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ALUMNI-FOUNDATION 

EVENTCENTER 



North Carolina Agricultural and 
Technical State University 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/bulletinofagricu88nort 



UNDERGRADUATE BULLETIN OF 
NORTH CAROLINA 

AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL 
STATE UNIVERSITY 

July 2006 

UNDERGRADUATE BULLETIN OF NORTH CAROLINA 
AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY 

NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY 
1601 East Market Street, Greensboro, North Carolina 2741 1 

This Bulletin is also available on the world wide web at 
www.ncat.edu/bulletin/ 






Undergraduate Bulletin 

of 

NORTH CAROLINA 

AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL 

STATE UNIVERSITY 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 

2006 - 2008 



II 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

University Calendars: 2006 - 2007 and 2007 - 2008 VI-IX 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Historical Statement 1 

Mission, Purpose and Goals of the University 2 

Policy Governing Programs and Course Offerings 3 

Nondiscrimination Policy and Integration Statement 3 

The University of North Carolina 4 

Organization of the University 5 

Governance of North Carolina Agricultural and 

Technical State University 5 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University 

Board of Trustees 6 

Officers of Administration of North Carolina Agricultural and 

Technical State University 6 

Location of the University 8 

Facilities 8 

Schools, College, Programs, and Offices 9 

Accreditation and Institutional Memberships 9 

The Office of International Programs 11 

The Honors Program 11 

Academic Degree Programs 12 

Ferdinand D. Bluford Library 16 

Educational Support Centers 16 

Office of Summer Sessions and Outreach 16 

The Center for Distance Learning 17 

The Division of Information Technology and Telecommunication Services 17 

The Center for Student Success 19 

Waste Management Institute 20 

The Division of Development and University Relations 20 

Division of Research 20 

Auxiliary Services 20 

University Bookstore 21 

Aggie C-Store 21 

AggieONEcard 21 

Food Service 21 

Ticket Office 22 

Mail Center 22 

STUDENT LIFE 

Student Development Services 23 

Counseling Services 23 

Health Services 24 

Drug and Alcohol Education Policy 25 

Food Services 29 

Housing and Residence Life 29 

Memorial Student Union 30 

Student Organizations and Activities 30 

Aggie Pride Compact 30 

Student Conduct 31 

III 



Computer Use Policy Statement 31 

Veteran Affairs 32 

Disability Support Services 32 

Office of Career Services 32 

Multicultural Student Center 35 

International Students and Scholars Office 35 

EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 

General Information 37 

Required Deposits, Charges and Fees 38 

Audit of Courses 40 

Registration for Thesis Courses 40 

Refunds and Repayments for Withdrawals 41 

Withdrawal from Courses 42 

Student Financial Aid 46 

ADMISSIONS 

Policy 55 

Procedures 55 

Admission Criteria 56 

Admission-Freshman 56 

Admission-Transfer 57 

Admission-Special Students 58 

Admission-International Students 58 

Regulations for Veterans and Children of Deceased and Disabled Veterans 59 

Admission-Graduate School 59 

Admission-Continuing Education 60 

Residence Status for Tuition Purposes 60 

ACADEMIC INFORMATION AND REGULATIONS 

Advanced Placement 63 

Courses of Study 65 

Declaration of Major 65 

Registration 65 

Official Registration 65 

Late Registration 65 

Auditors , 65 

Course Load 65 

Double Major 66 

Prerequisites 66 

Repetition of Courses 66 

General Education Requirements of the University 66 

Course Credit by Examination 67 

Grading System 68 

Normal Credit Load 68 

Minimum Academic Requirements for Continued Enrollment 68 

Academic Warning 69 

Academic Probation/Suspension 69 

Academic Dismissal Appeals 70 

Veterans and Persons Eligible for Veterans Benefits 70 

Quality Points 70 

Grade Point Average 70 

Course Number and Classification 70 

IV 



Course Scheduling 70 

Classification of Students 70 

Change of Grade 71 

Grade Appeal 71 

Changes in Schedule 71 

Changing Schools/Colleges 71 

Withdrawal from the University 71 

Readmission of Former Students 71 

Five Year Readmission Policy 72 

Incompletes 72 

Semester Examinations 72 

Honor Roll 73 

Class Attendance Policy 73 

Policy on Make-Up of Required Course Work 73 

General Requirements for Graduation 74 

Graduating with Honors 75 

Commencement Participation 75 

Graduating Under a Given Catalogue 75 

Second Baccalaureate Degree 76 

Grades 76 

Privacy of Student Records 76 

Access to Student Records 76 

Change of Name and Address 77 

Transcripts of Records 77 

Indebtedness to the University 77 

Plan to Improve Graduation Rates 77 

Academic Dishonesty Policy 78 

Student Appeals on Academic Dishonesty 79 

Disruptive Behavior in the Classroom 79 

SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 81 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 143 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS 350 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 392 

SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY 424 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 483 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 572 

UNIVERSITY STUDIES PROGRAM 586 

THE CENTER FOR STUDENT SUCCESS 594 

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE 596 

DEPARTMENT OF AEROSPACE STUDIES 601 

WASTE MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE 605 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 606 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY - F D. BLUFORD LIBRARY 610 

INDEX 612 



NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY 
2006 - 2008 UNIVERSITY ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



FALL SEMESTER 2006 

August 4 - Friday 
August 16 - Wednesday 
August 17 - Thursday 
August 17-18 -Thursday-Friday 

August 18 -Friday 

August 18-20 -Friday-Sunday 
August 19 - Saturday 

August 21 - Monday 



August 25 - Friday 



September 4 - Monday 
September 15-17 - Friday-Sunday 

September 23 - Saturday 
September 25 - Monday 

October 9-10 - Monday-Tuesday 
October 16-20 - Monday-Friday 
October 18 - Wednesday 
October 19 - Thursday 
October 21 - Saturday 
October 27 - Friday 

October 31 - Tuesday 
November 3 - Friday 
November 6 - Monday 



November 7 - Tuesday 

November 22 -Wednesday 
November 27 - Monday 
December 1 - Friday 
December 5 - Tuesday 
December 6 - Wednesday 
December 7-13 - Thurs.-Wed. 
December 15 - Friday 

December 16 - Saturday 



Tuition, Fees, Room and Board Due 

Faculty Institute - Faculty Report 

Graduate Research and Teaching Assistant Training 

New Students Report for Fall 

(Residence Halls Open 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.) 

Graduate Student Orientation 

Registration for Continuing Students 

Welcome Program for New and Transfer Students 

Continuing Students Report 

(Residence Halls Open 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.) 

Classes Begin 

Late Registration Begins ($50 late fee) 

Last Day to Apply for Fall Graduation (Graduate Students) 

Last Day to Add or Audit a Course 

Last Day to Drop and Receive Financial Credit 

Last Day to Apply for Fall Graduation (Undergraduate Students) 

Late Registration Ends (Includes Tuition Waivers) 

Last Day to Receive Book Allowance 

University Holiday (Labor Day) 

NC A&T SU Family Weekend (NC A&T vs. Hampton 

University) 

University Day 

Deadline to Remove Incomplete(s) Received Spring and 

Summer 2006 

Fall Break 

Final Comprehensive Exam Week (Graduate Students) 

Mid-term Grades Due 

Founder's Day (Classes Suspended 3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 

Homecoming 

Deadline to Apply for Certificate in Entrepreneurship 

Deadline to Apply for Certificate in Waste Management 

Last Day to Drop a Course without a Grade Evaluation 

Last Day to Defend Thesis/Dissertation 

Advisement and Registration for the Spring 2007 Semester 

Defended and Approved Thesis/Dissertation Due in Graduate 

School Office 

Last Day to Withdraw from the University without a Grade 

Evaluation 

Thanksgiving Holiday Begins 7:00 a.m. 

Thanksgiving Holiday Ends 7:00 a.m. 

Applications for Spring 2007 Due to the Admissions Office 

Classes End 

Reading Day 

Final Exam Week 

Residence Halls Close for Non-Graduating Students at 12 noon 

Waste Management Certificate Ceremony 

Commencement 

Residence Halls Close for Graduating Seniors 7:00 p.m. 



VI 



NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY 
2006 - 2008 UNIVERSITY ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



SPRING SEMESTER 2007 

January 2 - Tuesday 

January 4 - Thursday 



January 4-5 - Thursday-Friday 
January 5 - Friday 
January 8 - Monday 



January 12 - Friday 



January 15 - Monday 
January 26 - Friday 
February 16 - Friday 
February 28 - Wednesday 

March 3 - Saturday 

March 5-9 - Monday-Friday 

March 1 1 - Sunday 

March 12-16 - Monday-Friday 

March 22 - Thursday 

March 28 - Wednesday 
April 2-6 - Monday-Friday 
April 2 - Monday 

April 5 - Thursday 
April 6 - Friday 
April 9 - Monday 

April 1 1 - Wednesday 

April 27 - Friday 

May 1 - Tuesday 

May 2 - Wednesday 

May 3-9 - Thursday- Wednesday 

May 10 -Thursday 

May 1 1 - Friday 

May 12 -Saturday 



New Year's Resolution Party 

Tuition, Fees, Room and Board Due 

New Students in Residence Halls Report (Residence Halls Open 

9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.) 

Faculty Report 

Graduate Student Orientation 

Orientation, Advisement and Registration for New Students 

Graduate Research and Teaching Assistant Training 

Classes Begin 

Late Registration Begins ($50 Late Fee) 

Last Day to Apply for Spring Graduation (Graduate Students) 

Last Day to Add or Audit a Course 

Last Day to Drop and Receive Financial Credit 

Last Day to Apply for Spring Graduation (Undergraduates) 

Last Day to Receive Book Allowance 

Late Registration Ends (Including Tuition Waivers) 

University Holiday (Martin Luther King, Jr.) 

Ronald E. McNair Memorial Day 

Deadline to Remove Incomplete(s) Received Fall 2006 

Deadline to Apply For Certificates in Entrepreneurship and 

Waste Management 

Residence Halls Close at 1 :00 p.m. 

Spring Break 

Residence Halls Re-Open 9:00 a.m. 

Final Comprehensive Exam Week (Graduate Students) 

Honor's Convocation (Classes are Suspended from 3:00 p.m. - 

5:00 p.m.) 

Last Day to Drop a Course without a Grade Evaluation 

Graduate Student Appreciation Week 

Advisement and Registration for the Fall 2007 Semester 

Early Summer School Registration Begins 

Last Day to Defend Thesis/Dissertation 

University Holiday (Good Friday) 

Defended and Approved Thesis/Dissertation Due in Graduate 

School Office 

Last Day to Withdraw from the University without a Grade 

Evaluation 

Thesis/Dissertation Print Copies for Binding Due in Graduate 

School Office 

Classes End 

Reading Day 

Final Exam Week 

Residence Halls Close for Non-Graduating Students 12 noon 

Waste Management Certificate Ceremony 

Grades Due by 3:00 p.m. 

Commencement 

Residence Halls Close for Graduating Seniors 7:00 p.m. 



VII 



NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY 
2006 - 2008 UNIVERSITY ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



FALL SEMESTER 2007 

August 16 - Thursday 

August 17 -Friday 



August 18 - Saturday 

August 18-1 9 -Sat.-Sun. 
August 20 - Monday 

August 24 - Friday 



September 3 - Monday 
September 24 - Monday 

September 28 - Friday 

October 8-9 - Monday-Tuesday 
October 13 - Saturday 
October 17 -Wednesday 
October 1 8 - Thursday 
November 2 - Friday 
November 5 - Monday 
November 9 - Friday 

November 2 1 - Wednesday 
November 26 - Monday 
December 6 - Thursday 
December 7 - Friday 
December 8-14 - Sat.-Fri. 
December 14 - Friday 



December 15 - Saturday 



Residence Halls open (9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.) for 

New Students who attended June '07 New Student Orientation 

Residence Halls open (9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.) for 

New Students who DID NOT attended June '07 New Student 

Orientation 

Registration for Continuing Students 

Residence Halls open (9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.) for Continuing 

Students 

Welcome Program for New Students and Transfer Students 

CLASSES BEGIN 

Late Registration Begins ($50.00 late fee) 

Last Day to Add or Audit a Course 

Last Day to Drop and Receive Financial Credit 

Last Day to Apply for Fall Graduation-(Undergraduate students) 

Late Registration Ends (Includes Tuition Waivers) 

Last Day to Receive Book Allowance 

UNIVERSITY HOLIDAY (Labor Day) 

Deadline to remove Incomplete(s) received Spring and 

Summer 2007 

Deadline to Apply for Certificate in Entrepreneurship 

Deadline to Apply for Certificate in Waste Management 

FALL BREAK 

HOMECOMING 

Mid-Term Grades Due 

Founder's Day (Classes Suspended 10:00 am - 12:00 Noon) 

Last Day to withdraw from a Course without a Grade Evaluation 

Advisement and Registration for Spring and Summer 2008 

Last Day to Withdraw from the University without a Grade 

Evaluation 

THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY begins 7:00 a.m. 

THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY ends 7:00 a.m. 

CLASSES END 

READING DAY 

FINAL EXAM WEEK 

Residence Halls Close for Non-graduating Students at 12 noon 

Waste Management Certificate Ceremony 

Grades Due 

COMMENCEMENT 

Residence Halls Close for Graduating Seniors 5:00 p.m. 



VIII 



NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY 
2006 - 2008 UNIVERSITY ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



SPRING SEMESTER 2008 

January 3 - Thursday 



January 3-4 - Thurs.-Fri. 
January 5 - Saturday 

January 7 - Monday 

January 1 1 - Friday 



January 21 - Monday 
January 25 - Friday 
February 18 - Monday 
February 23 - Friday 

March 1 - Saturday 
March 3-7 - Monday-Friday 
March 9 - Saturday 
March 10 - 14 - Mon. - Fri. 
March 20 - Thursday 

March 21 -Friday 
March 28 - Friday 
April 4 - Friday 

April 7 - Monday 

April 29 - Tuesday 
April 30 - Wednesday 
May l-7-Thurs.-Wed. 
May 8 - Thursday 
May 9 - Friday 

May 10 -Saturday 



Residence Halls open (9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.) for New Students 

Registration for Continuing Students 

Faculty Report 

Orientation, Advisement and Registration for New Students 

Residence Halls open (9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.) for 

Continuing Students 

CLASSES BEGIN 

Late Registration Begins ($50.00 late fee) 

Last Day to Add or Audit a Course 

Last Day to Drop and Receive Financial Credit 

Last Day to Apply for Fall Graduation (Undergraduate Students) 

Late Registration Ends (Includes Tuition Waivers) 

Last Day to Receive Book Allowance 

UNIVERSITY HOLIDAY (Martin Luther King, Jr.) 

Ronald E. McNair Memorial Day 

Deadline to Remove Incomplete(s) Received Fall 2007 

Deadline to Apply for Certificate in Entrepreneurship 

Deadline to Apply for Certificate in Waste Management 

Residence Halls Close at 1 :00 p.m. 

SPRING BREAK 

Residence Halls Re-Open 9:00 a.m. 

Final Comprehensive Exam week (Graduate Students) 

HONOR'S CONVOCATION 

(Classes are suspended from 3-5 p.m.) 

University Holiday 

Last Day to Withdraw from a Course without a Grade Evaluation 

Last Day to Withdraw from the University without a Grade 

Evaluation 

Advisement and Registration for Fall 2008 

Early Summer School Registration 

CLASSES END 

READING DAY 

FINAL EXAM WEEK 

Residence Halls Close for Non-graduating Students at 12 noon 

Waste Management Certificate Ceremony 

Grades Due 

Commencement 

Residence Halls Close for Graduating Seniors 5:00 p.m. 



IX 



X 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University 

HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

Today, one of the nation's leading Historically Black Universities and Colleges (HBCU), 
North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is classified as a Carnegie doc- 
toral/research intentsive university that is recognized as the top producing university for Afri- 
can American engineers and technologists. The University's programs have numerous ac- 
creditations including the first nationally accredited AACSB accounting program in the na- 
tion among HBCUs. The university's history as one of only eighteen HBCUs 1890 land-grant 
universities is well reflected in agriculture, animal science, environmental science, engineer- 
ing, and technology programs, and a growing student enrollment is a further reflection of the 
demands for the North Carolina A&T's programs in education, nursing, and arts and sci- 
ences. North Carolina A&T also has a rich civil rights legacy, and its students, especially the 
Greensboro Four who are credited with beginning the movement, played a prominent role in 
the sit-ins of the 1960s. 

Today's university has changed a great deal from the Agricultural and Mechanical College 
for the "Colored Race" established by an act of the General Assembly of North Carolina 
ratified on March 9, 1891. The College actually began operation during the school year of 
1890-91, before the passage of the state law creating it. 

The scope of degree programs has been expanded to meet new demands. The first graduate 
degree was approved when the General Assembly authorized the institution to grant the Mas- 
ter of Science degree in education and certain other fields in 1939. The first master's degree 
was awarded in 1 94 1 . 

In 1957 the General Assembly repealed previous acts describing the purpose of the Col- 
lege and redefined its purpose "to teach the Agricultural and Technical Arts and Sciences" 
and added a heavy emphasis to the strengthening its efforts to train "teachers, supervisors, 
and administrators for the public schools of the State" especially preparing them to earn the 
Master's degree. 

North Carolina's General Assembly voted to elevate the College to the status of a Regional 
University effective July 1, 1967. On October 30, 1971, the General Assembly ratified an Act 
to consolidate the Institutions of Higher Learning in North Carolina. Under the provisions of 
this Act, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University became a constituent 
institution of The University of North Carolina effective July 1, 1972. 

Ten presidents/chancellors have served the Institution since it was founded in 1891. They 
are as follows: Dr. J. O. Crosby (1892-1896), Dr. James B. Dudley (1896-1925), Dr. F.D. 
Bluford (1925-1955), Dr. Warmofh T Gibbs (1956-1960), Dr. Samuel DeWitt Proctor (1960- 
1964), Dr. Lewis C. Dowdy (1964-1980), Dr. Cleon F. Thompson (Interim Chancellor - 1980- 
1981), Dr. Edward B. Fort (1981-1999), and Dr. James C. Renick (1999-2006), Dr. Lloyd V. 
Hackley (Interim Chancellor - 2006). 



MISSION, PURPOSE AND GOALS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Mission Statement 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is a public, doctoral/research 
intensive, land-grant university committed to fulfilling its fundamental purposes through ex- 
emplary undergraduate and graduate instruction, scholarly and creative research, and effec- 
tive public service. The university offers degree programs at the baccalaureate, master's and 
doctoral levels with emphasis on agriculture,engineering, science, technology, literature and 
other academic areas. As one of North Carolinathree engineering colleges, the university 
offers Ph.D. programs in engineering. Basic and applied research is conducted by faculty in 
university centers of excellence, in interinstitutional relationships, and through significant 
involvement with several public and private agencies. The university also conducts major 
research through engineering, transportation, and its extension programs in agriculture. 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University aspires to be the premier inter- 
disciplinary-centered university in America that builds on its comparative advantages in engi- 
neering, technology, and business; a strong civil rights legacy; and status as an 1890 land- 
grant institution. The challenges of preparing our students to meet the complex needs of the 
global society necessitate that these exemplary and relevant educational experiences are in- 
herently global in nature and interdisciplinary in focus. The commitment to excellence and 
the unique NCA&TSU legacy of nurturing the individual student remain strong. 

The University's evolution toward interdisciplinarity responds to societal and intellectual 
issues that require new solutions. Cross-functional teams with expertise from a variety of 
disciplines and perspectives are the best hope for the solution of complex modern challenges. 
As new problem-solving methods are needed, new disciplines are created at the intersection 
of old ones. Students are enthusiastic about courses that link learning to contemporary issues. 
An interdisciplinary education provides students with not only essential knowledge, but also 
connections across the disciplines, and finally, the ability to apply knowledge to life beyond 
the campus. 

Interdisciplinary studies build upon disciplinary excellence while inspiring new possibili- 
ties beyond the strengths of traditional fields of study. This model provides a focus for cur- 
riculum innovation, fosters communication across disciplines, and promotes partnerships with 
public and private entities. This university creates a learning environment in which opportu- 
nities to build solutions are based on expertise in more than one discipline. Teaching focuses 
more on the ability to organize, assess, apply, and create interdisciplinary knowledge rather 
than the transmission of existing knowledge to students. 

The teaching and learning process involves not only a commitment to knowledge and 
research, but also appreciates the influences of diverse thoughts, values, processes, resources, 
and structures as it seeks to organize and plan lifelong learning experiences. High expecta- 
tions are supported by an infrastructure that facilitates the opportunity for constituents within 
the University to achieve and excel individually and collectively. Opportunities for learning 
are enhanced by varied methods of instruction, 24-hour availability, and through partnerships 
that are collaborative and cooperative. 

To be productive citizens of the 21st century, our students must be globally informed. 
Thus, current efforts to globalize the curriculum will continue. In addition, students will have 
the opportunity to enhance their undergraduate education by taking part in overseas study, 
internships, or service learning experiences. Some may even earn a certificate in international 
studies. Likewise, international partnerships enhance interdisciplinary efforts and provide 



new opportunities for faculty and students to participate in and contribute to global change. 
The University exists for a society that is committed to research, knowledge and service to 
humankind. The physical space for learning is not to be limited to a specific site, but deliver- 
able in a variety of locations with a multiplicity of available resources. 

The interdisciplinary-centered university envisions its role to serve the needs of individu- 
als and groups who seek continuous opportunities for intellectual stimulation and growth. 
Utilizing the traditional disciplines and technological resources, this University fosters excel- 
lence in communication, enhances critical thinking, conducts research, and transmits new 
knowledge to a community that seeks to improve the quality of life for all in the 21st century. 

To realize the promise of the interdisciplinary-centered university, North Carolina A&T 
must initiate and nurture strategic partnerships, while concurrently enhancing and diversify- 
ing its resource base. 

VISION 

Building upon a solid foundation in academic programs, the faculty, staff and students 
endorsed the FUTURES strategic vision toward an interdisciplinary university. The adoption 
of the vision statement and a set of five goals are aimed at enhancing the culture of high 
standards in all programs and facilities and for all stakeholders — students, faculty, staff, 
alumni, community, public and private sector friends of the University. 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is a learner-centered commu- 
nity that develops and preserves intellectual capital through interdisciplinary learning, dis- 
covery, engagement, and operational excellence. 

Goal One: Establish and ensure an interdisciplinary focus for North Carolina A&T that 
mandates overall high quality, continued competitiveness, and effective involvement of glo- 
bal strategic partners in marketing and delivery of programs and operations. 

Goal Two: Deliver visionary and distinctive interdisciplinary learning, discovery, and en- 
gagement that include collaborations and partnerships as part of the learning experience. 

Goal Three: Foster a responsive learning environment that utilizes an efficiently integrated 
administrative support system for high quality programs, research and collegial interactions, 
and effectively disseminates consistent information to University stakeholders. 

Goal Four: Provides superior: readily available student services and programs that recog- 
nize and respond to diverse student needs. 

Goal Five: Enhance and diversify the University's resource base through effective fund- 
raising, entrepreneurial initiatives, enhanced facilities, and sponsored research programs. 

POLICY GOVERNING PROGRAMS AND COURSE OFFERINGS 

All provisions, regulations, degree programs, course listings, etc., in effect when this cata- 
logue went to press are subject to revision by the appropriate governing bodies of North 
Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. Such changes will not affect the gradu- 
ation requirements of students who enroll under the provisions of the catalogue. 

NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY AND INTEGRATION STATEMENT 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is committed to equality of 
educational opportunity and does not discriminate against applicants, students, or employees 
based on race, color, national origin, religion, gender, age, or disability. Moreover, North 
Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is open to people of all races and ac- 
tively seeks to promote racial integration by recruiting and enrolling a larger number of white 
students. 



North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University supports the protections avail- 
able to members of its community under all applicable Federal laws, including Titles VI and 
VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Sections 
799A and 845 of the Public Health Service Act, the Equal Pay and Age Discrimination Acts, 
the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Executive Order 1 1246. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

In North Carolina, all the public educational institutions that grant baccalaureate degrees 
are part of the University of North Carolina. North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State 
University is one of the 16 constituent institutions of the multi-campus state university. 

The University of North Carolina, chartered by the N.C. General Assembly in 1789, was 
the first public university in the United States to open its doors and the only one to graduate 
students in the eighteenth century. The first class was admitted in Chapel Hill in 1795. For the 
next 136 years, the only campus of the University of North Carolina was at Chapel Hill. 

In 1877, the NC General Assembly began sponsoring additional institutions of higher 
education, diverse in origin and purpose. Five were historically black institutions, and an- 
other was founded to educate American Indians. Several were created to prepare teachers for 
the public schools. Others had a technological emphasis. One is a training school for per- 
forming artists. 

In 1931, the NC General Assembly redefined the University of North Carolina to include 
three state-supported institutions: the campus at Chapel Hill (now the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill), North Carolina State College (now North Carolina State University 
at Raleigh), and Woman's College (now the University of North Carolina at Greensboro). The 
new multi-campus University operated with one board of trustees and one president. By 1969, 
three additional campuses had joined the University through legislative action: the University 
of North Carolina at Charlotte, the University of North Carolina at Asheville, and the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina at Wilmington. 

In 1971, the General Assembly passed legislation bringing into the University of North 
Carolina the state's ten remaining public senior institutions, each of which had until then 
been legally separate: Appalachian State University, East Carolina University, Elizabeth City 
State University, Fayetteville State University, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State 
University, North Carolina Central University, the North Carolina School of the Arts, Pem- 
broke State University, Western Carolina University, and Winston-Salem State University. 
This action created the current 16-campus University. (In 1985, the North Carolina School of 
Science and Mathematics, a residential high school for gifted students, was declared an affili- 
ated school of the University; and in 1996, Pembroke State University was renamed The 
University of North Carolina at Pembroke through Legislative action.) 

The UNC Board of Governors is the policy-making body legally charged with "the gen- 
eral determination, control, supervision, management, and governance of all affairs of the 
constituent institutions." It elects the president, who administers the University. The 32 vot- 
ing members of the Board of Governors are elected by the General Assembly for four-year 
terms. Former board chairmen and board members who are former governors of North Caro- 
lina may continue to serve for limited periods as non-voting members emeriti. The president 
of the UNC Association of Student Governments, or that student's designee, is also a non- 
voting member. 

Each of the 16 constituent institutions is headed by a chancellor, who is chosen by the 
Board of Governors on the president's nomination and is responsible to the president. Each 



institution has a board of trustees consisting of eight members elected by the Board of Gover- 
nors, four appointed by the governor, and the president of the student body, who serves ex- 
officio. (The NC School of the Arts has two additional ex-officio members.) Each board of 
trustees holds extensive powers over academic and other operations of its institution on del- 
egation from the Board of Governors. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Board of Governors 

The University of North Carolina 

J. Bradley Wilson, Chair 

Dudley E. Flood 
Hannah D. Gage 
Willie J. Gilchrist 
H. Frank Grainger 
Peter D. Hans 
Charles A. Hayes 
Peter Keber 
Adelaide Daniels Key 
G. Leroy Lail 
Charles H. Mercer, Jr. 
Fred G. Mills 
Charles S. Norwood 

Emeritus Member 

James E. Holshouser, Jr. 
Benjamin S. Ruffin 

Ex Officio Member 

Zachary A. Wynne 

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Bradley T. Adcock 
Brent D. Barringer 
Peaches Gunter Blank 
R. Steve Bowden 
F. Edward Broadwell, Jr. 
William L. Burns, Jr. 
Anne W. Cates 
John F.A.V. Cecil 
Bert Collins 
John W. Davis, HI 
Phillip R. Dixon 
Ray S. Farris 



Cary C. Owen 
Patsy B. Perry 
Jim W. Phillips, Jr. 
Gladys Ashe Robinson 
Irvin A. Roseman 
Estelle 'Bunny' Sanders 
William G. Smith 
J. Craig Souza 
Priscilla P. Taylor 
Robert F. Warwick 
J. Bradley Wilson 
David W. Young 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 
(Sixteen Constituent Institutions) 



ERSKINE B. BOWLES 
President 

HAROLD L. MARTIN 
Senior Vice President for 

Academic Affairs 
ROBERT NELSON 
(Interim) Vice President for Finance 



MARK FLEMING 

Senior Vice President for University 

Affairs 
VACANT 
Vice President for University-School 

Programs 



ROBYN RENDER 

Vice President for Information 

Resources / CIO 
LESLIE WINNER 
Vice President and General 

Counsel 



GOVERNANCE OF NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND 
TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is a constituent institution of 
The University of North Carolina. It functions under the jurisdiction of a thirty-two member 
Board of Governors of The University of North Carolina elected by the General Assembly of 
North Carolina. Policies of the Board of Governors are administered by the President of the 
University and his/her staff. They constitute the General Administration and are located in 
Chapel Hill. 

The Board of Trustees of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University con- 
sists of thirteen members. Eight members are appointed by the Board of Governors, four are 
appointed by the Governor of the State, and the President of the Student Government Asso- 
ciation serves as an ex officio member. The Board of Trustees receives its authority by delega- 
tion from the Board of Governors. 

The Chancellor is the chief administrative officer of each University. 



NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL 
STATE UNIVERSITY BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

John H. Becton Henry H. Isaacson Michael L. Suggs 

Carole Bruce Albert Lineberry, Jr. Melvin C. Swann, Jr. 

D. Hayes Clement Franklin McCain Steve Watson 

Eunice Dudley Velma R. Speight-Buford Joseph A. Williams 

Ex Officio Member 

President, Student Government Association 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



LLOYD V.HACKLEY 

B.A., Ph.D. 

Interim Chancellor 

JANICE G. BREWTNGTON 

B.S.N., M.S.N., Ph.D. 

Interim Provost and Vice Chancellor 

for Academic Affairs 
WILLIE T.ELLIS, JR. 
B.S., M.B.A. 
Vice Chancellor for 

Business and Finance 
SULLIVAN A. WELBORNE 
B.S., M.S., Ed.D. 
Interim Vice Chancellor for Student 

Affairs 



MARVIN H. WATKINS 
B.S.,M.S. 

Interim Senior Vice Chancellor for 

De\>elopment and University 

Relations 
N. RADHAKRISHNAN 
B.E., MTech., Ph.D. 
Vice Chancellor for Research and 

Economic Development 
RODNEY E. HARRIGAN 
B.S..M.S. 
Vice Chancellor for 

Academic Affairs/Computing and 

Information Technology 



JANICE BREWINGTON 
B.S.N., M.S.N., Ph.D. 

Interim Provost and Vice 

Chancellor for Academic Affairs 
KENNETH MURRAY 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Associate Vice Chancellor 

for Academic Affairs 
LEE YOUNG 
B.S., M.S. 
Associate Vice Chancellor for 

Enrollment Management and 

Director of Admissions 
LEA E. WILLIAMS 
B.A., M.S., M.A., Ed.D. 
(Interim) Associate Vice Chancellor 

for Academic Affairs/Institutional 

Research, Assessment and Planning 
ERIC CHEEK 
B.S., B.S., M.E., Ph.D. 
Assistant Vice Chancellor and 

Director for Summer Sessions 

and Outreach 
ALTON THOMPSON 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Dean, School of Agriculture and 

Environmental Sciences 
MICHAEL PLATER 
A.B., M.B.A., Ph.D. 
Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 
QUIESTER CRAIG 
B.A.,M.B.A., Ph.D. 
Dean, School of Business and 

Economics 



CAMILLE L. KLUTTZ-LEACH 
B.A., J.D. 

Special Assistant to the 

Cliancellor for Legal Counsel 
GEORGE A. ANTONELLI 
B.A.,M.A.,Ph.D. 
Special Assistant to the Chancellor 
SHIRLEY T.FRYE 
B.S.,M.S. 

Special Assistant to the Chancellor 
LARRY R. KREISER 
B.S. 

Interim, Internal Auditor 
DELORES S. TODD 
B.S.,M.S. 
Director of Athletics 



Academic Affairs 

LELIA VICKERS 

B.A.,M.A., Ph.D. 

Dean, School of Education 

JOSEPH MONROE 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Dean, College of Engineering 

THOMAS HASSELL 

B.S., D.D.S, Ph.D. 

Dean, School of Graduate Studies 

WALTRENE CANADA 

B.S., M.L.S. 

Dean, Library Services 

PATRICIA PRICE LEA 

B.S.N., M.S.N. , M.S.Ed., Ph.D. 

Interim Dean, School of Nursing 

EARNEST WALKER 

B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D. 

Interim Dean, School of Technology 

JOSEPH L. GRAVES, JR. 

Dean, University Studies 

RITA LAMB 

B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

Director of The Center for 

Student Success 
GODFREY UZOCHUKWU 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Director of Waste Management 

Institute 
SCOTT SIMKINS 
B.A., Ph.D. 
Director of the Academy for 

Teaching and Learning 



PETER MEYERS 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Director of the University 

Honors Program 
MINNIE BATTLE MAYES 
B.A., M.A. 
Director of the Office of 

International Programs 
JAMES J. GOOCH 
B.S., M.P.H., Dr.PH. 
Director of the Institute for 

Public Health 
SHERRI AVENT 
B.S., M.B.A. 
Director of Financial Aid 
LESTER LUGO 
A.S., B.H.S.A., M.S. 
University Registrar 
KELVIN P. KEARNEY 
B.S. , M.S. 

Professor of Aerospace Studies 
JOSHUA JONES 
B.A., M.S., D.M. 
Professor of Military Science 
MARY MIMS 
B.S., M.P.A. 

Special Assistant to the Provost 
SHARON NEAL 
B.A., M.A. 
EPA Administrator 



SULLIVAN A. WELBORNE 

B.S., M.S., Ed.D. 

Interim Vice Chancellor for 

Student Affairs 
JUDY RASHID 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Dean of Students 
DENISE IVERSON-PAYNE 
B.A., M.Ed. 
Executive Dir. For Orientation, 

First Year Experience and 

Parent Programs 
EARL HILTON 
B.S., M.P.A., J.D. 
Executive Director for 

Budget, Planning, and Personnel 
JOYCE EDWARDS 
B.S.,M.S. 
Executive Director for 

Career Services 



WILLIE T.ELLIS, JR., 
B.S., M.B.A. 

Vice Chancellor for Business 

and Finance 
AKUA J. MATHERSON, 
B.S. 
Assistant Vice Chancellor for 

Budget and Planning 
P. SCOTT HUMMEL, 
A.B., MAT., M.B.A, C.P.A. 
Assistant Vice Chancellor for 

Business and Finance/ 

Comptroller 
HELEN R. BUCK, 
Interim Director of Accounting 
B.S., M.S., C.PA. 



Student Affairs 

RYAN MALTESE 
B.A.,J.D. 

Executive Director for University 

Events Auxiliary Services 
BEVERLY WALLACE 
B.S.,M.S. 

Director of Upward Bound 
LINDA WILSON 
B.S., M.S., R.N. 
Executive Director for Student 

Health Services 
LEONARD JONES 
B.S., M.S., Ed.D. 
Director for Housing and 

Residence Life 
CARL BAKER 
A.S.,B.S.,M.S. 
Executive Director for Memorial 

Student Union 



Business and Finance 

VANESSA LAWSON, 

B.S. 

Interim Director of Human Resources 

CURTIS BIGELOW 

B.A.,M.S. 

Assistant Vice Chancellor for 

Public Safety 
LAVONNE MATTHEWS, 
BA. 

Director of Contracts and Grants 
TED A. LITTLE, 
B.S. 

Director of Purchasing 
ANGELA PETERSON, 
B.A. 
Director of Auxiliary Services 



JOYCE E. BROWN 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Director of Ronald E. McNair 

Program 
LORETHA GRAVES 
B.S. , M.S. 
Director of International Students 

and Scholars 
E. PEGGY OLIPHANT 
B.S.,M.S. 
Director of Veteran and 

Disability Support Services 
L. DENISE WHITE 
B.S., M.S., Ed.D. 
Director of Student Support Services 
DONNA BLUE 
B.S.,M.S. 
Director of Student Judicial Affairs 



KIM SOWELL, 

B.S. 

Treasurer 

GODFRIED RIBERIO-YEMOSIO, 

Food Services Director 

KATHERENE BURCKLEY, 

B.S., C.P.A. 

Reporting Director 

ANDREW PERKINS, JR. 

B.S., M.S. 

Assistant Vice Chancellor 

for Business and Finance/Facilities 
REGINALD WADE 
B.S. 
Assistant Vice Chancellor for 

Business Sen'ices 



Development and University Relations 



MARVIN H. WATKTNS 

B.S.,M.S. 

Interim Senior Vice Chancellor for 

Development and University 

Relations 
MICHAEL MAGOON 
B.A., M.S. 
Associate Vice Chancellor for 

Development 
MABLE SCOTT 
B.S.,M.S 
Assistant Vice Chancellor for 

University Relations 
NETTIE ROWLAND 
B.A.,M.S. 
Director of Media Relations 



SANDRA BROWN 

B.A., MA. 

Director of Publications 

HARRIET DAVIS 

B.A.,M.S. 

Director of Alumni Affairs 

PATRICIA BROWN 

B.A. 

Senior Director of Development 
Advancement Services, Annual 
Giving, Prospect Research, 
Stewardship 



DIANNA VASS 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Development Officer, College 

of Engineering 
MARTINA CHAVIS 
B.A. 
Development Officer, Corporate 

and Foundation Relations 
PHILLIP McALPIN 
B.A. 
Development Officer, Athletics 



N. RADHAKRISHNAN 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Vice Chancellor for Research & 

Economic Development 
MITZI BOND 
B.A., M.A., Ed.D. 
Assistant Vice Chancellor for 

Research Administration 



Research 

SHENA L. CRITTENDON 
B.A., MA. 

Assistant Vice Chancellor for 
Communications and Operations 



LOCATION 



THOMAS HASSELL 
B.S., D.D.S, Ph.D. 

Associate Dean, and Dean of the 
School of Graduate Studies 



North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is located in the city of Greensbor 
North Carolina. This city is 300 miles south of Washington, D.C. and 349 miles north of Atlanta. It 
readily accessible by air, bus and automobile. 

The city offers a variety of cultural activities and recreational facilities. These include athletic event 
concerts, bowling, boating, fishing, tennis, golf and other popular forms of recreation. 

The University is located near major shopping centers, churches, theaters and medical facilities. T* 
heavy concentration provides, manufacturing plants, service industries, governmental agencies and shoj 
ping centers provides an opportunity for many students who desire part-time employment while attem 
ing the University. 

FACILITIES 

The main campus of the University is located on land holdings in excess of 191 acres. The Universii 
farm, located east of the Greensboro City limits, includes approximately 600 acres of land and modern fan 
buildings. The approximate value of the physical plant is $403 million. 



University Buildings 

Dudley Building — Reed & Taylor Art Galleries 

F.D. Bluford Library 

Richard B. Harrison Auditorium 

Charles Moore Gymnasium 

Coltrane Hall (Headquarters for N.C. 

Agricultural Extension Service) 
The Memorial Student Union 
The Oaks (Faculty Club) 
Garrett House 

Classroom and Laboratory Buildings 
Carver Hall — School of Agriculture 
Cherry Hall — College of Engineering 
Corbett Sports Center 

Crosby Hall — College of Arts and Sciences 
Gibbs Hall — Social Sciences & School of 

Graduate Studies 
Hodgin Hall — School of Education 
Noble Hall — School of Nursing 
Benbow Hall — Human Environment and 

Family Sciences 
Hines Hall — Chemistry 
Sockwell Hall - Bioenvironmental Engineering 
Reid Greenhouses — Plant Science 
Graham Hall — College of Engineering 
Frazier Hall — Music and Fine Arts 
Price Hall — School of Technology 
Price Hall Annex — Child Development 

Laboratory 



Dormitories 

Curtis Hall 

Holland Hall 

Morrison Hall 

Vanstory Hall 

Morrow Hall 

Daniel Street Honors Houses (1) 

New Scott Residence Halls 

Zoe P. Barbee Hall 

Cooper Hall 

Aggie Terrace (Foundation/University asset) 

Aggie Suites (Foundation/University asset) 

Pride Hall (Foundation/University asset) 

Service Building s 

Murphy Hall — Student Services 
Dowdy Building — Student Financial Aid, 

Registrar's, and Treasurer's Offices 
Ward Hall — Police and Parking Services 
Williams Cafeteria 
Brown Hall — University Bookstore, Ticket Office, 

and Mail Center 
Sebastian Health Center 
T. E. Neal Heating Plant 
Clyde DeHuguley — Facilities 
Music Annex 
1020 Wendover Avenue 



Campbell Hall — ROTC 

Headquarters 
Merrick Hall — School of Business and 

Economics 
J.M. Marteena Hall — Physics, Mathematics 

and Physical Science 
BC Webb Hall — Animal Science 
Ron McNair Hall — College of Engineering 
Smith Hall — School of Technology 
General Classroom Building B (Craig Hall) 
Paul Robeson Theatre 

Research Facilities 

The Edward B. Fort Interdisciplinary 
Research Center (IRC) 



Other Facilities 

Alumni Stadium 

Athletic Field — including nine practice fields 

for football, 400 meter track, softball field 
Yanceyville Street Center 
Barnes Hall — Biology 
Strickland Fieldhouse — Athletic Offices 
Environmental Studies Lab-Farm 
Swine Research Center Farm 
Charles H. Moore — Agricultural 

Research Center 
GEAR-UP House 

Motorsports Center — Aggie Racing 
Bryan Fitness & Wellness Center 



SCHOOLS, COLLEGES, PROGRAMS, AND OFFICES OF NORTH CAROLINA 
AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE UND/ERSITY 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University includes the following schools, 
colleges, programs and offices: the School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, the 
College of Arts and Sciences, the School of Business and Economics, the School of Educa- 
tion, the College of Engineering, the School of Graduate Studies, the School of Nursing, the 
School of Technology, the University Studies Program, the Office of Summer Sessions and 
Outreach, and the Office of Continuing Studies. 

ACCREDITATION AND INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERSHIPS 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is accredited by the Commis- 
sion on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, 
Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097: Telephone number 404-679-4501) to award bachelor's, master's, 
and doctoral degrees. 

A listing of programs and their accrediting agencies follows: 

The program of Industrial Technology is accredited by the National Association of Industrial 
Technology; 

The Media Program is accredited by the Association of Educational Communications and 
Technology; 

The undergraduate programs in agricultural, architectural, electrical, industrial, and 

mechanical engineering, leading to the B.S. degree, are accredited by the Engineering 
Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology; 

The undergraduate program in Landscape Architecture is accredited by the Landscape 
Architecture Accreditation Board; 

The School of Nursing is accredited by the National League for Nursing, Department of 
Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs; 

The Teacher Education Programs are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of 
Teacher Education; 

The Department of Chemistry is accredited by the American Chemical Society; 



The undergraduate business programs of the School of Business and Economics are 

accredited by AACSB International - The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of 
Business; 

The undergraduate accounting program of the Department of Accounting is accredited by 
AACSB International - The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business; 

The Social Work Program of the Department of Sociology and Social Work is accredited by 
the Council on Social Work Education; 

The Department of Home Economics is accredited by The American Home Economics 
Association; 

The Music Department is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music; 

The Theater Arts Program in Acting is accredited by The National Association of Schools of 
Theater; and 

The Department of Journalismand Mass Communication is accredited by the Accrediting 
Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication 

Below is a listing of professional organizations that the University is a member: 

American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education 

American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admission Officers 

National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges 

American Association of Colleges of Nursing 

American College Public Relations Association 

American Council for Construction Education 

Associated Schools of Construction 

American Council on Education 

American Public Welfare Association 

American Library Association 

Association of American Colleges 

Association of Collegiate Deans and Registrars 

Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture 

College Language Association 

National Association of Business Teacher Education 

American Personnel and Guidance Association 

National Association of Industrial Technology, International Association of Technology 
Education 

National Association of Student Personnel Administrators 

Association of College Unions International 

National Association of College and University Food Service 

National Commission on Accrediting 

National Institutional Teacher Placement Association 

National League for Nursing, Council of Member Agencies, Department of Baccalaureate 
and Higher Degree Programs 

North Carolina Association of Colleges and Universities 

North Carolina League of Nursing 

North Carolina Library Association 

10 



National Association of College and University Business Officers 

Southeastern Library Association 

Southern Regional Education Board Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing 

Graduates of the University are eligible for membership in the American Association of 
University Women 

THE OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS (OIP) 

The Office of International Programs (OIP) is charged with institutionalizing the univer- 
sity wide globalization initiative. To fulfill this mission the OIP provides resources for stu- 
dents, faculty and staff to increase their level of international awareness and understanding 
through study abroad, student and faculty exchange, and global perspectives enrichment pro- 
grams (i.e., workshops, lectures, cultural events, etc.). 

Study Abroad/Exchange Programs/International Internships: The Office of International 
Programs administers North Carolina A&T's study abroad and exchange programs, which 
provide students the possibility of spending a semester or year at universities in more than 40 
countries. Short-term study abroad programs are administered by various academic depart- 
ments and information about these can be obtained at the OIP. Any student in good academic 
standing may apply to study abroad. 

Global Studies Certificate Program (GSCP): The Office of International Programs admin- 
isters this undergraduate interdisciplinary program designed to provide all students the op- 
portunity to better prepare to live and work in a global society. The Global Studies Certificate 
can be earned while fulfilling the academic requirements for an A&T degree in any disci- 
pline. In addition to completing general University and major degree requirements, students 
must complete a minimum of 16 semester hours outlined as follows: GSCP 200 Introduction 
to Global Studies, three (3) credit hours; GSCP elective courses, six to twelve (6-12) credit 
hours (foreign language courses must be intermediate or advanced to qualify for credit); Ex- 
perience Abroad (study or internship), six to twelve (6-12) credit hours; and the GSCP 500 
Capstone Seminar course, one to three (1-3) credit hours. 

For additional information about these programs, please contact Mrs. Minnie Battle Mayes, 
Director, Office of International Programs, Room A- 16, CH Moore Building, Greensboro, 

NC 27411, (336) 334-7104. 

THE HONORS PROGRAM 

The Honors Program offers highly talented and motivated students a four-year, student- 
centered experience of academic enhancement, cultural enrichment, leadership training, and 
professional development that stimulates them to reach their full potential and become future 
leaders. Every aspect of the program provides special opportunities for qualified students to 
grow intellectually through contact with a community of Honors students and supportive 
faculty scholars. No matter what a student's future plans, those who participate in the Honors 
Program will find that it gives them a competitive edge, preparing them for success in the 
nation's best graduate schools and in their future careers. Through Honors, students can get 
the best education the University has to offer. 

Admission to and Retention in the Honors Program 

Entering freshmen are invited to join the Honors Program if they have earned a cumulative 
weighted high school GPA of 3.7 and SAT scores totaling 1,050 or above. All public high 
school Valedictorians and Salutatorians as well as graduates of the North Carolina School of 
Science and Math are automatically eligible to join if they score at least 1,000 on the SAT and 
have a cumulative high school GPA of 3.0. Students with 1,200 or above on the SAT are 

11 



automatically eligible for the Program as long as they compile a cumulative high school GPA 
of 3.0. Incoming freshmen who are selected for the North Carolina Teaching Fellows Pro- 
gram are also automatically eligible to join Honors. 

Students already enrolled at NC A&T State University may join Honors if they have a 
cumulative GPA of at least 3.5 and have completed at least 12 credit hours of classes. To 
remain in the Honors Program, students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.5 and take one 
course for Honors credit each semester. 

Program Description 

A student who joins Honors as an incoming freshman has the opportunity to complete a 
four year, forty-two (42) semester hour, program of classes distributed as follows: eighteen 
(18) hours of General Education classes (English, History, etc.) taken for Honors credit, six 
credit hours of low enrollment Honors Seminars, and eighteen (18) credit hours of Honors- 
augmented courses in the student's major. Completion of the four-year Honors Program re- 
quires a senior thesis or creative project. Students who complete this four-year Honors expe- 
rience receive special recognition at graduation and on their college transcript. 

For various reasons, students may not be able to, or want to, participate in the Honors 
Program throughout their entire academic career. Accordingly, there are two tracks within the 
Honors Program that students can choose from if they participate in Honors for only a portion 
of their academic career. These tracks are: 

Track #1: General Honors 

The twenty-four (24) credit hour General Honors Program requires eighteen (18) hours of 
General Education classes taken for Honors credit and six hours of Honors Seminars. 

Track #2: Honors in the Major 

The Honors Program in the Major requires eighteen hours of Honors-augmented classes 
in the student's major or related courses, six hours of Honors Seminars, and a senior thesis or 
creative project. 

Students who complete either of the Honors tracks are given special recognition at gradu- 
ation and on their college transcripts. 

Students must earn a minimum grade of "B" in any course taken for Honors credit for it to 
count towards completing any portion of the Honors Program. 

For more information, contact: Dr. Peter Meyers, Director, The Honors Program, 329 Gibbs 
Hall, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, North Caro- 
lina 27411. Dr. Meyers can be reached by phone at (336) 256-0277 or by e-mail at 
peterm@ncat.edu. 

ACADEMIC DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Degree Program. A program of study with a concentration or (major) in some specified 
discipline that leads to a degree in that discipline specialty, or in some designated subdivision 
of the specialty at a particular level of instruction. 

All four year degree programs at the University require a minimum of 1 24 semester hours 
and a maximum of 128 semester hours, excluding deficiency courses and remedial work for 
the bachelor's degree. Semester hour requirements beyond 128 must be approved by the Board 
of Governors. 



12 



Students who complete one or more of the courses of study offered by the University will 
be awarded the degree indicated. 

School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences 



Degree 


Program Title 


Concentrations 


BS 


Agricultural Economics 






Agricultural Economics 


(Agricultural Business) 




Agricultural Education 


(Ag Professional Service) 




Agricultural Education 


(Secondary Education) 




Agricultural Science, Natural Resources 


(Environmental Horticulture) 




Agricultural Science, Natural Resources 


(Plant Science) 




Agricultural Science, Natural Resources 


(Soil Science) 




Animal Science 






Animal Science 


(Animal Industry) 




Bioenvironmental Engineering 






Child Development: Early Ed. & Family Studies 


(B-K)(Teaching) 




Child Development 






Earth and Environmental Sciences 






Family and Consumer Science Education 






Food and Nutritional Sciences 


(Dietetics) 




Food and Nutritional Sciences 


(Food Science) 




Family and Consumer Science 


(Fashion Merch & Design) 




Laboratory Animal Science 






Landscape Architecture 




MS 


Agricultural Economics 






Agricultural Education 


(Professional Licensure) 




Agricultural Education 


(Professional Service) 




Animal Health Science 






Food and Nutritional Sciences 






Plant, Soil and Environmental Science 






College of Arts and Sciences 


Degree 


Program Title 


Concentrations 


BA 


English 






English 


(Technical Writing) 




History 






Liberal Studies 


(International Studies) 




Liberal Studies 


(African- American Studies) 




Liberal Studies 


(Cultural Change & Social Development) 




Liberal Studies 


(Dance) 




Liberal Studies 


(Business) 




Liberal Studies 


(Interdisciplinary) 




Liberal Studies 


(Pre-Law) 




Liberal Studies 


(Women's Studies) 




Music 


(General) 




Music 


(Performance) 




Political Science 






Psychology 






Romance Languages and Literatures, French 






Romance Languages and Literatures, Spanish 






Sociology 






Speech 






Speech 


(Speech Pathology/Audiology) 




Visual Arts, Design 




BFA 


Professional Theatre 




BS 


Applied Mathematics 

Biology 

Chemistry 






Comprehensive Science Education 


(Biology Education) 



13 



Comprehensive Science Education (Chemistry Education) 

Comprehensive Science Education (Physics Education) 

Criminal Justice 

Journalism and Mass Communication (Broadcast Production) 

Journalism and Mass Communication (Electronic Media & Journalism) 

Journalism and Mass Communication (Media Management) 

Journalism and Mass Communication (Print Journalism) 

Journalism and Mass Communication (Public Relations) 

Mathematics 

Physics 

Romance Languages and Literatures, French Secondary Education 

Romance Languages and Literatures, Spanish Secondary Education 
BSW Social Work 

MA English and African American Literature 

MAT Teaching (Biology Education) 

Teaching (Chemistry Education) 

MS Mathematics Education 

Applied Mathematics 

Physics 

Biology 

Chemistry 

English Education 

History Education 
MSW Social Work (Jt. with UNC-G) 

School of Business and Economics 

Concentrations 



(Information Technology) 

(Voc. Bus. Ed.) 

(Voc. Bus. Ed.-Data Pro.) 



Degree 


Program Title 


BS 


Accounting 




Business Administration 




Business Education 




Business Education 




Business Education 




Economics 




Finance 




Management 




Management 




Marketing 




Transportation 


MAT 


Teaching 


MSM 


Management 




Management 




Management 




School 


Degree 


Program Title 


BS 


Elementary Education 




Sport Science and Fitness Management 


MAED 


Elementary Education, General 




Reading Education 


MAT 


Teaching 




Teaching 




Teaching 


MS 


Adult Education 




Counselor Education 




Health and Physical Education 


MSA 


School Administration 



(Management Information Systems) 



(Business Education) 
(Human Resources Management) 
(Management Information Systems) 
(Transportation and Business Logistics) 



Concentrations 



(Elementary Education) 
(Special Education) 
(Physical Education) 



14 



College of Engineering 



Degree 


Program Title 


Concentrations 


BS 


Architectural Engineering 
Chemical Engineering 
Civil Engineering 
Computer Engineering 
Computer Science 
Electrical Engineering 
Geomatics 

Industrial Engineering 
Interdisciplinary General Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 




MS 


Civil Engineering 

Computational Science and Engineering 

Computer Science 

Electrical Engineering 

Industrial Engineering 

Chemical Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering 




Ph.D. 


Electrical Engineering 
Industrial Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 
Energy And Environmental Studies 
Leadership Studies 

Interdisciplinary 




Degree 


Program Title 


Concentrations 


BA 


Liberal Studies 


(Business) 




Liberal Studies 


(Interdisciplinary) 




Liberal Studies 


(Pre-Law) 




Liberal Studies 


(Women's Studies) 



MS Computational Science & Engineering 

Ph.D. Energy & Environmental Studies 

Leadership Studies 

School of Nursing 

Degree Program Title Concentrations 

BSN Nursing 

School of Technology 

Degree Program Title Concentrations 

BS Construction Management 

Electronics Technology 

Electronics Technology (Computational Technology) 

Electronics Technology (Information Technology) 
Graphic Communication Systems 

Graphic Communication Systems (Computer Aided Drafting and Design) 

Graphic Communication Systems (Integrated Internet Technologies) 

Graphic Communication Systems (Printing and Publishing) 
Manufacturing Systems 

Manufacturing Systems (Motorsports) 
Occupational Safety and Health 

Technology Education (Technology Education, Teaching) 

Technology Education (Trade and Industrial Education, Teaching) 

Technology Education (Training and Development for Industry) 

MAT Teaching (Technology Education) 

MS Technology Education (Technology Education, Teaching) 

Technology Education (Trade and Industrial Education, Teaching) 

Technology Education (Training and Development for Industry) 

Technology Education (Workforce Development Director) 

15 



msit 



Industrial Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Industrial Technology 



(Environ, and Occupational Safety & Health) 
(Electronics and Computer Tech) 
(Information Technology) 
(Construction Management) 
(Graphic Communication Systems) 
(Manufacturing Systems) 
(Occupational Safety and Health) 



FERDINAND DOUGLASS BLUFORD LIBRARY 

The Ferdinand Douglass Bluford Library is located near the center of the West campus. 
The current holdings include more than 580,00 bound volumes, over 40,000 e-books, and as 
a select depository in North Carolina for United States government documents, the library 
contains a collection of over 279,000 official government publications. Current serials in- 
clude approximately 50,000 print and electronic subscriptions. Other holdings include a col- 
lection of videotapes, microforms and other audiovisuals. The library maintains special col- 
lections in Archives, Black Studies and Teacher Education materials. 

Special services are provided through a formal and informal library instructional program, 
document delivery, interlibrary loans, and laptop checkouts. During the academic year, the 
library is open each week as shown below. Variations in this schedule are posted at the front 
entrance of the library. 

Sunday - 2:00 p.m. with 24-hour service until Friday, 8:00 p.m. 
Saturday - 10:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 

EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT CENTERS 

The University's educational support centers include, The Center for Student Success, 
Academic Enrichment Program (ACE), Learning Resource Laboratory, Writing Center, Ad- 
ministrative Information Systems, Computing and Information Technology, Computer As- 
sisted Learning Laboratory, Academic Tutorial Program, Tutorial/Study Center, the Carver 
Hall Tutorial Laboratory, Learning Assistance Center (Nursing), Writing Laboratory, Teacher 
Education Center, Learning Assistance Center (Chemistry), Student Athlete Tutorial Program, 
Disability Support Services, and Counseling Services. 

OFFICE OF SUMMER SESSIONS AND OUTREACH 

The Office of Summer Sessions and Outreach provides the opportunity to take advantage 
of a wide range of summer learning experiences in condensed formats that support educa- 
tional, career and personal enrichment goals. These activities are designed to reach the total 
community with courses, workshops and programs that are offered to populations of all ages 
from children to the retiree. The standards of academic achievement and the quality of work 
required are maintained at the same level as during the regular terms. 

The Office has the responsibility for planning, coordinating and administering the 
University's Summer Sessions and Summer Outreach activities. These programs have been 
designed to help optimize student progress and to enhance the University's four-year gradua- 
tion rates by providing degree-related course work for undergraduate and graduate students. 
Most courses are conveniently taught in five weeks allowing time for work and travel during 
the summer months. 

The summer programs feature several convenient sessions of varying lengths: two five- 
week sessions, one two-week intersession and one ten- week dual session which runs from the 
beginning of the first session through the end of the second session. Students are permitted to 
enroll in a maximum of seven credits each five-week session and in the dual session. Students 
can take one three-credit hour course during the intersession. There are several short courses 



16 



and workshops that are scheduled within the two five-week sessions. These programs support 
the attainment of educational goals for undergraduate and graduate degree candidates at the 
university or elsewhere and the meeting of licensure requirements for teachers and other 
professional personnel. 

The Outreach effort seeks to provide a broad base of support, through collaborative initia- 
tives with the various units on the campus, for pre-college activities for youth that support 
learning, discovery and engagement in the greater university community. The Office partners 
with public and private schools in and around the Greensboro area in order to support teacher 
training and promote interdisciplinary learning experiences at all levels. 

THE CENTER FOR DISTANCE LEARNING 

The Center for Distance Learning (CDL), in close cooperation with the academic depart- 
ments, enables students to access degree programs and courses of the University at conve- 
nient sites and times. Courses are offered at a distance through online and extension pro- 
grams. More than 800 people are currently taking classes via Web-based instruction, via in- 
teractive video, and on-site instruction. Students and instructors can interact via online group 
chat sessions, email, CD ROM, DVD. interactive video classrooms, streamed videos, and on- 
site instruction. 

Currently, more than 250 courses are offered online and through extension programs from 
all colleges and schools of the University. There are three undergraduate and two graduate 
online degree programs offered. The degree programs include: 1) Agricultural Education (B.S.), 
2) Business Education (B.S.), 3) Electronics Technology (B.S.), 4) Occupational Safety & 
Health (B.S.), 5) Agricultural Education (M.S.), 6) Instructional Technology (M.S.), 7) Tech- 
nology Education (M.S.), and 8) Technology Management (Ph.D.). There is one graduate 
degree program offered through extension programs, Adult Education (M.S. - Charlotte, NC). 
In addition, there are four licensure programs in Business Education, Elementary Education, 
Technology Education, and Vocational Industrial Education. 

CDL plans to increase the number of academic degree programs offered using state-of- 
the-art instructional and delivery systems. These systems will continue to address the educa- 
tional and professional development needs of the University students, faculty, and other stake- 
holders with a focus on relevance, quality, and utility. 

THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND 
TELECOMMUNICATIONS (IT&T) SERVICES 

The Information Technology and Telecommunications division is organized into fifteen 
collaborative operating units and departments. The Office of the Vice Chancellor for ITT/CIO, 
the Office of the Chief ITT Architect, the Office of ITT Operations/CTO and its eight depart- 
ments, and the Office of Teaching and Learning Technologies and its three departments. 

1 ) Office of the Vice Chancellor for ITT/CIO - The Office of the Vice Chancellor for Infor- 
mation Technology and Telecommunications/Chief Information Officer is responsible for 
supporting and strengthening the University's learning, discovery, and engagement activi- 
ties by providing the leadership and management guidance of central services and 
infrastructure characterized by operational excellence. All ITT operating units and depart- 
ments report to this office. 

2) Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for ITT/CTO - The ITT Operations Unit is 
responsible for managing eight of the eleven ITT departments. These departments plan, 
install, monitor and support the University's information technology and telecommunica- 
tions infrastructure. The ITT Operations cluster is led by the Associate Vice Chancellor for 



17 



ITT/Chief Technology Officer. The eight departments that report to the ITT Operations 
Unit are managed by directors. 

a. Administrative Information Systems (AIS) - AIS provides software development, 
project management, and application software technical support for the systems that 
support administrative processes related to the mission critical functions of the Univer- 
sity. The AIS vision is to develop and support a community of knowledge workers 
(students, teachers, researchers, staff and administrators). They focus on easy access to 
secure, reliable and timely data, retaining quality staff and partnering with others to 
provide technical leadership and effective solutions. 

b. Data Base Administration (DBA) - The mission of the DBA department is to create 
and support databases for the University; and to ensure the highest possible level of 
database availability and performance. The DBA department supports databases for 
the Banner Project, the Resource 25 System, and the Residential Management System. 
In addition to database support, the DBA department also provides application support 
for the following systems: Resource 25, Residential Management, Aggie One Card, 
Web Focus, Telephone Reporting, Traffic, and the Library System. 

A vital role of the DBA department is to perform database backup and recovery, data- 
base monitoring, and database tuning. The department also provides database 
consultation and assistance as needed. 

c. Converged Networks (CN) - CN has the responsibility to provide the networking 
infrastructure and services that will enable the integration of data, voice and video on 
the University network. Convergence will require a complete migration of the infra- 
structure to enable this integration. 

New Cisco centric hardware and network management software are being purchased 
to enable this convergence. CNS has also been charged with providing Distance Learn- 
ing Technical Support for the University. 

CNS also provides streaming media support for WNAA and the Aggie TV Studios as 
well as several on-line classes. Converged Network Video Service has enabled the 
University to experience new opportunities by utilizing the power of information tech- 
nology to create, support, and manage physical and intellectual resources. By utilizing 
a combination of microwave, H.320, H.323, MPEG, streaming, and emerging tech- 
nologies NC A&T State University is now in the position to deliver distance learning 
programs to anywhere in the world. 

The Converged Telecommunications Services department is responsible for managing 
all voice services and voice related applications for the University, faculty, staff, and 
student populations. The mission of Telecommunication Services is to provide effec- 
tive and efficient voice products and services to NC A&T State University. 

d. Research Computing, Academic Labs, Student Technology Services (STS) - The 
goal of Research Computing is to establish a research infrastructure that maximizes 
and leverages the usage and deployment of computer hardware and software at the 
university. 

Academic Labs exists to maintain and provide a productive accessible environment for 
students (and faculty) to accomplish their work. 

Student Technical Services (STS) provides a student run organization that supplies 
student resources to technical areas around campus to enhance the student learning and 
to supply critical resources that supplement existing ITT employees and non-student 
workers. 

e. Security and Audits (SA) - The mission of IT Security and Audits is to provide guid- 
ance relevant to making information technology resources accessible for appropriate 
academic and administrative purposes, yet secure from inappropriate intrusion or us- 

18 



age. This will be achieved by engaging the campus community in security education 
and end user audit compliance with university policies. This department monitors ad- 
herence to federal and state legislation regarding information technology. 

f. Special Projects and Programs (SPP) - SPP provides support for the Division of 
Business and Finance, Financial Records Systems (FRS) and other special projects 
Programs as they arise. FRS is a critical part of the SCT-centric ERP system. 

g. Systems and Support (SS) - is responsible for the technical support of the ITT infra- 
structure: back office systems, storage and computing systems configurations, 
maintenance, performance, and general operations. 

Systems and Support provides consulting services and information technology support 
to University faculty, staff, students, and external stakeholders. The Aggie Help Desk 
is the centralized point of contact for initiating or receiving status updates and requests. 
The Aggie Help Desk coordinates the support and services provided by all depart- 
ments in the Division of Information Technology and Telecommunications. 

h. The Department of Web Support Services (WSS) - The WSS department was cre- 
ated to provide support for the development, implementation and maintenance of the 
front-end portal and web interface for the ITT infrastructure. WSS is responsible for 
establishing website and portal policies, processes, procedures and standards for as- 
sisting the campus learning community with website management and development 
for publication, communication and collaboration. WSS communicates information 
on courses of study, faculty and student research, schedule of activities and outreach 
programs to potential students, researchers, corporate partners and other visitors. WSS 
also provide support for Internet, Intranet and Extranet design to facilitate such activi- 
ties as post grades, course schedules, lesson plans, and other documentation critical for 
students, faculty and staff web-based learning, discover and engage. 

3) Office of the Assistant Vice Chancellor for ITT and Chief ITT Architect - The chief 
ITT architect is responsible for the overall architectural design and coordination of the 
consolidated ITT infrastructure. This office is responsible for coordinating technology de- 
sign and development plans for all departments in the Division of ITT, throughout the 
University and with external groups to ensure that the campus infrastructure is developed 
and implemented using a consistent, comprehensive set of guiding technology principles 
and standards. 

4) Office of the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Teaching and Learning Systems (TLT) - 

The mission of Teaching and Learning Technology is to develop, deploy and manage the 
infrastructure and curriculum for delivering technology proficiency and professional de- 
velopment competencies of the University community including students, faculty, and staff. 
TLT also engages in community-based initiatives addressing the "digital divide." 

THE CENTER FOR STUDENT SUCCESS 

The Center for Student Success is organized to provide services to students who need 
assistance in strengthening their academic skills. The objective of this program is to promote 
the academic success of students by providing academic support through advising, facilitat- 
ing choice of major and career direction, and promoting student integration into the Univer- 
sity community. This program helps undeclared students develop a foundation for complet- 
ing their college careers and assists in the orientation of new students. 

The program provides special classes in mathematics, and university experience. Addi- 
tionally, the program coordinates tutorials, academic monitoring of Student Athletes, peer 
advising, and campus-wide academic advising and retention. 



19 



WASTE MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE 

The Interdisciplinary Waste Management Institute (WMI) coordinates the waste manage- 
ment efforts of the University. The goal of the Waste Management Institute is to help raise 
public consciousness of environmental security and waste management issues. Waste Man- 
agement activities are conducted through faculty members and facilities of the participating 
departments. The Waste Management Institute administers an undergraduate and graduate 
certificate programs. The Waste Management Certificate highlights the training of A&T stu- 
dents in environmental security and waste management issues. 

THE DIVISION OF DEVELOPMENT AND UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

The Division of Development and University Relations encompasses the program areas of 
Development, University Relations, Alumni Affairs, Advancement Services, the University 
Foundation and other administrative functions related to overall institutional advancement 
and marketing. In addition, the office aids in conducting the affairs of the North Carolina 
A&T University Foundation, Inc., which has been established to assist in soliciting gifts, 
grants and contributions from public and private sources for such worthy purposes as student 
scholarships, faculty development, library resources, specialized equipment and cultural and 
public service programs. 

It is the mission of the Division to build, maintain and expand relationships of the Univer- 
sity with its many publics for purposes of increasing both the financial and human resources 
of the University; to cultivate the goodwill of the University's many publics; and to market 
the University, its programs and services to their best possible advantages. 

The Development offices and Alumni Affairs are located in Suite 400 of the Dowdy Ad- 
ministration Building. The University Relations department is located in the Garret House on 
Nocho Street next to Murphy Hall; the Foundation is located in 172 Aggie Suites off of Benbow 
Street. 

DIVISION OF RESEARCH 

The Division of Research & Economic Development administers and manages research 
and sponsored programs as well as technology transfer and commercialization for the Uni- 
versity. Headed by the Vice Chancellor for Research & Economic Development, the division 
is made up of the Vice Chancellor's management team, the Office of Sponsored Programs, 
the Office of Technology Transfer and Outreach, the Office of Compliance and the Office of 
Research Services. The Division coordinates interdisciplinary funding opportunities among 
the University's colleges and schools and assists in transforming research into marketable 
economic opportunities. 

AUXILIARY SERVICES 

The Office of Auxiliary Services is responsible for administering, planning, and directing 
the University auxiliaries, including the Aggie C-Store, Aggie OneCard Center, Food Ser- 
vices, Mail Center, Ticket Operations, University Bookstore, and Vending Services. This of- 
fice also supervises and serves as Business Manager for the Athletics Department, Housing, 
Health Services, Student Union, and Police and Public Safety. 

Each auxiliary relates directly to the objectives of the University. Its significant contribu- 
tions to the realization of University objectives are measured directly by the quality of ser- 
vices rendered. Such functions provide needed services and also allow the University to ben- 
efit from these services without substantial cost. 



20 



UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE 

Located on the corner of Laurel and Bluford Streets in Brown Hall, the University Book- 
store offers a wide variety of services to the university community. The newest addition to its 
offerings is the ability to place orders online. Place your order today at 
www.ncatbookstore.com! Freshmen desiring to have their books ready at the beginning of 
each semester should use the bookstore's Textbook Pre-Pack Service offered during orienta- 
tion. A variety of computer hardware and software supplies are available from Dell and Apple 
at educational prices. The Bookstore offers snacks, school supplies, clothing, cards, note- 
books, and calculators! Other services include expanded store hours to satisfy the Aggie in 
you during home football games, a photocopying machine, fax services and free notary ser- 
vice. For added convenience, a Wachovia teller machine is located in the same building. For 
more information on the Bookstore's offerings, please call 336-334-7593 or visit our website 
at www.ncatbookstore.com. 

AGGIE C-STORE 

The Aggie C-Store is a full-service convenience store located in the Memorial Student 
Union. Students can use their Aggie OneCard to purchase a wide variety of perishable/non- 
perishable products, which are sold within this unit. Such products include drinks, milk, can 
goods, medicine, etc. The Aggie C-Store is open Monday through Thursday from 9:00 a.m. to 
8:00 p.m. Its convenient operating hours on Friday are 9:00 am to 6:00 pm and on Saturday 
from 10:00 am to 8:00 pm. 

AGGIE ONECARD 

The Aggie OneCard Center is located in room 215 of the Memorial Student Union. Cur- 
rently, the University's patrons and visitors can make purchases at various campus locations. 
Students, Faculty, and Staff are able to open a debit plan on their Aggie OneCard account by 
depositing money. The debit plan can then be used to make purchases at vending machines, 
laundry machines, the University Bookstore, the Tickets Office, the Bluford Library, Health 
Services, and to purchase meals at Williams Cafeteria, Boss Webster, Aggie Sit-In, Cafe-A- 
La-Carte and Freshens. Laundry facilities in the residence halls allow card usage and so do 
vending machines in many academic buildings and residence halls. This card also operates as 
an "access key" for specific buildings in Aggieland. Currently, all residence halls and some 
student labs are equipped with door access readers. To obtain access privileges in any of these 
facilities, please contact the ITT Help Desk or the Aggie OneCard Office. 

If your card is lost or stolen, please report it to the Aggie OneCard Center immediately at 
336-334-7114 during office hours and to Campus Police after hours 336-334-7675. This is 
for your protection and it will prevent others from using your card fraudulently. The Aggie 
OneCard Center is open Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm. If you need to 
contact the Aggie OneCard Center after 5:00 pm or on weekends, you should call the Univer- 
sity Police Dispatch Office at 336-334-7675. If your card is lost/stolen/damaged, there will 
be a $20 replacement fee, which will have to be paid at the OneCard Center. 

FOOD SERVICE 

The University seeks to provide dining for students at the most reasonable rate possible. 
Therefore, the University operates dining services on a contractual basis providing students 
with a healthy variety of nutritious foods on campus. 

Students assigned to University Housing accommodations are required to participate in 
the dining program. The dining program allows a student to choose a meal plan based on the 
number of meals per week (any 7, 14, 19 meals per week or the declining balance) or the 



21 



Aggie Dining Dollars ($100, $200, $300, $400). Each meal plan comes with complimentary 
flex dollars. Students living off-campus are welcome to participate in the dining program. 

Dining at NC A&T State University offers students more of a variety with seven different 
retail locations and a main dining facility. 

TICKET OFFICE 

The University Ticket Office is located in Brown Hall at the corner of Bluford and Laurel 
Streets. The mission of the Ticket Office is to support the campus and external community by 
managing and promoting ticket sales for Athletics and other University events. Coming soon, 
the Ticket Office will allow patrons the convenience of placing ticket orders online. Our 
normal operating hours are Monday through Friday 9:00 am until 6:00 pm; hours may vary 
depending on seasonal and other events. The telephone number to reach us is 336-334-7749 
or you may fax us at 336-334-7382. Call or come by for all your University ticketing needs! 

MAIL CENTER 

The University Mail Center is located on the lower lever of Brown Hall on Laurel Street 
and serves only as a postal station. Postage stamps are sold but services such as the purchase 
of postal money orders or cashing checks are not rendered. The Mail Center offers centralized 
mailboxes for students assigned to residence halls. Mail is placed directly into mailboxes 
assigned to each resident. An annual refundable key deposit of ten dollars ($10.00) is re- 
quired. The Mail Center window is open weekdays from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm and on Saturday 
from 9:00 am to 1 :00 pm. The window service hours on weekdays (to receive special mail and 
packages, etc.) will be from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm and on Saturday from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm. 
The Mail Center also offers express mailing via the U.S. Postal Service, Federal Express 
(Fedex) and United Parcel Services (UPS). 






22 



STUDENT LIFE 



STUDENT DEVELOPMENT SERVICES 

http://www.ncat.edu/~studev/ 

The Division of Student Affairs shoulders the major responsibility for Student Develop- 
ment Services. The Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs is the Chief Administrative Officer. 
The division is comprised of (15) fifteen departments assigned to major units that are super- 
vised by the Executive for Budget Planning and Personnel Services, Executive Director for 
Student Development, Executive Director for Career Services, Executive Assistant to VC for 
Student Affairs, Executive Director of Housing, Dean of Students, Director for University 
Events, Executive Director for Auxiliary Services for Student Affairs, Executive Director for 
Orientation, First Year Experience and Director for Athletics. 

Student Services Units at the University are organized for the purpose of providing pro- 
grams and services that complement the academic mission of the University and contribute to 
the intellectual, social, moral, cultural, and physical development of students. These pro- 
grams and services are designed to meet the expressed out-of-classroom needs of students 
while they pursue academic careers at the University. 

Student Affairs work with students in areas of counseling, leadership development, stu- 
dent housing and student activities, student governance and community service. Such activi- 
ties assist students in finding "a sense of belonging, responsibility, and achievement." The 
Division carries out its purpose through: 

1 . Providing leadership development opportunities for student leaders, the Student Govern- 
ment Association, the Student Union Advisory Board, the Counsel of Presidents, 
organizations such as NPHC sororities and fraternities, and service organizations. 

2. Providing improved services for students that support their personal and social develop- 
ment. 

3. Developing activities and programs that accommodate the special needs of off-campus, 
non-traditional and other. 

4. Providing programs to accommodate the special needs of minority students. 

Consistent with the overall goals of the University, Student Development Services include 
the following array of programs and activities: (1) Counseling Services, (2) Career Services, 
(3) Student Government Association, (4) Student Activities and Publications, (5) Health Ser- 
vices, (6) Intramural Sports, (7) Veteran and Disability Support Services, (8) Student Support 
Services, (9) Housing & Residence Life, (10) Memorial Student Union, (11) International 
Student Affairs, (12) Upward Bound Program, (13) Student Development, (14) Minority Af- 
fairs, (15) Ronald E. McNair Program, and (16) Judicial Affairs. 

Some of the specific services are described as follows: 

COUNSELING SERVICES 

http://www.ncat.edu/~counsel 

The University makes provisions for counseling, testing and guidance for all students 
through Counseling Services, located in 108 Murphy Hall. 

Counseling Services conducts a testing program for all freshman students. The results of 
this program are used to assist freshmen in the planning of their educational and vocational 
careers. The Office conducts other testing programs that are required or desired by the depart- 
ments of the University. 

Counseling Services offers students the opportunity to discuss with a trained professional 
counselor or clinical psychologist any questions, dilemmas, needs, problems or concerns in- 
volving educational, career/vocational, social, personal or emotional adjustments that may 
occur during their college experience. 



23 



The following is a list of services available through Counseling Services: 

1 . Individual and group personal counseling; 

2. Academic and Career. Vocational Counseling; 

3. Individual test administration and interpretation covering the areas of intelligence, apti- 
tude, personality, interest, achievement and other areas requiring special needs; 

4. University Diagnostic and Placement Testing Program for all freshmen to assist in the 
planning of their educational and vocational careers and other programs required or de- 
sired by departments of the University; 

5. College Level Examination Program (CLEP) for course credit by examination; 

6. National Testing Program, which includes administration of the Medical College Admis- 
sion Test (MCAT), National League of Nursing Tests and application and information for 
the Graduate Record Examination, PRAXIS Teacher Examinations, Graduate Manage- 
ment Admission Test, and other similar examinations; 

7. Graduate student internship training site; 

8. Graduate school information and cooperation in the placement of graduates who desire to 
pursue graduate studies; 

9. Withdrawal Exit Interview; and 

10. Outreach counseling programs and activities. 

All counseling is voluntary, free of charge, private and confidential. 

HEALTH SERVICES 

http://www.ncat.edu/~health 

A Director of Health Services manages the Sebastian Health Center. Medical services are 
available to all students in the student health center if they have paid the student health fee as 
part of their general university fee. 

The basic components of the Health Service Program are as follows: 

1. Medical Services: The University Physicians are in attendance in the Health Center daily 
(hours for routine treatment are posted) — and "On 24 hour call" for any emergency situ- 
ations. 

2. Nursing Services: Registered nurses, under the direction of the Nurse Supervisor, are in 
attendance daily to evaluate and treat students' health needs and answer any questions 
pertaining to health problems and other concerns. 

3. Laboratory Services: A Certified Medical Technologist is on duty daily, Monday - Fri- 
day to perform various laboratory tests as ordered by the physician to diagnose a variety of 
medical problems. 

4. Medical Records: The Medical Records Director is responsible for maintaining a physi- 
cally secure and confidential file of all student health records in the Health Center. 
Additionally, the North Carolina State Immunization Law stipulates required vaccines must 
be on file in the medical records department of the Health Center prior to registration. 

5 . Pharmacy Services: A registered pharmacist is available Monday-Friday to dispense medi- 
cation and provide patient teaching about all prescriptions filled. 

6. Health Education Services: Prevention education is available through the health educator 
on a variety of health conditions. The Health Educator is available Monday-Friday to assist 
students with any health issues or concerns. 

The Center provides up-to-date and emerging information on health related issues and 
concerns on a continuing basis for the University community. 



24 



DRUG AND ALCOHOL EDUCATION POLICY 

Preamble: 

The basic mission of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is to 
provide an educational environment that enhances and supports the intellectual process. The 
academic community, including students, faculty and staff has the collective responsibility to 
ensure that this environment is conducive to healthy intellectual growth. The illegal use of 
harmful and addictive chemical substances and the abuse of alcohol pose a threat to the edu- 
cational environment. Thus, this Drug and Alcohol Education Policy is being applied to assist 
members of the University community in their understanding of the harmful effects of illegal 
drugs and alcohol abuse; of the incompatibility of illegal drugs and the abuse of alcohol with 
the educational mission of the University; and of the consequences of the use, possession or 
sale of such illegal drugs and the abuse of alcohol, including the violation of applicable laws. 

Objectives: 

I. To develop an educational program that increases the University community's knowledge 
and competency to make informed decisions relative to the use and abuse of controlled 
substances and alcohol; and 

II. To increase those skills and attributes required taking corrective action conducive to the 
health and well being of potential drug and alcohol abusers. 

Program Components: 

There are five (5) components to this policy: 

I. Education 

II. Health Risks 

III. Rehabilitation 

IV. Sanctions 

V. Dissemination and Review 

I. EDUCATION 

It is the intent of the Drug and Alcohol Education Policy of North Carolina Agricultural 
and Technical State University to insure that all members of the University community (i.e. 
students, faculty, administrators and other employees) are aware that the use, sale and/or 
possession of illegal drugs and the abuse of alcohol are incompatible with the goals of the 
University. Moreover, each person should be aware that the use, sale or possession of illegal 
drugs and the abuse of alcohol are, as more specifically set forth later in this policy, subject to 
specific sanctions and penalties. 

All members of the University family are reminded that in addition to being subject to 
University regulations and sanctions regarding illegal drugs and the abuse of alcohol, they are 
also subject to the laws of the state and of the nation. Each individual is also reminded that it 
is not a violation of "double jeopardy" to be subject to the terms of this policy as well as the 
provisions of the North Carolina General Statutes. For a listing of relevant state criminal 
statutes, please see Appendix A. Further questions may be directed to the Office of the Uni- 
versity Attorney or the Office of Student Affairs. 

Each member of the University community is asked to pay particular attention to the full 
consequences of the sanctions specified in this policy as well as the consequences of the 
North Carolina criminal law referenced above. Certain violations may jeopardize an individual's 
future as it relates to continued University enrollment or future employment possibilities, 
depending on individual circumstances. 

25 



Further, it is a policy of the University that the educational, legal and medical aspects of 
this issue be emphasized on an annual basis through the provision of programs and activities 
in the following areas: 

(a) Annual Drug and Alcohol Education Week - Workshops and seminars on drug abuse 
led by former drug addicts and community agencies such as MADD, SADD, and the 
Sycamore Center; 

(b) Drug and Alcohol Awareness Fair - Exhibits featuring drug and alcohol related para- 
phernalia; 

(c) Media presentations on the University radio station, WNAA, emphasizing the most 
current programs with drug and alcohol education messages; 

(d) "Home for the Holidays, Don't Drink and Drive"; Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention 
Campaign; 

(e) Publication of brochure on drug education; 

(f) Continuous monthly outreach programs in each residence hall. 

Although directed primarily to the student population, the above noted educational pro- 
grams shall also open to participation by all categories of University employees. 

Additionally, the Staff Development Office is the designated University department respon- 
sible for the planning and implementation of drug and alcohol education programs geared 
toward the special needs of the faculty and staff. Among the programs to be implemented by 
the Staff Development Office are lunchtime seminars jointly conducted by the Sycamore Cen- 
ter, the Greensboro Police Department and the Guilford County Mental Health Department. 

II. HEALTH RISKS 

Health risks, associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol, are wide 
ranging and varied depending on the specific substance involved and individual abuse pat- 
tern. These risks include, but are not limited to: 

1 . Physical changes which alter bodily functions such as severely increased or decreased 
cardiac output; shallow to irregular respiration; and damage to other major organs, 
such as kidney, liver and brain; 

2. Emotional and psychological changes including paranoia, depression, hostility, anxi- 
ety, mood swings and instability; 

3. Additional health risks could include such illnesses as AIDS HIV infection, sexually 
transmitted diseases, severe weight loss, cancer, cirrhosis, hepatitis, short-term memory 
loss, seizures, and deformities to unborn children; 

4. Physical and psychological dependency (addiction); and 

5. Death from overdose or continuous use. 

While these health risks are broad in range, persons consuming illicit drugs and alcohol 
will exemplify some, if not all, of the above symptoms. See Appendix A for a list of a few 
specific drugs and their corresponding health risks. 

III. REHABILITATION 

The University recognizes that rehabilitation is an integral part of an effective drug and 
alcohol policy. Consistent with its commitment in the areas of education and sanctions, it is 
the University's intent to provide an opportunity for rehabilitation to all members of the Uni- 
versity family. This commitment is evidenced through access to existing University resources 
and is furthered by referrals to community agencies. 



26 



Students: 

The University Counseling Center and the Student Health Center are available to provide 
medical and psychological assessments of students with drug/alcohol dependency and drug/ 
alcohol abuse problems. Based on the outcome of this assessment, treatment can be provided 
by either or both of these centers. If, however, the scope of the problem is beyond the capabil- 
ity of these Centers, affected students will be referred to community agencies, such as the 
Guilford County Mental Health Center and Greenpoint. The cost of such services shall be the 
individual's responsibility. 

Employees: 

Referrals to local community agencies will be made available to include the Guilford County 
Mental Health Center, Greenpoint and private physicians. The cost of such services will be 
the individual's responsibility. The services of the University's Counseling and Health Cen- 
ters are not normally utilized by faculty and staff members except in emergency situations. 

IV. SANCTIONS 

A. Illegal Drugs/Prohibited Conduct 

All members of the University community have the responsibility for being knowledge- 
able about and in compliance with the provisions of North Carolina law as it relates to the 
use, possession or sale of illegal drugs as set forth in Article 5, Chapter 90 of the North 
Carolina General Statutes. Any violations of this law by members of the university family 
subjects the individual to prosecution both by University disciplinary proceedings and by 
civil authorities. It is not a violation of "double jeopardy" to be prosecuted by both of these 
authorities. The University will initiate its own disciplinary proceedings against a student, 
faculty member, administrator or other employee when the alleged conduct is deemed to 
affect the interests of the University. 

Penalties will be imposed by the University in compliance with procedural safeguards 
applicable to disciplinary actions against students (see the Student Handbook), faculty mem- 
bers (see the Faculty Handbook), administrators (see the Board of Governors Policies 
Concerning Senior Administrative Officers as well as the EPA Non-Teaching Personnel 
Policies) and SPA employees (see State Personnel Commission Policies). 

The penalties imposed for such violations range from written warnings with probationary 
status to expulsion from enrollment and discharges from employment. However, minimum 
penalties that apply for each violation are listed in Appendix A. For additional information, 
direct questions to the Office of the University Attorney or the Office of Student Affairs. It 
should be noted that where the relevant sanction dictates a minimum of one semester sus- 
pension from employment, the regulations of the State Personnel Commission (as pertaining 
to SPA employees) do not permit suspension from employment of this duration. Thus, 
such sanction as applied to SPA employees dictates the termination of employment. 

B. Alcohol/Prohibited Conduct 

1. Employees: 

While the sale, possession, or consumption of alcoholic beverages is not illegal under 
state or federal law, it is, hereby, the policy of North Carolina Agricultural and Techni- 
cal State University that the consumption of alcohol sufficient to interfere with or prohibit 
the otherwise normal execution of job responsibilities is improper and subjects the 
employee to appropriate disciplinary procedures. It is also the policy of North Carolina 
Agricultural and Technical State University that alcoholic beverages not sold on cam- 
pus. Employees violating the above noted policies are subject to appropriate disciplinary 
procedures, which range from warning and probation to dismissal consistent with the 
individual circumstances. 

27 



Similarly, employees are reminded that, under N.C. law, it is illegal to sell or give malt 
beverages, unfortified wine, fortified wine, spirituous liquor or mixed beverages to 
anyone less than 21 years old. It is also illegal to aid and abet any person less than 21 
years old in the purchase or possession of the alcoholic beverages noted above. Em- 
ployees found violating these state laws are subject to legal sanction as well as the 
appropriate disciplinary procedures. 

2. Students: 

Students are reminded of the following University regulations and state laws regarding 
alcoholic beverages as contained in the Student Handbook: 

1. Students are liable for violation of State Law GS 18B-302 while on University 
premises: 18B-302 Sale to or Purchase by Underage Persons 

a. Sale - It shall be unlawful for any person to: 

I. Sell or give malt beverages or unfortified wine to anyone less than 2 1 years 
old; or 

II. Sell or give fortified wine, spirituous liquor, or mixed beverages to anyone 
less than 21 years old. 

b. Purchase or Possession - It shall be unlawful for: 

I. A person less than 21 years old to purchase, to attempt to purchase, or to 
possess malt beverages or unfortified wine; or 

II. A person less than 21 years old to purchase, to attempt to purchase, or 
possess fortified wine, spirituous liquor, or mixed beverages. 

c. Aider and Abettor 

I. By Underage Person - Any person under the lawful age to purchase and 
who aids or abets another in violation of subsection (a) or (b) of this sec- 
tion shall be guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of up to five 
hundred dollars ($500.00) or imprisonment for not more than six months, 
or both, at the discretion of the court. 

II. By Person over Lawful Age - Any person who is over the lawful age to 
purchase and who aids or abets another in violation of subsection (a) or (b) 
of this section shall be guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of up 
to two thousand dollars ($2,000) or imprisonment for not more than two 
years, or both, at the discretion of the court. 

1. Students are responsible for conforming to state laws pertaining to: 

a. Transportation of alcoholic beverages 

b. Consumption of alcoholic beverages in public places 

c. Consumption of alcoholic beverages by students under the legal age 

d. Abuses of alcoholic beverages 

2. There will be no consumption of alcoholic beverages in a motor vehicle while on Uni- 
versity property or on University streets. 

3. Personal consumption of alcoholic beverages is restricted to students' rooms in resi- 
dence halls, if they are of legal drinking age. 

4. The possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages shall not be permitted in public 
places, such as lounges, game rooms, study rooms, kitchens, laundries or patios. 

5. There will be no public display of alcoholic beverages. 

6. The University discourages the drinking of alcoholic beverages, and other abuses of 
alcoholic beverages. Being under the influence of alcohol is considered a breach of 
conduct, and students who violate these standards are subject to disciplinary action. 

28 



Violations of the above regulations and laws will subject students to criminal prosecution 
as well as campus-based charges. 

C. Suspension Pending Final Disposition 

The University reserves the right through the Chancellor or his designee to suspend a stu- 
dent, faculty member, administrator and other employee between the time of the initiation 
of charges and the hearing to be held. Such decision will be made based on whether the 
person's continued presence within the University community will constitute a clear and 
immediate danger or disruption to the University. In such circumstances the hearing will be 
held as promptly as possible. 

V. DISSEMINATION 

A copy of the Drug and Alcohol Education Policy will be distributed on an annual basis to 
each employee and student of the University. The distribution to all enrolled students will 
occur as a part of the registration process. The University Personnel Office will administer the 
distribution to University employees. 

The Chancellor of the University shall insure on a biennial basis that this policy is re- 
viewed for purposes of assessing its effectiveness, consistency of application of sanctions and 
to determine the necessity for modification. This review shall be conducted by October 15 of 
every other year, beginning in 1992. 

CONCLUSION 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University recognizes that the use of ille- 
gal drugs and the abuse of alcohol are a national problem and that sustained efforts must be 
made to educate the University family regarding the consequences associated with drug and 
alcohol abuse. The primary emphasis in this policy has therefore been on providing drug and 
alcohol abuse counseling and rehabilitation services through the various programs and activi- 
ties outlined above. 

Past experience suggests that most members of the University family are law abiding and 
will use this policy as a guide for their future behaviors and as a mechanism to influence their 
peers and colleagues in a positive direction. However, those who choose to violate any por- 
tions of this policy will pay the penalty for non-compliance. The main thrust of this policy has 
been to achieve a balance between its educational and punitive components. 

The effective implementation of this policy rests on its wide dissemination to all members 
of the University family. This will be accomplished by the dissemination procedure previ- 
ously outlined and through its publication in the Faculty Handbook, Student Handbook and 
University Catalogue. All affected individuals can be assured that applicable professional 
standards of confidentiality will be maintained at all times. 

FOOD SERVICES 

The University provides food services for students at a reasonable cost. Several snack bar 
options are located in the Memorial Student Union Building. Students who live in the resi- 
dence halls are required to purchase a meal plan; several options are available (minimum 10/ 
week). Students who live off campus may also purchase meals or a meal plan. 

HOUSING AND RESIDENCE LIFE 

http://www.ncat.edu/~housing/ 

Administering to the physical environmental needs, along with the personal, educational 
and cultural development of over 4,200 residents, Housing and Residence Life support students' 
academic success. The Department strives to achieve this goal through the maintenance of 



29 



comfortable, clean and safe living and learning environments, coupled with developing 
partnerships with other entities that attend to the critical thinking, problem-solving, and 
community and civic responsibility perspectives and understandings of students. 

MEMORIAL STUDENT UNION 

http://www.ncat.edu/~memorial 

The Memorial Union functions as the "Community Center" for the University and its 
constituency by providing a variety of services and activities. The "Union" building encom- 
passes over 60,000 square feet of space and serves as the headquarters for the Student Gov- 
ernment Association, the Student Union Advisory Board, Campus Ministries/A&T Fellow- 
ship Gospel Choir, Aggie Escort Service, The Yearbook Office, computer lab and the Com- 
muter Student Center. Additionally, the Memorial Student Union offers room accommoda- 
tions for small group meetings or large banquet activities, lounge areas, self-service vending, 
the "Aggie Sit-In" food court, a game room, convenience store, and the Information Center. 

A primary goal of the Memorial Student Union is to promote an involved community 
through its various services, facilities, and programs. The Union's location in the heart of the 
north campus provides a co-curricular community for students, faculty members, alumni, and 
guests served by the university. The programming and recreational activities of the Student 
Union Advisory Board have a unique focus on the cultural and social development of the 
student community. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND ACTIVITIES 

http://www.ncat/edu/~studev/ 

The University provides a well-balanced program of activities for moral, spiritual, cultural 
and physical development of its students. Religious, cultural, social and recreational activi- 
ties are sponsored by various committees, departments, and organizations of the University. 
Outstanding artists, lecturers and dramatic productions are brought to the campus. 

The Office of the Vice Chancellor publishes a listing of student organizations, their pur- 
poses, objectives, chief officers, and advisors annually for Student Development. This docu- 
ment is available upon request by this office located in Murphy Hall Room 102. 

AGGIE PRDDE COMPACT 

Achieving Great Goals In Everything - 
Producing Renowned Individuals Dedicated To Excellence 

The essence of Aggie Pride is manifested in standards depicting what it truly means to be 
a responsible member of The North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University 
Family. These standards provide the impetus and inspiration, which motivate students, fac- 
ulty, staff, administrators, and trustees alike in their perpetual commitment to excellence. 
North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University has a unique legacy of nurturing 
individual students to realize their fullest potential. 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is a learner-centered commu- 
nity that develops and preserves intellectual capital through interdisciplinary learning, dis- 
covery, engagement, and operational excellence. As members of the university community, 
all stakeholders share a pervasive sense of trust, pride, and allegiance in ensuring the preemi- 
nent status of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University in a global society. 
The following standards define the essence of Aggie Pride: 



30 



Aggie Pride is consistently communicating and behaving in a manner that displays integ- 
rity, honesty, sound character, and virtuous ethics. (Values) 

Aggie Pride is expecting and achieving success and setting high standards in all personal 
and professional ventures. (Achievement) 

Aggie Pride is taking a personal stand to positively affect the continuous growth, develop- 
ment and enhancement of the University at large. (Commitment) 

Aggie Pride is accepting and demonstrating a steadfast commitment to learning by taking 
responsibility through personal and professional development. (Self-determination) 

Aggie Pride is striving to significantly influence the development of individuals of all ages 
within and beyond our community to become lifelong learners. (Lifelong Learning) 

Aggie Pride is exhibiting a positive and willing attitude to unselfishly serve and to pledge 
ones talents and gifts for the betterment of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State 
University and the larger world community. (Service) 

Aggie Pride is contributing to the establishment and maintenance of a safe, clean, and 
aesthetically appealing campus with a favorable ecosystem. (Building Community) 

Aggie Pride is exhibiting a relentless desire and commitment to treat all individuals with a 
high level of appreciation and respect and to expect the same in return. (Respect) 

Aggie Pride is effectively representing the University by utilizing personal knowledge, 
skills, and resources. (Confidence) 

Aggie Pride builds on the past, maintains the present, and accepts the challenges of the 
future while providing our personal financial resources to preserve our legacy and ensure our 
future. (Legacy) 

Therefore, as a member of the North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University 
family, I unconditionally accept the obligation entrusted to me to live my life according to the 
standards set forth in this Compact. By my words and actions, I commit to Aggie Pride and 
the pursuit of excellence for myself and for my university. 

STUDENT CONDUCT 

Students enrolled at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University are ex- 
pected to conduct themselves properly at all times. They are expected to observe standards of 
behavior and integrity that will reflect favorably upon themselves, their families, and the 
University. They are further expected to abide by the laws of the city, state, and nation, and by 
all rules and regulations of the University. 

Accordingly, any student who demonstrates an unwillingness to obey the rules and regula- 
tions that are prescribed or that may be prescribed to govern the student body will be placed 
on probation, suspended or expelled from the institution. 

A student may forfeit the privilege of working for the University when, for any reason, he 
or she is placed on probation because of misconduct. 

COMPUTER USE POLICY STATEMENT 

Students of North Carolina A&T State University are authorized to use computer net- 
works, equipment and related resources pursuant to administrative regulations established 
and promulgated by the Chancellor or his/her designee. All students are expected to follow 
the computer use policy and related University rules, regulations and procedures for com- 
puter usage and work produced on computing equipment, systems, and networks of the uni- 
versity. Students may access these technologies for personal use on a restricted basis. 

31 



Please refer to the Computing and Networking Usage Policy and Lab Usage Policy at the 
www.ncat.edu/~cit/policies/ for permissible use. Any violation of these policies is considered 
"misconduct" subject to the University's disciplinary procedures. Sanctions for violation of 
this policy may include revocation or suspension of computer access privileges in addition to 
any other sanction permitted under student conduct and academic policies. Violations of state 
or federal laws may also be referred to the appropriate authorities for criminal or civil action. 
Students are encouraged to contact the Client Services Department or the Aggie Helpdesk for 
information regarding any computer usage matters. 

VETERAN AFFAIRS 

http://www.ncat.edu/~ovdss/ 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is an approved site for veter- 
ans and veteran dependents wishing to attend and receive educational benefits. 

State University is done through normal admissions procedures. The issuing of a Certifi- 
cate of Eligibility by the Veterans Administration does not automatically assure a student of 
admission to the University. 

The Office of Veterans Affairs located in Suite 005, Murphy Hall has been established to 
assist veterans and veteran dependents with enrollment and adjustment to college life. Upon 
enrolling at the University, the veteran or eligible person should report to the Office of Veter- 
ans Affairs so that verification of enrollment can be sent to the Veterans Administration. If a 
Certificate of Eligibility has not been issued, the veterans or the eligible person should see the 
University Certifying Official. 

The Office also provides counseling and tutorial services as necessary. 
DISABILITY SUPPORT SERVICES 

http://www.ncat.edu/~ovdss/ 

The Office of Disability Support Services assures ready accessibility of all academic pro- 
grams, services, and activities to any person with a documented disability matriculating at the 
University. Likewise, services focus on facility accessibility and safety. 

The office staff serves as a liaison for students with disabilities as they participate in pro- 
grams and activities enjoyed by all students. The office staff arranges for any necessary rea- 
sonable accommodations or academic adjustments. Documentation is required for all dis- 
abilities. 

All information and services for persons with disabilities are confidential. The office is 
located in Suite 005 Murphy Hall. Students needing academic adjustments or accommoda- 
tions must be registered with this office. 

OFFICE OF CAREER SERVICES 

http://www.careerserv.ncat.edu 

The primary mission of the Office of Career Services at North Carolina Agricultural and 
Technical State University is to provide centralized, comprehensive and progressive programs, 
services and resources designed to prepare students to successfully pursue meaningful career 
opportunities. Continuous career development assistance is also available to alumni of the 
University. Individuals who are formally enrolled in a degree program at North Carolina 
Agricultural and Technical State University or who are A&T graduates are eligible to use the 
facilities, programs and services of the Office of Career Services. These services include the 
following: 

32 



Student Employment Programs 

Cooperative Education Program (Co-op) is an optional, counseling-centered program 
that offers students the opportunity to alternate periods of academic study with periods of 
work closely related to their major fields of study. The program is non-compulsory; however, 
the University urges students to consider co-op a viable alternative to gain work experience 
before graduation. Students who (1) maintain at least a 2.0 overall grade point average, (2) 
have completed the freshman year, (3) show intent to matriculate and graduate within a four- 
to-five year period, and (4) are willing to commit to a mutually agreed upon work schedule 
are eligible to compete for positions. Transfer and graduate students are also eligible for co- 
op after completing one semester of successful full-time study. Interested students must be 
registered with the Office of Career Services and closely match the qualifications requested 
by the employer. Selections are made by the employer with appropriately weighted consider- 
ation given to academic standing, skills and interest in the work to be performed. 

While on work assignment, students are considered in good standing with the University; 
however, they may not be enrolled in courses unless they are applying for academic credit. 
Participants are expected to work two to three times before they graduate and at least one 
work period should be scheduled other than a summer session. Students who co-op during the 
fall or spring semester is assessed a $30 administrative fee by the University, which is due and 
payable during the semester of work. In addition, students desiring academic credit for as- 
signments must register through their respective academic departments and pay the required 
tuition. Please contact the Assistant Director of Career Services for Experiential Learning 
with inquiries and questions. 

Part-time employment opportunities are posted as received in the Office of Career Ser- 
vices. These jobs provide local and regional opportunities for students who are interested in 
supplemental income during the school year. Students are responsible for making the appro- 
priate contacts and following through with prospective employers. 

Summer internships offer students the opportunity to gain work experience in industry 
and government. These positions are offered during the summer and are highly competitive. 
For companies that do not actively interview during the recruiting season, applications and 
announcements are available in the Office and online. Opportunities are also available for 
participation in The Institute of Government and the North Carolina State Government In- 
ternship Program. INROADS actively recruits at the University. Interested students must meet 
the criteria and qualifications established by INROADS and the sponsoring employers. 

Permanent Career Options 

On-campus Recruitment is available to degree seeking students and alumni of North Caro- 
lina Agricultural and Technical State University. Opportunities are available in the local, state, 
national and international arenas. North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University 
observes October 1 though November 30 as the official on-campus recruiting period for the 
fall semester. During the spring semester, interviews can be scheduled between late January 
and mid- April. There is no recruiting during the months of May through September nor dur- 
ing the month of December. The Office of Career Services on-campus interview information 
is available online. Students/Alumni must be registered with the Office of Career Services 
before they are allowed to interview. 

Alumni are eligible to participate in the referral service. They must update their on-line 
registration each semester. If alumni wish to schedule interviews, they must observe the policy 
regarding the two business days waiting period. 



33 



The Job Listing Service exposes graduating seniors, graduate students and alumni to thou- 
sands of job opportunities available nationwide. Job listings are available on-line. 

Awareness Programs/Career Fairs 

In addition to the recruitment function, the Office of Career Services is actively involved 
in exposing A&T students to career opportunities and professionals in various career fields. 
This is accomplished through annual career awareness programs, workshops and information 
sessions. The annual programs include the following: 

Career Awareness Fair is held in September to give students an opportunity to network 
with more than 200 companies/agencies to find out services/products produced, majors being 
sought, and opportunities available (permanent, summer, co-op). 

Graduate & Professional School Career Day is usually held in the fall semester and 
allows students an opportunity to broaden their knowledge of post-baccalaureate and post- 
graduate degrees. This career day is attended by graduate and professional schools from across 
the United States. 

Career Day for Nurses is jointly sponsored by the Office of Career Services at A&T and 
UNC-G and the Schools of Nursing at A&T and UNC-G. This day provides an opportunity 
for students to increase their awareness of the types and availability of careers in health services. 

Career Day for Teachers is held during the spring semester and is specifically designed to 
assist education majors. School systems from across the country attend to discuss opportunities 
in teaching and administration. 

N.C. Employers Career Day is set aside for companies/agencies to come to the campus 
during the spring semester to discuss career opportunities within state government and 
businesses. 

The Career Symposium is held in March and is designed to encourage students, especially 
freshmen and sophomores, to start critically thinking, learning and using information 
concerning career related-issues. 

The Experiential Career Fair is held the following day after the symposium. This event 
will provide an opportunity for employers to interact with A&T students of all academic 
disciplines, exchange information and most importantly explore internship and co-op 
opportunities. 

Additional Services 

The Office of Career Services hosts workshops, seminars, counseling sessions, classroom 
presentations, and information sessions on a regular basis. Representatives of industry also 
schedule general information sessions the evening before they interview prospective candidates. 

Career Resources Library is a collection of career literature. Companies/agencies 
conducting on-campus interviews have current literature available in the Office of Career 
Services. Links to companies/agencies Websites can be accessed through Career Services 
Web Page. The Office provides a video library and has individual VCR capabilities for viewing. 

On-line registration and job search information is also available in the office for interested 
students and alumni. Career Services' on-line services can be accessed on the Internet at 
www.careerserv.ncat.edu 



34 



MULTICULTURAL STUDENT CENTER 

http://www.ncat.edu/~multicultural 

The Multicultural Student Center is an integral part of the University and the Division of 
Student Affairs. Located in 213 of Murphy Hall, the Office provides programs and services 
that support the academic mission of the University by enhancing the educational, personal, 
cultural and social development of our diverse student population, including: African, Asian 
and Native American; Caucasian: Hispanic/Latino; International; Veteran; Non-Traditional; 
Students w/Disabilities; Visiting Scholars; and Others. North Carolina A&T State University 
is committed to the enrollment and retention of minority students. The Multicultural Student 
Center seeks to create an awareness of and appreciation for ethnic and cultural diversity by 
promoting culturally diverse activities. Programs and services are available to all students 
addressing academic, cultural and personal needs to ensure that each student in the A&T 
community receives the best education possible. Volunteer service opportunities exist through 
the Multicultural Student Center's Advisory Committee, Newsletter Editorial Board and vari- 
ous other committees. 

Supporting the Multicultural Student Center is one way in which the University has dedi- 
cated itself to building bridges of knowledge, cooperation and understanding between per- 
sons of differing ethnic and social backgrounds. Students are encouraged to affiliate with the 
many student organizations on campus as well. Efforts to serve our students are designed to 
increase the retention and graduation of students through activities, newsletters, workshops, 
mentoring programs, surveys, counseling, and a variety of program outreach services that 
focus on personal development and campus involvement. The Multicultural Student Center 
offers leadership opportunities, social and service activities, often in cooperation with other 
campus organizations. The Center is open from 8am - 5pm daily and is staffed by the Direc- 
tor and Assistant. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS AND SCHOLARS OFFICE (ISSO) 

http://www.ncat.edu~isso 

The International Students and Scholars Office (ISSO) provides services and programs for 
international (foreign-born) students and scholars. The office staff provides assistance with 
pre-arrival preparation, arrival/adjustment assistance, the admission process, housing, insur- 
ance, and immigration matters. Orientation and advisement are provided to assist students 
with their adjustment to the University and community. In cooperation with various depart- 
ments and organizations, including the International Student Association (ISA), the office 
provides activities that enhance cultural, social and personal development. The ISA is open to 
all international students and scholars with an interest in the goals of the organization. Regis- 
tration with the Office of International Students and Scholars Office is required. 

Students and scholars are encouraged to promote multicultural understanding by partici- 
pating in a variety of activities in the Greensboro community. 

Approximately one hundred fifty international students attend the University and they 
represent over 50 countries in the following regions: Africa, Asia, Caribbean/West Indies, 
Central America, Europe, Middle East, North America, and South America. 

All international (foreign-born) students are required to verify the immigration/residency 
status to the International Students and Scholars Office before registering at the University 
and notify the Office immediately of any change in their immigration status and address. 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is authorized under Federal 
law to enroll nonimmigrant students. All F-l non-immigrants are required to obtain an 1-20 

35 



[Certificate of Eligibility for Non-immigrant Student Status for Academic and Language Stu- 
dents] from this institution prior to enrollment. (I-20's issued by another institution are not 
valid for attendance at A&T). The requirements for an 1-20 include acceptance to the Univer- 
sity, a TOEFL score of 550 or above; a financial guarantee (letter of support, bank statement 
and verification of salary from sponsor's employer); and a partial deposit for the first year's 
tuition and fees. Proof of valid immigration status is required if the applicant is currently 
residing in the United States. Individuals seeking J-l status should contact the ISSO Director 
for current immigration regulations and University procedures. Possession of a social secu- 
rity card does not necessarily mean a student is eligible to work off-campus. 

Immigrants must provide the International Students and Scholars Office with a copy of the 
Permanent Resident Card. U.S. Naturalized Citizens should submit the Naturalization Cer- 
tificate and/or a copy of the U.S. Passport. All other applicants should provide the documents 
necessary to verify current immigration status. Information received helps the Office with 
statistical reports on the international student population, maintaining a cultural resource base 
and international student advising. 

All non-immigrants are required to attend the International Student Orientation held dur- 
ing the registration period. The immigration law requires F-l non-immigrants to complete 
their registration with the International Students and Scholars Office within 15 days after 
classes begin. 

All non-immigrants are responsible for maintaining legal immigration status. Non-immi- 
grant students in F- 1 visa status are required by USCIS regulations to enroll full-time, except 
for the summer terms. Full-time enrollment is defined as enrollment every semester in a mini- 
mum of 12 credit hours. F-l non-immigrants are not eligible to work off-campus without 
approval from the USCIS. F-2 and H-4 non-immigrants are not eligible to work. 

The legal regulations governing non-immigrant students are complex. The Director of the 
International Students and Scholars Office is available to explain these regulations in detail 
and strongly urge non-immigrants to seek advice about their legal immigration status. 

It is mandatory for F and J students to purchase and maintain the University's compre- 
hensive health and accident insurance coverage which includes repatriation and medical evacu- 
ation. This policy also has specific levels of coverage to ensure that it adequately meets re- 
quirements to provide for medical costs in the U.S. The ISSO automatically authorizes the 
Treasurer's Office to bill for the cost of University insurance for non-immigrant students 
(new and continuing) at the beginning of each semester. Non-immigrant students and Ex- 
change Visitors are also responsible to purchase and maintain similar coverage for each de- 
pendent present with them inside the U.S. Government sponsored students should discuss the 
insurance issue with and ISSO advisor. The advisor will make the final decision regarding the 
policy provided by the government and determine if it is acceptable. Exchange Visitors in 
professor, researcher, scholar, etc. categories must purchase and maintain coverage require- 
ments for insurance set forth by the Department of State. Exchange Visitor dependent cover- 
age is also required. 

F and J visa holders are considered as non-residents and are assessed non-resident (out-of- 
state) tuition and fees. 

The office is located in Murphy Hall, Room 221, at the corner of Nocho Street and S.G. 
Thomas Drive. The telephone number is (336) 334-7551; the fax number is (336) 334-7001. 
The ISSO is staffed with Director, a SEVIS compliance officer and an administrative secre- 
tary/receptionist. Admissions Application packets for international students are available in 
the Office of Undergraduate Admissions and on line at www.ncat.edu. 

36 



EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is a publicly supported institu- 
tion. Tuition payments and other required student fees meet only a part of the total cost of the 
education of students enrolled. On the average, for each full-time student enrolled in an insti- 
tution of the University of North Carolina, the State of North Carolina appropriated $8032 
per year in public funds to support the educational programs offered. 

The University reserves the right to increase or decrease all fees and charges as well as add 
or delete items of expense without advance notice as circumstances, in the judgment of the 
administration, may require. 

Boarding and lodging fees are based on the actual number of days school is in session and 
do not include holidays, breaks, or any other University vacations. 

Students' property in dormitories and other University buildings is at the sole risk of the 
owner, and the University is not responsible for loss, theft, or damage to such property arising 
from any cause. 

Students are required to pay for any loss or damage to University property at replacement 
cost due to abuse, negligence, or malicious action, in addition to being subject to disciplinary 
action. 

The University converted to a book purchase system effective fall semester, 1991. All 
undergraduate and graduate students are required to purchase all textbooks. This includes 
hard cover and paperback textbooks. The cost will vary according to academic discipline. 
Other policies and procedures governing the book purchase system can be obtained from the 
Bookstore. 

Personal spending money should be sent directly to and made payable to the student in the 
form of money orders or certified checks. As a policy, the University does not cash personal 
checks for students in any amount. 

Diplomas and transcripts are withheld until the student has paid in full all fees and charges 
due the University. A student in debt to the University in any amount will not be permitted to 
register for any subsequent semester until his or her obligations are paid. If special financial 
arrangements have been made, failure to comply with these arrangements as stipulated may 
result in the termination of the student's boarding and lodging privileges. Additionally, the 
student will no longer be able to receive alternative payment arrangements. 

Special Notice to Veterans 

Veterans attending school under the provisions of Public Law 89-358 receive a monthly 
subsistence allowance from the Veterans Administration. Therefore, veterans are responsible 
for meeting all of their required fee obligations. 

Veterans attending school under the provision of Public Law 894 (Disabled Veterans) re- 
ceive a monthly subsistence allowance from the Veterans Administration and also the Veter- 
ans Administration pays directly to the school the cost of the veteran's tuition and required 
fees. All other fees are the responsibility of the veteran. 

Veterans may contact the Veteran and Disability Support Services Office on Campus for 
any special consideration which may be available. 



37 



REQUIRED DEPOSITS, CHARGES AND FEES 

All registration fees and charges are due and payable in full before or at the beginning of 
registration for each semester. Payments made by mail must be postmarked 5 days before the 
due date for each semester. 

ALL PAYMENTS MUST BE MADE BY PERSONAL CHECK, CERTIFIED CHECK, 
BANK WIRE, MONEY ORDER, or CASH. American Express, Mastercard and Visa are also 
accepted in person or by going to www.ncat.edu and clicking on Aggie Access On-Line, or by 
calling 1-866-722-4358. You must have a Personal Identification Number (P.I.N.) to pay on- 
line. TELEPHONE PAYMENTS MADE BY 4:00 P.M. WILL BE POSTED TO THE STU- 
DENT ACCOUNT THE FOLLOWING DAY. Checks, drafts, and money orders must be made 
payable to North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, and sent directly to: 

Treasurer's Office 

Dowdy Administration Building 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University 

1601 East Market Street 

Greensboro, NC 27411 

PLEASE DO NOT SEND CASH PAYMENTS BY MAIL! 

A $35 NON-REFUNDABLE APPLICATION FEE IS REQUIRED OF ALL APPLICANTS. 

HOUSING DEPOSIT 

Housing and Residence Life at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University 
provides a reasonably priced, attractive, comfortable, clean, and safe environment. 

Residency options include: single and double occupancy, with co-educational and single 
gender facilities. 

The interdisciplinary living and learning community is composed of traditional residence 
halls and planned living and learning communities. This provides a setting where students 
find a sense of identification, belonging, responsibility and achievement that will prepare 
them for future roles of leadership and service. 

Students interested in living on-campus should complete a Housing Application indicat- 
ing hall preference and include a $150 non-refundable programming/processing fee. The ap- 
plication and fee should be returned to Office of Housing and Residence Life, North Carolina 
A&T State University, 1601 Market Street, Greensboro, NC 2741 1. Applications will not be 
processed without the $150 fee attached. 

Charge Category — UNDERGRADUATE DAY STUDENT (Student Living Off Campus). 
Payment — Each Semester. Residence Status — In-State — $1,533.00. Out-of-State — 
$6,254.00. GRADUATE DAY STUDENT (Student Living Off Campus). Payment — Each 
Semester. Residence Status — In-State — $1,569.00 Out-of-State— $6,361.50. Charge 
Category — UNDERGRADUATE BOARDING ONLY STUDENT (Student Living Off 
Campus but taking meals on campus). Payment — Each Semester. Residence Status — In- 
State — $2,683.00. Out-of-State — $7,404.00. GRADUATE BOARDING ONLY STUDENT 
(Student Living Off Campus but taking meals on campus). Payment — Each Semester. 
Residence Status — In-State — $2,719.00. Out-of-State — $7,51 1.50. Charge Category 
— BOARDING AND LODGING STUDENT (Student Living On Campus. NOTE: All 
Residence Hall Students must take meals in the University Dining Hall and participate in the 
student accident insurance program, however, the cost of this insurance is covered by our current 
lodging fee. Payment — Each Semester. UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT Residence 



38 






Status — In-State — $4,068.00. Out-of-State — $8,789.00. GRADUATE STUDENT 
Residence Status — In-State — $4,104.00. Out-of-State — $8,896.50 

MAILBOX KEY DEPOSIT 

The centralized Mail Center houses mailboxes for all lodging students. Box numbers are 
assigned and are retained during the length of time students reside in residence halls. No fee 
is charged for this service; however, a key deposit of $10 is required and is refundable when 
the key is returned at the end of the enrollment period or upon withdrawal from campus 
housing. This $10 mailbox key deposit is included in the fee schedule for lodging students. 

REGULAR SESSION CHARGES FOR PART-TIME STUDENTS 

NORTH CAROLINA STUDENT RATES 

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 



No. of Hrs. 


Tuition 


Other Required Fees 


Total 


1-5 


$221.00 


$140.80 


$361.80 


6-8 


$442.25 


$433.25 


$875.50 


9-11 


$663.25 


$648.50 


$1,311.75 


12 or more 


$884.50 


$648.50 


$1,533.00 




GRADUATE STUDENTS 




No. of Hrs. 


Tuition 


Other Required Fees 


Total 


1-2 


$230.00 


$ 96.90 


$326.90 


3-5 


$460.25 


$160.75 


$621.00 


6-7 


$690.25 


$224.75 


$915.00 


8 


$690.25 


$648.50 


$1,338.75 


9 or more 


$920.50 


$648.50 


$1,569.00 



OUT-OF-STATE STUDENT RATES 
UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 



No. of Hrs. 


Tuition 


Other Required Fees 


Total 


1-5 


$1,401.25 


$140.80 


$1,542.05 


6-8 


$2,802.75 


$433.25 


$3,236.00 


9-11 


$4,204.00 


$648.50 


$4,852.50 


12 or more 


$5,605.50 


$648.50 


$6,254.00 




GRADUATE STUDENTS 




No. of Hrs. 


Tuition 


Other Required Fees 


Total 


1-2 


$1,428.25 


$ 96.90 


$1,525.15 


3-5 


$2,856.50 


$160.75 


$3,017.25 


6-7 


$4,284.75 


$224.75 


$4,509.50 


8 


$4,284.75 


$648.50 


$4,933.25 


9 or more 


$5,713.00 


$648.50 


$6,361.50 



(Boarding and Lodging Per Semester) - $2,535.00 



39 



INCIDENTAL FEES, DEPOSITS, AND CHARGES: 



55.00 


Motor Vehicle Registration - Regular Student 


$ 200.00 




No Practice Teaching, Practicum Internship 


60.00 


35.00 


Regalia Fee - Graduate 


30.00 


11.00 


Regalia Fee - Undergraduate 


15.00 


5.00 


ROTC Uniform Deposit 


25.00 


10.00 


Air Force (Refundable) 


25.00 


30.00 


ROTC Uniform Deposit- Army (Refundable) 


10.00 


60.00 


Room Application Fee 


150.00 


60.00 


Parking Fee Violations 2.00-25.00 


20.00 


Transcript Fee 


2.00 


10.00 


USAID Sponsored Student Adm. Fee 




20.00 


Per Semester 


200.00 


33.00 


Visiting Auditor Course Fee 


25.00 




Orientation Fee - Freshmen & 


10.00 


00.00 


Orientation Transfer Students 


10.00 




Mail Box Key Deposit (Refundable) 


10.00 



Accident Insurance (Optional) 
Application Fee (Non-Refundable) 
Credit on Account 
Bowling Course Fee 
Chemistry Laboratory Breakage Fee 
Breakage Deposit 
Cooperative Education Adm. Fee 
Graduation Fee - Undergraduate 
Graduation Fee - Graduate 
Identification Card Replacement Fee 
Key Replacement Fee 
Late Registration Fee 
Master's Thesis Binding Fee 
Motor Vehicle Registration - 
Evening Student 



TWENTY-FIVE PERCENT (25%) TUITION SURCHARGE 

The 1993 Regular Session of the General Assembly enacted a special provision directing 
the Board of Governors to impose a 25% tuition surcharge on students who take more than 
140 degree credit hours to complete a baccalaureate degree in a four year program or more 
than 110% of the credit hours necessary to complete a baccalaureate degree in any program 
officially designated by the Board as a five-year program. Effective with the fall 1994 semes- 
ter, all new undergraduates seeking a baccalaureate degree at North Carolina Agricultural and 
Technical State University are subject to this tuition surcharge. The surcharge cannot be waived 
for out-of-state students and does not apply to required fees. The calculation of these credit 
hours taken at the University or transferred from a constituent institution of the University of 
North Carolina shall exclude hours earned through the College Board's Advanced Placement 
or CLEP examinations, through institutional advanced placement or course validation, through 
summer term or extension programs, or excess hours taken during 8 semesters for a four year 
or excess hours taken during 10 semesters for a five year program. 

AUDIT OF COURSES 

Course auditing is available to any student upon payment of all applicable fees. Full-time 
students may audit courses without additional charges. Students auditing courses are not re- 
quired to participate in class discussion, prepare assignments, or take examinations. COURSE 
AUDITING IS WITHOUT CREDIT. 

REGISTRATION FOR THESIS COURSES 

Students who have completed all of their course work and have already registered for the 
total number of credit hours provided for the thesis in a previous semester are required to 
register for "thesis only" if they need to be at the University to complete their thesis or to 
engage in a research project. 

Tuition charge for the 2004-2005 year for an in-state graduate student registered for thesis 
only is $326.90. The charge for an out-of-state graduate student is $1,525.15. 

Students are not permitted to use the facilities of the University without being officially 
registered. 



40 



RETURN OF TITLE IV FUNDS 

WITHDRAWAL FROM SCHOOL REFUND POLICY 

Students who must leave the University prior to the end of the semester should follow the 
University guidelines for withdrawing from school. An Official Withdrawal Form must be 
obtained from the Counseling Center, completed, signed by the respective offices and sub- 
mitted to the Registrar's Office before a student is considered officially withdrawn. Students 
who stop attending all of their classes but fail to complete the withdrawal process are consid- 
ered as unofficially withdrawn. The U.S. Department of Education has established guidelines 
for institutions to follow for students who withdraw (officially or unofficially). The policy 
listed below applies to students who officially and unofficially withdraw from the University. 

Federal student aid recipients who begin attending classes during a semester, who cease 
attending or performing academic activities prior to the end of the semester, and never com- 
plete an Official Withdrawal Form are considered by the federal government to have Unoffi- 
cially Withdrawn. The University will consider the Unofficial Withdrawal date to be the mid- 
point of the semester (unless documentation exists of an earlier date of academic activity by 
the student). 

When a federal financial aid recipient withdraws (officially or unofficially) after attending 
at least the first class day, the University will return, and the financial aid recipient will be 
required to repay a prorated portion of funds received based upon a federally required calcu- 
lation (see Return of Title IV Funds section below). The Student Financial Aid Office is 
required to calculate the amount of federal Title IV financial aid students have earned and the 
amount that is unearned. The unearned portion of Title IV financial aid must be returned to 
the appropriate financial aid programs according to federal and institutional guidelines. 

Students who withdraw on or before the 60% point of the semester will have a percentage 
of their financial aid calculated as earned and unearned on a pro-rata basis. If a student is 
enroll beyond the 60% of the semester, all financial aid is considered earned. 

Example: You withdraw on the 25 th day of the semester and there are 116 days in the 
semester, your earned and unearned financial aid would be calculated as follows: 

Calendar days completed in the period of enrollment 25 days 

Total calendar days in the period of enrollment 116 days = 21.6% 

(excluding scheduled breaks of 5 days or more) 

If University records show a federal student aid recipient never attended a class and/or 
never performed an academically related activity for a semester or term, then the recipient 
never established eligibility for any aid funds that may have been disbursed for that semester. 
In addition, any student aid recipient who withdraws, drops all classes prior to the first day of 
class for a semester did not establish eligibility for any aid funds that may have been dis- 
bursed for that semester or term. In either case, the student aid recipient must repay the entire 
amount of aid disbursed for that semester or term. 

If a student did not receive any federal student aid but did receive other types of aid funds, 
and subsequently officially withdraws, refunds or repayments will be based upon the 
University's refund policy. 

Repayment of the Unearned Amount is calculated as follows: 

School will return to the appropriate financial aid program(s) the lesser of: 

• total amount of unearned aid or 

• institutional charges (tuition, fees, room and board) multiplied by unearned percent 

41 



Student will return: 

• remaining balance of unearned aid to the appropriate program(s) plus any amount the 
school returned that exceeds the amount of institutional charges that are credited back 
to the withdrawing student based upon the Institutional Refund Policy calculation. 

The Unearned Amount of aid must be returned to the applicable Title IV aid programs in 
the following order: 

Funds will be refunded, to the applicable programs, in the following order: 

1 . Unsubsidized Federal Direct Loan 

2. Subsidized Federal Direct Loan 

3. Federal Perkins Loan 

4. Federal Direct PLUS Loan 

5. Federal Pell Grant 

6. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant 

7. Other Title IV Aid Programs 

If the student is required to repay funds through the federal grant program, the student will 
be required to return no more than 50% of the federal grant amount that was originally re- 
ceived. If a balance is due the University, a bill will be sent to the student's permanent home 
address and will be due upon receipt. 

With the exception of any amount owed to the school, students and/or parents who are 
required to return a portion of all of their loan proceeds, are allowed to repay the unearned 
amount according to the terms of the loan. 

Students who are withdrawn from the University must complete and Exit Counseling. The 
Exit Counseling can be completed on-line at www.ncat.edu, click on financial aid, click on 
Direct Loan and click on Exit Counseling. 

Note: The information contained in this section is subject to change, without notice, in 
order to comply with federal, state, or university requirements. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSES 

In order to receive financial credit for withdrawal from courses, a student must withdraw 
from course(s) within the official "add" period. 

THE UNIVERSITY RESERVES THE RIGHT TO INCREASE OR DECREASE ALL 
FEES AND CHARGES, AS WELL AS ADD OR DELETE ITEMS OF EXPENSE WITH 
OUT ADVANCE NOTICE AS CIRCUMSTANCES IN THE JUDGMENT OF THE 
ADMINISTRATION MAY REQUIRE. 



42 



SUMMER SCHOOL CHARGES PER CREDIT HOUR 
IN-STATE UNDERGRADUATE 



No. of Credit 


Tuition 


Other Required Fees 


Total 


1 


$75.00 


$41.44 


$116.44 


2 


$150.00 


$57.89 


$207.89 


3 


$225.00 


$74.33 


$299.33 


4 


$300.00 


$90.77 


$390.77 


5 


$375.00 


$107.21 


$482.21 


6 


$450.00 


$123.65 


$573.65 


7 


$525.00 


$140.09 


$665.09 


8 


$600.00 


$156.54 


$756.54 


9 or more 


$675.00 


$172.98 


$847.98 




OUT-OF-STATE UNDERGRADUATE 




No. of Credit 


Tuition 


Other Required Fees 


Total 


1 


$413.00 


$41.44 


$454.44 


2 


$826.00 


$57.89 


$883.89 


3 


$1,239.00 


$74.33 


$1,313.00 


4 


$1,652.00 


$90.77 


$1,742.77 


5 


$2,065.00 


$107.21 


$2,172.21 


6 


$2,478.00 


$123.65 


$2,601.65 


7 


$2,891.00 


$140.09 


$3,031.09 


8 


$3,304.00 


$156.54 


$3,460.54 


9 or more 


$3,717.00 


$172.98 


$3,889.98 



43 





IN-STATE GRADUATE 




No. of Credit 


Tuition 


Other Required Fees 


Total 


1 


$105.00 


$41.44 


$146.44 


2 


$210.00 


$57.89 


$267.89 


3 


$315.00 


$74.33 


$389.33 


4 


$420.00 


$90.77 


$510.77 


5 


$525.00 


$107.21 


$632.21 


6 


$630.00 


$123.65 


$753.65 


7 


$735.00 


$140.09 


$875.09 


8 


$840.00 


$156.54 


$996.54 


9 or more 


$945.00 


$172.98 


$1,117.98 




OUT-OF-STATE GRADUATE 




No. of Credit 


Tuition 


Other Required Fees 


Total 


1 


$458.00 


$41.44 


$499.44 


2 


$916.00 


$57.89 


$973.89 


3 


$1,374.00 


$74.33 


$1,448.33 


4 


$1,832.00 


$90.77 


$1,922.77 


5 


$2,290.00 


$107.21 


$2,397.21 


6 


$2,748.00 


$123.65 


$2,871.65 


7 


$3,206.00 


$140.09 


$3,346.09 


8 


$3,664.00 


$156.54 


$3,820.54 


9 or more 


$4,122.00 


$172.98 


$4,294.98 



Boarding and Lodging - (Double Occupancy) $745.00 



44 



DETAILS OF FEES, DEPOSITS AND CHARGES 

Per Semester Per Year 
Required Fees - N.C. Student Tuition 

Tuition $ 884.50 $ 1,769.00 

Other Required Fees 648.50 1.297.00 

Total - N.C. Day Student $1,533.00 $ 3,066.00 

Boarding and Lodging 

Board and Lodging $2,490.00 $ 4,980.00 

Reserve for Construction and/or 

Renovation of Dormitories $ 35.00 $70.00 

Mail Box Key (Refundable) 10.00 10.00 

Total Boarding and Lodging $2,535.00 $ 5,060.00 

Total N.C. Boarding and Lodging Student $4,068.00 $ 8,126.00 

Out-of-State Student Tuition $5,605.50 $11,211.00 

Other Required Fees $ 648.50 $ 1.297.00 

Total Out-of-State Student $6,254.00 $12,508.00 

Boarding and Lodging $ 2.535.00 $ 5.060.00 

Total Out-of-State Boarding and Lodging $8,789.50 $ 1 7,568.00 

*IN-STATE GRADUATE STUDENTS SHOULD ADD $36.00 TO THE PER SEMESTER 
TOTALS AND $72.00 TO THE PER YEAR TOTALS. OUT-OF-STATE GRADUATE 
STUDENTS SHOULD ADD $107.50 TO THE PER SEMESTER TOTALS AND $215.00 
TO THE PER YEAR TOTALS. 



45 



STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 

http://www.ncat.edu/~finaid/ 



Through the Student Financial Aid Program, the University makes every effort to assure 
that no qualified student will be denied the opportunity to attend because of a lack of funds. 
Students who demonstrate financial need and have the potential for success in the University 
may obtain assistance to meet their expenses depending upon available funds. Financial aid is 
awarded without regard to a student's race, religion, color, national origin, gender, or disabil- 
ity. The University provides financial aid for students from four basic sources: grants, schol- 
arships, loans, and employment. 

The University student aid funds are administered in conjunction with a nationally estab- 
lished policy and philosophy of financial aid for education. The basis of this philosophy is the 
belief that parents are the primary and responsible resource for helping to meet educational 
costs, and student financial aid is available for filling the gap between the student's resources 
and expenses. 

The amount of the contribution expected from parents is related to consideration of a 
family's net income, number of dependents, number in college and other financial informa- 
tion. The federal methodology is used to determine the student's and parents' expected family 
contribution (EFC). In order to be considered for federal, state and some institutional and 
private assistance, students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid 
(FAFSA). Students are encouraged to apply online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. 

The University utilizes the "packaging concept" of financial aid. Students who apply early 
with great need may expect assistance through a variety of sources, which may include loans, 
employment, scholarship and/or grants. 

Typical Sources of Financial Aid 

Federal Pell Grant 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) 

Federal Work-Study Program 

State Tuition Grant (Need Based) 

Federal Perkins Loan 

Campus Base Grant 

Federal Direct Student Loans 

Federal Direct Parent Loans to Undergraduate Students (PLUS) 

Detailed information pertaining to federal and state programs may be found on the web at 
www.ncat.edu. 

The University offers several types of Departmental and Institutional Scholarships. The 
majority of these scholarships are administered within the academic and athletic departments. 
Students interested in these scholarships should contact the academic departments or coach. 

A student seeking consideration for financial assistance must complete the following steps: 

1 . Submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid to the Federal processor. 

2. Submit copies of income information or other documents, if selected for verification or 
information is requested, to the Student Financial Aid Office. 

A student who completes the Free Application for Federal Student Aid will be considered 
for all financial assistance at the University for which he/she is eligible provided funding is 



46 



available. The priority deadline to have a completed application on file in the Student Finan- 
cial Aid Office in order to receive consideration for assistance for any award year is March 
15. Students must re-apply each year; financial aid is not an automatic process. A separate 
application must be completed for summer sessions. 

Entering Students. A student entering the University as a freshman, transfer, graduate, or 
former student should apply for financial aid immediately after January 1 of any academic 
year. An award will not be made until a student is admitted to the University. Therefore, it is 
important that the admission procedure be completed as soon as possible. Any student who is 
admitted to the University as a "Special Student or Non-Degree Intent" student is not eligible 
to receive financial assistance unless he/she is working on completing Teacher Certification. 
The student must petition the Director of Admissions to have his/her status reviewed and 
changed, if applicable. 

Graduate Students. A graduate student who applies for financial aid may be considered for 
loan assistance and campus employment. Information about graduate assistantships may be 
obtained from the Graduate School Office. To be considered for financial assistance, a gradu- 
ate student must be admitted as a degree seeking student and maintain a 3.0 or better cumula- 
tive grade point average to remain eligible for loans and work study. 

All applicants must re-apply for financial assistance each academic year and separately 
for summer sessions. 

Information about Other Financial Aid Programs 

A student is encouraged to apply for sources external to the University. Any award from an 
external source must be reported to the Student Financial Aid Office to be included as a part 
of the student's total aid. A student may be eligible for assistance from the following pro- 
grams: 

1 . North Carolina Student Incentive Grant (NCSIG) and the UNC Grant. Grant funds are 
available to North Carolina residents who are full and part-time undergraduate students 
and who have demonstrated financial need. Students must be full-time for the NCSIG. 
College Foundation Inc administers these programs. Students are encouraged to complete 
the Free Application for Federal Student Aid by March 15. 

2. Vocational Rehabilitation. Grants may be provided to needy students who are physically 
disabled. A North Carolina student should contact the Vocational Rehabilitation Office 
nearest the student's home or the North Carolina Division of Vocational Rehabilitation 
Services in Raleigh, NC. 

3. North Carolina Prospective Teachers' Scholarship-Loan. Applications may be obtained 
beginning in mid-November for North Carolina students interested in obtaining funding 
for a career in teaching. Additional information may be obtained at http:// 
www.dpi.state.nc.us/scholarships 

4. North Carolina Veterans' Scholarship. A full scholarship for four academic years at a state- 
supported institution may be awarded to children of deceased or disabled veterans or of 
veterans who were listed as POW/MIA. Interested students should contact the North Caro- 
lina Division of Veterans Affairs in Raleigh, NC. 

5. Rehabilitation Assistance for Visually Handicapped. Grants may be provided to full-time 
North Carolina residents who are visually impaired. Students must attend a North Carolina 
post-secondary institution. The amount of assistance is based on need. Interested students 
should contact the Chief of Rehabilitation Services, Division of Services for the Blind in 
Raleigh, NC. 



47 



6. Nurse Scholars Program (NSP). The Nurse Scholars Program is a competitive, merit-based 
scholarship/loan program available to students entering the nursing profession. Applica- 
tions can be obtained from the Student Financial Aid Office, North Carolina Agricultural 
and Technical State University School of Nursing and the North Carolina State Education 
Assistance Authority. 

7. ROTC Scholarships. AFROTC/AROTC scholarships for four (4), three-and-a-half (3 1/2), 
three (3), two-and-a-half (2 1/2), and two (2) years may be available, based on Air Force/ 
Army Officer accession needs, to men and women in selected engineering fields, selected 
scientific fields, selected non-technical academic majors, Navigator/Missile Launch Of- 
ficer (for last 3H, 3, 2 1/2, or 2 years of a Bachelors Degree), pre-health professions (only 
for last 2 or 3 years of a Bachelors Degree), pre-medicine (Physician/Osteopath only), and 
nursing (only for last 2 years of a Bachelors Degree in Nursing). Interested students should 
contact the ROTC Office on campus. 

8. The Quiester Craig Scholarship Fund. An anonymous benefactor endowed this fund to 
provide academic scholarships for students majoring in Accounting. Named in honor of 
the School Dean, Dr. Quiester Craig, the recipients are determined by the Dean of the 
School of Business and Economics in consultation with the Chairman of the Accounting 
Department. 

9. Special Engineering Grants and Scholarships. Students admitted as Engineering Majors 
are reviewed as part of the admissions process for eligibility for several scholarship pro- 
grams. Criteria include a high school record of distinction. These programs are supported 
by the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, Inc. (NACME), R.J. Reynolds 
Company, and others. In addition, a variety of Corporations supports scholarship and Co- 
op programs, internships, and summer employment opportunities for engineering students 
who have attained outstanding scholastic records during their freshman or sophomore years 
and who have met other program-specific criteria. 

10. The North Carolina Teaching Fellows Scholarship Program. Applicants are chosen on the 
basis of high school grades, class standing, SAT scores, writing samples, community ser- 
vice, extracurricular activities, and references from teachers and members of the community. 
Recipients must be accepted for admission to the University. Applicants are screened by 
two committees, one from the applicant's local school district and the other from the edu- 
cational region in which the applicant lives. Candidates recommended by the selection 
committees are interviewed by the Regional Screening Committees. Recipients of Teach- 
ing Fellows Awards are named in April of each year. Financial need is not a selection 
criterion. The maximum award is $6,500 per year and is renewable for a total of four years 
of college. Applications are available from the North Carolina Teaching Fellows Program 
and high school counselors' offices. Additional information may be obtained at http:// 
www.teachingfellows.org/. 

11. Ronald McNair Scholarships. Ronald McNair Scholarships are offered to economically or 
financially disadvantaged students entering the fields of physics or engineering. High school 
students are invited to apply for these scholarships as incoming freshmen. Interested stu- 
dents should contact the Department of Physics or Engineering at North Carolina Agriculture 
and Technical State University. 

Minimum requirements for recipients are: 

A. A minimum load of 12 credits per semester. 

B. A minimum gpa of 2.5. 

C. Two letters of recommendation from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State 
University faculty. 

The selection of scholars will be handled by the college of arts and Sciences for physics 
scholarships and by the College of Engineering for engineering scholarships. 

48 



12. North Carolina Student Loan Program for Health, Science, and Mathematics. Legal resi- 
dents of North Carolina accepted as full-time students in accredited baccalaureate or master's 
programs leading to a degree are eligible for this program. Studies must be in health (allied 
health, health sciences, clinical psychology, medical social work), mathematics (general, 
pure and applied mathematics, statistics, actuarial science), and science (agricultural sci- 
ences, renewable natural resources, computer and information sciences, engineering and 
engineering related technologies, life sciences, physical sciences, food sciences and hu- 
man nutrition, dietetics/ human nutritional services). Recipients are selected according to 
interest, academic capabilities, motivation and financial need. Maximum loans range from 
$2,500 to $6,000 a year depending on the degree level. Loans are renewable annually on 
satisfactory academic progress. Students should request information and applications be- 
tween December 1 and April 1 from the North Carolina Student Loan program for Health, 
Science, and Mathematics in Raleigh, NC. 

13. Sigmund Sternberger Scholarships. Sigmund Sternberger scholarships are available to as- 
sist Guilford County students in attending the university. These awards are made to students 
who have the character, integrity, ability and desire to make a contribution to the commu- 
nity, but who are prevented from developing their full potential because, due to no fault of 
their own, they lack economic resources with which to develop their skills. 

14. The CM. And M.D. Suther Scholarship Program. This award is available to a full-time 
North Carolina resident undergraduate who has a financial need. The student must be en- 
rolled. The scholarship can be made either to a freshman who graduated in the top 25% of 
his/her high school graduating class or to an upper-class student with an academic average 
of at least a 3.0. Only one award is made each year and is nonrenewable. The Director of 
Student Financial Aid chooses the recipient. 

15. Dr. A. P. and Frances Dickson Scholarships. The A. P. Dickson scholarship is awarded 
annually to a full-time undergraduate student who currently resides in Hoke County, North 
Carolina. The Director of Student Financial Aid chooses the recipient on the basis of aca- 
demic standing and financial need. Awards are nonrenewable and vary in amount according 
to income available from the trust. 

16. James Lee Love Scholarship. A Love Scholarship is awarded annually to a full-time North 
Carolina resident undergraduate student. The recipient is selected by the Director of Stu- 
dent Financial Aid on the basis of academic standing and financial need. Awards are 
nonrenewable and vary in amount according to income available from the trust. 

17. North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State National Alumni Scholarship. The North 
Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University National Alumni Scholarship is a four- 
year scholarship for ten entering freshmen. Applicants are selected based upon nominations 
from the local alumni chapters. The alumni chapters distribute the applications and other 
criteria to the area high schools. To be considered for the scholarship, the applicant must have 
a 3.0 cumulative grade point average and a minimum SAT score of 1,000. The filing deadline 
for the scholarship application is December 1 . In-state students who are selected will receive 
a maximum amount to cover the cost of tuition, fees, room and board. Out of state students 
who are selected will receive a maximum up to the cost of tuition, fees, room and board. The 
recipient must maintain at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average each semester for contin- 
ued eligibility. Interested students should contact the Office of Alumni Affairs or one of the 
North Carolina local A&T State University Alumni Chapters. 

18. UNC Grant. The UNC Grant is intended to give needed aid to needy and well-prepared 
students who want to attend North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. 
The UNC Grant will be used after all other need-based aid for which the student is also 
eligible has been included in the student's financial aid package. The grant is also used to 
enhance the diversity of the University. The total scholarship award under the program 
shall carry a maximum value not to exceed $3,000. 

49 



19. Nurse Education Loan Program (NESLP). The Nurse Education Loan Program is a schol- 
arship loan based on the student's financial need and the cost of attendance at the University. 
Awards are made on the basis of financial need and the promise to serve as a full-time 
nurse in North Carolina after completing the nurse education program. NESLP awards are 
available subject to continued legislative appropriation and allocation of funds. Applica- 
tions can be obtained from the Student Financial Aid Office or North Carolina Agricultural 
and Technical State University School of Nursing. 

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS 

The Higher Education Act requires that in order to receive any Title IV Aid (Federal Pell 
Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), Federal Work-Study 
(FWS), Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Direct Loan, Federal Direct Parent Loan for Under- 
graduate Students (PLUS) and State Assistance, a student must maintain satisfactory aca- 
demic progress towards a degree. The satisfactory academic progress applies to all terms 
whether or not financial aid was received. 





Undergraduate Eligibility* 




To be considered maintaining satisfactory academic 

must meet the following minimum requirements: 

Cumulative 
No. of Grade Point 
Semesters Average 


progress 


, an undergraduate student 

Minimum No. of 

Credit Hours 

Earned 


1 


1.40 




12 


2 


1.50 




24 


3 


1.60 




36 


4 


1.80 




48 


5 


1.90 




60 


6 


2.00 




72 


7 


2.00 




84 


8 


2.00 




96 


9 


2.00 




108 


10 


2.00 




124 



*This standard is consistent with the University's academic standards required for graduation. 

Satisfactory progress will be evaluated for all students (full or part-time) at the end of each 
academic year (end of spring semester). Students who enroll at the mid-point (January) of an 
academic year or attend one semester only will be evaluated at the end of the semester. There- 
after, these students will be evaluated at the end of the academic year. Students receiving the 
North Carolina Incentive Grant will be evaluated at the end of the academic year. 

Suspension for the Spring semester will be based on the list developed by the Registrar's 
Office. 

Failure to earn the required grade point average and cumulative hours will place the stu- 
dent on financial aid suspension. Students who are suspended from financial aid must remove 
their academic deficiencies or have an appeal granted before reinstatement of aid. All stu- 
dents are encouraged to attend summer school to remove their deficiencies or make addi- 
tional progress toward earning the degree. A student who does not enroll for a semester and 
re-enrolls will be evaluated at the time of re-admission. 



50 



Students who enroll for one semester must earn the required grade point average and cu- 
mulative hours for one semester of attendance. Any student who attends for one semester and 
fails to meet the semester requirement will be placed on financial aid suspension and encour- 
aged to attend summer school to get back on track. 

Students who are placed on probation for a semester must sign an action plan with the 
Student Finanical Aid Office. Any student who fails to meet the requirement of the action 
plan will be suspended the following semester. 

Financial aid suspension students are reviewed at the completion of summer school. If the 
deficiencies are removed after summer school attendance, the student will not be reviewed 
again until the end of the spring semester. 

A part-time undergraduate student is enrolled for less than twelve (12) semester hours. 
A part-time graduate student is enrolled for less than nine (9) semester hours. Part-time 
students must meet the same grade point average requirement for eligibility as full-time stu- 
dents and must earn 80% of the total credits for which they enroll. Students who attend with 
mix enrollment (e.g. full-time-first -semester and part-time-second semester) must earn 80% 
of the hours attempted for the year. 

Failure to meet the minimum standards outlined will result in immediate financial aid 
suspension. 

A student who has not received financial assistance in previous award years and subse- 
quently applies for financial aid will be evaluated based on the policy listed above. 

An undergraduate student pursuing his/her first undergraduate degree will be considered 
for financial aid for no more than 186 attempted hours of enrollment at athe University. With- 
drawing from class(s) after the add/drop period may affect the student's ability to earn the 
required hours. 

All attempted hours are counted in determining the 186 hours limit, including transfer 
hours, whether or not financial aid was received or the course work was successfully com- 
pleted. 

Transfer students will be evaluated based on the above policy. Transfer credits include 
hours earned at institutions other than North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State Uni- 
versity and will be used to determine the student's classification and required grade point 
average. Transfer hours will be included in "total hours attempted" in determining the 186 
hours requirement and to determine the cumulative grade point average required. Transfer 
students are required to earn the required number of hours depending upon enrollment status 
(full or part-time). To determine the number of semesters in attendance, accepted transfer 
hours are divided by 12 and will be added to full-time semesters at North Carolina A&T State 
University. If the remainder is 1-5 hours, it is not counted; if the remainder is 6-1 1 hours, it is 
counted as 1/2 of a semester. Hours transferred in after the student enrolled at the University 
will be used t o assist the student with removing deficient hours; however students must have 
the required grade point average based on the number of hours and semesters. 

Second Degree Students who have already earned a bachelor's degree and are pursuing 
another undergraduate degree must present a letter from the Academic Advisor, Dean or De- 
partment Chair indicating that the student is working on a second degree. Second-degree 
students cannot exceed the aggregate loan limit for an undergraduate student. Second-degree 
students must maintain a 2.0 annually and pass the required number of hours as all other 
students. 



51 



Teacher Certification Students must maintain a 2.0 annually and pass the required num- 
ber of hours as all other students. 

Dual Degree/Double Major Students must maintain progress as stated above. These stu- 
dents must pass the required number of hours and maintain the required grade point average 
as all other students. 

Withdrawal (W grade), which is recorded on the student's transcript, will be included as 
credits attempted and will have an adverse effect on the student's ability to maintain satisfac- 
tory academic progress. Students who officially withdraw from the University must make up 
the deficit hours and are encouraged to attend summer school to remove the deficient hours. 

The successful completion of a course is defined as receiving one of the following grades: A, B, 
C or D. Courses with grades of F, I and W will not qualify in meeting the minimum standard. 

An Incomplete (I) grade indicates that a student has not finished all course-work required 
for a grade and is included in the cumulative credits attempted. An incomplete will not count 
as hours passed until a final grade is posted in the Registrar's Office. 

Repeated courses - Repeating a course may negatively affect a student's Satisfactory Aca- 
demic Progress. The total hours attempted will increase; however, the earned hours will de- 
crease by the repeated course. Please review the University's policy on Repetition of Courses. ] 
The Student Financial Aid Office will follow the University policy on repeated courses. 

Change of Major - A student may change from one degree to another during attendance at 
the University. Students who change from one major to another are still expected to maintain 
satisfactory academic progress and complete the course work within the time frame or hours 
limitation stated unless an appeal is approved. 

Audited courses do no count as either attempted or earned hours. 

Hours Enrolled - The number of credit hours in which the student is enrolled on the day 
following the published last day to add/drop a class will be used as official enrollment for 
financial assistance purposes; full-time status is 12 or more hours. If a student withdraws 
from classes after the date cited above and reduces his/her enrollment below the awarded 
status, (the number of hours recorded as of the add/drop date) the student will not meet the 
minimum number of hours to be earned in one academic year. 

NOTE: Hours earned by Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or College 
Level Examination Program (CLEP) is considered towards meeting the semester hours re- 
quirement only for a student's first academic year. 

Re-admitted students will be reviewed on their previous academic records in order to 
determine eligibility for assistance, whether or not financial aid was received. 

Suspended students who are allowed to return to the University must attend and pay for 
the semester of re-admission unless an appeal is approved. Denial of financial aid does not 
prevent students from attending the University, if they are otherwise eligible to continue their 
enrollment. Students who enroll at the University, without benefit of financial aid, may re- 
quest a review of their academic records after any term in which they are enrolled to deter- 
mine whether satisfactory academic progress has been met. If the standards are met, eligibil- 
ity is regained for subsequent terms of enrollment in the academic year. 

It is the student's responsibility to be aware of his or her academic standing each semester. 
Although the Student Financial Aid Office will make every effort to promptly notify students 
of the cancellation of their awards, students are responsible for obtaining their grades and 
determining if they meet the criteria for continuation of their awards. 

52 



RE-ESTABLISHING SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS 

Any student whose financial aid has been terminated may reestablish satisfactory progress 
by any of the following methods: 

• taking courses during the summer session(s) 

• repeating failed courses 

• removing incomplete grades 

Cumulative grade point average can only be increased by attendance at North Carolina 
Agricultural and Technical State University. Deficient hours may be made up by successfully 
completing course work at NC A&T State University or at another institution. Before enroll- 
ing at another institution, the student must secure the proper approval(s). 

Summer School 

Satisfactory Academic Progress for Summer School will be based on the student's current 
eligibility status. Students who are suspended from financial aid are encouraged to attend 
summer school to remove their academic deficiencies. Financial aid for summer school is not 
available to students not maintaining satisfactory academic progress. Students attending sum- 
mer school to remove deficiencies must contact the Student Financial Aid Office for evalua- 
tion of their progress after summer school grades are posted. Evaluation is not an automatic 
process; however, removal of deficiencies automatically makes the student eligible for finan- 
cial aid. 

A student who is not suspended prior to a summer session will not be suspended because 
of performance in that summer session. Students will not be suspended at the end of a sum- 
mer session. All students will be given the opportunity to attend summer school to improve 
their gpa. Summer session enrollment at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State 
University will not be counted as a semester despite the number of hours enrolled. 

APPEAL PROCESS 

Students denied federal and/or state financial aid for failure to meet the satisfactory 
academic progress standards are advised in writing of their right to appeal the decision. A 
letter is mailed to the student's permanent home address on file in the Registrar's Office. A 
student may request reinstatement of his or her financial aid based on extenuating circum- 
stances by writing a letter of appeal to the Director of Student Financial Aid. Approval of an 
appeal for satisfactory academic progress will be considered if the student has suffered undue 
hardship, such as death of an immediate family member, injury or illness of the student, 
change of major, or other special circumstances that may have prevented the student from 
performing his/her academic best. Students should submit documentation to support the re- 
quest for a waiver. 

All appeals should be addressed to the Director of Student Financial Aid and on file in the 
Student Financial Aid Office no later than the deadline date established. All appeals will be 
reviewed on a case-by-case basis. 

If an appeal is approved, the student must: 

Sign a Satisfactory Academic Progress Action Plan with the Student Financial Aid Office, 
which indicates the stipulation of the appeal. 

Students will be notified, in writing, of the Financial Aid Administrator or Student Finan- 
cial Aid Committee's decision within three weeks of the request. Two appeals will be the 
maximum granted. 



53 



Students who disagree with the Financial Aid Administrator's decision may request an 
appeal before the Student Financial Aid Committee. 

Unsatisfactory Progress Notification 

Students who do not meet the requirements of the satisfactory academic progress policy 
will be notified by mail of their suspension from financial aid at the end of the academic year. 
The letter will be mailed to the student's permanent home address. 

Students who are granted an appeal and do not meet the requirement(s) will be notified at 
the end of the semester in which the appeal was approved and eligibility was not met. 



54 



ADMISSIONS 

http://www.ncat.edu/admissions.html 



POLICY 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is an equal opportunity institu- 
tion committed to the equality of educational opportunity and does not discriminate against 
applicants based on race, color, national origin, religion, gender, age or disability. Unless 
otherwise specified, admission to all undergraduate curricula is under the jurisdiction of the 
Director of Admissions. 

PROCEDURES 

Submission of Application 

Inquiries and applications for admissions should be made to the Office of Admissions, 
B.C. Webb Hall, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, 
North Carolina 2741 1. A non-refundable fee of $35.00 is required with each application. The 
University does not accept fee waivers. 

Application Deadline 

The recommended deadlines for submitting the application for admission is June 1 for the 
fall semester and December 1 for the spring semester. Applications received after these dates 
will be honored on a day-to-day basis as long as classroom space is available. Applications 
for early decision must be received by November 1 prior to the fall semester of the intended 
enrollment. In all cases, early application is encouraged because class space and housing 
facilities dictate, to some extent, the number of new students that can be admitted for each 
semester. 

International students on non-immigrant visas are required to submit the application by 
May 1 for the fall semester and November 1 for the spring semester. 

Supporting Documentation 

1. To be considered official, all transcripts from high school and/or college must be sent 
directly to the Office of Admissions from the sending institutions. 

2. SAT or ACT scores, when applicable, should be official and reports sent directly from 
the testing agency. The University's CEEB code for the SAT report is 5003; the code 
for the ACT report is 3060. Official scores listed on high school transcripts and student 
received reports may be utilized for admission consideration. 

3. The submission of a final or complete transcript from the last school attended is the 
responsibility of the student. Thus, the University reserves the right to withdraw any 
offer of admission if the applicant fails to satisfy all requirements prior to the begin- 
ning of the first semester of enrollment. Students who have not fulfilled minimum 
admission requirements will be withdrawn from the University. 

Notice of Admission and Confirmation 

The University practices "rolling admission"; therefore, decisions are made as soon as a 
file is complete. Early decision notices are mailed between December 1 and December 15. 
Candidates who are offered admission must notify the University by January 15 of their intent 
to enroll. Students approved for admission are forwarded a "Certificate of Admission." The 
candidate reply date of May 1 for freshman students for each fall term is honored by the 
University. Transfer students should confirm their acceptance within two weeks of the receipt 
of the admission letter. Failure to comply may adversely affect the candidate's reserved space. 
Persons who are not approved for admission will also be notified in writing on a timely basis. 



55 



Prior to registration for each semester, the final official high school transcript showing the 
date of graduation must have been received for all new freshmen, and the final official college 
transcript must have been received for all transfer students. In addition, the Medical Health 
Form must be completed by the student's physician and returned, along with a copy of his or 
her Immunization Record, to the Director of Health Services. North Carolina law requires the 
University to suspend students who have not satisfied immunization requirements within 30 
days from the beginning of classes for that semester. An immunization record copy from your 
high school is acceptable. 

ADMISSIONS CRITERIA 

Freshman Applicant 

An applicant for admission is considered individually in accordance with the following 
criteria: 

1 . Evidence of academic achievement and promise with considerable facility in the use of 
the English language and with an understanding of the fundamental mathematical pro- 
cesses; 

2. Complete record from an accredited secondary or preparatory school with graduation 
based on no fewer than 19 units; (See subject matter requirements in next section.) 

3. Satisfactory scores on the Scholastic Assessment Test or the American College Test; 
(Students may be exempt from these tests if the high school graduation date is five (5) 
or more years at the point of matriculation to the University.) 

4. Satisfactory class rank or grade point average. 

These criteria, and those which follow, are applied flexibly to assure that people with 
unusual qualifications are not rejected in the admissions process. However, admission to the 
University is selective for out-of-state students. The University of North Carolina System has 
mandated that no more than 1 8 percent of the freshman class can be from out-of-state. There- 
fore, academic achievement and SAT/ ACT scores must be competitive. 

Minimum Undergraduate Course Requirements 

For admission to all undergraduate programs, the applicant must present the following 
Minimum Course Requirements: 

English: four course units emphasizing grammar, composition and literature 

Foreign Language: two course units of the same foreign language 

Mathematics: four course units including Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry, 

and higher level mathematics course for which Algebra II is a pre- 
requisite 

Science: three course units including at least one unit in a life or biological 

science, at least one unit in a physical science, and at least one labo- 
ratory course 

Social Science: two course units including one unit in U. S. history 

In addition to the above listed criteria, the minimum standards governing admission to the 
School of Nursing are as follows: 

1) a combined Scholastic Assessment Test score of 800 or higher, and 

2) a cumulative grade point average of "B" or better. 



56 



The University of North Carolina System and North Carolina Agricultural and Technical 
State University may waive some of the minimum high school course unit requirements un- 
der the following categories: 

1 . Applicants who are at least twenty-four (24) years of age prior to the first day of classes 
for the semester which the applicant is applying; 

2. Transfer applicants who (a) have the associate of arts, the associate of science, the 
associate of fine arts, the baccalaureate or any higher level degree, or (b) are pursuing 
a degree under an approved articulation agreement, or (c) have completed six semester 
hours of degree creditable work in each of the following areas: English, Mathematics, 
the Natural Sciences, the Social and Behavioral Sciences, and Foreign Language. 

For specific requirements, students should refer to the respective schools/college section 
and to departmental listings in this bulletin. However, the University reserves the right to 
change admission standards for schools/colleges prior to the semester the student plans to 
enroll. 

Transfer Students 

The University accepts qualified students from other accredited colleges. Applications for 
admission may be considered if the transfer student: 

1) is not presently on social or academic probation at the last or current school of atten- 
dance; 

2) has a cumulative grade point average of at least a 2.0 at the institution from which 
transferring and is eligible to return to that institution; and 

3) has not been suspended or dropped from another institution. 

Transfer students who have attended another accredited college but have earned less than 
thirty (30) semester hours of specific acceptable credit must meet all freshman requirements. 
Transferable coursework must include six (6) semester hours in each of the following areas — 
English, history, mathematics, science, and foreign language — in order to be exempt from any 
high school requirements. Transfer for programs in the School of Engineering requires a 2.5 
GPA if transferring from a four year institution with an accredited engineering program or 3.0 
GPA if transferring from other types of institutions. Applications from transfer students cannot 
be considered until all credentials are received from the high school and all other institutions 
previously attended. In addition, there must be a statement of good standing and honorable 
dismissal from these institutions. Previous college records must show a cumulative grade point 
average of 2.0 or above. No course is accepted in transfer in which a grade below "C" was 
earned. 

Transfer applicants may be exempt from sending high school transcripts and/or standard- 
ized test scores if they fall under the following categories: 

1. Applicants who were awarded the high school diploma prior to 1988 and/or are at least 
twenty-four years (24) years old prior to the beginning of classes and have completed 
thirty (30) semester hours of degree creditable work; 

2. Applicants who have the associate of arts, the associate of science, or the associate of 
fine arts, the baccalaureate or any higher level degree; 

3. Applicants who have completed a degree under an articulation agreement; or 

4. Applicants who have completed six (6) semester hours of degree creditable work in 
each of the following areas: English, Foreign Language, Mathematics, the Natural Sci- 
ences, and the Social and Behavioral Sciences. 



57 



Accepted courses are recorded to the student's credit, but grade points are not calculated 
on the transferred courses. The University does not accept transfer credit from challenge 
examinations or for course work where grades of P/F have been given. The maximum number 
of transferable credits is 80 semester hours from a four (4) year college and 64 semester hours 
from a two (2) year college. 

Transfer applicants who are not covered by the above-stated policy should refer to the next 
section on special students. However, the University reserves the right to change admission 
standards prior to the semester the student plans to enroll. 

Special Students 

Special students are those who are not candidates for degree at the present time. This 
category includes (1) visiting students and (2) persons who have not enrolled for one aca- 
demic year and are ineligible for admission as a transfer student. The University welcomes 
into this admission status enrollment of persons who are pursuing degrees elsewhere, who 
possess a baccalaureate degree, or who desire to earn prerequisites for graduate work. Such 
students may register upon the presentation of a signed statement from the appropriate offi- 
cial of his/her institution, or certifying agency, specifically listing and approving the courses 
to be taken. Such enrollment does not constitute regular admission to the University. To apply 
for this category of admission, the applicant must submit the application form for admissions 
with fee and provide supporting documentation as appropriate. Transcripts from all colleges 
and universities attended are required if the applicant plans to enter degree-seeking status at a 
later date. Visiting students must submit a transient course study form from the home institu- 
tion that has been approved by the department chairperson, school or college dean and the 
University registrar. All others must provide evidence of readiness to pursue the courses de- 
sired and a statement of objective and purpose related to the request for special student ad- 
mission. Such persons may register for no more than 12 semester hours per academic term 
and may remain in this category until they have attempted a total of 24 semester hours. 

After completing one semester of full-time study or its equivalent, the unclassified student 
may petition the Office of Admissions to be admitted to the University as a regular degree 
seeking candidate on the basis of his/her academic accomplishments. All communications 
must be written and sent to the committee in care of the Director of Admissions. 

International Students 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University welcomes and accepts appli- 
cations from qualified students who are not United States citizens. Such students must meet 
each of the following criteria: 

1) Satisfy all requirements governing admissions for the School to which the application 
is made. 

2) Show proficiency in written and oral English usage. If English is not the first language 
of communication, the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is required and 
a satisfactory level of English proficiency on both the total and part scores are required. 
A minimum score of 550 (paper based) or 2 1 3 (computer based) is required. An appli- 
cant may submit SAT/ ACT scores in place of TOEFL scores. 

3) Can conform to all contract regulations of the United States Immigration and Natural- 
ization Service and be eligible for F- 1 Student status as a freshman or transfer student 
from another school. 

The 1-20 Certificate of Eligibility will be prepared for all new international students who 
are admitted to the University and who have official documentation on file attesting to their 

58 



ability to meet their school fees. The University has no financial aid for international students 
and permission to work is not usually granted by the Immigration and Naturalization Service. 

OTHER POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 

Filing of Credentials 

Applicants should take the proper steps to see that their credentials are sent to the Director 
of Admissions as early as possible, preferably not less than thirty (30) days before the begin- 
ning of the semester in which they plan to enroll. 

Interviews and Campus Visits 

Interviews are not required for admission; however, persons with unusual circumstances 
are welcome to schedule appointments to discuss these matters with an Admissions Counse- 
lor or the Director of Admissions. Campus visits are encouraged and campus tours are rou- 
tinely given. Reservations for the tour are highly recommended. 

Orientation, Registration and the Opening of the Semester 

All newly admitted students are expected to attend Orientation, and freshman students 
living on campus must arrive the day preceding the freshman Orientation program (see Uni- 
versity Calendar). Orientation for transfer and special students is scheduled for the day pre- 
ceding registration. Placement testing in Mathematics and English is required for all fresh- 
men. These tests are designed as aids for academic advising and scheduling. Students who 
fail to show proficiency in these academic areas will be assigned remedial course work. Transfer 
students for programs in Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Science, Animal and Plant 
Science, Chemistry, Physics, Biology, and Electronics Technology are required to take a spe- 
cial mathematics test. 

Permission to Take Courses Elsewhere 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University degree- seeking students who 
desire to take courses elsewhere are required to obtain approval from their school/college 
dean before registering at another institution. Course descriptions are needed in order for 
accurate evaluations to be done. Only the credit hours will transfer to A&T and a minimum 
grade of "C" is required for a course to transfer. The University does not accept credit from 
proficiency examinations or grades of P/F. Transient Study Forms and Guidelines for off- 
campus study are available in the Office of Admissions. 

Regulations for Veterans and Children of Deceased and Disabled Veterans 

Veterans and children of deceased and disabled veterans must meet regular admission 
requirements. Preliminary application for any educational benefits due them should be made 
to the nearest regional office of the Veterans Administration well in advance of the desired 
admission date in order that the necessary information and documents may be obtained. Vet- 
erans who have a minimum of one year of active service may receive credit for Health Educa- 
tion, Physical Education, and military science electives. A copy of the DD-214 must be sub- 
mitted to the Office of Admissions. 

Graduate Applicants 

Graduate school admission is under the supervision of the Dean of the Graduate School, 
North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, North Carolina 2741 1. 
For information concerning admission, please write the Dean of the Graduate School, North 
Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, NC 2741 1. 



59 



Continuing Education Applicants 

Summer session, the evening and weekend college and continuing education, off-campus 
and non-credit courses, are under the supervision of the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Aca- 
demic Affairs. Information concerning admission and/or enrollment should be directed to 
that office. The address is: 

Office of Continuing Education and 

Summer Sessions 

1020 East Wendover Avenue 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University 

Greensboro, NC 27411 

Generally, admission requirements for continuing education classes are the same as those 
for comparable work in regular classes on campus. However, persons may enroll without 
being officially admitted for non-credit courses and programs not applicable to a University 
degree. A continuing education applicant is usually one of mature years, with special training 
along particular lines or of long experience in special fields of knowledge. Thus, such a per- 
son can be either a degree or unclassified applicant. Continuing education enrollees who have 
taken compatible courses for credit may later choose to change their status to degree seeking. 
At the time of application for admission to degree status, the continuing education applicant 
is required to satisfy the standard admission policies. 

RESIDENCE STATUS FOR TUITION PURPOSES 

The basis for determining the appropriate tuition charge rests upon whether a student is a 
resident or a nonresident. Each student must make a statement as to the length of his or her 
residence in North Carolina with assessment by the institution of that statement to be condi- 
tioned by the following: 

Residence. To qualify as a resident for tuition purposes, a person must become a legal 
resident and remain a legal resident for at least twelve months (exactly 365 days) immedi- 
ately prior to classification. Thus, there is a distinction between legal residence and residence 
for tuition purposes. Furthermore, twelve months' (exactly 365 days) legal residence means 
more than simple abode in North Carolina. In particular, it means maintaining a domicile 
(permanent home of indefinite duration) as opposed to "maintaining a mere temporary resi- 
dence or abode incident to enrollment in an institution of higher education." The burden of 
establishing facts which justify classification of a student as a resident entitled to in-state 
tuition rates is on the applicant for such classification, who must show his or her entitlement 
by the preponderance (the greater part) of the residentiary information. 

Initiative. Being classified a resident for tuition purposes is contingent on the student's 
seeking such status and providing all information that the institution may require in making 
the determination. 

Parents ' Domicile. If an individual, irrespective of age, has living parent(s) or court-ap- 
pointed guardian of the person, the domicile of such parent(s) or guardian is, prima facie, the 
domicile of the individual; but this prima facie evidence of the individual's domicile may or 
may not be sustained by other information. Further, nondomiciliary status of parents is not 
deemed prima facie evidence of the applicant child's status if the applicant has lived (though 
not necessarily legally resided) in North Carolina for the five years preceding enrollment or 
reregistration. 

Effect of marriage. Marriage alone does not prevent a person from becoming or continuing 
to be a resident for tuition purposes, nor does marriage in any circumstance insure that a 

60 



person will become or continue to be a resident for tuition purposes. Marriage and the legal 
residence of one's spouse are, however, relevant information in determining residentiary in- 
tent. Furthermore, if both a husband and his wife are legal residents of North Carolina and if 
one of them has been a legal resident longer than the other, then the longer duration may be 
claimed by either spouse in meeting the twelve-month requirement for in-state tuition status. 

Military Personnel. A North Carolinian who serves outside the State in the armed forces 
does not lose North Carolina domicile simply by reason of such service. And students from 
the military may prove retention or establishment of residence by reference, as in other cases, 
to residentiary acts accompanied by residentiary intent. 

In addition, a separate North Carolina statute affords tuition rate benefits to certain mili- 
tary personnel and their dependents even though not qualifying for the in-state tuition rate by 
reason of twelve months' legal residence in North Carolina. Members of the armed services, 
while stationed in and concurrently living in North Carolina, may be charged a tuition rate 
lower than the out-of-state tuition rate to the extent that the total of entitlements for applicable 
tuition costs available from the federal government, plus certain amounts based under a statu- 
tory formula upon the in-state tuition rate, is a sum less than the out-of-state tuition rate for 
the pertinent enrollment. A dependent relative of a service member stationed in North Caro- 
lina is eligible to be charged the in-state tuition rate while the dependent relative is living in 
North Carolina with the service member and if the dependent relative has met any require- 
ment of the Selective Service System applicable to the dependent relative. These tuition ben- 
efits may be enjoyed only if the applicable requirements for admission have been met; these 
benefits alone do not provide the basis for receiving those derivative benefits under the provi- 
sions of the residence classification statute reviewed elsewhere in this summary. 

Grace Period. If a person (1) has been a bona fide legal resident, (2) has consequently 
been classified a resident for tuition purposes, and (3) has subsequently lost North Carolina 
legal residence while enrolled at a public institution of higher education, that person may 
continue to enjoy the in-state tuition rate for a grace period of twelve months measured from 
the date on which North Carolina legal residence was lost. If the twelve months end during an 
academic term for which the person is enrolled at a State institution of higher education, the 
grace period extends, in addition, to the end of that term. The fact of marriage to one who 
continues domiciled outside North Carolina does not by itself cause loss of legal residence 
marking the beginning of the grace period. 

Minors. Minors (persons under 18 years of age) usually have the domicile of their parents, 
but certain special cases are recognized by the residence classification statute in determining 
residence for tuition purposes. 

(a) If a minor's parents live apart, the minor's domicile is deemed to be North Carolina for 
the time period(s) that either parent, as a North Carolina legal resident, may claim and 
does claim the minor as a tax dependent, even if other law or judicial act assigns the 
minor's domicile outside North Carolina. A minor thus deemed to be a legal resident 
will not, upon achieving majority before enrolling at an institution of higher education, 
lose North Carolina legal residence if that person (1) upon becoming an adult "acts, to 
the extent that the person's degree of actual emancipation permits, in a manner consis- 
tent with bona fide legal residence in North Carolina" and (2) "begins enrollment at an 
institution of higher education not later than the Fall academic term following comple- 
tion of education prerequisite to admission at such institution." 

(b) If a minor has lived for five or more consecutive years with relatives (other than par- 
ents) who are domiciled in North Carolina and if the relatives have functioned during 
this time as if they were personal guardians, the minor will be deemed a resident for 

61 



tuition purposes for an enrolled term commencing immediately after at least five years 
in which these circumstances have existed. If under this consideration a minor is 
deemed to be a resident for tuition purposes immediately prior to his or her eighteenth 
birthday, that person on achieving majority will be deemed a legal resident of North 
Carolina of at least twelve months' duration. This provision acts to confer in-state 
tuition status even in the face of other provisions of law to the contrary; however, a 
person deemed a resident of twelve months duration pursuant to this provision con- 
tinues to be a legal resident of the State only so long as he or she does not abandon 
North Carolina domicile. 

Lost but Regained Domicile. If a student ceases enrollment at or graduates from an institu- 
tion of higher education while classified a resident for tuition purposes, and then both aban- 
dons and reacquires North Carolina domicile within a 12-month period, that person, if he or 
she continues to maintain the reacquired domicile into re-enrollment at an institution of higher 
education, may re-enroll at the in-state tuition rate without having to meet the usual twelve- 
month durational requirement. However, any one person may receive the benefit of the provi- 
sion only once. 

Change of Status. A student admitted to initial enrollment in an institution (or permitted to 
re-enroll following an absence from the institutional program which involved a formal with- 
drawal from enrollment) must be classified by the admitting institution either as a resident or 
as a nonresident for tuition purposes prior to actual enrollment. A residence status classifica- 
tion once assigned (and finalized pursuant to any appeal properly taken) may be changed 
thereafter (with corresponding change in billing rates) only at intervals corresponding with 
the established primary divisions of the academic year. 

Transfer Students. When a student transfers from one North Carolina public institution of 
higher education to another, he/she is treated as a new student by the institution to which he/ 
she is transferring and must be assigned an initial residence status classification for tuition 
purposes. 



62 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION AND REGULATIONS 

http://www.ncat.edu/~registra/ 

Each student is responsible for informing himself or herself of the academic regulations 
and requirements set forth in this Bulletin and for revisions of same as posted on campus 
bulletin boards or release in other official publications of the University. Failure to meet the 
requirements or comply with regulations because of lack of knowledge thereof does not ex- 
cuse the student from meeting the academic regulations and requirements. 

A student's program of study must be approved by his or her advisor, his or her chairper- 
son or a member of the faculty in his or her major department at registration. Advisors will 
make every attempt to give effective guidance to students in academic matters and to refer 
students to those qualified to help them in other matters. However, the final responsibility for 
meeting all academic requirements for a selected program rests with the student. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT 

A student entering the University from secondary school may obtain advanced placement 
and college credit on the basis of performance on the College Entrance Examination Board 
Advanced Placement examinations. A score of three (3) or higher on any CEEB advanced 
placement examination will entitle the student to credit for the comparable University course 
as determined by the Director of Admissions in consultation with the chairperson of the ap- 
propriate department. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT 





SCORE 


HOURS 


UNIVERSITY COURSES 


AP EXAMINATION REOUIRED 


GRANTED 


SATISFIED 


Art History 


3 


4 


Art 224 


Biology 


3 


4 


Biology 100 


Calculus AB 


3 


4 


Math 131 


Calculus BC 


3 


4 


Math 131,132 


Chemistry* 


4 


3 


Chemistry 106 


Comparative Government & Politics 


3 


3 


Political Science 310 


Computer Science A 


3 


3 


Computer Science 120 


Computer Science AB 


3 


4 


Computer Science 160 


English Language & Composition 


3 


3 


English 100, UNST 110 




4 


6 


English 100, 101, UNST 110 


English Literature & Composition 


3 


3 


English 100, UNST 110 




4 


6 


English 100, 101, UNST 110 


European History 


3 


6 


History 303, 304 


French Literature 


3 


6 


FOLA 300, 301 


German Language 


3 


6 


FOLA 102, 103 


Latin/Virgil 


3 


6 


Foreign Language Elective 


Latin/Catallus, Horace 


3 


6 


Foreign Language Elective 


French Language 


3 


6 


FOLA 100, 101 


Environmental Science 


3 


3 


EASC 201 


Spanish Language 


3 


6 


FOLA 104, 105 


Macroeconomics 


3 


3 


Economics 201 


Microeconomics 


3 


3 


Economics 200 


Music Theory 


3 


6 


Music 101, 102 



63 



Physics B* 


3 


6 


Physics 225, 226 


Physics C* 


3 


8 


Physics 241, 242 


Psychology 


3 


3 


Psychology 320 


Spanish Liteature 


3 


6 


FOLA 320, 321 


Studio Art/Drawing 


3 


3 


Art Elective 


Studio Art/General 


3 


3 


Art 100 


U.S. Government & Politics 


3 


3 


Political Science 200 


United States History 


3 


6 


History 204, 205 



^Proficiency exam(s) required to earn credit for corresponding lab courses. 

COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP) 
GENERAL EXAMINATION 



Minimum 


Course(s) and Credits Awarded 


Acceptable 










Score 


Department 


Course # 


Credits 


English Composition 


50 


English 


100, 101 


6 


with Essay 










Mathematics 


50 


Math 


101, 102 


6 


COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (SUBJECT EXAMINATION) 


CLEP Subject Exam 










Accounting, Intro. 


50 


Accounting 


221,222 


6 


American Government 


50 


Poli. Science 


200 


3 


American History 1 1600-1877 


50 


History 


204 


3 


American History II 1865-Present 


50 


History 


205 


3 


American Literature 


50 


English 


430,431 


6 


Biology, General 


50 


Biology 


100 


4 


Calculus, Intro. 


50 


Math 


112 


4 


Chemistry, General 


50 


Chemistry 


106, 107 


8 


College Algebra 


50 


Math 


101 


3 


College Algebra-Trig. 


50 


Math 


102 


3 


College Algebra-Trig. 


50 


Math 


111 


4 


College French, Levels 1 & 2 


50 


FOLA 


100, 101 


6 


College French, Levels 1 & 2 


62 


FOLA 


100, 101 
300, 301 


12 


College German, Level- 1 


50 


FOLA 


102, 103 


6 


College German, Level-2 


62 


FOLA 


102, 103, 

422,423 


12 


College Spanish, Levels 1 & 2 


50 


FOLA 


104, 105 


6 


College Spanish, Levels 1 & 2 


66 


FOLA 


104, 105, 
320, 321 


12 


Infor. Systems & Computer App. 


50 


Bus. Admin. 


361 


3 


Econ. (Macro), Intro. 


50 


Economics 


201 


3 


Econ (Micro), Intro. 


50 


Economics 


200 


3 


Edu. Psycho. 


50 


Ed. Psycho. & 
Guid. 


435 


3 


English Lit. 


50 


English 


220,221 


6 


Human Growth & Development 


50 


Home Econ. 


311 


3 


Human Growth & Development 


50 


Psychology 


324 


3 


Psychology, Intro. 


50 


Psychology 


320 


3 


Sociology, Intro. 


50 


See. & Social 
Service 


100 


3 



64 



COURSES OF STUDY 

A student should refer to the requirements of his/her respective department or school about 
his/her program of study and confer with his/her advisor whenever problems arise. The stu- 
dent is expected to follow the program outlined as closely as possible. This is very important 
during the first two years when he or she is satisfying basic degree requirements and prereq- 
uisites for advanced work. 

DECLARATION OF MAJOR 

A student is required to declare a major at or before completing 45 semester hours. If a 
major is not declared, the student will not be allowed to register for the next semester. 

REGISTRATION 

Registration is a time designated each semester to allow the student and his or her advisor 
to review the student's records and plan a course of study for the next semester. 

The student also has an opportunity to discuss academic problems with the advisor. Regis- 
tration helps to ensure that the courses requested on the registered schedule will be available 
to the student the following semester. 

Any student who is enrolled in the University during the registration period is expected to 
register during the period designated for this purpose. 

OFFICIAL REGISTRATION 

In order for a student to get credit for a course, he or she must be properly registered in that 
course. This means that the student must have gone through the registration procedures as 
outlined by the University. Further, the student must have paid all required tuition and fees. 

LATE REGISTRATION 

A student is expected to complete enrollment (including the payment of all required fees) 
on the dates listed on the University Calendar. The payment of fees is part of the registration 
process. No student is eligible to attend classes until the required fees have been paid. 

A student who fails to complete registration during the scheduled dates will be required to 
pay a late registration fee of $20.00 beginning that date. 

AUDITORS 

A regular student may audit a course by picking up the Audit Form from the Office of the 
Registrar. He or she must register officially for the course and pay the University Cashier. 

Attendance, preparation, and participation in the classroom discussion and laboratory exer- 
cises shall be at the discretion of the instructor. 

A student who audits courses is not required to take examinations and tests and he or she 
receives no credit. An auditor may not change his or her registration from audit to credit or 
from credit to audit after late registration ends. 

COURSE LOAD 

According to Administrative Memorandum - Number 345, all full-time undergraduate stu- 
dents are expected to comply with the Board's 1993 Plan to Improve Graduation Rates by 
enrolling in an average of at least 15 semester hours per term in order to graduate in four 
years. The majority of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University's academic 
programs require 128 semester hours. In order to complete a 128 hour degree program in 8 
semesters, it will be necessary for students to carry a course load consisting of an average of 
16 semester hours or complete 32 semester hours in an academic year. Undergraduate stu- 
dents enrolled in twelve (12) or more semester hours are designated as full-time stu- 

65 



dents and must pay full tuition and fees. Full-time students usually carry from 15 to 18 
semester hours. To enroll in more than 18 semester hours, students must get approval from 
the department head and the dean. 

The maximum course load that students who are on academic probation may carry is 
twelve semester hours. The maximum course load for a student with a minimum GPA of 3.0 
is 21 hours. 

Undergraduate students on academic probation who have a cumulative grade point aver- 
age at or above the minimum level that is required based on the number of semesters com- 
pleted are exempted from the twelve hour course load limit. 

DOUBLE MAJOR 

Students who desire to obtain a double major must file a double major form in the Office 
of the Registrar. Students who have double majors which involve two departments or two 
schools must satisfy the major requirements for each department or school. To graduate with 
a double major, students must complete requirements for both majors during the same semes- 
ter or summer. 

PREREQUISITES 

A course which is designated as prerequisite to another course indicates that the prerequi- 
site is required before taking the next course. 

Credit may be granted to indicate acceptable performance in the prerequisite course con- 
tent by successful completion of standardized tests under the College Level Examination 
Program (CLEP) or successfully passing an examination adopted or prepared by the depart- 
ment granting the credit. 

REPETITION OF COURSES 

A student who has received a failing grade in a required course at this University must 
repeat and pass the course unless the Dean of the College/School authorizes a substitute course. 
No single course may be repeated more than (2) two times. Course withdrawals do not count. 
Course drops do not count toward the attempts. A course completed with a grade of "C" or 
higher may not be repeated for a higher grade. Special authorization may be requested, as 
needed, from the Dean of the appropriate College/School to assist the student with complet- 
ing requirements for graduation. 

In order to officially repeat a course, the student must fill out the Course Repeat Form in 
the Office of the Registrar. 

Dual course credit is not allowed. For example, only three (3) hours of credit are allowed 
for a three (3) hour course. 

All grades earned by the student are a part of his/her official academic record and will 
appear on his/her transcript. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

The general education requirements of the university are satisfied by the University Stud- 
ies program. Additional information about the University Studies program is found in the 
University Studies Program section of this Bulletin. 



66 



In order to graduate, every student beginning in the 2006-2007 academic year is required 
to complete a minimum of 37 credit hours of coursework, as specified below. 

Freshman Year (Foundation Courses): 

Incoming freshmen are required to complete 13 credit hours of University Studies (UNST) 
foundation-level courses during their first 32 credit hours of study at North Carolina A&T 
State University, including the following: 

UNST 100 - University Experience 

UNST 1 10 - Critical Writing 

UNST 120 - The Contemporary World 

UNST 130- Analytical Reasoning 

UNST 140 - The African- American Experience: An Interdisciplinary Perspective 

Sophomore/Junior Years (Theme-based Courses and Major-Specified Courses): 

All students must complete: 

12 credit hours of theme-based courses in a single thematic cluster, and 

9 credit hours of major-specified courses that support University Studies learning objectives 

Theme-based courses are taken only after a student has completed all University Studies 
foundation-level courses and must be completed prior to beginning the senior capstone expe- 
rience. Students choose a University Studies thematic cluster in consultation with their advi- 
sor or major department chair prior to completing University Studies foundation-level 
coursework. Students wishing to switch clusters must still complete 12 credit hours in a single 
thematic cluster unless otherwise approved by the Dean of University Studies. A listing of 
thematic clusters and eligible courses is included in the University Studies Program section 
of this Bulletin. 

Senior Year (Capstone Experience): 

During their senior year, all students must complete 3-6 credit hours of a senior capstone 
experience (typically specified by the student's major department). 

Service/Experiential Learning Requirement: 

In addition to the 37 credit hour requirement outlined above, all students are required to 
complete 50 hours of service/experiential learning prior to the senior capstone experience. 

Mathematics and Freshman Proficiency: 

All Freshman students are required to demonstrate proficiency in mathematics and English 
composition by their performance on proficiency examinations completed prior to the start of 
the first semester of coursework. Freshman students who do not meet Freshman proficiency 
competency requirements in English composition and/or mathematics must successfully com- 
plete UNST 103 (Basic Writing) and/or MATH 099 (Intermediate Mathematics) with a pass- 
ing grade before being allowed to enroll in any University Studies Foundation courses. 

COURSE CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 

Credit may be earned by examination for any undergraduate course for which a suitable 
examination has been adopted or prepared by the department granting the credit. The student 
receives the grade "CE" and regular credit for the number of hours involved. However, the 
credit hours are excluded in computing the student's grade point average. 

Credit may also be granted for the successful completion of standardized tests under the 
College Level Examination Program (CLEP) as approved for specific courses by University 
departments. There is no maximum amount of credit that a student may earn, but a student 

67 



I 



must complete a minimum of three semesters as a full-time student in residence at the Univer- 
sity. Fees for CLEP and other standardized examinations are determined externally, rather 
than by the University. These credits are treated as transfer credits. Questions about the pro- 
gram may be addressed to the Director of Admissions or the Director of Counseling Services. 

(Grading System) 

Grades are assigned and recorded as follows: 



Grade 


Description 


Quality Points 


A 


Excellent 


4 


B 


Good 


3 


C 


Average 


2 


D 


Below Average, but passing 


1 


F 


Failure 





I 


Incomplete 




CE 


Credit by examination 




AP 


Advanced placement 




S 


Satisfactory (non-credit courses) 




U 


Unsatisfactory (non-credit courses) 




AU 


Audit 




W 


Withdrew 




P 


Passing 





NORMAL CREDIT LOAD 

The normal load for an undergraduate student is sixteen (16) credit hours per semester. 
The minimum load for a full-time undergraduate student is twelve (12) credit hours per se- 
mester. The student is expected to make normal progress toward a degree. Normal progress 
means the completion of sixteen (16) or more semester hours each semester with a 2.0 grade 
point average or higher for a full-time student. These sixteen (16) hours must consist of courses 
that count toward graduation for a full-time student. 

MINIMUM ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS FOR CONTINUED ENROLLMENT 

All students must have the following minimum grade point average after the listed semes- 
ter hours passed to be allowed to continue to enroll in classes. Full-time students should pass 
the following semester hours by the end of the semester listed in the table to be making 
normal progress toward graduation. 



Full-time 


Semester Hours 


Grade Point 


Semester 


Passed 


Average 


1 


12 


1.40 


2 


24 


1.50 


3 


36 


1.60 


4 


48 


1.80 


5 


60 


1.90 


6 


72 


2.00 


7 


84 


2.00 


8 


96 


2.00 



68 



A student must achieve a minimum semester grade point average of 2.0 each semester 
enrolled beyond the sixth (6 th ) semester to be allowed to continue to enroll. A student is 
eligible to continue to work toward an undergraduate degree until he or she has attended 
eleven (11) semesters as a full-time student (not including summer session) or until he or she 
has attempted 152 semester hours. At that point the student becomes ineligible to continue at 
the University unless approved by the dean of the college or school. 

A student is eligible to register if he or she has a minimum overall grade point average of 
2.0 and has attended the University less than the maximum number of semesters allowed for 
the degree program. 

ACADEMIC WARNING 

A freshman or sophomore student whose mid-semester grade point average is less than 2.0 
will be issued an academic warning indicated by a special notation on mid-semester grade 
reports issued from the Office of the Registrar. While being placed on academic warning 
does not become a part of the student's permanent record, the student is warned that failure to 
meet the minimum standards as defined above by the end of that semester will result in aca- 
demic probation. 

ACADEMIC PROBATION/SUSPENSION 

A student who does not meet the above requirements will be placed on academic proba- 
tion for the next semester of enrollment and required to remove the deficiency prior to the 
beginning of the following semester. Failure to remove this deficiency during the probation 
semester will lead to a one semester suspension. A student who is suspended for a given 
semester may petition the dean to waive the suspension. The student who has been suspended 
and re-admitted with a waiver from the dean is required to make a minimum grade point 
average of 2.0 each semester or summer session following re-enrollment until such time as 
the minimum cumulative grade point average is at or above the minimum appropriate pro- 
gression requirement. A student who is on probation at the end of the spring semester may 
attend summer school and work toward removing his or her academic deficiencies. 

A part-time undergraduate student is defined as one who enrolls in less than twelve (12) 
hours during a semester. The part-time student who fails to maintain the minimum average is 
subject to the actions prescribed for full-time students. A part-time student who enrolls in the 
University after an academic suspension must achieve a minimum grade point average of 2.0 
each semester. 

A part-time undergraduate student enrolled in a degree program must maintain the same 
minimum cumulative grade point average as indicated for a full-time student. 

Students are expected to be aware, at all times, of their academic status and to be respon- 
sible for knowing whether or not they are on academic probation. Students on academic 
probation shall be limited to a maximum of twelve (12) semester hours of credit in a fall 
or spring semester and no more than four (4) semester hours in each session of summer 
school. 

Any student who is placed on academic suspension at the end of the spring semester may 
attend both sessions of summer school to remove academic deficiencies. However, if the 
suspended student does not raise his or her average to the required minimum, the student will 
remain suspended. 

A student who fails to meet the minimum academic requirements after having been sus- 
pended and re-admitted is subject to permanent academic dismissal. There is an appeal pro- 
cedure for academic dismissal. 

69 



ACADEMIC DISMISSAL APPEALS 

Any student who has been dismissed from the University must be out for a minimum of 
one semester before an appeal may be made to the Committee on Admission and Academic 
Retention. Appeals are to be addressed to the Committee on Admission and Academic Re- 
tention in care of the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. 

VETERANS AND PERSONS ELIGIBLE FOR VETERANS BENEFITS 

Veterans will be certified annually unless otherwise specified (per academic year). Con- 
tinued certification is based on meeting the schools Standards of Progress as well as the 
Veterans Administration guidelines. Certification for benefits is not automatic. Students must 
notify the Certifying Officer of their enrollment plans and the intent to use his or her benefits. 

QUALITY POINTS 

Quality points are computed by multiplying the number of semester hour credits by 4 for 
courses in which a grade of A is earned - by 3 for a grade of B; by 2 for a grade of C; by 1 for 
a grade of D. No quality points are given for a grade of F. 

GRADE POINT AVERAGE 

The grade point average is obtained by dividing the total number of quality points earned 
by the total number of semester hours attempted. 

COURSE NUMBER AND CLASSIFICATION 

Each course bears a distinguishing number which identifies it within the department and 
indicates, broadly, its level. The number system is as follows: 

100-399, lower level courses primarily for freshmen and sophomores 

400-599, upper level courses primarily for juniors and seniors 

600-699, courses for undergraduate and graduate students 

700-799, courses for graduate students and appropriate professional students' special programs 

800-899, courses for doctoral students 

COURSE SCHEDULING 

To enhance the preparation of scheduling classes and the academic advisement process, 
each course has a scheduling designation relative to the grading period. This scheduling des- 
ignation is provided: "F" for fall semester, "S" for spring semester, "M" for first session 
summer school, "J" for second session summer school, "I" for intersession and "D" for dual 
sessions. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Students are classified on the basis of semester hours completed excluding remedial and 
deficiency courses. The following classification scale applies to all students regardless of 
enrollment date: 

Semester Hours 
Classification Completed 

Freshman 0-29 

Sophomore 30-59 

Junior 60-89 

Senior 90 or above 



70 



CHANGE OF GRADE 

A request for a change of grade, for any reason, must be made within one year following 
the date the original grade was assigned by the faculty member. 

GRADE APPEAL 

A student may appeal the final grade earned in a course. Initially, the student should at- 
tempt to resolve the matter informally through the instructor of the course, the department 
chair and/or dean of the academic unit in which the grade was assigned. If the matter is not 
resolved through this level of interaction, then the student should consult the individual school/ 
college on its written grade appeal policy. A student wishing to pursue a written appeal of a 
grade must demonstrate a legitimate basis for the appeal. Grade appeals are final at the level 
of the school/college. 

CHANGES IN SCHEDULE 

A change in a student's schedule may be made with the consent of his or her advisor or 
department chairperson. However, if a student's schedule is changed after the designated 
period for adding and/or dropping courses, the consent of the school dean is required. 

The student must obtain and properly complete the Change of Schedule Form. This form 
is obtained from the Office of the Registrar and should be returned to that office. 

CHANGING SCHOOLS/COLLEGES 

Students may transfer from one school/college of the University to another with the writ- 
ten approval and acceptance of the Deans of the schools/colleges involved. The proper forms 
on which to apply for such a change are to be obtained from the Office of the Registrar and 
executed at least six weeks prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student plans to 
transfer. When such a transfer is made, students must satisfy the current academic require- 
ments of the school/college and/or department to which students' transfer. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNTVERSITY 

A student who wishes or is asked to leave the University at any time during the semester 
shall complete and file official withdrawal forms. These forms may be obtained from the 
Counseling Services. They should be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar. 

Students who withdraw from the University within 15 calendar days of the beginning of 
the final examination period for the semester shall receive a "W" in all classes enrolled. 
Failure to execute and file these forms in a timely manner will result in a student incurring the 
penalty of receiving an "F" for each course in which he or she was enrolled during the semes- 
ter in question. 

READMISSION OF FORMER STUDENTS 

All students who withdraw from the University voluntarily, leave the University or are 
suspended, must complete a Readmission Application which can be obtained from the Office 
of the Registrar or on-line www.ncat.edu under Registrar. 

Before a student who voluntarily leaves or withdraws is re-admitted, his or her academic 
record is reviewed. If the student did not attain the minimum academic performance level for 
the number of semesters enrolled at the University, the request for re-admission may be denied. 

Former students who have been dismissed from the University for failure to meet the 
scholastic eligibility requirements may appeal to the Committee on Admissions and Reten- 
tion for a review of their case. The appeal should be addressed to the Committee in care of the 
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. 



71 



The person should not present him or herself for re-enrollment until he or she has received 
a reply from the Committee. Appeals should reach the committee at least sixty (60) days prior 
to the beginning of the term in which the persons expect to register. 

Former students whose attendance has been interrupted by the University for disciplinary 
reasons must apply to the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs for a review of their case for 
possible re-admission. 

FIVE YEAR READMISSION POLICY 

An undergraduate who has been academically dismissed can only be readmitted under the 
Five Year Readmission Policy. 

Any undergraduate student who has not been enrolled at North Carolina Agricultural and 
Technical State University for at least five years (10 academic semesters) may be eligible for 
one readmission under the "Five Year Readmission Policy." This policy is subject to a student 
being able to complete degree requirements without exceeding 152 hours attempted. 

Only courses in which a grade of "C" or better was earned will be counted toward gradu- 
ation. This policy will not alter the student's original academic record. 

The student's grade point average will begin at the time studies are resumed. Students 
must maintain a 2.00 GPA on courses taken after readmission to be eligible to continue. 
Degree requirements will be those in effect at the time the student re-enrolls. 

Students who select the Five Year Readmission Policy will not be recognized as graduat- 
ing with honors. Publication of honors and scholarships is made at commencement. 

Students must have a curriculum plan that leads to graduation developed jointly with the 
department chairperson and approved by the school/college dean. This documentation must 
accompany the Readmission application. 

The Five Year Readmission Policy must be exercised at the time of readmission to the 
University. Once exercised, this policy cannot be reversed. 

INCOMPLETES 

Students are expected to complete all requirements of a particular course during the se- 
mester in which they are registered. However, if at the end of the semester a small portion of 
the work remains unfinished and should be deferred because of some serious circumstances 
beyond the control of the student, an "I" may be submitted. 

Along with the recording of the incomplete grade, the instructor must also file with the 
head of the department the student's average grade and a written description of the work 
which must be completed before the incomplete is removed. 

Procedure for the Removal of an Incomplete 

An incomplete grade must be removed within SIX WEEKS after the beginning of the next 
semester. If the student has not removed the incomplete within the time specified, the Incom- 
plete is automatically changed to an "F" Developmental, thesis and research courses are ex- 
empted from the six week time limit. 

SEMESTER EXAMINATIONS 

A final examination will be required as a part of every course. An examination schedule 
showing the time and place of meeting of each course and section will be published each 
semester. Schedules so published will be followed without exception. Any changes in the 
examination schedule must be approved by the Office of Academic Affairs. 



72 



HONOR ROLL 

To encourage academic excellence, the University publishes a Dean's List at the end of 
each semester. Regular undergraduate students whose semester grade point average is 3.00 or 
higher shall be eligible for the Dean's List. Students making the Honor Roll must have com- 
pleted a total of 12 or more semester hours. 

CLASS ATTENDANCE POLICY 

Class Attendance 

The University is committed to the principle that regular and punctual class attendance is 
essential to the students' optimum scholastic achievement. An absence, excused or unex- 
cused, does not relieve the student of any course requirement. 

Attendance is required and punctuality is expected! A student is responsible for all the 
work, including tests and written work, of all class meetings. 

Instructor's Responsibility 

1) Description of attendance requirements should be stated in the course syllabus and 
announced in class, particularly at the beginning of each term. If class attendance is to 
affect a student's course grade, then a statement to that effect must be a part of the 
course syllabus distributed to each student. 

2) Instructors will keep attendance records in all classes. Each instructor has the right to 
prescribe procedures as to how and when attendance will be taken. 

Student's Responsibility 

It is the responsibility of each student to learn and comply with the requirements set by the 
instructor for each class in which he or she is registered. The student should: 

1) have knowledge of each instructor's attendance and monitoring practices for class ab- 
sences during the term, 

2) become familiar with all materials covered in each course during absences and makeup 
work of any work required by the instructor, and 

3) initiate the request to make-up work on the first day of class attendance after the ab- 
sence. 

POLICY ON MAKE - UP OF REQUIRED COURSE WORK 

The administration, faculty and staff recognize that there are circumstances and events 
which require students to miss classes and require course work which may be performed or 
due on the day of the absence. Also, they recognize that required course work is needed to 
give each student an adequate performance evaluation. Therefore, whenever reasonable (and 
more specifically described below), students should be allowed to make up required work. 

The following definitions will apply with respect to this policy: 

a. Required course work - All work which will be used in the determination of final 
grades, e.g. examinations, announced quizzes, required papers and essays, required 
assignments. 

b. Instructor - Person responsible for the course and providing instruction and evaluation. 

c. Permissible reasons for requesting make up of required work - Sickness (verification 
needed) - death of relatives (immediate family); participation in approved University 
related activities; acting in the capacity of a representative of the University (band, 
choir, sports related travel, etc.); extraordinary circumstances (court appearance, fam- 
ily emergency, etc.); require a signed statement. NOTE: Other reasons for requesting 
make up have required course work is not acceptable. 

73 



d. Documentation - Verification of sickness requires signed statement of a physician or a 
duly authorized staff member of the Health Center. Verification of death requires signed 
statement from the Minister or Funeral Director. Verification of participation in Uni- 
versity related activities requires signed statement from the Office of the Vice Chancellor 
for Academic Affairs. Verification of other reasonable circumstances; for example, court 
appearance, family emergency, etc. require a signed statement from an appropriate 
official (e.g., Court Official, parent or guardian, etc.). 

The policy regarding make-up of required course work is as follows: 

(1) A student may petition an instructor to make up required course work whenever the 
student has a permissible reason for requesting make up of required course work. 

(2) A student will be required to present documentation which certifies absence constitut- 
ing permissible reason. 

(3) Whenever possible, a student should consult with the instructor prior to an absence 
which will involve the failure to do required course work. Arrangements for make up 
should be discussed and agreed upon at this time. 

(4) A student must petition for make up of required course work on the first day that he 
returns to class. 

(5) If permission is granted to make up required course work, the instructor and the stu- 
dent should agree on an acceptable date for completion of missed required course work. 

(6) Failure to comply with item 4 may result in the denial to make up required course 
work. 

Instructors should schedule make up work at a time that is convenient to both the 
instructor and the student. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

A candidate for a degree from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University 
must satisfy the following minimum requirements: 

1 . Choose a specific curriculum leading to a degree in one of the schools/colleges and 
complete the requirements of this curriculum; 

2. Complete a minimum of 124 semester hours excluding deficiency courses and reme- 
dial work for the Bachelor's degree; 

3. Complete the core requirements of the University in English, Mathematics, Natural 
Science, Social Science Humanities and Health or Physical Education for the Bachelor's 
degree; 

4. Earn an average of two (2) grade points for every semester hour undertaken including 
hours passed or failed. After completing the number of credit hours required for gradu- 
ation, if the student is deficient in grade points, he or she must take additional courses 
that have been approved by his or her academic dean to secure these points. The stu- 
dent must also obtain an average of 2.0 or more in his or her major field; 

5. Complete a minimum of three semesters as a full-time student in residence at the Uni- 
versity. This requirement includes the two semesters prior to the period when the student 
completes his/her requirements for graduation. At least one half of the credits in the 
student's major field must be earned at the University. Exception to either of these 
provisions may be made upon the recommendation of the chairperson of the student's 
major department with the approval of the school dean. 

6. Clear all academic conditions by the end of the semester preceding graduation. 

7. Pay all University bills and fees; 



74 



8. File an application for graduation with the Office of the Registrar in accordance with 
the schedule below: 

A. May graduation — by last day for late registration for spring semester 

B. Summer graduation — by the end of the second week of class in the summer session 

C. December graduation — by last day of late registration for fall semester 

GRADUATING WITH HONORS 

Undergraduate candidates who complete all requirements for graduation in accordance 
with the following stipulations earn the following honors: (1) Those who maintain a general 
average within the range of 3.00 to 3.24 will receive CUM LAUDE, (2) those who maintain a 
general average within the range from 3.25 to 3.49 will receive MAGNA CUM LAUDE, and 
(3) those who maintain a general average within the range of 3.50 to 4.00 will receive SUMMA 
CUM LAUDE. 

All hours attempted are included in the grade point average computation for honors. This 
means that when a course is repeated, both grades are added in the computation. For a transfer 
student a minimum of 60 percent of the credit hours required for a degree program must be 
earned at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University to be considered for 
honors. For example, if the program requires a total of 128 credit hours, 77 of those hours 
must be earned at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. Publication of 
honors and scholarships is made at commencement. 

COMMENCEMENT PARTICIPATION 

Two commencement programs are scheduled each year, one in December for fall and 
summer graduates and one in May for spring graduates. Students must meet the following 
requirements to be eligible to participate in the commencement: 

• Have completed degree requirements the semester/session prior to the upcoming com- 
mencement ceremony for which they plan to participate; or 

• Be enrolled in the final courses and/or academic activity necessary to complete degree 
requirements in the semester for which they plan to participate in the respective com- 
mencement. 

In either scenario, all students must submit an application for graduation to the Registrar's 
Office prior to the commencement deadline for either May or December. The student must be 
"cleared" by the Registrar's Office to be approved to participate in the commencement activities. 

Students who complete degree requirements during summer session(s) will NOT be eli- 
gible to participate in the preceding May commencement activities. However, they will be 
eligible to participate in either the following December or May commencement provided 
they meet the respective requirements as stated above. 

GRADUATING UNDER A GIVEN CATALOGUE 

A student may expect to earn a degree in accordance with the requirements of the curricu- 
lum outlined in the catalogue in force when he or she first entered the University, provided the 
courses are being offered. Moreover, he or she must complete these requirements within six 
years. In addition, he or she may graduate under any subsequent catalogue published while he 
or she is a student. If a student elects to meet the requirements of a catalogue other than the 
one in force at the time of his or her original interest, he or she must meet all requirements of 
the catalogue he or she elects. 



75 



SECOND BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 

A student who has received a bachelor's degree from North Carolina Agricultural and 
Technical State University or another accredited college or university may enroll in a pro- 
gram leading to a second degree at the same level providing (1) the major field is different 
from that of the first degree and (2) the appropriate application for admission or re-admission 
is filed and approved. 

Students seeking a second baccalaureate degree and received the first degree must (1) 
complete a minimum of twenty-four (24) semester hours beyond those applied to the first or 
previous degree, excluding transfer credits or substitutions and dependent upon departmental 
requirements, (2) be in residence for a minimum of two (2) semesters as a full-time student if 
the first or previous degree was not earned at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State 
University, and (3) achieve a cumulative minimum grade point average of 2.0 for all hours 
attempted for the degree. 

GRADES 

As soon as grades are determined at the end of each semester or summer term, grades are 
available on-line, www.ncat.edu, AGGIE ACCESS. 

PRIVACY OF STUDENT RECORDS 

The University insures students access to their official academic records but prohibits the 
release of personally identifiable information, other than "directory information," from these 
records without their permission, except as specified by public law 93-380. "Directory infor- 
mation" includes: Student's name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, school, 
major, sex, marital status, dates of attendance, degree received, honors received, institution(s) 
attended prior to admission to North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, 
past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities, and physical fac- 
tors. Public Law 93-380 further provides that any student may, upon written request, restrict 
the printing of such personal information relating to himself or herself as is usually included 
in campus directories. A student who desires to have "directory information" withheld must 
submit a written request to the Office of the Registrar one week before the beginning of 
classes for the semester or session in which he or she is enrolled. 

ACCESS TO STUDENT RECORDS 

1 . The policy for the administration of student academic records is in accordance with the 
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 as amended. 

2. Students have the right to inspect and review any and all official records, files, and data 
directly related to them. 

3. A student who believes that his or her record contains inaccurate or misleading informa- 
tion shall have an opportunity for a hearing to challenge the content of the record, to insure 
that the record is not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of his or her privacy 
or rights, and to provide an opportunity for the correction or deletion of any such inaccu- 
rate, misleading, or otherwise inappropriate data contained therein or include the student's 
own statement of explanation. 

4. The University will comply with requests from his or her record within a reasonable period 
of time and not later than (30) days after the request is received. 

5. The release of academic records requires the written permission of the student, except as 
provided by Public Law 93-380. Transcripts are not issued to a student who has not met his 
or her financial obligations to the University. 



76 



6. Copies of the "University's Statement" concerning access to students records are available 
in the Office of the Registrar as well as the office of each school dean and department 
chairperson. 

CHANGE OF NAME AND ADDRESS 

It is the obligation of every student to notify the Office of the Registrar of any change in 
name or address. Failure to do so can cause serious delay in the handling of the student's 
records and in notification of emergencies at home. To change a name a student must first 
have a legal court document. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Requests for transcripts of students' records should be addressed to the University Regis- 
trar. The cost is $4.00 per copy. 

INDEBTEDNESS TO THE UNrVERSITY 

No diploma, certificate or transcript of a record will be issued to a student who has not 
made a satisfactory settlement with the cashier for all indebtedness to the University. A stu- 
dent may not be permitted to attend classes or final examinations after the due date of any 
unpaid obligation. 

PLAN TO IMPROVE GRADUATION RATES 

In response to legislation enacted by the General Assembly in 1992, the Board of Gover- 
nors has adopted a "Plan to Improve Graduation Rates in the University of North Carolina." 
The plan includes polices that are aimed at decreasing the average time taken for completion 
of degrees. 

What must a student do to graduate in four years? 

Full-time undergraduate students are expected to make scheduled progress toward gradu- 
ation. Thus, it should be possible for those students to complete most baccalaureate degree 
programs within four academic years or the equivalent. 

What must the University do to expedite student progress? 

Effective fall 1995, baccalaureate degree programs shall be limited to no more than 128 
semester hours. Any program that requires 135 semester hours or more shall be officially 
designated as a five-year baccalaureate program. 

Also, the University will make every effort to schedule a sufficient number of course sec- 
tions and/or alternate courses to assist students in meeting their graduation requirements. A 
new registration/advising system is being tested which will provide progress reports to stu- 
dents and advisors. 

What is the graduation rate at the University? 

Our data show that 39.1 percent of the first-time full-time freshmen who entered North 
Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University in Fall 1986 have received a baccalaure- 
ate degree from this institution or another UNC institution as of Fall 1992. In addition, an- 
other 9.9 percent were enrolled at this or another UNC institution in pursuit of their baccalau- 
reate degrees as of Fall 1992. 

Why do some students take longer? 

Many students carry fewer credits because they work; others interrupt their education for 
personal reasons. Some students take extra time completing special courses to improve their 
academic skills. Many students change majors, major in more than one field, or enroll in a 
major that requires more than 124 semester hours for graduation. A significant number of 



77 



students also take extra time to pursue related educational experiences. Finally, some students 
take extra time for social reasons. 

Working students. Nearly 20 percent of our students participate in the college work study 
program. Those students work an average of 15 hours each week. Over 30 percent of our 
undergraduate students work off campus. Students who work off campus average more than 
30 hours a week while taking fewer hours than the on-campus students. 

Many students work to help pay for school expenses. Some students work to avoid heavy 
loan debt upon graduation, and others work to enhance their career prospects after gradua- 
tion. However, far too many of our students are working so that they can have automobiles, 
clothes, apartments, and lifestyles which are not conducive to succeeding in college. 

The Piedmont Triad is an area in which college students may easily find work. Students 
who work are likely to carry fewer semester hours and are more likely to drop out of school 
for a period of time. 

Student retention rate. From 1986-1991, the percentage of freshmen on the North Caro- 
lina A&T State University campus who returned as sophomores has remained around 77 
percent except for 1989 when it reached 86 percent. These figures are up from the mid 60 
percent in earlier years. We anticipate that this increased retention of first-year students should 
be reflected in higher graduation rates over the next few years. 

What must a student do to graduate faster? 

The students must put education first. They should enroll in and complete at least 16 
hours per semester. They must take advantage of courses offered in summer sessions or inde- 
pendent study. They should seek the advice of their assigned academic advisors who know 
the degree and major requirements. 

The University of North Carolina requires North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State 
University to publish the following statement with the above material: 

Our data show that 46.0 percent of the first-time full-time freshman students who entered 
North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University in Fall 1988 have received a bac- 
calaureate degree from this institution or another UNC institution as of Fall 1994. This infor- 
mation is provided pursuant to requirements of the Student-Right-to-Know and Campus Se- 
curity Act of 1990. 

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY POLICY 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is committed to a policy of 
academic honesty for all students. Examples of Academic Dishonesty include but are not 
limited to: 

• Cheating or knowingly assisting another student in committing an act of academic 
dishonesty; 

• Plagiarism (unauthorized use of another person's words or ideas as one's own) which 
includes but is not necessarily limited to submitting examinations, theses, reports, draw- 
ings, laboratory notes or other materials as one's own work when such work has been 
prepared by another person or copied from another person. 

• Unauthorized possession of examinations or reserve library materials, destruction or 
hiding of source materials, library materials, or laboratory materials or experiments or 
any other similar action; 

• Unauthorized changing of grades or marking on an examination or in an instructor's 
grade book, or such change of any grade record; 



78 



• Aiding or abetting in the infraction of any of the provisions anticipated under the gen- 
eral standards of student conduct; or 

• Assisting another student in violating any of the above rules. 

A student who has committed an act of academic dishonesty has failed to meet a basic 
requirement of satisfactory academic performance. Thus, academic dishonesty is not only a 
basis for disciplinary action but may also affect the evaluation of the student's level of perfor- 
mance. Any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty is subject to disciplinary 
action as defined below. 

In instances where a student has clearly been identified as having committed an academic 
act of dishonesty, the instructor may take appropriate punitive action including a loss of credit 
for an assignment, an examination or project, or award a grade of "F" for the course subject to 
the review and endorsement of the chairperson and the dean. Repeated offenses can even lead 
to dismissal from the University. 

STUDENT APPEALS ON ACADEMIC DISHONESTY 

A student who feels that he or she has been unfairly treated as a result of an academic 
dishonesty matter may appeal the action in writing to the University Judicial Tribunal. The 
written notice of appeal must be submitted within one week (seven calendar days) of the date 
of the incident. The student should refer to the section on Appellate Procedures in the Student 
Handbook. 

DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOR IN THE CLASSROOM 

(UNC-GA Policies for Students-Adopted by BOG October 26, 1970) 

The instructor may withdraw a student from a course for behavior he deems to be disrup- 
tive to the class. The grade assigned will be "W" if the behavior occurs before the deadline for 
dropping a course without academic penalty, and the instructor has the option of giving a "W" 
or a "F" if the behavior occurs after the deadline. 

1. BINDING PROCEDURES FOR INSTRUCTORS 

The instructor must provide an opportunity for the student to be heard. In providing this 
opportunity, the instructor must follow the procedure described below: 

1 . The student should be notified in writing at the next class attended that the instructor 
proposes to drop the student from the course for disruption of the class, and the instruc- 
tor should provide the student with written instructions regarding the time and place 
for a meeting with the instructor. A copy of this written notification must be sent to the 
instructor's department head at the same time. 

2. A time limit of five working days (M-F) from the time written notification is given for 
the student's opportunity to be heard by the instructor. 

3. The date of notification establishes whether the withdrawn student will be given a "W" 
or "F." "W" is appropriate before the 8-week drop date and either "W" or "F" is appro- 
priate after that date, at the instructor's discretion. 

4. The instructor may suspend the student from class until the instructor takes final action 
to withdraw the student from class or to allow the student to continue in the class. The 
final decision to withdraw or continue the student is the instructor's. 

5. Either party in the resolution of this dispute may invite one other person of the univer- 
sity community to be present as an observer. 



79 



II. STUDENTS' RIGHT TO APPEAL 

If the student wishes to appeal the instructor's decision to withdraw the student from class, 
he/she should follow the academic appeal procedures outlined in the section on grading in 
the Undergraduate Bulletin. 

CELL PHONE POLICY 

The use of cell phones inside the classroom during the classroom period is prohibited. 
Please be advised that placing or receiving calls as well as conversing on cell phones during 
the conduct of a class shall be considered as disruptive behavior for students and unprofes- 
sional behavior for faculty and staff. 



80 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE AND 
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 

http://www.ag.ncat.edu/ 



Alton Thompson, Dean 

Donald McDowell, Associate Dean for Academic Programs 

Carolyn Turner, Associate Dean for Research 

M. Ray McKinnie, Associate Dean for Cooperative Extension 

OBJECTIVES 

The School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences (SAES) is organized in the land- 
grant university tradition where programs of resident instruction in the food, agricultural, 
family and environmental sciences, as well as closely related areas are offered. Agricultural 
Research and Cooperative Extension completes the land grant institution triumvirate. Thus, 
the School is guided by the values that underlie the land-grant philosophy: 

• Learning - creating a responsive learning environment and enhancing access to educa- 
tional opportunities for all; 

• Discovery - expanding knowledge through research; 

• Engagement - putting that knowledge to work; and collaborating with diverse institu- 
tions, communities and people to improve their quality of life. 

The hallmark of the School's work is the integration of these three values - learning, 
discovery and engagement - into programs that make a difference. Our teaching, research and 
Extension programs are part of a national system that maintains a statewide presence and 
links local, state, national and global issues. 

The School is fundamentally interdisciplinary; we apply the biological, physical and so- 
cial sciences to challenges in food, fiber, agricultural and environmental systems. Instruc- 
tional programs provide a strong foundation in the natural sciences, social sciences and eco- 
nomics, which support curricula in agricultural, family and consumer sciences. These pro- 
grams originate from a highly qualified faculty committed to academic excellence and the 
development of individuals to their personal and professional potential. Central to the School's 
goals is the cultivation of interdisciplinary problem-solving skills that serves as a foundation 
for continuing academic development, critical inquiry, life-long learning and adaptation to 
change. 

MISSION 

The School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences provides opportunities for indi- 
viduals from diverse backgrounds to achieve excellence in the food, agricultural, family and 
environmental sciences through exemplary and integrative instruction, and through scholarly, 
creative and effective research and Extension programs. 

VISION 

The School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences shall be a premiere learner-cen- 
tered community that develops and preserves intellectual capital in the food, agricultural, 
family, and environmental sciences through interdisciplinary learning, discovery, and engage- 
ment. 



AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH PROGRAM 

Organized research is conducted in the food, agricultural, family and environmental sci- 
ences by research faculty with joint appointments in the instructional and research programs. 
Much of the research activity is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture. It 
is conducted on the University Teaching and Research Farm and in on-campus laboratories 
where investigations include such areas as food safety, agromedicine, wetlands, water qual- 
ity, biotechnology, biofuels and renewable, energy international trade, rural development, 
animal sciences, plant science, specialty crops, landscape architecture and design, human 
nutrition, child development, housing, food science, and animal health. 

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM 

Cooperative extension is an outreach educational program whose objective is to provide 
science-based information and assistance in a broad range of subjects to individuals, families, 
and organized groups in rural and urban areas of the state. The Cooperative Extension Pro- 
gram at North Carolina A&T State University is an integrated participatory partner in North 
Carolina Cooperative Extension. North Carolina State University, in Raleigh, North Carolina, 
and North Carolina A&T State University collaborate in providing solutions to the problems 
that plague the citizens in the State of North Carolina. 

INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURAL PROGRAM 

The International Agricultural Program involves all departments in the School of Agricul- 
ture and Environmental Sciences and relates to the University's Office of International Pro- 
grams through the Office of the Coordinator for International Agriculture. 

In overseas locations, research, teaching, and community out-reach are conducted by fac- 
ulty in association with long-term development assistance projects. Additionally, faculty share 
their expertise through short-term assignments for consultation in various overseas settings. 

INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS 

Departmental Organization: 

The School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences is organized into four departments: 
(1) Agribusiness, Applied Economics and Agriscience Education, (2) Animal Sciences, (3) 
Family and Consumer Sciences, and (4) Natural Resources and Environmental Design. Advi- 
sory groups associated with various professions represented by the School continually review 
curricula and programs. The School sets high expectations and provides students with re- 
sources and support they need to take charge of their education. 

Requirements for Admissions: 

The requirements for admission to the School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences 
are the same as the general requirements for admission to the University. Some programs 
have higher requirements. Please see the specific Department of interest. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

The requirements for graduation for the Bachelor of Science Degree are as follows: 

1 . The student must have satisfied the course requirements of an approved curriculum in 
an organized department administered by the School of Agriculture and Environmen- 
tal Sciences. 

2. The student must have earned a cumulative grade point average of at least a "C" in his 
or her major courses and in his or her overall academic program. 



82 



3. Students planning to teach secondary agricultural education, family and consumer sci- 
ences education, and child development early education/family studies (B-K) must 
also meet the teaching requirements prescribed by the School of Education. 

Curricula: 

Departments in the School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences provide several 
program options through curricula leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree. These program 
options accommodate specialization in several areas of the food, agricultural, family and 
environmental sciences. In addition, the School has several enrichment programs available to 
our students and many students participate in summer internships and cooperative education 
programs which enable them to receive academic credit for career- related experiences. The 
School encourages involvement in co-curricular activities as a means of developing commu- 
nication and leadership skills. 

The Master of Science Degree is offered in agricultural economics, agricultural educa- 
tion, animal health science, food and nutrition, and plant and soil science. (For further details 
please consult the graduate school bulletin.) 

ACCREDITATION 

All of the programs in the School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences that have 
accrediting organizations have been accredited. They are as follows: 

• The Bioenvironmental Engineering Program is accredited by the Engineering Accredita- 
tion Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. 

• The Didactic Program is approved by the Commission on Accreditation/Approval, for Di- 
etetics Education of the American Dietetic Association, a specialized body recognized by 
the Commission on Recognition of Post Secondary Accreditation and the United States 
Department of Education. 

• Family and Consumer Sciences Programs are accredited by the American Association of 
Family and Consumer Sciences. 

• The Landscape Architecture Program is accredited by the American Society of Landscape 
Architecture Accreditation Board. 

• The Teacher Education Programs are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation 
of Teacher Education and the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

The School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences provides professional education 
for a wide range of career opportunities in the food, agricultural, family and environmental 
and sciences. Students are prepared for careers in business, government, public service agen- 
cies, retail and service industries, health-related fields, biomedical and biotechnology compa- 
nies, financial institutions, youth development agencies, conservation and environmental or- 
ganizations, research, extension and education. Students are also provided with an appropri- 
ate background for graduate and professional programs. 



83 



Department of Agribusiness, Applied Economics and 
Agriscience Education 

http://www:ag. ncat.edu/agribusiness 

Anthony Yeboah, Chairperson 

OBJECTIVES 

The Department of Agribusiness, Applied Economics and Agriscience Education offers 
programs leading to the Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Agricultural Econom- 
ics and Agricultural Education. Students who pursue the Bachelor of Science in Agricultural 
Economics may concentrate in Agribusiness. Students who pursue the Bachelor of Science 
degree in Agricultural Education may concentrate in Secondary Education or Agricultural 
Professional Service. In addition, students may take prescribed courses in Rural Sociology 
and Sociology. 

The objectives of the programs are to train students to understand and apply the educational 
concepts and analytical tools of economics and business in a systematic method in order to 
identify, analyze, and resolve management problems of the farm, agribusiness firms, rural com- 
munities, and government agencies, as well as preparing students for further study in Agricul- 
tural Economics and/or Education. 

The Agricultural Education program is accredited by the National Council for Accredita- 
tion of Teacher Education and the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction for 
the preparation of teachers in agriculture in the public school system. Agricultural Education 
majors in both the Secondary Education and Agricultural Professional Service study tracks are 
expected to complete a second major concentration in a basic academic discipline to include 
24-27 semester credit hours. The second major concentration requirement consists of a combi- 
nation of specified technical classes in addition to classes taken from the general education and 
technical agriculture core as determined by the student's advisor. The major options available 
include agricultural science, animal science, agribusiness and marketing, agricultural commu- 
nications, natural and environmental science, plant and soil science, and rural sociology. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Agricultural Economics - Bachelor of Science 

Agricultural Economics (Agribusiness) - Bachelor of Science 

Agricultural Education (Secondary Education) - Bachelor of Science 

Agricultural Education (Agricultural Professional Service) - Bachelor of Science 

Agricultural Education - Master of Science* 

Agricultural Economics - Master of Science* 
* See the Graduate School Bulletin 

Interdisciplinary certificate programs are offered to students enrolled in Bachelor of Sci- 
ence programs at the University. Areas of specialization include Entrepreneurship (18 credit 
hours), Biotechnology (18 credit hours) and Waste Management (18 to 20 credits hours) and 
Agricultural and Natural Resources Information Science (18 credit hours). 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The admission of students to the undergraduate degree program is based upon the general 
admission requirements of the University. 



84 



DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Undergraduate majors in Agricultural Economics and Agricultural Education must com- 
plete 127 semester hours of University courses. Students must earn an average grade of "C" in 
all Agricultural Education or Agricultural Economics courses in order to meet the major field 
requirements. Agricultural Economics majors must take a minimum requirement of 37 semes- 
ter hours in Agricultural and General Economics. Agricultural education majors must earn a 
minimum grade point average of 2.8 to be admitted to the teacher education program, in addi- 
tion to other admission requirements. 

As mandated by the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction, all candidates 
for teacher licensure will need to show evidence of computer competency. A basic skills test 
will need to be passed. Additionally, students must produce an electronic portfolio showing 
advanced technology for teaching skills during their program of study. The University, through 
course work, will provide opportunities for students to produce materials necessary to fulfill 
the technology portfolio requirement. 

TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The goals and objectives of the Teacher Education Program in agricultural education, as 
mandated by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NC ATE) and the 
North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction (SDPI), address the development of 
competencies in the areas of animal science, soil science, plant science, agricultural and natu- 
ral resources, horticulture, agricultural economics, agricultural mechanics, and agricultural 
communication. The goals of the program are twofold and are listed below: 

1. Develop an understanding of and appreciation for teaching agricultural education; and 

2. Develop competencies needed by individuals to teach agriculture in North Carolina pub- 
lic secondary schools. 

The fourteen objectives of the agricultural education teacher preparation program are listed 
below: 

1. To promote the agricultural education program in secondary schools; to meet the needs 
and interests of students and to satisfy employment demands; 

2. To plan for effective public relations; 

3. To plan for effective and comprehensive instruction; 

4. To manage the classrooms and laboratories effectively; 

5. To aid students in making career decisions; 

6. To evaluate vocational agriculture programs and student progress; 

7. To advise and manage the Future Farmers of America (FFA) as an integral part of instruc- 
tion; 

8. To extend learning experiences for students beyond the classroom through Supervised 
Occupational Experience Program; 

9. To plan and conduct a program of career exploration and guidance and provide hands-on 
learning experiences in technical agriculture including animal science, soil science, plant 
science, agricultural and natural resources, agricultural economics and agricultural me- 
chanics; 

10. To plan and conduct a program to develop knowledge and skills needed for job entry into 
agricultural production occupations and/or to pursue further training in the subject area; 



85 



1 l.To plan and conduct a program to develop knowledge and skills needed for job entry into 
agricultural mechanics occupations and/or pursue further training in the subject area; 

12. To plan and conduct a program to develop knowledge and skills needed for job entry into 

agricultural and natural resources occupations and/or pursue further training in the sub- 
ject area; 

13. To plan and conduct a program to develop knowledge and skills needed for job entry into 
forestry occupations and/or pursue further training in the subject area; 

14. To plan and conduct a program to develop knowledge and skills needed for job entry into 
agricultural products and processing occupations and/or pursue further training in the 
subject area. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

Students who successfully complete programs in Agricultural Economics or Agricultural 
Education are prepared for careers in teaching, supervision in schools and colleges, agricul- 
tural extension, agricultural-related business firms and industries, trade and professional asso- 
ciations, government and private research firms, government services (legislative, administra- 
tion, or professional), as well as for further study for advanced degrees. 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR 
AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND AGRIBUSINESS 

AGEC 130 

AGEC 240 

AGEC 300 

AGEC 330 

AGEC 335 

ECON 200 
A grade of "C" must be earned in all of the above requirements and an average of "C" must be earned in all 
courses. 



ECON 201 

ECON 410 

ECON 420 

AGEC 405 or ECON 305 

AGEC 406 or ECON 310 



AGEC 432 
AGEC 434 
AGEC 436 
AGEC 632 
AGEC 675 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 



First Semester 
UNST 100 
UNST 1 10 
UNST 130 
MATH 111 
BIOL 100 



First Semester 
UNST Elective 1 
ECON 200 
AGEC 300 
AGEC 240 
FOLA 2 
UNST Elective 1 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


1 


UNST 120 


3 


3 


UNST 140 


3 


3 


MATH 131 or 112 


4 


4 


CHEM 100/110 


4 


4 


ENGL 101 


3 


15 




17 


SOPHOMORE YEAR 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


3 


UNST Elective 1 


3 


3 


ECON 201 


3 


3 


AGEC 330 


3 


3 


FOLA 2 


3 


3 


ANSC211 


3 


3 


HPED 200 


2 


18 




17 



86 



JUNIOR YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


ANSC451 


3 


ECON 420 


3 


ECON 410 


3 


AGEC 335 


3 


ECON 305 or AGEC 405 


3 


ECON 310 or AGEC 406 


3 


AGEC 434 


3 


SPCH 250 


3 


AGEC 432 


3 


UNST Elective » 


3 


NARS 110 


3 
18 




15 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


Major Elective 


3 


AGED 438 


3 


AGEC 436 


3 


AGEC 632 


3 


Free Elective 


3 


AGEC 675 


3 


Major Elective* 


6 


AGEC 599 (Capstone) 


3 




15 




12 



Total Credit Hours: 127 

1 UNST Cluster Theme Elective: Student must choose one cluster and take courses only in that cluster. 

2 TOLA 100 Elementary French I or FOLA 104 Elementary Spanish I, FOLA 101 Elementary French II or 
Elementary Spanish II 

* Depending on area of interest, students will take 6 credit hours from the following groups of courses: 

1) Animal Sciences: ANSC 312, ANSC 411, ANSC 415 andANSC 416 

2) Nutritional Sciences: HEFS 135, HEFS 236, HEFS 246, HEFS 332 and HEFS 337 

3) Environmental Sciences: EASC 201, EASC 616, EASC 622, EASC 625, EASC 699 and AGED 607 

4) Environmental Horticulture: HORT 334, HORT 527, HORT 412, HORT 514, HORT 610, HORT611 and 
HORT620 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
(Agribusiness) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST 100 


1 


UNST 120 


3 


UNST 110 


3 


UNST 140 


3 


UNST 130 


3 


MATH 131 or 112 


4 


MATH 1 1 1 


4 


CHEM 100/110 


4 


BIOL 100 


4 


ENGL 101 


3 




15 




17 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST Elective 1 


3 


UNST Elective 1 


3 


ECON 200 


3 


ECON 201 


3 


UNST Elective 1 


3 


AGEC 330 


3 


AGEC 300 


3 


ANSC 211 or ANSC 411 


3 


BUAD 220 


3 


AGEC 405 or ECON 305 


3 


AGEC 240 


3 


HPED 200 


2 




18 




17 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


AGEC 432 


3 


ACCT 222 


3 


AGEC 434 


3 


PSYC 320 


3 


ACCT 221 


3 


ECON 420 


3 


ECON 410 


3 


SPCH 250 


3 


AGEC 406 or ECON 310 


3 


NARS 110 


3 


ANSC 451 


3 


UNST Elective 1 


3 




18 




18 



87 



SENIOR YEAR 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


3 


AGEC 599 (Capstone) 


3 


3 


AGEC 446 


3 


3 


AGEC 640 


3 


3 


AGEC 675 


3 


12 




12 



First Semester 
AGEC 436 
BUAD 453 
AGEC 442 
AGEC 444 

Total Credit Hours: 127 

' UNST Cluster Theme Elective: Student must choose one cluster and take courses only in that cluster. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS/AGRIBUSINESS 

Undergraduate 

AGEC 130. Survey of the Food and Agribusiness Industries Credit 1(1-0) 

This course provides an introductory overview of the characteristics, scope and functions of 
the U.S. food and fiber production/processing/distributing system such as, showing the rela- 
tionships of input supply, farm production, and product processing - distribution-marketing 
complex, and their role in meeting food and fiber needs of people; and identification of possi- 
bilities and requirements for training and services. (F) 

AGEC 240. Introduction to Computers in Agribusiness Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to familiarize students with the growing role of computers as a man- 
agement aid in agribusiness. Topics covered include: electronic spreadsheets, word processing, 
data base management, telecomputer communication, flow charting, etc. Emphasis will be 
placed on the application of software to agribusiness and agricultural economics analysis. (F) 

AGEC 330. Introduction to Agricultural Economics Credit 3(3-0) 

An application of the fundamental principles of economics to agricultural production, market- 
ing, land tenure, leasing arrangements, and financing and related economic problems will be 
included in this course. (S) 

AGEC 335. Economic Geography of World Food and Resources Credit 3 (3-0) 

The objective of this course is to acquaint students from across the University and hopefully 
those outside the University with the economics and geography of the world's human and 
natural resources as they affect food and fiber production, resource use, and economic welfare 
around the world. Content is drawn from many disciplines that study the natural world and 
investigate forces that affect the availability of resources, the dynamics of populations, the 
behavior of people, and different nation's policies towards food, resource use, trade, and the 
environment. The overall theme of the course is on the hard decisions and trade-off necessary 
to meet growing needs with fixed resources in a stressed natural environment. (S) 

AGEC 405. Statistical Methods in Agricultural Economics I Credit 3(3-0) 

This course emphasizes statistical methods with special applications to agricultural problems. 
The statistical table, ratios, percentages, bar charts, line charts, and frequency distribution are 
used as analytical tools. (DEMAND) 

AGEC 406. Statistical Methods in Agricultural Economics II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course emphasizes statistical methods with special applications to agricultural problems. 
The time series analysis, sampling theory, analysis of variance, and simple correlation are used 
as analytical tools. This course is a continuation of AGEC 644. (DEMAND) 

AGEC 432. Elements of Farm Management Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles, which govern the effective organization and operation of the farm firm, will be 
covered. (F) 



88 



AGEC 434. Marketing Agricultural Products Credit 3(3-0) 

This course emphasizes the principles and practices of marketing as applied to farm commodi- 
ties. Form, place, time and possession utility, the ultimate consumer's market, the agricultural 
industries market, the middleman system, exchange market operation and future contracts, 
price determination, reducing marketing costs will be examined. Visits will be made to local 
markets. Prerequisite: AGEC 330. (F) 

AGEC 436. Agricultural Prices Credit 3(3-0) 

Information regarding agricultural price changes, index numbers, price determination, sea- 
sonal and cyclical price movements, storage problems, methods of controlling extreme price 
fluctuations, and government price policy will be covered. (S) 

AGEC 438. Resource and Environmental Economics and Policy Credit 3(3-0) 

Economic theory and concepts associated with natural resources - renewable resources (for- 
ests, fisheries and wildlife populations), and non-renewable resources (minerals and energy 
resources, soil); analytical treatment of the role of the environment in economic activity and 
methods for protecting and enhancing environmental quality; implications of market failures 
for public policy; design of environmental policy; theory of welfare measurement; measuring 
the benefits of environmental improvement. Determinants of the institutional environment such 
as property rights; conservation; private and public resource use problems; and patterns of 
natural resource use. The application of economic principles and quantitative methods to envi- 
ronmental and natural resource problems. (S) 

AGEC 440. Resource Economics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course provides analysis of economic problems of resources use and management; per- 
ception of and definition of problems in terms of allocation mechanism; and analysis of eco- 
nomic relationships over time and market externalities with emphasis on welfare implications. 
Prerequisite: ECON 300. (S) 

AGEC 442. Futures and Options Markets Credit 3(3-0) 

This course studies the behavior of future markets; how public agencies, businesses, others use 
those markets. Studies nature of various strategies involving options, commodity and future 
contracts. Price determination in options and futures markets examined. (F) 

AGEC 444. Financial Management of Agribusiness Firms Credit 3(3-0) 

This course involves understanding the principles and techniques of financial management of 
agribusiness firms. Topics include the evaluation of financial statements, the analysis of finan- 
cial feasibility, the assessment of capital structure within agribusiness firms, the identification 
of sources and types of short-term, intermediate, and long-term capital, the examination of 
capital budgeting methods, theevaluation of policies affecting financial markets in agriculture, 
and the implementation of agribusiness case problems and simulation games. (F) 

AGEC 446. Introduction to Agribusiness Research Methods Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to provide a general understanding of agribusiness research through 
the use of various techniques of scientific methods. Subject matter includes the evaluation of 
research design - problem identification, literature review, data collection, methods of analysis, 
presentation of results, interpretation of findings, formation of conclusions, and the communi- 
cation of recommendations. (S) 

AGEC 530. Economics of Food Distribution Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers the description of market structures and operations in the processing and 
wholesale and retail distribution of food and the effect of industrial organization and govern- 
ment regulations on the efficiency of the market and consumer demand for food. (DEMAND) 



89 



AGEC599. Internship Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to provide the student with a capstone experience. The student partici- 
pates in a temporary period of supervised work experience which provides him/her with an 
opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge to a work situation. The internship is designed to 
give students supervised work experience in agriculture and environmental sciences. (F;S;SS) 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

AGEC 632. Food and Agricultural Policy Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles of agricultural and food policy formulation; agricultural adjustment processes; agri- 
cultural price and income policies in relation to land use, water, and rural development poli- 
cies; interelationships among U.S. and foreign agriculture and trade policies. (S) 

AGEC 634. International Agribusiness Marketing Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will examine and analyze the series of problems, issues, policies, regulations and 
procedures relevant to the global marketing of agricultural and related commodities by 
agribusiness firms. Emphasis will be on combining firm-level agribusiness marketing concepts 
with international agribusiness marketing and export management practices including the de- 
velopment of international agribusiness marketing plans and case studies from international 
agribusiness firms. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (S) 

AGEC 638. Special Problems in Agricultural Economics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed for students who desire to work out special problems in the field of 
agricultural economics; problem definition, formulation and investigation will be emphasized. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the department chairperson. (F) 

AGEC 640. Agribusiness Management Credit 3(3-0) 

This course emphasizes decision-making of agribusiness managers, agribusiness management 
consultants, and entrepreneurs of agriculturally related firms. Contemporary topics facing the 
agribusiness decision-maker such as how to establish an agriculturally based firm, marketing 
agribusiness firms through E-Commerce, examining food supply chains, establsihing contrac- 
tual agreements with other firms, and evaluating industrial organization within the agribusiness 
industry are presented. Students are expected to simulate the decision-making of the agribusiness 
manager/entrepreneur through the use of case studies, agribusiness projects, agribusiness re- 
search, and business plans. (F) 

AGEC 641. Special Problems in Agribusiness Management Credit 3(3-0) 

This course relies heavily on the "Harvard Case Studies Approach" to make decisions and 
solve problems faced by agribusiness managers. Also, students will be exposed to quantitative 
techniques for analyzing and solving problems confronting the firm. Emphasis is placed on 
applying theoretical concepts to the real world decision-making environment. Prerequisite: 
AGEC 640 or consent of instructor. (DEMAND) 

AGEC 642. Seminar in Agricultural Economics Credit 3(3-0) 

Discussion of reports and an appraisal of current literature on agricultural problems will take 
place. Prerequisite: Consent of the department chairperson. (DEMAND) 

AGEC 648. Appraisal and Finance of Agribusiness Firms Credit 3(3-0) 

The principles of land evaluation, appraisal and taxation will be examined. The role of credit in 
a money economy, classification of credit, principles underlying the economic use of credit 
and the role of the government in the field of credit will also be covered. (S) 

AGEC 675. Computer Applications in Agricultural Economics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to provide students with the tools to utilize computers for agricultural 
decision-making. Emphasis will be placed on utilizing existing software packages for micro- 
computers and mainframe computers to make financial, economic and quantitative analyses of 
farm and agribusiness-related problems. Prerequisite: AGEC 330 or ECON 300. (S) 

90 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

AGEC 300. Principles of Rural Sociology Credit 3(3-0) 

Social systems, cultural patterns, and institutional arrangements of people in rural environ- 
ments will be examined. An interpretation of the structure, functioning and change in rural 
social systems will also be covered. (F) 

AGEC 301. Rural Social Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

This course focuses on the problems and solutions of population dynamics, education, reli- 
gion, health, land tenure, parity income, farm labor, mechanization, housing, poverty, and rural 
development as they affect the growth of the rural community. (DEMAND) 

AGEC 303. Rural Family Credit 3(3-0) 

The course examines the institutional nature of the rural family, its role in the community, 
including its relationship to educational, religious, welfare and other community organiza- 
tions. (DEMAND) 

AGEC 505. Rural Standards of Living Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the consumption behavior in the main community groups of our rural 
society as well as the poverty threshold and the plight of the rural poor. (DEMAND) 

AGEC 506. Special Problems in Rural Sociology Credit (2 to 4 hrs) 

This course includes work on problems in the rural society under the guidance of a faculty 
member. (DEMAND) 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

(Secondary Education) 

AGEC 130 AGED 503 AGED 403 

AGED 400 AGEC 300 or AGED 609 AGED 502 

AGED 402 AGED 101 AGED 607 

AGED 501 AGED 401 

* Students in the secondary education track must meet all requirements for admission to the teacher education 

program. 
**A grade of "C" must be earned in all of the above requirements or an average of "C" must be earned in all 

courses for the agricultural professional service track. 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 



First Semester 
UNST 100 
MATH 101 
UNST 110 
BIOL 100 
UNST 120 



First Semester 
UNST Elective 1 
UNST Elective 1 
PSYC 320 
NARS 110 
AGEN 1 14 
CUIN 102 



(Secondary Education) 




FRESHMAN YEAR 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


1 


UNST 130 


3 


3 


MATH 102 


3 


3 


UNST 140 


3 


4 


CHEM 104 and 114 


4 


3 


AGED 101 


1 


14 


HPED 200 


2 
16 


SOPHOMORE YEAR 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


3 


UNST Elective 1 


3 


3 


UNST Elective 1 


3 


3 


ANSC211 


3 


3 


HORT 334 


3 


3 


Second Major Concentration 


3 


2 


AGEC 300 


3 


17 




18 



91 



JUNIOR YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


AGED 400 


3 


AGED 402 


3 


AGED 401 


3 


AGED 403 


3 


SLSC 338 


4 


CUIN 400 


3 


Second Major Concentration 


3 


Second Major Concentration 


3 


SPED 350 


3 


Second Major Concentration 


3 


CUIN 301 


2 


CUIN 436 


3 




18 




18 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


AGED 501 


3 


AGED 502 (Capstone) 


12 


Second Major Concentration 


3 


CUIN 624 


3 


Second Major Concentration 


3 




15 


AGED 503 


3 
12 







Total Credit Hours: 128 

' UNST Cluster Theme Elective: Student must choose one cluster and take courses only in that cluster. 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

(Agricultural Professional Service) 

AGEC 130 AGED 607 AGED 403 

AGED 400 AGEC 300 or AGED 609 AGED 504 

AGED 402 AGED 101 AGED 608 

AGED 503 AGED 401 

* Students in the secondary education track must meet all requirements for admission to the teacher education 

program. 
**A grade of "C" must be earned in all of the above requirements or an average of "C" must be earned in all 

courses for the agricultural professional service track. 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

(Agricultural Professional Service) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First Semester 
UNST 100 
MATH 101 
UNST 110 
BIOL 100 
UNST 120 



First Semester 
UNST Elective 
UNST Elective 
PSYC 320 
NARS 110 
AGEN114 



Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


1 


UNST 130 


3 


3 


MATH 102 


3 


3 


UNST 140 


3 


4 


CHEM 104 and 114 


4 


3 


AGED 101 


1 


14 


HPED 200 


2 
16 


SOPHOMORE YEAR 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


3 


UNST Elective 


3 


3 


UNST Elective 


3 


3 


HORT 334 


3 


3 


ANSC211 


3 


3 


AGEC 300 


3 


15 


Second Major Concentration 


3 
18 



92 





JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


AGED 400 


3 


AGED 402 


3 


AGED 401 


3 


AGED 403 


3 


SLSC 338 


4 


AGEC 330 


3 


MATH 224 


3 


Second Major Concentration 


3 


Second Major Concentration 


3 


Second Major Concentration 


3 




16 


AGED 607 


3 
18 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


Second Major Concentration 


3 


AGED 504 (Capstone) 


6 


Second Major Concentration 


3 


HORT514 


3 


ENGL 331 


3 


Free Elective 


3 


AGED 501 


3 




12 


AGED 503 


3 






AGED 608 


3 
18 







Total Credit Hours: 127 

' UNST Cluster Theme Elective: Student must choose one cluster and take courses only in that cluster. 

SECOND MAJOR CONCENTRATIONS 

AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE: BIOL 100, 160, 220, 240, 260, and SLSC 338 (Total 
Hours: 24) 

ANIMAL SCIENCE: ANSI 211, 212, 214, 411, 416, 312, 619, and BIOL 100 (Total 
Hours: 25) 

AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS AND MARKETING: AGEC 240, 300, 330, 432, 434, 436, 
599, and MATH 101 (Total Hours: 24) 

AGRICULTURAL COMMUNICATIONS: COMM 220, 202, 404, 405, ENGL 100, 101, 
331, and CUIN 624 (Total Hours: 24) 

NATURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCffiNCES: EASC 201, 330, 625, 622, 699, NARS 
1 10, 618, and AGED 607 (Total Hours: 24) 

PLANT AND SOIL SCIENCE: BIOL 100, 240, SLSC 338, HORT 334, NARS 110, 618, 
and HORT 608 (Total Hours: 24) 

RURAL SOCIOLOGY: AGEC 300, 301, 303, 505, 506, SOCI 100, 203, and PSYC 320 
( Total Hours: 24) 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 
Undergraduate 

AGED 101. Introduction to Agriscience Education Credit 1(1-0) 

This course includes a study of the broad base of modern agriculture with emphasis on current 
trends and opportunities. (F) 

AGED 300. Introduction to International Agriculture Credit 3(3-0) 

This is an introductory course to acquaint students with international agriculture and agricul- 
tural developments, including the relationship between agricultural systems in various coun- 
tries and the impact of world agriculture on the U.S. and other countries. It provides introduc- 
tion for students who plan careers in agricultural education in the U.S. or other countries. 
(DEMAND) 



93 



AGED 400. Instructional Technology In Agriscience Education Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will cover the utilization of multimedia instructional tools, and how their applica- 
tions can enhance the learning process. (F;S) 

AGED 401. Leadership Theory and Youth Program Management Credit 3(3-0) 

Theories in leadership development will be analyzed, and the organization of youth groups in 
secondary schools, cooperative extension, and other community groups will be examined. (F) 

AGED 402. History and Philosophy of Agriscience Education in the American Public 
School System Credit 3(3-0) 

The historical and philosophical structure of agriculture in the American public school system 
will be analyzed. (S) 

AGED 403. Adult Education in Agriscience and Extension Education Credit 3(3-0) 
Principles and techniques for organizing educational programs for adults involved in the food 
and fiber system. (F;S) 

AGED 501. Materials and Methods of Teaching Agricultural Education 

and Extension Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers the principles of teaching as applied to agriculture in secondary schools and 
cooperative extension. Preparing and using lesson plans and organizing teaching aids to meet 
educational and community needs will also be a part of this course. Prerequisites: AGED 400, 
401, and 402; PSYC 320. (F) 

AGED 502. Student-Teaching Credit 12(12-0) 

Students will be required to spend a minimum of twelve weeks in an approved teaching center 
doing observation and directed student teaching. Prerequisite: AGED 501. (F;S) 

AGED 503. Program Planning and Evaluation Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers the process of program building and evaluation in agricultural and exten- 
sion education. Prerequisites: AGED 501 and 502. (F;S) 

AGED 504. Internship in Extension, Government, or Agribusiness Credit 6(6-0) 

Students will be required to spend a minimum of six weeks in an approved extension program, 
governmental agency, or agribusiness firm doing observation and directed professional work. 
(F;S; SS) 

AGED 520. Special Problems in Agricultural Education and Extension Credit 1-6(1-6) 

Special work in problems dealing with Agricultural Education and Extension will be exam- 
ined. (Enrollment by permission of department) 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

AGED 600. Youth Organization and Program Management Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles, theories, and practices involved in organizing, conducting, supervising and manag- 
ing youth organizations and programs will be examined. Emphasis will be on the analysis of 
youth organization and programs in vocational and extension education. (SS) 

AGED 601. Adult Education in Vocational and Extension Education Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the principles and problems of organizing and conducting programs 
for adults. Emphasis is given to the principles of conducting organized instruction in agricul- 
tural education, extension and related industries. (F) 

AGED 607. Environmental Education Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the principles and practices of understanding the environment and the 
interrelated complexities of the environment. The course will include a study of agricultural 
occupations related to the environment and materials that need to be developed for use by high 
school teachers of agriculture and other professional workers. (S) 



94 



AGED 608. Agricultural Extension Organization and Methods Credit 3(3-0) 

The principles, objectives, organization, program development and methods in cooperative 
extension will be examined. (F) 

AGED 609. Community Analysis and Rural Life Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is the study of the educational processes, structure and function of rural society, 
and the role which diverse organizations, agencies, and institutions play in the education and 
adjustment of rural people to the demands of modern society. (SS) (DEMAND) 

AGED 610. International Education in Agriculture Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines formal and informal agricultural education systems and related situa- 
tions and processes which influence agricultural development in developing countries. Included 
are the nature and scope of the world food situation, the rationale and extent of U.S. involve- 
ment in development efforts, and the agencies and organizations involved and procedures they 
use. Educational programs that will enable families to improve their quality of life will be 
emphasized. (DEMAND) 

AGed 611. Special Problems In Agricultural Education 

And Extension Credit 1-6(1-6 repeatable) 

Special work in problems dealing with Agricultural Education and Extension will be exam- 
ined. Students should be at the graduate level or be working on their lateral or provisional 
license in agricultural education. (Enrollment by permission of department.) 

AGed 612 Field Studies In Agricultural Education Credit 1-6(1-6 repeatable) 

Field Studies involved in Agricultural and Extension Education. (Enrollment by permission 
of department.) 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY 

Kofi Adu-Nyako Adjunct Associate Professor 

B.S., University of Science and Technology; M.S., Cornell University; Ph.D., University of 
Florida 

Antoine J. Alston Associate Professor 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Iowa State University 

Marcus Comer Assistant Professor 

B.S., M.S., Tennessee State University, Ph.D., University of Missouri 

Godfrey C. Ejimakor Associate Professor 

B.S., North Carolina State University; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., 
Texas Tech 

Benjamin Gray Adjunct Assistant Professor 

B.S., M.S. North Carolina A&T State University, Ph.D., North Carolina State University 

Kenrett Y. Jefferson-Moore Assistant Professor 

B.S. Southern University, M.S. Alabama A&M University, Ph.D. Auburn University 

Daniel M. Lyons Cooperative Extension Faculty, Administration 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and 
State University 

Donald R. McDowell Professor andAssociate Dean for Academic Programs 

B.S., Southern University A&M; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois 



95 



John O'Sullivan Cooperative Extension Faculty 

B.A., Stanford University; M.S., Auburn University; Ph.D., University of California at Los 
Angeles 

John P. Owens Adjunct Instructor 

B.S. Appalachian State University, M.S. North Carolina A&T State University 

Richard D. Robbins Professor 

B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State University 
Terrence Thomas Adjunct Associate Professor 

B.S., University of West Indies; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., Louisiana State Univer- 
sity 

Alton Thompson Professor and Dean 

B.S., North Carolina Central University; M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Anthony K. Yeboah Professor and Chairperson 

B.S., University of Science and Technology; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State University 
Osei-Agyeman Yeboah Adjunct Assistant Professor 

B.S. University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana, M.S. North Carolina A&T State 
University; Ph.D. University of Nebraska 

FACULTY EMERITI 
Sidney H. Evans Professor Emeritus 

B.S., Virginia State University; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University 



96 



Department of Animal Sciences 

www.ag.ncat.edu/academics/anisci/index.html 



Ralph C. Noble, Chairperson 

OBJECTIVES 

Baccalaureate degree programs in the Department of Animal Sciences prepare students for 
careers in animal sciences, biotechnology, biomedical research, pharmaceutical, and related 
industries, for graduate school, and for entry into veterinary and human medicine professional 
schools. The Department provides service to the people of North Carolina, the United States, 
and the world. 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Animal Science - Bachelor of Science 

Animal Science (Animal Industry) - Bachelor of Science 

Laboratory Animal Science - Bachelor of Science 

Animal Health Science - Master of Science* 

* See the Graduate School Bulletin 

Interdisciplinary certificate programs in Biotechnology (18 credit hours) and Waste Man- 
agement (18 to 20 credit hours) and Agricultural and Natural Resources Information Science 
(18 credit hours) are offered to students enrolled in Bachelor of Science degree programs in the 
department. 

ADMISSION AND DEGREE PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS 

Admission of students to the undergraduate degree programs in the Department of Animal 
Sciences is based upon the general admission requirements of the University. The B.S. degree 
in Animal Science requires a minimum of 126 semester hours, and the B.S. with a concentra- 
tion in Animal Science (Animal Industry) requires a minimum of 126 semester hours. The B.S. 
degree in Laboratory Animal Science requires a minimum of 1 26 semester hours. It is a univer- 
sity requirement that students complete three hours of African /African American Studies, 
three hours of Global Studies, and six hours of humanities. During summer vacations, intern- 
ships are strongly recommended. During matriculation through the degree program, hands-on 
activities with various animal species are built into our education program. The various species 
are available on-campus through the Laboratory Animal Resource facility as well as our beef , 
dairy, equine, poultry, small ruminant (meat goats and sheep), swine and poultry units. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduates from the department have numerous and varied career opportunities that are re- 
lated to the area of a student's specialization and interest. Careers include but are not limited to: 
sales positions in animal science and related industries; feed, food, and animal health profes- 
sionals; technical professionals in biotechnology, biomedical and pharmaceutical industries, 
managerial, administrative, and public relations positions; product managers in swine, beef, 
dairy, poultry, sheep, and goat production; careers in veterinary and human medicine; consult- 
ants, representatives and managers with animal breeding and livestock marketing organiza- 
tions and stockyard companies; technicians with zoos, kennels and similar facilities, breed 
companies and production animal agriculture; teachers and researchers in education; extension 
specialists and livestock insurance representatives; federal agency officials; managers with 
commercial feedlots, and laboratory technicians; managers, researchers, and technicians with 
livestock processing plants; and journalists with radio and television stations. 

97 



REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR ANIMAL SCIENCE 

LASC 1 6 1 LASC 46 1 ANSC 4 1 3 

LASC 1 62 ANSC 2 1 1 ANSC 4 1 6 

LASC 26 1 ANSC 2 1 2 ANSC 45 1 

LASC 459 ANSC 214 ANSC 611 

LASC 460 ANSC 4 1 1 ANSC 665 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR ANIMAL SCIENCE 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST110 


3 ENGL 101 


3 


UNST 130 


3 MATH 112 


4 


UNST 100 or LASC 161 


1 ANSC 211 


3 


LASC 162 


3 UNST 120 


3 


MATH 1 1 1 


4 UNST 140 


3 


HPED 200 


2 
16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 


16 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 106/116 


4 CHEM 107/117 


4 


BIOL 100 or 101 


4 ENGL 200 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elective 1 


3 ANSC 411 


3 


LASC 261 


3 ANSC 212 


3 


ANSC 214 


3 UNST Elective 1 


3 




17 


16 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 221/223 


5 CHEM 222/224 


5 


MATH 224 


3 BIOL 220 or 221 


4 


LASC 459 


4 ANSC 451 


3 


PHYS 225,235 


4 UNST Elective 1 


3 




16 UNST Cluster Theme Elective l 


3 
18 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 251,252 


3 LASC 461 


3 


PHYS 226,236 


4 Major Elective 2 


3 


LASC 460 


3 ANSC 665 


3 


ANSC 416 


3 ANSC 619 (Capstone) 


3 


ANSC 413 


2 
15 


12 



Total Credit Hours: 126 

• The student in consultation with advisor should choose major and other electives 

• Special consideration to changes in the curriculum will be considered based upon Students career goals 

1 UNST Cluster Theme Elective: Student must choose one cluster and take courses only in that cluster 

2 Major electives include (ANSC 217, 312, 415, 421, 555, 614, 624, 641; LASC 363, 463, 569) 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR ANIMAL SCIENCE (ANIMAL INDUSTRY) 

LASC 161 ANSC 212 ANSC 413 

LASC 162 ANSC 214 ANSC 416 

LASC 363 or 463 ANSC 2 1 7 ANSC 42 1 

LASC 569 ANSC 312 ANSC 45 1 

ANSC 211 ANSC 411 ANSC 555 

A GPA of at least 2.00 or better has to be maintained in the required courses. 



98 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR ANIMAL SCIENCE 

(Animal Industry) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST 110 


3 ENGL 101 


3 


UNST 130 


3 MATH 102 


3 


UNST lOOorLASC 161 


1 UNST 120 


3 


LASC 162 


3 ANSC 211 


3 


BIOL 100 or 101 


4 UNST 140 


3 


MATH 101 


3 HPED 200 


2 




17 


15 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 106/116 


4 CHEM 107/117 


4 


UNST Elective 1 


3 UNST Elective 1 


3 


ACCT 203 


2 ANSC 212 


3 


ANSC214 


3 ANSC 217 


3 


AGEC 240 


3 BIOL 220 or 221 


4 


SPCH 250 


3 

18 

JUNIOR YEAR 


17 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


ECON 201 


3 AGEC 434 


3 


UNST Elective 1 


3 ANSC 413 


3 


ANSC416 


3 UNST Cluster Theme Elective 1 


3 


AGEC 330 


3 ANSC 451 


3 


ANSC411 


3 ANSC 555 


4 




15 


16 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


AGEC 446 


3 LASC 365 


3 


BUAD 422 


3 AGEC 436 


3 


LASC 363 or 463 


3 AGEC 440 


3 


ANSC312 


3 Major Elective 2 


3 


ANSC 619 (Capstone) 


3 LASC 569 


1 




15 


13 



Total Credit Hours: 126 

• The student in consultation with advisor should choose major and other electives 

• Student may only choose 12 hours from university cluster courses 

• Special consideration to changes in the curriculum will be considered based upon Students career goals 

• Business courses may range from BUAD 220 and/or 422 

1 UNST Cluster Theme Elective: Student must choose one cluster and take courses only in that cluster 

2 Major electives include (ANSC 312, 415, 421, 555, 541; LASC 261) 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR LABORATORY ANIMAL SCIENCE 

LASC 161 LASC 460 LASC 653 

LASC 1 62 LASC 46 1 ANSC 2 1 1 

LASC 261 LASC 462 ANSC 212 

LASC 365 LASC 569 ANSC 611 

LASC 459 LASC 636 

A grade of "C" must be earned in all of the above requirements or an average of "C" must be earned in all 



99 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR LABORATORY ANIMAL SCIENCE 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST110 


3 


ENGL 101 


3 


UNST 130 


3 


MATH 1 1 1 


4 


HPED (Elective) 


1 


HPED (Elective) 


1 


UNST 100 or LASC 161 


1 


UNST 120 


3 


LASC 162 


3 


ANSC 211 


3 


SPCH 250 


3 


UNST 140 


3 




14 




17 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 106/116 


4 


CHEM 107/117 


4 


BIOL 100 or 101 


4 


UNST Cluster Theme Elective 1 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elective 1 


3 


ANSC 212 


3 


LASC 2613 


3 


MATH 224 


3 


ANSC 214 


3 


Free Elective 2 


3 




17 




16 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 221/223 


5 


CHEM 222/224 


5 


LASC 459 


4 


LASC 460 


3 


LASC 365 


4 


UNST Cluster Theme Elective 1 


3 


PHYS 225/235 


4 


PHYS 226/236 


4 




17 


UNST Cluster Theme Elective 1 


3 
18 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 251/252 


3 


BIOL 221 


4 


BUAD 220 


3 


Major Elective 3 


3 


LASC 462 


3 


Major Elective 3 


3 


LASC 569 


1 


LASC 653 


4 


Professional Elective 


3 
13 




14 



Total Credit Hours: 126 

• The student in consultation with advisor should choose major and other electives 

• Student may only choose 12 hours from university cluster courses 

• Special consideration to changes in the curriculum will be considered based upon Students career goals 

• Business courses may range from BUAD 220 and/or 422 

' UNST Cluster Theme Elective: Student must choose one cluster and take courses only in that cluster 

2 Free elective (Student is encouraged to take a Foreign Language, or for medicine student should take MATH 
112) 

3 Major electives include (LASC 461, LASC 636, ANSC 451, ANSC 665) 



100 



VETERINARY AND HUMAN MEDICAL PREPARATION 

(Pre-Veterinary) 

Preparation for admission to Veterinary and Human Medical Schools is offered through the 
degree programs in Laboratory Animal Science or Animal Sciences. These programs have 
become the first choice programs for students aspiring to enter medical professional schools. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN ANIMAL SCIENCE 

ANSC 211. Animal and Laboratory Animal Sciences Credit 3(2-2) 

Basic genetics, physiology, nutrition, animal products, processing, disease control, euthanasia, 
anesthesiology, and pharmacology. Production practices, management, and health of livestock 
and animals used in biomedical research. Prerequisite: LASC 162. (F;S) 

ANSC 212. Feeds and Feeding Credit 3(3-0) 

Composition and nutrient content of feeds, basic principles of feeding, comparative digestive 
systems, basic principles of nutrition for ruminant and monogastric animals. Prerequisites: 
LASC 162 and ANSC 211. (S) 

ANSC 214. Agricultural Genetics Credit 3(2-2) 

Basic principles of heredity in relation to animal and plant improvement. Laboratory in cytol- 
ogy and the genetic basis of inheritance. Prerequisite: BIOL 101, 240, or 160. (F;S) 

ANSC 217. Anatomy and Physiology of Farm Animals Credit 3(2-2) 

Structures and functions of the body systems and organs of domestic animals. Pre-requisites: 
ANSC 211, BIOL 160. (S) 

ANSC 312. Meat and Meat Products Credit 3(2-2) 

Meats from the consumer, processor, and producer standpoints. Meat as a food; inspection, 
grading, processing, preservation, and identification. (F) 

ANSC 411. Livestock Production Credit 3(2-2) 

Selection, breeding, feeding, management of beef cattle, goats and sheep. Prerequisite: ANSC 
212. (F) 

ANSC 413. Sanitation and Diseases of Farm Animals Credit 2(2-0) 

Sanitation and the common diseases of livestock with reference to causes, prevention and treat- 
ment as well as their relation to the environment. (S) 

ANSC 415. Horse Production Credit 3(2-2) 

A survey of the light horse industry in the U.S. Horse Breeds and registry associations. Breed- 
ing, care, and management in the light Horse. Comparative judging of breed groups' preventa- 
tive procedures; disease control. (F) 

ANSC 416. Swine Production Credit 3(2-2) 

Breeding, nutrition, production, and management in modern swine enterprises. Marketing and 
economic aspects of swine production. Swine production and the environment. Prerequisite: 
ANSC 211. (S) 

ANSC 611. Principles of Animal Nutrition Credit 3(3-0) 

Fundamental of modern animal nutrition; classification of nutrients, nutrient metabolism; nu- 
trient partitioning in production. (S) 

ANSC 614. Animal Breeding Credit 3(3-0) 

Application of genetic and breeding principles to livestock production and improvement. Phe- 
notypic and genotypic effects of selection methods; mating systems. Prerequisites: ANSC 21 1 
and 214. (S) 

ANSC 615. Selection of Meat and Meat Products Credit 3(2-2) 

Identification, grading and cutting of meats. (SS) 

101 



ANSC 619. Special Problems in Livestock Management Credit 3(3-0) 

Problems in feeding, breeding and management in beef cattle, sheep and swine production. 
Prerequisite: Senior standing. (F) 

ANSC 624. Physiology of Reproduction in Vertebrate Species Credit 3(2-2) 

Mechanisms of reproductive processes with special emphasis on their interaction with the dis- 
ciplines of nutrition, immunology and biochemistry. Prerequisite: ANSC 461, 623, or permis- 
sion of instructor. (F) 

ANSC 637. Environmental Toxicology Credit 3(3-0) 

Basic principles of environmental toxicology; regulatory perspectives; spills, anthropogenic 
pollution problems; ecological and human risk assessments; overview of classes of toxic agents, 
routes of exposure, target animals (aquatic, terrestrial, and mammalian species), and toxico- 
logical testing. Prerequisites: BIOL 101, CHEM 106 or 107, and CHEM 251. (S) 

ANSC 665. Techniques in Biotechnology Credit 3(2-2) 

Basic principles and laboratory experiences in biotechnology. Concepts of DNA structure, 
function, related applications in biotechnology. Methods: isolating DNA and RNA; genomic 
DNA and plasmid DNA analysis, gel electrophoresis, Southern hybridization, gene probes, 
and more. Prerequisite: CHEM 251, ANSC 214, BIOL 466, or permission of instructor. (F;S) 

ANSC 713. Advanced Livestock Production Credit 3(2-2) 

Research relating to various phases of livestock production; the livestock enterprise on the 
whole farm system. Overall economic performance. (F) 

DAIRY SCIENCE 

ANSC 421. Dairy Cattle Production Credit 3(2-2) 

Lactation, management and nutrition for efficient milk production. Dairy cattle breeding and 
selection. Care of dairy equipment and dairy cattle records. Prerequisite: ANSC 212. (F) 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN POULTRY SCIENCE 

ANSC 354. Fundamentals of Poultry Breeding Credit 4(3-2) 

Breeding, selection, and improvement of poultry. Prerequisites: ANSC 214 and 451. (S) 

ANSC 451. Poultry Production Credit 3(2-2) 

Principles and practices of poultry production. Prerequisite: ANSC 211. (F) 

ANSC 555. Advanced Commercial Poultry Management Credit 4(3-2) 

Management of poultry farm and hatchery operation will be emphasized. Prerequisite: ANSC 
451. (F) 

ANSC 641. Disease Management of Livestock and Poultry Credit 3(2-2) 

Prevention and control of diseases in livestock species and Poultry; Micro and 
macroenvironments that result in disease. Prerequisite: ANSC 45 1 . (S) 

LABORATORY ANIMAL SCIENCE 

LASC161. Orientation I Credit 1(1-0) 

Orientation to college academic life with consideration for program demands, learning tech- 
niques and resources. (F) 

LASC 162. Introduction to Animal and Laboratory Animal Sciences Credit 3(3-0) 

Ethical considerations, basic sciences, history of use, laws, and guidelines in using livestock 
and laboratory animals. (F) 

LASC 261. Medical Terminology Credit 3(3-0) 

Introduction to medical terminology; vocabulary building using Latin and Greek terms as it 
relates to basic anatomy, physiology, and pathology. (F;S) 

102 



LASC363. Internship I Credit 1-6(0-2 to 12) 

Preparation and field experiences with activities in Laboratory Animal Sciences. Prerequisites: 
Junior standing and special departmental permission. (F;S;SS) 

LASC 365. Biology, Diseases and Care of Laboratory Animal Credit 4(3-3) 

The biology, diseases and care of laboratory animals; behavior of common laboratory animals; 
handling, restraint; necropsy and diagnostic procedures: anesthesia, aseptic surgical proce- 
dures. (F) 

LASC 459. Integrated Anatomy Credit 4(3-3) 

The origin, development, and structure of bio-systems in laboratory animals, food animals and 
companion animals will be studied. Prerequisite: LASC 261. (F) 

LASC 460. Microscopic Anatomy Credit 3(2-3) 

Microscopic studies of cells and tissues of laboratory, food, and companion animals. Prerequi- 
site: LASC 459. (F;S) 

LASC 461. Physiology of Domestic Animals Credit 3(2-3) 

Function of bio-systems in laboratory animals farm animals, and companion animals. Prereq- 
uisite: LASC 459. (S) 

LASC 462. Principles of Medical Sciences Credit 3(3-0) 

Basic concepts of diseases and the biological reactions to disease within the living body. Basic 
concepts on the living body; cell injury, inflammatory reactions; circulatory disturbances; im- 
mune disorders; growth disturbances; and the nature and cause of disease. (F) 

LASC 463. Internship II Credit 3-6(0-6 to 12) 

Field experiences in veterinary medical activities. Prerequisites: LASC 363 and special depart- 
mental permission. (F;S;SS) 

LASC 564. Introduction to Research Credit 3(2-3) 

Biomedical research techniques including fundamental laboratory investigations, precepts of 
the scientific method and experimental design; application of scientific instrumentation. Pre- 
requisite: Senior standing. (S) 

LASC 569. Seminar in Laboratory Animal Science Credit 1(1-0) 

Discussion of current topics in laboratory animal science or histotechnology. (F) 

LASC 636. Principles of Toxicology Credit 3(2-3) 

General principles involved in absorption, distribution, and excretion of toxicants, biotransfor- 
mation, adverse effects, and factors that modify their effects. Toxic effects on specific target 
organs. (S) 

LASC 653. Laboratory Animal Management and Clinical Techniques Credit 4(2-6) 

Principles, theories and current concepts of laboratory animal science. Government regula- 
tions, ethical considerations, animal facility management and animal health surveillance. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of instructor. (S) 

LASC 660. Special Techniques in Specimen Preparation, Immunological Techniques, 
Electron Microscopy, Radiology or Histotechnology Credit 3(1-6) 

Special expertise in either the preparation of animal models for classroom, museum, and spe- 
cial display, the theoretical and practical aspects of immunological techniques, electron and 
light microscopy, radiology, tissue culture or histochemistry. Prerequisite: Senior standing or 
special departmental permission. (F;S;SS) 



103 



DIRECTORY OF FACULTY 
John Allen Adjunct Assistant Professor 

B.S., University of Georgia; M.S., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Doris Fultz Associate Professor 

B.S. Virginia Commonwealth University; B.S., DVM, Tuskegee Institute 

Tracy L. Hanner Adjunct Assistant Professor 

B.S., North Carolina Central University; DVM, North Carolina State University 

M. Ray McKinnie Cooperative Extension Faculty/Associate Dean 

Cooperative Extension 

B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Ohio State University, Ph.D., North Caro- 
lina State University 

Ralph C. Noble Associate Professor and Chairperson 

B.S., M.S., Tuskegee University; Ph.D., University Illinois-Champaign-Urbana 

Sang Hyon Oh Adjunct Assistant Professor / Research Scientist 

B.S., M.S., Seoul National University; Ph.D., North Carolina State University 

Willie Willis Professor 

B.S., Fort Valley State College; M.S., Ph.D., Colorado State University 

Mulumebet Worku Associate Professor 

B.S., Addis Ababa University, Alemaya College of Agriculture; M.S., Ph.D., University of 
Maryland, College Park 



104 



Department of Family and Consumer Sciences 

http ://w ww. ag . neat . edu/academics/hef s/index .html 



Gladys G. Shelton, Chairperson 

OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the Family and Consumer Sciences Department are as follows: 

1. To develop satisfying personal, group and family relationships as a basis for active 
participation in a democratic society; 

2. To understand the enrichment of home and family living through the appreciation and 
use of art and advances in science and technology; 

3. To develop an understanding and appreciation of varying cultural backgrounds; and 

4. To prepare the students for gainful employment in one of the major areas of the profession. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Child Development and Family Studies (Non-Licensure) - Bachelor of Science 

Child Development Early Education & Family Studies (B-K Teacher Licensure) - Bachelor 

of Science 
Family and Consumer Sciences Education - Bachelor of Science 

Family and Consumer Sciences - (Fashion Merchandising and Design) - Bachelor of Science 
Food and Nutritional Sciences - (Food Science) - Bachelor of Science 
Food and Nutritional Sciences - (Dietetics) - Bachelor of Science 
Food and Nutritional Sciences - Master of Science* 
* See the Graduate School Bulletin 

Interdisciplinary certificate programs are offered to students enrolled in Bachelor of Sci- 
ence programs at the University. Areas of specialization include Biotechnology (18 credit hours) 
and Waste Management ( 1 8 to 20 credits hours) and Agricultural and Natural Resources Infor- 
mation Science (18 credit hours). 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The admission of students to the undergraduate degree programs in the Family and Consumer 
Sciences Department is based upon the general admission requirements of the University. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Majors in Family and Consumer Sciences Department and all of the concentrations must 
complete the required programs of course work. A minimum grade of "C" is required in all 
core and program area courses for graduation. 

ACCREDITATION 

The Family and Consumer Sciences Department programs are nationally accredited by the 
American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences. 

The Family and Consumer Sciences Education and the Child Development, Early Education 
and Family Studies (Birth-Kindergarten Teacher Licensure) programs are accredited by the 
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education and approved by the North Carolina 
State Department of Public Instruction under the University-wide accreditation and approval 
of teacher education programs. 

105 



The Didactic Program is approved by the Commission on Accreditation/ Approval, for Di- 
etetics Education of The American Dietetic Association, a specialized body recognized by the 
Commission on Recognition of Post secondary Accreditation and the United States Depart- 
ment of Education. 

TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The Child Development Early Education and Family Studies: Birth- Kindergarten (Licen- 
sure) Program has the following goals and educational outcomes: 

Goals: 

• To provide a course of study that prepares majors for appropriate birth-kindergarten teach- 
ing practices, and teacher-related careers. 

• To provide a course of study that encourages professional knowledge, skills, and disposi- 
tions as a foundation for professional growth and development while utilizing 
interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary training from diverse disciplines (elementary edu- 
cation, special education, speech pathology, physical education (public health), psychology, 
sociology, and social work. 

• To provide experiences and opportunities that promote professional development and 
affiliation. 

• To coordinate and supervise clinical experiences and research activities in a range of 
settings that demonstrate the blend of theory and practice with young children and fami- 
lies. 

Educational Outcomes: 

• Identify a personal philosophy and a career purpose that is related to the profession and 
embraces the diverse characteristics of the environment. 

• Demonstrate appropriate and professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions as an early 
childhood educator. 

• Strengthen the skills needed to effectively communicate in the professional realm with 
administrators, co-workers, students, parents and others. 

• Discover and consider benefits of graduate work within the field. 

• Commit to life-long learning and self-improvement through professional development 
opportunities related to, but not limited to technology, and assessment. 

• Identify and understand various diverse populations of young children and their families. 

The Family and Consumer Sciences Education Program has the following Goals and Edu- 
cational Outcomes: 

Goals: 

• To develop student competencies necessary for integrating the philosophy of family and 
consumer sciences and education, knowledge of contemporary society, and professional 
information needed to help individuals and families achieve and maintain a satisfying 
life. 

• To develop critical thinking skills and communication techniques necessary for transmit- 
ting knowledge, skills and attitudes to individuals and families. 

• To develop competencies needed for employment and graduate study in family and con- 
sumer sciences and related areas. 



106 



Educational Outcomes: 

• Identify the philosophy and role of family and consumer sciences in providing a satisfy- 
ing quality of life. 

• Describe the impact of cultural diversity on the economic, social, psychological and 
emotional well being of individuals and families in contemporary society. 

• Evaluate professional subject matter content and trends meeting current family and soci- 
etal needs. Incorporate educational and societal trends in developing professional subject 
matter content areas. 

• To strengthen, skills in critical thinking, coping and communication, which will facilitate 
effective working relationships with persons, from diverse socio-economic levels and 
backgrounds. 

• Demonstrate personal characteristics, attitudes, skills and knowledge needed for employ- 
ment as a professional family and consumer scientist. 

• Investigate opportunities to pursue research and/or graduate study. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

The programs in the Family and Consumer Sciences Department prepare students for, but 
do not limit them to the following suggested careers as public school/child-care personnel, 
community/early childhood center providers, family specialists, birth-kindergarten teachers, 
child-care directors, sport and corporate wellness nutritionists, private practice, nutrition-re- 
lated business and industries, nutritionists in hospitals and other health care facilities, research- 
ers in universities and medical centers, apparel design, visual merchandisers, retail buyers, 
manager, sketch artists, product development specialists, global sourcing managers, food pro- 
duction management specialist, quality assurance specialists, technical sales, food inspection 
specialists, and researchers for federal, state, and local government. 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES 

(Fashion Merchandising and Design) 

FCS 101 FCS 380 FCS 485 

FCS 181 FCS 382 FCS 487 

FCS 183 FCS 384 FCS 489 

FCS 280 FCS 480 FCS 514 

FCS 281 FCS 482 FCS 612 
FCS 310 

A grade of "C" must be earned in all of the above requirements and an average of "C" must be earned in all 
courses. 



107 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES 

(Fashion Merchandising and Design) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST 130 


3 UNST HO 1 


3 


MATH 1 1 1 


4 MATH 112 


4 


FCS 101' 


1 FCS 183 


3 


UNST 120 1 


3 FCS 181 


3 


SPCH 250 


3 UNST 140 1 


3 


HPED 200 


2 
16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 


16 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST Cluster Theme Elective 2 


3 UNST Cluster Theme Elective 2 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elective 2 


3 UNST Cluster Theme Elective 2 


2 


ART 100 


3 MATH 224 or SOCI 203 


3 


FCS 281 


3 SOCI 200 or 300 


3 


FCS 280 


3 ART 226 


3 




15 


15 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


BUAD 422 


3 FCS 310 


3 


FCS 380 


3 FCS 382 


3 


FCS 384 


3 FCS 483 


3 


ACCT 203 


3 PSYC 320 


3 


Elective 


3 FCS 486 


3 




1 5 Elective 


3 
18 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


FCS 514 


3 FCS 482 


3 


BUAD 425 


3 FCS 487 


3 


FCS 489 


3 FCS 480 


3 


FCS 612 


3 BUED 334 


3 


FCS 485 


3 Elective 


3 


BUAD 430 


3 
18 


15 



Total Credit Hours: 128 

1 UNST Foundation Courses: Each student is required to complete 13 credits of freshman competency. 

2 UNST Cluster Theme Elective: Each student is required to complete 12 credits of cluster theme courses. 

3 Capstone Course (FCS 612) : Each student is required to take a senior level course focused on interdiscipli- 
nary perspectives. 

4 FCS 514: Requires 50 volunteer hours. 
FCS 487 is only offered during the sumner. 



108 



REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY STUDIES 









(Non-Licensure) 




FCS 101 






FCS 417 


FCS 553 


FCS 310 






FCS 418 


FCS 600 


FCS 311 






FCS 419 


FCS 612 


FCS 336 






FCS 420 


FCS 629 


FCS 401 






FCS 430 


FCS 639 


FCS 403 






FCS 514 


FCS 642 


FCS 414 






FCS 551 




A grade of "C" must be earned in 


all 


of the above requirements and an 


average of "C 


courses. 











CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY STUDIES 

(Non-Licensure) 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST110 1 


3 UNST 120 1 


3 


FCS 101 ' 


1 MATH 102 


3 


MATH 101 


3 UNST 140 1 


3 


BIOL 100/Lab 


4 SPCH 250 


3 


HPED 200 


2 FOLA 104 


3 


UNST 130 1 


3 
16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 


15 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 


3 FCS 201 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 


3 UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 


3 


SPED 350 


3 FCS 31 1 5 


3 


FCS 310 


3 FCS 401 5 


3 


FCS 336 


3 FCS 403 


3 


SPCH319 


3 FCS 418 


3 




18 


18 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


HPED 442 


2 FCS 417 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 


3 FCS 419 5 


3 


FCS 414 


3 FCS 551 


3 


FCS 420 


3 FCS 553 


3 


FCS 430 5 


3 FCS 600 


3 


FCS 514 


3 Cognate Area Elective 6 


3 




17 


18 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


Elective 


2 FCS 642 


6 


Cognate Area Elective 6 


3 Cognate Area Elective* 


3 


FCS 629 5 


3 Elective 


3 


FCS 612 3 


3 


12 


FCS 639 5 


3 
14 





Total Credit Hours: 128 

' Foundation Courses: Each student is required to complete 13 credits of Freshmen competency. 

2 UNST Cluster Theme Elective: Each student is required to complete 12 credits of cluster theme courses. 

3 Capstone Course: Each student is required to take a senior level course focused on interdisciplinary perspectives. 

4 FCS 514: Requires 50 volunteer hours. 

109 



5 Field-Based Experience: Each student is required to complete afield-based experience in addition to course 
requirements. 

6 Cognate Area Elective: Each student is required to select courses from a major-related discipline area. 

Child Development and Family Studies (Non-Licensure) students are required to select a 
cognate area, which is designed to allow the student to specialize in a major-related discipline. 
All students are required to complete 9 hours of coursework in one of the following disciplines, 
or select from either area to create a multidisciplinary focus. The multidisciplinary focus can 
be selected only with the approval of the academic advisor or Department Chairperson. 



COGNATE AREA ELECTIVES 



CHILD & FAMILY SERVICE 
COORDINATION 

SOCI 100 
SOCI 200 

SOWK 133 
SOWK 372 
SOWK 412 
SOWK 472 



CHILD PUBLIC POLICY & CHILD 
ADMINISTRATION THERAPY 

POLI 150 PSYC320 

POLI 250 PSYC 324 

POLI 340 PSYC 325 

POLI 350 PSYC 420 

POLI 420 PSYC 434 

PSYC 644 
BUAD 220 PSYC 645 

BUAD 341 
BUAD 422 
BUAD 425 
BUAD 426 
BUAD 430 

EARLY INTERVENTION 

Students will select 9 hours from the special education corollary concentration with the assis- 
tance from the academic advisor. 

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 

Students will select nine (9) hours from major related disciplines with the assistance from the 
academic advisor. 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR CHILD DEVELOPMENT EARLY 

EDUCATION AND FAMILY STUDIES 

(BIRTH-KINDERGARTEN TEACHER LICENSURE) 







(Teacher Licensure) 






FCS 101 




FCS 418 


FCS 634 




FCS 201 




FCS 419 


FCS 639 




FCS 310 




FCS 430 


FCS 514 




FCS 311 




FCS 600 


FCS 551 




FCS 336 




FCS 612 


FCS 553 




FCS 401 




FCS 629 


FCS 559 




FCS 414 










A grade of "C" must be earned in 


all 


of the above requirements and an 


average of "C 


must be earned in all 


courses. 











110 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR CHILD DEVELOPMENT EARLY EDUCATION 

AND FAMILY STUDIES BIRTH-KINDERGARTEN 

(BIRTH-KINDERGARTEN TEACHER LICENSURE) 

(Teacher Licensure) 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 




Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST110 1 




3 UNST 120' 


3 


MATH 101 




3 MATH 102 


3 


FCS 101 ' 




1 UNST 140 1 


3 


UNST 130 1 




3 SPCH 250 


3 


BIOL 100 




4 FOLA 104 


2 


PHED 200 




2 CUIN 102 


2 






16 


17 






SOPHOMORE YEAR 




First Semester 




Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 


3 UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 


3 SPCH 319 


3 


FCS 336 




3 UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 


3 


SPED 350 




3 FCS 201 


3 


CUIN 301 




2 FCS 31 1 5 


3 


FCS 310 




3 FCS 418 5 


3 






17 


18 



Milestone: Students must pass PRAXIS I, obtain a cumulative 2.8 GPA, and complete a 16 Factors 
Personality Test and Teacher Interview for admission into the Teacher Education Program. 

JUNIOR YEAR 



First Semester 
CUIN 400 
HPED 442 
FCS 414 
FCS 430 5 
FCS 514 



First Semester 
SPED 536 
FCS 612 3 
FCS 629 5 
FCS 639 5 
Elective 



Credit 


Second Semester 


3 


FCS 40 1 5 


2 


FCS 419 5 


3 


FCS 551 


3 


FCS 553 


3 


FCS 600 5 


15 


FCS 559 


SENIOR YEAR 


Credit 


Second Semester 


3 


FCS 634 


3 


CUIN 560 


3 


Elective 


3 




3 




15 





Credit 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
18 

Credit 
3 
6 
3 
12 



Total Credit Hours: 127 

' Foundation Courses: Each student is required to complete 13 credits of Freshmen competency. 

2 UNST Cluster Theme Elective: Each student is required to complete 12 credits of cluster theme courses. 

3 Capstone Course: Each student is required to take a senior level course focused on interdisciplinary perspec- 
tives. 

4 FCS 514: Requires 50 volunteer hours. 

5 Field-Based Experience: Each student is required to complete a field-based experience in addition to course 
requirements. 

** Admission to Teache Education: Students should refer to the UndergraduateBulletin for detailed admission 
requirements 



111 



REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR FAMttY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES EDUCATION 

FCS 101 FCS310 FCS503 

FCS 130 FCS 400 FCS 505 

FCS 181 FCS 401 FCS 514 

FCS 183 FCS 446 FCS 604 

FCS 281 FCS 403 FCS 612 

FCS 300 FCS 500 FCS 679 

A grade of "C" must be earned in all of the above requirements and an average of "C" must be earned in all 

courses. 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES EDUCATION 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST110 1 


3 UNST 130 1 


3 


MATH 101 


3 MATH 102 


3 


FCS 101 ' 


1 FCS 183 


3 


CUIN 102 


2 HPED 101 


1 


UNST 120 1 


3 FCS 130 


3 


BIOL 100 


4 UNST 140 1 


3 




16 


16 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 


3 SPCH 250 


3 


HPED 200 


2 CUIN 104 





FCS 281 


3 FCS 336 


3 


UNST Clu. Th. El. 2 


3 UNST Clu. Th. El. 2 


3 


FCS 181 


3 CUIN 301 


2 


Elective 


1 Elective 


3 




17 


15 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


CUIN 400 


3 FCS 403 


3 


FCS 300 


3 FCS 500 


3 


FCS 401 


3 CUIN 436 


3 


SOCI 100 or 200 


3 FCS 503 


3 


FCS 310 


3 FCS 400 


3 


PSYC 320 


3 Elective 


3 




18 


18 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


FCS 612 3 


3 FCS 504 


3 


FCS 514 


3 CUIN 560 


6 


Elective 


3 CUIN 624 


3 


CUIN 528 


3 


12 


FCS 505 


3 
15 





Total Credit Hours: 127 

' Foundation Courses: Each student is required to complete 13 credits of Freshmen competency. 

2 UNST Cluster Theme Elective: Each student is required to complete 12 credits of cluster theme courses. 

3 Capstone Course: Each student is required to take a senior level course focused on interdisciplinary perspec- 
tives. 

4 FCS 514: Requires 50 volunteer hours. 

5 Field-Based Experience: Each student is required to complete afield-based experience in addition to course 
requirements. 



112 



REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR FOOD AND NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES - 

FOOD SCDZNCE 

FCS 101 FCS514 FCS633 

FCS236 FCS 612 FCS 638 

FCS 310 FCS 618 FCS 643 

FCS 336 FCS 631 

A grade of "C" mast be earned in all of the above requirements and an average of "C" mast be earned in all courses. 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR FOOD AND NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES - 

FOOD SCIENCE 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 




Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST HO 1 




3 ENGL 101 


3 


MATH 1 1 1 




4 MATH 112 


4 


FCS 101 ' 




1 UNST 140 1 


3 


SOCI 100 




3 BIOL 100 


4 


UNST 120 1 




3 SPCH 250 


3 


UNST 130 1 


. 


3 
17 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 


17 


First Semester 




Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 106 




3 CHEM 107 


3 


CHEM 116 




1 CHEM 117 


1 


UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 


3 FCS 337 


3 


PHYS 110 




2 MATH 224 


3 


PHYS 1 1 1 




1 UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 


3 


FCS 236 




3 UNST Cluster Theme Elec 2 


3 


AGEC 240 




3 HPED Elective 


1 






16 


17 






JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 




Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


BIOL 220 




4 FCS 514 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 


3 FCS 398 


3 


CHEM 221 




3 CHEM 222 


3 


CHEM 223 




2 CHEM 224 


2 


FCS 310 




3 FCS 651 


3 


HPED Elective 




1 
16 

SENIOR YEAR 


14 


First Semester 




Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


FCS 643 




3 FCS 633 


3 


FCS 618 




1 FCS 612 or 638 


3 


FCS 636 




3 FCS 631 


3 


BIOL 620 




4 FCS 637 


3 


HEFS 653 




3 Elective 


2 






17 


14 



Total Credit Hours: 128 

' Foundation Courses: Each student is required to complete 13 credits of Freshmen competency. 

2 UNST Cluster Theme Elective: Each student is required to complete 12 credits of cluster theme courses. 

3 Capstone Course: Each student is required to take a senior level course focused on interdisciplinary perspec- 
tives. 

4 FCS 514: Requires 50 volunteer hours. 

■ Field-Based Experience: Each student is required to complete a field-based experience in addition to course 
requirements. 



113 



REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR FOOD AND NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES - DIETETICS 

FCS 101 FCS 344 FCS 637 

FCS 130 FCS 398 FCS 648 

FCS 236 FCS 514 FCS 652 

FCS 246 FCS 544 FCS 656 

FCS 310 FCS 601 FCS 657 

FCS 332 FCS 630 FCS 679 

FCS 337 FCS 632 

A grade of "C" must be earned in all of the above requirements and an average of "C" must be earned in all courses. 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR FOOD AND NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES - DIETETICS 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST110 1 


3 


UNST 120 1 


3 


MATH 1 1 1 


4 


MATH 112 


4 


UNST 130 1 


3 


UNST 140 1 


3 


FCS 101 ' 


1 


SPCH 250 


3 


BIOL 100 


4 


FCS 130 


3 




15 




16 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 106 


3 


CHEM 107 


3 


CHEM 116 


1 


CHEM 117 


1 


FCS 236 


3 


BIOL 361 


4 


UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 


3 


FCS 246 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 


3 


FCS 337 


3 


MATH 224 or SOCI 203 


3 


PSYC 320 


3 


HPED Elective 


1 
17 




17 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


FCS 310 


3 


FCS 398 


3 


FCS 344 


3 


FCS 656 


4 


BIOL 220 


4 


FCS 601 


4 


CHEM 221 


3 


AGEC 446 


3 


CHEM 223 


2 


UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 


3 


FCS 630 


3 
18 




17 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


FCS 632 


3 


FCS 612 3 


3 


FCS 657 


4 


FCS 648 


3 


FCS 679 


3 


FCS 544 


3 


ENGL 331 orBUED360 


3 


FCS514 4 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 


3 
16 




12 



Total Credit Hours: 128 

' Foundation Courses: Each student is required to complete 13 credits of Freshmen competency. 

2 UNST Cluster Theme Elective: Each student is required to complete 12 credits of cluster theme courses. 

3 Capstone Course: Each student is required to take a senior level course focused on interdisciplinary perspec- 
tives. 

4 FCS 514: Requires 50 volunteer hours. 

5 Field-Based Experience: Each student is required to complete afield-based experience in addition to course 
requirements. 



114 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES 

FCS 101. Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences Credit 1(1-0) 

This course is designed to assist students in making personal adjustments to college living; it 
provides an introduction to the broad areas of family and consumer sciences and a study of the 
curricula and professional opportunities in the field. (F) 

FCS 104. The Individual and His Family in Contemporary Society Credit 1(1-0) 

This course focuses on individual development in the family, the changing needs and roles of 
individuals due to emerging social forces, and the role of the Family and Consumer Sciences 
professional in developing strategies for successful families. (DEMAND) 

FCS 130. Food Preparation/Meal Management Credit 3(2-2) 

This is an introductory food course that includes basic principles, techniques and management 
used in food preparation and preservation, which develop skills in planning, preparing and 
serving nutritious meals for families of various lifestyles. (F) 

FCS 133. Family Foods Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is study of the application of elementary principles of nutrition and cookery to the 
planning, preparation and serving of simple meals designed to meet the needs of all family 
members. (S) 

FCS 135. Food and Man's Survival Credit 3(3-0) 

This course acquaints students with the most common information regarding foods, nutrition 
and health, with attempts to dispel misconceptions about food properties and factors affecting 
the quality of foods. Areas of discussion include man's struggle for foods; chemical additives 
and food safety; modern food preservation; organic and health foods; and nutrition and the 
consumer. (DEMAND) 

FCS 181. Social-Psychological Aspects of Dress Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a basic study of the social, psychological, cultural and economic influences on 
contemporary fashions. (F) 

FCS 183. Textiles Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is an introduction to the study of textiles, their sources, characteristics and produc- 
tion; the performance, use and care of fabrics. (S) 

FCS 200. Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences Education Credit 2(2-0) 
Historical background, philosophy and objectives of education in the United States; educa- 
tional, social and political movement affecting vocational education in the public schools with 
emphasis on the requirements of North Carolina. (DEMAND) 

FCS 201. Cooperative Experience in Diverse Settings Credit 3(3-0) 

Historical background, philosophy and objectives of education in the United States; educa- 
tional, social and political movement affecting vocational education in the public schools with 
emphasis on the requirements of North Carolina. (DEMAND) 

FCS 236. Introduction to Food Science Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is an introductory study of the nature of raw foods and behavior of food compo- 
nents during handling and processing. Key methods and principles of food preservation will 
also be discussed. (F) 

FCS 246. Purchasing in Food Service Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of problems involved in the purchase of food, equipment and other expendable sup- 
plies for food service establishments are the major topics of this course. Prerequisites: FCS 130 
and AGEC 446. (S) 



115 



FCS 280. Introduction to Fashion Merchandising Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an introduction to apparel business including discussions of current trends in 
fashion merchandising, fashion coordination and analysis of the function of fashion merchan- 
dising. (S) 

FCS 281. Apparel Construction and Evaluation Credit 3(1-3) 

This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles of clothing construction using a 
commercial pattern with emphasis on fitting, pattern adjustments, garment and basic construc- 
tion skills. Laboratory experience is required. (F) 

FCS 300. Program Planning in Family and Consumer Sciences K-12 Credit 3(3-0) 

This course involves participation in planning Family & Consumer Sciences programs for 
occupational education in public schools K-12. (Career awareness, middle school, exploratory, 
comprehensive occupational family and consumer sciences, youth and adult program). (DE- 
MAND) 

FCS 310. Introduction to Human Development Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an introduction to the human development process covering the life span from 
prenatal, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and aging through death. The social, psychologi- 
cal, cognitive, physical and moral characteristics of each stage are studied. Prerequisite: FCS 
101.(F;S;SS) 

FCS 311. Child Development: Prenatal Through Early/ 

Middle Childhood Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is a study of the child's sequential development at different stages - conception 
through late childhood. Historical and theoretical approaches to child development programs 
for young children will be studied. Field experiences are required. (F;S) 

FCS 312. Adolescence and Young Adulthood Credit 3(3-0) 

This course provides a comprehensive study of the physical, mental, and psychological factors 
of development from late childhood through adulthood. Observation required. Prerequisite: 
Instructor's permission. (DEMAND) 

FCS 314. Human Ecology of the Family Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is the study of the family as environment and within environment. Relations of 
values, goals, standards and decision-making in the management of the family. The unique role 
of the family in the social, economics, and political system. Prerequisite: SOCI 100. (DE- 
MAND) 

FCS 332. Cultural Aspects of Food Credit 2(2-0) 

A study of the influence of cultural and socioeconomic factors on food patterns and nutritional 
status of selected ethnic groups. Prerequisite: FCS 337. (S; DEMAND) 

FCS 336. Contemporary Nutrition Credit 3(3-0) 

This course provides an introductory approach to the principles of nutrition as they relate to 
human requirements for nutrients during the life cycle; influences of nutrition on growth and 
development; and the influence of contemporary living as it impacts healthy lifestyle. 

FCS 337. Introduction to Human Nutrition Credit 3(2-2) 

This course provides an introductory approach to the principles of nutrition as they relate to 
human requirements for nutrients during the life cycle; the significance of and mechanism 
through which nutrients meet these biological needs during the life cycle. Prerequisites: CHEM 
106 and 1 16. Corequisite: BIOL 361. (F;S;SS) 

FCS 344. Organizational Management in Food Service Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to study the organizations, management and administration of various 
food service establishments and the inclusion of personnel management. Prerequisites: FCS 
1 30, 246, and AGEC 446. (F) 

116 



FCS 380. Visual Merchandising Credit 3(3-0) 

This course explores the use of visual merchandising and promotional techniques for textile 
and non-textile products. Prerequisite: FCS 181, 280 or instructor's permission. (F) 

FCS 382. Creative Apparel Design I (Flat Pattern) Credit 3(2- 2) 

This course examines the application of principles of creative design by the use of flat pattern 
techniques. Laboratory experience is required. Prerequisite: FCS 281. (S) 

FCS 384. Historic Developments of Costumes and Textiles Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the evolution of dress through the study of western dress from ancient to 
modern times. Individual research is required. Prerequisites: FCS 181 and 183. (S) 

FCS 398. Food and Nutritional Biochemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an introductory course for students in agricultrual, animal, food, and nutritional 
sciences. The course emphasizes the cellular metabolism, structure, and function of proteins, 
nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids. Vitamins, mineral, enzymes, and hormones are cov- 
ered also. Prerequisites: CHEM 106, 116, 107, 117. 

FCS 400. Contemporary Housing Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is a study of problems in house planning to meet family needs. Emphasis is placed 
on the study of house designs, methods of financing and location. (DEMAND) 

FCS 401. Family Systems Credit 3(3-0) 

The development of the family and the impact of environmental systems on the life cycle as 
families move from stages of effective status to crisis status. (S) 

FCS 403. Family Economics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is the study of financial budgeting and planning strategies during the various stages 
of the family life cycle. Consideration is given to multifaceted consumer problems and re- 
sources for problem resolution. (DEMAND) 

FCS 410. Practicum in Child Care Credit 6(2-8) 

Six child-care competencies are required for the Child Development Associate credential to be 
awarded by the National Consortium Credentialing Office. The student will demonstrate mas- 
tery of each competency. Prerequisite: Only continuing education students may enroll. (DE- 
MAND) 

FCS 414. Creative Expression in Early Education Credit 3(2-2) 

Materials, methods and evaluation used in the development of cognitive, affective and psycho- 
motor behaviors in dramatic play, music, art and literature will be focus areas. In addition, 
career opportunities in curricula and interagency services to assist families in a collaborative 
relationship will be emphasized. Field based teaching experiences are included in this course. 
Prerequisites: FCS 310, 311, and 418. (F) 

FCS 415. Materials, Methods and Evaluation II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the materials, methods and evaluation used in the development of cogni- 
tive, effective, and psychomotor behaviors. Focus areas: Social Studies, Science, Math, Health 
and Safety. Prerequisite: FCS 414. (DEMAND) 

FCS 417. Parent Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Parental interactions in the child's development at home, in the school and in the community. 
The effective use of assistance and volunteers in the school environment as well as elements of 
creative parenting in a rapidly changing social environment are also studied. (DEMAND) 

FCS 418. Foundations of Early Education and Family Studies Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is the study of the historical, sociological and philosophical background of typical 
and atypical development in young children; and a review of the dynamic of the family and 
current issues related to the teaching profession. Emphasis will be placed on curriculum plan- 



117 



ning, the integrated day, scheduling, and the curriculum development. Field experiences are 
included in this course. Prerequisite: FCS 310. (S) 

FCS 419. Practicum in Community Service Credit 3(1-4) 

This course includes practical field experience in community service agencies concerned with 
all areas of childcare and family development. Emphasis will be placed on services to young 
children. (S) 

FCS 420. Preschool Administration and Supervision in Divers Settings Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an introduction to business administration, organizations, and supervision in 
diverse early education and family interagency settings. Emphasis is placed on key administra- 
tive and human resources concepts, practices, and issues related to the administrating, plan- 
ning, organizing, staffing, financing, decision-making, supervising, and evaluating early edu- 
cation and family interagency settings. (F) 

FCS 421. The Cognitively Oriented Preschool Curriculum Credit 3(3-0) 

Methods, materials and strategies in preschool education as found in the cognitively oriented 
curriculum. Emphasis will be placed on development of skills in teaching. (DEMAND) 

FCS 425. Fashion Motivation Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is the study of the interaction of the social, psychological and economical aspects 
of dress. Prerequisite: FCS 424, PSYC 320, ANTH 200 or 300. (DEMAND) 

FCS 430. Assessment and Evaluation of Young Children Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the principles and practices of observing, recording and analyzing behavior and 
development of young children. Attention is focused on naturalistic observations, developmen- 
tal theories, diagnostic information and an analysis of interpreting play, language and physical 
development of young children. Field experiences are included in this course. Prerequisites: 
FCS 310, 311, and 418. (F) 

FCS 446. Special Problems in Family and Consumer Sciences Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to provide an opportunity for in depth study of a special topic in family 
and consumer sciences. Emphasis is placed on individual reading assignments, research, and 
group discussions. Topics will vary by semester. 

FCS 480. Computer Assisted Design for Apparel Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is an introduction to the use of the computer for sketching, pattern making, pattern 
grading and making markers. Prerequisite: FCS 281, 382, 489. (S) 

FCS 482. Global Trends and National Perspectives in 

Clothing and Textiles Credit 3(3-0) 

This course provides an in-depth investigation of global and national trends as they relate 
specifically to the textile industry. Prerequisites: FCS 181 and 280. (S) 

FCS 483. Principles of Apparel Evaluation Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an individual study of the factors that determine the cost, price, quality, perfor- 
mance and value of textiles and apparel. Prerequisites: FCS 183 and 281. (S) 

FCS 485. Fashion Marketing and Merchandising Credit 3(3-0) 

This course emphasizes the functions and responsibilities of the fashion merchandiser, and 
considers various retail establishments. A synthesis of business knowledge and its application 
to the fashion field will be included. Prerequisite: FCS 280. (F) 

FCS 486. Cooperative Training in Business and Industry I 

This course is designed to provide pre-professional experiences for students majoring in fash- 
ion merchandising and design. Emphasis will be placed on career exploration, resume writing, 
business correspondence, and internship preparation. 



118 



FCS 487. Cooperative Training in Business and Industry II Credit 3(3-0) 

Students will be employed for a minimum of 200 hours in their major field of work. They will 
be evaluated on report by their employer and a University coordinator. Prerequisite: Senior 
standing. (S) 

FCS 489. Creative Apparel Design II (Draping) Credit 3(2-2) 

This course will focus on the application of principles of creative apparel design by the use of 
the draping method. Prerequisites: FCS 281 and 382. (F) 

FCS 500. Occupational Family and Consumer Sciences Credit 3(1-4) 

This course examines the organization and administration of occupational wage-earning pro- 
grams at the upper high school level-methods and instructional media. Work experiences re- 
quire at least one area of Family and Consumer Sciences occupational cluster. (DEMAND) 

FCS 503. Concepts in Esthetics Ecology Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is a study of housing and interior requirements for individuals and families with a 
focus on plans, design, furnishing and aesthetic. (DEMAND) 

FCS 505. Home Management and Equipment Credit 3(1-4) 

This course examines the use of management principles in effecting an orderly management of 
the home and all of its environment. The use of basic equipment in the home that makes for an 
efficient and well-kept household will be emphasized. Selection and coordination of equip- 
ment for effective living is demonstrated. (DEMAND) 

FCS 514. An Integrative Approach to Family and Consumer Sciences Credit 3(3-0) 

The basic unifying concepts of family and consumer sciences are used to assist in the resolu- 
tion of social, political, economic and ethical issues currently affecting contemporary families. 
The basic unifying concepts are: human development, interpersonal relations, socialization, 
values, management, consumer choice and coping with daily activities. Prerequisite: FCS 310. 
(F) 

FCS 522. Food Engineering Credit 3(2-2) 

The fundamentals of heat transfer, fluid flow, refrigeration, evaporation and other unit opera- 
tions in the food processing industry. Application of engineering principles and concepts to the 
processing of food. Prerequisite: PHYS 320 or 225. (DEMAND) 

FCS 541. Food Packaging Credit 2(2-0) 

The characteristics of packaging materials, strength, elasticity, permeability, food packaging 
machines, adhesives, as related to products wholesomeness and package design as a form of 
advertising will be studied. Prerequisite: CHEM 106 or 107. (DEMAND) 

FCS 544. Internships Credit 3(0-6) 

The student participates in a temporary period of supervised work experience, which provides 
him/her an opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge to a work situation. The internship is 
designed to give students supervised work experience in Food Administration, Nutrition/Di- 
etetics and Food Science. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (F) 

FCS 549. Food Consultant for Older Adults Credit 3(3-0) 

Techniques of consultation with older adults on diets, food choices, food fads, planning, pur- 
chasing and preparational procedures will be examined. Menus for limited incomes will be 
emphasized. (DEMAND) 

FCS 550. Administrative Policies and Resources Management Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to introduce ethical and legal issues, professional liability, budget poli- 
cies, and resources management problems faced by managers in early education and family 
interagency settings. Prerequisite: FCS 420. (F) 



119 



FCS 551. Multicultural Perspective Credit 3(3-0) 

This seminar is designed to develop knowledge skills, and dispositions focused on multicultural 
anti-bias perspective in the field of early education and family systems. Critical review of 
research and literature emphasizing diversity topics will be used as a framework for discussion. 
Students will participate in applied activities designed to foster cultural awareness culturally 
and anti-bias sensitive practices, and advocacy in setting such as private and public early child- 
hood settings, schools, hospital-based settings, family agencies, and mental health agencies. 
(S) 

FCS 552. Independent Readings in Early Education and 

Family Studies Credit 3(3-0) 

This course permits a student to undertake an in-depth analysis of various problems or issues in 
child development, early education, family studies, teacher preparation, multiculturalism, and 
developmental learning principles through individual study. The problem or issue may be se- 
lected from the scholarly literature in the field or the professional workplace. Prerequisites: 
FCS 418 and 600. (F) 

FCS 577. Financial Planning for Families. Credit 3(3-0) 

This course introduces students to the various financial planning topics that face families such 
as the financial planning process, client/planner interactions, time value of money applica- 
tions, personal financial statements, cash flow and debt management, asset acquisition, and 
education planning. Risk management, investment planning, retirement planning, plan inte- 
gration, and ethics are also discussed. 

FCS 578. Insurance Planning for Families Credit 3(3-0) 

This course introduces students to risk management and insurance decisions in family finan- 
cial planning. Topics include insurance for life, health, disability, property and liability risks, 
as well as nnuities, group insurance, and long term care. 

FCS 579. Income Tax Planning for Families Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an overview of current tax laws, income tax principles, and taxation terminol- 
ogy. It focuses on tax planning considerations, computations, and tax planning strategies in- 
cluding tax pitfalls that impact families' financial planning. 

FCS 580. Investment Planning For Families Credit 3(3-0) 

This course provides the student with an understanding of the various types of securities traded 
in financial markets, investment theory and practice, portfolio construction and management, 
and investment strategies and tactics to meet a family's investment goals. 

FCS 581. Retirement Planning for Families Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides information about public and private retirement plans. The public plans 
include Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid. The private plans include defined benefit and 
defined contribution plans and their regulatory provisions. The specifics of the various plans 
are analyzed as well as non-qualified deferred compensation plans. Finally, issues that indi- 
viduals face in retirements, such as life-styles choices and medical issues are discussed. 

FCS 582. Estate Planning For Families Credit 3(3-0) 

This course focuses on the efficient conservation and transfer of wealth, consistent with the 
family's goals. It is a study of the legal, tax, financial and non-financial aspects of this process, 
covering topics such as trusts, will, probate, advanced directives, charitable giving, wealth 
transfers and related taxes. 

FCS 600. Approaches to Developmental and 

Culturally Appropriate Curricula Credit 3(2-2) 

This course provides a review of preschool curriculum as it relates to developmental learning 
patterns; and the nature of knowledge, societal forces and interagency services. Also, this course 



120 



develops an understanding of learning principles, developmentally appropriate resources and 
various educational strategies that can be organized to support an effective environment for 
young children. Special emphasis will be placed on screening and assessment procedures, and 
formulating objectives and strategies for working with professional team members. Labora- 
tory experiences are required. (S) 

FCS 601. Quantity Foods Credit 4(1-6) 

The application of principles of cookery to the preparation and service of food for group feed- 
ing with emphasis on menu planning, work schedules, cost and portion control, distribution 
and service are implemented in a laboratory setting. Prerequisites: FCS 130, 246, 344, and 
AGEC 446. (F) 

FCS 603. Special Problems in Family and Consumer Sciences Credit 3(1-4) 

Problems in the various areas of Family & Consumer Sciences may be chosen for individual 
study. (DEMAND) 

FCS 604. Seminar in Family and Consumer Sciences Education Credit 3(3-0) 

Consideration of problems resulting from the impact of social change in the various fields of 
Human Environment and Family Sciences, and the review of research and professional devel- 
opment will be included in this course. (S) 

FCS 605. Human Environment and Family Sciences Credit 6(0-12) 

This is a course designed to provide opportunity for students and specialists to study historic 
and contemporary points of interest abroad. Exposure to customs, cultures and industries in an 
international setting will provide the basis for broader background and experiences in selected 
areas of human environment and family sciences. (DEMAND) 

FCS 606. Cooperative Extension Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an introduction to the organization, philosophy, financing, personnel, clientele 
and programs of Cooperative Extension Service. (DEMAND) 

FCS 607. Cooperative Extension - Field Experience Credit 3(0-6) 

The course includes field experience to provide an opportunity for students to become ac- 
quainted with the role of country personnel, office organizations and programs in Cooperative 
Extension Service. (DEMAND) 

FCS 608. Teaching Adult and Youth in Out-of-School Groups Credit 3(0-6) 

The design and development of informal educational programs for youth and adults in out-of- 
school settings. Prerequisite: FCS 606. (DEMAND) 

FCS 612. Senior Seminar Credit 3(3-0) 

Students' review and present major research findings in the various disciplines of Family and 
Consumer Sciences. (Required of Family and Consumer Sciences Majors). Prerequisite: Se- 
nior year only. (F) 

FCS 613. Substance Abuse Credit 3(3-0) 

Alcoholism and drugs, as well as their inherent effects upon the family and society will be 
examined. Problems in the family, related to the individuals, business and industry. Additional 
focus will be given to treatment, agencies and methods of recovering self-esteem. (SS) 

FCS 618. Food Technology Seminar Credit 1(1-0) 

A review and discussion of selected topics and recent advances in the fields of animal and food 
science are emphasized. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (DEMAND) 

FCS 619. Community of Practice Internship Credit 6(1-10) 

This course emphasizes the application and practice of methods, techniques, and materials of 
field-based experience in infant/toddler programs, intermediate care programs, hospitals, pre- 
school, shelters and various family service agencies. These internships will include observa- 



121 



tion and field-based experiences under supervision. A minimum of 120 clock hours is required 
during internship experiences. Prerequisites: FCS 419, 514, and SPED 536. (F;S) 

FCS 630. Advanced Nutrition Credit 3(3-0) 

Intermediate metabolism and interrelationships of organic and inorganic food nutrients in hu- 
man biochemical functions will be studied. Prerequisites: FCS 337, 398, CHEM 251, 252 or 
equivalent. (F) 

FCS 631. Food Chemistry Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is the study of food components, their interactions and reactions with emphasis on 
biochemical changes in fruits and vegetables on post harvest storage, postmortem biochemical 
changes in meat and fish, browning reactions, lipid oxidation and other chemical alternations 
in food. Prerequisite: FCS 236. (F) 

FCS 632. Maternal and Lifespan Nutrition Credit 3(3-0) 

This course emphasizes the energy and nutrient requirements and feeding practices for stages 
of the life span. Influences of nutrition on growth and development are discussed. The nutri- 
tional quality of food, physiological development, growth assessment, dietary evaluation and 
nutrition assessment for various stages of the lifespan are covered. Prerequisite: FCS 332, 337 
or instructor's permission. (F) 

FCS 633. Food Analysis Credit 3 (1-4) 

This course is the study of fundamental chemicals, physical and sensory aspects of food com- 
position as they relate to physical properties, acceptability and nutritional values of foods. 
Prerequisites: CHEM 102, 112, and FCS 236. (DEMAND) 

FCS 634. Independent Study in Early Education and Family Studies Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes a synthesis of selected research for individual and group study, using 
projects, workshops and colloquia. The focus of the research may be an in-depth study of 
materials previously investigated or explored in early education, family studies, teacher prepa- 
ration and developmental learning. Prerequisites: FCS 418, 514, and SPED 536. (S) 

FCS 635. Introduction to Research Methods in Food and Nutrition Credit 3(0-6) 

This course provides laboratory experiences in the use of methods applicable to food and nutri- 
tion research. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. (DEMAND) 

FCS 636. Food Promotion Credit 4(1-6) 

This is a course, which gives experiences in the development and testing of recipes. Opportu- 
nities will be provided for demonstrations, writing, and photography with selected businesses. 
(DEMAND) 

FCS 637. Special Problems in Food and Nutrition Credit 3(0-6) 

This course provides independent study/research in the areas of Food and Nutrition or Food 
Science. Prerequisites: Junior, senior, graduate standing, and consent of instructor. (S) 

FCS 638. Sensory Evaluation Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is a study of the color, flavor, aroma and texture of foods by the use of sensory 
evaluation methods. Prerequisites: FCS 236 and 337. (S) 

FCS 639. Applied Principles for Active Learning Credit 3(2-2) 

This course involves the study of basic principles, materials, and evaluation measures underly- 
ing acting leading experiences in improving children's intellectual styles and social relations. 
Special attention is given to goals and objectives, daily routine, teacher-made materials, ques- 
tioning techniques and ideas for small and large group activities. Simulated teaching experi- 
ences are required. Prerequisites: FCS 310, 311, 414, and 600. (F) 



122 



FCS 640. Geriatric Nutrition Credit 3(3-0) 

Multi-disciplinary approaches to geriatric foods, nutrition and health problems. Evaluation of 
nutritional status and nutrition care of the elderly is emphasized. Field experiences: nursing 
home and other community agencies. Prerequisite: FCS 337. (DEMAND) 

FCS 641. Current Trends in Food Science Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is the study of recent development in food science and their implications for food 
scientists, nutritionists, dietitians and other professions in the food industry and related profes- 
sions. (DEMAND) 

FCS 643. Food Preservation Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is a study of current methods of preserving foods - canning, freezing, dehydration, 
radiation and fermentation. Prerequisite: FCS 236 or equivalent. (DEMAND) 

FCS 645. Special Problems in Food Administration Credit 2(0-4) 

Individual work on special problems in food administration is required. (DEMAND) 

FCS 648. Community Nutrition Credit 3(2-2) 

This course provides an introduction and review of major communication and education skills 
that dietitians and nutritionist use in techniques of interviewing and counseling in community 
nutrition programs. Materials, methods and goals in planning, assessing, organizing and mar- 
keting nutrition for health promotion and prevention of disease. Evaluation of food and nutri- 
tion program at State and Federal levels. Prerequisites: FCS 679. (S) 

FCS 650. International Nutrition Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of an ecological approach to the hunger and malnutrition in technologi- 
cally developed and developing countries. Focus is on integrated intervention programs, projects, 
and problems. Opportunities to participate in national and international internships through 
cooperative arrangements are available. (DEMAND) 

FCS 651. Food Safety and Sanitation Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers practices and procedures for hygienic food handling, processing, sanitation, 
food safety laws and implementation of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) sys- 
tem in food processing and food service operations. Emphasis is placed on sanitation manage- 
ment, hazards, standards and corrective actions for food service operations that are critical 
control points for food safety. Practical measures for prevention of food borne diseases and 
effects of microorganisms, toxins, foreign objects and physical damage on the safety and qual- 
ity of foods are discussed. Prerequisite: BIOL 220. (S) 

FCS 652. Diet Therapy Credit 4(3-2) 

This course is a study of the principles of nutritional sciences in the treatment and management 
of nutrition related diseases. Course content includes etiology, prevalence, path-physiology, 
biochemical, clinical and nutritional needs and diet modification in the treatment of diseases. 
Prerequisites: FCS 130, 337, and 630. (S) 

FCS 653. Food Biotechnology Credit 3(1-4) 

This course covers the impact of biotechnology on food production. It covers classical to mod- 
ern day food biotechnology and beyond. Modern day genetic tools, as applied to food biotech- 
nology, will be examined. A major focus will be on the improvement of microbes used in food 
production by modern biotechnological approaches. Prerequisite: BIOL 220. (S) 

FCS 655. Observation and Student Teaching in Early Education and 

Family Studies (B-12) Credit 9(1-16) 

The application and practice of methods, techniques, and materials of instruction in a real 
classroom situation under supervision will be studied. The course includes teaching purposeful 
observation, organizing teaching materials, participation in other activities, and parent-teacher 



123 



association activities. See: University Student Teaching Handbook for specific requirements. 
(DEMAND) 

FCS 656. Nutritional Therapy I Credit 4(4-0) 

This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills for assessment of 
the nutritional status of individuals. Students will develop nutrient based care plans for persons 
with various disease conditions. 

FCS 657. Nutrition Therapy H Credit 4(4-0) 

This course is a study of the principles of nutritional sciences in the treatment and management 
of nutrition related diseases. Course content includes etiology, prevalence, pathophysiology, 
biochemical, clinical, and nutritional needs and diet modification in the treatment of diseases. 

FCS 664. Occupational Exploration in Middle Grades Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed for persons who teach or plan to teach middle grades occupational 
exploration in the curriculum. Sources and uses of occupational information, approaches to 
middle school teaching, and philosophy and concepts will be taught in cooperation with the 
Department of Business Education and Administrative Services, Family and Consumer Sci- 
ences and Industrial Education. (DEMAND) 

FCS 665. Occupational Exploration in the Middle Grade Family and 

Consumer Sciences Credit 3(3-0) 

Emphasis is placed on curriculum, methods and techniques of teaching and resources and 
facilities for teaching in the service occupations cluster which involves the areas of consumer 
and family sciences education, personal service, public service, hospitality and recreation and 
health occupations. (DEMAND) 

FCS 679. Nutrition Education Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers the philosophy, principles, methods and materials involved in nutrition 
education. The application of nutrition knowledge and skills in the development of the nutri- 
tion education curriculum and programs in schools and communities are implemented. Prereq- 
uisites: FCS 332 and 337. Students must be advanced undergraduate or graduate level. (S) 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY 
Mohamed Ahmedna Adjunct Assistant Professor 

B.S., Institut Agronomique et Veterinaire Hassan II; M.S., Ph.D., Louisiana State University 

Mary J. Baldwin Cooperative Extension Faculty 

B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Thelma Feaster Cooperative Extension Faculty 

B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.A., Case Western Reserve University, Ph.D., 
Ohio State University 

William Fleming Adjunct Assistant Professor 

B.S., Morehouse College; M.S., Georgia State University 

Ipek Goktepe Adjunct Assistant Professor 

B.S., University of Istanbul; M.S., Ph.D.; Louisiana State University 

Thurman Guy Professor 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ed.D., Uni- 
versity of North Dakota 

Thessalenuere Hinnant-Bernard Assistant Professor 

B.A., M.A. North Carolina Central University; Ph.D. Iowa State Univerisity 

124 



Salam A. Ibrahim Adjunct Assistant Professor 

B.S., University of Mosul; M.S., University of Georgia; Ph.D., University of Kentucky 

Patricia A. Lynch Assistant Professor 

B.S., M.S. North Carolina A&T State University; R.D., University of Nebraska 

Valerie J. McMillan Associate Professor 

B.S., M.Ed; South Carolina State University; Ph.D. Iowa State University 

Shirley R. McNeill Cooperative Extension Faculty 

B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.Ed., North Carolina State, Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina at Greensboro 

Nancy Oliver Assistant Professor 

B.S. Appalachian State University; MEd. University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Ph.D. 
University of Tennessee 

Rosa S. Purcell Associate Professor 

B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.Ed., Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Geraldine Ray Associate Professor 

B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.Ed., University of North Carolina Greensboro; 
Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 

Lizette Sanchez-Lugo Assistant Professor 

B.S., M.P.H., University of Puerto Rico; M.S., Wake Forest University; Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina at Greensboro 

Chung W. Seo Professor 

B.S., M.S., Korea University; Ph.D., Florida State University 

Gladys G. Shelton Associate Professor and Chairperson 

B.S., North Carolina Central University, M.S., Cornell University, Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute and State University 

Claudette Smith Cooperative Extension Faculty 

B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Ellen Smoak Cooperative Extension Faculty 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Celvia E. Stovall Associate Administrator 

B.S., Central Michigan University; M.S., Louisiana State University; Ph.D., University of Min- 
nesota 

Sheilda Sutton Cooperative Extension Faculty 

B.S., North Carolina Central University, M.S., North Carolina State University 

Carolyn S. Turner Associate Professor 

B.S., M.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
and State University 

Rosemarie Vardell Assistant Professor 

B.S., Eastern Illinois University; M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., University of North Caro- 
lina at Greensboro 



125 



Wilda Wade Cooperative Extension Faculty 

B.S., M.S., R.D., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at 

Greensboro 

Jane Walker Associate Professor 

B.S., Appalachian State University; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Meeshay Wheeler Assistant Professor 

B.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.S., North Carolina Central University; 
Ph.D.University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

FACULTY EMERITI 

Harold E. Mazyck Professor 

B.S., South Carolina State College; M.A., New York University; Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro 



126 



Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design 

http://www.ag. ncat.edu./academics/natres/index. html 
Gudigopuram B. Reddy, Chairperson 

OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design are to 
meet its responsibilities to society by providing training for professional agriculturists, natural 
resources specialists, landscape architects, agricultural and biosystems engineers and environ- 
mentalists who can identify, analyze, and solve the problems of today, as well as new problems 
that may arise in the future. Realizing the dynamic and ever changing nature of modern society, 
the Department seeks to provide its students with the tools of analysis as well as facilities for 
applying the natural, physical, and social sciences to thinking processes that will enable them 
to relate to man's present and future needs in managing his environment. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Earth and Environmental Science - Bachelor of Science 

Agricultural Science, Natural Resources (Soil Science, Environmental Horticulture) 

Bioenvironmental Engineering - Bachelor of Science 

Landscape Architecture - Bachelor of Science 

Plant, Soil and Environmental Science - Master of Science* 

* See the Graduate School Bulletin 

Interdisciplinary certificate programs are offered to students enrolled in Bachelor of Sci- 
ence programs at the University. Areas of specialization include Biotechnology ( 1 8 credit hours), 
Waste Management (18 to 20 credits hours) and Agricultural and Natural Resources Informa- 
tion Science (18 credit hours). 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The admission of students to the undergraduate degree programs and qualification for the 
Bachelor of Science degree in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental De- 
sign are based upon the general admission and graduation requirements of the University. For 
admission to Bioenvironmental Engineering see respective handbooks and program require- 
ments elsewhere in this catalog. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Majors in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design must complete 
a minimum of 124 semester hours of University courses. Included in the 124 hours are thirty 
hours in a major elective depending on the degree program. A minimum grade of "C" may be 
required for major courses. A Waste Management Certificate is awarded with the Bachelor of 
Science degree to students who complete a minimum of 1 8 credit hours of courses identified as 
waste management core courses. There is also a biotechnology certificate for students who 
meet the requirements. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design provides professional 
education for a wide range of career opportunities. Graduates of the program work in such 
industrial areas as land-use planning, environmental control, natural resources management, 
waste management, water and soil quality, and environmental policy analysis, greenhouse pro- 
duction, landscape contracting, nursery /garden center management, landscape architecture and 
regional and urban planning. Career opportunities also include work with federal, state, and 
local government agencies involved in regulation, resource management, and policy develop- 

127 



ment. Students have found employment with consulting firms involved in solving environmen- 
tal and production problems, as well as working as a licensed landscape architect providing 
professional design consultations. Graduates also are prepared for graduate school to pursue 
degrees in the environmental science, soil science, horticulture, landscape architecture and 
bioenvironmental engineering. 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 

EASC 201 EASC 644 NARS 599 

EASC 309 EASC 666 SLSC 338 

EASC 444 EASC 699 SLSC 621 

EASC 616 GEOG200 SLSC 634 

EASC 622 NARS 520 SLSC 633 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST 100 


1 UNST 130 


3 


UNST110 


3 UNST 140 


3 


UNST 120 


3 MATH 112 


4 


MATH 1 1 1 


4 PHED Elective 


2 


CHEM 106 


3 CHEM 107 


3 


CHEM 116 


1 CHEM 117 


1 




15 


16 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 1 


3 UNST Cluster Theme Elect. ' 


3 


EASC 201 


3 UNST Cluster Theme Elect. ' 


3 


BIOL 221 


4 UNST Cluster Theme Elect. : 


3 


NARS 110 


3 MATH 224 


3 


SPCH 250 


3 GEOG 200 


3 




16 


15 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 221 


3 Major Elective 2 


3 


CHEM 223 


2 SLSC 621 


4 


PHYS 225 


3 NARS 520 


1 


PHYS 235 


1 EASC 309 


3 


SLSC 338 


4 AGEN216GIS 


3 


EASC 622 


3 
16 

SENIOR YEAR 


14 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


EASC 616 


3 EASC 666 


3 


NARS 599 


3 EASC 699 


3 


SLSC 634 


4 Electives (Major Area) 2 


3 


SLSC 633 


4 Electives (Non Major) 


6 


Major Elective 1 


3 
17 


15 



Total Credit Hours: 124 

' UNST Cluster Theme Electives: Student must choose one cluster and take courses only in that cluster. 

2 Major Electives: EASC 330, 433, 444, 644, BIOL301, CIEN310, 618.AGEN213, 204, 360, HIST210, SLSC 
609, SLSC 632, CHEM 222, 244, PHYS 101, FORS 618, AREN221, HIST 307, BUAD 341, ANSC 637, LASC 
636, CM 593, OSH 311, 312,411, 413, AGED 607 and approved consortium courses. These courses must be 
approved by the advisor. Courses are described in the University Catalog. 

2 Social Science Elective: Each student is required to complete a three-hour course in African/American Stud- 
ies and a three-hour course in Global Studies. 

128 



REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE, 
NATURAL RESOURCES* 



SLSC 338 
SLSC517 
SLSC 621 
SLSC 632 



(Soil Science) 

SLSC 633 
SLSC 634 
NARS 110 
NARS 520 



NARS 599 
NARS 608 
EASC 309 
EASC 622 



A grade of "C" must be made in all of the above requirements. 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE, 
NATURAL RESOURCES 





(Soil Science) 






FRESHMAN YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


ENGL 100 


3 UNST 110 


3 


CHEM 106 


3 CHEM 107 


3 


CHEM 116 


1 CHEM 117 


1 


MATH 1 1 1 


4 MATH 112 


4 


AGED 101 


1 UNST 130 


3 


UNST 100 


1 UNST 140 


3 


UNST 120 


3 
16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 


17 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


AGEN216GIS 


3 NARS 110 


3 


BIOL 101 


4 EASC 309 


3 


SPCH 250 


3 PHYS110 


2 


UNST Cluster Theme Elec. 1 


3 PHYS 1 1 1 


1 


UNST Cluster Theme Elec. 1 


3 UNST Cluster Theme Elec. ' 


3 




1 6 UNST Cluster Theme Elec. ' 


3 
15 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 221 


3 PHED Elective 


1 


CHEM 223 


2 MATH 224 


3 


HORT 334 


3 AGEC 330 


3 


ANSC211 


3 SLSC 517 


3 


SLSC 338 


4 BIOL 221 


4 


NARS 520 


1 
16 

SENIOR YEAR 


14 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


SLSC 634 


4 SLSC 632 


3 


EASC 622 


3 SLSC 621 


4 


SLSC 633 


4 NARS 608 


3 


NARS 599 


3 Elective (Major Area) 2 


3 


Electives (Major Area) 2 


3 
17 


13 



Total Credit Hours: 125 

' UNST Cluster Theme Elective: Student must choose one cluster and take courses only in that cluster 

2 Major Area Electives: CAAE 204, EASC 616, HORT 620, NARS 618, NARS 610, NARS 603, SLSC 640 



129 



REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE, NATURAL 

RESOURCES 

(Environmental Horticulture) 

EASC201 HORT610 NARS 599 

HORT 302 HORT 6 1 1 NARS 608 

HORT 303 HORT 620 SLSC 338 

HORT 334 NARS 110 SLSC 517 

HORT 600 NARS 520 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE, NATURAL 

RESOURCES 

(Environmental Horticulture) 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


ENGL 100 


3 UNST 110 


3 


EASC 201 


3 MATH 102 


3 


MATH 101 


3 UNST 130 


3 


NARS 1 10 


3 UNST 140 


3 


UNST 100 


1 BIOL 100 


4 


UNST 120 


3 
16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 


16 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


HORT 302 


3 HORT 303 


3 


HORT 334 


3 BIOL 240 


4 


CHEM 106 


3 PHYS110 


2 


CHEM 116 


1 PHYS 1 1 1 


1 


UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 1 


3 UNST Cluster Theme Elect. ' 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 1 


3 UNST Cluster Theme Elect. ' 


3 




16 


16 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


SLSC 338 


4 AGEC 330 


3 


ANSC 214 


3 BUAD 425 


3 


BIOL 220 


4 SLSC 517 


3 


Major Elective 2 


3 BIOL 430 


4 


HPED Elective 


2 Major Elective 2 


3 




16 


16 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


BIOL 530 


3 NARS 608 


3 


HORT 610 


3 HORT 600 


3 


BUAD 422 


3 HORT 611 


3 


HORT 620 


3 NARS 520 


1 


Elective 


3 NARS 599 


3 




15 


13 



Total Credit Hours: 126 

' UNST Cluster Theme Elective: Student must choose one cluster and take courses only in the cluster. 

2 Major Electives: HORT 412, 514, 527, 612, 613, NARS 603, 618, and LDAR 170, 171, 270, 360, 370, 371. 



130 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Landscape Architecture is concerned with the quality of land use. It includes the analysis of 
environmental and social factors and recommendations for the preservation, design, construc- 
tion, and maintenance of developed land areas. The scope of activities of projects varies from 
broad, regional landscape planning analysis to detailed site planning. 

This curriculum is planned to equip the student to deal with a wide range of environmental 
problems. A sequence of required courses develops an understanding of landscape design theory 
and practice and construction techniques. Elective and optional course offerings provide the 
student an opportunity to concentrate in an area of individual interest. 

Multiple courses in several major subject areas are sequential. Completing those courses in 
sequence as listed is required. A student who earns a "D" in a major course may be required to 
repeat the course. 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSE FOR LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

LDAR 150 LDAR371 LDAR 520 

LDAR 170 LDAR 380 LDAR 550 

LDAR 171 LDAR 460 LDAR 560 

LDAR 270 LDAR 461 LDAR 570 

LDAR 302 LDAR 470 LDAR 571 

LDAR 303 LDAR 471 LDAR 572 
LDAR 360 LDAR 510 
LDAR 370 
* A grade of "C" must be made in all of the above requirements. 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST 100 


1 UNST 120 


3 


UNST 110 


3 UNST 140 


3 


UNST 130 


3 MATH 102 


3 


LDAR 150 


3 LDAR 171 


3 


LDAR 170 


3 LDAR 270 


3 


MATH 101 


3 
16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 


15 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 1 


3 UNST Cluster Theme Elect. ' 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 1 


3 UNST Cluster Theme Elect. ' 


3 


PHYS 110 


2 LDAR 303 


3 


PHYS 1 1 1 


1 LDAR 371 


3 


LDAR 360 


3 GCS 234 


3 


LDAR 370 


3 EASC 201 


3 


LDAR 302 


3 
18 


18 



131 



First Semester 
LDAR 380 
LDAR 460 
LDAR 470 
CAAE 204 
SLSC 338 



First Semester 
LDAR 560 
LDAR 570 
LDAR 572 
Electives 



JUNIOR YEAR 


Credit 


Second Semester 


3 


LDAR 461 


4 


LDAR 471 


4 


LDAR 550 


3 


GCS 536 


4 




18 




SENIOR YEAR 


Credit 


Second Semester 


3 


LDAR 510 


4 


LDAR 520 


3 


LDAR 571 


6 


NARS 599 


16 





Credit 
4 
4 
3 
3 
14 



Credit 
4 
2 
4 
3 
13 



Total Credit Hours: 128 

' UNST Cluster Theme Elective: Student must choose one cluster and take course only in that cluster. 

THE PROGRAM IN BIOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 

MISSION STATEMENT 

The mission of the Bioenvironmental Engineering program is to provide a quality agricul- 
tural and biosystem's engineering education to its students and to satisfy the educational and 
technical needs of society on local, national and international levels. 

OBJECTIVES 

The primary objective of Bioenvironmental Engineering is to provide integrated under- 
graduate and graduate training in agricultural, biological, and environmental sciences and en- 
gineering design. Specific objectives are as follows: 

1 . Our graduates will demonstrate the ability to work productively as gainfully employed 
Bioenvironmental Engineers or to pursue graduate education. 

2. Our graduates will have the skills to actively lead or participate on multidisciplinary 
team projects. 

3. Our graduates will be active in professional societies, benefit from continuing education, 
and progress towards professional registration. 

4. Our graduates will help improve quality of life by contributing to workforce diversity 
and providing valuable services to the community. 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The Bioenvironmental Engineering major must complete 128 credit hours, following the 
approved curriculum. Students majoring in this discipline must maintain a minimum 2.00 cu- 
mulative grade point average. See program handbook for additional requirements. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

A degree in this field prepares a student for careers in engineering design, management, 
research, consulting, governmental agencies, industries, foreign services, sales, teaching, and 
product development. 



132 



REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR AGRICULTURAL AND 
BIOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 

AGEN 404 AGEN 330 CAAE 362 

AGEN 501 AGEN 440 CAAE 363 

AGEN 502 AGEN 600 CAAE 364 

AGEN 523 CAAE 204 CAAE 500 

AGEN 624 
A grade of "C" must be made in all the above requirements. 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR BIOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


CAAE 100 


2 


CAAE 102 


2 


CAAE 101 


2 


MATH 132 


4 


MATH 131 


4 


UNST 130 


3 


UNST 120 


3 


PHYS 241 


3 


UNST 100 


1 


PHYS 251 


1 


UNST 100 


3 


UNST 140 


3 


GEEN 110 





GEEN 120 







15 




16 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


CAAE 331 


3 


CAAE 332 


3 


MATH 231 


4 


CAAE 334 


2 


PHYS 242 


3 


CHEM 107 


3 


PHYS 252 


1 


MATH 431 


3 


CHEM 106 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elec. 


3 


CHEM 116 


1 


UNST Cluster Theme Elec. 


3 




15 


CAAE 202 



17 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


CAAE 204 


3 


CAAE 364 


3 


CAAE 362 


3 


INEN 260 


2 


MEEN441 


3 


AGEN 330 


4 


UNST Cluster Theme Elec. 


3 


Statistics Elective 3 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elec. 


3 


BIOL/CHEM Elec. 2 


3 




15 


CAAE 302 




15 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


AGEN 440 


3 


AGEN 624 


3 


AGEN 600 


3 


AGEN 523 


3 


ELEN 440 


3 


AGEN 502 


2 


EASC 622 


3 


SLSC 632 


3 


AGEN Elective 


3 


BIOL Elec. 


3 


CAAE 500/GEEN 500 


1 




14 


AGEN 501 


1 
17 







Total Credit Hours: 124 

' UNST Cluster Theme Electives: Student must choose one cluster and take courses only in that cluster. 

2 Biology/Chemistry Electives: BIOL 101 * 160* 220* 221 *, 240* 370* LDAR 230, BIOL 400, 410 or CHEM 
221, or other biology and chemistry courses approved by the faculty advisor. Some elective courses (marked 
with *) will result in taking extra credit hours. 

3 Statistics Elective: MATH 224, ECON 305, INEN 2 70. 

4 AGEN Elective: AGEN 404, C1EN 310, 618, 664, 668 or other engineering courses approved by the faculty advisor. 

133 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN BIOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 

AGEN 114. Home and Farm Maintenance Credit 3(1-4) 

This course provides instruction in the selection, sharpening, care and correct use of shop tools 
and equipment; Woodworking and simple carpentry; simple electrical repairs; sheet metal work; 
electric arc and oxy acetylene welding; pipe fitting and simple plumbing repairs. (F) 

AGEN 216. Geographic Information System in Engineering and 

Natural Resources Credit 3(2-3) 

This course will introduce the student to a Geographic Information System (GIS) for database 
analysis using ARC/INFO software. Management and techniques for data input, storage, re- 
trieval, analysis and display of spatial and tabular data would be covered in a computerized 
laboratory setting. Global Positioning Systems (GPS) will also be introduced. (F) 

AGEN 330. Engineering Design and Systems Analysis Credit 4(2-4) 

System-based thinking will be used to improve the students' integrative view in engineering 
designs. This concept will be used in designing physical models for real world application. 
Subject matter discussions will include: soft and hard systems, learning styles, relevant sys- 
tems, design techniques, optimum designs and evaluation. Prerequisites: MEEN 336 and ECON 
300 or 301. (S) 

AGEN 403. Power and Machinery Credit 3(2-2) 

This course deals with tractive units that include field machinery and tractor power. The first 
part involves the design principles of field machinery, evaluating the functional performance 
and the efficiency of these machines. The second part deals with the thermal analysis of inter- 
nal combustion engines. Students will learn to measure and calculate tractive and engine pow- 
ers. Prerequisites: MEEN 336 and 337. (F) 

AGEN 404. Structures and Environments Credit 3(2-2) 

This course deals with the fundamentals of building construction applied to location, selection 
materials, foundations, planning farm structures, and environmental considerations, such as 
temperature, humidity, condensation, and ventilation. Prerequisite: MEEN 336. (F) 

AGEN 440. Engineering Properties of Biological Materials Credit 3(2-2) 

Engineering properties of plant and animal materials will be studies. Specific topics will in- 
clude: structure and composition of plant and animal materials, elastic and visoelastic proper- 
ties, food rheology and thermal properties, aerodynamic and hydrodynamic properties, and 
electromagnetic properties. These properties will be used to design sound biological and envi- 
ronmental systems. Prerequisites: BIOL 221 and MEEN 336 or consent of instructor. (F) 

AGEN 501. Engineering Design I Credit 1(1-0) 

The major objective of this course is to enhance the design capability of bioenvironmental 
engineering students. During this course each student will identify a design project, define the 
problem, collect all required resources and databases and outline the work plan. This project 
should integrate design concepts from previous courses. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (F) 

AGEN 502. Engineering Design II Credit 2(2-0) 

The major objective of this course is to enhance the design capabilities of agricultural engi- 
neering students. This is a continuation of AGEN 501. During this course students will com- 
plete the design project selected in AGEN 501. (S) 

AGEN 522. Dairy/Food Engineering Credit 2(2-2) 

The general engineering principles of solids, fluids, and process equipment will be discussed. 
Topics include energy, heat, enthalpy, pyschometrics, heat and mass transfer, drying and refrig- 
eration of food products. Prerequisite: MEEN 441 or consent of instructor. (F) 



134 



AGEN 523. Biological and Agricultural Energy Systems Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course discusses the production, utilization, and system design for energy in food and 
agricultural productions. Specific topics include: biogas, biomass, solar energy, energy analysis, 
conservation and management, including electric power supply and motor control. Energy 
production through photosynthesis and energy flow in biological systems will also be studied. 
Prerequisite: MEEN 441. (S) 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Courses 

AGEN 600. Soil and Water Engineering I Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course is the study of the improvement of soil and water use by evaluating and using 
present conservation Practices and models. Water conveying and retaining structures, and soil 
conservation, drainage and irrigation systems will be discussed and designed. The course will 
emphasize sound environmental design practices. Prerequisite: AGEN 360 or consent of the 
instructor. (F) 

AGEN 619. Instrumentation and Measurement Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course will emphasize quantitative evaluation of some of the well established parameters 
such as temperature, humidity, fluid flow, pressure, displacement, velocity, acceleration, force, 
stress, strain, etc. that are widely used in bioenvironmental engineering and other engineering 
disciplines. Prerequisite MEEN 336 or consent of instructor. (DEMAND) 

AGEN 624. Water Resources Engineering Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course emphasizes the analysis and design of water resources systems. Topics include: 
water resources planning and development, hydraulic structures, introduction to aquifer and 
contamination, well development, pump evaluation and selection, water quality and manage- 
ment, water laws, and detention and retention pond, wastewater management and remediation. 
Prerequisite: AGEN 360 or consent of instructor. (S) 

EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 

EASC 201. The Earth— Man's Environment Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the earth's system as related to atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere 
and lithosphere. The interrelationship of humans with the earth's environment as revealed in 
the modification of natural processes will also be examined. (F;S;SS) 

EASC 309. Elements of Physical Geology Credit 3(2-2) 

This course examines the relation of geological principles in the development of a balanced 
concept of the earth and the earth's history; rock and mineral identification, utilization of geo- 
logical and topographic maps, geological processes, resource conservation, urban and environ- 
mental problems. Prerequisite: CHEM 101 or consent of instructor. (S) 

EASC 330. Elements of Weather and Climate Credit 3(2-2) 

This course examines the fundamental elements of weather conditions as revealed in world 
patterns of climate types. It surveys the types of land forms and makes applications to prob- 
lems in engineering, military science and in planning for agricultural, urban and regional de- 
velopment projects. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (F) 

EASC 408. Field Work in Earth Science Credit 3(1-4) 

Methods of geologic map construction using aerial photographic maps, Bruton Compass, etc., 
for stratigraphic measurements; interpretation of remotely sensed data will be studied. (SS) 

EASC 433. Fundamentals of Mineralogy Credit 2(1-2) 

This course provides systematic study of mineral groups, their occurrence, formation, eco- 
nomic importance, identification by x-ray and other techniques. Prerequisite: EASC 309. (F) 



135 



EASC 444. Earth and Environmental Science Seminar Credit 3(3-0) 

Group discussions, reports, and guest lectures on current environmental issues including case 
studies. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

EASC 616. Environmental Planning and Natural Resource Conservation Credit 3(2-2) 
Problems of uncontrolled use of natural resources, increased urbanization, unplanned growth 
and general deterioration of the man-made and natural environments will be examined. The 
basic principles of environmental planning and natural resources management as well as natu- 
ral resource conservation will also be studied. (F) 

EASC 622. Environmental Sanitation and Waste Management Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is the study of traditional and innovative patterns as well as problems of managing 
with handling waste products of urban and rural environments, their renovation and reclama- 
tion. (F) 

EASC 624. Earth Science, Geomorphology Credit 3(2-2) 

This course examines various land forms and their evolution - the naturally evolved surface 
features of the Earth's crust and the processes responsible for their evaluation, their relation to 
man's activities and as the foundation for understanding the environment. (F) 

EASC 625. Earth Resources Credit 3(2-2) 

Conservation, management and use of renewable and nonrenewable resources and their impact 
on the social and economic quality of our environment. (SS) 

EASC 644. Problem Solving in Earth Science Credit 3(3-0) 

Independent field and/or laboratory research in earth and environmental science for advanced 
students is/or required. (S) 

EASC 666. Earth System Science Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is the study of the earth as a "system" with emphasis on the atmosphere, biosphere, 
hydrosphere, and lithosphere interactions as related to global change and human activities. (F) 

EASC 699. Environmental Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

This course provides multidisciplinary examination of environmental problems and applica- 
tion of appropriate techniques of analysis to selected problems. Team taught by environmental 
faculty. (S) 

ENVIRONMENTAL HORTICULTURE 

HORT 302/LDAR 302. Plant Materials I Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is the study of plant materials as used in landscape design. Emphasis is placed on 
major categories of herbaceous plants and woody plants as they pertain to landscape usage. 
Identification techniques will be introduced and used. (F) 

HORT 303/LDAR 303. Plant Materials II Credit 3(2-2) 

The course is a continuation of LDAR 302 with different plant species. (S) 

HORT 334. Plant Propagation Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is the study of the types, construction, and management of propagation structures; 
and the fundamental principles of propagation by seed, cuttage, budding, grafting, and layer- 
age. Prerequisite: NARS 110. (F) 

HORT 412. Turf Grass Management Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers the establishment, maintenance, and adaptation of grasses for lawns, golf 
courses, parks, Athletic and playing fields and roadsides. Also considered is the association of 
different plant responses with soil, climate, and biotic factors. (F) 



136 



HORT514. Nursery Production Credit 3(2-2) 

This course includes the production principles and practices used for growing woody plants in 
the field and in containers along with the strategies for wholesale and retail marketing of nurs- 
ery crops. (S) 

HORT527. Basic Floral Design Credit 3(1-4) 

The essentials of flower arrangement and plant decoration for the home, office, hospital, school 
and church are studied. Special attention given to design principles, such as balance, scale, 
harmony, color, and line movement. (DEMAND) 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Courses 

HORT 600. Plant Tissue Culture Credit 3(2-2) 

Theory and principles of plant cell, tissue and organ culture, and their application in crop 
improvement will be studied. (F) 

HORT 608. Special Problems in Horticulture Credit 3(3-0) 

This course involves work along special lines given largely by the project method for advanced 
undergraduate and graduate students who have the necessary preparation. Special arrangement 
with instructor required. (F:S:SS1) 

HORT 610. Commercial Greenhouse Management Credit 3(2-2) 

The culture of floriculture crops in the greenhouse out-of-doors with emphasis on cut flowers 
and potted plants will be studied. Special attention is given to seasonal production as it relates 
to soils, fertilization and environmental factors. (DEMAND) 

HORT 611. Commercial Greenhouse Production Credit 3(2-2) 

The culture of floriculture crops in the greenhouse with emphasis on seasonal production, 
marketing, insect and disease controls and plant growing structures will be studied. Prerequi- 
sites: HORT 334 and HORT 610. (DEMAND) 

HORT 612. Plant Materials and Landscape Maintenance Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is the study of the identification, merits, adaptability, and maintenance of shrubs, 
trees, and vines used in landscape planting trees, shrubs, bulbs, and perennials. (DEMAND) 

HORT 613. Plant Materials and Planning Design Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is a continuation of HORT 612 with added emphasis on plant combinations and 
use of plant as design elements. (DEMAND) 

HORT 620. Vegetable Production Credit 3(2-2) 

This course provides a comprehensive study of major and minor vegetable crops of North 
Carolina, the United States, and the world in relation to the industry, production practices, crop 
development, nutritional value, Quality characteristics, marketing, and post-harvest handling 
and storage. (F) 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

LDAR 102. Environmental Design Ethics Credit 2(2-0) 

This course is designed to emphasize issues, values, and ethics in landscape architecture. Cur- 
rent concerns and issues involving the environment, design and social factors will be explored. 
A variety of ideologies within the practice of landscape architecture and their niches within the 
profession will be examined. (S) 

LDAR 170. Landscape Architectural Orientation I (Formerly LDAR 140) Credit 3(0-6) 

Students enrolled in this studio course will explore the field of landscape architecture and the 
various visual communication techniques. Students will be exposed to traditional and digital 
visual and graphic techniques necessary for the communication of ideas. (F) 



137 



LDAR 171. Landscape Architectural Orientation II 

(Formerly LDAR 141) Credit 3(0-6) 

This studio course is designed to explore further issues of visual communication. Both tradi- 
tional and digital visual media will be used to investigate more technical aspects of communi- 
cation; two and three dimensional aspects of form and space creation will be explored. (S) 

LDAR 230. Environmental Ecology Credit 3(3-0) 

Basic concepts of ecology, ecosystem structure and function will be explored; energy flow and 
material recycling emphasized. Field trips are required. Prerequisite: LDAR 170. (S) 

LDAR 270. History of Landscape Architecture I Credit 3(3-0) 

This history course is a study of the development of landscape architecture from antiquity to 
modern times, with emphasis on its relationships to allied arts and professions. Prerequisite: 
University History requirement. (F) 

LDAR 271. History of Landscape Architecture II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the development of landscape design during the modern and post 
modern eras. Topics will include the English Landscape School, the City Beautiful Movement, 
the Country Place Era and the International School. Prerequisite: LDAR 270. (S) 

LDAR /HORT 302. Plant Materials I Credit 3(1-4) 

This course will concentrate on the study of plant materials as used in landscape design. Em- 
phasis is placed on major categories of herbaceous plants and woody plants as they pertain to 
landscape usage. Identification techniques will be introduced and used. (F) 

LDAR 303/HORT 303. Plant Materials II Credit 3(1-4) 

This course is a continuation of LDAR 302. Different plant species will be the focus of this 
course. Prerequisite: LDAR 302. (S) 

LDAR 360. Landscape Construction Materials Credit 3(2-1) 

This course will introduce students to various materials used in landscape construction projects. 
The nature, structure and/or composition of the material, its typical application in the land- 
scape and construction techniques will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on the use of 
materials in the landscape and the development of drawn construction details during the lab 
period. (S) 

LDAR 370. Basic Landscape Design I Credit 3(0-6) 

Students in this studio course will explore basic concept development and principles and ele- 
ments of design. The course will give students a greater understanding of space through analy- 
sis of forms, proportions, and scale. Students will investigate design theory by proposing solu- 
tions. Prerequisite: LDAR 170. (F) 

LDAR 371. Basic Landscape Design II Credit 3(0-6) 

This studio course is designed to explore further issues of design. Course material will empha- 
size ideologies about scales, context, and concept development. Projects will explore creative 
solutions to "real" world constraints (i.e. zoning regulations, economic, environmental, social, 
political, etc.). The cyclic nature of the design process and its layers will also be emphasized. 
Prerequisite: LDAR 370. (S) 

LDAR 460. Landscape Architectural Construction Credit 4(0-8) 

This studio course will focus on exercises and projects in site engineering. Prerequisites: MATH 
102, PHYS 1 10 and 1 1 1. Corequisite: LDAR 470. (F) 

LDAR 461. Landscape Architecture Materials and Equipment Credit 4(0-8) 

This studio course will focus on lectures, exercises and projects dealing with landscape equip- 
ment, and design methods. Prerequisites: MATH 102, PHYS 110, 111. Corequisite: LDAR 

471. (S) 



138 



LDAR 470. Intermediate Landscape Architectural Design I Credit 4(0-8) 

This is a studio course for students to develop design solutions to problems involving private, 
quasi-public, and public spaces with emphasis on the design process. The student will develop 
programs, site analysis, concept, and presentation drawings. Prerequisites: LDAR 171, 230 
and 371. Corequisite: LDAR 460. (F) 

LDAR 471. Intermediate Landscape Architectural Design II Credit 4(0-8) 

This studio course is a continuation of LDAR 470 addressing more complex design issues. 
Prerequisite: LDAR 470. (S) 

LDAR 500. Special Problems in Landscape Architecture Credit 3(2-2) 

This is a course for landscape architecture students to work on independent study projects. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor and Program Director. (F) 

LDAR 510. Professional Practice Credit 4(4-0) 

This course is a study of the professional practice of landscape architecture, including profes- 
sional ethics and registration laws; the preparation of proposals and contract documents; office 
administration; job supervision, and relationships with clients and customers. Prerequisites: 
LDAR 461, 570, 560. Corequisites: LDAR 571 and 520. (S) 

LDAR 520. Seminar in Landscape Architecture Credit 2(2-0) 

Individual research, group discussions, and lectures on contemporary issues relating to the 
practice of landscape architecture are the focus of this seminar. Prerequisite: LDAR 570. 
Corequisites: LDAR 571 and 510. (S) 

LDAR 550. Planting Design (Formerly LDAR 400) Credit 3(0-6) 

This studio course will study the fundamentals of design as applied to aesthetic and functional 
arrangements. Problems will include preparation of planting plans, cost estimates and techni- 
cal specifications. Prerequisites: LDAR 302 and 303. Corequisites: LDAR 460 and 470. (F) 

LDAR 560. Advanced Landscape Architectural Construction Documents Credit 3(0-6) 

This studio course will serve as a capstone to Landscape Architectural Construction 330 and 
331 with emphasis on understanding and preparing complete sets of construction documents 
for landscape architecture projects. Prerequisites: LDAR 460 and 461. (F) 

LDAR 570. Advanced Landscape Architecture Credit 4(0-8) 

This studio course is an in-depth group study of a comprehensive landscape architecture man- 
agement, planning, and design problem while considering the research, programming, site 
analysis, conceptual studies, preliminary and master plan, design guidelines, and presentations 
of recommendations. Prerequisites: LDAR 461, 471, and 550. (S) 

LDAR 571. Advanced Landscape Architectural Design II Credit 4(0-8) 

This studio course focuses on an approved design problem requiring individual work, which 
will serve as a comprehensive examination. Preparation and presentation are to include a writ- 
ten and graphic problem statement, analysis, and detailed plans, or other activities approved by 
instructor. Prerequisite: LDAR 570. Corequisites: LDAR 510 and 520. (S) 

NATURAL RESOURCES 

NARS110. Natural Resources Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is an introduction to the basic principles underlying the production of economic 
crops. A brief introduction to drug and medical plants will also be included. Prerequisite: BIOL 

140. (F;S) 

NARS 305. Principles of Plant Breeding Credit 3(2-2) 

This is an introductory course with emphasis placed on basic principles of plant improvement 
through genetics; it is required of all Plant Science majors. Prerequisite: BIOL 140 or ANSC 
214. (DEMAND) 

139 



NARS307. Forage Crops Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is the study of grasses, legumes and other plants and their uses as hay pasture, 
silage and special purposes of forages, identification of plants and seeds and study of quality in 
hay, silage and pasture population. Prerequisite: NARS 110. (DEMAND) 

NARS 520. Seminar in Plant Science and Technology Credit 1(1-0) 

This course examines current problems in Plant Science and Technology. Designed especially 
for unifying the three major areas of the Department by involving the staff with junior and 
senior students. (F) 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

AGRI 604. Experimental Methods in Research Credit 3 (2-2) 

Experimental design, methods and techniques of experimentation, application of experimental 
design to plant, Animal and food research; and interpretation of experimental data will be 
included in the course. Prerequisite: MATH 224. (F) 

NARS 603. Agricultural Chemicals Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is a study of the important chemical pesticides and growth regulators used in the 
production of economic plants. Prerequisites: CHEM 102 and NARS 300. (DEMAND) 

NARS 604. Crop Ecology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is the study of the physical environment and its influence on crops and geographi- 
cal distribution of crops. (DEMAND) 

NARS 605. Breeding of Crop Plants Credit 3(2-2) 

This course examines the following: the significance of crop improvements in the maintenance 
of crop as well as the yields; application of genetic principles and techniques used in the im- 
provement of crops; and the place of seed certification in the maintenance of varietal purity. 
(DEMAND) 

NARS 608. Special Problems in Natural Resources Credit 3(3-0) 

The courses designed for students who desire to study special problems in Natural Resources; 
plant, soil, and environment. (F;S) 

NARS 610. Applied Spatial Statistics and GIS Credit 3(2-2) 

This course introduces spatial statistical analysis techniques, which provide the students with 
the opportunity to conduct exploratory spatial data analysis with Arc View GIS, S-PLUS/ 
SpatialStats and the S AS/GIS Software. The focus of this course is on effective application of 
spatial data analysis in GIS environment; MATH224 and GIS software or consent of instructor. 
(DEMAND) 

NARS 618. General Forestry Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is the study of the history, classification, culture, and utilization of native trees, 
with special emphasis on their importance as a conservation resource, the making of national 
forestry policy, and the ecological impact of trees on environmental quality. Prerequisite: BIOL 
140. (SS) 

SOIL SCIENCE 

SLSC 338. Fundamentals of Soil Science Credit 4(3-2) 

This course examines the fundamental nature and properties of soils, soil genesis, and classifi- 
cation and land use will be covered. (F) 

SLSC 517. Soil Fertility Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines that following: the general principles of soil fertility; influence of chemi- 
cal, physical and microbiological properties of soils on crop production; application of fertility 
principles in cropping programs; and limited treatment of impact of agricultural pollutants on 
the environment. Prerequisite: SLSC 338, CHEM 101 or consent of instructor. (DEMAND) 

140 



Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

SLSC621. Soil Microbiology Credit 4(2-4) 

A study of soil micro and macro organisms and their role in elemental cycles, environmental 
pollution remediation and crop yields. Also, deals with the rhizosphere ecology and processes. 
Organic matter accumulation and carbon sequestration in soils. 

SLSC632. Soil Physics Credit 4(2-4) 

This course is a study of fundamental physical principles and laws which govern the behavior 
of soils. Physical constitution of soil water, and soil air and the relationship of soil physical 
conditions to plant growth and environment will also be examined. Prerequisites: SLSC 338, 
CHEM 102, and MATH 1 13, and consent of instructor. Spring terms of even numbered years. 
(S) 

SLSC 633. Soil Genesis, Classification and Land Use Credit 4(2-4) 

Factors and processes of soil formation, grouping of soils based on their properties, soil map- 
ping, soil interpretations for various uses and discussion of new concepts in soil taxonomy will 
be studied. Prerequisite: SLSC 338 or consent of instructor. (F) 

SLSC 634. Soil Environmental Chemistry Credit 4(3-2) 

This course is a study of the chemical properties of soil environment including interactions of 
solid, liquid and gaseous phases. Discussion will also include ion and pollutant interactions 
with soil, their retention, potential movement and the environmental impact. Additional dis- 
cussion will include oxidation and reduction, soil acidity and alkalinity and their impact on 
waste management, resource utilization and the environment. (S) 

SLSC 640. Wetland Management Credit 3 (-0) 

Designed to provide a basic understanding of the benefits that wetlands in their natural condi- 
tions offer mankind, Fish and wildlife habitat, water quality improvement, flood protection, 
filter traps for pollutants, erosion control, natural products, recreation, and aesthetics. Primary 
instructional areas will include ecology, wetland systems of the southeast region, wetland law 
and regulations, soil conditions of wetlands, hydrology of wetlands, methodology of delineat- 
ing wetlands, wetland irrigation, plant and vegetation identification, and writing environ-men- 
tal reports. 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY 
Keith Baldwin Cooperative Extension Faculty 

B.S., M.Ed., University of California, Ph.D., North Carolina State University 

Peggy Fersner Adjunct Assistant Professor 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; M.S., Clemson University (PE.) 

Godfrey A. Gayle Professor 

B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State University 

Marihelen Glass Professor 

B.S., Texas Tech University; M.S., Ph.D., Texas A&M University 

Perry Howard Associate Professor 

B.L.A., Louisiana State University; M.L.A., Harvard University, Registered Landscape Architect 

Omoanghe S. Isikhuemhen Adjunct Assistant Professor 

B. S., M.S. University of Benn, Ph.D. Institute of Microbiology, MS CR, Prague 



141 



Carl Niedzela Adjunct Assistant Professor 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., West Virginia University; Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University 

Richard Phillips Adjunct Associate Professor 

B.S., Iowa State University, M.S., North Carolina State University (PE.) 

Charles W. Raczkowski Adjunct Associate Professor 

B.S., M.S.; Kansas State University; Ph.D., North Carolina State University 

G. Bhaskar Reddy Chairman and Professor 

B.S., M.S., A. P., Agricultural University, India; Ph.D., University of Georgia, Certified Soil 
Scientist 

M. Raj Reddy Professor 

B.S., Osmania University, M.S., A.P., Agricultural University, India; Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Manuel R. Reyes Associate Professor 

M.S., University of the Philippines at Los Banos; M.Phil., Cranfield Institute of Technology, 
England; Ph.D., Louisiana State University 

John F. Robinson Professor 

Sr., A. A., Jr. College of Albany, B.L.A., Louisiana State University, M.L.A., Harvard Univer- 
sity, Registered Landscape Architecture 

Abolghasem Shahbazi Professor 

B.S., University of Tabriz; M.S., University of California at Davis, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 
University (F.E.) 

Vestal Shirley Laboratory Manager 

B.S., Mid Western University; Ph.D., Louisiana State University-Baton Rouge 

Godfrey A. Uzochukwu Professor 

B.S., M.S., Oklahoma State University; Ph.D., University of Nebraska, Certified Soil Scientist 

Gouchen Yang Adjunct Professor 

B.S., Jilin Agricultural University, M.S., Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln 

Douglas William Assistant Professor 

B.S., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, M.S., Cornell University 



142 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

http://www.ncat.edu/artsnsci/ 



Michael A. Plater, Dean 
Nita M. Dewberry, Associate Dean for Curriculum and Student Affairs 
David W. Aldridge, Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies 

OBJECTIVES 

The College of Arts and Sciences at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State Uni- 
versity introduces the student to the world of higher education and its many fields of human 
interests. The College provides opportunities for the acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes 
and behavioral patterns that promote excellence and competence. Our primary aim is to pro- 
vide students with a global educational experience which prepares them to perform in a variety 
of dynamic leadership and employment situations. 

Through its formal curriculum and program of study in the arts and humanities, the social 
and behavioral sciences, as well as the natural and physical sciences, the College intends to 
achieve the following objectives: 

1 . to provide courses of instruction and service-learning experiences that prepare students 
for professional or self-employment. 

2. to provide opportunities and experiences for the student to acquire analytical and critical 
thinking skills. 

3. to provide training in effective communication. 

4. to stimulate and encourage individual creativity and personal development through re- 
search and related activities. 

5. to foster and inspire creativity, self-discipline, and objective thinking among our stu- 
dents. 

6. to provide the undergraduate academic foundation for successful graduate and profes- 
sional education. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

The College of Arts and Sciences is comprised of twelve academic departments with thirty- 
three undergraduate degree programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Science, 
the Bachelor of Fine Arts, and the Bachelor of Social Work. The Bachelor of Arts degree is 
offered with major programs of study in English; History; Music (General); and Music (Per- 
formance); Political Science; Psychology; Romance Languages (French and Spanish); Sociol- 
ogy; Speech; Visual Arts; and Liberal Studies. The Bachelor of Science degree is offered with 
major programs of study in Art; Biology; Chemistry; Criminal Justice; English; History; Math- 
ematics; Music; Physics; and Romance Languages (French and Spanish). The Bachelor of 
Fine Arts degree is offered in Professional Theatre and the Bachelor of Social Work degree is 
offered in Social Work. Many degree programs may be pursued jointly with professional edu- 
cation courses offered in the School of Education. Graduates of these programs qualify for 
certification to teach in the K-12 schools. 

INTERDISCIPLINARY DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The College of Arts and Sciences embraces the institution's visionary concept of an 
interdisciplinary university that "mandates overall high quality, continued competitiveness, 



143 



and effective involvement of global strategic partners in marketing and delivery of programs 
and operations." Specific interdisciplinary degree programs in the College include the Bachelor 
of Arts in Liberal Studies with concentrations in the following: African-American Studies, 
International Studies, customized Interdisciplinary, Women's Studies, Business, Pre-Law, 
Cultural Changes & Social Development, and Dance. The College also offers a Bachelor of 
Science in Comprehensive Science Education with concentrations and teaching licensure in 
Physics, Biology and Chemistry. Interdisciplinary and multi-disciplinary degree programs at 
the graduate level include the following university- wide programs: Master of Science in 
Computational Science and Engineering, Doctor of Philosophy in Energy and Environmental 
Studies, and Doctor of Philosophy in Leadership Studies. 

DEGREE ENHANCEMENT OPPORTUNITIES 

Undergraduate students in the College of Arts and Sciences may also broaden their learning 
experiences and achieve enhancements to their degree through the following university-wide 
special programs and certificates: University Honors Program, Global Studies Certificate, UNC 
in Washington Program, Waste Management Certificate, and Customer Relationship Market- 
ing & Management Certificate. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

To attain the baccalaureate degree in the College of Arts and Sciences, a student must satis- 
factorily complete the requirements of his/her major field, the university studies courses, and a 
sufficient number of electives to total at least 124 credits. The minimum scholastic average 
required for graduation in any department degree program is a 2.0 in all major courses, in 
addition to the overall grade point average requirement of 2.0. 

ACCREDITATION 

All of the Programs in the College of Arts and Sciences that have accrediting organizations 
have been accredited. They are as follows: 

• The Chemistry Program is accredited by the American Chemical Society (ACS). 

• The Music Program is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music 

(NASM). 

• The Social Work undergraduate program is approved by the Council on Social Work 
Education (CSWE). 

• The Bachelor of Fine Arts in Professional Theater is accredited by the National Associa- 
tion of Schools of Theatre (NAST). 

• The Teacher Education Programs are accredited by the National Council for Accredita- 
tion of Teacher Education and the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction 
(NCATE/ NCDPI). 

• The Journalism and Mass Communication Program is accredited by the Accrediting 
Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications (ACEJMC). 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

The curricula of the College prepares students for careers in teaching, research, social work, 
journalism, radio and television, the creative arts, industry, government and self-employment. 
Within the professional curricula, students may pursue studies which lead to careers in law, 
medicine, dentistry, librarianship, teaching and the ministry. 



144 



SEMESTER LOAD LIMIT 

The normal schedule is 15-16 credit hours per semester. No student may register for more 
than 18 semester hours per semester without permission of the Dean. 

ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 

To assist students in meeting graduation requirements, a system of student advisement is 
provided in all departments. Academic advising is essential for assuring students that the pro- 
grams of study they are pursuing include the requirements of their particular departments and 
desired degrees. It also assists in helping students make maximum use of the learning opportu- 
nities in the University and in helping them address academic problems. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Admission requirements for the College of Arts and Sciences are the same as those for the 
University. Requirements for graduation vary from department to department; therefore, stu- 
dents must be certain to satisfy departmental requirements. Students are responsible for meet- 
ing all academic requirements for graduation. 

UNIVERSITY STUDIES REQUIREMENTS 

University Studies is comprised of (13 credit hours) of foundation courses and (12 credit 
hours) of theme-based "problem-solving" courses. Students will be expected to complete their 
foundation courses in the freshman year, before taking the theme-based courses. 

In addition to the required University Studies courses, the College of Arts and Sciences also 
highly recommends that students enroll in the following courses which will further prepare 
students to enter the specialized programs of their university education, and to provide essen- 
tial elements of higher education not necessarily included in the students' specialties. 

Accordingly, the College of Arts and Sciences highly recommends students to take the 
following to enhance academic general knowledge: 

I. 3 cr. hrs. of English 101 (English Composition) + UNST 1 10 

II. 3 cr. hrs. of Arts or Humanities (can be met through the University Studies Theme 
Clusters) (Arts or Humanities may consist of Visual Arts, Music, Theatre, Dance, 
English, and Philosophy). 

III. 3 cr. hrs. of Mathematics (can be met through the University Studies Theme Clusters) 

IV. 4 cr. hrs. of laboratory science (can be met through the University Studies Theme 
Clusters) 

V 6 cr. hrs. of Foreign Languages 

Certain courses require specific prerequisites and certain majors require specific courses; 
therefore, students should be knowledgeable of departmental requirements when planning their 
courses of study. 

Students planning to enter teaching fields should also be knowledgeable about the semester 
hour requirements of these programs. 

Students should also be aware that satisfactory advanced placement scores and/or comparable 
experiential evidence may be used to satisfy some of the requirements for a baccalaureate 
degree. Students should consult the chairperson of their respective departments for information. 



145 



Department of Biology 

http://www.ncat.edu/~biology/ 



Goldie Smith Byrd, Chairperson 

OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the Biology Department are as follows: 

1 . to train professional biologists in the nature of scientific investigation, the principles of 
biology, and the value of scientific enterprise. 

2. to prepare students for career opportunities in research, industry, and government. 

3. to prepare students for graduate study in the biological sciences. 

4. to prepare students for admission to professional schools (i.e. medical, dental, and 
veterinary school). 

5. provide courses in biology that fulfill the general education core requirements of the 
University. 

6. to provide cognate courses for students majoring in or receiving certification in other 
fields including, but not limited to, agricultural sciences, home economics, nursing, 
horticulture, and physical education. 

7. to act as a resource to the University and community through cooperative programs, 
workshops, seminars, course offerings, and public service. 

8. to conduct research and scholarly activity in the areas of biology, biotechnology, 
computational biology, and biology education. 

9. to provide students with experience in the applications of computers in biological research. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Biology - Bachelor of Science 

Biology - Master of Science* 

Computational Science and Engineering - Master of Science* 

Energy and Environmental Studies - Doctor of Philosophy* 
* See the Graduate School Bulletin 

Students interested in pursuing the Bachelor of Science degree in the Department of Biol- 
ogy are advised that rigorous high school preparation is important to success. The Department 
strongly recommends that a prospective student's preparation include 5 units of high school 
science (including units in biology, chemistry and physics) and at least 1 unit of mathematics 
beyond Algebra II. 

GENERAL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

The admission of students to the undergraduate degree program in the Department of Biol- 
ogy is based upon the general admission requirements of the University. 



146 



DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Biology (Pre-Professional) - Students are required to complete a minimum of 1 25 hours for 
graduation. This includes a minimum of 47 semester hours of biology and 40 semester hours of 
supporting math and science courses. The remaining courses satisfy other requirements of the 
Department and University. 

ENRICHMENT PROGRAMS 

Several enrichment programs and activities are available to students in the department, which 
are designed to increase the knowledge and competitiveness of biology majors. They include: 

7. Departmental Seminars (including the Artis P. Graves Lecture Series and monthly de- 
partmental seminars). All students are encouraged to attend seminars presented by research 
scientists from industry, medical institutions, research laboratories and universities. 

2. Annual Life and Physical Sciences Research Symposium. The Department of Biology 
sponsors an annual research symposium to provide a forum for students and faculty mem- 
bers to present their research in poster and oral formats. The symposium is designed to 
increase student awareness of research opportunities and to facilitate interactions be- 
tween local students and faculty researchers with prominent scientists from other 
institutions including government, industry, and academia. 

3. Health Careers Opportunity Program. This program is a collaborative effort with the 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine designed to increase the 
number of underrepresented students entering the health professions. It focuses on aca- 
demic skills improvement, counseling, and mentoring. 

ENRICHMENT FACILITIES 

1. Herbarium (NCATG). A collection of approximately 6,000 specimens, several dozen of 
which were collected in the 1800's. NCATG is registered internationally. 

2. Computer Room. This satellite computer center, located in Barnes Hall, has 1 6-networked 
computers available for students. The room also houses printers and scanners for spe- 
cific student needs. 

3. Research Laboratories. The Department of Biology houses several state-of-the art re- 
search laboratories to support faculty and student research in molecular biology, 
biotechnology, microbiology, virology, ecology, and other biological sciences. In sup- 
port of research, the Department has a suite with transmission and scanning electron 
microscopes, an adjacent dark room, a cell tissue culture laboratory, plant growth cham- 
bers, a cold room and greenhouse. 

4. Lecture Facilities. The teaching facilities in the Department include a seminar room, 
auditorium, and a video-conferencing center equipped with state-of-the art computer and 
audiovisual technology. 



147 



RESEARCH & EXTRAMURAL FUNDING 

As is the standard in quality programs nationally, the department receives training and 
research support from Federal, State and private funding agencies to support its educational 
and research missions. Research areas in the department include: 

• Biotechnology 

• Bacteriology/Biochemistry 

• Cell & Molecular Biology 

• Virology/Immunology 

• Endocrinology/Biochemistry 

• Environmental Biology/Ecology 

• Developmental Biology 

• Experimental Plant Taxonomy/Floristics 

• Electron Microscopy 

• Plant Physiology 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

Due to the depth of required courses in biology and the breadth of support courses in the 
quantitative sciences, languages, humanities, the arts and others, Biology majors qualify for 
employment in many fields. Highly motivated graduates in biology compete successfully for 
entry into graduate and professional schools. Research careers in government and industry as 
well as jobs in technical and pharmaceutical sales, biotechnology, environmental science, and 
teacher education are some of the career opportunities available to majors in biology. 



148 



REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR BIOLOGY 

BIOL 101 BIOL 260 BIOL 466 

BIOL 160 BIOL 401 BIOL 501 (Capstone) 

BIOL 221 BIOL 410 BIOL 561 

BIOL 240 BIOL 462 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR BIOLOGY 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


BIOL 101 


4 


BIOL 160 


4 


CHEM 106 


3 


CHEM 107 


3 


CHEM 116 


1 


CHEM 117 


1 


UNST 110 


3 


HPED 101 ' 


1 


UNST 120 


3 


UNST 130 


3 


UNST 100 


1 


UNST 140 


3 




15 




15 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


BIOL 240 


4 


BIOL 221 


4 


CKEM 221 


3 


CHEM 222 


3 


CHEM 223 


2 


CHEM 224 


2 


MATH 131 2 


4 


MATH 132 


4 


UNST Elective 


3 


UNST Elective 


3 




16 




16 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


BIOL 401 


4 


BIOL 462 


4 


BIOL 466 


3 


BIOL 260 


4 


PHYS 241 


3 


PHYS 242 


3 


PHYS251 


1 


PHYS 252 


1 


MATH 231, 224, or 431 


3-4 


UNST Elective 


3 


UNST Elective 


3 

17-18 




15 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


BIOL 410 


3 


BIOL 501 (Capstone) 


3 


BIOL Elective 3 


3 


BIOL 561 


4 


BIOL Elective 3 


3 


CHEM 651 


3 


FOLA 100, 102, or 104 4 


3 


FOLA 101, 103, or 105 4 


3 


Free Elective 


3 


Free Elective 


3 




15 




16 



Total Credit Hours: 125-126 

' Substitute courses are accepted for HPED 101 upon approval of major advisor. 

2 Students not eligible to enter MATH 131 must complete MATH 110 prior to enrolling in MATH 131. 

3 Courses taken for Biology electives must be numbered 400 or above. 

4 Two consecutive courses in the same foreign language. 



149 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN BIOLOGY 

Undergraduate 

BIOL 100. Biological Science Credit 4(3-2) 

This is a general education course that stresses the objectives presented under the general 
education program of the University. This course stresses central concepts in biology includ- 
ing; basic chemical and physical phenomena, biochemistry, cell form and function, genetics, 
evolution, and multicellular organization. The laboratory will examine major biological con- 
cepts. Biological Science is not open to Biology majors. (F;S;SS) 

BIOL 101. Concepts of Biology Credit 4(3-2) 

This course is an introduction to science and the scientific method, basic biochemistry, cell 
structure and function, energy and metabolism, reproduction and genetics, evolution, life's 
diversity, and basic ecological principles for those students planning to enroll in additional 
major courses in the biological sciences. The laboratory will emphasize central biological con- 
cepts. Prerequisite: Credit or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 106 and 116. (F;S) 

BIOL 160. General Zoology Credit 4(3-2) 

This is an introductory study of structure, physiology and phylogeny of the major animal phyla. 
The laboratory emphasizes the comparative anatomy and taxonomy of the animals. Prerequi- 
site: BIOL 101. (F;S;SS) 

BIOL 220. Basic Microbiology Credit 4(2-4) 

This is an introduction to the fundamentals of microbiology and the role of microorganisms in 
daily life. Special emphasis is placed on infectious diseases and immunology. The laboratory 
introduces students to the principles of microscopy, specimen preparation for light micros- 
copy, aseptic techniques, cultivation techniques, and the biochemical activities of microorgan- 
isms. This course is not open to majors in Biology and Chemistry. Prerequisites: BIOL 100 or 
101; CHEM 104 or its equivalent. (F;S;SS) 

BIOL 221. General Microbiology Credit 4(2-4) 

This is an introduction to the basic principles of microbiology. Microbial ultrastructure, growth, 
metabolism, molecular genetics, diversity, infectious diseases, and immunology will be dis- 
cussed. The laboratory introduces students to the principles of microscopy, specimen prepara- 
tion for light microscopy, aseptic techniques, cultivation techniques, and the biochemical ac- 
tivities of microorganisms. Prerequisites: BIOL 101, CHEM 107 and 117. (F;S;SS) 

BIOL 240. General Botany Credit 4(2-4) 

Plants as living organisms constitute an integral part of man's environment. Emphasis is placed 
on the relationship between plant structure and function, the diversity of organisms tradition- 
ally classified as plants, and plant physiology. The laboratory will emphasize plant structure 
and function. Prerequisite: BIOL 101. (F;S) 

BIOL 260. Comparative Evolution of the Vertebrates Credit 4(2-4) 

This course is a comparative study of chordate organ systems with rather detailed emphasis on 
the evolution and organogenesis of primitive chordates, dogfish shark and the cat. The labora- 
tory emphasizes the comparative anatomy of representative chordates. Prerequisite: BIOL 101. 
(F;S) 

BIOL 361. Human Anatomy and Physiology Credit 4(2-4) 

This course is a study of the general structure and function of the human body. It is not open to 
Biology majors. The laboratory emphasizes human anatomy and major physiological processes. 
Prerequisites: BIOL 100, CHEM 104 or its equivalent. (F;SS) 



150 



BIOL 369. Human Anatomy Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is a general introduction to human anatomy. The laboratory emphasizes the funda- 
mental structure of the human body. This course is not open to Biology majors. Prerequisites: 
BIOL 100, CHEM 104 or its equivalent. (F;S;SS) 

BIOL 370. Human Physiology Credit 3(2-2) 

This is an introductory course with emphasis placed on basic principles and mechanisms of 
physiological functioning of body cells, tissues and systems. The laboratory emphasizes major 
physiological concepts. This course is not open to Biology majors. Prerequisite: BIOL 361 or 
369. (F;S;SS) 

BIOL 400. Field Biology Credit 3(2-2) 

This course emphasizes how ecological knowledge is acquired and communicated. Funda- 
mental techniques of sampling, numerical analysis, and the measurement of environmental 
factors will be studied using local aquatic and terrestrial communities. The laboratory empha- 
sizes the study of local biomes. Prerequisite: BIOL 410. (DEMAND) 

BIOL 401. Molecular Biology (Formerly BIOL 201) Credit 4(2-4) 

This course examines the molecular events in cell function using molecular genetics, cell biol- 
ogy, and fundamental biochemistry; using both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. The labo- 
ratory will emphasize fundamental techniques used in molecular biology. Prerequisites: BIOL 
101 and CHEM 107. (F) 

BIOL 410. Ecology (Formerly BIOL 310) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course surveys the major principles underlying the interactions between living organisms 
and their environment. Both plant and animal examples will be used to illustrate the basic 
ecological processes. Emphasis is placed on the characterization of different physical environ- 
ments; ecosystem processes such as ecological energetics and nutrient cycling; and current 
organismal concepts of adaptation, niche, population dynamics, life-history phenomena, 
organismal interactions and community organization. Major environmental issues concerning 
humans and their cultures will also be presented. Prerequisites: BIOL 101, CHEM 107 and 
117. (F) 

BIOL 430. Plant Taxonomy Credit 4(2-4) 

The fundamentals of taxonomy, botanical nomenclature and modern systematics are covered. 
An introduction to selected families and genera of vascular plants is included. The laboratory 
provides exposure to the common elements of the local flora and instruction in herbarium 
techniques. Prerequisite: BIOL 240. (DEMAND) 

BIOL 432. Plant Physiology Credit 4(2-4) 

This course is designed to develop a clear understanding of the basic physiological processes 
related to the structure, growth, and function of seed plants. The laboratory will emphasize 
major concepts in plant physiology. Prerequisites: BIOL 240 and CHEM 107. (DEMAND) 

BIOL 460. Invertebrate Zoology Credit 4(2-4) 

A comprehensive study of the morphology, function, phylogeny, classification and the life 
histories of representative forms of lower and higher invertebrate groups exclusive of insects. 
The laboratory emphasizes the functional morphology of the invertebrates. Prerequisite: BIOL 
160. (DEMAND) 

BIOL 461. Sociobiology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course stresses the biological basis of social behavior and the organization of animal 
societies. Prerequisite: BIOL 410. (DEMAND) 



151 



BIOL 462. Introductory Cell Physiology Credit 4(2-4) 

This course is a treatment at the molecular level of the fundamental processes of living cells. 
The biochemistry of cellular constituents, bioenergetics, intermediary metabolism, and the regu- 
latory mechanisms of the cell will be discussed. The laboratory will include exercises on the 
measurement of hydrogen ion activity, physical and chemical properties of macromolecules 
and membranes, chromatography, enzymes and enzyme kinetics, cell fractionation studies, 
and the use of spectrophotometry in the identification and characterization of cellular macro- 
molecules. Prerequisites: BIOL 401 and CHEM 222. (S) 

BIOL 465. Histology Credit 4(2-4) 

This course is a study of the microscopic anatomy of cells, tissues, and organs with special 
emphasis on normal histological structure and function. The laboratory emphasizes the major 
tissues. Prerequisite: BIOL 160. (DEMAND) 

BIOL 466. Principles of Genetics Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is a study of the traditional, classical areas of genetics as well as an introduction to 
gene action at the molecular level, including DNA and RNA structure, function and interac- 
tions in cellular systems. The laboratory features exercises with Drosophila. Prerequisite: BIOL 
401 and CHEM 221. (F) 

BIOL 467. General Entomology Credit 3(2-2) 

This course emphasizes the structure, description, and habits of the principal orders of insects. 
Laboratory work will consist of collecting, mounting, preserving, and classification of princi- 
pal insect representatives. Recommended for general science and biological science majors. 
Prerequisite: BIOL 160. (DEMAND) 

BIOL 468. Biology, Technology, and Ethics I Credit 1(0-2) 

This course evaluates recent technological advances in biology and how these advances impact 
societal issues and create ethical concerns. The course uses a seminar format. It is required for 
all undergraduate biology majors. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (F) 

BIOL 469. Biology, Technology, and Ethics II (Formerly BIOL 569) Credit 1(0-2) 

This seminar course is concerned with ethical issues in biology. It is required for all pre-profes- 
sional Biology majors. Prerequisite: BIOL 568. (S) 

BIOL 498. Independent Study Credit 1(0-2) 

Independent study under the direction of a faculty member. The submission of a written report 
is required. This course should be taken as a precursor to Undergraduate Research (BIOL 499) 
by students who plan to conduct their research on campus. Permission of instructor required. 
(F;S) 

BIOL 499. Undergraduate Research Credit 3 (0-6) 

Biological research under the direction of a faculty member. The research may be carried out in 
the department or as part of an internship in an off-campus academic or industrial setting. A 
written paper, an abstract, and an oral presentation open to the public are required. Limited to 
Biology majors with a 3.0 GPA overall and in the major. The student should register for the 
course the semester the research will be completed or in the fall for research done the previous 
summer. Permission of instructor required. (F;S) 

BIOL 501. Senior Project Credit 3(2-2) 

This course will require that students develop an independent hypothesis-based project in the 
area of biology. Each student will be required to submit a written paper followed by a public 
defense of the research project. Literature review, experimental design, hypothesis testing, data 
analysis, scientific writing and presentation will be major elements of the course. Prerequi- 
sites: Biology major, senior classification. (F,S) 



152 



BIOL 530. Plant Pathology Credit 4(2-4) 

This course is an introduction to the organisms and environmental conditions that cause dis- 
ease in plants, the disease cycle, the effects of diseases on host plants, the nature of plant 
resistance, and strategies for controlling plant disease. A survey of major pathogens and plant 
diseases with an emphasis on important agricultural and horticultural plants is included. The 
laboratory emphasizes the identification of plant pathogens. Prerequisite: BIOL 240. (DE- 
MAND) 

BIOL 561. Developmental Biology Credit 4(2-4) 

This course is an introduction to the cellular and molecular aspects of development in animal 
and plant systems. Laboratory exercises provide an introduction to techniques in classical ex- 
perimental embryology and modern developmental biology. Prerequisites: BIOL 401, 260. 
BIOL 462 is recommended. (S) 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

BIOL 610. Prokaryotic Biology Credit 4(2-4) 

This course is a survey of the taxonomy, classification, ultrastructure, reproduction, physiol- 
ogy, and ecology of selected bacteria and bacteriophages. The laboratory will emphasize self- 
instruction and independent study. Prerequisites: BIOL 220 or 221 and BIOL 466. (DEMAND) 

BIOL 620. Food Microbiology (Formerly BIOL 420) Credit 4(2-4) 

This is a survey of selected topics in food microbiology. The course will cover the metabolic 
pathways, organisms and processes involved with food production from fermented dairy prod- 
ucts, vegetables, fruits and meats. Food spoilage, preservation, infection, and intoxication will 
also be discussed. The laboratory will introduce students to the microorganisms involved with 
food production and spoilage. Prerequisite: BIOL 220 or 221. (F) 

BIOL 621. Soil Microbiology (Formerly BIOL 421) Credit 4(2-4) 

This is a study of the major groups of soil organisms including their classification and relation 
to soil environments. The abundance, significance, and functions of soil microorganisms as 
well as their role in chemical cycles in soil will be discussed. The laboratory will emphasize 
methods for studying soil microbes. Prerequisite: BIOL 220 or 221. (S) 

BIOL 630. Molecular Genetics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will examine DNA and RNA structure, function, and processing in prokaryotic 
and eukaryotic systems. Various aspects of recombinant DNA technology will be examined. 
Prerequisites: BIOL 401 and 466. (DEMAND) 

BIOL 631. Endocrine Physiology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will provide a basic introduction to endocrine function and include recent ad- 
vances in the field of endocrinology. Emphasis will be placed on general aspects of endocrine 
physiology, the organization of the endocrine system, mechanisms of hormone action, and 
control of endocrine secretion. Prerequisites: BIOL 401 and 462. (DEMAND) 



153 



BIOL 640. Introduction to Bioinformatics and Genomics Research Credit 3(1-4) 

The purpose of this course is to provide integrative experiences in computer and bench re- 
search in bioinformatics and genomic science. Students will acquire hands-on experiences 
with web-based software and the tools research scientists are using to study the genomes of 
plants, microbes, humans and other organisms. They will input experimental data into one or 
more of these databases to perform genetic analyses for making predictions about gene iden- 
tity, structure, function, similarities and phylogenetic relationships. They will also use the da- 
tabases to develop biochips, probes and primers for various laboratory applications. The inte- 
grative benchwork will involve testing results from database queries in the laboratory. This 
course will merge education and research and where possible, engage students in investigative 
activities that involve collaborations with scientists on and off the campus. Prerequisites: BIOL 
401 and 466. (F;S) 

BIOL 642. Special Problems in Biology Credit 3(2-2) 

This course offers laboratory research projects on specific problems in biology for advanced 
students. The lecture portion of the course will emphasize central concepts in the research area. 
Prerequisites: BIOL 462, or 466 or permission of instructor and advisor. (DEMAND) 

BIOL 650. Frontiers in Molecular Biology Credit 4(2-4) 

This course focuses on the theory, methods, and applications of recombinant DNA technology. 
It includes special topics in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology. The laboratory 
will provide hands-on exposure to the polymerase chain reaction, gene sequencing, develop- 
ment of gene libraries, and other techniques in molecular biology. (DEMAND) 

BIOL 661. Mammalian Biology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the evolutionary history, classification, adaptation and variation of 
representative mammals. Prerequisites: BIOL 160 and 260. (DEMAND) 

BIOL 665. Evolution Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will emphasize the genetics of populations and sources of genetic variation; causes 
of genetic change in populations including natural selection; speciation; and the evolutionary 
history of life on earth. Prerequisites: BIOL 410 and 466. (DEMAND) 

BIOL 667. Animal Physiology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will provide students with an understanding of the current state of animal physiol- 
ogy at the level of the whole organism and its component organs and organ systems. Emphasis 
will be placed on function as it relates to survival of organisms in natural environments and on 
the regulation of homeostatic mechanisms. Topics would include metabolism, temperature regu- 
lation, reproductive mechanisms, circulation, gaseous exchange, nutrient processing, osmo- 
regulation and ionic balance. Prerequisites: BIOL 160 and 462. (DEMAND) 

BIOL 668. Animal Behavior Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the qualitative and quantitative difference between behavioral charac- 
teristics at different evolutionary level. Adapativeness of differences in behavior and the devel- 
opment of behavior will be emphasized. Prerequisites: BIOL 410 and 466. (DEMAND) 

BIOL 671. Principles and Practices of Immunology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of mammalian immune responses; particularly in humans. Special em- 
phasis will be placed on the physiology, genetics, and regulation of immune responses. Interre- 
lationships between nonspecific and specific immune reactions, humoral and cell-mediated 
immunity, effector cells, and diseases are also stressed along with research and diagnostic 
methodologies. Prerequisites: BIOL 221, 466; CHEM 221, 222. (S) 



154 



BIOL 681. Statistical Methods for Research Credit 3(3-0) 

Introductory statistical methods for biological research including: descriptive statistics, prob- 
ability distributions (binomial, normal, student's t-distribution), parametric and non-paramet- 
ric hypothesis tests, confidence intervals, chi-square tests/contingency table analysis, introduc- 
tion to one-way ANOVA, and bivariate regression. Laboratory exercises will provide the stu- 
dent with experience using statistical software packages for data analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 
224or231.(F,S) 



155 



DIRECTORY OF FACULTY 

David W. Aldridge Professor and Associate Dean for 

Research and Graduate Programs 

B.S., M.A., University of Texas-Arlington; Ph.D., Syracuse University; Postdoctoral, 
Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratories 

Goldie Smith Byrd Professor and Chairperson 

B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Meharry Medical College; Postdoctoral, 
Meharry Medical College 

Roy Coomans Associate Professor 

B.S., Eckerd College; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Doretha B. Foushee Associate Professor 

B.S., Shaw University; M.S., North Carolina Central University; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland 

Joseph L. Graves, Jr. Professor and Dean for 

Division of University of Studies 

A.B., Oberlin College; M.S., University of Lowell; Ph.D., Wayne State University 

Gregory D. Goins Research Assistant Professor 

B.S., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State 
University 

Andrew G. Goliszek Associate Professor 

B.S., University of West Florida; M.S., Ph.D., Utah State University; Postdoctoral, Wake 
Forest University 

Ethel J. Gordon Associate Professor 

B.A., Southern Illinois University; M.S., Northeastern University; Ph.D., Rutgers 
University 

Rita A. Hagevik Assistant Professor 

B.S., Meredith College; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State University 

Minnie Holmes-McNary Associate Professor 

B.S., B.A., University of Illinois at Springfield; Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign 

Thomas L. Jordan Associate Professor 

B.A., Rockhurst College; M.S., University of Washington-Seattle; Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin-Madison 

Vinaya A. Kelkar Research Assistant Professor 

B.S., Gujarat University-India; M.S., Old Dominion University; Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro 

Perry V. Mack Pre-Health Advisor 

B.S., South Carolina State College; M.S., North Carolina Central University; Ed.D., 
Rutgers University, Extramural Associate, N.I.H.-Bethesda 



156 



Mary A. Smith Associate Professor and Associate Chairperson 

B.S., M.S. Morgan State University; Ph.D. Cornell University; Postdoctorals, Cornell 
University and Michigan State University 

Joseph J. Whittaker Associate Professor 

A.B., Talladega College; Ph.D., Meharry Medical College; Postdoctorals, Purdue 
University and Washington University 



157 



Department of Chemistry 

http://www.chem.ncat.edu/ 



Debasish Kuila, Chairperson 

OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the Department of Chemistry are as follows: 

1. to prepare chemistry majors for graduate study in chemistry or other chemistry-based 

sciences; 

2. to prepare majors for admittance to medical, dental, and other professional schools; 

3. to prepare majors for careers as professional chemists; 

4. to prepare majors to teach chemistry at the secondary school level; 

5. to provide majors in other departments with a functional understanding of chemistry 
commensurate with the needs of their chosen fields; 

6. to provide all students served by the department with an insight into the nature of scien- 
tific investigations and the scientific enterprise in general; 

7. to offer for graduate students learning experiences and research leading to a M.S. Degree 
in chemistry; 

8. to offer learning experiences and research leading to a M.S. Degree in education with a 
concentration in chemistry; 

9. to share the resources (human and physical) of the department with the local and aca- 
demic community through cooperative programs, workshops, seminars, course offerings, 
etc.; and 

10. to contribute to the extension of basic knowledge in chemistry and related sciences through 
applied and basic research, educational experimentation, publications, etc. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Chemistry - Bachelor of Science 

Chemistry - Masters of Science* 

Computational Science and Engineering - Master of Science* 

Energy and Environmental Studies - Doctor of Philosophy* 

* See the Graduate School Bulletin 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

Chemistry Major - the professional major in chemistry must complete 124 semester hours 
of University courses. The student may select one of three options in order to complete the 
professional major. The options are The American Chemical Society (ACS) Certified Program, 
Biochemistry Program, Research Program or the Pre-Health Program. The ACS program re- 
quires the student to complete 45 semester hours in basic chemistry courses and six to eight 
hours in advanced chemistry courses of which three hours must be Chemistry 503 or 504. The 
Biochemistry Program requires the student to compete 45 semester hours in basic chemistry 
courses, six to eight hours in advanced chemistry courses and 16 semester hours of basic biol- 
ogy courses. The Research Program requires the student to compete 45 semester hours in basic 
chemistry courses, three hours in advanced chemistry courses and 25 credits in research based 
courses. The Pre-Health Program requires the student to complete 45 semester hours in basic 






158 



chemistry courses and 16 semester hours of basic biology courses. A minimum grade of "C" 
must be achieved in all basic chemistry courses. 

Bachelor of Science/Master of Science in Chemistry - The curricula are identical in the first 
two years to the professional major's program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree. It is 
designed to enable talented undergraduate students to obtain the B.S. and M.S. degrees, in 
chemistry during a five year period of study and research. Any rising junior in chemistry with 
a grade point average of 3.0 in chemistry and 2.7 overall average is eligible. 

ACCREDITATION 

The professional curriculum (ACS Certified Program) is accredited by the American Chemi- 
cal Society. All Teacher Education Programs are accredited by the National Council for Ac- 
creditation of Teacher Education and approved by the North Carolina State Department of 
Public Instruction. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

B.S. level graduates in chemistry qualify for employment in many fields. There are many 
career opportunities for chemists in education, government, and industry. 

In industry, the chemistry graduate with a B.S. degree may be employed in manufacturing- 
plant management, research and development, product development, technical sales, market- 
ing, etc. B.S. level chemists work in research at federal, state, municipal, and university labora- 
tories. 

The B.S. degree program prepares students to pursue graduate study in chemistry or other 
chemistry-based sciences (biochemistry, pharmacology, physiology, chemical physics, mate- 
rial science, etc.), medicine, dentistry, and other health professional areas. 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR CHEMISTRY 



CHEM 106 
CHEM 107 
CHEM 108 
CHEM 116 
CHEM 117 
CHEM 221 
CHEM 222 
CHEM 223 



CHEM 224 
CHEM 231 
CHEM 232 
CHEM 431 
CHEM 432 
CHEM 441 
CHEM 442 



CHEM 443 
CHEM 444 
CHEM 451 
CHEM 452 
CHEM 511 
CHEM 545 
CHEM 610 



159 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR PROFESSIONAL CHEMISTRY 

(Option: ACS Certified) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 106 


3 CHEM 107 


3 


CHEM 108/UNST 100 


1 CHEM 117/CHEM 190 


1 


CHEM 116 


1 MATH 132 


4 


UNST110 


3 UNST 130 


3 


UNST 120 


3 UNST 140 


3 


MATH 131 ' 


4 PHED 2 


1 


PHED 2 


1 
16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 


15 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 221 


3 CHEM 222 


3 


CHEM 223 


2 CHEM 231 


3 


MATH 231 


4 CHEM 232 


2 


PHYS 241 


3 PHYS 242 


3 


PHYS 251 


1 PHYS 252 


1 


BIOL 101 


4 Biology Elective 5 


3 




17 


15 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 441 


3 CHEM 442 


3 


CHEM 224 


2 CHEM 443 


1 


CHEM 451 


3 CHEM 511 


3 


CHEM 452 


2 FOLA 4 


3 


UNST Electives 


6 UNST Electives 


6 




16 


16 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 431 


3 CHEM 503/ CHEM 504 




CHEM 432 


2 (UNST CAPSTONE) 5 


4 


CHEM 444 


1 Electives 


10 


CHEM 545 


3 CHEM 610 


2 


Advanced Chem. Electives 5 


3-4 


16 


FOLA 4 


3 
15-16 





Total Credit Hours: 126-127 

' Courses which may be taken as social science electives and meet the African/African American and/or Global 
studies requirement: HIST 100, 101, 215, 216, 201, 202, 412, 416, SOWK414, COMM 302. 

2 Students not eligible to enter MATH 131 must complete MATH 110 prior to enrolling in MATH 131. 

3 PHED 200 may be substituted for the two courses in Physical Education. 

4 Courses which may be taken as humanities electives: ENGL 200, 201, 333. 

5 Choice of any biology course that requires BIOL 101 as a prerequisite. 

6 Two consecutive courses in the same foreign language. 

7 To be selected from CHEM 611, 621, 631, 641, 643, 651,652 and 503 or 504. 



160 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR PROFESSIONAL CHEMISTRY 
(Option: Pre-Health) 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 106 


3 


CHEM 107 


3 


CHEM 108/UNST 100 


1 


CHEM 117/CHEM 190 


1 


CHEM 116 


1 


MATH 132 


4 


UNST 110 


3 


UNST 130 


3 


UNST 120 


3 


UNST 140 


3 


MATH 131 1 


4 


PHED 2 


1 


PHED 2 


1 
16 




15 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 221 


3 


CHEM 222 


3 


CHEM 223 


2 


CHEM 231 


3 


MATH 231 


4 


CHEM 232 


2 


PHYS 241 


3 


PHYS 242 


3 


PHYS251 


1 


PHYS 252 


1 


UNST Electives 


3 


BIOL 101 


4 




16 




16 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 441 


3 


CHEM 442 


3 


CHEM 224 


2 


CHEM 443 


1 


CHEM 451 


3 


CHEM 511 


3 


CHEM 452 


2 


FOLA 3 


3 


BIOL 260 


4 


UNST Electives 


6 


UNST Electives 


3 
17 




16 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 431 


3 


CHEM 651 


3 


CHEM 432 


2 


CHEM 652 


2 


CHEM 444 


1 


CHEM 610 


3 


PSYC 320 


3 


BIOL 561 


4 


BIOL 401 


4 


CHEM 503/ CHEM 504 




FOLA 3 


3 


(UNST CAPSTONE) 4 


4 




16 




16 



Total Credit Hours: 128 

' Courses which may be taken as social science electives and meet the African/African American and/or Global 
studies requirement: HIST 100, 101, 215, 216, 201, 202, 412, 416, SOWK414, COMM 302. 

2 Students not eligible to enter MATH 131 must complete MATH 110 prior to enrolling in MATH 131. 

3 PHED 200 may be substituted for the two courses in Physical Education. 

4 Courses which may be taken as humanities electives: ENGL 200, 201, 333. 

5 Two consecutive courses in the same foreign language. 

6 Choice of any biology course that requires BIOL 101 as a prerequisite. 

7 To be selected from CHEM 611, 621, 631, 641, 643, 651, 652 and 503 or 504. 



161 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM CHEMISTRY 





(Option: Biochemistry) 






FRESHMAN YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 106 


3 CHEM 107 


3 


CHEM 108/UNST 100 


1 CHEM 117/CHEM 190 


1 


CHEM 116 


1 MATH 132 


4 


UNST110 


3 UNST 130 


3 


UNST 120 


3 UNST 140 


3 


MATH 131 1 


4 PHED 2 


1 


PHED 2 


1 
16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 


15 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 221 


3 CHEM 222 


3 


CHEM 223 


2 CHEM 231 


3 


MATH 231 


4 CHEM 232 


2 


PHYS 241 


3 PHYS 242 


3 


PHYS251 


1 PHYS 252 


1 


BIOL 101 


4 UNST Electives 


3 




17 


15 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 441 


3 CHEM 442 


3 


CHEM 224 


2 CHEM 443 


1 


CHEM 451 


3 CHEM 511 


3 


CHEM 452 


2 UNST Electives 


6 


UNST Electives 


3 BIOL 221 


4 


BIOL 401 


4 
17 

SENIOR YEAR 


17 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 431 


3 CHEM 651 


3 


CHEM 432 


2 CHEM 652 


2 


CHEM 444 


1 CHEM 503/ CHEM 504 (UNST 




Advanced Chem. Elective 3 


3-4 CAPSTONE) 4 


4 


BIOL 466 


3 FOLA 4 


3 


FOLA 4 


3 CHEM 610 


3 




15-16 


15 



Total Credit Hours: 127-128 

' Students not eligible to enter MATH 131 must complete MATH 1 10 prior to enrolling in MATH 131. 

2 PHED 200 may be substituted for the two courses in Physical Education. 

3 To be selected from CHEM 611, 621, 631, 641, 643, 651, 652 and 503 or 504. 

4 Two consecutive courses in the same foreign language. 



162 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR PROFESSIONAL CHEMISTRY 
(Option: Research) 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 106 


3 CHEM 107 


3 


CHEM 108/UNST 100 


1 CHEM 190 


1 


CHEM 116 


1 MATH 132 


4 


UNST 110 


3 UNST 130 


3 


UNST 120 


3 UNST 140 


3 


MATH 131 1 


4 PHED 2 


1 


PHED 2 


1 
16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 


15 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 221 


3 CHEM 222 


3 


CHEM 223 


2 CHEM 231 


3 


CHEM 290 


3 CHEM 232 


2 


PHYS 241 


3 CHEM 291 


3 


PHYS251 


1 PHYS 242 


3 


BIOL 101 


4 PHYS 252 


1 




16 


15 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 224 


2 CHEM 391 


3 


CHEM 390 


3 CHEM 442 


3 


CHEM 441 


3 CHEM 443 


1 


CHEM 451 


3 CHEM 511 


3 


CHEM 452 


2 UNST Electives 


6 


UNST Electives 


3 
16 

SENIOR YEAR 


16 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


CHEM 431 


3 CHEM 491 


3 


CHEM 432 


2 CHEM 499 (UNST CAPSTONE) 


3 


CHEM 444 


1 CHEM 501 (Seminar) 


1 


CHEM 490 


3 CHEM 610 


2 


UNST Electives 


3 Electives (Advance Chem.) 4 


3-4 


FOLA 3 


3 FOLA 3 


3 




15 


15-16 



Total Credit Hours: 124-125 

' Students not eligible to enter MATH 131 must complete MATH 110 prior to enrolling in MATH 131. 

2 PHED 200 may be substituted for the two courses in Physical Education. 

3 Two consecutive courses in the same foreign language. 

4 To be selected from CHEM 611, 621, 631, 641, 643, 651,652. CHEM 503 or 504 required. 

B.S./M.S. CURRICULA 

Additional required Chemistry courses beyond the B.S. level are: CHEM 611, 701, 702, 
722, 732, 743 or 749, 799, and 5 hours from among 600 and 700 level chemistry courses. 



163 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN CHEMISTRY 

CHEM 099. Introductory Chemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

This course emphasizes basic methods and concepts in chemistry with emphasis on solving 
chemistry problems. It is a recommended first course in chemistry for students having little or 
no background in high school chemistry. May be used as preparation for CHEM 101, 104, or 
106. (F;S) 

CHEM 100. Physical Science* Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a one semester introductory course designed to make clear the nature of science as an 
enterprise and illustrate by numerous examples how science really proceeds. Learning 
experiences are constructed so that they closely approximate real life situations where one has 
to search for clues and insights from a variety of sources. This course is not open to students 
who have received credit for CHEM 101, 102, 104, 105, 106, or 107. (F;S;SS) 

CHEM 104. General Chemistry IV* Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an introduction to fundamental techniques and concepts in chemistry, including 
writing and interpretation of symbols, formulas, equations, atomic structure, composition and 
reactions of inorganic compounds. This course is not open to majors in chemistry, physics, 
biology, mathematics and engineering. Corequisite: CHEM 1 14. (F;S;SS) 

CHEM 106. General Chemistry VI* Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a course which emphasizes basic principles and important theoretical concepts of 
chemistry. Topics will include atomic structure, electronic configuration, the wave mechanical 
model of the atom, chemical bonding, states of matter, chemical equilibria, systems of acids 
and bases, and electrochemistry. Prerequisites: 2 units of high school algebra or equivalent, 
and 1 unit of high school chemistry or CHEM 099. Corequisite: CHEM 116. (F;S;SS) 

CHEM 107. General Chemistry VII* Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of CHEM 106. It includes chemistry of important metals and 
nonmetals and a rigorous treatment of qualitative inorganic analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM 106 
or equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 117. (F;S;SS) 

CHEM 108. Chemistry Orientation Credit 1(1-0) 

This course is a series of lectures and discussions on the nature and requirements of die chemical 
profession the application of chemistry to modern living, and other selected topics. (F) 

CHEM 110. Physical Science Laboratory Credit 1(0-2) 

This is a laboratory course designed to bring students into working contact with the essential 
aspects of scientific experiences. In this course the student develops concrete ideas about the 
operational meaning of the scientific method and problem solving. Corequisite: CHEM 100. 
This course is not open to students who have received credit for CHEM 1 14, 1 15, 1 16, or 1 17. 
(F;S;SS) 

CHEM 114. General Chemistry IV Laboratory Credit 1(0-3) 

This course is a study of inorganic reaction and substances and their relation to the processes. 
Corequisite: CHEM 104. (F;S;SS) 

CHEM 116. General Chemistry VI Laboratory Credit 1(0-3) 

This is a course which emphasizes quantitative studies of chemical reactions such as acid-base 
studies, redox reactions, and equilibrium reactions. Emphasis is also placed on the development 
of manipulative skills in the laboratory. Corequisite: CHEM 106. (F;S;SS) 

CHEM 117. General Chemistry VII Laboratory* Credit 1(0-3) 

This is a continuation of CHEM 1 16 with an introduction to qualitative analysis. Corequisite: 
CHEM 107. Prerequisite: CHEM 116. (F;S;SS) 



164 



CHEM 190. Introduction to Chemical Research Credit 1(0-3) 

This course is an introduction to basic concepts of research, involving multi-step experiments 
and discussion of research opportunities. (F;S) 

CHEM 210. Cooperative Experience I Credit 2(2-0) 

This course is a supervised learning experience in a specified private or governmental chemical 
facility. The student's performance will be evaluated by reports from the supervisor of the 
experience and the departmental staff. The student must present a seminar regarding the 
experience upon return to the University. (F;S;SS) 

CHEM 221. Organic Chemistry I* Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the hydrocarbons (aliphatic and aromatic) and introduction to their 
derivatives. Prerequisite: CHEM 102, 105, or 107. (F;S;SS) 

CHEM 222. Organic Chemistry II* Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of the study of derivatives of hydrocarbons and more complex 
compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 221. (F;S;SS) 

CHEM 223. Organic Chemistry I Laboratory* Credit 2(0-4) 

This laboratory course emphasizes the study of physical and chemical properties of aliphatic 
and aromatic compounds. Modern instrumentation such as gas and column chromatography, 
infrared and ultraviolet analyses are used. Corequisite: CHEM 221. (F;S;SS) 

CHEM 224. Organic Chemistry II Laboratory* Credit 2(0-6) 

This course is a continuation of Chemistry CHEM. However, more emphasis is placed on 
syntheses and qualitative analysis of organic compounds. Corequisite: CHEM 222. (F;S;SS) 

CHEM 231. Quantitative Analysis I Credit 3(3-0) 

Titrimetric and gravimetric analyses including theory and calculations associated with acid- 
base equilibria, oxidation reduction, nucleation, and precipitation-complexation processes will 
be covered in this course. Corequisite: MATH 131. Prerequisite: CHEM 102 or 107. (S) 

CHEM 232. Quantitative Analysis I Laboratory* Credit 2(0-4) 

This laboratory course emphasizes the basic principles of chemical separations. Laboratory 
studies of gravimetric and titrimetric analyses are also encountered. Corequisite: CHEM 231. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 117. (S) 

CHEM 251. Elementary Biochemistry Credit 2(2-0) 

This course is a study of fundamental cellular constituents. Emphasis is placed on physiological 
applications and analyses. Prerequisite: CHEM 105 or 221. Corequisite: CHEM 252. This 
course is open to nonchemistry majors only. (F) 

CHEM 252. Elementary Biochemistry Laboratory* Credit 1(0-3) 

Elementary biochemical reactions are studied with emphasis placed on applications to biology, 
home economics and nursing. Prerequisite: CHEM 115 or 223. Corequisite: CHEM 251. (F) 

CHEM 290. Methods in Chemical Research I Credit 3(1-4) 

This course is designed to provide basic research skills in the areas of analytical, inorganic, 
organic, physical, and biochemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 190. (F;S) 

CHEM 291. Methods in Chemical Research II Credit 3(0-6) 

This course emphasizes the development of the skills required to perform an independent research 
project. Students will work closely with faculty to understand research literature, writing a 
comprehensive research report and using graphics and statistical packages to enhance their 
report. Prerequisite: CHEM 290. (F;S) 



165 



CHEM 301. Current Trends in Chemistry Credit 2(2-0) 

This course is a series of lectures and discussions on special problems in chemistry and of the 
chemical profession not covered in formal courses. (F;S) 

CHEM 310. Cooperative Experience II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a supervised learning experience in a specified private or governmental chemical 
facility. The student's performance will be evaluated by reports from the supervisor of the 
experience and the departmental staff. The student must present a seminar regarding the 
experience upon return to the University. (F;S;SS) 

CHEM 390. Research in Chemistry and Biochemistry I Credit 3(0-6) 

This course will provide directed research involving one-on-one interaction between faculty 
mentor and student researcher. In consultation with the faculty mentor, the student will devise 
a research plan and implement aspects of the plan during the semester. Prerequisite: CHEM 
291. (F;S) 

CHEM 391. Research in Chemistry and Biochemistry II Credit 3(0-6) 

This course is a continuation of CHEM 390. In consultation with the faculty mentor, the student 
will further implement aspects of the research plan devised in CHEM 390. Prerequisite: CHEM 
390. (F;S) 

CHEM 431. Quantitative Analysis II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the theory and the operational features of some of the more important 
instruments that are currently being used as analytical tools such as ultraviolet, visible-light, 
and infrared spectrophotometers, electro-analytical instruments, thermometric titrators, 
fluorimeters, etc. Prerequisite: CHEM 441. Corequisite: CHEM 442, 444. (F) 

CHEM 432. Quantitative Analysis II Lab Credit 2(0-4) 

This laboratory course features the utilization of modern instruments such as ultraviolet, visible 
and infrared, and atomic absorption spectrophotometers, chromatographs (gas-liquid and liquid), 
electroanalyzer, and electrophoretic analyzer. Corequisite: CHEM 43 1 . (F) 

CHEM 441. Physical Chemistry I Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the fundamental laws governing matter in the gaseous state, and the 
laws of thermodynamics and their applications to chemistry; it includes an introduction to 
statistical thermodynamics. Prerequisites: MATH 132, PHYS 241 and CHEM 231. (F;S) 

CHEM 442. Physical Chemistry II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of CHEM 44 1 . Solid and liquid states, solutions, phase equilibria, 
chemical kinetics, and electrochemistry will be studied. Prerequisite: CHEM 441. (S) 

CHEM 443. Physical Chemistry I Laboratory* Credit 1(0-3) 

Thermodynamic and kinetic studies are emphasized in this course. Corequisite: CHEM 441. (F;S) 

CHEM 444. Physical Chemistry II Laboratory* Credit 1(0-3) 

This is a continuation of CHEM 443. Corequisite: CHEM 442. (S) 

CHEM 451. Biotechniques in Biochemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will emphasize the fundamental concepts and basic principles of biological 
chemistry. Topics will include acid-base properties of amino acids, protein structure and function, 
kinetic analysis of enzymatic reactions, isolation and characterization of biomolecules, 
recombinant DNA technology, and computer graphics and structure calculations. Prerequisite: 
CHEM 222 or permission of the instructor. (F) 

CHEM 452. Biotechniques in Biochemistry Laboratory Credit 2(0-6) 

This is a laboratory course that introduces the basic principles, technologies, and instrumenta- 
tion of current biochemical reserach. Students will acquire practical experiences, and applica- 



166 



tion skills for the isolation and characterization of biomolecules. The course will encompass 
spectroscopic, chromatographic, electrophoretic, and recombinant DNA technologies. Error 
analysis and statistical analysis of experimental data will be included. Prerequisites: CHEM 
224 and 252, or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: CHEM 451. (F) 

CHEM 490. Research in Chemistry and Biochemistry III Credit 3(0-6) 

This course will provide directed research involving one-on-one interaction between faculty 
mentor and student researcher. The student will perform research on state-of-the-art instruments 
corresponding to his/her research project. Students will be encouraged to make preparation to 
present research results at national and/or regional meetings of the American Chemical Society 
(ACS) or National Organization of Black Chemist and Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE). 
Prerequisite: CHEM 391. (F;S) 

CHEM 491. Research in Chemistry and Biochemistry IV Credit 3(0-6) 

This course is a continuation of CHEM 490. Student will continue his/her directed research. 
Student will be expected to make a presentation at a state, regional, or national meeting. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 490. (F;S) 

CHEM 499. Chemistry Thesis Credit 3(0-6) 

In this course the student will write a thesis in consultation with the faculty mentor. The student 
will give an oral presentation with visual aids and defend the work that has been performed. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 491 or permission of the instructor. (F;S) 

CHEM 501. Seminar Credit 1(1-0) 

In this course the student will choose a research paper from the literature, critically analyze the 
paper and make an oral presentation with visual aids to the faculty and students. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. (F;S) 

CHEM 503. Chemical Research Credit 4(0-10) 

This course makes use of the laboratory and library facilities in studying minor problems of 
research. Students will submit a written report and make an oral presentation with visual aids. 
Prerequisites: Advanced standing and permission of the Department. (F;S;SS) 

CHEM 504. Independent Study Credit 4(0-10) 

This course involves independent study or research in a particular area of chemistry. Students 
will submit a written report and make an oral presentation with visual aids. Prerequisites: 
Permission of the department and advanced standing. (F;S;SS) 

CHEM 511. Inorganic Chemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an introductory survey of structure and bonding in inorganic compounds; 
coordination compounds of the transition metals; donor- acceptor interactions; bonding theories. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 441. Corequisite: CHEM 442. (S) 

CHEM 545. Physical Chemistry HI Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of quantum chemistry and its application to studies of atomic and molecular 
structure. Prerequisite: CHEM 442. (S) 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

CHEM 610. Inorganic Synthesis Credit 2(1-3) 

A discussion of theoretical principles of synthesis and development of physical-analytical 
techniques in the synthesis of inorganic substances will take place in this course. Prerequisite: 
One year of physical chemistry. (S) 

CHEM 611. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a course in the theoretical approach to the systematization of inorganic chemistry. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 442. (F) 

167 



CHEM 621. Intermediate Organic Chemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

This course provides an in-depth examination of various organic mechanisms, reactions, 
structures, and kinetics. Prerequisites: CHEM 222 and CHEM 442. (F) 

CHEM 624. Qualitative Organic Chemistry Credit 5(3-6) 

This is a course in the systematic identification of organic compounds. Prerequisite: One year 
of Organic Chemistry. (S) 

CHEM 631. Electroanalytical Chemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the theory and practice of polarography, chronopotentiomnetry, potential 
sweep chronoampereometry and electrodeposition. The theory of diffusion and electrode kinetics 
will also be discussed along with the factors which influence rate processes, the double layer, 
adsorption and catalytic reactions. Prerequisite: CHEM 431 or equivalent. (F) 

CHEM 641. Radiochemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the fundamental concepts, processes, and applications of nuclear 
chemistry, including natural and artificial radioactivity, sources, and chemistry of the 
radioelements. Open to advanced majors and others with sufficient background in chemistry 
and physics. Prerequisite: CHEM 442 or PHYS 406. (S) 

CHEM 642. Radioisotope Techniques and Applications Credit 2(1-3) 

The techniques of measuring and handling radioisotopes and their use in chemistry, biology, 
and other fields will be studied. Open to majors and non-majors. Prerequisite: CHEM 107. (F) 

CHEM 643. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics Credit 3(3-0) 

Non-relativistic wave mechanics and its application to simple systems by means of the operator 
formulation will be studied. Prerequisites: CHEM 442 and PHYS 222. Corequisite: MATH 

231. (S) 

CHEM 651. General Biochemistry Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a study of modern biochemistry. The course emphasizes chemical kinetics and energetics 
associated with biological reactions and includes a study of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, 
vitamins, nucleic acids, hormones, photosynthesis, and respiration. Prerequisites: CHEM 431, 
442 and 451. (S) 

CHEM 652. General Chemistry Laboratory Credit 2(0-6) 

This is a companion laboratory to CHEM 651. Experimentation will include isolation and 
characterization of biochemical substances and studies of physical properties. Students will be 
introduced to a variety of techniques including high performance liquid chromatography, 
electrophoresis, and centrifugation. Corequisite: CHEM 651. (S) 
* Students are required to purchase supplemental materials for these general education courses. 



168 



DIRECTORY OF FACULTY 
William K. Adeniyi Associate Professor 

B.S., Hampton Institute M.S., Loyola University; Ph.D., Baylor University 

Zerihun Assefa Assistant Professor 

B.Sc., Addis Ababa University, Ph.D., University of Maine 

Adedoyin Adeyiga Adjunct Assistant Professor 

B.S, Christopher Newport University; Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University 

Igbal Ahmad Adjunct Instructor 

B.Sc., M.Sc, University of Karachi; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University 

Mufeed Basti Associate Professor 

B.S., Baath University; Ph.D., Northern Illinois University 

Robert E. Boyd Adjunct Professor 

B.A., Tennessee State University, M.A., Fisk University, Ph.D., University of Rhode Island 

Jahangir Emrani Adjunct Professor 

B.Sc, Teachers University, M.Sc, Pahlavi University, Ph.D., Indiana University 

J. Dennis Ergle Adjunct Professor 

B.S., University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Ph.D., University of South Carolina. 

Alexandra Faza Adjunct Instructor 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University. 

Marion Franks Assistant Professor 

B.S., Clark-Atlanta University, Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 

Etta C. Gravely Associate Professor 

B.S., Howard University; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ed.D., University of 
North Carolina at Greensboro 

Rhonda W. Graves Adjunct Instructor 

B.S., Medical University of South Carolina, M.B.A., University of Southern California 

Vallie Guthrie Associate Professor 

B.S., North Carolina A&T State University, M.S., Fisk University; Ed.D., American University 

Julius L. Harp Associate Professor 

B.S., York College; Ph.D., Howard University 

Sadou Ibrahim Adjunct Instructor 

B.S., Usman Danfodio University, M.S., University of Maiduavri. 

Margaret Kanipes Associate Professor 

B.S., North Carolina A&T State University, Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University 

Jothi V. Kumar Professor 

B.S., Annamala University; Ph.D., Kansas State University 

Claude N. Lamb Associate Professor and Interim Chairperson 

B.S., Mount Union College, M.S., North Carolina Central University; Ph.D., Howard Univer- 
sity 



169 



Antonia Lamberth Adjunct Instructor 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University 

Patricia E. Legrand Adjunct Professor 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Greens- 
boro 

Katrina T. McKenzie Adjunct Instructor 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University 

Calvin Miller Adjunct Instructor 

B.S., Saint Andrews Presbyterian College; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University 

Evans Oviosun Adjunct Instructor 

B.S., Western Carolina University; M.S. North Carolina A&T State University 

David Pollard Adjunct Instructor 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University 

Divi Venteskateswarlu Assistant Professor 

B.S., Sri University, M.S., Kakatiya University, M.S., University of Hyderabad, Ph.D., North 
Eastern Hill University 

Sullivan A. Welborne Adjunct Professor 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University, Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Greens- 
boro 

Karen Williams Adjunct Instructor 

B.S., Bennett College, M.S., North Carolina A&T State University 

Alex N. Williamson Associate Professor 

B.S., Jackson State University; Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana 



170 



Department of English 

http://www.ncat.edu/~english 



Chimalum Nwankwo, Chairperson 

OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the English Department are as follows: 

1 . to provide instruction in reading and writing skills, the humanities, linguistics, and litera- 
ture; 

2. to prepare English majors and minors to teach and to pursue graduate training in English 
and other professions; 

3. to train students in professional writing. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

English - Bachelor of Arts 

English (Technical Writing) - Bachelor of Arts 

English (Creative Writing) - Bachelor of Arts 

English, Secondary Education - Bachelor of Science 

English Education - Master of Science* 

English and African- American Literature - Master of Arts* 

Leadership Studies - Doctor of Philosophy* 

* See the Graduate School Bulletin 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The admission of students to the undergraduate programs in the Department of English is 
based upon the general admission requirements of the University. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Professional English major — The English major must complete 124-125 semester hours of 
University courses. (Whether the total is 124 or 125 semester hours depends on whether the 
student satisfies the Physical Science requirement with a three-credit or a four-credit course.) 
Included in the 125-126 semester hours are a minimum of 66 hours of English at the 200 level or 
above for the professional major. A minimum grade of "C" must be achieved in these courses. 

Teaching Major in English — The teaching major in English must complete a minimum of 
125-126 semester hours of University courses. (Whether the total is 125 or 126 semester hours 
depends on whether the student satisfies the Physical Science requirement with a three-credit 
or a four-credit course.) Included in these 127-128 hours are 54 semester hours of English courses 
at the 200 level or above with grades of "C" or better. 

English, African American Literature Concentration - To complete a concentration in Afri- 
can American Literature, the student must complete a minimum of 125-126 semester hours of 
University courses. (Whether the total is 125 or 126 semester hours depends on whether the 
student satisfies the Physical Science requirement with a three-credit or a four-credit course.) 
Included in these 125-126 hours are 96 semester hours of English courses at the 200 level or 
above with grades of "C" or better. 

English, Creative Writing Concentration - To complete a concentration in Creative Writing, 
the student must complete a minimum of 1 27- 1 28 semester hours of University courses. (Whether 
the total is 127 or 128 semester hours depends on whether the student satisfies the Physical 

171 



Science requirement with a three-credit or four-credit course.) Included in these 127-128 se- 
mester hours of University are 75 semester hours of English courses at the 200 level or above 
with grades of "C" or better. 

English, Technical Writing Concentration - To complete a concentration in Technical Writ- 
ing, the student must complete a minimum of 126-127 semester hours of University courses. 
(Whether the total is 126 or 127 semester hours depends on whether the student satisfies the 
Physical Science requirement with a three-credit or a four-credit course.) Included in these 
126-127 hours are 75 semester hours of English courses at the 200 level or above with grades 
of "C" or better. 

The Minor in English (teaching and non-teaching) - Students desiring a minor in English 
must complete 24 semester hours in English at the 200 level above. The required courses are 
ENGL 210; ENGL 220; ENGL 221 or 222; ENGL 230 or 231; ENGL 333 or 334; ENGL 406, 
410, 430 or 431, and one of the following: ENGL 335, 336, 401, 404, 435, or 436. 

COMMON COURSES FOR ALL CONCENTRATIONS 

A. Required Major Core Courses for All Concentrations in English (24 hours) 

ENGL 2 1 ENGL 410 ENGL 43 1 

ENGL 220 ENGL 430 

B. Required UNST Courses for All Core Courses in English (25 hours) 

UNST 100 UNST 120 UNST 140 

UNST 110 UNST 130 

FOUR THREE - HOUR UNST CLUSTER THEME ELECTIVES 

C. Required English Capstone Course 

ENGL 502-1 Independent Study in English 

The Capstone Course or the Integrative Capstone Experience is designed to incorporate mul- 
tiple knowledge areas consistent with the goals and objectives of the UNST program. The 
Capstone Course in English provides an opportunity for majors to pursue independently (at 
home or abroad) in depth study in English Literature, African American Literature, English 
Technical Writing, Creative Writing, or Linguistics. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

A degree in English prepares students to teach, to conduct research, to pursue graduate and 
professional degrees (such as law and library science), and to work in government, business, 
editing, and numerous other jobs requiring mastery of the language. 



REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR ENGLISH 



ENGL 101 
ENGL 210 
ENGL 220 
ENGL 221 
ENGL 226 
ENGL 222 
ENGL 230 
ENGL 231 
ENGL 240 



ENGL 243 
ENGL 331 
ENGL 333 
ENGL 334 
ENGL 335 
ENGL 336 
ENGL 401 
ENGL 404 



ENGL 405 
ENGL 406 
ENGL 410 
ENGL 430 
ENGL 431 
ENGL 435 
ENGL 436 
ENGL 502 



172 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR ENGLISH 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST 100 


1 UNST 130 


3 


UNST 1 10 


3 MATH 102 


3 


UNST 120 


3 ENGL 200 


3 


SPCH 250 


3 ENGL 210 


3 


UNST 140 


3 ENGL 226 


3 


HIST 100 


3 PHED (Activity Course) 


1 




16 


16 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST Cluster Theme Elective 


3 FOLA (Intermediate) II 


3 


FOLA (Intermediate) I 


3 UNST Cluster Theme Elective 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Course 


3 ENGL 201 


3 


ENGL 220 


3 ENGL 221 


3 


EASC 201 or 


UNST Cluster Theme Elective 


3 


CHEM 100 and 110 or 


ENGL 101 


3 


PHYS 110 and 111 


3-4 
15-16 

JUNIOR YEAR 


18 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


ENGL 333 


3 ENGL 334 


3 


ENGL 405 


3 ENGL 406 


3 


ENGL 230 


3 Elective 


3 


ENGL 430 


3 ENGL 231 


3 


ENGL 222 


3 ENGL 431 


3 




15 


15 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


ENGL 435 


3 ENGL 436 


3 


ENGL 404 


3 Elective 


3 


ENGL 410 


3 ENGL 502-1 (Capstone Course) 


3 


ENGL 401 


3 ENGL 336 


3 


Elective 


3 ENGL 335 


3 




15 


15 



Total Credit Hours: 124-125 



REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR THE ENGLISH MAJOR 
WITH A CONCENTRATION IN AFRICAN- AMERICAN LITERATURE 



ENGL 101 
ENGL 210 
ENGL 220 
ENGL 221 or 222 
ENGL 226 
ENGL 231 
ENGL 318 
ENGL 333 



ENGL 334 
ENGL 345 
ENGL 404 
ENGL 405 
ENGL 406 
ENGL 407 
ENGL 408 
ENGL 409 



ENGL 410 
ENGL 416/417 
ENGL 430 
ENGL 431 
ENGL 502 
ENGL 505 
ENGL 650 
ENGL 658/660 



173 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR ENGLISH, AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST 100 


UNST 130 


3 


UNST 110 


3 ENGL 226 


3 


UNST 120 


3 HIST 215 


3 


SPCH 250 


3 EASC 201 or CHEM 100/1 10 




UNST 140 


3 or BIOL 100 


3-4 


PHED (Activity Course) 


1 ENGL 210 


3 




14 


15-16 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


FOLA (Intermediate) I 


3 UNST Cluster Theme Elective 


3 


ENGL 333 


3 ENGL 221 or 222 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elective 


3 ENGL 334 


3 


ENGL 220 


3 FOLA (Intermediate) II 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elective 


3 UNST Cluster Theme Elective 


3 


ENGL 101 


3 ENGL 231 


3 




18 


18 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


ENGL 410 


3 ENGL 405 


3 


ENGL 404 


3 ENGL 406 


3 


ENGL 318 


3 ENGL 407 


3 


ENGL 345 


3 ENGL 409 


3 


Elective 


3 Elective 


3 




15 


15 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


Elective 


3 ENGL 650 


3 


ENGL 502-1 (Capstone Course) 


3 ENGL 408 


3 


ENGL 416/417 


3 Elective 


3 


ENGL 658 or 660 


3 ENGL 431 


3 


ENGL 430 


3 ENGL 505 


3 




15 


15 



Total Credit Hours: 125-126 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR ENGLISH, CREATIVE WRITING 



ENGL 101 
ENGL 105 
ENGL 210 
ENGL 220 
ENGL 221 or 222 
ENGL 231 
ENGL 31 lor 312 
ENGL 318 
ENGL 330 



ENGL 331 
ENGL 334 
ENGL 337 
ENGL 342 
ENGL 343 
ENGL 404 
ENGL 405 
ENGL 406 
ENGL 409 



ENGL 410 
ENGL 418 
ENGL 421 or 422 
ENGL 430 
ENGL 431 
ENGL 502 
ENGL 504 
ENGL 506 



174 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR ENGLISH, CREATIVE WRITING 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


ENGL 105 


3 UNST 130 


3 


UNST 100 


1 UNST 210 


3 


UNST110 


3 ENGL 200 


3 


SPCH 250 


3 BIOL 100 or EASC 201 or 




UNST 140 


3 CHEM 100/1 10 or 




UNST 120 


3 PHYS 110/111 


3-4 




16 ENGL 226 


3 
15-16 




SOPHMORE YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


ENGL 101 


3 ENGL 318 


3 


FOLA 2 (Intermediate I) 


3 Women's Studies Elective 


3 


ENGL 311 or 312 


3 ENGL 337 


3 


PHED (Activity Course) 


1 FOLA 2 (Intermediate II) 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elective 


3 UNST Cluster Theme Elective 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elective 


3 UNST Cluster Theme Elective 


3 




16 


18 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


ENGL 330 


3 ENGL 418 


3 


ENGL 333 


3 ENGL 334 


3 


ENGL 421 or 422 


3 ENGL 416 or 417 


3 


ENGL 220 


3 ENGL 221 or 222 


3 


ENGL 406 


3 ENGL 231 


3 




15 


15 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


ENGL 404 


3 ENGL 410 


3 


ENGL 502-1 (Capstone Course) 


3 ENGL 506 


3 


ENGL 430 


3 ENGL 431 


3 


ENGL 504 


3 ENGL 409 


3 


Elective 


3 Elective 


3 




15 


15 



Total Credit Hours: 125-126 



REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR ENGLISH, SECONDARY EDUCATION 



ENGL 101 
ENGL 200 
ENGL 201 
ENGL 210 
ENGL 220 
ENGL 221 
ENGL 222 
ENGL 226 



ENGL 230 or 231 
ENGL 240 
ENGL 331 
ENGL 333 
ENGL 334 
ENGL 404 
ENGL 405 
ENGL 406 



ENGL 410 
ENGL 430 
ENGL 431 
ENGL 435 
ENGL 436 
ENGL 460 
ENGL 627 



175 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR ENGLISH, SECONDARY EDUCATION 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


CUIN 102 


2 ENGL 210 


3 


UNST 100 


1 MATH 101 


3 


UNST 1 10 


3 UNST 120 


3 


CHEMlOO/llOor 


ENGL 101 


3 


PHYS 110/11 lor EASC 201 


3-4 UNST 130 


3 


ENGL 226 


3 


15 


UNST 140 


3 

15-16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST Cluster Theme Elective 


3 ENGL 201 


3 


ENGL 220 


3 HPED 204 


2 


ENGL 200 


3 UNST Cluster Theme Elective 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elective 


3 UNST Cluster Theme Elective 


3 


FOLA (Intermediate) I 


3 ENGL 240 


3 


SPCH 250 


3 FOLA (Intermediate) II 


3 




18 


17 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


ENGL 404 


3 ENGL 430 


3 


CUIN 301 


2 ENGL 405 


3 


ENGL 221 or 222 


3 ENGL 334 


3 


ENGL 333 


3 CUIN 400 


3 


ENGL 406 


3 ENGL 410 


3 


ENGL 230 or 231 


3 ENGL 460 


3 




17 


18 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


ENGL 435 or 436 


3 CUIN 624 


3 


ENGL 627 


3 CUIN 500 


3 


CUIN 436 


3 CUIN 560 


6_ 


CUIN 526 


3 


12 


ENGL 431 


3 
15 





Total Credit Hours: 125-126 



REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR ENGLISH (TECHNICAL WRITING) 



ENGL 210 
ENGL 220 
ENGL 221 
ENGL 222 
ENGL 226 
ENGL 230 
ENGL 231 



ENGL 331 
ENGL 336 
ENGL 411 
ENGL 412 
ENGL 413 
ENGL 414 
ENGL 432 



ENGL 415 
ENGL 430 
ENGL 431 
ENGL 434 
ENGL 435 
ENGL 502 
ENGL 729 



176 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR ENGLISH (TECHNICAL WRITING) 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 




Credit 


PHED (Activity Course) 


1 UNST 130 




3 


SPCH 250 


3 UNST 140 




3 


BIOL 100 


4 ENGL 210 




3 


UNST 100 


1 CHEM 100/1 10 or 






UNST 110 


3 PHYS 110/11 or EASC 201 


3-4 


UNST 120 


3 ENGL 200 or 201 




3 




15 ENGL 226 




3 
15-16 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 






First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 




Credit 


GCS 120 


3 ENGL 201 




3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elective 


3 UNST Cluster Theme Elective 


3 


ENGL 200 


3 ENGL 331 




3 


ECT 101 


3 ENGL 230 




3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elective 


3 ENGL 221 




3 


ENGL 220 


3 UNST Cluster Theme Elective 


3 




18 




18 




JUNIOR YEAR 






First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 




Credit 


ENGL 411 


3 ENGL 413 




3 


ENGL 412 


3 ENGL 414 




3 


ENGL 222 


3 ENGL 431 




3 


ENGL 231 


3 African American Lit. 


Elective 


3 


African American Lit. Elective 


3 GCS 130 




3 


Elective 


3 ENGL 410 




3 




18 




18 




SENIOR YEAR 






First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 




Credit 


ENGL 415 


3 ENGL 430 




3 


ENGL 502-1 (Capstone Course) 


3 ENGL 434 




3 


GCS 418 


3 ENGL 435 




3 


ENGL 432 


3 ENGL 436 




3 




12 




12 



Total Credit Hours: 124-125 

1 Recommended GCS electives: GCS 130 and GCS 418 

2 French, Spanish or German through intermediate level. Acceptable courses: FOLA 300, 301; SPAN 320, 
321; GERM 422, 423. Eligibility to enroll in any one of these is established by placement test or by successful 
completion of elementary level of appropriate language. 



Ill 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN ENGLISH 
Undergraduate 

UNST110. Critical Writing Credit 3(3-0) 

This course introduces students to reading comprehension and the writing process. Students 
will read and evaluate selected texts and develop critical thinking abilities through writing and 
speaking. (F;S;S) 

ENGL 100. Ideas and Their Expression I Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an introduction to college-level expository writing; it provides students with 
experience in writing and revising compositions. Students will also learn to write resumes, 
letters of application, short reports, and responses to literature. (DEMAND) 

UNST 210. Critical Writing II. Ideas and Their Expression II Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a continuation of UNST 1 10 which provides students with additional experience in 
various modes of writing, emphasizing expository writing; it introduces students to the techniques 
of writing the research paper and analyzing literary selections. Prerequisite: UNST 1 10. (F;S;SS) 

ENGL 102. Developmental Reading Credit 2(2-0) 

This course includes instruction and practice in methods of increasing rate of reading and 
techniques of comprehending written material; emphasis is upon vocabulary study skills. Limited 
registration. (F;S) 

HUMANITIES 

ENGL 200. Survey of Humanities I Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of interrelationships of literature, music, and the fine arts; it is a study of 
master works, philosophical ideas, and artistic movements of Western Civilization, with attention 
given also to non-Western culture. It will survey cultures from ancient times to the end of the 
Renaissance. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. (F;S;SS) 

ENGL 201. Survey of Humanities II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of ENGL 200. It will begin with the Baroque period and will 
include Neo-Classicism. Romanticism, and modern modes of artistic expression. Prerequisites: 
ENGL 101 and 200. (F;S;SS) 

ENGL 202. The Humanities in America Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a survey of the interrelationship of American and African- American literature, 
music, and art from colonial times to the present. The course will also include a study of the 
American historical, social, and philosophical experience. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 . (DEMAND) 

ENGL 203. Humanities Perspectives of the South Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the South from the perspectives of its history, beliefs, literature, music, 
and art. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. (F;S) 

ENGL 204. Topics in Humanities: A Multidisciplinary Course Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of selected topics in literature, art, music, philosophy, and other branches 
of the humanities. It is an elective course primarily for non-English majors. Prerequisite: UNST 

210. (DEMAND) 

ENGL 206. Film and Culture Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines film as a legitimate form of artistic expression worthy of serious critical 
analysis. Consequently, film will be studied as history (including its relationship to other print 
and non-print media), aesthetic theory, ideology, and cultural artifact. Particular attention will 
be paid to the ways in which film not only reflects, but also shapes, contemporary culture. 

(F;S) 



178 



ENGL 420. Humanities III, Great Ideas of World Civilization Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a seminar devoted to the identification, analysis, and appreciation of some of the basic 
ideas or concepts which have underlain world culture in the arts, religion, philosophy, and 
social attitudes from ancient times to the present. (DEMAND) 

LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 

ENGL 226. The Basic Grammar and Mechanics of Writing Credits 3(3-0) 

This course includes instruction and review of the most troubling grammatical and mechanical 
errors that plague college students' writing. All writing in this course will be limited to the 
context of well-developed paragraphs. There will be frequent practice in identifying and avoid- 
ing common grammatical and mechanical errors. (F;S;SS) 

ENGL 240 Advanced Grammar and Argumentation Credits 3(3-0) 

This course covers the techniques of argumentation and the logic of grammar essential to both 
higher level writing and teaching in middle and high schools. (F) 

ENGL 300. Advanced Composition for Non-Majors Credits 3(3-0) 

This is a course for non-English majors in which techniques of narrative, descriptive, expository 
and argumentative composition are studied. Prerequisite: UNST 210. (F;S;SS) 

ENGL 305. Grammar, Literature and Composition for 

Pre-Professional Students Credit 3(3-0) 

This course refines the skills in grammar, literature, and composition that are particularly needed 
by pre-professional students. Recommended for students preparing for the GRE, LSAT, and 
NTE. Prerequisite: UNST 210. (S) 

ENGL 404. Writing in the Discipline of English Credits 3(3-0) 

This course offers practice in critical, scholarly, and expository writing that emphasizes writ- 
ing within the discipline of English. Prerequisite: UNST 210. (DEMAND) 

ENGL 405. Introduction to Linguistics and the History of the Language Credits 3(3-0) 

This course covers the nature of language, levels of linguistic analysis, dialectology, comparative 
linguistics, and the development of the English language. Prerequisite: UNST 1 10. 

ENGL 480. Editing Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to teach the general techniques of editing. Integrity, clarification, style, 
recognition of the need for substantial changes, and methods of checking completeness are 
included. Prerequisite: ENGL 305. (DEMAND) 

ENGL 490. Professional Writing Internship Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes on-the-job training with an appropriate agency and compilation of a 
portfolio of high caliber. Prerequisites: ENGL 261 and 480. (DEMAND) 

ENGL 502-1. Independent Study in English Credits 3(3-0) 

This course provides an opportunity for students to pursue independently (at home and abroad) 
in-depth study in English Literature, African American Literature, English Technical Writing, 
Creative Writing, or Linguistics, culminating in a manuscript, report, or scholarly article suitable 
for publication. Prerequisites: Senior Standing, completion of all UNST requirements, and 
prior consultation with department faculty. (F;S;SS) 

AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE 

ENGL 209. The History, Literary Connections, and 

Social Relevance of Hip-hop Credits 3(3-0) 

This course focuses on the study of hip-hop as an artistic literary phenomenon which reflects 
elements of the Black experience and voices the concerns of a large and diverse segment of 



179 



African-Americans in contemporary society. The following will be examined: the origins of 
hip-hop; the relationship of hip-hop to the oral literary tradition; the literary elements of hip- 
hop, as well as hip-hop's connection to literary movements, such as the Harlem Renaissance 
and the Black Arts Movement; the ability of hip-hop to articulate social ills as well as the 
concerns of urban and poor African- Americans; and significant hip-hop artists, their lyrics, 
performances, and impact. Prerequisites: UNST 110. This course is open to non-majors. (F;S) 

ENGL 316. Hip-hop Discourse Credits 3(3-0) 

This course will analyze, critique, and discuss the literature and critical discourses that exam- 
ine hip-hop culture. Assigned readings will consist of the most current theoretical, political, 
and social dialogue/texts that provide a framework for class discussion and writing assign- 
ments. Some of the major areas of focus are as follows: the major movements and themes of 
hip-hop; the relationship between the predominant American culture and hip-hop; the new 
Black Renaissance — hip-hop culture literature, and the commercialization of hip-hop. Prereq- 
uisites: UNST 110. This course is open to non-majors of Sophomore, Junior, or Senior stand- 
ing. (F;S) 

ENGL 318. African-American Film and Culture Credits 3(3-0) 

This course examines African- American film as an interpreter of the history and culture of 
African- Americans. Attention will be given to the aesthetic theory and ideology of Black film 
and culture. Prerequisites: UNST 1 10. This course is open to non-majors. (F;S) 

ENGL 333. Survey of African-American Literature I Credits 3(3-0) 

This course is the study of prose, poetry, and drama by American authors of African ancestry 
from the 1 8 th century to the turn of the 20 th century. Students will explore African- American 
literature, tracing its origins through the Diaspora and the period of slavery in America to the 
beginning of the 20 th century. Important movements, authors, and works will be examined in 
both a literary and historical sense so that an understanding and knowledge of the Black expe- 
rience through its literature may be acquired. Prerequisites: UNST 1 10. (F;S) 

ENGL 334. Survey of African- American Literature II 

This is a survey course focusing on literature written by African- Americans from the beginning 
of the 20 th century to the present. Students will study exciting literary periods, such as the 
Harlem Renaissance and the Black Arts Movement, as well as modern and contemporary Black 
writers. Important movements, authors, and works will be examined in both a literary and 
historical sense. Prerequisites: UNST 110. (F;S) 

ENGL 417. African Literature Credits 3(3-0) 

This course surveys the literary genres and major authors of African literature and shows the 
relationship between modern African literature and African oral traditions, culture, and history. 
Texts will be selected from West, East, South, and North Africa. Prerequisites: UNST 1 10. (S) 

ENGL 342. African-American Male Writers Credits 3(3-0) 

This course examines the poetry, short stories, and novels of significant African-American 
male writers from the 20 th century to the present. Focus will be given to the literary and histori- 
cal elements which reflect the African- American male's experience in America, as well as his 
contributions to and place within the African- American literary tradition. Prerequisites: UNST 
110. This course is open to non-majors. (F;S) 

ENGL 343. African-American Women Writers Credits 3(3-0) 

This course examines the poetry, short stories, and novels of significant Black women writers 
from the 20 th century to the present. Focus will be given to the literary and historical elements 
which reflect the African- American woman's experience as well as her place within and con- 



180 



tribution to the African-American literary tradition. Prerequisites: UNST 1 10. This course is 
open to non-majors. (F;S) 

ENGL 345. The Survey of African- American Men's and 

Women's Autobiographical Writings Credits 3(3-0) 

This course surveys the genre of autobiographical writing from the 18 th century to the mid^O" 1 
century as expression of the Black experience in America from slavery to freedom. Focus will 
be given to the historical and literary importance of major autobiographical writers, as well as 
their works — particularly slave narratives, letters, and other forms of autobiographical writing. 
Prerequisites: UNST 110; ENGL 333 or ENGL 334. This course is open to non-majors. (S) 

ENGL 407. African-American Drama Credits 3(3-0) 

This course examines the dramatic literature of African- Americans, from the 20 th century to 
the present. Focus will be given to the literary, historical, and cultural elements of the Black 
tradition of drama. Prerequisites: UNST 1 10; ENGL 333 or ENGL 334. This course is open to 
non-majors. (F) 

ENGL 408. The African-American Novel Credits 3(3-0) 

This course will focus on the careful reading and discussion of the African- American novel 
from the 20 th century to the present. Attention will be given to the various aspects of the tradi- 
tions that have nourished the African- American novel as an art form and cultural interpreter of 
the Black experience in America. Among the authors' works to be examined are Zora Neale 
Hurston, John A. Williams, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Richard Wright, Alice Walker, Toni 
Morrison, and Gloria Naylor. Prerequisites: UNST 1 10; ENGL 334 or ENGL 334. This course 
is open to non-majors. (S) 

ENGL 409. Literature of the African Diaspora Credits 3(3-0) 

This course is an intensive examination of black voices from around the world. The focus is on 
writers whose works are almost inter-textual and cross-regional in the manner in which issues 
affecting the destiny of black people are reflected or addressed. The course will begin with the 
founding voices of negritude and pan- Africanism in literature and span across newer voices 
with works directly or indirectly participating in the discourse. Works or writers to be dis- 
cussed will be selected from the poetry, fiction, and drama of Aime Cesaire, Leopold Cedar 
Senghor, Birago Diop, Paule Marshall, Ama Ata Aidoo, Isidore Okpewho, Syl Cheney-Coker, 
Maryse Conde, Derek Walcott, Denis Williams, Toni Morrison, Tess Onueme, and others. Pre- 
requisites: UNST 110. (F) 

ENGL 416. Major African Women Writers Credits 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the works by major women writers from modern Africa. The thematic 
focus may be, but should not be exclusive to critical issues like feminism ad the contestation with 
colonialism and patriarchy. Old and new generation post-independence African women's works 
will be studied. Readings from fiction, poetry, and drama will be selected from the works of Bessie 
Head, Tsitsi Dangaremba, Flora Nwapa, Efua Sutherland, Theodora Akachi Ezeigbo, Chimamanda 
Adichie, Yvonne Vera, Nawal El Saadawi, Nadine Gordimer, Buchi Emecheta, Zulu Sofola, Rebecca 
Njau, Manama Ba, Ngcobo and so on. Prerequisites: UNST 1 10. (F) 

ENGL 417. African Literature from 1945 through the 1960's Credits 3 (3-0) 

This course will include study of the works of major male African writers whose works have 
shaped the growth of modern African literature. Particular focus will be given to the literature of 
protest. Selections from the great works of Chinua Achebe, Wole Soyinka, Ngugi wa Thiong'o, 
Christopher Okigbo, Alex Laguma, Dennis Brutus, John Pepper Clark, Lewis Nkosi, Arthur Nortije, 
Chikaya U'Tamsi, Mongo Beti, Ousman Sembene, Camara Laye, Ayi Kwei Armah, Nurrudin 
Farrah, M.G Vassanji, Amos Tutuola, Ben Okri and others. Prerequisites: UNST 1 10. (F) 



181 



ENGL 505. Interdisciplinary Research Methods in African-American 

Literary Studies Credits 3(3-0) 

This course is open only to junior and senior English majors and minors. It involves an 
interdisciplinary approach as well as practice in the research, documentation, and critical analyses 
of African-American literary studies. Students will discover, compile, and evaluate resources 
from across the disciplines that relate to the impact African-American literature and literary 
studies through using computer-based and traditional sources. This course will culminate in 
the students' completion of a final project which will include a writing assignment in conjunction 
with hosting an interdisciplinary literary colloquium, organizing and participating in an 
interdisciplinary literary conference, or publishing their papers. Prerequisites: This course is 
only open to junior and senior English majors and minors. (S) 

CREATIVE WRITING 

ENGL 105. Introduction to Creative Writing Credits 3(3-0) 

This course is for beginners in creative writing which introduces students to writing in various 
genres by means of creative exercises and assignments, workshops, and individual confer- 
ences. A multi-genre text on creative writing will be assigned to support the reading and analy- 
ses of published works. (Genres may include poetry, fiction, plays, and creative non-fiction.) 
Course may be repeated for a different focus, and there are no prerequisites. (F;S;SS) 

ENGL 208. Spoken Word Performance Poetry Troupe I: A Practicum Credits 3(3-0) 
This course is designed to develop and enhance the skills of individual student performers of 
the A & T Premier Spoken Word Troupe. Students will be instructed in the history and practice 
of the genre Spoken Word Performance Poetry through the study of the art form's development 
since the late sixties and seventies through to the current period. Influences on the art form 
such as Blues, Jazz, and Hip-hop will be covered. (This course can be taken more than once.) 
Student enrollment in this course is based on individual audition and/or by permission of the 
instructor. (F;S) 

ENGL 311. Fiction Writing Credit 3(3-0) 

Students will write and revise short fiction. A text on fiction writing will be assigned to support 
the reading and analyses of published fiction, including the following: developing characters, 
writing dialogue and managing point of view, as well as exploring techniques in narrative 
design in published stories. Students will also receive encouragement and constructive criti- 
cism from other writers in class, and develop the ability to criticize their own work. Contempo- 
rary authors such as Raymond Carver, Alice Walker, John Edgar Wideman, Louise Erdrich, 
Sandra Cisneros, Edwidge Danticat and Eudora Welty will be studied. Prerequisites: ENGL 
105, ENGL 210, and a survey course in British, American, or World Literature. (F) 

ENGL 312. Poetry Writing Credit 3(3-0) 

Students will study the craft of writing and revising poetry. A text on contemporary poetry 
writing will be assigned to support the reading and analyses of published poetry. The course 
will examine literary devices, such as diction, imagery, metaphor, rhyme, sound values, line 
units, meter, and forms. This study will be supported by a workshop devoted entirely to analyz- 
ing and discussing student poems. Contemporary authors such as Lucille Clifton, Joy Harjo, 
Yusef Kumunyakaa, Thylias Moss, Adrienne Rich, Michael Harper, Sharon Olds, Audre Lorde, 
Amira Baraka, Ethridge Knight, Naomi Shihab, Nye Haki Madhubuti, and Rita Dove will be 
studied. Prerequisites: ENGL 101, 210, and a survey course in British, American, and World 
Literature. (F) 



182 



ENGL 313. Drama Writing Credit 3(3-0) 

This course introduces the student to the study and practice of the various elements of contempo- 
rary dramatic writing. A text on contemporary dramatic writing will be assigned to support the 
reading and analyses of published plays. Course topics will include format, story structure, char- 
acter development, dialogue, building scenes and writing for a visual medium. Prerequisites: ENGL 
101, and 210, and a survey course in British, American, or World Literature. (DEMAND) 

ENGL 314. Workshop in Creative Nonfiction Writing Credits 3(3-0) 

This course introduces the student to the study and practice of the various forms of literary 
nonfiction. A text on creative nonfiction writing will be assigned to support the reading and 
analyses of published works. The student writer will develop skill in the incorporation of tech- 
niques from creative writing, such as point of view, voice, characterization and dialogue. Dis- 
cussion will center around works in progress as well as works by contemporary essayists, such 
as Katha Pollitt, Alice Walker, James Baldwin, Jewelle Gomez and Barry Lopez. Other areas of 
nonfiction which may be covered can include memoir, autobiography, nature writing and the 
personal essay. Prerequisites: ENGL 105 and 210. (DEMAND) 

ENGL 315. Editing Encore I Credits 3(3-0) 

This course is one in which students assist the student editor-in-chief in selecting, editing, and 
laying out editions of the University literary magazine sponsored by the Creative Writing Pro- 
gram. Prerequisites: ENGL 31 1, 312, 313 or 314. May be repeated. (F;S) 

ENGL 327. Editing Encore II Credits 3(3-0) 

This course, at the discretion of the program director, permits a student to serve as editor-in- 
chief. The student will work in conjunction with academic literary advisors and other student 
editors to edit the University literary magazine sponsored by the Creative Writing Program. 
Copy editing, layout, design, and aspects of distribution will be covered. Aptitude with digital 
and online media, as well as desktop and print publishing is essential. May be repeated. Prereq- 
uisites: ENGL 311, 312, or 313, 315, 327. (F;S) 

ENGL 330. Creative Literary Production and Service in Society Credits 3(3-0) 

The goal of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to apply their practice and 
understanding of creative writing to practical and concrete situations in their communities with 
groups such as the elderly in community and senior centers, teen groups and elementary stu- 
dents. Students will work in a variety of community settings - educational, political, and/or 
social service agencies - according to the availability/needs of such groups. Prerequisites: ENGL 
105, 311, 312, 313 or 314. (DEMAND) 

ENGL 337. The Elements of Craft Credits 3(3-0) 

Students will study the techniques and process of verse and fiction writing related to issues of 
prosody, such as length, meter, and scansion. Readings may include published poems and 
essays on the art of poetry technique and process as well as published short stories and essays 
on the art of fiction. Prerequisites: ENGL 31 1, 312, 313. (S;S) 

ENGL 421. Advanced Fiction Workshop Credits 3(3-0) 

This course offers advanced work in techniques of writing fiction for students with substantial 
experience in writing fiction. Classes are conducted as workshop sessions primarily where each 
student must comment on the manuscript of fellow students. In the course of critiquing techniques 
of fiction writing, such as establishment of character, manipulation of viewpoint, use of setting, 
and such matters as consistency, motivation, imagery, plotting, and theme will be covered. Prereq- 
uisites: An "A" of "B" in ENGL 3 1 1 or permission of the instructor upon review of a writing 
sample. (This course is limited to students with a concentration in creative writing, who have 
completed one of the following advanced courses: ENGL 31 1, 312, 313, or 314.) (F) 



183 



ENGL 422. Advanced Poetry Workshop Credits 3(3-0) 

This course offers advanced work in techniques of writing poetry for students with substantial 
experience in writing poetry. The course will consist of workshop sessions with students com- 
menting on each other's work. Students will be asked to pick several poets for a paper and an 
oral report. Prerequisites: An "A" or "B" in ENGL 312 or permission of the instructor. (This 
course is limited to students with a concentration in creative writing, who have completed one 
of the following advanced courses: ENGL 311, 312, 313, or 314.) (F) 

ENGL 418. Special Topics in Creative Writing Credits 3(3-0) 

Topics in this course might include "Style and Technique in African American Writing," "Style 
and Technique in Third World Writing," "Autobiography," "Prose and Poetry," "Poetry and 
Performance," "Novel Writing," "Science Fiction Writing," "Literature of Protest," "Poetry 
Translation," "Literature and Film," "Literature of the Black Diaspora," and "Oral History." 
The course may be repeated for a different focus. Prerequisites: ENGL 311,312, or 313. (S;S) 

ENGL 419. Writer in Residence Writing Workshop Credits 3(3-0) 

This course includes a two day writing workshop in Poetry, Fiction, Creative Nonfiction. A 
course in writing is taught by the Visiting Writer in Residence. Enrollment is limited to spe- 
cially selected students. Prospective enrollees should apply to the seminar committee and be 
prepared to submit writing samples for admittance before registering. The course is structured 
as a workshop and may be repeated for credit if the specific title and instructors are different. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 311, 312, 313 or 314. (F;S) 

ENGL 504. Senior Seminar Credits 3(3-0) 

The Senior Seminar includes intensive reading, creative writing and discussion. The course 
will also entail practice and studies of the form, craft, and theory of various genres. Topics may 
include: "Women's Poetics - Ancient to Contemporary," " Multicultural Poetics," "Problems 
of Adaptation, Poetry, Personae, and Author," "Studies in Manuscript Development," "Studies 
in Short Fiction," "Literature and Translation," and "Political Poetry." Prerequisites: Comple- 
tion of one workshop sequence (Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced Workshop) in at least 
one genre. (F) 

ENGL 506. Creative Thesis Credits 3(3-0) 

Students will propose a special writing project to be completed in conference and workshop. 
The project will be suitable for inclusion in a portfolio for graduate school applications and, in 
some instances, for submission to a publisher. The semester's work will include a project proposal 
and the compilation of a creative manuscript draft. The semester's work will also include the 
completion of a critical analysis and the defense and final edition of the thesis. Prerequisites: 
Completion of one workshop sequence (Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced Workshop) in 
at least one genre. (F;S) 

LITERATURE 

ENGL 205. Topics in Literature Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is the study of selected topics in literature. It is an elective course primarily for 
non-English majors. Prerequisite: UNST 210. (DEMAND) 

ENGL 210. Introduction to Literary Studies Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is required of English majors and minors and open to others only with approval of 
instructor; the critical analysis, literary criticism, investigative and bibliographical techniques 
necessary to advanced study in English will be studied. This course is a prerequisite for all 
advanced courses in literature. Prerequisite: UNST 1 10. (F;S) 



184 



ENGL 220. English Literature I Credits 3(3-0) 

This course is a survey of the literary movements and major authors of English literature in 
relation to the cultural history of England from Beowulf to 1660 Prerequisites: UNST 210, 
HIST 100 and 101. (F) 

ENGL 221. English Literature II Credits 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of ENGL 220 from 1660 to 1830. Prerequisites: UNST 1 10 and 
210. (S) 

ENGL 222. English Literature III Credits 3(3-0) 

This course surveys major authors and literary periods of English Literature from the begin- 
ning of the Victorian Period, about 1 830, to the present. 

ENGL 230. World Literature I Credits 3(3-0) 

This course is a survey of selected major world writers from ancient times to about 1600. 
Prerequisite: ENGL 101 and UNST 210. (F) 

ENGL 231. World Literature II Credits 3(3-0) 

This course surveys selected major world writers from about 1600 to the present, excluding 
English and American. Prerequisite: UNST 210. (S) 

WOMEN WRITERS AND WOMEN IN LITERATURE 

ENGL 232. Women Writers in Science Fiction Credits 3(3-0) 

This survey course will look at Science Fiction written by women, examine their work, their 
themes, and their values. 

ENGL 224. Contemporary Women's Literature: A Worle View Credits 3(3-0) 

This course is designed as an introduction to world literature focusing on the twentieth century 
and features literature from geographically and culturally diverse peoples. It is not intended to 
serve as a survey (historically or geographically) of world literature. This course allows stu- 
dents to work closely with a limited number of texts (poetry, fiction, essay and drama), which 
will reflect a view of world cultures from a decidedly feminist vantage point. The class will 
analyze how this literature is unique and similar to western literature. The class will view films 
and other works related to intercultural experiences and clashes. Prerequisite: ENGL 210. (DE- 
MAND) (F;S;SS) 

ENGL 233. Images of Women in Literature Credits 3(3-0) 

This course uses period literature by both male and female authors to examine the changing 
roles and attitudes toward women in Europe and American societies. (F;S;SS) 

ENGL 236. A Survey of Early African- American Women's Poetry Credits 3(3-0) 

This survey course focuses on poetry written by African American women from the 1 8 th cen- 
tury to the end of Reconstruction. Students will gain an understanding and knowledge of the 
African American experience from the perspective of African American women. 

ENGL 237. Standing and Testifying: African American Women Poets of the 

Harlem Renaissance Credits 3(3-0) 

This is a survey course focusing on the poetry written by African American women during the 
period of the Harlem Renaissance. Prerequisite: UNST 210. (DEMAND) 

ENGL 239. American Griots: Black Women Storytellers 

in the 20th Century Credits 3(3-0) 

This course focuses on the short stories written by African American women during the 20 th 
century. It examines the diversity, history, and literary techniques of Black women short story 
writers and shows how their work has evolved along with formal practices of the genre to the 
present time. Prerequisite: UNST 210. (DEMAND) 

185 



ENGL 241. Women Writers Credits 3(3-0) 

This course offers a study of literature and feminist theories by women from the 19 th and 20 th 
centuries. Prerequisite: UNST 210. (DEMAND) 

ENGL 242. Postcolonial Women Writers Credits 3(3-0) 

This course offers a study of literature and feminist theories by postcolonial women from the 
Caribbean, Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, India, Oceania, Asia, and the Balkans. 
Prerequisite: UNST 210. (F;S;SS) 

ENGL 243. Literature by Women of Africa and the African Diaspora Credits 3(3-0) 

This course offers a study of literature and feminist/womanist theories by Anglo- African, Afri- 
can American, Caribbean, Latin-American, and African women. Prerequisite: UNST 210. (DE- 
MAND) 

ENGL 336. Postcolonial Novel 

This course introduces novels and theory post- 1960 from areas including the Caribbean, Latin 
America, Africa, the Middle East, the Balkans, India, Asia, and Oceania. Prerequisite: ENGL 
210. (S) 

ENGL 401. Drama Credits 3(3-0) 

This course surveys the history, literature, criticism, and arts of the theatre. Prerequisite: ENGL 
210. (S) 

ENGL 406. Critical Theory Credits 3(3-0) 

This course examines interpretive strategies and theoretical assumptions of contemporary ap- 
proaches to literary criticism. Prerequisite: UNST 210. (S) 

ENGL 410. Shakespeare Credits 3(3-0) 

This course is an introduction to a study of the works of William Shakespeare through a de- 
tailed examination of representative works selected from the major periods of his development 
as a dramatist. Prerequisite: ENGL 210. (S) 

ENGL 430. American Literature I Credits 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the literary movements and major authors of American literature in 
relation to the cultural history of America from the Colonial Period to 1865. Prerequisites: 
ENGL 210, ENGL 200, and 201. (F) 

ENGL 431. American Literature II Credits 3(3-0) 

This is a continuation of English 430, from 1865 to the present. Prerequisites: ENGL 210, 
ENGL 200, and 201. (S) 

ENGL 435. The Novel Credits 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the novel as an art form, with attention to significant English novelists 
from 1750 to the present. Prerequisite: ENGL 210. (F) 

ENGL 436. Poetry Credits 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of poetry as an art form, with attention to significant English and Ameri- 
can poets of the twentieth century. Prerequisite: ENGL 210. (S) 

ENGL 445. Independent Study in English Credit 3(3-0) 

This course provides an opportunity for students to pursue independently in-depth study in 
literature, linguistics, or professional writing. Prerequisites: Second semester junior or senior 
standing, and prior consultation with department faculty. (F;S;SS) 

ENGL 460. Technology and the Teaching of English Credit 3(3-0) 

This course provides knowledge of how technology, especially the computer and non-print 
media, can be utilized effectively in the teaching of English and in classroom management. 
Students will acquire knowledge of various instructional strategies appropriate for diverse back- 

186 



grounds and learning styles. Development of appropriate professional attitudes and incorpora- 
tion of research findings in the instructional program will also be included. (S) 

ENGL 475. British and American Literary History Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to develop a sense of the 
continuity of British and American literary history, supported by a reading of major works. 
Prerequisite: Senior standing. (DEMAND) 

ENGL 502-11. Senior Seminar Credits 3(3-0) 

This course intensively explores major figures, periods, or ideas in African American, Ameri- 
can, British, World or Comparative Literature while emphasizing independent study and re- 
fines the techniques of literary research and critical analysis. Prerequisites: ENGL 404 and 
406. (F;S) 

ENGL 503. Senior Honors Thesis Credits 3(3-0) 

This course allows students with a GPA in English of 3.2 or above to complete an in-depth 
research project in their area of interest. Prerequisite: UNST 210. (F;S) 

TECHNICAL WRITING 

ENGL 331. Writing for Science and Technology Credits 3(3-0) 

This course includes the study and practice of the basic techniques of writing and editing 
scientific and technical materials for both the general audience and the specialist. Prerequisite: 
ECT 101 . (The prerequisite applies to students who are Technical Writing Concentration majors 
within the English department. All other students may take ENGL 331 without a prerequisite. 
(F;S;SS) 

ENGL 411. Visual Rhetoric for Technical and Scientific Writer Credits 3(3-0) 

This course provides an introduction to the theory and techniques used by scientific and technical 
communicators. It covers elements of layout, design, and typography, giving students practice 
with short and long print texts and non-print texts and non-print media. Prerequisite: UNST 
210. (F;S;SS) 

ENGL 412. Writing Reports and Proposals Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an intensive study of the principles and processes involved in preparing technical 
and scientific reports and proposals. (F;S;SS) 

ENGL 413. Feature Writing and Editing for Technical Journals, 

Magazines and Trade Publications Credit 3(3-0) 

This course provides theory and practice in writing and marketing articles for scientific publi- 
cations with students submitting articles to commercial and scientific publications. This course 
also examines principles and practice of editors of scientific and technical publications. Stu- 
dents edit other students' works and that of outside clients. (F;S;SS) 

ENGL 414. Designing and Testing User Documents for 

Scientific and Technical Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an advanced study of theories and practices associated with the production of 
user documents, instructional manuals and other media. (F;S;SS) 

ENGL 415. Practicum for Technical and Scientific Communicators Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to give students practical writing experience related to scientific and 
technical fields. Offered as an on-campus and off-campus-directed internship, the experience 
teaches students the importance of client relationships, problem-solving skills, and profession- 
alism in conduct and product. (F;S;SS) 



187 



ENGL 432. Writing for Health Professions Credits 3(3-0) 

This course will consider specific forms of written and oral communications in the health 
professions, particularly in working with the NCA&T Department of Nursing. As an introduc- 
tory writing course promoting effective communication skills, the course will ultimately con- 
tribute to the protection of the health and welfare of the public. (F;S;SS) 

ENGL 434. Writing Case Studies Credits 3(3-0) 

This course offers an intensive study of the principles and processes involved in writing case 
studies and histories. The focus will center around medical case studies and case studies dealing 
with engineering projects. The course is designed for both technical writing students and those 
in other fields such as nursing, engineering, and the sciences. (F;S;SS) 

ENGL 729. Introduction to Writing and Editing Documents, 

Theses and Dissertations Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an intensive study in the preparation and execution of professional documents 
such as the thesis and the dissertation. Students can actually begin writing these documents 
with the instructor's close supervision and feedback on the form and style of each document. It 
is designed to produce documents that are both readable and accurate. (F;S;SS) 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY 

Anjail R. Ahmad Assistant Professor 

B.A., Agnes Scott College; M. A., New York University; Ph.D. University of Missouri-Colum- 
bia 

Shirley H. Bell Associate Professor and Interim Chairperson 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ed.D., Auburn University at Auburn 

Patricia Bonner Associate Professor 

B.A., University of Alabama; M.A., Atlanta University; Ph.D., University of South Florida 

Jane G. Brown Associate Professor 

B.A., Converse College, M.A. Vanderbilt University; Ph.D., University of Dallas 

Hannah Free Lecturer 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University 

Samuel Garren Professor 

B.A., Davidson College; M.A., Ph.D., Louisiana State University 

Michael Greene Professor 

B.A., Duke University; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University 

Gibreel Kamara Associate Professor 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina A&T State University; Ed.D., Temple University 

Elon Kulii Professor 

B.A., Winston-Salem State University; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., 
Indiana University 

LaVie Leasure Lecturer 

B.A.S.I.S., Bennett College; M.A., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Indiana Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania 

Robert T. Levine Professor 

B.A., Queens College of the City University of New York; M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University 

188 



Michele F. Levy Professor and Chairperson 

B.A., George Washington University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill 

Jody B. Martin Lecturer 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina A&T State University 

Linda McArthur Lecturer 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina A&T State University 

Gregory D. Meyerson Assistant Professor 

B. A., Miami University of Ohio; M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Valerie Nieman Assistant Professor 

B.S., West Virginia University; M.F.A., Queens University of Charlotte 

Chimalum Nwankwo Professor 

B.A., University of Nigeria, Nsukka; M.F.A., University of Texas at Austin; M.A., University 
of Texas at Austin; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin 

Jeffrey D. Parker Associate Professor 

B.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.A., North Carolina A&T State Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Myrtle B. Solomon Lecturer 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina A&T State University 

Marcella J. Whidbee Lecturer 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina A&T State University 



189 



Department of Foreign Languages 

http://www.ncat.edu/~fola 



Carolyn Durham, Chairperson 

OBJECTIVES 

The specific objectives of the Department of Foreign Languages are as follows: 

1. to develop facility in the listening, speaking, reading and writing of foreign languages. 

2. to develop a better knowledge of foreign cultures and an appreciable awareness of one's 
own culture. 

3. to create a spirit of international understanding that will result in respectful attitudes 
toward individuals and national groups. 

4. to prepare students to teach second languages in elementary through secondary schools. 

5. to prepare and encourage students to continue further study and research in the major 
areas, foreign language literature and education. 

6. to provide students with experiences to develop communicative skills and competence 
requisite for personal fulfillment and challenging careers in which the foreign language 
study will be in full use or an asset. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Romance Languages and Literatures, French Secondary Education - Bachelor of Science 

Romance Languages and Literatures, Spanish Secondary Education - Bachelor of Science 

Romance Languages and Literatures, French - Bachelor of Arts 

Romance Languages and Literatures, Spanish - Bachelor of Arts 

Liberal Studies (International Studies) - Bachelor of Arts* 

* The Director of the Liberal Studies Program provides general oversight and administration of the program 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The admission of students to the undergraduate degree programs in the Department of 
Foreign Languages is based upon the general admission requirements of the University. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Romance Languages (French or Spanish) - B.A. (Non-Teaching Major) - The curriculum 
in this area requires the student to complete a minimum of 124 semester hours of University 
courses. Included in the 124 hours are 33 semester hours of French or Spanish in courses 
beyond the elementary level. (A minimum grade of "C" must be achieved in all French or 
Spanish courses.) 

Romance Languages (French or Spanish) - B.S. (Teaching Major) - The curriculum for the 
teaching major in Romance Languages (French or Spanish) requires that a student complete 
the courses and regulations as outlined by the School of Education for certification in the 
elementary and secondary schools. A student must complete a minimum of 124 semester hours 
of University courses. Included in the 124 hours are 33 semester hours of French or Spanish in 
courses beyond the elementary level. (A minimum grade of "C" must be achieved in all French 
or Spanish courses.) The Department also offers Teaching Certifications in both French and 
Spanish. 



190 



FOREIGN LANGUAGE PLACEMENT EXAMINATION 

A foreign language placement examination will be administered to entering freshmen whose 
programs have a language requirement and who have taken at least two consecutive years of 
the same foreign language in high school. The highest level in which a student can be placed is 
the intermediate I level. A student cannot satisfy a language requirement by taking this exami- 
nation. The foreign language placement examination will be given in order to place students in 
the appropriate levels only. 

A minor may be achieved in French or Spanish by students who complete a minimum of 18 
semester hours in Spanish or French at the 300 level or above. If a student starts the French or 
Spanish minor at the elementary I level, a minimum of 24 semester hours must be completed. 

ACCREDITATION 

All Teacher Education Programs are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation 
of Teacher Education and approved by the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruc- 
tion. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

In this time of growing internationalism, a degree in a foreign language has a high level of 
importance in many professional careers. For the language major, chances of employment in 
areas of government service, military service, teaching, international travel, law, business, in- 
dustry and mass communications, to name but a few, are greatly enhanced by the training in 
foreign languages. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE STUDY ABROAD/TRAVEL ABROAD 

North Carolina A&T State University through the Department of Foreign Languages offers 
Summer Study Abroad Programs to Costa Rica, France, Mexico and Gabon (Africa). Students 
may receive up to six credit hours for courses successfully completed in these study abroad 
programs. All students participating in these programs are accompanied to the foreign coun- 
tries by a program director who is a faculty member of the Department of Foreign Languages. 

Costa Rica: Qualified students may apply to participate in this summer study abroad pro- 
gram, which is in conjunction with the Forester Intensive Language Institute of Costa Rica in 
San Jose, Costa Rica. 

France: In conjunction with EF Educational Tours, students may apply for participation in 
this summer travel abroad program. 

Guatemala: Qualified students may apply to participate in this summer study abroad pro- 
gram, which is in conjunction with the Academia de Espanol in Antigua, Guatemala. 

Mexico: Qualified students may apply to participate in this summer study abroad program, 
which is in conjunction with Cuauhnahuac Instituto Colectivo de Lengua y Cultura in 
Cuernavaca, Mexico. 

Gabon (Africa): In conjunction with the University of Masuku in Franceville, Gabon (Af- 
rica), qualified students may apply for participation in this program in order to acquire the 
African Francophone experience. 

All study abroad programs and cultural enrichment programs were developed by faculty 
within the Department of Foreign Languages at North Carolina A&T State University. 



191 



REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR ROMANCE LANGUAGES - FRENCH 

FOLA 300 FOLA 4 1 1 FOLA 505 

FOLA 30 1 FOLA 4 1 5 FOLA 506 

FOLA 400 FOLA 416 FOLA 508 

FOLA 410 FOLA 417 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR ROMANCE LANGUAGES - SPANISH 

FOLA 320 FOLA 441 FOLA 45 1 

FOLA 321 FOLA 442 FOLA 452 

FOLA 404 FOLA 450 FOLA 460 

FOLA 440 

REQUIRED MAJOR CUIN COURSES FOR ROMANCE LANGUAGES - 
FRENCH OR SPANISH SECONDARY EDUCATION 

CUIN 102 CUIN 436 CUIN 560 

CUIN 301 CUIN 500 CUIN 624 

CUIN 400 CUIN 527 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR LIBERAL STUDIES 
(INTERNATIONAL STUDIES) 

The Director of the Liberal Studies Program provides general oversight and administration 
of the program. Advising for the International Studies Concentration is through the Depart- 
ment of Foreign Languages. This degree program requires a minimum of 124 semester hours 
for completion. Students must successfully complete six (6) consecutive semester hours of 
Foreign Language beyond the elementary level for a total of twelve (12) hours in one language. 
In addition, eighteen (18) hours must be selected from the following options: 
ECON 505 HIST 332 HIST 45 1 

ECON 537 HIST 409 JOMC 601 

ENGL 336 HIST 412 PHIL 265 

GEOG 210 HIST 4 1 8 POLI 444 

GEOG322 HIST 431 POLI 445 

HIST 313 HIST 433 POLI 446 

HIST 321 HIST 435 SOCI 300 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES - 

FRENCH 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST 100 


1 


MATH 102 or higher 


3 


MATH 101 or higher 


3 


UNST 130 


3 


UNST 110 


3 


CHEM 100 


3 


BIOL 100 


4 


FOLA 301 


3 


FOLA 300 


3 


UNST 140 


3 


UNST 120 


3 
17 




15 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


SPCH 250 


3 


UNST Electives 


6 


UNST Electives 


6 


FOLA 411 


3 


FOLA 410 


3 


FOLA 416 


3 


FOLA 415 


3 


FOLA 105 or above 


3 


FOLA 104 or above 


3 


Elective or Minor 


3 




18 




18 



192 



JUNIOR YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


FOLA 400 


3 


FOLA 417 


3 


FOLA 505 


3 


FOLA 321 or above 


3 


FOLA 320 or above 


3 


FOLA 505 or 506 


3 


GEOG210 


3 


Elective or Minor 


6 


Elective or Minor 


3 
15 




15 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


FOLA 508 


3 


FOLA Electives 


6 


FOLA Electives 


3 


FOLA 103 


3 


FOLA 102 


3 


FOLA 618 (Capstone) 


3 


Elective or Minor 


6 
15 




12 



Total Credit Hours: 125 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

SPANISH 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST 100 


1 


MATH 102 or higher 


3 


MATH 101 or higher 


3 


UNST 130 


3 


UNST 110 


3 


CHEM 100 


3 


BIOL 100 


4 


FOLA 321 


3 


FOLA 320 


3 


UNST 140 


3 


UNST 120 


3 
17 




15 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


SPCH 250 


3 


UNST Electives 


6 


UNST Electives 


6 


FOLA 441 


3 


FOLA 440 


3 


FOLA 451 


3 


FOLA 442 


3 


FOLA 101 or above 


3 


FOLA 100 or above 


3 


Elective or Minor 


3 




18 




18 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


FOLA 452 


3 


FOLA 455 


3 


FOLA 404 


3 


FOLA 301 or above 


3 


FOLA 300 or above 


3 


FOLA 460 


3 


GEOG 210 


3 


Elective or Minor 


6 


Elective or Minor 


3 
15 




15 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


FOLA 102 


3 


FOLA Electives 


6 


FOLA Electives 


3 


FOLA 103 


3 


FOLA 450 


3 


FOLA 524 (Capstone) 


3 


Electives or Minor 


6 

15 




12 



Total Credit Hours: 125 



193 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 
FRENCH (TEACHING, K-12) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST 100 


1 UNST 140 


3 


MATH 101 or higher 


3 MATH 102 or higher 


3 


UNST 110 


3 UNST 130 


3 


BIOL 100 


4 CHEM 100 


3 


FOLA 300 


3 FOLA 301 


3 


UNST 120 


3 
17 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 


15 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


SPCH 250 


3 UNST Electives 


6 


UNST Electives 


6 FOLA 411 


3 


FOLA 410 


3 FOLA 416 


3 


FOLA 415 


3 FOLA 105 or above 


3 


FOLA 104 or above 


3 CUIN 102 


2 




18 


17 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


FOLA 400 


3 FOLA 417 


3 


FOLA 505 


3 FOLA 321 or above 


3 


FOLA 320 or above 


3 FOLA 506 


3 


GEOG 210 


3 Elective or Minor 


6 


CUIN 301 


2 


15 


Elective 


3 
17 

SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


FOLA 508 


3 CUIN 500 


3 


CUIN 436 


3 CUIN 527 


3 


CUIN 624 


3 CUIN 560 (Capstone) 


6 


FOLA 515 


3 


12 


Elective 


2 
14 





Total Credit Hours: 125 



194 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 
SPANISH (TEACHING, K-12) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST 100 


1 FOLA 321 


3 


MATH 101 or higher 


3 MATH 102 


3 


UNST 110 


3 UNST 130 


3 


BIOL 100 


4 CHEM 100 


3 


UNST 120 


3 UNST 140 


3 


FOLA 320 


3 

17 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 


15 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


SPCH 250 


3 UNST Electives 


6 


UNST Electives 


6 FOLA 441 


3 


FOLA 440 


3 FOLA 442 


3 


FOLA 451 


3 FOLA 101 or above 


3 


FOLA 100 or above 


3 CUIN 102 


2 




18 


17 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


FOLA 452 


3 FOLA 455 


3 


FOLA 404 


3 FOLA 301 or above 


3 


FOLA 300 or above 


3 FOLA 460 


3 


GEOG 210 


3 CUIN 400 


3 


CUIN301 


2 Elective or Minor 


3 


Elective 


3 


15 




17 






SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


FOLA 450 


3 CUIN 500 


3 


CUIN 436 


3 CUIN 527 


3 


CUIN 624 


3 CUIN 560 (Capstone) 


6 


FOLA Elective 


3 


12 


Elective 


2 
14 





Total Credit Hours: 125 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN FOREIGN LANGUAGES 
FRENCH 

Undergraduate 

FOLA 100. Elementary French I* Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a course for beginners which emphasizes the four language skills-listening, speaking, 
reading, and writing. (F;S) 

FOLA 101. Elementary French II* Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a continuation of FOLA 100 with further emphasis placed on the oral-aural approach. 
Prerequisite: FOLA 100 or equivalent. (F;S) 

FOLA 300. Intermediate French I* Credit 3(3-0) 

This course consists of a brief review of pronunciation. Grammar is stressed with emphasis on 
cultural readings. Prerequisites: FOLA 100 and 101, or two units of high school French. (F) 



195 



FOLA301. Intermediate French II* Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of FOLA 300. Stress is placed on grammar, cultural reading and 
conversation. Prerequisite: FOLA 300 or equivalent. (S) 

FOLA 400. Phonetics Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a course in French sounds and diction. It is required of all students majoring and minoring 
in French, and recommended for those who wish to improve pronunciation. Prerequisites: FOLA 
300 and 301. (F;S) 

FOLA 402. French for Reading Comprehension Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes the development of skills needed for reading competency and interpretation; 
preparation for French reading proficiency examinations; emphasis placed on vocabulary 
development; mastery of all aspects of noun/pronoun character and modifiers; knowledge of 
tense, mood and form of verb structure; reading comprehension analysis and evaluation of 
selected passages. Readings will be in areas as the humanities, mathematics, social and natural 
sciences. Prerequisite: Successful completion of foreign language requirements in major area 
or consent of instructor. (F;S) 

FOLA 405. Introduction to Business French Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will enhance the student's ability to communicate in a multilingual environment. It 
will equip students with the necessary tools to conduct international business transactions. The 
course is conducted in French. Prerequisites: FOLA 300 and 301. (F;S) 

FOLA 410. Intermediate Oral French Credit 3(3-0) 

This is an intermediate oral French course, which prepares students for FOLA 41 1 . It is designed 
to enable students to understand lectures and conversations of average tempo. Prerequisites: 
FOLA 300 and 301. (F;S) 

FOLA 411. Advanced Oral French Credit 3(3-0) 

This course offers students intensive training in self-expression and an opportunity to improve 
pronunciation, diction, reading and speaking. Prerequisite: FOLA 410. (F;S) 

FOLA 415. Survey of French Literature I Credit 3(3-0) 

This course provides a general introduction to the study of French literature. It gives a clear 
idea of the great periods and main tendencies in history of French thought and letters from 842 
to the 18th century. (F;S) 

FOLA 416. Survey of French Literature II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of French literature from the 18th century to the present. (F;S) 

FOLA 417. Literature of Afro-French Expression Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an introduction to the literary style and currents of thoughts in poetry and prose 
of selected Afro-French writers in the Caribbean; special attention is given to "Negritude" as 
reflected in major works of selected Afro-French and Francophone African authors. Prerequisite: 
French 301 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. (F;S) 

FOLA 505. Advanced French Composition Credit 3(3-0) 

This is an advanced course in oral and written self-expression in French. Special attention 
given to vocabulary building, free composition and conversation, prepared and improvised, 
covering the many phases of everyday activities. (F;S) 

FOLA 506. Advanced French Grammar and Composition Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to give students practical training in the use of advanced French grammar 
and reading. (F;S) 

FOLA 508. French Civilization Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a general survey of the history of France, with emphasis on the social, political 
and economic development designed to give students an understanding of present conditions 

196 



and events. A detailed study of such French institutions as art, music, and education is included. 
This course is also offered in conjunction with reports of collateral readings. (F;S) 

FOLA 515. Structural Linguistics in the Teaching of French Credit 3(3-0) 

This course applies structural linguistic forms, doctrine and methodology to the teaching of 
French historical development of the French language. Presentation of dialogues and drills in 
French will be included. Emphasis is on phonemics, morphology and syntax. (F;S) 

FOLA 520. Selected Tales, Legends and Proverbs of Francophone Africa Credit 3(3-0) 

This course on the francophone tales of Africa will introduce the student to African culture and 
oral literary thoughts. Based on the analysis of these tales and proverbs, students will gain a 
better understanding of the African family structure and social organization. The course is 
conducted in French. Prerequisite: FOLA 410 or consent of instructor. (F;S) 

FOLA 521. Selected Poetry and Prose from Francophone Writers of 

Central Africa Credit 3(3-0) 

The study of poetry and prose from francophone writers of Central Africa is an advanced 
francophone course. Its goal is to give the students a solid knowledge through analysis of 
poetry and prose of African lyricism, politics, and philosophical themes. The course is conducted 
in French. Prerequisites: FOLA 410 and 41 1. (F;S) 

FOLA 524. Seminar in Foreign Languages Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes readings and special topics in French and Spanish. Presentations from 
students, faculty and guest lectures will also be included. Papers showing research techniques 
in literary studies are required of all candidates for a degree with concentrations in French or 
Spanish. Prerequisite: FOLA 320 or FOLA 300. (F;S) 

FOLA 528. Independent Study in Foreign Languages Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes independent study and research in a special area of the foreign language. 
Prerequisite: FOLA 320 or FOLA 300. (F;S) 

Advanced Undergraduate 

FOLA 602. Second Language Teaching and Learning Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes theoretical positions and practices in second language teaching and learning. 
Special features of the course will be practice, activities, and strategies for teaching and learning 
a new language and for developing the proficiency level(s) in a second language. Prerequisite: 
Junior standing. (F;S) 

FOLA 603. Oral Course for Teachers of Foreign Languages Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed for teachers of foreign languages to improve pronunciation. (F;S) 

FOLA 606. Research in the Teaching of Foreign Languages Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is open to students who are interested in undertaking the study of a special problem 
in the teaching of a foreign language. (F;S) 

FOLA 607. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century Credit 3(3-0) 

This course presents Classicism through masterpieces of Comeille, Racine, Moliere and other 
authors of the "Golden Period" in French letters. (F;S) 

FOLA 608. French Literature in the Eighteenth Century Credit 3(3-0) 

This course presents the life and works of Montesquieu, Voltaire, and Rousseau as the main 
emphasis. (F;S) 

FOLA 609. French Literature of the Nineteenth Century Credit 3(3-0) 

The great literary currents of the nineteenth century Romanticism and Realism will be studied. 
(F;S) 



197 



FOLA 610. The French Theatre Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a thorough study of the French theatre from the Middle Ages to the present. 
(F;S) 

FOLA 612. The French Novel Credit 3(3-0) 

The novel from the Seventeenth Century to the present will be studied. (F;S) 

FOLA 614. French Syntax Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to teach grammar on the advanced level. (F;S) 

FOLA 616. Contemporary French Literature Credit 3(3-0) 

This course deals with the chief writers and literary currents from 1900 to the present. (F;S) 

FOLA 618. Selected Afro-French Poets Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is the study and analysis of the most representative works of Afro-French poets of 
South America, Africa and the Caribbean. Prerequisite: FOLA 410, 411, 412 or consent of 
instructor. (F;S) 
* Students are required to purchase supplemental materials for this course. 

SPANISH 
Undergraduate 

FOLA 104. Elementary Spanish I* Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a course for beginners, which emphasizes the four language skills of listening, speaking, 
reading, and writing. The course is conducted in Spanish. (F;S) 

FOLA 105. Elementary Spanish II* Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of Elementary Spanish 104 and introduces students to more 
advanced grammar. There is emphasis on improving the four skills taught in Spanish 104. The 
course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: FOLA 104, Spanish Placement Test, or consent 
of instructor. (F;S) 

FOLA 320. Intermediate Spanish I* Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation from Elementary Spanish 105. There is a review of grammar and 
introduction to more advanced grammar. The course places emphasis on improving the skills 
taught in FOLA 105. It is conducted in Spanish and students begin to read essays and short 
stories in Spanish. Prerequisite: FOLA 105, Spanish Placement Test, or consent of instructor. 
(F;S) 

FOLA 321. Intermediate Spanish II* Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of FOLA 320. There is a review and completion of Spanish 
grammar. The course places emphasis on improving the four skills of reading, listening, speaking 
and writing. Students will also read short stories and essays. The course is conducted in Spanish. 
Prerequisite: FOLA 320, or equivalent, or consent of instructor. (F;S) 

FOLA 401. Spanish for Reading Comprehension Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes the development of skills needed for reading competency and interpretation; 
preparation for Spanish reading proficiency examination, emphasis placed on vocabulary 
development; mastery of all aspects of noun/pronoun character and modifiers; knowledge of 
tense, mood and form of verb structure; reading comprehension analysis and evaluation of 
selected passages. Readings will be in such areas as the humanities, the sciences, social and 
natural sciences and other areas of students' interests. Prerequisite: FOLA 321. (F;S) 

FOLA 404. Afro-Hispanic Literature Credit 3(3-0) 

The course is designed to provide the student with a general knowledge of Afro-Hispanic 
literature in its many manifestations throughout Spanish America and the Caribbean. 
Representative texts will be read within the context of the sociohistoric and cultural influences 

198 



that have shaped the black experience in Spanish America. The course is conducted in Spanish. 
Prerequisite: FOLA 321 or equivalent. (F;S) 

FOLA440. Phonetics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes a systematic analysis of speech sounds, and the operation of phonetic 
laws. Prerequisite: Spanish 105 or equivalent. (F;S) 

FOLA 441. Intermediate Spanish Conversation Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides practice and drill in oral Spanish based principally on topics of current 
interest and culture. It gives an introduction to more advanced listening and comprehensive 
practices. The course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: FOLA 320 or consent of instructor. 
This course may be taken simultaneously with FOLA 321. (F;S) 

FOLA 442. Introduction to Spanish Literature Credit 3(3-0) 

This course emphasizes readings of representative authors of Spain. (F;S) 

FOLA 450. La Cultura Hispanica Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers the significant elements of Hispanic Civilization: geography, history, 
literature, and economics of the Spanish people. (F;S) 

FOLA 451. Survey of Spanish Literature I Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a survey of Spanish literature from the Cid through the Golden Age with assigned 
readings and reports. (F;S) 

FOLA 452. Survey of Spanish Literature II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a survey of Spanish literature from the seventeenth century to the present. (F;S) 

FOLA 453. Americanos: Latino Culture in the United States Credit 3(3-0) 

This course studies Hispanic Americans as an increasingly important cultural, political, and 
economic force in the United States. Topics to be considered include reasons for emigrating, 
U.S. immigration policy, assimilation, discrimination, affirmative action, bilingual education, 
alliance and conflict with African Americans in political and economic arenas, and the Latin 
"boom" in the arts. The class will be conducted in Spanish, with an emphasis on discussion and 
composition. Prerequisite: FOLA 321 or consent of instructor. (F;S) 

FOLA 455. Syntax Credit 3(3-0) 

This course involves systematic study of Spanish grammar with conversational and other 
exercises based on contemporary authors. (F;S) 

FOLA 460. Introduction to Spanish for Business Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to enhance the student's ability to relate to a business environment in 
an increasingly important commercial language both nationally and internationally. It will 
introduce the student to the vocabulary and discourse related to business topics and functional 
areas as well as to the cultural setting of business. These topics will be interwoven with a 
grammar review taught in a business context. The course will be conducted in Spanish and will 
include some translating activities. Prerequisite: FOLA 321. (F;S) 

FOLA 461. Advanced Spanish for Business Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to complete and complement FOLA 460. It will provide the student 
with a solid foundation in the vocabulary and discourse related to business topics and functional 
areas. It will further develop the understanding of cultural settings in business. The course will 
be conducted in Spanish and will include some translating and interpreting activities. 
Prerequisite: FOLA 460. (F;S) 

FOLA 524. Seminar in Foreign Languages Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes readings and special topics in French and Spanish. Presentations from 
students, faculty and guest lectures will also be included. Papers showing research techniques 

199 



in literary studies are required of all candidates for a degree with concentrations in French or 
Spanish. Prerequisite: FOLA 320 or FOLA 300. (F;S) 

FOLA 528. Independent Study in Foreign Languages Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes independent study and research in a special area of the foreign language. 
Prerequisite: FOLA 320 or FOLA 300. (F;S) 

GERMAN 

FOLA 102. Elementary German I Credit 3(3-0) 

The fundamentals of pronunciation and grammar will be studied. Attention is given to prepared 
and sight translations and vocabulary building. (F;S) 

FOLA 103. Elementary German II* Credit 3(3-0) 

This course continues the emphasis on grammar, vocabulary building, prepared and sight 
translations. Maximum attention given to graded readings in German prose and drama. (F;S) 

FOLA 202. German Readings in the Natural Social Sciences and 

Technical Field Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes individualized readings in the natural, social sciences and technical fields 
for students desirous of developing competency in German. (F;S) 

FOLA 204. Introduction to Business German Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will introduce students to the German language of everyday business dealings. 
Emphasis will be placed on those aspects that have an impact on the average citizen such as 
daily business dealings, social and environmental problems, and the dependence of the population 
on international trade. Prerequisites: FOLA 102 and 103. (F;S) 

FOLA 420. Conversational German Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes intensive practice in everyday German. Prerequisite: German 102, 103, or 
approval of instructor. (F;S) 

FOLA 422. Intermediate German I Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is open to students who have completed German 102 and 103. The students read a 
cross-section of the simpler writings in German literature and German newspapers. (F;S) 

FOLA 423. Intermediate German II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of FOLA 422. Readings from German literature are included. 
(F;S) 

FOLA 424. Afro-German Studies Credit 3(3-0) 

Afro-German Studies will explore and discuss manuscripts either written by or written about 
Africans living in Germany and manuscripts written about or by Germans living in Africa. The 
manuscripts will be older and written in the older German script: some of the manuscripts will 
be current and modern. Prerequisites: FOLA 422 and FOLA 423. (F;S) 

FOLA 427. Survey of German Literature Credit 3(3-0) 

This course provides general introduction to the study of German literature. It is intended to 
give an overall picture of German literature and an opportunity to read outstanding works not 
offered in other German courses. (F;S) 

RUSSIAN 

FOLA 106. Elementary Russian I* Credit 3(3-0) 

This is an elementary course for beginners which consists of grammar translation, practice in 
pronunciation and limited use of the spoken language. (F;S) 



200 



FOLA107. Elementary Russian II* Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of Elementary Russian 106. Attention is given to more advanced 
grammar. Reading in Russian is stressed. Prerequisite: FOLA 106. (F;S) 

FOLA 310. Literature of American Communism and Soviet Russia Credit 3(3-0) 

This course surveys literature of communism from the depression era through present day in 
the United States and literature of Soviet Russia. Course materials will focus on autobiographies 
of the period, with an emphasis upon the black experience with communism in both the United 
States and Soviet Russia. The course is designed to give students a broader cultural understanding 
of how Americans and Russians view one another. The course is taught in translation. (F;S) 

FOLA 311. Technical Russian Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to teach basic reading and translation skills as well as vocabulary 
building, with an emphasis on the sciences/engineering. Course readings will be selected based 
on enrolled students' majors. The course is taught in translation. Prerequisites: FOLA 106 and 
107. (F;S) 

FOLA 322. Intermediate Russian I Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of basic Russian grammar. There is emphasis on reading, 
composition, and conversation. Prerequisite: FOLA 107. (F;S) 

FOLA 323. Intermediate Russian II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of Intermediate Russian I. Students will analyze well-known 
Russian works in order to develop a competency in Russian. Emphasis will also be placed on 
conversation and composition. Prerequisite: FOLA 322. (F;S) 

JAPANESE 

FOLA 108. Elementary Japanese I* Credit 3(3-0) 

This is an elementary course for beginners, which consists of practice in pronunciation and 
usage of the spoken language. This course is designed to offer the basic foundation for the 
development of listening comprehension and speaking skills, and also provides an introduction 
into the Japanese culture. (F;S) 

FOLA 109. Elementary Japanese II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of Elementary Japanese I. The focus will be to examine the 
elementary Japanese alphabet called Hiragana through reading and writing. Prerequisite: FOLA 
108. (F;S) 

FOLA 308. Intermediate Japanese I. Credit 3(3-0) 

This course focuses on development of conversational skills, with practice of reading skills and 
Japanese characters. Speaking and listening practice will be aided through the usage of videotapes 
and other media. (F;S) 

FOLA 309. Intermediate Japanese II * Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of FOLA 308. In addition to practice to improve oral proficiency, 
this course will reinforce reading and writing skills, with emphasis on composition and oral 
presentation. (F;S) 

PORTUGUESE 

FOLA 110. Elementary Portuguese I * Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a course for beginners, which emphasizes the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, 
and writing. The course is conducted in Portuguese. (F;S) 



201 



FOLA111. Elementary Portuguese II * Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of Elementary Portuguese I and introduces students to more 
advanced grammar. There is emphasis on improving the four skills taught in Elementary 
Portuguese I. The course is taught in Portuguese. (F;S) 

FOLA 314. Intermediate Portuguese I* Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation from Elementary Portuguese II. There is a review of grammar and 
introduction to more advanced grammar. The course places an emphasis on improving the 
skills taught in Elementary Portuguese II. The course is taught in Portuguese, and students 
begin reading essays and short stories in Portuguese. (F;S) 

FOLA 315. Intermediate Portuguese II* Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of Intermediate Portuguese I. There are reviews and completion 
of Portuguese grammar. The course places an emphasis on improving the four skills of reading, 
listening, speaking, and writing. Students will also read short stories and essays. The course is 
conducted in Portuguese. (F;S) 
* Students are required to purchase supplemental materials for these courses. 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY 
Brigitte E. Archibald Professor 

B.A., The King's College; M.A., Middlebury College; Ph.D., University of Tennessee 

Jose Alberto Bravo de Rueda Assistant Professor 

B.A., Pontificia Universidad Catolica; M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland - College Park 

Nita M. Dewberry Associate Professor and Associate Dean 

B.A., North Carolina State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill 

Carolyn R. Durham Associate Professor and Chairperson 

B.A., Drew University; M.A., Ph.D., Rutgers University 

Mark Groundland Assistant Professor 

B.A., M.A., University of Delaware, Ph.D., University of Kentucky 

Chinedum Emmanuel Ikegwu Associate Professor 

B.A., University of the District of Columbia; M.A., Antioch School of Law; Ph.D. Howard 

University 

Margaret L. Morris Assistant Professor 

B.A., Norfolk State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 

Elie Mbumina Lecturer 

B.S., Winston-Salem State University; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University 

Pedro Nino Lecturer 

B.A., Universidad Central de Venezuela; M.A., Universidad Santa Maria 



202 



Department of History 

http://www.ncat.edu/~history/ 



Olen Cole, Jr., Chairperson 

OBJECTIVES 

The Department of History offers students a knowledge of the past which enables them to 
better understand today's world and to prepare for the future. The department also helps stu- 
dents develop skills in research, analysis, decision-making, and communication. These skills 
prepare students for successful careers, constructive participation in civic affairs, and lifelong 
learning. In short, the department of history emphasizes the personal development of each 
student. 

The specific objectives of the History Department are: 1) to contribute to the general educa- 
tion of students by providing the historical, geographical, and philosophical background for 
studying the arts, the sciences, and technical subjects; 2) to give historical content and profes- 
sional skills to students preparing for careers in fields such as education, law, religion, interna- 
tional affairs, social service, journalism, history, or government; 3) to offer a curriculum which 
allows students to pursue the history of all areas of the world; 4) to offer a course of study 
leading to the Master of Science Degree in Education with a concentration in history; and, 5) to 
offer a course of study leading to the Master of Science Degree in Education with a concentra- 
tion in history; and, 6) to provide instruction for students preparing for doctoral programs. 

In carrying out its aims and objectives, the History Department offers a broad range of 
courses in history as well as courses in geography and philosophy. To help ensure student 
success the Department assigns each student major to an advisor and it is particularly impor- 
tant that students consult their advisors when planning their educational programs. The De- 
partment also offers students a variety of extracurricular opportunities to enrich their college 
experiences. These activities include the History Newsletter, Phi Alpha Theta International 
Honor Society in History, The History Scholars, and numerous public lectures. Finally, the 
Department participates in the University Honors Program, which enables outstanding stu- 
dents to work closely with faculty members on special course and research assignments. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

History - Bachelor of Arts 

History Education - Master of Science* 

Leadership Studies- Doctor of Philosophy* 

* See the Graduate School Bulletin 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The admission of students to the undergraduate degree programs in the History Department 
is based upon the general admission requirements of the University. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

History Major - A student in the history major must complete 124 semester hours of Uni- 
versity courses. Included in the 124 hours are 45 hours in history courses (24 hours at the 400 
level or above; remaining hours must be at the 200 level or above) and 18 hours in the social 
sciences. A minimum grade of "C" must be achieved in these history and social science courses. 
Students who wish to specialize in the history of Africa and African- Americans may pursue the 
special concentration in Africana history within the history major. 

203 



The Minor in History - Students desiring to minor in history must complete 18 semester 
hours in history at the 200 level or above including HIST 204, 205, 408 and 409. 

The Minor in African and African- American History - The minor in African and African- 
American History consists of 18 semester hours of history courses distributed as follows: 

Required Courses: 12 hours 

HIST 201, 202, 215, and 216 

Elective Courses: 6 hours to be selected from the following: 

HIST 272, 273, 320, 412, 416, 425, 455, 615, 616, 617, and 628 

The Minor in Museum Studies - The minor in museum studies consists of 1 8 semester hours 
of courses as follows: HIST 270, 271, 272, 273, 320, and 321. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

The undergraduate degree program in history leads to careers in journalism, business, ar- 
chives and museums, international affairs, and government service, among others. It also pre- 
pares students for law school, theological seminary, and other graduate and professional school 
programs. 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR HISTORY 

HIST 201 HIST 205 HIST 409 

HIST 202 HIST 250 HIST 599 

HIST 204 HIST 408 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR HISTORY 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 




Credit 


Second Semester 




Credit 


BIOL 100 or CHEM 100 and 1 10 


4 


BIOL 100 or CHEM 100 and 1 10 


4 


ENGL 100 




3 


ENGL 101 




3 


MATH 101 




3 


MATH 102 




3 


HIST 100 




3 


HIST 101 




3 


PHED 10 lor 200 




L2 


PHED 101 (if PHED 200 


not taken) 0- 1 






14-15 


SPCH 250 




3 
16-17 






SOPHOMORE YEAR 






First Semester 




Credit 


Second Semester 




Credit 


HIST 204 




3 


HIST 205 




3 


HIST 250 




3 


POLI200or210 




3 


PSYC 320 




3 


ECON 305, SOCI 302, or 


HIST 400 


1 3 


FOLA 




3 


FOLA 




3 


ENGL 200 




3 


ENGL 201 




3 


PHIL 260, 262, 263, 


264, 265, 








15 


or 266 




3 
18 












JUNIOR YEAR 






First Semester 




Credit 


Second Semester 




Credit 


HIST 403 




3 


HIST 404 




3 


HIST 201 




3 


HIST 202 




3 


Social Science Elective 2 


6 


Free Electives 3 




3 


ECON300or301 




3 


HIST Electives 4 




3 






15 


HIST Elective (Non-Western) 5 


3 












15 



204 



SENIOR YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Social Science Elective 2 


3 


Free Electives 3 


HIST Electives 4 


9 


HIST Electives 4 


Free Electives 3 


3 
14-15 


HIST 599 



Credit 
6 
6 
3 

15 



Total Credit Hours: 124 



HIST 400 will count as a Social Science course for History majors who take it instead ofECON 305 or SOCI 

302. 

9 hrs. - Students may take any Geography, Political Science, Sociology, or Anthropology courses for which 

they meet the prerequisites. 

12 hrs. - Students may take any courses offered at the University for which they meet the prerequisites. 

18 hrs. of which 6 hrs. must be at the 400 level or above. Choose from HIST 203, 209, 215,216, 220, 225, 230, 

270, 271, 272, 273, 275, 300, 302, 305, 306, 307, 312, 313, 320, 321, 332, 334, 340, 351, 355, 400, 401, 402, 

404, 405, 407, 410, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420, 421, 422, 425, 430, 431, 432, 433, 435, 440, 

450, 451, 455, 460, 461, or 477. Seniors may also choose from HIST600, 603, 605, 606, 607, 610, 615, 616, 

617, 618, 619, 620, 621, 622, 623, 625, 626, 628, 629, 630, or 633 

3 hrs. - Choose from HIST 21 5, 216, 417, 418, 320, 430, 431, 332, 412, or 444. Seniors may also choose from 

HIST 616, 617, 618, 619, 620, or 621. 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR HISTORY 

(Option: Africana History) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 






Credit 


Second Semester 




Credit 


BIOL 100 or CHEM 100 and 1 10 


4 


BIOL 100 or CHEM 100 and 1 10 


4 


ENGL 100 






3 


ENGL 101 




3 


MATH 101 






3 


MATH 102 




3 


HIST 100 






3 


HIST 101 




3 


PHED 101 or 200 




iz2 


PHED 101 (if PHED 200 


not taken) 0- 1 








14-15 


SPCH 250 




3 
16-17 








SOPHOMORE YEAR 






First Semester 






Credit 


Second Semester 




Credit 


HIST 204 






3 


HIST 205 




3 


HIST 250 






3 


POLI200or210 




3 


PSYC 320 






3 


ECON 305, SOCI 302, or 


HIST 400 


>' 3 


FOLA 






3 


FOLA 




3 


ENGL 200 






3 


ENGL 201 




3 


PHIL 260, 262, 


263, 


264, 265, 








15 


or 266 






3 
18 














JUNIOR YEAR 






First Semester 






Credit 


Second Semester 




Credit 


HIST 403 






3 


HIST 404 




3 


HIST 201 






3 


HIST 202 




3 


Social Science Electives 2 


6 


Free Electives 3 




3 


ECON300orECON301 


3 


HIST Electives 4 




6 








15 






15 



205 



First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Free Electives 3 


3 


Free Electives 3 


Social Science Electives 2 


3 


HIST 599 


HIST 215 


3 


HIST 216 


HIST Electives 4 


6 

15 


HIST Electives 4 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credit 
6 

3 
3 
3 
15 

Total Credit Hours: 124 

' HIST 400 will count as a Social Science course if taken in place ofECON 305 or SOCI 302. 

2 9 hrs. - Students may choose from POLI 220, POLI 445, POLI 447, or SOCI 314. 

3 12 hrs.- Students may take any courses offered at the University for which they meet the prerequisites. 

4 15 hrs. of which 6 hrs. must be at the 400 level or above. Choose from HIST 203, 272, 273, 31 7, 320, 355, 400, 
404, 412, 416, 425, 433, 440, 444, 451 or 455. Seniors may choose from HIST 615, 616, 618, 619, 621, 628, 
or 629. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN HISTORY 

HIST 100. History of World Civilizations-Part I Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a survey of the social, political, economic, religious, and cultural developments 
in world civilizations from the beginnings in the ancient world through the 16th century. (F;S;SS) 

HIST 101. History of World Civilizations-Part II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of the social, political, economic, religious, and cultural 
developments in world civilizations from the 17th century to the present. (F;S;SS) 

HIST 201. African-American History to 1877 Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a survey of the history of African- Americans in the United States from the African 
background through the Civil War. The emphasis is on American slavery, the abolition movement, 
the free African- American community, Civil War, Emancipation, and Reconstruction. (F;S;SS) 

HIST 202. African-American History Since 1877 Credit 3(3-0) 

This course emphasizes African-American leadership organizations, achievement, and the 
struggle of African- Americans for equality in the United States since 1877. (F;S;SS) 

HIST 203. North Carolina A&T State University: A Legacy of 

Social Activism and Aggie Pride Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines establishment and evolution of North Carolina A&T State University 
within the context of the development of American higher education. With the use of various 
primary and secondary sources, students will gain a greater knowledge of the development and 
growth of the institution during major historical periods by examining past and present leaders, 
facilities, programs, and accomplished alumni. Attention will be given to the impact of the 
University and its alumni on political, social, economic, and intellectual development at the 
local, national, and international levels. Emphasis is placed on the institution's and activists' 
impact on the Civil Rights movement and the pivotal role that each played. The course will also 
explore relevant contemporary issues and the institution's global perspective in the new mil- 
lennium. (F;S;SS) 

HIST 204. U.S. History From 1492-1877 Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the basic diplomatic, political, economic and sociocultural forces in the 
formation and development of the United States to 1877. Emphasis is placed upon political 
developments within a broad economic, social and cultural context. (F;S;SS) 

HIST 205. U.S. History Since 1877 Credit 3(3-0) 

This course continues the examination of basic diplomatic, political, economic and sociocultural 
forces in the development of the United States since 1877. Study of these major historical 



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elements is pursued in an effort to help students to better understand the problems and challenges 
of contemporary American life, both domestic and foreign. (F;S;SS) 

HIST 209. The American Military Experience Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed primarily to enable the student to understand better the role played by 
the armed forces in American society today through a study of the origins and development of 
military institutions, traditions, and practices in the United States, from 1775 to the present. 
(DEMAND) 

HIST 215. History of Africa to 1800 Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a general survey of the history of Africa to 1800. Major areas of study include 
the genesis of man in Africa, the ancient world, early East and West civilizations, and the 
coming of Europe. (F) 

HIST 216. History of Africa Since 1800 Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a general survey of the history of Africa since 1800. Major areas of study include 
the slave trade, the underdevelopment of Africa, Western imperialism and the African partition, 
and the growth of nationalism. (S) 

HIST 220. History of Science and Technology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a survey of major scientific discoveries and technological innovations since the 
Scientific Revolution. Special attention will be paid to the Newtonian mechanistic worldview, 
theories of evolution, relativity, industrial revolution, medical advances, nuclear energy, 
computers and robotics. The social, economic, and ethical impact of modern scientific and 
technical discoveries will also be discussed. (DEMAND) 

HIST 225. America in the 1960s Credit 3(3-0) 

This course surveys and analyzes the various movements which made the 1960s one of the 
most important and tumultuous decades in American history. Special emphasis will be placed 
on the civil rights movement, opposition to the Vietnam War, environmentalism, youth culture, 
and feminism. Attention will also be given to the continuing influence of the 1960s on the 
development of American society. (DEMAND) 

HIST 230. History of Modern Medicine Credit 3(3-0) 

This course surveys the development of modern medical theories and practices, the professional 
development of physicians and nurses, the impact of technology on health care, the rise of 
hospitals, the intersections between society and medicine, factors affecting wellness, and the 
current problems facing the American health care system. Attention will also be given to the 
ethical dilemmas faced by doctors and nurses in this age of high tech health. (DEMAND) 

HIST 250. The Nature, Study, and Writing of History Credit 3(3-0) 

The course includes material and presentations leading to an understanding of the basic nature 
of history, how to study it, methods and techniques in researching and writing it, basic computer 
and quantification skills, and more summarily, historiography and philosophies of history. (F;S) 

HIST 270. Introduction to Museums Credit 3(3-0) 

This course introduces the student to the collecting and educational functions of the museum. 
Students will learn how museum professionals research, interpret and exhibit the holdings of a 
museum for the benefit of the community. Students will gain experience in developing their 
own exhibits. Students will also have the opportunity to visit local historical projects, and 
museums to study how these agencies carry out mandated duties. (DEMAND) 

HIST 271. Museum Practice and Collection Maintenance Credit 3(3-0) 

This course introduces students to the duties of museum registrars, curators, conservationists, 
and administrators. Students will learn how to catalog and preserve the items in a museum's 



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collection. Students will also visit other local museums to gain greater knowledge of museum 
operations. (DEMAND) 

HIST 272. Oral History Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will introduce students to the ethics and techniques of collecting, preserving, and 
interpreting oral interviews. They will gain practice in using oral evidence, along with original 
primary sources and photographs, by exploring the role, impact, and consequences of race, 
gender and class on American history. (DEMAND) 

HIST 273. African-American History and Museum Collecting Credit 3(3-0) 

Students will develop collections of materials and create exhibits on themes in African American 
history, especially in North Carolina. Students will learn how to preserve and catalog 
photographs, documents, and archival materials. They will also be introduced to the theory and 
ethics of historical collecting, including the criteria, which should be used to determine if an 
item is of museum quality and historical importance. Prerequisite: HIST 202 or permission of 
instructor. (DEMAND) 

HIST 275. Introduction to Women's Studies Credit 3(3-0) 

This course explores the significant of women's studies, its contemporary relevance, and its 
pertinence to interdisciplinary scholarship. It introduces students to women's studies scholars 
and activists and traces the develop of feminist theory. 

HIST 300. Ancient History Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a history of civilizations from the beginnings in the Near East and Egypt through 
Hellenism and the Roman Empire. (DEMAND) 

HIST 302. The Pre-Modern West Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a survey of major developments in the Mediterranean and Western Europe from 
the origins of the Roman Empire through the end of the Middle Ages. (DEMAND) 

HIST 305. Socialism Since Karl Marx Credit 3(3-0) 

This course analyzes the transformation of socialist thought and practice since the time of 
Marx. Special attention will be devoted to Marxist doctrines, nineteenth century Revisionism, 
Social Democracy, and twentieth century Communism. (DEMAND) 

HIST 306. History of Women Since 1800 Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will trace the changes in female self-images and roles since the early 19th century 
in Europe and the United States. It will concentrate upon the growth of new educational and 
occupational opportunities for women, changing concepts of motherhood, and the rise of female 
protest movement. (DEMAND) 

HIST 307. The Historical Origins of Environmental Crises Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will deal with man's changing philosophical and technological relationship with 
his natural environment since the start of the Industrial Revolution. (DEMAND) 

HIST 312. History of Religions Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a course that surveys the origin and development of the traditional religions of India and 
China and the three "Religions of the Book": Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. (DEMAND) 

HIST 320. African History Through Art and Archaeology Credit 3(3-0) 

Drawing heavily on the holdings of the Mattye Reed African Heritage Center and other museums, 
this course will demonstrate how to use material culture collections of art, artifacts, and 
archaeological findings to document and interpret African history. (DEMAND) 



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HIST 321. Cultural History, Ethnicity, and Ethnographic 

Collections in America Credit 3(3-0) 

By drawing upon the ethnographic and multicultural collections of museums in North Carolina, 
students will become familiar with the role that museums can play in documenting and 
interpreting the culturally diverse history of the United States. (DEMAND) 

HIST 332. The Modern Middle East Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will focus on the Middle East from the mid 19th century to the present. Areas of 
study will include the nature of Islamic society; the rise of nationalism and independence 
movements; the creation of the state of Israel; and the Arab-Israeli conflict. (DEMAND) 

HIST 334. Honors in History Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes intensive reading and study or research in the field of history for 
departmental majors with a 3.0 average. (DEMAND) 

HIST 340. History of England Credit 3(3-0) 

This course concentrates on English history since 1688. Special attention is given to the following 
topics: The Glorious Revolution, industrialization, imperialism, decolonization, Victorianism, 
Ireland, and contemporary English society. (DEMAND) 

HIST 351. African-Americans in the American West Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers African- American contributions to the development of the western United 
States. Emphasis will be on reading, research, and discussion of the African- American 
experience. (DEMAND) 

HIST 355. African-American Historical Perspectives on Africa Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the historical relationship of African- Americans with Africa, stressing 
the political, economic, and cultural significance of the continent in African-American history 
and thought. Missionary, repatriation, and Pan-African movements will be analyzed, as well as 
the evolving image of Africa in African- American popular culture. (DEMAND) 

HIST 400. Computers in the Study and Teaching of History Credit 3(3-0) 

This course enables students to use computers to research historical topics and prepare materials 
for distribution both in print and electronically. Students will learn to find, access, and critically 
evaluate the quality of on-line databases and the Internet sites of libraries, archives, and museums. 
They will also interact with scholars and each other using electronic mail, electronic message 
boards, and Usenet news. (DEMAND) 

HIST 401. Old Testament History and Literature Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a survey of the books sacred to Judaism, Christianity, and Islam commonly 
called the Old Testament, in the context of the history of the people of Israel who composed 
them. (DEMAND) 

HIST 402. The Rise of Christianity Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a historical study of the origins and development of the Christian Church from 
its beginnings to the end of the ancient world (around 476 A. D.). The political, social, economic, 
intellectual, and religious environment will be considered equally along with the internal 
development of Christian institutions, beliefs, and practices. (DEMAND) 

HIST 405. African-American Religious History (Formerly HIST 404) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course surveys the origins and development of religious beliefs and organizations among 
African-Americans. Topics that will be studied include the rise of separate Christian 
denominations, African antecedents, the political and social role of the African- American church, 
and the appearance of Islamic and other religious groups. The relationships of religion to African- 
American reform and protest movements will be highlighted. (DEMAND) 



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HIST 407. American Diplomatic History Since 1900 Credit 3(3-0) 

American foreign policy and diplomacy from the Spanish- American War to the present will be 
covered in this course. Emphasis is on the impact of foreign policy upon domestic (U.S.) society 
and the growing involvement of the U.S. in international relations. Students are encouraged to 
understand fully and think critically about America's role in the world. (DEMAND) 

HIST 408. Early Modern Europe: Renaissance to 1815 

(Formerly HIST 303) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a survey of major trends in the development of early modern Europe. Topics to 
be discussed include Renaissance, Reformation, Scientific Revolution, Enlightenment, Abso- 
lutism, and the French Revolution. (F) 

HIST 409. Modern Europe Since 1815 (Formerly HIST 304) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a survey emphasizing main trends in European development including political 
and social impact of the French Revolution, Industrial Revolution, authoritarianism vs. liberalism, 
church vs. state, nationalism, imperialism, World Wars I and II, Communism, Nazism, and 
present-day Europe. (S) 

HIST 410. American Constitutional History Credit 3(3-0) 

The development of American constitutionalism from English origins to the present will be 
covered in this course. Emphasis on the development of separation of powers, states' rights, the 
Supreme Court, and the sectional controversy, economic regulations, and the modernization of 
the Bill of Rights, especially problems of desegregation, free speech, obscenity and criminal 
justice. (DEMAND) 

HIST 412. Modernization in Africa from 1920 to the Present Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is the study of African development since World War I. Areas of study include 
nationalism and independence movements, conflicts between traditional and modern ideas, 
United States and African relations, and racism in Southern Africa. (DEMAND) 

HIST 413. Identity and Double-Consciousness: Russian and 

African-American Cultural Identities Credit 3(3-0) 

The topic for this seminar is identity and "double-consciousness.'This topic will be explored 
through a comparison of the creative responses of Russians and African- Americans to Western 
standards of culture and literacy that marginalized and even attempted to erase the historic 
voices of these cultures. In both instances the response was cultural construction of an alterna- 
tive literacy, which involved the very definition of "soul" and rhetoric based on the idea of 
"double-consciousness." After examining the construction of the East European "other" by 
Western Europeans and the shared experience of unfree labor by slaves in North America and 
serfs in Russia, the emergence and assertion of a distinct cultural identity among both Russian 
and African- American thinkers will be examined. (F;S;SS) 

HIST 414. Nationalism Credit 3(3-0) 

Nationalism is one of the most powerful forces in the modern world and is at the root of many 
of the problems facing humanity. This theoretical and comparative course will utilize scholarship 
from a variety of disciplines (history, political science, sociology and geography) in order to 
examine how and why individuals have joined together to construct a collective identity and 
how the present draws upon the past to create nationalism. (F;S;SS) 

HIST 415. The Automobile and the Making of Modern America Credit 3(3-0) 

No country on earth has embraced the automobile as thoroughly as the United States. This 
course analyzes the reasons for the American love affair with the car and the impact of 
automobility on American society and culture from the early twentieth century to the present. 
Topics discussed include the advent of mass production as pioneered by Henry Ford, the 
transformation of the American landscape to meet the needs of the car, the growth of big labor, 

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the rise of consumer culture, the car as a cultural icon, environmental problems created by 
unchecked automobile use, the Japanese challenge to American industrial practices, and current 
efforts to reinvent the car to meet the needs of the future. Prerequisite: HIST 205, HIST 220, or 
permission of the instructor. (DEMAND) 

HIST 416. History of African- American Culture Credit 3(3-0) 

This course begins with an investigation of early African-American cultural developments, 
folk culture, and religious expression in Antebellum America. It also pays special attention to 
the cultural trends of the twentieth century, the "Harlem Renaissance," and urban life. 
(DEMAND) 

HIST 417. Colonialism and Slavery in Latin America and the 

Caribbean (Formerly HIST 317) Credit 3(3-0) 

This survey course begins with an examination of pre-Columbian societies. It then considers 
the changes that accompanied the various European colonial projects in the region, and the 
coming of Latin America's political independence. Topics considered include agrarian change 
and conflict, colonial economic practices, slave systems and slave cultural practices, indig- 
enous resistance and rebellion, the spread and impact of Christianity, colonial state policies, 
and the role of women. Students will have the opportunity to develop their ability to analyze 
and evaluate historical materials, and formulate written and oral arguments. (DEMAND) 

HIST 418. Conflict and Change in Post-Colonial Latin America 

and the Caribbean (Formerly HIST 318) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course surveys social and political conflict and change beginning with the movements for 
political independence and concluding with an assessment of recent developments. Topics 
considered include agrarian change and conflict, economic development and underdevelopment, 
slave emancipation, gender, urbanization and populism, social revolution, labor, and international 
relations and foreign intervention. Students will have the opportunity to develop their ability to 
analyze and evaluate historical materials, and formulate written and oral arguments. (DEMAND) 

HIST 419. Ethno Nationalism and Genocide in Eastern Europe Credit 3(3-0) 

For most of the recent past the nations of Eastern Europe have been prevented from asserting 
their identities fully in independent nation states. In such conditions the idea of the nation 
became Utopian. The collapse of the Soviet Union engendered endless conflicts that resulted in 
the rise of ethno nationalism throughout Eastern Europe, and led to genocide in the Balkans 
and still threatens peace and stability in the region today. The critique of nationalism from the 
standpoint of democracy and the relationship between democracy and nationalism will also be 
examined. (F;S;SS) 

HIST 420. Seminar: Urban America Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes special topics in the rise of the American city and the development of 
urban patterns of life, concentrates on such themes as population shifts to cities, the develop- 
ment of slums and ghettos, growth of municipal institutions and services, and the relationship 
of government with city residents. Prerequisites: HIST 205 and consent of the instructor. (DE- 
MAND) 

HIST 421. Exploring Europe's 'Others' Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will examine that deliberate historical construction of the image of "Eastern" Eu- 
rope and the "Balkans" which categorized entire peoples as being half-barbarian and thus only 
half-civilized. This served to convince "Western" Europeans of their own superiority so that 
the terms "Eastern" Europe and "Balkans" became synonymous with ethnic hatred, backward- 
ness and barbarism. Students will look at literature from these regions in order to understand 
their struggle to confront, resist and critique these stereotypes. (F;S;SS) 

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HIST 422. Colonizer and Colonized: The British Imperial Experience Credit 3(3-0) 

Imperialism was a shared experience that remade the cultures of both the colonized and the 
colonizers. Using Great Britain in general and London in particular as a basis for comparison, 
the course will begin with a discussion of the classic interpretations and criticisms of empire 
and then look at how the imperial experience changed Victorian England into today's vibrant 
multicultural and multiracial society. Students will also examine the psychological effects of 
empire on both colonizers and colonized through the reading of several classic novels. (F;S;SS) 

HIST 423. The History of Women in Africa Credit 3(3-0) 

The image of African women as seen in popular media has often given negative and stereotypical 
images of the role of women on the continent. This course intends to correct that image. It will 
show that women in Africa have always made significant contributions to the history of the 
continent and the world in various areas: economic, social, political and cultural. The course 
intends to highlight contributions from the pre-historic era to the present. 

HIST 425. Topics in African-American History Credit 3(3-0) 

This is an intensive reading, research, and discussion course that will address selected topics in 
African-American history, including the African background, the institution of slavery, 
Abolitionism, the Reconstruction era, migration out of the South, the Civil Rights Movement, 
and African- American intellectual traditions. Prerequisite: HIST 201 and HIST 202 or permission 
of the instructor. (DEMAND) 

HIST 430. Topics in Twentieth Century American History Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes in-depth analysis of selected topics since the late nineteenth century, with 
special emphasis on written historical communication. Prerequisites: 6 hours of American history 
(204 and 205) and the consent of the instructor. (DEMAND) 

HIST 431. History of the Far East to 1800 (Formerly HIST 330) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the history and culture of the Chinese, Japanese, and Vietnamese 
peoples from the early classical civilizations to the middle Ch'ing. (DEMAND) 

HIST 432. History of the Far East Since 1800 (Formerly HIST 331) Credit 3(3-0) 

Areas of study include traditional China under the Ch' ing the impact of the West, feudal Japan, 
modernization in Meiji Japan, the Chinese Revolutions, and the Chinese model in Vietnam. 
(DEMAND) 

HIST 433. United States-East Asian Relations Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the evolution of the relations between the United States and East Asian 
countries in the 19 th and 20 th centuries. It will focus on such themes as mutual perceptions of 
Americans and East Asians, activities of American merchants and missionaries in the region, 
East Asian immigration to the United States, the Pacific War, the Korean War, the Vietnamese 
War, and the normalization of Sino- American relations. (F;S;SS) 

HIST 435. Global History Since 1945 Credit 3(3-0) 

At the end of the World War II, the world political order was fundamentally restructured. The 
old European empires soon came to an end and the world was divided into two dominant 
blocks. This course explores the coming into being of the bipolar world order of the postwar 
period and its eventual demise. Special attention will be given to such issues as global vs. local 
cultures and social formation, development vs. underdevelopment, economic inequalities 
between the northern and southern hemispheres of the globe, wars of national liberation, ethnicity 
and nationalism, technological change and the environmental impact of technology, nation 
states vs. multi-national corporations, and the transformation of global capitalism. The final 
section of the course will deal with the definitions of postmodernity and their relevance for 



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analyzing the developments in the postwar world. Prerequisite: HIST 101 or permission of the 
instructor. (DEMAND) 

HIST 440. African-American Intellectual/Philosophical History Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the ideologies and programs of African- American leaders who have 
commanded both national and international attention from the antebellum period to the present. 
Special consideration will be given to the philosophical continuities and differences among 
leaders in the twentieth century. (DEMAND) 

HIST 444. History of West Africa Since 1800 Credit 3(3-0) 

This course explores the process by which the peoples of West Africa became integrated in the 
modern world system, examines cultural and scientific developments of the region, analyzes 
regional and Pan-African issues, and provides an in-depth study of major themes and problems 
in West African history. (DEMAND) 

HIST 450. Modernization in Historical Perspective Credit 3(3-0) 

This course concentrates on an analysis of the various paths to modernity taken by several 
advanced societies, notably the United States, England, France, Germany, Russia, and Japan. 
Particular attention will be devoted to the causes and effects of industrialization, population 
growth, urbanization, social protest, changes in family structure, intellectual responses to rapid 
change, and the development of the modern state. (DEMAND) 

HIST 451. Russian History (Formerly HIST 350) Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course surveys the history of Russia from earliest times to the present, with emphasis on 
the twentieth century. (DEMAND) 

HIST 455. Comparative Slavery of the Americas Credit 3(3-0) 

This course compares the development of different slave labor systems in the Americas from 
the fifteenth through the nineteenth centuries. After a brief consideration of slavery in the 
ancient world, the course examines the African origins of the slaves; the Atlantic slave trade; 
and slave life, work, culture, resistance, and emancipation in North America, Latin America, 
and the Caribbean. (DEMAND) 

HIST 460. The Old South (Formerly HIST 360) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will focus upon the social, political, cultural, and economic evolution of the Old 
South from the 17th century through the Civil War and Reconstruction eras. In addition, the 
question of Southern distinctiveness and the tension between democracy and slavery will be 
analyzed. Issues of race, class, gender and religion will also be central to the course's investigation 
of rural and urban development in Southern society through 1877. North Carolina will be used 
frequently as a case in point. (DEMAND) 

HIST 461. History of the New South (Formerly HIST 361) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course offers a chronological exploration of the history of the South from the end of 
Reconstruction in 1877 through the development of the concept of "The New South" to the 
politics and culture of the "Sunbelt South" of today. Major topics will include the political, 
economic and social conditions after Reconstruction; the myths and realities of the "New South"; 
Populism and Fusion politics; segregation and disfranchisement in the "New South"; the South 
in the Progressive Era and World War I; race, religion, gender, class and culture; the Depression 
and the new Deal; the South after World War II; urbanization and industrialization; and the 
Civil Rights movement. North Carolina will be used frequently as a case in point. (DEMAND) 

HIST 477. Technology, Empire, and Popular Culture Credit 3(3-0) 

This course focuses on the technologies of the New Imperialism of the late nineteenth Century 
both in the context of their use against native populations in various parts of the world and as 
mechanisms for building consensus in home countries for imperial adventures abroad. It will 

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also examine the process whereby East Asia, South and Southeast Asia, Latin America, and 
Africa were consolidated into a new global system of Western dominance. Sites such as 
international expositions, public museums and libraries, and new forms of mass culture and 
amusement will be explored to demonstrate the appeal of empire in the West. Prerequisites: 
HIST 250 and 101 or 205 or permission of the instructor. (DEMAND) 

HIST 501. 20th and 21st Century Women Activists of the World Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to introduce students to women activists, many of them not widely 
known to the general audience, who fought or are still fighting for social and economic change 
and justice in the United States and around the world. Women of all races, economic classes, 
and varying geographic locations will be studied. The class will examine a multitude of issues 
for which these women advocate, expanding student understanding of the role of global female 
activism. The emphasis upon "struggle over time" and "strategies for change" make this an 
important conversation for men and women alike. 

HIST 502. Research Seminar in Africana Historiography: 

A Comparative Approach Credit 3(3-0) 

This course takes comparative and interdisciplinary approach to studying the historiography of 
Africans in Africa and throughout the Diaspora. The primary course objective is for students to 
learn the general chronology and methodological approaches of Africana historians. Students 
will utilize anti-colonial, liberation, and critical theory paradigms in their research. 

HIST 599. Senior Seminar Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a capstone course for undergraduate majors in the History Department. The course will 
address enduring topics of historical interest requiring extensive readings and a research paper. 
Prerequisite: Senior standing with a major in History or History Education. Other students may 
take the course with the permission of the instructor. (F) 

CUIN 536. Methods of Teaching Social Sciences Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of techniques of social science instruction on the high school level. It is 
required of those planning to teach the subject. Prerequisites: 27 semester hours of social studies 
and 15 semester hours of education and psychology. (F) 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

HIST 600. The British Colonies and the American Revolution Credit 3(3-0) 

The planting and maturation of the English colonies of North America are required. Relationships 
between Europeans, Indians, and transplanted Africans, constitutional development, religious 
ferment, and the colonial economy are studied. (DEMAND) 

HIST 603. Civil War and Reconstruction Credit 3(3-0) 

Causes as well as constitutional and diplomatic aspects of the Civil War, the role of the African- 
American in slavery, in war, and in freedom, and the socio-economic and political aspects of 
Congressional Reconstruction and the emergence of the New South are studied. (DEMAND) 

HIST 605. Twentieth Century Russian History Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a reading, research, and discussion course that examines the history of twentieth century 
Russia with special emphasis on the Russian Revolution, the development of Communist society, 
the impact and legacy of Stalin, relations with the United States and other countries during the 
Cold War, the demise of the Soviet Union, and current problems facing post-society Russia. 
(DEMAND) 



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HIST 606. U.S. History, 1900-1932 Credit 3(3-0) 

This course emphasizes political, economic, social, cultural and diplomatic developments from 
1900 to 1932 with special attention to their effect upon the people of the United States and their 
influence on the changing role of the U.S. in world affairs. (DEMAND) 

HIST 607. U.S. Since 1932-Present Credit 3(3-0) 

With special emphasis on the Great Depression, New Deal, the Great Society, and the expanding 
role of the United States as a world power, World War II, cold war, and the Korean and Vietnam 
conflicts are studied. Major themes include the origin, consolidation, and expansion of the 
New Deal, the growth of executive power, the origins and spread of the Cold War, civil liberties, 
civil rights, and challenges for the extension of political and economic equality and the protection 
of the environment. (DEMAND) 

HIST 610. Seminar in the History of Twentieth Century Technology Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a reading, research, and discussion course, which investigates the development and, 
especially, the impact of major twentieth century technologies. Attention will also be given to 
the process of invention, the relationship between science and technology, and the ethical 
problems associated with some contemporary technologies. (DEMAND) 

HIST 615. Seminar in African-American History Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a reading, research, and discussion course, which concentrates on various aspects of the 
life and history of African- Americans. The emphasis is placed on historiography and major 
themes including nationalism, black leadership and ideologies, and economic development. 
(DEMAND) 

HIST 616. Seminar in African History Credit 3(3-0) 

Research, writing and discussion on selected topics in African history will be included in this 
course. (DEMAND) 

HIST 617. Readings in African History Credit 3(3-0) 

By arrangement with instructor. (SS) 

HIST 618. The African Diaspora Credit 3(3-0) 

This is an advanced reading, research, and discussion course on the historical experience of 
people of African descent in a global context. It examines the worldwide dispersal and 
displacement of Africans over time, emphasizing their migration and settlement abroad over 
the past five centuries. (DEMAND) 

HIST 619. Modern China Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will begin with attention to the main characteristics of traditional Chinese civilization. 
The focus of the course will be on the political, social, economic, and intellectual changes in 
Chinese society from the 1840s to the present. (F;S;SS) 

HIST 620. Seminar in Asian History Credit 3(3-0) 

Research, writing, and selected topics in Asian history will be included in this course. 
(DEMAND) 

HIST 621. Seminar in Latin American and Caribbean History Credit 3(3-0) 

This course requires research, writing and discussion of selected topics in Latin American and 
Caribbean History, including urban and rural conflict, social revolution, race relations, problems 
of underdevelopment, and contemporary issues. (DEMAND) 

HIST 622. History of Asian Women Credit 3(3-0) 

This course briefly examines the conditions of Asian (especially South Asian and East Asian) 
women in traditional societies and focuses on the changes in women's status in modern times 
(since 1800). It covers primarily the following topics: women and economic modernization 



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(especially the impact of industrialization on women), the impact of the introduction of West- 
ern ideas (such as feminism) on women, women and wars (revolutions - especially in China, 
Korea, and Vietnam), women and crimes, women's political participation, and gender rela- 
tions. (F;S;SS) 

HIST 623. Topics in East Asian Culture Credit 3(3-0) 

This course aims at illuminating some key features of East Asian culture, especially in modern 
times. It is concerned with East Asians' beliefs on a variety of issues (e.g., human relations, 
man-nature relations, state-society relations, and health) and the changes of these beliefs in the 
context of Western influence. Considerable attention will be given to such major intellectual 
schools as Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism. (F;S;SS) 

HIST 626. Revolutions in the Modern World Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a seminar course stressing comparative analysis of revolutions and revolutionary 
movements in the United States, France, Russia, China, Cuba, and Iran. Students will also 
evaluate theories of revolution in light of historical examples. (DEMAND) 

HIST 628. The Civil Rights Movement Credit 3(3-0) 

From original research, class lectures, and discussions, students will become familiar with the 
nature of the Civil Rights Movement; will evaluate its successes and failures; and will analyze 
the goals and tactics of each major participating Civil Rights organization. Students will also 
evaluate the impact of the Civil Rights Movement on American society. (DEMAND) 

HIST 629. Seminar on the History of Early Modern Europe Credit 3(3-0) 

Through extensive readings, discussion, research, and writing, students will examine selected 
topics of enduring importance in the history of Europe from the Renaissance through the French 
Revolution. (DEMAND) 

HIST 630. Studies in European History, 1815-1914 Credit 3(3-0) 

This is an intensive study of selected topics in nineteenth century European history. (DEMAND) 

HIST 631. Studies in Twentieth Century Europe, 1914-Present Credit 3(3-0) 

This course offers an intensive study of key topics in twentieth century European history, 
including World Wars I and II, the Russian Revolution, Hitler and the Holocaust, the Depression, 
the Cold War and bipolarism, the Welfare State, the Common Market, the collapse of 
Communism in Eastern Europe, and current problems. (DEMAND) 

HIST 633. Independent Study in History Credit 3(3-0) 

By arrangement with instructor. (F;S;SS) 

GEOGRAPHY 

GEOG 200. Principles of Geography Credit 3(3-0) 

This course surveys the physical characteristics of the earth's surface including landforms, 
climates, vegetation and soils. The emphasis is on global variations and interactions among 
these physical characteristics. (F;S) 

GEOG 210. World Regional Geography Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a survey of the geographic character of the major culture regions of the world. 
Contemporary cultural characteristics are examined within the framework of both environmental 
relationships and historical development. (F;S) 

GEOG 319. Regional Geography of the United States and Canada Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of geographic regions of the United States and Canada. (DEMAND) 



216 



GEOG 322. Economic Geography Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a geographical survey of major economic activity with emphasis on global patterns 
of production and exchange of commodities that are strategic in sustaining the world's population 
and modern economic development. (DEMAND) 

Undergraduate and Graduate 

GEOG 640. Topics in Geography of the United States and Canada Credit 3(3-0) 

Selected topics in cultural geography of the United States and Canada are studied intensively. 
Emphasis is placed upon individual reading and research and group discussion. (DEMAND) 

GEOG 641. Topics in World Geography Credit 3(3-0) 

Selected topics in geography are studied intensively. Concern is for cultural characteristics and 
their interrelationships with each other and with habitat. Emphasis is upon reading, research, 
and discussion. (DEMAND) 

PHILOSOPHY 

PHIL 260. Introduction to Philosophy Credit 3(3-0) 

This is an introductory course covering such topics as theories of reality, the nature of mind and 
knowledge, and the higher values of life. (S) 

PHIL 262. Logic Credit 3(3-0) 

This is an introductory course designed to give a critical analysis of the principles, problems 
and fallacies in reasoning. (F;S;SS) 

PHIL 263. Ethics of Good Life and Character Building Credit 3(3-0) 

This course explores the role of ethics in achieving a good life. The goal is to encourage stu- 
dents to reflect about their motivations and to contemplate the sort of character they might 
aspire to build. Questions examined include: What virtues make a person good? To what extent 
is self-interest compatible with being a virtuous person? What makes life meaningful? Why 
should we act morally and show concern for others? (F;S;SS) 

PHIL 264. Contemporary African American Philosophy Credit 3(3-0) 

This course has two objectives. First, it exposes students to the contributions made by African 
Americans to philosophy. Second, it explores issues of philosophy unique to the African Ameri- 
can experience. Readings are drawn from both contemporary and classic sources. Compari- 
sons between African American and African philosophy will be made. (F;S;SS) 

PHIL 265. World Religions Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the teachings and practices of the world's major religions. This explora- 
tion is conducted as a factual approach in which the history, beliefs, philosophy, practices and 
important figures of each religion are presented. Religions covered include African and Native 
American oral traditions, Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, 
Shinto, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and new religious movements. (F;S;SS) 

PHIL 266. Contemporary Moral Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

This course begins with an examination of various ethical theories and then applies these theories 
to address moral challenges faced by today's society. Topics include the environment, abortion, 
treatment of animals, drug use, pornography, hate speech, euthanasia, famine relief, affirmative 
action and the death penalty. (F;S;SS) 

PHIL 309. Contemporary Philosophy Credit 3(3-0) 

This course involves a critical investigation of some contemporary movements in philosophy 
with special emphasis on existentialism, pragmatism, and positivism. (DEMAND) 



217 



PHIL 400. Ancient Philosophy Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will examine the history of philosophy from the ancient Greeks t medieval Europe- 
ans. Philosophers discussed include the pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, and 
Augustine. Topics will range from theories of nature, persons happiness, human knowledge, 
the good life, and the existence of God. Special focus will be on how each philosopher pro- 
gressed ideas during this time period, thus setting the stage for modern philosophy. (F;S;SS) 

PHIL 401. Modern Philosophy Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will examine the history of philosophy from Descartes through Kant. Special focus 
will be given to the Rationalists (Descartes, Leibniz and Spinoza) and the Empiricists (Locke, 
Berkeley and Hume). Topics discussed include the possibility of human knowledge, the exist- 
ence of God, the nature of causation, and the mind-body problem. How the moderns differed 
from the ancients, the impact the moderns had on the direction of philosophy, and the role 
women played in this philosophical change will also be explored. (F;S;SS) 

PHIL 402. Philosophy of Law Credit 3(3-0 

This course is a philosophical investigation into the nature of law. Students will examine vari- 
ous theories of jurisprudence including natural law, legal positivism, legal naturalism, and 
legal realism. The course will also consider the relationship between law and morality and 
between equality and the law. Finally, students will investigate various philosophical problems 
in criminal and tort law. 

PHIL 441. Media Ethics Credit 3(3-0 

This course applies ethical theory to issues within the media profession. The course begins 
with an examination of major ethical approaches and decision-making strategies and examines 
some ethical challenges faced by media professionals. Topics include privacy versus "the right 
to know." Accuracy, fairness, exploitation in advertising, deceptive practices, media account- 
ability, conflicts of interest, the public interest versus ratings, and the Digital Millennium Act. 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY 

Margaret D. Barrett Associate Professor 

B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.A., Southern Illinois University; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Missouri - Columbia 

Sarah Beale Visiting Lecturer 

B.A., Wake Forest College, M.A.T., Duke University 

Millicent Brown Associate Professor 

B.A., College of Charleston, M.Ed., The Citadel, Ph.D., Florida State University 

Olen Cole, Jr. Professor and Chairperson 

B.A., M.A., California State University - Fresno; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill 

Margaret D. Barrett Associate Professor 

B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.A., Southern Illinois University; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Missouri - Columbia 

Larry Ferguson Visiting Lecturer 

B.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro, M.A., North Carolina A&T State University 

David Harris Visiting Lecturer 

B.A., University of North Carolina at Wilmington, B.A., B.S., University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro; M.A., Indiana University 

218 



Karen L. Hornsby Assistant Professor and Interim Director of 

Liberal Studies Program 

B.A., California State University-Sacramento; M.A., Ph.D., Bowling Green State University 

Tekla Johnson Assistant Professor 

B.A., M.A., University of Nebraska; Ph.D. candidate, University of Nebraska 

Conchita F. Ndege Kemei Professor 

B.F.A., Xavier University; M.A., Ph.D., Howard University 

Peter V. Meyers Professor and Director, University Honors Program 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., Ph.D., Rutgers University 

Thomas E. Porter Associate Professor 

B.A., Loyola College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Washington 

Michael Roberto Assistant Professor 

B.A., Adelphi University, M.A., University of Rhode Island, Ph.D., Boston College 

Sandrea T. Williamson Instructor 

B.A., Johnson C. Smith University, M.A., University of Illinois 

James A. Wood Associate Professor 

B.A., Tufts University, M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Yunqui Zhang Assistant Professor 

B.A., Qufu Normal University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Toronto 



219 



Department of Journalism and Mass Communication 

http://www.ncat.edu/~jmc/ 
Tamrat Mereba, Interim Chairperson 

OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication are as follows: 

1 . To assist students in developing their powers of critical thinking. 

2. To assist students in developing in-depth competencies at least in one subject area. 

3. To aid students in developing self-confidence and positive images. 

4. To provide financial assistance to qualified students who otherwise could not attend col- 
lege or enroll in the journalism and mass communication program or speech programs. 

5. To develop and maintain accredited undergraduate and professional programs. 

6. To encourage funded and non-funded faculty research. 

7. To encourage scholarly publications and creative productions. 

8. To determine and to satisfy the cultural and educational need of the community. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Journalism and Mass Communication (Broadcast Production) - Bachelor of Science 
Journalism and Mass Communication (Electronic Media & Journalism) - Bachelor of 

Science 
Journalism and Mass Communication (Media Management) - Bachelor of Science 
Journalism and Mass Communication (Print Journalism) - Bachelor of Science 
Journalism and Mass Communication (Public Relations) - Bachelor of Science 
Speech - Bachelor of Arts (Options: Advocacy and Argumentation; Organizational 

Communication) 
Speech (Speech Pathology/Audiology) - Bachelor of Arts 
Leadership Studies - Doctor of Philosophy* 
Energy and Environmental Studies - Doctor of Philosophy* 
* See the Graduate School Bulletin 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The admission of students to the undergraduate degree programs in Journalism and Mass 
Communication, and Speech are based upon the general admission requirements of the Uni- 
versity. All students are expected to maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5 
overall in the major 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Journalism and Mass Communication: All majors must meet certain prerequisites prior to 
beginning sophomore level communication courses required in their chosen concentration. 
They must demonstrate computer literacy skills as defined by the College of Arts and Sciences. 
A student must: 

a. Make a grade of "C" or better in the Grammar Proficiency Examination. 

b. Make a grade of "C" or better in the freshman composition courses. 



220 



Journalism and Mass Communication: A student admitted in the journalism and mass com- 
munication program and one who is eligible to be a candidate for the bachelor of arts degree 
must successfully complete a minimum of 124 hours and: 

a. Maintain a minimal 2.5 grade point average in the course of study. 

b. Have a combined Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) score of "800" in state and "920" 
out of state and achieve a cumulative grade point average of "B" or better. 

c. If criteria A and B are not met, a student may enter the University as an "Undecided," 
when the cumulative GPA of 2.5 is completed, the student may be admitted as a pre- 
journalism and mass communication major. 

d. Successfully complete a required Media Professional Development Seminar course 
(JOMC591) 

e. Complete an internship with an approved media organization. 

f . Complete the following necessary practicum courses with a grade of "C" or better: 

1 . Broadcast Production ( 1 Practicum + Media Professional Development Seminar 
+ Media Internship) 

2. Electronic Media and Journalism (1 Practicum + Media Professional Develop- 
ment Seminar + Media Internship) 

3 . Media Management ( 1 Practicum + Media Professional Development Seminar + 
Media Internship) 

4. Print Journalism (1 Practicum + 1 Newspaper Practicum + Media Professional 
Development Seminar + Media Internship) 

5. Public Relations (1 Practicum + 1 Newspaper Practicum + Media Professional 
Development Seminar + Media Internship) 

g. The department will administer an exit examination to students pursuing a degree in 
Journalism and Mass Communication. These examinations place emphasis on the 
major principles and skills necessary to excel in each concentration: Broadcast Pro- 
duction, Electronic Media and Journalism, Media Management, Print Journalism, 
and Public Relations. Students must pass the examination before graduating from the 
university. The test will be given in the junior year and may be repeated until passed. 

h. Repeat any major course in which a grade of "D" or lower was achieved and receive 
a grade of "C" or better. 

Speech: A student admitted in the speech program and one who is eligible to be a candidate 
for the bachelor of arts degree must successfully complete a minimum of 124 hours and: 

a. Maintain a minimal 2.5 grade point average in the course of study. 

b. Have a combined Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) score of "800" in state and "920" 
out of state and achieve a cumulative grade point average of "B" or better. 

c. If criteria A and B are not met, a student may enter the University as an "Undecided," 
when the cumulative GPA of 2.5 is completed, the student may be admitted as a pre- 
speech major. 

d. Transfer students must have earned an overall cumulative grade point average of 2.5 
or higher to be accepted as a speech major. 

e. Prerequisites must be successfully completed with a grade of "B" or better before 
attempting major courses. 

221 



f. Repeat any major course in which a grade of "D" or lower was achieved and receive 
a grade of "C" or better. 

Speech (Speech Pathology/Audiology): A student admitted in the speech pathology/audiol- 
ogy program and one who is eligible to be a candidate for the bachelor of arts degree must 
successfully complete a minimum of 124 hours and: 

a. Have a combined Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) score of "800" in state and "920" 
out of state and achieve a cumulative grade point average of "B" or better. 

b. Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.7 if the student entered the University 
as an "Undecided," to be accepted as a pre-speech pathology/audiology major. 

c. Earn an overall cumulative grade point average of 2.7 or higher as a transfer student 
to be accepted as a Speech (Speech Pathology/Audiology) major. 

d. Maintain a minimal 3.0 grade point average in the course of study. 

e. Maintain a minimal 2.7 grade point average overall. 

f. Make a grade of "B" or better in all major core courses. 

g. Successfully complete all prerequisites with a grade of "B" or better before attempt- 
ing major courses. 

h. Repeat any clinical practicum course in which a grade of "B" or lower was achieved 
and receive a grade of "B" or better. 

i. Be admitted to Clinical Phase with Privileges (i.e., admission to the clinical compo- 
nent of the program) prior to the junior year. This consists of a minimal 3.0 grade 
point average in all freshman and sophomore level major courses as well as the re- 
quired application. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Journalism and Mass Communication - The journalism and mass communication major 
must complete a minimum of 124 semester hours of University courses. Included in these 124 
semester hours are forty-two semester hours of communication courses. A grade of "C" or 
better must be earned in these courses. 

Speech Communication - Students pursuing a professional degree in speech must complete 
a minimum of 124 semester hours of University courses. Included in the 124 semester hours 
are 46 semester hours of speech courses. A grade of "B" or better must be earned in these 
courses. 

Speech (Speech Pathology/Audiology) - Students pursuing a pre-professional degree in 
Speech/Language Pathology and Audiology must complete a minimum of 124 semester hours 
of university courses. Included in the 124 semester hours are 53 hours of Speech/Language 
Pathology and Audiology. A minimal 2.7 grade point average overall and a minimal 3.0 grade 
point average in the course of study is required. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

A bachelor of science degree in journalism and mass communication will prepare students 
for careers in research and teaching, management, public relations, and corporate communica- 
tion. Corporations, consulting firms, non-profit organizations, educational institutions, state, 
federal and local government agencies may provide job opportunities. Careers in the journal- 
ism and mass communication industry continue to expand. With the development of new me- 
dia and modern technology, various professional employment opportunities are favorable. 

222 



A bachelor of arts degree in speech communication will prepare students to pursue ad- 
vanced degrees in communication, business, and law. The specific areas of emphasis include 
preparing students to become researchers, educators, advocates, and business and communica- 
tion leaders. 

A bachelor of arts degree in speech/language pathology and audiology will prepare stu- 
dents to pursue advanced degrees in the areas of speech pathology or audiology. The specific 
areas of emphasis include preparing students to become researchers, educators, clinicians and 
community leaders that prevent, assess, and treat speech, language, and hearing disorders in a 
culturally diverse population. Students must receive the master's degree in speech/language 
pathology and audiology in order to gain favorable employment in clinics, schools, hospitals, 
and state and federal government agencies. Teaching positions in colleges and universities will 
be competitive. 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR JOURNALISM AND MASS 
COMMUNICATION 



JOMC 220 
JOMC231 
JOMC 240 
JOMC 245 
JOMC 405 



(Broadcast Production) 

JOMC 406 JOMC 591 

JOMC 493 JOMC 598 

JOMC 445 Grammar Proficiency Examination 

JOMC 507 Exit Examination 

JOMC 508 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATION 

(Broadcast Production) 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 




Credit 


BIOL 100 


4 


ART 224, MUSI 216, 


220 or 




ENGL 102 


2 


ENGL 333 




3 


HPED 


1 


ENGL 101 




3 


SPCH 116 


1 


FOLA Level l 2 




3 


UNST 100 


1 


HPED 




1 


UNST 110 


3 


JOMC 231 




1 


UNST 120 


3 


UNST 130 




3 


Grammar Proficiency Examination 


UNST 140 




3 




15 






17 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 






First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 




Credit 


FOLA Level 2 2 


3 


JOMC 245 




3 


JOMC 220 


3 


JOMC 406 




3 


ENGL 200 


3 


JOMC 445 




3 


MATH 102 


3 


UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elective 


3 


UNST 2XX Cluster Theme 


Elective 3 


UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elective 


3 


UNST 2XX Cluster Theme 


Elective 3 
18 






15 




JUNIOR YEAR 






First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 




Credit 


JOMC 240 


3 


JOMC 493 




3 


JOMC 405 


3 


JOMC 507 




3 


JOMC 419 


3 


JOMC 508 




3 


JOMC Elective 


3 


JOMC 59 1 5 




2 


SPCH 250 


3 
15 


SOCI 203 




3 
14 



223 



SENIOR YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


GEOG 210 


3 


CAS Elective 


JOMC 598 


3 


PHIL 260 or 262 


JOMC Elective 


3 


POLI 210 


JOMC Exit Exam 





PSYC 320 


PHYS 110/111 


3-4 


SPCH 552 


SPCH 307 


3 
12-13 





Credit 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Total Hours: 124-125 

' Natural Science Elective: If taking EASC 3-credits, you will need an additional 1 -credit for graduation or an 
additional College of Arts and Sciences class. If taking CHEM 100/110 4-credits, you will not need an addi- 
tional hour. 

2 French (6 hrs), Spanish (6 hrs), German (6 hrs), Russian (6 hrs), Japanese (6 hrs) and Portuguese (6 hrs). 

3 Consult the University Bulletin for Practicum requirements. Volunteers are encouraged to work in labs. 

4 Concentrated Electives must be discussed with advisor. 

5 Must take JOMC 591 - Media Development Professional Seminar the semester prior to enrolling in JOMC 
598. 

Communication Electives: 302, 403, 418, 500, 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, 605, 606, 607. 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR JOURNALISM AND 
MASS COMMUNICATION 

(Electronic Media and Journalism) 

JOMC 220 JOMC 406 JOMC 493 

JOMC 23 1 JOMC 425 JOMC 59 1 

JOMC 240 JOMC 435 JOMC 598 

JOMC 245 JOMC 445 Grammar Proficiency Examination 

JOMC 255 JOMC 475 Exit Examination 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATION 

(Electronic Media and Journalism) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


BIOL 100 


4 


ENGL 101 


3 


ENGL 102 


2 


FOLA Level l 2 


3 


HPED 


1 


HPED 


1 


SPCH 116 


1 


CHEM 100/1 10 or PHYS 101 ' 


3-4 


UNST 100 


1 


UNST 130 


3 


UNST110 


3 


UNST 140 


3 


UNST 120 


3 


Grammar Proficienty Examination 







15 




17-18 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


ENGL 200 


3 


JOMC 23 1 4 


1 


FOLA Level 2 2 


3 


JOMC 245 


3 


JOMC 220 


3 


JOMC 255 


2 


MATH 102 


3 


JOMC 406 


3 


SPCH 307 


3 


SOCI 203 


3 


UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elect. 


3 


UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elective 


3 




18 


UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elective 


3 
18 



224 



JUNIOR YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


JOMC 240 


3 


ART 224, MUSI 216, 220 or 




JOMC 425 


3 


ENGL 333 


3 


JOMC 445 


3 


GEOG210 


3 


JOMC 493 


3 


JOMC 435 


3 


SPCH 250 


3 


JOMC 59 I s 


2 


UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elective 3 


JOMC Elective 


3 




18 




14 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


JOMC 475 


3 


CAS Elective 


3 


JOMC 598 


3 


PHIL 260 or 262 


3 


JOMC Elective 


3 


SPCH 552 


3 


PSYC 320 


3 


POLI 210 


3 


JOMC Exit Exam 




12 




12 



Total Hours: 124-125 

' Natural Science Elective: If taking EASC 3-credits, you will need an additional 1 -credit for graduation or an 
additionalCollege of Arts and Sciences class. If taking CHEM 100/110 4-credits, you will not need an addi- 
tional hour. 

2 French (6 hrs), Spanish (6 hrs), German (6 hrs), Russian (6 hrs), Japanese (6 hrs) and Portuguese (6 hrs). 

3 Concentrated Electives must be discussed with advisor. 

4 Consult the University Bulletin for Practicum requirements. Volunteers are encouraged to work in labs. 

5 Must take JOMC 591 - Media Professional Development Seminar the semester prior to enrolling in JOMC 
598. 

Communication Electives: 302, 403, 418, 500, 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, 605, 606, 607. 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR JOURNALISM AND 
MASS COMMUNICATION 



JOMC 220 
JOMC 240 
JOMC 245 
JOMC 366 
JOMC 368 
JOMC 405 



(Media Management) 

JOMC 406 
JOMC 493 
JOMC 499 
JOMC 522 
JOMC 591 



JOMC 598 

BUAD 200 

ECON 200 

Grammar Proficiency Examination 

Exit Examination 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATION 

(Media Management) 



First Semester 
BIOL 100 
ENGL 102 
HPED 
SPCH 116 
UNST 100 
UNST 110 
UNST 120 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Credit 


Second Semester 


Crec 


4 


ART 224, MUSI 216, 220 or 




2 


ENGL 333 


3 


1 


ENGL 101 


3 


1 


FOLA Level l 2 


3 


1 


HPED 


1 


3 


UNST 130 


3 


3 


UNST 140 


3 


15 


Grammar Proficiency Examination 



16 



225 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


ENGL 200 


3 BUAD 220 


3 


FOLA Level 2 2 


3 JOMC 240 


3 


JOMC 220 


3 JOMC 245 


3 


MATH 102 


3 UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elective 


3 


UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elective 3 UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elective 


3 


UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elective 3 

18 


15 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


ECON 200 


3 GEOG210 


3 


JOMC 231 


1 JOMC 493 


3 


JOMC 366 


3 JOMC 59 1 5 


2 


JOMC 405 


3 POLI210 


3 


JOMC 406 


3 PSYC 320 


3 


SPCH 250 


3 SOCI 203 


3 




16 


17 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


JOMC 499 


3 CAS Elective 


3 


JOMC 522 


3 JOMC 368 


3 


JOMC 598 


3 JOMC Elective 


3 


JOMC Exit Exam 


PHIL 260 or 262 


3 


Natural Science Elective 1 


3-4 SPCH 552 


3 


SPCH 307 


3 
15 


15 



Total Hours: 126-127 

' Natural Science Elective: If taking EASC 3 -credits, you will need an additional I -credit for graduation or an 
additional College of Arts and Sciences class. If taking CHEM 100/110 4-credits, you will not need an addi- 
tional hour. 

2 French (6 hrs), Spanish (6 hrs), German (6 hrs), Russian (6 hrs), Japanese (6 hrs) and Portuguese (6 hrs). 

4 Concentrated Elective must be discussed with advisor. 

5 Must take JOMC 591 - Media Professional Development Seminar the semester prior to enrolling in JOMC 
598. 

Communication Electives: 302, 403, 418, 500, 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, 605, 606, 607. 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR JOURNALISM AND 
MASS COMMUNICATION 



JOMC 220 
JOMC 231 
JOMC 240 
JOMC 245 
JOMC 300 



(Print Journalism) 

JOMC 424 
JOMC 440 
JOMC 493 
JOMC 502 
JOMC 530 



JOMC 540 

JOMC 591 

JOMC 598 

Grammar Proficiency Examination 

Exit Examination 



226 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATION 

(Print Journalism) 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


BIOL 100 


4 ART 224, MUSI 2 1 6, 220 or 




ENGL 102 


2 ENGL 333 


3 


HPED 


1 ENGL 101 


3 


SPCH 116 


1 FOLA Level l 2 


3 


UNST 100 


1 HPED 


1 


UNST 110 


3 JOMC 231 


1 


UNST 120 


3 UNST 130 


3 




15 UNST 140 


3 




Grammar Proficiency Examination 



17 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


ENGL 200 


3 GEOG210 


3 


FOLA Level 2 2 


3 JOMC 245 


3 


JOMC 220 


3 SPCH 250 


3 


MATH 102 


3 UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elective 


3 


UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elective 3 UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elective 


3 


UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elective 3 

18 


15 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


JOMC 240 


3 JOMC 493 


3 


JOMC 300 


3 JOMC 530 


3 


JOMC 424 


3 JOMC 540 


3 


JOMC Elective 


3 JOMC 59 1 5 


2 


SOCI 203 


3 JOMC 597 3 


1 




15 PSYC 320 


3 
15 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


JOMC 598 


3 CAS Elective 4 


3 


JOMC Elective 


3 JOMC 440 


3 


JOMC Exit Exam 


JOMC 502 


3 


Natural Science Elective 1 


3-4 PHIL 260 or 262 


3 


SPCH 307 


3 POLI210 


3 


SPCH 552 


3 
15-16 


15 



Total Hours: 125-126 

' Natural Science Elective: If taking EASC 3-credits, you will need an additional 1 -credit for graduation or an 
additional College of Arts and Sciences class. If taking CHEM 100/110 4-credits, you will not need an addi- 
tional hour. 

2 French (6 hrs), Spanish (6 hrs), German (6 hrs), Russian (6 hrs), Japanese (6 hrs) and Portuguese (6 hrs). 

3 Consult the University Bulletin for Practicum requirements. Volunteers are encouraged to work in labs. 

4 Concentrated Electives must be discussed with advisor. 

5 Must take JOMC 591 - Media Professional Development Seminar the semester prior to enrolling in JOMC 
598. 

Communication Electives: 302, 403, 418, 500, 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, 605, 606, 607. 



227 



REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR JOURNALISM AND 
MASS COMMUNICATION 



JOMC 220 
JOMC 230 
JOMC 231 
JOMC 240 
JOMC 245 



(Public Relations) 

JOMC 390 
JOMC 424 
JOMC 476 
JOMC 486 
JOMC 493 



JOMC 591 

JOMC 596 

JOMC 598 

Grammar Proficiency Examination 

Exit Examination 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATION 

(Public Relations) 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


BIOL 100 


4 ART 224, MUSI 2 1 6, 220 or 




ENGL 102 


2 ENGL 333 


3 


HPED 


1 ENGL 101 


3 


SPCH 116 


1 FOLA Level 1 


3 


UNST 100 


1 HPED 


1 


UNST110 


3 UNST 130 


3 


UNST 120 


3 UNST 140 


3 




15 Grammar Proficiency Examination 



16 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


ENGL 200 


3 JOMC 231 


1 


FOLA Level 2 


3 JOMC 245 


3 


JOMC 220 


3 JOMC 476 


3 


MATH 102 


3 PSYC 320 


3 


UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elect. 


3 UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elective 


3 


UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elect. 


3 UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elective 


3 




18 


16 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


JOMC 230 


3 GEOG 210 


3 


JOMC 424 


3 JOMC 240 


3 


JOMC 493 


3 JOMC 431 


1 


JOMC Elective 


3 JOMC 486 


3 


POLI 210 


3 SOCI 203 


3 




15 SPCH 250 


3 
16 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


JOMC 390 


3 CAS Electives 


3 


JOMC 59 1 5 


2 JOMC 598 


3 


JOMC 596 


3 PHIL 260 or 262 


3 


Natural Science Elective 


3-4 SPCH 552 


3 


SOCI 403 


3 JOMC Exit Exam 





SPCH 307 


3 
17-18 


12 


Total Hours: 124-125 







Natural Science Elective: If taking EASC 3 -credits, you will need an additional 1 -credit for graduation or an 
additional College of Arts and Sciences class. If taking CHEM 100/110 4-credits, you will not need an addi- 
tional hour. 
French (6 hrs), Spanish (6 hrs), German (6 hrs), Russian (6 hrs), Japanese (6 hrs) and Portuguese (6 hrs). 



228 



3 Consult the University Bulletin for Practicum requirements. Volunteers are encouraged to work in labs. 

4 Concentrated Electives must be discussed with advisor. 

5 Must take JOMC 591 - Media Professional Development Seminar the semester prior to enrolling in JOMC 598. 
Communication Electives: 302, 403, 418, 500, 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, 605, 606, 607. 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR Speech 



JOMC 220 
JOMC 431 
JOMC 440 
JOMC 476 
ENGL 102 
SPCH 116 
SPCH 118 



(Option: Advocacy and Argumentation) 

SPCH 250 SPCH 450 

SPCH 253 SPCH 539 

SPCH 309 SPCH 551 

SPCH 361 SPCH 561 

SPCH 421 SPCH 610 

SPCH 422 SPCH 680 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR SPEECH 

(Option: Advocacy and Argumentation) 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST 100 


1 UNST 130 


3 


UNST 110 


3 BIOL 100 


4 


UNST 120 


3 MATH 102 


3 


MATH 101 


3 UNST 140 


3 


SPCH 102 


3 SPCH 250 


3 


HPED 


1 
14 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 


16 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elect. 


3 ENGL 201 


3 


JOMC 220 


3 SOCI 100 


3 


FOLA 2 


3 FOLA 2 


3 


HPED 


1 UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elective 


3 


UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elect. 


3 Concentrated Elective 


3 


SPCH 251 


3 


15 


SPCH 316 


3 
18 

JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


ECON 201 


3 BUAD 220 


3 


POL1 200 


3 ENGL 331 


3 


SPCH 410 


3 SPCH 400 


3 


SPCH 401 


3 Concentrated Elective 


7 


SOCI 204 


3 
15 

SENIOR YEAR 


15 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


SPCH 505 


3 SPCH 565 


3 


SPCH 506 


3 SPCH 603 


3 


Concentrated Elective 3 


6 Concentrated Elective 3 


9 


JOMC 220 


3 
15 


15 


Total Hours: 124 







Natural Science Elective: If taking EASC 3 -credits, you will need an additional 1 -credit for graduation. If 
taking CHEM 100/110 4-credits, you will not need an additional hour. 

French (6 hrs), Spanish (6 hrs), German (6 hrs), Russian (6 hrs), Japanese (6 hrs) or Portuguese (6 hrs). 
Concentrated Electives must be discussed with your academic advisor. 



229 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR SPEECH 

(Option: Organizational Communication) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST 100 


1 UNST 130 


3 


UNST110 


3 BIOL 100 


4 


UNST 120 


3 MATH 102 


3 


MATH 101 


3 UNST 140 


3 


SPCH 102 


3 SPCH 250 


3 


HPED Any 


1 HPED Any 


1 




14 


17 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elect. 


3 ENGL 201 


3 


SPCH 316 


3 SOCI 100 


3 


FOLA 2 


3 FOLA 2 


3 


UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elect. 


3 JOMC 605 


3 


JOMC 220 


3 UNST 2XX Cluster Theme Elective 


3 


SPCH 251 


3 SPCH 314 


3 




18 


18 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


BUAD 220 


3 ECON 201 


3 


SPCH 552 


3 BUAD 422 


3 


SPCH 410 


3 Concentrated Elect. 3 


6 


SPCH 408 


3 PSYC 320 


3 


SPCH 461 


3 
15 

SENIOR YEAR 


15 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


Concentrated Elect. 3 


6 SPCH 602 


3 


JOMC 220 


3 Concentrated Elect. 3 


6 


SPCH 400 


3 BUAD 426 


3 


SPCH 675 


3 
15 


12 



Total Hours: 124 

' Natural Science Elective: If taking EASC 3 -credits, you will need an additional 1 -credit for graduation. If 
taking CHEM 100/110 4-credits, you will not need an additional hour. 

2 French (6 hrs), Spanish (6 hrs), German (6 hrs), Russian (6 hrs), Japanese (6 hrs) or Portuguese (6 hrs). 

3 Concentrated Electives must be discussed with your academic advisor. 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR SPEECH 



(Speech Pathology/ Audiology) 



ENGL 300 
MUSI 216 
SPCH 116 
SPCH 250 
SPCH 258 
SPCH 259 
SPCH 269 
SPCH 309 



SPCH 319 
SPCH 379 
SPCH 381 
SPCH 382 
SPCH 424 
SPCH 426 
SPCH 432 
SPCH 450 



SPCH 459 
SPCH 469 
SPCH 478 
SPCH 479 
SPCH 483 
SPCH 484 
SPCH 509 



SPCH 521 
SPCH 522 
SPCH 529 
SPCH 530 
SPCH 587 
SPCH 519 



230 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR SPEECH 
(Speech Pathology/Audiology) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Credit 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
1 
17 



Credit 

3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 
16 



Credit 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Credit 
2 
3 
4 
3 
12 



Total Hours: 124 

' French (6 hrs), Spanish (6 hrs), German (6 hrs), Russian (6 hrs), Japanese (6 hrs) or Portugese (6 hrs) 

Admission to Clinical Phase with Privileges must occur prior to your junior year. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATION 
JOMC 202. Introduction to Mass Media Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a survey of mass media, including newspapers, magazines, radio and television. 
(DEMAND) 

JOMC 220. News Writing (Formerly ENGL 225) Credit 3(2-2) 

The study of the elements of news stories and the writing of leads. The organization and format 
for writing various types of copy for newspapers, radio and television is included. Prerequi- 
sites: Grammar Proficiency Exam and SPCH 116. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 230. Public Relations Writing (Formerly ENGL 231) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course involves instruction and practice in writing for the news, governmental and legis- 
lative agencies, press releases and all other writing styles required of public relation special- 
ists. Prerequisite: Grammar Proficiency Exam, 220. (F;S;SS) 

231 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


UNST 100 


1 UNST 130 


UNST 110 


3 UNST 140 


UNST 120 


3 BIOL 100 


MATH 101 


3 MATH 102 


SOCI 100 


3 SPCH 259 


HPED 220 


2 SPCH 116 




15 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


FOLA Any 


3 FOLA Pt. II 


UNST 2xx cluster 


3 UNST 2xx cluster 


UNST 2xx cluster 


3 SPCH 381 


PHYS 110/111 


3 SPCH 424 


SPCH 319 


3 SPCH 382 


SPCH 379 


3 SPCH 309 




18 




JUNIOR YEAR 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


ENGL 400 


3 ENGL 305 or 331 


SPCH 469 


3 SPCH 522 


SPCH 509 


3 SPCH 484 


SPCH 426 


3 PSYC 320 


SPCH 483 


3 UNST 2xx cluster 


SPCH 250 


3 




18 




SENIOR YEAR 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


SPCH 529 


2 SPCH 530 


PSYC 242 


3 SPCH 587 


SPCH 521 


3 PSYC 322 


SPCH 258 


3 SPCH 478 


HEFS310 


3 




14 



JOMC 231. Practicum H Credit 1(0-2) 

Student serves on staff of campus media organizations such as the newspaper, television stu- 
dio, radio station, or university public relations. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 240. Media History Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the relationship between the media and United States history. It recog- 
nizes the significance of alternative media such as minority and non-traditional media and 
analyses the relationship between media and government to explore and understand the roles 
they play in history. Prerequisite: ENGL 100. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 245. Technological Information Sources Credit 3(3-0) 

This course involves the instruction and practice in utilizing libraries, databases, government 
records and the Internet for the purpose of obtaining information from electronic sources to be 
used by all professional communicators. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 255. On- Air Delivery Credit 2(2-0) 

This course is designed to emphasize performances skills essential to successful communica- 
tion through the electronic media. The course will focus on the analysis and delivery of copy, 
voice quality, guidelines for pronunciation, and techniques for specialized announcing. Prereq- 
uisite: SPCH 116. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 300. Photojournalism Credit 3(3-0) 

This course involves instruction and practice in the photography of university events with em- 
phasis on journalism techniques. The digital camera will be used for the development of pho- 
tographs necessary for the A&T Register and other campus publications. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 302. Minorities in Mass Media (Formerly SPCH 260) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course presents an overview of past and present minority contributions in the areas of 
film, radio, television, newspapers and magazines. This course presents an examination of 
minority roles in contemporary media with emphasis on career opportunities for minorities. 
(Open to university) (S) 

JOMC 366. Leadership Problems and Media Management Credit 3(3-0) 

This course involves the analysis of issues facing media executives and their employees. Prob- 
lems and solutions will be emphasized that reflect the concerns of management in print, elec- 
tronic media, and public relations. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 368. Practical Writing Credit 1(1-1) 

This course involves the instruction and practice in communication skills for students of media 
management who will be involved in writing policy and procedures for media organizations. 
Prerequisite: Senior standing. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 390. Public Relations Case Studies Credit 3(3-0) 

This course focuses on case studies and the success and failure of public relations practices. 
Prerequisite: Senior standing. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 403. Black Press in the United States Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines, within a chronological framework, the development of the African 
American press in the United States since the early 1800s. Focus is on significant personalities 
and issues during major movements in African American history. Prerequisites: JOMC 220 
and 240. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 405. Radio Production I (Formerly COMM 308 & SPCH 255) Credit 3(2-2) 
Practical experience in radio broadcasting techniques and conventional studio practices; projects 
in radio announcing. Programs are planned and executed by the students. Prerequisites: Gram- 
mar Proficiency Exam, 220, 445 and SPCH 1 16. (F;S;SS) 



232 



JOMC 406. Television Production I 

(Formerly COMM 307, 404 & SPCH 256) Credit 3(2-2) 

This course involves methods and techniques in television production, announcing, program 
design, lighting, audio, camera, and electronic techniques are studied. Laboratory practice is 
also required. Prerequisites: SPCH 1 16 and Grammar Proficiency Exam, 220, 445. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 417. Advanced Video Production Credit 3(3-0) 

Video production techniques are developed through the creation of individual video programs. 
Prerequisite: JOMC 419. (DEMAND) 

JOMC 418. Digital Audio Production Credit 3(3-0) 

Advanced editing and production techniques and practices utilizing digital production equip- 
ment. Prerequisite: JOMC 508. (DEMAND) 

JOMC 419. Video Editing (Formerly COMM 317) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course involves digital audio production; advanced editing and production techniques, 
and practices utilizing digital production equipment for the development of creative produc- 
tions of studio tapes for narrations, public service and commercial announcements and pro- 
grams. Prerequisite: Grammar Proficiency Exam, JOMC 220 and 406. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 424. News Editing and Layout 

(Formerly COMM 320 & ENGL 230) Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a continuation of JOMC 230, with the primary emphasis on basic copyediting. Exten- 
sive practical work in copy editing, headline writing, principles of typography and makeup are 
studied. Weekly outside news and feature assignments constitute the laboratory period. Prereq- 
uisites: Grammar Proficiency Exam, 220, 230, 530 Majors Only. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 425. Broadcast News Writing (Formerly COMM 325) Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis of broadcast journalism, reporting, writing and editing of news for radio and televi- 
sion in oral and visual modes. Prerequisite: Grammar Proficiency Exam, JOMC 220. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 431. Practicum II Credit 1(0-2) 

Student serves on staff of campus media organizations such as newspaper, television studio, 
radio station, or university public relations. Prerequisite: Junior and senior standing. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 435. Advanced Reporting and Producing (Formerly COMM 335) Credit 3(3-0) 
This course will focus on specialized beat reporting and producing news cast for converged 
media. The continuation of broadcast news concepts with more advanced fieldwork will be 
supervised. Students will have assigned beats to develop local packages and newscasts for 
broadcast on the TV Studio channel. Students will do their own videography and editing. Dead- 
line conditions are enforced. Prerequisites: Grammar Proficiency Exam, 220, 406, 425, and 
SPCH 116. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 437. Field Production Credit 3(3-0) 

Practical application of out-of-studio production techniques and theories for audio and video 
programs will be emphasized. Prerequisite: JOMC 419. (DEMAND) 

JOMC 440. Editorial Writing (Formerly ENGL 333) Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of interpretation and comment in the writing of editorials. Intensive practice in writing 
editorials for newspapers and magazines. Prerequisite: JOMC 424. (DEMAND) 

JOMC 445. Script Writing (Formerly COMM 345) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will focus on writing scripts for radio and television and the audiovisual division of 
a corporation or educational institution. Students will research and write treatment for corpo- 
rate video, writing and producing promotional copy, commercials, public service announce- 
ments, and talk shows. Prerequisites: SPCH 116 and Grammar Proficiency Exam, JOMC 220 
and 406. (F;S;SS) 



233 



JOMC 475. Special Projects Credit 3(2-2) 

The students will learn formats used in television news magazines and documentary produc- 
tions, with emphasis on developing a major research effort into a half-hour or hour program or 
a multi-part series. Prerequisite: JOMC 406, 425, and 435. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 476. Introduction to Public Relations Principles 

(Formerly COMM 376) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will emphasize internal and external public relations concepts for corporate, gov- 
ernment and non-profit organizations. Prerequisites: Grammar Proficiency Exam, 220, 230, 
445. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 486. Research, Communication, Planning and Strategy 

(Formerly COMM 386) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course involves instruction in research, planning and evaluation skills of public relations 
practitioners in internal and external business environments. Prerequisite: Grammar Proficiency 
Exam, 220, 230, 424, 476. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 493. Communications Law and Ethics (Formerly COMM 392) Credit 3(3-0) 
Survey of legal and extra-legal limitations on press freedom. Study of legal issues including 
libel, free press-trial, contempt of court, copyright, access law. Prerequisite: Junior or senior 
Standing. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 499. Seminar: Case Studies in International Media Management Credit 3(3-0) 

This course involves readings, discussions and analysis of case studies in international media 
management strategies in an effort to highlight the issues confronting media managers in inter- 
national media organizations. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 500. Public Relations Seminar Credit 3(3-0) 

A special topic course on a selected aspect of public relations as it relates to advertising and 
marketing research and other topics such as electronic communication. Topics vary from se- 
mester to semester. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 502. Current Issues in Mass Communication 

(Formerly COMM 402 & ENGL 462) Credit 2(2-0) 

A study of the rights, responsibilities and changing characteristics of the mass media and the 
problems therein. Extensive use of the debate, mass communications practitioners and guest 
speakers will be required. Prerequisites: Grammar Proficiency Exam, JOMC 220, junior or 
senior standing. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 507. Electronic Field and Studio Production 

(Formerly COMM 407) Credit 3(2-2) 

This course involves project based, hands on advance video productions for in-studio and field 
applications. Emphasis will be placed on producing professional quality programs for televi- 
sion. Prerequisite: Grammar Proficiency Exam, 220, 406, 419. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 508. Advanced Radio Production (Formerly COMM 408) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course involves production technology including recording, editing production techniques 
and concepts. Prerequisites: Grammar Proficiency Exam, 220, 405, 445, and SPCH 116. 
(F;S;SS) 

JOMC 522. Media Management and Legal Issues 

(Formerly COMM 422) Credit 3(3-0) 

An examination of the principles and policies of media management that encompasses elec- 
tronic and print media. Prerequisites: Grammar Proficiency Exam, 220, 406, and SPCH 116. 
(F;S;SS) 



234 



JOMC 530. Advanced Reporting and Writing (Formerly COMM 330) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course involves advanced training in newsgathering techniques with emphasis in investi- 
gative reporting and technical writing. Students will have assigned beats to cover for publica- 
tion in the A&T Register and other university publications. Prerequisites: Grammar Proficiency 
Exam and JOMC 220. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 540. Feature Writing (Formerly COMM 340 & English 330) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an intensive practicum of feature writing involving background research for an 
in-depth report on various topics. Prerequisites: Grammar Proficiency Exam, 220, 230. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 591. Media Professional Development Seminar Credit 2(2-0) 

This is an intensive study into professional practices, skills, etiquette and attitudes of the media 
industry in preparation for an off-campus field learning experience. Students will develop the 
necessary tools for a successful interview such as cover letter, resume, portfolio, and resume 
tape as they pertain to their specialized areas of study. Media professionals will conduct a 
mock interview to assess a student's skills and provide feedback in a written evaluation. *Note 
Prerequisites: This course must be taken the semester "prior" to enrolling in JOMC 598 - 
Media Internship, Junior or Senior Standing, There is a different prerequisite for each concen- 
tration: Broadcast Production - 591.01: Grammar Proficiency Exam, JOMC 220, 405, 406, 
419, 445; 507* Electronic Media and Journalism -59 1.02: Grammar Proficiency Exam, JOMC 
220, 255, 406, 425, 435*, 445*; Media Management - 591.03: Grammar Proficiency Exam, 
JOMC 220, 366, 405, 406, 499, 522, 499*; Print Journalism - 591.04: Grammar Proficiency 
Exam, JOMC 220, 300*, 424, 440*, 502*; Public Relations - 591.05: Grammar Proficiency 
Exam, JOMC 220, 230, 390, 424, 476, 486*. (F;S) No Summer Session,*Must be enrolled or 
have completed. 

JOMC 592. Cable Television Seminar 

(Formerly COMM 492 & SPCH 491) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes a review of the development of cable television in the U.S., including the 
law governing it, technical facilities necessary for an operation, methods of financing various 
types of programming. The course will also focus on the advantages and disadvantages of 
minorities in cable programming. Prerequisites: JOMC 493 and 522. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 596. Publication Design and Layout (Formerly COMM 496) Credit 3(3-0) 

Instruction in the principles of publication design and layout with actual practice in laboratory 
publications. Prerequisite: Grammar Proficiency Exam, 220, 424. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 597. Practicum II Credit 1(0-2) 

This course is intended for students to have an overall experience with each major. Students 
will participate with the student newspaper, TV studio, radio station or in a public relations 
capacity in university relations. It is an independent study as determined by the student in 
conjunction with the instructor. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 598. Media Internship (Formerly COMM 498) Credit 3(1-4) 

Off campus media experience designed to assist students in applying mass communication 
research and theory in the development of professional practices, skills, and attitudes. Aca- 
demic supervision provided by faculty members and direction in the field provided by an ap- 
proved supervisor. *Note Prerequisites: This course must be taken the semester "after" to en- 
rolling in JOMC 591 - Media Workshop, Junior or Senior Standing, There is a different prereq- 
uisite for each concentration: However, each concentration requires successful completion of 
the JOMC 591 - Media Professional Development Seminar with a grade of "C" or better. 
Broadcast Production - 598.01: Grammar Proficiency Exam, JOMC 220, 231, 405, 406, 419, 
445, 507, 508, 591; Electronic Media and Journalism - 598.02: Grammar Proficiency Exam, 
JOMC 220, 231, 255, 406, 425, 435, 445, 591; Media Management - 598.03: Grammar Profi- 
ciency Exam, JOMC 220, 368, 405, 406, 499, 522, 591, BUAD 220, ECON 300; Print Journal- 

235 



ism - 598.04: Grammar Proficiency Exam, JOMC 220, 231, 300, 424, 440, 502, 591; Public 
Relations - 598.05: Grammar Proficiency Exam, JOMC 220, 230, 231, 390,424, 476, 486, 
591, 596. (F,S,SS) 

JOMC 600. Media and Politics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines communication as a social behavior incorporating all facets of political 
science such as foreign policy, the courts, political movements and elections. Prerequisites: 
POLI 200and instructors permission. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 601. International Communication Credit (3-0) 

This course involves readings, discussion and papers on the development of international com- 
munication in developing countries an the role of communication in international relations. 
Prerequisites: POLI 200 and instructors permission. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 602. Communication Theory Credit (3-0) 

This course involves readings and discussions examining communication theories. Students 
will prepare papers on theories of communication. Prerequisite: Instructors permission. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 603. Mass Communication Seminar Credit (3-0) 

This course involves research, discussions, and papers on communication topics. Prerequisite: 
Instructors permission. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 604. Film Criticism Credit (3-0) 

This course involves an explanation of the development of film and the theory and practice of 
film criticism. Prerequisite: Instructors permission. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 605. Organizational Communication Credit (3-0) 

This involves the theory and practice of organizational communication to support organiza- 
tional objectives, policies, and programs. Prerequisite: Instructors permission. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 606. Business Reporting Credit (3-0) 

This involves instruction and practice in specific reporting techniques for business and indus- 
try. The coverage of trends and strategies will be explored. Prerequisite: Instructors permis- 
sion. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 607. Medical and Science Reporting Credit (3-0) 

This course involves instruction and practice in specific reporting techniques for the science 
and medical industry. The coverage of trends and strategies will be explored. Prerequisite: 
Instructors permission. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 680. Independent Study in Journalism and Mass Communication Credit (3-0) 

This course is an independent study in the area of journalism and mass communication to be 
determined by the student in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisites: Permission of chair- 
person and instructor, and junior or senior standing. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN SPEECH 

SPCH 102. Language Skills for Communication Professionals Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to help students master the basics of grammar, clarity, conciseness, and 
style in their oral and written messages. This course also includes lectures and seminars that 
introduce students to the communication studies discipline. Student's participation and discus- 
sion are essential. (F,S,SS) 

SPCH 116. Voice and Diction Lab I Credit 1(0-2) 

This is a course in speech improvement with emphasis on articulation, pronunciation and pro- 
jection. (F;S) 



236 



SPCH117. Voice and Diction Lab II Credit 1(0-2) 

This course is a continuation of Speech 116. Instruction and practice to improve articulation, 
pronunciation and voice quality. (DEMAND) 

SPCH 118. Development of General American Speech Patterns Credit 1(0-2) 

Topics to be studied include the development of general American speech patterns, the role and 
value of dialects, and the social functions of language. (DEMAND) 

SPCH 119. Speech Improvement for Foreign Students Credit 1(0-2) 

This course is an instruction and practice in the development of speech intelligibility, for for- 
eign students who wish to perfect their spoken American English. (DEMAND) 

SPCH 250. Speech Fundamentals Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an introduction to the theoretical bases of human communication including 
verbal and nonverbal communication, preparation and practice in intrapersonal, interpersonal, 
group and public communication, critical listening and critical thinking. SPCH 1 16 is a recom- 
mended prerequisite for students with nonstandard speech and voice patterns. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 251. Public Speaking (Formerly SPCH 450, 452) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines methods of developing, organizing, and effectively delivering public 
speeches. Emphasis is placed on informative, persuasive, and ceremonial addresses. Prerequi- 
site: SPCH 250. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 258. Sign Language Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to provide students with a strong basic knowledge of 1500 signs (words) 
covering the tools of the English language such as nouns, verbs, adverbs, and adjectives in 
order to ensure signing competency. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 259. Introduction to Speech-Language Pathology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed for those entering the field of communication sciences and disorders. It 
is an introduction to the basic concepts and theories of assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of 
speech and language disorders. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 301. Social Science Research Methods Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the basic qualitative and quantitative methods used in communication 
studies. Emphasis is placed on research methods and organization, and on the usage of SPSS 
for Windows. Prerequisites: SPCH 250. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 307. Phonetics for Non-Majors Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is the study of the physiological and acoustical bases of speech production with a 
practical application of phonetics in developing a General American Dialect using the Interna- 
tional Phonetic Alphabet. (Not open to (Speech Language Pathology and Audiology Majors. 
(F;SS) 

SPCH 309. Phonetics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an introduction to the acoustical and physiological bases of speech production, 
and is designed to help students acquire basic broad and narrow phonetic transcription skills 
for clinical application. This course is intended to prepare students for graduate work in com- 
munication sciences and disorders. (Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology Majors Only). 
Prerequisite: SPCH 259, 319, 379. (S) 

SPCH 310. Development of Speech and Language in 

Children for Non-Majors Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to provide student (non-majors) with theories of acquisition, growth, 
and development of speech/language skills in children. (Not open to Speech-Language Pathol- 
ogy and Audiology Majors.) This course is available for Education, Child Development, and 
Applied Arts and Sciences Majors. (S;SS) 

237 



SPCH 314. Intercultural Communication Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines interpersonal and public communication among people from different 
cultures. Explores the personal narratives of individuals from various co-cultures. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 315. Nonverbal Communication Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the roles and functions of nonverbal behavior in the communication 
process. Topic areas may include: body, face, and eye movements; physical appearance; 
paralinguistic; haptics; the effects of environment; and personal space. Prerequisites: SPCH 
250. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 316. Interpersonal Communication Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines how communication builds and sustains interpersonal relationships. 
Explores the role of gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation in interpersonal relationships. 
Prerequisites: SPCH 250. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 317. Gender Communication Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines communication styles and patterns in relationship to gender. Empha- 
sizes how communication creates gender and power roles, and how communicative patterns 
reflect, sustain, and alter social conceptions of gender. Prerequisites: SPCH 250. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 319. Development of Speech and Language in Children Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to provide the student with the theories of acquisition, growth, and 
development os speech and language skills in children and the bases for speech and language 
problems. Topics will include the observable developmental milestones and the identification, 
consequences, and management of speech and language behaviors. (Speech Language Pathol- 
ogy and Audiology Majors Only). Prerequisite: SPCH 259. (F) 

SPCH 379. Anatomy and Physiology of the Ear and Vocal Mechanism 

(Formerly SPCH 279, 479) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the organs and systems of the body related to the processes of hearing 
and speech. Prerequisite: Taken concurrently with SPCH 424, Sophomore Standing, BIOL 
100, SPCH 259. (F) 

SPCH 381. Diagnostic Testing and Measurements in 

Speech-Language Pathology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course emphasizes basic concepts of standardized and nonstandardized evaluation proce- 
dures for children and adults with mild to moderate communicative disorders. Theory and 
application of clinical writing, including the case history and the assessment report will be 
emphasized. Prerequisites: Taken concurrently with SPCH 424 259, 309, 319, 379, 382. (S) 

SPCH 382. Observation in Communication Disorders Credit 3(3-0) 

This course involves observation of the evaluation and management of speech/ language and 
hearing disorders. 25 hours of diagnostic/therapeutic observation are required. Instruction in 
case management fundamentals is emphasized. Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing, SPCH 259, 
309, 319, 379 (F;S) 

SPCH 400. Rhetoric of American Thought (Formerly SPCH 335, 561) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an introduction to the study of rhetorical discourse. It is a critical study of se- 
lected American orators - their speeches on controversial social and political issues from 1830 
to present. The main concentration is on audience, delivery and historical context. Prerequisite: 
SPCH 102 and 250. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 405. African American Family Communication Credit 3(3-0) 

This course provides students with an opportunity to examine communication within the Afri- 
can American family from an African-centered perspective. It requires students to read and 



238 



critically examine various theoretical and methodological approaches to the African American 
family. In groups, students will also write papers on communication within African American 
families in the cinema. Prerequisites: SPCH 250. 

SPCH 406. African American Relational Communication Credits 3(3-0) 

This course will examine interpersonal communication within African American and Interra- 
cial relationships within a holistic framework. We will also examine the role that race plays in 
interpersonal relationships for African American and European Americans. We will examine 
historical, sociological, and psychological factors that affect individual behaviors within these 
relationships including gender socialization from Africa to America. Understanding African 
conceptions of communication and relationships will be an important part of this course. We 
will study the intersection between African and American and their influences on individuals 
today. This course will be Afrocentric in that we will use Africa as the original point of refer- 
ence for discussions of African American masculinity, femininity, and relationships. This course 
will challenge many traditional assumptions and will require students to think critically about 
their beliefs and those of the scientific community in general. Prerequisites: SPCH 250. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 408. Business and Professional Communication Credits 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to introduce you to communication contexts, skills, and methods of 
assessment that are commonly used in business and professional settings. Our aim is to provide 
you with information designed to stimulate self-improvement in the areas of interviewing, 
group/teamwork, and formal presentational speaking and writing. Prerequisites: SPCH 102, 
250. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 410. Ethical Issues in Communication Credits 3(3-0) 

This course studies ethical problems in public, group, and interpersonal communication; crite- 
ria for their resolution. Prerequisites: SPCH 102, 250, 316. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 416. Parliamentary Procedures (Formerly SPCH 253) Credit 2(2-0) 

Theory and practice in the rules and customs governing the organization and proceedings of 
deliberative bodies are emphasized. (DEMAND) 

SPCH 401. Argumentation and Debate (Formerly SPCH 361) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes study and practice in analysis, gathering of material, briefing, ordering of 
arguments and evidence, refutation, and delivery. Prerequisite: SPCH 250. (F) 

SPCH 422. Oral Reading and Interpretation Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the analysis and the oral interpretation of the forms of classical and modern litera- 
ture, e.g. poetry, narrative prose, the essay, and dramatic literature will be included. Oral prac- 
tice in individual and group projects will be required. Prerequisite: SPCH 250. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 424. Practicum in Diagnostics in Communication Disorders Credit 3(3-0) 

Practicum in the evaluation of individuals with communicative disorders. Prerequisites: Taken 
concurrently with SPCH 381, 259, 309, 319, 379, 381, 382, 426, 478, 483, 509. (S;SS) 

SPCH 426. Voice and Fluency Disorders Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is the study of the etiology, characteristics, clinical assessment, and therapeutic 
management of voice and fluency disorders in children and adults. Prerequisites: SPCH 259, 
309, 319, 379, 381,382. (F) 

SPCH 461. Small Group Communication Credit 3(3-0) 

This course introduces the theory and the practice of communicating in small group settings. 
Topics may include group development, conformity and deviation, cohesion, power and cul- 
tural issues, problem solving and leadership. Prerequisite: SPCH 250. (F;S;SS) 

239 



SPCH 469. Introduction to Audiology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of hearing, both normal and abnormal, with information on the nature, 
causes, identification and rehabilitation treatment of persons with hearing disorders. Prerequi- 
site: Junior or Senior standing. (F) 

SPCH 478. Hearing and Speech Science Credit 3(3-0) 

This course involves a study of acoustic principles of speech and hearing; analysis of acoustic 
characteristics of speech and physiological correlates; speech perception. Prerequisites: Senior 
Standing, SPCH 259, 309, 319, 379, 381, 382, MATH 101, 102. (S) 

SPCH 483. Language Disorders Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed for students majoring in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology. 
The focus will be to explore the phenomenon of language/communication disorders from a 
developmental point of view. The emphasis will be upon the fundamental understanding of the 
theoretical bases, growth patterns, and deficits identified in language behavior through early 
intervention programs, family ecology, multicultural assessment measures, clinical and educa- 
tional accountability and efficacy. Prerequisite: SPCH 259, 309, 319, 379, 381, 382. (F) 

SPCH 484. Phonological and Articulatory Disorders Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines theories of normal and disordered acquisition of phonology and articula- 
tory production as well as basic phonologic assessment methods and treatment planning. Both 
functional and structural disorders are emphasized. Prerequisites: Junior Standing, Admission 
to Clinical Phase, SPCH 259, 309, 319, 379. (S) 

SPCH 502. Advanced Interpersonal Communication Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will examine interpersonal communication within African American, European 
American, Asian American, Latino/Latina, and Interracial relationships within a holistic frame- 
work. We will also examine the role that race plays in interpersonal relationships. We will 
examine historical, sociological, and psychological factors that affect individual behaviors within 
these relationships including gender socialization from country of origin to America. Under- 
standing various racial groups; conceptions of communication and relationships will be an 
important part of this course. This course will challenge many traditional assumptions and will 
require students to think critically about their beliefs and those of the scientific community in 
general. Prerequisites: SPCH 250, 301. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 505. Rhetoric as Social Movements Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is the study of traditional theories of opposition derived from sociological and 
rhetorical analyses of mass movements. Examines new social movements as groups contesting 
abortion, animal rights, feminism, and other local and national issues. Prerequisites: SPCH 
102, 250, Junior or Senior Standing. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 506. Advanced Argumentation Credit 3(3-0) 

Theories of argument drawn from classical and contemporary sources, with application to 
practice; making, judging, and appreciating forms of argument; consideration of their logical, 
ethical, and persuasive force. Prerequisites: SPCH 102, 250, 401. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 509. Introduction to Organic and Neurogenic 

Communication Disorders (Formerly SPCH 409) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an introduction to the study of theories, principles, and procedures for the evalu- 
ation and treatment of disordered communication behaviors that accompany organically and 
neurologically based anomalies. Prerequisites: SPCH 259, 319, 379, 381, 382. (F) 



240 



SPCH 521. Early Speech and Language Intervention Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an advanced study of speech and language disorders, assessment procedures, 
and intervention management of developmentally-delayed children from birth to five years. 
Prerequisites: Senior Standing, Admission to Clinical Phase, SPCH 259, 309, 319, 379, 381, 
382, 424, 426, 469, 478, 483, 484, 509. (F) 

SPCH 522. Aural Rehabilitation (Formerly SPCH 369, 469) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the principles and methods of intervention used in the rehabilitation of 
communication difficulties associated with hearing loss. Topics include hearing aids, assistive 
listening devices, cochlear implants, effects of hearing loss on the perception of speech and 
assessment of communication strategies. Prerequisites: SPCH 259, 309, 379, 381, 382, 424, 
426, 478, 483, 484, 509, 529, 521, 587. (S) 

SPCH 529. Clinical Practicum I (Formerly SPCH 429) Credit 2(0-2) 

This course provides a supervised clinical experience in the assessment, diagnosis, and treat- 
ment of speech-language and hearing disorders in children and adults. Prerequisites: Senior 
standing, Admission into Clinical Phase, 259, 309, 379, 381, 382, 424, 426, 478, 483, 484. 
(F;SS) 

SPCH 530. Clinical Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology II Credit 2(2-0) 

This course will provide an advanced supervised clinical experience in the assessment, diagno- 
sis, and treatment of speech language and hearing disorders in children and adults. Prerequi- 
sites: SPCH 259, 309, 319, 381, 382, 424, 426, 469, 483, 434. (S) 

SPCH 552. Persuasive Communication (Formerly SPCH 551) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is structured to provide the student with an organized study of the theories, prin- 
ciples, and strategies basic to attitude and behavior change. An attempt is made to balance the 
emphasis between the persuader's concerns and an understanding of various persuasive efforts 
directed at the consumer. A variety of persuasive contexts will be covered which include our 
society, the use of reasoning, advertising, and interpersonal persuasion. Prerequisite: SPCH 
250. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 565. Speech Writing Credit 3(3-0) 

This course introduces the student to the principles of writing speeches. Attends especially to 
audience adaptation, occasion analysis, and oral styles. Prerequisites: 250, 335, 552. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 587. Computer Applications in Communication Disorders Credits 3(3-0) 

This course emphasizes basic concepts and applications of computers in the field of Speech- 
Language Pathology and Audiology, including diagnostic and rehabilitative procedures, statis- 
tical and research applications, record keeping, and word processing. Review of contemporary 
computer hardware and software is emphasized. Prerequisites: Senior Standing, Acceptance 
into Clinical Phase, SPCH 309, 310, 381, 483, 484. (S) 

SPCH 600. Special Topics in Rhetoric Credit 3(3-0) 

This course explores the rhetoric of current events relating to topics such as technology, hip- 
hop culture, the environment and pornography. Prerequisites: SPCH 335. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 601. Narrative Research Credit 3(3-0) 

This course focuses on self as researcher, narrative research theory, methodology, and social 
relations of research subject. Prerequisites: SPCH 250, 375, Instructor's Permission. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 602. Bargaining and Negotiation Credit 3(3-0) 

Communication in bargaining and negotiation in organizational settings. Cognitive and moti- 
vational theories emphasizing bargaining and negotiation strategies. Prerequisites: SPCH 102, 
250, 427. (F;S;SS) 

241 



SPCH 603. Mass Media and Campaign Strategies Credit 3(3-0) 

Communication components of political campaigns, including broadcast advertising, direct 
mail, candidate speeches, debates, and news coverage. Campaign professionals share their 
expertise; students critically examine the effectiveness and appropriateness of campaign strat- 
egies and tactics. Prerequisites: SPCH 102, 250, 426. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 604. Rhetoric, Science and Technology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course focuses on contemporary debates concerning the standing and production of scien- 
tific argument. It investigates current controversies over the social constitution and consequences 
of science and technology. Prerequisites: SPCH 102, 250. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 675. Internship Credit 3(3-0) 

Students work in a corporate, non-profit, political, university, or departmental environment 
where learned skills can be implemented. Prerequisites: Senior Standing, Instructor's Permis- 
sion. (F;S;SS) 

SPCH 633. Speech for Teachers (Formerly SPCH 610) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes the study and application of the fundamental principles of oral communi- 
cation related to teaching and learning. (DEMAND) 

SPCH 635. Methods of Teaching Speech and Theatre (Formerly 539) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the aims, objectives, problems and difficulties experienced in teaching 
speech in the modern school. Special attention is given to the organization of speech curricula, 
course planning and presentation, and the selection of appropriate teaching aids. Prerequisites: 
27 hours of speech and 15 hours of education and psychology. (DEMAND) 

SPCH 680. Independent Study in Speech Communication Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an independent study in the area of communication studies. Content to be deter- 
mined by the student in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisites: Permission of chairper- 
son and instructor, junior and senior standing. 

SPCH 680. Independent Study in Speech-Language 

Pathology and Audiology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an independent study in the area of communication sciences and disorders. 
Content to be determined by the student in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisites: Junior, 
Senior Standing, Instructor and Chairperson Permission. (DEMAND) 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY 
Kathryn Barrett Lecturer 

B.S., M.S., East Carolina University, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin at Madison 

Jennifer Bell Brown Lecturer 

B.S., Vanderbilt University; J.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.P.P, Duke 
University 

June Bethea Lecturer 

B.A., M.S., South Carolina State University 

Linda Callahan Associate Professor 

B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Stephanie Carrino Lecturer 

B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Pamela Coote Lecturer 

B.S., Hampton Institute, M.S., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

242 



Shena Crittendon Lecturer 

B.A., Virginia Union University, M.A., University of Maryland, College Park 

Bruce Clark Director of the Television Studio and Lecturer 

B.A., Clark College, M.A., New York University 

A. Bernadette Mayfield-Clarke Associate Professor 

B.S., Marquette University, M.S., Ph.D., Howard University 

Linda Davidson Lecturer 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina A&T State University 

Dwight Davis Lecturer 

B.A., High Point University, M.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Emily Burch Harris Lecturer 

B.A., M.A., Marshall University 

Stephanie Howard Lecturer 

B.A., North Carolina A&T State University, M.A. Wake Forest University, ABD, Regent Uni- 
versity 

Linda Holiday Lecturer 

B.S., North Carolina A&T State University, M.S., Northwestern University 

Allen Johnson Lecturer 

B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Frances Ward Johnson Adjunct Associate Professor 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill 

Jacqueline Jones Lecturer 

B.A., North Carolina A&T State University; M.A., Ball State University 

Ingram Hill Land Lecturer 

B.A., North Carolina A&T State University, M.A., Michigan State University, ABD, East Caro- 
lina University 

Rita Lauria Associate Professor 

B.A., University of Southern California, M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill 

Deana Lacy McQuitty Lecturer 

B.A., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S.; Southern Connecticut University; ABD, 
Nova University 

Tamrat Mereba Professor 

B.S., University of Idaho, M.S., University of Wisconsin at LaCrosse, Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin at Madison 

Dawn Nail Lecturer 

B.A., North Carolina A&T State University, M.A. Austin Peay State University 

Valerie Nieman Visiting Assistant Professor 

B.S., West Virginia University, M.F.A., Queens University of Charlotte 



243 



Bonita Perry Lecturer 

B.A., Winston Salem State University, M.F.A., Savannah College of Art and Design 

Myra Shird Associate Professor 

B A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, M.A., San Diego State University, Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Regina Silverthorne Lecturer 

B.A., Hampton University, M.HR., University of Oklahoma, Ph.D. University of North Caro- 
lina at Greensboro 

Norita Speaks Lecturer 

B.S., Johnson C. Smith University, M.S., North Carolina A&T State University 

Donald Smith Lecturer 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University 

Tracey Snipes Lecturer 

B.A., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S. Appalachian State University 

Teresa Jo Styles Associate Professor 

B.A., Spelman College; M.A., Northwestern University; Ph.D. University North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill 

Brian Tomlin Lecturer 

B.A., University of Virginia; M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Greensboro, J.D., North 
Carolina Central University School of Law 

Nagatha Tonkins Assistant Professor 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina A&T State University 

Mary Vanderlinden Lecturer 

B.S., University of Missouri, M.B.A., Elon University 

Anthony Welborne Assistant Professor and General Manager, WNAA-FM 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University 

Sheila Whitley Assistant Professor 

A.A., Wingate University; B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.A., Appala- 
chian State University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Gail Wiggins Assistant Professor 

B.A., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University 



244 



Liberal Studies Program 
Humphrey Regis, Director 

OBJECTIVES 

The Liberal Studies Program is an interdisciplinary degree designed to prepare students for 
employment, civic participation and life-long learning in a complex, global environment. A 
Liberal Studies Bachelor of Arts degree requires students to complete 124-125 semester hours 
in designated areas of competency including 24 hours of Concentration Studies. The program 
seeks to provide students with a solid liberal arts education. The degree affords students a 
breath of academic experience as well as depth in a particular concentration field. The broad- 
based interdisciplinary nature of Liberal Studies provides the knowledge base, communication 
and analytical skills appropriate for graduate work, for entrepreneurial endeavors and for nu- 
merous careers and occupations. Currently, Liberal Studies offers concentration options in 
African- American Studies, International Studies, Dance, Women's Studies, Business, Pre-Law, 
Cultural Change & Social Development, Race, Class and Culture, and a customized Interdisci- 
plinary Concentration. This Interdisciplinary Concentration option allows students to tailor a 
degree that meets their educational and career goals and is especially helpful to non-traditional 
students who are returning to college after a break for family or career pursuits. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Liberal Studies (African American Studies) - Bachelor of Arts 

Liberal Studies (International Studies) - Bachelor of Arts 

Liberal Studies (Interdisciplinary) - Bachelor of Arts 

Liberal Studies (Dance) - Bachelor of Arts 

Liberal Studies (Business) - Bachelor of Arts 

Liberal Studies (Pre-Law) - Bachelor of Arts 

Liberal Studies (Women's Studies) - Bachelor of Arts 

Liberal Studies (Cultural Change & Social Development Studies) - Bachelor of Arts 

Liberal Studies (Race, Class and Culture) - Bachelor of Arts 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The admission of students to the Liberal Studies undergraduate degree program is based 
upon general admission requirements of the University. Transfer into the Liberal Studies Pro- 
gram requires a minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average. A minimum grade of a "C" is 
required for all concentration, related electives, English 101, and History 100/101 courses. 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR LIBERAL STUDIES 
FRESHMAN YEAR 

Credit 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


UNST 100 


1 


UNST 130 


UNST110 


3 


UNST 140 


UNST 120 


3 


ENGL 101 


FOLA Elective ' 


3 


FOLA Elective ' 


HIST 100 


3 


HIST 101 


MUSI 216 or Fine Arts Elective 2 


3 
16 





245 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


3 


ENGL 201 or Hum. Elect. 3 


3 


3 


MATH 102 or 112 


3 


3-4 


Concentration Studies Elect. 7 


6 


3 


UNST Cluster Elective 6 


3 


3 


UNST Cluster Elective 6 


3 


15-16 




18 


JUNIOR YEAR 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


3 


Thought & Reasoning Elective 8 


3 


3 


Technical & Prof. Writing Elective 9 


3 


3 


Social Interactions Electives 10 


3 


6 


Microcomputer Applications Elec. 11 


3 


15 


Concentration Studies Elective 7 


3 

15 


SENIOR YEAR 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


i 9 3 


Free Electives 


6 


6 


Communication Skills Elective 13 


3 


6 


Concentration Studies Elective 7 


3 


15 


LIBS 601 (Capstone) 


3 
15 



First Semester 
ENGL 200 or Hum. Elect. 3 
MATH 101 or 111 4 
Science Elective 5 
UNST Cluster Elective 6 
UNST Cluster Elective 6 



First Semester 

Thought & Reasoning Elective 8 

SPCH 250 

Science Elective 5 

Concentration Studies Elective 7 



First Semester 

Technical & Prof. Writing Elective 
Related Electives 12 
Concentration Studies Elective 



Total Credit Hours: 124-125 

' Two courses in the same foreign language are required. 

2 Fine Arts elective options: ART 100, 224, 225, 310*, DANCE 220, 331, 450, ENGL 105, 206, JOMC 604, 
MUSI 216, 219, 220* 221* 300, 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 308, 309, THEA 210 

3 Humanities elective options: ENGL 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 206 

4 MATH 111 and BUAD 220 are required for all Liberal Studies: Business majors. 

5 Students must select one course from Group A and one course from Group B. Group A options: BIOL 100, 
CHEM 100; Group B options: EASC 201 * PHYS 101, 105 

6 Students must select one cluster theme and take 12 hours in that cluster. 

7 Students must select 24 hours of concentration studies coursework from one concentration. 

8 Thought & Reasoning elective options: PHIL 260, 262, 263, 266, 400, 401, SOCI 100, 204, 304, POLI 150, 
200, 210, PSYC 320 

9 Social Interactions elective options: HEFS 310, 311, HIST 275*, HPED 104, 105, 107, 109, 110, 111, 112, 
113, 114, 115, 117, 118, 203, 204, 205, 207, 213, 214, 215, 234, 235, 237, 238, 246, 247, 251, JOMC 600, 
NURS 315* POLI 340, PSYC 324, 325, 420, 434, SOCI 304, 308, 473, SOWK 413, 503, SPCH 452, 461 
THEA 210 

10 Technical & Professional Writing elective options: BUED 360, ENGL 331, 411, 412, 413 
" Microcomputer Application elective options: ECT/L 101 or BUED 334 

12 Students must select 6 hours related to the senior research project topic with the approval of their concentra- 
tion advisor. 

13 Communication Skills elective options: ENGL 226, SPCH 102, 251, 258, 316, 401, 461, 552* 

* Course cannot be used to satisfy both a concentration and a required elective category or to satisfy two 
elective category requirements. 



246 



African-American Studies Concentration 

Students must successfully complete 24 semester hours from the following courses, select- 
ing a minimum of one course from at least four subject areas. 

ART 3 1 HIST 2 1 6 HIST 460 

ENGL 209 HIST 272 HIST 461 

ENGL 239 HIST 273 JOMC 302 

ENGL 3 1 8 HIST 306 JOMC 403 

ENGL 333 HIST 320 LIBS 220 

ENGL 334 HIST 351 LIBS 221 

ENGL 654 HIST 355 LIBS 402 

FOLA 404 HIST 405 PHIL 264 

FOLA 4 1 7 HIST 416 MUSI 220 

FOLA 424 HIST 4 1 7 MUSI 22 1 

HIST 201 HIST 425 POLI 220 

HIST 202 HIST 440 SOWK 4 1 4 

HIST 203 HIST 455 THEA 364 



HIST 215 



International Studies Concentration 



Students must successfully complete six (6) consecutive semester hours of Foreign Lan- 
guage beyond the elementary level for a total of twelve (12) hours in one language. The re- 
maining eighteen (18) hours must be selected from the following options: 
ECON505 HIST 321 JOMC 601 

ECON 537 HIST 332 LIBS 301 

ENGL 336 HIST 409 LIBS 307 

ENGL 409 HIST 412 PHIL 265 

ENGL 417 HIST 418 POLI 444 

FOLA 417 HIST 43 1 POLI 445 

GEOG 210 HIST 433 POLI 446 

GEOG 322 HIST 435 SOCI 300 

HIST 313 HIST 451 

Interdisciplinary Studies Concentration 

In the event that a student elects to customize an area for concentration studies, that student 
may design a program of study, in consultation with the Director of Liberal Studies, to reach 
the twenty-four (24) semester-hour requirement. The body of knowledge of the concentration 
will be determined by the participating academic units (i.e. Departments/Schools) according to 
their perceived disciplinary requirements. An interdisciplinary concentration and its related 
elective courses cannot replicate an existing degree program and must include courses from at 
least three different subject areas. Prior to implementation, the design of these concentration 
studies shall be approved by the Director of Liberal Studies, the student's academic advisor, 
the departmental coordinator, and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. A student 
cannot declare a major of Liberal Studies: Interdisciplinary until the concentration coursework 
has been fully approved. 

Dance Concentration 

All dance concentration majors must audition and be accepted into the program. All majors 
are required to participate in on-campus and community dance company productions as per- 
formers and/or as technical assistants. Students must successfully complete 24 semester hours 
from the following course options. 

DANC110 DANC220 DANC 450 

DANC 200 DANC 300 DANC 500 

DANC 210 DANC 301 DANC 550 

DANC 330 or 331 

247 



Pre-Law Concentration 

Students must successfully complete twenty-four (24) hours from the following courses, 
selecting a minimum of one course from each of three subject areas. 

BUAD461 JOMC493 POLI 543 

BUAD 462 PHIL 262 POLI 644 

BUAD 463 PHIL 402 CRJS/SOWK 503 

HIST 313 POLI 200 CRJS/SOWK 670 

HIST 410 POLI 542 SPCH 552 

Women's Studies Concentration 

Students must successfully complete three (3) semester hours of HIST275, Introduction to 
Women's Studies, prior to enrolling in concentration or related elective courses. The remaining 
twenty-one (21) hours must be selected from the following courses, selecting a minimum of 
one course from each of four subject areas. 

DANC310 ENGL 243 JOMC 608 

ENGL 224 ENGL 318 LIBS 302 

ENGL 232 ENGL 343 LIBS 306 

ENGL 416 ENGL 416 NURS 315 

ENGL 236 HEFS 1 8 1 PHIL 2 1 

ENGL 237 HIST 306 POLI 450 

ENGL 239 HIST 423 PS YC 55 1 

ENGL 241 HIST 501 SOWK320 

ENGL 242 HIST 622 

Cultural Change and Social Development Studies Concentration 

Students must successfully complete twenty-four (24) hours, to be allocated as follows: 

Required Courses: 

SOCI100 SOCI200 SOCI473 

SOCI 101 SOCI 300 SOSW 600 

Choose any TWO (2) of the following: 

EASC 201 LIBS 220 PHIL 265 

ECON515 LIBS 305 POLI 444 

HIST 312 LIBS 307 SOCI 306 

LIBS 201 LIBS 401 SOWK412 

Business Concentration 

To fulfill this concentration students must take MATH 1 1 1 (instead of MATH 101) and take 
BUAD 220 as a related elective course. A grade of "C" or better must be earned in MATH 111 
and BUAD 220. After completing these prerequisite courses, students must successfully com- 
plete the following 24 semester hours. 

ACCT 221 BUAD 430 ECON 200 

ACCT 222 BUAD 453 ECON 305 

BUAD 422 BUAD 461 

Students are also strongly encouraged to take BUAD 341, Introduction to Management 
Information Systems, for the second related elective and to take BUED 360, Business Commu- 
nications, as Technical & Professional Writing elective. 



248 



Race, Class and Culture Concentration 

Students must successfully complete three (3) semester hours of LIBS 201, Introduction to 
Race, Class and Culture, prior to enrolling in concentration of related elective courses. All 
Race, Class and Culture students must also take LIBS 501 as one of their related electives. The 
remaining twenty-one (21) hours must be selected from the courses listed below: 
COMP 390 HIST 477 LIBS 307 

ENGL 206 HIST 610 LIBS 308 

ENGL 242 LIBS 220 LIBS 401 

ENGL 316 LIBS 221 LIBS 402 

ENGL 318 LIBS 301 LDAR 102 

ENGL 336 LIBS 302 PHIL 265 

HEFS 181 LIBS 303 SOCI 304 

HEFS 332 LIBS 304 SOCI 406 

HIST 321 LIBS 305 

HIST 415 LIBS 306 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN LIBERAL STUDIES 

LIBS 220. Race, Class and Environmental Quality Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the relationships between race, class and environmental quality within 
the context of a global economy that seeks to maximize profits while minimizing responsibil- 
ity. It also examines the concept of environmental justice as a means to restore positive connec- 
tions within communities between environmental use and environmental quality. 

LIBS 221. Genetics, Race and Society Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the historical development of theories of "race" in the Western world. It 
provides the student with a basic understanding of the principles of evolutionary /population 
biology, genetics, and taxonomy as they relate to biological and social conceptions of race. 

LIBS 301. Ethno-Nationalism and the Reconstruction of Nations Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines how the breakup of the USSR led to the rise of ethno-nationalism in the 
process of national reconstruction. Exploring the myths, symbols and histories of those com- 
peting populations within the Soviet Union or its power, we discover a paradigm that applies to 
the wider postcolonial world as well. 

LIBS 302. Media Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the shaping of information in popular media, with special emphasis on 
the creation of news. Examining institutional configurations and conglomeration, it focuses on 
the role of news media within national discourses, on the shaping of ideological consensus and 
the marginalization of dissent. It asks questions about the limitations of political discourse, 
about bias and objectivity, about how news is defined, presented, and disseminated. 

LIBS 303. Consumer Culture Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the creation of consumer culture during the last two centuries. It looks at 
the development of advertising, public relations, mass marketing, and the construction of con- 
sumer consciousness. It also considers the consequences of global consumerism upon the envi- 
ronment, cultural tradition, human social relations and economic conditions. 

LIBS 304. The American South Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines mythologies and realities of the American South: the antebellum period, 
the Civil War, Reconstruction, the Civil Rights era, and the New South. It looks at how these 
historical moments have been written and rewritten, in academic and popular discourses, in 
response to racial beliefs and ideological needs. It considers the South as a geographical, so- 
cial, and cultural entity and as an important element within the shaping of an American na- 
tional mythos. 

249 



LIBS 305. Race and Class in Caribbean Culture Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will examine the ethnic, racial and cultural diversity of the Caribbean, including 
the impact of foreign cultures on the area, and the export of its unique cultural forms to the 
global society. 

LIBS 306. Gender and Technology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will explore technology's interaction with the concept of gender and how gender is 
embodied in technologies, and conversely, how technologies shape societal notions of gender. 
Students will critically assess the gender relations produced in areas such as entertainment and 
games, work, identity, education, culture, globalism, race and ethnicity. 

LIBS 307. Food and The Global Community Credit 3(3-0) 

This course uses multidisciplinary perspectives to examine the connections between food and 
human lifeways. Focusing on varied ethnic food traditions and people around the world, this 
course will explore 1) the interplay of class and gender in the preparation of food, 2) the role of 
political and economic power in the accessibility and distribution of food, and 3) the religious 
and cultural symbolism of eating. 

LIBS 308. Historical, Social, and Cultural Perspectives of Technology Credit 3(3-0) 
This course explores the interrelationships between the human race and technology, the range 
of determinism between the two, and the possible paths for technology and humans in the 
global world. 

LIBS 401. War and Culture Credit 3(3-0) 

This course investigates the nature of war, its causes and consequences, its depiction in news 
accounts, memoirs, literary texts, and popular media. This course asks questions about the 
function of war economically and idelogically. It considers the intersection of war with race 
and gender. It also considers the ways war is commonly represented within national discourses. 

LIBS 402. Historical Memory Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the nature of historical truth within a mass-mediated culture and against 
a prevailing postmodern skepticism. It also looks at the processes by which historical events 
are defined and represented. It asks questions about the intersections of nationalism and his- 
tory, about the determining power of schook curricula, textbooks, museums, academic experts, 
and popular media. 

LIBS 501. Reading and Writing Cultural Critique Credit 3(3-0) 

This writing intensive course emphasizes both critical analysis and writing, with particular 
attention on writing for a specific setting and audience. 

LIBS 601. Independent Study I Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed for students to conduct advanced research and study on a special topic. 

LIBS 602. Independent Study II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed for students to conduct advanced research and study on a special topic. 
Prerequisite: LIBS 601. 



250 



Department of Mathematics 

http://www.ncat.edu/~math/ 



Wilbur L. Smith, Chairperson 

OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the Mathematics Department are as follows: 

1 . to prepare students for employment in government or industry as well as graduate studies; 

2. to avail students of the opportunity to undertake independent investigations in mathematics; 

3. to prepare students to teach and present mathematics in a modem, meaningful, and 
stimulating manner at secondary school level; 

4. to provide courses which ensure acquisition of basic mathematical skills and concepts 
for all students at the university; 

5. to encourage wide ranging professional growth and research by faculty; 

6. to encourage faculty involvement in university, college, and departmental governance, as 
well as in community activities; 

7. to understand and effectively respond to student retention and graduation rates. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Applied Mathematics - Bachelor of Science 
Mathematics - Bachelor of Science 
Applied Mathematics - Master of Science* 
Mathematics Education - Master of Science* 
Computational Science and Engineering - Master of Science* 
Energy and Environmental Studies - Doctor of Philosophy* 
* See the Graduate School Bulletin 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

Admission, retention and graduation requirements for students enrolled in degree programs 
in the Department of Mathematics are based upon the general admission, retention and gradu- 
ation requirements of the University. However, two units of algebra, one unit of plane geom- 
etry and one-half unit of trigonometry are required of all students who elect to pursue any 
curriculum offered in the department. 

SPECIFIC PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

Applied Mathematics 

The Applied Mathematics major must complete a minimum of 124 semester hours of Uni- 
versity courses, including 44 hours in mathematics, 8 hours in physics and 24 hours of applica- 
tions area electives. 

Mathematics 

The Mathematics major must complete a minimum of 124 semester hours of University 
courses. These include 50 hours in mathematics and 16 hours in sciences. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

The Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor in its "Occupational Out- 
look for College Graduates" continues to report that the employment opportunities in educa- 
tion, cost analysis, government service and public health are expected to be excellent for gradu- 
ates in mathematics. 

251 



REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR APPLIED MATHEMATICS 

MATH 1 05 MATH 3 1 1 MATH 480 

MATH 1 3 1 MATH 43 1 MATH 505 

MATH 132 MATH 432 MATH 507 

MATH 224 MATH 440 or 465 MATH 608 

MATH 23 1 MATH 450 MATH 692 
MATH 240 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR APPLIED MATHEMATICS 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 

MATH 131 

UNST 100/MATH 105 

UNST110 

UNST 120 

FOLA Elective 1 

GEEN 102 



First Semester 

MATH 231 

UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 

PHYS 241/251 

UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 

MATH 224 



First Semester 

MATH 431 

MATH 450 

Applications Area Elective 3 

Applications Area Elective 3 

SPCH 250 



First Semester 
MATH 507 
MATH 440 or 465 
Applications Area Elective 3 
Applications Area Elective 3 
Elective 

Credit Hour Summary 

Mathematics 

Physics and Engineering 

Applications Area Elective 

University Studies 

SPCH, FOLA 

Free Elective 

Total Credit Hours: 



Credit 

4 
1 
3 
3 
3 
2 
16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Second Semester 
MATH 132 
MATH 240 
UNST 130 
UNST 140 
FOLA Elective 1 



Credit 
4 
3 
4 
3 
3 
17 



Second Semester 

MATH 311 

UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 

PHYS 242/252 

Applications Area Elect. 3 

UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Credit 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Second Semester 

MATH 432 

MATH 480 

Applications Area Elective 3 

Applications Area Elective 3 

Elective 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credit 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 

44 
10 
24 
28 



124 



Second Semester 

MATH 608 

MATH 505 

Applications Area Elective 3 

UNST Capstone/MATH 692 4 

Elective 



Credit 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
16 



Credit 

4 
3 
4 
3 
3 
17 



Credit 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Credit 
3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
13 



Two courses FOLA 100, 101; or FOLA 102, 103; or FOLA 104, 105: or FOLA 106, 107 taken in sequence 
UNST Cluster Theme Elective: must choose one cluster and take 12 hours in that cluster. 
Must include a total of 24 credit hours taken in one of the applications areas, including but not limited to: 
Applied and Computational Mathematics, Physical Sciences, Engineering and Applied Sciences, Life Sci- 
ences, or Business and Economics, and approved by the Applied Mathematics Undergraduate Program Com- 
mittee. A list of suggested core courses for each of the applications areas is available from the Department of 
Mathematics 

MATH 692, Independent Study, is the Math Department capstone to fulfill the UNST capstone experience 
requirement 



252 



REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR MATHEMATICS 



MATH 105 
MATH 131 
MATH 132 
MATH 224 
MATH 231 
MATH 240 



MATH 311 

MATH 431 

MATH 432,440 or 465 

MATH 450 

MATH 505 

MATH 507 



MATH 508 
MATH 511 
MATH 512 
MATH 692 
MATH Electives (two) 



CURRICULUM GUIDE for MATHEMATICS 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 

MATH 131 

Science Elective 1 

UNST 110 

UNST 120 

UNST 100/MATH 105 



First Semester 

MATH 231 

UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 

PHYS 241/251 

UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 

MATH 224 



First Semester 
MATH 431 
MATH 507 
Elective 
FOLA 3 
SPCH 250 



First Semester 
MATH 511 
MATH 505 
MATH Elective 4 
Electives 

Credit Hour Summary 
Mathematics 
Science 

University Studies 
Free Elective 
FOLA, SPCH, HPED 

Total Credit Hours: 126 

' 8 hours: CHEM 100, 110 and BIOL 100; or CHEM 106,116 and CHEM 107, 117. 

2 UNST Cluster Theme Elective: must choose one cluster and take 12 hours in that cluster. 

3 A sequence of two courses in either French, German, Russian, or Spanish 

4 6 hours: MATH 223, 420, 423, 440, 460, 607, 608, 610, 611, 612, 620, 623, 624, 631, 632, 633, 650, 651, 652, 
665. 



Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


4 


MATH 132 


4 


4 


Science Elective 1 


4 


3 


UNST 130 


3 


3 


UNST 140 


3 


1 


HPED 200 


2 


15 




16 


SOPHOMORE YEAR 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


4 


MATH 311 


4 


3 


MATH 240 


3 


4 


PHYS 242/252 


4 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 


3 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elect. 2 


3 


17 




17 


JUNIOR YEAR 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


3 


MATH 508 


3 


3 


MATH 432, 440 or 465 


3 


3 


MATH 450 


3 


3 


FOLA 3 


3 


3 


Elective 


3 


15 




15 


SENIOR YEAR 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


3 


MATH 512 


3 


1 


MATH Elective 4 


3 


3 


UNST Capstone/MATH 692 


3 


9 


Electives 


6 


16 




15 


50 






16 






28 






21 






11 







253 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN MATHEMATICS 

MATH 099. Intermediate Mathematics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers elementary properties of real numbers and basic algebra through solving of 
quadratic equations by various means. It is required of students whose mathematics SAT scores 
are low and whose major curriculum includes either MATH 101 or 111. (F;S;SS) 

MATH 101. Fundamentals of Algebra and Trigonometry I* Credit 3(3-0) 

Numbers and their properties polynominals, rational expressions, rational exponents, radicals, 
equations and inequalities in one variable, relations and functions are studied. Prerequisite: A 
satisfactory score on the mathematics portion of the SAT or MATH 099. (F;S;SS) 

MATH 102. Fundamentals of Algebra and Trigonometry II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of MATH 101. Quadratic functions, systems of linear equations, 
exponential and logarithmic functions, circular functions, trigonometric functions, analytical 
trigonometry and the binomial theorem will be studied. Prerequisite: MATH 101. (F;S;SS) 

MATH 105. Seminar for Freshmen and New Mathematics Majors Credit 1(1-0) 

This course will guide and encourage proper mathematics study habits, and develop an informed 
mathematics major who will be prepared to move through his or her curriculum. Seminar 
topics include: how to study mathematics; ethics-academic honesty, respect for property, civility; 
technology instruction; key information: special deadlines, required tests; and other related 
topics. (F;S) 

MATH 1 10. Pre-Calculus for Engineers and Scientists Credit 4(4-0) 

Algebraic properties of the number system, fundamental operations, exponents and radicals, 
functions and graphs, solutions of equations and systems of equations, trigonometric functions 
and identities, inequalities, logarithms, progressions, mathematical induction, binomial theorem, 
permutations and combinations will be studied. Prerequisites: One unit of high school algebra 
and one unit of high school geometry. (F;S;SS) 

MATH 111. College Algebra and Trigonometry* Credit 4(4-0) 

This course is a review of basic algebra; first and second degree equations; polynomial and 
rational functions-systems of equations-inequalities, right triangle trigonometry; and 
trigonometric identities and equations. Prerequisites: Mathematics 099 or two units of high 
school algebra, one unit of high school geometry and a satisfactory score on the mathematical 
portion of the Scholastic Aptitude Test. (F;S;SS) 

MATH 112. Calculus for Non-Mathematics Majors Credit 4(4-0) 

This course includes a brief treatment of basic concepts of differential and integral calculus 
with applications to business, economics, social and behavioral sciences; polynomial, rational, 
exponential and logarithmic functions. Prerequisite: MATH 102, 110, or 111. (F;S;SS) 

MATH 115. Mathematics of Business and Finance Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes a brief review of computing with whole numbers, decimals, fractions, 
percent, problem solving and the metric system. Simple interest, discount, partial payments, 
payroll wages and commission accounts, discounts and mark-ups, retailing, taxes, distribution 
of ownership, transactions in corporate securities, insurance, compound interest, annuities 
amortization and sinking funds will also be studied. Prerequisite: MATH 101, 110, or 111. 
(DEMAND) 

MATH 123. Discrete Mathematics I Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an introduction to applied discrete mathematics. Topics include set theory, 
introduction to logic, functions, recursion, relations, properties of integers, and elementary 
matrix algebra. Prerequisite: MATH 1 10 or equivalent. (F;S) 



254 



MATH 131. Calculus I Credit 4(4-0) 

Limits and continuity of functions, the derivative, applications of the derivative, the definite 
integral and applications of the definite integral will be studied. Prerequisite: MATH 1 10 or 
appropriate approval. (F;S;SS) 

MATH 132. Calculus II Credit 4(4-0) 

Topics in analytic geometry, differentiation and integration of exponential, logarithmic, 
trigonometric, inverse trigonometric and hyperbolic functions, additional techniques and 
applications of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, Taylor's Formula and infinite 
series will be studied. Prerequisite: MATH 131. (F;S;SS) 

MATH 223. Discrete Mathematics II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of MATH 123. Topics include Boolean algebra and applications 
elementary graph theory, trees and applications, and mathematical techniques for algorithm 
analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 123 or 31 1. (F;S;SS) 

MATH 224. Introduction to Probability and Statistics Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a general course covering fundamentals of statistics, central tendencies, variabilities, 
graphic methods, frequency distributions, correlations, reliability of measures, theory and 
methods of sampling and descriptive and analytical measures of statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 
lll.(F;S;SS) 

MATH 231. Calculus HI Credit 4(4-0) 

This course will cover plane curves and polar coordinates, vector and solid geometry, vector 
valued functions, partial differentiation, multiple integrals, applications of multiple integrals 
and vector analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 132. (F;S;SS) 

MATH 240. Introduction to the Programming of Digital Computers Credit 3(3-0) 

This course introduces the student to problem solving using Maple, Mathematica, or Matlab. It 
also provides an introduction to programming in the FORTRAN language. Prerequisite: MATH 
112orl31.(F;S;SS) 

MATH 242. College Geometry Credit 3(3-0) 

Postulational systems, Euclid's Parallel Postulate, a brief study of non-Euclidean geometries, 
Euclidean geometry as a special case of other geometries and defects of Euclid's system will 
be studied. Prerequisite: MATH 132. (DEMAND) 

MATH 311. Mathematical Logic and Proof Techniques Credit 4(3-2) 

Emphasis is placed on development or writing skills and the ability to understand and develop 
proofs and logical arguments. Topics include quantifiers, rules of logic, and methods of 
mathematical proof, with applications to sets, integers, real numbers, functions, relations, and 
combinatorics. In the weekly 2-hour active learning lab, exercises and proofs are given to 
groups of two to four. The students present solutions and the solutions are critiqued by the 
students and the instructor. Prerequisite: MATH 132. (S) 

MATH 397. Co-Operative Industrial Experience I Variable: 1-4 

This course is a supervised learning experience in a specified private or governmental facility. 
The student must be in industry full time for at least one summer or one semester and must 
perform supervised work that will enhance his/her educational background in an area related to 
mathematics and/or computer science. In addition to the supervisor's evaluation on the field, 
the student's performance will be evaluated by a departmental faculty committee, based upon 
reports, informal portfolios and forum and/or a seminar presented by the student upon his/her 
return to the University. (DEMAND) 



255 



MATH 398. Co-Operative Industrial Experience II Variable: 1-4 

The description of this course is the same as MATH 397 and is normally the second Co-op 
experience of the student related to mathematics and/or computer science. The maximum number 
of credit hours that may be earned by a student in the two courses MATH-397 and MATH 398 
is six. (DEMAND) 

MATH 420. History of Mathematics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a survey of the development of mathematics by chronological periods with 
biographical references, illustrations of national and racial achievements and discussion of the 
evaluation of certain important topics of elementary mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH 231. 
(DEMAND) 

MATH 423. Theory of Equations Credit 3(3-0) 

Methods of solving cubics, quarries and other algebraic equations, methods of approximating 
roots-systems of equations, and elements of determinants and matrices will be studied. 
Prerequisite: MATH 132. (DEMAND) 

MATH 430. Use of Technology in Teaching Mathematics Credit 4(3-2) 

This course covers the use of graphing calculators and mathematical software in doing and 
teaching of mathematics at the secondary and college levels. It includes and introduction to a 
calculator based programming language with in-depth treatment of algorithms and control 
structures. Application areas include algebra, geometry, trigonometry, precalculus, calculus, 
statistics, and elementary linear algebra. Prerequisites: MATH 224, 132. (S) 

MATH 431. Introduction to Differential Equations (Formerly MATH 331) Credit 3(3-0) 
This course will cover first order differential equations, higher order linear differential equations, 
matrices and determinants, systems of linear algebraic equations, systems of linear differential 
equations, and Laplace transforms. Prerequisite: MATH 132. (F;S;SS) 

MATH 432. Introduction to Applied Mathematics (Formerly MATH 332) Credit 3(3-0) 
This course will cover Fourier series, partial differential equations, complex variables, Taylor 
and Laurent series and residue theory. Prerequisite: MATH 431. (F;S;SS) 

MATH 440. Numerical Methods Credit 3(2-2) 

Numerical methods as related to programming techniques, interpolation, extrapolation, 
approximate solutions of algebraic and transcendental equations, simultaneous linear equations, 
initial- value, characteristic-value and boundary-value problems, partial differential equations 
of the hyperbolic parabolic and elliptic types will be studied. Corequisite: MATH 240. 
(DEMAND) 

MATH 450. Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory (Formerly MATH 350) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an introduction to linear algebra and matrix theory; the algebra of matrices and 
its application to the solutions of systems of linear equations, determinants, real and complex 
vector spaces, bases, dimension, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. 
Prerequisite: MATH 132. (F;S;SS) 

MATH 460. Numerical Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an introduction to principles and techniques of numerical mathematics. Topics 
in round-off error analysis, the approximation of functions, derivatives and integrals, and the 
numerical solutions of non-linear equations, ordinary differential equations and the systems of 
linear equations will be studied. Prerequisites: MATH 231, 240 and 450. (DEMAND) 

MATH 465. Introduction to Scientific Computing Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will cover scientific computing fundamentals, and expose the student to high- 
performance programming languages and scientific computing tools. Topics include errors, 
approximations, floating point operations, polynomial interpolation, cubic splines, numerical 

256 



integration, numerical linear algebra, solution of nonlinear equations, the initial value problems. 

The MATLAB or MAPLE computing environment is used. Prerequisites: MATH 43 1 and 450. 

(S) 

MATH 480. Introduction to Mathematical Modeling Credit 3(3-0) 

This course explores the fundamentals of both discrete and continuous mathematical modeling 
of problems in various fields where mathematics is used. The course will be project oriented 
and will emphasize multi-disciplinary problem solving. Prerequisites: MATH 231, 431: 
Corequisites: MATH 432, 450. (F;S) 

MATH 505. Seminar in Mathematics Credit 1(1-0) 

Methods of preparing and presenting seminars, presentation of seminars in current developments 
in mathematics and/or topics of interest which are not included in formal courses will be studied. 
Required for mathematics majors. Prerequisite: MATH 507 or 51 1. (DEMAND) 

MATH 507. Intermediate Analysis I Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes a rigorous treatment of the fundamental principles of analysis, limits, 
continuity, sequences, series, differentiability and integrability and functions of several variables. 
Prerequisites: MATH 231 and 31 1, or consent of instructor. (F) 

MATH 508. Intermediate Analysis II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of MATH 507. Prerequisite: MATH 507. (S) 

MATH 511. Abstract Algebra I Credit 3(3-0) 

Elementary properties of integers, rings, integral domains, and fields, properties of groups, 
including abelian groups, permutations, homomorphisms, normal subgroups, and factor groups 
will be studied. Prerequisite: MATH 231, 31 1 or consent of instructor. (F) 

MATH 512. Abstract Algebra II Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a continuation of MATH 511, including topics in commutative ring theory, Galois field 
theory and module theory. Prerequisite: MATH 51 1. (S) 

MATH 550. Vector Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

Vector and tensor calculus, covariant and contravariant components; integral theorems; 
applications to geometry, mechanics and electromagnetic theory will be studied. Prerequisite: 
MATH 431. (DEMAND) 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

MATH 600. Introduction to Modern Mathematics for 

Secondary School Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

Elementary theory of sets, elementary logic and propositional systems, nature and methods of 
mathematical proofs, structure of the real number system will be studied. Evaluation of 
instructional software and use of computer integrated instruction to teach pertinent concepts in 
secondary school mathematics will also be included. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 
(DEMAND) 

MATH 601. Technology and Applications in Secondary 

School Mathematics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers techniques of teaching algebra, advanced algebra, trigonometry, and other 
secondary mathematics using graphing calculators, software packages and other technology. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. (DEMAND) 

MATH 602. Modern Algebra Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers mappings, binary operations, groups, rings, integral domains, fields, and 
some applications to coding and cryptography. Prerequisite: MATH 311 or consent of the 
instructor. (DEMAND) 

257 



MATH 603. Introduction to Real Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

The following topics will be covered in this course: elementary set theory, functions, axiomatic 
development of the real numbers, metric spaces, convergent sequences, completeness, 
compactness, connectedness, continuity, limits, sequences of functions, differentiation, the mean 
value theorem, Taylor's theorem, Riemann integration, infinite series, the fixed point theorem, 
partial differentiation, and the implicit function theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 311 or consent 
of the instructor. (DEMAND) 

MATH 604. Modern Geometry for Secondary School Teachers Credit 3(3-0) 

Re-examination of Euclidean geometry, axiomatic systems and the Hilbert axioms, introduction 
to projective geometry and other non-Euclidean geometries will be included. Prerequisite: MATH 
600 or consent of the Department of Mathematics. (DEMAND) 

MATH 606. Mathematics for Chemists Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes a review of those principles of mathematics which are involved in chemical 
computations and derivations from general chemistry through physical chemistry; topics covered 
include significant figures, methods of expressing large and small numbers, algebraic operations, 
trigonometric functions and an introduction to calculus. (DEMAND) 

MATH 607. Theory of Numbers Credit 3(3-0) 

Divisibility properties of the integers, the Euclidean algorithm, congruences, diophantine 
equations, number-theoretic functions and continued fractions will be studied. Prerequisite: 
Twenty hours of college mathematics. (DEMAND) 

MATH 608. Methods of Applied Statistics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course introduces the SAS programming language, and uses it in the analysis of variance, 
both single and multifactor. It includes various methods of hypothesis testing and constructing 
confidence intervals. The course covers simple and multiple linear regression, including model 
building and variable selection techniques. Elements of time series and categorical data analysis 
are covered. Prerequisite: MATH 224. (DEMAND) 

MATH 610. Complex Variables I Credit 3(3-0) 

The following topics will be covered in this course: complex number system, limits of complex 
sequences, complex functions, continuity, limits of functions, derivatives, elementary functions, 
Cauchy-Riemann equations, antiderivatives harmonic functions, inverse functions, power series, 
analytic functions, analytic continuation, contour integrals, Cauchy's theorem and Cauchy's 
integral formula. Prerequisite: MATH 231. (DEMAND) 

MATH 611. Complex Variables II Credit 3(3-0) 

Mathematics 61 1 is a continuation of Mathematics 610. The following topics will be covered 
in this course: Liouville's theorem, the fundamental theorem of algebra, the winding number, 
generalized Cauchy theorems, singularities, residue calculus, Laurent series, boundary value 
problems, harmonic functions, conformal mappings, Poisson's formula, potential theory, physical 
applications and the Riemann mapping theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 610. (DEMAND) 

MATH 612. Advanced Linear Algebra (Formerly MATH 520) Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers vector spaces, linear transformations and matrices determinants and systems 
of linear equations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization, inner products, bilinear 
quadratic forms, canonical forms, and application to engineering, and applied sciences. 
Prerequisite: MATH 450 or consent of the instructor. (DEMAND) 

MATH 620. Elements of Set Theory and Topology Credit 3(3-0) 

Operations on sets, indexed families of sets, products of sets, relations, functions, metric spaces, 
general topological spaces, continuity, compactness and connectedness will be included. 
Prerequisites: MATH 231 and consent of the instructor. (DEMAND) 

258 



MATH 623. Probability Theory and Applications Credit 3(3-0) 

This course begins with an introduction to sample spaces and probability, including 
combinatorics. It covers continuous and discrete random variables, including multi-variate 
random variables and expectations; also marginal and conditional distributions are derived. 
The course introduces moment generating functions, and covers the central limit theorem and 
its applications. Prerequisite: MATH 231. (DEMAND) 

MATH 624. Theory and Methods of Statistics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course introduces methods of statistical estimation and inference including the following 
topics: sufficient statistics, confidence sets, hypothesis tests, and maximum likelihood methods. 
The theory of uniformly most powerful tests and the Neyman-Pearson Lemma are covered. 
Other topics include least squares estimation, the linear model, and Bayesian methods. 
Prerequisite: MATH 623. (DEMAND) 

MATH 625. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers, K-8, 1 Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed for in-service and prospective teachers who have as their goal "to teach 
the basic skills and competencies of mathematics sought in today's world." The course 
emphasizes that the teacher first, must have the knowledge and skills in order to accomplish 
this goal. It stresses fundamentals of arithmetic, sets and operations, number systems, fractions, 
decimals, percents, estimation, consumer arithmetic, problem solving and traditional and metric 
geometry and measurement. This course may not be used for degree credit. (DEMAND) 

MATH 626. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers, K-8, II Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a continuation of MATH 625; provides no credit towards a degree in mathematics; is 
not open to secondary school teachers of mathematics. Credit on elementary education degree. 
Prerequisite: MATH 625. (DEMAND) 

MATH 631. Linear and Non-Linear Programming Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes optimization subject to linear constraints; transportation problems, 
SIMPLEX algorithm; network flows; application of linear programming to industrial problems 
and economic theories; introduction to non-linear programming. Prerequisites: MATH 450 
and a high level programming language. (DEMAND) 

MATH 632. Games and Queue Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a general introduction to game theory; two-person-non-zerosum-non-cooperative 
games; two-person cooperative games; reasonable outcomes and values; the minimax theorem. 
Introduction to queuing theory; single server queuing processes; many serve queuing processes; 
applications to economics and business. Prerequisite: MATH 224, MATH 450, or consent of 
the instructor. (DEMAND) 

MATH 633. Stochastic Processes Credit 3(3-0) 

This course begins with a review of Probability and Random Variables. Markov Processes, 
Poisson Processes, Waiting Times, Renewal Phenomena, Branching Processes, Queuing System, 
Service Times are covered. Prerequisite: MATH 623 or consent of the instructor. (DEMAND) 

MATH 650. Ordinary Differential Equations Credit 3(3-0) 

This is an intermediate course in ordinary differential equations with emphasis on applications. 
Topics include linear systems and various phase plane techniques for non-linear ordinary 
differential equations. Prerequisite: MATH 431. (DEMAND) 

MATH 651. Partial Differential Equations Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes introduction to complex variables and residue calculus, transform calculus, 
higher order partial differential equations governing various physical phenomena, 
nonhomogeneous boundary value problems, orthogonal expressions, Green's functions and 
variational principles. Prerequisites: MATH 431 and 432. (DEMAND) 

259 



MATH 652. Methods of Applied Mathematics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers matrix theory, systems of linear equations, vector spaces, eigenvalue problem 
and its applications to systems of linear ODEs and mechanical vibrations, the simplest problems 
of calculus of variations, Euler equations, boundary conditions, extensions of Euler equations, 
Hamilton's Principles, constraints and Lagrange multipliers, introduction to integral equations, 
and solutions in iterative and other methods. Prerequisites: MATH 431 and 432. (DEMAND) 

MATH 665. Principles of Optimization Credit 3(3-0) 

Algebra, linear inequalities, duality, graph, transport network; linear programming; special 
algorithms; selected applications. An upper level course. Prerequisites: MATH 23 1 or equivalent 
and MATH 240 and 450. (DEMAND) 

MATH 675. Graph Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

Varieties of graphs, graph theory algorithms, and applications of graph theory to other disciplines 
will be studied. Prerequisite: MATH 450. (DEMAND) 

MATH 691. Special Topics in Applied Mathematics Credit 3(3-0) 

Topics are selected from differential equations, numerical methods, operations research, applied 
mechanics and from other fields of applied mathematics. Prerequisites: Senior or graduate 
standing and consent of the instructor. (DEMAND) 

MATH 692. Independent Study Credit 3(3-0) 

This course offers guided independent undergraduate study under faculty supervision in an 
approved mathematical topic. The course may be repeated for a maximum of six credit hours. 
(F;S;SS) 

* Students are required to purchase supplemental materials for this course. General Education course. 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY 

Bampia A. Bangura Associate Professor 

B.S., Njala University College; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University, Ed.D., Louisiana 
State University 

Bolindra N. Borah Professor 

B.S., Gauhat University, India; M.S., Ph.D., Oregon State University 

Shea D. Burns Associate Professor 

B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Ph.D., Howard University 

Gilbert Casterlow, Jr. Emeritus Professor 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Mingxiang Chen Assistant Professor 

B.S., M.S., Huazhong Normal University; Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology 

James F. Chew Associate Professor 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 

Thomas G. Clarke Assistant Professor 

B.A., Hiram College; M.S., Purdue University; Ph.D., Kent State University 

Dominic P. Clemence Professor 

B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and 
State University 



260 



Kathy M. Cousins-Cooper Associate Professor 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; M.S., North Carolina A&T State 
University; Ph.D., University of South Florida 

Ahmad A. Deeb Visiting Assistant Professor 

B.S., Yarmouk University; M.S., Ohio University; Ph.D., Kent State University 

Kossi D. Edoh Associate Professor 

B.S., Cap Coast University-Ghana; M.S., Ph.D., Simon Fraser University-Canada 

Legunchim Emmanwori Assistant Professor 

B.S., West Virginia University; M.S., New Mexico Institute of Technology; Ph.D., North Caro- 
lina A&T State University 

Gregory Gibson Assistant Professor 

B.A., State University of New York/College at Geneseo; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State 

University 

Alexandra Kurepa Professor 

B.S., M.S., University of Zagreb; Ph.D., University of North Texas 

Yaw Kyei Assistant Professor 

B.S., University of Ghana; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State University 

Marcus Lamberth Lecturer 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., University of Illinois 

Shelia M. Littlejohn Visiting Lecturer 

B.S., Elizabeth City State University; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University 

Robert C. Mers Associate Professor 

A.B., University of Texas; M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., University of Colorado 

Janis M. Oldham Associate Professor 

B.A., University of Chicago; M.S., Purdue University; Ph.D., University of California-Berke- 
ley 

Gloria J. Phoenix Lecturer 

B.S., Virginia Union University; M.S., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Patricia G. Shelton Lecturer 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University 

Wilbur L. Smith Professor and Chairperson 

B.S., North Carolina A&T State University, M.S., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Katrina Staley Assistant Professor 

B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., North Carolina State University 
Guoqing Tang Professor 

B.S., Anhui University; M.S., Nanjing University of Science and Technology; Ph.D., Rutgers 

University 

Barbara Tankersley Assistant Professor 

B.S., Paine College; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Ph.D., Howard Univer- 
sity 



261 



Paramanathan Varatharajah Associate Professor 

B.S., University of Jaffna; M.S., Ph.D., University of Arizona 

A. Giles Warrack Associate Professor 

B.S., M.S., California State Polytechnic University; Ph.D., University of Iowa 

Nail K. Yamaleev Associate Professor 

M.S., Ph.D., Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology 



262 



Department of Physics 

http://www.physics.ncat.edu 



Solomon Bililign, Chairperson 

OBJECTIVES 

The Department of Physics will provide North Carolina A&T State University with a com- 
prehensive and robust program of physics designed to educate, train, and prepare a diverse 
group of students for careers in science, technology, engineering, physics and mathematics. 
Physics majors at both the undergraduate and graduate levels will learn how to analyze com- 
plex phenomena, think critically, solve problems, develop independent learning skills, and use 
good judgment and practical skills in various laboratory environments. These graduates will be 
prepared to meet our nation's scientific workforce needs in state and federal governments, the 
industrial workplace, research laboratories, higher education, and secondary schools. 

The Department of Physics will continue to be a recognized leader in physics education, 
teaching, research, and scholarship. It will play a central and critical role in building an Inter- 
disciplinary University through the use of novel technologies in education and research. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Physics - Bachelor of Science 

Physics (Environmental Geophysics) - Bachelor of Science 

Physics (Space Science) - Bachelor of Science 

Engineering Physics - Bachelor of Science 

Interdisciplinary Physics - Bachelor of Science 

Physics - Master of Science* 

Computational Science and Engineering - Master of Science* 

Energy and Environmental Studies - Doctor of Philosophy* 

* See the Graduate School Bulletin 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to the general admission requirements of the University, a student must have two 
units of algebra, one unit of plane geometry, and 1/2 unit of trigonometry. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS COURSES 

Common Courses for All Concentrations (75 hours) 

A. Required Major Core Courses for Physics for All Concentrations (32 hours) 

PHYS 241 PHYS 400 PHYS 420 

PHYS 242 PHYS 405 PHYS 430 

PHYS 251 PHYS 406 PHYS 445 

PHYS 252 PHYS 415 PHYS 550 

B. Required Math Courses for Physics for All Concentrations (12 hours) 

MATH 1 3 1 MATH 1 32 MATH 23 1 

C. Required Unst Courses for Physics for All Concentrations (25 hours) 

UNST 100 UNST 120 UNST 140 

UNST 110 UNST 130 

Four UNST Elective courses 

D. Required Elective Courses for Physics for All Concentrations (6 hours) 

CHEM106 CHEM116 GEEN 102 



263 



Physics Major - As a major in physics all students in all concentrations must complete 124- 
128 semester hours of University courses depending on the concentration. Included in the 124- 
128 semester hours are 75 semester hours of core physics, mathematics, university studies and 
science electives courses. A minimum grade of "C" must be achieved in all math and physics 
courses. 

Space Science concentration - The concentration in space science must complete 124-128 
semester hours of University courses. In this program students can choose electives applicable 
to space science and technology such as image processing, digital communication, artificial 
intelligence, aerospace, computational fluid dynamics and Earth System Science. A minimum 
grade of "C" must be achieved in all math and physics courses. 

Environmental Geophysics concentration - The Concentration in environmental geophysics 
must complete 125 semester hours of University courses. The program is designed to provide 
international field experience to students, and the senior level geophysics courses are taken at 
NC State University. 

Interdisciplinary Physicist concentration - The concentration in Interdisciplinary physics must 
complete 124 semester hours of University courses. Students can choose a secondary disci- 
pline in biology, chemistry, mathematics, psychology or journalism and mass communication 
based on interest. 

Engineering Physics concentration - The concentration in engineering physics must complete 
128 semester hours of University courses. A minimum grade of "C" must be achieved in all 
math and physics courses. 

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES 

The Department of Physics provides quality instruction, mentoring, and training in order to 
produce competitive graduates who are trained in the arts of critical thinking, analytical 
reasoning, independent learning, and problem solving. The department has strong and active 
collaborations with major research institutions such as Duke University, the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill, Stanford University, the University of Connecticut, and Pennsylvania 
State University. Collaborations with national laboratories include the Joint Institute for 
Laboratory Astrophysics (JILA), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Lawrence 
Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge 
National Laboratory (ORNL), and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). 
International collaborations include the University of Marseilles in France and the Addis Ababa 
University in Ethiopia. More than half of our physics majors participate in summer research at 
these institutions. 

ENRICHMENT FACILITIES 

Departmental teaching facilities include smart classrooms, computerized undergraduate labo- 
ratories, an astronomy observatory, and a planetarium. The department plays a major role in 
many interdisciplinary campus research activities and program developments. In addition, the 
department provides numerous service courses to meet the science, technology, engineering, 
and mathematical needs for the university's engineering, science, and technology programs. 

RESEARCH PROGRAMS AND FACILITES 

There are five research groups in the department with adequate facilities. 

a. Low and Medium Energy Physics: Research carried out on campus and at Thomas 
Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory 
with support by grants from the National Science Foundation. 

264 



b. Chemical Physics: Experimental and Theoretical: Facilities include: two 20 Hz ND: 
YAG Laser two Continuum ND 6000 dye lasers, a UVX: frequency doubling and tracking 
system. A Continuum Leopard pico second laser with second, third and fourth harmonic 
generating crystals. Reflectron Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer: with pulsed source and 
effusive source. Other Accessories include a 35 cm McPherson monochromator, a SPEX 
Spectrometer, a Tektronix digital oscilloscope, Le Croy 4 channel, 3GHz with 20 GS/s sam- 
pling rate oscilloscope, box car averager and gated integrator system (Stanford System), 
power supply (Stanford), temperature controllers (Omega Engineering), PMT, PMT cooled 
housing, and optical components. In addition for theoretical and computational work facili- 
ties include: eight paralleled dual- processor Apple Macintosh G5's ("Big-Mac"), several 
IBM and SUN servers. The National Science Foundation supports the research. 

c. Physics of Materials: Research in low temperature and semiconductor physics. Facili- 
ties include: closed cycle refrigerators, LR-400AC resistance bridge, tube furnace, AC 
susceptibility set up, crystal growth setup, water cooled electromagnet (Varian), Lakeshore 
EM4-HV water cooled electromagnet 

d. Physics Education: Research on web-based education and innovative teaching methods 
and creating a responsive learning environment. The research is supported by a grant 
from The National Science Foundation and The Department of Education. Space and 
Earth Science Education development through NASA grant. 

e. Seismic Data Processing Facility: the research in seismic physical modeling, seismic 
data analysis, subsurface imaging and non-destructive testing using ultrasonic waves. 
The research is supported by a grants from the National Science Foundation and the 
Department of Education. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

A knowledge and understanding of the principles of physics not only lead to a profound under- 
standing of the physical world but also supply the scientist with the insight to develop new and 
innovative ideas. The technology and devices that influence our daily lives are based upon the 
discoveries of physics. Theoretical and experimental physicists are on the cutting edge of this 
exciting and vital progress. They are everywhere: they work in industry, in national laboratories, 
on college campuses, and on Wall Street. They are astronauts in the space shuttle. They are as- 
tronomers who hunt for new planets beyond our solar system and who are concerned with the 
origin and evolution of the universe. They are men and women who are interested in how things 
work and in how things might work. A physics education develops problem-solving skills and 
provides a firm knowledge of basic science and the ability to apply and adapt that knowledge 
within the workplace. Owing to their training, physicists excel at solving complex problems, which 
allows them to seek employment in a surprisingly wide range of academic, government, and in- 
dustrial settings, well beyond the traditional boundaries of physics. 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR PHYSICS 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First Semester Credit Second Semester Credit 

GEEN 160 2 PHYS 241 3 

MATH 131 4 PHYS 251 1 

UNST110 3 MATH 132 4 

UNST 120 3 UNST 130 3 

FOLA 3 UNST 140 3 

PHYS 102 1 FOLA 3 

16 17 

265 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



First Semester 
PHYS 242 
PHYS 252 
MATH 231 
UNST Elec. 
CHEM 106 
CHEM 116 



First Semester 
PHYS 400 
PHYS 415 
PHYS 420 
PHYS Elect. 
PHYS 445 



First Semester 
PHYS 430 
PHYS Elective 
Free Elective. 
PHYS 550* 



Credit 


Second Semester 


3 


PHYS 405 


1 


PHYS 406 


4 


PHYS 445 


3 


UNST Elec. 


3 
1 
15 


UNST Elec. 




JUNIOR YEAR 


Credit 


Second Semester 


3 


PHYS 401 


3 


PHYS 416 


3 


PHYS 422 


2 


Free Elective 


3 


UNST Elec. 


14 




SENIOR YEAR 


Credit 


Second Semester 


3 


Free Electives4 


6 


Free Electives 


3 
3 
15 


PHYS Elect. 





Credit 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Credit 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Credit 
4 
6 
6 
16 



Total Credit Hours: 124 

Physics core requirements: PHYS: 241,251,242,252,405,406,445,400,415,430,420,550 

Physics and MATH additional requirements: PHYS 401,416,422; MATH 450 

MATH and SCIENCE: MATH 131,132,231; CHEM106, 116, GEEN 102. 

UNST: 25 hours: 100,110,120 130,140 + 4 courses UNST Electives 

Physics electives: PHYS 520,467,468,465,450, 510,520 

Free electives: 18 hours, Foreign language: 6 hours 

# PHYS 550 - capstone course 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR PHYSICS 
(ENVIRONMENTAL GEOPHYSICS ) 

In addition to the ones listed for all concentrations the environmental geophysics track has 
the following additional requirements: 

EASC 433 CHEM 1 1 7 MATH 43 1 

PHYS 440 PHYS 300 EASC 201 

PHYS 441 AGEN 1 16 GEOG 200 

CHEM 107 CIEN310 EASC 309 

Students spend a senior semester at North Carolina State University in the Department of 
Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and take the following courses: 
MEA410 MEA471 MEA 493 

MEA451 



266 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR PHYSICS 
(ENVIRONMENTAL GEOPHYSICS CONCENTRATION) 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 
EASC 201 
MATH 131 
UNST 110 
UNST 120 
PHYS 102 



First Semester 
PHYS 242 
PHYS 252 
MATH 231 
CHEM 107 
CHEM 117 
UNST Elec. 



First Semester 
PHYS 400 
PHYS 415 
PHYS 440 
UNST Elec. 
GEOG 200 
AGEN 116 



First Semester 
PHYS 430 
FOLA 
PHYS 420 
PHYS 550* 
EASC 433 



Credit 


Second Semester 


3 


PHYS 241 


4 


PHYS 251 


3 


MATH 132 


3 


UNST 130 


1 


UNST 140 


14 


CHEM 106 




CHEM 116 


SOPHOMORE YEAR 


Credit 


Second Semester 


3 


PHYS 300 


1 


PHYS 405 


4 


UNST Elec. 


3 


PHYS 406 


1 

3 
15 


EASC 309 




JUNIOR YEAR 


Credit 


Second Semester 


3 


CIEN310 


3 


GEEN 160 


3 


PHYS 441 


2 


PHYS 445 


3 


UNST Elec. 


2 


MATH 431 



16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Credit 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Second Semester 
MEA410(atNCSU) 

MEA415(atNCSU) 
MEA471 (atNCSU) 
MEA 493 (at NCSU) 



Credit 
3 
1 
4 
3 
3 
3 
1 
18 



Credit 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Credit 

3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
17 



Credit 

4 
4 
3 
3 
14 



Total Credit Hours: 125 

Physics core requirements: PHYS: 241,251,242,252, 405,406,445,400,415,430,420,550 

Geophysics requirements: GEOG 200; AGEN 116; PHYS: 440,300,441; EASC: 201,309,433; C1EN310, CHEM 

107, 117 

MATHS and SCIENCE: MATH 131,132,231; CHEM106, 116,GEEN 102. 
UNST: 25 hours: 100,110,120 130,140 + 4 courses UNST Electives 
# PHYS 550 - capstone course 



267 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR PHYSICS 
(SPACE SCIENCE CONCENTRATION) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 
GEEN 160 
MATH 131 
UNST 110 
UNST 120 
PHYS 101 
PHYS 102 



First Semester 
PHYS 242 
PHYS 252 
MATH431 1 * 
CHEM 106 
CHEM 116 
Elective** 



First Semester 
PHYS 400 
PHYS 415 
UNST Elec. 
UNST Elec. 
Elective** 



First Semester 
PHYS 430 
PHYS 420 
Electives** 
PHYS 550* 



Total Credit Hours: 125 

Physics core requirements: PHYS: 241, 251,242,252,406,445,400,4] 5,430,420,550 

Space science requirements: PHYS: 101,280, 440,451,480,500, 490,580; EASC 330 

MATHS and SCIENCE: MATH 131,132,231,431,432, CHEM 106, and 116, GEEN 102 

UNST: 25 hours: 100,110,120 130,140 + 4 courses UNST Electives 

Note: MATH 431 used instead of PHYS 405 

** Electives can be taken in three categories: 

1. Earth System Science: ESAC: 201, 309,330,622,616,666, 699 

2. Electrical Engineering: EELN: 200,300400,650,651,66657,658,674,678,685,686 

3. Mechanical Engineering: MEEN: 335,336,337,415,422,416,653,655 

4. Other Electives: PHYS: 401,416,450,441,490 ECT 634 
# PHYS 550 - capstone course 



Credit 


Second Semester 


2 


PHYS 241 


4 


PHYS 251 


3 


MATH 132 


3 


UNST 130 


3 


UNST 140 


1 


PHYS 280 


16 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 


Credit 


Second Semester 


3 


MATH 231 


1 


PHYS 406 


4 


PHYS 445 


3 


UNST Elec. 


1 


Elective** 


3 




15 




JUNIOR YEAR 


Credit 


Second Semester 


3 


PHYS 440 


3 


PHYS 451 


3 


PHYS 500 


3 


Elective*** 


6 


MATH 432 


15 


UNST Elec. 


SENIOR YEAR 


Credit 


Second Semester 


3 


Electives** 


3 


PHYS 480 


6 




3 




15 





Credit 

3 
1 
4 
3 
3 
3 
17 



Credit 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Credit 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
18 



Credit 
11 
3 
14 



268 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR PHYSICS 

(INTERDISCIPLINARY PHYSICS CONCENTRATION) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 
GEEN 160 
MATH 131 
UNST 110 
UNST 120 
FOLA 
PHYS 102 



First Semester 
PHYS 242 
PHYS 252 
MATH 231 
CHEM 106 
CHEM 116 
UNST Elec. 



First Semester 
PHYS 400 
PHYS 415 
PHYS 420 
DISC. Elective 
MATH 450 



First Semester 
PHYS 430 
DISC Elective 
Free Elective 
PHYS 550 



Credit 


Second Semester 


2 


PHYS 241 


4 


PHYS 251 


3 


MATH 132 


3 


UNST 130 


3 


UNST 140 


1 


FOLA 


16 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 


Credit 


Second Semester 


3 


PHYS 405 


1 


PHYS 406 


4 


PHYS 445 


3 


UNST Elec. 


1 
3 
15 


UNST Elec. 




JUNIOR YEAR 


Credit 


Second Semester 


3 


DISC. Elective 


3 


DISC. Elective 


3 


PHYS Elective 


3 


Free Elective 


3 


UNST Elec. 


15 




SENIOR YEAR 


Credit 


Second Semester 


3 


DISC. Electives 4 


6 

3 


Free Electives 


3 
15 





Credit 
3 
1 
4 
3 
3 
3 
17 



Credit 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Credit 

3 
3 
3 
5 
3 
17 



Credit 
1 
6 
13 



Total Credit Hours: 124 

Disciplinary Electives (22 credit hours) to be determined by the student's interest and approved by an advisor in 

Chemistry, Biology, Mathematics or Psychology 

Physics core requirements: PHYS: 241,251,242,252,406,445,400,415,430,420,550,405 

MATHS and SCIENCE: MATH 131,132,231, CHEM106, and 116, GEEN 102 

UNST: 25 hours: 100,110,120 130,140 + 4 courses UNST Electives 

Foreign language requirements: 6 hours 



269 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR PHYSICS 
(ENGINEERING PHYSICS CONCENTRATION) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


PHYS 102 


1 


PHYS 241 


3 


GEEN 160 


2 


PHYS 251 


1 


MATH 131 


4 


MATH 132 


4 


UNST 110 


3 


UNST 130 


3 


UNST 120 


3 


UNST 140 


3 


FOLA 


3 


FOLA 


3 




16 




17 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


PHYS 242 


3 


PHYS 405 


3 


PHYS 252 


1 


PHYS 406 


3 


MATH 231 


4 


PHYS 445 


3 


CHEM 106 


3 


Engineering Electives 


4 


CHEM 116 


1 


UNSTElec. 1 


3 


UNSTElec. 1 


3 
15 




16 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


PHYS 400 


3 


PHYS 401 


3 


PHYS 415 


3 


PHYS 416 


3 


PHYS 420 


3 


PHYS 422 


3 


PHYS 520 


2 


Engineering Electives 


4 


MATH 431 


3 


UNSTElec. 1 


3 


UNSTElec. 1 


3 
17 




16 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


PHYS 430 


3 


Engineering Electives 


9 


Engineering Electives 


8 


PHYS Elective 


5 


MATH 432 


3 




14 


PHYS 550 (Capstone) 


3 
17 







Total Credit Hours: 128 

* Students must choose one cluster theme and take 12 hours in that cluster 

Students can choose any engineering discipline and follow a defined track guided by a faculty advisor. 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR THE MINOR IN PHYSICS 



Grades of " 


C" 


or Better in: 




Course 






Credit 


PHYS 241 






3 


PHYS 242 






3 


PHYS 251 






1 


PHYS 252 






1 


PHYS 406 






3 


400 level oi 


hi 


gher 




Physics Electives* 


9 








20 



* Chosen with prior approval by the Chairperson of the Department of Physics. 



270 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN PHYSICS 

PHYS 101. Introduction to Astronomy Credit 3(3-0) 

The fundamentals of astronomy with emphasis on methods of observation and the solar system; 
astronomical instruments including optical and radio telescopes; and the nature of the sun, 
moon, planets and other objects of the solar system will be studied. (F;S) 

PHYS 102. Physics Orientation Credit 1(1-0) 

The course introduces students to the subject area of physics, the various branches of physics. 
The applications of physics in science, engineering technology as well as current advances in 
physics will be discussed. The role of physics in interdisciplinary programs and research is 
discussed. Other topics may include African Americans and women in physics, physics and 
society, physics and religion, physics and politics, history of physics and physics and the national 
economy. (F) 

PHYS 105. Physics for Nonscientists Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is intended for non-science students. It is a qualitative introduction to topics at the 
forefront of modern physics, with an emphasis on conceptual understanding. Mathematics use 
is reduced to a minimum. The course stresses the major role physics plays in our everyday life 
and aims at helping students evaluate the importance of the new scientific developments and 
their technological and socio-economical implications. It covers a wide variety of topics such 
as the building blocks of matter, the evolution of our universe, superconductivity and superflu- 
idity, MRI and medical imaging techniques, the physics of lasers, the physics of semiconduc- 
tors and transistors, nanoscience and nanotechnology, modern and future energy sources and 
their effects on the environment. (F;S) 

PHYS 110. Survey of Physics Credit 2(2-0) 

This is a one-semester study of selected topics in physics from each of the following: Newtonian 
mechanics, heat, sound, electricity and magnetism, light, atomic, and nuclear physics, and 
relativity. Prerequisites: MATH 102, 1 10 or 1 1 1. Corequisite: PHYS 111. (F;S;SS) 

PHYS 111. Survey of Physics Lab Credit 1(0-2) 

This is a laboratory course to be taken concurrently with PHYS 1 10, Survey of Physics. Students 
will perform experiments designed to verify and/or clarify physics concepts. Corequisite: PHYS 
110. (F;S;SS) 

PHYS 211. Technical Physics I Credit 3(4-0) 

This is a study of the basic principles of mechanics, thermodynamics, wave motion, sound, 
electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Emphasis is placed on applications of physics 
in modern technology. Prerequisite: MATH 111. Corequisites: MATH 112 and PHYS 216. 
(DEMAND) 

PHYS 212. Technical Physics II Credit 3(4-0) 

This is a continuation of PHYS 211. Prerequisite: PHYS 211. Corequisite: PHYS 217. 
(DEMAND) 

PHYS 216. Technical Physics I Laboratory Credit 1(0-2) 

This is a qualitative and quantitative study of certain physical systems; critical observations 
and codification of data are emphasized. Corequisite: PHYS 211. (DEMAND) 

PHYS 217. Technical Physics II Laboratory Credit 1(0-2) 

This is a continuation of PHYS 216. Corequisite: PHYS 212. (DEMAND) 

PHYS 225. College Physics I Credit 3(3-0) 

This is an algebra-based course. No calculus is used. The course is a study of fundamental 
principles of Newtonian mechanics, heat, and thermodynamics. Corequisite: PHYS 235, MATH 
110orlll.(F;S;SS) 

271 



PHYS226. College Physics II Credit 3(3-0) 

This is an algebra-based continuation of PHYS 225. No calculus is used. The course covers the 
fundamental principles of electricity, magnetism, wave motion, and optics. Corequisite: PHYS 
236. Prerequisite: PHYS 225. (F;S;SS) 

PHYS 235. College Physics I Laboratory Credit 1(0-2) 

This is a course that will emphasize the importance of experimentation and observations in the 
development of a physical science. A selected group of experiments will be undertaken. 
Corequisite: PHYS 225. (F;S;SS) 

PHYS 236. College Physics II Laboratory Credit 1(0-2) 

This is a continuation of PHYS 235. Corequisite: PHYS 226. (F;S;SS) 

PHYS 241. General Physics I Credit 3(4-0) 

This is a calculus-based physics course that covers the fundamental princliple of Newtonian 
mechanics, heat, and thermodynamics. Corequisites: MATH 132, PHYS 251. (F;S;SS) 

PHYS 242. General Physics II Credit 3(4-0) 

This is a continuation of PHYS 241. It is a calculus-based study of physics, which covers the 
fundamental principles of electricity, magnetism, wave motion, and optics. Corequisite: PHYS 
252. (F;S;SS) 

PHYS 251. General Physics I Lab Credit 1(0-2) 

This is a laboratory course where a selected group of physics experiments will be performed. 
Emphasis is placed on the development of experimental technique, analysis of data, and physical 
interpretation of experimental results. Corequisite: PHYS 241. (F;S;SS) 

PHYS 252. General Physics II Lab Credit 1(0-2) 

This course is a continuation of PHYS 251. Corequisite: PHYS 242. (F;S;SS) 

PHYS 280. Introduction to Space Science Credit 3(3-0) 

This course explores major components of space science which include the science that studies 
properties of outer space (the region beyond the Earth's atmosphere), and/or that requires a 
space-based operation. Space science areas include both remote sensing studies of Earth and 
more distant objects including the near-Earth space environment. Prerequisite: PHYS 101. 
(F;S) 

PHYS 300. Introduction to Geophysics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course provides an introduction to the use of physical measurements to determine the 
structure and composition of the solid Earth. Topics include plate tectonics, the gravity and 
magnetic fields, elasticity and seismic properties of the Earth, seismic waves, 
earthquakeseismology, isostasy, and elementary concepts in geodynamics. The course summa- 
rizes current knowledge of the interior of the Earth as determined by modern geophysical 
techniques. Prerequisite: PHYS 242. (F;S) 

PHYS 400. Physical Mechanics I Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a course in Newtonian mechanics and includes particle dynamics, conservation laws, 
vibrational motion, central field motion, rigid body dynamics, Hamilton's principle and 
Lagrange's equations. Prerequisites: PHYS 242 and MATH 231. (F) 

PHYS 401. Physical Mechanics II Credit 3(3-0) 

This is an intermediate course on classical mechanics. Topics include: Lagrangian and 
Hamiltonian formalism, and special relativistic descriptions of the dynamics of particles and 
rigid bodies. Applications in engineering will be considered. Prerequisite: PHYS 400. (S) 



272 



PHYS405. Mathematical Physics Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a course in the applications of mathematics to solutions of physical problems. It covers 
selected topics in vector analysis, differential equations, special functions, calculus of variations, 
eigenvalues and eigenfunctions, and matrices. Prerequisite: MATH 231. (F;S) 

PHYS 406. Introduction to Modern Physics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the basics of special relativity, quantum, atomic, molecular, statistical, 
solid state, nuclear, and particle physics. Prerequisites: PHYS 242 or 226 and MATH 132. 
(F;S;SS) 

PHYS 415. Electromagnetism I Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an intermediate course in Maxwell's theory of electromagnetism. The course 
treats electrostatic fields in vacuum, Gauss's law, special techniques for calculating electric 
potentials, electrostatic fields in matter, electric polarization, linear dielectrics, magnetostatic 
fields and potentials in vacuum and matter, Lorentz transformation, Ampere's law, magnetization, 
paramagnetic, diamagnetic and ferromagnetic media, Faraday's laws and induction, Maxwell's 
equation,energy conservation and Poynting's theorem. Prerequisites: PHYS 242 and MATH 
231. (F) 

PHYS 416. Electromagnetism II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is the continuation of PHYS 415. It is an intermediate course in Maxwell's theory 
of electromagnetism. Electromagnetic phenomena are presented. This includes electromagnetic 
wave propagation, reflection and refraction, absorption and dispersion, dipole and point charge 
radiation. Relativistic electrodynamics is also presented. Applications to problems in engineering 
will be considered. Prerequisite: PHYS 415. (S) 

PHYS 420. Quantum Physics I Credit 3(3-0) 

This course presents mathematical introduction required for understanding of quantum 
mechanics. The solutions of the Schrodinger equation for free particle and a particle in one 
dimensional potentials (square, barrier, etc.), and the postulates of quantum mechanics are 
presented. The simple harmonic oscillator problem is solved. Other topics include angular 
momentum, spin, the two-particle problem and the hydrogen atom. Prerequisite: PHYS 406. 
(F;S) 

PHYS 422. Quantum Physics II Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a continuation of PHYS 420. This course deals with selected applications of quantum 
mechanics to problems in atomic, molecular, nuclear, solid state physics and materials science. 
Topics include: approximation methods, perturbation theory, and scattering theory. Prerequisite: 
PHYS422. (F;S) 

PHYS 430. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course reviews the principles of thermodynamics, which include macroscopic variables, 
thermodynamic equilibrium, the thermodynamic laws, and kinematic theory. The fundamentals 
of statistical mechanics are covered which include microcanonical and canonical ensembles, 
partition functions, Bose and Fermi statistics, and the Boltzmann equation. Prerequisite: PHYS 
400. (F;S) 

PHYS 440. Applied Geophysics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course offers an overview of the field procedures employed to collect different types of 
geophysical data, and provides an introduction to the techniques employed to analyze and 
interpret geophysical data collected for applied and engineering purposes. It covers the major 
geophysical methods employed in resource exploration, environmental assessment, and 
geotechnical investigations and includes theory and technical background for seismic refrac- 
tion and reflection methods, electrical resistivity and electromagnetic methods, ground pen- 

273 



etrating radar method, gravity method, and magnetic method. Case studies, and field and com- 
puter exercises are also included. Students will be given hands-on exercises with geophysical 
survey equipment. Prerequisite: PHYS 300 (F;S) 

PHYS 441. Geophysical Data Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers the fundamental principles and methods that are commonly used to analyze 
geophysical data. It includes the following topics: transforms, onesided functions, spectral 
factorization, resolution, matrices and multi-channel time series, data modeling by least squares, 
waveform applications of least squares, layers revealed by scattered wave filtering, and math- 
ematical physics in stratified media. Prerequisite PHYS 440. (F;S) 

PHYS 445. Introduction to Computations in Physics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will introduce and use computational techniques to analyze and solve physical 
problems. Techniques to be used include visual programming language, graphing package, 
spread sheet, symbolic packages, and other applications. Prerequisites: PHYS 241, PHYS 242 
and a course in programming. (F;S) 

PHYS 450. Waves and Optics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course explores wave phenomena. It covers the propagation, reflection, and refraction of 
light and includes studies of lenses and optical instruments, interference, diffraction, polarization, 
line spectra, and thermal radiation. Prerequisite: PHYS 242. (F;S) 

PHYS 451. Introduction to Astrophysics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of radiation from stars and nebulae to determine the basic stellar 
characteristics, the composition and physical conditions of matter in and between the stars. It 
also investigates the structural properties of our Milky Way galaxy, as evidenced by the spatial 
distribution of dust, gas, stars, and magnetic fields. Prerequisite: PHYS 242. (DEMAND) 

PHYS 457. Electromagnetism III Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an extended study of electromagnetism which covers simple radiating systems, 
multi-pole radiation, and radiation by moving charges, and relativistic kinematics. Prerequisite: 
PHYS 416. (DEMAND) 

PHYS 465. Physics of Atoms, Molecules and Nanosystems Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a study of one and many electron atoms, molecular structure, and molecular spectra, of 
diatomic and polyatomic molecules with introductory applications to nanoscience. The course 
also covers other topics that include: Limits of smallness, quantum nature of the nanoworld, 
self-assembled nanostructures in nature and industry. Prerequisite: PHYS 406. (S) 

PHYS 467. Solid State Physics Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a study of the basics of the topics of binding, crystal structure, the reciprocal lattice, 
phonons, free and nearly free electron gas models, energy bands, metals semiconductors, 
insulators, super-conductors, and magnetic properties. Prerequisite: PHYS 406. (F) 

PHYS 468. Nuclear Physics and Elementary Particles Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a study of the properties of the nucleus, radioactivity, nuclear reactions, fission and 
fusion, elementary particles, and particle accelerators. Prerequisite: PHYS 406. (F) 

PHYS 480. Introduction to Solar Physics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the Sun as a star its radius, mass, and luminosity as well as measuring of 
these parameters. It also explores other characteristics of the Sun such as variability of rotation, 
magnetism, chemical structure, and planetary system. The course will also adress the structure 
of solar bowels and atmosphere. Contemporary research on the Sun will also be discussed. 
Prerequisites: PHYS 406 and 415. (F;S) 



274 



PHYS490. Space Radiation Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a course in space radiation environment, space exploration and radiation protection 
requirements. The course covers cosmic rays and radiation environment, biological effect induced 
by space radiation, effects of space radiation on the spacecraft on-board electronics and 
equipment, space radiation measurement, monitoring and dosimetry, radiation protection for 
space exploration and shield design. Prerequisite: PHYS 242, MATH 231 (F,S) 

PHYS 500. Special Topics in Physics Variable Credit (1-3) 

This is a junior-senior level course on selected topics in physics not covered in other courses. A 
descriptive title, syllabus and the amount of credit must have received departmental approval 
before scheduling. Students' records will carry both course number and descriptive title. The 
course may be repeated to earn a maximum of six credits. (DEMAND) 

PHYS 510. Physics Seminar Variable Credit (1-3) 

This is a study of current developments in physics. The topics and the amount of credit will be 
determined before the beginning of the course. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (DEMAND) 

PHYS 520. Advanced Laboratory Credit 2(1-3) 

This is a laboratory course which emphasizes performing selected experiments in classical 
mechanics, electromagnetism, optics, and atomic, nuclear and condensed matter physics. This 
course may be repeated to earn a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: PHYS 242. (F;S) 

PHYS 530. Computational Techniques in Physics Credit 3(2-3) 

This course is an application of numerical methods to solve problems in physics. It includes 
root finding, systems of equations, integration, differentiation, boundary-value problems, and 
Monte Carlo methods. Prerequisite: PHYS 405. (DEMAND) 

PHYS 531. Experimental Physics Credit 3(2-3) 

This course surveys experimental methods in physics. It involves experiment development, 
including techniques in instrumentation design and data acquisition. Also, it involves oral and 
written presentations of experimental results. Prerequisite: PHYS 242. (DEMAND) 

PHYS 550. Undergraduate Research Variable Credit 1-3 

This course involves student participation in research conducted by faculty. Topics may be 
analytical and/or experimental and encourage independent study. The amount of credit will be 
determined before the beginning of the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (F;S;SS) 

PHYS 580. Introduction to High Energy Astrophysics Credit 3(3-0) 

The course will introduce the fundamentals of the subject, with a focus on compact objects 
such as black holes and neutron stars, and will also survey recent exciting developments in this 
field. Topics include general relativity, accreting neutron stars and black holes, and gamma-ray 
bursts. Prerequisite: PHYS 242. (DEMAND) 

PROFESSIONAL TEACHERS PROGRAM 

PHYS 705. Physics for Science Teachers I Variable Credit 1-6 

This course is for in service teachers. It covers fundamentals of astronomy and earth science. 
Full descriptive title, syllabus and the amount of credit must have received departmental ap- 
proval before scheduling. Prerequisite: MATH 1 1 1 or equivalent. (DEMAND) 

PHYS 706. Physics for Science Teachers II Variable Credit 1-6 

This course is for in service teachers. Lecture and integrated lab study of the fundamental 
principles of mechanics, thermodynamics, wave motion, electricity and magnetism, optics and 
modern physics will be included. Full descriptive title, syllabus and the amount of credit must 
have received departmental approval before scheduling. Focus: Mechanics and Thermody- 
namics. Prerequisite: MATH 1 1 1 or equivalent. (DEMAND) 



275 



PHYS 707. Physics for Science Teachers III Variable Credit 1-6 

This course is a continuation of PHYS 706. Focus: Wave motion and electricity and magne- 
tism. Prerequisite: PHYS 706 or equivalent. (DEMAND) 

PHYS 708. Physics for Science Teachers IV Variable Credit 1-6 

This course is a continuation of PHYS 707. Focus: Optics and modern physics. Prerequisite: 
PHYS 707 or equivalent. (DEMAND) 

PHYS 709. Physics for Science Teachers V Variable Credit 1-6 

This course is a continuation of PHYS 708. Focus: Modern Physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 708 
or equivalent. (DEMAND) 



Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

PHYS 600. Classical Mechanics 

PHYS 601. Selected Topics in Geophysics 

PHYS 602. Introduction to Geophysical Research 

PHYS 605. Mathematical Methods 

PHYS 615. Electromagnetic Theory I 

PHYS 620. Quantum Mechanics I 

PHYS 630. Statistical Mechanics 

PHYS 715. Electromagnetic Theory II 

PHYS 720. Quantum Mechanics II 

PHYS 730. Optical Properties of Matter 

PHYS 735. Atomic & Molecular Physics 

PHYS 736. Spectroscopic Techniques 

PHYS 737. Physics of Solids 

PHYS 738. Nuclear Physics 

PHYS 739. High Energy Physics 

PHYS 740. Graduate Seminar 

PHYS 743. Experimental Methods in Physics 

PHYS 744. Introduction to Computational Methods in the 
Physical & Biological Sciences 

PHYS 745. Computational Physics 

PHYS 750. Relativistic Quantum Mechanics I 

PHYS 751. Relativistic Quantum Mechanics II 

PHYS 760. Special Topics 

PHYS 770. Research 

PHYS 791. Masters Project 

PHYS 792. Masters Thesis 

PROFESSIONAL TEACHERS PROGRAM 

PHYS 705. Physics for Science Teachers I Variable Credit 1-6 

This course is for in service teachers. It covers fundamentals of astronomy and earth science. 
Full descriptive title, syllabus and the amount of credit must have received departmental ap- 
proval before scheduling. Prerequisite: MATH 1 1 1 or equivalent. (DEMAND) 



Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(2-2) 
Credit 3(1-4) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Variable Credit 1-3 
Credit 3(2-3) 

Credit 3(3-0) 

Credit 3(2-3) 

Credit 3(3-0) 

Credit 3(3-0) 

Variable Credit 1-3 

Variable Credit 1-9 

Variable Credit 1-6 

Variable Credit 1-6 



276 



PHYS 706. Physics for Science Teachers II Variable Credit 1-6 

This course is for in service teachers. Lecture and integrated lab study of the fundamental 
principles of mechanics, thermodynamics, wave motion, electricity and magnetism, optics and 
modern physics will be included. Full descriptive title, syllabus and the amount of credit must 
have received departmental approval before scheduling. Focus: Mechanics and Thermody- 
namics. Prerequisite: MATH 1 1 1 or equivalent. (DEMAND) 

PHYS 707. Physics for Science Teachers III Variable Credit 1-6 

This course is a continuation of PHYS 706. Focus: Wave motion and electricity and magne- 
tism. Prerequisite: PHYS 706 or equivalent. (DEMAND) 

PHYS 708. Physics for Science Teachers IV Variable Credit 1-6 

This course is a continuation of PHYS 707. Focus: Optics and modern physics. Prerequisite: 
PHYS 707 or equivalent. (DEMAND) 

PHYS 709. Physics for Science Teachers V Variable Credit 1-6 

This course is a continuation of PHYS 708. Focus: Modern Physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 708 
or equivalent. (DEMAND) 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY 

Abdellah Ahmidouch Associate Professor 

B.S., Mohammed V. University; M.S., Joseph Fourier Grenoble I University; Ph.D., University 
of Geneva 

Solomon Bililign Professor and Chairperson 

B.S., M.S., Addis Ababa University; Ph.D., University of Iowa 

Samuel S. Danagoulian Associate Professor 

M.S., Ph.D., Yerevan Physics Institute 

Ashot Gasparian Associate Professor 

B.S., Ph.D., Yerevan Physics Institute 

Floyd J. James Associate Professor 

B.S., M.S., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Abebe B. Kebede Associate Professor 

B.S., Addis Ababa University; M.A, Ph.D., Temple University 

Melvin Levy Research Professor 

B.S., M.A., Queens College, Ph.D., Indiana University 

Ronald S. Pedroni Associate Professor 

B.A., Jacksonville University; Ph.D., Duke University 

Thomas R. Sandin Professor Emeritus 

B.S., Santa Clara University; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University 

Charles A. Stone IV. Adjunct Assistant Professor 

B.S., North Carolina State University; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of 
California - Los Angeles 

Guoqing Tang Adjunct Professor 

B.S., Anhui University; M.S., Nanjing University of Science and Technology; Ph.D., Rutgers 
University 



277 



Department of Political Science and Criminal Justice 

http://www.poli.ncat.edu/ 
Samuel A. Moseley, Chairperson 

OBJECTIVES 

The specific objectives of the Political Science Program are as follows: 

1 . to help students develop an understanding of the operation of government at various 
levels. 

2. to encourage students to engage in critical discourse of political and social issues. 

3. to prepare students for advanced study. 

4. to provide skills for employment in public and private organizations. 
The specific objectives of the Criminal Justice Program are as follows: 

1 . to provide a broad-based liberal arts education with particular focus on the nature 
and causes of crime and delinquency, the prison system, the courts, the police, the 
juvenile justice system, and domestic violence. 

2. to increase the pool of students with research skills and techniques in the field of 
criminal justice. 

3. to provide an interdisciplinary focus of study in the field of criminal justice 

4. to serve as a strategy for recruiting a larger and more diverse student body. 

5 . to increase the pool of talented and qualified minority students in this growing area of 
public service and professional practice. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Political Science - Bachelor of Arts 
Criminal Justice - Bachelor of Science 
Leadership Studies - Doctor of Philosophy* 
* See the Graduate School Bulletin 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The admission of students to the undergraduate degree programs in the Department of 
Political Science and Criminal Justice Program is based upon the general admission require- 
ments of the University. 

Political Science is the study of governments, public policies, and political behavior. Politi- 
cal Science uses both humanistic and scientific perspectives and skills to examine public power, 
social transformations, the nature of democracies, elections, public opinion, constitutions, tech- 
nology and society, public policy, and similar issues. The Political Science degree program 
offers courses in the following fields: American Government, Public Policy and Administra- 
tion, Political Theory, Research Methodology, and International Affairs. 

The Department of Political Science and Criminal Justice requires students to develop com- 
petence in the use of modern political technology and information management systems. Stu- 
dents have access to excellent computing facilities as well as access to the Political and Social 
Research Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Laboratory. Students learn how to design, 
administer, and analyze surveys by working with the Political Science and Criminal Justice 
Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing Laboratory (CATI). 



278 






Criminal Justice will provide students with knowledge of the nature and causes of crime, 
criminal justice processes, and law enforcement. Students will be introduced to social scien- 
tific methods and theoretical models needed for analysis and critique of the criminal justice 
system. Students majoring in Criminal Justice will receive a broad-based interdisciplinary edu- 
cation with particular focus on the nature and causes of crime and delinquency, corrections, the 
courts, law enforcement, the juvenile justice system, and domestic violence. 

The Criminal Justice Program emphasizes an interdisciplinary approach to criminal justice 
where the departments of political science, psychology, and sociology and social work provide 
a core of courses in the criminal justice curriculum. Students in this program have the same 
access as Political Science majors to the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Com- 
puter Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI) Laboratory. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Political Science Major - Completion of a minimum of 124-127 semester hours of Uni- 
versity courses. Included in the 124-127 semester hours are 36 hours of political science courses 
and 12 hours in a cognate area. A minimum grade of "C" must be attained in the major courses. 

Students desiring to minor in political science must complete 18 semester hours in political 
science, including POLI 200 and 210. 

Criminal Justice Major - Completion of a minimum of 124-127 semester hours of Uni- 
versity courses. Included in the 124-127 hours are POLI 200, POLI 210, 36 hours of criminal 
justice courses and 12 hours in a cognate area. Criminal Justice majors are required to success- 
fully complete internship requirements their senior year. A minimum grade of "C" must be 
attained in the major and required POLI courses. 

Students wishing to minor in criminal justice must complete 18 semester hours in criminal 
justice, including CRJS 200 and CRJS 250. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

A baccalaureate degree in political science prepares students for careers in government, 
public administration, law (for those continuing to law school), business, campaign manage- 
ment, foreign service, industry, interest groups, journalism, international affairs, teaching, and 
leadership in civic and political activities. 

A baccalaureate degree in criminal justice is an asset for candidates entering the broad 
array of career options. Employment in the fields of law enforcement, court related occupa- 
tions and corrections, criminal justice graduates can use their knowledge and research skills in 
very rewarding and meaningful ways. This program will also provide an interdisciplinary foun- 
dation for students seeking advancement in these careers or wishing to pursue a graduate or 
professional degree. 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR POLITICAL SCIENCE 

POLI 150 POLI 333 POLI 440 

POLI 200 POLI 334 POLI 505 UNST Capstone 

POLI 210 POLI 340 



279 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR POLITICAL SCIENCE 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 
UNST 100 
UNST110 
UNST 120 
MATH lOlor 111 
POLI 150 
POLI 200 



First Semester 

UNST Cluster Theme Elective 1 

UNST Cluster Theme Elective 1 

FOLA Elective 2 

PHYS 101 or CHEM 100 & 110 

POLI 210 

HPED 200 



First Semester 
POLI 333 
POLI 440 
ECON 200 
ENGL 200 
SPCH 250 



First Semester 
POLI Elective 
PSYC 320 

Cognate Area Elective 3 
Cognate Area Elective 3 
Cognate Area Elective 3 



Total Credit Hours: 124-127 

' UNST Theme Cluster Electives: Students must choose one cluster and take 12 hours in that cluster. 

2 Students must complete two courses in the same language. 

3 Students are advised to choose their cognate area requirement of twelve hours from one of the following a 
disciplines: ACCT, BUAD, COMM, ECON, ENGL, HIST, SOCI, TRAN, CRJS, PSYC or anv other area with 
the approval of the Department Chair. 100 level courses will not be accepted to meet the cognate area re- 
quirement. 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

CRJS 200 CRJS 400 CRJS 500 

CRJS 250 CRJS 430 CRJS 505 Capstone 

CRJS 300 CRJS 440 

Criminal Justice students are required to take POLI 200 and POLI 210 and 12 hours of CRJS 

Electives from any of the following: 

CRJS 406/SOCI 406 CRJS 5 1 CRJS 542/POLI 542 

CRJS 434/PS YC 434 CRJS 5 1 5 CRJS 543/POLI 543 

CRJS 470 CRJS 520 CRJS 670 

CRJS 503 



Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


1 


UNST 130 


3 


3 


UNST 140 


3 


3 


ENGL 101 


3 


3-4 


MATH 102 or 112 


3-4 


3 


BIOL 100 


4 


3 




16-17 


16-17 






SOPHOMORE YEAR 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elective 1 


3 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elective 1 


3 


3 


FOLA Elective 2 


3 


3-4 


SOCI 203 or ECON 305 


3 


3 


PHIL 260 or 262 


3 


2 


POLI 340 


3 


17-18 




18 


JUNIOR YEAR 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


3 


POLI 334 


3 


3 


POLI Elective 


3 


3 


ECON 201 


3 


3 


ENGL 201 


3 


3 


POLI Elective 


3 


15 




15 


SENIOR YEAR 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


3 


POLI Elective 


3 


3 


POLI 505 UNST Capstone 


3 


3 


Cognate Area Elective 3 


3 


3 


Free Elective 


3 


3 




12 


15 







280 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 
UNST 100 
UNST 110 
UNST 120 
CRJS 200 
MATH lOlor 111 
SOCI 100 



First Semester 

UNST Cluster Theme Elective 1 

UNST Cluster Theme Elective 1 

FOLA Elective 2 

POLI 210 

BIOL 100 



First Semester 
CRJS 250 
PSYC 320 
ECON 200 
CRJS 430 
SPCH 250 
ENGL 200 or 201 



First Semester 
CRJS 400 
CRJS Elective 
CRJS Elective 
CRJS Elective 
Cognate Elective 



Total Credit Hours 4 : 124-127 

; UNST Theme Cluster Electives: Students must choose one cluster and take 12 hours in that cluster. 

2 Students must complete two courses in the same language and CRJS 430 and CRJS 440. 

3 Students are required to complete 12 semester hours in a cognate area that supports the interdisciplinary 
focus of Criminal Justice. Suggested areas include Political Science, Sociology, Foreign Languages, Psychol- 
ogy, or any other area with the approval of the Department Chair. 100 level courses will not be accepted to 
meet the cognate area requirement. 

4 The maximum number of transferable credits is 80 semester hours from a 4-year college and 64 semester 
hours from a 2-year college. The 64 semester hours earned at a North Carolina Community College will be 
accepted according to the Criminal Justice Articulation Agreement between The University of North Carolina 
System and the North Carolina Community College System 



Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


1 


UNST 130 


3 


3 


UNST 140 


3 


3 


ENGL 101 


3 


3 


POLI 200 


3 


3-4 


MATH 102 or 112 


3-4 


3 


HPED Elective 


1 


16-17 




16-17 


SOPHOMORE YEAR 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elective 1 


3 


3 


UNST Cluster Theme Elective 1 


3 


3 


FOLA Elective 2 


3 


3 


SOCI 203 or ECON 305 


3 


4 


PHYS 101 or CHEM 100 & 1 10 


3-4 


16 




15-16 


JUNIOR YEAR 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


3 


Cognate Elective 3 


3 


3 


CRJS Elective 


3 


3 


ECON 201 


3 


3 


CRJS 440 


3 


3 


CRJS 300 


3 


3 


HPED Elective 


1 


18 




16 


SENIOR YEAR 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


3 


CRJS/ 505 UNST Capstone 


3 


3 


CRJS 500 Internship 


3 


3 


Cognate Elective 


3 


3 


Cognate Elective 


3 


3 




15 


12 







281 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Undergraduate 

POLI 150. Introduction to Political Science Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an introduction to major concepts in political science including political culture, 
socialization, ideologies, institutions, processes, public policy, human rights, and interaction 
among nations. (F;S) 

POLI 200. American Government and Politics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course introduces the student to the study of politics through an analysis of major features 
of the American polity. Topics to be treated include the political self-understanding of Americans, 
the founding of the political system, the operation of our political institutions, and the forms of 
political participation. (F;S;SS) 

POLI 210. State and Local Government Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the structure and functions of state and local government in the United 
States and their relationship within the federal system. Special consideration is given to 
contemporary problems. (F;S;SS) 

POLI 220. Blacks in the American Political System Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed primarily to facilitate the development of a frame of reference which 
will make it possible for students to organize and interpret political phenomena involving Black 
people living in the United States. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the Black 
predicament in this country, causes and changes. (F;SS) 

POLI 250. Introduction to Public Policy Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to provide the student with basic knowledge of public policy. Students 
will survey the approaches and methods of policy studies, contemporary policy issues, and 
future considerations of public policies. (F;SS) 

POLI 310. Comparative Politics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a survey of the politics and governments of selected political systems highlighting 
their commonalities and particularities. Special consideration is given to aspects of political 
development. (F) 

POLI 333. Political Research Methods I Credit 3(3-0) 

This course introduces students to qualitative and quantitative research design, problem 
formulation, hypothesis construction and testing. Students will learn procedures for collecting 
and analyzing political data. Research on a specific political subject is required. (F;SS) 

POLI 334. Political Research Methods II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of Political Research Methods I, focusing on data analysis, 
interpretation and computer utilization. (S;SS) 

POLI 340. Public Administration (Formerly POLI 443) Credit 3(3-0) 

Emphasis is devoted to basic principles of organization, location of authority, fiscal management, 
personnel management, and forms of administrative action in the public service, technological 
and managerial advancements. (F;SS) 

POLI 350. Public Personnel Administration Credit 3(3-0) 

This course focuses on the theory and practice of public personnel administration with emphasis 
on public personnel selection, training, classification, compensation, promotion and human 
relations. (DEMAND) 



282 



POLI 400. Mass Political Attitudes and Behavior Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of mass political attitudes and their expression in various forms of political 
activity. Topics include opinion and democratic theory; social, psychological and institutional 
influences on political behavior; and opinion measurement and mass movements. (DEMAND) 

POLI 410. Public Policy and Technology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed primarily for students in sciences and engineering; however, it does not 
exclude students in other disciplines, especially business and economics. Students will study 
the social, economic, human, and environmental impact of technological development. The 
role of scientists and technologists in selected policy choices will be examined. (DEMAND) 

POLI 415. Environmental Policy Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines major environmental policies dealing with air pollution, water pollution, 
and solid wastes. Attention will be given to controversies in policy formulation, institutional 
arrangements for policy implementation, and the socio-economic and ecological impacts of 
these policies. (S) 

POLI 420. Public Budgeting Credit 3(3-0) 

The course deals with the evolution, process, and impact of public budgeting. Special attention 
is given to the purpose, models, reforms and key factors involved. Budgeting is viewed from 
the federal, state and local levels. (DEMAND) 

POLI 430. Policy Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an introduction to the foundation and methods of policy analysis. Statistical and 
economic methods are presented with case studies. (DEMAND) 

POLI 440. Political Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

This course provides an overview of western political philosophy from its origins in the 5 th 
Century B.C. to the latest controversies over multiculturalism, the nature of the liberal state, 
the role of racial inequality in modern democracies, of this area of political science and its 
relevance to the field. The approach considers ancient medieval thought as a unit and modern 
political thought as a separate unit. (F) 

POLI 444. International Relations Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a comprehensive treatment of the context and content of the structure, policies 
and politics of nations. Concepts pertaining to the nature of the field will also be investigated, 
including: imperialism, colonialism, balance of power, international morality, treaties, 
sovereignty, diplomacy, tariff, war and other arrangements. The limits of international relations 
in the emerging era of globalism will also be explored. Prerequisite: POLI 200. (S) 

POLI 445. Problems of Contemporary Africa Credit 3(3-0) 

This course presents an overview of important political, economic, and social challenges 
transforming modern continental Africa. Course considerations include factors influencing the 
development of democratic institutions and practices, the debt crisis in an environment of 
economic change, the nature of political violence, and the continental and foreign relations of 
African states. (F) 

POLI 446. Politics of the Americas Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to provide an overview of the development and operation of political 
systems comprising South and Central America, the Spanish-speaking Caribbean, and Mexico. 
Important economic and social factors affecting the nature of politics in this region will also be 
emphasized, including: the debt crisis, the nature of politically motivated violence, the politics 
of race and racial identity, and the foreign relations of these nations. (S) 



283 



POLI 447. African American Political Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the formation and development of political theory in the African American 
community from its classical period to the Post-Civil Rights Era. The course presents distinct 
periods in the development of African American political thought, examines major themes and 
debates of each period, and explores the contributions of important theorists. (S) 

POLI 448. Politics of Transportation Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes an analysis of the political roots of various transportation problems, such 
as highway location issues, mass transit issues, and the interest group struggle of transportation 
innovation. The working mechanisms of federal, state and local transportation related units 
will also be considered. Case studies of local, regional and national issues will be included. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. (DEMAND) 

POLI 460. Southern Politics Credit 3(3-0) 

The course presents an examination of political patterns and recent trends within the states of 
the former confederacy. Topics include southern race relations, African American political 
participation, demographic changes, party realignment and competitiveness, the Civil Rights 
movement, and the impact of the South on national politics. (S) 

POLI 499. Internship Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes supervised internship in public and private agencies for political science 
majors. Prerequisites: POLI 200 and 210. (DEMAND) 

POLI 504. Independent Study Credit 3(3-0) 

Senior political science majors who have exhibited facility for independent study and attained 
a minimum grade point average of 3.0 in their major may arrange to investigate an area not 
covered in the regular curriculum. Permission of the supervising instructor and the Department 
Chairperson is required. (DEMAND) 

POLI/CRJS 505. Honors Seminar in Political Science & 

Criminal Justice - Capstone Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes an examination of selected political science and criminal justice topics 
and experiences. Students participating in co-op and study abroad experiences may enroll in 
this course. Seniors only. (S) 

POLI 541. Party Politics and Pressure Groups Credit 3(3-0) 

This course deals with modern political parties in the United States as instruments of popular 
government. Special emphasis is placed upon party structure, functions and operations as they 
relate to African Americans. Prerequisite: POLI 200. (DEMAND) 

POLI 542. American Constitutional Law Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a case study of major Supreme Court Decisions, the Judiciary, the Congress, the 
President, the Federal System, the First Amendment Freedoms and Due Process Rights. (F) 

POLI 543. Civil Liberties Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of major Supreme Court decisions interpreting the Bill of Rights (the 
First Ten Amendments) and the subsequent amendments dealing with freedom and equality. 
Rulings of the Warren and Burger Courts will be given special attention. Prerequisite: Juniors 
and seniors only. (S) 

POLI 544. International Organization Credit 3(3-0) 

This course analyzes the role of international organizations in world politics. Particular emphasis 
is given to the various approaches of international organizations in fostering peace and economic 
and social cooperation. Some attention will be given to the United Nations system as well as 
such defense, political, and economic arrangements as NATO, OAS, SEATO and the European 
communities. (S) 

284 



Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

POLI 604. Directed Study/Research Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes directed study or research on a specific topic in political science. 
(DEMAND) 

POLI 642. Modern Political Theory Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines selected treatments of the state as a controversial concept. The course 
focuses on the works of Machiavelli, Hobbes, Spinoza, Rousseau, Burke, Mill, Hegel, Marx, 
Dewey, Rawls and Reed. (DEMAND) 

POLI 643. Urban Politics and Government Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a detailed analysis of the urban political arena including political machinery, 
economic forces and political structures of local governmental units. (DEMAND) 

POLI 644. International Law Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the major principles and practices in the development of the Law of 
Nations, utilizing significant cases for purposes of clarification. Prerequisites: POLI 200 and 
444 (DEMAND) 

POLI 645. American Foreign Policy- 1945 to Present Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes an examination of forces and policies that have emerged from Potsdam, 
Yalta, and World War II. Emphasis will be on understanding the policies that were formulated, 
why they were formulated, the consequences of their formulation, and the alternative policies 
that may have come about. Prerequisites: Survey course in American History, American 
Diplomatic History, and consent of instructor. (DEMAND) 

POLI 646. The Politics of Developing Nations Credit 3(3-0) 

Political structures and administrative practices of selected countries in Africa, Latin America, 
Asia, analysis of particular cultural, social and economic variables peculiar to the nations will 
be studied. (DEMAND) 

POLI 653. Urban Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

This course presents an analysis of major problems in contemporary urban America. The course 
also includes an examination of their causes, effects and possible solutions. (DEMAND) 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

CRJS 200. Introduction to Criminal Justice Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to provide freshmen and sophomore students with knowledge of termi- 
nology, classification systems, trends, and theories of criminal justice. (F;S;SS) 

CRJS 250. Introduction to Corrections Credit 3(3-0) 

This course provides an overview of correctional philosophies, practices, and procedures. 
(F;S;SS) 

CRJS 300. The Law Enforcement Process Credit 3(3-0) 

This course surveys the field of law enforcement concentrating on the police, emphasizing 
enforcement, maintaining order, and protecting individual rights that are guaranteed under the 
constitution. Prerequisite: CRJS 200. (F;S) 

CRJS 400. Police Administration Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines organizational theories and administrative functions with direct applica- 
tion to criminal justice agencies. (F;S) 

CRJS 406/SOCI 406. Criminology Credit 3(3-0) 

The genesis and origin of crime and an analysis of theories of criminal behavior will be stud- 
ied. (DEMAND) 



285 



CRJS 430. Research Methods in Criminal Justice Credit 3(3-0) 

This course introduces students to research methods with a special application to current crimi- 
nal justice issues. Attention is given to analysis with data from uniform crime reports and 
national crime surveys. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. (F;S;SS) 

CRJS 434/PSYC 434. Abnormal Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

Behavior deviations and psychological disorders occurring during the several developmental 
stages; basic concepts employed in psychopathology, mental hygiene, and psychiatry. (F;S;SS) 

CRJS 440. GIS for the Social Sciences Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the basic elements of GIS; collecting, transforming, recording, and merging 
data for GIS analysis; and GIS data analysis methods. Special attention will be given to re- 
search projects on police apprehensions, traffic violations, spatial housing patterns, and envi- 
ronmental racism. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor. (F;S;SS) 

CRJS 470. Criminal Procedure Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the constitutional provisions on which the due process rights are based; 
the rules and procedures that govern the criminal justice process from arrest through trial and 
sentencing, and the methods of imposing liability on criminal justice personnel for violations 
of constitutional and other legal rights granted to citizens. Prerequisite: CRJS 200 (F;S) 

CRJS 500. Internship Credit 3(1-3) 

This course provides an opportunity for practical experience in various criminal justice agen- 
cies. Interns are required to participate in a one-hour weekly seminar. Prerequisites: Senior 
standing and permission of internship coordinator. (F;S;SS) 

CRJS 503/SOWK 503. Juvenile Delinquency Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is the study of sociological and psychological explanations relative to the causes 
and rehabilitation of juvenile delinquents, probation and treatment of juveniles within the criminal 
justice system. (F) 

CRJS/POLI 505. Honors Seminar in Political Science & 

Criminal Justice - Capstone Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes an examination of selected political science and criminal justice topics 
and experiences. Students participating in co-op and study abroad experiences may also enroll 
in this course. Seniors only. (S) 

CRJS 510. Victimology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course exposes students to the role of victims in crimes, their treatment by the criminal 
justice system, victim assistance, and victim compensation. Sexual battery and domestic violence 
are also covered in the course. Prerequisite: CRJS 200 (S) 

CRJS 515. Alternatives to Incarceration Credit 3(3-0) 

This course explores alternatives to imprisonment and intermediate sanctions, including 
probation, parole, diversion and other community based corrections. Students will also be 
introduced to theories of rehabilitation, treatment, and corrections. (S) 

CRJS 520. Minorities and the Criminal Justice System Credit 3(3-0) 

This course provides a survey of minority relations and criminal justice adjudication in America. 
The course focuses on minority /majority relations and how these sentiments impact on the 
criminal justice process. Prerequisite: CRJS 200. (F) 

CRJS 542/POLI 542. American Constitutional Law Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a case study of major Supreme Court Decisions, the Judiciary, the Congress, the 
President, the Federal System, the First Amendment Freedoms and Due Process Rights. (F) 



286 



CRJS 543/POLI 543. Civil Liberties Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of major Supreme Court decisions, interpreting the Bill of Rights (the 
First Ten Amendments) and the subsequent amendments dealing with freedom and equality. 
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing. (S) 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

CRJS 670/SOWK 670. Law and Society Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines selected and representative forms of social justice and injustices; and 
barriers to opportunities for legal redress, as related to contemporary issues. Prerequisite: Se- 
nior or graduate standing (F;S;SS) 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY 
Claude W. Barnes, Jr Associate Professor 

B.A., North Carolina A&T State University; M.A., Ph.D., Clark Atlanta University 
Margaret Dudley Adjunct Instructor 

B.A., Howard University, J.D., Howard University 

Justice Henry E. Frye Distinguished Visiting Professor of 

Criminal Justice and Political Science 

B.S. North Carolina A&T State University; J.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
School of Law 

Maria Hicks Adjunct Instructor 

B.A. North Carolina A&T State University; MPA, University of North Carolina Greensboro 

James Howerton Adjunct Instructor 

B.A., North Carolina A&T State University, M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

James Mayes Assistant Professor and Director of Criminal Justice Program 

B.A. Princeton; M.A. The Ohio State University; J.D. University of Baltimore, School of Law 

Samuel A. Moseley Professor and Chairperson 

B.A., North Carolina A&T State University; M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University 

Phung Nguyen Professor 

B.A., M.A., National School of Administration, Saigon; M.B.A., Dalat University, Saigon; 
M.A., Ph.D., Duke University 

James C. Renick Professor and Chancellor 

B.A., Central State University, M.S.W., Kansas University, Ph.D., Florida State University 

Amarjit Singh Professor (Emeritus) 

B.A., Punjab University; LL.B., University of Delhi; M.I.S., Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School 
James D. Steele Associate Professor 

BA., Morgan State University; M.A., Ph.D., Atlanta University 



287 



Department of Psychology 

http://www.ncat.edu/~psych 



George S. Robinson, Jr., Chairperson 

OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the Psychology Program are as follows: 

1 . to provide the highest quality of instruction that will result in employment at the bacca- 
laureate level, or entrance to graduate school. 

2. to help students develop analytical, critical thinking and problem solving skills in all 
areas of psychology. 

3. to enhance written and oral presentation skills. 

4. to develop research and quantitative analysis skills. 

5. to enhance interpersonal skills that will enable students to recognize, understand and 
appreciate the diversity in human behavior. 

6. to enhance the awareness for the needs of human services in the community. 

DEGREE OFFERED 

Psychology - Bachelor of Arts 

Leadership Studies - Doctor of Philosophy* 

* See the Graduate School Bulletin 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Psychology major - The major in psychology must complete 124 semester hours of Uni- 
versity courses. Included in the 124 semester hours are 25 hours of university studies require- 
ments, 39 hours of required non-psychology courses, 47 hours of psychology courses, and 13 
hours of free electives. Initial acceptance to the psychology department requires a minimum 
high school GPA of 2.5. Students that wish to change their major to psychology must have an 
overall GPA of 2.5. A minimum grade of "C" must be achieved in ALL psychology courses. 
Thus, psychology courses with a "D" grade or less, must be repeated in order to count toward 
graduation. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

To function as a professional psychologist, it is necessary to complete graduate training in 
the discipline. However, the baccalaureate degree can lead to career and job opportunities in 
child care, human and social services, military services, law enforcement and criminal justice, 
and mental health services, to name a few. 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR PSYCHOLOGY (32 CREDIT HOURS) 

PSYC242 PSYC420 PS YC 440/441 

PSYC321 PSYC434 PSYC 542 

PSYC 322/323 PSYC 439 PSYC 544 

PSYC 324 

PSYCHOLOGY (COG/BIO) COURSES - 6 CREDIT HOURS (SELECT 2): 

PSYC 460 PSYC 461 PSYC 462 

PSYC 540 PSYC 550 PSYC 463 



288 



PSYCHOLOGY ELECTIVES - 9 CREDIT HOURS (SELECT 3): 

PSYC 445 PSYC 501 PSYC 540 

PSYC 460 PSYC 502 PSYC 545 

PSYC 461 PSYC 504 PSYC 550 

PSYC 462 PSYC 505 PSYC 625 

PSYC 463 PSYC 506 PSYC 644 

PSYC 500 PSYC 530 PSYC 645 

CURRICULUM GUIDE IN PSYCHOLOGY 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST 100 


1 UNST 130 


3 


PSYC 242 


3 MATH 101 


3 


UNST 110 


3 ENGL 100 


3 


UNST 120 


3 BIOL 100 


4 


UNST 140 


3 PSYC 324 


3 


PSYC 321 


3 
16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 


16 


First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


ENGL 101 


3 UNST ELEC 1 


3 


MATH 102 


3 UNST ELEC 2 


3 


PSYC 322/323 


4 PSYC COG/BIO 1 


3 


FOLA 1 


3 PSYC 440/441 


4 


PSYC 420 


3 FOLA 2 


3 




16 


16 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


PSYC 434/UNST MAJOR 1 


3 UNST ELEC 3 


3 


PSYC 439/UNST MAJOR 2 


3 UNST ELEC 4 


3 


CHEM 100/110 


4 BIOL 361 


4 


PSYC ELEC 1/UNST MAJOR 3 


3 SOCI 100 


3 


SPCH 250 


3 Free ELEC 1 


2 




16 


15 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


PSYC 544 


3 PSYC 542/UNST CAPSTONE 


3 


Humanities Elective 


3 PSYC ELEC 3 


3 


PSYC COG/BIO 2 


3 Free ELEC 3 


3 


PSYC ELEC 2 


3 Free ELEC 4 


2 


Free ELEC 2 


3 Free ELEC 5 


3 




15 


14 



Total Credit Hours: 124 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN PSYCHOLOGY 

PSYC 242. Information Processing Techniques in Behavioral Research Credit 3(2-2) 
This course is an exploration of the ability of computers to assist in behavioral research. In- 
cluded are literature review (bibliographic search), stimulus presentation and response record- 
ing (programming and data management), data analysis (spreadsheets and statistical pack- 
ages), data presentation (graphics), and report writing (word processing). Prerequisite: Psy- 
chology majors only. (F;S;SS) 



289 



PSYC320. General Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course provides an introduction to psychology for non-psychology majors. Topics given 
major consideration include maturation and development, motivation, emotion, and personal- 
ity; mental health, intelligence, and aptitude; perception and attention; learning, forgetting, 
language, and thinking; social influence, attitudes, beliefs, and vocational adjustments. Prereq- 
uisite: Non Psychology majors. (F;S;SS) 

PSYC321. Elementary Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an introduction to psychology as a behavioral science required of the psychol- 
ogy major with enrollment restricted to them. Major areas of consideration include maturation 
and development, nervous system and internal environment; physiological basis of behavior; 
motivation, emotion, and personality; and psychological testing. Prerequisite: Psychology major. 
(F;S;SS) 

PSYC 322. Introduction to Psychological Statistics Credit 3(3-0) 

This course introduces techniques of analysis and interpretation of research data. Topics will 
include descriptive statistics (frequency distributions, centrality, variability, and correlational 
measures), introduction to statistical inference (normal curve, sampling theory, test of statisti- 
cal hypotheses, t-test, analysis of variance, chi-square, and others). Prerequisites: PSYC 242, 
PSYC 320 or PSYC 321, taken concurrently with PSYC 323. (F;S;SS) 

PSYC 323. Introduction to Psychological Statistics Lab Credit 1(0-2) 

This laboratory provides first-hand experiences in the practical use of statistical methods. Com- 
puter software (i.e. SPSS) will be used to analyze, interpret, and graph data. Prerequisites: 
PSYC 242, 320 or 321; taken concurrently with PSYC 322. (F;S;SS) 

PSYC 324. Developmental Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an introductory survey of developmental psychology from birth through adult- 
hood and death. It also considers developmental theories and research that investigates biologi- 
cal, psychological, and social factors within a cultural framework. Prerequisite: PSYC 320 or 
321.(F;S;SS) 

PSYC 420. Social Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

This is an introduction to the study of the behavior of the individual in relation to factors in his 
social environment. Socialization, enculturation, attitude formation and modification, social 
influence on perceptual and conceptual processes, and social interaction will also be studied. 
Prerequisite: PSYC 320 or 321. (F;S;SS) 

PSYC 434. Abnormal Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

Behavior deviations and psychological disorders occurring during the several developmental 
stages; basic concepts employed in psychopathology, mental hygiene, and psychiatry will be 
studied. Prerequisite: PSYC 320 or 321. (F;S;SS) 

PSYC 439. Theories of Personality Credit 3(3-0) 

Contemporary theoretical formulations of the structure and development of personality and 
their empirical bases will be covered. Prerequisite: PSYC 320 or PSYC 321. (F;S;SS) 

PSYC 440. Introduction to Methods of Psychological Research Credit 3(3-0) 

This course provides a survey of various research methods with an emphasis on experimental 
design, instrumentation, and the collection, analysis, interpretation, and reporting of research 
data. Prerequisites: PSYC 242, 320 or 321, 322, 323, taken concurrently with PSYC 441. 
(F;S;SS) 

PSYC 441. Introduction to Methods of Psychological Research Lab Credit 1(0-2) 

This laboratory provides practice in human and animal research using various experimental 
designs in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of research data, and in methods of re- 

290 



porting experiments. Prerequisites: PSYC 242, 320 or 321, 322, 323, taken concurrently with 
PSYC 440. (F;S;SS) 

PSYC 445. Industrial Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course studies issues related to differences in personnel selection, training, and placement 
in organizations and industries. Topics will include organizational theory and development; 
personnel evaluation and assessment; skills development and measurement; theory of motiva- 
tion and leadership, and issues related to human factors, working conditions and safety. Prereq- 
uisite: PSYC 320 or 321. (F;S;SS) 

PSYC 460. Learning and Motivation Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a survey of different learning approaches and motivation. The focus will be on 
conditioning, discrimination learning, observational learning, motor learning, and verbal learn- 
ing. Discussions will include interactions of learning and innate physiological mechanisms 
related to behaviors such as aggression, sleep and waking, and reproduction. Prerequisite: PSYC 
320 or 321. (F;S;SS) 

PSYC 461. Memory and Cognition Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an introduction to human information processing. Coverage will include memory 
systems, attention, concept formation, decision making, imagery, language processing, mental 
representation, pattern recognition, problem solving, artificial intelligence, human factors, and 
applied problems (e.g., eyewitness testimony). Prerequisite: PSYC 320 or 321. (F;S;SS) 

PSYC 462. Introduction to Psychopharmacology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course explores the psychological, pharmacological, and physiological aspects of drugs 
and human behavior. Coverage includes both conventional and current approaches to drug use 
and abuse in clinical and non-clinical settings. Special emphasis is placed on narcotics, hallu- 
cinogens, alcohol, nicotine, caffeine, and psychotherapeutic drugs. Consideration will given to 
drug effects on learning, memory, and sleep; as well as drug screening procedures and drug 
regulations. Prerequisite: PSYC 320 or 321, BIOL 100, CHEM 100, 110. (F;S;SS) 

PSYC 463. Sensation and Perception Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of sensory systems in man and other animals. There will be discussions 
on cognitive organization related to measurable physical energy changes medicated through 
sensory channels. Coverage will include vision, audition, psychophysics, and practical appli- 
cations (e.g., work environments, human-machine interaction). Prerequisite: PSYC 320 or 321. 
(F;S;SS) 

PSYC 500. Independent Study Credit 3(3-0) 

Independent study on a specific topic or area in behavioral science is required. Prerequiste: 
PSYC 320 or 321, permission of the instructor. (F;S;SS) 

PSYC 501. Special Topics in Developmental Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of a specific developmental period (e.g., adolescence, or adulthood and 
old age). It surveys developmental theories and research on the biological, psychological, and 
social factors within a cultural framework. Prerequisite: PSYC 320 or 321. (F;S;SS) 

PSYC 502. Advanced Statistics and Computer Applications Credit 3(3-0) 

This course provides further study of descriptive and especially inferential statistics. It covers 
the basic principles underlying the logic of hypothesis testing. It also includes concepts and 
assumptions underlying parametric tests (e.g., ANOVA), non-linear correlation and regression 
(e.g., logistic regression), and nonparametric (e.g., Chi-Square, Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal- 
Wallis, Spearman Rank Order) statistical tests of significance, and the use of statistical soft- 
ware packages for data analysis. Prerequisites: PSYC 242, 320 or 321, 322, 323. (F;S;SS) 



291 



PSYC 504. Cross-Cultural Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to introduce students to the impact of European-based psychological 
principles on various ethnic groups in America. Differences in culture, background, percep- 
tions, and history in America will collectively serve as a foundation to assess the applicability 
of psychology as we know it. Additionally, the scientific assumptions of various psychological 
concepts will be challenged in terms of the cultures to which they appear to apply, and com- 
pared with ethnic-based alternatives. Prerequisite: PSYC 320 or 321, junior standing and above. 
(F;S;SS) 

PSYC 505. Internship Psychology I Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is designed for placement of students in applied settings like hospitals, industry, 
mental health and rehabilitation centers, or schools. Students will gain experiences in the ap- 
plication of various psychological principles under professional supervision. Lecture topics 
will cover practical and theoretical issues related to the specific placement setting. Prerequi- 
site: Psychology major with senior standing. (F;S;SS) 

PSYC 506. Internship Psychology II Credit 3(2-2) 

This is a continuation of Internship I. Students will do an in-depth study in the same or differ- 
ent applied settings, like hospitals, industry, mental health and rehabilitation centers, or schools. 
Moreover, students will gain experiences in the application of various psychological principles 
under professional supervision. Lecture topics will cover pratical and theoretical issues related 
to the specific placement setting. Prerequisite: PSYC 505, psychology major. (F;S;SS) 

PSYC 530. Forensic Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the psychological theories and research that address legal issues, and 
the role psychologists play in the criminal justice system. This course gives an overview of 
services provided by psychologists, such as expert witnessing, criminal profiling, trial consult- 
ing, legal decision making on child custody, jury selection, and other issues. Coverage will 
include the assessment and therapeutic services provided to individuals in forensic settings 
with suspected deviant behaviors such as drug abuse, mental illness, suicide, and sexual devi- 
ance. Also covered are the ethical issues confronted by psychologists in the criminal justice 
system. Prerequisite: PSYC 320 or 321, 434, 439. (F;S;SS) 

PSYC 540 Biological Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the biological basis of normal and abnormal behavior, including 
sensory systems, brain and behavior relationships, and underlying neurochemical processes. 
Prerequisites: PSYC 320 or 321 , BIOL 100. (F;S;SS) 

PSYC 542. Seminar in Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of selected major systematic views and theoretical issues in psychology will be in- 
cluded as the capstone experience. Each student will participate in research using psychologi- 
cal journals and other materials, which will lead to an oral presentation and a written paper on 
a substantive view or issue in psychology. The graduate school application process, and prepa- 
ration for the work-force will be included. Prerequisite: Psychology major, junior standing and 
above. (F;S;SS) 

PSYC 544. Psychological Testing Credit 3(3-0) 

This course emphasizes the principles of measurement of psychological attributes; an exami- 
nation of factors essential for a reliable and valid measuring instrument with an emphasis on 
the important role they play in producing their effects. There will be discussions and pre- 
clinical experiences with more valid tests available in the areas of personality, aptitude, atti- 
tude, interests and intelligence testing. Prerequisite: PSYC 320 or 321, 322, 323. (F;S;SS) 



292 



PSYC 545. History and Systems of Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an analysis of the philosophical and empirical antecedents of modern psychol- 
ogy and the contemporary systems from which they emerged. Coverage will include a review 
of the historical roots of selected systems and theories in psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC 320 
or 321. (F;S SS) 

PSYC 550. Psychology of Animal Behavior Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of various types of animal behaviors such as communication, aggression, 
feedng, sexual behavior, maternal behavior, territoriality, socialization, learning processes, and 
responses to stressors, and how heredity and environment affect these behaviors, with empha- 
sis on domestic animals and their often "unnatural" environments. Prerequisite: PSYC 320 or 
321, junior standing and above. (DEMAND) 

PSYC 551. Psychology of Women Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will include historical context, issues in research, and theories of gender-typing. 
Students will examine how gender, personality, and experiences shape the development of 
masculinity and femininity. Further topics for discussion include the development of gender 
role behavior, socio-cultural stereotypes, and contemporary issues in the psychology of women. 
Prerequisites: PSYC 320 and junior standing. (F;S;SS) 

PSYC 625. Introdution to Clinical Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

This is an advanced survey of the field of clinical psychology from a broad conceptual and 
historical perspective. This course examines professional issues such as various mental health 
delivery systems, clinical assessment and diagnoses, and ethics. The course also presents an 
overview of different approaches to psychotherapy along with assessment methods commonly 
used in evaluation of therapy, research, and decision making in a clinical setting. Prerequisites: 
PSYC 320 or 321, 434, 439, junior standing and above. (F;S;SS) 

PSYC 644. Applied Health Psychology Credit 3(3-0) 

The utilization of psychology concerning the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of physical 
disorder (e.g. hypertension) and disease from a behavioral and/or psychological perspective 
will be included. Prerequisite: PSYC 320 or PSYC 321, junior standing and above. (F;S;SS) 

PSYC 645. Behavior Modification Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a survey of relevant research and techniques making use of either learning theory 
or behavioral principles in the treatment of deviant behavior. Special emphasis is placed on the 
use of operant conditioning procedures in the prevention and treatment of abnormal behavior. 
Prerequisite: PSYC 320 or 321, senior or graduate student standing. (F;S;S) 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY 
Susie Edwards Assistant Professor 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Miami 

Phyllis Ford-Booker Associate Professor 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Howard University 

Alvin L. Keyes Associate Professor 

B.A., Wake Forest University; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Anthony R. Perry Associate Professor 

B.A., M.A., California State University; Ph.D., Brandeis University; Post-doctoral Fellow, 
University of Southern California 



293 



George S. Robinson, Jr Associate Professor and Chairperson 

B.A., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill; Post-doctoral Fellows, National Institutes of Health and University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill 
Susan Schumacher Associate Professor 

B.A., Roanoke College; M.A., Hollins College; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greens- 
boro 

Sarla Sharma Professor 

B.A., Banaras Hindu University; M.A., University of Chicago; Ed.D., University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro 

Marvin Hall Adjunct Assistant Professor 

B.A., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University, Ed.D., Western Michigan University 

Michelle Linster Visiting Adjunct Assistant Professor 

B.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Roxanna Anderson Visiting Lecturer 

B.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Dawn Baldwin Visiting Lecturer 

B.A., North Carolina A&T State University, M.A., Howard University 

Christy Balentine Visiting Lecturer 

B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Cheree Barber Visiting Lecturer 

B.A., North Carolina A&T State University, M.A., Virginia State University 

Audrey Campbell Visiting Lecturer 

B.A., University of San Francisco, M.A., Ph.D., Psychological Studies Institute 

Jennifer Dashiell Visiting Lecturer 

B.A., North Carolina A&T State University, M.A., Radford University 

Alan Goble Visiting Lecturer 

B.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Rachelle Redmond Visiting Lecturer 

B.A., North Carolina A&T State University, M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



294 



Department of Sociology and Social Work 

http://ncat.edu/~sociolog/ 



Robert Davis, Chairperson 
OBJECTIVES 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The admission of the students to the undergraduate degree program in the Department of 
Sociology and Social Work is based upon the general admission requirements of the Univer- 
sity. All majors are required to take courses in Sociology, Statistics, Sociological Theory and 
Research. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Sociology - Bachelor of Arts 

Social Work - Bachelor of Social Work 

Social Work - Master of Social Work** 

Leadership Studies - Doctor of Philosophy** 

**See the Graduate School Bulletin (Jointly administered with UNCG) 
**See the Graduate School Bulletin 

SOCIOLOGY OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the Sociology Program are as follows: 

1) to provide students with analytic and systematic skills necessary to understand the prob- 
lems inherent in societal relationships and to subsequently attempt to solve them, 

2) to prepare students for graduate study in the discipline, 

3) To provide a sociological background for departmental, university and college of arts and 
sciences' students who must meet major specific, general education or liberal arts require- 
ments. It should be noted that each major in social work must complete a minimum of 
27-30 credits in sociology in addition to any free elective sociology courses that he/she 
may choose. 

SOCIOLOGY REQUIREMENTS 

Sociology Major — Completion of a minimum of 128 semester hours of University courses. 
Included in the 128 semester hours are 49 hours of sociology. A minimum grade of "C" must 
be achieved in these courses; sociology majors are required to complete an 18 hour concentra- 
tion. Sociology majors are required to successfully complete a one semester internship in their 
senior year. 

Comprehensive Examination: All students prior to graduation from the department must 
pass the Comprehensive Exam, which is given in the Senior Seminar class during the second 
semester of the senior year. Those who do not pass the exam will not be able to pass the Senior 
Seminar course with a "C" or better and hence will not be able to meet all the requirements for 
graduation from the University. The exam will be administered during the midsemester and 
again, for those who need it, during regular exam time. NOTE: the Senior Seminar course can 
be repeated, if necessary, through Independent Study if recommended by the faculty). 



295 



CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 



A degree in sociology is preparatory for graduate study in sociology and can serve as the 
basic preparation for study of law, social work and public administration, entry into govern- 
ment service positions, applied research and education. 

• A BA in sociology is excellent preparation for future graduate work in sociology in 
order to become a professor, researcher, or applied sociologist. 

• The undergraduate degree provides a strong liberal arts preparation for entry level posi- 
tions throughout the business, social service, and government worlds. Employers look 
for people with the skills that an undergraduate education in sociology provides. 

• Since its subject matter is intrinsically fascinating, sociology offers valuable preparation 
for careers in journalism, politics, public relations, business, or public administration — 
fields that involve investigative skills and working with diverse groups. 

• Many students choose sociology because they see it as a broad liberal arts base for 
professions such as law, education, medicine, social work, and counseling. Sociology 
provides a rich fund of knowledge the directly pertains to each of these fields. 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR SOCIOLOGY 

SOCI 100 SOCI 306 SOCI 501 

SOCI 101 SOCI 308 SOWK503 

SOCI 203 SOCI 401 SOWK570 

SOCI 204 SOCI 402 SOCI 575 

SOCI 300 SOCI 403 SOSW 625 

SOCI 303 SOCI 406 SOCI/SOWK Electives (6 his.) 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR SOCIOLOGY 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


SOCI 100 


3 


ENGL 101 


BIOL 100 


4 


MATH 1 1 1 


UNST 120 


3 


UNST 130 


UNST 110 


3 


SOCI 101 


SPCH 250 


3 


UNST 140 


UNST 100 


1 
17 






SOPHOMORE YEAR 


First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


UNST Electives 


6 


FOLA 


FOLA 


3 


UNST Electives 


SOCI 203 


3 


SOCI204 


SOCI 401 


3 


SOCI 303 




15 


SOCI/SOWK Elective 




JUNIOR YEAR 


First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


SOCI 403 


3 


Free Elective 


ENGL 404 or 331 


3 


SOCI 402 


SOCI 300 


3 


SOCI 306 or SOWK 414 


Concentration 


6 


Concentration 


Sociology/Social Work Elective 


3 
18 





Credit 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 
16 



Credit 
3 
6 
3 
3 
3 
18 



Credit 
3 
3 
3 
6 
15 



296 



SENIOR YEAR 

First Semester Credit Second Semester Credit 

SOCI575 3 SOWK570* 3 

SOCI 406 or SOWK 503 3 SOCI308or501 3 

Concentration 3 SOWK/SOCI Elec/Free Elective 3 

Free Electives/SOSW 625 2z5 SOSW 625**(Capstone) 5 

12-14 Concentration 3 

17 

Total Credit Hours: 128 

* This course includes the program 's comprehensive exam. 

SOCIAL WORK OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the Social Work Program are as follows: 

1) to prepare students for careers as generalist social workers with the knowledge, values and 
skills necessary for effective practice with diverse client systems in a variety of settings. 

2) to prepare competent social workers who understand the value base of the profession and 
its ethical standards and are committed to ethical practice without discrimination that re- 
duces social and economic inequality. 

3) to prepare students for graduate education in social work or other related human service 
disciplines, 

SOCIAL WORK REQUIREMENTS 

Social Work Major — Completion of a minimum of 1 28 semester hours of University courses. 
Included in the 128 semester hours are 42 semester hours of Social Work. A minimum grade of 
"C" must be achieved in major courses. Social Work majors are required to successfully com- 
plete an internship their senior year. 

Certification in School Social Work requires completion of the Social Work Curriculum 
plus 9-12 additional hours in Social Work and 3 additional hours in Education. A minimum 
grade of "C" must be achieved in all major courses. All English and Speech courses require a 
minimum grade of "C." Students must have a 2.8 GPA. Begin their coursework no later than 
their sophomore year. Be accepted spring semester of sophomore year into the School of Edu- 
cation practicum program (submit "Application for Admission to Teacher Education" form to 
Education Department and be accepted into that program). 

Comprehensive Examination: All students prior to graduation from the department must 
pass the Comprehensive Exam, which is given in the Senior Seminar class during the second 
semester of the senior year. Those who do not pass the exam will not be able to pass the Senior 
Seminar course with a "C" or better and hence will not be able to meet all the requirements for 
graduation from the University. The exam will be administered during the midsemester and 
again, for those who need it, during regular exam time. NOTE: the Senior Seminar course can 
be repeated, if necessary, through Independent Study if recommended by the faculty). 

Entering the Department: All entering freshmen, transfer students and students desiring to 
change their major to Social Work (from another major) must meet with the undergraduate 
coordinator or the chairperson for an INTAKE INTERVIEW. They must bring the following 
materials with them to the interview: (1) the results of the Sixteen Personality Factor Test and 
the COPS test given by the Counseling Center; (2) a print-out from the Registrar regarding 
their grades and current GPA (if they are "change of major" students). Transfer students must 
provide a statement from the Admissions Office of the credits accepted by North Carolina 
A&T State University; (3) a brief essay (typewritten) that describes the personal background of 

297 



the student, giving reason for selecting the major, their career goals and how the major fits into 
those choices; and (4) at the end of the interview, the student and the administrator will sign the 
Undergraduate Student Admissions Contract. No academic credit is given for previous life 
experience. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

A degree in Social Work provides students with the competencies essential for immediate 
entry as a generalist into the professional field of social work. Career opportunities include but 
are not limited to departments of social services, school social work, mental health agencies 
and the criminal justice system. The Social Work Program is accredited by the Council on 
Social Work Education, and in cooperation with the School of Education is authorized to rec- 
ommend students for Baccalaureate Certification in School Social Work. 

SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM TERMINATION POLICY 

Program policies and procedures for terminating a student are as follows: 

1 . The University Administration (The Registrar's Office) monitors all students who in spite 
of ongoing advising and support of faculty continue to maintain an unacceptable academic 
average. These students are notified that they are on academic probation. This requires the 
student to contract with the department for the next semester not to exceed 12 credit hours. 

2. If a student's grades do not improve, the Registrar's Office will notify the student of sus- 
pension from the University and that he/she will not be readmitted for a period of one year. 

3. If faculty agrees that there is a student, who may or may not be experiencing academic 
problems but appears ill suited for a career in social work, the advisor meets with the 
student to discuss the "problem areas" observed. These areas could include, but are not 
limited to: 1) negative attitudes towards different populations, (2) lack of commitment in 
their volunteer assignments, (3) some perceived emotional problem exhibited by uncon- 
trollable crying and/or verbal attacks on peers (in classroom settings), and (4) indication of 
untreated substance abuse. If the counsel provided by the advisor and/or the next level 
professional (University's Counseling Center or private therapist) is deemed not successful 
and would appear to cause the student and the potential clients added stress, he/she is then 
counseled regarding other majors and other career options before he/she moves into junior 
status. A program was designed and instituted to address initial concerns regarding a student's 
choice of social work as a career as indicated (through the COPS and 16 Factor Inventory) 
and the interview. 

4. The field instruction program provides another opportunity to "select out" students during 
the application process which occurs during the junior year. Should the student be denied 
admission to the field, he/she has the right to invoke the appeals process. The Appeals 
Committee is made up of faculty and students from both field instruction programs. 
(NCA&TSU and UNCG) The student may select a faculty member or student to serve as 
his/her advocate. Professional liability insurance is required before entering the Field. 

5. If a student still persists in remaining in the major against all counsel, the issue of 
nonavailability of a field placement and the department's responsibility to indicate con- 
cerns to prospective employers and/or graduate schools is discussed with the student. 

6. All students must successfully pass a comprehensive Exit Exam administered in SOWK 
570 Senior Seminar before recommendation for graduation. 



298 



7. It should be noted that students have the right to appeal through the departmental, College 
of Arts and Sciences' and the University's channels any program decision that they per- 
ceive will adversely affect them. 

NOTE: All students must maintain a cumulative 2.3 grade point average to remain in the 
BSW program. Transfer and Change of Major students must complete the intake interview and 
receive a positive recommendation from the departmental faculty before the Change of Major 
form will be signed by the Chairperson or his/her designate. 

Junior Year Interview: All social work majors who have reached the status of juniors must 
no later than during the second semester (of the junior year), have a meeting with a panel of 
BSW faculty. They must bring the following to the meeting: (1) a completed copy of the "Field 
Application Form"; and (2) a short essay (typewritten) that outlines the students' progress 
toward completing requirements for their degree (BSW), and discuss progress toward their 
career goals. 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR SOCIAL WORK 

SOCI 100 SOWK 335 SOWK 509 

SOCI 1 1 SOCI 403 SOWK 5 1 2 

SOWK 133 SOWK 410 SOWK 514 

SOWK 134 SOWK 420 SOWK523 

SOCI 203 SOWK 430 SOWK 524 

SOCI 204 SOWK 507 SOWK 570 

SOS W 669 SOWK/SOCI Electives (6 hrs. ) 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR SOCIAL WORK 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST 110 


3 ENGL 101 


3 


SOCI 100 


3 MATH 101 


3 


BIOL 100 


4 UNST 140 


3 


UNST 130 


3 SOCI 101 


3 


SOWK 133* 


3 UNST 120 


3 




16 UNST 100 


1 
16 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST Electives 


6 UNST Electives 


6 


MATH 102 


3 SOCI 204 


3 


FOLA 


3 PSYC 324, 325 or 434 


3 


PSYC 320 


3 FOLA 


3 


SOWK 134 


3 POLI 200 or ECON 200 


3 




18 


18 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


ENGL 404 or 331 


3 SOCI 403 


3 


SOCI 203 


3 SOWK 420 


3 


SPCH 250 


3 SOWK 335. 


3 


SOWK 410 


3 Free Elective 


3 


SOWK Elective 


3 SOWK 430 


3 




15 


15 



299 



SENIOR YEAR 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


5 


SOWK 509 


5 


3 


SOWK 524 


3 


1 


SOWK 514 


1 


3 


SOWK 570(Capstone)** 


3 


3 


Free Elective 


3 


15 




15 



First Semester 
SOWK 507 
SOWK 523 
SOWK 512 
SOSW 669 
SOWK Elective 



Total Credit Hours: 128 

* This course must be successfully completed prior to enrolling in any other Social Work courses. 

**This course includes the program's comprehensive exam. 

All transfer social work credits must come from a CSWE accredited program. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN SOCIOLOGY AND SOCIAL WORK 

SOCIOLOGY 

SOCI 100. Principles of Sociology Credit 3(3-0) 

Basic concepts and principles in sociology as they are used to examine patterned and recurrent 
forms of social behavior will be studied. (F;S) 

SOCI 101. Basic Quantitative Writing and Computer Skills in Sociology Credit 3(3-0) 
This course, to be taken concurrently with SOCI 100 - Principles of Sociology, is designed to 
provide students with basic computer skills needed to summarize and describe sociological 
data. The ability to perform elementary calculations, such as percentages, proportions, and 
ratios, along with utilization of graphing techniques is a prime objective. Other descriptive/ 
summary statistical techniques emphasized include construction and interpretation of one- and 
two- variable tables. A third objective is to ensure that students can write a clear report in standard 
English on the methods and findings of elementary research. (F;S) 

SOCI 203. Social Statistics I Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an introduction to elementary statistical reasoning, descriptive statistics, frequency 
distribution, graphics, measures of central tendency and dispersion. Correlation and regression 
techniques are also taught. (F;S) 

SOCI 204. Social Problems Credit 3(3-0) 

Major social problems in American society and their relationship to social structures will be 
studied. Prerequisite: SOCI 100, concurrent, Statistics I. (F;S) 

SOCI 303. Social Statistics II Credit 3 (3-0) 

Inferential statistics, probability, sampling distribution tests of significance as well as measures 
of association, analysis of variance, multivariate correlational analysis are taught. Prerequisite: 
SOCI 302. (S) 

SOCI 304. Social Aspects of Human Sexuality Credit 3(3-0) 

Social aspects of human sexuality and American sexual behavior and its influence on life styles 
will be studied. Emphasis will be on social roles. (S; DEMAND) 

SOCI 305. Reading for Honors in Sociology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes intensive and extensive library research on topics in Sociology. Prerequisite: 
"B" average. (DEMAND) 

SOCI 306. Minority Group Relations Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an examination of racial and ethnic relations in society. The main focus is on 
intergroup relations within the United States, but a global comparative approach is also 
emphasized. It will present views from numerous perspectives within sociology, with special 
emphasis on the social psychological aspects of prejudice, discrimination, and differential power 



300 



structures in society. In addition, the course utilizes a comparative-historical approach to 
intergroup relations. (F;S) 

SOCI 308. Sociology of Marriage and the Family Credit 3(3-0) 

The family as a social institution and family types in cross-cultural perspectives will be studied. 

(F) 

SOCI 401. Origins of Social Thought Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes a review of the major historical sources, nature and growth of social 
thought as well as an introduction to the emergence of Sociological Theory in Europe and 
America in the 19th and early 20th centuries. (F) 

SOCI 402. Social Theories Credit 3(3-0) 

Social thought and theory in its development from Comte to the present will be studied. 
Prerequisite: SOCI 203, SOCI 204, and SOCI 401. (S) 

SOCI 403. Social Research Method I Credit 3 (3-0) 

This is an introductory course in social research methods; basic theory, principles and practical 
applications of data collection, analysis and interpretation. Includes study of research designs, 
measurement techniques, and sampling techniques used in survey research methods. Prerequisite: 
SOCI 203 or concurrent. (F) 

SOCI 406. Criminology Credit 3(3-0) 

The genesis and origin of crime and an analysis of theories of criminal behavior will be studied. 
(DEMAND) 

SOCI 408. Independent Study I Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes independent research on a specific topic or a delineated area in sociology. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (F;S) 

SOWK 412. Major Problems of Family Functioning Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines the dynamics of families experiencing major dysfunctions related to 
poverty, violence, the effects of deviant family members, and the social programs and policies 
relating to these problem areas. This course will enhance the studentsocial work practice with 
families by increasing understanding of dysfunctional effects of these problems on the family 
system and its individual members and the relationship of policies and programs to the 
enhancement or deterioration of family life. (S) 

SOWK 413. The Community Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the social areas commonly defined as communities, and analyses of 
the social processes that occur within their boundaries. Community organization skills are 
taught as a vehicle to address social ills. (DEMAND) 

SOWK 423. Introduction to Family Therapy Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the rapidly developing field of family therapy. 
A brief overview of family therapy will be presented, along with explanation of the similarities 
and the difference with other therapies. Several models of practices and technique will be 
presented. Prerequisites: SOCI 308 and SOWK 412. (DEMAND) 

SOCI 473. Introduction to Population Studies Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes a review of demographic processes; growth, fertility, mortality and migration 
in human populations. Focus on causes and consequences of demographic change in relation 
to social change and economic development. (S) 

SOCI 501. Social Stratification Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a study of social inequalities and differentiation as related to social structures and social 
systems. Prerequisite: SOCI 203. (DEMAND) 



301 



SOWK 503. Juvenile Delinquency Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is the study of sociological and psychological explanation relative to the causes 
and rehabilitation of juvenile delinquents, probation and treatment of juveniles within the criminal 
justice system. (F) 

SOCI 570. Senior Seminar Credit 3(3-0) 

Research and discussions of professional and field issues related to sociology and social work 
will be studied. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (S) 

SOCI 575. Research Methods II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is continuation of SOCI 403. Prerequisites: Senior or graduate standing; minimum 
of 6 to 9 credits in statistics and research. (S) 

SOSW 625. Sociology/Social Work Internship Credit 5(0-5) 

This course is an internship to provide opportunities for students to enhance their employabihty 
by supervised experiences in selected agencies. (S) 

SOCI 672. Selected Issues in Sociology Credit 3(3-0) 

Topics of current interest to sociologists and the student body are explored. (S) 

SOWK 674. Evaluation of Social Programs * Credit 3(3-0) 

The main focus is on evaluative research methodology; research designs, measurement of 
program effectiveness and cost effectiveness analysis. Includes case studies of needs assessment, 
program monitoring and impact measurement in human services. Prerequisite: Social Statistic 
(S203) and Research Methods (S403). (S) 

SOCIAL WORK 

SOWK 133. Social Professions, Fields and Services Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to introduce students to the human services professions with emphasis 
on social work as a profession. It explores the human service professions from historical, 
sociological, political, and economic viewpoints. (F;S) 

SOWK 134. Social Work & Human Diversity Credit 3(3-0) 

The purpose of this course is to prepare individuals to understand the impact of culture, ethnicity, 
race, disabilities, ageism, and sexual orientation on society, as well as on their own professional 
interactions. Prerequisites: SOWK 133, SOCI 100, SOCI 204 or permission of the instructor. 

(F) 

SOWK 320. Feminization of Poverty Credit 3(3-0) 

This three credit, upper division social work elective explores the status of women. It gives an 
historical look at women and the global perceptions of women, then focuses on women in the 
20* & 21 st centuries, in the U.S. The status of women is explored through the lenses of women 
issues with special emphasis on the impoverishment of women. (S) 

SOWK 325. Honors Seminar in Social Service Credit 3(3-0) 

Selected topics in social welfare are extensively studied and discussed. Prerequisites: Junior 
standing and "B" average. (DEMAND) 

SOWK 333. Social Welfare Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines social welfare legislation and policy. Students spend a minimum of 40 
hours in a social agency. Prerequisite: SOWK 133. (S) 

SOWK 335. Interviewing & Recording Skills Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the effective dimensions 
present in the helping process and an opportunity to learn and practice the skills. Prerequisites: 
SOWK 133, SOWK 134, SOWK 410 for BSW majors, or permission of instructor. (S) 



302 



SOWK 372. Child Welfare I Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to develop cognitive skills as they 
relate to the history and development of child welfare. Students will review needs of children 
and evaluate the extent to which parents/society are able to meet their needs. (F) 

SOWK 409. Disability and Employment Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will focus on selected mental, physical, and social disabilities, and their implications 
for coping and employment. (DEMAND) 

SOWK 410. Human Behavior in the Social Environment I Credit 3(3-0) 

This sequential course is a study of how biological, psychological, social and cultural dimensions 
of human behavior impinge upon every stage of the life cycle from infancy through adolescence. 
Knowledge is provided for the assessment of the development and behavior of families, groups, 
organizations, and communities. Prerequisites: SOWK 133, 134, SOCI 100, 101 and 203. 
Acceptance into BSW program. (F) 

SOWK 411. Professional Relationship Skills Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the effective dimensions 
present in the helping process and an opportunity to learn and practice the skills. The course 
will be helpful to students entering social work, guidance and counseling, teaching, and nursing. 
It must be taken prior to field placement for B.S.W. students. Prerequisites: SOWK 133, SOWK 
333, and SOWK 410. (S) 

SOWK 418. Practicum in the Community Credit 5(0-16) 

This course includes the selection of a community problem, study and analysis of the problem 
followed by corrective activities, when possible. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 
(DEMAND) 

SOWK 420. Human Behavior in the Social Environment II Credit 3(3-0) 

HBSE II builds upon content presented in SOWK 410 (HBSE I). Presents social systems theories, 
psychosocial theories, and developmental theories to examine why people behave as they do 
and to apply this knowledge to generalist social work practice across the later-half of the life 
span. This second course in the HBSE sequence explores the impact of socio-cultural, socio- 
historical, socio-political, and economic forces on individuals and social systems, and utilizes 
a diversity perspective to evaluate the effects of culture, social class, race, ethnicity, gender and 
sexual orientation. This course also introduces the students to macro issues within social work 
practice as adults interact with larger social systems. Prerequisities: SOWK 133, 134, and 410. 
(S) 

SOWK 421. Reading for Honors in Social Welfare Credit 3(3-0) 

Extensive library research in selected areas of social welfare is required. Prerequisites: 
Sophomore standing and "B" average. (DEMAND) 

SOWK 430. Social Welfare Policy and Services Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines social welfare legislation and policy. Students spend a minimum of 40 
volunteer hours in a social agency. 

SOWK 472. Child Welfare II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is an examination of philosophies and institutional systems that impact on child 
welfare. This course will examine influences of such issues as racism, sexism, women's 
liberation, and child advocacy. Major institutions (educational, court/legal, health care, economic, 
political) will be examined to identify and evaluate effects. (DEMAND) 



303 



SOWK 503. Juvenile Delinquency Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is the study of sociological and psychological explanation relative to the causes 
and rehabilitation of juvenile delinquents, probation and treatment of juveniles within the criminal 
justice system. (F) 

SOWK 507. Field Education I Credit 5(0-16) 

In this practicum, student will apply course-based knowledge and skills by working in a social 
service setting. A total of 220 volunteer hours are required. Prerequisities: SOWK 134, 335, 
410, and 420. Taken concurrently with SOWK 512 and 523. Acceptance into BSW program. 
Professional liability insurance required before entering the Field. (F) 

SOWK 509. Field Education II Credit 5(0-16) 

In this second sequential practicum, students will build on their generalist foundational 
knowledge and skills by working in a social service setting providing direct intervention to 
populations-at-risk, carrying professional level case loads. A total of 220 volunteer hours are 
required. SOWK 507, 512, 523. Taken concurrently with SOWK 514 and 524. (S) 

SOWK 512. Field Education Seminar I Credit 1(1-0) 

The first of a two-semester sequence, provides the forum for students to discuss their 
implementation of basic social work skills and interventions in their field practicum settings. 
Students will examine their personal values, as well as conflicting values and ethical dilemmas 
regarding the populations with whom they practice. Students are expected to develop skills that 
are essential to the micro level of social work practice. Prerequisities: SOWK 133, 134, 335, 
410, 420 and 430. Taken concurrently with SOWK 523. (F) 

SOWK 514. Field Education Seminar II Credit 1(1-0) 

The second of a two-semester sequence, provides the forum for students to continue discussing 
their implementation of generalist social work skills and interventions. Students are encouraged 
to share a range of learning, experiences encountered in different work settings as they continue 
to examine and evaluate their professionalism. Students are expected to develop skills and 
proficiencies that are essential to the micro level of social work practice. Prerequisites: SOWK 
512 and 523. Taken concurrently with SOWK 524. (S) 

SOWK 523. Social Work Practice I Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is designed to reinforce the knowledge and develop the skills essential for generalist 
social work practice. Various methods are offered for developing intervention skills with 
individuals, families and small groups in a variety of settings. SOWK 133, 134, 335, 410, 420 
and 430. Taken concurrently with SOWK 507 and 512. Acceptance into BSW program. (F) 

SOWK 524. Social Work Practice H Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is a continuation of skill development. Emphasis is placed on social work intervention 
in larger systems (organizations, groups and communities). Attention is given to further 
understanding the dynamic relationship between people and their environment, the conflicting 
issues in social work practice, and the impact of various settings on practice. Prerequisities: 
SOWK 523. Taken concurrently with SOWK 5 12 and 514. Acceptance into BSW program. (S) 

SOWK 525. Independent Study Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes independent research in a delineated area of social welfare. Prerequisites: 
Only Sociology/Social Work Majors and consent of the instructor. (F;S;SS) 

SOWK 570. Senior Seminar Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes research and discussion of professional and field issues related to careers 
in sociology and social work. Prerequisite: Senior status. (S) 



304 



SOWK 571. Social Work Methods II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a continuation of skill development. Emphasis is on social work intervention in 
larger systems, (organizations, groups and communities.) Attention is given to further 
understanding the dynamic relationship between people and their environments; the conflicting 
issues in social work practice, and the impact of various settings on practice. Taken concurrently 
with SOWK 520. (S) 

SOWK 574. Institutional Services for Children Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of the primary resources available for children. Emphasis will be placed 
on the characteristics of children needing help and the adequacy/inadequacy of community 
programs. Attention is given to the cooperative nature of these programs as well as the auspices, 
standards and policies. (DEMAND) 

SOSW625. Sociology/Social Work * Credit 5(0-5) 

This course is an internship to provide opportunities for students to enhance their employability 
by supervised experiences in selected agencies. (S) 

SOWK 674. Evaluation of Social Programs * Credit 3(3-0) 

The main focus is on evaluative research methodology; research designs, measurement of 

program effectiveness and cost effectiveness analysis. Includes case studies of needs assessment, 

program monitoring and impact measurement in human services. Prerequisites: Social Statistic 

(S203) and Research Methods (S403). (S) 

* Full time social work students are required to register for SOWK 333, 410, 507, and 519 concurrently. Part 
time students with faculty approval may complete SOWK 333, and 410 prior to registering for 507 and 519. 

INTRA-DEPARTMENTAL COURSES 

SOCI 200. Introduction to Anthropology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes an analysis and comparison of primitive cultures and further comparisons 
with modern cultures. (S) 

SOCI 300. Topics in Cultural Anthropology Credit 3(3-0) 

Selected topics in language, culture, mythology, and religion designed to acquaint students 
with analyzing cultural patterning in this and other cultures will be studied. (F) 

SOWK 370. Aging in Society Credit 3(3-0) 

Aging and its implication in social institutions are studied. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 
(DEMAND) 

SOWK 414. Black Experience Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a topical seminar focusing on commonly shared experiences of American Blacks in 
selected social institutions. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (F;S;SS) 

SOSW 415. Medical Sociology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course includes sociological analysis of medical services, the role of the sick professional 
organizations and quasi-professional groups; socializational structure of hospitals; 
sociodemographic and socioepidemiologic variables in relation to modern societies. Cultural 
and cross-cultural customs and traditions affecting attitudes toward health and the healing art 
will also be studied. (DEMAND) 

SOCI 416. Sociology of Mental Health Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a sociocultural variation in the assessment of sociopadiological and 
psychopathological aspects of mental disorder. A critical analysis of institutions of mental 
health care, consideration of the etiology of mental illness, typologies, and social policies relative 
to the phenomenon of mental health will also be included. Prerequisite: SOCI 100. (DEMAND) 



305 



SOCI 420. Human Evolution in Ecological Perspective Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines human cultural and biological evolution using an ecological perspective. 
(DEMAND) 

SOWK 515. Independent Study II Credit 3(3-0) 

Prerequisite: Six hours of statistics, and/or research. (DEMAND) 

SOSW 600. Seminar in Social Planning Credit 3(3-0) 

Personal and social values as related to social planning: "systems" theories program planning 
and evaluation are studied. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. (DEMAND) 

SOSW 601. Seminar in Urban Studies Credit 3(3-0) 

An analysis of the nature and problems of cities, urban society and urban development will be 
included. (DEMAND) 

SOCI 603. Introduction to Folklore Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a basic introduction to the study and appreciation of folklore. (DEMAND) 

SOSW 625. Sociology/Social Service Internship Credit 5(0-5) 

This course is an internship to provide opportunities for students to enhance their employability 
by supervised experiences in selected agencies. (F) 

SOCI 650. Independent Study in Anthropology Credit 3(3-0) 

This course enables the student to do readings and research in anthropology in cooperation 
with the instructor. (DEMAND) 

SOCI 651. Anthropological Experience Credit 3(3-0) 

This course provides an exploration of anthropological theories and research methods with an 
emphasis on qualitative research methods. (DEMAND) 

SOSW 669. Small Groups Credit 3(3-0) 

Elements and characteristics of small group behavior and process will be studied. Prerequisite: 
Senior or graduate standing; or permission of the instructor. (F;S) 

SOSW 670. Law and Society Credit 3(3-0) 

This course examines selected and representative forms of social justice and injustices; and 
barriers to and opportunities for legal redress, as related to contemporary issues. Prerequisite: 
Senior or graduate standing. (F;S;SS) 

SOWK 674. Evaluation of Social Programs* Credit 3(3-0) 

Main focus is on evaluative research methodology; research designs, measurement of Program 
effectiveness and cost effectiveness analysis. Includes case studies of needs assessment, program 
monitoring and impact measurement in human services. Prerequisite: Social Statistics (S203) 
and Research Methods (S403). (S) 

SOCI 701. Seminar in Cultural Factors in Communication Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed both to sensitize the student to the importance of cultural factors in 

nonverbal and verbal communication and to equip the student with ways to record and analyze 

this behavior. (S) 

Note: Sociology 100, Sociology 101, Sociology 203, Sociology 204, Social Work 133, and SOSW 669 are the only 
courses scheduled to be taught each semester. Other courses are taught once per year and students mus t follow 
the curriculum sheets. 



306 



DIRECTORY OF FACULTY 
Fasihuddin Ahmed Professor 

B.A., Forman Christian College; M.A., University of the Punjab; Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Arnold Barnes Assistant Professor 

B.A., University of Maryland; M.S.W., University of Maryland; Ph.D., Washington University 

Glenna Barnes Assistant Professor 

B.S., Boston University; M.S.W., University of Maryland, Ph.D., Indiana University 

Phillip Carey Professor 

B.S, Oklahoma State University; M.S., Oklahoma State University; Ph.D., Oklahoma State 
University 

Robert Davis Professor and Chairperson 

B.A., Southern University; M.A., Atlanta University; Ph.D., Washington State University; Post- 
Doctoral, University of Wisconsin, Madison 

David Johnson Associate Professor 

B.A., Hamilton College, M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Wayne Moore Associate Professor 

B.S., East Carolina University; M.S.W., Ohio State. University; Ph.D., University of South 
Carolina 

Ernest Morant Assistant Professor 

B.A., Claflin College; M.S.W., New York University 

Elizabeth Watson Associate Professor and Director of BSW 

B.S., Columbia Union College; M.S.W., Howard University; Ph.D., Andrews University 

ADJUNCT FACULTY 
Andrea Johnson Lecturer 

B.A., North Carolina A&T State University, M.S., North Carolina State University 

Deirdre Posey Lecturer 

B.S.W., North Carolina A&T State University, M.S.W., North Carolina A&T State University 



307 



Department of Visual & Performing Arts 

http://www.ncat.edu/~vpa 



Eleanor W. Gwynn, Chairperson 

OVERVIEW 

The Department of Visual and Performing Arts comprises the Programs of Music, Theatre, 
Visual Arts and a Dance concentration. Through an ongoing collaborative process, the Depart- 
ment develops and sustains the artistic and cultural environment of the university and the com- 
munity. The department prepares students both academically and artistically through the imple- 
mentation of interdisciplinary studies for leadership roles in a diverse society. 

MISSION 

To provide an environment that fosters creativity, exploration and discovery through inter- 
disciplinary collaboration and excellence, which inspires growth, change and global awareness 
through the arts. 

VISION 

To be the premiere Southeastern Visual and Performing Arts center for the study, research 
and creation of dance, music, theatre and visual arts from a cross-cultural perspective with an 
emphasis in the African Diaspora. 

OBJECTIVES 

1 . to prepare students for professional employment and admission to graduate and pro- 
fessional schools. 

2. to engage students in dialogue about the aesthetic experience and its role in a global 
society. 

3. to create awareness of the historical development of the arts in western and non- 
western traditions. 

4. to provide opportunities for international studies, travel and documentation of the 
arts. 

5. to provide an environment conducive to creative achievement in the arts. 

Music Program 

http://www.ncat.edu/~music 
William C. Smiley, Chairperson 

OBJECTIVES 

The general objectives of the Music Program are as follows: 

1 . to provide the student with basic skills, techniques, pedagogical concepts, and per- 
spectives for a career as an artist and as a teacher of music on the K-12 levels. 

2. to contribute to and present an experiential knowledge base that includes technologi- 
cal advances, instrumentation, and techniques which support the discipline. 

3. to interpret, create, and maintain the highest level in individual and group perfor- 
mance in music, 

4. to enhance the cultural and aesthetic life of the university student through personal 
experiences in a focused program of education in music. 

308 



DEGREES OFFERED 

Music (Performance) - Bachelor of Arts 
Music (General) - Bachelor of Arts 

The Music Program offers the Bachelor of Arts degree with two options. One of these is a 
liberal arts curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Arts in Music degree with concentrations in 
general music. This degree program is designed to accommodate students who wish to enter 
some area of music other than teaching. The other degree program is a professional degree in 
performance. This degree is designed for students who desire a career as a concert artist. De- 
gree program requirements differ, and are not necessarily interchangeable. Students are ad- 
vised to check programs carefully. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

Successful completion of the requirements of the B.A. degree in Music provides the student 
with opportunities for various careers in the performing arts, and/or related disciplines. 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

For certified admission to the study of music as a major, all prospective students must suc- 
cessfully pass auditions set by the Faculty in the principal applied music area. 

To continue in the Music Program as a major, students must maintain a 2.8 average in all 
music courses. Students whose averages fall below 2.8 will be placed on Program probation for 
the following semester of enrollment. Should the average not meet the minimum requirements 
at the end of the probationary period, their status will be subject to review by the Program 
Committee on Curriculum, Standards and Measures. Students who have a semester grade of 
"D" or below in a major course must repeat the affected course(s) and earn a grade of "C" or 
better before enrolling into any continuation or the next level of said course(s). Student progress 
will be evaluated at the end of the fourth semester of residency to determine approval for 
enrollment into upper level (junior classification, 400-600) music courses. 

MUSIC PERFORMANCE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

The Music Performance degree is a highly selective program that maintains specific entry 
and retention requirements. These requirements may include additional auditions and academic 
provisions. 

MUSIC DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Upon entrance into the music program, each student must choose a principal applied con- 
centration area - woodwind, brasswind, percussion, voice or piano. 

PERFORMANCE ENSEMBLES 

Each student with a major in music is required to have 7 credits in performance ensembles 
during their enrollment. For instrumentalists, at least 4 of these credits must come from March- 
ing Band or from Symphonic/Concert Bands. The remaining 3 credits may either be additional 
hours of Marching and Symphonic/Concert Bands, or may come from the other instrumental 
ensembles within the Program, such as Jazz Ensemble, Brass Ensemble, Woodwind Ensemble, 
Percussion Ensemble, Piano Chamber Ensemble, etc. For vocalists, 4 credit must come from 
Concert Choir, and the remaining 3 credits may come from Chamber Choir or Concert Choir. 
Participation in more than a single ensemble is encouraged so long as there are no schedule 
conflicts or violation of University policy concerning student course load. 



309 



RECITAL SEMINAR 



Music 307 is required each semester of enrollment as a major in the Program. As a part of 
this course, attendance is required for all music majors at student and faculty recitals, band, 
choir, and chamber ensemble concerts, and lyceum programs. A systematic method of check- 
ing and recording attendance will be used. 

INSTRUMENTS AND PRACTICE FACILITIES 

Several studios are provided as practice facilities for students. Each contains a piano that is 
tuned regularly and kept in good repair. These areas are reserved for music majors only, and 
each person using the practice space assumes the responsibility for the maintenance of the 
instrument provided. 

With the exception of piano students, each music major is expected to furnish an instrument 
for personal use. University-owned instruments are intended for use within ensembles and 
pedagogy classes only. 

REQUIRED MAJOR COURSES FOR MUSIC 



MUSI 101 
MUSI 102 
MUSI 113 
MUSI 114 
MUSI 119 
MUSI 120 
MUSI 121 
MUSI 200 
MUSI 201 
MUSI 213 
MUSI 214 
MUSI 218 
MUSI 260 

MUSI 101 
MUSI 102 
MUSI 113 
MUSI 114 
MUSI 120 
MUSI 213 
MUSI 214 
MUSI 200 



(Performance) 

MUSI 300 
MUSI 301 
MUSI 309 
MUSI 302 
MUSI 303 
MUSI 304 
MUSI 305 
MUSI 306 
MUSI 308 
MUSI 307 
MUSI 400 
MUSI 402 
MUSI 403 

(General) 

MUSI 201 
MUSI 216 
MUSI 220 
MUSI 221 
MUSI 300 
MUSI 302 
MUSI 301 
MUSI 307 



MUSI 404 
MUSI 408 
MUSI 409 
MUSI 410 
MUSI 411 
MUSI 412 
MUSI 413 
MUSI 427 
MUSI 450 
MUSI 501 
MUSI 503 
MUSI 513 
MUSI 550 

MUSI 309 
MUSI 400 
MUSI 402 
MUSI 403 
MUSI 404 
MUSI 501 
MUSI 551 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR MUSIC PERFORMANCE (PIANO) 



First Semester 
MUSI 307 
MUSI 120 
MUSI 101 
MUSI 163 
MUSI 154 
MUSI 301 
UNST 100 
UNST 110 
UNST 120 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Credit 


Second Semester 





MUSI 119 


1 


MUSI 121 


3 


MUSI 102 


2 


MUSI 163 


1 


MUSI 154 


1 


MUSI 301 


1 


MUSI 307 


3 


UNST 130 


3 


UNST 140 


15 


MUSI 218 



Credit 

1 
1 
3 
2 
1 
1 

3 
3 
2 
17 



310 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



First Semester 
MUSI 200 
MUSI 263 
MUSI 254 
MUSI 301 
MUSI 306 
MUSI 307 
FOLAI 
UNST Elective 
UNST Elective 



First Semester 
MUSI 402 
MUSI 463 
MUSI 306 
MUSI 307 
MUSI 403 
MUSI 450 
MUSI 301 
MUSI 415 
MUSI Elective 
MUSI 260 



First Semester 
MUSI 306 
MUSI 307 
MUSI 301 
MUSI 553 
MUSI 409 
MUSI 501 
MUSI 503 
MUSI Elective 



Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


3 


MUSI 201 


3 


2 


MUSI 263 


2 


1 


MUSI 254 


1 


1 


MUSI 301 


1 


1 


MUSI 306 


1 





MUSI 307 





3 


FOLA II 


3 


3 


UNST Elective 


3 


3 


UNST Elective 


3 


17 




17 


JUNIOR YEAR 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


3 


MUSI 404 


3 


2 


MUSI 463 


2 


1 


MUSI 300,301 or 308 


1 





MUSI 307 





3 


MUSI 306 


1 


1 


BIOL 100 


4 


1 


MUSI 301 


1 


2 


PSYC 320 


3 


1 


DANC 100* 


2 


1 




17 


15 






SENIOR YEAR 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


1 


MUSI 553 (Capstone) 


2 





MUSI 550 (Capstone) 


1 


1 


MUSI 306 


1 


2 


MUSI Elective 


2 


2 


MUSI 301 


1 


2 


MUSI 307 





2 


Free Elective 


3 


3 


MUSI 551 


3 


13 




13 



Total Credit Hours: 124 
* PHED requirement 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR MUSIC PERFORMANCE (VOICE) 



First Semester 
MUSI 307 
MUSI 120 
MUSI 101 
MUSI 153 
MUSI 164 
MUSI 301 
UNST 100 
UNST 110 
UNST 120 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Credit 


Second Semester 





MUSI 119 


1 


MUSI 121 


3 


MUSI 102 


2 


MUSI 153 


1 


MUSI 164 


1 


MUSI 301 


1 


MUSI 307 


3 


UNST 130 


3 


UNST 140 


15 


MUSI 218 



Credit 

1 
1 
3 
2 
1 
1 

3 
3 
2 
17 



311 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



First Semester 
MUSI 200 
MUSI 253 
MUSI 264 
MUSI 301 
MUSI 306 
MUSI 307 
FOLA I German 
UNST Elective 
UNST Elective 



First Semester 
MUSI 402 
MUSI 453 
MUSI 306 
MUSI 307 
MUSI 403 
MUSI 450 
MUSI 301 
MUSI 415 
MUSI 427 



First Semester 
MUSI 306 
MUSI 307 
MUSI 301 
MUSI 553 
MUSI 411 
MUSI 501 
MUSI 503 
FOLA I French 



Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


3 


MUSI 201 


3 


2 


MUSI 253 


2 


1 


MUSI 264 


1 


1 


MUSI 301 


1 


1 


MUSI 306 


1 





MUSI 307 





3 


FOLA II German 


3 


3 


UNST Elective 


3 


3 


UNST Elective 


3 


17 




17 


JUNIOR YEAR 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


3 


MUSI 404 


3 


2 


MUSI 453 


2 


1 


MUSI 300, 301 or 308 


1 





MUSI 307 





3 


MUSI 306 


1 


1 


BIOL 100 


4 


1 


MUSI 301 


1 


2 


PSYC 320 


3 


3 


DANC 100* 


2 


16 




17 


SENIOR YEAR 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


1 


MUSI 553 (Capstone) 


2 





MUSI 550 (Capstone) 


1 


1 


MUSI 306 


1 


2 


MUSI 410 


2 


2 


MUSI 301 


1 


2 


MUSI 307 





2 


FOLA II French 


3 


3 


MUSI 551 


3 


13 




13 



Total Credit Hours: 124 
* PHED requirement 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR MUSIC PERFORMANCE (INSTRUMENTAL) 



First Semester 
MUSI 307 
DANC 100* 
MUSI 101 
MUSI 133** 
MUSI 164 
MUSI 300 
UNST 100 
UNST 110 
UNST 120 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Credit 


Second Semester 





MUSI 119 


2 


MUSI 102 


3 


MUSI 133 


2 


MUSI 164 


1 


MUSI 300 


1 


MUSI 307 


1 


UNST 130 


3 


UNST 140 


3 


MUSI 218 


16 





Credit 
1 

3 
2 
1 
1 

3 
3 
2 
16 



312 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



First Semester 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


MUSI 200 




3 


MUSI 201 


3 


MUSI 233 




2 


MUSI 233 


2 


MUSI 264 




1 


MUSI 264 


1 


MUSI 300 or 308 




1 


MUSI 300 or 308 


1 


MUSI 302, 303 or 


304 


1 


MUSI 302, 303 or 304 


1 


MUSI 307 







MUSI 307 





FOLAI 




3 


FOLA II 


3 


UNST Elective 




3 


UNST Elective 


3 


UNST Elective 




3 
17 


UNST Elective 


3 
17 






JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


MUSI 402 




3 


MUSI 404 


3 


MUSI 433 




2 


MUSI 433 


2 


MUSI 302, 303 or 


304 


1 


MUSI 300 or 308 


1 


MUSI 307 







MUSI 307 





MUSI 403 




3 


MUSI 302, 303 or 304 


1 


MUSI 300 or 308 




1 


BIOL 100 


4 


MUSI 415 




2 


PSYC 320 


3 


MUSI 429 or 430 




3 
15 


MUSI 450 


1 
15 






SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


MUSI 302, 303 or 


304 


1 


MUSI 553 (Capstone) 


2 


MUSI 307 







MUSI 550 (Capstone) 


1 


MUSI 300 or 308 




1 


MUSI 302, 303 304 or 308 


1 


MUSI 533 




2 


MUSI Elective 


2 


MUSI Elective 




2 


MUSI 301 


1 


MUSI 501 




2 


MUSI 307 





MUSI Score Reading & Conduct 


2 


Elective 


4 


Elective 




4 
14 


MUSI 551 


3 
14 



Total Credit Hours: 124 
* PHED requirement 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR MUSIC GENERAL (PRE-MUSIC THERAPY) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


UNST 100 


1 


UNST 130 


3 


UNST 110 


3 


UNST 140 


3 


UNST 120 


3 


MUSI 220 


3 


MUSI 101 


3 


MUSI 102 


3 


MUSI 113** 


2 


MUSI 113** 


2 


MUSI 164 


1 


MUSI 164 


1 


MUSI 300, 301, or 308 


1 


MUSI 300, 301, or 308 


1 


MUSI 307 





MUSI 307 


Q 


MUSI 119 


1 
15 




16 



313 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



First Semester 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


MUSI 200 




3 


MUSI 201 


3 


MUSI 213* 




2 


MUSI 213* 


2 


PSYC 242 




3 


PSYC 320 


3 


MUSI 264 




1 


MUSI 264 


1 


MUSI 300, 301, 


or 308 


1 


MUSI 300, 301, or 308 


1 


MUSI 307 







MUSI 307 





UNST Elective 




3 


UNST Elective 


3 


UNST Elective 




3 
16 


UNST Elective 


3 
15 






JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 




Credit 


Second Semester 
ART 224 


Credit 

2 


FOLAI 




3 


MUSI 219 


3 


PSYC 321 




3 


SPCH 250 


3 


MUSI 221 




3 


FOLA II 


3 


MUSI 302 (or other ensemble) 


1 


MUSI 302 (or other ensemble) 


1 


MUSI 307 







MUSI 307 





MUSI 402 




3 


MUSI 404 


3 


MUSI 403 




3 
16 


DANC 100** 


2 
17 






SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 




Credit 


Second Semester 


Credit 


BIOL 100 




4 


BAUD 425 


3 


MUSI 415 




2 


MUSI 302 (or other ensemble) 


1 


MUSI 302 (or other ensemble) 


1 


MUSI 307 





MUSI 307 







MUSI 216 


3 


MUSI 501 




3 


MUSI 551 (Capstone) 


3 


PHIL 260 




3 


PSYC Elective 


3 


MUSI 105 




1 
14 


MUSI Elective 


2 
15 



Total Credit Hours: 124 

* MUSI 113 (Upper Brass), MUSI 123 (Lower Brass), MUSI 133 (Woodwinds), and MUSI 143 (Percussion). 

Courses with multiple numbers are determined on the basis of the principal applied instrument. 
** PHED requirement 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR MUSIC GENERAL (ELECTRONIC MUSIC) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 




Credit 


Second Semester 




Credit 


UNST 100 




1 


UNST 130 




3 


UNST 110 




3 


UNST 140 




3 


UNST 120 




3 


MUSI 220 




3 


MUSI 101 




3 


MUSI 102 




3 


MUSI 113* 




2 


MUSI 113* 




2 


MUSI 164 




1 


MUSI 164 




1 


MUSI 300, 301, 


or 308 


1 


MUSI 300, 301, or 


308 


1 


MUSI 307 







MUSI 307 







MUSI 119 




1 
15 






16 



314 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



First Semester 




Credit 


Second Semester 




Credit 


MUSI 200 




3 


MUSI 201 




3 


MUSI 213* 




2 


MUSI 213* 




2 


MUSI 226 




3 


MUSI 225 




2 


MUSI 264 




1 


MUSI 264 




1 


MUSI 300, 301, or; 


308 


1 


MUSI 300, 301, or 308 




1 


MUSI 307 







MUSI 307 







UNST Elective 




3 


UNST Elective 




3 


UNST Elective 




3 
16 


UNST Elective 




3 
15 






JUNIOR YEAR 






First Semester 




Credit 


Second Semester 




Credit 


MUSI 415 




2 


ART 224 




2 


FOLAI 




3 


MUSI 219 




3 


MUSI 221 




3 


SPCH 250 




3 


MUSI 302 (or other 


ensemble) 


1 


FOLA II 




3 


MUSI 307 







MUSI 302 (or other ensemble) 


1 


MUSI 402 




3 


MUSI 307 







MUSI 403 




3 


MUSI 404 




3 






15 


MUSI 416 




2 
17 






SENIOR YEAR 






First Semester 




Credit 


Second Semester 




Credit 


BIOL 100 




4 


BAUD 425 




3 


MUSI 516 




2 


MUSI 302 (or other ensemble) 


1 


MUSI 302 (or other ensemble) 


1 


MUSI 307 







MUSI 307 







MUSI 216 




3 


MUSI 501 




3 


MUSI 551 (Capstone) 




3 


PHIL 260 




3 


THEA 542 




3 


DANC 100** 




2 
15 


MUSI Elective 




2 
15 


Total Credit Hours: 


124 










* MUSI 113 (Upper Brass), MUSI 123 (Lower 


Brass), MUSI 133 (Woodwinds), and MUSI 143 (Percussion). 


Courses with multip 


le numbers are 


determined on the basis of the principal applie 


d instrument 





'PHED requirement 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR MUSIC GENERAL (MUSIC THEATER) 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 




Credit 


Second Semester 




Credit 


UNST 100 




1 


UNST 130 




3 


UNST 110 




3 


UNST 140 




3 


UNST 120 




3 


MUSI 220 




3 


MUSI 101 




3 


MUSI 102 




3 


MUSI 113* 




2 


MUSI 113* 




2 


MUSI 164 




1 


MUSI 164 




1 


MUSI 300, 301, 


or 308 


1 


MUSI 300, 301, or 


308 


1 


MUSI 307 







MUSI 307 







MUSI 119 




1 
15 






16 



315 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


MUSI 200 


3 MUSI 201 


3 


MUSI 213* 


2 MUSI 213* 


2 


PSYC 242 


3 MUSI 264 


1 


MUSI 264 


1 MUSI 300, 301, or 308 


1 


MUSI 300, 301, or 308 


1 MUSI 307 





MUSI 307 


MUSI 216 


3 


UNST Elective 


3 UNST Elective 


3 


UNST Elective 


3 UNST Elective 


3 




16 


16 




JUNIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


THEA210 


3 ART 224 


2 


FOLAI 


3 MUSI 219 


3 


THEA231 


3 SPCH 250 


3 


MUSI 302 (or other ensemble) 


1 FOLA II 


3 


MUSI 307 


MUSI 302 (or other ensemble) 


1 


MUSI 402 


3 MUSI 307 





MUSI 403 


3 MUSI 404 


3 




16 DANC 100** 


2 
17 




SENIOR YEAR 




First Semester 


Credit Second Semester 


Credit 


BIOL 100 


4 THEA 464 


3 


MUSI 415 


2 MUSI 302 (or other ensemble) 


1 


MUSI 302 (or other ensemble) 


1 MUSI 307 





MUSI 307 


MUSI 551 (Capstone) 


3 


MUSI 501 


3 THEA 


3 


PHIL 260 


3 MUSI 221 


3 


MUSI 105 


1 MUSI Elective 


2 




14 


15 



Total Credit Hours: 124 

* MUSI 113 (Upper Brass), MUSI 123 (Lower Brass), MUSI 133 (Woodwinds), and MUSI 143 (Percussion). 

Courses with multiple numbers are determined on the basis of the principal applied instrument. 
** PHED requirement 

ELECTIVE OPTIONS 

(*) The General Music degree program requires eleven (14) hours of related elective courses, 
all which lead directly to the culminating research project (MUSI 551 The courses must be 
selected from one of the allowable elective blocks inclusive of Musical Theater, Pre-Music 
Therapy, Music and Recreation, Electronic Music, Performance, and Music and Business. Any 
variations on this requirement must have the express written permission of the Major advisor 
and the Chairperson. 



316 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN MUSIC THEORY 

MUSI 101/102. Theory I and II Credit 3(2-2) 

This course includes a review of the fundamentals of music, including the rudiments of music 
theory- construction and function of scales; intervals, triads and dominant seventh chords in 
roof position and inversions; use of non-harmonic tones; correlated analysis, rhythmic, melodic, 
and harmonic dictation. (F;S) 

MUSI 110. Fundamentals of Music Credit 3(1-4) 

This is a comprehensive study of the rudiments of music: notation, intervals, scales, keys, and 
rhythm. The course is designed for the entering music major and is an elective for non- majors. 
This course may not be used for credit toward degrees in music. (F;SS) 

MUSI 119. Sight Singing and Ear Training Credit 1(0-2) 

This course is the study of the fundamentals of musicianship; correlated rhythmic, melodic, 
and harmonic drills. (F;S) 

MUSI 155. Gospel Improvisation- Vocal Credit 2(0-4) 

This is a survey course designed to teach standard vocal techniques of Gospel music. Areas of 
instruction will include such topics as proper posture, breathing techniques and concepts, vo- 
cal pedagogy, vocal alterations, rearranging, and spontaneous composition of melodic lines. 
Students enrolling in this course must demonstrate the ability to match pitches, and replicate 
dictated melodic content. This course may be repeated for two additional credits. Courses 
MUSI 155 and MUSI 165 may be taken simultaneously with the approval of the vocal and 
keyboard instructors. (DEMAND) 

MUSI 165. Gospel Improvisation-Keyboard Credit 2(0-4) 

This is a survey course designed to teach the fundamentals of keyboard improvisation in Gos- 
pel music. Emphasis will be placed on the basic elements of music importance of instrumenta- 
tion, meter and tempo, melody and harmony. Students enrolling in this course must demon- 
strate basic improvisational keyboard skills. This course may be repeated for two additional 
credits. Courses MUSI 155 and MUSI 165 may be taken simultaneously with the approval of 
the vocal and keyboard instructors. (DEMAND) 

MUSI 200/201. Theory III and IV Credit 3(2-2) 

Modulation, construction and function of seventh, ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth chords in root 
position and inversions; chromatic harmony; advanced modulation; trends of the twentieth 
century; corrected analysis, sight singing, ear training, dictation, and keyboard drill will be 
studied. Prerequisites: Music 101 and 102. (F;S) 

MUSI 402. Form and Analysis Credit 3(3-0) 

Harmonic and melodic structure of the phrase- phrases in combination- the analytical methods; 
theme and variation, ternary, rondo, binary, sonata, concerto and unique forms; the fugue and 
related genres will be examined. Prerequisites: MUSI 200 and 201. (S) 
MUSI 414. Composition Credit 3(2-2) 

This course includes an introduction to the basic elements of creative writing- melodic writing; 
organization and structure of musical sound; various approaches to the development of thematic 
and harmonic materials; as well as orchestration as it applies to composition. Prerequisites: 
MUSI 101, 102, 200, 201, and/or consent of instructor. (DEMAND) 

MUSI 415. Music Synthesis Credit 2(2-0) 

This course is an introduction to electronic music, both in its technology and its role in reshaping 
musical traditions. The course will emphasize waveform analysis with the related mathematical 
and acoustical concepts. Units will include a history of electronic musical instruments, related 
acoustics, exploration of various methods of synthesis, and spectra analyses of waveforms 

317 



using the mathematics developed by Fourier. Students will create original or mutated timbre 
for use in an original arrangement or composition. The use of the computer as a tool for 
composition and score production will be explored. (F) 

MUSI 416. Electronic Music Credit 2(1-0) 

This course is designed to introduce the student to electronic music and how it is created. 
Topics to be covered will be the history of electronic music, the use and possible applications 
of the tape recorders, mixers, amplifiers, speakers, microphones, sound generators, synthesizers, 
etc., and the proper maintenance of all the equipment utilized. Each student will arrange two or 
more hours per week to work alone in the Electronic Music Studio with the equipment and 
materials. The creation of original compositions will be a project assignment to be premiered 
at a public concert. (S) 

MUSI 501. Arranging Credit 3(2-2) 

Scoring for chorus, band, orchestra, vocal and instrumental chamber ensembles will be studied. 
Prerequisites: MUSI 400 and 401. (F;SS) 

MUSI 516. Electronic Music Composition Credit 2 (1-2) 

This course is a continuation of MUSI-416, and will explore advanced musical composition 
using electronically generated sounds. The compositions created in this course by students 
may be prerecorded sequences and/or interactive performances with some acoustic sounds. 
Project assignments will include the creation of electronic compositions that will be premiered 
at a public concert and used in the senior project. (DEMAND) 

MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

MUSI 216. Music Appreciation I Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of melody, harmony, rhythm, simple forms, vocal music, texture and the 
orchestra. It is designed for the general student to provide an introductory survey to the art of 
music. (F;S;SS) 

MUSI 217. Music Appreciation II Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a survey of the literature and styles of the several periods of music history from 
antiquity through the present. It is designed for the general student as a continuation of Music 
Appreciation I. Prerequisite: MUSI 216. (DEMAND) 

MUSI 218. Introduction to Music Literature Credit 2(2-0) 

This course will present a study of western and non- western music, and will include analysis of 
music literature from western culture and a select group of non-western cultures. The musical 
styles will be studied chronologically except when no historical data is present. In the case of 
that exception (ex.: Native American Music or African Music), those styles will be studied in 
the time period that historical data is present (written accounts or recordings). (F) 

MUSI 219. History of Gospel Music Credit 3(3-0) 

This course will present a survey of the historical development of African- American Gospel 
Music. Emphasis will be placed on the stylistic and evolutionary development of the music and 
its significant contributions. This course may be taken as fulfillment of the Black-Global Studies 
requirement. (F) 

MUSI 220. History of Black Music in America Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is a study of black American music from the 17th century to the present. Emphasis 
is placed on musical forms and styles within the social, economic, and political areas. Formal 
musical training desirable but not required. Humanities credit given. (S;SS) 



318 



MUSI 221. History of Jazz Credit 3(3-0) 

This is a general survey course of the history of jazz from its beginnings to the present, with 
major emphasis placed on the stylistic and evolutionary development of the music and the 
significant contributors to jazz styles. Lectures will be supplemented by films, slides, 
demonstrations, live concerts, and phonograph recordings. Course is open to non-music majors 
as well as music majors. No formal knowledge of music theory and history or previous 
background in music is necessary for enrollment. (F;S;SS) 

MUSI 226. History of Electronic Music Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will survey electronic music pioneers from the early twentieth century through the 
latest twentieth century developments with implications for the twenty-first century. Cahill, 
Cage, Vare'se, Stockhausen, Babbitt, Moog and Chowing are some of the electronic composers 
who will be studied. (DEMAND) 

MUSI 403. History and Literature of Music I Credit 3(2-2) 

This course includes analyses of main works of music literature presented in historical order; 
form, harmonic, and contrapuntal devices, orchestration, and other stylistic features investigated 
against the background of historic artistic and cultural developments — Ancient, Medieval, 
Renaissance and Baroque periods. Prerequisites: MUSI 101 and 102. (F) 

MUSI 404. History and Literature of Music II Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is an analysis of main works of music literature presented in historical order, form, 
harmonic and contrapuntal devices, orchestration, and other stylistic features investigated against 
the background of historic, artistic, and cultural development — Classical, romantic, 
Postromantic and contemporary periods. Prerequisite: MUSI 403. (S) 

MUSI 405. Music of the Baroque Period Credit 2(1-2) 

An analysis of the main works of the principal composers of the early, middle, and late Baroque 
periods culminating with a more detailed study of the works of Handel and J.S. Bach will be 
studied; vocal, keyboard and other instrumental forms are included; emphasis is on stylistic 
characteristics. Prerequisite: MUSI 403. (DEMAND) 

MUSI 406. Music of the Romantic Period Credit 2(1-2) 

This course includes intensive study of the works of the principal composers of the Romantic 
era; emphasis is on general and individual stylistic characteristics. Prerequisite: MUSI 404. 
(DEMAND) 

MUSI 407. Modern Music from 1890 to the Present Credit 2(1-2) 

The music of the so-called Viennese school of the twentieth century against the background of 
late German romanticism and French impressionism will be studied; the dissolution of the 
tonal system and the development of the serial principle- the music of Bartok, Stravinsky and 
others in the light of nineteenth and twentieth century investigations of folk or national materials 
and their influence upon serious artists; the relationship of Bartok and Stravinsky to traditional 
harmonic principles and to the formal structures of the past; and other trends in the twentieth 
century will be studied. Prerequisites: MUSI 201 and 404. (DEMAND) 

MUSI 408. The Symphony Credit 2(1-2) 

This course is the study of the formulation of classical principles of construction by Josef 
Haydn, with reference to the contributions of Gluck CPE. Bach and the Manheim school; the 
fulfillment of the classical ideal of the works of Mozart and Beethoven; changing concepts of 
the symphony after Beethoven; the Romanticists' approach to form; and study of the major 
Romantic symphonies by composers from Schubert to Mahler. Prerequisites: MUSI 201 and 
404. (DEMAND) 



319 



MUSI 409. Keyboard Music Credit 2(1-2) 

Techniques, musicianship, and stylistic aspects of interpretation from pre-Bach to the present; 
intellectual, emotional, and imaginative aspects of performance as exemplified by works from 
leading composers including Bach, Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy, 
and Moussorgsky will be studied; all lectures illustrated at the piano. Prerequisite: MUSI 404. 
(S) 

MUSI 410. Opera Credit 2(1-2) 

The establishment of the opera as a feasible musico-dramatic genre and the various solutions to 
problems of the opera as suggested by composers from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries 
will be examined; special emphasis will be placed on the works of Monteverdi, Scarlatti, Gluck, 
Mozart, Wagner, and Verdi. Prerequisites: MUSI 201 and 404. (F) 

MUSI 411. The Art Song Credit 2(1-2) 

This course is a survey of the art song from seventeenth century Italy to present, with special 
emphasis on the song literatures of Germany, France, and contemporary America- practice in 
interpretation with particular attention to style and diction. Prerequisite: MUSI 404. (S) 

MUSI 412. Chamber Music Credit 2(1-2) 

This course provides an analysis of masterworks of chamber literature for instrumental and 
vocal ensembles by the main composers for each of the several periods in music history and 
interpretation. Prerequisite: MUSI 404. (DEMAND) 

MUSIC PEDAGOGY 

MUSI 105. Class Guitar I Credit 1(0-2) 

This course provides basic instruction in guitar performance. Designed for the general college 
student; the course requires no previous experience with music. (S) 

MUSI 106. Class Guitar II Credit 1(0-2) 

This is a continuation of MUSI 105. Prerequisite: MUSI 105. (DEMAND) 

MUSI 111. Basic Performance Techniques Credit 2(0-4) 

This is a study of the basic elements of tone production, reading, techniques and style in the 
performance of instrumental or vocal music. The course is designed for entering music majors 
with deficiencies in the primary performance medium and as a music elective for non-majors. 
This course may not be used for credit toward degrees in music. (DEMAND) 

MUSI 225. Introduction to MIDI Credit 2 (2-1) 

This course will introduce the concepts and functions of Musical Instrument Digital Interface 
(MIDI) devices that are used in the creation of musical compositions, scores, and recordings. 
(DEMAND) 

MUSI 427. Voice Pedagogy Credit 2(1-2) 

This course includes the following: use of the singing voice; basic principles of singing, 
interpretation and musicianship; physiology, breathing; tone production, resonance and diction. 
The application of basic principles to the singing voice; pronunciation, articulation, intonation, 
attack, legato, sostenuto, flexibility and dynamics; ensemble singing; techniques for producing 
choral tone in accompanied and unaccompanied styles, choral procedure and repertoire. (F) 

MUSI 428. Music Pedagogy I (strings & Vocal) Credit 2(2-0) 

This course is designed for the Music Education major. This course will present basic 
instructional techniques for playing orchestral stringed instruments. It also will present training 
in use of the singing voice including basic principles of singing, breathing, tone production, 
resonance and diction. 



320 



MUSI 429. Music Pedagogy II (Brass & woodwinds) Credit2(2-0) 

This course is designed for the Music Education major. This course will present basic 
instructional techniques for playing orchestral brasswind instruments. 

MUSI 430. Music Pedagogy HI (Percussions) Credit 2(2-0) 

This course is designed for Music Education majors. This course will present basic instructional 
techniques for playing percussion instruments inclusive of Snare Drum. Timpani, Xylophone, 
Bells, Chimes, and other percussion instruments. 

PERFORMANCE ORGANIZATIONS 

The total number of semester hours to be earned through performance organization courses 
is specified in the outlines of major curricula. Each student with a major in music is required to 
maintain continuous membership in a Division-sanctioned performance ensemble. If the prin- 
cipal applied subject is a wind or percussion instrument, the student must elect band; if the 
principal applied subject is voice or piano, the student must elect choir. The organization elected 
must be repeated each semester as specified until the required number of semester hours has 
been earned. Other performance organization courses are elected as required of the several 
curricula and similarly repeated for credit until the necessary semester hours have been earned. 

MUSI 300. University Bands Credit 2(0-5) 

The University Marching Band is organized in the fall of the year (first semester) and plays for 
all football games. It is open to all qualified students, both men and women. The Symphony 
Band and the Concert Band function during the spring semester performing concerts throughout 
the southeast. Membership in both the Symphony and Marching Bands is through audition 
with the Director of Bands. May be repeated for credit each semester. (F;S) 

MUSI 301. University Choir Credit 2(0-5) 

This is an organization designed to perform a diversity of choral literature ranging from the 
classics to gospel. Numerous on and off-campus public appearances, as well as at least one 
tour are planned each year. Membership is open to all qualified students by audition. May be 
repeated for credit. (F;S) 

MUSI 302. Brass Ensemble Credit 1(0-2) 

The study and performance of literature for brass instrument chamber groups from all periods 
of music history and in all styles are included as well as frequent public concerts. Membership 
is open to all qualified students, both men and women through audition with the director. May 
be repeated for credit each semester. (F;S) 

MUSI 303. Woodwind Ensemble Credit 1(0-2) 

This course is the study and performance of literature for woodwind chamber music groups 
and in all styles. There will be frequent public concerts. Membership is open to all qualified 
students, both men and women through audition with the director. May be repeated for credit 
each semester. (F;S) 

MUSI 304. Percussion Ensemble Credit 1(0-2) 

This course is a study and performance of literature for percussion chamber groups representing 
a wide variety of styles. It is designed to develop skill in ensemble performance on all of the 
instruments of percussion used in this growing modern repertoire Membership is open to all 
qualified students, both men and women, through audition with the director. Frequent public 
concerts. May be repeated for credit each semester. (F;S) 

MUSI 305. Opera Workshop Credit 1(0-2) 

Musical and dramatic group study and performance of excerpts from the operatic repertoire 
will be included. This course includes an annual production of a standard opera and/or 

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contemporary chamber work, with staging, costumes, and scenery. Students must secure the 
approval of their university voice instructor before enrolling. May be repeated for credit each 
semester. (DEMAND) 

MUSI 306. Chamber Singers Credit 1(0-2) 

This is a choral organization which is designed to perform a wide variety of compositions 
written for voices representing various musical styles and periods will be included as well as 
frequent public concerts. Membership is open to qualified students through audition with the 
director. May be repeated for credit each semester. (F;S) 

MUSI 307. Recital Seminar Credit 0(0-1) 

This is a weekly assembly of music students with members of the faculty, providing opportunity 
for experience in public performance before an audience, lecture and discussion of problems in 
the general area of performance, including ensemble playing and singing, conducting, 
accompanying, stage deportment, also performance. (Required of all music majors during each 
semester of residence; a grade of pass (P) or fail (F) will be assigned on the basis of participation 
and attendance.) (F;S) 

MUSI 308. University Jazz Ensembles Credit 1(0-2) 

This course involves the study and performance of jazz literature in all styles and idioms with 
special emphasis on contemporary compositions. Membership is open to all qualified students 
through audition with the director. May be repeated for credit each semester. (F;S) 

MUSI 309. University Orchestra Credit 2(0-4) 

This is an organization designed to perform a wide range of orchestral compositions representing 
various musical styles, and periods. Emphasis is placed on the more important of the standard 
symphonic works from the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Membership is 
open to all qualified students through audition with the director. May be repeated for credit 
each semester. (DEMAND) 

APPLIED MUSIC 

Individual instruction is available in the following branches of applied music as both prin- 
cipal and secondary areas of study: 

Piano Flute Bassoon Trombone 

Voice Oboe French Horn Euphonium 

Percussion Clarinet Trumpet Tuba 

In the principal area of performance, each student receives a one hour individual lesson 
each week and must practice for at least two hours each day to earn two semester hours credit. 
In the secondary area of performance, each student receives two hours of lab instruction each 
week and is required to practice a minimum of one hour each day to earn one semester hour 
credit. (F;S) 

MUSI 503. Score Reading and Conducting Credit 2(1-2) 

This course is the study of the fundamental conducting beat patterns, size of beats, and use of 
each hand; discussion and study of musical terminology; conducting experience with laboratory 
group. Transposition; characteristics and ranges of instruments-study of tempos and dynamics; 
and continued conducting experience with both choral and instrumental laboratory groups will 
be studied. (F) 

MUSI 450. Junior Recital Credit 1(0-2) 

This course is designed for the Junior music performance major to demonstrate proficiency on 
their major instrument in a formal concert setting. 



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MUSI 550. Senior Recital Credit 1(0-1) 

This course is designed for the senior music major to demonstrate a high level of proficiency 
on a chosen instrument or in an applied music field (either brass, woodwinds, percussion, 
voice, strings or keyboards) in a concert situation. The course will culminate in a formal concert 
performance of hallmarks of music literature. This course is taken concurrently with MUSI 
513. For Bachelor of Arts- Performance majors the recital should be presented during the 
second semester of MUSI 513. Prerequisites: MUSI 1 13, 213, and 413. (DEMAND) 

MUSI 593. Applied Performance Recital Credit 2(0-2) 

This course is designed for the senior Music Education major to satisfy the final undergraduate 
semester requirements of applied music study and performance. The student will receive 
appropriates Senior-level studio instruction, followed by a faculty jury hearing and culminating 
with a formally evaluated solo concert performance of hallmarks of musical literature. 
Prerequisites: MUSI 1 13, 213, and 413. (DEMAND) 

MUSI 114, 124, 134, 144, 154, 164. Applied Music Secondary I Credit 1(0-1) 

This course is semi-private or class study on a secondary instrument. Students whose principal 
performing medium is voice or one of the orchestral instruments are required to study the 
piano as the secondary instrument. Students whose principal performing medium is the piano 
may choose either voice or an orchestral instrument as the secondary instrument. Piano students 
pursuing the music education curriculum with a choral concentration must study voice as the 
secondary applied area. Emphasis is placed on the development of sound basic performance 
technique. May be repeated for credit. Two semesters are required. (F;S) 

MUSI 214, 224, 234, 244, 254 or 264. Applied Music Secondary II Credit 1(0-1) 

This course includes continued development of basic performance skills that were begun in 
MUSI 114. Attention will be given to preparation for the comprehensive examination on the 
secondary instrument required of all students. (F;S) 

PIANO 

Requirements for Admission- Applicants must perform representative Classical works from 
major keyboard periods (Baroque, Classical, Romantic, 20* Century or Contemporary). Tech- 
nical exercises such as scales and arpeggios may also be requested. 

MUSI 163. Principal Applied Piano Credit 2(0-2) 

This course includes a three-part invention by Bach; a movement of a Sonata by Haydn, Mozart, 
or Beethoven; a work of moderate difficulty by a Romantic composer; scales and arpeggios in 
parallel or contrary motion at a moderately rapid tempo; and sight-reading. (F;S) 

MUSI 260. Accompanying Credit 1(0-2) 

This course includes analysis and practice in piano accompaniment of singers and 
instrumentalists; sight-reading and transposition; discussion of style and performance; experience 
in public performance. May be repeated for credit each semester. Prerequisite. Consent of 
instructor. (DEMAND) 

MUSI 263. Principal Applied Piano Credit 2(0-2) 

This course includes a prelude and fugue from the Well Tempered Clavier by Bach; completion 
of the Sonata started in 163; a work from the Romantic school; a work written since 1900; 
scales and arpeggios at rapid tempo; and sight reading. (F;S) 

MUSI 463. Principal Applied Piano Credit 2(0-2) 

This course includes dance forms from French suites or parties by Bach; a sonata by Haydn, 
Mozart or Beethoven one movement memorized; a work from the Romantic school; a 
contemporary work; and sight reading. (F;S) 



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MUSI 563. Principal Applied Piano Credit 2(0-2) 

This course includes a prelude and fugue from the Well-Tempered Clavier by Bach, a sonata by 
Haydn, Mozart, or Beethoven, one movement memorized; a work from the Romantic school; a 
contemporary work; and sight reading. (F;S) 

VOICE 

Requirements for admission: The voice applicant must demonstrate the ability to read stan- 
dard Western musical notation, match pitches and replicate dictated patterns. An English Lan- 
guage art song in required, however other language performances will be considered. 

MUSI 120. Music Diction I Credit 1(0-2) 

This course is designed to familiarize the voice student with the pronunciation of the English 
and Italian languages through the study and use of the International Phonetic Alphabet. (F) 

MUSI 121. Music Diction II Credit 1(0-2) 

This course is designed to familiarize the voice student with the pronunciation of the German 
and French languages through the study and use of the International Phonetic Alphabet. (S) 

MUSI 153. Principal Applied Voice Credit 2(0-2) 

1 . Competencies: Correct posture, breathing habits, phrasing, various five-note scales, diction. 

2. Studies: Simple English and Italian art songs, folk songs, spirituals. 

3. Solos: Six songs in English and Italian to be memorized each semester. Representative 
composers: Scarlatti, Handel, Purcell. 

MUSI 253. Principal Applied Voice Credit 2(0-2) 

1 . Competencies: Correct posture, breathing habits, phrasing, diction, scales and arpeggios. 

2. Studies: English and Italian art songs, German art songs, folk songs, spirituals. 

3. Solos: English songs in English, Italian, and German to be memorized each semester. 
Representative composers: Durante, Scarlatti, Schumann. 

MUSI 259. Singing for Actors Credit 2(2-0) 

This course will present instruction in the development of singing techniques as presented in 
the "Broadway" theatrical style. The focus is placed upon the relationship between singing and 
speaking, designed to enhance understanding and performance presentation of both. Emphasis 
is placed on breath control, resonance (vowels), articulation (consonants); exploration and 
expansion of individual voice quality; range intonation and vocalization. Literature studies 
will be selected from that which is characteristic in genre of the Broadway theatrical style. 
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. (F) 

MUSI 453. Principal Applied Voice Credit 2(0-2) 

1 . Competencies : Continuation of 2 1 3 . 

2. Studies: English and Italian art songs, German songs, French art songs, folk songs and 
spirituals. 

3. Solos: Nine songs in English, Italian, German, and French to be memorized each semes- 
ter. Representative composers: Schumann, Schubert, Strauss, Faure, Britten, Mozart. 

MUSI 553. Principal Applied Voice Credit 2(0-2) 

1 . Competencies: Continuation of 413 with emphasis on preparation for senior recital. 

2. Studies: Continuation of 413 with more intricate scales and arpeggios. 

3. Solos: 10 songs in English, German, Italian, and French to be memorized. Representa- 
tive composers: Wolf, Schumann, Faure, Verdi, Britten, Handel, Debussy. 



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PERCUSSIONS 

Requirements for Admission: The candidate shall demonstrate satisfactory performing abil- 
ity in at least one of the following areas of percussion: 

Performance: Snare drum, Xylophone, marimba and timpani. These competencies will 
include: 

1 . The ability to perform a solo. 

2. The ability to perform an excerpt from a book in which the applicant has studied that will 
demonstrate musicianship and technical skill. 

3. The ability to play at sight representative literature which is characteristic of the instrument. 

4. Previous ensemble in band and/or orchestra. Additional competencies for snare drum: 

a. Basic knowledge of rudiments. 

b. The performance of a Sousa march or the equivalent. 

Additional competencies for xylophone marimba: The ability to play major scales through 
4 flats and 4 sharps in one octave. 

Additional competencies for timpani: 

a. Basic knowledge of timpani techniques. 

b. A thorough knowledge of the range of each timpani. 

MUSI 143, 243. Principal Applied Percussions 

1. Competencies: 

a. Snare Drum: Fundamentals, military techniques, reading and control. 

b. Mallets: Fundamentals, reading technique-musical orientation. 

2. Studies: Price, Beginning Snare Drum; Goldeberg, Mallet Instruments; Stone, Stack Con- 
trol; Bower, Drum Method; Gardner, Modern Method, Book 1, Stone, Mallet Control. 

3. Solos: Wilcaxon, Rudimental Solos; Price, Exhibition Drum Solo; Colgrass, Advanced 
Snare Drum Solo; Brever Easy -Medium Mallet Solos; Stone, Military Drum Beats. 

MUSI 443, 543. Principal Applied Percussions 

1 . Competencies: 

a. Snare Drum: Fine control, orchestra techniques. 

b. Mallets: Reading, advanced techniques, tambourine, castanets, brass drum, and 
cymbals. 

c. Timpani: Kettle technique, tuning exercises and control. 

d. Latin- American Instruments. 

e. Percussion: 'Trap" techniques, tambourine, castanets, brass drum, and cymbals. Basic 
skills on each. 

2. Studies: Price, Techniques and Exercises for Triangle, Tambourine and Castanets; Brewer, 
Daily Studies; Goldenberg, Mallet Instruments. Goodman, Timpani Method-Fresia, Tim- 
pani Method- Tourte, Snare Drum Technique; Gardner, Modern Method, Book II, Mallets, 
Chopin, Advanced Techniques for the Modern Drummer. 

3. Solos: McKenzie, Graded Timpani Solos; Britton, Timpani Solo-Hart, Timpani Solos; Price, 
Unaccompanied Timpani Solos; Brewer, 3 and 4 Mallet Solos, Quick 3 and 4 Mallet Solos; 
Stone Rudimental Drum Solos; Duets and Quintets. 



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WIND INSTRUMENTS 

Requirements for Admission-The candidate shall show evidence of the following: 

1 . Basic development in embouchure and articulation. 

2. Knowledge of fingering and alternates. 

3. Satisfactory tone quality and control. 

4. Ability to play major scales through 4 flats and 4 sharps, in eight notes (M.M.=72) and 
the chromatic scale both slurred and articulated. 

5. Minimum-Two octave range. 

6. Ability to play a simple song demonstrating musicianship which includes phrasing and 
expression. 

7. Previous study in the equivalent of the Rubank Advanced Method. 

8. Previous ensemble experience in band and/or orchestra. 

9. Ability to play at sight representative literature which is characteristic of the instrument. 

MUSI 113-1, 213-1. Principal Applied Trumpet 

1 . Competencies: Breathing; elementary embouchure and tone production; tonguing as ap- 
plied to various articulations; coordination of tone production habits through progressive 
major and minor scales; practical problems of artistic performance. 

2. Studies: "Studies: Arban's selected studies; selected studies by Getchell, Hovey, Hering 
and Clarke." 

3. Literature-Selected from NIMAC-Music Educator's National Conference. 

MUSI 413-1, 513-1. Principal Applied Trumpet 

1. Competencies: Intonation; embouchure techniques; breath control and tone quality; ar- 
ticulation; reading; style; performance techniques. 

2. Studies: Rubank, Advanced Method, Arbam Cumpleti Method for Trumpet, Fischer; Laube 
- CIB Contest Album; Bantold-Orchestral Excerpts. 

3. Literature: Selected from NIMAC-Music Educator's National Conference. 

MUSI 113-2, 213-2. Principal Applied French Horn 

1. Competencies: Breathing, embouchure and tone production; tonguing; progressive ma- 
jor and minor scale technique; practical problems of artistic performance. 

2. Studies: Rubank, Intermediate Method for French Horn; Modern Pares Foundation. 

3. Studies: Whistler, Daily Exercises for French Horn, Pottag. 

4. Literature: Selected from NIMAC-Music Educator's National Conference. 

MUSI 413-2, 513-2. Principal Applied French Horn 

1. Competencies: Intonation, embouchure techniques, breath control and tone quality; ar- 
ticulations; reading; style; performance techniques. 

2. Studies: Rubank, Advanced Method for French Horn. 

3. Literature: Selected from NIMAC-Music Educator's National Conference. 

MUSI 123-1, 223-1. Principal Applied Trombone-Euphonium 

1 . Competencies: Breathing, elementary embouchure and tone production- tonguing as ap- 
plied to various instruments, coordination of tone production habits through progressive 
major and minor scales; practical problems of artistic performances. 

2. Studies: Trombone and Baritone, Arbans-Prescott Method for Trombone-Baritone-Carl 
Fisher, Inc., Rubank Intermediate Method for Trombone-Baritone. Skornicka and Boltz 
Rubank, Rubank, Inc. Modern Pares Foundation. Studies for Trombone and Bariton- 
Whistler. 

3. Literature: Selected from NIMAC-Music Educator's National Conference. 



326 



MUSI 423-1, 523-1. Principal Applied Trombone-Euphonium 

1. Competencies: Intonation, embouchure techniques; breath control and tone quality; ar- 
ticulations; reading; style; performance techniques. 

2. Studies: Rubank, Advanced Method for Trombone and Baritone. 

3. Literature: Selected from NIMAC-Music Educator's National Conference. 

MUSI 123-2, 223-2. Principal Applied Tuba 

1 . Competencies: Breathing, elementary embouchure and tone production; tonguing as ap- 
plied to various instruments coordination of tone production habits through progressive 
major and minor scales; practical problems of artistic performances. 

2. Studies: Tuba, Rubank Intermediate Method for Brass -Skornicka and Bolts, Rubank 
Inc. First Book of Practical Studies for Tuba-Hovey N. Beiwin, Inc. Vandercook Etudes 
for Bass-Rubank Inc. 

3. Literature: Selected from NIMAC-Music Educator's National Conference. 

MUSI 423-2, 513-2. Principal Applied Tuba 

1. Competencies: Intonation, embouchure techniques breath control and tone quality; ar- 
ticulation; reading; style, performance techniques. 

2. Studies: Rubank, Advanced Method for Tuba. 

3. Literature: Selected from NIMAC-Music Educator's National Conference. 

MUSI 113-1. Principal Applied Flute 

1 . Competencies: Major and minor scales through 5 sharps and 5 flats. Emphasis on finger- 
ing and tonal development. 

2. Studies: Soussmann, Complete Method for Flute; Anderson, 24 Progressive Studies, Op. 33. 

3. Literature: Bizet, Minuet; Mozart, Adagio; Handel, Sonatas. 

MUSI 233-1. Principal Applied Flute 

1. Competencies: All Major and Minor scales throughout the practical performing range. 
Emphasis on sight-reading. 

2. Studies: Cavally, Melodious and Progressive Studies for Flute Soussmann. 

3. Literature: Bach, Suite in B. Minor; Mozart, concertos. 

MUSI 433-1. Principal Applied Flute 

1. Competencies: Continued scale study, emphasis on performing literature. 

2. Studies: Soussman-Moyse, Flute Studies. 

3. Literature: Bach, Sonatas; Debussy, Syrinx. 

MUSI 533-1. Principal Applied Flute 

1. Competencies: Recital preparation. 

2. Studies: Schmitd, Orchestral Studies. 

3. Literature: Chaminade, Concertino, Hindemith, Sonata. 

MUSI 133-2. Principal Applied Oboe 

1 . Competencies: Major and Minor scales through 5 sharps and 5 flats. Emphasis on finger- 
ing and tonal development. 

2. Studies: Ferling, 144 Preludes and Studies; Barrett, Completed Method for Oboe. 

3. Literature: Franck, Piece V, Piece in G. Minor; Handel, Sonatas. 

MUSI 233-2. Principal Applied Oboe 

1. Competencies: All major and minor scales throughout the practical performing range. 
Emphasis on sight reading. Reed adjustment. 

2. Studies: Barret, Method: Tustin, Technical Studies. 

3. Literature: Schumann, Three Romances: Telemann, Concerto in F Minor. 



327 



MUSI 433-2. Principal Applied Oboe 

1. Competencies: Continued scale study, emphasis on performing literature. Reed-Making. 

2. Studies: Tustin, Studies; Prestin. 

3. Literature: Handel, Sonata in G. Minor, Goosens, Concerto. 

MUSI 533-2. Principal Applied Oboe 

1. Competencies: Continued emphasis on performing literature. 

2. Studies: Orchestral Literature. 

MUSI 133-3. Principal Applied Clarinet 

1. Competencies: Major and Minor scales through 5 Sharps and 5 flats. Emphasis on fin- 
gerings and tonal development. 

2. Studies: Klose Celebrated Method for Clarinet and Rose 32 Etudes. 

3. Literature: Stubbins, Recital Literature for the Clarinet, Vol. II. 

MUSI 233-3. Principal Applied Clarinet 

1. Competencies: All major and minor scales throughout the practical performing range. 
Emphasis on sight reading. Reed adjustment. 

2. Klose, Rose 40 Etudes. 

3. Literature: Stubbins, Recital Literature, Vols. I and II. 

MUSI 433-3. Principal Applied Clarinet 

1. Competencies: Continued scale study, emphasis on performing literature. 

2. Studies: Baermann, Method for Clarinet; Jean Jean, 18 Etudes de Perfectionnemen. 

3. Literature: Stubbins, Recital Literature, Vol. Ill (The Concertos). 

MUSI 533-3. Principal Applied Clarinet 

1. Competencies: Recital preparation. 

MUSI 133-4. Principal Applied Saxophone 

1 . Competencies: Major and minor scales through 5 sharps and 5 flats. Emphasis on finger- 
ings and tonal development. 

2. Studies: DeVille, Universal Method; Ebdressen, Endrejen, Supplementary Studies. 

3. Literature: Handel, Sonatas. 

MUSI 233-4. Principal Applied Saxophone 

1 . Competencies: All Major and Minor scales through the practical performing range. Em- 
phasis on sight reading. Reed adjustment. 

2. Studies: DeVille; Rascher, Top Tones for Saxophone. 

3. Literature: Bozza, Aria, Casadesus, Romance. 

4. Studies: Baermann- Jean Jean, Orchestral Studies. 

5. Literature: Bernstein, Sonata; Debussy, Rapsodie. 

MUSI 433-4. Principal Applied Saxophone 

1 . Competencies: Continued scale study, emphasis on performing literature. Introduction to 
jazz improvising. 

2. Studies: DeVille; Rascher, 158 Saxophone Exercises. 

3. Literature: Creston, Sonata, Debussy, Rapsodie-Fasch Sonata; Music Minus one Saxo- 
phone. 

MUSI 533-4. Principal Applied Saxophone 

1. Competencies: Recital preparation. 

2. Studies: Traler-Lazarus, Virtuoso Studies. 

3. Literature: Bozza, Scaramouche. 



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MUSI 133-5. Principal Applied Bassoon 

1 . Competencies: Major and Minor scales through 5 sharps and 5 flats. Emphasis on finger- 
ings and tonal development. 

2. Studies: McDowell, Practical Studies, Book I; Kovar, 24 Daily Exercises; Wessen- bom, 
Practical Method Bassoon. 

MUSI 233-5. Principal Applied Bassoon 

1. Competencies: All Major and Minor scales throughout the practical playing range. Em- 
phasis on sight reading. Reed adjustment and making. 

2. Studies: Wesseborn, Method for Bassoon; Kovar, 24 Daily Exercises; McDowell, Practi- 
cal Studies, Book II 

3. Rep. Literature Telemann, Sonata in F Minor, Weber Concerto in F (Slow Movement) 

MUSI 433-5. Principal Applied Bassoon 

1. Competencies: Continued scale study, emphasis on performing literature. 

2. Studies: Pierne, Concert Piece, Galliard, Sonatas, Mozart Concerto. 

MUSI 533-5. Principal Applied Bassoon 

1. Competencies: Recital preparation. Orchestral Studies. 

2. Studies: Orchestra Passages. 

3. Literature: Hindemith, Sonata. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

MUSI 609. Music in Early Childhood Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is a conceptual approach to the understanding of musical elements, and understanding 
of the basic activities in music in early childhood; modern trends in music education; and 
Kodaly and Orff methods. (DEMAND) 

MUSI 610. Music in Elementary School Today Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is the study of music in the elementary school curriculum creating a musical 
environment in the classroom; child voice in singing, selection and presentation of rote songs; 
development of rhythmic and melodic expressions; directed listening; experimentation with 
percussion and simple melodic instruments; criteria for utilization of notational elements; and 
analysis of instrumental materials. (DEMAND) 

MUSI 611. Music in the Secondary School Today Credit 3(3-0) 

This includes techniques of vocal and instrumental music instruction in the junior and senior 
high schools; the general music class; the organization, administration and supervision of music 
programs, as well as music in the humanities. This course includes the adolescent's voice and 
its care; the testing and classification of voices; operetta production; the instrumental program; 
and training glee clubs, choirs, bands, and instrumental ensembles. (DEMAND) 

MUSI 614. Choral Conducting of School Music Groups Credit 2(0-4) 

This course includes rehearsal techniques; balance, blend and relationship of parts to the total 
ensemble; analysis and interpretation of literature appropriate for use in school at all levels of 
ability; and conducting experience with laboratory group. (DEMAND) 

MUSI 616. Instrumental Conducting of School Music Groups Credit 2(0-4) 

This course includes rehearsal techniques; balance blend and relationship of parts to the total 
ensemble; analysis and interpretation of literature appropriate for use in school groups at all 
levels of ability; and conducting experience with laboratory group. (DEMAND) 

MUSI 618. Psychology of Music Credit 3(2-2) 

This course is the study of physical and psychological properties of musical sounds and the 
responses of the human organism to musical stimuli. (S) 

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MUSI 620. Advanced Music Appreciation Credit 3(2-2) 

Analytic studies of larger forms from all branches of music writing will be included. Special 
emphasis on style and structural procedures by principal composers; works taken from all 
periods in music history. Designed for students with previous study of music appreciation. 
(DEMAND) 

RESEARCH 

MUSI 551. Independent Study in Music Credit 3(0-6) 

This is a mentored independent research project, progressing from the proposal stage through 
final reporting and jury evaluation, devised by the student in consultation with a music faculty 
advisor. Prerequisites: Permission of selected faculty advisor and Division Coordinator, and 
junior or senior academic classification. (S;SS) 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY 

Hoyt Andres Adjunct Assistant Professor 

B.M., Furman University; M.M., University of Cincinnati; D.M.A., University of North Caro- 
lina at Greensboro 

Sonya Bennett-Brown Adjunct Instructor 

B.M., Salem College, M.M., North Carolina School of the Arts 

Jeff Calissi Adjunct Instructor 

B.A., Radford University, M.M. and D.M.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Vanessa Cornett-Murtada Adjunct Assistant Professor 

B.M. and M.M., West Virginia University, D.M.A., University of North Carolina at Greens- 
boro 

Ann Curtis Ajunct Instructor 

B.M., Baldwin- Wallace College, M.M., University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Michael D. Day Associate Professor 

B.F.A., and M.M., University of South Dakota; D.M.A., University of Arizona 

John Henry Assistant Professor (On Leave) 

B.M.E., M.M.E., University of Akron 

Jerrye Mooring Adjunct Instructor 

B.A., North Carolina Central University, M.M., East Carolina University 

Kenneth Ruff Instructor 

B.S., NC A&T State University, M.M.E. and Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Greens- 
boro 

William C. Smiley Professor 

B.M.E., Jackson State College; M.S., University of Illinois; Ed.D., University of North Caro- 
lina at Greensboro 

William Trice Adjunct Instructor 

B.A., Morehouse College, M.M., East Carolina University 

C. Mondre Moffett Adjunct Instructor 

B.A., New College of California, M.A., New York University, Further study NY University 



330 



Theatre Arts Program 

www.ncattheatre.org 
Frankie Day, Chairperson 

OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the Theatre Arts Program are as follows: 

1 . to teach students how to use theatre as a means of self-expression, awareness, and discipline, 

2. to acquaint students with the great works of the theatre through reading and producing them, 

3. to prepare students for professional careers in acting and technology, 

4. to prepare students for admission into graduate schools, 

5. to convey the skills necessary to promote theatre as a means of enhancing culture in the 
community, and, 

6. to assist students in developing the skills necessary to participate in global Theatre 
opportunities through studies of the histories and cultures of selected peoples, participate in 
plays, and meetings with dramatists, actors, artists, and intellectuals from other countries 
and cultures. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Professional Theatre - Bachelor of Fine Arts 
(Options: Acting and Theatre Technology) 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

1 . Admission is based upon the general admission requirements of the University. All ma- 
jors must maintain a minimum grade point average of 2.0. If your GPA drops below 2.0 
you will not be cast for any productions or given crew assignments until your GPA is 2.0 
or better. Recommendations will be made by your academic advisor to attend tutorial 
sessions. 

2. Students must pass an annual juried evaluation in acting or technology. The evaluation 
will be based on the improvement in creativity, technique, attitude, and determination. 

3. The fulfillment of acting, audition, and crew assignments - except when advance exemp- 
tions by faculty have been granted - is expected. 

4. Transfer students with previous training will be evaluated by the faculty, who might ex- 
empt the student from certain requirements. The exemptions will depend on demonstrated 
ability and experience. 

5. The students must earn at least a "C" in all theatre courses listed on the curriculum guide 
in his/her concentration. 

6. Anyone showing a fundamental weakness in an area of study might be requested by the 
Theatre Arts Program Chair to take additional course work in the area. 

7. Active participation is expected in at least two of the following organizations: The Rich- 
ard B. Harrison Players, Alpha Psi Omega, NCTC, SETC, the Black Theatre Network, or 
the National Association of Dramatic and Speech Arts. 

8. All students under the acting concentration must audition for all main stage productions, 
faculty directed studio productions and the Richard B. Harrison Players. 

9. All students must participate in load-ins and strikes of all main stage productions — un- 
less excused beforehand by the executive director of theatre, theatre arts program chair, 
the director of the play, or the technical director. 



331 



10. Only graduating seniors will be allowed to appear in off-campus commercial produc- 
tions. Exceptions for students other than seniors will be considered once the following 
steps have been completed: (1) The student submits a letter to the theatre program chair 
stating the producing organization in which he/she is wanting to work, his/her time com- 
mitment to the project, the reason he/she wishes to participate in the project and the 
benefits he/she will receive; (2) An interview with the theatre chair to review current 
GPA, completed course work, class attendance, past and present theatre participation; (3) 
An interview with the faculty who will then make the final decision. 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

THE B.F.A IN PROFESSIONAL THEATRE 

(Option: Acting) 

In order to become a candidate for the B.F.A. with an option in Acting, the student must: 

1 . Make as least a