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Agriculture and 
Agri-Food Canada 

Research 
Branch 



Agriculture et 
Agroalimentaire Canada 

Direction generale 
de la recherche 




Canada's Animal Genetic Resources: 
Cattle Breeds in Canada 



March 1997 







Canada 



Canada's Animal Genetic Resources: 
Cattle Breeds in 



EDITORS: J. N. B. SHRESTHA^ and C. HANSEN 

ANIMAL GERMPLASM CONSERVATION AND RESEARCH UNIT 

CENTRE FOR FOOD AND ANIMAL RESEARCH 
OTTAWA, ONTARIO 
CANADA, K1A 0C6 



Technical Bulletin 1998-2E 

Centre for Food and Animal Research contribution number 98-04. 



RESEARCH BRANCH 

AGRICULTURE AND AGRI-FOOD CANADA 

1998 



Present address: 



Present address: 



Dairy and Swine Research and Development Centre 

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada 

2000 Route 108 East, P. O. Box 90 

Lennoxville, PQ, Canada J1M 2A2. 

The School of Veterinary Science and Animal Production 

The University of Queensland 

Gatton College, QLD 4345, Australia. 



First Edition: March 1997 

© Minister of Public Works and Government Services Canada 1998 
Cat. No. A54-8/1998-2E 
ISBN 0-662-26594-7 



Disclaimer: 

The information contained in this publication does not indicate 
support or endorsement by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. 



PREFACE 



The first National Workshop on Conservation of Animal 
Germplasm in November, 1990 recommended that the Research Branch 
of Agriculture Canada should play a leading role in the conservation of 
animal genetic resources. This came as a result of the Branch's 
mandate in research, the availability of scientific expertise in 
genetics and cryopreservation as well as the availability of live 
animal resources at various locations across Canada. At that time, it 
was recognized that animal genetic resources in Canada should be 
catalogued by establishing a data bank capable of networking with 
similar data banks in other organizations and other countries. In 
response to this recommendation, the Centre for Food and Animal 
Research (CFAR) is therefore assembling inventories of Canada's 
animal genetic resources. 

This Publication documents the inventory of cattle breeds in 
Canada. It continues a series started earlier which now also includes 
goat, sheep and swine breeds in Canada. There are a large number of 
cattle breeds in Canada and the resources required to survey all of 
the relevant breeders would be monumental. It was decided 

therefore, that only owners of the less populous cattle breeds would 
be contacted. As a result, this Publication contains a brief 
description of all cattle breeds found in Canada but only includes the 
detailed information provided by cattle breeders who own animals of 
some of the less populous breeds. We value their willingness to help 
us in developing this public domain database and catalogue. Only 
breeders that have provided a consent to Agriculture and Agri-Food 
Canada for the disclosure of their information are included in the 
detailed listing. 

While all known breeders of the less populous cattle breeds in 
Canada were surveyed, some may have been unintentionally excluded. 
Breeders with less populous cattle breeds who have not been included 
are welcome to participate in future editions. Although the statistics 
associated with cattle breeds change rapidly due to calving, purchase, 
sale and mortality, the numbers presented can be used as a guideline 
to determine the status of cattle genetic resources in Canada. This 
information will be useful in developing strategies to prevent the 
erosion of genetic diversity in our domestic animal species in the 
future. 






Dr. Andre C. Lachance, Director 

Centre for Food and Animal Research 

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0C6 (Canada) 



Copies of this publication may be obtained from: 



Dr. Andre C. Lachance, Director 
Centre for Food and Animal Research 
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada 
Central Experimental Farm 
Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0C6 (Canada) 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

The Centre acknowledges the help, information and critical review 
provided by the Cattle Breed Associations in Canada. The authors wish 
to thank Mr. Bruce E. Hunt, General Manager, Canadian Livestock Records 
Corporation for valuable information on registrations. 



INTRODUCTION 



This Publication consists mainly of information derived from sources 
in Canada. When breed characteristics and performance statistics 
were not available, information from the United States and Europe 
were used. The data on milk yield, body weights and measurements 
tend to vary from country to country and with management procedures. 
Similarly, skilful breeding practices and natural selection have 
shaped the breeds to what they are today. A number of breeds that 
started as dual or triple purpose breeds have thus evolved into the 
specific beef or dairy breeds of the present. Information on breed 
description and registrations provided by the breed associations 
listed with the breed have been very helpful in defining unique 
Canadian characteristics of these breeds. Information on some of the 
composite breeds developed in Canada that do not have a breed 
association or are not represented in the General Stud and Herd Book 
have not been included. 



CONTENTS 



Angus 










1 


Aubrac 








.. 




.. 


2 


Ayrshire 








.. 




.. 


3 


Belgian Blue 








.. 






4 


Blonde d'Aquitaine 












. . 


5 


Brown Swiss and Braunvieh 








. . 




• • • • 


6 


Canadiennne 










• • ■ • 




• • • • 


7 


Charolais 










» • * • 






8 


Chianina 










■ ■ ■ • 




• • ■ a 


9 


Devon 










■ ■ • • 




■ ■ * ■ 


10 


Dexter 










• ■ • • 




■ • • • 


1 1 


Dutch Belted 










• • • • 




• ■ ■ ■ 


12 


Eringer 










• ■ • ■ 




■ • • 


13 


Galloway 










■ • 




* • • 


14 


Gasconne 










• • • 




• • • 


15 


Gelbvieh 










• ■ • 






16 


Guernsey 










■ • • 




• • 


17 


Hays Converter 










• • • 




• ■ • 


18 


Hereford 










• • • 






1 9 


Highland 










• • ■ 




■ • • 


20 


Holstein 










• • ■ 




■ • • 


21 


Jersey 










• 




• • a 


22 


Kerry 










. 




• • 


23 


Limousin 










■ ■ ■ 






24 


Lincoln Red 














. 


25 


Luing 










• • • 




• ■ ■ 


26 


Maine-Anjou 










• • ■ 




• • • 


27 


Marchigiana-Romagnola ... 








• 




. . ■ 


28 


Meuse-Rhine-ljssel 








* ■ ■ 




. 


29 


Murray Grey 










• • • 




. 


30 


Normande 
















31 


Parthenais 
















32 


Piedmontese 
















33 


Pinzgauer 










• ■ ■ ■ 






34 


Red Poll 
















35 


Salers 
















36 


Santa Gertudis 
















37 


Shorthorn 
















38 


Simmental 
















39 



CONTENTS 



South Devon 
Tarentaise 
Texas Longhorn 
Welsh Black 
White Park 



BACKGROUND INFORMATION 

DIRECTORY OF BREEDERS WITH RARE BREEDS 

RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 

SUMMARY OF CATTLE BREEDS IN CANADA 



40 
41 
42 
43 
44 

45 

46 
55 
94 



ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THIS PUBLICATION 



NZ 

UK 

A.I. 

CIAQ 

CLRC 

DHIA 

EBI 

ODHIC 

PATLQ 

PATBQ 

ROP 



New Zealand 
United Kingdom 



SA 

USA 



South Africa 

United States of America 



Artificial insemination 

Centre d'insemination artificielle du Quebec Inc. 

Canadian Livestock Records Corp. 

Dairy Herd Improvement Association 

Eastern Breeders Inc. 

Ontario Dairy Herd Improvement Corporation 

Programme d'analyse des troupeaux laitiers du Quebec 

Programme d'analyse des troupeaux bovins du Quebec 

Record of performance program 



DESCRIPTION OF TERMS 



Adult 
Calf 

Availability 
Breeding stock 
inter se breeding 



Animal older than one year of age 

Animal up to one year of age 

Cattle for sale 

Yes' indicates farm produces animals for breeding 

random mating 



Percentage animals Non-purebred cattle in the process of being graded up 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada - Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada 



http://www.archive.org/details/canadasanimalgenOOotta 



ANGUS 

Organized 1906. Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, May 4, 1906. 

Canadian Aberdeen Angus Association 
Doug Fee, General Manager 

Room 214, 6715-8th Street N.E. 

Calgary, AB T2E 7H7 

Phone: (403) 571-3580 

Fax: (403) 571-3599 

email: cdnangus@cadvision.com 

The origin of the Angus breed can be traced back to Angus Doddies and Buchan 
Humlies cattle around the year 1790 in the Scottish counties of Aberdeen and 
Angus. Initially a Herd Book, established in 1862, included the Polled 
Galloway, but by 1867 the breed was officially known as the Aberdeen Angus. 
Although some Angus cattle arrived in Montreal in 1860, credit for the first 
productive importation is given to Professor William Brown of the Ontario 
Agricultural College who imported a bull and two cows from Scotland in 1876. 
The Canadian Aberdeen Angus Association was formed 30 years later. 
Canadian Angus cattle are polled and both black and red in colour. Red Angus 
have been included in the Herd Book since 1968. Though a beef animal, the 
Angus cow is recognized for early maturity, mothering ability and milk 
production. Angus cattle are considered a popular breed with ranchers because 
of their ability to thrive in rough grazing conditions and to fatten quickly on 
low cost rations. These cattle produce a superior carcass with optimal rib eyes, 
good marbling and high dressing percentage. The average age of heifer at first 
breeding is 13 months. Mature bulls often weigh 1200 kg and cows 725 kg. The 
number of memberships and registrations has been steadily increasing. 

Number of members and registrations on a five yearly basis. 



Year 


Members 


Registrations 


Year 


Members 


Registrations 


1920 


637 


2893 


1960 


1501 


11224 


1925 


746 


1815 


1965 


2183 


18549 


1930 


482 


1659 


1970 


2020 


17867 


1935 


237 


1546 


1975 


2193 


14517 


1940 


303 


2366 


1980 


2251 


20387 


1945 


608 


4162 


1985 


2184 


14588 


1950 


837 


5919 


1990 


2195 


22164 


1955 


1187 


9024 


1995 


2558 


32523 



AUBRAC 

Entered into the General Stud and Herd Book, October 31, 1978. 

General Stud and Herd Book 
Bruce Hunt, Secretary 

2417 Holly Lane 
Ottawa, ON K1V 0M7 
Phone: (613) 731-7110 
Fax: (613) 731-0704 

email: clrc@clrc.on.ca 

The origin of the Aubrac breed can be traced back to a Benedictine abbey in 
Aveyron-Lozere, France. These cattle were originally a triple purpose breed 
developed in the 17th century. In the 19th century Durham Shorthorns, 
Scottish Highlands, Red North Devon and Brown Swiss bulls were mated to 
Aubrac cows to improve the performance of the breed. During that period, 
Aubrac cattle were used for milk production and as draft animals. In 1914, a 
breed society was formed in France. The number of Aubrac cattle began to 
decline thereafter and in 1976 the Aubrac was identified as one of the first 
breeds to be subjected to a government conservation program. As a result, the 
population increased considerably, but later came close to disaster when the 
herd was found to be infected with brucellosis. These cattle are fawn to brown 
in colour. Today, Aubrac cattle are primarily a beef-type breed. Aubrac cows are 
usually bred to Charolais bulls to produce suckler herds. In 1976, a bull and the 
two cows of the Aubrac breed were first imported into Canada from France. 
This was followed two years later with an additional bull and four cows. The 
average yearly production of a mature cow is approximately 2200 kg of milk 
containing 4.1% butterfat. Mature bulls weigh on average 1000 kg and cows 634 
kg. Only a few of these animals are found in Canada and most of the 
importations have been fairly recent. Since 1979, there have been no 
registrations. To date, a total of nine cattle have been registered in the General 
Stud and Herd Book. 

Number of registrations. 



Year Registrations 



1978 3 

1979 4 



AYRSHIRE 

Organized March 10, 1898, by amalgamation of the Canada Ayrshire Breeders' and Importers' 

Association, established 1870 and the Dominion Ayrshire Breeders' Association, established 

1872. Incorporated under Ontario Agricultural and Arts Act, 1887. Incorporated, Live Stock 

Pedigree Act, January 1, 1901. 

Ayrshire Breeders' Association of Canada 
Yvon Rioux, Secretary-Manager 

P.O. Box 188 

Ste. Anne de Bellevue, PQ H9X ICO 

Phone: (514) 398-7970 

Fax: (514) 398-7972 



The origin of the Ayrshire breed can be traced back to the Dunlop breed of dairy 
cattle around the mid-seventeenth century in the Scottish county of Ayr. It is 
highly probable that these descended from the Dutch and "Teeswater" cattle 
and, to a much lesser extent, the Channel Island breeds. In 1821, the Governor 
General Lord Dalhousie first imported the breed into Canada. Ayrshire cattle 
are known as a dairy breed. The breed is characterized by their red and white 
markings. Uniformity of type, straight backs, symmetry of form, excellent 
balance and attachment of the udder are prized. Ayrshire cattle are good grazers 
and more hardy than the common dairy breeds. Cows produce high-quality 
milk and good meat at low levels of nutrition. They exhibit admirable drought 
tolerance. The average yearly production of a mature cow is approximately 
6647 kg of milk containing 4.04% butterfat and 3.38% protein (PATLQ Official 
Test, 1996). Mature bulls weigh up to 900 kg and cows 560 kg. The number of 
memberships and registrations has been decreasing in the last 10 years. 

Number of members and registrations on a five yearly basis. 



Year 


Members 


Registrations 


Year 


Members Registrations 


1920 


1912 


7633 


1960 


1701 


11266 


1925 


1515 


6083 


1965 


1487 


9613 


1930 


1734 


9688 


1970 


1258 


10229 


1935 


1867 


8667 


1975 


1021 


8319 


1940 


1898 


9230 


1980 


1663 


10320 


1945 


2250 


12133 


1985 


1342 


10788 


1950 


2515 


13567 


1990 


1099 


9812 


1955 


2051 


11542 


1995 


804 


8812 (8223+589)* 



* Purebred and percentage animals. 



- 3 - 



BELGIAN BLUE 

Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, October 1, 1986. 

Canadian Belgian Blue Association 

Joanne Currie, Secretary-Treasurer 

R.R. No. 1 

Inglewood, ON LON 1K0 

Phone: (905) 838-0073 

Fax: (905) 838-3869 

The Belgian Blue breed, also known as the Witblauw or Blanc-Bleu, originated 
in Belgium. Beginning in 1840, Shorthorn bulls from Britain and Dutch Black 
Pied bulls were mated to the local red and red pied cattle of central and 
southern Belgium. These bulls were also crossed with the black and white 
Charleroi cattle of the area. By 1919 a Herd Book was established for the Belgian 
Blue breed of central and upper Belgium. These cattle were originally 
developed as a dual purpose breed, but during the 1960s evolved into an 
extreme beef type. In 1976, Belgian Blue cattle were first imported into Canada. 
These cattle vary in colour from all white to blue, blue roan or pied resulting 
from the Shorthorn parentage. It is a large breed that is early maturing and 
grows rapidly. Its major characteristic is its extreme double muscling. The 
muscling of the shoulders and especially the thighs is most pronounced. This 
characteristic is advantageous in that when used for crossbreeding, a Belgian 
Blue produces more meat, thus enabling a crossbred carcass to grade "AA ' or 
"AAA". Nevertheless, meat from a purebred Belgian Blue is very lean with 
little backfat. Although extremely muscled purebred cows have had difficulties 
calving, this does not occur when Belgian Blue bulls are used as terminal sires. 
The average age of mature cows at first calving is 32 months. The average birth 
weight of the calves is 44 to 48 kg and average daily weight gain is 
approximately 1.42 kg. The average yearly production of a mature cow is 
approximately 3400 kg of milk containing 3.56% butterfat. Mature bulls weigh 
on an average 1200 kg and cows 700 kg. The number of memberships and 
registrations has been increasing. 

Number of members and registrations on a five 
yearly basis. 



Year Members Registrations 



1976 




3 


1980 




3 


1985 




1 


1990 


49 


128 (75+53)* 


1995 


98 


258 (214+44)* 



Purebred and percentage animals. 



- 4 - 



BLONDE D'AQUITAINE 

Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, March 19, 1973 

Canadian Blonde d'Aquitaine Association 
Gerry Winter, Secretary-Manager 

Room 207, 1608 Centre Street, N. 
Calgary, AB T2E 2R9 
Phone: (403) 276-5771 
Fax: (403) 276-7577 

The origin of Blonde d'Aquitaine cattle can be traced back to the sixth century in 
southwest France. At that time these cattle were chosen as draft animals 
because of their muscle development, hardiness and docile temperament. The 
Blonde d'Aquitaine breed as we know it today represents a combination of the 
Garonnais cattle from the plains of Garonne and Quercy cattle from the hills of 
Garonne, two similar meat and draught types with down turned horns, and the 
Blonde des Pyrenees cattle from the Pyrenees mountains. In 1961, these three 
types were combined and officially recognized in 1963 as the Blonde 
d'Aquitaine breed. More recently, this breed nas been developed mainly for the 
production of slaughter calves. These cattle are predominantly cream coloured 
but vary from almost white to dark reddish tan shades showing considerable 
variation due to segregation of genes resulting from the combination of these 
breeds. The Blonde d Aquitaine breed has been subjected to extensive testing 
and genetic evaluation in France. The Blonde d'Aquitaine and the Limousin 
breeds are known to share common ancestors, namely the Quercy cattle. Cattle 
breeders in Canada became interested in the Blonde d'Aquitaine breed because 
of its rapid growth rate, muscling ability, calving ease and docile temperament. 
This resulted in the first importation of two bulls into Canada from France in 
1971, which was followed by subsequent importations of 7 bulls in 1972, 11 bulls 
and 9 cows in 1973, and 8 cows in 1974. The two bulls first imported and others 
that followed went into the stud service and helped propagate the breed across 
Canada. The Blonde d'Aquitaine breed has been selected in Canada for superior 
genetics resulting in increased milk production. The polled influence has been 
added to the breed resulting in another quality which is appealing to cattlemen. 
Today's Blonde d'Aquitaine cattle are renowned for cutability and high dressing 
percentage. The cattle are among the larger cattle breeds with a long body. 
Mature bulls weigh an average of 1200 kg and cows 800 kg. The breed has 
grown steadily since 1971 with the number of registrations increasing. 

Number of registrations on a five yearly basis. 



Year Registrations 



1972 


10 (9+1)* 


1974 


4 


1980 


878 ( 225+653)* 


1985 


1121 ( 558+563)* 


1990 


2506 (1720+786)* 


1995 


2484 (2034+450)* 



* Purebred and percentage animals. 

- 5 



BROWN SWISS AND BRAUNVIEH 

Organized June 12, 1914. Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, June 16, 1914. 

Canadian Brown Swiss and Braunvieh Association 
Bill Prins, Secretary-Treasurer 

350 Speedvale West, Unit 9 
Guelph, ON N1H 7M7 
Phone: (519) 821-2811 
Fax: (519) 821-2723 

Probably the oldest and possibly the purest of all recognized dairy breeds, Brown Swiss descended 
from cattle in the valleys and mountain slopes of Switzerland before historic records began. It 
was here that transmitting ability and certain breed characteristics became so firmly established 
that they mark the breed to this day. In 1888, Brown Swiss cattle were first imported into the 
eastern townships of Quebec from the United States. Although considered a dual purpose breed 
(dairy and beef) in Europe, pioneer North American breeders recognized the breed's great 
potential for milk production and concentrated their efforts on developing a dairy cow. 

These cattle range in colour from light to dark brown with a pale coloured ring around the 
muzzle. The horns are longer than those of the Jersey and grow outwards, forwards and upwards, 
with black tips. The ears are quite large and hairy, and lighter in colour inside. The udder is 
usually light in color with a stripe of light or mealy colour down the back. Cattle are slow 
maturing and more inclined to blockiness and fleshiness than the other dairy breeds. These cattle 
are docile, hardy and possess a good constitution. 

The original breed characteristics including size, ruggedness, strong and sound feet and legs, 
quality udders, thriftiness and gaining ability have been maintained and improved. These quiet, 
docile tempered cows are ideally suited for either the family-sized farm or the large commercial 
operation in any climate. Brown Swiss are hardy and rugged cattle especially adapted to grazing 
in rough territory. These cattle perform well in all climates including the cold north and humid 
regions with high temperature, and at all altitudes. The Brown Swiss breed is found throughout 
Canada and many cattle have been sold to foreign buyers. The average yearly production of a 
mature cow is approximately 6910 kg of milk containing 4.08% butterfat ancf 3.49% protein 
(National Breed Average, 1996). 

The beef aspect of the big brown cattle was developed in the late 1960s and early 1970s during 
the "exotic" beed rush. These beef focused cattle are known as Braunvieh, which is the Swiss 
word for "brown cow". These cattle of the same original genetic stock were allowed to enter the 
Brown Swiss Herd Book. The majority of the Braunvieh bloodlines in Canada have used semen 
and several bulls of the same breed imported from Switzerland. In 1966, the name of the 
Association was ammended to "Canadian Brown Swiss and Braunvieh Association" recognizing 
the two Herd Books it maintains. This Association is unique and gives recognition to both aspects 
of a dual purpose breed that has been selectively and seperately bred for dairy (Brown Swiss) and 
beef (Bruanvieh) in North America. Mature bulls weigh up to 950 kg and cows 650 kg. The number 
of memberships and registrations has been increasing in the last 15 years. 

Number of members and registrations on a five yearly basis. 



Year 



Members 



Registrations 



Year 



Members 



Registrations 



1920 


28 


1925 


25 


1930 


28 


1935 


23 


1940 


19 


1945 


28 


1950 


14 


1955 


11 



114 
70 
59 
95 
85 
62 
82 
73 



1960 
1965 
1970 
1975 
1980 
1985 
1990 
1995 



Purebred and percentage animals. 



37 


229 


145 


472 


118 


741 


337 


2162 


309 


1387 


261 


1375 


295 


2031 


359 


2332 




(1292+483)(529+28)* 




(Dairy) (Beef) 



- 6 



CANADIENNE 

Organized 1895. Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, November 20, 1905. 

Societe des Eleveurs de Bovins Canadiens 
Jean-Guy Bernier, Secretary 

468, rue Dolbeau 
Sherbrooke, PQ JIG 2Z7 
Phone: (819) 346-1258 
Fax: (819) 346-1258 

The origin of the Canadienne breed can be traced back to cattle that came to this 
country, specifically Quebec, from Normandy and Brittany in France beginning 
in the year 1601. These cattle probably arose from the same ancestors that gave 
rise to the Channel Island breeds i.e. Jersey and Guernsey. The Canadienne is 
unique in being the only breed of dairy cattle to be created in North America. 
The majority of these cattle are still found today in the province of Quebec. In 
conformation, the cattle are similar to the Channel Islands breeds. Colour 
ranges from black to brown, fawn or reddish brown with a light coloured stripe 
around the muzzle, and sometimes with a yellow streak down the back. The 
horns are medium in size turning upwards. These cattle are angular in 
outline, extremely hardy and gooa grazers. Canadienne cattle have a large 
capacity for roughage and the ability to utilize limited food resources. Cows 
have good fertility and are known for their calving ease. These cattle are 
highly adaptable to extreme climatic conditions. The average yearly production 
of a mature cow is 5156 kg of milk containing 4.28% butterfat and 3.65% protein 
(PATLQ Official Test, 1996). This is one of the breeds that was subjected to a 
government improvement program in Quebec. Unfortunately, as a 
consequence of this program based on the introduction of Brown Swiss into the 
Canadienne breed, very few purebred Canadienne cattle remain. In recent 
years, the breed registry has identified pure and graded animals. Mature bulls 
weigh up to 770 kg and cows 500 kg. The Canadienne is considered rare based 
on conservation priority of cattle oreeds with fewer than 1000 registrations 
globally. The number of registrations has been declining in the last 25 years. 

Number of members and registrations on a five yearly basis. 



Year 


Members 


Registrations 


Year 


Members 


Registrations 


1920 


156 


422 


1960 


324 


897 


1925 


294 


444 


1965 


252 


732 


1930 


415 


1000 


1970 


540 


826 


1935 


275 


1121 


1975 


265 


779 


1940 


249 


930 


1980 


116 


609 


1945 


293 


1031 


1985 


96 


411 


1950 


401 


1115 


1990 


57 


310(211+ 99)* 


1955 


333 


910 


1995 


68 


209 (105+104)* 



* Purebred and percentage animals. 



- 7 - 



CHAROLAIS 

Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, April 13, 1960. 

Canadian Charolais Association 
D.A. Kelly, General Manager 

The Charolais Building 
2320-41st. Avenue, N.E. 
Calgary, AB T2E 6 W8 
Phone: (403) 250-9242 
Fax: (403) 291-9324 

email: cca@charolais.com 

The origin of Charolais cattle dates back to the Roman era in ancient Italy according to 
figurines depicting the Charolais type and religious references to sacrificial white cattle. 
Charolais can be traced back to cattle in the Charolles region of east central France from 
the 14th century until the year 1772. Tariff barriers and custom duties virtually isolated 
the Charolles region which was used as a pawn and traded, sold or won by one royality 
after another. This encouraged the breeders to select the best white cattle and develop the 
Charolles strain. In 1772, the region was reunited with France and the Charolles cattle 
began moving throughout France. Two distinct types, the original Charolles and the 
Nivernais were centered in the province of Nievre and surrounding areas. In 1864, a 
Nivernais breeder, Count Charles de Bouille established a Herd Book. Later, in 1882, the 
Charolles breeders followed suit and began registering cattle in the province of Saone-et- 
Loire. By the 1880s, Charolais was recognized as one of France's most important breeds 
and in 1919, the two Herd Books were merged. Charolais cattle were brought into Brazil 
as early as 1879. However, it wasn't until Gene Pugibet imported the Charolais breed into 
the United States in 1930 that the North American cattle industry recognized its 
importance in crossbreeding with some of the more established beef breeds. Subsequently, 
a large number of composite breeds were developed with Charolais background. In 1953, 
Wayne Malmberg imported Charolais cattle to his ranch in Alberta from the United States. 
In 1966, 30 bull calves and 79 heifer calves of the Charolais breed imported to Canada 
from France were released from quarantine. In Canada, the Conception to Consumer 
program and a beef grading sytem became important tools in improving the Charlois breed 
and creating a product that the wholesaler, retailer and consumer would accept. As the 
first exotic beer breed in Canada, Charolais revolutionized the industry and set the stage 
for some of the most successful genetics in the world. Purebred Charolais are proven 
performers in the overall beef production chain and Char-cross cattle continue to 
demonstrate superior productivity. These cattle have outstanding weaning weights and 
superior performance in feed efficiency, growth and lean carcass. Mature bulls weigh up 
to 1200 kg and cows 800 kg. The number of registrations has been increasing in the last 15 
years. 

Number of members and registrations on a five yearly basis. 



Year Members Registrations Year Members Registrations 



1971 


2140 


21664 ( 4896+16768)* 


1985 


2380 


1975 


3427 


17697 ( 7913+9784)* 


1990 


2899 


1980 


2747 


20061 (14462+5599)* 


1995 


2485 



20075 (15925+4150)* 
23541 (22800+ 741)* 
28610 (28018+ 592)* 



*Purebred and percentage animals. 



8 



CHIANINA 

Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, May 5, 1972. 

Canadian Chianina Association 
Barbara Jack, Secretary-Manager 

P.O. Box 45 

Meskanaw, SK SOK 2W0 
Phone: (306)864-3644 
Fax: (306) 864-2599 

The origin of the Chianina breed can be traced back to cattle from the Roman 
era. The breed derives its name from a valley in the province of Tuscany. 
These cattle, valued in the early days as draft animals, are known for beef 
qualities today. This is the largest cattle breed in the world, standing on 
noticeably long legs. These long legs are an asset on a wide range of conditions. 
Cattle have a large stature which is complemented by a gentle disposition 
making them easy to handle. Although calves are born with light tan hair, 
mature animals have white hair and a black tongue and skin. These cattle are 
characterized by rapid, persistent growth, muscularity and lean meat with good 
cutability. Chianina are late maturing and continue to grow up to four years of 
age. Cattle are adaptable to both hot and cold climates and can thrive in rough 
weather on mountain farms. Chianina have found wide use as a meat type sire 
breed for crossbreeding. In 1971, Chianina cattle, consisting of 16 bulls and 6 
cows were first imported into Canada from Italy. A large number of Chianina 
cattle from Canada were later exported to the United States. Semen from 
Chianina bulls in Canada was exported into the United States and crossed with 
the Angus and Hereford breeds to create new breeds such as Chiangus, Chiford 
and Chimaine. The Chianina's milk production is low, however it has high 
butterfat content. Mature bulls weigh up to 1360 kg and cows 950 kg. The 
number of registrations has been declining because of the low number of 
members and the primary usage of the breed in crossbreeding. 

Number of members and registrations on a five 
yearly basis. 



Year 


Members 


Registrations 


1971 




22 


1975 


452 


5069 


1980 


157 


788 (352+436)* 


1985 


102 


328 (176+152)* 


1990 


33 


101 ( 55+ 46)* 


1995 


3 


9 ( 6+ 3)* 



* Purebred and percentage animals. 



DEVON 

Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, May 5, 1972. 

General Stud and Herd Book 
Bruce Hunt, Secretary 

2417 Holly Lane 
Ottawa, ON K1V 0M7 
Phone: (613) 731-7110 
Fax: (613) 731-0704 
email: clrc@clrc.on.ca 

The origin of the Devon breed, also known as the Ruby Red, can be traced to the 
hilly area in the northern part of the county of Devon in England. These cattle 
were popular in the latter part of the 18th century. The Devon breed which 
resembles Sussex cattle, is smaller and bright cherry or ruby red in colour. 
These cattle are adaptable to the uplands and moorlands of Devon with the 
ability to convert poor quality grass to beef. Beginning in 1855, a number of 
Devon herds were established in New Brunswick and Ontario. By 1893 as many 
as 145 cattle were registered in New Brunswick. During the subsequent years, 
however, the Devon disappeared from the Canadian agricultural scene only to 
be re-established half a century later. In 1968, Shaver Beef Breeding Farm of 
Gait, Ontario, imported two bulls and eight cows from England. Devon cattle 
often have red coloured hair with distinct dappled markings. Pigment is 
conspicuous around the eyes and muzzle. The colour of the skin and hair, 
which provides protection against the sun, is suitable for semi-tropical 
countries. The medium size, waxy, creamy white horns are dark at the tips. In 
the bulls, the horns grow outward curving slightly downwards, but in the cow 
the horns spread gracefully and turn upwards towards the end. These cattle 
were very popular for draught, but are kept today as a predominantly beef breed. 
Cows are very fertile, calve easily and have good mothering ability. The Devon 
breed is considered critical based on conservation priority of cattle breeds with 
fewer than 2000 globally. Overall, the number of registrations has been 
increasing. 

Number of registrations on a five yearly basis. 



Year 


Registrations 


1953 


5 


1955 


16 


1965 


3 


1970 


10 


1975 


11 ( 5+ 6)* 


1980 


12 ( 12+ 0)* 


1996 


238 (193+45)* 



* Purebred and percentage animals. 



10 - 



DEXTER 

Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, March 4, 1986. 

Canadian Dexter Cattle Association 
Ronald K. Black, Secretary 

2417 Holly Lane 
Ottawa, ON K1V 0M7 
Phone: (613)731-7110 
Fax: (613) 731-0704 
email: clrc@clrc.on.ca 

The origin of the Dexter breed can be traced back to cattle in the south and southwestern 
hill districts of Ireland in the year 1776. These cattle are known to have been tamed by the 
first inhabitants and driven to inaccessible mountaineous areas by invaders. Over the 
centuries the isolation of these indigenous cattle has helped to produce many distinct 
British breeds. There are two types of Dexter, the smaller dwarf cattle which carry the 
lethal gene and the proportionate non-dwarf type which does not carry the lethal eene. 
The breed is being closely studied to identify the lethal gene which can cause the bulldog 
calf syndrome. According to "The Farmer's Advocate" on December 15, 1899, Senator 
Drummond of Montreal, Quebec raised Dexter from stock imported from Great Britain. In 
1959, Dexter cattle were reintroduced into Canada with the importation of one bull and 8 
cows from Great Britain. The first 45 cattle registered in the General Stud book were born 
between 1956 and 1966, and were mostly imported from the United States. Prior to the 
formation of the Canadian Dexter Cattle Association, Canadian Dexters were registered in 
the United States. Dexters are one of the smallest breeds in. the world. Non-dwarf type 
Dexters are small, well proportioned animals. The horns are of medium leneth, curving 
forward and upwards. The breed's short, fine hair is predominantly black, although red 
and dun coloured cattle are not uncommon. Dwarfs are characterized by very short legs 
between the knee and fetlock. The head is short and broad with a short, deep and thick 
neck. The body is deep, compact, square and low set. Dexter cattle are a dual purpose 
breed that produces high quality milk and excellent meat. These cattle were originally an 
extremely hardy mountain breed, adaptable to extreme climatic conditions. Their small 
size is ideal for a small holding or a hobby farm. Dexter cattle are excellent grazers on 
rough pastures thus enabling tight stocking for more efficient use of land. Cattle mature 
very early and cows first calve at 2 years of age. Cows have good mothering ability and 
have been known to calve to 18 years of age. The average yearly production of a mature 
cow is approximately 3000 kg of milk containing 4.0% butterfat. Dexters provide 
excellent small lean beef carcasses ideal for a small family. Mature bulls weigh up to 460 
kg and cows 360 kg. Dexter is considered rare in North America based on conservation 
priority of cattle breeds, however it is no longer classified as a "rare" breed in the United 
Kingdom. Since 1987, the number of memberships and registrations has been increasing. 

Number of members and registrations. 



Year Members Registrations 



1960 




11 


1990 


58 


69 


1995 


129 


225 



- 11 



DUTCH BELTED 



Dutch Belted Association of America, Inc. 
Don Bixby, Registrar 

American Livestock Breeds Conservancy 

P.O. Box 477 

Pittsboro, NC 27312, U.S.A. 

Phone: (919)542-5704 

Fax: (919) 542-2460 

email: albc@emji.net 

The origin of the Dutch Belted breed can be traced to Lakenfeld in the 
Netherlands. These cattle are a very scarce breed with fewer than 1000 animals 
living world-wide. Dutch Belted cattle were first introduced into Canada from 
the United States with the importation of one bull and 8 cows in 1955. These 
cattle are generally black with a white belt, but red, belted animals are also 
sometimes seen. The white belt should begin just behind the shoulder and 
stretch nearly to the hip. It is believed that this white belt is the result of a 
recessive gene that was first found in cattle native to the Tyrol region of the 
European Alps. Breeds of cattle that exhibit this type of marking are the Belted 
Galloway, Belted Swiss, Belted Welsh and Sheeted Somerset. The Dutch Belted 
is a dairy breed known to be docile, easy calving and have high milk yields 
when properly managed. The average yearly production of a mature cow is 
approximately 6750-9000 kg of milk and the butterfat content of lies between 3.5 
and 5.5%. Mature bulls weigh on an average 900 kg and cows 500-550 kg. The 
Dutch Belted is considered "rare" based on conservation priority of cattle breeds 
with fewer than 1000 annual registrations in North America and approximately 
5000 globally. 

Number of North American members and 
registrations. 



Year 


Members 


Registrations 


1955 




9 


1970 




72 


1985 




100 


1990 




41 


1995 


222 


594 (114+480)* 



Purebred and percentage animals. 



12 



ERINGER 

Entered into the General Stud and Herd Book, March 8, 1982. 

General Stud and Herd Book 
Bruce Hunt, Secretary 

2417 Holly Lane 
Ottawa, ON K1V 0M7 
Phone: (613)731-7110 
Fax: (613) 731-0704 
email: clrc@clrc.on.ca 

The origin of Eringer cattle can be traced back to the Herens Valley area in 
Switzerland. The Eringer is one of the oldest Swiss breeds. These cattle are still 
being maintained as a pure breed with its own Herd Book in Switzerland. It has 
been common to fight the Eringer cows during festive occassions. These are 
held before cattle are moved to the pastures in the hills during the summer, at 
the time of their return to the valley in the fall, and at intervals in the 
mountains during the pasture season. Cows selected for fighting are groomed 
and given additional feed and occasionally some wine. Female offspring of 
aggressive fighting dams are selected, and young cows with proven fighting 
abilities command a good price. Bulls are never used for fighting. In 1981, 
Eringer cattle were first imported into Canada from Switzerland with three 
registrations. These cattle are solid, dull black with some shading to a reddish 
tinge over the hips and sides. In bulls a thin line of red hair down the backbone 
is quite common. The horns in the bulls are out thrust, nearly straight, short 
and thick while in the cows they are medium sized, upturned and often tilted 
backwards towards the tips. The average yearly production of a mature cow is 
approximately 3400 kg of milk containing 3.9% butterfat. Mature bulls weigh 
up to 590 kg and cows 450 kg. There have been no registrations in the last 10 
years. To date, a total of only three cattle have been registered in the General 
Stud and Herd Book. 



13 - 



GALLOWAY 

Organized November 24, 1882. Incorporated under Ontario Agricultural and Arts Act, 1882. 

Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, 1905. 

Canadian Galloway Association 
Ronald K. Black, Secretary 

2417 Holly Lane 
Ottawa, ON K1V 0M7 
Phone: (613)731-7110 
Fax: (613) 731-0704 
email: galloway@clrc.on.ca 



The Canadian Galloway Association is the oldest registry of purebred cattle in 
Canada. The Galloway breeds originated in southwestern Scotland and are 
likely the descendents of a polled breed of cattle brought to Scotland by Norse 
invaders. Thomas McCrae and other pioneers were instrumental in the 
registration of Galloway in 1872, then in the Ontario Galloway Herd Book in 
lo/4 and later in the formation of the predecessor of the Canadian Galloway 
Association in 1882. This association presently registers three types of cattle: the 
Galloway, the Belted Galloway and the White Galloway. 

In 1853, Mr. Graham of Vaughn, Ontario first imported the Galloway breed 
into Canada. Galloways were introduced into western Canada by the Cochrane 
Ranch in 1888. These cattle are black, dun or red in colour. 

In 1916, the Wiggins family of Czar, Alberta imported the Belted Galloway 
into western Canada. In 1950, the first continuous Belted group of Galloway 
cattle were imported into Canada by H. Gordon Green of Quebec. This was 
followed by additional importations from Scotland and the United States. 
These cattle are black, dun or red in colour with a white belt around the midriff. 

The White Galloway was imported to Canada in 1966 by Walking A Ranches 
of DeWinton, Alberta. These cattle display a white park colour pattern with 
black, dun or red points on the ears, nose and feet. 

The Galloway breeds are polled and are known for their longevity and 
adaptability to cola climates. The cattle have thick hide and long wavy hair 
with a unique thick undercoat and a long outer coat, providing excellent winter 
insulation. Galloway have the reputation of being hardy, good foragers with 
excellent feed efficiency, and producers of fine marbled beef. Cows are noted for 
their mothering ability and calving ease. Calves survive under more adverse 
conditions than most other breeds. The cattle are medium framed and deep 
bodied. Mature bulls weigh on an average 900 kg and cows 550 kg. Since 1950, 
there has been a overall increase in the number of registrations. 

Number of members and registrations on a five yearly basis. 



Year 


Members 


Registrations 


Year 


Members 


Registrations 


1920 


16 


57 


1960 


63 


390 ( 1)* 


1925 


9 


38 


1965 


110 


775 


1930 


7 


27 


1970 


93 


599 (41)* 


1935 


2 


15 


1975 


84 


378 (56)* 


1940 


4 


31 


1980 


79 


313 53 * 


1945 


4 


17 


1985 


75 


265 (35)* 


1950 


3 


50 


1990 


82 


279 (31)* 


1955 


20 


114 ( 2)* 


1995 


123 


419 (49)* 


* Belted 


Galloway. 











- 14 



GASCONNE 

Entered into the General Stud and Herd Book, November 8, 1976 

General Stud and Herd Book 
Bruce Hunt, Secretary 

2417 Holly Lane 
Ottawa, ON K1V 0M7 
Phone: (613)731-7110 
Fax: (613) 731-0704 
email: clrc@clrc.on.ca 

The origin of Gasconne cattle can be traced back to the region of Gascony in 
southwest France. These cattle are a dual purpose meat and draft breed. Cattle 
are grey in colour, with or without black points. There are two types of 
Gasconne cattle. The smaller, darker mountain type with black points and 
mucosae is very similar to the Piedmont breed of northwest Italy. These cattle 
are ideal for extensive systems of cattle production. The larger areole or 
Mirandais variety has pink mucosae and is nearly extinct. This has resulted 
from crossing these cattle with the Piedmont, the old Grasconne and the black 
mucosae variety. The long horned calves are red. The breed is very rare world- 
wide. In 1976, two bulls of the Gasconne breed were first imported into Canada 
from France. Since then, there have been no registrations. To date, a total of 
only one animal has been registered in the General Stud and Herd Book. 



15 - 



GELBVIEH 

Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, October 12, 1972 

Canadian Gelbvieh Association 
Wendy G. Belcher, Secretary/Manager 

Room 123A, 2116-27th Avenue, N.E. 
Calgary, AB T2E 7A6 
Phone: (403)250-8640 
Fax: (403) 291-5624 

The origin of the Gelbvieh can be traced back to the 19th century in Germany. 
Gelbvieh are a result of crossing between the Keltic-German Landrace cattle 
from northern Bavaria and Simmental, Shorthorn and Heil-Brown Landrace 
cattle. A number of varieties were combined into the Gelbvieh breed including 
Bernese, Swiss Brown, Local German Red and Red Pied, Limpurger from a Red 
Bavarian breed, Lahn in German Hesse, Glan-Donnersberg and Yellow 
Franconian of Northern Bavaria. Gelbvieh were developed as a dual purpose 
breed from the original draft animal. In 1972, John W. Riley in Prince Edward 
Island first imported a bull into Canada and subsequently 14 calves from 
Germany. Gelbvieh are reddish-gold to russet in colour. The areas around the 
eyes and muzzle are generally lignter in colour than the rest of the animal. The 
horns are thick and rather short, growing nearly straight out from the poll. 
Polled cattle are also common. These cattle have fine, dense hair, pigmented 
skin and dark hooves. In North America, the Gelbvieh is solely developed as a 
strong maternal beef breed without sacrificing performance or carcass quality. 
The Gelbvieh has the best conformation in a moderate framed animal of any 
German breed. Although selected for milk production, increased emphasis is 
placed in beef conformation. The hindquarter is exceptionally well muscled. 
Cows are known for their early sexual maturity, high fertility, calving ease, 
maternal ability, fast growth and placid temperament. These cattle adapt well to 
subtropical as well as cold climates. The average yearly production of a mature 
cow is approximately 3300 ke of milk containing 4.1% butterfat. The average 
body weight of calves was 41 Kg at birth and 278 Kg at 205 days. Bulls and heifers 
weighed 494 kg and 375 kg, respectively, at one year of age. Mature bulls weigh 
up to 1300 kg and cows 850 kg. Since the early 1980s, the number of 
memberships and registrations of purebred and percentage animals has been 
increasing. 

Number of members and registrations. 



Year 



Members 



Registrations 



Year 



Members 



Registrations 



1972 


20 


18 


1980 


39 


281 ( 182+ 99)* 


1973 


23 


103 


1985 


93 


879 ( 631+248)* 


1974 


78 


924 


1990 


139 


1300 (1047+253)* 


1975 


166 


1075 


1995 


249 


2054 (1535+519)* 



* Purebred and percentage animals. 



16 



GUERNSEY 

Organized 1905. Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, November 29, 1905. 

Canadian Guernsey Association 
Vivianne Macdonald, Secretary-Manager 

368 Woolwich St. 
Guelph, ON N1H3W6 
Phone: (519) 836-2141 
Fax: (519) 824-9250 

The origin of this breed can be traced back to the Island of Guernsey in the 
English Channel off the coast of France sometime in the 10th century. This 
breed is a combination of the now-extinct brindled Isigny draught breed of 
Normandy and the slender, wheat coloured lyre-horned Froment de Leon of 
Brittany. The breed includes the cattle of Guernsey, Alderney, Sark and Herm. 
In 1876, Sir John Abbott of Montreal, first imported these cattle into Canada. 
The Guernsey are a light fawn to brown or red coloured dairy breed with white 
patches. The forehead is generally marked with a white patch and the nose is 
usually buff coloured but occasionally black or streaked with black. Cattle have 
amber hoofs often tipped with black. The deep yellow pigmentation found in 
the skin, ears, udder, body and tail are characteristic. These cattle are considered 
gentle, hardy and easily managed. Guernsey cattle accompanied Admiral Byrd's 
Antarctic expedition. Guernsey cattle are bigger than Jerseys, have a typical 
dairy conformation with heavier bone and a wide pelvis for easy calving. Cows 
are known for their stayability and rich, golden coloured milk. The average 
yearly production of a mature cow is 5984 kg of milk containing 4.56% butterfat 
and 3.54% protein (National Herd Average, 1996). Mature bulls weigh up to 900 
kg and cows 600 kg. The number of memberships and registrations has been 
declining over the last 30 years. 

Number of members and registrations on a five yearly basis. 



Year 


Members 


Registrations 


Year 


Members 


Registrations 


1920 


105 


327 


1960 


864 


5243 


1925 


200 


569 


1965 


838 


6131 


1930 


469 


1122 


1970 


479 


3465 


1935 


346 


1558 


1975 


267 


2347 


1940 


509 


2201 


1980 


251 


2092 


1945 


731 


2883 


1985 


276 


1901 


1950 


903 


3996 


1990 


226 


1500 


1955 


824 


4424 


1995 


186 


1005 (931+74)* 



* Purebred and percentage animals. 



17 - 



HAYS CONVERTER 

Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, December 17, 1975. 

Canadian Hays Converter Association 
Terri Worms, Secretary-Manager 

Room 450, 1207-1 lth Avenue, S.W. 
Calgary, AB T3C 0M5 
Phone: (403) 245-6923 
Fax: (403) 244-3128 

Hays Converter is the first recognized breed of cattle that has been developed in 
Canada. The breed was developed by Senator Harry W. Hays of Alberta in 1952. 
Hereford cows were bred to eight Holstein-Friesian bulls for two years. This 
resulted in a foundation herd of 159 Holstein-Friesian x Hereford heifers that 
were then backcrossed to a certified meat-type Hereford bull. Sires derived from 
five of the fastest gaining bull were reintroduced to the foundation herd to 
produce 2/3 Hereford and 1/3 Holstein-Friesian crosses. At the same time, four 
Brown Swiss bulls were bred to 100 Hereford cows to produce 1/2 Brown Swiss 
and 1/2 Hereford crosses. Over the following years, the best of these crossbred 
cows were introduced into the original foundation cow herd. The top bulls 
from the combined group of Holstein-Friesian x Hereford and Hereford x 
Brown Swiss crosses were then bred to the cows with the best udders. The 
resulting herd was then closed and cattle were selected based on weaning 
weight, yearling weight and udder. Hays Converter cattle are noted for their 
uniformity of performance. Cattle are hardy, requiring minimal feed 
supplementation during wintering on the range. Cows do not have to be 
milked out and are more than capable of providing the extra milk required to 
wean heavy calves. Hays Converter is a large, well fleshed, long bodied animal 
known for its good legs and feet. Steers finish at a weight of approximately 500 
kg at 12-15 months of age under normal feedlot conditions. Mature bulls weigh 
up to 1260 kg and cows 810 kg. The Hays Converter is considered rare based on 
conservation priority of cattle breeds with fewer than 1000 registrations in 
North America. The number of registrations has been increasing steadily. 

Number of members and registrations on a five 
yearly basis. 



Year Members Registrations 



1976 


2 


2 


1980 


33 


111 (106+ 5)* 


1985 


47 


156 (124+32)* 


1990 


41 


271 (258+13)* 


1995 


18 


314 (285+29)* 



Purebred and percentage animals. 



18 - 



HEREFORD 

Organized 1890. Incorporated under Ontario Agricultural and Arts Act. Incorporated, Live Stock 

Pedigree Act, January 1, 1901. 

Canadian Hereford Association 
Duncan J. Porteous, General Manager 

5160 Skyline Way N.E. 

Calgary, AB T2E 6V1 

Phone: (403) 275-2662 

Fax: (403)295-1333 

email: herefords@hereford.ca 

The origin of the Hereford breed can be traced back to tenant farmers in the 
county of Herefordshire in England. In 1860, F.W. Stone, a Shorthorn breeder 
from Guelph, Ontario, first imported one bull and eight heifers of the Hereford 
breed from England. The Polled Hereford was established by Mossom Boyd of 
Bobcaygeon, Ontario from the pure strain of Polled Hereford imported from the 
United States in 1902. The Hereford cattle gradually spread across Canada and 
outnumbered the Shorthorn breed after World War II to become the 
predominant breed of beef cattle in every province in Canada. The Hereford is a 
beef breed predominantly red in colour with a white head, throat, brisket, belly, 
feet and switch. These cattle are noted for hardiness, good grazing ability, strong 
constitution, mild disposition and the ability to produce top grading carcasses 
under a variety of conditions. Hereford cattle adapt to environments from cold 
uplands to hot semi-desert plains and thrive in countries where droughts are 
prevalant, fodders in short supply and long distances for grazing. Cows are 
good mothers with high conception and calving rates. Mature bulls weigh up 
to 1250 kg and cows 725 kg. 

Number of members and registrations on a five yearly basis. 



Year 


Members 


Registrations 


Year 


Members 


Registrations 


1920 


932 


3290 


1960 


7205 


50772 


1925 


1029 


3234 


1965 


7871 


60604 


1930 


422 


3584 


1970 


6054 


59499 


1935 


451 


5197 


1975 


7025 


59858 


1940 


666 


7290 


1980 


8254 


72409 


1945 


1756 


14818 


1985 


5296 


42975 


1950 


4567 


25605 


1990 


3945 


40141 


1955 


6616 


43845 


1995 


3095 


31866 



19 



HIGHLAND 

Organized July 4, 1964. Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, October 2, 1964. 

Canadian Highland Cattle Society 
Margaret Badger, Secretary-Manager 

307 chemin Spicer 
Knowlton, PQ JOE 1V0 
Phone: (450) 243-5543 
Fax: (450) 243-1150 

The origin of the Highland breed can be traced back to the highlands and 
western coastal islands of Scotland. Highland is one of the oldest and possibly 
the purest breed in the United Kingdom. In 1885, Robert Campbell first 
imported these cattle from Scotland to the Riding Mountain country, north of 
Strathclair, Manitoba. Bulls were used to sire local cows throughout the Prairie 
province. Inspite of the attention paid to this breed in the early days of the cattle 
industry there was little effort to maintain these cattle as a pure breed. The first 
registered Highland cattle that came to Canada in the late 1920s and early 1930s 
were imported by R. Home Smith of Toronto, Ontario, Godfrey S. Pettit of 
Caledon, Ontario and Mary M. Lindsay of Lloydminister, Saskatchewan. A 
Herd Book of registrations has been kept since that time, now listing over 10,000 
purebred registrations. The breed appears to be the same in general appearance 
as it was two centuries aeo, when recorded cattle history began. Highland are 
characterized by a long, snaggy coat which extends on to the tail and down the 
legs, frequently covers the eye and provides excellent winter insulation. Cattle 
have a deep long body, a downy under coat and a long outer coat. Coat colours 
include black, red, yellow, white, dun and brindle. Highland have long horns 
which are widespread and curve upwards on the cow and to lesser degree on 
the bull. These cattle are fairly docile and known as a hardy, highly adaptable 
beef breed able to be productive where other cattle could not survive. Cows are 
slow maturing, usually calving at three years, easy calvers with good maternal 
ability, low calf mortality and a high weaning percentage. Meat is lean and well 
marbled. Mature bulls weigh up to 800 kg and cows 500 kg. The Highland is 
considered "watch" based on conservation priority of cattle breeds with fewer 
than 2500 registrations in North America and approximately 10000 globally. 
The number of memberships and registrations has been increasing. 

Number of members and registrations on a five yearly basis. 



Year 


Members 


Registrations 


Year 


Members 


Registrations 


1940 






1970 


54 


124 


1945 




9 


1975 


66 


162 


1950 




28 


1980 


156 


150 


1955 




100 


1985 


142 


177 


1960 




149 


1990 


228 


437 


1965 


22 


132 


1995 


326 


790 



- 20 



HOLSTEIN 

Organized 1884. Incorporated, 1891 

Holstein Association of Canada 

Keith Flaman, Secretary & Chief Executive 

P.O. Box 610 

Brantford, ON N3T 5R4 

Phone: (519) 756-8300 

Fax: (519) 756-5878 

email: general@holstein.ca 

web: nttp: / / www.holstein.ca 

The origin of Holstein cattle can be traced back to the Black-pied Dutch cattle in 
the province of Friesland in northeastern Holland. It was originally a dual 
purpose cattle. In 1881, Archibald Wright first imported a bull and cow of the 
Holstein breed into Winnipeg, Manitoba from the United States. After a couple 
of years 100 Friesian cattle were imported from the Netherlands and distributed 
across Ontario. Although there were subsequent shipments from the 
Netherlands, the major influx was from the Unitect States during the later part 
of the 19th century. The Canadian Herd Book was closed in 1903* and the name 
Holstein-Fresian was used for the breed until 1984 when the name was officially 
changed to Holstein. The breed is found all across Canada. In 1971 there were 
more Holstein in Canada than any beef or dairy breed. Today it is estimated that 
approximately 90% of all dairy cattle are purebred Holstein or possess distinct 
Holstein characteristics. Red and White Holstein-Friesian were allowed registry 
in the Alternate Herd Book up until 1976 when these cattle were incorporated 
into the the Official Herd Book. In the early years, the low fat content of milk 
was a subject of considerable ridicule. However, in the later years, large milk 
yields drew considerable attention as demand for fluid milk increased. 
Balanced breeding programs based on both production records and body 
conformation are the foundation for increased productivity of the Canadian 
Holstein breed. Holstein are large cattle known today for their clearly defined 
black and white markings, as well as for their excellent dairy conformation, 
great capacity for roughage, and production of huge quantities of good quality 
milk. The average yearly production of a mature cow is 8383 kg or milk 
containing 3.81% butterfat and 3.26% protein (PATLQ Official Test, 1996). 
Mature bulls weigh up to 1200 kg and cows 750 kg. The number of registrations 
has steadily been increasing. 

Number of members and registrations on a five yearly basis. 



Year 


Members 


Registrations 


Year 


Members 


Registrations 


1920 


-3500 


15497 


1960 


13443 


88150 


1925 


2945 


16001 


1965 


13933 


88500 


1930 


4248 


22400 


1970 


13870 


98800 


1935 


4751 


24825 


1975 


12749 


101368 


1940 


7106 


42902 


1980 


14462 


124944 


1945 


9717 


53149 


1985 


15840 


149014 


1950 


11950 


61799 


1990 


16385 


217916 (165916+52000)* 


1955 


12832 


73500 


1995 


14165 


202102 (179432+22670)* 



* Purebred and percentage animals. 



21 



JERSEY 

Organized June 7, 1901. Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, June 11, 1901. 

Jersey Canada 

Russell G. Gammon, Secretary-Manager 

350 Speedvale Avenue West, Unit 9 

Guelph, ON N1H7M7 

Phone: (519) 821-9150 

Fax: (519) 821-2723 

email: info@jerseycanada.com 

The origin of this breed can be traced back to cattle imported into France from 
the Island of Jersey, the largest of the Channel Islands. Jersey cattle were first 
imported into Canada by R. H. Stephens in 1868 and became the foundation of 
the famous St. Lambert herd. Today, the majority of these cattle are found in 
Ontario and Quebec. Cattle are generally fawn in colour with wide variation in 
shade. Red, brown, grey and black also occur. Jerseys often have white 
markings. Tongues and switches may be black. A ring of light colour around 
the muzzle is a constant feature of the breed. Jerseys are fairly small in stature, 
in fact being the most compact of the Channel Island cattle. A fine boned cattle 
with small hoof on slender but strong legs and the very wide pelvis enables easy 
calving even when mated to large bulls. Cattle are hardy, disease resistant with 
a good feed conversion and readily adaptable to extremes of climate. Jerseys are 
lean, refined, possess an extreme measure of dairy type and exhibit an 
exceptional heat tolerance for a temperate breed. Cows are early maturing and 
continue to yield well over a number of years. Fat globules in Jersey milk are 
large and the cream will thus rise quickly when setting. The breed is renowned 
for the high protein content of the milk it produces. The combination of high 
production, type and longevity in the Canadian Jerseys has elicited strong 
demand in the international markets. The average yearly production of a 
mature cow is 5720 kg of milk containing 4.93% butterfat and 3.86% protein 
(National Breed Average, 1996). Mature bulls weigh up to 700 kg and cows 550 
kg. The number of memberships and registrations has been declining over the 
last 30 years as the number of dairy cattle and dairy farms in Canada has 
declined. 

Number of members and registrations on a five yearly basis. 



Year 



Members 



Registrations Year 



Members 



Registrations 



1920 


582 


1925 


1266 


1930 


1636 


1935 


1438 


1940 


1630 


1945 


2187 


1950 


2250 


1955 


1416 



2195 

3786 

5088 

7235 

8314 

10952 

14762 

12675 



1960 


1514 


11802 


1965 


1430 


11603 


1970 


788 


7383 


1975 


705 


5951 


1980 


710 


6674 


1985 


816 


8098 


1990 


814 


7124 


1995 


663 


6565 (6290+275) 



* Purebred and percentage animals. 



22 - 



KERRY 

Entered into the General Stud and Herd Book, July 7, 1992 

General Stud and Herd Book 
Bruce Hunt, Secretary 

2417 Holly Lane 
Ottawa, ON K1V 0M7 
Phone: (613) 731-7110 
Fax: (613) 731-0704 

email: clrc@clrc.on.ca 

This breed, which can be traced back to the county of Kerry in Ireland, is thought 
to be the descendent of the Celtic Black breed of cattle. The Celtic Black breed 
originated in Asia in the 4th century and according to archaeological evidence 
was common in Ireland until the late 1600s. Kerry cattle became almost extinct 
by the early 1980s, and in 1983 the total world population of pedigreed cows was 
only 200. A rescue by the Royal Dublin iSociety and the Department of 
Agriculture and Public Works office has helped estabish 10 private herds of 
oedigreed cattle. These cattle generally have a glossy black coat. Some may 
lave a bit of white around the udder and occasionally one will see a red animal, 
^ed Kerry cattle are not recognized by the breed association, however. These 
cattle have fine bones and a clean head with white long horns proportional to 
the size of the body which curve upwards, tapering to black tips. Kerry cattle 
imported to Canada in the early 1800s, had disappeared by the 1930s. Later, in 
19/1, 11 heifers and one bull were imported into Ontario. There is no breed 
association in Canada. However, Rare breeds Conservancy in Canada has been 
encouraging breeders to maintain Kerry cattle on host farms. The Kerry is a 
dairy breed with a well-shaped and capacious udder. Cows are very docile and 
produce milk with a homogenized appearance since the fat globules produced 
are smaller than norrnal and do not rise to the top. Cattle are extremely hardy 
and suitable for all types of soils and climates, and can exist on scarce, poor 
forage. These cattle are known for their mothering ability, calving ease and 
stayability. The average yearly production of a mature cow is approximately 
3500 kg of milk containing 4.0% butterfat. Mature bulls weigh an average of 600 
kg and cows 450 kg. The Kerry is considered "critical" based on conservation 
priority of cattle breeds with fewer than 200 registrations in North America and 
approximately 2000 globally. The number of registrations has been declining. 

Number of registrations. 



Year 


Registrations 


1985 


4 


1990 


16 


1993 


20 


1994 


23 


1995 


7 



- 23 



LIMOUSIN 

Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, 1969. 

Canadian Limousin Association 
Geoff Barker, Executive Manager 

5663 Burleigh Crescent, S.E. 

Calgary, AB T2H 1Z4 

Phone: (403) 253-7309 

Fax: (403) 253-1704 

email: limousin@limousin.com 

The origin of the Limousin breed can be traced to the Limoges region of France. 
The Limousin breed has incorporated the Marchois of La Creuse, and the 
Meymac, the Meyssac, the Treignac and the Vendonnais types. In 1886 a Herd 
Book was established in France for the Limousin breed. Traditionally a strong, 
fast draft breed, Limousin are now popular beef cattle. In 1967, the North 
American Limousin Foundation imported a bull calf named Castor into Canada 
from France. This was followed by 11 bull calves and 5 heifers the following 
year and later several more importations occurred. The breed is found all across 
Canada. Limousin are dark yellow-red or light red in colour in areas around 
their eyes, muzzle and legs. Horns are of medium length growing outward and 
forward, although some cattle are polled. Cattle mature rapidly and are known 
for high fertility, calving ease and excellent feed conversion. Limousin are fine 
boned cattle with excellent beef conformation and a long body well off the 
ground. Cattle are noted for heavy muscling, light external fat, fine grained 
meat. These cattle carry a thick coat that allows them to withstand rigorous 
range weather when raised under more rugged conditions year-round, even 
during the calving season. It is one of the few breeds of European origin that 
was developed strictly for beef purposes. Limousin cattle are today one of 
Canada's major beef breeds. Mature bulls weigh up to 1180 kg and cows 770 kg. 
The number of memberships and registrations has been increasing over the 
past 10 years. 

Number of members and registrations on a five 
yearly basis. 



Year 


Members 


Registrations 


1970 


123 


202 


1975 


933 


4024 


1980 


1324 


5009 


1985 


2545 


9561 


1990 


4267 


12437 (10554+1883)* 


1995 


5579 


11401 (10370+1031)* 



* Purebred and percentage animals. 



24 - 



LINCOLN RED 

Organized 1969. Became part of Shorthorn breed, June 7, 1977. 

Canadian Lincoln Red Association 
Lynne Van Beek 

R. R. #1 

St. Charles, ON POM 2W0 

Phone: (705) 867-2291 

email: beeker@cyberbeach.net 

Lincoln Red cattle can be traced back to the Bos urus cattle introduced into Lincolnshire on 
the east coast of England by the Scandinavian invaders in the 8th to 10th centuries. These 
native cattle were crossed with Durham bulls, in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, 
resulting in the Lincoln Red. In 1822, the Lincoln Red was recognized as a separate breed 
of cattle in the Coates Herd Book and in 1896, the British Lincoln Red Shorthorn Society 
established its own Herd Book. Originally a horned breed, an ambitious breeding plan 
begun in 1939 resulting in the first polled cattle, and by the 1960s, the majority of cattle 
were polled. As a result, the breed society dropped the word "shorthorn' from its title, 
and became the present "Lincoln Red Cattle Society". In 1964 the first Lincoln Red were 
imported to Canada from England by Donald McQueen Shaver. The cow "Driby 325", the 
largest of the herd, weighing 870 kg produced a bull calf "Camson Pandrama" that grew to 
an enormous 1300 kg. By 1971, 9 males and 60 female Lincoln Red cattle had been 
imported to Canada. Although the Lincoln Red was originally a dual purpose breed, 
selective breeding gradually produced two distinct types, dairy and beef, ana in 1946 the 
society decided to divide the Herd Book by type. Gradually the emphasis on beef became 
more marked, so that today, the Lincoln Red is considered a beef breed, although its milk 
production potential is reflected in its rapid-growing offspring. These cattle are uniform, 
deep cherry red in colour. Only the tip or the tail is cream coloured. The body is long and 
deep chested with well sprung ribs, long lower quarters and well muscled legs. The head is 
short and wide and the Tegs are short and strong. These cattle are extremely hardy and 
rugged, due in part to their thick hides and relatively heavy coats. Lincoln Red are docile 
in temperament and easily adapt to varying climatic conditions. Average yearly 
production of a mature cow is approximately 3600 kg of milk. Mature bulls weigh up to 
1100 kg and cows 680 kg. The Lincoln Red is considered rare based on conservation 
priority of cattle breeds with fewer than 1000 registrations in North America and 
approximately 5000 globally. Although the Canadian Lincoln Red Association became 
affiliated with the Canadian Shorthorn Association in 1977, the Lincoln Red Association 
maintains a separate Herd Book and all Lincoln Red registrations are recorded separately, 
as well as in the Shorthorn Herd Book. Although there are relatively few North American 
breeders, current trends in the North American beef market's evaluation of quality beef has 
rekindled interest in this breed. 

Number of registrations. 



Year 


Members 


Registrations 


1965 




5 


1970 


6 


4 


1975 


32 


264 (84+180)* 


1976 


32 


140 (92+ 48)* 


1977 


32 


90(90+ 0)* 



Registration and percentage animals. 



25 



LUING 

Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, July 10, 1975. 

Canadian Luing Cattle Association 
Mrs. Richard J. Luft, Secretary-Treasurer 

Kathyrn, AB TOM 1E0 
Phone: (403) 935-4414 

Luing is a new beef breed developed by the Cadzow brothers on the island of 
Luing off the western coast of Scotland. The Blue Grey type resulting from the 
crossing of a white Shorthorn bull on a Highland heifer, has long been 
recognized as a superior animal to fatten. In 1947, the foundation herd of the 
Luing cattle were developed by crossing Beef Shorthorn bulls with Highland 
cows and then crossing the best heifer offspring back to the Shorthorn bulls. 
This was followed by a deliberate system of inbreeding and then line breeding to 
form the Luing breed. Selection has been for beef conformation and rate of gain 
on the herd raised in the open year-round. Luing cattle were officially 
recognized as a breed in 1965. A true-breeding type was established in 1967 with 
the breeding of the seventh generation offspring. In 1967, three bulls and 14 
cows were imported into Canada from the United Kingdom. These cattle have 
a thick, shaggy, red-brown coat much like that of the Highland cattle. The 
conformation of Luing cattle is very uniform, however, occassionally red to 
white, yellow, roan or brindle cattle appear. These cattle have been selected for 
growth potential. Cows calve easily, are good mothers and produce calves with 
a high weaning weight per kg cow weight. The average mature weight of Luing 
bulls is 966 kg. The number of registrations has been declining. 



Number of members and registrations on a five 
yearly basis. 



Year 


Members 


Registrations 


1976 


12 


34 


1980 


8 


71 (58+13)* 


1985 


6 


26 


1990 


7 


8 


1995 


7 


5 



* Purebred and percentage animals. 



26 



MAINE-ANJOU 

Organized 1969. Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, 1970 

Canadian Maine-Anjou Association 
Rod McLeod, General Manager 

Room 110, 3016-19th Street N.E. 
Calgary, AB T2E 6Y9 
Phone: (403) 291-7077 
Fax: (403) 291-0274 

The origin of Maine-Anjou cattle can be traced back to the Brittany region 
where it served as a draft breed which was also used for milk production. In 
1830, this breed was originally developed by crossing Shorthorn bulls with the 
Mancelle, one of the native red and white Brittany cattle types. In 1962, the 
Maine-Anjou and the Armoricaine breed societies merged and this was 
followed by the introduction of Meuse-Rhine-Ijssel bulls from the Netherlands 
and Rotbunte bulls from Germany into the breed to form the Rouge de l'Ouest. 
In 1970, this merger failed and the Maine-Anjou and the Armoricaine breed 
societies were reestablished. In 1968, Shaver Beef Breeding Farms, Gait in 
Ontario first imported three bull calves from France. This was followed by 
importation of lo male and 16 female calves within a couple of years and many 
more later. Maine-Anjou cattle are normally dark red in colour with white 
patches on the body and a white underline. Roan animals are also found. 
Horns in both sexes are small and extend outwards. The skin is lightly 
pigmented. Maine-Anjou are one of France's largest cattle with good length, 
heavy muscling and an excellent frame. Calves are fairly small at birth 
resulting in calving ease. Cattle are prized for their beef qualities, excellent 
growth rate and milk production. Although the primary emphasis is on beef, 
milk yield remains adequate enough for the Maine-Anjou to be considered a 
dual purpose breed. Bulls have been used for crossbreeding with Angus and 
several other breeds resulting in well-muscled offspring, clean in their middle, 
free from waste in the brisket area with minimal fat covering. Mature bulls 
weigh up to 1250 kg and cows 900 kg. The number of registrations has been 
increasing over the last 10 years. 

Number of members and registrations on a five 
yearly basis. 



Year Members Registrations 



1969 




3 


1970 


16 


9 


1975 


1789 


10418 


1985 




2340 (1879+461)* 


1990 


350t 


2997 (2535+462)* 


1995 


351 


3215 (2493+722)* 



* Purebred and percentage animals, 
t Approximate. 



- 27 



MARCHIGIANA - ROMAGNOLA 

Organized Canadian Romagnola Association. Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, July 4, 1974 
Organized Canadian Marchigiana Association. Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, Nov. 22, 1974 

Canadian Romagnola Association/Canadian Marchigiana Association 

Janet Carscallen, Secretary-Manager 

P.O. Box 37 

Priddis, AB TOL 1 WO 

Phone: (403) 931-2415 

Fax: (403) 262-2952 

The origin of Romagnola can be traced back to the Bos tanrus macroceros (long-horned 
aurochs) cattle in the steppes of Eastern and Central Europe. It was during the 4th century 
that the barbarian hordes of the Goths reached Europe with cattle and settled the fertile 
lands of Romagna. The Romagnola breed originated from these cattle in the lower Po river 
valley in Italy. Initially developed as a draft breed, during the 18th and 19th century 
selection for beef traits transformed the Romagnola into mainly a beef breed. In 1973, four 
bulls of the Romagnola breed were first imported into Canada from Italy. These cattle 
tend to be light grey in colour with a black tail brush. Bulls normally have darker patches 
on the neck or shoulders and black patches around the eyes. The horns are medium in size, 
thick, upturned and curved outwards and slightly forward. Romagnola cattle are large 
heavy boned, and have well developed forequarters, short sturdy legs and an excellent beef 
conformation. The outstanding characteristics of this breed are feed conversion, fast gain, 
hardiness to heat and cold, early maturity, docility and fertility. The milk and butter fat 
production of Romagnola cows are adequate to wean heavy calves. Mature bulls weigh up 
to 1362 kg and cows 818 kg. 

The Marchigiana breed, originating from the long-horned cattle that reached Italy 
following the barbarian invasions in the 6th century, can be traced to Marche and 
surrounding provinces in Italy. The breed was developed as a strain of cattle which 
originated in ancient times in the Podolla region of southwestern Russia and was brought 
to Italy during or after the time of the Roman Empire. The land in this area is fairly rough 
and feed is often hard to come by. Marchigiana are hardy cattle selected for the large type 
desirable for the lower and more fertile slopes where grazing and fodder is more abundant. 
The breed was developed primarily for meat production and draft. Marchigiana are large 
and muscular, fined boned with shorter horns and a lighter head. At the beginning of the 
20th century, although crossbreeding with Romagnola bulls occurred, Marchigiana cattle 
looked more like a distinct breed. In 1932 the population was closed and since then has 
been maintained as a pure breed to become the most popular beef cattle in Italy. These 
cattle have short hair that may vary in colour from light gray to off white. Skin is 
pigmented with a black tongue and muzzle. The area around the eyes and the tail switch 
is sometimes dark. Horns are short to medium in length, black tipped, white in the middle 
with a yellow cast base. Horns curve forward in the bulls and upwards in the cow. Polled 
cattle are also being selected. The body is long and cylinderical in shape, rumps are long 
and level. Cows demonstrate early sexual maturity, calving ease and good fertility. These 
cattle have a mild disposition and have been selected for fast growth and feed efficiency. 
On good pasture, the Marchigiana gain weight rapidly and produce top quality beef. 
Mature bulls weigh up to 1450 kg ancT cows 825 kg. 



Number 


of members and 


registrations on a 


five 


yearly basis. 






Year 


Members 


Registrations 




Year 


Members 


Registrations 


1973 
1975 
1980 


63 

4 


4 

313 

14 




1985 
1990 
1995 


4 

8 

10 


16 
39 
11 



28 - 



MEUSE-RHINE-IJSSEL 

Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, November 14, 1975. 

Canadian Meuse-Rhine-Ijssel Association 
J. Lozeman, Executive Secretary 

P.O. Box 235 

Claresholm, AB TOL 0T0 
Phone: (403) 625-4516 
Fax: (403) 625-4516 

The origin of the Meuse-Rhine-Ijssel breed can be traced back to the eastern and 
southeastern Netherlands along the Meuse, Rhine and Ijssel rivers for which 
the cattle are named. The red pied Hollander of North Holland, the red and 
white Zeeland, the Drentish from Over-yssel and the red-pied dairy Meuse- 
Rhine-Ijssel cattle of Flanders were incorporated into the Meuse-Rhine-Ijssel 
breed. The Meuse-Rhine-Ijssel was first recorded in the Netherlands Herd Book 
more than 100 years ago. In 1975, the first importation of Meuse-Rhine-Ijssel 
cattle into Canada consisted of one bull and 48 cows from United Kingdom and 
six bulls and one cow from Netherlands. This was followed in 1976 by 
importations from Britain, Germany and Netherlands. The Meuse-Rhine-Ijssel 
is a dual purpose meat and dairy breed. These cattle are red, dark red or red and 
white pied. Dark eye pigmentation is a breed trait. The neck and shoulders are 
usually red, the face if red has a white streak from the forehead to the muzzle. 
The horns of the bull are small and out thrust with a forward curve while those 
of a cow have a sharp forward curve. There appears to be a connection between 
the Red and White Friesian and this breed. Cows produce large quantities of 
milk which is notable for its high protein content (3.49%). The breed is known 
for improving milk production of beef cattle and well suited for single or 
multiple suckling. Meuse-Rhine-Ijssel cattle are known for a long deep, well 
developed frame with good body capacity supported by sound feet. These cattle 
have a quiet disposition and assume a good temperament. Cows have good 
mothering abilities, high quality udders and are easy calvers with a shorter 
gestation period than Friesian cattle. Cattle are maintained exclusively under 
pasture conditions. A large number of cows 14-15 years of age are still 
producing a calf every year. The average yearly production of a mature cow is 
approximately 6000 kg of milk containing 4.25% butterfat. Mature bulls weigh 
up to 1320 kg and cows 735 kg. 



Number of members and 
yearly basis. 


registrations on a five 


Year Members 


Registrations 


1975 

1980 4 

1985 51 


81 (21+60)* 

13 (12 + 1)* 

9(4 + 5)* 



* Purebred and percentage animals. 

- 29 - 



MURRAY GREY 

Organized 1970, Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, July 15, 1970. 

Canadian Murray Grey Association 
Sue Dixon, Secretary-Treasurer 
P.O. Box 868 
Carstairs,AB TOM 0N0 
Phone: (403) 337-4007 
Fax: (403) 337-4014 

The origin of Murray Grey cattle can be traced back to the Upper Murray region 
of Victoria in Australia. In 1905, a grey calf was born to a very light roan 
Shorthorn cow. When this grey cow was mated to a black Angus bull a silver- 
grey calf was produced. Subsequently, the same cow produced 12 grey calves. 
The breed was developed by the Sutherland family by selecting for a grey or dun 
colour when these cows were mated to Angus bulls. In 1940, the cattle were 
maintained by inter se breeding. Murray Grey cattle were recognized as a breed 
in 1962. In 1969, Lord Roderic Gordon and his wife of Bentley in Alberta first 
introduced the Murray Grey breed into Canada using imported semen from 
Australia. After 1971 it became possible to import live animals into Canada 
from Australia which resulted in the importation of bull and heifer calves. The 
Murray Grey breed was developed as a beef breed by upgrading with beef breeds. 
The Tasmania Greys, although of the similar genetic origin, are not recognized 
in Canada. Cattle are well balanced with length, width, spring of ribs and 
smoothness. Purebred cattle have silver grey, grey, dark grey or dun colour. 
Murray Grey are docile, medium sized, naturally polled with good length from 
eye to the dark muzzle. Skin should be dark coloured and loose, and hooves 
are generally dark. These cattle are gentle and structurally sound with strong 
feet and legs. Carcasses are of good quality and the meat is well marbled. Cows 
are good milkers and calve easily. Murray Grey cattle are adaptable to a wide 
range of climate and management conditions. Mature bulls weigh up to 1000 kg 
and cows 680 kg. The number of registrations has been increasing over the last 
10 years. 

Number of members and registrations on a five yearly basis. 



Year 


Members 


Registrations 


Year 


Members 


Registrations 


1971 
1975 
1980 


155 
179 
183 


197 
876 
699 (400+299)* 


1985 
1990 
1995 


159 

145 
89 


395 (343+ 52)* 
318 (302+ 16)* 
390 (364+ 26)* 



Purebred and percentage animals. 



30 



NORMANDE 

Entered into the General Stud and Herd Book, July 7, 1992 

General Stud and Herd Book 
Bruce Hunt, Secretary 

2417 Holly Lane 
Ottawa, ON K1V 0M7 
Phone: (613) 731-7110 
Fax: (613) 731-0704 

email: clrc@clrc.on.ca 

The origin of the Normande breed can be traced back to an indigenous coastal 
type of cattle in Normandy, France, possibly of Viking origin. From about 1845 
to 1860, these cattle were crossed with Durham Shorthorn and Channel Island 
cattle. As early as 1883, a breed Society was established in France for the 
Normande breed which was reorganized in 1926. Normande are dual purpose 
meat and dairy cattle. In 1975, one bull of the Normande breed was imported 
into Canada from France. The face of these cattle is mostly white with small 
coloured patches surrounding the eye with red eye rings. There is a large 
variation in colour within the breed. Black, dark reddish brown, brindled or 
spotted colour are distributed in patches on a white background. The face is 
dished like the Jersey while the brindling probably comes from the old 
Normande Isigny type. The breed is very hardy, and frequently maintained 
year-round on pasture supplemented with hay during the winter. Milk from 
cows is used to make Camembert cheese. The average yearly production of a 
mature cow is approximately 4500 kg of milk containing 4.0% butterfat. Mature 
bulls weigh up to 1200 kg and cows 680 kg. The number of registrations has 
been decreasing. 



Number of registrations on a five yearly basis. 



Year 


Registrations 


1975 


1 


1980 


19 (6+13)* 


1985 


18 (13+5)* 


1990 


2 


1995 


3 



* Purebred and percentage animals. 



- 31 



PARTHENAIS 

Entered into the General Stud and Herd Book, July 16, 1979 

Canadian Parthenais Association 
Allison Parkin, Secretary 

925 Chilligo Road, R.R. # 21 
Cambridge, ON N3C 2V3 
Phone: (519) 658-2526 
Fax: (519) 658-9489 

The origin of the Parthenais breed can be traced to the Deux-Sevres in western 
France. A Breed Society was formed in France as early as 1893. Although 
originally a triple purpose breed, Parthenais are attractive cattle now bred 
primarily for beef. These cattle display heavy muscling and are considered in 
some quarters as even being "double muscled". Parthenais are tan /buckskin in 
colour with black pigments and a black muzzle. In 1970, one bull of the 
Parthenais breed was first released from quarantine in Canada. These cattle are 
docile and have been crossed with almost every other breed in Canada. 
Parthenais cross cows have excellent maternal ability and tremendous udders, 
raising calves that are very competitive at weaning. Crossbred and purebred 
calves are born without the extra muscle but develop it starting at about two to 
three weeks of age. Parthenais are moderately framed cattle with a tremendous 
eye appeal. These cattle have a high muscle to bone ratio with a dressing 
percentage of over 67%, while carcasses are known to regularly cut at over 77%. 
In France, the Parthenais cattle are known for the quantity of meat produced 
and renowned for the quality of that meat. Mature bulls weigh on an average 
approximately 1000 to 1200 kg and cows 600 to 650 kg. The number of 
registrations of purebred and percentage animals has been increasing. 



Number of members and registrations on a five 
yearly basis. 



Year Registrations 



1972 


1 


1976 


21 (2+19)* 


1980 


1 


1995 


400* 



* Purebred and percentage animals. 



32 - 



PIEDMONTESE 

Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, October 18, 1983. 

Canadian Piedmontese Association 
Jan Petterson, Secretary-Treasurer 

P.O. Box 5097 
Airdrie, AB T4B 2B2 
Phone: (403) 948-1215 
Fax: (403) 948-3141 

The origin of the Piedmontese breed can be traced back to the upper Po valley of 
Piedmont in northern Italy. In 1887, the first Herd Book for the Piedmontese 
breed was established in Italy. These cattle show considerable variation within 
the breed. This may be because a number of breeds were combined in the mid 
nineteenth century with imported Iberian and Podolian blood lines. A Breed 
Society was established in 1934 and was followed by a new Herd Book in 1958. 
The Albese variety in Cuneo is the true double muscling type. Piedmontese 
cattle were originally developed for draft purposes. Later cows were worked and 
milked at the same time. In 1980, two bulls and four cows of the Piedmontese 
breed were first imported into Saskatchewan from Italy. Piedmontese are a 
lowland as well as a hill breed that are tall with a long body. Cattle are normally 
of a light grey-brown colour to white. The tail switch, eye lashes, muzzle, ears 
and hooves are black. Calves are relatively small at birth. These cattle are tall 
with a long body similar to, although slightly smaller than, the Italian 
Romagnola oreed. The breed carries the double muscling trait and selection 
programs within the breed have tried to eliminate some of the negative 
consequences associated with this characteristic such as calving difficulties, low 
fertility and low milk yield. Piedmontese are now used for beef production. 
These cattle are characterized by rapid growth rate, early maturity, good quality 
meat and a higher dressing percentage. The fine boned Piedmont when crossed 
with the heavy framed Holstein produce offspring of excellent quality. The 
average yearly production of a mature cow is 3100 kg of milk. Mature bulls 
weigh approximately 950 kg and cows 630 kg. The number of memberships and 
registrations has been increasing in the last 10 years. 

Number of members and registrations on a five 
yearly basis. 



Year Members Registrations 

1980 1 

1985 30 194 ( 10+184)' 

1990 97 493 (195+298)" 

1995 111 462 (130+332)" 

* Purebred and percentage animals. 



33 



PINZGAUER 

Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, October 16, 1972. 

Canadian Pinzgauer Association 
Roy Gardner, President 

R. R. # 2 

Olds, AB T4H 1P3 
Phone: (403) 556-7118 
Fax: (403) 556-2290 

The origin of the Pinzgauer breed can be traced back to the Pinzgau Valley in the 
alpine region of southeastern Germany and western Austria. In 1972, three 
bulls of the Pinzgauer breed from Germany and one cow from Austria were first 
imported into Canada. The breed is characterized by a red colour and a white 
topline in a jagged pattern that covers a narrow area across the shoulders. This 
white marking is wider towards the rear and at the hips extending slightly over 
the legs. The Pinzgauer also have a white underline. These cattle are easy to 
feed and finish due to their quiet nature, high average daily gain and excellent 
feed conversion, minimum fat cover and above average marbling capacity. In 
Canada, Pinzgauer cattle were developed for beef characteristics. The average 
carcass weight is about 312 kg for an average live weight of 532 kg. 
Furthermore, 19 out of 50 scored AAA for marbling and were classified as Al or 
A2. The average yearly production of a mature cow is approximately 3600 kg of 
milk containing 4.0% butterfat. Mature bulls weigh up to 1000 kg and cows 650 
kg. The number of registrations has increased slightly over the past four years. 



Number of registrations on a five yearly basis. 



Year Members Registrations 



1972 
1980 
1985 
1990 
1995 


112 


3 

79 ( 0+79)* 
417 (342+75)* 
262 (250+12)* 
330 (301+29)* 



* Purebred and percentage animals. 



34 



RED POLL 

Organized 1905. Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, May 5, 1906. 

Canadian Red Poll Cattle Association 

iackie Fleming, Secretary-Treasurer 
LR. No. 3 

Ponoka, AB T4J 1R3 
Phone: (403) 783-5951 
Fax: (403) 638-2276 

The origin of the breed can be traced back to the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk 
in England. In the early 1800s two local breeds were merged, the Norfolk Red, a 
small, red coloured, horned breed and the Suffolk Dun, a much larger, polled, 
dairy breed that had a dun coloured coat. Through targeted selection, the 
"Norfolk" and "Suffolk Polled" breeds were established by the year 1845 and in 
1882 were renamed "Red Poll". The infusion of Danish Reds to improve milk 
production in the 1960s adversely affected feed conversion, longevity and 
tardiness. This resulted in the Red Poll becoming a minor breed in the United 
kingdom. Red Poll cattle are a medium sized polled breed with a rich, red coat 
colour. Some white may be present in the switch and on the underline as far as 
the navel. Although originally a dual purpose breed with the combined beef 
confirmation and capacity for milk production, the Red Poll is today considered 
a beef breed producing fine grained meat. The cows have better udders than 
standard beef breeds and produce milk with small fat globules making it easily 
digestable. Red Poll cattle are the longest lived of the British breeds, mature 
early, have a quiet disposition and are good foragers. Cows are hardy with a low 
incidence of metabolic disease and have the potential to be a double suckler. 
Some families have the tendency to produce twins. Cattle are easily adaptable 
to intensive and extensive systems Tor beef production, tolerant to both heat 
and cold climates, resistant to eye cancer and, to some extent, ticks. The average 
yearly production of a mature cow is approximately 4600 kg of milk containing 
3.9% butterfat. Mature bulls weigh up to 1200 kg and cows 570 kg. The Red Poll 
is considered "watch" based on conservation priority of cattle breeds with fewer 
than 2500 registrations in North America and approximately 10000 globally. 
The number of registrations has been increasing over the last 2D years. 

Number of members and registrations on a five yearly basis. 



Year 


Members 


Registrations 


Year 


Members 


Registrations 


1920 


72 


282 


1960 


210 


701 


1925 


168 


305 


1965 


128 


437 


1930 


173 


443 


1970 


87 


206 


1935 


124 


477 


1975 


50 


84 


1940 


102 


392 


1980 


49 


165 


1945 


183 


625 


1985 


40 


113 


1950 


242 


830 


1990 


50 


262 


1955 


225 


869 


1995 


51 


245 



35 



SALERS 

Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, March 26, 1974. 

Salers Association of Canada 

Ms. Daphne Warnes, Executive Secretary 

Room 228, 2116-27th Ave., N.E. 

Calgary, AB T2E 7A6 

Phone: (403) 291-2620 

Fax: (403) 291-2176 

The Salers breed of cattle originated in the south-central region of France - the 
Auvergne, in the heart of the volcanic area of the Massif Central. This isolated 
mountainous area is noted for its rough terrain, harsh climate and poor soils. 
Bred for centuries in this isolated area, the breed has been far removed from any 
outside genetic influence and is considered to be one of the oldest and most 
genetically pure of all European breeds. The breed has been traced back more 
than 7000 years by archeologists who have found drawings of similar cattle on 
cave walls near the small town of Salers. In 1840 the breed was named after 
Salers, where some progressive breeders started selecting for milk and beef 
production. In 1906, the Salers Herd Book of France was established. The Salers 
breed was first imported into Canada from France in 1973. Cattle are usually of 
a dark mahogany red colour, occasionally with white spots under the belly. The 
coat is curly and very thick to protect it against cold. Salers generally have long 
lyre-shaped horns with hard black hooves and sound legs. The dark 
pigmentation of the skin protects this breed from eye disorders, and chapped 
and sunburned udders. Tnese cattle are extremely hardy and survive in rough 
climates under poor soil conditions. It is believecf that trie breed may have Bos 
indicus parentage. Salers are known for their good milk production, excellent 
fertility and calving ease. These cattle are fast growing, early maturing and 
produce a high yielding carcass of choice grade with good internal marbling and 
low back fat. Today, Salers are a beef cattle and considered as a "Balanced breed". 
The average yearly production of a mature cow is approximately 3200 kg of milk 
containing 4.0% butterfat. Mature bulls will weigh up to 1200 kg and cows 800 
kg. The breed is also known to carry a black recessive gene. A growing number 
or polled and black Salers are available. The number of memberships and 
registrations has been increasing. 

Number of members and registrations on a five 
yearly basis. 



Year Members Registrations 



1973 
1975 
1980 
1985 
1990 
1995 


161 
173 
260 
410 
495 


1 

974 

715 ( 239+ 476) * 
3423 (1489+1934)* 
4817(2649+2168) * 
4212 (3705+ 507)* 



* Purebred and percentage animals. 



36 - 



SANTA GERTRUDIS 

Organized 1967, Incorporated, Livestock Pedigree Act, July 15, 1970. 
Entered into the General Stud and Herd Book, December 16, 1996. 

General Stud and Herd Book 
Bruce Hunt, Secretary 

2417 Holly Lane 
Ottawa, ON K1V 0M7 
Phone: (613)731-7110 
Fax: (613) 731-0704 
email: clrc@clrc.on.ca 

The Santa Gertrudis breed was developed by two brothers, Richard and Robert 
Kleberg. They realized that the traditional British breeds were unprofitable in 
the subtropical climate found on the King Ranch in Texas. In 1910, the King 
Ranch bought a Brahman bull and after several crossbreeding trials it was found 
that the most profitable cross involved a combination of Zebu and Shorthorn. 
The ranch thus developed what is today the Santa Gertrudis breed over the next 
30 years. The Santa Gertrudis breed, which consists of 5/8 Shorthorn and 3/8 
Brahman blood, was officially recognized in the United States of America by the 
United States Department of Agriculture in 1940 and Santa Gertrudis Breeders 
International was formed in 1951. The King Ranch still has a very large herd of 
these cattle. In 1952, J. Grant Glassco first imported Santa Gertrudis cattle into 
Cold Creek Farms in Southern Ontario from the United States. Subsequently, 
small numbers of cattle have been imported from Texas and Colorado. These 
cattle have a distinctive cherry red coat with no white permitted other than 
minor spotting on the underline and dark pigmented skin. Santa Gertrudis 
may be horned or polled with slightly drooping ears, medium to large in size 
and their broad forehead tends to be slightly convex. The horns are short and 
thick and grow outwards from the head bending outwards and downwards. 
Bulls of this breed have a medium sized hump, the dewlap is well developed 
through the navel flap and sheath are moderate. Cows, however, are 
humpless. Santa Gertrudis cattle are strong boned, deeply bodied and 
symetrical. The breed shows a marked degree of resistance to ticks and biting 
insects and carries a high degree of heat tolerance markedly superior to any 
European breed. These cattle are used for beef production. Mature bulls weigh 
up to 1080 kg and cows 840 kg. To date (1996), the total number of registrations 
is 360 animals. 



37 



SHORTHORN 

Organized January 12, 1886 by amalgamation of Canada and British North American Herd Book 
Associations. Incorporated under Ontario Agricultural and Arts Act, 1887. Incorporated, Live 

Stock Pedigree Act, January 1, 1901. 

Canadian Shorthorn Association 
Patricia Coulson, Secretary-Treasurer 

Gummer Building, 5 Douglas Street 
Guelph,ON N1H2S8 
Phone: (519)822-6841 
Fax: (519) 837-2268 

The origin of the breed can be traced back to the counties of Durham, Northumberland and 
York in England. The original Shorthorn bred by the Dukes of Northumberland in the 16th 
century were probably descendents of red Anglo-Saxon cattle, red and white Dutch 
Hollanders and Zeelands cattle. Shorthorn cattle were first brought to Canada in 1825 
when four purebred bulls were imported. This was followed by the arrival of cows 7 years 
later. The breed is well established in all parts of the country. Shorthorns are red, white or 
roan in colour or a combination of red and white. These cattle have short horns which 
curve downwards and are noted for their quiet disposition. The breed has been very 
widely exported and played a major role in the creation and improvement of many other 
breeds world wide. These cattle are late maturing, adapt to a wide variety of climates and 
environments, heat and cold tolerant and resistant to diseases. In Canada, there are three 
sections to the breed registered in the same Herd Book: Beef, Lincoln Red and Dual- 
Purpose or Milking Shorthorn. The former two types are hardy cattle that produce good 
quality beef. The Lincoln Red had its origins in Lincolnshire county, England and is 
characterized by its rapid growth and large live weights (see page 25). Polled Shorthorn 
cattle are also available. Milking Shorthorns were originally triple purpose, providing 
meat, milk and draft power. Cows have good maternal ability and have minimal calving 
difficulties. Today the Milking Shorthorn cows continue to produce good quality meat. 
The average yearly production of a mature cow is 5791 kg of milk containing 3.57% 
butterfat and 3.33% protein (PATLQ Official Test, 1996). Mature bulls weigh up to 1090 
kg and cows 680 kg. The number of memberships and registrations has been increasing in 
the last 10 years. 

Number of members and registrations on a five yearly basis. 



Year 


Members 


Registrations 


Year 


Members 


Registrations 


1920 


4386 


23395 


1960 


2916 


15121 


1925 


4028 


12686 


1965 


1915 


10778 


1930 


1790 


10388 


1970 


1041 


8525 


1935 


1697 


8879 


1975 


923 


5785 


1940 


1626 


10276 


1980 


597 


3839 (3733+106)* 


1945 


2699 


16591 


1985 


530 


2688 (2636+ 52)* 


1950 


4428 


19476 


1990 


595 


3391 (3217+174)* 


1955 


4061 


21265 


1995 


633 


3839 (2954+885)* 



* Purebred and percentage animals. 

- 38 



SIMMENTAL 

Incorporated Live Stock Pedigree Act, February 20, 1969. 

Canadian Simmental Association 
Barry Bennett, General Manager 

No. 13, 4101-19th Street, N.E. 

Calgary, AB T2E 7C4 

Phone: (403)250-7979 

Fax: (403) 250-5121 

email: cansim@simmental.com 

web: http://www.Simmental.com 

The origin of the Simmental breed can be traced back to Bernese cattle found in 
the Simme valley of Switzerland. Several cattle from Switzerland, Austria and 
Germany have been incorporated into the breed. The Simmental breed was 
first introduced into North America in 1886, but disappeared after a number of 
years. In 1966, the first Simmental bull was imported into Canada from France. 
This was followed by further importations of 20 cattle from France and 
Switzerland a couple of years later. By 1971, more than 300 cattle had been 
imported into Canada. Simmental cattle are red and white in colour with the 
red ranging anywhere from dark red to fawn or tan. These cattle are horned 
and polled with a white face, legs and tail. Cows have excellent fertility and 
milk production with a high butterfat content. The udders and teats are among 
the best for beef breeds. Calving problems are minimal. The breed was 
originally developed as a triple purpose breed. It is today mainly a beef breed 
known for its growth rate and weight for age. The breed is also known for its 
sturdiness, resistance, adaptability and longevity. Simmental are large, long, 
muscular cattle, easy to handle and is one of the most populous breeds in the 
world. It has proved adaptable to a wide range of climates and geographical 
regions, including the high Alps, the foothills and lowlands, and a high 
proportion of alpine grazing. When crossed with the Hereford, Simmental 
cause no change in the appearance, a trait highly appreciated by the Hereford 
breeder. Simmental have often been used for upgrading other breeds and for 
the production of crossbred cows and feeder steers. Canadian Simmental cattle 
has been selected for strong maternal traits and high performance in feedlots. 
These traits have suited not only the Canadian cattle industry, but buyers of 
Simmental genetics throughout the world. Mature bulls weigh up to 1180 kg 
and cows 770 kg. The number of registrations has been increasing over the last 
20 years. 

Number of members and registrations on a five yearly basis. 



Year Members Registrations 



Year 



Members 



Registrations 



1970 


229 


667 


1985 


2151 


1975 


2588 


20540 


1990 


2226 


1980 


2319 


20622 


1995 


2250 



20861 (16948+3913)* 
25241 (23545+1696)* 
39449 (37389+2060)" 



* Purebred and percentage animals. 



39 - 



SOUTH DEVON 

Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, July 2, 1974. 

Canadian South Devon Association 
Lesley Fisher, Secretary-Treasurer 

Box 12, Site 4, R.R. No. 2 
Olds, AB T4H 1P3 
Phone: (403)556-6900 
Fax: (403) 556-7060 

The origin of South Devon cattle can be traced back to the South Hams region of 
southern Devon. These cattle were first recognized as a distinctive breed at the 
end of the 18th century. In 1969, Big Beef Hybrids, Inc. first imported South 
Devon cattle into Canada from England and maintained these at the company's 
ranch in Manitoba. A total of 60 bulls and 30 cows were imported and 
distributed to breeders across Canada. South Devon cattle were originally a draft 
breed, but were selected for both milk and meat production in the 19th century. 
These cattle are yellowish-red in colour, often with a slightly mottled 
appearance. Horns are small relative to the size of the animals and grow 
outward and forward on the bull and often upward on the cow. The breed has a 
reputation for being highly adaptable to hot and cold climates. It is a hardy 
breed with excellent longevity. Today, the South Devon is considered to be a 
beef breed. It is docile and is known to carry the double muscling gene. In 
Canada, the South Devon breed has been selected against double muscling. A 
unique feature of the South Devon is that it carries the haemoglobin B gene in 
addition to the haemoglobin A gene found in other British mainland breeds. 
South Devon are the largest of the English and Scottish breeds. In 1980, studies 
based on biochemical markers showed that the genetic distance between the 
South Devon and the Gelbvieh or Brown Swiss breeds was closer than the 
Hereford breed. Mature bulls weigh up to 1300 kg and cows 820 kg. The ancient 
type of this breed is considered rare. The number of registrations has been 
increasing over the last 20 years. 

Number of members and registrations on a five 
yearly basis. 



Year 


Members 


Registrations 


1975 


13 


34 


1980 


42 


42 ( 29+13)* 


1985 


40 


65 ( 45+20)* 


1990 


17 


130 (101+29)* 


1995 


41 


202 (148+54)* 



* Purebred and percentage animals. 



- 40 



TARENTAISE 

Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, December 21, 1973. 

Canadian Tarentaise Association 
Jan Petterson, Secretary-Treasurer 

P.O. Box 5097 
Airdrie, AB T4B 2B2 
Phone: (403)948-1212 
Fax: (403) 948-3141 

The origin of the Tarentaise breed can be traced back to the Tarentaise Valley in 
the Alpine region of southeastern France. The Tarentaise is one of the oldest 
breeds of cattle indigenous to this region of Europe which has survived without 
the introduction of other breeds. In 1972, a bull calf of the Tarentaise breed was 
first imported into Canada from France. These are hardy cattle with beef and 
dairy characteristics. Tarentaise are a medium-sized mountain type cattle with 
exceptional hardiness. Cattle have light brown-red, fawn or yellowish coloured 
coats with no white markings. The horns of the bull are short and thick, and 
grow outwards from the head while in the cow the horns are of medium size 
and turn upwards. The Tarentaise breed has demonstrated an ability to adapt to 
a wide variety of climatic and feed conditions. The breed is valued for its 
maternal characteristics as the cows calve with greater ease than those of many 
other breeds. This is an early maturing breed with more milk than the beef 
breeds. The Tarentaise breed, originally developed for draft purpose is now 
being selected more for milk than beef. The breed has been used extensively for 
the upgrading of local breeds in Canada and the United States. Mature bulls 
weigh up to 1200 kg and cows 600 kg. The number of memberships and 
registrations has been decreasing in the last 5 years. 

Number of members and registrations on a five 
yearly basis. 



Year 


Members 


Registrations 


1973 
1975 
1980 
1985 
1990 
1995 


96 

83 
120 
121 

54 


43 ( 1+42)* 
1215 
312 (187+125)* 
263 (200+ 63)* 
526 (410+116)* 
423(387+ 36)* 



* Purebred and percentage animals. 



41 



TEXAS LONGHORN 

Texas Longhorn Breeders Association 
Joe Stannard, President 

P. O. Box 77 

Spruce View, AB TOM 1V0 

Phone: (403) 728-3298 

Texas Longhorn cattle are descendents of the long-horned Spanish cattle 
brought to North America by the Spanish military and colonists. In 1690, a herd 
of 200 Criollo cattle was driven by vaqueros northwards through Mexico to a 
Spanish mission near the Sabine river. These cattle were feral in the Sabine 
and Rio Bravo areas and became the foundation of the American cattle industry 
over 500 years ago. Though one of the oldest breeds in North America, it was 
not until 1964 that a breed association was established. In 1876, Texas Longhorn 
cattle were first imported from Montana into Canada by George Emerson and in 
1879 another 1000 animals were imported. The breed failed to become 
established in this country, however. By 1903 the breed had disappeared from 
the Canadian scene. In 1969, several Longhorn cattle were again imported into 
Alberta from the United States and continue to be fairly widely used. The 
colour of these cattle tends to vary widely from patched, speckled black on white 
or red on white to brindle and sometimes solid red, tan, white or black. Texas 
Longhorn are a fairly large, horned breed with classic horns immediately 
recognized by their "handlebar" style. In the bulls, the horns grow outward, 
forward and sweep upward. In the cow the horns are slender and widespread, 
twisting upwards and outwards. These cattle are rangy and long legged with 
hips set higher than the wither so that the topline slopes upwards. Texas 
Longhorn cattle are very hardy, adaptable cattle known for their lean carcasses. 
Cows are very fertile, calve easily and are excellent mothers. Cows are very 
quick to nurse and calves are vigorous within a short time of birth. Calf 
mortality is extremely low and calves have a low birth weight. Texas Longhorn 
are very hardy with excellant endurance being able to fend for themselves in 
drought, hot desert or winter snow. These cattle make efficient use out of scant 
forage, even digging up yucca and cactus roots, if necessary. Texas Longhorn 
cattle are very resistant to parasites and disease. Canadian Texas Longhorn grow 
larger and appear to be more adaptable to the cold. Mature bulls weigh on an 
average 590-785 kg and cows 340-500 kg. Canadian Texas Longhorn cattle are 
registered with the Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America in Fort 
Worth, Texas. To date (1996), a total number of 248, 000 cattle have been 
registered in North America since the start of the registry in 1964. 



42 - 



WELSH BLACK 

Incorporated, Live Stock Pedigree Act, February 7, 1972. 

Canadian Welsh Black Cattle Society 
Marlene Wallace, Secretary 

P.O. Box 147 
Hanna, AB TOJ IPO 
Phone: (403) 854-4774 
Fax: (403) 854-4674 

The exact origin of Welsh cattle is unknown. It is generally agreed, however, 
that Welsh cattle are very ancient and probably resemble the cattle that existed 
in Britain in pre-Roman times more closely than any other breed. As recently 
as the last century, there were several distinct breeds of cattle in Wales, which 
tended to be quite isolated from England. North Wales or Anglesey and South 
Wales or Pembroke cattle remained distinct until 1904 when the Welsh Black 
Cattle Society was formed and the cattle were combined in one Herd Book. In 
1970, the Welsh Black breed was first imported into Canada with the purchase 
of four animals from the United States. Later several importations were made 
from Wales. Welsh Black cattle are generally black in colour with some white 
allowed in back of the navel. Some cattle are red due to a recessive gene. The 
winter coat of the breed may have a brown tinge. The horns grow outwards 
with a slight curve, but come in a variety of shapes. Naturally polled cattle are 
available in increasing numbers in both red and black. The hardy Welsh Black 
has a thick hair coat that can remain long or sleek depending on the climate. 
Welsh Black have tough, hard, black hooves, are less prone to injury, resistant 
to pinkeye or sunburned udders and have a rumen capable of breaking down 
very coarse fibre. These cattle are docile and known for their dressing 
percentage and lean carcass with excellent marbling. Welsh Black thrive on 
diets and in conditions that would not maintain less well-adapted breeds. Cows 
are good milkers, producing calves regularly under poor pasture and have 
excellent longevity. Welsh Black are generally considered to be a dual purpose 
breed, although are used primarily for beef production today. These cattle are 
found in nine provinces with a concentration of breeders in Alberta. Mature 
bulls weigh up to 1130 kg and cows 635 kg. The Welsh Black is considered 
"watch" based on conservation priority of cattle breeds with fewer than 2500 
registrations in North America and approximately 10000 globally. Overall, the 
number of registrations has been increasing. 

Number of registrations on a five yearly basis. 



Year Registrations Year Registrations 

1970 159 ( 55+104)* 1985 43 ( 35+ 8)« 

1975 206 (113+ 93)* 1990 199 (186+ 13)* 

1980 54 ( 36+ 18)* 1995 169 (134+ 35)' 

* Purebred and percentage animals. 



43 



WHITE PARK 

Ancient White Park Cattle Society of North America 

Wes Henthorne 

B Bar Ranch 

HC 87, Box 2214 

Big Timber, MO 59011, U.SA. 

Phone: (406) 932-4197 

Fax: (406) 932-4757 

White Park cattle are a very ancient type of cattle. First referred to in pre- 
Christian Irish epics, these cattle were probably used by the Druids in various 
ceremonies. The kings and barons of the middle ages prized the "wild white 
bulls" for hunting purposes and several of the magnates kept cattle in their 
private hunting preserves. The herd in Chillingham, England is the only 
remaining herd that traces back to these medieval hunting preserves. All other 
herds have exchanged stock and have, either directly or indirectly, used other 
breeds of cattle in the herd over the years. White Park cattle are predominantly 
white in colour with a white tail switch. There are two varieties, horned and 
polled. Cattle have black pigment around the eyes which are vivid white and 
black tipped horns. The horns are of middle length or can be quite long varying 
in size according to their origin. In cows the horns grow outwards, forwards 
and upwards. The cattle have black ears, nose, muzzle, teats and feet. White 
Park cattle are a dual purpose breed. These cattle tend to show a preference for 
rougher types of feed and cows are usually easy calvers. White Park produce 
lean beef and are good milkers and foragers. It is believed that these cattle are 
not related to the British breeds, therefore, there would be greater hybrid vigour 
expected in their crosses. The British government has recognized the White 
Park as an important historical breed and, in 1938, in an effort to aid in its 
conservation, shipped a few to the Riverdale Zoo in Toronto. In 1941, four 
cattle were established at the King Ranch in Texas and four others at the 
Washington Zoo. In 1987 a few cattle were re-introduced to Canada from the 
United States. Mature bulls weigh an average of 770-820 kg and cows 450 kg. 
White Park cattle are today an extremely rare breed world-wide. The White 
Park is considered "critical" based on conservation priority of cattle breeds with 
fewer than 200 registrations in North America and approximately 2000 globally. 



44 - 



BACKGROUND INFORMATION 

Agriculture Canada. 1986. Breeds of Cattle, Horses and Swine. Communications Branch, 
Agriculture Canada, Ottawa, Canada. Publ. No. 1749B, 45 pp. 

Briggs, H.M. and Briggs, D.M. (editors). 1980. Modern Breeds of Livestock. Macmillan 
Publishing Co., Inc., New York, USA. 802 pp. 

Bixby, D.E., Christman, C.J., Ehrman, C.J. and Sponenberg, D.P. 1994. Taking Stock. The 
North American Livestock Census. The McDonald & Woodward Publishing Company, 
Blacksburg, Virginia, USA. 182 pp. 

Canadian Livestock Records Corporation, 1990-1995. Annual Report of the Board of 
Directors to the Representatives and Member Associations. Canadian Livestock 
Records Corporation Annual Report, Ottawa, Canada. 

Canadian National Livestock Records, 1918-1989. Report of Record Committee to Record 
Board and Record Associations for the years 1918-1989. Ottawa, Canada. 

Hall, S.J.G. and Clutton-Brock, J. 1991. Two Hundred Years of British Farm Livestock. 
British Museum (Natural History), London, UK. 272 pp. 

Joywind RBC, 1992. Breeds & Breeders: A Guide to Minority Livestock Breeds in 
Canada. Joywind Farm Rare Breeds Conservancy Inc., Marmora, Ontario, Canada. 
125 pp. 

Mason, I.L. 1988. A World Dictionary of Livestock Breeds, Types and Varieties. CAB 
International, Wallingford, UK. 152 pp. 

Rouse, J.E. 1970. Cattle of Europe, South America, Australia, and New Zealand. 
In: World Cattle, vol. I. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, Oklahoma, USA. 
485 pp. 

Rouse, J.E., 1973. Cattle of North America. In: World Cattle, vol. III. University of 
Oklahoma Press, Norman, Oklahoma, USA. 650 pp. 



- 45 



DIRECTORY OF BREEDERS WITH RARE BREEDS 



Mr. John Badger 

58 Bailey Rd., R. R. #1 
Knowlton,PQJOElVO 
Phone: (514)243-6298 



Don & Margaret Badger 

Maple Lea Farm 
307 Spicer 

Knowlton,PQJ0ElV0 
Phone: (514) 243-5543 
Fax: (514) 243-1150 



Mr. Fred Barlow 

P. O. Box 84 
Earlton, ON POJ 1E0 
Phone: (705) 563-2916 



R.D. & L.M. Barnard 

Box 1768, R. R. #1 
Clearwater, BC VOE 2N0 
Phone: (604) 674-3874 



Keith & Sylvia Barrett 

R. R. #1 

Miscouche, PEI COB 1T0 

Phone: (902)436-6204 



Ferme Beaudry et Fils 

1717, lie Rang 
St.Valerien,PQJ0H2B0 



Herbert & Ann Becker 

R. R. #1 

Peers, AB TOE 1W0 



Bryce & Margo Bell 

R. R. #1 

Balderson, ON K0G 1A0 

Phone: (613) 264-8556 



Donald & Donna Bissett 

1914 Mountain Rd. 
Pontiac, PQ J0X 2G0 
Phone: (819) 455-2765 



Mr. Tony Bleumer 

R.R.#4 

Chesley, ON NOG 1L0 



Mark & Margaret Bond 

R. R. #1 

EUershouse, NS BON 1L0 

Phone: (902) 757-3084 



Mrs. I.J. Borowski 

Hi- Arrow Fold 

R. R. #6 

St. Thomas, ON N5P 3T1 

Phone: (519) 633-1568 



- 46 - 



DIRECTORY OF BREEDERS WITH RARE BREEDS 



M. Gilles Bouchard 

259 Boulevard Gaspe 
Gaspe, PQ GOC 1R0 



Mr. William Bryson 

Windrush Fold 
P. O. Box 81 
Brome,PQJ0ElK0 
Phone: (514) 538-2266 



A.R.C. Butson & Son 

Maple Brae Farm 
24 Auchmar Road 
Hamilton, ON L9C 1C5 
Phone: (905) 383-6775 
Fax: (905) 574-1968 



G., B. & F. Cahill 

Cahill Texas Longhorns 
R. R. #2 

Strathroy, ON N7G 3H4 
Phone: (519) 247-3644 



Mr. Michael Carty 

32 Kensington Ave. 
Kingston, ON K7L 4B5 
Phone: (613) 546-3010 



M. Fernand Charpentier 

Ferme Fernandale Enr. 

450 Rang St. Louis 

St. Guillaume D'Upton, PQ J0C 1L0 

Phone: (819) 396-5206 



Mr. Dell Clark 

916 Church St. 
Fenwick, ON LOS 1C0 



M. Jean-Paul Cote 

Ferme J.-P. Cote & Fils Inc. 
1225 Rte. 138 Ouest 
Neuville, Portneuf, PQ G0A 2R0 
Phone: (418) 876-2953 



Mr. Peter Cranham 

123 Henry St. 
Trenton, ON K8V 3T8 
Phone: (613) 394-5477 



Earl & Winona Crapp 

Earlona Farm 
1519 Villiers Line, R. R. #1 
Keene, ON K0L 2G0 
Phone: (705) 295-6536 



Mr. John Dawe 

R. R. #1 

Bras d'Or, NS B0C 1B0 



Jim & Carol Dawkins 

Box 1256 

Whitecourt, AB T7S 1P2 
Phone: (403) 778-5474 
Fax: (403) 778-2730 



- 47 - 



DIRECTORY OF BREEDERS WITH RARE BREEDS 



Frank & Gina Debogorski 

Box 1379 

Grimshaw, AB TOH 1W0 

Phone: (403) 597-3891 



M. Michel Desbiens 

2400 Ch. Derrick 
Stanstead, PQ JOB 3E0 



Douglas & Mary Donald 

Mill Hill Ranch 

R. R. #4 

Grandview, MB ROL 0Y0 

Phone: (204) 546-2220 



Mr. Hubert Earl 

Haedae Farms 
9121 Peterson Rd. 
Addison, ON K0E 1A0 
Phone: (613) 924-2052 
Fax: (613) 924-9755 



Mr. J.C. Eaton 

Eaton's of Canada 
250 Yonge St., 15th Floor 
Toronto, ON M5B 1C8 
Phone: (416) 343-4111 



G. Cardinale & G. Falardeau 

C. P. 314 

Guigues, PQ J0Z 2G0 

Phone: (819) 728-2441 



Mr. Brian Field 

Galloway Acres 

R. R. #1 

Port Howe, NS B0K 1K0 

Phone: (902) 243-2256 



Judy & Dan Fitzsimons 

Rimridge Farm for 
Rare Breeds of Farm Animals 
R.R. #3, Site 4, Box 13 
Rimbey, AB T0C 2J0 
Phone: (403) 843-6830 



Larry & Linda Fleming 

Double L Red Polls 
Box 269 

Wabamum, AB TOE 2K0 
Phone: (403) 892-2588 



Mrs. Patricia Freeman 

R. R. #3 

Dutton, ON N0L 1J0 
Phone: (519) 762-2446 
Fax: (519) 762-3672 



Mr. Derek Gee 

Old Fisher, Box 239 
Metcalfe, ON K0A 2P0 
Phone: (613) 821-1964 



M. Rejean Girard 

Au Domaine des Galloways 
1724 Denicour, C.P. 533 
St. Cesaire, PQ J0L 1T0 
Phone: (514) 469-3257 



- 48 - 



DIRECTORY OF BREEDERS WITH RARE BREEDS 



Mr. Alvin Goetz 

Frosty Acres Farms Ltd. 
Bluffton, AB TOC 0M0 
Phone: (403) 843-6482 



C.K. & M.M. Goodfellow 

Graymalkin Manor 
R. R. #3 

Stouffville, ON L4A 7X4 
Phone: (416) 473-2817 



Mr. Walter Goudy 

Merrittview Farm 
R. R. #3 

Markdale, ON NOC 1H0 
Phone: (519) 986-3015 



Mrs. Linda Graham 

P. O. Box 298 

Black Diamond, AB TOL OHO 



M. Real Grimard 

1395 rue Principale 

Parisville, Lobiniere, PQ GOS 1X0 



Mme. Monique Guay 

Ferme Emilien 
150 Rte. des Mines 
St-Jacques de Leeds, PQ GON 1J0 
Phone: (418) 424-0188 



Barry & Jean Haggett 

Fieldcrest Farm 

R. R. #2 

Addison, ON K0E 1A0 

Phone: (613) 924-9502 



Mr. Alain Hashimoto 

Walnut Ridge Farm (& Fold) 
11426 Sylvestre Rd., R. R. #3 
Mission, BC V2V 4J1 
Phone: (604) 826-1383 



Ms. B. Heidenreich 

Fern Hill Farm 

R. R. #1 

Bailieboro, ON K0L 1B0 

Phone: (705) 939-6831 

Fax: (705) 939-1556 



Bret & LouAnn Holt 
Holt-Dickinson Longhorns 
R. R. #1 

Winfield, AB TOC 2X0 
Phone: (403) 696-2223 
Fax: (403) 696-2207 



Mr. Lesley Jackson 

Lauriston Farm 
Site 3, Box 1, R. R. #4 
Calmar, AB TOC 0V0 
Phone: (403) 985-3863 



Ms. Jennifer Jardine 

Periwinkle Farm 
R. R. #4 

Athens, ON K0E 1B0 
Phone: (613) 924-9307 



49 - 



DIRECTORY OF BREEDERS WITH RARE BREEDS 



Mr. John Jeffery 

R. R. #3 

Caledon East, ON LON 1E0 

Phone: (416) 880-0229 



Mr. V.J. Jelinek 

R. R. #1 

Grand Valley, ON LON 1G0 



Miles & Brenda Johnson 

Molach Fold 
P. O. Box 328 
Turtlefold, SK SOM 2Y0 
Phone: (306) 845-3173 



Mr. Randy Kaiser 

R. R.#4 

Ponoka, AB T4J 1R4 

Phone: (403) 783-6614 



June & Frank Knox 

R. R. #3 

Appin, ON NOL 1A0 

Phone: (519) 289-5870 



Mr. Gordon Kohl 

Swains Fold 
Ch. Kohl, R. R. #1 
Georgeville, PQ JOB 1T0 
Phone: (819) 843-1394 



Mr. Brian Krick 

R. R. #1 

Stoney Creek, ON L8G 3X4 

Phone: (416) 662-1485 



M. Rene Lemaire 

Lazy "L" Ranch 
1402 Ch. Robinson 
Dunham, PQ JOE 1M0 
Phone: (514) 295-2557 
Fax: 



Mrs. Barbara Lewis 

Royals Beef Fold 
P. O. Box 338, R. R. #3 
Richmond, ON K0A 2Z0 
Phone: (613) 838-3586 



Fr. Bernard MacDonald 

Talbot House Fold 
Frenchvale, R. R. #2 
North Sydney, NS B2A 3L8 
Phone: (902) 794-2852 
Fax: (902) 794-2852 



David & Rosemary Manley 

Rhomanda Fold 
21123 8th Ave., R.R. #14 
Langley, BC V3A 7R2 
Phone: (604) 534-6678 



Mr. Alfred Masckle 

R. R. #2 

Mitchell, ON N0K 1N0 



- 50 - 



DIRECTORY OF BREEDERS WITH RARE BREEDS 



Mr. David McAdam 

Thorn Apple Croft 
Bull Pond Rd., R. R. #3 
Cowansville, PQ J2K 3G8 
Phone: (514) 263-2404 



Lome & Ruby McBeth 

RLT Texas Longhorns 
Box 4 

Baldonnel, BC VOC ICO 
Phone: (250) 789-3260 



John & Lee Mcllwraith 

Glenfiddich Galloways 
R. R. #3 

Puslinch, ON NOB 2J0 
Phone: (416) 659-3010 



Mrs. Karen McLeod 

Bokai Fold 

R. R. #2 

Mill Bay, BC V0R 2P0 

Phone: (604) 743-3236 



Dr. Donald McQueen-Shaver 

Shaver Beef Breeding Farms 
Box 817 

Cambridge, ON N1R 5W6 
Phone: (519) 623-4920 



Frank & Sandy Mills 

R. R. #1 

Marmora, ON K0K 2M0 

Phone: (613) 472-3672 



Jordan & Brigitte Morris 

12320 Land O'Nod Rd., R.R. #3 
North Augusta, ON K0C 1R0 
Phone: (613) 926-0544 



Tom & Shirley Morrish 

Willow-Mor Farms 
R. R. #1 

Devlin, ON P0W 1C0 
Phone: (807) 486-3622 



Robert & Brenda Murray 

R. R. #3 

Ashton, ON K0A 1B0 



G., H. & T. Myers 

R. R. #1 

Kensington, PEI COB 1M0 

Phone: (902) 836-5691 



Mrs. Cathy Nelson 

P. O. Box 418 
Marwayne, AB T0B 2X0 
Phone: (403) 847-2628 



Mrs. Betty O'Hara 

R. R. #1 

Southwold, ON N0L 2J0 



- 51 - 



DIRECTORY OF BREEDERS WITH RARE BREEDS 



Ronald & Charlene Orme 

902 Jerseyville Rd. West 
Jerseyville, ON LOR 1R0 
Phone: (416) 648-3362 



Mrs. Eileen Oxford 

1996 Middle Rd. 
Kingston, ON K7L 5H6 
Phone: (613) 546-4301 



Wes & Janice Parsons 

Box 1485 

Rossland, BC VOG 1Y0 

Phone: (604) 362-9672 



David & Nancy Pearse 

Glen Osprey Farm 
R. R. #6 

Shelburne, ON LON ISO 
Phone: (519) 925-6412 



Mrs. I.R. Perro 

R. R. #2 

Tottenham, ON LOG 1W0 
Phone: (905) 936-2069 
Fax: (905) 936-2069 



Ms. Diane Phipps 

Bo-di-Bar Farm 

23014, Springfield Rd., R. R. #3 
Appin, ON N0L 1A0 
Phone: (519) 289-5790 



Fredrick & Judith Pringle 

Ju-Will Grove Fold 
3609 Dicker Rd., R. R. #1 
Victoria, BC V9B 5T7 
Phone: (250) 478-1862 



M. Leo-Paul Provost 

1317 R. R. #2 

Acton Vale, PQJ0H1A0 

Phone: (514) 549-4068 



Jim & Evelyn Rae 

Jad Kyn Red Polls 
65 Manitoba St. 
Stouffville, ON L4A 4T2 
Phone: (905) 640-1220 



Mr. Keith Richardson 

Richardson's Fold 
Mac Lellan's Brook, R. R. #4 
New Glasgow, NS B2H 5C7 
Phone: (902) 922-2173 



Donald & Alice Richlings 

R. R. #3, 3012 Cowpath Rd. 
Dorchester, ON N0L 1G6 
Phone: (519) 268-7550 



Mr. Tom Ripley 

R. R. #2 

Hunter River, PEI C0A 1N0 

Phone: (902) 964-2008 



52 - 



DIRECTORY OF BREEDERS WITH RARE BREEDS 



M. Louis Roy 

Ferme Royala 

393 Rte. Kennedy 

St. Joseph de Beauce, PQ GOS 2V0 

Phone: (418) 397-4645 



Mr. John Saum 

Box 259 

Pilot Butte, SK SOG 3Z0 

Phone: (306) 781-4429 



Mr. Ronald S. Scott 

R. R. #2 

Ingersoll, ON N5C 3J5 

Phone: (519) 425-0909 



Tom, Allan & Randy Scott 

Scott Farms 

Box 477 

Hanna, AB TOJ IPO 

Phone: (403) 854-2138 



Mr. Ron Shelley 

Kettleview Farms 
R. R. #2 

Gorrie, ON NOG 1X0 
Phone: (519) 335-3879 



Jack & Phyliss Shier 

Squaw Coulee Texas Longhorns 
Box 7, Site 1, R.R. #1 
Cayley, AB T0L 0P0 
Phone: (403) 395-3744 
Fax: (403) 395-3788 



Mr. Daryl Shoemaker 

R. R. #1 

Elora, ON 

Phone: (519) 846-5292 



Mr. Ralph Spicer 

Spicer's Farm 
Box 6, Site 19, R. R. #1 
Wyunndel, BC 
Phone: (604) 866-5402 



M. Laval St-Gelais 

1453 Rang St. Ange 
Ste. Foy, PQ G2E 3L9 



Ian & Anna-Mae Starrett 

R. R. #1 

Fenelon Falls, ON 

Phone: (705) 887-2008 



Mr. Fred Stone 

Birch Valley Highlands 
P. O. Box 1090 
Wainright, AB T0B 4P0 
Phone: (403) 842-3967 



Mr. Arlin Strohschein 

Box 546 

Trochu, AB TOM 2C0 

Phone: (403) 442-4372 



53 - 



DIRECTORY OF BREEDERS WITH RARE BREEDS 



Mike & Claire Sullivan 

Maple Inn Farms 

R. R. #8 

Peterborough, ON K9J 6X9 

Phone: (705) 745-0830 



Mr. David Thomas 

56 Jeffrey 

Barrie, ON L4M 4L5 



Mr. Stewart Torrie 

Glen Aspen Fold 
648-4th Ave. N.E. 
Medicine Hat, AB T1A 6B4 
Phone: (403) 527-2064 



W.J. & V.A. Troop 

Crow Harbour Farm 
Box 1075 B 

Granville Ferry, NS BOS 1K0 
Phone: (902) 532-5044 



Mr. Milton Wallace 

R.R. #2 

Cameron, ON N0M 1G0 



Mr. Hans Westenberg 

Anchorage Fold 

R. R. #1 

Kingston, ON K7L 2N3 

Phone: (613) 548-4293 



Mary & Gil Wilson 

Kispiox Valley, Box 56, R. R. #1 
Hazelton, BC V0J 1Y0 
Phone: (604) 842-6025 



Reg & Christine Woodworth 

R. R. #1 

Lynden, ON LOR 1T0 

Phone: (519) 647-3397 



Mrs. Joan Wort 

Keijoasan Fold 
Hodge Podge Lodge, R. R. #2 
Tweed, ON K0K 3J0 
Phone: (613) 478-5929 
Fax: (613) 478-6752 



- 54 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Angus 

Registered: CLRC 

No. of males: Adult: 1 

No. of females: Adult: 3 

Availability: No 

Calf mortality: 5% 
Notes: Red Angus. 



Contact: Frank & Sandy Mills 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 



Other breeders 

Yes 

Pasture 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Increasing 

Meat 



Merits: Low maintenance, meat quality, 
superior productivity, maternal ability, herd 
instinct, calving ease. 



Breed: Belted Galloway 

Registered: CLRC 

No. of males: Adult: 1 

Availability: No 



Contact: Brian Field 

Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Other breeders 
Yes 

Conventional 
24 mo 
12 mo 



Increasing 

Storage of semen /embryos: 10 doses of semen 
from 1 bull stored. 
Usage: Meat 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, calving ease. 



Breed: Belted Galloway 



No. of males: Adult 
Calves 

No. of females: Adult 
Calves 

Availability: 



Contact: M. Rejean Girard 



3 

5 

16 

2 

Yes 



Source of bulls: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Own 

Pasture 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Same 

Storage of semen /embryos: 25 doses of semen 
from 1 bull stored at CIAQ, PQ. 
Usage: Meat, show 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, resistance to disease. 



- 55 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Belted Galloway 



Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult 

Calves 
No. of females: Adult 

Calves 
Availability: 
Calf mortality: 
Performance records: 



Contact: M. Rene Lemaire 



4 
2 
26 
6 

Yes 
<1% 
ROP 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 



Own, Scotland 

Yes 

Conventional 

12 mo 

Increasing 

Storage of semen /embryos: 10 doses of semen 
from 1 bull stored privately. 
Usage: Meat 

Merits: Low maintenance, meat quality, 
resistance to disease, calving ease. 



Breed: Belted Galloway 



Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult 

Calves 
No. of females: Adult 

Calves 
Availability: 
Calf mortality: 
Performance records: 



Contact: Jordan & Brigitte Morris 



2 
1 

13 
5 

Yes 
<2% 
Private 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 



Other breeders 

Yes 

Pasture 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Increasing 

Meat 



Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, calving 
ease. 



Breed: Belted Galloway 



Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult 

Calves 
No. of females: Adult 

Calves 
Availability: 



Contact: Mrs. I.R. Perro 



1 
3 
6 
1 
Yes 



Source of bulls: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 
Usage: 



Own 

Conventional 

12 mo 

Increasing 

Meat 
Merits: Hardiness, meat quality, resistance to 
disease, herd instinct. 



- 56 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Belted Galloway 

No. of males: Calves: 1 

No. of females: Adult: 3 

Calves: 1 

Availability: Yes 



Contact: W.J. & V.A. Troop 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Other breeders 

Yes 

Pasture 

24 mo 

12 mo 



Increasing 

Storage of semen /embryos: 7 doses of semen 
from 3 bulls stored privately. 
Usage: Meat, show, breeding 

stock 
Merits: Hardiness, meat quality. 



Breed: Belted Galloway 

Registered: CLRC, U.S. Belted Galloway Soc. 

No. of males: Adult: 1 

Calves: 4 

No. of females: Adult: 31 

Calves: 7 

Availability: Yes 

Calf mortality: 2% 

Bulls in Service: 1 

Bulls in A.I.: 4 

Performance records: ROP 



Contact: A.R.C. Butson & Son 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Own 

Yes 

Conventional 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Same 



Storage of semen /embryos: 312 doses of 
semen from 5 bulls stored at GENCOR, ON. 
Usage: Meat 

Merits: Hardiness, meat quality, maternal 
ability, calving ease. 



Breed: Canadienne 

Registered: CLRC 

No. of females: Adult: 14 

Calves: 4 

Availability: Yes 

Milk prod. /Lact.(l): 5500 

Milk Fat %: 4.2 

Milk Protein %: 3.6 



Contact: Ferme Beaudry et Fils 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Storage of semen /embryos: Yes 

Usage: Snow 

Merits: Calving ease 



Own 

Yes 

Conventional 

17 mo 

12 mo 

Decreasing 



- 57 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Canadienne 

Registered: CLRC 

No. of females: Adult: 2 

Availability: No 

Performance records: Private 

Notes: Rare Breeds Canada animals in host 

farm. 



Contact: Mr. Tony Bleumer 



Source of bulls: 
Canada 

Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 



Own, Rare Breeds 

Yes 

Conventional 
12 mo 
Increasing 



Storage of semen /embryos: 275 doses of 
semen from 11 bulls stored at Haedae Farms. 
Usage: Milk, rare breed 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, milk 
production, calving ease. 



Breed: Canadienne 




Registered: CLRC 




No. of females: Adult: 


15 


Calves: 


3 


Availability: 


Yes 


Milk prod. /Lact(l): 
Milk Fat %: 


5200 


4.2 


Milk Protein %: 


3.6 


Calf mortality: 


2% 



Contact: Mr. Fernand Charpentier 



Yes 

Conventional 
19 mo 
13 mo 



Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: Decreasing 

Usage: Milk, show 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, resistance 

to disease, calving ease. 



Breed: Canadienne 




No. of females: Adult: 


60 


Calves: 


19 


Availability: 


Yes 


Milk prod. /Lact.(l): 
Milk Fat %: 


5735 


4.5 


Milk Protein %: 


3.6 



Contact: M. Jean-Paul Cote 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 



Own, other breeders 

Yes 

Conventional 

25 mo 

12 mo 

Same 



Milk 
Merits: Hardiness, disease resistance, calving 
ease, milk production. 



- 58 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Canadienne 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of females: Adult: 
Calves: 
Availability: 



Contact: Mr. Hubert Earl 



11 
1 

No 



Notes: Rare Breeds Canada animals in host farm 
(2 cows and one heifer at Haedae Farm, 2 cows 
at Tony Bleumer). 



CIAQ, Other breeders 
Yes 

Conventional 
24-30 mo 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 12 mo 

Herd size: Increasing 

Storage of semen /embryos: 10 c 

from 2 bulls stored at EBI, ON. 

Usage: Milk, rare breed 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, milk 

production, calving ease. 



oses of semen 



Breed: Canadienne 




Registered: CLRC 




No. of males: Adult: 


1 


No. of females: Adult: 


25 


Calves: 


5 


Availability: 


No 


Milk prod. /Lact.(l): 
Milk Fat %: 


3959 


4.1 


Milk Protein %: 


3.5 


Bulls in Service: 


1 



Contact: M. Real Grimard 



Other breeders 

Yes 

Conventional 

12 mo 

Same 

Milk 
Merits: Low maintenance, resistance to disease, 
calving ease, milk production. 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 
Usage: 



Breed: Canadienne 

Registered: CLRC 

No. of females: Adult: 95 

Calves: 1 

Availability: Yes 

Milk Fat %: 4.3 

Milk Protein %: 3.7 



Contact: M. Leo-Paul Provost 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 
Usage: 



Other breeders 

Yes 

Conventional 

12 mo 

Same 

Milk, show 
Merits: Hardiness, resistance to disease, calving 
ease, milk production. 



- 59 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Canadienne 

No. of females: Adult: 25 

Calves: 20 

Availability: Yes 

Milk prod. /Lact.(l): 4800 

Milk Fat %: 4.0 

Milk Protein %: 3.7 

Performance records: ROP 



Contact: Mr. Louis Roy 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 



Own 

Yes 

Conventional 

12 mo 

Decreasing 



Merits: Low maintenance, resistance to disease. 



Breed: Dexter 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of females: Adult: 
Availability: 



1 

No 



Contact: Mr. Fred Barlow 



Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 



Conventional 
12 mo 
Increasing 
Usage: Meat, milk 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, milk 
production, calving ease. 



Breed: Dexter 

No. of females: Adult: 5 

Calves: 2 

Availability: Yes 



Contact: R.D. & L.M. Barnard 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 



Other breeders 

Yes 

Pasture 

24 mo 

12 mo 



Increasing 

Meat, breeding stock 
Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, maternal 
ability, herd instinct, feed conversion, calving 
ease, temperament. 



- 60 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Dexter 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of females: Adult: 
Calves: 



3 
1 



Contact: Donald & Donna Bissett 

Merits: Hardiness, maternal ability, herd 
instinct, calving ease. 



Breed: Dexter 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of females: Adult: 
Availability: 



Contact: Mr. Peter Cranham 



4 
No 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: Meat 

Merits: Hardiness, maternal ability, resistance 

to disease, calving ease. 



Other breeders 

Yes 

Pasture 

18 mo 

12 mo 

Same 



Breed: Dexter 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult 

Calves 
No. of females: Adult 

Calves 
Availability: 
Bulls in Service: 



Contact: Earl & Winona Crapp 



1 
3 
14 
7 

Yes 
2 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Own 

Yes 

Conventional 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Decreasing 



Storage of semen /embryos: 139 doses of 
semen from 11 bulls stored at GENCOR, ON. 
Usage: Meat 

Merits: Low maintenance, meat quality, 
superior productivity, calving ease. 



- 61 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Dexter 

No. of males: Adult 
Calves 
No. of females: Adult 
Availability: 
Bulls in Service: 
Performance records: 



Contact: Jim & Carol Dawkins 



2 

2 

4 

Yes 

2 

Private 



Notes: Producing Red Dexter. 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Own, other breeders 

Yes 

Pasture 

14 mo 

12 mo 



Increasing 

Storage of semen /embryos: 7 doses of semen 
from 1 bull stored privately. 
Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, maternal 
ability, resistance to disease, calving ease. 



Breed: Dexter 

Registered: CLRC 

No. of males: Adult: 2 

Calves: 1 

No. of females: Adult: 10 

Availability: Yes 

Calf mortality: <1% 

Bulls in A.I.: 1 
Notes: 5 embryos from 1 cow stored at 
GENCOR, ON. 



Contact: Mrs. Patricia Freeman 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Own, other breeders 

Yes 

Pasture 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Increasing 

Storage of semen /embryos: 1500 doses of 
semen from 4 bulls stored at GENCOR, ON. 
Usage: Meat, breeding stock 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, superior 
productivity, maternal ability, resistance to 
disease, calving ease. 



Breed: Dexter 

No. of males: Adult 
No. of females: Adult 
Calves 
Availability: 
Notes: Irish Dexter. 



Contact: Mr. Alain Hashimoto 



1 
5 
1 
Yes 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 



Other breeders 
Yes 

Conventional 
18-24 mo 
12 mo 



Increasing 

Meat 
Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, maternal ability, resistance to disease, 
herd instinct, feed conversion, calving ease. 



- 62 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Dexter 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult: 
No. of females: Adult 
Calves 
Availability: 
Performance records: 



Contact: Ms. Jennifer Jardine 



1 
6 
1 

Yes 
Private 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Own, other breeders 
Yes 

Conventional 
21-22 mo 
12 mo 



Increasing 

Storage of semen /embryos: 4 doses of semen 
from 1 bull stored at EBI, ON. 
Usage: Meat, breeding stock 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, feed 
conversion, calving ease. 



Breed: Dexter 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of females: Adult: 
Availability: 
Performance records: 



7 

Yes 
Private 



Contact: Mr. V.J. Jelinek 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 
Usage: 



Other breeders 

Yes 

Pasture 

12 mo 

Increasing 

Breeding stock 



Merits: Hardiness, resistance to disease, feed 
conversion, calving ease. 



Breed: Dexter 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult 
No. of females: Adult 
Calves 
Availability: 
Bulls in Service: 
Performance records: 
Notes: Irish Dexter. 



Contact: June & Frank Knox 



1 

7 

2 

Yes 

1 

Private 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Herd size: 



Own, other breeders 

Yes 

Conventional 

18 mo 

Decreasing 



Storage of semen /embryos: 4 doses of semen 
from 1 bull stored at GENCOR, ON. 
Usage: Meat 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, maternal ability, calving ease. 



- 63 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Dexter 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Calves: 
No. of females: Adult: 
Calves: 
Notes: Irish Dexter. 



Contact: G., H. & T. Myers 



2 
1 



Source of bulls: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Ontario 

Conventional 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Increasing 

Storage of semen /embryos: 4 doses of semen 
from 1 bull stored at Charlottetown A.I., NS. 
Usage: Meat, milk 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, superior productivity, maternal ability, 
daily gain, resistance to disease, herd instinct, 
feed conversion, calving ease. 



Breed: Dexter 



Registered: American Dexter Cattle Assoc. 



No. of males: Adult 
No. of females: Adult 
Calves 
Bulls in A.I.: 



1 

3 
1 



Contact: Mrs. Cathy Nelson 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Own, other breeders 

Yes 

Conventional 

23-24 mo 

12 mo 

Same 



Storage of semen /embryos: 9 doses of semen 
from 3 bulls stored privately. 
Usage: Meat, milk 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, maternal ability, resistance to disease, 
herd instinct, feed conversion, milk production, 
calving ease. 



Breed: Dexter 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Calves: 
No. of females: Adult: 
Availability: 
Notes: Irish Dexter. 



1 
2 
Yes 



Contact: Mrs. Betty O'Hara 

Breeding stock: Yes 

Housing: Conventional 

Age at first calving: 24 mo 

Merits: Hardiness, resistance to disease, calving 

ease. 



- 64 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Dexter 

No. of males: Adult 
Calves 

No. of females: Adult 
Calves 

Availability: 



Contact: Ronald & Charlene Orme 



3 
1 
8 
2 
Yes 



Source of bulls: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 



Own, other breeders 
Pasture 
30 mo 
12 mo 



Increasing 

Meat 
Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, superior productivity, maternal ability, 
resistance to disease, herd instinct, calving ease. 



Breed: Dexter 

No. of females: Adult: 4 



Contact: Mrs. Eileen Oxford 

Herd size: Decreasing 

Merits: Meat quality, calving ease. 



Breed: Dexter 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of females: Adult: 
Availability: 
Calf mortality: 



2 

No 
<1% 



Contact: Donald & Alice Richiings 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Ireland 

Yes 

Conventional 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Increasing 



Storage of semen /embryos: 1 dose of semen 
from 1 bull stored at GENCOR, ON. 
Usage: Meat, breeding stock 



- 65 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Dexter 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult 

Calves 
No. of females: Adult 

Calves 
Availability: 



Contact: Mr. Ralph Spicer 



3 
1 
3 
3 
Yes 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Usage: 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 

quality, calving ease. 



Own 

Yes 

Conventional 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Meat 



Breed: Dexter 

No. of males: Calves: 2 

No. of females: Adult: 2 

Availability: Yes 

Notes: Irish Dexter. Only milk during the first 

4 weeks of lactation to alleviate udder. 



Contact: Ian & Anna-Mae Starrett 



Source of bulls: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 



Own 

Conventional 

21 mo 

12 mo 

Increasing 

Meat, show, rare breed 



Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality. 



Breed: Dexter 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of females: Adult: 
Availability: 



6 
Yes 



Contact: W.J. & V.A. Troop 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Age at first calving: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 



Other breeders 

Yes 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Increasing 

Storage of semen /embryos: 20 doses of semen 
from 7 bulls stored privately. 
Usage: Meat, milk, work, 

breeding stock 

Merits: Low maintenance, meat quality, 
maternal ability, calving ease. 



66 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Dutch Belted 

Registered: Amer. Minor Breeds Conservancy 
No. of females: Adult: 7 
Calves: 2 
Availability: Yes 



Contact: Mr. Hubert Earl 

Source of bulls: USA 

Housing: Conventional 

Calving interval: 12 mo 

Herd size: Increasing 

Storage of semen /embryos: 30 doses of semen 

from 5 bulls stored at EBI, ON. 

Usage: Milk, rare breed 

Merits: Low maintenance, resistance to disease, 

milk production, calving ease. 



Breed: Galloway 

No. of females: Adult: 



Contact: Donald & Donna Bissett 



Breed: Galloway 

Registered: CLRC 

No. of males: Adult: 7 

No. of females: Adult: 13 

Availability: Yes 

Performance records: Private 

Notes: 14 embryos from 3 cows stored in 

Guelph 



Contact: John & Lee Mcllwraith 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Own, other breeders 

Yes 

Conventional 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Decreasing 



Storage of semen /embryos: 200 doses of 
semen from 10 bulls stored privately. 
Usage: Meat, show 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, maternal ability, resistance to disease, 
herd instinct, feed conversion, calving ease. 



- 67 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Galloway 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult 

Calves 
No. of females: Adult 

Calves 
Availability: 
Bulls in Service: 



Contact: Tom & Shirley Morrish 



2 

3 

13 

3 

Yes 

2 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 



Own, SK 

Yes 

Pasture 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Increasing 

Meat 



Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, calving ease. 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult 

Calves 
No. of females: Adult 

Calves 
Availability: 
Calf mortality: 
Performance records: 



Contact: Mr. John Badger 



3 

6 

22 

4 

Yes 

1-2% 

PATBQ 



Source of bulls: 

breeders 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 



Own, USA, other 

Yes 

Pasture 
24 mo 
12 mo 



Increasing 

Meat, breeding stock 
Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, maternal ability, daily gain, resistance 
to disease, herd instinct, feed conversion, 
calving ease. 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 

No. of males: Adult: 43 

Calves: 44 

No. of females: Adult: 118 

Calves: 25 

Availability: Yes 

Calf mortality: 1% 

Bulls in Service: 12 

Performance records: PATBQ 
Notes: Largest and most genetically diverse 
herd in Canada. 



Contact: Don & Margaret Badger 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Herd size: 



Own 

Yes 

Pasture 

32-36 mo 

Increasing 

Storage of semen /embryos: 3 embryos from 2 
cows stored at CIAQ, PQ. 
Usage: Meat 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, calving ease. 



- 68 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Highland 




Registered: CLRC 




No. of males: Adult: 


20 


Calves: 


15 


No. of females: Adult: 


86 


Calves: 


12 


Performance records: 


Private 



Contact: Herbert & Ann Becker 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Usage: 



Own, other breeders 

Yes 

Conventional 

24 mo 

Meat 
Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, maternal ability, resistance to disease, 
herd instinct, feed conversion, milk production, 
calving ease. 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of females: Adult: 



Contact: Donald & Donna Bissett 

Merits: Meat quality, maternal ability, herd 
instinct, calving ease. 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult: 
No. of females: Adult: 
Availability: 



1 

3 
No 



Contact: Mark & Margaret Bond 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 



Other breeders 

Yes 

Pasture 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Same 

Meat 



Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, herd 
instinct, feed conversion. 






- 69 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Highland 



Contact: Mrs. I.J. Borowski 

Source of bulls: Own 

Storage of semen /embryos: 560 doses of 

semen from 1 bull stored at GENCOR, ON. 

Usage: Meat 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 

quality, maternal ability, daily gain, resistance 

to disease, herd instinct, feed conversion, 

calving ease. 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 

No. of males: Adult: 1 

No. of females: Adult: 3 

Availability: No 

Bulls in Service: 1 

Performance records: Private 



Contact: M. Gilles Bouchard 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 
Usage: 



Other breeders 

Yes 

Pasture 

12 mo 

Same 

Meat 



Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, resistance to disease, herd instinct, 
calving ease. 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 

No. of males: Adult: 2 

No. of females: Adult: 5 

Availability: Yes 

Bulls in Service: 1 

Performance records: Private 



Contact: Mr. William Bryson 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 
Usage: 



Own, USA 

Yes 

12 mo 

Same 

Meat, breeding stock 
Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, resistance to disease, calving ease. 



- 70 - 






RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Highland 




Registered: CLRC 




No. of males: Adult: 


5 


Calves: 


4 


No. of females: Adult: 


40 


Calves: 


10 


Availability: 


Yes 


Bulls in Service: 


4 


Bulls in A.L: 


2 



Contact: Mr. Michael Carty 



Notes: Cattle have won a number of awards 
over the years at the Royal Agricultural Winter 
Fair. 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 



Own, other breeders 

Yes 

Conventional 

12 mo 

Increasing 



Storage of semen /embryos: 1000 doses of 

semen from 2 bulls stored at EBI, ON. 

Usage: Meat, show, breeding 

stock 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, resistance 

to disease, feed conversion. 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC, Can. Highland Cattle Soc. 
No. of females: Adult: 2 
Availability: No 



Contact: Mr. Dell Clark 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Herd size: 



Other breeders 

Yes 

Conventional 

36 mo 

Increasing 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, maternal 
ability, calving ease. 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult 
No. of females: Adult 
Calves 
Availability: 
Bulls in Service: 



Contact: Mr. John Dawe 



1 
4 
1 

Yes 
1 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 



Own, other breeders 

Yes 

Pasture 

30-36 mo 

12 mo 

Increasing 

Meat 
Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, calving ease. 



- 71 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult: 
No. of females: Adult: 
Availability: 



1 
5 
Yes 



Contact: Frank & Gina Debogorski 



Source of bulls: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 



Other breeders 
Pasture 
24 mo 
12 mo 



Decreasing 

Meat 
Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, maternal ability, resistance to disease, 
herd instinct, feed conversion, milk production, 
calving ease. 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 

No. of males: Calves: 1 

No. of females: Adult: 22 

Calves: 4 

Availability: No 

Performance records: ROP 



Contact: M. Michel Desbiens 



Source of bulls: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 
Usage: 



Own 
Pasture 
12 mo 
Increasing 
Show 



Merits: Low maintenance, maternal ability, 
resistance to disease, milk production. 



Breed: Highland 

No. of males: Adult 
Calves 

No. of females: Adult 
Calves 

Availability: 



Contact: Mr. J.C. Eaton 



3 

3 

16 

3 

Yes 



Own, USA 

Yes 

Pasture 

Decreasing 
Usage: Meat 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, resistance 
to disease, calving ease. 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Herd size: 



- 72 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult 
Calves 
No. of females: Adult 
Availability: 
Bulls in Service: 
Performance records: 



Contact: G. Cardinale & G. Falardeau 



3 
4 
16 
Yes 
2 
ROP 



Source of bulls: 

breeders 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 



Own, USA, other 

Yes 

Pasture 
26 mo 
12 mo 
Same 
Meat 



Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, maternal ability. 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult: 
No. of females: Adult: 
Availability: 



1 
6 
Yes 



Contact: Judy & Dan Fitzsimons 

Source of bulls: Other breeders 

Breeding stock: Yes 

Housing: Conventional 

Herd size: Increasing 

Storage of semen /embryos: 2 doses of semen 

from 1 bull stored privately. 

Usage: Meat 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, maternal 

ability, resistance to disease. 



Breed: Highland 

No. of males: Adult 
No. of females: Adult 
Calves 
Availability: 



Contact: Mr. Derek Gee 



1 
8 
1 

No 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 
Usage: 



Own 

Yes 

12 mo 

Same 

Meat 
Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, maternal ability, resistance to disease, 
calving ease. 






- 73 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult 
No. of females: Adult 
Calves 
Availability: 
Bulls in Service: 
Bulls in A.I.: 



Contact: C.K. & M.M. Goodfellow 



1 

5 
4 

Yes 
1 

2 



Notes: Bloodline producing 85% females over 
four generations. 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 



Own 
Yes 

Pasture 
12 mo 
Same 



Storage of semen /embryos: 120 doses of 
semen from 2 bulls stored at GENCOR, ON. 
Usage: Breeding stock 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, maternal ability, resistance to disease, 
herd instinct, calving ease. 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of females: Adult: 



Contact: Mrs. Linda Graham 



Other breeders 

Pasture 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Meat 
Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, maternal 
ability, calving ease. 



Source of bulls: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Usage: 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 

No. of males: Calves: 1 

No. of females: Adult: 1 

Availability: Yes 

Bulls in Service: 1 



Contact: Mme. Monique Guay 

Housing: Conventional 

Calving interval: 12 mo 

Herd size: Decreasing 

Merits: Low maintenance, maternal ability, 
resistance to disease. 



- 74 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Highland 

No. of males: Adult 
No. of females: Adult 
Calves 
Notes: Scottish Highland. 



Contact: Ms. B. Heidenreich 



1 
5 
1 



Other breeders 

Pasture 

12 mo 

Increasing 

Meat 
Merits: Hardiness, maternal ability, resistance 
to disease, herd instinct, calving ease. 



Source of bulls: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 
Usage: 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult 

Calves 
No. of females: Adult 

Calves 
Availability: 
Bulls in Service: 



Contact: Mr. Lesley Jackson 



2 
10 
18 
1 

Yes 
2 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Own, other breeders 

Yes 

Pasture 

24 mo 

12 mo 



Increasing 

Storage of semen /embryos: 2 doses of semen 
from 1 bull stored at Leduc, AB. 
Usage: Meat 

Merits: Hardiness, meat quality, maternal 
ability, calving ease. 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult 

Calves 
No. of females: Adult 

Calves 
Availability: 



Contact: Mr. John Jeffery 



1 
1 

14 
1 
Yes 



Own, other breeders 

Yes 

Pasture 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Same 

Meat, show, breeding 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 

stock 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, maternal 

ability, calving ease. 



- 75 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Highland 

No. of males: Adult: 2 

No. of females: Adult: 20 

Bulls in Service: 2 

Performance records: Private 



Contact: Miles & Brenda Johnson 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 



Own, other breeders 

Yes 

Conventional 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Same 



Meat 
Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, maternal ability, resistance to disease, 
herd instinct, calving ease. 



Breed: Highland 

No. of males: Adult 
Calves 

No. of females: Adult 
Calves 

Availability: 



Contact: Mr. Gordon Kohl 



4 

5 

10 

3 

Yes 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 
Usage: 



Own, UK 

Yes 

Pasture 

12 mo 

Decreasing 

Meat, breeding stock 
Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, superior productivity, maternal ability, 
daily gain, resistance to disease, herd instinct, 
feed conversion, calving ease. 



Breed: Highland 

No. of males: Adult 
Calves 
No. of females: Adult 
Availability: 



1 
2 
10 
Yes 



Contact: Mrs. Barbara Lewis 

Source of bulls: Own 

Merits: Hardiness, meat quality, resistance to 

disease. 



- 76 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult 
No. of females: Adult 
Calves 
Bulls in Service: 



Contact: Fr. Bernard MacDonald 



1 
19 

5 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 



Other breeders 

Yes 

Conventional 

22-24 mo 

12 mo 

Increasing 

Meat 



Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, calving ease. 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 

No. of males: Adult: 8 

No. of females: Adult: 10 

Availability: Yes 

Bulls in Service: 1 

Bulls in A.I.: 1 



Contact: David & Rosemary Manley 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



U.K., other breeders 

Yes 

Pasture 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Decreasing 
Storage of semen /embryos: 146 doses of 
semen from 1 bull stored at Milner A.I., BC. 
Usage: Meat 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, maternal ability, resistance to disease, 
herd instinct, calving ease. 



Breed: Highland 

No. of males: Calves: 1 

No. of females: Adult: 5 

Calves: 1 

Availability: No 



Contact: Mr. David McAdam 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 
Usage: 



Own 

Yes 

Pasture 

12 mo 

Same 

Meat 
Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, maternal ability, daily gain, resistance 
to disease, herd instinct, feed conversion, 
calving ease. 



- 77 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult: 
No. of females: Adult: 
Calf mortality: 



Contact: Mrs. Karen McLeod 



1 

13 

<3% 



Source of bulls: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 



Own, other breeders 

Pasture 

36 mo 

12 mo 

Same 



Meat, breeding stock 
Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, maternal ability, resistance to disease, 
herd instinct, calving ease. 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of females: Adult: 
Availability: 



2 

No 



Contact: Frank & Sandy Mills 

Housing: Pasture 

Herd size: Same 

Usage: Meat 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, maternal 

ability, resistance to disease. 



Breed: Highland 




Registered: CLRC 




No. of males: Adult: 


2 


Calves: 


1 


No. of females: Adult: 


15 


Calves: 


3 


Availability: 


Yes 


Bulls in Service: 


2 


Bulls in A.I.: 


1 



Contact: Robert & Brenda Murray 



Notes: This is a unique herd based on the herd 
sire, GUSGURLACH of WINDRUSH, son of an 
imported Scottish bull, IAIN MOR of 
GLENQUOICH, a cow ANNAH RUADH of 
TALBOT, progeny of an imported Scottish cow, 
ALICE DUBH 12th of CAILAICH. 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Own, other breeders 
Yes 

Conventional 
24-33 mo 
12 mo 



Increasing 

Storage of semen /embryos: 4 doses of semen 
from 1 bull stored at EBI, ON. 
Usage: Meat, show 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, calving ease. 



- 78 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Calves: 
No. of females: Adult: 
Availability: 



2 
6 
No 



Contact: Wes & Janice Parsons 

Breeding stock: Yes 

Housing: Pasture 

Age at first calving: 36 mo 

Calving interval: 12 mo 

Herd size: Increasing 

Storage of semen /embryos: 8 doses from 1 bull 

at A.I. Centre, BC. 

Usage: Meat 

Merits: Hardiness, meat quality, maternal 

ability, calving ease. 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 

No. of males: Adult: 1 

No. of females: Adult: 2 

Availability: Yes 

Performance records: ROP 



Contact: Ms. Diane Phipps 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 

stock 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 

quality, herd instinct. 



Own 

Yes 

Pasture 

12 mo 

Increasing 

Meat, show, breeding 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of females: Adult: 4 
Calves: 1 
Availability: Yes 

Notes: Scottish Highland. 



Contact: Fredrick & Judith Pringle 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 
Usage: 



Other breeders 

Yes 

Pasture 

12 mo 

Decreasing 

Meat 



Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, calving ease. 



- 79 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult: 
No. of females: Adult: 
Availability: 



1 

2 

No 



Contact: Mr. Keith Richardson 

Source of bulls: Other breeders 

Housing: Pasture 

Herd size: Increasing 

Storage of semen /embryos: 7 doses of semen 

from 2 bulls stored at N.S. Animal Breeders 

Coop., NS. 

Usage: Meat 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, maternal 

ability, calving ease. 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult 
No. of females: Adult 
Calves 
Availability: 



Contact: Mr. John Saum 



1 
4 
1 

No 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 
Usage: 



Own 

Yes 

Pasture 

12 mo 

Increasing 

Meat 
Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, maternal ability, herd instinct, calving 
ease. 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 

No. of males: Adult: 3 

No. of females: Adult: 9 

Calves: 1 

Availability: Yes 

Calf mortality: <1% 

Bulls in Service: 2 

Notes: 6 embryos from 1 cow stored at 
GENCOR, ON. 



Contact: Mr. Ronald S. Scott 



Source of bulls: 

breeders 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Own, USA, other 



Yes 

Pasture 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Same 

Storage of semen /embryos: 1 dose of semen 
from 1 bull stored at GENCOR, ON. 
Usage: Meat, show, breeding 

stock 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, maternal ability, resistance to disease, 
herd instinct, feed conversion, calving ease. 



- 80 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of females: Adult: 
Availability: 



4 
Yes 



Contact: M. Laval St-Gelais 

Source of bulls: Other breeders 

Housing: Pasture 

Herd size: Increasing 

Usage: Meat, show 

Merits: Low maintenance, maternal ability, 
resistance to disease, calving ease. 



Breed: Highland 

No. of females: Adult: 
Performance records: 



4 
ROP 



Contact: Mr. Fred Stone 



Source of bulls: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 



Own 

12 mo 

Same 

Usage: Meat 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, resistance to disease, feed conversion, 
calving ease. 



Breed: Highland 

No. of males: Adult 
Calves 

No. of females: Adult 
Calves 

Availability: 

Calf mortality: 

Performance records: 



Contact: Mr. David Thomas 



3 

3 

15 

5 

Yes 

2% 

ROP 



Own 

Yes 

Pasture 

Increasing 
Usage: Meat 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, resistance to disease, calving ease. 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Herd size: 



- 81 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 

No. of males: Adult: 1 

Calves: 4 
No. of females: Adult: 9 

Calves: 4 
Availability: No 

Bulls in Service: 1 

Performance records: Private 
Notes: Some embryos collected from one cow 
and stored at Canadiana Genetics, Carstairs, 
AB. 



Contact: Mr. Stewart Torrie 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 



Other breeders 

Yes 

Conventional 

12 mo 

Increasing 

Storage of semen /embryos: 16 doses of semen 
from 1 bull stored at Universal Genetics, AB. 
Usage: Meat 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, feed conversion. 



Breed: Highland 

No. of males: Adult: 
No. of females: Adult: 
Availability: 
Calf mortality: 
Bulls in Service: 



Contact: Mr. Hans Westenberg 



1 

10 
Yes 



Own, other breeders 

Pasture 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Decreasing 

Show 
Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, resistance to disease, herd instinct, 
calving ease. 



Source of bulls: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 



Breed: Highland 

No. of males: Adult: 1 

No. of females: Adult: 2 

Availability: Yes 



Contact: Mary & Gil Wilson 



Source of bulls: 
Housing: 
Herd size: 



Own 

Pasture 

Same 

Usage: Meat 

Merits: Low maintenance, maternal ability, 
herd instinct, calving ease. 



- 82 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult 

Calves 
No. of females: Adult 

Calves 
Availability: 
Calf mortality: 



Contact: Reg & Christine Woodworth 



3 

3 

20 

7 

Yes 

<1% 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 
Usage: 



Own, other breeders 

Yes 

Conventional 

12 mo 

Increasing 

Meat, show 



Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, calving ease. 



Breed: Highland 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult 

Calves 
No. of females: Adult 

Calves 
Availability: 



Contact: Mrs. Joan Wort 



3 

6 

30 

9 

Yes 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 



Own, other breeders 

Yes 

Pasture 

33-36 mo 

12 mo 



Decreasing 

Meat, show 
Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, resistance 
to disease, calving ease. 



Breed: Kerry 

No. of females: Adult: 3 

Notes: Rare Breeds Canada animals on host 

farm. 



Contact: Bryce & Margo Bell 



- 83 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Kerry 

Registered: CLRC 

No. of females: Calves: 1 



Contact: Donald & Donna Bissett 



Breed: Kerry 

Registered: CLRC, Kerry Assoc, Ireland 

No. of males: Adult: 1 

No. of females: Adult: 8 

Availability: No 

Bulls in Service: 1 

Notes: Rare Breeds Canada animals on host 

farm. 



Contact: Mr. Hubert Earl 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 



Own, Ireland 
Yes 

Conventional 
12 mo 
Increasing 



Storage of semen /embryos: 500 doses of 
semen from 5 bulls stored at EBI, ON. and 
Haedae Farms. 

Usage: Show, rare breed 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, maternal 
ability, resistence to disease, calving ease. 



Breed: Kerry 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult 
No. of females: Adult 
Calves 
Availability: 
Performance records: 



Contact: Judy & Dan Fitzsimons 



3 
6 
1 

Yes 
Private 



Source of bulls: 
Conservancy 
Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 



Rare Breeds 



Yes 

Conventional 

12 mo 

Increasing 

Storage of semen /embryos: 6 doses of semen 
from 3 bulls stored privately. 
Usage: Milk 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, resistance 
to disease, herd instinct, milk production. 



- 84 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Kerry 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of females: Adult: 
Bulls in A.I.: 



Contact: Mr. Brian Krick 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Ireland, other breeders 

Yes 

Conventional 

24 mo 

12 mo 



Same 

Storage of semen /embryos: 45 doses of semen 
from 3 bulls stored at GENCOR, ON. 
Usage: Meat 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, calving 
ease. 



Breed: Kerry 

No. of females: Adult: 2 
Availability: No 

Performance records: Private 
Notes: Rare Breeds Canada animals on host 
farm. 



Contact: Mr. Milton Wallace 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Herd size: 
Usage: 



Own 

Yes 

Conventional 

Increasing 

Rare breed 



Breed: Lincoln Red 

No. of males: Adult: 4 

No. of females: Adult: 16 

Availability: Yes 

Calf mortality: 1% 

Bulls in A.I.: 9 

Performance records: Private 
Notes: 6 embryos from 2 cows stored at 
GENCOR, ON. 



Contact: Dr. D. McQueen-Shaver 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Own 

Yes 

Conventional 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Increasing 



Storage of semen /embryos: 800 doses of 

semen from 9 unrelated bulls stored at 

GENCOR, ON. 

Usage: Meat 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 

quality, maternal ability, feed conversion, 

calving ease. 



- 85 



RAKE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Red Poll 




Registered: CLRC 




No. of males: Adult: 


3 


Calves: 


12 


No. of females: Adult: 


29 


Calves: 


14 


Availability: 


Yes 


Performance records: 


ROP 



Contact: Douglas & Mary Donald 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Calving interval 
Herd size: 
Usage: 



Own, other breeders 

Yes 

Conventional 

12 mo 

Increasing 

Breeding stock 



Merits: Meat quality, maternal ability, milk 
production, calving ease. 



Breed: Red Poll 

Registered: CLRC 
No. of males: Adult 
Calves 
No. of females: Adult 
Availability: 
Bulls in Service: 
Performance records: 



10 
9 

92 
Yes 
5 
Private 



Contact: Larry & Linda Fleming 

Own, USA, other 



Source of bulls: 
breeders 
Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 
Usage: 



Yes 

Conventional 
12 mo 
Increasing 
Meat 



Merits: Meat quality, maternal ability, milk 
production, Calving ease. 



Breed: Red Poll 

No. of males: Adult 
No. of females: Adult 
Calves 
Bulls in Service: 



1 
3 

2 



Contact: Jim & Evelyn Rae 



Source of bulls: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 
Usage: 



Own, other breeders 

Conventional 

12 mo 

Same 

Meat 
Merits: Low maintenance, meat quality, 
maternal ability, resistance to disease, nerd 
instinct, feed conversion, milk production, 
calving ease. 



- 86 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Salers 

Registered: Salers Assoc. 
No. of males: Adult: 
No. of females: Adult: 
Availability: 
Calf mortality: 
Bulls in Service: 
Performance records: 



Contact: David & Nancy Pearse 



of Canada 

4 

67 
Yes 
1.7% 
2 

ROP, Others 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Own, other breeders 
Yes 

Conventional 
24 mo 
12 mo 



Same 

Storage of semen /embryos: 67 doses of semen 
from 6 bulls stored at GENCOR, ON 
Usage: Meat 

Merits: Hardiness, maternal ability, resistance 
to disease, calving ease. 



Breed: Shorthorn 




No. of males: Adult: 


1 


Calves: 


2 


No. of females: Adult: 


72 


Calves: 


30 


Availability: 


Yes 


Milk prod. /Lact.(l): 
Milk Fat %: 


6600 


3.8 


Milk Protein %: 


3.4 


Calf mortality: 


1% 


Performance records: 


ADLIC 


Notes: Milking Shorthorn. 



Contact: Keith & Sylvia Barrett 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Own, USA 
Yes 

Conventional 
26-30 mo 
13 mo 
Same 



Storage of semen /embryos: Semen from 8 
bulls stored 

Usage: Meat, milk, show 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, feed 
conversion, milk production, calving ease. 



Breed: Shorthorn 




No. of males: Adult: 


4 


Calves: 


10 


No. of females: Adult: 


31 


Calves: 


11 


Availability: 


Yes 


Milk prod. /Lact.(l): 
Milk Fat %: 


6748 


3.9 


Milk Protein %: 


3.4 


Calf mortality: 


3% 


Bulls in Service: 


2 


Performance records: 


DHIA 



Contact: Mr. Walter Goudy 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Own, other breeders 
Yes 

Conventional 
24-30 mo 
12 mo 



Notes: Milking Shorthorn. 



Same 

Storage of semen /embryos: 60 doses of semen 
from 8 bulls stored at GENCOR, ON. 
Usage: Meat, milk 

Merits: Hardiness, feed conversion, milk 
production, calving ease. 



- 87 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Shorthorn 

Registered: CLRC 

No. of males: Calves: 3 

No. of females: Adult: 14 

Calves: 2 

Availability: Yes 
Notes: Beef Shorthorn. 



Contact: Barry & Jean Haggett 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Own, Australia 

Yes 

Pasture 

24 mo 

12 mo 



Same 

Storage of semen /embryos: 25 doses of semen 
from 3 bulls stored at EBI, ON. 
Usage: Meat, breeding stock 

Merits: Meat quality, maternal ability, feed 
conversion, calving ease. 



Breed: Shorthorn 




Registered: CLRC 




No. of males: Adult: 


1 


Calves: 


5 


No. of females: Adult: 


52 


Calves: 


12 


Availability: 


Yes 


Milk prod. /Lact.(l): 
Milk Fat %: 


6033 


3.6 


Milk Protein %: 


3.3 


Bulls in Service: 


1 


Performance records: 


ODHIC 



Contact: Barry & Jean Haggett 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



USA 
Yes 

Conventional 
27 mo 
12.4 mo 



Notes: Milking Shorthorn. 



Same 

Storage of semen /embryos: 12 doses of semen 
from 3 bulls stored at EBI, ON. 
Usage: Milk, meat, show 

Merits: Hardiness, feed conversion, milk 
production, calving ease. 



Breed: Shorthorn 

Registered: CLRC 

No. of females: Adult: 12 

Calves: 2 
Availability: No 

Performance records: Private 
Notes: Milking Shorthorn. 



Contact: Mr. Alfred Masckle 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 



Other breeders 
Yes 

Conventional 
24 mo 
12 mo 



Increasing 

Meat 
Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, maternal 
ability, resistance to disease, calving ease. 



- 88 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Shorthorn 




Registered: CLRC 




No. of males: Adult: 


3 


Calves: 


1 


No. of females: Adult: 


120 


Calves: 


40 


Availability: 


Yes 


Milk prod. /Lact.(l): 
Milk Fat %: 


6239 


3.6 


Milk Protein %: 


3.4 


Bulls in Service: 


3 


Performance records: 


ADLIC 


Notes: Milking Shorthorn. 



Contact: Mr. Tom Ripley 

Source of bulls: Own, USA 

Housing: Conventional 

Calving interval: 13 mo 

Herd size: Same 

Storage of semen /embryos: 100 doses of 

semen from 4 bulls stored privately. 

Usage: Meat, milk, show 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, resistance 

to disease, milk production, calving ease. 



Breed: Shorthorn 

No. of males: Adult 
Calves 

No. of females: Adult 
Calves 

Bulls in Service: 

Performance records: 



2 

9 

20 

5 

2 

ROP 



Notes: Polled Shorthorn. Herd in the family for 
over 50 years. 



Contact: Mr. Ron Shelley 

Source of bulls: Own 

Breeding stock: Yes 

Calving interval: 12 mo 

Herd size: Same 

Storage of semen /embryos: 25 doses of semen 

from 5 bulls stored at St Jacobs ABC. 

Usage: Meat, show 

Merits: Superior productivity, maternal ability, 

feed conversion, calving ease. 



Breed: Shorthorn 




Registered: CLRC 




No. of males: Adult: 


2 


No. of females: Adult: 


65 


Calves: 


30 


Availability: 


Yes 


Milk prod. /Lact.(l): 
Milk Fat %: 


5000 


3.8 


Milk Protein %: 


3.45 


Calf mortality: 


1% 


Bulls in Service: 


2 



Contact: Mr. Daryl Shoemaker 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Other breeders 
Yes 

Conventional 
30 mo 
12 mo 



Notes: Milking Shorthorn. 



Same 

Storage of semen /embryos: 10 doses of semen 
stored. 

Usage: Milk 

Merits: Low maintenance, maternal ability, 
calving ease. 



- 89 - 



RAKE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Shorthorn 

Registered: CLRC 

No. of females: Adult: 35 

Calves: 10 

Availability: Yes 

Milk prod. /Lact. (H: 5000 

Milk Fat %: 3.7 

Milk Protein %: 3.4 

Calf mortality: 3% 

Performance records: DH1A 
Notes: Milking Shorthorn. 



Contact: Mike & Claire Sullivan 



Breeding slock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Yes 



Conventional 

30-32 mo 

13 mo 

Same 

Storage of semen /embryos: 60 doses from 7 
bulls stored at GENCOR, ON. and 10 embryos 
from 1 cow stored in England. 
Usage: Milk, show 

Merits: Maternal ability, herd instinct, calving 
ease. 



Breed: Texas l.onghori. 



No. of males: 


Adult: 


2 




Calves: 


15 


No. of females: 


Adult: 


35 




Calves: 


15 


Availability: 
Calf mortality: 




Yes 




<1% 



Contact: G M 13. & F. Cahill 



Source of hulls: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 



USA 

Pasture 

24 mo 

Same 

Meat 
Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, maternal ability, resistance to disease, 
herd instinct, calving ease. 



Breed: Texas Longhorn 

Registered: Texas Longhorn Breeders Assoc, 
USA 

Adult: 



Contact: 3ret & LouAnn Holt 



No. of males: 
No. of females 



Calves 

Adult 

Calves 



Availability: 
Calf mortality: 
Bulls in Service: 
Bulls in A.I.: 
Performance records: 



18 
15 
65 
12 
Yes 
1% 
2 
2 
Private 



Source of bulls: 

Breed ing stock: 

Housing: 

Age at fust calving: 

Herd size: 



Own 

Yes 

Conventional 

24 mo 

Inci easing 

Storage of semen /embryos: 2000 doses of 
semen from 3 bulls stored at Winfield, AB. 
Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, maternal 
ability, resistance to disease, calving ease. 



90 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Texas Longhorn 

Registered: Texas Longhorn Breeders Assoc, 

USA 

No. of males: Adult: 5 

No. of females: Adult: 39 

Availability: Yes 

Calf mortality: 1% 

Performance records: Private 



Contact: Lome & Ruby McBeth 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Age at first calving: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 



USA, other breeders 

Yes 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Same 

Storage of semen /embryos: 34 doses of semen 
from 5 bulls stored privately. 
Usage: Meat 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, maternal ability, resistance to disease, 
herd instinct, calving ease. 



Breed: Texas Longhorn 

Registered: Texas Longhorn Breeders Assoc, 
USA 

Adult: 



No. of males: 
No. of females 

Availability: 
Calf mortality: 
Bulls in Service: 



Adult 
Calves 



2 

18 

8 

Yes 

<1% 

2 



Contact: Jack & Phyliss Shier 



Source of bulls: 
Breeding stock: 
Housing: 
Calving interval: 
Herd size: 



Own, other breeders 

Yes 

Pasture 

12 mo 

Same 

Storage of semen /embryos: 5 doses of semen 
from 2 bulls stored privately. 
Usage: Meat 

Merits: Low maintenance, maternal abilty, 
resistance to disease, calving ease. 



Breed: Welsh Black 



Contact: Mr. Alvin Goetz 



Registered: Can. Welsh Black Cattle Soc. 
No. of males: 

No. of females: 



Adult 
Calves 

Adult 
Calves 



Availability: 
Calf mortality: 
Bulls in A.I.: 
Performance records: 



4 

10 

115 

8 

Yes 

5% 

1 

Private 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Own, other breeders 

Yes 

Pasture 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Same 

Storage of semen /embryos: 300 doses of 
semen from 1 bull stored at Alta Genetics, AB. 
Usage: Meat 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 
quality, superior productivity, maternal ability, 
daily gain, resistance to disease, herd instinct, 
feed conversion, milk production, calving ease. 



- 91 - 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: Welsh Black 



Registered: Can. Welsh Black Cattle Soc 



No. of males: Adult 
Calves 

No. of females: Adult 
Calves 

Availability: 

Performance records: 



2 
3 

32 
10 
Yes 
Private 



Contact: Mr. Randy Kaiser 



Own, New Zealand 
Yes 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: Pasture 

Calving interval: 12 mo 

Herd size: Increasing 

Storage of semen /embryos: 10 doses of semen 

from 1 bull stored at Leduc, AB. 

Usage: Meat 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, meat 

quality, maternal ability. 



Breed: Welsh Black 

Registered: Can. Welsh Black Cattle Soc. 

No. of females: Calves: 54 

Calf mortality: <5% 

Bulls in Service: 12 

Bulls in A.I.: 2 

Performance records: Private 



Contact: Tom, Allan & Randy Scott 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 



Own, other breeders 

Yes 

Conventional 

24 mo 

12 mo 



Increasing 

Storage of semen /embryos: 1250 doses from 2 
bulls stored at Independent Breeders, AB. 
Usage: Meat 

Merits: Hardiness, superior productivity, 
maternal ability, fertility. 



Breed: Welsh Black 



Registered: Can. Welsh Black Cattle Soc. 
No. of males: 



Adult 
Calves 

No. of females: Adult 
Calves 

Availability: 

Performance records: 



5 
1 

39 
1 

Yes 
Private 



Contact: Mr. Arlin Strohschein 



Source of bulls: 

Breeding stock: 

Housing: 

Age at first calving: 

Calving interval: 

Herd size: 

Usage: 



Own, other breeders 

Yes 

Conventional 

24 mo 

12 mo 

Increasing 

Milk, show 



Merits: Hardiness, maternal ability, milk 
production, fertility. 



- 92 



RARE BREEDS OF CATTLE 



Breed: White Park 

No. of males: Adult: 1 

No. of females: Adult: 4 

Availability: No 

Performance records: Private 

Notes: Rare Breeds Canada animals in host 

farm. 



Contact: Bryce & Margo Bell 

Source of bulls: Own 

Breeding stock: Yes 

Housing: Conventional 

Herd size: Increasing 

Storage of semen /embryos: 500 doses of 

semen from 3 bulls stored at EBI, ON. and 

Haedae Farms. 

Usage: Rare breed 

Merits: Low maintenance, hardiness, maternal 

ability, calving ease. 



- 93 - 






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