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OPERATING PRINCIPLES 



OF THE 
UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER 



ISSUED JANUARY 1, 1956 



REMINGTON RAND UNIVAC 
DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



SPTM 4287 REV. 2 



OPERATING PRINCIPLES 
UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER 

INDEX 



I. Introduction 

II. General Components of Univac File -Computer 

III. Input - Output Equipment 

IV. Storage Components 

V. Arithmetic & Control Section — Programming 

VI. Illustrative Problems and Solutions 

VII. System Applications and Solutions 



ILLUSTRATIONS 

FIGURE NO. DESCRIPTION PAGE NO. 

1. General Schematic of Univac File-Computer II - 5 

2. Diagram and Explanation of Feeding III - 4 
Sequence - 150 CPM - 90 column 

3. 150 CPM - Data Flow between device, its III - 7 
plugboard and the computer 

4. Schematic of 150 CPM Card Sensing Circuitry HI - 12 

5. Schematic of Magnetic Drum Recording IV - 4 

6. The Small or Hi -Speed Drum IV - 6 

7. Functional Diagram of Hi -Speed Storage Drum IV - 7 

8. Intermediate Storage IV - 10 

9. Large Capacity Drum IV - 14 

10. Illustration of Large Capacity Drum Address IV - 17 
Numbering System 

11. Large Capacity Drum Circuitry IV - 20 

12. Schematic of Revolver URA's and fields IV - 43 

13. Schematic of a Selector V - 50 

14. Schematic of Program Select and Selector Operation V - 58 

15. Schematic of Input Control V - 73 



SECTION I 
INTRODUCTION 



I - 1 



INTRODUCTION TO THE UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER. 

The Univac File-Computer System is a medium sized electronic system 
designed to combine efficiently electronic computing with large cap- 
acity internal magnetic drum storage for random access processing of 
unsorted data. It possesses common language versatility and many 
types of input-output may be used simultaneously. Input-output units 
and storage units can be put together as building block units to pro- 
duce a system satisfying individual requirements. The five basic 
components of any computer system are input, storage, arithmetic, 
control and output. The Univac File-Computer has these components 
but the type, number and capacity of these units in any grouping of 
equipment is determined by the individual application requirements. 

Expanding requirements for better control of the basic business func- 
tions have dictated the need for computers with larger and larger 
internal storage systems. After carefully studying many business 
problems it was determined that this storage should possess a format 
for storing data similar to the form of the business transaction. 
This basic typical form is the individual unit record which is an 
extension of that common to punched card systems. In payroll we are 
concerned with the employee. Inventory control problems require the 
handling of single items successively. Sales analysis, material con- 
trol, billing and invoicing and virtually every other business prob- 
lem deal with individual unit records. This format then, has been 
adapted as the layout for storing data within the system. This lay- 
out, together with the user's ability to specify the desired length 
of this record allows maximum utility of the large storage capacity 
available in the Univac File-Computer. 

An evaluation of the Univac File-Computer's potential in solving 
problems involving high volume processing of unsorted data can be 
best made by examining its versatility. 

STORAGE VERSATILITY 

The large-scale random-access internal memory permits instant refer- 
ence to stored unit records which include all the control figures and 
master data required for the complete processing of each input item. 

This random-access storage feature permits entry of the input data to 
the system in the random sequence of its arrival. It can thus elim- 
inate manual steps such as pulling cards from a tub or looking up 
other types of records. It can also eliminate the need for periodic 
batch processing, saving the usual delays as well as the machine 
steps of sorting and merging input data, then re-sorting output data. 

On the other hand, the Univac File-Computer will readily handle the 
complete task of batch processing when this is indicated. By means 
of magnetic-tape, magnetic-drum or punched-card methods, input data 
and stored unit records can be sequenced and merged as needed for 
fast, efficient reference. 



1-2 



INPUT-OUTPUT VERSATILITY. 

Another trail-blazing feature is the simultaneous operation of up to 
31 universal language input-output units — any combination of 
punched -card, magnetic tape, perforated tape, line printer, electric 
typewriter, ten-key tape printer, and key punch units. 

This unusual flexibility opens the way for practically unlimited in- 
novations of procedures to solve particular problems of data pro- 
cessing and reference to stored data. In particular, it permits a 
direct tie-in with automated recording of the transaction items to 
be used as input data, and with automated methods for utilizing out- 
put data from the system. 



PROGRAMMING VERSATILITY. 

Processing of each input item can include many computations and logi- 
cal decisions based on simultaneous reference to both the input data 
and the stored data (balances, to-date totals, rates or prices, etc.). 
Output of results can be made immediately — including stored master 
descriptions, etc. 

As part of the same processing, all stored balances and totals can 
be brought forward to reflect the item processed — maintaining com- 
plete control figures on a truly current basis. 

Several applications can be combined into a single high-speed process- 
ing. For example, billing can be combined with inventory control and 
sales statistics — requiring only a single processing run of each 
customer order. Similarly, a production control system that includes 
both machine loads and operation schedules requires only a single 
processing for each work order and each job ticket. Complex mathe- 
matical problems can be completed in a single pass of a punched-card 
deck. 

The combination of multiple input and expandable programming capacity 
permits the simultaneous processing of many different types of data — 
with each input item processed selectively according to its own re- 
quirements. 



REPORTING VERSATILITY. 

All the data held in random-access storage is instantly available by 
keyboard inquiry when needed, eliminating any need to search records 
or wait until records are available. 

Condensed reports may be read out selectively from any type of stor- 
age, with calculations to extract the most significant figures of 
current position for management and operating reports. This method 
eliminates the mental arithmetic and individual judgments or the many 
extra machine steps usually required for such selective reports. 



1-3 

Another capability is the immediate reporting of any condition re- 
quiring supervisory attention, at the instant such a condition devel- 
ops during normal data-processing runs. Such reports can be printed 
out directly on an input-output unit located in the supervisory office 
concerned, and keyboard inquiry can also be made directly from that 
office for any stored information required. 

BUILDING-BLOCK VERSATILITY. 

The wide choice of input-output and storage units permits the design- 
ing of a system which is truly specific to the particular data- 
processing needs. Additional units may be added to the system at any 
time to meet expanded needs. 

The flexibility of the Univac File-Computer System also will permit 
the introduction of future developments in data-processing equipment 
and techniques without the danger of obsolescence for the complete 
system. 

The following six sections of this manual are designed to combine a 
detailed description of the computer with the tools and guidance to 
program effectively problems within the scope of the computer's capac- 
ity. Section II describes, in general terms, the components of the 
Univac File-Computer. Little attention is paid to the details con- 
cerning these components as this is covered in later sections. The 
purpose of this section is to give an overall picture of the system 
and illustrate how the various elements are tied together. Sections 
III, IV and V are designed to present a detailed description of the 
specifications of the Input-output equipment, Storage system, and 
Arithmetic and control system respectively. Section V concerns 
itself primarily with the tools for programming. In Section VI 
illustrative problems are presented together with their solutions. 
In addition, guidance is given in the preparation of problems for 
programming. These problems are included to illustrate the various 
functions of the computer and do not necessarily illustrate the most 
realistic approach to these simple problems. Section VII however 
has as its major objective the presentation of realistic approaches 
to various problems and the most effective use of the computer's 
commands and logic in arriving at the desired goal. 



SECTION II 

GENERAL COMPONENTS OF THE 

UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER 



GENERAL COMPONENTS OF THE UNI VAC FILE-COMPUTER. 
INDEX - SECTION II 

PAGE NO. 

1. General II - 1 

2. Input-Output II - 1 

3. Storage II - 2 

4. Arithmetic & Control II - 3 

5. Generalized Schematic of Entire System II - 5 



II - 1 



1. GENERAL 

The Univac File-Computer, as all computers, can be analyzed by func- 
tion or components. These computer functions or requirements are: 

A. Input 

B. Output 

C. Storage 

D. Arithmetic 

E. Control 

All computers require components of one form or another to accomplish 
these five functions. As an example of this we might analyze a 
10-key adding machine in light of these requirements and we would 
find that each of the functions is fulfilled as follows: 

A. Input — Keyboard digit keys — 9 

B. Output — Printed tape of input data and totals 

C. Storage - The accumulating register which remem- 

bers and carries the total forward. 

D. Arithmetic — 

The accumulating register which adds 
or subtracts the input data to arrive 
at a total 

E. Control - The motor bar, repeat key, sub-total 

key and subtract key. 

As can be seen by the above analogy all computers contain these five 
functions in one form or another and, of course, in varying degrees 
of capacity. 

The form these functions take in the Univac File-Computer are listed 
in this section along with a general explanation of how data is 
processed through the system. Subsequent sections describe the de- 
tail operating characteristics and use of each of the components men- 
tioned. 

2. INPUT - OUTPUT (See section III for detail operating characteristics) 

The types of input - output devices available with the Univac File- 
Computer are: 



II - 2 

A. 90 Column card sensing punching unit - 150 CPM 

B. 90 Column card sensing punching unit - 200 CPM 

C. 80 Column card sensing punching unit - 200 CPM 

D. Inquiry Keyboard 

E. Typewriter with paper tape and plugboard format 
control 

1. Paper tape reader — 20 characters per second 

2. Paper tape punch — 20 characters per second 

F. Paper tape reader — 200 characters per second 

G. Paper tape punch — 60 characters per second 
H. Key Punch - 90 column 

I. Magnetic Tape — Plastic 

J. Magnetic Tape — Metallic - Compatible with Univac 

K. High-Speed Printer 

Any combination of these devices in any total number from one (1) to 
thirty one (31) may be included in any one Univac File-Computer 
System. Since each device is equipped with its own buffer storage, 
multiple device systems can share the computer through direction of 
the multiplex function (see section V for detail operation). 

3. STORAGE (See Section IV for detailed characteristics and operation) 

There are five basic storage sections within the Univac File-Computer, 
of which one is composed of magnetic cores, while the remaining four 
types are magnetic drum storages. The five storage sections and 
their respective access speeds and capacities are: 

A. Input-Output Buffer Storages — Magnetic Cores 

These storages act as a translator medium between 
the input-output device and the computer 
input-output drum track for the device. The 
storage may be, dependent on the device, of 
either 12 or 120 digit capacity. However, even 
if the buffer is of 12 digit capacity it can 
handle up to 120 digits by repeated transfers. 



II - 3 



B. Input Drum Storages — Magnetic Drum 12,000 RPM 

These storages are used by the computer for ob- 
taining input data from and delivering output 
data to the input-output buffer storages. 
There are ten (10) storages of twelve digit cap- 
acity each for every input-output device in- 
cluded in the system. The average access time 
to any input storage is 2.5 milliseconds. 

C. Intermediate Storages — Magnetic Drum 12,000 RPM 

This storage section is used to retain constant 
or intermediate computing results. Either thirty 
(30) or fifty (50) of these twelve digit storages 
may be included in a system. Average access to 
any storage is 2.5 milliseconds. 

D. Program Storage — Magnetic Drum 12,000 RPM 

For additional program capacity (over and above 
the plugboard) additional storages may be in- 
cluded in a system. These storages may be used 
to store either three address program instruc- 
tions, results, or constant data. Average access 
time to any of these storages is 2.5 milliseconds, 

E. Large Capacity Storage — Magnetic Drums 1,750 RPM 

Large capacity drum storage is used for storing 
file reference data, summarized results or vola- 
tile file data. Each unit or drum can store up 
to 180,000 characters of data and a total of ten 
(10) drums can be included in one system to ob- 
tain a total of 1,800,000 characters of storage. 
The average access time to any set of characters 
in this storage sections is 17 milliseconds. 

External storage in the form of magnetic tapes or cards is also avail- 
able. 



4. ARITHMETIC AND CONTROL (See Section V for detailed operating instruc- 
tions) 

The arithmetic section of the machine provides the necessary circuit- 
ry to perform the data processing functions upon the stored informa- 
tion. The functions provided for in the Univac File-Computer are: 

A. Addition 

B. Subtraction 



II - 4 

C. Multiplication 

D. Division 

E. Comparison - alphabetic and/or numeric 

F. Transfer of data - alphabetic and/or numeric 

G. Left Zero Elimination - an editing function 

H. Channel Search — an automatic sequential 

search of the large capacity drums for desired 
data. 

I. Result sign determination and branching (+,-,o) 

The control section of the machine provides the means of linking and 
directing these processes of the arithmetic section to operate in a 
logical, pre-determined manner upon the stored data. 

A. External Programming: Control Panel of 48 non- 
sequential reusable three address steps. 

B. Internal Programming: Stored instructions from 
hi-speed drum to provide additional three address 
steps. 

Both of these means of control can be utilized in any one system. 

5. GENERAL SCHEMATIC OF ENTIRE SYSTEM 

Figure 1 illustrates the general flow of data within a complete 
system utilizing all major components. 

As mentioned before the subsequent sections describe, in detail, the 
functions, use, and applications of all of these components. 



II - 5 



FIGURE 1 

General Schematic of Univac F/le-Computer 

PLASTIC PM&UMVAC 
90 COL. MA6NOICTAPE TAPE 8OC0L. 



50U&E 
PATA 



INQUIRY 



ON-LINE 
KEY ENTRY 



BUFFER 



EXTERNAL 
MAGNETIC TAPE 
STORAGE 



8 
U 
F 
F 
E 
R 




LARGE CAPACITY 

DRUM 
STORAGE 



CARDS 1A< 




CARP5 



OFF- LINE 
MACHINE EXTRA 



BUFFER 



1 



\ INPUT - 

+ ] otrrpur 

JSTZXA6E 



I 



J 



INTER- \ NhSPEEp\ 

MEPtATE 

ST0EA6E I SID&&E I 



MULVPJJEX 
FUNCTION 



CONTROL 
PANEL 



ARITHMETIC UNIT 



SECTION III 
INPUT - OUTPUT EQUIPMENT 



Ill - 1 



1 . GENERAL 

This section deals with the detailed operational characteristics of 
all the various input-output devices which may be included in a Univac 
File-Computer system. A section has also been included to deal with 
the multiplex adapter control necessary for multiple device systems. 

The general format of data pertaining to each of the devices is as 
follows: 

1) Description of media utilized by the device 

2) Operation and function of the manual operating con- 
trols and indicators 

3) Diagrams of the feeding sequence and functions 

4) Diagram and explanation of the plugboard related to 
the device 

5) Timing chart of the control functions 

6) Explanation of verification checks related to the 
device 

7) Program planning sheet for the device 

8) Physical measurements and installation requirements 

In addition to the above data, the section dealing with the multiplex 
adapters shows the necessary wiring related to each device when it is 
to be used in either a scan or demand mode of operation. 



Ill - 2 



2. 90 COLUMN CARD SENSING PUNCHING UNIT - 150 CPM 

1) Input-Output Media: Ninety column punched cards, each column 
containing six punching positions i.e. (0,1,3,5,7,9) The punching 
codes are: 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 







X 
























X 


X 


X 










1 




X 


X 
















X 


X 








X 








3 








X 


X 


















X 


X 






X 




5 












X 


X 








X 


X 




X 






X 






7 
















X 


X 








X 






X 


X 


X 




9 






X 




X 




X 




X 


X 


X 










X 










I 


J 


K 


L 


M 


N 





p 


9 


R 


S 


T 


U 


V 


W 


X 


Y 


Z 













X 


X 


X 














X 


X 


X 


X 






X 


1 




X 










X 


X 




X 


X 












X 




X 


3 


X 


X 


X 








X 


X 


X 






X 




X 


X 




X 






5 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 






X 




X 




X 










X 




7 
















X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 




X 




9 






X 


X 




X 












X 




X 




X 


X 


X 





2) Operation & Function of the Manual Operating Controls & Indicators 

POWER (Circuit Breaker) SWITCH is located near the front of the machine 
on the left side just below the Control Panel. This switch serves to 
turn On and Off all current to the 150 CPM Card Unit and 150 CPM Card 
Adapter Unit from the main power supply. 

MOTOR (Toggle Switch) - This switch serves to turn On and Off the 
current to the Motor of the 150 CPM Card Unit. The Power Switch 
must be On as well as the Motor Switch before the current will flow 
to the Motor. 

AUTO. FEED (Toggle Switch) - This switch is set On or Off to obtain 
one of the following two card feeding operations: 

On - (Continuous) - After card feeding has been started, it 
will continue automatically. The last card from the 
Card Feeding Magazine will feed completely through the 
machine to the Card Receivers. 

Off - (Single Cycle) - After card feeding has been started, 
only one card will be fed or one machine cycle taken. 

CARD FEED (Throw Switch) - This switch is moved momentarily either up 
or down to one of the following two positions. The switch returns to 
the center position when released. 

START - With cards in the Card Feeding Magazine, this switch 
is moved UP momentarily to this position to start the 
card feeding operation. Whether the card feeding oper- 
ation continues automatically or whether only one card 
is fed depends on the setting of the Auto. Switch. 



Ill - 3 



When the machine is set for automatic card feeding, only 
one movement to the Start position is necessary. The 
card feeding will continue automatically following that 
initial impulse. 

When the machine is set for single cycle operation, 
this switch is moved to the Start for each card feeding 
cycle desired. To feed one card completely through the 
machine, three machine cycles are required. 

STOP - To obtain optional stopping during an automatic run, 
this switch is moved momentarily to the DOWN position. 
Card feeding will stop at the conclusion of the current 
Program. 

UNIT (Throw Switch) - This is a safety switch used in conjunction 
with either the Clear Switch to its right, or the Card Release Switch 
to its left (see below). 

This switch is moved momentarily either up to its PUNCH position or 
down to its CALC. (Calculate) position. The switch returns to the 
center position when released. 

CLEAR (Throw Switch) - This switch when moved simultaneously with the 
Unit Switch is used to reset the selectors by disconnecting B+. 

CARD RELEASE (Throw Switch) - This switch is moved momentarily to its 
UP position simultaneously with an UP movement of the Unit Switch. 
This switch movement causes a card to be ejected from the machine 
into the Rear Card Receiver without punching. Any information in the 
Punching Setup Section will, however, be cleared. 

One Up movement of both the Card Release and Unit Switches will feed 
a card from the Punching Section to the Rear Card Receiver, (despite 
the fact that the Sort may have been impulsed during the Program for 
that card), feed a card from the Sensing Section into the Punching 
Section (this card will be sensed), feed a card from the Card Feeding 
Magazine into the Sensing Section unless the cards have been removed 
from the Magazine before moving the switch. 

Before using the Card Release Switch, any card in the Card Feeding 
Magazine would usually be removed or prevented from feeding by means 
of the Card Lifting Lever. 

READY (White Indicator) - This indicator will light when the Card 
Unit is ready for operation. This means that the Card Unit is being 
supplied with the B+ voltage and the Motor is turned On. 

VOLTAGE (Red Indicator) - Not used in the File-Computer. 

CALCULATE (White Indicator) - While the Computer is connected to the 
Input/Output, this indicator will be lit. When this indicator lights 
and as long as it stays lit, no cards can be fed by means of the Card 
Feed Switch. 



Ill - 4 



Reference to this indicator applies especially when the Computer is 
performing lengthy or iterative Programs to assure the operator that 
the machine is functioning. 

INPUT CHECK (Red Indicator) - Not used in the File-Computer. 

CARD FEED (Red Indicator) - The machine will stop at the conclusion 
of a Program with this indicator lit to detect a mis-fed card between 
the Punching and Sensing Sections or between the Punching Section and 
the Card Receivers. 

All such mis-fed cards must be removed from the machine before resum- 
ing the card feeding operation. When the card feeding channel is 
clear, the operation is resumed with the Card Feed Switch. 

RECEIVER (White Indicator) - The machine will stop at the conclusion 
of a Program with this indicator lit in the event of: a full Card 
Receiver; a full Chip Pan. 

After removing the cards from the full Card Receiver or after emptying 
the Chip Pan, the light will go out. The card feeding is resumed by 
moving the Card Feed Switch to the Start position. 

When the indicator lights and as long as it stays lit, no automatic 
card feeding can be obtained. 

MAGAZINE (White Indicator) - The machine will stop with this indicator 
lit when the last card leaves the Card Feeding Magazine. 

Should the Card Feeding Magazine become empty during a run, the stop- 
page will occur with this light lit. When the new supply is placed 
in the magazine, the indicator will go out. The card feeding is re- 
sumed by moving the Card Feeding Switch to the Start position. 

f (White Indicator) - Not used in the File-Computer. 

N f (White Indicator) - Not used in the File-Computer. 

TEMPERATURE (Red Indicator) - Not used in the File-Computer. 

3) Diagram and Explanation of Feeding Sequence 

F/6URE Z 



















SENSING 
SET- UP 
SWITCHES 




PUNCMN6 
SET 
PIES 






, 


SENSING 




PUNQHN6 






^ STATION » STATION 




^ i 


'-"- 


^v 


PEEPING 








> 




MAGAZINE 




SENSIN6 
PINS 




CARP 
RECEIVER 




NoeMAL 

CAZP 
RECEIVER 



Ill - 5 



Sequence of Feeding: 

After the cards have been placed in the feeding magazine, the "Card 
Feed" Switch is raised and the following cycle is performed. 

1st cycle 

1. A card is fed to the sensing station. 

2nd cycle 

1. The sensing pins rise and set-up the sensing switches 
related to the positions punched in the card. 

2. The sensing pins drop back to normal. 

3. a. The Computer is notified that the input device is 

ready to be processed. 

b. The card at the sensing station moves to the 
punching station. 

c. The next card from the feeding magazine moves to 
the sensing station. 

All subsequent cycles are controlled by the Computer program. Each 
time the device receives a 'TRIP*' signal the following cycle takes 
place: 

1. a. The punching dies descend to punch the card with the 

data delivered to output storage for punching. 

b. The sensing set-up switches are reset to normal 
(cleared) . 

2. a. The punching dies rise and are reset to normal 

(cleared) . 

b. The sensing pins rise and set-up the sensing 

switches related to the positions punched in the 
card at the sensing station. 

3. The sensing pins drop back to normal. 

4. a. The card at the punching station is delivered to 

either the "segregate" or "normal" receiving 
magazine dependent on whether a "segregate" control 
pulse was received from the computer during the last 
computing cycle. 

b. The computer is notified that the input device is 
ready to be processed. 

c. The card at the sensing station moves to the 
punching station. 



Ill - 6 



d. The next card from the feeding magazine enters the 
sensing station. 

When the feeding magazine becomes empty the last card to enter will 
complete its calculations, be punched and delivered to a receiving 
magazine. At this point the card feeding will stop and the computer 
will not be notified that the device is ready to be processed. 

If, at any time, during a cycle, a card fails to feed from the punch- 
ing station to the receiver; or from the sensing station to the 
punching station, the card feeding will stop and the Computer will 
not be notified that the device is ready to be processed. 

4) Diagram And Explanation Of The Plugboard 

Before discussing the 150 CPM plugboard in detail the general flow of 
data and control between the device, its plugboard, and the computer 
will be explained. A schematic of this data flow is shown in figure 
3. 



Ill - 7 

Figure 3 



PATA FLOW 
CONTROL PULSES 




COMPUTER 
INPUT 
OUTPUT 
PRUM 



r-> 



MULTIPLEX 
FUNCTION 



>• 






ourpuT 

BUFFER 



ISO CPM PLV63CWRP 



INPUT 
CONTROL 



OUTPUT 
CONTROL. 



FEE0IN6,R£* 
CMMN6 4 
PUNCHING 
CONTROL 



f t 



COMPUTER 
PLU6B0ARP 
CONTROL 



XSCNSIN6 
XT -UP 
SWITCHES 



PUNCMIHC 
&ZT 

cues 



SENSING 
STATION 



&CPIN6 
MAOAZtNC 



36N5ING 
PINS 



PUHCH/NG 
STATION 



inTTn 



I L 



SEGREGATE NO&ML 

CAKV CAgP 

eec&va? aeceNez 



Ill - 8 



The preceding diagram shows the detail data and control flow between 
the 150 CPM unit and the Computer. To illustrate this matter more 
clearly, trace the data flow and card feeding operations of Card A. 

Raise the manual Card Feed switch and: 

a. Card A enters the card sensing station. 

b. The sensing pins rise and set up the sensing 
switches related to the positions punched in 
Card A. 

c. Information punched in Card A is now available on 
the input plugboard and through input wiring may 
begin to be transferred into the buffer core storage 
and thence into the input drum storages. 

d. Sensing pins drop. 

e. Card A moves to the punch station. 

f. The device signals the Computer that Card A's 
input is ready to be processed. 

g. The next card in the feeding magazine moves to 
the sensing station. 

h. The Computer has been calculating Card A's data 
and delivering the output results to the output 
drum storages. During this time Card A remains 
at the punching station. 

i. On completion of the program a "TRIP" signal will 
be delivered to the input-output plugboard thru an 
output control line from the Computer. This trip 
signal activates the following events in sequence. 

1) All drum output storages to be punched in the 
card are delivered (thru the input-output 
plugboards control) to the desired set dies 
and the dies are set for punching. 

2) The punching set dies descend and the dies which 
were set in (1) perforate their related positions 
in Card A. 

3) The set dies rise and clear. 

4) The sensing set-up station clears. 

5) The sensing pins rise and set up the sensing 
switches for the card in the sensing station. 

6) The sensing pins return to normal. 



Ill - 9 



7) Card A moves from the punching station to the 
normal receiver (note: if the Computer had 
delivered a segregate pulse to the input-output 
plugboard via an output control line during 
Card A's program, Card A would enter the segre- 
gate receiver) . 

8) The card in the sensing station repeats the 
cycle beginning at (e) above. 



As can be seen from the above example the functions available on the 
input-output control board are utilized during the following steps: 

c. Determination of what card columns go to which input 
storage units. 

i. Wiring of the trip signal from an output control line. 

i. (1) Determination of what card columns are to be 
punched from which output storage units. 

These three points are the major considerations in wiring the plug- 
board and are treated individually in the following detailed discus- 
sion of the input-output plugboard. 

The major areas of the plugboard are explained from a functional 
standpoint and examples of wiring are included for the various uses 
of the plugboard hubs. (Note complete plugboard diagram on 
page III - 38.) 

Card Sensing 

The plugboard hubs associated with the sensing of data from the card 
are: 



Ill - 10 



(1) 
r* 



Zero sensing conmons (A-X a-u) (1-4) 



o/c 


C 




0/ 


c 




I 







46 




2 


o 







47 




O 3 


o 







48 


f 


4 










49 O 


1 


5 







o 


50 




6 


o 







51 O 


1N0\ 


O 7 


o 







52 O 


1 °l 


O 8 


o 







53 O 


5 a 


O 9 





c/> 





54 O 


6. 1 


O 10 


o 


o 

2 





55 O 


7 ^A 


O 11 





o 
o 





56 O 


8 ol 


O 12 


o 


z 


o 


57 O 


9 d 


O 13 


o 


z 


58 O 


101 


O 14 





<y. 


o 


59 O 




O 15 


o 


o 
a. 


o 


60 O 




O 16 


o 




o 


61 O 




O 17 


o 







62 O 




O 18 


o 







63 O 




19 










64 O 




O 20 










65 O 




O 21 


o 







66 O 




O 22 


o 







67 O 




O 23 


o 







68 O 




O 24 


o 




o 


69 O 















o/c 


C 




o/c c 




O 25 


O 




O 70 O 




O 26 


o 




O 71 O 


l\ 


O 27 


o 




O 72 O 


3 1 


O 28 


o 




O 73 O 


si 


6 29 


o 




O 74 O 




O 30 


o 




O 75 O 


9 1 


O 31 


o 




O 76 O 




O 32 


o 


in 

z 
o 


O 77 O 




O 33 


o 


s 
o 


O 78 O 





Card Sensing (G-R) (9-53) 



pTO 


3+0| 


9 O 


o 


o 


o 






"*" 


w 








o 








o 








o 


o 


°1 








""o^ 


0~ 




V ° 


o 








o 


o 


o 





o 


o 








o 


o 





o 


o 





o 





o 


o 


o 


o 








o 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


I o 


1 O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o 





o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 








Jo 


3 O 


O 


o 





o 





o 


o 











o 








o 


o 








o 





o 


o 





o 


o 





























CARD 


SENSING 
























1° 


5 O 


O 





o 


o 





o 


o 


o 








o 


o 





o 











o 


o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


1 ° 


7 O 


o 


o 


o 


o 





o 


o 





o 





o 





o 


o 


o 





o 





o 














o 


o 


/ MS 






















































/ ° 

13 

1 ° 


9 O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 





o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 





o 


o 











o 








o 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 





o 





o 


o 




46 


47 


48 


49 


50 


51 


52 


53 


54 


55 


56 


57 


58 


59 


60 


61 


62 


63 


64 


65 


66 


67 


68 


69 


70 


71 


1 8 O 


1 O 





o 


o 





o 


o 





o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 


o 





o 


o 





o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


\ ° 


3 O 








o 


o 





o 


o 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


























CARD 


SENSING 


























o 


5 O 





o 


o 


o 





o 


o 





o 





o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 








o 




o 


7 O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 








o 







9 O 





o 


o 





o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o 








o 








o 


















^a- 






















o 


J 































Ill - 11 



OLSensinq Commons (G-R) (54-68) 




In order to explain the use of these hubs, the internal machine con- 
nections between these three parts of the card sensing switches are 
illustrated. Since all of these hubs are plugboard outlets of the 
90 card sensing switches we can best understand their function by 
illustrating a sensing switch. For this purpose, let us examine the 
sensing switch connections for card column 46. 



Ill - 12 



Schematic of 150 CPM Card Sensing Cizcuitkv 




JJEN5ING 

OAKM/AJ6 PS' 
TAIL HOT6HMN) 



iCTT 



Q 



Q 



PINS 



LJ 



U 



Figure 4 



Ill - 13 

In the case shown in figure 4 the following things have occurred: 

1) The card entered the sensing station 

2) The sensing pins rose, the seven (7) pin passed through the 
hole in the card, pushed the sensing set-up pin seven (7) 
into a latched position. This also closed the seven 
position sensing switch. All other sensing pins (0,1,3, 

5 & 9) were stopped by the card and therefore did not 
activate their respective sensing set-up pins. 

3) The sensing pins dropped (returned to normal), however 
the seven (7) sensing set-up pin remains latched (latch- 
ing mechanism not shown in diagram) thus keeping the 
seven (7) closed. The seven (7) sensing switch will re- 
main closed until the device receives a "TRIP" signal 
which un-latches the set-up pin allowing it to drop. 
This breaks the seven (7) sensing switch connection. 

As can be seen from figure 4, any current entering the card sensing 
common will be received at the card sensing positions related to the 
positions punched in the card. Note that if any current is to be 
received at the zero (0) position the originating current must enter 
the 0/C hub of the zero sensing commons. This separation of the zero 
switch from the 1,3,5,7, & 9 switches allows us to use zero's over 
numeric fields as control positions while still allowing the use of 
the other positions in the column as normal input data. Of course if 
the column being wired contains alphabetic data, then the "0/C hub" 
should be wired to the "C hub'* thus connecting the zero position to 
the common in the same manner as the other positions. 

The assignments of card columns to specific input storage locations 
are shown in the following paragraphs which deal with the input 
storage sections of the plugboard. 



Input Storage 

The plugboard hubs associated with delivering data sensed from the 
card to the computers input storage are: 

1) Input Field Entry hubs (A-F) (10-64) & (S-X) (10-64) 



J. ,. 


» 


12 


13 14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


,0 


» 


?2 23 


24 


25 


» 


27 


28 291 


1 


E 


5 


4 


3 2 


1 


s 


11 


10 


9 


8 


7 


6 F 


4 


3 


2 


1 


s 


11 


l<? 








O 


O O 


o 








o 


o 


O 


o 


O 











o 


o 


° 


II 


1 O 





O 


O O 

A 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 





o o 
B 


o 


o 





o 


o 


1 


It 


3 





o 


o 





o 

















o 








o 


o 


o 






l\ 


5 








O 

INPUT 


o 


o 











o 





o o 

INPUT 


o 





o 


o 


o 






16 


7 O 








O 





o 








o 


o 


o 














o 









y 








































p 


9 








o o 


o 


° 











o 














o 


o 


° 






h 





o 





O 


o , 


^o 


o 





o 


o 





o o 


o 





o 


o 

19 


o 

20 






i. 


J^- 























Ill - 14 



These hubs represent direct entries to the input buffer core storage 
Thus if card sensing columns are connected to these input entry hubs 
and current is run into the card sensing common then the buffer core 
storage will receive the data punched in the card columns and trans- 
fer this data to the input drum storage. The current used for this 
purpose is obtained from the: 

2) Input Call lines (T-X) (65-68) 




There is a set of two common hubs for each of the ten possible input 
storage locations (000-009). These hubs emit current at the appro- 
priate time to allow entry of the data punched in the card into the 
buffer storage in time to be entered from the buffer into the related 
drum storage location (000-009) . It should be noted that although 
there are ten, twelve digit, drum input storage locations there is 
only one, twelve digit, buffer storage; thus the data from the card 
is entered into the buffer and thence into the drum on a timed sequen- 
tial basis. The sequence of entry is: 

000,002,004,006,008,001,003,005,007 and 009 

An example of the necessary wiring will show these input functions 
more clearly. 

Assume that card columns are assigned to input storages as follows: 



Card Columns 


Input Storage 


1-6 


000 


9-20 


002 


46-51 


004 



Type of Data 
Numeric-always positive 
Alphabetic Description 
Numeric data-negative 
if a in Col. 46 



(+) 



The wiring for this input data would be: 



Note: The arrows shown on all following diagrams are drawn 
as an aid in tracing the wiring. 



Ill - 15 




21 22 23 



Vs, 



P— P— ^ — < —I F— ^ 



Comments on Wiring 




1. Since columns 1-6 were known to be numeric it was not 
necessary to wire the zero positions since the absence 
of an input code will generate a zero in the Computer 
arithmetic operations. However, the zero positions 
could be wired without changing the result in any way. 

2. Since columns 1-6 were known to always represent a 
positive number there was no need to wire anything to 
the sign position. The lack of a specific minus code 
will cause the Computer to accept the data as a positive 
number. 

3. Since columns 9-20 contain an alphabetic description and 
therefore will not be used in any arithmetic (+ - «• X) 
operations, it is possible to wire all twelve columns 

to one storage (002), the twelfth column being entered 
in the sign position. Since the minus code is a (3,5,7,9) 
and no alphabetic character consists of these positions 
the Computer would consider this a positive value. 



Ill - 16 



er. 



4. Since columns 46-51 are considered negative if there is 
a zero (0) in column 46, the zero position of column 46 
has been wired to the sign position of the input entry 
field. Note that a special wire is used here to convert 
the single zero position into the four position minus 
code. 

The above wiring provides for the following sequence of events to 
take place. 

1. Input call line 000 emits and probes card sensing switches 
1-6. 

2. Those positions of the columns 1-6 card sensing switches 
representing the holes punched in the card emit 000 call 
line current and send it into the input field entry hubs 
and thence into the buffer storage. 

3. The input buffer storage reads out and enters the data 
it contains from card columns 1-6 into the 000 location 
of the input storage drum. This also clears the buffer 

4. Input call line 002 emits and probes card sensing 
switches 9-20 and also the 0/C hubs of columns 9-20. 

5. Those positions of the columns 9-20 card sensing switches 
representing the holes punched in the card emit 002 call 
line current and direct it into the input field entry 
hubs and thence into the buffer core storage. 

6. The input buffer storage reads out and enters the data 
it contains from card columns 9-20 into the 002 location 
of the input storage drum. This operation also clears 
the buffer of data. 

7. Input call line 004 emits and probes card sensing switches 
46-51 and also the 0/C hub of column 46. 

8. Those positions of columns 46-51 representing the holes 
punched in the cards, emit 004 call line current and 
direct it to the input buffer cores. In addition a in 
column 46 creates four position entries in the sign posi- 
tion of the buffer (3,5,7,9) creating the negative indi- 
cation. 

9. The input buffer reads out and enters the data it contains 
from card columns 46-51 and the in column 46 into the 
004 location of the input drum. This "read out" opera- 
tion also clears the buffer of information. 

The next matter to be considered in planning input storage is: what 
storages should be used? The answer to this question lies in the 
next subject of: 



Ill - 17 



(3) Input Transfer (Control) (A-D (65) 




These hubs control how many input transfer cycles from buffer to drum 
will be accomplished. In order to further clarify this we should 
realize that the transfer of input data from the card columns to the 
buffer to the drum occurs in the following sequence: 

1. 000 call line to card columns to input buffer to the 
input drum location for the call line. 

2. 002 - same as 1 



3. 


004 - 


it 


m tt 


4. 


006 - 


t« 


n tt 


5. 


008 - 


*• 


it it 


6. 


001 - 


n 


it H 


7. 


003 - 


•t 


ii it 


8. 


005 - 


»t 


ti ii 


9. 


007 - 


ii 


M It 


10. 


009 - 


•t 


It tt 



This complete sequence of operation requires 2.5 ms average to find 
the first drum location (000) and then two complete drum revolutions 
or 10 ms to complete the cycle for a total of 12.5 ms. This time can 
be reduced through use of the input transfer hubs to 7.5 ms. if only 
five storages are used or zero ms. if no inDut is required. These 
three cases are: 

1. Assume that only 5 fields of data are required as input: 



Card Cols. 
1-6 
7-12 
13-18 
19-26 
27-33 



Input Storage 
000 
002 
004 
006 
008 



The card field columns are assigned to the even numbered 
input storages so that the input data is transferred on 
the first drum revolution, thus giving an input transfer 
time of 7.5 ms (2.5 to locate 000 plus 5 ms for one drum 
revolution). The input transfer control is wired: 



Ill - 18 




This technique may be used in all cases where 5 storages 
or less are required. 



2. Assume that no input is required in the problem, 
this case the input transfer control is wired: 



In 



•v 


1 


" A 


s J 


f NO 


o J 


5 EVEN 


ol 





O 1 


All 


S 1 


. O _ 


o J 



3. Of course if more than five storages are required the 
input transfer control must be wired: 




It should be noted that all three of these methods of input transfer 
control can be combined in one program and controlled by positions 
punched in the card. This control usually will be accomplished through 
selectors (discussed in following paragraphs) since the input trans- 
fer control must always be wired to one of the three positions. 



Ill - 19 



Output Storage (a-f) (5-64) & (s-x) (5-64) 




















3 

o 


2 





































11 ID 
o o 


9 

o 


8 




7 



6 5 

o o 


1 




s 
o 


11 
o 


10 

o 


9 

o 


8 

o 


o 


6 5 



4 

o 


3 

o 


2 

o 


1 



s 
o 


11 




10 



9 8 1 

o 




I o o 

3 O O 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o o 
000 
o o 






o 
o 


o 
o 




o 


o 
o 


o 




o 




o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 




001 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 








o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
2 




f° 


5 O O 

7 O 


o 
o 


o 




o 




o o 

OUTPUT 

o o 


o 




o 
o 


o 

o 


o 




o 
o 


o 
o 


o 




o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 

OUTPUT 
O 


o 
o 


o 
o 










o 
o 


o 








o 0/ 

OU T PUJ 

o dj 


o 


9 O O 


o 





o 


o o 





o ' 


d 


■0 





o 


o 


o 


o 





o o 





o 








o 








o oj 


lo 


w? 


o 


SEL. 



4 



- NS 





o o 





o 


o 











o 





o 


o 


o 





o 





o 


o 


o 





o <J 








- 































These storage output hubs represent the output storage buffer exits 
and are used to deliver the output data developed by the Computer to 
the card punching section. 

It is to be noted that an output storage position cannot be wired to 
punch to more than one place. However, wiring from one of two stor- 
ages to punch into one place can be done if one of the storages is 
odd and the other even. 





Card 


Punching 


(g-r) 


(9-53) 














































lo 


o o 


O O O 


O O 


O O o 





O O 





o 











o 





o 


o 


o 


O 


[ NS 


1 2 


3 4 5 6 


7 8 


9 10 11 12 


13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




27 


1 o 


1 o o 


O O O O 


O O 


o o o o 





o o 


o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 


o 







1 O 


1 ° 


3 O O 


O O O 


O O 


o o o o 

CARD 


o 

F 


o o 
UNCHING 


o 


o 


o 








o 


o 


o 


o 


O 




3 O 


1 ° 


5 O O 


O O O 


O O 


o o o o 


o 


o o o 





o 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 




5 O 


\° 


7 O O 





O O 


o o o 


o 


o o o 





o 


o 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




- O 


1° 


9 O O 


O O O 


O 


o 





o O 








o 








o 








o 


O 




? 














— °-«^oo - . 












o 



























Ill - 20 



These hubs represent the entries to the punching dies which are used 
to punch the output results into the card. These hubs are wired 
directly from the output storage hubs in order to receive the output 
data from the Computer. The controlling or signalling current which 
effects this setting of punch dies from the storage output is from 
the output call lines. 



Output Call Lines (a-e) (65-68) 




These output call lines emit a timed pulse controlled by the "TRIP" 
signal received from the Computer. As can be seen, there are in 
effect only two call lines; one for even storages (the first input- 
output drum revolution) and one for odd numbered storages (the second 
input-output drum revolution) . Dependent on whether the storage 
delivering the result has an odd or even number, one of the two call 
lines is selected and wired to the punching commons of the card col- 
umns into which the stored data is to be punched. 



Punching Commons (g-r)(54-68) 




Ill - 21 



These hubs receive the signal from the output call lines which 
instructs them to set the punch dies in their column with the data 
received at their card punching positions. The card punching posi- 
tions would of course, be wired to the output storage related to the 
call line pulse received at the punching common. 

In order to integrate the information concerning Output Storage, 
Card Bunching, Output Call lines, and Card Punching Commons let us 
take an example where: 



Size of 






Numeric 


Punch 


Field 


Sign 


Storage 


or Alpha 


in Cols. 


6 


+ 


000 


Numeric 


46-51 


12 


none 


001 


Alpha 


1-12 


7 


+ or - 


006 


Numeric 


52-58 punch a 
zero in 52 if 
negative 



The wiring for this 




Ill - 22 



Comments on Wiring 

1. The zeros in columns 46-51 and 53-58 need not be wired 
if zero punching is not desired. 

2. Since output storage emits a zero from the sign position 
for negative control, this position in 006 is wired to 
the desired negative control punching position (0/52) . 
Note that this could have been wired to punch any other 
position desired (1,3,5,7 or 9) . 

3. Note that in the case of 001 the zeros must be wired if 
we are to get the correct alphabetic punching. 

4. Note that there is no sign indication of a positive 
result although the zero in the sign position signifies 
a negative result. 

The remaining subjects to be covered can be considered under one 
heading. 



CONTROL FUNCTIONS 

The control functions and features cover those plugboard hubs which 
are used to vary the input or output format, energize certain compu- 
ter functions on the basis of data punched in the card, receive sig- 
nals from the computer to energize output control functions, etc. 
All of these functions are considered individually in the following 
paragraphs. 



Feeding and Punching Control 

As noted earlier in this section, the 150 CPM device feeds two cards 
upon raising the start switch and then feeds only under control pf 
the computer. This control is provided by pulses received from the 
computer (by programming) through the output control lines (n-r) (5-8) 
These control lines are then wired to the feeding and punching func- 
tions of: 



Trip (1-m) (5) 

Let us take an example where the computer delivers a program end or 
complete pulse to output control line J and this pulse is to instruct 
the 150 CPM device to punch the output data, feed the card into the 
normal receiver, sense the next card and feed it to the punching 
station, and feed the following card to the sensing station. The 
wiring would be as follows on the 150 CPM plugboard. 



Ill - 23 




The two trip hubs perform the same functions, however they are dioae 
protected so that current going into one cannot backfeed thru a wire 
going into the other. 



Segregate (j-k) (5) 

Assume in this case that the program sometimes desires to trip the 
card and segregate it into the segregate receiver, and at other times 
the program wishes to merely trip the card. For purposes of illus- 
tration let us assume that the program delivers a pulse to output 
control line I when it wishes to segregate and Trip and to output 
control line J when it wishes to merely trip the card and deliver it 
to the normal receiver. The wiring for these functions would be: 




Since the Trip and Segregate hubs are all diode protected there will 
not be a back current to the Segregate hub when output control line J 
is activated. 



Skip (h-i) (5) 

This function prevents the punching of all output storage data (even 
though wired) when it is impulsed prior to or simultaneously with the 
trip function. It should be noted that the skip function's two hubs 
are also diode protected to prevent back circuits. To illustrate 
this function let us assume the computer will impulse the indicated 
control lines when it wants the following output function: 



Ill - 24 



Output Control 

J 
I 
H 

The wiring would be: 



Function Desired 

Trip 

Segregate 

Skip 




Note that neither segregate or skip need to be combined with a trip 
function, but may actually come from the computer many steps before 
the trip signal is received. Thus in the above case the computer 
could, by impulsing the correct control lines during the program, 
accomplish the following combinations of functions. 

1. Trip 

2. Segregate and Trip 

3. Segregate, Skip and Trip 

4. Skip and Trip 



Selector Control (see section V for explanation of selectors) 

Use of the selectors on the 150 CPM plugboard can be sub-classified 
into the following areas of interest: 

1) Use of selectors to vary the input-output plugboard 
wiring on the basis of card controls. 

2) Use of selectors to vary the input-output plugboard 
wiring on the basis of computer control. 

Both of these areas require use of the 150 CPM selectors, B + current, 
and in the second use, program selects. Before discussing the appli- 
cations we will cover these functions of the plugboard. 



Ill - 25 



B+ Int (F)(9), (E-FK65), (w-x) (1) 



r- m \ 

/A 6 


7 ° 1 


1 | INT. 

|o jB+O 


9 O 1 




o 

L. 


o A 





The B + int (interrupted) hubs emit current capable of energizing the 
150 CPM selectors during the calculating time of any card. This cur- 
rent stops emitting after output punching time and starts emitting 
again before Input call line time for the next card. 



B + Hold (v)(l) 




This B + power starts emitting as soon as the input device is turned 
on and continues to emit, without interruption until the device is 
turned off or the Clear Switch is used (See III-3) . 



Selectors (H-M) (6-8) , (g-m) (6-8) , (v-x)(2-4), 
(A-F) (66-68) , (s-x) (66-68) 




Ill - 26 



These selectors act as switches in that any current entering the C 
hub (common) will emit from either the S hub (select) or the NS hub 
(non-select) dependent upon whether or not the related selector pick- 
up (G)(5-8), (H-M) (5) has been energized by B + or program select 
current. If one of these two types of current has been received at 
the pickup then any pulse entering into the C hub will be received 
out of the S hub. Conversely, if current is not received at the 
pickup hub then any pulse entering into the C hub will emit from the 
NS hub. Any time the pickup is energized and then the current stops 
being received at the pickup, the selector will resume a non-select 
state (current into C will exit from NS) . 



Program Selects (F) (5-8) 



1 o 


6 i 4 4 


1 


PROG. SEL. |lfj 

IN O OUT O 1 IN OUT '8-1 


2 O 


SELECJflg— — U 



The two program selects are used to convert current received from 
the computer, via output control lines, into the equivalent of B + 
int for use in energizing the selectors. The current from the output 
control line is wired to the "in" of the program select and when the 
current is received the "out" of the program select delivers B + 
interrupted current and may be used to energize selectors. 

As stated previously, these selectors are used primarily in two ways. 
Examples of these applications are: 

1) To vary input-output plugboard wiring on the basis of card con- 
trols. 

Case 1 
Assume that: 

a. if there is a in column 1 no input information is 
needed. Therefore, the "no" hub (B-65) should be 
wired to the "in" hub (A-65) to prevent the input 
transfer cycle. 

b. if there is a 1 in Column 1 the input data in 000,002 
and 004 should be transferred to storage. Therefore 
the "even" hub (C-65) should be wired to the "in" 
hub. 

c. if there is neither a nor a 1 in column 1 all input 
data should be transferred to storage. Therefore, 
the "all" hub (D-65) should be wired to the "in" hub. 



Ill - 27 



The wiring for this case is: 




Case 2 

Assume that card columns 6-8 should be wired to the three 
least significant positions of input entry A if there is not 
a in column 1. If there is a in column 1, columns 52-54, 
rather than 6-8, should be wired to the three least signifi- 
cant positions of input entry A. In either case the field 
should be called for by 000. Both fields are numeric. 




Ill - 28 



Note that, not only must the input call line for 000 be 
selected, but also the 9 position of every entry column. 
This is necessary because of the back circuit condition that 
would occur when the column selected to be sensed is punched 
with an odd code (1,3,5,7,9), and the unselected column is 
punched with the related even code (2,4,6,8). For example, 
in the preceding case assume that the card being sensed is 
punched with a 1 in column 52, a 2 (position 1 and 9) in 
column 6 and a in column 1. Since there is a in column 
1, input call line 000 current enters the sensing common of 
column 52, through the sensing switch and out the position 1 
wire to the 1 input entry position — from there to the 1 
position in column 6, through column 6 sensing switch and out 
the 9 position of column 6. Thus, if the 9 position was not 
selected, it would impulse input entry position 9, entering 
a 1 and a 9 (2) in the input position. 

If the fields contained alphabetic data, all positions would 
have to be selected. 



Case 3 

If there is no in column 1 output storage 003 should be 

punched into card columns 41-45. If there is a in column 

1, columns 41-45 should not be punched. The wiring is as 

follows: 



L 




Ill - 29 



Many other types of selection which fall into this class are possible; 
however, the foregoing examples should be sufficient to realize the 
possibilities of selector usage. 

2) Use of Selectors to vary the input-output plugboard wiring on the 
basis of computer control. 

In these cases the only plugboard positions which will be considered 
are those of an output nature. This is because the input functions 
take place before the computer has an opportunity to control them. 
The one exception to this rule is where a condition arising on one 
card is to effect a subsequent card or cards. 

Case 1 

If the computer delivers a pulse to output control line B we 
want to punch the six least significant positions of 003 into 
card columns 40-45. If output control line B is not energized 
by the computer we do not want to punch 003 into columns 
40-45. The wiring for this case is: 




Ill - 30 



The program select was used to energize the selector rather 
than the output control line for two reasons, these are; 

1. The output control pulse is momentary and would not be 
emitting at punching time, thus the selector wouldn f t be 
in a select position at the correct time. Whereas if 
the output control activates the program select, even 
momentarily, the "out" hub of the program select emits, 
and thus energizes the selector, until after punching 
time. 

2. The output control pulse is not of the correct character- 
istics of power to activate a selector directly. 

The above cases illustrate the use of the selectors on the input- 
output device. The next matter is the discussion of how to activate 
computer selectors on the basis of card controls. 



Ill - 31 



Input Control Lines (N-S) (5-8) 

The input control lines are direct tie lines between the input-output 
device and the computer (under control of the multiplex function) . 
They consist of two hubs per line and appear as: 




The common hub on the left is the equivalent of computer selector 
pick-up power and it is used to probe card columns for the presence 
of a position. If the position is present this current is allowed 
to get to the computer thru the right hand hub. Wiring on the compu- 
ter plugboard (see section V) completes the selector pick-up wiring. 
For example, assume that if there is a in column 56 a computer 
selector should be energized thru input control line M c". The wiring 
would be: 




Wiring from input control line c on the computer plugboard to the 
selector pick-up would pick up the selector, provided the circuit 
was completed by wiring the computer selector ground. 

These controls can also be used in conjunction with other input- 
output plugboard selectors in order to reduce the number of control 
lines used. For instance we might want to pick-up a computer selector 
only if there was a 0, a 1, a 3, and a 5 in column 1. This could be 
wired as follows: 



Ill - 32 




It should be remembered that the input control lines are diode pro- 
tected to accept current in only one direction; that is from the 
input device to the computer. 

Output Control Lines (n-r) (5-8) 

Dse of these control lines has been demonstrated from the input- 
output plugboard standpoint, and their use from the computer stand- 
point is shown in Section V; however, it should be noted here that 
computer output control lines will pass current in only one direc- 
tion, that is from the computer to the output device. 




TIMING CHART 90 COL. 150 CPM CARD UNIT 

' i l 



Clutch Cams 



Cards Stopped (Approx.) 



Actuator Retract 



Card Punching 



Cards Moving 

I 



Actuator Set-up Bracket 



Output Transfer 

42.5 ms. I 



Input Transfer (12.5 ms.) 



: 1 

Maximum Calculation Time (245 ms. @ 150 CPM) when more than 
5 storages are used as input. This time is increased to i 
250 ms. and 257.5 ms. respectively when less than 5 storages 
or no storages are used as input. 



Start Cam 



I I 



Sensing Switches Closed 



1 I I 



o 

CM 



© 



C 



o 

cc 



© 

CM 



© 



c 



o 


o 


© 


8 


© 


© 


© 


rr 


<o 


CO 


CM 


3 


>0 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 



8 



en 

H 

5 

3 

o 



03 



Ill - 34 



The timing chart indicated that maximum calculation time for 
operation at 150 CPM is 245 ms. The following table indicates 
card production for programs requiring more than 245 ms. 

Total Program Approximate 

Time in Card per Minute 

Milliseconds * Production 

245 150 

250 140 

260 136 

270 132 

280 130 

290 126 

300 124 

320 119 

340 112 

360 109 

400 103 

450 93 

500 86 

550 80 

600 75 

650 68 

700 65 

750 61 

800 58 

850 55 

900 53 

950 51 

1000 50 



* These times are increased by: 

5 ms if less than 5 input storages are used 
12.5 ms if no input storages are used 



Ill - 35 



8) Physical Measurements and Installation Requirements 

Length 33" 

Width 30" 

Height 65" 

Weight 1020 lbs. 

Voltage 230/220/208 Volts Single Phase 60 cycles 

Power 1.0 Kilowatt 

Cooling Air 

In Cubic Feet 

Per Minute None 

Heat Dissipation 57 BTU's per minute 



Ill - 36 

MULTIPLEX ADAPTER 

OPERATING CONTROLS - 150 CPM CARD ADAPTER UNIT 

START (Push Button Switch) - Turns on power to Adapter Unit. Light 
above start button is lit while power is on. Circuit breaker on 150 
CPM Card Unit must be closed to furnish power to the Adapter Unit. 

STOP (Push Button Switch) - Turns off power to Adapter Unit. 

OPERATE (Indicator) - This lamp when lit indicates the Adapter Unit 
is ready to function with the Computer and Card Unit. 

OVER TEMPERATURE (Indicator) - This lamp when lit indicates the 
Adapter Unit is running at an excessive temperature. Should the 
temperature continue to rise, the computer will shut down automati- 
cally. 

REDUCED FILAMENT (Indicator) - This lamp when lit indicates the unit 
is operating with reduced filament voltage for marginal checking pur- 
poses. The controls for reducing filament voltage are located in the 
Main Control Unit. 

DISABLE MPX (Toggle Switch) - When this switch is set to the On posi- 
tion, the Multiplexer station will be immediately disabled if the 
Computer is not connected (by the Multiplexer) to the Input /Output 
track. If the Computer is connected to the Input/Output track when 
the switch is set to the On position the Multiplexer station will not 
be disabled until the Computer releases the Input/Output track. As 
long as the Computer is connected to the Input/Output track the Calcu- 
late light on the Card Unit is on. 

PUNCH TEST (Toggle Switch) - When this switch is set to the On posi- 
tion, the Adapter Unit control relays are disconnected from the Card 
Unit signal cams. This allows the Card Unit to be operated for test 
purposes without generating Adapter Unit control signals. 



A 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



III - 37 



SYM. 



000 



001 



002 



003 



004 



005 



006 



007 



008 



009 



000 



001 



002 



003 



004 



005 



006 



007 



008 



009 



REMARKS: 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

150 CPM INPUT-OUTPUT CHART 



APPLICATION: 



PROGRAM NO. 



INPUT-OUTPUT STORAGE FIELD ASSIGNMENT 
DEMAND UNIT NO OR SCAN UNIT NO. 



INPUT FIELD ASSIGNMENT 



DESCRIPTION 



ENTER DESCRIPTION 
OF INPUT DATA 



CARD COLUMNS AND DECIMALS 



11 10 9 8 



SIGN 

5 | 4 | a [ 2 [1 I SN. |CTL. 



ENTER CARD COLUMNS TO SENSED 
AND INDICATE DECIMAL (A). 



OUTPUT FIELD ASSIGNMENT 



DESCRIPTION 



ENTER DESCRIPTION 
OF OUTPUT DATA 



CARD COLUMNS AND DECIMALS 



11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 SN. CTL 



ENTER CARD COLUMNS TO BE PUNCHED 
AND INDICATE DECIMAL (A). 



INPUT CONTROL LINES 


5YM. 


FROM 


a 




b 




c 










ENTER CONDITION WHEN THE 
INPUT CONTROL LINE SHOULD 
BE IMPULSED, SUCH AS 
COLUMN 45, ETC. 


d 






e 






f 






9 






h 






i 




i 




k 




l 





OUTPUT CONTROL LINES 


SYM. 


TO 


A 




B 




C 




ENTER FUNCTION TO 
BE IMPULSED, SUCH 
AS TRIP, IN PROGRAM 
SELECT 1, ETC. 




D 






E 






F 






G 


1 




H 






1 




J 





INPUT-OUTPUT SELECTORS 



ENTER CARD POSITION AND 
COLUMN WHICH INDICATES 
THE VALUE IS NEGATIVE. 



ENTER POSSIBLE SIGN OF VALUE 



5a 
-44- 
~5c~ 



6a 



NON-SELECT 



Enter description of 
function or hub to be 
energized by or directed 
to the common hub if 
the selector is not picked up 



Enter the function(s) which pick up 
selector, such as IPCa. 1 in col. 46 
or combinations as B+ thru 1/46 



ENTER POSITION TO BE PUNCHED 
IF VALUE IS NEGATIVE. 



i 



I TL I 



ENTER POSSIBLE SIGN OF VALUE: 
PLUS (+) , MINUS (-) OR BOTH (±) 



Enter description of 
function or hub to be 
directed in one of 
two ways 



9a 



9b 



9c 



10a 



10b 



10c 



t± 



Enter description of 
function or hub to be 
energized by or directed 
to the common hub if 
the selector is picked up 



ENTER THE NUMBER OF THE 
SELECTOR (S) TO BE PICKED 
UP, SUCH AS PU 8, ETC. 



-J 



INPUT TRANSFER 



IN 



(from) 



NO (to) 



EVEN (to) 



ALL (to) 



t 



PROGRAM SELECTS 



E- ;* OUT 



INDICATE CONTROL POSITION (IF ANY) 
WHICH CONNECTS NO, EVEN OR ALL TO 
THE IN HUB: 

NO - NO INPUT DATA IS READ 

EVEN - ONLY EVEN STORAGES ARE READ 

ALL - ALL STORAGES ARE READ 



ENTER THE OUTPUT CONTROL 
LINE WHICH SHOULD IMPULSE 
THE ENTRY. 



SP TM 4330 



24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



36 37 38 



Co 



a: 

UJ 



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BUSES 




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2 


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s 


11 


10 


9 


8 


7 


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4 


3 


2 


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11 


10 


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7 


6 


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o 


o 


o 








o 





o 


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o 


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o 


o 


o 


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o 


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o 


o 


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1111 




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o 

A 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 





o o 
B 


o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 

c 








O 3 O 48 O 


111! 




3 O O 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


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o 


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o 


o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


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1111 




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o 


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o 


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o 


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Till 








N PUT 
















INPUT 
















INPUT 






O 5 O 50 O 


o o 6 o 




> 7 O O 





o 





o 


o 


o 


o 


o 








O 





o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


PROG. SEL. 


INT 


O 6 O O 51 O 


INO0UTO| IN O0UTO 


B+O 9 O O 








o 


° 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


SELECTOR 
















































O 7 O 52 O 


4 O 3 O 2 O 1 O 


O o 





o 


o 








o 





o 


o 





O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 





o 





o 


8 O O 53 O 




PICK UP 


1 2 3 
1 O o 


4 



5 



6 



o 


8 

o 


9 



10 

o 


11 
o 


12 

o 


13 

o 


14 15 
o 


16 

o 


17 



18 

o 


19 

o 


20 

o 


21 

o 


22 

o 


23 24 

o 


25 

o 


26 

o 


5 O 


o o 






S C NS 
















































9 O 54 O 


6 O 


o O 


3 O 


o 








o 





o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o 








o 











O 


o 


o 


</> 




SEL. 2 






















CARD 


SENSING 






















10 O § 55 O 

2 
O 11 O q 56 


7 O 

8 O 


o o o 


5 o o 
7 O O O 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 








o 
o 




o 








o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


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o 
o 


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o 




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o o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


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O 12 O 57 O 


9 O 


o o o 


9 O O O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


Z 




SEL. 3 






























































































O 13 O CO 58 


10 O 


o o o 


O 


o 


o 





o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 












49 

o 


50 

o 


51 

o 


52 

o 


53 

o 


54 

o 


55 

o 


56 

o 


57 

o 


58 

o 


59 60 

o o 


61 

o 


62 



63 

o 


64 

o 


65 

o 


66 

o 










O 14 O *" 59 O 


O a O O g O 


1 O O O 


o 


o 





o 




COMPUTER 
















































OlS O 1 60 O 


6 b O h O 


3 O 





o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c o 


o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


M 


1 INPUT 






















CARD 


SENSING 






















O 16 O O 61 O 


6 c O i i O 


5 O O O 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


, o 


o 


o 




C0NT. I 
















































O 17 O O 62 O 


<J O O i O 


7 o o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 





o 




LINES 
















































O 18 O O 63 O 
O 19 O O 64 
20 O O 65 O 


6 e O O k O 
O f O O 1 o 


9 o o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


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o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


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o 







j> O 

1 1 o o 






o 
o 




o 




o 


o 




o 
o 




o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o o 
o o 


o 
o 




o 


o 
o 








o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


O 
O 


o 
o 


o 
o 
















F 


















G 
















H 






O 21 O O 66 O 




'ill 




1 3 O O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


O 22 O O 67 O 




? Y 9 ? 




S 5 O O 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 





o 






Ill 








INPUT 
















INPUT 
















INPUT 






O 23 O O 68 O 




III 




i 7 o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 





O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 





O 24 O O 69 O 




idol 




P 9 O O 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 





o o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




BUSES 




6 5 


4 


3 


2 


1 


s 


11 


10 


9 


8 


7 


6 5 


4 


3 


2 


1 


s 


11 


10 


9 8 


7 


6 


0/C C 0/C C 


11 10 9 8 




6 5 




3 


2 


1 


s 


11 


10 


9 


8 


7 


6 5 


4 


3 


2 


1 


s 


11 


10 


9 8 


7 


6 


O 25 O O 70 O 


O O o 


< 


) O O 


o 


o 








o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 








o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


O 26 O O 71 O 


1 O o o 


< 


3 O O 

000 


o 











o 


o 


o 





o 





o o 
001 


o 








o 


o 


o 





o 
002 





o 


O 27 O O 72 O 


3 o o o o 


c 


) O O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 





o 


o 





o 


O 28 O O 73 O 


5 O O o 


c 


3 O O 

OUTPUT 


o 


o 











o 


o 








o 


O 

OUTPUT 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 





o 




OUTPUT 








O 29 O O 74 O 


7 O O 


c 


> O O 


o 








o 











o 


o 


o 


o o 





o 


o 


o 








o 


o o 








O 30 O O 75 O 


9 


c 


> O O 


o 


o 








o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 


o 











o 





o 


o 


o 


o 




SEL. 4 
















































O 31 O O 76 O 


wz 


o 


C 


) o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 





o 


o 


o 


o 








o o 


o 


o 


O 32 O £ O 77 O 


S C NS 


1 c 


2 3 
3 O O 


4 

o 


5 

o 


6 

o 


7 

o 


8 

o 


9 



10 



11 



12 

o 


13 



14 15 

o 


16 

o 


17 



18 

o 


19 

o 


20 

o 


21 

o 


22 

o 


23 24 

o 


25 

o 


26 

o 


o 


o o o 


O 


SKIP 


S C NS 
















































O 33 O j O 78 O 





O o 


3 C 


) O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 


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30 31 32 



57 58 59 60 



SECTION IV 
STORAGE COMPONENTS 



STORAGE COMPONENTS 



INDEX - SECTION IV 



PAGE 


NO. 


IV 


- 6 


IV 


- 8 


IV 


- 8 



1. Small or High-Speed Drum - Diagram and Specifications 

(1) Input-Output Storage 

A. Use of Input-Output Storage 

B. Capacities and Designations of Input-Output Storage IV - 8 

C. Buffer Storage IV - 9 

(2) Intermediate Storage IV - 10 

A. Use of Intermediate Storage IV - 10 

B. Capacities and Designations of Intermediate Storage IV - 10 

(3) High-Speed Storage IV - 11 

2. Large Capacity Drum Storage - Specifications IV - 12 

A. Use of Large Capacity Drum Storage IV - 12 

B. Capacities and Designations of Large Capacity 

Drum Storage IV - 12 

C. How is Data Stored on, or Read from the Large 

Capacity Drum IV - IT 

(a) The Address Register and the Staticizer IV - 18 

Cb) The Revolver IV - 18 

D. Read Unit Record and Write Unit Record - 

Diagram of Circuitry IV - 19 

E. Channel Search IV - 23 

(a) Channel Search Equal IV - 24 

(b) Channel Search Unequal IV - 32 

F. Channel Overflow IV - 34 



PAGE NO. 
G. Large Capacity Drum Connection Panel IV - 38 

H. Fixed Unit Record Area Length IV - 47 

(a) Selection of Fields IV - 47 

(b) Multiple Items Stored in one URA IV - 47 

(c) Multiple URA's for Storage of One Item IV - 57 



IV - 1 



STORAGE COMPONENTS 

There are four main storage components of the Univac File-Computer: 
input-output storage, intermediate storage, high speed storage, and 
large capacity storage. Each of these types of storage is magnetic 
drum storage. 

A magnetic drum is a cylinder, coated with a magnetic material, which 
is mounted on a shaft and rotated at a constant speed. 

Data. . .numeric, alphabetic, or a combination. . .is recorded (stored) 
on the surface of the drum in the form of small magnetic spots. 
Magnetic drum storage is permanent storage; that is, once informa- 
tion is recorded on the drum it is always available. Turning off 
the power to th'e system, or a power failure, does not remove the 
magnetic spots from the drum. Stored data can be changed or re- 
moved from the drum by recording new data in the same location of 
the drum. Each class of the new data, such as alpha, numeric, 
space, etc., replaces the original data stored in this space. 

The method of recording and reading information on the drum can be 
compared with the method of recording and reading information in a 
punched card. With a punched card, information is recorded and stored 
by holes punched in the card. Information from the card is available 
by "reading" the holes punched. With the magnetic drum, information 
is recorded and stored on the surface of the drum by small magnetic 
spots. Information on the drum is available by "reading" these mag- 
netic spots. There are three important differences between punched 
card storage and magnetic drum storage: 

1. Capacity- The punched card can store 90 characters or 
less; the large capacity magnetic drum can store 180,000 
characters. 

2. Reuse - Data stored on the magnetic drum can be readily 
altered. 

3. Access - Any storage area on the drum is readily 
available; 

The surface of a magnetic drum is divided into narrow bands called 
"channels" or "tracks". It is on these channels that data is re- 
corded by the small magnetic spots. Associated with each channel of 
the magnetic drum are stationary read-write heads. As the drum re- 
volves, these heads can "read" or "write" magnetic spots on a channel 
of the drum. 

The internal machine code, or "language", of the Univac File-Computer 
is the seven level Univac code... that is a specific combination of 
seven possible pulses or magnetic spots represent a specific charac- 
ter, numeric or alphabetic, just as a specific combination of the six 
possible positions in a 90 column punched card represents a specific 
character. The Univac code has three major parts: 



IV - 2 



.Check Pulse: The verification circuits of the Univac File- 



UN I VAC 
7 LEVEL 
CODE 



Computer recognize only odd number codes as legitimate. 
The check pulse is automatically added to an even code 
character to make the code odd. If a pulse is dropped or 
added during transmission, the verification causes a 
parity error signal. 



Two character indicators: Two pulses utilized for alpha- 
betic and special character codes. 



J Four Binary Bits: In the binary system, all numbers are 
represented by a series of two symbols only... "0" and "1". 
,, Letters and special characters may also be represented by 
combinations of these two symbols. The Univac seven level 
code is based on the binary system. The "1" and "0" sym- 
bols correspond to the presence of a magnetic spot or 
pulse, and the absence of the pulse. 



In binary notation, the decimal digits '^O" through "9" 
expressed: 



are 



Decimal 
System 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 



Binary 
System 

0000 
0001 
0010 
0011 
0100 
0101 
0110 
0111 
1000 
1001 



The digit "1" in the binary system doubles in value each 
time it moves to the left. This system requires four 
binary "bits" to represent each decimal digit from "0" to 

MQH 

The internal Univac code is based on the four bit binary 
notation of 1-2-4-8 to represent decimal digits. The 
Univac code, however, is an excess three binary code, i.e. 
the Univac code for 1 is binary code 4, for 2... binary 5, 
for 3... binary 6, etc.: 



IV - 3 



Decimal 
System 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



Pure 

Binary 

8421 

0000 
0001 
0010 
0011 
0100 
0101 
0110 
0111 
1000 
1001 



Univac 
Excess 3 
Binary 

0011 
0100 
0101 
0110 
0111 
1000 
1001 
1010 
1011 
1100 



This system is extended by the use of two more binary bits to handle 
the alphabet and special characters. 

The Univac 7 level Code: 



tUPKATfe*. 



8 4 2 1 



x x 

X 

X X 

X X 
XXX 

X 
X 
X X 



X 
X 
X 
X 
X X 

X 

X X 

X X 

XXX 
X 

X X 

X X 

X XX 

X X 

X 





CMC* 


cuAueru 
inmcprrar 


8 


4 


2 


1 


K 




X 




X 




X 


L 




X 




X 


X 




M 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 


N 


X 


X 


X 













X 


X 






X 


P 




X 


X 




X 




Q 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


R 




X 


X 


X 






S 


x 


X X 




X 




X 


T 


X 


X X 




X 


X 




U 




X X 




X 


X 


X 


V 




X X 


X 








w 


X 


X X 


X 






X 


X 


X 


X X 


X 




X 




Y 




X X 


X 




X 


X 


z 


X 


X X 


X 


X 






SPACE 












X 


IGNORE 


X 












MINUS 










X 




PLUS 


X 


X X 






X 


X 



IV - 4 



Unassigned combinations of the Univac 7 level code are used for 
special characters. 

Data is stored serially around the circumference of the channel of 
the magnetic drum in the Univac 7 level code. The least significant 
digits are read or stored first; the most significant digits last. 
This is shown in Figure 5. 



REAP-rt&TZ HEAD 



Schematic of Magnetic 

PgUM R&CORP/N6 




App£azauc£ of 54321 



IV - 5 



In addition to the four main storage components of the Univac File- 
Computer, which are all magnetic drum storage, there is a second type 
of storage, related to the input-output devices called buffer storage, 
Buffer storage is magnetic core storage and is used exclusively to 
transfer data from an input-output device to input-output drum stor- 
age or to transfer data from input-output drum storage to an input- 
output device. 

A magnetic core is a small, doughnut shaped ring, which can be 
magnetized. Each core stores one bit of information. Bits of 
information are read into the cores by sending current through 
wires passing through the centers of the cores. 

This current may, or may not, change the information in the core, 
depending on its polarity. That is, if the core, before receiving 
any pulse was positively magnetized in the "1" state, only a nega- 
tive current pulse could change this core to the "0" state. 
Similarly, a core in the "0" state can only be changed to a "1" by 
applying a positive pulse. Information read into, stored in, or 
read out of the cores, is directly related to the bit code of the 
computer. 



Magnetic core 






The "1" or "0" state of a magnetic core is comparable to the presence 
or absence of a magnetic spot in a certain position on a magnetic 
drum. A number of cores are grouped together to store a character in 
the Univac 7 level code. The combination of "1" and "0" state of the 
cores in this group determines the character stored. Twelve of these 
groups of cores are in turn linked together to store input-output 
fields of twelve characters including sign. 



IV - 6 



1. THE SMALL OR HIGH-SPEED DRUM 

The high-speed storage drum is 15" long and 4-3/8" in diameter. It 
revolves at a speed of 12,000 revolutions per minute. Any desired 
location on the drum can be found within an average of 2.5 millisec- 
onds. Each track on the surface of the high-speed drum is divided 
into 10 units or words of 12 characters including sign. Each one of 
these units is identified by its "address"; that is, its specific 
location on the drum. 

The high-speed drum is divided into 3 major portions: 



1. Input-Output Storage 

2. Intermediate Storage 

3. High-Speed Storage 

Figure 6 



7m Small ap Ui-Spgbd Peat* 







mreiz- 
mephcte 

JTbKA6£ 
3 o££ 
TRACK5 



Hi -Sf&ED 
5T0eA6£ 




EACH TI2ACK VA5 lO 5TOZAG£ UUIT6 



EACH &WZA6>e UHtr COMAIUS /Z GiARfiCTERS 



Figure "7 
Functional Diagram q{ the Nj-3pe£p 
SroRA&e. PtzoNi 



* When scan mode of operation 
is desired the number of 
demand units is reduced by 
one. A maximum of 31 tracks 
can be used for input-output 
storage. 



tfOttf-PLEX 

CONTKOL 

fVNCTlGN 




< 
i 



IV - 8 



(1) INPUT-OUTPUT STORAGES 

A. Use of input-output storage 

Input-output storage units have three basic uses: 

1. The major function of the input-output storage units is 
to make available to the Univac File-Computer system 
data from input-output devices and to make available to 
the input-output devices results and data from the Univac 
File-Computer system. 

2. Input-output storage units may be used to store inter- 
mediate results. 

3. Input-output storage units are addressable, both through 
external (plugboard) and internal (stored) instructions. 
These units may also be used for internal instructions. 

B. Capacities and Designations of Input-Output Storage 

The input-output storage tracks are included as part of 
the basic Univac File-Computer. 

There are 32 tracks of input-output storage on the high- 
speed drum...l track for each of the 8 possible demand 
input-output devices and 1 track for each of the 24 
possible scan input-output devices. If the computer is 
operating with scan units, only 7 demand input-output 
tracks are available. Each track has a capacity of 10 
storage units... 12 characters including sign. The 
addresses of these storage units on each track are: 

000,001,002,003,004,005,006,007,008, and 009. 

Thus, there are actually 32 storage units on the high- 
speed drum, identified as 000, 32 identified as 001, etc. 
However, at any one time, only one of these input-output 
storage tracks is available to the arithmetic and control 
section of the system. (See preceding functional diagram 
of the high-speed storage drum) . The multiplex function 
controls which input-output track is to be connected 
with the main system at one specific time. 

When an input-output storage unit is called for, the 
related storage unit from the input-output track, which 
is connected with the system (through the multiplex 
function) at that time will be delivered to the arith- 
metic and control section of the system. For example: 
If, while demand input-output unit 4 is connected to the 
system, storage unit 007 is called for, the data from 
storage unit 007 on demand track 4 of input-output stor- 
age, will be delivered to the arithmetic and control 
section of the system. If a result is delivered to 
storage unit 007 while demand input-output unit 4 is 



IV - 9 

connected with the system, that result will be delivered 
to storage unit 007 on demand input-output track 4. (Refer 
to figure 15 page V - 73.) 

Since each input-output device has a separate track of 
input-output storage, it is possible to: 

1. Process the information from the input-output track 
which is connected to the system and to deliver 
results back to that track. At the same time: 

2. Read input data from some of the input-output 
devices to their respective input-output storage 
tracks, and: 

3. Deliver results and data from other input-output 
storage tracks to their respective input-output 
devices. 

C. Buffer Storage 

Associated with each input-output unit included in a 
Univac File-Computer system, is a temporary storage... 
"buffer storage". This buffer storage is magnetic core 
storage and is used exclusively to transfer data from 
an input-output device to its related input-output 
storage track, and to transfer data from an input-output 
storage track to its related input-output device. 

Included in the buffer storage unit, associated with 
each input-output device, is a "decoding" mechanism, 
The internal language of the Univac File-Computer is 
Univac 7 level code. As data is read into the buffer 
from an input-output device, it is decoded from its 
code (such as the 6 position punched card code) to the 
Univac 7 level code. As data is read from the buffer 
to the input-output device, the Univac 7 level code is 
decoded to the code of the input-output unit. 

Buffer storage is necessary because of the variable 
speed between the input-output device and the high- 
speed drum. The high-speed drum revolves at a con- 
stant rate of 12,000 revolutions per minute. The speed 
of the input-output devices is variable. It would be 
impossible to match the speed of input-output devices 
(such as on on-line key punches) with the constant speed 
of the high-speed drum. 



IV - 10 



(2) INTERMEDIATE STORAGE 

A. Use 

Intermediate storage units are addressable through plug- 
board programming. As the name implies, intermediate stor- 
age fields are used to store intermediate data and results, 
These storage fields are also used for storing constant 
values. 

B. Capacities and Designations 

Three intermediate storage tracks are included as part of 
the basic Univac File-Computer. 

The designations or "addresses" of these three tracks are 
10, 20 and 30. Each track has a capacity of ten storage 
units... 12 characters including sign. The addresses of 
these units are: 



Track 10 



Track 20 



Track 30 



10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18 and 19. 
20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28 and 29. 
30,31,32,33,34,35,36,37,38 and 39. 



tNPirr 
OU7HJT 



Fl&JRB & 




THE 3 INTERMEDIATE STOZAGE TRAOC5 



Two additional tracks of intermediate storage are available 
for expansion. The addresses of these units are: 

Track 40: 40, 41, 42,43, 44, 45, 46* 47,48 and 49- 

Track 50: 50,51,52,53,54,55,56,57,58 and 59. 



IV - 11 



(3) HIGH-SPEED STORAGE 
A. Use 



High-speed storage units are addressable only through 
internal (stored instructions) programming. High-speed 
storage units may be used to: 

1. Store internal instructions. 

2. Store intermediate results. 

3. Store reference tables, rates, etc. 

4. Store constant values. 

5. Store any combination of the above four items. 

High-speed storage will not be included in the model 
of the machine which this manual describes. There- 
fore, a detailed discussion of its capacity and usage 
has been omitted. 



IV - 12 



2. THE LARGE CAPACITY DRUM 

The large capacity storage drum is 17" long and 17" in diameter. It 
revolves at a speed of 1750 revolutions per minute. A specific loca- 
tion on the drum can be located within an average of 17 milliseconds. 

The large capacity drum has a capacity of 180,000 characters. From 
1 to 10 large capacity drums may be included in a Univac File-Computer 
system. 

A. Use 

The large capacity, random access, storage drum is an 
exclusive feature of the Univac File-Computer system. 

The primary reason for engineering the Univac File- 
Computer is to enable one to keep a current balance for 
a large number of items with high volume activity. The 
system is well suited to handle inventory and distribu- 
tion types of problems. . .problems where balances must be 
kept on a current basis, where amounts must be allocated 
to various accounts or classifications and balances 
brought forward. 

The large capacity storage drum is used to store large 
quantities of information, which are repeatedly referred 
to or changed. Some of the uses of the large capacity 
drum are: 

1. Store a continuing record, such as inventory 
balance and post entries affecting inventory. 

2. Store a volatile record, such as a schedule 
and post changes and progress to it. 

3. Classify and accumulate large masses of 
unsorted data... data reduction. 

4. Store tables and rates for reference in 
calculations. 

5. Serve as a storage media for distribution 
and summarization of results, so that refer- 
ence, calculation, and summarization can be 
accomplished in a single operation. 

6. Serve in combination of items 1 through 5 

B. Capacities and Designations 

The large capacity storage drum has a capacity of 180,000 
characters. . .numeric, alphabetic, or a combination of 
numeric and alphabetic characters. From 1 to 10 large 



IV - 13 



capacity storage drums may be included in a Univac File- 
Computer system. Ten drums would provide 1,800,000 
characters of storage. If fewer than 10 large capacity 
drums are included in an initial Univac File-Computer 
system, additional drums can be added, as required, to 
a maximum of 10. 

The surface of the large capacity drum is divided into 
three major "drum sections'*. Each section is divided 
into 100 tracks, or channels. Each channel has a capacity 
of 600 characters — 3 drum sections x 100 channels per 
section x 600 characters per channel = 180,000 characters 
per drum. 

At the time a large capacity storage drum is manufactured 
for a Univac File-Computer system, the 600 characters of 
each channel on the drum are divided into specific "unit 
record areas". There are 11 unit record area lengths 
available: 

12,15,20,24,30,40,50,60,75,100, or 120 characters. 

The length of the unit record area is fixed for all large 
capacity drums included in one Univac File-Computer sys- 
tem. The data for the applications to be processed by a 
Univac File-Computer system determines which length unit 
record area is required. 

The number of unit record areas available on one drum 
depends upon the character length of the unit record 
area. For example, with a unit record length of 30 
characters, each channel of the drum contains 20 unit 
record areas: 600 characters per channel 7 30 characters, 
per unit record = 20 unit record areas per channel. This 
drum then contains 6,000 unit record areas 20 unit record 
areas per channel x 300 channels per drum = 6,000 unit 
record areas per drum. 



IV - 14 



Figure 9 
Lazgz Capacity Pkom 




PZUM 3€CT/GN 
OO 



DZUM J56C77CA/ 
O/ 



PRUM SECTION 
OZ 



ONE CHANNEL OF ZO UNrT RgCORP AREAS {~ 





















| 








































ON 


<e 


L 


JN 


IT 


R 


'£< 


:o< 


1ZP 


At 


3E> 


9 


c 


>r 




3C 


> 


c 


HA 


\GA 


\C1 


IE* 


Z5 












This figure illustrates a large capacity drum with a 
30 character unit record area. The upper portion 
represents the drum and the 300 channels on the drum; 
next, a representation of the 20 unit record areas 
within one channel; and lastly, the 30 characters 
within one unit record area. 

The following table lists the 11 possible unit record 
area lengths and the related number of unit records 
available with 1 through 10 large capacity drums. 



IV - 15 



g$ 

1 


NUMBER OF UNIT RECORDS ON: 


1 


1 
Drum 


2 
Drums 


3 
Drums 


4 
Drums 


5 
Drums 


6 
Drums 


7 
Drums 


8 
Drums 


9 
Drums 


10 
Drums 


12 


50 


15000 


30000 


45000 


60000 


75000 


90000 


105000 


120000 


135000 


150000 


15 


40 


12000 


24000 


36000 


48000 


60000 


72000 


84000 


96000 


108000 


120000 


20 


30 


9000 


18000 


27000 


36000 


45000 


54000 


63000 


72000 


81000 


90000 


24 


25 


7500 


15000 


22500 


30000 


37500 


45000 


52500 


60000 


67500 


75000 


30 


20 


6000 


12000 


18000 


24000 


30000 


36000 


42000 


48000 


54000 


60000 


40 


15 


4500 


9000 


13500 


18000 


22500 


27000 


31500 


36000 


40500 


45000 


50 


12 


3600 


7200 


10800 


14400 


18000 


21600 


25200 


28800 


32400 


36000 


60 


10 


3000 


6000 


9000 


12000 


15000 


18000 


21000 


24000 


27000 


30000 


75 


8 


2400 


4800 


7200 


9600 


12000 


14400 


16800 


19200 


21600 


24000 


100 


6 


1000 


3600 


5400 


7200 


9000 


10800 


12600 


14400 


16200 


18000 


120 


5 


1500 


3000 


4500 


6000 


7500 


9000 


10500 


12000 


13500 


15000 



Each unit record of a large capacity drum has a specific 
location on the drum... it is within one of the three 
drum sections, on one of the 100 channels within the 
drum section, and in one of the unit record areas within 
the channel. 

The specific location of a unit record area on the drum 
is the "address" of that unit record. 

The function of the address for each unit record is the 
same as the function of a street address... to identify 
one specific location out of many locations. 

The address numbering system of the large capacity drum 
is a six digit address composed of: 

1. Drum section number 2 digits 

2. Unit record area number 2 digits 

3. Channel number 2 digits 



IV - 16 



The structure of the address can be specified for a system 
as: 



JC 



YY YY V— 



Drum section number 
Unit record number 



xx xx xx *"- Channel number 
or. 



Drum section number 



Ji^ ^ — , j — Channel number 

xx xx xx * — Unit record number 

Drum Section Number: There are three sections on each 
large capacity storage drum; and up to ten drums may be 
included in a Univac File-Computer system. The drum 
section numbers of the address range from 00 through 29. 
The drum section numbers of the first large capacity 

drum are 00, 01, and 02; the second drum 03, 04, 05; 

the tenth drum are 27, 28, 29. 

Unit Record Area Number: The unit record area address 
numbering depends on the unit record area length. (See 
preceding unit record area table.) The unit record area 
length determines the number of unit record areas per 
channel. The address numbering system is based on the 
number of unit record areas per channel. If the unit 
record area length of the large capacity drums included 
in a Univac File-Computer system is 12 characters, there 
are 50 unit record areas per channel. The range of the 
unit record area address numbers would be 00 through 49. 
If the unit record area length is 120 characters, the 
unit record area address numbers would be 00 through 04, 
since each channel would contain 5 unit record areas. 

Channel Number: Each drum section contains 100 channels. 
The channel numbers of the address range from 00 through 
99. 



IV - 17 



Iluxtzatiqh of ike Lags* Omar/ Peon 
Appe&ss Nom3ERJN6 System 



OO o/ OZ 97 98 99 CO 01 01 97 98 99 00 Of OZ 97 93 99 




-CHANNEL **■ 

ozoi<?<? o& 
OZ99o/ 

0ZO30O OfZ 
0Z0003 

oiosoo oe 
otooos 
00079& ae 

009807 



PZUMJGCTXXl* 



The standard unit record length of the large capacity 
drum can be divided into a maximum of 20 fields by exter- 
nal wiring of a drum connection panel. Each of the 20 
fields may have a capacity of from 1 to 12 characters 
including sign. The identification, or address, of these 
20 fields are: 

FO, Fl, F2, F3, F4 t F5, F6, F7, F8, F9, F10, Fll, F12, 
F13, F14, F15, F16, F17, F18, and F19. ■<- 

C. How is data stored on, or read from, the large capacity 
drum? 



Associated with each of the 100 channels of the 3 drum 
sections of each large capacity drum, which is constantly 
rotating, is a stationary read-write head. As the drum 
revolves, the unit record areas on each channel are con- 
tinuously passing under the related read-write head. 

Data is stored on the drum, or read from the drum though 
the channel read-write heads in conjunction with an 
address register switch. This switch connects any one 
of the channel read-write heads to the revolver through 
its associated circuitry. 



IV - 18 



(a) The address register and the staticizer; Associated 
with the large capacity drums is a 6 digit register 
called the "address register". The function of the 
address register is to receive the 6 digit address 
of a specific unit record area on the large capacity 
drums. The address is automatically transferred 
from the address register to the staticizer. The 
staticizer is a static register which controls the 
connection of the address register switch to a 
specific channel read-write head. 

To perform the actual reading or writing of a spec- 
ific unit record area, a "read unit record" or "write 
unit record" instruction is necessary. First, the 
address of the desired unit record must be placed 
in the address register. From there it is automati- 
cally transferred to the staticizer and the address 
register switch then connects the proper read-write 
circuits to the channel within the drum section 
specified by the address in the staticizer. Then a 
read unit record or write unit record instruction 
is given to the machine and the unit record number 
portion of the address in the staticizer controls 
the location of the specific unit record within the 
desired channel. 

In many applications, the identification numbering 
system of the data to be stored on the drum will 
not be compatible with the address numbering system 
of the large capacity drums; or it may not be possible 
to code the input data with the complete address of 
the related unit record area. In these instances, a 
"channel search" instruction is used to locate and 
read the desired unit record area. (See section E 
following.) 

(b) The revolver; The revolver is the means of rapid 
access to the large capacity storage drums. At any 
one time during a program, one unit record of the 
large capacity drums is available to the arithmetic 
and control unit of the system from an additional 
channel on the drum called the "revolver". The 
revolver is divided into the same unit record length 
as the other 300 storage channels on the drum. The 
twenty possible large capacity drum storage fields, 
FO through F19, are directly associated with the 
revolver. 

With a read unit record instruction, the data within 
the unit record, specified by the address delivered 
to the address register, is read from the drum and 
written on the revolver. That data can then be 
called upon by the arithmetic and control section 
of the system through the twenty storage field, 



IV - 19 



FO through F19. These fields are commonly called 
the "revolver fields". New data, changed balances, 
etc., can be placed in that unit record through 
these revolver fields. 

With a write unit record instruction, the data is 
read from the revolver and written in the unit 
record area, specified by the address delivered 
to the address register. 

D. Read Unit Record and Write Unit Record - Diagram of 
Circuitry. 

Read unit record is the instruction which reads the data 
from a specified unit record area and writes that data on 
the revolver. The data in that unit record area is then 
available to the arithmetic and control unit of the 
system. 

Write unit record is the instruction which reads the data 
from the revolver and writes that data in a specified 
unit record area of the large capacity drums. It pro- 
vides the means of storing data and results on the large 
capacity drums. 

Before either the read or write unit record instruction 
is given, the address of the desired unit record must be 
given to the address register. From there it is automat- 
ically transferred to the staticizer and the address 
register switch connects the drum section and channel 
specified by the address in the staticizer to the asso- 
ciated read circuitry. 

If a prior read or write unit record instruction is in 
process when a new address is delivered to the address 
register, the automatic transfer of the address from the 
address register to the staticizer is delayed until the 
prior instruction is completed. When the prior instruc- 
tion is completed the address is then automatically 
transferred from the address register to the staticizer 
and the indicated switching will immediately begin. 

The unit record number portion of the address in the 
staticizer controls switches which locate the specific 
unit record within the channel. 



o 



i 



APDRESS REGISTER 



X x 

PS 



XX XX 

J 

ST/IT/C/ZFR 



XX XX XX 

_JL_ 



COINCIDENCE 
C/*C UITS 



COAOP/QJP/SON 
C'RCO/T 

I 



pcusf 

COUMT 



Block J)//)GRAM Of 1/)E jjlfiGE CfiPAC/7 Y Drum CjRCU/TRY 



APPPESS FROM 
/fR/TWfTiC 
I/a/ /t 



C/.F/9P 
PCISF 



a/oTFz 

THE STRUCT UK F OF 
THF&eP#FSS COOLP 
SF PS J CM, l/R# //* Ttff 



X 



COMPARISON 
f*\ CIRCUIT 



x|x|X|X|xix|x|x|x|xixix 






S\#trcf/ t 



X|X|X|X|X|X|X]X|X]X|X X 






SWtrct/ Z 



READ 
AMP 



WRITE 
AMP 



To {* FxoaI? 
ARITHMETIC 
UNIT F -F, 9 

X 



AP&KESS 
">} /?FG/S7-Ftf 
SWITCH 




IV - 21 



Operation of Switches in Figure 11 



Operation 


Switch 1 


Switch 2 


Switch 3 


Switch 4 


Read URA. 


Open 


Closed — 
Opens when 
Switch 4 
closes. 


Open 


Open — 
Closes when 
desired URA 
is located. 


Write URA 


Open 


Open 


Open — 
Closes when 
desired URA 
is located 
on the drum 


Closed 


Channel 
Search 


Open — 
Closes at 
identifier 
time only 


Closed- 
Opens when 
Switch 4 
closes 


Open 


Open — 
Closes when 
identifiers 
match & last 
character of 
URA has been 
read 




RE 


VOLVER FIELD 


ACCESS 




Use Field 
(F0-F19) 


Open 


Open 


Open 


Closed 


Deliver 
result to 
Field (F0-F19) 


Open 


Open 


Open 


Closed- 
Opens only 
during 
specified 
Field (FO-F19) 
time 



IV - 22 



This block diagram of the large capacity drum cir- 
cuitry illustrates the relation of the storage channels 
on the drum, the revolver, and the arithmetic section 
of the system. 

Note that the revolver has one read head and one write 
head. The write head is spaced one unit record length 
before the read head. In addition, an erase head is 
located approximately 12 characters after the read 
head. This head is a permanent magnet. 

The address of the desired unit record area is placed 
in the address register and then automatically trans- 
ferred to the staticizer. The switching immediately 
begins to the read-write head of the channel specified 
by the drum section and channel number portion of the 
address in the staticizer. The drum is constantly re- 
volving under these heads. When a read unit record 
instruction is given the unit record number portion of 
the address in the staticizer is compared with timed 
drum pulses from the drum. Switch 2 and switch 4 are 
controlled by a coincidence pulse which is emitted 
when a match occurs. While the specified unit record 
is passing under the read-write head, switch 2 is 
closed. The data from that unit record area can then 
pass through the read-write head and the address 
register switch, across the closed switch 2, to the 
write head of the revolver. When the drum has re- 
volved so that the last character from the specified 
unit record is written on the revolver, switch 2 is 
opened and switch 4 is closed. Since the drum is 
rotating, the desired data is now in the unit record 
area of the revolver that is passing under the re- 
volver read head. That data passes through the re- 
volver read head, across the closed switch 4, back to 
the write head of the revolver. Switch 4 remains 
closed, and the data is continuously recirculated in 
this loop. 

The moment switch 4 closes after a read unit record 
instruction, that is, the moment the desired data is 
written once on the revolver, it is available to the 
arithmetic and control section of the system; and since 
that data is constantly recirculated it is continually 
available at the revolver read head. 

New data, changed balances, etc., that are to be stored 
on the drum are first written on the revolver through 
one of the 20 revolver fields, FO through F19. This 
writes the new or changed information on the unit record 
area passing under the revolver write head at that time. 
As the drum continues to revolve, the new or changed 
data is written in the unit record area of the revolver 
and is available to the arithmetic and control section 
of the system. 



IV - 23 



When a write unit record instruction is given Switch 3 
is controlled by the comparison between the unit record 
number portion of the address and the timed drum pulses. 
When the desired unit record area of the drum is passing 
under the read-write head, switch 3 is closed. The data 
from the revolver can then pass through the revolver 
read head, across closed switch 3, to the channel read- 
write head, and is written in the specified unit record 
area. 

The read and write unit record instructions are equipped 
with interlocks, making it possible to perform calcula- 
tions while the read or write function is taking place. 
If one of the revolver fields FO through F19 is addressed 
before, the read or write function is completed, the in- 
struction is initiated after the completion of the read 
or write function. 

E. Channel Search 

In previous references to the address delivered to the 
address register, it was assumed that the complete 
address of the specific unit record area desired was 
available; that is, that it was possible to code the 
input data with the address of its related unit record 
area on the large capacity drums, or that it was pos- 
sible to correlate the identification numbers, such as 
item number, of the input data with the address numbering 
system of the large capacity drums. 

Very often, it will not be possible to do either one of 
these things. How then, can a specific unit record area 
be located when the complete address of that area is not 
known? 

Two types of channel search instructions provide the 
means of accomplishing this: channel search equal and 
channel search unequal. With either of these instruc- 
tions a partial address of the desired item, preferably 
drum section and channel number, is developed from the 
designation of the input data. The identification of 
each item is stored in its unit record area. It is then 
possible to deliver the partial address of drum section 
and channel, plus a starting unit record number to the 
address register, and with a channel search function, 
compare the item identification of each unit record area 
in that channel with the identification of the item 
desired until the corresponding unit record area is found. 

When the desired unit record area is found, the data 
from that area is "trapped" on the revolver, making it 
constantly available by continuously recirculating the data 
on the revolver. 



IV - 24 



With either channel search instruction a complete six 
digit address of drum section, unit record, and channel 
(xx xx xx) must first be delivered to the address regis- 
ter. A partial address of drum section and channel 
alone (xx xx or xxxx ), depending on the address struc- 
ture specified for the system, would cause a parity error 
signal. With channel search, therefore, it is necessary 
that a unit record number be added to the partial address 
of drum section and channel and the result delivered to 
the address register before the channel search function 
is initiated. Note: The address register will treat 
zeros and space codes alike. A partial address of drum 
section and channel with space codes in the URA portion 
of the address will be treated as 00 by the address 
register and the staticizer. 

The unit record area within a channel, at which either 
type of channel search is started, is determined by the 
unit record number portion of the address in the address 
register. The end of channel search is determined by 
the drum index pulse, that is at the end of the last 
unit record area within a channel. Normally zeros or 
space codes will be added to the partial address of 
drum section and channel and delivered to the address 
register, so that the channel search will start with the 
first unit record area on the channel. For example, if 
with a Univac File-Computer system in which the fixed 
URA length is 30 characters. . .if the unit record number 
portion of the address were 05, the channel search would 
start with unit record area 05; and if matching designa- 
tion were not found, would end with unit record area 19. 
Unit record areas 00 through 04 would not be searched. 

The two channel search instructions are channel search 
equal and channel search unequal. 

(a) Channel search equal; With the channel search equal 
instruction it is possible to search a selected 
channel for a unit record area with stored indenti- 
fication which matches the desired indentification 
and to "trap" that entire unit record on the re- 
volver. If a matching identification is not found 
the last unit record area in the channel is "trapped" 
on the revolver. With this instruction it is also 
possible to search a selected channel for a unit 
record area with stored identification which matches 
either of 2 identifiers and to trap the entire unit 
record area with matching identification on the 
revolver. If neither identifier is found the last 
unit record area in the channel is trapped. 



IV - 25 



The channel search equal instruction controls switches, 
which will open and close under control of the unit 
record number portion of the address in the staticizer 
and the comparison of the identifiers. Refer to sche- 
matic drawing of the large capacity drum circuitry 
(Figure 11). 

Before a channel search equal instruction is given, the 
partial address of drum section and channel plus a 
starting unit record number is delivered to the address 
register. From there it is automatically transferred 
to the staticizer and the address register switch con- 
nects the read-write head of the specified channel to 
the associated read circuitry. Then, when the channel 
search equal instruction is given, switch 1, controlled 
by the field identification on the revolver, is closed, 
and switch 2, controlled by the starting address, is also 
closed. 

When the unit record area, specified in the address, 
starts to pass under the read-write head switch 4 is 
opened. The opening of switch 4 prevents the continuous 
recirculation of the data on the revolver. The closing 
of switch 1 permits the identification data in each unit 
record area to pass to the comparison circuits to be com- 
pared with the identification of the desired item. The 
closing of switch 2 permits the data from the unit record 
area of the drum to pass to the write head of the re- 
volver. . .thus, as the drum revolves, the data from each 
successive unit record area of the channel being searched 
is written on the revolver. When the identification from 
a unit record area on the channel being searched matches 
the desired identification in the arithmetic unit com- 
parator, switches 1 and 2 are opened at the end of that 
unit record area and switch 4 is closed. With the closing 
of switch 4, the data of the desired unit record is 
"trapped" on the revolver. 

When a matching unit record is found, its location on the 
channel is "remembered" until a new address is entered in 
the address register. Therefore, it is possible to find 
a unit record by channel search, change some of the data, 
such as balances, etc., and return the changed information 
to the same location on the drum by a write unit record 
instruction. 

If there is no matching identification in the channel 
searched, switches 1 and 2 are opened at the drum index 
pulse — the end of the last unit record area on the 
channel — and switch 4 is closed. Thus, the last unit 
record area is "trapped" on the revolver. 



IV - 26 



If a matching unit record is found during a channel 
search equal instruction with one identifier, the machine 
will emit a signal which is used to direct the machine 
to the next operation. If a matching record is found 
during a channel search equal instruction with two identi- 
fiers, the machine will emit one signal if the trapped URA 
matches the first identifier or another signal if the 
trapped URA matches the second identifier. The machine 
can, therefore, be directed to two different operations 
depending on which identifier is found. If no matching 
unit record area is found during a channel search equal 
instruction, a third signal will be emitted by the machine. 
This signal is used to direct the machine to the next 
operation desired if no matching URA is found. 
Note: In all following examples, the address numbering 
structure is shown as DS/CH/URA. This could, of course, 
be DS/URA/CH, depending on the structure specified for 
the particular system. 

Following is a flow chart of a channel search equal 
operation with one identifier: (Actual programming is 
discussed in Section V.) 

1. Transfer address, DS/CH (xxxx— ) to ADR. 

2. Channel search equal: compare input identification 
with identification stored in URA. Does designation 
match? 



i 



* 

Yes No 

i I 

Desired URA is trapped 

on revolver. 1 



Desired URA is not in 
the channel just searched. 
Last URA is trapped on 
the revolver. 



IV - 27 



Following is a flow chart of a channel search equal 
operation with two identifiers: 

1. Transfer DS/CH (xxxx— ) to ADR. 

I 

2. Channel search equal: compare both input identifiers 
with identification stored in URA. Does URA 
identification match either identifier? 



J" 



T 



Yes = 1st 



Yes * 2nd 



I 



Matches 1st identifier. 
The URA, whose 
identification matches, 
is trapped on the 
revolver. 



i 



Matches 2nd identifier. 
The URA, whose 
identification matches, 
is trapped on the 
revolver. 



T 

No f 

\ 

Matches neither. 
The last URA 
is trapped on 
the revolver. 



The maximum number of characters (excluding sign) that 
can be compared during a channel search operation is 
11. Occasionally, an application will require that the 
identification of the items to be located by channel 
search is more than 11 characters. When this occurs, it 
is impossible to compare the full identification of the 
desired item during a channel search equal operation. 
However, it is possible to locate the desired item 
through a channel search equal operation in conjunction 
with programmed comparing. 

Eleven characters of the item designation are compared 
during a channel search equal operation. If a match is 
found, the remaining characters of the designation are 
then compared by programmed comparison. If the remaining 
characters also match, the unit record area "trapped" on 
the revolver is the desired one. If they do not match, 
the channel search equal operation is resumed at the next 
unit record area in that channel. 

Following is a flow chart of a channel search equal oper- 
ation for an item with a 14 character identification. 



IV - 28 



(Actual programming is discussed in Section V.) The full 
identification of the item is stored in its unit record 
area. In addition, the unit record number of the follow- 
ing unit record area on that channel is also stored. 
Then, to perform the channel search, the partial address 
of drum section and channel number is transferred to the 
address register. The channel search equal is then started, 
comparing the first 11 characters of the desired item with 
the first 11 characters of the identification stored in 
the URA. Since zeros or spaces are in the URA position the 
channel search will start with the first unit record area 
on the channel. 

If a match of these 11 characters of the identification 
is found, the machine will emit a signal and that unit 
record area will be "trapped "on the revolver. The re- 
maining three characters of the identification are then 
compared. If they also match, the desired unit record 
area is available on the revolver. If they do not match, 
the unit record area trapped on the revolver is not the 
desired one. The search of the channel must, therefore, 
be continued. To do this, the unit record area number 
stored in the unit record trapped on the revolver is 
tested. If this is not the last unit record on the chan- 
nel, the stored unit record number (the number of the 
next unit record area in that channel) is added to the 
partial address and entered in the address register. The 
channel search equal instruction is again called for and 
the search resumes at the next unit record area. This 
sequence continues until the desired item is found in the 
channel, or until the entire channel has been searched 
without locating the item. 



IV - 29 



FLOW CHART OF CHANNEL SEARCH FOR ITEMS WITH 
14 CHARACTER DESIGNATIONS 



1. Transfer address. DS/CH (xxxx — ) 

\ 

2. Channel search equal: compare 11 characters 
Do the 11 characters match? 

i 

Yes 

I 

3. Compare remaining 3 characters 
Do remaining 3 characters match? 



1 
No 



Yes 



Desired URA is trapped 
on revolver 



1 

No 



4. Test stored URA * 

Is this last URA on channel? 



No 



5. Add stored URA * to 
DS/CH to obtain next 
starting address. Deliver 
new address to ADR. 

1 

Return to Step 2 to 
continue channel 
search equal oper- 
ation 



Yes 



Item not stored 
on this channel, 
Last URA is 
trapped on re- 
volver. 



Note: Complete designation stored 
in URA. URA number of fol- 
lowing URA is also stored. 



IV - 30 



Note: The channel search equal instruction with two identifiers 
is usually used when periodically loading and/or making additions 
to a volatile record on the large capacity drums. The identifi- 
cation of the input data is used as one identifier and space codes 
or zeros as the second. 

As the items .are processed they are successively written in the URA's 
— 00-01,02, etc. — of the channel designated by their partial address. 
The channel search equal instruction is initiated for each item, 
starting with URA 00 of its designated channel, looking either for 
a matching designation or the first empty URA on the channel. The 
first item to be processed for a specific channel will produce a 
signal indicating a match has been found and trapped on the revolver 
for the second identifier — the space codes. URA 00, the first empty 
URA on the channel, is trapped on the revolver. The data for that 
item is then stored in URA 00. The next item for that specific chan- 
nel will be stored in URA 01 since it will be trapped as the next 
empty URA when processing the item; the third item will be stored in 
URA 02, etc. 

When an item is processed that has had previous activity — one or 
more documents for the same item have already been processed and 
stored — the channel search operation will produce a signal indica- 
ting that a match has been found and trapped on the revolver for the 
first identifier — the designation of the item. The data for the item 
being processed is then added to the data for the item already stored 
on the drum. 

Following is a flow chart of this channel search equal operation. 



IV - 31 



1. Transfer DS/CH to ADR (xxxx— ) . 

] 

2. Channel search equal: compare input part number 

and spaces with the part numbers stored in the URA's. 
Does a URA part number field match either the input part 
number or space codes? 



Matches space codes. 
No previous activity 
for this part. 1st 
empty URA is trapped 
on the revolver. 



3. Store data 



4. 



Matches part 
number. Previous 
activity for this 
part. Matching 
URA trapped on 
revolver. 



I 



Add new data 
to stored data 
as required. 



1 



Matches neither. 
No empty URA on 
channel and no 
matching part 
number. Last URA 
trapped on revolver, 



IV - 32 



(b) Channel search unequal: With the channel search unequal 
instruction it is possible to search a selected channel 
for a unit record area with stored identification which 
does not match the identifier and to trap the entire 
unit record area with an unequal identification. If the 
identification of all the unit record areas on the chan- 
nel match the identifier, the last unit record area on 
the channel is trapped on the revolver. 

The channel search unequal instruction governs switches 
(similar to the channel search equal instruction) which 
open and close under control of the unit record number 
portion of the address in the staticizer and the compar- 
ison of the identifier. Refer to the schematic drawing 
of the large capacity drum circuitry (Figure 11). 

Before the channel search unequal instruction is given, 
the partial address of drum section and channel plus a 
starting unit record number is delivered to the address 
register. From there it is automatically transferred 
to the staticizer and the address register switch con- 
nects the read-write head of the specified channel to 
the associated read circuitry. Then, when the channel 
search unequal instruction is given, switch 2, controlled 
by the starting address, closes when this starting URA 
starts to pass under the read-write head. Then switch 1, 
controlled by the field identification on the revolver, 
closes when the particular field is passing under the 
read-write head. At the same moment, switch' 4 is opened. 
The identification of each URA is then compared with the 
identifier in the arithmetic unit and each successive unit 
record area on the channel being searched is written on the 
revolver. When the identification of a unit record area 
on the channel being searched does not match the desired 
identifier, switches 1 and 2 are opened at the end of that 
unit record area and switch 4 is closed. With the closing of 
switch 4 the data of the non-matching unit record area is 
"trapped" on the revolver. 

When a non-matching unit record area is trapped on the re- 
volver its location on the channel is "remembered" until a 
new address is entered in the address register. 

If the identification of every unit record area on the 
channel searched matched the specified identifier switches 1 
and 2 are opened at the drum index pulse — the end of the last 
unit record on the channel — and switch 4 is closed. Thus, 
the last unit record area on the revolver is trapped. 



IV - 33 



Two separate signals will emit; one if a non-matching 
unit record was found and trapped on the revolver or a 
second if all the unit record areas matched the speci- 
fied identifier and the last unit record is trapped on 
the revolver. 

Following is a flow chart of a channel search unequal 
operation: 



1. Transfer address, DS/CH (xxxx--) to ADR. 

2. Channel search unequal: compare specified identifier with 
identification stored in URA. 

Is there a non-matching URA? 

T 



Yes 

J 

Non-match URA 
is trapped on 
revolver. 



1r 
No 



All URA's match. Last URA 
is trapped on revolver. 



The channel search unequal instruction is usually used in an 
unloading routine for the large capacity drums. Space codes or 
zeros are used as the identifier. 



The starting drum section and channel number plus unit record 
number 00 is delivered to the address register and the chan- 
nel search unequal instruction is given, comparing the space 
codes as the identifier with the identification field of the 
URA's. The first URA in the channel with stored data is 
trapped on the revolver. The desired information from that 
URA is transferred to output. Then space codes are trans- 
ferred to the revolver field and a write unit record instruc- 
tion is given — clearing that URA on the drum. The channel 
search unequal instruction is then given again, looking for 
the next URA with stored data, etc. 



IV - 34 



1. Transfer starting address, DS/CH (xxxx — ) to ADR. 

2. Channel search unequal: compare space codes with identification 
stored in URA. 

Is there a non-matching URA? 

.1- 



Yes 



1st URA with stored 
data trapped on re- 
volver. 

3. Transfer desired data from 
revolver to output. 

I 

4. Transfer space codes to revolver 

1 

5. Write unit record 

6. Return to channel search 
unequal to trap next URA with 
stored data. 



1 
No 



All URA's match- 
no stored data in 
this channel. 



F. Channel Overflow 

In some instances, the partial addresses developed from 
the designation of input data will indicate that the 
number of items to be stored in one channel exceed the 
number of unit record areas on that channel. When this 
occurs, a programming technique of channel overflow is 
used in conjunction with channel search. Then, if the 
desired item is not found on the channel searched, it is 
possible to direct the machine to the next channel that 
should be searched to locate the item. 

When channel overflow occurs, one specific unit record 
area (the same one on each channel that overflows) is 
used to store the overflow address; that is, the address 
of the next channel to search, if the item is not located 
in this channel. Usually, the last unit record area in 
a channel is used to store the overflow address since, 
with either the channel search equal or the channel 
search unequal instruction, the last unit record area is 
trapped on the revolver if the desired URA was not located 
in the channel. Then, if after searching a channel the 
desired item is not found, the overflow address stored 
in the last URA (which is available on the revolver) is 
entered in the address register and the channel search 
is resumed in the overflow channel. 



The following is a flow chart of a channel search equal 
operation when there is the possibility of channel over- 
flow. (Actual programming is discussed in Section V.) 



IV - 35 



FLOW CHART OF CHANNEL SEARCH EQUAL WITH OVERFLOW 
POSSIBILITY 

1. Transfer address DS/CH (xxxx— ) to ADR. 

t 

2. Channel search equal: compare one input designation with stored 

designation. 

Does the designation match? 

.t" 



Yes 



No 



Have desired item 
trapped on revolver 



Last URA trapped 
on revolver 



3. Deliver overflow address 
(DS/CH/OO) from revolver 
to ADR 



Return to Step 2 to initiate 
channel search equal of the 
overflow channel. 



In this chart of a channel search operation, with the 
possibility of channel overflow, the channel overflow 
address is always stored in the last unit record area 
of any channel that may overflow. The stored overflow 
address consists of drum section (xx) , channel (xx) , 
and unit record area 00. 



First the partial address of drum section, channel and 
space codes is transferred from input to the address 
register. The channel search equal therefore, starts 
with the first unit record on that channel. If the 
desired item is located during the search, the machine 
will emit a signal and the desired unit record area is 
trapped on the revolver. If the item is not located, 
the machine will emit another signal and the last unit 
record area... the one which contains the overflow 
address... is written on the revolver. The stored over- 
flow address is then called for from the revolver and 
entered in the address register. Channel search is 
again initiated and the overflow channel is searched. 
This sequence can be continued until the desired item 
is located. 

The following are flow charts of the programming tech- 
nique for a channel search equal instruction with two 
identifiers as used for a loading routine and channel 
search unequal as used for an unloading routine. The 
possibility of overflow is considered. 



IV - 36 



In each case the last URA in a channel is used for the 
overflow address. 

Loading routine: Channel search equal with two identifiers and 
automatic assigning of overflow channels: 



1. 



2. 



Transfer DS/CH to ADR. (xxxx— ) 

1 



Channel search equal: compare input item identification 
and space codes with the identification stored 
in the URA's. Does either identification match 



a URA 



identification? 



Match space codes. 
No previous activity 
for item. 1st empty 
URA is trapped 
on revolver. 



3. Store data 



4. 



5. 



6. 



Match item designation. 
Previous activity for 
item. Matching URA 
trapped on revolver. 



Add new data 
as required. 



1 



Matches neither 
No empty URA 
& no previous 
activity for 
item on this 
channel. Last 
URA trapped 
on revolver. 



I 
Test o'flow address. 

Has channel o' flowed 

before? 



t 



Yes 

I 

Transfer o'flow 
address to ADR. 



Return to step 2 
& continue 
channel search. 



8. 
9. 



10. 



~1 

No 

4 

Transfer storage 10 
to revolver o'flow 
field 

I 

Write unit record. 

\ 

Transfer storage 10 
to ADR. 

Add 1 to storage 10. 

1 

Return to step 2 
& continue channel 
search. 



IV - 37 



NOTE: In the preceding example a portion of the channels are set 
aside for overflow. The address of the first overflow channel is 
stored in intermediate storage 10 before the run. During the run 
the overflow channels are automatically assigned as a channel is 
filled. 

Unloading routine: Channel search unequal 



1. Transfer starting DS/CH (xxxx — ) to ADR. 

i 

2. Channel search unequal: Compare space codes with identification 
stored in URA. 

Is there a non-matching URA? 

Yes 
1st URA with stored 
data is trapped 
on revolver. 

i 

3. Transfer desired data from 
revolver to output. 

4. Transfer space codes to revolver 

\ 

5. Write Unit Record 

I 

Return to channel search 
to trap next URA with 
stored data. 



^ 

No 
All URA's match — no stored 
data in this channel 
Last, URA in channel is 
trapped on revolver. 



Note: In this example the channels 
are sequentially unloaded. The 
address of the starting channel 
is stored in intermediate 
storage 10 before the run. 



6. Add 1 to storage 10 

I 

7. Transfer storage 10 to ADR 

Return to channel search to 
unload the next channel. 



IV - 38 



G. The Large Capacity Drum C onnection Panel 

Once a unit record of the large capacity storage drums 
is written on the revolver, by a read unit record or 
channel search operation, the data within that unit 
record is available to the arithmetic and control section 
•of the system through the 20 revolver fields, FO through 
F19. Data from the system is placed on the revolver 
through the revolver fields. 

The standard unit record area of the large capacity 
drums can be divided into these 20 possible revolver 
fields by wiring the drum connection panel. One connec- 
tion panel governs all the large capacity drums in a 
system. That is, the field assignment, wired on the 
connection panel is effective for every unit record area 
called upon during a run. The field assignment can be 
varied during a run by the use of "selectors". The wir- 
ing of the connection panel can, of course, be changed 
between runs to produce a different field assignment 
arrangement for another run. 

A tabulator wiring unit divides the standard unit record 
area of punched cards into fields for a tabulation run. 
The function of the drum connection panel is similar. 
It is the means of dividing the standard unit record 
character lenghth of the large capacity drums into the 
20 possible revolver fields. The size of the revolver 
fields may vary from 1 through 12 characters including 
sign. 



IV - 39 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 

TABULATING MACHINES 



UNIVAC FILE - COMPUTER 

UNIT RECORD 
FIELD ASSIGNMENT PANEL 



APPLICATION:- 



25 26 27 21 



CHARACTERS 



18 !» 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 2! 29 



II 



32 33 34 35 36 37 



39 40 41 42 43 



45 45 47 48 49 50 



54 55 56 57 58 59 



61 62 63 64 65 66 



75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 68 89 



91 92 93 94 



I I II II I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I 1 

96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 lis 



SELECTORS 



SELECTORS 



UNIT RECORD FIELD 



APPLIED PLUS SIGN 



SELECTORS 



SELECTORS 



22 23 24 25 



30 31 32 33 



IV - 40 



Characters: (A-L; 1-30) This section of the connection panel 
includes 120 double hubs, identified as CH and numbered 
through 119. These represent the characters in the unit 
record area, up to the maximum of 120. (Note, double hubs... 
hubs that are joined together by a straight line on the con- 
nection panel are common; that is, they are internally joined 
together.) Data in the unit record area, which is to be 
treated as a field of information, must be in adjacent unit 
record area characters. Adjacent characters are grouped into 
fields by coupling (with external wires) the related charac- 
ter assignment hubs. The least significant character of a 
field is always represented by the left hand character within 
a coupled group of character assignment hubs, the most sig- 
nificant character by the right hand character. 

Unit Record Field: (M-Q; 9-16) This section of the panel 
includes 20 double hubs, identified as through 19. These 
represent the 20 possible revolver fields, FO through F19. 
To give a group of coupled character hubs field identity, 
any character of the group is wired to a unit record field 
assignment hub. 

Positive Sign Hubs: (C; 1-30), (F; 1-30). (I; 1-30) and 
(L; .1-30) Immediately below each of the character hubs, in 
the character section of the control panel, is a hub identi- 
fied with a +. These are the positive sign hubs. Normally, 
the least significant character location of a field stores 
the sign code. When the sign is not stored, a positive sign 
must be generated. This is done by wiring the positive sign 
hub directly under the least significant character of the 
field to a hub in the "applied plus sign" section. 

Applied Plus Sign : (S-W; 9-16) This section of the connection 
panel includes 20 double hubs, identified as through 19. 
These are related to the 20 possible revolver fields, FO 
through F19. Whenever a sign is not stored for a field, a + 
sign is generated by the wiring from the positive sign hub 
of the least significant character of that field, to the 
applied plus sign hub which corresponds to the revolver field 
number to which the group is connected. 

Selectors: (M-P; 1-6), (U-X; 1-6), (M-P; 19-24), and (U-X; 19-24). 
Eight 4 pole selectors, identified as Al through A8, are included 
on the large capacity drum connection panel. The pickups of these 
selectors are on the computer connection panel. These selectors 
are used to vary the field assignment wiring. (Note: Selectors are 
explained in Section V.) 



IV - 41 



Examples: 



1. Characters through 5 are assigned to unit record field 
FO. The sign of the field is stored in character 0. 




2. Characters 11 through 14 are assigned to unit record 

field F2. No sign is stored so the positive sign hub of 
character 11 (the least significant character) is wired 
to the applied plus sign of field F2 to generate a posi- 
tive sign for the field. 




IV - 42 



3. Selectors on the drum connection panel are used to vary 
the character and field assignment when two or more types 
of records are stored on the large capacity drum(s) for 
one application and/or when two or more applications are 
being processed simultaneously by the system. 

In this example assume that two applications are being 
processed simultaneously. The field assignments desired 
are: 



First Application 

Field FO - Characters 0-3 
Sign - Applied plus 



Second Application 

Field FO - Characters 0-6 
Sign - Character 



Field F6 - Characters 13-15 
Sign - Applied plus 



Field F6 - Characters 9-12 
Sign - Character 9 



Selector Al is non-select when a revolver field for the 
first application is called for; it is select when a 
revolver field for the second application is called for. 



Therefore, characters through 3 are connected to field FO, 
the plus sign of character is connected to FO applied plus 
sign, and character 13 through 15 are connected to field F6 
with the plus sign of character 13 connected to F6 applied 
plus sign for the first application. For the second applica- 
tion, characters through 6 are connected to field FO and 
no applied plus sign for FO is connected; and characters 9 
through 12 are connected to field F6 with no connection be- 
tween these characters and the applied plus sign of F6. 




IV - 43 



FIGURE 12 
DIAGRAM OF REVOLVER UNIT 

RECORD AREAS AND FIELDS 



££ASF HEAO 










IV - 44 



The preceding schematic drawing illustrates two revolver 
unit record areas, the data written on the revolver and 
the break-down of the revolver unit record area of 15 
characters into revolver fields. Below is an illustration 
of the drum connection panel wiring for the field assignment 
of the characters. 

Illustration of Connection Panel Wiring for Above Break- 
Down of Revolver URA Into Fields 



CHARACTERS 



urunan 




Note: In accordance with the data written on the revolver 
in the above schematic, these values are obtained when the 
revolver fields are called: 



Value 



FO = 


02784 


Fl = 


2150 


F2 = 


7H1A 



Sian 

+ 



Since field F2 contains alpha information it is obvious 
that it would not be used in an arithmetic process but in 
the functional process of transfer. Therefore, it would 
not be necessary to wire the applied + sign for F2 if the 
value F2 never required shifting, since data may be stored 
in the sign position of a storage unit. If the applied + 
sign were not wired, the value obtained when field F2 was 
called for would be: 



IV - 45 



Value Sign 

F2 ■* 7H1 A 

(See Section V for discussion of shifting and use of sign 
position to store data.) 

Points to be observed in wiring large capacity drum connection panel: 

1. One connection panel controls the field assignment of all large 
capacity storage drums in the system. 

2. Only those characters in the character section on the panel 
which correspond to the fixed unit record area length of the 
system are wired. For example, if the unit record area length 
of the system is 50 characters, only character hubs through 49 
are used. 

3. A desired field of information must be in adjacent characters of 
the unit record area. 

4. The first character to the left in an adjacent group of characters 
is the least significant character; the last character to the 
right, the most significant. If no applied plus sign is gener- 
ated, the least significant character in a field holds the sign; 
if an applied plus sign is generated, the least significant char- 
acter is the least significant digit of the value. 

5. Any character of the coupled character hubs may be wired to 
the unit record field assignment hub. 

6. If the sign of a field is not stored, the positive sign hub of 
the least significant character must be wired to the related 
field applied plus sign to generate a plus sign unless the sign 
position is to be used to store alpha/numeric data which is to 
be used in a transfer operation. 

7. If the number of characters in a field of data that is to be 
written on the revolver, through one of the revolver fields, 
exceeds the number of characters wired to that field, the most 
significant characters of that data are lost. For example, if 
a result of 11 characters, 1234567890 + , were delivered to a 
revolver field wired to 9 character hubs, the two most significant 
characters would be lost. 34567890 + would be written on the 
revolver. 

8. The least significant character of a field and the applied plus 
sign establish the decimal relationship of the coupled characters. 

a) If an applied plus sign is generated, the least significant 
character holds the units position of the value; the next 
character the tens position, etc. 



IV - 46 



b) If an applied plus sign is not generated and if the sign of 
the value is stored, the least significant character holds 
the sign; the next character, the units position of the value; 
the next, the tens position, etc. 

c) If an applied plus sign is not generated and if the sign of 
the value is not stored, the least significant character 
holds the units position of the value (this character is in 
the sign position); the next character the tens position, etc. 

9. In a revolver field that is to be compared during a channel 
search operation, the least significant character of that field 
must be located at least 12 characters from the next identifier 
field. For example: 

Assume a unit record area of 12 characters. The least significant 
character of the field to be compared during the channel search 
operation must be stored in character 0: 

least 

significant 

character 

Item No. 



URA x x x x 

characters^ 123456789 10 11 



Item No 



x x x x 



icterarU 123456789 10 11 01234b678V10 1I 

12 characters from end of end of 

the least signifi- one URA next URA 

cant digit of the 
next identifier field 

10. If two revolver fields are to be compared during a channel search 
operation, the least significant characters of the fields must 
be at least 12 characters apart — that is, separated by 11 charac- 
ters. (Note, if more than two fields are to be compared see 
following section H.) For example: 

Assume a unit record area of 30 characters. Two fields of 11 
characters plus sign each are to be compared during the channel 
search operation. They could be stored in the unit record area 
in this fashion: 



IV - 47 
1st Item No. 2nd Item No. 



'XXXXXXXXXXX 'XXX xx xx xx xx 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23.. 29 

v v • 

the least significant least significant characters are and 12 
characters are separated 
by 11 characters 

H. Unit Record Length 

The unit record area length is the same for all large 
capacity drums included in a Univac File-Computer 
system. In analyzing the applications to be handled 
by the system, it may be found that the unit record 
area requirements for the large capacity drums vary 
from one application to another. When this occurs, 
the unit record length of the application which requires 
the most frequent reference to the large capacity drums, 
is generally chosen for the system. Programming tech- 
niques can then be used to divide tlie unit record length 
into controllable areas for the applications which re- 
quire a shorter unit record length, and/or to couple 
unit record areas for the applications which require a 
longer unit record length. 

In addition, when two or more applications are being 
processed simultaneously by the system, the field assign- 
ment of the unit record area characters may vary accord- 
ing to the application. When this occurs, the characters 
to be assigned to a specific field can be selected 
through the large capacity drum connection panel selec- 
tors. 

a. Selection of Fields: The selectors on the drum con- 
nection panel are the means of altering the revolver 
character and field assignment. This selection was 
illustrated in Example 3 in the preceding section. 

b. Multiple Items Stored in One Unit Record Area: When 
the unit record area requirements of an application are 
smaller than the fixed unit record length, two of the 
items can be stored in one unit record by dividing the 
unit record length into controllable areas by programming, 
The unit record in which the item is stored can be found 
by a channel search operation (if the specific address 

is not available from input) and then, the specific item 
within that unit record area by programmed comparing of 
the designation. 

For example, assume that the fixed unit record length of 
a system is 40 characters, and that a payroll application 
to be processed by the system required only 20 characters 
of storage: 



IV - 48 

Employee number 4 characters 

Earnings-to-date 6 characters 

FICA-to-date 4 characters 

FWT-to-date 6 characters 

Two of these payroll unit records can be stored in 
the fixed unit record area of 40 characters: 

Description URA Characters Field Assignment 

(*Emp. number through 3 FO 

1. jEarn-to-date 4 " 9 Fl 

|FICA-to-date 10 " 13 F2 

FWT-to-date 14 H 19 F3 



2. 






thro 


ugh 3 


4 


i» 


9 


10 


« 


13 


14 


»f 


19 


20 


m 


23 


24 


t* 


29 


30 


M 


33 


34 


II 


39 



Emp. number 20 M 23 F4 

Earn-to-date 24 M 29 F5 

FICA-to-date 30 " 33 F6 

FWT-to-date 34 " 39 F7 

In order to locate the stored data for a specific 
employee the employee number from the input data is 
compared, during an equal channel search operation, 
with the 2 stored employee numbers in each unit record 
area. When one of the stored employee numbers matches 
the desired employee number, that complete unit record 
area is trapped on the revolver. 

Note that there are 19 characters between the least 
significant characters of the two stored employee 
numbers (characters 1 through 19) , and that the least 
significant character of the last employee number in 
the unit record area is 20 characters (characters 20 
through 395 , from the end of the unit record area. 
Therefore, for the channel search operation, the least 
significant characters of the employee numbers are sep- 
arated by at least 11 characters. The least signifi- 
cant character of the last stored employee number is at 
least 12 characters from the end of the unit record 
area. 

When the unit record area is "trapped" on the revolver, 
programmed comparing is used to determine which of the 
2 groups of stored employee information is the desired 
one. The first stored employee number (field FO) is 
compared with the desired employee number. If they 
are equal, revolver fields FO through F3 relate to the 
desired employee; if they are not equal, fields F4 
through F7 relate to the desired employee. 



IV - 49 



Following is a flow chart of a channel search operation 
for this example... 2 items stored in one unit record 
area. (Actual programming is discussed in Section V). 

FLOW CHART OF CHANNEL SEARCH WHEN DATA FOR 2 ITEMS ARE STORED IN ONE 
UNIT RECORD AREA: NO OVERFLOW 

1. Transfer address, DS/CH (xxxx— ) to ADR. 

I 

2. Equal channel search: compare input designation with both 
designations (FO & F4) in URA. 

Does the input designation match one of the designations in the 
URA? 

J 1 

Yes No 

\ 

3. Compare input designation with FO 
Is this the first employee stored in URA? 

J * 

Yes No 

\ 

1st employee is the 
desired one. Revolver 
fields FO - F3 relate 
to this employee 

* 
2nd employee is the 

desired one. Revolver 

fields F4 - F7 relate 

to this employee. 

r, , * 
Employee not 

stored in 

this channel. 

It is possible to store the information for more than 2 items in one 
URA and to locate the desired item by a channel search equal instruc- 
tion and programmed comparison. Following are three methods of ac- 
complishing this: 

Method 1. Perform 2 or, if necessary, more channel search operations of 
the channel. For example, the preceding illustration showed 
the data for 2 items, requiring 20 characters each, stored in 
one 40 character URA. Assume that the fixed URA length is 60 
characters. It is possible to store the data for 3 items in 
one URA and locate the desired item by channel searching the 
channel twice. 



IV - 50 





Description 


URA Characters 


Field Assignment 




Emp. number 





throu 


gh 3 


FO 




1. < 


Earn. -to-d ate 


4 


♦♦ 


9 


Fl 


1 




FICA-to-date 


10 


ir 


13 


F2 






FWT-to-date 

> 


14 


ii 


19 


F3 

j 






Emp. number 


20 


ii 


23 


F4 " 




2. , 


Earn. -to-d ate 


24 


M 


29 


F5 


> 2 


* 


FICA-to-date 


20 


♦i 


33 


F6 


> 




FWT-to-date 


34 


♦t 


39 


F7 

j 






Emp. number 


40 


ti 


43 


F8 * 




3- , 


Earn. -to-d ate 


44 


fi 


49 


F9 t 3 




FICA-to-date 


50 


ii 


53 


F10 






FWT-to-date 


54 


•• 


59 


Fll 





In order to locate the stored data for the specific employee, 
the employee number from the input data is first compared, 
during a channel search equal operation, with FO & F4. If a 
match is found then the specific employee can then be determined 
by comparison (see preceding example). If a match is not found, 
the channel search equal operation is again called for, this 
time comparing the input designation with F8. 



IV - 51 



1. Transfer address, DS/CH (xxxx— ) to ADR. 

2. Channel search equal: compare input designation with FO & F4, 
Does the input designation match either FO or F4? 



Yes 

\ 

3. Compare input designation with FO 
Is this 1st employee stored? 



1 

No 



Yes 

1st employee is the 
desired one. Revolver 
fields F0-F3 relate 
to this employee. 



1 
No 



2nd employee is the 
desired one. Revolver 
fields F4-F7 relate 
to this employee 



4. Channel search equal: 
compare input designation 
with F8. 
Does input match F8? 



1 

No 



Yes 

3rd employee is the 
desired one. Revolver 
fields F8 - Fll relate 
to this employee. 



Employee not 
stored in 
this channel 

The next two methods can be used if the URA length of the system is 
divisible by 12, ie, 12, 24,60 & 120. Both of these methods are 
most practical with the longer URA lengths — 60 and 120. 

Both methods make use of a special channel search address, "all". 
This "all" address tells the machine to ignore the revolver field 
assignment, wired on the drum plugboard, and to consider each succes- 
sive group of 12 characters as a field.. That is, with a URA length 
of 120 characters, when a channel search instruction is given, com- 
paring the desired designation with "all" URA fields, the machine 
ignores the wired field assignment and compares the specified desig- 
nation first with characters through 11, then with 12 through 23, 
then 24 through 35, etc. through 108 through 119. These comparisons 
are made for each URA on the channel. If any one of the 10 groups 
of 12 characters in a URA match the desired designation, the machine 
will emit a signal and that URA will be trapped on the revolver. 



IV - 52 



Since each successive group of 12 characters are treated as a field 
when using the channel search "all" address, 2 precautions should 
be observed: 

1. 12 characters must be allowed for each identification stored; 

2. Other values, such as balances, amounts, etc. in a group of 12 
characters could match the specified designation. 

The following two methods illustrate the means of locating a specific 
item, when more than 2 items are stored in one URA, with the channel 
search "all" address. 

Method 2. Store an "impossible code" within each group of 12 characters 
which do not contain an identification. This "dummy" or 
"impossible" code should be one that cannot possibly be part of 
the designation of the desired item. A negative code for example, 
would never be part of an employee number or part number. If 
a match is then found during channel search equal, it is certain 
to be a valid identification. 



IV - 53 



Method 2 - URA Layout. 



Channel Search 
Comparisons for 
each URA 
in Channel 

1st comparison 



2nd comparison 



3rd comparison 4 



4th comparison 



5th comparison 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8J 

9 
10 
11 
121 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32J 
331 
34 
35 J 
361 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 J 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47^ 
48 
49 
50J 
51 
521 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 



Field 
Assignment 



> FO - Part No. 



F6 - Spaces codes 



Fl - Part No. 



► F7 - Space codes 



F2 - Part No. 



In this example, with the 
channel search equal oper- 
ation and the channel 
search "all" address, the 
wired field assignment of 
the characters is ignored 
and characters 0-11, 12-23, 
24-35, 36-47, and 48-59 of 
each URA will be compared 
with the desired part 
number . 

Since a negative code will 
never be in a part number, 
the negative signs stored 
in characters 43 and 51 
will prevent any possibil- 
ity of an equal comparison 
between the desired part 
number and the values 
stored in characters 36 - 
47 or 48 - 59. 

Therefore, if an equal 
comparison is obtained it 
must have been from char- 
acters 0-11, 12-23 or 

24-35. the 3 stored part 

numbers. 



F8 - Space codes 



F3 - Balance for 
1st Part No. 



■F9 - Negative sign 



F4 - Balance for 
2nd Part No. 



-F10 - Negative sign 



F5 - Balance for 
3rd Part No. 



URA characters 



IV - 54 



Flow chart of Method 2: 

1. Transfer address, DS/CH (xxxx— ) to ADR. 

2. Channel search equal: compare "all" URA fields with desired 
part number. 

Does 1 of the groups of 12 characters match the part number? 

Yes 

Characters 36-47 and 48-59 cannot possibly 
match. Therefore, match must be result 
of characters 0-11, 12-23 or 24-35. 

3. Does FO match 
part number? 



1 
No 



Yes 

1 
1st part no. is 

desired one. Balance 

in F3 relates to 

this part. 



No 



4. Does Fl match 
part number? 

i 



Yes 

I 
2nd part no. is 

desired one. Balance 

in F4 relates to 

this part. 



No 



3rd part no. is 
desired one. 
Balance in F5 
relates to this 
part. 



Part not 
stored in 
this 
channel. 



Method 3: 



Following is the third method of storing data for more 
than two items in one URA and locating the desired item 
by channel search. 



IV - 55 
Method 3: URA Layout 

In each URA, store the URA number of the following URA. 



For 



example: 



1st comparison 



>FO - Part No. 



F6 - Space codes 



2nd comparison * 



3rd comparison < 



>F1 - Part No. 



F7 - Space codes 



>F2 - Part No. 



F8 - Space codes 



^F3 - 



4th comparison < 



5th comparison 



Balance for 
1st part 



> F4 - 



Balance for 
2nd part 



► F5 - Balance for 
3rd part 



7\ F8 - URA No. of 
3 J following URA 

URA characters 



In this example, with the 
channel search equal 
instruction and the channel 
search "all" address, char- 
acters 0-11, 12-23, 24-35, 
36-47 and 48-59 will be 
compared with the desired 
part number. 

An equal comparison could 
result from any one of the 
5 groups of characters; 
from the first 3 groups if 
the part number matched or 
from the last 2 groups 
if the balances stored 
happened to match the desired 
part number. 

Therefore, if a match is 
obtained, the 3 stored part 
numbers are tested against 
the specified part number. 
If one matches, the desired 
URA is available on the 
revolver. If none of them 
match, the stored URA number 
(of the following URA) is 
added to the partial address 
of DS and CH and the channel 
search is resumed at the 
next URA in that channel. 



IV - 56 



Flow chart of Method 3: 



1. Transfer address, DS/CH (xxxx— ) to ADR. 

„ l 

2. Channel search equal: compare "all" URA fields with desired 
part number. 

D oes 1 of the groups of 12 characters match the part number? 

f " ~~ — 

Yes 

\ 
(Match may be result of characters 
0-11, 12-23, 24-35, 36-47 or 48-59.) 

3. Does FO match 
part number? 

J- 



No 



Yes 

\ 

1st Part no. is 
desired one. Balance 
in F3 relates to 
this part. 



"I 
No 



4. Does Fl match 
part number? 

\ 

Yes 

2nd part no is 
desired one. Bal- 
ance in F4 relates 
to this part. 



1 
No 



5. 



Does F2 match 
part number? 

\ 

Yes 

1 

3rd part no. 
is desired one. 
F5 relates to 
part. 



1 
No 



None of the 
parts match 
desired part 
number. False 
comparison 
from balances. 

6. Add URA no. 
(F8) to 
DS/CH. Deli- 
ver address 
(DS/CH/XX) to 
ADR. 

„ \ 

Return to step 
2 to resume 
channel search 
in next URA. 



Part not 
stored in 
this chan- 
nel. 



IV - 57 



Multiple Unit Record Areas for the Storage of One 
Item: When the unit record area requirements for 
an application are greater than the fixed unit 
record area length, two (or more) unit records can 
be used for the storage of data related to one item. 
The item designation and part of the data related 
to that item are stored in one unit record area. 
In addition, the address of the unit record area 
which contains the balance of the data related to 
that item is also stored. 

The unit record area which contains the first por- 
tion of data can be located by an equal channel 
search operation and the references to and/or calcu- 
lations based on that portion of the data can be 
performed. Then, the stored address of the unit 
record area which contains the balance of the data 
related to that item can be entered in the address 
register and the second portion of the data made 
available on the revolver by a read unit record 
instruction. 

If possible, the unit record area chosen to hold the 
balance of the data for an item, is located in the 
same channel as the unit record area which contains 
the first portion of the data. Then, it is only 
necessary to store 2 characters (the unit record 
number) for the address of the second unit record 
area. If this is not possible, the full 6 digit 
address of the unit record area which contains the 
balance of the data must be stored. 

The item identification must be stored in the unit 
record area which contains the first portion of data 
related to that item, so that the unit record area 
can be located by a channel search equal operation 
(if the specific address is not available from input) 
It does not have to be stored in the unit record 
area which contains the balance of data related to 
that item since the stored address can be used to 
locate the specific unit record area. 

Since different data is stored in the various unit 
record areas, the revolver field alignment must 
either be arranged to be consistent with both types 
of unit record areas (the URA which contains the 
1st portion of data, and the URA which contains the 
balance of data related to one item) or the fields 
must be selected according to the portion of the 
data being referred to. 



IV - 58 

For example, assume that the fixed unit record 
length of a system is 20 characters and that a 
payroll application to be processed by the system 
requires 34 characters of storage: 

Employee number 5 characters 

Day Work Rate 5 characters 

Average Incentive rate... 5 characters 

Earnings-to-date 6 characters 

FWT-to-date 6 characters 

FICA-to-date 4 characters 

State Tax-to-date 3 characters 

34 characters 

Two unit record areas are required to store the 
data for one item. In this example, assume that it 
is possible to locate both unit record areas required 
for an item in the same channel. Therefore, only 
2 characters are required to store the address of 
the next unit record area. The data could be 
stored: 



UNIT RECORD AREA WHICH CONTAINS 


UNIT 


RECORD AREA WHICH CONTAINS 


1ST PORTION OF DATA 




BALANCE OF DATA 




URA 


URA 




Description Field 


Character 


Character Field Description 






r xo 


OX] 








XI 


IX 




Employee No. FO 


< 


X2 
X3 
X4 
. 5 
' X6 
X7 
X8 


2X 

3X 

4X 

5X, 

6X^ 

7X 

8X 


► FO Earn-to-date 


Day Rate Fl 


< 


X9 
X10 

. 11 

' X12 

X13 


9X 
10X 
11X, 
12X' 
13X 


> Fl FWT-to-date 


Average F2 


< 


X14 


14X 


L F2 FICA-to-date 


Incentive Rate 




X15 

X16 

f X17 


1 15X 

16 , 
17X^ 


| 


Address F3 


\ X18 


1 18X 


> F3 State-to-date 






19 


1 19X 


I 






IV - 59 



The revolver field alignment is consistent for both 
types of unit record areas. The last 15 unit record 
areas on each channel (15 through 29) are used to store 
the 1st portion of data; the first unit record areas 
(00 through 14) are used to store the 2nd portion of 
data for the related employees. The channel search is 
started with URA 15, comparing field FO — thus, only the 
stored employee number is compared with the desired one; 
earnings-to-date, in the same relative characters in the 
1st 15 unit record areas is not allowed to compare with 
the desired employee number. 

Following is a flow chart of a channel search operation 
for this example... 1 item stored in 2 unit record areas. 
(Actual programming is discussed in Section V.) 



FLOW CHART OF CHANNEL SEARCH WHEN DATA FOR 1 ITEM IS STORED IN 2 



URA'S: 



NO OVERFLOW 



1. Add 15 to DS CH— . Deliver address (xxxxlS) to ADR. 

\ 

2. Equal channel search: compare input designation with 
stored designation (field FO) . Does the input designation 
match a stored designation? (Channel search starts with 
URA 15.) 

T 



Yes 



3. 1st URA is "trapped** on revolver. Perform 
calculations requiring rates. 

4. Add stored URA number (F3) to DSCH —. Deliver 
result (XXXXXX) to ADR. 

y 

5. Read unit record. 2nd URA is written on 

revolver. 

\ 

6. Calculate taxes, etc. Bring forward 
to-date amounts. 

\ 

7. Write unit record. Write changed to-date 
amounts in 2nd URA. 



1 
No 



Desired employee 
not stored. 



SECTION V 
ARITHMETIC AND CONTROL SECTION 
PROGRAMMING 



ARITHMETIC AND CONTROL 
PROGRAMMING 

INDEX - SECTION V 



1. INTRODUCTION 

2. VALUE 1, VALUE 2, AND RESULT 

3. SHIFTING 

4. PROCESSES 

A. Addition 

B. Subtraction 

C. Multiplication 

D. Division 

E. Transfer 

F. Compare 

G. Left Zero Elimination 
H. Channel Search 

5. EXIT OR OUT OF A STEP 

A. Wiring from "Out" of a Step 

1. The next step of the program 

2. Any interstep function 

3. Demand assignment 

4. Output control line 

B. Error Hubs 

1. Invalid address 

2. Parity error 

3. Arithmetic error 

4. Addition or subtraction overflow 

5. Division overflow 



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6. INTERSTEP FUNCTIONS 

A. Step Clear 

B. Read Unit Record 

C. Write Unit Record 

D. Branching 

E. Selectors 

1. Operation of Selectors 

2. Use of Selectors 

F. Program Selectors 

G. Selector Hold 

H. Channel Search Branching 

7. OTHER FUNCTIONS 

A. Alternate Switches 

B. Out Expanders 

C. Function Delay 

D. Function Sequence 

E. Code Distributor 

F. Input Control Lines 

G. Output Control Lines 
H. Indicator Lights 

I. Unit Record Field Assignment Selector Pick-Up 

8. MULTIPLEX CONTROLS 

A. Scan Multiplexing 

B. Demand Programming 

9. SUMMARY - TIMING 

10. PROGRAM CHARTS 



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V - 1 



1. INTRODUCTION 

A program is a series of instructions which, when followed by the 
machine will produce the desired computational results. These 
instructions are given to the machine in a form known as a program 
step. A program step will perform one complete arithmetic or opera- 
tional function. 

Each program step consists of five basic elements: 

1. The arithmetic or operational process to be performed: 
addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, transfer, 
compare, left zero eliminaton, or channel search. 

2. The storage location of the first value (V\) upon which the 
process is to operate. 

3. The storage location of the second value (V2) upon which the 
process is to operate. 

4. The storage location to which the result of the process (R) is 
to be delivered. 

5. The next step. This function permits the joining together of 
steps to form a program. 

As can be seen, a program is merely a combination or series of indi- 
vidual steps which direct the machine to perform the operations re- 
quired to obtain a desired result or results. 

There are two means of setting up a program for the Univac File- 
Computer; and they may be used in combination with each other: 

1. External Program : This is the type of programming used with the 
Univac 60-120. All instructions are wired on a removable connec- 
tion panel. 

2. Internal Program: With this type of program, the instructions 
are stored on the high-speed storage drum. The connection panel 
is used with internal programming to determine the process and to 
initiate an internal instruction; that is, to tell the control 
section to look on the drum, rather than the connection panel, 
for its next instruction. 

Combination of internal and external program: With this type of 
program, part of the instructions are wired on the connection 
panel and part are stored on the high-speed storage drum. 



V - 2 



The basic form of a program step consists of the program elements 
arranged in the following form: 



Value 1 


Process 


Value 2 = Result 


Next 


(V x ) 


(Pr) 


(V 2 ) (R) 


Step 



There are nine processes available on the Univac File-Computer, 
classified as follows: 

Arithmetic : 

Addition 
Subtraction 
Multiplication 
Division 

Operational : 

Transfer 

Compare 

Equal Channel Search 

Unequal Channel Search 

Left Zero Elimination 

The following sections deal with each element of a program step in 
relation to its use with external programming only. At the end of 
Section V the Control and Program Panel is shown with a numbered 
guide indicating where the particular hubs are described in the 
section. 



V - 3 



2. VALUE 1. VALUE 2. AND RESULT 

Value 1 and Value 2 are always wired to a storage location. In ex- 
ternal programming, these storages may be of any of the following 
types: input-output, intermediate, or large capacity drum-revolver 
field. The designation used for a value is the numeric address of 
the storage field: 



1. Input-output 

2. Intermediate 

3. Large Capacity Drum 



000 through 009 

10 through 39 
(To 59 if additional are ordered) 

FO through F19 



Input-output storage address hubs are located on the connection panel 
in lines 29, A-J; 48, A-J; and 59, A-J. Intermediate storage address 
hubs are located in lines 29, K-x and 30, m-x; 48, K-x and 49 m-x; 
59, K-x and 60, m-x. Large capacity drum storage field address hubs 
are located in lines 30, A-T; 49, A-T; and 60, A-T. Although each 
hub is a single hub, it may be reused without any danger of back 
feed. Although Vi, V2, and R each has its own set of storage hubs, 
the storage hubs are actually common and may be used interchangeably. 

The result of a step may be placed in one of the three types of 
storage units indicated for Vi and V2» The result of a step may 
also be placed in the ADR (Address register), or the CD (code 
distributor register). In this case, the designation would be ADR 
or CD, instead of a numeric storage designation. 

The Vi address hubs are located in line 31, A-x; V2 address hubs are 
located in line 50, A-x; R address hubs are located in line 61, A-x. 
To use a particular storage as part of a step, it is merely necessary 
to wire from the value or result of the step to the storage desired. 
For example, to call on storage 003 as V\ of step 2, the wiring would 
be: 




The shift hubs associated with each value and result are explained 
in the section on Shifting. 

For all processes, except transfe^the maximum size of the two values 
to be operated upon is 11 digits, plus the sign of the value. In 
transfer, the sign position may be used for a sign or for a numeric 
or alphabetic character, making the maximum size 12 digits. In mul- 
tiplication and division all digits must be numeric; with addition 



V - 4 



and subtraction all digits should normally be numeric, although there 
is a feature called "alpha add"; in all other processes the values 
may be either numeric or alphabetic. 

The maximum size of the result of an arithmetic process delivered 
to storage on one step is 11 digits, plus the sign of the result, 
although a larger answer may be developed during certain processes. 
The sign of the result is delivered automatically by the arithmetic 
unit. In transfer, the result may be either 11 characters plus sign 
or 12 characters. 

Storage fields do not have a fixed, or predetermined, decimal loca- 
tion. All numbers are acted upon as if they were whole numbers. 
Both values and the result of each step can be independently decimally 
aligned by a feature called "shift". Any value or result can be 
shifted either to the right or to the left a maximum of 11 digits 
(except in certain cases of multiplication and division). This 
feature gives the programmer complete control over the decimal align- 
ment of all factors. 

There must be a V^ wired on every step programmed. There must be a 
Vo wired on every step, except where the process is transfer, left 
zero elimination, or channel search unequal. 

In multiplication, Vj is the multiplicand and V2 is the multiplier. 
The program is speeded up if the multiplier is the value with the 
least number of digits. 

In division, Vj is the dividend, V2 is the divisor. 

In any arithmetic process and in the compare process, V\ and V~2 may 
have the same storage location. In addition, subtraction, transfer, 
and left zero elimination the result may have the same storage loca- 
tion as Vi or V2. 

The placing of a value into a storage unit as the result of a step 
will completely replace all information previously located in that 
storage unit, even though the new value is smaller than the old value, 
or contains only spaces or zeros. The new value will remain in the 
storage unit until replaced by other information. 

If the result of an arithmetic process does not have 11 significant 
digits, the remaining digits will be delivered to the result storage 
as zeros. The only exception to this is a right shift in the result 
(see section on shifting). 



V - 5 



For example, a result of; I- 1-1-1 -1-1 -I II 2| 31 4 15| will be delivered 

to storage as |0|0| 01 1 01 01 1 1 2131 4151 . The arithmetic section "packs' 

zeros in the result. 

In an operational process, spaces will be delivered to the result 
storage as spaces; zeros. will be delivered as zeros. The only 
exception to this rule is left zero elimination (see process section 
on left zero elimination) . 

3. gHFTING 

As mentioned above, the Univac File-Computer treats all values as if 
they were whole numbers. Through the feature called shift, the pro- 
grammer can give the proper decimal alignment to Vi, V"2t or R. 

All values are handled in storage fields of 11 digits plus the char- 
acter for the sign of the value. The positions in a storage unit 
are numbered from right to left as follows: 

|11|10|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|SN| 

The registers in the arithmetic section of the computer in which a 
process occurs are also numbered in the same fashion. Without shift- 
ing, the 11 digits of a storage field will enter their respective 
positions in the register. The shift feature causes the value in 
the storage field to enter the register in a shifted position. 

The sign position, however, cannot be shifted. If the sign position 
is used for a character other than the sign of the value, this fact 
must be considered if any shifting is attempted. 

Shifting is used unconsciously when adding or subtracting with a 
pencil and paper... the values are physically aligned. For example, 
to add 12.3671 and 16.8, the values are not written: 

1 2.3 6 7 1 
1 6.8 



12 3 8 3 9 



Rather, one of the values is written down and the other value shifted 
to the same decimal alignment. In this case, the second value could 
be shifted 3 places to the left in order to decimally align both 
values: 

1 2.3 6 7 1 
1 6.8 



2 9.1 6 7 1 



Now assume that 1 2.3 6 7 1 is V\ in inte rmediate storage unit 22 in 
these positions: |0|0I0|0|0I1| 2^3 [61 7| 1| +| ; and that 16.8 is V 2 in 
input storage unit 001 i n these positions: 

|0|0|010|0|0I0|01116JL8|+1; and the problem is to place the result in 
intermediate storage 23. If the program step is wired to add the two 
values, shifting neither, an incorrect answer is obtained ...just as 
with pencil and paper. 



V - 6 



V x Pr V 2 R 

15 T 001 = "23 

Storage Register 

22 |0|0l0l0l0|ll2i3l6l7lll enters register as lol Ololololll 2 j,3 1 6 i 7 111 

+ 

001|0l0l0|0|0l0|0|0fll6l8| enters register as 1~0| 0|0|0l 0|0| olol 1 [6|8| 

Result I0|0l0l0l0lll2l3l8|3|9l 

enters storage 23 as lol 0l0l0l0ll|2l3l8|3|9| 

However, if we arrange to shift V 2 three places to the left, as 
with pencil and paper, the correct result is obtained: 

Vi Pr V 2 R 
22 + 001 (3D = 23 

Note the use of (3 L) to indicate "3 shift left" 

Storage Register 

22 I0|0|0l0l0ll|2|3|6l7|li enters register as lolol Olol 0| ll ^3| 6l7l l| 

+ 

001|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|1|6JL8| enters register as lOl Ol OlOl 01 ll 6|8| OlOlOl 

Result |0|OIOIOIOI2|9|1I6I7|1| 

enters storage 23 as |0|OlOlOl Ol 21 9^1 1 61 7| 1| 

The shift operation does not change the position of the value in the 
storage unit. It does change the position in which the value is 
received by the register in the arithmetic section. At the end of 
the program st ep in the last illustra tion, storage 001 still contains 
its value as: 101 0I0I0I0I0I0I0I1I6J81 

Either value of a program step or the result of a program step may 
be shifted to the right or to the left a maximum of 11 digits. 
For instance, in the above example, assume that only one decimal 
place must be retained in the result. Two ways in which this can 
be accomplished are: 



V - 7 



1. Shift V2 three places to the left, then shift the result 
three places to the right. 

2. Shift Vj three places to the right. 

(1) Vj^ Pr V2_ JL 
22 + OOK3L) = 23(3R) 

Storage Register 

22 |0l0l0|0|0lll2i3l6!7ll| enters register as |0|0l0l0l0|ll2|3l6l7lll 

+ 

001|OlO|0|0|OlO|0|0|ll6l8l enters register as |OlO|OlOlOl Il6l8l0l0l0l 

Result |0|0|0|0I0I2I9J11|6I7|1I 

enters storage 23 as |-|- I-I0l0l0l0l0|2l9^1l 

(2) h. Zi II _L 
22 (3R) + 001 = 23 

K)I0|0|0|0|1[2X3I6|7|1| enters register as |-I-I-I0|0|0|0|0| 1 12^3| 

I0|0|0|0l0|0|0|0|ll6l8i enters register as |0|0|0|0] 0|0|0|0| I|6j8| 

Result 10101010101010101219^11 

enters storage 23 as |0|0|0|0| 0|0|0|0| 2|9J^1I 

Note in the first illustration above, a result is shifted as it is 
received by the storage unit, not as the process is occuring in the 
register. 

On a left shift (V"2 in the first example), zeros are "packed" to the 
right of the value. On a right shift, however, (R in the first 
example, V\ in the second example), spaces are entered to the left 
of the number. 

When digits in Vi or V2 are shifted to the right or to the left 
beyond the 11 positions of the register, they are dropped off. 
They do not affect the result in any way. 



V - 8 



Each value and result of a program step has a shift hub which can be 
wired. V^ shift hubs axe located on the connection panel in line 
32, A-x; V2 shift hubs in line 51, A-x; and R shift hubs in line 
62, A-x. Close to these hubs are the ones indicating whether the 
shift is to be left or right, and the number of places that the 
value is to be shifted. The left shift hubs are located in lines 
34, A-K and a-k; 53, A-K and a-k; 64 A-K and a-k. The right shift 
hubs are located in lines 34, M-X and m-x; 53, M-X and m-x; and 
64 M-X and m-x. The shift hubs for the value or result are wired 
to the desired left or right shift. The shift hubs may be bussed 
if necessary. 

The particular rules for shifting connected with each process are 
explained in the process section. 

4. PROCESSES 

Each program step has available nine arithmetic or operational 
processes, any one of which may be used on any program step. One 
of them must be used in every step called upon by the machine. 

The four arithmetic processes are: 

Addition 
Subtraction 
Multiplication 
Division 

These processes always involve two values (V"i and V2) f each of which 
may be a maximum of 11 digits plus sign. The values are usually 
numeric (see addition for the only use of alphabetic information in 
an arithmetic process.) 

The values and their signs are handled according to algebraic rules; 
and the result of the process is delivered to storage with the sign 
of the result. Since the maximum size of a storage unit is 11 digits 
plus sign, this is also the maximum size of the result which may be 
delivered on one arithmetic step. 

The five operational processes are: 

Transfer 

Compare 

Equal Channel Search 

Unequal Channel Search 

Left Zero Elimination 

These processes always involve a Vj. Compare and channel search 
equal always involve a V*2. The values may be alphabetic or numeric. 
There will be a result of all operations except compare. In these 
operational processes a value or a result may contain 11 digits plus 
the sign of the value. Transfer may contain 12 digits of alphabetic 
or numeric information. 

The process hub for each step is located in line 21, A-x. This hub 
is wired to the desired process, the location of which will be dis- 
cussed in detail below for each process. 



V - 9 



A. ADDITION 

This process is used when adding V\ and V2 together to obtain 
a sum, or for combining alphabetic and numeric data for output 
storage or similar purposes. The symbol used in programming 
for this process is +. The addition process hubs are located 
in line 23, A-x. As a sample step, assume that the problem is 
to accumulate sales-to-date. The values are: 

Input-output storage 001: Sales today 
Drum revolver field F5: Sales-to-date 



Step 3) 



1L 
F5 



Pr 



V2_ = R 

001 - 75 



(Sales-to-date) (Sales today) ■ (New sales-to-date) 
The wiring on the connection panel for the above step would be: 




The special rules for addition are as follows: 

(1) For normal addition, both Vj and V2 must be numeric. 
When the corresponding positions in both V\ and V2 
are numeric, the quantities are always added. 



V\ |0|0|0|0|0|0|0|l|3|ei9[- 



T2I3P 



R !0|0|0l0l0|0|0|l|4|l|2^- 



V - 10 



(2) If in the corresponding positions, either Vi, V"2 t or both, 
are alphabetic, the character in Vj will always be trans- 
mitted to the result. If in the same values, certain 
corresponding positions are both numeric, addition will 
occur in these positions 



Vl |-|R|M|X|-|-|-|-|-|-1-M 



V 2 |-|-|_|_|_|3|7|2l9M-M 



R |0|R|M|X!0|3|7|2|9|0|0| 



(3) If an ignore code occurs in Vj, the corresponding character 
of V"2 will be transmitted to the result. Ignore codes 
occurring in V 2 are considered alphabetic and Rule (2) 
applies. 



V X l-l-l-l2)7|-|i|i|-|-|-| + | 

+ 

Vo l-l-l-l-l. 



R|X|7|4|2| + | 



R |0|0|0|2|7|0|R|X|7|4|2!+| 



(4) Whenever a character is transmitted to the result by rule 
2 or 3, any carry into this position caused by addition 
in the position to the right, will be destroyed. 






|-|-l8lBlxlili|2l4|0|0M 



V 2 |-|-|i|-|-|2|4l7|8|R|Ml + | 



R |0|0|8|BlXl2|4|0|2|0|0|+| 

(5) Spaces are considered numeric. 

(6) The left hand digit of a result must fall within the 
11 digit register. If it does not, the machine will 
signal an overflow condition. For example: 



11 U0l9|8l7l6|5|4|3|2|l|SNl 
8| 7|4lO|9|2jH-l-l-l-l+ I 



V 



2 |6|0|2[l|3|9j-|-|-|-|-| + | 

R |1| 4| 7|6|2l3|liO|0|0|OlO|+ | 



V - 11 



The above addition developed a 1 in the twelfth position. 
In this case, the step exit will be obtained from the 
+/- overflow hub rather than the normal step exit hub, 
thus indicating an overflow. By shifting V^ and V2 to the 
right, this could be avoided. It is not possible to shift 
R to avoid this condition, since the overflow is signalled 
at the time the carry occurs in the register. 



Vi (1 R) |8|7|4l2l9l2l-|-l-l-l-W 

+ 

v 2 (1 r) r6ioi2imi^-i-i-i-i-i+i 

R |1|4|7|6|2!3|1|0|0|0|0|+| 

(7) As mentioned earlier, it is essential to align decimal 
points before doing addition. The following examples 
show some of the possibilities. 

(a) Vj (1 R) |-|-|-|-I6|7|6|524|2|-|+| 
+ 

V 2 (3 R) |-|-|7|6l3U!2|5|-|-|-|+| 

R |0|0|0|olll4|3|9|9|6|7|+| 

In the above example, it would also have been possible to 
shift V 2 two to the right and R one to the right. In this 
case, the result would have been: 

|-|0|0|0|l|4|3|9|9i6l7|+| 

(b) V X |-|-|-I6|4|3±2|9|4|-|-| + I 



V 2 (I R) l-|7|6|2|3J[7|0|6|6r5|-l+l 



R (3 R) |-|-J-|0|0|8|2|6|7|0|0| + | 

If in this case, Vj were shifted 3 right, and V 2 
4 right, the result would be: 



I0|0|0|0|0|8|2l6l6i9l9l+1 



V - 12 



The difference is due to the fact that .004 would be 
dropped off in V^ and .00665 in V"2. The sum of the values 
dropped is .01065, which affects the result to the extent 
of .01. The programmer must remember not to shift digits 
in either Vi or V~2 outside of the register if they might 
have significance in the result. 

(8) The verification of an addition step by repeating the step 
cannot be eliminated for addition. Therefore, even if 

"no check" is wired, checking will occur. 

(9) The storage location of Vi or V"2 of an addition step may 
be used to store the result. 



A summary of the rules for alpha add is given below: 





Numeric 


Alpha 


Ignore 


Numeric 


Sum 


Alpha * 


Numeric * 


Alpha 


Numeric* 


Alpha (Vi) 


Alpha 


Ignore 


Numeric 


Alpha 


Ignore 



* A carry (borrow) generated by the addition of numbers 
in preceding digit position is destroyed. 



V - 13 

B. SUBTRACTION 

This process is used when subtracting the storage wired as V2 
from the storage wired as V\. The symbol used in programming 
for this process is -. The subtraction process hubs are 
located in line 24, A-x, As a sample step, assume that the 
problem is to subtract quantity ordered from the on-hand balance 
to determine the new on-hand balance. 

The values are: 

Input-output storage 002: Quantity ordered 

Drum revolver field F2: On-hand balance 



The step would be: 



Step 3) || 



Pr 



V2. 
002 



R 
F2 



(On-hand bal.)-(Quan. ordered) = (New on-hand bal.) 

The wiring on the connection panel for the above step 
would be: 




An overflow condition might develop for subtraction, as well as 
for addition, because of the rules of algebra. 



V X |6|3|8l4|5l3i-|-|-| 



V 2 |5|0|0|2|llli-l-l-l-l-|-| 



R|1|1|3|8|6|6I4|0|0|0|0[0| + | 

As in the case of addition, the step exit will come from the +/- 
overflow hub rather than the normal step exit. 

The same special rules apply to subtraction as were listed above 
for addition, with the two following exceptions: 

(1) Whenever a character is transmitted to the result due to 
alphabetic information or an ignore code (see addition, 
rules 2 and 3), the borrow which would normally occur 
from that position is destroyed. 

(2) If alphabetic characters or ignore codes appear in either 
V"i or V*2, the sign of V\ will be transmitted as the sign 
of the result. 



V - 14 



c - MULTIPLICATION 

This process is used when multiplying \\ by V2. The symbol used 
for this process is X. The multiplication process hubs are 
located in line 25, A-L and a-1. As a sample step, assume that 
the problem is to multiply hours times rate to determine straight 
time pay. The values are: 



Input-output storage 001: Hours 

Drum revolver field F3: Hourly rate 

Place straight time pay in input-output storage 003. 

The step would be: 

, v l Pr v 2 = R 
Step 3) — ±- — 

H F3 X 001 003 

(Rate) X (Hours) . (Straight time pay) 

The wiring on the connection panel for the above step 
would be: 



20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 21 29 30 31 32 



l_i 




IL 



002 

So 
wooa 



MR. 
O 2 



47 U 4* 30 SI 





:s 






V 2 




o 


o 


o 


O 1 




I 


ooo 

•- 


FO 

. o 


MM. 
2 




I 


001 


^ 






f 


lu o 
§002 


n 


■*• 1 




So 


o 


O 4 





















r* " 


M 


il ii 








R 






O 


O 


O 1 O 






001 


TO 


MM. SH 






o 


o 


O 2 O 






001 


Fl 






Jf 


gra 


jf* 


^30 




u 


K«> 


*-*> 


O 4 O 




r 


»003 


F3 






In 


H- O 


o 


O 5 O 




in 


5 J 


F4 







To round the result of the multiplication requires an additional 
step. This is usually done by adding .005 to the result. If a 
man earned $15.2845 (unrounded), the addition of .005 would 
make the rounded earnings $15,2895; if his earnings were $15.2878. 
the rounded earnings would be $15.2928. If the result is to be 
used in further calculation, it is important to shift the result 
so as to drop off the position in which the rounding 5 has been 
added. 

The step to accomplish this might be: 



Pr Vo = R 



Vl rr v 2 
005 (1R) ~T~ ~W 
(S.T.Pay) + (5) 



009 (1R) 
(Rounded S.T.Pay) 



(1R) VI I0I0I0I0I0I1I512I8I7I8UI 

-.— r-T— This would have been 

V2 |- 1 -| -| -I -|-|-|-^_|-|5j + I entered previously in 

intermediate storage 29. 
(1R) R l-l-|OIOIOIOIO|l|5|2|9| + | 



V - 15 

The special rules for multiplication are: 

(1) Both values in multiplication must be numeric. 

(2) Unless the verification of each multiplication step is pre- 
vented by the wiring of "no-check", it is impossible to use 
a normal result shift in multiplication. Because of the 
method of multiplication, the File-Computer would attempt 
to compare the entire result as recomputed with the shifted 
result; therefore the step would never check. In most 
cases, however, a rounding step follows multiplication. As 
long as the total number of digits in the product does not 
exceed 11, the insignificant digits can be shifted off to 
the right during the rounding step. However, if the total 
number of digits in the result exceeds 11, a normal right 
shift does not move the digits to the left of the 11th 
position; therefore, the value would lose significant digits 
on the left. This is more fully explained below. 

If verification of each step is prevented by the wiring of 
"no-check", result shifting can take place, subject to the 
limitations in the following paragraphs. 

With the possibility of an 11 digit multiplier and an II 
digit multiplicand, a 22 digit product can be developed. 
The arithmetic section of the File-Computer contains 4 reg- 
isters, as follows: 

A B 

|11|1019|817|6|5|4|3I2I1I Ill|l0|9|8|7|6l5|4|3| 2|l| 

C ^^^ D 

I11I10I9I8I7I6I5I4I3I2I1I 111 1 10 1 9 l8|7|6l5|4|3| 2| ll 

On a multiplication step, Vj (multiplicand) is placed in 
the A register; V"2 (multiplier) is placed in the B register; 
and the product is developed in the C and D register, with 
the least significant digit of the product in the 1 position 
of the D register, and the other digits developing to the 
left. The product is always transferred from the D register 
into the result storage. With a product of more than 11 
digits, the additional digits will develop in the C register. 
A normal result shift will shift only the D register; there- 
fore, any attempt to shift significant digits from the C 
register into the D register would actually result in the 
entry of spaces in the left of the D register, rather than 
the digits from the C register. 



V - 16 



Since the maximum size of a storage field is 11 digits, no 
more than 11 digits can be retained as a product. In most 
cases of a product of over 11 digits, it is more important 
to retain the 11 digits to the left, rather than the 11 
digits to the right. 

A (Vi) B (V2 

I-I-Il|5l6l7[0|$l6|3|2l |-|-|-|ljfi|0|l|4|6l6|2| 

C D 

loloioloio 



Ol2|8|2l3jol I7I4I6I5I5 
most significant 



5I5I6I7I8I4I 



When the product is more than 11 digits, it is possible to 
retain either the 11 most significant digits of a product 
or the 11 least significant digits on one step. It is also 
possible to drop off insignificant digits to the right, 
thus retaining less than 11 digits in the product. 

The principle involved is the shifting of V^ and V2 to the 
left... so that all of the desired product digits fall within 
the C register. Then, by wiring the result shift to a 
special shift hub known as "EX. SH.", all the digits in the 
C register are shifted to their same relative position in 
the D register. The EX. SH. hubs are located in line 64, 
X and x. 

To determine the total number of shifts required in V\ and 

v 2 . 

a. Determine the maximum size of the product (the sum of 
the number of digits in V\ and V2) . A convenient way 
of doing this is making an X for each digit in V\ and 
V"2, and placing the decimal point in its proper location, 
The product in the example above could be: 

XXXXXjXXXXXXXXXXXX 

b. Determine how many digits are insignificant — how many 
are to be dropped off to the right. The formula for 
doing this is: 

Vi decimals + V"2 decimals - Desired result decimals = 
drop off digits. 

Decimals are the number of storage positions to the 
right of the decimal point. 

In the example shown above, assume that it is desirable 
to retain 6 digits following the decimal point. 

Ml dec. + V2 dec. - R dec. = Drop off digits 

5 + 7 - 6 6 



V - 17 



c. The formula for computing total left shifts of V\ and 
V 2 is: 

11 - drop off digits = Vj left shift + V 2 left shift. 

In assigning the left shifts, shift Vj as many places to 
the left as there are spaces to the left of the first sig- 
nificant digit; then shift V 2 the remaining number required 
For example: 



Assume Vi = |- |- |l|5l6l 7|0l9l8l3l 2l and V 2 = |-| -! -|l|8|0| 1| 4|6l 6l 2| 
(a) Retaining the 11 most significant digits 
Il|10|9|8j7f6|5|4|3|2i 



0' 







0?0 ( 

L 



Of 2' 81 21 3J 

Product 



l|l||lljlQ|9]8 | 7|6|5j4[3T2lTl Drop 

ilojj 71 4I6I515I5I5I61718I4I n _ 



off Vi + V 2 



" " v w ■ w -^ ■ 11 - 
^X — Drop oiij Vi : 



Would be computed as: 

|0|2|8|2|3|0|7|4|6|5|5||5|5|6|7|8|4|0|0|0|0|0l 
I Product — > 



2 left shift 
V 2 : 3 left shift 
R : EX.S 



(b) Retaining less than 11 digits in product 



11 


10 


9 


8 


7 


6 


5 


4 


3 


2 


1 


11 


10 


9 


8 


7 


6 


3" 


4131211 




















2 


8 


2 


Dr 


P 


7 


4 


6 


5 


5 


5 


5 


6l 7I e|4 












11 UUUl> t 










Lirop uii' 



Would be computed as: 
0I0I0|0|2I8I2I3]0|7|4 



Product- 



6I5I5I5I5I6I7I8I4I0I0I 



(c) Dropping off the maximum of 11 digits 



Drop off Vj + V 2 
11 - 9 = 2 

Vi : 2 left shift 
V 2 : left shift 
R : EX.S 



11 11019 18|7|6|5[4|3|2 ll 11 |lO|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2jT 
o| OI0I0I0I012I8I2I3I0II 7| 4I6I5I5I5I5I6I7I8I4 



Product 



■Drop Off 



This would be computed just as it stands 



Drop off Vi + V 2 
11-11 = 

Vi : left shift 
V 2 : left shift 
R : EX.S 



V - 18 



Assume Vi »| -|-|-|-|-|-|-|5|l|2|5|and V 2 = I- I- l-|- 1-|- |- I6J0 |5 |5I 



Retain 6 most significant digits of product 



11 







10 







11 



10 9 



010 



7f6|5|4 | 3|2 | l 
llo|3lll8l7|5 



Drop off Vi + V 2 



.Produc 



t J.DropJ .. 



11-2 = 9 

7 left shift 



J)ropJ 
off V 2 : 2 left shift 

R: EX.S 



Would be computed asi 



|0| 01 01 01 0| 31 II OJ 31 II 811 71 5] 01 01 01 010! 010! 01 01 

I I 

< Product ' 

Note that this method can be used for dropping off 
digits to the right when the product is less than 11 
digits, although it would be a faster machine opera- 
tion to drop off insignificant digits on the next 
step when rounding. 

3. If "no check" is wired, the location of the result may be 
the same as the location of V"i or V2. However, if it is 
not wired the location of the result must be different from 
both Vi and V2, because the check operation reaccesses the 
operands from Vj and V^. 

4. The program is speeded up if V~2 is the value whose sum of the 
digits is least. 



5. The sign of the product is delivered to the result storage 
according to the laws of algebra. 



V - 19 



D. DIVISION 

This process is used when dividing V^ by V"2, in order to obtain 
the quotient or remainder. The division process hubs are located 
in line 25, M-X and m-x. The programming symbol for this process 
is * . As a sample step, assume that the problem is to compute 
an average hourly rate. The values are: 

Input-output storage 003 = Total hours 1 decimal 

Input-output storage 005 = Gross pay 2 decimals 

Place average rate in intermediate storage 10 3 decimals 

This step would be: 

Pr 



v l 
Step 3) — 

F 005 (2 L) 
(Gross Pay) 



V2 = JL 
003 10 
(Total Hours) (Average Rate) 



The connection panel wiring for the above step would be: 



22 23 24 25 




The special rules for division are as follows: 

(1) Both values in division must be numeric. 

(2) To determine the number of shifts necessary to obtain a 
quotient with the desired number of decimals, the following 
rule is used: 



V - 20 

If Rd - (V ld - V^) = 

+ and < 12 : Vj Left Shift 

+ and ^12 : Vj (n Left Shift) + V 2 right shift to = total 

Shifts required 

- : V 2 Left Shift or R right Shift (only if "no-check" is 
wired) 

Note 1: "d" in above formula means decimals. 

Note 2: Vj left shift on the division process does not drop 
off any digits to the left in Vj, but merely acts to increase 
the number of quotient digits. Decimals refer to the number of 
storage positions to the right of the decimal point. 

In the sample step above, the average rate might be carried to 
2, 3 or 4 decimals. Using the formula, the shifts in each case 
would be computed as follows: 

R dec. - Vj dec. + Vp dec. = Shift 

2 - 2 + 1 = +1. V 1 left shift of 1 

3 - 2 + 1 = +2. V x left shift of 2 

4 - 2 + 1 = +3. Vi left shift of 3 

A V" 2 left shift might occur as follows: 

R dec. - V| dec. + V 2 dec. = Shift 

1 - 3 + 1 = -1. V 2 left shift of 1 

(3) Either an 11 digit quotient or an 11 digit remainder can be 
obtained on any one step. Any attempt to obtain a quotient 
of greater than eleven digits will result in the step exit 
emitting from the divide overflow hub, rather than the 
normal step exit. 

The values and results of the division process appear in 
the computer's registers as follows: 



V - 21 



A B 

11|10|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|±| |ll|lO|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2il|i| 



A Dec. 



Dividend - Vj 



B Dec. 



-Divisor - V~2 



11|10|«|6|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|±| |ll|16|«>|tt|7|6|5|4|3J2|l|i| 



C Dec. 



Remainder 



J v 



D Dec. 



Quotient 



Quotient decimal = V^ dec. - V*2 dec. + Vi left shift + V2 right shift 

- V] right shift - V2 left shift 



Remainder decimal - V^ dec. + Vj left shift 

- Vj right shift 



As can be seen, the quotient is normally delivered as the 
result. If it is desired to deliver the remainder as the 
result rather than the quotient, it is necessary to give 
the result a special shift instruction (Ex.SH). 

This shift transfers the remainder into the D register and 
the quotient into the C register. 

A sample problem illustrating the use of the remainder is: 

Drum Revolver Field F3 = Sales-to-date (in units) 

Intermediate Storage 39 = Constant value of 12 

Place sales-to-date (in dozens and fractions of 
dozens) in output storage 005 



V - 22 

The program would be: 

Step # Vj SH Pr V 2 SH R SH Next Step * 

15 F3 * 39 10 16 
(Sales) (12) (Dozens) 

16 F3 39 11 17 
(Sales) ' (12) (Fractions) EX SH 

17 10 2L 11 005 18 
(Dozens) + (Fractions) (Dozens 

& Fractions) 

The registers would appear as: 
Step 15 

Vil | I | I I I I I |5|5|+| 

f B 

V 2l I I I I I I I I Il|2| + | 

C = D 

|o|o|o|o|o|o|0|0|0|0|7j+| R |0| 0|0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 4|+| 

To 10 

Step 16 A 

Vxl | j I I I I I | |5|5l + | 

t B 

V 2 | I I I | | I I | UI2M 

C z D 

|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|7i+| R | 0|0|0|0|0|0|0 |0|0|0 141+1 Before R Shift 

|O|O|6|0|0|6|0|6|0|0|41+| R |O|O|O|0|O|0|0|0J0|0|71+|After R Ex.SH 

To 11 



Step 17 



A 
Vi |0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|4|0|Q1+| After 2L Shift 

+ R 

V 2 |0|0|0|0|0|0|0|OjO|0|71+! 



R |0|0|0|0|0|0|0|0|4|0|7J[+| 

To 005 



V - 23 

Of course, in one step the quotient could be delivered as: 
|0|0|0|0|0|0|4|5|8|3|3|+| 

which would be the decimal equivalent of 4 7/12 dozen. 
The program step would be: 

v l _SH _Pr 1 2 J>H. — — 
F3 4L t 39" 005 

(Sales) (12) (Sales dozens and decimal 

fractions) 

The four left shifts of Vj are required to obtain the 
four decimals in the result as determined from rule 2. 

(4) If division is made with a zero divisor (V2) , the quotient 
will always be 0. 

(5) Unless "no-check function" is wired, the storage location of 
the result should not be the same as the location of Vj or 
V"2. If "no-check" is wired, this limitation does not apply. 

(6) The sign of the quotient is determined according to the 
laws of algebra. The sign of the remainder is the sign of 
the dividend. 



V - 24 



E. TRANSFER 

This process is used to transfer information from one storage to 
another, or from a storage into the ADR or CD. The transfer hubs 
are located in line 22, A-x. The programming symbol for this 
process is T. As a sample step, assume that drum section and 
channel are located in input-output storage 000, and it is desired 
to transfer them to the ADR. 



The program step would be: 

Step 1) -11- IB. J2- 
000 T 

(drum sect. & channel) 



R 
ADR 
(address' register) 



The connection panel wiring for this step would be: 




The rules for transfer are: 



(1) The value to be transferred may be numeric, alphabetic, or 
a combination of alphabetic and numeric. 

(2) The sign of the value is automatically delivered as the 
sign of the result. 

(3) With a transfer operation, there is only one value, unless 
the transfer is a masking transfer as covered in rule 6. 
The value to be transferred is always wired as Vj. 

(4) During transfer the value to be transferred may be shifted, 
giving it a different decimal alignment or dropping off 
digits to the right or to the left. 

With a value in input-output storage 005 to be transferred 
to intermediate storage 10, some of the results which can 
be obtained are: 



V - 25 



V l storage 005 = |-|-|1|2|3|4|5 16|7|-|-|+| 
(a) 005 T - 10 |-|-|1|2|3|4|5|6|7|-|-| 



(b) 005 (2R) T - 10 |-|-|-|-|1|2|3|4|5|6|7| 



(c) 005 (5R) T - 10 |-|-|«|-|-|-|-|l|2|3|4|+| 



(d) 005 (4L) T - 10 |3|4|5|6|7|-|-|0|0|0|0| 



(e) 005 (4L) T - 10 (8R) |-|-|-| -| -| -| -|-|3|4|5| + 

(5) The transfer process d oes not pack zeros. A v alue such a s: 
}-| ),i ) |A| Bl-illQ|51will be transferred as: |-|-|-|-|- [ 
|A|B|-jl|0|5J Of course, if a value is shifted to the left 

during a transfer process, the rule for a left shift applies; 
that is zeros will be placed in the positions to the right 
(See example d above) . 

(6) A "masking" transfer permits the transfer of a value, while, 
at the same time, any desired digits are suppressed and 
replaced by ignore codes. The programming symbol for this 
process is T. As a sample problem, assume that a portion 

of a part number is to be transferred to the ADR. The values 
are: 

Input-output storage 000: Part number 

Intermediate storage 20 : Word to be used in masking 

part number 

Intermediate storage 11 : Blank 

The program could be: 

(1) -Ii- -£L _J 2 - = -£_ 

000 T 20 10 C2 R) 

(part number) (masking word) 



■♦•Drum Section 
■* Channel 



Vj |A|B|1|1|4|M|.2|9|9|1|X| 

T 

V 2 H-H-H?|9|0|0|0|0| 

R |-|-|A|B|l|l|4|i|i|9|9| 



V - 26 

(2) _I X _ _Pr_ _V 2 - = -H- 
10 + 11 ADR 

(drum sect, channel) (blank storage) 

V! |.|.|a|b|i|i|4|i|i|9|9| 

+ 

Vo 



R l0t0fA!Bflflf4f0(0[9l9| 

Note that two steps were required to accomplish this t be- 
cause ignore codes will not be accepted by the ADR. Since 
the ADR will accept only the last six digits of a value, 
it was not necessary to mask the five digits to the left 
of the storage. 

The rules for masking transfer are: 

(a) Vj is the value in which certain characters are to be 
suppressed. It may be numeric, alphabetic, or a 
combination of the two. 

(b) V*2 is the value which causes the characters in V^ to 
be suppressed and replaced by ignore codes. The 
masking code is determined by a zero or any other 
digit in V^. A zero in V 2 will transfer the charac- 
ter in V^ to the result. Any other digit in V 2 will 
transfer an ignore code to the result. V 2 , the 
"masking word", will in most cases be stored in inter- 
mediate storage as a constant. 

(c) A masking transfer does not pack zeros. 



V - 27 



F. COMPARE 

This process is used when V^ is to be compared with V2 to deter- 
mine whether Vj is equal to, greater than, or less than V2« By 
wiring to an interstep function known as branching, the results 
of the comparison are made available. The programming symbol 
for the process is C. The compare hubs are located in line 26, 
G-L and g-1. 

For example, assume an invoicing problem with a tabulating card 
input-output device, where the cards represent the items on a 
customer order grouped together by customer number. The problem 
is to determine when the first card of a new order enters the 
machine, so that the dollar total of the preceding order can be 
accumulated with orders to date in the customer's URA. The 
values are: 

Input-output storage 001: Customer number 

Intermediate storage 10 : Customer number (stored 
from the first card of the order) 

The program step would be: 



Step 5)iL 5 12. 
001 c 10 



R Next Step 
~ BR 1 



The connection panel wiring for the above is as follows: 



21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 2» 30 31 




.48 41 


M Sll 






V 2 








O 1 o 


ooo 


FO 


tern. sh. 








O 2 o 


001 


Fl 




3 ° 

ij 002 





3 o 


F2 










o o 


O 


O 4 o 


SjOO: 


F3 




? 





t s ° 




/ 






/ 1 


Ho 


° 


/o « 


. 00! 


n 




5 ° 


Of 


7 C 


X0O6 


Ff 









• c 


007 


In 




O 


1° 


» c 


008 


/ rt 




O 


mo 


o io o 


4 


uj ° 


11 o 


10 


a fio 




i o 


12 O 


u 


S FU 




o 


nO 


13 


12 


«F12 




u 




14 O 



99 SO 


61 62 








R 




o 


o 


1 


1 


000 


FO 


AM. SH. 


1 





o 


2 


1 


001 


Fl 






Sooa 


o 


3 




F2 






So 


o 


O 4 




5>0O3 


F3 






K 


o 


5 




?004 
















A ° 


o 


O 6 




. 005 


F5 






t 


o 


7 












LOO) 


F6 














" 


o 


8 




007 


F7 






O 


O 


4 




008 


F8 






O 


a o 


O 10 




009 


UJ F9 

u. 

uj° 






O 


11 




10 


O FIO 

< 






O 


ft° 


12 




11 


S" 1 









n° 


13 O 




12 


§F12 









flo 


O 14 O 




13 


"f^ 






ujO 


1° 

-a.fj4. 


15 





V - 28 



The rules governing compare are: 

(1) V"i and V 2 may be numeric, alphabetic, or a combination 
thereof. Comparisons are made in accordance with the 
following sequence. 

Minus <( space = < 1 < 9 < A < R < + < S < Z 



(2) 



(3) 



(a) 



Vl 
V 2 



(b) V! 















1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


+ 
















1 


8 


9 


9 


+ 


"~T~ 


- 


A 


B D 


9 8 


716 


5 


+ 


- 


- 


- 


A 


C 


C 


1 


2 


3 


4 


4 


+ 



v l> V I 



v 2 > v x 



Zeros and spaces are considered equal by the compare 
process. An ignore code in Vj or V 2 will suppress 
comparison of that digit. 



V- 



- 


- 


- 


1 


4 


i 


5 


6 


- 


4 





+ 











1 


4 


A 


5 


6 





1 





+ 



Vl = v 2 



The signs of the two values are considered according 
to the laws of algebra during the compare process. 
This sign comparison is made first by the computer 
followed by the highest order digit comparison and 
proceeding to the least significant digit (not in- 
cluding sign position). Any code in the sign posi- 
tion is considered positive unless a negative code 
appears in this position. A sign code in any other 
position will follow the sequence of Rule (1). 



(a) V, 

V 2 

(b) V x 
Vo 













1 


2|3 


4 


5 


6| + 











[0| 





1 


213 


4 


5 


6l- 








--I- 




2 


5 


3 


4 


- 




















4 


6 


- 



Vj > v 2 



v 2 > Vl 



(4) No Result (R) is wired on a compare step. 

(5) The "next step" of a compare step is wired into a branch 
which has three "out" hubs: +, -, and 0. The result of 
the comparison is indicated as follows: 

+ V"i is greater than V 2 

- V^ is less than V 2 

V| is equal to V 2 



Each of these hubs is wired to the next step or interstep 
function desired. 



V - 29 



(6) Vi and V 2 may be shifted during the compare process to 
align the decimals or to drop off digits to the right or 
to the left. Comparison takes place after the shifts are 
completed. 

(a) Vj C V 2 (2R) 

v l 

Vj is equal to V 2 

V 2 















1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


+ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 








+ 



Without the shift, Vj is less than V 2 



(b) V x (6L) 



(6L) 



1 " 



- 


A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


+ 


F 


G 


H 


I 


J 


K 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


+ 



Vj is equal to V 2 



Without the shift, Vj is less than V 2 



V - 30 



G- LEFT ZERO ELIMINATION 

This process is used to replace zeros to the left of the first 
significant digit in a value with space codes. The programming 
symbol for the process is LZE. The hubs are located in line 26, 
M-R and m-r. 

With a tabulating card input-output device, it may be desirable 
not to punch preceding zeros in a value. With an amount in 
input-output storage 004, the program step to accomplish this 
would be: 



Step 3) 



ooJ 


Pr 
LZE 


(amount) 





pr V2. 



R 
004 
(amount) 



Vl |O|0|O|0|0|0|l|2|5|5|O|+| 
R |.|-|-|.|.|.|1|2|5|S|0H 

The connection panel wiring for the above step would be: 




QO 



V 2 
O l O 

•OH SM. 
O 2 O 

O 3 O 

O 4 O 

o s o 
o • o 

O 7 O 

O 1 o 
o » o 
O 10 o 



\ 




" 


1 M «0' 


« 


62 








R 








» O 





O 1 


O 


\ 


OK 


FO 


mm. 


SH. 


\ 


> O 





O 2 





4 


II 001 


Fl 






\ 


78!« 


O 


* 3 


o 


4 


'> 


' 




\ 


Ago 

£003 


6 


O 4 


o 





5.004 


o 


O 5 


o 


o 


F4 




O < 








. 00« 


FS 








<U o 

MM 





7 


o 





Ft 








~ 





o a 








1 001 


F7 








r ° 


o 


o s 


o 





1 OM 


FS 








r ° 

\ 009 


go 

gj F9 

L£ 


O 10 


o 


°l 







The rules governing left zero elimination are: 

(1) Vj may be numeric, alphabetic, or a combination thereof. 

(2) The process operates by shifting Vj to the left until the 
first significant digit is positioned in the 11th character 
position. It then shifts the value to its original position, 
replacing any zeros to the left with space codes. The stor- 
age location of the result may be any storage location de- 
sired, thus affecting a transfer at the same time as suppres- 
sing zeros. 



V - 31 

(3) No V2 is wired on a left zero elimination step, 

(4) Both V^ and R may have an external shift wired. 

Vi Pr V9 - _R_ 
Tm T2E - 004 (3 R) 

Vi |0|0|0|0|8|3|6|5|2|9|4|+| 

H |-I4-|-|-|-|-|8|3|6|5| + | 



V - 32 

H. CHANNEL SEARCH 

There are two channel search processes - channel search equal 
and channel search unequal. Both are used to search the channel 
of the large capacity storage drum whose drum section and channel 
number are in the ADR. 

A channel search process is used, only when a full address (drum 
section, channel and URA) is not available; it is a means of 
locating the URA when only the drum section and channel are 
known. The equal process hubs are located in line 26, A-C and 
a-c; the unequal process hubs are located in line 26, D-F and 
d-f. 

EQUAL CHANNEL SEARCH 

Channel search equal compares two identifiers with the field in 
each URA in which the identifier has been stored. Either of the 
two identifiers may be at input or intermediate storage, however, 
they do not have to be wired to the same storage. If either of 
the two identifiers match that of a URA, that URA is written on 
the revolver. If neither of the two identifiers match, the last 
URA on the channel is written on the revolver. The programming 
symbol for this process is ECS. 

The purpose of having two possible identifiers in a channel 
search-equal step is the simplification of certain loading 
routines. In these routines the second identifier will usually 
contain only spaces or zeros. This use of channel search is 
covered in section IV. In almost all other cases, only the 
identifier from input will actually be used. However, because 
of the provision for two identifiers, if only one is required 
it must be wired as both Vj and V2 of a program step. This 
wiring is normal wiring of V^ and V2 to the same storage. 

The result of a channel search-equal step is wired to the channel 
search identifier field in which the identifier has been stored. 
Note that these hubs, located in line 58, O-k, are used only dur- 
ing the channel search process. The unit record area storage 
fields, line 60, A-T, are used at all other times when referring 
to a field on the drum revolver. 

As an example of the programming required to complete an equal 
channel search operation, assume the following: 



Input-output storage 000 
Input-output storage 001 
Drum field FO 



Drum section, channel 
Complete part number 
Complete part number 



V - 33 



The two program steps required to locate the URA and write it on 
the revolver (assuming there is no channel overflow) 
would be: 



OOO 



.EB. 



-V2- 



ADR 



Next step 
2 



(drum section, channel) 



(2) 001 ECS 001 CSFO 

(part no.) (part no.) (part no.) 



Substituting values in the above steps: 

(1) V X (000) |-|-|-|-|-|1|6|3|3|-|-| + | 
T 



R (ADR) |-H-r-Hl|6|3|3J-|-l+| 



(drum sect.) (channel) (URA) 



ex:s Out 



Vl = 
Step 
3 


v 2 = 

Step 
3 


Step 
6 



(2) Vi (001) |-|-|-|A|B|1|0|9|6|3|3|+| 
V 2 (001) |-|-|-|A|B|1|0|9|6|3|3| + | 
R (CSFO) |-|-|-|A|B|1|0|9|6|3|3|+| 

As of the beginning of step 3, all fields in the 
unit record area of part no. AB109633 are available 
for use. 



V - 34 



The connection panel wiring for step 2 would be: 




The rules governing the equal channel search process are: 

(1) Vi and V2 may be numeric, alphabetic, or a combination. 
Vi and V2 are the locations of the input or intermediate 
storage. R is the drum field to be searched. Note that 
with an equal channel search process, the full designation 
must be stored in the URA. With a complete address to 
place in the ADR and the use of "read", the designation need 
not be stored in the URA in order to locate the URA. 

(2) The drum field being used during channel search is identified 
as "Channel Search Identifier". During the channel search 
process, the actual fields on the drum are being compared 
with the input and/ or intermediate storage. Once a URA has 
been located and written on the revolver, the drum revolver 
fields are used. There are two types of indication: CSFO 
through CSF19, used only during channel search and FO through 
F19, used at all other times. If two fields in a record are 
to be searched, wire one channel search field from the R 
address hub and the other from the result shift hub. 



(3) The process itself is wired into an equal channel search hub. 
There are 6 of these hubs on the connection panel. 



V - 35 



(4) The exit of the equal channel search step is wired to 
an in hub of the CS equal branches (D-X) (13-16) . If a 
DRA whose identifier equals the Vi or V2 value is found, it 
is written on the revolver and the next step branch is 
obtained from the CS Equal Out hubs Vi - or V2 = (D-X) 
(14-15) respectively. If no DRA is found in the channel 

whose identifier equals Vj or V"2 then the last DRA in the 
channel is written on the revolver and the next step exit 
is obtained from the equal CS £ hub (D-X) (16) . This last 
exit will normally be wired to the channel overflow routine 
(see rule 11) . 

(5) V]_, V~2 and R may be shifted to give them the same decimal 
alignment, as in the compare process. 

(6) The channel search process does not consider zeros and 
spaces as equals. 

(7) An ignore code in Vj or V"2 will not prevent comparison of 
that position with the corresponding character in R. 



(a) V X & V 2 PT 
ECS 

R FT 



(b) Vi & v 2 pf 
ECS 

r rrr 



■|-|A|i|i|l|2|3| 

v l & Vo compare with R 

•l-|A|i|i|l|2|3| 2 



A|i|i|l|2|3| 

\I\ & V"2 do not compare 



■ |-|-|A|B|C|1|2|3| with R 



(8) A channel search is started at the URA designation in the 
ADR. It will end at the last URA in the channel. In a 
system with URA numbers from 00 to 19, if the number 13 were 
entered in the ADR in the URA positions, channel search 
would take place only on URA's 13 through 19. Therefore, 

to search a channel completely, 00 should be entered into 
the ADR in the URA position. 

If significant digits might be present in the URA positions, 
ignore codes should be substituted for them before adding to 
a blank storage and placing in the ADR. Shifting of V\ and 
R might also be used to accomplish this suppression. 

(9) When a URA is written on the revolver, the address of the 
URA from which it was taken is remembered until a new address 
is entered in the ADR. However, it is not possible to take 
this address from the ADR and place it in storage, thereby 
learning the full address of the URA. 



V - 36 



(10) If a complete drum address (drum section, channel, unit 
record area) is available, channel search is not used; the 
interstep function of "read" is used to place the informa- 
tion on the revolver instead. When channel search is used, 
"read" is not used. 

(11) Channel Overflow. . .In many File-Computer systems, it will 
be impossible to develop a full six digit address (drum 
section, URA, channel) from the existing code number. How- 
ever, in most cases it will be possible to develop a drum 
section and channel number. Channel number should be two 
digits with fairly even distribution; that is, as many OO's 
as Ol's, as 02's, as 99 f s. This will minimize the chances 
of channel overflow. 

t 
Obviously, when using this technique, there will be cases 

where the number of items to be placed on a channel is 

greater than the number of URA's available on that channel. 

At the same time, there may be channels where the number of 

items to be placed is considerably less than the URA's on 

the channel. Through the programming technique of channel 

overflow, the excess items from one channel can be placed 

on a channel where space is available. 

Assume a Univac File-Computer system with a URA of 24 digits. 
There are, therefore, 25 URA's in each channel, and -each 
channel can contain a maximum of 25 items. Analysis of the 
digits of the item number which have been selected as drum 
section and channel reveals that in drum section 02, channel 
76, there would be 30 items. However, in drum section 00, 
channel 55, there are only 16 items. All other channels are 
within the 25 item capacity of each channel. 

Channel 0276 — has five items for which there is no space; 
channel 0055 — has room for nine additional items. The 
excess items from 0276 — will, therefore, be stored on 0055 — . 
In order to do this, one URA from channel 0276 — must be used 
as an "overflow address". . .that is, where to look if the 
item number is not found on channel 0276 — . This means that 
only 24 items can be stored on 0276 — , and the extra six 
will be stored on 0055 — . 

The URA in which the overflow address is stored is the last 
URA on the channel, in this case URA # 24. 

The reason for placing the overflow address in the last URA 
on the channel is obvious when we realize that the equal 
channel search process automatically places the last URA in 
the channel on the revolver if a URA matching either \\ or 
V2 is not found during the search. In addition the equal 
channel search branch hubs notify us of the overflow condi- 
tion by emitting the branch exit from the ^ hub. 



V - 37 

Any field of a URA may be used to store the overflow address 
It should, of course, be at least four digits in length. 



The principle of overflow programming is as follows. If the 
item number is not found during an equal channel search 
operation, the last URA on the channel is written on the 
revolver. This URA will contain the overflow address, if 
any. On the next step, the overflow address is placed in 
the ADR. The program is then routed back to the channel 
search step, and the new channel is searched. This type of 
program is known as a "loop"; the machine will search as 
many channels as necessary until the item is found, always 
going to the new channel whose address has been found on 
the channel just searched. 



Assume the following: 
Input storage 001 
Input storage 002 
Drum storage FO 



Drum section and channel (0276 — ) 

Complete item number (A502376) 

Complete item number or overflow 
address... (A604839, etc.) or (005500) 



Program: 












Step: 


Si. 


Pr 


_V2_ 


= 


R Next Step 


1. 


001 
(0276—) 


T 






ADR 2 
(0276—) 


2. 


002 
(A502376) 


ECS 


002 
(A502376) 


CSFO ECS Br£ 
(A604839 etc.) 


inch 


(item no. 
found) 
To step 


1 

v 2 = 

is (item no. is ( 

found) 
4 To step 4 


* 
item 
To 


no. is not found) 
step 3 




3. 


FO 
(005500) 


T 






ADR 2 






(005500) 



On step 1, the drum section and channel are placed in the 
ADR. On step 2, the channel is searched for the item 
number; if it is found, the program continues with step 4. 
If it is not found, the last URA in the channel is written 
on the revolver. On step 3, the overflow address, located 



V - 38 



in field FO of the overflow URA is transferred to the ADR. 
The program reverts to step 2. As before, if the item is 
found on the new channel, the program continues at step 4. 
If it is not found, the new overflow address is transferred 
to the ADR and the loop is continued. 

In some cases an incorrect item number is being searched 
for in a channel which does not contain overflow data in 
the last URA. Because of this, it is necessary to make a 
test of the last URA to determine if it is a legitimate 
overflow address URA, before transferring the overflow 
address to the ADR. This can be done in many ways; however, 
the most usual technique is to place the overflow address 
in some URA field other than the item number field. If this 
is done, then the item number field will be blank if it is 
an overflow URA. This field can then be tested for a blank 
to determine valid overflow URA's. 

Unequal Channel Search 

The unequal channel search process is the exact opposite of 
the equal channel search operation in that it is used to 
locate all unit record areas which are unlike Vj (Note: V2 
is never wired on the unequal channel search process) rather 
than URA's which are like Vj as is the case in the equal 
channel search process. The programming symbol for this 
process is UCS. 

In principle the unequal channel search allows us to locate 
any URA within a channel whose identifier is not equal to 
the V\ value. If all the URA's within the channel have 
identifiers which are equal to the V^ value, then the last 
URA within the channel is captured on the revolver. 

In addition to being able to locate URA's whose identifier 
field does not equal Vi we can also locate URA's in which 
all fields do not equal'Vi (only in URA's which are divisible 
by 12). This is done by wiring the result of the step to 
the CS ALL hub (k-58) . 

The primary use of the unequal channel search process and its 
related branching function is in clearing or unloading drums, 
for it allows us to locate all those URA's which are not 
equal to a given storage (V"i) . If we wire V\ to a blank 
storage then this process will locate, within the channel 
specified by the ADR, the URA's whose identifier field or 
all fields are not blank and write the URA which is not blank 
on the revolver. An example will serve to illustrate the 
use of this process. 



V - 39 

Assume that we wish to locate all URA's, within the system, 
which are not blank in FO and clear them so that they are 
blank. Further assume that by either an input entry for 
each channel, containing the DS and CH number of every chan- 
nel in the system or by a progressive address total we can 
obtain the drum section and channel number from OOO. The 
values dealt with are: 

000= |-|-|-|-|-|0J1|9|6|0|0| + | 

DS CH URA (URA * always equals 00) 

19 . U-W-i-U-i-W-i-W 

CSFO* |-|-|-|-|-|X|X|X|X|X|X|+| Item no. or blank (space) 



The program for this operation would be: 



-Vl- 
1. 000 

(019600) 



2. 



19 



PR 



UCS 



-K2. 



R 



Tp_ 



ADR 


2 




(019600) 


CSFO UCS Branch 


(~ XXXXXX) 






Vl* 


Vl = 




clear all 


take 




revolver 


next 




fields 


address 
and 




write 


then 




to step 


back 




2 


to step 
1. 



In step number 1 the address, (obtained from a card or from 
a computer progressive total), is transferred to the ADR 
and the program proceeds to step number 2. Step 2 compares 
FO of every URA in the channel against a blank storage (19) 
for inequality. If a URA whose FO is not blank is found, 
then that URA is written on the revolver, and the exit of 
the step, being wired to the UCS branch, emits from the UCS 
V\ ^ hub. This exit would then be guided to a series of 
steps which clear the revolver fields with spaces (19) and 
then writes the revolver fields back to the drum URA, clear- 
ing the URA which caused the inequality signal. The routine 
is then directed back to step 2 in order to capture any more 
URA's in the channel which contain data in FO. Eventually 
all URA's within the channel will be cleared and then, since 
all FO's in the channel are blank (or equal to Vj) , the exit 
of the step will emit from the UCS V\ = hubs, thus instruct- 
ing us to place a new address in the ADR by either feeding 
the next address card or increasing the address progressive 
total by 1 in the 3rd position. 



V - 40 



The rules governing channel search-unequal are in general 
the same as those given for the equal channel search process 
except for the points mentioned above. 



V - 41 



5. EXI T OR O U T OF A STEP 

»■— — — — — i - - 

The exit, or out of a step, is the means whereby the individual steps 
are tied together to form a program. The step out hubs are located 
at line 12, A-x. When the process called for has been completed, the 
result entered into storage, and the step completely checked (if "no- 
check M is not wired), a pulse will be emitted at the exit hub. This 
pulse can be wired to the entry of the following functions: 

1. The next step of the program 

2. Any interstep function 

3. Demand assignment 

4. Output function transfer line 

When the Univac File-Computer, through its self-checking features, 
detects certain types of errors, the exit of the step in which the 
error was detected is not emitted at the out hub of the step, but 
rather at a hub indicating the type of error. (See B, following) 

A discussion of the places to which an out of a step may be wired, as 
well as the error hubs, follows: 

A. WIRING FROM "OUT" OF A STEP 



1. The next step of the program 

In many cases, the "out" of a step will be wired to the "in" of 
the step immediately beneath it on the plugboard. The step in 
hubs are located at line 11, A-x. That is, the out of step 3 
may be wired to the in of step 4. However, the Univac File- 
Computer is completely non-sequential in operation. This means 
that the out of a step can be wired to the in of any of the 
other 47 steps. A program could be set up to go from step 1 to 
5 to 3 to 4 to 10 to 6 to 48, etc. It would even be possible to 
start at step 48 and work backwards to step 1. 

As discussed under channel search, it is possible to set up a 
"loop" of steps; that is to go back through a series of steps 
until a certain desired result is obtained. Note that in all 
cases where a loop is set up, some means must be found of 
getting out of the loop, for example, the branching of a 
channel search or +, -, or branching. If this is not done, 
the prdtjram will never continue past the loop. Another example 
of a loop is the calculation of square root, which is done by 
approximating the square root, testing, and making another 
approximation until the root is found. To accomplish this, 
the same series of steps is used several times. If step 
numbers 3 through 6 were used 5 times, this would be the 
equivalent of 20 steps; yet only 4 are wired on the plugboard. 

The exits of several different steps can be wired to the entry 
of the same step. If one program step is common to several 
different routines, the exit of the last step of each routine 
could be wired to the entry of the common step, saving the 
necessity of repeating it for each routine. 



V - 42 



2. An interstep function 

An interstep function is an operation that occurs between 
program steps. It has an in and an out in the same way that 
a program step does. The in is wired from the out of a pro- 
gram step or another interstep function, and the out is wired 
to the entry of any of the functions to which a step out is 
wired. A pulse will be emitted from the out hub when the 
function has been completed. (See interstep functions for a 
more complete discussion.) 

The interstep functions are: 



a. 


Step clear 


b. 


Read unit record 


c. 


Write unit record 


d. 


Branching 


e. 


Program selector 


f. 


Channel search branching 


Demand 


assignment 



3. 

The out of a step may be wired to one of two types of hubs 
in the demand assignment section. . ."test" and "in". 

If it is wired to a test hub, (line 3-4, B-I) the correspond- 
ing "yes" ready hub (line 6, B-I) will emit if the associated 
demand input-output device is fully loaded. If the corres- 
ponding demand unit is not fully loaded, the corresponding 
"no" ready hub (line 5, B-I) will emit. 

If the exit of a step is wired to "in" of demand (line 7, B-I) 
it will cause the multiplex function to shift to the unit 
demanded. When the connection has been completed, one of the 
two out hubs will emit. If the last operation by this demand 
unit was to transfer information into the output medium the 
"output" hub (line 9, B-I) will emit. If the last operation 
by this demand unit was to transfer information from the input 
medium into storage the "input" hub (line 8, B-I) will emit. 

4. Output control lines 

The out of a step may be wired to any one of the 10 output 
control lines (line 2-7, e-n) which are numbered A - J. There 
are 6 hubs for each line, and wiring may be to any of the 6 
without danger of a "backfeed". Each of the 10 lines may 
perform a special function at the input-output device to 
which the multiplex function is connected at the moment. For 
example, function A, when connected to the card sensing- 
punching unit may sort a card; when connected to a tape unit, 
function A may feed tape. Function B on the card sensing- 
punching unit might trip a card, and so forth. 



V - 43 

B. ERROR HUBS 

For the following reasons, the Univac File-Computer will signal 
an error condition: 

1. Invalid address 

2. Parity check 

3. Arithmetic error 

4. Addition or subtraction overflow 

5. Division overflow 

When one of these conditions exists, the following will occur: 

(1) The step "out" will not emit a pulse. Instead, the corres- 
ponding error hub will be energized. This hub may be wired 
to program selectors, output transfer lines (to operate a 
function in an input-output device), and similar functions. 
However, it should not be used to start another program step. 

(2) The computer will hang up at the point in the program in 
which the error was detected. Before another program step 
can be started, this step must be cleared. This is done by 
wiring to "step clear". It may be done by wiring directly 
from the error hub to step clear, or by wiring first to a 
program selector or similar function and then to step clear. 
Since there are two hubs for each error, one hub may be wired 
to step clear while the other is wired to a program selector 
or other function. 

A more detailed explanation of each of the error hubs follows: 

1. Invalid address (line 3-4, a) 
Invalid addresses include: 

a. Alphabetic information (including ignore codes) 

b. Drum section and/or URA numbers larger than the maximum 
range of the system. For example, in a one drum system, 
any drum section number of 03 or more would be invalid. 

If an invalid address is entered into the ADR and a read, 
write, or channel search operation is called for, the instruc- 
tion will not be performed. No data will be read out or 
altered. The invalid address error signal will emit on the 
first following step with a value or result wired to one of 
the revolver fields, FO through F19. 

2. Parity error (line 7-8, X) 

The Univac File-Computer checks each character as it is trans- 
mitted into, or out of a register, to be certain that it has 
not changed during transmission. If it does not check, the 
step will not be completed, and the two "parity" error hubs 
will emit a pulse. 



V - 44 



3. Arithmetic error (line 3-4, X) 

The File-Computer will automatically check each process. If 
a process does not prove the "arith" error hubs will be ener- 
gized. One of these hubs can be wired to "step repeat " f 
causing the machine to repeat the step until the correct 
answer is computed, provided the error is a computer error 
and not a program error (i.e. R shift in multiplication when 
check is made) . 

The machine hangs up on the step on which the error was made 
until a correct answer is computed by means of step repeat 
(if it was wired) . In addition and subtraction, no result 
is delivered to storage until a correct answer has been com- 
puted. In multiplication and division, an incorrect answer 
could be placed in storage, though it will be replaced by 
the correct result computed on the step repeat. 

If the "no-check" hub is wired, the machine will not verify 
the results of a multiplication or division*. 

4. Addition or subtraction overflow (line 5-6, X) 

This error signal will occur when a carry takes place into 
the 12th position. 

5. Division overflow ( line 5-6, a) 

If the left shifts wired on a division step would develop 
more than 11 quotient digits, the division process is not begun; 
and the computer hangs up. This occurs whether or not step 
repeat is wired. 



V - 45 
INTERSTEP FUNCTIONS 



An interstep function is a function which occurs between steps of a 
program. For each function used, there is an "in" hub, which is 
usually wired from the out of a step or another interstep function. 
When the operation has been completed, the corresponding out hub will 
emit. This can be wired to another interstep function or to a pro- 
gram step. 

The interstep functions are: 

a. Step clear 

b. Read unit record 

c. Write unit record 

d. Branching 

e. Program select 

f. Channel search branching 

Each of these is considered in detail. 

A. STEP CLEAR (line 3-8, b) 

Step clear is used to clear the step on which the File-Computer 
hangs up because one of the errors listed in Section 5-B has 
occurred. When one of these errors occurs the program cannot 
be continued until the step has been cleared by means of step 
clear. 

The "in" hub is wired from the error hub. The "out" hub may be 
wired to another step, a program select, or any other place to 
which a step out is wired. 

Note that when a pulse is emitted from step clear, there is no 
indication as to which step has just been cleared. When an error 
occurs, it is probably advisable not to continue the program, but 
rather to stop the computer. The cause of the error can then be 
determined, and the program continued. 

B. READ UNIT RECORD (line 13-14, D-G and 13-14, e-h) 

This interstep function is used to read a specific unit record 
area on the large capacity drum, and write that URA in every unit 
record area on the revolver. In order to use this function, a 
complete address (drum section, unit record area, and channel) 
must have previously been placed in the address register. 

Note: Switching of the address register to the specified drum 
section and channel is initiated as soon as the address in the 
address register is transferred to the staticizer. This transfer 
takes place automatically when the address is delivered to the 
address register, unless a prior read or write unit record or 
channel search operation is in process. In that case, the auto- 
matic transfer is delayed until the prior instruction is com- 
pleted then the transfer takes place and the switching imme- 
diately commences. It is possible, therefore, to "overlap" other 



V - 46 



instructions with the switching time. If the switching is not 
completed when a read, write or channel search instruction is 
received, the instruction will be "remembered" until switching 
is completed and then will be initiated. 

The "out" hub of a read function emits a pulse immediately follow- 
ing the receipt of an "in" pulse. Calculations not involving a 
revolver field can take place simultaneously with reading. If a 
revolver field is called upon before the URA is written on the 
revolver (and, therefore, available for use), an automatic inter- 
lock will delay the program until the read function has been com- 
pleted. 

There are 8 read functions available, indicated as Rl through R8. 
This makes it possible to go to 8 different places from a read 
function without the use of selectors. 

Assuming that a complete address is placed in the address regis- 
ter from input storage 000 on step l...the programming would be: 



Step _Vj_ _Pr _y 2 - = R Next Step Rl From 



To 



000 



ADR 



Rl 



Step 1 Step 2 



The connection panel wiring for this step would be: 




Note that both channel search and read accomplish the same 
purpose. . .the writing of a URA on the revolver so that the 
fields in the URA are available for use. Unless one of the 
two operations is used, it is impossible to call on the storage 
fields of the large capacity drum. Read is used when a complete 
address is available, channel search when an incomplete address 
is to be used. Note also that a read instruction does not re- 
move the fields from the large capacity drum; the URA remains 
on the drum unchanged until a write instruction is given. 



V - 47 



C. WRITE UNIT RECORD (line 15-16, D-G and 15-16, e-h) 

This interstep function is used to read the fields in the revolver 
and write them in the URA whose address is in the ADR. Whenever 
one of the large capacity drum fields (FO through F19) has been 
changed during a program, a write instruction should be given to 
the File-Computer so that the changed information can be placed 
in its URA. During the program, changes are made only on the 
revolver; therefore, unless a write instruction is given to the 
File-Computer, the new information will not be placed on the 
large capacity drum. If no change has been made, as for example, 
in referring to a list of rates, a write instruction is unneces- 
sary. 

When the "in" of a write instruction receives a pulse, the fields 
on the revolver will be written in the URA specified by the ad- 
dress in the staticizer, usually the URA which was read last. If 
two URA's are read before a write instruction is given to the 
File-Computer, the write instruction will always place the infor- 
mation in the last URA which was read. If, at the time the "in" 
of a write instruction is impulsed, a channel search operation 
had been performed and no new address transferred to the ADR, 
the data from the revolver will be written in the URA located by 
channel search. 

The "out" of a write function emits a pulse immediately following 
the receipt of an "in" pulse. Calculations not involving a 
revolver field can take place simultaneously with writing. If 
a drum field is called upon before writing is complete, an auto- 
matic interlock will delay the step until the completion of the 
writing operation. 

There are 8 write instructions available, indicated as Wl through 
W8. This makes it possible to go to 8 different places from a 
write instruction without the use of selectors. If it is desired 
to go into a write instruction from several different steps be- 
cause of varying routines, yet always go to the same place follow- 
ing the write instruction, only one write need be used. The "in" 
would be wired from all the steps desired, while the out would 
go to the one common destination. It would be equally correct 
to wire each step to a separate write instruction. 

Assume that the last step of a problem is to accumulate sales-to- 
date, then write the information from the revolver back on the 
drum, and finally inform the output device that the program has 
been completed. With the detail sales information in input 
storage 008, and sales-to-date in drum field F10, the program 
step might be: 

Step _Vj_ Pt _V 2 _ = J. Next Step W4 From To 

10 F10 + 008 F10 W4 Step 10 Transfer 

line A 



V - 48 



.T he conne ction panel wiring for this would be: 





There is no relationship between the read hubs and the write hubs. 
In other words, when Rl is used, it does not matter whether Wl or 
W8 is used for writing the information back on the drum. 

Whether read or channel search is used, write is the only method 
of placing the information back on the drum. A new address may 
be transferred to the ADR while a read, write or channel search 
operation is in process... its automatic transfer to the stati- 
cizer will be delayed until the completion of the previous in- 
struction. 

D. BRANCHING (line 13-16, H-P and 13-16, i-q) 

Branching is the means of determining the next operation, depend- 
ing on whether the result of a step is +, -, or 0. It is also 
used in connection with the compare process to determine whether 
Vj is larger than, equal to, or less than V2 (see "compare"). 

For example, one step in a payroll problem might be to subtract 
an employee's non-taxable income from his gross pay. If the 
remainder is plus, it should be multiplied by the tax rate; if 
it is minus, no tax is to be deducted. Note that compare is not 
the best process to use, since the result itself may be used in 
further computation, and there is no result with a compare process 

Assume the following: 

Input storage 007: Gross pay 

Intermediate storage 12: Non-taxable income 

Intermediate storage 20: 18% (Tax rate) 



Place the taxable income in storage 10, withholding tax in 
004. 



V - 49 



The steps to accomplish this might be: 

Step V 1 Pr V2 = R Next Step From + 



12 007 - 12 10 BR1 
(gross Pay) (non-tax inc) (tax inc) 



12 13 15 15 



13. 10 X 20 004 14 
(tax inc) (.18) (with. tax) 

14. Rounding step 

15. Continue program 

Note that the zero hub is wired. If the result should happen to 
be zero, and the zero hub were not wired, the machine would hang 
up... in this case, if the answer were zero, the same steps would 
be skipped, as if the answer were minus. 

The connection panel wiring for step 12 would be: 



51 


n 


to 


ft *2 










R 




? 








O 1 O 




I 


MX 


FO 


JM. SH 




4 








O 2 O 




1 


001 


Fl 








There are 18 branches, referred to in programming as BR1 through 
BR18. This means that 18 determinations of + -, or (including 
comparisons) can be made without the use of selectors. 

E. SELECTORS 

(1) Operation of selectors 

Although a selector itself is not an interstep function, it 
is important to explain what a selector is before explaining 
the interstep function of Program Select. 

A selector is a two-way, electrically operated switch which 
allows the programmer to route machine functions in one of 
two directions, based upon the presence or absence of con- 
trol positions, negative results, or any other controllable 
machine function. 



V - 50 



Basically, a selector functions as a relay and as such is 
shown in Fig. 13. 



FtGURE 13 




\* 



GROUND 



V - 51 



The iron core (a) around which the wire is coiled becomes 
magnetized when current is placed in the pickup hub, and the 
ground hub is wired to either computer ground, demand ground 
or scan ground. Thus, when current enters the pickup, the 
metal bar (b) over the iron core is drawn down to make con- 
tact with the "select" bar (c) , and any current entering 
into the common hub will emit or come out of the select 
hub. Conversely, if current does not enter the pickup hub, 
the iron core will not be magnetized and the spring (d) 
will keep the common bar (b) in contact with non-select 
bar (e) ; and any current entering the common hub will be 
received at the non-select hub. 

In order to complete the circuit, and, therefore, make the 
selector effective, it is necessary to wire the ground hub 
to one of three places: computer ground, demand or scan 
ground. Demand or scan ground is used when the selector 
has reference to a particular input-output device. There 
are 8 hubs labeled "demand ground", each of which belongs 
to its corresponding demand input-output device. There are 
6 hubs labeled "scan ground". Each of these is related to 
the 6 corresponding scan outs. (See following section V-8 
for discussion of multiplex control) . 

When the ground of a selector is wired to a demand ground 
hub, the circuit will be completed only when that particular 
demand input-output device is connected to the computer 
through the multiplex function. For example, suppose that 
selector 1 is to be energized whenever a minus condition 
occurs on step 29 if demand input-output device 3 is con- 
nected to the computer. The ground of selector 1 would be 
wired to demand ground 3. No matter how many times step 
29 has a minus result, the selector would be energized only 
when demand input-output device 3 is connected to the compu- 
ter. 

Scan ground operates in the same fashion. It is effective 
only when a scan input-output device, related to the specific 
scan out, is connected to the system through the multiplex 
function. 

If a selector is to operate regardless of the input-output 
device connection to the computer, the ground of the selector 
is wired to "computer ground". When this is done, whenever 
a pulse enters the pickup, the selector will be energized. 

The File-Computer has 48 selectors (lines 38-43, A-z) . 
These are of two types. . .single pole and multi-pole. The 
difference is that when the pickup of a multi-pole selector 
is energized, more than one common bar (b) is affected. 
Thus, more than one choice may be made based upon the con- 
dition causing the selector to be energized. The 46 selec- 
tors are divided as follows: 



V - 52 

16 single-pole selectors 

24 two-pole selectors 

8 four-pole selectors 

A selector may be diagrammed as follows: 

JUL ®L £G_ _DG_ SCAN S_ JC_ NS 

Selector 1 oo o o oooo 

PU = Pickup - wired from the pulse causing the selector 
to become select, (line 20, A-z) 

GD = Ground - wired to either computer ground, demand or 
scan ground, (line 2, A-z) 

CG = Computer ground, (line 1, A-P & 1, g-z) 

DG = Demand ground, (line 1, Q-X) 

SCAN = Scan ground, (line 1, a-f) 

S = Select - wired to hub desired when selector is on 
the select side, (line 38, A-z and 41, A-z) 

C = Common - wired from hub which is to change, dependent 
upon the position of the selector, (line 39, A-z and 
42, A-z) 

NS = Non-select - wired to hub desired when selector has 
not been changed to the select side, (line 40, A-z 
and 43A-z) 

2. Use of selectors 



Selectors may be used to alter any factor, or combination 
of factors, in a program: value 1, process, value 2, re- 
sult, next step, etc. There are two basic ways in which 
a selector operates: 

a. Altering a program dependent upon a condition recognized 
at the input device. 

b. Altering a program dependent upon a condition recognized 
by the computer as a result of its calculations. 

In the first case, the exception is pre-coded and placed in 
the input device; in the second case, it is recognized that 
the exception might occur as a result of the program, but it 
is impossible to pre-code the input media causing the excep- 
tion. An example of each type follows: 



V - 53 



(a) Use of selector precoded at input device. 



Assume a payroll problem with the following information 
in input storage units: 



Storaae 








De script 


ion 


000 
001 








Day rate 
Hours 


wired through 
input transfer lines 


1 
2 
3 


- 1st shift" 

- 2nd shift 

- 3rd shift_ 


" Shift code 


Shift 


Shift 


rate 




Stored as constant in 
storage 


1 
2 
3 


.00 
.05 
.09 






10 
11 
12 





By using selectors, only one step would be required to 
add shift rate to day rate to arrive at total pay rate, 
The step would be: 



Step 
20. 



JLU JPlL JE2- 



R 



000 + 10, 11 or 12 20 
(day rate) (shift rate) (total rate) 



In this case, value 2 is to be put through selectors 
to determine whether to add the constant from storage 
10, 11, or 12 to the day rate. 

Assume that selector 1 will be on the select side for 
2nd shift employees and that selector 2 will be on the 
select side for 3rd shift employees. If neither selec- 
tor 1 nor selector 2 is select, the employee must be on 
the 1st shift. This may be diagrammed as follows: 




GD CG. 



_S_ C. NS 



(11 = .05)(V 2 /of step 20) 



Selector 2 



3 at input' 



PU 



GD 



_CG 



NS 



(12 = .09) (10 = .00) 



V - 54 



V2 of step 20, which is to be selected, is wired to the 
common of selector 1. If selector 1 is on the select 
side, the employee is 2nd shift. Storage 11 will be 
called upon, and .05 will be added to the day rate. 
If selector 1 is not on the select side, the employee 
is either 3rd shift or 1st shift. The wiring is, 
therefore, to the common of selector 2 to determine his 
shift. If selector 2 is on the select side, the man is 
3rd shift. Storage 12 is called upon and .09 will be 
added to the day rate. If a man is neither 2nd shift 
nor 3rd shift, neither selector will be on the select 
side, and the employee must be 1st shift. On the non- 
select side of selector 2, storage 10 will be called 
upon, and .00 will be added to the man's day rate. 

(b) .Use of selector determined by computer. 

Assume a problem where the entire 48 step capacity of 
the machine has been used, but one more step is needed 
when there is a minus result on step 48. The problem 
is to reuse one of the existing steps to accomplish 
the additional operation. The extra step appears as: 

-Vl_ £r_ _1 2 - - -B_ To 
002 X 003 004 OPC A 

In order to make the most economical use of selectors, 
search through the program for another similar step. 
Assume the step most similar is: 

STEP 27: 

J£i_ -£r_ -V2_ = _R_ _To_ 

002 + 10 11 28 

As can be seen by comparing the two steps, the problem is 
to go through step 27 once and do the operation once; 
however, when there is a minus result on step 48, repeat 
step 27 changing the process from plus to multiply, 
V~2 from 10 to 003, result from 11 to 004, and step exit 
from 28 to output control line A. In order to do this, 
the machine must be told that it has been through step 
27 once, and that the values should now be changed. 
The means of doing this is a program select (explained 
more fully below). A program select is an interstep 
function which changes the selectors associated with it 
from the non-select side to the select side, and keeps 
them on the select side for a predetermined length of 
time. 

In this case, a 4-pole selector should be used, since 
there are four choices to be made. Assume that imme- 
diately upon a minus branching of step 48, the program 



V - 55 



is wired to program select 2, which is associated with 
selector 6, a 4-pole selector. (Note that a selector 
remains on the select side only for the duration of 
the pulse at the pickup; the minus pulse itself could 
not be used as a pickup since it would not last into 
the next step, and the selector would immediately 
revert to the non-select side.) 

A diagram of selector 6 would be: 



Selector 6: PU 


GD 


CG 


£ 

A 




NS 

a. (a) 


Cps 2 






£ 


PIT 27 










CTO3 


V 2 *27 


•^ (b) 
10 



* f •* (c) 

004 R J 27 11 

•> H ^ (d) 

IPC A OUT 27 IN 28 



OP 



When selector 6 is on the non-select side, it means 
that we have not gone through step 48; therefore, we 
must be using step 27 for the first time. However, if 
selector 6 is on the select side, it means that we have 
gone through step 48, have received a minus branch, and 
are using step 27 for the second time. The first time 
through step 27, the process will be + , V"2 will be 
storage 10, R will be storage 11, and out of step 27 
will be step 28. The second time through, the process 
will be X, V2 will be 003, R will be 004, and out of 
step 27 will be to output control line A. It was not 
necessary to put V\ through the selector since the 
storage location will be 002 in both cases. 

A brief summary of the points to remember about selec- 
tors: 

1. A selector is merely a switch to redirect a pulse; 
it does not emit a pulse of its own. 

2. A selector will remain on the select side only as 
long as a pulse is entering its pickup; when that 
pulse stops, the selector will return to the non- 
select side. 

3. Any function of the machine can be changed through 
use of selectors. 



V - 56 



4. If only one factor is to be changed because of a 
certain condition, use a single pole selector; if 
more than one is to be changed, use a multi-pole 
selector. The same pulse can be used to operate 
several selectors if necessary. 

5. The factor which is to be changed is wired to the 
common. The variables are wired to the select 
and non-select sides. 

F. PROGRAM SELECTS (lines 18-19, A-p) 

Program selects are used to pick up selectors at a specific 
time, or upon detection of a certain condition during the pro- 
gram. It is a means of lengthening or "remembering" a pulse. 
In the second example of the use of selectors, the minus sign 
of step 48 was a momentary pulse which was no longer in existence 
during the time that selector 6 should be on the select side; by 
wiring to a program select, a pulse was created which would last 
the required length of time. 

There are 16 program selects provided, referred in programming 
as PS1 through PS16. Each program select has 4 hubs: 

1. In - When a pulse is received at the "in" hub, no matter how 
long in duration, the out (power) hub begins to emit current. 
The "in" hub is usually wired from the out of a step, the +, -, 
or of branching, or some other similar function. It re- 
sembles the "in" of a step. 

2. Delayed out or immediate out - 10 of the program selects 
are provided with delayed out hubs, PS 1 through PS 10, and 
6 with immediate out, PS 11 through PS 16. The out hub is 
the means of continuing the program, resembling the out of a 
step. A delayed out hub will not emit until the selector or 
selectors associated with the program select have changed 
from the non-select to the select side, a process requiring 
15 milliseconds. A delayed out hub should be used when the 
associated selector is to be used immediately. An immediate 
out hub will emit immediately following the pulsing of "in". 
This may be used when the selector is not to have an effect 
until at least 15 milliseconds have passed (check step process 
times). Unless the "in" hub of the program select is split 
wired or bussed, the delayed or immediate out hub must be 
wired. The delayed or immediate out hub is wired to the in 

of a program step, interstep function, or any other place to 
which the out of a step is wired. 

The delayed out of program selects 2 through 10 will emit 
15 milliseconds after the related "in" has received an im- 
pulse. The delayed out of program select 1 will emit 20 
milliseconds after its "in" has received an impulse. Selec- 
tors to be picked-up from an input code require 20 millisec- 
onds to be changed from the non-select to the select side. 



V - 57 



If calculations or operations, selected through the selectors 
picked up by the input codes, are to be made early in the 
program, this program select, in conjunction with a function 
delay, can be used to insure that 20 milliseconds have elapsed 
before the selectors picked-up by the input codes are used. 
(See function delay, part 7-C following.) 

Note: It is not necessary to wire the delayed or immediate 
outs of program selects. The pulse which impulses the 
"in" of the program select can be bussed to the next oper- 
ation desired. (See out expanders 7-B, following for illus- 
tration.! 

3. Out (Power) - The out (power) hub of a program select is the 
hub that emits a steady pulse to hold a selector on the select 
side. As soon as a pulse goes into the "in M hub, the power 
hub will start to emit. It requires 15 milliseconds for the 
associated selector to change to the select side: the 
selector will remain select until a pulse is received by 

the drop-out hub (note that this hub bears no relationship 
to the immediate or delayed out). The power hub is wired 
to the pickup of the selector or selectors to be associated 
with the program select. 

4. Drop out - The purpose of the drop-out hub is to end the 
pulse going to the selector, and thereby allow the selector 
to return to the nonselect side. As in the case of changing 
a selector to the select side, it requires 15 milliseconds 
to drop out the selector. The pulse used to do this may be 
any pulse, thVough frequently it will be the out of a step 
or some similar function. 

No "out" is provided for the drop-out of a program select. 
If the out of a step or an interstep function is used to 
drop out the program select, some means must be found to 
continue the program. This is usually done by bussing the 
drop-out pulse through an out-expander or normal bus hubs. 

No automatic drop-out is provided for program selects. 
However, it is possible to drop out all program selects 
which are emitting by wiring to "clear". When a pulse is 
wired to "clear", it has the same effect as wiring to the 
"drop-out" of all active program selects. This would 
most frequently be done at the end of a program, so that 
all selectors would be on the non-select side at the start 
of a new program. "Clear" (line 18-19, Q-R and 18-19, q-r) 
has no "out" hub, so it is usually bussed in the same way 
as the drop-out of a program select. 

• 

Figure 14 is a schematic diagram of the operation of a pro- 
gram select. Note that electronic tubes, not relays, actually 
accomplished this function: relays are used for ease of 
illustration only. 



V - 58 



Figure 14 
Schematic of Program Select aho 

5EUX.TOR OP&WiON 




"±- GROUND 



V - 59 



When relay "a" is energized, bar "c M comes in contact with 
bar "d", allowing current to reach the selector pick-up. 
This keeps relay M b" energized, and holds the selector on 
the select side until a drop-out pulse breaks the connection, 
Once this is done, bar "c" will not come into contact with 
"d" again until a pulse is received at the "in". 

G. SELECTOR HOLD (B+) line 9, e-h 

Selector hold is a constant source of power which never stops 
emitting as long as the machine is on. It may be used to keep 
a selector on the select side even though the pulse which was 
entering the pick-up has ceased. The two most important uses 
would be: 

1. To "remember" -a control from an input device, even 
though the control is no longer present. 

2. To keep selectors associated with a program select 
on the select side even though a clear signal, which 
would normally drop out the program select, is given. 

Selector hold has no drop out of its own. Once a selector is 
picked up through a selector hold connection, it will remain on 
the select side until the machine is turned off, unless some 
means is found of breaking the connection. This is usually done 
through another selector, as well as one pole of the selector 
which is to be controlled. 

Assume that selector 30, a 4-pole selector, is to be held on the 
select side even though a clear signal is given. Pole "a" will 
be used to control the selector hold. Selector 25, a single pole 
selector, will also be used as a control of selector hold. Poles 
b, c, and d of selector 30 may be used for their normal purpose 
of re-routing functions. 

The connection panel wiring for this would be: 




V - 60 



Until selector 30 is picked up by PS 6, selector hold power can- 
not flow to the pick-up of selector 30. It can only go from the 
non-select side of selector 25 through the common of 25 to the 
common of selector 30a. With selector 30 on the non-select side, 
the current can go no further. However, as soon as PS 6 changes 
selector 30 to the select side, selector hold power will flow 
through the select side of 30a to the PU of selector 30. Then, 
even though PS 6 is dropped out by a clear pulse, selector hold 
power will keep the selector on the select side. It will remain 
select until PS 7 is impulsed and picks up selector 25. Since 
selector hold power will no longer be connected to the common of 
selector 25 and cannot reach the pick-up of selector 30, selector 
30 will revert to the non-select side. It will remain there until 
PS 6 pulses the pick-up again. Note that PS 7, which is control- 
ling selector 25, must be dropped out before selector hold power 
can be used again to hold selector 30. 

H. Channel Search Branching (See discussion of the channel search 
processes, section V) 

When either of the channel search processes are used, the "out" 
of the related program step is wired to "in" of the channel 
search equal or unequal branching, as dictated by the function 
used (lines 13-16, U-X and 13-15, a-d) . If the out of the step 
is wired to a channel search equal "in", the related =Vj or = V"2 
or ^ hub will emit, depending on the comparison received from 
the channel search. If the out of the step is wired to a channel 
search unequal "in", the related = or / hub will emit, depending 
on the comparison. 



V - 61 



7. OTHER FUNCTIONS 

This section explains various features of the Univac File-Computer 
which have not been covered in other sections. These include: 

1. Alternate switches 

2. Out expanders 

3. Function delays 

4. Function sequence 

5. Code distributor 

6. Input control lines 

7. Output control lines 

8. Indicator lights 

9. Unit record field assignment selector pick-up 

A. ALTERNATE SWITCHES (line 3-5, P-U) 

An alternate switch is basically a type of selector under the 
control of the operator of the machine. Six of these switches 
are provided. Externally mounted on the control cabinet are six 
switches, each with an open and closed position. On the connec- 
tion panel are three hubs for each switch. . .select,, common, and 
non-select. 

The function which is to be changed is wired into the common of 
the switch, the variables to the select and non-select sides, 
just as in a selector. The main difference between a selector 
and an alternate switch is that the operator manually determines 
whether the switch is to be select or non-select; therefore, the 
setting is constant for a particular program. 

If there are two programs on one board which are not being handled 
simultaneously, an alternate switch could be used to determine 
which program is to be used at a particular time. Assume that 
one program starts on step 1, the other on step 18. The input 
device demand or scan out would be wired to the common of the 
alternate switch, step 1 "in" could be wired to the non-select 
side, step 18 "in" to the select side (step 1 could have been 
wired to the select side and step 18 to the non-select side) . 
The step on which a program will start is, therefore, dependent 
on the setting which the operator makes of the alternate switch. 



V - 62 



The connection panel wiring for this would be: 




B. OUT EXPANDERS (lines 3-5, o-v) 

There are 8 out expanders on the computer plugboard. Each out 
expander has 1 in hub and 2 related out hubs. When the "in" hub 
is impulsed the two related "out" hubs emit. These hubs are 
diode protected to prevent back circuits. 

The out expanders are used when the exit of a step or function is 
to be wired to 4 or more places and/or to prevent back circuits. 

As an example of the use of out expanders to prevent back circuits 
and also to illustrate when the delayed or immediate out of a 
program select would not be wired, assume that 2 distinct con- 
ditions will occur for one program and that both conditions must 
impulse program select 16. However, the first condition must 
impulse PS 16 from the out of program step 38 and then go to 
program step 39, while the second condition must impulse PS 16 
from program step 41 and then go to program step 42. The "out" 
of program step 38 would be wired to the "in" of one out expander; 
one of the related "outs" would be wired to the "in" of program 
select 16 and the other to the "in" of program step 39. The "out" 
of program step 41 would be wired to the "in" of another out ex- 
pander; one of the related "outs" would be wired to the "in" of 
program select 16 and the other to the "in" of program step 42. 
Thus, although the "outs" of both program steps 38 and 41 are 
wired to the "in" of PS 16 there will be no back circuit as to 
the choice of the next step since the out expanders are diode 
protected. 



Illustration of wiring: 



V - 63 




C. FUNCTION DELAY (line 3-8, c-d) 

Function delay is for the purpose of delaying the start of an 
operation until two other operations have been completed. Three 
function delays are provided in the File-Computer. 

Each function delay has two input hubs identified as In 1 and In 
2, and one output hub. The output hub will emit only when a pulse 
has been delivered to each of the input hubs. These two pulses 
need not arrive simultaneously. Once a pulse has been received 
at one of the input hubs, the only way of clearing it out is by 
receipt of the pulse at the other input hub and the resultant 
emission from the output. The output may be wired to any place 
to which the exit of a step is wired. 

Assume that the "input out" of demand input-output unit # 1 is to 
start program step 1. Program step 1 is used to transfer an 
address from input storage to the ADR, and then a read unit 
record instruction is to be given. The immediate out of the 
read unit record is to be wired to program step 2 where value 1 
and 2 are to be selected t based on input codes. There must be 
at least 20 elapsed milliseconds between the start of this program 
and the calling of V"i and V"2 of step 2 since they are selected 
through selectors picked up by input controls. The function de- 
lay, in conjunction with program selector 1 (20 millisecond 
delayed out) can be used to insure that 20 milliseconds have 
elapsed: 



V - 64 



Demand #1 "input out" 
L_ 



To step 1 



Read URA 



To P.S. 1 
(20 Ms. delayed out) 



IN FD 1 



IN FD 2 



Out FD 



To Step 2 



The "input out" of demand unit 1 is bussed to the in of program 
step 1 and also to the in of program select 1. The out of step 
1 is wired to read URA and the out of read URA to in FD 1. The 
out of program select 1 is wired to the other in of the function 
delay, in FD 2. The out of the function delay is wired to step 2. 
Thus the in of step 2 will not be impulsed until both the out of 
read URA and the 20 millisecond delayed out of program select 1 
have emitted. Assuming the address is in input storage 000 the 
wiring for this example would be: 




V - 65 



D. FUNCTION SEQUENCE (line 6-8, U-V) 

There are 2 function sequence units on the plugboard. Each unit 
consists of these 3 hubs: 

Set - An input hub to which a step out or similar pulse may be 
wired. A pulse delivered to this hub will be "remembered" 
by the device. 

Probe - An input hub to which a step out or similar pulse may be 
wired. A pulse delivered to this hub will cause a pulse to 
be emitted from the out hub if a pulse was previously re- 
ceived by the set hub. A pulse delivered to the probe hub 
is not "remembered" by the device. 

Out - This hub will emit a pulse whenever the probe hub is im- 
pulsed if the set hub was previously impulsed. Note, these 
units are similar to the function delay. However, the pulse 
to set must be received before the pulse to probe. Pulses 
delivered in the reverse order would have no effect on the 
device. 

The function sequence units can be used effectively to route a 
program to different program steps or functions when one demand 
unit is referred to twice within one program. For example, 
assume that demand unit 1 is to be called for from the out of 
program step 10 and should start program step 11. It must also 
be called for from the out of program step 20 and should then 
start program step 21. 



V - 66 



Illustration of the wiring: Note, out 
prevent back circuits. 



expanders are used to 




E. COPE DISTRIBUTOR 

The code distributor is a means whereby a two digit numeric code, 
ranging from 00 to 49, may be used to select the storage location 
to be used as Vj, V2, or R in a program step. A one digit code, 
ranging from to 9, may be used to select the next program step 
or function. 

The one digit number (0-9) or two digit number (00-49), which is 
to do the selecting, will be located in a storage unit. In many 
cases it will be at an input storage location, though it may be 
in an intermediate or drum storage location. This number is 
transferred into the code distributor register, (line 68, A-H and 
68, a-h) . Spaces will not be accepted by the CD register. The 
CD register will recognize only the last two digits of a storage 
field. However, the number to be placed in the CD register must 



V - 67 



be located in the last two digits of the field, either originally 
or by shifting. Once a value has been placed in the CD register, 
it will remain there until replaced by a new value. 

The first step in the use of the code distributor will always be 
the transfer (or addition, if necessary to provide zeros instead 
of spaces) of the storage in which the code is located into the 
CD register. Assuming that the code is in input storage 009, the 
step would appear as: 



Xl 
009 



Pr V 2 
T 



R_ 
CD 



The connection panel wiring would be the normal wiring for a 
transfer step. 

Located on the connection panel are 61 hubs related to the code 
distributor. The hubs are numbered as follows: 

00 through>49 - Codes for selection of V]_, V"2, and R. (line 
44 , A-z and 45, A-C) . 

through 9 - codes for selection of next step or function 
(line 18-19, T-X) . 

The 00-49 codes are wired to storage locations. If, for example, 
it is desired to call on intermediate storage 25 if code 10 is 
in the CD register, the 10 CD hub would be wired to storage 25. 
As many of these hubs as desired can be wired to storage loca- 
tions. 

If any code greater than 49 is placed in the CD register, what- 
ever storage location is wired to the>49 hub will be called upon, 

The 0-9 hubs are wired to the entry of steps, interstep functions, 
or any other place to which step exits can be wired. 

For example, if from the out of step 16, step 17 is desired when 
code 3 is present, step 19 when code 5 is present, and PS 13 
when code 7 is present, the wiring would be: 




V - 68 



Also associated with the code distributor are 4 hubs labeled CDV1 
(line 30, f-i), 4 hubs labeled CDV2, (line 49, f-i) , 4 hubs 
labeled CDR, (line 60, f-i), and 4 hubs labeled CD pulse IN, 
(line 9, U-X) . These are timing hubs used to call upon the 
storage desired as the value or result of a step or the next 
function desired. For example, suppose that a quantity in a 
card is to be added to one of several intermediate storages, 
dependent upon which code is present. Assume the folowing: 

Quantity ordered: Input storage 001 

Code: Input storage 000 

If 00 - add to intermediate storage 10 
If 01 - " " " - 11 

If 02 - " " " " 12 

The two program steps required would be: 

Step No. V_i _Pr_ J2 - JL_ Next Step 

1. 000 T CD 2 
(code) (CD register) 

2. CDV1 + 001 CDR 3 
(prev. quan.) (quan.) (new quan.) 

The CDV1 means that at Vi time of step 2, the storage location 
connected to the code in the CD register will be called upon. 
Vi of step 2 is wired to one of the CDV1 hubs. If code 00 is in 
the CD register, storage 10 will be called upon; if code 01 is 
in the CD register, storage 11 will be called upon; if code 02 
is in the CD register, storage 12 will be called upon. The same 
will hold true of the result. 



V - 69 



The connection panel wiring for step 2 would be: 



tl «2 (3 




If a code is called upon which is not wired to a storage location, 
the machine will hang up. 

F. INPUT CONTROL LINES (line 13-14, Q-T) 

An input control line is a means of transferring a pulse from 
the input-output device, connected to the system through the 
multiplex function, to the computer connection panel. 

There are 12 input control lines, identified as "a" through "1". 
A pulse delivered to one of these on an input-output connection 
panel will emit from the related input control line on the com- 
puter connection panel when that input-output device is connected 
to the system. 

Normally, these control lines are used to pick-up a selector from 
a condition present in the input data, such as a control position 
in a punched card. The pulse to activate the pick-up of a selec- 
tor comes from the input-output connection panel, through an 
input control line. The input control line on the computer con- 
nection panel is wired to the pick-up of the desired selector. 
(See section III, Input-Output Equipment). 

A selector picked up in this manner will remain on the select 
side as long as the input-output device which caused the pick-up 
to be impulsed, is connected to the system. 20 milliseconds 
should be allowed for the selector to change from the non-select 



V - 70 



to select if the desired condition is present in the input data. 
The selector will drop out when the multiplex function switches 
to another device. 

G. OUTPUT CONTROL LINES (lines 3-8, e-n) 

An output control line is a means of transferring a pulse from 
the computer connection panel to the particular input-output unit 
connected to the system through the multiplex function. There are 
10 output control lines provided, indicated as A through J. 
There is no internal connection or relationship between input 
control lines and output control lines. 

Each output control line has 6 entry hubs on the computer connec- 
tion panel. This hubs are diode protected to prevent back cir- 
cuits. 

The pulse wired into an output control line is generally the exit 
of a step or some similar function. On the input-output device 
it is wired to some control function. For example, on a card 
sensing-punching unit, it might be used to segregate the card, 
to skip punching in the card, or to trip the card. It would be 
wired directly to the function desired. For example, to trip a 
card following step 29, the connection panel wiring would be: 



SINGLE CARD FEED 
INPUT - OUTPUT PANEL 



CONTROL & PROGRAM PANEL 



m ui IT 

O 82 O 

O 83 O 

O 84 O 

O 85 O 

O 86 O 



R 



O 0-- -o 

1 COMPUTER ' 




If it is desired to continue the program on the computer, as well 
as perform the output function, the exit of the step should be 
bussed to the output control line and to the next step desired. 

Note, both the input and output control lines are diode protected 
The input control lines can only be used to deliver a pulse from 
the input output device to the computer connection panel; the 
output control lines can only be used to deliver a pulse from 
the computer to the input-output device. 

H. INDICATOR LIGHTS 



There are four indicator lights on the computer display panel 
which can be lit from the computer connection panel, (line 9, a-d) 
An indicator light will be lit on the display panel when a pulse 
is delivered to the corresponding hub on the computer panel. It 
will stay lit as long as the pulse is present. It will drop out 
when the pulse is no longer impulsing the related hub. 



V - 71 



Associated with these four lights is an indicator light switch 
(line 9, i-j). This switch is normally closed, allowing a pulse 
that enters one of the hubs to emit from the other. The switch 
is opened by a manual button mounted on the computer control 
cabinet. When this button is manually depressed the indicator 
switch is opened, breaking the connection between the two hubs 
on the computer control panel. 

Normally, these lights are utilized, in conjunction with the 
indicator switch, B+ and a selector to indicate that a specific 
condition has been detected by the computer. For example, 
assume that demand input-output unit 1 is a card sensing-punching 
unit, and it is the only unit that goes through step 16. If a - 
result is obtained on program step 16 the machine should be 
stopped and the card that caused the - condition should be imme- 
diately investigated. Indicator light 1 should also be lit so 
the operator will know the cause of machine stoppage. 



Illustration of wiring: 



06 

3 T 

* A 
o Y 


O 
8 



9 

O 

£>• 
§° 

all 
o 

JLi 

3° 

J 13 

ro 

p, '* 
r ° 

15 

o 

16 

o 

17 

18 
O 
19 
O 
20 

o 

21 " 

O 

22" 

O 

23 

O 

24 


! 




2 

qO 

So 

« 4 
O O 

B; 

o 

7 


8 








O 

1 


i* 

§0 
S 3 

<? 

8 4 


5 
O 
6 


O 
2S 
O 
26 
O 
27 
O 
28 

29 



30 

31 


32 



33 



g 3«,| 


/ 














o 


° 







o 




6 









O in 

a: 




o o 


O ,_ i 
o 







" 1 




7 


UJ 




O 


O < 




8 




1 


o 


o < 




9 




» 








I 


O 

10 


o 


1 





o 





O 

11 


o 


p 








) 




o 







o 




12 




1 





o 


) 


o 


o 




s c 


NS 




s c 


NS 


1 


o 
25 


O 


o o 


o 






26 






o o 


o 




27 






o o 







o o 


o 




28 




1 


o 





> 


o o 

29 





> 


o 





1 


o 





p 


o o 






V - 72 



In the above illustration the out of step 16 is wired to the in 
of Branching #9. The - out hub is wired to the in of PS 5. 
(The + and o hubs would be wired to continue the normal program) . 
The power out of PS 5 is wired to the pick up of selector 12. 
The ground of selector 12 is wired to demand ground # 1. Thus, 
selector 12 will be select only if a - result was obtained on 
step 16. 

The B+ is used to light indicator light 1 since it is a constantly 
emitting pulse. It is first routed through the indicator switch, 
so that the light can be manually dropped out when the card has 
been investigated. The B+ is then routed through the common and 
select of selector 12a to the indicator light 1 hub. The B+ 
pulse, then, can only get to the indicator light when selector 
12 is select when a - result occurred on step 16. 

The delayed out of PS 5 is wired to output transfer line C. On 
the input-output connection panel, output transfer line C is 
wired to skip the card out and to stop the machine. The delayed 
out is also wired to drop out PS 5. Selector 12, however, is 
maintained in the select position because B+, through the select 
of selector 12a, is impulsing the pick-up. 

When the machine stops, the operator will instantly know that a - 
result occurred on step 16 since the indicator light 1 is lighted. 
To resume operation the manual indicator switch is manually de- 
pressed, thus dropping out the indicator light and also selector 
12, and the start button depressed. 

I. UNIT RECORD FIELD ASSIGNMENT SELECTOR PICK-UPS 

On the connection panel for the large capacity drums there are 8 
selectors. These selectors are identical in operation to the 
selectors previously mentioned. The pick-up and ground hubs, 
which are also identical to the pick-up and ground hubs for other 
selectors, are located on the computer connection panel. The 
wiring of these pick-ups and grounds is the same as that discussed 
previously in this section (6 E) . 



V - 73 



8. MULTIPLEX CONTROL 

Since the Univac File-Computer can service more than one input device 
at a time it is essential that we have some means of controlling the 
connection of the input devices to the computer. This control is 
provided by the function called multiplexing. As will be recalled 
from Section TV (Storage) each input device enters its data into the 
buffer related to the device, and then the buffer transfers this data 
to its input drum track. It is from this input drum track that the 
computer obtains the input data and it is to this track that the out- 
put data is delivered. It may then be said that the multiplex func- 
tion occurs between the input drum and the computer. Thus in a four 
(4) device system the schematic of input control is: 



Figure IS 
Schematic of Input Control. 



JNPCT 
DEVICE 
I 



BUFFER 



DEVICE 
2. 



IfiPUT 
PEVICE 
3 



BUFFER 



INFUT 

PEVICE 

4 



BUFFER 




BUFFER 



i ^ rt 



J J I J 




UNPSR FidXJ&M 
C&JT7&L 



TIMING SWITCH 
(iH 3V/JCHGONlZA7X>i 



V - 74 



In the diagram, the computer is connected through the multiplex 
switch in the storages related to input device #1, and any calcu- 
lations performed at this time will be based on device #l's input 
information. In summary we can say that the multiplex function 
is a switching device which connects the computer to one input 
device's storage information at one time. 

The multiplex operation may be controlled in one of two ways; these 
techniques are: 

a. Scan Multiplexing 

b. Demand Multiplexing 

A. SCAN MULTIPLEXING 

Scan multiplexing means that the machine will successively examine 
each scan input device to determine which device has information 
ready to be processed (i.e. -it has finished a complete input 
transfer cycle). The scan is sequential in nature in that it 
first looks at the storages for scan device 1 then scan device 
2 etc. The multiplexer stops and connects any device's drum 
track to the computer if the device is ready. The multiplexer 
remains connected to the track until the calculations for the 
device are completed, and then (under program control) it moves 
on to test the next device. Thus many devices may be loading 
data into the input drum at. one time, while one device is being 
processed by the computer. The program control for a scan 
multiplex operation is illustrated by the following example: 

1. There are 4 input devices to be operated on a scan mode 
of operation and these devices are numbered 1,2,3 & 4. 

2. Each device, when processed by the computer, is to go 
through a separate series of program steps as follows: 



Device 


In At Step 

1 


Out After Ste 


1 


10 


2 


11 


15 


3 


16 


25 


4 


26 


48 



3. In order to have input devices operate in a scan mode we 
must sacrifice one "Demand Input Unit". This unit is 
used as the multiplex control for the scan devices. In 
this case we will assume Demand unit eight (8) controls 
input devices 1,2,3 & 4. 

The following functions must be controlled by our wiring of the 
various input and computer plugboards: 

a. The adapter must scan the input devices in the following 
sequence: 1,2,3,4, 1,2,3,4, 1 4, 1 4, etc. 



V - 75 



b. The computer must connect to the first device which 
is ready, process the data through the required 
steps, and then proceed scanning the next device 
in sequence. 



For example: 
Start 

* 

Scan device #1 



Not ready 



Scan device # 2 



t 

Not ready 



Scan device #3 



\r 



Not ready 



Scan device #4 



t 

Not ready 



Ready 



Connect input track 1 

I 

Steps 1*10 



* 

Ready 

Connect input track 2 

1 

Steps 11*15 
I 



\ 

Ready 

Connect input track 3 

I 

Steps 16*25 
i 



* 

Ready 

Connect input track 4 

Steps 26 *• 48 

_i . 



V - 76 



The program necessary to accomplish the above is: 



— 




f 


DEMAND IN FROM 


DEMAND OUT TO 


L 


INPUT 


OU TPU T 


r 




^_j 














3TArr,ix>x*« . 


x>i*a 


3>l*a 







START 
TO 



i>I*e 



SCAN OUTS 


NO. 


TO 


/ 


/a/ 4t*i 


z 


„ . // 


3 


" * 16 


4 


*• " Z6> 











Pn 








EE 


TYPE OF UNIT 


TO SCAN OUT 


NO 




i 




so, 


9 




2 




602. 


10 




3 




50 3 


11 




4 




504 


12 




5 






13 




6 






14 




7 






15 




8 






16 




1 



This program accomplishes the following: 

When the start button is pressed we Demand Unit # 8 which, 
since it is acting as a multiplexer for units 1-4, scans 
unit 1. If unit 1 is ready we proceed through steps 1 
thru 10. At the end of step 10 the exit of the step rede- 
mands unit # 8 and unit 2 is scanned. If unit 1 was not 
ready the next unit (unit 2) would automatically be scanned, 
After unit 4 is scanned and found not ready we obtain a 
pulse from the "demand out" which is wired back to the 
"demand in" to repeat the cycle beginning with unit # 1. 



V - 77 



The plugboard wiring to accomplish the above would be: 



Dsmand Unit *8 Multiplex 
Apapter PLdcbqakp 




10 U 12 13 



V - 78 



As can be seen by the dotted lines in the diagram, the computer 
Scan-Out hubs on the multiplex adapter plugboard are internally 
connected with the "Scan Out" hubs on the computer plugboard. 
Thus the scan unit multiplex exits emit current when the particu- 
lar device is ready to be processed and the computer is connected 
to the related input track. This current comes out of the compu- 
ter plugboard routine scan out assignment hubs and is directed 
through external wires to the appropriate step. The completion 
of a devices routine re-demands the Multiplex adapter and tells 
it to test the next unit and so on. Of course if any unit in 
the sequence is not ready to be processed the multiplexer auto- 
matically moves on and tests the next device in sequence. 

As can be seen there are only six (6) routine assignment hubs 
for each multiplex adapter although each adapter can handle up 
to 24 devices. This should not present a problem since it is 
rare that more than 6 routines would be required in any one 
processing run. However, should such a case occur, selector 
techniques could be used to effectively expand the routine possi- 
bilities. 



SCAN GROUND 

It may often be true that the input device routines overlap in 
certain steps of the program. Thus some means of branching step 
exits on the basis of what routine is effective at the time is 
needed. Scan ground provides a means of accomplishing this in 
a very direct manner. Scan ground is merely a ground function 
which is controlled by the routine used. Thus, on the computer 
plugboard, there is a scan ground exit hub for each scan out 
hub. Their use might be best shown by an example; 

Assume that in the last case we want: 



Device 
No. 


In At 
Step 


Out At 
Step 


1 
2 
3 
4 


1 

7 
11 
20 


10 
12 
26 
48 



V - 79 

As can be seen there are step overlaps between each devices 
routine, these may be flow charted as: 



Scan out 1 



Step 1 
" 2 
" 3 

" 4 
" 5 
" . 6 



t 



Step 7 
" 8 
" 9 
" 10 



f 

Step 11 
Step 12 



Step 13 
i 
i 

Step 19 



Scan out 2 



Scan out 3 Scan out 4 



DI #8 



t 

DI #8 



Step 20 



Step 26 



Step 27 



t 

DI »8 



Step 48 

I 

DI *8 



V - 80 



The flow chart clearly points out that we must select the exits 
of steps 10, 12, and 26 on the basis of which routine is being 
processed. 

The selector programming for this is: 




SH 



Sb, 



J>I*8 



FtSDM^T 1 * IO 






SH 



SGi 



J>1*& 



/Z 



~^Z7 



SH 



SG* 



3a 



z>i*a 



Zb 



3b 



The fact that selector hold is wired to the pickup of the three 
selectors indicates that current is entering each selector pickup 
at all times during the program. However, since the selector 
grounds are wired to scan ground, the circuit will be completed 
(and the selector transferred) only when the appropriate device 
is connected to the computer through the multiplex adapter, thus 
allowing the selector hold pulse to get to ground. 



81 



The wiring for these selectors would be: 



3»V «0 41 « 




In summary, note the following facts concerning the 'Scan Multi- 
plex" mode of operation. 

1) One demand unit is required to act as a multiplex 
adapter for the scan units. 

2) Only six scan out hubs are available for all scan 
units included in a system. 

3) The demand unit appropriated to act as a multiplex 
adapter for the scan units serves the following purposes: 

a) The Demand "In" hub starts the sequential scan of the 
input devices when it receives a pulse. The unit 
the scan begins on is always the unit following the 
last one processed by the computer. 



V - 82 

b) The Demand "Out" hub emits when the last scan unit 
has been tested and found not ready. This pulse 
is usually wired back to the Demand "In" hub to 
start the scanning cycle again. It also emits when 
the last scan unit has been processed. 

4) Through use of "Scan Ground", selectors can be activated 
to identify which routine or unit is being processed by 
the computer at any time. 

B. DEMAND PROGRAMMING 

In the preceding section the "Scan Multiplex" mode of operation 
was discussed. In this portion the other mode of input-output 
device control available with the Univac File-Computer is 
covered. It should be noted that either or both modes of con- 
trol can be utilized in one program. 

Scan Control is a technique whereby the input device informs the 
computer that it is ready to be processed. In other words the 
input device controls the computer. Obviously such an arrange- 
ment is not satisfactory for programs which require activating 
an input-output device on the basis of a condition arising in 
the program, nor would "scan multiplexing" be of any use in hand- 
ling a pure output device such as an on-line printer. It is for 
these reasons that the Univac File-Computer has the capacity to 
include up to 8 input-output units operating on what is known as 
a "Demand" basis. The term demand means that the unit can be 
directly interrogated and activated by the program itself, rather 
than by automatic multiplex scanning. 

Before illustrating the use of Demand controlled input-output 
units, the functions of the plugboard hubs related to each demand 
unit are described. 




As can be seen, there is provision for eight input-output demand 
units. This is of course reduced by one for each scan adapter 
included in the system. 



V - 83 



This true since a Demand unit's controls must be utilized to 
perform the multiplex function for the scan devices. The meaning 
and use of the "demand" unit hubs are as follows: 

1) Test: These two common hubs are probed by a program 
pulse (start, step exit, etc.) to determine if the unit's 
input storage is full. This is, in effect, the same as 

a scan multiplex test except that here the test is under 
control of the program; in a scan multiplex operation 
the test is automatic. It should be noted that entering 
current in these hubs does not connect the computer to 
the device. Instead it merely tests the device's input 
storages to determine if the device has completed its 
input transfer cycle. 

2) Ready: This hub emits current after a pulse has been 
delivered to the test hubs if the device has completed 
the input transfer. This current is usually wired to 
the "In" hub in order to connect the computer to the 
device. 

3) Not Ready: This hub emits current after a pulse has 
been delivered to the test hubs if the device has not 
completed the input transfer. This current is usually 
used to test another device or to energize some program 
step to be done while the device is loading. 

Note: These last two hubs (Ready and Not Ready) are 
analogous to the scan multiplex operation of either 
connecting the device to the computer when the device 
is ready, or proceeding to the next unit if the device 
is not yet ready. Again the only difference lies in 
the fact that in the "Demand" operation the alternatives 
are under control of the programmer rather than an auto- 
matic function. 

4) In: When a pulse is delivered to this hub the computer 
connects to the related device's drum input-output track, 
thereby making the input-output track related to the 
device available to the computer for values or results. 



V - 84 



5) Out Inp. After a pulse has been delivered to the "In" 
hub this hub will emit current if the last operation 
the device accomplished was a reading function (tape 
read, etc). In other words this hub tells us two 
things - 

a) The computer is now connected to this device's 
input-output track and, 

b) The last thing this device did was read, that is 
accept input data. 

This hub is usually wired to the in of a program step 
in order to initiate the device's program routine. 

It should be noted that if the device is in the process 
of transferring input data, this hub will not emit un- 
til the transfer is completed. 

6) Out-Outp: This hub performs exactly the same function 
as Out- Inp except that emission of current from this 
hub indicates that the last input-output function that 
the device performed was that of writing or recording 
output data, rather than reading as in 5. 

To illustrate the use of a demand unit assume the following case: 

1) The system includes 4 scan units controlled by Demand 
Unit #8 which are all doing a simple pre-billing and 
inventory deletion program which runs from step 1 - 
step 11. These scan units are all assigned to routine 

*1. 

2) If the result of step 11 is negative, place the values 
in intermediate storages 24 and 25 into output storages 
001 and 002 of Demand unit #1 (a 150 CPM card punching 
device), and then return to the normal scan multiplexing 
operation. 

Note: This might be a case of punching a below re-order 

point card when .the inventory on any item went below 
its minimum balance. 



V - 85 



The operations to be performed might be flow charted as 



Start 



r 



In Demand 
Unit *8 



Scan Out *1 



Demand 
Unit 8 Out 



Step 1 
2 
3 



Step 11 

k 
BR \ 



OPC A (Trip) 

In Demand 
Unit *1 



Out - Out P 
In P 

\ 

Step 12 

24 T - =001 

\ 

Step 13 

25 T - =002 

I 

(OPC A 
Trip) 

I ^ 



OPC A (Trip) 



- V 86 



The program controls for this operation would be: 






(-DEMAND IN FROM 


DEMAND OUT TO 


InPut 


OUTPUT 


or, 


/y sr. jt'Z 


/// jt&sz 






































Sr/utr,*o/**, 
000*0, aA 


OT#& 


, 0Z-#& 





OUTPUT CONTROL LINES 



Q£, , Q£» 



NO. 




TO SCAN OUT 1 


' so, 


2 . 


So, 


3 


so, 


4 


so, 


5 




6 




7 




8 I 




. 











BRANCHING 




NO. 


IN FROM STEP 


TO IF + 


TO 1 F - 1 TO 1 F O 




:« 


#SJ 


0*2 


Of, 


Of* 




5 













OUT EXPANDERS 


NO. 


IN 


OUT 


OUT 


1 


- 0*4 


o*>c # 


0J **J 


2 


+/o8*+*srm 


OPC fi 


0£**8 


„_3- 









The computer plugboard 
would be: 



Multiplex and Demand Control Wiring 





Although this example indicates the most common use of Demand 
Units it should be noted that through use of the "Test in", the 
"Ready" and "Not Ready" hubs a demand unit can be made to operate 
just as a scan unit. 



V - 87 



9. SUMMARY - TIMING 

The time required to perform and prove a step depends on four 
(4) factors: 

A. Access time to storage fields. 

B. Shift time 

C. Loading and Unloading time of the Arithmetic Unit registers 

D. Process operation time. 

The sum of these four factors will determine the length of time re- 
quired to perform a complete three address step. 

A. Access time 

Access time is the time required to locate a specific storage 
field. This must be determined for Vx, V2, and R. The average 
access times are: 



1. Input-output storage 

2. Intermediate storage 

3. High speed storage 

4. Large capacity revolver 



2.5 milliseconds 
2.5 milliseconds 
2.5 milliseconds 
.343 to 3.429 milliseconds 



Access time to a field in the large capacity storage drum is 
dependent upon the size of the unit record area. The maximum 
access time is the length of time required for one unit record 
area to pass under the read or write head of the revolver. This 
can be found by multiplying the unit record length by .05714 
milliseconds. The average time is one-half of this amount. 

Unit Record Length 

12 

15 

20 

24 

30 

40 

50 

60 

75 
100 
120 



Maximum access 


Average 


access 


.686 milliseconds 


.343 mi 


Lli seconds 


.857 




.429 


11 


1.143 




.572 


it 


1.371 




.686 


it 


1.714 




.857 


•• 


2.286 




1.143 


11 


2.857 




1.429 


•1 


3.429 




1.715 


ii 


4.286 




2.143 


11 


5.714 




2.857 


11 


6.857 




3.429 


k 



B. Shift time 



Shift time is .042 milliseconds for each place shifted. 



V - 88 



C Register loading and unloading time 

The time to transfer a storage to or from the Arithmetic 
Unit registers is 0.504 milliseconds or the equivalent of 
12 shifts (12 X .042 = .504). 

D. Process time 

Process time is the time required by the arithmetic section to 
perform and prove the process. This time is not constant for 
each process. In an arithmetic process it varies with the 
number and value of the digits entering the calculation. In 
the transfer process it varies with the source and destination 
of the value. In the channel search process it varies with 
the ADR switching time and number of channels to be searched. 

Listed below are the times of, or formulae for computing the 
time of, the nine (9) processes performed by the Arithmetic 
Unit. These times are measured from the "Initiate Process" 
pulse to the "End Process" pulse, and therefore, do not in- 
clude access time to storage media nor the loading and 
unloading time of the Arithmetic Unit registers. 



1. ADD: 

(a) 
(b) 



Alpha-Numeric: 

Numeric -Including Check: 



T - 0.71 Milliseconds. 
T = 1.89 Milliseconds. 



2. SUB1EACT: 

(a) Alpha-Numeric: 

(b) Numeric, VI-V2>0: 

(c) Numeric, VI-V2<0: 

3. MULTIPLY: 



T = 0.71 Milliseconds. 
T s 1.89 Milliseconds. 
T s 2.47 Milliseconds. 



T = 1.60 + 0.588 (Nl) Milliseconds. 
4. MULTIPLY CHECK: 



T = 1.00 + 1.00 (Nl) Milliseconds. 

Where Nl = sum of the value of digits in the multiplier. 



V - 89 

5. DIVIDE: 

T = 0.8 + 1.2 (1-k+n+l) + 0.588 (N2) Milliseconds. 

Where: 1 = Dividend digits 
k = Divisor digits 
n = VI Left shifts 
l-k+n+ 1 = Number of digits in quotient. 

N2 ■ Sum of the value of the quotient digits 

6. DIVIDE CHECK: 

T = 1.6 + 0.042 (k-n) + 0.588 (N2) Milliseconds. 

7. MASKING TRANSFER: 

T = 0.63 Milliseconds. 

8. COMPARE: 

T = 0.67 Milliseconds. 

9. LEFT ZERO ELIMINATION: 

T = 0.042 + 0.084n Milliseconds. 

10. TRANSFER: 

T = 0.504 Milliseconds. 

11. CHANNEL SEARCH: 

Four different factors are involved in determining channel 
search time when overflow channels are not included. If 
overflow channels are used, an additional factor is involved. 
The factors listed do not include the placing of the address 
in the ADR, since that would be done in a preceding step. 
The timing of this step would be the normal timing for the 
step involved, except that no access time need be allowed 
for the ADR. Instead 6 right shift time is required for 
ADR entry or 6 x .042 = .252 ms. 

The factors involved in channel search without overflow are: 

a. Switch time: The address register switches to the 
indicated drum section and channel as soon as it 
receives an entry (provided that a read or write 
operation is not in process). Therefore, this 
time may or may not be included in channel search 
time. The time required for the switching is: 



V - 90 



1. To a different drum 0.1 Milliseconds 

2. To a different drum section 

in the same drum 0.1 Milliseconds 

3. To a different channel 

in the same section 0.1 Milliseconds 

4. To same channel in same 

drum section 0.0 Milliseconds 



b. Access time: The average time to find the starting 
point (index point or starting address) is 17 milli- 
seconds* 

c. Search time: The search time is the time required to 
locate the desired record. Since one complete drum 
revolution is 34 milliseconds, the average search 
time to a specific record is 17 milliseconds. 

The time for a channel search, not including overflow, would 
be the sum of switch time, access time and the search time* 
For example, to locate a record in another drum would be: 

0.1 + 17 + 17 s 34.1 milliseconds. 

If there is a possibility of overflow channels, the time to 
transfer the overflow address to the ADR need not be included 
in the calculations since it will be overlapped with the time 
required to locate the starting point of the next channel to 
be searched. 



V - 91 



12. Read Unit Record 

When a complete address, DS/CH/URA (xxxxxx) is transferred to the 
ADR, it must be followed by a Read instruction to transfer this 
record to the revolver. Three factors are involved in determining 
Read time. The factors involved are: 

a. Search time: 17 milliseconds (average) 

b. Read time: This time is dependent on the unit record 
length and may be determined by the following table: 



it Record 


Length 


Read 


-write ti 


12 






.686 


15 






.857 


20 






1.143 


24 






1.371 


30 






1.714 


40 






2.286 


50 






2.857 


60 






3.429 


75 






4.286 


100 






5.714 


120 






6.857 



c. Access time: If switching is done to another drum it is 

necessary to add 17 milliseconds. This is the average 

time required to locate the starting point for the new 
drum. 

13. Write Unit Record 

The time required to transfer a unit record from the revolver 
back to its drum location (or some other location if a new 
address is transferred to the ADR before the write instruction 
is given) involves two factors. These factors, are as follows 

a. Search Time : 17 milliseconds 

b. Write Time: determined by table for Read Unit record. 

Whether a complete address is used to capture a unit record or 
channel search is used, it is necessary to give a "write" in- 
struction to transfer the record on the revolver back to the 
drum. This time may be overlapped if the write command occurs 
in the program at a time where additional steps, not utilizing 
unit record fields, are required. 



V - 92 



Item 

No. Description 



Page 
No. 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
32. 
33. 
34. 
35. 
36. 



Input-Output Storage y 
Intermediate Storage y 
Unit Record Storage Fields y 



VI address hubs 

V2 address hubs 

VI shift 

V2 shift 

R shift 

VI left shift 

VI right shift 

V2 left shift 

V2 right shift 

R left shift 

R right shift 

Process hubs 

Addition 

Subtraction 

Multiplication 

Exshift 

No check 

Division 

Transfer 

Compare 

Left zero elimination 

Channel Search 

Channel search identifier 

Channel search equal 

Channel search unequal 

Channel search all 

Step out hubs 

Step in hubs 

Demand test 

Ready hub - yes 

Ready hub - no 

Demand In 

Demand Out 



V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
9 
13 

14 
16 
18 
19 
24 
27 
30 
32 
32 
35 
38 
38 
41 
41 
42 
42 
42 
42 
42 



Item 

No. Description 

37. Output Control Lines 

38* Invalid address 

39. Parity error 

40. Arithmetic error 

41. Overflow - +/- 

42. Overflow - - 

« 

43. Step repeat 

44. Step clear 

45. Read unit record 

46. Write unit record 

47. Branch 

48. Selectors 

49. Selector pick-up 

50. Selector ground 

51. Computer ground 

52. Demand ground 

53. Scan ground 

54. Program select 

55. Selector Hold (B +) 

56. Alternate switches 

57. Out expander 

58. Function delay 

59. Function sequence 

60. Code distributor 

61. Code distributor - Selection 

62. Code distributor out 

63. CDVI 

64. CDV2 

65. CDR 

66. CD Pulse in 

67. Input control lines 

68. Indicator lights 

69. Indicator switch 

70. Field assignment selector pick- 

71. Scan out 



Page 
No. 

V - 42 

V - 43 

V - 43 

V - 44 

V - 44 

V - 44 

V - 44 

V - 45 

V - 45 

V - 47 

V - 48 

V - 51 

V - 52 

V - 52 

V - 52 

V - 52 

V - 52 

V - 56 

V - 59 

V - 61 

V - 62 

V - 63 

V - 64 

V - 65 

V - 67 

V - 67 

V - 68 

V - 68 

V - 68 

V - 68 

V - 69 

V - 70 

V - 71 
up V - 72 

V - 78 



< 



CXl 



O 

o 
I 

LU 



< 

Q_ 



< 

o 
O 
a: 
o_ 

°3 



> o 

— CJ 




I 

z 
o 

< 



a. 
< 




54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



V - 94 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

STORAGE ASSIGNMENT CHART 



APPLICATION: 



PROGRAM NO. 







LARGE CAPACITY DRUM ADDRESS FF 


iOM 












ENTER THE STARTING ADDRESS OF >> 
THE URA'S RELATED TO THIS ^ 
APPLICATION, I.E., 000000. 


^ TO 


SYM 




AND DECIM> 


«k 


B 


4. 


3 




1 


SN 


F 
















F 1 




















ENTER THE ENDING ADDRESS OF 
THE URA'S RELATED TO THIS 
APPLICATION, I.E., 029949. 


F 2 




F 3 




F 4 


+ 


F 5r 

F 6 

F 7 
F 8 


' 1 


























ENTER DESCRIPTION OF THE 
FIELD, I.E., BALANCE ON 
HAND, EMPLOYEE NO., ETC. 




























































i 
















F 9 


t 


1 








t 
















ENTER THE CHARACTERS 
ASSIGNED TO A FIELD 
AND INDICATE DECIMAL 
POSITION, I.E., * 


F10 


1 






Fll 








F12 








F13 








F14 












t 
















F15 




























F16 




IF THE SIGN IS STORED, ENTER 
THE CHARACTER; IF THE SIGN IS 
NOT STORED, ENTER + TO INDICATE 
AN APPLIED PLUS SIGN MUST BE 






> 






F17 










F18 










F19 
















WIRED FOR T 


HE F 


IEl 


D. 



























LARGE CAPACITY 


DRUM 


ADDRESS FROM 


' 


FIELD ASSIGNMENT TO 








SYM 


DESCRIPTION 


CHARACTER AND DECIMAL 


t 1 


10 


9 


B 


7 


6 


G 


4 


3 


2 


1 


SN 


F 




























F 1 




























F 2 




























F 3 




























F 4 




























F 5 




























F 6 




































F 7 




IF TWO TYPES OF URA'S ARE STORED 
FOR ONE APPLICATION, USE THIS TO 
INDICATE THE SECOND FIELD ASSIGN- 
MENT LAYOUT. 












F 8 














F 9 














F10 














FIT 




























F12 




























F13 




























F14 




























F15 




























F16 




























F17 




























F18 




























F19 





























LARGE CAPACITY DRUM 
FIELD ASSIGNMENT SELECTORS 



PICK-UP FROM 



GROUND 
TO 



la 



NON-SEL ECT 



ENTER THE NUMBER OF THE INPUT 
CONTROL LINE OR PROGRAM SELECTOR 
WHICH IS TO IMPULSE THE PICK UP, 
I.E., IPC a, PSO 12, ETC. 



2c 



2d 



J ENTER TYPE OF GROUND, I.E., SCAN 
< GROUND 3, DEMAND GROUND 4, COMPUTER 
( GROUND, ETC. 



4a 



4b 



4c 



4d 



5a 



5b 



5d 



6a 



6b 



6c 



6d 



7b 



7d 



8a 



8b 



8c 



8d 



INTERMEDIATE STORAGE FIELD ASSIGNMENT 
TRACK 10 


SYM. 


DESCRIP TION 


1 1 


10 


s 


8 


7 


6 


5 


4 


3 


2 


1 


SN 


10 


t 


























11 


ENTER DESCRIPTION OF THE 
STORAGE UNIT, I.E., ROUNDING 
5, CONSTANT 14, WORKING 
STORAGE, ETC. 






















12 






















13 






















14 






















15 




A 
























16 










f 


















17 




ENTER THE VALUE, IF IT IS 
KNOWN, I.E., CONSTANT 5. 
















18 


















19 










1 





















TRACK 20 



20 



21 



ENTER THE CHARACTER, APPLIED 
PLUS SIGN, ETC. DESIRED WHEN 
THE SELECTOR IS ON THE NON- 
SELECT SIDE. 



INDICATE SIGN POSSIBILITIES, 
IF THEY ARE KNOWN, I.E., +, 
-, +/- etc. 



27 



28 



ENTER THE UNIT RECORD FIELD 
CHARACTER, ETC THAT IS TO 
BE SELECTED. 



TRACK 30 



31 



32 



ENTER THE CHARACTER, APPLIED 
PLUS SIGN, ETC. DESIRED WHEN 
THE SELECTOR IS ON THE SELECT 
SIDE. 



INTERMEDIATE STORAGE FIELD ASSIGNMENT 
TRACK 50 


SYM 


DESCRIPTION 


1 1 


10 


9 


B 


7 


6 


S 


4 


3 


2 


1 


SN 


50 




























51 




























52 




























53 




























54 




























55 




























56 




























57 




























58 




























59 





























38 



39 



TRACK 40 


40 




























41 




























42 




























43 




























44 




























45 




























46 




























47 




























48 




























49 





























SPTM-4326 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



V - 95 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

PROGRAM PLANNING CHART 



APPLICATION: 



PROGRAM NO. 



STtH 
NO. 


INPUT 

UNIT 

NO. 


CARD 
NO. 


VALUE 1 


PRO- 


VALUE 2 


RESULT 


NEXT 
STEP 


VALUE 1 AS STORED 


VALUE 2 AS STORED 


UNSHIFTED RESULT 


STORED RESULT 


S 
T 


DESCRIP TION 


SYM 


SH 


CESS 


DESCRIP TION 


SYM 


SH 


DESCRIP TION 


SYM 


SH 


l l 


10 


9 


8 


7 


6 


8 


13 1 


i 




1 10 


9 


8 


7 « 


1 5 4 


3 2 


N 22 21 


20 


19 18 


171618 


1413 12 


11 10 


9 


8 ' 


7 6 


8 


4 : 


> 2 


1 i 


i u 


10 


> 8 


7 


e 


8 


4 


3 2 1 


5p 


1 






L_ 


































~wm. 












*m~ 










i- 


XXX 








~F-xxxx? 












Exxxr- 


2 




IF A PROBLEM INVOLVES MORE 
THAN ONE INPUT DEVICE, ENTER 
THE NUMBERS OF ALL INPUT 
DEVICES UTILIZING THE STEP. 




. 
























































^ 


2 


V 






ENTER THE DIGITS OF THE UNSHIFTED 
RESULT AND ITS SIGN POSSIBILITIES 
AS DETERMINED FROM V lf V 2 & PROCESS. 


3 


-*- 




























































3 


MAKE ENTRIES IN THE SAME MANNER AS FOR 
VALUE 1. KEEP IN MIND THAT VALUE 2 
MUST ALWAYS BE THE DIVISOR IN THE * 
PROCESS AND THAT VALUE 2 IS THE MULTIPLIER 
IN THE X PROCESS AND SHOULD REPRESENT THE 
VALUE WITH THE LEAST NUMBER OF DIGITS. 




4 


















































4 


5 






























































1 1 1 1 1 






















5 


6 






































































ENTER THE RESULT AND ITS 
SIGN AS IT APPEARS AFTER 
THE RESULT SHIFT. 


6 
8 


7 








































































8 








































































9 












































































































9 


10 




















1 






















































i-82KaQQfiQQQQ£-L. 












10 


11 






IF THE PROBLEM INVOLVES MULTIPLE 
ENTRY TYPES, ENTER THE CARD OR 
ENTRY TYPE NUMBER. 








t 


























OVERFLOW DIGIT IS NEVER 
AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY 
TO STORAGE. A RIGHT 
SHIFT OF RESULT WILL NOT 
MAKE IT AVAILABLE. 


RESULT OF ADD OR SUBTRACT 
PROCESS: ONLY THE 12 DIGITS 
AT THE RIGHT ARE AVAILABLE 
FOR DELIVERY TO STORAGE 


11 
12 
13 

14 
15 


12 




-<— 




ENTER THE DESCRIPTION OF THE RESULT, 
SUCH AS, NEW ON HAND BALANCE OR SALES 
AMOUNT. USE N.R. FOR NOT ROUNDED. 














13 




















14 






1 








1 














15 














«- 








































— r '"- 


























16 






































































































i 




16 


17 












































































































17 


18 








ENTER THE DESCRIPTION OF THE 
VALUE, SUCH AS EMPLOYEE NUMBER 
OR ON HAND BALANCE. 








A 




















































































18 




19 














T 














































































1 




19 


20 












ENTER THE SHIFT INSTRUCTION, IF ANY, 
SUCH AS 2L, 3R, OR EXS. WHERE UNSHIFTED 
RESULT DIGITS 12 - 22 IN THE x or * 
PROCESSES ARE DESIRED. 
















































i 




20 


21 




































































| 




21 


22 










































































22 


23 




































































i 
1 




23 


24 






































































































1 




24 


25 










ENTER THE SYMBOL OF THE STORAGE FROM 
WHICH THE VALUE IS TO BE OBTAINED, 
OR CDVi IF THE VALUE IS TO BE SELECTED 
BY THE CODE DISTRIBUTOR. IF THE VALUE 
IS TO BE SELECTED THROUGH USE OF 
SELECTORS, ENTER THE APPROPRIATE CT». 




















































































! 




25 


26 
















































i 


- sxxxxmxxx mmmm -i : 








1 
! 




26 


27 








-*- 
























THE MOST SIGNIFICANT DIGITS 
ARE AVAILABLE FOR STORAGE 
DELIVERY IF THE RESULT IS 
GIVEN AN EXS SHIFT TO TRANSFER 
THE DIGITS TO THE RIGHT. 


RESULT OF MULTIPLY PROCESS: 
THE LEAST SIGNIFICANT DIGITS 
ARE AVAILABLE FOR STORAGE 
DELIVERY. 


27 
28 

29 

30 


28 
































29 
































30 
































31 


























A 
















































31* 


32 


























T 




















1 






























































32 


33 






















ENTER THE INSTRUCTION FOR WHERE THE 
PROGRAM IS TO GO NEXT, SUCH AS, 2, 
CDNS, CT», ETC. 




















































33 


34 








































































34 


35 










-*- 


ENTER SHIFT INSTRUCTION IF ANY, 
SUCH AS 2L OR 3R. 






















































35 


36 




































































































36 


37 








































♦ 














4 




















































37 


38 






















ENTER WITH x AND DECIMAL POINT THE 
VALUE AS IT APPEARS IN ITS STORAGE 
BEFORE SHIFTING. ALSO INDICATE THE 
SIGN POSSIBILITIES. 














































~~ ' i 




38 


39 


































































! 




39 


40 
































































i 
1 




40 


41 
























\»mmmmmmww «r 








— 1 — 

1 
j 




41 


42 














































REMAINDER DIGITS AVAILABLE 
FOR STORAGE DELIVERY IF THE 
RESULT IS GIVEN AN EXS SHIFT 
TO TRANSFER THESE DIGITS TO 


QUOTIENT DIGITS AVAILABLE 
FOR STORAGE DELIVERY. 
NOTE THAT THE QUOTIENT AND 
THE REMAINDER HAVE THE SAME 
RELATIVE DECIMAL POSITIONS 
AND SIGNS. 


42 


43 














ENTER THE ARITHMETIC OR LOGICAL 
PROCESS TO BE PERFORMED, SUCH AS 
+ , -, x, *, ECS, UCS, C, T, OR LZE. 


























43 
44 


44 






































45 






































45 


46 












































THE RIGHT. 






46 
47 


47 


























































i 




M 'I 1 M M M- 






1 














48 


























































_ 




RESULT OF DIVIDE 


PROCESS: 








J- 












. 


48 

_ 



SPTM-432S 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



V - 96 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

FUNCTION CONTROL CHART 



APPLICATION: 



PROGRAM NO. 



DEMAND UNITS 


SCAN UNITS 






NO. 


TYPE OF UNI T 


TEST IN FROM 


test out to 


DEMAND IN FROM 


DEMAND 


OU T TO 


NO. 


TYP EOF UNI T 


TO SCAN OU T 


NO 


TYP EOF UNI T 


TO SCAN OUT 


NO. 


TYPE OF UNI T 


TO SCAN OU T 


NOT READY 


READY 


INPU T 


OU TPU T 


1 
















1 






9 






17 






2 
















2 






10 






18 






3 
















3 






11 






19 






4 


I 


z 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


4 


s 


9 


12 


8 


9 


20 


s 


9 


5 
















5 






13 






21 






6 
















6 






14 






22 






7 
















7 






15 






23 






8 
















8 






16 






24 







INPUT CONTROL LINES 


NO. 


TO 


a 




b 




c 




d 




e 




f 


lo 


g 




h 




i 




i 




k 




1 





OUTPUT CONTROL LINES 


NO 


FROM 


A 




B 




C 




D 




E 


11 


F 




G 




H 




1 




J 





SYMBOLS FOR PROGRAMMING: 

Processes: PR 

Transfer T 

Addition + 

Subtraction — 

Multiplication X 

Division -r 

Left Zero Elim LZE 

Compare C 

Channel Search = ECS 

Channel Search *f UCS 

SHIFTS: 

Shift 2 Left 2L 

Shift 2 Right 2R 

Expand Prod. Shift EXS 



SP TM-4327 



START 
TO 



JL JLk 



SCAN OUTS 


NO. 


TO 












13 

















READ UNIT 


RECORD 


NO. 


IN FROM 


OUT TO 


1 






2 






3 






4 


19 


ZO 


5 






6 






7 






8 







CHANNEL SEARCH EQUAL 


NO. 


FROM OUT 
OF STEP NO. 


TO 1 F = VI 


TO IF = V2 


TO 1 F ^ 


1 










2 










3 


Z7 


ZB 


Z9 


30 


4 











ERROR CHECKS 


FROM 


TO 


ARITH. 




iO'FLOW 




-5-O'FL.OVY 


14 


PARI TY 




ADDRESS 





INDICATORS 


NO. 


FROM 


1 




2 


1H 


3 




4 




IND. 

SWITCH 


FROM 4S TO 4^/ 


NO 

CHECK 


m 





WRITE UNIT 


RECORD 


NO. 


IN FROM 


OUT TO 


1 






2 






3 






4 


Zl 


zz 


5 






6 






7 






8 









STEP 


C L E t 


k R 




IN 


I 


OU T 




ZL6 


j 


24- 


CLEAR 
PROG.SEL. 


25 






STEP 


R E P E 


a r 


IN 
FROM 




j26 





BRANCHING 


NO. 


IN FROM STEP 


TO IF + 


TO 1 F - 


TO 1 F O 


1 










2 










3 










4 










5 










6 










7 










8 


34 


3S 


36 


37 


9 










10 










11 










12 










13 










14 










15 










16 










17 










18 











SELECTORS: 

Computor Selector T^T^ 

Drum Selector A, - 'Aj 

Input-Output Selectors S,~*S , 

Common CT(#) or CA (ft) 

Select ST (ft) or SA (ft) 

Non-Select NST(#)or NSA (ft) 

Pick-Up PUTU) or PUA (ft) 

Program Selector PS,~*PSi 4 

Delay of PS DPS,-DPS, 

Imm. of PS IPSii~MPS, t 

Power of PS PS0,-PS0 14 

Drop Out of PS PSDO.-PSDOu 

Ground of Sel GT(#) 

Computer Ground CG 

Demand Ground DG,~*DG, 

Scan Ground SG, _> SG 4 

Selector Hold SH 



Function Delay FD 

In FD 1 FDlf-FDl, 

In FD 2 FD2,-FD2, 

Out FD FDOfFDO, 

STORAGES: 

Input-Output 000—009 

Intermediate 10—59 

Revolver F — F,» 

Channel Search Fields CSF - CSF,» 

DEMAND UNITS: 

Test In TST (ft) 

Test Out Ready .TSTR (ft) 

Test Out Not Ready TSTN (#) 

Demand In Dl (#) 

Demand Out Input DOI (») 

Demand Out Output DOO (#) 



Scan Out SO^SO*, 

Program Step In In ST (#) 

Program Step Out From ST (#) 

Out Expanders OE^OE, 

In Branching BR,-BR,» 

+ Branch Out +BR,-'BR 18 

-Branch Out -BR, — BR,, 

o Branch Out oBR,—BR„ 

Read Unit Record Ri"*R» 

Write Unit Record W,-W, 

Equal Channel Search In ECSI {ft) 

Equal Channel Search Out=V, ..ECSV, (ft) 
Equal Channel Search Out=V, ..ECSV, (#) 
Equal Channel Search Out ^ ....ECS^ (#) 

Unequal Channel Search In UCSI (#) 

Unequal Channel Search Out=..UCS = (#) 
Unequal Channel Search Out*..UCS * (#) 

Program Address Counter PAK 

Address Register ADR 





CHANNEL SEARCH 


UNEQUAL 


NO. 


FROM OU T 
OF STEP NO. 


TO 1 F = 


TO IF ^ 


1 








2 








3 


31 


3Z 


33 


4 









OUT EXPANDERS 


NO. 


IN 


OUT 


OU T 


1 








2 








3 








4 


J& 


39 


40 


5 








6 








7 








8 









FUNCTION DELAYS 



31 



3Z 



32 



ALTERNATE SWITCHES 


NO. 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SEL ECT 


1 








2 








3 


45 


44 


46 


4 








5 








6 









CODE DISTRIBUTOR 


FROM Vl 
OF STEPS 


47 


FROM V2 
OF STEPS 


4& 


FROM R 
OF STEPS 


49 


NO. 


TO 


NO. 


TO 


00 




26 




01 




27 




02 




28 




03 




29 




04 




30 




05 




31 




06 




32 




07 




33 




08 




34 




09 




35 




10 




36 




11 


50 


37 


50 


12 




38 




13 




39 




14 




40 




15 




41 




16 




42 




17 




43 




18 




44 




19 




45 




20 




46 




21 




47 




22 




48 




23 




49 




24 




>49 




25 








FROMOUTO F 
FUNCTION: 


SI 


NO. 


TO 


NO. 


TO 







5 




1 




6 




2 


5Z 


7 


32 


3 




8 




4 




9 





FUNCTION SEQUENCE 


NO. 


SET 


PRO BE 


OU T 


1 


55 


54 


S3 


2 









Code Distributor CD 

In CD V, CDV, 

In CD Vi , CDV, 

In CD R CDR 

Out CD 00 to > 49 CD 00 -CD> 49 

In CD Pulse In CDP 

Out CD Pulse Out CDPo-CDP, 

Function Sequence Set FSS, _ *FSS 2 

Function Sequence Probe FSP, ~*FSPi 

Function Sequence Out FSO,"~*FS0 2 



ALTERNATE SWITCHES: 

Common SW,C ^SWjC 

Select SW,S -SW 4 S 

Non- Select SW,NS-SW 4 N 4 



V - 97 
FUNCTION CONTROL CHART 
EXPLANATION KEY 

1. Enter type of unit, i.e., 150 CPM, Magnetic Tape, etc. 

2. TST - Enter source of pulse, i.e., start, step exit, etc. 

3. TSTN - Enter step number or function to be initiated if unit is not 
ready. 

4. TSTR - Enter step number or function to be initiated if unit is ready. 

5. DI - Enter source of piilse, i.e., start, step exit, etc. 

6. DOI - Enter step number or function to be initiated if last operation 
was the transfer of data to input. 

7. DOO - Enter step number or function to be initiated if last operation 
was the transfer of data to output. 

8. Enter type of unit. 

9. Enter the number of the scan out routine assigned to the unit. 

10. IPC - Enter the number of the selector (s) to be picked up, i.e., 
PU T12, PU A8, etc. 

11. OPC - Enter the number of the step exit or other function which 
impulses the output control line. 

12. Enter the step number or function to be initiated by the start 
impulse. 

13. Enter step number or function to be initiated by the scan out impulse. 

14. Enter the function to be initiated if the related error occurs. 

15. Enter source of pulse, usually B+ through a selector, i.e., ST ff 2, etc. 

16. Enter source of pulse, usually B+. 

17. Enter the destination of the pulse routed through the indicator 
switch, i.e., CT*2, etc. 

18. Enter an x if no check is to be wired. 

19. R - Enter the step exit or out of function which is to initiate the 
reading of a specific URA from the drum to the revolver. 

20. Enter the step number or other function to be initiated immediately 
following the read instruction. 

21. W - Enter the step exit or out of function which is to initiate the 
writing from the revolver to the drum. 



V - 98 

22. Enter the step number or other function to be initiated immediately 
following the write instruction. 

23. Enter the error check exit(s) which are to initiate step clear. 

24. Enter the step number or function to be initiated after step clear, 
i.e. , step 24, PS 5, etc. 

25. Enter source of pulse, i.e., out of step 36, etc. 

26. Enter the error check exit(s) which are to initiate step repeat. 

27. ECSI - Enter the step number of the channel search equal step, i.e., 
out of step 4, etc. 

28. ECSVj - Enter the step number or function to be initiated if a match 
was found for value 1. 

29. ECSV2 - Enter the step number or function to be initiated if a match 
was found for value 2. 

30. ECS^ - Enter the step number or function to be initiated if no match 
was found. 

31. UCSI - Enter the step number of the channel search unequal step. 

32. UCS= - Enter the step number or function to be initiated if all 
URA's matched. 

33. UCS f - Enter the step number or function to be initiated if a non- 

matching URA was found. 

34. BR - Enter the number of the step exit whose result is to be tested 
for +, - or 0. 

35. +BR - Enter the step number or function to be initiated if the result 
is +. 

36. -BR - Enter the step number or function to be initiated if the result 
is -. 

37. OBR - Enter the step number or function to be initiated if the result 
is 0. 

38. OE - Enter the number of the step exit or function exit which is to 
be expanded. 

39. Enter the step number or function to be initiated, (maximum of two). 

40. Enter the step number or function to be initiated, (maximum of two). 

41. FD1 - Enter the number of the step exit or function exit. 

42. FD2 - Enter the number of the step exit or function exit. 



V - 99 

43. FDO - Enter the step number or function to be initiated after both 
FD1 and FD2 have been impulsed. 

44. SW C - Enter the step number, function, value, etc. which is to be 
selected by the manual alternate switch. 

45. SW S - Enter the step number, function, value, etc. which is to be 
chosen if the alternate switch is on the select side. 

46. SW NS - Enter the step number, function, value, etc. which is to be 
chosen if the alternate switch is on the non select side. 

47. CD Vj - Enter the step number (s) whose value 1 is to be chosen through 
the code distributor. 

48. CD V2 - Enter the step number (s) whose value 2 is to be chosen through 
the code distributor. 

49. CD R - Enter the step number (s) whose result is to be chosen through 
the code distributor. 

50. CD 00 through 49 - Enter the address of the storage unit to be 
called for if the related value is in the code distributor. 

51. CD P - Enter the number of the step exit or function. 

52. CDP through 9 - Enter the step number or function to be initiated 
if the related value is in the code distributor. 

53. FSS - Enter the number of the step exit or function exit. 

54. FSP - Enter the number of the step exit or function exit. 

55. FSO - Enter the step number or function to be initiated after the 
FSS and then the FSP have been impulsed. 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



V - 100 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

COMPUTER SELECTOR CONTROL CHART 



APPLICATION: 



PROGRAM NO. 



PICK-UP FROM 



GROUND 
TO 



SPTM-4328 



3b 



4a 



Tt7 



5a 



5b 



6a 



6b 



6c 



6d 



9a 



9b 



10a 



10b 



11a 



lib 



12a 



12b 



12c 



12d 



13 



14 



15a 



15b 



16c 



16b 



17c 



17b 



18c 



18b 



18c 



18d 



19 



20 



21a 



21b 



22a 



22b 
23a" 
23b 

24a 
24b 
24c" 
24J 



NON-SELECT 



ENTER THE NUMBER OF THE 
INPUT CONTROL LINE OR 
PROGRAM SELECTOR WHICH 
IS TO IMPULSE THE PICK UP, 
I.E., IPC a, PSO 12, ETC. 



PICK-UP FROM 



ENTER THE TYPE OF GROUND 
I.E., SCAN GROUND *1, DEMAND 
GROUND *4. COMPUTER GROUND, ETC. 



ENTER THE ADDRESS OF THE VALUE, 
THE STEP NUMBER, THE FUNCTION, 
ETC. DESIRED WHEN THE SELECTOR 
IS ON THE SELECT SIDE. 



GROUND 
TO 



25 



26 



27c 



27b 



28c 



28b 



29c 



29b 



30a 



30b 



30c 



30d 



31 



32 



33c 



33b 



34c 



34 b 



35a 



35b 



36c 



36b 



36c 



■353" 



37 



38 



39a 



39b 



40a 



40b 



ENTER THE VALUE, RESULT, STEP 
NUMBER, FUNCTION, ETC. THAT IS 
TO BE SELECTED. 



■*2E- 



42c 



42d 



43 



NON-SELECT 



PROGRAM SELECTS 



ENTER THE NUMBER OF THE STEP 
EXIT OR FUNCTION WHICH IMPULSES 
THE PS IN. 



ENTER THE ADDRESS OF THE VALUE, 
THE STEP NUMBER, THE FUNCTION, 
ETC. DESIRED WHEN THE SELECTOR 
IS ON THE NON-SELECT SIDE. 

47a 
47b 

48o 

48 b 

48c 

"48T 



8 



10 



11 



12 



13 



14 



15 



16 



+ 



DELAY OUT TO 



REMARKS: 



E OUT TO 



D. O. FROM 



ENTER STEP NUMBER OR FUNCTION 
TO BE INITIATED. NOTE, PS 1 
IS A 20 ms. DELAYED OUT; PS 2 
THROUGH 10 ARE 15 ms. DELAYED 
OUTS; PS 11 THROUGH PS 16 ARE 
IMMEDIATE OUTS. 



D. O. FROM 



POWER TO 



ENTER SELECTOR (S) TO BE 
PICKED UP, I.E., PU T8, 
PU A6, ETC. 



ENTER THE NUMBER OF THE STEP 
EXIT OR FUNCTION WHICH IMPULSES 
THE DROP OUT. 



SECTION VI 
ILLUSTRATIVE PROBLEMS AND 
SOLUTIONS 



ILLUSTRATIVE PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS 
INDEX - SECTION VI 



PAGE NO, 



1. Problem Approach 1 

2. Problem I Billing and Inventory 6 

3. Problem II Billing and Inventory 16 

4. Problem III Inventory and Sales 28 

5. Problem IV Daily Payroll 43 

6. Problem V Weekly Payroll 58 



VI 



1. Problem Approach 

Every problem applied to a Univac File-Computer consists of several 
areas of interest. In other words, all the aspects of the system 
must be controlled through the program by analysis of the problem. 
These areas of interest or break-up of the overall problem can be 
stated as: 

1) Analyze the problem. 

a) What end results are required? 

b) When and on what schedule must the results be obtained? 

c) What is the source data? 

d) What is the source media? 

e) What reference file information is needed? 

f) What calculations are necessary to transform the source 
and reference data into the desired end results. 

2) Specify the System Required. 

After the problem has been analyzed and the questions mentioned 
above are answered the following questions should be consid- 
ered: 

a) What type of input devices are required? 

b) Is more than one input device needed? 

c) What information is to be stored on drums? 

d) Is external tape storage needed? 

e) Is stored instruction programming needed? 

Note: This question can be better answered after 
the problem has been flow charted. 

Note: After specifying a system in this way t subsequent pro- 
gramming may require a change in the original specifi- 
cations. However, it is necessary to have a general 
idea of what equipment is needed before starting the 
flow programming. 

3) After completing 2) and preparing tentative machine specifica- 
tions the entire application should be analyzed in detail. 
This may be best accomplished by: 

a) Referring to the information obtained when analyzing the 
problems, prepare a rough flow chart indicating what runs 
are to be made by the computer. 



VI - 2 



After these general flow charts are completed, a schedule of computer 
runs such as the following, might be prepared: 



Mi/Ac File Computed - APFLicfimoM ScHEDOLE 




DF<TPlRTlaM 


\foWME 


Mode 


tupor 
Media 


03QUUZED 


ftauaict 


lime 


//V/bT 

Ssl'd 


Ourrur^ „ __ AJj „.„ 


LM'5 


0*1 


Off 


Doe. 


am rut mrviH 


/ 

— 


lUtftuf &4i 


20M 




/ 


04C 


/- ifocPH 






lew 


MJLf 

Tiff 
/Xlfam 


6iC 


I4& 

X 



The card forms and unit record areas referred to would, of course, be 
tentatively designed through the operations described in 1) and 2). 

It is obvious that this format of scheduling computer runs would not 
be necessary where only one or two runs are required; however, in 
more complex applications involving many runs of various frequency 
such a schedule provides an excellent check point for scheduling the 
work in the best fashion. The elapsed time column must necessarily 
remain blank until the next step of the procedure is completed. 

4) Program Flow Charting. 

After we have completed the preceding steps the following 
information should be available for each scheduled computer 
run: 

a) Input media and data description. 

b) Output media and data description. 

c) Reference or drum URA data description. 

d) Calculation formulae necessary to transform the 
input data to the output or reference results. 

Having this information the next step is to flow chart the necessary 
program. 

The flow chart breaks down the step by step operation of the computer. 
This type of chart is an invaluable aid to the programmer since it 
exposes all the potential flaws in his logic. It forces him to think 
logically, in the manner in which the computer will operate. It must 
be remembered that the computer does not "think" by itself; it merely 
performs mathematical processing of data in a logical fashion as set 
forth by the programmer. Without such charts it is easy for the pro- 
grammer to lose the thread of alternatives which are presented to the 
machine, and thereby miss important steps in the logical sequence. 



VI - 3 



It is not necessary to be mechanically technical in these charts. 
It is better to prepare it in everyday terminology. Writing the 
actual program after having charted the steps in this logical fashion 
is simple and virtually all errors can be avoided. 

5) After the program flow chart has been completed it is pos- 
sible to proceed to the next step of "timing" the program. 
Form SPTM-4329 is used for this purpose. 





01VISION OF SPERRY HAND COSPORATION 

UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER 

PROGRAM TIMING (IN milliseconds) 






3 
T 
E 
P 


V1 
ACCESS 


PROCESS 

TIME 


V2 
ACCESS 


R 
ACCESS 


INTERSTEP * OTHSR 
FUNCTIONS - DESCRIPTION 


TOTAL 
STEP 
TIME 


% VOL- 
UME 
AFFECTED 


AVERAGE 
TRANS- 
ACTION 
TIME 




/ 


3 ' \oo 


I 

\5o 


■ I 


\7S 




4\ZS 


l\DO 


4^25 






I 


I 
I 


I 
I 


/?0& •5tV/T<TA'/*6 


\Jo 


/ X DC 


i/*? 






| 


I 


l 


%*ao 7/**r 


J&\37 


J s oo 


/a \37 


z 


A/9 


/ \89 


3 \oo 


'W 




7W 


/\oo 


7 \27 






i 


L . 




L 


i 


I 





6) 



The entries made refer to Problem I calculations in part. 
Symbols should be entered in the description column to 
cross-reference the volume % figure used for the calculations 
performed to obtain the result. This will also prove of 
value when changing or altering a program. The % volume 
figure should also include provision for iterative processes 
where a step is performed more than once for the routine. 

The various program step times can be obtained from the time 
summary section of this manual, however, care should be exer- 
cised in accurately applying these times since program tech- 
niques of simultaneous operations often eliminate process 
times from the total elapsed time total. The timing is done 
directly from the program flow chart and should include all 
interstep functions (ADR switching, Read, Write etc.) as 
well as the step process and access times. Note that the 
total times computed in this step should be entered on the 
application schedule. 

After the program flow charts and their related timing 
charts have been completed it is possible to chart the com- 
puter usage against available time to determine how the pro- 
gram sequence can be best arranged in light of input receipt 
time and desired output time in order to produce the most 
satisfactory results. This is done most easily by means of 
a Gantt chart such as: 



VI - 4 



r — — 

UNIVAC FILE - COMPUTER - DAILY USAGE 


Program 
No. 


9-10 


10-11 


11-12 


12-1 


1-2 


2-3 


3-4 


4-5 




















1 


























2 






























3 










m 




L 










i— 1 1 





The above elapsed time usage report would indicate the 
following daily schedule: 



Run 1 
Run 2 
Run 3 



Starts 


Ends 


Total Time 


3:00 PM 

11:00 AM 

2:00 PM 


11:00 AM 
1:20 PM 
3:00 PM 


4 hours 

2 hours 20 min. 

1 hour 



The preparation of this chart enables us to get a clear 
picture of the time end results will be available, and also 
forces us to time our preparatory work to fit in with the 
scheduled computer usage. 

7) The information provided by the preceding six (6) steps is 
sufficient to allow us to determine the feasibility of our 
applications, and in addition it gives us an excellent basis 
for creation of the detailed program. 

As mentioned before, if we are complete enough in preparing 
our program flow chart we will have little or no difficulty 
in transforming the flow chart to a detailed program. 
Complete examples of this entire process are shown in the 
examples covered in this section. 



VI - 5 



Illustrative Problems: 

The following sample problems and their solutions are designed to 
be used as practice problems in programming the Univac File-Computer, 
They are presented in a sequence of ascending complexity, and each 
problem employs one or more machine features or program techniques 
not utilized in the preceding problems. 

Each problem consists of 7 parts, these are: 

1) Statement of problem 

2) Machine specifications and comments 

3) General procedure flow chart 

4) Input-Output data format and explanation 

5) Drum stored data 

6) Program flow chart and comments 

7) Program planning sheets 

A list of the training problems is as follows: 

I Billing and Inventory Control, 

An off-line, punched card, single input device problem. 

II Billing and Inventory Control, 

An off-line, punched card, single input device problem, 
including back-ordered item control. 

III Multi-Card Inventory and Sales Problem. 

An off-line, single input device, punched card problem. 

IV Incentive Payroll - Daily Job Card Calculation and Summariza- 
tion by Employee. 

Involves two types of URA's (operation standards, 
and employee) 

V Weekly Payroll, 

Gross to net calculations. 



VI - 6 



2. PROBLEM I 

1. Statement of Problem 

This problem involves the continuous daily processing of approx- 
imately 7500 order item cards. These cards are produced from 
the customers order by means of a Card-O-Matic punch and are 
then placed into the DFC operation in order receipt sequence. 
As far as the computing operation is concerned the only signifi- 
cant data in these cards is the quantity ordered and the item 
number. The item number is so designed as to be the complete 
drum address of the item's DRA. There are approximately 10,000 
inventoried items. The operations to be performed by the compu- 
ter are: 

a) Reduction of the drum balance on hand figure for the 

item by the quantity ordered. (For purposes of simplicity 
we will assume that the balance on hand will never 
become negative. We will also assume that every order 
can be shipped i.e. - No backorder conditions will 
arise.) 

b) Quantity ordered is to be multiplied by the sales price 
obtained from the item URA and the result, sales amount, 
is to be rounded with .005 and punched into the card. 

c) Quantity ordered is to be multiplied by the cost price 
obtained from the item URA and the result, cost amount, 
is to be rounded with .005 and punched into the card. 

It should be noted that normally an application such as this could 
also include customer name cards which would be used with the com- 
puted item cards to produce the invoice. Consideration of these 
name cards has not been included in this problem in the interests of 
simplicity. 

2. Machine Specifications 

1 - 150 CPM Input-Output Card Sensing Punching Unit 

2 - Large Capacity Drums with 24 digit URA length. 
1 - Arithmetic and Control Unit (External Program) 



VI - 7 



3. General Procedure Flow Chart 



Cl&TOMEft 

oepEg 





CAXP FILE 



CAgO -O* 
MAWC 






ITBM cAKVd 



^ 
B 






Jh 

ILLlNCt 



COMPUTED 

i-reM c/U?C5 




2 piacb zepeepuczD /mn 
CAe& in tfocPM iupot 



ARITHMETIC <*> CONTROL 



Z) £KT£NO OUWMT/ry cepg&Gp dY 
4M£6 AhiP COST paces 




OP TO \ 
7SOO \ 

ITEMS I 






VI - 8 

4. Input-Output Data and Definition 

The input source media are punched cards which appear as follows: 



X 






12 12 12 12 12 12 


12 


12 
34 
56 


12 

34 
56 


\l 


12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 H 12 12 12 


12 


12 12 12 12 12 
1 4 34 34 34 34 

56 56 56 56 56 


12 
34 
56 


12 
34 
56 


12 
34 
56 


12 


12 12 12 12 12 '2 12 12 12 12 12 <2 


12 


fTlSM MMi 


fc£ 


34 
56 


34 
56 


ornmr/ 


MDBL NO. 


34 
56 


34 

56 


CasrAHOOtfT 


4U&JU*UNT 


34 
56 


H 5 4 


34 34 


M 5 i 


34 34 34 34 H H 


U 34 34 34 34 34 
56 56 56 56 5& 56 


34 34 34 34 134 34 
1 

56 56 56 56 J 56 56 


34 34 34 34 |34 34 
1 

56 56 56 56} 56 56 


i>£ 


c>V 


ueA 


OZDESLED 


5& 56 


56 56 


56 56 


56 56 56 56 56 56 




78 7 8 


7j»V8 


78 78 


78 


78 


78 


78 


78 78 7^^8 78 7g 


78 7r 7a^8 78 7s 


78 


78 7g 7 8 7s 7s 


78 


78 


78 


78 


4t 

78 78 jp 7s|7 8 7s 


78 78js 78| 78 78 


78 






1 2 


3 4 


S 6 


7 


e 


9 


10 


II 12 13 14 15 16 


17 18 19 20 21 22 


23 


24 25 26 27 26 


29 


30 


31 


32 


33 34 33 36J37 38 


39 40 41 42J43 44 


43 




o 

X 

< 

ac 

z 
o 


9 9 


9 9 


9 9 


9 


9 


9 


9 


9 9 9 9 9 9 


9 9 9 9 9 9 


9 


9 9 9 9 9 


9 


9 


9 


9 


9 9 9 9 [9 9 


9 9 9 9 |9 9 


9 










/TEM OZDEZ 


CA£D 










12 12 lZ 12 12 12 12 


12 


12 


12 12 12 12 12 12 12 "12 12 12 12 12 12 12 


«2 12 12 12 12 


12 


12 


12 


"2 12 12 12 12 12 12 »2 12 U 12 12 12 »2 


* 
i 


34 34 34 34 14 34 34 


34 


34 


34 34 34 34 34 34 34 M 34 34 34 34 34 34 


34 34 34 34 34 


34 


34 


34 


34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 




ac 

< 


56 56 56 56 56 56 56 


56 


56 


56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 


56 56 56 56 56 


56 


56 


56 


56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 




6 


7g 78 7g 78 78 7s 7s 


78 


78 


78 78 7s 78 7s 78 7s 78 78 78 78 7s 7s 7s 


78 78 78 78 78 


78 


7a 


78 


78 78 78 78 78 ?8 7g 78 78 78 78 78 78 7s 




J 


9 9 9 9 9 9 9 


9 


9 


99999999999999 


9 9 9 9 9 


9 


9 


9 


99999999999999 




X 


4( 47 48 49 30 31 32 


91 


34 


S3 3* 37 3S 3* 60 61 62 6] 64 65 66 67 68 


69 70 71 72 73 


74 


75 


76 


77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 BO 



























Definitions: 



Input 

1. Item Number 



2. Order number 



3. Quantity Ordered - 



Output 

4. Cost Amount 



5. Sales Amount 



This is the inventory number for the item 
ordered. It is also the actual large capac- 
ity drum address of the item's stored data. 

This is the customers order number. This 
information is not required in the calcula- 
tion. 

This field contains the quantity of the 
item ordered by the customer. 



This field is the output resulting from 
multiplying quantity ordered by the drum 
stored cost price. 

This field is the output resulting from 
multiplying quantity ordered by the drum 
stored sales price. 



VI - 9 



The above input and output data will be assigned to input-output 
storage as follows: 

INPUT - 000 - Item Number (Drum Address) 
002 - Quantity Ordered 

OUTPUT - 003 - Cost Amount 
004 - Sales Amount 

Note: The two fields of input are assigned to even input storage 
units so that the "even" input transfer may be used. This will 
transfer the data to input storage in one drum revolution. 

5. Drum Stored Data and Definition 

a) Drum Unit Records for 10,000 items, Drum locations 000000 - 
039924. 

UNIT RECORD AREA - FIELD ASSIGNMENT 
SYM. DESCRIPTION DIGITS SIGN 



xxxxxx . 


-f 


xxxxxxx . 


+ 


XX. xxx 


+ 


XX.XXX 


+ 


.005 


+ 



FO Item Number 

PI Balance on Hand 

F2 Cost Price 

F3 Selling Price 

F4 Constant 5 

b) Definitions 

FO - Item Number - Actual drum address of the inventory item. 
Since the input media contains the item address there is 
no need for this information in this program. 

Fl - Balance On Hand - This represents the quantity of the item 
on hand and available for shipment. The statement of the 
problem precludes the possibility of this balance ever 
becoming negative. 

F2 - Cost Price - Cost price per each item sold. 

F3 - Selling Price - Sales price per each item sold. 

F4 - Constant 5 - Since the problem requires rounding of the 
cost and sales amounts to the nearest penny we need this 
constant. We have placed the constant in the unit record 
area for two reasons: 

1) We have the necessary space to include this 
digit in the 24 digit URA chosen. 

2) Access time to this URA field will be faster 
than to an input-output or intermediate storage. 

For purposes of this problem, assume the above data has been loaded 
onto the drums. 



VI - 10 



6. 



Program Flow Chart 



stagt 



\ 



t>£M*MD Umt^/ 






1 ooo T- =AP& 

e&p 

i 

Z F, -ooz=F, 

4 O03 +F4 =003 

1 

6 004 + £4 -oo4 

♦ 
Metre 

1 



TRIP 
4 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 11 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

150 CPM INPUT-OUTPUT CHART 



APPLICATION: 23ti.UA/6t & I NK/ENTOEy? 



ROGRAM NO. 



z 



INPUT-OUTPUT STORAGE FIELD ASSIGNMENT 
DFMANn UNIT NO. 3- OR SCAN UNIT NO. 


INPUT FIELD ASSIGNMENT 


SYM. 


DESCRIPTION 


CARD COLUMNS AND DECIMALS 


SIGN 
CTL. 


11 


10 


9 


8 


7 


6 


5 


4 


a 


2 


\ 


SN. 


000 


Item Num&e/z. (p#um aw #£~ss) 












/ 


2 


3 


4 


S 


*>* + 




001 






























002 


Quantity Oevezed 












// 


IZ 


/3 


14 


JS 


Jh^-h 




003 






























004 






























005 






























006 






























007 






























008 






























009 
































OUTPUT FIELD ASSIGNMENT 


SYM. 


DESCRIPTION 


CARD COLUMNS AND DECIMALS 


SIGN 
CTL. 


1 1 


10 


9 


8 


7 


6 


8 


4 


3 


2 


i 


SN. 


000 






























001 






























002 






























003 


Co^t Amount 










33 


34 


35 


^,37 


3& 




-h 




004 


3aue3 Amount 










39 


4C 


41 


4Z A tf3 


44 




■J- 




005 






























006 






























007 






























008 






























009 































INPUT CONTROL LINES 


SYM. 


FROM 


a 




b 




c 




d 




e 




f 




9 




h 




1 




i 




k 




1 





OUTPUT CONTROL LINES 


SYM. 


TO 


A 


TeiR 


B 




C 




D 




E 




F 




G 




H 




1 




J 









INPUT-OUTPUT 


SELECTORS 




PICK UP 


S# 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SELECT 




la 








lb 








lc 










2a 








2b 








2c 










3a 








3b 








3c 










4 










5a 








5b 








5c 










6a 








6b 








6c 










7a 








7b 








7c 










8a 








8b 








8c 










9a 








9b 








9c 










10a 








10b 








10c 









INPUT TRANSFER 


IN (from) 


£\T£N 


NO (to) 




EVEN (to) 


IN 


ALL (to) 





PROGRAM SELECTS 


NO. 


IN FROM 


POWER OUT TO 


1 






2 







REMARKS: 



SPTM 4S30 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 12 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

STORAGE ASSIGNMENT CHART 



APPLICATION: 



J5/L.L-IM& £ /A/[/EAnZ>1Zy PROGRAM NO.: -2" 



LARGE CAPACITY DRUM A nnRF5» from 40 &° oa 
FIFl D ASSIGNMENT TOd3 99^4 


SYM 


DESCRIP TION 


CHARACTER AND DECIMAL 


1 1 


io 


9 


S- 7 


e 


e 


4 


3 


2 1 


SN 


F 


Item Number 












.5" 


A 


3 


z 


/ 


° t 


<^ 


F 1 


Balance, okj Mand 










12 


// 


/o 


<P 


3 


7 


*i* 


F 2 


Ca6T PfelCE 














n 


/b 

t 


L 


14-/ 3 


■f 


F 3 


Celling FkicE. 














2Z 


*. 


P 


10 


IS 


-h 


F 4 


CnA/JTTWT S 
















, 


i 




23 


-t~ 


F 5 




























F 6 




























F 7 




























F 8 




























F 9 




























F10 




























FIT 




























F12 




























F13 




























F14 




























F15 




























F16 




























F17 




























F18 




























F19 






























LARGE CAPACITY DRUM ADDRESS FROV 




FIELD ASSIGNMENT TC 




SYM 


DESCRIP TION 


CHARACTER AND DECIMAL 


t 1 


10 


9 


8 


7 


6 


5 


4 


3 


z 


1 


SN 


F 




























F 1 




























F 2 




























F 3 




























F 4 




























F 5 




























F 6 




























F 7 




























F 8 




























F 9 




























F10 




























Fll 




























F12 




























F13 




























F14 




























F15 




























F16 




























F17 




























FJ8 




























F19 





























LARGE CAPACITY DRUM 
FIELD ASSIGNMENT SELECTORS 


PICK-UP FROM 


GROUND 
TO 


A* 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SEL ECT 






la 








lb 








lc 








Id 












2a 








2b 








2c 








2d 












3a 








3b 








3c 








3d 












4a 








4b 








4c 








4d 












5a 








5b 








5c 








5d 












6a 








6b 








6c 








6d 












7a 








7b 








7c 








7d 












8a 








8b 








8c 








8d 









INTERMEDIATE STORAGE FIELD ASSIGNMENT 
TRACK 50 


SYM 


DESCRIP TION 


1 1 


10 


9 


S 


7 


6 


5 


4 


3 


2 | 1 


SN 


50 




























51 




























52 




























53 




























54 




























55 




























56 




























57 




























58 




























59 





























INTERMEDIATE STORAGE FIELD ASSIGNMENT 
TRACK 10 


SYM. 


DESCRIPTION 


1 1 


10 


S 


B 


7 


e 


8 


4 


3 


2 


1 


SN 


10 




























11 




























12 




























13 




























14 




























15 




























16 




























17 




























18 




























19 





























TRACK 20 


20 




























21 




























22 




























23 




























24 




























25 




























26 




























27 




























28 




























29 





























TRACK 30 


30 




























31 




























32 




























33 




























34 




























35 




























36 




























37 




























38 




























39 





























TRACK 40 


40 




























41 




























42 




























43 




























44 




























45 




























46 




























47 




























48 




























49 





























SP TM-4326 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 13 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

PROGRAM PLANNING CHART 



APPLICATION: BlLUNG <fi /AIVEM7D2Y PROGRAM NO.: 



s-rt* 

NO. 


NPUT 

UNIT 

NO. 


CARD 
NO. 


VALUE 1 


PRO- 
CESS 


VALUE 2 


RESULT 


NEXT 
STEP 


VALUE 1 AS STORED 


VALUE 2 AS STORED 


UNSHIFTED RESULT 


STORED RESULT 


s 

T 


DESCRIPTION 


SYM 


SH 


DESCRIPTION 


SYM 


SH 


DESCRIPTION 


SYM 


SH 


1 1 


10 


9 


8 


7 


6 


s 


A 


3 


2 


1 


s 

N 


1 1 


10 


» 


8 


7 


e 


8 


4 


3 


2 


1 


s 

N 


22 


21 


20 


19 


18 


171815 14 


13 i; 


! 11 


10 


9 


8 


7 


a 


s 


4 


3 


2 


1 


s 

N 


1 1 


10 


9 


8 


7 


e 


8 


4 


a 


2 


i i 


1 p 
1 


1 


/ 


/ 


item no. fmuiM Apd&zs) 


ooa 




r 








/■boM Mo. 


AD2. 




£t 












X 


x 


XXXX^ 






















































XX^XXXjf 












X 


XX 


x: 


X 


K 


2 


/ 


/ 


3<?Layi6?r ou MaidD 


F, 




— 


QuAiAh+/ azoev&d 


002 




Mew T3Au\kt£EMi Maa/d 


Ft 




3 










K 


X 


X 


X 


X 


XX 


+ 












X 


X 


x 


XX 


*,+ 




























[X 


x 


X 


XXX 


Xf 










XX 


X 


X 


X* 


X.T 2 


3 


/ 


/ 


AuanhiY 02D&/CD 


OOZ 




X 


CQ5T PEice 


/£ 




^CbTAMOUMT U>g. 


403 




4 












X 


X 


X 


X 


XX 


f 














X 


^x_xx+ 




























XK5C 


XXxl 


X 


-h 










X 


X 


y 


*X 


X 


X+ 3 


4 


/ 


/ 


Coir AmaoMT a/.E 


do3 




+ 


*OOS 


F4 




" " IZDD. 


DQ3 




jS" 










X 


X 


X 


K 


x 


XX. 


t 
















1 


L 




5 


T- 




























x* 


X 


XX 


X*C4- 










XX 


** 


* 


K 


y+ 4 


5 


/ 


/ 


fiuaiAh-H DeoctifD 


ooz. 




X 


5eluM£> Przic£ 


& 




3ALE6 " Al.e. 


/xrt 




& 












X 


X 


^ 


X 


X 


Xf 














X 


x^x 


X-h 




























xxv£xx_ 


XX 


+ 










xx: 


xx: 


X 


X 


X + 5 


6 


/ 


/ 


^AlE6 AMOJhlt'ki.2. 


cod 




4- 


.ODZ 


fV 




2DD. 


Add- 




H// 










X 


X 


X 


z 


* 


* 


X 


+ 
















i 1 




5 + 




























XX 


XX, 


XX 


X 


+ 










K 


XxIXXXXt 6 


7 












































































































































7 


8 












































































































































8 


9 












































































































































9 


10 












































































































































10 


11 












































































































































11 


12 












































































































































12 


13 












































































































































13 


14 












































































































































14 


15 












































































































































15 


16 












































































































































16 


17 












































































































































17 


18 












































































































































18 


19 












































































































































19 


20 


































































































































1 








20 


21 


































































































































J 

j . 








21 


22 


































































































































1 

I 








22 


23 


































































































































1 

1 








23 


24 


































































































































I 








24 


25 












































































































































25 


26 












































































































































26 


27 






























































































































1 












27 


28 






























































































































1 

1 












28 


29 






i 


































































































































29 


30 










































































































































30 


31 












































































































































31' 


32 












































































































































32 


33 












































































































































33 


34 












































































































































34 


35 












































































































































35 


36 












































































































































36 


37 












































































































































37 


38 


































































































































1 








38 


39 


































































































































i 








39 


40 


































































































































1 








40 


41 


































































































































i 








41 


42 












































































































































42 


43 












































































































































43 


44 












































































































































44 


45 












































































































































45 


46 












































































































































46 


47 












































































































































47 


48 










... - 


































































































































48 



SPTM-4325 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 14 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

FUNCTION CONTROL CHART 



APPLICATION: &'///"* f / #WTQ#/ 



PROGRAM NO.: 



DEMAND UNITS SCAN UNITS 


NO. 


TYPE OF UNIT 


TEST IN FROM 


TEyfgJTTg — — 


DEMAND IN FROM 


DEMAND OUT TO 


NO. 


TYPE OF UNIT 


TO SCAN OUT 


NO 


TYPE OF UNIT 


TO SCAN OUT 


NO. 


TYPE OF UNIT 


TO SCAN OUT 


NOT READY 


READY 


INPUT 


OUTPUT 


1 


/SO CM 








smerJor, 


/M sr&/ 




1 






9 






17 






2 
















2 






10 






18 






3 
















3 






11 






19 






4 
















4 






12 






20 






5 
















5 






13 






21 






6 
















6 






14 






22 






7 
















7 






15 






23 






8 
















8 






16 






24 







INPUT CONTROL LINES 


NO. 

a 


TO 




b 




c 




d 




e 




f 




9 




h 




i 




i 




k 




1 






OUTPUT CONTROL LINES 


NO 


FROM 


A 


Of, 


B 




C 




D 




E 




F 




G 




H 




1 




J 





START 
TO 



pr &/ 



SCAN OUTS 


NO. 


TO 



























READ UNIT RECORD 


NO. 


IN FROM 


OUT TO 


1 


srjf/ 


<sr*t2 


2 






3 






4 






5 






6 






7 






8 







ERROR CHECKS 


FROM 


TO 


ARITH. 


^TSP G&V/9T 


JO'FLOW 


&TOP 


■^O'FLOW 




PARITY 


5Top 


ADDRESS 


STOP 



INDICATORS 


NO. 


FROM 


1 




2 




3 




4 




IND. 
SWITCH 


FROM 


TO 


NO 
CHECK 





WRITE UNIT RECORD 


NO. 


IN FROM 


OUT TO 


1 


3T#6 


o£"/ 


2 






3 






4 






5 






6 






7 






8 







STEP CLEAR 


IN 


OUT 






CLEAR 
PROG.SEL. 




STEP REPEAT 


IN 
FROM 


A/e/r//. £-jeeo/e 



SYMBOLS FOR PROGRAMMING: 

Processes: PR 

Transfer T 

Addition + 

Subtraction — 

Multiplication X 

Division -f 

Left Zero Elim LZE 

Compare C 

Channel Search = ECS 

Channel Search ^ UCS 

SHIFTS: 

Shift 2 Left 2L 

Shift 2 Right 2R 

Expand Prod. Shift EXS 



SP TM-4327 



SELECTORS: 

Computor Selector T,— T^ 

Drum Selector A,- Aj 

Input-Output Selectors S,- S , 

Common CT(ff) or CA (#) 

Select ST («) or SA (#) 

Non-Select NST(#)or NSA (#) 

Pick-Up PUT(») or PUA (#) 

Program Selector PS,— PS,» 

Delay of PS DPS,-DPS 10 

Imm. of PS IPS,,— IPS, 4 

Power of PS PSO,-PSO, 4 

Drop Out of PS PSDO,-PSDO, 4 

Ground of Sel GT(#) 

Computer Ground CG 

Demand Ground DG, — DG, 

Scan Ground SG,— SG 4 

Selector Hold SH 



Function Delay FD 

In FD 1 FD1,-FD1, 

In FD 2 FD2,-FD2j 

Out FD FDOf*FDO , 

STORAGES: 

Input-Output 000—009 

Intermediate 10—59 

Revolver F - F,» 

Channel Search Fields CSFo~*CSF, 9 

DEMAND UNITS: 

Test In TST (#) 

Test Out Ready TSTR (#) 

Test Out Not Ready TSTN (#) 

Demand In Dl (») 

Demand Out Input DOI (#) 

Demand Out Output DOO (#) 



Scan Out SO,— SO* 

Program Step In In ST (#) 

Program Step Out . From ST (#) 

Out Expanders OE,— OE, 

In Branching BR, — BR„ 

+ Branch Out +BR,— BR„ 

-Branch Out -BR,— BR„ 

o Branch Out oBR,— BR„ 

Read Unit Record Ri^Ri 

Write Unit Record W,-W, 

Equal Channel Search In ECSI (#) 

Equal Channel Search Out=V, ..ECSV, (#) 
Equal Channel Search Out=V 2 ..ECSVj (#) 
Equal Channel Search Out \ ....ECS^ (#) 

Unequal Channel Search In UCSI (#) 

Unequal Channel Search Out=..UCS = (#) 
Unequal Channel Search Out ^.. UCS ^F (#) 

Program Address Counter PAK 

Address Register ADR 



CHANNEL SEARCH EQUAL 


NO. 


FROM OUT 
OF STEP NO. 


TO 1 F = VI 


TO IF = V2 


TO IF ^ 


1 










2 










3 










4 












BRANCHING 


NO. 


IN FROM STEP 


TO IF + 


TO IF - 


TO 1 F O 


1 










2 










3 










4 










5 










6 










7 










8 










9 










10 










11 










12 










13 










14 










15 










16 










17 










18 











CHANNEL SEARCH UNEQUAL 


NO. 


FROM OUT 
OF STEP NO. 


TO IF = 


TO IF \ 


1 








2 








3 








4 










OUT EXPANDERS 


NO. 


IN 


OUT 


OUT 


1 


Wi 


OPC* 


z>jr^/ 


2 








3 








4 








5 








6 








7 








8 










FUNCTION DELAYS 


NO. 


IN 1 


IN 2 


OUT 


1 








2 








3 










ALTERNATE SWITCHES 


NO. 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SEL ECT 


1 








2 








3 








4 








5 








6 









CODE DISTRIBUTOR 


FROM Vt 
OF STEPS 




FROM V2 
OF STEPS 




FROM R 
OF STEPS 




NO. 


TO 


NO. 


TO 


00 




26 




01 




27 




02 




28 




03 




29 




04 




30 




05 




31 




06 




32 




07 




33 




08 




34 




09 




35 




10 




36 




11 




37 




12 




38 




13 




39 




14 




40 




15 




41 




16 




42 




17 




43 




18 




44 




19 




45 




20 




46 




21 




47 




22 




48 




23 




49 




24 




>49 




25 








FROMOUTO F 
FUNCTION: 




NO. 


TO 


NO. 


TO 







5 




1 




6 




2 




7 




3 




8 




4 




9 





FUNCTION SEQUENCE 


NO. 


SET 


PRO BE 


OUT 


1 








2 









Code Distributor CD 

In CD V, CDV, 

In CD V, CDV, 

In CD R CDR 

Out CD 00 to > 49 ...CD 00 -CD> 49 

In CD Pulse In CDP 

Out CD Pulse Out CDP --CDP, 

Function Sequence Set FSS,— FSSj 

Function Sequence Probe FSP, ~ 'FSPj 

Function Sequence Out FSO,— FSOj 



ALTERNATE SWITCHES: 

Common SW,C -SW 6 C 

Select SW,S -SW 4 S 

Non- Select SW,NS-SW t N t 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 15 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

COMPUTER SELECTOR CONTROL CHART 






JZ 



PICK-UP FROM 


GROUND 
TO 


T# 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SELECT 






1 












2 












3a 








3b 












4a 








4b 












5a 








5b 












6a 








6b 








6c 








6d 












7 












8 












9a 








9b 












10a 








10b 












11a 








lib 












12a 








12b 








12c 








12d 












13 












14 












15a 








15b 












16a 








16b 












17a 








17b 












18a 








18b 








18c 








18d 












19 












20 












21a 








21b 












22a 








22b 












23a 








23b 












24a 








24b 








24c 








24d 









PICK-UP FROM 


GROUND 
TO 


T# 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SELECT 






25 












26 












27a 








27 b 












28a 








28 b 












29a 








29b 












30a 








30b 








30c 








30d 












31 












32 












33a 








33b 












34a 








34 b 












35a 








35b 












36a 








36b 








36c 








36d 












37 












38 












39a 








39b 












40a 








40b 












41a 








41b 












42a 








42b 








42c 








42d 












43 












44 












45a 








45b 












46a 








46b 












47a 








47 b 












48a 








48 b 








48c 








48d 









PROGRAM SELECTS 


PS# 


IN FROM 


DELAY OUT TO 


D. O. FROM 


POWER TO 


1 










2 










3 










4 










5 










6 










7 










8 










9 










10 










PS# 


IN FROM' 


IMMEDIATE OUT TO 


D. O. FROM 


POWER TO 


11 










12 










13 










14 










15 










16 











REMARKS: 



SF TM-4328 



VI - 16 VI - 16 

3. PROBLEM II 

1. Statement of Problem 

This problem is a further extension of problem I in that considera- 
tion has been given to back- ordered quantities. The problem again 
involves continuous daily processing of 7500 order item cards 
against a drum stored inventory file of 10,000 items. The cards are 
created from the customers order by means of a Card-O-Matic punch 
and fed into the 150 CPM sensing punching unit of the UFC. The 
computer is to perform the following operations: 

a) Reduce the quantity on hand (drum) by the quantity ordered. 
If the result is negative, then the result equals the quan- 
tity to be back-ordered. Punch the quantity back-ordered. 
In addition the quantity on hand should be changed to 
equal zero when a back-order occurs. The quantity shipped 
is determined by reducing the quantity ordered by the 
quantity back-ordered (if any). 

b) Quantity shipped is to be extended by the cost and selling 
prices to obtain cost and sales amounts. 

c) When a back-order occurs a one (1) should be added to a 
number of back-orders count maintained on the drum by item. 

d) Gross profit is to be calculated and punched as well as 
added to the gross profit total on the drum. Gross profit 
equals sales amount less cost amount. 

The item number is again the complete drum URA address of the item's 
unit record area. Assume that the cost price is never more than the 
sales price. Further conditions of the problem are: 

1) Assume the item unit record areas are already on the drum. 

2) Assume all intermediate storages are clear (i.e. spaces). 
2. Machine Specifications 

1 - 150 CPM Input-Output Card Sensing Punching Unit 

2 - Large Capacity Drums with a 30 digit OlA length 
1 - Arithmetic and Control Unit (External Program) 



VI - 17 



J. 6en£zal Proczpurb Flow Ctoer 



CUSTOMER. 





MAStBe J1SH 



CARP -O- 
MATIC 



/RePROPUcep] 
|rrtM c*gpS| 



1. JGU£CT THE PROPER ITEM 

carp prom piue amp ee- 

PRoOUCE iT,ENTZRlM<* 

aoAAjrrry ORpeRep amp 
customer orprr mo. 



To 



j^Li 



ITCH CMSDS 



ISO 
CPfA 
IfOPUT 



CAR& m TH£ ISO CPM INPUT 



JR/THMETlC <L CONmoL 



COMPUTE NEW ON UANP BALANCE. 

2) " 3AC&0/eP€ie QOANTiT/ 

3) - JHlPPlMb 

V " JAL& AMOiMJT 

S) " CC&T " 

•' GROSS PROFIT 

rj - QACk!'ORP£K COUNT 




UP TO 
&ooo 

iMEtfrag/ 
items 



VI - 18 



4. Input-Output Data and Definition 



X 

m 

a 
z 

K 

z 
o 

z 

5 
ac 

< 

X 






12 12 12 12 12 


12 12 


12 


12 12 


12 


12 12 12 12 12 


12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 


12 12 

34 34 

56 5 6 

78 7g 
SI 32 

9 9 


12 12 12 12 


M- 


12 12 12 12 12 12 12 


12 


/7XTM A/a 


aeoee. aax 


auftunrv 


34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 U U U 

56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 $6 56 56 56 56 

7g 7g 7g 78 7g 78 7g 7g 7g 7g 78 7g 7g 7g 
17 IS 1* 20 21 22 IS 24 25 24 27 26 2* SO 

99999999999 9 99 


34 34 34 34 

56 56 56 5& 

78 78 78 7g 
SS 34 S3 34 

9 9 9 9 


atMurnv 


34 

56 

78 
45 

9 


.'1 ,?1 


M '.* 


34 


3+ 


34 
56 

78 

7 
9 


34 

56 

78 
I 

9 


34 34 
56 56 

z 

78 7s 
» 10 
9 9 


34 

56 

78 
1 1 
9 


34 

56 

78 
IS 
9 


34 34 34 34 


i£ 


U 34 34 


34 34 34 34 


^5 


«o^ 


UBA 


suMeE 




6IHffB> 


?6 56 

1 2 

9 9 


56 56 

i. 

78 7« 
a 4 

9 9 


56 

78 

s 

9 


56 

78 
e 

9 


56 56 56 56 

3 

7g 78 7s 78 
IS 14 IS 16 
9 9 9 9 


56 

78 

S7 

9 


56 56 56 

78 78 78 
36 )■ 40 

9 9 9 


56 56 56 56 

3 

78 78 78 78 
41 42 43 44 

9 9 9 9 


JTBM DEPEZ CJ)2D 


12 12 12 12 12 

>4 U 34 34 34 

5ft 56 56 5fi 56 

7g 7g 78 7j 7g 

9 9 9 9 9 
46 47 4* 4* SO 


12 12 

34 34 

56 56 

78 7 8 

9 9 
31 51 


12 

34 

56 

78 

9 
si 


12 12 
34 34 
56 56 
78 78 
9 9 

34 31 


12 
34 
56 

78 

9 
34 


12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 


12 12 12 12 12 


1Z 12 


12 12 12 12 12 


12 12 12 12 12 12 


12 12 


34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 
56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 

78 7g 78 78 78 7s 7s 78 78 78 7s 7s 78 78 

99999999999999 
37 Si 3« 60 61 62 61 44 65 66 67 66 6* 70 


&J3QS3 


3ALEJ 


005T 


34 34 

56 56 

78 7 8 
9 9 

66 60 


34 34 34 34134 


34 


J4 


34 34 34 '34 3 4 


U 34 34 341 34 34 


FTBa&rr 


AMOUNT 


AMOOtfT 


56 56 56 56|56 

78 78 7a 78|78 

t> \ 

9 9 9 9 19 
71 72 7J 74| 75 


56 

78 

9 
76 


56 

78 

9 
77 


56 56 S6| 56 56 

78 78 78 ! 7g 7s 

9 9 9 |9 9 
76 7» S0| >1 62 


56 56 56 561 '6 56 

1 
78 7g 7g 78J 7g 78 

a ] 

9 9 9 9. 9 9 
63 »4 S3 86] 67 66 

























Data Definition 



Input 

1. Item Number 



2. Order Number 



3. Quantity Ordered 



Output 

4. Quantity Back Ordered 



5. Quantity Shipped 



This is the inventory number for the 
item ordered. It is also the specific 
large capacity drum address for the 
item's URA. 

This is the customer* s order number. 
This information is not required in 
the computations. 

This field contains the quantity of the 
item ordered by the customer 



This field represents that portion of 
the quantity ordered which cannot be 
filled from the on hand balance. 

This field represents the portion of 
quantity ordered, which can be shipped 
from the balance on hand. 



6. Gross Profit 



7. Sales Amount 



8. Cost Amount 



The gross profit realized on the sale 
of this item: the difference between 
sales amount and cost amount. 

The dollar amount rounded to two (2) 
decimal places resulting from the 
extension of quantity shipped by sales 
price. 

Same as 7 except substitute cost price 
for sales price. 



VI - 19 



The above input and output data is assigned to input-output storage 
as follows: 

INPUT - 000 - Item Number (Drum address) 
002 - Quantity Ordered 

OUTPUT - 002 - Quantity Shipped 

004 - Quantity Back Ordered 

006 - Cost Amount 

007 - Gross Profit Amount 

008 - Sales Amount 

5. Drum Stored Data 

a) Drum unit records for 10,000 items, Drum locations 
000000-049919. 



UNIT RECORD AREA - FIELD ASSIGNMENT 



SYM. 


DESCRIPTION 


DIGITS 


SIGN 


FO 


Sales Price 


XX. XXX 


+ 


Fl 


Cost Price 


XX. XXX 


+ 


F2 


On Hand Balance 


XXXXXX . 


+ 


F3 


Number of Back Orders 


XXXX. 


+ 


F4 


Gross Profit to Date 


XXXXXX. XX 


+ 


F5 


Constant 1 


1. 


+ 


F6 


Constant 5 


.005 


+ 



b) Definitions 

FO - Sales Price 

Fl - Cost Price 

F2 - On Hand Balance 



- Sales Price for each unit sold. 

- Cost Price for each unit sold. 

- Quantity of the item on hand and 
available for shipment on customer 
orders. 



F3 - Number of Back Orders - A statistical total kept to keep 

track of the number of times 
the item was not available to 
fill a customers order. 

F4 - Gross Profit to Date - A cumulative total of the real- 
ized gross profit on shipments 
of the item to date (i.e. since 
beginning of the accounting 
period) . 



VI - 20 



F5 - Constant 1 



This constant is required to 
enable us to add a one (1) to F3 
when a back-order occurs. It is 
kept in the unit record area 
rather than intermediate storage 
since we have space in the URA 
and the field access time to a 
30 digit URA is faster than to an 
intermediate storage. 



F6 - Constant 5 



Required to round the cost and 
sales amounts. 



For the purpose of this problem we will assume the above data has 
been loaded on the drums. 



VI - 21 

6. Pzo&eAM Flowchart 



JTAGT 



\ 



PfMMP 1/A//T&/ 



sPfffiY 






\ 

i 

esAP 

i 



3 % t- *oo4 

1 

4 to r - * F z 

\ 

6 OoZ-004-^Ooz 
«£-& — >. 



7 f=o xooz=oc& /3 /0T=oo7 

i 

3 ooe + fi « oo&o^y 

9 F, x ooz = oo6 

10 COS 4- ?t, * °06 0<e) 

11 OQS - O0t> *O07 

* 

1Z CCn + f 4 * Fjj 






DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 22 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

150 CPM INPUT-OUTPUT CHART 



APPLICATION: &////*/<? ^Z" ' rfAtT*#y PROGRAM NO.: ZZ 



rsf 

\ 



INPUT-OUTPUT STORAGE FIELD ASSIGNMENT 
DFMAND UNIT NO. / OR SCAN UNIT NO. 


INPUT FIELD ASSIGNMENT 


SYM. 


DESCRIPTION 


CARD COLUMNS AND DECIMALS 


SlGN 
CTL. 


1 1 


10 


9 


8 


7 


e 


B 


4 


3 


2 


1 


SN. 


000 


/TlfM A/itAo&^e (pevw /9£>p£'£-3s) 












/ 


z 


3 


4* 


5" 


'..+ 




001 






























002 


Qu#AJT/ry o&Dfxfp 
















/3 


14- 


/s 


/h <.+ 




003 






























004 






























005 






























006 






























007 






























008 






























009 
































OUTPUT FIELD ASSIGNMENT 


SYM. 


DESCRIPTION 


CARD COLUMNS AND DECIMALS 


SIGN 
CTL - 


1 1 


10 


9 


8 


7 


e 


S 


4 


3 


2 


i 


SN. 


000 






























001 






























002 


QuQ/vr/Ty 5 '/i '//>/>£-# 
















4-/ 


4-2 


4-3 


4-4 A + 




003 






























004 


Ourf/tfT/ry 3 /?<?*' o/ZD^e^p 
















37 


~58 


39 


4-o^ -h 




005 






























006 


(To ST /9aO01/a/7~ 












S3 


B4- 


85 


e6 A @7 


86> 


-h 




007 


C?/?0s& fleo^/.r /?/v70£/A/r 












7/ 


72 


73 


74 A 7S 


76 


-f- 




008 


^5 ' tf/£j$ /9*y>at/A/7~ 












77 


7s 


79 


eo^ei 


32 


y- 




009 































INPUT CONTROL LINES 


SYM. 


FROM 


a 




b 




c 




d 




e 




f 




9 




h 




i 




i 




k 




1 





OUTPUT CONTROL LINES 


SYM. 


TO 


A 


T/e/p 


B 




C 




D 




E 




F 




G 




H 




1 




J 





INPUT-OUTPUT SELECTORS 


PICK UP 


s# 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SELECT 




la 








lb 








lc 










2a 








2b 








2c 










3a 








3b 








3c 










4 










5a 








5b 








5c 










6a 








6b 








6c 










7a 








7b 








7c 










8a 








8b 








8c 










9a 








9b 








9c 










10a 








10b 








10c 









INPUT TRANSFER 


IN (from) 


£V^s/ 


NO (to) 




EVEN (to) 


/// 


ALL (to) 





PROGRAM SELECTS 


NO. 


IN FROM 


POWER OUT TO 


1 






2 







REMARKS: 



SPTM 4330 



\ 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 23 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

STORAGE ASSIGNMENT CHART 



LARGE CAPACITY DRUM 
FIELD ASSIGNMENT 



ADDRESS FROM 000000 
TO 0* 99/9 



LARGE CAPACITY DRUM 
FIELD ASSIGNMENT SELECTORS 



F 



F 1 



F 2 



F 3 



F 4 



F 5 



F 6 



F 7 



F 8 



F 9 



F10 



Fll 



F12 



F13 



F14 



F15 



F16 



F17 
Fl¥ 



F19 



DESCRIPTION 



aT^i^s Ptf/trf 



Co^r /^/r/" 



O// fS/Ps/fi B/P/tf/SC^ 



/Sc//w&*~& 0<r £?/*?*' O/ep&es 



C^^oSS- /^e/c/r- 7~o J?y9r£~ 



COS/37V?A/r / 



Co/V^rf/7'S' 



1ACTER AND DEC 



27 



2L> 



J£ 



/¥ 



25 



'9 



94 



e 



/3 



'# 



23 



/2 



22 t 2t 



// 



// 



Z6 



Z1 



O 



6" 



/o 



/b 



20 





LARGE CAPACITY 


DRUM 


ADDRESS FROM 




FIELD ASSIGNMENT TO 




SYM 


DESCRIPTION 


CHARACTER AND DECIMAL 


1 1 


to 


9 


8 


7 


6 


5 


4 


3 


2 


1 


SN 


F 




























F 1 




























F 2 




























F 3 




























F 4 




























F 5 




























F 6 




























F 7 




























F 8 




























F 9 




























F10 




























FIT 




























F12 




























F13 




























F14 




























F15 




























F16 




























F17 




























F18 




























F19 





























PrtK-VJP FROM 



GROUND 
TO 



la 



lb 



2a 



2b 



2c 



2d 



3a 



3b 



3c 



3d 



4a 



4b 



4c 



4d 



5a 



5b 



5d 



6a 



6b 
6c 
6d 



7a 



7b 



7c 



7d 



8a 



8b 



8c 



8d 



NON-SEL ECT 



INTERMEDIATE STORAGE FIELD ASSIGNMENT 
TRACK 50 


SYM 


DESCRIPTION 


1 1 


10 


9 


8 


7 


6 


B 


4 


3 


2 


1 


SN 


50 




























51 




























52 




























53 




























54 




























55 




























56 




























57 




























58 




























59 





























APPL 



ICATION: &'* L '*/& ^ Irt/frtTOyey 'PROGRAM NO.: JT 





INTERMEDIATE STORAGE FIELD ASSIGNMENT 
TRACK 10 


SYM. 


DESCRIPTION 


1 1 


to 





8 


7 


e 


8 


4 


3 


2 


1 


SN 


10 


Cl£/9£ fftwtrf Co£>£^) 
























+ 


11 




























12 




























13 




























14 




























15 




























16 




























17 




























18 




























19 






























TRACK 20 


20 




























21 




























22 






' 






















23 




























24 




























25 




























26 




























27 




























28 




























29 






























TRACK 30 


30 




























31 




























32 




























33 




























34 




























35 




























36 




























37 




























38 




























39 






























TRACK 40 


40 




























41 




























42 




























43 




























44 




























45 




























46 




























47 




























48 




























49 





























SPTM-4328 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 24 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

PROGRAM PLANNING CHART 



APPLICATION: &/ll//J$ ^ZA/ff-s/T-Q*/ PROGRAM 



NO.: 



JT 



STfcJ- 
NO. 


NPUT 

UNIT 

NO. 


CARD 
NO. 


VALUE 1 


PRO- 
CESS 


VALUE 2 


RESULT 


NEXT 


VALUE 1 AS STORED 


VALUE 2 AS STORED 


UNSHIFTED RESULT 


STORED RESULT 


S 
T 


DESCRIP TION 


SYM 


SH 


DESCRIPTION 


SYM 


SH 


DESCRIP TION 


SYM 


SH 


STEP 


1 1 


10 


9 


B 


7 


6 


s 


4 


3 


2 


1 N 




10 


9 


8 


7 


6 


8 


4 


9 2 


t 


s 

N 


22 


21 


20 


'.9 


18 


17 IS IB 14 


3 12 11 10 


9 


8 7 


6 B 


4 3 2 


S 

1 N 11 


10 9 


8 7 t 


8 


4 


3 


2 1 


s p 

N p 


1 


/ 


/ 


/Tf/s) Wo. 7pev*trf£®> 


ooo 




7" 








ZT^AS) a/o. 


tfze 




&J 












X 


X 


Y 


X 


X 


\? 


(■ 








































XX 


xxx 


x + 




XX 


XX 


xx: 1 


2 


/ 


/ 


O// ///&*£> g/9i#*<rf 


£2. 




— 


QufiNnry £?ez>fefj> 


O0Z 




Of-f- /V£W O/U BALANCE 

- b/o <?ry 


F=Z 




8#, 












X 


X" 


X 


X 


XX + 














XYX 


X + 




















XX 


XXX 


^ 




XX 


X 


X 


X^i 2 


3 


/ 


/ 


3/0 Qry 


fz 




T 








tftfe/S-tf^ee <?/-/ 


Ot>4- 




4- 
















X 


XX 


X J 


V 










































XXX 


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/£> 




T 








C ££#&*& *///£&. 


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a/o. 0/? &te*< 0/e&r#s 


£3 




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oof 




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1 






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1 








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44 


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48 














































































































48 



SPTM-4328 






DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 25 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

FUNCTION CONTROL CHART 



APPLICATION: . &/*/*/<$ ffZrft/fAtro* / 



PROGRAM NO.: 



JZ 



DEMAND UNITS 


SCAN UNITS 


NO. 

"T 


TYPE OF UNIT 


TEST IN FROM 


tESTOU^to ""- — 


DEMAND IN FROM 


DEMAND OUT TO 


NO. 


TYPE OF UNIT 


TO SCAN OUT 


NO 


TYPE OF UNIT 


TO SCAN OUT 


NO. 


TYPE OF UNIT 


TO SCAN OUT 


NOT READY 


READY 


INPUT 


OUTPUT 


/So CP*) 








5TA£r-> o£/ 


/V C57"^/ 




1 






9 






17 






2 
















2 






10 






18 






3 
















3 






11 






19 






4 
















4 






12 






20 






5 
















5 






13 






21 






6 
















6 






14 






22 






7 
















7 






15 






23 






8 
















8 






16 






24 







INPUT CONTROL LINES 


NO. 


TO 


a 




b 




c 




d 




e 




f 




g 




h 




i 




i 




k 




1 






OUTPUT CONTROL LINES 


NO 


FROM 


A 


OS, 


B 




C 




D 




E 




F 




G 




H 




1 




J 





SYMBOLS FOR PROGRAMMING: 

Processes: PR 

Transfer T 

Addition + 

Subtraction — 

Multiplication X 

Division -f 

Left Zero Elim LZE 

Compare C 

Channel Search = ECS 

Channel Search \ UCS 

SHIFTS: 

Shift 2 Left 2L 

Shift 2 Right 2R 

Expand Prod. Shift EXS 



START 
TO 


J>X&/ 



SCAN OUTS 


NO. 


TO 



























READ UNIT RECORD 


NO. 


IN FROM 


OUT TO 


1 


3W» &/ 


*5r&>*£2. 


2 






3 






4 






5 






6 






7 






8 







ERROR CHECKS 


FROM 


TO 


ARI TH. 


S7¥p tffP&T 


iO'FLOw 


sro^ 


tO'FLOW 




P ARI TY 


STOP 


ADDRESS 


STdP 



INDICATORS 


NO. 


FROM 


1 




2 




3 




4 




IND. 
SWI TCH 


FROM ITO 


NO 
CHECK 





WRITE UNIT RECORD 


NO. 


IN FROM 


OUT TO 


1 


JTit/Zjfr*/* 


0£~/ 


2 






3 






4 






5 






6 






7 






8 







CLEAR 



CLEAR 
PROG.SEL. 



STEP REPEAT 



/?/p/r//, £-fpo/? 



CHANNEL SEARCH EQUAL 


NO. 


FROM OUT 
OF STEP NO. 


TO 1 F = VI 


TO IF = V2 


TO IF \ 


1 










2 










3 










4 












BRANCHING 


NO. 


IN FROM STEP 


TO IF + 


TO IF - 


TO 1 F O 


1 


3r& z. 


jr&icy 


jr£?>-#3 


^T£P if? 


2 


ST&4, 


STfpjt'? 




^r£P#/3 


3 










4 










5 










6 










7 










8 










9 










10 










11 










12 










13 










14 










15 










16 










17 










18 











SELECTORS: 

Computor Selector T^T^ 

Drum Selector A, - 'Aj 

Input-Output Selectors S^S 10 

Common CT(#) or CA (#) 

Select ST (#) or SA (#) 

Non-Select NST(#) or NSA (#) 

Pick-Up PUT(#) or PUA (#) 

Program Selector PSfPSu 

Delay of PS DPS,-DPS I0 

Imm. of PS IPSn"MPS, 6 

Power of PS PSO,-"PSO, 6 

Drop Out of PS PSDO,— PSD0 14 

Ground of Sel GT(#) 

Computer Ground CG 

Demand Ground DG^DG, 

Scan Ground SG) - *SG 4 

Selector Hold SH 



Function Delay FD 

In FD 1 FD1,-FD1, 

In FD 2 FD2,^FD2, 

Out FD FD0,-FD0 3 

STORAGES: 

Input-Output 000 _, 009 

Intermediate 10 _, 59 

Revolver Fo - *F l 9 

Channel Search Fields CSFo""*CSF,» 

DEMAND UNITS: 

Test In TST (#) 

Test Out Ready TSTR (#) 

Test Out Not Ready TSTN (#) 

Demand In Dl (#) 

Demand Out Input DOI (#) 

Demand Out Output D00 (#) 



Scan Out S0,"*S0*, 

Program Step In In ST (#) 

Program Step Out From ST (#) 

Out Expanders OEi~*OE, 

In Branching .....BR|"" , BR, 8 

+ Branch Out +BR,- , BR lg 

-Branch Out -BR, - * BR„ 

o Branch Out oBR,—BR„ 

Read Unit Record Ri~*R t 

Write Unit Record W,-W 8 

Equal Channel Search In ECSI (#) 

Equal Channel Search Out=V, ..ECSV, (#) 
Equal Channel Search Out=V 2 ..ECSV 2 (#) 
Equal Channel Search Out ^ ....ECS^f (#) 

Unequal Channel Search In UCSI (#) 

Unequal Channel Search Out=..UCS = (#) 
Unequal Channel Search Out *.. UCS ^ (#) 

Program Address Counter PAK 

Address Register ADR 



CHANNEL SEARCH UNEQUAL 


NO. 


FROM OUT 
OF STEP NO. 


TO IF = 


TO IF ^ 


1 








2 








3 








4 










OUT EXPANDERS 


NO. 


IN 


OUT 


OUT 


1 


tl/s 


ope /? 


2>jr**/ 


2 








3 








4 








5 








6 








7 








8 










FUNCTION DELAYS 


NO. 


IN 1 


IN 2 


OUT 


1 








2 








3 










ALTERNATE SWITCHES 


NO. 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SEL ECT 


1 








2 








3 








4 








5 








6 









CODE DISTRIBUTOR 


FROM Vl 
OF STEPS 




FROM V2 
OF STEPS 




FROM R 
OF STEPS 




NO. 


TO 


NO. 


TO 


00 




26 




01 




27 




02 




28 




03 




29 




04 




30 




05 




31 




06 




32 




07 




33 




08 




34 




09 




35 




10 




36 




11 




37 




12 




38 




13 




39 




14 




40 




15 




41 




16 




42 




17 




43 




18 




44 




19 




45 




20 




46 




21 




47 




22 




48 




23 




49 




24 




>49 




25 








FROMOUTO F 
FUNCTION: 




NO. 


TO 


NO. 


TO 







5 




1 




6 




2 




7 




3 




8 




4 




9 





FUNCTION SEQUENCE 


NO. 


SET 


PRO BE 


OU T 








2 









Code Distributor CD 

In CD V, CDV, 

In CD V 2 , CDV, 

In CD R CDR 

Out CD 00 to > 49 CD 00 -'CD> 49 

In CD Pulse In CDP 

Out CD Pulse Out CDP --CDP» 

Function Sequence Set FSS,-*FSS 2 

Function Sequence Probe FSPi ""FSPj 

Function Sequence Out FSO^FSOj 



ALTERNATE SWITCHES: 

Common SW,C -*SW 6 C 

Select SW,S -SW t S 

Non-Select SW,NS-SW t N t 



TffemMMmgrttm. Kami. ^Mnivvui. 

DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 26 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

COMPUTER SELECTOR CONTROL CHART 



APPLICATION: 



2?////V«f ^ 



PROGRAM NO. 



JL 



/f/t/£Wr<9*>/ (WcT~ QS*V> /" T///3 /Rro34£-M ) 



PICK-UP FROM 


GROUND 
TO 


T* 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SELECT 






1 












2 












3a 








3b 












4a 








4b 












5a 








5b 












6a 








6b 








6c 








6d 












7 












8 












9a 








9b 












10a 








10b 












11a 








lib 












12a 








12b 








12c 








12d 












J 3 












14 












15o 








15b 












16a 








16b 












17a 








17b 












18a 








18b 


' 






18c 








18d 












19 












20 












2la 








21b 












22a 








22b 












23o 








23b 












24a 








24b 








24c 










24d 









PICK-UP FROM 


GROUND 
TO 


T# 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SELECT 






25 












26 












27a 








27b 












28a 








28b 












29a 








29b 












30a 








30b 








30c 








30d 












31 












32 












33a 








33b 












34a 








34b 












35a 








35b 












36a 








36b 








36c 








36d 












37 












38 












39a 








39b 












40a 








40b 












41a 








41b 












42a 








42b 








42c 








42d 












43 












44 












45a 








45b 












46o 








46b 












47a 








47b 












48a 








48b 








48c 








48d 









PROGRAM SELECTS 


PS# 


IN FROM 


DELAY OUT TO 


D. O. FROM 


POWER TO 


1 










2 










3 










4 










5 










6 










7 










8 










9 










10 










PS» 


IN FROM 


IMMEDIATE OUT TO 


D. O. FROM 


POWER TO 


11 










12 










13 










14 










15 










16 











REMARKS: 



VI - 27 



Program Comments 

Step 2) Although a minus result may occur on this step the actual 
numeric result will be stored in F2 as a positive number 
since we have an applied plus sign in F2. 

Step 8) & 10) 

The sales and cost amounts must be shifted 1 position to the 
right in order to drop off the trailing decimal in the rounded 
result. If this is not done it is possible to get an incor- 
rect gross profit figure in step 11. (Incorrect in the sense 
that the punched gross profit plus the punched cost amount 
may not equal the punched sales amount) . 



VI - 28 

4. PROBLEM III 

1. Statement of Problem 

This problem is a further refinement of problems I and II in that it 
includes provision for other types of transactions which can affect 
a finished stock inventory item i.e.: 



a. Customer Order Cards 

b. Stock Receipt Cards 

c. Stock Order Cards 

d. Cards representing customer orders which have been previously 
back-ordered. 

The inclusion of these new transactions makes this problem more 
comprehensive in scope than the prior inventory cases. The calcula- 
tions required, by card, are as follows: 

a. Customer Order Cards 

(1) Reduce drum on hand balance by quantity ordered 

(2) If the result of (1) is minus: 

(a) Increase the drum quantity back-ordered by 
the quantity back-ordered on this transaction. 

(b) Reduce the drum on hand balance to zero. 

(c) Place the quantity back-ordered in storage 
for punching. 

(d) Reduce quantity ordered by quantity back- 
ordered to obtain quantity shipped. 

(3) If the result of (1) was plus or zero: 

(a) Quantity shipped equals quantity ordered. 

(4) On all items, quantity shipped times sales price 
equals sales amount, round to two decimals. 

b. Stock Receipt Cards 

(1) Increase on hand balance by the quantity received. 

(2) Reduce drum quantity on order by the quantity 
ordered. 

(3) Punch the difference between quantity ordered and 
quantity received in the card as the stock overage 
or shortage. Also punch a zero (0) in column 18 
if the difference represents a shortage. 

Note: Assume that each receipt card represents the 
completion of a stock order. 

c. Stock Order Card 

(1) 



Increase the drum on order balance by the 
quantity ordered. 



VI - 29 



d. Back-Order Card - Prior day transactions. 

(1) Treat the same as a customer order card, except 

(2) Reduce the drum quantity back-ordered total by 
the quantity ordered field. 

Note: Quantity ordered in this card, represents the 
quantity back-ordered in a customer's order 
at some previous time. 

The problem involves 7500 cards a day entered at random to apply 
against 10,000 items. The arrangement of the items on the drums 
creates over-flow channels on approximately 10% of the channels 
used in the system. Of the 7500 transactions there are approximately 
7000 customer order cards, 215 receipt cards, 215 stock order cards 
and 70 prior day back-order cards. 

2. Machine Specifications 

1 - 150 CPM - Card Sensing Punching Unit 

2 - Large Capacity Drums with a 30 digit URA length 

1 - Arithmetic and Control Unit (external programming) 



VI - 30 

3. Gznzzal Procedure Flow Chart 



TlQbl 





STcctCBPoH 



PILE 






'pfvoe. pay 



cAgp-o-M#nc 

?Cti£A7ECUS*>M& 



cr/iep-O-MATic 



f CUSTbMEE>~ 



K& PUNCH 
OoANTiTY 






CAKPS 



jzrryMETtc&ccxMBbL 



PZOC&5 c04-roM£fZ 

ozpe£ cntepSj jroctz 

PAY 3AaC'&&ee ca€D& 
3it>ti8? /nvbsjtchy msrti 



i 



/SO CPM 

INPlTT 

£E\/IC€ 






OP TO 
6O0O \ 

ITEH* / 






bAsr.o«pfie 
(ttor B/t>) 




{BACZOBpyt 


To 
3ILUNO 

pgotepo 


ita* 


\ 


' 


i\ 










&PBOPOC£ 

p&ofrvAy 


r OZ&UAlS 













Grockoepexi 



TO pGoPOcnOH 

P^oc£oacWS~ 

TfZAMF&e 3/o 
30-34 to e-12. 

ALSO PUNCH A 
f IN COtVMti 9&' 






OP TO 
6>000 I 



ftiePiaopvosi 
B/o ctn9S 



VI - 31 



4. Input-Output Data and Definition 

The source media consists of 90 column punched cards, entered in 
random sequence, and punched in the following form: 



X 

o 

St 

a 
i» 

M 

a 
w 

< 
6 

i 








•«-^^£TA^£ 




















12 12 12 12 12 '2 12 12 


12 12 


12 


12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 


12 


•2 

34 

56 

78 
24 

9 


12 

34 

56 

78 
2S 

9 


12 

34 

56 

78 
2S 

9 


12 
34 

56 

78 
27 
9 


12 

34 

56 

78 
24 

9 


12 


12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 


12 


12 12 


U 12 t 2 12 1 2 


FA 


Her mo. 


£k 


UAtiTi-TV 


34 

56 

78 
23 

9 


34 

56 

78 
I» 

9 


CLOAK T/7V 


*Al£± 


M ji 


U 34 


34 34 34 

56 56 56 

78 78 78 
5*7 

9 9 9 


-3J_ 


34 34 


'4 


?4 


U )f 34, 34 34, 


34 34 34 34 34 


34 34 34 34 34 


34 34 34 


34 


34 


34 


34 34 34134 U 


bd 


cA 


ceUEOJED 


RGCOMSD 


oetauvcer 


anct-auauD 


j#tfm> 


AMoorar 


% 56 

-J 
78 78 
1 2 
9.9. 


56 56 

78 7 8 
1 4 

9 9 


56 

78 

s 
9 


56 56 

3 

78 78 
» 10 
9 9 


56 

78 
it 
9 


56 

7g 
12 
9 


56 56 56 56 56 

T 

78 7g 78 78 7g 
13 14 IS IS 17 
9 9 9 9 9 


56 56 56 56 56 

78 78 7g 78 78 

is is 20 21 22 

9 9 9 9 9 


56 56 56 56 56 

6 

78 78 *78 78 7g 
30 31 32 33 34 

9 9 9 9 9 


56 56 56 

7 

78 78 78 
SS 3* 37 

9 9 9 


56 

78 
31 

9 


56 

7g 
SS 

9 


56 

78 
40 
9 


56 56 56 | 56 56 

3 ! 

7g 7« 78| 78 7s 
41 42 4S|44 45 

9 9 9 |9 9 


lo+ 


12 

\ 

• 


12 12 Xi 12 12 12 


12 12 


12 12 
34 34 

56 56 

78 78 

9 9 
34 SS 


12 
34 
56 

7g 

9 
54 


12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 
34 34 34 34 34 34 3 4 3 4 34 34 34 34 

56 $6 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 
78 78 7g 78 7g 78 7s 7g 7g 7g 7g 7g 

999999999999 

57 SI SI SO SI (2 SS 44 41 ** (7 *» 


12 
34 
56 
78 

9 

IS 


12 
34 

56 

7g 

9 
70 


12 
34 
56 

78 

9 

71 


12 

34 
56 
78 
9 

71 


12 

34 

56 

78 

9 
73 


12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 

34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 3 4 

56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 

7g 78 7g 7g 78 7g 7g 78 7g 

999999999 
74 75 7S 77 7* 7* SO SI *2 


12 

34 

56 

78 

9 
S3 


12 12 

34 34 

56 56 

7 8 Tg 

9 9 
S4 SS 


12 12 12 12 
34 34 34 34 
56 56 56 56 
7g 7g 7g 78 
9 9 9 9 

S* 17 •• IS 


ojzoeB. ajo. 


34 34 
56 56 

78 78 

9 9 
.SI SI 


54 34 34 »4 34 34 
$6 $6 $6 56 56 56 

9 

78 7g 7g 78 78 78 

9 9 9 9 9 9 
46 47 4f 4S SO S* 

































Definitions 



Input 

(1) All Cards 

(2) All Cards 



- Drum section and channel number of 
the item's large capacity drum URA. 

- Complete part number (cols. 1-7) of 
the item. 



(3) Customer Order Card - Quantity of the item which the 

customer has ordered. 



Stock Receipt 
Stock Order Card 

Back Order Cards 



Quantity of the item which was 
ordered to be produced for stock. 

Quantity of the item which is now 
being ordered to be produced for 
stock. 

Quantity of the item which was back* 
ordered on a customers order prior 
to this time. This quantity is to 
be re-tested against the inventory 
balance to determine if it can now 
be shipped. 



VI - 32 



(4) Stock Receipt Card - Quantity received by the stockroom 

for the complete production order. 
This may or may not agree with the 
quantity ordered (3). 



All Other Cards 
(9) Order No. 

(10) Customer Order Card 
Stock Receipt Card 
Stock Order Card 
Back Order Card 

Output 

(5) Stock Receipt Card 



Blank 

Stock order number, Stock Receipt 
number and Customers order number 
not required in the calculation. 

in column 90 

1 in column 90 
3 in column 90 
5 in column 90 



Difference between (3) and (4) 
represents a production shortage 
or overage, a in column 18 
should be punched if the quantity 
represents a shortage. 



All Other Cards - Blank 
(6) Customer Order Card 



Back Order Cards 



All Other Cards 

(7) Customer Order Card 
and Back-Order Card 

All Other Cards 

(8) Customer Order and 
Back-Order Cards 



- That portion of the quantity ordered 
which cannot be shipped out of stock. 

- Same as for the customer order card 
except that this represents the 
second (or third etc.) time the item 
has been back-ordered. 

- Blank 

- That portion of the quantity ordered 
which can be shipped from stock. 

- Blank 

- Result of quantity shipped multi- 
plied by the sales price and 
rounded to two decimal places. 



All Other Cards 



- Blank 



VI - 33 



The above input-output is assigned to the input-output storages as 
follows: 

INPUT STORAGES 



Syra. 

000 
002 
004 



Description 

Part No. 

Quantity Received 
Quantity Ordered 



OUTPUT STORAGES 



Sym. 

002 
004 
006 
008 

5. Drum Stored Date and Definition 



Description 

Overage or Shortage 
Quantity Shipped 
Sales Amount 
Quantity Back-ordered 



a. Drum unit record areas for 10,000 items. Drum locations 
000000 to 054919. 

UNIT RECORD AREA - FIELD ASSIGNMENT 



Sym. Description 

FO Part No. 

Fl Balance on Hand 

F2 Balance on Order 

F3 Unfilled Back-Order Qty. to Date 

F4 Sales Price 



Digits 



Sign 



xxxxxxx 


+/- 


xxxxxx. 


+ 


xxxxxx. 


+ 


xxxxx . 


+ 


XX. XXX 


+ 



b. Definitions 

Item URA's 

FO - Part Number 



Fl - Balance on Hand 



F2 - Balance on Order 



Complete part number of the 
item, corresponds to field 
(2) in the input cards. 

Quantity of the item which 
is on hand and available for 
shipment. 

Quantity of the item which 
has been ordered and will 
eventually be received in 
the stock room. This is work 
in process for a fabricated 
item or the quantity ordered, 
but not yet received from 
vendors for purchased items. 



VI - 34 



F3 - Unfilled Back-Order - This is the total of the quantity 
Quantity to Date backordered to date. 

F4 - Sales Price - Unit sales price for the item. 

Overflow URA's - Unit Record #19 in channels where overflow 
is required. 

FO - Drum Section and Channel 

Number of overflow channel i.e. 

xx xx 00 - 

DS CH URA SN 
Fl - Spaces 

F2 - Spaces 

F3 - Spaces 

F4 - Spaces 



For purposes of this problem we will assume the drum data 
has been stored. In addition, channel 00 of drum section 00 
is not used for overflow. 

The following constants are stored in intermediate storage: 

storage 10 - spaces 
storage 11 - constant 5 



VI - 35 

6- P/?ogj?am Row Chart 



3TA#T 



v 



DEMAND UN/T*/ 

j 

ratty 

I 

DFMANP OUTPUT-/N*! 



1 000(5Z)T=AP/?(2L) 



\ 

2 000£CSO00*CSF o 

\ 



V,=K-/? 



\ 

5 fo+/0*ADR 



*/*\ 



A/o O'rtOW 



— J- 
o'rtow 



soer 



Ft?,-*/ /=%-#/ 
our 

j 



//V P&l 
20 MS &CLAY 
OUT 



/v 



^ 



Te/p 



VI - 36 



PO PS*/ 

5/90 P&oe &A Y BACX-0#Df£ 



4 F*-00l*F 3 
y '%> CUSTOMfk > ORD£G 



A/Ofi/'S&. 



//oM-yri. 



//orf-sei 



S£Z. 

5" ff-Q04*F, 



^ 



6 f, r= oo8 



7 fi+fz »/\j 

6 /O T =F/ 

SOXT 
9 004-006*004 



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JO Q04~XF4.~O06> 

I 

11 O06+JI=O0(> 
\ '/go STOCK /?£-e£//>T 



1 



SSL. 



OPC S- #/-ai/rPS 
\ 

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15 Fz-ooJ^fr 

14 oo2-po4~±ooz 



*/9o Sroar o#Q£& 

SO F2-tO04 s FL 



L. 



STOP 



W/?/Tf 



-> 






DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 37 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

150 CPM INPUT-OUTPUT CHART 



APPLICATION: Ml/lT/-f/}#J> 



PROGRAM NO.: 



JZT 



INPUT-OUTPUT STORAGE FIELD ASSIGNMENT 
DFMANn UNIT NO. / OR SCAN UNIT NO. 


INPUT FIELD ASSIGNMENT 


SYM. 


DESCRIPTION 


CARD COLUMNS AND DECIMALS 


SIGN 
CTL. 


11 


to 


« 


B 


7 


« 


8 


4 

4- 


3 


2 


i 


SN. 


000 


PPPT a/omB&? fl>3 -Co/. /Se, <:#- d 3f4) 










/ 


z 


3 


jr 


c 


7 ^ 


001 






























002 


Q(//t//r/ry PsCftt/fp 














J3 


/+ 


/S 


/£ 


'*«+ 




003 






























004 


Q(/*A/r/rY OP0&&&P 














& 


9 


JO 


// 


>*,+ 




005 






























006 






























007 






























008 






























009 































OUTPUT FIELD ASSIGNMENT 


SYM. 

000 


DESCRIPTION 


CARD COLUMNS AND DECIMALS 


SIGN 


11 


10 


9 


8 


7 


e 


8 


4 


3 


2 


i 


SN. 






























001 






























002 


OY£'^0<*£' *& <^yo*>r/9<f£' 














/a 


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2/ 


***?/- 


V* 


003 






























004 


QVA/sr/T/ ^ ////**>£& 














3S 


5t> 


37 


33 


39<> + 




005 






























006 


S/?4£& /?~?ol/as7~ 










4-0 


H 


4-2 


+3^++ 


+$ 




+ 




007 






























008 


QvA/vr/ry £#c/S0*'&€#£P 














3o 


3/ 


32 


33 


34^ 




009 































INPUT CONTROL LINES 


SYM. 


FROM 


o 


0/90 


b 


//9o 


c 


3/9o 


d 


S/90 


e 




f 




9 




h 




» 




j 




k 




1 





OUTPUT CONTROL LINES 


SYM. 


TO 


A 


re/p 


B 


^5o*r <? T£>/P 


C 


^5cr#7~ 


D 


SKtP 


E 


/A/'Ot/r &s&/ 


F 




G 




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1 




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REMARKS: 



CAP& & / 
C/9/PD #2 



Ct/Jraw^/e oP££^e C/?#£ 

^roc/c op&£/e £/?&/> 
3 #c/c a /?&&/? c&£>/> 



INPUT-OUTPUT SELECTORS 


PICK UP 


s* 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SELECT 




la 








lb 








1c 










2a 








2b 








2c 










3a 








3b 








3c 








PS & / 


4 




£v*// ourrt/r C#l£ I/** 


Pmc^M* Cols. 3S"-39 






5a 








5b 








5c 










6a 








6b 








6c 










7a 








7b 








7c 










8a 








8b 








8c 










9a 








9b 








9c 










10a 








10b 








10c 









INPUT TRANSFER 


IN (from) 


fl/£A/ 


NO (to) 




EVEN (to) 


/// 


ALL (to) 





PROGRAM SELECTS 


NO. 


IN FROM 


POWER OUT TO 


1 


OPC £" 


PC/ 3 #4- 


2 







SPTM 4330 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 38 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

STORAGE ASSIGNMENT CHART 



APPLICATION: AMIT/- £**£> 



PROGRAM NO.: 



2ZZ. 



*0 



Frter U&#'*S LARGE CAPACITY 1 


3RUM 


I 


ADDRESS FROM 


oooooo 


FIELD ASSIGNMENT TO 


0?<?f/f 


SYM 


DESCRIPTION 


CHARACTER AND DECIMAL 


11 


10 


s 


• 


7 


e 


6 


^ 


9 


2 


1 


SN 


F 


£>#jer s/tJ/vfe*'* 










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F 1 


g/Q-t/t/ser o/* //&*£> 












13 


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19 


18 


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Fll 


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F12 


d"M#*/9CT£-# 2*0*4 . 


























F13 




























F14 




























F15 




























F16 




























F17 




























F18 




























F19 





























oree**** CX*'S LARGE CAPACITY 


DRUM 


ADDRESS FROM 




V#* '9 e/eW'V'CtSb F|ELD ASSIGNMENT TO 








SYM 


DESCRIPTION 


CHARACTER AND DECIMAL. 


1 1 


10 


e 


8 


t 


s 


8 


4 


? 


2 


1 


SN 


F 


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fL 










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c 


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r* 


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► 








F 3 


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55. 


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F 4 


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\ 














F 5 




























F 6 




























F 7 




























F 8 




























F 9 




























F10 




























Fll 




























F12 




























F13 




























F14 




























F15 




























F16 




























F17 




























F18 




























F19 





























LARGE CAPACITY DRUM 
FIELD ASSIGNMENT SELECTORS 


PICK-UP FROM 


GROUND 
TO 


A* 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SELECT 






la 








lb 








lc 








Id 












2a 








2b 








2c 








2d 












3a 








3b 








3c 








3d 












4a 








4b 








4c 








4d 












5a 








5b 








5c 








5d 












6a 








6b 








6c 








6d 












7a 








7b 








7c 








7d 












8a 








8b 








8c 








8d 









INTERMEDIATE STORAGE FIELD ASSIGNMENT 
TRACK 50 


SYM 


DESCRIPTION 


11 


10 


B 


S 


7 


6 


8 


4 


3 


2 


1 


SN 


50 




























51 




























52 




























53 




























54 




























55 




























56 




























57 




























58 




























59 





























INTERMEDIATE STORAGE FIELD ASSIGNMENT 
TRACK 10 


SYM. 


DESCRIPTION 


1 1 


10 





8 


7 





8 


4 


3 


2 


1 


SN 


10 


w5V^*^ 
























/ 


11 


C&sssrv+A'T' S" 
















ii 




5" 


r* 


12 




























13 




























14 




























15 




























16 




























17 




























18 




























19 





























TRACK 20 


20 




























21 




























22 




























23 




























24 




























25 




























26 




























27 




























28 




























29 





























TRACK 30 


30 




























31 




























32 




























33 




























34 




























35 




























36 




























37 




























38 




























39 





























TRACK 40 


40 




























41 




























42 




























43 




























44 




























45 




























46 




























47 




























48 




























49 





























SP TM-4326 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION C/?#D &4 



- sSrac* *ec*y*r V I - 39 UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

- S/PCX' /?£>£*> 



PROGRAM PLANNING CHART 



APPLICATION: /*^/7- <?*&£> 

/A/y^/yreiey 4* s*?i£3 



PROGRAM NO.: 



JZZ 



STB- 
NO. 


NPUT 

UNIT 

NO. 


CARD 
NO. 


VALUE 1 


PRO- 
CESS 


VALUE 2 


RESULT 


NEXT 
STEP 


VALUE 1 AS STORED 


VALUE 2 AS STORED 


UNSHIFTED RESULT 


STORED RESULT 


s 

T 


DESCRIPTION 


SYM 


SH 


DESCRIPTION 


SYM 


SH 


DESCRIPTION 


SYM 


SH 


1 1 


10 


9 


B 


7 


e 


6 


4 


3 


2 


1 


s 

N 


1 1 


10 


9 


s 


7 


e 


B 


4 . 


» 2 


1 N 


22 21 


20 


1918 171010 14 


3 12 11 10 


9 8 7 8 4 


3 2 1 N 1 1 10 


» a 7 a 


4 


3I2 1 


» p 

N K 


1 


/ 


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&/?er /Sua>)0£v? 


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p/p^er s/e/AU&? 


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3 


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gM/9A/Cf 0*/ //£?*/> 


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MfW &/?/. 0/v 


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X 


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<xxx + 


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13 


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g/p/tfA/cfe*/ £»&>** 


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X 


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004 




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X 


X 


X 


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1 














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x+ 












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xxxxx 


+ 14 

1" 


15 


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3 


<pr/. 0#£>&&ri> 


004- 




+ 


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X 


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xxx 


xxx 


l + 15 


16 




























































































16 


17 
























































































i 




17 


18 




























































































18 


19 




























































































19 


20 




























































































20 


21 




























































































21 


22 
























































































j 




22 


23 
























































































j 
1 




23 


24 
























































































i 




24 


25 




























































































25 


26 




























































































26 


27 






















































































1 






27 


28 






















































































_! 


1 




28 


29 
























































































i 




29 


30 






















































































1 






30 


31 






















































































i 






31 


32 
























































































i 




32 


33 




























































































33 


34 




























































































34 


35 




























































































35 


36 




























































































36 


37 




























































































37 


38 
























































































1 

1 




38 


39 




























































































39 


40 




























































































40 


41 
























































































1 




41 


42 




























































































42 


43 




























































































43 


44 




























































































44 


45 




























































































45 


46 




























































































46 


47 




























































































47 


48 














































































1 














48 

— 1 



SPTM-4325 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 40 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

FUNCTION CONTROL CHART 



APPLICATION: Mtrir/ - f/?P& 



PROGRAM NO.: 



22Z 



DEMAND UNITS 


SCAN UNITS 


NO. 


TYPE OF UNIT 


TEST IN FROM 


TEST OUT TO 


DEMAND IN FROM 


DEMAND OUT TO 


NO. 


TYPE of unit 


TO SCAN OUT 


NO 


TYPE OF UNIT 


TO SCAN OUT 


NO. 


TYPE OF UNIT 


TO SCAN OUT 


NOT READY 


READY 


Input 


Output 


1 


/S'O c&4 








fr/fersof^aea 


/t/jrtt/tPs*/ 




1 






9 






17 






2 
















2 






10 






18 






3 
















3 






11 






19 






4 
















4 






12 






20 






5 
















5 






13 






21 






6 
















6 






14 






22 






7 
















7 






15 






23 






8 
















8 






16 






24 







INPUT CONTROL LINES 


NO. 

a 


TO 


pi/t&z (°/9o) 


b 


Pur ^7 ('/**) 


c 


pvr# a &/90) 


d 


Pvr*/ (s/ 96 ) 


e 




f 




9 




h 




i 




i 




k 




1 





OUTPUT CONTROL LINES 


NO 


FROM 


A 


OS/ 


B 


0&3 


C 


oor &T Ms 


D 


O^z ) 0&4- 


E 


3T* 7 


F 




G 




H 




1 




J 





SYMBOLS FOR PROGRAMMING: 

Processes: PR 

Transfer T 

Addition + 

Subtraction — 

Multiplication X 

Division -r 

Left Zero Elim LZE 

Compare C 

Channel Search = ECS 

Channel Search ^ UCS 

SHIFTS: 

Shift 2 Left 2L 

Shift 2 Right 2R 

Expand Prod. Shift EXS 



START 
TO 


£>Z^/ 



SCAN OUTS 


NO. 


TO 



























READ UNIT RECORD 


NO. 


IN FROM 


OUT TO 


1 






2 






3 






4 






5 






6 






7 






8 







ERROR CHECKS 


FROM 


TO 


ARITH. 


STSP /?rpf*r 


tO'FLOW 


^TOP 


+0'FLOW 




PARITY 


STOP 


ADDRESS 


STOP 



INDICATORS 


NO. 


FROM 


1 




2 




3 




4 




IND. 
SWITCH 


FROM 


TO 


NO 
CHECK 





WRITE UNIT RECORD 


NO. 


IN FROM 


OUT TO 


1 


°Br* *ftf# 


Of, 


2 






3 






4 






5 






6 






7 






8 







STEP CLEAR 


IN 


OUT 






CLEAR 
PROG.SEL. 




STEP REPEAT 


IN 
FROM 


/4/e/rM £~/?xo# 



SELECTORS: 

Computor Selector T^T^ 

Drum Selector A,~*Ae 

Input-Output Selectors S,~~*S l0 

Common CT(#) or CA (#) 

Select ST (#) or SA {#) 

Non-Select NST(#)or NSA (#) 

Pick-Up PUT(#)orPUA(#) 

Program Selector PS, - 'PSu 

Delay of PS DPS,-DPS )0 

Imm. of PS IPSi,-|PS,« 

Power of PS PS0,-PS0,» 

Drop Out of PS PSD0,-*PSD0, 6 

Ground of Sel GT(#) 

Computer Ground CG 

Demand Ground DG,~*DG § 

Scan Ground SG t ~*SG* 

Selector Hold SH 



Function Delay FD 

In FD 1 FD1,-FD1, 

In FD 2 FD2,-FD2, 

Out FD FD0,-FD0 3 

STORAGES: 

Input-Output 000—009 

Intermediate 10—59 

Revolver F - F,» 

Channel Search Fields CSFo— CSF,» 

DEMAND UNITS: 

Test In TST (#) 

Test Out Ready .TSTR (#) 

Test Out Not Ready TSTN (#) 

Demand In Dl (#) 

Demand Out Input DOI (#) 

Demand Out Output D00 (#) 



Scan Out SO,— SO* 

Program Step In In ST (#) 

Program Step Out From ST (#) 

Out Expanders OE,— OE, 

In Branching .....BR,-BR„ 

+ Branch Out +BR,-BR„ 

-Branch Out -BR,-BR„ 

o Branch Out oBR,— BR U 

Read Unit Record R,~*R» 

Write Unit Record W,-W, 

Equal Channel Search In ECSI (#) 

Equal Channel Seorch Out=V, ..ECSV, (#) 
Equal Channel Search Out=V, ..ECSVj (#) 
Equal Channel Search Out ^ ....ECS^ (#) 

Unequal Channel Search In UCSI (#) 

Unequal Channel Search Out=..UCS = (#) 
Unequal Channel Search Out ^.. UCS *f (#) 

Program Address Counter PAK 

Address Register ADR 



CHANNEL SEARCH EQUAL 


NO. 


FROM OUT 
OF STEP NO. 


TO IF = VI 


TO IF = V2 


TO IF ^ 


1 


z 


P&,*/ 





/V 3r*3 


2 










3 










4 












BRANCHING 


NO. 


IN FROM STEP 


TO IF + 


TO IF - 


TO IF O 


1 


& 3 


Of z 


/// srx* 2. 


0£z 


2 


-MS- 


/s/jrtt/o 


/# STM& 


/a/ sr**/o 


3 


M9 


s/sjr#/c 




W, 




4 










5 










6 










7 










8 










9 










10 










11 










12 










13 










14 










15 










16 










17 










18 











CHANNEL SEARCH UNEQUAL 


NO. 


FROM OU T 
OF STEP NO. 


TO IF = 


TO IF ^ 


1 








2 








3 








4 










OUT EXPANDERS 


NO. 


IN 


OUT 


OUT 


1 


W/ 


OPC P 


&T4 / 


2 


+/•&*, 


0£~3 


OPC P 


3 


0£~2. 


PC B 


dj:*/ 


4 


5T&8 


Pc & 


/a/ sr y/5" 


5 








6 








7 








8 










FUNCTION DELAYS 


NO. 


IN 1 


IN 2 


OUT 


1 


2>PS&/ 


£CS*/S*) 


/Vj>Otf/ t c7#/ 


2 








3 










ALTERNATE SWITCHES 


NO. 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SELECT 


1 








2 








3 








4 








5 








6 









CODE DISTRIBUTOR 


FROM Vl 
OF STEPS 




FROM V2 
OF STEPS 




FROM R 
OF STEPS 




NO. 


TO 


NO. 


TO 


00 




26 




01 




27 




02 




28 




03 




29 




04 




30 




05 




31 




06 




32 




07 




33 




08 




34 




09 




35 




10 




36 




11 




37 




12 




38 




13 




39 




14 




40 




15 




41 




16 




42 




17 




43 




18 




44 




19 




45 




20 




46 




21 




47 




22 




48 




23 




49 




24 




>49 




25 








FROMOUTO F 
FUNCTION: 




NO. 


TO 


NO. 


TO 







5 




1 




6 




2 




7 




3 




8 




4 




9 





FUNCTION SEQUENCE 


NO. 


SET 


PROBE 


OUT 


1 








2 









Code Distributor CD 

In CD V, CDV, 

In CD V 2 CDV, 

In CD R CDR 

Out CD 00 to > 49 CDoo-CD > 49 

In CD Pulse In CDP 

Out CD Pulse Out CDP --CDP, 

Function Sequence Set FSS,— FSSj 

Function Sequence Probe FSPj— FSPj 

Function Sequence Out FSO,— FSO t 



ALTERNATE SWITCHES: 

Common SW,C -SW 4 C 

Select SW, S -SW 4 S 

Non- Select SW,NS-SW t N* 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 41 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 



APPl irATinN- /QoiT/-C##£> program no. -M£ 



COMPUTER SELECTOR CONTROL CHART 



jA/l/£~A/T&/?\/ ^ ^/gi£S 



PICK-UP FROM 


GROUND 
TO 


T# 


SELECT COMMON 


NON-SELECT 


tPCctC^Q 


C6 


1 


//sjt***- 1 ^DoM' 


cr-** z 


/0C«fo/9o) 


<r<? 


2 


/tf sr#&~ 


/V6T&S 


c 7-#7 






3a 








3b 












4a 








4b 












5a 








5b 












6a 








6b 








6c 








6d 








//><r 6 O/9*) 


cc 


7 


/rfsr0/2jOPc£ 


/Vsr-#2 


cr#a 


IPc c 0/9o) 


CO 


8 


&S+. 


//sr*7 










9a 








9b 












10a 








10b 












11a 








lib 












12a 








12b 








12c 








12d 












13 












14 












15a 








15b 












16a 








16b 












17a 








17b 












18a 








18b 








18c 








18d 












19 












20 












21a 








21b 












22a 








22b 












23a 








23b 












24a 








24b 








24c 








24d 









PICK-UP FROM 


GROUND 
TO 


T# 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SELECT 






25 












26 












27a 








27b 












28a 








28 b 












29a 








29b 












30a 








30b 








30c 








30d 












31 












32 












33a 








33b 












34a 








34b 












35a 








35 b 












36a 








36b 








36c 








36d 












37 












38 












39a 








39b 












40a 








40b 












41a 








41b 












42a 








42b 








42c 








42d 












43 












44 












45a 








45b 












46a 








46 b 












47a 








47b 












48a 








48 b 








48c 








48d 









PROGRAM SELECTS 


PS# 


IN FROM 


DELAY OUT TO 


D. O. FROM 


POWER TO 


1 


j?e>Z-M/ 


/V /="^-^/ 


/^£?0 #6/ 




2 










3 










4 










5 










6 










7 










8 










9 










10 










PS# 


IN FROM 


IMMEDIATE OUT TO 


D. O. FROM 


POWER TO 


11 










12 










13 










14 










15 










16 












REMARKS: 



VI - 42 



Program Comments 

Before Step (1) - From the demand unit out we have gone to two 

places (step 1 and PS 1). This is done so that 
we may get a timed pulse of 20 ms before we 
enter the selectors after step 2. This is 
necessary since 20 ms are required before the 
selectors are picked up from the input device 
(5 ms delay on the device itself and 15 ms 
delay on the transfer of the computer selectors) . 

Step (3) - The last URA is captured. If this is an 

overflow URA, FO will have a negative sign 
plus the overflow DS and CH. By adding FO 
to spaces and delivering the result to the 
ADR, we can also determine if this is a 
legitimate overflow URA. 

FDj - FD2 - After we have found the URA from the channel 

search process we are ready to enter our selec- 
tors if 20ms have elapsed since start time. 
This is controlled by delivering the channel 
search equal pulse and the exit of the 20ms 
delay from PS1 to a Function Delay unit. With 
this wiring the entry to the selectors from 
the Function Delay Out will occur when channel 
search is completed or 20ms has elapsed since 
start time, whichever occurs last. 

Step (5) - By our drum URA field assignment we have deter- 
mined that Fl will always be considered as a 
plus amount. However, since the branching 
function examines the result sign from the reg- 
ister, not the result storage, we will still 
get the correct negative branching. This drum 
wiring does, of course, make the back-order 
quantity a plus figure. 

Note: Certain steps could be combined for the various 
cards and the values, processes, results and 
exits, selected on the basis of card control. 
However, the only saving would be in the number 
of plugboard steps used, since the number of 
steps each card went through would remain the 
same. Since plenty of steps were available this 
approach would be an unnecessary complication 
of the problem. 



VI - 43 



5. PROBLEM TV 

1. Statement of problem 

The processing of daily job cards is illustrated in this problem. 
There are approximately 5000 employees with an average of four job 
cards per employee. A daily run will therefore involve the proces- 
sing of 20,000 cards. These cards are produced from the employee 
daily record sheet to show employee clock number, operation number, 
elapsed hours, pieces produced and the various codes. They are then 
placed in the UFC. The employee clock number is four digits, of 
which two are used for channel number. The drum section is obtained 
from the department number. The operation number is six digits, of 
which four are used for drum section and channel number. A channel 
search operation is required in both cases to locate the employee 
unit record and the operation unit record. 

The operation's unit record is used first to determine the employee's 
standard hours produced. The standard hours produced is obtained by 
multiplying the standard hours per 100 pieces by the pieces produced. 
This is the only use of the operation unit record. 

The employee unit record is then obtained and the operations performed 
by the computer are: 

a) Determine the employee's earnings at standard. This is the 
standard hours produced multiplied by the employee's day rate. 

b) Calculate any shift pay by multiplying the shift rate, which 
is coded in the job card by a 1,2 or 3 in column 45, by the 
elapsed time. 

c) Calculate outside work pay which is noted by a code 1 in 
column 46 (10 cents) multiplied by the elapsed hours. 

d) Determine if there is any make up pay due the employee. This 
is obtained by taking the difference between his guaranteed 
pay* (day rate x elapsed hours) and his earnings at standard 
(calculated in operation a). 

e) Determine employee's total pay, (a) + (b) + (c) + (d) . 

f) Dpdate employee week to date fields. 

The problem involves 5,000 employees and 20,000 different operations. 
The employee URA length is 40 characters and each operation URA 
required 12 characters. We will put 3 operations in each unit record 
and maintain the 40 characters unit record length. Therefore 3 drums 
with a capacity of 13,500 URA's is adequate to store all employee and 
operation data. 

2. Machine Specifications 

1 - 150 CPM - Card Sensing Punching Unit 

3 - Large Capacity Drums (3) with a 40 digit URA length 

1 - Arithmetic and Control Unit (external programming) 



VI - 44 



3 GehtZKAL Procedure Fip*/ QlAzr 






m^ 



\ 



Key 

PUNCH* 



t &y Poticdii/jEzifY.- 
pieces fTBc&Oaea^ 



PjUe 



&3 <=A*vi 







AZfTHMZriC <& CCtfTBOL 



CaMPOTZ-' 
Ostavpao> #t&.p0poc£p 

2) &HCAMJ&S AT JTAVUUl? 
3)JtHPTPAV 

weufetpe utotik. my 

JlMAve op my 

Tom. PAy 

*) or-twe BALAuces w&iPbs/er oka 






OP TO \ 

4Soo 

&MPW/&3 







OP7Z>\ OPlt> 

i&o\ 9000 



X~ 

JEMPU&E& 



\ \ 

J3,SOO 
\OPEf?ATlCm\ 

I 



ueA'4 



— T 7 

£>P&UkTiOM VGA3 



VI - 45 



4. Input-Output Data and Definition 

The input source media are 90 column punched cards, entered in random 
sequence, and punched in the following form: 



'? 12 »» '2 



C/OCK& 



% Sfi 



0* 

78 7s 78 78 
I 2 J 4 
9 9 9 9 



liJLi. 



pen OAee/tr/oA/ * 



12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 



34 34 34 34 34 34 



£/4PS4* 



£1. 



56 56 
78 7) 
9 9 



«TV 



56 I 



B 



78 7 8 

1 1 12 

9 9 



14 34 J 34 



78 78| 78 

IS 14 | IS 

< 9 |1 



.12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 '2 12 '2 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 
34 34 34 34 34 14 '4 34 34 U H H U 34 
56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 



78 78 78 78 78 7s 78 7s 7s 78 7s 78 78 78 
16 17 16 19 20 21 22 23 24 2S 2f 27 26 29 

9999*9999999999 



jnnnnn*. 



56 56 5>_J6 56 56 



78 78 7?T^8 7s 7s 

30 31 32 33 34 35 

9 9 9 9 9 9 



12 12 12 12 12 

34 34 34 34 34 

56 56 56 56 56 

78 78 78 78 7s 

3* 37 31 It 40 

9 9 9 9 9 



12 12 12 12 

34 34 34 34 

56 56 56 56 

78 78 78 78 

41 42 43 44 

9 9 9 9 



m 



S7"fi. 



msm 



56 56 '56 



34 34 1 34 U 



StfrfT 



34 1 34 34 



56 56 • 56 56 



&*/ 



34 1 M ?4 



*>A*r-e* total 



34 34t34 3 4 



34 34 1 34 34 



12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 1? 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 <2 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 

34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 

56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 

78 78 78 7s 78 7s 7s 78 78 78 78 78 78 7s 78 7s 78 78 



1 
\ 

a 



W 



78 7: 



9 9-*7 9 

30 5l|32 H 



56 1 56 56 
I 

78 ^Ta-Jt 



IT 9 



84|»» 54 ,»7l 



>«V*V 



56 1 56 56 
I 



9 19 9 
J7|SB SI 



56 56,56 56 



9 9*^ 9 
tO Sl| l2 43 



56 56156 lb 



7 8 7 M*%. 7 8 
64 6 3| 66 67 



999999999999999999 
66 69 70 71 72 73 74 73 76 77 76 79 60 61 62 6) 64 65 



12 12 U 12 12 

34 34 34 34 34 

56 56 56 56 56 

78 78 78 78 78 

9 9 9 9 9 

66 67 66 •• 90 



Definitions: 



Input 

(1) Employee clock number (cols. 1-4) 

(2) Dept. number (cols. 5 6 6). Drum section is cols. 5 & 6 
and channel is cols. 3 6 4 

(3) Complete operation number (cols. 7-11) (In incentive cards only.) 

(4) Drum section and channel number of operation URA 
(cols. 7-10) 

Elapsed hours - numbers of hours the employee has 
worked on this particular operation (cols. 13-15) 
Shift code - 1 in col. 45 - 1st Shift .00 premium 

2 in col. 45 - 2nd Shift .06 premium 

3 in col. 45 - 3rd Shift .09 premium 
- 1 in col. 46 - outside work - .10 per 

hour premium 
3 in col. 46 - no incentive (no operation 

number in card) 
Pieces produced - quantity of pieces produced by 
employee on this operation (cols. 30-35) 



(5) 
(6) 

(7) Work code 
(8) 



Output 

(9) Standard hours produced — used to determine employee's 
earnings at the standard. 

(10) Earnings - if incentive worker, standard hours 
produced x day rate: non-incentive, elapsed hours x 
day rate. 

(11) Shift pay - additional pay due employee for 2nd or 3rd 
shift work. 



VI - 46 

(12) Outside work pay - if employee works out of building 
he receives an additional .10 for every hour worked 

(13) Make up pay - difference of employee's rated pay (day 
rate x elapsed hours) and (10). The employee is 
guaranteed a minimum wage and if his pay at standard 
is less he will receive his minimum wage 

(14) Total pay - sum of (10), (11), (12) & (13) 

The above input-output data is assigned to the following input-output 
storage locations: 

INPUT STORAGES 



Sym. 

000 
002 
004 
006 



Description 

Clock Number & Dept. No. 
Operation Number 
Elapsed Hours 
Pieces Produced 



OUTPUT STORAGES 



Sym. 


Description 


000 


Make-Up Pay 


001 


Earnings 


002 


Standard Hours Produced 


003 


Total Pay 


004 


Outside Work Pay 


008 


Shift Pay 



5. Drum Stored Data and Definition 

a. Drum unit record areas for 5000 employees - Drum location 
000000 to 039914. 

LARGE CAPACITY DRUM REVOLVER 
UNIT RECORD AREA - FIELD ASSIGNMENT 
(EMPLOYEE RECORD) A (Select) 



Sym. 


Description 


Digits 


Si. 


FO 


Clock No. & Dept. No. 






Fl 


Day Rate 


xxxxxx . 


+ 


F2 


Reg. Earnings WTD 


x.xxx 


+ 


F3 


Shift Pay WTD 


XXX. XX 


+ 


F4 


Outside Work Premium WTD 


x.xx 


+ 


F5 


Gross Earnings YTD 


x.xx 


+ 


F6 


FICA YTD 


XXXX . XX 


+ 


F7 


Fed. W. Tax YTD 


XX. XX 


+ 


F8 


Elapsed Hours WTD 


XXXX. XX 


+ 






XX. X 


+ 



VI - 47 



b. Definition 

Employee URA's 



FO - Clock No. & 
Department No. 



Fl - Day Rate 

F2 - Regular Earnings WTD 



F3 - Shift Pay WTD 



Employee complete clock and 
department number. Corresponds 
to fields (1) and (2) in the 
input cards. 

Employee* s hourly rate of pay. 

Weekly accumulation of earn- 
ings. This is the sum of the 
employee's daily earnings and 
make-up pay. 

Accumulation of daily shift pay. 



F4 - Outside Work Premium WTD Accumulation of daily outside 

work pay. 



F5 - Earnings YTD 



F6 - FICA YTD 



F7 - Federal Withholding Tax 
YTD 



F8 - Elapsed Hours - WTD 



Accumulation of employee's 
total earnings on a yearly 
basis (not used in this problem). 

Federal Insurance Contributions 
Act deductions accumulated on 
a yearly basis, (not used in 
this problem) . 

Accumulation of Withholding 
tax on a yearly basis (not 
used in this problem). 

Accumulation of hours worked 
during the week. 



Drum Unit Record Area for 20,000 operations - Drum location 
040000 to 089914. 

LARGE CAPACITY DRUM REVOLVER 
UNIT RECORD AREA - FIELD ASSIGNMENT 
(OPERATION STD - URA) 



Sym . 

FO 
Fl 
F2 
F3 

F4 
F5 



Description 



Digits 



Sign 



Operation 


No. 




xxxxxx. 


+ 


Std. Hrs. 


Per 


100 Pes. 


xxx . XXX 


+ 


Operation 


No. 




xxxxxx . 


+ 


Std. Hrs. 


Per 


100 Pes. 


xxx. xxx 


+ 


Operation 


No. 




xxxxxx. 


(stored +) 


Std. Hrs* 


Per 


100 Pes. 


xxx . xxx 


•i- 



VI - 48 

d. Definition 

FO, F2, F4 - Operation No. - complete operation number. 

Fl f F3, F5 - Std. Hrs. per 100 pes. - This defines the 

number of hours alloted to the employee for 
his production of every 100 pieces. This 
figure multiplied by the total number of pieces 
produced in this operation is the employee's 
earnings at standard. 

The following constants are stored in intermediate storage: 

Storage 20 - Constant 5 

21 - " spaces 

22 - " 06 

23 - M 09 



Overflow ORA's - Unit Record #14 in channels where overflow is 
required: 

a. Operation DRA 

F0-F3 « 2 operations 

F4 - Drum Section and channel number of overflow 

channel (xxxxOO-) 
F5 s Spaces 

b. Employee DRA 

FO a DS & channel (xxxxOO) 
F1-F8 * Spaces 

Channel 00 of drum section 00 is not used for overflow. 



VI - 49 



6- P#OG£>AM Ft OW Cf/ART 



START 



PfMMP VA//T#/ 



R£At>Y 



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PfMAA/P OtJT-///Pvr#/ 



TRIP*- 



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s 

5. OOZ C K 



3. ooz /res ooz * CSP+ 



6. /> X 006* ooz 

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aw 



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soer 

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0£+ 



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9. 00Z(3#) + 20*0020*) 

< 



-/\ 



10.000 TAPR<2L) 

\ f 



OUT 
f 



J 



V 



VI - 50 



11.000 £CS 000 = CSFo 



<_ 



A/OtfS£L 



V,=Vz*Z 



12. f,C2l 

+ 



k 



9<**/45 



Sei. 



yf,-v t +G 



13. Fo + IIZAK 



J o\ 






r 



14 004 X ZIP') ~ 00Q 

jq. 004/ 23 Co 9 ) A/0 0WOV 

15-008+20 =O03Of) 
IS' Fb+OO&^Fs 



i 



po s oer 



18- oo/o*)+2o =oo/oe) 



t/MSZL 
Id. 004 c ooz 

s . ■ 

+ 

20. F,X004'* 003 

I 

21- O030R)-+2O*0OZ0e) 

22- Qo3-oo\ *ooo(6l) 

23. F z +003 = Fz 



24. 005 + 003 = 003 



^ SSL 



^ 



25'Fl-^oo^/^ 



26. 001 + 063 =O0~5 



VI - 51 



27.F & + 004 
'fa 



= F* 



a 



r 



DOPSz 



\ S£L 
28.004- +003 =003 

29. 004 + Ef. = F+ 



30.004(31) T 004 



-*f 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 52 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

150 CPM INPUT-OUTPUT CHART 



APPLICATION: 0AUV P/?VeOJL 



PROGRAM NO.: 



& 



INPUT-OUTPUT STORAGE FIELD ASSIGNMENT 
DFMAND UNIT NO. OR SCAN UNIT NO. 


INPUT FIELD ASSIGNMENT 


SYM. 


DESCRIPTION 


CARD COLUMNS AND DECIMALS 


SIGN 
CTL. 


1 1 


10 


9 


8 


7 


e 


8 


i 


3 


2 


1 


SN. 


000 


Cloc/S /VoAo&s/e ^ zp&frfjer/wfssr # 












/ 


2 


s 


£ 


3 


4- 


+ 




001 






























002 


off/e/tr/D/S /Vv/*?£&e % 












// 


/2 


7 


a 


9 


/O 


+ 




003 






























004 


£140^/) t/ac/ses 


















J3 


/4-J& 


+ 




005 






























006 


Pf&TfS /?#OJ>£Xr£Z> 












3o 


31 


32 


33 


34 


35 '^-+ 




007 






























008 






























009 































OUTPUT FIELD ASSIGNMENT 


SYM. 


DESCRIPTION 


CARD COLUMNS AND DECIMALS 


SIGN 
CTL. 


t t 


10 


9 


8 


7 


e 


8 


4 


3 


2 


1 


SN. 


000 


/*?/?Afc*- UP &#/ 




£>D 


6 J 'i 


M 


cs 














+ 




001 


£~##aJ /S/6S 
















52> 


S/ A S2 


53 


~h 




002 


^TP. //evtt jP/PoDocfP 


















#7 


4S/-9 


+ 




003 


7-&T/91 /=>/?V 
















u 


**i 


<ot> 


£.7 


-/ 




004 


OCsr^/^f Wo&K 












*7^a 


59 








+ 




005 






























006 






























007 






























008 


^/S//?r P/9)/ 


















54 d fS 


S6 


-h 




009 































INPUT CONTROL LINES 


SYM. 


FROM 


a 


9/*5- 


b 


3 As- 


c 


'/+* 


d 


3/jtfe 


e 




f 




g 




h 




i 




i 




k 




l 





OUTPUT CONTROL LINES 


SYM. 


TO 


A 


T&/P 


B 


■SoRT ^ SK/P 


C 




D 




E 




F 




G 




H 




1 




J 





REMARKS: % //*r£ & A T A tSTeef!) o* D*t"* US///4 SAMtT 



INPUT-OUTPUT SELECTORS 


PICK UP 


S# 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SELECT 




la 








lb 








lc 










2a 








2b 








2c 










3a 








3b 








3c 










4 










5a 








5b 








5c 










6a 








6b 








6c 










7a 








7b 








7c 










8a 








8b 








8c 










9a 








9b 








9c 










10a 








10b 








10c 









INPUT TRANSFER 


IN (from) 


&V£a/ 


NO (to) 




EVEN (to) 


/// 


ALL (to) 





PROGRAM SELECTS 


NO. 


IN FROM 


POWER OUT TO 


1 






2 







SPTM 4330 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 53 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

STORAGE ASSIGNMENT CHART 



APP. ICATION. 04MV PPVPo/L 



PROGRAM NO.: 



IF 



&A9&av1f2r t/f/9 LARGE CAPACITY DRUM AnnRF « FRnM 00 OO OO 
fj<9 f -/Of ^St&Cr) FIFI n ASSIGNMENT TO 03 99 14- 


SYM 


DESCRIPTION 


CHARACTER AND DECIMAL 


11 


10 


a 


s 


7 


8 


B 


i 


3 


2 


1 


SN 


F 


C/oc^ s/tf»?a&? 4? l>£T#er/*>Mr 












s 


-* 


3 


2 


/ 


°4> + 


F 1 


P#y P*rf 
















% 


i 3 


7 


6 


4- 


F 2 


fffzviAe &/9e*/#6s wrp 














/* 


/3 


IZJ/ 


/D 


+ 


F 3 


S/S/^r P>#y wrp 


















^ 


!* 


'5 


¥■ 


F 4 


Ovrs/Pf Woe* Ptoy wrp 


















2oJ9 


/8 


¥ 


F 5 


Gfoss S#*A"»'cs Vrp 












21 


2S 


24 


Z3 t 22 


2/ 


¥ 


F 6 


p/<:/<? yrp 
















3o 


29.28 


27 


+ 


F 7 


pwr Yrp 












36 


3S 


34-33, 


3Z 


3/ 


+ 


F 8 


&*9Parp Poo&s v/rp 


















39 


3337 


+ 


F 9 




























F10 




























F11 




























F12 


A/t>T*-' Oi/e/erlo* ue/} 


























F13 


ro ' x* xx oo 


























F14 


p-Pfi - Sf/lces 


























F15 




























F16 




























F17 




























F18 




























F19 






























Op£##r'o>/ OX* LARGE CAPACITY DRUM ADDRESS FROW 
^-/<V //»*r-^€ieer) FIELD ASSIGNMENT TC 


04-00 oo 
06 99 14 






SYM 


DESCRIPTION 


CHARACTER AND DECIMAL. 


t 1 


10 


9 


8 


7 


6 


8 


4 


3 


2 


1 


SN 


F 


OPE/eAT/od A/o. 












f 


4- 


3 


2 


/ 


°< 


-h 


F 1 


^T2>. Hoo/?s pe/e c 












J/ 


IO 


9 t 


fi 


7 


6 


4 


F 2 


Op£#/>r/o*/ A/o. 












'7 


/(> 


/£ 


it 


/3 


'\ 


,* 


F 3 


Std poo/es Pe/e c 












21 


22 


Zl \ 


?° 


/? 


ie 


t 


F 4 


OPse/fr/OA/ //<>.(?$fap<r&'"<:'/± 


>A 










3o 


2<? 


18 


2.1 


Zi 


*i 


* 4 


F 5 


Srp. Mouses P<r# C 












3t 


3S" 


3+i 


« 


32 


3/ 


+ 


F 6 




























F 7 


/ 


























F 8 


fileTf: (9'plo\*/ /?PpP£SS /£> 


























F 9 


/// P+ <*>/ /AST VP>/9 


























F10 


Po " &P£&. Vo. 


























Fll 


P, * Srp //#s. 


























F12 


P 2 * op&e. //c 


























F13 


P* * £r& //ps. 


























F14 


^7 - x y xy oo — 


























F15 


Pf= SP/tC£S 


























F16 




























F17 




























F18 




























F19 





























LARGE CAPACITY DRUM 
FIELD ASSIGNMENT SELECTORS 


PICK-UP FROM 


GROUND 
TO 


A* 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SELECT 


PSo Z 


CG 


la 


¥ C// /O 


/9PP//SP + Pz 


-^ £P /z. 


lb 


¥ cr// /5" 


/PPP. + P 3 


¥cr// /& 


1c 


¥ £// /e 


PPP ¥ P*. 


— 


Id 


¥ <zt/ 2/ 


PPS> ¥ Ps- 


¥<rP3/ 


PSoZ 


CG 


2a 


¥ <?¥/ 2 7 


/?PP +PC 


— . 


2b 


+ C/¥ 3/ 


/fPP+P-r 


— 


2c 


Ps 


<?// '9 


c// /o 


2d 


CM /z 


<rp/y 


p/ 


PS 02. 


C6 


3a 


Prz. 


C///4 


Cp /& 


3b 


P3 


CP /7 


Pz 


3c 


P+ 


<rp 20 


cp z/ 


3d 


<Z//24- 


<?P 23 


P3 


PSoZ 


CG 


4a 


Ps~ 


Cd 2£> 


<?//27 


4b 


Pl 


<Zp3o 


Pe- 


4c 


P? 


Z//36. 


Ps 


4d 












5a 








5b 








5c 








5d 












6a 








6b 








6c 








6d 












7a 








7b 








7c 








7d 












8a 








8b 








8c 








8d 









INTERMEDIATE STORAGE FIELD ASSIGNMENT 
TRACK 50 


SYM 


DESCRIPTION 


1 1 


10 


9 


8 


7 


6 


8 


4 


3 


2 


1 


SN 


50 




























51 




























52 




























53 




























54 




























55 




























56 




























57 




























58 




























59 































INTERMEDIATE STORAGE FIELD ASSIGNMENT 
TRACK 10 


SYM. 


DESCRIPTION 


1 1 


10 


9 


8 


7 


e 


8 


4 


8 


2 


1 


SN 


10 


























11 




























12 




























13 




























14 




























15 




























16 




























17 




























18 




























19 






























TRACK 20 


20 


CoA/5r/9A/r 6~ 
















if 


O 


f + 


21 


^~P/9C£*S 
























4- 


22 


Co /*3T/9a/T - C> 6 


















,P 


6 


¥ 


23 


Ce>NST/>s*T~ .09 


















iP 


9 


¥- 


24 




























25 




























26 




























27 




























28 




























29 






























TRACK 30 


30 




























31 




























32 




























33 




























34 




























35 




























36 




























37 




























38 




























39 






























TRACK 40 


40 




























41 




























42 




























43 




























44 




























45 




























46 




























47 




























48 




























49 





























SPTM-4320 



J£&*nMM*£jt*m- Hand. ^Mnimc 

DIVISION OF SPERRY It A N CORPORATION 



VI - 54 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

PROGRAM PLANNING CHART 



app. .rATinKi. n piLy PRyfaLL PROGRAM NO.: __^Ct 



STEF 
NO. 


NPUT 

UNIT 

NO. 


CARD 
NO. 


VALUE 1 


PRO- 
CESS 


VALUE 2 


RESULT 


NEXT 
STEP 


VALUE 1 AS STORED VALUE 2 AS STORED UNSHIFTED RESULT STORED RESULT % 


DESCRIPTION 


SYM 


SH 


DESCRIPTION 


SYM 


SH 


DESCRIPTION 


SYM 


SH 


11 1 


o o a 


7 6B432 1 N 1 110 » 8 7 6 S 4 3 2 1 N » 2' 20 IB 18 17 16 IS 14 Is 12 >« » B 870 84 32 1 N 1 1 «0 9 87 8 8 4 3 2 1 * P 


1 






ope/e*Tioht mo- 


0O2> 




•f- 


SPACES 


21 




TFS7VO ^^/ «/tf<0< 


flA* 


2L 


BR I 






_ liXtxifc + 


*****}$;* m%*c>t>_ i 


2 






A P P A PTiAN Al/). 


AP2 




£<■* 


£>P0AflTlOht hlO- 


002, 




OP5/P. Ai/J. 


CSFO 
C4F* 




KSf 






_ t%tVL%t teZZlL^t 


>(^>^3j^ _ 2 


3 






aP f* ATiON fltO. 


OOJL 




pc% 


OPEARTlOAl HO. 


002 




OPE A. NA> 


c$F+ 




ECS2 






. i(|L^&XLi ZZXXlL^ 


>^^>»^j 3 


4 






atFLaui /9A0AES5 


FV 




T* 


SPACES 


2/ 




— o>ri.cut nop. 

T£3T'. £>/+ A/A *WLAht 


fUMl 




sin 








>t>5>K04£ ^X>SX©^_ 4 


5 






QPEA AT 16 At Aid. 


&&2t. 




c 


t*t OPEA. Al<*. 


F& 




_^. _ A o ~ i*r ope*. 
TEST ! -/^ ■•^" ****- 






RH3 






. *S2&)L]ld: __ -&&1L&2Lli » 


5 


6 






5Tfl. UfcS. Pf A e 


PI 




X 


PCS, PfioD. 


OOCp 




STD. HAS. PAoSl A».H 


oox 




OEZ 






_ g****&+ xxxxx%£ 


X!C^^&x^i X^J[^X^^+ 6 


7 






attd. Atfs. Pen <• 


F3 




X 


f*S. PfOA. 


aa<* 




STD* rt&s, ptoo* NH 


0QX 




0C2 






. xygg**- 1 xxxxxm 


XS3S*:*** i<XAX5cy& , • 7 


8 






srix ///ps. pc/8 c 


FJT 




* 


p£&. PR6D. 


004 




STD. tflK. PAoDl Af.^. 


Ml 




0E2 






_ ^^^XXH'* ^X^^^c>$^ 


>^2?^x* _ >*£****:! • 


9 






STD. */*S_ PRPD. N. ft. 


cox 


*n 


-f 


Canztamt S" 


24 




STO. *«. P£6D. At>D. 


001 


IR 


10 






_XXX*X&1+ ^£6+ 


x^^^^ V^^ 1 * 9 


10 






CZoCtf * DEPT. NO. 


&GQ. 




T 




~u 




ADDAFA* 


PDA 


2L 


FDl 






- 2S2^i^>ii 


XXX>XXt \X|>Td0P. 10 . 


11 






CtOTK "* />^/»t: a/6 


000 




FCS 


Clock. * DEPT AJ0. 


OQQ 




CL6CM-*DEPT. A/fl. 


CAE&. 




fen 






*sxsa&;t *****>$£ 


!>^^X>^^: " 


12 






a/?/ *flT£ 


Ft 




C 


SPfiO&S. 


*\ 










AN 






%&XX+ 4 


12 


13 






G* FLOW ADflAESS 


FO 




-f- 


S PAC E$ 


2t 




+ e'&.ou* AOO. 


f)0& 




8AS 






XZ)UtlOO£ 1 


>^»mi %*k*c>o 13 


14 






ELAPSED HRS. 


Wt- 




* 


.6L die .09 






SHIFT PAY Al.£ 


Oot 




/4T 






xsx-* -u^x-t 


%£$')<+ ^k:** u 


15 






SHIFT PAY Al-fi 


60% 




•f 


• 6A5~ 


20 




^rf/AT Pi9)^ ^0^. 


oof 


\R 


16, 






._ _&&*fc± - - _-<ifi^4i 


4^^^+ _ 4-*i**i 15 


16 






SHIFT PAY WV.D. 


F3 




•f- 


SAiPT PAY 


°pj 




A^r^> 5W/^T p/>y 0^7P 


F3 




n 






JSi^* + ft»^ + 


>p<x^ _L>^^* 16 


17 






DA V RATE 


Fl 




X 


PLftP. ah STD. #fi& 


#*- 




FAANM6S frP. 


OOl 




l* 






^>i>>«5<i >2SX* 


>)$^>^^+ ^s^^X^t* 17 


18 






FAANlNO-S H.%. 


0O( 


IR 


•f* 


• QO-S 


-2<? 




EftfiNtN6S XW>. 


061 




e fo 






_ XSte**X+ ^^0^1 


>^J^^^H m^XZ*™ 


19 






ELRPSEp ##$ . 


00$ 




C 


STO* H#$- 


0rt2 




TT$T . -jA r^/lP- «"t * a7D « 






BR£> 






J(^^+ )S>C^+ 


19 


20 






DAY RATE 


Ft 




X 


PLfiP&ED AAS. 


A?" 




GofiAAHreen p/n h* 


003 




W 






_ _ *2**± i^S^f 


- _ _ _^a^i<>Ai ' ^i&texiipq 


21 






£(>*tfflM7££/> PflYH-% 


003 


IR 


-h 


• AGS 


^tf 




£u/t*AHT£ep PA9 Zii 


OOl 


\& 


22 






_ *$£><**+ ^&a&± 


z&mx± _S^^^ 421 


22 






GD/rc/?AiTf£(> ty/a* 


M3 






EA&AIINGS 


oot 




mfiue-oP PAi 


000 


6l 


33 






xx&x* x^Sl^^t-*- 


*>^x± y^yoacooc\22 


23 






#F£* FftfiH/Aff UlTb 


Fl 




+ 


GUflAQhtTEBO pflY 


rt/)? 




NFto /?GS.E/?^/V/. 0)TD 


F.7 




2H 






x>^j(Xf 32te*+ 


%%%xx+ yxx&Mii 


24 






OrUAp. PAY OtEMK+lMti 


oo? 




-f 


SHIFT PAY 


(Jnf? 




fefi«Ai +/rwite t^ + ^jf/ir 


003 




27 






_ ^*K± ^2t* 


yx^x* ^jj^>*- 24 


25 






i?Rr. jpa^ihici WTO 


F2 




+ 


£"/>£MJM£ k 


COf 




MAD PF» ^>»JPJIf. ZI^TD 


Fl 




2& 






. fti(j(fc+ _ }S^JSX+ - _- 


^ >2<i<5^ ,f ±X%2<}Li 25 


26 






EAfiN/t*64 


oot 




•f 


SHIFT PAY 


^^ 




lEnpu. +&nipT 


003 




21 






^Xii^i a^^i 


>'^>:>+ >>j[>Jef26 


27 






fLflP$en ftps. utTD 


FK 




+ 


FLP-P&ZD MRS. 


OQtL 




AjEtD flap ^j». urn 


FtSl 




CT/ 






J(^^^ ^x> + 


>ij^4 VVjiV* 27 


28 






FLAP, HAS.*ocn> Pm 


6&L 




•f 


1 fAAH. +[DMEDP+SHlfiT 


ocz 




TbTAL PAY 


603 




2f 






)$>V+ >X&)l± 


^^^it** ^^lV>-* 28 


29 






f£J)p. HAS. *<*oT. Pfiy 


004 




4- 


Out* 1» P PAY IM TO 


Ft- 




AlEtD OOT. PAY H)TD 


F# 




So 






&£X± &&&± 


^8>^4 ^^2? 


30 






FLAP.M&.-* AtiT-PM 


00**- 


3L 


T 








OUTSIDE PAY 


OOtl 




Vt 






4^^+ 


)j^X^^^+ )j^>^<?0 30 


31 


































31* 


32 


































32 


33 


































33 


34 


































34 


35 


































35 


36 


































36 


37 


































37 


38 
































; > 


38 


39 


































39 


40 


































40 


41 


































41 


42 


































42 


43 


































43 


44 


































44 


45 


































45 


46 


































46 


47 


































47 


48 


































_ J E 



SPTM-4325 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 55 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

FUNCTION CONTROL CHART 



application, n/)/Ly PAV&a£t- 



PROGRAM NO 



,_j£ 



DEMAND UNITS 


SCAN UNITS 




NO. 


TYPE OF UNIT 


TEST IN FROM 


TEST OUT TO 


DEMAND IN FROM 


DEMAND OUT TO 


NO. 


TYPE OF UNIT 


TO SCAN OUT 


NO 


TYPE OF UNIT 


TO SCAN OUT 


NO. 


TYPE OF UNIT 


TO SCAN OUT 


NOT READY 


READY 


Input 


OUTPUT 


1 


ISa CPm 








$\Mtf;oE 3 


/M STTEP I 




1 






9 






17 






2 
















2 






10 






18 






3 
















3 






11 






19 






4 
















4 






12 






20 






5 
















5 






13 






21 






6 
















6 






14 






22 






7 
















7 






15 






23 






8 
















8 






16 






24 







INPUT CONTROL LINES 


NO. 

a 


TO 


pU T? 


(f/HSj 


b 


pti r-2 


C3/*S) 


c 


ft) Ti 


O/vO 


d 


fti Tit 


6»/»6> 


e 




f 




9 




h 




i 




i 




k 




1 





OUTPUT CONTROL LINES 


NO 


FROM 


A 


ae 3 


B 


OE i 


C 




D 




E 




F 




G 




H 




1 




J 





SYMBOLS FOR PROGRAMMING: 

Processes: PR 

Transfer T 

Addition + 

Subtraction — 

Multiplication X 

Division ■=- 

Left Zero Elim LZE 

Compare C 

Channel Search = ECS 

Channel Search \ UCS 

SHIFTS: 

Shift 2 Left 2L 

• Shift 2 Right 2R 

Expand Prod. Shift EXS 



SP TM-4327 



START 

_™ 1 i>T ^ / 



SCAN OUTS 


NO. 


TO 

























READ UNIT RECORD 


NO. 


IN FROM 


OUT TO 


1 






2 






3 






4 






5 






6 






7 






8 







, CHANNEL SEARCH EQUAL 


NO. 


FROM OUT 
OF STEP NO. 


TO 1 F = VI 


TO IF = V2 


TO IF ^ 


1 


JL 


srrEP S 


— 


ATEP 3 


2 


$ 


STEP i 


~~ 


STEP # 


3 


// 


C T3*. 




STEP iJL 


4 











ERROR CHECKS 


FROM 


TO 


ARITH. 


S1EP tePEnr 


tO'FLOW 


SToP 


*0'FLOW 




PARITY 


£76 P 


ADDRESS 


XTaP 



INDICATORS 


NO. 




FROM 




1 




2 




3 




4 




■ ND. 
SWITCH 


FROM 


TO 




NO 
CHECK 





WRITE UNIT RECORD 


NO. 


IN FROM 


OUT TO 


1 


#3 T/ 


OE 3 


2 






3 






4 






5 






6 






7 






8 







STEP CLEAR 


IN 


OUT 






CLEAR 
PROC.SEL. 




STEP REPEAT 


IN 
FROM 


fiRlM* £&&>£ 







BRANCHING 


NO. 


IN FROM STEP 


TO 1 F + 


TO IF - 


TO 1 F O 


1 


/ 


AtPP £ 


— 


OE # 


2 


H 


ap i 


STEP A 


a£ I 


3 


S 


STEP 7 


STEP 7 


$T£J> /£> 


4 


/* 


OEI 




STEP IS 


5 


/I 


STEP It 


~- 


OEt 


6 


l<? 


&TpP 3fK 


&TEP JtS 


step -25 


7 










8 










9 










10 










11 










12 










13 










14 










15 










16 










17 










18 











SELECTORS: 

Computor Selector T, - *^ 

Drum Selector Aj—A, 

Input-Output Selectors S,~*S , 

Common CT(#) or CA {#) 

Select ST {») or SA (#) 

Non-Select NST(#)or NSA (#) 

Pick-Up PUT(#)orPUA{#) 

Program Selector PS^PSi* 

Delay of PS DPS,-DPS, 

Imm. of PS IPSii-IPS,* 

Power of PS PSC-PSOu 

Drop Out of PS PSDOf*PSDO,» 

Ground of Sel GT(#) 

Computer Ground CG 

Demand Ground DG^DG, 

Scan Ground SGi—SG* 

Selector Hold SH 



Function Delay FD 

In FD 1 i FD1.-FD1, 

In FD 2 FD2,-FD2, 

Out FD FDO,-FD0 3 

STORAGES: 

Input-Output 000—009 

Intermediate 10~*59 

Revolver F ~*F, 9 

Channel Search Fields C$Fo~*CSF,* 

DEMAND UNITS: 

Test In TST (#) 

Test Out Ready TSTR (#) 

Test Out Not Ready TSTN (#) 

Demand In Dl (#) 

Demand Out Input DOI (#) 

Demand Out Output DOO (#) 



Scan Out SO^SO*. 

Program Step In In ST (#) 

Program Step Out From ST (#) 

Out Expanders OE,—OE« 

In Branching BR^BR,, 

+ Branch Out +BR 1 -BR,» 

- Branch Out -BR,— BR,» 

o Branch Out oBR,— BR„ 

Read Unit Record R|~*R. 

Write Unit Record W,-W, 

Equal Channel Search In ECSI (#) 

Equal Channel Search Out=V\ ..ECSV, (#) 
Equal Channel Search Out=V, ..ECSV, (#) 
Equal Channel Search Out ^f ....ECS^ (#) 

Unequal Channel Search In UCSI (#) 

Unequal Channel Search Out =..UCS = (#) 
Unequal Channel Search Outii..UCS * i#) 

Program Address Counter PAK 

Address Register ADR 



CHANNEL SEARCH UNEQUAL 


NO. 


FROM OUT 
OF STEP NO. 


TO IF = 


TO IF ^ 


1 








2 








3 








4 









OUT EXPANDERS 



■jU- 






*tfl*y 



dft ,QEl 



o£R t 



OUT 



opc S 



m Psjl 



aPCft, fitt/St, DI*t 



in Psx 



Q£ * 



IH STEP f 



IN S TEP SO 



FUNCTION DELAYS 



NO. IN 1 



gps i 



Fltoth SX&to 



IH ST£P U 



ALTERNATE SWITCHES 


NO. 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SELECT 


1 








2 








3 








4 








5 








6 









CODE DISTRIBUTOR 


FROM VI 
OF STEPS 




FROM V2 
OF STEPS 




FROM R 
OF STEPS 




NO. 


TO 


NO. 


TO 


00 




26 




01 




27 




02 




28 




03 




29 




04 




30 




05 




31 




06 




32 




07 




33 




08 




34 




09 




35 




10 




36 




11 




37 




12 




38 




13 




39 




14 




40 




15 




41 




16 




42 




17 




43 




18 




44 




19 




45 




20 




46 




21 




47 




22 




48 




23 




49 




24 




>49 




25 








FROMOUTOF 
FUNCTION: 




NO. 


TO 


NO. 


TO 







5 




1 




6 




2 




7 




3 




8 




4 




9 





FUNCTION SEQUENCE 


NO. 


SET 


PROBE 


OUT 


1 








2 









Code Distributor CD 

In CD V, „.-.CDV, 

In CD V, , CDV, 

In CD R CDR 

Out CD 00 to > 49 CD 00 -CD> 49 

In CD Pulse In CDP 

Out CD Pulse Out CDP *-CDP, 

Function Sequence Set FSSj—FSS, 

Function Sequence Probe FSPj—FSPj 

Function Sequence Out FSOi""*FSOj 



ALTERNATE SWITCHES: 

Common SW,C -SW,C 

Select ...SW,S ~*SW 4 S 

Non- Select SW,NS-SW 4 N t 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 56 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

COMPUTER SELECTOR CONTROL CHART 



APPLICATION!. P flllY FtoY#/iU~ PROGRAM NO. lK 



PICK-UP FROM 


GROUND 
TO 


T# 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SELECT 


IPC* Vmtm 


/•fi. 


1 


,N £TEt> 2* 


fftom <r£P 2.7 


IPC h 3Jm* 


cc 


2 


,N STEP W 


Ai< T3A. 


in srep n 


IPC a. *6s 


ca 


3a 


/At &T£P Jtf 


?C* M t ** 


C Tl 


3b 


23. CO^"\ 


\/2 -sr m 


JLZ C*o4> 


\PCd ¥*u 


CCt 


4a 


04 4 


V? £j 17 


6&1 


4b 


IN ST£P 2S 


Ffom <ttP 1% 


/M STEP rf 






5a 








5b 












6a 








6b 








6c 








6d 












7 












8 












9a 








9b 












10a 








10b 












11a 








lib 












12a 








12b 








12c 








12d 












13 












14 












15a 








15b 












16a 








16b 












17a 








17b 












18a 








18b 








18c 








18d 












19 












20 












21a 








21b 












22a 








22b 












23a 








23b 












24a 








24b 








24c 








24d 









PICK-UP FROM 


GROUND 
TO 


T# 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SELECT 






25 












26 












27a 








27b 












28a 








28 b 












29a 








29b 












30a 








30b 








30c 








30d 












31 












32 












33a 








33b 












34a 








34b 












35a 








35 b 












36a 








36b 








36c 








36d 












37 












38 












39a 








39b 












40a 








40b 












41a 








41b 












42a 








42b 








42c 








42d 












43 












44 












45a 








45b 












46a 








46b 












47a 








47b 












48a 








48 b 








48c 








48d 









PROGRAM SELECTS 


PS# 


IN FROM 


DELAY OUT TO 


D. O. FROM 


POWER TO 


1 


ae o. jAE a 


/A/ FD / 


aB $ 


P/i At t 2.^U 


2 










3 










4 










5 










6 










7 










8 










9 










10 










PS# 


IN FROM 


IMMEDIATE OUT TO 


D. O. FROM 


POWER TO 


11 










12 










13 










14 










15 










16 











REMARKS: 



SP TM-4328 



VI - 57 



Program Comments 

Before Step (11) - Drum field selectors are picked up because 

two unit records are used in this run and 
they each have different field layouts. To 
insure using the proper fields in calcula- 
tions, the field layout must be changed for 
individual processing. 



VI - 58 



6. PROBLEM V 

1. Statement of Problem 

This problem is the processing of the weekly payroll for 5000 
employees. In problem IV daily job eards were processed to 
reflect the employee's daily activity in his URA. The employee 
unit record used in problem IV is again used in this problem. 
An employee master deck is used to produce this weekly payroll. 
Each card has, in addition to the employee name, the employee's 
clock number, department number, number of exemptions and other 
deductions. This master deck is then placed in the UF-C for 
processing. 

The employee clock number, department number, number of exemptions and 
other deductions are the only factors in this card used by the compu- 
ter in arriving at an employee's paycheck. The operations performed 
by the computer are to calculate: (Note WTD = week to date, YTD = year 
to date, FWT = federal withholding tax.) 

1) Regular Pay WTD - This has already, been summarized in 

his unit record, F2. 

2) Overtime Premium Pay - Since an employee will have various 

rates of pay for different jobs during 
the week, the overtime rate is an 
average of his rates. Standard work 
week is 40 hours. Overtime hours - 
elapsed hours - 40. The formula used 
to calculate overtime pay is: 

(Reg. Pay + Shift + Outside Work) /Overtime Hours) 
v Elapsed Hours i X 2 ' 

3) Shift Pay - Accumulated in field F3. 

4) Outside Work - Accumulated in field F4. 

5) Gross Pay - Regular pay + shift pay + 

outside work + overtime pay. 

6) FICA This Week - 2% of the employee's gross 

pay to $4200.00. 

7) Withholding Tax - This is equal to (Gross pay - the 

This Week number of exemptions x 13) 18%. 

8) Net Pay - Gross pay minus FICA, Withholding 

Tax and other deductions. 

9) Withholding Tax YTD - FWT to date + this week's FWT. 

10) Gross Earnings YTD - Gross earnings to date + this 

week's gross earnings. 

11) FICA YTD - FICA to date + this week's FICA. 

2. Machine Specifications 

1 - 150 CPM Card Sensing Punching Unit 

2 - Large Capacity drums with 40 digit DRA length 

1 - Arithmetic & Control Unit (external programming) 



VI - 59 



3 General Procedure Flow Chart 






FZ/A/r 



COMPUTED 
PtycARP 



/SO 
CPH 
/a/pot 



A e/TMM£77C *t CONTROL 



WTD 



COMPOTE ■ 

BB&OLAK PAY 
OV£Rmrt£ - 
5H\FT 
OUT3IV5 

net* tuls HJj&ex 

H/JltiOUMG " '" 

TAy yrp 

6*0355 £AMl/0&S VtV 

AJer f%y 
1 




EM&J>Jez UgA'J 



&AMJZ OVERALL 3V3Tlzy\ 
A6 USED )H F&&MMJ3- 



VI - 60 



4. Input - Output Data & Definition 

The input source medium are 90 column punched cards, entered in random 
sequence and punched in the following form: 



12 12 12 12 12 12 «2 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 «2 12 '2 



EMPUDVSE. MARK 



H 34 34 34 ?4 U U 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 

56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 5<L 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 

7» 78 7s 78 78 7s 78 78 7s 78 7s 78 78 7s 7s 78 7s 7s 7s 7s 
I 2 J 4 S S 7 a S tO 11 12 II 14 15 l« 17 I* I* 20' 
99999999999999999999 



CLOCK* 



34 34 34 34 

56 56. 56 56 

z 

78 7s 7s 7g 

21 22 21 24 
9 9 9 



Iwfl 



34 U 
56 T> 

3 

78 7 8 
25 26 
9 9 



% 



I 



12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 >2 12 12 12 12 tl 12 U 



veoocnoiJS 



34 34 34 J 34 '4 

\ 

56 56 5^| 56 ?6 

78 7 8 7 8 |7 8 7 8 

2» 30 31 | 32 3 3 

9 9 |9 9 



MfWoFQtGCU. 



34 34 



Ho 



DM 



% 56 

7s 7 8 

34 35 

9 9 



34 34 



56 56 

15 

78 7 S 



34 34 



w. 



56 56 



7 8 7 8 
38 39 



Fat**** eunuc 



34 34 



MO 



56 56 



78 78 
40 41 



34 34 



MY 



56 56 

78 78 



34 34 



56 56 



EB*XJ#rAv 



34 34 34 1 34 34 

56 56 56 56 56 
78 7g 7g , 78 7» 



9 9 9,9 9 

46 47 «B| t» 30 



evetriMB 



34 34134 34 



56 56 

7 

78 7g 



56 56 

78 7g 



9 9 "9 9 
91 32l 93 34 



JHlfir 

U\U 34 



56 1 56 56 

78 178 78 



9 '9 9 
sslse 37 



0U&9E 



34 1 34 34 

56i56 56 

\9 

7s J 78 7g 
9 j9 9 



PICA 



34|34 34 

56* 56 56 

78' 78 7 8 



9'9 9 
6ll 62 6 



FED. TAX 



34 34 34 1 34 34 

I 

56 56 56 1 56 56 

78 7g 7g 1 78 7g 

9 9 9 '9 9 

64 45 t&| 67 61 



NET PAV 



H 34 34 1 34 34 

56 56 56 56 56 

12! 

7g 7g 7s [ 78 7 8 



9 9 9 19 9 

69 70 7l|?I 73 



AaaisPA^ 



»2 12 12 12 12 12 12 12. 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 

34 
56 
78 



34 34 34 |34 34 

56 56 56 ,56 56 



±3\ 



78 7g 7« |7g 7g 

I 

I 
9 9 9 19 9 

74 75 76 177 78 



12 12 12 12 12 12 12 



ftegfr to bXte 



34 34 34 34 34 1 34 34 

I 

56 56 56 j6 56 1 56 56 

78 7g 7g 7 8 78 1 7g 78 

I 

9 9 9 9 9 19 9 

80 81 82 63 84| 85 86 



12 12 12 12 

34 34 34 34 

56 56 56 56 

78 78 7g 7s 

9 9 9 9 

87 88 8» SO 



Definitions: 



Input 
(1) 
(2) 

(3) 

(4) 



(5) 



Employee name (col 1-20) 

Clock No. (col 21-24). Col 23 & 24 are used for 

Channel number. 

Dept. No. (col 25-26) - These two digits are used 
for drum section number. 

Number of exemptions (col 20) - The number of 
federal withholding tax exemptions. 
10 exemptions is punched as an over- 
capacity zero. 

Deductions (col 29-33) - The sum of all payroll 
deductions except taxes. 



Output 
(6) 



(7) 



Regular Pay WTD (col 46-50) - The employee's 

accumulated regular pay for this week. 
Item in URA cleared after processing. 

Overtime Pay WTD (col 51-54) - This is the employee's 
overtime pay. 



VI - 61 



(8) Shift Pay WTD (col 55-57) - Accumulated shift pay for 

this week. Item in URA cleared after process- 
ing. 

(9) Outside Work Pay WTD (col 58-60) - Accumulated outside 

work for this week. Item in URA cleared after 
processing. 

(10) FICA This Week (col 61-63) - Employee's FICA deduction 

this week. 

(11) Fed. Withholding Tax This Week (col 64-68) - Withholding 

tax deduction this week. 

(12) Net Pay (col 69-73) - Gross pay less all taxes and other 

deductions. If gross pay is not sufficient to 
cover tax deductions plus the total of other 
deductions, punch gross pay minus tax deductions 
as net pay and also punch a zero in column 89 to 
identify this card. 

(13) Gross Pay (col 74-78) - The employee's gross earnings 

for the week. 

(14) Gross Earnings YTD (col 80-86) - Accumulation of Gross 

Earnings on a yearly basis. 

The above input-output data is assigned to the following input-output 
storage locations. 



Input Storage 



Output Storage 



Sym. 


Description 


000 


Clock number and 


002 


Other deductions 


000 


Outside work pay 


001 


Gross to date 


002 


Net Pay 


003 


Regular Pay 


004 


Overtime Pay 


005 


Shift Pay 


006 


FWT 


007 


Gross Pay 


008 


FICA 



5. Drum Stored Data and Definition 

a) Same as problem IV - Employee's Unit Record. 

LARGE CAPACITY DRUM REVOLVER 
UNIT RECORD AREA - FIELD ASSIGNMENT 



a 



m. 



FO 
Fl 
F2 
F3 
F4 
F5 
F6 
F7 
F8 



Description 

Clock & Dept. No. 

Day Rate 

Reg. Earning WTD 

Shift Pay WTD 

Outside Work 

Gross Earnings YTD 

FICA YTD 

Fed. W. Tax YTD 

Elapsed Hours WTD 



Digits 



Sign 



xxxxxx. 


+ 


x.xxx 


+ 


XXX. XX 


+ 


x.xx 


+ 


x.xx 


+ 


xxxx.xx 


+ 


XX. XX 


+ 


XXXX.XX 


+ 


XX. X 


+ 



VI - 62 

b) Definition - Same as problem IV. 

The overflow address is located in DRA #14 of overflow channels. 

FO = Drum section & channel number of overflow 
channel i.e. 

xx xx 00 

DS CH URA 

Fl - F8 = Spaces 
The following constants are stored in intermediate storage: 
Intermediate Storage * - Constant 

10 - 2.335 + 

11 - 4.675 + 

12 - 7.015 + 

13 - 9.355 + 

14 - 11.695 + 

15 - 14.035 + 

16 - 16.375 + 

17 - 18.715 + 

18 - 21.055 + 

19 - 23.395 + 

20 - .005 - 

21 - 40.0 + 

22 - 84.00 + 

23 - .02 + 

24 - 5 + 

25 - Spaces 

26 - .18 + 



NOTE: 



Constants in storages 10-20 are formed as follows: 
[18% x (No. of Exemptions x $13.00) ] - .005 



VI - 63 



6 Program Flow Qnapt 



START 

\ 
DEMAND UNIT *1 

\ 

R£ADY 

\ 

PEAOAM OCfT-/NPt/r#l 
J m 000(20 T 4DR 

Y 



Tfi/P 



2. 000 £~CS* OO0=CSPo 



3- pi cig 



1 



ol 

V fo+l£-A*R 



//0 O'fLGW 

L 



L 



51 f2+2£=O05 (/STtf&f fiff. £#e#/*63 ?) 



■h 



6. Es-tzs-oos C/5 r//£f<r s///pr /wy?) 

o 



7 Es + fz^ °°7 
8. E 3 6*) T F 3 



Id* ^4 t Ez -007 



o 



JO, f 4 + 007=007 



Sozr 

■*" SKIP 



Sort 
SKIP 



13.E 2 T007 



\ 

J 4 f * r e+ 

15. Eq-2i - 30 0* T/z&f oyjtfr/A&d 



i 



^% 



VI - 64 



16. F» + F» = f: 



3 r r 3 = rz 



17, 007 fa) + r z ^i 



\ f 

i& ~51 fa) X50C+L) ***&.$#) 



19. Fz+24*004 0e) 



20. 004 + 007=007 



21. 007+ F 5 *F S 



2% F? T O01 



21 2Z- Fc - 30 C/s T/Zf/ee- /=/<r,g To P#y?) 



24. 007X23=F 2 



25. 30fc) C F z 



~ /0 \ 
2& 3D T 008 

29. ZZ T Ft 



26. F z (f$)+24=O0Q0#) 



27. 08 +F 6 ~F6 



VI - 65 



30- 007 X Z6 = 30 



3?. - Sao*) 

L. 

-A 



comst,- 006 (//?) 



^T 



3X. OOG + F7 ~F 7 



33. r 3 too 6 



1 



34 007-006 = /x 



35. /S -£<?<9 =/i 



36. /="* - £>££ - ££>£ 



v 



3# ^3 r f?j 



39 r 3 t Fa 



37. /^ -/^ = OOZ 

I 



w/e/r? 
I 



/Mfe*ninal£m. Hajari. ^Mniwun. 

DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 66 






UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

150 CPM INPUT-OUTPUT CHART 



APPLICATION: Wfr/A / &*y#oll. 



PROGRAM NO.: 



& 



INPUT-OUTPUT STORAGE FIELD ASSIGNMENT 
nFMAKin UNIT NO. / OR SCAN UNIT NO. 


INPUT FIELD ASSIGNMENT 


SYM. 


DESCRIPTION 


CARD COLUMNS AND DECIMALS 


SIGN 
CTL. 


1 t 


10 


9 


a 


7 


e 


8 


4 


3 


2 


i 


SN. 


000 


C/ocf sSfA^jbe-A? t^ P*S>**7 A*£-a*T 












zt 


zz 


Z4 


zt> 


Z3 


^ 


■/ 


001 






























002 


ToT/9L -0Trff# &*-pt/eT/0fi/4 














I? 


3o 


3/ J2 33 


+ 




003 






























004 






























005 






























006 






























007 






























008 






























009 































OUTPUT FIELD ASSIGNMENT 


SYM. 


DESCRIPTION 


CARD COLUMNS AND DECIMALS 


SIGN 


11 


10 


• 


8 


7 


6 


8 


4 


s 


2 


i 


SN. 


000 


O </rS /&£• itfo&AT 


















S8 t 


S9 


60 


/■ 


001 


Ca*o*s 4n*#*/Af6s To p/erf 












3/ 


8z 


#3 


&**£*- 


86 


/" 




002 


//fr £>*y 














t>9 


7o 


7/ < 


7* 


73 


_£ 


%? 


003 


#£-<svi/9/p /?*y 














+L 


4-1 


±&u 


+9 


So 


+ 




004 


0t/£-/?r/A*r £> &£■/*>/*/*) P*y 
















Sf 


^"Z JP 53 


S4 


+ 




005 


Sd/?r p*y 


















SS^S** 


57 


•+ 




006 


/y"Ar/e»/?z h//r//tf*ifi///6 T*y 














6+ 


t>S 


M> A t>7 


68 


+ 




007 


tZ/ees* /?/?V 














7+ 


7f 


7<> yr 


78 


> 




008 


A/c/9 


















*'< 


(,2 


63 


-h 




009 































INPUT CONTROL LINES 


SYM. 


FROM 


a 


o/gfi 


b 


//*6 


c 


3/ze 


d 


r/2a 


• 


7/z& 


f 


9/ZB 


g 




h 




i 




i 




k 




l 





OUTPUT CONTROL LINES 


SYM. 


TO 


A 


7"^V/* 


B 


So/^r <? *>/?//> 


C 




D 




E 




F 




G 




H 




1 




J 





INPUT-OUTPUT SELECTORS 


PICK UP 


s* 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SELECT 




la 








lb 








1c 










2a 








2b 








2c 










3a 








3b 








3c 










4 










5a 








5b 








5c 










6o 








6b 








6c 










7a 








7b 








7e 










8a 








8b 








8c 










9a 








9b 








9c 










10a 








10b 








10c 









INPUT TRANSFER 


IN (from) 


£V£f/ 


NO (to) 




EVEN (to) 


//V 


ALL (to) 





m PROGRAM SELECTS 


NO. 


IN FROM 


POWER OUT TO 


1 






2 







REMARKS: 



SP TM 4380 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 67 



LARGE CAPACITY DRUM AD nRFSS from OOOOOO 
FIFl D ASSIGNMENT TO 0399/4- 


SYM 


DESCRIPTION 


CHARACTER AND DECIMAL 


~\\ 


10 


9 


e 


? 


6 


5 


\ 


3 


2 


i 


SN 


F 


C/£>f# A/ufiABFr fj>f/>/9erA4£*r 








£ 


¥ 


3 


2. 


/ 


°i 


.-* 


F 1 


J>*9Y ##T£~ 
















9 < 


\ Q 


7 


6 


4 


F 2 


#&&**#* fAWMfs */rp 














14 


J3 


'*< 


f" 


to 


4 


F 3 


^Mrr P*Y */.rp. 


















'?< 


ih 


16 


+ 


F 4 


O t/rs/pe rtcex w/ */t~p 


















2 ° t 


'9 


<6 


+ 


F 5 


czeoss £&&*//*'<»$ )frp 












2b 


Zf 


24 


**> 


22 


21 


4 


F 6 


f^/CSt Yrp 
















3o 


2 \ 


2*27 


•f 


F 7 


Fw t Vrp 












36 


5f 


3f 


*1 


52 


31 


+ 


F 8 


&£/?/»S£-p //oujes *srp 


















39 


^ 


*-> 


4 


F 9 




























F10 




























Fll 




























F12 


//eTf: 0ve*now up A 


























F13 




























F14 


P, -/fc • J5P4C6S 


























F15 




























F16 




























F17 




























F18 




























F19 































LARGE CAPACITY 


DRUM 


ADDRESS FROM 




FIELD ASSIGNMENT TO 








SYM 


DESCRIPTION 


CHARACTER AND DECIMAL 


1 1 


16. 


9 | 8 


7 


6 


8 


4 


9 


2 


* 


SN 


F 




























F 1 




























F 2 




























F 3 




























F 4 




























F 5 




























F 6 




























F 7 




























F 8 




























F 9 




























F10 




























FIT 




























F12 




























F13 




























F14 




























F15 




























F16 




























F17 




























F18 




























F19 





























UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

STORAGE ASSIGNMENT CHART 



APPLICATION: 



WW// P/9y/?e>ll 



PROGRAM NO.: 



LARGE CAPACITY DRUM 
FIELD ASSIGNMENT SELECTORS 


PICK-UP FROM 


GROUND 
TO 


A* 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SELECT 






la 








lb 








lc 








Id 












2a 








2b 








2c 








2d 












3a 








3b 








3c 








3d 












4a 








4b 








4c 








4d 












5a 








5b 








5c 








5d 












6a 








6b 








6c 








6d 












7a 








7b 








7c 








7d 












8a 








8b 








8c 








8d 









INTERMEDIATE STORAGE FIELD ASSIGNMENT 
TRACK 50 


SYM 


DESCRIPTION 


1 1 


10 


9 


8 


7 


e 


5 


4 


3 


2 


1 


SN 


50 




























51 




























52 




























53 




























54 




























55 




























56 




























57 




























58 




























59 





























INTERMEDIATE STORAGE FIELD ASSIGNMENT 
TRACK 10 


SYM. 


DESCRIPTION 


1 1 


10 


9 


8 


7 


e 


B 


4 


3 


2 


t 


SN 


10 


Co* f 3r/?As7~ ( '/ ^xe-Atipr/o/v) 
















Z , 


s 


3 


s 


+ 


11 


Cos/sr/9"T Cz. *fx) 
















+* 


t 


7 


5 


-F- 


12 


Co *S TJ9*t7~ (9 <Pa ) 
















7 t 


° 


/ 


5 


•+ 


13 


Co*sr**sr- (a £~a) 
















*. 


3 


S 


S 


+ 


14 


Coa/^t/9^7' {££*) 














/ 


'. 


* 


9 


r 


+ 


15 


Co /*sr*/*~ C £ £v) 














/ 


+ 4 P 


3 


$ 


T~ 


16 


Co s/s rj^r ( 7 <Fx) 














/ 


6< 


* 


7 


f 


+ 


17 


Cos/sTA-tfT ( 8 ex) 














/ 


*, 


7 


/ 


5* 


+ 


18 


Ca^sr*"r "f9 £*) 














2 


',.* 


5 


S 


+ 


19 


Co //s/~**T (/o £<) 














2 


3i 


3 


9 


5" 


+ 



TRACK 20 


20 


Co/vsT/t^sT Co £~*e/*)/>r/o/</) 
















0° 


a 


5" 


— 


21 


Cot/sr/?#r 


















f- 


°4 


o 


•+ 


22 


Co/*sr/9Af7~ 
















3 


+a° 


o 


4- 


23 


C~o/*sr**'7~ 


















-i° 


2 


-h 


24 


Cofit&rA" 7 " 






















& 


-h 


25 


Cos/srs9"~7~ 






















— 


4- 


26 


Co//s/y9//r 


















.J 


e 


■4 


27 




























28 




























29 





























30 



31 



32 



33 



34 



35 



36 



37 



38 



39 



40 



41 



42 



43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 



TRACK 30 



TRACK 40 



SPTM-4326 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 68 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

PROGRAM PLANNING CHART 



APPLICATION: UJEEtLy PWROLL 



PROGRAM NO.: 



32: 



5TEF 
NO. 


NPUT 

UNIT 

NO. 


CARD 
NO. 


VALUE 1 


PRO- 
CESS 


VALUE 2 


RESULT 


NEXT 
STEP 


VALUE 1 AS STORED 


VALUE 2 AS STORED 


— ' -■■ ' ■■■ 

UNSHIFTED RESULT 


STORED RESULT 


s 

T 


DESCRIPTION 


SYM 


SH 


DESCRIPTION 


SYM 


SH 


DESCRIP TION 


SYM 


SH 


1 1 l 


9 8 


7 


e s - 


1 3 2 


• £ 


11 


10 


s 


8 


7 


8 


8 


4 2 


> 2 t 


N 22 


21 


20 


10 


IB 


17 1618 141a 12 11 10 


s 


8 7 


6 8 


4 3 


2 1 J 


ill 


10 9 


8 7 < 


8 


4 


3 


2 1 


S P 

N w 


1 






clock «* oe.pt. nz». 


ooo 


at 


T 








RDDQESS 


n^R 




& 








5x* 


,**&£ 


































x&xxxx 


£&± 




' 


*&*x; 


OO 


1 


2 






C4.OC.IL ** D&PT. mo. 


OAQ 




-ECS- 


CLOCK * QEPTT MA. 


OA6 




CLAck. - DEPT MA. 


CSFO 




£CS| 








jS^jtSt^Yiii 










[**£*_*&£ 


















xx&x*x± 














2 


3 






j>/ay RfijE 


Fl 




c 


SPACES 


2S 




7£§T. o**3*. atjrLauj 






SRI 








_ J 


C^* 5 




















4 






































3 


4 






0*FLau> ADDRESS 


FO 




4 


Spaces 


2£ 




TEST, a v-P ot^t^tu 


RPR 




BR* 








^C5<3 


^Xtf 


o+- 


















+ 


















XXX& 


00 


c 




< 


<XXV0D 


4 


5 






RE&. EAftM. M*TD 


Ft 




t 


.SPACED 


25 




RE&. EflRhi. 


003 




6R3 








Sjocaa*' 








- 






-- 




t 


















XJkXJXe 






_i<x^^xj 5 


6 






JZHirr pah \ntd 


F3 




4 


SPACES 


^5 




SHIFT PAY 


OOJS 




8«4 










Si* 


xS- 


















+ 




















xwi 










^J(Xi 6 


7 






SfllFT PRi NNTD 


Ft 




4 


RE&. PflV 


F2 




£ PE&. + SHIFT 


OA"7 




8 










_^iX^ + 












X2C)iJCX 


+ 


















X^CK^^+ 






X3LAAX-* 7 


8 






SHIFT PflY LUTD 


F* 


3ft 


T 








CLE A R. SHIFT 


F3 




9 










-Hp« 


x + 


















































- 





1 8 


9 






OUTSIDE. PAH UJTD 


F4 




■+ 


5P/irFS 


F3 










*££ 










_x^^^ 
















-~~ 


+ 




















x^xi 










Xi^X 


t 9 


10 






GtiT&mE PAY LUTD 


F# 




+ 


<? REfr. +5MIFT 


vol 




* SHIFT +PEfi. + PUT. 


0P1 




'T 










Jj^-* 












X* 


















x& 






_JtX 


&JCXt 10 


11 






OuT^lDE. PftV UJTD 


FH 




4 


5P/)tES 


n 




OUT&IDF PAY 






8R(» 










x^xi 
















m. 


4 




















XiXxt 










X-lXI 


J" 


12 






Outside ppy dtp 


F*h 




4- 


#eg. Pi9y 


F2 




1 #£ 6. -* oar ^am shift) 


0P7 




K 










)£^Xf 














x^x^^-* 1 


















XXX»»X4 






JCXXiXX 


4.12 
* 13 


13 






/?££. Eflftll 


FX 




T 








RE&(/<JA jiHtFr ax 6t>T.) 


OQ-7 




l£ 








xjcicyx -1 


f 




































^XXJSlY+ 






X 


JC 


XlXX 


14 






SPACES 


F3 




T 








CLFAR Outside p/jV 


F4 




IS 










-- 


"*■ 










































4 














H^ 4 


15 






ELPPjSED HtfS. LUTH 


F? 




— 


#a. a 


*t 




TEST*. ^»° 'TmaS^.' rfflS. 


30 




Qfp 










x ^^ + - 














fS.k£ 


4 




















xXlx; 


r 










XX.X 


S 15 


16 






EL&PSEn HftS. LUTD 


FB 




4- 


ELAPSED UPS. £2/TD 


FH 




A H BL.AP. H««. 


Pi 




18 










X34^. 














x)SkX + -J 




















VXK.X4 








XX 


H^ 


^16 


17 


/ 




£ RFA, T £*llfT + AaT. 


ocl 


HL 




A * FLAP. Z/fiS. 


F2 




7i A of. HRiX. Rate 


"51 




J9 








XX^^K+ 














5(XXiX + 








_i^0XXXX 






XXXXXX+ 




\ 


&tJ4x& 


XK 


4 17 


18 






Va. floe, titty. Rptte 


3l 


Vt 


% 


o.r. #je$. 


SO 


Hi- 


iQ-T PPEfn. PA1 fl.R- 


FQ 


fi 


/^ 








K^^^^^+- 














XXJ5 + 










x^kxx 


X 


00 


{30OOd04 






^XXi^X 


+ 18 


19 






o.T- PpE/n. Pry Ai.fc 


F2 




+ 


• OQ R 


2H 




o.T PJ?Enri. P«Y RDA 


QQ*t 


fft 


ao 








X^^&K + 














a< 


3£)5+ 


















XXiXXlL4 








X 




* 19 


20 






(XT. PPE/W. P*H PDA 


QQt 




4 


£ PEL. + SHIFT +AOT 


001 




Sftoss P«Y 


QOl 




2/ 








&iii*& + 












^ 


XXJiS 


+ 


















KXXdSXt 






-^ickiiLii 2° 


21 






&f?6£S PAY 


ocn 




4 


<?£0&S TO DAT£ 


FS 




AIFLJ £ftOSS To Dim 


F,«T 




J22 








X&^JL^^ 










*x**sx± 


















xy)?x«x+ 




\ 


tK&X^lL^ 


4 21 


22 






fi/toSS PAY T3 MM- 


FS 




T 








GP6ZS To DATE 


OQI 




23 








X^X^^K+" 




































y^xxx^+ 




\ 


^XlXX* 22 


23 






8 11. on 


22 






PICA ta date: 


F(* 




TEST, a jya ncA 


3d 




B*7 








g4$^0 + 














xx*x-t 




















vx^xi 








SXiXlft 23 


24 






a%6<>s p^v 


col 




X 


,42. 


23 




TEA|TAT1VE T/Cfl M.R. 


ra 




25 








XK5$*& + 
















,^2-fc 


















X^^c^x+ 






x^ 


f 24 


25 






fl/nt rtc Ft ta Ga 


40 


2Z. 


c 


TENTATIVE FlCfl N-8. 


fl 




TFiT . ito nmt «r rc-Arr 






3P^ 








^X2^±_ 












X^^XY^t^ 






































25 


26 






TEM"TflTltfE PICA fl.R. 


Fl 


IR 


4 


• 60* 


24 




F/Cfl 


O09 


/f? 


27 








JC^xxX-*- 














^ t 


flZ)54 




















X^^X'*' 










XiXk- 


4-26 


27 






FICA 


00$ 




+ 


Ftcn to t>RTE 


F6> 




A(F£JJ F/Cfl Tfl DATE 


F6 




3d 










££X"»- 














xx:x*+ 




















1X&X4 








^x^t 


4 27 


28 






RpiT. Pica ta &o 


to 




T 








F/r/i 


OOflf 




2-f 










K.XX.+ 






































>0{X + 










JCJC^4 28 


29 






55 if- % Ad 


21 




T 








WF£i/ FICR TO DAT* 


Fft 




3d 








54^0+ 






































S^^64 








«U i Od4 29 


30 






&Paas. PAS 


CAT 




* 


-/« 


%U 




1 1 % &&*£& 


3/5 




5/ 








^XKXX l + _ 
















ill 8 


+ 
















XXXJJXXX4J 




Xyx^yxxf 30 


31 






/fr% 6R.6<<i PAH 


30 


iR 




T/iv EJtEmpr -f rod. 


CTt 




FluT RDD. 


d06 


/ft 


«?» 






fc**,**** 4 












xx^^x 


+ 


















>^x^xxl 






_^it 


KXfc* 31 ' 


32 






fu>T 


66te 




4 


FU1T TD DATE 


Fl 




NFU) f£L»T TC DATE, 


F7 




3^ 








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xxxxx 


+ 


















>^V)Ci\X + 




l 


^K 


X^* 432 


33 






J$PP.C£S 


F?> 




T 








CLEflfc Ft*i~r 


/)^4 




34 










— 


-t 
























































j 33 


34 






&£££& PAY 


00 1 






FU)T 


oak 




£/t65S - /="^/T 


F2 




3S 








&&&^X +n 












J<XXXX 


4 


















XX2VkS^^ 






.JlUX^^* 34 


35 






£jfe>£S - FLUT 


F2 




— 


F\CA 


0*$ 




^A^55 -TAX£S 


f2 




3t> 








xx>ijcx- 


h 














&kJS& + 


















->^&l>&± 






_.x* 


XtV^-»35 


36 






QRA&S -T/)VES 


F% 




— 


OlHEfL DE0ucr/4Mi 


■ 0^2 




NET PAY 


06 2 




Mil 








XJCXJCXt. 












X 


xxxx^- 


















XXK,^X4 






X 


XXA1 


f 36 


37 






^p/JtfF$ 


F3 




— . 


QRosz - rates 


F2 




A/ET P/?Y 


^A2 




3? 










— 


- + 












XXXXXl 


















^XX^i 








_^xxx 


M7 


38 






£P/>£^ s 


F3 




T 








OLPP.& pe&. Pay 


F^ 




39 










-.- 


-^ 


f- 
















































- 




-' 


4 38 


39 






ipfl^« 


F3 




T 








CLEAR FLAP. Hf&. 


Fff 




Ufl 










— 1 


-T 






























t* * 


















- 


- 




439 


40 
































































































40 


41 
































































































41 


42 
































































































42 


43 
































































































43 


44 
































































































44 


45 
































































































45 


46 
































































































46 


47 
































































































47 


48 














.. 


















































































48 



SPTM-4828 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 69 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

FUNCTION CONTROL CHART 



APPMrATinKi ^^fVzy Payroll 



PROGRAM NO.: 



DEMAND UNITS 


SCAN UNITS 


*o. 


TYPE OF UNIT 


TEST IN FROM 




DEMAND IN FROM 


DEMAND OUT TO 


NO. 


TYPE OF UNIT 


TO SCAN OUT 1 NO. 


TYPE OF UNIT 


TO SCAN OUT 


NO. 


TYPE OF UNIT 


TO SCAN OUT 


NOT READY 


READY 


INPUT 


OUTPUT 


1 


i3b cr/n 








STAflT j £>£1 


/A/ Aj^P 1 




1 






9 






17 






2 
















2 






10 






18 






3 
















3 






11 






19 






4 
















4 






12 






20 






5 






* L 










5 






13 






21 






6 
















6 






14 






22 






7 
















7 






15 






23 






8 
















8 






16 






24 







INPUT CONTROL LINES 



Pu Ti 



Pu TZ 



P u T7 



f>U Tf 



PU T/3 



Pa r& - /H 



OUTPUT CONTROL LINES 


NO 


FROM 


A 


OE Ji 


B 


4F J 


C 




D 




E 




F 




G 




H 




1 




J 





SYMBOLS FOR PROGRAMMING: 

Processes: PR 

Transfer. T 

Addition + 

Subtraction — 

Multiplication X 

Division -r 

Left Zero Elim LZE 

Compare C 

Channel Search = ECS 

Channel Search \ —UCS 

SHIFTS: 

Shift 2 Left 2L 

Shift 2 Right 2R 

Expand Prod. Shift EXS 



SP TM-4327 



START 
TO 



PZ */ 





SCAN 


OUTS 


NO. 




TO 












' ' .'■.' "••., " 















READ UNIT RECORD 


NO. 


IN FROM 


OUT TO 


1 






2 






3 






4 






5 






6 






7 






8 







CHANNEL SEARCH EQUAL 


NO. 


FROM OUT 
OF STEP NO. 


TO 1 F = VI 


TO 1 F = V2 


TO IF ^ 


1 


STPP Ji 


step ^ 


— 


STEP 3 


2 










3 










4 











ERROR CHECKS 


FROM 


TO 


ARITH. 


STEP RFPEBT 


lO'FLOW 


^raP 


+CFLOW 


&T&P 


PARITY 


£T*p 


ADDRESS 


JroP 



INDICATORS 


NO- 


FROM 


1 




2 




3 




4 




IND. 
SWITCH 


FROM |TO 


NO 
CHECK 





WRITE UNIT RECORD 


NO. 


IN FROM 


OUT TO 


1 


Ffia/n STEP31 


&£1 


2 






3 






4 






5 






6 






7 






8 







STEP CLEAR 


IN 


OUT 






CLEAR 
PROG.SEL. 




STEP REPEAT 


IN 
FROM 


PRtTti* ERMR 



BRANCHING 


NO. 


IN FROM STEP 


TO IF + 


TO IF - 


TO IF O 


1 


3 


ae i 


—— ' 


step y 


2 


4 


STFP -2 


— 


OSl 


3 


*r 


ST*P £ 


— 


a El 


4 


4 


•Sffr 7 


— 


&TEP it 


5 


9 


stpp /a 


. 


*ST£P if 


6 


ft 


STEP '* 


_— 


■$T&P J3 


7 


t-S 


STEp t£m 


STEP *f 


STEP A/ 


8 


23 


STFp 2if 




STPp Jh 


9 


2£ 


STEP 2£> 


STEP 2ST 


£T£P 29 


10 


-31 


STfP3^ 


SfTEP 3? 


STEP 3* 


11 


J*£ 


STFP 3% 


S^Ep 37 


STEP 3J 


12 










13 










14 










15 










16 










17 










18 











SELECTORS: 

Computor Selector T, - *^ 

Drum Selector •• A, - *^ 

Input-Output Selectors Si^S 10 

Common .. CT(#) or CA (ft) 

Select ST (ft) or SA (ft) 

Non-Select. NST(#)or NSA (#) 

Pick-Up PUT(#) or PUA (ft) 

Program Selector PSfPSu 

Delay of PS DPS,-DPS,o 

Imm. of PS IPSu-IPS 14 

Power of PS PS0,-*PS0, 6 

Drop Out of PS PSD0,-PSD0 u 

Ground of Sel GT(#) 

Computer Ground CG 

Demand Ground DG^DG, 

Scan Ground SGj^SG* 

Selector Hold SH 



Function Delay FD 

In FD 1 FD1,-FD1, 

In FD 2 FD2.-FD2, 

Out FD - FDOfFDO, 

STORAGES: 

Input-Output 000~'009 

Intermediate 10~*59 

Revolver Fo^F^ 

Channel Search Fields CSF ~*CSF, f 

DEMAND UNITS: 

Test In TST (ft) 

Test Out Ready TSTR (#) 

Test Out Not Ready TSTN (ft) 

Demand In Dl (ft) 

Demand Out Input DOI (ft) 

Demand Out Output DOO (ft) 



Scan Out SO,— SO*. 

Program Step In In ST (ft) 

Program Step Out From ST (ft) 

Out Expanders OE,— OE, 

In Branching BR,— BR )t 

+ Branch Out +BR,- BR„ 

- Branch Out -BR,— BR„ 

o Branch Out oBR,— BR„ 

Read Unit Record R|~*R| 

Write Unit Record W,-W, 

Equal Channel Search In ECSI (ft) 

Equal Channel Search Out=V, ..ECSV, (ft) 
Equal Channel Search Out=V, ..ECSV, (ft) 
Equal Channel Search Out * ....ECS* (ft) 

Unequal Channel Search In UCSI (ft) 

Unequal Channel Search Out =..UCS = (ft) 
Unequal Channel Search Out*..UCS * (#) 

Program Address Counter PAK 

Address Register ADR 





CHANNEL SEARCH UNEQUAL 


NO. 


FROM OU T 
OF STEP NO. 


TO IF = 


TO IF ^ 


1 








2 








3 








4 









OUT EXPANDERS 


NO. 


IN 


OUT 


OUT 


2>%2-*3 


OPC B 


£>E 3. 


2 


<P^/, LUf 


&p<in 


DT *l 


3 


•" ■ / # 






4 








5 








6 








7 








8 









FUNCTION DELAYS 


NO. 


IN 1 


IN 2 


OUT 


1 








2 








3 









ALTERNATE SWITCHES 


NO. 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SELECT 


1 








2 








3 








4 








5 








6 









CODE 


DISTRIBUTOR 


FROM VI 
OF STEPS 




FROM V2 
OF STEPS 




FROM R 
OF STEPS 




NO. 


TO 


NO. 


TO 


00 




26 




01 




27 




02 




28 




03 




29 




04 




30 




05 




31 




06 




32 




07 




33 




08 




34 




09 




35 




10 




36 




11 




37 




12 




38 




13 




39 




14 




40 




15 




41 




16 




42 




17 




43 




18 




44 




19 




45 




20 




46 




21 




47 




22 




48 




23 




49 




24 




>49 




25 








FROMOUTOF 1 
FUNCTIONS 1 




NO. 


TO 


NO. 


TO 







5 




1 




6 




2 




7 




3 




8 




4 




9 





FUNCTION SEQUENCE 


NO. 


SET 


PROBE 


OUT 


1 








2 









Code Distributor CD 

In CD V, CDV, 

In CD V 2 CDV, 

In CD R CDR 

Out CD 00 to > 49 CDoo-CD> 49 

In CD Pulse In CDP 

Out CD Pulse Out ~ CDP --CDP, 

Function Sequence Set ....FSS,— FSS, 

Function Sequence Probe FSP, —FSP, 

Function Sequence Out FSO,— FSO, 



ALTERNATE SWITCHES: 

Common SW,C -$W»C 

Select. SW,S -SW 4 S 

Non- Select SW,NS-SW*N* 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



VI - 70 



UNIVAC FILE-COMPUTER SYSTEM 

COMPUTER SELECTOR CONTROL CHART 



appi k-atidn- W££K^y 



■ WE£Kiy fay /a 



QLU PROGRAM NO. 



3Z 



PICK-UP FROM 


GROUND 
TO 


T# 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SELECT 


IPC a- O/Z.9 


CG- 


1 


\°i 


V<2_ STEP 31 


CT2L. 


\rc\> 1/7.9 


CG- 


2 


CT fea. 


NS Ti 


CT-7 






3a 

3b 


















4a 








4b 












5a 








5b 








\Pc$ 1/is 


CG- 


6a 


1) 


ST Z. 


\o 


6b 


13 


ST -7 


12. 


6c 


'5 


ST 8 


'¥ 


6d 


/7 


ST 13 


/6 


IPCc 3/zs 


CG- 


7 


CT6b 


NSTzl 


CTg 


IPc A *A* 


CG~ 


8 


crrfec. 


A/5T7 


CTl3 






9a 








9b 












10a 








10b 












11a 








lib 












12a 








12b 








12c 








12d 








IPCe %g 


CG- 


13 


CT<5 Jl. 


NS-rv 


CT/^f 


IPC* <*/*.« 


c^<5- 


14 


is 


NS~T,3 


20 






15a 








15b 












16a 








16b 












17a 








17b 












18a 








18b 








18c 








18d 












19 












20 












21a 








21b 












22a 








22b 












23a 








23b 












24a 








24b 








24c 








24d 









PICK-UP FROM 


GROUND 
TO 


T# 


SELECT 


COMMON 


NON-SELECT 






25 












26 












27a 








27b 












28a 








28b 












29a 








29b 












30a 








30b 








30c 








30d 












31 












32 












33a 








33b 












34a 








34b 












35a 








35b 












36a 








36b 








36c 








36d 












37 












38 












39a 








39b 












40a 








40b 












41a 








41b 












42a 








42b 








42c 








42d 












43 












44 












45a 








45b 












46a 








46b 












47a 








47b 












48o 








48 b 








48c 








48d 









PROGRAM SELECTS 


PS# 


IN FROM 


DELAY OUT TO 


D. O. FROM 


POWER TO 


1 










2 










3 










4 










5 










6 










7 










8 










9 










10 










PS# 


IN FROM 


IMMEDIATE OUT TO 


D. O. FROM 


POWER TO 


11 










12 










13 










14 










15 










16 











REMARKS: 



SP TM-432S 



DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 



•MMvaMw^vUMM 



*+**tmmmi\\ ' * 



315 FOURTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 10, N. Y. 



SPTM 4287 REV., 2 



PRINTED IN U.S.A.