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Arrow Gabanaro gives vou 
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Wear the collar open. or... 




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ARROW 
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.F. Goodrich 
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gives blowout and puncture protection so 
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WITH BRAKES APPLIED AT THE SAME INSTANT, car in foreground, equipped with 
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test at 30 MPH on wet pavement. The "Life-Saver" has a new kind of tread with over 
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BECAUSE THERE'S NO TUBE to be pinched by a 
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blowouts to safe s-s-s-sfowautsl In case of damage, air 
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EVEN WHEN DRIVEN OVER SPIKES like these, the 
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The tire that earned its name LIFE-SAVER 



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have a "walking" action that reduces scuffing, average mileage is 10% to 15% greater. 



PATENTED 
PUNCTURE 
SEALANT 



PATENTED 
BLOWOUT 
PROTECTING 
LINING 



PATENTS COVERING BASIC features of Tubeless 
Tires have been issued to B. F Goodrich by the U. S. Pat- 
ent Office. See your BFG retailer now for the tire that 
may save your life, can save you trouble, will save you 
money. Look for his address in the phone book Yellow 
Pages. The B. F. Goodrich Company, Akron, Ohio. 



Tune in "BURNS and ALLEN" 
CBS-TV Thursday 8:00 PM EST 



® 




LIFE LIFE is published weekly by TIME Inc.. 540 N. Michijran Ave., Chicano 11. HI. Printed in U. S. A. Entered as second-class matter November 16. 1936 at the Poetomce at Chicago, Volume 34 , 

February 2, 1053 III. under the act of March 3, 1870. Authorised by Post Othco Department, Ottawa, Canada, as second-class matter. Subscriptions 90.75 a year in U. S. A.; S7.25 in Canada. Number 5 I 



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Cop 



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tylo/mk UGod^fa$M (pit 'wk fit 

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' -nrc.. U.S. PAT. OFF. 

WORLD FAMOUS FOR I.E CANT* « A*LURE' • WARNER ETTE* . FREE-LIFT* 
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Thl s One 



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Copyrighted material 

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LETTERS TO THE EDITORS 



ARCHTHIEF'S CONFESSION 

Sirs: 

May I congratulate you for presenting in your last 
few issues some excelleut pieces of writing: Heming- 
way s novel, the Sherlock Holmes story, and now the 
selections from Willie Sutton's autobiography ("Con- 
fessions of an Archthief," Life, Jan. 12). 

GUNTHER H. JANSEN 

New York, N.Y. 
Sirs: 

Giving publicity to Willie Sutton seems a perversion 
of good tasle. The concluding moral paragraphs do not 
make it any more acceptable. 

Stressing the details of crime encourages our kids to 
experience similar thrills. . . . 

Alfked K. Raia 

Miami, Fla. 
Sirs: 

Please do not run articles on criminals. Crime docs 
not pay. Willie says so most emphatically. Still the 
glamour comes through. 

Hilda White 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Sirs: 

Only through frank publication of life stories of men 
like Willie Sutton will the American people ever be- 
come aware of the need for an adequate social program 
for youth before they go astray. 

W. Wallace Lee Jr. 

Storrs, Conn. 

HOLIDAY IN MAJORCA 

Sirs: 

Having heard and read just such nonsense as in your 
article, "New U.S. and European Styles nn Bearh in 
Majorca" (Life, Jan. 12), my husband and I visited 
Majorca last September. 

We stayed at a first-class hotel which cost S15 a day 
with meals, not $6. The beds were stuffed with slraw. 
The polite word for the plumbing was "primitive." It 
was impossible to get anything to eat but the vilest 
coffee and the inevitable roll until afternoon when 
anv American stomach had long since rebelled. . . . 
The temperature was 90 3 in the shade. Maybe that's 
"balmy" but Californians have higher climatic ideals. 

Mrs. Michael Hughes 

Malibu, Calif. 
Sirs: 

As one who has gone to Majorca and been conquered, 
I wish to ronfirm sour findings. 

Last winter our family enjoyed a villa plus maid for 
$52 a mouth. Like all others we expect to return. 

John Hall Blackburn 

Albany, N.Y. 

LIVES OF GOOD OTTERS 

Sirs: 

In "The Good Life of Good Oners" (Life, Jan. 12) 
you answered a queslion that plagued us for years. Are 









Please send 
























to 


mm 


address 


city zone 




state 


ONE YEAR $6.75 « co*tin* n t B i u.$., *w 0 «r, aio^o. 


Puerto Rico, Virgin It. 






(1 year at the single copy price would cost you $10.40} 




(Canada: 1 year, $7.25) 




Give to your newsdealer or to your local subscription represent- 


ative or mail to LIFE, 540 N, Michigan Ave.. Chicago 11. III. 






L-3405 



there really otters on the Liers's farm? We've driven 
past the Liers's place hundreds of times. Near their 
home is a sign -"Slow, Otters Crossing." This always 
brings some quip from passengers, for none had ever 
seen an otter crossing that highway. Now we know. 

Gene Sayre 

La Crosse, Wis. 
Sirs: 

Those otler pictures were perfect. The greatest pleas- 
ure I get from your magazine is in your marvelous pic- 
tures of animals. 

I. Kesper 

Lorain, Ohio 

Sirs: 

Give us more, more such pictures, please. 

Ruth Armstrong 

Fort Smith, Ark. 

• Here is one more. — ED. 




OTTER BALANCES APPLE 



Sirs: 

Emil Liers and readers who saw his otters will be in- 
terested in ihe wonderful pet otter of Jan Pasek, a 17th 
Century Polish counterpart of James Boswell. 

Pasrk's otler was trained like a dog and performed 
a dog's tricks. Al Pasek's order, he could catch fish 
from ponds and streams. He uas called Kobal, (Worm) 
and became famous all over Poland. He was housebro- 
ken and slept in his master's bed. Acting as a watch- 
do-:, be fought strange dogs and would not allow a 
Stranger to touch Pasek. When King John Sobieski 
heard of the wonder animal, Pasek was induced to give 
him to the king. Unfortunately, a soldier at the royal 
castle killed Kobak, not knowing he was the king's pet. 

Alexander Janta 

Buffalo, N.Y. 

HOT-SHOT JOCKEY 

Sirs: 

I thought you would like to know Tony DeSpirito is 
really only 17 years old ("Fortune Smiles on Hot-Shot 
Tony DeSpirito," Like, Jan. 12). This means most of 
his 390 victories were piled up while he was onlv 16. 

Robert DeNapoli 

Mount Prospect, III. 

• Tony DeSpirito, who had given his age as IK. re- 
cently revealed he is 17 to clarifv his drafl status. 
Like many apprentices he added a year lo his real 
age to help convince horse owners that he could 
ride.— ED. 

SWEDISH HEARTTHROB 

Sirs: 

As a small child mv parents taught me that success 
in life conies through hard work, not a pleasing smile 
and gentle face. Your profile picture of the new "Heart- 
throb for the Swedes" (Life, Jan. 12) seems to prove 
my parents' point. 

Arthur S. Nichols 

Meeteetse, Wyo. 



GREETING CARD GLUT 

Sirs: 

George Englehardt who is being swamped with Christ- 
mas cards (LtFE on the Newsfronts of the World, Jan. 
12) and your readers may be interested to know that 
the Rev. Peter Caironi, S.J., Cherukunnu P.O., North 
Malabar, India remakes and sells used Christmas cards 
to buy rice for the untouchables. 

John J. Kelleiier 

New Orleans, La. 
Sirs: 

For years the Rev. Joseph Savage, 995 Main Street, 
Antioch, III., has had an unlimited demand for used 
greeting cards, which he ships to schools for American 
Indians and missions and hospitals around the world. 

Joseph Glunz 

Chicago, III. 

ARGENTINE QUINTS 

Sirs: 

The Diligenti quintuplets ("Argentine Quintuplets 
Make First Public Appearance," Life, Jan. 12), being 
of both sexes and no two looking verv much alike, 
must be fraternal (each from a separate ovum). Can 
you conlirm my guess? 

Wvat Wetmerley 

Creensboro, N.C. 

• Buenos Aires doctors believe the children came 
from five separate ova. — ED. 

Sirs: 

Your report on the Diligenti quints and your story 
on Chang-Eng, the Siamese twins, are valuable and 
permanent contributions to literature on plural births. 

It is rare for quintuplets lo survive after birth. Of 
six cases recorded in the U.S., no complete set has sur- 
vived. But the U.S. can claim a case of sextuplets. 
This occurred in the fabulous Bushnell familv, to 
whom 16 children were born, never less than three at 
a time. The Rushnells had triplets in I860, sextuplets 
in 1866, then triplets and quadruplets. Four sextuplets 
lived to old age. The last, Mrs. Alincia Parker (shown 
with her brother below), died in March 1952. 

John B. Nichols, VI. D. 

Washington, D.C. 




SURVIVING SEXTUPLETS 



LIFE IN BOTTLE 

Sirs: 

The bottle has often helped to degrade man. Now we 
see a man actually becoming the inmate of a bottle 
(Speaking of Pictures, Life, Jan. 12). I,et us not en- 
courage such dubious projects. 

Mrs. T. P. Hepwortii 

Larchmont, N.Y. 



A6dr»U all editorial and advrtiung co"#ip©nd*ne* to: LIFE, 
9 Rockefeller Plata. Now York 20. N. Y. 

Svbtcriptiom S— , J. E. King, Gen 'I. Mgr. Address all 
iMitttcriplion correspondence to: LIFE, MO N. Michigan 
Av«\. Chicago II. Illinois. 

Chang* of Addritt: Four weeks' notice required. When order- 
ing change, please nurne magatine and furnish address 
imprint from u recent issue. If unable lo do so. please 
state exactly how inagaiinv in addressed. Change cannot 
he made without old as well as new address, including 
postal tone number. Time Inc. also publishes Time, 
Fotm.'NK, A itcH 1 t 1 ■ 1 ■ 1 it a t. Fohl'm and House & Home. 
Chairman. Maurice T. Moore; President, Roy E. Larsen; 
Executive Vice President and Treasurer. Charles L. 
8l ill man; Executive Vice President for Publishing, Howard 
Black; Vice Presidents, Allen Crover, Andrew Heiakell. 
C. D. Jackson. .1. A. Linen. P. I. Prentice; Vice Presi- 
dent A Secretary, D, W. Brumbaugh; Comptroller & 
Assistant Secretary, A. W. Carlson; Manager, March 
ok Time Division, A. R. Murphy. 



7 





ON A CHAIR IN THE SENATE HOUSE NEXT TO MOPS WHICH WERE USED FOR CLEANING MARBLE FLOOR 



SNOOZING CAESAR RESTS UNDER THE CAMERAS 



SPEAKING OF PICTURES . . . 

. . .These show noblest Romans incongruously gelling ready to film 'Julius Caesar' 



"All right, kids," the assistant director would cry, "it's hot, it's Rome 
and here comes Caesar." Caesar was Louis Calhern and day after day he 
had to lie lifeless at the foot of Pompey's statue while Mark Antony made 
his funeral oration. Sometimes a dummy (left) was put in his place while 
the cameraman figured out his angles; but Calhern preferred to be his own 
corpse and rose from the dead after one take to say, "Let's do that one 
again — I wasn't very good." Noble Romans might meanwhile be taking cat 



naps in the Forum while burly grips arranged a corpse-strewn battlefield. 
It is part of standard operating procedure when a costume film is being 
shot on a Hollywood set; it was the more fascinating in this case because 
the film was an all-star version of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar. Photog- 
rapher John Swope was allowed on the M-G-M set during production of the 
picture, and, as seen here, took full advantage of the chance to document 
the incongruities of noble Romans preparing for a tragedy in Hollywood. 






STABBING of Caesar in pin stripes is Hone by 
Edmond O'Brien. John Gfolgud (right) is Cassius. 



NONSTAINING BLOOD, a special chemical in- 
vented in Hollywood, is applied to Caesar's toga. 



STUFFED HORSE is carried into position to be 
strewn, along with other corpses, on the battlefield. 



i . :■" j inaterial 



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Lovely Bnrbarii Halt' enjoying a fish- 
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Barbara relaxes in the pool of her Holly- 
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SLIM THE WAY THE STARS SLIM 



LIFE 

Editor-in-Chief Henry Tt. Lmt' 

President . . Hoy E. Larsen 

Editorial Director. . . John Shaw Billing 

BOARD OF EDITORS 

Daniel LonRWell Cu m km an 

Etlward K. Thompson. . M anaoinu Editor 
Maitland A. Edcy \ Assist kst 

.Sidney I,. Jamcn ( Managing Editors 
John K. Jessup. ,Cmr.r Editorial Writkr 

Charles Tudor Abt Director 

Fillmore Calhoun. Robert T. Elson, 
Emmet J. Huuhcs, .lo- KaStlMTi 
Marian A. MacPhail. Hugh MotTetl. 
John Osborne. Philip 11. Wooltnn Jr. 
STAFF WRITERS 
Robert Coii|*hlan. Entcwi Huvemann, Win- 
throp Sarifeanl, KoIhti Wallace. 

PHOTOGRAPHIC 5TAFF 

Hay Macklnnd PlCTOBI Editor 

Assistant*: Frank J. Bch*f»chel, London 

Wainwricht 

Mar E arct Bourke- White. Cornell Capa. Ed- 
ward Clark, Ralnh Crane. Loomis Dean, 
John Domini*, David Douglas Duncan. 
Alfred Eisenstscdt, Eliot Elisofon. J. R. 
Eyerman. N. R. Farbinan. Andrea* Fein- 
inner, Albert Fenn. Frit* C.oro. Allan 
Grant. Yule Joel, Mark KaiitTman. EtotMTt 
W. Kelley. Dmitri Kessel. Walhire Kirk- 
land, Nina Leon. Thomas MeAvoy, Francis 
Miller. Ralph Morse. Curl Mydans, Cordon 
Parka, Michael Rouuier. Walter Sander-. 
Joe Schrrschcl. fieorjie Silk. Genrce Skad- 
dinn. W. Eiidene Smith. Howard Soetairek 
Peter Stackpole. Hank Walker. 
Film Eihtohs: Maruaret lament, Barlwira 
Brewster. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Oliver Allen. Donald Berminizhain. William 
Jay Gold. William 1'. Gray. Mary Hamman, 
Sally Kirkland, Kenneth MacLeish. Tom 
Priueaux, Marshall Smith, Claude Stanush, 
John Thorne. 

ASSISTANT EDITORS 
HerWrl Brean, William Brinkley. Earl 
Brown, Robert Campbell. Gene Cook, 
David Dreiman. Lee Eitimton, Honor 
Fit»|Mitrick. Ralph Graves. Muriel Hall, 
Jerry Hannifin, Richard W. Johnston, Rene 
Kuhn, Mary Leatherbee, Patricia O'Con- 
nell, Dorothy Seiberlinj;, Mary Lou Skinner, 
Margit Van* a. Valerie Vondermuhll. RoImtI 
Wernick, Keith Wheeler. A. B.C. Whipple, 
Warren Young. Duvid Zejtlin. 

REPORTERS 

Robert Ajemian. Shana Alexander, Mary 
EliKiibeth Barber, Marnarel Ba*-*ett. David 
Beritaimni. Vivian Campbell, Barbara 
Dawson, Anne Denny, Beatrice Dobie. 
Terry Drueker. Unra Eeker. Clay Felker. 
Jean FerrisB. Nancy Fobes, Naney Genet, 
Doris Getsiniter. Robert Ginna, Jauien 
Goode. Patricia Grave*. Roxanc Guerrero. 
Terrv Harnan, Kav Hendry, Alice EUgglBa, 
Helen Hodnes, Judith Holden. Uavard 
Hooper, Monica Home, Patricia Hunt, 
Leon JarofT. Patricia Johnson. Nancy Kins. 
James Lebcnthal, Marshall Lumsden. Hel- 
ena Malinow!«ka, Mar>- Ellen Murphy, 
Lorettu Nelson. Gravee Northerona. Wil- 
liam Pain. Eleanor Parish. Patsy I'arkin. 
John Porter, Henrietle Rooseiil.ury. Betty 
Schinid. Robert Shnayernon. Kathleen 
Shortall, Anabel StnUMOn, Katharine Sui- 
ter. Jeanne Stahl, Gabrielle Stauh, Marion 
Steinmann. Henry Snydam Jr.. Lucy 
Thomas, Alice Thomp-son. Viruinia I nsell, 
Claire Waller. Marnaret William*. 

COPY READERS 
Helen Deuell (Chief), Dorothy llUon, Ber- 
nice Adelnon, Irraine Barry, Hilda Ed>on. 
Clam Nieolui, Suaanne Seixa-«, Rachel Tuek- 
erttian. 

PICTURE BUREAU 

Dorothy Hoover (Chief), Natalie Kosek, 
Mary Carr. Betty Doyle. Maraaret Gold- 
smith. Ruth Lester, .Maude Milar- 
PliTrRr. Libhahv; Alma Eeiileston (Chief). 
Jennie Hart, Doris O'Neil. 

LAYOUT 

Michael Phillips. Bernard (Jutnt. William 
Gallaicher. Hildc AdelsWrner. Matt Greene. 
Earl Kensh. Fernando Marline*, Behri 
Pratt, Anthony Sodaro. Alfred Zinuuro. 

NEWS SERVICES 
U.S. AND CANADIAN: Lawrence Lnybotirne 
(Chief of Correspondents). Irene Saint, 
Tom Carmiehael, Jean Snow. Bvrtavt — 
Washington : James Shepley, James Truitt, 
Mary H. Cadwalader, Helen Fennell, 
William Goolrick Jr., Will Lam-: Chicauo: 
Sam Welles. Geortie Hunt, Ruth Dennis. 
Robert Drew, Georue Shim-; Low Anoklls: 
Ben Williamson. Frank Campion. Stanley 
FHnk, Virginia Hublw, Philip Kunhardt Jr.. 
Richard Meryman Jr.; AtlanTv: William 
S. Howland. Coles Phiniiy: Boston: Jeff 
Wylie, John Bryson; D\u.\s: William 
Johnson. Scot Leavitt, Willard C. Rappleye 
Jr.; Dknvkr: Ed Onle, Charles ChampHn; 
Detroit: Fred Collins, Edward Kern, 
Donald Wilson: San Francisco; Alfred 
Writthl. Richard Pollard. Jane Estvs; 
Skattle: Dean Brelis; Ottawa: Serrell Hill- 
man, Byron Hitman; Montrkm.: James R, 
Conant; Toronto: RoWt Parker. Frank 
McNauiihton (Special Correspondent). 
FOREIGN: Manfred Gottfried (Chief of Cor- 
respondents), John Boyle. Donald Burke. 
Bureaus — London: Andre Lauuerre. Gene 
Farmer. Dora June Hamblin, Ruth Lynam, 
John Mulliken; Pahi»: Erie Gibbs. John 
Jetikisson. Mmlulde Camacho, Nuthalie 
Kotchoubey. Joann Mctiniston. Milton 
Orehevsky; Bonn: Frank White, Roy 
Rowan; Rome: Thomas Dotier, John Luter; 
Maohid: Piero Saporiti; Jon \NNKsBtfHo: 
Alexander Camphell; Middle East: James 
Bell; New Delhi: Jaine- Burke; Singa- 
pore: John Dowlinjt; Hong Kono: Kolart 
Neville; Tokyo: Dwj K ht Martin. John Dille; 
Mexico Citv: Robert Lubar; Panama: 
Philip Payne; Hio DI Janeiro: Cranston 
Jones; Buenos Aires: Hamellc MaCoy. 
PUBLISHER 
Andrew Heiskell 
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 
Clay Buckhout 




SOLD IN LEADING STORES 
THROUGHOUT THE COUNTRY 

POLOS FOR EVm JUNIOR VtFUBtR OF 
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RKOOKItS NfW VOIk 




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toi — if any — highvr outtidc 
United S'otet — pottage paid 
if check tent with order. 

SALADMASTER SALES, INC. 

131 129 How.ll St., Dall.t. T,»at 



10 



Copyrighted material 



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Kellngg's ni'W Sweetheart nf the Corn, now 
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SWEETHEART 

of the CORN 



Have you met our new Sweetheart face to face? 

You'll be seeing her on your grocer's cereal shelves, 
smiling an invitation for you to join the millions who 
enjoy Kellogg's Corn Flakes for breakfast. 

But if you have a feeling that you've already met this 
young lady sometime in the past, don't think your memory 
is playing tricks. For Kellogg's new Sweetheart is a direct 
descendent of Kellogg's original Sweetheart. Today, as 
then, she symbolizes the goodness in the heart of the corn. 

Like that original Kellogg's Sweetheart, this one is also 
destined to play the dual role of globe trotter and home- 
body. For Kellogg's Corn Flakes are— today as yesterday 
—the world's favorite ready- 



to-eat cereal. They will be 
found in London's Piccadilly 
and the African veldt, as well 
as in most of the homes in 
your own block. 

We hope Kellogg's Sweet- 
heart becomes a familiar 
friend in your home, and 
that you frequently accept 
her invitation to enjoy the 
crisp, crisp flakes with the 
deep, deep flavor. You'll find 
it the same can't-be-copied 
flavor that has distinguished 
Kellogg's Corn Flakes ever 
since W. K. Kellogg created 
his still secret recipe. And a 
happy breakfast to you! 




Kellogg's original Sweet' 
heart of the Corn, who used 
to greet grandpa at break- 
fast when he was a boy. 



To keep up with the nation's growing breakfast 
appetite not only Kellogg's home plant at Battle 
Creek, but also a brand new plant at San Leandro, 
California, is now working around the clock to 
turn out those fresh Kellogg's Corn Flakes. 




BEAUTY WORLD 

WO O I wo rth'§ 



SUSAN S1VIAJRT 



/ hate to miss beauty aids that could help me look lovelier. I hat s why I shop 

Woolworth s. just once around the counter and I re seen every type oj beauty aid 
imaginable jrom . . . well, timely cosmetics that keep me glamorous whatever 

the weather to the newest in powder puj]s. At W'oolworlh s I find the besl- 
•rands . . . in every size jrom small trial ones to big money-saving economy sizes. 
It s so complete ... so varied ... no wonder I call it my Beauty World! 
Come with me and see. . . 



t Woolworth's 
Shopping Reporter 



•plus lax 



There's Pacquins Hand Cream on 
the counter to remind me 1 need 
Pacquins' soothing protecting care. 
Purple label for normal skin . . . 
red for extra-dry. 25c, 49c, 98c* 

Again, Helene Curtis Suave. When 
winds blow, where would I be with- 
out it! Just a touch of Suave gives 
hair a soft cared-for look all day. 
Curtisol does it. 50c. $1* 

Love the way Wool worth's groups 
hair aids. I want Noreen Super 
Color Rinse. Noreen blends glam- 
our into hair! You brighten, 
darken, change at will. It sham- 
poos out! 30c* 

Speaking of shampoos, have you 
tried White Rain? It's like wash- 
ing hair in softest rainwater. This 
new gentle lotion shampoo pam- 
pers hair . . . leaves it cloud-soft, 
sunshine bright! 30c, f>0c, SI 

This is new! Toni Trio gives you 
a home permanent custom-made 
for you for a far better wave. 
Regular for normal, Super for 
hard-to-wave and Vtry Gentle for 
easy-to-wave hair. Refills §1.50* 

, Thrills me to find toiletries worth 
up to 59c in Woolworth's close- 
out assortment. Lotions, toilet 
waters, creams, powders, many 
wonderful items from divisions of 
Lander Co. all priced at 19c* ea. 



G. With Hazel Bishop No Smear 
Lipstick on your dressing table, 
you seldom need carry one. Once 
on, it slays fresh, lovely Uirough 
dining, drinking, romance. §1.10* 

H. For a lastingly fresh mouth, here's 
Pepsodent Toothpaste . . . While 
or the new Chlorophyll. Patented 
Oral Detergent brings a clean 
mouth taste for hours. White 10c. 
27c, 47c, 63c, Chlorophyll 43c, 6Uc 

J. Mustn't forget Heed Deodorant 
to protect my warm clothes. ..and 
vie. Heed's super-fine spray really 
covers... checks perspiration safely, 
surely, daintily. 25c. 39c, 59c* 

K. While I'm on daintiness, I'll pick 
up Freshies Mints. Protect 
against food, drink, smoking odors. 
Nature's deodorant, chlorophyll, 
sweetens my breath in seconds. 10c 

L. Have you tried Lady Esther's 
1 -minute home facial? Do! Buy 
4-Purpose Cream at Woolworth's. 
It cleanses, softens, helps nature 
refine pores. Grand as a powder 
base. 29c, 55c, 83c* 

M. I keep my finger on fashion with 
Woolworth's Helen Neushaefer 
shades. Doubly pretty because ex- 
clusive Plasteen keeps nails jewel- 
clear . . . resists chipping. 10c* 




Shop Woolworth's First For Everything In Cosmetics 



Vol. 34, No. 5 



LIFE 



REG. U.S. PAT. OFF. 



February 2, 1953 



COLOR IN ART AND A UNIQUE COVER 



It is theoretically possible to bring you a whole issue of 
Life in color, but it would involve manv sacrifices that 
are not immediately apparent. Our many readers who 
take color pictures could tell you something about that. 
The amount of color we publish is limited by the addi- 
tional time, expense and skills which 
it demands. Many subjects fortunate- 
ly can be presented just as well or 
better in black and white — like the 
knockout blow of a prizefighter, the 
mood of a misty evening or the flick 
of a maiden's smile. 

There are subjects, however, which 
cry for color. Fancy trying to display 
the charm of an Arlene Dahl (Life, 
July 7, 1952) without noting the ex- 
act shade of her Titian hair, or seek- 
ing in monotone the autumnal splen- 
dors of a forest scene where every leaf 
^^^^J> seems In grasp briefly a different hue. 

When it came to doing our story 
on the great French artist Rouault, 
we knew last summer that a big U.S. 
show was to be held this month so we made an assign- 
ment for color photographs of the artist and his work. 
Then we gave the craftsmen in the engraving anil print- 
ing plants weeks in which to get all the nuances into 
final reproductions. 

Most of Life's major color presentations are like 
that. Their value is so enduring that it is worth the 




GEORGES ROUAULT 
IN PARIS 



extra time we take to produce them. But we also realize 
that color sometimes adds interest to topical subjects, too. 
Our production department has devised a method by 
which wc can give you a limited amount of color on a 
much faster schedule. For instance, we knew that most 
of our readers would be interested in 
the sporty hues of this year's new 
sports cars. So, a few weeks ago, as 
soon as the manufacturers let us see 
their jealously guarded new models, 
wc took the pictures on page 38. 

Then, as the inauguration neared, 
we felt that Life's readers couldn't 
reallv get the full impact of the event 
without use of color photography. 
The extensive black and white cover- 
age on pages 14-2.3 was a matter of 
normal editorial operations. But it 
took performance which set a record 
in speed and quality to produce color. 

The pictures were shot Tuesday 
afternoon. A special crew of techni- 
cians rushed them through our Wash- 
ington laboratory and at 10:30 p.m. Frank Scherschel's 
photo of the inaugural stands was chosen as the cover. 
A courier caught an 11:30 p.m. plane and by 3 a.m. 
engravers in Chicago started work. A proof was back in 
the New York offices early Thursday and by midnight 
Thursday the presses were rolling off the more than 
5,300,0(X) covers for the issue you are now reading. 




FRANK SCHERSCHEL 
AT INAUGURATION 



CONTENTS 



COVER 

THE COLOR OF THE INAUGURATION, 

FOR IDENTIFICATIONS SEE PARES 1ft and 1Q 

THE WEEK'S EVENTS 

A flHANRE OF GOVERNMENT THAT COULDN'T HAPPEN ANYPLACE ELSE 14 



DOMINO 1?TH OUTPRICES HEREFORD FOREBEARS 77 

A HABV IB HORN ACCORDING TO SCRIPT 29 

I IFF ON THF NFWSFRflNTS OF THE WORLD _ 

CARS-TO-COME HOG LIMELIGHT M 

EDITORIALS 24 

A NOBLE INAUGURAL 
SALUTE TO A SOLDIER 

PHOTOGRAPHIC ESSAY 

A COMEBACK FOR RIG FAMILIES B2 

PHOTOGRAPHED FOR LIFE BY GORDON PARKS 

ARTICLE 

ROUAULT. by WINTHROP SARGEANT (WITH 6 PAGES OF COLOR) S6 



THE COVER AND ENTIRE CONTENTS OF LIFE ARE FULLY 
PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHTS IN THE UNITEO STATES AND 



MOVIES 

THE CUSTOMER CUTS THE BAD AND THE BEAUTIFUL' 45 

ANIMALS 

THE CAT THAT WON'T COME DOWN 53 

FASHION 

DARING DIGBY'S MALE-INSPIRED FASHIONS 72 

SCIENCE 

IRRADIATED RAT GROWS FANGS 78 

THEATER 

FOUR COLONELS WOO A BEAUTY 95 

OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

LETTERS TO THE EDITORS 7 

SPEAKING OF PICTURES: THESE SHOW NOBLEST ROMANS 

INCONGRUOUSLY GETTING READY TO FILM 'JULIUS CAESAR' 8 

SEQUEL- PASADEN A FIGHTS OLD BATTLE AS IT GETS NEW SCHOOL HEAD 35 

I IFF'fi PARTV- CHORIMF-nFR fOMFS OUT AT A COTII I ION 1TJ2 

MISCELLANY- WINTER MAKES A SELF-PORTRAIT 104 



IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES AND MUST NOT BE REPRO- 
DUCED IN ANY MANNER WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION 



The following list, page by pace, shows the source from which each picture 
in this 1--1H- was gathered. Where a single page is indebted lo several 



COVER-FRANK SCHf RSCHEL 
7 — WALLACE KIRKLAND-INT. 
I. S JOHN SWOPE 

13— ERIC 5CHAAL ALFRED E1SENSTAE0T 

14 — HARK KAUFFMAN 

15— GEORGE SKADDING 

16— HOWARD SOCHUREK. HANK WALKER. CORNELL 
CAPA — CORNELL CAPA— GEORGE GRIMAND, CARL 
IWASAKI. JOHN ZIMMERMAN 

17— GEORGE SKADDING CORNELL CAPA, GEORGE SKAD- 
DING 

18. 19 — FRANK SCHERSCHEL EXC HI. LT. HOWARD 
SOCHUREK 



20. 21 LT. HOWARD SOCHUREK —HANK WALKER — 
HOWARD SOCHUREK: Cfo. FRANK SCHERSCHEL — 
ALBERT FENN: RT. ALBERT FENN HANK WALKER 

22 CORNELL CAPA TO, ALFRED EI5EN5TAE0T —CORNELL 
CAPA— ALFRED E1SENST AEDt (2), INT. 

Zi— HANK WALKER 

27-COIiitest AMERICAN HEREFORD ASSOCIATION 

29- DESILU PRODUCTION— DALE GILLETTE 

30 — PARKE. OAVIS ft CO.— U.S. ARMY PHOTO. A.P. 

35 -EDWARD CLARK BEN OLENDER FOR PASADENA STAR- 

NEWS EDWARD CLARK 

36 —EDWARD CLARK 

3) —HOWARD SOCHUREK— ELIOT ELISOFON 



sources, credit 
torn) and line bv 



ecorded picture by picture (left to right, top tn bnt- 
■ (lines separated by dashes) unless otherwise specified. 



JJ-HOWARD SOCHUREK —ELIOT ELISOFON 

41) — ELIOT ELISOFON EXC. ROT. 

12 ELIOT ELISOFON 

45 — M-G-M tic. V)i RT, EDWARD CLARK 

4S-M-G-M EXC. T. EDWARD CLARK 

41 M-G-M 

S3, 54— ILSE MATER 

57— ERIC SCHAAL 

51. ». 6 J —WILLIAM i SUMITS 

61— COURTESY HARRY N. ABRAMS, INC. IXC. T. IT. ARNOLD 

NEWMAN 
62 —WILLIAM ). SUMITS 
G4 COURTESY OR. A MRS. HARRY BAKWIN 



«— T. COURTI** "LE POINT" 
S9 —BONNET 

70 -TVONNE CHEVALIER FROM 8. S. 

71 — NINA LEEN 

7) -NINA LEEN 

71— JAMES A. ENGLISH 

SI— DRAWING BY JAMES LEWICKI 

92— CHARTS IT RICHARD ERDOES 

95. M— MILTON GREENE 

99 — MILTON GREENE 

191 —DENIS DE MARHEY— JOHN 5 * DO V Y 
102. 103— NINA LEEN 
104— JOHN C. WINTER 



13 



Cop 



LIFE 



Vol. 34, No. 5 



Feb. 2, 1953 



IN NEW HOME at 1600 
Pennsylvania Avenue in 
Washington, the Presi- 
dent ami Mamie wave to 
friends before officially en- 
tering the White House. 




IT COULDN'T HAVE HAPPENED 



On the threshold of power, at the doorstep of the While House, President 
D wight U. Eisenhower paused with Mamie on inauguration night to wave. 
The next day in Independence, Mo., Harry S. Truman. Bess beside him, 
waited a moment to wave before stepping over the threshold into retire- 
ment. So simple that they seemed no more than commonplace, these actions 
marked an event so extraordinary that it could scarcely have happened any- 
where else in the world. All through the ages mankind's greatest problem 



has been the transmission of power — whether it be from sav age cbieflain to 
chief, faction to faction, or in the succession of anointed kings and em- 
perors. Too often, as history's bloodiest pages attest, it has been accom- 
plished by assassination, revolution, bribery, terror and torture. 

Last week the transmission of the greatest responsible power in history 
was accomplished peacefully and ill a way unique in the annals of the 
republic. No inauguration had ever been w itnessed by so mighty an audience 



14 



Copj 




I 






IN OLD HOME on Tru- 
man Road, Independence, 
Mo., the ex-President and 
his wife Bess pause on the 
front porch. "It's good to 
be home," said Truman. 



ANYPLACE ELSE IN THE WORLD 



— literally half the nation, through television, saw Dwight D. Eisenhower 
swear to protect and defend the Constitution. The capital itself had seldom 
seen such a jubilee. The event was celebrated in the afternoon by the great- 
est parade ever to pass before a president and in the evening by two great 
formal balls which were so crowded that even on the floor of the city's big 
armory men and women could scarcely move. 

Impressed and delighted by all the glitter and the glamour, all Americans 



would more gratefully remember the prayerful moment in which one re- 
gime ended and another began. The stark and homely inaugural ceremony, 
in the shadow of the great dome of the Capitol, invoked a mood expressed 
by the new President as he began his address: "We are summoned . . . 
to witness more than the act of one citizen swearing his oath of service 
in the presence of God. We are called as a people to give testimony in 
the sight of the world to our faith that the future shall belong to the free." 



15 



Copyi 



SOME HIJINKS FROM WESTERNERS 




NEW STYLE TRENDS showed up on heads and hatraeks. Ladies wore every- toppers, lined up almost universally with Ike's choice of a Hoinlmr". Tin's caused 

tiling irom hirds to li<*auio. hut mm. who ordinarih would ha\e had in wear such a run on Homhur»> thai many Washington hat stores were soon sold out. 



NATIONAL RUSH FOR THE TV SET 




NATIONWIDE AUDIENCE u;iii lic! on TV from roast lo roast— llic net- Assembly took time out to watch the screens; in Denver, as everywhere, school 
work- put the potential number at 75 million [ ij.li-. In \ ermont (/«//) the Stale kids pot a history lesson, anil soldiers (as at Fort McPherson) pot some time off. 



16 



THE WAIT FOR THE BIG MOMENT 






TWO EX-PRESIDENTS, Harry Truman and llerliert Hoover, stand as Ma- 
rine band ruffles and flourishes announce arrival of President-elect Eisenhower 



on platform. Al this moment, just after 12 o'clock, the U.S. had no president. 
Tromtn'l term expired at noon anil Eisenhower was not sworn in until 12:32. 





DURING PRAYER ju-t before swearing-in, Kore- 
an veterans from Walter Reed Hospital bow heads. 



TAKING OATH, Eisenhower raises right hand 
anil repeats the solemn words after Chief Justice 



Vinson. In background is stand from which TV and 
other cameras photographed the speech {next page). 



CONTINUED ON NEXT MCE 17 



opynghtcd material 




IftHfltMlttlftl 



gathering OF CELEBRITIES hears Eisenhower make inaugural address. 
'I'lit* proplc in tlit* photograph above ran be identified bv comparing their posi- 
tions with the numbers in the outline drawing U-loiv. 1 Mr-. Truman. 2 Mrs. 
Nixon. 3— Mrs. Kisenhower. 4 — Forest Hame— . Sergeant at \rm- of Senate. 
5 Mr. Truman. 6 Mr-. John Eisenhower. 7 Mr-. Joel Oirl-on. 8 Joel (Pri- 
son. Mrs. Eisenhower's unele. 9 Major John Kisenhower. 10 — Mr-. Milton 
Eisenhower. 11— Clare Boot he I.uee. 12 Milton Kisenhower. 13 Joseph M. 
Dodge. Budget Director. 14 W illiam Castle Jr.. I nder-Secrelan ol Stale under 
Hoover. 15 —Mr-. Herman Welker. wife ol Idaho Senator. 16 Herbert Hoover. 
17 — Mrs. Si vies Bridges. Senator's wife. 18 Sherman \dam-. \--i-tanl to the 
President. 19 George Hart Jr.. Assistant to Chairman id Inaugural Committee. 
20 — Wesley Hubert-. Chairman of Republican National Committee. 21 Har- 
old Stassen. Director of MS\. 22 Mr-. Joseph MeCarraphx . 23 Mr-. K. L. 
Megonigal. guesl of the Senate. 24 Ovela Culp Hobby. KS \ \dminislrator. 
25 Joseph McCarraghv. Chairman of the Inaugural Committee. 26 Mr-. Ken- 
neth G. Hope Jr.. wife of a naval officer. 27 — Governor Earl W arren. California. 
28 Mr-. Mark Trice. 29— Governor Paul Patterson, Ore. 30— Henry Cabot 
Lodge, Chief Deb-ale to the UN. 31— Rep. Wilbur Milk Ark. 32— General J. 
Law ton Collins. Chief of Slalf, I ,S. Arm v. 33 — Governor Dan Thornton. Coin. 



34 Governor John Pine. Pa. 35— Governor Frank Lausche, Ohio. 36— Admiral 
W illiam Kechteler. Chief of \a\al Operation-. 37 Governor Edward F. Am, 
Kan. 38 Viee-Admiral Merlin O'Neill. Commandant of I .S. Coast Guard. 
39 General Omar \. Bradley. (Chairman Joint Chief- of Slalf. 40 Governor 
Burton M. Cross. Maine. 41 — \\ illiam F. Russell. House Serjeant-at-Arms* 
42 — Kyle 0. Snader. Clerk of tlie House. 43 The President. 44— Thomas K. 
Stephens. Legislative Counsel to President. 45 — Archbishop of Washington! 
Patrick A. O'Boyle. 46 Justice Hugo I.. Black. 47— Dorothy May nor. singer. 
48 The Vice-President. 49 Mark Trice. Secretary of Senate. 50 Eugene Con- 
ley, singer. 51— Justice Felix Frankfurter. 52 — Harold \\ i!h \. DepUtJ Depart* 
merit Clerk. I .S. Supreme Court. 53 — Chief Ju-tice Fred Vinson. 54 Senator 
William Knoulaml. Calif. 55 — Senator Si vies Bridges. VIE. President pro tern 
of Senate. 56 Speaker Joseph Martin Jr.. Mass.. obscuring Mrs. Frank Nixon, 
mother of the \ ice-President. 57 Jo-e |'.'li\ de I.e^uerica. Spain-h Ambassa- 
dor. 58 Raphael de la Colina. Mexican Ambassador. 59 W ilhelm Munlhe de 
Morgenstierne. Norwegian \rnha--ador and Dean of Diplomatic Corp-. 60 John 
Foster Dulles. Secretary of State. 61 George M. Humphrey. Seerelarv of the 
Treasury. 62 Justice Stanley hYed.63 — Cbarle- E. W ilson. Seerelarv -designate 
of Defen-e. 64 Baron Sil \ en i n \ -. Belgian Amlia--ador. 65 DerU-i t Brown- 





INAUGURATION CROWD JAMS THE CAPITOL 



aterial 




■ 





tiltMMff'ftffl 



ell Jr.. Attorney General. 66 Justice William Douglas. 67 Rabbi Abba Hillel 

Silvcc. 68 [ustice Robeii Jackson. 69 Presiding Bishop Henry Knox Sher* 
rill, of Episcopal Church. 70 Justice Harold II. Burton. 71 Walk Benn.n, 
Timk photographer. 72— Dr. Jose A. Mora. I ruguavan Ambassador. 73 — Ker- 
nando Berckemeyeri Peruvian Embassador. 74 I >r. Guillerrno Sevilla-Sacasa, 
NiVaraguan \niba->adnr. 75 Sheikh \sad M-I'aip'h. Saudi- Arabian Ambassador. 
76 Henri Bonnet, French Embassador. 77 — Dr. You Chan Yang, Korean Am- 
bassador, 78 Dr. Rafael Heliodoro Yallc Ambassador from Honduras. 79 — Dr. 
Luis Oscar Boetl tier, Paraguayan Vmbassador. 80 \ll«*rl»i Tarchiani. Italian 
Embassador. 81 — Raj II. S. Irnru. Kthinpian Ambassador. 82 — Arthur Summer- 
field, Postmaster General. 83 Dr. H«Vior David Castro. K! SaKador \mba-sa- 
dor. 84 — Douglas McKav. Seeretar\ i»l the Interior. 85 Dr. V. K. W ellington 
Koo, Chinese Ambassador. 86— K/ra Tat't Benson. Secretary of Agriculture. 
87 Sinclair W eek-, Secretary uf Commerce. 88 Sir Roger M. Makiti-. Brit- 
ish Ambassador. 89— Kikirhi \raki. Japanese Ambassador. 90 Dr. Cipriano 
Restrepo-Jaramillo, Colombian Embassador. 91 — Charles Bruggmann. Sw Ess 
Minister. 92 \ ictor Andrade. Bolivian Ambassador. 93 Guillermo Toriello* 
Carrido, Guatemalan Ambassador. 94 Thor Thors, Iceland Minister. 95— Sir 
Percy Spender, Australian Ambassador. 96 AllahYar-Saleh. Iranian Ambassa- 



dor. 97 — Or. Charles Malik. Lebanese Mini-ter. 98 — Leslie Knox Munro, New 
Zealand Ambassador. 99 0. I 1 . Joost, Ambassador from the I nion of South 
Africa. 100— Mrs. Oswald R. Lord. U.N. Delegate. 101— C. D. Jackson, For- 
tune Publisher. 102— Emmel Hughes, Administrative Assistant, 103 Gabriel 

Hauge. Administrative Assistant. 104 RoU-rt Culler, \dmini-trative Assi-taul. 
105 Winlhrop \ldrieh. Embassador to ( ireat Britain. 106 Carl McArdle. As- 
sistant Secretary of State. 107 — Mrs. Allan Hoover. 108— Allan Hoover, ex- 
president'a son. 10$ — Lawrence Richey. associate of Herbert Hoover. 110 — Ber- 
niee Miller, secretary to Hoover. Ill — Archbishop Michael, Greek Orthodox 
Church. 112— Dr. Heinz L. Krekeler, German Charge d'AfTaircs. 113 — Abdullah 
Ibraham Bakr. Iratji Minister. 114 Mario Rodriguez. Chilean Charge d'Atlaires. 
115— Karel Bros. Czechoslovak tan Charge d* Affaires. 116 — Johannes Kaiv. EstO* 
nian Acting Consul General. 117— David Goitein. Israeli Minister. 118 John 
Cabot. Ambassador to Pakistan. 119 George Mien. Vrnhassjdor to Yugosla- 
via. 120— Mark Kauffman. Life photographer. 121 — Dean Achcson. 122— Mrs. 
Wesley Roberts. 123— General Bedell Smith. 124 Maxwell Rabh. \ssistant 
to Sherman \dams. 125 Rodney O'Connor. Assistant to Dulles. 126 Her- 
man Phleger. Legal Advisor to the State Department. 127 — Lieut. Col. RoU-rt 
Si lmlz. President's \rmy \ide. Vmong those unidentified are Secret Service men. 






AFTER OATH tlie .11th President of L.S. walks 
from mikes to Mamie with his outstretched arms. 



PRESIDENTIAL KISS is bestowed on Mamie 88 
evervbodv in stands almost bursts with beaming. 



CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE 19 



Copyrighted material 



Inaugural 



CONTINUED 




PARADE PERCH, shared b) b pooch, was a peach 
l>ar-kel. Prices for l>a-ket> ranged from T"ic lo 25f£. 




LASSOED, hut after liai. \ t-ii |«-niii->iun. t lie 
Prtttldeiil lolerantlv jzrin* at a lldllvunml cnwlmy. 




MISS BURMA, «.nf ..1 Hirer rlrpliant- in paraile, 
\*a?- loaned Uy rirnis i<» help represent Ohio group. 



20 




KANSAS RIDERS BROUGHT 46 HORSES ON A SPECIAL TRAIN AT A COST OF J250 PER HORSE AND RIDER 



MIGHTIEST PAGEANT 
SALUTES NEW CHIEF 



\V illiDUl exaggeration 1 In- inaugural parade w* 
called *'l lie mightiest pageant over lo pass he- 
fore a president." In il ivrri' 22.000 ser\ icemen 
and ttiirara, 5,500 civilians. .50 duals, the 
worlds first atomic cannon. .559 horses and 
three elephants. The parade, formed in the 



THE ARMY'S 84-FOOT-LONG NEW ATOMIC CANNON NEGOTIATES THE CORNER NEAR THE U S TREASURY. 







NINE STATES HAD MOUNTED UNITS ON PARADE 



ON INTO THE DUSK the paraders still marched. 
At 5:15. when picture was taken anil only two thirds 



of the parade had passed reviewing stand, the street 
lights were horning and the Capitol was illuminated. 



midday sun, was still swinging by in front of 

the W hite House long after nightfall. At 6:59, 
when the last two elephants which brought up 
the rear of the parade passed, Mamie and Ike 
left for the W hite House, had a quick supper 
and dressed for the Inaugural Ball (rieA< page). 



THIS WAS FIRST TIME WEAPON WAS ON PARADE 





PARADE'S END found the President. Robert 
Hoover and Mamie in reviewing stand though Mr. 



Hoover could no longer suppress an ex-presidential 
yawn. At this lime many public stands were empty. 



CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE 



21 



Copyrighted material 



Inauguration CONTINUED 





t9 




RED TAFFETA with a short train 
was dress worn hv I^iiira llcllc W alts. 



PUFFY CHIGNON, biggest at the 
hail. is worn bv Cornelia YlcCinnis. 



SCARLETT O'HARA hafnlo was 
one of the fancier worn at the ball. 



BLACK VELVET with white skirt 
was choice of Mrs. William Paley. 




WAITING FOR CARS after lea\ing Georgetown 
hall, Iwd'urred ladies and white-lied men resignedly 



stand around. Huge crush of traffic forced most to 
park their cars a mile or two from the ballrooms. 




HANDSOME GENERAL, Air Force' ^ Hoyt Van 
denherg. wore a white tie and lull drc-> uniform. 




A FESTIVE OCCASION 
AND A HAPPY ENDING 



The committee for the inaugural hall antici- 
pated that at least half of the invited guests 
would decline. Instead, hefore any invitation 
was sent out, it was swamped by thousands of 
applications. Hastily it scheduled two halls. 

The requirement of formal evening dress 
seemingly was no barrier to those who sought 
entrance. The city's traffic, jammed by the pa- 
rade, became even more tangled as the hour 
of the balls drew- near. Distinguished guests 
found waiting in cars or on curbs (left) the 
order of the night. For the President the cele- 
bration (the full spectacle will be shown in 
color in Life, Feb. 16) was somewhat over- 
shadowed by an official problem. The Senate- 
Armed Services Committee had balked at rec- 
ommending confirmation of Charles Wilson of 
General Motors as Defense Secretary because 
he owned $2.5 million in CM slock. While his 
friends danced, President and nominee look 
time off for a serious discussion. Finally \\ il- 
son agreed to sell his stock — which would cost 
him hundreds of thousands of dollars in taxes 
— removing the barrier to Senate confirma- 
tion, providing a happy ending to a gala week. 



HANDSOME PAIR were wealthy Conrad 
and Dori*- Lillv. author ol How to .Wert a Millionaire. 



EARNEST TWOSOME wa* formed by Ike and 
Charles Wilson. who»e appointment was in doubt. 



22 



EDITORIALS 



A NOBLE INAUGURAL 



Amid almost universal acclaim. President Eisenhower's inau- 
gural address received two critical comments. These were 
1) that it was all generalities, and 2) that the world policy it 
proclaimed sounded much like the Truman-Acheson policy, 
with something "for everybody but the isolationists." 

The latter criticism is probably beard for the last time. As 
a serious influence on Republican policy, isolationism has 
long been a corpse propped up by Democrats, and it needed 
only a Republican victory to make it lall over. This was clear 
I rom Ike s speech and will become even clearer as be proceeds 
in action. So will the real difference between the Eisenhower 
and the Truman foreign policy, which as Mr. Dulles said is to 
be chiefly a "change in heart." 

As for generalities, they are always the chief ingredient of 
ceremonial addresses like this, including the one at Gettys- 
burg. The trick is to pick the right generalities. Ike's general- 
ities nobly and precisely described our national situation of 
this moment. They also added up to a coherent and timeless 
view of the human situation, a v iew which long has been and 
we hope long will be identifiable as peculiarly American. In 
that sense Ike s inaugural was a historic speech, worthy of 
a historic occasion and of general pondering. 

The first thing to ponder is the fact that Ike ilid not dwell 
long on our so-called domestic problems. He said: 

"Great as are the preoccupations absorbing us . . . each 
of these domestic problems is dwarfed by. anil often even 
created by, this question thai involves all humankind." 

The second thing to note is his definition of this overriding 
question the Soviet challenge- and the level of his response, 
to it. It is not a geographical question, nor an "argument 
between slightly differing philosophies," but a challenge to 
our faith. He said: 

"At such a time in history, we who are free must proclaim 
anew our faith. 

"This faith is the abiding creed of our fathers. It is our 
faith in the deathless dignity of man. governed bv eternal 
moral and natural laws. 

"This faith defines our full view of life. It establishes, 
beyond debate, those gifts of the Creator that are man's 



General James A. Van Fleet has been ordered to give up 
bis command of the Eighth Army in Korea, come home, 
and retire. He is turning 61, be is in his 38th vear of mili- 
tary service, and he has had the field command in Korea 
for 22 months. He hows out with this tribute Irom Presi- 
dent Eisenhower: "the best-qualified combat officer in the 
Armed Forces." 

(Jeneral \ an Fleet deserves the salutes of all Americans. He 
was one of the best ol our infantry commanders in World 
War II. He rebuilt, trained and to all effects commanded the 
Greek armv which in 19-1R and 1919 defeated armed Commu- 
nism in Greece, and thereby gave the first proof that an appli- 
cation of serious and intelligent American effort could re- 
verse the Soviet tide. 

As commander of the I .IN. forces in Korea, he has brought 
bis forces safely through difficulties too little understood at 
home. During most of bis time there, be lias been required 
to wage a stalemate war. A soldier born and schooled to 
win, he has had little stomach for it. Neither have the men 
under his command. Given inferior or laltering leadership, 
our forces in Korea might literally have fallen apart. The 



inalienable rights, and that make all men equal in His sight." 
There was no modish ambiguity in Ike's references to the 
"watchfulness of a divine providence." 

The third thing to notice is the sureness with which Ike 
reconciled the cause of the patriot with that of the ideal- 
ist, the American's interest with the free world's. Ameri- 
can leadership of that world was unsought: "destiny has 
laid |it| upon our country." But so be it: "We wish our 
friends the world over to know this above all: we face the 
threat - not with dread and confusion— but with confidence 
and conviction." 

lie then named nine principles of conduct bv which we 
may attract the cooperation of the free world. They are: 

To "promote the conditions of peace" through our own 
strength and through our readiness "to engage with any and 
all others in joint effort to remove the causes of mutual fear." 

To avoid appeasement ("a soldier's pack is not so heavy 
a burden as a prisoner's chains"). 

To treat our own strength and security as a trust" lor the 
free world. 

To honor "the identity and the special heritage" of every 
other nation, and "observe the difference between world 
leadership and imperialism." 

To help other free nations and to expect their help "within 
the limits of their resources." 

To "encourage . . . profitable trade." 

To strengthen regional associations like the European and 
the Pan-American. 

To "bold all continents and peoples in equal regard and 
honor," none being "in any sense inferior or expendable." 

To try to make the U.N. effective. 

I nder these rules of conduct, said Ike. "an earth ol peace 
mav become not a vision but a fact. But tbev require devo- 
tion and sacrifice from every American citizen. "A people 
that values its pri\ ileges above its principles soon loses both." 
And these principles are not mere abstractions, but "laws 
of spiritual strength that generate and define our material 
strength . . . whatever America hopes to bring to pass in the 
world must first come to pass in the heart of America." 

SALUTE TO A SOLDIER 



fact that they constitute a fine fighting Army today is in 
great part due to James A. Van Fleet. 

Much has been told of late about the rebirth and growth 
of the ROK armv. That, too, has been in large part Van 
Fleet's doing. In a complex chain of command no single man 
decides and does everything. Rut it may be said that there 
probably would be no KOK armv in Korea todav. holding 
two thirds of the line, if at the start of his tour there in 1951 
General Van Fleet bad not made up his mind on two disputed 
points we had to have the help of the South Koreans, and 
tbev were perfectly capable of giving it if they had sufficient 
training, equipment and backing. Aside from the military re- 
wards of this decision, the political effects in Asia have been 
immense. For the re-creation of the KOK army with I .S. 
help and supervision has demonstrated that Americans and 
Asians can work together, fight together, and even come to 
like and respect each other. In the unhappy davs of 1950 and 
carlv 1951, when "gook" was the American synonym lor all 
Koreans, almost no one thought il could ever happen. Gen- 
eral Van Fleet made it happen, and for this alone be would 
be entitled to any honor in the gift ol his country. 



24 



Copyrighted material 




Serve delicious Campbell's Tomato Soup 

with golden-crisp crackers! Mmm # Good ! 

Yes, they're a perfect pair! The crisp, flaky ... a puree of luscious, red-ripe tomatoes blended 
goodness of fresh crackers sets off beautifully with fine table butter and gentle seasonings, 
the mellow velvet-smoothness of this great soup according to Campbell's own matchless recipe! 



Kn own Everywhere as America's Guest Whisky 




As it says on the label: 

i^/^ze^ & Htf^u^ ^eC6e^ s^c<jCc*> 7 **t# /t ^e£^ 

Old Forester 



KENTUCKY STRAIGHT BOURBON WHISKY • BOTTLED IN BOND • 100 PROOE • BROWN-FORMAN DISTILLERS CORPORATION ■ AT LOUISVILLE IN KENTUCKY 



V .Cpdyrighted material 



ANCESTRESS of the line, Helena, was dam of 
Dinedor's grcat-grcat-great-grcat-grandson, Anxiety. 




FIRST DOMINO, who begun seven generations? 
of "Domino Boys," was the fifth after Anxiety 4th. 



FAMILY PRIDE 

Domino 12th outprices forebears 



FIRST IMPORT, Anxiety, won fame in England, 
was brought to the U.S. in 1879, died a year later. 




REJU VENATOR of Hereford line, in opinion of 
breeders, was Prince Domino, who lived in 1920s. 



A Hereford bull, w ith a better documented gen- 
ealogy (above) than most people, lias gained 
another advantage over most humans, and all 
other bulls, by having himself valued at $105,- 
000 — on a part-time basis. The well-paid blue- 
blood is HC (for Hillcrest Farms of West Vir- 



U.S. PROGENITOR of Hereford line was Anxie 
ty 4th, one of the original Anxiety's many sons. 




GREATEST HEREFORD or all. Lirrv Domino 
50th, outclassed grandson, II. C. Larry Domino 12th. 



ginia) Larry Domino 12th, who can trace his 
line 18 generations to Dinedor, an English bull 
of about 1800. Larry, whose kin came here in 
1879, won his new distinction when E. C. Mc- 
Cormick, an Ohio breeder, paid that amount 
for a half interest in Larry as a father, not beef. 






■ 



EIGHT-YEAR-OLD LARRY DOMINO 12th, CHAMPION HEREFORD BULL OF THE 1947 INTERNATIONAL LIVESTOCK SHOW IN CHICAGO, HAS SIRED FIVE CHAMPIONS 



27 



Copyi 




Desert Dan was hot and tired, he'd traveled far enough, 
t Said he, "I'm awful sick of sand, this life is mighty rough. 
Please show me to the Statler, I only want the hest. 

So I'm hcadin' for the Statler where you really arc a guest. 




"This water hole is no mirage." said Dan in Statler's tub. 
» "There's lots of steaming water here in which to soak and rub." 
The desert dirt was soon dissolved and there was Dapper Dan 
With lots of soap and snowy towels — a clean and happy man. 





?Out of the finest bath he'd had, Dan stepped and saw his l>ed. 
t "The softest l>ed I've seen," he breathed, and that was all he said. 
For he was in a Statler bed! A sound and dreamless sleep 

Was his until the morning came. His snores soared loud and deep. 



^Yhen Dan awoke, he spoke once more, "I've had a bed and tub, 
) But now the time has come for me to have some Statler grub. 
"Oh. boy," said Dan, as he cleaned up the last Kite on his plate, 
"It's Statler every time for me. The food is really great. 





STATLER 
HOTELS 




STATIER HOTEIS: NEW YORK • BOSTON • BUFFALO ■ DETROIT 
CLEVELAND • ST. LOUIS • WASHINGTON • LOS ANGELES 



» "I've no more use for maps and mules. The Statler's so darn near 
To shows and shops and business, too. My future plan is clear. 
I'm settlin' down at Statler. I'm sure you'll all agree 

You strike gold at the Statler. It's the only place to be!" 



28 



Copy 




One of the niftiest mixtures of science and 
showmanship brought history's biggest audi- 
ence of a commercial show-some 44 million 
-to the nation s TV screens last week to greet 
the baby above. He was the fictional newborn 
son of Luc,lle Ball, acting the heroine of 1 L ove 
Lucy. What interested these millions most was 
a thing that had just happened to Lucille Ball 
herself. That day she had a real newborn son 



LUCY'S T U BflBV Wfls PLAYED By 15 . day . old with beooism biack ^ 

WHAT THE SCRIPT ORDERED 



The coincidence was long expected. When 

Ball, who ,s Mrs. Desi Ar„a 2 . was to have a 
baby, they bega.i building the weeklv shows 

a T '"i J , ar " Und her Openly 
acknowledged but treated with good-humored 
delicacy, M.ss Ball's condition soon attracted 
far w,der .merest than most interesting con- 
anions. January 19 was set for the Iving-in 



episode so on January 19 Miss Ball, aided by 
science (a cesarean operation), had her baby 
By pure luck it was a boy, jus. as in the script' 
I f baby actor will soon be fired. Califor- 
ma law limits the posing time under lights of 

Z^TrT^ ( \ m0n " ,S oW l ° 3(, -«ond in- 
ter als The producers are looking for a pair of 
unde rslzed( 6 month-old twins who could pose 
two hours each and spell each other in the part. 




F.RST PHOTOGRAPH or LU CV, REAL SON WAS SHOT AFTER 3* DAVS. HE 



-AS NAMED DESIDER.O ALBERTO ARNAZ HAS REDDISH -BLACK Z 



R. BLUE EVES 



29 



opyrighted material 



LIFE ON THE NEWSFRONTS OF THE WORLD 

Student leaves a coded clue to his death, a soldier plants a flag and flu virus sweeps the world 



When N.Y.U. Sophomore Paul Rubin left his 
Brooklyn home one morning last week he was, 
so far as his parents could see, "composed and 
happy." When his body was found in a ditch 
the next day at Philadelphia's International 
Airport, the police, the coroner's office and the 
F.B.I, were handed one of the strangest death 
puzzles on record. 

Rubin had died of cyanide poisoning, but 
since the body was sitting boll upright, the 
spectacles were undisturbed and no vials or 
containers were found nearby, murder seemed 
a strong possibility. The clues were something 
out of detective fiction: Rubin's pockets con- 
tained an empty .38-caliber cartridge shell, a 
photograph of a plane with a Nazi swastika on 
its tail and a snapshot of Rodin's statue. The 
Thinker. Taped to his stomach was a coded 
message containing the words "Dulles" and 
"Conant," apparently a reference to the new 
Secretary of State and the new High Commis- 
sioner of Germany. F.B.I, experts are still try- 
ing to crack both the code and the mystery. 

From Burlington, Vt. the U.S. Employment 
Service has received a perfectly genuine job 
order for 10 professional wrestlers. Appli- 
cants will hat e to satisfy the following re- 
quirements: "Must he able to realistically 
portray such emotions as hatred, fear and 
pain and to emulate person in final stages of 
unbearable suffering. Desirable but not nec- 
essarily required that applicants be able to 
fake foreign words, antagonize audiences 
when necessary and be knoun for some spe- 
cial hold or action which appears homicidal 
in intent." 




CONNORS LEAVES FLAG ON KOREAN HILL 



When Sergeant Francis Connors dra- 
matically planted an American flag on 
the top of snow-covered Sandbag Cas- 
tle on the eastern Korean front, the 
Chinese Communists tried to cut it 
flown with a barrage of gunfire, but 
Connors lashed the flag firmly to a tree. 
As he turned to crawl back to the safe- 
ty of his own lines, an Army photog- 
rapher got his picture. 




FLU VIRUS MAGNIFIED 16.000 TIMES 



The world catches flu 

All over the world people of all ages are com- 
ing down with temperatures, arhes and pains 
— symptoms of influenza. This world flu out- 
break has struck one out of c\cry two people 
in Tokyo, one out of ten in France and has hit 
hard all across the U.S., especial]] in the cen- 
tral and southern slates. The \rm\ is hastily 
vaccinating all of the troops bound for Europe 
or the Far East. Fortunately tlii- outbreak is 
unlikely to reach the proportions of the mur- 
derous 1918 epidemic, for it is canard bv a rela- 
tively mild form of the virus which usually 
makes its victims miserable for about a week 
but almost never kills them. 



"Uncle Mike" Jacobs, who was the 
most famous boxing promoter of his 
day (LIFE, June 17, 1946), died in Mi- 
ami last week at the age of 72. Famous 
for profanity, false teeth arid £1(MI ring- 
side seats, Jacobs had controlled the 
boxing scene more tighth than any 
oilier HUM in ring history. 

Air war moves outside Korea 

The air war moved outside the limits of Korea 
last week. A Navy patrol bomber was shot 
down in Formosa Strail by Chinese Commu- 
nis I shore batteries. A Coast Guard plane land- 
ing in the wafer to pick up -ur\i\nrs crashed 
during lake-olT. A destroyer then moved in to 
pick up some survivors from both planes and 
was fired on by the Communist batteries, Rear 
Admiral Thomas Williamson, Navy command- 
er of Formosa Strait, forbade interviews with 
survivors because the incident was "far too se- 
rious a development." Meanwhile, after shoot- 
ing down a B-29 — over Manchuria said the 
Reds, over North Korea said the U.S. — the 
Chinese Communists announced that the 11 
survivors were "aggressors" and "spies." 

When Labor M. P. s found that it was cost- 
ing almost a halfpenny to mint the British 

farthing or quarter penny, they asked that 
this 'singularly unprofitable enterprise" be 
abandoned. Bankers and government offi- 
cials sprang to the defense. Farthings are 
very useful, they explained, as bridge stakes 

for "dear old ladies." 



After 31 straight days in a coma, Roger 
Lee Brodie, the weaker of the Siamese 
twins whose heads were separated in 
a 13-hour-long. unprecedented opera- 
tion (I II I . Jan. 12), died last week in 
a Chicago hospital. His brother Rod- 
ney Dee is still on the critical list hut 
has a fair chance to live. 

Second team Reds are found guilty 

After a nine-month trial and seven days of de- 
liberation, a New York jury convicted 13 Com- 
munist party leaders of conspiracy to over- 
throw the government. These "second team" 
leaders had been picked by the Communists 
to replace the lop group convicted of the same 
conspiracy charge back in 1919. 

Traffic troubles are getting the better of 
Southern tempers. In Tampa. Fin. Charles 
Jones was fined $35 because, when a driver 
stopped in a pedestrian lane, he not only 
walked over the car but also jumped up 
and down on the hood, in Memphis, Tenn., 
when a freight train stopped in Jront of his 
car, M. E. Cockrell angrily uncoupled the 
last 78 cars, leaving the engineer to steam 
on for 14 miles before discovering that he 
had lost his train. 

Double-barreled prison riot 

Pennsylvania got off to a fast and furious start 
in the 1953 prison riots. At the Western Pen- 
itentiary near Pittsburgh 1,100 convicts took 
five guards hostage and then tore up their cell 
blocks in a 2 1-hour demand for prison reforms. 




PRISONERS LAUGH AT CELL-BLOCK DAMAGE 



As soon as Pittsburgh was quiet, 700 convicts 
at Rock view conducted an even more deter- 
mined riot of their own. Half the mulinecrs 
quickly surrendered, but 330 shut themselves 
up w ith six guards, seven guns, 500 rounds of 
ammunition and some tear-gas shells. Mount- 
ed state troopers sent down to Washington for 
the inaugural parade were rushed home in ease 
help was needed, but on the fourth day of the 
Rockview riot the last convict surrendered. 



30 



Copyrighted material 




Not a shadow of a doubt 
with Kotex 



— with Kotex you get absorbency that doesn't fail : 
the trustworthy kind of protection you need, for safety, 
for comfort, and a fresh, dainty feeling. 

— and only Kotex of all leading napkins has 
flat, pressed ends. So there's no revealing outline. 

— best of all, this pad is made to stay soft 

while wearing— to retain its fit and comfort for hours. 
Your choice of three absorbencies— Regular, Junior 
or Super Kotex. 




More women choose Kotex* 

than all other sanitary napkins 



*t. a. ate. u. a, pat. orr. 




Not a shadow of a doubt when 

Herbert Sondheun turns his flair 
for flattery to a soft silk twill of 
tiny geometries. This gently pleated 
afternoon dress has velvet collar, 
velvet-touched buttons. 



Cop' 



laterial 



MODERN LIVING GOES FORWARD 



NEW 1953 LINCOLN-POWERED 





1. New V-205 V-8 Engine — 205 horsepower, the ultimate 
in performance, and response. With dual-range HYimA-MATic 
Transmission as standard equipment. 2. New Power Steer- 
ing, combined with Lincoln's exclusive hall-joint Front wheel 
suspension, gives you sports car steering with limousine sta- 
bility— virtually cflortless turning even when the car is at a 
standstill. 3. New Power Brakes instantly respond to the 
whisper-light touch of your toe. 4. The world's first 4 way 
Power Elevator Seat moves hack and forth, up and down, 
and even adjusts to your posture— at the flick of a button. 
5. Lincoln Capri Custom Sports Coupe in Royal Red and 
Raven Black, with black and white leather upholstery — a 
captivating model of modern living on wheels. 



Copyrighted material 



TO LEAVE THE PAST FAR BEHIND 




Standard equipment, accessories, and trim illustrated are subject to change without notice. Power steering, power elevator seats, power brakes, sea-tint glass, white side-wall tires optional ol eslro cost. 



rHERE is more to modern living than glass walls 
and clean, functional lines. There is a spirit that 
!arcs to defy the outworn tradition of bulk and fussy 
;Iittcr. 1 his is the spirit of the new Lincoln for 1953 
-the fine car that sets into magnificent motion the 
nagical case of modern living. For here power does 
aore than it ever has on wheels. 

Here are more kinds of power than you have 
nown. It is in the steering wheel. It controls the 
rakes. It adjusts seats back and forth, even up and 
own. And it supplies astonishing action in the new 
05 horsepower V-8 engine — the engine you hardly 
elieve even after you try it! 



And everything you sec is alive with the spirit of 
grace and good design. Clean lines speak eloquently 
of a new freedom in driving. Sweeping walls of glass 
let you see the road and the life around you. And ex- 
quisite fabrics and finely pleated leathers set a mood 
of unsurpassed luxury. 

Already, Lincoln for 1953 has excited the fine car 
connoisseurs. In the famous 1, 938-mile Mexican Pan- 
American Road Race, it won the first four places- 
scoring a clean sweep over 66 other stock cars. Surely, 
you will want to arrange a demonstration drive with 
the new Lincoln Cosmopolitan or Capri. 

LINCOLN CI VISION-FORD MOTOR COMPANY 



LINCOLN 

THE ONE FINE CAR DESIGNED FOR MODERN LIVING 
—COMPLETELY POWERED FOR MODERN DRIVING 



Lincoln-crowning achievement in 
the fine car field (or Ford Motor 
Company's 50th Anniversary. 




-i"-.?- ^il'ii-Nrt. rt»\ 



Copyrighted materia 




RICE AND BEEF PORCUPINES 



EASY RECIPE 



GOOD? They're simply wonderful! 

Just look how those grains of rice swell up 
luscious and tender, thanks to nice-and-spicy 
Hunt's Tomato Sauce. 

Hunt's is the real, kettle-simmered tomato 
sauce— not a soup, no starchy thickeners ! It's 
for one purpose— to make your favorite dishes 
still more flavory.Gct some and try this recipe! 

Mix together: 

1 lb. ground beef 'i cup raw rite, wefJ washed 
3 rbsp. chopped onion ' ; fsp. pepper 

& ftp. poultry seasoning 1 fsp. sa/f 

Form mixture into 10 or 12 small balls. Brown 



For breakfast or dessert . . 




them lightly in an uncovered saucepan in: 

3 rbsp. faf 

Drain off excess fat and add : 

2 cans HUNT'S TOMATO SAUCE 
1 cup water 

Cover tightly. Simmer 45 to 50 minutes, or till 
rice is tender. Serve with the flavory pan 
gravy. Lmmm, but it's- good! 

Using Hunt's Tomato Sauce is like doubling 
the number of recipes you can make. How it 
does brighten up stews, soups, casseroles, left- 
overs. Costs but a few cents a can ! 



Hunt's Heavenly Peaches 




tomato sauce 



Hunt foods, Inc., Fvlterton, California 

Hunt-fbrthe best 



k 4 . • - Copyrighted material 



SEQUEL 



PASADENA FIGHTS OLD BATTLE 
AS IT GETS NEW SCHOOL HEAD 




OUT IN 1950: DR. GOSLIN 




AT HEARING, WHERE IT FORESTALLED MOVE TO MAKE WALKUP SUPERINTENDENT, BOARD COPES WITH HECKLERS AS WALKUP (RIGHT) STANDS GLUMLY BY 



BOARD HEARS OBJECTIONS BOT NAMES MAN IT WANTS 



Two years ago Pasadena citizens engaged in a furious 
wrangle over their public school superintendent, Willard 
Goslin (top). An able, well-qualified educator, Goslin 
managed to alienate many citizens who attacked him as 
too progressive and his program as too extravagant. The 
school board fired Goslin (Life, Dec. 11, 1950), and its 
action in bowing to pressure brought by extremist groups 
became a nationally discussed educational issue. The 
board appointed a conservative junior high principal, 
Frank Walkup, as acting superintendent and then waited 
for the storm to blow itself out. 

Meanwhile a citizens' survey group had been asked to 
decide what the schools needed and what sort of man 
should run them. When it became clear that Walkup was 



not the man the committee had in mind, the storm broke 
out again. Walkup accused the board of downright in- 
gratitude (above), and his friends roared that he deserved 
the job. Hundreds of Pasadenans jammed each meeting 
to have their say (next puge). But the hoard ignored the 
outcries, voted 4-1 to choose its new superintendent 
from a list the committee had recommended. With the 
backing of most of Pasadena, it named Dr. Stuart F. Mc- 
Comb (right), a mild-spoken 43-year-old school adminis- 
trator in nearby Compton, Calif., who is considered a 
middle-of-the-road educator. Now Dr. McComb faces his 
first test: a prospective fight on a 815 million bond issue 
for new school buildings. If it passes, Pasadena's school 
system may look forward to a reasonably calm spell. 




IN IN 1963: DR. McCOMB 



CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE 



35 



Cop 



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36 



CONTINUED 



Pasadena School Fight 

CITIZENS SPEAK THEIR MINDS 

AGAINST BOARD FOR BOARD 




REALTOR V.. K. LVfonzingo leads 
the move to oust two board mem- 
bers. "We're stuck with McComb," 
he said, "but we'll get rid of them." 



CLUBWOMAN, Mrs. Arthur Han- 
isch of local League of Women Vot- 
ers, reads resolution applauding the 
board's decision to hire MoGomb. 




EDITOR Paul Leonard hints se- 
lection group bead is engaged in 
Communist-front activities, contin- 
ued fight via mimeographed weekly. 



MOTHER of school-age sons, Mrs. 
W. L. Jloyt, praises board s "cour- 
age and devotion." She liked Walk- 
up, deplored "his friends* tactics." 




HOUSEWIFE Mrs. Mary Allen 
is old Coslin opponent who thinks 
progressive educators are root of 
evil, "the Politburo of education." 



STUDENT Margaret Bennett ap- 
proves the board's actions: "This 
is the same kind of democracy that 
I was taught in Pasadena schools." 




MINISTER, Rev. M. H. Reynolds, 
sees loss in demoting Walktip. "If 
school hoard commends him why 
didn't it give him the job?" he asks. 



SOCIAL WORKER, Mrs. Martha 
Wheeldon, got many cheers when 
she called the opposition "vocal far 
out of proportion" to its actual size. 



Cot 



i 



A brand-new wonder dessert 

— |CE Bo* Cookie 0*E » 

VA/lTH JELtO pUDDIrJGS AMD PIE R LUNGS AMD NJaBISCOjS MEW CoOOAMliT BARS! 




Never has there t-icr been an Ice Box Cake as 
grand and glorious as this prize beauty! 

And that's only half the good news! This one 
is easy— and we mean fo.vv.'Takc a peek at the 
ingredients and right away you'll guess why! 



Jcll-O Puddings and Pie Fillings are famous 
shortcuts to grand desserts— and with the new, 
crunchy-good Nabisco Cocoanut Bars— well, 
words can't describe this new easier Ice Box 
Cake. You'll just have to taste for yourself! 



ICE BOX COOKIE CAKE 

1 package JelM) Chocolate Pudding and Pie hilling 
1 envelope <l tablespoon) unfavored gelatin 
1 1 j cups cold water 
I pint chocolate ice cream 
38 Nabisco Snack Size Cocoanut Bars (about Yi box) 

Combine pudding mix, gelatin, and cold Mater. Cook according 
lo directions on package for pudding. Cool about 5 minutes: 
Mir once or twice. Then add ice cream; stir until melted. Chill 
10 to 15 minutes, or until slightly thickened. 

Arrange 6 cookies in the bottom of a greased 9 x 5-inch 
pan. Spoon one-third of the pudding over the cookies. Then 
place 12 cookies on top of pudding and 4 cookies against both 
long sides of pan. Continue layering pudding and cookies, mak- 
ing 3 layers of each. Chill until firm (at least 1 hour). Unroold. 
Garnish with whipped cream. Makes 8 servings. 

Substitute Jdl-O Butterscotch, Coconut Cream, or Vanilla Pud- 
ding and Pie Filling with vanilla ice cream, if desired. 




NABISCO 



Cocoanut Bars 



JELLO Puddings 
& Re Fillings 



^^^^^^^^ 



Yummy for youngsters — 
Jcll-O Coconut Cream 
Pudding and Pie Filling 
and some Oreo Creme 
Sandwiches. 



Refreshing quickie— Jell-O 
Lemon Pudding and Pie 
Filling served with Nabisco 
Vanilla Wafers! 



ell-o it a mcurtntn tkaocmark or general foods corp. 




c 



aterial 




Copyrighted material 



CARS -TO -COME 
HOG LIMELIGHT 

They have a flashy, foreign look 

This midwinter, with their traditional hulla- 
haloo, U.S. auto makers whipped the wraps 
from their 1953 models. What they unveiled 
was a line of slick new machines that bore the 
unmistakable influence of the foreign-styled 
sports car. Faced with new competition and a 
change in U.S. taste, the manufacturers had 
bowed in the direction of the sporty, speedy 
German. Italian and British cars which U.S. 
drivers have been buying by thousands. Even 
the standard American models with their pow- 
er steering, power brakes, power-raised aerials 
and power-adjusted scats, had something of 
the sports car under their hoods. Lincoln shift- 
ed to a four-barreled carburetor, and Cadillac 
led the horsepower race with a mighty 210. 

What really stole the show, however, was 
not the production models but a collection of 
all-out sportsters, long, low and flashy autos 
that were still experimental and, when pro- 
duced, would be bought only bv those who 
could pay for fun and excitement. Boldly com- 
bining their looks with everyday utility, Stude- 
baker took the year's biggest gamble and an- 
nounced il was going into lull production with 
a car (lop. opposite page) which most thought 
the sportiest standard car since the '37 Cord. 




A GERMAN PORSCHE, WHICH INFLUENCED STUDEBAKER DESIGN, SITS AT STUDEBAKER PROVING GROUNDS 




CHRYSLER "SPECIAL" IS A PURELY EXPERIMENTAL MODEL BUILT IN ITALY. IT IS ONLY 56 INCHES HIGH, HAS VENTS IN HOOD FOR ITS AIR-CONDITIONING UNIT 



CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE 39 

Copyrighted materia 



New Autos CONTINUED 




Relieve the 
PRESSURE of 
Neuralgic Pain! 



• When the tense, pressing agony 
of neuralgic pain strikes, you 
want relief in a hurry. And here's 
a way for you to get it — quickly, 
easily, effectively. 

Doctors generally will tell you 
that neuralgic pain may be largely 
caused by pressure. Sensitive 
nerves are irritated. Local areas 
become tender and swollen. That 
torture you feel is simply Nature's 
call for help. 

You can get blessed relief — 
fast — by rubbing Absorbine Jr. 
on the sore, swollen areas. 

Absorbine Jr. actually helps to 
counteract the pressure which may 
be causing your misery. At the 
same time, it warms and soothes 
those throbbing pain spots. The 
speed with which it works will 
amaze you. 

Used by thousands 
Thousands rely on Absorbine Jr. 
for its quick.comforting relief from 
neuralgic and rheumatic pain, 
and from sore, aching muscles. 

Before the next attack of neu- 
ralgic pain — get Absorbine Jr. 
Only $1.25 a long-lasting bottle 
at all drug counters. 



W. F. Young, Inc., Springfield, Mast. 




W. F. Young, Inc. 

202 I.yman Street, Springfield 3, Man. 
Please Rend me a Free sample bottle of 
Absorbine Jr. — postpaid. 



NAMK 

AUUK ESS 

CITY STATU. 




LINCOLN'S CAPRI COMES EITHER FULLY CONVERTIBLE OR IN HARD-TOPPED MODEL SHOWN ABOVE. IT HAS 205 HP 




FORD'S CRESTLINE SUNLINER IS A SIX-PLACE CONVERTIBLE. SHOWS LESS EXTREME CHANGE IN DESIGN THAN MOST 



EVER SEE A SCALE MODEL OF A MAN'S KIND OF FUN ? 



Someday, you '11 build. And like the men above, admiring a miniature 
version of their host's new weekend cabin, you'll find you can have a 
lot of fun with a scale model. The roof comes off; the walls move 
around; and your building plans really take shape. It's quite an idea, 
as many a new home builder has found. 

Did you notice that the host here has had another good idea? And 



one that you can enjoy immediately? On the table, in easy reach, is 
the very model of an excellent whiskey. 

Imperial is its name. And Hiram Walker is its maker. And it is so 
pleasantly smooth, so truly good-tasting, that men like yourself have 
made Imperial one of America's very largest selling whiskies. 

Wouldn't you like to try some soon? 



Just tell the man you want imperial 

BLENDED WHISKEY. 86 PROOF. 70X GRAIN NEUTRAL SPIRITS. HIRAM WALKER & SONS INC.. PEORIA. ILLINOIS 



Copyrighted material 



New Autos CONTINUED 



w 



I drink all the coffee I want... 




I gef all the sleep I need 1 




DONT STOP DRINKING COFFEE ... 
JUST STOP DRINKING CAFFEIN ! 



You know the effect caffein has on 
delicate nerves, causing tension and 
sleeplessness. Yet caffein doesn't add 
one bit of flavor or fragrance to your 
coffee. 

So wouldn't you be wise to try New 
Extra-Rich Coffee? You'll sleep better 
at night. You'll feel better and think 
better during the day. And you'll get all 
the fragrant, flavorful coffee goodness 
of 100% choice coffee! 

Taste New Extra-Rich Sanka Coffee 



today — hot, fresh, made good and 
strong. Don't be surprised if you like 
it better than the coffee you've been 
drinking! 

Product* of Cei 




DELICIOUS IN EITHER 
INSTANT OR REGULAR FORM 



New 
Extra-Rich 



SANKA COFFEE 



Iff Mkious! It's 97% cafhin-fnml II lets, you ileepl 



42 



NOT TOO FAR IN THE FOTORE 

Thifl year General Motors, the world's biggest auto maker, plans to 
turn out three million ears in its more conventional lines. To please 
the more sedate it is experimenting with an automotive throwback — 
a I'onliae lamlau called La I'arisienue upholslered in pink with places 
for holh chauffeur and footman. But in its hid for the sports ear mar- 
ket, General Motors has seven models already huill. among them the 
three shown below. Still experimental, these three models now have 
plastic bodies but will probably eventually be produced in steel. First 
to bit production, perhaps in July, will most likely be the Chevrolet. 




CHEVROLET CORVETTE has soupe.l-.ip IM) hp Chewy engine, will do 
lttO. It seats two people, has exposed rear wheels, unconventional bumpers. 




OLDSMOBI LE STARFIRE has 2IM) hp. dual radio antenna, trap-doorlike 
hood. It will seal six people if the wide armrests between the seats are raised. 




BU1CK WILDCAT -eats three, has thin rear fenders, a wide, sloping hack. 
Il is Mack, with green leather. Front bubcipa stay stationary as wheels turn. 



Copj 



New! PiMury 




CAKE MIX 



Angel Food as fine 
as the finest home-recipe cake... 
so delicate in flavor, texture and 
aroma you have to eat it to believe it 

Contains the whites of 13 eggs... Water is All you add 





(Pood 



CAKE MIX 

Hurt* rs ro« in 



Now look what you can do! You can now make 

the most elegant angel food cake you ever saw 
without a bit of fuss or fear. Pillsbury makes 
it really easy for you — and sure! 

Complete — All of the finest ingredients you 

can put into angel food are in the package. 
No eggs to separate. No yolks left over. 
You get more than a dozen egg whites 
(13 to be exact i in easy-to-whip form. 

Water is all you add 

Easy to make — Anyone can do it. Simple 
directions right on the package. 

Costs 25% less than the average 

fine home-recipe angel food cake. 

Why don't you forget those old 

bugaboos about how hard angel 
food is to make and see how 
beautifully easy it now can be. 
Just remember to get yourself some 
new Pillsbury Angel Food Cake Mix 
right soon. 



MOVIES 




A BAD PRODUCER (KIRK DOUGLAS) TELLS OFF A BEAUTIFUL STAR (LANA TURNER) IN A SCENE WHICH WAS GENERALLY APPROVED BY PREVIEW AUDIENCES 



THE CUSTOMER IS THE BOSS 

'Sneak' allows man on street to edit 'The Bad and the Beautiful' 



A Hollywood feature picture, like M-G-M's The 
Bad and the Beautiful (budget: SI. 5 million), 
passes under the eye of a hierarchy of techni- 
cians and moguls as it is being put together: 
the cutter, the writer, the music supervisor, 
the director, the producer, executive producer 
and frequently the executive producer's wife. 
But after all these a final authority is consult- 
ed: a crowd, the more nondescript the better, 



drawn off the streets by a theater marquee 
promise of a major studio preview. 

Most "sneaks" are given within two hours' 
drive of Los Angeles, and the audience is prac- 
tically a semiprofessional one. But its word is 
close to law. If it yawns at a blow or laughs at 
a kiss, offending footage almost always comes 
out. To see what a sneak audience thought 
of The Bad and the Beautiful, turn the page. 



We would appreciate your aid in fiiiing out ibis questionnaire. 
PREVI EW 
"THE BAD AND THE BEAUTIFUL" 

I HOW WOULD YOU RATE THE PICTURE? 

□ OUTSTANDING □ EXCELLENT □ VERY GOOD □ GOOD 

2. HOW WOULD YOU RATE THE PERFORMANCES OF THE FOLLOWING? 



O FAIR 



LANA TURNER as Georgia Lorrison □ Excellent 

KIRK DOUGLAS as Jonathan Shield? □ Excellent 



C Good 
□ Good 



' Fait 
1 . fair 




THIS IS THE TOP PORTION OF THE QUESTIONNAIRE DISTRIBUTED AT THE SNEAK PREVIEWS 



FILM MAKERS WAIT ANXIOUSLY FOR RESULTS 



CONTINUED ON NEXT PACE 



45 



Cop; 



Sneak Preview CONTINUED 





MEN'S CLOTHING 





AUDIENCE AT PACIFIC PALISADES THEATER FILLS OUT CARDS. BELOW: THE MOST COMMON ADVERSE CRITICISM 



S. ANT ADOTD COMMENT? 



] 



HERE ARE SOME SCENES AUDIENCE KNOCKED OUT 



The preview audiences generally were delighted by 
the lush melodramatics of The Hud and the Beauti- 
ful (the story of a ruthless Hollywood producer), 
but they tended to get restless. Though a majority of 
the cards rated it from "very good" to "outstand- 



ing," there were many complaints that it was ovcr- 
long. To shorten and tighten il up, director and pro- 
ducer went back over the whole film, snipped out 12 
minutes' worth of scenes (helmv) which audiences 
had found improbable or repetitious or merely dull. 



W 




BEACH SCENE was cut nut when ocean backdrop was 
considered "too obviously fake" by eagle-eyed pre viewers. 



MEETING of Dick Powell and Lana Turner was judged 
repetitious because be meets her again soon afterward. 




HELICOPTER FLIGHT lo find crashed plane seemed 
anticlimax after revelation of crash in newspaper headline. 



PARIS ROOM from which Kirk Douglas phones disap- 
peared. Showing other end of conversation proved enough. 



CONTINUED ON PAGE 48 



Copyrighted material 



FOR HOME OR 
BUSINESS NEEDS 




Advertisement 



DANDRUFF? 



Why it may be "the beginning 
of baldness" 




i ST stage 



Spores of Malassez in a case 
of ordinary dandruff. 



We don't claim miracles. We can't prevent bald- 
ness. Nor do we believe anyone can. But you 
should know the following facts about dandruff. 

Those unsightly dandruff "snowflakes" on the 
shoulders of your suit may be more than just a 
nuisance and an embarrassment. Excessive dan- 
druff reveals a strong possibility that you will be 
at least partially bald in years to come. 

There is more than 
one kind of baldness in 
men. And dermatolo- 
gists differ in their views 
as to causes of baldness. 
But dermatologists do 
agree that the condition 
symptomized by exces- 
sive dandruff does fre- 
quently lead to baldness. 

How can you tell 
when you have excessive 
dandruff? A reliable in- 
dication is, dandruff so 
thick that flakes of it "snow" down on your shoulders. 

Seborrhea 

What causes excessive dandruff? It commonly arises 
from a disease of the scalp called seborrhea. Many 
leading dermatologists say that a causative agent of 
seborrheic dandruff is a tiny parasite called the Spore 
of Malassez— also known as Pityrosporum Ovale and 
the Bottle Bacillus. 

But whatever the basic cause of seborrheic dan- 
druff may be, in most men who have it the disease 
progresses through three more or less distinct stages. 

First stage: dry white scales 

In the first stage of seborrhea, the familiar dry white 
scales flake off your scalp, many of the flakes drop- 
ping to your shoulders. 



Second stage — and 
"thinning hair" 

The second stage of se- 
borrhea is characterized 
by moistness and sticki- 
ness of the flakes on the 
scalp. They may be 
heaped up in consider- 
able amounts. There 
may also be some scalp 
inflammation. In many 
cases, hairs begin to die, 
before they reach full 




growth . . . your hair has begun to "thin," so subtly 
that at first you may not notice it. 

Third stage— and baldness 

In the next condition that develops, more often than 

not, the glands at the roots of your hair overproduce 

a fatty substance called sebum. The sebum rises in 

the tiny pocket or follicle that encases the root of 

each hair. The root may be "choked" with fatty 

sebum and dead cells from the glands and follicles, 

and accumulated dirt. In a large percentage of cases, 

this condition seriously interferes with hair growth 

. . . and the restdt is increasingly "thin" hair, often 

baldness. .... . , 

What can you do? 

When you understand this progression of scalp dis- 
ease, you realize why excessive dandruff has been 
called "the beginning of baldness." You realize the 
danger of neglecting excessive dandruff, or only tak- 
ing half measures. 

One factor to watch is your general health; if you're 
"run down" you should see your doctor— otherwise, 




I#4£ 



3 rd STAGE 



2 nd STAGE 



Scales become sticky. Micro- 
bacilli shown may be present. 



Microbacilli shown may be present. 
Hair growth may be affected. 



excessive dandruff may persist in spite of anything 
you may do. The other important factor is to give 
your hair and scalp the right kind of care. 

A scalp hygiene program: the Kreml Method 

Here is a program designed to clear out your present 
crop of dandruff flakes. It is called the Kreml Method. 
It is simple, it is easy— and it has helped thousands 
of men. 

The Kreml Method of scalp hygiene is used pro- 
fessionally by leading barbers and hairdressers. The 
famous Charles De Zemler of New York, formerly 
personal barber to European royalty, has used the 
Kreml Method for years. 

You yourself can give your scalp the wonderful 
benefits of the Kreml Method, in your own home. 

Start this program tonight 

Today, get a bottle of Kreml Hair Tonic. And make 
sure you have a good shampoo on hand. 



Any dandruff that shows on your shoulders is excessive 
dandruff . . . you're wise to see your scalp gets suitable care. 



Tonight, start the Kreml Method of treatment. Shake 
Kreml Hair Tonic generously on to your head. Now, 
massage your scalp vigorously. 

As you massage, shake on more Kreml Hair Tonic. 
You will enjoy the cool feeling of stimulation that 
tells you Kreml Hair Tonic is going to work. 

Next, apply shampoo to your hair. Work up a thick 
lather— without putting any water on your head. If 
you have put enough Kreml on your hair, that's all 
the shampoo needs to make a good lather. 

Now, rinse with water. Lather again. Rinse. 

Dry your hair thoroughly. Shake on Kreml Hair 
Tonic — massage it into hair — comb hair in place. 

Tomorrow morning— and every morning: Shake on 
Kreml Hair Tonic— rub it in— and comb your hair in 
place. 

Kreml Hair Tonic contains just enough oil to hold 
your hair the way you like it. There's no greasy, 
plastered-down appearance. Your hair looks good in 
a natural way. 

Improvement should come quickly 

After just the one Kreml-and-shampoo treatment, 
plus continued daily use of Kreml, you will almost 
certainly notice a gratifying improvement in the con- 
dition of your hair and scalp. In many cases, that is 
all that's needed. In more stubborn cases, it may be 
necessary to repeat the Kreml-and-shampoo treat- 
ment within two or three days. 

The Kreml Method is not offered as a substitute 
for the services of a dermatologist. If the condition 
of your scalp is such that you feel you ought to con- 
sult a dermatologist— do so at once. But if you simply 
want a good home method of scalp hygiene— try the 
Kreml Method. See what it can do for you. 

Inhibits growth of Spores of Malassez 

Certain ingredients of Kreml Hair Tonic inhibit the 
growth of bacilli and of the Spores of Malassez. 

There is no known permanent "cure" for seborrheic 
dandruff. But you should exercise every precaution 
by a suitable program of regular scalp hygiene. That 
is the basis of the Kreml Method. 

Kreml Hair Tonic was perfected over 25 years ago. 
Millions of men use it and go on using it, because 
Kreml Hair Tonic gives the kind of results they want. 
They have told us so in thousands of lettersl 

Money-back offer 

Try the Kreml Method faithfully, and, if you are not 
entirely satisfied, write the J. B. Williams Company, 
Glastonbury. Conn. Send us the label from your 
Kreml Hair Tonic bottle— tell us what you paid for 
it— and we will gladly refund your money. 

Visit your drug counter today. Ask for a bottle of 
Kreml Hair Tonic. And if you haven't a good sham- 
poo on hand — buy one. We recommend our own 
Kreml Shampoo— we know it's good. Starting tonight, 
go after your dandruff with the Kreml Method of 
scalp hygiene. See how quickly your hair and scalp 
feel better and look better! Kreml Hair Tonic 



47 



Sneak Preview CONTINUED 




Feed your dog like these Dash-fed champions! 

International Champion Aristo von Marienlust and his son, Candidate, 
another Dachshund champion, are photographed with handler Dorothy 
Hardy. You can see why these two dog show veterans win ribbons. Their 
sleek coats happy dispositions, and all-around good health— the very things 
that impress you — impress judges, too. Dash has done its job well. And, 
with Dash, your dog will be as well-fed as these famous champions. Dash is 
fortified with liver, the richest of all meats in proteins, vitamins and minerals. 
Why not see how much Dash will help your dog? 



Dash is fortified 
with LIVER! 

CONTAINS CHLOROPHYLLIN-Stopj Doggy Odors 

A product of Armour and Company 



""»it[ »IT» Ull' 



Dash 




i. IT ANY. DtD YOU C 





BIGGEST COMPLAINTwas made on scenes following one in which Lan.; 
Turner's heart is broken. She goes on a hysterical ride through a storm {tup)/ 
which some previewers thought was too harrowing but majority found exci t t 
ing. But almost everyone disliked the abrupt shift to scene (middle picture 
which showed her with impeccable hairdo as she was having a drinl 
It was out to a later scene giving a more somber view of Lana's face (AoftomJ ; 



48 




Blue Points and Blue Ribbon! 



. . . every lover of seafood will appreciate the taste companionship of 
luscious oysters-on-the-half-shell and smooth, sociable, satisfying 
Pabst Blue Ribbon. For you who seek new adventures in good taste 
and good living. Pabst Blue Ribbon is a welcome discovery that opens 
up a whole new world of beer enjoyment. 



Try this ■ ■ . for one week . . . make Pabst 
Blue Ribbon your beer. When you find out 
how much you've been missing— your one 
week's trial of Pabst Blue Ribbon will 
Stretch into a lifetime of beer enjoyment. 



DRINK PABST BLUE B1BBON . . . satisfy uour thirst for better beer! 



FOLLOW PABST BLUE RIBBON BOXING BOUTS ...EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT ON TELEVISION ... CBS NETWORK. Copr. 1953, Pablt Brewing Company. Milwaukee. Wis. Trade Mark. Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 



If you can hang a picture 




you can install 



NEW, SENSATIONALLY BEAUTIFUL 
KELVINATOR CABINETS 

With Advanced New Styling, Exclusive Sliding Glass Doors, Rounded Edges, 
Contour Design! Install them yourself and save! 





WHETHER you want merely a few feet of additional shelf space 
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with Kelvinator cabinets. "Pantryettes" are hung just like pictures. 
The only tools required are a hammer and screwdriver. Now you 
can afford to modernize your kitchen! Just attach hanger strip to 
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there is to it. Base cabinets slide into place just like furniture. 



Pantryettes are hung like pictures on special wall brackets. 

• Palcnl applied for 
** After minimum down pjymcnt 




YOU CAN have the newest, most advanced kitchen cabinets of today 
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vinator cabinets. And these are the finest quality cabinets ever . . . with 
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lete. Made of heavy-gauge steel with lifetime baked enamel finish . . . 
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edges, sliding glass doors, sloping fronts to allow more headroom with 
no danger of head bumps. Base cabinets have "contour-front" design 
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either linoleum or Formica in many beautiful colors. See the complete 
Kelvinator kitchen including cabinet sinks, "Rotashelf" corner units 
and "Electro-Drain" garbage disposers, at your dealer's now. 



SEE THE ALL-NEW 1953 KELVINATOR RE- 
FRIGERATORS! Ten sensational new models. 
And look at these new features: "Magic-Cycle"* 
Defrosting — Roll-Out Dairy Shelf — Giant Freezer 
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Shelves in the Door— Built-in Butter Chest— 
Moisture-Seal Crispers — Colonial Blue Interior 
Trim — Cold-Clear-to-the-FIoor Design. And you 
can have a beautiful new Kelvinator Refrigerator 
in your kitchen for as little as S3. 14** a week! 
Much less if you hare a trade-in. 




SEE THIS COMPACT RANGE WITH "GREAT SCOT" 
OVEN I This new 1953 Kelvinator Electric Range is no 
wider than a card table — takes up only 30 inches of space 
— yet its oven is a whole roast wider than most ! Automatic 
cooking, too! Have your dealer show you all the new 1953 
Kelvinator ranges. Models to fit every kitchen and budget. 
Double-Oven Ranges . . . Standard Ranges ... all have 
Kelvinator's new High-Speed Heat! Surface units get red 
hot in seconds! Ovens heat to 350 degrees in 5 minutes! Seven controlled 
heats instead of the usual 5. Enjoy all the convenience of Kelvinator cooking 
for only dimes a day. 




GET KELVINATOR'S KITCHEN PLANNING GUIDE 

This handy, colorful booklet tells you how 10 plan your 
kitchen for utmost efficiency and convenience. Tips by 
trained home economists show you how proper kitchen 
planning saves steps, conserves your energy, and makes 
meal preparation much easier. Send coupon and 10c in 
coin for your copy. 

Kehinator Division, Nash-Kelvinator Corp., Dept. L-23, 
Detroit 32, Mich. 

Please send me my copy of Kelvinator's Kitchen Planning 
Guide. I enclose 10c to cover costs of handling. 



NAME- 



I 

I ADDRESS- 
I 



ci [Y- 




LOOK AT THE FEATURES. . . LOOK AT THE EEAC/Ty. . . LOO/C AT THE PP/CE. 



/rS T/M£ TO G£T 




a/it/jOM Me /Ce/i/mator Porac/e to Better //Who / 




r Jwo in the 
Front Row 
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Just a few teeth -and it's time to start your little 
hero (or heroine) on Gerber's Junior Foods! 
And what could please him more? For Gerber's, who 
make baby foods and nothing else, know exactly 
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just right for babies learning to chew. 





Appealing Performance! Your teething toddler will find 
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Gerber's Habtj Foods, Fremont, Mich., Oakland, Calif., Rochester, N. Y., Niagara Falls, Can. 




M INCH A, THE UNSOCIABLE CAT, CROUCHES ABOVE A CAN WHICH SOLICITOUS MILKMAN HAS HUNG ON NAIL IN FORK OF TREE AND FILLS EACH DAY WITH MILK 



THE CAT THAT WON'T COME DOWN 

She went up a tree in Buenos Aires more than five years ago and has stayed up there ever since 



On Oct. 5, 1917. a yellow -eyed Muck cat scam- 
pored up a 40-fool-high tree in a residential 
section of Buenos Aires. Several people in the 
neighborhood remember the exact dale hut no 
one is quite sure why the cat went up the tree. 
( hie story is that a gang of rowdy kids tied cans 
to her tail; another is that she was kicked by 



a drunk. Whatever the reason, the cat has nev- 
er come down from the tree. 

IV-pile heat and cold, despite storms that 
have ripped limbs from her tree, even despite 
maternity, the cat has stuck tenaciously to her 
hermitage. Several people have tried, by feed- 
ing her, to break dow n her standollishness, and 



one benefactor, a milkman, has alfcelionaldv 
named her "Mincha." W hen hungry. Vlincha 
will accept fooil hut has never show n anv affec- 
tion for her benefactors. At least three times 
during the live vears she has given birth to lit- 
ters of four kittens, but each time her babies 
dropped to the sidewalk below and were killed. 



CONTINUED ON NEXT PACE 53 



Copyrighted material 



the power 
you bought! 

Car Hard to Start wlicn 

your engine is cold? II so, there's 
an easy way to help. 

Change your oil now . . . and 
put in a hrand of 100% Pure 
Pennsylvania Motor Oil. It's 
made trom Nature's finest crude oil. 



ASK \ ox 



a brand of 




54 



Cat 



CONTINUED 




FEEDING CAT, Senora 
Adda J. tie Arnejo. who 
lives iti an apartment di- 
rectly in front of the tree, 
uses wooden pole to hand 
some food up to Mtncha. 



WIRE FORK is Kusebia 
Ramirez' utensil for feed- 
ing the cat. She always 
snilTs a sliver of meat be- 
fore offering it to make 
sure that it is not spoiJed. 





HER DAILY MILK is poured for Mimlia hy Irineo Vaecari, who then lianas 
it up with pole. He has fed her conscientiously ever\ morning for four years. 



RELIEVES PAIN 
OF HEADACHE 
NEURALGIA 
NEURITIS - 



r 




The way 
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recommend 



Here's Why. 

Anacin* is like a doctor's 
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specially compounded to give 
FAST, LONG LASTING relief. 
Don't wait. Buy Anacin today. 




INGROWN NAIL 

Hurting You? 

Immediate 
Relief! 



A f*w dro|rt of OtTORO* bring blcs«.d rrllrf fmni 
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ON THE FAMILY 

FOR GENERATIONS 




Aik Your Groc«r For The 
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Copyrighted material 




2,000,000 

more of you to feed 
each year 



These smiling, reflective, howling American 
citizens are part of the two million people 
added to the U. S. every year. Our country 
is growing that fast. 

Two million more mouths to feed each 
year could, in time, mean meat shortages 
for your family. 

Already, the farmer has done a lot to 
avert this threat. He's producing more on 



his busy acres; with machinery, with better 
breeds and, now, with lifesaving antibiotics 
such as aureomycin. 

The discovery that an aureomycin sup- 
plement would help poultry to grow 
healthier and faster was first made in 1948 
by researchers at Lederle. A year later, the 
first antibiotic feed supplement was in the 
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Rouautt 



GREAT MYSTIC PAINTS GOOD FRIDAY BUT NEVER EASTER 

by WlNTHROP SARGEANT 

THERE are some critics who think that Georges Rouault is 
the greatest of living painters. There are others who merely 
rate him high among the hig and controversial names — Pi- 
casso. Matisse. Braqtie — which have niaile Paris llie most lalked- 
about art center of the past generation. But whatever the verdict 
of history on this point. Georges Rouault will certainly he re- 
membered as one of the most powerful and individual artists ol 
this or any other era. Just how powerful and individual, thou- 
sands of Americans were able to judge for themselves last week 
when a huge retrospective show of 160 of his paintings, brought 
together by New York's Museum of Modern Art, opened at the 
Cleveland Museum for a six-week exhibition prior to their New 
York showing in April. 

These paintings, as any average gallery-goer could see. depict 
a far different world from the gay, decorative realm of cubes, 
two-nosed women and tropical odalisques that seems to be in- 
habited by so many modem French artists. The world Rouault 
paintings depict is a grim one. suflused with an intense passion 
that ranges from savage anger to religious ecstasy. Their subject 
matter consists for the most part of human beings caught in an 
atmosphere of eternal tragedy: sad-eyed clowns, bloated prosti- 
tutes, corrupt-looking judges, acrobats, saints ami suffering fig- 
ures of Christ. Their bold, deceptively coarse draftsmanship 
seems to have been accomplished with some primitive device, 
such as a trowel, or a soot-smudged thumb. 

The observer s first impression ol these paintings is apt to be 
one of unrelieved ugliness. But a second look reveals that the 
somber colors in which Rouault has painted his tragic world 
glow with the splendor of inlaid jewels or panes of medieval 
stained glass. It takes at least a third look to see what Georges 
Rouault is really driving at. and the observer who has taken this 
third look is never likely to forget the profound poetry that 
underlies his painting. 

Rouault diners from nearly all the other celebrated artists of 
his period in that he is a deeplv religious painter. Nearly every 
one of his works is a parable or commentary on the drama of 
human life seen through the eyes of a Christian mystic. How- 
ever, his mysticism is concerned only with the pessimistic side 
of Christianity, with the crucified rather than the victorious 
Christ. Rouault always paints Good Friday, never Easter. 

The world he depicts is the murky one of human imperfec- 
tion, loaded down with the burdens of original sin. Through 
this world, their way dimly lit by a pale and distant polar sun. 
trudge human beings, striving against nearly hopeless odds and 
obstacles toward divine mercy and redemption. They are the 
dregs of their kind, grotesque, clodlike symbols of humanity, 
portrayed with such bluntness that they seem scarcely to have 
emerged from the primordial clay. But they also possess beauty, 
and the beautv comes from an element of tenderness and pity 
that Rouault manages to infuse into even the most sordid of his 
subjects. This mixture of the grotesque and the tender is basic 
to all of Rouault's work. Like El Greco. Rembrandt and certain 
other artists of the past. Rouault is a painter of moral concepts 
and a somber judge of human weakness and aspiration. 

The presence of this gloomy mystic among the gay bohemian 
extroverts of "modern art" has excited the curiosity of art lov- 
ers for a long time. The curiosity has seldom been satisfied. 
Georges Rouault is popularly regarded as one ol the most eccen- 
tric men in Paris. He lives in deliberate and carefully guarded 
obscurity. No one but the members of his immediate family has 
ever seen his studio. The address of his home is a secret known 
only to a lew intimate friends. For years he bought his paints, 




MADONNA AND CHILD is one of a celebrated series of etchings called 
'Miserere" which Rouault produced between I and 1027. lis severe 
and simple style suggests the art of the early Middle A^es; its feeling of ten- 
derness anil reverence is the spirit that pervades most of Rouault 8 work. 



TE X T CO I N TI M I D O N PAGE (> 4: PAINTINGS ON NEXT SIX PAGES 



56 



Copyrighted material 




KOI VI !.T \T HI 1 i \ es in Paris in an apartment wlin>-c wall> arc tleroiated 
with his nun works. W hen painting he habitually wears a while ooal md cap. 



CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE 



Rouautt 



CONTINUED 





MIS EARLY ART Ol SHADOWS AND SATIRE 



Today Rouault is best known fur his heavily painliil religious subjects, 
conceived in llie colors ami contours ol stained-glass windows. Hut be- 
fore he arrived at his "stained-glass ' style, Houault passed through 
various somber and searching stages. As a student influenced by his 
teacher, Moreau, and the work of Rembrandt, he did scenes (ahmv) in 
shadowy, ominous tones. Later, in a period of intense loneliness and 
inner torment, depressed by the evils he saw everywhere around him, 



Rouault poured out his emotions furiously in a style recalling the biting, 
satirical art of Daumier. In ruthless portraits (op/msi/v jmpr) he lashed 
out at members ol society who stood lor hypocrisy ami materialism, while 
in starkly sympathetic scenes he portrayed the de graded ligures of slum 
and circus life who were to him the victims of an unjust humanity. From 
this period evolved Rouault s own vision of a spiritual world, glow- 
ing with the colors of medieval glass but pervaded by a profound sadness. 



Copyrigt 




MR. X, painted in 1911, is imaginary portrait of a man who "has existed 
eternally," an overlord whose face glowers with avarice and venality. 



TIIK Ql'AKUY, 1897, based on a scene not far from Paris, assumed for Rotiautt 
the character of a mysterious simple of human forces in a world of shadows. 



<_;<>l PUS seated in a cabaret were painted in L905 as overstuffed symbolfl of 
worldliness and false pride, show Rouault*» early interest in Daumier's satires. 




CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE 





BOUQUET) one of many still lifes Rouault produced in 
1930-, shows influence ot Cistern enamels and tnpe>tries. 
Frame \*a> painted as an integral pari of the composition. 



JUDGES have long been targets of Rouault's bitterest 
attacks. These judges, done in 1928, wear expressions of 
greed and complacency characteristic of corrupt officials. 



-THREE CLOWNS were 
portrayed in 1917 like 
saints of tnedie\al art, 
with Mack outlines re- 
sem hi i ng the lead i ng of 
ancient church windows. 



FUNERAL, painted in 
L930 in tones of stained 
glass, is imaginary scene 
in which trees and house 
echo mournful shapes of 
people following the hier. 




CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE 



Rouauft 




CHRISTIAN NOCTURNE, a visionary scene of 1932, was done in sunny col- 
ors of artist's latest work. Drifting Loal ami islands heighten the mystic effect. 



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63 



Copyrighted material 




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TEXT CONT1M I I) FROM R\r.F. .'><> 



canvases and brushes through intermediaries who 
were sworn not to disclose the name of the real 
purchaser to the paint dealers. 

At rare intervals Rouault has appeared fleeting- 
ly at official openings of his exhibitions or at lec- 
tures on his work. All that the public has seen is 
a frail old man with an impish smile set in a crag- 
gy, slightly simian face, a mariner that oscillates 
between childlike candor and testv aloofness, and 
a natty, elegant way of dressing that seems more 
appropriate to a retired pawnbroker than an art- 
ist. Invariably the old man appears leaning on the 
protective arm of his daughter 
Fsabelle Rouault, a somewhat 
prim, nunlike woman of about 
40 who shields him from per- 
sonal contacts with the anx- 
ious devotion of a mother hen. 

Actually there is a good deal 
less drama behind this appar- 
ent mystery than might be ex- 
pected. Georges Rouault is one 
of the world's most dedicat- 
ed craftsmen and his pointed 
avoidance of social contacts 
has a perfectly sensible mo- 
tive: he does not want to be in- 
terrupted in his work. His one 
weakness, in fact, is a love of 
talking. If he allows himself 
the luxury of easy acquaint- 
ance he is likely to spend all 
his time in conversation. 

His home is a staid, conven- 
tional apartment overlooking 
the square in front of one of 
Paris' busiest and noisiest railroad stations. It is 
filled with a nondescript array of old-fashioned, 
heavy, carved-oak furniture which indicates no 
decided taste either for the antique or the modern. 
A bust of himself and a conservative, academic 
portrait of his wife (both by other artists) are the 
principal ornaments of his parlor, which might be 
that of any of a hundred thousand prosperous, 
bourgeois Frenchmen. 

As one of the most celebrated French painters, 
whose canvases sell for prices ranging from $2,000 
to $25,000, Rouault is, of course, close to being a 
millionaire. Yet long habits of French thrift and 
an evident obliviousness to luxury cause him to 
live very frugally. His constant companions are 
his daughter Isabelle and his wife, a plump, sun- 
ny-tempered, wrinkled, white-haired old lady who 
cares for the apartment and does the cooking her- 
self, keeping modestly in the background and sel- 
dom opening her mouth when visitors are pres- 
ent. Both Mme. Rouault and Isabelle have the 
long, thin noses that are features of hundreds of 
Rouault's bleak portraits. 

Rouault himself looks, in repose, something 
like the old American comic strip character Foxy 
Grandpa. But he is not often in repose. When he 
emerges from the sanctum of his studio, where he 
labors over his pictures in a long white surgeon's 
apron, he puts on an elegant tweed dressing gown, 
wraps a yellow-striped muffler around his neck 
and greets his visitors with slightly combative 
good humor. His pale blue eyes are usually framed 
by horn-rimmed spectacles. On his head is a white 
surgeon's skullcap which he always wears indoors. 
He much prefers standing to sitting, and is a tire- 
less monologist, pacing the floor of his parlor, 
striking stances like a Shakespearean actor, swing- 
ing his arms, pointing indicatively with his stubby 




PROSTITUTES were painted by Rouault 
in 1900s as the martyrs of society's injustice. 



fingers, occasionally stopping to pound the top of 
a table, laughing uproariously at his own witti- 
cisms and hammering incessantly at the two sub- 
jects that interest him: art and artists. 

At 81, Rouault is still a man of fiery passions. 
Though his battle lor recognition has long since 
been won, he is still fighting it with undiminished 
ardor. To him, the world seems divided between 
two categories of people: artists and Philistines; 
and he is darkly certain that the latter are busy 
from morning to night conspiring against the for- 
mer. The discrepancy between the two Rouaulls 
— the painter of Christian pes- 
simism and the hot-tempered 
champion of art and artists 
— is somewhat disconcerting. 
The explanation seems to lie 
partly in Rouault's moody 
temperament, partly in his in- 
domitable idealism. Like many 
a mystic and many an artist 
of the poetic, inward-looking 
variety, Rouault has always 
found the real world a rather 
thorny place to live in. 

Georges Rouault was horn 
in Paris during the short-lived 
revolution known as the Com- 
mune of 1871, when the city, 
in the hands of leftists, was 
under siege by the constitut- 
ed government of France. As 
he was about to emerge into 
the world, a shell fired bv the 
besiegers struck the Rouault 
home and tumbled his mother 
out of bed. She was wrapped in a sheet and carried 
hastily to the cellar where, in the dark and with- 
out even the benefit of warm water, she gave birth 
to a son. 

Having survived this rather traumatic entrance 
into life, Rouault grew into a frail little boy who, 
from the age of 4, spent a great deal of his time 
making chalk drawings in copybooks and on stray 
pieces of paper. His father, a Breton whose Celtic 
blood may explain some of Rouault's own rather 
un-French addiction to moodiness and passion, 
was a wood finisher who worked for the Pleycl 
piano company. Rouault remembers that his la- 
ther had a true craftsman's devotion to wood. A 
squeaking door irritated him only because he felt 
that the wood was suffering. 

At 14, Rouault was taken out of school and put 
to work in a stained-glass factory. His salary was 
20c a week. His duties were to assemble bits of 
damaged windows and run errands for his employ- 
er. On these errands. Rouault used to pocket his 
bus fare, but so as not to cheat his employer by 
wasting time, he would run beside the bus all the 
way to his destination. In the evenings he crossed 
Paris on foot to attend drawing classes at a school 
of applied art. 

When he was 20, just as the stained-glass manu- 
facturer was about to offer him the wages and 
work of an adult. Rouault quit his job and en- 
tered the Ecole des Beaux Arts. Here he studied 
in the same class with Henri Matisse under the 
old-fashioned religious painter Gustave Moreau. 
Moreau was a conservative artist and taught Rou- 
ault to paint conservatively. But he had a great 
teacher's gift for fostering individuality in his pu- 
pils. The gangling, underfed, dedicated Rouault, 
who painted in moody silence and seldom said a 
word to his fellow students, interested Moreau 

CQNTIHUfD ON MCI 66 



64 



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66 



Rouautt 



MOKEAl" did religious paint- 
ings which influenced Rouault. 



enormously. He lent him money and provided him with castoff 
clothes. He onee remarket) of Rouault. "lie onlv answers 'ves,' or 
'no,' but into that 'yes' and 'no' he puts so much passion that, if 
he paints as he speaks, he will go far." 

Moreau prophesied, however, that his young student was des- 
tined to wait many years for success and he exacted two promises 
from him which Kouault has scrupulously kept all his life. One 
was that he would never smoke. The other was that if he were dis- 
satisfied with a painting he would stand it against a wall and ignore 
it for several days before deciding whether or not to destroy it. 

The relation between master and 
pupil became so close that when 
Moreau died in 1897 Rouault felt 
that he was completely alone in a 
hostile world. As a legacy, Moreau 
had left him a lifetime job at about 
$400 a year as curator of the Mo- 
reau Museum, a building that had 
been Moreau's home and studio, and 
which he bequeathed to the state. 

The next few years w ere the rough- 
est of Rouaults life; they were also 
the years in which he evolved his in- 
dividual style as a painter. Rouault 
will not discuss this period, but cer- 
tain facts indicate the severity of 
the crisis he endured. The death of 
Moreau had hit him a crushing blow. 
"It was then," he commented lat- 
er, "that I learned the truth of Ce- 
zanne's famous words, 'Life is horrifying.' " He seriously consid- 
ered entering the priesthood, but remembered that Moreau had ad- 
vised against it. Ultimately, his spiritual agony brought a nervous 
collapse and be was shipped off to Switzerland to recover. 

But recovery did not change Rouault s darkening outlook. Nei- 
ther did marriage. The arrival of four children, whom he was 
obliged to support on his meager stipend from the Moreau Mu- 
seum, added to his troubles. At about this time he came under the 
influence of a morally indignant Catholic author named Leon Bloy, 
who wrote scathing novels about the seamy side of Parisian life 
and who believed that humanity could be saved only by a return 
to medievalism. Rouault became Bloy's friend, and Bloy succeeded 
in converting him to Catholicism. 

Rouault started to paint, as he expresses it, with "frenzy," and 
bis painting took on a savagery that had hitherto been foreign to 
him. Although he had once done landscapes and still lifes, he now- 
devoted himself almost exclusively to painting prostitutes, clowns, 
corrupt judges — and the suffering Christ. They all exuded a bitter 

spirit of moral indignation. 

Even Leon Bloy, whose word pic- 
tures of the Parisian prostitutes had 
shocked others, was shocked by Rou- 
ault's fierceness. "I have today two 
things to say to you," Bloy wrote 
him in 1907, "alter which you will 
be to me no longer a Iriend in spirit. 
First: you are drawn by ugliness 
only, you have a hideousncss in 
your head. Second: if you are a man 
of prayer, a true Catholic, you could 
not possibly have painted such ter- 
rible canvases. Since you are capa- 
ble of profundity, this is even more 
horrible." 

But Georges Rouault was not to 
be swerved. A taciturn man with a 
sparse red beard who seldom visited 
cafes and never participated in the 
easygoing bohemian life of Paris, he 
continued his solitary work. Picasso, Matisse and Braque were 
already becoming celebrated figures. Rouault was still practically 
unknown. Only a handful of friends ever thought of buying anv 
of his paintings. He took courage by remembering a dictum of 
Moreau's. "Give thanks to God," Moreau had said, "that you are 
not successful until as late as possible. Only thus will you be 
permitted to experiment freely and without restraint.' 

It was not until nearly 1920, when he was already in his late 
40s. that Rouault began to be recognized as one of the important 
painters in Paris. The recognition came mainly as the result of a 
strange relationship which was by no means an unmixed blessing. 




BLOY wrote of degraded soci. 
ety which Rouault put into art. 



CONTI N UED ON PA GL 63 




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ROUAL'LT'S BACKER and dealer, Vollanl, exploited him mercilessly. The 
dealer kept artist busy with commissions, took work as soon as it was done. 



Rouautt 



CONTINUED 



Around 1914 his angry, passionate canvases and walercolors at- 
tracted the attention of the great Parisian art dealer Ambroise Vol- 
lanl, who, 20 years earlier, had helped to set Cezanne, Van Gogh 
and Gauguin on the road to fame. Vollard, sensing in Rouault a 
highly original talent, made him an offer. Rouault was to receive a 
permanent studio in Vollard's palatial mansion and an initial cash 
advance of 810,000. In return Vollard was to have the right to 
Rouault's entire output as a painter. To a man of Rouault's tem- 
perament, impoverished and with a family to support, the otfer 
seemed a solution to all his problems. All he had to do was paint. 
Security was guaranteed. 

But in the process Rouault became practically a prisoner of Vol- 
lard. "It was worse than a marriage," one friend commented grim- 
ly. Rouault would lock himself in his studio at Vollard's place and 
work by the hour, forbidding Vollard even to look at his paintings. 
"If I see your nose sticking through my door," he threatened, 
"I'll squash it." W hen he left the studio temporarily, he would 
put secret marks beside his pictures so that he could tell whether 
Vollard had moved them during his absence. Vollard shrewdly 
kept the pressure turned on. "I spent hours in the summer," 
Rouault remembers, "working with my torso naked in 102° heat. 
It was so hot that I had three abscesses on my eyes caused by the 
sweat streaming down my glasses. Vollard was always on my back. 
I worked like a couple of Negro slaves, not one. I dined sometimes 
at 10 in the evening. Vollard would come and say, 'Hurry up, the 
museums are asking for more.' Sometimes he would give me 300 
paintings to retouch at a time. Everyone was afraid of Vollard." 

Occasionally Vollard would take Rouault out to dinner and they 
would shout and belabor each other all evening. "He just cooked 
you in all sorts of sauces," complains Rouault. But whatever the 
emotional tensions,' of the relationship, it did cause Rouault to do 
an enormous amount of painting, and \ery soon the museums and 
art connoisseurs of the world began to realize that the mysterious 
recluse in the Hotel V ollard (as Vollard's residence was known) 
was a painter of great power. Besides his paintings, Rouault pro- 
duced a great quantity of prints which are regarded as among the 
finest done by an artist of his generation. Sometime in the '20s 
the eminent Italian art critic Lionello Venturi invaded Vollard's 
house with the idea of doing a definitive book on Rouault's work. 
"He came into the studio one day," Rouault relates, "and dis- 
covered that I was there. Everyone thought I was dead." 

In 1939 Ambroise Vollard was killed in an automobile accident. 
Rouault, by this time, had moved out of Vollard's place to a studio 
of bis own, but more than 700 of Rouault's works (some of them 
unfinished) remained stacked in the Hotel Vollard, and Vollard's 
heirs promptly took possession of them. The value of this' g hoard was 
estimated at nearly a million dollars, and Rouault was forced to go 
to court to regain possession of it. Rouault based his plea on the 
principle that an artist has a "spiritual right" to his work no mat- 
ter who the nominal owner of it may be and that no owner of a 
work of art has a right to sell it unless the artist has stamped it 
with his approval. The works in the Vollard family's possession, he 
claimed, were either unfinished or inferior examples, and his repu- 
tation was at stake. 

The suit became a celebrated one. After months of litigation, 
Rouault won the custody of the pictures. Promptly, in a dramatic 
gesture, Rouault sealed 315 of them in huge packages, carted them 
off in a moving van to the basement of a suburban hat factory 




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CONTINUED ON NEXT PACE 



"FEEL like 

YOURSELF" 
TOMORROW! 

Why punish yourself with harsh, fast-acting 
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night's rest— and leave you feeling "all 
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or anytime— take mild but thorough Ex-Lax. 

Don't Miss "THE DOCTOR'S WIFE" 
Every day on NBC Monday thru Friday. 

69 



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and, with several witnesses present, calmly fed them into a blaz- 
ing furnace, stirring the embers with a shovel. Half a million dol- 
lars' worth of art went up in smoke. But shrewd observers noted 
that there was a suspicion of method in this apparent madness. 
The sudden unloading of 315 Rouaults might have depressed the 
art market, which is actually as sensitive to supply and demand as 
a stock exchange. International art dealers had been fearful that 
any sudden dispersal of the huge Vollard collection would set mod- 
ern art prices tumbling. Whatever the anguish that his dramatic 
bonfire might have caused the artist, it undoubtedly raised the 
value of the world's remaining Rouaults. 

Since the time (November 1948) of this harrowing episode. 
Georges Rouault has been living and working with comparative 
placidity. His painting has taken on a new atmosphere of serenity 
and even occasionally a sort of solemn gaiety. The faces of his 
ikonlike portraits have begun to smile slightly, and his color 
schemes have departed from his original somber blues and purples 
toward warmer greens, yellows and oranges. Rouault himself at- 
tributes this change to his final escape from the clutches of Vol- 
lard. "I have spent my life painting twilights," he remarked re- 
cently. "I ought to have the right now to paint the dawn. 

Georges Rouault at 81 has reached a point where most men 
would take things a little easier. His four children have long since 
grown into responsible adults (his son. Michel, is a successful phy- 
sician; two daughters are happily married) and he has eight grand- 
children to whom he is deeply attached. His prestige in the inter- 
national art world is that of an established master. But Rouault 
continues to paint with all the fervor and dedication that he had as 
a youth. He still works from 12 to 13 hours a day in his studio, often 
occupying himself until 2 in the morning, painting, gouging away 
at lithographers' plates or making notes on his pictures. 

One thing that annoys him is the machine age, and he can be 
roused to floods of vituperation over mechanical gadgets that frus- 
trate him. He hates to answer what he refers to as "that damned 
telephone," and a few years ago when he lived on the sixth floor of 
another apartment building, he used to climb the entire si\ floors 
on loot rather than subject himself to the mechanical indignity of 
using the elevator. "One goes faster and faster," he wrote in the 
introduction to a book a few years ago. "There is not even time to 
gasp at the moment of dying. Art in this mechanical age, should 
it not be considered a miracle?" 

Despite these rather crotchety reactions. Rouault has a shrewd 
estimate of himself and his talents. "My color and my form," he 
wrote recently, "are the crust of my intelligence; they arc worth as 
much as my thought or my feeling. I have never pretended to be a 
thinker. It is not in my line." Like many of the greatest artists, he 
has a specialized mind which channels all of its important crea- 
tive ideas into the medium of his art. It is only in his painting that 
he expresses himself with lucid eloquence, and here he is con- 
scious and proud of his mastery. 

"The painter who loves his art," Rouault says, "is king in his 
realm, be it Lilliput and he a Lilliputian. From a kitchen maid he 
makes a fairy queen and from a noble lady a brothel keeper, if he 
wishes and if he sees, because he is clairvoyant. He has a window 
to life and to all that the past conceals from the living." 




HOLOCAUST OF AKT tonk place in 19 4-8 when Rouault stulTcil 315 nf his 
painlings into furnace. Later lie said remorsefully. They were my clu'lilren. 



70 



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Borden foods must be good — more 
folks buy food packages carrying 
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A 



i 



BOW-TIED SHIRTS are of ••■••^l<»i>t. broadcloth, cotton shantung, tie -ilk and 
wool iulirii'-. I)c-igner Morton, -landing in kick, alwav.- wear- hou lip- liim-cIC 




NEEDLEPOINT WAISTCOAT form- fancy from of a dress which sells for 
about S5IXI in the I .S. Kmbruiilcry is done lo order by l.nali-li countrywomen. 



Daring Digby 

BRITISH DESIGNER COMES ACROSS 
WITH SOME MALE-INSPIRED STYLES 

Tlir man behind the gaily-colored women's shirt- above is the 
first of Britain's top designers lo invade the U.S. Dighy Mor- 
ton has always seemed the daring and adventuresome type to 
Btay-&t-horfie British couturiers. In 1919 lie took a eolleetion 
lo Paris because U.S. buyer- were by-passing London. Re- 
cently be made a Irip lo thi- Country to step up interest in 
British styling as well a- British fabrics. Be-ides selling some 
striking custom designs, be arranged lo have some ol bis 
suits produced by Philip Mangonc anil was hired by the Hath- 
away Co. lo sly le llieir I-ady Hathaway shirts (those above cost 
$7.9o lo S28.50). Copying the cut of men's shirts. Morion 
has heightened the hues lor women and. u-ing a dizzy array 
of fabrics and patterns, ha- equipped each shirt with a con- 
trasting bow lie. lie has also adapted the male'- Edwardian 

waistcoat (Life, Dec. 1.1) into a Acrid feminine style {left). If 

there areanv mure at home like Digbv. buyers headed for Par- 
is may more and more have to arrange a stopover in London., 



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Color-keyed, interior-exterior 
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You get the "Go" you need for today's 
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Minute Rice is pre-cooked to eliminate work and guesswork. Just 
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Serve Minute Rice alone . . . star it in hundreds of delicious dishes. 
Your cooking's sure to make a hit with Minute Rice! 





JuSf- |£ minutes wi+h Minute Rice.' 



Brilliant way lo turn a scrap of cheese into a family treat— fast 
as 1-2-3! Prepare V,\ cups Minute Rice as directed on package. 
Let stand 10 minutes; add cup grated American cheese, mix- 
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3 tablespoons chopped onion and I clove garlic in drippings until 
tender. Add 2 cans tomato sauce, pinch of basil. Simmer 5 minutes. 
Remove garlic. Arrangecheesericeonsening plate; topvwth sauce, 
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Another quickie! Pineapple Rice Molds — delicious with ham, 
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DARING D1GBY CONTINUED 

A TWEED SLIP-SUIT 





BOX JACKET poes over match- 
ing slip {below) in Digby Morton's 
suit of lightweight Donegal tweed. 



TRICKY TOP with jersey pulled 
diagonally comes with suit, can be 
worn over tweed slip in afternoon. 




TWEED SLIP, the basis of the suit, can also be worn alone as a dress with 
the waist cinched in by a wide leather belt. This makes the suit an all-dav out- 
fit. The jacket and slip will be copied in the U.S. by Philip Mangonc for $165. 



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MICHAEL OF THE WALDORF 



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75 



Con 




Picture /tying is the name pilots give to Hying with omni-mac. Merely 
by watching the pointer the pilot always knows where he is, where he is 
going, and how to get there. All the pilot needs to do is set the course, 
dial the proper VIIF radio station at his destination and turn the plane 
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Bendix OMNI -MAG makes 
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Thia compact Inttrumenl, small enough 
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instantly solves navigation problem* involving 
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jobs and aiding accurate aerial navigation in any 
weuther, this tireless electronic bruin becomes 
a major factor in assuring on-time arrivals. 



'l ite Bendix OMNI-MAG is one of the newer results of the 
continuous Bendix program to ease the load on pilots. As 
planes have hecome bigger, faster and more complex, Ben- 
dix has countered with a long list of electronic muscles and 
brains which not only simplify flight crews' duties, but do 
them faster and more accurately than human minds and 
muscles. The OMNI-MAG is an excellent example, for this 
single instrument— easy to operate as your radio, and easy to 
read as your watch— has literally reduced navigation in the 
United States to as simple a matter as following a pointed 
finger— or guiding a car down the center strip of a highway. 
It has rapidly become one of the most important instruments 
in the cockpit. In fact, so great is the demand by airlines, the 
armed services, and executive plane owners, that facilities for 
building this fine, precision instrument have been expanded. 
The OMNI-MAG is produced by the Bendix* Radio Division, 
one of several Bendix Aviation Corporation divisions devoted 
to forwarding the progress of electronic SCieilCC. *reg.u.s. pat. off. 




Auk any airman why you can confidently 
expect your Bendix* television to give you the 
very apex of performance. He knotcs, because 
virtually every plane that (lies relies on Bendix 
electronic equipment from take off to landing. 



And he will tell you that whether the product 
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television and radio for homes, you can trust 
Bendix Aviation Corporation to build the best. 
That is the only standard this company knows. 



76 



Cop; 



route Wonderland of 




;iy/.\:/:/,o 

l/< ;>.<);•'. A - (ON 



FOR 1953 

BENDIX BRINGS YOU 
THE TRUEST PICTURE IN TELEVISION! 






"TV'S finest union of science and art," 
wonder-struck viewers agree 

With this power-packed new line of 17", 21" and 27" models for 1953, 
Bendix performs a service for television buyers equal to its electronic 
accomplishments in aviation and other important fields. 

In picture perfection, operating ease, freedom from interference, long- 
range, and trouble-free operation, these beautifully styled sets represent 
television's longest step forward— and for this very simple reason: The 
difference in television sets is a difference in engineering— and Bendix 
engineers are the most widely experienced in the electronic field, as just 
one look at the excitingly new Bendix picture will clearly demonstrate. 

Styling presents an equally welcome difference from anything that has 
come before. Here, in compactly designed models at all prices, are the 
beauty of line and finish to match every home decorator's dreams. 

This year get a new thrill from television. Get a Bendix with 6uch ad- 
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77 



Copyi 



LONG EXTRA FANGS IN IRRADIATED RAT'S MOUTH JUT OUT IN FRONT OF THE NORMAL LOWER INCISORS. THEY FAIL TO MEET THE DAMAGED UPPER TEETH 




IRRADIATED RAT GROWS FANGS 

Exposure to X-rays makes animal grow extra pair of front teeth 



NORMAL RAT photographed from below like irrad- 
iated animal al lop has ^in^le pair of lower incisors. 



Whether large numbers of monsters might 
be produced by the radiation from hydrogen 
bombs is a question scientists are as yet un- 
able to answer. But the more they study the 
effects of radiation, the greater grows the list 
of physiological changes they know it can pro- 
duce. A recent addition to the list is shown 
in the portrait of an irradiated rat above. After 
being exposed to a large dose of X-rays in an 
experiment conducted by Navy scientists, the 
rat grew an extra pair of lower front teeth that 



jut like monster's fangs from its misshapen 
jaw. The extra incisors are made of abnormal, 
weakened dentine and enamel. They are use- 
less for chewing, and the X-rays that pro- 
duced them also injured the upper teeth, turn- 
ing them into dull-pointed stubs. 

One result of the experiment: doctors must 
now be sure to use lead shields to give spe- 
cial protection to the teeth of patients, partic- 
ularly children, who are undergoing prolonged 
X-rav treatment for anv disease of the face. 



78 



Cop 



1 




-give 



THINK BETTER! . . . Charles Boyer, Agnes Moorehead, Charles Laughton and Sir Cedric Hardwickc get set 
for their recording of "Don Juan in Hell"— and take a "Coffee-break"! When you have to be alert, have a 
cheerful cup of coffee! Your mind is clearer . . . solutions are nearer . . . when you give yourself a "Coffee-break"! 



yourself 
a 

C&ffee-break ! 





WORK BETTER I . . . The recording engineers get ready for 
the record — with a fragrant cup of coffee! Coffee's gentle 
stimulation is your cue for better work. You'll help effi- 
ciency, feel less tired . . . when you take a "Coffcc-brcak"! 



FEEL BETTER ! . . . Good records, good company, good cof- 
fee! Whatever you're doing, a delicious cup of full-strength 
coffee adds to the pleasure. At home, at work or in your 
favorite restaurant — give yourself a "Coffee- break"! 01953 



Coffee always gives you a break! 



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< 



In Next Week's Issue 



Part II 



The World 
We Live In 



T 

1_IIE second article in Life's unique series, "The World 
We Live In." will appear in next week * issue. In 2(1 pages 
I.lFKs editors will explore lor you the waters that envelop the 
earth. Specially rommissioned, scientifically lailhlul paint- 
iiiL's. maps and color photographs will show you the sea and 
main of it- hidden secrets. The lucid and moving prose ol 
Lincoln Harnett will tell vou the story of the sea. as it was in 
the beginning, as it has grown and changed the lace ol the 
earth, as it moves and govern.-- all life on the earth today. 

\\ hen LlFE launched its new science series in tin- issue 
of Dec. !i with The Earth Is Born." we hoped our readers 
would enjoy a word-and-picture venture into the fascinating 
world in which we live. We were overwhelmed hv tin 1 epiick 
and glowing response the lirst essay brought from our readers. 
Here are a lew comments from experts and laymen: 

"Enthusiastic congratulations for a noteworthy article. Seldom does a 
nontechnical magazine eomhine successfully, as you have done, reader in- 
tercut with scientific soundness." — L. H. Adam-. Retired Director. Geo- 
phv-ical I^iUiralorv . Garnegic Institution of Washington. 

"I was particularly intere-ted. and pleased, with the iulen-e enthusiasm 
with which my l.Vvear-old daughter digested the -tor v." — Geologist Che-ler 
I). Whorton. Wcll-ville, N.Y. 

" The -uperh manner in which vou have |irc-euterl (hi- snhject doe- much 
to create intere-t and. more important, a desire to await the next in-tahnciit." 
— A. I - .. Alexander. \— i-tanl treasurer, Tiffanv & Go.. New York, N.Y. 

"The lie-l writing I have found in your magazine, or ariv oilier, in a 
long, long time." — A. I.. Strand. President. Oregon State College. 

"The line-l pre-cntation of hi-torical geologv that ha- e\er 1m-cii puh- 
lished h\ a popular magazine. — Donald J. \lac\eil. Head. Department of 
Geologv. St. Francis Xavier University. 




LIFE 

y 



THE WORLD WE LIVE IN: 
MIRACLE OF THE SEA 




"If Tlif Karth is Born* i- ji sample of what the rest is to \*c. Life will 
haw established a new mark in top-notch journalistic reporting ol scientific 
subjects. — Garald G. Parker, Senior Geologist, Geological Survey. U.S. 
Department of the Interior. 

"When I starlet! reading the first article. I found I couldn't nut the 
magazine down until I had finished it word for word. — Mr*. William 
Korlf. Ulue Spruce Farm. Wadsworth. III. 

"\ our new science series is a triumph of collaborative journalism, which 
I 'j inn- a ma-lerlul arrangement ot words into \ital interaction with visual 
impressions." — Arnold Gesell. Gesell Institute ol Ghild Development. 



"I am 
grows up 



-aving the entire series for my 3-ycar-old son to reail when he 
' — Mrs. Eugene Pelot. Hammond, Ind. 



" 'The Karth is Born' was a monumental undertaking, ami I am en- 
thusia-tir ahout the results. \ou have perl orr net) a very valuable public 
service."— I,eo Goldl>crg. Director. Observatory. Iniversily of Michigan. 

"A magnificent presentation and sets a new standard, even lor Life.* 1 — 
Geologist K. DeGolyer. Dallas, Tevas. 

"It is refreshing in these davs when so much space in current magazines 
i- being given to what one might call futuristic science or science fiction 

I" see so - I a popularization "I established science.' Vstronomer and 

Gcophy-icist Harlan T. Stelson. 

"I have read it twice — which is more of a tribute than I pay to most 
magazine articles. In some way. hard to define. The harth is Born en- 
riched my conception of God.'*— The Kt. Be\. Lewis Bli-s \\ hiltemore, 
D.D.. Bi-hop. Diocese of Western Michigan. 

To the readers quoted above, and to the hundreds and 
hundreds of other readers who have been so generous in 
their praise of this new science series, our sincere thanks. 
\\ e believe they will find next weeks essay. " The Miracle 
of the Sea," as rewarding as the first. 

Axdkkw Hklskkll. Publisher 



81 




A Comeback 
for Big Families 

TWO SETS OF COLLEGE-EDUCATED AMERICAN PARENTS 
HELP TO REVERSE A WORRISOME POPULATION TREND 



FHOrO<iK\PH£D tOR LIFE BY GORDON PARKS 



FROM FAMILY'S EVERY-OTHER-DAY MILK SUPPLY 



Silting on the hack sloop nf his parents' home 
Snitching a drink from the IS quart* of milk 
which arc to nourish his hrolhers anil sisters 
as well as himself, 3-year-old David Perkins 
looks like anything hut a significant index of 
population trends. Yet. in a sense, that is what 
he is. David is the seventh child in his family, 
and there is still another after him. 

Fifteen vears ago population experts would 
have regarded the hov. ami most of his hrolh- 
ers and sisters, as improhahle. Experts were 
sure that higher-educated U.S. citizen- were 
engaging in race suicide hv permitting their 
hirth rate to fall, (lollege-trained professionals 
and the white-collar class appeared to feel they 
had fulfilled their obligation in reproducing 
tin' species if they spawned a child or two. 

They were not tile only ones worrying the 
population experts, for the over-all U.S. hirth 
rate was steadily dropping. Rut they were the 



82 



Copyrighted material 






THE SEVEN YOUNGS arrange thcm-el\es for a portrait in pine-paneled liv- 
ing room of Pemwlale, Pa. home. At top with lather Honk. 32, is Janette, 8. Mrs. 
Young, 31. holds Jeffrey. 1!. who is busy jiggling a string of pearls. At Iter 
shoulder* are Harry. I {left), ami Stephen. 7. Right foreground is Johnny, 6. 



DAVID PERKINS, 3, HELPS SELF TO A GLASSFUL 



worst offenders. Now the general birth rate dc- 
cline seems to be cheeked (.see graphs, p, *f'J). 
and with college-educated parents a large fam- 
ily is no less fashionable than in grandma's 
time. Two such families—especially big — are 
the Hank \ oungs of Pennsdale, Pa. (top, rig/it) 
ami the W illiam Perkinses of Joplin. \lo. (bot- 
tom, right), whose homes bulge with children. 

The lour parents all have been to college, 
but this has not inhibited their desire for chit* 
dren. The Youngs live in a modern house in a 
country town of about 2<M> population, and 
the Perkinses in an old-fashioned house in a 
city of 38.711 population. Financially neither 
family is more than middle class, but no one 
babble- about how little there i-. or how tbev 
have to scrimp. More than most families, they 
enjoy life with all its problems. Some of the 
reason! why none of them would trade il 
for any other kind are shown on these pages. 




THE TEN PERKINSES crowd together SO portrait ran Ik.* taken in their Jop- 
lin. Mo. living room. Top are Judy. 1">. and Charles. 17. Second row, father 
Hill. 15, hold- I)a\id. 3: mother Phoebe \rme. 36. holds Douglas. 2'1 months, 
on her lap. Right is Mark. 6. At bottom are Tommy, 10, Penny, 8, Phillip, 13. 



CONTINUED ON NEXT PACE 83 



Copyrighted material 




THE PERKINS PLATOON 

In Joplin, all live together in a one-bathroom house 

IN FORMATION, the .en Perkins-, leave house With A hUQ^ hOlM frCCZCr 311(1 an C i (jll t - b U I' II C I' StOVC 

to go for a Sunday ride in the family Station wagon. 




MORNING RUSH in family's only bathroom finds 
Judv brushing teeth, Charles shaving. Penny and 



Tommy combing their hair. Phillip washing, Mark 
plaving with a shoehorn. David watching all the fun. 




FIXING DINNER, which will lie cooked on fam- 
ily's out>ized stove, Mrs. Perkins' mother withstands 



assistance from Pcnnv. In the background, Phoebe 
Anne digs into the huge 23-cubic-foot home freezer. 




AT MEALTIME the family divides into two groups, 
older members at table in rear, younger ones in fore- 



ground. Each table is equipped with large revolv- 
ing trays so no one has to reach very far for food. 



84 



GYM ON WHICH PENNY AND MARK SWING HELPS WORK OFF KIOS' ENERGIES - 




Phoebe Anne Perkins, an only child, always wanted a big family. This was 
line w ith Bill, though his idea of "big" was tw o or three children. Both he 
and Phoebe Anne are relaxed and easygoing. The children do not get on 
their nerves and they have never spanked any of them. 

The Perkinses live in a big, old-fashioned house with four bedrooms, 
and one bathroom, 12 blocks from the center of Joplin. Phoebe Anne has 
no regular servants, only an occasional cleaning woman and somebody to 
do most of the ironing. The washing machine runs three or four washings 
a day and the stove, which has eight burners, three broilers and tw o ovens, 




works overtime too. The six oldest children draw jobs out of a bat each 
Saturday so that no child gets stuck with the same job all the time. 

The Perkinses' biggest expense is food, which used to total 8400 a 
month to account for 14' i of their yearly expenditures. With their new 
home freezer Bill figures they will cut costs by '20' "< or more. The chil- 
dren usually wear out their school clothes but band dow n their coals and 
best suits. Bill, who is manager of the Joplin branch of I.B.M. and has 
been with the company for 24 years, wants all the children to go to college, 
but he says it w ill not be possible unless they earn part of the expenses. 




HELPFUL, despite fad that he i- not yet given ail) assigned I sehold duties, 

David undertake- lit wash the family ear. He also like;- In sweep the kitchen* 




BARBERSHOP VISIT l.v the live oldest Perkins boys ff>r their bi-weekl) hair 
trimming tills all available chair- al Guirtlinu-c Simp nt t^lareme Spain (Irfl). 



CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE 85 




UNDER DRYER al beauty salon where her liair 
is done weekly. Phnelrt" Anne catches up on reading. 




UNDER SPELL of jive. Charles keep- record play- 
er in his bedroom playing music almost constantly. 





MOTHER (REAR) AND JUDY REHEARSE SCENE FOR "THE HEIRESS" GIVEN AT JOPLIN LITTLE THEATER 

Dramatics, dressing up and no drudgery 



Bill Perkins boasts that Phoebe Anne has never 
become a drudge. She belongs to the Woman's 
Club, takes art lessons one night a week, acts 
with the Joplin Little Theater. She anil Bill 
belong to a bridge club and the country club 
where they go for dances, dinner parlies. 

Every Sunday some of the family, but sel- 
dom all of them, attend the First Presbyterian 
Church. Charles. 17. boxes on the town team, 
and he earns money summers working in filling 



stations, digging ditches for state highway de- 
partment. Judy, 15, a Joplin belle called "whis- 
tle bait' 1 by her brothers, is an honor student 
and a bookworm. For two summers she has had 
a morning nursery school called Judv's Story 
Hour, charges SI. 25 a week for each child. Phil- 
lip, 13, loves hunting, is a crack shot. Tommy, 
10. takes singing lessons, likes to fish. Penny, 
fi. takes piano lessons ami goes around the 
house with shoes off, practicing ballet sleps. 





UNDER WRAPS, in privacy of parents' bedroom, 
Judy engage- in telephone conversation with friend. 



BREAKFAST IN BED, brought to »ifc by Bill, 
allows her to mi-s the furor of mosl early mornings. 



DRESSED UP, Phoebe Anne and Bill kenler) 
dance al weekly party at Twin Hills Country Club. 



86 



Copyi 




Copyrighted materia 



YOUNG YOUNGS 

They've had five children in 10 years, 
live well but don't try to be stylish 



The Henry Youngs got married when both were 22 and now, 10 years lat- 
er, have five children, their own house and business in Pennsdale, Pa. 
When he came out of the Air Force in 1945, Hank went to work for a 
machinery manufacturer, started his own machinery business a year and 
a half later. In 1947 his business grossed $110; in 1952 it was $150,000. 

The Youngs live in a $16,000 house with four bedrooms, two baths, 
which Hank designed, helped build. Their furniture is mostly hand-me- 
downs from Hank's parents. "When you have live children,'' May says, 
"you might as well not try to be stylish." The house is easy to take care 




ENTANGLEMENT in apron frustrates Harry as he tries to don coverall made 
by mother for the children to wear while eating and thus cut down on laundry. 





















































ft 


| 




HOMEMADE HOT ROD, still in beginning stage, is a business venture for 
Hank but the source of great pleasure for the youngsters, who clamber over it in 




LESSON ABOUT LAMB is given to Harry {fore- 
ground) and Jeffrey before May puts it in freezer. 



88 




FAVORITE BREAD, made of oatmeal dough, is 
baked weekly by May particularly to please Hank. 



CHILDREN AMUSE THEMSELVES WHILE PARENTS PONDER FAMILY BILLS IN KITCHEN 



of. Ma v - chief aids arc a dishwasher, an X-pouinl washing machine (she 
loads il every day), chillies dryer and a portable ironer (she never irons 
sheets). They get a sitter in once or W ice a week- three limes if I hen- i- 
a IT A meeting. A neighbor comes on Fridays to wax floors, change beds. 
As with the Perkinses, food is the biggest expense ( Jothes COS) about f 10 
a month for the family. "We live in the country and don I have to dress 
up often." May say s. They belong to a country club, play bridge, subscribe 
to the symphony in \\ illianisporl and in summer go regularly to a nearby 
slock thcaler which concentrates on plays by Moliere, [been and Shaw. 




YOUNGS' HOME, designed hy Hank wlio also supervised construction, has 
sleeping tpiarlers for boy* at one end (right), ''apartment" for daughter anil selves. 




the basemen! garage with cries of "Let me steer now' and "I want to pump too." 
To co\cr this chassis and minor, rebuilt from an old car. Hank's shop crew- 



is building a reinforced plastic body. When the first car is finished. Hank 
hope- lo use il as a model wild which in gel order' from -ports car enthusiasts. 





RESTING BRIEFLY between chore-. Ma> basks in sun on terrace. In back- 
ground, onlv .>() vards away, i- Hank? plant which -oon i- to he expanded. 



CONTINUED ON NEXT PACE 89 



Copyrighted materia 





WAITING FOR SCHOOL BUS across the road old hunting lirense pinned to coat — and Stevie 
from their house. Jannie, Johnny — with his father's munch fruit they were supposed to save for recess. 



fl 





A CONSCIENTIOUS CITIZEN, Hank {second 
from left) presides over the school board meeting. 



'Thought we should 
have a few boys too' 



Mrs. Young says she and Hank did not exaclly 
plan a large family. Jannie, iheir oldest child, 
is a girl. ' Then we thought we should have a 
few hoys around too." May thinks it is easier 
to have a hig family when they are all nearly 
the same age. " For one thing, they can all he 
tucked ill bed in one shift. Malik adds that 
they have never had any jealousy problem 
about a new babv. ' The children have always 
been too small to know another baby was 
here." He tries Dot to favur one child over an- 
other. "If I tickle one, I try to tickle them all." 

Neither Mr. nor Mrs. Young believes in lots 
of toys. They have one bike, one tractor, one 
scooter for the five. Hank bought boxing gloves 
for the boys, says he was a sissy when young, 
wants his kids to be tough. Fighting among the 
children is not allowed. If one gets ornerv, he is 
sent to bed until "he feels better/ "With five 
kids," Hank says, "we have to have >ome dis- 
cipline. We don't want them to run the house." 
The three older children go regularly to Sunday 
school at an Episcopal church, but the parents 
attend irregularly because it is difficult to get a 
Sunday morning baby sitter. The Youngs might 
like more children but aren I sure because big 
families are so expensive and ihev will be even 
more expensive when thev are readv for col- 
lege. When Hank goes to business conventions 
his friends always greet him with: "How manv 
kids have you got this year?" This is the onlv 
thing about his big family that bores Hank. 




THE NEIGHBORS' CHILDREN come in to join 
the Youngs w hen Hank shows movies. In addition 



to making his own home movies he often rents cow- 
boy films for these jam-packed, squeal-filled sessions. 



PRAYERS END DAY at 7:30 for older children. 
Jannie joins older brothers in their room for ritual. 



AT BEDTIME, children may read. Johnnv (top) . 
and Stcvie do, but little Harry plays with his toes. 



90 



Copyrighted material 




Copyrighted material 



FOUND 




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92 



The trends in U.S. families 




BIRTHS AND MARRIAGES in the I .S. over the past six decades, figured 
in number per thousand population (figures at left), are shown in this chart. 
The decline in birth rate began even before 1890, brought Oil by the flight 
of young people front farm to city, increasing jobs for women and bv growing 
availability ol birtli control knowledge. (Dotted line indicates estimated fig- 
ure-: -olid lines, official statistics.) World War I had the characteristic effect 
of any war — a sharp decline in birth rate as men went away, a quick climb as 
they came hack. The high prosperity of the '20s oddly accentuated birth 
rate decline because of the intensely competitive working life and sophis- 
ticated social outlook id the time. The rate dropped further during the de- 
pression, picked up in the early war years, zoomed to a 1947 high, seems to 
be leveling off. The marriage rate has slowly risen, its big peaks and dips 
preceding birth rate [teaks and dips by just about a year. One reason for 
relatively high recent marriage rales has been earlier average marriage age. 
Another is increase in divorces which mure often now mean remarriages. 




FAMILY SI2E since 1920 is shown in chart giving first, second, third, 
fourth, filth, sixth and seventh children born in I .S. (per thousand native 
white women aged 15-44). Largest increase is in first anil second babies, but 
there has been significant rise in third children, slow steady rise in fourth. 
Five-child family just holds its own while the very large ones slowly decline. 



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Co 



aterial 



THEATER 



Four Colonels 
W>o a Beauty 



COLONELS wait In 
be led by the Wicked 
Fairy (Re\ Harrison) 
to Sleeping Beauty. 



THEIR LOVE (Lilli 
Palmer) wakes up for 
each colonel, becomes 
ideal woman for him. 




\F.\Y COMKDY SPOOKS Till. SK1H CTIO.N TKCIIMOl E OK KOI \\ COLM IUKS 



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a London bit and has now opened on Broad- 
way. Written by England's cleverest young 
actor-playwright, Peter Ustinoi [p, KH). Four 

Colonels has Lilli 1'almer and Rex Harrison 
each playing live roles. In a cbaradelike series 



of scenes it tolls how four army officers from 
four countries reveal their national foibles by 
wooing the Sleeping Beauty. Though spun out 
like a long afterdinner joke, the plav is kept 
sparkling most of the time by Harrison, acting 
a had fairy who in various disguises tries to gel 
ili. Sleeping Beautv -educed, and !.v Palmer 
acting, as anybody should gue--. [he Beauty. 



CONTINUEO ON NEXT PAGE 95 



Copyrighted material 



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96 



OTTUMWA, IOWA 



SIOUX FALLS, S. D. 



'FOUR COLONELS' 



CONTINUED 




IlOW A FRENCHMAN LOVES 

The Frenchman (right) is fir*! of four colonels to woo the Beauty. Like the 
three others, he is permitted to see her in the period of history in which he 
feels most at home. He chooses to become a courtier m 17<H* trying to per- 
suade a ladv lo he his new mistress. YMien lie finds she is not married, the con- 
quest seems dull to him, so Harrison as the Wicked Fairy appears in the guise 
of the girl s gOUty old husband (above), thus encouraging the Frenchman to 
enjoy the traditional Gallic delight of stealing another man s w ife. The seduc- 
tion is foiled by a Good Fairy who turns up as Frenchman's oldtime mistress. 




THE KOU) \\\\) BRITISHER 

The conservative ant! polite English colonel imagines himself transformed 
into an extrovert Elizabethan called Desmonio who tries to rob the lady of 
her chaslitv. Speaking ID a parody of Shakesjvearean \er>e. Desmonio bellows 
ferociously at Ins reluctant lady and assures her that he i> a geographic 
of rivers red/ Which break their banks and rush for thee/ In one cascading 
tide." But Desmonio also gives in to the purifying influence of the Good 
Fairy who appears suddenly as an lllyrian nun. He remembers that years 
ago he seduced her, and now the nun turns out to be Beauty's mother. 

CONTINUED ON PAGE S3 



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98 




'FOUR COLONELS' CONTINUED 




A SOULFUL RUSSIAN LOVE 

The Russian colonel, an anient Communist, choose? to retreat to the peaceful 
days of the czars. Decked out in imperial finery, lie sit> stolidlv in a garden 
swing and knit-, while his ignored sweetheart occupies her-elf with a game 
of croquet. In the style of the Chekhov drama, there is mournful conversation 
about tree> being chopped down to clear the land, and an olfslage gun keeps 
going oil" as melancholy L nele Mischa tries to shoot himself. The W ic ked 
Fairy {above) totters on to urge the colonel In seduce his little croquet plaver. 
but the colonel succumbs to virtue and decides just to sit, knit and suing. 




THE ZEALOUS AMERICAN 

The American colonel, burning with idealism and missionary zeal, imagines 
him.-ell as a battling clergyman in a cheap nightclub trying to save the soul 
of a beautiful harlot. (\\p runs a farm for fallen women called Girls* Town.) 
She gives him a cold shoulder until he defends her in a fi--t fight with a 
gang-ter. and then agree- to become Ins sweetheart. But the affair peters out 
as the Good Fairy appears, this time as a woman psychiatrist who informs the 
girl that the clergyman is in love with her only because she represents "the 
mother image/ The play ends with nobody defiling the Sleeping Beauty. 

CONTINUED ON PAGE 101 




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TOUR COLONELS" continued 




AS THE STAR of his own play, Ustinov plays the Wicked Fairy in London's 
production of Four Colonels. Here he appears as the fop in the boudoir scene. 



UNQUENCHABLE USTINOV 

Until now Peter Ustinov, who wrote The Love of Four Colonels, has 
been known in the U.S. only for his performance as Nero in Quo 
Vadis. But for 10 years in England Ustinov has remained, disturb- 
ingly, a kind of perennial prodigy. When he was 21, Ustinov's first 
play, House of Regrets, was compared to the dramas of Chekhov. 
Since then he has come up with six more plays and two books; he 
has directed or played in half a dozen films, acted in two plays by 
other authors and even made a phonograph record in which he 
alone imitates a male quartette and full orchestra. The only con- 
spicuous failure in his life has been bis inability to play the flute 
because of an unusually protrudent upper lip. 

Physically Ustinov protrudes in almost all directions. He is wit- 
ty, hard working, gifted, but he is anything but prepossessing. Born 
in England of a Russian journalist father and a French painter 
mother, Ustinov had no patience with schooling, at 18 was acting 
in London revues and for five years was miscast as a private in the 
Royal Sussex Regiment, managing to write three plays and a movie 
while in service. A superb and relentless storyteller, Ustinov can, 
and does, collar anyone anywhere and make him laugh. Profession- 
ally this may be his greatest handicap. For all his lively imagina- 
tion, which is one of the freshest things in the theater today, Usti- 
nov is a worry to his friends, who are afraid that he may be ne more 
than a brilliant vaudevillian — a man loo smart for his own good. 




IN HIS HOME, a cottage where the great actress Ellen Terry once lived, 
Ustinov is visited by his parents. Married and divorced, he has a daughter, 7. 



HE 

makes 
the 

difference 





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Tie KlipS2.50, 
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The Set $6.00. 



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101 

Copyrighted material 




FALSE EYELASHES come off in theater dress- 
ing room. Tina left on the rest of her stage make-up. 







SHE MIXES BACKSTAGE 
AND GRAND BALLROOM 

Tina Myers started out the evening as one of 
the 15 chorus girls in the Bette Davis Broad- 
way show. Twos Company. She got through 
her sketch in which she speaks two lines and 
then, being excused from the last two num- 
bers, ran to her dressing room to don a white, 
wide-skirted gown and go off to a cotillion. 
For Tina, 18, and the daughter of a wealthy 
New York manufacturer, was about to make 
her debut in society one week after her debut 
in the professional theater. 

There were 1 1 1 debutantes coming out with 
Tina at the W aldorf Astoria. They were all 
greeted with polite applause as they curtsied. 
But when Tina appeared she was met by a 
storm of gasps and wolf whistles. She danced 
out the night in conventionally romantic style, 
then, next night, in a gaudy South Sea skirt, 
was back for a hula number on the chorus line. 




TINA^S BALL DRESS gets zipped up by her per- 
sonal dresser, a luxury provided her by ber family. 



102 




CARD in flowers from family friends gets read to 
chums: ''This is your night. Make llie most of it." 



FOLK ESCORTS WHO WAI1 Kl> FOR TINA AT STACK DOOR ESCORT IIKR INTO WALDORF 



MISCELLANY 




WINTER MAKES A SELF-PORTRAIT 



John Winter, a piano teacher at Kentucky's 
Murray State College, was in his hack yard 
after an eight-inch snow when he noticed that 
a wheel of his trailer hail been decorated with 
a strange pattern. To Amateur Photographer 
Winter the snow-coated wheel looked like the 
face of an old man complete with upswept 



snowy mustache ami downswept snowy heard. 
He took a picture of it, and, sure enough, his 
friends took one look and said. Whv that's 
Old Man Winter." This makes Mr. Winter 
very proud, hut he is getting tired of his friends 
looking at him archly and adding* "Of course, 
you know which Old Man Winter I mean." 



104 



Copy rig 




Co 




"Situation 
well in hand" 

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