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IHLVDIH THE MODERN THEATRE 





with statistics about M-G-M’s leadership in 
Stars, Hits, Producers, Directors, etc., based 
on votes, polls, surveys or what have you! 





FOR INSTANCE IN THIS 
ISSUE OF “BAROMETER” 


M-G-M: 20 HIT PICTURES 

(next company: 14) 

Here are the M-G-M productions which 
rated over 110% in Box-office survey: 

“Gone With the Wind” • “Honky Tonk” • “The Philadelphia 
Story” • “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” • “Ziegfeld Girl” 
“Shadow of the Thin Man” • “Life Begins For Andy Hardy” 
“Lady Be Good” • “Two-Faced Woman” • “Andy Hardy’s 
Private Secretary” • “Love Crazy” • “A Woman’s Face” 
“They Met In Bombay” • “Come Live With Me” • “When 
Ladies Meet” • “Billy the Kid” • “Flight Command” 
“Blossoms In the Dust” • “Men of Boys Town” • “Comrade X” 

ALSO IN SHORTS: Pete Smith; M-G-M Specials 

(such as “Tell-tale Heart**); FitzPatrick Traveltalks 


BUT WHY BORE YOU? 

All you know or want to know is that 

LEO IS FIRST AT THE BOX-OFFICE! 



u 




[r 




New\brkli^^&*Telegram 

and William Boehnel whose Big Ten 
included SERGEANT YORI^ 
ONE FOOT IN HEAVEN, THE 
MALTESE FALCON and MEET 
JOHN DOE with TARGET FOR 
TONIGHT named as the best doc- 
umentary. 


Tffi FILM CRITICS OF THE AIR 

who picked SERGEANT YORK a! 

HEAVED' 7 %^^^ IN 
falcon .the MALTESE 

best Tn '"H^ded among the five 

Gary 5oopL"%)Tr 

y ^ooper, (2) Bette Davis n) 

Humphrey Bogart. Ho-hum! ' ^ 


YOR^’ , a 

HE*AVEN au^ with THE 
for TG^I®2t con, meet 

IVIALTESEFALO) 


ners-up* 


THE MILWAUKEE JOURNAL 

whose readers picked ONE FOOT IN 
HEAVEN as their favorite picture with 
SERGEANT YORK and THEY DIED 
WITH THEIR BOOTS ON as runners- 
up, Bette Davis as the favorite actress, and 
Gary Cooper by an eyelash over Errol 
Flynn as favorite actor. A clean sweep for 
WARNERS! 





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a*"”” s reVaa*®'' 

witb ^ oVct'i^^ 

a«'«\S94l. 



iiAROMETER 

which “""geANt" YORK 

1041 with a conservative iv 

other WARNER releas^^--^ 

the hit class - all over 110 A- 


^om$ 0 to\)jtl ^inhirnf^^ 

^hose William 

lected SERntfA se- 

^HE SEA VORK, 

letter 'LHE 

PALCON Onlv^f^^'^^^PSE 

'Ve m J »W of ten 

Sapping... 


— Cr w *-p ^ 

p'’° , 

Remarkable Studio -WAR MR 
E* ONE EOOT IN ' 

my "«t-to.favoritepSf 7 ff^“ 
year; ,ta SERGEANT YORK 
deservedly the year-, « ® 

money maker; its thRv 
^ITH THEIR Ss 
wonderful horse o„ ® 

target EOR TONIGHT is ‘t 

course, the ^ is, of 

'■ts ^^ALTESE FAlioiV^-®'™’' 
year’s best thriller A ^ 

man who r^a the 

NER is the^f.P'^-^E TO DIN. 
seen all yet.” Eve 









otion c tu re ion 

1942; A Year of Stern Resolve 8 

The Production Trend for 1942 10 

The Effect of the War on Hollywood 12 

The Most Popular Shorts of 1941 14 

The First Year of Arbitration 16 

Blue Ribbon Winners of 1941 20 

Winners of Past Years 33 

Blue Ribbon Honor Roll Call 34 

The All-American Favorites of 1941 35 

The Western Favorites of 1941 39 

Grosses — Ratings at the Boxoffice 41 

Directors of the Year's Big Hits 50 

Producers of 194 1's Hit Films 52 

Writers of the Hits of the Year 55 

Feature Index of 1941 Releases 59 

Alphabetical Index of Features 89 

Review Digest of 1941 Features 89 

Shorts Index of 1941 Releases 97 

Looking Ahead at Coming Features 109 

Index of Advertisers 134 


W o d e rn Dk eat re Seel 


ion 


Structural Records of 1941 and a Forecast of the 


Near Future 140 

Pictorial Review of the Projects of 1941 141 

The Overall Pattern for Peace-Time Theatre Planning.... 158 

Probable Effect of Priorities on Theatre Property 

Improvement 162 

The Year Just Past in New Product Development 164 

"All Thru the House" — a Manual of Modern Thea- 
tre Maintenance 174 

The Key to Better Buying 177 

Theatre Equipment and Supply Dealers 184 

Index of Advertisers 134 


BOXOFFICE BUOMETER I94S 



5 . 


HIS YEAR, more than ever, information 
about motion pictures and those attributes that make for 
their showing and physical surroundings is of vital concern. 

The record of the past year, always a guide for the future, is 
accurately presented in the pages that follow. Too, there is 
presented a look ahead at forthcoming releases and at what 
may be expected in the mechanical and maintenance side of 
exhibition. While the view is necessarily limited by the world 
situation and its attendant uncertainties, the editors have found 
much of a definite nature — and all of it practical. In custom with 
past volumes, this sixth edition of BAROMETER is designed to give 
a maximum of information and service value in a minimum of space; 
concise, yet complete; helpful in the everyday functions of the exhibi- 
tor in particular — and of general interest and value to all branches of 
the motion picture industry. 




BAROMETER is published annually by Associated Publications at Ninth and Van Brunt, Kansas City, Mo. Ben Shlyen, Publisher; Maurice Kann, Editor- 
in-Chief; Raymond Levy, General Manager; Wm, G. Formby, Editor; Jesse Shlyen, Managing Editor; Ivan Spear, Hollyvirood Editor; J. Harry Toler, Modern 
Theatre Editor. Eastern Office: 9 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. Western Office; 6404 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. Central Office: 332 S. Michi- 
gan Ave., Chicago, 111. Other Associated Publications: BOXOFFICE, the National Film Weekly; THE PICTURE GUIDE, Published Annually; BOXOFFICE 
RECORDS, Published Annually; THE MODERN THEATRE, Published Monthly as a Section of BOXOFFICE. 




ern 


by RED KANN 

2^ T THIS writing the impress of 
■**' the pattern of an all-ocean 
war on the industry is ill-defined. 
No one can foretell with full accu- 
racy what the gigantic changeover 
from peacetime to wartime econ- 
omy will mean beyond arriving 
quickly at this conclusion: 

That in a nation dedicated, far and 
above all other issues to the win- 
ning of the war, motion pictures can- 
not remain altogether escapist in a 
very, very realistic world. 

Because it is not possible, this in- 
dustry will not escape inroads upon 
its manpower. It will not escape, 
nor will it want to, the urgency of 
demands upon its production facili- 
ties, its distribution and its exhibi- 
tion. For this is a time for national 
service, superimposed upon the com- 
mercial framework. It is also a time 
during which the industry will have 
in its hands an opportunity as broad 
as the horizons to demonstrate what 
it is capable of doing and the meas- 
ure of the doing. 

It ought to be self-evident that, 
perforce, there must be a tightening 
of the belt — everyone's belt in this 
industry and outside of it. In terms 
of the impending, much of the fol- 
lowing, therefore, is not at all re- 
mote. 

New theatres, of course, are out. 
Alterations of existing structures will 
be countenanced by the Office of 
Production Management in some in- 
stances, but those instances will be 
uncommon. Where existing ma- 
chinery functions, replacements may 
not be available. Where replace- 
ments in terms of new equipment, or 
parts, are essential, this need will 
be met in the light of war essentials 
and residues left over after war 
needs are met. 

Freon gas, required for air con- 
ditioning, is on the banned list; thus, 
air conditioning in theatres faces 
suspension for the duration. Acids 
normally applied in the inspection 
rooms of exchanges in the cleansing 
of prints are off the commercial mar- 
ket and a substitute, if possible, 
must be found. 

It is estimated there are seven 
thousand different items required in 
the routine operations of the indus- 
try. Questionnaires are in circula- 
tion, seeking to fix accurately what 
consumption totals were in normal 


times, so that OPM may know what 
the industry would like to have, then 
determine for it how much it may 
get. 

The demands on screen time, al- 
ready fairly heavy and consistent, 
inevitably will increase; probably 
sharply so. Most of the nation's the- 
atres are pledged to show regularly 
whatever shorts and trailers are ac- 
cepted by the War Activities Com- 
mittee — Motion Picture Industry. 
How any theatre, consistent with its 
place in the community and so up 
the line into its place in the fabric 
of the nation, can fail to exhibit this 
type of subject is a matter that 
passes understanding. 

The time, too, may come when 
theatremen may be asked to buy 
and play features, fashioned in the 
deliberate design of morale, so that 
by eye, as well as ear impact, sig- 
nificant phases of the national pol- 
icy may be conveyed to millions of 
the public. 

The time may come when what 
was once known as the prestige pic- 
ture, geared to the fighting order of 
the day but in terms of dignity and 
stature which usually do not pay off 
at the boxoffice, will make its ap- 
pearance. Exhibitor reaction to 
them as of another day, consequent- 
ly rates a serious reappraisal. 

The essentials entering into the 
manufacture of nitro-cellulose film, 
employed in production and the 
manufacture of release prints, like- 
wise enter into the manufacture of 
explosives. It has already been re- 
marked that shells alone will not 
win the war and that entertainment 
will play a most significant role as 
well. Undeniably true as it is, the 
demands of the war machine, nev- 
ertheless, may force upon the indus- 
try a prohibition in the volume of 
raw stock which, quickly, points up 
potential changes in the operations 
of the industry. 

For instance, it is not unlikely pro- 
duction may be curtailed. This, how- 
ever, need not create any undue 
concern, provided curtailment kills 
off a percentage of the mediocrities 
which continue to flow from Holly- 
wood. After all the conversation 
and the statements accumulating 
over the years, the Second World 
War may prove to be the avenue 
by which the levels of production 
turns out to be raised beyond its 
current, overall high. 


Several distributors, early os ore 
the deliberations looking toward 
the creation of a priorities standard 
for the industry, feel the materials 
pinch may result in a reduction in 
prints. It would follow that what 
was once on-the-nose deliveries of 
the show may be partially eclipsed 
by lack of print availability. This, 
in turn, may bring about a general 
practice of more extended runs, if 
exhibitors would keep their screen 
occupied. Similarly, any serious de- 
crease in production would bear on 
the double feature situation be- 
cause, on a mere counting of noses, 
there might not be enough product 
in circulation to maintain the dou- 
ble show standard. 

Even now, with the war slightly 
more than two months old, the ef- 
fect in Hollywood is evident, and 
will be more so as time progresses. 
There will be no attractions from 
John Ford, Frank Capra and Gar- 
son Kanin until the smoke of the 
battle ends in peace. It must be as- 
sumed, however, that this condition 
will grow, not shrink, and that the 
inevitable result will mark sharper 
and sharper inroads into the activ- 
ity of many of those whose produc- 
tions regularly reached the market 
in the past. 

And yet, in the face of the ac- 
tualities and in the light of the shape 
of things which may come, cross- 
sectional opinion of seasoned indus- 
try executives is that the industry 
faces good times, perhaps boom 
times. This viewpoint is built square- 
ly on the conviction the American 
public not only will stand by its 
oldtime patronage of motion pictures 
but further increase it as surcease 
from the rigors of war and the emo- 
tional reaction to bad news mili- 
tarily if it develops before the vic- 
tory is achieved. 

The future, consequently, appears 
to take on a double hue. On the 
one hand must be complete realiza- 
tion that ease in operations proba- 
bly will be replaced by mounting 
difficulties and this suggests the 
time to prepare for cushioning is 
now. On the other is the accepted 
forecast, that, despite the incon- 
veniences, business will improve so 
that, while the industry fulfills its in- 
escapable commitment of greater 
and greater national service, it will 
continue to go forward in terms of 
prosperity and influence. 


8 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 



From Universal in 1941-42 

Alfred Hitchcock 

With Priscilla Lane and Robert Cummings starring, 
Mr. Hitchcock, noted for suspense mastery, is directing 
a picture of sabotage in America.' This is a Frank 
Lloyd Productions, Inc., picture; Jack H. Skirball is the 
associate producer. 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


9 



Pr oductio 


n 


^rend /94-2 


by IVAN SPEAR 

H e may not prove to be as 
popular as his few predeces- 
sors — although his introduction into 
productional circles was certainly 
more ostentatious. What his doubt- 
ful genius will do to the quality of 
films and to their reception and 
revenue is, at year's beginning, a 
debatable question. But whether he 
is welcome or not, and regardless 
of how financially successful his ef- 
forts may prove, Hollywood's new- 
est four-way, writer-director-pro- 
ducer-actor Wonder Boy who ap- 
parently will be beaver-busy domi- 
nating 1942 film-making schedules is 
none other than Old Man Mars. 

No sooner had the reverberations 
subsided from the bombs which 
those little yellow men dropped on 
Pearl Harbor than it became ob- 
vious war subjects would outweigh 
almost all others on studios' agenda 
for the year. There will, of course, 
be the usual proportion of dramas, 
comedies, musicals, westerns, and a 
sprinkling of the perennial chapter- 
plays; and when they ultimately 
emerge from the assembly belt, 
they will probably be aligned in just 
about the same ratio which has pre- 
vailed in recent years. For 1942, 
however, there is one essential dif- 
ference: 

So many films wiU have been 
given a military-defense-prepared- 
ness background that large quan- 
tities of them will lose their normal 
and orthodox identity, to find classi- 
fication under the broader scope of 
"war" pictures. 

Adhering to standardized grad- 
ing, the signposts all point to the 
fact that the drama, standby al- 
ways, again will head the list of 
product to be manufactured during 
the year. Out of an approximate 
365 titles which, early in 1942, had 
been announced for production, 180 
— or very close to half — wiU be of 
the dramatic variety. Here it is to 
be noted, however, that 71 of them 
are recorded as war topics, covering 
every conceivable phase of the cur- 
rent conflict, as a glance at the titles 
of a few, cited as examples, w.Tl 
establish. The battle between the 
U, S, and Japan, most popular sub- 
ject, will be recorded in such at- 
tractions as "Wake Island," "Re- 
member Pearl Harbor" and "De- 
stroyer Men." Britain's campaign in 
North Africa will be recorded on cel- 
luloid in "Salute to Tobruk," The 


Burma Road figures prominently 
in several vehicles — notably in 
M-G-M's "A Yank on the Burma 
Road," already completed. In short. 
World War II films will cover the 
globe geographically — what with 
"Two Yanks in Trinidad," "Canal 
Zone," "Alaskan Outpost," "Sky 
Over China," "Dakar," "Watch on 
the Rhine" and scores of others. 

Not to be neglected, either, are 
features which will concern them- 
selves with internal conditions with- 
in the U. S. In the forefront, pre- 
liminary schedules indicate, will be 
subjects built around labor and the 
defense effort — "Night Shift," "Six 
Girls in Uniform" and "Washington 
Drama," to name but three of many. 
It may safely be said that not one 
single facet of the entire world con- 
flict and its many ramifications has 
been overlooked by studio produc- 
tion moguls. 

Apparently on the time-tried 
theory that the public, willing as it 
may be to accept serious and sober 
film fare, nevertheless will also de- 
mand entertainment in the lighter 
vein, Hollywood also will endeavor 
to meet that request. Hence, an es- 
timated 100 pictures will be manu- 
factured with the principal aim of 
extracting laughter — from sophisti- 
cated chuckles to down-to-earth guf- 
faws. For some unexplainable rea- 
son, however — especially when one 
considers the popularity and profits 
garnered by "Buck Privates," 
"Caught in the Draft" and other mili- 
tary comedies last season — pro- 
ducers seemingly intend to leave 
World War II more or less out of 
their output of celluloid humor. Thus 
far only 13 comedy titles have been 
announced which treat, in one man- 
ner or another, with the armed forces 
or current hostTities. These, pat- 
terned after the above-mentioned 
"Buck Privates" and others, include 
"Camp Nuts," "Henry Aldrich, 
ROTO," "My Favorite Spy," "Call 
Out the Marines" and others of simi- 
lar design. In the absence of any 
other rational explanation, it is 
probable that the comparative 
dearth of such military comedies is 
due to the bekef on the part of pro- 
duction leaders that war, as such, no 
longer is a laughing matter — that it 
must be treated seriously or not at 
all. 

Occupying third position — and far 
behind dramas and comedies — are 
musicals, once so important a cog 
in the Hollyv/ood production wheel. 


A mere handful — 30 — tunefilms are 
on schedules to date, and of them 
only five will concern themselves in 
any respect with the defense effort 
or the world aflame. Oddly enough, 
among the latter the U. S. Navy is 
by far the most popular background, 
what with "The Fleet's In," "Sweet- 
heart of the Fleet" and "Ship Ahoy" 
on schedule. Another, "Swing Shift," 
will probe into the subject of de- 
fense-plant workers, the plot to be 
interwoven with singing, dancing 
and production numbers. 

The international crisis notwith- 
standing, and come what may in the 
present gargantuan world struggle, 
there is to be no curtailment in the 
manufacture of what many film fig- 
ures and fans alike consider the in- 
dustry's life-blood — the western. 
Crooning cowboys and their com- 
edy side-kicks are going to ride the 
range from Montana to the Mexican 
border, rounding up rustlers and 
cleaning the lawless element out of 
frontier communities, in a minimum 
of 52 boots-and-saddle epics, a fig- 
ure that undoubtedly will be dou- 
bled, at least, before the final re- 
turns are in from all precincts dur- 
ing the year. A representative num- 
ber of them — such as "Cheyenne," 
"Jackass Mail," "The Stranger" and 
"Teach Me to Live" — will emerge 
bearing the super-western label in 
casts and productional treatment. 
The vast majority, however, will be 
of the reliable, lower-budgeted va- 
riety — and action patrons can here 
and now rest assured that such 
straight-shootin', hard-ridin' heroes 
as Gene Autry, Bill Boyd, Roy Rog- 
ers, Tim Holt, Johnny Mack Brown, 
Buck Jones and the rest of the prairie 
policemen are going to be much in 
evidence throughout 1942. 

Bringing up the rear of the pro- 
duction parade, 1942 model, are the 
chapter-plays. Time has an unfor- 
tunate habit of marching on, and 
leaving in its wake many a dated, 
however inherently sound, idea — 
and, in the motion picture industry, 
the melodramatic cliff-hanger seems 
to be the victim. Only three seria's 
were, as the year began, listed for 
production — a far cry from the days 
when Pearl White and Ruth Roland 
walked in the grandeur of screen 
immortality. Of the trio of serials, 
one — "G-Men vs. the Black Dragon" 
— will be concerned with the U. S.- 
Japanese War. The others, "Cap- 
tain Midnight," and "Dick Tracy vs. 
Crime," are adapted from newspa- 
per comic strips. 


10 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 



From Universal in 1941-42 

Walter Wanger 

The incomparable excellence that characterizes all 
Wanger productions will gleam from his '^Eagle 
Squadron/^ a topical drama of human adventure, the 
girls and the men in the R. A. F. fighting unit composed 
entirely of Americans. Screenplay is by Norman 
Reilly Raine from the Cosmopolitan Magazine story 
by C. F. Forrester, to be filmed by Walter Wanger 
Productions, Inc., for Universal release. 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


11 


DL Effect of tL War on 



by PHILIP JUERGENS 

UT of the welter of war's far- 
reaching effects on all phases 
of American life and following the 
refluence of the wild hysteria which 
accompanied the conflict's early 
days, it becomes increasingly ap- 
parent that the making of motion 
pictures will be less curtailed and 
hampered than most other major in- 
dustries. Two major factors are re- 
sponsible for the indications that the 
physical aspects of production will 
go through 1942 on something close 
to an even keel: 

First, it is a self-evident fact that 
comparatively few of the items 
which go into the manufacture of 
motion pictures are requisites for 
the making of armaments and other 
defense material. True, laboratories 
and processing plants which em- 
ploy certain chemicals in their treat- 
ment of film stock may feel some- 
thing of a pinch; and makeup de- 
partments probably will experience 
a shortage in the supply of cosmet- 
ics. These are among the excep- 
tions, however. 

Secondly, Hollywood has pro- 
ceeded thus far upon the theory in 
which there is no small amount of 
wishful thinking, that the manufac- 
ture, distribution and exhibition of 
motion pictures will be considered 
by the nation's war-lords a defense 
necessity to bolster and maintain 
American morale, both at home and 
in camp. Thus far there have been 
no signs of any other interpretation 
by the authorities. Of course, the 
industry cannot entirely escape. 
Already wartime conditions have 
inaugurated several changes from 
normal operations — none too severe, 
however — while still in the realm of 
conjecture are many others which 
may become actualities during en- 
suing months. 

Perhaps the most drastic, to date, 
of these changes has been the al- 
teration in working hours at the 
studios. Effective shortly after war 
was declared, the film plants began 
operating from 8:00 to 5:00 instead 
of from 9:00 to 6:00, to give all em- 
ployes, from highly-paid stars to 
technicians and backlot workers, 
time to reach their homes before 
dark, thus avoiding possible black- 
outs. 

Fearing espionage, sabotage and 
they knew not what else, studio 


managers — backed by an edict from 
the producers association — banned 
all visitors from all lots, save those 
on official business. Every studio 
increased its force of police and 
watchmen, some establishing a 24- 
hour-a-day guard. Likewise each 
lot formed emergency committees 
to be tutored in first-aid work and 
formulated procedures to be fol- 
lowed in case of air raids or other 
emergencies. Surveys were made of 
studio equipment, lighting and fire- 
fighting apparatus which might 
prove useful to civilian or military 
defense leaders. Most studios' 
transportation departments are on 
call at all times. Many workers and 
all visitors must submit packages, 
lunch kits and tools to inspectors 
upon entering the lots. One com- 
pany issued new identification cards 
to all employes, bearing their photo- 
graphs and fingerprints. 

Warner's Burbank plant con- 
structed four air-raid shelters, with 
auxiliary trenches, parapets and 
dugouts. RKO Radio blackened the 
windows in all studio buildings; 20th 
Century-Fox installed battery-oper- 
ated auxiliary lighting systems on 
all sound stages. Night location 
work was called off in many in- 
stances. Two scheduled gala pre- 
mieres — Walt Disney's "Dumbo" and 
20th Century-Fox's "How Green Was 
My Valley" — were cancelled be- 
cause defense authorities urged the 
assembly of large crowds be elimi- 
nated. 

These aforementioned activities, 
all of which transpired within a 
month after the Pearl Harbor inci- 
dent, are as nothing, however, as 
compared to the literally endless 
speculations and surmises, ranging 
from the probable to the fantastic, 
which made the rounds during the 
early days of America's showdown 
fight with the Axis. Among them; 

That the production center might 
be moved inland — possibly to Ari- 
zona or New Mexico — where it 
would be less vulnerable to attack 
from the skies. The feasibility of the 
gargantuan project has been dis- 
cussed many times in the past, but 
the manner in which it might be ac- 
complished remains unanswered. 

That a shortage of power is en- 
tirely possible, a development which 
would cripple production. 

The probability that a shortage of 
skilled labor will ensue because 


many studio employes are of mili- 
tary age and qualifications. 

The ban on the sale of new tires 
— unless certain studio vehicles are 
given priority rating — is expected to 
have a farflung influence on film- 
plant operations. The lack of rubber 
may abolish all location trips and 
render useless hundreds of studio 
trucks, motorcycles and delivery 
wagons. That same lack may pro- 
vide considerable of a transporta- 
tion problem for thousands of film 
employes; many of whom, in this 
community of great distances, live 
from five to fifteen miles away from 
their work. The answer may be 
found, of course, in the establish- 
ment of a centrally-operated bus 
system, or a return to the era of the 
Gay Nineties through the extended 
use of bicycles. 

There has been plenty of discus- 
sion about the comparative vul- 
nerability of the various studios to 
air attack. Warner, Republic, Uni- 
versal and Disney are perilously 
close to Lockheed's airplane factory 
and — from the air — look remarkably 
like that defense plant. M-G-M and 
20th Century-Fox are uncomfortably 
near to Douglas. 

Another subject of considerable 
debate is that concerning what the 
war will do as regards ever-present 
labor controversies within the indus- 
try. Since all Hollywood has pledged 
100 per cent cooperation with the 
administration, it appears local 
unions will emulate the example set 
by their brethren in defense indus- 
tries by calling off all strikes for the 
duration. Indeed, several crafts 
hereabouts have already agreed to 
waive overtime and other wage pen- 
alties caused by air-raid alarms and 
other emergencies. 

All of the above possibilities, 
which were prognosticated during 
the early days of the hostilities, are 
no closer to realization now, after 
two months of war, than they were 
then. Ignoring them, and consider- 
ing only the effects that thus far 
have actually been felt, studio rou- 
tine and operations, productional 
methods and day-by-day procedure 
in the film colony are surprisingly 
little different from what they were 
during 1941. Further, there is con- 
siderable of a probability that cur- 
rent conditions will prevail, at least 
throughout the first year of Ameri- 
ca's military operations. 



12 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 



From Universal in 1941-42 

Gregory La Cava 

Irene Dunne is the star of Mr. La Cava’s production 
for Universal, entitled tentatively, '^Sheltered Lady,^^ 
which will be produced and directed by Mr. LaCava. 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


13 


^lie ^opuicif ^LopIa / 94 / 


by JOSEPH PRIORE 

N THE past year the short subject 
came into its own. Not that it 
ever was something that lurked on 
the fringes of exhibitor-patron hesi- 
tation to recognize it as a prime fig- 
ment in the composition of a screen 
program. 

Retrospectively, the past season 
and the new one which is well un- 
der way have been times of emer- 
gence for the briefies. Not only has 
timeliness of subject helped this 
movement along but the nature of 
the product itself, superior in many 
cases to the main attractions, has 
been a contributing factor. 

The short subject is important in 
interpreting the war; it has provided 
entertainment which is vital in this 
hour of defense projects, civilian 
morale building, necessary diversion 
from problems which might psycho- 
logically harm the civilian populace. 

More and more effort was ex- 
pended along exploitation lines to 
the remunerative benefit of the ex- 
hibitor. Texas, which leads the 
country in any showmanship ag- 
gressiveness, has the Interstate Cir- 
cuit. This circuit has Mrs. Besa 
Short. Never was a woman more 
aptly named. And she has done her 
job well. 

Warners, pioneers in any number 
of revolutionary forms of picture en- 
tertainment, brought the Monte Car- 
lo Ballet Russe to the screen, in 
Technicolor. Technical opinion and 
choreographic criticism by the nu- 
merous experts in the dance field, 
notwithstanding, the films will cer- 
tainly open up a new field of ma- 
terial and entertainment. 

Travel films took a beating this 
year. Foreign travel, that is. Most 
of the footage in this category was 
home stuff with a few excursions 
into Canada, Mexico and South 
America. What there was of it was 
good, as is the usual case. 

One thought that should be 
brought to mind from time to time is 
the inclusion of a 20-minute western 
musical into the program. These 
items have all the required reading 
into the script of full-length product 
and, with inconsequential matter 
clipped away, give in one-third the 
time what audiences get in the full- 
time article. 

Elsewhere on this page there is 
listed the ten best series and nine 
rating honorable mention. It seems 




The Ten Best Series 

The ten outstanding short 
subject series of 1941, as se- 
lected by BOXOFFICE: 

1 — Walt Disney Cartoons 

(RKO) 

2 — Merrie Melodies 

(Warner) 

3 — Looney Tunes (Warner) 

4 — Pete Smith Specialties 

(M-G-M) 

5 — ^M-G-M Specials (such as 
"The Telltale Heart") 

6 — March of Time (RKO) 

7 — Technicolor Specials 

(Warner). These include, 
as examples, "The Gay 
Parisian," "Tanks Are 

Coming" and "Here Comes 
the Cavalry" 

8 — Two-reel Musicals 
(Universal) 

9 — FitzPatrick Traveltalks 

(M-G-M) 

10 — Sportlights (Paramount) 
HONORABLE MENTION: 

Stranger Than Fiction (Universal) 
Miniatures (M-G-M) 

Information Please (RKO) 

Adventures of a Newsreel Camera- 
man (20th-Fox) 

Sports Parade (Warner) 

Headliners (Paramount) 

News World of Sports (Columbia) 
Broadway Brevities (V/arner) 

Ed Thorgersen Sports (20th-Fox) 


necessary to qualify these ratings in 
detail: 

In brief: Walt Disney and his staff 
continued to create cartoons out of 
this world with their animation of 
the foibles and quirks of the best 
character menagerie in the field. 

Merrie Melodies rate because of 
"Bugs Bunny." And the fellow who 
cooks up the scripts for this series 
rates bows. 

Looney Tunes feature "Porky." 
They are the best black and white 
entertainment for reasons similar to 
the companion series noted above. 

Pete Smith won an Academy 
Award with his "Quicker 'N Wink" 
dealing with stroboscopic photog- 
raphy. Science took a good-natured 
kidding and audiences saw things 
never before shown. And Smith, in 
his other offerings, continued to de- 
liver fresh gags, novel humor and 
what it takes. 

M-G-M specials included "The 
Tell-Tale Heart," after Poe, an am- 
bitious project that is good for a 
long haul. 


The March of Time, controversial 
at times and at variance with 
other popular thought on its themes, 
came through handsomely with war 
material and its "Battlegrounds of 
the Pacific" was perfectly timed. 

Warner Technicolor Specials — the 
ballet shorts and a series on the 
various divisions of the armed forces 
— waved the flag for good effect and 
provided what was necessary for 
all concerned. 

Universal's two-reel musicals got 
in the groove. Name bands banged 
out the tunes. Fresh, youthful faces 
and smart handling of the produc- 
tion end brought this series into 
prominence. 

James FitzPatrick in his Travel- 
talks concerned himself with the 
American and Canadian scene. Also 
he ventured into South America. As 
usual his Technicolor photography 
was a solace to the eye. . 

Paramount's Sportlights, with Ted 
Husing handling his chores capably 
and entertainingly on the sound- 
track, topped off the list of sport 
series. Equally at home in' water, 
among dogs, lacrosse bats and kin- 
dred appurtenances, Husing held his 
end up creditably. 

Stranger Than Fiction in the hon- 
orable mention group is probably 
one of the oldest series in the field. 
Now nearing its hundredth number 
this series has continued to supply 
year in and out an amazing assort- 
ment of oddities. Some are laugh- 
able, some rate cheers. Metro's 
Miniatures, such as "Triumph With- 
out Drums," speak for themselves. 

Information Please continued to 
deliver high calibre footage with the 
smart style as the first issue. The 
Adventures of a Newsreel Camera- 
man was superbly filmed material 
of varied interest. Warner's Sports 
Parade covered a varied field for 
the thrilling utmost. Paramount's 
Headliners were handsome as band 
shorts and The Copacabana Revue 
was a standout. 

Columbia's News World of Sports, 
with Bill Stern perched on the 
soundtrack, covered the field effi- 
ciently, entertainingly. Warner's 
Broadway Brevities was an assorted 
mixture of sport thrills, drama and 
music. "At the Stroke of Twelve" 
was really something, also "Min- 
strel Days." Ed Thorgersen's sport 
reels for 20th-Fox were breezy, col- 
orful moments narrated in slick style. 


14 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 



From Universal in 1941-42 

Frank Lloyd 

Two more pictures which Mr. Lloyd will produce for 
Universal ore '^The Spoilers'^ and ^^River Lady.^" 
Marlene Dietrich, Randolph Scott and John Wayne 
are starred in ''The Spoilers," the Rex Beach novel, 
which Ray Enright will direct with Lee Marcus as 
associate producer. Mr. Lloyd will personally produce 
and direct "River Lady," with Jack H. Skirball as 
associate producer 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


15 



l^ear 


n 


by WILLIAM G. FORMBY 

NINVITED and, in some quarters, 
undesired, arbitration came in 
with the consent decree that called 
a truce in the government's anti- 
trust case against the five theatre- 
owning majors. 

There were three complaints 
against it from the start: 

1. No power was given to the 
boards to enforce their decisions. 

2. None of the personnel, nation- 
ally or locally, was familiar with the 
industry. Appeals board members, 
clerks and arbitrators were delib- 
erately selected with an eye to com- 
plete lack of previous knowledge of, 
and experience in, the trade. 

3. While voluntary, it reached 
into situations and affected third- 
party investments and personalities 
that had asked no change and had 
no voice in the formation of the 
system. 

Despite its handicaps and its com- 
paratively cool reception, arbitra- 
tion did achieve a rather thriving 
growth. Operating under a cloud of 
pretty general dissatisfaction (per- 
haps disaffection is a better term), 
it nevertheless settled a number of 
long-standing grievances that had 
refused to yield to persuasion or 
litigation. And it afforded a method 
of settling disputes of certain types 
without the necessity of recourse to 
courts. 

During the first 12 months the sys- 
tem operated (it began to function 
in February), a total of 168 cases 
were filed with the local tribunals. 
Complaints on clearance predomi- 
nated, constituting 118 cases, or over 
70 per cent of the whole. The 
"some run" clause drew 28 cases, 
four were filed over "specific run," 
and 18 others were combination 
complaints. 

Of the 168 filed, 42 were with- 
drawn because they were settled, or 
because the complainants under- 
went a change of heart. Forty-eight 
cases were pending before the local 
boards as the year ended. Twenty- 
three awards were appealed, of 
which 17 were decided. 

The exhibitors got an almost even 
shake with the distributors in the 
local board decisions, 37 awards go- 
ing to them and 41 to the distribu- 
tors. Concessions in cases that for- 
mally were listed as distributor vic- 
tories, however, increased the actual 
exhibitor benefit. 

New York turned in the highest 
number of cases filed, 31. Of these, 


25 related to clearance; eight were 
withdrawn; seven were won by ex- 
hibitors, three by distributors, and 
1 1 complaints were pending. Two 
cases were appealed, one of the 
awards going to the exhibitor and 
the other case awaiting action. 

Seattle alone turned in a blank, 
not a case coming before it. 

The attack of Northwest Allied 
against the consent decree, via legis- 
lation designed to knock out the 
blocks-of-five provision and substi- 
tute full-line offerings with a 20 per 
cent cancellation privilege, also 
looked obliquely at arbitration. 
Several majors precipitated a test 
case by violating the law, and pro- 
ceedings challenging its constitu- 
tionality were in progress. 

As the system approached its sec- 
ond year, the department of justice 
through Robert L. Wright, assistant 
attorney general, who prosecuted 
the anti-trust case that armisticed in 


the decree, issued a significant re- 
port on the first year of operation 
under the document. 

Experience with arbitration has 
shown a number of defects in the 
system set up under the decree, 
Wright reported, and cited one of 
them as the lack of familiarity with 
the industry by the arbitration per- 
sonnel. This condition, he said, was 
"deliberately created by the framers 
of the decree in an effort to secure 
the impartiality of decision which 
has admittedly been achieved — 
which has to some extent given 
added weight to the superior pre- 
sentation of their cases generally 
enjoyed by the distributors through 
their better legal talent and wider 
experience than that of the ordi- 
nary exhibitor. 

"It is, of course, impossible to 
judge the extent to which this factor 
has weighted the system against 
(Continued on page 134) 


Of the 168 cases filed in the first full year of arbitration — that year ended Janu- 
ary 31 — there were 118, or slightly over 70 per cent, dealing with clearance. That 
percentage clambers still higher to slightly over 80 per cent if 17 of 18 additional 
cases which included clearance as well as other decree sections, such as some run, 
ivithholding prints, desigriated runs and forced buying, are calculated. 

This is the tally of the first 12 months, in terms of total cases filed'. 


Clearance 


Some Run 

Designated Run 



City (Section VIII) 

(Section VD 

(Section X) 


Combination Cases Total 

Albany 

3 





3 

Atlanta 

2 





2 

Boston 

7 

1 




8 

Buffalo 

8 

1 


1 

some run, clearance 






1 

clearance, designated run 

11 

Charlotte 

1 

1 




2 

Chicago 

10 

1 


1 

clearance, designated run 

12 

Cincinnati .... 

3 



1 

clearance, designated run 

4 

Cleveland 

1 

1 




2 

Dallas 

3 

1 


1 

some run, clearance 

5 

Denver 

1 

1 


1 

clearance, withhold- 


Des Moines.... 

2 

1 



ing prints 

3 

Detroit 

5 


1 

1 

some run, clearance 

o 





1 

designated run, clear- 







ance 

8 

Indianapolis .. 

1 

1 




2 

Kansas City.. 

3 

1 




4 

Los Angeles.... 

4 





4 

Memphis 


2 




2 

Milwaukee .... 

2 





2 

Minneapolis.... 


3 


1 

some run, clearance 

4 

New Haven.... 

4 

2 


1 

clearance, withhold- 







ing prints 

7 

New Orleans 


4 


1 

clearance, designated run 

5 

New York 

25 

1 

1 

1 

some run, clearance. 







designated run 






2 

clearance, designated run 






1 

some run, clearance 

31 

Okla. City 


1 




1 

Omaha 

1 





1 

Philadelphia .. 

15 

1 


1 

some run, clearance 

17 

Pittsburgh .... 



2 

1 

some run, designated 







run, forced buying 

3 

Portland 

1 

1 




2 

St. Louis 

2 

3 




5 

Salt Lake City 

1 





1 

San Francisco 

4 





4 

Seattle 







Washington.... 

9 



1 

clearance, designated run 

i’6 

Totals 1 

18 

23 

.1 

18 

168 



16 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 



the elusive romantic adventurer who’s a one-man 
invasion inside Germany — the man whose 
wit has the Nazis at their wits’ end! 


Produced and Directed by Leslie Howard 

RELEASED THRU UNITED ARTISTS 


FOR DEFENSE— BUY UNITED STATES 
★ ★ SAVINGS BONDS AND STAMPS ★ ★ 




If 

Wm • • • mtm 

is Victory and 
MISTER V is for every 
showman who's looking for 


C xiuMSAxi SmaJU 

presents 


■with 

MARY MORRIS 

FRANCIS 

SULLIVAN 

HUGH 

McDermott 



,© Walt Disney Productions 





is aiven each month to the film receiving the majority 
vote of the National Screen Council whose selection is 
governed by outstanding merit and suitability to whole- 
family entertainment. Members of the Council include 
leading motion picture editors, motion picture reviewing 
committee of the International Federation of Catholic 
Alumnae, state motion picture chairmen of the General 
Federation of Women's Clubs, Better Films Councils and 
other civic organizations, constituting a nation-wide, 
cross-section of critical and public entertainment opinion. 




January 

Philadelphia Story 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

February 

Virginia 


March 

The Lady Eve 

Paramount 

April 

Men of Boys Town 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

May 

That Hamilton Woman! 

United Artists 

June 

I Wanted Wings 

Paramount 

July 

Caught in the Draft 

Paramount 

August 

Blossoms in the Dust 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

September.. 

Citizen Kane 

RKO Radio 

October 

Sergeant York 

Warner Bros. 

November.. 

One Foot in Heaven 

Warner Bros, 

December.. 

H. M. Pulhom, Esq. 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 



20 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 




Cast of Characters 


C. K. Dexter Haven. ...C ary Grant 
Tracy Lord.... Katharine Hepburn 
Macaulay Connor.... James Stewart 

Elizabeth Imbrie Ruth Hussey 

George Kittredge John Howard 

Uncle Willie Roland Young 


Seth Lord John Halliday 

Margaret Lord Mary Nash 

Dinah Lord Virginia Weidler 

Sidney Kidd Henry Daniell 

Edward Lionel Pape 

Thomas Rex Evans 


JANUARY 

WINNER 



Production Staii 


Executive Producer 

Louis B. Mayer 

Prodncer.... Joseph L. Mankiewicz 

Director George Cukor 

Screenplay 

Donald Ogden Stewart 

Based on Play by Philip Barry 

Produced by.... Theatre Guild, Inc. 
Photography 

Joseph Ruttenberg, A.S.C. 


Musioal Score Franz Waxman 

Recording Director 
Douglas Shearer 

Art Director Cedric Gibbons 

Associate Art Director 

Wade B. Rubottom 

Set Decorations. ...Edwin B. Willis 

Gowns by Adrian 

Hair Styles by.. ..Sydney Guilaroff 

Film Editor Frank Sullivan 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


21 


FEBRUARY 

WINNER 




Cast of Characters 

Charlotte Dunterry Pretty Elliott Carolyn Lee 

Madeleine Carroll Connie Potter Marie Wilson 

Stonewall Elliott Thomas. Paul Hurst 

Fred MacMurray Carter Francis.... Tow. Rutherfurd 

Norman Williams Ezechial Leigh Whipper 

Stirling Hayden Ophelia Louise Beavers 

Theo Clair mont.. Helen Broderick Joseph Darby Jones 


Production Staff 


Producer -Director 

Edward H. Griffith 

Based on a Story by 

Edward H. Griffith and 

Virginia Van Upp 

Screenplay Virginia Van Upp 

Directors of Photography 

Bert Glennon, A.S.C. 

William V. Shall, A.S.C. 

Process Photography 

Farciot Edouart, A.S.C. 


Music Score Victor Young 

Art Directors Hans Dreier, 

Ernst Fegte 

Edited by Eda Warren 

Sound Recording 

Hugo Grenzbach, 

Walter Oberst 

Costumes Edith Head 

Technicolor Art Director 
Natalie Kalmus 

Associate Henri Jaffa 


22 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 





THE LADY EVE 


A Paramount Production 


Cast of Characters 


Jean 

Barbara Stanwyck 

Muggsy 

...William Demarest 

Charles ... 

Henry Fonda 

Gerald 

Melville Cooper 

"Colonel” 

Harrington 

Charles Coburn 

Martha 

Mrs. Pike 

...Martha O’Driscoll 

Janet Beecher 

Mr. Pike.. 

Eugene Pallette 

Burrows 

Robert Greig 

Sir Allred McGlennan Keith 

Eric Blore 

Gertrude 

Pike's Chef... 

Dora Clement 

Luis Alberni 


MARCH 

WINNER 



Production Staff 


Producer Paul Jones 

Written and 

Directed by Preston Sturges 

Screenplay Based on 

Story by Monckton Hoffe 


Sound Mixer Harry Lindgren 

Film Editor Stuart Gilmore 

Art Director Hans Dreier 

Photographer 

Victor Milner, A.S.C. 


BOXOmCE BAROMETER 


-1 





23 



APRIL 

WINNER 




Cast of Characters 


Father FZanagran... .Spencer Tracy 

Whitey Marsh Mickey Rooney 

Pee Wee Bobs Watson 

Ted Hartley Larry Nunn 


Mo Kahn Sidney Miller 

The Judge Addison Richards 

Roger Gorton Lloyd Corrigan 

Bradford Stone George Lessey 


Flip Darryl Hickman 

Mr. Maitland Henry O’Neill 

Mrs. Maitland Mary Nash 

Dave Morris Lee J. Cobb 


Burton Robert Emmett Keane 

Guard Arthur Hohl 

Superintendent Ben Weldon 

Mrs. Fenely Anne Revere 


Production Staii 


I 


Executive Producer 

Louis B. Mayer 

ProdMcer.... John W. Considine Jr. 

Director Norman Taurog 

Original Screenplay 
James Kevin McGuinness 

Musical Score.. ..Herbert Stothart 


Director of Photography 

Harold Rosson, A.S.C. 

Recording Director 

Douglas Shearer 

Art Director Cedric Gibbons 

Associate Harry McAfee 

Set Decorations. B. Willis 

Film Editor.. ..F rederick Y. Smith 


1 


24 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 



Cast of Characters 


Emma, Lady Hamilton 

Vivien Leigh 

Lord iVeZsora... Laurence Olivier 

Sir William Hamilton 

Alan Mowbray 

Mrs. Cadogan-Lyon 

Sara Allgood 

Lady Nelson Gladys Cooper 

Captain Hardy ....Henry Wilcoxon 
A Street Girl Heather Angel 


Reverend Nelson 

Halliwell Hobbes 

Lord Spencer Gilbert Emery 

Lord Keith Miles Mander 

Josiah Ronald Sinclair 

King of Naples Louis Alberni 

Queen of Naples Norma Drury 

Gavin Olaf Hytten 

Lady Spencer.. ..Juliette Compton 
Captain Troubridge 

Guy Kingsford 


MAY 

WINNER 



Production Staff 


Producer-Director 
Alexander Korda 

Original Screenplay 

Walter Reisch and 

R. C. Sherriff 

Assistant Director.. ..Walter Mayo 

Art Director Vincent Korda 

Associate 

Lyle Reynolds Wheeler 

Cinematographer 

Rudolph Mate, A.S.C. 

Costumes Rene Hubert 


Musical Director Miklos Rozsa 

Special E//ecZs.... Lawrence Butler 

Special Sequences 
photographed by 
Edward Linden, A.S.C. 

Set Decorations Julia Heron 

Supervising Film Editor 

William Hornbeck 

Sound Technician 

William H. Wilmarth 

Makeup Artist 

Blagoe Stephanof?’ 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


25 




Cast of Characters 


Jeff Ray Milland 

Al William Holden 

Tom Wayne Morris 


Captain Himter.... Brian Donlevy 

Caroline Constance Moore 


Sally Veronica Lake 

Masters Phil Brown 


Sandbag Riley.... Harry Davenport 

Cadet Captain Richard Webb 

Flight Commander. ...Richard Lane 


Production Staff 


Producer Arthur Hornblow 

Director Mitchell Leisen 

Screenplay Richard Maibaum, 

Lt. Beirne Lay jr., Sig Herzig 


From the book 

by Beirne Lay jr. 

Sound Mixer Gene Merritt 

Film Editor Hugh Bennett 


Based on story 

by Eleanore Griffin, 

Frank Wead 


Art Directors Hans Dreier, 

Robert Usher 

Photographer.... I jEO Tover, A.S.C. 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


Cast of Characters 

Don Gilbert Bob Hope Yetta Ferike Boros 

Tony Fairbanks.. Tio^OTHY Lamour „ 

Margie Phillis Ruth 

Steve Lynne Overman 



JULY 

WINNER 



Bert Eddie Bracken 

Col. Peter Fairbanks 

Clarence Kolb 

Sergeant Burns Paul Hurst 


Cogswell Irving Bacon 

Director Arthur Loft 


Recruiting Sergeant 

Edgar Bearing 


Production Staii 


Producer B. G. Be Sylva 

Director Bavid Butler 


Original Story 

and Screenplay. ...Yi^RRY Tugend 

Additional Dialogue 

Wilkie C. Mahoney 


Sound Mixer Gene Merritt 

Film Editor Irene Morra 

Art Directors Hans Breier, 

Haldane Bouglas 

Photography 

Charles Schoenbaum, A.S.C. 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


27 





AUGUST 

WINNER 




Cast of Characters 


Edna Gladney Greer Garson 

Sam Gladney Walter Pidgeon 

Dr. Max Brestor... .F elix Bressart 


Charlotte Marsha Hunt 

Mrs. Kahly Pay Holden 

Mr. Kahly Samuel S. Hinds 

Mrs. Keats Kathleen Howard 

Mr. Keats George Lessey 

Allan Keats William Henry 

Judge Henry O’Neill 

Damon John Eldredge 


Zeke Clinton Rosemond 

Cleo Theresa Harris 

G. Harrington 

Hedger Charlie Arnt 

Mrs. Gilworth 

Cecil Cunningham 

Mrs. Loring Ann Morriss 

Sammy Richard Nichols 

Helen Mary Taylor 

Tony Pat Barker 

La Verne Marc Lawrence 


Production Staff 


Executive Producer 


Louis B. Mayer 

Producer Irving Asher 

Director Mervyn LeRoy 

Screenplay Anita Loos 

Story by Ralph Wheelwright 


Directors of Photo- 
graphy. .Karl Freund, ASC., and 
W. Howard Green, ASC. 

Color Director Natalie Kalmus 

Associate Henri Jaffa 

Musical Score by 

Herbert Stothart 


Recording Director 

Douglas Shearer 

Art Director Cedric Gibbons 

Associate Urie McCleary 

Set Decorations by 

Edwin B. Willis 

Special Effects by 

Warren Newcombe 

Gowns by Adrian 

Men’s Costumes by Gile Steele 

Hair Styles by 

Sydney Guilaroff 

Make-up Created by.... Jack Dawn 
Film Editor George Boemler 



28 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


/ 



Cast of Characters 


Citizen Kane Orson Welles 

Jededmh Leland.... Joseph Gotten 

Susan Alexander 

Dorothy Comingore 

Mr. Bernstein Everett Sloane 

James W. Gettys Ray Collins 

Walter Parks Thatcher 
George Coulouris 

Mrs. Kane (Mother) 

Agnes Moorhead 

Raymond Paul Stewart 


Emily Norton Ruth Warrick 

Herbert Carier.. ..Erskine Sanford 

Thompson William Alland 

Matiste Fortunio Bonanova 

Headwaiter Gus Schilling 

Mr. Rawlston Philip Van Zandt 

Miss Anderson Georgia Backus 

Kane’s father Harry Shannon 

Kane III Sonny Bupp 

Kane (age 8) Buddy Swan 


SEPTEMBER 

WINNER 



Production Staff 


Director-Producer. ...Orson Welles 

Original Screenplay 

Orson Welles 

Herman Mankiewicz 

Photography 

Gregg Toland, A.S.C. 

Music Composed and 

Conducted by 

Bernard Heermann 


Special Effects 

Vernon L. Walker, A.S.C. 

Art Director....VkN Nest Polglase 

Associate Art Director 
Perry Ferguson 

Editing Robert Wise 

Recording Bailey Fesler 

James G. Stewart 

Set Decorations. ...OhRREEE Silvera 
Costumes Edward Stevenson 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 



29 






■V 


t 


OCTOBER 

WINNER 




Cast of Characters 


Alvin C. York...., Gary Cooper 

Pastor Rosier Pile 

Walter Brennan 

Grade Williams Joan Leslie 

“Pusher” Ross George Tobias 

Major Buxton Stanley Ridges 

Mother Yorfc.. M argaret Wycherly 

Ike Botkin..... Ward Bond 

Buck Lipscomb Noah Beery Jr. 

Rosie York June Lockhart 

George York Dickie Moore 


Zeke Clem Bevans 

Lem Howard Da Silva 

Cordell Hull. .Charles Trowbridge 
Capt. Danforth... .Harvey Stephens 

Bert Thomas David Bruce 

German Major Charles Esmond 

Sergeant Early Joseph Sawyer 

Sergeant Harry Parsons 

Pat Flaherty 

Zeb Andrews. .Robert Porterfield 
Nate Toinkins.... Erville Alderson 


Production Staff 


Executive Producer 


Hal B. Wallis 

Producer Jesse L. Lasky 

Director Howard Hawks 


Original Screenplay 

Abem Finkel, Harry Chandlee, 
Howard Koch and John Huston 
Based upon the diary of 

Sergeant York 

as edited by Tom Skeyhill 

Director of Photog- 
raphy Sol Polito. A.S.C. 

Battle Sequences Photographed 


by Arthur Edeson. A.S.C. 

Art Director John Hughes 

Film Editor William Holmes 

Sound by ....Oliver S. Garret,son 
Technical Advisors 

Donoho Hall, Paul Walters, 
Capt. F.A.R., William Yetter 
Orchestral Arrangements 

by Hugo Friedhofer 

Musical Director 

Leo F. Forbstein 

Makeup Artist Perc Westmore 

Music by Max Steiner 


"7 



30 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 




Cast of Characters 


William Sperice Fredric March 

Hope Morris Spence 

Martha Scott 

Mrs. Lydia Sandoii;.. B eulah Bondi 
Preston Thurston. .Genz Lockhart 
Eileen Spence.... Elisabeth Fraser 
Elias Samso7i Harry Davenport 

Mrs. Preston Thurston 

Laura Hope Crew.s 

Clayton Poifer.... Grant Mitchell 


Dr. John Poiner.... Moroni Olsen 
Hartzell Spence.... Frankie Thomas 

Dr. Harrigan Jerome Cowan 

Joh7i E. Morris. ...Ernest Cossart 
Mrs. Morris Nana Bryant 

Eileen Spence (as a girl) 

Carlotta Jelm 

Hartzell Spence (as a boy) 

Peter Caldwell 

Fraser Spence Casey Johnson 


NOVEMBER 

WINNER 



Production Staff 


Executive Producer 

Jack L. Warner 

Director Irving Rapper 

Screenplay Casey Robinson 

Original Story.. ..Hartzell Spence 

Director of Photography 

Charles Rosher, A.S.C. 

Film Editor Warren Low 

Art Director Carl Jules Weyl 

Dialogue Director Eddie Blatt 

Montages Don Siegel 


Sound by Francis J. Scheid 

Makeup Artist Perc Westmore 

Technical Advisor: 

Dr. Norman Vincent Peale, 
Minister of the Marble Colle- 
giate Church, New York City. 

Gowns by Milo Anderson 

Orchestral Arrangements 

Hugo Friedhofer 

Musical Director 

Leo F. Forbstein 

Music by Max Steiner 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


31 




\ 


\ 


DECEMBER 

WINNER 




Cast of Characters 


Marvin Myles Hedy Lamarr 

Harry Pulham Robert Young 

Kay Motford Ruth Hussey 

Mr. Pulham, sr Charles Coburn 

Bill King Van Heflin 

Mrs. Pulham Pay Holden 

Mary Pulham. ...BoniTk Granville 


Mr. Bullard Douglas Wood 

Walter ifaM/man.. Charles Halton 

Rodney "Bo-Jo” Brown 

Leif Erikson 

Joe Bingham Phil Brown 

Hugh (the Butler ) ....Ukvio Clyde 
Miss Rollo Sara Haden 


Production Stall 


Executive Producer 

Louis B. Mayer 


Recording Director 

Douglas Shearer 


Director King Vidor 

Screenplay Elizabeth Hill 

and King Vidor 

Musical Score Bronislau Kaper 

Director of Photography 

Ray June, A.S.C. 

Musical Dt?‘eciion....LENNiE Hayton 


Art Director Cedric Gibbons 

Associate Malcolm Brown 

Set Decorations by 
Edwin B. Willis 

Goums by Kalloch 

Men’s Costumes by....GihE Steele 
Makeup Created by....JACK Dawn 
Film Editor Harold P. Kress 


32 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


EL LUon m 


inner 6 in 


Past Vi 


ear 6 


19 3 2 


19 3 3 


(Inaugurated March, 1932, Therefore Only 10 
Awards This Year) 

March BUSINESS AND PLEASURE Fox 

April TARZAN, THE APE MAN M-G-M 

May NO GREATER LOVE Columbia 

June THE DOOMED BATTALION Universal 

July REBECCA OF SUNNYBROOK FARM Fox 

August BRING 'EM BACK ALIVE RKO-Radio 

September A SUCCESSFUL CALAMITY Warner Bros, 

October PHANTOM PRESIDENT Paramount 

November LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE RKO-Radio 

December UPTOWN NEW YORK KBS 


19 3 4 


January ROMAN SCANDALS United Artists 

February THE CAT AND THE FIDDLE M-G-M 

March DAVID HARUM Fox 

April TARZAN AND HIS MATE M-G-M 

May VIVA VILLA M-G-M 

June LITTLE MISS MARKER Paramount 

July HERE COMES THE NAVY Warner Bros. 

August TREASURE ISLAND M-G-M 

September ONE NIGHT OF LOVE Columbia 

October JUDGE PRIEST Fox 

November WHITE PARADE Fox 

December FLIRTATION WALK First National 


19 3 6 


January A TALE OF TWO CITIES M-G-M 

February STORY OF LOUIS PASTEUR Warner Bros. 

March THE COUNTRY DOCTOR 20th Century-Fox 

April MR. DEEDS GOES TO TOWN Columbia 

May SHOW BOAT Universal 

June SAN FRANCISCO M-G-M 

July THE WHITE ANGEL Warner Bros, 

August THE GREEN PASTURES Warner Bros. 

September THE LAST OF THE MOHICANS United Artists 

October A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM Warner Bros. 

November CHARGE OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE Warner Bros. 

December WINTERSET RKO-Radio 


19 3 8 


January WELLS FARGO Paramount 

February SNOW WHITE AND SEVEN DWARFS RKO-Radio 

March REBECCA OF SUNNY BROOK FARM 20th-Fox 

April IN OLD CHICAGO 20th Century-Fox 

May ADVENTURES OF ROBIN H00D‘ Warner Bros. 

June HOLIDAY Columbia 

July LOVE FINDS ANDY HARDY M-G-M 

August ALEXANDER'S RAGTIME BAND 20th Century-Fox 

September BOYS TOWN M-G-M 

October YOU CAN’T TAKE IT Vs^ITH YOU Columbia 

November THE CITADEL M-G-M 

December A CHRISTMAS CAROL M-G-M 


January THEY JUST HAD TO GET MARRIED Universal 

February STATE FAIR Fox 

March OLIVER TWIST Monogram 

April KING KONG RKO-Radio 

May ADORABLE Fox 

June GOLD DIGGERS OF 1903 ^ Warner Bros. 

July STRANGER'S RETURN M-G-M 

August TUGBOAT ANNIE M-G-M 

September ONE MAN'S JOURNEY RKO-Radio 

October THE BOWERY 20th Century-UA 

November ONLY YESTERDAY Universal 

December LITTLE WOMEN RKO-Radio 


19 3 5 


January 

DAVID COPPERFIELD 

M-G-M 

February 

LITTLE COLONEL 

Fox 

March 

..ROBERTA 

RKO-Radio 

April 

NAUGHTY MARIETTA 

M-G-M 

May 

... G-MEN 

Warner Bros. 

June 

THE INFORMER 

RKO-Radio 

July 

LOVE ME FOREVER 

Columbia 

August 

ALICE ADAMS 

RKO-Radio 

September,. 

. TOP HAT 

, , . RKO-Radio 

October 

O'SHAUGHNESSY'S BOY 

M-G-M 

November... 

MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY 

M-G-M 

December... 

AH WILDERNESS! 

M-G-M 


19 3 7 


January THE PLAINSMAN Paramount 

February MAID OF SALEM Paramount 

March MAYTIME M-G-M 

April ROMEO AND JULIET M-G-M 

May THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER Warner Bros. 

June CAPTAINS COURAGEOUS M-G-M 

July WEE WILLIE WINKIE 20th Century-Fox 

August THE GOOD EARTH M-G-M 

September LOST HORIZON Columbia 

October THE LIFE OF EMILE ZOLA Warner Bros. 

November THE FIREFLY M-G-M 

December TOVARICH Warner Bros. 


19 3 9 


January SWEETHEARTS M-G-M 

February GUNGA DIN RKO-Radio 

March PYGMALION M-G-M 

April WUTHERING HEIGHTS United Artists 

May UNION PACIFIC Paramount 

June YOUNG MR. LINCOLN 20th Century-Fox 

July ON BORROWED TIME M-G-M 

August STANLEY AND LIVINGSTONE 20th Century-Fox 

September THE WIZARD OF OZ M-G-M 

October MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON Columbia 

November DRUMS ALONG THE MOHAWK ..20th Century-Fox 

December GULLIVER'S TRAVELS Paramount 


19 4 0 


January THE GREAT VICTOR HERBERT Paramount 

February PINOCCHIO RKO-Radio 

March YOUNG TOM EDISON M-G-M 

April REBECCA United Artists 

May EDISON, THE MAN M-G-M 

June THE MORTAL STORM M-G-M 


July 

August 

September. 

October 

November., 

December.. 


ALL THIS, AND HEAVEN TOO Warner Bros. 

PRIDE AND PREJUDICE M-G-M 

THE HOWARDS OF VIRGINIA Columbia 

THE GREAT DICTATOR United Artists 

NORTH WEST MOUNTED POLICE Paramount 

... TIN PAN ALLEY 20th Century-Fox 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


33 











EL LLLn J4, 


onor 



Recipients of Two or More Awards From 1932 Through 1941 Are Herein Cited' 


Producers 


6 Awards 

Henry Blanke 
Hunt Stromberg 

5 Awards 

Pandro S, Berman 
Kenneth Macgowan 

4 Awards 

lotm W. Considine, Ir 
David O. Selznick 

3 Awards 

Cecil B. DeMille 
Hal B. Wallis 

2 Awards 

Merrian C. Cooper 
B. G. De Sylva 
Walt Disney 
Orville O. Dull 
Edward H. Griffith 
Raymond Griffith 
Arthur Hornblow 
Alexander Korda 
Jesse L. Lasky 
Albert Lewin 
Joseph L. Mankiewicz 
J. R. McDonough 
William H, Pine 


Directors 


5 Awards 

George Cukor 
William Dieterle 
Henry King 

4 Awards 

Frank Capra 
John Ford 
William Keighley 
Mervyn LeRoy 
Frank Lloyd 
Norman Taurog 
W S. Van Dyke 

3 Awards 

David Butler 
Cecil B, DeMille 
Victor Fleming 
Robert Z. Leonard 
King Vidor 

2 Awards 

Frank Borzage 
Clarence Brown 
Jack Conway 
Michael Curtiz 
Anatole Litvak 
John Robertson 
Alfred Santell 
George B, Seitz 
George Stevens 
Preston Sturges 


Actors 


9 Awards 

Lionel Barrymore 

6 Awards 

Wallace Beery 


Henry O'Neill 
V/illard Robertson 
Spencer Tracy 

5 Awards 

Donald Crisp 
Frank Morgan 
Lynne Overman 
Basil Rathbone 
Mickey Rooney 
C, Aubrey Smith 

4 Awards 

Mischa Auer 
Charles Coburn 
Gary Cooper 
Cary Grant 
Joel McCrea 
Laurence Olivier 
Henry Stephenson 
James Stewart 

3 Awards 

Edv/ard Arnold 
Lieorge Bancroft 
James Cagney 
Jackie Cooper 
Brian Donlevy 
Nelson Eddy 
Errol Flynn 
Henry Fonda 
Jack Haley 
Sir Cedric Hardwicke 
Porter Hall 
Edward Everett Horton 
Ian Hunter 
Allan Jones 
Guy Kibbee 
Gene Lockhart 
Fred MacMurray 
Grant Mitchell 
Dickie Moore 
Paul Muni 
Jack Oakie 
Eugene Pallette 
Dick Powell 
Claude Rains 
Randolph Scott 
Lewis Stone 
Slim Summerville 
Akim Tamirotf 
Robert Young 
Roland Young 

2 Awards 

Don Ameche 
Fred Astaire 
Lew Ayres 
John Barrymore 
Freddie Bartholomew 
Charles Bickford 
Sidney Blackmer 
Eric Blore 
John Boles 
Ray Bolger 
Charles Boyer 
Walter Brennan 
Bruce Cabot 
Leo Carrillo 
Berton Churchill 
Eduardo Ciannelli 
Ronald Colman 
Henry Daniell 
Stuart Erwin 
Clark Gable 
Reginald Gardiner 
Billy Gilbert 
Alan Hale 
Neil Hamilton 
Walter Hampden 
Jean Hersholt 
John Howard 
Leslie Howard 
Sam Jatfe 


Victor Jory 
Patric Knowles 
Frank McHugh 
Victor McLaglen 
Barton McLane 
Billy Mauch 
Thomas Mitchell 
Ralph Morgan 
Alan Mowbray 
David Niven 
Pat O'Brien 
Reginald Owen 
Tyrone Power 
Robert Preston 
Stanley Ridges 
Bill Robinson 
Joseph Schildkraut 
Franchot Tone 
H. B. Warner 
Bobs Watson 
Johnny Weissmuller 
Michael Whalen 
Henry Wilcoxon 
Warren William 
Donald Woods 


Actresses 


7 Awards 

Edna May Oliver 

6 Awards 

Jeanette MacDonald 

5 Awards 

Jessie Ralph 
Maureen O'Sullivan 

4 Awards 

Jean Arthur 
Claudette Colbert 
Katharine Hepburn 
Anita Louise 
Shirley Temple 
Helen Westley 

3 Awards 

Beulah Bondi 
Spring Byington 
Olivia De Havilland 
Frances Dee 
Alice Faye 
Fay Holden 
Mary Nash 
Ginger Rogers 
Gloria Stuart 
Verree Teasdale 
Virginia Weidler 
Fay Wray 

2 Awards 

Elizabeth Allan 
Binnie Barnes 
Alice Brady 
Helen Broderick 
Madeleine Carroll 
Irene Dunne 
Joan Fontaine 
Judy Garland 
Greer Garson 
Janet Gaynor 
Paulette Goddard 
Sara Haden 
Ruth Hussey 
Ruby Keeler 
June Lang 
Margo 

Grace Moore 
Una O'Connor 


Cecilia Parker 
May Robson 
Ann Rutherford 
Martha Scott 
Gale Sondergaard 
Barbara Stanwyck 
Margaret Sullqvan 
Evelyn Venable 


Writers 


(Original Stories) 

2 Awards 

George S. Kaufman 
Charles MacArthur 
Allan Scott 
Phil Stong 

(Screenplays) 

6 Awords 

Sonya Levien 

5 Awards 

Lamar Trotti 

4 Awards 

Sidney Buchman 
Talbot Jennings 

3 Awards 

Hugo Butler 
Julien Josephson 
Jesse Lasky, jr. 
Jane Murfin 
Norman Reilly Raine 
Robert Riskin 
Casey Robinson 
Dore Schary 
Claudine West 

2 Awards 

Marc Connelly 
William Conselman 
Ian Dalrymple 
Walter De Leon 
Philip Dunne 
Howard Estabrook 
Bradbury Foote 
Sheridan Gibney 
Ben Hecht 
Elizabeth Hill 
Noel Langley 
Anita Loos 
John Lee Mahin 
Ben Markson 
Seton I. Miller 
Ernest Pascal 
Robert Sherwood 
Donald Ogden Stewart 
C, Gardner Sullivan 


Companies 


Awards 


Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 35 

20th Century-Fox 17 

Warner Bros. -First Nat'l .17 

RKO Radio 14 

Paramount 13 

Columbia 9 

United Artists 7 

Universal . .. . .. 4 


IVationwide Poll Names Screen’s Who’s Who 

^■POPllLlRITy 


^xliiLitofi, j^reid and j^uLlic ^iim ^foupi WM SJ.d ions 


Dke 


men cun 



THE WINNERS 


MALE 

1. Clark Gable 

2. Spencer Tracy 

3. Gary Cooper 

4. Bob Hope 

5. Bud Abbott and 

Lou Costello 

6. Mickey Rooney 

7. Cary Grant 

8. Errol Flynn 

9. Gharles Boyer 

10. Bing Crosby 

11. Tyrone Power 

12. James Cagney 


FEMALE 

1. Bette Davis 

2. Myrna Loy 

3. Ginger Rogers 

4. Olivia De Havilland 

5. Judy Garland 

6. Rosalind Russell 

7. Irene Dunne 

8. Claudette Colbert 

9. Greer Garson 

10. Deanna Durbin 

11. Alice Faye 

12. Madeleine Carroll 


A nother year, another Barom- 
eter and another annual cross- 
sectional nationwide poll by BOX- 
OFFICE find Clark Gable and Bette 
Davis again the most popular film 
stars in America. 

This publication reached through 
and beyond theatre revenues to de- 
termine by ballot the All-American 
Screen Favorites of 1941. Into rep- 
resentative sections of the public, 
press, exhibition, civic, educational 
and religious segments of thought 
delved the poll, to come up with 
true popularity shadings. 

In holding top place. Gable turned 
the tables on Spencer Tracy by 
keeping the apex two years, the 
length of time it rook him in this 
annual poll to dethrone Tracy. 

Gary Cooper, who dropped a peg 
in 1940 to fifth position, took a 
couple of steps in 1941 to wind up 
in third spot, and Bob Hope vaulted 
from the ranks of the also-rans to 
take a firm grip on fourth place. 

Those two zanies of the screen, 
Abbott and Costello, burst forth from 
comparative oblivion to enliven the 
scene with a landing as a team in 
fifth place. Their, and Hope's, sky- 
rocketing pushed Mickey Rooney 
down from third to sixth position. 

Cary Grant moved up from tenth 
spot to seventh, and Errol Flynn 
dropped from seventh to eighth. 
Charles Boyer, a new recruit, came 
in at position nine. Bing Crosby 
stepped down from fourth to tenth 
place, Tyrone Power held on to 
eleventh, and James Cagney slipped 
from eighth down to twelfth. 

Retirements from the varsity line- 
up to make room for the newcomers 
were James Stewart at sixth, Wal- 
lace Beery at ninth and Henry Fonda 
at twelfth. All, however, figured 
heavily in the runners-up division. 

Dividing the balloting so that 
players compete with those of their 
o';/n sex has proved equitable 
through the years, and such a pro- 


cedure was followed for this issue. 
Now to the ladies: 

Bette Davis continues in first place 
for the third consecutive year. This 
record, an achievement in itself, is 
the more noteworthy when it is re- 
called that in 1939 Miss Davis was 
not even among the first twelve, 
though she topped the runners-up 
class. 

Perhaps most significant in the 
feminine division was the leap by 
Ginger Rogers from ninth to third 
place, and the catapulting of Glivia 
De Havilland from the second team 
into the big time at fourth position. 
Myrna Loy moved up to second 
from third place, Judy Garland 
dropped from second to fifth and 
Rosalind Russell moved a long way 
from eleventh to sixth. 

Irene Dunne, Greer Garson and 
Madeleine Carroll were other new 
members, coming in at seventh, 
ninth and twelfth, respectively. Re- 


tirements were Vivien Leigh from 
seventh, Jean Arthur from eighth, 
Loretta Young from tenth and Jean- 
ette MacDonald from twelfth. Clau- 
dette Colbert dropped from fourth 
to eighth, Deanna Durbin from fifth 
to tenth, and Alice Faye from sixth 
to eleventh. 

For a truly cross-sectional re- 
sponse, BCXCFFICE combined the 
following elements in seeking the 
measure of popularity: 

1. Daily newspaper photoplay editors. 

2. Independent theatre owners not sub- 
ject to producer-affiliation pressure or in- 
fluences. 

3. The National Screen Council, which 
each month selects the outstanding pic- 
ture to receive the BOXOFFICE Blue Rib- 
bon Award. The Council is composed of 
newspaper motion picture editors, leaders 
of civic organizations, representatives of 
the General Federation of Women's 
Clubs, the film chairmen of the Interna- 
tional Federation of Catholic Alumnae, 
various Better Films Councils and other 
groups interested in the improvement of 
motion pictures. 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


35 




IHt ULL-lllIltlilCfln SCIitte fllVORITtS Of 1941 


The Winners: 

(Listed in Order of Highest Number of Votes Received) 

MALE FEMALE 


Clark Gable 
Spencer Tracy 
Gary Cooper 
Bob Hope 
Bud Abbott and 
Lou Costello 
Mickey Rooney 


Cary Grant 
Errol Flynn 
Charles Boyer 
Bing Crosby 
Tyrone Power 
James Cagney 


Bette Davis 
Myma Loy 
Ginger Rogers 
Olivia De Havil- 
land 

Judy Garland 
Rosalind Russell 

2 ^ 


Irene Dunne 
Claudette Colbert 
Greer Garson 
Deanna Durbin 
Alice Faye 
Madeleine Carroll 


The Runners-Up: 

(Listed in Order of Highest Number of Votes Received) 

Male Female 


Melvyn Douglas 
Lionel Barrymore 
Robert Taylor 
Robert Montgomery 
Henry Fonda 
James Stewart 
Walter Pidgeon 
Wallace Beery 
Don Ameche 
William Powell 
Humphrey Bogart 
Fredric March 


Jack Benny 
Robert Young 
Ronald Colman 
Charles Laughton 
Fred MacMurray 
Edward Arnold 
Fred Astaire 
Walter Brennan 
Laurence Olivier 
Lew Ayres 
Paul Muni 
Pat O'Brien 


Margaret Sullavan 
Lana Turner 
Hedy Lamarr 
Betty Grable 
Dorothy Lamour 
Barbara Stanwyck 
Rita Hayworth 
Vivien Leigh 
Katharine Hepburn 
Ann Sheridan 
Martha Scott 
Greta Garbo 


Joan Crawford 
Paulette Goddard 
Ingrid Bergman 
Joan Fontaine 
Loretta Young 
Sonja Henie 
Carole Lombard 
Norma Shearer 
Jean Arthur 
Jeanette MacDonald 
Ruth Hussey 
Ann Sothern 



The Medalists: 

(Listed in Order Named) 

Male Female 


V/alter Huston 
Brian Aherne 
Eddie “Rochester" 
Anderson 
Oliver Hardy and 
Stan Laurel 
Edward G. Robinson 
Lewis Stone 
George Brent 
Robert Donat 
Nelson Eddy 
Herbert Marshall 
Edgar Bergen (and 
Charlie McCarthy) 


Barry Fitzgerald 
Alan Hale 
William Holden 
Leslie Howard 
Paul Lukas 
Lum and Abner 
Jeffrey Lynn 
Marx Bros. 

Lloyd Nolan 
Gene Raymond 
Charles Ruggles 
Franchot Tone 
Leo Carrillo 
Charles Coburn 


Douglas Fairbanks jr.Andy Devine 
Joel McCrea 
Ray Milland 
Claude Rains 
Ronald Reagan 
Red Skelton 
Warner Baxter 
John Garfield 
Jack Oakie 
Brian Donlevy 
Jean Hersholt 
Burgess Meredith 
John Payne 
Randolph Scott 
Orson Welles 
Robert Benchley 
Charles Chaplin 
W. C. Fields 


Richard Dix 
Jon Hall 
Louis Hayward 
Boris Karloff 
Guy Kibbee 
Kay Kyser 
Victor McLaglen 
George Raft 
Basil Rathbone 
Cesar Romero 
George Sanders 
Henry Armstrong 
Charles Butterworth 
Joseph Calleia 
Harry Carey 
John Carradine 
James Craig 


Sir Cedric HardwickeLaird Cregar 


Ian Hunter 
Raymond Massey 
Victor Mature 
Thomas Mitchell 
Mischa Auer 
John Barrymore 
Joe E. Brown 
Bob Burns 


Robert Cummings 
Johnny Downs 
Glenn Ford 
Preston Foster 
Jack Haley 
Stirling Hayden 
Jack Holt 
Dean Jagger 


Linda Darnell 

Wendy Hiller 

Laraine Day 

Hattie McDaniel 

joan Bennett 

Marjorie Main 

Marlene Dietrich 

Maureen O'Hara 

Gene Tierney 

Carol Bruce 

Mary Astor 

Elviry Weaver 

Edna May Oliver 

Susanna Foster 

May Robson 

Patsy Kelly 

Priscilla Lane 

Veronica Lake 

Ida Lupino 

Rosemary Lane 

Maria Ouspenskaya 

Claire Trevor 

Jane Withers 

Virginia Weidler 

Jean Blondell 

Sara Allgood 

Spring Byington 

Judith Anderson 

Judy Canova 

Andrews Sisters, The 

Mary Martin 

Lynn Bari 

Geraldine Fitzgerald Mary Boland 

Carmen Miranda 

Helen Broderick 

Anna Neagle 

Ellen Drew 

Merle Oberon 

Frances Farmer 

Betty Field 

Fay Holden 

Kay Francis 

Marsha Hunt 

Margaret Wycherly 

Brenda Joyce 

Virginia Bruce 

Frances Langford 

Billie Burke 

Ann Miller 

Joan Davis 

Virginia O'Brien 

Eleanor Powell 

ZaSu Pitts 

Fay Bainter 

Penny Singleton 

Constance Bennett 

Shirley Temple 

Jane Darwell 

Vera Zorina 


Honorable Mention: 

(Listed Alphabetically) 

Male 


OTcar Levant 
Donald Meek 
Dennis Morgan 
George Murphy 
Eugene Pallette 
Phil Regan 
Henry Stephenson 
Akim Tamiroff 
Conrad Veidt 
Walter Abel 
Eddie Albert 
Richard Arlen 
Edward Ashley 
Nils Asther 
George Bancroft 
Albert Basserman 
John Beal 
Eric Blore 
Ray Bolger 
Lee Bowman 
Felix Bressart 
Nigel Bruce 
Edgar Buchanan 
Eddie Cantor 
Richard Carlson 
John Carroll 
Lon Chaney jr. 
Eduardo Ciannelli 
Jerry Colonna 
Jackie Cooper 
Joseph Cotten 
Frank Craven 
Donald Crisp 
Cliff Edwards 
Stuart Erwin 
Dick Foran 
William Gargan 
James Gleason 


Leo Gorcey 
Charley Grapewin 
Tito Guizar 
Edmund Gwenn 
Walter Hampden 
Hugh Herbert 
Edward Everett 
Horton 
Allan Jones 
Otto Kruger 
Francis Lederer 
Peter Lorre 
Bela Lugosi 
Barton MacLane 
Frank McHugh 
Adolphe Menjou 
Frank Morgan 
Ralph Morgan 
Alan Mowbray 
Tom Neal 
Lynne Overman 
Reginald Owen 
Franklin Pangborn 
Nat Pendleton 
Robert Preston 
Roger Pryor 
Philip Reed 
Ralph Richardson 
Sabu 

C. Aubrey Smith 
George “Slim" Sum- 
merville 
William Tracy 
Raymond Walburn 
Bobs Watson 
John Wayne 
Donald Woods 
Roland Young 



Female 


Lucille Ball 
Binnie Barnes 
Beulah Bondi 
Dorothy Comingore 
Joyce Compton 
Glenda Farrell 
Gladys George 
Virginia Gilmore 
Sigrid Gurie 
Miriam Hopkins 
Rita Johnson 
Carole Landis 
Lola Lane 
Carolyn Lee 
Joan Leslie 
Margaret Lindsay 
Una Merkel 
Constance Moore. 
Ilona Massey 


Anne Nagel 
Nazimova 
Barbara O'Neil 
Maureen O'Sullivan 
Jean Parker 
Gail Patrick 
June Preisser 
Martha Raye 
Florence Rice 
Ann Rutherford 
Baby Sandy 
Anne Shirley 
Sylvia Sidney 
Alexis Smith 
Gale Sondergaard 
Ruth Terry 
Marjorie Weaver 
Helen Westley 


38 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 









Oke ^ 


W. 

item ^ 

'J'a.voviteS 


IIIT IS beginning to look like the 
action bracket ol the All-Ameri- 
can Favorites poll is taken to de- 
termine who shall follow Gene Au- 
try, and in what sequence. 

For the fifth consecutive year, the 
crooning western king of the screen 
held his throne while the gales of 
public fancy shuffled his court 
around him. His rule continued in 
essentially the same type of role, 
the triumph of good over evil in the 
traditional shoot-'em-up style of a 
good action film, as the once-lowly 
western climbed from the side-street 
subsequents to the big first runs in 
the form of frontier and historical 
epics. 

William Boyd, who has had con- 
sistently high ranking in these polls, 
moved up from third to second 
place, replacing John Wayne, who 
retired from the western field for 
dramatic roles. Other retirements 


THE LEADERS 

1. Gene Autry 

2. William Boyd 

3. Buck Jones 

4. Tim Holt 

5. Roy Rogers 

6. Smiley Burnette 

7. Charles Starrett 

8. Johnny Mack Brown 

9. Tim McCoy 

10. George "Gabby" Hayes 

11. Bob Steele 

12. Bill Elliott 


were George O'Brien at sixth, Tex 
Ritter at eleventh and Ken May- 
nard at twelfth. 


New arrivals to the action All- 
American were Tim McCoy, George 
"Gabby" Hayes, Bob Steele and Bill 
Elliott. They placed ninth, tentjh, 
eleventh and twelfth, respectively. 

Buck Jones, who held down po- 
sition number six the previous yeqr, 
rose into third place, Tim Holt Idft 
tenth place in favor of fourth, and 
Roy Rogers held his own in fifth 
position. Smiley Burnette took a 
step upward into sixth place, as did 
Charles Starrett from eighth to sev- 
enth, and Johnny Mack Brown in 
moving from ninth to eighth. 

Other action players finished in 
the following order: 

Tex Ritter, Noah Beery jr., Donald 
"Red" Barry, Russell Hayden, Ray 
Corrigan, Tom Tyler, Tom Keene, 
Raymond Hatton, Rule Davis, Max 
Terhune, John King, George Hous- 
ton, Bob Baker, Duncan Renaldo, Ai 
St. John. 



GENE AUTRY 
BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


WILLIAM BOYD 


BUCK JONES 



Picture Ratings at the Natinn’s Boxoffices 



Wkat DU 2>iJ in the ^irit I^un6 • Outstanding Odit. 


A COMPUTATION OF BUSINESS IN 28 PRINCIPAL CENTERS COMPILED FROM WEEKLY AVERAGES IN BOXOFFICE. PICTURES WITH 
LESS THAN 5 RUNS ARE NOT LISTED. AVERAGE THEATRE GROSS PLAYING WEEK 100%. INITIAL LETTERS INDICATE DISTRIBUTOR. 



Boston 

Cleveland 

Indianapolis 

Minneapolis 

Oklahoma City 

Portland, Me. 

San Francisco 

Charlotte 

Dallas 

Kansas City 

New Haven 

Omaha 

Portland, Ore. 

Seattle 

Chicago 

Denver 

Los Angeles 

New Orleans 

Philadelphia 

Providence 

Springfield, Mass. 

Cincinnati 

Detroit 

Milwaukee 

New York 

Pittsburgh 

Salt Lake City 

Washington 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


41 



Henry Hathaway 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


43 



PERCENTAGES 75 90 100 110 125 140 


Charley's Aunt (20th-Fox) 

Charlie Chan in Rio (20th-Fox) 

Charter Pilot (20th-Fox) 

Cheers for Miss Bishop (UA) 
Chocolate Soldier, The (M-G-M) 

Citadel of Crime (Rep) 

Citizen Kane (RKO) 

Come Live With Me (M-G-M) 
Comrade X (M-G-M) 

Confirm or Deny (20th-Fox) 
Convoy (RKO) 

Cowboy and the Blonde (20th-Fox) 

Dance Hall (20th-Fox) 

Dangerous Game, A (Univ) 

Dead Men Tell (20th-Fox) 

Devil and Miss Jones (RKO) 

Devil Bat (PRC) 

Devil Commands (Col) 

Devil Dogs of the Air (WB) 

Dive Bomber (FN) 

Doomed Caravan (Para) 

Double Date (Univ) 

Down in San Diego (M-G-M) 

Dressed to Kill (20th-Fox) 

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (M-G-M) 

Dr. Kildare's Crisis (M-G-M) 

Dr. Kildare's Wedding Day (M-G'M) 

East of the River (WB) 

Ellery Queen and the Murder 
Ring (Col) 


Ellery Queen and the Penthouse 
Mystery (Col) 


Ellery Queen, Master Detective (Col) 

Escape to Glory (Col) 

Face Behind the Mask (Col) 

Fantasia (Disney) 

Father's Son (WB) 

Father Takes a Wife (RKO) 
Feminine Touch, The (M-G-M) 

Flame of New Orleans (Univ) 

Flight Command (M-G-M) 

Flight From Destiny (WB) 


- 1^9 


-144 

-146 


-112 


PERCENTAGES 75 90 100 


Flying Blind (Para) 

Flying Cadets (Univ) 

Footlight Fever (RKO) 

Footsteps in the Dark (WB) 

For Beauty's Sake (20th-Fox) 

Forced Landing (Para) 

Four Mothers (WB) 

Free and Easy (M-G-M) 

Gallant Sons (M-G-M) 

Gay Falcon, The (RKO) 

Get-Away, The (M-G-M) 

Girl, a Guy and a Gob, A (RKO) 

Girl in the News (20th-Fox) 

Girls Under 21 (Col) 

Give Us Wings (Univ) 

Glamour Boy (Para) 

Go West (M-G-M) 

Golden Hoofs (20th-Fox) 

Gone With The Wind (M-G-M) 

Great American Broad- 
Cast (20th-Fox) 


Great Dictator, The (UA) 

Great Guns (20th-Fox) 

Great Lie, The (WB) 

Great Mr. Nobody (WB) 

Great Plane Robbery (Col) 

H. M. Pulham, Esq. (M-G-M) 

Harmon of Michigan (Col) 

Hello, Sucker (Univ) 

Her First Beau (Col) 

Her First Romance (Mono) 

Here Comes Happiness (WB) 

Here Comes Mr. Jordan (Col) 

Here Comes the Navy (WB) 

Henry Aldrich for President (Para) 

High Sierra (FN) 

Highway West (FN) 

Hit the Road (Univ) 

Hold Back the Dawn (Para) 

Hold That Ghost (Univ) 

Honeymoon for Three (WB) 

Honky Tonk (M-G-M) 





10 125 140 


IS 4 


lies 


44 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


PERCENTAGES 75 


no 125 140 


Horror Island (Univ) 



Hot Spot (I Wake Up Scream- 
ing) (20th-Fox) 

Hudson's Bay (20th-Fox) 

Hullabaloo (M-G-M) 

Hurricane Smith (Rep) 

Hurry, Charlie, Hurry (RKO) 

I Wanted Wings (Para) 

I Was a Prisoner on Devil's 
Island (Col) 

I'll Wait for you (M-G-M) 

Ice-Capades (Rep) 

In the Navy (Univ) 

International Lady (UA) 

International Squadron (WB) 

Invisible Ghost (Mono) 

Invisible Woman (Univ) 

It Started With Eve (Univ) 

Jennie (20th-Fox) 

Jungle Cavalcade (RKO) 

Keep 'Em Flying (Univ) 

Keeping Company (M-G-M) 

King of the Zombies (Mono) 

Kiss the Boys Goodbye (Para) 
Kisses for Breakfast (WB) 

Kitty Foyle (RKO) 

Knockout (FN) 

Ladies in Retirement (Col) 

Lady Be Good (M-G-M) 

Lady Eve, The (Para) 

Lady From Cheyenne (Univ) 

Lady From Louisiana (Rep) 

Lady Scarface (RKO) 

Lady With Red Hair (WB) 

Land of Liberty (M-G-M) 

Las Vegas Nights (Para) 

Law of the Tropics (WB) 

Let's Make Music (RKO) 

Life Begins for Andy Hardy (M-G-M) 
Li'l Abner (RKO) 

Little Foxes, The (RKO) 

Little Men (RKO) 


PERCENTAGES ^5 ,9p ipq^lp 
Lone Wolf Keeps a Date (Col) 

Lone Wolf Takes a Chance, The (Col). 

Long Voyage Home (UA) 

Look Who's Laughing (RKO). 

Love Crazy (M-G-M). 

Love Thy Neighbor (Para) 

Lucky Devils (Univ). 

Lydia (UA). 

Mad Doctor, The (Para) 

Maisie Was a Lady (M-G-M). 

Major Barbara (UA) 

Maltese Falcon, The (WB). 

Man at Large (20th-Fox) 

Man Betrayed, A (Rep) 

Man Hunt (20th-Fox). 

Man Made Monster (Univ) 

Man Who Lost Himself (Univ). 

Manpower (FN) 

Married Bachelor (M-G-M). 

Mata Hari (M-G-M) 

Meet Boston Blackie (Col) 

Meet John Doe (WB). 

Meet the Chump (Univ) 

Melody lor Three (RKO) 

Men in Her Life (Col). 

Men of Boys Town (M-G-M). 

Mexican Spitfire's Baby (RKO) 

Michael Shayne, Private 
Detective (20th-Fox) 

Million Dollar Baby (WB) 

Missing Ten Days (Col) 

Mob Town (Univ) 

Model Wife (Univ) 

Monster and the Girl (Para) 

Moon Over Her Shoulder (20th-Fox) 

Moon Over Miami (20th-Fox) 

Moonlight in Hawaii (Univ) 

Mr. and Mrs. Smith (RKO) 

Mr. District Attorney (Rep) 

Mr. Dynamite (Univ) 

Murder Among Friends (20th-Fox) 

Murder by Invitation (Mono) 


129 ,1|40 



BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


45 


^C|3i3 j£Or'»’‘ tM’-OJ 


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■itiHo'H 'i o-p V •• V _v;j:- 

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Claudette Colbert 


9 K . -i . 


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49' 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 






BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


47 


PERCENTAGES 75 


90 ipO UO 125 


Murder Over New York (20th-Fox). 

Mutiny in the Arctic (Univ) 

My Life With Caroline (RKO) 

Mystery Ship (Col) 

Naval Academy (Col) 

Navy, Blue and Gold (M-G-M) 

Navy Blues (WB) 

Never Give a Sucker an Even 

Break (Univ) 

New Wine (UA) 

New York Town (Para) 

Niagara Falls (UA) 

Nice Girl? (Univ) 

Night at Earl Carroll's (Para) 

Night of Jan. IG (Para) 

Night Train (20th-Fox) 

Nine Lives Are Not Enough (WB) 


140 



PERCENTAGES 


75, ,90 100 no 


Rage in Heaveii (M-G-M) 

Reaching for the Sun (Para) 



125 


Redhead (Mono) 

Reluctant Dragon (RKO) 

Remedy for Riches (RKO) 

Repent at Leisure (RKO) 

Richest Man in Town (RKO) 

Ride, Kelly, Ride (20th-Fox) 

Ride On, Vaquero (20th-Fox) 

Ringside Maisie (M-G-M) 

Rise and Shine (20th-Fox) 

Road to Zanzibar (Para) 

Road Show (UA) 

Roar of the Press (Mono) 

Romance of the Rio Grande (20th-Fox) 



Rookies on Parade (Rep) 


,140 


48 


No, No, Nanette (RKO) 

Nobody's Children (Col) 

Nothing But the Truth (Para) 
Nurse's Secret, The (WB) 
Officer and the Lady (Col) 

One Foot in Heaven (WB) 

One Night in Lisbon (Para) 

One Night in the Tropics (Univ) 
Our Wife (Col) 

Out of the Fog (WB) 

Parachute Battalion (RKO) 
Parson of Panamint (Para) 
Passage From Honkong (WB) 
Penalty, The (M-G-M) 

Penny Serenade (Col) 

People vs. Dr. Kildare (M-G-M) 
Phantom of Chinatown (Mono) 
Phantom Submarine (Col) 
Philadelphia Story (M-G-M) 
Pittsburgh Kid (Rep) 

Play Girl (RKO) 

Pot O' Gold (UA) 

Power Dive (Para) 

Private Nurse (20th-Fox) 
Puddin'head (Rep) 



Roundup, The (Para) 

Sailors on Leave (Rep) 

Saint in Palm Springs (RKO) 

Saint's Vacation (RKO) 

San Antonio Rose (Univ) 

San Francisco Docks (Univ) 

Santa Fe Trail (FN) 

Scattergood Baines (RKO) 

Scattergood Pulls the Strings (RKO) ■ 
Scotland Yard (20th-Fox) 

Sea Wolf, The (WB) 

Second Chorus (Para) 

Secrets of the Lone Wolf (Col) 

Sergeant York (WB) 

Shadow of the Thin Man (M-G-M) 
Shadows on the Stairs (FN) 

She Couldn't Say No (FN) 

She Knew All the Answers (Col) 
Shepherd of the Hills (Para) 

Shining Victory (WB) 




Shot in the Dark (WB) 

Sing Another Chorus (Univ) 

Singapore Woman (WB) 

Sis Hopkins (Rep) 

Six Lessons From Madame 
LaZonga (Univ) 


48 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


I/-- 




PERCENTAGES 75 90 100 110 125 140 


Skylark (Para) 

Sleepers West (20th-Fox) 

Small Town Deb (20th-Fox) 

Smiling Ghost. The (WB) 

Smilin' Through (M-G-M) 

So Ends Our Night (UA) 

Son of Monte Cristo (UA) 

South of Suez (WB) 

South of Tahiti (Univ) 

Stars Look Down (M-G-M) 

Strange Alibi (WB) 

Strawberry Blonde, The (FN) 

Sun Valley Serenade (20th-Fox) 
Sundown (UA) 

Sunny (RKO) 

Suspicion (RKO) 

Swamp Water (20th-Fox) 

Sweetheart of the Campus (Col) 
Swing It, Soldier (Univ) 

Tall, Dark and Handsome (20th-Fo;<) 
Tanks a Million (UA) 

Target for Tonight (WB) 

Texas (Col) 

Texas Rangers Ride Again (Para) 

That Hamilton Womanl (UA) 

Thai Night in Rio (20th-Fox) 

That Uncertain Feeling (UA) 

There's Magic in Music (Hard 
Boiled Canary) (Para) 

They Dare Not Love (Col) 

They Died With Their Boots On (WB) 

They Meet Again (RKO) 

They Met in Argentina (RKO) 

They Met in Bombay (M-G-M) 

Thief of Bagdad (UA) 

Thieves Fall Out (WB) 

This Woman Is Mine (Univ) 

This Thing Called Love (Col) 

Three Cockeyed Sailors (UA) 

Three Girls About Town (Co!) 

Three Sons O' Guns (FN) 

Tight Shoes (Univ) 



PERCENTAGES 


Tillie the Toiler (Col) 

Time Out for Rhythm (Col) 

Tobacco Road (20th-Fox) 

Tom, Dick and Harry (RKO) 

Too Many Blondes (Univ) 

Top Sergeant Mulligan (Mono) 

Topper Returns (UA) 

Trail of the Vigilantes (Univ) 

Trial of Mary Dugan (M-G-M) 

Tugboat Annie Sails Again (V/B) 

Two-Faced Woman (M-G-M) 

Two in a Taxi (Col) 

Two Latins From Manhattan (Col) 

Under Age (Col) 

Underground (WB) 

Unexpected Uncle (RKO) 

Unfinished Business (Univ) 

Unholy Partners (M-G-M) 

Very Young Lady (20th-Fox) 

Victory (Para) 

Virginia (Para) 

Vivacious Lady (RKO) 

Wagons Roll at Night (WB) 

Washington Melodrama (M-G-M) 

Wg Go Fast (20th-Fox) 

Week-End in Havana (20th-Fox) 

West Point Widov/ (Para) 

Western Union (20th-Fox) 

When Ladies Meet (M-G-M) 

Where Did You Get That 
Girl (Univ) 

Whistling in the Dark (M-G-M) 

Wild Geese Calling (20th-Fox) 

Wild Man of Borneo (M-G-M) 

Woman's Face, A (M-G-M) 

World Premiere (Para) 

Yank in the RAF (20th-Fox) 

You Belong to Me (Col) 

You'll Never Get Rich (Col) 

You're the One (Para) 

Youth Will Be Served (20th-Fox) 

Ziegfeld Girl (M-G-M) 



BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


49 


The Guiding Hands nf the Bigger Hits 



Z^Le Uniun^ Zeroed 'WJko Wjake or iZreak tke f^iclurei 




W HILE the names of the stars 
for the marquee are important 
to the boxoffice, and the ex- 
hibitor reaches for as many of them 
as he can get, the smart showman 
looks beyond the cast for the name of 
the man who directed. There he so 
often finds an important clue to the 
degree of quality and income he may 
expect from the finished product. 

As a matter of fact, so well estab- 
lished are some of the boxoffice direc- 
tors that many showmen buy and book 
as much, and sometimes more, on the 
strength of their reputation, as they 
do on the draw to be expected from 
the cast. 

The comparatively recent public 
trend toward recognition of the direc- 
tor’s importance in production con- 
tinues to become more evident as the 
public grows more picture-wise. It is 
expected to accelerate still further un- 
der a war economy. 

Looking again into the record of the 
films that hit the bigtime, we find that 
90 pictures grossed more than 110 per 
cent (ten per cent above average) at 
representative key first runs through- 
out the nation. The authority is the 
regular weekly reporting of such 
grosses in the various editions of Box- 
office throughout the year. Of that 
number, 40 were helmed by 16 direc- 
tors, this number making two or more 
of the hits. 

This compares with 77 hit films dur- 
ing 1940, when 20 directors turned in 
43 of them. In 1939, the number was 
67, with 14 directors responsible for 34. 
In 1938, the list held 59, with 12 direc- 
tors making 29. The big year was 1937, 
when 23 directors contributed 55 of the 
101 top pictures. 

Restriction in the compilation to 
grosses of necessity omits many that 
high quality alone would place on the 
list. Such films not always are big 
grossers in comparison to mass-appeal 
vehicles. It will be seen, however, that 
many pictures of this class also at- 
tained big-gross ratings. 

Following are the hit-producing direc- 
tors, listed alphabetically according to 
the number they delivered; 


The following directors are credited 
with four hit films each: 

ARTHUR LUBIN: Buck Privates 
(Univ), Hold That Ghost (Univ), In 
the Navy (Univ), Keep ’Em Flying 
(Univ) . 

RAOUL WALSH: High Sierra (WB), 
Manpower (FN) , Strawberry Blonde, 
The (FN), They Died With Their Boots 
On (WB). 

The following directors are credited 
with three hit films each: 

GEORGE CUKOR: Philadelphia 

Story, The (M-G-M), Two-Faced 
Woman (M-G-M), Woman’s Face, A 
(M-G-M). 

MICHAEL CURTIZ: Dive Bomber 
(FN), Santa Fe Trail (FN), Sea Wolf, 
The (WB). 

FRITZ LANG: Western Union (20th- 
Fox), Man Hunt (20th-Fox), Week- 
End in Havana (20th-Fox). 

VICTOR SCHERTZINGER: Birth of 
the Blues (Para), Kiss the Boys Good- 
bye (Para), Road to Zanzibar (Para). 

The following directors are credited 
with two hit films each: 

CLARENCE BROWN: Come Live 
With Me (M-G-M), They Met in Bom- 
bay (M-G-M). 

JACK CONWAY: Honky Tonk 

(M-G-M), Love Crazy (M-G-M). 

VICTOR FLEMING: Dr. Jekyll and 
Mr. Hyde (M-G-M), Gone With the 
Wind (M-G-M). 

ALEXANDER HALL: Here Comes 
Mr. Jordan (Col), This Thing Called 
Love (Col). 

HENRY HATHAWAY: Shepherd of 
the Hills (Para), Sundown (UA). 

ALFRED HITCHCOCK: Mr. and 
Mrs. Smith (RKO), Suspicion (RKO). 


MITCHELL LEISEN: Hold Back the 
Dawn (Para), I Wanted Wings (Para). 

ROBERT Z. LEONARD: When Ladies 
Meet (M-G-M), Ziegfeld Girl 
(M-G-M). 

MARK SANDRICH: Love Thy Neigh- 
bor (Para), Skylark (Para). 

GEORGE B. SEITZ; Andy Hardy’s 
Private Secretary (M-G-M), Life 
Begins for Andy Hardy (M-G-M). 

The following directors are credited 
with one hit film each: 

LLOYD BACON; Navy Blues (WB). 

L. BERGER: Thief of Bagdad (UA). 

FRANK BORZAGE: Flight Command 
(M-G-M). 

JOHN BRAHM: Wild Geese Calling 
(20th-Fox) . 

DAVID BUTLER: Caught in the 
Draft (Para). 

FRANK CAPRA: Meet Joe Doe 
(WB). 

CHARLES CHAPLIN: Great Dicta- 
tor, The (UA). 

IRVING CUMMINGS; That Night in 
Rio (20th-Fox). 

EDWARD DMYTRYK: Her First 
Romance (Mono). 

ALLAN DWAN: Look Who’s Laugh- 
ing (RKO). 

JOHN FORD: Tobacco Road (20th- 
Fox) . 

Edmund Goulding: Great Lie, The 
(FN). 

EDWARD H. GRIFFITH: Virginia 
(Para) . 

H. BRUCE HUMBERSTONE: Sun 
Valley Serenade (20th-Fox). 

JOHN HUSTON: Maltese Falcon, 
The (WB). 


50 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 








CLARENCE BROWN 


JACK CONWAY 


GEORGE CUKOR 


MICHAEL CURTIZ 


VICTOR FLEMING 


ALEXANDER HALL 


GARSON KANIN: Tom, Dick and 
Harry (RKO). 

WILLIAM KEIGHLEY: Bride Came 
C. O. D., The (WB). 

HENRY KING: Yank in the RAP 
(20th-Fox) . 

ALEXANDER KORDA: That Hamil- 
ton Woman! (UA). 

HENRY KO§TER: It Started With 
Eve (Univ) . 

GREGORY LaCAVA: Unfinished 
Business (Univ). 

SIDNEY LANFIELD: You’ll Never 
Get Rich (Col) . 

WALTER LANG: Moon Over Miami 
(20th-Fox) . 

MERVYN LeROY : Blossoms in the 
Dust (M-G-M). 

ROUBEN MAMOULIAN: Blood and 
Sand (20th-Fox). 

DAVID MILLER: Billy the Kid 
(M-G-M). 

GEORGE MARSHALL: Texas (Col). 

ARCHIE MAYO: Charley’s Aunt 
(20th-Fox) . 

NORMAN Z. McLEOD: Lady Be 
Good (M-G-M) . 

ELLIOTT NUGENT: Nothing But 
the Truth (Para). 

IRVING PICHEL: Hudson’s Bay 
(20th-Fox) . 

M. POWELL: Thief of Bagdad (UA). 


IRVING RAPPER: One Foot in 
Heaven (WB). 

CAROL REED: Stars Look Down, 
The (M-G-M). 

JEAN RENOIR: Swamp Water 
(20th-Fox). 

WESLEY RUGGLES: Arizona (Col). 

ALFRED SANTELL: Aloma of the 
South Seas (Para). 

WILLIAM SEITER: Nice Girl? 
(Univ) . 

GEORGE STEVENS: Penny Sere- 
nade (Col). 

ROBERT STEVENSON: Back Street 
(Univ) . 

PRESTON STURGES: Lady Eve, 
The (Para). 

NORMAN TAUROG: Men of Boys 
Town (M-G-M). 

JACK TOWNLEY: Pittsburgh Kid, 
The ( Rep ) . 

MAJ. W. S. VAN DYKE II: Shadow 
of the Thin Man (M-G-M). 

KING VIDOR: Comrade X (M-G-M). 

ORSON WELLES: Citizen Kane 
(RKO). 

TIM WHELAN : International Lady 
(UA) . 

HERBERT WILCOX: No, No, Nan- 
ette (RKO). 

SAM WOOD: Kitty Foyle (RKO). 

WILLIAM WYLER: Little Foxes, The 
(RKO). 



HENRY HATHAWAY 



ALFRED HITCHCOCK 



FRITZ LANG 



MITCHELL LEISEN 


RAOUL WALSH 


GEORGE B. SEITZ 





V. SCHERTZINGER 


MARK SANDRICH 


ARTHUR LUBIN 


ROBT. Z. LEONARD 















The Power Behind the Scenes 


PRODtCGRS 


C^o-ot'dinate the ^LowmaniLip -^n^redienti of the f^icturei 


owmaninip -Jrn^fec 


2 4 im, 1941’^ i ^ ^Jdi t ^ i imS 


B sj EFORE the director can bring his 
^ sense of the dramatic or the 
comic into play, and before the 
stars can shine for the benefit of mil- 
lions of people throughout the world, 
some difficult and responsible work 
has to be done. That is where the pro- 
ducer comes in. His is the job of selec- 
tion, of decision, of probing into box- 
office records and into other baromet- 
ers of public response to determine 
what will fare best at the nation’s 
theatres. 

While the producer had a hectic 
1940, he had an upset 1941. War in- 
creased in its violence and in its spread; 
it came to these shores late in that 
year. Entertainment tastes changed, 
and with them (even sometimes per- 
haps prompting them) the producer 
called upon his ingenuity and experi- 
ence and inspiration to supply the de- 
mand. That he did a good job is proved 
in the record, in the general trend of 
attendance and in the high quality of 
the product that flashed upon the 
country’s screens during the past 12 
months. 

The producer’s role in this industry 
is about as well defined in the 1941 
Barometer as we have seen. It reads: 

“Through the intricate process of 
production, the job of the producer 
largely is one of selection and co-ordi- 
nation: selection of the proper story, 
sometimes months ahead of the public 
taste, and fitting together the various 
personalities of talent and management 
into one smoothly operating whole. He 
is the searcher, eternally on the alert 
for new names and new faces — for an 
idea that will lift the fair and the good 
into the more rarified atmosphere of 
excellent.’’ 

And this past year he came up with 
a good batch of results, as witness the 
performances listed on this page. 

Again we turn to the key city grosses 
for our guide, setting the mark at 110 
per cent or above and point up the fol- 
lowing hit-making producers, listing 
them alphabetically according to the 
number of big grossers they delivered: 


THREE WINNERS 

Pandro S. Berman: 

Honky Tonk (M-G-M) 

Love Crazy (M-G-M) 

Ziegfeld Girl (M-G-M) 

Henry Blanke: 

Great Lie, The (FN) 

Maltese Falcon, The (WB) 

Sea Wolf, The (WB) 

Harry Joe Brown: 

Moon Over Miami (20th-Fox) 
Western Union (20th-Fox) 
Wild Geese Calling (20th-Fox) 
Arthur Hornblow jr.: 

Hold Back the Dawn (Para) 

I Wanted Wings (Para) 
Nothing But the Truth (Para) 
Darryl F. Zanuck: 

Blood and Sand (20th-Fox) 
Tobacco Road (20th-Fox) 
Yank in the RAF (20th-Fox) 


TWO WINNERS 

Irving Asher: 

Billy the Kid (M-G-M) 

Blossoms in the Dust (M-G-M) 
Monta Bell: 

Aloma of the South Seas (Para) 
Birth of the Blues (Para) 

Samuel Bischoff: 

Texas (CoD 

You’ll Never Get Rich (Col) 
William Cagney: 

Bride Came C. O. D., The (WB) 
Strawberry Blonde, The (FN) 

B. G. DeSylva: 

Birth of the Blues (Para) 

Caught in the Draft (Para) 

Robert Fellows: 

Santa Fe Trail (FN) 

They Died With Their Boots On 
(WB) 

Alex Gottlieb: 

Buck Privates ( Univ ) 

In the Navy (Univ) 

Mark Hellinger: 

High Sierra (FN) 

Manpower (FN) 

Paul Jones: 

Lady Eve, The (Para) 

Road to Zanzibar (Para) 


Alexander Korda: 

Thief of Bagdad (UA) 

That Hamilton Woman! (UA) 
William LeBaron: 

Kiss the Boys Goodbye (Para) 
Week-End in Havana (20th-Fox) 
Robert Lord: 

Dive Bomber (FN) 

One Foot in Heaven (WB) 
Kenneth Macgowan: 

Hudson’s Bay (20th-Fox) 

Man Hunt (20th-Fox) 

Joe Pasternak: 

It Started With Eve (Univ) 

Nice Girl? (Univ) 

William Perlberg: 

Charley’s Aunt (20th-Fox) 

This Thing Called Love (Col) 
Gottfried Reinhardt: 

Comrade X (M-G-M) 

Two-Faced Woman (M-G-M) 

Mark Sandrich: 

Love Thy Neighbor (Para) 

Skylark (Para) 

Hunt Stromberg: 

Shadow of the Thin Man (M-G-M) 
They Met in Bombay (M-G-M) 
Glenn Tryon: 

Hold That Ghost (Univ) 

Keep ’Em Flying (Univ) 

• 

ONE WINNER 

Clarence Brown: 

Come Live With Me (M-G-M) 
Frank Capra: 

Meet John Doe (WB) 

I. E. Chadwick: 

Her First Romance (Mono) 
Charles Chaplin: 

Great Dictator, The (UA) 

John W. Considine jr.: 

Men of Boys Town (M-G-M) 

Walt Disney: 

Fantasia (Disney) 

Orville O. Dull: 

When Ladies Meet (M-G-M) 

Allan Dwan: 

Look Who’s Laughing (RKO) 
Harry Edington: 

Mr. and Mrs. Smith (RKO) 
Arthur Freed: 

Lady Be Good (M-G-M) 


52 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 



WLLLIAM CAGNEY B. G. DE SYLVA 


I. Goldsmith: 

Stars Look Down, The (M-G-M) 

Samuel Goldwyn: 

Little Foxes, The (RKO) 

Edward H. Griffith: 

Virginia (Para) 

David Hempstead: 

Kitty Foyle (RKO) 

Alfred Hitchcock: 

Suspicion (RKO) 

Robert T. Kane: 

Blood and Sand (20th-Fox) 

Burt Kelly: 

Hold That Ghost (Univ) 

Fred Kohlmar: 

That Night in Rio (20th-Fox) 

Gregory LaCava: 

Unfinished Business (Univ) 

Robert Z. Leonard: 

When Ladies Meet (M-G-M) 



PAUL JONES ALEXANDER KORDA 



WILLIAM PERLBERG MARK SANDRICH 





(TX) 


SAMUEL BISCHOFF 


HENRY BLANKE 


HARRY JOE BROWN 



ROBERT FELLOWS 



ALEX GOTTLIEB 



MARK HELLINGER 



ARTHUR HORNBLOW. Jr. 


Joseph L. Mankiewicz: 

Philadelphia Story, The (M-G-M) 

Bruce Manning: 

Back Street (Univ) 

Boris Morros: 

Second Chorus (Para) 

Jack Moss: 

Shepherd of the Hills (Para) 

Irving Pichel: 

Swamp Water (20th-Fox) 

Everett Riskin: 

Here Comes Mr. Jordan (Col) 

J. Walter Ruben: 

Flight Command (M-G-M) 

Wesley Ruggles: 

Arizona (Col) 

Jack Saper: 

Navy Blues (WB) 

Victor Saville: 

Woman’s Face, A (M-G-M) 


Armand Schaefer: 

Pittsburgh Kid, The (Rep) 

David O. Selznick: 

Gone With the Wind (M-G-M) 

Robert Sisk: 

Tom, Dick and Harry (RKO) 

Edward Small: 

International Lady (UA) 

Milton Sperling: 

Sun Valley Serenade (20th-Fox) 

George Stevens: 

Penny Serenade (Col) 

Jerry Wald: 

Navy Blues (WB) 

Walter Wanger: 

Sundown (UA) 

Orson Welles: 

Citizen Kane (RKO) 

Herbert Wilcox: 

No, No, Nanette (RKO) 






JOE PASTERNAK 


WILLIAM LE BARON 


HUNT STROMBERG 


ROBERT LORD 



GLENN TRYON 


KENNETH MACGOWAN 


DARRYL F. ZANUCK 
















54 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


The Story’s the Thing 


WRITERS 


JL 


id WJomen l/id/io Pgyiyigd the —Jditi 


TITLE 

THE AUTHOR 

THE SCRIPTER 

Aloma of the 

South Seas 

LeRoy Clemens 

John B. Hymer 

Seena Owen 

Lillie Hayward 

Andy Hardy’s 
Private Secretary 

Katharine Brush 

Jane Murfin 

Harry Ruskin 

Arizona 

Clarence Budington 
Kelland 

Claude Binyon 

Back Street 

Fannie Hurst 

Bruce Manning 

Felix Jackson 

Billy the Kid 

Howard Emmett 
Rogers 

Bradbury Foote 

Gene Fowler 

Birth of the Blues 

Harry Tugend 

Harry Tugend 
Walter DeLeon 

Blossoms in the 
Dust 

Ralph Wheelwright 

Anita Loos 

Blood and Sand 

Vincente Blasco 
Ibanez 

Jo Swerling 

Bride Came C.O.D. 

Kenneth Earl 

M. M. Musselman 

Julius J. and 

Philip G. Epstein 

Buck Privates 

Arthur T. Herman 

Arthur T. Herman 

Caught in the 
Draft 

Harry Tugend 

Harry 'Tugend 

Charley’s Aunt 

Brandon Thomas 

George Seaton 

Citizen Kane 

Orson Welles 

Herman J. Mankie- 
wicz 

Orson Welles 
Herman J. Mankie- 
wicz 

Come Live 

With Me 

Virginia Van Upp 

Patterson McNutt 

Comrade X 

Walter Reisch 

Ben Hecht 

Charles Lederer 

Dive Bomber 

Prank Wead 

Fl’ank Wead 

Robert Buckner 

Dr. Jekyll and 

Mr. Hyde 

Robert Louis Stev- 
enson 

John Lee Mahin 

Fantasia 



Plight Command 

Com. Harvey Haislip 
John Sutherland 

Com. Harvey Hais- 
lip & Wells Root 

Gone With the 
Wind 

Margaret Mitchell 

Sidney Howard 

Great Dictator, 

Charles Chaplin 

Charles Chaplin 


The 


TITLE 

THE AUTHOR 

THE SCRIPTER 

Great Lie, The 

Polan Banks 

Lenore Coffee 

Her First Romance Gene Stratton -Porter 

Adele Comandini 

Here Comes 

Mr. Jordan 

Harry Segall 

Sidney Buchman 
Seton I. Miller 

High Sierra 

W. R. Burnett 

W. R. Burnett 

John Huston 

Hold Back 
the Dawn 

Ketti Frings 

Charles Brackett 
Billy Wilder 

Hold That Ghost 

Robert Lees 

Fred Renaldo 

Robert Lees 

Fred Renaldo 

John Grant 

Honky Tonk 

Marguerite Roberts 
John Sanford 

Marguerite Roberts 
John Sanford 

Hudson’s Bay 

Lamar Trotti 

Lamar Trotti 

I Wanted Wings 

Eleanore Griffin 
Prank Wead 

Lt. Beirne Lay 

Richard Maibaum 
Lt. Beirne Lay 

Sig Herzig 

In the Navy 

Arthur T. Herman 

Arthur T. Herman 
John Grant 

International Lady E. Lloyd Sheldon 

Jack DeWitt 

Howard Estabrook 

It Started 

With EVe 

Hans Kraly 

Norman Krasna 

Lee Townsend 

Keep ’Em Flying 

Edmund Hartmann 

True Boardman 

Nat Perrin 

John Grant 

Kiss the Boys 
Goodbye 

Clare Booth 

Harry Tugend 
Dwight Taylor 

Kitty Foyle 

Christopher Morley 

Dalton Trumbo 

Lady Be Good 

Jack McGowan 

Jack McGowan 

Kay Van Riper 
John McClain 

Lady Eve, The 

Monckton Hoffe 

Preston Sturges 

Life Begins for 
Andy Hardy 

Agnes Christine 
Johnston 

Agnes Christine 
Johnston 

Litle Foxes, The 

Lillian Heilman 

Lillian Heilman 

Look Who’s 
Laughing 

James V. Kern 

James V. Kern 

Love Crazy 

David Hertz 

William Ludwig 

David Hertz 
William Ludwig 


Charles Lederer 


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55 


TITLE 

THE AUTHOR 

THE SCRIPTER 

Love Thy Neighbor Z. Myers 

William Morrow 
Edmund Beloin 
Ernest Pagano 

Z. Myers 

William Morrow 
Edmund Beloin 
Ernest Pagano 

Man Hunt 

Geoffrey Household 

Dudley Nichols 

Manpower 

Richard Macaulay 
Jerry Wald 

Richard Macaulay 
Jerry Wald 

Maltese Falcon, 

The 

Dashiell Hammett 

John Huston 

Meet John Doe 

Robert Riskin 

Robert Riskin 

Men of Boys Town 

James Kevin Mc- 
Guinness 

James Kevin Mc- 
Guinness 

Moon Over Miami 

Stephen Powys 

Vincent Lawrence 
Brown Holmes 

Mr. and Mrs. 

Smith 

Norma Krasna 

Norman Krasna 

Navy Blues 

Arthur T. Horman 

Arthur T. Horman 
Jerry Wald 
Richard Macaulay 
Sam Perrin 

Nice Girl? 

Phyllis Duganne 

Richard Connell 
Gladys Lehman 

No, No, Nanette 

Prank Mandel 

Otto Harbach 

Vincent Youmans 
Emil Nyitray 

Ken Englund 

Nothing But 
the Truth 

James Montgomery 
Frederick S. Isham 

Don Hartman 

Ken Englund 

One Foot in 
Heaven 

Hartzell Spence 

Casey Robinson 

Philadelphia 

Story 

Philip Barry 

Donald Ogden 
Stewart 

Penny Serenade 

Martha Cheavens 

Morrie Ryskind 

Pittsburgh Kid, 
The 

Octavus Roy Cohen 


Road to Zanzibar 

Don Hartman 

Sy Bartlett 

Don Hartman 
Frank Butler 

Santa Fe Trail 

Robert Buckner 

Robert Buckner 

Sea Wolf, The 

Jack London 

Robert Rossen 

Second Chorus 

Prank Cavett 

Elaine Ryan 

Pi’ank Cavett 

Ian Hunter 

Shadow of the 
Thin Man 

Harry Kurnitz 

Harry Kurnitz 
Irving Brecher 

Shepherd of the 
Hills 

Harold Bell Wright 

Grover Jones 
Stuart Anthony 

Skylark 

Z. Myers 

Samson Raphaelson 

Allan Scott 

Stars Look Down 

A. J. Cronin 

J. B. Williams 

Strawberry Blonde 

James Hagan 

Julius J. and 


Philip G. Epstein 


TITLE 

THE AUTHOR 

THE SCRIPTER 

Sun Valley 
Serenade 

Art Arthur 

Robert Harari 

Robert Ellis 

Helen Logan 

Sundown 

Barre Lyndon 

Barre Lyndon 

Suspicion 

Francis lies 

Samson Raphael- 
son 

Joan Harrison 

Alma Reville 

Swamp Water 

Vereen Bell 

Dudley Nichols 

Texas 

Michael Blankfort 
Lewis Meltzer 

Michael Blankfort 
Lewis Meltzer 
Horace McCoy 

That Hamilton 
Woman 

Walter Reisch 

R, C. Sherriff 

Walter Reisch 

R. C. Sherriff 

That Night in Rio 

Rudolph Lothar 

Hans Adler 

George Seaton 

Bess Meredith 

Hal Long 

They Met in 
Bombay 

Hans Kafka 

Edwin Justus 

Mayer 

Anita Loos 

Leon Gordon 

They Died With 
Their Boots On 

Wally Kline 

Aeneas MacKenzie 

Wally Kline 

Aeneas MacKenzie 

Thief of Bagdad 

Lajos Biro 

Miles Malleson 

This Thing 

Called Love 

Edwin Burke 

George Seaton 

Ken Englund 

P. J. Wolfson 

Tobacco Road 

Jack Kirkland 

Nunnally Johnson 

Tom, Dick 
and Harry 

Paul Jarrico 

Paul Jarrico 

Two-Faced Woman 

S. N. Behrman 

Salka Viertel 

George Oppenheimer 

S. N. Behrman 
Salka Viertel 

George Oppen- 
heimer 

Unfinished 

Business 


Eugene Thackery 

Virginia 

Edward H. Griffith 
Virginia Van Upp 

Virginia Van Upp 

Week-End in 
Havana 

Karl Tunberg 

Darrell Ware 

Karl Tunberg 
Darrell Ware 

Western Union 


Robert Carson 

When Ladies Meet 

Rachel Crothers 

S. K. Lauren 

Anita Loos 

Wild Geese Calling Stewart Edward 
White 

Horace McCoy 

Woman’s Pace, A 

Francis de Croisset 

Donald Ogden 
Stewart 

Elliott Paul 

Yank in the 

R. A. F. 

Melville Crossman 

Darrell Ware 

Karl Tunberg 

You’ll Never 

Get Rich 

Michael Fessier 
Ernest Pagano 

Michael Fessier 
Ernest Pagano 

Ziegfeld Girl 

William Anthony Mc- 
Guire 

Marguerite Roberts 
Sonya Levien 


5G 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


MICKEY ROONEY 


M-G-M Studios 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


57 



CHARLES BOYER 


58 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


A Complete Production Record for the Year 


mnu iiDEx 


<^66eittiai information On Urom ^anuari^ Okra O^ecemLer, 194t 


Columbia 

Across the Sierras ...2212 (58) Feb. 13 

Western. Elliott has to choose between 
a girl and a gun, and has a pal to help 
and a score to settle with a murderer. 
Bill Elliott, Luana Walters. Director: D. 
Ross Lederman. 

Adam Had Four Sons .2006 ...(81) Feb. 18 

Drama. Based on the Charles Bonner 
novel, “Legacy,” the story deals with 
the raising of four motherless boys by 
a father and a beloved governess dur- 
ing the turbulent period between 1907 
and the end of World War No. 1. War- 
ner Baxter, Ingrid Bergman, Pay Wray. 
Director: Gregory Ratoff. 

Adventure in Washington....2010 (86) May 30 
Drama. Topical story concerning a lit- 
tle-known phase of our national legis- 
lature, and the influence these page 
'boys have on Congress and its mem- 
bers. Herbert Marshall, Virginia Bruce, 
Gene Reynolds. Director: Alfred E. 
Green. 

Bedtime Story 3004 (85) Dec. 25 

Comedy-Drama. Concerns the trials 
and tribulations of the first lady of 
Broadway and her zany writer-husband. 
Loretta Young, Fredric March, Robert 
Benchley. Director: Alexander Hall. 

Big Boss, The 2037. ..(69) Apr. 28 

Melodrama. Two brothers, one good, the 
other bad, choose conflicting careers. 
One becomes a gangster, the other a 
crusading attorney, with the inevitable 
clash. Otto Kruger, Gloria Dickson, 
John Litel. Director: Charles Barton. 

Blonde From Singapore, The . .3041 

(70) Oct. 16 

Comedy-Drama. Grounded in Singa- 
pore, the hero goes pearl-diving and 
finds some hot gems. They are stolen 
from him and his efforts to retrieve 
them, after he first lands in jail, fur- 
nish the rest of the story. Florence Rice, 
Leif Erikson. Director: Edward Dmyt- 
ryk. 

Blondie Goes Latin 2015 (69) Feb. 27 
Comedy. The Bmnsteads start on a 
South American vacation, but Dagwood 
is sent off the boat at the last minute. 
He sneaks back, unknown to Blondie, 
and a series of entanglements begin 
when Dagwood disguises himself as 
drummer in the ship’s orchestra. Penny 
Singleton, Arthur Lake, Larry Simms. 
Director: Prank R. Strayer. 

Blondie in Society 2014 (77) July 17 

Comedy. In which Mrs. Dagwood Bum- 
stead goes highbrow and tries to crash 
the upper crust, much to the discom- 
fort of Dagwood, Baby Dumpling and 
their dog, Daisy. Arthur Lake, Penny 


Singleton, Larry Simms. Director: 
Frank R. Strayer. 

Devil Commands, The 2028 (65) Feb. 3 


Mystery Melodrama. Still the cadaver- 


Explanatory 


Statistical and summary data 
on feature releases of 1941, ar- 
ranged alphabetically under 
company headings. 

PRODUCTION NUMBER fol- 
lows title. 

RUNNING TIME in parenthesis. 

RELEASE DATE at end of title 
line. 

TYPE of picture indicated in 
italic. 

STAR and DIRECTOR credits 
conclude each summary. 

Symbol ^ indicates BOX- 
OFFICE Blue Ribbon Award 
Winner. 

Symbol ^ indicates color pho- 
tography. 


snatching scientist, Karloff conducts 
weird experiments of the human brain, 
in an endeavor to read minds. Karloff 
is saved from an irate New England 
populace when his last test wrecks the 
place. Boris Karloff, Amanda Duff, 
Richard F'iske. Director: Edward Dmyt- 
ryk. 

Ellery Queen and the Murder Ring 

3030 (70) Nov. 18 

Mystery. Two murders and a suicide 
set the detective off again on the trail 
of the criminals. Ralph Bellamy, Mar- 
garet Lindsay, Charley Grapewin. Di- 
rector: James Hogan. 

Ellery Queen and the Perfect Crime 

2023 (71) Aug. 14 

Mystery. Ellery finds the loophole in 
the perfect crime, thereby solving the 
murder of a power company tycoon. 
Ralph Bellamy, Margaret Lindsay, 


Charles Grapewin. Director: James 
Hogan. 

Ellery Queen's Penthouse Mystery 

2025 (70) Mar. 24 

Mystery. Second in the “Ellery Queen” 


series. Story centered around the mur- 
der of a man, deputized by the Chinese 
government to bring valuable jewels 
into the U. S. and sell them, the money 
to go for Chinese relief. Ralph Bellamy, 
Margaret Lindsay, Charles Grapewin, 
Anna May Wong. Director: James 
Hogan. 

Face Behind the Mask, The . 2029 

(69) Jan. 16 

Mystery Drama. A man with a disfig- 
ured face turns criminal to obtain 
funds for plastic surgery. He meets and 


falls in love with a blind girl, and his 
efforts to quit the gang result in trag- 
edy. Peter Lorre, Evelyn Keyes. Direc- 
tor: Robert Florey. 

Go West, Young Lady .3015 (71), ... Nov. 27 
Musical Western. The sweetheart of 
the town’s new sheriff uncovers the 
skullduggery of the town’s banker-out- 
law leader. Penny Singleton, Charles 
Ruggles, Glenn Ford. Director: Frank 
R. Strayer. 

Great Swindle, The 2034 (54) Apr. 10 

Action Drama. A fire insurance com- 
pany investigator comes up against a 
difficult case of arson in the burning 
of a warehouse. Jack Holt, Marjorie 
Reynolds. Director: Lewis D. Collins. 

Hands Across the Rockies .2215 (58) June 19 
Western. Wild Bill Hickok saves a girl 
from forcefully being married to a mur- 
derer, the girl having been the only 
witness to the murder. Bill Elliott, Mary 
Daily, Dub Taylor, Eddy Waller. Direc- 
tor : Lambert Hillyer. 

Harmon of Michigan 3023 (66) Sept. 11 

Action Drama. A gridiron background, 
the story dealing with the problems and 
ethics of coaching collegiate football. 
Tom Harmon, Anita Louise. Director: 
Charles Barton. 

Harvard, Here 1 Come 3039 (64) Dec. 18 

Comedy. Herein the celebrated ex-pug, 
nightclub impresario and actor goes to 
college. Arline Judge, Maxie Rosen- 
bloom, Marie Wilson. Director: Lew 
Landers. 

Her First Beau 2013 (78) May 8 

Comedy Drama. From the stage play, 
“June Mad,” this deals with young lovo 
in the springtime, and its comic and 
dramatic developments. Jane Withers, 
Jackie Cooper. Director: Theodore 
Reed. 

Here Comes Mr. Jordan 2007 . (94) Aug. 21 
Comedy. A prize fighter dies in a plane 
crash, and Heaven’s messenger, Mr. 
Jordan, learns his death had not been 
scheduled for some years, and the 
search to secure another body for the 
fighter’s soul results in a series of 
comic, tragic and romantic episodes. 
Robert Montgomery, Claude Rains, Rita 
Johnson, Evelyn Keyes. Director: Alex- 
ander Hall. 

Honolulu Lu 3024 (72) Dec. 11 

Musical. Consuelo can’t reform her im- 
postor Uncle, so leaves him in Honolulu 
to start out on her own. She winds up 
in a burlesque show as Lu and the 
events leading up to her winning the 
title of “Miss Honolulu” take up the 
rest of the film footage. Lupe Velez. 
Bruce Bennett, Leo Carrillo. Director: 
Charles Barton. 

1 Was a Prisoner on Devil's Island 

2041. (72) June 30 

Melodrama. Story of a man unjustly 
tried, convicted and sentenced to 


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Devil’s Island, dreaded French penal 
colony. Sally Filers, Donald Woods, 
Eduardo Ciannelli. Director: Lew Lan- 
ders. 

King of Dodge City .3209 (63) Aug. 14 
Western. A secret state agent and the 
sheriff work at cross purposes until 
they discover their mutual aims and 
merge efforts to clean up wild Abilene. 
Bill Elliott, Tex Ritter, Dub Taylor, 
Judith Linden. Director: Lambert Hill- 
yer. 

Ladies in Retirement 3003 (93) Sept. 18 

Coinedy Drama. Film version of the 
Broadway stage success, this is a mur- 
der mystery concerning two crackpot 
old ladies who engage in plain and 
fancy homicide. Elsa Lanchester, Ida 
Lupino. Louis Hayward. Director: 
Charles Vidor. 

Lone Wolf Takes a Chance, The 

2022 (76) Mar. 6 

Mystery. Based upon the stories by 
Louis Joseph Vance, this finds the Lone 
Wolf coming out of retirement again 
to aid a lady in distress. Warren Wil- 
liam, Henry Wilcoxon, June Storey. Di- 
rector: Sidney Salkow. 

Medico of Painted Springs 2206 

(59) June 26 

Outdoor Drama. Initialer in an eight- 
picture series featuring Charles Star- 
rett as a rough-and-ready frontier doc- 
tor. Musical interludes supplied by the 
Four Symphonies. Charles Starrett, 
Terry Walker, Four Symphonies. Direc- 
tor: Lambert Hillyer. 

Meet Boston Blackie 2027 (61) Feb. 20 
Drama. A well-known shady character 
plays cat and mouse with the police 
while he uncovers a gang of spies in- 
tent on stealing the U. S. Navy’s bomb- 
sight plans, their operations being car- 
ried on from a Coney Island concession. 
Chester Morris, Rochelle Hudson. Di- 
rector: Robert Florey. 

Men in Her Life, The 3005 (90) Nov. 20 
Drama. The biography of a young bal- 
lerina and three suitors, two of whom 
she marries. Loretta Young, Conrad 
Veidt, Dean Jagger. Director: Gregory 
Ratoff. 

Missing 10 Days 2044 (77) Feb. 28 

Drama. British cast, the story based on 
mistaken identity of the hero, who finds 
himself on the enemy side during the 
pre-Maginot crackup. He stalls off sub- 
versive work behind the Anglo-French 
lines, unravels a spy ring and checks a 
sabotage plot. Rex Harrison, Karen 
Verne. Director: Tim Whelan. 

Mystery Ship 3040 (66) Sept. 4 

Melodrama. Maritime melodrama re- 
lating the escapades of a mysterious 
vessel plying the seas in the interests 
of peace. Paul Kelly, Lola Lane. Direc- 
tor: Lew Landers. 

Naval Academy 2020 (67) May 22 

Drama. A sequel to “Military Academy,” 
this concerns training at a naval de- 
fense station. The cast is largely juve- 
nile and adolescent. Freddie Bartholo- 
mew, Jimmy Lydon, Joe Brown Jr. Di- 
rector: Erie C. Kenton. 

North From the Lone Star 2213 

(58) Mar. 31 

Western. Wild Bill Hickok takes over 
the job of marshal of Deadwood, and 
rescues the town from its outlaw rul- 
ers. Bill Elliott, Dorothy Fay, Dub Tay- 
lor. Director: Lambert Hillyer. 


Officer and the Lady, The 2039 (60) July 24 
Melodrama. The heroine vows never to 
marry a policeman after her father had 
been crippled in line of duty, but weak- 
ens when her cop suitor exposes her 
other suitor as a gangster and saves 
her father’s life. Rochelle Hudson, 
Roger Pryor, Bruce Bennett. Director: 
Sam White. 

Our Wife 2003 (95) Aug. 28 

Comedy Drama. A domestic farce com- 
edy concerning a marital mixup. Mel- 
vyn Douglas, Ruth Hussey, Ellen Drew, 
Charles Coburn, Louise Beavers. Direc- 
tor: John M. Stahl. 

Outlaws of the Panhandle 2205 

(59) Feb. 27 

Western. Cattle thieves loan ranchers 
money on a two-months’ contract to 
build a railroad, then deliberately halt 
the work. Charles Starrett, Prances 
Robinson. Director: Sam Nelson. 

Penny Serenade 2002 (120) Apr. 24 

Drama. A girl marries a penniless re- 
porter in Tokyo. Driven to San Fran- 
cisco by the Japanese earthquake of 
1923, they lose their baby, then find 
happiness through adopting another. 
Irene Dunne, Cary Grant, Beulah Bon- 
di, Edgar Buchanan. Director: George 
Stevens. 

Pinto Kid, The 2204 (61) Jan. 9 

Western. Depicts the days when the 
west was young. Starrett plays the role 
of a rancher driving cattle from Texas 
to Kansas, to a railroad, his way beset 
with constant danger and excitement. 
Charles Starrett, Louise Currie, Sons of 
the Pioneers. Director: Lambert Hill- 
yer. 

Prairie Stranger 2208 (59) Sept. 18 

Western. Third in the “Medico” series, 
in which the hero foils the villains’ at- 
tempts to poison the ranchers’ cattle, 
after first clearing himself of the 
charge. Charles Starrett, Cliff Edwards. 
Director: Lambert Hillyer. 

Return of Daniel Boone, The 2214 

(60) May 7 

Western. Another in the series of sage- 
brush adventures, in which the town’s 
crooked mayor boosts taxes too high 
for the ranchers to pay so he can fore- 
close on their properties. Musical con- 
tributions are by the Rodik Twins, a 
radio duo hailing from Oklahoma. Bill 
Elliott, Dub Taylor, Betty Miles. Direc- 
tor: Lambert Hillyer. 

Richest Man in Town, The 2006 

(70) June 12 

Melodrama. Story of two life-long 
enemies, the most influential citizens 
of a typical American small town, and 
the civic disruption caused by the in- 
vasion of a group of questionable straw 
hat theatre promoters. Frank Craven, 
Eileen O’Heam, Roger Pryor, Edgar 
Buchanan. Director: Charles Barton. 

Riders of the Badlands 3202 (57) Dec. 18 
Western. The Texas Rangers rout a 
gang of bankrobbing, cattle-rustling, 
freight-holdup, thieves. The resem- 
blance of one ranger to one of the crook 
leaders almost causes him to lose his 
life. Charles Starrett, Russell Hayden, 
Cliff Edwards. Director: Howard Breth- 
erton. 

Roaring Frontiers 3210 (62) Oct. 16 

Western. Ritter is falsely accused of 
murder, but is protected by Marshal 
“Wild Bill” Hickok from the crooked 
gang that framed him, until he can 


prove his innocence. Bill Elliott, Tex 
Ritter. Director: Lambert Hillyer. 

Royal Mounted Patrol, The. 3201 

(59) Nov. 13 

Western. The Mounted Police invade 
the lumber country to stop illegal tim- 
ber cutting. Charles Starrett, Russell 
Hayden, Lloyd Bridges, Wanda McKay. 
Director: Lambert Hillyer. 

Secrets of the Lone Wolf 3026 (67) Nov. 13 
Mystery. A gang of jewel thieves pull 
off a big robbery on a yacht, in which 
foreign passengers from an invaded 
European nation were bringing over 
Napoleonic jewels. Warren William, 
Ruth Ford, Victor Jory. Director: Ed- 
ward Dmytryk. 

She Knew All the Answers 2008 

(85) May 15 

Comedy Drama. This tells of a Wall 
Street telephone operator who plays 
the financial and matrimonial game 
all backwards, but who nevertheless 
walks off with a fortune and the 
street’s most eligible young broker. 
Franchot Tone, Joan Bennett, Eve 
Arden. Director: Richard Wallace. 

Sing for Your Supper 3022 (65) Dec. 4 
Musical Comedy. Story of a honky- 
tonk dancehall, a dime-a-dance girl 
and a handsome orchestra leader. Jinx 
Falkenburg, Chas. (Buddy) Rogers, Eve 
Arden. Director: Charles Barton. 

Son of Davy Crockett 2216 (60) July 15 

Western. Davy Crockett jr., on assign- 
ment from President Ulysses S. Grant, 
takes on the job of breaking up the 
arbitrary rule of a self-appointed 
“king” in a narrow strip of land that, 
through a surveyor’s error, does not 
belong to the U. S. Bill Elliott, Iris 
Meredith, Dub Taylor. Director: Lam- 
bert Hillyer. 

Stork Pays Off, The 3036 (68) Nov. 6 
Comedy. A former beer baron goes in 
the laundry “business” with his stooge 
aids. They get involved in a nursery 
mixup. Then a rival “laundry” tries to 
muscle in. Further complications are 
cooked up along political lines. Every- 
thing irons out in due time. Victor 
Jory, Rochelle Hudson, Maxie Rosen- 
bloom. Director: Lew Landers. 

Sweetheart of the Campus 2019 

(67) June 26 

Musical Comedy. The dean’s daughter 
uses a novel way to get new enrollments 
for Lambert Tech to keep a mean old 
lady from taking over the school and 
making it into a seminary. Ruby Kee- 
ler, Ozzie Nelson and Orchestra, Har- 
riet Hilliard. Director: Edward Dmyt- 
ryk. 

Texas 3008 (94) Oct. 9 

Action Drama. Sepia tint, semi-histori- 
cal western tracing the growth of the 
Lone Star State. William Holden, Claire 
Trevor, Glenn Ford. Director: George 
Marshall. 

They Dare Not Love 2011 (75) Apr. 28 

Drama. Story of two who fall in love 
in modern, Nazi-controlled Vienna, but 
who are kept apart by the Gestapo be- 
cause they are suspected of anti-Nazi 
leanings. George Brent, Martha Scott, 
Paul Lukas. Director: James Whale. 

This Thing Called Love 2205 (98) Jan. 2 
Comedy. A career girl with a “modern 
Dlan for marriage” tries to apply her 
theory when she marries, which gives 
rise to uproariously humorous situa- 


60 


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A^urt .-c^aari ^- 

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tions. Melvyn Douglas, Rosalind Rus- 
sell. Director: Alexander Hall. 

Three Girls About Town .3016 ..(73) Oct. 23 
Comedy. A trio of hotel hostesses be- 
come involved in a morticians’ con- 
vention and find themselves with a 
corpse and a casual murder on their 
hands. Joan Blondell, John Howard, 
Binnie Barnes. Director: Leigh Jason. 

Thunder Over the Prairie 2207 (60) July 30 
Western. Another sagebrush saga in- 
terspersed with musical moments sup- 
plied by Cliff Edwards and the Rhythm 
Rangers. Based on book by James L. 
R u b e 1. Charles Starrett, Eileen 
O’Hearn. Director: Lambert Hillyer. 

Tillie the Toiler 2017 (62) Aug. 7 

Comedy. First in a proposed series 
adapted from Russ Westover’s famous 
comic strip. Kay Harris, new discovery, 
portrays “Tillie.” Kay Harris, William 
Tracy, Marjorie Reynolds. Director: 
Sidney Salkow. 

Time Out for Rhythm .2009 (75) June 20 
Musical Comedy. Such radio favorites 
as Brenda and Cobina and the singing 
aggregation of the Six Hits and a Miss 
lend their talents to this film. Rudy 
Vallee, Ann Miller, Rosemary Lane, 
Glenn Gray and Orchestra. Director: 
Sidney Salkow. 

Two in a Taxi 2042 (63) July 10 

Melodrama. A cab driver meets with all 
kinds of tribulations trying to raise 
money for the down payment on a 
garage he wants to buy. Anita Louise, 
Russell Hayden, Noah Beery jr. Direc- 
tor: Robert Florey. 

Two Latins From Manhattan 3020 

(66) Oct. 2 

Comedy. A night club press agent sub- 
stitutes her two Latins from Manhat- 
tan roommates when a South American 
sister team fails to appear. The girls 
click. Joan Davis, Jinx Falkenburg, 
Joan Woodbury. Director: Charles 
Barton. 

Under Age 2036 (60) April 17 

Melodrama. Drama of a blackmail ring 
operating behind a cross-country chain 
of hotels. Nan Grey, Tom Neal, Alan 
Baxter, Mary Anderson. Director: Ed- 
ward Dmytryk. 

Voice in the Night, The 2040 (82) May 20 
Drama. An “inside anti-Nazi Germany” 
story, made in England. It is the story 
of an Austrian doctor who operates a 
portable radio transmitter through 
which he endeavors to broadcast the 
truth to those under Nazi control. Clive 
Brook, Diana Wynyard, Ronald Squire, 
Joyce Howard. Director: Anthony As- 
quith. 

You Belong to Me. 3003 (95) Oct. 30 

Comedy. A light, sophisticated domestic 
comedy of a millionaire playboy who 
marries a woman doctor with a large 
male clientele. He goes through every- 
thing the wife of a doctor normally 
faces. Barbara Stanwyck, Henry Fonda, 
Melville Cooper. Director: Wesley 
Ruggles. 

You'll Never Get Rich 2004 (89) Sept. 25 

Musical Comedy. A draft camp in the 
background for Fred Astaire’s dance 
routines and musical interludes. Fred 
Astaire, Rita Hayworth, Robert Bench- 
ley, Cliff Nazarro, Director: Sidney 
Lanfield, 


Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

A Woman's Face .136 (106) May 9 

Drama. A beautiful woman’s face is 
horribly scarred in an accident. Story 
concerns her inward and mental bat- 
tle to force herself to go out and meet 
the world again. Joan Crawford, Mel- 
vyn Douglas, Conrad Veidt. Director: 
George Cukor. 

Andy Hardy's Private Secretary 126 

(101) Feb. 21 

Comedy Drama. Andy gets himself a 
secretary to help him with his varied 
activities in connection with the high 
school annual and divers committees 
of which he is chairman. Mickey 
Rooney, Lewis Stone, Cecilia Parker. 
Director: George B. Seitz. 

Bad Man, The 124 (70) Mar. 28 

Drama. Beery again plays the role of 
a tough hombre with a tender heart, 
who rides through daring adventure 
as a modern Robin Hood of the West. 
Wallace Beery, Lionel Barrymore, La- 
raine Day. Director: Richard Thorpe. 

Barnacle Bill 141 (92) July 4 

Comedy Drama. Story of an old salt, 
its locale the waterfront, and of his 
crusty affection for a little girl. Wal- 
lace Beery, Virginia Weidler. Director: 
Richard Thorpe. 

Big Store, The 139 (83) June 20 

Comedy. The Marx Brothers’ buffoon- 
ery this time is given rein with a de- 
partment store, in which they are 
floorwalkers, as the background. Marx 
Bros., Tony Martin, Virginia Grey. Di- 
rector: Charles Riesner. 

©Billy the Kid 137 (95) May 30 

Western Drama. Remake of an his- 
torical western tracing the life of one 
of the west’s most notorious gunmen. 
Robert Taylor, Brian Donlevy, Mary 
Howard. Directors: Frank Borzage, 
David Miller. 

Blonde Inspiration 123 (72) Feb. 7 

Comedy. A young literary aspirant who 
can’t get his work accepted, finally gets 
a chance, after many hilarious episodes, 
through the aid of the secretary of a 
publishing house. He gets the contract 
and the girl. John Shelton, Virginia 
Grey. Director: Busby Berkeley. 

CI©Blossoms in the Dust 144 (99) . July 25 
Drama. Based on the life of Mrs. Edna 
Gladney, founder of the Texas Chil- 
dren’s Home and Aid Society. Greer 
Garson, Walter Pidgeon, Marsha Hunt. 
Director: Mervyn LeRoy. 

Chocolate Soldier, The 208 (100) Nov. 

Musical. Based on the famous light 
opera, this marks the screen debut of 
Rise Stevens, Metropolitan Opera so- 
prano. Nelson Eddy, Rise Stevens, 
Nigel Bruce. Director: Roy Del Ruth. 

Come Live With Me 132 (86) Jan. 31 

Romatic Comedy. An Austrian refugee 
faces deportation unless she marries an 
American citizen. The latter turns 
out to be a penniless author who agrees 
to the marriage on a business basis. 
They gradually fall in love. James 
Stewart, Hedy Lamarr, Ian Hunter. Di- 
rector: Clarence Brown. 

Design for Scandal 213 (85) Dec 

Comedy. Story of the romance of a 
woman judge and a newspaper photo- 
grapher. Rosalind Russell, Walter Pid- 
geon, Edward Arnold. Director: Nor- 
man Taurog. 


Down in San Diego 203 (70) Sept 

Melodrama. The story of youth engag- 
ing in amateur spying to clear the 
marine brother of one of their friends, 
who is in dutch with Uncle Sam. Bonita 
Granville, Ray McDonald, Leo Gorcey. 
Director: Robert B. Sinclair. 

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde 201 (127) Sept. 

Drama. Prom Robert Louis Stevenson’s 
fantastic story of the doctor, respected 
and eminent, who discovers a concoc- 
tion whereby he turns into a lustful, 
murderous beast. Spencer Tracy, In- 
grid Bergman, Lana Turner. Director: 
Victor Fleming. 

Dr. Kildare's Wedding Day 145 (82) Aug. 22 
Drama. The main theme concerns the 
tragic death of Dr. Kildare’s affianced 
on the eve of their marriage. Lew 
Ayres, Laraine Day, Lionel Barrymore. 
Director: Harold S. Bucquet. 

Feminine Touch, The .207 (97) Oct. . ... 

Comedy. A brilliant young psychology 
professor writes a treatise on jealousy 
and at the psychological moment finds 
himself jealous of another man in love 
with his wife and himself interested in 
another woman. Don Ameche, Rosa- 
lind Russell, Kay Francis. Director: 
W. S. Van Dyke. 

Flight Command 117. (114) Jan. 3 

Drama. Brings to the screen the U. S. 
Navy’s mighty air armada, and pictures 
air maneuvers at sea with aircraft car- 
riers, battleships and squadrons of 
fighting planes engaged in every phase 
of the service. Robert Taylor, Walter 
Pidgeon, Ruth Hussey. Director: Frank 
Borzage. 

Free and Easy 127 (56) Feb. 28 

Comedy. Sophisticated comedy con- 
cerning the life and loves of playboys 
and playgirls high in the social scale. 
Robert Cummings, Ruth Hussey, Regi- 
nald Owen. Director: Edward Buz- 
zed . 

Get-Away, The 138 (89) June 13 

Melodrama. A fugitive from justice is 
the victim of a nation-wide hunt for 
him by his pursuer, who poses as a 
convict himself. Robert Sterling, Dan 
Dailey, jr., Charles Winninger. Direc- 
tor: Robert Rosson. 

©Gone With the Wind (225) Jan. 17* 

Historical Drama. From Margaret 
Mitchell’s famous love story of Scarlett 
O’Hara and Rhett Butler, with a Civil 
War background. Clark Gable, Vivien 
Leigh. Director: Victor Fleming. 
*National Release Date. 

4^H. M. Pulham, Esq. 212 (119) Dec 

Drama. Based on the best-seller by 
J. P. Marquand. Story is about Pul- 
ham, jr., who breaks away from his 
staid Bostonian mould during the World 
War. He returns with a restless spirit, 
finds work in New York and falls in 
love with a career girl. Family ties 
drag him back; he loses touch with 
her, marries a girl of his own set and 
plods through life methodically. Robert 
Young, Hedy Lamarr, Ruth Hussey. Di- 
rector: King Vidor. 

Honky Tonk 204 (105) Oct. . 

Drama. The hero gets married while 
drunk and settles down in a gold-rush 
boom town. He rules the citizenry with 
an iron hand until a near-tragedy re- 
forms him. Glark Gable, Lana Turner, 
Frank Morgan. Director: Jack Con- 
way. 

I'll Wait for You .135 (75) May 15 

Drama. A young married couple from 


^2 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


JESSE L LASKY 

producer'^ 

“SERGEANT YORK” 

(For Warner Brothers) 

Boxoffice Blue Ribbon Award, October 1941 



In Preparation: 

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BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


63 




the city moves to the country, where, 
after a brush with gangsters and other 
disturbing elements, they find peace 
and happiness. Virginia Weidler, Ro- 
bert Sterling, Marsha Hunt. Director: 
Robert B. Sinclair. 

Kathleen 215 (88) Dec 

Drama. Story of a father’s love for his 
daughter, and the sacrifices that must 
be made before they can be together. 
Shirley Temple, Herbert Marshall, Lar- 
raine Day. Director: Harold S. Buc- 
quet. 

Lady Be Good 202 (111) Sept. ... 

Musical. Adapted from the hit stage 
play. Husband and wife, as a song- 
writing team, become the toast of 
Broadway, but the former gets success 
fever and their paths lead to the di- 
vorce court. A kindly judge irons out 
the difficulty. Robert Young, Ann 
Sothern, Eleanor Powell. Director: 
Norman McLeod. 

Land of Liberty 120 (98) Jan. 24 

Historical. A panorama of American 
history from pre-revolutionary times 
through the industrial and machine 
age, and up to the present day. Com- 
prised of sequences from films pro- 
duced for the theatre during the past 
25 years. Edited by Cecil B. DeMille. 
Historical consultant: Professor James 
T. Shotwell. 

Life Begins for Andy Hardy 146 
(100) Aug. 15 

Comedy. Having at last succeeded in 

graduating from high school, Andy 
Hardy is confronted with his newest 
problem — college or a job? Mickey 
Rooney, Judy Garland, Lewis Stone, 
Ann Rutherford. Director: George B. 

Seitz. 

Love Crazy 134 (99) May 23 

Co7nedy Drama. A scrapping married 
couple go to the divorce courts over 
absurd quarrels, and reconcile in the 
nick of time. William Powell, Myrna 
Loy. Director: Jack Conway. 

Maisie Was a Lady 116 (79) Jan. 10 

Comedy Drama. Maisie, as a maid in 
the wealthy home of Lew Ayres, tries 
very hard to come up to his expecta- 
tions of a lady. Ann Sothern, Lew 
Ayres. Director: Edwin L. Marin. 

Married Bachelor 205 (81) Oct. 

Comedy. Bob Young becomes the radio 
voice which gives wives advice on how 
to hold their husbands, while at the 
same time his own marriage is threat- 
ened. Ruth Hussey, Robert Young, Lee 
Bowman, Felix Bressart. Director: Ed- 
ward Buzzell. 


Mata Hari (Reissue) (89) June 6 

Drama. (3reta Garbo, Ramon Novarro. 

ilMen of Boys Town 132 (106) Apr. 11 


Drama. Father Flanagan, still in debt 
because he can’t turn down homeless 
boys, this time takes up the battle 
against brutal practices in reform 
schools. Spencer Tracy, Mickey Rooney. 
Director: Norman Taurog. 

Navy Blue and Gold (Reissue) (94) July 11 
Drama. James Stewart, Robert Young. 

Penalty, The 129 (80) Mar. 14 

Drama. Concerns the regeneration of 
a gangster and his boy when they are 
forced to hide out on a small farm. 
Lionel Barrymore, Edward Arnold, 
Gene Reynolds. Director: Harold S. 
Bucquet. 

People vs. Dr. Kildare 133 (77) May 2 

Drama. Further adventures of young 
Dr. Kildare, in which he confronts an- 


other problem of medical ethics and 
is shown the right path by his crotch- 
ety friend and counselor, Lionel Barry- 
more. Lew Ayres, Lionel Barrymore, 
Laraine Day. Director: Harold S. Buc- 
quet. 

i^Philadelphia Story, The 119 (112) Jan. 17 
Comedy Drama. Adapted from the 
stage play about the ex-husband who 
turns up when his ex-wife is to be mar- 
ried to another man. Katharine Hep- 
burn, Cary Grant, James Stewart, Ruth 
Hussey. Director: George Cukor. 

Rage in Heaven 128 (85) Mar. 7 

Drama. Story of a man mentally tor- 
tured by the fancied belief that his 
bride is in love with his closest friend. 
He plots a suicide to appear that he 
was murdered by the friend. Robert 
Montgomery, Ingrid Bergman. Director: 
W. S. Van Dyke, II. 

Ringside Maisie 143 (96) Aug. 1 

Comedy. Wise-cracking Maisie gets her- 
self entangled with a stumble-bum 
prizefighter and manages to train him 
into a winner. Ann Sothern, Robert 
Sterling, George Murphy. Director: 
Edwin L. Marin. 

Shadow of the Thin Man 210 (97) Nov. . 

Mystery Comedy. The mystery involves 
a race track ring protected by a man 
appointed by the legislature to run down 
the gang of which he himself is the 
head. William Powell, Myrna Loy, Hen- 
ry O’Neill. Director: W. S. Van Dyke. 

©Smilin' Through 206 (100) Oct 

Musical. From the famous stage pro- 
duction, made once as a silent film with 
Norma Talmadge, and once as a talk- 
ing picture with Norma Shearer. Jean- 
ette MacDonald, Gene Raymond, Brian 
Aherne. Director: Frank Borzage. 


Two-Faced Woman 211 (94) Nov. . 

Romantic Comedy. A wealthy and suc- 
cessful publisher marries a ski instruc- 
tress after a 24-hour whirlwind court- 
ship. Their marriage cools and how 
it is saved furnishes the rest of the 
story and humorous situations. Greta 
Garbo, Melvyn Douglas, Constance 
Bennett. Director: George Cukor. 


Unholy Partners 209 (94) Nov 

Drama. A fighting newspaperman re- 
tmms from World War No. 1 to launch 
New York’s first tabloid against big- 
shot gangsters during a daring era in 
U. S. history. Edward G. Robinson, 
Edward Arnold, Laraine Day. Director: 
Mervyn LeRoy. 

Washington Melodrama 131 (80) Apr. 18 

Melodrama. Topical story of adventure 
and romance in the nation’s capitol, 
with a behind-the-scenes slant on the 
political scene. Frank Morgan, Kent 
Taylor, Ann Rutherford. Director: S. 
Sylvan Simon. 

When Ladies Meet 148 (102) Aug. 29 

Comedy. Concerns a mixup between 
two sweethearts, a wife and her hus- 
band. Joan Crawford, Robert Taylor, 
Greer Garson. Director: Robert 2. 
Leonard. 

Whistling in the Dark 147 (78) Aug. 8 
Comedy Drama. A writer of blood-cur- 
dling radio mysteries is shanghaied 
by a villainous mob nad forced to plan 
a murder for them. Red Skelton, Ann 
Rutherford. Director: S. Sylvan Sim- 
on. 

Wild Man of Borneo 121 (78) Jan. 24 

Comedy. Story of a girl and her fa- 
ther, of youth and middle-age ro- 
mances, against a background of the 
days of medicine shows and penny ar- 
cades. Frank Morgan, Mary Howard, 
Billie Burke. Director: Robert B. Sin- 
clair. 

©Ziegfeld Girl, The 130 (134) Apr. 25 
Musical Extravaganza. Lana Turner 
portrays one of the Ziegfeld girls ^d 
the picture deals with her career, ro- 
mances and ultimate fall from the pin- 
nacle. James Stewart, Judy Garland, 
Lana Turner, Hedy Lamarr. Director: 
Robert Z. Leonard. 


Deadly Game, The 4017 (65) Aug. 8 

Melodrama. Foreign agents try to steal 
the plans for a night air-raid detector 
being perfected by a refugee scientist. 
Charles Farrell, June Lang. Director: 
Phil Rosen. 

Double Trouble 4120 (63) Nov. 21 

Comedy. Two British refugees work in 
a beancanning factory. The firm’s 


Stars Look Down, The 142 (97) July 18 
Drama. British cast. The theme deals 
with the hardships and problems of 
Welsh coal miners. Adapted from the 
novel by A. J. Cronin. Michael Red- 
grave, Margaret Lockwood. Director: 
Carol Reed. 

Tarzan's Secret Treasure 214 (80) Dec. 

Melodrama. Tarzan overcomes un- 
friendly natives, unscrupulous whites 
and the animal kingdom and keeps the 
avaricious expeditionists from exploit- 
ing his mountain of gold. Johnny 
Weissmuller, Maureen O’Sullivan, John 
Sheffield. Director: Richard Thorpe. 

They Met in Bombay 140 (93) June 27 
Drama. Story of international intrigue, 
its locales Burma and Hongkong. Gable 
portrays an officer who, discharged 
from the British army as a card sharp, 
redeems himself. Clark Gable, Rosa- 
lind Russell, Jesse Ralph. Director: 
Clarence Brown. 

Trial of Mary Dugan, The 125 (90) Feb. 14 
Melodrama. On trial for her life, Mary 
Dugan seems doomed to be convicted 
of murder until her lawyer -sweetheart 
reveals the true killer. Laraine Day, 
Robert Young, Marsha Hunt. Director: 
Norman Z. McLeod. 


Monogram 

Arizona Bound 4057 (57) July 19 

Western. First in a series of “Rough 
Riders” westerns, co-starring two vet- 
eran sagebrush heroes. Tim McCoy, 
Buck Jones, Raymond Hatton, Luana 
Walters. Director: Spencer Bennett. 

Borrowed Hero 4121 (65) Dec. 5 

Drama. A sob sister and her prosecut- 
ing attorney-boy friend clean up the 
underworld. Alan Baxter, Florence 
Rice. Director: Lewis D. Collins. 

Bowery Blitzkrieg 4006 (62) Aug. 1 

Comedy Drama. Another “East Side 
Kids” vehicle in which Jordan redeems 
himself for trying to send Gorcey to 
the reform school. Leo Gorcey, Bobby 
Jordan, Warren Hull. Director: Wal- 
lace Fox. 

Dead Man's Shoes 4023 (69) Jan. 15 

Drama. The story of a man, wounded 
in the war and who, through loss of 
memory, steps into a new life as a 
wealthy industrialist, only to find the 
life he can’t remember catching up with 
him through the outstretched palms 
of blackmailers. Wilfrid Lawson, Leslie 
Banks, Judy Kelly. Director: Thomas 
Bentley. 


64 


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WILLIAM A, 

directed 

"MICE GIRL 
"APPOINTMENT FOR LOVE 

Preparing: 

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65 


press agent rents a $100,000 diamond 
bracelet to be used in an advertising 
stunt, but one of the refugees inad- 
vertently seals it up in a can of beans 
— which, when the newspapers get wind 
of it, results in a booming bean busi- 
ness. Harry Langdon, Charles Rogers. 
Director: William West. 

Driftin' Kid, The 4057 (57) Sept. 19 

Western. A sagebrush thriller in 
which the bad men are routed by fire- 
works. Tom Keene, Betty Miles. Pro- 
ducer-director: Robert Tansey. 

Dynamite Canyon 4056 (58) Aug. 8 

Western. The story of a marshal mas- 
querading as a crook to catch the real 
villains. Tom Keene, Sugar Dawn. Pro- 
ducer-Director: Robert Tansey. 

Father Steps Out 4005 (63) July 19 

Melodrama. A railroad president, or- 
dered by his physician to take a short 
holiday, is accidentally thrown from his 
private car and falls in with a couple 
of amusing hoboes. A rival group tries 
to ruin him financially but a reporter, 
in love with his daughter, saves the 
day. Frank Albertson, Jed Prouty, 
Lorna Gray. Director: Jean Yarbrough. 

Flying Wild 4013 (63) Mar. 10 

Air Drama. The “East Side Kids” work 
in an airplane factory and uncover sab- 
otage and saboteurs. Leo Gorcey, Bob- 
by Jordan, Joan Barclay. Director: 
William West. 

Forbidden Trails 4153 ( ) Dec. 26 

Western. Newest in the “Rough Rid- 
ers” series of prairie adventures. Buck 
Jones, Tim McCoy, Raymond Hatton. 
Director: Robert Bradbury. 

Fugitive Valley RB-8 (60) July 30 

Western. 'The Range Busters pretend 
to be holdup artists in order to get into 
the gang’s headquarters. Ray Corrigan. 
John King, Max Terhune. Director: 
S. Roy Luby. 

Gang's All Here, The 4016 (61) June 11 
Melodrama. Insurance racketeers mus- 
cle into the cross-country trucking 
business and almost get away with it — 
until Frankie Darro and his pals swing 
into action. Frankie Darro, Mantan 
Moreland, Marcia Mae Jones. Director: 
Jean Yarbrough. 

Gentleman From Dixie 4119 (63) Sept. 5 
Drama with Music. The story of a 
breeding farm operated by two broth- 
ers, one an innocent ex-convict who 
works as a horse trainer on the farm. 
He breeds a champion and thwarts the 
villain who had railroaded him to the 
pen. Jack LaRue, Marian Marsh, Mary 
Ruth. Director: A1 Herman. 

Gun Man From Bodie 4152 (62) Sept. 26 
Western. Second in the “Rough Rid- 
ers” sagebrush series, in which more 
notches are put in their guns. Buck 
Jones, Tim McCoy, Raymond Hatton. 
Director : Spencer Bennett. 

Hoosier Schoolboy, The (Reissue) 


( ..) Apr. 17 

Drama. 

House of Mystery 4025 (62) May 7 


Mystery Melodrama. Story centers 
around the murder of an eccentric old 
woman in southern France and the 
disapnearance of her clairvoyant com- 
nanion. Based on the novel by A. E. W. 
Mason, author of “Four Feathers.” Ken- 
neth Kent. Judy Kelly, Walter Rilla. 
Director: Walter Summers. 

I Killed That Man 4118 (70) Nov. 28 

Melodrama. A murder takes place with- 
in a prison death chamber just before 


the scheduled execution, with the vic- 
tim the condemned prisoner. Ricardo 
Cortez, Joan Woodbury, Pat Gleason. 
Director: Phil Rosen. 

Invisible Ghost, The .4007 (64) Apr. 25 

Mystery Melodrama. Murder by hyp- 
notic remote control furnishes the plot 
of this story. Bela Lugosi, Polly Ann 
Young, Betty Compson. Director: Jos- 
eph H. Lewis. 

Kid's Last Ride, The RB-5 (55) Feb. 10 
Western. The Range Busters, as peace 
officers, are out to rid a rangeland 
gang of malpractitioners. Ray Corri- 
gan, John King, Max Terhune. Di- 
rector: S. Roy Luby. 

King of the Zombies 4009 (67) May 14 

Melodrama. Through phoney radio 
signals, the arch villain attracts Amer- 
ican aviators to his island stronghold, 
where he makes zombies of them to 
extract military secrets. Dick Purcell, 
Mantan Moreland, Joan Woodbury. Di- 
rector: Jean Yarbrough. 

Let's Go Collegiate 4111 (62) Sept. 12 

Comedy with Music. Story of a pair 
of college boys who place an unedu- 
cated truck driver as a member of their 
rowing crew, only to have the scheme 
kick back at them with hilarious re- 
sults. Frankie Darro, Marcia Mae 
Jones, Jackie Moran. Director: Jean 
Yarbrough. 

Lone Star Law Men 4140 (61) Dec. 5 

Western. Tom Keene portrays a 
straight-shooting member of the famed 
Texas Rangers. Tom Keene, Betty 
Miles. Producer-director: Robert Tan- 
sey. 

Murder by Invitation 4015 (67) June 30 

Melodrama. An eccentric old lady with 
parasitic relatives, all after her millions, 
invites them to spend the week with 
her, during which time the murders 
occur. Wallace Ford, Marian Marsh, 
Sarah Padden. Director: Phil Rosen. 

Pioneers, The 4054 (61) May 10 

Westerji Based on the classic novel by 
James Fenimore Cooper, this finds Tex 
Ritter in a semi-historical role as a 
frontier scout. Tex Ritter, Wanda Mc- 
Kay. Director: A1 Herman. 

Redhead 4008 (64) May 21 

Drama. A millionaire playboy, disin- 
herited by his father, marries a girl 
just acquitted of a murder charge. She 
takes him in hand, rejuvenates him, 
and wins the father’s affection. June 
Lang, Johnny Downs, Eric Blore. Di- 
rector: Edward Cahn. 

Hidin' the Cherokee Trail 4053 (61) Feb. 25 
Western. The Texas Ranger’s new as- 
signment is to capture the bandit chief 
of Cherokee Strip. Tex Ritter, Betty 
Miles. Director: Spencer G. Bennett. 

Riding the Sunset Trail 4058 (56) Oct. 31 
Western. After thinking he got rid of 
his halfbrother, the villain presents a 
forged will which leaves him all of the 
brother’s money, ranch and cattle. The 
“murdered” man shows up in time to 
keep his daughters from being put off 
the land. Tom Keene, Betty Miles, 
Frank Yaconelli. Sugar Dawn. Direc- 
tor: Robert Tansey. 

Riot Squad 4128 (55) Dec. 12 

Melodrama. Acting under police orders, 
a doctor joins a criminal gang as the 
vrouD’s medico, tips off the law as to 
the gangsters’ doings, and one by one 
has them arrested. Richard Cromwell, 


John Miljan. Producer-director: Ed- 
ward Finney. 

Road to Happiness .4101 (84) Dec. 19 

Musical. John Boles returns to the 
screen after a long absence, in the role 
of a father struggling to give his tal- 
ented son a musical education. John 
Boles, Mona Barrie, Billy Lee. Director: 
Phil Rosen. 

Roar ol the Press 4002 (72) Apr. 30 

Action Drama. The irregularities of 
the habits and hours pursued by news- 
papermen, with a background story of 
the uncovering of a pair of murders 
and a fifth-column expose. Wallace 
Ford, Jean Parker. Director: Phil 
Rosen. 

Saddle Mountain Roundup 4159 

(GO) Aug. 29 

Western. A murder mystery yarn is 
woven into this western, with suspicion 
resting on the shoulders of half the 
cast. Ray Corrigan, John King, Max 
Terhune. Director: S. Roy Luby. 

Sign of the Wolf 4004 ..(69) Mar. 25 

Drama. Adapted from a Jack London 
story about the heroism of two trained 
Alsatian shepherd dogs. Grace Bradley, 
Michael Whalen. Director: Howard 
Bretherton.- 

Silver Stallion 4018 (57) May 28 

Western. The story of a wild stallion, 
a young rebel and a reckless girl, bat- 
tling against odds and outlaws. David 


Sharpe, Chief Thundercloud, LeRoy 
Mason. Producer-director: Edward 
Finney. 

Siren of the South Seas (Reissue) 

3701 (70) Nov. 14 


Drama. Formerly “Paradise Isle,” this 
film is the poignant romance of a 
South Sea Island girl for a white man 
— a blind artist whom she nurses back 
to health. Movita, Wan-en Hull. Di- 
rector: Arthur G. Collins. 

Spooks Run Wild 4106 (64) Oct. 24 

Comedy Drama. The Kids are sent to 
a summer camp for underprivileged 
children, in a neighborhood where a 
blood-sucking monster is allegedly on 
the loose. East Side Kids, Bela Lugosi, 
Dorothy Short. Director: Phil Rosen. 

Stolen Paradise 4124 (80) Oct. 31 

Melodrama. A story of adolescence 
and the unbridled passion of youth 
seeking expression and enjoyment with 
no knowledge of the cost. Leon Jan- 
ney, Eleanor Hunt. Director: Louis 
Gasnier. 

Tonto Basin Outlaws 4160 (60) Oct. 10 
Western. The “Range Busters” act as 
undercover agents in Wyoming to com- 
bat a gang of cattle rustlers. The ro- 
mantic interest is supplied by a news- 
paperwoman who goes West to cover 
the crime wave. John King, Ray Cor- 
rigan, Max Terhune, Jan Wiley. Di- 
rector: S. Roy Luby. 

Top Sergeant Mulligan 4107 (70) Oct. 17 
Comedy Drama. Two drugstore propri- 
etors join the army to escape a bill 
collector who has been dunning them, 
only to find that the latter is in the 
army too. Nat Pendleton, Frank Fay- 
len, Charles Hall. Director: Jean Yar- 
brough. 

Trail of the Silver Spurs R3-4 (60) Jan. 5 
Western. The Range Busters set out 
to solve a desert mystery involving the 
sudden wealth of a man claiming to 
have a secret gold mine. They find 
the money was stolen from the Denver 


66 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


HMUEL BHOHTOI 



MARTIN EDEN 

(Columbia) 

with GLENN FORD and CLAIRE TREVOR 

A Samuel Bronston Production 

Producer: 

BRITISH FOREIGN LEGION 

a forthcoming spectacle production 
written by Burnet Hershey 

MUTINY OF THE ELSINORE 

One of Jack London's most vital stories. 


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67 



mint. Max Terhune, Ray Corrigan, 
John King. Director: S. Roy Luby. 

Tumbledown Ranch in Arizona RB-G 

(62) Apr. 20 

Western. John King, injured in a 
rodeo, loses consciousness and dreams 
he is back in the days of the lawless 
west, riding the range and righting 
wrongs with his pair of pals. Ray 
Corrigan, John King, Max Tehune. Di- 
rector: S. Roy Luby. 

Underground Rustlers .4161 (57) Nov. 21 

Western. This time the “Range Bust- 
ers” set out to end the great gold con- 
spiracy of 1869. Ray Corrigan, John 
King, Max Terhune, Gwen Gaze. Di- 
rector: S. Roy Luby. 

Wanderers of the West 4055 (58) June 25 
Western. Tom Keene tracks down his 
father’s killer, who had changed his 
name and become foreman of a ranch. 
Tom Keene, Sugar Dawn. Betty Miles, 
Tom Siedel. Director: Robert Hill. 

Wranglers' Roost RB-7 (57) June 4 

Western. In which the Range Busters 
trail the “Black Bart,” a masked bandit 
who uses an unloaded rifle. Ray Cor- 
rigan, John King, Max Terhune. Di- 
rector: S. Roy Luby. 

You're Out of Luck 4014 (62) Jan. 20 

Comedy Mystery. An elevator boy and 
a janitor in an apartment hotel solve 
the mystery of two murders. Frankie 
Darro, Mantan Moreland, Kay Sutton. 
Director: Howard Bretherton. 

Zis Boom Bah 4112 (62) Nov. 7 

Musical Comedy. Stars Grade Hayes, 
nightclub entertainer, and her son, 
Peter Lind Hayes. Story is about a son 
who knows nothing of his mother and 
is being raised in collegiate luxury by 
his grandparents — the mother bearing 
the expense — and turns into a snob. The 
mother gets the students to put on an 
amateur musical show — which helps 
the college and redeems her boy. Grace 
Hayes, Mai-y Healy, Peter Lind Hayes. 
Director: William Nigh. 

Paramount 

®*Aloma of the South Seas 4038 

Aug. 29 

Romatic Drama. As a “ ‘Helen of Troy’ 
of the South Sea Islands,” it took a 
rebellion and an earthquake to decide 
between the two men who wanted her. 
Dorothy Lamour, Jon Hall, Lynne Over- 
man. Director: Alfred Santell. 

Among the Living 4108 (69) Dec. 19 

Horror Melodrama. Story deals with 
twin brothers, one the heir to the town 
and factories his father created, the 
other, a hopeless maniac, believed dead, 
but who follows a long trail of strang- 
ulation murders. A case of confused 
identities results in near death for the 
sane brother. Albert Dekker, Frances 


Farmer. Susan Hayward. Director: 
Stuart Heisler. 

Birth of the Blues 4109 (84) Nov. 7 


Musical. Delves into the origin and 
history of modern popular music, and 
is dedicated to the lads in Memphis 
and New Orleans who originated “jazz.” 
Bing Crosby, Mary Martin, Brian Don- 
levy, Carolyn Lee, Rochester. Director: 
Victor Schertzinger. 

Border Vigilantes 4053 (70) Apr. 18 

Western. One of the Hopalong series. 
Supposedly a respected citizen of Sil- 
ver City, the leader of the vigilantes 
seeking the capture of train robbers, is 


in reality the outlaw chief himself. 
William Boyd, Russell Hayden, Andy 
Clyde, Frances Gifford. Director: Der- 
win Abrahams. 

Buy Me That Town 4102 (79) Oct. 3 

Comedy Drama. New York racketeers 
“take over” a typical small mid-western 
town when their head man is drafted. 
A defense order boom in the town and 
the love of a girl reforms them. Lloyd 
Nolan, Constance Moore, Albert Dekker. 
Director: Eugene Forde. 

^Caught in the Draft 4032 (82) July 4 
Comedy. Topical story of the nation’s 
conscription program, which traces Bob 
Hope’s adventures as a draftee. Bob 
Hope, Dorothy Lamour, Eddie Bracken. 
Director: David Butler. 

Doomed Caravan 4051 (62) Jan. 10 

Western. A Hopalong Cassidy sage- 
brusher in which Hoppy and his pal. 
Lucky, come to the rescue of a courage- 
ous woman pioneer who captains a 
train bringing supplies to the rough, 
tough west. William Boyd, Russell Hay- 
den, Andy Clyde. Director: Lesley 
Selander. 

Flying Blind 4037 (70) Aug. 29 

Aviation Drama. Third in a series of 
of aviation melodramas. A honeymoon 
airline, specializing in transporting 
eloping couples, is commandeered by 
foreign spies seeking to smuggle a vital 
bomber part out of the country. Rich- 
ard Arlen, Jean Parker, Dick Purcell. 
Director: Frank McDonald. 

Forced Landing 4033 (62) July 11 

Melodrama. Second in a series of avia- 
tion melodramas. Intrigue and sabo- 
tage on a tropical island, bringing out 
Uncle Sam’s hemispheric defense 
through fortification of a Latin-Amer- 
ican republic. Richard Arlen, Eva Ga- 
bor, J. Carrol Naish. Director: Gordon 
Wiles. 

Glamour Boy 4110 (80) Dec. 5 

Comedy Drama. A behind-the-scenes- 
in-Hollywood story of an adolescent 
screen star, his trials and tribulations. 
Jackie Cooper, Susanna Foster, Walter 
Abel, Daryl Hickman. Director: Ralph 
Murphy. 

Henry Aldrich for President 4104 

(75) Oct. 24 

Comedy. Another in the “Aldrich Fam- 
ily” series, this is the first in which 
Jimmy Lydon replaces Jackie Cooper 
in the title role. Jimmy Lydon, Charles 
Smith, June Preisser. Director: Hugh 
Bennett. 

Hold Back the Dawn 4103 (116) Sept. 26 

Drama. Story of a man with an un- 
savory past who marries for conveni- 
ence in order to hasten his U. S. entry 
from Mexico, but who learns to love 
his trusting wife and to regret his past. 
Paulette Goddard, Charles Boyer, Olivia 
De Havilland. Director: Mitchell Lei- 
sen. 

Wanted Wings 4028 (135) May 30 

Aviation Drama. How the army molds 
and trains its warbirds, furnishes the 
background for this story of four fly- 
ing cadets and two young women. Wil- 
liam Holden, Ray Milland, Veronica 
Lake. Director: Mitchell Leisen. 

In Old Colorado 4052 (66) Mar. 14 

Western. Hoppy goes to Colorado to 
buy a herd of cattle, and arrives in 
time to settle an unwarranted feud be- 
tween ranchers and nesters and to run 
to earth the undercover villains who 
have been preying on both factions. 


William Boyd, Russell Hayden, Andy 
Clyde. Director: Howard Bretherton. 

Kiss the Boys Goodbye 4035 (85) Aug. 1 
Musical Farce. The south wins over the 
north in the Civil War in this satirical 
play from the original Clare Booth 
story. Don Ameche, Mary Martin, Os- 
car Levant. Director: Victor Schertz- 
inger. 

IILady Eve, The 4022 (97) Mar. 21 

Comedy. A woman transatlantic card 
sharp falls in love with her victim, is 
jilted by him, poses as another to win 
him back, marries him for revenge, then 
discovers she loves him. Barbara Stan- 
wyck, Henry Fonda, Charles Coburn, 
Director-screenplay: Preston Sturges. 

Las Vegas Nights 4023 (86) Mar. 28 

Musical Comedy. Heirs inherit a de- 
crepit place and ultimately beat out 
a couple of slick birds. Tommy Dorsey, 
Lillian Cornell, Bert Wheeler. Director: 
Ralph Murphy. 

Life With Henry 4016 (82) Jan. 24 

Comedy Drama. The second chapter 
in Henry’s screen career finds him mak- 
ing application to accompany a boys’ 
trip to Alaska, for which he tries to 
earn the necessary $100.00 to make him 
eligible, plus certain character qualifi- 
cations. Jackie Cooper, Leila Ernst, 
Kay Stewart. Producer-director: Jay 
Theodore Reed. 

©Louisiana Purchase 4136 (98) Dec. 25 

Musical Comedy. From the stage hit, 
concerning a ring of four political trick- 
sters who finally face a senatorial in- 
vestigation. Bob Hope, Vera Zorina, 
Victor Moore. Director: Irving Cum- 
mings. 

Mad Doctor, The .4018 (90) Feb. 14 

Mystery Melodrama. The story of a 
mad doctor who marries heiresses and 
then kills them. Ultimately he falls 
in love with a beautiful girl but his 
past catches up with him. Basil Rath- 
bone, Ellen Drew. Director: Tim Whe- 
lan. 

Monster and the Girl, The 4020 

(65) Feb. 28 

Horror Melodrama. A lad is executed 
for a murder of which he is innocent. 
Before dying, he gives a scientist per- 
mission to use his brain, which is trans- 
ferred to the body of a live ape. Ellen 
Drew, Onslow Stevens. Director: Stuart 
Heisler. 

New York Town 4105 (94) Oct. 31 

Drama. A romance springs up between 
a New York street photographer and a 
girl out of work, who gets the job of 
selling the photos. Fred MacMurray, 
Mary Martin, Robert Preston, Akim 
Tamiroff. Director: Charles Vidor. 

Night of January 16, The 4106 (79) Nov. 28 

Mystery Melodrama. Concerns the mur- 
der of a world-famed industrialist. El- 
len Drew is an innocent suspect. El- 
len Drew, Robert Preston, Nils Asther. 
Director: William Clemens. 

Nothing But the Truth 4101 (90) Oct. 17 

Comedy. Farce concerning a stockbrok- 
er who bets $10,000 he will not tell a 
lie for 24 hours. Bob Hope, Paulette 
Goddard, Edward Arnold. Director: El- 
liott Nugent. 

One Night in Lisbon 4029 (97) June 13 

Romantic Comedy. A Texan flies Amer- 
ican bombers to Britain, where he falls 
in love with an English girl. Their 
whirlwind romance and courtship with 
the European war as background, fur- 


68 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


TAY GARNETT 

DIRECTOR 


In Production: 

"MY FAVORITE SPY" 

For Harold Lloyd Productions 


R K O 



BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


69 



nishes the plot. Madeleine Carroll, 
Fred MacMurray. Producer-director: 
Edward H. Griffith. 

Parson of Panamint, The 4031 (84) Aug. 22 

Western. One of Peter B. Kyne’s pop- 
ular western novels is brought to the 
screen, in this story of a minister of 
the sagebrush and a dance-hall girl. 
Charles Ruggles, Ellen Drew, Phillip 
Terry. Director: William McGann. 

Pirates on Horseback 4054 (75) May 23 
Western. Hopalong Cassidy and his pals 
hunt for a lost gold mine to solve a 
desert murder mystery. William Boyd, 
Russell Hayden, Andy Clyde. Director: 
Lesley Selander. 

Power Dive 4026 (71) Apr. 25 

Aviation Drama. First in a projected 
Series of three aviation adventures star- 
ring Arlen. The building and testing 
of fast pursuit planes furnish the back- 
ground for this story. Richard Arlen, 
Jean Parker, Roger Pryor. Director: 
James Hogan. 

Reaching for the Sun 4027 (90) May 2 

Comedy Drama. A Michigan woodsman 
and clam digger goes to work in a De- 
troit automobile plant. His only ambi- 
tion is to own an outboard motor, un- 
til he has to choose between the boat 
and a girl. Joel McCrea, Ellen Drew. 
Producer-director: William A. Wellman. 

Road to Zanzibar 4025 (90) Apr. 11 

Comedy. The locale is Africa where a 
pair of chiselers are making themselves 
a bankroll through operating fake carn- 
ival sideshows. But two stranded Brook- 
lyn show girls take them for a buggy 
ride for their money; they are captured 
by cannibals: but all ends on a happy 
and romantic note. Bing Crosby, Bob 
Hope, Dorothy Lamour. Director: Vic- 
tor Schertzinger. 

Round-Up, The 4024 (90) Apr. 4 

Western. An early west locale with a 
triangle plot of two men in love with 
the same woman. Richard Dix, Preston 
Foster, Patricia Morison. Director: Les- 
ley Selander. 

Second Chorus 4014 (88) Jan. 3 

Musical. A behind-the-scenes revela- 
tion of the activities of a popular dance 
band, with Artie Shaw and his orches- 
tra supplying the authentic atmosphere. 
Fred Astaire, Paulette Goddard, Artie 
Shaw and Orchestra, Burgess Mered- 
ith. Director: H. C. Potter. 

©Shepherd of the Hills, The 4034 
(98) July 18 

Outdoor Drama. From the Harold Bell 
Wright novel with a rugged mountain 
background, depicting the earthy qual- 
ities, the quaint philosophies, the loves, 
hates and frustrations of the backwoods 
people. John Wayne, Betty Field, Harry 
Carey. Director: Henry Hathaway. 

Skylark 4107 (94) Nov. 21 

Comedy Drama. Based on the stage 
success by Samson Raphaelson, the 
story concerns a young advertising ex- 
ecutive whose five-year marriage is 
about to go on the rocks because of 
his commercial ambition. Claudette 
Colbert, Ray Milland, Brian Aherne. 
Producer-Director: Mark Sandrich. 

There's Magic in Music 4021 (79) May 16 

Musical. Using the National Music 
Camp at Interlochen, Michigan, as its 
locale, the story is about a burlesque 
show entertainer, rescued in a raid by 
a lad whose father directs the music 
camp, in which she is placed. She at- 
tains fame and popularity but only after 


an endless series of events which try 
and test her character. Allan Jones, 
Susanna Poster. Producer-director: An- 
drew L. Stone. 

Victory 4015 (79) Jan. 17 

Drama. From Joseph Conrad’s immor- 
tal story of a man brought up to be 
indifferent toward life and in the be- 
lief that all effort is futile. It is laid 
against a background of islands in the 
Java Sea. Fredric March, Betty Field. 
Director: John Cromwell. 

^©Virginia 4019 (109) Feb. 21 

Romantic Drama. A New York actress 
without funds returns to Virginia to 
dispose of her ancestoral estate. She 
shocks her old friends and neighbors 
by her scorn for tradition, but ultimate- 
ly breeding and Cupid assert them- 
selves and she chooses Southern pov- 
erty with the man she loves to a life 
of ease as wife of a Northern million- 
aire. Madeleine Carroll, Fred Mac- 
Murray, Carolyn Lee. Producer-Direc- 
tor: Edward H. Griffith. 

West Point Widow .4030 (64) June 20 

Drama. West Pointers can’t wed, but 
this cadet had a wife and child wait- 
ing for him to graduate. Working as 
a nurse in a hospital, the wife meets 
an interne who falls in love with her. 
When her husband graduates, he spurns 
her and she marries the interne. Anne 
Shirley, Richard Carlson, Richard Den- 
ning. Director: Robert Siodmak. 

Wide Open Town .4055 (78) Aug. 8 

Western. Hopalong Cassidy goes on the 
trail of cattle rustlers to clean out a 
gang of outlaws headed by an iron- 
willed woman. William Boyd, Russell 
Hayden, Andy Clyde, Evelyn Brent. Di- 
rector: Lesley Selander. 

World Premiere 4036 (67) Aug. 15 

Comedy Drama. In which the Holly- 
wood custom of premiering new pic- 
tures in remote spots around the coun- 
try is subjected to satirical treatment, 
with a nest of foreign spies who com- 
prise the audience, thrown in for good 
measure. John Barrymore, Frances 
Farmer. Director: Ted Tetzlaff. 

You're the One 4017 (81) Feb. ') 

Musical Comedy. Story takes place in 
a resort specializing in reducing treat- 
ments, to which comes an orchestra 
leader, who must lose 50 lbs. to get a 
sponsor. The dance band background 
provides the stage for five musical num- 
bers. Bonnie Baker, Orrin ’Tucker, Al- 
bert Dekker. Director: Ralph Murphy. 

Producers Releasing Corp. 

Billy the Kid in Santa Fe 162 

( ) July 11 

Western. Sixth in the series relating to 
the adventures of a modern Billy the 
Kid. Bob Steele, Rex Lease, A1 St. 
John. Director: Sherman Scott. 

Billy the Kid Wanted 257 (64) Oct. 10 
Western. The swimming star in the role 
of the modern Robin Hood plays crook 
against crook for the benefit of the 
farmers. Buster Crabbe, A1 St John. 
Director: Sherman Scott. 

Billy the Kid's Fighting Pals 161 

(62) Apr. 18 

Western. Adventures of a newspaper 
publisher in a frontier town. Bob Steele, 
A1 St. John. Director: Sherman Scott. 

Billy the Kid's Range War 160 

(61) Jan. 24 

Western. The hero clears himself of 
wrongdoing by revealing another mas- 


querading as himself. Bob Steele, Al 
St. John. Director: Peter Stewart. 

Billy the Kid's Roundup. .258 . ..(58) . Dec. 12 
Western. The hero cleans up a town 
town after the sheriff is murdered. 
Buster Crabbe. Al St. John. Director: 
Sherman Scott. 

Blonde Comet 116 (67) Dec. 26 

Melodrama. A thrill-mad girl racing 
driver is tamed by another daredevil 
of the speedway. Robert Kent, Vir- 
ginia Vale, Vince Barnett, Barney Old- 
field. Director: William Beaudine. 

Caught in the Act .107 (62) Feb. 7 

Comedy-Drama. The construction fore- 
man gets mixed up with the blonde 
member of a gang of racketeers and 
frees his boss from their clutches. Henry 
Armetta, Iris Meredith, Robert Baldwin. 
Director: Jean Yarborough. 

Criminals Within ..111 ...(67) June 27 

Mystery Melodrama. Espionage and a 
murder myster in an army camp. Eric 
Linden, Ann Doran, Ben Alexander. Di- 
rector: Joseph Lewis. 

Dangerous Lady .115 (63) Sept. 12 

Comedy Drama. Husband detective and 
wife lawyer solve a couple of murders. 
Neil Hamilton, June Storey, Douglas 
Fowley. 

Desperate Cargo 113. (69) July 4 

Melodrama. Stranded show girls pro- 
mote passage on a Clipper plane and 
outwit crooks who later take it in 
charge. Ralph Byrd, Carol Hughes, 
Julie Duncan, Jack Mulhall. Director: 
William Beaudine. 

Devil Bat (69) 

Mystery. A mad scientist destroys his 
victims with a giant bat, attracted by 
a shaving lotion, and dies via the same 
weapon. Bela Lugosi, Dave O’Brien, Su- 
zanne Kaaren. 

Double Cross 111 (68) June 27 

Melodrama. A police captain’s son a- 
venges the death of a fellow officer. 
Kane Richmond, Pauline Moore, Wynne 
Gibson. Director: Albert Kelley. 

Emergency Landing .109 (67) Apr. 25 

Action drama. A spoiled debutante, 
foreign spies and a test pilot tangle in 
a desert weather-bureau outpost. Carol 
Hughes, Forest Tucker, Evelyn Brent. 
Director: William Beaudine. 

Federal Fugitives 108 (64) Mar. 29 

Melodrama. An intelligence officer 

solves sabatoge in a plastic plane fac- 
tory. Neil Hamilton, Doris Day, Victor 
Varconi. Director: William Beaudine. 

Gambling Daughters. .124 (62) Aug. 1 

Melodrama. A French school instructor 
who teaches gambling and stealing on 
the side is brought to justice by an in- 
surance agent. Cecilia Parker, Roger 
Pryor, Robert Baldwin. Director: Max 
Nosseck. 

Hard Guy 205 (68) Oct. 17 

Drama. Night club owners and their 
female entertainers lose out in the gin 
marriage racket that forces rich play- 
boys to pay heavily. Jack LaRue, Mary 
Healy, Kane Richmond. Director: El- 
mer Clifton. 

Jungle Man .126 (62) Oct. 10 

Aviation Drama. A jungle doctor fights 
wild animals and savages to obtain a 
serum for a rare disease. Buster Crabbe, 
Sheila Darcy, Vince Barnett. Director: 
Harry Fraser. 


70 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


Only Once Since the 
BOXOFFICE Blue Ribbon 
Award Was Established in 
IQ32 Idas a Picture Received 
a SPECIAL MERIT AWARD 
That Picture Was 


OTHER 

SELZNICK 

PRODUCTIONS 
THAT RECEIVED 

BLUE RIBBON 
AWARDS: 

VIVA VILLA 

Blue Ribbon Award Winner, May, 1934 

DAVID COPPERFIELD 

Blue Ribbon Award Winner, January, 1935 

A TALE OF TWO CITIES 

Blue Ribbon Award Winner, January, 1936 

REBECCA 

Blue Ribbon Award Winner, April, 1940 

DAVID O. SELZNICK PRODUCTIONS 



Law of the Timber 215 Dec. 19 

Action Drama. An eastern dude and a 
lumberman’s daughter round up the 
gang who killed her father, and save a 
big defense order. Marjorie Reynolds, 
Monte Blue, J. Farrell MacDonald. Di- 
rector: Bernard B. Ray. 

Lone Rider Ambushed 167 (64) Sept. 5 

Western. The hero releases a bank rob- 
ber from prison to trail him to the loot. 
George Houston, A1 St. John, Maxine 
Leslie. Director: Sam Newfield. 

Lone Rider Crosses the Rio, The 164 

(61) Feb. 28 

Western. The Rider returns a kidnap- 
ed son of a banker to his home and 
settles with the crook. George Houston, 
A1 St. John, Roquell Verria. Director: 
Sam Newfield. 

Lone Rider Fights Back 168 (64) Nov. 7 

Western. The Rider and his buddy 
again put the forces of evil to rout. 
George Houston, A1 St. John. Direc- 
tor: Sam Newfield. 

Lone Rider in Frontier Fury 106 

(GO) Aug. 8 

Western. A case of murder and mistak- 
en identity, with The Lone Rider win- 
ning the showdown. George Houston, 
Al St. John, Hillary Brooke. Director: 
Sam Newfield. 

Lone Rider in Ghost Town 165 (64) May 16 
Western. The hero rounds up a gang 
of claim jumpers and releases the girl’s 
father from their custody. George Hous- 
ton, Al St. John, Alaine Brandes. Di- 
rector: Sam Newfield. 

Lone Rider Rides On 163 (64) Jan. 10 

Western. A son grows up to avenge the 
murder of his parents. (3eorge Houston, 
Al St. John, Hillary Brooke. Director: 
Sam Newfield. 

Marked Men 114 (67) Oct. 31 

Melodrama. An innocent, forced to 
break jail with hardened convicts, later 
rounds them up. Warren Hull, Isabel 
Jewell. 

Miracle Kid 213 (G8) Nov. 14 

Melodrama. A girl proves to her be- 
throthed, a professional boxer, that all 
his bouts are bought in advance. Tom 
Neal, Carol Huehes, Vicki Lester. Di- 
rector: William Beaudine. 

Mr. Celebrity 114 (69) Oct. 31 

Melodrama. A veterinarian and a youth 
defeat grandparents’ efforts to get the 
boy, and train a racer as a long-shot 
winner. Buzzy Henry. James Seay, Jim 
Jeffries, Clara Kimball Young, Francis 
X. Bushman. Director: William Beau- 
dine. 

Outlaws of the Rio Grande 155 (53) Mar. 7 
Western. A marshal and a stooee clean 
up a band of counterfeiters. Tim Mc- 
Coy, Virginia Carpenter, Charles King. 
Director: Peter Stewart. 

Paper Bullets 123 (69) May 30 

Melodrama.. An expose of vice and 
crooked politics in a large city. Joan 
Woodbury. Jack LaRue, Linda Ware. 
Director: Phil Rosen. 

RegTar Fellers 125 (65) Aug. 15 

Comedy-drama. The comic-strip kids 
design fantastic inventions to trap fifth 
columnists. Billy Lee, Carl (Alfalfa) 
Switzer, Buddy Boles. Director: Arthur 
Dreifuss. 

Secret Evidence 107 (63) Ian. 3 

?/[elodrama. Circumstantial evidence 
almost convicts a man of murder. Mar- 
’orie Reynolds, Charles Quigley. Direc- 
tor: William Nigh. 


South of Panama 110. ...(66) Apr. 18 

Spy Drama. Adventure over a secret 
paint formula for airplanes. Roger 
Pryor, Virginia Vale, Lionel Royce. Di- 
rector: Jean Yarborough. 

Texas Marshal, The 156 (58) May 30 

Western. A modern criminologist brings 
his weapons to bear on a gang of mur- 
derers seeking rich tin ore land. Tim 
McCoy, Kay Leslie. Director: Peter 
Stewart. 

Swamp Woman 230 (68) Dec. 5 

Drama. A dancer of questionable rep- 
utation returns to her native swamp- 
land to save her niece from an unhappy 
marriage. Ann Corio, Jack LaRue, 
Mary Hull. Director: Elmer Clifton. 

RKO Radio 

A Girl, a Guy and a Gob 120 (91) Mar. 14 

Comedy. The boss, the steno and her 
boy-friend in a Harold Lloyd comedy. 
George Murphy, Lucille Ball, Edmond 
O’Brien. Director: Richard Wallace 

All That Money Can Buy 205 (106) .Oct. 17 
Drama. From “The Devil and Daniel 
Webster,” by Stephen Vincent Benet, 
this is an allegorical subject in which 
Webster is beset by Satan and outwits 
him. Edward Arnold, Walter Huston, 
Anne Shirley. Director: William Die- 
terle. 

Along the Rio Grande 183 (66) Feb. 7 
Western. Cowhands run down the kill- 
er of their employer. Tim Holt, Ray 
Whitley. Director: Edward Killy. 

Bandit Trail .281 (60) Oct. 10 

Western. A youngster, egged-on by a 
bandit uncle, fronts for gang but helps 
the law. Tim Holt, Ray Whitley. Di- 
rector: Edward Killy. 

Bringing Up Baby .163 (102) May 2 

Comedy. Reissue. Katharine Hepburn. 
Cary Grant. Director Howard Hawks. 

yCitizen Kane 201 .(120) Sept. 5 

Drama. The life and methods of a 
world-enveloping newspaper publisher. 
Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Dorothy 
Comingore, Ruth Warrick. Director: 
Orson Welles. 

Convoy .161 (78) Jan. 3 

Drama. The North Atlantic fleet of 
England ferry the life-line. Clive Brook, 
John Clements, Judy Campbell. Di- 
rector: Pen Tennyson. 

Cyclone on Horseback 185 (58) June 13 
Western. Difficulties of telephone 
linesmen across the west. Tim Holt, 
Marjorie Reynolds, Ray Whitley. Di- 
rector: Edward Killy. 

Devil and Miss Jones, The 122 (92) Apr. 11 
Comedy. New York shop girl plunges 
into complications via romantic inclina- 
tions. Jean Arthur, Robert Cummings, 
Charles Coburn. Director: Sam Wood. 

Dude Cowboy 282 (59) Dec. 12 

Western. A government engraver is 
kidnapped by a counterfeit ring, who 
force him to print phoney money for 
them. Tim Holt, Marjorie Reynolds, 
Ray Whitley. Director: David Howard. 

©Dumbo 293 (64) Oct. 31 

Disney Cartoon. Story of an elephant 
who learned to fly. Director: Ben Sharp- 
steen. 

Father Takes a Wife .204 (79) Oct. 3 

Comedy. Father wants to marry an 
actress and son and his wife try to 
make the best of the bargain. Adolphe 


Menjou, Gloria Swanson, Signe Hasso. 
Director: Jack Hively. 

Footlight Fever .119 (69) Mar. 21 

Musical Comedy. Stage producers with 
a shoestring bankroll pose as sailors to 
obtain backing from an old lady whose 
true love was a sailor. Alan Mowbray, 
Donald McBride, Elyse Knox. Director: 
Irving Reis. 

Frank Buck's Jungle Cavalcade 166 

(77) June 27 

Animal Adv. Jungle life as shot by 
Frank Buck. Contains cuts of two 
earlier pictures. 

Gay Falcon, The 206 (67) Oct. 24 

Mystery. Adventures of a modern Robin 
Hood from Michael Arlen’s stories. 
George Sanders, Wendy Barrie, Allen 
Jenkins. Director: Irving Reis. 

Hurry, Charlie, Hurry 129 (62) July 25 

Comedy. Errol becomes involved in 
ludicrous adventures as head of a 
screwball family. Leon Errol, Mildred 
Coles, Kenneth Howell. Director: 
Charles E. Roberts. 

Lady Scarface 203 (66) Sept. 26 

Comedy Drama. Story of a feminine 
gang boss with emphasis on comedy. 
Judith Anderson, Dennis O’Keefe, Eric 
Blore. Director: Frank Woodruff. 

Let's Make Music 115 (84) Jan. 17 

Musical. Small town music teacher 
writes a hit novelty tune. Bob Crosby, 
Jean Rogers, Elisabeth Risdon. Direc- 
tor: Leslie Goodwins. 

Little Foxes, The 175 (116) Aug. 29 

Drama. Film version of the stage play 
by Lillian Heilman, depicting the avar- 
ice for money by an unsavory family 
of one sister and two brothers. Bette 
Davis, Herbert Marshall, Richard Carl- 
son. Director: William Wyler. 

Little Men 110 (84) Jan. 10 

Drama. Good qualities of his swindler 
father, cause the adopted son to over- 
come his own bad habits. Kay Francis, 
Jack Oakie, George Bancroft. Director: 
Norman Z. McLeod. 

Look Who's Laughing 209 (79) Nov. 21 

Comedy. Two of radio’s top comedy 
teams in a laugh-fest. Edgar Bergen 
& Charlie McCarthy, Fibber McGee & 
Molly, Lucille Ball. Director: Allan 
Dwan. 

Melody for Three 124 (67) Mar. 28 

Drama. Dr. Christian unveils a violin 
prodigy. Jean Hersholt, Fay Wray, 
Schuyler Standish. Director: Erie C. 
Kenton. 

Mexican Spitfire's Baby 210 (70) Nov. 28 
The Spitfire and Lord Epping, her ad- 
visor, travel in Scotland. Lupe Velez, 
Leon Errol, ZaSu Pitts, Charles “Bud- 
dy” Rogers. Director: Leslie Goodwins. 

Mr. and Mrs. Smith 117 (95) Jan. 31 

Comedy. After three years, the Smiths 
learn their marriage was illegal. Carole 
Lombard, Robert Montgomery, Gene 
Raymond, Jack Carson. Director: Al- 
fred Hitchcock. 

My Life With Caroline .135 (81) Aug. 1 
Comedy Drama. Remake of a French 
farce, portraying a husband who re- 
wins the affections of an emotional and 
fUghty wife. Ronald Colman, Anna Lee. 
Producer-Director: Lewis Milestone. 

Parachute Battalion 202 (75) Sept. 12 

Drama. Defense-minded picture of the 
parachute troops of the U. S. Army. 
Robert Preston, Nancy Kelly, Harry 


72 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 



BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


73 



Carey, Buddy Ebsen. Director: Leslie 
Goodwins. 

Play Girl 121 (77) Feb. 14 

Drama. A breach of promise racket and 
its pitfalls. Kay Francis, James Elli- 
son, Nigel Bruce. Director: Frank 
Woodruff. 

Playmaies 212 (96) Dec. 26 

Musical Comedy. A down-at-the-heels, 
Shakespearean actor angles for a radio 
contract. Kay Kyser, Jolin Barrymore, 
Lupe Velez, Patsy Kelly. Producer-di- 
rector: David Butler. 

©Reluctant Dragon 191 (73) June 20 

Fairy Tale. Combining cartoons and 
people the story of Disney studios is 
revealed. Bob Benchley. Director: Al- 
fred L. Werker. 

Repent at Leisure 125 (66) Apr. 4 

Drama. Story of a hasty wedding and 
the serio-comic consequences. Kent 
Taylor, Wendy Barrie, George Barbier. 
Director: Prank Woodruff. 

Robbers of the Range 184 (61) Apr. 18 

Western. Tim and Ray foil a band of 
outlaws. Tim Holt, Ray Whitley, Vir- 
gina Vale. Director: Edward Killy. 

Saint in Palm Springs, The 116 (66) Jan. 24 

Mystery. Postage stamp smugglers tan- 
gle with the Saint. George Sanders, 
Wendy Barrie. Director: Jack Hively. 

Saint's Vacation, The 131 (61) June 6 

Mystery. The Saint, of English vintage, 
tangles with intrigue in Switzerland. 
Hugh Sinclair, Sally Gray. Director: 
Leslie Fenton. 

Scattergood Baines 123 (69) Feb. 21 

Comedy Drama. Modern David Harum 
runs $40 into financial security. Guy 
Kibbee, Carol Hughes, John Archer. 
Director: Christy Cabanne. 

Scattergood Meets Broadway 136 

(70) Aug. 22 

Comedy Drama. Third in the series, in 
which the Sage of Coldwater pays a 
visit to the Big City. Guy Kibbee, Wil- 
liam Henry, Mildred Coles. Director: 
Christy Cabanne. 

Scattergood Pulls the Strings 132 

(67) May 23 

Comedy Drama. Second in the series 
based upon Clarence Budington Kel- 
land’s fictional character, the sage of 
Coldriver, with three separate story 
strains running through it. Guy Kib- 
bee, Dink Trout, Bobs Watson. Director: 
Christy Cabanne. 

Six Gun Gold 186 (57) Aug. 8 

Western. Tim & Co. team with miners 
in convoying gold shipments. Tim Holt, 
Ray Whitley. Director: David Howard. 

Story of the Vacation of Pius XII, The 

172 (54) July 18 

Religious. Document of Vatican City 
and its functions. Narrated by Mon- 
seigneur Fulton J. Sheen. 

Sunny 133 (98) May 30 

Musical Comedy. Adapted from the 
famous stage musical with a circus 
background. Anna Neagle, John Car- 
roll, Ray Bolger. Director: Herbert 
Wilcox. 

Suspicion 208 (99) Nov. 14 

Drama. Story is about a wife who fears 
her husband will murder her and the 
idea preys on her mind until the sight 
of him becomes abhorrent. Cary Grant, 
Joan Fontaine. Director: Alfred Hitch- 
cock. 

They Meet Again 134 (67) July 11 

Drama. Dr. Christian solves another 


weighty problem of River’s End. Jean 
Hersholt, Dorothy Lovett, Maude 
Eburne. Director: Erie C. Kenton. 

They Met in Argentina 128 (77) Apr. 25 

Musical-Comedy Drama. Music and 
atmosphere of South America highlight 
this one. James Ellison, Maureen 
O’Hara, Buddy Ebsen. Director: Jack 
Hively. 

Tom, Dick and Harry 126 (86) July 4 

Comedy. The problem of choosing a 
husband — rich, imaginative or enter- 
prising. Ginger Rogers, George Mur- 
phy, Alan Marshal, Burgess Meredith. 
Director: Garson Kanin. 

Unexpected Uncle 207 (67) Nov. 7 

Comedy. A former millionaire aids a 
friendless Cinderella adjust herself to 
being rich. Charles Coburn, Anne 
Shirley, James Craig. Director: Peter 
Godfrey. 

Vivacious Lady 162 (90) Mar. 28 

Comedy. Reissue. Ginger Rogers, James 
Stewart. Director: George Steven.s. 

Week-End for Three 211 (66) Dec. 12 

Comedy Drama. The third man com- 
plicates a party. Dennis O’Keefe, Jane 
Wyatt, Philip Reed. Director: Irving 
Reis. 

Republic 

Angels With Broken Wings 016 (72) May 27 

Musical Comedy. A widow with three 
daughters is about to marry a wealthy 
man when his adventuress ex-wife pops 
up to inform him their divorce had 
been nullified. Binnie Barnes, Gilbert 
Roland, Billy Gilbert. Director: Ber- 
nard Vorhaus. 

Apache Kid, The 171 (56) Sept. 12 

Western. First in the Don Barry series. 
Story concerns the development of 
Rock Creek, Oregon, wherein the new 
settlers find the going difficult. Don 
Barry, Lynn Merrick, Robert Fiske. Di- 
rector: George Sherman. 

Arkansas Judge 010 (72) Jan. 28 

Rural Melodrama. Based on a novel, 
“False Witness,’’ in which Peaceful Val- 
ley lives up to its name until somebody 
lifts the Widow Smithers’ $50, which 
starts dissension, lawsuits, slander, and 
even romance. Weaver Bros, and El- 
viry. Director: Frank McDonald. 

Back in the Saddle 045 (73) Mar. 14 

Western. A feud develops between 
ranchers and the crooked operator of 
a copper mine and smelter. Gene Autry, 
Smiley Burnette, Mary Lee. Director: 
Lew Landers. 

Bad Man of Deadwood 058 (61) Sept. 5 
Western. The singing cowboy rides the 
range again to right wrongs done by 
a racketeering civic league. Roy Rogers, 
George “Gabby” Hayes, Carol Adams. 
Director: Joe Kane. 

Citadel of Crime 024 (58) July 24 

Melodrama. Story of an alcohol tax 
unit of the Bureau of Internal Reve- 
nue, the action laid in the West Vir- 
ginia mountains. Robert Armstrong, 
Linda Hayes, Frank Albertson. Di- 
rector: George Sherman. 

Country Fair 015 (74) May 5 

Comedy Drama. A battle of the sexes 
theme played against a background of 
state politics. Eddie Foy jr., June Clyde, 
Guinn Williams. Director: Frank Mc- 
Donald. 

Death Valley Outlaws 172 (56) Sept. 29 

Western. Phoney vigilantes make 


things hot for the good citizens of 
Hopetown. Don “Red” Barry, Lynn 


Merrick, Milburn Stone. Director: 
George Sherman. 

Desert Bandit 077 (56) May 24 


Western. The hero uncovers a gang of 
contraband smugglers. Don Barry, 
Lynn Merrick. Director: George Sher- 
man. 

Devil Pays Off, The 111 (70) Nov. 10 

Melodrama. Skullduggery in Havana, 
where the navy sends a “rehabilitated” 
bum on a secret mission. J. Edward 
Bromberg, Margaret Tallichet, Wm. 
Wright, Osa Massen. Director: John 
H. Auer. 

Doctors Don't Tell 026 (65) Aug. 25 

Melodrama. A struggling young doctor 
falls in with gangsters. John Beal, Flor- 
ence Rice, Bill Shirley. Director: Jac- 
ques Tourneur. 

Down Mexico Way 142 (78) Oct. 15 

Western Musical. The singing cowboy 
and his pals trail a pair of film pro- 
motion swindlers to Mexico. Gene 
Autry, Smiley Burnette, Fay McKenzie. 
Director: Joseph Santley. 

Gangs of Sonora 068 (56) July 10 

Western. The Mesquiteers take up the 
freedom of the press and thwart ele- 
ments that would have it suppressed 
because of its attempt to uncover graft 
and corruption. Robert Livingston, Bob 
Steele, Rufe Davis. Director: John Eng- 
lish. 

Gauchos of Eldorado 162 (56) Oct. 24 

Western. In which the Mesquiteers be- 
friend a Mexican mother whose son is 
killed en route home from a criminal 
career to pay off the mortgage on her 
home. Bob Steele, Tom Tyler, Rufe 
Davis. Director: Les Orlebeck. 

Gay Vagabond, The 022 (66) May 12 

Comedy Drama. A middle-class family 
leads a simple, quiet life, until a twin 
brother, long thought dead, comes home 
from China, and ravages of mistaken 
identity set in. Roscoe Karns, Ruth 
Donnelly, Ernest Truex. Director: Wil- 
liam Morgan. 

Great Train Robbery, The 021 (61) Feb. 28 

Action Drama. A railroad cop learns his 
brother is about to hold up a train car- 
rying a gold shipment and sets out to 
foil the stickup and corral the crooks. 
Bob Steele, Claire Carleton, Milburn 
Stone. Director: Joe Kane. 

Hurricane Smith 108 (67) July 20 

Melodrama. Story concerns a rodeo star 
and his reporter sweetheart and their 
adventures in tracking down a gang 
of railroad robbers. Jane Wyatt, Ray 
Middleton, J. Edward Bromberg. Di- 
rector: Bernard Vorhaus. 

Ice-Capades of 1942 004 (88) Aug. 20 

Skating Musical. Newsreel cameramen, 
assigned to photograph a Swiss skat- 
ing star, by mistake photograph an 
unknown alien, who is signed for a 
sumptuous revue. Difficulties arise 
when a hide-and-seek with immigra- 
tion authorities begins. Jerry Colonna, 
Dorothy Lewis, James Ellison, Belita, 
Red McCarthy. Director: Joseph Sant- 
ley. 

In Old Cheyenne 055 (56) Mar. 28 

Western. In which Rogers, this time 
as a newspaper reporter, continues to 
thwart villainy on the plains. Roy 
Rogers, George Hayes, Joan Woodbury. 
Director: Joseph Kane. 


74 


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75 



Jesse James at Bay 151 (56) Oct. 17 

Western. Jesse James works for the 
liberation of farmers from the rail- 
road and a land crook. Roy Rogers, 
George “Gabby” Hayes, Sally Payne. 
Director: Joe Kane. 

Kansas Cyclone 078 (56) June 24 

Western. An undercover U. S. mar- 
shal gets at the root of a series of ore 
wagon robberies. Don Barry, Lynn Mer- 
rick. Director: George Sherman. 

Lady From Louisiana 014 (82) Apr. 22 

Drama. Concerns a lady from the 
wrong side of the tracks who reaches 
the pinnacle of old New Orleans so- 
ciety, then topples back into oblivion. 
Ona Munson, John Wayne. Director: 
Bernard Vorhaus. 

Man Betrayed, A 011 (83) Feb. 27 

Drama. Small-town lawyer cleans up 
the big city political dirt. John Wayne, 
Frances Dee, Edward Ellis. Director: 
John H. Auer. 

Mercy Island 110 (72) Oct. 10 

Drama. Based on the novel by The- 
odore Pratt. Story of a demented hus- 
band, who gets that way on a fishing 
trip to the Florida Keys. Ray Middle- 
ton, Gloria Dickson, Otto Kruger. Di- 
rector: William Morgan. 

Missouri Outlaw, A. 173 (58) Nov, 25 

Western. Action on the plains of Mis- 
souri, with Two-Gun Barry thwarting 
the crooks. Don Barry, Lynn Merrick. 
Director: George Sherman. 

Mr. District Attorney 012 (69) Mar. 26 

Comedy Drama. First in a proposed 
series adapted from the popular radio 
program by Phillips Lord. The head 
of a political ring is tracked down after 
many escapades. Dennis O’Keefe, Flor- 
ence Rice, Peter Lorre. Director: Wil- 
liam Morgan. 

Mr. District Attorney in the Carter Case 

112 (68) Dec. 18 

Mystery Drama. Sequel to “Mr. Dis- 
trict Attorney,” in which a girl re- 
porter and her fiance in the D. A.’s of- 
fice are being constantly torn away 
from the altar to unravel just one more 
crime. James Ellison, Virginia Gil- 
more. Director: Bernard Vorhaus. 

Mountain Moonlight 107 (68) July 12 

Musical Comedy. The Weaver tribe goes 
high hat when they inherit some wealth. 
Weaver Bros, and Elviry, Kane Rich- 
mond. Director: Nick Grinde. 

Nevada City. 057 ..(58) June 20 

Western. Sagebrush story of days in 
the old west, with the rootin’, tootin’ 
cowboy hero and his bewhiskered side- 
kick. Roy Rogers, George “Gabby” 
Hayes, Sally Payne. Director: Joe 
Kane. 

Outlaws of the Cherokee Trail 161 

(56) Sept. 10 

Western. Outlaws in the Cherokee Strip 
near Texas. Bob Steele, Tom Tyler, 
Rufe Davis. Director: Les Orlebeck. 

Pals of the Pecos 066 (56) Apr. 8 

Western. The Mesquiteers become in- 
volved in a battle between villainous 
railroad men and a stagecoach line, 
through which they are falsely accused 
of murder and fight their way out. Bob 
Livingston, Bob Steele, Rufe Davis. Di- 
rector: Les Orlebeck. 

Petticoat Politics 020 (67) Jan. 31 

Comedy. The Women’s club enters pol- 
itics. Roscoe Karns, Ruth Donnelly. Di- 
rector: Erie C. Kenton. 


Phantom Cowboy, The 075. ..(56) Feb. 14 
Western. El Lobo, a masked rider, 
thwarts the efforts of a villain to seize 
the property of the niece of a Mexican 
haciendado. Don Barry, Virginia Car- 
roll, Milbum Stone. Director: George 
Sherman. 

Pittsburgh Kid, The ...133 (76) Aug. 29 

Drama. Features the boxer, Billy Conn, 
in his first screen appearance. From 
“Kid Tinsel,” story by Octavus Roy 
Cohen. Billy Conn, Jean Parker, Alan 
Baxter. Director: Jack Townley. 

Poison Pen 023. (66) June 30 

Drama. Based on a story by Richard 
Llewellyn. Theme is a case in abnormal 
psychology, wherein a woman turns to 
writing “poison pen” anonymous let- 
ters, to satisfy her inhibitions and sup- 
pressions. Flora Robson, Robert New- 
ton. Director: Paul L. Stein. 

Prairie Pioneers. 065 (57) Feb. 16 

Western. California in the gold rush 
days. Bob Livingston, Bob Steele, Rufe 
Davis. Director: Les Orlebeck. 

Public Enemies ...121. (66) Oct. 30 

Drama. Reporter and “Deb” on trail 
of alien smugglers. Philip Terry, Wendy 
Barrie. Director: Albert S. Rogell. 

Puddin' Head .003 (80) June 25 

Comedy. Hillbilly comedy with music. 
Additional humorous support includes 
the veteran Buster Keaton and Slim 
Summerville. Judy Canova, Francis 
Lederer, Raymond Walburn. Director: 
Joseph Santley. 

Rags to Riches 025 (57) July 31 

Melodrama. Story of gangdom and a 
racket-buster, in which fur thieves, pos- 
ing as respectable citizens, are eventu- 
ally trapped. Alan Baxter, Mary Car- 
lisle. Director: Joe Kane. 

Red River Valley 152 (62) Dec. 12 

Western. The hero, leading his group 
of barnstorming, instrumentalist-cow- 
boys, digs into a fight to the finish 
against a gang that would tie up the 


valley’s water supply. Roy Rogers, 
George Hayes, Sally Payne. Director: 
Joseph Kane. 

Ridin' on a Rainbow 004 (79) Jan. 24 


Western. Musical aboard a river show- 
boat. Gene Autry, Smiley Burnette, 
Mary Lee. Director: Lew Landers. 

Robin Hood of the Pecos 054 (59) Jan. 14 
Western. Post-Civil war politics in Tex- 
as. Roy Rogers, Marjorie Reynolds, 
George Hayes. Director: Joseph Kane. 

Rookies on Parade 013 .(69) Apr. 17 

Musical. Musical comedy romance with 
a conscription camp background. Bob 
Crosby, Marie Wilson, Cliff Nazarro. 
Director: Joseph Santley. 

Saddlemates 067 (55) May 26 

Western. Mesquiteers as soldiers chase 
indian plotters. Robert Livingston, Bob 
Steele, Rufe Davis. Director: Les Orle- 
beck. 

Sailors on Leave 109 (71) Sept. 30 

Musical Comedy. Service musical with 
the famous “doubletalk” comedian in 
one of the leading roles. William Lundi- 
gan, Shirley Ross, Chick Chandler, Cliff 
Nazarro. Director: A1 Rogell. 

Sheriff of Tombstone 056 (56) May 7 

Western. The story has to do with min- 
ing and the efforts of a crook to get 
the mother lode claim. Roy Rogers, 
George Hayes, Sally Payne. Director: 
Joe Kane. 


Sierra Sue 143. ...(64) Nov. 12 

Western. This Autry sagebrusher is 
unique in that the script contains no 
villain — just action, comedy and music. 
Gene Autry, Smiley Burnette, Fay Mc- 
Kenzie. Director: William Morgan. 

Singing Hill, The .046 ..(75) Apr. 26 

Western. Relates further sagebrush ad- 
ventures of the screen’s No. 1 cowboy 
and his comedy sidekick. Gene Autry, 
Smiley Burnette, Mary Lee. Director: 
Lew Landers. 

Sis Hopkins 002. ...(98) Apr. 12 

Musical Comedy. Judy goes to college. 
Judy Canova, Jerry Colonna, Charles 
Butterworth, Bob Crosby. Director: 
Joseph Santley. 

Sunset in Wyoming 047 (65) July 15 

Western. A lumber company is deplet- 
ing the timber growth on a mountain 
which is resulting in floods. Autry de- 
ters the revenging ranchers. Gene 
Autry, Smiley Burnette, Maris Wrixon. 
Director: William Morgan. 

Tuxedo Junction 113. (71) Dec. 4 

Hillbilly Comedy. Home-spun and so- 
ciology mixed in the hills. Weaver 
Bros. & Elviry, Thurston Hall, Lorna 
Gray. Director: Frank McDonald. 

Two-Gun Sheriff 076 (56) Apr. 10 

Western. Good and bad brothers fight 
ends in good triumphing. Don “Red” 
Barry, Lynn Merrick. Director: George 
Sherman. 

Under Fiesta Stars 048 (64) Aug. 25 

Musical Western. Autry foils confidence 
men to ranch and the girl. Gene Autry, 
Smiley Burnette, Carol Hughes. Direc- 
tor: Frank McDonald. 

V/est of Cimarron 163 (56) Dec. 15 

Western. The film deals with a mur- 
derin’ crooked tax collector who is prey- 
ing on the meek souls of post-Civil 
War Texas. Bob Steele, Tom Tyler, Rufe 
Davis. Director: Les Orlebeck. 

Wyoming Wildcat 074 (56) Jan. 6 

Western. Son of an outlaw tries to 
save the family honor. Don “Red” Bar- 
ry, Julie Duncan. Director: George 
Sherman. 

20th Century-Fox 

A Very Young Lady 145 (79) June 27 

Comedy Drama. An adolescent school- 
girl “sacrifices” her professor when she 
learns he loves one of the teachers. 
Jane Withers, Nancy Kelly, John Sut- 
ton. Director: Harold Schuster. 

A Yank in the RAF 211 (97) Oct. 13 

Action Drama. An American’s adven- 
tures, both combative and amatory, as 
a volunteer in Britain’s air force. Ty- 
rone Power, Betty Grable. Director: 
Henry King. 

Accent on Love 148 (61) July 11 

Drama. Married to his employer’s 
daughter, the hero gets disgusted and 
begins anew on a WPA ditchdisging 
project. George Montgomery, Osa Mas- 
sen, J. Carrol Naish. Director; Ray 
McCarey. 

©Belle Starr 207 (87) Sept. 12 

Historical Western. The West’s first 
“trigger woman.” avenging the depred'’- 
tions of Civil War reconstruction days. 
Gene Tierney, Randolph Scott. Direc- 
tor : Irving Cummings. 

©Blood and Sand 143 (123) May 30 

Drama. The lives and loves of an ace 


76 


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Paramount 


Hopglong Cassidys 


"Secrets of the Wastelands" 
"Riders of the Timberline" 
"Outlaws of the Desert" 
"Stick to Your Guns" 
"Twilight on the Trail" 


Preparing: 

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toreador. Tyrone Power, Linda Dar- 
nell. Director: Rouben Mamoulian. 

Bride Wore Crutches, The 112 (55) June 13 
Comedy Melodrama. A newspaper 
fledgling bungles his first assignment, 
is helped over the rough spots by Miss 
Star Newshawk, and later stumbles into 
a bank holdup, winding up with a scoop 
and a bride. Ted North, Lynne Roberts. 
Director: Shepard Traube. 

Cadet Girl 230 (G9) Nov. 28 

Comedy Drama. A West Point cadet 
falls for the singer in his brother’s 
orchestra, but the two, his brother and 
the singer, conspire to send him back 
to West Point. Carole Landis, George 
Montgomery. Director: Ray McCarey. 

Charley's Aunt 201 (82) Aug. 1 

Comedy. The perennial English farce 
with the male masquerading as 
“Auntie.” Jack Benny, Kay Francis. 
Director: Archie Mayo. 

Charlie Chan in Rio 208 (62) Sept. 5 
Mystery Melodrama The detective ar- 
rives to make an arrest, only to fi»d 
the “murderess” killed and many sus- 
pects complicating matters. Sidney 
Toler, Sen Yung, Mary Beth Hughes. 
Director: Harry Lachman. 

Confirm or Deny 222 (73) Dec. 12 

Drama. Adventures of an European cor- 
respondent during the current war. Don 
Ameche, Joan Bennett, John Loder. Di- 
rector: Archie Mayo. 

Cowboy and the Blonde, The 141 

(68) May 16 

Comedy Drama. A temperamental star 
falls for a rodeo rider, who is then 
imported to keep her disposition sweet- 
ened, even though as an actor he 
smells. He discovers the deception and 
leaves for his ranch, where the star 
follows him for the all-is-forgiven fade- 
out. Mary Beth Hughes, George Mont- 
gomery. Director: Ray McCarey. 

Dance Hall 149 (73) July 18 

Drama. A dime-a-dance girl and a 
smooth gangster find romance. Cesar 
Romero, Carole Landis, William Henry. 
Director: Irving Pichel. 

Dead Men Tell 136 (61) Mar. 28 

Mystery. Sleuthing adventures aboard 
a pirate museum ship where two mur- 
ders occur. Sidney Toler, Sheila Ryan, 
Sen Yung. Director: Harry Lachman. 

Dressed to Kill 202 (74) Aug. 8 

Murder Mystery. A broken-down stage 
impresario and the woman who starred 
in his last venture are found murdered, 
and a private investigator is side- 
tracked from his marriage to track the 
killer. Llovd Nolan. Mary Beth Hughes. 
Director: Eugene Porde. 

For Beauty's Sake 144 (62) June 6 

Comedy Drama. A woman-hating pro- 
fessor inherits a beauty salon which he 
must personally manage. An attempt 
on his life sets him to work, and he 
shows up the estate’s attorney as the 
villain. Ned Sparks. Marjorie Weaver. 
Director: Shepard Traube. 

Girl in the News 127 (77) Jan. 31 

Drama. A young nurse to a neurotic 
invalid stands trial when her patient 
dies from an overdose of sleeping pills. 
A courtroom ruse uncovers the real 
crimmals. Margaret Lockwood, Barry 
K. Barnes. Director: Carol Reed. 

Golden Hoofs 130 (68) Feb. 14 

Comedy Drama. A trainer of trotting 
horses brings around the new owner of 
her breeding farm to being a full- 


fledged harness racing fan and so sav- 
ing them. Jane Withers, Charles Rog- 
ers. Director: Lynn Shores. 

Great American Broadcast, The 140 

(91) May 9 

Musical Drama. Cavalcade of the 
growth of radio, incorporating many 
song hits. Alice Faye. Cesar Romero, 
Jack Oakie. Director: Archie Mayo. 

Great Commandment, The 141 (80) May 23 

Biblical Drama. How a hatred was 
turned to love in the days of Pontius 
Pilate by the commandment, “Thou 
Shalt Love Thy Neighbor.” Albert Dek- 
ker, John Beal, Maurice Moscovich. Di- 
rectors: Irving Pichel, John Beal. 

Great Guns 212 (73) Oct. 10 

Comedy. The two veteran comedians 
are drafted. Stan Laurel, Oliver Hardy, 
Sheila Ryan. Director: Monty Banks. 

How Green Was My Valley 224 

(118) Dec. 26 

Drama. Lives of the Welsh coal min- 
ers, as they watch their once green 
valley turn bare and barren, and what 
they make of it. Walter Pidgeon, Mau- 
reen O’Hara, Roddy McDowall. Direc- 
tor: John Ford. 

Hudson's Bay 115 (95) Jan. 3 

Drama. A colorful phase of Canada’s 
early history and how a French-Ca- 
nadian’s fanatical love for his country 
led to the establishment of a great Do- 
minion. Paul Muni, Gene Tierney. Di- 
rector: Irving Pichel. 

I Wake Up Screaming 216 (82) Nov. 14 
Drama. A psychopathic detective seeks 
to pin the murder of a girl he loved, 
although never professing his love, up- 
on the showman who made her f'^m- 
ous and. accordingly, out of reach. Car- 
ole Landis. Betty Grable. Victor Ma- 
ture. Laird Cregar. Director: H. Bruce 
Humberstone. 

Last of the Duanes 209 (57) Sept. 26 

Western. A son who avenges the death 
of his father is accused of murder, but 
clears himself. George Montgomery, 
Lynne Roberts, Eve Arden. Director: 
James Tinling. 

Mail Train 139 (60) Apr. 25 

Comedy Mystery. Investigating thiev- 
ery in an army cantonment, a pair of 
memoir-writing policemen run into an 
espionage setup. Gordon Harker, Ala- 
stair Sim. 

Man at Large 210 (69) Sept. 26 

Melodrama. An FBI man with the aid 
of a newspaper girl goes on the hunt 
for foreign spies. Marjorie Weaver, 
Richard Derr. Director: Eugene Forde. 

Man Hunt 146 (102) June 20 

Drama. A British citizen escapes from 
the clutches of the Nazis. Walter Pid- 
geon. Joan Bennett, George Sanders. 
Director: Fritz Lang. 

Marry the Boss' Daughter 221 (60) Nov. 28 

Comedy Drama. A small town boy in 
New York lands a job when he returns 
a lost dog. He progresses in the firm 
and marries the girl whose dog he re- 
turned and who is also the boss’ daugh- 
ter. Brenda Joyce, Bruce Edwards. 

Michael Shayne, Private Detective 124 
(77) Jan. 10 

Comedy -Mystery. A private detective 
has an assignment to keep his eye on 
an heiress who likes to gamble. Lloyd 
Nolan. Marjorie Weaver. Director: 
Eugene Forde. 


Moon Over Her Shoulder 215 (68) Oct. 24 
Comedy Drama. A perfectionist hus- 
band advises his wife to take up her 
former hobby — painting. Meaning to, 
she meets a former friend and gets 
romantically whisked away on a series 
of innocent fishing trips. Lynn Bari, 
John Sutton. Director: Alfred Werker. 

©Moon Over Miami 147 (91) July 4 

Musical Comedy. Two girls on the hunt 
for millionaire husbands in Florida. 
Don Ameche, Betty Grable, Jack Haley. 
Director: Walter Lang. 

Murder Among Friends 132 (67) Feb. 28 

Melodrama. Beneficiaries on a joint 
policy die with rapidity as the date for 
collection nears. Murders are traced 
to the wife of one of the insured. Mar- 
iorie Weaver, John Hubbard. Director: 
Ray McCarey. 

Perfect Snob, The 223 (62) Dec. 19 

Comedy. An indifferent young man, 
hired to wreck the impending marriage 
of a girl to a stuffed shirter, falls in 
love with her. Lynn Bari, Charlie Rug- 
gles, Anthony Quinn. Director: Ray 
McCarey. 

Private Nurse 204 (61) Aug. 22 

Drama. Drunken playboys and heart- 
broken racketeers are on the list of 
cured cases of two nurses. Brenda 
Joyce, Jane Darwell, Robert Lowery. Di- 
rector: David Burton. 

Ride, Kelly, Ride 129 (59) Feb. 7 

Comedy. A cowhand becomes a jockey, 
is pushed to the fence by another, but 
leaves the hospital to ride to victory 
when he learns of a fixed race. Eueene 
Pallette, Marvin Stephens. Director: 
Norman Foster. 

Ride On, Vaquoro 138 (64) Apr. 18 

Western. Captured by troops, the band- 
it is freed on his promise to aid in 
capturing a kidnapping gang, which 
promise he keeps. Cesar Romero, Chris- 
Pin Martin, Mary Beth Hughes. Di- 
rector: Herbert I. Leeds. 

Riders of the Purple Sage 213 (56) Oct. 10 

Western. Cattle rustlers and a phony 
vigilante committee are kept from do- 
ing the heroine dirt by the cowboy and 
his pals. George Montgomery. Mary 
Howard. Director: James Tinling. 

Rise and Shine 219 (92) Nov. 21 

Musical. There’s music, coeds, a re- 
tired Civil War drummer, a gangster’s 
stooge, and a run down a football field 
twice to score a winning touchdown in 
tbis eridiron farce. Jack Oakie. George 
Murnhy, Linda Darnell. Director: Al- 
lan Dwan. 

Romance of the Rio Grand 125 (73) Jan. 17 

Western. The Cisco Kid assumes the 
identity of a wounded man v.'ho re- 
sembles him and continues the mas- 
querade long enough to save the ranch- 
er’s estate. Cesar Romero, Patricia 
Morison. Director: Herbert I. Leeds. 

Scotland Yard 131 (67) Apr. 4 

Mystery Melodrama. Plastic surgery 
lets a thief escape the clutches of Scot- 
land Yard and assume the role of a 
changed husband. Edmund Gwenn, 
John Loder, Nancy Kelly. Director: 
Norman Foster. 

Sleepers West 134 (74) Mar. 14 

Melodrama. The detective is escorting 
a girl who is the all-important witness 
in a murder trial. Hence there are 
efforts to block her appearance, which 


78 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


MITCHELL LEISEN 


Director 

"HOLD BACK THE DAWN" 
"TAKE A LETTER, DARLING" 

Paramount 


Producer-Director 
'THE LADY IS WILLING 

Columbia 



BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


79 




are overcome. Lloyd Nolan, Lynn Bari. 
Director: Eugene Forde. 

Small Town Deb 217 (72) Nov. 7 

Comedy Drama. Only the youngest 
daughter understands her father’s 
business troubles and salvages the fam- 
ily when her maneuvers bring the sale 
of land to the government for an air 
field. Jane Withers, Jane Darwell. Di- 
rector: Harold Schuster. 

Sun Valley Serenade 205 (87) Aug. 29 

Musical. A band leader falls in love 
with the refugee he adopted as a pub- 
licity stunt. Sonja Henie, John Payne, 
Glenn Miller & Orch. Director H. Bruce 
Humberstone. 

Swamp Water . 218 (90) Dec. 9 

Drama. A young trapper finds a con- 
victed murderer hiding out in the 
swamps. He becomes convinced of his 
innocence, and does find the real crim- 
inals. Walter Brennan, Walter Huston. 
Director: Jean Renoir. 

Tall, Dark and Handsome .128 (78) Jan. 24 

Comedy Melodrama. A gangster with 
a reputation of being a killer is re- 
vealed as soft-hearted when his rivals, 
thought dead, are found locked up. He 
is taken for a ride, but escapes and 
with his girl departs for South Amer- 
ica. Cesar Romero, Virginia Gimore. 
Director: H. Bruce Humberstone. 

©That Night in Rio 137 (90) Apr. 11 

Musical. An American entertainer in 
Rio is called upon to impersonate a 
local millionaire when the latter gets 
in a jam. Alice Faye, Don Ameche, Car- 
men Miranda. Director: Irving Cum- 
mings. 

Tobacco Road 133 (84) Mar. 7 

Drama. Life of Georgia crackers whose 
love for the land of their forefathers is 
overshadowed only by shiftlessness and 
aversion to labor. Charley Grapewin, 
Marjorie Rambeau, Gene Tierney. Di- 
rector: John Ford. 

V/e Go Fast 208 (64) Sept. 18 

Comedy Drama. Alan Curtis, a motor- 
cycle cop, gets into a lively rivalry with 
Don DeForest over Lynn Bari, and to- 
gether they unwittingly help a confi- 
dence man hook the town’s leading 
business man, making it possible for 
them to come out heroes in the end. 
Lynn Bari. Alan Curtis, Sheila Ryan. 
Director: William McGann. 

©Week-End in Havana 214 (80) Oct. 17 
Musical. John Payne is forced to post- 
pone his marriage to a shipping ty- 
coon’s daughter to get waivers from 
passengers on a boat that hits a reef. 
Alice Faye, a salesgirl on a vacation, 
insists on a “guaranteed good time,” 
and, of course, winds up with Payne. 
Alice Faye, John Payne, Carmen Mir- 
anda. Director: Walter Lang. 

©Western Union 126 (95) Feb. 21 

Historical Western. The stringing of 
the first transcontinental telegraph line 
between Omaha and Salt Lake City. 
Robert Young, Randolph Scott, Dean 
Jagger. Director: Fritz Lang. 

Wild Geese Calling 203 (78) Aug. 15 

Adventure Melodrama. A man with a 
wanderlust and a desire to be away 
from civilization, meets and falls in 
love with a dance hall entertainer. To- 
gether, they find love and happiness. 
Henry Fonda, Joan Bennett. Director: 
John Brahm. 


United Artists 

©Adventures of Tom Sawyer (91) May 16 
Drama. Reissue. Tom Sawyer, May 
Robson. 

All-American Co-Ed (45) Oct. 31 

Musical Comedy. Female impersonator 
wins beauty contest to get revenge on 
a girls’ college. Frances Langford, 
Johnny Downs, Marjorie Woodworth. 
Director: LeRoy Prinz. 

Broadway Limited (75) June 13 

Drama. Action aboard a transcontin- 
ental express. Dennis O’Keefe, Victor 
McLaglen, Marjorie Woodworth. Di- 
rector: Gordon Douglas. 

Cheers for Miss Bishop (95) Feb. 21 

Drama. The life of an educator from 
her freshman year at college to her re- 
tirement. Martha Scott, William Gar- 
gan, Edmund Gwenn. Director: Tay 
Garnett. 

Corsican Brothers, The (113) Dec. 25 

Drama. Story of two brothers tied to- 
gether by their emotions. Douglas Fair- 
banks jr., Ruth Warrick, Akim Tamir- 
off. Director: Gregory Ratoff. 

Dudes Are Pretty People ( ) Dec. 25 

Comedy Drama. A streamliner of the 
musical western variety. Marjorie 

Woodworth, Jimmy Rogers. Director: 
Hal Roach jr. 

©Fiesta (44) Nov. 28 

Comedy. Musical with Mexican back- 
ground. Anne Ayars, George Negrete, 
Armida. Director: LeRoy Prinz. 

CJ^Great Dictator, The (126) Mar. 1 

Satirical Comedy. Lampoons dictator- 

ships and portrays the folly of rule by 
force. Charles Chaplin, Paulette God- 
dard, Jack Oakie. Director-Producer- 
Writer: Charles Chaplin. 

Hay Foot (47) Dec. 12 

Comedy. Adventures of three sergeants 
and the colonel’s daughter. William 
Tracy, Noah Beery jr., James Gleason. 
Director: Fred Guiol. 

International Lady (102) Sept. 19 

Drama. The involvements of an Amer- 
ican G-Man, Scotland Yard’s detective 
and an international adventuress. 
George Brent, Ilona Massey, Basil Rath- 
bone. Director: Tim Whelan. 

Love on the Dole ( ) Dec. 12 

Drama. Action from across the seas. 
Deborah Kerr, Clifford Evans. 

Lydia (100) Sept. 26 

Drama. Story of a woman of many 
loves. Merle Oberon, Joseph Cotten, 
Alan Marshal. Director: Julien Duvi- 
vier. 

Major Barbara (112) Sept. 12 

Drama. The adventures of a Salvation 
Army lass from the pen of G. B. Shav;. 
Wendy Hiller, Rex Harrison. Director: 
Gabriel Pascal. 

Miss Polly (45) Nov. 14 

Comedy. The activities of a well-liked 
small town spinster and a crackpot in- 
ventor. ZaSu Pitts, Slim Summerville. 
Director: Fred Guiol. 

New Wine (87) Oct. 10 

Musical Drama. Life and loves of Com- 
poser Franz Schubert. Ilona Massey, 
Binnie Barnes, Alan Curtis. Director: 
Reinhold Schunzel. 

Niagara Falls (43) Oct. 17 

Musical. Honeymooning antics at the 
famous resort. Marjorie Woodworth, 


Tom Brown, ZaSu Pitts, Slim Summer- 
ville. Director: Gordon Douglas. 

Pot O' Gold (86) Apr. 11 

Musical. The trials and tribulations of 
an orchestra and the resulting radio 
shows. James Stewart, Paulette God- 
dard, Horace Heidt. Director: George 
Marshall. 


Prisoner of Zenda (101) May 16 

Drama. Reissue. Ronald Colman, Doug- 
las Fairbanks jr. 

Road Show (87) Jan. 24 


Comedy. Two nuts escape from an 
asylum and take refuge in a carnival. 
Adolphe Menjou, Carole Landis, John 
Hubbard. Director Hal Roach. 

So Ends Our Night (118) Feb. 14 

Drama. The trails of the refugees in 
Central Europe. Fredric March, Mar- 
garet Sullavan, Frances Dee, Glenn 
Ford. Director: John Cromwell. 

Son of Monte Cristo (102) Jan. 10 

Drama. Another story brought to the 
screen from the books of Dumas. Louis 
Hayward, Joan Bennett, George San- 
ders. Director: Rowland V. Lee. 

Sundown (90) Oct. 31 

Melodrama. A half-caste girl a,nd a 
trading chain in Africa. Bruce Cabot, 
Gene Tierney, George Sanders. Direc- 
tor: Henry Hathaway. 

Tanks a Million .(50) Sept. 12 

Comedy. A draft comedy in the stream- 
liner class. William Tracy, Noah Beery 
jr., James Gleason. Director: Fred 
Guiol. 

4^That Hamilton Woman! (128) Apr. 30 
Drama. The love affair of Lady Ham- 
ilton and Lord Nelson. Vivien Leigh, 
Laurence Olivier, Alan Mowbray. Di- 
rector: Alexander Korda. 

That Uncertain Feeling (89) Apr. 20 

Comedy Drama. Marriage triangle with 
a psychoanalyst involved. Melvyn 
Douglas, Merle Oberon, Burgess Mered- 
ith. Director: Ernst Lubitsch. 

Three Cockeyed Sailors (78) July 4 

Comedy. Three British sailors tangle 
with the Germany navy. Tommy Trin- 
der, Claude Hulbert. Director: Walter 
Forde. 

Topper Returns (89) Mar. 21 

Comedy. Topper gets involved in a mur- 
der mystery with trick photography 
again. Joan Blondell, Roland Young, 
Billie Burke, Eddie (Rochester) Ander- 
son. Director: Roy Del Ruth. 

Universal 

Appointment for Love 6007 (89) Oct. 31 
Comedy Drama. A lady-killing play- 
wright and a successful M. D., the 
former romantic and the latter scienti- 
fic, get married but have countless com- 
plications to overcome before they re- 
ally meet. Charles Boyer, Margaret 
Sullavan. Director: William A. Seiter. 

Arizona Cyclone 6063 (57) Nov. 14 

Western. Head driver for a freight line 
tracks down a criminal competitor. 
Johnny Mack Brown. Director: Ray 
Taylor. 

Bachelor Daddy 5035 (60) July 4 

Comedy. Baby Sandy is left in the care 
of three bachelors, whose lives accord- 
ingly become re-arranged. Baby Sandy, 
Edward Everett Horton, Donald Woods. 
Director: Harold Young. 


80 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


LARRY DARMOUR 

PRODUCTIONS 


HOLLYWOOD 

CALIFORNIA 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


81 



Back Street 5002 (89) Feb. 7 

Drama. A resumed romance that re- 
mains alive over a period of 25 years, 
never able to culminate in marriage. 
Charles Boyer, Margaret Sullavan. Di- 
rector: Robert, Stevenson. 

Badlands ol Dakota 6013 (74) Sept. 5 

Western. A brotherly feud, with one a 
marshal and the other a bandit gives 
grounds for the chase, into which an 
Indian raid and a bank robbery are 
mixed. Robert Stack, Ann Rutherford, 
Richard Dix. Director: Alfred E. Green. 

Black Cat, The 5028 (71) May 2 

Mystery Comedy. The reliable myster- 
ious mansion on a rainy night with an 
abundance of trapdoors, eerie noises, 
clutching hands and screwball comedy. 
Basil Rathbone, Hugh Herbert. Direc- 
tor: Albert S. Rogell. 

Boss oi Bullion City 5064 (59) Jan. 10 
Western. Another in the series of John- 
ny Mack Brown heroics wherein vil- 
lainy is overcome after the round of 
riding, shooting and fisticuffs. Johnny 
Mack Brown. 

Buck Privates 5009 (84) Jan. 31 

Comedy. Two become units in Uncle 
Sam’s draft army and find life as rookie 
soldiers better than being constantly be- 
hind the eight-ball. Bud Abbott, Lou 
Costello. Director: Arthur Lubin. 

Burma Convoy 6035 (60) Oct. 17 

Melodrama. A truck convoy boss stays 
on the job to track down the spy ring 
murderers of his brother. Charles Bick- 
ford, Evelyn Ankers. Director: Noel G. 
Smith. 

Bury Me Not on the Lone Prairie 
5065 (59) Mar. 21 

Western. Cowboys on the loose find ad- 
venture and foes to overcome on the 
plains of the West. Johnny Mack 
Brown, Fuzzy Knight. 

Cracked Nuts 5039 (62) Aug. 1 

Farce Comedy. A group of zany in- 
ventors create a mechanical man which 
gets out of control. Mischa Auer, Una 
Merkel, Stuart Erwin. Director: Eddie 
Cline. 

Dangerous Game, The 5057 (62) Aug. 22 

Comedy Drama. A lot of people run- 
ning around a sanitarium where two 
men are murdered and an heir has con- 
cealed $250,000 which everybody is try- 
ing to get his hands on. The killer is 
finally cornered. Richard Arlen, Andy 
Devine. Director: John Rawlins. 

Dark Streets of Cairo 5040 (59) Feb. 28 
Melodrama. A murdered scientist’s as- 
sistants are saved from involvement by 
their girl friends, and the killer, who 
also has stolen discovered gems, is 
tracked down. Sigrid Gurie, Ralph 
Byrd. Director: Leslie Kardos. 

Double Date 5037 (60) Mar. 14 

Comedy. Two youngsters endeavor to 
break up a romance between their re- 
spective widowed elders, but fail, and 
fall in love themselves. Edmund Lowe, 
Una Merkel. Director: Glenn Tryon. 

Flame of New Orleans 5011 (79) Apr. 25 

Romantic Comedy. A lady of easy vir- 
tues, broke, ensnares a social biggie but 
at the altar leaves the slightly decrepit 
groom for a sailor she loves. Marlene 
Dietrich, Bruce Cabot, Roland Young. 
Director : Rene Clair. 

Flying Cadets 6028 (60) Oct. 24 

Action Drama. A flying hero gives his 
younger brother’s flying school the 
glamor of his name and services. Mis- 


understandings crop up and reconcilia- 
tions effect the happy climax. Edmund 
Lowe, William Gargan. Director: Erie 
C. Kenton. 

Girl Must Live, A 6045 (69) Sept. 19 

Musical Comedy. Daughter of a once- 
famous actress lands a night club job, 
meets a young nobleman, foils a clique 
trying to victimize him and runs off. 
He follows and they marry. Margaret 
Lockwood. Director: Carol Reed. 

Hello, Sucker 5038 (60) July 11 

Comedy. A trio sinks its funds into a 
worthless vaudeville agency and dis- 
covers that they themselves are their 
own best clients. Hugh Herbert, Tom 
Brown, Peggy Moran. Director: Ed- 
ward Cline. 

Hellzapoppin' (83) Dec. 26 

Musical Comedy. Slapstick antics that, 
without striving for coherence, aim for 
laughs. Film version of the Broadway 
stage show. Olsen and Johnson, Mar- 
tha Raye. Director: Henry C. Potter. 

Hit the Road 5029 (62) June 27 

Melodrama. The problems concerning 
inmates of reform schools. Gladys 

George, Barton MacLane, Dead End 
Kids. Director: Joe May. 

Hold That Ghost 5000A (86) Aug. 8 

Comedy. Heirs to the estate of a gang 

lord have a job on their hands in 
searching for buried treasure while the 
gangster’s henchmen strive to drive 
them off. Bud Abbott, Lou Costello. 
Director: Arthur Lubin. 

Horror Island 5033 (60) Mar. 28 

Mystery Melodrama. A week-end treas- 
ure hunt for society folk turns into the 
real thing when a couple of murders 
and a masked menace follow discovery 
of a map indicating treasure. Dick Fo- 
ran, Leo Carrillo, Peggy Moran. Di- 
rector: George Waggner. 

In the Navy 5000 (86) May 30 

Comedy. A radio-idol getting away from 
a too-adoring public, becomes the mess- 
mate of the two comies in Uncle Sam’s 
Navy. Abbott and Costello, Dick Powell, 
Andrews Sisters. Director: Arthur 
Lubin. 

It Started With Eve 6005 (90) Sept. 26 
Comedy with Music. A dying man 
wants to meet his son’s fiancee, who 
cannot be found, and a hatcheck girl’s 
services are enlisted. The old man re- 
covers and the masquerade has to be 
carried on. Deanna Durbin. Charles 
Laughton. Director: Henry Koster. 

Keep 'Em Flying 6001 (86) Nov. 28 

Comedy. A circus stunt flyer is drafted 
in the air corps and Abbott and Cos- 
tello are his stooges. Abbott and Cos- 
tello, Martha Raye, Carol Bruce. Di- 
rector: Arthur Lubin. 

Kid From Kansas 6051 (61) Sept. 19 

Action Melodrama. Land grabbing ef- 
forts of banking interests in a South 
American banana-raising country are 
foiled. Dick Foran, Leo Carrillo, Andy 
Devine. Director: William Nigh. 

Lady From Cheyenne 5043 (87) Apr., 11 

Historical Western. An eastern school 
teacher is responsible for bringing 
women’s suffrage to the territory of 
Wyoming. Loretta Young, Robert Pres- 
ton, Edward Arnold. Director: Prank 
Lloyd. 

Law of the Range 5066 (59) June 20 

Western. An old feud between two cat- 
tleraising families is revived by sheep 
raisers, after new gazing lands. Framed 


with a murder, the son of one tribe sets 
out to clear his name. The girl of the 
other faction helps him. Johnny Mack 
Brown. Director: Ray Taylor. 

Lucky Devils 5053 (62) Jan. 3 

Adventure Drama. The two pals go 
through a series of adventures in their 
traversing the westland. Richard Ar- 
len, Andy Devine. Director: Lew Lan- 
ders. 

Man From Montana 6061 (56) Sept. 5 

Western. The daughter of a homestead- 
ing family saves the sheriff protecting 
them from ranchers, from being lynch- 
ed, when murder is done. In good time 
he corrals the culprits. Johnny Mack 
Brown, Nell O’Day. Director: Ray Tay- 
lor. 

Man Made Monster 5012 (59) Mar. 28 
Horror Drama. Experiments on a car- 
nival trouper able to take severe elec- 
trical shocks, make of him a walking 
electrocutionist, whom it is death to 
touch. Lon Chaney, jr., Lionel Atwill. 
Director: George Waggner. 

Man Who Lost Himself .5016 (72) Mar. 21 
Comedy. A Puerto Rican business man 
meets his double, a philandering wastrel, 
and winds up in the latter’s home, with 
his lookalike killed in an accident. Con- 
vincing the other man’s wife of his 
true identity becomes his job. Brian 
Aherne, Kay Francis. Director: Edward 
Ludwig. 

Masked Rider, The .6062 (59) Oct. 24 

Western. Getting a shipment of silver 
past the masked rider and his gang, so 
that a friendly haciendo owner can pay 
off the mortgages, are the elements 
here. Johnny Mack Brown, Fuzzy 
Knight. Director: Ford Beebe. 

Meet the Chump 5032 (60) Feb. 14 

Comedy. An uncle tries to appear in- 
sane to cover up a $5,000,000 shortage 
in his nephew’s estate, of which he is 
administrator. Hugh Herbert, Lewis 
Howard. Director: Edward Cline. 

Melody Lane 6029 (60) Dec. 19 

Comedy with Music. The advent of a 
corn-belt band into the big-time coast- 
to-coast broadcasting. Baby Sandy, 
Leon Errol, The Merry Macs. Direc- 
tor: Charles Lament. 

Men of the Timberland 5055 (62) June 6 
Melodrama. A stalwart ranger and a 
superhuman lumberjack overcome vil- 
lainy in the north woods. Richard Ar- 
len, Andy Devine, Linda Hayes. Di- 
rector: John Rawlins. 

Mr. Dynamite 5041 (63) Mar. 7 

Melodrama. A world series pitcher turns 
detective when he becomes involved in 
a murder and espionage through hid- 
ing a beautiful girl accused of the kill- 
ing. Lloyd Nolan, Irene Hervey. Di- 
rector: John Rawlins. 

Mob Town 6021 (60) Oct. 3 

Comedy Drama. A cop who believes in 
giving the kids a chance steers a tough 
kid off the road to reform school. Dead 
End Kids, Little Tough Guys. Direc- 
tor: William Nigh. 

Model Wife 5014 (78) Apr. 18 

Comedy. A young couple keep their 
marriage secret for fear of being fired. 
Their employer’s wastrel son comes in 
on the scene and proceeds to fall in 
love with the young wife. Joan Blon- 
dell, Dick Powell, Charlie Ruggles. Di- 
rector: Leigh Jason, 

Moonlight in Hawaii 6025 (60) Nov. 21 
Musical Comedy. Youngsters endeavor 
to line up a pineapple grower as spon- 


82 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


SCENES FROM RALPH SPENCE MODEL RAILWAY 



Village of Maimix has streets, stores, Pullman cars, etc., named after motion picture friends of owner. 

(Designed 'by Spentojie Hobbies) 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


83 





sor of their band and show on the air. 
Johnny Downs, Maria Montez, Merry 
Macs. Director: Charles Lament. 

Mutiny in the Arctic .5054 (61) Apr. 18 
Melodrama. The two discoverers of an 
Arctic mountain rich in ore, overcome 
an attempted mutiny. Richard Arlen, 
Andy Devine, Anne Nagel. Director: 
John Rawlins. 

Never Give a Sucker an Even Break 

6016 (70) Oct. 10 

Comedy. A screen writer is tolerated 
because his niece is a child star. An 
effort to visualize his writings in ac- 
tion leads to some of the weirder se- 
quences. W. C. Fields, Gloria Jean, 
Leon Errol. Director: Edward Cline. 

Nice Girl? 5003 (95) Feb. 21 

Comedy with Music. Daughters of a 
professor make a play for a visiting ex- 
plorer. A rumor of an engagement 
proves embarrassing, but the explorer 
helps the maiden out of the predica- 
ment and she returns to her small town 
sweetheart. Deanna Durbin, Franchot 
Tone, Robert Benchley. Director: Wil- 
liam Seiter. 

Quiet Wedding 6044 (63) Nov. 21 

Comedy. An elopement to avoid a spec- 
tacular wedding proves more trouble- 
some than the big blow-out fond par- 
ents were planning. Margaret Lock- 
wood, Derek Farr. Director: Anthony 
Asquith. 

Raiders of the Desert 5056 (60) July 18 
Melodrama. A marauding desert sheik 
is outwitted and outslugged in his at- 
tempt to blitz a model city. Richard 
Arlen, Andy Devine. Director: John 
Rawlins. 

Rawhide Rangers. .5067 (55) July 18 

Western. A gang of outlaws led by a 
seemingly respectable citizen commit 
their depredations from cattle rustling 
to murder till two cronies round them 
up. Johnny Mack Brown, Fuzzy Knight, 
Kathryn Adams. Director: Ray Taylor. 

Road Agent 6052. ...(60) Dec. 19 

Western. An end to stagecoach robber- 
ies is brought about. Dick Foran, Leo 
Carrillo, Andy Devine, Anne Gwynne. 
Director: Charles Lament. 

San Antonio Rose 5031 (63) June 20 

Musical Comedy. Show girls team up 
with a dance orchestra and take over 
a night club originally forced out of 
business by gangster rivals. Jane Fra- 
zee, Robert Paige, The Merry Macs. Di- 
rector: Charles Lament. 

San Francisco Docks 5027 (66) Jan. 10 
Melodrama. The waterfront pals and 
the sweetheart of a longshoreman turn 
detective to round up the killer for 
whose crime the longshoreman is ac- 
cused. Burgess Meredith, Irene Her- 
vey, Robert Armstrong. Director: Arth- 
ur Lubin. 

Sealed Lips 6038 (62) Dec. 5 

Melodrama. Upon the eve of his re- 
lease, the authorities suspect the man 
they thought a master crook is a double 
for the real one, only taking the rap 
for him. This they proceed to prove. 
William Gargan, June Clyde. Director: 
George Waggner. 

Sing Another Chorus 6030 (64) Sept. 19 
Musical. Concerning boys and girls in 
the dress business who make show busi- 
ness their avocation. Jane Frazee, John- 
ny Downs, Mischa Auer. Director: 
Charles Lament. 


Six Lessons From Madame LaZonga 

5022 (62) Jan. 17 

Comedy with Music. The lady wants 
to reopen her Havana night club and 
gets the dough from the confidence man 
who sets out to clip a would-be enter- 
tainer heading for a job in the night 
club. Lupe Velez, Leon Errol, William 
Frawley. Director: John Rawlins. 

South of Tahiti. 6020. ..(75) Oct. 17 

Comedy Drama. Pearl hunters become 
stranded on a tropical isle when the 
chief’s daughter, in love with one of 
them, burns their boat. A conspiracy 
by the others to steal pearls and escape 
is foiled, as is a revolt led by the girl’s 
native suitor. Brian Donlevy, Maria 


Montez, Brod Crawford. Director: 
George Waggner. 

Swing It, Soldier . .6033 ..(65) Nov. 7 


Musical Comedy. A friend is asked by 
a draftee to look after his wife who is 
about to have a baby. The wife mean- 
time goes to the hospital and it is her 
twin sister the friend assumes care for, 
falling in love with her and then dis- 
covering she is the twin. Ken Murray, 
Frances Langford. Director: Harold 
Young. 

This Woman Is Mine .5044 (92) Aug. 15 
Drama. A stern sea-captain’s expedi- 
tion goes awry when a young woman, 
smuggled aboard by a crew member, 
is discovered. Franchot Tone, John 
Carroll, Carol Bruce. Director: Frank 
Lloyd. 

Tight Shoes .5012A (67) June 13 

Comedy. A pair of shoes that don’t fit, 
ruin an errand-running gangster’s dis- 
position, bankroll, job, and lose him his 
girl friend, with the clerk who sold 
him the shoes, just about replacing 
him. John Howard, Binnie Barnes, Brod 
Crawford. Director: Albert S. Rogell. 

Too Many Blondes 5034 (60) May 23 

Comedy with Music. A couple deciding 
on a divorce, put themselves on a strict 
budget to save the money for it, only 
to be reimited in the final reel. Rudy 
Vallee, Helen Parrish. Director: Thorn- 
ton Freeland. 

Unfinished Business 6004 (95) Sept. 12 
Comedy Drama. Jilted by the socialite 
she meets on board train, a small town 
belle later marries his younger brother. 
The triangle develops, with separation 
and reunion setting things aright. Ir- 
ene Dunne, Robert Montgomery, Pres- 
ton Foster. Director: Gregory LaCava. 

Where Did You Get That Girl 5030 

(70) Jan. 3 

Comedy with Music. Talented young- 
sters crash the big-time band status 
with borrowed instruments and after 
limitless connivance. Leon Errol, Helen 
Parrish. Director: Arthur Lubin. 

Wolf Man, The 6015 (70) Dec. 12 

Horror Melodrama. Fantastic tale of a 
man who turns werewolf, murdering 
without knowning why. Lon Chaney jr., 
Claude Rains, Ralph Bellamy. Director: 
George Waggner. 

Warner Bros. 

Affectionately Yours 566 (88) May 10 

Comedy Drama. Foreign correspondent 
returns home to re-win his divorced 
wife, the other woman following him. 
Merle Oberon, Dennis Morgan, Rita 
Hayworth, Ralph Bellamy. Director: 
Lloyd Bacon. 

Bad Men of Missouri 557 (74) July 26 
Outdoor Drama. The James, Dalton and 


Younger brothers all together on the 
screen. Dennis Morgan, V/ayne Morris, 
Jane Wyman. Director: Ray Enright. 

Blues in the Night 110 (88) Nov. 15 

Drama with Music. Louisiana in the 
early “blues” days is the locale. Pris- 
cilla Lane, Betty Field, Lloyd Nolan. 
Director: Anatole Litvak. 

Body Disappears, The 111 (72) Dec. 6 

Comedy. Experiments in bringing back 
the dead help to liven up the living 
with a “Topper” approach. Jeffrey 
Lynn, Jane Wyman, Edward Everett 
Horton, Director: D. Ross Lederman. 

Bride Came C. O. D., The 507 (90) July 12 
Comedy. A flying kidnapper hired by 
an irate father breaks up a “deb”- 
orchestra leader marriage only to fall 
himself. Bette Davis, James Cagney, 
Stuart Erwin. Director: William Keigh- 
ley. 

Bullets for O'Hara 518 (50) July 19 

Melodrama. Cops and robbers yarn 
about the owner of an illegal gambling 
establishment. Roger Pryor, Joan Per- 
ry, Anthony Quinn. Director: William 
K. Howard. 

Case of the Black Parrot 572 (60) Jan. 11 

Mystery. Murder about the blackmail 
and antique rackets. William Lundigan, 
Maris Wrixon. Director: Noel Smith. 


Devil Dogs of the Air 550 (86) June 7 
Drama. Reissue. Pat O’Brien and 
James Cagney. 

©Dive Bomber 553 (132) Aug. 30 

Drama. The navy air corps and its de- 


velopment on a scientific basis is the 
story behind this one Errol Flynn, Fred 
MacMurray, Ralph Bellamy Director: 
Michael Curtiz. 

Father's Son .520 (57) Feb. 1 

Comedy Drama. Family troubles cen- 
tering about a “bad boy” finally solved 
with a faked kidnapping. John Litel, 
Frieda Inescort. Director: D. Ross Led- 
erman. 

Flight From Destiny 514 (74) Feb. 8 

Drama. Is there such a thing as a 
“socially useful” murder is the question 
put by this picture. Thomas Mitchell, 
Geraldine Fitzgerald, Jeffrey Lynn. Di- 
rector: Vincent Sherman. 

Footsteps in the Dark 509 (96) Mar. 8 

Mystery Drama. A blue-blood financier 
with a yen for mystery writes murder 
novels and becomes involved in one. 
Errol Flynn, Brenda Marshall, Ralph 
Bellamy. Director: Lloyd Bacon. 

Four Mothers 503 (86) Jan. 4 

Melodrama. The latest in this series 
deals with the results of a tornado on 
a land investment in which the family is 
involved. Priscilla, Rosemary and Lola 
Lane, Gale Page, Claude Rains. Direc- 
tor: William Keighley. 

Great Lie, The 504 (107) Apr. 12 

Drama. A man, two loves, an illegal 
marriage and a baby result in the need 
of a “great lie” with all ending well. 
Bette Davis, George Brent, Mary Astor. 
Director: Edmund Goulding. 

Great Mr. Nobody 515 (71) Feb. 15 

Comedy Drama. An “easy guy” falls in 
love but his good nature prevents his 
getting far enough ahead to pop the 
question. Eddie Albert, Joan Leslie, 
Alan Hale. Director: Ben Stoloff. 

Here Comes Happiness 521 (58) Mar. 15 

Comedy. Rich girl-poor boy-irate moth- 


84 


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BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


85 



er and you have the story of this one. 
Mildred Coles, Edward Norris. Director: 
Noel Smith. 

High Sierra 556 (100) Jan. 25 

Drama A big-time gangster is released 
from prison to “pull a job” and during 
the period outside discovers himself to 
be a human being. Ida Lupino, Hum- 
phrey Bogart. Director: Raoul Walsh. 

Highway West 565 (65) Aug. 23 

Melodrama. Action along the famous 
Highway 66 through the eyes of an 
auto camp. Brenda Marshall, William 
Lundigan, Olympe Bradna. Director: 
William McGann. 

Honeymoon lor Three 510 (76) Jan. 18 

Comedy Drama. A novel-writing Casa- 
nova discovers an old flame on a lec- 
ture tour with complications and a hus- 
band dogging him. Ann Sheridan, 
George Brent, Charlie Ruggles. Direc- 
tor: Lloyd Bacon. 

International Squadron 106 (87) Oct. 11 

Melodrama. The smart-guy aviator in 
the famous RAF squadron does every- 
thing wrong but squares himself in the. 
end. Ronald Reagan, Olympe Bradna. 
Director: Lew Seiler. 

Kisses for Breakfast 517 (82) July 5 

Comedy. Amnesia and two wives com- 
plicate the life of the hero in this one. 
Dennis Morgan, Shirley Ross, Jane 
Wyatt. Director: Lew Seiler. 

Knockout 568 (73) Mar. 29 

Drama. The cocky fighter who is good 
but knows it with the usual results for 
his family. All ends well. Arthur Ken- 
nedy, Olympe Bradna. Director: Wil- 
liam Clemens. 

Law of the Tropics 105 (76) Oct. 4 

Melodrama. Romance and adventure 
on a near East rubber plantation. Con- 
stance Bennett, Jeffrey Lynn, Regis 
Toomey. Director: Ray Enright. 

Maltese Falcon, The 107 (100) Oct. 18 

Mystery Drama. A top mystery story 
from the book by Dashiell Hammett, of 
“Thin Man” fame. Humphrey Bogart, 
Mary Astor, Gladys George. Director: 
John Huston. 

Manpower 505 (100) Aug. 9 

Drama. A rough and ready lineman on 
a power company mixes work and ro- 
mance. Edward G. Robinson. Marlene 
Dietrich, George Raft. Director: Raoul 
Walsh. 

Meet John Doe 500 (123) May 3 

Drama. The political boss starts a com- 
mon man campaign to get into the 
white house by proxy but the “come on” 
man is too smart for him. Gary Cooper, 
Barbara Stanwyck, Walter Brennan. Di- 
rector: Frank Capra. 

Million Dollar Baby 508 (101) May 31 
Comedy Drama. A “deb” loses chance 
for European culture due to the war and 
instead discovers America. Jeffrey 
Lynn, Priscilla Lane, Ronald Reagan. 
Director: Curtis Bernhardt. 

Navy Blues 103 (108) Sept. 13 

Musical. The navy frolics, loves and 
fights in this one centered around now- 
famous Pearl Harbor. Ann Sheridan, 
Jack Oakie, Jack Haley, Martha Raye. 
Director: Lloyd Bacon. 

Nine Lives Are Not Enough 104 

(G3) Sept 20 

Melodrama. A smart alecky reporter 
gets involved in murder and the daugh- 


ter of the murdered man finally buys 
him a newspaper. Ronald Reagan, Joan 
Perry. Director: Edward Sutherland. 

Nurse's Secret, The 523 (65) May 24 

Mystery Drama. Murder and the in- 
surance racket rings. Lee Patrick, Regis 
Toomey. Director: Noel Smith. 

^w^One Foot in Heaven 108 (103) Nov. 1 
Biographical Drama. The biography of 
a “practical parson” written by his son. 
Fredric March, Martha Scott, Beulah 
Bondi. Director: Irving Rapper. 

Out of the Fog 555 (86) June 14 

Drama. The small-time racketeer runs 
afoul of two old men with final result 
against him. Ida Lupino, John Garfield, 
Thomas Mitchell. Director: Anatole Lit- 
vak. 

Passage From Hongkong 524 (61) June 21 
Comedy Drama. Romance and intrigue 
aboard a round-the-world tour. Sab- 
otage, etc. all do their part. Lucile 
Fairbanks, Keith Douglas. Director: D. 
Ross Lederman. 

Sea Wolf, The 501 (99) Mar. 22 

Drama. Two fugitives from justice 
aboard the ship of a plundering aveng- 
er. Edward G. Robinson, Ida Lupino, 
John Garfield. Director: Michael Cur- 
tiz. 

OSergeant York 101 (134) Sept. 27 

Biographical Drama. The story of the 
World War hero, Alvin York. Gary 
Cooper, Joan Leslie, Walter Brennan. 
Director: Howard Hawks. 

Shadows on the Stairs 573 (63) Mar. 1 

Mystery. Murder in a London boarding 
house with everyone a suspect. Frieda 
Inescort, Paul Cavanagh. Director: D. 
Ross Lederman. 

Shining Victory 564 (80) June 7 

Drama. Action in a mental hospital in 
Scotland. Geraldine Fitzgerald, James 
Stephenson, "Donald Crisp. Director: 
Irving Rapper. 

Shot in the Dark, A 522 (57) Apr. 5- 

Mystery Drama. Two newspapermen 
vie for a night club entertainer and 
solve a murder in the process. Nan 
Wynn, William Lundigan, Regis 
Toomey. Director: William McGann. 

Singapore Woman 563 (64) May 17 

Drama. The regeneration of a water- 
front woman on the Malaya peninsula. 
Brenda Marshall, David Bruce. Direc- 
tor: Jean Negulesco. 

Smiling Ghost, The 102 (71) Sept. G 

Mystery Comedy. A haunted house and 
a series of mysterious killings provide 
the story here. Wayne Morris, Brenda 
Marshall, David Bruce. Director: Lew 
Seiler. 

Steel Against the Sky 112 (68) Dec. 13 

Melodrama. The story of the bridge 
builders. Lloyd Nolan, Alexis Smith, 
Craig Stevens. Director: A. Edward 
Sutherland. 

Strange Alibi 567 (63) Apr. 19 

Melodrama. A detective-lieutenant 
quits the force to join a gang of rac- 
keteers in order to capture them. Arth- 
ur Kennedy, Joan Perry. Director: D. 
Ross Lederman. 

Strav/berry Blonde, The 559 (91) Feb. 22 

Comedy Drama. The story of a small- 
time dentist of the nineties who sees a 
chance for a revenge he has desired 
for years but via the flashback route 
decided against it. James Cagney, 


Olivia de Havilland, Rita Hayworth. Di- 
rector: Raoul Walsh. 

Target for Tonight 109 (48) Nov. 8 

Documentary. The actual story of a 
bomber trip to Germany and back by 
the RAP. This is the real thing. Di- 
rected by Harry Watt. 

Thieves Fall Out 516 (72) May 3 

Comedy Drama. The story of the dazed 
young man in love and his efforts to 
succeed to a legacy with gangster com- 
plications. Eddie Albert, Joan Leslie, 
Jane Darwell. Director: Ray Enright. 

Three Sons O'Guns 574 (65) Aug. 2 

Comedy. The life of a draftee in one 
of the large defense camps. Wayne 
Morris, Lucile Fairbanks, Arthur Ken- 
nedy, Tom Brown. Director: Ben Stol- 
off. 

Underground 558 (94) June 28 

Drama. Story of the German internal 
strife and an effort to overthrow Hitler. 
Jeffrey Lynn, Philip Dorn, Kaaren 
Verne, Mona Maris. Director: Vincent 
Sherman. 

Wagons Roll at Night 560 (84) Apr. 26 
Comedy Drama. The trials of a travel- 
ing tent show and its people. Hum- 
phrey Bogart, Sylvia Sidney, Eddie Al- 
bert, Joan Leslie. Director: Ray En- 
right. 

You're in the Army Now 113 (79) Dec. 25 
Comedy. Another in the ever-increas- 
ing number of draft comedies with la 
"Schnozzola.” Jimmy Durante, Jane 
Wyman, Phil Silvers. Director: Lew 
Seiler. 

Miscellaneous 

Break the News (70) Trio Films Apr. 10 
Farce Melodrama. Distributed through 
Monogram, and made in England, story 
is about a pair of hoofers who decide 
to reap the rewards of publicity by 
having one of them disappear and the 
other to pretend he was the “murderer.” 
Maurice Chevalier, Jack Buchanan, 
June Knight. 

Buzzy and the Phantom Pinto 

(57) Fortune Films 

Western. A land grabber murders a 
rancher, tries to intimidate his surviv- 
ors and winds up facing the business 
end of a six shooter. Buzzy Henry, 
Dave O’Brien. 

Cavalcade of Faith (65) Jeffery Film Corp. 
Documentary. A compilation of scenes 
taken at various church functions in 
Rome, at Eucharistic Congresses in Chi- 
cago, Buenos Aires and other cities. 
Background dialogue handled by Basil 
Ruysdael. 

Chinese Den (75) Film Alliance 

Melodrama. Produced in England by 
British Lion some years ago. Singapore 
Sadie marries a Chinese planter and 
goes with him to his jungle home, 
where a triangle plot unfolds. Paul 
Lukas, Jane Baxter. 

City of Missing Girls 

(73) Select Attractions 

Drama. A detective, a district attorney 
and a newspaperwoman solve the prob- 
lem of where girls go when they are 
missing. H. B. Warner, Astrid Allwyn, 
Sarah Padden. 

Day in Soviet Russia, A (56) Artkino 

Documentary . A survey of life in Rus- 
sia showing the people at work, play, 
traveling and eating. Narrated by 
Quentin Reynolds. 


8G 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 



Forgotten Village, The (67) 

Sept. 16 Mayer-Burstyn 

Documentary. A remote Mexican vill- 
age is left to its own resources when 
an epidemic strikes its children. Native 
cast. Narrated by Burgess Meredith. 
Director: Herb Kline. 

Forty Thousand Horsemen 

(87) Goodwill Pictures 

War Drama. A romantic military drama 
detailing the exploits of the Australian 
Light Horse — the Anzacs — during World 
War No. 1, in Palestine and the Near 
East. Grant Taylor, Betty Bryant. 

I'll Sell My Life (73) Sept. 11 Select 
Mystery. Plot deals with the jealousy 
of an entertainer who murders her al- 
leged rival and then offers $20,000 if 
someone else will take the rap. Rose 
Hobart, Michael Whalen, Joan Wood- 
bury, Roscoe Ates. Director: Elmer 
Clifton. 

King of the White Elephants (66) Pridi 
Oriental Novelty. A Thailand (Siam- 
ese) film based on a historical incident 
in that country in 1540. The Siamese 
cast speak in English. 

Larceny Street (65) Film Alliance 

Comedy Drama. A husband-wife “de- 
tective team” track down a gang of 
insurance company defrauders and jew- 
el thieves in Dublin. Jack Buchanan, 
Elsie Randolph. Director: Tim Whelan. 

Kukan (9) Adventure Epics, Inc. 

Documentary. A film record of China’s 
internal unity, showing their work in 
agriculture, religion, and their war 
struggle. Photographed entirely in 
color. 

Lady Luck (72) 

March Consolidated Nat'l Films 

Comedy. Produced by Dixie National 
Films with an all-colored cast. A dice- 
thrower changes from a hobo to a high- 
brow and back again. Mantan More- 
land, P. H. Miller. 

Law of the Wolf (57) Fortune Films 

Melodrama. A pair of escaped convicts 
have the law officers and Rin-Tin- 
Tin’s grandson after them. Dennis 
Moore, Luana Walters, Jack Ingram. 

Murder at the Baskervilles (66) Astor 

Mystery Drama. A British film about 
10 years old. Murder and the turf con- 
cern the sleuth of Baker Street. Arthur 
Wontner, Lyn Harding, Judy Gunn. 

Mystery of Room 13 (71) 

July 25 Alliance Films 

Melodrama. A young man in cahoots 
with the police goes to jail to get a 
line on counterfeiters. Gibb McLaugh- 
lin, Sara Seegar. 

No Greater Sin (85) University Film 

Drama. An “expose” of syphilis, with 
a defense industry and an army camp 
background Leon Ames, Luana Walters. 
Director: William Nigh. 

Pirate of the Seven Seas (61) Film Alliance 
Drama. The master of a tramp steamer 
p.ying oriental ports tries his hand at 
pearl smuggling. John Lodge, Judy 
Kelly, Kenneth Kent. 

Proud Valley (70) Supreme Prod., Inc. 

Drama. Deals with unemployment in 
the Welsh mines of Wales and attend- 
ant evils. Produced in England by 
Michael Balcon. Paul Robeson, Edward 
Chapman. 

Queen of Crime (55) Film Alliance 

Comedy Drama. A female super crook 


and her ten cohorts make off with a 
trainload of gold bullion. Genevueve 
Tobin, Noel Madison, Jack Huibert. 

Secret of Stamboul, The 

(68) I. H. Hofiberg Co. 

Melodrama. The exploits of an English- 
man in Turkey, who gets entangled in 
a political web. Valerie Hobson, Frank 
Vosper, James Mason. 

Sensation (54) Film Alliance 

Melodrama. A crime reporter chases 
down the murderer of a young woman 
after a series of hair-breadth escapes. 
John Lodge, Diana Churchill. 

Terror, The (64) July 29 Film Alliance 
Mystery Drama. Based on an Edgar 
Wallace plot which concerns the re- 
covery of stolen gold, with Scotland 
Yard and three crooks after it. Wil- 
frid Lawson. Bernard Lee, Arthur Wont- 
ner. 

This England (80) Esquire Films 

Historical. A cavalcade of English his- 
tory from 1066 to the present day of 
air raids. Emlyn Williams, Constance 
Cummings, John Clements, Roddy Mc- 
Dowall. 

Foreign Dialogue 

(All pictures listed have English 
subtitles) 

Compliments of Mr. Flow 
French (77) Hoffberg 

Mystery Comedy. A young lawyer gets 
himself involved with a crook who op- 
erates while in jail through his aides 
on the outside. Fernand Gravet, Louis 
Jouvet. 

General Suvarov Russian (90) 

Sept. 19 Artkino 

Historical Drama. Story of Suvarov’s 
victory before Warsaw, in the 18th cen- 
tury, who served Catherine the Great 
and Czar Paul I. 

Hatred French (67) World Piet. Corp. 

Drama. Story of a sea captain, married 
to a woman who despises him. Harry 
Baur, Gabrielle Dorziat, Pierre Renoir. 

Heroes of the Sea Russian (84) Artkino 
Sea Drama. A tale of Red navy revenge 
for the disaster of Tshushima in 1919. 

Hotel Du Nord French (83) Juno Films 

Drama. The existences of a group of 
prosaic people in a small pension in 
Paris are jolted into emotional heights 
by the affairs of a man and a girl. 
Annabella, Louis Jouvet. Director: Mar- 
cel Came. 

I Give My Life French (80) AFE Corp. 

Spy Drama. Japan’s war against Rus- 
sia in 1894 for Port Arthur. Danielle 
Darrieux, Anton Walbrook, Charles 
Vanel. Director: Nicolas Farkas 

King, The French (94) Trio Films 

Comedy. A pre-war French film with 
a satirical essay on the theme of cuck- 
oldry. Raimu, Victor Francen. 

Mad Emperor, The (89) 

French World Piets. 

Historical Drama. Russia in the time 
of Paul I, showing a depraved ruler 
who is assassinated for his and Rus- 
sia’s good. Harry Baur, Pierre Renoir, 
Suzy Prim. 

Man Who Seeks the Truth, The 

French (75) Dome Films 

Comedy Drama. A banker suspects his 
mistress of two-timing and feigns deaf- 


ness to find out. Raimu, Jacqueline 
Delubac. 

Mannerheim Line, The Russian (75) Artkino 
Documentary . Details the military ac- 
tivity when the Red Army engaged the 
Finnish White Guard Army in the 
Karelian Isthmus. 

New Teacher, The Russian (85) Artkino 
Romatic Drama. Romance of a bash- 
ful school teacher who loves the friend 
of his sister. Boris Chirkov, Tamara 
Makarova. 

Pepe Le Moko French 

(90) Mayer-Burstyn, Inc. 

Melodrama. Story of a French jewel 
thief hiding out in Algiers, and his 
tender love for a woman. Jean Gabin, 
Mireille Balin. Director: Julien Duvi- 
vier. 

Personal Column French (89) Pax Films 
Comedy Drama. Story of a taxi danc- 
er recruited by the police to answer 
unusual newspaper ads for young girls, 
in an effort to solve the disappearance 
of girls in Paris. Maurice Chevalier, 
Marie Dea, Eric Von Stroheim. 

Soviet Frontiers on the Danube Russian 

(60) Artkino 

Documentary. Details the so-called lib- 
eration of the populations of Bessarabia 
and northern Bukovina, formerly under 
Rumanian control. 

They Met on Skis French 

(74) C. L. Import Corp. 

Comedy. Locale is Mount Blanc, and 
concerns the rivalry between two hotel 
keepers there. Wissia Dini, Henri Pres- 
les, Charpin. Producer: Henri Sokal. 

Volga-Volga Russian (95) Artkino 

Musical Comedy. A couple of river boats 
are racing down to Moscow bearing 
varied native musical talents to com- 
pete in a cultural Olympiad. Lubov 
Orlova. 

Wings of Victory Russian (95) Artkino 
Drama. A screen portrait of the career 
of Valeri Chkalov, Soviet flyer, who 
flew from Moscow to San Francisco in 
1937. Vladimir Belokurov, Mikhail 
Gelovani. 


From Maine 
to California! 

The various BOXOFFICE depart- 
ments probably account for our 
gradually dropping our subscrip- 
tions to all other trade papers, 
except one, and depending more 
on the information received 
through your pages. 

Wishing you continued suc- 

RONALD E. WARREN, 
Lubec Theatre, 

Lubec, Me. 

• 

BOXOFFICE is the best trade 
paper published today. You have 
always anticipated the wants of 
the theatre owner and given him 
the service so necessary to carry 
on. 

0. L. MeVEY, 

Bel-Air, 

Los Angeles, Cal, 


88 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 



Alphabetical Index of Features and 


REVIEW DUEH 


j. 


n ^nterpretati- 


lipii 


Opinions ' 2 )eclucecl ^rom, l^ei 


ALL PICTURES LISTED HERE APPEAR IN THE FEATURE INDEX IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER UNDER THE PROPER COMPANY HEAD- 
INGS. FIGURES FOLLOWING TITLE ARE ISSUE OF BOXOFFICE IN WHICH PICTURE WAS REVIEWED. DESIGNED AS A TIME- 
SAVER FOR THOSE WHO KNOW PICTURE TITLE, BUT NOT THE PRODUCER OR DISTRIBUTOR. ALL PICTURES ARE OF 1941 RELEASE. 


Title 


Distr. 


Review 

Date 



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A Very Young Lady (20th-Fox) 5-3 

A Woman's Face (M-G-M) 5-10 

A Yank in the RAF (20th-Fox) 9-13 

Accent on Love (20th-Fox) 7-12 

Across the Sierras (Col) 4-19 

Adam Had Four Sons (Col) 2-22.... 

Adventure in Washington (Col) 5-31 

Adventures of Tom Sawyer (UA) Reissue 

Affectionately Yours (WB) 5-10 

All That Money Can Buy (RKO) 7-19. .. 

(Reviewed under title, "Here Is a Man 

All-American Co-Ed (UA) 10-11.. 

Aloma of the South Seas (Para) 8-30... 

Among the Living (Para) 9-6 

Andy Hardy's Private Secretary 

(M-G-M) 3-1 

Angels With Broken Wings (Rep) 6-7.— 

Apache Kid. The (Rep) 9-27 

Appointment for Love (Univ) 11-1 

Arizona Bound (Mono) 8-2 

Arizona Cyclone (Univ) 

Arkansas Judge (Rep) 1-25 

B 

Bachelor Daddy (Univ) 6-28 

Back in the Saddle (Rep) 3-15 

Back Street (Univ) 2-8 

Bad Man, The (M-G-M) 4-5 

Bad Man of Deadwood (Rep) 10-11 

Bad Men of Missouri (WB) 8-2 

Badlands of Dakota (Univ) 8-30.. 

Bandit Trail (RKO) 9-6 

Barnacle Bill (M-G-M) 7-5 

Bedtime Story (Col) 12-13 

Belle Starr (20th-Fox) 8-23 

Big Boss. The (Col) 5-3 

Big Store. The (M-G-M) 6-21 

Billy the Kid (M-G-M) 5-31 

Billy the Kid in Santa Fe (PRC) 

Billy the Kid Wanted (PRC) 11-1 

Billy the Kid's Fighting Pals (PRC) 4-19 
Billy the Kid's Range War (PRC) 4-5. .. 
Billy the Kid's Roundup (PRC) 1-3-42.. . 

Birth of the Blues (Para) 9-6 

Black Cat. The (Univ) 5-3 

Blonde Comet, The (PRC) 1-10-42 

Blonde From Singapore. The (Col) 9-6.. 

Blonde Inspiration (M-G-M) 2-22 

Blondie Goes Latin (Col) 2-22 

Blondie in Society (Col) 7-5 

Blood and Sand (20th-Fox) 5-24 

Blossoms in the Dust (M-G-M) 6-28 

Blues in the Night (WB) 11-1 

Body Disappears, The (WB) 12-13 

Border Vigilantes (Para) 4-5 

Borrowed Hero (Mono) 12-13 

Boss of Bullion City (Univ) 

Bowery Blitzkrieg (Mono) 8-30 

Break the News (Trio) 1-11 

Bride Came C. O. D.. The (WB) 6-28.. . 


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Title 


Distr. 


Review 

Date 


Bride Wore Crutches (20th. Fox) 7-27-40 
Bringing Up Baby (RKO) Reissue 2-19-38 

Broadway Limited (UA) 6-28 

Buck Privates (Univ) 2-8 

Bullets lor O'Hara (WB) 8-9 

Burma Convoy (Univ) 10-4 

Bury Be Not on Lone Prairie (Univ) 

Buy Me That Town (Para) 8-2. 

Buzzy and Phantom Pinto (Fortune) 6-7 

c 

Cadet Girl (20th-Fox) 11-15 

Case ol the Black Parrot (WB) 2-1 

Caught in the Act (PRC) 

Caught in the Draft (Para) 5-31 

Cavalcade ol Faith (lelfrey Films) 2-1 
Charley's Aunt (20th-Fox) 7-26... 

Charlie Chan in Rio (20th-Fox) 8-30 

Cheers lor Miss Bishop (UA) 1-18 

Chinese Den (Film Alliance) 4-5 
Chocolate Soldier, The (M-G-M) 10-18 
Citadel ol Crime (Rep) 8-9 

Citizen Kane (RKO) 4-19 

City ol Missing Girls (Select) 4-5 

Come Live With Me (M-G-M) 2-1 

Compliments ol Mr. Flow (Hollberg) 4-5 

Confirm or Deny (20th-Fox) 11-15 

Convoy (RKO) 1-18 

Corsican Brothers, The (UA) 12-20 

County Fair (Rep) 5-24 

Cowboy and the Blonde (20th-Fox) 4-26 

Cracked Nuts (Univ) 8-2 

Criminals Within (PRC) 9-6 

Cyclone on Horseback (RKO) 6-28 

D 

Dance Hall (20th-Fox) 7-5 

Dangerous Game, The (Univ) 11-1 

Dangerous Lady (PRC) 11-1 

Dark Streets of Cairo (Univ) 12-7-40 

Day in Soviet Russia, A (Artkino) 11-8 

Dead Man's Shoes (Mono) 

Dead Men Tell (20th-Fox) 3-29 

Deadly Game, The (Mono) 9-6 — 

Death Valley Outlaws (Rep) 10-4 

Desert Bandit (Rep) 5-31 

Design for Scandal (M-G-M) 11-15 

Desperate Cargo (PRC) 

Devil and Miss Jones, The (RKO) 4-12 

Devil Bat (PRC) 4-26 ... 

Devil Commands, The (Col) 2-22 ---. 

Devil Dogs ol Air (WB) Reissue 2-9-35 

Devil Pays OH, The (Rep) 11-22 

Dive Bomber (WB) 8-16 

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (M-G-M) 7-26 
Dr. Kildare's Wedding Day (M-G-M) 8-23 

Doctors Don't Tell (Rep) 9-13 

Doomed Caravan (Para) 1-18 

Double Cross (PRC) 9-6 

Double Date (Univ) 3-22 

Double Trouble (Mono) 11-22 

Down in San Diego (M-G-M) 8-2 


0 

U 

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'a 

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— 

- 

4+ 6— 

44 

++ 

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44 

44 

+ 

+ 

14+ 

— 

ip 





— 

ip 

3+ 7- 

+ 



+ 

+ 


+ 

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8+ 4- 






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+ 


2+ 1- 


± 

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+ 

44 

+ 

± 

+ 

10+ 3- 

= 


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it 



+ 



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8+ 7- 

— 

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+ 

+ 


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± 

7+ 6— 







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2+ 3- 

+ 

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-ff 

44 

44 

44 

+ 

+ 

14+ 

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44 


+ 

+ 

+ 

44 

+ 

+ 

10+ 1— 

zt 

tl 




+ 

± 


6+ 6- 

44 

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44 

44 

44 

44 

4f 

16+ 

44 



44 

44 

44 

+ 

-f 

12+ 2- 

+ 

ip 

it 




— 


3+ 5— 

tt 

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ff 

44 

44 

44 

44 

ff 

16+ 

44 

± 

- 

44 

44 

44 

± 

+ 

11+ 3— 










ip 

+ 

— 

+ 

44 

44 



9+ 3— 

-f 

+ 


+ 

44 


+ 


7+ 1- 

++ 

•H 

+ 

44 

44 

44 

+ 


12+ 

it 

it 

— 

zt 



± 


4+ 5- 


± 

— 

+ 

+ 




7+ 6- 

qi 





ZjZ 

— 


4+ 5- 

— 








2+ 3- 

± 

it 




+ 



5+ 4— 

it 

it 





± 

_ 


It 

5+ 8- 


— 





— 

= 

1+ 9- 

— 



+ 




it 

3+ 3- 


ti 

+ 




+ 


4+ 3- 

— 






+ 


3+ 2— 

+ 



zp 

+ 

+ 

zt 


7+ 3- 

It 

it 


+ 

+ 

± 

± 


7+ 5- 




+ 


+ 



5+ 3- 



+ 

+ 


44 

+ 


6+ 2— 


-H- 


44 

44 

44 



11+ 

ff 

-H- 

+ 

44 

44 

44 

+ 

+ 

13+ 

it 



± 





3+ 5- 

H- 

— 

= 

+ 



— 


3+ 6— 

_ 



± 


+ 

+ 

ip 

5+ 4- 

ff 

fl 

ff 

+ 

44 

44 

44 

ff 

15+ 

It 


'+ 

44 

44 

+ 

+ 

it 

9+ 2— 

ip 


di 

+ 

+ 

+ 



6+ 3- 

— 



± 


+ 

+ 

ip 

5+ 4- 



+ 

44 

44 

44 

+ 

It 

11+ 1- 

— 








1+ 4- 

+ 

It 

± 

+ 

zt 

+ 

± 

It 

8+ 5- 




+ 


+ 

+ 


5+ 2- 

It 

It 

— 

± 


± 

zt 


6+ 7- 


The plus and minus signs indicate the degree of favor or disfavor of 
the review. Where our compiler is unable to form any opinion from 
the review the sign "o" is used. Blank spaces indicate no review. 
This department serves also as an Alphabetical Index to feature re- 


leases. The meaning of the various signs and their combinations is 
as follows: 

+ Very Good; t Good; — Fair; + Mediocre; “ Poor; = Very Poor. 

In the summary f|- is rated as 2 pluses; = as 2 minuses. 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


89 


TT Very Good; + Good; — Fair; ■+■ Mediocre; ~ Poor; — Very Poor. 


In the summary H is rated as 2 pluses; = as 2 minuses. 



o 

W 



-0 

o 

O 

O 

U) 

<D 

D 

Review 

Title Distr. Date 

*0 

X 

o W 

•C 0 

s g- 

% 

‘u 

a 

a 

O 

6 

^ o 
^ 0, 
O nt 

S .S’ 

>t 4) 
S ‘u 
o 0 

a 0 

o rji 

go 

O 0 

E 

E 

3 



See 

> 

Cm 

See 

B>. 

OiS 

SQ 

CO 

Down Mexico Way (Rep) 10-25 

+ 


+ 

4- 

4- 

4- 

4- 


6+ 

Dressed to Kill (20th-Fox) 7-26 

+ 


It 

It 


di 

+ 

It 

7-4 5- 

Driltin' Kid, The (Mono) 10-4 





4- 

± 



2-4 1- 

Dude Cowboy (RKO) 9-6 - 

Dudes Are Pretty People (UA) 



4- 


+ 

4- 



5-4 2— 

Dumbo (RKO) 10-4 

+ 

+ 


44 

44 

44 

+ 

+ 

104- 

Dynamite Canyon (Mono) 9-6 

— 








1— 

£ 

E. Queen and Murder Ring (Col) 9-20 

— 



4- 

+ 

+ 


— 

7+ 5- 

E. Queen and Perfect Crime (Col) 7-19 

-H 


it 

4- 

-1- 


It 


8-4 7- 

E. Queen's Penthouse Mystery (Col) 3-1 


± 

4- 

4- 

4- 

+ 

4- 

IF 

8-4 3— 





— 

-1- 



-H 


3-4 6- 

F 

Face Behind the Mask, The (Col) 2-15.. 

+ 





4- 



7-4 5- 

Father Steps Out (Mono) 8-2 

+ 



± 

H- 

4- 

± 


6-4 4— 

Father Takes a Wife (RKO) 7-19 

+ 

± 

4- 

It 

+ 

4- 

4- 

+ 

8-4 2- 

Father's Son (WB) 2-22 

=h 

± 

= 

It 

— 


It 

IF 

6-4 9- 

Federal Fugitives (PRC) 6-7 

= 


— 

IF 




IF 

2-4 5— 

Feminine Touch, The (M-G-M) 9-20 

+ 

±: 

4+ 

44 

44 

44 

+ 

2±2 

12-4 2- 

Fiesta (UA) 12-27 

+ 




±: 

+ 



3+ 1- 

Flame of New Orleans. The (Univ) 5-3. 

tt 


— 

it 


+ 


+ 

8-4 5— 

Flight Command (M-G-M) 12-21-40 

++ 

-H- 

44 

44 

44 

44 

4- 

+ 

14-4 

Flight From Destiny (WB) 1-4 

+ 

+ 

It 

44 

44 

44 

4- 

tl 

11-4 2— 

Flying Blind (Para) 8-23 

+ 


4- 

44 

44 

44 

4- 

It 

11-4 2- 


+ 

-+- 


44 

44 

4- 

44 

+ 

+ 


9-4 1- 
6-4 6— 

Flying Wild (Mono) 3-8 


— 


Footlight Fever (RKO) 4-5 

— 

± 


— 

IF 

-t- 

— 


4+ 7- 

Footsteps in the Dark (WB) 3-8 

+ 


+ 


44 

+ 

It 

+ 

9-4 3- 

For Beauty's Sake (20th-Fox) 


±: 

— 

— 


— 

— 


3-4 6— 


+ 

+ 




44 

44 

-1- 


9-4 3— 

Forgotten Village (Mayer-Burstyn) 9-6. 






Forty Thousand Horsemen (Goodwill) 8-9 










F. Buck's Jungle Cavalcade (RKO) 7-12 

+ 


+ 


44 

4- 

+ 

-4 

7-4 


-H- 

+ 

-1- 

1 4- 

4- 

44 

4- 

4- 

10-4 1- 







3- 410- 

4- 4 2— 

Fugitive Valley (Mono) 8-23 

G 

Gambling Daughters (PRC) 11-1 

+ 


4- 





2±2 

ip 








2-4 2- 

Gang's All Here, The (Mono) 6-28 


± 

— 


+ 



, IF 

6-4 e— 

Gangs of Sonora (Rep) 7-19 

+ 


± 

+ 

4- 


+ 


5-4 1- 

Gauchos of Eldorado (Rep) 10-25. .. 

+ 


+ 

+ 


it ■ 



4+ 1- 


H- 

-1- 

+ 


4- 

4- 


-4- 

7+ 3— 
3+ 4— 


-1- 

_ 

■ 4- 



General Suvarov (Artkino) 10-11 

— 








Gentleman From Dixie (Mono) 9-13 

+ 


— 

4- 

44 

+ 

+ 

— 

7-4 3- 

Get-Away, The (M-G-M) 6-21 


±: 


+ 

+ 

4- 


± 

8-4 5- 

Girl, a Guy and a Gob, A (RKO)| 3-8.. 

-H- 

++ 

+4 

44 

44 

44 

+ 

tl 

14-4 1— 

Girl in the News, The (20th-Fox) 1-4.. 

+ 

+ 

+ 

+ 



+ 


5-4 

Girl Must Live, A (Univ) 10-11 

— 

— 

It 

It 





2-4 4- 

Glamour Boy (Para) 9-6 

+ 

•H 

44 

44 

44 

4- 

4- 


H-4 

Go West, Young Lady (Col) 12-13 

+ 

It 


it 




2±2 

6-4 5— 

Golden Hoofs (20th-Fox) 2-22 

+ 

±2 

+ 

4- 

4- 

4- 

+ 

;+; 

8-4 2— 

Gone With the Wind (M-G-M) 12-23-33 

H 

-H- 

41 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

16-4 

Great American Broadcast (20th-Fox) 5-3 

ft- 

4+ 

41 

44 

44 

44 

+ 

+ 

14-4 

Great Commandment (20th-Fox) 10-21-39 

+ 






44 


3+ 

Great Dictator, The (UA) 10-26-40 


++ 

+ 

44 


+ 

44 

+ 

12-4 1— 

Great Guns (20th-Fox) 9-13 

-h 

4- 

± 

+ 

np 

4+ 

4- 

± 

9-4 4- 

Great Lie. The (WB) 4-5 

+ 

4- 

+ 

44 

44 

44 

4- 

4- 

11 + 

Great Mr. Nobody, The (WB) 4-5 



It 


± 


di 


6+ 6- 

Great Swindle, The (Col) 4-12 

+ 


— 

4- 

± 

IF 

± 


7+ 6- 

Great Train Robbery, The (Rep) 3-8 

+ 

4- 


± 

-t- 

4- 

+ 

=p 

8+ 4- 

Gun Man From Bodie (Mono) 10-18 

H 

H. M. Pulham, Esq. (M-G-M) 11-15 



— 

+ 

4- 

4- 


— 

6+ 3- 

(4 

±2 

4F 


44 

44 

44 


12+ 1- 

Hands Across the Rockies (Col) 6-14. .. 





4- 

4- 

— 


3+ 2— 

Hard Guy (PRC) 11-1 

— 


-f- 



+ 

4- 



— 

4+ 4- 

Harmon of Michigan (Col) 9-20 

Harvard, Here I Come (Col) 

+ 

- 

—H 


44 

± 

± 

8+ 4- 


Hatred (World) 4-5 










Hay Foot (UA) 12-27 




+ 

4- 

4- 



4+ 1- 

Hello, Sucker (Univ) 7-5 

+ 



— 


4- 

It 


5+ 6— 

Hellzapoppin' (Univ) 12-20 

+ 

4- 

+ 

44 

44 

44 

4- 

+ 

11 + 

Henry Aldrich for President (Para) 8-2.. 

+ 


4- 

4- 

4- 

4- 

±2 

it 

8+ 3- 

Her First Beau (Col) 5-10 

+ 

± 

4 - 

±2 

44 

44 

+ 


10+ 3- 

Here Comes Happiness (WB) 3-29 

— 

— 


— 

— 

it 



3+ 7- 

Here Comes Mr. Jordan (Col) 7-2S 

1+ 

+ 

+4 

44 

4 - 

+ 

41 - 

\ 

12-1 

Heroes of the Sea (Artkino) 7-5 










High Sierra (WB) 1-25 

-H- 



44 

44 

44 


4 

114 2— 

Highway West (WB) 8-16 

+ 


it 

Ip 




it 

7 4 7- 

Hit the Road (Univ) 6-28 

= 


= 


— 

— 

— 

=p 

3+10— 


90 


Review 

Title Distr. Date 

0 

o 

*0 

X 

0 42 

'n O 

t 

§ 

ra 

0 

Q 

6 

'O 

o 

n 

■o §■ 

O 

u 

an 
© 0 

O 

a S 

9 O' 

S 8 

ha O 

a 





> 

[M 

Bps 

s> 


3Q 

02 

Hold Back the Dawn (Para) 8-2 

+4 


44 

44 

+ 

+ 

+ 


12+ 

1- 

Hold That Ghost (Univ) 8-2 

+ 

+ 

44 

44 

44 

44 

+ 

+ 

12+ 


Honeymoon for Three (WB) 1-25 

di 



± 


44 

+ 

It 

9+ 

6- 

Honky Tonk (M-G-M) 9-20 

44 

+ 

44 

44 


+ 


2*2 

10+ 

2— 

Honolulu Lu (Col) 







it 


1+ 

1— 

Hoosier Schoolboy (Mono) Reissue 7-17-37 











Horror Island (Univ) 4-5 

-4- 

IF 



It 

— 

di 

± 

6+ 

9- 

Hotel Du Nord (Juno) 2-8 

+ 










House of Mystery (Mono) 6-7 

— 

2^22 

2^ 




2^ 


5+ 

6- 

How Green Was My Valley 











(20th-Fox) 11-1 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

16+ 


Hudson's Bay (20th-Fox) 12-28-40 

+ 

± 


di 

+ 

44 

+ 

+ 

9+ 

3- 

Hurricane Smith (Rep) 8-2 

2±2 

It 


2±2 

It 

+ 

di 


6+ 

5- 

Hurry, Charlie, Hurry (HKO) 7-12 

I 

I Give My Liie (AFE) 9-3 

+ 

2^ 



+ 

It 

+ 


7+ 

4- 












I Killed That Man (Mono) 11-8 

+ 



+ 

+ 

44 

+ 


7+ 

1- 

I Wake Up Screaming (20th-F©x) 10-18 











(R. as "Hot Spot") 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

+ 


13+ 


I Wanted Wings (Para) 3-28 

44 

+ 

+ 

44 

44 

44 

It 

44 

13+ 

1- 

I Was a Prisoner on Devil's Island 











(Col) 6-28 

= 


— 

— 

+ 

It 

± 

-+2 

5+ 

8- 

I'll Sell My Liie (Select) 9-27 

2±2 










I'll Wait for You (M-G-M) 5-10 

+ 

It 

IF 


+ 

+ 

2t. 


8+ 

5- 

Ice-Gapades (Rep) 8-23 

2^ 

+ 

+ 

44 


44 

2±2 


9+ 

3- 

In Old Cheyenne (Rep) 4-5 

+ 


+ 

44 

+ 

+ 

+ 


8+ 

1- 

In the Navy (Univ) 6-7 - 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

+ 

+ 

14+ 


International Lady (UA) 9-13 

+ 

+ 

44 

44 

+ 

+ 

+ 

2^ 

10+ 

1- 

International Squadron (WB) 8-16 

+ 


+ 

44 

44 

it 

+ 

+ 

10+ 

2- 

Invisible Ghost, The (Mono) 4-19 

+ 



+ 

It 

'if 

It 


6+ 

6- 

It Started With Eve (Univ) 10-4 

j 

Jesse James at Bay (Rep) 10-18 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 


14+ 


+ 


H- 

+ 


+ 

2^ 


6+ 

3- 

Jungle Man (PRC) 11-1 

K 

Kansas Cyclone (Rep) 6-28 

— 



— 





1+ 

3- 

+ 


+ 

+ 


ip 

2±2 


6+ 

3- 

Kathleen (M-G-M) 11-15 

44 

+ 


4f 

44 

44 

44 

2^ 

13+ 

2— 

Keep 'Em Flying (Univ) 11-22 

44 

+ 

+ 

44 


44 

+ 

+ 

11+ 

1— 

Kid From Kansas, The (Univ) 9-27 

=;= 

It 

IF 


— 

+ 


IF 

5+ 

5- 

Kid's Last Ride, The (Mono) 4-5 

IF 


_ 






1+ 

2— 

King, The (Trio) 11-8 

±2 










King of Dodge City (Col) 8-9 

+ 




IF 

It 



4+ 

3- 

King of the White Elephants (Pridi) 4-19 

=F 










King of the Zombies (Mono) S-17 

± 

2±2 


+ 

+ 

+ 

It 

It 

7+ 

4- 

Kiss the Boys Goodbye (Para) 8-28 

+ 

+ 

+ 

44 

44 

+ 

+ 

+ 

10+ 


Kisses for Eroaklast (WB) 8-9 

It 

2±_ 


IF 

44 


— 

IF 

7+ 

6- 

Knockout (WB) 8-9 


2^ 

+ 

+ 

± 

2+2 


It 

8+ 

6- 

Kukan (Adventure Epics) 7-19 

L 

Ladies in Retirement (Col) 8-13 

±: 










+ 

+ 

+ 

44 

44 

+ 

44 

+ 

12+ 


Lady Eve, The (Para) 3-8 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

+ 

+ 

14+ 


Lady Luck (Consolidated Nat’l) 9-6 











Lady Scarface (RKO) 7-26 

IF 

— 


2^ 

+ 

+ 

H= 

± 

8+ 

6- 

Lady Be Good (M-G-M) 7-19 


di 



+ 

+ 


it 

8+ 

6- 

Lady From Cheyenne, The (Univ) 4-12.. 

44 

+ 

— 


44 

+ 

+ 

+ 

9+ 

2- 

Lady From Louisiana (Rep) S-17 

+ 

it 


+ 

+ 

44 

it 

2± 

9+ 

4— 

Land of Liberty (M-G-M) 1-25 

44 

± 

+ 




44 

+ 

7+ 

1— 

Larceny Street (Film Alliance) 2-1 











Las Vegas Nights (Para) 3-29 

+ 

IF 

— 

+ 

+ 

It 

— 

+ 

7+ 

4- 

Last of the Duanes (20th-F©x) 9-13 

+ 

+ 

di 

± 

+ 

+ 

+ 

It 

8-f- 

3- 

Law of the Range (Univ) 7-19 

It 


it 

+ 

2t. 

+ 

+ 

2± 

7+ 

4- 

Law of the Timber (PRC) 1-10-42 

=: 




2t. 




2+ 

4- 

Law of the Tropics (WB) 9-6 

± 

It 

± 


+ 

+ 


T 

8+ 

6- 

Law of the Wolf (Fortune) 8-7 

— 










Let's Go Collegiate (Mono) 9-20 

± 


— 


+ 

2^ 

— 


5+ 

6- 

Let's Make Music (RKO) 12-14-40 

+ 



+ 

± 

+ 

+ 


7+ 

3- 

Life Begins for A. Hardy (M-G-M) 8-16 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

+ 

It 

14+ 

1- 

Life With Henry (Para) 1-25 

+ 

It 

It 

+ 

+ 

+ 

+ 


8+ 

3- 

Little Foxes, The (HKO) 8-16 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

+ 

15+ 


Little Men (RKO) 12-7-40 

— 


= 

it 

44 

+ 

it 

2t 

7+ 

7- 

Living Corpse, The (Juno) 1-11 











Lone Rider Ambushed (PRC) 11-1 

+ 


+ 

— 




= 

2+ 

3- 

Lone Rider Crosses the Rio (PRC) 4-5 . 

+ 


2t 






2+ 

1- 

Lone Rider Fights Back (PRC) 1-3-42 




— 


+ 



2+ 

2- 

Lone Rider in Frontier Fury (PRC) 11-1 

+ 








1+ 


Lone Rider in Ghost Town (PRC) 5-17 

it 


di 

FI 





4+ 

4- 

Lone Rider Ride On, The (PRC) 3-1 







+ 


2+ 

1— 

Lone Star Law Men (Mono) 









1+ 

1- 

Lone Wolf Takes a Chance (Col) 4-12 . 

— 

it 

— 

+ 

+ 

2+2 


2t 

6+ 

6- 

Look Who's Laughing (RKO) 9-20 

44 

it 

+ 

+ 

44 

+ 

+ 

± 

9+ 

2— 

Louisiana Purchase (Para) 12-6 

44 

+ 

44 


44 

44 

+ 

+ 

11+ 



BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


++ Very Good; + Good; — Fair; Mediocre; — Poor; — Very Poor. 


In the summary 4+ is rated as 2 pluses; — as 2 minuses. 


Review 

Title Distr. Date 

Love Crazy (M-G-M) 5-17 

Love on the Dole (UA) 

Lucky Devils (Univ) - 

Lydia (UA) 8-23 

M 

Mad Doctor, The (Para) 2-15 

Mad Emperor, The (World) 4-5 

Mail Train (20th-Fox) 7-12 

Maisie Was a Lady (M-G-M) 1-11 

Major Barbara (UA) 5-10 

Maltese Falcon, The (WB) 10-4 

Man Betrayed, A (Rep) 3-22 

Man Hunt (20th-Fox) 6-21 

Man at Large (20th-Fox) 9-13 

Man From Montana (Univ) 10-11 

Man Made Monster (Univ) 3-29 

Man Who Lost Himself, The (Univ) 3-29 
Man Who Seeks the Truth, The 

(Dome Films) 11-8 

Mannerheim Line, The (Artkino) 4-5 

Manpower (WB) 7-12 

Marked Men (PRC) 2-1 

Married Bachelor (M-G-M) 9-13 

Marry the Boss* Daughter (20-Fox) 11-22 

Masked Rider. The (Univ) 10-11. 

Mata Hari (M-G-M) Reissue 

Medico of Painted Springs (Col) 6-28... 

Meet Boston Blackie (Col) 3-8 

Meet John Doe (WB) 3-22 

Meet the Chump (Univ) 2-15 

Melody for Three (RKO) 3-8 

Melody Lane (Univ) 12-20 

Men in Her Life. The (Col) 10-4 

Men of Boys Town (M-G-M) 3-15 

Men of the Timberland (Univ) 5-31 

Mercy Island (Rep) 10-11. 

Mexican Spitfire's Baby. The (RKO) 9-6 
Michael Shayne, Private Detective 

(20th-Fox) 12-28-40 

Million Dollar Baby (WB) 5-31 

Miracle Kid. The (PRC) 1-17-42 

Miss Polly (UA) 11-8 

Missing 10 Days (Col) 4-19 

Missouri Outlaw, A (Rep) 11-22 

Mr. and Mrs. Smith (RKO) 1-25 

Mr. Celebrity (PRC) 11-1 

Mr. District Attorney (Rep) 4-5. 

Mr. District Attorney in the Carter 

Case (Rep) 1-3-42 

Mr. Dynamite (Univ) 3-15 

Mob Town (Univ) 10-4 

Model Wife (Univ) 4-19. 

Monster and the Girl (Para) 2-15 - 

Moon Over Her Shoulder (20-Fox) 10-18 

Moon Over Miami (20th-Fox) 6-21 

Moonlight in Hawaii (Univ) 10-11 

Moimtain Moonlight (Rep) 7-19 

Murder Among Friends (20th-Fox) 3-15 
Murder at the Baskervilles (Astor) 7-5 

Murder by Invitation (Mono) 7-5 

Mutiny in the Arctic (Univ) 5-17 

My Life With Caroline (RKO) 7-19 

Mystery of Room 13 (Film Alliance) 9-6 
Mystery Ship (Col) 8-9 

N 

Naval Academy (Col) 5-31 

Navy Blue and Gold (M-G-M) Reissue 

11-20-37 

Navy Blues (WB) 8-16 

Nevada City (Rep) 6-21 

Never Give a Sucker an Even Break 

(Univ) 10-11 

New Teacher, The (Artkino) 4-26 

New Wine (UA) 8-2 _ 

New York Town (Para) 8-2 

Niagara Falls (UA) 9-27 

Nice Girl? (Univ) 3-1 

Night of January 16, The (Para) 9-6 

Nine Lives Are Not Enough (WB) 9-6 

No Greater Sin (University Film) 6-28 ... 
North From the Lone Star (Col) 


Boxoffice 

Harrison's 

Reports 

Variety 

Film Daily 

Hollywood 

Reporter 

Hollywood 

Variety 

Parents' 

Magazine 

New York 
Daily News 

Summary 

++ 


++ 

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Review 

Title Distr. Date 

Nothing But the Truth (Para) 8-2 

Nurse's Secret, The (WB) 6-14 

o 

Officer and the Lady, The (Col) 7-19. .. 

One Foot in Heaven (WB) 10-4 

One Night in Lisbon (Para) 5-17 

Our Wile (Col) 8-23 

Out of the Fog (WB) 6-14 

Outlaws of Cherokee Trail (Rep) 9-20 

Outlaws of the Panhandle (Col) 5-17 

Outlaws of the Rio Grande (PRC) 3-29 

P 

Pals of the Pecos (Rep) 5-3 

Paper Bullets (PRC) 6-14 

Parachute Battalion (RKO) 7-19 

Parson of Panamint, The (Para) 6-28 

Passage From Hongkong (WB) 10-25 

Penalty, The (M-G-M) 3-15 

Penny Serenade (Col) 4-26... 

People vs. Dr. Kildare (M-G-M) 5-10 

Pepe Le Moko (Mayer-Burstyn) 1-11 

Perfect Snob, The (20th-Fox) 11-22 

Personal Column (Pax Films) 4-5 

Petticoat Politics (Rep) 2-22 

Phantom Cowboy, The (Rep) 4-5 
Philadelphia Story (M-G-M) 11-30-40 . 

Pinto Kid, The (Col) 2-8 

Pioneers, The (Mono) 5-10 

Pirate of the Seven Seas (Film All) 4-19 

Pirates on Horse Back (Para) 5-24 

Pittsburgh Kid, The (Rep) 9-6 

Play Girl (RKO) 12-14-40 

Playmates (RKO) 11-lb 

Poison Pen (Rep) 7-5 

Pot O' Gold (UA) 4-21 

Power Dive (Para) 4-12 

Prairie Pioneers (Rep) 3-1 

Prairie Stranger (Col) 9-13 

Prisoner of Zenda (UA) Reissue 9-4-37 

Private Nurse (20th-Fox) 7-26 

Proud Valley (Supreme) 7-19 

Public Enemies (Rep) 11-1 

Puddin' Head (Rep) 7-5 

Q 

Queen of Crime (Film Alliance) 4-5 

Quiet Wedding (Univ) 1-3-42 

R 

Rage in Heaven (M-G-M) 3-15 

Rags to Riches (Rep) 8-16 

Raiders of the Desert (Univ) 7-19 

Rawhide Rangers (Univ) 8-23 

Reaching for the Sun (Para) 4-12 

Red River Valley (Rep) 1-3-42 

Redhead (Mono) 5-24... 

Reg'lar Fellers (PRC) 9-6 

Reluctant Dragon, The (RKO) 6-21 

Repent at Leisure (RKO) 

Return of Daniel Boone (Col) 9-13 

Richest Man in Town, The (Col) 6-14 ... 

Ride,. Kelly, Ride (20th-Fox) 2-15 

Ride On, Vaquero (20lh-Fox) 4-5 

Riders of the Badlands (Col) 

Riders of the Purple Sage (20th-Fox) 9-13 

Ridin' on a Rainbow (Rep) 2-1 

Ridin' the Cherokee Trail (Mono) 3-1 ... 
Riding the Sunset Trail (Mono) 12-13. .. 

Ringside Maisie (M-G-M) 8-2 

Riot Squad (Mono) 12-20 

Rise and Shine (20th-Fox) 11-15 

Road Agent (Univ) 12-13 

Road Show (UA) 2-15 

Road to Happiness (Mono) 1-10-42 

Road to Zanzibar (Para) 3-15 

Roar of the Press (Mono) 5-17 

Roaring Frontiers (Col) 8-30 

Robbers of the Range (RKO) 4-5 

Robin Hood of the Pecos (Rep) 1-18 

Romance of the Rio Grande (20th- 

Fox) 1-11 

Rookies on Parade (Rep) 5-3 


Boxoffice 

Harrison's 

Reports 

Variety 

Film Daily 

Hollywood 

Reporter 

Hollywood 

Variety 

Parents' 

Magazine 

New York 
Daily News 

Summary 

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BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


91 


++ Very Good; + Good; — Fair; + Mediocre; — Poor; = Very Poor. 


.1 

In the summary ++ is rated as 2 pluses; = as 2 minuses. 


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Round-Up, The (Para) 3-22 

Royal Mounted Patrol, The (Col) 12-27. 

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Saddle Mountain Roundup (Mono) 11-1 

Saddlemates (Rep) 6-21 

Sailors on Leave (Rep) 10-11 

Saint in Palm Springs, The (RKO) 1-4 

Saint's Vacation, The (RKO) 6-21 

San Antonio Rose (Univ) 6-28 

San Francisco Docks (Univ) 12-7-40 

Scattergood Baines (RKO) 2-15 

Scattergood Meets Broadway (RKO) 8-30 
Scattergood Pulls the Strings (RKO) 5-17 

Scotland Yard (20th-Fox) 4-12 

Sea Wolf, The (WB) 3-22 

Sealed Lips (Univ) 12-13 

Second Chorus (Para) 12-7-40 

Secret Evidence (PRC) 2-8 

Secret of Stamboul, The (Hoffberg) 6-7 

Secrets of the Lone Wolf (Col) 

Sensation (Film Alliance) 1-11 

Sergeant York (WB) 7-12 

Shadow of the Thin Man (M-G-M) 10-25 

Shadows on the Stairs (WB) 4-19 . 

She Knew All the Answers (Col) 5-24.. 
Shepherd of the Hills, The (Para) 6-21 

Sheriff of Tombstone (Rep) 5-17.. 

Shining Victory (WB) 5-31 

Shot in the Dark, A (WB) 6-14 

Sierra Sue (Rep) 11-22 

Sign of the Wolf (Mono) 3-29 

Silver Stallion (Mono) 

Sing Another Chorus (Univ) 9-13 

Sing for Your Supper (Col) 12-13 

Singapore Woman (WB) 5-24 

Singing Hill, The (Rep) 5-17 

Siren of the South Seas (Mono) 

Sis Hopkins (Rep) 4-12- 

Six Gun Gold (RKO) 9-6 

Six Lessons From Madame LaZonga 

(Univ) 1-18 

Skylark (Para) 9-13 

Sleepers West (20th-Fox) 3-22 

Small Town Deb (20th-Fox) 10-18 

Smilin' Through (M-G-M) 9-13 

Smiling Ghost, The (WB) 8-16 

So Ends Our Night (UA) 2-1 

Son of Davy Crockett, The (Col) 7-12... 

Son of Monte Cristo (UA) 12-7-40 

South of Panama (PRC) 6-7 

South of Tahiti (Univ) 10-25 

Soviet Frontiers on the Danube 

(Artkino) 7-19 . 

Spooks Run Wild (Mono) 10-11 

Stars Look Down, The (M-G-M) 7-12 

Steel Against the Sky (WB) 12-13 

Stolen Paradise (Mono) 

Stork Pays Off, The (Col) 11-15 

Story of the Vatican, The (RKO) 8-16. .. 

Strange Alibi (WB) 5-3 

Strawberry Blonde, The (WB) 2-22 

Sun Valley Serenade (20th-Fox) 7-26 

Sundown (UA) 10-18 

Sunny (RKO) 5-24 

Sunset in Wyoming (Rep) 8-9 

Suspicion (RKO) 9-20 

Swamp Water (20th-Fox) 10-18 

Swamp Woman (PRC) 1-3-42 

Sweetheart of the Campus (Col) 6-28 
Swing It, Soldier (Univ) 11-1 

T 

Tall, Dark and Handsome (20th-Fox) 1-25 

Tanks a Million (UA) 8-9 

Target for Tonight (WB) 10-18 
Tarzan's Secret Treasure (M-G-M) 11-15 

Terror, The (Film Alliance) 9-13 

Texas (Col) 9-27 

Texas Marshal, The (PRC) 7-19 

That Hamilton Woman! (UA) 3-29 

That Night in Rio (20th-Fox) 3-15 


+ + - + + 

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There's Magic in Music (Para) 3-1 

(R. as "Hard-Boiled Canary") 

They Dare Not Love (Col) 5-10 

They Meet Again (RKO) 10-25 

They Met in Argentina (RKO) 5-31 

They Met in Bombay (M-G-M) 6-28 

They Met on Skis (C. L. Imp. Corp.) 1-18 

Thieves Fall Out (WB) 8-2 

This England (Esquire) 11-22 

This Thing Called Love (Col) 12-28-40.. 

This Woman Is Mine (Univ) 8-23 

Three Cockeyed Sailors (UA) 6-28 

Three Girls About Town (Col) 11-1 

Three Sons O' Guns (WB) 10-25 

Thunder Over the Prairie (Col) 9-S 

Tight Shoes (Univ) 6-14. 

Tillie the Toiler (Col) 8-9 

Time Out for Rhythm (Col) 6-7 

Tobacco Hoad {20th-Fox) 3-1 

Tom, Dick and Harry (RKO) 7-19 

Tonto Basin Outlaws (Mono) 1-3-42 

Too Many Blondes (Univ) 5-24 

Top Sergeant Mulligan (Mono) ll-I 

Topper Returns (UA) 3-22 

Trail of the Silver Spurs (Mono) 3-8 

Trial of Mary Dugan, The (M-G-M) 2-15 
Tumbledown Ranch in Arizona 

(Mono) 5-24 

Tuxedo Junction (Rep) 12-13 

Two-Faced Woman (M-G-M) 10-25 

Two-Gun Sheriff (Rep) 4-26 

Two in a Taxi (Col) 6-28 

Two Latins From Manhattan (Col) S-30 

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Under Age (Col) 4-26 

Under Fiesta Stars (Rep) 8-30 

Underground (WB) 8-28 

Underground Rustlers (Mono) 

Unexpected Uncle (RKO) 9-20 

Unfinished Business (Univ) 8-30 

Unholy Partners (M-G-M) 10-18 

V 

Victory (Para) 12-21-40 

Virginia (Para) 1-18 

Vivacious Lady (RKO) Reissue 5-7-38.... 

Voice in the Night, The (Col) 5-31 

Volga-Volga (Artkino) 6-7 

W 

Wagons Roll at Night, The (WB) 5-3... 

Wanderers of the West (Mono) 11-1 

Washington Melodrama (M-G-M) 4-26. .. 

We Go Fast (20th-Fox) 9-13 

Week-End for Three (RKO) 11-1 

Week-End in Havana (20th-F©x) 9-13. .. 

West of Cimarron (Rep) 1-3-42 

West Point Widow (Para) 6-14 

Western Union (20th-Fox) 2-S 

When Ladies Meet (M-G-M) 8-30 

Where Did You Get Thai Girl 

(Univ) 12-28-40 

Whistling in the Dark (M-G-M) 8-2 

Wide Open Town (Para) 8-2 

Wild Geese Calling (20th-Fox) 7-26 

Wild Man of Borneo (M-G-M) 2-8 

Wings of Victory (Artkino) 11-22 

Wolf Man, The (Univ) 12-20 

World Premiere (Para) 8-23 

Wranglers' Roost (Mono) 6-28 

Wyoming Wildcat (Rep) I-ll 

Y 

You Belong to Me (Col) 10-25 

You'll Never Get Rich (Col) 9-27 

You're in the Army Now (WB) 12-6 

You're Out of Luck (Mono) 1-18 

You're the One (Para) 2-8 

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Ziegfeld Girl, The (M-G-M) 4-19 

Zis Boom Bah (Mono) 11-i 


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92 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


Technicolor Motion 


Picture Corporation 


Techjiicolor Pictures 
More Popular Tha?i Ever Before, 
Approximately 100^000^00 feet of prints 

processed by the Technicolor Laboratories in I()4L 


TECHNICOLOR MOTION PICTURE CORPORATION 

Herbert T. Kalmus, President 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


93 


> 


) 



AN EXCLUSIVE 


4/M THANKFUL 
FOR RECliVm THIS 

GREAT HONOR AGAIN IN 
I 1941.., SO MANY KNOCK 

I AT THE DOOR OF FAME 
I ...ONLY 10 ARE CHOSEN. 

I I AM VERY LUCKY 




l AJIA GRATEFUL TO MY 
FRIENDS, EXHIBITORS, 

AND PALS EVERYWHERE 
FOR AGAIN CHOOSING ME 

PUBLIC COWBOY NO. 1 1N 
1941 7HAT GOES FOR 
CHAMPION, TOO.” 



96 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 




“Little Fellers” That Do a Big Job 


SHORTS IWDHX 


-'ll^etaiiecl information On ^Hi l^eieaieS irom ^anaari^ Ohru OyecemLer, 1941 


COLUMBIA 

ALL-STAR COMEDIES 

Black Eyes and Blues . (I6V2) 2432 Apr. 18 

Roscoe Karns tries to convince his di- 
vorce-bound wife of his innocence and 
devotion. 

Blitzkiss, The (16) ,3424 Oct. 2 

El Brendel is drafted and his neighbor 
enlists to heckel. Result upsets the 
army. 

French Fried Patootie (16) .2436 June 27 
An American Legion convention is the 
scene of this one with the Fifi-wife 
row present. 

Fresh as a Freshman (18) 2428 Jan. 29 

Glove Slingers in a typical boy-meets- 
girl story with a conga finish. 

General Huisance (18) 3423 Sept. 18 

Keaton enlists to be near some nurses. 
He has misunderstandings including a 
runaway airplane. 

Glove Affair (I6V2) 2431 Apr. 4 

The folks decide to send Jimmy to camp 
and all go along for the ride, a hectic 
one with Roscoe Ates as the driver. 

Half Shot at Sunrise (16) 3422 Sept. 14 

Roscoe Karns in a domestic comedy 
with the family engaging in a pie- 
throwing contest. 

Host to a Ghost ..( 17) 2438 Aug. 8 

Andy Clyde in the wrecking business 
encounters gangsters, ghosts and zom- 
bies. 

Kink of the Campus ( ) 3410 Dec. 25 

Love Is Gloom (21) 3421 Aug. 15 

This one features a Meet-a-Mate, Lose- 
a-Mate agency with lots of musical 
numbers. 

Lovable Trouble (16) 3425 Oct. 23 

Andy Clyde becomes manager of a girl’s 
baseball team and impersonates a 
woman catcher. 

Love at First Fright .( ) 2437 July 25 

Mitt Me Tonight (16) 3409 Nov. 6 

College students go on a cruise with a 
fight aboard involving cheating on an 
examination. 

Ready, Willing, But Unable (I6V2) 

2434 May 30 

Ring and the Belle, The .( 17) .2433 May 2 
Andy Clyde meets a pug-ugly prize- 
fighter in the ring and knocks him out 
with dynamite-loaded gloves. 

She's Oil Mine ..( ) .3426 Nov. 20 

Buster Keaton becomes involved in a 
chase and ends up in a duel with a 
phony noble. 

So You Won't Squawk ..(16) 2429 Feb. 21 

Sweet Spirits of Nighter (16) 3427 Dec. 25 

Brendel and Kennedy are detectives 
sent to investigate a house where a 
scientist tries to bring back the dead. 


Explanatory 


Statistical and summary data 
on short subjects released in 
1941, arranged alphabetically 
under company headings and 
under company groupings. 

RUNNING TIME in parenthesis 
immediately following title. 

PRODUCTION NUMBER fol- 
lows running time. 

RELEASE DATE at end of title 
line. 

Symbol © indicates color 
photography. 

Symbol ^ indicates BOX- 
OFFICE Merit Award for "Short 
of the Week.” 


Watchman Takes a Wife (16) 2427 Jan. 10 

Andy Clyde is egged on by a lawyer 
into spying on his wife with usual mis- 


understandings. 

Yumpin' Yiminy ( 17). 2430 Mar. 7 

CINESCOPES 

Capital Sidelights (10) 2978 Apr. 28 

Exploring Space (9) .3971 Aug. 8 

Feathers (Cosmocolor) (9) 2975 Jan. 31 

From Nuts to Soup (8) 3972 Sept. 5 

Fighter Pilot (7) 2979 June 13 

Movie Magic . (10) 2976 Feb. 22 

Strange Fact (10) 3975 Dec. 6 

This Is England (10) 2977 Mar. 27 

Women in Photography ( 10) .3974 Nov. 7 

World of Sound (10) 3973 Oct. 3 

COLOR RHAPSODIES (In Technicolor) 

Cuckoo 1. G. ..(7) 2510 July 3 

Carpenters, The (8V;) 2507 Mar. 14 

Fox and the Grapes ..(8) 3502 Dec. 5 

Helping Paw, A (7). 2505 Jan. 7 

Land of Fun (7) 2508 Apr. 18 

Red Riding Hood Rides Again (7) 

3503 Dec. 25 

Tom Thumb's Brother (7) 2509 June 12 

Way of All Pests (7) 2506 Feb. 28 

Who's Zoo in Hollywood (7) .3501 Nov. 15 


COLUMBIA TOURS 

Alaska Tour (10) 3453 Nov. 7 

Buenos Aires, Up to Date (10) 

3552 Sept. 26 

©Beautiful Ontario (10) 2560 May 23 

From Singapore to Hongkong (10) 

2557 Jan. 10 

Journey in Tunisia (10) 3551 Aug. 15 

San Francisco-Metropolis of the 
West (10) 2559 Apr. 3 

Western Wonderland (10) 2558 Feb. 28 

COMMUNITY SING 

No. 4 (10) 2654 Jan. 1 

Gay Tunes. 

No. 5 (10) 2655 Feb. 7 

Fun With Songs. 

No. 6 (10) 2656 Mar. 14 

Songs With Harmony. 

No. 7 (9) 2657 Apr. 25 

Peppy Song Hits. 

No. 8 (10) 2658 May 29 

Featuring “Perfidia.” 

No. 1 (10) 3651 Aug. 15 

Don Baker. 

No. 2 (10) 3652 Sept. 5 

Current Hits. 

No. 3 (10) 3653 Oct. 1 

College Songs. 

No. 4(101/2) 3654 Dec. 5 

Popular Songs. 

No. 5 (10) 3655 Dec. 26 

Hits of the Day. 

FABLES CARTOONS 

Streamlined Donkey (7) 2754 Jan. 17 

Dumb Like a Fox (7) 2757 July 18 

It Happened to Crusoe (7) 2755 Mar. 14 

Kitty Gets the Bird (7) 2756 June 13 

Great Cheese Mystery (7) 3751 Oct. 27 

Playing the Pied Piper (7) 2758 Aug. 8 

INTERNATIONAL FORUM 

Dorothy Thompson (16) 3451 Feb. 22 


Will Democracy Survive (19) 3453 Oct. 17 

Will England Be Invaded ( ) 3452 May 27 


PANORAMICS 

City Within a City (10) 3901 Aug. 8 

Gallup Poll, The (10) 3902 Oct. 17 

New York's Finest (10) 3903 Dec. 11 

PHANTASIES CARTOONS 
Crystal Gazer, The (10) 3701 Oct. 10 

Cute Recruit, The (7) 2705 May 2 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


97 


Little Theatre, The (7) 2703 


Feb. 7 

Merry Mouse Cafe (G) 2707 


Aug. 15 

There's Music in Your Hair (7) 

2701 

Mar. 23 

Wallflower, The (7) 270S 


July 3 

QUIZ REELS 



Junior I. Q. Parade (GV’) 2G01 


Mar. 7 

Kitchen Quiz No. 1 (10’/2) 3302 

Sept, 12 

I'itckon Quiz No. 2 (0) 3803 


Doc. 12 

So You Think You Know Mucic 
No. I (11 1 / 2 ) 2305 


Apr. 3 

Co You Think You Knov/ Ilusic 
No. 1-S (10) 3001 


Aug. 22 

Take It or Leave It No. 3 (11) 

2303 

Feb. 7 

Take It or Leave It No. 4 (11) 

2G03 

May 1 

RAYMOND GRAM SITING 
REELS 

HISTORICAL 

Broken Treaties (0) 3031 

Swing, radio commentator, 
history of the invasion of 

Aug. 1 
reviews the 
Poland. 

Hov 7 War Came ( 81 / 2 ) 3332 

This centers about the set- 
suits of the League of 
Geneva. 

Nov. 7 
-up and re- 
Nations at 

SPORT REELS 



Aquaplay (10) 2303 


June 6 

Diving Thrills (10) 2807 


May 9 

Ice Capers (10) 2801 


Jan. 24 

Jungle Archer, The (10) 2303 


Mar. 23 

Jungle Fishing (11) 3093 


Oct. 10 

Rack 'Em Up (10) 3305 


Dec. 19 

Show Dogs (10) 3302 


Sept. 12 

Su'its, Spares and Strikes (10) 
2305 


Feb. 21 

Toe Up (10) 3301 


Aug. 1 

20TII-ANNIVEnSARY SNAPSHOTS 

No. 5 (9) 2855 

Bob Hope. 


Feb. 2 

No, 6 (9) 285G 

Larry Simms. 


Mar. 14 

Ho. 7 (10) 2857 

Ken Murray. 


Apr. 2,5 

Ho. 8 ( ) 2858 

Jerry Colonna 


June 6 

No. 9 ( ) 2853 

Don Wilson. 


July 11 

Ho. 1 ( ) 3851 

Ken Murray 


Aug. 15 

Ho. 2 ( ) 3852 

Hobart Bos worth. 


Sopt. 12 

No 3 ( ) 3853 

John Hubbard. 


Nov. 7 

No. 4 ( ) 3854 

Billy Gilbert. 


Dec. 5 

THREE STOOGES COMEDIES 


Ache in Every Stake (18) 3401 


Aug. 22 

All the V/orld's a Stooge (18) 

2407 

May 16 

Dutiful But Dumb (17) 2103 


Mar. 21 

I'll Never Heil Again (18) 2403 

July 4 

in the Sweet Pie and Pio (10) 

3402 

Oct. 16 

So Long, Mr. Chumps (17) 2405 

Feb. 7 

Some More of Samoa (17) 3403 

Dec. 4 


V//\SIIINGTON PARADE 

rio.OdO) 2003 Jan. 17 

U. S. Naval Academy. 


No. 4 (10) 2904 Mar. 7 

Spirit of 1941. 

METRO-GOLDVVYN-MAYER 
CRIME DOES NOT PAY 

Coilins on Wheels (17) P-205 June 7 

An exposure of the racketeering meth- 
ods of some unscrupulous used car 
dealers. 

Forbidden Passage (21) P-20'4 Feb. 8 

The methods of smuggling immigrants 
into the country. 

Respecl the Law (20) P-203 Jan. 4 

Showing how minor ordinance violators 
can be greater menaces than killers. 

Sucker List (21) P-203 Sept. 27 

Investigation and tips on illegitimate 
horse tipsters and their companion 


rackets. 

FITZPATRICK THAVELTALKS 
Alluring Alaska (0) T-218 Mar. 8 

Georgetown, Pride ol Penang (9) 

T-313 Nov. 15 

Glimpses of Florida (9) T-311 Sept. G 

Glimpses of Kentucky. (3) T-219 Apr. 12 

Glimpses of Wash. Stale (3) T221 June 7 

Haiti, Land of Dark Fdajesty (10) 

T-222 July 5 

Historic Maryland (9) T-315 Doc. 27 

Inside Passage (9) T-312 Oct. 4 

Mediterranean Ports (9) T-216 Jan. 4 

ITed Men on Parade (9) T-217 Feb. 1 

Scenic Grandeur (9) T-314 Dec. 13 


Yosemite the Magnificent (8) T-320 May 10 

METRO SCOPIX 

©Third Dimensioned Murder (7) 

A-lOO Mar. 1 

MINIATURES 

Battle, The (11) M-235 May 31 

How the U. S. Navy is victualled, fueled 
and behaves during a problem battle. 

Ghost Treasure (11) M 238 Aug. 2 

Search for gold in Death Valley by 
various historical and recent characters. 

Man Who Changed the World (11) 

237 June 28 

The story of James Hargraves who in- 
vented the muhinle spinning Jenny, 

his trials and results. 

Memories ol Eurone Til) M-236 lune 14 

The Europe of before the war with the 
Paris Exposition and the flowers of 
several nations. 

More About Noslradamous (10) 

M-234 Jan. 18 

A comparison of the 16th century pre- 
dictions of this doct'"!’ and what re- 
sulted today. 

Changed Identity (10) M-331 Nov. 8 

A play concerning two brothers, one 
killing the other and using his name 
to fool police. 

Triurnnh Without Drums til) M-239 Oct. 18 
The history of the Pure Food Act from 
it's conception in the mind cf Dr. Wiley 
to its enactment. 

Viva Mexico (9) M-240 Nov. 1 

Cplnr reel of the beauty of Mexico 
covering the country’s rural hfe as v'e’l 
rs Mexico City. 

M-G-M CARTOONS 

.Abdul the Bulbul Amoor (8) d.7-2''-3 Feb. 22 

Alloy Cat, The ( ) 47-219 hdy 5 


Dance of the Weed (9) W-248 June 7 
Field Mouse (9) Dec. 27 

Flying Bear, The (9) V\I-253 Nov. 1 

Goose Goes South (8) W-246 Apr. 26 

Little Cesaro (10) V7-251 Aug. 30 

Little Mole, The (9) W-245 Apr. 5 

Midnight Snack, The (9) W-250 July 19 
Night Before Christmas (9) W-341 Dec. G 

Prospecting Bear, The (9) \7-244 Mar. 8 

Rookie Bear, The (8) W-247 May 17 

Officer Pooch (8) .W-252 Sept. 6 

r.4-G-M News of the Day 

OUR GANG 

Baby Blues (9) . C-23S Feb. IS 


The news that every fourth child is a 
Chinese upsets Mickey, whose home is 
expecting their fourth offspring. Twins 
complicate matters. 

Fightin' Fools (9) C-295 Jan. 25 

The Gang agrees to settle difference 
with another gang by a war, with in- 
genious results. 

^<^1-2-3 Go (10) C-230 Apr. 23 

The Gang organizes a safety society 
with vast city-wide results. 

Robot Wrecks (11) C-299 July 12 

Attempts to build a mechanical man to 
do the chores ends with dubious results. 

Wedding Worries (11) C-393 Doc.13 

The kids try to thwart Darla’s father’s 
efforts to remarry and make Darla a 
modern Cinderella. 

Yo Olde Minstrels (11) C-297 Mar. 8 

The kids with the aid of an old trouper 
put on a stage show for the Red Cross. 

PASSING PARADE 

Hobbies (11) K-289 Sopt. 20 

Various unusual hobbies featuring a 
castle built of stones after 33 years of 
effort. 

More Trifles of Importance (11) 

K-283 Mar. 22 

The history of the tannic acid t”eat- 
ment for burns and digitalis for heart 
disease told via story of their medsst 
discovery. 

Of Pups and Puczles (11) 11-283 Sopt. IG 

An experiment to match dog and man 
in an intelligence test, 3 men and 3 
dogs taking part. 

Out of Darkness (11) K-284 Mar. 29 

The story of the underground Belgian 
newspaper that defied German discov- 
ery in the last war. 

Strange Testament (11) K-381 Nov. 15 

^The story of a man whose will be- 
""queathing dowries to all poor brides 
in his part of Louisiana was the clue 
to his life. 

This Is the Bowery (10) K-236 May 31 

Sociological revelation into the inner 
workings of the notorious New York 
section. 

Whispers (10) K-282 Feb. 8 

How small town gossips have instituted 
the newest advertising technique — the 
whispering campaign. 

Your Last Act (11) K-237 Julv 12 

A collection of edd wiUs and te-t'^ments 
of eccentrics and sentimentalists. 

PETE SMITH 

Aeronautics (10) S-2G7 Apr. 2G 

The results of an air student let loose 


90 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 



"KATHLEEN 

(M-G-M) 


SUe 


1 


^empie 


"ANNIE ROONEY 

(Edward Small - U. A.) 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


99 



upon the controls. 

Army Champions (10) S-361 Oct. 11 

The army in action with guns and 
tanks. 

Cuban Rhythm (9) S-269 June 21 

Rhumba and Conga lessons from Ar- 
thur Murray. 

Fancy Answers (9) S-362 Nov. 1 

Questions to puzzle the audience in a 
typical Pete Smith gag-style. 

How to Hold Your Husband — Back (10) 

S-363 Dec. 13 

The don’ts of wifehood as pointed out 
by Pete Smith, with illustrations. 

Flicker Memories (8). S-262 Oct. 4 

The early days of the industry from the 
theatre manager’s point of view. 

Football Thrills ol 1940 (11) S-270 Aug. 16 

The annual compilation of football 
thrills for the past year and a number 
of laughs. 

Lions on the Loose (9) S-268 May 24 

Pair of lost lion cubs wander in the 
woods and a house joining up with a 
lamb a monkey and a python. 

Memory Tricks (9) S-266 Mar. 15 

Methods of improving the memory are 
shown. 

Penny to the Rescue (10) S-264 Jan. 25 

Home economist Prudence Penny helps 
save the home on the kitchen stove. 

Quiz Biz (9) S-265 Feb. 8 

Another in the “What’s Your I. Q.” 
series. 

Water Bugs (10) S-270 Aug. 16 

Following the antics of an under- 
water club of marine maniacs. 

SPECIALS 


War Clouds in the Pacific (20) 

X-310 Dec. 24 

A glance at the defenses pro and con 
in our present battle area. 

TWO-REEL SPECIALS 

Tell-Tale Heart (20) A-301 Oct. 25 


A dramatization of the Edgar Allen Poe 
story of man’s conscience starring 
Joseph Schildkraut. 

PARAMOUNT 

ANIMATED ANTICS 

Copy Cat (7) HO-11 July 18 

Pop and Mom in Wild Oysters (7) 

HO-5 Feb. 14 

Sneak, Snoop and Snitch in Triple 
Trouble (7) HO-8 May 9 

Speaking of Animals (7) HO-7 Apr. 18 

Twinkletoes (7) HO-10 June 27 

Twinkletoes Gets the Bird (7) HO-6 Mar. 14 
Twinkletoes in Hat Stuff (7) HO-13 Aug. 29 
Wizard of Arts (7) HO-12 . Aug. 8 

Zero, The Hound (7) HO-9 May 30 

BENCHLEY COMEDIES 
Crime Control (11) SO-3 Apr. 11 

Forgotten Man (11) SO-4 May 23 

How to Take a Vacation (10) SI-1 Oct. 10 
Waiting for Baby (11) SO-2 Jan. 24 

FASCINATING JOURNEYS 
(In Technicolor) 

Delhi (11) MO-4 Mar. 21 


Indian Durbar (11) MO-5 May 16 

Jungle, The (11) MO-6 July 25 

Road to India (11) MI-1 Oct. 24 

GABBY CARTOONS 
(Technicolor) 

Fire Cheese (7). GO-6 June 20 

Gabby Goes Fishing (7) . GO-7 July 18 

It's a Hap-Hap-Happy Day (7) 

GO-8 Aug. 15 

Swing Cleaning (7). GO-5 Apr. 11 

Two for the Zoo (7) GO-4 Feb. 21 

GRANTLAND RICE SPORTLIGHTS 

Acrobatic Aces (10) RO-6 Feb. 7 

Several teams of acrobatic performers 
with nice angle shots. 

Buying a Dog (10) RI-5 Dec. 26 

Canine Sketches (10) RO-8 Mar. 28 

Dogs in pictures are brought to life and 
watched at work in the field doing 
pointing and retrieving. 

Feminine Fitness (10) RO-5 Jan. 10 

Various female athletes parade their 
prowess with the reel closing number, 
the wrestlers. 

Fishing Fever (10) RO-7 Feb. 28 

Ted Husing and several Hollywoodites 
in a fishing adventure on river and 
ocean. 

Lasso Wizards (10) RO-11 June 20 

Cowboys, young and old, girls and other 
experts show their stuff with a rope. 

Meet the Champs (10) RI-2 Oct. 3 

The Wilhelm Brothers, champion arch- 
ers, go through their stunts climaxed 
by one shooting a collar button off 
the others’ head. 

On the Spot (10) RO-10 May 23 

A question and answer bee on sports 
with Ted Husing supplying the an- 
swers. 

Quick Returns (10) RI-4 Nov. 28 

Shooting Mermaids (10) RI-1 Sept. 5 

Underwater shots of Newton Perry, out- 
standing underwater star and his girl 
troupe. 

Sittin' Pretty (10) RI-3 Oct. 31 

The finer side of riding with the acro- 
batic and sporting rider thrown in for 
thrills. 

Snow Dogs (10) RO-12 July 25 

Sled dogs and St. Bernards in a snowy 
background in New Hampshire and 
Idaho. 

Sun Fun (10) RO-9 Apr. 25 

Sun Valley and its diversified sporting 
program are the subject of this reel. 

What's Lacrosse? (10) RO-13 Aug. 15 

This one shows the game from the angle 
of Cherokee Indian boys, prep school, 
collegiate and sand lot viewpoints. 


HEADLINER 

Beauty and the Beach (10) AI-I Sept. 26 

Bob Chester and Orchestra (10) 

AO-5 Mar. 21 

Copacabana Revue, The (10) AI-2 Nov. 28 
Gene Krupa and Orch. (11) AO-4 Jan. 31 
Hands of Destiny (10) AO-7 July 11 

Those We Love (11) AO-6 June 6 

MADCAP MODELS (In Technicolor) 
Dipsy Gipsy (8) UO-2 April 4 


Hoola Boola (9) UO-3 June 27 

Gay Knighties, The (9). UO-4 Aug. 22 

Western Daze (9) UO-1 Jan. 17 

HEDDA HOPPER'S HOLLYWOOD 

No. 1(10) Zl-1 Sept. 12 

No.2(10) Zl-2 Nov, 28 

PARAMOUNT NEWS 

(Released Twice Weekly) 

PARAGRAPHICS 

Red, White and Blue Hawaii (11) 

VO-4 Feb. 28 

The industries, sugar and pineapple, of 
the island are documented as well as 
defense. 

POPEYE CARTOONS 

Child Psykolojiky (7) EO-11 July 11 

Flies Ain't Human (7) EO-8 Apr. 4 

I'll Never Crow Again (7) El-1 Sept. 19 

Mighty Navy, The (7) El-2 Nov. 14 

Nix on Hyponotricks (7) El-3 Dec. 19 

Olive's Boithday Presink (7) EO-10 June 13 

Popeye Meets Rip Van Winkle (7) 

EO-9 May 9 

Problem Pappy (7) . EO-5 Jan. 10 

Pest Pilot (7) EO-12 Aug. 8 

Quiet Pleeze (7) EO-6 Feb. 7 

POPULAR SCIENCE (In Cinecolor) 

No. 4(11) JO-4 Feb. 21 

Okla. quail; Stratoliner flight; plastics; 
rayon and Prof. Oakes. 

No. 5(11) Jo-5 May 2 

Times Square lights; household aids; 
microbe farm; Prof. Oakes. 

No. 6(11) JO-6 July 4 

Snake farm in Florida where snakes 
are “milked’’ for snake bite medicine; 
comedy. 

No. 1(11) Pl-1 Sept. 19 

Armored Tank Division, Fort Knox, 
Ky.; Reducing gadgets for women; eye 
opener for men. 

No. 2(11) Jl-2 Nov. 7 

Pennsylvania ’Turnpike; Super micro- 
scope; Forest fires and parachutes; 

Prof. Oakes. 

QUIZ KIDS 

No. 1 (11) QIT Sept. 12 

No.2(ll) Ql-2 Dec.5 

SPEAKING OF ANIMALS 

In a Pel Shop (8) ..Yl-1 .Sept. 5 

In the Zoo (10) Yl-2 Oct. 31 

SUPERMAN CARTOONS 

Superman (IOV 2 ) Wl-1 Sept. 26 

Mechanical Monsters, The (10) 

Wl-2 Nov. 21 

UNUSUAL OCCUPATIONS (In color) 

No. 3(10) LO-3 Jan. 24 

Mechanical elephant in Miami; Soap 

bubble tricks; Racing mayor of Salt 

Lake; Dolls; mattress breaker-inner. 

No. 4(11) LO-4 Mar. 28 

London jewelry; colored wool pictures; 
private railroad engineer; traveling 

beauty shop; girl bull fighter; cartoon 
dog Napoleon. 


100 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


h -■ 



BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


101 


QNo. 5(11) LO-5 Aug. 1 

John Barrymore’s collections; Ken Car- 
penter. 

No. 6(11) LO-6 Sept. 1 

Miniature circus: home-made rifles; 
human hair collector; Cypress Gardens, 
Fla.; cleaning of Marineland, Fla. 

No. 1(11) Ll-1 Oct. 3 

Lewis Plantation, Brooksville, Fla.; toy 
balloons: bill and horn of animals col- 
lector; air hostesses: trick typing. 


Westward Ho-Hum (16) 23,401 Sept. 5 

By a series of involvements Ed becomes 
the owner of a restaurant in a ghost 
town with usual Kennedy results. 

LEON ERROL COMEDIES 

Fired Man, The (20) 13,703 Jan. 10 

Errol is the store stooge who gets fired 
whenever a customer complains. Bed- 
room farce and nightwalking are in- 
cluded. 


No. 13(9) 14,213 Aug. 8 

Anna Neagle. 

No. 1 (9) 24,201 Sept. 19 

John Gunther. 

No. 2 (10) 24,202 Oct. 17 

Howard Lindsay. 

No. 3 (11) 24,203 Dec. 12 

PATHE NEWS 

(Released Twice Weekly) 


No. 2(11) Ll-2 Dec. 12 

Husband- wife shooting team; Stories 
on stained glass; woman zoo keeper; 
goldfish farm; odds and ends musical 
instruments. 


PRODUCERS RELEASING 


AMERICAN HISTORY 

Our Bill o! Rights (21) 0.1 Mar. I 

Our Constitution (22) 0.3 Mar. 1 

Our Declaration of Independence (22) 

0.2 Mar. 1 

Our Louisiana Purchase (22) 0.5 Aug. 1 

Our Monroe Doctrine (22) 0.4 Mar. 1 

WOODWARD NOVELTY 
Alive in the Deep (25) June 7 

Man the Enigma May 7 


RKO RADIO 


DISNEY CARTOONS (In Technicolor) 


Art of Skiing (8) 14,113 Nov. 14 

Baggage Buster (7) 14,103 Apr. 18 

Canine Caddy (7) 14,105 May 30 

Chef Donald ( 71 / 2 ) 14,114 Dec. 5 

Donald's Camera (8) 14,112 Oct. 24 

Early to Bed (8) 14,107 July 11 

Gentlemen's Gentleman (7) 14,102 Mar. 28 

Golden Eggs (8) 14,101 Mar. 7 

Good Time for a Dime ( 7 V 2 ) 14,104 May 9 

Lend a Paw (8) 14,111 Oct. 3 

Little Whirlwind (8) 04,118 Feb. 14 

Nifty Nineties (7) 14,106 June 20 

Old MacDonald Duck (8) 14,110 Sept. 12 

Orphan's Benefit (9) 14,109 Aug. 22 

Pluto's Playmate (8) 04,117 Jan. 27 

Timber (8) 04,116 Jan. 10 

Truant Officer Donald (8) 14,108 Aug. 1 

EDGAR KENNEDY COMEDIES 
Apple in His Eye (14) 13,405 June 6 


Kennedy and his neighbor start a pie- 
throwing feud and are joined by their 
wives and others. 


I'll Fix It (17) 23,402 Oct. 17 

Rather than pay $100, Kennedy de- 
cides to install the new hot water 
heater. Total cost; $500. 

It Happened All Night (19) 13,405 Apr. 4 

Ed and his father-in-law botch a chance 
to collect a reward on escaped convicts 
but put the family feud first. 

Quiet Fourth, A (15) 23,403 Dec.I9 

Mad About Moonshine (19) 13,404 Feb. 21 

Father-in-law inherits a southern 
“estate” and Ed gets involved in a 
mountain feud climaxed by an arrest 
for moonshine found on the estate. 


Man-i-cured (20) 23,701 Sept.26 

Leon gets mixed up with a manicurist 
and that results in the usual complica- 
tions. 

Panic in the Parlor (18) 13,703 June 27 


Errol returns from a Mexican spree 
with everyone thinking he is away at a 
convention. Falsefaces, accents, etc. 
complicate matters more. 

Polo Phoney, A (18) 13,705 May 16 

Errol tries to sell a big order to a polo 
champ by posing as a polo player him- 
self. Jail is the final result after mis- 


haps. 

When Wifie's Away (20) 13,704 Mar. 14 

The blonde menace, the irate wife, the 
usual incidents and you have the story 
of this one. 

Who's a Dummy (17) 23,702 , Nov. 28 

MARCH OF TIME 

No. 6(21) 13,106 Jan. 17 

Uncle Sam — Non-Belligerent 

No. 7(19) 13,107 Feb. 14 

Americans All 

No. 8 (18) 13,108 Mar. 14 

Australia at War 

No. 9 (21) 13,109 Apr. 11 

Men of the FBI 

No. 10(18) 13,110 May 9 

Crisis in the Atlantic 

No. 11 (18) 13,111 June 6 

China Fights Back 

No, 12(20) 13,112 July 4 

New England 8 Million Yankees 

No. 13(18) 13,113 Aug. 1 

Peace — By Adolf Hitler 

No. 1(19) 23,101 Sept. 29 

Thumbs Up, Texas 

No. 2 (20) 23,102 Sept.26 

Norway in Revolt. 

No. 3 (20) 23,103 Oct. 24 

Sailors With Wings. 

No. 4 ( 171 / 2 ) 23.104 Nov. 21 

Main Street, U. S. A. 

No. 5 (17) 23,105 Dec. 19 

Our America at War. 

Special (22) Dec. 17 

Battlefields of the Pacific. 

PATHE INFORMATION PLEASE 

No. 6 (11) 14,206 Jan. 24 

Jan Struther Is Guest. 

No. 7 (10) 14,207 Feb. 21 

Anna Neagle. 

No. 8 (10) 14,208 Mar. 21 

Boris Karloff. 

No. 9 (11) 14,209 Apr. 18 

Alice Marble. 

No. 10(10) 14,210 May 16 

Louis Bromfield. 

No. 11(10) 14,211 June 13 

Jan Struther. 

No. 12(9) 14,212 July 11 

Boris Karloff. 


PATHE SPORTSCOPE 

Caballero College (9) 14,307 Feb. 14 

Shots from the Chilean cavalry school 
where some of the world’s best riders 
are trained. 

Craig Wood (9) 14,313 Aug. 1 

The national open champ gives pointers 
on the use of golf clubs — looks easy in 
pictures. 

Crystal Flyers (8) 24,304 Nov. 28 

Dog Obedience (9) 24,302 Oct. 3 

Here dogs are awarded the honors not 
on beauty, stance or lineage but on 
their ability to obey. 

Gaucho Sports (9) 24,303 Oct. 31 

South American cowboys perform with 
roping, bronco busting and other like 
pursuits. 

Jockey's Day (9) 14,310 May 9 

A day in the life of Wendell Eads, one 
of the better jockeys of the times. 

Mat Men (9) 14,306 Jan. 17 

The training of intercollegiate wrestlers 
at Lehigh University. 

Pampas Paddock (9) 24,301 Sept. 5 

Following the kings of the racetracks at 
a South American track. 

Publicity Sports (9) 14,308 Mar. 14 

Shots of all the publicity angles you 
see in the papers of personalities and 
events. 

Rolling Rhythm (9) 14,311 June 6 

Roller skating as filmed at Madison 
Square Garden with racing and dancing 
shots. 

Steeds and Steers (9) 14,312 July 4 

Roping on the range and several good 
rodeo sequences. 

Sword Soldiers ...(9) 14,309 Apr. 11 

Fencing and military swordsmanship 
as shot at the Military Academy at 
West Point. 

PICTURE PEOPLE 

No. 6 (10) 14,406 Jan. 31 

Charles Laughton, Elsa Lanchester, 
Arch Oboler. 

No. 7 (10) 14,407 Feb. 28 

Burns and Allen, Margaret Lindsay. 
Lum and Abner, Joe E. Brown, Jack 
Benny. 

No. 8 (10) 14,408 Mar. 28 

Kay Kyser, Ginny Simms, Rosemary 
Lane, Victor McLaglen, Anna May 
Wong, Jimmy Durante. 

No. 9 (8) 14,409 Apr. 25 

Ray Bolger, Brenda and Cobina, Ab- 
bott and Costello, Larry Simms, Rita 
Hayworth. 

No. 10(8) 14,410 May 23 

Basil Rathbone, Constance Bennett. 

No. 1 (8), 24,401 So::t. 12 

Helen Broderick, Jimmie Gleason and 
wife, Sigrid Gurie, Rochelle Hudson, 
James Craig. 

No. 2 (9). 24,402 Oct. 10 

Gail Patrick, Guy Kibbee, Rudy Valise. 


boxd: 






102 



BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


103 



Helen Broderick, Nat Pendleton. 


No. 3 (9) 24,403 Nov. 7 

No. 4 (8). 24,404 Dec. 5 

RAY WHITLEY WESTERNS 

California or Bust (18) 23,501 Nov. 7 

Musical Bandit (16) 13,504 July 18 

Prairie Spooners (13) 13,502 Jan. 31 

Red Skins and Red Heads (18) 

13,503 Apr. 25 

SPECIALS 

Eyes on Brazil (11) 14,501 Feb. 21 

What's Happened in Argentina (10) 

14,502 Mar. 21 


REPUBLIC 

MEET THE STARS 

Hollywood Meets the Navy (10) 

028-5 Apr. 24 

Los Angeles Examiner Benefit (10) 

028-4 Mar. 24 

Meet Roy Rogers (10) 028-7 June 24 

Stars at Play (10) 028-6 May 24 

Stars — Past and Present (10) 028-8 July 24 


20TH CENTURY-FOX 

ADVENTURES OF A NEWS CAMERAMAN 

l?Highways of a Friendship (10) 

2202 Oct. 24 

This one covers the 9,000 miles of high- 
way on the Pan-American Highway be- 
tween Texas and Buenos Aires. 

Modern Highway (10) 1203 Jan. 31 

CISoldiers of the Sky (9) 2201 Aug. 1 

The training of parachute troops in 
the United States army. 

Training Police Horses (10) 1202 Jan. 17 

The breaking of mounts for the New 
York City police force. 

Wonders of the Sea (10) 2203 Nov. 21 

Underwater life as shot off the Aus- 
tralian coast. 

ED THORGERSEN— SPORTS 

Aristocrats of the Kennel (10) 2301 Sept. 12 

Tire various breeds, their pups, train- 
ing and the Morris and Essex show. 

Fun on Rollers (9) 1307 June 6 

Life of a Thoroughbred (10) 2302 Nov. 7 
The makings of a Kentucky Derby Win- 
ner. 

Playing With Neptune (9) 1305 Feb. 28 

Aquaplaning, diving boating, etc. from 
Australia to Maine. 

Playtime in Hawaii (10) Dec. 19 

Surfboarding, boating and other sports 
before Pearl Harbor. 

Symphony in Snow (9) 1306 Mar. 28 

Skiing and ski technique at Yosemite 
National park. 

FATHER HUBBARD'S ADVENTURES 

Arctic Springtime (10) 1108 Apr. 25 

Winter in Eskimo Land ,.(10) 1110 July 4 

FOX MOVIETONE NEWS 
(Released Twice Weekly) 


LEW LEHR AND HIS DRIBBLE PUSS 


PARADE 

Tale of Butch the Parrot. 1402 Feb. 28 

LOWELL THOMAS' MAGIC CARPET 
Call of Canada (10) Dec. 5 

Caribbean Sentinel. (10) .1103 Feb. 14 

Glacier Trails (10) 2102 Sept. 26 

Letter From Cairo (9) . .1 108 May 9 

Miracle of Hydro (10). ...1107 Mar. 14 

Sagebrush and Silver (9) 2101 Aug. 15 

TERRY-TOONS (In Technicolor) 

Bird Tower, The ..(7) 2555 Nov. 28 

Home Guard, The. (7) .1558 Mar. 7 

Mississippi Swing (7) 1557 Feb. 7 

Old Oaken Bucket, The (7) 2551 Aug. 8 

One Man Navy (7) 2552 Sept. 5 

Slap Happy Hunters (7) .2554 Oct. 31 

Uncle Joey (7) 1559 Apr. 18 

Welcome Little Stranger . (7) 2553 Oct. 3 

What Happens at Night (7) 1560 May 30 

Yarn About Yarn (7) 2556 Dec. 12 

TERRY-TOONS (Black and White) 

Baby Seal (7) 1510 Apr. 4 

Back to the Soil....(7) . 2504 Nov. 14 

Bringing Home the Bacon ..(7) 1515 July 7 

Dog's Dream, A ..(7) 1511 May 2 

Fishing Made Easy (7) 1508 Feb. 21 

Flying Fever ..(7) 2505 Dec. 26 

Frozen North, The ..(7) 2503 Oct. 17 

Good Old Irish Tunes (7) 1514 June 27 

Horse Fly Opera (7) 1513 June 13 

Ice Carnival (7) 2501 Aug. 22 

Magic Shell, The (7) 1512 May 16 

12 o'clock and All Is Well (7) 

1516 July 11 

Uncle Joey Goes to Town (7) 2502 Sept. 19 

What a Little Sneeze Will Do (7) 

1506 Jan. 10 

When Knights Were Bold (7) 1509 Mar. 21 

THE WORLD TODAY 

American Sea Power (9) 2401 Aug. 29 

Anzacs in Action (10) 1701 June 20 

Battle of the Atlantic (7) 1701 Apr. 11 

Empire in Exile (10) .1703 May 23 

War in the Desert (9) 1702 July 18 


UNITED ARTISTS 

SPECIALS 

Letter From Home, A (17) Nov. 28 

UNIVERSAL 

GOING PLACES WITH GRAHAM 
McNAMEE 


No. 85 (9) 5355 Jan. 20 

Frozen Wastes of the Arctic. 

No. 86 (9) 5356 Feb. 17 

A Trip Through Mexico. 

No. 87 (9) 5357 Mar. 17 

Bar Harbor, Maine. 


No. 88 (9). 5358 Mar. 31 

Deserts of America. 

No. 89 (9) 5359 Apr. 21 

The Amish Colony of Pennsylvania. 

No. 90 (9) 5360 May 12 

Modern Way Down East. 

No. 91 (9) 5361 May 26 

Trial of Father Kino. 

No. 92 (9) 5362 June 16 

Mountain Summer. 

No. 93 (9) 5363 June 30 

Meet Jimmie the Chump. 

No. 94 (10) 5364 July 21 

Isles of Fate. 

No. 95 (9) 5365 Aug. 16 

Garden Spot of the North. 

LANTZ CARTUNES (Technicolor) 

Andy Panda's Pop (7) 5252 July 14 

Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy of Co. B (7) 

6241 Sept. 1 

Dizzy Kitty (7) 5249 May 26 

Fair Today (7) 5246 Feb. 24 

Hysterical Highspots of American 
History (7) 5247 Mar. 31 

Man's Best Friend (7) 6242 Oct. 20 

Mouse Trappers (7) 5245 Jan. 27 

Salt Water Daffy (7) 5250 June 9 

Screwdriver, The (7) 5253 Aug. 11 

Scrub Me Mama With a Boogie 

Beat (6) 5248 Apr. 28 

21 a Day Once a Month (7) 6244 Dec. 1 

What's Cookin' (7) 6243 Nov. 24 

Woody Woodpecker (7) 5251 July 7 

PERSONALITY AND NAME BAND 
MUSICALS 

Doin' the Town (15) 6224 Nov. 26 

Ozzie Nelson, and his orchestra, Helen 
Parrish, Butch and Buddy. 

In the Groove (I6V2) 6222 Oct. 8 

Freddie Slack and Orch. 

Is Everybody Happy (17) 6221 Sept. 3 

Ted Lewis and Band. 

Skyline Serenade (16) 6223 Nov. 5 

Ted Fio Rito & Orch. 

SPECIALS 

Cavalcade of Aviation (20) 6110 

STRANGER THAN FICTION 
No. 86 (9) 5376 Feb. 3 


Japanese stenography; lifeboat launch- 
ing device: upside-down tree; minia- 
ture Michigan city; water-going loco- 
motive: paralyzed boy writes with teeth. 

No. 87 (9) 5377 Mar. 10 

Ave Maria Grotto; anti-tail flipping de- 
vice; Flaming well; woman railroader; 
muzzle-loading guns; acrobatic bird. 

No. 88 (9) 5378 Mar. 24 

Feather-collecting fish lures; driftwood 
hotel: water and lye motor fuel; post- 
age stamp pictures: child contortionist. 

No. 89 (8) 5379 Apr. 7 

Art colony pictures; flowers of sponge; 
natural hot water; unusual steeple; 
clever dog acrobat. 

No. 90 (9) 5380 May 5 

Motorized cripple-chair; solid silver 
chess set; driftwood zoo; dog-raised 
lions; cannibalistic sea anemones. 


104 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 



tL 


cJCu L 


UP 


i n 


Director 


'Buck Privates' 
'In the Navy" 


'Hold That Ghost' 
'Keep 'Em Flying' 


UNIVERSAL 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


105 






No. 91 (9) 5381 May 19 

Embroidered pictures; sailor hermit; 
stained glass windows; curbside bank; 
water power-printed paper; cow who 
pumps own water. 

No. 92 (9) 5382 June 2 

Redwood bark dolls; General Grant’s 
rifle-barrel fence; flower painting with 
real blooms; bird nest collector; am- 
bidextrous girl; dog gas station at- 
tendant. 

No. 93 (9) 5383 June 23 

Girl truck driver; shell collecting; me- 
chanical horse; twice-a-year church; 
army duck pet; goose-stepping dog. 

No. 94 (9) 5384 June 27 

Illustrated Braille books; corn cob col- 
lection and rare bird collection. 

No. 95 (9) 5395 Aug. 25 

Barnyard Steam Buggy (9) 8376 Jan. 19 

Blacksmith Dentist (9) 6375 Dec. 15 

Candy Kid, The (9) 6373 Oct. 27 

Hermit of Oklahoma (9) 6372 Oct. 6 

Junior Battle Fleet (9) 6374 Nov. 27 

Shampoo Strings ..( 71 / 2 ) 6371 Sept. 8 

TWO REEL MUSICALS 

Bagdad Daddy (17) 5226 Feb. 19 

Gertrude Neisen, Ambassadorettes, Fuz- 
zy Knight, Johnson Bros. 

Beat Me, Daddy, Eight to the Bar (17) 

5225 Jan. 22 

The Fashionaires and Cathlyn Miller. 

Dizzy Doings (17) 5233 Aug. 18 

Jingle Belles (13) 6225 Dec. 24 

Gloria Jean, Milt Herth Trio, The 
Sportsmen, Margery Daye. 

Jumpin' Jive (17) 5228 Apr. 23 

Butch and Buddy, Judy Starr, the Up- 
towners. 

Music a la King (17) 5230 June 18 

Henry King and Orch., King’s Men. 

Music in the Morgan Manner ( 171 / 2 ) 

5227 Mar. 19 

Russ Morgan and Orch., Southern 

Swingsters. 

Once Upon a Summertime (17) 

5231 July 30 

Skinnay Ennis and Orch., Six Hits and 
a Miss. 

Rhythm Revels (16) 5232 July 30 

Will Osborne and Orchestra. 

Shadows in Swing (18) 5229 May 21 

Jan Garber and Orchestra. 

UNIVERSAL NEWS 

(Released Twice Weekly) 

VARIETY VIEWS 
Annapolis Salutes the Navy (9) 


6355 Dec. 8 

George Washington, Country Gentle- 
men (9) 6353 Nov. 10 

Moby Dick's Home Town (9) 6351 Sept. 15 
Northern Neighbors . (9) .6352 Oct. 19 


VITAPHONE 

BROADWAY BREVITIES 

At the Stroke of Twelve (20) 7103 Nov. 15 

An old lady helps a young man in trou- 
ble in memory of her own son. Some- 
thing a little different in shorts. 

Happy Faces (20) 6209 July 26 

The chase, the villain, the pure heroine, 


the brave hero; all are present in this 
one. 

Hunting the Hard Way (20). 6208 May 17 

ilMinstrel Days (20) 7101 Sept. 6 

A history of the minstrel man with 
parts by A1 Jolson, Eddie Cantor, Eddie 
Leonard and others famous in the pro- 
fession. 

Monsters of the Deep (20) ,7102 Dec. 13 

Perils of the Jungle (20) 7104 Oct. 18 

Jungle shots as taken by Comm. At- 
tilio Gatti’s last expedition to Africa. 

Seeing Eye, The (19) 6206 May 3 

The training of the dogs who lead the 
blind at the famous N. J. institution. 

Sockeroo (20) 6207 May 21 

Maxie Rosenbloom goes to school on the 
side and while fighting the champ is 
hypnotized into thinking himself a poet. 

Take the Air (20) 6205 Feb. 22 

The trials and tribulations of a would- 
be radio entertainer and his ultimate 
success. 

West of the Rockies (20) 7105 Nov. 29 

A radio sponsor goes west looking for 
real cowboys. 

ELSA MAXWELL'S BLUE RIBBON 
COMEDIES 

Lady and the Lug (20) 6102 Mar. 22 

Throwing a Party (20) 6103 July 12 

HOUYWOOD NOVELTIES 

History Repeats Itself (10) 6304 Jgn. 18 

Points on Arrows (10) 7304 Dec. 27 

Howard Hill, famous archer, shows 
trick bow and arrow shooting to amaze 
the amateur. 

Polo With the Stars (9) 7301 Sept. 20 

Buddy Rogers, Joe E. Brown and other 
stars engage in the game. 

Trouble in Store (10) 6306 Aug. 2 

Arthur Bryan attempts to exchange his 
wife’s stockings, running into women 
shoppers, and ends up in jail. 

White Sails (10) 7302 Nov. 8 

A trip by windjammer from Australia 
to England with the accompanying sea 
shots. 

Wild Boar Hunt (10) 6305 Mar. 15 

Howard Hill shoots wild boars with a 
bow and arrow even rescuing another 
man. 

LOONEY TUNES (In Technicolor) 


Coy Decoy, A (7) 6612 June 7 

Haunted Mouse, The (7) 6607 Feb. 15 
Henpecked Duck, The (7) 6616 Aug. 30 
Joe Glow, the Firefly (7) 6608 Mar. 8 

Meet John Doughboy (7) 6614 July 5 

Notes to You (7) 7601 Sept. 20 

Porky's Ant (7) 6611 May 10 

Porky's Bear Facts (7) 6609 Mar. 29 

Porky's Midnight Matinee (7) 7604 Nov. 22 

Porky's Pooch (7) 7603 Dec. 27 

Porky's Preview (7) 6610 Apr. 19 

Porky's Prize Pony (7) 6613 June 21 

Porky's Snooze Reel (7) 6606 Jan. 11 

Robinson Crusoe jr. (7) 7602 Oct. 23 

We, the Animals, Speak (7) 6615 Aug. 9 

MELODY MASTERS 

Carioca Serenaders (10) 7502 Oct. 25 

Carl Hoff and Band (10) 6510 Aug. 16 

Cliff Edwards and His Buckaroos (10) 

6506 Mar. 8 


i^Forty Boys and a Song (10) 7503 Dec. 6 
Freddy Martin and Orch. (10) 6507 Apr. 12 

Hal Kemp and Orchestra (10) 6509 June 14 


Jan Garber and Orchestra (10) . 6503 Feb. 1 
Marie Greene and Her Merrie Men (10) 


6508 Apr. 26 

University of California Band . ..(10) 

7501 Sept. 13 

MERRIE MELODIES (In Technicolor) 

All This and Rabbit Stew (7) 7701. Sept. 13 

Aviation Vacation (7) .6724 Aug. 2 

Brave Little Bat (7) 7702 Sept. 27 

Bug Parade. (7) .7703 Oct. 11 

Cagey Canary, The (7) .7706 Nov. 22 

Cat's Tale, The ...(7) 6713 Mar. 1 

Crackpot Quail. (7) .6712 Feb. 15 

Farm Frolics ...(7). .6718 May 10 

Fighting 69thV2, The (7) 6710 Jan. 18 

Goofy Groceries (7) 6715 Mar. 29 

Heckling Hare, The (7) 6722 July 5 

Hiawatha's Rabbit Hunt (7) 6720 June 7 

Hollywood Steps Out (7) 6719 May 24 

Inki and the Lion. ..(7) 6723 July 19 

iIRhapsody in Rivets (7) .7707 Dec. 6 

Saddle Silly (7) 7705 Nov. 8 

Sniffles Bells the Cat (7) .6711 Feb. 1 

Snow Time for Comedy (7) 6726 Aug. 30 

Sport Chumpions (7) .6725 Aug. 16 

Tortoise Beats Hare (7) 6714 Mar. 15 

Toy Troubles (7) 6716 Apr. 12 

Trial of Mr. Wolf (7) 6717 Apr. 26 

Wabbit Twouble (7) 7708 Dec. 20 

Wacky Worm, The (7) 6721 June 21 

SPECIALS 

CIThey Spent Christmas Under 
Fire (IOV 2 ) 6850 Jan. 24 


Quentin Reynolds takes the audience 
into the homes of London for the 
Christmas season showing how they 
can make the best of a bad situation. 


SPORTS PARADE (Color) 

Big Bill Tilden (10) 6407 May 24 

Big Time Tennis. 

California Thoroughbreds (10) 6404 Jan. 11 

Race horses. 

Fight, Fish, Fight ..(10) 6405 Mar. 1 

Deep Sea Fishing. 

It Happened on Rollers (10) 6409 July 19 

Skating. 

King Salmon (10) 7402 Dec. 27 

Salmon Fishing. 

Kings of the Turf (10) 7401 Sept. 27 

Trotting Horses. 

Lions for Sale (10) 6410 Aug. 9 

Lion Farm in California. 

Sail Ho (10) 6408 June 14 

Sailboating and racing. 

Sky Sailing (10) 6406 Apr. 19 

Sailplane gliding. 

Water Sports (10) 7403 Nov. 1 

Swimming, Diving and Aquaplaning. 

TECHNICOLOR 

Carnival of Rhythm (20) 6006 Aug. 23 

Here Comes the Cavalry (20) 6005 June 28 

Meet the Fleet (20) 6003 Feb. 8 

QTanks Are Coming (20) 7001 Oct. 4 

Wings of Steel (20) 6004 Apr. 5 

VITAPHONE VARIETIES 

All Girl Revue (10) 5706 June 22 


106 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


Lion SCHLESinCER 

CARTOO/i S£NSATI(£>N 

BUGS Bunnv 

yiouf 



GmL 

R£LEAS£D BY WAfiNER BROS. 



WHY 

THEY’RE TOPS. 

“FIRST: M-G-M with five distinguished shorts 
and for AN ACE IN THE HOLE. THE DEPEND- 
ABLE. NEVER FAILING. PETE SMITH.*" 

— Annual Poll of Interstate Theatres 
conducted by Besa Short. 


* Winner o/ last Academy Award; winner of News- 
View Theatres Award for best novelty; winner of 
News-View Theatres for most popular screen com- 
mentator. 


Thanks to Exhibitors 
of America 


GEORGE 

"GABBY" 

HAYES 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


107 





SKOURAS 

THEATRES 

CORPORATION 


108 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 




A Glance at Coming Featnres 


lOOKIIG iHMD 


^ijnopiii, C^ait an d Otli 


'nformalLon on 


Sckeduied 1942 l^eie 


eaies 


BRONSTON 


British Foreign Legion 

Cast: Edgar Barrier (Incomplete). Producers: 
Samuel Bronston, Robert J. McDonald. Director: 
Not Set. Original: Burnet Hershey. Screenplay: 
No Credits. 

Concerns the governments in exile in 
London. Hershey has been dispatched 
there and to Cairo to gather additional 
material. 

Mutiny on the Elsinore 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Samuel Bronston. 
Director: Not Set. Original: Jack London. 

Screenplay: W. L. River. 

From Jack London’s tale of the hell- 
ship, Elsinore, and how a man and a 
girl staved off disaster by defeating 
the mutinous crew. 


COLUMBIA 


Adventures of Martin Eden 

Cast: Glenn Ford, Claire Trevor, Evelyn 

Keyes. Producers: Samuel Bronston, B. P. Schul- 
berg. Director: Sidney Salkow. Original: Jack 
London, Screenplay: No Credits. 

Concerns an ignorant sailor who falls 
in love with a cultured woman; deter- 
mines to make himself worthy of her; 
and succeeds in becoming famous as a 
writer, only to kill himself when he dis- 
covers life on land is empty and futile. 

Alias Boston Blackie 

Cast: Chester Morris, Adele Mara, Richard 
Lane, George E. Stone. Producer: Wallace Mac- 
Donald, Director: Lew Landers. Original: No 
Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Another in the series in which Chester 
Morris portrays “Boston Blackie,” 
crime-loving adventurer. 

The American Way 

Cast: Not Set. Producer-Director: George 

Stevens. Original: George S. Kaulman, Moss 
Hart. Screenplay: Sidney Buchmon. 

Prom the stage hit which ran for nine 
months on Broadway. 

Blondie's Blessed Event 

Cast: Penny Singleton. Arthur Lake, Larry 
Simms, Daisy, Jonathan Hale. Producer: Robert 
Sparks. Director: Frank R. Strayer. Original: No 
Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. Based on the 
comic strip created by Chic Young. 

In which young Mrs. Bumstead in- 
creases her family with the addition of 
a daughter. 

Blondie Buys a Horse 

Cast: Penny Singleton, Arthur Lake, Larry 
Simms, Daisy, Jonathan Hale. Producer: Robert 
Sparks. Director: Frank R. Strayer. Original: No 
Credits. Screenplay: Connie Lee. Based on the 
comic strip created by Chic Young. 

Another in this series of comedies re- 
volving aroimd the adventures of the 
Bumstead Family. 

Blondie for Victory 

Cast: Penny Singleton, Arthur Lake, Larry 
Simms, Daisy, Jonathan Hale. Producer: Robert 
Sparks. Director: Not Set. Original Screenplay: 


Explanatory 


Advance Data on Feature 
Productions, Completed or in 
Course of Production, for Release 
After January 1, 1942. Included 
are Pictures Contemplated at 
Time of Going to Press. 

Title, Cast and Other Changes 
Subsequently Made Will Be 
Published as They Occur in the 
BOOKING CHART and the 
PRODUCTION INDEX Sections 
of BOXOFFICE. 


Karen DeWolf. Based on characters created by 
Chic Young. 

In which Blondie does her bit for the 
defense effort. 

Broadway Daddies 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Colbert Clark. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: 
Edward James. 

Musical comedy about gold-diggers in 
Manhattan. 

Captain Midnight 

Cast: Dave O'Brien, Dorothy Short, James 
Craven, Sam Edwards. Producer: Larry Darmour. 
Director. James W. Horne. Original: No Credits., 
Screenplay: No Credits, 

A 15-chapter serial, based on the ra- 
dio thriller of the same name. 

Cover Girls of 1942 

Cast: Rita Hayworth, Jinx Falkenberg, Janet 
Blair, Marguerite Chapman. Producer: Not Set. 
Director: Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

Twelve of the nation’s most popular 
“magazine cover” girls will appear in 
this musical. 

Destroyer 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Lou Edelman, Direc- 
tor: Not Set. Original Screenplay: Lieut. -Comm. 
Frank Wead. 

Story of the Pacific Fleet. 

Ellery Queen and the Living Corpse 

Cast: William Gargan, Margaret Lindsay, 
Charley Grapewin, James Burke, Lillian Bond. 
Producer: Larry Darmour. Director: James Hogan. 
Original: Ellery Queen. Screenplay: Eric Taylor. 

Another in the series of detective 
dramas based on the “Ellery Queen” 
sleuth novels. 

Every Man for Himself 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Harry Joe Brown. 
Director: Not Set. Original: Milton Lazarus. 
Screenplay: Clarence Greene. 

Farce comedy, based upon a Broad- 
way play. 

The Gentlemen Misbehave 

Cast: Cary Grant, Jean Arthur, Ronald Col- 
man, Claire Trevor, Edgar Buchanan. Producer- 
Director: George Stevens. Original: No Credit. 
Screenplay: Sidney Buchman, Fred Guiol. 

In which a group of staid college pro- 
fessors are forced to hide out a no- 
torious criminal. 


He Kissed the Bride 

Cast: Melvyn Douglas, Joan Crawford. Pro- 
ducer: Edward Kaufman. Director: Alexander 
Hall. Original: Gina Kaus, Andrew Soil. Screen- 
play: Richard Flournoy, 

Relates the hectic romance between 
a feminine business tycoon and a cru- 
sading author. 

Hello. Aimapolis 

Cast: Tom Brown, Jean Parker, Larry Parks, 
Robert Stevens, Lloyd Bridges, Stanley Brown. 
Producer: Irving Briskin. Director: Charles Bar- 
ton. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

Service drama, its locale the U. S. 
Naval Academy. 

The Invaders 

Cast: Laurence Olivier, Leslie Howard, Ray- 
mond Massey, Glynis Johns. Producer-Director: 
Michael Powell. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

Filmed largely in the North Cana- 
dian woods, this deals with the chase 
across Canada of a German U-boat 
crew of six men, stranded following the 
destruction of their craft in Hudson’s 
Bay. 

Just Call Me Darling 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: B. P. Schulberg. 
Director: Not Set. Original: Margaret Lee. 
Screenplay: No Credits. 

Light domestic comedy. 

Klondike Kate 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: Not 
Set. Original: Kate Rockwell Matson. Screenplay: 
Huston Branch. 

Biography of Klondike Kate, prom- 
inent feminine personality of Alaskan 
gold-rush days. 

Highly Irregular 

Cast: Franchot Tone, Joan Bennett, Allyn Jos- 
lyn, Elisabeth Risdon, Chester Clute, Aubrey 
Mather. Producer: B. P. Schulberg. Director: 
Richard Wallace. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

Romance laid against an army back- 
ground in Holland, with Tone as a 
British flier and Miss Bennett a Dutch 
girl. 

Just Another Dame 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Leon Barsha. Director: 
Charles Barton. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

Concerns a 10-year-old boy who 
thinks he hates women — but changes 
his mind. 

Let the Eagle Scream 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Sam Bischoff. Direc- 
tor: Not Set. Original: No. Credits. Screenplay: 
No Credits. 

Story of U. S. military aviation and 
its heroes. 

Lucky Legs 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Wallace MacDonald. 
Director: Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: Stanley Rubin. 

Comedy about beauty-contest win- 
ners. 

Mightier Than the Sword 

Cast: Glenn Ford (Incomplete). Producer: Not 
Set. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Historical drama based on the life 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


109 


of Peter Zenger, New York editor and 
crusader for freedom of the press, who 
in 1734 was brought to trial on 
trumped-up charges, and whose martyr- 
dom has made him a journalistic im- 
mortal. 

Miss Grant Takes Richmond 

Cast: Rosalind Russell, Melvyn Douglas 

(Tentative, incomplete). Producer: Not Set. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: Gene Towne, Mark 
Kelly. Screenplay: Gene Towne. 

Comedy about how Miss Grant (Rosa- 
lind Russell) sets her cap for, and wins, 
Mr. Richmond (Melvyn Douglas). 

My Sister Eileen 

Cast: Rosalind Russell (Incomplete). Producer: 
Max Gordon. Director: Not Set. Original: No 
Credits. Screenplay: Jerome Chodorov, Joseph 
Fields. 

Based on the Broadway hit of the 
same name. 

Pal Joey 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Harry Joe Brown. 
Director: Not Set. Original: John O'Hara. Screen- 
play: John O'Hara. 

Musical, from the Broadway stage 
success. 

The Pioneers 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Harry Joe Brown. 
Director: Not Set. Original: James Fenimore 
Cooper. Screenplay: Max Brand. 

From one of James Fenimore Cooper’s 
famous “Leatherstocking Tales,’’ its 
background the French and Indian 
Wars. 

Prairie Gunsmoke 

Cast: Bill Elliott, Tex Ritter, Virginia Carroll, 
Tristram (lloffin, Hal Price. Producer: Leon Bar- 
sha. Director: Lambert Hillyer. Original: No 
Credits. 

Fifth in the series of westerns co- 
starring Bill Elliott and Tex Ritter. 

Precinct 27 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Jack Fier. Director: 
Not Set. Original Screenplay: Paul Yawitz. 

Crime-busting melodrama. 

Professional Model 

Cast: Jinx Falkenburg (Incomplete). Producer: 
Jack Fier. Director: Not Set. Original: No Credits. 
Screenplay: Louis Lantz. 

Comedy of the advertising business, 
with Jinx Falkenburg, playing the title 
role, depicting for the screen the trade 
she followed before entering films — 
that of a professional model. 

The Rumelhearts of Rompler Ave. 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Harold Clurman. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: Paul Green. 

Drama of family life. 

Salute to Tobruk 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Ralph Cohn. Director: 
Not Set. Original Screenplay: Renee Nell, George 

Sklar. 

Inspired by the radio program of the 
same name, emanating from the Brit- 
ish Broadcasting Corp. in London, this 
will have an all-male cast. Its locale 
is the Libyan desert, where British and 
Axis troops have been fighting. 

Shut My Big Mouth 

Cast: Joe E. Brown, Adele Mara. Producer: 
Robert Sparks. Director: Charles Barton. Origi- 
nal: No Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 

In which Joe E. Brown essays the role 
of a tenderfoot in the wild and woolly 
west. 

Something Borrowed 

Cast: Frances Dee, William Holden. Producer: 
Robert Sparks. Director: Alfred E. Green. Origi- 
nal: Elizabeth Dunn. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Romantic comedy, based on a story 
which first appeared in the Ladies Home 
Journal. 


The Spirit of Stanford 

Cast: Frankie Albert (Incomplete). Producer: 
Not Set. Director: Not Set. Original: No Credits. 
Screenplay: William Brent, Nick Lukats. 

Football drama. Frankie Albert, who 
will star, was the All-American quarter- 
back at Stanford. 

Sweetheart of the Fleet 

Cast: Jinx Falkenburg (Incomplete). Producer: 
Jack Fier. Director: Not Set. Original: No Cre- 
dits. Screenplay: Maurice Tombragel, Ned 
Dandy. 

Musical comedy with a U. S. Navy 
background. 

Tramp, Tramp, Tramp 

Cast: Florence Rice, Bruce Bennett, Jackie C. 
Gleason, Jack Durant. Producer: Wallace Mac- 
Donald. Director: Charles Barton. Original: No 
Credits. Screenplay; No Credits. 

Comedy, with a draft-army back- 
ground. 

Two Yanks in Trinidad 

Cast: Pat O'Brien, Brian Donlevy, Janet Blair, 
Veda Ann Borg, Frank Jenks, Donald MacBride. 
Producer: Sam Bischoff. Director: Gregory Rat- 
off. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Service story concerning U. S. Ma- 
rines and their defense activities in 
South America. 

A Young Girl's Fancy 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: B. P. Schulberg. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: Ernest Pascal, Michael Blankfort. 

Modern romantic comedy. 


GOLDWYN 


The Pride of the Yankees 

Cast: Gary Cooper, Walter Brennan, Babe 
Ruth, Teresa Wright, Don Duryea. Producer: 
Samuel Goldwyn. Director: Sam Wood. Original: 
Paul Gallico. Screenplay: Herman Mankiewicz, 
Richard Maibaum. 

This relates the life and career of 
the late Lou Gehrig, the “Iron Man” 
of the New York Yankees. Gary Coop- 
er has the title role and Walter Bren- 
nan portrays Miller Huggins, the team’s 
manager. 

Swing Shift 

Cast: Dana Andrews, Virginia Gilmore, Bettye 
Avery, Dan Duryea. Producer: Samuel Goldwyn. 
Director: Not Set. Original Screenplay: Sol and 
Ben Barzman, Bess Taffel. 

Modern comedy with music, based on 
the activities of the hundreds of thou- 
sands of youthful defense workers who 
toil between 4 p. m. and midnight. 

Treasure Chest 

Cast: Bob Hope (Incomplete) . Producer: 

Samuel Goldwyn. Director: Not Set. Original: 
No Credits. Screenplay: Bert Granet, Frank 
Ryan. 

Musical comedy. 

The Washington Drama 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Samuel Goldwyn. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: Leonard Spigplgass, 
Leo G. Rosten. Screenplay: Alan Campbell, 
Helen Deutsch. 

Drama set against the background of 
official Washington and utilizing famil- 
iar landmarks such as the Lincoln Me- 
morial, the Press Building and the Cap- 
itol. 


METRO-GOLDWYN- 

MAYER 


Above Suspicion 

Cast: William Powell (Incomplete). Producer: 
Not Set. Director; Not Set. Original: No Credits. 
Screenplay: Melville Baker. 


About an Englishman who ventures 
into Nazi Germany on a secret mission. 

Along Came . . . Murtder 

Cast: Marsha Hunt, Van Heflin, Lee Bowman. 
Producer: Jack Chertok. Director: Fred Zinne- 
man. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

This mystery is built around the elec- 
tion of a reform mayor and district at- 
torney, both of whom are slain. The 
crimes are detected by science, with 
Van Heflin and Marsha Hunt portray- 
ing the police chemist and his assistant. 
Lee Bowman is a lawyer responsible for 
the election of the reform element, but 
who in reality is working hand-in-hand 
with the underworld. 

American Cavalcade 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Sidney Franklin. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: George Froeschel. 
Screenplay: Arnold Phillips. 

Story of America from the day the 
first Pilgrims set foot on Plymouth 
Rock up to the present hour of na- 
tional crisis, told through two principal 
characters. 

Apache Trail 

Cast: Wallace Beery (Incomplete). Producer: 
Sam Marx. Director: Not Set. Original: Ernest 
Haycox. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Western, adapted from a Collier’s 
serial. 

As Thousands Cheer 

Cast: Red Skelton, Judy Garland (Incomplete). 
Producer: Not Set. Director: Not Set. Original: 
Irving Berlin, Moss Hart. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Red Skelton and Judy Garland team 
their talents in the film version of the 
Broadway musical revue. 

The Black Pearl of Paradise 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: George Haight. Di- 
rector: A1 Santell. Original: Bogart Rogers. 
Screenplay: No Credits. 

Adventure-romance, its locale the 
coral islands of the South Seas. 

Born to Sing 

Cast: Ray McDonald, Virginia Weidler, Leo 
Gorcey, Rags Ragland, Larry Nunn, Henry 
O'Neill, Douglas McPhail. Producer: Frederick 
Stephani. Director: Edward Ludwig. Original: 
No Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 

This is built around a recent song 
hit of the same title. Dramatic high- 
lights include the rescue of an attempt- 
ed suicide by a group of youngsters, an 
escape from a patrol wagon with a 
gangster and the rehearsal of a musical 
show while hiding from the police. 

The Bugle Sounds 

Cast: Wallace Beery, Marjorie Main, Lewis 
Stone, George Bancroft, Henry O'Neill, William 
Lundigan, Tom Dugan. Producer: J. Walter Ru- 
ben. Director: S. Sylvan Simon. Original: Law- 
rence Kimble. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Hap (Wallace Beery) is first ser- 
geant of a regular cavalry troop and 
his iron heart bleeds rust when the cav- 
alry is transformed into armored tank 
soldiers. Susie (Marjorie Main), pro- 
prietress of a restaurant, is in love with 
him. When the discovery is made that 
saboteurs have tampered with the 
tanks. Hap goes into action and rounds 
up the villains. 

Cherie Jolie 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: 
Not Set. Original: Jacques Thery, Louis de 
Vohl. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Story of France before and during 
the Nazi invasion. 

The Courtship of Andy Hardy 

Cast: Mickey Rooney, Lewis Stone, Fay Hol- 
den, Ann Rutherford, Donna Reed, Cecilia 
Parker. Producer: No Credit. Director: George 


110 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


S. SYLVAN SIMON 

Director 


"WHISTLING IN THE DARK" 


Current Release: 

"THE BUGLE SOUNDS" 


In Production: 

"RIO RITA" 


METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER PRODUCTIONS 


THANKS TO EXHIBITORS 
OF AMERICA 


LEW AYRES 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


111 


B. Sietz. Original; Based on characters created 
by Aurania Rouverol. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Andy Hardy is working in a garage 
in Carvel to pay off the debts he in- 
curred in New York. Miss Reed is the 
pathetic “ugly duckling” daughter of 
separated parents. At the request of 
his father, Andy takes her to her first 
dance and teaches her how to be at- 
tractive to the boys, with amazing re- 
sults. 

A Delicate Affair 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Edwin Knopf. Direc- 
tor: Not Set. Original: Frederick Kohner. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

Three luckless girls in New York sud- 
denly gain possession of a baby given 
them by one girl’s brother, a member 
of the RAF. The infant brings each 
girl luck — in an embarrassing way. 

Fingers at the Window 

Cast: Lew Ayres, Laraine Day, Basil Rath- 
bone, Russell Gleason. Producer: Irving Starr. 
Director: Charles Lederer. Original; No Credijs. 
Screenplay: Charles Lederer. 

Murder mystery which finds Lew 
Ayres temporarily stepping out of his 
“Dr. Kildare” character. 

The First Sob Sister 

Cast: Myrna Loy (Incomplete). Producer: Sam 
Marx. Director; Not Set. Original: Jack Pollex- 
fen. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Miss Loy will portray one of the first 
newspaperwomen in a story laid in the 
1890’s. 

Full Glory 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: 
Not Set. Original: William A. Wellman, Lester 
Koenig. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Laid in the general locale of Prance 
and the U. S. and covering the period 
from 1918 to 1941, the story concerns 
the experience of three flyers and a girl. 

Gentle Annie 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: 
Not Set. Original: MacKinlay Kantor. Screenplay: 
No Credits. 

Concerns a railroad detective who 
meets an Oklahoma family and is ac- 
cepted as one of them, only to discover 
they are the very train robbers he is 
hunting. Despite his friendliness for the 
family, especially for two brothers who 
also are his rivals in love, he decides 
to carry out his duty. 

Girl Crazy 

Cast: Mickey Rooney, Judy Garland, Virginia 
Weidler, Ray McDonald (Incomplete). Producer: 
Arthur Freed. Director: Not Set. Original: 
George and Ira Gershwin. Screenplay: Fred 
Finkleholfe. 

Musical, adapted from the hit Broad- 
way revue. 

Grand Central Murder 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: B. F. Zeidman. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original; Sue MacVeigh. Screen- 
play: Peter Rurick. 

The central figures are a railroad de- 
tective and his pretty wife, who set out 
to solve the mystery of the death of a 
dancer, killed in the private car in 
which she was about to travel west from 
the Grand Central Station in New York. 

Jackass Mail 

Cast: Wallace Beery, Marjorie Main, J. Carrol 
Naish (Incomplete). Producer: John W. Consi- 
dine jr. Director; Norman McLeod. Original: 
No- Credits. Screenplay; No Credits. 

Wallace Beery returns to the western 
scene in this story of California in the 
gold rush era. 

Joe Smith, American 

Cast: Robert Young, Marsha Hunt, Harvey 
Stephens, Darryl Hickman, Noel Madison, Jona- 


than Hale. Producer: Jack Ghertok. Director: 
Richard Thorpe. Original: Paul Galileo. Screen- 
play: Alle»r hivkin. 

Robert Young portrays a worker in 
an aviation factory who installs bomb 
sights. He is set upon one night by 
enemy agents but finds the inner cour- 
age to withstand torture and cruelty, 
and the initiative to retain the neces- 
sary clues that lead to the capture of 
his tormentors. 

Journey for Margaret 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: 
Not Set. Original: W. L. White. Screenplay: 
David Hertz, William Ludv/ig. 

From the book of the same name, 
relating the adventures of an English 
war refugee brought to this country. 

Keeper of the Flames 

Cast: Spencer Tracy, Ruth Hussey (Tentative, 
incomplete). Producer: Not Set. Director: Not 
Set. Original: I. A. R. Wylie. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

About a newspaperman who sets out 
to expose a corrupt state legislature. 

Kim 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Victor Saville. Direc- 
tor: Not Set. Original: Hudyard Kipling. Screen- 
play: Leon Gordon. 

From Kipling’s story about the ad- 
ventures of a youngster in India. 

I Married an Angel 

Cast: Jeanette MacDonald, Nelson Eddy, 

Reginald Owen, Mona Maris, Edward Everett 
Horton, Inez Cooper. Producer: Hunt Stromberg. 
Director; Roy Del Ruth. Original: Richard Rodg- 
ers, Lorenz Hart. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Anna (Jeanette MacDonald), a drab 
office slavey, is maliciously invited to 
her boss’ costume party. Count Willie 
(Nelson Eddy) , forced into a dance with 
her, excuses himself and takes a nap, 
during which he dreams Anna is an 
angel and they are wed. How this “di- 
vine” creature proceeds to make life 
miserable for him supplies the plot. 

Melodrama 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Sam Marx. Director: 
Not Set. Original: Gordon Kahn, David Lang. 
Screenplay: No Credits. 

Action story, its locale the far north- 
west. 

Men at Sea 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Jack Chertok. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: Allen Rivkin. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

Nautical melodrama. 

Mokey 

Cast: Dan Dailey jr., Donna Reed, Sara Ha- 
den, Bobby Blake, Cordell Hickman. Producer: 
J. Walter Ruben. Director: Wells Root. Original: 
Jenny Harris Oliver. Screenplay: Wells Root, Jan 
Fortune. 

Youth drama. 

Mr. and Mrs. North 

Cast: Grade Allen, William Post jr.. Rose 
Hobart, Tom Conway, Paul Kelly, Henry 
O'Neill, Inez Cooper, Virginia Grey. Producer: 
Irving Asher. Director: Robert Sinclair. Original: 
Owen Davis sr. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Pam North (Gracie Allen) is the ir- 
responsible wife of Jerry (William Post 
jr.) He is strongly suspected of two 
murders when bodies fall out of closets 
in their home — but Pam furnishes the 
amazing — and unintentional — solution 
and saves her husband. 

Mrs. Miniver 

Cast: Greer Gorson, Walter Pidqeon, Teresa 
Wright, Henry Wilcoxon, Henry Travers. Pro- 
ducer: Sidney Franklin. Director: William Wy- 
ler. Original: Jan Struther. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

From tire novel by Jan Struther, 
showing how a typical English house- 


wife is managing to face the war and 
its hardships. 

Night Shift 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Irving Asher. Direc- 
tor: Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: 
Leonard Lee. 

Concerns the drama and adventure 
behind the scenes in a defense factory. 

Once Upon a Thursday 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Irving Starr. Director: 
S. Sylvan Simon. Original: Isobel Fennant, Lee 
Gold. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Concerns a fashionable neighborhood 
which is given a severe case of the 
jitters by the news that a maid in one 
of the houses has written a revealing 
book of memoirs, in which the idiosyn- 
crasies of her employers are described 
in detail. 

The Ox Train 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Jack Chertok. Direc- 
tor: Not Set. Original: Jesse Lasky jr. Screen- 
play: Jesse Lasky jr., Hugo Butler. 

Western, a tale of the covered-wagon 
days. 

Rio Rita 

Cast: Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Kathryn Gray- 
son, John Carroll. Producer: Pandro S. Berman. 
Director: S. Sylvan Simon. Original: No Credits. 
Screenplay: No Credits. 

Modernized version of the famous 
musical comedy, filmed once before 
during early talking-picture days. 

Salute to the Marines 

Cast: Wallace Beery (Incomplete). Producer: 
John W. Considine jr. Director: Not Set. Original: 
Robert D. Andrews. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Wallace Beery will portray a tough 
American sergeant of marines who leads 
a Filipino contingent against the Jap- 
anese in the invasion attempt in Luzon. 

Ship Ahoy 

Cast: Eleanor Powell, Red Skelton, Bert Lahr, 
Virginia O'Brien, Tommy Dorsey and His Or- 
chestra. Producer: Jack (Summings. Director: Ed- 
ward Buzzell. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: 
No Credits. 

Musical comedy in which Eleanor 
Powell portrays a chorus girl on a va- 
cation cruise. She discovers some spies 
and manages to capture them by tap- 
ping out a message in Morse code with 
her dancing feet. 

Six Girls in Uniform 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: George Haight. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: Robert Hopkins. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

Depicts the adventures of girls work- 
ing in defense plants to do their bit for 
their country. 

Somewhere I'll Find You 

Cast: Clark Gable, Lana Turner, Robert Ster- 
ling, Patricia Dane. Producer: Pandro S. Ber- 
man. Director: Wesley Ruggles. Original: No 
Credits. Screenplay: Gene Fowler. 

Paula Dane (Lana Turner), cub re- 
porter, becomes famous as a correspon- 
dent in the Orient. She worships at 
the shrine of Johnny Davis (Clark 
Gable), senior of the brother team of 
Johnny and Kirk Davis (Robert Ster- 
ling), for years top war correspondents 
in various parts of the world. She wins 
Johnny’s love, but not without diligent 
competition from a society girl (Patri- 
cia Dane) . 

The Stranger 

Ca"t: Robert Young (Tentative, incomplete). 
Producer: Louis K. Sidney. Director: Not Set. 
Original: Clarence Upson Young. Screenplay: 
No Credits. 

The leading character, a stranger, 
enters a frontier town, where he is sus- 
pected of being a notorious outlaw. 


112 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


FRANK CAPRA 

MR. DEEDS GOES TO TOWN 

BLUE RIBBON AWARD, APRIL, 193S 

LOST HORIZON 

BLUE RIBBON AWARD, SEPTEMBER, 1937 

YOU CAN'T TAKE IT WITH YOU 

BLUE RIBBON AWARD, OCTOBER, 1938 

MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON 

BLUE RIBBON AWARD, OCTOBER, 1939 

CURRENT RELEASE: 

ARSENIC and OLD LACE 


JACK BENNY 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


113 




There is a mystery twist to the story 
concerning the stranger’s true identity. 

Strictly Platonic 

Cast: Norma Shearer, Robert Taylor, George 
Sanders, Frank McHugh (Incomplete). Producer: 
J. Walter Ruben. Director: George Cukor. Ori- 
ginal: Jacques Duval. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Miss Shearer portrays a woman who 
fears her infatuation for a playboy 
(Robert Taylor) and tries to escape, 
later to regret her decision. 

Sunday Punch 

Cast: William Lundigan, Jean Rogers, J. Car- 
rol Naish, Sam Levene, Rags Ragland. Producer: 
Irving Starr. Director: David Miller. Original: 
Michael and Fay Kanin. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Drama of the prize ring. 

Tarzan Against the World 

Cast: Johnny Weissmuller, Maureen O'Sulli- 
van, John Sheffield, Paul Kelly, Charles Bick- 
ford. Producer: Frederick Stephani. Director: 
Richard Thorpe. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

In which the ape-man doffs his leop- 
ard-skin for mufti and ventures forth 
into civilization. 

Teach Me to Live 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Bernard P. Fineman. 
Director: Not Set. Original: Forbes Parkhill. 
Screenplay: Maurice Geraghty. 

This western is based on incidents in 
the advance of white men in Colorado, 
the story placing five persons in a bar- 
ricade under vicious attacks by Ute In- 
dians. Each of the group reacts dif- 
ferently to the threat of impending 
death and life assumes new meaning for 
all of them. 

That Was No Lady 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Pandro S. Berman. 
Director: Not Set. Original: Paul Jarrico, Rich- 
ard Collins. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Concerns Lee Anthony, a fascinating 
and clever lady editor, who takes over 
a varied chain of publications, includ- 
ing a big-game magazine presided over 
by virile Jed Blake. 

Thin Man (Untitled) 

Cast: William Powell, Myrna Loy (Incomplete). 
Producer: Not Set. Director: Not Set. Original 
Screenplay: Robert Riskin. 

Continues the sleuthing adventures of 
Nick Charles (William Powell) and the 
irrepressible Mrs. Charles (Myrna Loy). 

Tortilla Flat 

Cast: Spencer Tracy, John Garfield, Hedy La- 
marr, Akim Tamiroff, Henry O'Neill. Producer: 
Sam Zimbalist. Director: Victor Fleming. Origi- 
nal: John Steinbeck. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Concerns the adventures of Danny, 
the Mexican of Monterey, Calif., and 
his friends — based on the best-selling 
novel by John Steinbeck. 

We Were Dancing 

Cast: Norma Shearer, Melvyn Douglas, Gail 
Patrick, Lee Bowman, Marjorie Main, Alan Mow- 
bray, Reginald Owen. Producers: Robert Z. 
Leonard, Orville O. Dull. Director: Robert Z. 
Leonard. Original: Noel Coward. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

Princess Vicki (Norma Shearer) is a 
“Millionnaire tramp,” a noble refugee 
who dresses like a queen and hasn’t a 
thin dime in her purse. She lives off 
the idle rich and her ambition in life 
is to wed a wealthy American. But 
when she meets the equally penniless 
Baron Nicki (Melvyn Douglas) it’s love 
at first sight. 

Woman of the Year 

Cast: Spencer Tracy, Katharine Hepburn, Fay 
Bainter, Reginald Owen, Minor Watson, Roscoe 
Karns, Gran: Withers. Producer: Joseph Mankie- 
wicz. Director: George Stevens. Original: Ring 
Lardner jr., Michael Kanin. 


Tracy portrays a tough, two-fisted 
sports writer who meets and feuds with 
the sophisticated girl who writes the 
international column on the same pa- 
per — Miss Hepburn. They soon discover 
that they have only one thing in com- 
mon — love. 

A Yank on the Burma Road 

Cast: Laraine Day, Barry Nelson, Stuart 

Crawford, Keye Luke, Sen Yung. Producer: 
Samuel Marx. Director: George B. Seitz. Origi- 
nal: No Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Joe (Barry Nelson) pilots supplies 
over the Burma Road. He agrees to 
take Gail (Laraine Day), who has been 
refused entry into China, over the bor- 
der in his truck, where she is seeking 
her husband. He finds her husband has 
been captured by guerillas, but before 
Joe can save him he dies. Gail and Joe 
then return to America. 

The Youngest Profession 

Cast: Virginia Weidler (Incomplete). Pro- 

ducer: Irving Asher. Director; Not Set. Original: 
No Credits. Screenplay: Lillian Day, Ethel 
Frank. 

Comedy of family life, serving as a 
starring vehicle for adolescent Virginia 
Weidler. 


MONOGRAM 


Arizona Roundup 

Cast: Tom Keene, Sugar Dawn, Frank Yacon- 
elli (Incomplete). Producer-Director: Robert 
Tansey. Original: Frances Kavanaugh, Robert 
Emmett. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Seventh in the 1941-42 series of west- 
erns starring Tom Keene. 

Aunt Emma Paints the Town 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Lindsley Parsons. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: Harry Hervey. Screen- 
play: Edmond Kelso. 

Comedy, based on a story by the au- 
thor of “Anthony Adverse.” 

The Avenging Rider 

Cast: Tom Keene (Incomplete). Producer-Di- 
rector: Robert Tansey. Original: Frances Kava- 
naugh. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Another boots-and-saddles adventure 
starring Tom Keene. 

Below the Border 

Cast: Buck Jones, Tim McCoy, Raymond Hat- 
ton (Incomplete). Producer: Scott R. Dunlap. Di- 
rector: Howard Bretherton. Original: No Credits. 
Screenplay: No Credits. 

Further frontier adventures of the 
“Rough Ridei’s.” 

Black Beauty 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Lindsley Parson. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: Anna Sewall. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

Another film version of the children’s 
classic about a horse. 

Black Dragons 

Cast: Bela Lugosi, Joan Barclay, Clayton Moore, 
Robert Frazer. Producer: Sam Katzman. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: Robert Kehoe. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

Horror melodrama. 

Down Texas Way 

Cast: Buck Jones, Tim McCoy, Raymond Hat- 
ton (Incomplete). Producer: Scott R. Dunlap. 
Director: Not Set. Original: Jess Bowers. Screen- 
play: Jess Bowers. 

Sixth in the “Rough Riders” series 
of westerns. 

Frontier Law 

Cast: Tom Keene (Incomplete). Producer: Rob- 
ert Tansey. Director: Robert 'Tansey. Original: 
No Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 


Further sagebrush adventures with 
Tom Keene as the hero. 

Ghost Town Law 

Cast: Buck Jones, Tim McCoy, Raymond Hat- 
ton (Incomplete). Producer: Scott R. Dunlap. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original Screenplay: Jess Bowers. 

Another in the frontier series star- 
ring the “Range Busters.” 

Here Come the Marines 

Cast: Wallace Ford, Toby Wing, Grant With- 
ers, Sheila Lynch. Producer: George A. Hirli- 
man. Director: Louis Gasnier. Original: No 
Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Lieut. Steve Landers (Wallace Ford) 
of the U. S. Army Air Corps has per- 
fected a new airplane bomb release 
known only to two of his mechanic 
friends. An enemy agent attempts to 
steal the plans from the safe in the 
home of Steve’s fiancee (Toby Wing), 
but fails. On another try he succeeds, 
but arouses Steve’s suspicions and is 
caught before he can escape. 

I'm an American 

Cast: East Side Kids (Incomplete). Producer; 
Sam Katzman. Director: Not Set. Original 
Screenplay: Barney Sarecky. 

In which the East Side Kids join the 
U. S. Navy. 

Klondike Victory 

Cast: Edmund Lowe, Lucille Fairbanks, Wil- 
Ii«m Henry, Dick Purcell, Ralph Morgan. Pro- 
ducers: Maurice and Franklin King. Director; 
William K. Howard. Original Screenplay: Henry 
Blankfort. 

Melodrama with an Alaskan locale. 

Land of the Sky Blue Water 

Cast: John Boles (Incomplete). Producer: Not 
Set. Director: Not Set. Original: Based on the 
song by Charles Wakefield Cadman. Screen- 
play: Berne Giler. 

John Boles will sing at least two 
songs, the title number and “At Dawn- 
ing,” in this musical romance. 

Law of the Jungle 

Cast: Mantan Moreland, Montague Shaw, 

Theodore Chaliapin (Incomplete). Producer; 
Lindsley Parsons. Director: Jean Yarbrough. 
Original Screenplay: George Bricker. 

The locale of this adventure melo- 
drama is the jungle borderland of 
South Africa. 

Man With Two Lives 

Cast: Edward Norris (Incomplete). Producer: 
A. W. Hackel. Director: Phil Rosen. Original: 
Joseph Hoffman. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Domestic comedy drama. 

Maxwell Archer, Detective 

Cast: John Loder, Leueen MacGrath, Athole 
Stewart, Marta LaBarr, George Merritt, Ronald 
Adam. Producer: William Sistrom. Director: John 
Paddy Carstairs. Original: Hugh Clevely. Screen- 
play: Katherine Strueby, Hugh Clevely. 

Amateur Detective Maxwell Archer 
(John Loder) is always getting in Scot- 
land Yard’s way. Having identified the 
members of a spy ring, Archer pays 
their leader, Simon Retlow, a visit only 
to find him dead and robbed of ten 
thousand pounds. Archer phones Scot- 
land Yard and then leaves the scene 
of the crime. Archer becomes involved 
in the theft and later in the abduc- 
tion of Sarah (Leueen MacGrath) but 
he proves his innocence and slips away, 
contributing 10,000 pounds to an orph- 
anage fund. 

Midnight Blackout 

Cast: Not Set. Producers: Maurice and Frank- 
lin King. Director: Not Set. Original: No Credits. 
Screenplay: No Credits. 

Story of the Pacific Coast during 
Japanese invasion threats. 

Mr. Wise Guy 

Cast: East Side Kids, Billy Gilbert, Douglas 
Fowley, Warren Hymer, Benny Rubin. Producer: 


114 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 



SIDNEY TOLER 


Management: 

Bill Woolfenden 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


115 


Sam Katzman. Director: William Nigh. Original 
Screenplay: Sam Robins, Jack Henley, Harvey 
Gates. 

Another in the series of comedy- 
melodi’amas concerning the adventures 
of the irrepressible “East Side Kids.” 

The Road to Happiness 

Cast: John Boles, Mona Barrie, Billy Lee, Ros- 
coe Karns, Lillian Elliott, Paul Porcasi. Pro- 
ducer: Scott R. Dunlap. Director: Phil Rosen. 
Original: Matt Taylor. Screenplay: Robert D. 
Andrews. 

When John Boles, an opera singer, 
goes abroad to improve his voice, his 
wife, Mona Barrie, divorces him and 
puts their son, Billy Lee, in a military 
school. Boles, returning broke, takes 
his boy away and sets out to crash ra- 
dio — winding up with a job on a serial 
program. When a great singer is too 
ill to go on the air. Boles steps in and 
makes a hit. 

Rock River Renegades 

Cast: Ray Corrigan, John King, Max Terhune 
(The Range Busters), (Christine MacIntyre. Pro- 
ducer: George W. Weeks. Director: S. Roy 
Luby. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

In which that trio of buc karoos, the 
Range Busters, hop into the saddle in 
search of more frontier adventures — 
and find them. 

She's in the Army Nov/ 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: T. H. Richmond. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: Robert Kehoe. Screen- 
play: Sidney Sheldon. 

Concerns the important part played 
by women in the current war crisis. 

Snuffy Smith, the Yard Bird 

Cast: Bud Duncan, Edgar Kennedy, Sarah 
Padden, Andraia Palmer, J. Farrell MacDonald. 
Producer: Edward Gross. Director: Edward 

Cline. From comic strip by Billy DeBeck. 

Snuffy Smith, hillbilly, is forever 
dodging revenue agents, headed by 
Cooper (Edgar Kennedy). Snuffy de- 
cides to join the army, but is rejected. 
However, he is allowed to join as a 
“Yard Bird,” or servant around the 
camp. When he arrives, he finds 
Cooper, the revenuer, is his superior. 
Don, another hillbilly in the army, has 
invented a range-finder. Snuffy gets 
tired of the army and leaves. Some 
fifth columnists have managed to steal 
Don’s range finder. They hide it in 
Snuffy’s kit. The army maneuvers are 
held near Snuffy’s home. The general, 
realizing Snuffy knows the mountains 
thoroughly, summons him for advice. 
The fifth columnists have followed 
Snuffy, but Lowazie (Sarah Padden) 
manages to capture them. 

Yellow Menace 

CasH Not Set. Producer: Sam Katzman. Direc- 
tor: William Nigh. Original Screenplay: Harvey 
Gates. 

Melodrama concerning the U. S. -Jap- 
anese war. 


PARAMOUNT 


Across the Border 

Cast: Bill Boyd, Bill George, Ella Boros, Chris- 
Pin Martin, Producer: Harry Sherman. Director: 
Not Set. Original: Clarence E. Mulford. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

A Mexican adventure, 42nd in the 
“Hopalong Cassidy” series. 

Alaskan Outpost 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set Director: 
Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: F. 
Hugh Herbert. 

Story of U. S. defense outposts in the 
Arctic. 


American Empire 

Cast: Richard Dix, Leo Carrillo, Preston 
Foster, Frances Gifford, Robert Barrat, Jack La 
Rue, Chris-Pin Martin, Guinn Williams. Pro- 
ducer: Harry Sherman. Director: William Mc- 
Gann. Original: Gladys Atwater. Screenplay: 
J. Walter Bren. 

This western deals with the romantic 
story of early Texas, based on authen- 
tic history found in journals of the pe- 
riod before it was admitted as a state in 
the Union. 

Angel in Furs 

Cast: Dorothy Lamour (Tentative, incomplete). 
Producer: Not Set. Director: Not Set. Original: 
No Credits. Screenplay: Michael Hogan. 

Story of Alaska and of the nurses who 
brave death in the frozen wastes to save 
lives. 

Bahama Passage 

Cast: Madeleine Carroll, Stirling Hayden, 

Flora Robson, Leo G. Carroll, Mary Anderson, 
Cecil Kellaway, Leigh Whipper, Dorothy Dan- 
bridge. Producer-Director: Edward H. Griffith. 
Screenplay: Virginia Van Upp. Original: Nelson 
Hayes. 

Filmed on Salt Cay, tiny speck of an 
island, and Harbor Island, in the far- 
distant Bahamas. This is the romance 
of a young man on an island where his 
family’s business is salt mining. His 
marriage, like those of other men in his 
family before him, breaks up because on 
this barren, bleak island there has never 
been any romance possible. But to the 
island comes a beautiful girl, daughter 
of a scoundrel who has become over- 
seer in order to cheat the salt-mining 
family. Through action, suspense and 
tragedy, the villain is thwarted and the 
boy and the girl find true love even on 
such a spot. 

Beyond the Blue Horizon 

Cast: Dorothy Lamour, Richard Denning, Jack 
Haley, Helen Gilbert, Walter Abel, Patricia 
Morison, Abner Biberman, Elizabeth Patterson. 
Producer: Monta Bell. Director: Alfred Santell. 
Original: E. Lloyd Sheldon, Jack De Witt. 
Screenplay: Frank Butler, Harry Tugend. 

Dorothy Lamour is back to the sa- 
rong. playing a white girl found in the 
, ungle with a playful ape and a fero- 
cious tiger as her pets. This picture 
is made in Technicolor. The story 
opens in the United States with the 
boy and girl in civilization, then takes 
them back to the jungle and the menace 
of an insane elephant. 

The Black Curtain 

Cast: Burgess Meredith, Claire Trevor, Frieda 
Inescort, Jerome Cov/an, Sheldon Leonard. Pro- 
ducer: Burt Kelly. Director: Jack Hively. Orig- 
inal: Cornell Woolrich. Screenplay: Garrett Ford. 

Burgess Meredith portrays a man who 
has been an amnesia victim for three 
years, and who recovers his memory 
only to find he is accused of murder. 

Botany Bay 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: 
Not Set. Original: Charles Nordhoff, James 
Norman Hall. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Another tale of the South Seas by 
the authors of “Mutiny on the Bounty” 
and “Hurricane.” It will be filmed in 
Technicolor. 

Caprice 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: 
Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: 
George Beck. 

Musical, the story of a ballet star. 

Connie Goes Home 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: 
Not Set. Original: Edv/ard Childs Carpenter. 
Screenplay: No Credits. 

Comedy, from an oldtime Broadway 
stage hit. 


Dancing Debs 

Cast: Susanna Foster (Incomplete). Producer: 
Not Set. Director: Not Set. Original: No Credits. 
Screenplay: Vera Caspary, F. Hugh Herbert. 

In this musical comedy Susanna Pos- 
ter portrays a young Junior Leaguer 
who joins with a group of other debs in 
an entertainment tour of the country 
in a deluxe trailer for charity. 

Dr. Broadway 

Cast: Macdonald Carey, Jean Phillips, J. 
Carrol Naish, Eduardo Ciannelli, Richard Lane, 
Joan Woodbury, Warren Hymer. Producer: Sol. 
C. Siegel. Director: Anton Mann. Original: 
Borden Chase. Screenplay: Art Arthur. 

Comedy-melodrama filled with the 
colorful characters along Broadway. 
Carey is a physician who knows the 
Great White Way from one end to an- 
other. Miss Phillips is his receptionist. 
A man he had sent to prison and who 
is now dying, asks Carey to locate a 
daughter and give her a fortune. But 
others think they have claims on the 
fortune — and it takes all of doc’s pals 
to block their plans. 

The Fleet's In 

Cast: Dorothy Lamour, William Holden, Eddie 
Bracken, Betty Hutton, Cass Daley, Gil Lamb, 
Leif Erikson, Jimmy Dorsey's Band. Producer: 
Paul Jones. Director: Victor Schertzinger. Origi- 
nal: Monte Brice, J. Walter Ruben. From a play 
by Kenyon Nicholson, Chas. Robinson. Screen- 
play: Walter DeLeon, Sid Silvers, Ralph Spence, 

A battle between a Shakespeare- 
reading sailor who finds himself the 
lady-killingest man in the fleet, and 
the gal singer who has never been 
kissed. Dorothy Lamour tops the list 
of feminine entertainers, with Betty 
Hutton and Cass Daley on hand, while 
Bill Holden, Eddie Bracken, Leif Erik- 
son and Gil Lamb don navy uniforms. 
Jimmy Dorsey and his band provide the 
music. 

Fly By Night 

Cast: Nancy Kelly, Richard Carlson, Albert 
Basserman, Martin Koslek, Walter Kingsford, 
Nestor Paiva. Producer: Sol C. Siegel. Director: 
Robert Siodmak. Screenplay: Jay Dratler. Orig- 
inal: Ben Roberts, Sidney Sheldon. 

Richard Carlson, a young interne, 
gets tangled up in a murder accidentally 
and finds himself being hounded by po- 
lice. In escaping he forces Nancy Kelly, 
"n artist, to flee with him, using novel 
twists on methods used to elude police. 
Albert Basserman and Martin Koslek, 
European actors, appear in supporting 
roles as the villains. 

For Whom the Bell Tolls 

Cast: Akim Tamiroff (Incomplete). Producer: 
B. G. DeSylva. Director: Sam Wood. Original: 
Ernest Hemingway. Screenplay: Dudley Nichols'. 

From Hemingway’s famous novel 
about the recent revolution in Spain. 

The Forest Rangers 

Cast: Fred MacMurray, Paulette Goddard, 
Lynne Overman, Susan Hayward, Albert Dek- 
ker. Producer: Robert Sisk. Director: George 
Marshall. Original: Thelma Strabel. Screenplay: 
Harold Shumate. 

Adapted from a Cosmopolitan Maga- 
zine novel, to be filmed in Technicolor. 
Miss Goddard portrays a backwoods girl 
who rivals the city-bred girl for the 
affections of MacMurray, the ranger. 

Frenchman's Creek 

Cast: Not Set. Producer-Director: Edward H. 
Griffith. Original: Daphne Du Maurier. Screen- 
play: Edwin Justus Mayer. 

A story of piracy, by the author of 
“Rebecca” and “Jamaica Inn.” 

The Glass Key 

Cast: Brian Donlevy, Alan Ladd (Incomplete). 
Producer: Not Set. Director: Stuart Heisler. Orig- 
inal: Dashiell Hammett. Screenplay: Jonathan 
Latimer. 

From the mystery novel of the same 


116 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


WILLIAM KEIGHLEY 

Director 

Current Release: 

'THE MAN WHO CAME TO DINNER" 



WILLIAM H. 

PINE WILLIAM C. THOMAS 


Producing tor 






m 


Current Releases: 

In Production: 

Preparing: 

"NO HANDS ON THE CLOCK" "I LIVE ON DANGER" 

"WRECKING CREW" 

"TORPEDO BOAT" 

"WILDCAT" 

"INTERCEPTOR COMMAND" 


BOXOFFICE BAHOMETER 117 


name by Dashiell Hammett, author of 
"The Thin Man” and “The Maltese 
Falcon.’” 

The Good Fellow 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Sol C. Siegel. Direc- 
tor: Not Set. Original: George S. Ksufman, Her- 
man Mankiewicz. Screenplay: Muriel Roy Bolton, 
Joseph Krumgold. 

Comedy, based on the Broadway stage 
success of the same name. 

The Great Man's Lady 

Cast: Barbara Stanwyck, Joel McCraa, Brian 
Donlevy, Katherine Stevens, Thurston Hall, Lloyd 
Corrigan. Producer: William A. Wellman. Di- 
rector: William A. Wellman. Original Screen- 
play: Adela Rogers St. Johns and Seena Owen, 
based on a short story by Vina Delmar. 

A saga of the early West and the un- 
seen part a woman plays in helping 
her man achieve a greatness which will 
last through the ages. Joel McCrea is 
a hero in buckskins. The story is from 
Vina Delmar’s widely-discussed short 
story. 

Happy Go Lucky 

Cast: Mary Martin, Eddie Bracken, Rudy 
Vallee. Producer: Not Set. Director: Not Set. 
Original: Michael Uris. Screenplay: Frank 

Cavett, Melvin Frank, Norman Panama. 

Musical comedy, its setting an isle 
in the Caribbean Sea. 

Henry Aldrich, Editor 

Cast: Jimmy Lydon, John Litel (Incomplete).. 
Producer: Jules Schermer. Director: Hugh Ben- 
nett. Original: Based on characters created by 
Clifford Goldsmith. Screenplay: Muriel Roy 
Bolton. 

In which Hem-y Aldrich decides to 
establish himself as a member of the 
Fourth Estate, with results that are 
not too satisfactory, from his stand- 
point. 

Henry Aldrich Gets Glamour 

Cast: Jimmy Lydon, John Litel (Incomplete). 
Producer: Not Set. Director: Not Set. Original: 
Aline Leslie. Screenplay: Aline Leslie. Based on 
characters created by Cliflord Goldsmith. 

Another in the series relating the 
adventures of that typical American 
boy, Henry Aldrich, of stage, screen and 
radio renown. 

Henry and Dizzy 

Cast: Jimmy Lydon, Mary Anderson, Charles 
Smith, John Litel, Olive Blakeney, Eleanor 
Counts. Producer: Sol C. Siegel. Director: Hugh 
Bennett. Original: Val Burton. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

Second in the 1941-42 series of Henry 
Aldrich escapades produced by Sol. C. 
Siegel for Paramount and starring Jim- 
my Lydon in the title role. Through 
the inspiration of a girl (Mary Ander- 
son) Henry is induced to become a 
salesman. He gets involved with vac- 
uum cleaners, motor boats and a fa- 
ther-son race at a picnic for which 
he hires a father, Warren Hymer. De- 
velopments put Henry more and more 
on the spot especially since he is com- 
pelled to pay for a motor boat which 
he destroys by accident, but all turns 
out well. 

Holiday Inn 

Cast: Bing Crosby, Fred Astaire, Virginia 
Dale, Marjorie Reynolds, Walter Abel, Louise 
Beavers, Marek Windheim, John Gallaudet, 
James Bell. Producer-Director: Mark Sandrich. 
Sreenplay: Claude Binyon. Adopted by Elmer 
Rice from Original Idea by Irving Berlin. 

The story deals with Crosby’s idea of 
operating a rustic inn where meals are 
served and entertainment provided only 
on the fifteen holidays of each year, 
Bing loafing on the remaining 350 days. 
Miss Reynolds .joins Bing in the finale 
as a life partner in the entertaining 
and loafing. 

Hong Kong 

Cast: Charles Boyer, Veronica Lake (Incom- 
plete). Producer: Arthur Hornblow jr. Director: 


Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: Joan 
Harrison, Ellis St, Joseph. 

Intrigue and romance in the English 
settlement in China, now captured by 
the Japanese. 

I Live on Danger 

Cast: Chester Morris, Jean Parker, Ralph San- 
ford, Roger Pryor, Elisabeth Risdon, Eddie Norris, 
Douglas Fowley. Producers: William H, Pine, 
William C. Thomas. Director: Sam White. Orig- 
inal: Alex Gottlieb. Screenplay: Maxwell Shane, 
Richard Murphy, Lewis R. Foster. 

Story of a radio spot news commen- 
tator, Chester Morris. He and Jean 
Parker are placed in many adventures 
ranging from boat explosions to city- 
size fires. 

I Married a Witch 

Cast: Veronica Lake, Joel McCrea, Patricia 
Morison, Walter Abel. Producer: Not Set. Direc- 
tor: Rene Clair. Original: Thorne Smith, Norman 
Matson. Screenplay: Robert Pirosh, Dalton 
Trumbo. 

Joel McCrea portrays a prosaic small- 
city millionaire whose dull existence is 
turned topsy-turvy following his mar- 
riage to a modern witch (Veronica 
Lake), whom he has rescued — sans 
clothing — from a hotel fire. 

Interceptor Command 

Cast: Richard Arlen (Incomplete). Producers: 
William H. Pine, William C. Thomas. Director: 
Not Set. Original: Maxwell Shane. Screenplay: 
No Credits. 

Deals with the operations of the In- 
terceptor Command and its various 
units in warding off enemy aerial and 
fifth-column activity in America. 

Lady Bodyguard 

Cast: Robert Preston, Ellen Drew (Incomplete). 
Producer: Not Set. Director: Not Set. Original: 
Vera Caspary. Screenplay: F. Hugh Herbert, 
Edmund L. Hartmann. 

Ellen Drew sells Robert Preston, a test 
pilot, a $1,000,000 insurance policy and 
then has to assume the job of guard- 
ing him from danger. 

The Lady Has Plans 

Cast: Paulette Goddard, Ray Milland, Roland 
Young, Margaret Hayes, Albert Dekker, Cecil 
Kellaway, Addison Richards. Producer: Fred 
Kohlmar. Director: Sidney Lanfield. Original: 
Leo Birinski. Screenplay: Harry Tugend. 

This is a broad spy comedy — the 
story of an American radio commen- 
tator (Ray Milland) in Lisbon. Paul- 
ette Goddard, American newspaper 
woman, is assigned as his assistant in 
tracking down international news stor- 
ies. While in Lisbon, Miss Goddard’s 
identity gets mixed with that of red- 
haired Margaret Hayes who portrays 
an American racketeer in the employ 
of a foreign spy ring. 

The Listening Post 

Cast: Robert Preston, Ellen Drew, Albert Dek- 
ker (Incomplete) Producer: Sol C. Siegel. Direc- 
tor: Not Set. Original: Edward Haldeman. Screen- 
play; Edward Haldeman, Jay Dratler. 

Concerns the unsung heroes of Amer- 
ican defense, those who man the iso- 
lated radio stations set up by the army 
and navy at unrevealed but strategic 
points, where groups listen in on al- 
most every conceivable wave length for 
messages and orders in code or spoken 
word transmitted by the enemy, and 
for radio beams indicating approach of 
enemy ships and nlanes. Locale of this 
story is the Pacific Northwest. 

Manhattan at Midnight 

Cast; Mary Martin (Incomplete). Producer: 
Not Set. Director: Not Set. Original: No Credits. 
Screenplay: Warren Duff. 

Musical comedy, set against a back- 
ground of radio activities. 

The Major and the Minor 

Cast: Ginger Rogers (Incomplete). Producer: 


Arthur Hornblow jr. Director: Not Set. Original 
Screenplay: Charles Brackett, Billy Wilder. 

Romantic comedy about a Cinderella 
girl and an army man. 

Merton of the Movies 

Cast: Eddie Albert, Marjorie Reynolds, Susanna 
Foster (Incomplete). Producer: Sol C. Siegel. 
Director: Ralph Murphy. Original: Harry Leon 
Wilson. Screenplay: Val Burton, Bradlord Ropes, 
Garrett Fort. 

Story of a country boy who makes 
good in Hollywood — the hard way. 
Filmed early in the 1920’s as a silent. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cugat 

Cast: Ray Milland, Betty Field, Patricia Mori- 
son, Eugene Pallette, Phil Terry, Richard Haydn, 
Charles Dingle, Leil Erikson. Producer: Fred 
Kohlmar. Director: Norman Taurog. Origina: 
Isabel Scott Rorick. Screenplay: Tess Slesinger, 
Frank Davis. 

Domestic comedy in which a dithery 
young couple who have been getting 
along fine and dandy come a cropper 
along about their second anniversary 
when wifey sticks her nose in hubby’s 
business affairs, and hubby’s old flame 
comes back to town. 

Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch 

Cast: Fay Bainter, Carolyn Lee, Hugh Herbert, 
Ellen Drew, Vera Vague, Phil Terry, Barbara 
Britton. Producer: Not Set. Director: Ralph Mur- 
phy. Original: Alice Hegan Rice. Screenplay: 
Doris Anderson, Art Arthur, F. Hugh Herbert, 
Maurice Leo. 

From the famed children’s classic by 
Alice Hegan Rice. This was previously 
filmed in the early days of talking pic- 
tures. 

My Favorite Blonde 

Cast: Bob Hope, Madeleine Carroll, Gale 
Sondergaard, George Zucco, Clem Wilenchick, 
Lionel Royce. Producer: Paul Jones. Director: 
Sidney Lantield. Original: Melvin Frank, Nor- 
man Panama. Screenplay: Don Hartman, Frank 
Butler. 

Hope is a vaudeville actor with a pen- 
guin for a partner, and who gets in- 
volved in Madeleine Carroll’s attempts 
to escape a band of German agents. 

My Heart Belongs to Daddy 

Cast: Martha O'Driscoll, Cecil Kellaway, Rich- 
ard Carlson, Frances Gifford. Producer: Not Set. 
Director: Robert Siodmak. Original; No Credits. 
Screenplay: F. Hugh Herbert. 

Depicts the life of young women gov- 
ernment workers in the capitol during 
the present national emergency. 

Night in New Orleans 

Cast: Preston Foster, Patricia Morison, Albert 
Dekker, Charles Butterworth, Jean Philips, Dooley 
Wilson. Producer: Sol C. Siegel. Director: Wil- 
liam Clemens. Screenplay: Jonathan Latimer. 
Original: James R. Langham. 

Preston Foster, a New Orleans de- 
tective, tries to recover some school- 
girl love letters written by wife Patri- 
cia Morison only to find that the re- 
cipient has been murdered just before 
Foster broke in. Suspicion turns on 
Foster, who finally captures the real 
crooks. 

No Hands on the Clock 

Cast: Chester Morris, Jean Parker, Rose Hobart, 
Dick Purcell, Astrid Allwyn, Rod Cameron, James 
Kirkwood. Producers: William H. Pine and 
William C. Thomas. Director: Frank McDonald. 
Original: Geoffrey Homes. Screenplay: Maxwell 
Shane. 

Comedy-mystery teaming for the first 
time Chester Morris and Jean Parker, 
and also after a ten-year absence bring- 
ing James Kirkwood, former stage fav- 
orite and silent-screen star, back to 
the screen in an important role. The 
story concerns a private detective and 
his wife who starts on a search for a 
missing person, during which several 
murders ensue before the surprise end- 
ing. This is the first in the new series 


118 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


FRANK LLOYD PRODUCTIONS 

INC 

FRANK LLOTD JACK H. SKIRBALL 


President 


present 


Vice-Presiden t 


• ■ m 



1941-42 



^ ^ ^ 

THE SPOILERS 

A Charles K. Feldman Group Production starring 

Marlene DIETRICH Randolph SCOTT John WAYNE 

with 

Richard BARTHELMESS Harrij CAREY Margaret LINDSAY 

From the Novel by Rex Beach Directed by Ray Enright 

Produced by FRANK LLOYD Associate Producer, Lee Marcus 

^ ^ ^ 

PRISCILLA LANE and ROBERT CUMMINGS 

in 

Allied cH^dcUooch^ 

"SABOTEUR' 

with 

NORMAN LLOYD OTTO KROGER 

ALAN BAXTER ANN SHOEMAKER 

Directed by ALFRED HITCHCOCK Associate Producer, JACK H. SKIRBALL 

-¥■ ■¥^ ■¥■ 

"THE INVISIBLE SPT^^ 




Released by 

UNIVERSAL PICTURES COMPANY, Inc. 


of six pictures Pine and Thomas are 
making for Paramount’s 1941-42 sched- 
ule. 

Out of the Frying Pan 

Cast: William Holden, Susan Hayward, Eddie 
Bracken, Robert Benchley, Martha O'Driscoll, 
Barbara Britton, Jim Brown. Producer-Director: 
Edward H. Griffith. Original: Francis Swann. 
Screenplay: Virginia Van Upp. 

Six hopeful Thespians share a Green- 
wich Village apartment and scheme to 
bring themselves to the attention of 
the stage producer (Robert Benchley) 
who occupies the apartment below them. 
Prom the original New York cast come 
Florence MacMichael and Mabel Paige. 

Outlaws of the Desert 

Cast: Bill Boyd, Brad King, Andy Clyde, 
Forest Stanley, Jean Phillips, Nina Guilbert. 
Producer: Harry Sherman. Director: Howard 
Bretherton. Original Screenplay: J. Benton 
Cheney, Bernard McConville, Based on char- 
acters created by Clarence E, Mulford, 

Hoppy, Johnny and California are 
sent to Arabia to buy horses from a 
sheik, who gives the trio the animals as 
a gift, thus saving Mr. Grant and his 
daughter Susan a goodly sum of money. 
Adventurers pose as brother and sister, 
trick Grant, and kidnap him for ran- 
som. Hoppy investigates for himself be- 
fore giving the Arabian kidnappers the 
money. He cleans up the lawless ele- 
ment, with the aid of Sheik Suleiman; 
helps the sheik fight off marauding at- 
tackers; and brings back the Grants 
and the horses for the Army Remount 
Service. 

Pacific Blackout 

Cast: Robert Preston, Martha O'Driscoll, Eva 
Gabor, Philip Merivale, Louis Jean Heydt. Pro- 
ducer: Sol C. Siegel. Director; Ralph Murphy. 
Original: Franz Spencer, Kurt Siodmak. Screen- 
play: Lester Cole, W. P. Lipscomb. 

First story to capitalize on the civil- 
ian defense situation in the United 
States. The picture deals with the at- 
tempts of a young inventor (Robert 
Preston), convicted of murder, to ef- 
fect his escape during a practice air 
raid and prove his innocence, aided by 
an adventure-loving telephone operator 
(Martha O’Driscoll). 

Pahaska 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Harry Sherman. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: No (Credits. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

Western. The story of Buffalo Bill. 

The Palm Beach Story 

Cast; Claudette Colbert, Joel McCrea, Rudy 
Vallee, Robert Dudley, Esther Howard, Franklin 
Pangborn, William Demarest. Producer: Paul 
Jones. Director: Preston Sturges. Original 
Screenplay: Preston Sturges. 

A young married couple, after five 
years of married life, find that they 
haven’t accomplished a thing in the 
world. She walks out on him, despite 
his protests, starts out to get her hus- 
band the $99,000 he needs for an en- 
gineering project, gets herself a divorce 
and a wealthy husband and only gets 
both of them and the rich suitor (Rudy 
Vallee) into a tangle of emotions, un- 
derstandings, and misunderstandings. 

Priorities of 1942 

Cast: Robert Preston, Ellen Drew, Betty Jane 
Rhodes, Cass Daley, (311 Lamb. Producer: Not 
Set. Director: Not Set. Original: No Credits, 
Screenplay: Frank Loesser, Art Arthur. 

Musical comedy with a national de- 
fense background, this will have a Pitts- 
burgh steel plant as its locale and will 
show men and women defense workers 
in their jobs. 

Ready Money 

Cast: Bob Hope, Victor Moore (Incomplete). 
Producer; Freid Kohlmar. Director: Not Set. 
Original: James Montgomery. Screenplay: Joseph 
Schranck. 


Comedy about Wall Street, reuniting 
the stars of “Louisiana Purchase.” 

Reap the Wild Wind 

Cast: Ray Milland, John Wayne, Paulette 
Goddard, Raymond Massey, Robert Preston, 
Susan Hayward, Lynne Overman, Walter Hamp- 
den, Louise Beaver. Producer-Director: Cecil B. 
DeMille. Screenplay: Alan Le May, Charles 
Bennett, Jesse Lasky, Jr. Original: Thelma 
Slrabel. 

An historic drama of America’s fight 
to rid the Florida Keys of piratical 
wreckers who preyed upon the “life- 
line” of her merchant marine 100 years 
ago — before the railroad era, when only 
the sailing ship lanes linked the At- 
lantic Coast commercially with the rich 
Mississippi Valley. Several hundred 
brilliantly-colored tropical fish, as well 
as three octopi and a number of sharks, 
were imported from Florida for the 
underwater scenes. 

Red Harvest 

Cast: Paulette Goddard, Brian Donlevy, Allan 
Ladd (Incomplete). Producer: Fred Kohlmar. 
Director: Not Set. Original: Dashiell Hammett. 
Screenplay; Jonathan Latimer. 

Traces the developments wliich occur 
when the financial overlord of a small 
American city calls in a tough and re- 
sourceful private detective to restore 
law and order and dispel the thugs and 
hoodlums who have taken over. 

The Remarkable Andrew 

Cast: William Holden, Ellen Drew, Brian Don- 
levy, Rod Cameron, Richard Webb, Spencer 
Chartiers. Producer: Richard Blumenthal. Direc- 
tor: Stuart Heisler. Original Screenplay: Dalton 
Trumbo. 

Andrew Long ( 'William Holden) is an 
honest, scrupulous young bookkeeper in 
Shale City Hall. When he discovers 
that his books do not balance and that 
the fault lies with his superiors’ shady 
dealings, he is thrown in jail on a 
trumped-up charge. Discouraged be- 
cause his love will not bloom while he 
is in prison, Andrew is visited by the 
spirits of famous historical personages, 
who are really flesh and blood ghosts 
of Andrew Jackson, Benjamin Franklin, 
George Washington and the rest. Under 
their tutelage, with his sweetheart (El- 
len Drew) thinking that he is berserk, 
he uncovers the evidence of his, own 
innocence and sends to their rightful 
punishment the villains. The ghosts go 
back to whence they came. 

Riders of the Timberline 

Cast: William Boyd, Brad King, Andy Clyde, 
J. Farrell McDonald, Eleanor Stewart, Anna Q. 
Nilsson. Producer: Harry Sherman. Director: Les- 
ley Selander. Original Screenplay: J. Benton 
Cheney. 

Hoppy, California and Johnny set 
out to the timber country to deliver 
money to Kerrigan, a lumber camp 
owner whose men have been aroused 
to leave him. En route, they encounter 
Kerrigan’s impulsive daughter, who has 
brought the “fighting forty” with her 
to work her father’s business. Many 
troubles arise accidentally at the lum- 
ber headquarters and Hoppy is looked 
upon as a blackguard emissary of tim- 
ber thieves. After a narrow escape from 
death, when the heavies attempt to 
break down the dam in order to lose 
the timber, Hoppy catches the crim- 
inals redhanded. 

The Road to Morocco 

Cast: Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, Dorothy La- 
mour, Dona Drake, Cilem Beuans. Producer; Not 
Set. Director: David Butler. Original Screenplay; 
Frank Butler, Don Hartman. 

In which the comedy stars of “The 
Road to Singapore” and “The Road to 
Z'^nzibar” go off on another geographi- 
cal spree. 


Satan Plays the Piano 

Cast: Not Set. Producer; Fred Kohlmar. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: George Beck. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

Musical comedy with a backstage 
locale. 

Secret of the Wastelands 

Cast: Bill Boyd, Brad King, Andy Clyde, Bar- 
bara Britton, Douglas Fowley, Keith Richards. 
Producer: Harry Sherman. Director: Derwin 
Abraham. Original: Clarence E. Mulford. Screen- 
play: Gerald Geraghty. 

Hoppy, Johnny and California at- 
tend an archeological expedition into 
the desert. Mysterious happenings oc- 
cur to warn them not to proceed fur- 
ther. When they trek on, pretty Jen- 
nifer is kidnapped without a trace. Hop- 
py discovers the hidden Chinese settle- 
ment in the midst of the desert, with 
a gold mine being worked by the Chin- 
ese, under the leadership of May Soohg. 
Jennifer has wandered into their hands 
by accident but she is unharmed and 
happy with the Chinese. Hoppy be- 
friends them, and advises that they 
register the mine with the United States 
Government. The expedition finds what 
it wants, the Chinese retain their set- 
tlement, and everyone is satisfied ex- 
cept Johnny Nelson — who was turned 
down by the girl scientist. 

Silver Queen 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Harry Sherman. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: J. Benton Cheney. 
Screenplay: Bernard Schubert, E. E. Paramore jr. 

Western, the story of a woman gam- 
bler in the roaring frontier days. 

Sky Over China 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: Not 
Set. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: Earl Fel- 
ton, Theodore Reeves. 

Drama of the war in the Orient. 

Sled Train 

Cast: Dorothy Lamour (Tentative, incomplete). 
Producer: Not Set. Director: Not Set. Original: No 
Credits. Screenplay: E. E. Paramore jr. 

Tale of U. S. Defense activities in 
present-day Alaska. 

Stick to Your Guns 

Cast: William Boyd, Brad King, Andy Clyde, 
Jacqueline Holt, Henry Hall, Joe Whitehead. 
Producer: Harry Sherman. Director: Lesley Se- 
lander. Original Screenplay: J. Benton Cheney. 

French McAllister, one of the former 
Bar-20 men, now operating a ranch on 
his own, is having considerable trouble 
with rustlers. He sends an appeal to 
his old boss. Buck Peters, who immedi- 
ately sends out a call to all of the 
former Bar-20 men. They, in turn, join 
with Hoppy, California and Johnny in 
a move to exterminate the outlaws who 
have their hideout somewhere in the 
forbidden Black Buttes. Hopalong’s 
identity is discovered just before the 
showdown, but through some quick 
thinking, fast riding and hard shoot- 
ing he and the others finally bring the 
rustlers to book. 

Storm 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: 
Not Set. Original: George R. Stewart. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

Book of the Month Club selection for 
December, 1941, the heroine of this 
novel is a devastating storm, a tor- 
rential downpour that sweeps across the 
Pacific, smashes down on San Francisco 
and the California coast and, trans- 
formed into a blizzard when it beats 
against the mountain ranges, buries 
mountain passes, power lines and rail 
road tracks under 20 feet of snow. 

Sullivan's Travels 

Cast: Joel McCrea, Veronica Lake, Robert 
Warwick, William Demarest, Franklin Pangborn, 


120 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 



Porter Hall. Producer: Paul Jones. Director: 
Preston Sturges. Original Screenplay: Preston 
Sturges. 

Preston Sturges’ fourth written-and- 
directed picture, the story of a young 
director of successful slapstick comedy 
(Joel McCrea), who wants to direct a 
great, tragic social document, an epic 
of misery, troubles, poverty and unem- 
ployment. When reminded that he 
knows nothing at all about such things, 
being a rich young man from his child- 
hood, he puts on a tramp’s outfit and 
goes out to see this sort of life. He 
meets a young girl who helps him be- 
cause he is a man, not a famous di- 
rector. Together, they go through num- 
erous adventures until he, alone, ac- 
tually runs up against personal trouble 
without being able to reveal his identity. 
In the end, he returns, realizing that 
there is a great place in the world for 
laughter and that comedy far surpasses 
all the great human documents in the 
world in helping the world to happiness. 

Sweater Girl 

Cast: Eddie Bracken, June Preisser, Phillip 
Terry, Frieda Inescort, Betty Jane Rhodes, Nils 
Asther, Ella Neal. Producer: Sol C. Siegel. 
Director: John Coonan. Screenplay: Eve Greene. 
Original: Beulah Marie Dix, Bertram Millhauser. 

This college campus mystery musical 
teams Eddie Bracken and June Preisser 
for the first time in the leads. The 
story deals with a group of college stu- 
dents putting on their spring campus 
review called “Sweater Girl.’’ Two of 
the students are murdered and the bal- 
ance of the story deals with attempts 
to solve the murder in the midst of 
rehearsals of the show within the show. 
Pour song numbers by Frank Loesser 
and Jule Styne are featured in the 
score. 

Take a Letter, Darling 

Cast: Rosalind Russell, Fred MacMurray, Fran- 
ces Farmer, Macdonald Carey, Robert Bench- 
ley, Cecil Kellaway, Charles E. Arnt. Pro- 
ducer: Fred Kohlmar. Director: Mitchell Leisen. 
Original: George Beck. Screenplay: Claude 

Binyon. 

A feminine advertising executive 
(Rosalind Russell) hires male secre- 
tary (Fred MacMurray) to pay atten- 
tion to the suspicious wives of her male 
clients. The complications develop when 
Miss Russell, after hiring MacMurray 
on condition that there be no romantic 
ideals on his part, falls in love with 
him. She sees herself apparently los- 
ing him to Miss Parmer, the sister of 
tobacco magnate Macdonald Carey, and 
agrees to marry Carey out of spite, 
only to regret her rash decision. 

Tex Guinan 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: Not 
Set. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: Claude 
Binyon. 

A biography, with music, of Tex 
Guinan, noted night club entertainer 
whose greatest fame was during the 
prohibition era. 

This Gun for Hire 

Cast: Veronica Lake, Robert Preston, Laird 
Cregar, Alan Ladd. Producer: Richard M. Blum- 
enthal. Director: Frank Tuttle. Original: Graham 
Greene. Screenplay: Albert Maltz, W. R. Bur- 
nett. 

A girl magician (Veronica Lake) is 
selected to get information on a sus- 
pected fifth columnist (Laird Cregar) 
and achieves success dynamically 
through the aid of a young killer (Alan 
Ladd), intent on murdering Cregar and 
the only man on earth who can piunp 
a confession from him. Through all 
this the girl’s sweetheart, a police de- 
tective (Robert Preston) is pursuing 
Ladd, who has made the girl a captive. 


Tombstone, the Town Too Tough 
to Die 

Cast: Richard Dix, Frances Gilford, Edgar 
Buchanan, Don Castle, Kent Taylor, Rex Bell. 
Producer: Harry Sherman. Director: William 
McGann. Original: Dean Franklin, Charles 
"Chuck" Reisner. Screenplay: Albert Shelby 
Levino, Edward E. Paramore, Jr. 

Story of a frontier marshal (Wyatt 
Earp) who employed his fists instead 
of guns to eliminate undemocratic prac- 
tices. The tale is based on true his- 
torical incidents taken directly from 
actual documents and old newspaper 
clippings in Tucson, Arizona. Most of 
the film was produced on outdoor loca- 
tions including Lone Pine, Long Valley, 
California, and Tucson. 

Torpetio Boat 

Cast: Richard Arlen, Jean Parker, Mary Car- 
lisle, Phil Terry, Dick Purcell, Ralph Sanford. 
Producers: William H. Pine and William C. 
Thomas. Director: John Rawlins. Original: No 
Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 

The story revolves around a torpedo 
boat which Arlen and Terry have in- 
vented. Terry meets and falls in love 
with Jean Parker, an ex-sweetheart of 
Arlen’s. Jean, a night club singer, comes 
between the two friends. Mary Car- 
lisle plays the romantic interest for Ar- 
len and Purcell. The story features 
many motor boat races and spills. 

Triumph Over Pain 

Cast: Joel McCrea (Incomplete). Producer: Not 
Set. Director; Preston Sturges. Original: Rene 
Fuelop Miller. Screenpla’y: Preston Sturges, 
Charles Brackett. 

The story of Dr. William Morton, 
Boston dentist, who is credited with the 
discovery of anaesthesia. 

True to Life 

Cast: Bing Crosby, Bob Hope (Incomplete). 
Producer: Not Set. Director: Not Set. Original: 
Ben and Sol Barzman, Bess Tafel. Screenplay; 
Dalton Trumbo. 

Comedy with a radio background, the 
principals a pair of young men who 
write and act in a popular radio fam- 
ily serial, and whose search for real 
human-interest situations involves them 
in a romance of their own. 

True to the Army 

Casf: Judy Conova, Allan Jones, Ann Miller, 
Jerry Colonna. Producer: Sol C. Siegel. Director: 
Albert S. Rogell. Original: Edward Hope, How- 
ard Lindsay. Screenplay: Arthur Arthur, Brad- 
ford Ropes. 

With Private Allan Jones as the pro- 
ducer and Jerry Colonna as his cohort, 
the army puts on its own show, with 
talent recruits from the ranks-plus, of 
course, the talents of Judy Canova, who 
hides out at the army post from pursu- 
ing gangsters; and the twinkling toes 
of Ann Miller, who steps up her tap 
dancing to match the firing pace of a 
machine gun. 

Twilight on the Trail 

Cast: William Boyd, Brad King, Andy Clyde, 
Jack Rockwell, Wanda McKay, Norma Willis. 
Producer: Harry Sherman. Director: Howard 
Bretherton. Original: Cecile Kramer, Ellen Han- 
sen Corby. Screenplay: J. Benton (iheney. 

A rancher has his hands full because 
of mysterious cattle rustlers so he sends 
for Hopalong Cassidy and his two side 
kicks, Johnny Nelson and California 
Carlson, to try to solve the mystery. 
Hopalong soon discovers the rancher’s 
foreman is the actual leader of the 
heavies and learns how the cattle are 
led into a hidden valley between the 
hills. Hoppy manages to get himself 
captured with California and Johnny, 
then breaks a glass, cuts his bonds and 
wipes out the entire gang. 


Very Hot in Haiti 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: Not 
Set. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: Walter 
DeLeon, Arthur Phillips, Zora Neal Huston. 

Musical comedy with a West Indies 
locale. 

Wake Island 

Cast: Fred MacMurray, William Holden, Brian 
Donlevy, Macdonald Carey, Robert Preston, 
Lynne (Dverman. Producer: Joseph Sistrom. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: Joseph Sistrom. Screen- 
play: W. R. Burnett, Sloan Nibley. 

Dramatizes the defense of the tiny 
Pacific outpost by a small force of 
U. S. Marines against repeated attacks 
by Japanese naval and air forces. 

Wildcat 

Cast: Richard Arlen, William Frawley, Elisha 
Cook jr., Buster Crabbe, William Hall. Pro- 
ducers: William H. Pine, William C. Thomas. 
Director: Frank McDonald. Original: No Credits. 
Screenplay: Maxwell Shane, Richard Murphy. 

Melodrama of the Texas oil fields. 

Wrecking Crew 

Cast: Richard Arlen, Jean Parker, Chester 
Morris, Arline Judge. Producers: William H. Pine, 
William C. Thomas. Director: Not Set. Original: 
Robert Shannon, Mauri Grashin. Screenplay: 
Richard Murphy. 

Adventure melodrama about the 
house-wrecking trade. 

You Go Your Way 

Cast: Not Set. Producer-Director: Edward H. 
Griffith. Original: Katharine Brush. Screenplay: 
Jeanne Bartlett, Dale Eunson. 

Sophisticated comedy romance with 
a New York background. 


PRODUCERS 


Broadway Big Shot 

Cast: Ralph Byrd, Virginia Vale, William Hal- 
ligan, Dick Rush, Herbert Rawlinson, Sfubby 
Kruger, Joe Ookie. Producer: Jed Buell. Direc- 
tor: William Beaudine. Original Screenplay: 
Martin Mooney. 

Jimmy (Ralph Byrd), ex-All-Ameri- 
can grid star and ace reporter, allows 
himself to be framed and sent to prison 
so he can get the inside on a news story 
from a convict. When he arrives, he 
discovers the convict has died. But the 
governor, whom he had counted on for 
quick pardon, has been defeated for re- 
election and Jimmy finds he has to get 
his story the hard way in order to get 
out. There is a romance between him 
and the warden’s daughter, Betty (Vir- 
ginia Vale) and, of course, he succeeds 
in getting the story and freeing himself. 

Girls Town 

Cast: Edith Fellows, June Storey, Alice White, 
Warren Hymer. Producers: Lou Brock, Jack 
Schwarz. Director: Victor Halperin. Original 
Screenplay: Jean Kerr, Victor McLeod. 

Exploitation melodrama, its cast pre- 
dominantly feminine. 

Law of the Timber 

Cast: Marjorie Reynolds, Monte Blue, J. Far- 
rell MacDonald, Hal Brozeal, Sven-Hugo Borg. 
Producer: B. B. Ray. Director: B. B. Ray. Origi- 
nal: James Oliver Curwood. Screenplay: Jack 
Natteford. 

Concerns skullduggery in the timber 
country, the villainy thwarted by a 
courageous girl (Marjorie Reynolds) 
and a tenderfoot (Hal Brazeal). 

Lone Rider in Cheyenne 

Cast: George Houston, A1 St. John, Dennis 
Moore, Ella Neal, Roy Barcroft. Producer: Sig- 
mund Neufeld. Director: Sam Newfield. Orig- 
inal Screenplay: Olive Drake. 

Second in the series of musical west- 
erns for 1942. 

Men of San Quentin 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: 
Not Set. Original Screenplay: Martin Mooney. 

Prison melodrama. 


122 


BOXOFnCE BAROMETER 



BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


123 


Raiders of the West 

Cast: Bill (Radio) Boyd, Art Davis, Lee Pow- 
ell, Virginia Carroll, Charles King. Producer: 
Sigmund Neufeld. Director: Peter Stewart. 
Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Bill Boyd and Art Davis pose as 
horse-traders to get information about 
a mysterious counterfeiting ring headed 
by Duke (Charles King). Bill and Art 
stumble on the counterfeiting hideout 
by accident and round up the gang in 
a rough-and-tumble battle. 

Too Many Women 

Cast: Neil Hamilton, Joyce Compton, June 
Lang, Warren Hymer. Producer-Director: B. B. 
Ray. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

Comedy about a playboy and his love- 
life. 


REPUBLIC 


Affairs of Jimmy Valentine 

Cast: Dennis O'Keefe, Gloria Dickson, Ruth 
Terry. Producer: Leonard Fields. Director: 
Bernard Vorhaus. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

Sleuth melodrama about a safe- 
cracker. 

Broadway Goes to College 

Cast: Mary Lee (Incomplete). Producer: Al- 
bert J. Cohen. Director: Not Set. Original: 
George Carleton Brown. Screenplay: George 
Carleton Brown. 

Musical comedy. 

Calling Manila 

Cast: Pat O'Brien (Incomplete). Producer: Sol 
M. Wurtzel. Director: Irving Pichel. Original 
Screenplay: Samuel G. Engel. 

Story of two American telephone en- 
gineers who undertake to aid the U. S. 
army’s Philippine forces in establish- 
ing communications on the island. 

Code of the Outlaw 

Cast: Tom Tyler, Bob Steele, Rule Davis, Me- 
linda Leighton, Bennie Bartlett, Weldon Hey- 
burn. Producer: Lou Gray. Director: Jack Eng- 
lish. Original Screenplay: Barry Shipman. From 
characters created by William Colt MacDonald. 

Sam Hardin’s gang robs the Billings 
Mining Company of its $98,000 payroll. 
Sheriff Stoddard calls in the Three 
Mesquiteers to help. They manage to 
exterminate the gang and through the 
help of Tim, Sam Hardin’s 11-year-old 
son, the money is turned over to Sher- 
iff Stoddard. 

Commando 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Edmund Grainger. 
Director: Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: Philip MacDonald. 

Concerns Britain’s Commando troops, 
picked soldiers who cause plenty of 
trouble along the Axis-held French 
coast. 

G-Men vs. The Black Dragon 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: William O'Sullivan. 
Director: Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

Serial, dealing with the FBI’s fight 
against fifth-column activities by Jap- 
anese agents. 

The Girl From Alaska 

Cast: Ray Middleton, Jean Parker, Jerome 
Cowan, Robert Barrat. Producer-Director: Nick 
Grinde. Original: Robert Ormond Case. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

A story of Alaskan adventure adapted 
from the novel, “The Golden Portage.” 

Gold Runs the River 

Cast: John Wayne (Incomplete). Producer: 
Robert North. Director: Not Set. Original: J. 
Robert Bren, Gladys Atwater, Screenplay: Ger- 
trude Purcell. 

Drama of the early days of Califor- 


nia, when the gold-rush fever was at 
its height. 

Home in Wyoming 

Cast: Gene Autry, Smiley Burnette (Incom- 
plete) . Producer: Harry Grey. Director: Not Set. 
Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Further sagebrush adventures of 
Gene Autry, crooning cowpoke, and his 
comedy sidekick, Smiley Burnette. 

Interceptor Command 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Leonard Fields. Direc- 
tor: Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screenploy: 

No Credits. 

War story, about U. S. military-radio 
activities. 

Lady for a Night 

Cast: Joan Blondell, John Wayne, Ray Mid- 
dleton, Philip Merivale, Blanche Yurka, Leonid 
Kinskey. Producer: Albert J. Cohen. Director: 
Leigh Jason. Original: Garrett Fort. Screenplay: 
Isabel Dawn, Boyce DeGaw. 

Joan Blondell is a partner in oper- 
ating a Natchez gambling ship. She 
wants to be a lady of “quality,” though 
her partner, John Wayne, a political 
boss, knows it to be impossible. Never- 
theless, when Ray Middleton, wastrel 
planter, loses several thousand dollars 
on the boat and cannot pay, she strikes 
a bargain whereby she marries him in 
return for cancelling the debt. Middle- 
ton is accidentally poisoned and Miss 
Blondell, tried for murder, is acquitted 
— and returns to Wayne. 

The Man From Cheyenne 

Cast: Roy Rogers, George (Gabby) Hayes, 
Sally Payne, Gale Storm, Lynne Carver. Pro- 
ducer: Joseph Kane. Director: Joseph Kane. 
Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Brought up by George (Gabby) 
Hayes, but separated from him for ten 
years, Roy Rogers returns to Cheyenne 
to discover his childhood playmates, 
who own a ranch, are plagued by cat- 
tle-rustlers. Though Roy does not 
know it, one of them is the villainess. 
Her foreman is in active charge of the 
rustling. Roy hits upon the truth and, 
with other ranchers backing him 
thwarts the girl’s plans. 

Moonstruck 

Cast: Judy Canova (Incomplete). Producer: 
Harriet Parsons. Director: Not Set. Original: No 
Credits. Screenplay: Robert Harari, Eve Greene. 

Musical comedy with a South Seas 
background. 

Mr. M. and the Pigeons 

Cast: Binnie Barnes (Incomplete). Producer: 
Robert North. Director: Not Set. Original: Fran- 
ces Hyland, Albert Ray. Screenplay: Frances 
Hyland. 

Gangster comedy. 

Outlaws of the Cherokee Trail 

Cast: Tom Tyler, Bob Steele, Rule Davis, Lois 
Collier, Rex Lease. Producer: Lou Gray. Direc- 
tor: Les Orlebeck. Original Screenplay: Albert 
DeMond. Based on characters created by Wil- 
liam Colt MacDonald. 

The Three Mesquiteers are hampered 
by legal technicalities in cleaning up a 
band of outlaws in the Cherokee Strip. 
After trying many tricks, the trio 
makes a last-minute cleanup, rescuing 
the kidnaped daughter of the Ranger 
captain and capturing the crooks. 

Remember Pearl Harbor 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Albert J. Cohen. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: 
Malcolm Stuart Boylan, Isabel Dawn. 

Based on the Japanese attack on 
Honolulu, this relates the exploits of 
the U. S. Navy. 

Shepherd of the Ozarks 

Cast: The Weaver Brothers and Elviry (In- 
complete). Producer: Armand Schaefer. Director: 


Frank McDonald. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

Hillbilly musical starring the farm- 
belt radio stars. 

Sleepytime Gal 

Cast: Judy Canova, Tom Brown, Ruth Terry, 
Harold Huber, Fritz Feld, Jerry Lester, Skinnay 
Ennis and His Orchestra. Producer: Albert J. 
Cohen. Director: Albert S. Rogell. Original: No 
Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Musical comedy starring Judy Can- 
ova, the hillbilly comedienne, with mu- 
sic supplied by Skinnay Ennis and his 
orchestra. 

Spy Smasher 

Cast: Kane Richmond, Marguerite Chapman 
(Incomplete). Producer: William O'Sullivan. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

Serial, a melodrama about espionage 
activities. 

Suicide Squadron 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: Not 
Set. Original: Douglas Darrow. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

Story of Polish aviators who have 
volunteered for combat service with 
Britain’s RAF. 

A Tragedy at Midnight 

Cast: John Howard, Margaret Lindsay, Timo- 
thy Ryan, Roscoe Karns, Keye Luke, Miles Man- 
der. Producer: Robert North. Director: Joseph 
Santley. Screenplay: Isabel Dawn. Original: 
Hal Hudson, Sam Duncan. 

Greg Sherman, young radio detective, 
has won the animosity of the police by 
his knack of solving current murder 
mysteries from under the very noses of 
the detectives. Now he has become in- 
volved in a murder mystery of his own. 
Upon his arrival at his apartment, he 
finds a corpse. The police pin the mur- 
der on hirn. Greg eludes them in a 
series of hair-breadth escapes, develop- 
ing, meanwhile, his own clues. In the 
course of his investigations, he becomes 
more and more involved. He knows that 
in order to fulfill the terms of his con- 
tract, he must have the solution to the 
crime for his next broadcast. He suc- 
ceeds in doing this and saves his repu- 
tation for solving crimes before the po- 
lice are able to. 

War of the Wildcats 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Leonard Fields. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: Thomson Burtis. 

Screenplay: Thomson Burtis. 

Concerns independent oil men and 
their battle to survive in the Texas oil 
fields around the turn of the century. 

Water Carnival 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Albert J. Cohen. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: Mauri Grashin, Robert 
Shannon. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Drama built around the professional 
swimming circus. 

Yokel Boy 

Cast: Albert Dekker, Joan Davis, Alan Mow- 
bray, Eddie Foy jr., Roscoe Karns. Producer: 
Robert North. Director: Joseph Santley. Original: 
No Credits. Screenplay: Hal Long, Isabel Dawn. 

About a country boy who comes to 
Hollywood, and his adventures in the 
film colony. 


RKO RADIO 


Adventure at Salt Valley 

Cast: Tim Holt (Incomplete). Producer: Bert 
Gilroy. Director: Not Set. Original: Martin Sper- 
ber. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Another in the series of westerns 
starring Tim Holt. 


124 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


Angel Face 

Cast: Joan Carroll, Edmond O'Brien, Ruth War- 
rick Producer: Richard "Wallace, Director: Rich- 
ard Wallace. Original: Jean C. Becket. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

About a little girl (Joan Carroll) 
with a face like an angel — and a brain 
like a master spy. Has to do with the 
problems which beset the romantically 
and socially inclined when they are 
confronted by the small girl’s resolute 
determination to tell the unadorned, 
unadulterated truth. 

Army Surgeon 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: 
Peter Godfrey. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: 
No Credits. 

story of the U. S. Army Medical 
Corps. 

The Bashful Bachelor 

Cast: Lum 'n' Abner, ZaSu Pitts, Louise Cur- 
rie, Irving Bacon, Grady Sutton, Benny Rubin. 
Producer: Jack "Votion. Director: Mai St. Clair. 
Original: Chester Lauck, Norris Goff. Screen- 
play: Chandler Sprague. 

The two leading citizens of Pine 
Ridge (Lum ’n’ Abner) become involved 
in a matrimonal mixup in their second 
screen appearance. 

Battle Stations 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Islin Auster. Director: 
Not Set. Original: Borden Chase. Screenplay: 
John Twist. 

Concerns the adventures of a group 
of U. S. Navy gunners assigned to pro- 
tect a London-bound freighter from 
Nazi submarines. 

Behold the Bridegroom 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Reeves Espy. Direc- 
tor: Not Set. Original: George Kelly. Screen- 
play; Maureen Watkins. 

Domestic comedy from a play by 
George Kelly. 

Bombardier 

Cast: Randolph Scott, June Havoc, Anne Shirley, 
Producer: Reeves Espy. Director: Not Set. Ori- 
ginal: No Credits. Screenplay: William Wister 
Haines. 

Story of the men who operate the 
secret bomb sights in the army’s twin- 
engined bombers. 

Call of the Marines 

Cast: Edmund Lowe, Victor McLaglen, Binnie 
Barnes, Robert Smith, Dorothy Lovett, Paul Kel- 
ly, Franklin Pangborn. Producer: Howard Bene- 
dict. Director: Frank Ryan. Original: James Ed- 
ward Grant. Screenplay: Jerry Cady, Andrew 
Bennison, Frank Ryan. 

In which two U. S. Marines (Edmund 
Lowe and Victor McLaglen) , rivals for 
the affections of Vi (Binnie Barnes) , 
singer in a cafe, become involved in an 
espionage plot. Though it comes as a 
shock, they learn Vi is an enemy agent, 
and manage to capture her and cover 
themselves with glory. 

Challenge to the Night 

Cast: Michele Morgan (Incomplete). Producer: 
David Hempstead. Director: Not Set. Original: 
Cecil Lewis. Screenplay: Charles Bennett. 

Romantic drama with a South Seas 
locale, this is based on a British best- 
seller of 1938. Its author is now serv- 
ing with the RAF. 

Cheyenne 

Cast: Eddie Albert (Tentative, incomplete). 
Producer: Islin Auster. Director: Not Set. Origi- 
nal: No Credits. Screenplay: Oliver H. P. Gar- 
rett. 

The story of a rodeo performer who 
attains his ambition — starring in Madi- 
son Square Garden. 


The Falcon Takes Over 

Cast: George Sanders, Lynn Bari, James Glea- 
son, Allen Jenkins, Helen Gilbert, Ward Bond, 
Ed Gargan, Willie Fung. Producer: Howard 
Benedict. Director: Irving Reis. Original Screen- 
play: Frank Fenton, Lynn Root. 

Third in the “Falcon” series, this re- 
volves around -the theft of a valuable 
necklace, a mysterious murder and an 
ex-convict’s hunt for the girl who testi- 
fied falsely against him at his trial. The 
Falcon (George Sanders) ultimately 
solves the mystery, of course. 

Farmer Malachy's Miracle 

Cast: Thomas Mitchell (Incomplete). Producer: 
Sol Lesser. Director: Not Set. Original: No 
Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 

In which a priest is the hero. 

The Five of Spades 

Cast: Tim Holt (Incomplete). Producer: Bert 
Gilroy. Director: Not Set. Original: Harry O. 
Hoyt, Screenplay: Harry O. Hoyt. 

One in the series of sagebrush adven- 
tures starring young Tim Holt. 

General Billy Mitchell 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: William Hawks. Di- 
rector: Howard Hawks. Original: William Ran- 
kin. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Concerns the spectacular career of 
the far-sighted flying general, who was 
courtmartialled and reduced to the rank 
of colonel in 1926 because of his out- 
spoken insistence on the superiority of 
the air weapon over naval and land 
forces. He resigned from the service 
and died February 19, 1936, of a broken 
heart. 

The Gilded Pheasant 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: William Hawks. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: Stephen Morehouse 
Avery. Screenplay: Carl Winston, Stephen More- 
house Avery, Frank Cavett. 

Romantic adventure with a Mexican 
locale. 

Grand Canyon 

Cast: Lucille Ball, James Craig (Incomplete). 
Producer: Sol Lesser. Director: Not Set. Original: 
No Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Story of the frontier, a sequel to “Val- 
ley of the Sun.’” 

Growing Pains 

Cast: Bonita Granville, Jackie Cooper, Nancy 
Gates, Renee Haal, Barbara Moiiett. Producer- 
Director: Allan Dwan. Original: Aurania Rou- 
verol. Screenplay: William Bowers, Martin 
Berkeley. 

Story of adolescence, from a play by 
the creator of the “Judge Hardy” 
family. 

Gun Law 

Cast: Tim Holt (Incomplete). Producer: Bert 
Gilroy. Director: Not Set. Original: No Credits. 
Screenplay: Bennett Cohen. 

Further sagebrush adventures with 
Tim Holt as the cowboy hero. 

Gwangi 

Cazt: Not Set. Producer: John Speaks, Willis 
O'Brien. Director: Irving Reis. Original: No 
Credits. Screenplay; Harold Lamb, Emily Barrye. 

Fantasy concerning a scientific ex- 
pedition which penetrates a lost jungle 
and finds a prehistoric monster — alive. 

The History of Mr. Polly 

Cast: Charles Laughton (Incomplete). Pro- 
ducer: Not Set. Director: Not Set. Original: H. G. 
Wells. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Chronicles the ups and downs (most- 
ly downs) in the life of a pathetically 
ludicrous little man who comes at last 
to his own idea of peace after years of 
bowing to fate, ill health, the inability 
to cope with the ways of the world and 
the selfish strategems of his relatives. 


I'll Never Tell 

Cast: Ginger Rogers (Incomplete). Producer: 
David Hempstead. Director: Sam V/ood. Origi- 
nal: No Credits. Screenplay: Stephen Longstreet. 

Romantic drama, reuniting the star- 
producer-director team which made the 
Academy Award winner, “Kitty Foyle.” 

It Comes Up Love 

Cast: Henry Fonda, Dorothy Comingore (In- 
complete). Producer: Damon Runyon. Director: 
Irving Reis. Original: Damon Runyon. Screen- 
play: Damon Runyon, Leonard Spigelgass. 

In which bus boy loves chorus girl, 
the whole being peopled with the amus- 
ing underworld characters for which 
Runyon’s fiction is famous. 

Joan of Paris 

Ca_t; Michele Morgan, Paul Henreid, Thomas 
Mitchell, Laird Cregar, May Robson, Alan Ladd. 
Producer: David Hempstead. Director: Robert 
S.evenson. Original: Jacques Thiery, Georges 
Kessels. Screenplay: Charles Bennett, Ellis St. 
Joseph. 

Paul Lavallier (Paul Henreid), Free 
French flyer, is shot down during a raid 
over Prance with four comrades. Dis- 
guising themselves, they seek refuge in 
a church presided over by Father An- 
toinne (Thomas Mitchell), but are 
trailed by a Gestapo agent. Joan 
(Michele Morgan) a barmaid, hides 
Paul. The Gestapo tells her if she will 
help capture the four flyers she and 
Paul will not be shot. She leads the 
Germans on a wild goose chase through 
the sewers, giving the flyers time to 
escape, but sacrificing her own life. 

Journey Into Fear 

Cast: Orson Welles, Dolores Del Rio, Joseph 
Gotten, Ruth Warrick, Agnes Moorhead, Edgar 
Barrier. Producer: Orson Welles. Director: Nor- 
man Foster. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: 
Orson Welles, Joseph Gotten. 

In which Welles portrays Colonel 
Haki, head of the Turkish secret po- 
lice. Story relates the adventures of 
an American gunnery expert who is at- 
tempting to escape Nazi agents bent 
on murdering him. 

The Magnificent Ambersons 

Cast: Joseph Gotten, Dolores Costello, Tim 
Holt, Anne Baxter, Agnes Moorehead, Ray Col- 
lins, Richard Bennett. Producer: Orson Welles.' 
Original: Booth Tarkington. Screenplay: Orson 

Welles. 

Isabel Amberson (Dolores Costello), 
daughter of Major Amberson (Richard 
Bennett) , wealthiest citizen of a mid- 
western city, surprises the town when 
she marries Wilbur Minafor (Donald 
Dillaway) instead of the dashing Eu- 
gene Morgan (Joe Gotten). Morgan 
had, while serenading her, fallen 
through a bass viol, thus revealing that 
he had been drinking, as had Isabel’s 
brother. Jack (Ray Collins). Morgan 
leaves town, and following hectic years 
v/ith her spoiled son, George (Tim 
Holt), Isabel dies, leaving a depleted 
fortune. George goes to v/ork to sup- 
port his aunt (Agnes Moorehead) and 
himself, and finally Morgan realizes 
that, at last, the qualities v,(hich he 
loved in Isabel have developed in her 
son. 

Mexican Spitfire at Sea 

Cast: Lupe "Velez, Leon Errol, Charles Rogers, 
Elisabeth Risdon, Marion Martin, ZaSu Pitts. 
Producer: Cliff Reid. Director: Leslie Goodwins. 
Original: Jerry Cady. Screenplay: Charles E. 
Roberts. 

In which the Mexican Spitfire (Lupe 
Velez), Uncle Matt (Leon Errol) and 
Lord Epping (Leon Errol) become in- 
volved in another financial-social-mar- 
ital tangle, this time aboard an ocean 
liner en route to Hawaii. 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


125 


My Favorite Spy 

Cast: Kay Kyser, Ellen Drew, Helen Westley, 
Edmund Lowe, Robert Armstrong. Producer: Har- 
old Lloyd. Director: Tay Garnett. Original: M. 
Coates Webster. Screenplay: William Bowers, 
Sig Herzig. 

Comedy in which Kyser portrays an 
officer in the U. S. Army reserve who 
is called into active service on the day 
of his wedding. Edmimd Lowe plays the 
head of the spy ring. 

One Hour of Glory 

Cast: Thomas Mitchell, Maureen O'Hara (In- 
complete). Producer: Not Set. Director: Not Set. 
Original: Mary Roberts Rinehart. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

About a private citizen who goes to 
Washington and has his “hour of glory” 
doing his bit for the defense effort. 

Passage From Bordeaux 

Cast: Lucille Ball, Joseph Gotten, Ruth War- 
rick, Anga Enters. Producer; Not Set. Direc- 
tor: Not Set. Original: Budd Schulberg. Screen- 
play: Oliver H. P. Garrett, William L. Shirer. 

Concerns a group of Americans 
trapped in Prance after the Nazi In- 
vasion, and how they plot and struggle 
to escape to the United States. 

Pike's Peak or Bust 

Cast: Tim Holt (Incomplete). Producer: Bert 
Gilroy. Director: Not Set. Original: Joseph 
Cheney. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Western, another in the series star- 
ring Tim Holt. 

Powder Town 

Cast: Edmond O'Brien, Dorothy Lovett, Victor 
McLaglen, June Havoc, Eddie Foy jr. Producer: 
Cliff Reid. Director: Rowland V. Lee. Original: 
Vicki Baum. Screenplay: David Boehm. 

Concerns Powder Town, a boom city 
in the throes of defense preparation, 
and J. Quincy Pennant (Edmond 
O’Brien), who is experimenting with a 
new type of powder in the laboratories 
of a large gunpowder company. He 
meets and vanquishes saboteurs and 
wins the hand of Sally (Dorothy 
Lovett) . 

Scattergood at the Races 

Cast: Guy Kibbee, Dorothy Moore, Jed Prouty 
(Incomplete). Producer: Jerrold T. Brandt. Direc- 
tor: Christy Cabanne. Original: Clarence Bud- 
ington Kelland. Screenplay: Michael L. Simmons. 

Another in the series of comedy- 
dramas in which Guy Kibbee portrays 
the famous magazine character created 
by Clarence Budington Kelland. 

Shore Leave 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: David Butler. Direc- 
tor: David Butler. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

Musical comedy with a navy back- 
ground, based on the Broadway hit, 
“Hit the Deck.” 

Sing Your Worries Away 

Cast: Bert Lahr, Buddy Ebsen, Sam Levine, 
Dorothy Lovett, June Havoc, Patsy Kelly, Mor- 
gan Conway. Producer: Cliff Reid. Director: Ed- 
ward Sutherland. Original: Charles E. Belden. 
Screenplay: No Credits. 

Chew Brewster (Bert Lahr), a down- 
and-out songwriter, and his cousin 
Carol (Dorothy Lovett), cigarette girl 
in a night club, are heirs to $3,000,000 
— but don’t know it. So Smiley Clark 
(Sam Levene) evolves a scheme to 
worry Chew to a point where he will 
commit suicide; leaving Carol the only 
heiress. Smiley then plans to marry 
Carol. But the plot goes awry when 
Chew, supposedly dead, returns to ob- 
struct and delay the wedding ceremony. 

Spitfire 

Cast: David Niven, Leslie Howard (Incom- 
plete). Producer: Samuel Goldwyn. Director: Les- 
lie Howard. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: 
No Credits. 

Filmed In England and employing 


members of the British armed forces in 
the cast, this depicts the life of R. J. 
Mitchell, inventor of the Spitfire com- 
bat plane. 

Syncopation 

Cast: Adolphe Menjou, Bonita Granville, Jackie 
Cooper, George Bancroft, Robert Benchley, Mona 
Barrie, Frank Jenks. Producer: William Dieterle. 
Director: William Dieterle. Original: Valentine 
Davies. Screenplay: No Credits. 

The story of modern music, against 
the shifting pattern of American life; 
a cavalcade of dance tunes woven into 
the lives of Americans in general. 

There Goes Lona Henry 

Cast: Tim Holt, James Craig, Ruth Warrick. Pro- 
ducer: Reeves Espy. Director: Not Set. Original: 
Polan Banks. Screenplay: Samuel Hoffenstein, 
Ketti Frings. 

Prom the novel of the same name, 
tracing the romantic exploits of Lona 
Henry. Concerns the romance of a 
young woman who has to choose be- 
tween her own promising future and her 
husband’s brilliant public career. 

They Fly Alone 

Cast: Anna Neagle (Incomplete) . Producer- 
Director: Herbert Wilcox. Original: No Credits. 
Screenplay: No Credits. 

Filmed in England, this finds Anna 
Neagle portraying Amy Johnston, famed 
British aviatrix. 

The Tuttles of Tahiti 

Cast: Charles Laughton, Jon Hall, Margaret 
Drake, Gene ' Reynolds, Joady Gilbert. Producer: 
Sol Lesser. Director: Charles Vidor. Original: 
Charles Nordhoff, James Norman Hall. Screen- 
play: James Hilton, Lewis Meltzer, Robert Carson. 

Comedy about an impecunious family 
which ekes out an existence in the 
South Seas. 

Valley of the Sun 

Cast: Lucille Ball, James Craig, Dean Jagger, 
Sir Cedric Hardwicke, Billy Gilbert, Peter Whit- 
ney, Antonio Moreno, Tom Tyler. Producer: Gra- 
ham Baker. Director: George Marshall. Origi- 
nai: Clarence Budington Kelland. Screenplay: 
Horace McCoy. 

Realizing that the army in Arizona 
Territory in the ’Sixties is breeding 
trouble by stupid treatment of the 
Apaches, Jonathan Ware (James Craig) , 
an Indian scout, aids some innocent 
Apache prisoners to escape and is ar- 
rested himself and sentenced to five 
years’ imprisonment. Ware escapes 
from the fort. He tries to steal a ride 
on a private stage belonging to Jim 
Sawyer (Dean Jagger), an unscrupu- 
lous Indian agent, but Sawyer throws 
him out. Sawyer is bringing a justice 
of the peace (Billy Gilbert) to officiate 
at his marriage to Christine Larson 
(Lucille Ball). Ware meets Christine 
and falls in love with her. Ware learns 
that Sawyer has been cheating the In- 
dians, stealing cattle intended for them. 
Ware averts a massacre, bringing him 
freedom, and marries Christine. 

Yankee Fable 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Jed Harris. Director: 
Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: Milt 
Gross, Arthur Ripley. 

First film to be made by the noted 
Broadway stage producer, Jed Harris, 
this is in the patriotic vein. 


20TH CENTURY-FOX 


Another Spring 

Cast: Not Set. Producer-Director: John M. 
Stahl. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: Allan 
Scott. 

Romantic drama. 


Blind Man's House 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Robert Bossier. Direc- 
tor: Not Set. Original: Hugh Walpole. Screen- 
play: R. C. Sherriff. 

Drama with an English background. 
From the novel by Hugh Walpole. 

The Californian 

Cast: Dana Andrews (Incomplete). Producer: 
Mark Hellinger. Director: Not Set. Original: No 
Credits. Screenplay: Philip Dunne, Horace Mc- 
Coy. 

Story of Joaquin Murietta, famed 
bandit of California’s early days, to 
be filmed in Technicolor. 

Castle in the Desert 

Cast: Sidney Toler, Arleen Whelan, Richard 
Derr, Douglas Dumbrille, Henry Daniell, Sen 
Yung. Producer: Ralph Dietrich. Director: Harry 
Lachman. Original Screenplay: John Larkin. 
Based on the "Charlie Chan" character created 
by Earl Derr Biggers. 

In which Charlie Chan (Sidney Toler) 
is called to solve murder in a million- 
aire’s mansion in the sun-baked Mo- 
jave desert. This is the 31st in the vet- 
eran sleuth series. 

Channel Float No. 18 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Bryan Foy. Director: 
Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

Story of British troops marauding the 
Axis-held French coast. 

Crime in Crayon 

Cast: Marjorie Weaver (Incomplete). Pro- 
ducer: Ralph Dietrich. Director: Eugene Forde. 
Original: Ralph Dietrich. Screenplay: John Lar- 
kin. 

Detective comedy concerning the ap- 
prehension of a crook through his 
identification by means of a crayon por- 
trait made of him on the scene of his 
crime. 

Dakar 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Bryan Foy. Director: 
Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: Frank 
Nugent, Samuel G. Engel. 

War drama, its locale the French 
African seaport. 

Dem Lovely Bums 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Oliver Morosco. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original Screenplay: Lee Loeb, 
Harol(d Buchman. 

story of the Brooklyn Dodgers. 

Down to the Sea in Ships 

Cast: George Montgomery (Incomplete). Pro- 
ducer: William Perlberg. Director: Gregory Rat- 
off. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: Talbot 
Jennings. 

Drama of the men who make their 
living in the whaling trade, and of the 
women who wait for them on land. 

Flying Showboat 

Cast: Carole Landis, Dale Evans (Incomplete). 
Producer: Ralph Dietrich. Director: Robert Siod- 
mak. Original Screenplay: Jerry Sackheim. 

Concerns film players who tour army 
and navy camps by airplane, enter- 
taining the troops and building morale. 

A Gift of the Magi 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Robert Bassler. Direc- 
tor: Not Set. Original: O. Henry. Screenplay: 
Jo Swerling. 

F^om one of O. Henry’s celebrated 
short stories. 

Girl Trouble 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Robert Bassler. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: Oscar Millard. 

Romantic comedy, to feature a num- 
ber of youthful players. 

Greenwich Village 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: William LeBaron. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: Frederick Hazlett Brennan. 

Musical comedy, its locale the artists’ 
community in New York. 


126 


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127 


Ground Pilots 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Ralph Dietrich. Direc- 
tor: Not Set. Original: Ralph Dietrich. Screen- 
play: Jaihes Webb. 

Aviation drama, its heroes the me- 
chanics who keep our military planes 
in flying condition. 

Hello, Frisco, Hello 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Milton Sperling. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: Ken Englund, Harold Friedman. 

Musical comedy. 

Iceland 

Cast: Sonja Henie (Incomplete). Producer: 
William LeBaron. Director: Not Set. Original: 
No Credits. Screenplay: Robert Ellis, Helen 
Logan. 

Sonja Henie, queen of skaters, por- 
trays a native of Iceland in this com- 
edy about American troops stationed 
there. 

The Impostor 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: 
Irving Pichel. Original: Kurt Steel. Screenplay: 
No Credits. 

Mystery melodrama, its principal 
character a masquerader. 

Improper Relations 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: William LeBaron. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: 
Arthur Kober. 

Comedy about family life. 

Les Miserables 

Cast: Laird Cregar (Tentative, incomplete). 
Producer: William Perlberg. Director: Not Set. 
Original: Victor Hugo. Screenplay: No Credits. 

The classic story of Jean Valjean, in- 
nocent but pursued by the lav;. 

Lone Star Ranger 

Cast: Sheila Ryan, Jonathan Hale, William 
Farnum, Truman Bradley, George E. Stone. Pro- 
ducer: Sol M. Wurtzel. Director: James Tinling. 
Original: Zone Grey. Screenplay: William Con- 
selman jr., Irving Cummings jr. and George 
Kane. 

A concerted attack by cattle rustlers 
is slowly driving ranchers in Exeter 
County, Tex., into bankruptcy. Gold 
shipments are intercepted, herds my- 
steriously disappear; horses are stolen 
from their barns. The crooks are 
backed by Judge Longstreth, leading 
banker. Major McNeil (William Far- 
num) has been unsuccessful in catch- 
ing them and he calls on Buck Duane 
(John Kimbrough) to investigate. Buck 
calls on his old pal Euchre (George E. 
Stone) a not-too-successful insurance 
agent, to accompany him. After a bat- 
tle, Lawson, the judge’s assistant, is 
killed; the Rangers ride into town and 
force the rest of the gang to surrender. 
With crime ended in Exeter County. 
Euchre sets up his insurance business 
there and Buck plans to settle there 
too, with Barbara, the judge’s daugh- 
ter, as his wife, the judge having vin- 
dicated himself. 

The Magnificent Jerk 

Cast: Henry Fonda, Don Ameche, John Payne, 
Betty Grable, Lynn Bari. Producer: William 
LeBaron. Director: Walter Lang. Original: No 
Credits. Screenplay: Robert Riley Crutcher. 

Musical comedy. 

Million Dollar Ghost 

Cast: Lloyd Nolan, Marjorie Weaver, Helen 
Reynolds, Henry Wilcoxon. Producer: Sol M. 
Wurtzel. Director: Herbert I. Leeds. Original: No 
Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Fifth in the series of detective dramas 
in which Lloyd Nolan portrays “Mich- 
ael Shayne.” 

Moontide 

Cast: Jean Gabin, Ida Lupino, Claude Rains, 
Mary Beth Hughes, Jerome Cowan, Helen Rey- 


nolds. Producer: Mark Hellinger. Director: Fritz 
Lang. Original: Willard Robertson. Screenplay: 
No Credits. 

This is the first American starring 
picture for Jean Gabin, French film 
celebrity. A drama, it is based upon a 
popular novel of the same name by 
Willard Robertson, who is also well- 
known as a character actor. 

My Friend Flicka 

Cast: Roddy McDowall (Incomplete). Pro- 
ducer: Ralph Dietrich. Director: Eugene Forde. 
Original: Mary O'Hara. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Concerns a boy and a pony on a Mon- 
tana ranch. 

My Gal Sal 

Cast: Rita Hayworth, Victor Mature, Carole 
Landis, Stuart Erwin, James Gleason, Walter 
Catlett. Producer: Robert Bossier. Director: Irv- 
ing Cummings. Original: Theodore Dreiser. 
Screenplay: No Credits. 

Musical, a biography of Paul Dresser, 
noted American composer. 

New York Nocturne 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Walter Morosco. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: Matt Taylor. Screen- 
play: John Larkin. 

Romantic dram.a, based on a stage 
play. 

On the Sunny Side 

Cast: Roddy McDowall, Jane Darwell, Stanley 
Clements, Katharine Alexander, Don Douglas, 
Ann Todd. Producer: No Credits. Director: Har- 
old Schuster. Original: Mary McCall jr. Screen- 
play: Lillie Hayward, George Templeton. 

The story of a little London laddie 
(Roddy McDowall), bombed out by the 
blitz, who comes to America for the 
duration of the war — and has plenty of 
trouble before he adjusts himself to 
life in the United States. 

Pitfalls of the Big City 

Cast: Stan Laurel, Oliver Hardy (Incomplete). 
Producer: Sol M. Wurtzel. Director: Not Set. 
Original Screenplay: Lou Breslow. 

In which Laurel and Hardy seek their 
fortunes in the big city anti encounter 
numerous and devious obstacles. 

Prison Ship 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Bryan Foy. Director: 
Not Set. Original: Bryan Foy. Screenplay: Jack 
Jungmeyer jr., Maurice Rapf. 

Anti-Axis melodrama concerning cap- 
tives aboard German, Italian and Jap- 
anese sea raiders. 

Quota Girl 

Cast: Sonja Henie (Incomplete). Producer: 
William LeBaron. Director: Not Set. Original: No 
Credits. Screenplay: Frederick Jackson. 

Another musical comedy in which 
Sonja Henie will display her ice-skating 
prov/ess. 

Rings on Her Fingers 

Cast: Henry Fonda, Gene Tierney, Laird Cre- 
gar, John Sheppard, Henry Stephenson, Donald 
MacBride. Producer: Milton Sperling. Director: 
Rouben Mamoulian. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

About a country yokel (Henry Fonda) 
who has weird ideas about finance. 
Coming to New York, he plunges into 
the stock market and sets the nation 
cn its ear, financially speaking, with 
his unorthodox operations. 

Secret Agent of Japan 

Cast: George Sanders, Preston Foster (Incom- 
plete). Producer: Sol M, Wurtzel. Director: Irv- 
ing Pichel. Original Screenplay: John Larkin. 

Espionage mystery in which, as the 
title indicates, the Japanese are the 
villains. 

Self-Made Cinderella 

Cast: Ginger Rogers (Incomplete). Producer- 
Director: Ernst Lubitsch. Original: No Credits. 
Screenplay; No Credits. 


Modern comedy about a girl who 
wanted wealth — and got it. 

Sioux City 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Bryan Foy. Director: 
Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: Stuart 
Anthony, Louis Stevens. 

Western, about the early days in that 
Dakota metropolis. 

Son of Fury 

Cast: Tyrone Power, Gene Tierney, George 
Sanders, Frances Farmer, Roddy McDowall, Elsa 
Lanchester, John Carradine. Producer: William 
Perlberg. Director: John Cromwell. Original: Edi- 
son Marshall. Screenplay: Philip Dunne. 

Five women play a part in the life of 
Benjamin Blake (Tyrone Power) swash- 
buckler who fought his way upward in 
life from a viciously persecuted stable 
boy to a millionaire of the South Seas. 
Accused of murder, he flees to the trop- 
ics, finds happiness with a beautiful na- 
tive girl anti returns, wealthy, to Eng- 
land, to wreak revenge on his merciless 
enemies. 

Song of the Islands 

Cast: Betty Grable, Victor Mature, Jack Oakje, 
Thomas Mitchell, George Barbier, Billy Gilbert. 
Producer: William LeBaron. Director: Walter 
Lang. Original Screenplay: Joseph Schrank, Rob- 
ert Pirosh, Robert Ellis and Helen Logan. 

Eileen O’Brien (Betty Grable) returns 
to the Hawaiian ranch of her father 
(Thomas Mitchell) after three years of 
school on the mainland. A few days 
later, Jeff Harper (Victor Mature) and 
Rusty Smith (Jack Oakie) land on the 
O’Brien beach. They have come to Ha- 
waii to inspect Jeff’s father’s ranch, 
which adjoins that of O’Brien. Rodney, 
the Harper foreman, explains to Jeff 
that if they could buy or lease deep- 
water dockage from O’Brien, the Har- 
per cattle could be dock-loaded instead 
of being made to swim out to lighters. 
This mission requires that Jeff and 
Rusty spend a good deal of time on the 
O’Brien ranch, which results in Jeff 
falling in love with Eileen and Rusty 
with a cute little Hawaiian girl. 

Spitfire Squadron 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: Not 
Set. Original: Arch Whitehouse. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

Story of the R. A. F. which appeared 
first as a serial in the Saturday Eve- 
ning Post. 

Springtime in the Rockies 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: William LeBaron. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: Walter Bullock, Jacques Thery. 

Musical western, to be filmed in 
Technicolor. 

Strictly Dynamite 

Cast: John Payne, Betty Grabe (Imitative, in- 
complete). Producer: William LeBaron. Direc- 
tor; Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: 
Lynn Starling. 

story of the prize ring. 

Submarine School 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: William Perlberg. Di- 
rector: Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

Naval drama concerning the training 
of submarine crews. 

Sundown Jim 

Cast: John Kimbrough, Arleen Whelan, Vir- 
ginia Gilmore, Cliff Edvirards. Producer: Sol M. 
Wurtzel. Director: James Tinling. Original: Ernest 
Haycox. Screenplay: William Bruckner, Robert 
Metzler. 

Western, starring the former AU- 
American football hero, and based on 
a Collier’s serial. 

Sunset Graze 

Cast: John Kimbrough (Incomplete). Producer: 


128 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


Sol M. Wurtzel. Director; Not Set. Original; Luke 
Short. Screenplay; George Kane. 

Western, starring the former All- 
American football hero. 

Tales of Manhattan 

Cast: Charles Boyer, Rita Hayworth, Ginger 
Rogers, Henry Fonda, Charles Laughton, Thomas 
Mitchell, Edward G. Robinson, W. C. Fields. 
Producers; Boris Morros, S. P. Eagle. Director: 
Julien Duvivier. Original; No Credits. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

Filmed in separate sequences, with 
two to three stars in each, this relates 
what happens to a dress suit from the 
time it is new until it has been handed 
down to a bum. 

Ten Gentlemen From West Point 

Cast: George Montgomery, Maureen O'Hara, 
John Sutton, William Tracy, Laird Cregar. Pro- 
ducer; William Perlberg. Director: Henry Hatha- 
way. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

Service drama, its locale the U. S. 
Military Academy. 

This Above All 

Cast: Tyrone Power, Joan Fontaine, Philip 
Merivale, Queenie Leonard. Producer: Darryl F. 
Zanuck. Director: Anatole Litvak. Original: Eric 
Knight. Screenplay: R. C. Sherrill. 

Story of bomb-torn England from the 
recent best-selling novel. 

Thunder Birds 

Cast: Preston Foster (Incomplete). Director; 
William A. Wellman. Original: No Credits. 
Screenplay: Lamar Trotti. 

Something of a sequel to “A Yank in 
the RAP,” this concerns British fledg- 
lings being trained in the U. S. 

To the Shores of Tripoli 

Cast: John Payne, Randolph Scott, Maureen 
O'Hara, Nancy Kelly, Ted North. Producer: Mil- 
ton Sperling. Director; H. Bruce Humberstone. 
Original: No Credits. Screenplay: Steve Fisher. 

This takes its title from the words 
of the U. S. Marine Corps’ hymn, and 
relates the adventures of Uncle Sam’s 
devildogs in farflung outposts. 

Twelve Men in a Box 

Cast: Lloyd Nolan (Incomplete). Producer: 
Sol M. Wurtzel. Director: Not Set. Original: Jo 
Eisinger. Screenplay: Arnold d'Usseau. 

Another in the sleuth series in which 
Lloyd Nolan portrays “Michael Shayne.” 

Whispering Ghosts 

Cast: Brenda Joyce, Milton Berle, John Shel- 
ton, Edmund O'Donnell. Producer: Sol M. Wurt- 
zel. Director: Alfred Werker. Original: No 
Credits. Screenplay: Lou Breslow. 

Comedy murder mystery. 

White Collar Girl 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: William Perlberg. Di- 
rector: John Brahm. Original; No Credits. Screen- 
play: Ken Englund. 

Comedy-drama about the working 
girl and her problems. 

Who Is Hope Schuyler? 

Cast: Ricardo Cortez, Sheila Ryan, Joseph Al- 
len jr.. Rose Hobart. Producer: Sol M. Wurtzel. 
Director: W. Zolley Lerner. Original: Stephen 
Ransome. Screenplay: Arnold d'Usseau. 

Comedy murder mystery. 


UNITED ARTISTS 


About Face 

Cast: William Tracy, Joseph Sawyer, Marjorie 
Lord, Veda Ann Borg. Producer: Hal Roach. 
Director: Kurt ' Neumann. Original: No Credits. 
Screenplay: No Credits. 

Third in the series of streamlined 
comedies concerning the hectic army 
career of William Tracy, the boy with 
the photographic memory, previously 


seen in Roach’s “Tanks a Million” and 
“Hayfoot.” 

Annie Rooney 

Cast: Shirley Temple, William Gargan (In- 
complete). Producer; Edward Small. Director; 
tor: Edwin L. Marin. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: George Bruce. 

Remake of the famous silent-screen 
success, with Shirley Temple doing the 
role created by Mary Pickford. 

Bella Donna 

Cast: Ilona Massey (Incomplete). Producer: 
Edward Small. Director: Not Set. Original: Rob- 
ert Hichens. Screenplay: No Credits. 

The loves of a beautiful woman are 
traced against the romantic mystery of 
an Egyptian background. By the author 
of “The Garden of Allah.” 

Claudia 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: David O. Selznick. 
Director: Not Set. Original: Rose Franken. 
Screenplay: No Credits. 

The story of a typical young Ameri- 
can housewife. From the play and the 
“Claudia” stories which have appeared 
in national magazines. 

Friendly Enemies 

Cast: Akim Tamiroff (Tentative, incomplete). 
Producer: Edward Small. Director: Allan Dwan. 
Original; Samuel Shipman, Aaron Hoffman. 
Screenplay: No Credits. 

From the play of the same name, an 
old-time hit. 

Hayfoot 

Cast: William Tracy, Joseph Sawyer, James 
Gleason, Noah Beery jr., Elyse Knox, Douglas 
Fowley. Producer: Hal Roach. Director: Fred 
Guiol. Original Screenplay: Eugene Conrad, Ed- 
ward E. Seabrook. 

Second in the series of streamlined 
service comedies in which William 
Tracy portrays the draftee with the 
photographic memory. This time he 
outwits two rival sergeants and wins 
the commanding officer’s daughter. 

The Keys of the Kingdom 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: David O. Selznick. 
Director: Not Set. Original: A. J. Cronin. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

The story of Father Chisholm, Cath- 
olic missionary in China, and how he 
succeeded, although outwardly he was 
labelled a failure. From A. J. Cronin’s 
best selling novel. 

Life of Valentino 

Cast: Not Set. Producer; Edward Small. Direc- 
tor: Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screenplay; 
No Credits. 

Film biography of the great lover of 
the silent screen, Rudolph Valentino. 

My Official Wife 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Edward Small. Direc- 
tor: Not Set. Original: Ernest Vajda. Screenplay: 
Stephen Morehouse Avery. 

Domestic comedy. 

Shanghai Gesture 

Cast: Gene Tierney, Walter Huston, Victor 
Mature, Ona Munson, Maria Ouspenskaya, Al- 
bert Basserman, Phyllis Brooks. Producer: Ar- 
nold Pressburger. Director: Josef Von Sternberg. 
Original: John Colton. Screenplay: Josef Von 
Sternberg, Geza Herczeg, Karl Vollmoeller, Jules 
Furthman. 

From the famed Broadway play, a 
melodrama of the Far East and the 
story of a violent, unmanageable Eura- 
sian daughter of a Chinese mother and 
an English father. 

To Be or Not to Be 

Cast: Carole Lombard, Jack Benny, Robert 
Stack, Felix Bressart, Lionel Atwill, Stanley 
Ridges, Tom Dugan. Producers: Ernst Lubitsch, 
Alexander Korda. Director: Ernst Lubitsch. 
Original: Ernst Lubitsch, Melchior Lengyel. 

Screenplay: Edwin Justus Mayer. 

Benny and the late Miss Lombard 


portray Polish Shakepearean actors 
caught in Poland at the time of the 
Nazi invasion. 

Two Years Before the Mast 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Edward Small. Direc- 
tor: Not Set. Original: Richard Henry Dana. 
Screenplay: No Credits. 

From the classic tale of maritime ad- 
venture, the experiences of a boy who 
sailed aboard a square-rigger around 
the Horn. 

Up in Mabel's Room 

Cast: Louis Hayward, Ilona Massey (Incom- 
plete). Producer: Edward Small. Director; Allan 
Dwan. Original; No Credits. Screenplay: Earl 
Baldwin. 

A re-make of the silent-screen com- 
edy success, which in turn was based 
upon the hit stage farce. 

War and Peace 

Cast: Merle Oberon (Incomplete). Producer: 
Alexander Korda. Director: Not Set. Original: 
Tolstoy. Screenplay: No Credits. 

From the classic novel by the cele- 
brated Russian author. 


UNIVERSAL 


Almost Married 

Cast: Jane Frazee, Robert Paige, Eugene Pall- 
ette, Charles Coleman, Elizabeth Patterson. Pro- 
ducer: Ken Goldsmith. Director: Charles Lament. 
Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Gloria Dobson (Jane Frazee), a 
night club singer, marries James Man- 
ning III (Robert Paige) because she 
thinks his name will help her in her 
career. Then each discover they have 
fallen in love with the other and she 
renounces her job for a fulltime position 
as a housewife. 

Bombay Clipper 

Cast; William Gargan, Irene Hervey, Mary 
Gordon, Lloyd Corrigan, Maria Montez. Pro- 
ducer; Marshall Grant. Director: John Rawlins. 
Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Unknown to his fiancee, Frankie 
(Irene Hervey), Jim (William Gargan), 
news correspondent, is on an assign- 
ment when they hop the Clipper for 
San Francisco. Jim must learn who is 
carrying $5,000,000 in diamonds, be- 
longing to a Maharaja, to America — 
and why. When enemy agents try to 
seize the jewels, Jim vanquishes them 
and the gems are turned over to Ameri- 
can manufacturers to be used in mak- 
ing fine precision dies. 

Boy Meets Baby 

Cast: Robert Cummings (Incomplete). Producer- 
Director: Henry Koster. Original: Regis Ginoux, 
Jacques Thery. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Farce comedy, adapted from a French 
stage production. 

Broadway 

Cast: George Raft, Brod Crawford, Edmund 
MacDonald (Incomplete). Producer: Bruce Man- 
ning. Director: William Seiter. Original: No 
Credits. Screenplay: Bruce Manning, Felix Jack- 
son, John Bright. 

Story of the Gay White Way during 
the reckless prohibition era. 

Butch Minds the Baby 

Cast: Virginia Bruce, Broderick Crawford, Dick 
Foran, Porter Hall. Producer: Jules Levey. Di- 
rector: Albert S. Rogell. Original: Damon Run- 
yon. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Comedy about the underworld, 
adapted from one of Damon Runyon’s 
short stories. 

Don't Get Personal 

Cast: Hugh Herbert, Mischa Auer, Jane Fra- 
zee, Anne Gwynne, Robert Paige, Ernest Truex. 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


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PRODUCTIONS 


Winner of 



GOLD-DIGGERS OF 1933 

BLUE RIBBON AWARD, JUNE, 1933 


TUGBOAT ANNIE 

BLUE RIBBON AWARD, AUGUST, 1933 


THE WIZARD OF OZ 

BLUE RIBBON AWARD, SEPTEMBER, 1939 


BLOSSOMS IN THE DUST 

BLUE RIBBON AWARD, AUGUST, 1941 




Now in Release: 

UNHOLY PARTNERS 

(M-G-M) 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


BUSBY BERKELEY 

Director 

4 

STRIKE UP THE BAND 

BABES IN ARMS 

Current Release: 

BABES ON BROADWAY 

Coming: 

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131 



Producer: Ken Goldsmith. Director: Charles La- 
mont. Original: Bernard Feins. Screenplay: Hugh 
Wedlock jr. 

Hugh Herbert, who ardently listens 
to all the radio serials, inherits a pickle 
factory which sponsors one of the pro- 
grams, which allows him to indulge his 
whim of helping the hero and heroine 
• Robert Paige and Anne Gwynne) to 
keep their story-book marriage from 
going on the rocks. He is so persuasive 
they finally do fall in love and are 
married. 

Drums of the Congo 

Cast: Ona Munson, Don Terry, Stuart Erwin, 
Peggy Moran, Richard Lane. Producer: Henry 
MacRae. Director: Christy Cabanne. Original: 
No Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 

A band of explorers sets out for the 
African jungles to find a meteorite, re- 
ported to have fallen somewhere in the 
interior, and which contains valuable 
minerals needed in defense work. 

The Eagle Squadron 

Cast: Robert Stack, Diana Barrymore, Ion 
Hall, Eddie Albert, Leif Erikson, Nigel Bruce, 
Alan Hale jr., Todd Karns. Producer: Walter F. 
Wanger. Director: Arthur Lubin. Original: C. S. 
Forrester. Screenplay: Norman Reilly Raine. 

Tale of American volunteers who 
have enlisted in Britain’s R. A. F. 

Exile Express 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: 
Not Set. Original Screenplay: Charles Evedon. 

Adventure melodrama. 

Frisco Lil 

Cast: Irene Hervey, Kent Taylor, Jerome Co- 
wan, Minor Watson, Samuel S. Hinds, Matty 
Fain. Producer: Paul Malvern. Director: Erie C. 
Kenton. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

Lillian (Irene Hervey), a young law 
student, in love with her instructor, is 
unaware that she is the daughter of a 
famous gambler When the gambler, 
Jeff (Minor Watson) falls in a trap, 
Lillian uses her knowledge of the law — 
and of cards — to extricate him. Pete 
( Kent Taylor ) , the professor, proves 
his love by coming to Lillian’s aid. 

Ghost of Frankenstein 

Cast: Lon Chaney jr.. Sir Cedric Hardwicke, 
Bela Lugosi, Lionel Atwill, Ralph Bellamy, Eve- 
lyn Ankers. Producer: George Waggner. Direc- 
tor: Erie C. Kenton. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

In which Frankenstein’s monster is 
revived when the townspeople blow up 
Frankenstein’s castle. The monster 
goes to the home of Harwicke, who at- 
tempts to humanize it, but with disas- 
trous results. 

Juke Box Jenny 

Cast: Ken Murray, Harriet Hilliard, Iris Adrian, 
Don Douglas, Marjorie Gateson, Joe Brown jr. 
Producer: Joseph G. Sanford. Director: Harold 
Young. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

In which the secrets of the juke-box 
industry are revealed — with music sup- 
plied by Harriet Hilliard and the or- 
chestras of Charlie Barnet, Wingy Ma- 
none and Milt Herth. 

Lady in a Jam 

Cast: Irene Dunne, Ralph Bellamy, Patric 
Knowles, Hardie Albright, Charles Kane. Pro- 
ducer: Gregory LaCava. Director: Gregory La 
Cava. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

Miss Dunne portrays a wealthy, pro- 
tected woman who sets out to see how 
the other half lives. 

The Mad Doctor of Market Street 

Cast: Una Merkel, Lionel Atwill, Nat Pendle- 
ton, Claire Dodd, Richard Davies, John Eldredge. 


Producer: Paul Malvern. Director: Joseph H. 
Lewis. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

Making her fourteenth trip to Aus- 
tralia in the hopes of finally snagging 
her reluctant fiance. Aunt Margaret 
(Una Merkel) accompanied by her 
niece, Patricia (Claire Dodd) runs into 
a mess of trouble, including a prize- 
fighter (Nat Pendleton), a mad doctor 
(Lionel Atwill), a shipwreck and a tribe 
of savage headhunters. 

Mississippi Gambler 

Cast: Kent Taylor, Frances Langford, John 
Litel, Claire Dodd, Shemp Howard, Douglas 
Fowley. Producer: Paul Malvern. Director: John 
Rawlins. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

Johnny (Kent Taylor), newspaper- 
man, gets into a cross-country race in 
pursuit of a murderer — at the end of 
which he not only finds the killer, but 
discovers the loveliest girl in the world, 
Beth (Prances Langford), singer and 
entertainer aboard a gambling barge. 
She helps him track down the crim- 
inals. 

Mystery of Marie Roget 

Cast: Marie Montez, Patric Knowles, Marie 
Ouspenskaya, Edward Norris, John Litel. Pro- 
ducer: Paul Malvern. Director: Phil Rosen. Origi- 
nal: Edgar Allen Poe. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Concerns the disappearance of a Pa- 
risian matinee idol, and of how an as- 
tute detective solved the problem. 

No Murder to Guide Her 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Ken Goldsmith. Direc- 
tor: Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: 
Homer McCoy, Brenda Weisberg. 

Story of a feminine detective. 

North to Klondike 

Cast: Brod Crawford, Lon Chaney jr., Andy 
Devine, Evelyn Ankers, Dorothy Granger, Willie 
Fung, Keye Luke. Producer: Paul Malvern. Di- 
rector: Erie C. Kenton. Original: No Credits. 
Screenplay: No Credits. 

Johnny (Brod Crawford), a yoimg 
mining expert, goes into the Klondike 
seeking gold, but instead finds adven- 
ture — and love. 

Ride 'Em. Cowboy 

Cast: Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, the Merry 
Macs, Dick Foran, Johnny Mack Brown, Anne 
Gwynne, Samuel S. Hinds, Richard Lane, Doug- 
las Dumbrille. Producer: Alex Gottlieb. Director: 
Arthur Lubin. Original: No Credits: Screenplay: 
No Credits. 

Duke (Bud Abbott) and Willoughby 
(Lou Costello), a pair of drugstore cow- 
boys from Brooklyn, get jobs as peanut 
and hotdog vendors at a Long Island 
rodeo, then find themselves shanghaied 
through their own blundering into a 
transcontinental jaunt as nursemaids 
to a herd of wild steers and bucking 
broncos. 

The Saboteur 

Cast: Robert Cummings, Priscilla Lane, Nor- 
man Lloyd, Guy Kibbee, Murray Alper, Otto 
Kruger. Producer: Frank Lloyd Director: Alfred 
Hitchcock. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

Concerns a sabotage ring, first dis- 
covered operating in airplane plants in 
California, and chased to the shinyards 
of New York where it is rounded up. 

The Spoilers 

Cast: John Wayne, Marlene Dietrich, Richard 
Barthelmess, Margaret Lindsay, Harry Carey. 
Producer: Frank Lloyd. Director: Ray Enright. 
Original: Rex Beach. Screenplay: Lawrence 
Hazard, Tom Reed, 

Alaskan adventure drama, from the 
famous novel by Rex Beach. 

The Strange Case of Dr. R. X. 

Cast: Patric Knowles, Anne Gwynne, Lionel 
Atwill, Mona Barrie, Shemp Howard, Paul 


Cavanagh, Samuel S. Hinds. Producer: Jack 
Bernhard. Director: William Nigh. Original: No 
Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Jerry Church (Patric Knowles), a de- 
tective, is called in to solve the mystery 
of the identity of a mysterious avenger 
known only as “Dr. R. X.’’ Church 
marries Kit (Anne Gwynne), a writer 
of mystery stories, and is captured by 
the killer. The detective outwits him, 
however, and solves the case in a 
rough-and-tumble battle. 

There's One Born Every Minute 

Cast: Hugh Herbert, Tom Brown, Peggy Mo- 
ran, Guy Kibbee, Gus Schilling, Edgar Kennedy. 
Producer: Ken Goldsmith. Dir.ector: Harold 

Young. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

Lemuel P. Twine (Hugh Herbert) is 
heir to the Twin Tasty Pudding busi- 
ness and a candidate for mayor of Wit- 
umpka Falls. How he wins, despite the 
machinations of Lester Cadwalader 
(Guy Kibbee), proprietor of the Gen- 
eral Store and local political boss, sup- 
plies the plot; Tom Brown and Peggy 
Moran the romance. 

Tough as They Come 

Cast: Paul Kelly, Helen Parrish, Billy Halop, 
Bernard Punsley, Huntz Hall, Gabriel Dell, Ann 
Gillis. Producer: Ken Goldsmith, Director: Wil- 
liam Nigh. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

Billy Halop, one of the slum kids, 
wants a law apprenticeship but winds 
up working for a loan-shark outfit. He 
finds the job distasteful, but carries 
on because he has ambitions to marry 
Helen Parrish, a girl from the “other 
side of the tracks.” He soon learns his 
boss is operating a gyp outfit, however; 
tells the Legal Aid Society all he knows 
about its operations, and winds up a 
hero in the eyes of his pals — and Helen. 

Trail of the Yukon 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: George Waggner. 
Director: Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: Scott Darling. 

Adventure melodrama with an 
Alaskan locale. 

Treat 'Em Rough 

Cast: Ecidie Albert, Peggy Moran, William 
Frawley, Lloyd Corrigan, Truman Bradley. Pro- 
ducer: Marsfiall Grant. Director: Ray Taylor. 
Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 

On the eve of his chance to win the 
boxing championship. Bill (Eddie Al- 
bert) gives up the ring to go back to 
his home town and fight the lawless in- 
terests that are trying to trap his father 
in a million-dollar oil-graft scandal. 

Unseen Enemy 

Cast: Leo Carrillo, Andy Devine, Don Terry, 
Irene Hervey. Producer: Marshall Grant. Direc- 
tor: John Rawlins. Original: No Credits. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

With San Francisco its locale, this 
concerns the deportation of enemy 
aliens. 

What's Cookin', Soldier? 

Cast: Andrews Sisters, Gloria Jean, Charles 
Butterworth, Billie Burke, Jane Frazee, Robert 
Paige, Leo Carrillo, Franklin Pangborn. Pro- 
ducer: Ken Goldsmith. Director: Edward Cline. 
Original: No Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 

A group of youngsters trying to 
crash the stage succeeds through the 
aid of a famous radio singer. 

You're Telling Me 

Cast: Hugh Herbert, Anne Gwynne, Robert 
Paige, Ernest Truex, Edward Ashley. Producer: 
Ken (joldsmith. Director: Charles Lament. Origi- 
nal: No Credits. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Hubert (Hugh Herbert) gets a job in 
a radio advertising concern and, as a 
talent scout on the trail of a big-time 
explorer, doubles in love and trouble. 


132 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


WARNER BROS, 


Across the Pacific 

Cast: Ann Sheridan, Dennis Morgan (Incom- 
plete). Producer: Not Set. Director: Not Set. 
Original: Robert Carson. Screenplay: No Credits. 

From the Saturday Evening Post 
serial, a story of Japanese espionage in 
Hawaii. 

Burning Daylight 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: 
Not Set. Original: Jack London. Screenplay: 
James Gow. 

From one of Jack London’s stories of 
Alaska and San Francisco during the 
Alaskan gold rush. 

Casablanca 

Cast: Ann Sheridan, Ronald Reagan, Dennis 
Morgan (Incomplete). Producer: Not Set. Direc- 
tor: Not Set. Original: Murray Burnett, Jean 
Alison. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Relates the adventures of a group of 
war refugees in French Morocco. 

The Constant Nymph 

Cast: Charles Boyer, Joan Fontaine, Alexis 
Smith (Incomplete). Producer: Henry Blanke. Di- 
rector: Edmund Goulding. Original: Margaret 
Kennedy. Screenplay: No Credits. 

From the famed novel and play. 

The Damned Don't Cry 

Cast: Ida Lupino (Incomplete). Producer: Not 
Set. Director: Not Set. Original: Harry Hervey. 
Screenplay: James M. Cain. 

Relates the battle of a courageous 
girl against the odds of environment. 
From the novel of the same name. 

The Desert Song 

Cast: Dennis Morgan, Irene Manning (Incom- 
plete). Producer: Not Set. Director: Not Set. 
Original: Sigmund Romberg. Screenplay: Charles 
Grayson. 

Dennis Morgan will portray the “Red 
Shadow,” Arabian marauder, in the 
musical to be based upon the celebrat- 
ed stage operetta. 

Desperate Journey 

Cast: Errol Flynn, Kaaren Verne, Raymond 
Massey, Jack Carson, Ronald Reagan, John Lo- 
der. Producer: Not Set. Director: Raoul Walsh. 
Original: No Credits. Screenplay No Credits. 

Adventure-drama with a U. S. -Jap- 
anese war background. 

The Edge of Darkness 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: 
Not Set. Original: William Woods. Screenplay: 
No Credits. 

From the novel of the same name. 

Escape From Crime 

Cast: Humphrey Bogart, Brenda Marshall, 
Richard Travis, Donald Crisp, Chick (Chandler. 
Producer: Walter MacEwan. Director: Lewis 
Seiler. Original: Daniel Fuchs. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

Crime melodrama 

The Fortune Teller 

Cast: Gloria Warren (Incomplete). Producer: 
Not Set. Director: Not Set. Original: Victor 
Herbert. Screenplay: No Credits. 

Musical, based upon the famous light 
opera of the same name by the late 
Victor Herbert. 

Forty Whacks 

Cast: Humphrey Bogart, Mary Astor (Incom- 
plete). Producer: Not Set. Director: Not Set. 
Original: Goeffrey Homes. Screenplay: Dale Van 
Every. 

Mystery melodrama reuniting the 
stars of “The Maltese Falcon.” 


Further Adventures of the 

Maltese Falcon 

Cast: Humphrey Bogart, Mary Astor, Peter 
Lorre, Sidney Greenstreet, Barton MacLane. Pro- 
ducer: Not Set. Director: John Huston. Original 
Screenplay: John Huston. 

A sequel to “The Maltese Falcon” 
v.'herein are related the continued ef- 
forts of Bogart, as Samuel Spade, to 
locate that priceless bird. 

The Gay Sisters 

Cast: George Brent, Barbara Stanwyck, Nancy 
Coleman, Geraldine Fitzgerald, Donald Woods, 
Larry Simms, Gene Lockhart. Producer: Henry 
Blanke. Director: Irving Rapper. Original: 
Stephen Longstreet. Screenplay: Lenore Coffee. 

Concerns three wealthy sisters, heir- 
esses to a copper-baron’s millions, and 
how they react to riches. 

Gentleman Jim 

Cast: Errol Flynn (Incomplete). Producer: Not 
Set. Director: Not Set. Original: No Credits. 
Screenplay: No Credits. 

The biography of James J. Corbett, 
one-time heavyweight boxing cham- 
pion of the world. 

George Washington Slept Here 

Cast: Jack Benny (Incomplete). Producer: 
Jerry Wald, Jack Saper. Director: Not Set. Ori- 
ginal: George S. Kaufman, Moss Hart. Screen- 
play: No Credits. 

Film version of the musical comedy 
which was a Broadway hit. 

The Hard Way 

Cast: Ida Lupino (Incomplete). Producer: Not 
Set. Director: Vincent Sherman. Original: Jerry 
Wald. Screenplay: Irwin Shaw. 

Romantic drama. 

Kings Row 

Cast: Ann Sheridan, Robert Cummings, Ron- 
ald Reagan, Betty Field, Charles Coburn, Claude 
Rains, Judith Anderson. Producer: David Lewis. 
Director: Sam Wood. Original: Henry Bellaman. 
Screenplay: Casey Robinson. 

The story of a typical A.merican small 
tov.'n and of how it influences the desti- 
nies of the people in it, based on the 
best-seller by Henry Bellaman. 

Klondike 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Jerry Wald. Director; 
Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: 
No Credits. 

story of the Alaskan gold rush of 
1898. 

The Man Who Came to Dinner 

Cast: Bet.ty Davis, Ann Sheridan, Monty Wool- 
ley, Jimmy Durante, Billie Burke, George Bar- 
bier, Grant Mitchell. Producers: Jack Saper, Jerry 
Wald. Director: William Keighley. Original: 
George S. Kaufman, Moss Hart. Screenplay: 
Julius J. and Philip G. Epstein. 

Sheridan Whiteside 'Monty Woolley), 
insufferable but amusing literary pest, 
comes to dinner at the home of a 
stuffed-shirt family, suffers an injury 
and stays indefinitely — during which he 
runs the household like a tyrant, trys 
to break up a romance between his sec- 
retary and a newspaperman, and gener- 
ally makes things miserable for every- 
one but himself. 

Nobody Lives Forever 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: Not 
Set. Original: W. R. Burnet. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

Gangster melodrama. 

Peter Biddle, Air Warden 

Cast: Ann Sheridan, Ronald Reagan (Incom- 
plete). Producer: Not Set. Director: Not Set. 
Original: Edwin Gilbert. Screenplay: Edwin 
Gilbert. 

Concerns a wealthy playwright who is 
pressed into service as an air warden. 

Pittsburgh Pilot 

Cast: Ronald Reagan, Joan Leslie, Richard 


Travis (Incomplete). Producer: Not Set. Director: 
Not Set. Original Screenplay: Charles Grayson. 

Relates the exploits of America’s 
first ace in World War II — Lt. Boyd 
(Buzz) Wagner, now doing aviation 
combat duty in the Philippines. 

Rhapsody in Blue 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: 
Not Set. Original: Ira Gershwin, Kathryn Scola. 
Screenplay: Robert Rossen, Clifford Odets. 

The biography of George Gershwin, 
which will include many excerpts from 
his musical compositions. 

Saratoga Trunk 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: Not 
Set. Original: Edna Ferber. Screenplay: No 
Credits. 

story of the early days in the west, 
from the hit novel of the same name. 

Shadow of Their Wings 

Cast: Ann Sheridan, Jack Carson, Dennis 
Morgan, George Tobias. Producer: Not Set. Di- 
rector: Lloyd Bacon. Original Screenplay: Har- 
rison Orkow, Byron Morgan. Adaptation: Rich- 
ard Macaulay. 

Concerns the adventures of four mid- 
west youths working in a huge aircraft 
plant on the Pacific Coast. 

Songs of the Fighting 69th 

Cast: Not Set. Producer: Not Set. Director: 
Not Set. Original: No Credits. Screenplay: 
Charles Grayson. 

Designed as a sequel to “The Fighting 
69th,” this will be based on the current 
conflict. 

Spy Swatters 

Cast: Jimmy Durante, Phil Silvers, Peggy Dig- 
ains (Incomplete). Producer: Not Set. Director: 
Not Set. Original Screenplay: George Beatty, 
Paul Gerard Smith. 

Espionage comedy, reuniting the com- 
edy team of Jimmy Durante and Phil 
Silvers, which starred in “You’re in the 
Army Now.” 

Watch on the Rhine 

Cast: Not Set. Producer-Director: Herman 

Shumlin. Original: Lillian Heilman. Screenplay: 
No Credits. 

Anti-Nazi play, chosen the best of 
1941 by the New York Critics’ Circle. 
Its author also wrote “The Little 
Poxes.” 

The Widow Wouldn't Weep 

Cast: Jack Benny (Incomplete). Producer: Not 
Set. Director: Not Set. Original: Dalton Trumbo. 
Screenplay: Richard Macaulay, Arthur T. Her- 
man. 

Comedy starring the radio player. 

Wild Bill Hickok Rides 

Cast: Bruce Cabot, Constance Bennett, War- 
ren William, Betty Brewer, Walter Catlett, Ward 
Bond. Producer: Edmund Grainger. Director: 
Ray Enright. Original Screenplay: Charles 
Grayson, Paul Gerard Smith, Raymond Schrock. 

Western, relating the exploits of Wild 
Bill Hickok (Bruce Cabot), his ro- 
mance with a lady gambler (Constance 
Bennett) and his struggle to rid the 
community of villainy in the person of 
Warren William. 

Yankee Doodle Dandy 

Cast; James Cagney, Joan Leslie, Richard 
Whorf, Jean Cagney, Frances Langford. Pro- 
ducer: William Cagney. Director: Michael Curtiz. 
Original Screenplay: Robert Bruckner. 

The biography of George M. Cohan, 
famed songwriter, playwright and 
actor, whose role is essayed by James 
Cagney. 

The Young and the Brave 

Cast: Not Set. Producers: Jerry Wald, Jack 
Saper. Director: Not Set. Original Screenplay: 
Dean Franklin Reisner. 

story of today’s American flying 
heroes. 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


133 



f 


The First Year of 
Arbitration 

(Continued from page 16) 
the independent exhibitor," he said, 
''but its presence cannot be ignored. 
The problem of seeing that inde- 
pendent exhibitors secure the bene- 
fit of an expert presentation of their 
cases is one which the national and 
regional associations of such ex- 
hibitors may be able to solve, but 
it does not appear to have been 
solved to date. This may be due 
in part to the fact that many ex- 
hibitor organizations have delib- 
erately discouraged arbitration rath- 
er than furthering the use of the 
system." 

The use of technical defenses in 
the form of motions to dismiss for 
want of jurisdiction, employed by 
the distributors to prevent decision 
on the merits of many complaints, 
evidently with a view to restricting 
the scope of matters to be arbi- 
trated, came in for criticism. "Inso- 
far as the department is concerned," 
he said, "such restriction tends to 
similarly restrict the extent to which 
the department may recognize such 
a system as a valid substitute for 
other relief." 

Asserting that there has been com- 
plaint of the limited character of 
the relief available under Section 
VIII relating to unreasonable clear- 
ance in appeal board decisions, 
Wright said the department recog- 
nized such a failure existed. "The 
decree unit," he said, "is of the 
opinion that the section has not pro- 
vided the relief against unreason- 
able clearance to the extent which 
the Sherman act requires and will 
therefore recommend trial of this is- 
sue in preference to continuance of 
the section in its present form at the 
conclusion of the trial period." The 
section, it was pointed out, could ncd; 
be changed without the consent of 
the distributors and it was admitted 
there was no unanimity of distribu- 
tor opinion in this regard. 

Summarizing the position of the 
anti- trust division, Wright included 
arbitration in speaking of the en- 
tire decree when he said: 

"The department, on the basis of 
its experience to date, has not at- 
tempted to finally judge the net re- 
sults of the decree in solving the 
problems it was intended to solve. 
The decree has certainly already 
supplied some relief to a substan- 
tial number of exhibitors from cer- 
tain unfair trade practices. It has 
not yet demonstrated that film li- 
censing discriminations inherent in 
the ownership of theatres by dis- 
tributors may be effectively reme- 
died by measures short of divorce- 
ment." 


INDEX of ADVERTISERS 


Motion Picture Section 


Page 

Astaire, Fred 54 

Autry, Gene 94-5 

Ayres, Lew Ill 

Benny, Jack 113 

Berkeley, Busby 131 

Boyer, Charles 58 

Bronston, Samuel 67 

Brulatour, Inc., J. E 3 

Capra, Frank 113 

Colbert, Claudette 46 

Cooper, Gary 42 

Crosby, Bing 40 

Darmour, Larry 81 

Davis, Bette 61 

DeSylva, B. G 75 

Disney Productions, Walt 18 

Dunne, Irene 121 

Durbin, Deanna 96 

Freed, Arthur 103 

Garnett, Tay 69 

Grable, Betty 108 

Hathaway, Henry 43 

Hayes, George "Gabby" 107 

Hitchcock, Alfred 47 

Hope, Bob 123 

Hughes Productions, Howard 127 

Keighley, William 117 

Korda, Alexander 87 

Lasky, Jesse L 63 

Leisen, Mitchell 79 


Page 

LeRoy, Mervyn 130 

Lloyd Productions, Inc., Frank 119 

Lubin, Arthur 105 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 2nd Cover 

National Screen Service 3rd Cover 

National Theatres 85 

Pine, William H 117 

Rooney, Mickey 57 

Schlesinger, Leon 107 

Seiter, William A 65 

Seiznick, David 0 71 

Sherman, Harry 77 

Simon, S. Sylvan Ill 

Skouras Theatres Corp 108 

Smith, Pete 107 

Spence, Ralph 83 

Stromberg, Hunt 73 

Technicolor, Motion Picture Corp 93 

Temple, Shirley 99 

Toler, Sidney 115 

Thomas, William C 117 

Tracy, Spencer 101 

20th Century-Fox Film Corp 

Back Cover 

United Artists Corp 17 

Universal Pictures Co., Inc...9, 1 1, 13, 15 

Wayne, John 115 

Warner Bros 4, 5 


Modern Theatre Section 


Page 


Adler Sign Letter Co 170 

Advance Mfg. Co 168 

American Seating Co 138 

Automatic Devices Co 172 

Chicago Expansion Bolt Co 172 

Chicago Hardware Foundry Co 170 

Continental Lithograph Corp 166 

De-Fi Manufacturing Co 170 

Droll Theatre Supply Co 168 

G-M Laboratories, Inc 172 

General Chair Co 170 

General Electric Co 159 

Hey wood- Wakefield 157 

Ideal Seating Co 170 

International Seat Co 169 


Page 


International Projector Corp 173 

Kroehler Mfg. Co 165 

Manley, Inc 161 

National Carbon Co., Inc 171 

National Theatre Supply Co 167 

S. O. S. Cinema Supply Corp 172 

Strong Electric Corp 137 


Union Carbide and Carbon Corp 171 

United States Air Conditioning Corp. 163 


Vallen, Inc 166 

Wagner Sign Service, Inc 136 

Wolk, Edw. ,H 168 

Wood Conversion Co 175 


134 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


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BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 




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leMODERITHMTIlE 

UEm^lCU MUETEXHCE SECTION of BflXOFFICE 


(Title registered U. S. Patent Office) 


Issue oi FEBRUARY 21, 1942 


J. HARRY TOLER, Managing Editor 


Vol. IX. - No. 3 


Topics: 

structural Records of 1941 and a 

Forecast of the 'Near Future 140 


Another Year of Marked Achievement 
Despite All Restraints 


Pictorial Review of the Projects 

of 1941 141 


-K 


During 1940 theatre building and general property improvement were 
held safely within what would otherwise have been boom proportions by 
inter-industrial disputes and indecisions culminating finally in the now famous 
Consent Decree, the wisdom or workability of which will not now be discussed. 


The Overall Pattern for Peace-Time 

Theatre Planning 158 

edited by HAL PEREIRA 

-K 


However, during 1941 there was a noticeable decline in the fraternal hos- 
tilities, and the whole theatre industry showed remarkable promise of having 
made peace with itself. The calm presaged an era of prosperity for moving 
picture business in toto, and the industry was again on the verge of a new 
building boom. 


Probable Effect of Priorities on 

Theatre Property Improvement. ...162 


Then came priorities and the government's pre-emption of materials vital 
to the preparation for defense. And finally, at the end of the year, the infam- 
ous incident at Pearl Harbor which electrified the entire nation and unified it 
overnight in one huge purpose: To lick hell out of Hitler and his Japs! 


The Year Just Past in New Product 

Development 164 

by HELEN KENT 

¥ 

“All Thru the House” — a Manual of 

Modern Theatre Maintenance 174 

by ANSEL M. MOORE 

¥ 

The Key to Better Buying 177 


Now we are at war! New theatre building can wait. It will bide its time 
willingly, granting full right-of-way to a war that must be won first. The 
further restraints of 1942 will be accepted cheerfully. 

More acute scarcity of materials and equipments may be anticipated. 
Ingenuity of the highest type will be called for in maintaining present theatre 
properties, that they may not literally fall apart, and thus falter or fail in the 
special propaganda motion pictures theatres are called upon to spread in 
the successful prosecution of this war. 

The propaganda we refer to is that of Pollyanna — the spreading of Cheer- 
fullness, Courage and Confidence to the nation. Morale will be nourished in 
more than 18,000 movie theatres throughout the United States and the Domin- 
ion of Canada. 


¥ 

Theatre Equipment and Supply 

Dealers 184 



Published 14 times yearly by Associated Publica- 
tions every fourth Saturday as a section of BOX- 
OFFICE and included in all Sectional Editions of 
the AP group, including the annual BOXOFFICE 
BAROMETER. Contents copyrighted, 1942; repro- 
duction rights reserved. All editorial or general 
business correspondence relating to The MODERN 
THEATRE section should be addressed to Pub- 
lisher's Representative, Harrison Toler Company, 
332 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111., or Eastern 
Representative: A. J. Stocker, 9 Rockefeller Plaza, 
Nevr York. 


The enforced dearth of new theatre building for the duration will be sub- 
stantially compensated for by the active determination of the majority of 
exhibitors to keep their properties at a high level of appearance and operat- 
ing efficiency, despite all restraints. 

The growing popularity of motion pictures as a source of entertainment 
and relief from hard work and worry and wartime nerves, is already ap- 
proaching a high pitch. 

It is not, therefore, unsafe to predict unusual pros- 
perity for our industry after the war; provided theatre 
owners will protect their present investments in House 
Appeal. 

We review the past year and predicate our forecast 
of the future on the belief that theatre business will come 
through it all, and with flying colors. 

I 






structural Records of 1941 aud a 


Forecast of the Hear Future 


D 

EFORE discussing style, quality and 
other characteristics of last year’s modern 
theatre projects, let us first present a sta- 
tistical report with a numerical analysis 
of the structural progress of 1941 in com- 
parison with the preceding years. The 
figures prove conclusively that, despite 
many obstacles, the trend to more and bet- 
ter theatres met no recession in 1941. 

There were 28 more new theatres opened 
in 1941 than in the preceding year, a sur- 
vey by Boxoffice correspondents shows. 

With 357 new projects entering the ex- 
liibition scene, as compared to 329 in 1940, 
the state-by-state analysis shows that 
seven states added no new houses in the 
past 12 months as compared with seven 
in that category in the preceding year. 

Ai'izona, District of Columbia, Idaho, 
Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, Rhode 
Island and South Dakota were without 
newly opened theatres in 1941, while in 
the previous 12 months the blank list 
showed Delaware, Idaho, Iowa, Montana, 
North Dakota and Vermont. 

Twenty-Five in Work 

However, there was, and still is, con- 
siderable activity by the government in 
camp theatres in various parts of the coun- 
try. The latest report shows at least 25 in 
work or planned. As against this boom, 
there is a decided tapering off by private 
operators hit by the priorities ruling and 
unable to secure materials such as steel 
and other essentials. Reports from the field 
also show a number of projects planned 
and even started were suspended because 
of the government ruling. 

In a quarter-by-quarter comparison be- 
tween 1941 and the year before, the 
records reveal 68 openings for the first 
three months of 1941 amounted to one less 
than the same quarter in 1940. For the 
second 1941 quarter, the total of 106 com- 
pares with 83 the same three months in 
’40. For the third quarter, the 87 new 
houses were five less than in the same 1940 
quarter and for the fourth quarter 97 new 
projects opened as compared with 86 for 
the last three months in 1940. 

Again Texas, and the south in general, 
assumed leadership in new theatres. The 
state reported 38 for 1941 and 25 in 1940. 
California and Canada each had 22 new 
projects entering the field. This means 
California is shy two over the preceding 
year when the total was 24, and Canada 
is up seven with 15 reported for 1940. 

Other southern states which showed 
marked activity in 1941 openings included 
Arkansas with 18, compared with 11 the 
preceding year; Florida with 18, as com- 
pared with 12 in 1940; Georgia seven in 
comparison with 10 in 1940; Kentucky with 


18 as compared with 11 the year before; 
Louisiana six in 1941 and 11 for 1940; 
Mississippi seven against six; North Caro- 
lina 14 as compared with 12; Oklahoma 
10 in 1941 and only four in 1940; South 
Carolina eight as compared with five; 
West Virginia four as compared with 13 
in 1940. 

In 1939 the number of theatres was 389. 

In the west, California held its own 
with 22 for 1941. The year before the total 
was 24. Illinois had 16 new openings, or 
four more than in 1940. Michigan reported 
13, the same as the year before. Missouri 
had 12, an increase of five over 1940. New 


York came through with 11 new projects 
three more than the preceding 12 months. 
Ohio maintained its pace with 17, one less 
than in 1940 and Pennsylvania witnessed 
13 new ventures, a drop of 10 over the 
preceding year. The state of Washington 
continued to contribute five as it did in 
1940. Tennessee, incidentally, dropped 
from 10 in 1940 to six last year. 

Massachusetts showed an increase of one 
with eight new houses listed for 1941. 
Maine and Maryland each had seven in 
1941 and two each in 1940. 

In all respects the second quarter of 
1941 was best. It not only showed 106 
new units opened, but also marked an in- 
crease of 23 over the same quarter in 1940 
and also nine more than the last quarter 
of the year when the total was 97. . 

According to latest indications, as re- 
ported from the field, there should be at 
least 55 to 75 new openings early in 1942. 
This is based on the figures which show 
(Continued on page 160) 


REPORT ON STRUCTURAL PROGRESS FOR THE YEAR 

This is a state-by-state record of new theatres which entered the field in 1941. 
The chart is based on quarterly surveys made last year and drawn from reports 
gathered by Boxoffice’s nation-wide corps of correspondents. 


State 

1st 

Quarter 

2nd 

Quarter 

3rd 

Quarter 

4th 

Quarter 

Total 

Alabama 

Arkansas 

O 

6 

1 

4 

0 

1 

"7 

5 

18 

California 

3 

6 

7 

6 

22 

Colorado 



1 

2 

3 

Connecticut 

1 

i 


2 

4 

Delaware 



1 

1 

Florida 

3 

8 

7 

18 

Georgia 


4 

3 


7 

Illinois 

i 

7 

7 

1 

16 

Indiana 


2 

1 


3 

Iowa 


2 

2 

i 

5 

Kansas 

3 



1 

4 

Kentucky 

5 

6 

3 

4 

18 

Louisiana 


3 

2 

1 

6 

Maine 

2 

1 



3 

Maryland 

2 

1 

i 

3 

7 

Massachusetts 

1 

4 

2 

1 

8 

Michigan 

1 

5 

2 

5 

13 

Minnesota 

1 


1 


2 

Mississippi 

1 

3 

3 


7 

Missouri 

2 

3 


7 

12 

Nebraska 

1 

1 


2 

4 

Nevada 


1 



1 

New Jersey 

i 

1 

i 


3 

New Mexico 




1 

1 

New York 

2 

2 

5 

2 

11 

North Carolina 

3 

4 

5 

2 

14 

Ohio 

2 

7 

1 

7 

17 

Oklahoma 

2 

2 

4 

2 

10 

Oregon 

1 


2 


3 

Pennsylvania 

4 

3 

2 

4 

13 

South Carolina 

2 

1 

1 

4 

8 

Tennessee 

3 

1 

1 

1 

6 

Texas 

7 

8 

7 

16 

38 

Utah 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

Vermont 




1 

1 

Virginia 

i 


1 

1 

3 

Washington 


3 

2 


5 

West Virginia 

2 

1 


i 

4 

Wisconsin 



5 

1 

6 

Wyoming 



1 


1 

Canada 

2 

9 

2 

9 

22 

Totals 

68 

106 

87 

97 

357 


140 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


\ 


PICTORIU REVIEW 


of the Projects of 1941 


The following sixteen pages comprise a presentation of seventeen mod- 
ern theatres selected from the many projects which we described in detail 
to readers of The Modern Theatre section of BOXOFFICE during 1941. We 
present them numerically and in the chronological order of original pre- 
sentation, to show the development and design trend of last year's theatre 
projects in various sizes, classes and locations, with an identification of 
material and service supply sources. 


I 

1 The RUSSELL 

Location: Millersburg, Ohio. 

(Pop. 2,200) 

Owners: Mr. and Mrs. Hoy L. 
Russell 

Architect: Col. Robt. S. Harsh. 
Seating Capacity: 500. 

Project: New construction. 
Views: The front and below 
(at left) the standee area and 
entrance from outer lobby. At 
right — the auditorium. 

Reference: The Modern Theatre sec- 
tion, issue of January 4, 1941; page 
52. 


IDENTIFICATION 

AIR DIFFUSERS: Anemostat Corp. of America. 
CARPET: Alexander Smith & Sons Carpet Co. 
COOLING COILS: Trane Company. 

DECORATING: Queen City Scenic Studios. 
EQUIPMENT CONTRACTOR: National Theatre Sup- 
ply Co., of Cleveland. 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR: C. J. Vogel Sons Con- 
struction Co. 

PROJECTION & SOUND: International Projector 
Corp. 

SEATING: Irwin Seating Co. 

STAGE CURTAIN: Queen City Scenic Studios. 













The PARKSIDE 


Location: Detroit, Michigan (Sub- 
urban). 

Owners: Moss Investment Com- 
pany. 

Architect: Bennett & Straight. 
Seating Capacity: 1,000. 

Project: New Construction. 
Views: Theatre front and fac- 
ade entrance to bowling rooms 
and bar and grill. Theatre audi- 
torium and (below) two views 
of the commodious 20-lane 
bowling arena operated in con- 
nection with the theatre. 

Reference: The Modern Theatre sec- 
tion, issue of February 1, 1941; 

page 54. 



IDENTIFICATION 

AIR CONDITIONING: McLouth Air Conditioning 
Corp. 

BOWLING EQUIPMENT: Brunswick-Balke-Collender 
Co. 

CARPETS: Bigelow-Sanford Carpet Co. 

COOLING: American Refrigerating Co. 

DRAPERIES: Mork-Green Studios. 

ELECTRICAL WORK: Jackson Electric Co. 

FRONT: ''Namelstone" Company. 

LIGHTING FIXTURES: Michigan Chandelier Co. 
PAINTING: Anthony Eugenio. 

PROJECTION: Brenkert Light Projection Co. 
SEATING: American Seating Co. 

SIGN & MARQUEE: Long Sign Co. 

SIGN LETTERS: Adler Silhouette Letter Co. 

SOUND EQUIPMENT: RCA Mfg. Co,, Inc. 





The TODAY 


(Newsreel) 


Location: Madison Street at 

Dearborn, Chicago, 111. 

Owner: Richard E. Beck. 
Designer: David Chapman. 
Seating Capacity: 325. 

Project: Complete conversion of 
old building. 

Views: Close-up of marquee 
and main entrance. At center 
(left) outer lobby and boxoffice. 
Right — the foyer lounge, and be- 
low the auditorium. 

Reference: The Modern Theatre sec- 
tion, issue of March 29, 1941; page 
38. 




IDENTIFICATION 

ACOUSTICAL MATERIAL: Sprayo-FIake Co. 

AIR CONDITIONING: Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. 

Co., by Kroeschell Eng. Co. 

AUDITORIUM MURALS: John Pratt. 

CARPET: Klearflax Carpeting Co., through The 


Slater Co. 

DESIGNER: David Chapman. 

FOYER MURALS: Miss Pat O'Brien. 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR: Krahl Construction Co. 
HAND-DRIERS: Chicago Hardware Foundry Co. 
LIGHTING FIXTURES: Belson Mfg. Co. 
PROJECTION: Brenkert Light Projection Co. 

SEATS: Kroehler Mfg. Co. 

SIGNS: Whiteway Sign Co. 

SOUND: RCA Mfg. Co., Inc. 

STRUCTURAL GLASS: Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Co. 
TOILET SEATS: Sterilseat Corp. 

WOOD VENEER: United States Plyvrood Corp. 



BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 





The ROYAL 


Location: Detroit, Michigan (Sub- 
urban). 

Owner: United Detroit Theatres. 
Architect: Charles N. Agree. 
Seating Capacity: 2,496. 

Project: New construction. 

Views: Exterior front elevation. 
Center (left) the lobby and at 
right the foyer standee area. 
Below, the auditorium. 

Reference: The Modern Theatre 

section, issue of April 26, 1941; 

page 36. 




IDENTIFICATION 

ACOUSTICAL MATERIAL: United States Gypsum Co. 
AIR CONDITIONING: Carbondale, by American Re- 
frigerating Co. 

AMPLIFIERS: Western Electric Co. 

.AUDITORIUM CARPET: Alexander Smi'.h & Sons Car- 
pet Co. 

CURTAIN CONTROLS: Novelty Scenic Studios, Inc. 
DECORATION: Thomas Dilorenzo. 

DRAPERIES & CURTAINS: Novelty Scenic Studios, 
Inc. 

EQUIPMENT CONTRACTOR: National Theatre Supply 
Co., Detroit. 

INTERIOR LIGHTING: Wolker & Co. 

LOBBY CARPET: Bigelovr-Sanford Carpet Co. 
LOUNGE FURNITURE: Davidson, Ltd. 

PROJECTORS: International Projector Corp. 

RUBBER MATS: Puritan Rubber Mfg. Co. 

SEATING: Heywood-Wakefield Co. 

SIGN LETTERS: Adler Silhouette Letter Co. 

SIGNS & MARQUEE: Walker & Co. 

SOUND HEADS: Western Electric Co. 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 






The KEN 


Location: Chicago, Illinois (South 
Side) 

Owners: B. Bannowitz and John 
Landis, 

Architect: Roy B. Blass. 
Decorating: Hanns R. Teichert. 
Seating Capacity: 885. 

Project: Complete modernization 
of old Kenwood Theatre. 

Views: Front and above (at 
right) main entrance lobby 
through glass doors. Center, 
ladies' lounge and below the 
auditorium with black-lighted 
civic murals. 

Reference; The Modern Theatre sec- 
tion, issue of May 24, 1941; page 40. 



IDENTIFICATION 

ACOUSTIC MATERIAL: Johns-Manville Corp. 

AIR CONDITIONING; York Ice Machinery Corp. 
CARPETS: Bigelow-Sanford Carpet Co., through 
Mandel Bros. 

FURNITURE: Davidson, Ltd. 

GLASS DOORS: Libbey-Owens-Ford Co., through 
City Glass Co. 

HAND DRIERS: Chicago Hardware Foundry Co. 
HEATING EQUIPMENT; Reynolds Corp. 

LIGHT FIXTURES: Mutual Metal Mfg. Co. 

MARBLE: Vermont Marble Co. 

MARQUEE: Whiteway Electric Sign & Maintenance 
Co. 

PLUMBING FIXTURES: Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co. 
PORCELAIN ENAMEL: Porcelain Products Co. 
POSTER CASES: Chicago Metal Covering Co. 
PROIECTORS: International Projector Corp. 

RUBBER MATTING: Goodyear Rubber Co. 

SCREEN: National Theatre Supply Co. 

SEATS: Kroehler Mfg. Co. 

SIGN LETTERS: Adler Silhouette Letter Co. 

SOUND: Motiograph Mirrophonic thru Droll Theatre 
Supply Co. 

TOILET PARTITIONS: Sanymetal Products Co. 
WOOD VENEERS: Wood Interiors of America. 




W The LAKE 

Location: Canandaigua, New 
York (Pop. 7,000). 

Owner: Schine Theatre Corp. 
Architect: Michael J. DeAngelis. 
Seating Capacity: 400. 

Project: New construction. 

Views: Front and auditorium. 

Reference: The Modern Theatre sec- 
tion, issue of June 21, 1941; page 30. 



IDENTIFICATION 

ACOUSTIC MATERIALS: Armstrong Cork Co. 

AIR CONDITIONING: Trane Heating Co. 
DECORATION: Meyo Construction Co. 

DISPLAY FRAMES: Stanley Frame Co. 

LIGHTING FIXTURES: Lighting Distributor Co. 
SCREEN: Walker-American Corp. 

SIGN & MARQUEE: General Outdoor Advertising 
Co. 

SIGN LETTERS: Wagner Sign Service, Inc. 

SOUND: International Projector Corp., through 

National Theatre Supply Co. 



The STAR 



IDENTIFICATION 

ACOUSTIC MATERIALS: Armstrong Cork Co. 

AIR CONDITIONING: Carrier Corp. 

CARPETS: Mohawk Carpet Mills, Inc. 

CURTAIN CONTROLS: Novelty Scenic Studios. 
DECORATION: Novelty Scenic Studios. 

GENERAL EQUIPMENT: Becker Theatre Supply Co. 
LIGHTING FIXTURES: Lighting Distributor Co. 
PROJECTORS: Motiograph, Ihc. 

PROJECTION LAMPS: C. S. Ashcraft Mfg. Co. 
RECTIFIERS: Baldor Electric Co. 

SCREEN: Walker-American Corp. 

SEATING: American Seating Co. 

SIGN & MARQUEE: Flexlume Sign Co. 

SIGN LETTERS: Adler Silhouette Letter Co. 
SOUND: RCA Mfg. Co., Inc. 


Location: Tonawanda, New York 
(Pop. 12,000). 

Owner: Dipson Theatre Corp. 
Architect: Michael J. DeAngelis. 
Seating Capacity: 980. 

Project: New construction replac- 
ing old Star Theatre. 

Views: Facade and below, the 
auditorium. 

Reference: The Modern Theatre sec- 
tion, issue of June 21, 1941; page 30. 




* 


V 


1 







% 


146 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 





8 The ARCADIA 

Location: Dallas, Texas (Neigh- 
borhood). 

Owners: Winfield Morten, Bob 
Clemmons and Lee Handley. 

Architects: Pettigrew & Worley. 
Seating Capacity: 1,042. 

Project: Rebuilding of former the- 
atre damaged by fire. 

Views: Front entrance, foyer 
(left) and ladies' lounge. Be- 
low — Auditorium as seen from 
balcony and main floors. 

Reference: The Modern Theatre sec- 
tion, issue of June 21, 1941; page 44. 


IDENTIFICATION 

ACOUSTIC MATERIAL: Certain-teed Products Corp. 
AIR CONDITIONING: Frigidaire Corp., through Joe 
Hoppe, Inc. 

ATTRACTION BOARDS: Wagner Sign Service, Inc. 
CARPETS: Alexander Smith & Sons Carpet Co. 
CASHIER'S CHAIR: Royal Metal Mfg. Co. 
CHANGE-MAKER: Universal Stamping & Mfg. Co. 
DECORATION: Eugene Gilboe. 

EQUIPMENT CONTRACTORS: National Theatre Sup- 
ply Co. 

FIREPROOF DOORS: Metal Products Co. 
FURNITURE: Anderson Studio. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS: Cowdin Bros. 

GLASS & MIRRORS: Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co. 
HEATING: Delco Appliance Div., through Joe 

Hoppe, Inc. 

LIGHT FIXTURES: Meletio Electric Co. 

MARQUEE: Waters Neon Co. 

MOTOR-GENERATOR: Hertner Eectric Co. 
PLUMBING EQUIPMENT: Kohler of Kohler. 
POPCORN MACHINE: Manley, Inc. 

PORCELAIN ENAMEL: Texlite, Inc. 

POSTER FRAMES: Universal Building Products Co. 
PROJECTORS: International Projector Corp. 
PROJECTION LAMPS: J, E. McAuley Mfg. Co. 
REWINDS: Goldberg Bros. 

SCREEN: Walker-American Corp. 

SEATING: American Seating Co. 

SIGN LETTERS: Wagner Sign Service, Inc. 

SOUND: International Projector Corp. 

TICKET MACHINE: General Register Corp. 

TOILET PARTITIONS: Henry Weis Mfg. Co. 


BOXOFFICE BARQMETER 







IDENTIFICATION 

CARPETS: Alexander Smith & Sons Carpet Co,, 
thru National Theatre Supply Co. 

DECORATING: T. Jagmin <S Co. 

DRAPERIES: National Theatre Supply Co. 

FRONT MATERIAL: United Cast Stone Co. 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR: Philip Gorelick. 
PROJECTORS: Motiograph, Inc., thru McArthur The- 
ater Equipment Co. 

SEATS: Ideal Seating Co. 

SIGN & MARQUEE: Long Sign Co. 

VENTILATING: Supreme-Aire, Inc. 



The CIVIC 


Location: Detroit, Michigan (Sub- 
urban). 

Owner: Joseph Miskinis. 

Seating Capacity: 1,400. 

Project: New construction. 

Views: Frontage and (left) 
trance lobby as seen from the 
mezzanine. Below, the audi*o-- 
ium and (inset) a close-ut3 of 
the chairs selected for the Civi'' 
(All nhotos courtesy Ideal Seat- 
ing Co ). 

Reference; The Modern Theatre sec- 
tion. issue of July 19, 1941; page 70. 








The STATE 


Location: Richmond, Indiana 
(Pop. 40,000). 

Owner: Robert L. Hudson. 
Architect: Erwin G. Fredrick. 
Decorating: Hanns R. Teich- 
ert. 

Seating Capacity: 1,000. 
Project: New construction. 
Views: Facade and elec- 

trical display and at left a 
close-up of clever display 
case in lobby. Below, (right) 
decorative detail in foyer 
and at bottom left, two views 
of the auditorium. 

Reference: The Modern Theatre 
section, issue of August 16, 1941; 
page 68 and issue of September 
13, 1941; page 70. 




'' 

m 





" ! 


. 



! 




IDENTIFICATION 
ACOUSTIC MATERIAL: Sprayo-Flake Co. 

AIR CONDITIONING: York Ice Machinery Corp. 
CARPETS: Alexander Smith & Sons Carpet Co. 
CEMENT TILE: Federal American Cement Co. 
DRAPERIES: Levinson & Sons. 

FANS & MOTORS: American Blower Corp. 

IIGHT FIXTURES: Mutual Metal Mfg. Co. 
LOBBY WALLS: U. S. Plywood Corp. 

PLUMBING FIXTURES: Standard Sanitary Corp. 
POSTER CASES: Anco Metal Co, 

PROJECTORS: International Projector Corp. 
RADIATORS: American Radiator Corp. 

SEATS: American Seating Co. 

STGN LETTERS: Adler Silhouette Letter Co, 
SOUND: International Projector Corp. 

STAGE HARDWARE: J. R. Clancy Co. 

STAGE LIGHTS: Belson Mfg. Co. 

TOILET PARTITIONS: Fiat Metal Co, 



BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


149 







The V E R N 


Location: Los Angeles, Calif. 
(Suburban). 

Owner: Eastland Theatres, 
Inc. 

Architect: S. Charles Lee. 

Project: All new theatre for 
refined real estate develop- 
ment. 

Views: Night and day per- 
spectives of exterior front. 
Below (inset) confectionery 
niche in foyer and main 
foyer lounge. 

Reference: The Modern Theatre 
section, issue of September 13, 
1941; page 38. 


IDENTIFICATION 

AIR CONDITIONING; Carrier Corp. 

CARPETS: Alexander Smith & Sons Carpet Co. 
GENERAL CONTRACTORS: Myers Bros. 

GENERAL EQUIPMENT CONTRACTORS: National 
Theatre Supply Co. 

LENSES: Bausch & Lomb Optical Co. 

PROJECTION LAMPS: J. E. McAuley Mfg. Co. 
PROJECTORS; International Projector Corp. 

SCREEN: Walker-American Corp. 

SEATS: American Seating Co. 

SOUND: International Projector Corp. 






The COLONIAL 


Location: Elmira, New York 
(Pop. 50,000). 

Owner: Elmira Colonial The- 
atres, Inc. 

Architect: Michael J. De- 
Angelis. 

Seating Capacity: 1,500. 

Project: Complete moderniza- 
tion of an antiquated theatre. 

Views: Front and lobby 

and foyer. At right, a side 
view of the auditorium and 
its decorative points of in- 
terest. 

Reference: The Modern Theatre 
section, issue of October 11, 1941; 
page 42. 




IDENTIFICATION 

AIR CONDITIONING: Carrier Corp. 

CARPETS: Mohawk Carpet Mills, Inc. 

CURTAIN CONTROLS: Automatic Devices Co. 
DECORATIONS: Novelty Scenic Studios. 

FRONT: Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co. 

FURNITURE: Doehler Metal Furniture Co. 
LIGHTING FIXTURES: Lighting Distributors, Inc. 
PROJECTION LAMPS: Strong Electric Corp. 
PROJECTORS: International Projector Corp. 
RECTIFIERS: General Electric Co. 

SCREEN: Walker-American Corp. 

SEATS: American Seating Co. 

SIGN LETTERS: Wagner Sign Service, Inc. 

SIGN & MARQUEE: Flexlume Corp. 

SOUND: Western Electric Co. 

TICKET REGISTER: General Register Corp. 



BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 




The FAIRFAX 


Location: Jacksonville, Fla. 
(Community). 

Management: Francis Seel. 
Architect: Roy A. Benjamin. 
Seating Capacity: 555. 
Project: New construction. 
Views: Front elevation and 
foyer and below, fore and 
aft views of the auditorium 
Inset, the projection room of 
the Fairfax. 

Reference: The Modern Theatre 
section, issue of October If, 1941; 
page 44. 



IDENTIFICATION 

AIR CONDITIONING: U. S. Air Conditioning Corp. 
CARPET: A. & M. Karagheusian, Inc. 
CHANGE-OVERS & REWINDS: Golde Mfg. Co. 
CUt^RENT CONVERTER: Hertner Electric Co. 
INTERIOR WALL TREATMENT: U. S. Plyvrood Corp 
PROJECTORS: L. J. Gardiner Mfg. Co. 

P'^OTECTION LAMPS: Brenkert Light Projeo:ion Co. 
SEATS: American Seating Co. 

SOUND: RCA M‘g. Co., Inc, 






IT The MAGIC 

Location: Barbourville, Ky. 
(Pop. 3,000). 

Owner: Paul T. Mitchell. 
Architect: Churchill & Son. 
Seating Capacity: 300, plus. 

Project: New construction 

with many novel innovations. 

Views: Front and at right, 
the photoelectric controlled 
glass entrance doors. Cen- 
ter, detail of oroscenium and 
decorative design on side 
walls. Below, fore and aft 
views of the auditorium. 

Reference: The Modern Theatre 
section, issue of November 8, 
1941; page 52. 


IDENTIFICATION ' 

CARPET: Alexander Smith & Sons Carpet Co. 
ENTRANCE DOORS: Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Co. 
GENERAL EQUIPMENT CONTRACTOR: National The- 
atre Supply Co. 

GLASS BLOCKS: Owens-Illinois Glass Co. 
MAGIC-EYE DOOR EQUIPMENT: Stanley Works. 
PROJECTION LAMPS: National Theatre Supply Co. 
PROJECTORS: International Projector Corp. 

SCREEN: Walker-American Corp. 

STAGE CURTAIN: Premier Scenery Studios. 
THEATRE FRONT: Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Co 
WALL & CEILING MATERIAL: United States Gypsum 
Co. 




BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


153 








The MANOS 


Location: Uniontown, Pa. 

(Pop. 20,000). 

Owner; Monessen Amuse- 
ment Co. 

Architect: Victor A. Rigau- 
mont. 

Project: New construction; 

functionally modern. 

Views: Night scene of the- 
atre front electrical display. 
Below, the large main lounge 
and at left, the auditorium 
as viewed from the stage. 

Reference: The Modern Theatre 
section, issue of November 8, 
1941; page 72. 


IDENTIFICATION 

AIR CONDITIONING: Westinghouse Electric & MIg. 
Co. 


CARPET: Alexander Smith & Sons Carpet Co. 
GENERAL EQUIPMENT CONTRACTOR: Alvin Seiler 


Co. 

PROJECTORS: Motiograph, Inc. 

SEATING: Ideal Seating Co. 

SIGN LETTERS: Adler Silhouette Letter Co. 

SIGN <S MARQUEE: Pittsburgh Outdoor Advertising 


Co. 

SOUND: Motiograph, Inc. 

UPHOLSTERY MATERIAL: Cotan Corp. 




154 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


m 



The MARION 


Location: Ocala, Florida (Pop. 

7 , 500 ). 

Owner: Florida State The- 
atres, Inc. 

Project: All new construc- 
tion. 

Views: The facade and im- 
mediately below, the ladies' 
powder room. At right be- 
low, fore and aft views of 
the auditorium. 

Reference: The Modern Theatre 
section, issue of December 6, 
1941; page 42. 








BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


IDENTIFICATION 
AIR CONDITIONING; York Ice Machinery Co. 
CARPET: Alexander Smith & Sons Carpet Co. 
CURTAIN CONTROL & TRACK; Automatic Devices 
Co. 

GENERAL EQUIPMENT: Wil-Kin Theatre Supply Co. 
HEARING AIDS: Acousticon Co. 

SEATING: American Seating Co. 

SOUND EQUIPMENT: RCA Mfg. Co., Inc. 




X 



The MIDTOWN 


Location: Detroit, Michigan 
(Downtown), 

Owners: Julius and Milton 
London. 

Architect: Bennett & Straight. 
Project: Conversion of an 
old garage building to a 
modern theatre. 

Views: The front and be- 

low, (at left) the lobby and 
confectionery counter in 
background. At right, the 
spacious standee foyer. At 
left, (below) the auditorium. 

Reference: The Modern Theatre 
section, issue of December 6, 
1941; page 54. 





IDENTIFICATION 

ACOUSTICAL MATERIAL: Celotex Corp. 

AIR CONDITIONING: Westinghouse Electric (S Mfg. 
Co. 

CARPETS: Alexander Smith & Sons Carpet Co. 
DECORATION: T. Jagmin, Inc. 

DRAPERIES: Mork-Green Studios. 

GENERAL EQUIPMENT: National Theatre Supply Co. 
MARQUEE: Long Sign Co. 

PROJECTION LAMPS: National Theatre Supply Co. 
PROJECTORS: International Projector Corp. 
RECTIFIERS: Strong Electric Corp. 

SCREEN: Walker-American Corp. 

SEATS: Ideal Seating Co. 

STGN LETTERS: Adler Silhouette Letter Co. 

SOUND: International Projector Corp. 
TEMPERATURE CONTROLS: Barber-Colman Co. 
TICKET MACHINE: General Register Corp. 
UPHOLSTERY MATERIALS: R, Allender Co. & Cotan 
Corp. 

VENETIAN BLINDS: French Windowshade Co. 




BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 




V 


N. 






E 


VERY picture you book can’t be a box office “smash.” You can’t have a money- 
maker on your screen every night in a row. BUT . . . you can give your patrons a 
swell, comfortable chair to enjoy every night in the week and every week in the year. 

And, you can do this with Heywood’s handsome CAMEO chair. This luxurious, 
comfortable chair makes every show seem just a little better . . . and more enjoyable. 
That’s why so many showmen have called the Cameo the “first real theatre man’s 
chair ever developed.” They know, from experience, that the swanky Cameo is a 
sure-fire box office attraction ... an attraction they can depend upon for every 
program. May we furnish details? 



for Peaee- 


The Overall Pattern 
time Theatre Planning 


T 

H. HE the: tra of tomorrow, referring 
not to the day that follows today; but to 
the period when all the world returns to 
peace-time pursuits and pleasures, will be 
radically different. The very name “thea- 
tre,” traditionally used to designate a 
place where moving pictures are shown 
will lose much, if not all, of its meaning- 
less insignificance. 

In fact, it is predicted that these pro- 
jects of the peaceful era will be so radi- 
cally different in form and function and 
operating procedure that some other more 
descriptive designation may be found neces- 
sary to define the new purpose and plan 
for magnificent diversion, to which picture 
smusement will be only one important in- 
cidental. Not cnly will a new type of edi- 
fice be in evidence but a new kind of man- 
agement will be needed — and this latter 
phase is of utmost importance right now. 

Obvious Omens 

We visualize an entirely new application 
of the moving picture to public interest 
and enjoyment and our prophesy is not 
based on dream stuff nor idle fancy. Al- 
ready and for some time, there have been 
plenty of hints and harbingers of a new 
type of institution to house moving pic- 
ture presentation of the future. The pre- 
diction is not, therefore, without prece- 
dent. 

However, great courage is required to 
practically relegate present theatre, de- 
sign technique and traditional manage- 
ment custom to the discard. So much in 
fact, that we have prevailed upon an ex- 
perienced practitioner to check the de- 
tails of our proposals, to tone them down 
where necessary, and to generally attune 
them to the practical side of accomplish- 
ment. 

Hal Pereira, of Chicago, who in associa- 
tion with his brother, Wm. L. Pereira of 
Hollywood is a member of the Advisory 
Board of The Modern Theatre Planning 
Institute, reluctantly consented to au- 
thenticate and rationalize our over-all pat- 
tern. Since the Pereiras are internation- 
ally known for having initiated many of 
the innovations we shall mention herein, 
our selection of Hal Pereira as a redactor 
may readily be understood. 

But let us preface our new housing pat- 
tern with the general and somewhat start- 
ling observation that not all moving pic- 
tures are amusing, despite the fact that 
they are still being offered largely for 
amusement purposes rather than as a rec- 
reational, educational inspiration to the 
higher social purpose of better living to 
which they are so readily adapted. 

Moving pictures sorely need a new en- 
vironment. With but few and minor dis- 
tinguishing features for the novelty effect, 
most new theatre buildings erected or re- 
constructed since the beginning of moving 


edited by HAL PEREIRA* 


pictures have basically been replicas of 
the original — still merely places to sit in 
and see a picture. 

So with this condition in mind and the 
result of it so clearly apparent in the de- 
cline cf movie-going during the past two 
decades, we foresee the abandonment of 
the “stock plan” for picture theatres and 
the adoption of a new planning technique 
that calls for originality of design in every 
project, each of which will be the recrea- 
tion center of its community, radiating its 
influence in all directions. 

Call for Innovation 

To paraphrase a currently popular prod- 
uct advertising catch-line, “Something 
new has been added to picture show busi- 
ness.” Certain of these new public inter- 
est ingredients have already been added 
and our over-all pattern calls for more, 
many more, in fact. 

“The theatre of tomorrow,” Hal Pereira 
reminds your reporter, “will of necessity 
be a civic project, for the very simple rea- 
son that John Q. Public has two businesses 
— his own and the moving picture business. 
The stars are his. The stories are about 
him — as he is or wants to be. The pro- 
ducer knows this, and when he forgets it, 
the picture flops.” 

Places in which pictures are to be sold 
and delivered to the public must become 
even more intimately involved in the 
“share the honors” plan, according to Mr. 
Pereira, who puts it this way: “The thea- 
tre is also his (the Public’s) and unless we 
give him his part of it, and allow him to 
help us operate it, he will build one of 
his own and thus develop a new medium 
in which to indulge his ego.” 

To illustrate a typical point of practical 
innovat’on for future theatres: The aver- 
age family is known to discuss, argue and 
even quarrel over pictures. Friendly dis- 
putes arise frequently in the family circle, 
regarding stories and stars, and the rela- 
tive merits of this or that picture. Why 
not, instead of a meaningless foyer, give 
over this space to a library function, in 
which questions of public interest in pic- 
ture production and picture people may 
be answered readily? A capable assistant 
manager should be a good librarian. It 
gives him poise and patience and a chance 
to understand people. 

The theatre of tomorrow will be man- 
ned and managed by men and women who 
know the business and are proud to be in 
it. It must and it will attract a new per- 
sonnel from intelligent groups and train 
them as operatives. It must offer a future 
to ambitious hard-working executives, in- 
stead of a field for opportunists who are 
attracted to show business because it’s easy 

*of Pereira & Pereira, theatre design consultants, 
Chicago and Hollywood. 


— if you can get a picture franchise and 
financial backing. 

A Day-Time Job 

In the interim of study and preparation 
for the coming of the theatre of tomorrow, 
we must follow the lead of Hollywood and 
clean up our business methods. Unless 
and until this is done, young blood — men 
with vision and promise and proper train- 
ing will not be ready. Right now, not 
later, we should open up the theatre as 
a nine o’clock (daylight) enterprise and 
adopt regular business hours. The theatre 
staff of tomorrow will do a day-time pub- 
lic relations job, in which maintenance, 
management and merchandising methods 
will consume normal business hours. 

The physical form of the theatre of to- 
morrow cannot be as costly or as elabarate 
as its predecessors of the show-off period. 
It doesn’t need to be. Simple buildings, 
purely functional furnishings, highly effi- 
cient equipment. Landscaped settings — 
areas conforming to and protecting com- 
munity zoning laws. Grouped amusements 
and recreational — educational enterprises 
in a given area, all serving as satellites 
(drawing attractions) to the principal 
planet — the picture show place of tomor- 
row. 

And here again in the interval before its 
formal induction, there is need for exhi- 
bitors to begin functioning with their lo- 
cal zoning boards — plotting and laying the 
groundwork for the future project. Now 
(not later on) is the time to organize 
competition and counter-attractions. Co- 
operate with them to the end that “all 
front doors will be next to yours.” 

Since the motion picture you sell teaches 
people and controls them; influences their 
tastes for all elements of living save reli- 
gion, which is a man’s own private affair, 
the theatre of tomorrow will naturally at- 
tract a higher type of stores and service 
shops to its community. The theatre por- 
tion of the project cannot be isolated; nor 
can it be predominated by other enterprises. 
It must have shops around it and nearby 
to make readily available those things the 
picture suggests. People are not long in- 
terested in things they cannot have, 
pronto. 

The Inquiring Architect 

The architect of the future theatre will 
need to know, and will ask pertinent ques- 
tions to learn what present theatre men 
know about your own business. Don’t 
consider him impertinent because he’ll do 
it for your benefit. After which he will 
try to convince you that a simple build- 
ing with a circulating library, a Legion 
room, a town museum, an art exhibit, a 
display room for church rummage sales 
a bowling alley, a music room, a milk bar 
— or any other thing people can operate 
and enjoy is good business. 

Many innovations will be suggested. 
Many others will suggest themselves to 
prospective theatre builders on the alert. 
They will listen because it is far cheaper 
to build functional theatres than those 
Spanish castles of another era or even 
the chrome-banded ultra-ultras called the 
modern theatres of today. When they 

(Continued on page 160) 


158 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 



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Find out how you can benefit 
with G-E Air Conditioning 
in your theatre. 


Send the coupon for free brochure, "Air Conditioning for Busi- 
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GENERAL & ELECTRIC 


GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. 

Div. 2571, Bloomfield, N. J. 

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Name 


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BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


159 


Structural Records of 1941 
and a Forecast of the 
Near Future 

(Continued from page 140) 


55 projects currently under construction 
and 28 planned. These, of course, include 
many of the army theatres. 

Look to Remodeling 

It is believed in exhibition circles that 
independent and major circuits will con- 
centrate additions on acquisitions of thea- 
tres now operated by small exhibitors and 
on the reopening of houses which have 
been dark for some time. The feeling is 
that new building will be reduced further 
in 1942 and that, in order to protect hold- 
ings, the takeover and refurbishing angle 
is the only alternative. It is also apparent 
the government must be satisfied where 
decree consenting companies are involved. 
The general impression is that, where the 
competitive angle is not so involved, the 
government will permit acquisitions of this 
sort. 

During the past year, major circuit ex- 
pansion was reduced to a minimum be- 
cause of the consent decree. However, a 
number of deals have been made with the 
consent of the government on the taking 
over of properties and buying into pro- 
jects where both parties would benefit. Be- 
fore giving its approval, however, the gov- 
ernment investigates each situation. 


THE FORECAST 


The theatre industry and all those 
connected with it in the varied capacities 
of structural supply and service, bowed 
promptly and willingly to the demands of 
all-out defense, which crystallized instant- 
ly with the declaration of war on De- 
cember 8, 1941. 

Any forecast of the near future as re- 
gards new theatre planning and the frui- 
tion of current plans must be predicated 
entirely on the fortunes of war. Adequate 
total defense comes first and finally com- 
plete Victory must be achieved before new 
theatre construction can be expected to re- 
sume the upward curve. 

But looking to and not far beyond the 
uncertain present, insofar as our subject 
is concerned, we can see an interim of en- 
forced curtailment in new theatre build- 
ing. During this interim practically all 
building activity will be confined largely to 
maintenance of properties, remodeling and 
such modernization of premises as will be 
permitted under the priorities of national 
defense. 

Favorable Factors 

During this period, theatre business at 
the boxoffice will be extremely good. De- 
prived of many other pleasure pursuits, 
the public will spend more and more of 
its leisure time and rest periods in the 
neighborhood movies that are well main- 
tained. Restriction of automobile traffic 
alone will affect local theatre patronage 
most favorably. 

As leading factors in helping to main- 


tain the morale of the nation, existing 
modern theatres will thrive during the 
period of restraint in proportion to the ser- 
vice they render to the public. Properties, 
therefore, will be strictly maintained 
through the foresight of go;d management 
and the skill of architects, designers, deco- 
rators and suppliers of materials. 

Fortunately, theatre maintenance and 
remodeling, even the large scale projects, 
require a minimum of the critical materials. 
Substitutes will serve in many instances. 
The cleverness of theatre architects and 
decorative specialists in improvising for 
economy and effect is well known. 

The Longer View 

Veyond the present emergency and after 
the war has been won, we foresee an un- 
precedented era of new theatre building, 
in which the present concepts of theatre 
design and construction will be radically 
altered. The very functions of the mov- 
ing picture plant will be so completely 
changed that a new type of building pro- 
ject will replace all but a very few of our 
present theatre structures. 

A perspective of our prediction on this 
point is outlined in “The Overall Pattern 
for Peace-Time Theatre Planning” to be 
found also in this issue. We prophesy an 
era of renewed prosperity for theatre in- 
dustry after the war. 

\ 

In the meantime, we urge theatre own- 
ers and management to jealously hold and 
guard the prestige they have gained 
through House Appeal for the duration of 
the emergency. During these trying times 
it will be more necessary than ever to 
provide comfort, cheerfulness and a place 
to which people can come and relax and 
remove themselves temporarily from the 
stern realities of war. 

Property upkeep, for comfort, cleanli- 
ness, cheerfulness was never more import- 
ant than now. - — ■ 


Better Projection a 

House Appeal Angle 

From the theatre manager’s point of 
view, better projection is a definite aid to 
house appeal. It simplifies film selection 
because every show is a good show and 
every picture billed is made more inter- 
esting and appealing. It enables him to 
cash in on heavily advertised features and 
on color by filling the house — because pa- 
trons know they will always find good pro- 
jection there. Thus, it reduces promotion 
cost by insuring regular patronage based 
on the experience of always being able to 
see well anywhere in the house. 

Furthermore, the provision of finest pro- 
jection and sound increases the range of 
patronage by bringing people past other 
theatres nearer them, to get the benefit 
of satisfactory seeing in a house which 
they know by experience or hearsay is bet- 
ter equipped. They know also that modern 
projection promotes safety in the audi- 
torium by raising the general level of il- 
lumination all over the house, thus pre- 
venting groping or stumbling accidents. 

The theatre manager who has given the 
subject a little study will realize at once 


The Overall Pattern for 
Peace-Time Theatre 
Planning 

(Continued from page 158) 


know their business, theatre men will have 
learned to give people what they most 
want, which, surprising as it may seem 
now, is things they can operate — buttons 
to push, levers to pull, gadgets to play with. 
Given these things, plus comfort, conven- 
iences and hospitable consideration 
throughout the house and they’ll fairly 
take over the house, leaving only the 
duty of buying pictures and checking box- 
office receipts to management. 

Democratic politics provides a grand 
pattern for successful theatre operations 
of the future, according to Pereira. Poli- 
tics is based on the principle of making 
people feel that the candidate is obedi- 
ently theirs — one of them. Baby-kissing 
may yet be a chore of theatre manage- 
ment. 

In the new scheme of things to come, 
the moving picture exhibitor and his men 
must be seen often and in broad daylight 
as civic minded people in a setting of civic 
pride. Otherwise, the day will arrive soon 
when ambitious young business men with 
money who can see the unexplored possi- 
bilities of motion pictures properly pre- 
sented, will start building theatres for 
themselves — the kind of theatres they 
dream about and want to operate. 

A Prediction 

Foreseeing this alarming possibility, 
Pereira puts the problem up to us in these 
words: “He will not know the rules of 
franchise. He will not know an A week 
from a B week. But he will go ahead and 
build and then not be able to open. Then 
he will cry to the world that he has built 
a civic theatre. By force of circumstances 
h’s nice new theatre will be dark. Then 
some film company will serve him perhaps 
through some booker or salesman wh® 
doesn’t know the rules either. Then you 
have a competitor on your hands — or 
maybe a partner. You still have playing 
time but you don’t know whether people 
will decide to wait for the product to be 
shown in a theatre designed for waiting — 
a theatre in a park, a theatre with other 
attractions and shops around it, or an in- 
stitution that opens at nine in the morn- 
ing, as a civic function, and presents 
movies at 3 o’clock in the afternoon.” 

All this from a designer of theatre 
buildings who maintains that there can 
be no theatre of the future until men first 
learn how to run them. 


To design with light is a new concept in 
theatre construction. It gives relish and 
atmospheric seasoning to the entire un- 
dertaking. 


that better projection levels out patronage, 
fills the theatre regularly, and makes ev- 
ery week a good week instead of feast- 
and-famine operation. And finally, it pro- 
tects against competition of newer houses 
because patrons who are satisfied will re- 
turn regularly to get real entertainment 
value for their money. 


160 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 



P^vo^ jM4n 

BOX OFFICES 

9*iiieaA 0^ Om 

You can’t double your admission charge — 
but you CAN increase your “take” and 
your net profit from 25 % to 50 % with an 
Electric Manley Popcorn Machine in the 
lobby. And, best of all, your customers will 
relish the stop at your “second” box office! 



mnNiiEy, me. 

Formerly Burch M/g. Co. 

Dept. B 1906 Wyandotte Street 

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 




Probable 
Theatre Plant 


f 

^ ONSERVATION of manpower and 
raw materials, of manufactured products 
and monetary resources, is now the all- 
important obligation of all industry. For 
the duration of our speedy preparation 
and successful prosecution of the war, all 
waste of time, vital materials and vigor- 
ous manual effort must be cut to the very 
minimum. 

The practice of strict conservation, 
therefore, must apply to theatre building, 
maintenance and operation for the dura- 
tion of the emergency, if the nation is to 
emerge from it successfully and within the 
shortest period of time. 

However, there is one highly important 
consideration, secondary only to the prior 
requirements of defense, that must be 
kept foremost in the minds of theatre 
ownership and management: There is 
grave danger in allowing theatre proper- 
ties to deteriorate unnecessarily and too 
greatly during the unavoidable period of 
enforced restrictions. 

Further Regulations 

The effect of priorities on new theatre 
building has been felt for some time. There 
will be further restraints and regulations, 
and the probabilities are that all -new 
theatre construction will be reduced to the 
very minimum of requirements for the ac- 
commodation and entertainment of armed 
forces in training and for the maintenance 
of morale in the armament production 
centers. 

Most fortunately, moving picture thea- 
tres require a minimum of critical ma- 
terials as compared to other commercial 
plants and enterprises. And for a surpris- 
ing number of the critical materials com- 
monly used in theatre construction and 
upkeep, very satisfactory unrestricted sub- 
stitutes have been found and are now 
available. 

The scarcity of metals will continue to 
be the prime cause of curtailment in new 
theatre building. But this factor is not 
fatal because in all except very large pro- 
jects, wood trusses, where not prohibited 
by present building codes, are a most satis- 
factory substitute for structural steel. In 
various cities, wooden trusses are now pro- 
hibited; but since they would be classed as 
slow-burning and practically fireproof, 
such codes will undoubtedly be amended 
or otherwise relaxed. 

Quite naturally the effect of priorities 
will continue to restrict the buying of 
heating and ventilating equipment and 
refrigerant gases will be hard to get. New 
electrical construction will be limited for 
similar reasons, and through scarcity of 
copper for wiring. 

But there is no appreciable shortage ex- 


Effect of Priorities on 


Improvement 


isting, or to be anticipated soon, in such 
items as lumber, wood composition ma- 
terials, glass, marble, tile, cement, common 
brick, face brick, flooring materials and 
various other commodities outside the pale 
of priorities. 

Architects Know How 

During the past several months, and 
prior to the declaration of war, theatre 
architects and designers have been plan- 
ning “away” from the priorities with 
marked success in both efficiency and 
economy of projects. Competent and ex- 
perienced theatre architects already know 
of many and devious ways of substituting 
available material for such items as may 
now or later be affected by the war short- 
age. Careful, conservative planning will be 
necessary under prevailing conditions. 

Now, of all times, theatre building or 
remodeling should not be undertaken with- 
out the services of a competent theatre 
architect. Without such counsel and guid- 
ance, grave consequences are liable to re- 
sult. 

So much for the present and expected 
effects of priorities on planning and pro- 
curement of major structural items. Simi- 
larly repair and replacement parts and 
detached equipment elements will be some- 
what affected. While there is not now an 
acute shortage in fabrics and furnishings, 
nevertheless, there is need for strict con- 
servation and careful maintenance of all 
materials in which metals and rubber and 
certain chemicals are a constituent. 

Repair parts for projection and sound 
equipment, as well as air conditioning 
equipment and other machinery, may still 
be had. Steel for theatre chair construc- 
tion is not too plentiful, therefore, ply- 
wood backs and seat bottoms may return 
to popularity. 

Plastics Loom Large 

Plastics now appear as the most versa- 
tile answer to the problems of theatre 
planning and property upkeep for the 
duration of this emergency as well as for 
the future. Already plastics have stepped 
into the metal scarcity breach as a more- 
than-satisfactory alternate for aluminum 
in the manufacture of marquee sign let- 
ters, adding color and snap to advertising 
which could not be had with the aluminum 
silhouette letters. 

Plastics are plentiful, and as a by-prod- 
uct of many industries, the supply is 
ample at present and, so far, quite im- 
mune to priorities. Production of plastics 
is being stepped up as rapidly as fabri- 
cating forms and dies can be prepared, and 
it is predicted that the material will re- 
place metals for many purposes around 
the theatre. Because of color effects ob- 


tainable, plastics are peculiarly adapted 
to use in theatres. 

Floor coverings and wall fabrics as well 
as upholstery materials are still readily 
obtainable at this writing and we know 
of no acute shortages that will affect 
theatre building and maintenance other 
than those ascribed above. 

Recommendations 

Again reminding our readers that “the 
show must go on;” that the prestige of 
House Appeal must not be lost sight of 
and that more than ever we will need com- 
fortable, cheerful, efficiently operated 
theatres everywhere, we urge new building, 
wherever and whenever it can be done, 
within priority regulations and without 
prejudice to the defense effort. Theatres 
can still be erected conservatively and add- 
ed seating capacity will be needed in many 
cases to take care of increased patronage 
possibilities. 

And most definitely do we urge exhibi- 
tors to maintain the appearances and 
operating efficiencies of their plants dur- 
ing the defense effort. Strict maintenance, 
modernization, equipment repair and re- 
placement under routine inspection, will 
help to remove the sting of priorities for 
the duration. 

In the wake of World War No. 1, the 
American public had to endure a shame- 
ful panorama of dilapidated, dirty and 
disgraceful moving picture theatres. It 
mustn’t happen again — and you can help 
avoid it. 


Cover Plate 

Clearly typifying the manner in 
which the challenge of material short- 
ages will be met in old theatre mod- 
ernization and maintenance for the 
duration, we present this architectural 
perspective of a remodeling project 
now well under way in Chicago . . . 
The front of the old Dearborn Thea- 
tre at Dearborn and Division Streets, 
now being completely remodeled, upon 
completion will be renamed “The Surf” 
. . . Property of H. & E. Balaban Corp., 
the reformation was designed, and is 
being supervised by Pereira & Pereira 
. . . The widening of Dearborn Street to 
boulevard status demanded a change 
of frontage in which fine commercial 
stores of excellent rental value ivill 
supplant a needless old lobby . . . The 
entire project, later to be presented 
in detail in The Modern Theatre sec- 
tion of Boxoffice, was planned away 
from priorities and is proceeding apace, 
without closing the present theatre. 


162 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


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ENGINEERING SKILL AND 
MANUFACTURING INGENUITY 

Qiit *1iieiaine QooUtUf Qo^itl 


I ESS than a score of years have elapsed 
j since USAIRCO blazed the trail to 
low-cost theatre cooling with its first 
installation in a little Iowa theatre. To- 
day, there is a USAIRCO installation in 
nearly every community in the United 
States in which a theatre is located. 

Today the list of USAIRco-equipped 
theatres is approaehing the 9,000 mark, 
representing more than half the Na- 
tion’s theatres. More theatre owners 
have seleeted USAIRCO than all other 
makes eombined. 

The real significanee of this reeord 
lies in the vast amount of evidenee it of- 
fers you concerning USAIRCO perform- 
ance and cost. These several thousand 
ease histories furnish a yardstiek by 
which you can measure the experience, 
knowledge and resourcefulness of 
USAIRCO in providing better equipment 
values. They are the source of inspira- 
tion and incentive behind USAIRCO’s 




development of new prineiples of equip- 
ment design and application which im- 
prove performanee and reduce costs. 

Whatever your cooling, heating, ven- 
tilating and air eonditioning needs, 
USAIRCO can provide the proper equip- 
ment, ranging from a single blower to a 
eomplete year ’round eonditioning sys- 
tem. Kooler-aire cooling units are avail- 
able for evaporative, refrigeration or 
cold water applications. USAIRCO en- 
gineering service is ready to eooperate 
with you, your architeet, your engineer, 
in the planning and installation of your 
equipment. 

A USAIRco sales engineer is ready to 
discuss your needs — without obliga- 
tion. Write for the details. Learn how 
USAIRco engineering skill and manu- 
facturing ingenuity cut air condition- 
ing costs — why USAIRCO is the first 
ehoice of more than half the Nation’s 
theatres. 




nsAIRco 




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AIR CONDITIONING 


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the earning power 

OF 

fONTROLlED 

iAlRGONBlTIONlNw 




UNITED STATES AIR CONDITIONING CORPORATION 

Manufaclurert of HEATING, COOLING, VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT 

NORTHWESTERN TERMINAL • MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA 



The Year Jnst Past. 
Product Development 


j N product development for theatre con- 
sumption during 1941, progress was in- 
fluenced as greatly by world conditions as 
were other elements of industry. For 
this reason, it took the form of least re- 
sistance but of greatest ingenuity, which 
resulted in adaptation of existing prod- 
ucts to present needs and essentialities. 
World conditions caused confusion, of 
course, but industry has been unwaver- 
ing in its solutions of perplexing prob- 
lems, and it is to be noted commendably 
that although needed things were hard 
to get, high quality was and is yet the 
rule. 

Among other things, 1941 saw the sub- 
stitution and application of plastic ma- 
terials for critical metals and learned that 
alternates may be as adaptable as ori- 
ginals when a prior demand exists. Short- 
ages reared their heads threateningly, but 
patience prevailed and in most cases en- 
tire satisfaction was found. In the thea- 
tre field, many factors contributed to a 
slowing up of deliveries of equipment. A 
number of large orders for peculiarly thea- 
trical equipment were put through for the 
government at a time when the theatre 
field was in a position to spend a great 
deal of money for new theatres and mod- 
ernization of existing houses. 

It may be said that miracles were per- 
formed to produce equipment to meet this 
enormous demand for both military and 
civilian theatres. And many of the prob- 
lems faced in the theatre equipment field 
were well on the way to solution when 
the country was plunged into active war. 
This immediately cast a shadow of un- 
certainty upon the future again, and even 
now prediction is most difficult. 

Almost all manufacturers who formerly 
contributed developments of their highest 
arts to the theatre field and looked upon 
it as a preferred outlet are now in de- 
fense work to some extent. They expect 
to fulfill their patriotic duty by doing con- 
siderably more. Although the country’s 
theatres are of vital importance in sus- 
taining public morale and spreading in- 
formation, and this fact is verified by the 
government itself and by all those who 
place defense first in both heart and 
thought, they are yet, like every other in- 
dustry and service, second in importance 
to the supreme war effort. 

However, it may be said that suppliers 
of material and equipment for theatres 
have done their best to meet the needs 
of this industry without lowering stan- 
dards of quality in any respect. That has 
been the rule in 1941, and barring com- 
plications, it is a sincere promise for the 
future. 

A review of outstanding developments 


by HELEN KENT 


in product design and application can best 
be delineated in the customary manner 
of classifying the news-worthy accom- 
plishments under general headings. These 
headings also serve in the “Key to Better 
Buying” department of this publication, to 
which attention is directed as a logical 
source of supply and further information 
on all products mentioned herein. 


1. ADVERTISING 


In the realm of theatre advertising, per- 
taining particularly to front or point-of- 
sale position, developments were perhaps 
more far-reaching than they have been 
in any single year in the past. Again, 
adaptation to present world conditions 
was a motivating element. 

About midway in the year, priorities 
applied to certain metals made their pur- 
chase for the enhancement of theatre 
fronts impractical and unpopular. Con- 
temporary architecture, recognizing this, 
immediately set about designing away 
from the defense materials, and we saw 
new theatre fronts designed with marquees 
and illuminating units of unusual substi- 
tute materials and unique pattern to meet 
the new exigencies. To make up for sub- 
stitution, increased illumination was 
brought into play as a trump card in ad- 
vertising. 

One of the most significant uses of 
plastic materials in place of the defense- 
demanded aluminum was a development 
of one of the silhouette sign letter com- 
panies. Early in the year, letters com- 
bining both aluminum and insets of col- 
orful plastic materials were introduced, 
and with the priority placed on aluminum, 
letters composed entirely of plastic ma- 
terial were next introduced. 

These proved to be highly practical and 
in many respects more efficient than their 
metal predecessors. Aside from this, the 
plastic material of which they were com- 
posed is colorful and transparent in ef- 
fect for greater eye-appeal. For func- 
tional reasons, the newly developed let- 
ters were designed to work in conjunction 
with metal letters so that in future they 
can serve as replacements for the latter. 

Another outstanding development to- 
ward further color and interest in theatre 
front display advertising was that of 
transparency frames for star photos to 
be used on the more brilliantly illumin- 
ated marquee, and which are hung on the 
marquee in the same manner as are sil- 
houette letters. They add greatly to the 
human interest angle of advertising effect 



and have met with rapid response on the 
part of theatre operators throughout the 
country. 

Early in 1941, the world commerce sit- 
uation shut off the supply of flashed opal 
glass, which formerly had been imported 
exclusively from one of the new occupied 
nations. This threatened a stoppage of 
this type of marquee advertising back- 
ground, but immediately a similar glass 
product was developed and patented in 
this country with the result that another 
shortage was check-mated. 

With further reference to the glass sit- 
uation, a silhouette letter company de- 
signed glass-in-frame units for back- 
grounding its letters. Many improvements 
for both safety and greater ease of main- 
tenance characterize these units. An en- 
tire section of the marquee attraction 
board may be removed easily and with 
almost no danger of breakage. This en- 
courages more frequent cleaning of both 
glass and electric lamps, thus adding 
further to the illuminative efficiency of 
an advertising element so equipped. 


2. AIR CONDITIONING 


Many adjustments which defense indus- 
tries made under the recent speeded up 
status affected air conditioning perhaps 
more than any other factor of interest in 
the theatre field. Heating and ventilat- 
ing are essential to the smooth working 
of defense industries, now on a 24-hour 
basis and a seven-day week in so many 
instances, and air conditioning is an ab- 
solute requisite to a number of process 
steps in the production of critical ma- 
terials. Sudden acceleration of the tempo 
of work has stepped up the load on all 
equipment in hundreds of plants, creating 
new problems and changing the status 
of many materials and supplies. 

Priorities, shortages, substitutions of 
materials, diversion of products out of 
normal channels and into the defense 
routine have created situations which are 
being met by the air conditioning fra- 
ternity. Industrial mobilization for de- 
fense has created many new problems for 
the air conditioning industry, but at the 
same time it is adjusting and carrying on 
commercial activities during the emer- 
gency. 

In theatre air conditioning, the trend 
during 1941 was definitely toward the re- 
frigeration method. New features of this 
type of conditioning which were develop- 
ed included a reduction in the over-all 
dimensions of the macliinery, a greater 
selection of sizes to fit the individual re- 
quirements, improved performance and ef- 
ficency, elimination of the need for a 
liquor pump on the cooler, and the em- 
bodiment of economizers of various types. 
With capacities to suit the requirements 
of all theatres, from the largest to the- 
smallest, this means of cooling which for- 
merly had been economically beyond the 


164 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 



KROEHLER 

PATENTED 

HAVE UNPARALLELED 

BOX-OFFICE APPEAL 


PUT AN END TO ALL THIS 


wm^ 


I ONSiDER what Push-Back’s 
^ I patented and exclusive seat- 
ing; iinproveinents mean to your hox office. 

Pusli-Back puts an end to standing to let others 
pass — keeps patrons seated in lounge-chair com- 
fort throughout show. 

No stepped-on toes. 

No obstructed vision — no more standing by 
entire rows to let someone enter or leave. 


Built hy the world’s largest furniture manufac- 
turer, Push-Back Seats are pretested for super- 
durability. Extra-loM installation cost and mini- 
mum maintenance. 

Expressly designed for easv eleaning. Remov- 
able backs and cushions greatlv simplifv transpo- 
sition of center and side seats. Movable parts all 
enclosed. Absolutely safe. 

Built and backed by the vast resources of 
Kroehler. the Push-Back Seat is the answer to 
faster turnover on peak days and all other seating 
problems. \\ rite today for full particulars. 



KROEHLER MEG. CO. Public Seating Division 


W orld’s Largest Furniture Manufacturer 

St. Louis, Mo., L. T. Kockenstein, 3327 
I.ociist St. 

(Export) Roy Chaiulier, 505 Fifth Ave., 
New York, N. Y. 


Chicago, III., 1284 S. Wabash Ave. Boston, Mass., Standard Theatre Sup- 

New York, N. Y., 206 Lexington Ave. ply Corp., 78 Broadway 

Los Angeles, Calif., 2013 S. Vermont Ave. Minneapolis, Minn., Elliott Film Co., 
San Francisco, Calif., 24 Golden Gate Ave. 72 Glen wood Ave. 



BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


165 



reach of small capacity houses now 
creates year-round comfort for all. 

New evaporative condensers for air con- 
ditioning and refrigeration also were in- 
troduced, offering substantial improve- 
ment over earlier types because of better 
appearance, ease of installation, simplicity 
of operation and ease of servicing. The 
condensers incorporate finned-copper 
heat-transfer surfaces and the metals and 
finishes used were designed to reduce cor- 
rosion and weathering, with consequent 
reduction in maintenance cost. 

The conservation of aluminum also had 
its effect upon an outstanding line of dec- 
orative air diffusers for ceiling and side- 
wall installation. In cooperation with 
the government, this company immediate- 
ly switched to a special ductile spinning 
steel in the production of its line. Engi- 
neers for the company found that the 
new product was just as satisfactory al- 
though of higher cost to produce, yet 
prices were not advanced and deliveries 
have been made on schedule in all cases. 


3. FURNISHINGS 


Interior furnishings for theatres were 
affected somewhat by conditions, but a 
great deal less drastically than mechani- 
cal equipments and structural materials. 
It is true that shortages have been threat- 
ened in many departments contributing 
to the manufacture of furnishings, but for 
the most part, substitutes of high value 


These Theatres Painted 
With Liquid Light! 

American Theatre, Charleston, Mo. 
Avalon Theatre, Lowville, N. Y. 
Bloomfield Theatre, Birmingham, Mich. 
Boulevard Theatre, Columbus, Ohio 
Carlos Theatre, San Carlos, Arizona 
Dueber Theatre, Canton, Ohio 
Essex Theatre, Port Henr^, N. Y. 

State Theatre, Elk Rapids, Mich. 

Sunset Theatre, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Today Theatre, Chicago, 111. 

Garden Theatre, Cleveland, Ohio 
Riverside Theatre, Cleveland, Ohio 
Lorain-Fulton Theatre, Cleveland, Ohio 
Ambassador Theatre, Cleveland, Ohio 


You. too, can intrigue your audiences 
with the unusual dramatic atmospheric 
effects created by the use of 

BLACK LIGHT 

Pat. Pending. Trade Mark Reg. U. S. Pat. 
Off. 

FLUORESCENT 

LACQUER-ENAMELS 

cause walls and ceiling to glow brilliantly 
in a variety of striking colors . . . 

Murals to take on a third dimensional 
effect . . . under the practically invisible 
near ultra-violet rays of Conti-Glo Black 
Light lamps. 

Inexpensive. Easily applied. As perman- 
ent as average indoor paints. 

Write for literature. 

Conti-Glo Division 
CONTINENTAL LITHOGRAPH Corporation 
952 East 72nd Street, 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 


and efficiency are already available and 
ready for immediate use, due to foresight 
on the part of manufacturers. 

Acoustical and insulation materials, for 
example, were affected hardly at all, al- 
though their processing may be retarded 
a bit and deliveries also may be held up. 
On the other hand, new developments in 
these materials during the past year por- 
tend greater use value and design-ability. 
Motifed materials for unadorned appli- 
cation were developed, and more color was 
added to the materials as they have been 
customarily supplied for theatre use. This 
new color harmony has been highly de- 
veloped and simplified through provision 
of color harmonizing manuals furnished 
to those who investigate this smart inter- 
ior finish material. 

Curtailment of the importation of car- 
pet wools may soon become serious, but 
as yet because of stock on hand no very 
great shortage exists. On the other hand, 
scientific development of substitute ma- 
terials has been going on and it is claim- 
ed that everything in this department is 
completely under control. Carpet manu- 
facturers are cutting down the extent of 
their line of patterns and there is to be 
no lessening of quality, which is continu- 
ally in a state of further development. 

In theatre seating, many new models 
were introduced by all the outstanding 
organizations in this field. Again, im- 
provements in comfort were the motivat- 
ing element, seconded by more functional 
design and greater adaptability to the 
present scene. The development of up- 
holstery materials for these creations kept 
pace also, with the popularity edge on the 
synthetic leathers for seats and luxurious 
mohair velvet for backs. 

Interior decoration for theatres during 
1941 was noteworthy for its individualism. 
In every respect, decorative designers 
seemed to be striving for the unusual in 
effect, yet with not the least appearance 
of blatant faddism or bad taste. One of 
the media which contributed no little to 
the ingenuity of interior decorators was 
“black lighted” fluorescent paint, which 
during this year just past was used lavish- 
ly and stunningly as an eye-catching dec- 
orative device. Development during 1941 
of the exact scientific lighting methods so 
necessary to the success of this technique 
for both mural and fluorescent carpet also 
heightened its acceptance and popularity. 


4. LIGHTING 


The big news in lighting for 1941 was 
the enormous volume increase which has 
been made in this comparatively recent 
science. The number of incandescent 
lamps sold during 1941 substantially in- 
creased, and for the second time in history 
more than a billion lamp bulbs were pro- 
duced in the United States. Fluorescent 
lamps, not yet four years old commer- 
cially, showed a 300 per cent increase and 
reached the 22 million sales mark. 

Again, world conditions were partially 
responsible for this lighting progress in- 
asmuch as many of the new light sources 
are being quietly utilized in the nation’s 
defense. There were but few new lamp 
types introduced during 1941, but patient 


research was devoted to the improvement 
of existing sources. The progress this year 
may be measured by improved efficiencies, 
bulb shapes and sizes, color quality, di- 
rectional control, dependability and the 
development of more extensive fields of 
application. 

The year also was one in which signifi- 
cant progress was achieved in illuminat- 
ing engineering. New concepts of practical 
footcandle levels were developed while il- 
lumination design and installation tech- 
nique kept apace. Similarly inspiring pro- 
gress was made in the uses of fluorescent 
lamps. These elements and the lines of 
light which they produce were readily in- 
corporated as integral parts of architec- 
tural designs. Cove lighting, which in 
theory is a very desirable treatment, had 
been shunned in the past because of un- 
satisfactory results. However, the linear 
shape, proportion and uniform brightness 
of the fluorescent lamp has now made a 
neat, unobtrusive cove possible and the 
past year has seen an increasing use of 
these lighting systems. 

With longer rated life achieved through 
practical development, lamp replacement 
and cleaning now also may be scheduled 
at greater intervals so that maintenance 
objections are overcome in the applica- 
tion of cove lighting. The use of this new 
and strictly modern source when coordi- 
nated with other modern materials such 
as plastics, molded glassware, lens plates 
and delicately decorated glass panels 
brings evience of a new sense of appropri- 
ateness in design. 

Finally, in reviewing the year’s progress 
in lighting, the interest and extended ap- 
plication of color should be noted. The 
soft white lamp has come to be used for 
those applications where a flatteringly 
warm color is required. The cool appear- 
ance of the daylight lamp, on the 
other hand, has been utilized where 
very high footcandles are to be pro- 
vided or where outdoor lighting con- 
ditions are to be reliably duplicated in- 



STILL 


★ 

AVAILABLE 

★ 

★ 

The same high-class work- 
manship, design and ma- 

★ 

★ 

terial. responsible years ago 
for recognition of Vallen 

★ 

★ 

as the leading manufac- 
turer of guaranteed pro- 

★ 


scenium equipment. 



We stand ready to serve 


★ 

our supporters through the 
year 1942. 

★ 

★ 

VALLEN, INC. 

★ 


Mirs. oi 


★ 

Vallen Noiseless All-Steel Ball-Bearing 
Tracks and Floating Curtain Controls. 

★ 


AKRON, OHIO 



166 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 





OF COURSE, YOU CAN NOW AFFORD 
^THE BEST PROJECTION LIGHT! 




Operating costs of high intensity projection no longer 
stand in your way and the vast improvement in 
screen results more than justifies the low original 
cost. 



One-Kilowatt 
Projection Arc Lamps 



DISTRIBUTED BY NATIONAL THEATRE SUPPLY COMPANY 

' THBRE'S A BRANCH NBA R YOU 


designed for moderate sized theatres with screens up 
to 18 feet in width, project twice as much light as 
your old low intensities — the brilliant snow-white light 
so necessary to the projection of colored pictures. You 
can't secure satisfactory projection today without high 
intensity lamps. 

GET TfflS FREE PROOF! 

See the Simplex High in your own theatre and see 
the difference. Phone for a free demonstration now. 
No obligation. Thousands know the name Simplex 
to be a guarantee that you get the best. Resolve to- 
day to have better grosses by having better projec- 
tion than your competitors. 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


doors. Considerable interest developed in 
the specification of color quality by var- 
ious types of spectral data. It is interest- 
ing to note that the color for fluorescent 
lamps is specified by I. C. I. coordinates 
and the factory tolerances are specified as 
a certain number of minimum perceptible 
color steps beyond each of these central 
reference points. A year or two ago, I. C. I. 
coordinates were mentioned only in the 
most learned discussions, but today they 
are used as factory limits for controlling 
the color of fluorescent lamps. 


5. MAINTENANCE 


The subject of proper maintenance to 
prolong the life of all materials and pro- 
perties in theatres took on added signific- 
ance in 1941, with the nation-wide con- 
servation effort well in force. The Gov- 
ernment early decreed that there would be 
no priority on “soap and water,” which 
are the very basic elements of proper 
maintenance. Hence, good housekeeping 


THE BIGGEST VAI 
IN A POPCORN MACHINE 


The ADVANCE Machine 
Has EVERYTHING 
WHY PAY MORE? 

If you need larger ma- 
chines. or if you need 
smaller machines, we 
make them. But for the 
average location, here 
is the finest machine — 
one that offers you 
more profit possibilities. 
Yet it costs you less to 
own and costs you less 
to operate. 

Pays You a Profit of 70c 
on Every Dollar 

Why not let an Advance 
Machine bring you in 
the countless extra dol- 
lars in profits you can 
easily make by selling 
delicious Popcorn to 
your patrons? A fine, 
beautiful model with 
lights, color and motion 
to draw trade and get 
the profits. 


INVESTIGATE! Get the Facts. 



WRITE FOR CATALOG, OR SEE YOUR DEALER TODAY 




DVANCE MF6. CO. 

6334 St. Louis Ave. St. Louis.Mo. 


ASK US ABOUT 

NEW HEAVY 
PROJECTOR BASE 

THREE and FIVE POINT 
PEDESTALS COMPLETE 
and 

16" and 18" MAGAZINES 
PARTS FOR SIMPLEX, POWERS, MOTIO- 
GRAPH, PEERLESS HI-LOW <S PEERLESS 
LOW INTENSITY LAMPS. 

Manufactured by 

EDW. H. WOLK 

1018 S. Wabash Ave. Chicago, Illinois 


became a rule which now not only is wise 
but mandatory. 

Although it has been considered highly 
effective for most cases during the recent 
past, dry-cleaning, or shampooing, of car- 
pets on the floor came into popularity 
during 1941. Prior to this process, the com- 
plete cleaning of theatre carpets had been 
a costly and time-involving problem. But 
with the introduction of carpet-sham- 
pooing units, the process was simplified 
and made safe for use during the theatre’s 
closed hours. 

The process involves direct application 
of a soap and water lather to small por- 
tions of the rug, which is then removed 
by suction, taking away all imbedded dirt 
and leaving the carpet in its pristine 
beauty. Several units of this type were 
introduced to the theatre field, and one 
manufacturer of a theatre-type heavy 
duty vacuum cleaner added such a unit to 
the standard cleaner, making the process 
entirely simple and readily available to 
theatre owners. 

Also introduced was a lighter weight 
suction cleaner which is said to embody 
the same power but because of its smaller 
size is claimed to make cleaning of niches 
and corners easier. In addition, develop- 
ment of new cleaning tools and attach- 
ments continued apace and the entire 
maintenance operation was noticeably 
simplified during 1941. 


6. MISCELLANEOUS 


The classification “miscellaneous” cov- 
ers a multitude of items in the theatre 
field, but foremost among them is the 
“extra profit” angle, which cannot read- 
ily be placed under any other heading 
because of its unique nature and the com- 
manding influence it exerts upon theatre 
income today. During 1941, the position 
of refreshment and confection vending 
equipment in theatres was glamorized, so 
to speak, and the provision of such ser- 
vice within the theatre took on the im- 
portance of a “secondary business” for 
operators of houses so equipped. 

This year saw the addition of more ex- 
terior beauty into the equipment for 
candy and popcorn vending. The manu- 


CUT CARBON COSTS 10%to25% 

Droll processed carbons provide a milled 
male end and a drilled female end. You 
simply join two of them and clip with a 
sleeve of pure copper, which matches ex- 
actly the copper coating on the carbon and 
which is consumed without altering light 
quality or intensity. When a carbon is 
burned to about 3" it is fitted onto the next 
carbon. No dirt, delay, work, or machine 
to buy. Burn every inch of every carbon. 

Available in: Negatives, 6mm x 9", 6.5mm 
X 9", 7mm x 9", and Positives, 6mm x 12", 
7mm X 12" x 14", 8mm x 12" x 14". Also 
High Intensity 13.6mm x 22" (machined for 
adapters) which provide 20 minutes more 
burning time per trim. 

Shipped t. o. b. Chicago at regular carbon 
list prices plus 75c per hundred tor milling, 
drilling and clips; less 5%, 10 days. 

DROLL THEATRE SUPPLY CO. 

351 East Ohio St. Chicago, Illinois 


facturers of these devices developed de- 
signs for their equipment which made it 
harmonize with theatre interiors. Even the 
prosaic popcorn machines were given 
beauty treatment, such things as colorful 
lighting and modern functional finishes 
so that of themselves they would sell more 
merchandise. 

Candy vending machines were beauti- 
fied also and given finishes to comple- 
ment theatre interiors. They were en- 
larged to make servicing a very minor 
item. The showcases also were developed 
along theatric lines. Many enterprising 
theatre owners and their architects de- 
signed their theatres especially to pro- 
mote this extra business, providing niches 
or special rooms for the purveying of re- 
freshments within the house. The “milk 
bar” was another outstanding example of 
this trend. 


7. PROJECTION 


Projection and its contributing element, 
sound, were particularly influenced by the 
government’s orders for its recreational 
facilities for the military. Manufacturers 
of these equipments were met with an 
enormous demand for their products. That 
orders were filled for both military and 
civilian use is an outstanding testimonial 
to the progressiveness of projection as it 
now stands. 

While the intermediary high intensity 
projection arc lamp, commonly referred to 
as the “One-Kilowatt Arc” was actually 
developed and perfected during the pre- 
vious year, the successor to the low in- 
tensity arc, reached a high point of pro- 
motional expansion and popularity during 
1941. It thus became confirmed as the an- 
swer to the better projection problem in 
thousands of small-sized theatres. 

Other developments for efficiency and 
economy were not held up either. The 
year saw the usual number of technical 
improvements which have come to be as- 
sociated with the projection fraternity. 
Outstanding among new developments 
with respect to projection and its acces- 
sories was the lens-coating process. A 
second accessory improvement was the 
new plastic type screen offering many ad- 
vantages. 

The lens-coating process resulted from 
scientific developments and was simplified 
for general usage during 1941. It involves 
a microscopically thin chemical coating 
applied to the surface of glass, which was 
found to reduce reflection greatly and thus 
in effect to increase the transparency of 
glass pieces so treated. Motion picture 
camera and projector lenses treated in 
this manner become noticeably more ef- 
ficient, producing brighter, clearer and 
more contrasting pictures. 

The new type screen is composed of sur- 
face materials that do not discolor. It is 
said to be less susceptible to chemical 
changes which usually cause yellowing or 
other types of discoloration and is claimed 
to retain its high reflection qualities for 
longer periods of time. Because of its 
thinness and more clean-cut perforations, 
better sound reproduction results and re- 


IBS 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 



INTERNATIONAL SEAT CORPORATION 

UNION CITY. . . INDIANA. 


WELDED CONSTRUCTION 
FACTORY ASSEMBLEPj 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


169 






IDEAL 

CHAIRS 


"Built to excel... 
not just to compete" 


IDEAL SEAtING COMPANY 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN 
Export Office — 

330 W. 42ncl Street, New York City 
Attention: J. E. ROBIN 


Write for literature describing 
the many exclusive features of 
Ideal Seating, 


4^0^ the. cem^o^ 
the *iatlo4i. 


duced power consumption also is claimed 
for it. 

All in all, projection developments dur- 
ing 1941 pointed most specifically to- 
ward the needs of the smaller theatres. 
Several projector manufacturers and 
makers of projection lamps and other ac- 
cessories as well, introduced new models 
of interest to small-capacity theatre own- 
ers and offering greater efficiency and 
economy than ever before. 

The projector carbon situation also was 
responsible in no small measure for the 
economy angle in projection development. 
New “Suprex” type carbons, both posi- 
tives and negatives, were promoted to the 
trade outstandingly because of their 
claimed saving of 15 per cent in the cost 
for light over the old style carbons. Im- 
provements also were made in high inten- 
sity carbons whereby a greatly increased 
amount of light was made available for a 
slight increase in power and carbon costs. 
These carbons were developed primarily 
for the large houses requiring very large 
amounts of light. 


8. SANITATION 


Sanitation, like maintenance, in the 
theatre field found itself one of the “fair 
haired”' during 1941. Because of world 
conditions, this subject has really come 
into its own as an important element of 
theatre operation. With interest in health 



PROTECTS 
H EALTH 


— 

SANI-DRI 

THE MODERN 
ELECTRIC 
HAND - DRIER 


There is nothing to 
carry contamination 
from one user to an- 
other. It dries quickly, 
thoroughly, prevents 
chapping — le a v e s 
hands soft and 
smooth. 


SANI-DRI provides a sanitary, continuously dependable drying service. 
SANI-DRI automatically keeps washrooms cleaner — free from towel litter. 
SANI-DRI eliminates a dangerous fire-hazard — towel-litter in the wash- 
room awaiting only a carelessly dropped match or cigarette to create 
fire and panic. 

Send for illustrated literature. 

Dependable Since 1897 


THE CHICAGO HARDWARE FOUNDRY CO. 


Sani-Dri Division 


242 Box Street 


North Chicago, Illinois 


Producers of “Sani” Food and Drink Equipment 


at its highest, complete sanitation prac- 
ticed at all times in places of entertain- 
ment is the only answer possible for the 
more critical public at this time. 

House Hygiene is the public go-between 
for theatres of the present. It is one of 
the plus services which is to make friends 
for the institution when other more im- 
pressive provisions may not be immediate- 
ly available. By keeping equipment and 
materials which go to make up a theatre 
clean and sanitary, their longevity also 
will be increased. 

An interesting sidelight on the sanita- 
tion situation also is the availability of 
supplies. No shortage of sanitary supplies 
is anticipated, with the exception of paper. 
Paper conservation has been suggested as 
a defense measure, and paper towels for 
theatre consumption is one item which 
can be readily replaced through the in- 
stallation of modern electric hand-driers. 
Although not new to theatre usage, this 
type of equipment has recently been de- 
veloped to a high point of efficiency and 
economy and at present it may be said to 
serve also as a patriotic provision in the 
conservation of paper towels. 


9. SOUND 


Development in sound equipment went 
on behind the scenes during all of 1941. 
The “control track” method of sound re- 
production, which burst upon the indus- 
try with the end of 1940 and release of 
Walt Disney’s “Fantasia,” is still in course 
of development for commercial applicabil- 
ity to all theatres. 

This revolutionary method, involving as 
it does a great deal of change in both 
equipment for producing the pictures and 
that for reproducing them in all individual 
theatres, naturally will take considerable 
time and study. To report that progress is 
being made as to its standardization is 
most encouraging. 

In the meantime, definite every-day 
progress also has been made in sound 
equipment development. During the year 


De-Fi Chromium All Metal Insert Frames 

stock on Hand — All Standard Sizes. 

See Your Dealer or Write Direct lor 
Circular 

DE-FI MANUFACTURING CO. 

17 No. Wabash Ave. Chicago, 111. 


ADLER SILHOUETTE 
LETTERS and STAINLESS 
STEEL SUPPORTING FRAMES 

in All Sizes and Constructions. 
Protected by National Patent Corp. 

ADLER SIGN LETTER COMPANY 

2009 Indiana Ave. CHICAGO 


GENERAL CHAIRS 

wj /jie H/cnhsh fhteit 

GENERAL CHAIR CO. 

" t successor to 

i GENERAL SEATING COMPANY 
Ei.I.i.I.i.I.i.l MGS Charleston St., CHICAGO, ILL. 


170 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 




balance- 

ia\W e''®" 


• The successful theater owner real- 
izes how much his profits depend upon 
good projection. That is why you will 
find High Intensity projection in the 
most successful theaters. 


The fast moving colorful modern 
productions demand the abundance 
of snow white light that can be ob- 
tained only from High Intensity pro- 
jection. Clear, comfortable vision is 
assured and that means satisfied 
patrons who come again and again. 
This repeat business is what builds 
box office profits. 

High Intensity projection is avail- 
able at low cost to every theater, 
small and large. With the new "One 
Kilowatt” arcs even the smallest 
theater can now afford to cash in on 
the dividends that will accrue from 
High Intensity projection light. 

Ask your dealer for a demonstra- 
tion of this modern projection light. 
See for yourself what a vast difference 
it makes in your pictures and how 
little it costs to be modern. 


NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, INC. 

Unit of Union Carbide and Carbon Corporafion 


The words '^National”, ”Suprex” and ”Orotip” 
are trade-marks of National Carbon Company, Inc. 


Carbon Sales Division, Cleveland, Ohio 

GENERAL OFFICES 
30 East 42nd Street, New York, N. Y. 
BRANCH SALES OFFICES 

New York, Pittsburgh, Chicago, St. Louis, San Francisco 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


171 


PROJECTIONISTS 
KNOW 




IS 


ALSO 
FOR 


ISITRON 


QUALITY PHOTOELECTRIC 
CELLS SINCE 1925 


Visitron Photoelectric Cells have been 
preferred since the earliest days of 
Sound-on-film. They are manufac- 
tured for every type of sound projec- 
tion equipment. Your Theatre Supply 
Dealer will gladly recommend the 
proper Visitron for your equipment. 
Always have a spare cell on hand. 
Order a Visitron from your supply 
dealer today, or write 

G-M LABORATORIES, INC. 

4332 N. Knox Ave. Chicago, U. S. A. 



IN TIME OF NEED FOR— 


COMPLETE SOUND SYSTEMS - PRO- 
JECTORS - ARCS - RECTIFIERS 
GENERATORS - AMPLIFIERS. 

OR WHAT HAVE YOU— 

REPLACEMENT PARTS FOR ALL MAKES 
AT MOST REASONABLE PRICES— 
Quick Shipments. 

STUDIO, RECORDING AND 
LABORATORY EQUIPMENT 

We Specialize in 16 MM and 35 MM Port- 
able Sound Projectors — 

New and Used 

Our 100% Union Shop Does Masterlul 
Repair Work and Rebuilding of Old Machines 
Which We Offer at Real 

BARGAIN PRICES 

Our GENERAL CATALOG is the Industry's 
Bible 


S.O.S. CINEMA 
SUPPLY CORP. 

636 11th Avenue, New York, U. S. A. 

Export Department Cable Address 

II Warren St., N. Y. C. Sosound, N. Y. 


many new sound equipments and acces- 
sories were introduced by the various 
manufacturers interested in this field and 
each contained important new efficiencies 
or economies. In the sound producing end 
of the picture, important accomplishments 
also took place. Extensive modernization 
led to improved acoustic properties in Hol- 
lywood studios to keep pace with increased 
technical development, while lighting and. 
appearance also were improved to increase 
efficiency. Even the mobile sound record- 
ing units have been rebuilt and modern- 
ized. 

Because of its kinship with motion pic- 
ture sound, television must not be over- 
looked in any such review of progress 
either. It is reported that as a result of 
the work of the National Television Sys- 
tems Committee, an industry committee, 
a set of standards for television was 
adopted by the PCC. These standards 
form the basis for further development 
in black and white as well as color tele- 
vision. While the formulation of these 
standards was in itself a basis for co- 
operation between an industry and gov- 
ernment regulatory body to the end that 
a constructive action will result. 

However, television as well as other ser- 
vices provided by the radio industry has 
suffered from the defense effort. It may 
even have been retarded, inasmuch as no 
new types of television receivers have been 
placed on the market, presumably due to 
material shortages, plus the fact that two 
companies previously marketing receivers 
had to change the sets in the hands of 
the public and in distribution channels to 
meet the new standards established by 
the FCC. Whether or not television will 
increase in importance soon probably de- 
pends upon the material situation and the 
decision of the individual manufacturers 
as to whether it is more desirable to utilize 
such material as is available for radio or 
television receivers. 


10. STAGE EQUIPMENT 


Stage equipment for motion picture 
theatres remained in status quo, although 
developments were noted in technique of 
proscenium treatment and stage drapery. 
Now recognized as the focal point in any 
theatre, this portion of the house is treat- 
ed by architects and designers with the 
amount of importance which it earnestly 
deserves. 

Equipment for the smooth-running 
operation of stage curtains and draperies 
has been highly developed to a point where 
it is noiseless and foolproof in operation. 
In most cases, it can be remotely con- 
trolled from the projection room to pro- 
vide a smart accent between parts of the 
program. Curtains and draperies also are 



“SEAT JITTERS” 

Keep seats securely anchored with 
SUPREME EXPANSION BOLTS. 
Sold by leading supply houses. 

Chicago Expansion Bolt Co. 

2228 W. Ogden Ave., Chicago, III. 



of the more luxurious types, and a most 
graceful “cascade” type of curtain became 
increasingly popular. 

Stage lighting, of course, is forever in 
a state of development, with ingenuity as 
a motivating element. To secure the un- 
usual, many effective devices have been 
conceived. One of these, “black lighting,” 
has found a most intriguing use for both 
stage curtain ornamentation and in the 
case of stage presentations for settings 
and costumes as well. 


11. STRUCTURE 


In structural materials, aside from the 
very most basic ones, 1941 appears in 
retrospect to have been a year of glasses 
and plastics. Developments in these lat- 
ter products made them adaptable to so 
many uses and offered such unlimited de- 
sign possibilities that it is not surprising 
that acceptance of these new media was 
so widespread in the theatre field. 

Undoubtedly, this situation was brought 
about because of these products’ ability 
to act as alternate materials and thus to 
(Continued on page 175) 


ALLENTOWN PRODUCTS 

STABILARC Motor Generators 

Uniform power supply for Simplified 
High Intensity Projection. 42-60-80 volt 
Multiple. 

AUTODRAPE Curtain Machines 

Designed to accomplish all essential 
curtain operations by remote control. 
New Improvements. Low cost. 

BESTEEL Curtain Track 

Large and strong enough for average 
stage. Small enough for restricted 
spaces. Equipped with ball-bearing 
sheaves and two-wheel carriers. 

SILENT STEEL Curtain Track 

One piece construction without welds or 
joints up to 72 ft. gross lengths. Ad- 
justable attachment clamps. Ball-bear- 
ing carriers and pulleys. 

STEELITE Curtain Track 

Light duty track for inexpensive jobs 
up to 25 ft. and curtain weights up 
to too lbs. 

FENESTEEL Window Curtain 
Track 

Self-lapping master carriers in one 
length of track. Adequate for all size 
windows. 

AUTOMATIC DEVICES CO. 

1035 Linden St. Allentown, Pa. 

Export Office: 220 W. 42nd St., N. Y. C. 


IT MUST 
BE 

BRIGHT 

See Page BR 


>72 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 





and 

★★★★ 

are Materially Aiding 
in Maintaining Morale 
by Assisting in the Entertainment of 
the Armed Forces of the United States 

on Land and at Sea 

and by an Important Contribution to 

the Happiness of Millions of Patrons 

of 


American Motion Picture Theatres 






"All Thru the House” . . . some hints 


on Theatre Maintenance 


EFORE focusing your attention on the 
immediate aspect of form and fixtures be- 
hind your own property lines, and before 
we enter upon a discussion of things per- 
tinent to the upkeep of the house itself, 
both outside and within, let us approach 
and look over the situation from the dis- 
tant, or scenic point of view. 

So to begin, how does your theatre front 
look from, say, four or five blocks away? 
Would the view properly impress a pros- 
pect (provided it can be seen at all from 
that distance) or is it obstructed and 
hidden by trees, telephone poles, and other 
extraneous camouflage that ought anyway 
to be removed in the interest of civic 
beauty? 

If you are being imposed on in this im- 
portant particular, then you have some- 
thing to say to the city dads. Likewise, if 
the street approaches and sidewalks are 
in a bad state of repair and your busi- 
ness is resultantly retarded, you can in- 
clude that also in your complaint, using 
your political influence if necessary. 

Hidden Charm 

Is the front elevation of your house 
high enough, or is it too low, in relation 
to adjacent property, to be seen from sev- 
eral blocks away? Are your main sign and 
the marquee attraction boards “reaching” 
far enough away? That of course, is your 
problem. Your one best advertising media 
should have maximum circulation in all 
directions and from all angles of approach. 

How about parking facilities in your 
neighborhood? If you feel you can’t afford 
free parking for your patrons, then per- 
haps through cooperative arrangements 
with local realtors or neighboring estab- 
lishments, you can make it easy for them 
to find space at reasonable fees. How 
about policing your parking areas? The 
fear of car thieves and strippers may cause 
patrons to drive elsewhere for entertain- 
ment. 

Why not “father” a spirited clean-up 
campaign in your community to be car- 
ried on regularly or revived at frequent 
intervals? Your business would be directly 
benefited and you’d be a hero in your 
home town. Showmen should be leaders in 
civic betterment wherever they may be. 

Now that we’ve covered the surround- 
ing areas, let’s look at your property, the 
theatre, at close range and with a critical 
eye to conditions all through the house, 
starting our inspection at the curb. 

While at the curbstone, what is its con- 
dition? Is it chipped or cracked? Are the 
gutters free or do they serve merely as 
catch basins for trash and street rub- 
bish, slushy snow and such? Do you re- 
strict street parking adequately with ap- 


by ANSEL M. MOORE 


propriate signs? What is the condition and 
appearance of the sidewalk? Calking might 
be needed. Minor details maybe, but 
they’re most important. 

Dirty-Faced Theatres 

Looking at the entire front elevation of 
your theatre, in close-up, what is its all- 
over surface condition? Is it cracked, dirty, 
faded or forsaken in regard to paint? How 
are the joints? If face brick or in tile for- 
mation, tuck-pointing or puttying might 
help. Check the cornices and corners care- 
fully. 

And now, the name-sign and its nether 
elements, the marquee and attraction 
boards. How about the surface conditions 
here? Rusty spots and paint-flaked frame- 
works make poor backgrounds for elec- 
trical display. Or maybe, beneath the 
crusted accumulation of dirt and dust the 
original coat of paint may be in fair con- 
dition. A thumb nail scraping might tell. 

Do the marquee ceiling and reflector 
coves of your outdoor lighting system re- 
flect light, as they should, or do they re- 
tard it because of dirt and dullness? If so, 
you’re wasting both current and lamps. 

Is the whole layout properly lamped for 
economy and greatest luminosity? Does it 
need more color and/or animation? Empty 
lamp sockets and burnouts are abomin- 
able. The copy on your attraction boards — 
Is it spaced properly or just thrown to- 
gether with little thought of emphasis or 
readability? Got enough sign letters of 
different sizes, and what’s their condition? 

How about the outdoor poster frames 
and door hardware? Polishing might help 
at the ticket office, which may need at- 
tention too. Lasting impressions, good or 
bad, are created at this point of entrance. 
How are you fixed here for slick or sloppy 
weather? Scraping mats that catch and 
hold the dirt and provide a safety tread 
may save you trouble? 

Inside the lobby, what is the over-all 
effect to greet the incoming patron? Deco- 
ratively we mean, and in respect to light- 
ing, which should recede gradually as we 
pass on through the theatre. How about 
the functional furnishings, conditions of 
floors, mop boards, wainscotes, etc.? 

Practical Provisions 

While we are on the subject of func- 
tional furnishings in the lobby, let us be 
reminded that few decorative geegaws, art 
gadgets or exhibits are needed here, be- 
cause traffic must be kept moving. But 
there are such practical things as indoor 
advertising displays of coming events, 
drinking fountains, sand urns, and many 
other utilities for public convenience that 
have a place in the lobby. Otherwise, the 
call is for floor clearance and a cheerful. 


inviting atmosphere. How does your lobby 
stack up in these particulars? 

And now, without contradiction to the 
above conclusion and in direct relation to 
the profit angle of operation — How about 
confections? Unless you have a modern 
popcorn machine, confection counter, or 
candy vender operating in your lobby, you 
are passing up a highly profitable support- 
ing enterprise. Haven’t the space for one or 
more of these elements? You’d be surprised 
how compact they make ’em nowadays. 

A remodeling of your lobby might be 
required to add the popcorn, candy, cold- 
drink, cigarette catering provision for your 
patrons, but when you consider the profits 
to be made in these popular commodities, 
the cost of alterations, if necessary, be- 
comes negative. Why not capitalize the 
nibbling instincts of your patrons with 
confections? 

The foyer, or salon, or standee area, 
or whatever provision your theatre may 
have for waiting patrons, is an important 
area because it must compensate for the 
impatience of waiting. Here cheerfulness 
and comfort and convenience must be 
forcefully impressed. How about the at- 
mosphere and appointments in yours? Soft 
lighting, restful decor, informality and 
artistic finesse are needed here where peo- 
ple have time and inclination to examine 
and criticize your conceptions of good 
taste. 

Cleanliness Counts 

The Qomfort stations rate some careful 
checking too. Above all, are your rest- 
rooms in good repair, spotlessly clean and 
correctly equipped? Or are they liable to 
remind the user of an ordinary public com- 
fort station? Soiled towels and floors lit- 
tered with paper fragments; leaky faucets, 
dirty mirrors, cracked toilet seats and yel- 
low, smelly wash basins and urinals are 
inexcusable in this age of modern sani- 
tation. Examine floors and walls critic- 
ally. 

Emerging logically from the toilet rooms 
we inspect the ladies’ lounge. How are you 
fixed for cosmetic facilities and conveni- 
ence, such as makeup tables and mirrors, 
ash trays and waste receptacles, settees 
and such? How’s the lighting and is it 
right for milady’s rouge adjustments? Less 
fussiness may be required in the men’s 


IT MUST 
BE 

BRIGHT 

See Page 



174 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 



lounge, but you can be off base there too, 
if you’re not careful. 

Before we get to the auditorium, let’s 
take a “gander” at the remote little room 
aloft called, all too aptly in some cases, 
“the projection booth.” Is it big enough for 
its purpose or does the operator have to 
crawl under the lamphouses to make a 
changeover? Is it properly lighted and 
correctly ventilated and equipped for 
safety or would it be classed as merely a 
fire-trap. Check this point painstakingly. 
Does it have all the equipment needed for 
the proper (and we mean near-perfect) 
projection and reproduction of today’s 
sound pictures and what’s the condition 
thereof. Repairs or replacements needed? 
Order the projectionist to make up a “want 
list” and study it carefully, considerately. 
Provide all of it you possibly can and then 
give him hell if he doesn’t use, oil, clean 
and take care of it properly. 

A Critic’s Criteria 

Now we enter the main arena — the place 
in which you actually deliver the merchan- 
dise, meaning the pictures. So here ap- 
plies generally many precautions already 
given and more besides. Is your audi- 
torium, including the balcony, if you have 
one, a place in which a person can be at 
ease and enjoy what’s shown on the screen 
without being conscious of physical sur- 
roundings? If so, you’ve got everything, in- 
cluding comfortable posture-correct seats, 
properly spaced; harmonious, non-distract- 
ing decorations; efficient house-lighting; 
adequate temperature regulation for all 
seasons; perfect sight lines; satisfactory 
acoustics; a restful, refined, and odorless 
atmosphere; projection that is sharp and 
clear, yet easy on the eyes; sound recep- 
tion that is natural and non-offensive to 
human ears; a place to relax the nerves 
and really enjoy whatever you may have 
to offer. How much of it have you? 

Just in case, and to make sure that all 
the above requirements are in order, in 
your auditorium we suggest a complete 
analytical check-up for the discovery of 
weak points. Whereupon steps for correc- 
tion may be taken intelligently and effec- 
tively, bearing in mind that it takes all 
elements throughout the house, coordin- 
ated and working together, to create House 
Appeal and House Appeal in turn creates 
and holds theatre patronage. 


The Year Just Past — in New 
Product Development 


(Continued from page 172) 


counteract the shortage in other proper- 
ties and simultaneously to control and 
improve building and manufacturing 
operations in the most active period in 
building history. The need for metal re- 
placements, for example, greatly increased 
the uses of plastics and finally created 
shortages in certain plastic materials as 
well. 

Glass for construction purposes in thea- 
tres also made many forward strides. 
Among new glass products introduced was 
the heavy plate glass for dear-vision en- 
trance doors. This striking treatment was 
immediately accepted by many theatre 


operators for both new construction and 
remodeling, as a novelty appealing thea- 
tre front accoutrement. Another glass 
development was the introduction of glass 
blocks having transparency and complete 
light transmission quality. Still another 
was the design discovery of uniquely com- 
posed glass murals, composed of brightly 
colored structural glasses formed on the 
mosaic principle. 


Conclusion 


Despite the fact that theatre building 
was expected to be somewhat curtailed, a 


review shows that activity in this connec- 
tion was on a par with former good years, 
although ingenuity was necessary to over- 
come certain limitations placed upon 
building by world conditions. Remodeling 
and modernization, on the other hand, 
were much less hampered by restrictions 
and 1941 saw a great deal of activity in 
this connection. The trend for the future 
would appear to be highly similar, with 
the emphasis again on upkeep and main- 
tenance of properties so that the great 
value of the motion picture as a morale- 
builder will not be undermined by thread- 
bare and uninviting surroundings for its 
presentation. 



STYLE WITH NU-WOOD 


"'-pHE play’s the thing” of coursc— but you 
X can go a long way towards building box 
office sales by making your theater more at- 
tractive, more inviting and more comfortable. 
Nu-Wood, the modern, insulating interior 
finish, has made many a theater a better- 
paying proposition. For Nu-Wood, applied 
directly over your present walls and ceilings, 
brings exclusive beauty . . . fadeproof colors, 
interesting patterns in endless variety. 


With Nu-Wood, your sound apparatus can 
do a better job — because Nu-Wood cor- 
rects faulty acoustics and quiets noise. And 
your patrons will be more comfortable winter 
and summer when you utilize the high in- 
sulating efficiency which Nu-Wood provides. 
Find out why so many theaters, large and 
small, have chosen Nu-Wood above all other 
interior finishes. The coupon below will 
bring you information and examples. 


NU-WOOD 

INSULATING INTERIOR FINISH 


ziz:.:.; r: 

WOOD CONVERSION COMPANY 
Dept. 134-1 First National Bank Bldg., St. Paul, Minn. 
Gentlemen: I want to know more about the new Nu-Wood 
Kolor-Fast and Sta-Lite. Without obligation, please send me 
complete facts for new construction ( ) for remodeling ( ). 

NAME 

ADDRESS 



BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


175 


AoamAjo^ 




Most active in the design and engineering 


Charles N. Agree 
Detroit. Mich. 


D. H. Brush jr. 
Rapp & Rapp 
Chicago. III. 


R. A. Benjamin 
Jacksonville. Fla. 



T. H. Buell 
T. H. Buell & Co. 
Denver. Colo. 


phases of theatre construction during 1941 
were these members of the Architectural Ad- 
visory Board of The Modern Theatre Planning 
Institute. Other members of the group whose 
photographs were not available, include: 

Clifiord A. Balch, Los Angeles, Calii.; Ben- 
nett & Straight, Dearborn, Mich.; Roy B. 
Blass, Chicago, 111.; J. W. DeYoung, Portland, 
Ore.; Liebenberg & Kaplan, Minneapolis, 
Minn.; Bill J. Moore, Dallas, Texas; Pettigrew 
& Worley, Dallas, Texas; and Erie G. Still- 
well, Hendersonville, N. C. 







Wm. Pereira 
Pereira & Pereira 
Chicago, 111. 



Mason G. Rapp 
Rapp <S Rapp 
Chicago, 111. 



Hanns R. Teichert 
Theatre Decorator 
Chicago, 111. 



A. Sprachman 
Kaplan & Sprachman 
Toronto, Ont., Canada 



Jack M. Corgan 
Dallas, Tex. 



Geo. A. Ebeling 
Cleveland, Ohio 



M. J. DeAngelis 
New York 



E. G. Fredrick 
Chicago, 111. 



Donn Hougen 
Wisconsin Rapids, Wis. 



Edw. Paul Lewin 
Chicago. 111. 



Earl Kamrath 
MacKie & Kamrath 
Houston, Tex. 



S. Charles Lee 
Los Angeles, Calii. 



R. F. Smith 
Dallas, Tex. 



D. Supowitz 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Vincent G. Roney 
San Francisco, Calif. 



V. A. Rigaumont 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Wm. I. Hohauser 
Wm. I. Hohauser, Inc. 
New York, N. Y. 


Jos. G. Holman 
Marr & Holman 
Nashville, Tenn. 


H. S. Kaplan 
Kaplan d Sprachman 
Toronto, Ont., Canada 


Fred J. MacKie 
MacKie d Kamrath 
Houston, Texas 


M. A. Tucker 
Tucker d Howell 
Atlanta, Ga. 


E. H. Wetherell 
Wetherell d Harrison 
Des Moines, la. 
















THE KEY TO BETTER BUYING 

A CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY OF EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS MANUFACTURERS WITH CROSS REFERENCE TO LOCAL SUPPLY SOURCES 


Refer to the department of theatre operation in which 
■ your requirements are to be used. These divisions are 
g arranged alphabetically in the fotlowing directory and 
numbered in the order ot appearance. Under each ot 
these divisional headings, items are classified in alphabetical order and the manufacturer's 
name and address is given thereunder with letter symbols in parentheses to indicate nearest 
source of supply. 'Majority with (B) symbols have branches in all principal cities, to 
which inquiry may be directed; (D) means the manufacturer sells direct, (C) through 
local contractors; while symbols (A), (1) and (N) indicate that the item can be pur- 

chased through local theatre supply dealers or other local supply sources indicated in the 
"Key" at right. See listing of Theatre Equipment and Supply Dealers immediately fol- 
lowing this portion of the Directory and reter to the territory in which you are located. 
Bold-face listing denotes advertisers in this issue. Reference to page on which advertise- 
ment appears herein is also given. READ THE ADVERTISEMENTS herein as well as 

those appearing regularly in The MODERN THEATRE section of BOXOFFICE, and in making 
inquiry please TELL THEM WHERE YOU SAW IT. Thanks! 



These Symbols Indicate Source of Purchase: 

*(A) All Dealers; (B) Branch Offices; (C) 
Contractors; (D) Sells Direct; (I) Indepen- 
dent Supply Dealers; (N) National Theatre 
Supply Company Branches. 


o 


See page 184 for names and ad- 
dresses of all theatre supply deal- 
ers in U. S. A. and Canada. 


1 ADVERTISING 


Advertising Slides 

Cosmopolitan Studios, Inc., 145 W. 45th St., New 
York, N. Y. (DINA) 

Quality Slide Co., 6 E. Lake St., Chicago, 111. (A) 

Attraction Board Letters 

Adler Silhouette Letter Co., 2909 S. Indiana Ave., 
Chicago, 111. (CHINA). See page 170. 

Falk Glass Products Co., 24 E. 21st St., New York, 
N, Y. (DCA) 

Wagner Sign Service, Inc., 218 S. Hoyne Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. (DCBA). See page 136. 

Display Frames and Cases 

Ames Metal Moulding Co., Inc., 225 E. 144th St., 
New York, N. Y. (DCIA) 

Columbus Show Case Co., 826-82 W. Filth Ave., 
Columbus, Ohio. (NA) 

De-Fi Mfg. Co., 17 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 
(A). See page 170. 

Metal Goods Corp., 5239 Brown St., St. Louis, Mo. 
(DA) 

Sioux Metal Products Co., 3000 Lowell Ave., Sioux 
City, Iowa. (Cl) 

Flashed Opal Glass 

Rawson & Evans Co., 710-12 Washington Blvd., 
Chicago, 111. (DC) 

Wagner Sign Service, Inc., 218 S. Hoyne Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. (DCBA). See page 136. 

Flashers, Sign 

Federal Electric Co., Inc., 8700 S. State St., Chi- 
cago, 111, (B) 

Fluorescent Signs 

Belson Mfg. Co,, 800 S. Ada St., Chicago, 111. (CIN) 

Day-Brite Lighting, Inc,, 5411 Bulwer Ave., St. Louis, 
Mo. (CIN) 

Federal Electric Co., Inc,, 8700 S, State St., Chicago, 
111. (B) 

Modern Metal Mfg. Co., 204 E. 28th St., New York, 
N. Y. (C) 

Rawson & Evans Co., 710-712 Washington Blvd., 
Chicago, 111. (DC) 

Insert Frames 

Ames Metal Moulding Co,, Inc., 225 E, 144th St 
New York, N. Y. (DCIA) 

De-Fi Mfg. Co., 17 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 
(A). See page 170. 

Metal Goods Corp., 5239 Brown St., St. Louis, Mo. 
(DA) 

Lamp Coloring 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St., New 
York, N. Y. (CA) 

Kliegl Bros,, 321 W. 50th St., New York, N. Y. 
(DCBINA) 

Letter Mounting Units 

Adler Silhouette Letter Co., 2909 S, Indiana Ave., 
Chicago, III. (CBINA). See page 170. 

Wagner Sign Service, Inc., 218 S. Hoyne Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. (DCBA). See page 136. 

Lobby Display Lights 

Belson Mfg. Co., 800 S. Ada St,, Chicago, III. (CIN) 

Federal Electric Co., Inc., 8700 S. State St., Chi- 
cago, 111. (B) 

Modern Metal Mtg. Co., 204 E. 28th St., New York, 
N. Y. (C) 

Pickwick Metalcraft Corp., 489-93 Broome St., New 
York, N. Y. (A) 

Lobby Display Units 

Hildreth Display Service, 516 12th St,, Des Moines, 
la. 


Wagner Sign Service, Inc., 218 S. Hoyne Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. (DCBA). See page 136. 

Marquees 

Federal Electric Co., Inc,, 8700 S. State St., Chicago, 
111. (B) 

Sioux Metal Products Co., 3000 Lowell Ave., Sioux 
City, Iowa. (Cl) 

Plastic Silhouette Letters 

Wagner Sign Service, Inc., 218 S. Hoyne Ave.. Chi- 
cago, 111. (DCBA). See page 136. 

Porcelain Enameled Signs 

Day-Brite Lighting, Inc., 5411 Bulwer Ave., St. 
Louis, Mo. (CIN) 

Federal Electric Co., Inc., 8700 S. State St., Chi- 
cago, 111. (B) 

Ingram-Richardson Mfg. Co., 32nd St., Beaver Falls, 
Pa. (DC) 

Poster Projectors 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., 635 St. Paul St., Roches- 
ter, N. Y. (A) 

F. D. Kees Mfg. Co., Box 102, Beatrice, Neb. (DIN) 

Signs, Admission 

Falk Glass Products Co., 24 E. 21st St., New York, 
N. Y. (DCA) 

Federal Electric Co., Inc., 8700 S. State St. Chi- 
cago, 111. (B) 

Ingram-Richardson Mfg. Co., 32nd St., Beaver Falls, 
Pa, (DC) 

Rawson & Evans Co., 710-12 Washington Blvd., 
Chicago, III. (DC) 

Signs, Electric 

Day-Brite Lighting, Inc., 5411 Bulwer Ave., St. 
Louis, Mo. (CIN) 

Federal Electric Co., Inc., 8700 S. State St., Chicago, 
111. (B) 

Kliegl Bros., 321 W. 50th St., New York, N. Y. 
(DCBINA) 

Rambusch Decorating Co., 2 W. 45th St., New York, 
N. Y. (DC) 

Rawson & Evans Co., 710-12 Washington Blvd., 
Chicago, 111. (DC) 

Signs, Neon, Zeon 

Federal Electric Co., Inc., 8700 S. State St., Chicago, 
111, (B) 

Ingram-Richardson Mfg. Co., 32nd St., Beaver Falls, 
Pa. (DC) 

Transparency Frames 

Federal Electric Co., Inc., 8700 S. State St., Chi- 
cago, 111. (B) 

Wagner Sign Service, Inc., 218 S. Hoyne Ave., Chi- 
cago, III. (DCBA). See page 136. 


2 AIR CONDITIONING 


Air Circulators 

Anemostat Corp. of America, 10 E. 39th St., New 
York, N, Y. (D) 

General Electric Co., Air Conditioning & Com. Re- 
frigeration Dept., 5 Lawrence St., Bloomfield, N. 
I. (Cl). See page 159. 

Air Conditioning Motors 

Diehl Mfg. Co., Trumbull St,, Elizabethport, N. J. 
(CBA) 

Hertner Electric Co., 12690 Elmwood Ave., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. (N) 

Air Conditioning Systems 

Airtemp Div., Chrysler Corp., 1119 Leo St., Dayton, 
Ohio. (C) 

Bryant Heater Co., 17825 St. Clair Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio, (B) 


Carbondale Div., Worthington Pump & Machinery 
Corp., Harrison, N. J. (B) 

Carrier Corp., Syracuse, N. Y. (B). 

Fedders Mtg. Co,, Inc., 99 Tonawanda St., Buffalo, 
N. Y. (C) 

General Electric Co., Air Conditioning & Com. Re- 
frigeration Dept., 5 Lawrence St., Bloomfield, N. 
J. (Cl). See page 159. 

Hall Mfg. Co., Cedar Rapids, la. (DCA) 

Iron Fireman Mfg. Co., 3170 W. 106th St., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. (CB) 

McQuay, Inc., 16()0 Broadway N. E., Minneapolis, 
Minn. (B) 

B, F. Sturtevant Co., Damon St., Hyde Park, Bos- 
ton, Mass. (DCB_) 

U. S. Air Conditioning Corp., Northwestern Terminal, 
Minneapolis, Minn. (DCA). See page 163. 

Westinghouse Electric & Mtg. Co., Air Condition- 
ing Div., 653 Page Blvd., Springfield, Mass. (B) 

York Ice Machinery Corp., Roosevelt Ave., York, 
Pa, (B) 

Air Filters 

General Electric Co., Air Conditioning S Com. Re- 
frigeration Dept., 5 Lawrence St., Bloomfield, N. 
J. (Cl). See page 159. 

Universal Air Filter Co., 332 W. Michigan St., Du- 
luth, Minn, (B) 

U. S. Air Conditioning Corp., Northwestern Terminal, 
Minneapolis, Minn. (DCA). See page 163. 

York Ice Machinery Corp., Roosevelt Ave., York, Pa. 
(B) 

Air Washers 

Ballantyne Co., 222 N. 16th St., Omaha, Neb. (DI) 

B. F. Sturtevant Co., Damon St., Hyde Park, Bos- 
ton, Mass. (DCB) 

U. S. Air Conditioning Corp., Northwestern Terminal, 
Minneapolis, Minn. (DCA). See page 163. 

York Ice Machinery Corp,, Roosevelt Ave., York, Pa. 
(B) 

Blast Coils 

McQuay, Inc., 1600 Broadway N. E., Minneapolis, 
Minn. (B) 

U. S. Air Conditioning Corn., Northwestern Terminal, 
Minneapolis, Minn. (DCA). See page 163. 

Blowers 

Ballantyne Co., 222 N. 16th St., Omaha, Neb. (DI) 

McQuay, Inc., 1600 Broadway N. E., Minneapolis, 
Minn. (B) 

Reynolds Mtg. Co., 412 Prospect Ave. N. W., Grand 
Rapids, Mich. (D) 

B. F. Sturtevant Co., Damon St., Hyde Park, Bos- 
ton, Mass. (DCB) 

U. S. Air Conditioning Corp., Northwestern Terminal, 
Minneapolis, Minn. (DCA). See page 163. 

Boilers and Furnaces 

Airtemp Div., Chrysler Corp., 1119 Leo St., Dayton, 
Ohio. (C) 

Bryant Heater Co., 17825 St. Clair Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio. (B) 

Carrier Corp., Syracuse, N. Y. (B) 

General Electric Co., Air Conditioning & Com. Re- 
frigeration Dept., 5 Lawrence St., Bloomfield, N. 
J. (Cl). See page 159. 

Iron Fireman Mfg. Co., 3170 W. 106th St., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. (COB) 

Kewanee Boiler Corp., Franklin & Q Tracks, Ke- 
wanee. III. (Bl) 

York Ice Machinery Corp., Roosevelt Ave., York, 
Pa. (B) 

Coils, Cooling and Heating 

Airtemp Div., Chrysler Corp., 1119 Leo St., Dayton, 
Ohio. (C) ■ 

Carrier Corp., Syracuse, N. Y. (B) . 

Fedders Mtg. Co., Inc., 99 Tonawanda St., Buffalo, 
N. Y. (C) 

General Electric Co., Air Conditioning iS Com. Re- 
frigeration Dept., 5 Lawrence St., Bloomfield. N. 
J. (Cl). See page 159. 

McQuay, Inc., 1600 Broadway N. E., Minneapolis, 
Minn. (B) 

Reynolds Mfg. Co., 412 Prospect St. N. W., Grand 
Rapids, Mich. (D) 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


177 


B. F. Sturtevant Co., Damon St., Hyde Park, Bos- 
ton, Mass. (DCB) 

U. S. Air Conditioning Corp., Northwestern Terminal, 
Minneapolis, Minn. (DCA). See page 163. 

Compressors 

Airtemp Div., Chrysler Corp., 1119 Leo St., Dayton, 
Ohio. (C) 

General Electric Co., Air Conditioning & Com. Re- 
frigeration Dept., 5 Lawrence St., Bloomfield, N. 
J. (Cl). See page 159. 

B. F. Sturtevant Co., Damon St., Hyde Park, Boston, 
Mass. (DCB) 

York Ice Machinery Corp., Roosevelt Ave., York, 
Pa. (B) 

Condensers 

Carrier Corp., Syracuse, N, Y. (B) 

General Electric Co., Air Conditioning & Com. Re- 
frigeration Dept., 5 Lawrence St., Bloomfield, N. 
J. (Cl). See page 159. 

York Ice Machinery Corp., Roosevelt Ave., York, 
Pa. (B) 

Cooling Equipment 

Airtemp Div., Chrysler Corp., 1119 Leo St., Dayton, 
Ohio. (C) 

Carbondale Div., Worthington Pump & Machinery 
Corp., Harrison, N. J. (B) 

Carrier Corp., Syracuse, N. Y. (B) 

Fedders Mfg, Co., Inc., 99 Tonawanda St., Buffalo, 
N. Y. (C) 

General Electric Co., Air Conditioning & Com. Re- 
frigeration Dept., 5 Lawrence St., Bloomfield, N. 

I. (Cl). See page 159. 

McQuay, Inc., 1600 Broadway N. E., Minneapolis, 
Minn. (B) 

Reynolds Mfg. Co., 412 Prospect Ave. N. W., Grand 
Rapids, Mich. (D) 

B. F. Sturtevant Co., Damon St., Hyde Park, Boston, 
Mass. (DCB) 

U. S. Air Conditioning Corp., Northwestern Terminal. 
Minneapolis, Minn. (DCA). See page 163. 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co., Air Condition- 
ing Div., 653 Page Blvd., Springfield, Mass. (B) 

York Ice Machinery Corp., Roosevelt Ave., York, 
Pa, (B) 

Cooling Towers 

General Electric Co., Air Conditioning <S Com. Re- 
frigeration Dept., 5 Lawrence St., Bloomfield, N. 

J. (Cl). See page 159. 

Dehumidiliers 

Bryant Heater Co., 17825 St. Clair Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio. (B) 

Carrier Corp., Syracuse, N. Y. (B) 

General Electric Co., Air Conditioning d Com. Re- 
frigeration Dept., 5 Lawrence St., Bloomfield, N. 
J. (Cl). See page 159. 

McQuay, Inc., 1600 Broadway N. E., Minneapolis, 
Minn. (B) 

U. S. Air Conditioning, Corp., Northwestern Terminal, 
Minneapolis, Minn. (DCA). See page 163. 

York Ice Machinery Corp., Roosevelt Ave., York, 
Pa. (B) 

Diffusers, Air 

Air Devices, Inc., 17 E. 42nd St., New York, N. Y. 
(B) 

Anemostat Corp. of America, 10 E. 39th St., New 
York, N. Y. (B) 

Barber-Colman Co., Rockford, 111, (BC) 

Dorex Div., W. B. Connor Engineering Corp., 114 
E. 32nd St,, New York, N. Y. (DC) 

U. S. Air Conditioning Corp., Northwestern Terminal, 
Minneapolis, Minn. (DCA). See page 163. 

Fans, Desk and Bracket 

Diehl Mfg. Co., Trumbull St., Elizabethport, N, J. 
(CBA) 

Fans, Exhaust 

Diehl Mfg. Co., Trumbull St., Elizabethport, N. J. 
(CBA) 

B. F. Sturtevant Co., Damon St., Hyde Park, Boston, 
Mass. (DCB) 

U. S. Air Conditioning Corp., Northwestern Terminal, 
Minneapolis. Minn. (DCA). See page 163. 

Grilles and Registers 

Anemostat Corp. of America, 10 E. 39th St., New 
York, N. Y. (B) 

Barber-Colman Co., Rockford, 111. (CB) 

Carrier Corp., Syracuse, N. Y. (B) 

U. S. Air Conditioning Corp., Northwestern Terminal, 
Minneapolis, Minn. (DCA). See page 163. 

Heating Equipment 

Airtemp Div., Chrysler Corp., 1119 Leo Ave., Day- 
ton, Ohio, (C) 

Bryant Heater Co., 17825 St. Clair Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio. (B) 

Carrier Cprp., Syracuse, N. Y. (B) 

Fedders Mfg. Co., Inc., 99 Tonawanda St., Buffalo, 
N. Y. (C) 

General Electric Co., Air Conditioning <S Com. Re- 
frigeration Dept.. 5 Lawrence St., Bloomfield, N. 
J. (Cl). See page 159. 

Iron Fireman Mfg. Co., 3170 W. 106th St., Cleveland, 
Ohio, (CB) 

McQuay, Inc., 1600 Broadway N. E., Minneapolis, 
Minn. (B) 

B. F. Sturtevant Co., Damon St., Hyde Park, Boston, 
Mass. (DCB) 

York Ice Machinery Corp., Roosevelt Ave., York, 
Pa. (B) 

Oil Burners 

Airtemp Div., Chrysler Corp., 1119 Leo Ave., Day- 
ton, Ohio (C) 

Carrier Corp., Syracuse, N. Y. (B) 

General Electric Co., Air Conditioning & Com. Re- 


frigeration Dept., 5 Lawrence St., Bloomfield, N. 
J. (Cl). See page 159. 

York Ice Machinery Corp., Roosevelt Ave., York, 
Pa. (B) 

Refrigeration 

Airtemp Div., Chrysler Corp., 1119 Leo Ave., Day- 
ton, Ohio. (C) 

Carbondale Div., Worthington Pump & Machinery 
Corp., Harrison, N. J. (I) 

Carrier Corp., Syracuse, N. Y, (B) 

Fedders Mfg. Co., Inc., 99 Tonawanda St., Buffalo, 
N. Y. (C) 

General Electric Co., Air Conditioning & Com. Re- 
frigeration Dept., 5 Lawrence St., Bloomfield, N. 
J. (Cl). See page 159. 

McQuay, Inc., 1600 Broadway N. E., Minneapolis, 
Minn. (B) 

York Ice Machinery Corp., Roosevelt Ave., York, 
Pa, (B) 

Spray Nozzles 

U. S. Air Conditioning Corp.. Northwestern Terminal, 
Minneapolis, Minn. (DCA). See page 163. 

Stokers 

Carrier Corp., Syracuse, N. Y. (B) 

Iron Fireman Mfg. Co., 3170 W, 106th St., Cleve- 
land, Ohio, (CB) 

York Ice Machinery Corp., Roosevelt Ave., York 
Pa, (B) 

Temperature Control Devices 

Barber-Colman Co., Rockford, 111. (CB) 

Thermostatic Valves 

Fedders Mfg. Co., Inc., 99 Tonawanda St., Buffalo, 
N. Y. (C) 

Thermostats and Humidistats 

Barber-Colman Co., Rockford, 111. (CB) 

Unit Heaters and Coolers 

Bryant Heater Co., 17825 St. Clair Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio. (B) 

Carrier Corp., Syracuse, N. Y. (B) 

Fedders Mfg. Co., Inc., 99 Tonawanda St., Buffalo, 
N, Y. (C) 

Grinnell Co., Inc., 260 W. Exchange St., Providence, 
R. I. (DCBI) 

McQuay, Inc., 1600 Broadway N. E., Minneapolis, 
Minn, (B) 

B. F. Sturtevant Co., Damon St., Hyde Park, Boston, 
Mass. (DCB) 

U. S. Air Conditioning Corp., Northwestern Terminal, 
Minneapolis, Minn. (DCA). See page 163. 

Ventilating Systems 

Carrier Corp., Syracuse, N. Y. (B) 

Reynolds Mfg. Co., 412 Prospect N. W., Grand 
Rapids, Mich. (D) 

B. F. Sturtevant Co., Damon St., Hyde Park, Boston, 
Mass. (DCB) 

U. S. Air Conditioning Corp., Northwestern Terminal, 
Minneapolis, Minn. (DCA). See page 163. 

Water Cooling Systems 

Airtemp Div., Chrysler Corp., 1119 Leo St., Dayton, 
Ohio. (C) 

Carrier Corp., Syracuse, N. Y. (B) 

General Electric Co., Air Conditioning & Com. 
Refrigeration Dept., 5 Lawrence St., Bloomfield, 
N. J. (Cl). See page 159. 

McQuay, Inc., 1600 Broadway N. E., Minneapolis, 
Minn. (B) 

U. S. Air Conditioning Corp., Northwestern Terminal, 
Minneapolis, Miim. (DCA). See page 163. 

York Ice Machinery Corp., Roosevelt Ave., York, 
Pa. (B) 

Water Supply Heaters 

Kewanee Boiler Corp., Franklin St. & "Q" Tracks, 
Kewanee, III. (BI) 


3 FURNISHINGS 


Acoustical Materials 

Celotex Corp., 919 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 
111. (Cl) 

Geo. R. Hall & Sons, 516 Fifth Ave., New York, 
N, Y, (DC) 

Sprayo-FIake Co., 2715 Irving Park Rd., Chicago, 
111. (C) 

United States Gypsum Co., 300 W. Adams St., 
Chicago, 111, (C) 

Wood (Sonversion Co., First National Bank Bldg., 
St. Paul. Minn. (A). See page 175. 

Aisle Lights 

Capitol Stage Lightina Co., 527-29 W. 45th St., 
New York, N. Y. (CA) 

Day-Brite Lighting, Inc., 5411 Bulwer Ave., St. 
Louis, Mo. (CIN) 

Modern Metal Mfg. Co., 204 E. 28th St., New York, 
N. Y. (C) 

Edward H. Wolk, 1018 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 
III. (A). See page 168. 

Carpets 

Bigelow-Sanford Carpet Co., 140 Madison Ave., 
New York, N. Y. (C) 

L. C. Chase & Co., 295 Filth Ave., New York, 
N, Y. (C) 

Clinton Carpet Co., Merchandise Mart, Chicago, 
111. (CIN) 

Charles P. Cochrane Co., Bridgeport, Pa. (CB) 


A. & M. Karagheusian, Inc., 295 Fifth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (D) 

Mohawk Carpet Mills, Inc., Lyon St., Amsterdam, 
N. Y. (C) 

Alexander Smith & Sons Carpet Co., 295 Fifth 
Ave., New York, N. Y. (CIN) 

Carpet Cushions 

Bigelow-Sanford Carpet Co., Inc., 140 Madison 
Ave,, New York, N. Y. (C) 

Clinton Carpet Co., Merchandise Mart, Chicago, 
III, (CIN) 

United States Rubber Co., 1230 Sixth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (D) 

Directional Signs 

Belson Mfg. Co., 800 S. Ada St., Chicago, 111. 
(CIN) 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St., 
New York, N. Y. (CA) 

Day-Brite Lighting, Inc., 5411 Bulwer Ave., St. 
Louis, Mo. (CIN) 

Falk Glass Products Co., 24 E. 21st St., New York, 
N. Y. (DCA) 

Frink Corp., 23-10 Bridge Plaza South, Long 
Island City, N. Y. (DCBI) 

Ingram-Richardson Mfg. Co., 32nd St., Beaver Falls, 
Pa. (DC) 

Modern Metal Mfg. Co., 204 E. 28th St., New York, 
N. Y. (C) 

Pickwick Metalcraft Corp., 489-93 Broome St., New 
York, N. Y. (A) 

Rambusch Decorating Co., 2 W. 45th St., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Rawson & Evans Co., 710-12 Washington Blvd., 
Chicago, 111 (DC) 

S. O. S. Cinema Supply Corp., 636 Eleventh Ave., 
New York, N. Y. (D). See page 172. 

Voiot Co., 12th & Montgomery, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(DCA) 

Draperies and Curtains 

L. C. Chase & Co., 295 Fifth Ave., New York, 
N. Y. (C) 

Collins & Aikman Corp., 200 Madison Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (C) 

Metropolitan Scenic Studios, Inc., 1611 Davenport 
St., Omaha, Neb. (D) 

Novelty Scenic Studios, Inc., 320 W. 48th St., New 
York, N. Y. (DA) 

William Samson Co., 39 E. 20th St., New York, 
N. Y. (DCN) 

Volland Scenic Studios, 4040 Easton Ave., St. 
Louis, Mo. (DCIA) 

Drinking Fountains 

Voigt Co., 12th & Montgomery, Philadelphia, 

Pa. (DCA) 

Exit Signs 

Belson Mfg. Co., 800 S. Ada St., Chicago, 111. 

(CIN) 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St., 

New York, N. Y. (CA) 

Day-Brite Lighting, Inc., 5411 Bulwer Ave., St. 
Louis, Mo. (CIN) 

Frink Corp., 23-10 Bridge Plaza South, Long 

Island City, N. Y. (DCBI) 

Ingram-Richardson Mfg. Co., 32nd St., Beaver Falls, 
Pa. (DC) 

Modern Metal Mfg. Co., 204 E. 28th St., New York, 
N. Y. (C) 

Neumade Products Corp., 427 W. 42nd St., New 
York, N. Y. (INA) 

Rambusch Decorating Co., 2 W. 45th St., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Rawson & Evans Co., 710-12 Washington Blvd., 
Chicago, 111. (DC) 

S. O. S. Cinema Supply Corp., 636 Eleventh Ave., 
New York, N. Y. (D). See page 172. 

Voigt Co., 12th & Montgomery, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(DCA) 

Foam Rubber Seat Cushions 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Corp., Buffalo, N. Y. 
(DCA) 

Firestone Tire (& Rubber Co., Airtex Div., Akron, 
Ohio. (C) 

B. F. Goodrich Co., Akron, Ohio. (C) 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., Akron, Ohio. (C) 

United States Rubber Co., 1230 Sixth Ave., New 

York, N. Y. (D) 

Interior Decoration 

Novelty Scenic Studios, 320 W. 48th St., New York. 
N. Y. (DA) 

Rambusch Decorating Co., 2 W. 45th St., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

William Samson Co., 39 E. 20th St., New York 
N. Y. (DCN) 

Hanns R. Teichert, 620 N. Michigan Ave., Chi- 
cago, III. (D) 

Interior Wall Finishes 

Celotex Corp., 919 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 
111. (Cl) 

L-bbey-Owens-Ford Glass Co., Vitrolite Div., To- 
ledo, Ohio. (D) 

Novelty Scenic Studios, Inc., 320 W. 48th St., New 
York, N. Y. (DA) 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co., Grant Bldg., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. (I) 

Rambusch Decorating Co., 2 W. 45th St., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

United States (gypsum Co., 300 W. Adams St., 
Chicago, III. (B) 


178 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


United States Plywood Corp., 103 Park Ave,, New 
York, N. Y. (DBI) 

United States Rubber Co., 1230 Sixth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (B) 

Wood Conversion Co., First National Bank Bldg., 
St. Paul, Minn. (A). See page 175. 

Lamps, Portable 

Modern Metal Mfg. Co., 204 E. 28th St., New York, 
N. Y. (C) 

Reliance Devices Co., Inc., 140 Liberty St., New 
York, N. Y, (INA) 

Lounge Furniture 

Heywood-Wakelield Co., Gardner, Mass. (B) See 
page 141. 

Kroehler Mfg. Co., Naperville, 111. (B). See page 165. 

Matting. Rubber 

American Mat Corp., 1717 Adams St., Toledo, 
Ohio (N) 

B. F. Goodrich Rubber Co., Akron, Ohio (D) 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., Akron, Ohio (D) 

O. W. Jackson Co., 290 Fifth Ave., New York, 
N. Y, (N) 

Puritan Rubber Mfg. Co., Perrine Ave., Trenton, 
N. J. (DCIA) 

Mirrors 

Semon Bache & Co., 636 Greenwich St., New 
York, N. Y. (CINA) 

Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Co., Toledo, Ohio. (D) 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co., Grant Bldg., Pitts- 
burgh. Pa. (DCBl) 

Rawson & Evans Co., 710-12 Washington Blvd., 
Chicago, 111. (DC) 

Ornamental Metal Work 

Ames Metal Moulding Co., Inc., 225 E. 144th St., 
New York, N. Y. (DCIA) 

Modern Metal Mfg. Co., 204 E. 28th St., New York, 
N. Y. (C) 

Rambusch Decorating Co., 2 W. 45th St,, New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Sioux Metal Products Co., 3000 Lowell Ave., Sioux 
City, Iowa (Cl) 

Paint Products 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co., Grant Bldg., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. (DCBI) 

United States Gypsum Co., 300 W. Adams St., 
Chicago, 111. (B) 

Seating, Auditorium 

American Desk Mfg. Co., 9th & D Sts., Temple, 
Tex. (DI) 

American Seating Co., Grand Rapids. Mich. (DBN). 
See page 138. 

General Chair Co., 2035-49 Charleston St., Chicago, 
111. (DI) 

Heywood-Wakeiield Co.. Gardner. Mass. (B). See 
page 157. 

Ideal Seating Co.. 521 Ann St.. Grand Rapids, 
Mich. (I). See page 170. 

International Seat Corp.. Union City. Ind. (DBI) 
See page 169. 

Irwin Seating Co., 1516 S. Division Ave., Grand 
Rapids, Mich. (DCI) 

Kroehler Mfg. Co., Naperville. 111. (B). See page 165. 

Peabody Seating Co., North Manchester, Ind. (DI) 

Ticket Choppers and Boxes 

Neumade Products Corp., 427 W. 42nd St., New 
York, N. Y. (INA) 

Ticket Registers Corp. of America, 910 S. Michi- 
gan Ave., Chicago, 111. (D) 

Edward H. Wolk, 1018 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 
111. (A). See page 168. 

Upholstery Materials 

L. C. Chase & Co., 295 Filth Ave., New York, 
N. Y. (C) 

Collins & Aikman Corp., 200 Madison Ave., New 
York, N. Y, (B) 

E, I. duPont de Nemours & Co., Inc., Fabrikoid 
Div., Fairfield, Conn. (I) 

Maharam Fabric Corp., 130 W. 46th St., New 
York, N. Y. (DCINA) 

Masland Duraleather Co., Amber & Willard Sts., 
Philadelphia, Pa. (I) 

Novelty Scenic Studios, Inc., 320 W. 48th St., New 
York, N. Y. (DA) 

Pantasote Co., Inc., 250 Park Ave., New York, 
N. Y. (N) 

United States Rubber Co., 1230 Sixth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (D) 

Volland Scenic Studios, 4040 Easton Ave., St. 
Louis, Mo, (DCIA) 

Wall Coverings, Fabric 

Ernest T. Bode, 2492 S. 5th St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

(D) 

L. C. Chase & Co., 295 Fifth Ave., New York, 
N. Y. (C) 

Maharam Fabric Corp., 130 W. 46th St., New 
York, N. Y. (DCINA) 

Metropolitan Scenic Studios, Inc,, 1611 Davenport 
St,, Omaha, Neb. (D) 

Novelty Scenic Studios, Inc., 320 W. 48th St., New 
York, N. Y. (DA) 

William Samson Co., 39 E. 20th St., New York, 
N. Y. (DCN) 

Volland Scenic Studios, 4040 Easton Ave., St. 
Louis, Mo, (DCIA) 


4 LIGHTING 


"Black Light" Equipment 

Belson Mfg. Co., 800 S. Ada St., Chicago, 111. 
(CIN) 

Continental Lithograph Corp., 952 E. 72nd St., 
Cleveland, Ohio. (DBIN). See page 166. 

General Electric Co., Lamp Dept., Nela Park, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. (CBINA) 

Modern Metal Mfg. Co., 204 E. 28th St., New York, 
N. Y. (C) 

Pickwick Metalcraft Corp., 489-93 Broome St., New 
York, N. Y. (A) 

Cove Lighting 

Belson Mfg. Co., 800 S. Ada St., Chicago, III, (CIN) 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St., 
New York, N. Y. (CA) 

Curtis Lighting, Inc., 6135 W. 65th St., Chicago, 
111. (DC) 

Day-Brite Lighting, Inc., 5411 Bulwer Ave., St. 
Louis, Mo. (CIN) 

Federal Electric Co., Inc., 8700 S. State St., Chi- 
cago, 111. (B) 

Frink Corp., 23-10 Bridge Plaza South, Long 
Island City, N. Y. (DCBI) 

Hub Electric Corp., 2219 W. Grand Ave., Chicago, 
111. (CA) 

Kliegl Bros., 321 W. 50th St., New York, N. Y. 
(DCBINA) 

Modern Metal Mfg. Co., 204 E. 28th St., New York 
N. Y. (C) 

Pickwick Metalcraft Co., 489-93 Broome St., New 
York, N. Y. (A) 

Rambusch Decorating Co., 2 W. 45th St., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Wabash Appliance Corp., 335 Carroll St., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. (lA) 

Dimmers and Controls 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St., 
New York, N. Y, (CA) 

General Electric Co., Lamp Dept., Nela Park, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. (CBINA) 

Hub Electric Corp., 2219 W. Grand Ave., Chicago, 
111. (CA) 

Kliegl Bros., 321 W. 50th St., New York, N. Y. 
(DCBINA) 

Effect Lighting Devices 

Belson Mfg. Co., 800 S. Ada St., Chicago, 111 
(CIN) 

Best Devices Co., 10516 Western Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio. (INA) 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St., 
New York, N. Y. (CA) 

Federal Electric Co., Inc., 8700 S. State St., Chi- 
cago, 111. (B) 

Hub Electric Corp., 2219 W. Grand Ave., Chicago, 
111. (CA) 

Kliegl Bros., 321 W. 50th St,, New York, N. Y. 
(DCBINA) 

Modern Metal Mfg. Co., 204 E. 28th St., New York, 
N. Y. (C) 

Engines, Diesel 

Worthington Pump & Machinery Corp., Har- 

rison, N. J. (I) 

Fluorescent Lamps and Fixtures 

Belson Mfg. Co., 800 S. Ada St., Chicago, III. (CIN) 

Curtis Lighting, Inc., 6135 W. 65th St., Chicago, 
111. (DC) 

Day-Brite Lighting, Inc., 5411 Bulwer Ave., St. 
Louis, Mo, (ClH) 

Federal Electric Co., Inc., 8700 S. State St., Chi- 
cago, 111. (B) 

Frink Corp., 23-10 Bridge Plaza South, Long Island 
City, N, Y. (DCBI) 

General Electric Co., Lamp Dept., Nela Park, 
Cleveland, Ohio. (CBINA) 

Hub Electric Corp., 2219 W. Grand Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111, (CA) 

Kliegl Bros., 321 W. 50th St., New York, N. Y. 
(DCBINA) 

Modern Metal Mfg. Co., 204 E. 28th St., New York, 
N. Y. (C) 

Parco Lighting Equipment Co., Inc., 688 Broadway, 
New York, N, Y. (Cl) 

Pickwick Metalcraft Co., 489-93 Broome St., New 
York, N. Y, (A) 

Rambusch Decorating Co., 2 W. 45th St., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Voigt Co., 12th & Montgomery, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(DCA) 

Fluorescent Paints 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St., New 
York, N. Y. (CA) 

Continental Lithograph Corp., 952 E. 72nd St., 

Cleveland, Ohio. (DBIN). See page 166. 

Gelatine Sheets 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St., 

New York, N. Y. (CA) 

Kliegl Bros., 321 W. 50th St., New York, N. Y. 
(DCBINA) 

Incandescent Lamps 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St. 

New York, N. Y. (CA) 

General Electric Co., Lamp Dept,, Nela Park, 
Cleveland, Ohio. (CBINA) 

Wabash Appliance Corp., 335 Carroll St., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. (A) 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co., East Pittsburgh, 
Pa. (B) 


Lighting Fixtures 

Belson Mfg. Co., 800 S. Ada St., Chicago, 111. 
(CIN) 

Best Devices Co., 10516 Western Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio. (INA) 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St., New 
York, N. Y. (CA) 

Curtis Lighting, Inc., 6135 W. 65th St., Chicago, 
111. (DC) 

Day-Brite Lighting, Inc., 5411 Bulwer Ave., St. 
Louis, Mo. (CIN) 

Federal Electric Co., Inc., 8700 S. State St., Chi- 
cago, 111. (B) 

Frink Corp., 23-10 Bridge Plaza South, Long Island 
City, N. Y. (DCBI) 

Hub Electric Corp., 2219 W. Grand Ave., Chicago, 
111, (CA) 

Kliegl Bros., 321 W. 50th St., New York, N. Y. 
(DCBINA) 

Modern Metal Mfg. Co., 204 E. 28th St., New 
York, N. Y. (C) 

Modern Theatre Supply Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 
(D) 

Parco Lighting Equipment Co., Inc., 688 Broad- 
way, New York, N. Y. (Cl) 

Pickwick Metalcraft Co., 489-93 Broome St., New 
York, N. Y. (A) 

Rambusch Decorating Co., 2 W. 45th St., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Reliance Devices Co., Inc., 140 Liberty St., New 
York, N. Y. (INA) 

Voigt Co., 12th & Montgomery, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(DCA) 

Lighting Plants, Emergency 

IC. W. Battery Co., Inc., Foot of Montague St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. (DCBIN) 

Reflectors 

Belson Mfg. Co., 800 S. Ada St., Chicago, 111. 
(CIN) 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St., 
New York, N. Y. (CA) 

Climax Reflector, Inc., 403 Schroyer Ave. S. W., 
Canton, Ohio. (D) 

Curtis Lighting, Inc., 6135 W. 65th St., Chicago, 
111, (DC) 

Day-Brite Lighting, Inc., 5411 Bulwer Ave., St. 
Louis, Mo. (CIN) 

Frink Corp., 23-10 Bridge Plaza South, Long Island 
City, N. Y. (DCBI) 

Hub Electric Corp., 2219 W. Grand Ave., Chicago, 
111. (CA) 

Kliegl Bros., 321 W. 50th St., New York, N. Y. 
(DCBINA) 

Modern Metal Mlg. Co., 204 E. 28th St., New 
York, N. Y. (C) 

Pickwick Metalcraft Co., 489-93 Broome St., New 
York, N. Y. (A) 

Rambusch Decorating Co., 2 W. 45th St., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Reflector Lamps 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co.. 527-29 W. 45th St., 
New York, N. Y. (CA) 

Climax Reflector, Inc., 403 Schroyer Ave. S. W., 
Canton, Ohio. (D) 

General Electric Co., Lamp Dept., Nela, Park, 
Cleveland, Ohio. (CBINA) 

Wabash Appliance Corp., 335 Carroll St., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. (lA) 

Spot and Flood Lights 

Belson Mfg. Co., 800 S. Ada St., Chicago, 111. 
(CIN) 

Best Devices Co., 10516 Western Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio, (INA) 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St,, New 
York, N. Y. (CA) 

Curtis Lighting, Inc., 6135 W. 65th St., Chicago, 
III. (DC) 

General Electric Co., Lamp Dept., Nela Park, 
Cleveland, Ohio (CBINA) 

Hub Electric Corp., 2219 W. Grand Ave., Chicago, 
111. (CA) 

Kliegl Bros., 321 W. 50th St., New York, N. Y. 
(DCBINA) 

J. E. MgAuIey Mfg. Co., 554 W. Adams St., Chi- 
cago, 111. (N) 

Neumade Products Corp., 427 W. 42nd St., New 
York, N. Y. (INA) 

Rambusch Decorating Co., 2 W. 45th St., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Wabash Appliance Corp., 335 Carroll St., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. (lA) 


IT MUST 


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179 



Spotlight Lenses 

Best Devices Co., 10516 Western Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio. (INA) 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St., 
New York, N. Y. (CA) 

Storage Batteries 

K. W. Battery Co., Inc., Foot of Montague St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. (DCBIN) 

Switchboards 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St., 

New York, N. Y. (CA) 

Hub Electric Corp., 2219 W. Grand Ave., Chicago, 
111. (CA) 

Transformers, Neon 

General Electric Co., Lamp Dept., Nela Park, 

Cleveland, Ohio. (CHINA) 

Wiring Materials 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St., 

New York, N. Y. (CA) 

Curtis Lighting, Inc., 6135 W. 65th St., Chicago, 
111. (DC) 

General Electric Co., Lamp Dept., Nela Park, 

Cleveland, Ohio. (CHINA) 

Rockbestos Products Corp., 50 Mitchell Dr., New 
Haven, Conn. (N) 


5 MAINTENANCE 


Bolts, Expansion and Toggle 

American Desk Mfg. Co., 9th & D Sts., Temple, 
Tex. (DI) 

Ames Metal Moulding Co., Inc., 225 E. 144th St., 
New York, N. Y. (DCIA) 

Chicago Expansion Bolt Co., 2228 W. Ogden Ave., 
Chicago, III. (A). See page 172, 

Carpet Spotting Compounds 

Kelite Products, Inc., 909 E. 60th St., Los Angeles, 
Calit, (DB) 

Carpet Sweepers 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., 
New York, N. Y. (DC) 

E. R. Wagner Mfg. Co., 4611 N. 32nd St., Mil- 
waukee, Wis. (IN) 

Chair Fastening Cement 

General Chair Co., 2035-49 Charleston St., Chicago, 
III. (DI). See page 170. 

Chair Patching Cement 

General Chair Co.. 2035-49 Charleston St., Chicago, 
III. (DI). See page 170. 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Chrome Cleaner 

Kelite Products, Inc., 909 E. 60th St., Los Angeles, 
Calif., (DB) 

J, S. Lawston Co., Inc., 8 Henshaw St., New York, 
N. Y. (DCBI) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y, (DC) 

Drills 

Chicago Expansion Bolt Co., 2228 W. Ogden Ave., 
Chicago, 111. (A). See page 172. 

Dry Cleaning Fluids 

J. S. Lawston Co., Inc., 8 Henshaw St., New York, 
N. Y. (DCBI) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Fire Extinguishers 

American-LaFrance-Foamite Corp., 909 Erie St., 
Elmira, N. Y. (B) 

Dayton Safety Ladder Co., 121 W. Third St,, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. (I) 

Neumade Products Corp., 427 W. 42nd St., New 
York, N. Y. (INA) 

Fireproofing Compound 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Volland Scenic Studios, 4040 Easton Ave., St. Louis, 
Mo. (DCIA) 

Floor Scrubbers and Polishers 

Lincoln-Schlueter Floor Machinery Co., Inc., 512-32 
S. Peoria Ave., Chicago, 111. (D) 

Theo. B. Robertson Products Co., Inc., 700-04 W. 
Division St., Chicago, 111. (D) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 


Floor Waxes and Finishes 

Kelite Products, Inc., 909 E. 60th St., Los Angeles, 
Calif. (DB) 

J. S. Lawston Co., Inc., 8 Henshaw St., New York, 
N. Y. (DCBI) 

Puritan Rubber Mfg. Co., Perrine Ave., Trenton, N. 
J. (DCIA) 

Theo. B. Robertson Products Co., Inc., 700-04 W. 

Division St., Chicago, 111, (D) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Furniture Polish 

]. S. Lawston Co., Inc., 8 Henshaw St., New York, 
N. Y. (DCBI) 

Theo. B. Robertson Products Co., Inc., 700-04 W. 

Division St., Chicago, HI. (D) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N, Y. (DC) 

Glass and Porcelain Cleaner 

Kelite Products, Inc., 909 E. 60th St., Los Angeles, 
Calif. (DB) 

Theo. B. Robertson Products Co., Inc., 700-04 W. 

Division St., Chicago, 111. (D) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Gum Removers 

Kelite Products, Inc., 909 E. 60th St., Los Angeles, 
Calif. (DB) 

J. S. Lawston Co., Inc., 8 Henshaw St., New York, 
N. Y. (DCBI) 

Theo. B. Robertson Products Co., Inc., 700-04 W. 

Division St., Chicago, 111. (D) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., 
New York, N. Y. (DC) 

West Disinfecting Co., 42-16 West St., Long Island 
City, N. Y. (B) 

Mopping Tanks and Wringers 

Lincoln-Schleuter Floor Machinery Co., Inc., 512-32 
S. Peoria Ave., Chicago, 111. (D) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Neon Tube Cleaner 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Portable Bench Grinders 

Diehl Mfg. Co., Trumbull St., Elizabethport, N. J, 
(CBA) 

Rug and Upholstery Cleaner 

]. S. Lawston Co., Inc., 8 Henshaw St., New York, 
N. Y. (DCBI) 

Lincoln-Schlueter Floor Machinery Co., Inc., 512-32 
S. Peoria Ave., Chicago, 111. (D) 

Theo. B. Robertson Products Co., Inc., 700-04 W. 

Division St., Chicago, 111. (D) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Safety Ladders 

Dayton Safety Ladder Co., 121 W. Third St., Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. (I) 

Rich Ladder & Mtg. Co., 1000-28 Depot St., Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. (DCBI) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Stainless Steel Cleaner 

Theo. B. Robertson Products Co., Inc., 700-04 W. 

Division St., Chicago, 111. (D) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Terrazzo Cleaner 

Kelite Products, Inc., 909 E. 60th St., Los Angeles, 
Calil. (DB) 

Theo. B. Robertson Products Co., Inc., 700-04 W. 

Division St., Chicago, 111. (D) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Vacuum Cleaners 

General Electric Co., 1285 Boston Ave., Bridge- 
port, Conn. (IN) 

Invincible Vacuum Cleaner MIg. Co., Dover, Chio. 
(D) 

Lincoln-Schlueter Floor Machinery Co., inc., 512-32 
S. Peoria Ave., Chicago, HI. (D) 

National Super Service Co., 1946 N. 13th St., 
Toledo, Chio. (INA) 

B. F. Sturtevant Co., Damon St., Hyde Park, Boston, 
Mass. (DCB) 

Venetian Blind Cleaner 

Kelite Products, Inc., 909 E. 60th St., Los Angeles, 
Calif. (DB) 

Theo. B. Robertson Products Co., Inc., 700-04 W. 
Division St., Chicago, 111. (D) 

Wall Cleaner 

Kelite Products, Inc., 909 E. 60th St., Los Angeles, 
Calif. (DB) 

Theo. B. Robertson Products Co., Inc,, 700-04 W. 
Division St,, Chicago, Hi. (D) 


State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 


6 MISCELLANEOUS 


Candy Display Cases 

Ballantyne Co., 222 N. 16th St., Cmaha, Neb. (DI) 

Columbus Show Case Co., 826-82 W, Fifth Ave., 
Columbus, Chio. (NA) 

Felgreen Co., 2915 Clive St,, St. Louis, Mo. (DN) 

Candy Vending Machines 

Rowe Mfg. Co., Inc., Main & Mill Sts., Belleville, 
N. J. (N) 

Stoner Corp., 328 Gale St., Aurora, 111. (D) 

Coin Changmg Machines 

Ampro Corp., 2839 N. Western Ave., Chicago, 111. 
(INA) 

Brandt Automatic Cashier Co., 515 First St., 
Watertown, Wis. (D) 

General Register Corp., 1540 Broadway, New York, 
N. Y. (A) 

Ticket Registers Corp. of America, 910 S, Michigan 
Ave., Chicago, 111. (D) 

Universal Stamping & Mfg. Co., 2839 N. W. West- 
ern Ave., Chicago, Hi. (A) 

Fire Extinguisher Fluid 

Neumade Products Corp,, 427 W. 42nd St., New 
York, N. Y. (INA) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc,, 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N, Y. (DC) 

Fireproof Safes and Files 

Neumade Products Corp., 427 W. 42nd St., New 
York, N. Y. (INA) 

Music Stands 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St., New 
York, N. Y. (CA) 

Kliegl Bros., 321 W. 50th St., New York, N. Y. 
(DCBINA) 

No-Parking Signs 

Ingram-Richardson Mfg. Co., 32nd St., Beaver 
Falls, Pa. (DC) 

Edward H. Wolk, 1018 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 
III. (A). See page 168. 

Paper Cups 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Popcorn Machines & Supplies 

Advance Mfg. Co., 8324 St. Louis Ave., St. Louis, 
Mo. (DCBNA). See page 168. 

American Pop Corn Co., Sioux City, Iowa (D) 

C. Cretors & Co., 600-626 W. Cermak Rd., Chicago, 
111. (D) 

Dunbar & Co., 2652 W. Lake St., Chicago, 111. (D) 

Manley, Inc., 1906 Wyandotte St., Kansas City, 
Mo. (D). See page 161. 

Staff Uniforms 

Chicago Uniform & Cap Co., 208 W. Monroe St., 
Chicago, 111. (DNIA) 

Russell Uniform Co., 1600 Broadway, New York, 
N. Y. (DNA) 

Stench Bomb Neutralizer 

[. S. Lawston Co., Inc., 8 Henshaw St., New York, 
N. Y. (DCBI) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Ticket Machines 

General Register Corp., 1540 Broadway, New 
York, N. Y, (A) 

Ticket Registers Corp. of America, 910 S. Michigan 
Ave,, Chicago, 111. (D) 

Water Coolers 

Carrier Corp., Syracuse, N. Y. (B) 

York Ice Machinery Corp., Roosevelt Ave., York, 
Pa. (B) 


7 PROJECTION 


Booth Doors and Ports 

Best Devices Co., 10516 Western Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio. (INA) 

Carbon Savers 

Best Devices Co., 10516 Western Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio. (INA) 


180 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


Droi! Theatre Supply Co., Ohio St., Chicago, 
111. (D). See page 172. 

S.O.Sr Cinema Supply Corp., 636 Eleventh Ave., 
New York, N. Y. (D). See page 172 

Wenzel Co., 2509 S. State St., Chicago, III. (I) 

Edward H. Wolk, 1018 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 
111. (A). See page 168. 

Carbon Waste Cans 

Belson Mfg. Co., 800 S. Ada St., Chicago, 111. 
(CIN) 

Neumade Products Corp., 427 W. 42nd St., New 
York, N. Y. (INA) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y, (DC) 

Edward H. Wolk, 1018 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 
111. (A). See page 168. 

Cement Applicator Sets 

Bell & Howell Co., 1801-15 Larchmont Ave., 
Chicago, 111. (I) 

Neumade Products Corp., 427 W. 42nd St., New 
York, N. Y. (INA) 

Change-Over Devices 

Essannay Electric Mfg. Co., 1241 S. Wabash Ave., 
Chicago, 111. (A) 

Wenzel Co., 2509 S. State St,, Chicago, 111. (I) 

Condensing Lenses 

Semon Bache & Co., 636 Greenwich St., New York, 
N. Y. (CINA) 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., 739 St. Paul St., 
Rochester, N. Y. (IN) 

Best Devices Co., 10516 Western Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio (INA) 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St., 
New York, N. Y. (CA) 

Dowsers 

Motiograph, Inc., 4431 W. Lake St., Chicago, 111. 


Film Cabinets 

Belson Mfg. Co., 800 S. Ada St., Chicago, 111. (CIN) 

Neumade Products Corp., 427 W. 42nd St., New 
York, N. Y. (INA) 

Wenzel Co., 2509 S. State St., Chicago, 111. (1) 

Edward H. Wolk, 1018 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 
ill. (A). See page 168. 

Film Cement 

Bell & Howell Co., 1801-15 Larchmont Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. (I) 

Neumade Products Corp., 427 W. 42nd St., New 

York, N. Y. (INA) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Wenzel Co., 2509 S. State St., Chicago, 111. (I) 

Film Cleaners and Preservatives 

Neumade Products Corp., 427 W. 42nd St., New 

York, N. Y. (A) 

Film Fire Prevention 

Neumade Products Corp., 427 W. 42nd St., New 

York, N. Y. (INA) 

Film Handling Devices 

Neumade Products Corp.', 427 W. 42nd St., New 

York, N. Y. (INA) 

Film Reels 

DeVry Corp., 1111 Armitage Ave., Chicago, 111. 
(DBI) 

Goldberg Bros., 3500 Walnut St., Denver, Colo. (D) 

Neumade Products Corp., 427 W. 42nd St., New 

York, N. Y. (INA) 

Film Rev7inders 

Golde Mfg. Co., 1214 W. Madison St., Chicago, 
111. (NA) ^ 

Neumade Products Corp., 427 W. 42nd St,, New 
York, N. Y. (NA) 

S.O.S. Cinema Supply Corp., 636 Eleventh Ave., 
New York. N. Y. (D). See page 172. 

Wenzel Co., 2509 S. State St., Chicago, 111. (I) 

Edward H. Wolk, 1018 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 
111. (A). See page 168. 

Film Splicers 

Bell & Howell Co., 1801-15 Larchmont Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. (I) 

Neumade Products Corp., 427 W. 42nd St,, New 
York, N. Y. (INA) 

Fire Shutters, Projection 

Ballantyne Co., 222 N. 16th St., Omaha, Neb. (DI) 

Belson Mfg. Co., 800 S. Ada St., Chicago, 111. 
(CIN) 

Best Devices Co., 10516 Western Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio. (INA) 

Intermittent Movements 

International Projector Corp., 90 Gold St., New 
York, N. Y. (N). See page 173. 

S.O.S. Cinema Supply Corp.. 638 Eleventh Ave.. 
New York, N. Y. (D). See page 172. 

Wenzel Co., 2509 S. State St., Chicago, 111. (I) 


Lamphouse Supports 

Edward H. Wolk, 1018 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 
III. (A). See page 168. 

Motion Picture Cable 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St., 
New York, N. Y. (CA) 

Rockbestos Products Corp., 50 Mitchell Dr., New 
Haven, Conn. (N) 

Motion Picture Sound Screens 

Da-Lite Screen Co., Inc., 2723 N. Crawford Ave., 
Chicago, 111. (1) 

Forest Mfg. Corp., 200 Mt. Pleasant Ave., Newark 
N. J. (I) 

RCA Mfg. Co., Inc,, Front & Cooper Sts., Cam- 
den, N. I. (DI) 

Walker-American Corp., 800 Beaumont St., St. 
Louis, Mo. (N) 

Motor Brushes 

National Carbon Co., Inc., Carbon Sales Div., 
Madison Ave. 4 W. 117lh St., Cleveland, Ohio. 
(IN). See page 171. 

Edward H. Wolk, 1018 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 
111. (A). See page 168. 

Motor-Generators 

Automatic Devices Co., 1035 Linden St., Allen- 
town, Pa. (I). See page 172. 

Diehl Mfg. Co., Trumbull St., Elizabethport, N. J. 
(CBA) 

Hertner Electric Co., 12690 Elmwood Ave., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. (N) 

Portable Sound Projectors 

Ampro Corp., 2839 N. Western Ave., Chicago, 111. 
(A) 

DeVry Corp., 1111 Armitage Ave., Chicago, 111, 
(DBI) 

International Projector Corp., 90 Gold St., New 
York, N. Y. (N). See page 173. 

RCA Mfg. Co., Inc., Front & Cooper Sts., Camden, 
N. ]. (DI) 

Professional M. P. Cameras 

Bell’ & Howell Co., 1801-15 Larchmont Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. (I) 

Cine Simplex Corp., 92 Gold St., New York, N. Y. 
(D) 

Projection Arc Lamps 

C. S. Ashcraft Mfg. Co., 47-31 35th St,, Long Island 
City, N. Y. 

Ballantyne Co., 222 N, 16th St., Omaha, Neb. (DI) 
Brenkert Light Projection Co., '7348 St. Aubin Ave., 
Detroit, Mich. (I) 

Forest Mfg. Corp., 200 Mt. Pleasant Ave., Newark, 
N. J. (I) 

|. E, McAuley Mfg. Co., 554 W. Adams St., Chi- 
cago, 111. (N) 

National Theatre Supply Co., 92 Gold St., New 
York, N. Y. (N). See page 167. 

Strong Electric Corp., 2501 LaGrange St., Toledo, 
Ohio. (I). See page 137. 

Projection Lenses 

Semon Bache & Co., 636 Greenwich St., New York, 
N, Y. (CINA) 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., 739 St. Paul St., 
Rochester, N. Y. (IN) 

Projection Optics Co., 330 Lyell Ave., Rochester, 
N. Y. (A) 

Projection Slides 

Cosmopolitan Studios, Inc., 145 W. 45th St., New 
York, N. Y. (DINA) 

Quality Slide Co., 6 E. Lake St., Chicago, 111. 
(A) 

Projector Carbons 

National Carbon Co., Inc., Carbon Sales Div., 
Madison Ave. 4 W. 117th St., Cleveland. Ohio. 
(IN). See page 171. 

Projector Parts 

International Projector Corp., 90 Gold St.. New 
York, N. Y. (N). See page 173. 

Motiograph, Inc., 4431 W. Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

(I) 

S.O.S. Cinema Supply Corp., 636 Eleventh Ave., 
New York, N. Y. (D). See page 172. 

Wenzel Co., 2509 S. State St., Chicago, 111. (I) 
Edward H. Wolk, 1018 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 
III. (A). See page 168. 

Projector Pedestals 

Ballantyne Co., 222 N. 16th St., Omaha, Neb. (DI) 
Motiograph, Inc., 4431 W. Lake St., Chicago, 111. 
(I) 

S.O.S. Cinema Supply Corp.. 636 Eleventh Ave., 
New York, N. Y. (D). See page 172. 

Wenzel Co., 2509 S. State St., Chicago, 111. (I) 
Edward H. Wolk, 1018 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago. 
III. (A). See page 168. 

Rectifiers, Bulb T-ype 

Baldor Electric Co., 4357 Duncan Ave., St. Louis, 
Mo. (I) 


Ballantyne Co., 222 N. 16th St., Omaha, Neb, (DI) 

Benwood-Linze Co., 1842 Washington Ave., St. 

Louis, Mo. (I) 

Forest Mfg. Corp., 200 Mt. Pleasant Ave., Newark, 
N. J. (1) 

Garver Electric Co., 327 Carter St., Union City, 
Ind. (IN) 

Rectifiers, Copper-Oxide 

Benwood-Linze Co., 1842 Washington Ave., St. 

Louis, Mo. (I) 

Forest Mfg. Corp., 200 Mt. Pleasant Ave., Newark, 
N. J. (I) 

General Electric Co., 1285 Boston Ave., Bridge- 
port, Conn. (IN) 

Rectifiers, Copper Sulphide 

Forest Mfg. Corp., 200 Mt. Pleasant Ave., Newark, 
N. I. (I) 

Reel-End Signals 

Essannay Electric Mfg. Co., 1241 S, Wabash Ave., 
Chicago, III. (A) 

Golde Mfg. Co., 1214 W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 
(NA) 

Rewind PuUe'ys 

Best Devices Co., 10516 Western Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio. (IN) 

Neumade Products Corp., 427 W. 42nd St., New 
York, N. Y. (INA) 

Wenzel Co,, 2509 S. State St., Chicago, III. (I) 

Edward H. Wolk, 1018 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 
|11. (A). See page 168. 

Rewind Tables 

Golde Mfg. Co., 1214 W. Madison St., Chicago, 111, 
(NA) 

Neumade Products Corp., 427 W. 42nd St., New 
York, N. Y. (INA) 

Edword H. Wolk. 1018 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 
111. (A). See page 168. 

Rheostats 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St., 
New York, N. Y. (CA) 

Hertner Electric Co., 12690 Elmwood Ave., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. (N) 

Strong Electric Corp., 2501 LaGrange St., Toledo, 
Ohio. (I). See page 137. 

Slide Projectors 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., 739 St. Paul St., 
Rochester, N. Y. (IN) 

Best Devices Co., 10516 Western Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio. (INA) 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St,, New 
York, N. Y. (CA) 

Cosmopolitan Studios, Inc., 145 W. 45th St., New 
York, N. Y. (DINA) 

Golde Mfg. Co., 1214 W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 
(NA) 

5.0. 5. Cinema Supply Corp., 636 Eleventh Ave.. 
New York, N. Y. (D). See page 172. 

Sound Projectors. 35mm 

Ballantyne Co., 222 N. 16th St., Omaha, Neb. (DI) 

Brenkert Light Projection Co., 7348 St. Aubin Ave., 
Detroit, Mich. (I) 

DeVry Corp., 1111 Armitage Ave., Chicago, 111. 
(DBI) 

International Projector Corp., 90 Gold St., New 
York, N. Y. (N). See page 173, 

Motiograph, Inc., 4431 W. Lake St,, Chicago, 111. 

(I) 

RCA Mlg. Co., Inc., Front & Cooper Sts., Cam- 
den, N. J. (DI) 

5.0. 5. Cinema Supply Corp,, 636 Eleventh Ave,, 
New York, N. Y. (D). See page 172, 

Wenzel Co,, 2509 S. State St., Chicago, 111. (I) 

Sound Projectors. 16mm 

Ampro Corp., 2839 N. Western Ave., Chicago, 111. 
(INA) 

Bell & Howell Co., 1801-15 Larchmont Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. (1) 


IT MUST 


BE 


BRIGHT 


See Page 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


181 



DeVry Corp., 1111 Armitage Ave., Chicago, 111, 
(DBI) 

RCA Mfg. Co., Inc., Front & Cooper Sts., Cam- 
den, N. J. (DI) 

Stereopticons 

Bausch <S Lomb Optical Co., 739 St. Paul St., 
Rochester, N. Y. (l[K) 

Best Devices Co., 10516 Western Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio. (INA) 

Brenkert Light Projection Co., 7348 St. Aubin 
Ave., Detroit, Mich. (I) 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St., 
New York, N. Y. (CA) 

Cosmopolitan Studios, Inc., 145 W. 45th SL, New 
York, N. Y. (DINA) 

Kliegl Bros., 321 W. 50th St., New York, N. Y. 
(DCBINA) 

S.O.S. Cinema Supply Corp., 636 Eleventh Ave., 
New York, N. Y. (D). See page 172. 

Tool Kits 

International Projector Corp., 90 Gold St.. New 
York, N. Y. (N). See page 173. 

Voltage Regulators 

S.O.S. Cinema Supply Corp., 636 Eleventh Ave., 
New York. N. Y. (D). See page 172. 


8 SANITATION 


Cleansing Compounds 

Kelite Products, Inc., 909 E. 60th St., Los Angeles, 
Calif. (DB) 

J. S. Lawston Co., Inc., 8 Henshaw St., New York, 
N. Y. (DCBI) 

Theo. B. Robertson Products Co., Inc., 700-04 W. 

Division St., Chicago, 111. (D) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 9th Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

West Disinfecting Co., 42-16 West St., Long Island 
City, N. Y. (B) 

Deodorants and Disinfectants 

Kelite Products, Inc., 909 E. 60th St., Los Angeles, 
Calif. (DB) 

J. S. Lawston Co., Inc., 8 Henshaw St., New York, 
N. Y. (DCBI) 

Theo. B. Robertson Products Co., Inc., 700-04 W. 

Division St., Chicago, ill. (D) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

West Disinfecting Co., 42-16 West St., Long Island 
City, N. Y. (B) 

Drain Cleaners 

Kelite Products, Inc., 909 E. 60th St., Los Angeles, 
Calif. (DB) 

J. S. Lawston Co., Inc., 8 Henshaw St., New York, 
N. Y. (DCBI) 

Theo. B. Robertson Products Co., Inc., 700-04 W. Di- 
vision St., Chicago, 111. (D) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Germicidal Lamps 

General Electric Co., Lamp Dept., Nela Park, Cleve- 
land, Ohio (CHINA) 

Hand Driers, Electric 

Chicago Hardware Foundry Co., Sani-Dri Div.. 
Dept. 6. North Chicago, III. (I). See page 170. 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Insecticides and Germicides 

Kelite Products, Inc., 909 E. 60th St., Los Angeles, 
Calif. (DB) 

J. S. Lawston Co., Inc., 8 Henshaw St., New York, 
N. Y. (DCBI) 

Theo. B. Robertson Products Co., Inc., 700-04 W. 

Division St., Chicago, 111. (D) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

West Disinfecting Co., 42-16 West St., Long Island 
City, N. Y. (B) 

Mats and Matting, Rubber 

American Mat Corp., 1719 Adams St., Toledo, Ohio. 
(DCBN) 

B. F. Goodrich Rubber Co., Arkon, Ohio. (D) 
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., Akron, Ohio. (D) 

O. W. Jackson Co., 290 Fifth Ave., New York, N. 
Y. (N) 

Puritan Rubber Mfg. Co., Perrine Ave., Trenton, 
N. J. (DCIA) 

Odor Adsorbers 

Dorex Div., W. B. Connor Engineering Corp., 114 
E. 32nd St., New York, N. Y. (DC) 

Ozone Generators 

Automatic Electrical Devices Co., 324 E. Third 
St., Cincinnati, Ohio. (DIA) 

Kozono Co., 125 W. Trade St., Charlotte, N. C. (D) 


Paper Towels and Cabinets 

Scott Paper Co., Front & Market St., Chester, Pa. 
(lA) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Perfumes 

J. S. Lawston Co., Inc., 8 Henshaw St., New York, 
N. Y. (DCBI) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Plumbing Fixtures 

Crane Company, 836 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 
111. (C) 

Kohler Company, Kohler, Wis. (C) 

Standard Sanitary & Mfg. Co., Bessemer Bldg., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. (B) 

United States Sanitary Mfg. Co., Arrott Bldg., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. (I) 

Raticides 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

West Disinfecting Co., 42-16 West St., Long Island 
City, N. Y. (B) 

Sanitary Receptacles 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Sanitary Supplies 

J. S. Lawston Co., Inc., S. Henshaw St., New York, 
N. Y. (DCBI) 

Theo. B. Robertson Products Co., Inc., 700-04 W. 
Division St., Chicago, III. (D) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

West Disinfecting Co., 42-16 West St., Long Island 
City, N. Y. (B) 

Soaps and Cleaners 

Kelite Products, Inc., 909 E. 60th St., Los Angeles, 
Calif. (DB) 

J. S. Lawston Co., Inc., 8 Henshaw St., New York, 
N. Y. (DCBI) 

Theo. B. Robertson Products Co., Inc., 700-04 W. 
Division St., Chicago, III. (D) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

West Disinfecting Co., 42-16 West St., Long Island 
City, N. Y. (B) 

Soap Dispensers 

Kelite Products, Inc., 909 E. 60th St., Los Angeles, 
Calif, (DB) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Toilet Seats 

Brunswick-Balke-Collender Co., 623 S. Wabash 
Ave., Chicago, 111. (C) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N, Y. (DC) 

Sterilseat Corp., 101 Park Ave., New York, N. Y. 
(DI) 

Toilet Tissue and Fixtures 

Scott Paper Co., Front & Market Sts., Chester, Pa. 
(lA) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Urinal and Bowl Cleaners 

Kelite Products, Inc., 909 E. 60th St., Los Angeles, 
Calif. (DB) 

J. S. Lawston Co., Inc., 8 Henshaw St., New York, 
N. Y. (DCBI) 

Theo. B. Robertson Products Co., Inc., 700-04 W. 
Division St., Chicago, 111. (D) 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

Washroom Accessories 

State Sanitary Products, Inc., 630 Ninth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DC) 

West Disinfectina Co., 42-16 West St. Long Island 
City, N. Y. (B) 


9 SOUND 


Amplifiers 

Altec Lansing Corp., 6900 McKinley Ave., Los An- 
geles, Calif. (D) 

Atlas Sound Corp., 1451 39th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
(Cl) 

Ballantyne Co., 222 N. 16th St., Omaha, Neb. (DI) 
International Projector Corp., 90 Gold St.. New 
York, N. Y. (N). See page 173. 

Operadio Mfg. Co., St. Charles, 111. (I) 

R(CA Mfg. Co., Inc., Front 6. Cooper Sts., Camden, 
N. I. (DI) 

S.O.S. Cinema Supply Corp., 436 Eleventh Ave., 
New York, N. Y. (D). See page 172. 


Amplifier Tubes 

Bell & Howell Co., 1801-15 Larchmont Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. (I) 

Cincinnati Time Recorder Co., 1733 Central Ave., 
Cincinnati, Ohio. (DCl) 

RCA Mfg Co., Inc., Front & Cooper Sts., Camden, 
N. J. (DI) 

Hearing Aids 

RCA Mfg. Co., Inc., Front & Cooper Sts., Camden, 
N. J. (DI) 

Horn Lifts and Towers 

Atlas Sound Corp., 1451 39th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
(Cl) 

Bruckner-Mitchell, Inc., 420 W. 45th St., New York, 
N. Y. (D) 

Intercommunicating Systems 

Atlas Sound Corp., 1451 39th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
(Cl) 

Cincinnati Time Recorder Co., 1733 Central Ave., 
Cincinnati, Ohio. (DCI) 

Operadio Mfg. Co., St. Charles, 111. (I) 

RCA Mfg. Co., Inc., Front & Cooper Sts., Camden, 
N. J. (DI) 


Lamps, Exciter 

Bell (S Howell Co., 1801-15 Larchmont Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. (I) 

Cincinnati Time Recorder Co., 1733 Central Ave., 

Cincinnati, Ohio. (DCI) 

General Electric Co., Lamp Dept., Nela Park, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. (CBINA) 

RCA Mfg. Co., Inc., Front & Cooper Sts., Camden, 
N. J. (DI) 

Lens Assemblies, Sound 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., 635 St. Paul St., 

Rochester, N. Y. (A) 

Cincinnati Time Recorder Co., 1733 Central Ave., 

Cincinnati, Ohio. (DCI) 

RCA Mfg. Co., Inc., Front & Cooper Sts., Camden, 
N. J. (DI) 

Microphones 

Amperite Company, 561 Broadway, New York, 
N. Y. (D) 

Bell (Sc Howell Co., 1801-15 Larchmont Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. (I) 

Cincinnati Time Recorder Co,, 1733 Central Ave., 

Cincinnati, Ohio. (DCI) 

Operadio Mfg. Co., St. Charles, 111. (I) 

RCA Mfg. Co., Inc., Front & Cooper Sts., Camden, 
N. J. (DI) 

Microphone Connectors and Stands 

Amperite Company, 561 Broadway, New York, N. 
Y. (D) 

Atlas Sound Corp., 1451 39th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
(Cl) 

Bell & Howell Co., 1801-15 Larchmont Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. (I) 

Cincinnati Time Recorder Co., 1733 Central Ave., 
Cincinnati, Ohio. (DCI) 

Photoelectric Cells 

Bell & Howell Co., 1801-15 Larchmont Ave., Chi- 
cago, 111. (I) 

Cincinnati Time Recorder Co., 1733 Central Ave., 
Cincinnati, Ohio. (DCI) 

G-M Laboratories, Inc., 4328 N. Knox Ave., Chi- 
cago, III. (IN). See page 172. 

RCA Mfg. Co., Inc., Front & Cooper Sts., Camden, 
N. J. (DI) 

Public Address Amplifiers- 

Altec Lansing Corp., 6900 McKinley Ave., Los An- 
geles, Calif. (D) 

Ampro Corp., 2839 N. Western Ave., Chicago, 111. 
(INA) 

Atlas Sound Corp., 1451 39th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
(Cl) 

Cincinnati Time Recorder Co., 1733 Central Ave., 
Cincinnati, Ohio (DCI) 

National Theatre Supply Co., 92 Gold St., New 
York, N. Y. (B). See page 167. 

Operadio Mfg. Co., St, Charles, 111. (I) 

RCA Mfg. Co., Inc., Front & Cooper Sts., Camden, 
N. J. (DI) 

S. O. S. Cinema Supply Corp., 636 Eleventh Ave., 
New York, N. Y. (D). See page 172. 

Public Address Systems 

Altec Lansing Corp., 6900 McKinley Ave., Los An- 
geles, Calif. (D) 

Atlas Sound Corp., 1451 39th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
(Cl) 

Cincinnati Time Recorder Co., 1733 Central Ave., 
Cincinnati, Ohio. (DCI) 

National Theatre Supply Co., 92 Gold St., New 
York, N. Y. (B). See page 167. 

Operadio Mfg. Co., St. Charles, 111. (I) 

RCA Mfg. Co., Inc., Front & Cooper Sts., Camden, 
N. J. (DI) 

S.O.S. Cinema Supply Corp., 636 Eleventh Ave., 
New York, N. Y. (D). See page 172. 

Sound Equipment, Complete 

Atlas Sound Corp, 1451 39th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
(Cl) 


182 


BOXOFTICE BAROMETER 


Ballantyne Co., 222 N. 16th St., Omaha, Neb. (DI) 

Cincinnati Time Recorder Co., 1733 Central Ave., 
Cincinnati, Ohio. (DCl) 

International Projector Corp., 90 Gold St., New 
York, N. y. (N). See page 173. 

Motiograph, Inc., 4431 W. Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

(I) 

RCA Mfg. Co., Inc., Front & Cooper Sts., Camden, 
N. J. (Dl) 

Western Electric Co., 195 Broadway, New York, 
N. Y. (B) 

Sound Heads 

Ballantyne Co. 222 N. 16th St., Omaha, Neb. (Dl) 

Cincinnati Time Recorder Co., 1733 Central Ave., 
Cincinnati, Ohio. (DCl) 

International Projector Corp., 90 Gold St., New 
York, N. Y. (N). See page 173. 

Motiograph. Inc., 4431 W. Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

(I) 

RCA Mfg. Co., Inc., Front & Cooper Sts., Camden, 
N, J, (DI) 

S.O.S. Cinema Supply Corp., 636 Eleventh Ave., 
New York, N. Y. (D). See page 172. 

Sound Service, Contract 

Altec Service Corp., 250 W. 57th St., New York, 
N. Y. 

RCA Mfg. Co., Inc., Front & Cooper Sts., Camden, 
N. J. (DI) 

Speakers 

Altec Lansing Corp., 6900 McKinley Ave., Los An- 
geles, Calif. (D) 

Atlas Sound Corp., 1451 39th St., Brooklyn, N. Y, 
(Cl) 

Ballantyne Co., 222 N. 16th St., Omaha, Neb. (DI) 

Motiograph, Inc., 4431 W. Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

(I) 

Operadio Mfg. Co., St. Charles, III. (I) 

RCA Mfg. Co., Inc,, Front & Cooper Sts., Camden, 
N. J. (DI) 

Two-Way Horn Systems 

Altec Lansing Corp., 6900 McKinley Ave., Los An- 
geles, Calif. (D) 

-itlas Sound Corp., 1451 39th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

■ (Cl) 

Ballantyne Co., 222 N. 16th St., Omaha, Neb. (DI) 

Motiograph, Inc., 4431 W. Lake St., Chicago, 111. (I) 


10 STAGE EQUIPMENT 


Curtain Controls 

Automatic Devices Co., 1035 Linden St., Allentown, 
Pa. (I). See page 172. 

Bruckner-Mitchell, Inc., 420 W. 45th St., New York, 
N. Y. (D) 

j. R. Clancy, Inc., 1010 W. Belden Ave., Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. (N) 

Vallen, Inc., 225 Bluff St., Akron. Ohio. (A). See 
page 166. 

Volland Scenic Studios, 4040 Easton Ave., St. Louis, 
Mo. (DCIA) 

Curtain Tracks 

Automatic Devices Co., 1035 Linden St., Allentown, 
Pa. (I). See page 172. 

Bruckner-Mitchell, Inc., 420 W. 45th St., New York, 
N. Y. (D) 

]. R. Clancy, Inc,, 1010 W. Belden Ave., Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. (N) 

Metropolitan Scenic Studios, Inc., 1611 Davenport 
St., Omaha, Neb. (D) 

William Samson Co., 39 E. 20th St., New York, 
N. Y. (DCN) 

Vallen, Inc., 225 Bluff St., Akron, Ohio. (A). See 
page 166. 

Volland Scenic Studios, 4040 Raston Ave., St. Louis, 
Mo. (DCIA) 

Stage and Effect Lighting 

Belson Mfg. Co., 800 S. Ada St., Chicago, 111. (CIN) 

Best Devices Co., 10516 Western Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio. (INA) 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St., 
New York, N. Y. (CA) 

Hub Electric Corp., 2219 W. Grand Ave., Chicago, 
111. (CA) 

Kliegl Bros., 321 W, 50th St., New York, N. Y. 
(DCBINA) 

Metropolitan Scenic Studios, Inc., 1611 Davenport 
St., Omaha, Neb. (D) 

Reliance Devices Co., Inc., 140 Liberty St., New 
York, .N. Y. (INA) 

Volland Scenic Studios, 4040 Easton Ave., St. Louis, 
Mo. (DCIA) 

Stage Hardware 

Bruckner-Mitchell, Inc., 420 W. 45th St., New York, 
N. Y. (D) 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 52729 W, 45th St., 
New York, N. Y. (CA) 

j. R. Clancy, 1010 W. Belden Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 
(N) 

Metropolitan Scenic Studios, Inc., 1611 Davenport 
St., Omaha, Neb. (D) 

Volland Scenic Studios, 4040 Easton Ave., St. Louis, 
Mo. (DCIA) 


Stage Rigging 

Bruckner-Mitchell, Inc., 420 W. 45th St., New York, 
N. Y. (D) 

Capitol Stage Lighting Co., 527-29 W. 45th St., 
New York, N. Y. (CA) 

J. R. Clancy, Inc., 1010 W. Belden Ave., Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. (N) 

Metropolitan Scenic Studios, Inc., 1611 Davenport 
St., Omaha, Neb. (D) 

William Samson Co., 39 E. 20th St., New York, 
N. Y. (DCN) 

Volland Scenic Studios, 4040 Easton Ave., St. Louis, 
Mo. (DCIA) 

Stage Scenery 

Bruckner-Mitchell, Inc., 420 W. 45th St., New York, 
N. Y. (D) 

Metropolitan Scenic Studios, Inc., 1611 Davenport 
St., Omaha, Neb. (D) 

Novelty Scenic Studios, Inc., 320 W. 48th St., New 
York, N. Y. (DA) 

Volland Scenic Studios, 4040 Easton Ave., St. Louis, 
Mo. (DCIA) 


11 STRUCTURE 


Architects, Theatre 

Charles N. Agree, 1140 Book Tower, Detroit, Mich. 

Clifford A. Balch, 1548 W. Washington Blvd., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Roy A. Benjamin, Bisbee Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Bennett & Straight, Schaefer Bldg., Dearborn, Mich. 

Roy B. Blass, 910 S. Michigan Ave,, Chicago, 111. 

T. H. Buell & Co., 14th cS Stout Sts., Denver, Colo. 

Jack Corgan, Tower Petroleum Bldg., Dallas, Tex. 

Michael J. DeAngelis, Temple Bldg., Rochester, N. 
Y. 

f. W. DeYoung, 730 S. W. Salmon St., Portland, 
Ore. 

George A. Ebeling, 241 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio, 

Erwin G. Fredrick, 307 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 

111 . 

Wm. I. Hohauser, Inc., 1841 Broadway, New York, 
N. Y. 

Donn Hougen, Wood Block, Wisconsin Rapids, Wis. 

Kaplan & Sprachman, 305 Dundas St. W. Toronto, 
Ont., Canada. 

S. Charles Lee, 1648 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

Edward Paul Lewin, 134 N. LaSalle St., Chicago, 

111 . 

Liebenberg & Kaplan, 710 McKnight Bldg., Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

MacKie & Kamrath, 2017 W. Gray St., Houston, 
Tex. 

Marr & Holman, 701 Stahlman Bldg., Nashville, 
Tenn. 

Bill J. Moore, 302'/^ S. Harwood St., Dallas, Tex. 

Pereira & Pereira, 221 N. LaSalle St., Chicago, 111. 

Pettigrew & Worley, 302 S. Harwood St., Dallas, 
Tex. 

Vincent G. Raney, 233 Post St., San Francisco, 
Calif. 

C. W. & Geo. L. Rapp, 230 N. Michigan Ave., Chi- 
cago, III. 

Victor A. Rigaumont, 5471 Coral St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Raymond F. Smith, Melba Theatre Bldg., Dallas, 
Tex. 

Erie G. Stillwell, Inc., Hendersonville, N. Car. 

David Supowitz, 246 S. 15th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Tucker & Howell, Rhodes-Haverty Bldg., Atlanta, 
Ga. 

Wetherell & Harrison, 506 Shops Bldg., Des Moines, 
Iowa, 

Electric Eye Doors 

Yale (Sc Towne Mfg. Co., Henry St., Stamford, 
Conn. (C) 

Facing Materials, Exterior 

Ames Metal Moulding Co., Inc., 225 E, 144th St., 
New York, N. Y. (DCIA) 

Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Co., Vitrolite Div., To- 
ledo, Ohio. (B) 

Pittsburgh Plate (jlass Co., Grant Bldg., Pittsburgh, 
Pa. (DCBI). 

United States Plywood Corp., 103 Park Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DBI) 

Flexible Glass 

United States Plywood Corp., 103 Park Ave., New 
York, N. Y, (DBI) 

Flooring Materials 

Puritan Rubber Mfg. Co., Perrine Ave., Trenton, 
N. J. (DCIA) 

Tile-Tex Co., 1232 McKinley Ave., Chicago Heights, 
111. (C) 

Glass Blocks 

Owens-Illinois Glass Co., Ohio Bldg., Toledo, Ohio. 
(D) 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co., Grant Bldg., Pittsburgh, 
Pa. (DCBI) 

Insulation Materials 

Celotex Corp., 919 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 
(Cl) 


Geo. R. Hall & Sons, 516 Fifth Ave., New York, 
N. Y. (DC) 

Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corp., Second NatT Bank 
Bldg,, Toledo, Ohio. (I) 

United States Gypsum Co., 300 W. Adams St., 
Chicago, 111. (B) 

Wood Conversion Co., First NatT Bank Bldg., St. 
Paul. Minn. (A). See page 175. 

Metal Trim and Mouldings 

Ames Metal Moulding Co., Inc., 225 E. 144th St., 
New York, N. Y. 

Sioux Metal Products Co., 3000 Lowell St., Sioux 
City, Iowa. (Cl) 

Pipe Hangers and Brackets 

Grinnell Co,, Inc., 260 W. Exchange St,, Providence, 
R. I. (DCBI) 

Plaster Products 

Voigt Co., 12th & Montgomery, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(DCA) 

Plastic Materials 

E. I. duPont de Nemours & Co., Inc., Plastics 
Dept., Arlington, N. J, (DC) 

General Electric Co., Plastic Dept., 1 Plastics Ave., 
Pittsfield, Mass. (D) 

Tennessee Eastman Corp., 10 E. 40th St., New 
York, N. Y. (D) 

Plate Glass 

Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Co., Toledo, Ohio. (B) 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co., Grant Bldg., Pittsburgh, 
Pa. (DCBI) 

Porcelain Enameled Panels 

Ingram-Richardson Mfg. Co., 32nd St., Beaver Falls, 
Pa. (DC) 

Roofing Materials 

Barrett Co., 40 Rector St., New York, N. Y. (Cl) 

Berger Mfg. Div., Republic Steel Corp., 1038 Bel- 
den Ave., N. E., Canton, Ohio. (DB) 

Celotex Corp., 919 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111, 
(Cl) 

Certain-Teed Products Corp., 100 E. 42nd St., New 
York, N. Y. (I) 

Stainless Steel 

Ames Metal Moulding Co., Inc., 225 E. 144th St., 
New York, N. Y. (DCIA) 

Republic Steel Corp., Republic Bldg., Cleveland, 
Ohio. (I) 

Sioux Metal Products Co., 3000 Lowell Ave., Sioux 
City, la. (Cl) 

Steel and Iron Sheet Metal 

Ames Metal Moulding Co., Inc., 225 E. 144th St., 
New York, N. Y. (DCIA) 

Berger Mfg. Div., Republic Steel Corp., 1038 Bel- 
den Ave., N. E., Canton, Ohio. (DB) 

Sioux Metal Products Co., 3000 Lowell Ave., Sioux 
City, Iowa. (Cl) 

Structural Glass 

Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Co., Vitrolite Div., Toledo, 
Ohio. (B) 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co., Grant Bldg., Pittsburgh, 
Pa. (DCBI). 

Theatre Fronts, Porcelain 

Day-Brite Lighting, Inc., 5411 Bulwer Ave., St. 
Louis, Mo. (CIN) 

Ingram-Richardson Mfg. Co., 32nd St,, Beaver Falls., 
Pa. (DC) 

Theatre Fronts, Structural Glass 

Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Co., Vitrolite Div., To- 
ledo, Ohio. (B) 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co., Grant Bldg., Pittsburgh, 
Pa. (DCBI) 

Wood Veneers 

United States Plywood Corp., 103 Park Ave., New 
York, N. Y. (DBI) 


IT MUST 


BE 

BRIGHT 


See Page. 


137 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 


183 




GEOGRAPHIC DIRECTORY OF ESTABLISHED EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLY SOURCES IN THE UNITED STATES & CANADA 


NEW ENGLAND 


BOSTON 

Capitol Theatre Supply Co,, 28 Piedmont St. 
Cifre, Joe, Inc., 37 Winchester St. 

Independent Theatre Co., 28 Winchester St. 
National Theatre Supply Co., 40 Piedmont St. 
Standard Theatre Supply Co., 78 Broadway. 
Theatre Service & Supply Co., 30 Piedmont St. 

NEW HAVEN 

Modern Theatre Equipment Corp., 130 Meadow St, 
National Theatre Supply Co., 122 Meadow St, 

PROVIDENCE 

Rhode Island Theatre Supply, 357 Westminster St. 


EAST 


ALBANY 

Albany Theatre Supply Co., 1046 Broadway. 
Empire Theatre Supply Co,, Inc., 1003 Broadway. 
National Theatre Supply Co., 962 Broadway. 

AUBURN N. Y. 

Auburn Theatre Equipment Co., 5 Court St. 

BALTIMORE 

Dusman M. P, Supplies, 213 N. Calvert St. 
National Theatre Supply Co., 417 St. Paul Place. 

BUFFALO 

Becker Theatre Equipment Co., Inc,, 492 Pearl St. 
National Theatre Supply Co., 498-500 Pearl St. 
United Projector & Film Corp., 228 Franklin St, 

NEW YORK 

Amusement Supply Co., Inc., 341 W. 44th St. 
Behrend Motion Picture Supply, 630 9th Ave. 
Capitol Motion Picture Supply Corp., 630 9th Ave. 
Crown Motion Picture Supply Co., 346 W. 44th St. 
Hornstein, Joe, Inc., 630 9th Ave. 

National Theatre Supply Co., 356 W. 44th St. 

J. E. Robin, Inc., 330 W. 42nd St. 

S. O. S. Corp., 636 Eleventh Ave. 

PHILADELPHIA 

National Theatre Supply Co., 1225 Vine St. 

Penn Theatre Equipment -Co. , 309 N 13th St. 

WASHINGTON 

Ben Lust, 1001 New Jersey Ave., N. W. 


MIDEAST 


AKRON, OHIO 

Akron Theatre Supply Co., 1025 N. Main St. 

CHARLESTON, W. VA. 

Charleston Electric Supply Co., 910 Kanawha St. 
Charleston Theatre Supply, 506 State St. 

CINCINNATI 

Midwest Theatre Supply Co., Inc., 1632 Central 
Parkway. 

National Theatre Supply Co., 1637 Central Parkway. 

CLEVELAND 

National Theatre Supply Co., 2112 Payne Ave, 
Oliver Theatre Supply, Inc., 1701 E. 23rd St. 

COLUMBUS, OHIO 

American Theatre Equipment Co., 165 N. High St. 

DAYTON, OHIO 

Dayton Theatre Supply Co., Ill Volkenand St. 

DETROIT 

Amusement Supply Co., 208 W. Montcalm St. 
Forbes, Ernie, Theatre Supply Co,, 214 W. Mont- 
calm. 

McArthur Theatre Equipment Co., 2501 Cass Ave. 
National Theatre Supply Co., 2312 Cass Ave. 

GREENSBURG, PA. 

Seiler, Alvin, Seiler Bldg. 

LOUISVILLE 

Central Theatre Sutjply Co., 318 Fifth Ave. 

Falls City Theatre Equipment Co., 427 S. Third St. 

PITTSBURGH 

National Theatre Supply Co., 1721 Blvd. of Allies. 
Seiler, Alvin, 1711 Blvd. of Allies. 

A. & S. Steinberg, 1705 Blvd. of Allies 
Superior Motion Picture Supply, 84 Van Braam St. 

TOLEDO, OHIO 

American Theatre Supply Co., 310 St, Clair St. 


CENTRAL 


CHICAGO 

Abbott Theatre Equipment Co., 1311 S. Wabash 
Ave. 

Droll Theatre Supply Co., 351 E. Ohio St. 
Goldberg Joe, Inc., 1245 S. Wabash Ave. 

Midwest Theatre Supply Co., 1223-27 S. Wabash 
Ave. 

Movie Supply Co., Ltd., 1318 S. Wabash Ave. 
National Theatre Supply Co., 1325 S. Wabash Ave. 
Stanley Theatre Supply Co., 1235 S. Wabash Ave. 

INDIANAPOLIS 

Ger-Bar, Inc., 442 N. Illinois St. 

Indiana Theatres Equip. Corp., 316 N. Illinois St. 
National Theatre Supply Co., 436 N. Illinois St. 

MILWAUKEE 

National Theatre Supply Co., 1027 N. 8th St. 

Smith, Ray, Co., The, 710 W. State St. 

Theatre Equip. & Supply Co., 709 W. Wells St. 

ST. LOUIS 

Erker Bros. Optical Co., 610 Olive St. 

Exhibitors Supply Co., 3236 Olive St. 

National Theatre Supply Co., 3210 Olive St. 
Rockenstein, L. T., Co., 3327 Locust St. 


MIDWEST 


DES MOINES 

Des Moines Theatre Supply Co., 1121 High St. 
National Theatre Supply Co., 1115 High St, 
Service Theatre Supply Co., 1514 12th St. 

FARGO, N. DAK. 

McCarthy Theatre Supply Co., 55 Fifth St. N. 

KANSAS CITY 

Missouri Theatre Equipment Co., 115 W. 18th St. 
National Theatre Supply Co,, 223 W. 18th St. 
Stebbins Theatre Equipment Co., 1804 Wyandotte. 

MINNEAPOLIS 

Elliott Theatre Equipment Co., 72 Glenwood Ave. 
Frosch Theatre Supply Co., 38 Glenwood Ave. 
National Theatre Supply Co., 56 Glenwood Ave. 
Ruliffson, Don H., 1011 Currie Ave. 

Western Theatre Equip. Exch., 45 Glenwood Ave. 

OMAHA 

Quality Theatre Supply Corp., 1511 Davenport St, 
Scott-Ballantyne Co., The, 222 N, 16th St. 

Western Theatre Supply Co., 214 N. 15th St. 

SIOUX FALLS, S. DAK. 

American Theatre Supply Co., 220 W. 10th. 

WICHITA 

Southwest Theatre Equipment, 309 W. Douglas St. 


WEST 


BUTTE. MONT. 

Western Theatre Equipment Co., 107 Granite St. 

CLOVIS, N. M. 

Eastern New Mexico Theatre Supply Co. 

DENVER 

Graham Bros. Theatre Equipment, 546 Lincoln St. 
National Theatre Supply Co., 2111 Champa St. 

HOLLYWOOD 

Mole-Richardson Co., 941 N. Sycamore St. 

LOS ANGELES 

Breck Photoplay Supply Co., 1969 S. Vermont Ave. 
Filbert, John P. Co., 2007 S. Vermont Ave. 

Motion Picture Theatre Accessories Co., 2200 S. 
Vermont Ave. 

National Theatre Supply Co., 1961 S. Vermont Ave. 
Projection Equipment Co., 1975 S. Vermont Ave. 
Shearer, B. F., Co., 1964 S. Vermont Ave. 
Wholesale Supply Co., 1047 N. Wilcox St. 

PORTLAND, ORE. 

Shearer, B. F., Co., 1947 N. W. Kearney. 

Theatre Utilities Service Co., 1935 N. W. Kearney 
Western Theatre Equipment, 1923 N, W. Kearney. 

SALT LAKE CITY 

Inter-Mountain Supply Co,, 142 E. First South St. 


National Theatre Supply Co., 248 E. First South St. 
Service Theatre Supply Co., 256 E. First South St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

National Theatre Supply Co., 255 Golden Gate Ave. 
Pacific Coast Theatre Supply Co., 250 Golden Gate 
Ave. 

Preddey Theatre Supplies, 187 Golden Gate Ave. 
Shearer, B. F., Co., 243 Golden Gate Ave. 

Skinner, C. R., Mfg. Co,, 290 Turk St. 

Western Theatrical Eq. Co., 222 Golden Gate Ave. 

SEATTLE 

National Theatre Supply Co., 2319 2nd Ave, 
Shearer, B. F. Co., 2318 Second Ave. 

Western Theatre Equipment Co., 110 Wall St. 

SPOKANE 

Shearer, B. F. Co., 724 First Ave. 

TUCSON, ARIZ. 

Arizona Film Supply Co., 84 W. Pennington St. 


SOUTH 


ATLANTA 

Capitol City Supply Co., 161 Walton St., N. W. 
National Theatre Supply Co., 187 Walton St., N .W. 
Wil-Kin Theatre Supply, Inc., 150 Walton St., N. W. 

BIRMINGHAM 

Queen Feature Service, Inc., 19121/2 Morris Ave. 

CHARLOTTE 

Bryant Theatre Supply Co., 227 S. Church St. 
National Theatre Supply Co., 304 S. Church St. 
Wil-Kin Theatre Supply, Inc., 321 S. Church St. 

DALLAS 

Hardin Theatre Supply Co., 714 Hampton Road. 
Herber Bros., 408 South Harwood St. 

Modern Theatre Equip. Co., 2011A Jackson St. 
National Theatre Supply Co., 300 S. Harwood St. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Standard Theatre Supply, 124 E. Washington St. 
Theatre Suppliers, Inc., East Sycamore St. 

HOUSTON 

Southwestern Theatre Equipment Co., 1416 Main St. 

MEMPHIS 

Monarch Theatre Supply Co., 494 S. Second St. 
National Theatre Supply Co., 400 S. Second St. 

NASHVILLE 

American Theatre Supply Co., 117 Seventh Ave., N. 

NEW ORLEANS 

Delta Theatre Supply Co., 214 S. Liberty St. 
Electrical Supply Co., 201 Magazine St. 

Louisiana Mot. Piet. Equip., 1414 Cleveland Ave. 
National Theatre Supply Co., 220 S. Liberty St. 

OKLAHOMA CITY 

Howell, W, R., 12 S. Walker Ave. 

National Theatre Supply Co., 700 W. Grand Ave. 
Oklahoma Theatre Supply Co., 710 W. Grand Ave. 

SAN ANTONIO 

Independent Film Exchange, 352 E. Commerce St. 

TAMPA 

United Theatre Supply Corp., 110 Franklin St. 


CANADA 


CALGARY, ALTA. 

Sharp's Theatre Supplies, Film Exchange Bldg. 
Western Theatre Service, 1217 Second St. 

HALIFAX, N. S. 

Dominion Sound Equipment, Ltd., 86 Hollis St. 

MONTREAL, QUE. 

Cinema Service Registered, 5959 Monkland Ave. 
Dominion Sound Equipment, Ltd. (head office), 1620 
Notre Dame St., W. 

Dominion Sound Equipments, Ltd., 5971 Monkland 
Ave. 

General Theatre Supply Co., 366 Mayor St. 

Perkins Electric Co., Ltd., 2027 Bleury St. 

TORONTO, ONT. 

Coleman Electric Co., 258 Victoria St. 

Dominion Sound Equipments, Ltd., 276 Victoria St. 
General Theatre Supply Co., 104 Bond St. 

VANCOUVER, B. C. 

Dominion Sound Equipment, Ltd,, 820 Cambie St. 
Theatre Equipment Supply Co., 906 Davie St. 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 

Canadian Theatre Supply Co., 510 Canada Bldg. 
Dominion Sound Equipment, Ltd., 65 Rorie St. 

Rice, J, M., Co., 202 Canada Bldg. 


184 


BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 




Entertainment and morale go hand in 
hand . . . and advertising ... the right kind of 
advertising...v7ill play a more important part 
in tieing these two together than any other 
single factor except the motion picture itself. 

Advertising with a punch and a promise. 

Advertising with a message of confidence. 

Advertising that sells the big idea. 

Advertising that will make all people . . . 
in every phase of our national life realize 
that this industry is doing its share to keep 
laughter, entertainment and enjoyment 
in the forefront of everyday commodities. 

if Yesl — Roll up your sleeves. Get down to 
business. 

if Keep the American temperament on an 
even keel. 

if Tell them we're still making pictures for 
fun and relaxation. 

★ Tell them with the most potent American 
modern implement . . . Advertising 

Tell them with 

NATIONAL SCREEN SERVICE 

Prize Baby of the Industry! 



)NTG0AAERY 

he’s on his 

„ to stardom 






Scanned from the collection of 
Margaret Herrick Library 
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences 


Coordinated by the 

Media History Digital Library 
www.mediahistoryproject.org 


Funded by a donation from 
Columbia University Libraries