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RSX-11M/RSX-11S 

Release Notes 

Order No. AA-2573E-TC 



READ RSX-11M SOFTWARE DISPATCH REVIEW 
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 



RSX-11M/RSX-11S 

Release Notes 

Order No. AA-2573E-TC 



RSX-11M Version 3.1 
RSX-11S Version 2.1 



To order additional copies of this document, contact the Software Distribution 
Center, Digital Equipment .Corporation, Maynard, Massachusetts 01754 



digital equipment corporation • maynard, massachusetbs 



First Printing, November 1974 
Revised: September 1975 

January 1977 

April 1977 

December 1977 



The information in this document is subject to change without notice 
and should not be construed as a commitment by Digital Equipment 
Corporation. Digital Equipment Corporation assumes no responsibility 
for any errors that may appear in this document. 

The software described in this document is furnished under a license 
and may only be used or copied in accordance with the terms of such 
license. 

No responsibility is assumed for the use or reliability of software on 
equipment that is not supplied by DIGITAL or its affiliated companies. 



Copyright (g) 1974, 1975, 1977 by Digital Equipment Corporation 



The postage-prepaid READER'S COMMENTS form on the last page of this 
document requests the user's critical evaluation to assist us in pre- 
paring future documentation. 

The following are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation: 



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COMTEX 

DDT 

DECCOMM 

ASSIST-11 



DECsystem-10 

DEC tape 

DIBOL 

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DECSYSTEM-20 

RTS-8 



MASSBUS 

OMNIBUS 

OS/8 

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TYPESET-11 

TMS-11 

ITPS-10 



RSX-llM/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 

1.0 GENERAL NOTES OF IMPORTANCE 

1.1 RSX-llM V3.1 Features 

RSX-llM V3.1 offers a modest set of enhancements to Release 3 as well 
as improved performance and superior reliability. Naturally, the size 
constraints of the previous releases have been upheld; systems 
running under RSX-llM V3.1 should be about the same size as their 
predecessors. 

Non-privileged tasks that ran under RSX-lM V03 will run as is with 
RSX-llM V3.1. Privileged tasks and most drivers need only be 
relinked, because internal modifications between releases were 
minimal. 

Following is a summary of noteworthy enhancements in RSX-llM V3.1. 
Consult the documentation set for more complete descriptions. 

Device Support: 

RM03 - 67Mb Disk for the PDP-11/70 

LPAll-K - Laboratory Peripheral Accelerator 

Laboratory K-Series Modules 

Modular software implementation that bypasses need for a 

formal device driver 
Enhanced data throughput 

Callable from FORTRAN, BASIC-PLUS-2, and MACRO-11 programs 
Designed to match LPA-llK support routines. 

Patient Powerfail Support 

Disk drivers will wait for drives to resume spinning before 

retrying the operation 
Magnetic tape drivers detect loss of vacuum and prevent 
accidental loss of tape volume due to improper tape 
position. 

Write-check extended to all supported disks except RXOl. 
Error Logging extended to the RXOl and the new RM03. 

Executive Enhancements: 

The Connect to Interrupt directive. 

Dynamic UMR allocation for PDP-11/70 systems. 

Conversion of Null Task into Kernel state to reduce context 
switching. 

Unlimited outstanding I/O requests for a checkpointable task, 

lAS/RSX-llD compatibility features to 

Support all forms of directive macros. 
Receive Data by specific task name. 

Return default protection UIC from Get Task parameters 
directive. 

Support for RMS record locking. 

Crash Dump Analyzer (CDA) support. 



RSX-llM/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 

MCR Enhancements: 

Buffered display output to eliminate system lockouts. 

Indirect command processor for 

Improved string and numeric capabilities. 

Call, Return and Chain capability. 

New .IF command and symbols to return system information. 

Handling up to four open data files. 

ATL/TAL for a specific task, 

ACT for a specific terminal, 

DEV for a specific device type, 

HELP supports the selective retrieval of information. 

Multiuser Support: 

HEL and BYE log to the system console terminal, 

ACNT enhancements 

Maintains file in sorted order. 

Allows account file access by a privileged user. 

Selective account listings with printer attach/detach logic. 

Utility Enhancements: 

EDT - New DEC EDITOR, 

DSC support for transfer verification (/VE) or volume comparison 
(/CMP) , 

Standalone version of BAD, 

CDA - Crash Dump Analyzer, 

DMP support for 1600 bits/in magnetic tapes. 

New Pseudo-device LB: used by Macro, TKB, INS, LOA, UNL, etc. 

Support for 132-character MAC command input with continuation 
lines. 

New switch in PIP (/SB) for copying files from ANSI magtape to 
disk. 

Print Spooler Task (PRT) is tolerant of records bigger than 132 
characters. 

Miscellaneous: 

SYSGEN 

New kit for dual RK05 systems provides a better SYSGEN 

procedure, 
SYSGEN3 reworked to manage disk space better and to build 

RMS-11 utilities. 
Done totally by indirect command files making process easier 

to understand, maintain, and extend. 



RSX-HM/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 

New Documentation: 

DEC EDITOR Reference Manual 

RSX-llM Crash Dump Analyzer Reference Manual 

IAS/RSX-11 System Library Routines Reference Manual 

GCML supports command input greater than 80 characters and allows 
continuation lines. 



1.2 Reporting Problems and Errors 

When completing a Software Performance Report (SPR) form, please 
describe only one problem at a time to simplify record-keeping and to 
facilitate a speedy response. 

User problems are often difficult to reproduce in a different 
configuration, so please help us by defining as precisely and as 
simply as possible the state of the system when the problem occurred. 
Illustrate a general problem with one or more examples. When an SPR 
contains concise information about a problem's context, we are more 
likely to reproduce it accurately, and therefore more likely to 
correct it. In addition, please ask simple and direct questions so 
that we can answer them clearly and directly. When you refer to a 
manual, specify the full title and the appropriate section, table, or 
page number . 

When reporting problems that involve DIGITAL-supplied software, please 
supply the following information {on a machine-readable medium if 
possible) : 

• A copy of the Executive task-build map if the problem involves 
a system crash, 

• A copy of the system's Executive configuration file RSXMC.MAC, 

• The console output from CRASH and a Panic Dump listing. 

• The version numbers of relevant software and information about 
patches or fixes made to the task image in question, 

• The task termination console output (if appropriate) if the 
problem involves a system utility, as well as a map if the 
task image differs from that distributed. 

• Any available information about the reproducibility of the 
problem. 

If a system failure occurs while running privileged, add-on software, 
such as DECNET, XYDRV, etc., you should try to reproduce the failure 
with the additional software not installed. Then, on your SPR, be 
sure to indicate clearly the behavior of the system with and without 
the add-on software. Without this information, the maintainers 
probably will not be able to reproduce your problem. 



RSX-llM/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 

1.3 Unsupported Software 

As a courtesy to our customers, DIGITAL is supplying the object 
libraries and command files to build three tasks that are normally 
available only through DECUS. These are: 

1. TECO - a character-oriented editor, 

2. RUNOFF - a text-processing program, and 

3. SRD - a program that produces sorted directory listings. 

This software is not supported by DIGITAL but is supplied to provide 
additional useful capabilities. Documentation of these three programs 
is available only through DECUS. 

These utilities may be built by the SYSGEN3 indirect command file, 
which is fully documented in the RSX-llM System Generation Manual . 



1.4 Applying Corrections to Released Software 

There are several ways to make corrections to released software: 

• At the source level, using the Source Language Input Program 
(SLP) , 

• At the object level, using the Object Module Patch Utility 

(PAT) , and 

• At the task image level, using the Task/File Patch Utility 

(ZAP) . 

All three methods require the user to adhere to the following rules: 

• Never delete the unmodified, distributed version of the file 
unless you have a copy. The distributed version is always the 
base to which corrections are applied. 

• Never delete the correction file; this file contains an 
accumulation of all corrections made to the distributed file, 
but if disk space is at a premium, store all correction files 
on separate media. 



1.4.1 Applying Corrections to Files on the Source Disk - Interim 
changes to the Executive, MCR, and the file system (FllACP) are made 
by creating correction files to be processed by the Source Language 
Input Program (SLP) . SLP uses these files to generate a new copy of 
the modules that contained the errors by applying the corrections to 
the distributed source file. SLP is fully described in the RSX-11 
Utilities Procedures Manual . 

Once the corrections have been applied and a new version of the file 
has been obtained, DO NOT delete the original source file. All 
interim changes are cumulative and are based on the contents of the 
distributed sources. 

The diverse distribution media for RSX-llM make it impractical to 
provide a comprehensive set of examples for applying source 
corrections. The examples provided are intended to illustrate the 
general techniques and files to be used. They assume a privileged 



RSX-llH/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 

user executing on a multiuser, mapped, dual RK05-based system with the 
dual RK05 distribution kit. 

If you have a single RK05 system, disk-to-disk transfers using PIP 
must be made usin" FLX in two steps? (1) transfer from RK05 to 
secondary storage medium, then (2) transfer from secondary storage 
medium to the target RK05. If you are not using a multiuser system, 
you do not allocate and deallocate devices. If your system disk is 
large {RK06, RP02, RP03, RP04, RP05, or RP06) , it contains all the 
necessary files, and disk-to-disk file transfers are not required. 

To update an Executive source file (e.g., ABCDEF.MAC) , mount the disk 
labeled EXECSRC and create a SLP correction file named ABCDEF.COR in 
the UFD [11,40]. Then, running under UIC [11,10], submit the file to 
SLP. For example, to update REQSB.MAC, you could follow this 
sequence : 

>TIM mm/dd/yy hh:mm 
>SET /UIC=[11,40] 
>ALL DKl: 
>MOU DKl: EXECSRC 
>ASN DK1:=SY: 

>EDI REQSB.COR 

[CREATING NEW FILE] 
INPUT 



*EX 
[EXIT] 

>SET /UIC=[11,10] 

>SLP @[ 11, 40] REQSB.COR 

> 

If the updated Executive module in your system is not a loadable 
driver, you will probably have to rebuild the Executive and privileged 
tasks in order to incorporate the modification. 

To rebuild, you need to repeat most of SYSGEN2 after making a few 
preparations. In brief: 

• Assemble the new module using the RSXMC.MAC file for the 
target system. 

• Use LBR to replace the old version of the module in the target 
system's RSXllM.OLB. 

• Rebuild the Executive using the target system's RSXBLD.CMD. 

• Use SYSGEN2.CMD to rebuild the privileged tasks and to 
establish your system with VMR. (Answer "yes" to HAVE YOU 
ALREADY BUILT THE EXEC.) Note that before initiating VMR, you 
must assign devices SY: and LB: to the disk containing your 
target system. 

If the modified file in your system is a loadable device driver 
(ZZDRV.MAC, for example) , the updated module can be replaced without 
doing another system generation. Assemble the updated module and 
replace the resulting object file in the RSXllM.OLB of your target 
system. 



RSX-llM/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 

Boot the target disk. 

>TIM mm/dd/yy/ hh:mm 

>ALL DKl: 

>MOU DKltEXECSRC 

>SET /UIC=[1,24] ![1,20] for unmapped systems 

>MAC ZZDRV=[1,1]EXEMC/ML, [200 , 200] RSXMC/PA: 1 ,DKl : [11,10]ZZDRV 

>DMO DKl: 

>DEA DKl: 

>LBR RSX11M/RP=ZZDRV 

>PIP ZZDRV.OBJ;*/DE 

> 

Use the indirect command file [200 ,200] BLDDRV.CMD to produce the files 
ZZDRV.TSK and ZZDRV.STB. Note that if you do not want the task-build 
map for the driver, BLDDRV throws it away by outputting it to the null 
device (NL:). If your system does not have an NL:, TKB will output a 
diagnostic message. 

If necessary, copy ZZDRV.TSK and ZZDRV.STB into the UFD corresponding 
to the system UIC. 

>@ [200,200] BLDDRV 



>SET /SYSUIC 

SYSUIC=[g,m] 

>SET /UIC=[g,m] 

>PIP /NV=[1,54]ZZDRV.TSK, ZZDRV.STB !or [1,50] for unmapped systems 

> 

Use VMR to unload the old device driver and to load the new one. If 
the new driver is larger than the old one, it may not fit into the 
same locations as the old one. It may be necessary to unload and 
reload all the loadable drivers in that partition to create enough 
room. If the system is unmapped, some other drivers may have to be 
rebuilt. 

>VMR 

ENTER FILENAME: RSXllM 

VMR>UNL ZZ: 

VMR>LOA ZZ: 

VMR>"Z 

>RUN $SHUTUP 

Hardware boot the modified system. 

Updating an MCR source file is similar to updating an Executive source 
file, except that the MCR source files are on the disk labeled MCRFCP 
in UFD [12,10]. The steps to update a source file for MCR 
(single-user and multiuser) and external MCR tasks are the same. The 
procedures for rebuilding the components differ slightly. An example 
is provided for each procedure. 

To update the MCR source file SETOV.MAC, mount the RK05 disk labeled 
MCRFCP. 

Create the SLP correction file SETOV.COR and use it to update 
SETOV.MAC. Assemble SETOV for the target system. 



RSX-llM/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 



>TIM mm/dd/yy hh:mm 
>SET /UIC=[12,40] 
>ALL DKl: 
>MOU DK1:MCRFCP 
>ASN DK1:=SY: 
>EDI SETOV.COR 
[CREATING NEW FILE] 
INPUT 



*EX 
[EXIT] 



>SET /UIC=[12,10] 

>SLP (§[12, 40] SETOV.COR 

> 



Boot the target system, if necessary. 

>TIM mm/dd/yy hh:mm 

>ALL DKl: 

>MOU DK1:MCRFCP 

>SET /UIC=[1,24] lor [1,20] for unmapped systems 

>MAC SETOV=[200,200]RSXMC/PA:1, [1 , 1] EXEMC/ML,DKl : [12,10]SETOV 

>DMO DKl: 

>DEA DKl: 

s 

Single-user and multiuser versions of MCR require different procedures 
for incorporating the modified module into the system. Both 
procedures, however, involve the following steps: 

• Copy the necessary indirect command files and libraries from 
the RK05 containing the privileged object files to SY: . 

• Incorporate the updated module into MCR's object library. 

• Rebuild MCR, and install it into the system using VMR, 
ensuring that SY: and LB: are first assigned to the disk 
containing the target system. 

All of the task-build command files output a map to logical device 
MP:. MP: must be assigned to NL: or other device to avoid a 
diagnostic error message from TKB. 

Example for a single-user MCR: 

>ALL DKl: 

>MOU DKl: SYSTEM 

>SET /UIC=[1,24] !or [1,20] for unmapped systems 

>PIP /NV=DK1:MCRBLD.CMD,MCRBLD.0DL,MCR.0LB 

>DMO DKl: 

>DEA DKl: 

>LBR MCR/RP=SETOV 

>PIP SETOV.OBJ;*/DE 

If it was necessary to modify the MCR 
task-build command file (MCRBLD.CMD) 
during the last system generation, it 
may be necessary at this time to 
replicate those changes. 



RSX-llM/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 

>ASN SY:=MP: 

>TKB @MGRBLD 

>SET /SYSUIC 

SYSUIC=[g,m] 

>SET /UIC=[g,m] 

>PIP /NV=[1,54]MCR.TSK !or [1,50] for unmapped systems 

>VMR 

ENTER FILENAME: RSXllM 

VMR>REM ...MCR 

VMR>INS MCR 

VMR>~Z 

>RUN $SHUTUP 

Hardware boot the system. 

Example for a multiuser MCR: 

>ALL DKl: 

>MOU DKl: SYSTEM 

>SET /UIC=[1,24] "or [1,20] for unmapped systems 

>PIP =DK1 : MCRMUBLD . CMD , MCRMUBLD . ODL , SYSBLD , SYSROT . OBJ , MCR . OLB 

>DMO DKl: 

>DEA DKl: 

>LBR MCR/RP=SETOV 

>PIP SETOV.OBJ;*/DE 

If it was necessary to modify the MCR 
task-build command file (MCRMUBLD.CMD) 
during the last system generation, it 
may be necessary at this time to 
replicate those changes. 

>ASN SY:=MP: !if your system supports ASN 

>TKB ^MCRMUBLD 

>SET /SYSUIC 

SYSUIC=[g,m] 

>SET UIC=[g,m] 

>PIP /NV=[1,54]MCRMU.TSK,SYS lor [1,50] for unmapped systems 

>VMR 

ENTER FILENAME: RSXllM 

VMR>REM ...SYS 

VMR>REM . . . MCR 

VMR>INS MCRMU 

VMR>INS SYS 

VMR>"Z 

>RUN $SHUTUP 

Hardware boot the system. 

There is only one procedure for replacing an external MCR task. It 
involves the following steps: 

• Copy the necessary command files and libraries from the disk 
containing the privileged object files to SY:. 

• Incorporate the updated module into the task's object library. 

• Rebuild the task and install it into the system using MCR or 
VMR. Before using VMR, you must assign SY: and LB: to the 
disk containing the target system. 



RSX-llM/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 

Example of the module INSLB of the external MCR task Install: 

>ALL DKl: 

>MOU DKl: SYSTEM 

>SET /UIC=[1,24] lor [1,20] for unmapped systems 

>PIP /NV=DK1 : INSBLD. * , INS .OLE , MCR. OLE 

>DMO DKl: 

>DEA DKl: 

>LBR INS/RP=INSLB 

>PIP INSLB.OBJ;*/DE 

If it was necessary to modify the 
external task's task-build command file 
during the last system generation, it 
may be necessary at this time to 
replicate those changes. 

>ASN SY:=MP: !if your system supports ASN 

>TKB @INSBLD 

>SET /SYSUIC 

SYSUIC=[g,mj 

>SET /UIC=Ig,m] 

>PIP /M=I1,54]INS,TSK Jpr [1,50] for unmapped systems 

>VMR 

ENTER FILENAME: RSXllM 

VMR>REM . . . INS 

VHR>INS INS 

VMR>"Z 

>RUN $SHUTUP 

Hardware boot the system. 

Updating FllACP can be confusing since the system includes three 
different versions of FllACP. Understanding how these versions relate 
to one another is necessary to avoid confusion. 

FCP and BIGFCP contain the same modules and therefore build from the 
same library (FCP.OLB) . The two versions have the same capablities, 
but different overlay structures. BIGFCP is faster and bigger (5.5K 
versus 2.5K) . 

FCPNMH, which has fewer capablities than FCP or BIGFCP (it is a 
Non-MultiHeader FllACP), is built from two libraries: FCP.OLB and 
FCPNMH. OLB. The modules taken from FCP.OLB are the same modules used 
to build FCP and BIGFCP. The modules taken from FCPNMH. OLB have the 
same names as modules in FCP.OLB; however, because of conditional 
assembly, the modules from FCPNMH. OLB contain different object code. 

All FllACP updates start by creating a SLP correction file in the UPD 
[13,40] (for RK05 distributions, the UFDs [13,40] and [13,10] are on 
the disk labeled MCRFCP) . In the following example, WTRNl replaces a 
dummy name . 

Mount the disk labeled MCRFCP 

>TIM mm/dd/yy hh:mm 
>SET /UIC=[13,40] 
>ALL DKl: 
>MOU DKl: MCRFCP 
>ASN DK1:=SY: 
>EDI WTRNl. COR 
[CREATING NEW FILE] 



RSX-llM/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 



INPUT 



*EX 
[EXIT] 

>SET /UIC=[13,10] 

>SLP @[13,40]WTRN1.COR 

> 

The updated source module is then assembled and the resulting object 
module is used to update a library. A module can be classified into 
one of three categories depending on the library into which the 
corrected module must be inserted. SPR responses will identify which 
category applies to the module in question. Note that a particular 
module's category can change from one SPR to another. The deciding 
factor is in which section of the conditionally assembled code the 
error occurs. 

• FCP only — The source module is assembled with the prefix 
file FllPRE.MAC, and the resulting object module is placed 
only in FCP.OLB. This occurs when the error is in a module 
that is only in FCP.OLB, or when the error is in conditionally 
assembled code that is enabled only for FCP and BIGFCP. 

• FCPNMH only — The source module is assembled with the prefix 
file PRE. MAC, and the resulting object module is placed only 
in FCPNMH. OLB. This occurs when the error is in conditionally 
assembled code that is enabled only for FCPNMH. 

• FCP and FCPNMH — The source module is assembled twice. The 
first time with the prefix file FllPRE.MAC. The resulting 
object file is placed in FCP.OLB. The second assembly is done 
with the prefix file PRE. MAC, and the resulting object file is 
placed in FCPNMH. OLB. This occurs when the error is in 
unconditionally assembled code in a module that is in both 
FCP.OLB and FCPNMH. OLB. 

Example for an FCP only module (WTRNl replaces a dummy name) : 

Boot the target system 

>TIM mm/dd/yy hh:mm 

>ALL DKl: 

>MOU DK1:MCRFCP 

>SET /UIC=[1,24] !or [1,20] for unmapped systems 

>MAC WTRN1=[1,1]EXEMC/ML, [200 , 200] RSXMC/PA: 1 ,DK1 : [13 , 10] FllPRE , WTRNl 

>DMO DKl: 

>DEA DKl: 

> 

Example for an FCPNMH module (WITRN replaces a dummy name) : 

Boot the target system 

>TIM mm/dd/yy hhrmm 

>ALL DKl: 

>MOU DK1:MCRFCP 

>SET /UIC=[1,24] !or [1,20] for unmapped systems 

>MAC WITRN. NMH= [1,1] EXEMC/ML, [ 200 , 200] RSXMC/PA: 1 , DKl : [13 , 10] PRE , WITRN 

>DMO DKl: 

>DEA DKl: 

> 



10 



RSX-llM/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 

Example for an FCP and FCPNMH module (CLACC replaces dummy name) : 

Boot the target system 

>TIM mm/dd/yy hh:mm 

>ALL DKl: 

>MOU DK1:MCRFCP 

>SET /UIC=[1,24] lor [1,20] for unmapped systems 

>MAC CLACC=[1,1]EXEMC/ML, [ 200 , 200] RSXMC/PA: 1 , DKl : [13 , 10] FllPRE ,CLACC 

>MAC CLACC.NMH=[1,1]EXEMC/ML, [ 200 , 200] RSXMC/PA: 1 , DKl : [13,10] PRE, CLACC 

>DMO DKl: 

>DEA DKl: 

> 

FCP, BIGFCP and FCPNMH require similar but not identical procedures 
for incorporating the modified module into the system. All procedures 
involve the following steps: 

• Copy the necessary command files and libraries from the RK05 
disk containing the privileged object files to SY: . 

• Incorporate the updated module into an object library. 

• Rebuild FllACP, and install it into the system using VMR, 
ensuring that SY: and LB: are first assigned to the disk 
containing the target system. 

All of the task-build command files output a map to logical device 
MP:. MP: must be assigned to NL: or other device to avoid a 
diagnostic error message from TKB. 

Example for FCPNMH (2. OK): 

>ALL DKl: 

>MOU DKl: SYSTEM 

>SET /UIC=[1,24] !or [1,20] for unmapped systems 

> PIP /NV=DK1 : FCPNMHBLD , CMD , FCPNMHBLD . ODL , FCPNMH . OLB , FCP . OLB 

>DMO DKl: 

>DEA DKl: 

>LBR FCPNMH/RP=WITRN.NMH 

>PIP WITRN.NMH;*/DE 

If it was necessary to modify the 
task-build command file (FCPNMHBLD. CMD) 
during the last system generation, it 
may be necessary at this time to 
replicate those changes. 

>ASN SY:=MP: !if your system supports ASN 

>TKB @FCPNMHBLD 

>SET /SYSUIC 

SYSUIC=[g,m] 

>SET /UIC=[g,m] 

>PIP /NV= [1,54] FCPNMH. TSK !or [1,50] for unmapped systems 

>VMR 

ENTER FILENAME: RSXllM 

VMR>REM FllACP 

VMRMNS FCPNMH 

VMR>''Z 

>RUN $SHUTUP 

Hardware boot the system. 



11 



RSX-llM/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 

The following example serves for both the 2.5K file system (FCP) and 
the 5.5K file system (BIGFCP) by substituting FGP or BIGPCP for every 
occurrence of XXX in the example. 

>ALL DKl: 

>MOU DKl: SYSTEM 

>SET /UIC=[1,24] lor [1,20] for unmapped systems 

>PIP /NV=DK1 : XXXBLD . CMD , XXXBLD . DDL , FCP . OLB 

>DMO DKl: 

>DEA DKl: 

>LBR FCP/RP=WTRN1 

>PIP WTRN1.0BJ;*/DE 

If it was necessary to modify the 
task-build command file (XXXBLD.CMD) 
during the last system generation, it 
may be necessary at this time to 
replicate those changes. 

>ASN SY:=MP: !if your system supports ASN 

>TKB eXXXBLD 

>SET /SYSUIC 

sysUIC=[g,m] 

>SET /UIC=[g,m] 

>PIP /NV= t 1,54] XXX. TSK !or [1,50] for unmapped systems 

>VMR 

ENTER FILENAME: RSXllM 

VMR>REM FllACP 

VMR>INS XXX 

VMR> " Z 

>RUN $SHUTUP 

Hardware boot the system. 



1.4.2 Making Patches to Object Nodules - To make interim changes to 
object modules, use the Object Module Patch Utility (PAT) to 
incorporate an object patch into an existing module. To correct an 
error, DIGITAL publishes a patch file written in MACRO-11 assembly 
code. Create and assemble the published file, which you then input to 
PAT together with the relevant object file. 

You must include the published checksum values in the specifications 
of the input file and the correction file. If a checksum value does 
not agree with the computed result, PAT reports an error. If a 
correction file causes the error, check the source against the 
original published source to verify that it has been copied correctly. 
If the input file causes the checksum error, verify that the correct 
version of the file is being patched. 

Note that it may be necessary to use LBR to extract the original 
object module from a library. PAT produces a new object module file 
containing the corrected object code. When patching modules from a 
library, you should always take the object module from the distributed 
library and put it in a copy that will accumulate all patches to that 
library. 



12 



RSX-llM/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 

The following guidelines apply to the formats for PAT command input 
and correction files: 

• Specify an explicit name, extension, and version number for 
each file. Use the following naming conventions: 

File Specification 

Correction file source name. PAT 

Correction file object name.POB 

Input file object name.OBJ;n 

Corrected input file name. OBJ; n+1 

• Always specify checksums for the input and correction files. 

The following example illustrates the command formats for creating the 
correction file and the PAT output file: 

>MAC NAME. POB=NAMB. PAT 

>LBR NAME .OB J ; 1=LIBRARY . OLB ; 1/EX : NAME 

>PAT NAME .OBJ ; 2=NAME.0BJ; 1/CS : 3471 ,NAME . POB/CS : 1532 

>LBR LIBRARY. OLB ;2/RP=NAME. OBJ; 2 

The correction file source input is used to accumulate all patches to 
a given module. This module should be prepared in the format 
described in Appendix E of the IAS/RSX-11 MACRO-11 Reference Manual , 
with the following additions: 

• The .TITLE statement must contain the name of the module to be 
patched. 

• the preface to the module should contain a summary of all 
patches made. 

• The module must include a list of equated symbols that defines 
the initial location counter values for each p-section that 
contains a patch. 

• The module should be subdivided into one or more patch blocks 
that contain the following information: 

1. An .IDENT statement in the format described in Section 
E.IO of the IAS/RSX-11 MACRO-11 Reference Manual, 

2. Any equated symbols, local macros, or local data 
associated with the patch, 

3. A description of the patch code, 

4. The patch code, and 

5. A set of equalities that reset the location counter for 
each p-section to the initial value. 

The following example illustrates this format: 

.TITLE NAME 



copyright statement 



13 



RSX-llM/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 



VERSION 00 
MODIFICATIONS: 
03-MAY-77 



OOA — CORRECT SYNCHRONOUS TRAP 
PROCESSING 

30-JUN-77 

GOB — PROVIDE INTERLOCKING MECHANISM 
FOR DATA BASE ACCESS 





.PSECT 




.BLK.= 






A — 


PSECT 


A 


£\— • 


.PSECT 


B 


B=. 








.IDENT 


/OOA/ 




• 

module 


code 





.PSECT 




,BLK. 








.PSECT 


A 


A 








.PSECT 


B 


B 








.IDENT 


/OOB/ 




module 


code 



; RESET LOCATION COUNTER 
; RESET LOCATION COUNTER 





.PSECT 




.=.BLK 


, 






.PSECT 


A 


.=A 








.PSECT 


B 


.=B 






; ADD 


NEXT PATCH HERE 


/ 


.END 





See the RSX-H Utilities Procedures Manual for a complete description 
of PAT. 



1.4.3 Making Patches to Task Image Files - Interim changes to task 
image files may be made by executing an interactive command sequence 
with the Task/File Patch Utility Program (ZAP) . These changes modify 
the appropriate task image files to make the corrections. Two command 
sequences are specified, one for each of the distributed task image 
files. 



14 



RSX-llH/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 

Virtual disk block 2 is assumed to be the beginning of all task 
images. In addition, for unmapped task images, 40000 (octal) is 
assumed to be the base address of the task. If a task to be patched 
has been rebuilt with checkpoint space allocation or with a 
nonstandard base address, the ZAP relocation commands must be modified 
to reflect the differences. 

See the RSX-11 Utilities Procedures Manual for a complete description 
of ZAP. 



2 . EXECDTIVE 



2.1 Dynamic DNR Allocation 

Dynamic UMR allocation has been implemented for PDP-11/70 systems 
running in 22-bit mode. Most NPR device drivers that ran on RSX-llM 
V03 should not be affected by this feature. In particular, the 6-word 
block still exists at the end of the SCB but it does not require 
initialization. In addition, the driver calls to the Executive to map 
the UMRs are identical. However, a driver cannot use the stack to 
store data prior to calling $STMAP because $STMAP returns as a 
co-routine. For a detailed description, read Appendix B of the 
RSX-llM Guide to Writing an I/O Driver. 



2.2 User-Written Drivers 

Chapter 4 of the RSX-llM Guide to Writing an I/O Driver describes the 
I/O packet field I.PRM as having read-only access by a device driver. 
In fact, several DIGITAL-supplied drivers store temporary data into 
unused portions of this eight-word field. However, you should not use 
the I/O packet as scratch storage. For example, if a driver completes 
an I/O request and leaves word I.PRM+16 non-zero, a system crash will 
occur if RMS record locking was included in the Executive. 



2.3 Connect to Interrupt Vector Directive 

The new Connect to Interrupt Vector (CINT$) directive is described in 
detail in the RSX-llM Executive Reference Manual . 

For examples of a program using the directive, see the support 
routines for the K-series Laboratory modules. You should concentrate 
your attention on the following modules: 

KAST.MAC 

KDISWP.MAC 

KDRDRV.MAC 

KGHIST.MAC 

These source files are located in UFD [45,10] on the appropriate disk 
in your distribution kit. 



15 



RSX-llM/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 

2.4 Clarification in Use of Executive Swapping Option 

Chapter 4 of the RSX-llM System Generation Manual explains the 
swapping option. Users must also consider the following additional 
factor : 

A task that is checkpointed by a lower priority task after its 
priority has been lowered by time will be placed into the 
partition wait queue according to its installed priority; it, 
therefore, is immediately eligible to to reclaim the memory it 
just vacated. 

Therefore, to obtain maximum benefit and reduce unnecessary disk I/O 
due to ineffective swapping, use the following guidelines: 

• Group all tasks that should swap with each other at the same 
priority. 

• Consider the swapping priority range only within the context 
of individual swapping groups; use the parameter only as 
stated in the discussion of hint #1 (section 4.9.5) in the 
manual. 

• Do not overlap the effective priorities of the individual 
swapping groups. 



2.5 Restriction in the Dse of Resident Libraries 

The error code lE.SPC indicates that a directive's DPB or required 
buffer was outside of the user task's address space when a system 
directive was issued. There is an additional instance when lE.SPC can 
result from issuing a system directive. If the DPB or any buffer is 
located in a read-only resident library, the address check algorithm 
will fail and lE.SPC will result. 

The problem can be circumvented by linking tasks to the resident 
library with read-write access, rather than read-only access. 



3.0 DEVICE DRIVERS 



3.1 LPAll-K Driver (LADRV) 



3,1,1 Restriction With PDP-11/70 Systems - Due to the extreme 
flexibility of the LPAll-K microprocessor controller, there are 
potentially more data buffers in use than there are POP 11/70 mapping 
registers (UMRs) to handle them. Therefore, the LPAll-K cannot be 
used on a PDP-11/70 system in 22-bit addressing mode. 



3.1.2 Caution Required When Unloading Driver - To attempt to take 
advantage of the LPAll-K 's power and flexibility, the driver was 
designed never to look busy to the RSX-llM Executive. The major 
problem with this technique is that a privileged user can Unload the 
driver while the LPAll-K is servicing one or more users. Therefore, 
you must exercise caution if you desire to Unload the driver. 

16 



RSX-llM/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 

3 13 Microcode Loader - The LPAll-K microcode loader is a privileged 
task that loads the microcode into the LPA's RAM, initializes the 
unit, and establishes the real-time clock rate. In addition, there is 
one task per LPAll-K unit that requests the loader, specifying unit 
characteristics. The loader taskname is LAINIT; the initiating 
tasknames are LAINn, where n represents the LPAll-K unit number. 

When a powerfail recovery occurs, the LPAll-K driver terminates all 
outstanding activity and requests execution of the initiating task 
(LAINn) for each unit. This provides automatic powerfail recovery for 
the LPAll-K microprocessors provided the LAINn and LAINIT tasks are 
installed. Note that a simulated powerfail occurs when the system is 
bootstrapped and when a driver is loaded. 

If the request for the initiating task or loader fails, the LPAll-K 
unit will not be initialized. Any attempt to use the LPAll-K will 
fail with the error code for device not ready (lE.DNR) . To initialize 
the device manually, the tasks LAINn and LAINIT must be installed. 
Then enter the command RUN LAINn. 

A command file is invoked automatically during SYSGEN2 if LPAll-K 
support was selected during SYSGEN part 1. Questions are asked to 
determine the target operating system environment and LPAll-K 
characteristics. There are additional options available for which 
questions are not offered; these may be selected by editing the 
task-build command files at the appropriate time. 



3.2 Magnetic Tape Drivers (MTDRV/MMDRV) 

To ensure that output tapes are not overwritten accidentally and that 
improper data is not read unknowingly from an input tape, a new 
powerfail procedure has been implemented in the magnetic tape drivers. 
Following a powerfail (or other loss of vacuum) , the drivers will 
reject all user requests until it receives one to rewind to BOT 
(lO.RWD, lO.RWU, or lO.SMO) . This ensures that a read or write does 
not occur when the tape is not at its proper position. Note that 
system boot and driver load are a simulated powerfail. 



3.3 DMC-11 Driver (XMDRV) 

In Version 3.0 of RSX-llM, Unibus Mapping Registers were assigned to 
devices at sysgen time; each DMC-11 was assigned five (5) UMRs. The 
DMC-11 driver used one UMR for the base table, two UMRs for active 
transmits, and two UMRs for active receives. Version 3,1 of RSX-llM, 
however, assigns UMR's dyamically. 

Therefore, the DMC-11 driver will assign its UMRs when the initialize 
QIO (lO.INL) is processed, and will de-assign its UMRs whenever the 
device goes off line. An off-line condition may result from a 
terminate QIO (lO.TRM) , a powerfail, or a fatal microprocessor error. 
Note that failure to assign UMRs will cause the initialize QIO to 
fail, in which case the lOSB code will be lE.RSU. 

For some systems, five UMRs may be too many to dedicate to the DMC-11, 
especially if there is more than one DMC-11. The DMC-11 driver may be 
assembled to use only three (3) UMRs instead of five if the symbol 
XM$UMR is defined and if its value is 3. The special symbol may be 
defined in RSXMC.MAC or it may be edited into the driver source code 
(XMDRV. MAC) . 



17 



RSX-llM/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 

3.4 Laboratory K-Series Support Routines 

The K-Series support subroutines also support the LPS-11 and the 
LSI-11 version of the K-Series peripherals. The LPS-11 support does 
not include the relays or the DMA option. 

When performing A/D input sampling with multiple channels or auto-gain 
ranging, the A/D conversion start is disabled when the interrupt 
routineis entered. This has the effect of missing A/D conversion 
starts if the clock overflow or external trigger rate is too fast. If 
this is undesirable, you may edit the source files [45,10]KADIN1.MAC, 
KADIN3.MAC, KADIN4.MAC, and KADIN5.MAC and delete the line labeled 
".ADnDC::", where n is 1, 3, 4, or 5, corresponding to the module 
name. You may also use a GBLPAT at task build time and patch the 
instruction to a no-op (i.e. GBLPAT=segment: .ADnDC: 240) . 



3.5 Additional Instances of the lE.PRI Error Code 

Chapters 3 and 4 of the RSX-llM I/O Drivers Reference Manual discuss 
the lE.PRI error code for disk and DECtape drivers. Two reasons are 
given for the return of this error: a non-privileged task attempts to 
perform logical I/O (such as lO.WLB) to a mounted volume; or, a user 
attempts to attach (10. ATT) a mounted volume. Here is an additional 
reason: an attempt to perform virtual block I/O (such as lO.RVB) to 
an unmounted volume. 

Also, under Chapter 5, it is possible to get the lE.PRi error status 
from the magnetic tape drivers if the system has support for ANSI 
magnetic tape. In this case, the criteria for the error are the same 
as used by the disk drivers. 



4 . MACRO 

Following are several updates to the IAS/RSX-11 MACRO -11 Reference 
Manual . ~ 

In the discussion of keyword arguments in a macro call (Section 7.3.6) 
the manual omits the fact that a macro call statement may be 
constructed such that an argument has been specified both as a 
positional argument and as a keyword argument. When this occurs, the 
positional specification takes precedence. 

Two symbols were omitted from the Permanent Symbol Table in Appendix 
C. The symbols STAG and STBO are diagnostic floating-point op codes 
having the values 170005 and 170006, respectively. 

In Appendix D, the description of the L assembly error states that it 
can be obtained only during a macro expansion. This is no longer 
true. An input line greater than 132 characters will be flagged with 
the L error; this condiiton no longer results in a fatal I/O error. 

In Appendix D, the description of the E assembly error states that it 
is obtained by omitting a valid .END statement. It is now also 
possible to receive the E error during expression analysis if the 
assembler's stack overflows. In addition to flagging the statement 
with the E error, a question mark (?) will be inserted into the line 
at the point where the overflow occurred. To avoid this, simplify the 
expression or build Macro with a larger stack. 



18 



RSX-llM/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 

The size of the assembler's command line buffer has been increased 
from 80 to 132 characters. In addition, command input may continue to 
additional lines provided each line terminates with a hyphen. It 
should be noted in Appendix G that the subset (8K) assembler will 
support neither of these features. 



5 . MCR 



5.1 Problems Booting an RK06 Based System 

It is possible for BOOT to loop indefinitely when booting a system 
from an RK06. This is the result of encountering an ECC-correctable 
error when reading the system image. The bootstrap driver in BOOT is 
not large enough to allow for the inclusion of ECC logic. Therefore, 
it simply retries the read, which will never succeed. 

To recover from this error, use PIP to copy the system image to 
another area on the disk and try booting the copy. 



5.2 Problems Booting a Mapped System From an Unmapped System 

It is Dossible for BOOT to loop indefinitely when booting a mapped 
system' from an unmapped system on a processor with MOS memory. This 
is the result of random parity bit settings in the parity registers 
for memory above 28K. The disk controller therefore fails to 
successfully transfer the system image to that portion of memory and 
the bootstrap drivers will simply retry the read, which will never 
succeed. 

This problem may be avoided either by running a standalone memory 
diagnostic before bringing the unmapped system into memory or by using 
a mapped system to boot the target mapped system. 



5.3 Potential Problem With a Saved System 

When booting a saved system on a configuration with less memory than 
the original one, SAV will adjust the length of the last partition 
(system-controlled only) to reflect the amount of memory actually in 
the configuration. A problem arises if you have a task installed in a 
partition that is larger than the new partition size after adjustment 
by SAV. If activated, the task will not be loaded into memory because 
the partition is now too small. Furthermore, the task can not be 
aborted because that also requires the task to be loaded into memory. 

To avoid this problem you must manually remove any task that has 
become too large for its system-controlled partition. 



5.4 SAV Relocates Vectors of a Saved System 

In a saved system image locations 0-1000 (octal) are relocated by SAV. 
Because there is no OPEN command in VMR, these locations can only be 
examined or modified by using ZAP in absolute mode. 



19 



RSX-llM/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 

The relative address within the file of these locations is stored by 
SAV in the two words at $sysIZ+2 and $SYSIZ+4. The first word 
contains the relative virtual block number and the second contains the 
byte offset into the block of relocated location 0. 



6,0 UTILITIES 



6.1 Undocumented DSC Error Message 

When DSC attempts to initialize either an input or output magnetic 
tape, the driver may return an Illegal Function error code (lE.IFC). 
If so, DSC will display the following message: 

DSC — *FATAL*40 I/O ERROR F ON MMx: 
ILLEGAL FUNCTION 

This will occur after a system powerfail, initial boot, driver load, 
or loss of vacuum. 

To recover from this error, you must force DSC to issue a Rewind 
command to the tape drive indicated in the error message. This can be 
accomplished by specifying /RW in the DSC command line. 



6.2 DEC EDITOR (EDT) 

The use of the new EDT text editor is described in the DEC EDITOR 
Reference Manual . Information specific for RSX-llM V3.1 is provided 
here. In general, these notes describe EDT invocation and file 
specification formats. Additional information concerning line 
sequencing, sequenced listings, and EDT defaults is also included. 



6.2.1 EDT Invocation from MCR 

In the RSX-llM system, EDT is invoked from the Monitor Console Routine 
(MCR) . The input and output file specifications in the examples in 
this section follow the RSX-llM conventions (f ilename.type;ver ) . All 
EDT file specifications follow the same conventions as the file 
specifications in the RSX-llM system. 

Example 1: 

>RUN $EDT <CR> 

EDT> [output file specification=] [input file specification] <CR> 

* (EDT command level) 

Example 2: 

>EDT <CR> 

EDT> [output file specif ication=] [input file specification] <CR> 

* (EDT command level) 



20 



RSX-llM/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 



Example 3: (Invocation Command Line variations) 

>EDT [output file specif ication=] [input file specification] <CR> 

* (EDT command level) 

>EDT [input file specification] <CR> 

* (EDT command level) 

(outfile defaults to infile;n + 1) 

>EDT [output file specification=] <CR> 

* (EDT command level) 
(provide input at terminal) 

>EDT <CR> 
EDT> <CR> 

* (EDT command level) 
(provide input at terminal) 

In this case, EDT will permit entry and editing of text, but will 

not accept an EXit command. To exit, you must use the 

EXit/rename option or the WRite command, followed by the QUIT 
command . 



6.2.2 Line Sequencing 

The /SEQuence option is not supported in the first release of EDT for 
RSX-llM V3.1. Line numbers are therefore not part of a file and are 
present only in the text buffer. 

The PRint command produces a listing file with line numbers. Do not 

attempt to modify this file. Line numbers are part of the text in 

this file, and any editing of this file will result in an additional 

set of line numbers at the left margin of a subsequent printout. 



6.2.3 EDT Command Defaults 

A brief list of EDT commands, with defaults, is included here to 
indicate the defaults for EDT command lines in which no options (or 
file specifications, where applicable) have been entered by the user. 



Command 



Default 



Change 
copy 
Delete 
Exit 

Find 

INClude 

Insert 



current line 

error (must have range) 

current line 

exit with output file or backup file 
saved 

current line 

error (must have filename) 

current line 

(continued on next page) 



21 



RSX-llM/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 



Command 



Default 



Move 

PRint 

QUIT 

Replace 
RESequence 
RES tore 

SAve 
Substitute 

WRite 
Type 



error (must have range) 

error (must have filename) 

no default — terminates with all text 
buffer contents lost 

current line 

resequence all lines in text buffer 

error (must have filename) 

Note: file must have been previously 

SAved 

error (must have filename) 

error (must have object-string and 
replacement string) 

error (must have filename) 

display current line 



6.3 Peripheral Interchange Program (PIP) 



6.3.1 PIP Partition Limitation 



PIP has logic to use large buffers and perform multiple block virtual 
I/O when copying disk-to-disk. If PIP is installed or run in a 
partition 16K or larger, PIP will appear to lose large parts of files 
copied. 



6.3.2 PIP List Switch (/LI) 

There is an inconsistency in defaults under the PIP List switch (/LI). 
Here is an example. If an /LI command is given with all filename 
fields (filename, type, and version) completely blank, as follows: 

PIP TEST. FTN/LI, [301,301] 

you would expect PIP to list TEST.FTN in the current UIC and in UIC 
[301,301]. For the second UIC, however, PIP defaults to *.*;* and 
lists TEST.FTN in the current UIC and all filenames in UIC [301,301]. 



6.4 Line Text Editor (EDI) 

Entering either of the following EDI commands, M* or Mn*, will cause 
EDI to terminate with a MEMORY PROTECT VIOLATION. The fix for this 
involves more work than has been available recently for EDI 
maintenance. This problem will be addressed at a later time. 



22 



RSX-llM/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 



7 . DIAGNOSTICS 



The TElO and TE16 magnetic tape drives are replacements for the TUlO 
and TU16, respectively. For the most part, these units are program 
compatible at the user level. However, the system user-mode 
diagnostic tasks (TUIO.TSK and TU16.TSK) cannot be used on the new 
hardware. Updated online diagnostics have not been developed for the 
new hardware. 



8.0 MISCELLANEOUS 



8.1 VT55 Support 

Software support for the VT55 Graphics Display Terminal is included in 
this release of RSX-llM. The software consists of the following 
files: 

[l,l]PLOT55.0BJ (in SYSLIB.OLB) 

[200,200]TEST55.FTN 

PLOT55 is a single FORTRAN-callable routine that provides access to 
the graphics features of the VT55 terminal. 

PLOT55 is already incorporated into [1,1]SYSLIB.0LB on the kits, and 
thus will be automatically linked into your program at task-build 
time. 

To test the PLOT55 package and the VT55 itself, run the test program 
as follows: 

1. Login to [200,200] from a VT55 (Set baud rate as high as 
possible.) 

2. >FOR TEST55,TEST55=TEST55 or 
>F4P TEST55,TEST55=TEST55 

3. >TKB TEST55=TEST55 

4. >RUN TEST55 

The TEST55 program will test the terminal and software and demonstrate 
the capabilities of the VT55. 



8.2 Pseudo Device LB: 

A new psuedo-device (LB:) has been added to the system. This device 
is redirected by SAV to the system boot device. It represents the 
true system device in that the macro assembler and task builder search 
device LB: for system libraries. In addition, the MCR commands BOO, 
LOA, UNL, INS $, RUN $, HELLO, and HELP use device LB:. The VMR 
command INS also uses device LB:. The utilities SYE, PIP, FLX, F4P, 
EDT, DMP, and VFY use device LB: for error message text files. 
Finally, ACNT uses LB: to access the system account file. 



23 



RSX-llM/RSX-llS RELEASE NOTES 

This new feature introduces a new level of flexibility to RSX-llM 
multi-user systems. Now individual users can assign device SY: to a 
private disk pack without having to replicate all of the system files 
on that disk. 

Note, however, that SAV automatically will remove any task that is not 
installed from device LB: when the system is bootstrapped. 
Therefore, tasks that must reside in the system permanently must be 
installed from device LB:. Users performing target Sysgens must be 
aware of this and carefully assign LB: to the target device. 



8.3 Using RMS with the Dual RK05 Distribution Kit 

If you intend to use RMS-11 with the dual RK05 distribution kit, you 
must copy the appropriate RMS libraries ( [1,1]RMSMAC.MLB and 
[1,1]RMSLIB.0LB) to your SYSTEM disk after your SYSGEN is completed. 
SYSGEN3.CMD will not do this for you. 



8.4 Sample Procedure 

The system-building procedure (SYSGEN) makes extensive use of the 
operating system and its utilities and constitutes the sample procedure 
as mentioned in DIGITAL'S Terms and Conditions of Sale. 



24 



ESX-llM/RSX-llS 
Release Notes 
AA-2573E-TC 



READER'S COMMENTS 



NOTE: This form is for docvunent comments only. DIGITAL will 
use comments submitted on this form at the company's 
discretion. Problems with software should be reported 
on a Software Performance Report (SPR) form. If you 
require a written reply and are eligible to receive 
one under SPR service, submit your comments on an SPR 
form. 

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^ Please make suggestions for improvement. 



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Please indicate the type of user/reader that you most nearly represent. 

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