer. For this week only, 
when you come in for a no- 
risk demonstration, we will 
redesign one of your cor- 
documents, while you 
watch! But hurry—our 
offer is limited. Call 
13)555-1111 today. 


°m^sflEBSE^a3sr 

Xac«<li aB » hwk«XwoiCBrp»wa att 









5-10 


Planning the flyer 


Planning the flyer 

Consider the thousands of advertisements you see each year. 
How many do you remember? In a small amount of space an 
advertisement must provoke, lure, entice (or annoy) the 
prospect into reading the copy and (hopefully) buying the 
product. Advertisements also carry another responsibility: 
They project the company name and image to the outside 
world. For these reasons, good design is crucial to the success 
of an advertisement. Some documents — reports, proposals, 
memos — can get by with an adequate page design. But 
adequate is not good enough for an ad. The public is bom¬ 
barded by hundreds of advertisements each day. Sales 
materials that are merely average will be ignored. 

The design of an advertisement carries several burdens. First, 
it must attract attention. Second, it must lead the eye into the 
copy and keep it moving. And third, it must reinforce the 
underlying theme and message of the words. Meeting these 
goals requires attention to all the details that make up good 
design — the layout, the typography, the white space, the 
graphics, and so on. Fortunately, Ventura Publisher provides 
the tools to fine-tune your pages so they stand out from the 
crowd. 

This chapter’s sample advertisement is a self-mailer — it can 
be folded in thirds, stapled, and mailed without needing an 
envelope. The first page is the mailer. It has been divided into 
three panels as illustrated in Figure 5-10. The top panel (#1) 
is the inner flap. It is tucked inside when the flyer is folded 
and stapled for mailing. The center panel (#2) is the back flap. 
Both the inner and the back flap contain “teaser copy,” 
designed to entice the reader into opening the mailer and 
reading further. The bottom panel (#3) is for the address. It 
appears on top when the flyer is folded and contains the 
return address, mailing label, and stamp. 

The second page of this document is the advertisement itself. 
It will be printed on the opposite side from the mailer. When 
the readers open the flyer, they can see the ad as a single, 
full-page unit. 



Cropping pictures 


5-11 


Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Figure 5-10. The first page of the flyer has three panels that can be 
folded for mailing. 


^ NOTE: If your company does not prepare mailers, you can 
skip the instructions for page one and produce only the ad on 
page two. The principles and theories taught for page two 
apply equally to print advertisements. 

The thumbnail sketch for the the advertisement shows you 

some of the techniques you will use to create these effects: 

• Frames on the Page 

• Box Text 

• Text runarounds 

• Kerned headlines 

• Drop shadows 

• Special non-keyboard characters for a trademark symbol, 
ellipsis, and em dash 

• Typographic controls to fine-tune the headlines and body 
copy 




























5-12 


Ventura prep 


Ventura prep 


If you have the Power disk 

H If you are continuing from the previous chapter, select New 
from the File menu to clear the screen. 

H Enable Frame mode and select the Page. 

H Select Load Text/Picture to load the ASCII format text file 
5AD.TXT from the C:\POWER subdirectory. The text auto¬ 
matically flows onto the Page. Use File/Type Rename to 
rename it as C:\TEMP\5MAILER.TXT. 

Because the Page was selected when you loaded the file, 

Ventura placed the file on the Page for you (when you load 

several files, Ventura does not attempt to place any of them. 

You must remove the file from the Page, however, before you 

can add frames to contain text and graphics. 

^ Select Remove Text/File from the Edit menu. The file name 
5MAILER.TXT appears on the File name line. Choose 
Remove from: Frame. 

*+NOTE: As we explained earlier in Chapter Two, Ventura will 
not allow you to rename a text file until it has been placed on 
the Page. 

i§ Select Load Diff. Style to load the style sheet 5AD.STY from 
the C:\POWER subdirectory. 

H Use Save As New Style to save it as 
C:\TEMP\5MAILER.STY. 

Now load the two PostScript files. 

II Select Load Text/Pictures and choose Type of File: Line-Art, 
Line-Art Format: PostScript, and # of Files: Several. Load 
the two files, 5AD.EPS and 5COURIER.EPS in turn from 
the C:\POWER subdirectory. When you are finished, click 
OK or Cancel to return to the document. 

Next, load the line-art picture. 

II Press Ctrl-X to redisplay the Load/Text Picture dialog box. 




Cropping pictures 


5-13 


Choose Type of File: Line-Art, Line-Art Format: GEM. Load 
the file COMPUTER.GEM from the C:\POWER subdirec¬ 
tory. 


*+■ TIP: You can use Ctrl-X whenever you want to redisplay the 
previous dialog box. 

H Use Save As to save the chapter as 
C:\TEMP\5MAILER.CHP. 



If you do not have the Power disk 


Using your word processor, type the text file for Chapter 5 
from Appendix A and save it as C:\TEMP\5MAILER.TXT. 


Load the original Ventura style sheet &PREL-P1.STY from 
the C:\TYPESET subdirectory. Change the margins and 
columns to match Figure 5—11. Rename it as 
C:\TEMP\5MAILER.STY. 


i Change the tags to match the ones listed in the tag table in 
Appendix B. 

i Load three Ventura sample line-art picture into the Assign¬ 
ment List. If you don’t have any line-art pictures of your 
own, load the Ventura sample picture COLUMBIA.GEM 
from the C:\TYPESET subdirectory. 

i Save the chapter as C:\TEMP\5MAILER.CHP. 


Text 


In this project, you will use three techniques to place text. You 
will place a file into a frame; you will type text directly into a 
frame; and you will use Box Text. This is a good opportunity to 
apply what you’ve already learned about text to a design that 
requires a combination of different skills. Like the newsletter 
and form in Chapters Three and Four, this sample document 
relies heavily on text in frames and Box Text. Therefore, you 
will vary slightly from the Ventura Formula and delay placing 
text until you build frames and boxes to contain it. 





Figure 5-11. If you do NOT have the Power disk, change &PREL-P1 .STY to match these 
dimensions. 


Style 

Your first task is to size and position frames and Box Text. If 
you start by laying out the margins and columns on the Page, 
you can use them later as a guide. 






Select the page format 


5-15 


*+■ TIP: Even when creating a free-form, graphics-intensive docu¬ 
ment, start by formatting the Page as a framework. 

Select the page format 

Since this piece is a self-mailer, it will be printed on both sides 
— the mailing information on the outside and the ad on the 
inside. As you know from Chapter Three, a double-sided for¬ 
mat allows you to mirror identical headers, footers, margins, 
etc., on right and left pages. For this advertisement, however, 
you will create left and right pages that have completely 
different values (Figure 5-12). 


Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Figure 5-12. This project has different formats for the left and right 
pages. 


H Select Page Size & Layout from the Chapter menu. Choose 
Sides: Double, Start On: Right Side. 

Layout page one 

The style sheet you loaded (or created) contains the column 
and margin settings for the first page. This one-column format 
lets you easily place and size frames for the mailing panels. 
Continue on to add frames and Box Text to the page. 

H Verify that Column Snap and Line Snap are turned on from 
the Options menu. (The menu displays “Turn Column Snap 
Off’ and “Turn Line Snap Off”) 














































5-16 


Style 


H Reset the zero point to line up with the upper left corner of 
the column guide (Figure 5-13). 



Figure 5-13. 


*+NOTE: If you reset the zero point (to a point other than the 
upper left corner of the Page), the Upper Left X and Y values 
in the Sizing & Scaling dialog box do not change to reflect the 
new ruler positions. The Upper Left X and Y values are always 
measured from the upper left corner of the page. 

Draw three frames on page one 

11 Draw three frames on top of the Page. Draw frame #1 
starting at position 0,0 picas on the ruler. Draw frame #2 
starting at position 21 picas on the vertical ruler and frame 
#3 starting at position 42 picas on the vertical ruler. 

Use the horizontal and vertical crosshairs and rulers, and the 
Sizing & Scaling dialog box to position and size the frames on 
the Page. Figure 5-14 will help you gauge the frame dimen¬ 
sions. 

TIP: For more accuracy, you may want to change to Normal 
View . Place the upper left corner and stretch the frame as 
large as possible. Then enter the width and height of the frame 
through the Sizing & Scaling dialog box. 















Figure 5-14. Draw these three frames on page one. 


You will notice that the frames are not of equal size; nor are 
they spaced equally. Rather, they have been sized so that the 
smaller inner flap can fold up comfortably beneath the ad¬ 
dress flap. 













5-18 


Style 


Draw Box Text shapes in the bottom frame (frame #3) 

Now that you have placed the three frames, you will add the 
Box Text and rectangle shapes that show the position of the 
return address, mailing label, and stamp in the bottom frame. 
Start by setting a snap-to grid. 

H Enable Graphic mode. Select the bottom frame (frame #3). 

il Select Grid Settings. Choose Grid Snap: On. Make both the 
Horizontal and the Vertical Spacing 01,00 picas & points. 


GRID SETTINGS 



0 

Grid Snap: 

On 



Horizontal Spacing: 

01,00 

picas 

& points 

Vertical Spacing: 

01,00 





Cancel 


Draw the return address Box Text 

Draw the return address using Box Text. 

§1 Reset the zero point of the ruler to line up with the upper 
left corner of the bottom frame (Figure 5—15). 

H Select the Box Text tool from the Side-Bar. Starting at 
position 01,00 picas on the vertical ruler and position 01,00 
picas on the horizontal ruler, draw a box 05,00 picas high 
and 12,00 picas wide. 

** TIP: Remember ; you can check the size of a Box Text or 
rectangle by placing the ruler’s zero point on one corner of the 
shape. 





Draw the mailing label 


5-19 



Figure 5-15. 


Next you will change the line attributes for the Box Text. 

M Line Attributes Thickness: Thin 

End Styles (Beginning and End): Square 
Defaults: Save To 

II Fill Attributes Color: White 

Pattern: Hollow 
Results: Transparent 
Defaults: Save To 


Draw the mailing label 

Now you will use the Box Text shape to draw a mailing label 
06,00 picas high and 24,00 picas wide (1 inch by 4 inches, a 
standard label size) in the bottom frame (frame #3). 

H Select the Box Text tool. Starting from position 08,00 picas 
on the vertical ruler and 13,00 picas on the horizontal ruler, 
draw the box 06,00 picas high and 24,00 picas wide (Figure 
5-16). 

Ventura remembers the line and fill attributes from the last 
Box Text. 


































5-20 


Style 


Desk File Edit Vie* Chapter Frene Paragraph Graphic Options 



Figure 5-16. 


Draw the stamp 

Now you will draw the “stamp” with a rectangle shape. 

^ Grid Settings Grid Snap: On 

Horizontal Spacing: 00,06 picas & points 
Vertical Spacing: 00,06 picas & points 

H Select the rectangle tool from the Side-Bar. Draw a rec¬ 
tangle 03,00 picas high and 04,06 picas wide in the upper 
right corner of the frame (Figure 5-17). 

If necessary, move the rectangle into position. 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Figure 5-17. 
















































































Change the rectangle’s attributes 


5-21 


NOTE: Judge the position as best you can from previous 
illustrations. Accuracy is not essential. 

Change the rectangle’s attributes 

^ Line Attributes Thickness: Thin 

End Styles (Beginning and End): Square 
Defaults: Save To 

i! Fill Attributes Color: White 

Pattern: Hollow 
Results: Transparent 
Defaults: Save To 


Layout page two 

You have completed the layout for page one. Before you con¬ 
tinue, reset the zero point back to its original position at the 
upper left corner of the column margin. As you saw earlier, 
when you place text in frames (instead of on the Page), Ven¬ 
tura doesn’t automatically create new pages. Therefore, you 
must add one manually. 

H Select Insert/Remove Page from the Chapter menu to in¬ 
sert a new page after the current one. 

H Choose Operation: Insert New Page After Current Page 
and click OK. 

On the second page, you will create a two-column format with 
different margins and columns from the first page. The new 
format will make it easier to size and place the frames for the 
finished layout. 

H Enable Frame mode and select the Underlying Page. 

i§ Select Margins & Columns from the Frame menu. Choose # 
of Columns: 2. Set the top and bottom margins at 03,00 
picas & points. Make the left and right margins 08,00 picas 
& points. Make the Column 1 width 16,03 picas & points 
and the first gutter width 02,06 picas & points. Choose 
Make Equal Widths and click OK. 



5-22 


Style 


MARGINS R COLUMNS 


# of Columns: m o m m m m m m 


Settings For: 


Left Page 


| Right Page 1 


m 


Column 1: 
2 : 
3: 
4: 
5: 
6 : 
7 : 
8 : 


Widths 

16,63) 

16,03 

m,m 

88,88 

88,88 

m,m 

88,88 

88,88 


Gutters 

02,06 

00,00 

00,00 

00,00 

00,00 

00,00 

00,00 


Margins 

Top: 03,60 picas R points 
Bottom: 03,00 
Left: 08,00 
Right: 08,00 


Calculated Width = 51,00 
Actual Frame Width = 51,00 


Inserts: 


Make Equal Width 


f 


| Copy To Facing Page | 


| OK | | Cancel | 


TIP: As a general rule, always enter the top, bottom, left, and 
right margins before you enter the column widths. If you want 
all the columns equal, use this sequence: enter the first 
column width, then the first gutter width, and then choose 
Make Equal Widths. If you want unequal columns, enter the 
first column width, then the first gutter width, and then man¬ 
ually enter the second column width. 

Add frames to page two 

Once you set the margins and columns for page two, you are 
ready to add the frames. Use the ruler plus Line and Column 
Snap to accurately position the frames as shown in Figure 
5-18. Use the Sizing & Scaling dialog box to verify the posi¬ 
tion and size of the frames. 

H Draw the frames on page two using Figure 5-18 as a guide. 

*+NOTE: We intentionally placed the bottom-most frame (frame 
#6) so it extends below the bottom column guide. 


Add a ruling box around the center frames 

To make the two center frames (frame #6 and #7) stand out on 
the page, and to enclose the pictures that will be placed inside, 
add a Ruling Box Around. 

H Select the left frame (frame #6). 







Add a ruling box around the center frames 


5-23 



Figure 5-18. Draw frames matching these dimensions on page two. 


Select Ruling Box Around from the Frame menu. Choose 
Width: Frame. Give Rule 1 a height of 00.25 fractional pts 
and click OK. 













5-24 


Style 


RULING BOH AROUND 



ml 

Width: Frane 
Color: Black 
Pattern: Solid 
Dashes: Off 

Space Above Rule 1: 00.00 

Height of Rule 1: 00.2S| 
Space Below Rule 1; 00,00 
Height of Rule 2: 00.00 
Space Below Rule 2: 00.00 
Height of Rule 3: 00.00 

Custom Indent: 
Custon Width: 

Dash Width: 
Dash Spacing: 

36.00 

00.00 fT] |T"! 

00.00 

00.00 

00,00 fractional pts 

Space Below Rule 3: 00.00 
Overall Height: 00.25 

DQ 






Cancel| 


Repeat the step above for the right picture frame (frame #7). 
When you are finished the frames should look like Figure 
5-19: 



Figure 5-19. 

Change the number of columns in one frame 

When you place a frame on the Page, Ventura gives it a single 
column and sets all the margins to 00,00 picas & points. With 
Margins & Columns you can change the margins of a frame. 

Select the frame reserved for the body copy (frame #8). 

H Select Margins & Columns. Choose # of Columns: 2. (Notice 
that Ventura remembers the two-column and gutter set- 

























Add text to page one 


5-25 


tings from the Page.) Leave the column and gutter settings 
as they are and keep all the margins at 00,00 picas & 
points. Then click OK to close the dialog box. 


MARGINS 8 COLUMNS 


m 

« of Coiunns: rTlHlTIfTllTlfTllTIpn 

Settings For: | Right Page | 

Widths 

Gutters 

Margins 

Column 1: 16,03 

02,06 

00,00 

00,00 

00,00 

Top: 00,00 picas 8 points 

2: 16,03 

Bottom: 00,00 

3: 88,88 

Left: 00,00 

4: 88,88 

Right: 00,00 


00,00 


7: $3,88 

00,00 

00,00 

Calculated Width = 35,00 

8: 111,88 

Actual Frame Width = 35,00 

Inserts: | Make Equal Widths | | Copy To Facing Page | 



SEiilSSft 1 Cancel | 





Now the frame has the same column and gutter settings as 
the Page (even though the column guides are not visible inside 
the frame). 


Add text to page one 

With the frames in their proper place you can enter the text. 
Start on page one and work frame-by-frame until you have 
placed all the text. 

^ Press PgUp to go to page one. 

H Enable Text mode and click the text cursor anywhere inside 
the top frame (frame #1). 

*+NOTE: You may want to change to Normal or Enlarged View 
as you type in the text 

Type the first teaser 

Use a non-keyboard character to create the ellipsis at the end 
of the first teaser headline. At this point, do not worry about 
the appearance of the text. You will format it later. 




5-26 


Style 


^ Type: 

Introducing a cure for the common document 

Now make the ellipsis: 

^ Hold down the Alt key and use the numeric keyboard to 
type: 193 

Then release the Alt key. 


Type the second teaser 

Now enter the second headline, which includes another non¬ 
keyboard character — the em dash in frame #2. 

H Place the text cursor anywhere in the middle frame (frame 
#2), and type the text shown in the Figure 5-20. Place a line 
break (press Ctrl-Enter) at the end of each line. 

(To make the em dash, hold down the Alt key and type: 197 on 
the numeric keypad, or type Ctrl-]). 



Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


■ - C:\TEHP\5HflILER.CHP (5MflILER.STV) 


team how to turn your ideas into J 
polished, professional-looking documents - J 
light on youi desktapID 


Figure 5-20. 


Type the return address 

Now move to the bottom frame (frame#3). 

H Type the text into the Box Text shape as shown in Figure 
5-21. Place line breaks (press Ctrl-Enter) at the end of each 
line. If the text doesn’t fit, make the Box Text shape bigger. 
































Type the mailing address 


5-27 


■ iiiiiiiiii! 

IIBiiSISi C:\TEHP\SHflILER.CHP ( 5 ttftiLBR.SlVf mmwmmsms - mmi * 1 

gjjp*<g 


Biai 

aYZ urporauonj m 

123 Main Street J M 

in 

iH 

Los Angeles, CA 90000 j 0 II 

g 

□ m 

EasKa 

uaiiia 

ummm 

knnnnnnanHni 


| | iiIIilI||S;iS:i|i|S 

lilllllp C:\TEMP\5MflILER.CHP (5(1flILER.STV) • 

ggtog 

,i°.i*.i";.r*..i”.i f 

msMnm 

DBI 

IH 

• KY2 CorporationJ || 

1 123 Main Street J 
i Los Angeles, CA 90000 □ 

i - 

i m 

\ M 

9 

| International Paper Company J *§ 

| 1701 Broad Street J 

| Philadelphia, PA 19000D 

j ^ 

i 

| 

) 

lamiaun 

ummm 






































5-28 


Style 


Add text to page two 

Continue on to page two and finish adding text. 

11 Press PgDn to go to page two. 

II Enable Text mode. 

II Place the cursor inside the top frame (frame #4) (Figure 
5-23) and type: 

The Ventura [Ctrl-Enter] 

Makeover 



Figure 5-23. 


^ Now place the text cursor in the second frame (frame #5) 
(Figure 5-24) and type: 

Take a great idea [tab] [Alt-193] [tab] and make it 
greater 

Place a text file on page two 

The two frames in the middle of the page are reserved for 
pictures. Skip them for now and move to the frame that is 
second from the bottom (frame #8). It will contain the body 
copy you loaded at the beginning of the project. 

II Enable Frame mode and select the frame. 


Select the file 5MAILER.TXT from the Assignment List. 














Type the remaining text on page two 


5-29 


Desk File Edit Vie* Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



told 

Halle 


1 V 


Snell 

Superict'lpt 
Subscript 
Underline 
Double unorLn 
Strike-thru 
Overscore 


Upper Case 


li 

BlSBHWa 

U 

isEBraa 


♦ 





Take a great idea*..,-and make it greater □ 






4 


Mi 



Figure 5-24. 


Ventura flows the text into the frame and stops (Figure 5-25). 
Do not be concerned that the text doesn’t fill the frame. When 
you get to the picture section, you will insert a small frame 
between the text columns, which will reflow the text to the 
end of the frame. 


Desk File Edit Vie* Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


■ pllll 11111111II111111; C:\TEMP\5MAILER.CHP (5MAILER.STY) j|HHHHH!!||Hill 



500.EPS 
5C0UMEft.EPS 
SMAILEK.TXT 
COHPUTEA..GEM 




u 

EHS3 




I I I ) l.L 


.1.,, 


$fow you can give an ordinary per 
lonal computer the power of a pro 
Sessional print shop. With Xerox 
Centura Publisher and espert train- 
jpg from the people at XY2 Cor¬ 
poration, you can learn to create 
professional-quality documents 
using a personal computer and an 
Inexpensive laser printer. lor this! 


v jweek only, when you come in for ? 
bo -risk demonstralion, we will! 
iedesign one of your corporate 
documents, while you watch! But! 
hurry-our offer is limited. Ca^ 
£213) 555-1111 today. □ 


f[7 


Figure 5-25. 


Type the remaining text on page two 

Now you will place text in the bottom-most frame (frame #9) 
(Figure 5-26). Use a non-keyboard character to create the 
registered sign after the word Xerox. 








































5-30 


Style 


H Enable Text mode. 

II Place the text cursor in the bottom-most frame (frame #9) 
and type: 

Contact your nearest XYZ representative for fur¬ 
ther information . [Ctrl-Enter] 

XYZ Corporation, 123 Main Street, Los Angeles, CA 
90000 [Ctrl-Enter] 

Xerox [Alt-190] is a trademark of Xerox 
Corporation. 


Desk file Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



lliiilil C:\TEMP\5MflILER.CHP (5t1flILER.STV) ill 


|fow you can give an ordinary per¬ 
sonal computer Ihe power of a prod 
Sessional print shop, With Xerox: 
:Ventura Publisher and espert train ' 
jng from the people at XYZ Cor¬ 
poration, you can learn to create 
professional-quality documents 
jusing a personal computer and an 
inexpensive laser printer. Por this 


•week only, when you come in for a 
bo-risk demonstration, we will 
Redesign one oi your corporate] 
documents, while you watch! But: 
hurry-our offer is limited. Call! 
i[213) 555-1111 loday.D 


^Contact your nearest XYZ representative for further information. J 
|XYZ Corporation, 123 Main Street, Los Angeles, CA 90000 J 
Xe r ox Q i s a t r adema rk o f Xe r ox C o r p or a t io n, i i _ 


Figure 5-26. 


Apply tags to page one 

Now it’s time to format the text. Because the tags have been 
predefined in the style sheet from the Power disk, all you need 
to do is to choose the right paragraph and apply the proper 
tag. Start on page one and apply the first two headline tags. If 
you have questions about any tags or effects, take a few 
moments to examine the appropriate dialog boxes from the 
Paragraph menu. 

*+NOTE: If you are not using the pre-defined style sheet from the 
Power disk, you must create the tags as you go along, using 
the tag table provided in Appendix B. 

11 Press PgUp to go to page one. 
























































Apply tags to page one 


5-31 


Enable Paragraph mode. 

Select the teaser headline in frame #1 and tag it as Head3. 

Select the teaser headline in frame #2 and tag it as Head- 
Rotate (Figure 5-27). 



Figure 5-27. 


i§ In frame #3, select XYZ’s return address and tag it as 
Address. 

H Select the mailing address and tag it as BodyCenter. 

Your screen should look like Figure 5—28: 



Figure 5-28. 
































5-32 


Style 


*+NOTE: If your screen shows tab and line break symbols, you 
know that Show Tabs & Returns is on from the Options menu . 

Before you go to page two, let’s take a moment to show you 
how we got the effect of rotated text. 

II Select the teaser headline (the HeadRotate tag) in the 
second frame. 

H Now select Alignment from the Paragraph menu. 

Notice that Text Rotation is set to 180. Because we want the 
teaser to appear right-side up when the mailer is folded, we 
made it upside-down — that is, rotated 180 degrees on-screen. 
You can edit rotated text by placing the text cursor through 
the “invisible” rotated text. In practice, however, it is easier if 
you edit your text before rotating it. 

Apply tags to page two 

!! Press PgDn to go to page two. 

si Select the first headline “The Ventura Makeover” and tag it 
as Headl. 

Select the second headline “Take a great idea ... and make 
it greater” and tag it as Head2 (Figure 5-29). 



Figure 5-29. 

























Apply tags to page two 


5-33 


Leave the main body copy tagged as Body Text. 

H Go to frame #9 and select the paragraph that begins “Con¬ 
tact your nearest... ” and tag it as BodyCenter (Figure 
5-30). 



Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


I f H,tiIlSl!Iii 11 IlilHjl C:\TEMP\5HflILER.CHP (5HAILER.SW) pilillllillllllllll 


jtfow you can give an eidinary per¬ 
sonal computer the power of a pro 
Sessional print shop, With Xerox 
Centura Publisher and expert train 
ing from the people at XYZ Cor 
joration, you can learn to create 
professional-quality documents 
using a personal computer and an 
inexpensive laser printer, Por this 


jweek only, when you come in for a! 
bo-risk demonstration, we will! 
Redesign one of your corporate: 
documents, while you watch! But: 
hurry-our offer is limited. Call: 
£213) 555-1111 today. □ 


a 


Figure 5-30. 


That was fast, wasn’t it? The more you tag, the easier it 
becomes. Before you continue, let’s examine the Head2 tag 
more closely. You may recall that you entered two tab charac¬ 
ters as part of the Head2 text. The first tab setting is a center 
tab and the second tab setting is right-aligned (Figures 5-31 
and 5-32). To position the tabs correctly you should measure 
their locations from the edge of the frame (not the edge of the 
page). The location of the second tab forces the text past the 
visible column guides. We chose this tab location so the text 
would line up with the right-most picture frame. 


NOTE: The second tab setting pushes the text outside the 
normal frame and column boundaries. 






















5-34 


Style 


"Head2" TAB SETTINGS 



m 

Tab Number: 

♦ 


♦ 


Tab Type: 

Center 



Tab Shown As: 

Open Space 


Tab Location: 

17,B6| 

picas & points 

Leader Char: 

Spaces 


032 (ASCII) 

Leader Spacing: 

0 




Auto-Leader: 

Off 







| OK | Cancel 


Figure 5-31. 


"Head2 u TAB SETTINGS 


HI 

Tab Number: 

♦ 

2| + 


Tab Type: 
Tab Shown As: 
Tab Location: 

Right 

Open Space 

35,06| picas & points 

Leader Char: 

Spaces 

032 (ASCII) 

Leader Spacing: 
Auto-Leader: 

0 

Off 





F0K 1 Cancel 






Figure 5-32. Tab settings for Head2 



Stopping point 


This is a good place to stop and save what youVe done so far. 
Check your progress against the sample page in Figure 5-33. 


If you wish, you can quit now and return to this project later. 
If you have the time, continue on to the next section. In the 
pictures section you will learn some helpful tips and tech¬ 
niques. 





Apply tags to page two 


5-35 


The Ventura 
Makeover 


Take a great idea ... and make it greater 



Now you can give an ordinary per- week only, when you come in for a 

sonal computer the power of a pro- no-risk demonstration, we will 

fessional print shop. With Xerox redesign one of your corporate 

Ventura Publisher and expert train- documents, while you watch! But 

ing from the people at XYZ Cor- hurry—our offer is limited. Call 

poration, you can learn to create (213)555-1111 today, 

professional-quality documents 
using a personal computer and an 
inexpensive laser printer. For this 

Contact your nearest XYZ representative for further information. 

XYZ Corporation, 123 Main Street, Los Angeles, CA 90000 
Xerox ®is a trademark of Xerox Corporation 


Figure 5-33. 







5-36 


Pictures 


Pictures 


In this section you will add the final graphic touches to the 
advertisement by placing three line-art pictures into frames 
on page two. 

Place pictures on page two 

An advertisement relies heavily on visual imagery to create 
an impact and convey a message. For this example, you will 
place three pictures. Two of them are Encapsulated Postscript 
Files (which Ventura treats as line-art) and the third is a 
standard line-art picture (in GEM format). If you do not have 
a PostScript printer, leave the two EPS frames blank, or fill 
them with any picture of your choice. 

^ NOTE: EPS files will not print on non-PostScript printers. 

II Make sure you are on page two. 

II Enable Frame mode. 

si Select the left frame (frame #6) and place the file 
5COURIER.EPS. 

11 Select the right frame (frame #7) and place the file 
5AD.EPS (Figure 5-34). 


















Add drop shadows to the frames 


5-37 


** TIP: If you see the message, “You’re about to overwrite an 
existing caption. You won’t be able to recover the caption text. 
Is that OK?,’’ choose Yes. Ventura displays this message if you 
previously typed in text or added a caption to the frame. 

When Ventura loads the Ventura-generated PostScript file 
into a frame, it displays an “X” on the screen. You will not see 
the picture until you print the chapter. 

** TIP: Since it is impossible to preview a Ventura-generated 
EPS file on-screen, it is important to make the frame size the 
same aspect ratio as the original EPS file. 

Add drop shadows to the frames 

A drop shadow gives the illusion of depth to a two-dimensional 
object. One way to create a drop shadow is to lay one frame on 
top of another. The bottom frame, which is gray or black, is 
offset slightly so that only the two edges show. However, this 
method may not work on all printers, and slows down some 
others. We recommend a second method: drawing two rec¬ 
tangle shapes with a gray screen pattern at right angles to 
each other. 

Before you start drawing, choose a grid value that will make it 
easy to place your shapes on the page. 

II Enable Graphic mode and select the left picture frame 
(frame #6). 

i§ Grid Settings Grid Snap: On 

Horizontal Spacing: 00,03 picas & points 
Vertical Spacing: 00,03 picas & points 

TIP: Every frame on the Page can have its own grid settings. 

Draw a horizontal shadow 

H Draw a rectangle along the bottom edge of the left frame. 
Stretch it to the right to create the bottom shadow (Figure 
5-35). 




5-38 


Pictures 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


■ 1 fSiffiilifslili!lISi»! C :\f EflPXaifl I LER 7cw>" _ CSrtfi fLER. S1V) ♦ 



Figure 5-35. 


Change the rectangle’s attributes 

Now change the line and fill attributes of the rectangle. 

M Line Attributes Thickness: None 

Defaults: Save To 

II Fill Attributes Color: Black 
Pattern: 4 

Result: Transparent 
Defaults: Save To 

Draw a vertical shadow 

is Draw a second rectangle at a right angle to the first as 
shown in Figure 5-36. 

^ NOTE: Do not be discouraged if it takes some time to draw the 
two drop shadows. If you want, go on to the next section 
(placing and sizing an image) and complete the shadows later. 

When you are satisfied with the size and position of the drop 
shadow, you must use the Send to Back option, so the rec¬ 
tangles don’t cover up the frame’s ruling lines. 


WARNING: If you omit this next step, the ruling lines at the bottom and side of the 
frame will not be visible when you print the page. 














Shadow the second frame 


5-39 


Desk File Edit Mien Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Figure 5-36. 


I Use the Shift-Click method to select both rectangles. Then 
select Send to Back from the Graphic menu (or press Ctrl- 
Z), as shown in Figure 5-37. 



Figure 5-37. 


Shadow the second frame 

To eliminate a drawing step, you will copy the drop shadows 
from the left frame (frame #6) to the right frame using the 
following steps. 

H Use Shift-Click to select both rectangles. To copy them into 
the Graphic clipboard, press Shift-Del (or select Copy 






























5-40 


Pictures 


Graphic from the Edit menu). To paste them back onto the 
Page, press Ins (or select Paste Graphic from the Edit 
menu). While the rectangles are still selected, press and 
hold down the mouse button and drag the shapes over to 
the right frame. Carefully line them up with the edges of 
the frame. You may want to switch to Normal or Enlarged 
View to fine-tune the placement of the rectangles (Figure 
5-38). 


Figure 5-38. 

H While the two rectangle shapes are still selected, choose 
Send to Back from the Graphic menu. 

Place and size an image 

Now that you’ve completed the drop shadows, you will place a 
picture of a computer in the next frame (frame #8) the one 
which contains the body copy. First, however, you will need to 
add a smaller frame within the frame to contain the picture. 

11 Enable Frame mode. Add a frame with the dimensions 
shown in Figure 5-39. Position the center of the frame in 
the center of the gutter margin. Use Sizing & Scaling to 
verify its position and dimensions. 

























Place and size an image 


5-41 


Figure 5-39. Draw a frame with the dimensions shown here to contain 
the picture of the computer. 




Ventura automatically flows the Body Text around the new 
frame. Do not be concerned how the text fits into the frame or 
if it matches the illustration we show below. You will have a 
chance to make adjustments later. 

Now you will place the picture of the computer inside. 

II With the small frame still highlighted, place the file COM- 
PUTER.GEM from the Assignment List. 









































5-42 


Pictures 


Scale the image 

After placing the picture, you can use the Sizing & Scaling 
dialog box to scale the picture in the frame and to make the 
text runaround. 

H Select Sizing & Scaling from the Frame menu. Choose Flow 
Text Around: Off, Picture Scaling: By Scale Factor, and 
Aspect Ratio: Distorted. 

Now crop the image. 

^ Enter X Crop Offset: (+) 7,00 picas & points, Y Crop Offset: 
(+) 11,06 picas & points. Scale Width: 30,00 picas & points 
and Scale Height: 30,00 picas & points. 



^ NOTE: You can also interactively crop the image. Place the 
mouse cursor inside the picture frame. Then press the Alt key 
as you hold the mouse button. Slide the image back and forth 
until you achieve the placement you want. 

When you turn Flow Text Around: Off, Ventura allows the text 
to flow into the frame and the over the picture inside it (Figure 
5-40). 




Create a text runaround 


5-43 



Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


iltliii C:\TEMP\5MfiILER.CHP (5MAILER.STV) 1111111111111111111 


5ftD.EPS 
5C0UftIER.EPS 
SMAIUER.TXT 
COMPUTED.GEH 


Easmasa 


Now you can give an ordinary per- week only, when you come in for a| 

willi 
orporalej 


sonal computer the po wer o f a_Mjisk ..demonstration, we 

professional print shotfwiih X ° T ^y aM ipn ole of your corp 


professional print shop. 
Fentura Publisher and expert 
jng from the people jal XY2 
(rotation, you can le^n to c 
professional-quality! doc 
(using a personal computer, 
inexpensive laser prim 




pents, While you watch! But; 
-our bffer is limited. Calk 
555-1^11 today.O 


Oorftcr yor nans* XYZ far Islta- frcrarbrj 

XV2 cwpcnwa 123 h*m sm, La u&os, oft 90000J 
JCrwo 3 Irotencrtc of Xsroc O c rpcnta o na 


Figure 5-40. 


Create a text runaround 

Now that you’ve turned Flow Text Around off, you will now 
place small frames over portions of the computer to create an 
irregular text runaround. Place the frames in a pyramid ar¬ 
rangement to make the text run around in a stair-step 
fashion. 

Before you add your frames, make sure that Line Snap is on 
and Column Snap is off (the Options menu). 

** TIP: Turning Line Snap on guarantees that the new frames will 
be sized in increments of the Body Text inter-line spacing. You 
will be able to create frames exactly one or two lines deep. 

!i Add four small frames over the computer image as shown 
in Figure 5—41. If you want absolute accuracy, check each 
frame’s dimensions with the Sizing & Scaling dialog box. If 
you don’t have the time, use your best judgment to gauge 
the sizes of the frame. 

Copy fit the body copy 

Now that you’ve created the text wraparound, it’s time to 
copy-fit the text so it fills the frame exactly. With Ventura you 
can copy-fit in several different ways: 

1. Add or delete from the text. 












































5-44 


Pictures 



Figure 5-41. 


The traditional way to copy-fit is to add or delete words to 
make the text fit the space. If you trim all the excess from your 
copy and the text still won’t fit the space, try one of the other 
options. 

2. Change the size of the frame containing the text. 

When text is placed in a frame on top of the Page, you can 
increase or reduce the size of the frame to make the text fit. 
With Line Snap On you can add to or subtract from the frame 
size by one-line increments. 

3. Fine-tune the frame typography settings. 

Initially, Ventura makes all the Frame Typography settings 
equal to the Chapter Typography settings (e.g. Widows and 
Orphans, Column Balance, and Move Down to 1st Baseline). 
You can, however, change a setting in the Frame Typography 
menu so it overrides the chapter settings you defined in the 
Chapter Typography menu. 

In this project, you will adjust the Frame Typography to make 
the body copy fit into the frame. 

H Enable Frame mode and select the frame reserved for the 
body copy (frame #8). 

ii Select Frame Typography from the Frame menu. 

H Choose Widows (Min Lines at Top): 1, Orphans (Min Lines 
at Bottom): 1. 



































Kern the headline 


5-45 


Select Column Balance: On and Move Down to 1st Baseline 
By: Inter-Line. Then click OK to close the dialog box. 


FRAME TVPOGRAPHV SETTINGS 

Widows (Min Lines at Top): 1 

Orphans (Min Lines at Bottom): 1 

Column Balance: On 

Move Down To 1st Baseline By: Inter-Line 
Pair Kerning: Default 


□ 



Cancel 


With the baseline position of text changed to inter-line, the 
text will align across columns (Figure 5^42). 



SOB.EPS 
SCOUKIEft.EPS 
SMflILEH.TXT 
COMPUTES.GEM 


pj 

IfllLER.fXT I 


Pg # 8802 | 

2 

f 


Jow you can give an ordinary per sonal computer and an inexpensive 
jonai computer the poKerjif^mi!!;._J.am.ptMei, lor this week only! 


[essional print shopj. With; 
Xeros Ventura Publisher and! 
Expert training frojm the! 
people at XYZ Corpioratipn,; 
you can learn to creite-Li 
prof ess ional-quaUtyUJi 


when you come in for a no 
risk demonstration, we willj 
redesign one of your cor^ 
jjiqrale 'documents, while you! 
..watch! But hurry— our) 


r .... .L yhlfer is limited. Call 

documents using a 555-1111 today. 


Cerfad yar mret KYI rvrcvtorirt fcr Utff fifmoriarv 
XYS CotpDfWwt 133 Una SfrwJ, Us 06 90000 

X»o< Oil a tasaofc <t Xcck C vpi 'af ui 


Figure 5-42. 


These adjustments should make the text reach to the bottom 
edge of the frame. If not, try adding or deleting a few words 
until it looks right. 


Kern the headline 

Before you complete this project, well show you how to make 
















































5-46 


Pictures 


some adjustments to your headlines and body copy. Because of 
space limitations, we will not go through all the fine-tuning 
that would ordinarily occur for an advertisement. We will, 
however, introduce you to the methods. Once you grasp these 
techniques, you can use them to adjust this and other docu¬ 
ments until all the details are perfect. 

Kerning is a typographic technique that allows you to selec¬ 
tively reduce the amount of space between individual letter 
pairs and leave the rest of the word the same. Kerning (or the 
lack of it) is most noticeable in display type of 18 points or 
larger. Ventura has two ways to kern: automatically and 
manually. 

Automatic pair kerning occurs only if the fonts for your 
printer come with special files called kerning tables (Ventura 
2 includes kerning tables for most printers). Kerning tables 
contain information about special letter pairs that look better 
spaced more closely. Certain letter combinations are improved 
by kerning, such as AV, YO, Ve, LY, and Te. Figure 5-43 shows 
how kerning alters the appearance of the word “wave.” 

Unkerned WAVE 
Kerned WAVE 


Figure 5-43. 


*+NOTE: You will not do any damage if you specify automatic 
kerning for fonts that do not have kerning information. Ventura 
will simply ignore the command. 

In our example, the kerning table contains information that 
told Ventura what to do if it found a capital letter A followed 
by a capital V. More specifically, it told Ventura just how far to 
move the V to the left to improve the appearance of this letter 
pair. Although we used “AV” as an example, most kerning 
tables also include information on 200 or more combinations. 






Enable automatic kerning for the headline 


5-47 


To implement automatic kerning, you must take two steps: (1) 
turn it on globally for the entire document and (2) turn it on 
for each tag that you want kerned. You must take both steps. 
Turning kerning on globally has no effect if you haven’t turned 
it on for the individual tags. Likewise, turning it on for an 
individual tag does nothing unless you also remember to turn 
it on globally. 

Enable automatic kerning for the headline 

Let’s begin by enabling automatic kerning for the headline. 
Later you will do some manual kerning as well. First you 
should verify that kerning is globally on. 

^ Select Chapter Typography from the Chapter menu. 
Choose Pair Kerning: On then click OK. 

H Enable Paragraph mode. Select the headline “The Ventura 
Makeover” in frame #4. 

H Select Paragraph Typography from the Paragraph menu. 
Verify that Automatic Pair Kerning is on, Letter Spacing is 
off, and Tracking is set to 0.040 Ems Tighter. Click OK. 


"Headl" TVPOGRAPHV SETTINGS Q] 

Automatic Pain Kenning: On 

Letten Spacing: Off Up to: 8.100 &s 

Tracking: Tighten B.640j Ens 

Grow Inter-Line To Fit: On 

Minium Space Width: 1.008 * (space width) = 6.277 Ems 

Morinal Space Width: 2.000 * (space width) = 0.555 Ens 

Maximum Space Width: 3.000 * (space width) = 0.832 Ens 


1 Cancel 


With the Paragraph Typography dialog box, you can also 
tighten type with the tracking command. Refer to Chapter 
Three for an explanation of tracking. 







5-48 


Pictures 


Perform manual kerning on the headline 

You can also kern manually in addition to, or instead of auto¬ 
matic pair kerning. For example, here’s how to move the “e” in 
the word ‘‘Ventura” close to the “V”. 


^ Enable Text mode. Select the letter “V” in the word “Ven¬ 
tura” (Figure 5-44). 



Desk file EditView_Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


iSlilillllllllll C:\TEMP\5MflIlER.CHP (5HAILER.STV) Hill 


l Pg t* B892 

■t 


■.. i*..r*.i?.i*. 4 ..i 3 .°.i“. 

fThe J 
Mata 

ientura 
sover I 

1 Take a great idea 

...j and make it greater 


E 


Figure 5-44. 


H Hold down the Shift key and press the left arrow key 8 
times to move the letter “e” closer to the V. 

*+NOTE: When you kern manually, the letter following the 
selected letter moves in the direction of the arrow. 

This moves the “e” closer to the V. The amount of kerning is a 
matter of personal taste. We suggest you experiment with 
different values until you come up with the best look. 

*+NOTE: Do not be concerned if the letters overlap on-screen. 
When you print out the page, the two letters will look right. 

You can also kern manually using the Set Font Addition but¬ 
ton in Text mode. Highlight the letter “V” and choose Set Font 
from the Side-Bar. Choose Kern: Tighter and enter the 
amount in Ems to kern. When you close the dialog box you can 
see the result of the kerning. 
















































About screen kerning 


5-49 


FONT SETTING FOR SELECTED TEXT 


a 


11 Style !1 


HASH 

Light 


CSB1 

Nornal 


Black 

Bold 


Red 

L-Italic 


Green 

N- Italic 


Blue 

B- Italic 


Cyan 

Vellow 

Magenta 




Helvetica 

T 

Tines 


Courier 


Synbol 


flvant Garde Gothic Book/Demi 


ITC Booknan Light/Deni 


Helvetica Narrow 


Palatino 


ipjjjj 

RffHf 

n 

CUSTOM 1 

u 

i 

D 

1 


CustoM Size: 074.0 paints 

Overscore: Off Shift: Up 00.00 fractional pts 

Strike-Thru: Off Kern: Tighter B.991 Ems 

Underline: Off 
Double Underline: Off 


OK i\ 


[Cancel 1 


About screen kerning 

You may not notice much difference on the screen when you 
apply kerning. Check Set Preferences from the Options menu 
to see if On-Screen Kerning is on for all display type 18 points 
and larger. 

^ Select Set Preferences from the Options menu. Choose On- 
Screen Kerning: 18. Click OK. 


SET PREFERENCES 


Generated Tags: 

Shown 

Text to Greek: 

6 

Keep Backup Files: 

Ves 

Double Click Speed: 

3 

On-Screen Kerning: 

18 

fluto-fldj ustments: 

None 

Pop-Up Menu Symbols: 

Hidden 

Menu Type: 

Drop-Down 

Decimal Tab Char: 

046| (ASCII) 


m 


Cancel 


Ventura permits you to select the size at which to show kern¬ 
ing on the screen. In general, it is best to show on-screen 
kerning only for large type sizes or not at all. Otherwise, 
on-screen kerning slows down the display. And because of the 

















5-50 


Pictures 


low resolution of computer screens, it is not effective or ac¬ 
curate at lower point sizes. In fact, don’t be surprised if your 
monitor doesn’t show any visible on-screen kerning. Because 
Ventura uses generic screen fonts, on-screen kerning is an 
approximation at best. 

*+ TIP: The only way to accurately gauge the effects of typo¬ 
graphic adjustments is to print out the page. 


WARNING: Remember to reset On-Screen Kerning to None before you continue on 
to the next section. 


About letter spacing 

Ventura has another typographic control called Letter Spac¬ 
ing. To understand letter spacing, it is first necessary to un¬ 
derstand how Ventura justifies text. Although the explanation 
below is not technically thorough, it will help you understand 
the letter spacing option. As it flows text onto the page, Ven¬ 
tura fits as many words as possible onto each line before 
moving to the next. If the words do not fit, Ventura adds or 
subtracts space between words, but not between letters. Ven¬ 
tura will not reduce the word space beyond the minimum or 
maximum word spacing values. Ventura has default maxi¬ 
mum and minimum space widths, but you can change them in 
the Paragraph Typography dialog box (Figure 5-45). 


'■Body Text" TVPOGRflPHV SETTINGS 


E 


Automatic Pair Kerning: Off 
Letter Spacing: On 

Tracking: Tighter 


Up to: 0.100] Ens 
8.600 Ens 


Grow Inter-Line To Fit: On 


Minimum Space llidth: 8.660 
Normal Space Width: 1.000 
Maximum Space Width: 2.000 


(space width) = 0.150 Ens 
(space width) = 0.249 Ens 
(space width) = 0.498 Ens 




Cancel 


Figure 5-45. 








Enter letter spacing 


5-51 


Quite often Ventura cannot fit the words onto the line without 
exceeding the maximum or minimum values. In that case, it 
searches for the discretionary hyphens that were placed in the 
text file when it was loaded. If it can find a hyphenation point, 
Ventura will split a word, so part goes on one line and part 
goes on another. 

Even with the help of hyphenation, Ventura still encounters 
some lines that cannot be justified without exceeding the 
maximum space width. These lines, which have too much 
white space between the words, are known as loose lines. You 
can instruct Ventura to highlight these lines by selecting 
Show Loose Lines from the Options menu. 

There are several ways to reduce the number of loose lines: 

• Manually hyphenate words (sometimes Ventura’s hyphena¬ 
tion algorithm misses opportunities) 

• Edit your text 

• Allow Ventura to use its Letter Spacing feature to adjust 
the space between individual letters as well as the space 
between words 

*+NOTE: Even if you fix the loose lines with letter spacing, 
Ventura will still highlight them on screen. 

Enter letter spacing 

Let’s use the letter spacing technique to fine tune the body 
copy. You will tell Ventura that it is allowed to add a small 
amount of space between letters if necessary to justify a line. 

^ Enable Paragraph mode and select the Body Text para¬ 
graph in frame #8. 

H Paragraph Letter Spacing: On 

Typography Up to: 0.100 Ems 

Experiment with fixing loose lines 

As we mentioned above, letter spacing is just one of the ways 
you can avoid loose lines in body copy. If you are interested, 
you may want to take some time to experiment on your own to 



5-52 


Chapter 


further reduce the number of loose lines in the ad copy. Try 
adding a discretionary hyphen or two (place the text cursor 
where you want and press Ctrl-Hyphen), edit the text, or 
stretch one of the small frames. To continue practicing these 
adjustments, refer to Figure 5-46 for places to hyphenate 
text. Since this is for practice only, do not be concerned if your 
text is off a word or letter. The important thing is to under¬ 
stand that you have several powerful typographic tools at 
your command. 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



„:| C:\TEMP\5MflILER.CHP (5MAILER.S1Y) fUMiilliilil 


jKow you can give an ordinary per; sonal computet and an inexpensive- 
jonal computer the pqjReuif 1 a^ua£.—iaxei-jirintei, lor this week only, 


Sessional print shop:, With! 
jXerox Ventura Publisher and] 
bxpert training frojm the! 
people at XYZ CorpjoratLnnU 
you can learn to create,-Ljg 


when you come in for a no-j 
Irisk demonstration, we will; 
jredesi^n one of your cor 
Jporate Idocuments, while youj 


3-,'witch! But hurry-our, 
SSah-Mfer is limited. Call; 


Certatf yw raret XVZ fcr mtw Trfmctm 

| XVZ Ocrjcratwv 123 XAp Strict! US fiftffos, CA 90000 

■h l ...Q ygn ftr... 


E 


Figure 5-46. 


Now that you’ve completed the ad, let’s see the results of your 
efforts and print the chapter. 


Chapter 

Take a moment to save your work (press Ctrl-S). Then use the 
Print option to print out the entire document. 

*+NOTE: Because of the size of the Encapsulated Postscript 
files , you should allow extra time for printing. 

H Select To Print from the File menu. Choose Which Pages: 
All. 






























Print hidden pictures 


5-53 


PRINT INFORMATION (POSTSCRIPT - Ultinate) 

m 

Which Pages: 

All 


From Page: 

0001| 


Through Page: 

9999 


Number oF Copies: 

01 


! Collated Copies: 

Off 


Printing Order: 

1st to Last 


Paper Tray: 

Default 


Crop Marks: 

Off 


Spot Color Overlays: 

Off 


Hulti•Chp. Print F ilea: 

Combined 


Device Name: 

POSTSCRIPT 


Output To: 

C0M1: 



HP 

|Cancel| 


Print hidden pictures 

If you customarily work with documents that use many pic¬ 
tures, you can save time printing a rough draft if you hide all 
the pictures in the document. When you hide pictures, Ven¬ 
tura prints out a gray box in place of the picture. 

To hide pictures, choose Hide All Pictures from the Set 
Preferences dialog box (Options menu). When you print the 
document, Ventura first tells you that the document contains 
at least one hidden picture and then asks if you want to print 
all hidden pictures or keep them hidden. Choose Hide Them to 
hide the pictures. 

*+ TIP: You can also use Hide Pictures to decrease screen 
redraw time. 


Print to file 


As you see from the final printed version of the advertisement, 
an Encapsulated Postscript file allows you to take a “snap¬ 
shot” of a page and make it part of a document. If you have a 
PostScript printer, you can make your own EPS file by using 
the print option Print To File. Before we conclude this chapter, 
we’d like to show you how you to make an EPS file from the 
second page of this document. 

^ Go to the second page (the advertisement itself). 





5-54 


Chapter 


*+NOTE: You can only make an EPS file of one page at a time. 

ii Select Set Printer Info from the Options menu. 

In this dialog box you can select which printer port (LPT1, 
COM1), to print a file to or you can choose to print to a 
filename. 

Is Choose Output To: Filename. 


SET PRINTER INFO (POSTSCRIPT - Ultimate) 


Device Name: 


| HP LJ+, 308 foil 


POSTSCRIPT 


□ 


Screen Fonts: EGfl| (Use those matching this file extension.) 
Output To: | LPT1 H LPT2 ||TPT3l fcHT!fclTl |Direct| 


Width Table; C:\VENTURA\OUTPUT.WID_ 

Command: | Load Different Width Table (i.e., Font Metrics) | 




| Cancel | 


*+ NOTE: You may want to review Chapter Three for an explana¬ 
tion of the other printer options in this dialog box. 


WARNING: Remember to use Set Printer Info to return the settings to the original 
output device (e.g. COM1, COM2) after you are finished making the EPS file. 


if Select To Print from the File menu. Select Which Pages: 
Current and click OK. 

Ventura displays the Item Selector, which asks you for the 
name of the print file. 

i§ Move the cursor to the Directory line and replace the 
filename extension COO with EPS. 

H Locate the C:\TEMP subdirectory and type in the file 
name, 5MAILER.EPS on the Selection line. Click OK. 








Print to file 


5-55 


ITEM SELECTOR 
Directory: C :\TEMP\*.EPS. 



*.EPS 

Selection: 5MAILER .EPS| 


t 


* 


| OK | 




% 


Cancel 


♦ 



TIP: Always use the .EPS extension when printing to a 
filename. 

Ventura prints as normal, except the output goes to the file 
instead of to the printer. Once you create an EPS file, you can 
load it into a frame like any other picture. 


Tips and techniques 


Picture tips 

□ Use a stand-alone graphics program for complex illustra¬ 
tions. Ventura’s built-in graphics tools are most useful for 
annotating existing drawings or producing very simple il¬ 
lustrations such as organization charts. 

□ Ventura does not store or modify outside graphics files. It 
stores a pointer to the file. 

□ If you revise a picture with an outside program and give it 
the same name as the old version, Ventura will load the 
new picture the next time you open the chapter. 

□ When sizing pictures with By Scale Factors, remember that 
the numbers shown in the dialog box represent the original 
size of the picture. To change the picture, enter the new 
values you want. 

□ When using By Scale Factors together with Aspect Ratio: 














5-56 


Chapter 


Maintain, Ventura lets you choose the width. Then it auto¬ 
matically calculates the necessary height to avoid distort¬ 
ing the aspect ratio. 

□ Scanned images look better if you leave them at their 
original size. If you must enlarge or reduce, do so in integer 
amounts. 

□ A positive X offset moves the picture to the left. A positive Y 
offset moves the picture up. 

□ Reset the zero point of the ruler for more accurate position¬ 
ing of graphics elements. 

□ To create a text runaround, turn Flow Text Around to Off in 
the original frame. Then use smaller overlapping frames to 
keep the text away from the object inside the frame. 

More Box Text tips 

□ Use the snap-to grid for easy, precise sizing and placement 
of Box Text. 

□ Once the first Box Text looks correct, use the Save To 
buttons in the Line and Fill Attributes dialog boxes. These 
buttons store the attribute settings. From then on, every 
Box Text you draw will have the same attributes. 

□ If you must position a Box Text with extreme accuracy, 
attach the upper left corner of the Box Text to the upper left 
corner of a small, invisible frame. Use Sizing & Scaling to 
position the frame. Since the Box Text is attached, it will 
move to the correct position too. 

□ If you must size a Box Text with extreme precision, first 
draw a frame of that size. Use Sizing & Scaling to verify the 
size. Then place the Box Text over the sizing frame. You can 
then delete the frame. Be careful to attach the Box Text 
where you really want it, and not to the sizing frame, which 
will be deleted. 

□ Use Send to Back and Bring to Front from the Graphic 
menu to force graphics shapes to overlap in the order you 
want them to. 

□ See Chapter Four for more tips on Box Text. 



Print to file 


5-57 


Other tips 

□ Always format the Chapter first, even when creating a 
free-form document. Use the Page as a guide to positioning 
page elements. 

□ Type non-keyboard characters by holding down the Alt key 
while typing the decimal code on the numeric keypad. 

□ lb select a frame underneath another, hold down the Ctrl 
key and click the mouse button on the frame you want. 
Each time you press Ctrl-Cliek, Ventura selects the next 
layer down. Continue clicking until you see sizing buttons 
around the frame you want. 

□ To achieve automatic kerning, you must (1) turn it on 
globally using Chapter Typography from the Chapter menu 
and (2) turn it on for the individual tag using Paragraph 
Typography from the Paragraph menu. 

□ Use the Set Preferences dialog box from the Options menu 
to set On-Screen Kerning to None. Screen kerning slows 
down the display and is generally not very accurate. 

□ Enter additional discretionary hyphens on-screen with 
Ctrl-Hyphen. 

□ To keep Ventura from hyphenating a word, enter a discre¬ 
tionary hyphen immediately before the word. 

□ Enter additional discretionary hyphens permanently by ad¬ 
ding the word to the user hyphenation dictionary. This 
dictionary is called HYPHUSER.DIC and is found in the 
Ventura subdirectory. Use the ASCII mode of your word 
processor to load the file. Then type in the words as you 
want them hyphenated. 

□ lb permanently prevent Ventura from hyphenating a word 
(such as a product name), enter it into the user hyphena¬ 
tion dictionary without a hyphen. 

□ To create an EPS file, choose the PostScript printer and 
print the page to a file, using the Set Printer Info dialog 
box. 




Chapter Six 
Skills Checklist 


Theory 

□ The grid system 

□ Using frames to design a complex 
page layout 

Text 

□ Converting file formats from different 
word processors 

□ Adding jump text 

□ Typing a pull quote 

Style 

□ Adding editorial color to frames 

□ Improving display type with tracking 
and kerning 

□ Using pull quotes for spacing and 
graphic effect 

□ Adding style with big first characters 
(drop caps) 

□ Understanding chapter and frame 
typography 

□ Creating boldface lead-in heads 

□ Advanced effects with double and 
dashed rules 

Pictures 

□ Building a calendar with Box Text 

□ Placing and sizing an image 

□ Adding captions to illustrations 

Chapter 

□ Saving production time with chapter 
templates 




Chapter Six 


A Three-Column Newsletter 


P roducing newsletters is one of the most popular desktop 
publishing applications. With Ventura and a laser printer, 
there is virtually no limit to what you can do. In Chapter 
Three you learned how to build a simple, two-column newslet¬ 
ter. In this chapter, you will tackle a second newsletter, a 
three-column format that shows off some of Ventura’s ad¬ 
vanced design capabilities. You will create this sophisticated 
layout using the skills and effects listed to the left. At the end 
of the chapter we will also explain two time-saving production 
tips that make newsletter production faster and easier. 


Theory 

The grid system 

It is easiest and most efficient to build newsletters by pouring 
text into frames. The format of the Page determines the size 
and placement of those frames. For example, a two-column 
page presents two columnar alternatives: (1) frames that are 
one column wide or (2) frames that are two columns wide 
(Figure 6-1). 

A three-column Page offers more alternatives. Frames can be 
one, two, or three columns wide (Figure 6-2). 

As you can imagine, four- and five-column pages offer even 
more possibilities. However, more alternatives also mean 
more decisions. In general, four- and five-column grids are 
best left to those with graphic arts experience. 



Theory 



Figure 6-1. On a two-column page you can place frames that are one 
column or two columns wide. 



Figure 6-2. When you use a three-column grid, frames can be one, 
two, or three columns wide. 


The three-column format is a good compromise (Figure 6-3). 
It is simple enough that production doesn’t become too time- 
consuming. Yet it is also flexible enough to provide the variety 
and visual excitement lacking in one- and two-column for¬ 
mats. You can fit more text on the page with three columns 
than with one or two. And you have many more ways to 
present illustrations. In short, you can solve almost any 
layout problem within the framework of a three-column grid. 
For these reasons, it is the most popular newsletter style. You 
will learn it in this chapter. 






































The danger of overdesign 


6 - 3 


VENTURA 


SCOOP 


Xerox Introduces ■ nav product 
Will Ventura rt*i on the Macintosh? 
Xerox tikes on Aldus In IBM market 
Scanner producei 256 levels of grey 


Xerox shows Ventura 1.1 
at Spring conference 


Xotn Corporation bra introduced w 
■ioo 1.1 of its fint oloctrooic publishing 


distribute** (including CoropatwLstfid, 



Board approves 
Ventura purchase 

President DsvkM. Fulbright announced 
today bis approval of a 12-month plan to 

in key department throughout Aptoa 
Post Typography. The announcement 
follows a throe-month pilot study con¬ 
ducted by tbe Marketing Communica¬ 
tions Department 

“W» initially (bought (bat deaktop 
publishing would only have advantage* 
for one or two department” said froei- 
deot Pulbrigit, "but our study revealed 
that it could save time and money 
throughout tbo company while improv¬ 
ing the appearanc* and effectiveness of 
our document.” 

Several technological advances 
make tbe company-wide strategy 
feasible Pint, Aptoa was able to stand¬ 
ardise on a single software p ro gram for 
all applications. Second, the selected 
software, Xmn Ventura Publisher, will 
Comitmtntl on pogtJ 


software product (hat runs on industry 
standard personal computers. Confer, 
•oca at t endees west Impressed by the 
eighty-one new features, all of which 
wars added without compromising tbe 
speed of (ha product and its depth of 
functionality. In addition, Xerox spon¬ 
sored a second booth for third party dev. 
eloper* who have created add-on 
producte that work with Ventura. Over 
(hirty companies displayed books, edu¬ 
cational videos, hardware and soft-ware 
eaahnoamenta for Ventura. 

Tbe updated patch to (be Xerox 
Desktop Publishing Software Series: 


added new meaning to (be term "Desktop 
Publishing.” Before tbe introduction of 
Ventura Publieber Bdition, deektop pub¬ 
lishing referred primarily to advanoed 
drawing pecksgee that were extended to 
handle different text fonts. 

These types of peckagce were char¬ 
acterised by a band-intensive approach 
that attempted to mimic what graphic 
artiste and t y peset t ers ware used to doing 
using (he pemortal computer screen an an 
electronic paste-up boeud. While this ap¬ 
proach was easy for artiste to pick up, it 
did not result in much time-saving be- 


Microage, and PacteQ, and tee Xerox 
Business Software Center via (8O0>£22- 
8221, and (be Xerox general tine aides 
fores. Comm «ntod one observer, "Xerox 
bn* always bad a reputation of good 
quality aarvioe and aftor-support. V* 
feel we can expect tee same excel lent 
technical back-up with the Ventura 
product Una.” 

"A* one of the piooeera in the field 
of electtonic publishing, Xerox Billy un¬ 
derstands users' requirements for a 
de s ktop publishing software product,” 
•aid fames Brown, vice president, office 
system*. "There are some very ox citing 
developments we can look forward to in 


drudgery of band-adjusting each piece of 
text on (be page. 

Fortunately, tee software dovotop- 
•m at Ventura Software Inc. recognized 
this and adopted a tty k sftott approach. 
In tee same way that * spreadsheet 
define* the rules for • complex set of 
rap-etitive calculations, a Style Sheet 
defines tee rules for complex layout. 
Once these rotes are defined, aon- 
typeeettera can quickly achieve typeset¬ 
ter-quality reaulte simply by applying or 
tagging each paragraph aa a Heads oe, 
Sub-Head, etc. Style shoots give typeeot 
results, and let professionals got the 
quality they expect from high-priced 
pr o fe s s io nal type-setting systems. 


Ventura 1.1 takes on PageMaker in battle 
for IBM PC marketplace 


Figure 6-3 Three-column newsletters are one of the most versatile 
and popular design formats. 


The danger of overdesign 

As you venture into more complex layouts, beware of an afflic¬ 
tion that strikes many first-time desktop publishers: Over- 
designitis. This disease results in an overwhelming urge to 
cram as many fonts, rules, patterns, and other effects onto one 
page as possible. 

Good page design doesn’t call attention to itself. For instance, 
when readers pick up a business-oriented newsletter, you do 
not want their first reaction to be surprise, amazement or 
shock. Rather, you want the design to pull them into the page 
and entice them to start reading. Overdesign shouts. It says 
“Stop! Look at me first! See what I can do!” Proper page 
design, by contrast, talks in a quiet voice: “Come on in, make 
yourself comfortable, here’s something you’ll enjoy....” 



6-4 


Theory 


So don’t let Ventura’s power lure you into the trap of over- 
design. Don’t let your layouts become a barrier to communica¬ 
tion. Yes, you want enough pizzazz so pages look pleasing and 
professional. But your main goal is to make it easier for busy 
readers to find information. 


The danger of overdesign 


6 - 5 


Before 








6 - 6 


Planning the newsletter 


Planning the newsletter 

The first thing you see on the front page of a newsletter is the 
logo or nameplate. The logo draws attention to the page and 
identifies the publication. Most newsletters need a carefully 
thought-out logo design because it sets the tone for the rest of 
the publication. For instance, as you proceed through this 
chapter, you will see how several effects from the logo are 
repeated elsewhere. Newsletters benefit from a design theme 
that is repeated throughout. This consistency improves the 
look while helping readers identify different parts of the pub¬ 
lication. 

The headlines are sized in proportion to the logo and to each 
other. This hierarchy — the bigger the story the bigger the 
headline — helps the reader judge which information is most 
important. 

Since this newsletter will be mailed, the back page includes 
space for a label and a stamp. Depending on the amount of 
editorial space you need, you can allocate a full, half, or frac¬ 
tion of a page to mailing information. 

As you create layouts of your own, you will discover that 
Ventura contains lots of built-in power you can put to work in 
your newsletters. Here are some of the effects you will learn to 
use to add character and punch to your newsletter designs. 

• Three-column format 

• Frame backgrounds 

• Custom and double rules 

• Big first character 

• Boldface lead-ins 

• Box Text for a calendar of events 

Even though this newsletter is more a complex layout than 
the one from Chapter Three, the same basic principles apply. 
First you will format the Page. Next you will place frames 
using the Page as your guide. Then you will put text into the 
frames. 



Converting file formats 


6-7 


Ventura prep 

Verify that the settings from the Options menu are the way 
you want them. In particular, be sure that Column and Line 
Snap are turned on so frames automatically snap to the Page. 
Choosing Show Column Guides also makes it easier to posi¬ 
tion frames. 


!»® if you have the Power disk 

Instead of building the newsletter chapter from scratch, you 
will use the sample newsletter chapter from the Power disk. 
The chapter file contains the newsletter style sheet and most 
of the frames for the newsletter text. 

m Open the chapter C:\POWER\6NEWSLET.CHP. 

H Load the ASCII text files 6NEWSLT1.TXT, 
6NEWSLT2.TXT, 6NEWSLT3.TXT, 6NEWSLT4.TXT, 
6NEWSLT5.TXT, and 6NEWSTOC.TXT from the 
C:\POWER subdirectory. 

^ Use Save As New Style to save the style sheet as 
C:\TEMP\6NEWS.STY 

§§ Load the image file, WPVP.IMG (GEM/HALO DPE format) 
from the C:\POWER subdirectory. 

** NOTE: If Ventura automatically places the image on the Page, 
use Remove Text/File to remove the image from the frame (do 
not remove it from the list of files). 

Before you place the text files, we want to show you how to 
convert text files from one word processing format to another. 

Converting file formats 

If you publish a newsletter composed of articles from several 
writers, you are likely to receive files in different formats. 
Ventura can convert from one file format to another. After 
loading a text file you can use File Type/Rename from the Edit 
menu to convert it to a different word processing format. 
Thanks to File Type/Rename you can standardize the text 


6-8 


Ventura prep 


format of the newsletter without restricting writers to any one 
word processor. 

For practice, convert the six ASCII text files you just loaded 
into your favorite word processing format (at the same time 
you rename them). 

Change formats 

Follow these instructions for each of the six files in turn. First, 
place the text file on the Page. Then call up the File 
Type/Rename dialog box. Type in the new name (and new 
location) and choose the new file format. As always, you will 
be placing the new file in the \TEMP subdirectory along with 
the projects from other chapters. Figure 6-4 shows how it 
would look if you were changing 6NEWSLT1.TXT to Microsoft 
Word format: 


FILE TYPE / RENAME 

Old Name: C:\P0WER\6MEWSLT1.TXT 
New Name: C:\TEMP\6NEWS-1.TXT_ 

Text Format: | Generated~| | ASCII | | WordStar 3~| | WS 4.0/5.B~~| 




■ 



IIS-Word 


WordPerfect | | XyWrite | 

8-Bit ASCII || 



■ 


MHMiliMiMi 

■ 

| MultiMate | | PRN-to-Table | | 

ilordPerfect 51 


Writer 


°K M 


Figure 6-4. 

If yoti were changing to MultiMate format, the dialog box 
would look identical except that the MultiMate button would 
be highlighted instead. 

When you have finished, put the next file on the Page and 
repeat the process. 

*+NOTE .When you place a new file on the Page, Ventura auto¬ 
matically replaces the old file with the new one. 


0 



















Change formats 


6-9 


Here’s a listing of the new file names (you can change the 
extension to your own word processing format if you prefer): 


Load from C:\POWER 

6NEWSLT1.TXT 

6NEWSLT2.TXT 

6NEWSLT3.TXT 

6NEWSLT4.TXT 

6NEWSLT5.TXT 

6NEWSTOC.TXT 


Save to C:\TEMP 

6NEWS-1.TXT 

6NEWS-2.TXT 

6NEWS-3.TKT 

6NEWS-4.TXT 

6NEWS-5.TXT 

6TOC.TXT 


WARNING: Neither the format change or the name change/relocation takes effect 
until you save the chapter. 


Using File Type/Rename merely tells Ventura, ‘Please make 
these changes the next time you save to the disk.” If you 
abandon the chapter without saving you will lose the changes. 

II After you rename all the text files, use Remove Text/File to 
remove the last file from the frame. 

H Select Save As to save the chapter as 
C:\TEMP\6NEWS.CHR 



If you do not have the Power disk 


Using your favorite word processor, type the text files for 
Chapter Six from Appendix A. Save them under the 
C:\TEMP subdirectory using the names listed in the right 
column in the table above. 


M Load the original Ventura style sheet &NEWS-P3.STY 
from the C:\POWER subdirectory. Change the margins 
and columns to match Figure 6-5. Change or add tags 
according to the tag table for Chapter Six in Appendix B. 
Save and rename the style sheet as 
C:\TEMP\6NEWS.STY. 




6 - 10 


Ventura prep 



Load the sample image file, CHANEL.IMG from the 
C:\POWER subdirectory or substitute your own bit¬ 
mapped image in place of the one provided on the Power 
disk. 










Verify the page layout 


6 - 11 


Style 

Since the newsletter is composed of text files in frames, it is 
easier to add frames before placing text. Start by formatting 
the Page, then use it as a guide for drawing the frames. 

Verify the page layout 

Although the 6NEWS.STY style sheet should have the correct 
values for page layout, margins, columns, and global kerning, 
verify that the values match Figure 6-5. 


Add a footer 


Select Headers & Footers from the Chapter menu. Choose 
Define: Right Page Footer, Usage: On. Type: Fall/Winter 
1989 on the Left line and Page [P#] on the Right line. 


HEADERS 8 FOOTERS Q] 


Define: | Left Page Header [ 

1 Right Page Header | 

1 Left Page Footer | 



Usage: Q [~0Ff~| 
Left: Fall/Winter 1989 


Center: _ 

Right: Page 


Inserts: | Chapter ~5~| | Page 5 | | 1st Match"] | Last Hatch | 

| Text flttr, | | Copy To Facing Page | _____ _____ 

|___0K_J 1 Cancel | 


^ Choose Define: Left Page Footer, Usage: On. Type: Page 
[P#] on the Left line and Paginations on the Right line. 

Choose Turn Footer Off from the Chapter menu for the first 
page of the newsletter. 

Change the chapter typography 

Now you will change the settings in the Chapter Typography 
dialog box to complete the chapter format. (See Chapter Three 
for a detailed explanation of these settings.) 




6 - 12 


Style 


^ Select Chapter Typography from the Chapter menu. 

Hi Choose Widows (Min. Lines at Top): 1 and Orphans (Min. 
Lines at Bottom): 1. 

H Choose Move Down to 1st Baseline By: Inter-Line. 

H Verify that Column Balance is off. 

Chapter Typography settings ensure that the text will align 
across multiple columns and reach the bottoms of the frames. 

Add frames to page one 

li Place nine frames on page one using Figure 6-7 as a guide 
for their size and position. 

II Use Sizing & Scaling to fine-tune the size and placement. 

Don’t forget that you can use temporary memory to create 
identical frames. See Chapters Two and Three. 

*+NOTE: With Line Snap turned on, the frames (frames #6 and 
#7) at the bottom of the page will extend below the column 
guide. Nevertheless, the text you pour into the frames will line 
up properly with the bottom of the column guide. 

Place the two “jump text” frames (frames #8 and #9) inside the 
column frames as shown in Figure 6-6. (Shading in the figure 
is for illustration purposes only. Do not add shading.) 










































Add a ruling box around 


6 - 13 


Frame #1 

Upper Left X: 04,06 picas 
Upper Left Y: 04,06 picas 

42,00x12,00 picas 


Frame #2 

Upper Left X: 04,06 picas 
Upper Left Y: 16,06 picas 


42,00 x 07,00 picas 


Frame #3 

Upper Left X: 04,06 picas 
Upper Left Y: 23,06 picas 


13,00x24,00 picas 


Frame #4 

Upper Left X: 19,00 picas 
Upper Left Y: 23,06 picas 


13,00x24,00 picas 


Frame #5 

Upper Left X: 33,06 picas 
Upper Left Y: 23,06 picas 


13,00x24,00 picas 


Frame #8 
13,00x02,00 picas 


Frame #6 

Upper Left X: 04,06 picas 
Upper Left Y: 47,06 picas 

27,06x13,00 picas 


Frame #9 
13,00x01,00 picas 


Frame #7 

Upper Left X: 33,06 picas 
Upper Left Y: 47,06 picas 


13,00x13,00 picas 


Figure 6-7. Use this illustration to draw the frames on page one. 










6 - 14 


Style 


Add a ruling box around 

When you are finished adding the frames, you will make a 
ruling box around the frame reserved for the logo. 

H Select the top frame (frame #1). 

II Ruling Box Width: Frame 

Around Height of Rule 1: 00.25 fractional pts 

Add a pattern 

To add intrest to the page design, put a gray fill pattern inside 
the Logo frame (frame #1). 

si Select Frame Background from the Frame menu. Choose 
Color: Black and Pattern: 1. Click OK. 


FRAME BACKGROUND Q] 

Color: Black 
Pattern: 1 



| Cancel 


Change columns 

Use Margins & Columns from the Frame menu to change the 
bottom left frame (frame #6) to a two-column format. The size 
of the columns inside this frame will match the columns on 
the Page. 

H Select frame #6. 































Add a ruling box around the TOC 


6 - 15 


m Margins & # of Columns: 2 

Columns Column 1: 13,00 picas & points 

Column 2: 13,00 picas & points 
Gutter 1: 01,06 picas & points 

Add a ruling box around the TOC 

H Select the frame that will contain the TOC (frame #7). 

^ Ruling Box Width: Frame 

Around Height of Rule 1: 00.25 fractional pts 



Add frames on page two 


If you are using the Power disk, proceed directly to the section 
entitled, “Add a dashed ruling line.” 


If you do not have the Power disk and the sample newsletter 
chapter file, use Figures 6-8, 6-9, and 6-10 as guides to lay out 
the remaining frames on pages two, three, and four. 


Insert/Remove Operation: Insert New Page 

Page After Current Page 


Use Figure 6-8 to guide the placement of frames on page two. 
Then check for accuracy with Sizing & Scaling. 


Add margins and a ruling box around 

If you do not have the Power disk, you will add margins and a 
ruling box around the frame reserved for the staff box (frame 
#12). Start by adding margins to the frame. This keeps the 
text in the frame from touching the ruling box around it. 

^ Select the frame for the staff box (frame #12). 

H Margins & Top: 02,00 picas & points 

Columns Bottom: 02,00 picas & points 

Left: 01,00 picas & points 
Right: 01,00 picas & points 

Select Ruling Box Around. Choose Width: Frame. Give Rule 
1 a height of 00.25 fractional pts. 




6 -16 


Style 


Frame #13 
13,00x02,00 picas 


Frame #10 

Upper Left X: 04,06 picas 
Upper Left Y: 04,06 picas 

27,06x48,00 picas 


Frame #11 

Upper Left X: 33,06 picas 
Upper Left Y: 06,06 picas 

13,00x46,00 picas 


Frame #12 

Upper Left X: 04,06 picas 
Upper Left Y: 52,06 picas 


42,00x07,06 picas 


Figure 6-8. If you do NOT have the Power disk, you must draw these frames on page two. 







On to page three 


6 - 17 


RULING BOX AROUND 



0 

Width: Frame 
Color: Black 




Pattern: Solid 




Dashes: Off 



36.00 

Space Above Rule 1: OO.BOj 




Height of Rule 1: 00.25 

Custon Indent: 

oo.oo h i! 

- 1 

Space Below Rule 1: 00.00 

Custom Width: 

00.00 


Height of Rule 2: 00.00 
Space Below Rule 2: 00.00 

Dash Width: 

00.00 


Height of Rule 3: 00.00 

Dash Spacing: 

00*00 fractional ptsj 

Space Below Rule 3: 00.00 

DEI 



Overall Height: 00.25 





[ Cancel | 


On to page three 

Good work — you’re halfway through placing the frames (If 
you have the Power disk, these frames were drawn for you). 
Two more pages to go. Insert another page before drawing the 
frames on page three. 

H Insert/Remove Operation: Insert a New Page 

Page After Current Page 


Add frames to page three 

Using the Figure 6-9 as a guide, draw the five frames on page 
three, then check your results with Sizing & Scaling. The 
upper right frame (frame #18) is reserved for a picture and a 
caption. You will add a caption to the picture frame in the 
picture section of the chapter. For now, simply leave enough 
space for the caption. 


Add a ruling box around the picture frame 

To visually separate the picture from the rest of the text, add 
a ruling box around the frame that will contain it. 

§1 Select the frame that will contain the picture (frame #18). 

^ Ruling Box Height of Rule 1: 00.25 fractional pts 

Around 










6 - 18 


Style 


Frame #14 

Upper Left X: 04,06 picas 
Upper Left Y: 04,06 picas 


13,00x56,00 picas 


Frame #18 

Upper LeftX: 19,00 picas 
Upper Left Y: 04,06 picas 


27,06x24,00 picas 


Allow 03,00 picas for caption frame 


Frame #17 
13,00x02,00 picas 


Frame #15 

Upper LeftX: 19,00 picas 
Upper Left Y: 31,06 picas 


13,00x29,00 picas 


Frame #16 
Upper Left X: 33,06 picas 
Upper Left Y: 33,06 picas 


13,00x27,00 picas 


Figure 6-9. If you do NOT have the Power disk, draw these frames on page three. 











Insert page four 


6 - 19 


Insert page four 

H Insert/Remove Operation: Insert a New Page 

Page After Current Page 

Add frames to page four 

Add the two frames shown in Figure 6-10. 


Frame #19 

Upper Left X: 04,06 picas 
Upper Left Y: 04,06 picas 

42,00x27,00 picas 


Frame #20 

Upper Left X: 04,06 picas 
Upper Left Y: 31,06 picas 

42,00x29,00 picas 


Figure 6-10. If you do NOT have the Power disk, draw these frames on page four. 








6-20 


Style 


Add a dashed ruling line above 

To create a fold line, you will add a dashed rule above the 
bottom frame on page four. 

^ Go to page four. 

H Select Go To Page from the Chapter menu (or press Ctrl-G). 
Move to the Selected Page line and enter 0004 

II Select the bottom frame (frame #20). 

HI Select Ruling Line Above. Choose Width: Frame, Dashes: 
On. Make the Dash Width: 02.16 fractional pts and the 
Dash Spacing: 02.16 fractional pts. Give Rule 1 a height of 
00.50 fractional pts. 


RULING LINES ABOVE 


0 

Width: Frane 
Color: Black 
Pattern: Solid 
Dashes: On 

Space Above Rule 1: 00.08 

Height of Rule 1: 00.50| 

Custon Indent: 00.00 [ * ji 

36.00 

Space Below Rule 1: 00.60 

Custon Width: 00.00 


Height of Rule 2 \ 00.00 

Space Below Rule 2: 00.00 

Dash Width: 02.16 


Height of Rule 3: 00.00 

Dash Spacing: 02.16 fractional ptsl 

Space Below Rule 3: 00.00 

DR 


Overall Height: 00.50 

| Cancel | 


Place text files 

Now that the frames are completed, you are ready to place the 
text. Start with the two articles on page one. 

II Press Home to go to page one. 

II Select frame #3. 

II Select 6NEWS-1.TXT from the Assignment List. 

Ventura pours as much of the text file it can fit in the frame 
and then stops. 












Place text files 


6 - 21 


*+NOTE: Most of the sample text files have been pretagged. 
Ventura will automatically format these paragraphs as you 
place the text 

Finish placing the first article. 

II Select frame #4 then select 6NEWS-1.TXT from the Assign¬ 
ment List. 

H Select frame #5 then select 6NEWS-1.TXT from the Assign¬ 
ment List. 

You will place the rest of 6NEWS-1.TXT when you get to page 
two. For now, continue working on page one. Place the article 
“Ventura Complements CAD” (6NEWS2.TXT). 

^ Select frame #6 and place the text file 6NEWS-2.TXT. 

Ventura flows the text in the two columns and stops when it 
reaches the end of the second frame (Figure 6-11). You will 
place the remaining text when you get to page three. 



Figure 6-11. 

II Select frame #7 and place the text file 6TOC.TXT. 

^ TIP: You do not have to place all of a file at once. Ventura will 
“remember" where you left off when you get to the next page. 
Generally ; the most efficient way to work is to do everything 
you can on one page before moving on to the next. 


























6-22 


Style 


After placing the last text file, take a moment to compare your 
first page to Figure 6-12. Your newsletter is now starting to 
shape up. 



Figure 6-12. The first page so far. 


Add logo text on page one 

To complete the text on page one, add the logo, headline, 
dateline, and jump text to the proper frames. Change to Nor¬ 
mal or Enlarged View (your choice) so you can see the text as 
you type. 

ii Enable Text mode. 

^ Click anywhere in the logo frame (frame #1) and type the 
following three paragraphs: 

PAGINATIONS [Enter] 

NEWSLETTER [Enter] 

Design and Production News for Ventura Publishers 

Add dateline and headline 

H Click anywhere in frame #2 and type the next two para¬ 
graphs: 

Volume 1, Number 1 [Tab] Winter 1989 [Enter] 
Training workshops underway 






























Add jump text 


6 - 23 


The text in the first two frames should look like the sample 
screen in Figure 6-13. 



Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Option! 

llililiilBircT\fDi^EMs^(i^sTvr i h \ i HBB i? j j ff | if ji ♦ 


; ; 

•: ; 1 • 

’ /KMtoBrtSftf -.. :: 1 ' J ■ • . 


M $3 ii M iiMmmM •;S i J:•: : :;:S$ •: V:. 

j i'l 

; * .• *■ S : : I 1- ; 

l :•«s i > S :• S :•: : :• •: > 5 > •: 5 •:> •: J: i: •: •: •: :• i < < 5: 

i 

:•: :• > •: •:; :•; >f : : > j: :| :j J :| f: |: :j > |: j:: 

•; •• > ^) •; & 

J? U H :• \ $ ^ 0 .: 

• : *• : | • J 

! VoKim«1,NunW 1-Wnter 1988f : 


| Tnininj workshops uiufcfwyp 

1 : i 

: : 


EE 


Figure 6-13. 


Add jump text 

H Click once inside the small frame (frame #8) above the 
Table of Contents and type: (Figure 6-14) 

See WORKSHOP next page 

^ Click anywhere in the small frame at the bottom of the page 
(frame #9) and type: (Figure 6-14) 

See CAD page 3 

*+NOTE: If you do not see the end of file marker after clicking on 
the frame, make the jump text frame larger. Later, you can 
resize the frame so it measures 01,00 pica high. The logo, 
headline, and jump text will be stored as part of the chapter’s 
caption file. 

If you wish to place this text into separate files, switch to 
Frame mode. Select the frame containing the text you want to 
put in a separate file. Select File Type/Rename from the Edit 
menu. Ignore the name you see listed as Old Name. Clear the 
New Name line and type in the new name and location. Then 
click OK. 






































Place text on page two 

i§ Press PgDn to go to page two and enable Frame mode. 

II Select frame #10 and place the text file 6NEWS-3.TXT. 

Now continue the article from page one in frame #11 and put 
a new article into frame #12. 

Is Select frame #11 and place the text file 6NEWS-1.TXT. 

II Select frame #12 and place the text file 6NEWS-4.TXT. 
Upon finishing, your page will look similar to Figure 6-15: 



Figure 6-1 5. Page two as it should appear at this stage. 





































































Add a pull quote 


6 - 25 


Notice that the text does not completely fill frame #11. What 
do you do with the empty space? You could type in additional 
text. Or you could add something to take up space, like an 
illustration or a pull quote (sometimes called a lift out). 


Add a pull quote 

A pull quote is a short quotation or extract that can be used as 
a graphic element to fill space and to attract attention to an 
article. 

To create the pull quote, you will add a small frame inside the 
existing frame (frame #11). To set it apart from the rest of the 
text add vertical padding and rules to the frame. The style of 
the rules is derived from the graphic look of the logo. After you 
add the frame, you will type in the pull quote text. 

H While still in Frame mode, select Add New Frame from the 
Side-Bar. 


II Make sure that the zero point is set to its original position 
at the upper left corner of the Page (click the 0,0 square in 
the upper left corner of the Page). 

si' Starting at position 19,06 picas on the vertical ruler, draw a 
frame 13,00 picas wide by 09,00 picas high inside frame 
#11 as shown in Figure 6—16. You can check for accuracy 
with the Sizing & Scaling dialog box. 


Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



If C:\TEMP\6MEWS.CHP C6HEWS.STV) 


is i netvwli'suIpuVieloK wlieii Imitdi' 
like those in ,use at XYZ Corporation. In the future^ 

J make it possible for Ventura users to send documents* 
ter vs t ioaliarea network If j 

ky has be4n augmented by the purchase of the Docu-j 
Infections frpm New Riders Publishing. The collections’ 
documents, riarketing documents, forms, books andj 


dcms 

DC MS 
NEMS 

dcms 

fT0C.TXT 

WW.1HG 


r 

EMPTV | 

t 

Pg tt 8002 1 


' yniMgemen{ 1 L i 'typeset appearance^ f 
gives your documents in edge. Anyone* 
tvho wmts to keep up should attend one* 
pr more of the workshops and seminars.^ 

| All workshops, both basic and ad-j 
nreA^are...brrV4J|,rJ«si«OT_A;.A.ii 


iced a ne*i large-screen display compatible with Xeroxj 
I kX-IOOis Jhe first display to incorporate four graphics] 
I is a special microchip that speeds dkpfcy speed] 
! n graphic* adapter will ship in the last quarter of this* 

j | j 

B pen fjom 5:00 to 7:00 pm Tuesday and Thursday* 
iarketing Communications Department wiTl be on* 
que^bonS and help with problems ! \ 

nnounce4 for|the purchase of small computers X?Z» 
Imt on its cpmpUter purchases, has made arrangements* 


Kent to the cafeteria. Interested user^ 
tan also sign up for supervised practice^ 
Jime on one of its six computers frojr$ 
5:00 to 7:00 p.m. on Tuesdays ant| 
Thursday s.1 j 

j The classroom features state-of-the* 
^rt equipment including high resohif 


H 


Figure 6-16. 






























6-26 


Style 


Add padding 

Add vertical padding to keep the text from butting up against 
the pull quote frame. 

M With the frame still highlighted, select Sizing & Scaling 
from the Frame Menu. Make the vertical padding 00,06 
picas & points. 



You have just added padding of 06.00 fractional pts above 
(00,06 picas & points) and 06.00 fractional pts below the frame 
— a total of 12.00 fractional pts which is equal to the inter-line 
spacing of the Body Text. By making the frame padding an 
integer of the Body Text inter-line spacing, you maintain even 
spacing throughout the document. 

Add ruling lines to the pull quote frame 

With the frame still highlighted: 

M Ruling Line 
Above 

II Ruling Line 
Below 


Width: Frame 

Height of Rule 1: 00.25 fractional pts 
Width: Frame 

Height of Rule 1: 00.25 fractional pts 















Add the pull quote fext 


6-27 


Add the pull quote fext 

H Enable Text mode. Click anywhere inside the pull quote 
frame. Type the following pull quote text using non-key¬ 
board characters to create the quote marks. (For example, 
[Alt-169] means “type 169 on the numeric keypad while 
holding down the Alt key.” This procedure creates an open 
quote mark when you release the Alt key.) (Figure 6-17.) 

[Alt-169] Anyone who wants to make an impression on 
paper should attend a Ventura training 
workshop.[Alt-170] 

TIP: You can also enter open and close quotes with Ventura’s 
built-in keyboard shortcuts, Ctrl-Shift-[ (open bracket) and Ctrl- 
Shift-] (closed bracket). 



Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


C:\TEMP\6f1EWS.CHP (6HEWS.STV) I 


Set Font 


No mol 
•old 
none 
Snail 

Superscript 
Subscript 
Underline 
|Double UndrLn] 
Strike-thru 
Overscore 


p 

id oF File j 

L 

Pg « 0082 | 


ideals icr iseVs 1 1 iwtwwYcuVput 'deWce wken ImlceSil A 
like thosfe m -use at XYZ Corporation. In the future,! 
mike it possible for Venturi users to send documents! 
.ter Yi i Jocaljirea network.* \ 

^ry his bein. augmented by the purchase of the Doeu-j 
actions fr'pm New Riders Publishing. The collections] 
i documenjs, rtarketing documents, forms, books and} 


I ced a net large-screen display compatible with Xerox] 
l-X-IOQ isJhe first disphy to incorporate four graphics! 
is a specialize^ microchip that speeds display speed] 
n graphics adapter will ship in the last ([uarter of thii 


pw open ftom 5:00 to 7:00 pjn Tuesday and Thursday} 
e Marketing Communications Department will be on] 
f (pie^tioni and help with problems! j 

^nnounee<| for:the purchase of small computers. XYZ] 
mt on its ^mpjiter purchases, has made arrangements] 


“managemenVa rypesei appearance]' 
gives your documents an edge. Anyone] 
Ivho wants to keep up should attend on^ 
br more of the workshops and seminars.*] 

\ All workshops, both basic and ad] 

] “Anyone who wants to make an inn-; 
■pression on paper should attend a Ven-j 
Ituratraining workshop*^ j 


Jranced, are held in classroom A-6 id! 
beent to the cafeteria. Interested uses i 
jan also sign up for supervised practice! 
jime on one of its six computers froirf 
^:00 to 7:00 p.m. on Tuesdays an<S 
jlhursdiys.f : 

1 Tha fbtcrftftm 


Figure 6-17. 


Add jump text 

Next type in the jump text at the top of the right-hand column 
and change its attributes. 

!I While still in Text mode, click anywhere inside the small 
frame at the top of the right-hand column (frame #13) and 
type: WORKSHOP from page 1 




























6-28 


Style 


Select the word “WORKSHOP” and change its attributes. 
Highlight the word and choose Bold. Then choose Italic 
from the Assignment List (Figure 6-18). 



Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


iililllllliillliiilli C:\TEMP\tf1EWS.CHP (6NWS.STV) ■ llllIBii 


£ 


jL 


been instilled in the Engineering ud Publications, 
and Adv^tisijig departments ire scheduled to receive* 


1 Je its first pubic demonstrations of i new 40-pagfper-j 
“pi* with |the; PostScript pige description language] 
desktop publishing, and is supported by Ventura] 
Ideals for Use is i network output device when linked] 
tike those in .use it KTZ Corporation, In the future^ 
mike it possible for Ventura users to send documents,’ 
ter via i ioaljirei network.! j 

i I i 

|ry his be4n augmented by the purchase of the Docu-j 
tions frbm New Riders Publishing, The ejections, 
documenjs, nkrketing documents, forms, books and] 


ffrompage 10 ] 

juive i tremendous impact it XYZ A J 
khe puts it "Anyone who rants to ere j 
tile a better impression on piper should* 
feim to use Ventura Publisher, or make 
^ure someone in their department 
kirns. Whether you ire trying to gei 
lour message to the public or to uppeij 
ynanagement, i typeset ippetrane^ 
gives your documents in edge. Anyone* 
jvho wants to keep up should attend on^ 
pr more of the workshops and seminars.!, 
j All workshops, both basic and ad| 

i "Anyone who wants to make an im-j 
jpression on paper should attend i Ven-; 




Figure 6-18. 


Create boldface lead-in heads 

In addition to using headings on a separate line, you can also 
draw the reader’s attention to an article with lead-in heads. 
Lead-in heads use boldface, italic, or small capitals for the 
first few words of a paragraph. To create the boldface lead-in 
heads in frame #10, highlight the text (by dragging or the 
Shift-Click method), then choose Bold from the Assignment 
List. 

li Make sure you are still in Text mode. 

II Select the two following phrases in the first two paragraphs 
in frame #10 and make them bold: 

“Ventura Workstations... ” 


“Digital Laser Corporation... ” 









































Place text on page three 


6-29 


*+NOTE: If you accidentally click your text cursor on the Under¬ 
lying Page instead of in the desired frame, Ventura asks you if 
you intend to type text on an empty page. Choose Cancel to 
remove the message. 

The rest of the lead-in heads have been completed for you. 

When you are finished the page should look like Figure 6-19: 


Desk file Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



iiiiiiiiiliiliiiiiiill c:\tehp\6«ews.chp uhehs.stv) iiiiiiliiilllliilll 


Venture Workstations hive tain injlilleii in the Engineering ind Pubbationsj 

ileputments. Tht Accounting ind Advertising departments ire scheduled to receive; 

Venturi next month.1 j j ; 

pijiil Laser Corporation give Hs first public demonstrations of i new W-page; 

J*r-minute liser printer compatible with thje PostScript pige description language; 

fostSffipt is the standard for desktop publishing, and is supported by Venturi; 

publisher. The printer seems ideals for use is a network output device when linked* 

Jo VAX minicomputer systems like those in Kis* at XYZ Corporation. In the future^ 

jiser printers like this one may make it piossilite for Ventura users to send document^ 

Jo the central high-speed printer vk i Vxiliam network.! 

hvXTZ Style Sheet Library has bedn augmented by the purchase of the Doeu- 

tont Gallery style sheet collections frjom New Riders Publishing. The collections 

Include newsletters, eorponte documents, marketing documents, forms, books and* 

technical documentibonf j 

jdoM Company has announced a new large-saeen display compatible with Kero* 

Centura Publisher. The new B-X-100 is'the first display to incorporate four graphics; 

Jo-processors A co-processor is a specitzef microchip that speeds display speed; 

|The 19-inch monito' and add-in graphics adapter will ship in the last quarter of this* 


Jvive a trej 

jhe puts 

Jte a bette 
Jearntous 
Jure som 
Jearns. W) 
your mess 
Jnanagem 
jpves your 

Who wants 

br more of 
All wo 

“Anyoi 
pression 
jura trainij; 


EH 


Figure 6-19. Check your progress against this illustration. 


Place text on page three 

H Press PgDn to go to page three. 

Now you will place the article “Preformatting Ventura Docu¬ 
ments” in frame #14 and frame #15 and the rest of the article 
“Ventura Complements CAD” in frame #16 as explained 
below. 

H Enable Frame mode. 

H Select frame #14 and place 6NEWS-5.TXT. 

H Select frame #15 and place the rest of6NEWS-5.TXT. 

H Select frame #16 and place the rest of 6NEWS-2.TXT. 

Your page should look like Figure 6-20: 











































6 - 30 


Style 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Figure 6-20. At this stage, your page should look like this. 


Add jump text 

H Enable Text mode. Click anywhere inside the small frame 
above the right-hand column (frame #17). Then type: 

CAD frontpage 1 

H Select the word “CAD.” Choose Bold, then Italic from the 
Assignment List (Figure 6-21). 

*+NOTE: If you select the wrong attribute from the Assignment 
List, choose Normal to return the text to its original format. 
Then reselect another attribute. 



Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


llllliillllllliliiillll C:\TEHP\6MEWS.CHP (6NEKS.STV) 111111111111111 


template files. Load in unformatted textj 
lilt into Ventura and tig it is you would* 
hormilty. When everything is perfedj 
we the chapter (thereby saving the tigs! 
lo the text fife! 'j 

Now mile i <opy of the file tinder £ 
iew name Remove the text, leaving 
ity the tigs. Assuming the tig nameS 
re self-descriptive, i template miles ft 
frill-in-the-blinks simple to creit^ 
^reformatted files. To mile it ever? 
pripW, innotite the tempfcte with th^ 
jwd processor’s hidden text feituxe.1 | 
| The temphte method is parbcuIirTyj 
jiseful when in editor must worl withe 
Multiple authors.! » 

j Authors (in also assist in the hvout 


rfrompage ID 


1 


fvhat it does best, the Engineering 
jDepirtment expects to achieve superior 
documents in a fraction of the time it 
jvould tale to produce them by rmnui j 
plains. Ease of revision is etpuffy im| 
tortint As produets change, so must the! 
drawings ind technical manuals that 
support them. Ventura and AutoCAD! 
together provide the ability to produce 
Almost instant updates.! I 

{ For instance, i Ventura chapter file? 
jontains pointers to the graphics fitaj 
' sed in the document If these graphx«f 
e changed, Venturi will lutomabally? 
dude the new drawings the next time 


Figure 6-21. 




















































































Add text to page four 


6 - 31 


Add text to page four 

You’re almost done with the text on page four. 

Use Text mode to create the address panel on page four. 

H Press PgDn or End to go to page four. 

H Click anywhere in the bottom frame on page four (frame 
#20) and type the following address (use Ctrl-Enter to cre¬ 
ate a line break): 


New Riders Publishing [Ctrl-Enter] 

31125 Via Colinas, Unit 902 [Ctrl-Enter] 

West Lake Village, CA 91362 [Enter] 

^ Start a new paragraph for the postage text and type: 

Bulk Rate [Ctrl-Enter] 

US Postage [Ctrl-Enter] 

PAID [Ctrl-Enter] 

LOS ANGELES, CA [Ctrl-Enter] 

PERMIT # XXXX 

M Select the text “PAID, LOS ANGELES, CA, PERMIT # 
XXXX” and make it Bold. 

K Now select the text “LOS ANGELES, C A PERMIT # XXXX” 
and make it Small. 


When you are finished, check that your page looks similar to 
Figure 6-22. 


Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Nornol 

uu 

Italic 

Snail 

Superscript 
Subscript 
Underline 
lOouMe UndrLn| 
Strike-thr i 
Overscore 


M 

HRSfll 

u 



) N«wRidir*PubTishmg4 
£1125 VaCrt'nis, Unit 902j 
^V*st Life Vilkgt, CA 913621 
1 Bulk Rite J 
$JS Postage.) 

J>AIDJ 


faomM xxxxB 


Figure 6-22. At this point, your page four should look similar to this 
illustration. 




















6 - 32 


Style 



Stopping point 


This is a good point to stop, take a break and save your work 
(press Ctrl-S). You’ve already done a lot of work, so we should 
probably remind you the first time through a newsletter is 
always the hardest. Make no mistake — it takes a substantial 
effort to produce a newsletter the first time around. But don’t 
become discouraged. Once you’ve set up your pages and 
finished the first issue, the production gets easier each time, 
particularly if you use the techniques we show you at the end 
of this chapter. 


If you want to take a break now, and start again later, save the 
changes to the document and quit Ventura. When you have 
more time, load Ventura, open the chapter 
C:\TEMP\6NEWS.CHP and start from where you left off. 


If you’re ready to forge ahead, proceed directly to the next 
section. 


Tagging the newsletter 

With the text in place, you can format the rest of the newslet¬ 
ter with tags. As always, start with the Body Text tag. Then 
proceed from the first frame to the last until all the text is 
tagged. 

M Go to page one. 

^ Enable Paragraph mode. 

H Select the second paragraph in frame #3, which starts “Ms. 
Belden will conduct basic skills workshops....” 

Confirm that the Body Text matches the following attributes: 

H Font Face: Times 

Style: Normal 
Size: 010.0 points 

H Alignment Horz. Alignment: Justified 

Overall Width: Column-Wide 
First Line: Indent 

In/Outdent Width: 01,00 picas & points 




Add the Logo tag 


6 - 33 


II Spacing Inter-Line: 12.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: When Not At Column Top 

When you’re finished with Body Text, you will then go to 
frame #1 and add a new tag called Logo. 

Add the Logo tag 

The logo is the most important element on the front page. It 
distinguishes a newsletter from others, projects the overall 
tone, and lends consistency from issue to issue. A logo can be 
letters and pictures or just letters and rules combined in a 
visually exciting way. The logo’s size should relate to the other 
elements on the page. It should be easy to read without con¬ 
flicting with the headlines. 

H Select the paragraph “PAGINATIONS.” 

P Add New Tag Tag Name to Add: Logo 

^ Font Style: Bold 

Size: 072.0 points 


WARNING: If you are using a non-Postscript printer, you may not be able to print 
fonts as large as 072.0 points. Use the largest size available to you instead. 


H Alignment Horz. Alignment: Center 

Width: Column-Wide 
In/Outdent Width: 00,00 picas & points 

*+NOTE: In this style sheet, tags are copied from Body Text, 
which has a first-line indent of 01,00 picas & points. Therefore, 
you must remove this indent for all the tags that follow. 

H Spacing Inter-Line: 80.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: Always 

Now use kerning and tracking to reduce the space between 
the individual letters and improve the appearance of the type. 

li Select Paragraph Typography from the Paragraph menu. 
Choose Automatic Pair Kerning: On, Letter Spacing: Off. 
Make Tracking 0.050 Ems Tighter. 




6-34 


Style 


’Logo" TVPOGRflPHV SETTINGS 



Automatic Pair Kerning: 
Letter Spacing: 
Tracking: 

On 

Off 

Tighter 

Up to: 0.100 £h* 

0,658* Ens 

Grow Inter-Line To Fit: 

On 


Minimal Space Width: 
Normal Space Width: 
Maximum Space Width: 

0.600 * 
1.000 * 
2.000 * 

(space width) = 0.150 Ens 
(space width) = 0.250 Ens 
(space width) = 0.500 Ens 



You can also track the letters interactively. Enable Text mode 
and select the letters you want to track. With the letters 
highlighted press the Shift key and the left arrow about five 
times. Each time you press the left arrow key you move the 
letters together about .01 Em. (Conversely, you can press the 
right arrow to move the letters further apart.) To find out the 
how much tracking you’ve done on-screen, choose Set Font 
from the Side-Bar while the letters are still highlighted. 

Add Logo2 tag 

Now you will add a tag named “Logo2.” 

H Try to select the paragraph “NEWSLETTER.” 

You may find it impossible to select the NEWSLETTER para¬ 
graph. The inter-line spacing of the Logo tag is so large (80.00 
fractional pts) that it causes the Logo paragraph to overlap 
the paragraph below. Fortunately, there are a few techniques 
to get around this problem: 

• Select the second paragraph before you tag the Logo para¬ 
graph. This is a good method only if you know ahead of time 
that one tag will overlap the next. 

• Tag the Logo paragraph as Body Text. This reduces the 
Logo tag to the size of Body Text and lets you select the 
paragraph below. After you add the Logo2 tag (to the 
Newsletter paragraph), retag the paragraph above it as 
Logo. 





Review move down to 1st baseline 


6 - 35 


• Change the Frame typography. Select the frame reserved 
for the logo and change the setting for Move Down to 1st 
Baseline By from Default to Cap Height (Frame Typo¬ 
graphy, Frame menu). This action raises the baseline of the 
logo text and lets you select the paragraph below. 

NOTE: If you are interested in understanding the subtle dif¬ 
ferences between Move Down to 1st Baseline By: Cap Height 
and Move Down to 1st Baseline By: Inter-Line, we encourage 
you to read the next section. On the other hand, if you have 
little interest in advanced typographic techniques, just follow 
the step-by-step instructions and watch what happens. 

Review move down to 1st baseline 

In Chapter Three we introduced you to the concept of Move 
Down to 1st Baseline By in the Chapter Typography menu. 
Because most beginners have a hard time with this concept, 
we’re going to take the time to review it. 

Move Down to 1st Baseline By affects the starting position of 
text at the top of a column or page. For instance, when you 
select Move Down to 1st Baseline By: Inter-Line, Ventura 
positions the baseline (the imaginary line on which the text 
rests) of the word PAGINATIONS 80.00 fractional pts from 
the top of the margin (the value of its inter-line spacing). 
When you select Move Down to 1st Baseline By: Cap Height, 
Ventura “hangs” the word PAGINATIONS from the column 
margin by the tallest capital letter in the word. (Imagine the 
word PAGINATIONS hanging down from the top of the 
column like laundry hanging from a clothesline.) 

Using Move Down to 1st Baseline By: Cap Height causes the 
word to be raised upward in the frame (Figure 6-23 and 
Figure 6-24). 






Figure 6-24. Move Down to 1st Baseline By: Cap Height. 


If you’re still struggling with this concept, you may under¬ 
stand it better if you step through the process. Go ahead and 
change the frame typography and watch what happens. 

Change the frame typography 

Enable Frame mode. 

II Select the logo frame. 

11 Select Frame Typography from the Frame menu. 


























Change the frame typography 


6 - 37 


H Choose Move Down to 1st Baseline By: Cap Height and 
click OK. 

The word PAGINATIONS is raised up and you can now select 
the paragraph below. 

H Enable Paragraph mode and select the paragraph 
“NEWSLETTER” in frame #1. 

Tag Name to Add: Logo2 

Style: Bold 
Size: 030.0 points 

Horz. Alignment: Center 
In/Outdent Width: 00,00 picas & points 

Above: 02.00 fractional pts 
Inter-Line 34.00 fractional pts 
Add in Above: Always 

As you saw earlier, you can use tracking to reduce the in¬ 
dividual space between characters and make a headline more 
legible. You can also use tracking to add space between char¬ 
acters for special effects. You will now add extra space be¬ 
tween letters in the Logo2 tag. 

^ Select Paragraph Typography. Choose Automatic Pair 
Kerning: On, Letter Spacing: Off. Choose Tracking: Looser 
and enter 0.750 Ems. 

When you are finished, the tag should look like Figure 6-25: 


H Add New Tag 
Si Font 

H Alignment 

H Spacing 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Fnane Paragraph Graphic Options 

■ [ ~cT\f^Eijs^l6H^sTvn|aii8il|[giaiiiiiiiii!a ♦ 

m [ ..." ....... I?......... i?.,,,,, i 8 *,,,,,,,, i”,,,,,,, i»,,,,,,, ,,\ a , ,,, t 



Figure 6-25. 
















6 - 38 


Style 


Add a ruling line above and below the Logo2 tag 

With the paragraph still highlighted, add ruling lines above 
Width: Frame 

Height of Rule 1: 01.00 fractional pts 
Width: Frame 

Height of Rule 1: 01.00 fractional pts 


H Select the paragraph “Design and Production News for 
Ventura Publishers.” 

Tag Name to Add: Motto 

Size: 012.0 points 

Horz. Alignment: Center 
Overall Width: Frame-Wide 
In/Outdent Width: 00,00 picas & points 

Now use tracking to tighten the spacing between letters. 

^ Paragraph Letter Spacing: Off 

Typography Tracking: Tighter 

Ems: 0.030 

Add a custom rule to the Motto tag 

To create the effect of a double line — one thick and one thin 
— you will add a custom rule above the Motto tag. Even 
though these two lines look like one unit, they are not. The 
top, thinner rule is part of the Logo2 tag above. The bottom, 
thicker rule will be attached to the Motto tag. 

fi With the Motto paragraph still highlighted, select Ruling 
Line Above. Make the unit measurement picas & points. 
Choose Width: Custom. Make the Space Above Rule 1: 
00,01 picas & points. Give Rule 1 a height of 00,10 picas & 
points. Enter a Custom Indent of (+) 06,00 picas & points 
and a Custom Width of 30,00 picas & points. 


H Add New Tag 
M Font 
i§ Alignment 


and below. 

11 Ruling Line 
Above 

II Ruling Line 
Below 

Add the Motto tag 



Add a Dateline tag 


6-39 


"Motto" RULING LINES ABOVE 


Width: 
Colon: 
Pattern: 
Dashes: 

Space Above Rule 1: 

Height of Rule 1: 
Space Below Rule 1: 

Height of Rule 2: 
Space Below Rule 2: 
Height of Rule 3: 


Custom 

Black 

Solid 

Off 

BO.OI 

00,10 

00,00 

00,00 

00,00 

00,00 


Space Below Rule 3: 00,00 
Overall Height: 00,11 


□ 


03,00 


Custom Indent: 
Custom Width: 

Dash Width: 
Dash Spacing: 


06,00 

30,0B| 

00,00 

00,00 


IS 


picas & points! 


IH 


|Cancel| 


*+NOTE: If the text below the motto paragraph disappears 
belows the frame try 1) enlarging the frame, 2) reducing the 
Height of Rule 1, or 3) reducing the Space Above Rule 1. 

Add a Dateline tag 

Now move to the next frame to create the Dateline and Head¬ 
line tags. In Chapter Three, you learned how to create a 
dateline by placing two different tags on the same line. Now 
we will show you another way to achieve the same effect, but 
this time with Tab Settings. 

^ Select the paragraph “Volume 1, Number 1.... ” 

H Add New Tag Tag Name to Add: Dateline 

H Font Style: N-Italic 

H Alignment Horz. Alignment: Left 

In/Outdent Width: 00,00 picas & points 

M With the paragraph still highlighted, select Tab Settings 
from the Paragraph menu. Choose Tab Number 1, Tab 
Type: Right, Tab Shown As: Open Space. Make the Tab 
Location: 42,00 picas & points and the Leader Char: 
Spaces. Click OK. 




6-40 


Style 


"Dateline" TAB SETTINGS 


m 

Tab Number: 

♦ 

1 

nr 


Tab Type: 

Right 



Tab Shown As: 

Open Space 


Tab Location: 

42, 

00| 

picas & points 

Leader Char: 

Spaces 


032 (ASCII) 

Leader Spacing: 

0 




Auto-Leader: 

Off 







Cancel 


Tab settings are always measured from the left margin. By 
setting a right tab at 42,00 picas & points (the width of the 
frame) you position the words ‘Winter 1989” flush against the 
right margin. 


Tag the headline 

Since most of the text on this page has already been prefor¬ 
matted for you, there are only a few more paragraphs to tag. 

II Tag the paragraph “Training workshops underway” as 
Headl (Figure 6-26). 



Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


Body Text 
8odyFlr*t 
Byline 
ColDey* 
ColTltle 
Dateline 
Deckhcod 


Heod» 

Hcod4 

Jun*Lcft 


Headl 


R Pg 8 9881 


C:\TDP\6NEWS.CHP (6HEKS.STV) 


: N B W 

illllljfiiflfiKliil 


FMriw 1, Nunber 1- 



i 


rainingwoiikshopsunddrway 


jVentui Piblisher users miyj 
i»ow enroll in training- 
Workshops! 


Venturi Publisher workshops in task' 
and advanced skills begin this month.- 
Interested XYZ personnel may enroll 
■by contacting loin BeMen of Marketing; 
Caaaauftiaiiaafcjd avt 2221 _L 


pf different documents (hit cm be; 
Treated with this softwire package.” Ini 
ithe second half of the daylong 
workshop, attendees will practice on in-; 
flividual workstations. They will learn- 
ihe basic Ventura skills necessary to 
joad and format their own documents: 
•using a style sheet from XYZ’s growing 
library of preformatted designs Ms< 
SUldnn tairi that irihar mamhact. of th.»,,. 


The reference book 
complete explanation] 
lures and offers in: 
methods of operaboj 

Advanced Semii 

■ The advanced sen 
•specialized skills nec 
bon of specific docu 
.j t i fc o. p .. t o.. k »je y a<i 


Figure 6-26. 



























Tag the TOC 


6 - 41 


H Select both jump text paragraphs (in frames #8 and #9) and 
tag them as JumpRight (Figure 6-27). 



Figure 6-27. 


11 Select the paragraph “Ventura Complements CAD” and tag 
it as Head2. 

To create the banner headline (“Ventura complements CAD”) 
we gave the tag a frame-wide alignment. Ventura stretches 
the text across the full width of the frame. If you are unclear 
about the difference between frame- and column-wide align¬ 
ment, open the Alignment dialog box for Head2 and switch 
back and forth a few times. 

^ TIP: You can also create a banner headline by placing text in a 
separate frame that spans more than one column. You used 
this second technique to create the Headl headline above the 
first article. 


Tag the TOC 

The last format changes on this page are in the Table of 
Contents (TOC) in the bottom right frame (frame #7). Add a 
new tag called DeptTitle. 

^ Enable Paragraph mode. 

H Select the word “INSIDE” in the bottom right frame. 

11 Add New Tag Tag Name to Add: DeptTitle 













































6-42 


Style 


Style: Bold 
Size: 018.0 points 

Horz. Alignment: Center 
In/Outdent Width: 00,00 picas & points 

Below: 06.00 fractional pts 
Inter-Line: 24.00 fractional pts 

Add tracking to the DeptTitle tag 

You can use tracking to add more space between the letters 
and mimic the graphic effect used in the logo. 

H Paragraph Letter Spacing: Off 

Typography Tracking: Looser 

Ems: 0.800 


Font 

Alignment 

Spacing 


Add ruling lines 

A ruling line above and below the DeptTitle tag separates it 
from the TOC entries below. 

Width: Frame 

Height of Rule 1: 01.00 fractional pts 
Space Below Rule 1: 06.00 fractional pts 

Width: Frame 

Space Above Rule 1: 06.00 fractional pts 
Height of Rule 1: 01.00 fractional pts 


Ruling Line 
Above 

Ruling Line 
Below 


Check the page 

Page one is now complete. Take a moment to look carefully for 
changes that might improve the design. For instance, examine 
the TOC title (“INSIDE”). If it does not appear properly 
centered you might want to use Text mode to add a thin space 
(Ctrl-Shift-T) or a figure space (Ctrl-Shift-F) in front of the 
word. (Figure 6-28.) Also, check that the jump text lines up 
with the text in the adjacent column. If it does not, adjust the 
size or position of the jump text frame (turn Line Snap off 
temporarily). 




Apply the DeptTitle tag 


6-43 


Thin Space ■ 


Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



C:\TEMPWlEWS.CHP (6NEWS.STV) illllillilglliiii ii§l ill ♦ 


[will receive i tnining guide ind i refer-; 
knee book. The training guide and its 
'accompanying software disk are used as 
!the basis for the hands-on exercises that 
imih up the second half of the seminar. 
3t can also be used for self-paced ad¬ 
vanced self-study after the workshop.* 


pl e m -p n ts- C A Dt- 


UfM 






photographs are made ink) printing; 
jplates, and the document an then be) 
reproduced via offset lHhography.1 j 
; Ms Betden believes that desktop) 
•publishing with Ventura Publisher will) 
sMOJOC&cr /x<r wed, 


iDXF file format and HPGL format: 
jCAD users can now include electronic: 
[AutoCAD drawings in technical docu-: 
jments and manuals. The Engineering) 
Department has been an enthusiastic) 
juser of AutoCAD, the leading CAD pro-) 
-gram, for more than two years. Its 2D) 
land 3D capabilities make it the perfect) 
BS&ttfio&Xt 


U N S I D E I 


Training workshops 
underway*.. 11 ] 

Ventura complements 
CAD*. 11 

Newsinet.......21 

Tipofthe month*..X 




Figure 6-28. 

TIP: If you come across text alignment problems in a frame-in¬ 
tensive document, try adjusting your frames so they do not 
touch. Sometimes, when frames butt up against each other, 
Ventura pushes the text in the upper frame up a line. 


Apply the DeptTitle tag 

is Press PgDn to move to the next page. 

^ If necessary, enable Paragraph mode before you continue. 

M Select the paragraph “NEWSLINE” at the top of frame #10 
and tag it as DeptTitle. 

II Select the jump text ‘WORKSHOP from page 1” (frame 
#13) and tag it as JumpLeft. 


Add a Pul I Quote tag 

Earlier, you created a special frame that separated the pull 
quote from the main text. Now you will enhance its ap¬ 
pearance by enlarging the size of the text and adding a second 
ruling line above. This second line echoes the double line 
effect from the logo. 

^ In the pullquote frame (in the middle of frame #13), select 
the paragraph that begins “Anyone who wants.... ” 

!! Add New Tag Tag Name to Add: PullQuote 




































6 - 44 


Style 


Style: B-Italic 
Size: 014.0 points 

Horz. Alignment: Left 
In/Outdent Width: 00,00 picas & points 

Inter-Line: 14.00 fractional pts 
In From Left: 01,00 picas & points 
In From Right: 01,00 picas & points 

II Select Ruling Lines Above. Make the Width: Custom. Give 
Rule 1 a height of 00,08 picas & points and the Space Below 
Rule 1: 01,01 picas & points. Make the Custom Indent: (+) 
00,07 picas & points and the Custom Width: 10,00 picas & 
points. 

The pull quote should look like Figure 6-29: 


Font 

Alignment 

Spacing: 



Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


C:\TQff\6NEWS.CHP C6HEWS.STV) i liiiaiiliilililli 


•mJiMt 


A* 


tt 0002 


make it possible for Venturi users to send documents; 
.ter vii i joal [ith network.! 

iry Jus teen ujgmented by the purchase of theDocu- 
:t»ns frpm (few Riders Publishing. The collections 
document, n^irketing documents, forms, books and 


( ad i nevj lirje-screen disphy compatible with Xerox 
l-X-100 is Ihe first display to incorporate four graphics 
is a specialized microchip that speeds display speed, 
n graphic^ adapter will ship in the last garter of this- 


Low open fjom 5:00 to 7:00 pjn Tuesday and Thursday 
(he Marketing Communications Department will be on 
f question? and help with problems.! 

3 -£jmnounee4 for;the purchase of small computers. XYZ; 
itsftmpiiter purchases, has made arrangements: 
employed who wish to buy computers or related 


•or more of 4e workskop's and seminars.!; 
All workshops, both basic and ad' 


fomiie in impres¬ 
sion on piper should 
if fend a Venfun frlin¬ 
ing workshop 77 


jvinced, are held in classroom A-6 ad¬ 
jacent to the cafeteria. Interested users 
ican also sign up for supervised practice: 
itime on one of its six computers from! 
£00 to 7:00 p.m. on TWsdays and! 
Thursdiys.t 

The classroom features stite-otthe- 
•art equipment: including high resolu¬ 
tion monitors and network cards. All; 
iunrVftaHftag-fia. jfjfcCf-ihA /laggaaro 1 


H 


Figure 6-29. 


Add a big first character to the StaffBox tag 

Now let’s change the text in the staff box frame at the bottom 
of page two. To set it apart from the surrounding text, change 
the text to italics and add a big first character. 

11 Select the paragraph from the staff box “Paginations is 
published.... ” 


Style: N-Italic 





























Apply JumpLeft tag 


6-45 


Select Special Effects from the Paragraph menu. Choose 
Special Effect: Big First Character. Choose Set Font 
Properties to bring up the Font dialog box. Choose Style: 
B-Italics, and Size: 024.0 points. Click OK to return to the 
first dialog box. Now choose Space for Big First: Custom 
and make the custom lines 001. Click OK to close the dialog 
box. 


"StaffBox" SPECIAL EFFECTS 

Special Effect: | Hone | I Bullet | 

Connands: | Set Font Properties"! 

Space for Big First: | Normal | 00l| lines 

Sho« Bullet As: ! * 


0 


»_! j > j [ NoUph Box 
Bullet Char: 000 (ASCII) 

Indent After Bullet;; 00,00 picas R points 




Filled Box i I Other 1 


OK 


| Cancel 1 


If you had chosen Space for Big First: Normal, Ventura would 
have made its own best decision where to place the big first 
character. In this particular case — a 24-point big first charac¬ 
ter on 12-point lines — it would have chosen two lines. It 
would have set the first character on the baseline of the 
second line, creating a two-line indent. 

When you choose Custom instead, you get to decide which 
baseline to use. By entering 1, for example, you tell Ventura to 
place the big first character on the baseline of the first line. To 
make a big first character start below the first line, enter a 
number greater than one. 

Apply JumpLeft tag 

H Press PgDn to move to page three. 

H Select the jump text “CAD from page 1” (frame #17) and tag 
it as JumpLeft. 



















6-46 


Style 


Add an end of article symbol on page three 

To distinguish the beginnings and ends of articles in a 
newsletter, it is common to place a special editorial symbol, 
like a square (either hollow or solid) or a small version of the 
logo at the end of the article. In a text-intensive, multi-column 
format, this symbol is easy to spot and guides the reader from 
the end of one story to the beginning of another. We will show 
you how to create a special end of article symbol using the Ins 
Special Item option. You will insert a small hollow box at the 
end of an article on page three. 

*+NOTE: You can also create an end of article symbol with a 
character from the international character set or (if you have a 
PostScript printer) Zapf Dingbats. In Text mode, insert the 
code you want by pressing Alt and the number from the 
numeric keyboard. Then highlight the character and choose 
Set Font from the Side-Bar to change the font to either Zapf 
Dingbats or Symbol. 

i§ Enable Text mode. Place the cursor in front of the end of file 
marker at the end of the middle frame on page three (frame 
#15). (Figure 6—30.) 



Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


lliillllllllllillilll C:\TEMP\6MEWS.CHP (6NEHS.STY) 1111111111111111111111 


Iwd* pcoo^sor V1 

’ The tempkte method is parlkukrty 

juseful when an editor must work with| 
Multiple authors.! j 

| Authors an also assist in the layout 
process by inserting kgs that create; 

foace for illustrations. If you uses; 

yisuak in standard sices, create a tag 

ihat leaves the correct amount of space! 

|>n the page The authors an type in the! 

hame of the illustration or even its capi 

lion This tigged paragraph created 

kpace where the layout editor will want 
lo place the actual frame The editor cant 
jlelete the tag and insert ttji frame thalj 
JviTl contain the illustration^ 




equalfy i 


ahs. use bi revision is i 

^: riant As products change, so must the; 

jin wings and technical rnanuik tha^ 
Support them. Venturi and AutoCAEi 

jogether provide the ability to product 

ptmost instant updates! j 

1 For instance, a Venturi chapter filej 

Contains pointers to the graphics files; 

iised in the document If these graphics! 

kre changed, Ventura will automabaHyj 

include the new drawings the next time! 

Jhe document is loaded, as long as thei 

hew files have the same name as the old] 

Keeping the document up-to-date is isi 

pimple as repkang oM files with new] 

jutes.! I 


E 


Figure 6-30. 


Select Ins Special Item from the Edit menu (Ctrl-C). 






















































Add an end of article symbol on page three 


6-47 


Choose Box Char or press the FI function key. 



Desk File I3!ff| View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


| Set Font I 

m 


t 

* 

Normal 

•«» 

Italic 

Snail 

Superscript 

Subscript 

Underline 

Double Undrln 

Strlk«*thru 

Overseer* 

Upper Case 

Htt 

r. Setting 

R 

m 

Pg tt 0003 


; The tonpfett method it pirtxulirbj 
Wful whin in editor must work withj 
pultipk authors. j 

j Authors ran also assist in Iht kyou^ 
process by inserting kgs that emit 




; MlMSj 

ethent 
««, tigs 
kMj’wilj 
| Thin 
1 ichingt! 
it i 
1 rraerej 
Irocessori 


Footnote F2* 

M Index Entry... F3 
r Fraction... F4 
L* Frane finchor... F5 
top Cross Ref... F6 
Jlelett the tig ind insert the frune tlul 
Will contain the illustration. 


cortint As products thing e, so must thi 
drawings and kchniul animals thij 
support them. Ventura and AutoC, 
together provide the ability to prodiu^ 
ltmosl instant updates. j 

J For instinct, i Venturi chapter fils 
jontiins pointers to the graphics files* 
|ised in the document. If these gnphksj 
Ire (hinged, Venturi wil! lulcmibalty 
include the new drawings the next tinuj 
the document is baled, is long is the 
kew files hive the seme name is the oldj 
keeping the document up to-dite is uj 
pimple is repkdng old files with nt^ 

i 


Fif*3 


J± 


II When you are asked to insert a hollow or filled box charac¬ 
ter, choose hollow. 

Ventura places the hollow box at the end of the text. Now you 

can interactively change the size of the hollow box. 

^ While you are still in Text mode, highlight the box by 
dragging or by using the Shift-Click method. 

.11 Once it is selected, hold down the Shift key and tap the 
down arrow key until you see the box get smaller. (To 
increase the box, hold down the Shift key and press the up 
arrow key.) 

^ NOTE: If the box does not appear smaller, press the ESC key 
once to redraw the screen. 

When finished, your page should resemble Figure 6-31: 










































6-48 


Style 


D 

if 

esk File 

Edi 

t Vie* Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 

_ 

m 

& 

! 

t 

1 

el Font 

Hemal 

B old 

Italic 

Small 

Superscript 

Subscript 

Underline 

Double UndrLn 

Strike-thru 

Overscere 

0,0 

...r. 8 . i? . iv. . i” . i s ‘ . i" ... 

T 


you an capitause 
is you prefer. Many 
st ail capitals, or start 
rmbol such as Iso the 
n the text 

ffames 

"generic" tag mines 
t you an reuse them 
in. For instance, tags 
" and “Subhead” wilt 
ocumenls. Then by 
isets, you can change 
if the document 
ce the keyboard macro 
ng word processor 

tvora p'ocessor*s nmen text rniure. > means. tase oi revision is equally mis 

| The template method is particularly! ^ortant As products change, so must the| 

fistful when an editor must work wtfcj firawings and technical manuals fa j 

fnultiple authors. j Support them Ventura and AutoCAD* 

| Authors can also assist in the feyout; together provide the abibty b product 

process by inserting tags fat create; Almost instant updates. j 

?pace for illusfrations If you use$ ; For instance, a Ventura chapter file; 

visuals in standard sizes, create a tag; Contains pointers to the graphics fifes; 

b at leaves the correct amount of space! 3used in the document. If these graphics; 

tn the page. The authors an type in the! *re changed, Ventura will automatically! 

Hare of the illustration or even its cap*; include the new drawings the next time; 

ben. This tagged paragraph creates the document is loaded, as long as the! 

Space where the layout editor will want hew files have the same name is the oHi 

to place the actual frame The editor can! Keeping the document up-to-date is a£ 

jtelete the tag and insert the frame that} pimple as repfedng old fifes with new* 

fvill contain the illustration^ > jmes. \ 

T 

Upper Case 


mm 



Fiat 3 

R 

3 g 8 0003 



: 1 IIIF 

K 


Figure 6-31. 


*+NOTE: When you move the text cursor over a box character 
on-screen the words “Box Character’’ appear in the Current 
Selection Box. You can cut, copy, and paste a box character 
just as you would any other text character — use the Edit Text 
option in the Edit menu or use the equivalent keyboard 
shortcuts. 

11 If you want more practice inserting box characters, repeat 
the steps above to add a hollow box to the end of the each 
article in the newsletter. 

** TIP: You can copy the hollow box to the clipboard and then 
paste it in where you want 


The final page 

Since the rest of page three is already preformatted, go to the 
last page of the newsletter. 

H Press End to go to the last page. 

Adding the Address tag 

To complete the style section, you will add two tags that reside 
on the same line: the Address tag and the BulkRate tag. 







































The Address tag 


6-49 


The Address tag 


II Enable Paragraph mode. 

H Select the paragraph “New Riders Publishing....” 

II Add New Tag 

Tag Name to Add: Address 

H Font 

Face: Helvetica 

H Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: Left 

In/Outdent Width: 00,00 picas & points 

H Spacing 

Above: 24.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 24.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: Always 

In From Left: 02,00 picas & points 

As you learned earlier, you can use Breaks to place two tags on 
the same line. The first tag — in this case the Address tag — 
uses a line break before. 

M Breaks 

Line Break: Before 

Allow Within: Yes 

Keep With Next: No 

The BulkRate Tag 


Now create the BulkRate tag and change the Line Break to 
After so it appears on the same line with the Address tag 
(Figure 6-32). 

II Select the paragraph that begins “Bulk Rate... ” 

li Add New Tag 

Tag Name to Add: BulkRate 

^ Font 

Face: Helvetica 

H Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: Center 

In/Outdent Width: 00,00 picas & points 

H Spacing 

Above: 24.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: Always 

In From Left: 30,00 picas & points 

In From Right: 02,00 picas & points 

Using In From Left and In From Right pushes the BulkRate 
tag to the right margin. The In From Left and Right spacing 
prevents the two tags from overlapping. 




6 - 50 


Style 


Now place the BulkRate tag on the same line as the Address 
tag. 

ii Breaks Line Break: After 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frang Paragraph Graphic Options 


11 

11 

11 

II 

li 

|| 

11 

ii 

ii 

li 

ii 

C:\TEMP\6MEWS.CHP (6NEHS.STV) 

lliiliil 




New Riders Publlshingj 
31125ViaCo!inas, Unit902j 
West take Village, CA 91362f 


Bulk Rate j 
US Postagsj 

PHDj 

UK AtCaCS. OAj 

pp>Mrr»xnx.Q 


Figure 6-32. 


Add ruling lines to the BulkRate tag 

Add the finishing touches by adding ruling lines above and 
below the margins of the BulkRate tag. 

Width: Margin 

Height of Rule 1: 04.00 fractional pts 
Space Below Rule 1: 06.00 fractional pts 

Width: Margin 

Space Above Rule 1:06.00 fractional pts 
Height of Rule 1: 04.00 fractional pts 


Ruling Line 
Above 

Ruling Line 
Below 


** TIP: We made the ruling line width equal to Margin so it lined 
up with the margin created by In From Left and In From Right 
spacing. 











































Place the picture 


6 - 51 


Pictures 


Illustrations are an important part of many newsletters. In 
this section, you will import and scale an image file and use 
Box Text shapes to draw a monthly calendar. Let’s start by 
adding an illustration and caption to the article on page three. 

Place the picture 

P Press PgUp to move back to page three. 

H Enable Frame mode. 

H Select the picture frame (frame #18) and place the image 
file WPVP.IMG from the Assignment List. 

Scale the picture 

H Sizing & Picture Scaling: Fit in Frame 

Scaling Aspect Ratio: Distorted 


SIZING 8 SCALING 


0 


Flow Text Around: On 


Upper Left X: 19,00| HE] Upper Left V: 04,06 HE] 

Frane Width: 27,06 Frame Height: 24,00 

Horiz. Padding: 00,00 Vert. Padding: 00,00 picas & points 


Picture Scaling: 


Fit in Frane 


By Scale Factors 


Aspect Ratio: | Maintained 


Distorted 


X Crop Offset: 00,00 BE] V Crop Offset: 00,00 HP1 
Scale Width: 27,06 Scale Height: 24,00 


Cancel 


By choosing Distorted, you allow Ventura to stretch the 
dimensions of the picture as much as needed to fit it exactly 
inside the frame. 

*+NOTE: Because the picture is close to the actual size of the 
picture frame, there is very little visable distortion. 




6 - 52 


Pictures 


Add a caption to the frame 

With the picture frame still selected, add a caption. 

H Anchors Caption: Below 

& Captions 

Ventura attaches an empty caption frame to the original 
frame. Now add the caption text inside this frame. 

II Enable Text mode. Place the cursor in front of the end of file 
marker inside the caption frame. Type: 


Insert tag names into word processing files to 
preformat Ventura documents. 

The caption is already formatted for you (Figure 6-33). 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Fnane Paragraph Graphic Options 


ililliil C:\TEMP\6fiEWS.CHP (6NEHS.STV) 


Set Font 


gRPgM»03| 

M 


IJie til It- night loak like tkij jb th« k i Je^l 
9GHEHM.1N2 - Pc-nlomattinj Uutura 
Wt fDJ-jct tic sjjocc at kill siica of tic cfinh aigri id 
ioi't fojjct to ip el I tie tos rant mctly as it ayjeics ir| 



i \% eich text pint 
; us is also i hand)? 

1 abilities, so writers? 

24 ! without worrying 
“ look tte.ff | 

: the ultimate time] 

1 ffieutt. One simple} 

; e tag names into ij 
irocessor to save; 

3t) ! er format uses the} \ | j ; 

ft margin followed} Jnserttagnames into word processing tiles to preformatVenturadocumentsp; 

: ag, an equals sign} —J-: 

: j, if we were using} Jemptate fifes. Load an unformatted text! 'fADfrcmptgn IB I 

' preformat this ar t jfite into Ventura and tag it as you would! } } 

I »k Kke this in the? When everything is perfect^ Resign tool AutoCAD, however, is not 

34 '. | save the chapter (thereby saving the tags} optimised for the layout of pages that 

tef or matting Ven | jnto the text fikf I ynerge text with graphxs.ff 5 

j j Now make a copy of the fill under aj 1 Venturi Publisher, by contrast, was} 

1 >pace at both sides! new name. Remove the text, leaving} designed expressly to merge text and} 

! nd don’t forget toj jmly the tags Assuming the tag names} graphics. By letting each package 4c} 

! <actly as it appears? *re self-descriptive, a template mikes itj What it does best, the Engineering? 

tptoved XYZ style* Till-in-the-blanks simple to create Department expects to achieve superkxj 


F 


Figure 6-33. 


Draw a calendar 

Many readers consider the calendar the most useful part of a 
newsletter. It lists current and future events in an eye-catch¬ 
ing, visual format. By placing the calendar on the back page, 
you make it easy for someone to find and refer to throughout 
the month. 











































Draw the title box 


6 - 53 


H Go to page four. 

Before you begin to draw the Box Text, set up a snap-to grid 
for the frame that will contain the calendar. 

^ Enable Graphic mode. 

M Select the top frame. 

^ Grid Settings Grid Snap: On 

Horizontal Spacing: 06,00 picas & points 
Vertical Spacing: 02,00 picas & points 


Draw the title box 

Start the calendar by drawing the Box Text shapes to contain 

the calendar title and the days of the week. 

P Before you draw the first Box Text, reset the zero point of 
the ruler to the upper left comer of the frame (frame #19). 

P Select the Box Text tool from the Side-Bar. Starting at the 
upper left column margin, draw a Box Text 42,00 picas & 
points wide (the width of the frame) by 02,00 picas & points 
high (one grid snap unit). (Figure 6—34.) 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Figure 6-34. 


** NOTE .-Remember, you can align the ruler with any edge of a 
Box Text to check its measurements. 






































6 - 54 


Pictures 


Now change the line and fill attributes. 

H Line Attributes Thickness: None 

H Fill Attributes Color: White 

Pattern: Hollow 
Result: Transparent 
Default: Save To 


Draw the days of the week 

Draw one Box Text for the first day. Then use copy and paste 
to duplicate the shape across the frame. 

II Switch to Normal or Enlarged View to draw the next shape. 
Starting at position 2 picas on the vertical ruler, draw a Box 
Text 06,00 picas wide by 02,00 picas high (Figure 6-35). 

if Line Attributes Thickness: Thin 

End Styles: Square 
Default: Save To 

H Fill Attributes Color: Black 

Pattern: 2 

Result: Transparent 



Figure 6-35. 







































Copy the shape 


6 - 55 


Copy the shape 

M Press Shift-Del to copy the last shape into the clipboard. 
Press Ins to paste a copy on the page. 

Remember, Ventura pastes the copy on top of the original. 

H Use the mouse to move the shape to the right. Thanks to 
the grid, it will snap into position. 

Complete the remaining boxes 

H To add the rest of the boxes for the days of the week, copy 
the last Box Text shape, then copy it five times across the 
width of the frame. 

When you are finished, your screen should look similar to 

Figure 6-36: 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 

■ 

SI 

a CATOPXSilWS.Dl 1 (6NEIK.STV) iil==i= ==i5iEE=iiS== 


a 

,.f, . i‘ . i? . i" .. i” . i” . i?„ t 

0 




l 


- r 


s 

0 

1! 


:=£;=§i==;|I:5^;=|:=5i=|:i|;||:= 


Hill 


liilii 


:=|:==:==;~=:=E:=i;==:====!==:= 




jlili 

liisiisiilii 

==== = 



• 

T 

1 




i 

♦ 

ill ill 

□□ 


Figure 6-36. 


Finish the calendar 

Now you will copy the entire row of boxes four times, using 
Shift-Click to select the entire row at once. 

** TIP: Be careful when trying to move an entire row of boxes. 
You must avoid accidentally resizing the boxes, or selecting 
just one and leaving all the others behind. 
















6 - 56 


Pictures 


To move an entire row, use Shift-click to select all the shapes. 
Now hold down the Shift key and press down the mouse 
button in one of the shapes. Do not move the mouse until the 
four-way arrow appears. If the pointing finger appears in¬ 
stead, release the button immediately without moving the 
mouse. Then reposition the cursor and try again. 

With these precautions in mind, complete the following steps. 

Draw the first box 

By changing the vertical grid settings, you make it easier to 
create the right size box. 

^ Grid Settings Grid Snap: On 

Horizontal Spacing: 06,00 picas & points 
Vertical Spacing: 04,00 picas & points 

H Starting from position 4 picas on the vertical ruler draw a 
Box Text 06,00 picas wide by 04,00 picas high. 

Copy the box 

i! Press Shift-Del to copy the first box to temporary memory. 

li Paste a copy of the box back onto the page. 

II Use the mouse to move the copy to the right until it snaps 
into place. 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 

IT W§*>\M«S:w"l6NEHS.S:r) 1 .IT = = I ♦ 


1 



_ 


—^~ 


_ 

=1 


S**d" * 

i 

i ii 


=F===PSiig 

ii 

minis 

-~ = = ~!-EU 

- - - D 

~--r : li 

==:-= ==-=ai| 

□ 

□ 



□ 

□ 



n 

D 

Q 

[ 

1 

1 

[ 

I 




i 


♦III 1 HE 


Figure 6-37. 































































Copy the row 


6 - 57 


Paste five more copies and move them into position to 
complete one row of the calendar (Figure 6-37). 


Copy the row 

Now you will copy the entire row of boxes into the clipboard. 

^ Select the first box. Shift-Click to select the remaining 
boxes. Then press Shift-Del to copy the entire row into 
temporary memory. 

H Press Ins to paste a copy of the row onto the page. 

H Hold down the Shift key and place the cursor in the middle 
of one box shape. Drag the entire row of shapes down one 
grid unit. 

H Paste three more copies and move them into position to 
complete the calendar (Figure 6-38). 


Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Trane Paragraph Graphic Options 


1 

Ijil 


iiSIIiliiS C:\TEMP\df1EWS.CHP (6NEWS.STV) i 


tim 

• H- 
tiii 

. 

iiiii 

ill 

ill ♦ 

M 


“. 

«. i 

L..... i 

1ft 

». 

30 

36 

« n t 

£ 

z± 




=£:== 




c:== 





-— c 

;ss;======~ 

Ipill 

;==== ^ 




I 



T 

D 

□ 


□ 

o 



0 

D 

D 

D 

0 


□ 

□ 



° 

D 

a 

D 

n 


° 

n 



□ 

D 

° 

0 

D 


□ 

D 



□ 

0 

0 

D 



□ 

a 



□ 

0 

□ 

♦ 


1 FI 7 ! 

*\K 


Figure 6-38. 

NOTE: If you have trouble moving the shapes as a group, 
move them one at a time. 

Add text to the calendar 

Now that all the Box Text shapes are in place, use Text mode 
to enter the calendar text. Use Figure 6-39 as a guide. 





































































6-58 


Pictures 


*+NOTE: Use a line break (Ctrl-Enter) to separate lines within a 
Box Text 



Figure 6-39 Your calendar will look like this after typing in the text and tagging it. 



























Apply tags to the calendar 


6 - 59 


Apply tags to the calendar 

Use the predefined tags in the Assignment List to format the 
calendar. 

li Enable Paragraph mode. 

H Select the paragraph “February 1989” and tag it as Cal- 
Title. 

H Tag all the days of the week as CalDays. 


Chapter 

Nice work. You should be proud of yourself. After completing 
this project, you’re ready to take on any type of newsletter, 
whether simple or complex. Let’s take a look at the finished 
product. 

H To Print Which Pages: All 

Printing Order: Last to 1st 

Once you have the final copy in your hands, inspect each page, 
looking for small changes that will improve its appearance. 
Remember, no matter how good it might appear on the screen, 
the true test of your talents shows up after printing. 

Creating a chapter template 

As promised, we’re going to finish this chapter with tips that 
speed newsletter production. Once you establish a successful 
format, the hard part has been done. You can reuse your 
newsletter chapter over and over again for future issues. 

Here’s how it works. Open the newsletter and save it under a 
new name — TEMPLATE.CHP, for example, or BLANK.CHP. 
Now remove all the text files and graphics files with Remove 
Text/File from the Edit menu (Figure 6-40). 




6 - 60 


Chapter 


Desk File Edit Mien Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Figure 6-40. 


*+NOTE: You do not have to remove the logo text, unless you 
are using the same template for different newsletters with 
different names. 

Now save TEMPLATE.CHP again. From now on, you will use 
this chapter full of blank frames as your starting point. Start 
by renaming the template so you preserve it intact. Then load 
and place text files into the empty frames. Change the 
headers and footers if necessary to reflect the new dates. 
Adjust frame sizes, add frames, edit copy and make any other 
minor changes as necessary to make the new text and pictures 
fit. Newsletters that vary quite a bit from month to month 
may require more extensive adjustments. Even so, you will 
still be finished with the newsletter in a fraction of the time it 
takes to build one from scratch. 

Another time-saving trick 

If you want to save a step, simply use the same file names for 
each issue’s text and pictures. This technique is most useful if 
the newsletter format is nearly the same each month. Make a 
copy of the first issue under a new name, but do not remove the 
text and graphics files. Keep this new version in a subdirec¬ 
tory of its own, together with all the files that make up the 
chapter. For example, you might call the copy FINAL. CHP 
and store it in a directory called \FINAL because this is the 























Another time-saving trick 


6 - 61 


chapter you will use to print the final version of the newsletter 
each month. 

Collect the text and graphics for each new issue in a separate 
subdirectory (for instance, \JANUARY, \FEBRUARY, 
\MARCH, etc.). When everything’s ready to go, copy the text 
files to the \FINAL directory, but rename the files so they 
match the names used in the first issue. Once you’ve updated 
the files in \FINAL directory, you can load FINAL.CHR Since 
the file names are the same, Ventura will immediately flow 
the new text and graphics into the old layout. You won’t even 
need to place the files. You will, however, need to make some 
minor adjustments before printing. 



Tips and techniques 


Text tips 

□ After you convert a text file format, or rename it to a new 
location, the changes do not take effect until you save the 
chapter. If you abandon the chapter without saving, you 
will lose the changes. 

□ To create a dashed line effect, choose Ruling Line Above, 
Below or Ruling Box Around from either the frame or para¬ 
graph and select Dashes On. You can adjust the width of 
the dashes and the space between them. 

□ The text you type directly into a frame or caption is stored 
in Ventura’s caption file. If you wish to save the text as a 
separate file use File Type/Rename from the Edit menu. 
Ignore the name you see listed in Old Name. Type in the 
new name and location and click OK. 


Style tips 

□ A pull quote is a short quotation that can be used as a 
graphic element to fill space or add emphasis to an article. 
To make a pull quote, place and size a separate frame 
within a column. Then type the pull quote text directly into 
the frame. Add a new tag called PullQuote and change the 
text attributes to create the desired effect. 



6 - 62 


Chapter 


□ Use tracking to reduce or increase the space between in¬ 
dividual letters in a word. 

□ To create a banner headline, tag the text as frame-wide, or 
place text in a separate frame that spans more than one 
column. 

□ If you choose Space for Big First: Normal, Ventura makes 
its best guess where to place the big first character. When 
you choose Custom instead, you decide which baseline to 
use. By entering 1, for example, you tell Ventura to place 
the big first character on the baseline of the first line. To 
make a big first character start below the first line, enter a 
number greater than one. 

□ Use an end of article symbol to show where one article ends 
an another begins. Use the Ins Special Item to insert a 
hollow or filled box at the end of a story. 

Picture and frame tips 

□ It is easiest and most efficient to build newsletters by pour¬ 
ing text into frames. 

□ Frames can have fill patterns and up to three ruling lines 
around. 

□ Frames that reside on top of the Underlying Page can have 
the same or different margins and columns as the Underly¬ 
ing Page. 

□ Make the vertical padding of frames equal to the current 
inter-line spacing of the Body Text tag. 

□ If you come across text alignment problems in frame-inten¬ 
sive layouts, try adjusting the frames so they do not touch 
each other. Sometimes when frames butt up against each 
other, Ventura pushes the text in the upper frame up one 
line. 

□ Be careful when you move a group (a row or a column) of 
graphic shapes together. To avoid accidentally re-sizing 
them, or selecting one by itself, be sure to select them by 
holding down the Shift key before you go to move the boxes. 
After you press the mouse button, do not move the shapes 
until the four-way arrow appears. 




Another time-saving trick 


6 - 63 


Chapter tip 

□ You can re-use a standard chapter format over and over 
again by converting it into a chapter template. Take the 
original chapter and save it as a new chapter. Then remove 
all the text and picture files. Once they are removed, save 
the new chapter with a name like BLANK.CHP. From now 
on, you will use this chapter, including its frames, headers 
and footers, and so forth, to begin your new projects. 



Chapter Seven 
Skills Checklist 


Theory 

□ The power of pretagging 

□ Creating a directory from a database 
file 

Text 

□ Line breaks versus paragraphs 

□ More timesaving tips on preformatting 

Style 

□ Live headers and footers that change 
from page to page 

□ How to make your own crop marks 

□ Advanced typographic effects using 
reverse type 

□ Inserting the page number anywhere 
on the frame 

Picture 

□ Creating thumb tabs with repeating 
frmaes 

□ Adding fill patterns to frames 

Chapter 

□ Creating a publication 

□ Linking page numbers from chapter 
to chapter 

□ Using Multi-Chapter to print a 
publication 

□ Using chapter templates to speed 
production 




Chapter Seven 


A Directory 


C ombining the power of a database program with Ventura’s 
batch formatting allows you to publish professional- 
quality directories quickly and easily. In this chapter, you will 
create a sample directory using the skills and techniques 
listed on the facing page. 

In Chapter Two, you learned the basics of preparing text in 
advance, including how to use bracket codes to enter at¬ 
tributes directly into word processing files. In this chapter, 
you will also learn how to enter tag names directly. In addi¬ 
tion, we will pass along a few ideas on how to use a database 
program to generate pretagged files for Ventura. 


Theory 

Because of time and space limitations, you will not actually 
use a database to build the sample document in this chapter. 
However, the text file you will load into the sample document 
resembles a file you would get from a database. If you expect 
to use a database in your real-life applications, you will 
benefit from understanding the theory of using a database to 
generate pretagged files. 

The power of pretagging 

The fastest way to format text from a database is to include 
tag names in the text file. As soon as the file is loaded into 
Ventura, the style sheet definitions are automatically applied. 
Pretagging virtually eliminates the need to tag inside Ventura 
and reduces layout time and formatting errors. You can, of 
course, produce sophisticated documents without pretagging. 



7-2 


Theory 


course, produce sophisticated documents without pretagging. 
In the long run, however, this pretagging shortcut saves time 
and increases productivity. 

Rules for pretagging 

When you load a text file, Ventura treats all untagged para¬ 
graphs as Body Text. For this reason, you do not need to 
pretag Body Text. All other paragraphs, however, can be 
pretagged using the format @TAGNAME = . The “at” sign (@) 
comes first followed by the tag name (e.g. HEAD1, HEAD2, 
etc.), a space, an equals sign, and a second space. Leaving out 
any character or space cancels the tagging instruction. 
Likewise, the tag will not take effect unless it is the first line 
in the paragraph and flush against the left margin. Moreover, 
the tag name in the text file must match the name in the style 
sheet exactly. Ventura doesn’t care whether you capitalize or 
not, but it does care that you spell both tag names the same. 

In the files you will load for this chapter, @HeadSection = is 
the tag code for the title of each directory section. @Headl = is 
the tag code for the first-level heading (the single letters that 
precede each alphabetical section); @Head2 = is the tag code 
for the second level heading, and so on. Backward arrows (J) 
at the end of lines indicate line breaks. Paragraph symbols (<[[) 
indicate paragraph returns. 

At first glance, it seems like extra trouble to type in tag names 
at the beginning of each paragraph. Once you settle on a 
standard set of names, however, you can store them as key¬ 
board macros (with your word processor or a separate pro¬ 
gram like Smartkey). Then you can enter tags in quickly by 
pressing a single macro key. Or, as suggested below, you can 
have a database program do the work for you. 

You’ll find more tips on pretagging text at the end of the 
chapter. 

Using a database file with Ventura 

Database programs are more practical than word processors 
for generating lists and directories. Businesses use database 
programs to maintain client lists, mailing lists, inventory 
lists, and so forth. You can transform such a list into a Ventura 




Line breaks versus paragraphs 


7-3 


document by having the database program generate an ASCII 
file, which then can be loaded into Ventura. Creating an 
ASCII file can be as simple as printing a report to disk. 

*+NOTE: If you are not familiar with the structure and use of a 
database, you may not understand some of the terminology 
(e.g. fields, records, and so forth) we introduce in the strategy 
section below. Don’t worry. Just skip ahead to the planning 
section and read about the Ventura skills you will learn in this 
chapter. You will be able to apply most of these skills to 
practical projects that don’t require the use of a database. 

A “raw” ASCII file, however, needs lots of formatting once 
inside Ventura. You can make things even easier by using the 
database to pretag the file. Here’s the strategy: 

• Prepare a thumbnail sketch of the directory. Choose names 
for the tags (for instance, Headl, Head2, Company, Phone#, 
etc.). 

• Use Ventura to create a style sheet with matching tag 
names. Format it to match the thumbnail sketch. 

• Sort the database to pull out the specific information you 
need. 

• Specify a database report with the fields in correct order. 

So far you’ve done nothing out of the ordinary with Ventura or 
with the database. To pretag, however, you must take two 
additional steps: 

• Use the database report generator to insert the tag names 
in front of the fields. 

• Print the report (which now includes the tag names) to 
disk. 

Once you’ve generated the pretagged ASCII file, you can load 
it into Ventura. The text will be formatted as soon as you place 
the file on the Page. 

Line breaks versus paragraphs 

The sample text file you will use in this chapter contains line 
breaks as well as paragraph returns. For long documents such 




7-4 


Theory 


as directories, you should get in the habit of using line breaks 
to create new lines whenever both lines have the same tag 
name. Line breaks consume less memory than returns. 
Memory considerations do not come into play for short docu¬ 
ments, but they can become a concern with long documents, 
especially those with many lines of small type and memory-in¬ 
tensive effects such as leader dots. 

A database can enter line breaks by inserting the bracket code 
<R> in place of a carriage return (Figure 7-1). 



Figure 7-1 . Use line breaks instead of returns in a long directory file. 
Ventura’s line break code is <R>. 










Line breaks versus paragraphs 





K zTm 



^3U?t 


lAv!>Sc4Pts FoAshAT 
3 Coc.Ufi\A/$ l4,0l SA 

2 t oo 6 otter 


Reseat tieAOBt 


Bleep 




tiff fives Bu.o 

Voobio Rule 

ABot/tE 

Q&iouu 


-Cn/e Foote R 
Heivenc a 



1870 Embarcadero Rd. 

Palo Alto, CA 94303 

Pro duct: PostScript, Illustrator, Adobe 

Type Library 

Phone: (415)852-0271 

Allied Linotype Co. 


_ Digital Research Inc. _ 

60 Garden Court 

Monterey, CA 93942 

Product: GEM Desktop, GEM Draw 

Plus, GEM Paint 

Phone: (408)649-3896 


55 Cambridge Parkway 
Cambridge, MA 02142 
Product: Lotus I -2-3. Symphony. 
Freelance, Graphwriter 
Phone: (617)577-8500 


425 OserAve. 

Hauppauge, NY 11788 

Pro duct: Linotronic 100 and 300 

Phone: (516)434-2016 


2320 Marinship Way 
Sausalito.CA 94965 
Product: AutoCAD, AutoSketch 
Phone: (415)332-2344 


1215 Terra Bdla Ave 
Mountain View, CA 94043 


P.O.Box 15 
Boise, ID 83707 

Product: LaserJet Plus, LaserJet II, Scan- 

j*t 

Phone: (208)323-3869 


2650 San Tomas Expressway 
Santa Clara, CA 95051 
Product: DDL Language 
Phone: (408)986-9400 


_ Media Cybernetics _ 

8484 Georgia Ave., Ste. 200 
Silver Spring, MD 20910 
Product: Halo Desktop Publishing Editor 
Phone: (301)49S-330S 

Micro Publishing 

21150 Hawthorne BlvtL, Ste. 104 
Torrance, CA 90503 
Product: m icroPublishing Report 
Newsletter, Ventura Style Sheets 
Phone: (213)376-5724 


1889 Edition 


Manufacturers A-A 


Chapter 






7-6 


Planning the directory 


Planning the directory 

Directories are text-intensive documents with detailed list¬ 
ings of people, products, organizations, etc. Most directories 
are quick reference guides. They are scanned and skimmed to 
pinpoint information. As such, they should be designed to help 
the reader find facts quickly and efficiently. Since most direc¬ 
tories maintain the same format from page to page they are 
fast to format, especially if you pretag the files. 

The landscape page format of this chapter’s sample directory 
provides three spacious columns for text. Graphic techniques 
such as reverse type, ruling lines, and thumb tabs help the 
reader spot different sections, headings, and entries. For in¬ 
stance, the thumb tabs bleed to the edge of the page. Even 
with the book closed, you can tell where one section begins 
and another ends by the dark edges of the pages. The reverse 
type effect on the heading creates a visual contrast between 
major headings and minor entries and helps establish an 
hierarchical order of information. 

Here are some of the effects and techniques you will learn in 
the directory: 

• Live footers 

• Thumb tabs 

• Landscape layout 

• Reverse type (or shaded type) 

• Crop marks 

• Page numbers anywhere on the page 

This chapter’s sample contains two partial sections of a three- 
section directory. The first section is arranged alphabetically 
by manufacturer, the second by category. You will create each 
section as a separate chapter. At print time, you will use 
Ventura’s multi-chapter operation to combine them into a 
single publication. In actual practice, you may find it practical 
to create directories of up to 30-40 pages as a single chapter. 
For longer directories, we recommend breaking the individual 
sections into separate chapters. 



Line breaks versus paragraphs 


7-7 


Ventura prep 


t* If you have the Power disk 

Load and rename/relocate the files for this chapter. 

H Load the text file 7LIST.TXT from the C:\POWER sub¬ 
directory. Use File Type/Rename to save it as 
C:\TEMP\7DIRECT.TXT. 

H Load the style sheet 7LIST.STY from the C:\POWER sub¬ 
directory. Save it as C:\TEMP\7DIRECT.STY. 

H Save the chapter as C:\TEMP\7DIRECT.CHP. 



If you do 


not have the Power disk 


If you don’t own the Power disk, type in 7DIRECT.TXT 
from Appendix A. Save it as C:\TEMP\7DIRECT.TXT. 

Load &TBL2-L1.STY from C:\TYPESET. Modify it to 
match Figure 7-2. Add or change tags using the tag tables 
in Appendix B. Save it as C:\TEMP\7DIRECT.STY. 


Save the chapter as C:\TEMP\7DIRECT.CHP. 


WARNING: When you type in the directory file listings in ASCII format, remember to 
place two carriage returns between each paragraph. Otherwise, Ventura runs all the 
lines of text together. This warning applies to database files you create on your own. 


Text 


For this project, you will act as if you have already used a 
database program to generate and preformat the ASCII file 
7LIST.TXT. Although the text file contains tag names, those 
tags have not yet been defined in the style sheet, so all the text 
is displayed as Body Text. When you get to the style section, 
you will build the tags while learning some new graphic ef¬ 
fects. 


Place the text file 7DIRECT.TXT on the Page. 





7-8 Style 



Figure 7-2. If you do NOT have the Power disk, modify the right page of &TBL2-L1 .STY to match this illustration with 
Margins & Columns, then copy these settings to the facing page. 


Style 

In the style section you will learn a variety of useful techni¬ 
ques, including crop marks, live headers and footers, leader 
dots, and more. 

Chapter layout 

If you loaded the preformatted style sheet from the Power 
Disk, all the chapter settings should be intact. To be on the 
safe side, confirm both the page layout and the margins and 
columns. 

H Page Size & Orientation: Landscape 
Layout Sides: Double 

Start On: Right Side 








Draw crop marks 


7-9 


Margins & # of Columns: 3 

Columns Settings For: Right Page 

Top: 06,00 picas & points 
Bottom: 06,00 picas & points 
Left: 08,00 picas & points 
Right: 10,00 picas & points 
Column 1,2,and 3 width: 14,08 picas & 
points 

Gutter width: 02,00 picas & points 


Draw crop marks 

Although the size of the paper is 11x8.5 in., the paper will be 
trimmed by V 2 inch on all four sides to create a page size of 
10x7.5 in. Crop marks (also called trim marks ) show the “live 
area” — the area which remains after the paper is trimmed by 
the printer (Figure 7-3). 



You will create the crop marks in this project using the rec¬ 
tangle tool in Graphic mode. Then you will tell Ventura to 
repeat the graphic shapes on every page of the document. 
Before you draw the rectangle, plan the grid settings. Because 
you are trimming the paper V 2 inch (03,00 picas) on each side, 
you will make the grid settings 03,00 picas & points. This grid 
setting guarantees that the crop marks will be exactly 
03,00 picas from the edge of the Page. 






























H Reset the zero point to the upper left corner of the Page 
(click on the 0,0 square in the upper left corner of the 
screen). 

H Enable Graphic mode. Then select the rectangle tool from 
the Side-Bar. Now set the grid for the Page. 

^ Grid Settings Grid Snap: On 

Horizontal Spacing: 03,00 picas & points 
Vertical Spacing: 03,00 picas & points 

H Change to Normal or Enlarged View to draw the crop 
marks. 

H Starting at position 0,0 picas on the ruler, use the rectangle 
tool to draw a 03,00 by 03,00 pica shape. 

The grid settings force the rectangle into position (Figure 7-4). 



Figure 7-4. 


*+NOTE: If you draw the rectangle and the grid doesn’t take 
effect, just set the grid again while the rectangle tool is high¬ 
lighted. 

Now change the line attributes. 

H Line Thickness: Thin 

Attributes End Styles: (Beginning and End) Square 

Defaults: Save To 

















Draw crop marks 


7-11 


M Fill Color: White 

Attributes Pattern: Hollow 

Result: Transparent 
Defaults; Save lb 

** NOTE: You may have to experiment a few times before you 
get the hang of drawing shapes with a mouse. Keep trying until 
you master this new skill. 

Repeat the above steps to place crop marks at the other three 
corners. Your finished page should look like Figure 7-5: 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Figure 7-5. 


Now that you’ve completed the crop marks for this page, you 
will make them repeat on every page of the directory 

II Choose Select All from the Graphic menu (or press Ctrl-Q) 
to select all the line shapes. 

II Select Show On All Pages from the Graphic menu. 

*+NOTE: You can also use Ventura’s built-in crop mark feature 
from the To Print dialog box instead of drawing marks on the 
page. 

Although Ventura has a crop mark feature in the To Print 
dialog box, we taught you to draw your own crop marks as an 
alternate technique. Ventura’s automatic crop marks are 
visible only on the printed page. They cannot be seen on the 




























7-12 


Style 


screen, since they are not selected until print time. By con¬ 
trast, if you draw the crop marks you can see them on the 
screen, which helps when you visualize the page design. To get 
Ventura’s generated crop marks for this size directory you 
would have to reduce the size of the Page to 10x7.5 in. But 
reducing the size of the Page makes it harder to accomplish 
bleed effects like the thumb tabs in this chapter. 

In general, Ventura’s built-in crop marks are most useful 
when working with the Paper Type & Dimension: Half option 
from the Page Size & Layout dialog box, or for those who have 
a printer that creates pages larger than 8.5x11 in. In most 
other cases, we recommend drawing the crop marks yourself. 

Build the footer 

Headers and footers are vital to a good reference document. 
They help readers zero in on the facts. For instance, a phone 
book’s header shows the first and last names on the page. A 
dictionary’s header tells the first and last word on the page. 
Headers and footers that change from page to page are called 
live headers and live footers. 

For this exercise, you will build a live footer that shows the 
first and last entries on each page. The commands to ac¬ 
complish this effect are shown in Figure 7-6: 



Figure 7-6. 





Build the footer 


7-13 


Here are the steps for creating a live footer. 

H Select Headers & Footers. Select Define: Right Page Footer, 
Usage: On. 

11 Move to the Left line and type: 1989 Edition 

li Move to the Center line and select Inserts: 1st Match. 
Delete the words “tag name” between the brackets (do not 
delete any of the brackets) and replace them with: Head- 
Section 

H Next, use the right arrow key to move past the right brack¬ 
et. Press the space bar to enter a space following the right 
bracket. 

You have just given the 1st Match instruction. Ventura will 
look on every page and find the first paragraph tagged as 
HeadSection. It will display this paragraph in the footer. If it 
gets to a page and doesn’t find a new HeadSection tag, it will 
use the one from a previous page. 

li Select Insert: 1st Match again. Delete the words “tag name” 
and replace them with: Headl 

This command tells Ventura to display the first occurrence of 
the Headl tag in the center of the footer. 

si Move past the right bracket and select Inserts: Text Attr. 
Delete the letter “D” between the brackets and replace it 
with: 196 

You just told Ventura to print an en dash (a dash the size of 
the letter n in the current font). The decimal code for an en 
dash is 196. 

$$ Move past the right bracket and select Inserts: Last Match. 
Delete the words “tag name” and replace them with: Headl 

This copies the last occurrence of Headl to the center footer. 

!i Move to the Right line and type: Chapter followed by a 
space. 

^ Choose Inserts: Chapter #. 

Now you will copy these settings to the left page and modify 
them slightly. 




7-14 


Style 


li Choose Inserts: Copy to Facing Page to copy the footer 
settings to the left page. 

M Select Define: Left Page Footer, Usage: On. Move to the 
Right line, press Esc to clear the line, and type: Desktop 
Publishing Directory and click OK. 

When you are finished, your page should look similar to 
Figure 7-7. 



Change the footer frame margins 

When the paper is trimmed, it will later lose V 2 in. from each 
side. If you trimmed the page as it is, the footer text might get 
clipped off (Figure 7-8). 

To raise the footer into the live area of the Page, you will 
change the top margin of the footer frame. 

H Enable Frame mode and select the footer frame. 

I! Margins & Top: 01,00 picas & points 

Columns 







Change the footer frame margins 


7-15 



Notice that the right and left margins of the footer are equal 
to the Page margins (Figure 7-9). You raised the footer text on 
the page by decreasing the top margin from 02,04 picas & 
points to 01,00 picas & points. 



Figure 7-9. 


^ TIP: You can also change the position of headers and footers 
by changing the Above Spacing value in the Z_HEADER or 
Z_FOOTER tag (Spacing, Paragraph menu). 

Spacing attributes are stored with the style sheet and can be 
reused if it is easier. Document attributes, such as footer 
margins, are stored with the chapter. They cannot be reused 










































7-16 


Style 


unless you construct a chapter template (as described in 
Chapter Six). Sometimes, however, you cannot achieve the 
effect you want without changing the header or footer mar¬ 
gins, especially if you have large trim margins — as is the case 
with this document. 


Building new tags 

Now that you’ve completed the changes to the Page, you are 
ready to format the tags. Start with the Body Text tag, then 
proceed through the document paragraph by paragraph. 


Verify the Body Text tag 


^ Enable Paragraph mode. 

Select the paragraph “1870 Embarcadero Rd.” at the top of 
the page and check that the Body Text tag matches these 
settings: 


Font 


H Alignment 


Face: Times 
Style: Normal 
Color: Black 
Size: 010.0 points 

Horz. Alignment: Justified 
Overall Width: Column-Wide 


II Spacing Inter-Line: 12.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: When Not At Column Top 


Build the HeadSection tag 

The HeadSection tag uses a Ruling Line Above to create the 
reverse type effect. Later, in the picture section, we will show 
you how to achieve the same effect by placing white text in a 
solid black frame. 

*+NOTE: Certain printers may not be able to print out white text 
on a black background You can, however, achieve a similar 
effect using black text over a gray patterned rule (or frame). 
We will show you how to create both effects. 

il Select the first paragraph “Manufacturers.” 




Build the HeadSection tag 


7-17 


The tag name, HeadSection, appears in the Current Selection 
Box (Figure 7-10). Now change its font. 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Erane Paragraph Graphic Options 



11 C:\1EMP\7DIRECT.CHP (7D1RECT.S1V) jilil lll Bl lglllilliiil 




iCTiWHWBE 

•At 

jAdobf, Incf 
*1870 EmUradero Rd.J 
fib AHo, CA *3031 
Product 1 

f wlScripi, Illustrate, Adobe Typt Librarfl; 
fbc'.t.l 

jdl5) 8S2-02711 
Allied Linotype Col 
}1250s«r A*tJ 
peuppiuje, NT 117891 
product 1 

tinctronx 100 end 3001 
^bone: 1 
?516l 43.-2C161 


Sf 

SewleltPidardl 
J>.0 RoxISj 
Soist, ID 837071 
Product I 

jet Plus, Usenet 0, Scinjet IF 
Phone: I 
J208) 323-386SIF 

It 

Jrigen f 

£650 Sin Tonus Express wiyj 
jSanti Gin, CA 350511 
product 1 
£>DL Language! 

Ehone t 


E 


Figure 7-10. 


i§ Font Style: Bold 

Color: White 
Size: 024.0 points 

Because you just made the text white, it is invisible against 
the white screen. But as soon as you drop a black background 
behind it, the text will become visible again. 

§1 Alignment Horz. Alignment: Center 

Overall Width: Frame-Wide 

Frame-wide alignment forces the text to extend across all 

Below: 24.00 fractional pts 
Inter-Line: 24.00 fractional pts 
Add in Above: Always 

Page Break: Before/Until Right 

This Page Break selection places a page break before every 
HeadSection tag. As a result, every section of the directory 
starts on a separate right-hand page. 


three columns. 
11 Spacing 

H Breaks 


*+NOTE: If you want the HeadSection tag to start on either a new 
right or a new left page, choose Page Break: Before instead of 
Before/Until Right 
























7-18 


Style 


Create reverse type 

Now you will create the reverse type effect with Ruling Line 
Above. The strategy behind this effect is simple: You make the 
type white and drop a black ruling line on top of it. 

*+NOTE: If your printer is incapable of reverse type, follow the 
substitute procedures explained in the next section. 

You will start by giving Rule 1 a height larger than the type. 
In this example, HeadSection is 24.00 fractional pts and Rule 
1 is 36.00 fractional pts. If you did nothing else, the rule would 
appear above the white type. You can, however, shift the rule 
downwards, by entering a negative value for the Space Below 
Rule 3. If you enter a positive value, Ventura adds space below 
the rule. If you enter a negative value, Ventura subtracts 
space so the rule shifts downwards. 

^ TIP: Although it is called Space Below Rule 3, this measure¬ 
ment refers to the space below the last rule, whether that last 
rule is the first, second, or third. 

To calculate how many points to shift the rule down, use the 
following formula: 

• Add the ruling line height and the font size 

• Divide the sum by two 

This formula vertically centers the text within the rule. 

Here’s the simple math for finding the Space Below Rule 3 in 
our example above: 

• 36 + 24 = 60 (fractional pts) 

• 60 + 2 = 30 (fractional pts) 

You would, therefore, make the Space Below Rule 3 equal to 
negative 30.00 fractional pts to center the type exactly in the 
middle of the rule. The formula, however, is only a starting 
point. In many cases, you will find it necessary to adjust the 
Space Below Rule 3 to create a more pleasing visual effect. For 
instance, in this example, you will use 34.00 fractional pts 
instead of 30.00 for the Space Below Rule 3. This places the 
text slightly above the center of the rule. 




If you cannot print reverse type 


7-19 


H Select Ruling Line Above. Choose Width: Frame. Give Rule 
1 a height of 36.00 fractional pts. Make the Space Below 
Rule 3: 34.00 fractional pts. Choose the minus sign to shift 
the rule downwards (Figure 7-11). 


"HeadSection" RULING LINES ABODE 


Width: 
Color: 
Pattern: 
Dashes: 

Space Above Rule 1: 

Height of Rule 1: 
Space Below Rule 1: 

Height of Rule 2: 
Space Below Rule 2: 
Height of Rule 3: 

Space Below Rule 3: 
Overall Height: 


Frane 

Black 

Solid 

Off 

oe.ee 

36.ee 

ee.ee 

ee.ee 

ee.ee 

ee.ee 



m 


36.ee 


Custon Indent: 00.00 { 

Custon Width: (X).00 

Dash Width: 00.00 
Dash Spacing: 00.00 fractional pts 


34.ee rn i 
e 2 .ee 


0K |v 


|Cancel | 


Figure 7-11. 


If you cannot print reverse type 

If your printer is incapable of reverse type, create black text 
on a gray rule instead. Use the same steps as above, but 
change the font color to Black and make the Ruling Line 
Above a gray pattern. For instance you would select: 

^ Font Style: Bold 

Color: Black 
Size: 024.0 points 

H Select Ruling Line Above. Choose Width: Frame, Color: 
Black, Pattern: 3. Make the height of Rule 1:36.00 fraction¬ 
al pts and the Space Below Rule 3: (minus) 34.00 fractional 
pts (Figure 7-12). 






7-20 


Style 


"HeadSection" RULING LINES ABOVE 



ED 

Width: 

Frane 



— nr 


Color: 

Black 





Pattern: 

3 





Dashes: 

Off 










36.00 

Space Above Rule 1 : 

00.00 





Height of Rule 1 : 

36.00 

Custort Indent: 

00,00 1 H! 

- j 

Space Below Rule 1 : 

00.00 

Custon Width: 

00.00 


Height of Rule 2: 

00.00 





Space Below Rule 2: 

00.00 

Dash Width: 

00.00 


Height of Rule 3: 

00.00 

Dash Spacing: 

00.00 fractional ptsl 

Space Below Rule 3: 

34.00 

□ D 




Overall Height: 

02.00 









mm 

Cancel| 


Figure 7-12. Without special add-on cards, printers such as the 
Hewlett-Packard LaserJet Series II cannot printer reverse type, but they 
can produce black text on a gray background. 


Change the Headl tag 

The next paragraph to tag is Headl. You will use the method 
described above to create reverse type. Because the file was 
pretagged, every Headl paragraph will be effected by the 
changes you make in the following step. 

i§ Select the paragraph “A” that was pretagged as Headl. 

il Font Style: Bold 

Color: White 
Size: 018.0 points 

li Alignment Horz. Alignment: Left 

In/Outdent Width: 00,06 picas & points 

il Spacing Above: 18.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 18.00 fractional pts 

To prevent Ventura from isolating the Headl tag at the top or 
bottom of a page or column, you will choose Keep With Next: 
Yes from the Breaks dialog box. 

il Breaks Keep With Next: Yes 










Create the ruling line above 


7-21 


"Headl" BREAKS 
Page Break: 

Column Break: 
Line Break: 
Next V Position: 

Allow Within: 
Keep With Next: 


0 


m 1 Before 1 [ After | | Before & After 


Before/Until Left [ [ Before/Until Right 


Before After Before 8 After 


| No | I After | | Before 8 After | 

| Beside Last Line of Prev. Para 

fitol 




Cancel | 


Create the ruling line above 

Now you will create a black ruling line above the Headl tag 
and move it down over the white type. This time you will make 
the rule a custom width so it is confined to a smaller space 
within the column. 

^ Select Ruling Line Above. Choose Width: Custom. Give 
Rule 1 a height of 24.00 fractional pts. Make the Space 
Below Rule 3 (minus) 24.00 fractional pts. Then make the 
Custom Width 24.00 fractional pts. 


"Headl” RULING LINES ABODE 


Width: 

Custom 


Color: 

Black 


Pattern: 

Solid 


Dashes 

Off 


Space Above Rule 1: 

00.00 


Height of Rule 1: 

24.00 

Custom Indent: 

Space Below Rule 1: 

00.00 

Custom Width: 

Height of Rule 2: 

00.00 


Space Below Rule 2: 

00.00 

Dash Width: 

Height of Rule 3: 

00.00 

Dash Spacing: 

Space Below Rule 3: 

24.00 

SB 

Overall Height: 

00.00 



m 


36. B0 


00.00 

24.001 


GO.tttt 

00,00 


IS 


fractional pts 


|Cancel | 







7-22 


Style 


*+NOTE: The centering formula would indicate a negative space 
of 21 fractional pts (18 + 24 = 42. 42 + 2 = 21). We have 
increased the Space Below Rule 3 setting by 03.00 fractional 
pts to raise the text slightly above the center line of the rule. 

If you cannot print reverse type 

To make black text on a gray rule, change the font color to 

Black and the rule Pattern to 3. 

Change the Head2 tag 

Now you will change the Head2 tag. 

^ Select the paragraph “Adobe, Inc.” 

Style: Bold 

Horz. Alignment: Center 

Above: 12.00 fractional pts 
Below 12.00 fractional pts 
Inter- Line: 14.00 fractional pts 

The space below separates the title from the entries below. 

H Breaks Keep With Next: Yes 

Keep With Next prevents the title from being isolated at the 

top or bottom of a column or page. 

H Select Ruling Line Above. Choose Width: Column. Give 
Rule 1 a height of 02.00 fractional pts. Make the Space 
Below Rule 1 02.00 fractional pts (Figure 7-13). 

M Select Ruling Line Below. Choose Width: Column. Make the 
Space Above Rule 1 02.00 fractional pts, then give Rule 1 a 
height of 00.50 fractional pts (Figure 7-14). 

Change the Head3 tag 

^ Select the paragraph “Product.” 

11 Font 

H Alignment 

P Breaks 


Style: Bold 

Horz. Alignment: Left 
Keep With Next: Yes 


II Font 
ii Alignment 
II Spacing 




Change the ItalKWN tag 


7-23 


”Head2" RULING LINES ABOUE 




□ 

Width: 

Colunn 





Color: 

Black 





Pattern: 

Solid 





Dashes: 

Off 










36.00 

Space Above Rule 1: 

00.ee 





Height of Rule 1: 

02.BB 

Custon Indent: 

00.00 

i <• 11 

- ! | 

Space Below Rule 1: 

02 . eel 

Custon Width: 

TO .00 



Height of Rule 2: 

oo.ee 





Space Below Rule 2: 

0 e.ee 

Dash Width: 

00.00 



Height of Rule 3: 

00.00 

Dash Spacing: 

TO . 00 

fractional ptsl 

Space Below Rule 3: 

00.00 

BE] 




Overall Height: 

04.01 








■ 

IP 

Cancel| 


Figure 7-13. 


”Head2'' RULING LINES BELOW 




0 

Width: 

Colunn 





Color: 

Black 





Pattern: 

Solid 





Dashes: 

Off 










36.00 

Space Above Rule 1: 

02.ee 





Height of Rule 1: 

00.58] 

Custon Indent: 

TO. 00 

<• ! 1 

- { 

Space Below Rule 1: 

oo.ee 

Custon Width: 

TO. 00 



Height of Rule 2: 

00.ee 





Space Below Rule 2: 

ee.ee 

Dash Width: 

TO. 00 



Height of Rule 3: 

0o.ee 

Dash Spacing: 

00,00 

fractional ptsl 

Space Below Rule 3: 

0o.ee 

BE] 




Overall Height: 

02.51 








m 


Cancel | 


Figure 7-14. 


The Breaks dialog box accomplishes two things. Line Break 
Before allows another tag to reside on the same line. Keep 
With Next: Yes keeps the listing from being separated from 
the following tag. 


Change the ItalKWN tag 

H Select the paragraph “PostScript, Illustrator, Adobe Type 
Library.” 

The tag name ItalKWN (short for Italics Keep With Next) 
appears in the Current Selection Box. 












7-24 


Style 


H Font Style: N-Italic 

H Alignment Horz. Alignment: Left 

In/Outdent Width: 00,06 picas & points 
Relative Indent: On 

Relative Indent: On positions the tag next to the previous 
paragraph. 

^ Breaks Line Break: After 

Keep With Next: Yes 

Line Break: After allows the ItalKWN tag to reside on the 
same line as the previous tag. 


Change the ItalSeparate tag 

The next tag encountered is ItalSeparate. It is identical to the 
ItalKWN tag, except that Keep with Next is set to No in the 
Breaks menu. Choosing No permits Ventura to split the text 


to a new column after the tag. 

11 Select the paragraph “(415) 852-0271.” 

Font 

Style: N-Italic 

11 Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: Left 

In/Outdent Width: 00,06 picas & points 
Relative Indent: On 

11 Breaks 

Line Break: After 

Keep With Next: No 



Stopping point 


Here’s the stopping point for the chapter. Take a moment to 
save your work and relax. You should also congratulate your¬ 
self for all the progress you are making. Before you continue, 
check to make sure your document matches Figure 7-15. 



Change the ItalSeparate tag 


7-25 


| Manufacturers 1 

□ 

Product: Model 730 Scanmr 

Phone: (415)965.7900 

D 

Adobe, Inc 


Lotu* Development Carp. 

1S70 Hmbarcodoto Pd. 

dOOeidoe Court 

S3 Cambridge Pathway 

Preduct: rcxiScrtpt. Itkum tor. Adobe 
Type Library 

Phono: (413)832-0271 

Monterey, CA 93942 

Product: OEM Desktop. GEM Dren* 

Flu. GEM FcAiti 

Phone: (408) 649-3496 

Product: Loan 1-24. Symphony. 

Prmhutct, Grapkwrittr 

Phone: (62 7) 377-8500 

Allied Linotype Co. 

m 

Ej 


Hottppeopo, NY 11788 

Howldt-Pochord 

Media Cyb emetic* 

Product Linobomc 200 and 300 

Phone: (516)4344016 

PX>. Box 13 

•4*4 Oeorgi* Are., Mo. 200 

Moor Spring. MD 20910 

Aut«doA,he. 

Product: LaserJet Pitts, LaserJet IT, Scan- 

Product: Halo Desktop rubksMnf Edlsyr 
Phene: (301)493-3303 

2320 Martmhip Way 

J*t 

(tM) 


MlcroPubliahlng 

Product: AutoCAD, Am toSJoet^h 

Phone: (415) 332-2344 

n 

21130 Hawthorne BNd., Me. 104 
Tonaaoo.CA 90303 

□ 

Imogen 

Product mkcroPubltsking Report 


Phene: (213) 376-5724 

Detecopy Corp. 

Seat* CJoto, CA 95031^ 


1213 Tom BoD* An 

Mountain View, CA 94043 

Product: DDLLtmgttafs 

Phone: (408)986-9400 



imUMn ManJeotvere A-A Chapter 1 


Figure 7-15. Your document should look similar to this illustration at this stage of the project. 


If you don’t have time to continue, quit Ventura and come back 
later. Simply open the chapter C:\TEMP\7DIRECT.CHP and 
jump right into the pictures section. 

You are now ready to proceed with the pictures section. If you 
plan to continue without a break, proceed directly to the next 
section. 


Pictures 


Now that you have finished the style section, you are ready to 
make the thumb tabs. As explained earlier, thumb tabs make 
it easier to find different sections of a directory. You will create 
the thumb tabs with repeating frames. As the name implies, a 
repeating frame shows up on every page of the document. 
Before you draw the thumb tabs you must do two things: 

1. Determine how high the thumb tab should be. 

For the three-section directory, the height of each thumb tab 
will be V 3 of the total column height, or 13,00 picas & points 
(Figure 7-16). 









7-26 


Pictures 



Figure 7-16. 


2 . Calculate how wide the thumb tab should be. 

You will make the thumb tab wider than necessary, so it will 
bleed off the edge of the paper. Since the margin from the live 
area to the trim edge is 03,00 picas & points, you could make 
the thumb tab 04,00 or 05,00 picas & points — anything larger 
than 03,00 picas & points will extend past the trim area. It is 
easier to position if you use a six-pica frame. Then you can line 
it up with the top column guide and the edge of the paper for 
perfect alignment. 

Create the thumb tab frame 

^ Enable Frame mode. Select Add New Frame from the Side- 
Bar. 

11 Make sure the zero point is reset to the upper left corner of 
the Page. (Click the 0,0 square at the upper left corner of 
the Page.) 

H Starting at position 60 picas on the horizontal ruler and 6 
picas on the vertical ruler, draw a thumb tab frame 06,00 
picas wide by 13,00 picas high. You may want to change to 
Normal View to draw the frame (Figure 7-17). 






























































Add a frame margin 


7-27 



Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


c \TEMP\7DIRECT.CHP (7D1RECT.STV) illllllllilBIll 


■ 


r 



ufadurers! 


Ifodil 730 Sannerf 
is} SS&TSOOf 


jita1R*s«ireh 


l 93S42I 

3EN Dusllop, G&l Dnw 
fyitf 

to ms 89 st 


2 


UtusDtytWfmtuI Cfp.l 


■55 CjraUidje PukvayJ 
idmWdje, KA 02W2I 
■Pr*du?t f uhis 1-2-3, Sfmphmy, 
\Fmkntt, OnpMmkrf 
iPhmt: I led) S77-SS30f 


Figure 7-17. 


Verify the position and size of the frame with the Sizing & 
Scaling dialog box. 


SIZING g SCALING 
Flow Text Around: On 


0 


Upper Left X: 60,0O| B[Z] NPP er Left V: 06,W Hltl 
Frane Width: 06,00 Frane Hei^it: 13,00 

Horiz. Padding: 00,00 Uert. Padding: 00,00 picas g points 


Picture Scaling: I Fit in Franc | i By Scale Factors 


Aspect Ratio: j Haintained | I Bistwted i 


X Crop Offset: 00,80 = * ~ j j - j V Crop Offset: 00 J® I <•!i - 
Scale Width: 00,00 Scale Heiglit: 00,00 


rm ffancel 


Add a frame margin 

By adding a right margin inside the thumb tab frame, you will 
center the text inside the three-pica area that remains after 
trimming. Without the right margin, the text would be 
centered inside the full six-pica width — and part of it would 
get trimmed off by the printer. 

I! With the thumb tab frame still highlighted, select Margins 
& Columns. Make the right margin 03,00 picas & points. 












































7-28 


Pictures 



Add a page number to the thumb tab frame 

To make the vertical text within the frame, you will use line 
breaks as spacers after each letter in the word. 

^ Enable Text mode and type within the thumb tab frame: 

[Ctrl-Enter] 

[Ctrl-Enter] 

[Ctrl- Enter] 

M[Ctrl-Enter] 
f [Ctrl-Enter] 
g[Ctrl-Enter] 
s [Ctrl-Enter] 

[Ctrl-Enter] 

Now you will insert a page number inside the thumb tab 
frame with the Ins Special Item option (Edit menu). With the 
text cursor still at the bottom of the thumb tab: 

M Select Ins Special Item from the Edit menu (or press the 
keyboard shortcut Ctrl-C). 

H Choose Reference or press the F6 key. 

H When asked if you wish to insert a reference to the current 
page or chapter number, choose Page #. The number 1, 
preceded by a degree symbol appears in the thumb tab 
frame. 









Change the frame’s fill pattern 


7-29 


By inserting a page number reference in the frame, Ventura 
displays the current page number in the thumb tab. If you 
turn on Show Tabs & Returns (Options menu) you can see the 
Reference marker (a degree symbol) at the bottom of the 
frame. The word “Reference” is displayed in the Current 
Selection Box (Figure 7-18). 



rr 

Normal 

LI 

1*24 

■ 


■ 

Snell 

■ 

Superscript 

■ 

Subscript 

■ 

Underline 

■ 

Double Undrln 

H 

Strike-thru 

n 

Ovtrscore 

Li 

upper Case 

E 


azEnnj 


jelopmentCorp.T 


Figure 7-18. 


*+NOTE: Like other text attributes, you can cut, copy and paste 
a page reference using Ventura’s editing tools. 

Now you will tag the thumb tab text to make it white. 

H Enable Paragraph mode. Select the letters “Mfgs” and tag 
them as ThumbTab. 

The white text is invisible against the screen until you change 
the frame background. 

Change the frame’s fill pattern 

Now you will change the frame’s fill pattern to solid black. 

^ Enable Frame mode and select the thumb tab frame. 

11 Select Frame Background from the Frame menu. Choose 
Color: Black and Pattern: Solid. 

















7-30 


Pictures 


FRAME BACKGROUND |T| 

Color: Black 
Pattern: Solid 

Result: 



mm [ Cancel | 


*+NOTE: If you cannot print white text on solid black; make the 
text color black and the frame background pattern gray. 

The thumb tab should look like Figure 7-19: 


Desk File Hit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Figure 7-19. The completed thumb tab. 


Copy the thumb tab frame 

Now you will make a copy of the frame to place on the second 
page of the directory. 

H With the thumb tab frame still selected, copy it into the 
clipboard (press Shift-Del). 



























Change the thumb tab frame to a repeating frame 


7-31 


Be sure to make this copy before taking the next step. You will 
need to paste in this frame on page two. 

Change the thumb tab frame to a repeating frame 

To make the thumb tab repeat on every right page, turn it into 
a repeating frame. 

H While the thumb tab frame is still selected, select Repeat¬ 
ing Frame from the Frame menu. Choose For All Pages: 
Right, On Current Page: Show This Repeating Frame. 


REPEATING FRAME 


7 


For All Pages: 
On Current Page: 


Off Left 


Left 8 Right 


Show This Repeating Frame 


Hide This Repeating Frame 


Show All Hidden Frames 



Cancel 


*+NOTE: You cannot copy, delete, or change a repeating frame. 
To change a repeating frame, first return it to normal, then 
make the changes, then make it a repeating frame again. 

Create a thumb tab for the left page 

Thumb tabs gain part of their effectiveness because they sit 
back-to-back on both sides of a page. This creates a black area 
that can easily be seen along the edge of the document. To 
mirror the thumb tab from the first page, you will paste the 
copy onto page two, then move it into its new position. 

II Press PgDn to go to page two. 

H Press the Ins key or select Paste from the Edit menu. 

The thumb tab frame will appear in the same position it had 




7-32 


Pictures 


on the first page. Now move it to the left page margin, as 
shown in Figure 7—20. 



Figure 7-20. 

Use Sizing & Scaling to position the frame accurately. Other¬ 
wise, the two frames may not line up back-to-back. 

i! Select Sizing & Scaling. Make the Upper Left X: (+) 00,00 
picas & points and the Upper Left Y: (+) 06,00 picas & 
points. 


SIZING R SCALING 


0 

Flow Text Around: 

On 


Upper Left X: 

00,00 QH 

Upper Left V: 06,00 D FI 

Frame Width: 

06,06 

Frarte Height: 13,00 

Horiz. Padding: 

00,08 

Uert. Padding: 00,00 picas & points 

Picture Scaling: 

| Fit in Fret* 1 

1 By Scale Factors j 




Aspect Ratio: 

1 Haintained j | 

Distorted i 

i X Crop Offset: 

00,1X1 FIR 

V Crop Offset: $1,00 | * ij - ! 

Scale Width: 

00,(X) 

Scale Height: 00,00 



HOBb Cancel 


















































Verify frame margins 


7-33 


Verify frame margins 

Check the frame margins so the text is properly centered 
within the tab. (The margins should be the mirror opposites of 
the margins for the right page.) 

^ Margins & Left: 03,00 picas & points 

Columns Right: 00,00 picas & points 

Make the left page thumb tab a repeating frame 

As you did on page one, make the left page thumb tab a 
repeating frame. 

^ Repeating 
Frames 


Create a chapter template 

Now that you’ve formatted the first section of the directory, 
you can use it to create a blank template. Normally we would 
teach this technique in the chapter section. However, we want 
you to practice starting with a template. As you will see, a 
template speeds production by eliminating the need to rebuild 
headers and footers. 

Save your chapter with its existing name before turning it into 
a template. 

^ Press Ctrl-S. 

Now you will remove the text file from the Page and save the 
chapter under a new name to make a copy, which you will turn 
into a template. 

Remove the text file 

^ Enable Frame mode. Select the Page. 

II Select Remove Text/File from the Edit menu. Choose 
Remove from: List of Files. 


For All Pages: Left 

On Current Page: Show This Repeating 
Frame 




7-34 


Pictures 


REMOVE FILE |7] 

File Mane: 7DIRECT .TXT 
Remove from: List of Files 



Ventura removes the text file 7DIRECT.TXT from the Assign¬ 
ment List. 

H Select Save As from the File menu. Save the chapter as 
C:\TEMP\DIRPLATE.CHP. 

You just made a template — an “empty” chapter. Now you are 
ready to use it to create the next section of the directory. 

*+NOTE: If you had selected Save As while the text file 
7DIRECT.TXT was still on the Page, Ventura would have 
automatically renamed and relocated the text file to 
DIRPLATE.TXT 

Load text into the template 

Load the text for the second section. Since the text is 
pretagged and all the tag definitions are present in the style 
sheet, the document is formatted as soon as you load it. 

11 Make sure the Page is selected. 

H Load and place the text file 7CATGORY.TXT from the 
C:\POWER subdirectory. 

*+NOTE: If you don’t have the Power disk, remember that you 
will have to create this file in advance. 


The text flows onto the Page. 





Rename the text 


7-35 


Rename the text 

H While the Page is still highlighted, select File Type/Rename 
from the Edit menu. Rename the text file as 
C:\TEMP\7DIRECT2.TXT. 

H Use Save As to save the new chapter as 

C:\TEMP\7DIRECT2.CHP. 

By saving under a new name, you preserve the template in its 
original form. The empty template can be used over and over 
again to create additional directory sections. 

Change the thumb tab 

The thumb tab for the second section of the directory will be 
shifted down so it aligns with the bottom edge of the first tab. 

To make a copy of the original thumb tab, select the frame and 
change it from a repeating frame to a normal frame (remem¬ 
ber, you cannot copy a repeating frame). 

^ Select the thumb tab frame. Select Repeating Frame from 
the Frame menu. Choose For All Pages: Off. 



Now you are ready to copy the frame. 

WARNING: Do not delete the original frame until you place the copy. You will use the 
original as a guide to line up the second thumb tab. 













7-36 


Pictures 


H Select Copy from the Edit menu (or press Shift-Del). 

Now you will paste a copy on top of the original. 

H Press the Ins key or select Paste Frame from the Edit 
menu. 

Move the frame into place below the first thumb tab, so the 
top edge aligns with the bottom edge of the original (Figure 
7-21). 



Figure 7-21. 

Once the frame is properly placed, delete the original. 

^ Select the top frame and press Del. 

M Select Repeating Frame from the Frame menu. Choose For 
All Page: Right and On Current Page: Show This Repeating 
Frame. Then click OK. 

Now you will change the text in the frame to read “Products.” 

1§ Enable Text mode. Delete the text but do not delete the page 
reference symbol (°) from the frame. 

Is Now type: 































Make a second thumb tab on page two 


7-37 


[Ctrl-Enter] 

P [Ctrl-Enter] 
r [Ctrl- Enter] 
o [Ctrl-Enter] 
d[Ctrl-Enter] 
u [Ctrl-Enter] 
c [Ctrl-Enter] 
t [Ctrl-Enter] 
s [Ctrl-Enter] 

[Ctrl-enter] 

*+NOTE: If you delete the page number by mistake, reinsert 
another page reference. Select Ins Special Item (Edit menu). 
Choose Reference then Page # (See the section ‘‘Add a page 
number to the left thumb tab frame” in this chapter). 

Make a second thumb tab on page two 

Go to the next page and repeat the previous instructions to 
create a second thumb tab. 

2. Select the left thumb tab frame. 

3. Make it a non-repeating frame. 

4 . Copy it to temporary memory. 

5. Paste a copy on top of the original. 

6. Move the new frame into place below the first thumb tab, so 
the top edge aligns with the bottom edge of the original. 

7 . Delete the original once the frame is properly placed. 

8. Make it a repeating frame again. 

9 . Change the text in the frame to read “Products” and leave 
the page reference as is. 

When you are finished your screen should look like Figure 
7-22 for page two. 




7-38 


Chapter 



Figure 7-22. Page two of the completed directory. 


Because of space limitations, we will not show you how to 
complete the third section of the directory. You would, how¬ 
ever, use the identical steps and methods. 

Chapter 

In this section, you will renumber the chapters, place both 
sections into a publication and print the publication. 

Update the page counter 

You will now use the Update Counters option to renumber the 
second chapter to start on page three. (In this teaching ex¬ 
ample, the first chapter was only two pages long. Normally, it 
would be much longer. Nevertheless, the principles are the 
same.) Ventura can link the page numbers across chapters in 
a publication. Once you make a publication in the Multi- 
Chapter dialog box (Options menu) you will renumber the 
chapters so that the second chapter starts on the next page 
number after the previous chapter. 

Press Home to go to page one of the chapter 
7DIRECT2.CHP. 

II Select Update Counters from the Chapter menu. Choose 
i Which Counter: This Page, Update Method: Previous Num¬ 

ber + 1, Number Format: 1,2. Then click OK. 



























Create a new publication 


l — 6V 



You will not actually see the new page numbers until you 
perform the renumber operation in the Multi-Chapter dialog 
box. 

Since the directory is composed of two chapters, you can use 
Ventura’s Multi-Chapter function to print both at once. First 
you will put both chapters into a publication. Then you will 
renumber the chapters. Finally, you will use the Print option 
from the Multi-Chapter dialog box to print both chapters with 
a single command. Although you are using only two chapters 
in our example, you can use this same technique to print 
many chapters at once. 

li Select Multi-Chapter from the Options menu. 

^ NOTE: If you have made any changes, Ventura asks if you 
want to Save or Abandon. Choose Save. 

Create a new publication 

Select New from the Multi-Chapter dialog box. 

Add the two chapter names from this project to the publica¬ 
tion. 

& Select Add Chapter. Select C:\TEMP\7DIRECT.CHP from the 
Item Selector. 

The chapter appears at the top of the Multi-Chapter dialog 
box. 









7 - 4U 


Chapter 


Now add the next chapter. 

P Select Add Chapter again. Select C:\TEMP\7DIRECT2.CHP 
from the Item Selector. 

Ventura returns you to the dialog box and displays the two 
chapter names (Figure 7-23). 


MULTI-CHAPTER OPERATIONS [7] 


Ill I-1! : C:\POWER\UNTITLED.PUB -• = 



D 

C:\TEMP\7DIRECT.CHP 

C:\TEMP\7DIRECT2.CHP 


uMmMsm 

| 



Save... 

Save As... 

I 



Add Chapter >. 

Remove Chap 

Q 



,, 

Hake TOC,,. 
Hake Index,,, 


Raamher... 

Copy AIL,, 

Figure 7-23. 

Now you are ready to save the chapters as a publication. 

II Select Save As from the Multi-Chapter dialog box. If neces¬ 
sary, use the Backup button to locate the C:\TEMP sub¬ 
directory. Then save the publication as C:\TEMP\DIREC- 
TOR.PUB. 


ITEM SELECTOR 
Directory: C:\TEMP\*.PUB. 



Selection: DIRECTOR.PUB| 

PfiRTJNE.PUB 

D 

.—‘— 

1 

D 

1^^* 0K A 


_ \ 

Cancel 





















Create a new publication 


7-41 


The publication name appears in the Multi-Chapter menu 
bar. Once the publication is created, you can renumber it. 

*+NOTE: If a single chapter is highlighted in the list, Ventura will 
not be able to perform the renumber operation. 

i§ Choose Renumber from the Multi-Chapter dialog box. 

^ When asked if you want to renumber chapters, pages, 
tables, and figures across the entire publication, choose 
Renumber. 

Ventura displays a message telling you it is renumbering all 
the chapters in the publication. 

After the publication is renumbered, you are ready to print. 

H While still in the Multi-Chapter dialog box, select Print. 
Choose All, Last to 1st. 

NOTE: If your printer puts out pages printed-side down, 
choose 1st to Last instead. 


PRIMT INFORMATION (POSTSCRIPT - Ultinate) 

m 

Which Pages: 

All 


From Page: 

00011 


Through Page: 

9999 


Number of Copies: 

01 


Collated Copies: 

Off 


Printing Order: 

Last to 1st 


Paper Tray: 

Default 


Crop Marks: 

Off 


Spot Color Overlays: 

Off 


Hu.'lti • Chp. Print F .i les: 

Combined 


Device Name: 

POSTSCRIPT 


Output To: 

C0M1: 



■^■1 OK J 

|Cancel| 


Ventura prints out both chapters, one after another. When you 
are finished, select Done to return to the work space. 







7-42 


Chapter 



Tips and techniques 


Pre tagging tips 

□ Always use the format @TAGNAME = . Make sure the tag 
name is the first thing in the paragraph. 

□ Ventura assumes that any paragraph without a tag name is 
Body Text. 

□ The tag name must precede the rest of the paragraph. 
Ventura applies the tag name until it encounters a hard 
carriage return (<[[). Then it switches back to Body Text, or 
to the next tag name. 

□ Put the @ sign in the left margin. If the @ sign is any other 
place in the text file, it will not be recognized as part of the 
tag code. 

□ Tag names are not case-sensitive. Ventura doesn’t recog¬ 
nize any difference between upper and lower case. 

□ Always match the tag name in the text file with the tag 
name in the current style sheet. Ventura recognizes any 
minor mismatch between tag names, including spaces. For 
instance, CHAP # and CHAP# would be listed as two 
separate tags in the Assignment List. 

□ When Ventura finds tag names in the text file that are not 
part of the current style sheet, it lists them in the Assign¬ 
ment List in uppercase and displays them on the screen 
with Body Text attributes. 

□ Use the ©PARAFILTR = tag to strip out double carriage 
returns in a document. This allows you to retain normal 
spacing (two carriage returns between paragraphs) for 
readability in the text file, but strips out the extra returns 
when you bring the file into Ventura. 

□ Tags added in Ventura with Paragraph mode will be saved 
back to the original text file when the chapter is saved. 

□ When producing files in ASCII format, make sure to enter 
two carriage returns between each paragraph. 

□ The fastest way to format a text generated from a database 
is to include the tag names in the text file. 




Create a new publication 


7-43 


Other tips 

□ You can create crop marks manually by drawing line 
shapes on the Page. To repeat them on every page of the 
document, choose Show On All Pages from the Graphic 
menu. You can also use Ventura’s built-in crop marks in the 
print option. Use the automatic crop marks when you are 
creating half-size pages, or if you have a printer that can 
print larger than 8.5x11 in. format. 

□ You can create live headers and footers that change from 
page to page throughout the document in the Headers & 
Footers dialog box. If you select 1st Match, Ventura places 
the first occurrence of the tag in the header (or footer). If 
you select Last Match, Ventura places the last occurrence of 
the tag into the header (or footer). If Ventura doesn’t find 
the tag on a page, it uses one from a previous page. 

□ Initially, the frame margins of headers and footers are set 
to vertically center the header. You can raise or lower the 
header or footer by changing the frame margins (in Mar¬ 
gins & Columns) or by changing the space above or below 
(in Spacing). The spacing attributes are stored with the 
style sheet and therefore can be reused. The header and 
footer frame margins are stored with the chapter and can 
only be reused by creating a chapter template. 

□ A reverse type effect can be created by placing white text in 
a black frame, or by dropping a solid black rule down over 
white text. If you want to use reverse text as a predominant 
effect in your style sheet, it’s best to make it as a tag using 
the rule above technique. 

□ Some non-PostScript printers cannot print white type on a 
black background. Substitute black type on a gray back¬ 
ground. 

□ Space Below Rule 3 refers to the space below the last rule in 
the tag (or frame), whether that last rule is the first, second 
or third. If you enter a positive value the Ventura adds 
space below the rule and the rule shifts upwards. If you 
enter a negative space, Ventura subtracts space below the 
rule, so it shifts downwards. 

□ The Breaks option Keep With Next can be used to keep tags 
from being isolated at the top or bottom of a column or page. 




7-44 


Chapter 


□ When you turn select the Relative Indent:On in the Align¬ 
ment dialog box, Ventura makes the first line indent equal 
to the length of the last line in the previous paragraph. 
When this is used in combination with the Breaks option, 
you can make two tags reside on the same line side-by-side. 

□ To make a thumb tab that repeats on every page of the 
document, use a repeating frame. 

□ You can insert a page number anywhere on the page includ¬ 
ing captions, frames, and Box Text with the Ins Special 
Item option. 

□ Once you make a frame into a repeating frame you cannot 
cut or delete it. Change it back to a normal frame with the 
Repeating Frame dialog box if you need to make changes. 

□ Multi-Chapter allows you to combine a list of chapters 
together into a publication. Once the publication is created, 
you can print all the chapters at once. 

□ Once you create a publication you can renumber the chap¬ 
ters so the page numbers follow sequentially from chapter 
to chapter. Open a chapter and use Update Counters to 
update the initial page to Previous + 1. The new page 
numbers will not be displayed until you choose Renumber 
from the Multi-Chapter dialog box. 





Chapter Eight 
Skills Checklist 


Theory 

□ The parts of a book 

Text 

□ Inserting footnote references 

□ Adding footnote text 

□ Working with true typographic 
fractions 

□ Inserting index entries 

□ Changing the attribute overrides 

□ Preparing text for vertical tabs 
(side-by-side paragraphs) 

Style 

□ Using a half-size page layout 

□ How to update the page and chapter 
counters 

□ Understanding widows and orphans 

□ Creating a table with side-by-side 
paragraphs 

□ How to use spacing and breaks to 
create multiple columns 

□ Adding a big first character to the 
lead-in paragraph 

Chapter 

□ Creating and printing a publication 

□ Rearranging the chapter list 

□ Renumbering a publication 

□ Generating a table of contents 

□ Creating an index 

□ Printing crop marks 




Chapter Eight 


A Book 


F or book publishers large and small, Ventura can mean 
faster production and lower costs. In this chapter you will 
learn the special Ventura skills that apply to long documents. 
You may need to make a few changes to your current produc¬ 
tion practices to accommodate the realities of working with 
Ventura. 


Theory 

There are three parts to a traditional book: the front matter, 
the main text, and the back matter. Each section has its own 
format and style, but all three work together to complement 
the overall design. It is tempting to put the entire book into 
one large chapter file. For easier production, however, we 
recommend a separate Ventura chapter for each book chapter, 
plus separate Ventura chapters for the front and back matter. 

Preformatting text files in advance can help reduce the bot¬ 
tlenecks that typically occur in the book production cycle. By 
establishing standard tag names and using bracket codes, 
authors and editors can format as they write. 



8-2 


Theory 


-f- JO,™ 


Oesipo Principles 


ifAUC 

14.fit 'Times Bou> TeAfte 7 tet> 

- i^ eoce x 12,00 pic# Tessre/ieD 

- Jo fit Ttwies doLO Cet/reft ev 

l>R0PC*P 


Q*+a+ Tlj-VfVkv* 


-> / ^itA/S /AJOChTT IjOOpt* 

L. r^xr 1 2fit Times 

Ifyt spAcitob 


( 1/2 f¥^beiT 0 <MAT 

- ' 5 l /zxrt‘/z _ 









8-3 


Planning the book 

For the example in this chapter, you will use the 5.5x8.5 in. 
half-size format. This size lends itself to text-intensive books 
with only a few illustrations. It is easy and economical to 
produce; it is easy to bind (either perfect, sewn or saddle- 
stitched); and it fits nicely in your hand. In the corporate 
environment, this format is especially useful for in-house 
booklets and software documentation. 

The page design taught in this chapter is quiet and under¬ 
stated. It has large right and left margins with a generous 
amount of space separating the chapter title and subheads 
from the Body Text. The use of white space conveys an open 
feeling and makes the page more readable. Single horizontal 
rules separate the header and index title from the rest of the 
Body Text. 

In this project, you will use several special Ventura long-docu¬ 
ment features: 

• Generating a table of contents 

• Generating an index 

• Inserting footnotes and fractions 

• Big first character 

• Vertical tabs (side-by-side paragraphs) 

• Changing chapter and page counters 

• Printing crop marks 

To learn these long document techniques, you will work with 
four chapters in all: one for a table of contents, two main text 
chapters, and one for an index. 



8-4 


Ventura prep 


Ventura prep 


If you have the Power disk 

m Load the ASCII text files 8TBL.TXT and 8DESIGN.TXT 
from the C:\POWER subdirectory. Using File 
Type/Rename from the Edit menu save and rename them 
respectively as C:\TEMP\8TABLE.TXT and 

C:\TEMP\8BOOKTXT. When you are finished, the file 
8BOOK.TXT should be on the Page. 

^ NOTE: Do not load the file 8PRINT. TXT It will be used later in 
the project 

Since there are no pictures to place in this document, load the 

proper style sheet. 

i§ Load the style sheet 8DESIGN.STY from the C:\POWER 
subdirectory and save it under the name 

C:\TEMP\8BOOKSTY. 

tt Save the chapter as C:\TEMP\8BOOK.CHP. 


If you do 


not have the Power disk 


In your word processor, rename any two existing text files 
as 8BOOK.TXT and 8PRINT.TXT. Save them in the 
C:\TEMP subdirectory. Choose files of more than five pages 
if possible. (If you have the time and the energy you can 
type in the two text files for Chapter Eight from Appendix 
A.) Then type in the file 8TABLE.TXT from Appendix A and 
save it in the C:\TEMP subdirectory. 


II Load the &BOOK-P1.STY style sheet from the 
C:\TYPESET subdirectory and save it as 

C:\TEMP\8BOOKSTY. 


H Format the style sheet to match Figure 8-1. Then use the 
tag table in Appendix B to format the necessary tags. 

H Select Save As from the File menu to save the chapter 
under the name and location C:\TEMP\8BOOK.CHP. 





Figure 8-1. If you do NOT have the Power diisk, modify &BOOK-P1 .STY as shown here. 


Text 

In this section, you will learn a variety of powerful text func¬ 
tions. You will enter footnotes, true typographic fractions, and 
index references. If you do not expect to use any of these three 
features, you may skip ahead to the style section. The sample 
text file for this chapter (8BOOK.TXT) has, for the most part, 
been pretagged and precoded for you. 






8-6 


Text 


Inserting a footnote 

Before you insert a footnote in Ventura, you must set the 
format using Footnote Settings from the Chapter menu. Once 
you choose the format, you create a footnote in two steps: (1) 
you insert the reference into the text file and (2) you type the 
footnote text at the bottom of the page. 


Set the footnote format 


Your first task is to design how the footnotes will appear on 
the page. You only have to do this once for the entire docu¬ 
ment. 


i! Select Footnote Settings from the Chapter menu. Choose 
Usage & Format: # From Start of Page (User-Defined), 
Position of Number: Superscript. 

Now create a “separator line” to visually separate the footnote 
from the main Body Text above. 

II Make the Separator Line Width 12,00 picas & points, the 
Space Above Line: 01,01 picas & points. Switch from picas 
& points to fractional pts and make the Space Above Line 
14.00 fractional pts and make the Height of Line 00.25 
fractional pts. Then click OK. 


FOOTNOTE SETTINGS 

m 

Usage 8 Fornat: 

| Off | | 8 From Start of Page (1,2,3) | 




I From Start of Page (User-Defined) I 




| 8 From Start of Chapter (1,2,3) | 

Start With #: 

0001 

Number Template: 

8_ 

Position of Number: 

Superscript 

User-Defined Strings: 

T; * 2 : #* 3 : *** 4: **** 


5: +_ 6: ++_ 7: *■**■_ 8: ++++ 

Separator Line Width: 

. fractional pts 

Space Above Line: 

14.00 

Height of Line: 

00.251 BHap | Cancel | 




Insert the footnote reference 


8-7 


^ NOTE: Be careful to make the height of the line 00.25 fraction¬ 
al pts, not picas & points. If you switch back to picas & points, 
the height will show as 00,00 picas & points. Do not be con¬ 
cerned. Your measurements have not disappeared. They are 
simply too small to show up in picas & points mode. 

The separator line is measured from the left edge of the page, 
not from the margin. The left margin is 06,00 picas & points, 
and the separator line is 12,00 picas & points. The portion of 
the separator line in the margin (the first 06,00 picas) will not 
print. The portion on the live area (the second 06,00 picas) will 
print (Figure 8-2). 


The portion in the 
margin 
will not print 



Figure 8-2. 


The separator line is not yet visible on your screen. It will 
appear after you insert the footnote reference in the following 
step. 

Insert the footnote reference 

After setting the format, you’re ready to insert the footnote 
reference in the text file. 

H Go to page seven and change to Normal View. 

H Enable Text mode. 

H Place your cursor after the period at the end of the sentence 
as shown in Figure 8-3. 

































8-8 


Text 



Figure 8-3. 


*+NOTE: Do not be concerned if there are minor discrepancies 
between the position of text on your screen and the text shown 
here. Different monitors and graphic cards may show more or 
less than our illustrations. 

H Select Ins Special Item from the Edit menu (or hit Ctrl-C). 
!§ Choose Footnote (or press F2). 

A small cross shows the location of the footnote reference in 
the text. Ventura also displays the separator line, the footnote 
symbol (an asterisk), and the words “Text of Footnote” at the 
bottom of the page (Figure 8—4). 



Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


IllSI C:\TEMP\8B00K.CHP (BBOOK.STY) 


jJa 


X 


•Poetry often uses centered lines, Plush left is occasional-; 
iy chosen for special formats Plush right has few ap-i 
plicationsin toots outside of titles, tables and charts.II 
; Hyphenation and justification are crucial to achieve aj 
jtypeset loot When justifying lines, page layout- 
programs attempt to end lines at the space between; 
words. When that is not possible, they insert a hyphen,; 
■and put part of the word on one line and the remainder oi>; 
the line below. lest can be justified without hyphena- 


?!f Iextof Footnoted 


Figure 8-4. 






























Add footnote text 


8-9 


Add footnote text 

After you insert the footnote reference into the text, you will 
delete the words “Text of Footnote” at the bottom of the page 
and type in the footnote text. 

^ Delete the words “Text of Footnote.” Then type: 

For more information on this program, see Inside 
Xerox Ventura Publisher by James Cavuoto and Jesse 
Berst (MicroPublishing and New Riders, Westlake 
Village, CA, 1987) 

*+NOTE: If you backspace to erase the footnote text and get the 
message ‘The paragraph you are trying to tag/edit is made up 
of text that was automatically generated...,’’ simply press OK 
to delete the message. 

When you are finished the footnote should look similar to 
Figure 8-5. 



Figure 8-5. 


The footnote symbol is a generated tag named Z_FNOT# and 
the footnote text is a generated tag named Z_FNOT ENTRY. 
For now, do not be concerned with their appearance. Later 
when you get to the style section of the chapter, you will 
change their appearance. 





























8-10 


Text 


*+NOTE: Like headers and footers , footnotes occupy their own 
frames. You can raise or lower the footnote on the page by 
changing the top margins of this frame or by changing the 
space above the tag. You cannot, however, resize the frame. 

To delete a footnote and its text reference, delete the footnote 
symbol (the asterisk) in the text file. When the footnote sym¬ 
bol and its corresponding footnote text are deleted, Ventura 
automatically renumbers the remaining footnotes. 


Insert a fraction 

In earlier chapters, we taught you how to use bracket codes to 
insert true typographic characters in your word processor. In 
this section we will show you how to enter true typographic 
fractions directly in a text file. The Fraction option in the Ins 
Special Item dialog box (Edit menu) gives you true fractions 
that display as smaller-than-normal letters separated by a 
fraction bar. 

^ Go to page four. 

For this project, you will replace the fraction “1/6” in the 
second paragraph with a true typographic fraction. 

II In Text mode, place the cursor in front of the fraction and 
press the Del key three times to delete the 1, the separator 
bar, and the 6 (Figure 8-6). 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


Delete 
fraction here 



, UIII 

Superscript 

Subscript 

Underline 

Couble Undrin 

Strike-thru 

Overscore 


Upper Cose 



I L Pg n 8804 S 

3 

III! 


C:\TEMP\8B00K.CHP (8BOOK.STY) 


example. soon aeve lop an eye' tor ttf 
mon sizes.! 

Picas are a larger unit. Don’t confuse t| 
typewriter style of the same name. They ar 
points (ab oMinlbh). Printers and typograph 
to measure lines, margins and columns 
shows a page from this book with the n 
expressed in picas and points. (The measu; 
to the full-sized page.)! 

EtnsancTens are less imnortant hut yo u 




1 


Figure 8-6. 





































Insert a fraction 


8-11 


Now you are ready to insert a real fraction. 

^ Without moving the text cursor, select Ins Special Item 
from the Edit menu. 


View Chapter Frame 


Cut Text 
0 vpy Text 

Paste Text 


Del 
fBe l 

Ins 


Ins Special Item 


Edit Specie I 1 tee„, * " I) 


Remove Tex t /File *„, 
File lype/Rerse^Cs s, 


^ Choose Fraction (or press F4). 

The fraction editing screen appears (Figure 8-7). 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 

■ 


iS:gi=li===3=;i Fraction Editinq •• (Press A D to Exit) i=:== -= b ~- z -= 

* 

a 

.l‘.1“.l".I*. 4 .. 

C 

□ 

r 

ir 

\£ 

| • > :•>:: : : : : :: : ; /. 
j:j:| |:i: < • U > |>; >:* |:v 

* 


D 


Figure 8-7. 


m Type: 1/6 

Ventura displays the typographic fraction on-screen. 

ffl Now press Ctrl-D to return to the document, where you will 
see the new fraction format (Figure 8-8). 






















8-12 


Text 



Figure 8-8. After you close the fraction editing screen, the true 
typographic character appears in the main text file. 


You can also make a fraction that looks like this: Select Ins 

o 

Special Item and choose fraction. When the equation editing 
screen appears type: 1 over 6. Make sure you leave a space on 
both sides of the word over. 

After creating a simple fraction, you are ready to learn how to 
index. 

^NOTE: To create complex mathematical equations, we recom¬ 
mend the equation editing capabilities of Ventura’s Profes¬ 
sional Extension. 

Insert an index 

Indexing is a difficult concept to teach and to learn. The best 
way to master the process is simply to go through it a time or 
two. It is a three-step process: (1) insert index references into 
the text file, (2) generate the index file, (3) format the 
generated index file. For the moment, you will insert sample 
index entries into the text file. Later, in the chapter section, 
you will generate and format the index. 

Before you insert your first index reference, take a moment to 
review the different levels of an index as shown in Figure 8-9. 





































Insert an index entry 


8-13 



Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


Body Text 
Bodyireok 
BodyFIrst 
Bullet 
ChepB 
ChdpTltle 
Head 
Heodi 
TDJJCo.11 
TDJJC012 
TDlJColJ 
3_EQUQTI0N 


R Pg tt 0981 


C:\TEMP\8BOOKIDX.CHP (8BG0K.STV) 1111111111 


iisrtm.103: 

Body 1yp« .102j 

ioii . 

| Sie ito Text Attributes 

Books 

• Book (ovirs .105: 

• Book denjn .97; 

i Book jubtishmi.105: 

: Sot itso Dtsipi GuidifiJts it Books 

i Plje fomst .10t| 


Clltadl .98 

^option .98 

.htui Morks_SB 


Figure 8-9. 


In Figure 8-9, each major index section is preceded by a letter 
heading — A, B, C , and so forth. The first entry below the 
letter is the Primary Entry (for example, Books in the illustra¬ 
tion above). The indented words are Secondary Entries (for 
example, Book covers, Book design, and Book publishing). See 
and See also references can also be secondary entries. For 
instance, “See also Design Guidelines for Books” is a secon¬ 
dary entry. Instead of listing a page number, the See and See 
Also references direct the reader to a related entry elsewhere 
in the index. 


Insert an index entry 

To learn how to insert references, you will place a Primary 
Entry and a See Also Entry. 

H Go to page five. 

^ Enable Text mode. 


Place the cursor immediately in front of the “a” in the word 
“attributes” in the third paragraph. (The word attribute is 
underlined in Figure 8—10 to help you place the text cursor 
on the page. Do not underline the word.) 

Select Ins Special Item from the Edit menu (or press the 
shortcut Ctrl-C). 




































Figure 8-10. 

^ Select Index Entry (or press the F3 key). 

M Choose Type of Entry: Index. Place the text cursor on the 
Primary Entry line, type: Attributes and click OK. 



Ventura inserts a degree symbol (°) in front of the word At¬ 
tributes. If you do not see the symbol on-screen, make sure 
Show Tabs & Returns is on from the Options menu (or press 
Ctrl-T). 

Now you will add the identical entry on another page. 

P Go to page six. 




















































Add a see also entry 


8-15 


Place the text cursor in front of the letter “A” in the word 
“ATTRIBUTES” (Figure 8-11). 



Desk file Edit Vie* Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


giailllllllliilillBlil C:\TEMP\8B00K.CHP (8B00K.STY) 181118 111111! 




jlonts,sometimes called “pi fonts, contain special chaiac-; 
Sem, symbols, foreign language characters and so on. If ; 
; There are other kinds of type available from desktop; 
publishing systems, including script, cursive, shadow,; 
■outline and reverse (white letters on a black back-f 
ground) These decorative effects can be achieved direct-; 
jy in some page layout programs, They can also be; 
treated in a special graphics programs and imported onto; 
•the page. These unusual typestyles are rarely used irt 
■books expept for covers or chapter openings, 1 
TYPE Attributes, The same typestyle can vary irt 
Several ways. Weight refers to the thickness of the leH 
jterstrokes. Most desktop publishing programs provide- 
only normal and "bold. A few programs offer light as; 
JevcO. Slopeitfm to the slant of the letters, either vertical; 
(called normal or roman) or slanted (italic or obligue); 
•The proportion of type is its horizontal width Most: 
desktop publishing programs offer only normal propori 


Figure 8-11. 

il Select Ins Special Item and press F3. 

H Select Type of Entry: Index. Place the text cursor on the 
Primary Entry line and type: Attributes and click OK. 


** TIP: When you insert multiple entries be careful to use identi¬ 
cal spelling and case. 

For instance, if you were to enter the word Attributes as one 
Primary Entry and the word Attribute as the other Primary 
entry, Ventura would create two separate entries in the index. 


Add a see also entry 

Ventura permits you to go back to a reference to make changes 
or additions. Let’s return to the previous index reference and 
add a secondary entry. 

^ Go to page five. 

^ Place the cursor immediately in front of the degree symbol 
(°) that precedes the word “attributes” (Figure 8-12). 

il Move the cursor back and forth with the arrow keys until 
the words “Index Entry” appear in the Current Selection 
box. 































8-16 


Text 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



III C:\TEMP\8B00K.CHP (8BOOK.STV) Ilillllllliilili! 


Jpet 

y, different programs use different words 
and its£ attributes. The definitions given 
|mo$t common in the desktop publishing 
e cases, they vary from those in use by 
setters.! 

re specified in points as explained above. 
|erstand the point system to give correct 
the software. Many people refer to small 


Figure 8-12. 


Select Edit Special Item from the Edit menu. Select Type of 
Entry: See Also. Move the cursor next to the Secondary 
Entry line and type: Text Attributes and click OK. 


1HSERT/EDIT INDEX ENTRV 

0 

Type of Entry: See Also 


Prinarv Entry: Attributes 


Prinarv Sort Key: 

Secondary Entry; Text Attributes! 

Secondary Sort Key: 

■9 

Cancel 


You will see the words “Index-See Also” in the Current Selec¬ 
tion Box. 

Because of space limitations, we will not ask you to insert 
additional index entries. Instead, we have done this for you in 
the files you loaded from the Power disk. We have inserted 
additional entries into the text file so you will have enough 
entries to generate a sample index later. If you look closely, 
you will see the degree symbols marking these entries on the 
screen. 





































Verify the page size and layout 


8-17 



Stopping point 


You have learned two of Ventura’s most complex features, 
footnoting and indexing. This is a good place to save your work 
and take a break. When you’re ready to continue, begin with 
the style section. 


Style 

If you are returning to this project after turning off your 
computer, open the chapter C:\TEMP\8BOOK.CHP to 
resume where you left off. In this next section, you will learn 
more about page and chapter counters, and widows and or¬ 
phans. 

Verify the page size and layout 

Now you will verify the settings for Page Size & Layout and 
Margins & Columns. You can do this while on any page in the 
document. 

Page Orientation: Portrait 

Paper Type & Dimension: Half 
Sides: Double 
Start On: Right Side 

Enable Frame mode and select the Page. Then check the 
margins and columns. 

Margins & # of Columns: 1 

Columns Settings For: Right Page 

Column 1: 22,06 picas & points 
Top: 06,00 picas & points 
Bottom: 06,00 picas & points 
Left: 06,00 picas & points 
Right: 04,06 picas & points 

*+NOTE: The above settings are for the right page only. The left 
and right margins are reversed for the left page. 




8-18 


Style 


Build the header 

^ Go to page one. 

H Select Headers & Footers from the Chapter menu. 

Choose Define: Right Page Header, Usage: On. Type: 
Design Principles on the Left line and [P#] on the 
Right line. 



!1 Without closing the dialog box, choose Define: Left Page 
Header, Usage: On. Type: [P#] on the Left line and 
Chapter [C#] on the Right line. Then click OK. 






Update the chapter counter 


8-19 


ii Turn off the header on the first page only. 

Update the chapter counter 

In the header you just made, the chapter number is displayed 
as part of the header text. For each consecutive book chapter, 
you must update the chapter counter (Update Counters, 
Chapter menu) so this number is correct. If you do not update 
the counter, the header will read “Chapter 1” for every chap¬ 
ter. The chapter counter controls both the number and the 
numbering format. 

Hi Make sure you are on page one of the chapter. 

^ Select Update Counters from the Chapter menu. 

^ Choose Which Counter: Chapter, Update Method: Restart 
Number, Restart Number: 0006. Do not click OK yet. In the 
next section, you will change the page counter in the same 
dialog box. 


UPDfiTE COUNTERS 


0 


Which Counter 4 : 

Update Method: 
Restart Number: 
Number Format: 


This Page! i This Table j i Ibis Figure 


Initial Page 


Initial Table 


Initial Figure 


Previous Number ♦ 1 


Restart Number 


1,2 



You have restarted the chapter counter at six. When you close 
the Update Counters dialog box the header will now read 
“Chapter 6.” If you had chosen, for example, the One, Two 
button, it would read “Chapter Six.” If you had chosen I, II, it 
would read “Chapter VI.” 














8-20 


Style 


Update the page counter 

The page counter function is similar to the chapter counter. It 
allows you to reset the current page number to any number 
and override the automatic page number counter. In the fol¬ 
lowing example, let’s assume that the previous five chapters of 
this book have taken 96 pages. You will, therefore, reset the 
starting page number of Chapter Six to 97. 

H Choose Which Counter: Initial Page, Update Method: Res¬ 
tart Number, Restart Number: 0097, and Number Format: 
1,2. Click OK to close the dialog box. 



Because you turned off the header on this page, you must go 
to page two to see the new page numbers. 

^ Press PgDn to go to page 2. 

Check that the number in the header is 98 (Figure 8-13). 

*+ NOTE: The page numbers you see at the bottom of the Side- 
Bar are not affected by the Update Counters dialog box. The 
new page numbers appear only when you print the chapter. 

Widows and orphans 

As we explained in an earlier chapter, a widow is a single line 
of text at the top of the page. An orphan is a single line of text 
at the bottom. The Widows & Orphans dialog box determines 
the minimum number of lines Ventura can leave at the top or 







Widows and orphans 


8-21 



bottom of a page or column. For this book chapter, turn off the 
widow and orphan control so Ventura has the flexibility to 
place single lines at the top and bottom of the page. 

m Select Chapter Typography from the Chapter menu. 
Choose Widows (Min. Lines at Tbp): 1 and Orphans (Min. 
Lines at Bottom): 1. 

Before you close the dialog box, change the position of the 1st 
baseline: 

§1 Chapter Move Down to 1st Baseline By: 

Typography Inter-Line 



















8-22 


Style 


Changing the position of the text baseline from cap-height to 
inter-line ensures that the text reaches all the way to the 
bottom of the column. 

Tag the first paragraph 

Now that you’ve completed the overall page format, you will 
fine tune the appearance of the document by changing two 
tags. First you will change the book’s first paragraph to in¬ 
clude a big first character. Earlier, in Chapter Six, you learned 
to make a big first character rise above the first line. This 
time, you will create a big first character that drops below the 
baseline. This effect is often called a Drop Cap. 

^ Go to page one. 

^ Enable Paragraph mode. 

!i Select the first paragraph of the chapter, which was 
pretagged as BodyFirst (Figure 8-14). 


Desk file Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



illlllllillillSlIlIlll C:\TEHP\8BOOK.CHP (8B00K.STV) l ljjliilllljl 


soap Text 
BodyBrcok 
BodyFirst 
Bullet 
Chop* 
ChopTltle 


{.EQUATION 
Z.FNOT * 
Z^NOT ENTRY 
Z.HEADCR 


r 

odyFirst j 


Pg h 8801 I 


Jl 


Design Principles^ 


jutting top-polity books horn a desktop publishing sys- : 
'em requires special know-how in two areas: design and 
rinting. Ibis chapter discusses the theory of design. The 
ollowing chapter. Chapter Seven, outline s the steps t 
‘ate beforegenre to a commercial printer, II 


i This chapter offers comments on the principles of; 
■book design is they ipp!)< to desktop publishing, In some! 
bases, the realities of desktop publishing force changes; 
from traditional methods, II 


Design Terminology! 


Figure 8-14. 


P Special Effects Special Effect: Big First Char 

Space for Big First: Normal 

Selecting normal lets Ventura choose the number of lines the 
character should take up, based on the point size of the big 
first character. You will set that point size next. 

































Change the footnote tag 


8-23 


^ Without leaving the Special Effects dialog box, choose Set 
Font Properties. When the Font dialog box appears, choose 
Style: Bold and Size: 030.0 points. 

Before you exit the Font dialog box, use the Shift option to 
shift the first big character down a point. This fine-tune ad¬ 
justment will ensure that the first big character lines up 
properly with the first line of the paragraph. 

H Select Shift: Down. Enter 01.00 fractional pts. 


FONT SETTING FDR BIG FIRST CHARACTER 



•§=-S 



t 

Helvetica 


i Tines 


* 

Courier 

Symbol 

Avant Garde Gothic Book/Deni 

ITC Bookman Light/De*i 

Helvetica Harrow 

Palatino 



Gusto* Size: 030.8 points 

Overscope: Off Shift: Down 

Strike-Thru: Off 
Underline: Off 
Double Underline: Off 


01 .G 


fractional pts 


— 1 


Click OK to return to the Special Effects dialog box. Click OK 
again to return to the workspace. 

Change the footnote tag 

Now you will change the attributes of the footnote tag so the 
two tags (Z_FNOT# and Z_FNOT ENTRY) reside on the same 
line. 

^ Go to page seven and select the footnote text (the Z_FNOT 
ENTRY tag) at the bottom of the page. 

Style: N-Italics 
Size: 010.0 points 

Inter-Line: 10.00 fractional pts 
In From Left: 01,06 picas & points 

For now, this is the only tag you need to change. 


Font 

Spacing 




















8-24 


Style 


Change attribute overrides 

There’s one more small detail to complete in the style section. 
You will change the size of the small text (small caps) at¬ 
tribute with the Attribute Overrides option. 

M Go to page five. 

The lead-in heads you see on the page (for example, TYPE 
STYLES) were created in Text mode by applying the small 
(capitals) attribute. You can customize the size of the small 
caps attribute and apply it to selected words throughout the 
document. Let’s say you wanted to change all the lead-in 
heads from 12 points to 14 points. Normally, you would have 
to scan the document for every occurrence of the lead-in head, 
and change its font to 14 points using Set Font from the 
Side-Bar (Text mode). However, there’s an easier method. 
Select the Attribute Overrides option from the Paragraph 
menu and change the default size of the small text attribute. 
Now every occurrence of small text throughout the document 
automatically changes size. 

Try out this feature for yourself. 

H In Paragraph mode, select the Body Text paragraph that 
includes the small text lead-in head, “TYPE STYLES.” 
(Figure 8-15) 


Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Hill millllllHHII C:\TEMP\8B00K.CHP (BBOOK.STV) IIIllHilBIIl 


B«<Jy Text 

BoflyBreck 

Bullet 

Chap* 

ChopTltJe 

Hcadl 

Heod2 

z.equotion 

2.FN0T i 
*_FN0T INTU 
Z.HCODER 


r 

ody Text | 

& 

Pg ft 0005 1 


j!: 


'■traditional typesetters.! 

: Type sizes are specified in points as explained above.! 
jYou must understand the point system to jive correct! 
instructions to the software. Many people refer to small; 

Jypeinthe9to 12 point range as “body type. larger sizes 

‘used for headings is often called flisplay type. § 


PE styles. Most desktop publishing programs use 
'ypeface and lypestyle sponymcnsly to mean one par¬ 
ticular typedesign. Each design has a name, Helvetica is 
me typestyle; Century Schoolbook is another; ard so on. 
Io choose a different design from the page layout pro- 
yam, the user specifies it byname or picks its name fron 


i A font is one particular variety of a lypestyle. Thus; 
itnost software manuals would refer to Dutch as a types-; 
ityle and 12-point Dutch bold italic as a font. Most 
publishing programs have a Tont menu item where the! 


Figure 8-15. 


Select Attribute Overrides from the Paragraph menu. 



























Place the 8TABLE.TXT file 


8-25 


Move to the Small Caps Size line and enter Oil points. 
Then click OK. 


"Body Text" ATTRIBUTE OVERRIDES 

□ 

Line Width: 

Text-Wide 


Overscore Height: 

60.66 

Shift t By: 

11.94 fractional pts 

Strike-Thru Height: 

60.66 


03.72 

Underline 1 Height: 

66.24 

Shift | By: 

02.52 

Underline 2 Height: 

00.66 


02.04 

Superscript Size: 

010 

Shift t By: 

05.64 

Subscript Size: 

010 

Shift | By: 

01.32 

Snail Cap Size: 

011| points 





| Cancel | 


Now every occurence of the small text attribute throughout 
the document changes to 11 points. 



Stopping point 


You’ve reached the stopping point for this chapter. We know 
that we’re packing a lot of information into one chapter. Stick 
with us. The next section includes some powerful, valuable 
Ventura features. If you’re tired, get up from your desk, 
stretch, and come back when you’re refreshed. 


Place the 8TABLE.TXT file 

If you are continuing after a break, load Ventura and open the 
chapter 8BOOK.CHP and go to page four. 

You have finished formatting the 8BOOK.TXT file. Now you 
are ready to place and tag the second text file, 8TABLE.TXT. 
To format this file you will use a technique called side-by-side 
paragraphs (what the Ventura manual calls vertical tabs). It’s 
a complicated procedure but extremely powerful. Even if it 
seems a bit confusing, try to stick it out to the end of the 
exercise. 







8-26 


Style 


*+NOTE: If you do not use tables in your documents, skip this 
section and go directly to the chapter section. However, if you 
use tables of any kind, we recommend that you learn side-by- 
side paragraphs. 

Before you place the text, insert a new frame to contain it. 
Goto page four. 

H Reset the zero point to its original position at the upper left 
corner of the Page by clicking on the 0,0 square in the upper 
left comer of the page. 

^ Enable Frame mode and select Add New Frame. Add a new 
frame that measures 22,06 picas & points wide by 17,06 
picas & points high. Place the upper left corner of the frame 
at position 28,00 picas on the vertical ruler. Stretch the 
frame downwards to position 45,06 picas and over next to 
the right column. The frame will extend slightly below the 
bottom column guide (Figure 8-16). 



Figure 8-16. 

^ NOTE: You may want to Turn Column Snap and Line Snap Off 
to help you place the frame. 

H Use Sizing & Scaling to confirm that the frame measures 
22,06 picas & points by 17,06 picas & points. 

Before closing the Sizing & Scaling dialog box, add vertical 
padding to the frame. 


















Create a table 


8-27 


^ Sizing & Vertical Padding: 07.00 fractional pts 

Scaling 

Now add a box around the frame. 


H Ruling Box Width: Frame 

Around Height of Rule 1: 00.05 fractional pts 

Give the frame its own margins. 


Margins & Number of Columns: 1 

Columns Top: 01,00 picas & points 

Bottom: 01,00 picas & points 
Left: 01,00 picas & points 
Right: 01,00 picas & points 

With the frame still selected, place the text file, 
8TABLE.TXT, by selecting it from the Assignment List. 


*+NOTE: You will not see the entire text file when you first place 
it in the frame. Do not be concerned. Later ; when you tag the 
text, it will become visible. 


Create a table 

There are several ways to create tables in Ventura. You can 
use tab settings; you can use Box Text; or you can use the 
technique referred to as vertical tabs in the Reference Guide. 
In this chapter you will learn the vertical tabs method, which 
we prefer to call side-by-side paragraphs. 

We will start by reviewing the process and showing examples. 
Then we will give you a chance to try it yourself. 

To use side-by-side paragraphs, you must do two things. First 
you must properly format the text file. Second, you create a 
separate tag for each column. 

*+NOTE: As a general rule, use tab settings when each table 
entry is only a single line. For tables with multi-line entries, it is 
easier to use side-by-side paragraphs, which allows each 
column to have more than one line. 




8-28 


Style 


Preparing text for side-by-side paragraphs 

To prepare text for side-by-side paragraphs, type each column 
entry as a separate paragraph. The text file you just loaded 
(8TABLE.TXT) is already in the proper format. Do not enter a 
tab stop at the end of an entry. Figure 8-17 shows what the 
text file looks like before loading it into Ventura. 


r=I.1.2.3.4.5.]. 7 . 

[jnchesH 

fl 

Picas and Points!] 

U 

Points!! 

11 

1/6 inchi! 

n 

01,00 picas & points!! 

n 

1Z points]] 

U 

1/4 inchi! 

n 

01,06 picas & points!! 

H 

18 points!! 
il 

1/3 inchi! 

1 -=—=-= ===== -~ ■■ == 8TBL. TXT=JI 

COMMAND: Copy Delete Fornat Gallery Help Insert .limp Library 

Options Print Quit Replace Search Transfer Undo Uindou 
Edit document or press Esc to use Menu 

Pgl Col O ? Microsoft Wore 


Figure 8-17. 

Once you create, load, and place the text, you are ready to 
create the tags for each column. 

Spacing with side-by-side paragraphs 

Spacing and Breaks are the two keys to building columns with 
vertical tabs. With In From Left and In from Right Spacing 
you restrict the text to individual columns (Figure 8-18). 

The hard part is calculating the column settings. Start by 
deciding the width of the columns and gutters. In the example 
you will build for this project, we divided the space into three 
equal columns of 07,06 picas & points. Once you know these 
widths, you must translate them into settings for In From Left 
and In From Right. To figure these settings, subtract the 
cumulative column widths from the margins (Figure 8—19). 














Breaks with side-by-side paragraphs 


8-29 



Column 

1 


16,00 picas 

06,00 picas 

Column 

06,00 picas 


2 



16,00 picas 


Column 




3 




Figure 8-18. Figure 8-19. 


Breaks with side-by-side paragraphs 

After using Spacing to confine the text to columns, move to 
Breaks. Change the line breaks to allow all three column tags 
to co-exist on the same line. In the example below, the left 
column has a line break before; the center column has no line 
breaks; and the right column has a line break after. Now that 
we’ve reviewed the key concepts, you are ready to go ahead 
and create the table. 

Add the tag for the first column 

At this point, you will create the tags for all three columns. 

H Enable Paragraph mode. 

^ Select the paragraph “Inches.” 

II Add New Tag Tag Name to Add: Tbl3Coll 

II Font Face: Helvetica 

Style: Normal 
Size: 010.0 points 
















8-30 


Style 


P Alignment Horz. Alignment: Center 

Overall Width: Column-Wide 
In/Outdent Width: 00,00 picas & points 

;! Spacing Above: 06.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 12.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: When Not at Column Top 

Do not close the dialog box yet. You will now create a tem¬ 
porary right margin with In From Right Spacing. 

H Make the In From Left Spacing 00,00 picas & points and 
the In From Right Spacing 16,00 picas & points. 


"Tbl3Col1" SPACING 

m 

Above: 

06.001 fractional pts 


Below: 

00.00 


Inter-Line: 

12.00 fractional pts 


Inter-Paragraph: 

00.00 


Add in Above: 

Uhen Not at Column Top H 

Settings For: 

1 Right Page | 


In From Left: 

00,00 picas K points 


In From Right: 

16,00 


Inserts: 

| Copy To Facing Page | 



■ap 

| Cancel | 


You just completed the first column. Now create the other two 
tags. You can use the Tbl3Coll tag as a starting point for 
building the second and third column tags. 

H Select the paragraphs “Picas and Points” and “Points” and 
tag them as Tbl3Coll. 

Now change the attributes of both tags. 

Add the Tbl3Col2 tag 

^ Select the paragraph “Picas and Points.” 

II Add New Tag Tag Name to Add: Tbl3Col2 

^ Spacing In From Left: 06,00 picas & points 

In From Right: 06,00 picas & points 




Add the Tbl3Col3 tag 


8-31 


The In From Left Spacing and the In From Right Spacing 
create a temporary left and right margin to restrict the text to 
the center of the page. 

H Breaks Line Break: No 


Add the Tbl3Col3 tag 

Finally, create the tag for the third column. 

^ Select the paragraph “Points.” 

Tag Name to Add: Tbl3Col3 

In From Left: 16,00 picas & points 
In From Right: 00,00 picas & points 

Line Break: After 

Now that you’ve created the tags for all three columns, you’re 
ready to apply them to the rest of the paragraphs in the text 
file. Use Figure 8-20 as your guide to tag the rest of the table. 


^ Add New Tag 
li Spacing 

^ Breaks 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


HHU|1 HHHIIHH C:\TW\8BOOK.DHP (BB00K.STV) iilliiilgiili 


Set Font 


L P 3 B B684 


. I'.*. 


Expressed in picas and points. (The measurements refer: 
Jo the full-sized page.) 


t 


Inches 

Picas and Points 

Points 

1/6 inch 

01,00 picas 4 points 

12 points 

1 Minch 

01,06 picas 6 points 

18 points 

1/3 inch 

02,00 picas 4 points 

4 points 

1/2 inch 

03,00 picas 4 points 

36 points 

1 inch 

05,00 picas 4 points 

72 points 

51/2 inches 

33,00 picas 4 points 


81/2 inches 

51,00 picas 4 points 


11 inches 

66,00 picas 4 points 



Figure 8-20. 


To put the final touches on the table, make the column head¬ 
ings bold. 

II Enable Text mode. 

P Select each column heading (“Inches,” “Picas and Points,” 
and “Points”) in turn and make it bold. 





































8-32 


Pictures 


Congratulations. You made it through one of Ventura’s most 
difficult and most useful techniques. Your reward awaits you 
in the next section. 


Pictures 


Since you will not be placing any pictures in this sample 
project, proceed directly to the Chapter section. 


Chapter 

So far you have formatted the text and inserted index entries. 
You are now ready to advance to the Chapter section, where 
you will generate a table of contents (TOC) and an index. To do 
either function, you must first make a publication. The publi¬ 
cation would normally include all the chapters in the book. 
For this example, you will include only two chapters: Chapter 
Six, which you completed above, and Chapter Seven, a fully- 
formatted sample chapter from the Power disk (or typed in 
from Appendix A). 

Prepare for the publication 

Before you generate a TOC or index, you must update the 
page and chapter counters for every chapter in the publica¬ 
tion. If you were to omit this step, the page numbers in the 
TOC and index would be incorrect. 

Add a page to Chapter Six 

Now you will go to the end of Chapter Six (8BOOK.CHP) to 
find the last page number in the chapter. 

*+ TIP: When Ventura updates the page number, it displays the 
new number in the header or footer, not in the Side-Bar. 

M Press the End key to go to the last page in the chapter. 

Note that the page number is 107 and that it is a right-handed 
page. Traditionally, book chapters start on a right-hand page. 
Therefore, to start the next chapter (Chapter Seven) on a right 




Update the chapter counter 


8-33 


page, you will insert a blank left page as a “spacer” page at the 
end of the Chapter Six. 

P Insert/ Operation: Insert Page After Current 

Remove Page Page 

Now, the last page reads as 108. Chapter Seven will start on 
the right-hand page number 109. 

Save the chapter. 

^ Press Ctrl-S. 


L: Open Chapter Seven (if you have the Power disk) 

Now you will change the starting page number of Chapter 
Seven. 

11 Select Open Chapter from the File menu and open the 
chapter C:\POWER\8PRINT.CHR 

M Save the text file as C:\TEMP\8PRINT.TXT. 

M Load the style sheet C:\TEMP\8BOOKSTY. 

m Save the chapter as C:\TEMP\8PRINT.CHP. 



Open Chapter Seven (if you do not have the disk) 


Load the text file 8PRINT.TXT from the C:\TEMP sub¬ 
directory. 


li Load the style sheet 8BOOK.STY from the C:\TEMP sub¬ 
directory. 

^ Save the chapter as C:\TEMP\8PRINT.CHP. 


Update the chapter counter 

Now update the chapter counter to make the header read 
“Chapter 7”. 

li Select Update Counters from the Chapter menu. 





8-34 


Chapter 


Select Which Counter: Chapter, Update Method: Previous 
Number + 1, Number Format: 1,2. Do not close the dialog 
box until you also update the page counter. 



Update the page counter 

After setting the chapter number, reset the first page of the 
chapter. 

Select Which Counter: Initial Page, Update Method: Pre¬ 
vious Number + 1, Number Format: 1,2. Click OK to close 
the dialog box. 

When you select the initial page counter, Ventura resets the 
first page of the chapter as you specified in the update 
method. By selecting Update Method: Previous Number + 1, 
Ventura makes the first page of Chapter Seven start one page 
after the last page of Chapter Six. The header will not reflect 
the new page and chapter counters until later, when you 
renumber the publication in the Multi-Chapter dialog box. 

Save Chapter Seven before continuing on. 

*1 Press Ctrl-S. 

Create a publication 

To create the publication, you will use the Multi-Chapter 
dialog box in the Options menu. 









Rearrange the chapter list 


8-35 


Select Multi-Chapter from the Options menu. 
Select New to start a new publication. 

Select Add Chapter. 

Select the chapter C:\TEMP\8PRINT.CHP. 


MULTI-CHAPTER OPERATIONS 


0 



= C:\POWER\UNTITLED.PUB-= 

D 

1 

D 

C:\TEMP\8PRINT.CHP 


New 

Open 

Close 


Save... 
Save As... 


Add Chapter... 

Tteftove Chap 


Print.,, 
Hake TOC.,, 
Hake Index. 
Rentinber.., 
Kopy All... 


| Done 


Now add the second chapter to the list. 

^ Select Add Chapter. 

H Select the chapter, 8BOOK.CHP, from the C:\TEMP sub¬ 
directory. 

The chapter name 8BOOK.CHP is the second item in the list. 

Rearrange the chapter list 

Before saving the publication, you will practice rearranging 
the chapters in the list so that 8BOOK.CHP (Chapter Six) is 
first and 8PRINT.CHP (Chapter Seven) is second. 

H Press and hold down the mouse button over 8BOOK.CHP 
until you see the hand cursor appear. Now drag the 
filename to the top of the list and release the button (see- 
Figure 8-21). 

Before you save the publication, make sure that none of the 
names are highlighted. Otherwise, Ventura will save only that 
chapter. 

















8-36 


Chapter 


MULTI-CHAPTER OPERATIONS [7] 

New 
Open 

Close 


Save... 
Save As... 


Add Chapter... 
Remove Chap 


Print... 

Hake TOC... 

Hake Index,,, 

Renunher,,. 

Copy All,.. 

|MDorie_J 

Figure 8-21. 

H Select Save As from the dialog box. 

H The Item Selector appears. Use the Backup button to locate 
the C:\TEMP subdirectory if necessary. On the Selection 
line type the name of the publication: 8BOOK. PUB and click 
OK. Ventura returns you to the Multi-Chapter dialog box. 

Renumber the publication 

After making the publication, you can renumber the chapter 
and page counters for every chapter in the publication. This 
will generate the correct page numbers in both the Index and 
the TOC. 

*+NOTE: Make sure that none of the chapter names are high¬ 
lighted. Otherwise, Ventura will not let you renumber the publi¬ 
cation. 

11 While you are in the Multi-Chapter dialog box, choose 
Renumber. When asked if you want to renumber chapters, 
pages, tables, and figures across the entire publication, 
choose Renumber. Ventura displays a message that it is 
renumbering the publication. 

Generate a table of contents 

Now you are ready to generate the TOC. A table of contents 
provides an outline of a book’s major topics and sub-topics, 




















Generate a table of contents 


8-37 


along with their page numbers. Ventura generates a TOC in 
two steps. First, it searches the publication for the tag names 
you specify. Second, it generates a text file that shows each 
instance of those tags and the page on which they appear. 

The generated TOC text file can be loaded and formatted like 
any other text file. Ventura assigns the different levels of the 
TOC a generated tag. For example, Level One is tagged as 
Z_TOC LVL 1, level two is Z_TOC LVL 2, etc. As with other 
generated tags, you can change the attributes of the tags to 
achieve the desired effect. 


ii While still in Multi-Chapter, select Make TOC. 


MULTI-CHAPTER OPERATIONS 


ft 


- 

II C:\TENP\9B00K.PUB 

D 

D 

C:\TEMP\8B00K.CHP 

C:\TEMP\8PRINT.CHP 


New 

□pen 

Close 


Save,,, 

Save As... 


Add Chapter... 

flenove Chap 


Renumber... 
Copy AH,.. 


Done 


TIP: You cannot select the Make TOC option if a single chapter 
is highlighted. 

The Generate Table of Contents dialog box appears. Notice 
that the name of the current publication is displayed next to 
TOC File except that the last three letters have been changed 
to TOC and the file extension to GEN. This is the default 
name that Ventura assigns to a generated TOC file. Although 
you can change the name of this file, we suggest that you not 
change the three-letter extension GEN. 


WARNING: Make sure that the TOC File line reads C:\TEMP\8B00KT0C.GEN. If a 
different subdirectory name is displayed, press Esc to clear the line and type in 
C:\TEMP\8B00KT0C.GEN. 

















8-38 


Chapter 


For this project, you will not change the Title String that tells 
Ventura to display the words “Table of Contents” at the top of 
the page. You will, however, make additions to the other levels 
of the TOC. 

H Place the text cursor next to the Level 1 line and select the 
Inserts: Text Attr. button at the bottom of the dialog box. 

The bracket code <D> appears on the line. 

^ Delete the D and replace it with the letter B. 

The bracket code <B> turns on the Bold text attribute. 

H Move the cursor past the right bracket and choose the 
Inserts: Chapter # button. 

The bracket code [C#] appears on the line. 

The [C#] code tells Ventura to display the number of the 
chapter. 

II Now choose Inserts: Tab from the bottom of the dialog box. 

The tab symbol appears on the line. The tab separates the 
chapter number from the next tag name. 

si Choose Inserts: Tag Text. The code [*tag name] appears on 
the line. Delete the words “tag name.” Type in: ChapTitle 
within the brackets. 

[*ChapTitle] tells Ventura to scan for all occurrences of the tag 
ChapTitle and to list them as level 1 entries in the TOC. 

II Move the cursor past the right bracket and choose Inserts: 
Tab. 

The tab separates the entry from the page number that fol¬ 
lows. Later in this chapter you will use this tab setting to 
create leader dots between the entries and the page numbers. 

^ Choose Inserts: Page # 

The [P#] code tells Ventura to display the page number on 
which it found this occurrence of the tag you indicated. 

II Choose Inserts: Text Attr. 

The bracket code <D> appears on the line. <D> turns off the 
Bold text attribute and returns the font to normal. 




Insert the codes for second and third levels 


8-39 


When the TOC is generated and formatted the first level will 
look similar to Figure 8-22: 



Desk File Edit Uigw Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


ilSlillillilliiilll! C:\rENP\BBGOKTOC.CHP ( 8 B 00 K.STV) llililiilililil 


ItOOKTOC.GEN 


mnaasi 




Table of Contents 


6 Design Principles 97 

Design Terminology .97 

Describing Pages .98 

Measuring Pages ..99 

Describing Type 1 .101 

Other Important T eras .103 

Design Guidelines for Books.104 

The Purpose of Page Design , , . . 105 


n 


Figure 8-22. 


Insert the codes for second and third levels 

Place the text cursor on the Level 2 and Level 3 lines and type 
in the codes shown in Figure 8-23. Use the buttons at the 
bottom of the dialog box as shortcuts. 


GENERATE TABLE OF CONTENTS 


TOC File: 
Title String: 
Level 1: 
Level 2: 
Level 3: 
Level 4: 
Level 5: 
Level 6: 
Level 7: 
Level 8: 
Level 9: 
Level 10: 


C:\TEMP\8E00KT0C.GEN_ 

Table of Contents_ 

<B>[C#]-H*ChapTitle]*[P8]<D> 

[*Head1]HP#]_ 

r«HeacB1»rP4] | 


m 


Inserts: | Tag Tex~ ] [ Chapter B~| | Page B | 

| Text Rttr. | 


Cancel 


Figure 8-23. 


Generate the TOC by clicking the OK button. 





























8-40 


Chapter 


Ventura displays a message that it is generating the TOC text 
file and shows which chapter files it is scanning. When the 
TOC is finished, you return to the Multi-Chapter dialog box. 
Later you will format this file. For the moment, complete the 
last Multi-Chapter operation. 

Generate an index 

Do you remember the index entries you inserted into the text 
file? Ventura will generate its index based on those references 
(plus some extras we inserted for you in advance). Once the 
index is complete, you will load and format both the index and 
the TOC generated files. 

With the Multi-Chapter dialog box still open, select Make 
Index from the Multi-Chapter Side-Bar. 

The Generate Index dialog box appears on the screen. On the 
Index File line Ventura displays the current publication name 
with the last three letters changed to IDX and the extension 
changed to GEN. Do not change this file name extension. 


WARNING: If a different subdirectory name is displayed, change the TOC File line to 
read C:\TEMP\8B00KIDX.GEN. 


Leave the Title String line as “Index.” This tells Ventura to 
display the word “Index” as the heading for the index. 

^ Choose Letter Headings: On. 

When you turn Letter Headings on, you instruct Ventura to 
place an A before the entries starting with A, a B before the B 
index entries, and so forth. 

H Move the cursor to the For Each # line and delete both 
occurrences of the [C#] code and the hyphen {do not delete 
the hyphen between the page number [.P#] codes). This tells 
Ventura to display only the page numbers in the completed 
index, not the chapter numbers (Figure 8-24). 

M Choose OK to generate the index. 

During index generation, Ventura locates the index refer¬ 
ences, and builds them into a sorted list with the correspond¬ 
ing page numbers. After each entry, Ventura inserts a line 





Format the TOC and the index 


8-41 


GENERATE INDEX 


0 

Index File: 

C:\TEMP\8B00KIDX.GEN 


Title String: 

Index 


Letter Headings: 

On 


Before 8s: 

♦ 


For Each ft: 

IP8] - IPH]| 


Between 8s: 



After 8s: 



"See ": 

See 


"SeB Also": 

See also 





Inserts: 

| Tab | | Chapter 8 | | Page 8 | 

| Text Attr. | 


[ 



Figure 8-24. 


break and a horizontal tab character. After the last entry of a 
letter heading, Ventura inserts a paragraph return. 

The index contains three generated tags: Z_INDEX TITLE, 
Z_INDEX LTR, and Z_INDEX MAIN. Later in this chapter 
you will change the attributes of these generated tags. 

After generating the index, Ventura returns you to the Multi- 
Chapter dialog box. 

H Choose Done to exit the Multi-Chapter dialog box. 

M If Ventura asks, choose Save to save the changes you made 
to the publication. 

Format the TOC and the index 

This is a good place to pause and remind ourselves where 
we’ve been and where we are headed. At this point, you have 
used Ventura to generate “raw” text files. By searching the 
chapter, Ventura was able to find and insert the page numbers 
where each entry can be found. 

With that work out of the way, you can load and format the 
TOC and the Index text files. You will create them as two 
separate chapters using the same style sheet (8BOOK.STY). 
Begin with the table of contents. 




8-42 


Chapter 


*+NOTE: If you are in a hurry, you can skip over this formatting 
section, since it does not introduce any new skills. However, 
we suggest you read over it, if you plan to do TOCs and 
indexes of your own. For instance, because of the way Ven¬ 
tura outputs the index file, you must use Tab Settings to create 
the proper indents. 


Start a new chapter 

Since you are using the same style sheet, you can simply 
“empty out” the current workspace by choosing New from the 
File menu. 

H Select New from the File menu. 

The screen is emptied of text, but Ventura retains the current 
8BOOK.STY style sheet. 

li Enable Frame mode and select the Page. 

II Select Load Text/Picture from the File menu. Select Type of 
File: Tfext, Text Format: Generated, # of Files: One, and 
Destination: List of Files. 



si Use the Backup button to locate the C:\TEMP subdirec¬ 
tory. Then load the text file 8BOOKTOC.GEN and place it 
on the Page. 













Change the Z_TOC TITLE tag 


8-43 


Select Save As to save the chapter as C:\TEMP\BOOK- 
TOC.CHP. 


Change the Z TOC TITLE tag 


You will change the text attributes of the generated tags in the 
TOC. Start with the title. 

II Enable Paragraph mode. 

Select the paragraph “Table of Contents.” (Notice the tag 
name Z_TOC TITLE in the Current Selection Box.) 


Font 


Alignment 


Spacing 


Breaks 


Style: Bold 
Size: 024.0 points 

Horz. Alignment: Center 
In/Outdent Width: 00,00 picas & points 

Above: 28.00 fractional pts 
Below: 56.00 fractional pts 
Inter-Line: 28.00 fractional pts 

Page Break: Before/Until Right 


Selecting Before/Until Right forces the TOC to start on a 
right-hand page, the traditional placement in books. When 
you are finished, the title should look like Figure 8-25: 



Figure 8-25. 
















8-44 


Chapter 


Change the Z_TOC LVL1 tag 

H Select the paragraph “6 Design Principles97.” 

Horz. Alignment: Left 
In/Outdent Width: 00,06 picas & points 

Above: 28.00 fractional pts 
Below: 07.00 fractional pts 
Inter-Line: 14.00 fractional pts 
Add in Above: When Not at Column Top 

You will now use tab settings to position the text across the 
page, as shown in Figure 8-26. 

11 Tab Settings Tab Number: 1 

Tab Type: Left 
Tab Shown As: Open Space 
Tab Location: 02,00 picas & points 

Tab Number: 2 
Tab Type: Right 
Tab Shown As: Open Space 
Tab Location: 21,09 picas & points 


Alignment 

Spacing 



Ttncoii 
T6J3C012 
TB1K013 
Z.EQUOTICtN 
Z..FN0T • 
Z_FN0T ENTR.V 
Z_HEfiDER 
INDEX UR 
Z_IN0EX MAIN 

|z_:mdex title 

Z.TOC LVL 
Z.TOC LVL 


R Pg tt 8601 


Table of Contents! 


6+ Design Principles* 

DesignIerminology«97(! 
DescribingPages<98l! 
Measuring ?ag«*99ll 
DescribingTvpe*10HI 


m 


Figure 8-26. 


Change the Z TOC LVL 2 tag 

11 Select the paragraph “Design Terminology97.” 






























Change the Z_TOC LVL 3 tag 


8-45 


^ Alignment 
Hi Spacing 


Horz. Alignment: Left 

In/Outdent Width: 02,00 picas & points 

Add in Above: When Not at Column Top 


Tab Settings Tab Number: 1 
Tab Type: Right 
Tab Shown As: Leader Char 
Tab Location: 21,09 picas & points 
Leader Char:... 

Leader Spacing: 3 


Change the Z TOC LVL 3 tag 


Select the paragraph “Describing Pages98.” 


Alignment 

Spacing 


Horz. Alignment: Left 

In/Outdent Width: 04,00 picas & points 

Add in Above: When Not At Column Top 


Tab Settings Tab Number: 1 
Tab Type: Right 
Tab Shown As: Leader Char 
Tab Location: 21,09 picas & points 
Leader Char:... 

Leader Spacing: 3 


Apply the tags 

When you are finished, the table of contents should look like 

Figure 8-27: 

Congratulations on completing your first table of contents. 

Now save your work. 

^ Press Ctrl-S 

11 Select New from the File menu to create a new chapter for 
the index. Load the generated file 8BOOKIDX.GEN from 
the C:\TEMP subdirectory and place it on the Page. Save 
the chapter as C:\TEMP\8BOOKIDX.CHP. With the text 
file loaded, you’re ready to change the tags. 




8-46 


Chapter 


Table of Contents 

6 Design Principles 

97 

Design Terminology . 

97 

Describing Pages . 

98 

Measuring Pages. 

99 

Describing Type. 

101 

Other Important Terms . 

103 

Design Guidelines for Books. 

104 

The Purpose of Page Design . . . 

105 

7 Offset Printing From Laser Mechanicals 

109 

Traditional Book Printing . 

109 

The Desktop Workflow . 

111 

Preparing Photographs . 

111 

Positioning Photographs. 

114 

Scanning and Digitizing. 

115 

Crop Marks. 

116 

Screen Tints. 

117 

Color printing. 

118 

Covers . 

120 

Adjusting Page Count. 

121 

Improving the Look of Laser-printed Pages 

122 

Improving Mechanicals. 

122 

The Lithographer Can Help . . . 

126 


Figure 8-27. 


Change the ZJNDEX TITLE tag 


Enable Paragraph mode. Select the title “Index” at the top 
of the page. 


II Font 
II Alignment 
is Spacing 

H Ruling Line 
Below 


Style: Bold 
Size: 024.0 points 

Horz. Alignment: Left 

In/Outdent Width: 00,00 picas & points 

Above: 28.00 fractional pts 
Below: 28.00 fractional pts 
Inter-Line: 21.00 fractional pts 

Width: Column 
Color: Black 
Pattern: Solid 

Space Above Rule 1: 02.00 fractional pts 
Height of Rule 1: 00.25 fractional pts 




















Change the Z_INDEX LTR tag 


8-47 












8-48 


Chapter 







Print the publication 


8-49 


Desk File Edit View Chapter frane Paragraph Graphic Options _ 

j lll!!ilili ;iS11liiII;il i~C FVTEhPNBBDOKllwTCHP f 8B55k rSTVl~ IIII11111111 SllililllB ♦ I 


tcdy Ttxt 
lodylraok 
IcdyMrft 
Bullet 
Chop* 
cnopTitn 

HOtid 1 
Heed* 
Tpncoit 
tbjko12 
TP 13 C 013 
Z.EQUATION 


Advtfbsingj 

* Dtrijn ippbabon**.106 il 


[ R Pg ft 0001 | ,« 


0 


.Attribute*. 

. . . 103? 

• St* iko Ttxt Attributel 


Bf 


$istbne*. 

. . . ircii 

Body type* . 

. . . 102 jl 

Bold*. 

... 103*1 

* St* tko Ttxt Attribute J 


Soobj 


•* Book coYtrs*. 

. . . 105*1 

<• Book design*. 

. . . S7il 

T Book publishing*. 

. . . lOSjl 

<* Sit tlso Design Guidelines for Booksj 


i* Pige formal*. 

. . . 10« 


Figure 8-28. 


When you have completed the changes to the index tags, save 
the chapter. 

^ Press Ctrl-S. 


Print the publication 

Now that you’ve created the TOC, the index and two sample 

chapters, you are ready to print them. First, add the TOC and 

the index to the C:\TEMP\8BOOK.PUB publication. 

1! While still in BOOKIDX.CHP, select Multi-Chapter from 
the Options menu. 

M Open the C:\TEMP\8BOOKPUB publication if it is not 
already open. Select Add Chapter and then choose 
C:\TEMP\8BOOKTOC.CHP. 

M Select Add Chapter, and then choose the chapter 
C:\TEMP\8BOOKIDX.CHP. 

Organize the book chapters by moving the TOC chapter to the 

top of the list. 

m Drag C:\TEMP\8BOOKTOC.CHP to the top of the publi¬ 
cation list. 

!§ Make sure none of the files are highlighted. 

H Select Save As to save this publication under the name 
C:\TEMP\8BOOKPUB. 


























8-50 


Chapter 


When Ventura asks you if you want to overwrite the existing 
publication, choose Overwrite. 

Leave the Multi-Chapter dialog box open for printing. 

Print crop marks 

Now you will print out all the chapters listed in the publica¬ 
tion using the Print function found in the Multi-Chapter 
dialog box. This time you will tell Ventura to print crop marks. 
Ventura is able to print crop marks as long as they reside 
within the live area of the printer (the area of the page on 
which the printer can actually produce marks). Almost all 
laser printers can show crop marks that fall inside a 7x10 in. 
area. 

*+ TIP: To find out the exact live area of your printer, print out the 
sample chapter CAPABILI.CHP in the \TYPESET subdirec¬ 
tory. 

H To Print Which Pages: All 

Crop Marks: On 

Ventura prints out each chapter of the publication in order. 

*+NOTE: This project contains more than 30 pages. It will take 
longer to print than other, shorter sample chapters in this book. 



Tips and techniques 


Book tips 

□ The last thing you must do before generating an index and 
TOC, is to udpate the chapter and page numbers in every 
chapter included in the publication. Use Update Counters 
from the Chapter menu to reset the numbering in the 
correct sequence. 

□ If you want each chapter to start on a right-hand page (as 
is traditional), check that the preceding chapter ends on a 
left-hand page. If not, insert a blank left-hand page at the 
end of the preceding chapter. 




Print crop marks 


8-51 


□ Changing page numbers with Update Counters (Chapter 
menu) does not affect the page numbers shown at the bot¬ 
tom of the Side-Bar. 

□ Some publishers use a single style sheet for the whole book. 
Others create a separate style sheet for each section. Al¬ 
though Version 2 of Ventura automatically numbers pages 
sequentially across chapters, it may be tempting to put the 
entire book in one large chapter file. In practice, very large 
chapters can lead to crashes or other problems, especially, if 
there are many pictures involved. 

□ Putting the entire book into one chapter file also makes it 
difficult to work in groups. When one person is busy with 
the one and only file, no one else can work on it. For easier 
access and manageability, most books should have separate 
Ventura chapters for every book chapter. 

Table tips 

□ Generally, it’s best to use tab settings when creating a table 
with single-line entries. For tables with multiple-line 
entries it is easier to use side-by-side paragraphs which 
allow each column to have more than one line. 

□ To prepare text for side-by-side paragraphs, make sure you 
enter each table entry as a single line. Enter a carriage 
return instead of a tab at the end of each line. 

□ Spacing and Breaks are the key to creating a table. Use In 
From Left and In From Right spacing to restrict text to 
individual columns. Use Breaks to allow multiple tags to 
reside on the same line. 

Footnote and index tips 

□ The footnote separator line is measured from the left edge 
of the page, not from the margin. Only the portion inside 
the margin actually prints. Suppose, for example, that you 
have a five-pica margin. If you wanted a three-pica 
separator line, you would enter a Separator Line Width of 
eight picas (5 + 3 = 8). Only the three-pica portion that is 
inside the margin would print. 




8-52 


Chapter 


□ If you cannot see the symbols which marks footnotes, 
anchors and index entries, choose Show Tabs & Returns 
from the Options menu. 

□ Footnotes occupy a special frame created by Ventura. You 
can change the margins inside this frame, but you cannot 
change the size of the frame. 

□ You can insert footnotes, anchors and index entries directly 
into word processing files using the following bracket codes: 
Footnote: <$Ftext> 

Anchor (same page): <$&Anchor name> 

Anchor (below): <$&Anchor name[v]> 

Anchor (above): <$&Anchor name[ A ]> 

Fraction: <$Enumerator/denominator> 

Fraction: <$Enumerator over denominator 
Index: <$IPrimary; Secondary> 

□ Indexes and tables of contents are created with Multi- 
Chapter from the Options menu. 





Chapter Nine 
Skills Checklist 


Theory 

□ Technical illustrations for desktop 
publishing 

□ Importing AutoCAD drawings into 
Ventura 

Text 

□ Assigning tags in Text mode 

□ Creating empty paragraphs 

Style 

□ How to format numbered lists 

□ Adding a page break tag 

□ A double rule effect with ruling line 
above 

□ A special note tag with ruling box 
around 

□ Adding space with a tag 

□ Adding spot color to page elements 

Picture 

□ Attaching callouts to illustrations 

□ Anchoring frames to text references 

□ Automatic figure numbering in 
captions 

Chapter 

□ Printing spot color overlays 




Chapter Nine 


A Technical Manual 


M odem industry has produced a new generation of pub¬ 
lishers, writers, and designers, dedicated to creating 
“user-friendly” technical manuals. These manuals are in¬ 
strumental in selling and maintaining high-tech equipment, 
from microwaves to machinery to personal computers. In this 
chapter, you will learn some special techniques for producing 
technical documentation with Ventura. The checklist on the 
left gives you an overview of the skills you will learn. 


Theory 

Technical documentation is a demanding application. Conse¬ 
quently, this chapter may require more than one attempt to 
create some of the effects. If you can stick with it, however, you 
will be rewarded with hands-on knowledge of some of 
Ventura’s most powerful capabilities. Before starting with the 
project, let’s take a moment to examine how Ventura deals 
with technical illustrations. 

Technical illustrations 

Skip this section if you do not use illustrations from line-art 
programs, such as AutoCAD. 

As a general rule, line-art is used for technical drawings and 
illustrations because of its higher quality (see Chapter Five 
for more details on the difference between line-art and im¬ 
ages). AutoCAD is one of the most popular line-art programs. 
AutoCAD drawings can be imported into Ventura in four 
different formats (SLD, GEM, HPGL, and PostScript), three 
of which produce line-art. 




9-2 


Theory 


AutoCAD Slide Files (SLD) are image files (bit-mapped 
graphics) produced by taking a “snap shot” of an AutoCAD 
screen. Their quality is only as good as the resolution of the 
screen. Consider using slide files if you have access to a 
monitor with at least a 1,024 x 960 resolution, or if you do not 
require high-quality images. Otherwise, you will get better 
results from line-art. 

You can import AutoCAD line drawings in three ways: in 
GEM format (via Ventura’s DXFTOGEM utility), in HPGL 
format (Hewlett Packard Graphics Language), or in Encap- 
sualted PostScript format. 

DXFTOGEM conversion 

Ventura’s conversion utility takes AutoCAD DXF files (which 
it cannot read directly) and transforms them into GEM files 
(which it can use in documents). Before using the 
DXFTOGEM conversion, you must produce a DXF drawing 
file in AutoCAD (or any other CAD program that supports the 
DXF drawing interchange format). After the DXF file is 
created, use the DOS copy command to copy the file to the 
C AVENTURA subdirectory. 

Move to the C:\Ventura subdirectory. At the DOS prompt, 
type: 

DXFTOGEM Filename Filename 

First type the command name, followed by the AutoCAD DXF 
file name, a space, and the GEM file name, leaving off the 
three-letter extension. The DXF and the GEM file names can 
be the same or different. For example, here’s the command for 
converting a DXF file named SAMPLE.DXF to a GEM file 
named CADTEST.GEM: 

DXFTOGEM SAMPLE CADTEST 

After creating the GEM file, copy it to the subdirectory of your 
choice. 

TIP: The DXFTOGEM utility is normally located in the C:\Ven- 
tura subdirectory. If you cannot find it there, load it from the 
Ventura Utilities disk. 



HPGL format 


9-3 


You may find that certain AutoCAD shapes are lost during the 
DXFTOGEM conversion. For a complete listing of shapes that 
are converted, see the Xerox Ventura Publisher Reference 
Guide. 

HPGL format 

HPGL is an alternative to the DXFTOGEM conversion. To 
create a HPGL file in AutoCAD, first configure your plotter as 
any Hewlett Packard plotter (for example, the HP 7475). Then 
plot the drawing to a file instead of to the plotter. The result¬ 
ing file has a .PLT extension. You can load this file directly 
into Ventura, by selecting Line-Art Format: HPGL in the Load 
Text/Picture dialog box. Simply change the .HPG extension to 
.PLT on the Directory line of the Item Selector before selecting 
a file. 

Encapsulated PostScript 

AutoCAD can also produce a PostScript file, that, when 
modified, can be loaded into Ventura. To create a PostScript 
file in AutoCAD, configure your plotter for the desired resolu¬ 
tion (300 dpi for a laser printer, 1270 or 2540 for a 
phototypesetter, etc.) and plot the drawing to a file instead of 
to the printer. The resulting file has a .PLT extension. Before 
you load it in Ventura, you must do two things: change the 
extension from .PLT to .EPS, and change three lines in the 
PostScript file itself. 

To encapsulate an AutoCAD PostScript plot file, you will need 
to edit the file with an ASCII text editor. Begin by recording 
the four sets of numbers on the the bounding box line that is 
second from the end of the file listing. Now delete that line. To 
the top of the file add the following three lines: 

%!PS-Adobe-2.0 EPSF-1.2 
%%BoundingBox: XX XX XXX XXX 
%%EndComments 

Substitute the numbers you recorded from the original bound¬ 
ing box line for the Xs in the second line above. Now you are 
ready to load the encapsulated file. Select Load Text/Picture 
from the File menu, and choose Line-Art and PostScript for¬ 
mat in the dialog box. 



9 -4 


Theory 









Encapsulated PostScript 


9 - 5 


Planning the manual 

Whether it deals with a microwave or a microcomputer, the 
primary responsibility of a technical manual is to teach the 
user how to operate and benefit from the system. It must 
include all the technical specifications. It must also help the 
user get started, discover features, and learn both elementary 
and advanced operations. Finally, it must help people know 
what to do when things go wrong. 

The manual you will create in this chapter includes instruc¬ 
tions for assembling and using a laser printer. Its landscape 
format provides space for three columns without crowding the 
text. The three-column format also provides flexibility for 
varying picture sizes and column combinations. On some 
pages, the left column is used for the major heading and 
nothing else. The resulting white space gives the page a more 
open, non-threatening appearance. 

Throughout the manual, lists are identified with bullets, and 
step-by-step instructions are shown with boldface section 
numbers. The instructions are slightly indented from the 
numbers to make them easy to locate on the page. The box 
around the warnings is a visual device to draw attention to 
important material not included in the main body of text. 

The manual has two standard sizes for illustrations. Smaller 
pictures fit three across. Because they are positioned directly 
above descriptive text, they do not demand captions or cal¬ 
louts. On the other hand, a full page illustration needs a 
caption and/or callouts for clarity. 

The “before” and “after” illustrations show the manual in the 
planning and final stages. In addition to many of the skills you 
already have learned, you will use the following effects to 
create the technical manual: 

• Column breaks 

• Section numbers 

• Rules around table entries 

• Callouts for illustrations 

• Spot color for emphasis 



9 - 6 


Ventura prep 


Ventura prep 


If you have the Power disk 

H If you are continuing from a previous chapter, select New 
from the File menu to clear the work area. 

M Load the ASCII file 9TECH.TXT from the C:\POWER sub¬ 
directory. Use File Type/Rename to save it as 
C:\TEMP\9TECHDOC.TXT. Leave the file 9TECH- 
DOC.TXT on the Page. 

Load the style sheet, 9TECH.STY from the C:\POWER 
subdirectory and save it as C:\TEMP\9TECHDOC.STY. 

II Load the GEM Line-Art format files 9-LASER1.GEM, 
9LASER-2.GEM, 9LASER-3.GEM, and 9LASER-4.GEM 
from the C:\POWER subdirectory. 

B Save the chapter as C:\TEMP\9TECHDOC.CHP. 



If you do not have the Power disk 


^ Use your word processor to type in the text file 9TECH.TXT 
from Appendix A. Then save it as C:\TEMP\9TECH- 
DOC.TXT. 


^ Use Load Text/Picture to load and place the file 9TECH- 
DOC.TXT on the Page. 

^ Load the &TBL2-L1.STY style sheet from the 
C:\TYPESET subdirectory. Change the margins and 
columns to match Figure 9-1. Use the tag table in Appendix 
B to change the tags you will need for the project. Then save 
the revised style sheet as C:\TEMP\9TECHDOC.STY. 

H Since you do not have access to the AutoCAD drawings 
included on the Power Disk, load any four pictures to use as 
substitutes in the picture section of this chapter. 

M Save the chapter as C:\TEMP\9TECHDOC.CHP. 



Draw crop marks 


9 - 7 



Style 


You will learn several powerful new functions in the style 
section of this chapter. You will start by learning a fast way to 
draw crop marks. Then you will learn about new tagging 
effects using column breaks, page breaks, and ruling lines. 
You will continue with an example of auto-numbering, a use¬ 
ful technique for technical documentation. 

Draw crop marks 

Crop marks designate the live area of the paper. For this 
document, you will draw the crop marks at each corner of the 
Page and instruct Ventura to show them on every page of the 
document. 














9 - 8 


Style 


>TIP: It is easier to draw crop marks if you temporarily change 
the margin settings to equal the trim size. Then you can use 
the (temporary) column guides to help you position the lines. 

Enable Frame mode and select the Underlying Page. Select 
Margins & Columns from the Frame menu. 

Choose # of Columns: 1. Make the top and bottom margins 
09,00 picas & points, and the left and right margins 07,06 
picas & points (Figure 9-2). 

Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 

lliilll! lf:\TEMP\9fECiiDBcr(5i J C9 fEOfflocTsWrilil 


Top and bottom mar¬ 
gins: 09,00 picas 


Left and right mar¬ 
gins: 07,06 picas 




t 

?LASEfc - 1.GEM 

?LASEfc-2.GEM 

9LASER-3.GEH 

9LASER-4.GEM 

mCHDOC.TXT 

7 


9T 


R 

Pg H 0001 1 

3 




Figure 9-2. After you change the margins, your page should look like 
this illustration. 


Choose grid settings 

II Make sure the zero point is reset to the upper left corner of 
the Page. (Click on the 0,0 square at the upper left corner of 
the Page.) 

H With the Page selected, enable Graphics mode. 

Hi Select the line tool from the Side-Bar. 

Make the grid settings an integer multiple of the margins so 
the lines automatically snap to the margin. 

^ Grid Settings Grid Snap: On 

Horizontal Spacing: 01,06 picas & points 
Vertical Spacing: 01,06 picas & points 




















































Choose grid settings 


9-9 


Select the line tool again. Starting from the upper left 
corner of the column margin, draw a 03,00 pica vertical line 
(two snap-grid units) perpendicular to the horizontal 
column guide and toward the edge of the Page (Figure 9-3). 
Press the Alt key as you draw to keep the line absolutely 
straight. 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Figure 9-3. 


*+NOTE: Don’t worry if it takes you a couple of attempts to draw 
the correct line. Drawing with a mouse can be tricky. If you 
make a mistake, simply delete the line (press the Del key) and 
try again. 

Now make sure the line attributes match the following values: 

H Line Attributes Thickness: Thin 

End Styles: (Beginning and End) Square 
Defaults: Save To 

^ TIP: If you hold down the Shift key while drawing, you can 
continue to draw lines without reselecting the line tool. 

!! Select the line tool. Starting at the upper left corner of the 
column guide draw a 03,00 pica horizontal line (two snap- 
grid units) perpendicular to the vertical column guide and 
toward the edge of the Page (Figure 9-4). 






















Figure 9-4. 


Repeat the steps above to create crop marks on the other three 
corners on the page. When you are finished, reset the margins 
and columns to their original values. Refer to Figure 9-5 for 
the original margin and column sizes. 



Figure 9-5. 

After drawing the crop marks, make them appear on every 
page of the document. 

i§ ’While still in Graphic mode, choose Select All from the 
Graphic menu (or press Ctrl-Q) to select every line shape on 
the Page. 

H Select Show On All Pages from the Graphic menu. 




































Build the footer 


9 - 11 


Build the footer 

You will complete the chapter format by building the footer. 

H Select Headers & Footers from the Chapter menu. 

^ Choose Define: Right Page Footer, Usage: On. Move to the 
Left line and choose 1st Match. Delete the words “tag 
name” and type: Headl 

H Move to the Right line and choose Inserts: Page #. 



Choose Define: Left Page Footer, Usage: On. Move to the 
Left line and choose Inserts: Page #. Move to the Right line 
and type: Laser AstroZ Manual 





9 - 12 


Style 


The footer text is automatically formatted as soon as you close 
the dialog box. (The Z_FOOTER tag was predefined in the 
style sheet you loaded at the beginning of the chapter.) 

Raise the footer 

To prevent the footer from being cropped off at print time, you 
must raise it upward on the page. 

H Enable Frame mode. Select the footer frame so you can 
change its margins. 

II Margins & Top: 02,00 picas & points 

Columns Inserts: Copy To Facing Page 

Now you will turn off the footer on page one. 

H Select Turn Footer Off from the Chapter menu. 

Because a cover page is not normally numbered, you must 
update the page counter so that “page one” starts on the 
second page of the chapter. 

Press PgDn to go to page two. 

11 Select Update Counters from the Chapter menu. 

11 Choose Which Counter: This Page, Update Method: Restart 
Number, With Number: 0001, Number Format: 1,2. 

The page number in the footer changes to 1 (Figure 9-6). 



Figure 9-6. 






























Verify the Body Text settings 


9 - 13 


*+NOTE: If the following pages do not automatically increase , 
you will have to renumber them manually. Move to each page 
in turn and select Update Counters from the Chapter menu. 
Choose Which Counter: This Page, Update Method: Previous 
Number + 1, and click OK, until all pages are in the correct 
sequence. 

With the chapter format complete, you can begin to assign 
tags to the text. 

Verify the Body Text settings 

H Press Home to go to the beginning of the chapter. 

H Enable Paragraph mode. 

H Select the paragraph “Thank you for choosing the Laser 

Face: Times 
Style: Normal 
Color: Black 
Size: 010.0 points 

Horz. Alignment: Left 
Overall Width: Column-Wide 

Above: 12.00 fractional pts 
Inter-Line: 12.00 fractional pts 
Add in Above: When Not At Column Top 

Create a title page with the BodyBreak tag 

To isolate the title page text from the rest of the document, you 
will create an empty paragraph (a paragraph that includes a 
carriage return only) and tag it with the BodyBreak tag. Since 
the BodyBreak tag (which has already been defined in the 
style sheet) includes a page break after, the text following the 
tag will be forced to the next page. 

si Enable Text mode to create the empty paragraph. Place the 
text cursor at the end of the paragraph “Guide to Opera¬ 
tions — Model XYZ-11” and press Enter once. 

li Enable Paragraph mode. 


AstroZ... ” 
H Font 


^ Alignment 
1 Spacing 




9 -14 


Style 


Select the empty paragraph (click on the paragraph symbol 
*11) and tag it as BodyBreak (Figure 9-7). 


This text will be 
forced to the next 
page by the Body- 
Break tag 



Desk File Edit Mlew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


C:\TEMP\9fEOiD6C.CHP(9fEM)6cTSTV)l 


* 

Z.CftPTIOH 

ZJ'OOTER 


itleSub 

R 

Pg n 0601 


jL 


JlL 


riteLaser 


Guide to Operations 

r-. I 


Getting Started! 


j A Word to Ownersf 

Thank you for choosing the Laser AstroZ 


print* from XYZ Corporation. 
Jjuality laser printer gives you t 
flexibility and power for afl yot 
ipublishing needs. The Laser As 
•comes standard with PostScript 
is Hewlett-Pickard PCL and H 
■programs you still use that are 


E 


Figure 9-7. 


The text following the tag moves to the next page (Figure 9-8). 



Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


i==i=Ei=Ei=£ 

lliiil 



ll 

ii 



E= 



,< ,11 ,11 ,14 ,30 ,31 


i,..i..r 


The.Laser 


Guide to Operations— 


Figure 9-8. 


With the title page complete, go to the second page to continue 
tagging. 

^ Press PgDn to go to the second page. 



































































Change the Headl tag 


9 - 15 


Change the Headl tag 

To isolate the Headl tag in the far left column, you will 
include a column break before and after. The Column Break 
Before keeps the heading from slipping back to the previous 
page. The Column Break After forces the text following the 
tag to start at the top of the next column. 

M Select the paragraph “Getting Started.” 

H Select Breaks. Choose Column Break: Before & After. 


"Headl" BREAKS 


0 


Page Break: UQ 1 Before [ | After | | Before & After 


1 Before/Until Left| | Before/Until Right 
Column Break: | Ho 1 | Before | [ After 1 IjQSSBSQQZSSI 
Line Break: | Ho | ^22331 I After | [ Before 8 After 


Next V Position: 
Allow Within: 



Beside Last Line of Prev. Para 


UD 

Keep With Next: | Ves | 


Cancel 1 


Use the BodyBreak tag 

To start a new page, you will put a page break after the 
BodySmall paragraph at the end of page one. You will first 
create an “empty” paragraph. Then you will assign the Body- 
Break tag to a function key so you can tag the empty para¬ 
graph while you are in Text mode. 

Enable Text mode. Place the text cursor after the words 
“LOS ANGELES, CA” at the bottom of the page and press 
Enter once (Figure 9-9). 






Figure 9-9. 

H Without moving the cursor from its current position, press 
Ctrl-K to bring up the Assign Function Keys dialog box. 

*+NOTE: If you press Ctrl-K while you are in Paragraph mode, 
Ventura will ask you if you want to save your changes. 

M Assign the BodyBreak tag to the FI key. Click OK to close 
the dialog box. 


ASSIGN FUNCTION KEVS 


□ 

FI: BodyBreakl 

F2: 

Head2 

F3: Head3 ‘ 

F4: 


F5: Head5 

F6: 

ListBullet 

F7: 

F8: 


F9: 

FIB: 

Body Text 



^ Cancel 


*+NOTE: Do not be concerned if your function key assignments 
do not match ours exactly 





















About auto-numbering 


9 - 17 


H Press FI to tag the empty paragraph you just typed as 
BodyBreak. 

The text following the tag is pushed to the next page. 

^ TIP: If you accidentally hit the wrong function key while tag¬ 
ging, you can usually recover by pressing the correct key 
immediately, before you do anything else. 

About auto-numbering 

For the first two pages, you formatted the manual using 
predefined tags from the style sheet. In the next section, you 
will create some advanced effects by adding several tags. 

Many technical documents include section numbers, outlines, 
or numbered lists. Ventura’s automatic numbering can handle 
these chores for you. It can create anything from simple lists 
to multi-level outlines. Rearrange part of the list, and Ventura 
will renumber it for you — automatically. Automatic number¬ 
ing includes two basic steps: First, you choose which tags to 
number and what style of numbering to use; second, you 
format the section numbers Ventura has generated. For the 
first step, use the Auto-Numbering dialog box from the Chap¬ 
ter menu to choose which tags to number and what style to 
use. For example, Figure 9-10 shows the dialog box settings 
for Headl displayed in roman numerals (I, II, III, IV, etc.) 



Figure 9*10. 






9 - 18 


Style 


When Ventura creates the numbers, it assigns generated tags 
at the same time. The name of the tag depends on the level of 
the numbers. Numbers created at Level 1 are tagged as 
Z_SEC1. Level 2 numbers are tagged as Z_SEC2, and so on. 
Once Ventura has generated and tagged the numbers, you can 
format them as you like. The theory of auto-numbering will 
become clearer after you perform the sample project in this 
chapter. 

To create the numbered list of instructions, you will add a new 
tag named List#. The tag is indented from the margin to make 
room for the section numbers (which you will add below using 
Auto-Numbering). 

1! Press PgDn to go to the third page of the chapter. 

H Enable Paragraph mode. 

il Select the paragraph in the second column that begins “Lift 
the release lever....” 

11 Add New Tag Tag Name to Add: List# 

^ Spacing In From Left: 01,00 picas & points 

Use Shift-Click to select the next two paragraphs shown in 
Figure 9-11 and tag them as List#. 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


lllliiiil 


Rod/ Text 
BodyBr&ale 
BodySnall 
Hcfldi 
HtodZ 
HftOdJ 
HccdS 


list mutt' 
Title 
Titles* 
r_CftPTI0N 


MULTIPLE 


R Pg B 6803 


j3\--gg 


Add Hen Tag 


Ilill C:\TEMP\9TECHD0C.CHP (9TECHD0C.STV) 


Unpacking' and 
Setting Up! 


You; User AstroZ weighs 73 pounds, so 
do not try to lift it without someone's 

jhelp. Lift the printer "by its handles ind 

jplaee Horn dean, stable surface, ff 


UnpackingV' 



The Caie of Your 
Piinteif 


1-UrU 


Replidng 
clewing s| 
» Clewing 
Clewing 
* Clewing 
Wtsf 


'•■About 

Caitiid\ 

The toner <n 
jserves as ink 
irtseK has a e 
;<ate the level 
<of prints. If y| 
graphics) at a 
Will get more; 
•graphics at a 
tey in to look] 


E 


Figure 9-11. 


Next, we will show you how to use Auto-Numbering to 
generate the numbered list. 

























Using auto-numbering 


9 - 19 


Using auto-numbering 

To create the numbered list, use Auto-Numbering from the 
Chapter menu. By placing the List# tag on Level 1, you in¬ 
struct Ventura to place numbers before each paragraph 
tagged as List#. After Ventura generates the section numbers, 
you format them to reside on the same line as the List# 
paragraph. 

*+NOTE: Although we are teaching a single level list, you can 
use these same basic principles to create multi-level num¬ 
bered lists such as outlines. 

H Select Auto-Numbering from the Chapter menu. 

^ Choose Usage: On. Move to the Level 1 line and choose 
Inserts: 1,2. This button defines the number format for the 
list. 

H Delete the words “tag name” and type List#, then move 
the cursor past the right bracket and type a period. The 
period separates the automatically generated numbers 
from the text that follows. Click OK. 


AUTO-NUMBERING [7] 

Usage: QJj | Off | 

Level 1: [*List#, 1 ] .1_ 

Level 2: _ 

Level 3: _ 

Level 4: _ 

Level 5: _ 

Level 6: _ 

Level 7: _ 

Level 8: _ 

Level 9: _ 

Level 10: _ 


Inserts: | Chapter *5~| | 1,2 | | fl,B | | a,b | [ I, II | | i,ii | 


| Suppress Previous Level | | Text ftttr. | 


0K I> 


| Cancel | 


Notice that the numbers (which are tagged as Z_SEC1) and 
the text paragraphs (tagged as List#) appear on separate 
lines. To place both number and paragraph text on the same 
line, you will change the attributes of the Z_SEC1 and List# 
tags (Figure 9-12). 





9 - 20 


Style 


Should U funilBr|:j: 
Repliang the t 
(toning slid* > 

* Clearing the c< > 
Ctoningthe :£ 

* Cleaning and r 
heltsl 



Locate the green wire (toner and 
remove its protective sealing tape. 

You will use the wire (toner to clean j 
the corona wire in the print cartridge.! • 


'About the 
Cartridge 

The toner artridg 
serves is ini to t% 
itself has a color c 
jate the level of pel-: 
jof prints. If you pn>: 
graphics) at a high f 


Figure 9-12. 


Change the Z SEC1 tag 

!! Select the number 1 (the Z_SEC1 tag). 

M Font Style: Bold 

II Breaks Line Break: Before 

Keep With Next: Yes 

Change the List# tag 

II Select the first List# paragraph “Lift the release lever and 
raise the upper part of the printer.” 

Now you will change the tag to include a line break after . The 
line break after allows the List# and Z_SEC1 tag to reside on 
the same line. 

m Breaks Line Break: After 

Earlier, you used In From Left Spacing to add a first line 
indent to the List# tag. You can see now how this indent keeps 
the List# paragraphs from touching the numbers. When you 
are finished the list should look like Figure 9-13: 

*+NOTE: If you had created the indent with the In/Outdent option 
in the Alignment dialog box , only the first line of the paragraph 
would have been indented. 

























Aaa a page oreaR 


u - 


Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


I i!ll!l!!l!!S!!l!!llli C:\TEMP\9TECHDQC.CHP (9TECHD0C.STV) ililllllllllillllllli ♦ 



ling an'cf 
Up 


'Unpacking 


•Your Laser AstrcZ weighs 73 pounds, so 
[do not try to bft it without someone's 
■help. Lift the printer by its handles and 
jplice it on a clean, stable surface. 

it Lift the release lever and raise the 
upper part of the printer 

2 Lift the green fixing assembly cover 
and remove the four red spacers. 

3. Locate the green wire cleaner and 
remove its protective seating tape 
You will use the wre cleaner to clean 
the corona wire in the print cartridge 


The Care of Your 
Printer _ 


Replacing the toner cartridge 
cleaning stick 

» Cleaning the corona wires 
Cleaning the guides 
* Cleaning and replacing the sej 
belts 


■■Aboutthe Toner 
'■Cartridge 

The toner cartridge includes pow^^’j 
ser ves as ink to the printer. The 
itself has a color coded bir that 4 
cate the level of powder and the 
of prints. If you print plain text (n|: 
•graphics) at a higher toner setting 
[will get more prints than if you pcj 
graphics it a lower setting If y< 

[begin to look faded in areas, or stj 




Figure 9-13. 


Add a page break 

To complete the page, you will create an empty paragraph and 
tag it as BodyBreak. The text following the tag will move to 
the next page. 

11 Enable Text mode. 


H Place the text cursor at the end of the last paragraph in the 
third column “...replace your toner cartridge.” Then press 
Enter once (Figure 9—14). 

il While the text cursor is next to the end of paragraph sym¬ 
bol, press FI to tag the new paragraph as BodyBreak. 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



llllillililliliilill C:\TEt1P\9TECHDQC.CHP (9TECHD0C.STV) lilllilliililli 


Set Font 


Remove the four red spacers! 

the green wire cleaner and 
> its protective sealing tape, 
jwfll use the wire cleaner to clean 
Jrona wire in the print cartridge! 


Care of Your 
\terf 

e several routine maintenance 
!S you can perform to keep your 
jrtroZ running smoothly. You 


Cartridge! 


The toner cartridge includes powder that 
serves as ink to the printer. The cartridge 
itself has a color coded bar that will indi¬ 
cate the level of powder and the number 
[of prints. If you print plain text (not 
‘graphics) at a higher toner setting, you 
Will get more prints thin if you print 
graphics at a lower setting. If your prints 
•begin to look faded in areas, or streaked 
jit the edges, replace your toner cartridge.! 


Figure 9-14. 

























































ouyie 



Stopping point 


Let’s pause here to summarize where we’ve been and what lies 
ahead. You certainly have reason to be pleased with yourself. 
In the last few pages, you have been working with two of 
Ventura’s most powerful and sophisticated functions, Breaks 
and Auto-Numbering. The ability to associate breaks and 
numbers with tags sets Ventura apart from ordinary 
programs. When you can manipulate these two dialog boxes 
with ease, you will stand out from the crowd. 

Before you stop, check your progress against Figure 9-15. 


Unpacking and 
Setting Up 


Unpacking and Setting Up 


Unpacking 

Your Laser AstroZ weighs 73 pounds, so 
do not try to lift it without someone's 
help. Lift the printer by its handles and 
place it on a clean, stable surface. 

L Lift the release lever and raise the 
upper part of the printer 

2. Lift the green fixing assembly cover 
and remove the four red spacers. 

3. Locate the green wire cleaner and 
remove its protective sealing tape. 

You will use the wire cleaner to clean 
the corona wire in the print cartridge. 

The Care of Your 
Printer 

There are several routine maintenance 
procedures you can perform to keep your 
Laser AstroZ running smoothly. You 


should be familiar with: 

• Replacing the toner cartridge and 
cleaning stick 

• Cleaning the corona wires 

• Cleaning the guides 

• Cleaning and replacing the separation 
belts 

About the Toner 
Cartridge 

The toner cartridge includes powder that 
serves as ink to the printer. The cartridge 
itself has a color coded bar that will indi¬ 
cate the level of powder and the number 
of prints. If you print plain text (not 
graphics) at a higher toner setting, you 
will get more prints than if you print 
graphics at a lower setting. If your prints 
begin to look faded in areas, or streaked 
at the edges, replace your toner cartridge. 


Figure 9-15 At this stage in the project, page three of your document should look like this. 


If you’re planning to stop and relax for awhile, save the docu¬ 
ment and exit from Ventura. When you’re ready to start again, 
reload Ventura and open the chapter C:\TEMP\9TECH- 
DOC.CHP. 




Add the Head4 and Rule tags 


9-23 


If you plan to forge ahead, you will discover a well kept secret 
about Auto-Numbering. You will also learn a fancy effect 
created with ruling lines. 

Add the Head4 and Rule tags 

H Press PgDn to go to page four. 

Now get ready to create two new tags: a heading (Head4) and 
a double rule (Rule). The double rule stretches from the end of 
the Head4 paragraph to the right-hand margin, no matter 
how long or how short the Head4 paragraph turns out to be. 
This advanced effect uses two different tags side by side on the 
same line. Figure 9-16 gives an idea of how the effect looks. 



Figure 9-16. 

Because this is an advanced effect, we suggest that you save 
the chapter (press Ctrl-S) before you proceed. Then, if you 
make a mistake, you can Abandon the chapter and return to 
where you were the last time you saved. 

You will start by adding the Head4 tag. 

^ Enable Paragraph mode. 

H Select the paragraph “Paper Trays, Paper Cassettes.” 

I! Add New Tag Tag Name to Add: Head4 

M Font Style: Bold 

Size: 014.0 points 




















9 - 24 


Style 


II Alignment Overall Width: Frame-Wide 

H Spacing: Above: 00.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 18.00 fractional pts 

H Breaks Page Break: Before 

Keep With Next: No 

Your paragraph should now look like Figure 9-17. 



Figure 9-17. 

The Page Break Before guarantees that Head4 will always 
start on a new page. 

Next you will add the Rule tag. The paragraph tagged as Rule 
will include two characters: a horizontal tab and a paragraph 
return (<[[). With Tab Settings (Paragraph menu), you will set 
the tab location at the right margin of the page. Then you will 
choose Ruling Line Above: Text. In this case, the only text is 
the tab character itself. Ventura extends the rule the length of 
the text — that is, to the tab location at the right margin. 

WARNING: The effect you are learning is a complex one. Do not be concerned if text 
temporarily overlaps as you proceed. Once you complete all the steps, the text will 
realign properly. 

1! Enable Text mode. 

H Verify that Show Tabs & Returns is on from the Options 
menu. 





























Add the Head4 and Rule tags 


9 - 25 


Place the text cursor before the “P” in the word ‘Taper 
trays” on the second line. Press Enter once to create an 
empty paragraph (Figure 9-18). 



Desk File Edit Uie* Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


Italic 

Small 

Sup*r*cript 
Subscript 
Underline 
|0ouble unarm 
Strike-thru 
Overscare 


D 

Hi 

E 

EBESEIS] 1 

n 

iimam 


E 


II C:\TEMP\9TECHD0C.CHP (9TECHD0C.STY) 


X 


J 'L 


k 


•Paper Tnjsl 

Print tny pesitiea. Hold the print tray 
iso the wide end filed towards the front 
jof the printer. Insert the photic pins into 
•the front slots ito*e the handle. II 


iPapei Trays, Paper CassettejsIF I 


JapeiCassettesI 

•Place the piper in the cassette ind 
fonder the piper dips. Insert the; 
itissetle into the slot under the frorf: 
khe printer until it stops. The ossej 
holds approximately 110 sheets.1 


f 


Figure 9-18. 


Now you will enter the tab character. 

H Place the text cursor in front of the new end of paragraph 
symbol (<[[) and press the tab key once. 

You will see the tab character on-screen (Figure 9-19). 


Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


: . C:\TEMP\9TECHD0C.CHP (9TECHMC.STV) ilBfilili illlgilliil l 



X 


jPaper Trays, lapei Cassettejsff 

k 

•Piper Tzijrsf 

Print tray pa sit ion. Ho 1 ! the print tny 
<sc the wide end faced tcwirds the front 
pi the printer. Insert the phstic pins into 
|the front slots above the handle, 1 


iPaper Cassettes 11 

•Place the piper in the cassette ind 
fonder the paper dips. Insert the; 
jeassette into the slot under the frorf 
the printer until it stops. The eassel 
holds approximately 110 sheets.1 


F 


Figure 9-19. 

































9 - 26 


Style 


Now you will change the tab location with Tab Settings in the 
Paragraph menu. 

li Enable Paragraph mode. 

^ Select the paragraph that includes the tab character and 
the end of paragraph symbol (Figure 9-20). 



Desk File Edit Mien Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


1 1 111 | ||||||| || I! |||||| C:\TEMP\9IECHDDC.CHP (9TECHD0C .STV) Ilii iiiHII ii l illilli 

SBSm 

HU 


•Piper TnjrsV 

Stmt tray fsitk*. Hold the print tray 
to the wide end faced towards the front 
pf the printer. Insert the pbslfc pins into 
Jhe front slots above the handle II 


jPaper Trays, lapei Cissetteisf i 


iapeiCassettesll 

?kt( fin pi;ir in the assitti ini 
Jtunder the paper dips. Insert the ] 
kissette into the slot under the frorj 
jthi printer until it stops. The rassej: 
holds ipproxiratety 110 sheets ! 


Ill 


Figure 9-20. 


ii Add New Tag Tag Name to Add: Rule 

^ Alignment Overall Width: Frame-Wide 

First Line: Indent 

Relative Indent: On 

In/Outdent Width: 00,04 picas & points 

The relative indent aligns the beginning of this paragraph 
with the end of the previous paragraph — no matter how long 
or how short the previous paragraph may be. Since you don’t 
want the rule to touch the text, you must also specify an extra 
00,04 picas & points indent to separate the rule from the text. 

H Tab Settings Tab Number: 1 

Tab iype: Right 

Tab Shown As: Open Space 

Tab Location: 46,00 picas & points v 

The new tab location moves the paragraph symbol to the right 
margin (Figure 9-21). 































Add a ruling line above 


9 - 27 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



IBBIHHilIBBliillH C:\TEMPV9TECHD0C.CHP (9TECHD0C.STV) II 


SPapeiCassettesff 

Phct the piper m the eissette wd push 
Sunder the pipes clips. Insert the piper 
<(issette into the slot under the front of 
|the printer unlil it stops. The assette 


A Quick Tour 
of the Laser 
AstroZtl 


sfl 


Figure 9-21. 


At this point the Head4 and Rule tags still reside on separate 
lines. With the Rule paragraph still selected, use the Breaks 
dialog box to put them on the same line. 

^ Breaks Line Break: After 


Add a ruling line above 

You’ve placed the Rule tag on the same line, but it doesn’t 
make much difference yet because nothing is showing in the 
Rule paragraph. Now you will make it visible by creating two 
ruling lines above. 

In the next step you are going to create a double rule that is 
the width of the text. Recall that you created the paragraph 
with a tab stop (which is invisible) instead of actual text. 
Nevertheless, Ventura sees the tab as text. When you make 
the ruling line text-wide, the double rule stretches from the 
end of the Head4 paragraph to the tab location at the right 
margin. 

^ With the empty paragraph still highlighted, select Ruling 
Line Above. Choose Width: Text. Give Rule 1 a height of 
02.00 fractional pts and make the Space Below Rule 1 
02.00 fractional pts. Give Rule 2 a height of 00.50 fractional 
pts. Make the Space Below Rule 3 negative (-) 09.00 frac¬ 
tional pts. Click OK. 






































9 - 28 


Style 


’Rule" RULING LINES ABOVE Q] 


Width: 

Text 




Color: 

Black 




Pattern: 

Solid 




Bashes: 

Off 



36. BO 

Space Above Rule 1: 

oo.ee 




Height of Rule 1: 

02.06 

Custon Indent: 

oo ,do Fir 

» ! 

Space Belou Rule 1: 

02.ee 

Custora Width: 

00,00 


Height of Rule 2: 

00.56 




Space Belou Rule 2: 

00.66 

Dash Width: 

00,00 


Height of Rule 3: 

Qo.ee 

Dash Spacing! 

(XhO0 fractional pts 

Space Belou Rule 3: 

0?.0e| 

□ B 




Overall Height: 


OKjvi 


The negative value for Space Below Rule 3 shifts the rule 
down from its original location and aligns it with the Head4 
paragraph (Figure 9-22). 



r 

— 

L 

Pg tt 0004 | 


jPapei Tuys, Paper Casselleisf 
iPaperlnysl 

Prmtkiy position. HoW th« print tray 
to the wide end faced, towards the front 
jof the printer. Insert the plistk pins into 
the front slots ibove the Kindle, ! 

flOTE Do not oertoid the piper tray, 
packing it too full will ause piper juns 
imd print errors.! 

ifUtuhtheiHnul feed juke. Hold the 
Jnmuil feed guide with the plastic brack¬ 
ets towuds the rear of the printer. Fiee 
ihe ribbed side up. ff_ 


sunder the piper dips. Insert the piper 
tissette into the slot under the front of 
the printer until it stops. The ossette 
holds ipproxinately 110 sheets.! 

NOTE: If you wmt to print on letter 
held, place the piper FACE DOWN 
■beneith the tbps! 


AQ 
of tt 
Astr 


M. 


Figure 9-22. 


Since you gave the Rule tag a line break after, the double rule 
appears right next to the Head4 tag. 


Add the Note tag 

The Note tag isolates special warnings and procedures inside 
a box. To create the box around the Note tag, you will use the 
Ruling Line Around dialog box. As is often the case with 
Ventura, there is more than one way to create the effect we 



























Add the Note tag 


9-29 


will show you. You could also achieve a similar effect with 
frames or with Box Text. Each method has its advantages and 
disadvantages. The method we are showing you relies on tag 
attributes. It has the advantage of allowing you to change the 
look of multiple paragraphs throughout the entire document 
by changing a single tag. 

Select the paragraph that begins “NOTE: Do not overload 
the paper tray ... ” in the first column of the page. 

Tag Name to Add: Note 

In From Left: 01,00 picas & points 
In From Right: 01,00 picas & points 

I! Select Ruling Box Around. Choose Width: Column. Give 
Rule 1 a height of 00.06 fractional pts and make the Space 
Below Rule 1: 03.00 fractional pts. 

The Space Below Rule 1 adds extra space between the text 
and the ruling box (Figure 9-23). 


Add New Tag 
^ Spacing 


Desk File Edit Miew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



iiisiiauiiiiiiiiiii c:\temp\9techdoc.chp (9techdqc.stv) l isiiBigiiiiBiii 


Heod4 




Id 

l-u:i 


Prmttny positioi Bold the print tray 
to th« wide end faced towards the front 
pf the printer. Insert the plastic pins into 
-the front slots above the Kindle, ff 

NOTE: Do not oyerloid the 
piper tray. Parking H too full will 
ause piper jams and print errors.* 


Altirhthemni.il feed glide. Hold the 
jninuil feed guide with the plisbc brad* 
ets towards the rear of the printer. Face 
ihe ribbed side up. ff 

Laid paper in annul feed. Insert one 
jsheet of paper at a time. Gbde the paper 
kbng the tray until it ant go any fur¬ 
ther, then stop.* 

•PapaCassettesff 


the printer until it stops. The cassette 
holds approximately 110 sheets.! 

^OTE: If you want to print on letter 
fail, place the paper FACE DOWN 
beneath the elips.ff 


of tl 
Astr 


E 


Figure 9-23. 

Once the Note tag is defined, you can apply it to the next Note 
paragraph. 

H Select the paragraph that begins “NOTE: If you want to 
print on letterhead ...” in the second column and tag it as 
Note. 

























9 - 30 


Style 


*+NOTE: You can force Ventura to keep all of the paragraph 
together by choosing Allow Within: No from the Breaks dialog 
box. Ventura will not allow line breaks within the paragraph. 
Instead, it will move the entire paragraph to the next column or 
page if necessary to keep the paragraph together. However, 
this method has the danger of leaving large gaps of white 
space at the bottom of the previous column. 

Create a second list 

You will now create a second numbered list by tagging three 
paragraphs as List#. 

*+NOTE: Because the List# tag has a Line Break After, the three 
paragraphs you tag will shift on top of preceding paragraphs. 
This temporary confusion will be eliminated as soon as you 
renumber the chapter. 

H Select the following paragraphs and tag them with the 
List# tag. 

“Print tray position... ” 

“Attach the Manual Feed Guide... ” 

“Load Paper in Manual Feed... ” 

To generate numbers for the newly tagged List# paragraphs, 
use Ventura’s Renumber Chapter function. 

H Select Renumber Chapter from the Chapter menu or press 
Ctrl-B (Figure 9-24). 

TIP: Despite its name, Renumber Chapter does not affect 
chapter numbering. It applies only to Auto-Numbering. 




Figure 9-24. 


Create multiple lists 

After renumbering the chapter, the instructions are num¬ 
bered sequentially, but they start with the number four (Fig¬ 
ure 9-25). 



Desk File Edit Uie** Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


iFiper Tnysl 

jtfftjiifriy ptlttjui Hold the print 
! triy so the wide end heed towirds the 
| front of the printer. Insert the phstie 
• pins into the front slots above the 
: handle.! 


NOTE Do not overload the 
paper tray. Packing it too full will 
cause paper jams ind print errors! 


l 


iPiperCassettesfl 

iPkce the piper in the cassette and i 
junder the paper dips Insert the pi] 
cassette into the slot under the frori 
She printer until it stops. The asset 
holds approximate))' 110 sheets.f 


NOTE: If you want to print on 
ter head, pfcce the piper PACE 
DOWN beneith the dips.! 



5.!Aftaeh the manual feed guide. Bold 
the nunuil feed guide with the plistx 
brackets towards the rear of the 
printer. Face the ribbed side up. f 

GUnri paper it manual feed Insert 
one sheet cf paper it a time. Glide the 
piper along the tny until it can't go 
iny further, then stop.ff 




H 


□ 



Ventura starts with the list with the number four because it 
assumes that the sequence continues from the list on the 
previous page. In some cases, you may want a list that is 
numbered sequentially throughout the chapter. In other 
cases, however, you may want multiple lists that start num- 




























9 - 32 


Style 


bering over again at one. We will show you a quick way to 
restart the numbering. 

Whenever Ventura encounters a Level 1 tag, it resets the 
numbering for all the lower levels. By putting ordinary Body 
Text at Level 1, you trick Ventura into restarting the number¬ 
ing for Levels 2 and below. In this case, then, you will use 
Body Text for Level 1 and List# for Level 2. 

H Select Auto-Numbering from the Chapter menu. 

H Place the text cursor next to the Level 1 line and press Esc 
to clear the line. Choose Inserts: 1,2. Delete the 1, the 
comma, and the words “tag name.” Then type: Body Text 

By deleting the 1, you tell Ventura to number Body Text but 
not to show the numbers. In effect, then, you have “invisible” 
numbers. 

II Move the text cursor next to the Level 2 line. Select Inserts: 
1,2. Remove the words “tag name”, but keep the 1 and the 
comma. Then type: List# 

si Add a period after the right bracket. Click OK. 



The list now starts over at one (Figure 9-26). 





Add a page break 


y - 33 


| Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options | 

||taii=i*iiis=rfl=i=M C:\TEMP\9TECHD0C.CHP (9TECHD0C.STY) M 

1 

□ 



1 Add he* Tag | 

Pi 


t 

Body Text 

BodyBrcek 


todySMoll 


Keodl 

— 

Heads 


List* 


ustluiiet 

i 

Mote 

Mile 




L Pg H 8884 


iPiperTnjrsI 

jtfftiittray psttisn. Hold th* print 
tii/ »the wid« end ficed towirds the 
front of the printer. Insert the phsfa'e 
pint into the front slots ibove the 
hindle.f 


NOTE Do not overload the 
piper tny. Picking it too full will 
ause piper jims ind print errors.! 


2.! Attack the nurasl feed suite Hold 
the iranuil feed guide with the plistk 
brackets lowerds the reir of the 
printer. Faee the ribbed side up. f 

•IfLaadptper in manual feed. Insert 
one sheet of paper it i time. Gbde the 
piper ifong the tny until it cin't go 
iny further, then stop ! 


iPaj»r Cassettes* 

iPhce the piper in the cassette and 
under the piper dips. Insert the pal 
kissette into the slot under the fron 
ihe printer until it stops. The ossej 
holds approximately 110 sheets.! 


NOTE: If you want to print on| 
terhead, place the piper FACE] 
DOWN beneith the dips.! 




Figure 9-26. 

*+NOTE: The numbers are now tagged as Z_SEC2, since they 
are now on Level 2 in the Auto-Numbering dialog box. If you 
are using the style sheet from the Power disk, this tag has 
already been defined for you. If not, copy the attributes set 
forth for Z_SEC1 earlier in this chapter. 


Add a page break 

When you’re finished with Auto-Numbering, you will enter a 
page break after the last Note paragraph to push the rest of 
the text to the next page. Then leave the page as is. In the next 
section you will add frames and pictures to this page. 

H Enable Text mode. 

P Place the text cursor at the end of the paragraph “NOTE: If 
you want to print on letterhead....” Press Enter (Figure 
9-27). 

H Press FI to tag the new paragraph as BodyBreak. 

You have formatted the final paragraph in the 9TECH- 
DOC.TXT file. Before we continue, let’s take stock once again. 
You’ve already learned about breaks and Auto-Numbering. 
Now you are ready to tackle a new feature that will add spark 
and dazzle to your Ventura documents. Get ready for some 
fun. 









































y - 34 


Style 



Figure 9-27. 


Adding spot color 

If you have the budget, color can add an extra dimension to 
your visual communication. With color, you have a powerful 
visual aid that can add impact and import to information in a 
document. Color can jazz up a dull report or transform a 
lackluster manual. As you plan for color in your publication, 
don’t get lured into the snare many beginners find themselves 
in: placing too many colors in too many shades on a single 
page. You’ll find that too many conflicting colors can be garish, 
amateurish and at worse, distracting to your main com¬ 
munication. If you are just starting out in design, we suggest 
you stick to one or two colors for your document. 

Without going into all the complexities of color theory, in this 
section we will show you how to define and apply one color. We 
will start with a few basics about color printing. 

*+NOTE: If you never use or intend to use color in any of your 
documents, feel free to skip ahead to the pictures section. 

In traditional printing, there are two ways to print color: 
Process color and spot color. Let’s look at both in turn. 

In process color printing you run a page through the press 
four times. One time for each primary color (cyan, magenta, 
and yellow) and another time for black. By mixing these four 
colors in different combinations, you get a limitless palette of 























L/isaoie cotuns 


colors. You would use process color printing to print color 
photographs or illustrations with a range of colors. If you have 
the budget for photography and/or color illustrations, you can 
define over 125 million colors in Ventura and print directly to 
a color printer, such as the QMS ColorScript. 

On the other hand, if you don’t have the luxury of a color 
printer, you can still use Ventura to define one or two colors. 
When your document uses only a few colors, you do not use 
process printing. Instead, you use what is known as “spot 
color.” Spot color runs a page through the press for each color 
(plus black) that you define on the page. 

Before you give a document to a printer for spot color printing, 
you must create a set of color separations, that is, a separate 
page for each color you define. For instance, let’s say you 
wanted to use two colors, black and red. First, you would 
define the colors. In our example, you would apply red to the 
desired text, ruling lines, or graphic shapes and backgrounds 
in the document. (You can apply the color in any dialog box 
that includes color selections.) Second, you would instruct 
Ventura to print out a page for every page element that is black 
and a separate page for every element that is red. The end 
result is a set of color overlays that you can send to an offset 
printer for printing. 

*+NOTE: With Ventura’s color capabilities, you eliminate the 
extra expense of paying an offset printer to make the color 
separations for you. 

So let’s get started. In this section you will define and apply a 
color to one page element. Later in the Chapter section, you 
will print out your color overlays. For this example, we will 
assume that you are printing to a black and white printer, not 
a color printer. 

Disable colors 

First you will disable the colors that you will not use — in this 
case, everthing exept red, black, and white. 

§i Enable Paragraph mode. 

H Select Define Colors from the Paragraph menu. 





Assign a color to selected page elements 

Next you will tell Ventura which page elements will be red. 
^ Make sure you are on page four. 

H Select the Note in the first column (Figure 9-28). 
li Select Ruling Box Around from the Paragraph menu. 

M Choose Color: Red and click OK. 




Assign a color to selected page elements 


9 - 37 




"Mote" RULING BOX AROUND 



□ 

Width: Column 
Colon: Red 




PatternSolid 




Dashes: Off 



36.00 

Space Above Rule 1: 00.0 b| 




Height of Rule 1: 00.06 

Custon Indent: 

oo.oo Mi 

' ! 

Space Below Rule 1: 03.08 

Custon Width: 

GO.OO 


Height of Rule 2: 00.00 
Space Below Rule 2: 00.00 

Dash Width: 

00.00 


Height of Rule 3: 00.00 

Dash Spacing: 

80*GO fractional ptsl 

Space Below Rule 3: 00.00 

DEI 



Overall Height: 03.06 

mm 

Cancel | 



You just changed the color of the ruling box around the note. 
Now you will change the color of the Head4 tag to red. 

^ Select the paragraph “Paper Trays, Paper Cassettes” at the 
top of the page. 

^ Select Font from the Paragraph menu. Choose Color: Red 
and click OK. 

Notice that the only colors in the dialog box are white, black 
and red, the ones you defined and enabled in the Define Colors 
dialog box. Because of time and space limitations, you will 
only add color to one page. 






















































9 - 38 


Pictures 



Pictures 


Before you print out the color overlays, you will place pictures 
into frames. In this section, you will incorporate illustrations 
by adding new frames and importing AutoCAD pictures. You 
will also learn to anchor frames to text. As with the rest of this 
chapter, you will be learning advanced techniques that may 
take extra time and effort to master completely. 


Add three frames 

Before you place the pictures, you must add the frames to 

contain them. 

II Check that you are on page four. 

II Reset the zero point to its original position at the upper left 
corner of the Page by clicking on the 0,0 square in the upper 
left corner of the page. Check to make sure that Line snap 
and Column Snap are on. 

^ Enable Frame mode. Select Add New Frame from the Side- 
Bar. 

II Add a frame in the first column, starting from position 13 
picas on the vertical ruler. Stretch it 14,00 picas wide and 
11,00 picas high (Figure 9-29). 















Place pictures inside the frames 


9 - 39 



Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


iilHiil C:\TEI1P\9TECHDGC.CHP (9TECHD0C.STV) 


nascit'i.GEn 
ELASEK-2 
ELGSEft-3.GEM 
ElflSEK-i.GEM 
ETtCHOOC.TXT 


r 

EMPTY I 

E 

Pg 8 0064 | 


•Paper Trtys, Piper Cassettejs ! 

ja-*-t 

j UpperLeftX: D9.06 picas i 
) UpperLekY: 13,00 picas : 

: WkMiiHOO picas | 

1 Height: 11,00 picas ■ 


k_■_ft 

jPiperTraps 

It Prinl tray >«sitj*n. Hold the print 
I tray so the wide end faced towards the: 
: fror.t cf the pfir.ttr Insert 1h< phst; : 


2 Attachfhemuul feel glide] 

the manual feed guide with the 
brackets towards the rear of the 
printer. Face the ribbed side up 

3 LaalpiperinMBu1feel.il 
one sheet of paper at a time G 
paper along the tray until it or 
any further, then stop. 

iPiperCassettro 

iPk<e the paper in the cassette and 
under the paper dips. Insert the pa| 
kassette into the skt under the froi 
the printer until it stops. The assei 


m 


Figure 9-29. 


NOTE: You can check the frame’s width and height with the 
Sizing & Scaling dialog box. 

To visually separate the frame from the Page, you will add a 
ruling box around. 

Ruling Box Width: Frame 

Around Height of Rule 1: 00.05 fractional pts 

Now you will copy the frame and paste it twice. 

i! With the frame still selected, press Shift-Del. 

H Press the Ins key to paste a copy on top of the original. 

H Press Ins again to insert another copy of the frame. 

ii Move the two copies into position. Make sure the top and 
bottom edges of the new frames line up with the top and 
bottom edge of the original frame (Figure 9-30). 


Place pictures inside the frames 

H Select the left frame and place the file 9LASER-1.GEM 
inside. 

^ Select the middle frame and place the file 9LASER-2.GEM 
inside. 

H Select the right frame and place the file 9LASER-3.GEM 
inside (Figure 9-31). 

























9-40 


Pictures 




Desk File Edit Uiew Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


C:\TEMP\9fECHD0C.CHP (9TECHD0C.STY) 



1. Print tray position HoVI the print 
tray so the wide end faced towards the 
front of the printer, Insert the plastic 
pins into the front slots above the 


Z Attach the nuuul feed ipnde. Hold 
■ the manual feed guide with the plastk 
| brackets towards the reir of the 
| printer. Face the ribbed side up. 

2- Load paper in manual feeilnsert 




•PaperCassettes 

^Uee the paper in the assette ind push it 
[under the paper clips. Insert the paper 
[assette into the slot under the front of 
Jthe printer until it stops. The cassette 




mm 



Figure 9-31. 


NOTE: If you do not have these three pictures from the Power 
Disk, substitute others of your own choosing. 


Size and scale the pictures 

You will use Picture Scaling: By Scale Factors (Sizing & Scal¬ 
ing dialog box) to scale the pictures in the frames. Select the 
left-most frame. 
















































Add a Spacer paragraph 


9 - 41 


§1 Sizing & Picture Scaling: By Scale Factors 

Scaling Aspect Ratio: Maintained 

X Offset: + 03,00 picas & points 
Y Offset: + 12,00 picas & points 
Scale Width: 29,00 picas & points 

Use Figure 9-32 to gauge the scale and aspect ratio for the 
rest of the three frames. 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 

T 


- 


t 



paper Tra js. Paper Cassettejs 


Picture Seating: By Scale Factors 
AspectRaio: Maintained 

XOfcet+03,00 picas 
YOtse* +12D0 picas 

Scale Wdfc 29,00 picas 


Paper Trays 

t Mil tray pasHian Hold the print 
tray so the wile end feoed towirds the 
front of the printer. Insert the phstir 
pins into the front slots above the 



Picture Seating: ByScale Factors 
AspectRabo: Maintained 

XOtiseC +01,06 picas 
YOtiset+01,06 picas 

Scale Width: 15,00 picas 


J2. Atbdi the rranual feed guide. Hold 
: the manual feed guide with the phstic 

• brackets towards the rear of the 
■ printer. Fate the ribbed side up. 

il Leadpeper iamanualfeed-lnsert 

• one sheet of saner it i time Qbde the 


i Picture Seating: ByScale Factors 
j AspectRabo: Maintained 

j XOfset +01,00 picas 

| Y OOset+01,06 picas 

i ScaJeWidth: 14,00 picas 


TapeiCasseltes i 

■Pkct the paper in the cassette and push it i 5® 
junder the paper tbps Insert the piper is® 
jussette into the slot under thefront of i : :■ 
•the printer until it stops. The cassette : "T 
noils. lUDrmnraiih-. .HQ. jhteli, JL 


Figure 9-32. 


Add a Spacer paragraph 

When you placed the frames, the text automatically re-flowed 
on the page. Now you will finish the formatting with one 
adjustment — you will add a spacer tag to an empty para¬ 
graph in the second column to keep the spacing of the num¬ 
bered items even. 

^ Enable Text mode. 

H Place the text cursor after the last period in the first Note 
paragraph in column 1 (Figure 9-33). Press Enter. Then 
press F10 to tag the empty paragraph as Body Text. 

^ Enable Paragraph mode. 

H Select the empty paragraph you just created (which was 
tagged as Body Text). 

II Add New Tag Tag Name to Add: Spacer 

































9 - 42 


Pictures 



Figure 9-33. 


^ Spacing Add in Above: Always 

Unlike Body Text, you want the Spacer tag to keep 12.00 
fractional pts of extra white space at the top of the column. 
The extra space above in the Spacer tag makes the top of all 
three columns line up with each other (Figure 9-34). 



*+NOTE: You also did not use Body Text as the spacer because 
Body Text would cause the Auto-Numbering to reset to one. 


















































Add the final illustration 


9-43 


Add the final illustration 


Now you will go to page five and add the frame for the final 

illustration. 

^ Go to page five. 

H Enable Frame mode. 

^ Select Add New Frame. Start the frame at the upper left 
corner of the second column and stretch it 30,00 picas wide 
and 24,00 picas high. You may want to change to reduced 
view to place the frame (Figure 9-35). 



Figure 9-35. 

U With the frame still selected, choose the file 9LASER- 
4.GEM from the Assignment List. 


Sizing & 
Scaling 


Picture Scaling: By Scale Factors 
Aspect Ratio: Maintained 
X Crop Offset: +08,00 picas & points 
Y Crop Offset: +20,00 picas & points 
Scale Width: 63,00 picas & points 


Add a caption label 


You are almost finished with the manual. Let’s make a few 
more enhancements to the page by including automatic figure 
numbering. 
































9-44 


Pictures 


!i With the frame still selected, choose Anchors & Captions 
from the Frame menu. 

H Choose Caption: Below. Move to the Label line and type: 
Figure followed by a space. 

^ Choose Inserts: Chapter #, type a hyphen and choose In¬ 
serts: Figure # and type a period. The code will read [C#] - 
[F#] . Click OK. 



Add caption text 

1! Enable Text mode. 

§§ Place the text cursor in front of the end of file mark inside 
the caption and type: 

The front view of the Laser AstroZ, showing the dis¬ 
play panel, the toner cartridge door, the release 
lever, the paper cassette, and the print tray. 

Add a frame anchor 

We promised to show you some advanced picture techniques, 
and frame anchoring is one of the most useful. Frame anchor¬ 
ing keeps frames on the same page as the text they refer to. 
Once a frame has been anchored, you can make large addi¬ 
tions and deletions to a text file without worry that the frame 
will be displaced from its text reference. It is a two-step 
process: (1) insert an anchor reference into the text file and (2) 





Add a frame anchor 


9 - 45 


attach an identical reference to the frame. Once a frame has 
been anchored, you can make large additions or deletions to 
the text without the fear that you will move the frames. The 
Re-Anchor Frames function searches the text file for anchor 
references and then moves frames to the correct pages again. 

As is so often the case, the best way to understand this ad¬ 
vanced function is to try it out. Start by placing an anchor 
reference into the text on page five. 

H! Place the text cursor after the “Z” in the phrase “A Quick 
Tour of the LaserAstroZ” on page five. 

M Select Ins Special Item (or press Ctrl-C) from the Edit 
menu (Figure 9-36). 


Cut Text 


Paste Text 


hi 

(Del 

Ins 


Ins Special Item... 


Edit Spsciai Stea*„ I) 


Rmm fext/fife^» 
Fife 


Figure 9-36. 


H Choose Frame Anchor (or press the F5 key). 

H Move the text cursor to the Frame’s Anchor Name line and 
type: 1-1 

H Choose Frame’s New Location: Fixed, On Same Page As 
Anchor and click OK. 

^ NOTE: When Ventura tells you it cannot find the Anchor Frame 
1-1, and asks what you want to do about it, choose Ignore. 
You have not yet added the anchor. 







9-46 


Pictures 



If Show Tabs & Returns is selected, you will see a degree 
symbol (°) in the text to indicate the anchor reference. 

** TIP: Like footnotes and index entries, anchor references can 
be typed directly into text files using a bracket code. See the 
tips at the end of Chapter Eight for details. 

After placing the anchor reference in the text, you will attach 
an identical anchor name to the frame with Anchors & Cap¬ 
tions. 

H Enable Frame mode. Select the frame. 

^ Select Anchors & Captions from the Frame menu. 

H Move the text cursor to the Anchor line and type: 1-1 
(Figure 9-37). 

WARNING: Type the anchor reference exactly the same in both dialog boxes. 
Otherwise, Ventura cannot match the two references. 

Re-anchoring frames 

There is no need to use anchoring until a frame is separated 
from the text reference. Just to see the feature in operation, 
try deleting the frame you just anchored. Move to any other 
page of the document and paste the frame there. 

Now you will try re-anchoring. 








Adding callouts 


9-47 



Figure 9-37. 


H Select Re-Anchor Frames from the Chapter menu (or press 
Ctrl-B) and choose All Pages. If you press the keyboard 
shortcut, Ctrl-B, you will automatically Re-Anchor Frames 
for all pages. 

The frame returns to the page containing the anchor reference 
in the text. You may need to re-position it slightly. 

Adding callouts 

Ventura’s graphics tools are perfect for adding callouts to 
pictures. Using Box Text and lines, you can create annotations 
and arrows. Since graphic shapes stay tied to the parent 
frame, when you move the frame, the callouts move with it. 

Draw Box Text 

To create callouts, you will start by creating the Box Text. 
Then you will type in the actual words, and draw arrows 
pointing to specific features in the picture. First you will set 
the horizontal and vertical grid settings. 

H Enable Graphic mode. Choose the picture frame to make it 
the parent to the shapes you will draw. 

^ Grid Settings Grid Snap: On 

Horizontal Spacing: 00,06 picas & points 
Vertical. Spacing: 00,06 picas & points 





9-48 


Pictures 


Select the Box Text tool. Draw a Box Text shape 06,00 picas 
wide and 03,00 picas high. Position it close to where we 
show in Figure 9-38. 


Desk File Edit Uieu Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 



Figure 9-38. 


li Line Attributes Thickness: None 

Defaults: Save To 

H Fill Attributes Color: White 

Pattern: Hollow 
Results: Transparent 
Defaults: Save To 

Now add the text part of the callout. 

^ Enable Text mode. 

H Place the cursor inside the Box Text and type: Display 
Panel 

Now you will draw an arrow. 

II Enable Graphic mode and make sure the picture frame is 
selected as the parent. Then select the line tool. Starting 
from the end of the word “Panel,” draw a line from the text 
to the picture as shown in Figure 9-38. 

*+NOTE: Although you could have drawn the arrow before typing 
the words, you would have been forced to guess at the precise 
location. Placing the arrow after typing the callout makes 
placement easier. 

















Draw Box Text 


9 - 49 



Figure 9-39. 


^ Line Attributes Thickness: Thin 

End Styles: (Beginning) Arrow 
Defaults: Save To 

Repeat the steps above to add two more callouts as shown in 
Figure 9-40. 



Figure 9-40. 

When you are finished, save the chapter and move on to the 
Chapter section. 






























9 - 50 


Chapter 


Chapter 

Now you are ready to print out the chapter and create a set of 
color overlays. You will get two sheets of paper for the color 
overlays on page four. 

^ Go to page 4. 

§1 Choose To Print form the Chapter menu. 

II Choose Which Pages: All and Spot Color Overlays: On. 
Then click OK. 


^ When Ventura asks if you want to print 2 spot overlays per 
page of the chapter, choose Overlays (Figure 9-41). 


PRIMT INFORMATION (POSTSCRIPT - Ultimate) (7] 

Which Pages: Current 

From Page: 0004 

Through Page j 0004 


f- 

STOP 


Are you sure you want to print 
2 spot color overlays per page 
of this chapter? IF not, either 
print just one page for all colors 
or cancel the print request. 


| One Page | 
| Cancel j 


Huiti-Chp. Print tiles: i.;onh.me£S 


Device Name: POSTSCRIPT 
Output To: C0M1: 


OK 


Figure 9-41. 


Ventura prints out the manual. When it gets to page four, it 
prints out one sheet for black and one sheet for red. 


*+NOTE: If you place the two overlays pages on top of each 
other, you can see the resulting effect 

Now give yourself a big pat on the back. You made it through 
all nine chapters of Ventura expert training. You should be 
proud of yourself. Now you are ready to show off your talents 
to the world. Get started on those high-powered, award-win¬ 
ning designs. 

For all of you who have the ambition and the determination to 
go beyond your own limits, don’t stop here. You are just one 




Draw Box Text 


9 - 51 


chapter away from becoming a true Ventura master. In Chap¬ 
ter Ten, we tackle the advanced features of the Professional 
Extension. If you have the Professional Extension and are 
ready for the challenge, go to the next chapter. 



Tips and techniques 


Text tips 

□ You can create a special page break (BodyBreak) tag that 
includes a Page Break: After. To force a page break within 
the text file, tag an empty paragraph with the page break 
tag. All the text following the tag will be forced to the next 
page. 

□ Auto-Numbering includes two basic steps: first you choose 
which tags to number and what style of numbering to use. 
Second, you format the numbers that Ventura generates. 

□ Initially the generated section number tags have the same 
attributes as body text. You can format them like any para¬ 
graph. 

□ You can create a traditional outline format (uppercase 
Roman numerals, uppercase letters, lower case Roman, 
and so forth) with the Auto-Numbering dialog box. Insert 
the Suppress Previous Level symbol ([-]) as the first item on 
the Level line. This selection instructs Ventura to suppress 
printing of the higher level numbers. 

□ Whenever Ventura encounters a Level 1 tag, it resets the 
numbering for all the lower levels. 

□ Using Body Text to reset numbering will not work properly 
if you want to intersperse Body Text between consecutive 
numbers in the same list. In these cases, you can create a 
special Reset tag. Here’s how you do it: First, go to the 
Auto-Numbering dialog box and place the tag name Reset 
on the Level 1 line. Now select an empty paragraph and add 
a tag called Reset. Align the new tag flush right. Set the 
line spacing to a very small amount. Use the Breaks dialog 
to set the Line Breaks to No. In essence, you will create an 
invisible tag that resides on the same line with other para- 




9 - 52 


Chapter 


graphs. Its only function is to signal Ventura when to start 
renumbering from one. 

□ When a tag with a ruling box around crosses a page or 
column boundary, the paragraph text continues but the 
ruling line does not. To avoid this problem, try creating the 
same effect with Box Textor text inside a frame. 

Picture tips 

□ Frame anchoring allows you to tie frames to the text refer¬ 
ence they refer to. Once a frame has been anchored you can 
make large additions and deletions to a text file without 
worry that the frame will be displaced from its text refer¬ 
ence. 

□ Like text references and footnotes, frame anchors can be 
typed directly into the text file in advance using a bracket 
code. The anchor codes are as follows (where anchor name 
is the frame reference name specified in Anchors & Cap¬ 
tions): 

Picture frame on same page: <$&anchor name> 

Picture frame below: <$&anchor name[v]> 

Picture frame above: <$&anchor name[ A ]> 

Picture frame floats with text <%8ianchor name [-]> 

□ Make sure you type the anchor name exactly the same in 
the Insert/Edit Anchor dialog box and the Anchors & Cap¬ 
tion dialog box. Otherwise Ventura cannot match the two 
references. 

Miscellaneous tips 

□ You can create a special spacer to insert extra spaces be¬ 
tween paragraphs. Simply tag an empty paragraph with 
the above, below, or inter-line spacing desired. 

□ It is easier to draw crop marks manually if you temporarily 
reset the page margins to equal the trim size of the paper. 
Then you can use the column guides to help you position 
the marks. 





Chapter Ten 
Skills Checklist 


Theory 

□ Using cross references to link text 
with frames 

□ Ventura’s Table mode 

□ The parts of a table 

□ Editing tables 

□ Understanding vertical justification 

Text 

□ Inserting cross references 

□ Table text 

□ Editing table text 

Style 

□ Building a table 

□ Adding tint screens to tables 

□ Applying vertical justification 

□ Vertical justifications in paragraphs 

Chapter 

□ Printing a publication to a single disk 
file 




Chapter Ten 


The Professional Extension 


B y completing the first nine chapters of Publishing Power 
you have gained a solid, working knowledge of Ventura. 
Now you are ready to advance beyond the basics to reach a 
higher level of expertise. In Chapter Ten, you will broaden 
your inventory of Ventura skills and techniques as you learn 
the specialized features of Ventura’s Professional Extension. 
The checklist on the left gives a preview of the skills you will 
learn in this chapter. 


Theory 

In the first half of the theory section, we will show you how to 
operate Ventura’s Cross Reference feature. In the second half, 
we will cover the principles behind vertical justification and 
Ventura’s automatic table generator, two features that bolster 
Ventura’s professional publishing capabilities. 

*+NOTE: Because of time and space limitations, we did not 
include complex equation editing in this chapter. We did, how¬ 
ever, include a simple example of equation editing in the 
“Insert Fractions”section in Chapter Eight. 

Cross references 

As you begin to work on long documents of your own, you will 
find that keeping track of all the figures, tables, captions, and 
pictures is crucial to the success of the project. With the 
Professional Extension, Ventura provides a high-powered 
device for creating and updating all the page, chapter, figure, 
table, caption, or section number references in a document. 



10-2 


Theory 


Among other things, the Cross Referencing feature lets you 
keep track of pictures and text as you change a document. 

To help you understand cross referencing, let’s apply its basic 
principles to the following hypothetical situation: 

Imagine that you have created a technical manual with fifty 
illustrations. You numbered each frame (with automatic fig¬ 
ure numbers) and gave it a Frame Anchor name. Figure 10-1 
shows how the Anchors & Caption dialog box would appear for 
a typical frame in our sample document. 



In the text, you have also inserted a reference to each illustra¬ 
tion that reads “See Figure 1,” “See Figure 2,” and so forth 
(Figure 10—2). 

Now it’s time to update the manual. You insert a new illustra¬ 
tion on the first page of the document. With Ventura’s auto¬ 
matic figure numbering, when you add a frame, you “bump 
up” all the subsequent figure numbers in the document. But 
the “See Figure...” references in the text keep their old num¬ 
bers — which are now inaccurate. Normally you would have to 
renumber each one individually in Text mode. But if you use 
the Cross Reference feature to link each text reference with its 
corresponding frame, Ventura can update the numbers auto¬ 
matically. The following steps show how you can make a cross 
reference and link the text reference with a frame. We are 
assuming that you have already inserted frames and given 
them anchor names, as explained in Chapter Nine. 





Cross references 


10-3 



Figure 10-2. 


^ NOTE: The steps below illustrate the theory of cross-refer¬ 
encing. Later in the chapter you will have a chance to try some 
hands-on practice. 

• Enable Text mode. 

• Place the text cursor where you want the figure number to 
appear. Typically, you would place the number after the 
word “Figure ” as in Figure 10—3. 



Set Font 


Nomol 

•♦Id 

it<uac 

Soon 

Superscript 
Subscript 
Underline 
|Doublc UndrLn| 
Strike-thru 
Overscore 


L Pg S 8804 


joilfLoad I'aper in Manual heed! insert 
onesheetofpaperata time. Glide the 
paper along the tray until it can’t go 
anyfurther, then stop (Figure^).! 


P 


Figure 10-3. 






































10-4 


Theory 


To insert a cross reference you would: 

• Select Ins Special Item from the Edit menu and choose 
Cross Reference (Figure 10-4). 


Desk File 1739 View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 




■ 


D 

| 

| 

Nornai 

laid 

Italic 

Small 

Superscript 

Subscript 

Underline 

Double UndrLn 

Strike-thru 

Overscore 

upper Cate 

■ 


auHsa; 

\*mmm 


iBililllilllHIHIII C:\P0HER\PR0FEXT.CHP (PROFEXT.STV) IllilSlll 


p.HLoadriaper in Manual heed! insert' 
onesheet of paper ata time. Glide the 
until it can’t go 

n SZE*" ” kFigureb-IT 


Box Chan... 

Ft 

Footnote 

F2 

Index Entry... 

F3 

Equation... 

F4 

Frane Anchor.. 

. F5 

Cross Ref... 

F6 

Marker Hane... 

Fin 

Variable Def.. 

. F8 

Table... 



Figure 10-4. 


• Move to the At The Name line and type in the name of the 
frame you want to reference. 

*+NOTE: Make sure you enter the same name as you entered 
for the Anchor Name line (Anchors & Captions dialog box). 
Otherwise , Ventura won’t link up the frame with the cross 
reference. 

• Move to the Refer Tb line and enter the type of reference 
you want to create (Figure 10-5). For our example above, 
you would choose F# to references the figure numbers. 
Click OK to close the dialog box. 

No new numbers appear yet. First you must generate a cross 
reference for the chapter. Tb do so, you save the chapters) as 
a publication. Then you select Renumber from the Multi- 
Chapter dialog box. When Ventura renumbers the publica¬ 
tion, you will see the correct figure numbers inserted into the 
text (Figure 10-6). 

If cross referencing seems difficult, don’t be concerned. 




















Table mode 


10-5 


Remember you are learning an advanced application that 
goes beyond everyday skills. It will become clear with practice. 


INSERT/EDIT REFERENCE Q] 

fit The Name: 1 -1[_ 

Refer To: Ftt 
Format: Default 


OK 


Cancel 


Figure 10-5. 



Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


HA5ER-1.GIH 
HASIH-I.GIM 
»LASER*!.Gth 
K()JEK*4. GIH 
PMFEXT.TXT 


PROFEXT.TXT 


L Pg tt 9604 


III C:\PQKER\PROFBU.CHP (PROFEXT.STV) |i» 


ii'lfjJoail i’aper in Manual heed! insert' 
onesheetofpaperatatime. Glide the 
paper along the tray until it can’t go 
any further, then stop (Figure l-l°).f 


L. 

if 


III 


Figure 10-6. 


Table mode 


In earlier chapters, you learned several methods for creating 
tables. Chapter Two showed how to format simple, single-line 
tables using Tab Settings. Chapter Eight explained side-by- 
side paragraphs for complex tables. In this chapter, you will 
learn how to use the Professional Extension’s table editor, an 
advanced capability for generating simple or complex tables. 








































10-6 


Theory 


The parts of a table 

A table is any text (words or numbers) that is formatted in a 
grid of rows and columns (up to 9999 rows or columns with the 
Professional Extension). Each table is a collection of in¬ 
dividual grid units called “cells” (Figure 10-7). 



Desk 

File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 

— 

u 

a 

|« 112 |tt 12 4 |30 |3< |42 

T 

R 



























iJL 




















* 

♦ 


m 

□ 


Figure 10-7. In Table mode, tables are constructed of individual cells. 


Ventura can place a ruling box around the table and ruling 
lines between each row and column. Or, at your option, you 
can hide or change any or all of the lines (Figure 10-8). 



Figure 10-8. 




























The parts of a table 


10-7 


The table editor assigns row and column numbers. This built- 
in numbering system makes it easy to specify a cell or range of 
cells. For instance, Figure 10-9 shows the row and column 
numbers for a three-row by four-column table. 



Figure 10-9. 


In Figure 10-9, the grid cell in the upper left corner is 
R0C0...R0C1, or row zero, column zero through row zero, 
column one. To see the position of a cell, point and click on one 
of its ruling lines. Ventura highlights the selected ruling line 
in gray and displays the range of rows and columns in the 
Current Selection Box (Figure 10-10). 



Figure 10-10. 














































10-8 


Theory 


** TIP: Ventura sees each grid cell as a box defined by four 
borders. 

Each cell can contain one or more lines of text. In fact, you can 
make every cell a different size. You can also dress up the 
table by adding a tint screen to an individual or group of cells. 
A tint screen adds visual contrast and helps separate diverse 
information. 

*+NOTE: You may not be able to get all of the effects if you do 
not have a PostScript printer. 

You can place a table on the Underlying Page or in a separate 
frame that resides on top of the Page. If your table is exces¬ 
sively long, you can instruct Ventura to continue the table 
across a column, a page, or a frame (Figure 10-11). 



Figure 10-11. 


Editing tables 

After you generate a table, you can use Ventura’s standard 
editing tools to add or delete rows and columns. You start by 
highlighting the cell or range of cells you want to cut or copy. 
Then you select Cut or Copy Row/Column from the Edit menu 
(or press the Shift-Del or Del keys) to copy or cut cells to the 
clipboard. To paste a row or column, select the line between the 
row or column where you want to insert the cell(s) and select 
Paste from the Edit menu (or press the Ins key). 













Editing tables 


10-9 


*+NOTE: You can select a ruling line even if it is hidden. 

In addition to cut, copy, and paste, Table mode lets you change 
the table specifications and change column widths. 

To change the table settings, click anywhere in the table and 
select Edit Table Settings from the Edit menu (or press Ctrl- 
D). The Insert/Edit Table dialog box appears. Now you can 
change the # of header rows, the ruling line attributes, and 
the spacing values for the entire table. 

Once you create a table, you cannot change the number of 
rows and columns through the Insert/Edit dialog box. Instead, 
you must add or subtract rows and columns using Ins Row 
and Ins Column from the Assignment List. To do this, you 
place the Table Edit cursor on the ruling line where you want 
to insert the row(s) or column(s). Then you drag the cursor 
across the number of cells you want to insert. If you drag the 
cursor over three rows, you are instructing Ventura to insert 
three rows. If you drag the cursor across two columns, you are 
instructing Ventura to add two columns. After selecting the 
number of rows or columns to add, select Ins Row or Ins 
Column from the Assignment List. 

To change the width of a column, click on the column you wish 
to change then select Set Column Widths from the Edit menu. 
The current column number is displayed on the Column Num¬ 
ber line (Figure 10-12). 


TABLE COLUMN WIDTHS 


Column Number: 


* 




Width Setting: Variable 



Fixed Width: 

Variable Width: 


00,00 

00011 


picas R points 
proportions 


OK 


Cancel 


Figure 10-12. 








10-10 


Theory 


*+NOTE: To change the column number, click on the left or right 
arrows next to the Column Number. 

In the Set Column Width dialog box, you can change the 
column width by a fixed or variable amount. If you choose 
Width Settings: Fixed, Ventura applies the width you specify 
to the selected column. To make the column exactly 06,00 
picas & points wide, you would enter 06,00 for the Fixed 
Width (Figure 10-13). 


TABLE COLUMN WIDTHS 


Column Number: 




1 + 


Width Setting: Fixed 



Fixed Width: 

Uarkble Width: 


06,00 picas 8 points 
1200 proportions 


OK 


Cancel 


Figure 10-13. 


On the other hand, if you choose Variable Width, Ventura 
sizes the current column in proportion to all the other columns 
in the table. For instance, if you entered a variable width of 2, 
Ventura would give the current column two proportional units 
of the space left over after creating the fixed columns. Perhaps 
the easiest way to understand variable widths is to use per¬ 
centages. Let’s say you assign columns 1, 2, and 3 variable 
widths of 20, 30, and 50. Ventura will give column 1 20 percent 
of the space, column 2 30 percent, and column 3 50 percent. 
From there, it should be apparent that you could also enter 
widths of 2, 3, and 5 to achieve the same effect. To make things 
easy on yourself, when first learning variable widths, make 
sure that the numbers you enter always add up to a total of 10 
or 100 (Figure 10-14). 






Figure 10-14. 

To determine the size of each column, Ventura uses the vari¬ 
able proportion you enter in the Insert/Edit Table dialog box 
and calculates the relative proportions of the current column 
width, the fixed column widths, and the overall width of the 
table. 

You can also change column widths interactively. In Table 
mode, put the cursor anywhere in the column you want to 
change. Press and hold down the Alt key. A line appears from 
the top to the bottom of the screen (Figure 10-15). Move the 
line to change the position of the right-hand column. 



Figure 10-15. Press and hold the alt key while sliding the mouse to 
interactively change the column width. 






































10 - 12 


Theory 


Table text 


Now that you’ve learned how to set up the physical dimen¬ 
sions of a table, let’s take a look at the “text” part of tables. For 
every cell in the table Ventura automatically generates a tag 
named Table Text. You can format it with the attributes from 
Paragraph menu or rename it as a different tag. In this 
chapter’s table, you will change the text attributes of Table 
Text and add a new tag for the table title. 

Vertical justification 

Vertical justification is a sophisticated typographic technique 
that makes text fill to the bottom of a column, frame, or page. 
Just as horizontal justification aligns text on both right and 
left edges of a column or page, vertical justification aligns text 
with the top and bottom edges of a column or page (Figure 
10—16 and Figure 10-17). 



To understand vertical justification, you must first under¬ 
stand why Ventura cannot always fill text to the bottom of the 
page. As you know from earlier projects, Ventura flows as 
much text onto a page or frame as possible, then stops. If the 
text file you place does not contain enough text to reach the 
bottom, a large gap is left over. Likewise, gaps are made when 
you force headings to stay with the following text using Keep 
With Next (Breaks menu), and when you prevent single lines 







































Vertical justification 


10-13 



Figure 10-17. After applying vertical justification. 


of text at the top or the bottom of the page with the Widows 
and Orphans control (Chapter Typography menu). Further¬ 
more, you make extra spaces whenever you arbitrarily insert 
a page or column break (Figure 10-18). 



Figure 10-18. 


To eliminate unattractive “holes” at the bottom of a page, you 
can use the vertical justification control in the Professional 
Extension. Ventura will add space until the text reaches the 
bottom of the column or page according to the rules you define. 
You tell Ventura how much space to add between frames, 
paragraphs, tables, and lines of text. Ventura then adds space, 
to the maximum you specified, in the following order: 
























































10-14 


Theory 


1. Between frames and the surrounding text 

2. Between paragraphs or between paragraphs and tables 

3. Between individual lines of text 

*+NOTE: During vertical justification, space is always added, 
never subtracted. Vertical justification never moves text across 
the boundary of a page. 

For a preview of each vertical justification control, take a 
moment to read through Table 9-1. The table shows you 
where to find each vertical justification control, which settings 
are available, and what each option does . 

Because vertical justification is an advanced typographic ef¬ 
fect, you may not understand the effects of every vertical 
justification control. Don’t let that bother you. For now, con¬ 
centrate on observing how text flows and reflows on the page 
before and after you turn on vertical justification. Then try 
changing one or another vertical justification setting to see 
the results. As you already know, the best way to understand 
a complex feature is to explore its options on your own. For the 
project in this chapter, you will have the chance to experiment 
with vertical justification as you fine-tune the page format in 
the technical manual. 

Now that you’ve read through the theory section of the chap¬ 
ter, you are prepared for some hands-on practice. In the next 
few sections, you will have a chance to apply the Professional 
Extension’s powerful tools to a real-life project. 




Vertical justification 


10-15 


Table 9-1. Vertical Justification Settings 


Menu 

Setting 

Option 

What It Does 

Chapter 

Vert. Just. Within Frame 

Carding 

Space added in multiples of Body Text 
inter-line spacing only 

Feathering 

Space added in exact amount of space 
needed for text to reach the bottom of 
the page or column 

Vert. Just. Around Frame 

Moveable 

Frame can be moved down and space 
added below 

Typography 

Fixed 

Frame cannot be moved from its original 
position. 

Space can be added below frame only 


Vert. Just. Allowed 

100.0% 

Increase or decrease amount of vertical 
justification allowed on each page 

At Top of Frame 

Enter value 

Set equal to Body Text inter¬ 
line spacing 

At Bottom of Frame 

Enter value 

Set equal to Body Text inter¬ 
line spacing 

Frame 

Typography 

Same as Chapter Typography 

same 

Can override global settings from Chap¬ 
ter Typography menu for an individual 
frame or inserted page 

Paragraph 

Typography 

Vert. Just. At Top of Para 

Enter value 

Set equal to Body Text Above Spacing 

Vert. Just. At Bottom of Para. 

Enter value 

Set equal to Body Text Below Spacing 


Between Lines of Para 

Enter value 

Set to zero 

Insert/Edit 

Tables 

Same as Paragraph Typography 

same 

Tables are treated like paragraphs for 
vertical justification 



















































10 - 16 


Ventura prep 


Ventura prep 

For this project you will work with the technical manual you 
created in Chapter Nine of Publishing Power. If you have 
already completed the project in Chapter Nine, follow the 
instructions outlined in the section, “If you completed chapter 
nine.” If you did NOT complete Chapter Nine, you can use the 
preformatted chapter supplied on the Power Disk, following 
the instructions in the section “If you have the Power disk.” If 
you do not own the Power disk and you did not complete 
Chapter Nine, follow the instructions in the section “If you do 
not have the Power disk.” 

*+NOTE: We recommend that you finish Chapter Nine before 
you venture any further with the Professional Extension. 
Otherwise, you may find it difficult to follow along. Many skills 
presented in this chapter build on techniques in Chapter Nine. 


If you have the Power disk 

m Open the chapter C:\POWER\PROFEXT.CHP. 

H Use Save As New Style to save the style sheet as 
C:\TEMP\PROFEXT.STY. 

^ Use File Type/Rename to rename the text file as 
C:\TEMP\PROFEXT.TXT. 

^ Save the chapter as C:\TEMP\PROFEXT.CHP. 



If you do 


not have the Power disk 


Use your word processor to type in the text file for Chapter 
Ten from Appendix A. Load it in Ventura and save it as 
C:\TEMP\PROFEXT.TXT. 


H Load the original style sheet &TBL2-L1.STY from the 
C:\TYPESET subdirectory. Use the tag table for Chapter 
Ten from Appendix A to change the columns and margins 
and the tag definitions you will need for the project. Then x 
save the revised style sheet as C:\TEMP\PROFEXT.STY. 





If you completed chapter nine 


10-17 



Figure 10 - 19 . Those WITHOUT the Power disk must insert the above 
frames into the document. 

H Add frames to pages in the document (Figure 10-19). 
m Save the chapter as C:\TEMP\PROFEXT.CHP. 

If you completed chapter nine 

S Open the chapter 9TECHDOC.CHP from the C:\TEMP 
subdirectory. 

HI Use Save As New Style to save the style sheet as 
C:\TEMP\PROFEXT.STY. 

H Use File/iype Rename to rename the text file as 
C:\TEMP\PROFEXT.TXT. 

M Save the chapter as C:\TEMP\PROFEXT.CHP. 

Text 

How many times have you used your word processor’s search 
and replace feature to quickly update information in a text 
file? More than likely, search and replace has become an 
indispensable part of your text editing tool kit. In this section, 
we will show you how to use the Professional Extension’s cross 
referencing feature to replace text while you are in Ventura. 

Before you can trigger the replace operation, you must define 
the variable text and the substitute text. Variable text is a 


























10-18 


Text 


word or phrase that changes in the document. For instance, in 
the sample technical manual, the product name , “Laser Astro- 
Z,” is the variable. (The product name will change when the 
XYZ corporation manufacturers a new line of printers next 
month.) The substitute text in our example is the new product 
name, “TurboSpeed-X.” When you activate the replace func¬ 
tion, the new product name will appear throughout the docu¬ 
ment. 

After you define the variable and substitute text, you must 
insert a cross reference marker in the text wherever you want 
the substitute text (the product name) to appear. For instance, 
on page one of the document you would delete the words Laser 
AstroZ, then insert a cross reference in the space between the 
words “the” and “printer ” in the first paragraph “Thank you 
for choosing the_printer from XYZ Corporation.” 

** TIP: The cross reference you insert is a hidden text attribute, 
similar to the hidden footnote and index attributes you inserted 
in Chapter Eight. If you want to see the attribute marker (the 
degree symbol) displayed on-screen, make sure you select 
Show Tabs & Returns from the Options menu. 

After all cross reference markers are inserted, you will select 
Renumber from the Multi-Chapter dialog box to activate the 
replace operation. From now on, whenever you want to change 
the product name in the manual, just enter new substitute 
text and Renumber the chapter. 

*+NOTE: You can replace different variables within one chapter. 

Now it’s time to apply the theory to a practical test. Start by 
defining the text variable. 

^ Go to page one (the cover page) of the technical manual. 

II Enable Text mode. 

II Place the text cursor before the “T” in the word “The” 
(Figure 10-20). 

P Select Ins Special Item from the Edit menu. Choose Vari¬ 
able Def (or press the F8 key). 





Figure 10-20. 

i§ Move to the Variable Name line and type: Product, which 
is the variable name to which you will refer when you insert 
the cross reference attributes in the text file. 



*+NOTE: When you insert a variable text definition in a text file, 
Ventura generates a hidden attribute and attribute marker (you 
can see the marker, a degree symbol, when Show Tabs & 
Returns is on). By inserting the attribute marker at the begin¬ 
ning of the document, you make it easier to locate. 

Now move to the Substitute Text line and type: 

TurboSpeed-X 






























The words Variable Def. appear in the Current Selection Box 
and a degree symbol is displayed on-screen to show the hidden 
text attribute. Later, when you renumber the publication, 
Ventura will insert the name “TurboSpeed-X,” at each cross 
reference location. 

Now that you’ve entered the variable and substitute text, you 
are ready to insert the cross reference markers. 

i§ While you are in Text mode, delete the name “Laser Astro- 
Z,” on the cover page. (Be careful not to delete the variable 
definition you just inserted.) 

Now you will place a cross reference after the title word “The” 
on the cover page. 

M Without moving the cursor, select Ins Special Item from the 
Edit menu (Figure 10-21). 



II Choose Cross Reference (or press F6). Move to the At The 
Name line and type: Product 

H Choose Refer To: V* and click OK (Figure 10—22). 

The word Reference appears in the Current Selection Box and 
a degree symbol is displayed on-screen to show the hidden 
text attribute. 

You will now continue to insert cross references in the docu¬ 
ment. 



































If you completed chapter nine 


10-21 


Delete here 


INSERT/EDIT REFERENCE 

0 

fit The Name: Product 


Refer To: U* 


Format: Default 


■P 

Cancel 


Figure 10-22. 

^ Press PgDn to go to page 2. 

M Delete the first occurrence of the words “Laser AstroZ,” in 
the first paragraph of the second column. Be careful to 
retain the space before and after. (Figure 10-23). 


Desk File Edit View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


j E5 h;e=;=~==;== 

lipra 

1 ™ ie •«• 1 


et Font 

t 

a 

Hornoi 

•old 

Italic 

Small 

Superscript 

Subscript 

underline 

Double Undrln 

Strike-thru 

Overscore 

Upper Cate 



L 



I gii!iii!|iiiiBiBiBiliiri^\TEiflp\PROFExf tPROFDrrsT^liiigai 


Getting Started! 


I A Word to O . 



^printer jives you the 
•power for ill your desktop publishing 
needs The Laser AstroZ comes standard 
jtfith PostScript, as well as Hewlett-Paclf 
*rd PCI and HPGL for programs you 
stall use that are non-PostScript com¬ 
patible. I 

•Introduction! 

Tirst well show you hot to unpack and 
Instill your User AstroZ p inter. You 
•should carefully check to make sure you 
^ave the following rtems.f 
ONE IBM PC DISKETTE in 5-W 
format! 


■You am 

Before you in 
•sure it is Vxa 
jtway from di 
•make sure th 
[wiring is ade<; 
•should not 
[tied voltage n 
jprinter. Avoid 
loffxe with ab 
tore. Do not p 
faucets, heat* 
humidifiers, 

Place the print 
jehes away frej 
jroom in the frj: 
•open freely.! 


E 


Figure 10-23. 


Now you will place another cross reference between the words 
“the” and “printer” in the first paragraph. 

^ Without moving the text cursor, select Ins Special Item 
from the Edit menu (Figure 10-24). 

































10-22 


Text 


Desk File ML View Chapter Frane Paragraph Graphic Options 


yyygg-jgjigj 

gj Table Edit | 


et Font 

7 

Normal 

Bold 

italic 

Snail 

Superscript 

Subscript 

Underline 

Double UndrLn 

Strike-thru 

Overscere 

Upper Case 



L 

Pg 8 8002 


C:\1EMP\PR0FEXT.CHP (PROFEXT.STV) 


Getting Started! 


Box Chan... 

FI 

Footnote 

F2 

Index Entry.,, 

F3 

Equation... 

F4 

Frane Anchor., 

F5 


Hrt* 

Marker Matte... 

Fn 

Variable DeF.. 

FB 

Table... 

F9 


IA Word to Owners f 

Think you for choosing the (printer from 
" Corporation. This high quality User 
ter gives you the flexibility and 
F2 fr for all your desktop publishing 
s. The Laser AstroZ comes standard 
PostScript, as well as Hewlett-Pack 
CL and HPGL for programs you 
use that are non-PostScript com 
tie. I 

>ductionT 

well show you hot to unpack and 
SnstaTI your Laser AstroZ printer. You 
•should carefully check to make sure you 
Juve the following items! 

ONE IBM PC DISKETTE in 5-1/4" 
formitf 


■You am 

Sefore you m 
•sure it is loca 
jaway from di 
jmake sure th 
firing is id« 
•should not va 
tied voltage 
printer. Avoid 
office with ib. 
ture. Do not p 
faucets, heate: 
humidifiers, 

PUcetheprinj;: 
dies away frdj 
jroom in the frj 
iopen freely! 


E 


Figure 10-24. 


M Choose Cross Reference (or press F6). Move to the At The 
Name line and type: Product 

H Choose Refer To: V* and click OK to close the dialog box.. 

Repeat the steps above to insert five more cross references in 
place of the name Laser AstroZ everywhere in the document 
(pages 2, 3, and 5). 

Now that you’ve inserted all the cross references, you are 
ready to Renumber the chapter. 

H Save the chapter by pressing Ctrl-S. 

II Select Multi-Chapter from the Options menu. The chapter 
C:\PROFEXT.CHP appears at the top of the list. 


*+NOTE: If the PROFEXT.CHP chapter is not listed, select New 
to start a new publication. Then choose Add Chapter. Move to 
the C:\TEMP subdirectory and select the chapter PROF- 
TEXT.CHP. Ventura will return you to the Multi-Chapter dialog 
box and place the PROFEXT.CHP at the top of the list. 

il Select Save As to save the publication as 
C:\TEMP\PROFEXT.PUB. 

Once you’ve made the publication, you can renumber it. 

^NOTE: Be sure the chapter is not highlighted. Otherwise, the 
Renumber operation will not be available for selection. 





































Appendix A 


A- 9 


@BODYFIRST = <B>Acme Company<D> has an¬ 
nounced a new large-screen display compatible 
with Xerox Ventura Publisher. The new B-X-100 
is the first display to incorporate four graphics 
co-processors. A co-processor is a specialized 
microchip that speeds display speed. The 19-inch 
monitor and add-in graphics adapter will ship in 
the last quarter of this year.! 

! 

@BODYFIRST = <B>The Ventura Classroom<D> 
is now open from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m Tuesday and 
Thursday of every week. A member of the Market¬ 
ing Communications Department will be on hand 
during those hours to answer questions and help 
with problems.! 

! 

@BODYFIRST = <B>An employee discount<D> 
was announced for the purchase of small com¬ 
puters. XYZ, which receives a volume discount on 
its computer purchases, has made arrangements 


to pass this discount on to employees who wish to 
buy computers or related equipment for home use. 

©BODYFIRST = <B>A new desktop publishing- 
related job position<D> has been created in the 
Engineering Department, which recently an¬ 
nounced its intention to convert its entire library 
of technical documentation to electronic form. 
Now the production of technical manuals and 
other technical documentation will be automated 
as well. In accordance with company policy, the 
new position will be filled from within XYZ if 
possible. If no suitable internal candidates 
present themselves within two weeks, the job will 
be advertised in local papers.! 

! 

©BODYFIRST = <B>ABC Company<D> has 
released a low-cost document scanner capable of 
sensing and transmitting 16 levels of gray. Priced 
under $3,000, the scanner permits desktop pub¬ 
lishers to convert halftones to electronic form. 


ASCII file to create: C:\TEMP\6NEWS-4.TXT 

©STAFFBOX = Paginations is published quarter¬ 
ly for the employees of XYZ Corporation, Los An¬ 
geles, CA. Copyright 1989 by XYZ Corporation, all 
rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part 

ASCII file to create: C:\TEMP\6NEWS-5.TXT 

@KICKER = Tip of the month! 

! 

©HEAD3 = Preformatting Ventura documents! 

! 

©BODYFIRST = Ventura Publisher allows you to 
preformat text files by inserting tags names into 
the original word processing file. By inserting 
these tags in advance, you save the time of paging 
through the document and tagging each text para¬ 
graph in Ventura. This is also a handy way to 
divide responsibilities, so writers can tag docu¬ 
ments without worrying what the format will look 
like.! 

! 

Preformatting is the ultimate time-saver and it’s 
not difficult. One simple trick is to program the 
tag names into a keyboard macro processor to 
save typing time. The proper format uses the at 
sign (@) at the left margin followed by the name of 
the tag, an equals sign (=) and the text. Thus, if 
we were using a word processor to preformat this 
article, the title might look like this in the file:! 

! 


without written permission is strictly forbidden. 
The editors welcome submissions, but cannot be 
responsible for manuscripts or their return. 


©HEADLINE = Preformatting Ventura docu¬ 
ments! 

! 

Don’t forget the space at both sides of the equals 
sign and don’t forget to spell the tag name exactly 
as it appears in the style sheet. Approved XYZ 
style sheets come with a listing of all the tag 
names for handy reference. As you add tags to the 
style sheet, you can capitalize the name or not as 
you prefer. Many people choose to use all capitals, 
or start the name with a symbol such as ! so the 
tags stand out from the text.! 

! 

©HEAD4 = Choosing tag names! 

! 

By choosing <169>generic<170> tag names, you 
will find that you can reuse them over and over 
again. For instance, tags like <169>Title,<170> 
<169>List,<170> and <169>Subhead<170> will 
apply to most documents. Then by changing style 
sheets, you can change the entire format of the 
document.! 

! 



A - 10 


Text Files 


If you don’t like the keyboard macro idea, try 
building word processor template files. Load an 
unformatted text file into Ventura and tag it as 
you would normally. When everything is perfect, 
save the chapter (thereby saving the tags into the 
text file.*n 
! 

Now make a copy of the file under a new name. 
Remove the text, leaving only the tags. Assuming 
the tag names are self-descriptive, a template 
makes it fill-in-the-blanks simple to create prefor¬ 
matted files. To make it even simpler, annotate 
the template with the word processor’s hidden 
text feature.! 

ASCII file to create: C:\TEMP\6TOC.TXT 

INSIDE! 

! 

@TOCENTRY = Training workshops 
underway—>11 
! 

Chapter Seven 

ASCII file to create: C:\TEMP\7DIRECT.TXT 

@HEADSECTION = Manufacturers ! 

! 

@HEAD1=A! 

! 

@HEAD2 = Adobe, Inc! 

! 

1870 Embarcadero Rd.<R>Palo Alto, CA 94303'! 

! 

@HEAD3 = Product: f 

u 

©ITALKWN = PostScript, Illustrator, Adobe Type 
Library'll 

@HEAD3 = Phone:f 

! 

@ITALSEPARATE = (415) 852-02711 

1 

@HEAD2 = Allied Linotype Co.! 

! 

425 Oser Ave.<R> Hauppauge, NY 11788! 

! 

@HEAD3 = Product: ! 

! 

@ITALSEPARATE = Linotronic 100 and 300! 

! 

@HEAD3 = Phone: ! 

! 


! 

The template method is particularly useful when 
an editor must work with multiple authors.! 

! 

Authors can also assist in the layout process by 
inserting tags that create space for illustrations. 
If you uses visuals in standard sizes, create a tag 
that leaves the correct amount of space on the 
page. The authors can type in the name of the 
illustration or even its caption. This tagged para¬ 
graph creates space where the layout editor will 
want to place the actual frame. The editor can 
delete the tag and insert the frame that will con¬ 
tain the illustration. 


@TOCENTRY = Ventura complements CAD->1! 

! 

@TOCENTRY = Newsline-»2! 

! 

@TOCENTRY = Tip of the month->3 


©ITALSEPARATE = (516) 434-2016! 

! 

@HEAD2 = Autodesk, Inc.! 

! 

2320 Marinship Way<R>Sausalito, CA 94965! 

! 

@HEAD3 = Product:! 

! 

@ITALKWN = AutoCAD, AutoSketch! 

! 

@HEAD3 = Phone:! 

! 

©ITALSEPARATE = (415) 332-2344! 

! 

@HEAD1 =D! 

! 

@HEAD2 = Datacopy Corp.! 

! 

1215 Terra Bella Ave<R>Mountain View, CA 
94043! 

! 

@HEAD3 = Product:! 

! 

@ITAL KPWTHNXT = Model 730 Scanner! 

! 

©HEAD3 = Phone:! 

! 




Appendix A 


A -11 


©ITALSEPARATE = (415) 965-79001 
1 

©HEAD2 = Digital Research Inc.1 
1 

60 Garden Court<R>Monterey, CA 939421 
1 

@HEAD3 = Product: 1 
1 

©ITALKWN = GEM Desktop, GEM Draw Plus, 
GEM Paintl 
1 

©HEAD3 = Phone: 1 
1 

©ITALSEPARATE = (408) 649-38961 

1 

©HEAD1 = HI 
1 

@HEAD2 = Hewlett-Packardl 
1 

P.O. Box 15<R>Boise, ID 837071 
1 

@HEAD3 = Product: 1 
1 

@ITALKWN = Laseijet Plus, Laserjet II, Scanjet 
1 
1 

@HEAD3 = Phone: 1 
1 

@ITALSEPARATE = (208) 323-38691 
1 

@HEAD1 = I1 
1 

@HEAD2 = Imagen 1 
1 

2650 San Tomas Expressway<R>Santa Clara, CA 
950511 
1 

@HEAD3 = Product: 1 
1 

@ITALKWN = DDL Languagel 
1 

@HEAD3 = Phone:1 
1 

©ITALSEPARATE = (408) 986-94001 
1 

@HEAD1=LI 
1 

©HEAD2 = Lotus Development Corp.1 
1 

55 Cambridge Parkway<R>Cambridge, MA 
021421 
1 

@HEAD3 = Product: 1 
1 


©ITALKWN = Lotus 1-2-3, Symphony, Freelance, 

Graphwriterl 

1 

©HEAD 3 = Phone: 1 
1 

©ITALSEPARATE = (617) 577-85001 
1 

©HEAD1 = M1 
1 

©HEAD2 = Media Cyberneticsl 
1 

8484 Georgia Ave., Ste. 200<R>Silver Spring, MD 
209101 
1 

@HEAD3 = Product: 1 
1 

©ITALKWN = Halo Desktop Publishing Editorl 
1 

©HEAD 3 = Phone: 1 
1 

©ITALSEPARATE = (301) 495-33051 
1 

@HEAD2 = MicroPublishingl 
1 

21150 Hawthorne Blvd., Ste. 104<R>Torrance, 
CA 905031 
1 

©HEAD3 = Product: 1 
1 

©ITALKWN = microPublishing Report Newslet¬ 
ter, Ventura Style Sheetsl 
1 

©HEAD3 = Phone: 1 
1 

©ITALSEPARATE = (213) 376-57241 
1 

©HEAD1 = R1 
1 

©HEAD2 = Ricoh Corp.1 
1 

5 Dedrick Place<R>West Caldwell, NJ 070061 
1 

@HEAD3 = Product: 1 
1 

@ITALKWN = IS30 Scannerl 
1 

@HEAD3 = Phone: 1 
1 

©ITALSEPARATE = (201) 882-20001 
1 

©HEAD1 = SI 
1 

©HEAD2 = Sigma Designsl 
1 

46901 Landing Parkway<R>Fremont, CA 945381 




A -12 


Text Files 


'll 

©HEAD3 = Product: ! 

! 

©ITALKWN = LaserView Display System'll*1 

! 

@HEAD3 = Phone: ! 

1 

@ITALSEPARATE = (415) 770-0 100! 

1 

@HEAD2 = Symsoft! 

1 

P.O. Box 477<R>Mountain View, CA 94040*0 

1 

@HEAD3 = Product: 'll 

1 

@ITALKWN = HotShot*! 

1 

@HEAD3 = Phone: ! 

1 

@ITALSEPARATE = (415) 941-1552*11 

1 

@HEAD1 = T1 

! 

@HEAD2 = Tall Tree Systems! 

! 

ASCII file to create: C:\TEMP\7DIRECT2. 

@HEADSECTION = Products ! 

@HEAD1 = FI 

! 

@HEAD2 = Fonts and Font Software'll 

H 

©HEAD4 = Adobe Typeface Library! 

! 

©COMPANY = Adobe Systems Inc.! 

! 

@HEAD3 = PostScript:! 

! 

@ITALKWN = Yes! 

! 

@HEAD3 = Computers:! 

! 

©ITALKWN = Macintosh, IBM PC! 

! 

©PHONE = (415) 852-0271! 

! 

©HEAD4 = Conofonts! 

! 

@COMPANY = Conographics! 

! 

©HEAD3 = PostScript:! 


1120 San Antonio Rd.<R>Palo Alto, CA 94303! 

! 

©HEAD3 = Product: ! 

! 

@ITALKWN = JLaser Plus! 

! 

©HEAD3 = Phone: ! 

! 

©ITALSEPARATE = (415) 964-1980! 

! 

©HEADl=V! 

! 

@HEAD2 = Verticom, Inc.! 

! 

545 Weddell Dr.<R>Sunnyvale, CA 94089-2114! 

! 

@HEAD3 = Product: ! 

! 

@ITALKWN = Desktop 1280! 

! 

©HEAD3 = Phone: ! 

! 

©ITALSEPARATE = (408) 747-1222! 

! 


©ITALKWN = No! 

! 

@HEAD3 = Computers:! 

! 

©ITALKWN = IBM PC! 

! 

©PHONE = (714) 474 -1188! 

! 

©HEAD4 = Fluent Fonts! 

! 

©COMPANY = Genny Software Research and 
Development! 

! 

©HEAD3 = PostScript:! 

! 

@ITALKWN = Yes! 

! 

©HEAD3 = Computers:! 

! 

@ITALKWN = Macintosh! 

! 

@PHONE = (409) 860-5817! 

! 

@HEAD4 = Hewlett Packard Soft Fonts! 

! 


@COMPANY = Hewlett Packard! 




Appendix A 


A - 13 


! 

@HEAD3 = PostScript:! 

! 

@ITALKWN = No! 


@HEAD3 = Computers:*! 

! 

©ITALKWN = IBM PC'! 


@PHONE = (800) 538-8787! 

1 

@HEAD4 = PC Fontwarel 

! 

©COMPANY = Bitstream^ 


@HEAD3 = PostScript:!! 

! 

@ITALKWN = No!! 

!I 

@HEAD3 = Computers:!! 

! 

©ITALKWN = IBM PC'! 

1 

@PHONE = (617) 497-6222!! 

1 

@HEAD1 = GH 

@HEAD2 = Graphics Software!! 

1 ! 

@HEAD4 = AutoCAD !I 

! 

©COMPANY = Autodesk,Inc.*! 

1 

©HEAD3 = Ventura Format:*! 

1 

@ITALKWN = SLD or GEM*! 

! 

©HEAD3 = Computers:!! 

1 

©ITALKWN = IBM PC*! 

1 

@PHONE = (415) 332-2344*! 

! 

@HEAD4 = Desktop Publisher’s Graphics! 

! 

@COMPANY = IMS I! 

! 

@HEAD3 = Ventura Format:! 


@ITALKWN = Image! 

! 

@HEAD3 = Computers:! 

! 

@ITALKWN = IBM PC! 

! 


©PHONE = (415) 454-7101! 

! 

@HEAD4 = Halo DPE! 

! 

@COMPANY - Media Cybernetics! 

! 

@HEAD3 = Ventura Format:! 

! 

@ITALKWN = Halo DPE!! 

! 

©HEAD3 = Computers:! 

! 

©ITALKWN = IBM PC! 

! 

@PHONE = (301) 495-3305! 

! 

@HEAD4 = PC Paintbrush Plus! 

! 

@COMPANY = ZSoft! 

! 

©HEAD3 = Ventura Format:! 

! 

©ITALKWN = PC Paintbrush! 

! 

©HEAD3 - Computers:! 

! 

©ITALKWN = IBM PC! 

! 

@PH0NE = (404) 980-1950! 

! 

@HEAD1 = M! 

! 

©HEAD2 = Monitors! 

! 

@HEAD4 = Crystal View! 

! 

©COMPANY = Taxan! 

! 

@HEAD3 = Resolution:! 

! 

@ITALKWN = 1,280 x 960! 

! 

@HEAD3 = Display Size:! 

! 

@ITALKWN = 19!! 

! 

©PHONE = (818) 810-1291! 

! 

@HEAD4 = Laserview! 

! 

©COMPANY = Sigma Design! 

! 

©HEAD3 = Resolution:! 

! 

@ITALKWN = 1,664 x 1200! 





A -14 


Text Files 


1 

@HEAD3 = Display Size:*! 

©ITALKWN = 191 
1 

©PHONE = (415) 770-01001 
1 

@HEAD4 = Viking II 
1 

©COMPANY = Moniterml 
1 

©HEAD3 = Resolution:1 
1 

@ITALKWN = 1,280 x 9601 
1 

@HEAD3 = Display Size:1 
1 

©ITALKWN = 19.61 
1 

@PHONE = (612) 935-41511 
1 

@HEAD4 = Wy-7001 
1 

@COMPANY = Wyse Technologyl 
1 

@HEAD3 = Resolution: 1 
1 

©ITALKWN = 1,280 x 8001 
1 

@HEAD3 = Display Size:1 
1 

@ITALKWN = 151 
1 

@PHONE = (408) 433-10001 
1 

@HEAD1 = SI 
1 

©HEAD2 = Scanners - Graphics and OCR1 
1 

@HEAD4 = Crystal Scan Image Scanner Model 

30011 

1 

©COMPANY = Taxan Corporationl 
1 

©HEAD3 = Scan Area:1 
1 

@ITALKWN = Platen Feedl 
1 

@HEAD3 = List Price: 1 
1 

©ITALKWN = $1,6951 
1 

@PHONE = (818) 810-12911 
1 

@HEAD4 = Datacopy 7301 


1 

©COMPANY = Datacopyl 
1 

@HEAD3 = Scan Area:1 
1 

@ITALKWN = Flatbedl 
1 

@HEAD3 = List Price :1 
1 

©ITALKWN - $1,8001 
1 

@PHONE = (800) 821-28981 

1 

©HEAD4 = Microtek MS-300C1 
1 

@COMPANY = Microtek Lab, Inc.1 
1 

©HEAD3 = Scan Area:1 
1 

@ITALKWN = Platen Feedl 
1 

©HEAD3 = List Price:1 
1 

©ITALKWN = $1,7951 
1 

©PHONE = (213) 321-21211 
1 

@HEAD4 = The Laser Scanner, Model KS-3001 
1 

©COMPANY = Princeton Graphics Systemsl 
1 

@HEAD3 = Scan Area:1 
1 

©ITALKWN = Platen Feedl 
1 

©HEAD 3 = List Price :1 
1 

@ITALKWN = $1,0951 
1 

©PHONE = (609) 683-16601 
1 

@HEAD1 =U1 
1 

@HEAD2 = Utilitiesl 
1 

©HEAD4 = PubSetl 
1 

©COMPANY = EDCO Servicesl 
1 

@HEAD3 = Description^ 

1 

©ITALKWN = Software typesetter driver to send 
Ventura documents directly to your typesetterl 
1 

©HEAD3 = List Price :1 





Appendix A 


A - 15 


1 

©ITALKWN = $4,2331 

H 

@PHONE = (813) 962-78001 

1 

©HEAD4 = VPToolboxI 

1 

@COMPANY = SNA, Inc.1 

1 

@HEAD3 = Description:1 
*1 

©ITALKWN = File management program that 
lets you review the contents of related files and 
style sheetsl 
1 

@HEAD3 = List Price:1 
1 

@ITALKWN = $991 
1 

©PHONE = (609) 683-12371 
1 

@HEAD4 = VP/Saddlel 
1 

©COMPANY = The Laser Edgel 

1 

©HEAD3 = Description:! 


1 

@ITALKWN = Enhanced features for printing 
books and booklets with PostScript Printersl 
1 

©HEAD3 = List Price:1 

1 

@ITALKWN = $791 

1 

©PHONE = (415) 835-15811 

1 

@HEAD4 = Headlinel 
1 

©COMPANY = Corell 
1 

@HEAD3 = Description:1 
1 

©ITALKWN = Application program which gives 
access to the powerful graphics features of Post- 
Scriptl 
1 

@HEAD3 = List Price:! 

1 

©ITALKWN = $891 
1 

@PHONE = (613) 728-82001 

1 


Chapter Eight 

ASCII files to create: C:\TEMP\8BOOK.TXTand C:\TEMP\8PRINT.TXT 


If you do not want to type in the two text files 
below, substitute two text files of your own and 
rename them as shown above. Text files of five 

ASCII file to create: C:\TEMP\BOOK.TXT 

@CHAP# = Chapter Sixl 

1 

@CHAPTITLE = <$IDesign;Design Prin- 
ciples>Design Principles! 

1 

@BODYFIRST = Getting top-quality books from a 
desktop publishing system requires special know¬ 
how in two areas: design and printing. This chap¬ 
ter discusses the theory of design. The following 
chapter, Chapter Seven, outlines the steps to take 
before going to a commercial printer. 1 
1 

This chapter offers comments on the principles of 
<$IBooks;Book design>book design <MI>as they 
apply to desktop publishing<D>. In some cases, 
the realities of desktop publishing force changes 
from traditional methods. 1 


pages or longer are best. Save them in ASCII 
format. 


1 

@HEAD1 = Design Terminology! 

1 

If you're new to page design and typography, 
you’ll need to learn a few words. You’ll encounter 
this vocabulary over and over again in software 
manuals and in conversations with graphic desig¬ 
ners and commercial printers. This specialized 
terminology applies to three areas: (1) describing 
pages, (2) measuring pages and (3) describing 
type.1 
1 

©HEAD2 = <$IDescribing pages>Describing 
Pages 1 
1 

The most common page elements used in tradi- 




A -16 


Text Files 


tional and desktop publishing are described 
below:! 

1 

A <$ICallouts>callout is a brief text label used to 
describe one part of an illustration. Callouts are 
often accompanied by arrows. <MS>! 

! 

A <$ICaption>caption is a brief description that 
labels or describes the entire illustration. Also 
referred to as a <$ACutline;CaptionxMI>cut- 
line<D> or a <MI>legend<D>. 1 
! 

The chapter number and chapter title identify the 
section of the book. Often one or both are repeated 
in the header.! 

1 

<$ICrop marksx$SCrop marks;Describing 
Pages>Crop marks are small lines, usually at the 
corner of the live area, that show the offset 
printer where to cut the pages after printing. 
They are also used by the printer to align each 
page correctly. Also called <$ICorner Marksx$A- 
Corner marks;Crop marks>corner marks, or<MI> 
<D>trim marks.f 
1 

The <$IFolio>folio is the page number.'ll 

! 

A <$IFooter>footer is a line or two of text that 
appears at the bottom of every page (or almost 
every page). A footer may include the folio (page 
number) or other information.! 

! 

A <$IGutter>gutter is the white space between 
two areas of text. Gutters appear between 
columns on a page. The word also refers to the 
margin between facing pages.<MS>! 

1 

A <$IHeader> header is a line or two of text that 
appears at the top of every page (or almost every 
page). A header often includes the title of the 
book, the title of the chapter and/or the 
folio.<MS> <D>Alternating <$IHeader;Alternat- 
ing headers and footers>headers and footers put 
different information on left and right pages. 
Quite often the header is omitted from the<MI> 
<D>first page of a chapter.<MI>1f 
! 

A <$IHeading>heading is a few words set off from 
the rest of the text to describe a major section of 
the chapter. Also called a main heading.<B>! 

1 

A keyline is a thin rule that shows the printer 
where to position a halftone or other illustration.’ll 
! 


The live area is the area of the page that receives 
ink when printed.! 

1 

The margins are the white borders that surround 
the live area. Margins must be carefully con¬ 
sidered to take into account the look of the book, 
the binding method and the limitations of laser 
printers. ! 

1 / 

A subhead is a few words set off from the rest of 
the text to describe a minor section of the chapter. 
Also called a <MI>minor heading<D>. ! 

H 

@HEAD2 = Measuring Pages'll 

Most Americans are comfortable with inches. But 
for desktop publishing, the method called 
<MI>printer’s measure<D> or <MI>the point sys- 
tem<D> is superior. Since type sizes are always 
specified in points, it makes sense to use printer’s 
measure for everything on the page so you don’t 
waste time converting back and forth. In addition, 
the point system has units that are much smaller 
than inches, so it is rarely necessary to complicate 
things with fractional units. By contrast, using 
inches requires you to make many fractional com¬ 
putations.1 
! 

For these reasons, printer’s measure is the easiest 
way to talk to a page layout program. (Most 
programs let the user choose between inches, cen¬ 
timeters or printer’s measure.) The two most im¬ 
portant units in printer’s measure are 
<MI>points<D> and <MI>picas<D>.! 

1 

Points are a very small unit, about 1/72 inch. 
They are used to measure type sizes and rules. 
The point size of a typeface is is roughly the meas¬ 
urement from the highest ascender (the top of a 
<169>b<170> for instance) to the lowest descend¬ 
er (the bottom of a <169>g<170>). This is only an 
approximation, since point sizes originate from 
the metal body used to carry type in the days 
before phototypesetting. The best way to get 
familiar with point sizes is by example. You’ll soon 
develop an eye for the most common sizes.'ll 

H 

Picas are a larger unit. Don’t confuse them with 
the typewriter style of the same name. They are 
equal to 12 points (about 1/6 inch). Printers and 
typographers use picas to measure lines, margins 
and columns. Figure 6-2 shows a page from this 
book with the measurements expressed in picas 
and points. (The measurements refer to the full- 
sized page.)! 



Appendix A 


A - 17 


! 

<$IEm Dash>Ems and <$IEn Dash>ens are less 
important but you’ll hear them mentioned. Ems 
and ens vary according to the size of the type. In 
12-point type, an em is 12 points. In 18-point type 
it is 18 points, and so on. An en is 1/2 the em. In 
12-point type, then, the en is 6 points; in 18-point 
type it is 9 points, and so on.<MS>! 

n 

The em is the basis for spacing. An <MI>em in- 
dent<D>, also called an em square, is an indent 
from the left margin equal to the em size <197> 12 
points in 12-point type, 18 points in 18-point type, 
and so on. It is the standard indent for books, f 
! 

The most common use for the em is to describe the 
<MI>em dash<D>. The em dash is, obviously, the 
length of one em. Em dashes are used to separate 
sentences <197> like this. The most common con¬ 
vention is to use the em dash without any space 
between the dash and the word<197>like this. It 
is also acceptable to use the em dash with a space 
on both sides, as has been done in this book.! 

! 

En dashes are half the length of the em. They are 
used to represent <169>to<170> between num¬ 
bers and words, as in 

<169>1950<196>1955<170> or <169>Figure 1- 
2.<170> The hyphen is even shorter yet. It is used 
to <$IHyphenation;Use of en dash>hyphenate 
words. Some desktop publishing programs make 
no distinction between hyphens and en dashes.! 

! 

@HEAD2 = Describing Type ! 

! 

Unfortunately, different programs use different 
words to refer to type and its attributes. The 
definitions given below are the most common in 
the desktop publishing industry. In some cases, 
they vary from those in use by traditional typeset¬ 
ters.! 

H 

Type sizes are specified in points as explained 
above. You must understand the point system to 
give correct instructions to the software. Many 
people refer to small type in the 9 to 12 point 
range as <$IBody type>body type. Larger sizes 
used for headings is often called <$IDisplay 
Typex$ADisplay Type;Headings>display type.! 

II 

<MS>TYPE STYLES.<D> Most desktop publish¬ 
ing programs use typeface and typestyle 
synonymously to mean one particular type design. 
Each design has a name. Helvetica is one types¬ 
tyle; Century Schoolbook is another; and so on. To 


choose a different design from the page layout 
program, the user specifies it by name or picks its 
name from a menu. ! 

11 

A font is one particular variety of a typestyle. 
Thus, most software manuals would refer to 
Dutch as a typestyle and 12-point Dutch bold 
italic as a font. Most publishing programs have a 
<$IFonts>Font menu item where the user can 
specify all the attributes of the typestyle.! 

! 

<MS>KINDS OF TYPE.<D> Different people 
divide type in different groups. Book publishers 
are most likely to use three different kinds: serif, 
sans serif and symbol. Serifs are curlicues that 
decorate the ends of letters, so serif type is distin¬ 
guished by these tiny lines. This book uses a serif 
typestyle. Sans is the French word for without, so 
sans serif is type without the curlicues. And sym¬ 
bol fonts, sometimes called <$IFonts;Pi fonts>pi 
fonts, contain special characters, symbols, foreign 
language characters and so on.<MI> ! 

! 

There are other kinds of type available from 
desktop publishing systems, including script, cur¬ 
sive, shadow, outline and reverse (white letters on 
a black background). These decorative effects can 
be achieved directly in some page layout 
programs. They can also be created in a special 
graphics programs and imported onto the page. 
These unusual typestyles are rarely used in books 
except for covers or chapter openings. ! 

! 

<MS>TYPE ATTRIBUTES<D>. The same types¬ 
tyle can vary in several ways. <MI>Weight<D> 
refers to the thickness of the letterstrokes. Most 
desktop publishing programs provide only normal 
and <$IBoldx$ABold;Text Attributes>bold. A 
few programs offer light as well. <MI>Slope<D> 
refers to the slant of the letters, either vertical 
(called normal or roman) or slanted (italic or obli¬ 
que). The <MI>proportion<D> of type is its 
horizontal width. Most desktop publishing 
programs offer only normal proportions. Oc¬ 
casionally they also provide access to condensed 
and expanded versions.! 

! 

@HEAD2 = Other Important Terms! 

! 

Understanding printer’s measure is the most im¬ 
portant part of becoming a good desktop designer. 
But you’ll also encounter a few other phrases. - ! 

! 

The <$IBaseline>baseline is the invisible line the 
type sits on. Some programs use this term and/or 




A -18 


Text Files 


display the baselines as a light gray or dashed 
line on screen. Whether or not the term is used by 
the program, line spacing is measured from 
baseline to baseline. If you were using 8-point 
type with 2 points of leading, the baseline to 
baseline measurement would be 10 points (8 + 
2).<MS>! 

1 

Some programs, including Xerox Ventura Pub¬ 
lisher, modify this concept slightly. Ventura Pub¬ 
lisher considers the baseline to be the bottom of 
the lowest descender rather than the line upon 
which the body of the type rests. 1 
1 

<MS>PAGE FORMAT<D>. There are four basic 
formats. <MI>Flush left<D> has an even left mar¬ 
gin and a ragged right margin. For this reason it 
is often referred to as ragged right. <MI>Flush 
right<D> is the reverse: even right margin, 
ragged left margin. <MI>Justified<D> has even 
margins left and right. <MI>Centered<D> puts 
each line in the center, leaving both margins 
ragged. Justified is the choice for almost all books. 
Poetry often uses centered lines. Flush left is oc¬ 
casionally chosen for special formats. Flush right 
has few applications in <$IBooks;Page for- 
mat>books outside of titles, tables and charts.1 
1 

<$IHyphenation;Hyphenation and justifica¬ 
tion:* Hyphenation and justification are crucial to 
achieve a typeset look. When justifying lines, 
page layout programs attempt to end lines at the 
space between words. When that is not possible, 
they insert a hyphen, and put part of the word on 
one line and the remainder on the line below. Text 
can be justified without hyphenation, but this for¬ 
ces the program to stretch the words too far apart. 
! 

The computer program needs to know where it is 
allowed to insert hyphens when needed. Good 
page layout programs insert invisible <$I- 
HyphenationjDiscretionary hyphens>discretion- 
aiy hyphens into text files when they are loaded. 
These discretionary hyphens tell the program 
where to divide a word if necessary. By hyphenat¬ 
ing a word, the program can fit a few extra char¬ 
acters on the line, improving the spacing and ap¬ 
pearance. ! 

! 

@HEAD1 = <$ABooks;Design Guidelines for 
Booksx$IDesign;Design Guidelines for 
Books>Design Guidelines for Books! 

! 

Good page design is inconspicuous <197> it calls 


attention to the message, not to itself. But just 
because good design isn’t loud and flashy doesn’t 
mean there isn’t a lot going on behind the scenes. 
Definite rules, skills and aesthetic choices go into 
the creation of book pages. Until now, this 
knowledge was the province of specialists. 
Desktop publishing, however, forces untrained 
users to grapple with the same decisions.! 

! 

Fortunately, there is a way to harness the power 
of desktop publishing <197> <MI>design<D>. 
Design is a business tool, a way to make words 
more effective. It is often regarded as an innate 
ability <197> you’re born with it or you’re not. In 
reality, you <MI>can<D> learn the fundamentals 
of good design. Creating straightforward, profes¬ 
sional pages just takes a little know-how. You can 
get such pages by consistently applying a few safe 
and sane rules.! 

! 

@HEAD2 = <$IDesign;Purpose of>The Purpose of 
Page Design! 

! 

Page design has five goals: ! 

! 

©BULLET = Attract attention! 

! 

@BULLET = Please the eye! 

! 

@BULLET = Provide guideposts! 

! 

@BULLET = Improve legibility! 

! 

©BULLET = Make production easier and more 
efficient! 

! 

<MS> ATTR ACTING THE EYE<D>. The atten¬ 
tion-grabbing power of design does not play a 
large role in <$IBooks;Book covers>books, except 
on covers. Covers are such a crucial part of 
marketing that they are best left to design profes¬ 
sionals. It is valuable to understand, however, 
that cover design can set a book apart on the 
shelves and entice browsers.! 

! 

<MS>PLEASING THE EYE<D>. Once again, this 
aspect of design does not have the same crucial 
role in <$IBooks;Book publishing>book publish¬ 
ing as in magazine publishing and <$I- 
Advertising;Design applications>advertising. 
Nevertheless, a book’s physical format can add (or 
detract) from its sales appeal. To compete in the 
marketplace, books must meet certain minimum 
standards of design and attractiveness. What’s 
more, the book must project the right image for 




Appendix A 


A - 19 


the target market, whether business, educational, 
scientific or mass market. 1 ! 

1 

This chapter does not go into the more esoteric 
aspects of pleasing the eye. But it is valuable to 
realize that top-quality books utilize balance, 
symmetry and proportion for aesthetic effect. 
Novice desktop publishers are well-advised not to 
stray too far from time-tested formats, f 

<MS>GUIDING THE EYE<D>. A page can be a 
structuring device, a way to organize information. 
The eye needs guideposts or it becomes lost in a 
sea of type. Readers need signals so they don’t 
miss key information. Good page design makes 
documents easier to use by providing these visual 
cues. There are three keys to guiding the eye: 
contrast, separation and consistency, f 

n 

Light against dark, small against large, slanted 
against upright, one typestyle against another 
<197> these are all examples of contrast. The eye 
picks up these differences, which provide signals 
and separation. *| 

‘tt 

Visual separation tells the eye that something 
new is coming along. You can achieve it with con¬ 
trast, with barriers or with formatting. Barriers 
are page elements that stop the eye. The most 
common barrier <197> and generally the best one 
<197> is white space. This book, for example, con¬ 
tains extra white space above <$IHeadings>head- 
ings and subheadings. Rules (lines across the 
page) are another effective barrier. Format can 

ASCII file to create: C:\TEMP\8PRINT.TXT 

@CHAP# = Chapter Seven'll 

1 

@CHAPTITLE = Offset Printing From Laser 
Mechanicals 1 
1 

@BODYFIRST = This is not a report on printing 
or production. Nevertheless, it will be valuable to 
briefly review the traditional production process. 
We can then examine how that process changes 
for desktop publishing. Our discussion centers 
around laser printers, but much of the advice also 
applies when electronic pages are sent to 
phototypesetting machines. The workflow is the 
same. The difference is that phototypeset pages 
don’t need the extra precautions necessary with 
low-resolution laser type. *! 

H 


also provide visual separation. The way text is 
spaced and indented give clues to the reader. The 
more complex the document, the more important 
it is to use formatting to guide the reader <197> 
one reason technical documentation often has 
several levels of indents. Headings, subheadings, 
lists and quotes are often good candidates for spe¬ 
cial formatting. U 
1 

But contrast and separation won’t accomplish 
their purpose without consistency. Once a rule 
has been established, it should be used 
throughout the book. Every heading, for example, 
should use the same format.*! 

H 

<$IDesign;Design Guidelines for Books>Improv- 
ing legibility is the fourth goal of page design. The 
way text is laid out on the page affects how easy it 
is to read.You must be careful to avoid designs 
that look good on the screen but are difficult to 
read for long stretches.'! 

u 

Making production easier and more efficient is 
the final goal of page design and certainly one of 
the most important. Page designs must take into 
account the realities of today’s desktop publishing 
programs to minimize their weaknesses and play 
up their strengths. Often a few small changes can 
make a format much faster and easier to work 
and/or improve the final printed result. At the 
same time, a page design should be cost-efficient 
<197> for example, by using trim sizes that cor¬ 
respond to standard offset press dimensions. 


@HEAD1 = Traditional Book Printing*! 

H 

Traditionally, book publishers delivered camera- 
ready copy to the lithographer (the commercial 
printer). This material was in the form of 
<169>mechanicals.<170> Mechanicals were 
made by pasting type and line art onto stiff 
mounting boards. These mechanicals were then 
photographed to produce printing plates. *! 

1 

Photographs were not pasted on the boards. 
Original photographs have continuous tone <197> 
a full range of shades ranging from dark to light. 
Printing is an all or nothing, black or white 
process <197> either there’s ink on the page or 
there’s not. To simulate continuous tone, a 
photograph must be <MI>screened<D>. This 




A-20 


Text Files 


process converts the photo into a 
<MI>halftone<D>. A halftone breaks the 
photograph into tiny dots. Since the human eye 
perceives closely spaced black dots as gray, a 
halftone permits a printing press to simulate the 
shades of a continuous tone photograph. 1 
! 

Black and white line art can be treated like text 
<197> it does not require a halftone. But con¬ 
tinuous tone drawings <197> those with shadings 
and gray tones <197> must be converted into 
halftones before printing. Black and white pic¬ 
tures need one halftone. Color photographs need 
four, one for each of the three primary colors and 
one for black. These four halftones are called 
<MI>color separations<D>.! 

! 

The more dots per inch, the better the quality of a 
halftone. Newspapers typically use a screen of 65 
to 85 dpi. Inexpensive books sometimes use 100- 
line screens (100 dpi), which give quality that’s 
good but not great. Modern photocopiers can 
reproduce screens up to 100 dpi. Most books, how¬ 
ever, are printed using the superior resolution of 
133- to 150-line screens. After the halftoning 
process, the converted photograph can be recom¬ 
bined with the text to form the complete page. 1 
! 

How the photographs are combined with the text 
depends on the type of printing. <MI>Getting It 
Printed<D>, an outstanding book for anyone who 
buys printing services, divides the industry into 
two categories: commercial printers and quick 
printers. Commercial printers typically produce 
longer jobs. They produce metal printing plates by 
combining line negatives (negatives of the text 
and the line art) with halftone or separation nega¬ 
tives (negatives of photographs). Quick printers 
are sometimes used for short-run books. They 
produce plates directly without an intervening 
negative stage. For this reason, photographs must 
be pasted onto the page in the correct position 
before they are given to a quick printer. Those 
photographs must first be converted to a printable 
form through halftoning.! 

! 

@HEAD1 = The Desktop Workflow! 

! 

Desktop publishers do most of their paste-up 
electronically. Then they substitute laser-printed 
pages for mounting boards. Typically, the text is 
laid out first. Then line art is placed on the page, 
since line art can be imported directly into page 
layout programs. ! 

! 


@HEAD2 = Preparing Photographs! 

! 

Photographs, on the other hand, must still be 
handled the old-fashioned way. Although page 
layout programs can accept scanned photos, the 
end result is generally not up to the standards of 
book publishers. So a space, or <MI>window<D> 
is created for each photo. What you do with the 
window depends on whether you are using a com¬ 
mercial printer or a quick printer. ! 

! 

If you are going to a co mm ercial printer, the win¬ 
dows are left blank. The photographs are given to 
him separately. He makes separate negatives of 
the text (including the windows) and the photos. 
At this time the photographs are screened (con¬ 
verted to a halftone) and scaled (re-sized) if neces- 
saiy. Then the two negatives are combined in a 
process called <MI>stripping.<D> This method 
produces the best results. It is mandatory for 
color photographs.! 

! 

There is a second, less expensive alternative for 
black and white photos. If you are using a quick 
printer, you must paste the photos onto the page 
directly. However, normal photos won’t reproduce, 
so they must first be screened. Rather than creat¬ 
ing a halftone negative, as you would for a com¬ 
mercial printer, you obtain a halftone <MI>posi- 
tive<D>. While it is being screened, the photo is 
also re-sized if necessary. This converted version 
of the photograph is pasted directly onto the laser- 
printed page, in the window. The combined page 
is given to the lithographer. This method is less 
expensive, because the lithographer no longer has 
to strip the two negatives together. He can take a 
single shot of the combined page and use it to 
create a printing plate. There is, however, some 
loss of image quality (reproducing a photo of a 
photo). There is also the risk that cut lines will 
show. ! 

! 

Positive halftones go by several different names, 
including <MI>PMTs<D>, <MI>veloxes<D> and 
<MI>stats.<D> Although there are slight dif¬ 
ferences, they all work in the same basic fashion. 
Many books and references state that 100 dpi is 
the best you can expect using the PMT method. In 
fact, knowledgeable printers can obtain results up 
to 120 dpi. The loss in quality, therefore, does not 
have to be great. On the other hand, this second 
alternative does require the desktop publisher to 
do some paste-up.! 

! 

There are two easy ways to obtain a positive 




Appendix A 


A - 21 


halftone. The best is to take the photo to a com¬ 
mercial printer or a trade camera shop. (To locate 
trade camera services, look in the yellow pages 
under <169>lithographic negative and plate 
makers.<170>) These services turn photos into 
positive halftones for $5 to $15 each. At the same 
time they can resize the photo if necessary. Ask 
them to use fixer during development. Otherwise 
the prints will yellow and fade in a few months. 
When you get the screened PMTs back, check to 
make sure they are printed on pure white paper 
with no chemical stains. 1 
1 

If quality is not a concern and the photo is the 
right size already, you can also buy special plastic 
screens. The plastic is pasted on top of the 
photograph on the page. Cost is $3 to $4 per sheet 
from most graphic arts supply houses. You can 
achieve up to 85 dpi or so with this method <197> 
somewhat less than the 100 dpi most experts con¬ 
sider the minimum for a professional-quality 
book. You can also use a 85 dpi or 100 dpi 
photocopier screen for <169>homemade<170> 
veloxes. Run the photo through the copier with 
the screen on top. Use the copier’s facilities to 
enlarge or reduce. Paste the resulting image 
directly onto the page. <MI>Warning<D>: quality 
suffers with this method.*! 

1 

Use rubber cement to paste photos down. Pay 
extra attention to the edges <197> if they lift up 
they will cause a shadow line on the printed page. 
Use extra glue, then rub off any excess that shows 
after it’s dry with a special rubber cement lifter 
available at art supply stores. You can also paste 
line art directly onto the page if you prefer to use 
existing hand drawings rather than creating the 
art with the computer.H 

'll 

@HEAD2 = Positioning Photographs*! 

1 

Whether you strip photos or paste them on the 
page you must create a window. Decide which 
photographs you plan to use, what size they will 
be and where they belong in the text. Using the 
tools of the page layout program, create a box for 
each picture. Make it the exact size you want the 
final photo. Place a thin rule around the box. This 
rule is called the keyline, and it’s vital. The lithog¬ 
rapher uses it to properly size and position the 
halftone. So will you if you decide to paste positive 
halftones directly onto the page. Normally the 
lithographer will drop out the keyline so it does 
not show on the printed page. If you want the rule 


to show, specify “Keyline prints” in your instruc¬ 
tions.^ 

1 

Both the photos and the windows must be careful¬ 
ly labeled. Desktop publishers have an advantage 
here. They can use the text editing capabilities of 
the page layout software to insert labels in the 
center of the blank window as they go along.*! 

1 

Here’s another possibility for creating windows: 
draw a box as before. Now use the page layout 
program to fill the box with black. This solid black 
box is the equivalent of the Rubylith window some 
layout artists use to key photographs to mechani¬ 
cals. When the page is photographed by the 
lithographer, the black box leaves a transparent 
window on the film negative. The separately 
prepared halftone negative is positioned behind 
this window.*! 

1 

With the keyline method, the lithographer actual¬ 
ly cuts the negative along the line before stripping 
in the halftone. This provides the ultimate in 
quality, since there’s no intervening layer of film. 
Ask the printing company which method it 
prefers. If you are using the PMT or velox method, 
key lines are the way to go. Why waste toner and 
print time creating black boxes? All you need is 
something to indicate where to paste down the 
velox. 1 
1 

@HEAD2 = Scanning and Digitizing*! 

If the job requires special care, consider using a 
scanner to provide position stats. In traditional 
publishing, a position stat is a photocopy that’s 
pasted on the page in the window. It’s only func¬ 
tion is to show the printer what goes where. If you 
have a scanner, you can accomplish the same 
thing electronically. Digitize the photograph and 
place it in the window using the desktop publish¬ 
ing software. Scanned images from today’s tech¬ 
nology are not good enough for reproduction. At 
best they produce the equivalent of a 50 to 70 line 
screen. But scanned images are ideal for proofing 
purposes. They allow you and the lithographer to 
accurately visualize how the final page will look. 
Scanned position stats are the ultimate in con¬ 
venience and safety. It’s virtually impossible to 
put the wrong picture on the page when you can 
look at a sample. But they may be too much 
trouble for all but the most demanding projects. 
Most scanners still cost over $1000. Creating 
scanned images requires extra time and effort. 





A-22 


Text Files 


And storing the results demands lots of space on 
the hard disk. ! 

! 

If there’s one thing a commercial printer wants 
it’s consistency <197> consistent density and con¬ 
sistent placement. Density refers to the type. 
Placement refers to the position of folios, rules, 
column tops and bottoms, captions, key lines and 
other repeating page elements. They must be in 
the same place from page to page. Consider a rule 
at the top of the page. If the desktop publisher 
places it inconsistently, the lithographer will be 
unable to use it to align pages. The rule will 
<169>jump<170> up and down as the reader 
pages through the book. And it may not match up 
across the top of facing pages.! 

@HEAD1 = Crop Marks! 

! 

While using the page layout program, you can 
take several steps to make life easier for the 
lithographer. One is to add keylines for photos, as 
discussed above. Another is to place crop marks 
on each page. Crop marks are also known as 
<169>register<170> or <169>comer<170> marks. 
These tiny lines help the lithographer position the 
page. Lithographers can work without crop 
marks. In such cases, they try to line up each page 
by using the folio or a rule as the 
<169>anchor.<170> Some lithographers also sug¬ 
gest avoiding ragged right margins. Ragged right 
is a good effect for certain brochures and newslet¬ 
ters, but it’s generally inappropriate for books. If 
margins are even and consistent, the lithographer 
can use them to help position the pages. But com¬ 
mercial printers are happier when they can work 
from crop marks. Most prefer hairline rules 
placed just outside the live area. However, some 
lithographers like register marks placed inside 
the trim area. Ask in advance, then use your page 
layout program to produce the marks. ! 

! 

The specifics of creating crop marks depends on 
the software. In Ventura Publisher, for example, 
lines placed on the Underlying Page appear on 
every page of the document. Most software pack¬ 
ages have a similar <169>Master Page,<170> 
<169>Repeating Page<170> or <169>Underlying 
Page<170> feature to place crop marks 
throughout the manuscript.! 

! 

@HEAD1 = Screen Tints! 

! 

Most page layout programs provide screen tints. A 
screen is a pattern of tiny dots. With black ink, 


the dots make an area look gray. With colored ink 
they give a light tint. Lithographers use percent¬ 
ages to describe the amount of ink laid down. A 
10% screen is very light; a 90% screen is very 
dark. Screen tints are used to highlight an area, 
to set text apart and to accent charts and graphs. 
Often type is <MI>overprinted<D> <197> laid 
down on top of the tint. ! 

! 

Short-run publishers who use quick printers must 
supply complete mechanicals. They must, there¬ 
fore, put the screen tint on the page themselves. 
One alternative is to use the page layout program. 
Trouble is, the dots produced by laser printers are 
too large for top-quality screens. There’s no prob¬ 
lem if the screen if simply used as a pattern to fill 
in a pie chart or a graph. But if type is difficult to 
read when placed on top of a coarse screen. The 
smaller the type, the harder it is to read. Tb mini¬ 
mize problems, use screens of 20% or less (if the 
program doesn’t specify percentages, use one of 
the two lightest shades). Keep the type as large as 
possible <197> 14 points or bigger if possible. An 
alternative is to buy tint material from an art 
supply store and paste it over the area to be 
screened. Use this option if you must put small 
type inside a large screened area. Buy tint 
material with the highest resolution you can find. 

H 

! 

Publishers who use commercial printers should 
the printer do the screen. Indicate the area to be 
screened. Use a non-reproducing blue pencil, a 
stick-on Post-It note or write the instructions on 
top of a see-through tissue overlay. ! 

! 

@HEAD1 = Color printing! 

! 

Multicolored documents are created in several 
passes through the printing press. Each time 
another color is added to a page, it must be sent 
through the press again. The lithographer must 
have a separate plate for each color. Normally, the 
commercial printer makes these color separa¬ 
tions. It costs extra, of course. But desktop pub¬ 
lishers can easily create their own separations, 
thereby saving money and time. The process 
described here works for spot color. Continuous 
tone color photographs must still be handled 
using traditional methods.! 

! 

The method relies on the ability of some software 
to specify the color of different text elements. It is 
most effective with programs such as Xerox Ven¬ 
tura Publisher that use style sheets <197> docu- 




Appendix A 


A-23 


ment formatting guidelines that can be prepared 
once and used over and over again. This report 
describes a method for Ventura Publisher, but it 
can be 

adapted to other programs as well.’ll 

1 

Let’s use a two-color example. The same prin¬ 
ciples would apply for more than two colors. Con¬ 
sider, for instance, black text with blue headings. 
Start by creating the document as normal. The 
style sheet for this step will have all text elements 
specified as black. Now create another style sheet 
for each color. These style sheets will be identical 
to the first except for the color of the text ele¬ 
ments. *! 

H 

To create a color separation for the black text, 
specify that all the headings (all the blue text) 
should print in white. By changing the color to 
white, the text disappears<197>white text on 
white paper is invisible. The beauty of this 
method is that the invisible headings are still on 
the page. Consequently, the position of the page 
elements does not change. The overlay for each 
color will match up with the others, *! 

The third and final style sheet reverses the 
process. All the headings print in black. Eveiy- 
thing else is set to print in white. When you print 
this version out on the laser printer, it shows only 
the text that is to be printed in blue ink. The 
lithographer will match the two separations to 
create a composite page with the black and the 
blue text in perfect registration. 

H 

The beauty of the system described here is its 
speed and ease-of-use. The only real investment 
in time is to create the two extra style sheets. 
Once these have been prepared, the user can cre¬ 
ate color separations in moments just by calling 
up the different style sheets and printing out the 
separate versions. If your page layout program 
does not have these capabilities, you can simulate 
the effect by manually deleting text, as long as 
you do so without changing the position of any¬ 
thing on the page. Naturally, you can also use the 
traditional method. Specify which elements are to 
be what color and let the printer prepare the 
separations.*! 

1 

@HEAD1 = Covers *! 

1 

Some publishers may be tempted to produce 
covers using laser mechanicals. It is not recom¬ 
mended. Most covers use display type on slick 


stock. That’s simply too demanding for the 300 dpi 
resolution of laser printers. The imperfections 
stand out. The design of the cover is also an issue. 
Most publishers are unlikely to do as good a job as 
a professional designer. Buyers judge books by 
their covers, especially wholesalers, distributors 
and retailers. If those individuals aren’t im¬ 
pressed, your books will never get on the shelves 
for readers to find. The most common failing of 
small independent publishers is to put a good 
book inside a shoddy, amateurish cover, 'll 

H 

If you insist on producing camera ready art for the 
cover, send the file to a phototypesetter for high 
resolution output. And be sure to calculate care¬ 
fully for the spine. You must know the number of 
pages and the bulk of the paper (the pages per 
inch) to figure the correct width. Printers say it is 
very difficult to correct for an improperly-sized 
spine. ^ 

@HEAD1 = Adjusting Page Count*! 

1 

Desktop publishing differs from traditional 
publishing in another key aspect <197> the 
ability to make last minute changes. That 
capability can be put to good use to make the 
books you publish mesh properly with the work 
customs of commercial printers.*! 

1 

The final page count is vitally important to a book 
printing job, and desktop publishers are ideally 
suited to adapt to the constraints of the printing 
industry. Lithographers print in signatures of 16 
and 32 pages. You can save money by working 
within these limitations, coor planning can force 
the lithographer to add a <169>bastard 
eight<170> (an undersized, eight-page signature). 
This extra work can add a surprising amount to 
the total print bill.*! 

1 

And it’s unnecessary, since desktop publishing 
gives you the control to tailor books to the right 
size. If the final page count is not a multiple of 16, 
make changes until it fits. Often a small change 
creates a substantial difference by the time it 
ripples through the entire manuscript. To shorten 
a book, try removing words and lines. Add 
hyphens to shorten paragraphs. Expand margins 
slightly. Reduce the size of illustrations. Go down 
a point size or two. Or try a different types- 
tyle<197>some take more space than others, even 
when set at the same size and line spacing.*! 

1 

In other cases, you might want to up the page 





A-24 


Text Files 


count. For instance, you might be able to increase 
156 pages to 160 by removing a single line from 
each page. An added bonus would be more white 
space and a more readable manuscript. Or you 
could add illustrations, or make existing illustra¬ 
tions slightly larger. As long as you need extra 
pages to fill up the signature anyway, consider 
adding some order cards at the back, or a page or 
two of sales copy and testimonials at the front.f 
! 

@HEAD1 = Improving the Look of Laser-printed 
Pages'll 
1 

Several advanced techniques can boost the 
quality of pages printed from laser mechanicals. 
Although desktop laser printers can create im¬ 
pressive documents, the density and resolution of 
the type simply isn’t up to the standards of tradi¬ 
tional photo typesetters. Nowhere is this more ap¬ 
parent than when laser output is used as 
mechanicals for offset printing. Three problems 
occur most often:*! 

1 

@BULLET = Washed out areas <197> sections or 
even entire pages that have a pale gray, washed- 
out appearance! 

! 

@BULLET = Broken letters <197> characters 
where small sections have dropped out 1 ! 

! 

@BULLET = The jaggies <197> rough, uneven 
edges an,d diagonals caused by the low resolution 
of laser printers'! 

! 

Fortunately, there are tricks and techniques that 
improve the quality of pages printed from laser 
mechanicals. ! 

! 

@HEAD2 = Improving Mechanicals'! 

! 

<MS>SELECTING THE RIGHT TYPEFACE<D> 
is the first step. Some typefaces are more suitable 
than others for offset reproduction. If you produce 
more than one or two books each year, experiment 
with different typefaces. It may be cost effective to 
purchase additional fonts, either from the original 
supplier or from an outside company. As a bonus, 
your documents will not have the all-to-familiar 
<169>Times-Roman body, Helvetica head- 
lines<170> look that is common to 90% of all 
desktop publishing documents. ! 

1 

Getting dark, dense type is the next challenge. 
Laser printers, unfortunately, are plagued by 
drop outs and washed out, gray areas. Sometimes, 


the problem lies with the toner or the toner 
cartridge. It also has to do with the way printers 
work. Some laser printer engines are better than 
others at creating solid black areas. The Canon 
CX engine at the heart of most first- generation 
laser printers was notorious for weak, gray let¬ 
ters. If your printer has a front panel control of 
any kind, put it on the darkest setting. Many pros 
also suggest removing the toner cartridge and 
rotating it. This may overcome clumping and clot¬ 
ting and help achieve a uniform print quality 
across the page. And cartridges work better than 
others. When you find one that creates dense, 
dark type, set it aside and save it for special print 
jobs. U 
1 

It’s best to have type as dark and dense as pos¬ 
sible. Nevertheless, if all the pages are slightly 
pale, most lithographers can compensate. What 
they hate is type that fluctuates from page to page 
or, worst of all, within each page. Check each page 
before the job goes to the lithographer. Reprint 
any pages that aren’t consistent.*! 

! 

<MS>SPRAYING WITH A MATTE FIXA- 
TIVE<D> usually causes laser-printed pages to 
<169>darken up.<170> Not only does the fixative 
make black areas appear darker, it also protects 
the pages. Fixative helps prevent smears, 
fingerprints and flaking. The aerosol cans are 
sold at art supply stores. To the best of our 
knowledge, any fixative suitable for charcoal 
drawings will also work with laser-printed 
pages.*! 

1 

<MS>SPECIAL LASER PRINTER PAPER <D>is 
sometimes recommended for laser mechanicals. 
The theory is that this paper has whiter whites 
and blacker blacks. It also has a smoother even 
coating that makes it easier for the camera 
operator to produce a good negative. Warning: 
Some desktop publishers complain that certain 
coated laser papers jam repeatedly in laser 
printers. Buy a small sample and test first.*! 

! 

Special paper may be an especially good idea for 
publishers who create galleys with the laser 
printer and paste them up using traditional 
methods. Some special papers contain wax hold¬ 
out that minimizes problems from waxing and 
paste-up. Be aware, however, that coated papers 
must be treated with care. The laser-printer type 
tends to crack and fall off if coated pages are bent, 
folded or stacked.! 

! 



Appendix A 


A - 25 


<MS>PHOTOREDUCTION<D> is a difficult 
technique, but it also has great potential for im¬ 
proving pages from laser mechanicals. Reducing 
an image makes flaws less apparent. (Conversely, 
enlarging magnifies flaws. That’s why you should 
never enlarge laser type). By reducing laser type, 
you increase its apparent resolution. Most laser 
printers create type at 300 dpi. Researchers think 
the human eye loses its ability to distinguish in¬ 
dividual dots at about 450 dpi. (By way of com¬ 
parison, graphic arts-quality phototypesetters 
produce 900 dpi or higher.)! 

! 

It would seem an obvious step, then, to create 
pages at a larger size and reduce them down. In 
practice, this method creates problems. You can, 
for example, start with 18 point type and 
photoreduce it to 10 points. Unfortunately, the 
letterspacing and line spacing will be incorrect. 
Although subtle, these spacing problems begin to 
be noticeable when type is reduced more than 10 
percent or so. In addition, fine lines or dot pat¬ 
terns may end up too thin to print, or disappear 
altogether. You may not want to make a small face 
even smaller or decrease the margins too much, ! 
1 

Careful planning is essential to make sure every¬ 
thing fits properly on the page after the 
photoreduction. As anyone who has sized photos 
already knows, its easy to make mistakes. Basi¬ 
cally, it’s just another step and one that many 
publishers don’t want to bother with.! 

! 

<MS>THERE IS A SIMPLER METHOD<D> for 
pages where the live area is 5 x 7 or smaller. Start 
by laying out the page exactly as you would other¬ 
wise. Use normal linespacing, letterspacing and 
type sizes. At print time, however, use the Print 
dialog box to enlarge. The laser printer will in¬ 
crease by the percentage you specify. (Note: Some 
programs cannot perform this enlargement func¬ 
tion. Others require a separate, add-on pro¬ 
gram.)! 

1 

Now take the enlarged page to the lithographer 
and instruct him to reduce back down to the 
original size. Since these are the dimensions you 
originally worked with, everything will be exactly 
as you saw it on the screen. The letterspacing, 
margins, and so on will be correct, but the type 
will be at a higher apparent resolution.! 

! 

Why doesn’t this technique work for pages larger 
than 5x7? Today’s laser printers accept 8 1/2 x 11 
paper, but they can only print to within an inch or 


so of the margin, for an effective live area of only 
7 1/2 x 10. You can enlarge a 5 x 7 page up to about 
150% before you run out of room. When you bring 
this 150% enlargement back down to the original 
5X7, you will have achieved an effective resolu¬ 
tion of 450 dpi.! 

! 

This photoreduction technique can distinctly im¬ 
prove the look of a page. One Southern California 
publishing company, for example, wanted to 
produce a final live area of 3 3/4 x 6. Through trial 
and error, they discovered they could enlarge by 
165% before coming up against the laser printer’s 
<169>dead zone.<170> By bringing this enlarge¬ 
ment back down to the original size, they 
achieved an apparent resolution approaching 500 
dpi.! 

! 

What if you must produce pages larger than 5x7? 
Access to an 11 x 17 printer is one answer. The 
Dataproducts LZR-2665 is a PostScript com¬ 
patible laser printer that produces 11 x 17 pages 
at 26 ppm. At $17,900, it’s too high-priced for most 
desktop publishers, but you may be able to find a 
service bureau or print center to output final copy 
for a page charge.! 

! 

@HEAD2 = The Lithographer Can Help 

So far we’ve covered how the publisher should 
prepare laser mechanicals. In addition, the lithog¬ 
rapher can take steps to improve the final out¬ 
put.! 

! 

<MS>ALTERING THE EXPOSURE<D> is one 
relatively simple technique. The kind of altera¬ 
tion depends on whether the lithographer creates 
a positive or a negative. In either case, the idea is 
the same: to alter the exposure so the type looks 
darker. For the traditional, high-quality method 
involving a film negative, a 10 percent underex¬ 
posure is generally enough to help <169>fill 
in<170> the type. ! 

! 

Discuss this concept with the lithographer. Most 
of them are more familiar with the same proce¬ 
dure done in reverse. For example, when creating 
negatives, camera operators will often 
<MI>over<D>expose. This causes tiny specks and 
dots to disappear and become white. Sometimes 
operators refer to a <169>dropout<170> halftone, 
since the overexposure causes imperfections and 
small details to drop out. If the operator knows 
how to alter exposure for dropouts, ask if he can 
do the same thing in reverse to make the type 



A-26 


Text Files 


denser. One warning: When you darken the type, 
you also darken dirt, dust and other imperfections 
that would normally disappear. Both the publish¬ 
er and the lithographer must take exceptional 
care to make sure the mechanicals are spotless. 1 

H 

<MS>THE PAPER STOCK<D> can also make a 
difference. Work with the lithographer to select 
the paper that gives the best look for the money. 


There may not be much point in going to expen¬ 
sive coated stock. Slick paper only brings out the 
shortcomings of laser type by making jagged 
edges and drop outs more visible. On the other 
hand, cheap newsprint will cause the ink to 
spread, making characters even fuzzier. A good 
grade of uncoated book stock is probably the best 
bet. Ask the lithographer to run some tests and 
give his suggestions. 


Chapter Eight 


ASCII file to create: C:\TEMP\8TABLE.TXT 


Inches! 

1 

Picas and Points'! 

! 

Points'! 

1 

1/6 inch! 

! 

01,00 picas & points! 

! 

12 points! 

! 

1/4 inch! 

! 

01,06 picas & points! 

! 

18 points! 

! 

1/3 inch! 

! 

02,00 picas & points! 

! 

4 points! 

! 


1/2 inch! 

! 

03,00 picas & points! 

! 

36 points! 

! 

I inch! 

! 

06,00 picas & points! 

! 

72 points! 

! 

5 1/2 inches! 

! 

33,00 picas & points! 

! 

8 1/2 inches! 

! 

51,00 picas & points! 

! 

II inches! 

! 

66,00 picas & points ! 

! 


Chapter Nine 

ASCII file to create: C:\TEMP\9TECHDOC.TXT 


@TITLE = The Laser AstroZ! 

! 

©TITLESUB = Guide to Operations <197> Model 
XYZ-11! 

! 

@HEAD1 = Getting Started! 

! 


@HEAD2 = A Word to Owners! 

! 

Thank you for choosing the Laser AstroZ printer 
from XYZ Corporation. This high quality laser 
printer gives you the flexibility and power for all 
your desktop publishing needs. The Laser AstroZ 
comes standard with PostScript, as well as 




Appendix A 


A-21 


Hewlett-Packard PCL and HPGL for programs 
you still use that are non-PostScript compatible, ! 
! 

©HEAD3 = Introduction! 

! 

First we’ll show you hot to unpack and install 
your Laser AstroZ printer. You should carefully 
check to make sure you have the following items:*!! 
! 

@LISTBULLET = ONE IBM PC DISKETTE in 
5-1/4" format*!! 

1 

©LISTBULLET = A PRINT TRAY and manual 
feed guide'll 
! 

@LISTBULLET = A PAPER CASSETTE and 
toner cartridge'll 
! 

©HEAD2 = You and Your Printer! 

1 

Before you install your printer, make sure it is 
located in a well-ventilated area away from direct 
sunlight. Check to make sure that your office’s 
electrical wiring is adequate. The line voltage 
should not vary from the factory warrantied volt¬ 
age marked on the back of the printer. Avoid plac¬ 
ing the printer in an office with abrupt changes in 
temperature. Do not place the printer near open 
faucets, heaters, air conditioners, humidifiers, or 
radiators. ! 

1 

Place the printer on a flat surface 8-9 inches away 
from the wall. Leave enough room in the front for 
the cartridge door to open freely.! 

! 

@BODYSMALL = This manual prepared by the 
publications and communications department, 
XYZ Corporation, Los Angeles, CA. ! 

! 

@HEAD1 = Unpacking and Setting Up! 

! 

@HEAD2 = Unpacking! 

! 

Your Laser AstroZ weighs 73 pounds, so do not try 
to lift it without someone’s help. Lift the printer 
by its handles and place it on a clean, stable 
surface. ! 

! 

Lift the release lever and raise the upper part of 
the printer! 

! 

Lift the green fixing assembly cover and remove 
the four red spacers.! 

1 

Locate the green wire cleaner and remove its 


protective sealing tape. You will use the wire 
cleaner to clean the corona wire in the print 
cartridge.! 

! 

©HEAD2 = The Care of Your Printer! 

! 

There are several routine maintenance proce¬ 
dures you can perform to keep your Laser AstroZ 
running smoothly. You should be familiar with:! 

! 

©LISTBULLET = Replacing the toner cartridge 
and cleaning stick! 

! 

©LISTBULLET = Cleaning the corona wires! 

! 

©LISTBULLET = Cleaning the guides! 

! 

©LISTBULLET = Cleaning and replacing the 
separation belts! 

! 

©HEAD2 = About the Tbner Cartridge! 

! 

The toner cartridge includes powder that serves 
as ink to the printer. The cartridge itself has a 
color coded bar that will indicate the level of pow¬ 
der and the number of prints. If you print plain 
text (not graphics) at a higher toner setting, you 
will get more prints than if you print graphics at a 
lower setting. If your prints begin to look faded in 
areas, or streaked at the edges, replace your toner 
cartridge.! 

! 

Paper Trays, Paper Cassettes! 

1 

©HEAD5 = Paper Trays! 

! 

<B>Print tray position<D>. Hold the print tray so 
the wide end faced towards the front of the 
printer. Insert the plastic pins into the front slots 
above the handle.! 

! 

NOTE: Do not overload the paper tray. Packing it 
too full will cause paper jams and print errors.! 

! 

<B>Attach the manual feed guide<D>. Hold the 
manual feed guide with the plastic brackets 
towards the rear of the printer. Face the ribbed 
side up.! 

! 

<B>Load paper in manual feed.<D> Insert one 
sheet of paper at a time. Glide the paper along the 
tray until it can’t go any further, then stop. ! 

! 

@HEAD5 = Paper Cassettes! 

! 




A-28 


Text Files 


Place the paper in the cassette and push it under 
the paper clips. Insert the paper cassette into the 
slot under the front of the printer until it stops. 
The cassette holds approximately 110 sheets.! 

1 


NOTE: If you want to print on letterhead, place 
the paper FACE DOWN beneath the clips.f 

@HEAD1 = A Quick Tour of the Laser AstroZ 


Chapter Ten 

ASCII file to create: C:\TEMP\PROFEXT.TXT 


©TITLE = The Laser AstroZ']] 

1 

@TITLESUB = Guide to Operations<197> Model 
XYZ-111 
1 

©BODYBREAK = 1 

1 

@HEAD1 = Getting Started']} 

! 

@HEAD2 = A Word to Owners*]] 

1 

Thank you for choosing the Laser AstroZ printer 
from XYZ Corporation. This high quality laser 
printer gives you the flexibility and power for all 
your desktop publishing needs. The Laser AstroZ 
comes standard with PostScript, as well as 
Hewlett-Packard PCL and HPGL for programs 
you still use that are non-PostScript compatible. U 
! 

©HEAD3 = Introduction! 

! 

First we’ll show you hot to unpack and install 
your Laser AstroZ printer. You should carefully 
check to make sure you have the following items:! 
! 

©LISTBULLET = ONE IBM PC DISKETTE in 
5-1/4" format! 

! 

@LISTBULLET = A PRINT TRAY and manual 
feed guide! 

! 

@LISTBULLET = A PAPER CASSETTE and 
toner cartridge! 

! 

©HEAD2 = You and Your Printer! 

! 

Before you install your printer, make sure it is 
located in a well-ventilated area away from direct 
sunlight. Check to make sure that your office’s 
electrical wiring is adequate. The line voltage 
should not vary from the factory warrantied volt¬ 
age marked on the back of the printer. Avoid plac¬ 
ing the printer in an office with abrupt changes in 
temperature. Do not place the printer near open 


faucets, heaters, air conditioners, humidifiers, or 
radiators. ! 

! 

Place the printer on a flat surface 8-9 inches away 
from the wall. Leave enough room in the front for 
the cartridge door to open freely.! 

1 

@BODYSMALL = This manual prepared by the 
publications and communications department, 
XYZ Corporation, Los Angeles, CA! 

! 

@BODYBREAK = ! 

! 

@HEAD1 = Unpacking and Setting Up! 

! 

@HEAD2 = Unpacking! 

! 

Your Laser AstroZ weighs 73 pounds, so do not try 
to lift it without someone’s help. Lift the printer 
by its handles and place it on a clean, stable 
surface. ! 

! 

©LIST# = Lift the release lever and raise the 
upper part of the printer! 

! 

©LIST# = Lift the green fixing assembly cover 
and remove the four red spacers.! 

! 

@LIST# = Locate the green wire cleaner and 
remove its protective sealing tape. You will use 
the wire cleaner to clean the corona wire in the 
print cartridge.! 

! 

@HEAD2 = The Care of Your Printer! 

! 

There are several routine maintenance proce¬ 
dures you can perform to keep your Laser AstroZ 
running smoothly. You should be familiar with:! 

! 

@LISTBULLET = Replacing the toner cartridge 
and cleaning stick! 

! 

©LISTBULLET = Cleaning the corona wires! 

! 




Appendix A 


A - 29 


@LISTBULLET = Cleaning the guides!! 

H 

@LISTBULLET = Cleaning and replacing the 
separation belts'! 

1 

@HEAD2 = About the Toner Cartridge'll 

H 

The toner cartridge includes powder that serves 
as ink to the printer. The cartridge itself has a 
color coded bar that will indicate the level of pow¬ 
der and the number of prints. If you print plain 
text (not graphics) at a higher toner setting, you 
will get more prints than if you print graphics at a 
lower setting. If your prints begin to look faded in 
areas, or streaked at the edges, replace your toner 
cartridge.^ 

1 

@BODYBREAK = 1 

U 

@HEAD4 = Paper Trays, Paper Cassettes'! 

1 

@RULE = 

1 

@HEAD5 = Paper Trays'! 

H 

©LIST# = <B>Print tray position<D>. Hold the 
print tray so the wide end faced towards the front 
of the printer. Insert the plastic pins into the front 
slots above the handle. *! 

1 

©NOTE = NOTE: Do not overload the paper tray. 


Packing it too full will cause paper jams and print 
errors.U 
1 

©SPACER = 1 

1 

@LIST# = <B>Attach the manual feed guide<D>. 
Hold the manual feed guide with the plastic 
brackets towards the rear of the printer. Face the 
ribbed side up. *5 
1 

©LIST# = <B>Load paper in manual feed.<D> 
Insert one sheet of paper at a time. Glide the 
paper along the tray until it can’t go any further, 
then stop. 1 
1 

@HEAD5 = Paper Cassettes'! 

1 

Place the paper in the cassette and push it under 
the paper clips. Insert the paper cassette into the 
slot under the front of the printer until it stops. 
The cassette holds approximately 110 sheets.^ 

1 

©NOTE = NOTE: If you want to print on letter¬ 
head, place the paper FACE DOWN beneath the 
clips.^l 
1 

©BODYBREAK = 1 

1 

©HEAD1 = A Quick Tour of the Laser Astro- 
Z<$&1-1> 




Appendix B 

Tag Tables 


If you do not have the Power disk, you can construct the 
sample style sheets using the tag tables below. Each tag table 
includes the settings for the Page (e.g., page size and layout, 
margins and columns, etc.) and the settings for each tag in the 
style sheet. The tag tables omit all settings that are identical 
to the Body Text tag. So if a tag has the same Font as Body 
Text, the Font for that tag is not included in the list. Just 
make it the same as Body Text. 

To create the style sheets, open a blank chapter, load the 
DEFAULT. STY style sheet from the \TYPESET subdirectory 
and load a sample text file onto the Page. (Make sure the text 
file you load does not contain any predefined tag names — or 
they will become part of the style sheet.) Change the Page 
settings first using the Chapter and Frame menus. Then go 
on to creating the tags. 

Start with the Body Text tag. Select a paragraph and modify 
its font, alignment, spacing, and so forth until it matches the 
settings Body Text in the tag table. Once the Body Text tag is 
completed, begin to add new tags, one at a time, for each tag 
name in the table. In Paragraph mode, select any Body Text 
paragraph, then choose Add New Tag. Enter the new tag 
name. Then modify the tag’s font, alignment, spacing, etc., 
until it matches the settings in the tag table. 

After you have completed all the tags in a style sheet, select 
Save As New Style (File menu). Save the new style sheet in 
the C:\TEMP subdirectory with the name we give below. 
Then abandon the chapter. 



B - 2 


Appendix B 



C:\POWER\4FORM.STY 



Save as C:\TEMP\4INVOICE.STY 


Underlying Page Settings 



Page Size & Layout 

Orientation: 

Portrait 

Sides: 

Single 

Paper Type: 

Letter, 8.5 x 11 in. 



Margins & Columns 




# of Columns: 

1 

Settings For Right Page 

Settings For Left Page 

Top: 

06,00 picas & pts. 

Top: 

06,00 picas & pts. 

Bottom: 

06,00 picas & pts. 

Bottom: 

06,00 picas & pts. 

Left: 

07,06 picas & pts. 

Left: 

07,06 picas & pts. 

Right: 

07,06 picas & pts. 

Right: 

07,06 picas & pts. 

Wi dths/Gutters—1: 

36,00 picas & pts. 

Wi dths/Gutters—1: 

36,00 picas & pts. 



Tag Settings 




Body Text 




Font 

Face: 

Helvetica 

Style: 

Normal 

Size: 

12 points 

Color: 

Black 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Left 

First Line: 

Indent 

Vert. Alignment: 

Tbp 

Relative Indent: 

Off 

Text Rotation: 

None 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Hyphenation: 

Off 

In/Outdent Ht.: 

1 

Successive Hyphens: 

2 

In Fm. Rt. to Dec.: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Overall Width: 

Column-Wide 



Spacing 

Above: 

07.00 fractional pts 

In Fm. Left (L): 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Below: ^ 

00.00 fractional pts 

In Fm. Right (L): 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Inter-Line: 

14.00 fractional pts 

In Fm. Left (R): 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Inter-Paragraph: 

00.00 fractional pts 

In Fm. Right (R): 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Add in Above: 

Always 



Breaks 

Page Break: 

No 

Next Y Position: 

Normal 

Column Break: 

No 

Allow Within: 

Yes 

Line Break: 

Before 

Keep With Next: 

No 

Logo 





Font 

Size: 


18 points 


Style: 


Bold 









Tag Tables 


B - 3 



Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Center 



Spacing 

Above: 

Inter-Line: 

00.00 fractional pts 
24.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: 

When Not at C.T. 

Label 




Font 

Size: 

10 points 



Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Center 

Vert. Alignment: 

Middle 

Spacing 

Aibove: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

12.00 fractional pts 

Breaks 

Keep With Next: 

Yes 



Z_BOXTEXT 




Spacing 

Above: 

Inter-Line: 

03.00 fractional pts 
12.00 fractional pts 

In Fm. Left (L): 

In Fm. Left (R): 

00,06 picas & pts. 
00,06 picas & pts. 

Balance 




Font 

Style: 

Bold 



Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Decimal 

In Fm. Rt. to Dec.: 

05,06 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

Above: 

03.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

12.00 fractional pts 

Address 




Font 

Style: 

B-Italic 



Spacing 

Above: 

10.00 fractional pts 



LabelBlack 




Font 

Size: 

10 points 

Style: 

Bold 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Center 




Spacing 
















B - 4 


Appendix B 


Above: 

04.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

12.00 fractional pts 

Breaks 

Keep With Next: 

Yes 



LabelLeft 




Font 




Size: 

10 points 



Alignment 

Vert. Alignment: 

Middle 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,06 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

Above: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

12.00 fractional pts 

Breaks 

Keep With Next: 

Yes 



LabelLine 




Font 




Size: 

10 points 



Alignment 

Vert. Alignment: 

Middle 



Spacing 

Above: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

12.00 fractional pts 

Breaks 

Keep With Next: 

Yes 



Tab Settings 

Leader Char: 

95 

Auto-Leader: 

On 

Leader Spacing: 

0 



LogoAddress 




Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Center 



Spacing 

Above: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: 

When Not at C.T. 

ListDecimal 




Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Decimal 

In Fm. Rt. to Dec.: 

03,00 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

Above: 

03.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

12.00 fractional pts 












Tag Tables 


B - 5 


Tab Settings 
LabelLine 

Tab Number 2: 
Tab Number 3: 
Tab Number 4: 
Tab Number 5: 
Tab Number 6: 
Tab Number 7: 
Tab Number 8: 
Tab Number 9: 


Left, 06,00, 32 
Left, 09,00, 32 
Left, 12,00, 32 
Left, 15,00, 32 
Left, 18,00, 32 
Left, 21,00, 32 
Left, 24,00, 32 
Left, 27,00, 32 


Tab Number 10 
Tab Number 11 
Tab Number 12 
Tab Number 13 
Tab Number 14 
Tab Number 15 
Tab Number 16 


Left, 30,00, 32 
Left, 33,00, 32 
Left, 36,00, 32 
Left, 39,00, 32 
Left, 42,00, 32 
Left, 45,00, 32 
Left, 48,00, 32 




B - 6 


Appendix B 



C:\POWER\5AD.STY 



Save as C:\TEMP\5MAILER.STY 


Base Page Settings 



Page Size & Layout 

Orientation: 

Portrait 

Sides: 

Double 

Paper Type: 

Letter, 8.5 x 11 in. 

Start On: 

Right Side 

Margins & Columns 




# of Columns: 

1 

Settings For Right Page 

Settings For Left Page 

Top: 

03,00 picas & pts. 

Top: 

03,00 picas & pts. 

Bottom: 

03,00 picas & pts. 

Bottom: 

03,00 picas & pts. 

Left: 

03,00 picas & pts. 

Left: 

03,00 picas & pts. 

Right: 

03,00 picas & pts. 

Right: 

03,00 picas & pts. 

Wi dths/Gutters—1: 

45,00 picas & pts. 

Wi dths/Gutter s—1: 

45,00 picas & pts. 



Tag Settings 




Body Text 




Font 




Face: 

'limes 

Style: 

Normal 

Size: 

14 points 

Color: 

Black 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Justified 

First Line: 

Indent 

Vert. Alignment: 

Top 

Relative Indent: 

Off 

Text Rotation: 

None 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Hyphenation: 

USENGLSH 

In/Outdent Ht.: 

1 

Successive Hyphens: 

2 

In Fm. Rt. to Dec.: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Overall Width: 

Column-Wide 



Spacing 

Above: 

00.00 fractional pts 

In Fm. Left (L): 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Below: 

00.00 fractional pts 

In Fm. Right (L): 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Inter-Line: 

16.00 fractional pts 

In Fm. Left (R): 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Inter-Paragraph: 

00.00 fractional pts 

In Fm. Right (R): 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Add in Above: 

When Not at C.T. 



Breaks 

Page Break: 

No 

Next Y Position: 

Normal 

Column Break: 

No 

Allow Within: 

Yes 

Line Break: 

Before 

Keep With Next: 

No 

Address 





Font 

Size: 10 points 










Tag Tables 


B - 7 



Spacing 

Inter-Line: 

In Fm. Left (L): 

12.00 fractional pts 
02,00 picas & pts. 

In Fm. Left (R): 

02,00 picas & pts. 

Head3 




Font 

Size: 

24 points 

Style: 

Bold 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Center 



Spacing 

Above: 

Inter-Line: 

60.00 fractional pts 
30.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: 

Always 

Paragraph Typography 

Tracking: 0.025 Ems Tighter 

Vert. Just. At Top of Para:0.833 inches 

Headl 




Font 

Face: 

Size: 

Helvetica 

74 points 

Style: 

Bold 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
Hyphenation: 

Center 

Off 

Overall Width: 

Frame-Wide 

Spacing 

Inter-Line: 

74.00 fractional pts 



Paragraph Typography 

Automatic Pair Keming:On 

Letter Spacing: Off 

Tracking: 

0.040 Ems Tighter 

Head2 




Font 

Face: 

Size: 

Helvetica 

20 points 

Style: 

B-Italic 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
Hyphenation: 

Left 

Off 

Overall Width: 

Frame-Wide 

Spacing 

Inter-Line: 

28.00 fractional pts 




Tab Settings 

Leader Char: 


32 


Leader Spacing: 


0 













B - 8 


Appendix B 


HeadRotate 

Font 

Size: 

24 points 

Style: 

Bold 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Center 

Text Rotation: 

180 

Spacing 

Above: 

Inter-Line: 

60.00 fractional pts 
30.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: 

Always 

Paragraph Typography 

Tracking: 0.025 Ems Tighter 



BodyCenter 




Font 

Size: 

8 points 



Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Center 

Overall Width: 

Frame-Wide 

Spacing 

Above: 

Inter-Line: 

08.00 fractional pts 
08.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: 

Always 


Tab Settings 


Head2 

Tab Number 1: 


Center, 17,06, 32 


Tab Number 2: 


Right, 35,06, 32 









Tag Tables 


B - 9 



C :\POWER\6N EWSLET.STY 




Save as C:\TEMP\6NEWS.STY 





Base Page Settings 





Page Size & Layout 

Orientation: 

Portrait 

Sides: 


Double 


Paper Type: 

Letter, 8.5 x 11 in. 

Start On: 


Right Side 


Margins & Columns 






# of Columns: 

3 

Settings For Right Page 


Settings For Left Page 


Tap: 


04,06 picas 

& pts. 

Top: 

04,06 picas & pts. 

Bottom: 


06,00 picas 

& pts. 

Bottom: 

06,00 picas & pts. 

Left: 


04,06 picas 

& pts. 

Left: 

04,06 picas & pts. 

Right: 


04,06 picas 

& pts. 

Right: 

04,06 picas & pts. 

Widths/Gutters— 

-1: 

13,00/01,06 

pcs & pts 

Wi dths/Gutters—1: 

13,00/01,06 pcs & pts 

Widths/Gutters— 

-2: 

13,00/01,06 

pcs & pts 

Widths/Gutters—2: 

13,00/01,06 pcs & pts 

Widths/Gutters— 

-3: 

13,00 picas 

& pts. 

Widths/Gutters—3: 

13,00 picas & pts. 






Tag Settings 

Body Text 


Font 

Face: 

Size: 

Times 

10 points 

Style: 

Color: 

Normal 

Black 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Justified 

First Line: 

Indent 

Vert. Alignment: 

Tbp 

Relative Indent: 

Off 

Text Rotation: 

None 

In/Outdent Width: 

01,00 picas & pts. 

Hyphenation: 

USENGLSH 

In/Outdent Ht.: 

1 

Successive Hyphens: 
Overall Width: 

3 

Column-Wide 

In Fm. Rt. to Dec.: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

Above: 

00.00 fractional pts 

In Fm. Left (L): 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Below: 

00.00 fractional pts 

In Fm. Right (L): 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Inter-Line: 

12.00 fractional pts 

In Fm. Left (R): 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Inter-Paragraph: 

Add in Above: 

00.00 fractional pts 
When Not at C.T. 

In Fm. Right (R): 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Breaks 

Page Break: 

No 

Next Y Position: 

Normal 

Column Break: 

No 

Allow Within: 

Yes 

Line Break: 

Before 

Keep With Next: 

No 











B -10 


Appendix B 


Byline 

Font 

Style: 

N-Italic 



Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
Hyphenation: 

Left 

Off 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

Above: 

12.00 fractional pts 



Paragraph Typography 

Letter Spacing: Off 



Z_FOOTER 




Font 

Style: 

N-Italic 



Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
Hyphenation: 

Left 

Off 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

Above: 

Inter-Line: 

06.00 fractional pts 

12.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: 

Always 

Ruling Line Above 

Width: 

Color: 

Pattern: 

Dashes: 

Space Above Rule 1: 
Height of Rule 1: 

Frame 

Black 

Solid 

Off 

00.00 fractional pts 

00.12 fractional pts 

Space Below Rule 1: 
Height of Rule 2: 
Space Below Rule 2: 
Height of Rule 3: 
Space Below Rule 3: 

06.00 fractional pts 
00.00 fractional pts 
00.00 fractional pts 
00.00 fractional pts 
00.00 fractional pts 

Kicker 




Font 

Face: 

Size: 

Helvetica 

12 points 

Style: 

N-Italic 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Left 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

Add in Above: 

Always 



Attribute Overrides 

Superscript Size: 
pts 

10 points/05.64 fractional 

Subscript Size: 

10 points/01.32 
fractional pts 


Small Cap Size: 10 points 











Tag Tables 


B - 11 



Ruling Line Below 

Width: 

Color: 

Pattern: 

Dashes: 

Space Above Rule 1: 
Height of Rule 1: 

Tfext 

Black 

Solid 

Off 

02.00 fractional pts 
00.06 fractional pts 

Space Below Rule 1: 
Height of Rule 2: 
Space Below Rule 2: 
Height of Rule 3: 
Space Below Rule 3: 

00.00 fractional pts 
00.00 fractional pts 
00.00 fractional pts 
00.00 fractional pts 
00.00 fractional pts 

Headl 




Font 

Size: 

36 points 

Style: 

Bold 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
Hyphenation: 
Successive Hyphens: 

Left 

Off 

Off 

Overall Width: 
In/Outdent Width: 

Frame-Wide 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

Above: 

Inter-Line: 

18.00 fractional pts 
36.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: 

Always 

Paragraph Typography 

Letter Spacing: Off 

Tracking: 

0.030 Ems Tighter 

Head2 




Font 

Size: 

24 points 

Style: 

Bold 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
Hyphenation: 
Successive Hyphens: 

Left 

Off 

Off 

Overall Width: 
In/Outdent Width: 

Frame-Wide 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

Above: 

Below: 

12.00 fractional pts 
12.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

Add in Above: 

24.00 fractional pts 
Always 

Breaks 

Allow Within: 

No 

Keep With Next: 

Yes 

Paragraph Typography 

Letter Spacing: Off 

Tracking: 

0.030 Ems Tighter 

Z_CAPTION 




Font 

Face: 

Helvetica 



Alignment 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 




Spacing 

Above: 


12.00 fractional pts 


Add in Above: 


Always 














B -12 


Appendix B 


Z_BOXTEXT 

Font 

Face: 

Size: 

Helvetica 

8 points 

Style: 

Bold 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Right 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

Above: 

Add in Above: 

03.00 fractional pts 
Always 

In Fm. Right (L): 

In Fm. Right (R): 

00,04 picas & pts. 
00,04 picas & pts. 

StaffBox 




Alignment 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 



Spacing 

Above: 

12.00 fractional pts 



TOCEntry 




Font 

Face: 

Helvetica 

Style: 

Bold 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
Hyphenation: 

Left 

Off 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

Above: 

In Fm. Left (L): 

In Fm. Right (L): 

06.00 fractional pts 
00,06 picas & pts. 

02,00 picas & pts. 

In Fm. Left (R): 

In Fm. Right (R): 

00,06 picas & pts. 
02,00 picas & pts. 

Tab Settings 

Leader Char: 

46 



BodyFirst 




Alignment 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 



Spacing 

Above: 

12.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: 

Always 

JumpLeft 




Font 

Style: 

N-Italic 



Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
Successive Hyphens: 

Left 

Off 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 












Tag Tables 


B - 13 


JumpRight 

Font 

Style: 

N-Italic 



Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
Successive Hyphens: 

Right 

Off 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

Add in Above: 

In Fm. Right (L): 

Always 

01,00 picas & pts. 

In Fm. Right (R): 

01,00 picas & pts. 

CalTitle 




Font 

Size: 

14 points 

Style: 

Bold 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
Hyphenation: 

Center 

Off 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

Add in Above: 

Always 



CalDays 




Font 

Face: 

Helvetica 

Style: 

Bold 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
Hyphenation: 

Center 

Off 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

Above: 

06.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: 

Always 

Deckhead 




Font 

Size: 

12 points 

Style: 

Bold 

Alignment 

Hyphenation: 

Overall Width: 

Off 

Frame-Wide 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

Add in Above: 

Always 



Breaks 

Allow Within: 

No 













B -14 


Appendix B 


Ruling Line Above 

Width: 

Color: 

Pattern: 

Dashes: 

Space Above Rule 1: 
Height of Rule 1: 

Frame 

Black 

Solid 

Off 

00.00 fractional pts 
00.25 fractional pts 

Space Below Rule 1: 
Height of Rule 2: 
Space Below Rule 2: 
Height of Rule 3: 
Space Below Rule 3: 

05.75 fractional pts 
00.00 fractional pts 
00.00 fractional pts 
00.00 fractional pts 
00.00 fractional pts 

Ruling Line Below 




Width: 

Frame 

Space Below Rule 1: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Color: 

Black 

Height of Rule 2: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Pattern: 

Solid 

Space Below Rule 2: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Dashes: 

Off 

Height of Rule 3: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Space Above Rule 1: 

05.75 fractional pts 

Space Below Rule 3: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Height of Rule 1: 

00.25 fractional pts 



Head4 




Font 




Size: 

12 points 

Style: 

Bold 

Alignment 




Horz. Alignment: 

Left 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Hyphenation: 

Off 



Spacing 




Above: 

12.00 fractional pts 



Breaks 




Keep With Next: 

Yes 



Head3 




Font 




Size: 

24 points 

Style: 

Bold 

Alignment 




Horz. Alignment: 

Left 

Overall Width: 

Frame-Wide 

Hyphenation: 

Off 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Successive Hyphens: Off’ 



Spacing 




Above: 

12.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: 

Always 

Below: 

12.00 fractional pts 

In Fm. Left (L): 

01,00 picas & pts. 

Inter-Line: 

24.00 fractional pts 

In Fm. Left (R): 

01,00 picas & pts. 

Breaks 




Allow Within: 

No 

Keep With Next: 

Yes 


Paragraph Typography 

Letter Spacing: Off Tracking: 0.030 Ems Tighter 










Tag Tables 


B -15 


Tab Settings 
TOCEntry 

Tab Number 1: 


Left, 12,00, 46 




B -16 


Appendix B 



C:\P0WER\7LIST.STY 



Save as C:\TEMP\7DIREC.T..STY 


Base Page Settings 



Page Size & Layout 

Orientation: 

Landscape 

Sides: 

Double 

Paper Type: 

Letter, 8.5 x 11 in. 

Start On: 

Right Side 

Margins & Columns 




# of Columns: 

3 

Settings For Right Page 

Settings For Left Page 

Tbp: 

06,00 picas & pts. 

Top: 

06,00 picas & pts. 

Bottom: 

06,00 picas & pts. 

Bottom: 

06,00 picas & pts. 

Left: 

08,00 picas & pts. 

Left: 

10,00 picas & pts. 

Right: 

10,00 picas & pts. 

Right: 

08,00 picas & pts. 

Wi dths/Gutters—1: 

14,08/02,00 pcs & pts 

Wi dths/Gutters—1: 

14,08/02,00 pcs & pts 

Widths/Gutters—2: 

14,08/02,00 pcs & pts 

Wi dths/Gutters—2: 

14,08/02,00 pcs & pts 

Widths/Gutters—3: 

14,08 picas & pts. 

Wi dths/Gutters—3: 

14,08 picas & pts. 


Tag Settings 




Body Text 




Font 

Face: 

Times 

Style: 

Normal 

Size: 

10 points 

Color: 

Black 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Justified 

First Line: 

Indent 

Vert. Alignment: 

Tbp 

Relative Indent: 

Off 

Text Rotation: 

None 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Hyphenation: 

USENGLSH 

In/Outdent Ht.: 

1 

Successive Hyphens: 

2 

In Fm. Rt. to Dec.: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Overall Width: 

Column-Wide 


Spacing 

Above: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Paragraph: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Below: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: 

When Not at C.T. 

Inter-Line: 

12.00 fractional pts 



Breaks 

Page Break: 

No 

Next Y Position: 

Normal 

Column Break: 

No 

Allow Within: 

Yes 

Line Break: 

Before 

Keep With Next: 

No < 

Z_FOOTER 





Font 

Face: Helvetica Size: 8 points 











Tag Tables 


B - 17 



Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Left 

Hyphenation: Off 

Spacing 

Inter-Line: 

09.60 fractional pts 

Add in Above: Always 

Ruling Line Above 

Width: 

Color: 

Pattern: 

Dashes: 

Space Above Rule 1: 
Height of Rule 1: 

Margin 

Black 

Solid 

Off 

00.00 fractional pts 
00.50 fractional pts 

Space Below Rule 1: 02.00 fractional pts 

Height of Rule 2: 00.00 fractional pts 

Space Below Rule 2: 00.00 fractional pts 

Height of Rule 3: 00.00 fractional pts 

Space Below Rule 3: 00.00 fractional pts 

Phone 



Spacing 

Add in Above: 

Always 


Headl 



Alignment 

Hyphenation: 

Off 


Head2 



Alignment 

Hyphenation: 

Off 


Breaks 

Allow Within: 

No 


Company 



Spacing 

Add in Above: 

Always 


Breaks 

Keep With Next: 

Yes 


Head3 



Spacing 

Add in Above: 

Always 


Head4 



Font 

Size: 

11 points 

Style: Bold 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
First Line: 

Left 

Outdent 

In/Outdent Width: 01,00 picas & pts. 












B -18 Appendix B 



Spacing 

Above: 12.00 fractional pts 


Breaks 

Keep With Next: Yes 

Special Effects 

Special Effect: Bullet 

Bullet Char: 175 

Indent After Bullet: 01,00 picas & pts 

HeadSection 

Alignment 

Hyphenation: Off Overall Width: Frame-Wide 

Paragraph Typography 

Tracking: 0.020 Ems Tighter 

ItalSeparate 

Spacing 

Add in Above: Always 

ThumbTab 

Font 


Face: 

Helvetica 

Style: 

Bold 

Size: 

14 points 

Color: 

White 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Center 

Hyphenation: 

Off 


Spacing 

Add in Above: Always 


Breaks 

Keep With Next: Yes 


Face: Times 

Size: 11 points 

Color: Black 










Tag Tables 


B - 19 



C:\POWER\8DESIGN.STY 


Save as C:\TEMP\8B00K.STY 



Base Page Settings 



Page Size & Layout 

Orientation: 

Portrait 

Sides: 

Double 

Paper Type: 

Half, 5.5 x 8.5 in. 

Start On: 

Right Side 

Margins & Columns 




# of Columns: 

1 

Settings For Right Page 

Settings For Left Page 


Top: 

06,00 picas & pts. 

Top: 

06,00 picas & pts. 

Bottom: 

06,00 picas & pts. 

Bottom: 

06,00 picas & pts. 

Left: 

06,00 picas & pts. 

Left: 

04,06 picas & pts. 

Right: 

04,06 picas & pts. 

Right: 

06,00 picas & pts. 

Widths/Gutters—1: 

22,06 picas & pts. 

Wi dths/Gutter s—1: 

22,06 picas & pts. 



Tag Settings 




Body Text 




Font 

Face: 

Times 

Style: 

Normal 

Size: 

12 points 

Color: 

Black 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Justified 

First Line: 

Indent 

Vert. Alignment: 

Top 

Relative Indent: 

Off 

Text Rotation: 

None 

In/Outdent Width: 

01,00 picas & pts. 

Hyphenation: 

USENGLSH 

In/Outdent Ht.: 

1 

Successive Hyphens: 

3 

In Fm. Rt. to Dec.: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Overall Width: 

Column-Wide 



Spacing 

Above: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Paragraph: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Below: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: 

Always 

Inter-Line: 

14.00 fractional pts 


Breaks 

Page Break: 

No 

Next Y Position: 

Normal 

Column Break: 

No 

Allow Within: 

Yes 

Line Break: 

Before 

Keep With Next: 

No 

Headl 





Font 

Size: 18 points Style: Bold 









B -20 


Appendix B 



Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
Hyphenation: 

Center 

Off 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

Above: 

Below: 

42.00 fractional pts 
18.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

Add in Above: 

18.00 fractional pts 
When Not at C.T. 

Breaks 

Allow Within: 

No 

Keep With Next: 

Yes 

Head2 




Font 

Size: 

14 points 

Style: 

B-Italic 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
Hyphenation: 

Left 

Off 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

Above: 

Below: 

21.00 fractional pts 
07.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: 

When Not at C.T. 

Breaks 

Allow Within: 

No 

Keep With Next: 

Yes 

Bullet 




Spacing 

Above: 

07.00 fractional pts 

Below: 

07.00 fractional pts 

Breaks 

Line Break: 

Before & After 



Special Effects 

Special Effect: 

Bullet Char: 

Indent After Bullet: 

Bullet 

195 

01,06 picas & pts. 

Face: 

Size: 

Color: 

Times 

12 points 

Black 

Z_HEADER 




Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
Hyphenation: 

Left 

Off 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

BodyBreak 




Alignment 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 




Breaks 

Page Break: After 














Tag Tables 


B - 21 


BodyFirst 


Alignment 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 



Spacing 

Above: 

42.00 fractional pts 



Chap# 




Font 

Size: 

14 points 

Style: 

B-Italic 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
Hyphenation: 

Center 

Off 

Overall Width: 
In/Outdent Width: 

Frame-Wide 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Breaks 

Page Break: 

Allow Within: 

Before/Until Right 

No 

Keep With Next: 

Yes 

Ruling Line Below 

Width: 

Color: 

Pattern: 

Dashes: 

Space Above Rule 1: 
Height of Rule 1: 
Space Below Rule 1: 

Custom 

Black 

Solid 

Off 

00.00 fractional pts 
01.02 fractional pts 
00.00 fractional pts 

Height of Rule 2: 
Space Below Rule 2: 
Height of Rule 3: 
Space Below Rule 3: 
Custom Indent: 
Custom Width: 

00.00 fractional pts 
00.00 fractional pts 
00.00 fractional pts 
00.00 fractional pts 
05,00 picas & pts. 
12,00 picas & pts. 

ChapTitle 




Font 

Size: 

30 points 

Style: 

Bold 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
Hyphenation: 

Center 

Off 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

Above: 

98.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

36.00 fractional pts 

Breaks 

Allow Within: 

No 

Keep With Next: 

Yes 


Paragraph Typography 

Tracking: 0.050 Ems Tighter 














B -22 


Appendix B 


C :\P0WER\8PRINT.STY 

Save as C:\TEMP\8PRINT.STY 


Base Page Settings 


Page Size & Layout 

Orientation: 

Portrait 

Sides: 

Double 

Paper Type: 

Half, 5.5 x 8.5 in. 

Start On: 

Right Side 

Auto-Numbering 

Margins & Columns 




# of Columns: 

1 

Settings For Right Page 

Settings For Left Page 

Top: 

06,00 picas & pts. 

Top: 

06,00 picas & pts. 

Bottom: 

06,00 picas & pts. 

Bottom: 

06,00 picas & pts. 

Left: 

06,00 picas & pts. 

Left: 

04,06 picas & pts. 

Right: 

04,06 picas & pts. 

Right: 

06,00 picas & pts. 

Wi dths/Gutters—1: 

22,06 picas & pts. 

Wi dths/Gutters—1: 

22,06 picas & pts. 



Tag Settings 




Body Text 




Font 




Face: 

Times 

Style: 

Normal 

Size: 

12 points 

Color: 

Black 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Justified 

First Line: 

Indent 

Vert. Alignment: 

Tbp 

Relative Indent: 

Off 

Text Rotation: 

None 

In/Outdent Width: 

01,00 picas & pts. 

Hyphenation: 

USENGLSH 

In/Outdent Ht.: 

1 

Successive Hyphens: 

3 

In Fm. Rt. to Dec.: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Overall Width: 

Column-Wide 



Spacing 

Above: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Paragraph: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Below: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: 

Always 

Inter-Line: 

14.00 fractional pts 


Breaks 

Page Break: 

No 

Next Y Position: 

Normal 

Column Break: 

No 

Allow Within: 

Yes 

Line Break: 

Before 

Keep With Next: 

No 

Headl 





Font 

Size: 18 points Style: Bold 








Tag Tables 


B -23 



Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
Hyphenation: 

Center 

Off 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

AJbove: 

Below: 

42.00 fractional pts 
18.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

Add in Above: 

18.00 fractional pts 
When Not at C.T. 


Breaks 

Allow Within: No Keep With Next: Yes 


Head2 


Font 




Size: 

14 points 

Style: 

B-Italic 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Left 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Hyphenation: 

Off 



Spacing 

Above: 

21.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: 

When Not at C.T. 

Below: 

07.00 fractional pts 



Breaks 

Allow Within: 

No 

Keep With Next: 

Yes 

Bullet 




Spacing 

Above: 

07.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

14.00 fractional pts 

Below: 

07.00 fractional pts 


Breaks 

Line Break: 

Before & After 



Special Effects 

Special Effect: 

Bullet 

Face: 

Times 

Bullet Char: 

195 

Size: 

12 points 

Indent After Bullet: 

01,06 picas & pts. 

Color: 

Black 

ZJHEADER 




Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Left 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Hyphenation: 

Off 



BodyBreak 




Font 




Size: 

10 points 




Alignment 

In/Outdent Width: 


00,00 picas & pts. 












B - 24 Appendix B 



Spacing 

Inter-Line: 12.00 fractional pts 


Breaks 

Page Break: After 

BodyFirst 

Alignment 

In/Outdent Width: 00,00 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

Above: 42.00 fractional pts 

Special Effects 

Special Effect: Big First Char Size: 30 points 

Space for Big First: 2 lines Color: Black 

Face: Times Shift: Down 01.00 fractional pts 

Chap# 

Font 


Size: 

14 points 

Style: 

B-Italic 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
Hyphenation: 

Center 

Off 

Overall Width: 
In/Outdent Width: 

Frame-Wide 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Breaks 

Page Break: 

Allow Within: 

Before/Until Right 

No 

Keep With Next: 

Yes 

Ruling Line Below 

Width: 

Color: 

Pattern: 

Dashes: 

Space Above Rule 1: 
Height of Rule 1: 
Space Below Rule 1: 

Custom 

Black 

Solid 

Off 

00.00 fractional pts 
01.02 fractional pts 
00.00 fractional pts 

Height of Rule 2: 
Space Below Rule 2: 
Height of Rule 3: 
Space Below Rule 3: 
Custom Indent: 
Custom Width: 

00.00 fractional pts 
00.00 fractional pts 
00.00 fractional pts 
00.00 fractional pts 
05,00 picas & pts. 
12,00 picas & pts. 


ChapTitle 

Font 

Size: 30 points Style: Bold 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: Center In/Outdent Width: 00,00 picas & pts. 

Hyphenation: Off 

Spacing 

Above: 98.00 fractional pts Inter-Line: 36.00 fractional pts 

Breaks 

Allow Within: No Keep With Next: Yes 
















Tag Tables 


B - 25 



C:\POWER\9TECH.STY 



Save as C:\TEMP\9TECHD0C.STY 


Base Page Settings 



Page Size & Layout 

Orientation: 

Landscape 

Sides: 

Double 

Paper Type: 

Letter, 8.5 x 11 in. 

Start On: 

Right Side 

Margins & Columns 




# of Columns: 

3 

Settings For Right Page 

Settings For Left Page 

Tap: 

11,00 picas & pts. 

Tap: 

11,00 picas & pts. 

Bottom: 

13,00 picas & pts. 

Bottom: 

13,00 picas & pts. 

Left: 

10,06 picas & pts. 

Left: 

09,06 picas & pts. 

Right: 

09,06 picas & pts. 

Right: 

10,06 picas & pts. 

Wi dth s/Gutters—1: 

14,00/02,00 pcs & pts 

Wi dths/Gutters—1: 

14,00/02,00 pcs & pts 

Widths/Gutters—2: 

14,00/02,00 pcs & pts 

Wi dths/Gutters—2: 

14,00/02,00 pcs & pts 

Widths/Gutters—3: 

14,00 picas & pts. 

Widths/Gutters—3: 

14,00 picas & pts. 



Tag Settings 




Body Text 




Font 




Face: 

Times 

Style: 

Normal 

Size: 

10 points 

Color: 

Black 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Left 

First Line: 

Indent 

Vert. Alignment: 

Tap 

Relative Indent: 

Off 

Text Rotation: 

None 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Hyphenation: 

USENGLSH 

In/Outdent Ht.: 

1 

Successive Hyphens: 

2 

In Fm. Rt. to Dec.: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Overall Width: 

Column-Wide 



Spacing 

Above: 

12.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Paragraph: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Below: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: 

When Not at C.T. 

Inter-Line: 

12.00 fractional pts 



Breaks 

Page Break: 

No 

Next Y Position: 

Normal 

Column Break: 

No 

Allow Within: 

Yes 

Line Break: 

Before 

Keep With Next: 

No 

Z_LABEL FIG 





Font 

Size: 12 points Style: B-Italic 











B -26 


Appendix B 



Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Justified 



Spacing 

Above: 

06.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: 

Always 

ZJLABEL CAP 




Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Center 

Hyphenation: 

Off 

Spacing 

Above: 

00.00 fractional pts 



Z_FOOTER 




Font 

Style: 

N-Italic 



Alignment 

Hyphenation: 

Off 



Spacing 

Above: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: 

Always 

Title 




Font 

Size: 

60 points 

Style: 

Bold 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
Hyphenation: 

Center 

Off 

Overall Width: 

Frame-Wide 

Spacing 

Above: 

Below: 

48.00 fractional pts 
48.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

Add in Above: 

60.00 fractional pts 
Always 

Headl 




Font 

Size: 

24 points 

Style: 

Bold 

Alignment 

Hyphenation: 

Off 



Spacing 

Above: 

Below: 

24.00 fractional pts 
12.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

24.00 fractional pts 

Head2 





Font 

Size: 


18 points 


Style: 


B-Italic 














Tag Tables 


B -27 



Alignment 

Hyphenation: 

Off 



Spacing 

Above: 

24.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

18.00 fractional pts 

Breaks 

Keep With Next: 

Yes 



Head3 




Font 

Face: 

Size: 

Helvetica 

12 points 

Style: 

Bold 

Head5 




Font 

Size: 

12 points 

Style: 

Bold 

Spacing 

Add in Above: 

Always 



Breaks 

Keep With Next: 

Yes 



Z.CAPTION 




Font 

Style: 

N-Italic 



Alignment 

Relative Indent: 

On 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,04 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

Above: 

00.00 fractional pts 



Breaks 

Line Break: 

After 



Z_SEC2 




Font 

Style: 

Bold 



Spacing 

Add in Above: 

Always 



Breaks 

Keep With Next: 

Yes 



BodyBreak 





Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 


Justified 
















B -28 



Appendix B 


Spacing 

Above: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

02.00 fractional pts 

Breaks 

Page Break: 

After 



BodySmall 





Helvetica 

Size: 

8 points 

Spacing 

Below: 

12.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

10.00 fractional pts 

ListBullet 




Spacing 

Above: 

00.00 fractional pts 



Special Effects 

Special Effect: 

Bullet Char: 

Indent After Bullet: 

Bullet 

195 

01,00 picas & pts. 

Face: 

Size: 

Color: 

Times 

12 points 

Black 

TitleSub 




Font 

Face: 

Size: 

Helvetica 

24 points 

Style: 

B-Italic 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
Hyphenation: 

Center 

Off 

Overall Width: 

Frame-Wide 

Spacing 

Above: 

24.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

24.00 fractional pts 










Tag Tables 


B - 29 


C :\POWER\PROFEXT.STY 

Save as C:\TEMP\PROFEXT.STY 


Base Page Settings 


Page Size & Layout 

Orientation: 

Paper Type: 

Landscape 

Letter, 8.5 x 11 in. 

Sides: 

Start On: 

Double 

Right Side 

Auto-Numbering 

Level 1: 

[*Body Text] 

Level 2: 

[*List#,l]. 

Margins & Columns 

# of Columns: 

3 

Settings For Right Page 

Settings For Left Page 

Tbp: 

11,00 picas & pts. 

Top: 

11,00 picas & pts. 

Bottom: 

13,00 picas & pts. 

Bottom: 

13,00 picas & pts. 

Left: 

10,06 picas & pts. 

Left: 

09,06 picas & pts. 

Right: 

09,06 picas & pts. 

Right: 

10,06 picas & pts. 

Wi dths/Gutters—1: 

14,00/02,00 picas & pts 

Widths/Gutters—1: 

14,00/02,00 picas & pts. 

Wi dths/Gutters—2: 

14,00/02,00 picas & pts 

Widths/Gutters—2: 
Widths/Gutters—3: 

14,00/02,00 picas & pts. 
14,00 picas & pts. 

Widths/Gutters—3: 

14,00 picas & pts. 


Color Settings 


w 

Screen Display: Shades of Gray 

Color Number 0 (White):(000.0, 000.0, 

000 . 0 , 000.0) 

Tag Settings 

Body Text 

Color Number 1 (Black):(100.0,100.0, 

100 . 0 , 000.0) 

Color Number 2 (Red): (000.0,100.0,100.0, 
000.0) 

Font 




Face: 

Times 

Style: 

Normal 

Size: 

10 points 

Color: 

Black 

Alignment 




Horz. Alignment: 

Left 

First Line: 

Indent 

Vert. Alignment: 

Tbp _ 

Relative Indent: 

Off 

Text Rotation: 

None 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Hyphenation: 

USENGLSH 

In/Outdent Ht.: 

1 

Successive Hyphens: 2 

In Fm. Rt. to Dec.: 

00,00 picas & pts. 

Overall Width: 

Column-Wide 



Spacing 




Above: 

12.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Paragraph: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Below: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: 

When Not at C.T. 

Inter-Line: 

12.00 fractional pts 







B - 30 


Appendix B 



Breaks 

Page Break: 

Column Break: 

Line Break: 

No 

No 

Before 

Next Y Position: 
Allow Within: 

Keep With Next: 

Normal 

Yes 

No 

Z_LABEL FIG 




Font 

Size: 

12 points 

Style: 

B-Italic 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Justified 



Spacing 

Above: 

06.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: 

Always 

ZJLABEL CAP 




Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Center 

Hyphenation: 

Off 

Spacing 

Above: 

00.00 fractional pts 



Z.FOOTER 




Font 

Style: 

N-Italic 



Alignment 

Hyphenation: 

Off 



Spacing 

Above: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Add in Above: 

Always 

Title 




Font 

Size: 

60 points 

Style: 

Bold 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
Hyphenation: 

Center 

Off 

Overall Width: 

Frame-Wide 

Spacing 

Above: 

Below: 

48.00 fractional pts 
48.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

Add in Above: 

60.00 fractional pts 
Always 

Headl 




Font 

Size: 

24 points 

Style: 

Bold 


Alignment 

Hyphenation: 


Off 















Tag Tables 


B - 31 



Spacing 

Above: 

Below: 

24.00 fractional pts 
12.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

24.00 fractional pts 

Breaks 

Column Break: 

Before & After 



Head2 




Font 

Size: 

18 points 

Style: 

B-Italic 

Alignment 

Hyphenation: 

Off 



Spacing 

Above: 

24.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

18.00 fractional pts 

Breaks 

Keep With Next: 

Yes 



Head3 




Font 

Face: 

Size: 

Helvetica 

12 points 

Style: 

Bold 

Head5 




Font 

Size: 

12 points 

Style: 

Bold 

Spacing 

Add in Above: 

Always 



Breaks 

Keep With Next: 

Yes 



Z.CAPTION 




Font 

Style: 

N-Italic 



Alignment 

Relative Indent: 

On 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,04 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

Above: 

00.00 fractional pts 



Breaks 

Line Break: 

After 



Z_SEC2 





Font 
















B -32 


Appendix B 


Style: 

Bold 



Spacing 

Add in Above: 

Always 



Breaks 

Keep With Next: 

Yes 



BodyBreak 




Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 

Justified 



Spacing 

Above: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

02.00 fractional pts 

Breaks 

Page Break: 

After 



BodySmall 



r~ 

Font 

Face: 

Helvetica 

Size: 

8 points 

Spacing 

Below: 

12.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

10.00 fractional pts 

ListBullet 




Spacing 

Above: 

00.00 fractional pts 



Special Effects 

Special Effect: 

Bullet Char: 

Indent After Bullet: 

Bullet 

195 

01,00 picas & pts. 

Face: 

Size: 

Color: 

Times 

12 points 

Black 

UtleSub 





Helvetica 

24 points 

Style: 

B-Italic 

Alignment 

Horz. Alignment: 
Hyphenation: 

Center 

Off 

Overall Width: 

Frame-Wide 

Spacing 

Above: 

24.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

24.00 fractional pts 

List# 





Spacing 

In Fm. Left (L): 


01,00 picas & pts. 


In Fm. Left (R): 


01,00 picas & pts. 











B - 33 


Tag Tables 



Breaks 

Line Break: 

After 



Z_SEC1 




Font 

Style: 

Bold 



Breaks 

Keep With Next: 

Yes 



Head4 




Font 

Size: 

Style: 

14 points 

Bold 

Color: 

Red 

Alignment 

Overall Width: 

Frame-Wide 



Spacing 

Above: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Inter-Line: 

18.00 fractional pts 

Breaks 

Page Break: 

Before 



Rule 




Font 

Size: 

12 points 

Style: 

Bold 

Alignment 

Overall Width: 
Relative Indent: 

Frame-Wide 

On 

In/Outdent Width: 

00,04 picas & pts. 

Spacing 

Add in Above: 

Always 



Breaks 

Line Break: 

After 

Keep With Next: 

Yes 

Ruling Line Above 

Width: 

Color: 

Pattern: 

Dashes: 

Space Above Rule 1: 
Height of Rule 1: 

Tfext 

Black 

Solid 

Off 

00.00 fractional pts 
02.00 fractional pts 

Space Below Rule 1: 
Height of Rule 2: 
Space Below Rule 2: 
Height of Rule 3: 
Space Below Rule 3: 

02.00 fractional pts 
00.50 fractional pts 
00.00 fractional pts 
00.00 fractional pts 
09.00 fractional pts 

Note 





Spacing 

In Fm. Left (L): 
In Fm. Right (L): 


01,00 picas & pts. 
01,00 picas & pts. 


In Fm. Left (R): 
In Fm. Right (R): 


01,00 picas & pts. 
01,00 picas & pts. 








B -34 


Appendix B 



Ruling Box Around 

Width: 

Column 

Space Below Rule 1: 

03.00 fractional pts 

Color: 

Red 

Height of Rule 2: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Pattern: 

Solid 

Space Below Rule 2: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Dashes: 

Off 

Height of Rule 3: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Space Above Rule 1: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Space Below Rule 3: 

00.00 fractional pts 

Height of Rule 1: 

00.06 fractional pts 


Spacer 




Spacing 

Add in Above: 

Always 



Z.BOXTEXT 





Alignment 

Hyphenation: Off 


Tab Settings 
Rule 

Tab Number 1: 


Right, 46,00, 32 





Appendix C 


The Power Disk 


The Power disk contains text files, style sheets, and chapter 
files for use with the sample projects in Publishing Power 
With Ventura. You may obtain as many original copies of the 
Power disk as you need by using the order form at the back of 
this book, or by phoning the number shown on the form. 

The Power disk requires Xerox Ventura Publisher Version 2.0 
or 2.0 Professional Extension, and PC-DOS/MS-DOS 2.0 or 
higher. 

Benefits of the disk 

The Power disk saves time. It allows you to get right to the 
heart of the sample projects by using prepared text files, style 
sheets, and chapter files. It contains many pages of text that 
you would otherwise need to type on your own. In addition, it 
includes style sheets with predefined tags, margins, columns, 
and other basics. Because the style sheets are partially en¬ 
coded, you can focus on the specific topics at hand, without the 
need to recreate basic parameters before you can start. 

Disclaimer 


The Power disk is subject to change at any time without 
notice. It is provided on an as-is basis, as a convenience. New 
Riders Publishing is not liable or responsible to any person or 
entity with respect to any loss or damage in connection with or 
arising from the use of the disk. 



C - 2 


Installing the disk 


Installing the disk 

Before starting, make a copy of the disk using the DOS utility 
DISKCOPY. (DISKCOPY will duplicate the subdirectories 
and the files. If you prefer to use the COPY command, you 
must create the subdirectories on your own and copy the 
correct files to the correct subdirectories.) Store the original in 
a safe place and use the copy as the working disk. 

The Power disk is copyrighted. It is intended for your personal 
use. It may not be sold or transferred for profit. 

After making a copy, you are ready to install the files onto the 
hard disk. You should begin by scanning the README. 1ST 
file on the disk for possible changes or corrections: 

Turn on your system. 

When you see the DOS prompt, put the working Power disk 
in drive A: 

Change to the A: drive by typing: 

A: [Enter] 

To view the README.1ST file, type: 

HELP [Enter] 

Alternatively, you can type: 

TYPE README.1ST [Enter] 

To stop the screen from scrolling, type Ctrl-S. Type Ctrl-S 
again to resume scrolling. 

To produce a printout of the file, turn on your printer and 
type: 

COPY README.1ST PRN [Enter] 

Installing on hard disk C: 

You may install the Power disk with a simple DOS COPY 
procedure provided (1) that your hard disk is designated as C: 
and (2) that you are able to set up a separate C:\POWER 
subdirectory. 

If you do not meet both conditions, you must perform the 



If your hard disk is designated other than C: 


C - 3 


additional procedure below titled “If your hard disk is desig¬ 
nated other than C:.” 


WARNING: If you use DOS COPY to move the files from the Power disk to any place 
other than C:\POWER without following the additional procedures explained below, 
the sample chapters may not work properly. 


To install the Power disk, you will perform two steps: 

1. create a C:\POWER subdirectory and 

2. copy the files from the floppy to the C:\POWER subdirec¬ 
tory. 

Here are the steps to take: 

H Move to the C: disk by typing: 

C: [Enter] 

II At the C: prompt, type: 

MD \POWER v 

CD\POWER 

II Put the working Power disk in drive A: and type: 

V COPY A:* . * 

The installation is complete. Remove the working Power disk 
from the A: drive and store it in a safe place. You may proceed 
to Chapter One and begin work. 

If your hard disk is designated other than C: 

If your hard disk is named other than C:, you must perform an 
additional Multi-Chapter function before you can begin work 
with the Power disk. 

For instance, your hard disk may be designated as D:. Or, you 
may already have a C:\POWER subdirectory to which you do 
not wish to add any additional files. In either case, you can use 
the Power disk, but only if you use the Multi-Chapter proce¬ 
dures explained below. 

Ventura’s chapters contain pointers that tell the program 
where to find the files it needs. The sample chapters on the 





C — 4 


Installing the disk 


Power disk point to the C:\POWER subdirectory. If you place 
them anywhere else, you must change their pointers before 
they will work properly. To do that, you must use Multi-Chap¬ 
ter from the Options menu while in Ventura. 

The first step is to decide where you want to place the Power 
files. For illustration, we will assume that you wish to place 
them in a subdirectory called D:\SAMPLE. In the instruction 
below, substitute your actual disk drive and subdirectory 
wherever you see D:\SAMPLE. 


WARNING: You must follow the installation instructions in the order shown below. 
Otherwise, we cannot guarantee proper operation of the sample chapters. 


11 Change to the D: disk by typing: 

D: [Enter] 

!! At the D: prompt, type: 

MD \SAMPLE 

CD \SAMPLE 

II Put the working Power disk in drive A: and do not remove 
it until the end of this procedure. Type: 

COPY A:*.* 

§1 Load Ventura Publisher. Once it is on the screen, select 
Multi-Chapter from the Options menu. You do not need to 
open a chapter first. 

II If there is a chapter highlighted in the Multi-Chapter 
dialog box, deselect it by clicking anywhere else inside the 
dialog box. 

II Select Open from the list at the side of the dialog box. The 
Item Selector will appear. 

II Move the cursor to the Directory line. Press Esc to clear the 
line and type: 

A:\CHAPTERS\*.PUB [Enter] 

Ventura looks on the A: drive for publications. An Item Selec¬ 
tor appears. It shows only one publication, called 

POWER. PUB. 





If your hard disk is designated other than C: 


C - 5 


m Click on POWER.PUB to select it. Click OK 

The Multi-Chapter dialog box now shows a list of the chapters 

that make up the publication. 

H Select Copy All from the list at the right side of the dialog 
box. 

The Copy All dialog box appears. At the top is a Source section. 

Confirm that it shows the publication A:\CHAP- 

TERSXPOWER.PUB. 

H Move the cursor to the line labeled PUB & CHPs. Press Esc 
to clear the line. Type in the name of your destination 
subdirectory. For example: 

D:\SAMPLE 

II Click once on the button titled Make All Directories the 
Same As the First. 

All the lines now read D:\SAMPLE. 

M Click OK. 

WARNING: As Ventura copies the files, you will see one or more of the following 

messages. Respond by choosing the uppermost button, as explained below. 


Ventura displays several messages like the one below: 

D:\SAMPLE\6NEWSLET.CHP already exists on the tar¬ 
get drive. Do you wish to overwrite the old ver¬ 
sion, keep the old file, or cancel the archive 
process? 

H Choose Overwrite (the uppermost button). 

You may also see this message: 

This file could not be found: C|VENTURA\OUT- 
PUT.WID. Do you wish to skip over it or retry 
with a new disk, or cancel the archive process? 

H Choose Skip (the uppermost button). 

When Ventura has finished copying, it returns you to the 
Multi- Chapter dialog box. 





C - 6 


Installing the disk 


Remove the Power disk from the A: drive. You are ready to 
begin work. 

*+NOTE: See Chapter One for more information about Ventura 
files and pointers. See Chapters Three and Seven for hands- 
on practice with Multi-Chapter. 




/ 



Appendix D 


Colophon 


Not only do we produce books about Ventura at New Riders, 
we also produce books with Ventura. Consequently, people 
often ask us about our favorites: our favorite equipment, our 
favorite software, our favorite production tricks and techni¬ 
ques. We included this brief appendix to answer some of those 
questions. 

Perhaps the most important advice we have to offer concerns 
the management of the production process. Some of the big¬ 
gest problems with Ventura arise not from the software, but 
from lack of organization and standardization. We use a 
variety of techniques to make it easier to produce pages with 
Ventura in a workgroup environment: 

• Standard tag names 

• Standard file naming conventions for every file that goes 
into the document 

• Standard subdirectory naming and organization across dif¬ 
ferent computers 

• A standard chapter template so headers, crop marks, frame 
sizes, and other repeating elements are identical from 
chapter to chapter 

• A style guide for authors and editors that covers tagging, 
file naming, spelling, grammar, and other basics 

• A tag that shows the latest date of the style sheet, so we 
don’t accidentally use an old version 



D -2 


Software and hardware 


• An ID line at the top of text files to identify the file name 
and date. This information is placed in a footer that falls 
outside the trim margin. That way, we can glance at the 
bottom of the page and immediately know which version of 
the document we are looking at 

These procedures have brought numerous benefits: 

• We can recognize files at a glance just by their name and 
extension 

• Authors can pretag manuscripts so we have less pretagging 
to do 

• Authors can mark the manuscripts with the position, file 
name, and a description of the pictures they want. The 
layout editor merely has to load the right file into the right 
frame 

• We can use DOS to archive and copy chapters between 
machines (because the subdirectory organization is 
identical) 

• Any layout operator can work on any project, because the 
procedures are the same 

We developed some of these ideas on our own. Many of them, 
however, are borrowed from editors and experts around the 
country who have been kind enough to share their favorite 
tricks and tips. Our production management techniques are 
described in detail in our book New Writing, a style guide and 
procedures handbook for desktop publishing. See the ordering 
section for more information on this book. 

Software and hardware 

Our job was made easier this time around by several new or 
improved tools. At the top of the list is Ventura 2.0 Profes¬ 
sional Extension. In our experience, this new version is much 
less prone to bugs and crashes. We employed many of its new 
features. Our favorites include: 

• EMS support for faster formatting and fewer crashes 

• Table mode for quick, easy preparation of tables 


• Enhancements to Graphic mode so callouts and other il¬ 
lustrations are easier to produce 

We are also experimenting with the new cross referencing and 
frame anchoring features available in the Professional Exten¬ 
sion, but we have not yet fully integrated them into our 
production system. 

We captured the screen shots with Hotshot Graphics from 
Symsoft. This combination screen capture/graphics 
editor/graphics library program continues to expand and im¬ 
prove with each new edition. 

We also made extensive use of LaserTorq, a print spooling 
utility from LaserTools. You can print your chapters to a disk 
or (RAM disk) and LaserTorq will then spool them to the 
printer in the background. Meanwhile, you get your keyboard 
back so you can go on working without waiting for the printer 
to stop. Unfortunately, we did not have enough memory to 
permit us to use LaserTorq with very large chapters. 

In addition, we also made use of our own third-party program, 
Desktop Manager. This utility works “inside” Ventura to add 
new dialog boxes and new features. We can track the status of 
projects, check the contents and size of files, get automatic 
timed backup, and much more, all without leaving the Ven¬ 
tura work session. Best of all, from a production standpoint, is 
the ability to copy, move, rename, or delete any file, chapter, or 
publication within Ventura. Until we had Desktop Manager, 
we had to leave Ventura to rename a graphics file; or to 
archive a chapter without also sending the width file to the 
hard disk; or to delete a chapter and its associated files. Now 
we can do all these tasks (and many more) within Ventura. 

The manuscript was created with Microsoft Word. We used 
Ventura to convert to WordStar format for in-house editing. 

We couldn’t have gotten by without our big screen monitors 
from Verticom and Moniterm. Verticom no longer makes 
monitors for desktop publishing (although they are still sell¬ 
ing in the CAD arena), but Moniterm is still active. 

Our computers are Premium 286 models from AST equipped 
with 1- 2MB of RAM and 40MB hard disks. When you routine¬ 
ly produce 700-page books with 500 illustrations, you soon 




D - 4 


Production details 


come to wish for the speed of a 386-based computer and the 
storage capacity of 100MB+ hard drives. We hope to upgrade 
soon. We are also still searching for the ideal backup solution. 
At the moment, we still use 1.2 MB floppies. 

Production details 

The camera-ready pages for this book were produced on a 
300-dpi laser printer. 

The main text is 11/13 Century Schoolbook. Display type is 
Helvetica Bold. Captions and tables are Helvetica Narrow. 

Printing: Web offset, R.R. Donnelley & Sons, Indiana. 





Index 


A 

Abandon 1-29 
publications 1-65 
recovering from mistakesl-53 
Abbreviated Format 1-53, 3-37 
Above Spacing 1-43, 1-51,1-66 
See also Spacing 
Add Chapter 3-64 
Add New Frame 1-58, 3-23, 3-32 
Add New Tag 2-29 
Adding a Caption 2-51, 3-59 
Adding a Frame 2-41, 3-23 
Adding a New Printer 3-63 
Adding a New Tag 2-28, 2-49, 

2- 56 

Adding a Page Break 2-30, 2-56 
Adding a Picture 2-41 
Addition Button 1-9 
Adobe Illustrator 5-1 
An Advertising Flyer 5-10 
Aligning Text Frame-Wide 2-27 
Alignment 
decimal 4-46 

frame-wide 2-27, 6-41, 7-17 
indents 2-26, 2-56 
middle 4-43 

relative indent: on 7-44, 9-26 
rotated 5-32 
Allow Within: No 9-30 
Alt Key 2-5, 4-51, 5-7, 5-26, 5-30, 
5-57,10-11 

Anchors & Captions 2-51, 2-57, 

3- 59, 3-70, 6-52, 9-43 


See also Insert/Edit Anchors 
Applying Tags 1-39, 2-25 
to an empty paragraph 2-31 
Arrow Keys 

finding hidden attributes 2-17 
ASCII Files 

converting to other formats 6-8 
creating 7-2 
typing in 7-7 

Aspect Ratio: Distorted 5-6, 6-51 
Aspect Ratio: Maintained 3-59, 5-6, 
5-55 

Assign a Color 9-36 
Assign Function Keys 3-50, 3-53, 
3-68, 9-16 

Assigning a File Extension 1-24 
Assignment List 1-9, 1-39 
Attribute Overrides 8-24 
Attributes, Text 2-5, 2-15, 2-18 
bold 6-27, 10-34 
hidden 10-18 
in headers 4-17 
italics 2-16, 6-27 
normal 6-30 
paste 2-21 
removing 2-18, 2-21 
small 6-28, 8-24 
Auto-Adjustments 1-52, 2-8 
Auto-Leader 4-44 
Auto-Numbering 9-17, 9-19, 9-51 
creating outlines 9-51 
with multiple lists 9-31 
AutoCAD 5-1, 9-1 
DXFTOGEM conversion 9-2 


E - 2 


B-B 


encapsulated postscript format 9-2 
HPGL format 9-2 
slide file format 9-2 
Automatic Figure Numbering 9-43 
Automatic Invoice Numbering 4-13 
Automatic Pair Kerning 5-46, 5-47 
implementing 5-49, 5-59 

B 

Backing Up 

a chapter 1-5, 1-63 
a publication 1-5, 3-64 
See* also Copying 
See also Multi-Chapter 
Backspace Key 1-22 
Backup Button 1-23,1-67 
moving to subdirectories 1-17 
Backup Files 1-27 
Balancing Columns 2-25, 2-56, 3-20 
Banner Headline 6-41, 6-62 
Below Spacing 1-43, 1-51,1-66, 

2-28, 3-48 
See also Spacing 

Big First Character 6-6, 6-44, 6-62, 
8-22 

Bit-Mapped Images 
See Pictures 
Body Text 

formatting first in a document 
1-40, 2-25, 6-32 
inter-line spacing 1-66,10-36 
removing a tag to 3-58 
Boldface Lead-ins 6-6 
A Book 8-3 
parts of 8-1 
Book Tips 8-50 
Box Character 6-47 
copy 6-48 
cut 6-48 
paste 6-48 


Box Text 1-9, 4-7 
adding text to 4-38 
changing fill attributes 4-26, 4-47 
changing line attributes 4-25, 4-49 
copy 4-26, 4-34, 6-55 
cut 4-24 
deselecting 4-47 
drawing 4-24, 5-13, 9-47 
effects 4-7 
end styles 4-50 

modifying the Z_BOXTEXT tag 4-9, 
4-42 

moving 4-27, 4-54 
paste 4-27, 4-35 
resizing 4-24, 4-28 
tips 5-56 

versus frame text 4-8 
versus rectangles 4-9 
Box Text Tips 4-54, 5-56 
Bracket Codes 2-5, 2-17, 8-52, 9-46 
Breaks 2-25, 2-30, 2-32 
allow within: no 9-30 
keep with next 2-35, 2-39, 2-56, 
7-20, 7-22 to 7-24 
page 2-32 

with side-by-side paragraphs 8-28 
Bring to Front 5-56 
Bullets 2-37, 2-39 

See also Special Effects 
Business Documents 
an advertising flyer 5-10 
an invoice 4-12 
a book 8-3 
a directory 7-6 
a single-column report 1-7 
a technical manual 9-5 
a three-column newsletter 6-6 
a two-column newsletter 3-13 
a two-column proposal 2-8 
By Scale Factors 5-4, 5-6, 5-55 
aspect ratio distorted 5-6 
aspect ratio maintained 5-6, 5-55 




c -c 


E-3 


C 

A Calendar 6-6, 6-52 
Callouts 4-7, 4-54, 9-5, 9-47 
Canceling a Dialog Box 1-11 
Caption File 3-28, 3-30, 4-8, 6-61 
Caption Labels 3-59, 3-70 
Captions 2-56 

adding 2-51, 3-5, 3-59, 6-52, 9-43 
automatic figure numbering 3-59, 
9-43 

definition of 3-5 
formatting 2-53 
label 3-59 
modifying 3-60 
overwriting 5-37 
sizing and scaling 2-52, 2-54 
text in 2-53, 6-52 
Carding 10-36 
Cells 10-6 

adding text to 10-32 
contents of 10-8 
editing 10-43 
joining 10-28 
specifying 10-6 

Changing Column Formats 2-23 
Changing Page Numbers 4-21, 4-52, 
8-20, 8-32 

Chapter Counter 8-19, 8-32 
Chapter Files 

backing up 1-5,1-63 
definition of 1-1 
opening 1-5, 1-49 
parts of 1-1 

pointers in 1-1, 1-5, 1-63 
printing 1-62 
renaming 1-27, 3-16 
restoring 1-27 
saving 1-28, 1-62, 3-22 
where Ventura stores 1-2 
Chapter Menu 1-31 


Chapter Templates 6-59, 7-33 to 

7- 35 

Chapter Tips 1-67, 3-70, 6-60, 6-63 
Chapter Typography 3-19, 6-11 
column balance 2-25 
move down to 1st baseline by 3-20, 
6-35, 8-22 
overriding 5-44 
pair kerning 5-47 
vertical justification allowed 10-37 
vertical justification around frame 
10-35 

widows and orphans 3-20, 8-20 
Clipboard 2-19, 2-21, 2-56, 3-3, 3-34, 
3-67, 4-26 to 4- 28, 5-39, 6-48 
Codes, Typographic 2-5, 2-17, 4-19, 
5-11, 5-25, 5-59, 6-27 
Color 

See Spot Color 
Color Printing 
process color 9-34 
spot color 9-34 

Column Balance 2-25, 2-56, 3-20, 

5-46 

Column Break: Before & After 9-15 
Column Breaks 9-5 
Column Guides 1-10, 3-23 
Column Snap 2-41, 3-23, 4-4, 5-15, 
5-45 

Columns 

balancing 2-25,3-20 

calculating side-by-side paragraphs 

8- 28 

changing number of 2-23, 5-22, 6-14 
making equal widths 2-24, 2-56 
unequal 5-22 
Conversion 

DXFTOGEM 9-2 
of file formats 6-7, 6-61 
to typographic characters 2-8 
Copy All 1-64, 3-66 
Copy Box Character 6-48 




E - 4 


D-D 


Copy Box Text 6-55 

Copy Column 10-8 

Copy Fitting 5-46 

Copy Frames 3-34 

Copy Graphic 4-26, 4-31, 4-34, 5-40 

Copy Row 10-8 

Copy Text 2-15, 2-19, 2-21, 2-55 
Copy To Facing Page 3-17, 3-19 
Copying 

a chapter 1-5 
a publication 1-5 
See also Backing Up 
See also Multi-Chapter 
Copyright Symbol 2-5 
Correcting Typing Mistakes 1-22, 
3-29 

Creating a Publication 1-63, 3-64, 
3-70,10-40 

Creating a Title Page 9-13 
Creating ASCII Files 7-2 
Creating Multiple Lists 9-31 
Creating Subdirectories in Ventura 
1-14 

Creating Technical Illustrations 9-1 
Crop Marks 7-6, 7-9, 7-43, 8-3, 9-7 
built-in vs. hand-drawn 7-11 
changing margins to draw 9-8 
printing 8-50 
Cropping Pictures 5-4 
images, bit-mapped 5-7 
line-art 5-7 
x, y offset 5-7 

Cross Referencing 10-1 to 10-3, 
10-42 

substitute text 10-17 
variable text 10-17 
Ctrl-[ 5-26 
Ctrl-] 5-26 
Ctrl-B 9-30 
Ctrl-C 6-46 
Ctrl-E 1-30 
Ctrl-Enter 4-40, 5-26 


Ctrl-Hyphen 5-51, 5-57 

Ctrl-K 3-51, 3-53, 3-69, 9-16 

Ctrl-N 1-30 

Ctrl-Q 4-52, 4-55, 7-11 

Ctrl-R 1-30 

Ctrl-S 1-28, 1-62, 3-23 

Ctrl-Shift-[ 6-27 

Ctrl-Shift-] 6-27 

Ctrl-Shift-F 6-42 

Ctrl-Shift-T 6-42 

Ctrl-T 2-19 

Ctrl-X 1-11, 2-54, 3-24, 3-34, 3-57, 
5-12 

Ctrl-Z 5-39 

Current Selection Box 1-10, 1-55, 
2-18 

displaying file name 1-20 
Custom Rules 7-21 
Cut Box Character 6-48 
Cut Column 10-8 
Cut Frames 1-60, 3-24, 3-34 
Cut Graphic 4-24, 4-27 
Cut Row 10-8 

Cut Text 2-15, 2-19, 2-21, 2-55 


D 

Dashed Rules 6-20, 6-61 
Database Program 

generating a directory from 7-1, 7-3 
pretagging in 7-1 to 7-3 
Decimal Alignment 4-46 
Deckhead 3-55 
Define Colors 9-35 
Del Key 1-22, 3-34, 4-24 
Delete Frames 1-60, 3-24, 3-34 
Delete Graphic 4-24, 4-27 
Delete Tables 10-43 
Delete Text 2^15, 2-19, 2-21 
Deselecting Graphic 4-29 
Dialog Box 



E-E 


E-5 


cancelling choices 1-11 
enter key 1-11 
help menus 1-11 
measurement units 1-11 
OK button 1-11 
recalling last 2-54 
saving choices 1-11 
text attr. button 4-18 
Diamond 1-23 
A Directory 7-6 
Directory Line 1-23, 1-67 
Disable Colors 9-35 
Discretionary Hyphens 5-51, 5-57 
Display Generated Tags 2-40 
Display Type 3-40 
Documents 

See Business Documents 
DOS 1-16, 1-67 

copy command 1-5, 1-15, 1-63,1-67 
rename command 1-26, 2-13 
starting Ventura from 1-8 
using Multi-Chapter instead of 1-5 
Double Rule 9-23, 9-27 
Double-Clicking 2-10 
Double-Sides 3-17, 5-15 
Dragging the Mouse 3-1 
Drawing Box Text 4-24, 5-18 to 

5-21, 9-47 

Drawing Multiple Frames 3-32 
Drop Cap 

See Big First Character 
Drop Shadows 5-37 


E 

Edit Fractions 8-11 
Editing Text 1-66, 2-15, 2-19, 2-21, 
2-55, 5-32 
Effects 
arrow 4-50 


underscore 4-44 

automatic numbering in header 4-13 

balanced columns 2-25 

banner headline 2-28, 6-41, 6-62 

big first character 6-6, 6-44, 8-22 

boldface lead-in heads 6-6, 6-28 

box text 4-7, 5-11 

bullet 2-37, 2-39 

callouts 4-7, 4-54, 9-5, 9-47 

column breaks 9-5 

creating a calendar 6-6, 6-52 to 

6-57, 6-59 

creating a dateline 3-41 
creating a title page 2-26 
creating chapter templates 6-59 to 

6- 61, 6-63, 7-33 to 7-35 

crop marks 7-6, 7-9, 7-43, 9-7 
custom rule 3-54, 6-6, 7-21 
deckhead 3-55 

dotted tear line 4-13, 4-36, 4-44 

double rule 6-6,6-43, 9-23, 9-27 

drop cap 8-22 

drop shadows 5-11, 5-37 

end of article symbol 6-46 

fold line 6-20 

hollow box 6-46 

jump text 6-23, 6-27 

kerning headlines 5-11, 5-46, 6-33 

kicker 3-43 

lead-in paragraph 3-46 

letter spacing 5-50 

logo 3-37, 6-33 

nameplate 3-37 

note 9-28 

number lists 4-46 

outlines 9-51 

overlapping graphics 4-8 

page break 2-30, 2-32 

pull quote 6-25, 6-43, 6-61 

reverse type 4-13, 7-6, 7-16, 7-18, 

7- 43 

rotated text 5-32 



E - 6 


F-F 


ruling box around frame 2-45, 5-22 

ruling lines in tables 10-44 

secondary margins 1-48 

section numbers 9-5 

small cap lead-in heads 8-24 

snap-to grid 4-13 

solid box 6-46 

spacer tag 9-41 

spot color 9-5 

table of contents 3-28, 8-36 
tables with horizontal tabs 2-45 
tags residing on same line 3-42, 
3-69, 6-39, 6-48, 7-23, 7-44 
teaser 5-25 

text aligned across columns 1-47, 

3- 22, 5-47, 6-12 

text runarounds 5-11, 5-42, 5-43, 

5- 56 

thumb tabs 7-6, 7-25 

tint screens 4-13, 4-47, 6-6, 6-14 

tracking headlines 3-38, 3-40, 6-33, 

6- 37 

two-column format 2-23 
typographic fractions 8-10 
Ellipsis 5-11, 5-25 
Em Dash 2-5, 2-8, 5-11, 5-26 
converting from hyphens 2-8 
Em Space 3-40 

Empty Paragraph 2-31, 9-13, 9-15 
En Dash 7-13 

Encapsulated PostScript 5-57 
creating 5-53 
displaying 5-3, 5-37 
placing 5-3, 5-36 
End Key 1-29 
End of Article Symbol 6-46 
End of File Marker 2-52, 3-28, 4-7, 

4- 24, 6-23 
tagging the 4-45 

End Styles 4-26 
Enlarged View 1-30, 5-16 
Enter Key 


closing a dialog box 1-11 
EPS 

See Encapsulated PostScript 
Esc Key 1-22 
Extensions 

assigning 1-2, 1-24, 5-55, 8-37 

F 

Feathering 10-35 

Figure Numbering, Automatic 9-43 
Figure Space 6-42 
File Management 
pictures 5-2 

problems encountered in 1-15 
renaming and relocating files 1-2, 
1-14, 2-11 

storing files in subdirectories 1-14 
File TyP e /Rename 1-21, 2-11, 3-15, 

6-7, 6-9, 6-23 
tips for using 1-66 
File Types 
CAP 1-2 
CHP 1-2 
CIF 1-2 
IMG 1-2 
VGR 1-2 
Files 

backing up 1-3 
extensions 1-2,1-24 
loading 1-16,1-25, 1-49, 2-10, 3-14 
managing 1-1, 1-14, 1-67 
removing from frame 2-13 
renaming and relocating 1-2, 1-15, 
1-21, 1-26, 2-11, 2-55, 6-8, 6-61 
restoring 1-27 

selecting in Item Selector 1-18, 2-10 

spreadsheet 2-41 

See also Chapter Files 

See also Graphics Files 

See also Picture Files 




F-F 


E- 7 


See also Program Files 
See also Text Files 
Fill Attributes 

changing 4-26, 4-47 
saving 4-26, 4-56 
Fill Patterns 6-14, 7-29 
Fit in Frame 3-59, 5-4 

aspect ratio distorted 5-5, 6-51 
aspect ratio maintained 5-5 
Flow Text Around: Off 5-42 
Fold Line 6-20 
Font Dialog Box 

for non-PostScript printer 1-41 
for PostScript Printer 1-41 
Fonts 

shifting up/down 8-23 
with non-PostScript printer 1-41 
with PostScript printer 1-41 
Fontware 3-37 
Footers 2-56 

building 2-23, 2-40, 7-12, 9-11 
changing the frame margin of 7-14, 
9-12 

changing the position with spacing 

7- 15 

inserting page numbers in 2-23 
live 7-6, 7-12, 7-43 
turning off for first page 2-23 
Footnote 

changing the frame margin of 8-10 
changing the position with spacing 

8 - 10 

deleting 8-10 
inserting 8-6 
separator line 8-6 
setting the format of 8-6 
text of 8-8 
tips 8-51 

See also Ins Special Item 
Footnote Settings 8-6 
Formatting a Generated Tag 2-53 
Formatting Tables 


horizontal tabs 2-45, 2-49, 2-57 
side-by-side paragraphs 8-27 
See also Tables 
Formula, The Ventura -xi 

See also The Ventura Formula 
Fractions 
editing 8-11 
inserting 8-10 
See also Ins Special Item 
Frame Background 6-14 
See also Fill Patterns 
Frame Menu 1-31 
Frame Mode 1-9 

enabling 1-20, 1-36, 3-1 
Frame Text 3-30 
versus box text 4-8 
Frame Tips 3-67, 4-54, 6-62 
Frame Typography 6-35 
for copy fitting 5-44 
Frame-Wide Alignment 2-27, 6-41, 
7-17 
Frames 

adding 1-58, 2-41, 3-32, 5-16 

adding an anchor to 9-44 

adding captions to 3-5 

adding columns to 3-4 

adding margins to 2-44, 3-4, 7-27, 

7-43 

aligning on page 1-60, 3-9 
blank frame 1-10 

chaining text files between 3-4, 3-9, 
6-21 

changing the order of 3-10 
copy 3-34, 3-67 

creating text runarounds with 5-44, 
5-56 

cut 1-60, 3-24, 3-34 
fill patterns 6-6,6-14, 6-62, 7-29 
grid settings in 4-7, 5-37 
jump text 3-26, 3-30 
moving 1-60, 3-2, 3-34, 3-67 
overlapping 3-3 




E - 8 


G-H 


padding 1-60 

parent 4-2 

paste 3-3, 3-34 

placing pictures in 2-41 

placing text in 1-19, 2-41, 3-1, 3-7, 

3-9, 3-68, 6-20 

re-anchoring 9-46 

removing text from 2-13 

repeating 7-25, 7-31 

ruling lines around 6-62 

selecting 3-1, 3-67, 5-57 

sizing and scaling 1-59, 2-42, 3-1, 

3-24, 3-34, 3-59, 3- 67, 5-4, 5-16 

typing text in 3-28, 3-30, 3-35, 3-68, 

5-13, 6-61 

versus the Page 3-1, 3-7 
Function Keys 3-50, 3-53, 3-68 
tagging with 3-52 
tips for naming 3-52 

G 

GEM Draw 5-2 
GEM/HALO DPE 3-15 
Generated Tags 1-39, 2-40, 2-53, 

2-56, 3-53, 3-60, 4-9, 4-42, 8-9, 8-37, 
8-41, 8-43, 9-12, 9-18, 10-12 
Generating a Table of Contents 8-3, 
8-36, 8-38, 8-40 
Generating an Index 8-3, 8-12 
Generating Pretagged Files 7-1 
Go to Page 6-20 
Graphic 
box text 4-1, 4-7 
bring to front 5-56 
circles 4-1 
clipboard 4-28, 5-39 
copy 4-26, 4-31,4-34, 5-39 
cut 4-24, 4-27 
deselecting 4-29, 4-47 
drawing several shapes 4-30 


end styles 4-26 

fill attributes 4-26 

line attributes 4-25, 4-49 

lines 4-1, 4-50 

moving shapes 4-27, 6-62 

overlapping 4-8 

parent frame 4-2 

paste 4-26, 4-31, 4-35, 5-39 

rectangles 4-1, 5-37, 7-9 

resizing 4-24, 4-28 

select all 4-52 

send to back 5-38, 5-56 

show on all pages 4-3, 4-52, 4-55, 

7-11, 9-10 

Graphic Mode 1-9, 4-1 
enabling 4-23 

if selected while loading text 1-19 
key points of 4-2 to 4-4 
Graphic Tips 4-55 
The Grid System 6-1 
Grid Settings 4-4, 5-18, 5-37, 7-9 
horizontal 4-23 
vertical 4-23 
Grid Snap: On 4-24 
Grid, Snap-To 3-9, 4-4 to 4-6, 4-13, 
4-55, 5-56 
Ground Rules 

making your system match vii 
Gutters 

entering 2-24, 3-17 

H 

Half-Size Format 8-3 
Handles 

See Sizing Buttons 
Header Rows 10-9 
Headers 2-56 

automatic numbering in 4-13 
building 4-17 




I-I 


E-9 


changing the position with spacing 
7-15 

copy to facing page 3-19 
entering text in 4-17 
inserting page numbers in 1-35, 
3-19, 4-19 
live 7-43 

modifying the Z_HEADER tag 3-53 
resetting after margins change 1-37 
text attributes in 4-17 
turning off for first page 1-35, 3-19 
Headers & Footers 2-23, 2-40 
1st Match 7-13 
Help Menus 1-11 
Hide All Pictures 5-53 
Hide Tabs & Returns 2-30 
Hollow Box 6-46 

changing size of 6-47 
Home Key 1-29 
Horizontal Spacing 
See Spacing 
Horizontal Tabs 2-45 
Hyphenation 
dictionary 5-57 
manual 5-51 
preventing 5-57 

turning off for display type 1-51 
Hyphens 

converting to em dash 2-8 
discretionary 5-51, 5-57 
placing in text files 1-16 

I 

I-Beam 2-15 
Images, Bit-Mapped 
See Pictures 

In From Left Spacing 1-48, 2-39, 

3-43, 3-47, 3-69, 6-49, 8-28, 9-20 
See also Spacing 


In From Right Spacing 1-48, 3-43, 
3-69, 6-49, 8-28 
See also Spacing 
Indents 2-26, 2-56 
Index 

generating 8-3, 8-12 
levels of 8-12 
primary entry 8-13 
secondary entry 8-13 
see also references 8-13 
Ins Column 10-9 
Ins Key 2-19, 3-34, 4-27, 4-35 
Ins New Table 10-25, 10-43 
Ins Row 10-9, 10-33 
Ins Special Item 6-46 
box character 6-47 
cross reference 10-4,10-21 
footnote 8-8 
fraction 8-11 
frame anchor 9-45 
index entry 8-13 
reference 7-28, 7-37 
variable def 10-18 
Inserts 

1st Match 7-13 
Last Match 7-43 
Insert Frames 3-3, 3-34 
Insert Graphic 4-27, 5-39 
Insert Text 2-15, 2-19 
Insert/Edit Anchor 9-44, 9-52 
Insert/Edit Table 10-8, 10-11, 10-24, 
10-43 

Insert/Remove Page 3-32 
Inserting a Footnote 8-6 
Inserting a Fraction 8-10 
Inserting a Page 3-32, 4-52, 5-21 
Inserting a Reference Marker 7-29 
Inserting an Index Entry 8-13 
See also Ins Special Item 
Inserting Cross References 10-3, 
10-18, 10-42 




E -10 


J-L 


Inserting Discretionary Hyphens 

5- 51 

Inserting Typographic Codes 2-4, 
4-19, 5-11 

Installing a Second Printer 3-70 
Inter-Col. Rules 3-18 
Inter-Line Spacing 1-43, 1-47, 1-51, 
1-60,1-66 
See also Spacing 

Inter-Paragraph Spacing 1-66, 2-28 
See also Spacing 
Interactive Tracking 6-34 
An Invoice 4-12 
Italics 

when to use 2-16 
Item Selector 1-17 

backup button 1-17,1-67 
diamond 1-17 
directory line 1-23,1-67 
selection line 1-19 

J 

Join Cells 10-28 

Jump Text 3-26, 3-30, 6-12, 6-23, 

6- 27 

K 

Keep With Next 2-35, 2-39, 2-56, 

7- 20, 7-22 to 7-24 
Kerning 6-33 

automatic pair 5-46, 5-57 
definition of 5-46 
in text mode 5-48 
manual 5-46, 5-48 
on-screen 5-49, 5-57 
tables 5-46 
Keyboard Mode 

accidentally enabling 1-30 


Keyboard Shortcuts 2-19 
alt Key 2-5, 5-7, 5-26, 5-30 
backspace 1-22 
ctrl-[ 5-26 
Ctrl-] 5-26 
ctrl-b 9-30 
ctrl-c 6-46 
ctrl-e 1-30 
ctrl-enter 4-40, 5-26 
ctrl-hyphen 5-51, 5-57 
ctrl-k 3-51, 3-53 
ctrl-n 1-30 
ctrl-q 4-52, 4-55 
ctrl-r 1-30 
ctrl-s 1-28, 3-23 
ctrl-shift-[ 6-27 
ctrl-shift-] 6-27 
ctrl-shift-f 6-42 
ctrl-shift-t 6-42 
ctrl-t 2-19 

ctrl-x 1-11, 2-54, 3-24, 3-34, 3-57, 
5-12 

ctrl-z 5-39 

del 1-22, 2-19, 2-55, 3-34 
end 1-29 
esc 1-22 

function keys 3-50 
home 1-29 
ins 2-19, 2-55 
pgdn 1-21,1-29 
pgup 1-29 
shift key 4-30 

shift-click 1-55, 1-57, 2-18, 2-34, 2-56 
shift-del 2-19, 2-55 
Kicker 3-43 

L 

Landscape Format 7-6, 9-5 
Lead-in Heads 6-28, 8-24 
Lead-in Paragraph 3-46 



M-M 


E- 11 


Leader Dots 3-48, 3-69 
Letter Spacing 5-50 
Line Attributes 

adding an arrow 4-50 
changing 4-25, 4-49 
end styles 4-26 
saving 4-25, 4-56 
Line Break: After 3-42, 7-24 
Line Break: Before 3-43, 7-23 
Line Break: No 8-31 
Line Breaks 1-38, 4-40, 5-26 
versus paragraphs 7-3 
Line Snap 2-41, 3-23, 4-4, 5-15, 
5-43, 6-12 
Line-Art 
See Pictures 
Lines 4-50 

Lists 9-5, 9-17 to 9-19, 9-31 
creating 9-5 

Live Headers and Footers 7-6, 7-12, 
7-43 

steps for creating 7-13 
Load Diff. Style 1-22 
Load Different Width Table 3-63 
Load Text/Picture 1-25, 2-55 
Loading a Picture File 1-25, 3-15 
Loading a Style Sheet 1-22 
Loading a Text File 1-16, 2-41 
Loading Several Files 2-10 
Logo 3-37, 6-33 
Loose Lines 5-51 
reducing 5-51 


M 

MacDraw 5-2 

Make Equal Widths Button 2-24 
Make TOC 8-37 
Making Columns Equal Widths 
2-24, 2-56 

Managing Files 1-1, 1-14,1-67 


Margins 

changing 1-36, 3-17 
creating temporary 1-48, 8-31 
resetting the header after changing 
1-37 

rule of thumb for creating 1-37 
Margins & Columns 1-36, 2-23, 5-22 
copy to facing page 3-17 
in frames 2-44, 3-4, 6-14 
Markers, On-Screen 2-17, 2-19 
displaying 2-30 

Maximum and Minimum Space 
Values 5-50 

Measurement Units 1-11 
changing in dialog box 1-36 
Measuring Indents 2-26 
Measuring System 
picas and points 2-2 
Menus 

drop down 1-8 
selecting 1-8 

MicroSoft Word Format 6-8 
Middle Alignment 4-43 
Mode Selector 1-8 
frame mode 1-8 
graphic mode 1-8 
paragraph mode 1-8 
text mode 1-8 
Modifying Tags 1-30, 2-25 
Mouse 1-18, 3-2 
using viii 

Move Down to 1st Baseline By 3-22, 
5-44, 6-35, 8-22 
definition of 3-20 
Multi-Chapter 1-63 

for backing up a chapter 1-5,1-63 
for backing up a publication 1-5, 
1-63, 3-64, 3-70 
make TOC 8-37 

printing with 1-62, 3-64, 3-66, 7-39, 
10-39 



E- 12 


N-P 


renumbering a publication 7-39, 
10-4,10-22 
See also Backing Up 
See also Copying 
MultiMate Format 6-8 

N 

Nameplate 3-37 
New 1-8, 4-13 
when to use 2-10 
Newsletter-Style Layout 3-1, 3-7, 

3-9, 3-11, 3-17, 3-20, 3-22, 3-37, 
3-68, 6-1, 6-6, 6-21, 6-52, 6-62 
Normal View 1-30, 5-16 
Number Lists 4-46 

O 

Object-Oriented Graphics 
See Pictures 
OK Button 1-11 
On-Screen Kerning 5-49, 5-57 
One-Column Report 1-7 
Open and Closed Quotes 6-27 
converting from standard quotes 
2-5, 2-8 

Open Chapter 1-49 
Options Menu 1-11 

starting configuration 1-11 
OUTPUT.WID 3-64 

P 

Padding 

setting to body text inter-line 1-60, 
6-62 

vertical 1-47, 1-60, 6-26 
The Page 


as parent to graphic 4-2 
definition of 1-10, 3-6, 3-68 
double-sides 1-32 
if selected while loading text 1-19, 

2- 11, 5-12 

moving around 1-29 
placing text on 1-19, 1-21, 3-7 
removing files from 2-13 
selecting 1-20 
single-sides 1-32 
sizing and scaling 1-32, 3-6, 3-68 
versus frames 3-1, 3-7 
viewing 1-29 
Page Break 2-32, 2-56 
adding a 2-22, 2-30 
Page Break: After 2-30, 9-51 
Page Break: Before 7-17, 9-24 
Page Break: Before/Until Right 7-17 
Page Counter 8-20, 8-32 
Page Layout Strategy 1-31, 2-22, 

3- 1, 3-7, 3-9, 3-17, 3-22, 4-12, 4-17, 
5-10, 5-15, 5-57, 6-3, 6-32 

Page Numbers 1-10 

changing 4-20, 4-52, 8-20, 8-32 
in thumb tabs 7-6, 7-28 
inserting in footers 1-35 
inserting in headers 1-35, 3-19, 4-19 
linking across chapters 7-38 
on double-sided pages 3-17 
See also Page Counter 
Page Size & Layout 1-32 
defining the page with 1-10 
double-Sides 3-17, 5-15 
half-size format 7-12, 8-3 
landscape format 7-6, 9-5 
Pair Kerning: On 5-47 
Paper Type & Dimension 7-12 
Parafiltr Code 2-4, 2-55, 7-42 
Paragraph 

definition of 1-38 
empty 2-31 
lead-in 3-46 



P-P 


E - 13 


tagging the wrong 2-27 
using line breaks in 1-38 
versus line breaks 7-3 
Paragraph Menu 1-31 
Paragraph Mode 1-9 
enabling 1-40 

if selected while loading text 1-19 
when to use 2-16, 2-55 
Paragraph Typography 3-39, 6-33 
at bottom of paragraph 10-38 
at top of paragraph 10-38 
automatic pair kerning 5-47 
Paste Box Character 6-48 
Paste Column 10-8 
Paste Frames 3-3, 3-34 
Paste Graphic 4-26, 4-31, 4-35, 5-39 
Paste Row 10-8 
Paste Text 2-15, 2-19, 2-55 
PC Paintbrush 5-1 
PgDn Key 1-21, 1-29 
PgUp Key 1-29 
Picture Files 

how Ventura manages 5-2 
loading 1-25, 1-49, 5-2 
renaming and relocating 1-26, 2-13 
Picture Tips 2-57, 3-70, 5-55, 6-62, 
9-52 
Pictures 

Adobe Illustrator 5-1 

AutoCAD 5-1 

cropping 5-4, 5-7 

encapsulated postscript 5-3, 5-37 

GEM Draw 5-2 

hiding 5-56 

images, bit-mapped 5-2, 5-4 

line-art 5-2 to 5-4, 5-36, 9-1 

MacDraw 5-2 

object-oriented 5-2 

PC Paintbrush 5-1 

sizing and scaling 5-4 to 5-6, 5-42, 

5-55, 6-51 

Placing Text in Frames 1-19 


Placing Text on the Page 1-19,1-21 
Planning 

an advertising flyer 5-10 
a book 8-3 
a directory 7-6 
an invoice 4-12 
a one-column report 1-7 
a technical manual 9-5 
a three-column newsletter 6-6 
a two-column newsletter 3-13 
a two-column proposal 2-8 
The Point System 2-2 
Pointers 

changing 1-5,1-63, 1-67 
storing 1-1, 1-16, 5-55 
Pop-Up Menus 1-11 
PostScript Printer 

creating Encapsulated Postscript 
files with 5-3 

fonts used with 1-41, 3-37 

if you do not have 1-41,1-62, 3-37, 

6-33 

installing as a second printer viii, 
1-41 

overlapping graphics 4-8 
using the book with viii 
The Power Disk 

if you do not own ix, 1-8 
if you own 1-8 
installing ix, 1-8 
ordering ix 

Preformatting Text 2-3 to 2-5, 2-55, 
8-1 

Pretagging Text 7-1 
rules for 7-2 
tips 7-42 

Print Spooler 10-39 
Printer Ports, Changing 3-63 
Printer’s Measure 2-2 
picas 2-2 
points 2-2 
Printing 1-62 



E - 14 


Q-R 


1st to last 6-59, 7-41 
crop marks 7-11, 8-3, 8-50 
current page 2-54, 2-57, 4-53 
hidden pictures 5-53 
last to 1st 3-61, 3-70, 7-41 
number of copies 4-53 
publications 8-49,10-41 
selected pages 3-61 
spot color 9-34, 9-50 
to file 5-53,10-39 
which pages 6-59 
The Professional Extension 
if you have installed vi to vii 
Publications 

abandoning 1-65 
backing up 3-64 

creating 1-63, 3-64, 3-70, 8-34,10-40 
definition of 1-63, 3-64 
linking page numbers across 
chapters 7-38 
new 8-34 

printing 8-49,10-41 
rearrange chapter list in 8-35 
renumbering 7-39, 7-44, 8-36,10-18, 
10-22 

saving 3-65, 10-22 
Pull Quote 6-25, 6-43, 6-61 

Q 

Quit 

without saving 1-16 
Quotes 

true typographic 2-5 

R 

Re-Anchoring Frames 9-46 
Rearrange Chapter List 8-35 


Recalling the Last Dialog Box 2-54, 
3-24 

Rectangles 4-9, 5-37, 7-9 
Reduced View 1-30 
Reducing Loose Lines 5-51 
Reference 7-28, 7-37 
Registered Sign 5-11 
Relative Indent: On 7-44, 9-26 
Remove Selected Tag 3-58 
Remove Text/File 2-12, 3-15, 6-7 
Removing Ruling Lines 2-34 
Removing Text from Frames 2-12, 

3- 15 

Rename Tag 3-57 

Renaming and Relocating Files 1-2, 
1-21, 1-26, 2-11, 2-13, 3-15, 3-30, 
6-8, 6-61 

Renumber a Publication 7-39, 7-44, 
8-36, 10-4,10-18,10-22 
Renumber Chapter 9-30 
Repeating Frame 7-25, 7-31 
editing a 7-31 

Resetting the Zero Point 2-42, 4-21, 

4- 37 

Reverse Type 4-13, 7-6, 7-16, 7-18, 
7-43 

if you cannot print 7-16, 7-18, 7-22 
Rotated Text 5-32 
Rows and Columns in Tables 10-6 
copy 10-8 
cut 10-8 
paste 10-8 
Rulers 

changing units 1-58 
displaying 1-58 
Rules 

changing attributes in tables 10-43 
custom 3-54, 6-6, 6-38, 7-21 
dashed 6-20, 6-61 
double 6-6, 9-23, 9-27,10-43 
hidden 10-43 
inter-column 3-18 




S-S 


E- 15 


margin-wide 6-50 
normal 10-43 
single 10-43 

space below rule 3 7-18, 7-22, 7-43, 
9-27 

thick 10-43 
vertical 3-18 
Rules of Thumb 

adding a new tag 2-29 
alignment versus spacing 2-39 
for building style sheets 1-31, 2-25, 
3-17, 5-15 

for creating side-by-side paragraphs 

8- 27 

for entering margins & columns 5-22 
for vertical justification 10-13 
keep with next 2-36 
placing text in pictures 6-21 
preformatting text 2-4 
pretagging text in a database 7-2 
Ruling Box Around 2-45, 3-26, 5-22, 

9- 28 

tables 10-6 

when crossing a page or column 9-30 
Ruling Line Above 7-21 

creating reverse type with 7-16 
custom width 3-54, 6-38 
dashed 6-20, 6-61 
margin 6-50 
text 9-24 

Ruling Line Below 
margin 6-50 
removing 2-34 
text 3-44 

S 

Save 1-28, 3-22 
Save As 1-67 
Save As New Style 1-24 
Save To 4-26, 4-56, 5-56 


Saving Chapter Files 1-28 
Scanned Images 5-2, 5-56 
Screen Fonts 3-63 
Scroll Arrows 1-18 

moving around the page with 1-29 
Scroll Bars 

moving around the page with 1-29 
Scroll Box 1-18 
Section Numbers 
See Lists 

Select All Graphics 4-52 
Selecting Files 1-19, 2-10 
Selecting Multiple Paragraphs 2-38 
Selecting the Page 1-20 
Selection Line 1-19 
Send to Back 5-38, 5-56 
Separator Line for Footnote 8-6 
Set Column Width 10-43 
fixed width 10-10 
variable width 10-10 
Set Font 2-15, 6-34 
kerning with 5-48 
Set Preferences 1-13, 2-40 
auto-adjustments 1-52 
hide all pictures 5-53 
keep backup files 1-27 
on-screen kerning 5-49 
starting configuration 1-13 
Set Printer Info 3-62,10-39 
adding a new printer 3-63 
changing printer ports 3-63, 5-54 
changing width tables 3-63 
output, wid 3-64 
screen fonts 3-63 

switching printers viii, 1-41, 1-62, 
3-37, 3-63, 3-70 
Set Ruler 1-58 
Set Tint 10-30 
Setting Tabs 2-50 
Shapes 

See Graphic 




E- 16 


S-S 


Shift Key 3-32 
for drawing 9-9 

Shift-Click 1-55, 1-57, 2-18, 2-34, 
2-38,2-56, 3-67 
Shift-Del 2-19, 4-34, 5-39 
Shortcuts, Keyboard 
See Keyboard Shortcuts 
Show Column Guides 6-7 
Show Loose Lines 5-51 
Show On All Pages 4-3, 4-52, 4-55, 
7-11, 9-10 

Show Tabs & Returns 2-30, 3-43, 
5-32 

Show This Picture 3-59 
Side-By-Side Paragraphs 8-3 
calculating column widths 8-28 
preparing text for 8-28 
Sizing & Scaling 2-42, 2-57, 3-34, 

5- 16, 5-42 

aspect ratio maintained 3-59 
cropping pictures 5-7 
fit in frame 3-59, 5-4 
flow text around 5-42 
frames 3-24 
pictures 5-4 
tips for using 5-7 
upper left y 5-16 

Sizing Buttons 1-10, 1-20, 3-1, 4-2, 
4-28 

Snap-To Grid 3-9, 4-4 to 4-6, 4-13, 
4-55, 5-56 
Solid Box 6-46 
Space Below Rule 1 9-29 
Space Below Rule 3 7-18, 7-22, 7-43, 
9-27 

Space Between Columns 10-27 
Space Between Rows 10-27 
Space For Big First: Custom 6-44 
Space For Big First: Normal 6-45, 

6- 62, 8-22 


Spacing 

at bottom of frame 10-37 
at top of frame 10-37 
between lines 1-43 
between paragraphs 1-43 
body text inter-line spacing 1-47, 
1-66, 2-25, 3-22 

changing the position of footnotes 
with 8-10 

changing the position of headers 
and footers with 7-15 
dialog box 1-43 

eliminating space at the top of a 
page or column 1-43, 1-46 
horizontal spacing 1-43, 1-48 
how auto-adjustments affect 1-52 
in from left 1-48, 2-39, 3-47 
in from right 1-48 

maintaining standard spacing 1-47, 
10-27,10-36 
padding 1-47 

tips for above spacing 1-43, 1-51, 
1-66 

tips for below spacing 1-43, 1-51, 
1-66, 2-28, 3-48 

tips for in from left and in from 
right 1-48, 3-43, 3-69, 6-49, 8-28, 

9- 20 

tips for inter-line spacing 1-43, 1-47, 
1-51, 1-66 

tips for inter-paragraph spacing 
1-43, 1-66, 2-28 
versus alignment 2-39 
vertical justification 10-13, 10-17, 

10- 19,10-27 to 10-31,10-33, 10-35 
vertical spacing 1-43, 1-47, 1-51, 
3-22 

with side-by-side paragraphs 8-28 
Special Effects 

big first character 6-44, 6-62, 8-22 
bullet 2-37, 2-39 




T-T 


E - 17 


Spooler, Print 10-39 
Spot Color 9-5 
adding 9-34 
printing 9-34 
printing overlays 9-50 
Spot Color Printing 9-35 
Spreadsheet File 2-41 
preformatting 2-10 
Starting a New Chapter 1-8, 4-13 
Style Sheets 
contents of 1-31 
definition of 1-31 
modifying 1-40 

renaming and relocating 1-24, 1-66 
rules of thumb 1-31 
Style Tips 1-66, 2-56, 3-69, 6-61 
Subdirectories 

creating in Ventura 1-14, 1-22 
displayed in item selector 1-17 
moving to 1-17, 1-23 

T 

Tab Settings 2-45, 2-47, 2-50, 2-57, 
3-48, 3-69, 5-33, 6-39, 9-26 
auto-leader 4-44 
creating an underscore 4-44 
measuring locations from margin 
2-47, 6-40 
turning off 2-57 
Table Editor 
See Tables 
Table Mode vii, 10-5 
Table of Contents 3-28 

generating a 8-3, 8-36, 8-38, 8-40 
Table Text 10-12, 10-27, 10-30, 10-43 
Table Tips 8-51,10-43 
Tables 

adding rows 10-33 
adding tint screen 10-29 
cells 10-6,10-43 


changing column number 10-10 
changing column widths 10-9 to 
10-11 

changing header rows 10-9 
changing lines 10-6 
changing rule attributes 10-9 
changing settings 10-9 
changing spacing values 10-9 
creating with table mode 10-5, 
10-24, 10-26 

creating with horizontal tabs 2-45 

creating with side-by-side 

paragraphs 8-27 

deleting 10-43 

editing 10-8 

hiding lines 10-6 

joining cells 10-28 

rows and columns in 10-6 

ruling box around 10-6 

ruling lines between 10-6 

set column width dialog box 10-10 

setting the tint of 10-8, 10-30 

space above 10-27 

space around 10-27 

space below 10-27 

space between columns 10-27 

space between rows 10-27 

text in 10-12, 10-30, 10-43 

the parts of 10-6 

tips 10-43 

Tag Tables 4-15 

Tagging the Wrong Paragraph 2-27 

Tags 

adding new 2-28, 2-49, 2-56 

applying 1-39, 2-25 

applying to empty paragraph 2-31 

applying with function keys 3-50, 

3-68 

definition of 1-31,1-39 
generated 1-39,2-40, 2-53, 2-56, 
3-60, 4-9, 4-42 
in a database program 7-1 



E- 18 


T-T 


modifying 1-30,1-38, 1-40,1-54, 2-25 
removing 3-56, 3-58 
renaming 3-56 

residing on same line 3-42, 3-69, 
6-39,6-48, 7-23, 7-44 
Teaser 5-25 

A Technical Manual 9-5 

Technical Illustrations, Creating 9-1 

Templates 

See Chapter Templates 
Temporary Margins 

with in from left and in from right 
spacing 8-31 
Temporary Memory 
See Clipboard 
Text 

adding to box text 4-38 
aligning across columns 1-47, 3-22, 
5-45, 6-12 

at top of column or page 3-20 
attributes 2-5, 2-15, 2-18, 2-21 
clipboard 2-19, 2-21 
copy 2-15, 2-19, 2-21, 2-55 
copy fitting 5-43 
correcting mistakes 1-22, 3-29 
cut 2-15, 2-19, 2-21, 2-55 
editing 2-15, 2-19, 2-21, 2-55 
hidden attributes in 2-18 
in captions 2-53, 6-52, 6-61 
in tables 10-12, 10-30, 10-43 
inserting typographic characters 
2-5 

locating hidden attributes 2-18 
paste 2-15, 2-19, 2-55 
preformatting 1-66, 2-3 to 2-5, 7-1, 
8-1 

replacing in Ventura 10-17 
rotated 5-32 

runarounds 5-11, 5-42, 5-56 
stored in caption file 3-28, 3-30, 3-35 
tips 3-68, 10-42 


typing into frames 3-28, 3-30, 3-35, 
3-68, 5-13 
vertical 7-28 
white 7-17, 7-29 
See also Editing Text 
See also Word Processing 
Text Attr. Button 4-18 
Text Files 

generating TOC 8-40 

loading 1-16, 2-11 

placing in frames 1-19, 2-41, 3-1, 

3-7, 3-27, 3-68, 5-13, 6-20 

placing on the Page 1-19, 3-7 

pretagging 7-1 

renaming and relocating 1-21, 2-11, 
3-15, 5-12 

selecting in item selector 1-19 
Text Mode 1-9 
enabling 2-15 

if selected while loading text 1-19 
kerning in 5-48 
tagging in 3-50 to 3-53, 3-68 
when to use 2-16, 2-55 
Text of Footnote 8-8 
Text Tips 1-66, 2-55, 6-43, 6-61, 

9- 51, 10-42 
Thin Space 6-42 
Third-Party Utilities 1-26, 3-37 
A Three-Column Newsletter 6-6 
Three- Column Format 6-2, 9-5 
Thumb Tabs 7-6, 7-25 

steps for creating 7-25 
Thumbnail Sketch 4-12 
Tiff Format 5-4 

Tint Screens 4-13, 4-47, 6-14, 10-8, 

10- 29 
Tips 

book 8- 50 

box text 4-54, 5-56 

chapter 1-67, 3-70, 6-60, 6-63 

footnote 8-51 

frame 3-67, 4-54, 6-62 




u-v 


E- 19 


graphic 4-55 

other 7-43, 10-44 

picture 2-57, 3-70, 5-55, 6-62, 9-52 

style 1-66, 2-56, 3-69, 6-61 

table 8-51,10- 43 

text 1-66, 2-55, 6-43, 6-61, 9-51, 

10-42 

vertical justification 10-44 
Title Bar 1-8, 1-24 
To Print 2-54, 2- 57, 3-61 
Tracking 3-38, 6-33, 6-37, 6-62 
definition of 3- 40 
interactive 6-34 
Trim Marks 
See Crop Marks 
Turn Column Snap Off 3-23 
Turn Footer Off 2-23 
Turn Header Off 1-35 
Turn Line Snap Off 3-23 
Two-Column Newsletter 3- 13 
Two-Column Proposal 2-8 
Type Sizes 
measuring 2-2 
Typographic Characters 2-5 
bracket codes 2-5, 2-17 
copyright symbol 2-5 
ellipsis 5-11, 5-25 
em dash 2-5, 2-8, 5-11, 5-26 
en dash 7-13 
fractions 8-10 

open and closed quotes 2-5, 2-8, 6-27 
registered sign 5-11, 5-30 
Typographic Effects 3-19 
big first character 6-6, 6-44 
kerning 5-11, 5-46, 6-33 
letter spacing 5-50 
move down to 1st baseline by 6-35 
reverse type 4-13 

tracking 3-38, 3-40, 6-33, 6-37, 6-62 
vertical justification 10-13, 10-17, 
10-19 to 10-23, 10-27 to 10-32, 10-35 


U 

Underlying Page 
See The Page 

Update Counters 4-20, 4-52, 7-38, 
8-19, 8-32, 9-12 
Update Method 

previous number + 1 8-34 
Update Tag List 3-50, 3-69 
Upper Left X 5-16 
Upper Left Y 5-16 
User Interface 1-8 
addition button 1-9 
assignment list 1-9 
column guides 1-10 
current selection box 1-10 
dialog box 1-10 
menus 1-8 
mode selector 1-8 
mouse button 1-18 
the page 1-10 
page number 1-10 
scroll arrows 1-8, 1-18 
scroll bars 1-8 
scroll box 1-18 
sizing buttons 1-10 
title bar 1-8 

V 

Variable Definition 10-18 
The Ventura Formula x, 1-1, 1-16, 
1-29, 2-14, 3-16,4-17 
getting you out of trouble xi 
rules for building a document x 
Ventura Prep 1-15 

file managment operations ix 

for book 8-4 

for directory 7-7 

for invoice 4-13 

for one-column report 1-15 




E - 20 


W-Z 


for professional extension 10-16 
for two-column newsletter 3-13 
for two-column proposal 2-10 
for three-column newsletter 6-7 
rules ix, 4-14 
Vertical Alignment 4-43 
Vertical Justification 10-1,10-13, 
10-17, 10-19 to 10-23, 10-27 to 
10-31, 10-33 
allowed 10-37 
applying 10-35 
carding 10-36 
feathering 10-36 
rules for 10-13 

spacing at bottom of frame 10-37 
spacing at top of frame 10-37 
tips 10-44 

Vertical Justification Around Frame 
10-35 

Vertical Justification At Top of 
Paragraph 10-38 

Vertical Justification Within Frame 
10-35 

Vertical Padding 6-26, 6-62 
Vertical Rules 3-18 
Vertical Spacing 
See Spacing 
Vertical Tabs 

See Side-By-Side Paragraphs 
Vertical Text 7-28 
View Menu 1-30 
Viewing the Page 1-30 

W 

When Not At Column Top 1-43,1-46 
Which Counter 
chapter 8-19 
initial page 4-21, 8-34 
this page 4-21 


Widows and Orphans 3-20, 5-44, 

8-20 

Width Tables 3-63, 3-70,10-44 

Windows Metafile Format 5-4 

Word Processing 

converting file formats 6-7 
inserting the parafiltr code 2-4, 2-55 
inserting typographic characters 
2-5,2-17 
macros 2-6, 7-2 

preformatting text in 2-3 to 2-5, 2-55 
search and replace 2-4,10-17 

X 

X Offset 5-7 


Y 

Y Offset 5-7 


Z 

Z_BOXTEXT 4-9 
Z_CAPTION 2-53 
Z_DOUBLE 10-44 
Z_FNOT ENTRY 8-9 
Z_FNOT# 8-9 
Z.FOOTER 2-40, 9-12 
Z_HEADER 2-40, 3-53 
Z_INDEX LTR 8-41 
Z_INDEX MAIN 8-41 
Z_INDEX TITLE 8-41 
Z.LABEL CAP 3-60, 3-70 
Z_SEC1 9-18 
Z_SEC2 9-18 
Z_SINGLE 10-44 
Z_TOC LVL 1 8-37 



Z-Z 


E - 21 


Z_TOC LVL 2 8-37 
Z_TOC LVL 3 8-45 
Z_TOC TITLE 8-43 
Zapf Dingbats 6-46 


Zero Point 

resetting 1-58, 2-42, 3-23, 4-21, 
4-37, 5-16, 5-18, 5-56 
Zooming in on the Page 1-30, 3-29 




New Riders Library 


Bestselling how-to books, reference guides, learning materials, 
and companion disks for corporate and technical publishing 
from the desktop. Use the postage-free card at the back of the 
book to order today. 


gagaa 

INSIDE XRRCK VENTURA 
PI ’RUSHER 




tiiiss 


INSIDE XEROX VENTURA PUBLISHER 

A Guide to Professional-Quality Desktop Publishing on 
the IBM PC 

James Cavuoto and Jesse Berst 
704 pages, 330 illustrations 
ISBN 0-934035-59-8 $24.95 
2nd Edition 

The best reference guide to Ventura Publisher is now even better! Inside Xerox 
Ventura Publisher, 2nd Edition, has been completely rewritten for Ventura 
Publisher Version 2 and includes more of what readers have asked for: more 
hands-on examples, more easy-to-use charts, and more time-saving tips and 
tricks. 


'PUBLISHING WHVliR 
WITH VENTURA 



PUBLISHING POWER WITH VENTURA 
The Complete Teaching Guide to Xerox Ventura 
Publisher 

Martha Lubow and Jesse Berst 
624 pages, 230 illustrations 
ISBN 0-934035-61-X $27.95 
2nd Edition 

Unlock the inner secrets of Ventura Publisher Version 2 with this well-written 
tutorial. You’ll learn how to create your own great-looking business documents 
by producing the “real world” documents presented in this book. These 
documents include reports, newsletters, directories, technical manuals, and 
books. Companion software is available. 



DESKTOP MANAGER 

ISBN: 0-934035-34-2 $99.95 
Supports Version 1 and 2 

Desktop Manager is the desktop accessory software for IBM and compatible 
personal computers that helps your manage your Ventura Publisher 
documents, running transparently from within the Ventura Publisher 
environment. A multifunction software utility, Desktop Manager provides file 
management, timed backup, document control, style sheet settings, and report 
generation. This essential utility program comes complete with an 180-page 
guide. 


For fast service, call a New Riders Sales Representative 
now at (818) 991-5392 




INSIDE Xerox Ventura Publisher 



STYLE SHEETS FOR BUSINESS DOCUMENTS 

(Book and Disk Set) 

Martha Lubow and Jesse Berst 
320 pages, 150 illustrations 
ISBN 0-934035-22-9 $39.95 
Supports Version 1 and 2 

Introducing a cure for the common document —Style Sheets for Business 
Documents. This book and disk set contains more than 30 predesigned 
Ventura Publisher templates for creating top-quality business documents. 
Style sheets are presented for proposals, reports, marketing materials, ads, 
brochures, and correspondence. More than 100 pages of design tips and tricks 
are also included. 



STYLE SHEETS FOR TECHNICAL 
DOCUMENTS 

(Book and Disk Set) 

By Byron Canfield and Chad Canty 
320 Pages 150 illustrations 
ISBN: 0-934035-29-6 $39.95 
Supports Version 1 and 2 

Get the maximum out of Ventura Publisher with these advanced technical 
document formats. This book/disk combination presents more than 25 
ready-to-use templates for creating technical documents and books. Also 
includes techniques for creating pictures and tables, plus advanced tips for 
modifying formats to fit your needs. 



STYLE SHEETS FOR NEWSLETTERS 

(Book and Disk Set) 

By Martha Lubow and Polly Pattison 
320 Pages over 150 illustrations 
ISBN: 0-934035-31-8 $39.95 
Supports Version 1 and 2 

This book and disk set presents more than 25 predesigned Ventura Publisher 
templates for creating one-, two-, three-, and four-column newsletters. Just 
open the chapter template, load in your own text, and print. A complete 
description of every style sheet and key tag for all chapter templates is also 
included. 


For fast service, call a New Riders Sales Representative 
now at (818) 991-5392 










New Riders Library 



NEW WRITING 

By Jesse Berst 

320 Pages over 160 illustrations 
ISBN: 0-934035-27-X $9.95 

The essential handbook for the modern writer and editor. New Writing shows 
you how to save production time by preformatting documents. Learn to 
manage your files, styles and style sheets. Also presented are the elements of 
style you need to succeed in today’s desktop publishing arena. Companion 
software is available. 


New Riders Library also 
includes books on AutoCAD 

INSIDE AUTOCAD 

D. Raker and H. Rice 

750 pages, over 400 illustrations 

ISBN: 0-934035-49-0 $29.95 

INSIDE AutoCAD, the best selling book on AutoCAD, is entirely new and 
rewritten for AutoCAD’s 3D Release 10. This easy-to-understand book serves 
as both a tutorial and a lasting reference guide. 


INSIDE AUTOLISP 

J. Smith and R. Gesner 

672 pages, over 150 illustrations 

ISBN: 0-934035-47-4 $29.95 

Introducing the most comprehensive book on AutoLISP for AutoCAD Release 
10. Learn AutoLISP commands and functions and write your own custom 
AutoLISP programs. 

INSIDE AUTOSKETCH 

By Frank Lenk 

240 pages, over 120 illustrations 
ISBN: 0-934035-20-2 $17.95 

INSIDE AutoSketch gives you real-life mechanical parts, drawing schematics, 
and architectural drawings. 


For fast service, call a New Riders Sales Representative 
now at (818) 991-5392 





CUSTOMIZING AUTOCAD 

J. Smith and R. Gesner 

480 pages, over 100 illustrations 

ISBN: 0-934035-45-8 $27.95 

Uncover the hidden secrets of AutoCAD’s 3D Release 10 in this all new edition. 
Discover the anatomy of an AutoCAD menu and build a custom menu from 
start to finish. 

AUTOCAD FOR ARCHITECTS AND ENGINEERS 

John Albright and Elizabeth Schaeffer 
480 pages, over 160 illustrations 
ISBN: 0-934035-53-9 $29.95 

Learn by doing a typical AEC project using high-powered design development 
with AutoCAD Release 10. Learn to construct working drawings using 
techniques from real life AEC projects. 

STEPPING INTO AUTOCAD 

By Mark Merickel 

380 pages, over 140 illustrations 

ISBN: 0-934035-51-2 $29.95 

This popular tutorial has been completely rewritten with new exercises for 
Release 10. The book is organized to lead you step by step from the basics to 
practical tips on customizing AutoCAD for technical drafting. 

AUTOCAD QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE 

By Dorothy Kent 

180 pages, over 50 illustrations 

ISBN: 0-934035-57-1 $11.95 

All essential AutoCAD functions and commands are arranged alphabetically 
and described in just a few paragraphs. 

THE AUTODESK FILE 

Written and Edited by John Walker 
608 pages 

ISBN 0-934035-63-6 $24.95 

The unvarnished history of Autodesk, Inc. the company behind AutoCAD. 
Read the original memos, letters and reports that trace the rise of Autodesk, 
from start-up to their present position as the number one CAD software 
company in the world. 


For fast service, call a New Riders Sales Representative 
now at (818) 991-5392 



Order from New Riders Publishing Today 


Yes, please send me the productivity-boosting material I have 
checked below. Make check payable to New Riders Publishing. 

□ Check enclosed. 

□ Charge to my credit card: 

□ Visa □ Mastercard 

Card #_ 

Expiration:_ 

Signature:_ 


Name_ 

Company:_ 

Address:_ 

City:_ 

State_Zip:_ 

Phone:_ 

The easiest way to order is to pick-up the phone and call (818) 
991-5392 between 9:00 AM and 5:00 PM PST. Please have your 
credit card readily available and your order can be placed in a 
snap! 


Quantity 

Description of Item 

Unit Cost 

Total Cost 


Inside Xerox Ventura Publisher 2nd Edition 

$24.95 



Publishing Power with Ventura 2nd Edition 

$27.95 



Publishing Power Disk 

$14.95 



Style Sheets for Business Documents-Book/Disk Set 

$39.95 



Style Sheets for Newsletters-Book/Disk Set 

$39.95 



Style Sheets for Technical Documents-Book/Disk Set 

$39.95 



Desktop Manager for Xerox Ventura Publisher 

$99.95 



New Writing 

$ 9.95 



New Writing - Desktop Utility Disk 

$ 7.95 



COOKIES (Put the fun back in your computer) 

$ 6.95 










Send to: 

vO w New Riders Publishing 

P.O. Box 4846 

Shipping and Handling: see 
information below. 



Sales Tax: California please 
add 6.5% sales tax. 



TOTAL: 




Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 
(818)991-5392 


Shipping and Handling: $3.50 for the first book and $1.00 for each additional book. Floppy disk add $1.50 for shipping and 
handling. Add $15.00 per book for overseas shipping and handling. If you have to have it NOW, we can ship product to you in 
24 to 48 hours. For an additional $5.00 RUSH CHARGE for processing plus the actual cost of air freight, you’ll be able to receive 
your item over night or in 2 days. 


New Riders Publishing P.O. Box 4846 Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 (818) 991-5392 

FAX (818) 991-9263 





Order from New Riders Publishing Today! 


Yes, please send me the productivity-boosting 
material I have checked below. Make check 
payable to New Riders Publishing. 

□ Check enclosed. 

□ Charge to my credit card: 

□ VISA □ MasterCard 

Card #_ 

Expiration:_ 

Signature:_ 


Name:_ 

Company:_ 

Address:_ 

City:_ 

State:_ ZIP:_ 

Phone:_ 

The easiest way to order is to pick up the phone and call (818) 
991-5392 between 9:00 AM and 5:00 PM PST. Please have your 
credit card readily available and your order can be placed in a 
snap! 


Quantity 

Description of Item 

Unit Cost 

Total Cost 


Inside Xerox Ventura Publisher, 2nd Edition 

$29.95 



Publishing Power with Ventura, 2nd Edition 

$27.95 



Publishing Power Disk 

$14.95 



Style Sheets for Business Documents—Book/Disk Set 

$39.95 

| 


Style Sheets for Newsletters—Book/Disk Set 

$39.95 



Style Sheets for Technical Documents—Book/Disk Set 

$39.95 



Desktop Manager for Xerox Ventura Publisher 

$99.95 

1 


New Writing 

$ 9.95 



New Writing—Desktop Utility Disk 

$ 7.95 

pgppsi 


COOKIES (Put the fun back in your computer) 

$ 6.95 


• ^ Send to: 

vS/ w New Riders Publishing 

P.O. Box 4846 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 
(818)991-5392 

Shipping and Handling: 

See information below. 



Sales Tax. California please 
add 6.5% sales tax. 



TOTAL 




Shipping and Handling: $3.50 for the first book and S1.00 for each additional book. Floppy disk add SI.30 for shipping and 
handling. Add $ 15.00 per book for overseas shipping and handling. If you have to have it NOW, we can ship product to 
you in 24 to 48 hours. For an additional $5.00 RUSH CHARGE for processing plus the actual cost of air freight, you’ll be 
able to receive your item overnight or in 2 days. PP2E 

New Riders Publishing P.O. Box 4846 Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 (818) 991-5392 

FAX (818) 991-9263 























To order: Fill in the reverse side, fold, and mail 











comm9'h£P jse ' 


PUBLISHING POWER 
WITH VENTURA 


An In-Depth Guide to Mastering 
Ventura Version 2 

Learn the secrets the professionals use to 
make good looking documents fast. 

♦ Create and design Reports, Proposals, 
Newsletters, Invoices, Flyers, Directories, 
Books, and more! 

♦ Make high-powered business documents, 
just follow the sample screens! 

♦ Overflowing with time saving Tips and 
Tricks on Xerox Ventura Version 2. 

Other books talk about productivity—this 
book delivers it. Only Publishing Power 
provides the right tools for serious Xerox 
Ventura users. 


Optional Disk Available