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oakulina LIBRARY 1 COMfHTN 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume I 


MAY, 1952 


Number 1 

\ 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 

With this issue the North Carolina State De¬ 
partment of Archives and History begins publica¬ 
tion of a newsletter, entitled Carolina Com¬ 
ments, which will be distributed to all members 
of the State Literary and Historical Association, 
to public libraries and newspapers of the state, 
and to other interested persons. 

Carolina Comments will endeavor to keep its 
readers informed of the services and program of 
the Department of Archives and History, the ac¬ 
tivities of the State Literary and Historical Asso¬ 
ciation, and other historical enterprises which 
are of interest to North Carolinians. 

THE STATE LITERARY AND HISTORICAL 
ASSOCIATION 

The Department of Archives and History is in 
reality the child of the State Literary and His¬ 
torical Association, which was largely responsible 
for establishing the State Historical Commission 
in 1903. The Association celebrated its fiftieth 
anniversary in 1950. 

At the December, 1951, meeting in Raleigh, 
members of the Association discussed a program 
to expand and widen the appeal of their society 
to render greater service to more North Caro¬ 
linians. At that time many urgent needs of the 
Association were pointed out. Plans were made 
to act upcn recommendations to hold more fre¬ 
quent meetings in various areas of the state, 
launch an aggressive membership campaign, and 
grant more awards for literary and historical 
achievements. It was also urged that the Associa¬ 
tion take a more active role in encouraging the 
preservation of literary and historical museum 
items, the promotion of local historical organiza¬ 
tions, and the publicizing of North Carolina his¬ 
tory. 

In order to implement these suggestions into 
action the following persons were appointed to 
head special committees: Dr. D. J. Whitener, 
Boone, Committee on Meetings and Programs, Mr. 
Russell M. Grumman, Chapel Hill, Committee on 
Membership, Prof. Richard Walser, Raleigh, Com¬ 
mittee on Awards, Mr. D. L. Corbitt, Raleigh, 
Committee on Local Historical Societies, and Mr. 
Clarence Griffin, Forest City, Committee to Publi¬ 
cize North Carolina History. 

Officers of the State Literary and Historical 


Association for the present year are Dr. Frontis 
W. Johnston, Davidson, president, Dr. Alice B. 
Keith, Meredith College, Mr. Burnham S. Colburn, 
Biltmore Forest, and Miss Gertrude Weil, Golds¬ 
boro, vice presidents, and Dr. Christopher 
Crittenden, Raleigh, secretary-treasurer. Other 
members of the Executive Committee are Dr. 
C. Sylvester Green, Chapel Hill, Prof. Roger P. 
Marshall, Raleigh, Mr. James G. W. MacClam- 
roch, Greensboro, Mrs. Theodore Partrick, Raleigh, 
Prof. Forrest W. Clonts, Wake Forest, and Dr. 
L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh. 



Frontis W. Johnston, President of the State 
Literary and Historical Association 


At a meeting of the Executive Committee, held 
in the Hall of History auditorium at 2:30 p.m., 
on February 22, 1952, further steps were taken 
to make the program for a bigger and better State 
Literary and Historical Association a reality. Sev¬ 
eral committee chairmen attended the meeting. 
President Johnston outlined the progress which 
had been made and the problems which must be 
met. Plans were discussed for a meeting of the 
Association in the Cape Fear Valley during the 
late spring and for a meeting in Watauga County 
during the late summer. Mr. Grumman spoke of 
the membership drive which will soon get under 
way by mail and personal solicitation. Prof. Wal¬ 
ser expressed the interest which has been shown 
in granting awards similar to the Mayflower Cup. 
Mr. Corbitt told of recent efforts which had been 
made to establish historical societies in several 
counties. 





CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume I May, 1952 Number 1 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 

Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals. 


Edwin A. Miles, Editor 


SPRING MEETING OF THE ASSOCIATION 

Make your plans now to attend the spring 
meeting of the Association, which will be held 
on Saturday and Sunday, May 17 and 18, at 
Carolina Beach. The theme of the program will 
be “The History of the Lower Cape Fear Valley,” 
and the following schedule has been tentatively 
arranged. 


Saturday, May 17th 

3:00-4:00 P.M.—Registration of Members, Royal Palm 
Hotel 

4:00 P.M.—General Session, City Hall Auditorium 
Welcome 

Mayor A. L. Mansfield, Carolina Beach 
“The Moore’s Creek Campaign,” Hugh F. Rankin, 
Chapel Hill 

7 :00 P.M.-—Banquet, Mrs. High’s Dining Room — Seafood 
Dinner ($2.50 per person) 

“Historic Sites of the Lower Cape Fear Valley,” 
Louis T. Moore, Wilmington 

8:15 P.M.—General Session, City Hall Auditorium 

“The Colonial Cape Fear and the Spanish 
Danger,” E. Lawrence Lee, Jr., Chapel Hill 
“The Professional Theater in Wilmington,” 
Donald J. Rulfs, State College, Raleigh 

Sunday, May 18th 

9:30 A.M.—County Historical Tour — Conducted by Louis 
T. Moore and Assistants 

1:00 P.M. — Dinner, Mrs. High’s Dining Room — Turkey 
Dinner ($2.50 per person) 

Greetings 

Addison Hewlett, Chairman, New Hanover 
Board of County Commissioners 

2:30 P.M. — Scenic Boat Ride ($1.00 per person) 

4:30 P.M.— End of Boat Ride and Adjournment of 
Meeting 


A cordial invitation to attend all sessions is 
extended to all persons interested in Tarheel liter¬ 
ature and history, as well as to members of the 
Association. Remember the date, May 17 and 18, 
or better still, plan to go down on Friday, May 16, 
and enjoy the facilities of the “Playland of North 
Carolina” for the entire week end. Within a few 
days members of the Association will be sent a 
postal card to be returned, indicating whether or 
not they will be able to attend. Reservations may 
be obtained by writing to Mr. George W. Bame, 
Bame Hotel, or Mr. Elmo Fountain, Royal Palm 
Hotel. The following rates prevail at both hotels: 


Single with connecting bath 
Double with connecting bath 
Single with private bath 
Double with private bath 
Twin beds with private bath 


$4.00 per person 

5.50 per room 
5.00-5.50 per room 
6.50-7.50 per room 

7.50 per room 


NORTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL REVIEW 

The annual dues for membership in the State 
Literary and Historical Association are $3.00, 
including a subscription to The North Carolina 
Historical Revieiv, published quarterly by the De¬ 
partment of Archives and History. (For each 
additional member of the same immediate family 
the annual dues are $2.00, not including a sub¬ 
scription to the Review.) The following articles 
appear in the April issue: Fannie Memory Farm¬ 
er, “The Bar Examination and Beginning Years 
of Legal Practice in North Carolina, 1820-1860”; 
John Chalmers Vinson, “Electioneering in North 
Carolina, 1800-1835”; Charles Grier Sellers, Jr., 
“Jim Polk Goes to Chapel Hill”; James M. Mer¬ 
rill, “The Hatteras Expedition, August, 1861”; 
Ernest M. Lander, “Paper Manufacturing in 
South Carolina before the Civil War”; E. Law¬ 
rence Le6, Jr., “Old Brunswick, the Story of a 
Colonial Town”; Frontis W. Johnston, “North 
Carolina Non-Fiction Works for 1951”; Elizabeth 
Gregory McPherson (ed.), “Letters from North 
Carolina to Andrew Johnson”; and Mary Lindsay 
Thornton (comp.), “North Carolina Bibliography, 
1950-1951.” 

LEMUEL SAWYER'S BLACKBEARD 

For a limited time only, new members of the 
State Literary and Historical Association will also 
receive, without any charge, a copy of the fac- 



LEMUEL SAWYER 


Author of “Blackboard, 
a Com edy. 1824. an 
early drama on North 
Carolina. 8 other works. 
Member of Congress. 
Grave 160 yds. N. W. 




Historical Marker to Lemuel Sawyer 
near Camden 


simile edition of Lemuel Sawyer’s play, Black- 
beard, which has just been reissued by the North 
Carolina Department of Archives and History. 
Blackbeard was first published in 1824, but there 













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iMULinn LI Ll\ni\ If 


RALEIGH, 

is only one copy of the original edition in North 
Carolina, located in the University Library at 
Chapel Hill. Professor Richard Walser of State 
College, who has written the introduction to the 
facsimile edition, says: “While Blackbearcl was 
not the first drama of North Carolina origin, it is 
the first, as far as we know, by a native of the 
state and the first with a North Carolina setting 
and with North Carolina characters.” 

Lemuel Sawyer, a native of Camden County, 
served for many years in the United States House 
of Representatives. It is fitting that the facsimile 
edition of his play should be published in 1952, 
the hundredth anniversary year of his death. The 
Department of Archives and History, in coopera¬ 
tion with the Department of Conservation and 
Development and the Highway and Public Works 
Commission, has erected a historical marker in 
Sawyer’s honor near his unmarked grave „in 
Camden County, which is reproduced on page 2. 

All persons desiring to join the State Literary 
and Historical Association in order to take ad¬ 
vantage of this offer should write to the Associa¬ 
tion, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C., enclosing a check 
or money order for $3.00. 

COVERED BRIDGES 

In recent years the covered bridge has been 
passing rapidly from the North Carolina scene. In 
1938 their number was estimated at seventy-five. 
Today there are less than ten. 

Nostalgic Tarheels have long regretted the dis¬ 
appearance of the once familiar landmark from 
the state. Many old-timers recall with pleasure 
the sound of hoofbeats upon the wooden surface or 
with gratitude the shelter afforded by the cover 
in time of rain. And many a Tarheel grandmother 
remembers with a smile that first kiss she received 
one summer’s night when her young swain’s horse 
suddenly stopped when the buggy entered a se¬ 
cluded covered bridge. 

But the covered bridges were designed for the 
days of the horse and buggy and not for modern 
traffic, so one by one they have been replaced by 
newer concrete-and-steel bridges. Today many 
North Carolinians have never laid eyes on one of 
the earlier structures. 

In many states, particularly in New England, 
care has been taken to preserve covered bridges 
for their historic value. In some localities covered 
bridge associations have been formed. The bridges 
have proved to be a good tourist attraction. 

Of the remaining few bridges in North Caro¬ 
lina, all but one or two are located in Randolph 
County. Dr. J. E. Pritchard of Asheboro does not 
regard the lingering of the covered bridge in his 


LUIVli.l oOlUlV 

N. C. 

county as an indication of its backwardness. “On 
the contrary,” says Dr. Pritchard, “it proves that 
the people of Randolph County were more pro¬ 
gressive than their neighbors during the times 
when the counties had maintenance of the roads. 
They preferred to erect wooden bridges than to 
use the fords to cross the streams.” 

In January, 1952, one of the oldest remaining 
covered bridges in the state, the Settle’s Bridge 
over Dan River, near Wentworth, in Rockingham 
County, was torn down and replaced by a modern 
two-lane structure. The demolition of this vener¬ 
able bridge, built shortly before 1861 and con¬ 
taining no metal bolts or nails, brought to public 
attention the rapid disappearance of the covered 
bridges of North Carolina. 



Mill Creek Bridge at Beane Mill, Randolph County 


At a meeting on April 2, 1952, in the office of 
Dr. Henry W. Jordan, director of the Highway 
and Public Works Commission, a group of citi¬ 
zens, led by Dr. Clarence Poe of Raleigh, urged 
that steps be taken to prevent the complete ex¬ 
tinction of the covered bridge in the state. 

Others present at the meeting were Mrs. Elias 
Carr of Macclesfield, representing the North Caro¬ 
lina Society for the Preservation of Antiquities, 
Dr. J. E. Pritchard of Asheboro, James S. Braw- 
ley of Salisbury, John E. Tyler of Roxobel, George 
R. Ross, director, and Mrs. Grace Lane and 
Thomas W. Walker of the Department of Con¬ 
servation and Development, and Dr. Christopher 
Crittenden, director, and Edwin A. Miles of the 
Department of Archives and History. 

Dr. Jordan said that the Highway and Public 
Works Commission would be happy to cooperate 
in the preservation of North Carolina’s few re¬ 
maining covered bridges. Suggestions were dis¬ 
cussed for the creation of state parks or recre¬ 
ational areas adjacent to one or more of the re- 





maining bridges or for the removal of covered 
bridges to existing state parks. 

North Carolina has been slow to recognize the 
historic value of her covered bridges. But at last 
a beginning has been made to secure their preser¬ 
vation as part of the Tarheel scene. 


REGINALD A. FESSENDEN HONORED 

Dare County, North Carolina, has been the 
locale of many pioneer adventures. In the 1580’s 
Sir Walter Raleigh sent the first English colonists 
to Roanoke Island. In 1903 the Wright brothers 
made the first airplane flight at Kill Devil Hill. 
Another pioneer undertaking in Dare County was 
honored last month by the election to radio’s “Hall 
of Fame” of Reginald A. Fessenden, inventor and 
pioneer in wireless telegraphy, whose radio ex¬ 
periments on Roanoke Island took place just half 
a century ago. 




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“Hall of Fame” Award to R. A. Fessenden 


The award was made at the annual dinner of 
the Radio Pioneers Club, held in the Conrad- 
Hilton Hotel in Chicago, Illinois, on April 1. The 
presentation was made by Carl Haverlin, presi¬ 
dent of the Club, and was accepted on behalf of 
the Fessenden National Memorial Association by 
Dr. Christopher Crittenden, director of the North 
Carolina Department of Archives and History. 


The Radio Pioneers Club, founded in 1942 by 
H. V. Kaltenborn, is composed of veterans of more 
than twenty years in the industry. Former Presi¬ 
dent Herbert Hoover is the honorary chairman. 
In 1950 the Club established the “Hall of Fame” 
award to honor deceased persons who have “made 
great contributions to the cause of radio and 
broadcasting.” Previous recipients of the honor 
were Thomas A. Edison and Guglielmo Marconi. 

Fessenden was born October 6, 1866, in East 
Bolton, Quebec, Canada. In 1900 he resigned as 
professor of electrical engineering at the Uni¬ 
versity of Pittsburgh to undertake research in 
wireless telegraphy under the United States 
Weather Bureau. With headquarters near Manteo, 
N. C., he conducted experiments in 1901-02 which 
established .wireless communication between 
Roanoke Island and Cape Hatteras, the greatest 
distance then spanned by the new telegraphy. 

In 1906 Fessenden produced the first trans- 
Atlantic radio communication by sending a mes¬ 
sage from Brant Rock, Massachusetts, to Machri- 
hanish, Scotland. That same year he sent out from 
Brant Rock what is said to have been the first 
broadcast of speech and music ever made. 

The Fessenden National Memorial Association 
was established in August, 1941, at Washington, 
D. C., with R. Bruce Etheridge, president, Miles 
Clark, Roy Davis, and Mrs. Roxie Atkinson, vice- 
presidents, Victor E. Meekins, secretary, and 
Martin Kellogg, Jr., Treasurer. All except Mr. 
Clark, a resident of Elizabeth City, N. C., are 
citizens of Dare County. Among the other charter 
members are Dr. Crittenden and Mrs. Agnes L. 
Starrett of the University of Pittsburgh. The 
Association’s plan to erect a monument to Fessen¬ 
den on the site of his wireless station on Roanoke 
Island was delayed by the outbreak of World 
War II. 



Library Commission 
State Library Building 

Raleigh, North Carolina 






















/ 


IWiuH CAROLINA LkHAhY OCIX.] 3SI0N 

^ RALESG. l, N. C. 

CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume I 


JULY, 1952 


Number 2 


FROM CAROLINA BEACH 


... TO BOONE 


On May 17 and 18, the State Literary and His¬ 
torical Association held its first spring meeting 
and its first meeting outside of Raleigh in the 
pleasant atmosphere of Carolina Beach. The 
weather was delightful, the program was enter¬ 
taining and varied, and those members who at¬ 
tended were well pleased with the week end’s out¬ 
ing. For many members in the Cape Fear region . 
it was the first session of the Association which 
they had ever attended. 

Highlights of the meeting were a historical tour 
of Wilmington and a scenic boat ride on Sunday. 
The program, which appeared in the May issAie of J 
Carolina Comments, was concerned with the his¬ 
tory of the lower Cape Fear Valley. The Wilming¬ 
ton Star-News complimented the Association “for 
the neat tying-in of their program with the local¬ 
ity.” “History,” editorialized the Star-Neivs, “is 
becoming more and more tangible in our lives, 
thanks to the State Literary and Historical Asso¬ 
ciation and similar organizations.” 



Dr. Alice Barnwell Keith, associate professor of 
history at Mei’edith College, is a vice president of the 
State Literary and Historical Association. Author 


of several articles on North Carolina history, Dr. 
Keith is currently editing for publication the Blount 
papers, including letters of John Gray, Thomas, and 
William Blount. Volume One of this work will soon 
be issued by the Department of Archives and History*'. 


Take out your calendar and circle the dates 
August 30 and 31, the Saturday and Sunday of the 
Labor Day week end. On those two days the State 
Literary and Historical Association, in coopera¬ 
tion with the Western North Carolina Historical 
Association and the North Carolina Society of 
County and Local Historians, will hold a meeting 
at Boone. 

As yet the program is tentative, but it promises 
to be informal and pleasant. Arrangements are 
being made to secure free dormitory rooms at 
Appalachian State Teachers College and a special 
rate to a production of Kermit Hunter’s new out¬ 
door drama, “Horn ip the West.” A tour of Wa¬ 
tauga County is being planned for Sunday. Plenty 
of time will be given to enjoy the beauties of the 
Blue Ridge Mountain area. 

Members of the organizations will be kept in¬ 
formed of plans for the meeting by letter and 
postal card. But make your plans now to go to 
Boone on August 30 and 31. Don’t miss this op¬ 
portunity to enjoy coolness and culture in the 
mountains on the Labor Day week end. 

WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL 
ASSOCIATION 

Meeting with the State Literary and Historical 
Association at Boone on the Labor Day week end 
will be one of the newest cultural organizations in 
the; state, the Western North Carolina Historical 
Association. Organized at Asheville on May 10, 
the Association boasts eighty-eight charter mem- 
bers. Its officers are as follows: Dean W. E. Bird, 
Cilllowhee, president; Dr. D. J. Whitener, Boone, 
vice president; Albert S. McLean, Asheville, secre¬ 
tary ; and Miss Doris K. Hill, Marion, treasurer. 
TPhe executive committee includes, in addition to 
■These officers, John B. Murphy, Hendersonville, 
George W. McCoy, Asheville, and Clarence Griffin, 
Forest City. 

Trustees of the Association, in addition to the 
members of the executive committee, are W. N. 
Sloan, Franklin, Prof. Edwin S. Dougherty, 
Boone, Mrs. Sadie S. Patton, Hendersonville, 
James E. Henderson, Canton, Gwynn Denton, 
Robbinsville, Samuel E. Beck, Cherokee, Carroll 
P. Rogers, Tryon, Miss Phyllis S. Snyder, Murphy, 
Miss Ruth M. Greenlee, Marion, H. C. Wilburn, 
Waynesville, Mrs. Aubrey F. Jennings, Cherokee, 
and Dr. Rosser H. Taylor, Cullowhee. 








CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume I JULY, 1952 Number 2 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 


Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals. 

Edwin A. Miles, Editor 


COUNTY HISTORIANS 

At Boone, on August 31, the historical tour of 
Watauga County will be conducted in cooperation 
with the North Carolina Society of County and 
Local Historians. Organized in 1941, the County 
Historians tour several counties each year. In¬ 
formality and congeniality are two features of 
these county tours. 

On May 25 the Society’s first tour of 1952 was 
conducted through parts of Wilkes and Caldwell 
counties. Among the sites of historic interest 
visited by the members during the tour of the 
“Happy Valley” and its environs were “Clover 
Hall,” the home of Colonel Edmund Jones con¬ 
structed about 1840, “Riverside,” built in 1840 by 
John Ludwell Jones, “Fort Defiance,” the resi¬ 
dence of General William Lenoir erected in 1788- 
1789, “Mourne Rouge,” the home of Governor 
Montford Stokes, which he built in 1810, St. 
Paul’s Church in Wilkesboro, which was erected 
about 1848, “Tory Oak” in Wilkesboro, from 
whose limbs Colonel Benjamin Cleveland hanged 
two Loyalists during the Revolution, and the 
cabin of the colonel’s brother, Captain Robert 
Cleveland, which was built prior to the Revolu¬ 
tion. 

Officers of the Society are as follows: Dr. W . P. 
Jacocks, Chapel Hill, president ; Miss Mary Louise 
Medley, Wadesboro, and Charles M. Heck, 
Raleigh, vice presidents; and Leon McDonald, 
Olivia, secretary-treasurer. Malcolm Fowler, of 
Lillington, has charge of arranging the tours fop 
this summer. 

OUR OUTDOOR DRAMAS 

Kermit Hunter’s “Horn in the West,” which 
will be seen by members of the State Literary and 
Historical Association, the Western North Caro¬ 
lina Historical Association, and the North Carolina 
Society of County and Local Historians at the 
Boone meeting, is one of the four outdoor histor¬ 
ical dramas that will delight Tarheel audiences 
this summer. From June 27 through August 31, 
the drama will be shown at the Boone amphi¬ 
theatre. 


North Carolina’s oldest outdoor drama, Paul 
Green’s “The Lost Colony,” will be presented for 
the twelfth season at Fort Raleigh, Roanoke 
Island, from June 28 through August 31. At 
Mountainside Theatre, Cherokee, Kermit Hunt¬ 
er’s “Unto These Hills,” which attracted 151,740 
patrons last summer, will open its third season on 
June 28 and close on September 2. Another new 
drama, Robert Hayes’s “Thunderland,” based on 
the life of Daniel Boone, is scheduled for the 
Asheville-Biltmore College amphitheatre near 
Asheville from July 4 through Labor Day. Per¬ 
formances of all the dramas will be given every 
night except Mondays for the inclusive dates. 

NORTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL REVIEW 

T he July issue of The North Carolina Historical 
Review contains the following items: David B. 
Quinn, “Christopher Newport in 1590”; C. Robert 
Hav-'yood, “The Mind of the North Carolina Op¬ 
ponents of the Stamp Act” ; Donald J. Rulfs, “The 
An te-Bellum Professional Theater in Raleigh”; 
Wilfred B. Yearns, Jr., “North Carolina in the 
Confederate Congress”; Elaine Von Oesen, “Pub¬ 
lic Library Extension in North Carolina and the 
WPA”; Elizabeth Gregory McPherson (ed.), 
“Letters from North Carolina to Andrew John¬ 
son” ; book review's; and historical news. 

MICROFILMING RECORDS 

Next month will mark the first anniversary of 
the Department of Archives and History’s long- 
range program of microfilming the modern rec¬ 
ords of North Carolina’s state agencies. 

The microfilm program w'as born of necessity. 
In recent years the agencies of the state have 
watched their files of records crowd them into less 
and less working area. In some cases file cabinets, 
boxes, and packages of noncurrent correspond¬ 
ence, reports, memoranda, and dossiers on various 
subjects, groups, or individuals have occupied as 
much as tw r o-thirds of the office space of a depart¬ 
ment of the state government. Some records have 
even been stored in hallw'ays and basements. 

To meet this critical problem the Department 
of Archives and History launched a program to 
microfilm the bulky modern records of the state, 
which are seldom if ever consulted. In some cases 
it is required by law' that certain records be re¬ 
tained for varying periods up to twenty-five years. 
In 1951 the state legislature passed a law' making 
microfilmed records equally admissible in evidence 
as originals when duly certified. 

In microfilming, documents are photographed 
on a narrow^ strip of film wffiich can be run through 
a “reader” and magnified for quick and easy use. 
Photographic prints can also be made from this 







mm CAROLIf'A LIBRARY (^MM'SSlON 


l a ' r. 

film. A similar process of micronlmm^’was used 9 
for “V-Mail” during World War II. The film copies 
of a quantity of records occupy only about 2 per 
cent of the space required for the originals. 

Since August, 1951, when the program was , 
launched, approximately 2,500,000 documents 
from five state agencies have been filmed. Micro¬ 
film copies of these records have been placed on 
430 reels, which can easily be placed on an aver¬ 
age-sized desk. The reduction in space required 
for the storage of the records has been enormous. 

In every case two copies are made of each docu¬ 
ment. One remains with the agency or depart¬ 
ment which created the records while the other 
goes to the state archives. ■* 



$ 

V 

Dr. Christopher Crittenden (extreme right), director 
of the State Department of Archives and History, hands 
a roll of microfilm to Henry Bridges (second from right), 
state auditor. Looking on (left to right) are Mrs. Julia B. 
Jordan, Mrs. Bettie Yates Holland, W. Frank Burton, 
state archivist, and Herbert R. Paschal, Jr. 

Mr. W. Frank Burton, state archivist, who has 
over-all supervision of the program, estimates 
that it will take several years to film the backlog 
of records piled up over a long period of time. Mr. 
Herbert R. Paschal, Jr., a Wake Forest alumnus 
who has also done graduate work in history at the 
University of North Carolina, has been in charge 
of the actual process. His assistants have been 
Mrs. Bettie Yates Holland, 1951 Meredith gradu¬ 
ate who completed the “internship” course in 
archives offered jointly by the college and the 
Department of Archives and History, and Mrs. 
Julia B. Jordan, who holds a master’s degree from 
the University of Alabama. 

HISTORICAL INTEREST IN BERTIE 

Bertie County is proud of its history. From the 
original area of the county, created in 1722, some 
twenty-two or more counties have subsequently 
been organized. Several governors and other 


A' 

prominent figures in the state’s history have been 
born within the limits of the county. 

In January, 1950, at a meeting in the county 
courthouse at Windsor, the Bertie County His¬ 
torical Association was formed. Despite its youth, 
this organization already has many accomplish¬ 
ments to its credit. 

Officers of the Association are E. S. (Steve) 
Askew, Windsor, president; Mrs. Ruth Lyon, 
Windsor, vice president; T. F. Norfleet, Jr., Roxo- 
bel, secretary; and John E. Tyler, Roxobel, his¬ 
torian. Dr. W. P. Jacocks, Chapel Hill, formerly 
of Bertie County, is chairman of the executive 
committee. 

At present the Association boasts approxi¬ 
mately eighty-five members. Annual dues are 
$2.00 per member. 

For each of Bertie’s nine townships a township 
chairman has been appointed to further the Asso¬ 
ciation’s aims to create a greater interest in local 
history and to gather material relating to the 
county’s history. Photographs of old homes in 
each township have been placed on display in the 
headquarters of the Association adjacent to the 
County Library in the municipal building at 
Windsor. In cooperation with the State Depart¬ 
ment of Archives and History, manuscript papers 
relating to the history of Bertie County have been 
microfilmed and placed at the Association’s dis¬ 
posal. 

In April, 1951, the Association was host to 
members of the Society of County and Local His¬ 
torians, who held a historical tour of the lower 
half of the county. Lunch was served visitors from 
eight North Carolina counties as well as several 
out-of-state guests. 

The Association has two meetings a year—in 
April and October. Among the speakers who have 
addressed the group at these meetings are Willis 
G. Briggs, Raleigh attorney and local historian, 
Phillips Russell, author and professor of journal¬ 
ism at the University of North Carolina, and Mrs. 
Inglis Fletcher, of Edenton, the well-known novel¬ 
ist. The most recent guest speaker, Dr. Hugh T. 
Lefler, professor of history at the University of 
North Carolina, addressed the Association on 
April 18. 

For the future the Association has made plans 
to establish a permanent county museum, write 
the history of the county, sponsor post cards de¬ 
picting places of historic interest in the county, 
and issue a quarterly journal to publish articles 
on and sources of the county’s history. 

Other counties might well study the record of 
the Bertie County Historical Association. It is an 
enviable one. 



m 

\ 

RETURN OF A FLAG 

When Fort Macon fell into the hands of Union 
forces on April 26, 1862, the state flag of Com¬ 
pany II of the Tenth North Carolina Confederate 
Troops was captured by Company E of the Fifth 
Rhode Island Volunteers. It was not until last 
month that the battle-scarred banner was again 
brought to Fort Macon. 

Four sisters, Misses Mary and Henrietta Robin¬ 
son, Mrs. Cinderella Poole, and Mrs. Susan How¬ 
land, all of Beaufort, made the flag during the 
early days of the war. Constructed of silk, it con¬ 
tains the usual white, red, and blue tricolor with 
a silver star and bears the dates May 20, 1775, 
for the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence, 
and May 20, 1861, for the date of North Carolina’s 
secession from the Union. It was presented to 
Company H in 1861 when that body was organized 
in Beaufort. 

The victorious Rhode Island troops gave the 
captured flag to Captain Arthur Dexter, of Provi¬ 
dence, their battalion commander. After Captain 
Dexter’s death his widow presented the flag to 
the Rhode Island Veterans’ Association with in¬ 
structions that it should be returned by them to 
the survivors of the Confederate company from 
which it was taken. 

On March 2, 1906, in an impressive ceremony 
in the Senate chamber at Raleigh, the flag was re¬ 
turned to this state by Chief Justice William W. 
Douglas of Rhode Island, who had participated 
in the siege of Fort Macon. “This is not the trans¬ 
fer of a time-worn and faded piece of silk,” said 
Justice Douglas on that occasion. “It is the resto¬ 
ration to its proper custody of a sacred emblem 
under which the blood of brave men has been 
shed.” 

The flag was accepted by Chief Justice Walter 
Clark of North Carolina, who received it as “a 
token of a reunited country, reunited in sentiment 
and sincerity as well as in deed.” In turn, Justice 
Clark handed the emblem to Lieutenant John W. 
Saunders, ranking surviving officer of Company 
H. The galleries of the Senate were filled for the 
occasion and a special train brought guests to 
Raleigh from Rhode Island for the ceremony. 

In August, 1916, Mrs. B. J. Bell, of Beaufort, 
donated the flag to the Hall of History. There it 
remained until the creation of the Fort Macon 
state Park Museum, where it has now been placed 
on an indefinite loan. Before turning it over to 
the Museum, the Department of Archives and 
History restored the flag by sealing it between 
sheets of plastic foil, thus insuring its preserva¬ 
tion indefinitely. After ninety years the time-worn 
and time-honored emblem has found an appro¬ 
priate sanctuary. 



t> R. Christopher Crittenden (right), director of the 
State Department of Archives and History, points out one 
of North Carolina’s newest historical markers to Governor 
W. Kerr Scott (left) and Dr. A. L. Venable, president of 
- the ^Historical Commission of South Carolina. The scene 
occurred at the unveiling of the marker just south of 
Tryon on April 19. The ceremonies took place prior to the 
annual Block House Hunt Races, which are held each year 
on a course surrounding the site of the landmark com¬ 
memorated by the marker. 

This issue of Carolina Comments is being 
sent to members of the Western North Carolina 
Historical Association and of the North Carolina 
Society of County and Local Historians as well as 
to members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association. 

Persons who have items of interest to the read¬ 
ers of Carolina Comments are urged to com¬ 
municate them to the editor, Box 1881, Raleigh, 
North Carolina. 



NORTH CAROLINA LIBRARY C0:.':4I33 ION 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


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7 

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IfUKlH UAKULfNA UbKAKT LUIVHYl bbluiM 

RALEIGH, N. G. 


2 CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume I SEPTEMBER, 1952 Number 3 


WEEK END IN THE WEST 

As we go to press the joint meeting of the State 
Literary and Historical Association, the Western 
North Carolina Historical Association, and the 
North Carolina Society of County and Local His¬ 
torians is drawing near. Scheduled for Boone on 
August 30 and 31, the Saturday and Sunday of the 
Labor Day week end, the gathering promises to 
be a highlight in the activities of the year for all 
three societies. 

Appalachian State Teachers College has gra¬ 
ciously consented to permit members of the or¬ 
ganizations and their immediate families to occupy 
dormitory rooms at the college on the nights of 
August 30 and 31. Rooms will be free of charge, 
but each person must provide his own pillow, 
bed linen, and towels. 

Approximately 200 persons have already indi¬ 
cated to the Business Manager of Appalachian 
State Teachers College that they will attend and 
have requested rooms. There is space for about 
300 persons, and rooms may still be reserved at 
the college on a first-come-first-serve basis as long 
as they last. So if you desire to attend the Boone 
meeting and want a room, act now! Write the 
Business Manager of Appalachian State Teachers 
College, Boone, North Carolina, and tell him the 
names and number of persons in your party. Or if 
you have friends who would like to come, have 
them write today—they may join one of the or¬ 
ganizations after reaching Boone. 

Unless otherwise indicated, all sessions will be 
held in the Music and Art Building on the campus 
of Appalachian State Teachers College. The pro¬ 
gram is as follows: 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 30 

12:30-1:45 P.M. Registration 

(Downstairs Lobby) 

1:45-3:15 P.M. General Session 

(Auditorium) 

Dr. Frontis W. Johnston, Davidson, President of 
the State Literary and Historical Association, 
presiding 
Call to Order 
Dr. Johnston 
Invocation 

Dr. J. D. Rankin, Boone, Dean of Appalachian 
State Teachers College 
Welcome 

Mr. Clyde R. Green, Boone, Chairman of the 
Watauga County Board of Commissioners 


Response 

Mrs. Charles A. Cannon, Blowing Rock and Con¬ 
cord 

Introductions and Recognitions 

Dr. Christopher Crittenden, Raleigh, Secretary- 
Treasurer of the State Literary and Historical 
Association 

Address: “The Men Who Fought the Battle of Kings 
Mountain” 

Dr. B. B. Doughei’ty, Boone, President of Appa¬ 
lachian State Teachers College 


Adjournment 



A scene from “Horn in the West”—Amos Howard 
(Charles Elledge) dodges frying pan swung by his wife 
Jessie (Jean Stephens) in lighter moment of new outdoor 
drama of Southern Appalachian pioneers staged at Boone. 
Members of the State Literary and Historical Association, 
the Western North Carolina Historical Association, and the 
North Carolina Society of County and Local Historians 
ivill have an opportunity to view the drama at their meet¬ 
ing at Boone on August SO a?id 31. (Photo courtesy State 
News Bureau) 

3:30-4:15 P.M. Special Business Meetings 

Western North Carolina Historical Association 
(Band Room) 

Dean W. E. Bird, Cullowhee, President 
North Carolina Society of County and Local His¬ 
torians 

(Room 22) 

Dr. W. P. Jacocks, Chapel Hill, President 
State Literary and Historical Association 
(Auditorium) 

Dr. Johnston, President 

4:15-5:00 P.M. Reception for Members and 

Guests of the Societies 
(Chorus Room) 

8:15 P.M. “Horn in the West” 

(Daniel Boone Theatre) 

(Continued on page 2) 






CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Volume I SEPTEMBER, 1952 Number 3 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 

Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals. 

Edwin A. Miles, Editor 


(Continued from page 1) 

SUNDAY, AUGUST 31 

9:30-10:30 A.M. General Session 

(Auditorium) 

Dr. W. P. Jacocks, presiding 
“The Story Behind ‘Horn in the West’ ” 

Professor Leo K. Pritchett 
“Historical Background of Watauga County” 

Dr. D. J. Whitener 

“Plans of the Western North Carolina Historical 
Association” 

Dean W. E. Bird 

10:45 A.M. Tours 

(Take Your Choice) 

1. The Blowing Rock and the Craft Center in Moses 
H. Cone Memorial Park 

2. Blue Ridge Parkway 

3. Grandfather Mountain 

4. “The Magic Circle”—Blowing Rock, Linville, New- 
land. Banner Elk, Valle Crucis, and Boone 

For reservations to “Horn in the West” on the 
night of August 30 or 31, write “Horn in the 
West,” Boone, North Carolina. Tickets cost $3.00, 
$2.40, $1.80, and $1.50. As long as tickets are 
available reservations will be held at the Box 
Office. 

Host for the meeting is Appalachian State 
Teachers College. Mr. Barnard Dougherty, Busi¬ 
ness Manager, has been in charge of the arrange¬ 
ments for dormitory rooms. The following com¬ 
mittees were appointed to make preparations for 
the meeting: 

Program —Dr. D. J. Whitener, chairman, Dr. 
Christopher Crittenden, Mr. Edwin A. Miles. 

Reception —Dr. Ina Woestemeyer Van Noppen, 
chairman, Dean Helen Burch, Mr. Barnard 
Dougherty, Mrs. Edwin Dougherty, Mrs. Leo K. 
Pritchett, Dr. J. D. Rankin, Professor George 
Sawyer, Mrs. D. J. Whitener, Mrs. Carrie Winkler, 
Dr. John H. Workman, Dr. Julian Yoder. 

Registration — Professor Edwin Dougherty, 
chairman, Professor E. C. Duggans, Professor 
H. R. Eggers, Professor V. C. Howell, Professor 
John Justice, Professor John Kirk. 

Tours —Professor Leo K. Pritchett, chairman, 
Mr. Wade E. Brown, Mr. J. H. Council, Mr. S. C. 
Eggers, Mr. Grady Farthing, Mr. Malcolm Fowler, 
Mr. Clyde R. Green, Mrs. Grady Moretz, Mr. 
Herman Wilcox, Mr. W. R. Winkler. 


HORN IN THE WEST 

The Boone meeting of the State Literary and 
Historical Association, the Western North Caro¬ 
lina Historical Association, and the North Caro¬ 
lina Society of County and Local Historians will 
give members of those organizations an opportu¬ 
nity to see Kermit Hunter’s great new outdoor 
drama, “Horn in the West.” Since June 27 the 
drama has played to enthusiastic audiences, night¬ 
ly except Mondays, in the Daniel Boone Theatre 
on the outskirts of Boone. The last performance 
will be given on Sunday, August 31. 

“Horn in the West” is the story of the frontiers¬ 
men who pushed westward during the 1770’s to 
escape oppression in the colonial settlements of 
North Carolina. It covers roughly the period from 
the Battle of Alamance in 1771 to the Battle of 
Kings Mountain nine years later. In it appear 
such important figures of that era as Daniel Boone, 
John Sevier, and Governor William Tryon. 

Kermit Hunter, the author of “Horn in the 
West,” has also written two other well-known and 
successful outdoor dramas, “Unto These Hills,” 
presented this year for the third season at Chero¬ 
kee, North Carolina, and “Forever This Land,” the 
story of Abraham Lincoln’s youth now shown for 
its second year in New Salem, Illinois. 

Sponsor of the drama is the Southern Appalach¬ 
ian Historical Association, organized in October, 
1951, and chartered the following month. Officers 
of this non-profit organization are: Dr. I. G. Greer, 
president; Dr. D. J. Whitener, executive vice pres¬ 
ident; Mrs. Earleen G. Pritchett, secretary; Mr. 
James Marsh, treasurer; and Mrs. B. W. Stallings, 
corresponding secretary. 

The Association is primarily interested in “col¬ 
lecting, preserving, and transmitting the historical 
heritage of the people of the Southern Appalach¬ 
ian Mountains.” In addition to the production of 
the drama, “Horn in the West,” the Association 
proposes to build a pioneer village to demonstrate 
how the people of the area lived during the days of 
Daniel Boone. 

NEXT YEAR 

This year, for the first time, the State Literary 
and Historical Association has held regional meet¬ 
ings in different parts of the state. The Boone 
meeting follows a similar one held last spring at 
Carolina Beach. This practice has proved to be a 
popular one. 

Soon it will be time to consider the time and 
place of next year’s regional meetings. It is hoped 
that two such meetings will be held—one in the 
late spring and another in the late summer. 
Already certain communities have manifested an 









NORTH CAROLINA LIBRARY COMMISSION 


RALEIGH, 

interest in inviting the Association to hold one of 
its sessions with them. Perhaps there are other 
towns or cities which would like to be host to a 
meeting of this organization. Those interested 
should contact Dr. Christopher Crittenden, Secre¬ 
tary-Treasurer, State Literary and Historical As¬ 
sociation, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 

NEWS FROM NEW BERN 

On June 25, 1952, work was begun on the res¬ 
toration of the Tryon Palace in New Bern under 
the direction of the architectural firm of Perry, 
Shaw and Hepburn, Kehoe and Dean, of Boston. 
Built at an original cost of approximately $80,000, 
the Palace when restored will cost several times 
that amount. 

Constructed during the period 1767-1770 under 
the supervision of Governor William Tryon, the 
structure was considered by some to be “the most 
beautiful building in Colonial America.” But many 
North Carolinians of that day objected to the 
enormous burden such a building placed upon the 
taxpayers. Governor Tryon’s opponents dubbed 
it “Tryon’s Palace”—and the name has stuck. It 
housed not only the governor’s residence, but pub¬ 
lic offices, the assembly hall, and the council room 
of the colony. It later served as the first capitol 
of the state of North Carolina. 

After the Revolution the Tryon Palace fell into 
disrepair. In 1792 the state capital was moved to 
Raleigh. In 1795 the Palace was used as an acad¬ 
emy. Three years later a fire destroyed all but the 
west wing of the building. 



The Tryon Palace before restoration began. Only the 
west wing of the building still stands. (Photo courtesy 
State News Bureau) 


The remaining wing was later used as a paro¬ 
chial school of the Episcopal Church, and, more 
recently, as an apartment building. 


N. C. 

The restoration of the Tryon Palace was made 
possible largely through the donations of the late 
Mrs. J. E. Latham of Greensboro, a native of New 



The Tryon Palace as it will appear after restoration. 


Bern. During her lifetime and in her will Mrs. 
Latham, who died on April 8, 1951, gave over 
$1,500,000 to carry out the project. Last year the 
Tryon Palace Commission, headed by Mrs. J. A. 
Kellenberger, Mrs. Latham’s daughter, was or¬ 
ganized to supervise the restoration. The state 
appropriated the necessary money to purchase 
part of the land. 

To date the restoration work has been largely 
confined to the west wing of the building which is 
still standing. The rear porch, added at a more 
recent date, has been demolished. The stucco, 
which was placed on the outer walls during the 
nineteenth century, has been chipped off, so that 
only the eighteenth-century portions of the wing 
remain. Brick wall surfaces have been exposed for 
inspection. 

To assist the architects in the restoration Mr. 
Alonzo T. Dill, a native of New Bern, has been 
appointed to conduct the documentary research. 
Mr. Dill has been granted a leave of absence from 
his duties as associate editor of the Norfolk 
Ledger-Dispatch. Mr. Morley J. Williams of 
Raleigh, who has had years of experience in his¬ 
torical restorations at the White House, Mount 
Vernon, and elsewhere, is in charge of the archeo¬ 
logical excavations. 

WELCOME NEW MEMBERS 

Although organized in 1900, the State Literary 
and Historical Association today is growing faster 
than ever before. This growth is due in a large 
measure to the activity of the Association’s mem¬ 
bership committee headed by Mr. Russell M. 
Grumman, director of the Extension Division of 
the University of North Carolina. 







To assist Mr. Grumman in the current drive for 
new members five division chairmen have been 
appointed. In addition, county chairmen have also 
been selected. Miss Elizabeth Vann Moore of Eden- 
ton is chairman of the Albemarle Division, which 
comprises the counties of Bertie, Beaufort, Cam¬ 
den, Chowan, Currituck, Dare, Edgecombe, Gates, 
Halifax, Hertford, Hyde, Martin, Nash, North¬ 
ampton, Pasquotank, Perquimans, Pitt, Tyrrell, 
Washington, and Wilson. 

Mr. H. Galt Braxton of Kinston is chairman of 
the Cape Fear Division, which includes the coun¬ 
ties of Bladen, Brunswick, Carteret, Columbus, 
Craven, Cumberland, Duplin, Greene, Jones, 
Lenoir, New Hanover, Onslow, Pamlico, Pender, 
Robeson, Sampson, and Wayne. 

Dr Hugh T. Lefler of Chapel Hill is chairman 
of the Central Division, consisting of the counties 
of Alamance, Caswell, Chatham, Durham, Frank¬ 
lin, Granville, Guilford, Harnett, Hoke, Johnston, 
Lee, Montgomery, Moore, Orange, Person, Ran¬ 
dolph, Richmond, Rockingham, Scotland, Vance, 
Wake, and Warren. 

Mr. John F. Blair of Winston-Salem is chairman 
of the Piedmont Division. This division includes 
the counties of Alexander, Alleghany, Anson, 
Cabarrus, Catawba, Cleveland, Davidson, Davie, 
Forsyth, Gaston, Iredell, Lincoln, Mecklenburg, 
Rowan, Stanly, Stokes, Surry, Union, Wilkes, and 
Yadkin. 


might like to join, send their names to your divi¬ 
sion chairman or to Mr. Russell M. Grumman, 
Extension Division, University of North Carolina, 
Chapel Hill. 



Miss Ann Beal, exhibits curator, is shown preparing a 
display on “North Carolina — 50 Years of Progress,” cur¬ 
rently being shown in the Modern Room of the Hall of 
History. 


This issue of Carolina Comments is being 
sent to members of the Western North Carolina 
Historical Association and of the North Carolina 
Society of County and Local Historians as well as 
to members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association. 


Mr. D. Hiden Ramsey of Asheville is chairman 
of the Mountain Division, which consists of the 
counties of Ashe, Avery, Buncombe, Burke, Cald¬ 
well, Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Haywood, Hender¬ 
son, Jackson, McDowell, Macon, Madison, Mitchell, 
Polk, Rutherford, Swain, Transylvania, Watauga, 
and Yancey. 

On July 21 Chancellor Robert B. House of the 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, who 
has served the State Literary and Historical Asso¬ 
ciation both as president and secretary-treasurer, 
wrote to several hundred Tarheels urging them to 
join the Association. The response has been most 
gratifying. As we go to press 190 new members 
have joined. They are distributed among the 
various divisions of the state as follows: 

Albemarle 26 
Cape Fear 29 
Central 54 
Piedmont 34 
Mountain 47 

We feel such that there are many other North 
Carolinians who would welcome an opportunity 
to join the Association. If you have friends who 


Persons who have items of interest to the read¬ 
ers of Carolina Comments are urged to com¬ 
municate them to the editor, Box 1881, Raleigh, 
North Carolina. 



NORTH CAROLINA LIBRARY C0MUI3 
RALEIGH, N. C. 










NORTH CAROLINA LIBRARY COMM.SSION ( 

U ^ RALEIGH, N. C ' 

z CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume I 


NEW BUILDING 

At present the State Department of Archives 
and History is housed in an office building in 
which it cannot serve the public to the fullest 
extent. In order to render the greatest possible 
service, it should be provided with a specially de¬ 
signed building, with adequate space for records, 
for exhibits, and for a variety of historical activi¬ 
ties. 

Throughout the Union several states have pro¬ 
vided such structures for their historical agen¬ 
cies. In the South action has been taken by 
several states, including Maryland, Virginia, 
Alabama, and Mississippi. Surely North Carolina, 
which is often called the most progressive state 
of the Southeast, can take the lead in this field 
as it has already done in so many others. 

After a careful study of what is needed, esti¬ 
mates have been for a building to cost $1,596,095 
and the Advisory Budget Commission has been 
asked to include this item in the state budget for 
1953-1955. 

Many of our leading citizens have already 
gone on record as favoring this forward step, 
and all patriotic Tarheels will want to play a 
part in the movement. The building will be a 
great historical center of which our people may 
be proud for generations to come. 

ANNUAL MEETING 

The largest attendance in the history of the 
State Literary and Historical Association is ex¬ 
pected for its annual meeting, which will be held 
in Raleigh on Friday, December 5. Since last 
year’s annual meeting over 350 new members 
have joined the Association. 

In view of the increased membership the eve¬ 
ning session will be held this year in the Hugh 
Morson High School Auditorium. It is felt that 
the Virginia Dare Ballroom of the Sir Walter 
Hotel, which was crowded to capacity last year, 
will not be large enough to accommodate this 
year’s gathering for that occasion. All other ses¬ 
sions will be held in the Sir Walter Hotel. 

Plans for the meeting are now being completed. 
The morning session, beginning at 10:00, will be 
held in the Virginia Dare Ballroom. Mr. George 
W. McCoy of Asheville will talk on Thomas Wolfe 


Number 4 


as Asheville knew him; Mr. Kermit Hunter of 
Chapel Hill, author of “Unto These Hills,” “Horn 
in the West,” and “Forever This Land,” will dis¬ 
cuss the outdoor historical drama; a review of 
the North Carolina non-fiction books of the year 
will be given; and the annual business session 
will be held. 

A new feature of this year’s meeting will be an 
informal luncheon at 1:00 p.m. in the Manteo 
Room, where Dr. J. G. de Roulhac Hamilton of 
Chapel Hill will speak on the University of North 
Carolina’s Southern Historical Collection, which 
he established. For twenty-five years prior to his 
retirement Dr. Hamilton traversed the length 
and breadth of the South in quest of manuscript 
materials for this valuable collection. 

At 6:00 p.m. a subscription dinner will be held 
in the Cafe Garden. Mr. Lambert Davis, director 
of the University of North Carolina Press, will 
be moderator for a “Meet the Authors” program, 
featuring several of the state’s leading writers. 

The final session will be held at 8:15 p.m. Dr. 
Frontis W. Johnston of Davidson, president of 
the Association, will deliver an address on Zebu- 
Ion B. Vance as a writer and public speaker. 
Following an address by Mr. J. Donald Adams, 
contributing editor of the New York Times Book 
Review, announcement of the Mayflower and Sir 
Walter Raleigh awards will be made. 

Further details concerning the meeting, in¬ 
cluding information about tickets for the lunch¬ 
eon and dinner and a copy of the program, will 
be sent soon to members of the State Literary 
and Historical Association. Remember the date, 
December 5, and make your plans now to attend. 

OTHER MEETINGS 

This year, as usual, a number of the state’s 
leading cultural organizations, in addition to the 
State Literary and Historical Association, have 
selected the first week in December for their an¬ 
nual meetings in the Tarheel capital. 

Other organizations which will be meeting 
from December 3 through December 5 are the 
North Carolina Folklore Society, the North Caro¬ 
lina Society for the Preservation of Antiquities, 
the North Carolina Society of County and Local 
Historians, the North Carolina State Art Society, 
and the Roanoke Island Historical Association. 


NOVEMBER, 1952 





CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Volume I November, 1952 Number 4 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 

Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals. 

Edwin A. Miles, Editor 


MR. J. DONALD ADAMS 

Mr. J. Donald Adams, who will deliver the 
principal address at the meeting of the State 
Literary and Historical Association in Raleigh, 
December 5, is a recognized literary authority. 
A contributing editor of the New York Times 
Book Review, Mr. Adams conducts Page Two, 
with a weekly column entitled “Speaking of 
Books.” From 1925 until 1943 he served as editor 
of the magazine. 

Mr. Adams has had a long and distinguished 
career as a reporter, editor, and writer. A grad¬ 
uate of Harvard (class of 1913) he taught briefly 
at the University of Washington before entering 
the newspaper world. He served as reporter for 
the New Bedford Evening Standard, the Provi¬ 
dence Journal, and the New York Sun, and later 
as an editorial writer for the New York Herald. 
He became assistant editor of the New York 
Times Book Review in 1924, and editor the fol¬ 
lowing year. 

Mr. Adams is the author of two books, The 
Shape of Books to Come (1944) and Literary 
Frontiers (1951). He is also editor of The Treas¬ 
ure Chest: An Anthology of Contemplative Prose 
(1945). 

LITERARY AWARDS 

Two literary awards will be announced at the 
annual meeting of the State Literary and His¬ 
torical Association in Raleigh, December 5. The 
announcement of the winners of the Mayflower 
Society Cup and the Sir Walter Raleigh Cup will 
be made at the conclusion of the evening session. 

The Mayflower award, established in 1931, is 
granted annually by the Society of Mayflower 
Descendants in the State of North Carolina. 
Under new regulations the award will be given 
to the best non-fiction work by a North Caro¬ 
linian published in the twelve-month period end¬ 
ing August 31. 

The list of eligible volumes follows: 

Mrs. G. I. Joe, by Blanche Egerton Baker Goldsboro: 

privately printed. 

The Other Harmony of Prose, by Pauli F. Baum. Durham: 

Duke Univ. Press. 

Piedmont Partisan, by Chalmers G. Davidson. Davidson: 

Davidson College. 


Browning and America, by Louise Greer. Chapel Hill: 
U. N. C. Press. 

History of Rutherford County, 1937-1951, by Clarence 
Griffin. Asheville: Inland Press. 

Revolutionary Justice, by James L. Godfrey. Chapel Hill: 
U. N. C. Press 

You Can Believe, by Frank W. Hanft. Indianapolis: 
Bobbs-Merrill Co. 

Daily Living in the Twelfth Century, by Urban T. 

Holmes. Madison: Univ. of Wisconsin Press. 
Northampton Parishes, by Henry W. Lewis. Jackson: 
privately printed. 

The Legal Status of the Tenant Farmer in the Southeast, 
by Charles S. Mangum. Chapel Hill: U. N. C. Press. 



Mayflower Society Cup 


Wheels of Faith and Courage, by Mary Green Matthews 
and M. Jewell Sink. High Point: Hall Printing Co. 

The Papacy, by John P. McKnight. New York: Rinehart 
& Co. 

Mr. Justice Sutherland, by Joel F. Paschal. Princeton: 
Princeton Univ. Press. 

Alcohol, Culture, and Society, by Clarence H. Patrick. 
Durham: Duke Univ. Press. 

Through Eight Decades as Minister, Editor, Author, by 
Marion T. Plyler. Durham: privately printed. 

Graveyard of the Atlantic, by David Stick. Chapel Hill: 
U. N. C. Press. 

Early Histo>~y of Belmont and Gaston County, by Robert 
L. Stowe, Sr., Belmont: privately printed. 

Inglis Fletcher of Bandon Plantation, by Richard Wal- 
ser. Chapel Hill: U. N. C. Library. 

Top Secrets of Successful Selling, by Jack Wardlaw. 
New York: Wilfred Funk, Inc. 

The Sir Walter Raleigh Cup, to be granted for 
the first time this year, will be awarded annually 
by the Historical Book Club to honor North 
Carolina writers of fiction. Announcement of the 
regulations concerning the award will be made 
at a later date by officials of the Club. Miss Clara 
B. Byrd of Greensboro is president of the or¬ 
ganization. 













NORTH CAROLINA LIBRA 

OUR THANKS 

A grateful acknowledgment is made to Appala¬ 
chian State Teachers College, host to the joint 
meeting of the State Literary and Historical As¬ 
sociation, the Western North Carolina Historical 
Association, and the North Carolina Society of 
County and Local Historians at Boone on August 
30 and 31. Special thanks are due to Dr. D. J. 
Whitener, chairman of the program committee, 
and to Dr. B. B. Dougherty, president, and Mr. 
Barnard Dougherty, business manager of the 
College. Approximately 150 persons attended the 
meeting. 

All of the arrangements were perfe'ct—except 
for the weather. And even the rain held up dur¬ 
ing most of the performance of “Horn in the 
West,” which the group attended on Saturday 
night. Members of the societies were given rooms 
in a new dormitory which had just been com¬ 
pleted. 

The State Literary and Historical Association 
is planning to continue its policy of holding 
regional meetings in the late spring and summer. 
Already two invitations from communities have 
been received for next year. Other groups which 
are interested in having the Association meet 
with them are asked to contact Dr. Christopher 
Crittenden, secretary-treasurer, State Literary 
and Historical Association, Box 1881, Raleigh. 

HISTORICAL MARKERS 

During the past few months several ceremonies 
have been held for the unveiling of historical 
markers throughout the state. These markers 
were erected under North Carolina’s Historical 
Marker Program, conducted jointly by the State 
Department of Archives and History, the State 
Department of Conservation and Development, 
and the State Highway and Public Works Com¬ 
mission. 

On August 23 exercises were held in Lincoln- 
ton for markers to the U. D. C. Memorial Hall, 
formerly Pleasant Retreat Academy, and the 
Confederate Laboratory at Laboratory. On Sep¬ 
tember 16 a marker for Thalian Hall was unveil¬ 
ed in Wilmington. 

On October 3, in ceremonies near Lucia, Gaston 
County, a marker was unveiled to honor Oak 
Grove, the home of Colonel James Johnston, 
soldier and political leader during the Revolution. 
On the following day two markers were unveiled 
in Buncombe County ceremonies—one honoring 
pioneer tuberculosis fighter Dr. L. B. McBrayer 
and another for diplomat Richmond Pearson. 



Following the latter program Mr. Thomas Pear¬ 
son and Miss Marjorie N. Pearson entertained 
members of the Western North Carolina Histori¬ 
cal Association at a reception at “Richmond 
Hall,” their home near Asheville. 

On October 10 a ceremony was held near Nor¬ 
wood, Stanly County, for a marker commemorat¬ 
ing the site of the Colson’s Mill engagement 
between Whigs and Tories during the Revolu¬ 
tion. Dr. Chalmers G. Davidson of Davidson Col¬ 
lege gave a brief talk on Colonel William Lee 
Davidson, leader of the Whig forces on that oc¬ 
casion. 

LOCAL HISTORICAL SOCIETIES 

Mr. D. L. Corbitt, chairman of the committee 
on local historical societies of the State Literary 
and Historical Association, reports an increasing 
interest throughout the state in the formation of 
,£ounty historical societies. During the year his 
committee has held two meetings, one at Ashe¬ 
ville and another at Carolina Beach, to formulate 
a program to encourage the creation of additional 
societies. 

To implement this program Mr. Corbitt has 
talked to interested groups in Gaston, Pitt, Stan¬ 
ly, and Warren counties and has talked to or 
corresponded with individuals in Alleghany, 
Cleveland, Craven, Iredell, Onslow, Robeson, and 
Rowan counties. As a result several societies have 
already been organized and others are in the proc¬ 
ess of formation. Mr. Corbitt would welcome 
correspondence from persons interested in form¬ 
ing such societies in other counties. 



Governor and Mrs. W. Kerr Scott entertained members 
of the Southeastern Museums Conference at a reception 
in the Governor’s Mansion, October 17. At the left are 
Mrs. Joye E. Jordan, head of the Hall of History, Gover¬ 
nor Scott, and Mrs. Scott. Hosts for the meeting, attended 
by approximately 80 persons, were the Hall of History, 
the State Art Gallery, and the State Museum. 



CALL FOR PICTURES 


ITEMS IN BRIEF 


Old photographs are among the most interest¬ 
ing and useful sources of North Carolina history. 
The picture of the Wright brothers’ flight in 1903, 
reproduced on this page, is one of thousands of 
prints in the Hall of History files. 

The Hall of History is anxious to increase its 
file of photographs in order to obtain a better 
camera-eye coverage of Tarheel history. Photo¬ 
graphs of old buildings and houses, street and 
rural scenes, costume scenes, pictures of historic 
events, and non-current files of commercial pho¬ 
tographers and newspapers would make a wel¬ 
come addition. 



Wright Brothers’ Flight, 1903 

Do you have any pictures or negatives which 
you would like to add to this growing collection? 
If so, write Mrs. Joye E. Jordan, head, Division 
of Museums, State Department of Archives and 
History, Raleigh. Mrs. Jordan is particularly 
interested in photographs taken prior to 1920. 


The Charles B. Aycock Memorial Commission 
met in Goldsboro, October 8, to discuss plans for 
the restoration of the birthplace of North Caro¬ 
lina’s “Educational Governor” near Fremont, in 
Wayne County. Dr. J. Y. Joyner of LaGrange, 
honorary chairman of the Commission and former 
state superintendent of public instruction, an¬ 
nounced that he was preparing a letter, to be sent 
to all school teachers and education officials in the 
state, urging each of them to contribute one dollar 
to the fund. A goal of $40,000 has been set. Dr. 
D. J. Rose of Goldsboro is chairman of the Com¬ 
mission, Miss Gertrude Weil of Goldsboro is secre¬ 
tary, and Mrs. Charles G. Doak of Raleigh is 
treasurer. 

At the business meeting of the State Literary 
and Historical Association, December 5, members 
o'f the nominating committee for 1953 will be 
chosen from the floor. Members should now be 
considering suitable persons to serve on that com¬ 
mittee. 

On December 5 the special case designed for the 
original charter of Carolina, granted by Charles 
II to the Lords Proprietors in 1663, will be offici¬ 
ally opened in the Hall of History. The charter 
was purchased and presented to the Department 
of Archives and History by a group of citizens of 
the state in 1949. The case was constructed to 
permit the charter to be seen at close range by 
the public while providing protection from theft, 
vandalism, fire, moisture, and excessive light. 



NORTH CAROLINA LIBRARY COMMISSION 


RALEIGH, N. C 




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NORTH CAROLINA 


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CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume I JANUARY, 1953 Number 5 


A YEAR OF PROGRESS 

During 1952 the State Literary and Historical 
Association “enjoyed the most active and most 
successful year for several decades, if not for the 
entire period of its history,” Christopher Critten¬ 
den, secretary-treasurer of the Association, told 
members at the organization’s fifty-second annual 
meeting in Raleigh, December 5. 

In their reports the chairmen of the Associa¬ 
tion’s committees gave proof of Dr. Crittenden’s 
statement. Russell M. Grumman of Chapel Hill, 
chairman of the Membership Committee, an¬ 
nounced that there were now 876 members in the 
Association, more than double the 1951 total 
of 434. Members of the committee, in addition 
to Chairman Grumman, are John F. Blair of 
Winston-Salem, H. Galt Braxton of Kinston, Hugh 
T. Lefler of Chapel Hill, Miss Elizabeth Vann 
Moore of Edenton, and D. Hiden Ramsey of Ashe¬ 
ville. 

Richard Walser of Raleigh, chairman of tire 
Awards Committee, outlined plans for granting a 
separate award for the best volume of poetry by 
a North Carolinian published each year, for the 
creation of an official “Poet Laureate of North 
Carolina” to be appointed by the governor upon 
the recommendation of the Association, and for 
the establishment of an annual Robert D. W. Con¬ 
nor Award for the student who has written the 
best article of original research in North Carolina 
history published in The North Carolina Histor¬ 
ical Review. Serving with Mr. Walser on the 
Awards Committee are Miss Clara Booth Byrd of 
Greensboro, Burnham S. Colburn of Biltmore 
Forest, Fletcher M. Green of Chapel Hill, Mrs. 
Bernice Kelly Harris of Seaboard, Robert Lee 
Humber of Greenville, and William T. Polk of 
Greensboro. 

D. L. Corbitt of Raleigh, chairman of the Com¬ 
mittee on Local Historical Societies, reported that 
his committee had been instrumental in the or¬ 
ganization of two county historical societies—in 
Stanly and Craven counties—and that steps had 
been taken to set up similar organizations in sev¬ 
eral other counties. Other members of this com¬ 
mittee are Mrs. W. D. Boone of Winton, James S. 
Brawley of Salisbury, Malcolm Fowler of Lilling- 
ton, Mrs. Fred D. Hamrick, Jr., of Rutherfordton, 
W. P. Jacocks of Chapel Hill, Weimar Jones of 
Franklin, Miss Mary Louise Medley of Wadesboro, 


Phillips Russell of Chapel Hill, J. F. Stanback of 
Mt. Gilead, Miss Sara Stewart of New Bern, 
George M. Stephens of Asheville, and John E. 
Tyler of Roxobel. 

W. Frank Burton of Raleigh, chairman of the 
Committee on Historical Materials, reported on 
the progress of his committee, which held two 
meetings during the year. Other members of the. 
committee, which was established “to encourage 
the collection and preservation of valuable his¬ 
torical records throughout North Carolina,” are 
W. E. Bird of Cullowhee, Chalmers Davidson of 
Davidson, Malcolm Fowler of Lillington, Paul 
Murray of Greenville, James W. Patton of Chapel 
Hill, John R. Peacock of High Point, T. H. Spence 
of Montreat, and John E. Tyler of Roxobel. 

The Resolutions Committee, consisting of Mrs. 
J. Henry Highsmith, chairman, Mrs. John M. 
Parker, and Miss Clyde Smith, all of Raleigh, re¬ 
ported resolutions expressing sympathy for the 
families of four members of the Association who 
died during the year—Mrs. S. Westray Battle of 
Asheville, Charles M. Heck of Raleigh, Herbert 
Peele of Elizabeth City, and Mrs. Anne B. Pruitt 
of Buies Creek. The Auditing Committee, which 
was composed of James A. Shackford, chairman, 
Mrs. A. W. Hoffman, and Mrs. R. R. Sermon, all 
of Raleigh, reported that the accounts of the As¬ 
sociation were correct. 

In his report Luther W. Barnhardt of Raleigh, 
chairman of the Nominating Committee, recom¬ 
mended the re-election of the current officers for 
another year “in order to give continuity of lead¬ 
ership in the enlargement program of the associa¬ 
tion which is being so ably and so successfully 
launched at this time.” The following persons 
were then re-elected by acclamation for 1953: 
Frontis W. Johnston of Davidson, president* 
Burnham S. Colburn of Biltmore Forest, Miss 
Alice B. Keith of Raleigh, and Miss Gertrude 
Weil of Goldsboro, vice-presidents; and Chris¬ 
topher Crittenden of Raleigh, secretary-treasurer. 

Upon the recommendation of the Nominating 
Committee, Stuart Noblin of Raleigh and William 
H. Ruffin of Durham were chosen to vacancies on 
the Executive Committee of the Association. Mem¬ 
bers of the Nominating Committee, in addition to 
Chairman Barnhardt, were Forrest W. Clonts of 
Wake Forest, Mrs. Charlotte Hilton Green of Ra¬ 
leigh, William S. Powell of Chapel Hill, and Rich¬ 
ard Walser of Raleigh. 




CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Volume I JANU ARY, 1953 _ Number 5 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 

Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals. 

Edwin A. Miles, Editor 


THE WINNERS 

At the annual meeting of the State Literary and 
Historical Association two literary awards were 
presented for 1952. The Mayflower Society Cup, 
established in 1931 by the Society of Mayflower 
Descendants in North Carolina, was awarded this 
year for the North Carolina non-fiction volume 
adjudged best by a Board of Award. The Sir 
Walter Raleigh Cup, granted for the first time, 
was established by the Historical Book Club to 
honor Tar Heel writers of fiction. 

John P. McKnight of Shelby, author of The 
Papacy: A New Appraisal, was the winner of the 
Mayflower Cup and Paul Green of Chapel Hill 
was granted the Sir Walter Raleigh Award for 
“outstanding literary achievement.” In the future 
the Sir Walter Raleigh Award will be presented 
annually for the best fiction work published each 
year by a North Carolinian. 

In his review of the North Carolina non-fiction 
books of the year LeGette Blythe of Huntersville 
said that Mr. McKnight “has developed out of an 
amazing chore of research an important contribu¬ 
tion to American writing in 1952.” The Greens¬ 
boro Daily News declared that “as a first-rate 
book on a subject of vast importance in our time, 
The Papacy well deserved, in our opinion, to win 
the Mayflower Cup.” The Shelby Daily Star ex¬ 
pressed the opinion that Mr. McKnight “has con¬ 
tributed a monumental work to the libraries of the 
free world in his book.” The Papacy was included 
in the selected list of the year’s most significant 
books, which appeared in the December 7 issue of 
the New York Times Book Review. Mr. McKnight, 
who served for twenty years with the Associated 
Press overseas, is now with the State Department 
in Rome. 

The award to Mr. Green was also applauded. 
The Greensboro Daily Neics said that “Paul Green 
was, of course, a ‘natural’ for the first award of the 
Sir Walter Raleigh Cup. Pulitzer-prize drama 
winner, poet, philosopher, artist and man of great 
heart and mind, Paul Green has done fine and 
moving work in many fields, including the drama, 
the short story and the essay—more than that, he 
created a new form of art, the symphonic drama, 


which has spread throughout the country and en¬ 
riched American life with a fresh and patriotic 
self-knowledge. ‘The Lost Colony,’ and ‘The Com¬ 
mon Glory’ reach a hand through time to catch the 
magnificence and true glory of America’s heritage 
more compellingly, we believe, than any other 
works of our time.” The Raleigh Netvs and Ob¬ 
server, writing in a similar vein, declared that 
“the value of the Sir Walter Raleigh Cup for all 
who receive it in the future will be enhanced by 
the fact that its first recipient was Paul Green.” 

ANNUAL MEETING 

Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association enjoyed a full day’s activities at the 
annual meeting in Raleigh, December 5. The pro¬ 
gram consisted of a morning session, luncheon, 
dinner, evening session, and reception. 

Following the business session, which began at 
9 :45 A.M., three interesting papers were presented 
to the Association. George W. McCoy of Asheville 
spoke on “Asheville and Thomas Wolfe”; Kermit 
Hunter of Chapel Hill talked on “The Outdoor 
Historical Drama”; and LeGette Blythe of Hunt¬ 
ersville gave a review of the Mayflower books of 
the year. 

At the luncheon, held in the Virginia Dare Ball¬ 
room of the Sir Walter Hotel, J. G. de Roulhac 
Hamilton of Chapel Hill delivered an address on 
“George Patterson, North Carolinian by Adop¬ 
tion.” The Executive Committee of the Association 
met at 3 :00 P.M. 

A “Meet the Authors” program was the feature 
at the annual dinner of the Association, held in 
the Cafe Garden of the Sir Walter Hotel. Lambert 
Davis of Chapel Hill, director of the University of 
North Carolina Press, acted as moderator and the 
following authors participated in the program: 
Mrs. Mebane Holoman Burgwyn of Jackson, Mrs. 
Inglis Fletcher of Edenton, Hugh T. Lefler of 
Chapel Hill, David Stick of Kitty Hawk, Richard 
Walser of Raleigh, and Mrs. Max'gery Wilson of 
New York. 

The evening session w r as held in the Hugh Mor- 
son High School Auditorium. Frontis W. Johnston 
of Davidson delivered the presidential address on 
“Zebulon B. Vance—A Personality Sketch.” Fol¬ 
lowing an address by J. Donald Adams, con¬ 
tributing editor of the New York Times Book Re¬ 
view, on “The Writer’s Responsibility,” presenta¬ 
tion of the Mayflower and Sir Walter Raleigh lit¬ 
erary awards was made. A reception at the Sir 
Walter Hotel concluded the day’s program. 

Many of the interesting papers delivered at the 
meeting will appear in the April, 1953, issue of 
The North Carolina Historical Review. 










SCENES FROM THE ANNUAL MEETING OF 
THE STATE LITERARY AND HISTORICAL 
ASSOCIATION 

Approximately 120 members of the Association 
attended a luncheon (above) at which J. G. de 
Roulhac Hamilton delivered an address. 

A “Meet the Authors ” program (below) featured 
the annual dinner of the Association. Participants 
were, left to right, Hugh T. Lefler, David Stick, Mrs. 
Inglis Fletcher, Lambert Davis, moderator, Mrs. 
Margery Wilson, Richard Walser, and Mrs. Mebane 
Holoman Burgwyn. 

At the evening session (upper light) the state’s 
top literary awards were made. Shown, left to light, 
are Miss Clara B. Byrd, president of the Historical 
Book Club, donor of the Sir Walter Raleigh Cup, and 
Paul Green, first recipient; Mrs. Preston B. Wilkes, 
Jr., president of the Mayflower Society, which do¬ 
nated that cup; and John S. McKnight, father of 
John P. McKnight who was winner of the Mayflower 
Cup. 

Frontis W. Johnston and J. Donald Adams (cen¬ 
ter light) were the speakers at the evening session. 

A reception (lower right) followed the evening 
session. 









AMERICAN HERITAGE 

Three years ago the first issue of American 
Heritage, the quarterly magazine devoted to bring¬ 
ing “to life for America’s people the colorful, ex¬ 
citing history of America’s past,” appeared on the 
nation’s newsstands. A non-profit periodical, 
American Heritage has ably lived up to its goal of 
“preserving our history at the local level and mak¬ 
ing it known to ALL the people as a basis for 
understanding our heritage as a free people.” 

Roger Butterfield, Carl Carmer, Frank Mona¬ 
ghan, Allan Nevins, and Roy Franklin Nichols, 
all outstanding historians, are members of the 
Editorial Board of American Heritage. Members 
of the board, as well as all contributors to the 
magazine, serve without compensation. Earle W. 
Newton, director of Old Sturbridge Village, Mas¬ 
sachusetts, is the able and energetic editor of the 
periodical. Time magazine has said that editor 
Newton is “well on his way toward making the 
past as readable as the present.” 

American Heritage is recognized as one of the 
most beautiful publications in America today. For 
three successive years it has won the Certificate 
of Excellence of the American Institute of Graphic 
Arts. A large magazine with a page size of 8 1 /? 
inches by 11 inches, it is magnificently printed on 
heavy, glossy stock. The average issue contains no 
less than thirteen plates in full color. 

The Winter, 1953, issue of American Heritage 
has a definite Tar Heel flavor. Christopher Crit¬ 
tenden, director of the State Department of Ar¬ 
chives and History, is guest editor of the issue 
featuring the history and development of the 
South. North Carolinians will be particularly in¬ 
terested in the articles on “Southern No Man’s 


Land” by Dr. Crittenden, “Sir Walter Raleigh” by 
William S. Powell, “What Became of the ‘Lost 
Colony’?” by Charles W. Porter, III, “Tobacco” 
by Howard H. Peckham, and “North Carolina 
Foods” by William S. Powell. 

American Heritage has won the plaudits of 
many leading citizens of the nation. Governor 
Earl Warren of California has commended it for 
possessing “a wealth of historical data, and some 
of the most beautiful pictures and illustrations I 
have seen.” Senator Margaret Chase Smith of 
Maine has expressed the wish that American Her¬ 
itage could “be placed in the hands of every stu¬ 
dent in the country so that the youth of the nation 
could be brought up with the same appreciation 
of American Traditions that we were.” 

Begin your subscription to this interesting and 
informative magazine now—the cost is only $3.00 
per year for the four issues. The address of Ameri¬ 
can Heritage is Box 969, Harrisburg, Penna. 

REGIONAL MEETINGS 

Last year the State Literary and Historical As¬ 
sociation held two regional meetings—one at Caro¬ 
lina Beach and another at Boone. Because of the 
popularity of this feature of the Association’s ex¬ 
panded program two additional regional meetings 
have been planned for 1953. 

During the late spring the Association will meet 
in Winston-Salem and in the latter part of August 
a meeting will be held at Cullowhee together with 
the Western North Carolina Historical Associa¬ 
tion and the Society of County and Local His¬ 
torians. 

Further details concerning the Winston-Salem 
meeting will be given in the March issue of Caro¬ 
lina Comments. 


NORTH C 


ROLINA LIBRARY COMMISSION 



RALEIGH, N. C 



< 5 ° wwu|NA L'PRARY CCmSSION 

CAROLINXttJMMENTS 


Volume I MARCH, 1953 Number 6 


SPRING MEETING 

The spring meeting of the State Literary and 
Historical Association will be held in Winston- 
Salem, Friday and Saturday, May 22-23. Dr. 
Douglas L. Rights, archivist of the Moravian 
Church, Southern Province, is chairman of the 
committee on arrangements. 

Further details will be announced in the May 
issue of Carolina Comments and members of the 
Association will be kept informed of the plans by 
letter and postal card. But make your plans now 
to attend. 

MANGUM PAPERS 

The newest documentary publication of the 
State Department of Archives and History, The 
Papers of Willie P. Mangum, Volume II, is now 
available for distribution. Dr. Henry Thomas 
Shanks, dean of Birmingham-Southern College, 
Birmingham, Alabama, is editor of the 673-page 
volume which sheds much light on state and na¬ 
tional politics during the 1830’s. 

Mangum, a native of Orange (now Durham) 
County, was born in 1792 and died in 1861. He 
served in the United States House of Representa¬ 
tives, 1823-1826, and in the Senate, 1831-1836 and 
1841-1853. From 1842 to 1845 he was president 
pro tempore of the Senate and thus acting vice 
president of the United States. 

Volume II of the Mangum Papers covers the 
years from 1833 to 1838 when he was a prominent 
leader in the formation of the Whig party in op¬ 
position to President Andrew Jackson. In 1836 he 
received the electoral votes of South Carolina in 
the presidential race. 

The volume contains 400 letters which Mangum 
wrote or received. Among his numerous corre¬ 
spondents during the period were John C. Cal¬ 
houn, Henry Clay, Daniel Webster, and other 
political leaders. The bulk of the correspondence 
was found in collections in the Library of Con¬ 
gress, the State Department of Archives and His¬ 
tory, and the libraries of the University of North 
Carolina and Duke University. Thirteen illustra¬ 
tions are reproduced, including portraits of 
Mangum (see cut), Calhoun, John Randolph of 
Roanoke, Archibald Debow Murphey, Duncan 
Cameron, Walter Avis Mangum, and William C. 
Preston. 

Dr. Shanks, the editor, is a native of Vance 
County and a graduate of Wake Forest College. 


In 1929 he received the Ph.D. degree from the 
University of North Carolina. His doctoral dis¬ 
sertation, The Secession Movement in Virginia, 
18.(7-1861, was published in 1934. 



Courtesy of National Gallery of Art 

Willie P. Mangum. This portrait, from an original oil 
painting by James B. Lambdin in 1844 and now in the 
possession of Miss Preston Weeks, Washington, D. C., is the 
frontispiece of the Willie P. Mangum Papers, Volume II. 

The new volume is the second documentary 
publication of the State Department of Archives 
and History issued within recent months and 
the thirtieth since the establishment of the His¬ 
torical Commission in 1903. Volume I of The 
John Gray Blount Papers, edited by Dr. Alice B. 
Keith, associate professor of history at Meredith 
College, Raleigh, was issued last fall. All bound 
volumes of the Department may be obtained for 
$1.00 each upon application to D. L. Corbitt, head 
of the Department’s Division of Publication. A 
list of available publications will be sent upon 
request. 

The Department has also recently published its 
Twenty-Fourth Biennial Report, which may be 
obtained without cost. 


fh Carolina S.als Library 








CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Volume I MARCH, 1953 Number 6 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 

Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals. 

Edwin A. Miles, Editor 


GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY 

This month the State Department of Archives 
and History celebrates its golden anniversary. 

On March 9, 1903, the General Assembly rati¬ 
fied Senate Bill 327, “A Bill to be Entitled An Act 
to Establish an Historical Commission” (see cut). 
The Commission was instructed to “have collected 
from the files of old newspapers, from court rec¬ 
ords and elsewhere valuable documents pertaining 
to the history of the State.” For this purpose‘the 
Commission was authorized to spend a sum not 
exceeding five hundred dollars annually. 



The original bill establishing the State Historical Com¬ 
mission, ratified March 9, 1903 (in Legislative Papers, 
State Department of Archives and History). 


From this humble beginning the State Histori¬ 
cal Commission, whose name was changed in 1943 
to the State Department of Archives and History, 
has shown a steady growth and today ranks as 


one of the leading state historical agencies in the 
nation. 

Although created in 1903, it was not until 1907 
that the Commission was given an office force. In 
that year the General Assembly increased the ap¬ 
propriation to $5,000 a year, permitting the em¬ 
ployment of a full-time secretary. Robert D. W. 
Connor (see cut), who had served as secretary 
without pay from 1903 to 1907, filled that position 
until 1921 and established the agency on a firm 
foundation. 



Courtesy of National Archives 

Robert Digges Wimberly Connor. This portrait, painted 
by Mrs. Arthur M. Nash, was unveiled in the National 
Archives Conference Room in Washington, D. C., October 
10, 1952. Dr. Connor, secretary of the State Historical 
Commission from 1903 to 1921, was first archivist of the 
United States, 1934-1941. He died in 1950. 

Others who served as secretary (since 1945 
director) have been D. H. Hill, 1921-1924; Robert 
B. House, 1924-1926; A. R. Newsome, 1926-1935; 
and Christopher Crittenden since 1935. The staff 
now numbers twenty-two persons. 

Today the Department not only continues its 
original function of the collection and preserva¬ 
tion of historical documents but also maintains a 
historical museum, publishes documentary and 
popular historical volumes, conducts a historical 
highway marker program, cooperates with other 
state agencies in solving modern records problems, 
acts as a clearing house for information on Tar 































Heel history, and works closely with m 
torical groups in telling the history of the state 
to the people. 

Each year the Hall of History, since 1914 con¬ 
ducted by the Department, attracts nearly 100,000 
visitors, including school groups from all sections 
of the state. 

Since 1903 the Department has published over 
300 items, including pamphlets, leaflets, charts, 
newsletters, documentary publications, and issues 
of The North Carolina Historical Review. 

In cooperation with the State Department of 
Conservation and Development and the State 
Highway and Public Works Commission, the De¬ 
partment has erected approximately 700 historical 
markers in 97 counties of the state. 

At present the Department is microfilming 
bulky modern records of other state agencies in 
order to release critically needed storage space. 
Microfilm enables a 99 per cent saving in the use 
of storage space. 

The Department is governed by an Executive 
Board of seven members appointed by the gov¬ 
ernor for staggered terms of six years. Present 
members are B. F. Brown, Raleigh, chairman; 
Miss Gertrude Carraway, New Bern; Clarence W. 
Griffin, Forest City; W. T. Laprade, Durham; Mc¬ 
Daniel Lewis, Greensboro; Mrs. Sadie S. Patton, 
Hendersonville; and Mrs. Callie Pridgen Williams, 
Stedman. 

SMITHWICK AWARD 

In order to promote the writing of local history, 
the North Carolina Society of County and Local 
Historians has announced the establishment of the 
D. T. Smithwick Award, which will be sponsored 
by the Society. Dr. Smithwick, of Louisburg, a 
patron of the organization, is donor of the award. 

According to an announcement by W. P. Ja- 
cocks of Chapel Hill, president of the Society, the 
award will be given “for an acceptable published 
county or local history or historical paper or 
article and shall relate to the history of a section 
of the state or shall be a biographical work re¬ 
lating to a resident or residents of this state.” 

The first award, which is open to residents of 
North Carolina, natives of North Carolina, or 
members of the Society, will be given in December, 
1953, for works published between July 1, 1950, 
and July 1, 1953. The second award will be given 
in 1955 and subsequent awards thereafter at 
biennial intervals. The following points will be 
the guiding principles in determining the winners 
of the award: accuracy, adequacy, local scope, 
style and readability, and arrangement. 

Willis G. Briggs, of Raleigh, is chairman of 


& dfMiamittee on Awards for this year. 
Other members are Mrs. Louise A. Froelich, Jack- 
son ; Miss Mary Louise Medley, Sanford; John H. 
Monger, Sanford; Mrs. S. T. Peace, Henderson; 
William S. Powell, Chapel Hill; and John E. 
Tyler, Roxobel. 

TRYON PALACE 

In the September, 1952, issue of Carolina Com¬ 
ments we carried an account of the beginning of 
the restoration of the Tryon Palace in New Bern. 
During the last six months significant progress has 
been made in the work of rebuilding the edifice 
which was the capitol of North Carolina as well 
as the governor’s residence during the late colonial 
period and the early days of statehood. Perry, 
Shaw and Hepburn, Kehoe and Dean, architects 
of Boston, are conducting the restoration. 

The west wing of the Palace, the only remaining 
portion of the building still standing, has been 
stripped, measured drawings have been completed, 
and the brickwork construction has been care¬ 
fully studied. Mr. Morley J. Williams is in actual 
charge of the physical restoration. 

Excavations have been made on the sites of the 
main building and the east wing. Two corners of 
the basement face wall of the main building have 
been uncovered, while the other two corners are 
represented only by the offsets of the foundations. 
One corner of the east wing has also been def¬ 
initely established. 

In the process of excavation and sifting, workers 
have uncovered many artifacts, including frag¬ 
ments of marble, a moulded piece of brown sand¬ 
stone, bits of plaster moldings, and pieces of thin 
sheet glass. The remains of a sewage system, ultra¬ 
modern for its time, have also been uncovered. 

Mr. Alonzo T. Dill, who has charge of the docu¬ 
mentary research, has traveled extensively 
throughout the eastern United States in quest of 
material relating to Governor Tryon and his New 
Bern residence. In addition to a careful study of 
records available in North Carolina he has visited 
archives and historical collections in Virginia, 
Maryland, the District of Columbia, New Jersey, 
and New York. At present he is in England ex¬ 
ploring records in British archives, consulting 
British architects and specialists in eighteenth 
century history, and collecting photographs and 
drawings to aid in the restoration project. 

The restoration of the Palace was made possible 
by the donations of the late Mrs. J. E. Latham of 
Greensboro, a native of New Bern. Mrs. J. A. 
Kellenberger, Mrs. Latham’s daughter, is chair¬ 
man of the Tryon Palace Commission. 


NUKIH (JAI OLINA LIBRARY 


Ef tT* : J 

‘Hie S oci 


ROMM SSI0 



VIRGINIA DARE DESK 

Christopher Crittenden, director of the State 
Department of Archives and History, has a new 
desk (see cut). 



The Virginia Dare Desk (State Department of Archives 
and History photo by Dorothy R. Phillips). 


Actually the Virginia Dare Desk is not new—it 
is sixty years old—but it is new to the director’s 
office. Built for display at the Columbian Exposi¬ 
tion in Chicago in 1893, it was made of white 
holly wood from Roanoke Island, the place of Vir¬ 
ginia Dare’s birth. A group of Wilmington crafts¬ 
men led by E. V. McKenzie made the desk, which 
was designed by Silas McBee of Lincolnton. 

The desk boasts five handsome hand-carved 
panels, carved by Miss Kate Cheshire of Tarboro. 
The central front panel depicts a doe on the coast 


of Roanoke Island—in recognition of the Indian 
legend that the first child born of English parents 
in America was transformed into a white doe. On 
the right front panel is carved the coat of arms of 
Sir Walter Raleigh, promoter of the first English 
colonies in the New World. On the left front panel 
appears a reproduction of the pinnace which bore 
the first colonists to Roanoke Island, as shown on 
John White’s map of 1586. 

On both end panels are designs of the scupper- 
nong grape vine, which the colonists are said to 
have found growing on the island and which is 
native to North Carolina. On one end panel is 
carved the date 1587, the year of Virginia Dare’s 
birth, and on the other appears the date 1892, the 
year the Virginia Dare Desk was made. 

After the close of the Chicago fair the desk was 
returned to North Carolina and placed in the State 
Library prior to the removal of that agency to its 
present building in 1914. In 1915 it was presented 
to the Raleigh Woman’s Club. George Ross Pou, 
late state auditor, afterwards secured it from the 
Woman’s Club, and for several years it was in 
his office. 

In March, 1952, Mrs. Pou presented the desk 
to the State Department of Archives and History. 
Dr. Crittenden was so pleased with the donation 
that he decided that it would be appropriate for 
his office. The Virginia Dare Desk was handsomely 
refinished and last month began serving in its new 
capacity in Room 108, Education Building. 

Persons who have items of interest to the read¬ 
ers of Carolina Comments are urged to com¬ 
municate them to the editor, Box 1881, Raleigh, 
North Carolina. 


NORTH C 




.INA 


iRY C! 


T '■N • ? 



RALEIGH, N. C. 


















numn umhulii r\ lidkakt UJnilYl do!' 


// v° c RALEIGH, N. C. 

1 CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume II 


May, 1953 


SPRING MEETING 

The dates: Friday and Saturday, May 22-23. 

The place: Winston-Salem. 

The hosts: Wachovia Historical Society and Old 
Salem, Inc. 

The program: The History of the Winston-Sa¬ 
lem Area. 

Headquarters: Hotel Robert E. Lee—write for 
reservations. 

These are the important facts to remember con¬ 
cerning the forthcoming regional meeting of the 
State Literary and Historical Association. Dr. 
Douglas L. Rights, archivist of the Moravian 
Church, Southern Province, and chairman of our 
local arrangements committee, has arranged a 
program that will be of interest to all of us. 

Registration will be held at the Old Salem Head¬ 
quarters, 614 South Main Street, from 1:30 to 2:30 
P. M., Friday. At 2:30 Mr. James A. Gray, Jr., 
president of Old Salem, Inc., will speak on “Plans 
for the Restoration of Old Salem” in a session to 
be held at Salem College. Following this session a 
guided tour of the restoration area will be con¬ 
ducted and members of the Wachovia Historical 
Society will be hosts at a complimentary tea in the 
Salem Tavern from 4:30 to 5:30. 

At 6:30 a subscription dinner will be held in 
the ballroom of the Hotel Robert E. Lee. Follow¬ 
ing the dinner two illustrated talks will be given: 
Bishop J. K. Pfohl will speak on “The History of 
Old Salem” and Mr. Frank L. Horton will talk 
on “Combining Documental and Physical Evi¬ 
dence in Restoration Work.” 

At 9:30 A.M., Saturday, Dr. Rights will speak on 
“The Development of Modern Winston-Salem” at a 
session at the Hotel Robert E. Lee. Following this 
talk buses will take us on a tour to Bethabara 
(Old Town), to the future campus of Wake Forest 
College, and to other points of interest in and 
near Winston-Salem. 

A subscription luncheon at 12:30 P.M. will con¬ 
clude the program of the two-day meeting. Bishop 
Howard E. Rondthaler, president emeritus of Sa¬ 
lem College, will speak on “Highlights and Side¬ 
lights of Wachovia History.” 

Members of the Association will receive a copy 
of the program. Make your plans now to attend 
—and bring your family and friends. All meetings 
will be open to the public. 


Number 1 


OLD SALEM 

Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association who attend the meeting in Winston- 
Salem, May 22-23, will have a splendid opportunity 
to observe what has been accomplished toward the 
restoration of Old Salem village. Old Salem, Inc., 
a non-profit organization established three years 
ago, hopes that considerable progress toward “re¬ 
capturing” the Moravian village of 1766-1830 will 
be made by 1966, the town’s 200th anniversary. 

The restoration of the Lick-Boner blockhouse, 
built in 1787 by Martin Lick and later the birth¬ 
place of John Henry Boner, the poet, and the 
acquisition of the John Vogler house, a gift from 
Mrs. James A. Gray, Sr., are the two most recent 
accomplishments of the organization. 



Courtesy State News Bureau 

The Home Moravian Chinch, Old Salem. 

At present Old Salem, Inc., is conducting a cam¬ 
paign to raise $500,000 to further the restoration 
project. The organization, which is aided by several 
civic and patriotic groups in Winston-Salem, de¬ 
serves the enthusiastic support of all North Caro¬ 
linians. 










CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Volume II MAY, 1953 Number 1 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 

Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals. 

Edwin A. Miles, Editor 


"RICHMOND HILL" 

"Richmond Hill,” the fine old home of Richmond 
Pearson (1852-1923,) congressman and diplomat, 
overlooks Asheville from high on the west bank 
of the French Broad River. Built during the 1880’s, 
it contains "a collection of rare books and histori¬ 
cal documents; furniture, portraits, china, glass 
and other heirlooms; also Persian rugs, hand- 
wrought silver and brass from Isfahan and Shiraz 
and other articles collected from abroad.” Present 
owners of the house are Thomas Pearson and Miss 
Marjorie N. Pearson. 



The Parlor of “Richmond Hill.” 


This year, from May 1 to October 1, "Richmond 
Hill” will be open to the public from 2 :00 to 7:00 
every afternoon except Tuesdays. Admission is by 
ticket available at Daves’ Store at the entrance to 
“Richmond Hill.” $1.20 per person includes tax. 
To reach “Richmond Hill” drive west on U. S. 
Highway 19-23 across the Smoky Mountains Park 
Bridge and turn right at Louisiana Avenue and 
continue for two miles. 

WINTER REPORT 

The first three months of 1953 were busy ones 
for the staff of the State Department of Archives 
and History. 


Approximately 25,000 persons, including many 
school groups, visited the Hall of History. During 
March alone, 174 school groups, a total of 7,332 
children, were shown the slide program before 
visiting the museum. 

During January, February, and March, 696 
visits were made to the Search Room of the Divi¬ 
sion of Archives and Manuscripts. The Division 
also handled 453 mail and 35 telephone requests 
for information. Among records accessioned were 
those of three counties and the official papers of 
the administration of Governor W. Kerr Scott. 

The Division of Publications mailed 2,930 items 
in addition to one issue of The North Carolina 
Historical Review and two issues of Carolina 
Comments. 

"BURNSIDE" 

“Burnside,” near Williamsboro, in Vance Coun¬ 
ty, has been called “probably the most beautiful, 
certainly the most imposing” house in the historic 
Roanoke River basin. According to tradition it 
was once the home of Memucan Hunt, first state 
treasurer of North Carolina. It later belonged to 
Patrick Hamilton, who named it “Burnside” after 
the home in Scotland where he was born. 

In later years the Hardy family purchased 
“Burnside.” Here Mary Pinckney Hardy, who 
became General Douglas MacArthur’s mother, 
spent many of her childhood days. 

At present the Seminole Rock & Sand Company 
owns “Burnside” and the surrounding estate of 
1,500 to 2,000 acres. The property is for sale but 
only to some family who will appreciate its historic 
value and preserve the property accordingly. Any¬ 
one interested should contact Mrs. Beulah J. Wea¬ 
ver, assistant secretary, Seminole Rock & Sand 
Company, 101 Capital Apartments, Raleigh. 

OUTDOOR DRAMAS 

With Labor Day falling on September 7 this 
year, the outdoor drama season in North Carolina 
will be one week longer than in 1952. A record 
attendance is expected. 

The state’s oldest outdoor drama, Paul Green’s 
“The Lost Colony,” will be presented for the thir¬ 
teenth season at Fort Raleigh, Roanoke Island, 
from June 27 through September 6. At Mountain¬ 
side Theatre, Cherokee, Kermit Hunter’s “Unto 
These Hills” will open its fourth season on June 
27 and close on September 7. 

Two dramas will be presented for their second 
season from June 26 through September 7: Mr. 
Hunter’s “Horn in the West” in the Daniel Boone 
Amphitheatre, Boone, and Robert Hayes’ “Thun- 
derland” in the Forest Amphitheatre, Asheville. 

















OUR HISTORICAL MARKER PROGRAM 

North Carolina’s historical marker program, 
established in 1935 by legislative enactment, is 
conducted jointly by the State Department of 
Archives and History, the State Department of 
Conservation and Development, and the State 
Highway and Public Works Commission. Since 
the unveiling of the first historical marker in Jan¬ 
uary, 1936 (see cut), approximately 700 markers 
have been erected in 97 counties of the state. 

All markers are authorized by the Advisory 
Committee on Historical Markers, which is com¬ 
posed of historians from several colleges and 
universities of the state. Present members of the 
committee are Forrest W. Clonts, Wake Forest 
College; William B. Hamilton and Robert H. 
Woody, Duke University; Frontis W. Johnston, 
Davidson College; Luther W. Earnhardt, State 
College; and Elisha P. Douglass, Cecil Johnson, 
Hugh T. Letter, James W. Patton, and William S. 
Powell, University of North Carolina. Christopher 
Crittenden, director of the State Department of 
Archives and History, is chairman, and Edwin 
A. Miles is researcher for the program. 

According to the law, markers erected under 
this program must be of statewide historical in¬ 
terest and not merely of local concern. They are 
ordinarily placed only on paved numbered high¬ 
ways, but, if necessary, can point the way to places 
off such highways by indicating the distance and 
direction to the site. 

In drafting the inscriptions for the markers the 
committee does not “editorialize” or pass judg¬ 
ment ; only straight-forward and undisputed his¬ 
torical facts are set forth. For each statement of 
fact it is required that contemporary, documen¬ 
tary evidence be produced or be available to the 
researcher. In no case will tradition or hearsay be 
considered adequate authority. 

Because of space limitations, inscriptions must 
be concise. The heading, generally of one line only, 
can consist of approximately fifteen spaces and 
letters. The body of the inscription is limited to 
five or six lines with each line composed of only 
18 or 20 spaces and letters. 

The proposed site to be marked has to be famil¬ 
iar and well-known locally or records to establish 
such a claim must be available. This applies, for 
example, to the location of homes of noteworthy 
persons, the sites of battles, and the location of 
graves, schools, churches, and forts. 

Frequently several months elapse between the 
time a marker is suggested and its actual erection. 
The Advisory Committee, whose members serve 


without pay, meets only on call, generally three or 
four times a year. There is usually a backlog of 
proposed inscriptions, so that new requests neces¬ 
sarily have to wait their turn. 

After an inscription has been prepared by the 
Advisory Committee the researcher must deter¬ 
mine exactly where the marker is to be placed and 
obtain the exact distance and direction from the 
location on the highway to the place for which the 
marker is authorized. When 15 or 20 such inscrip¬ 
tions have been prepared they are sent to the 
foundry for casting. 



GNE OF NORTH CAROLI¬ 
NES THREE SIGNERS OF 
THE DECLARATION OF 
INDEPENDENCE SITE OF 
HOME 3 MILES NORTH¬ 
EAST 


Scene at the unveiling of the first marker erected under 
the state historical marker program, .January 10, 1936, in 
Granville County. 


A proof for each marker is submitted to the De¬ 
partment of Archives and History for final check¬ 
ing. When completed the markers are shipped to 
the Department’s warehouse, where they are pick¬ 
ed up by representatives of the State Highway 
and Public Works Commission’s local divisions 
when they are in Raleigh on other business. 

When local groups desire to have an unveiling 
ceremony arrangements can be made in advance to 
have the marker covered until the proper time. 
The Department has a special cloth cover which 
can be used for the ceremony. 

The Advisory Committee endeavors to see that 
new markers are fairly distributed throughout the 
state and that markers cover all phases of the 
state’s history (military, political, cultural, and 
other) and also all periods (Colonial, Revolution¬ 
ary, and the rest). 

The Department welcomes suggestions concern¬ 
ing the program. Such correspondence may be ad¬ 
dressed to Edwin A. Miles, Researcher, State 
Department of Archives and History, Raleigh. 









MEMBERSHIP CAMPAIGN 

During 1952 the State Literary and Historical 
Association more than doubled its membership, 
thanks to the able work of the membership com¬ 
mittee with Russell M. Grumman of Chapel Hill 
as chairman. The organization now includes ap¬ 
proximately 900 members. 

Yet the membership drive is by no means com¬ 
pleted. Several midwestern historical societies 
have membership rolls far greater than ours. 
Surely North Carolina, with its proud historical 
heritage, can make far greater strides in this re¬ 
spect. 

Each individual member of the Association can 
do his share in making the membership drive a 
success. There are many persons who would doubt¬ 
less welcome an opportunity to join if they were 
acquainted with the program of the Association; 
probably some of your friends and neighbors are 
included in this group. If so, send their names to 
Mr. Grumman, Head, Extension Division, Univer¬ 
sity of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, who will see 
that they are contacted. 

Or perhaps there is some one whom you would 
like to honor by presenting him with a year’s mem¬ 
bership in the Association. You can do this by 
sending his or her name with a check for $3.00 to 
Christopher Crittenden, Box 1881, Raleigh. 


BERTiE CHRONICLE 

Volume One, Number One, of The Chronicle of 
the Bertie Count)/ Historical Association appeared 
in April. John E. Tyler of Roxobel is chairman 


of the Association’s publications committee. The 
new periodical is issued to members, public li¬ 
braries, and individuals. 



Eleven North Carolina doctors of the past are featured 
in the current exhibition in the Portrait Gallery of the 
Hall of History. These young visitors to the gallery are 
shown examining the portrait of Richard Henry Whitehead 
(1865-1912), dean of the Medical School of the University 
of North Carolina. 

Persons who have items of interest to the read¬ 
ers of Carolina Comments are urged to com¬ 
municate them to The Editor, Box 1881, Raleigh, 
North Carolina. 



rlSS ELIZABETH HOUSE 
library commission 
RALEIGH» N. C. 


L 











1 %d> NORTH CAROLINA LIBRARY ROMMSSION 

A 7 - 2 - ' RALEIGH, N. G. 

2 CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Volume II JULY, 1953 Number 2 


CULLOWHEE MEETING 

On August 27, 28, and 29 a joint meeting of the 
State Literary and Historical Association and the 
Western North Carolina Historical Association 
will be held at Cullowhee. Dean W. E. Bird of 
Western Carolina College is chairman of the pro¬ 
gram and arrangements committee. 

Through the courtesy of Western Carolina Col¬ 
lege members of the two associations and their 
families will be able to stay in the college dormi¬ 
tories for $1.00 per night (including bed linen 
and maid service). Meals will be obtainable at the 
college cafeteria on equally reasonable terms. 

The program will feature the history of the 
Tuckaseigee Valley and the surrounding area. 
Members of the societies will have an opportunity 
to see Kermit Hunter’s “Unto These Hills” in 
the Mountainside Theatre (see cut) at Cherokee, 
eighteen miles away. A historical tour of the 
vicinity is also being planned. 



Courtesy State News Bureau 


Mountainside Theatre, Cherokee 

The Cullowhee meeting will be the second joint 
meeting of the two associations, the first having 
been held in August, 1952, at Appalachian State 
Teachers College in Boone. Approximately 175 
persons attended that meeting and an equally 
large group is expected this year. 

A copy of the program for the forthcoming 
meeting will be sent to members of the two socie¬ 
ties. Remember the dates, August 27, 28, and 29 
(Thursday, Friday, and Saturday). 


LITERARY AWARDS 

Although the annual meeting of the State 
Literary and Historical Association is over five 
months away, work has already begun toward the 
compilation of lists of books to be considered for 
the Mayflower and Sir Walter Raleigh awards. 

The Mayflower Cup, established in 1931 by the 
Society of Mayflower Descendants in the State of 
North Carolina, will be given for the best non¬ 
fiction work by a North Carolinian published in 
the twelve-month period ending August 31. John 
P. Knight of Shelby, author of The Papacy, was 
last year’s winner. 

The Sir Walter Raleigh Award, given for the 
first time in 1952 by the Historical Book Club 
(to Paul Green for “outstanding literary achieve¬ 
ment”), will be granted to the Tar Heel author of 
the best fiction volume published in the three- 
year period ending August 31. In the future, 
this award will be given for the best fiction work 
published each year. 

A special award, to be granted by the North 
Carolina Division of the American Association of 
University Women, will be given to the author of 
the best juvenile book considered for the other 
two awards (to be granted only in the event that 
a juvenile work does not win either major award). 

In a subsequent issue of Carolina Comments, 
a preliminary list of books eligible for the awards 
will be published. The juvenile award will be an¬ 
nounced at the morning meeting and the May¬ 
flower and Sir Walter Raleigh cups will be pre¬ 
sented at the evening session of the Association, 
December 4. 

NEW PAMPHLET 

The State Department of Archives and History 
has recently published a new edition of Explora¬ 
tions, Descriptions, and. Attempted Settlements 
of Carolina, 1584-1590, edited by D. L. Corbitt. 

The new bulletin contains material not found 
in the earlier edition, including the account of 
Giovanni da Verrazano, who explored the Caro¬ 
lina coast for the King of France in 1524. Several 
new illustrations are also included in the 154-page 
publication. 

The bulletin may be obtained upon application 
to Mr. Corbitt, State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh. 









CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume II JULY, 1953 Number 2 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 

Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals. 

Edwin A. Miles, biditor 


COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETIES 

Throughout North Carolina interest is being 
shown in the establishment of local historical so¬ 
cieties. For example, within the past few weeks 
we have had reports that new organizations have 
been established in Columbus, Pender, and Robe¬ 
son counties. 

In addition, older organizations—the Bertie 
County Historical Association and the Stanly 
County Historical Society, to mention only two— 
have recently held interesting meetings and have 
made significant plans for the future. Details of 
their programs may be found in the July issue of 
The North Carolina Historical Review. 

Is there a historical society in your county? 
There should be one in each of North Carolina’s 
one hundred counties. Two of the state’s cultural 
societies are actively encouraging the establish¬ 
ment of such organizations. For further informa¬ 
tion write Dr. W. P. Jacocks, president, North 
Carolina Society of County and Local Historians, 
Carolina Inn, Chapel Hill, or Mr. D. L. Corbitt, 
chairman, Committee on Local Historical Socie¬ 
ties, State Literary and Historical Association, 
Box 1881, Raleigh. Both of them will be happy to 
advise you in such an undertaking. 

If you already have a historical society in your 
county, Mr. Corbitt, who is managing editor of 
The North Carolina Historical Review', will ap¬ 
preciate information concerning its activities. He 
is currently compiling a list of all such organiza¬ 
tions and their officers, which he intends to pub¬ 
lish in The Review. 

OUR THANKS 

For the success of the Winston-Salem meeting 
of the State Literary and Historical Association, 
our genuine thanks are extended to Dr. Douglas L. 
Rights and Mr. James A. Gray, Jr., co-chairmen 
of the local committee on arrangements; to Miss 
Lila Fisher, publicity director of Old Salem, Inc.; 
to Mr. Frank L. Horton and Bishops J. K. Pfohl 
and Howard E. Rondthaler, participants in the 
program; and to the members of the Wachovia 
Historical Society. 


Among the highlights of the two-day program 
were the historical tours. On Friday members of 
the Association were conducted on a tour of the 
Old Salem restoration area and were entertained 
at a Moravian tea in Salem Tavern (see cut). On 
Saturday the visitors were shown a glimpse of 



Courtesy Winston-Salem Journal 


Dressed in a Moravian costume, Mrs. R. M. King of 
Winston-Salem explains a display of antiques at Salem 
Tavern to (left to right) Dr. Frontis W. Johnston of 
Davidson, president of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Mrs. W. K. Hoyt, Wachovia Historical Society 
director, and Dr. Christopher Crittenden of Raleigh, 
secretary-treasurer of the State Literary and Historical 
Association. This picture was taken at the reception given 
by the Wachovia Historical Society for members of the 
state association, May 22. 

both the past and the future of Wachovia: a bus 
tour to Bethabara and Bethania, the sites of the 
oldest Moravian villages, and to the new campus 
of Wake Forest College, for which the buildings 
are now being constructed at Reynolda. 

Approximately one hundred persons attended 
one or more of the sessions, which were held May 
22 and 23. 

ADDITIONAL FACTS REGARDING THE 
VIRGINIA DARE DESK 

In addition to the facts presented in our March 
issue regarding the Virginia Dare Desk, it should 
be pointed out that Mrs. Sallie Southall Cotten of 
Greenville conceived the idea of the desk, aroused 
the interest of others, and worked out with infi¬ 
nite pains every detail of its creation. She went to 
Roanoke Island and obtained the holly wood from 
which the desk was made, selected the subjects 
for the historical panels, and supervised the 
actual manufacture in the Atlantic Coast Line 
shops in Wilmington. 









The story of the desk is interesting. Mrs. Cot- 
ten served as one of the Board of Lady Managers 
for the Columbian Exposition at Chicago, 1892- 
1893. There the desk was intended for the North 
Carolina Room in the Woman’s Building, but 
when it reached Chicago it created so much en¬ 
thusiasm that it was placed in the Assembly 
Room. Here the chairman of the Board of Lady 
Managers presided and all business was trans¬ 
acted. 

After the desk’s return to North Carolina it 
had a strange history and was almost lost to the 
state until the late George Ross Pou rescued it 
from oblivion. It was through the good offices of 
Mrs. Lyman A. Cotten of Chapel Hill that Mrs. 
Pou recently presented the desk to the State De¬ 
partment of Archives and History. 

THE HALIFAX "GAOL" 

Halifax, North Carolina, is rich in Revolution¬ 
ary history. There the Halifax Resolves were 
passed, April 12, 1776. In that town lived Wil¬ 
liam R. Davie, Willie Jones, and other leading- 
figures of that era. In order to preserve the town’s 
remaining Revolutionary landmarks, the Halifax 
Restoration Committee has been established. 

The first project of the Committee is to pre¬ 
serve the old Halifax Jail, built as early as the 
1760’s. Following the battle of Moore’s Creek 
Bridge, the Tory leaders were imprisoned in the 
old “Gaol.” The committee hopes to establish a 
museum in this building to portray eastern North 
Carolina’s role in the Revolution. 

Mrs. Sterling M. Gary of Halifax is president 
pro tem of the committee. Other members are 
Mrs. R. L. Applewhite, Mrs. F. W. M. White, Mrs. 
Quentin Gregory, Mrs. F. H. Gregory, and Mrs. 
Caswell Shaw. 

A total of $2,000 is needed to purchase the 
Jail building from its present owner. Mr. Ray 
Wilkinson of Rocky Mount is temporary chair¬ 
man of the drive. The names of all contributors 
will be inscribed on a scroll which will hang in 
the proposed museum. You can participate in this 
worthy cause by sending your contribution to Mr. 
Wilkinson, Radio Station WCEC, Rocky Mount. 

LEGISLATIVE REPORT 

The 1953 regular session of the North Carolina 
General Assembly adjourned April 30. Among 
other accomplishments, it passed significant legis¬ 
lation pertaining to historical activities in the 
state. The Legislature: 

(1) appropriated $148,718 and $147,474 for the 
maintenance of the State Department of Archives 


and History during the fiscal years 1953-54 and 
1954-55 respectively. It provided for six new 
employees for the Department, including four 
additional persons for the State Microfilm Project 
conducted by the Division of Archives and Manu¬ 
scripts (Carolina Comments, Ju1jM952). Mem¬ 
bers of the staff received a ten percent salary in¬ 
crease (as did most other state employees), retro¬ 
active to July 1, 1952. 

(2) provided for the establishment of a His¬ 
toric Sites Commission to screen requests for 
state aid in the preservation and maintenance of 
historic and archeological sites, buildings, and 
other properties. The director of the State Depart¬ 
ment of Archives and History is ex officio secre¬ 
tary of this commission. 

(3) provided for the creation of a Zebulon 
Baird Vance Memorial Commission to purchase 
and preserve the house in Buncombe County in 
which North Carolina’s famed governor and sena¬ 
tor was born. It also provided for a $5,000 ap¬ 
propriation to aid in the project. A similar law 
was passed in 1949 pertaining to the Charles B. 
Aycock birthplace in Wayne County. 

(4) provided for the appointment of a commis¬ 
sion to arrange North Carolina’s participation in 
the celebration of the golden anniversary of the 
first airplane flight. Carl Goerch, Raleigh publish¬ 
er and flying enthusiast, has been appointed 
chairman of this commission. The fiftieth anniver¬ 
sary of the Wright brothers’ historic flight at Kill 
Devil Hill will be celebrated on December 17, 
1953. 

(5) granted permission to the State Depart¬ 
ment of Archives and History to inaugurate a 
junior historian program in the public schools. 
Further details concerning this movement will 
be given in subsequent issues of Carolina Com¬ 
ments. 

(6) contributed $22,500 to aid three historical 
dramas: $10,000 to the Southern Appalachian 
Historical Association for “Horn in the West”; 
$10,000 to Sunset Mountain Attractions, Inc., for 
“Thunderland”; and $2,500 to Kings Mountain 
Little Theatre, Inc., for “Sword of Gideon.” The 
General Assembly also “forgave” the Cherokee 
Historical Association’s debt of $25,000 to the 
state. 

(7) released custodians of county, city, town, 
or other governmental records of liability in cases 
of destruction of records declared useless in ac¬ 
cordance with the procedure established by law. 
The State Department of Archives and History 
advises such agencies in the disposal of records. 

(Continued on page U) 


(Continued from page 3) 

(8) enabled the State Department of Conser¬ 
vation and Development to apply the balance of 
the $15,000 originally appropriated for the pur¬ 
chase of the James Iredell house in Edenton to the 
liquidation of an outstanding indebtedness on the 
house. 

(9) permitted Alamance County to deed Ala¬ 
mance Battleground to the State Department of 



Conservation and Development for the creation 
of a state historical park. 

Although an appropriation for the proposed 
new Archives and History building (Carolina 
Comments, November, 1952) was not made, more 
interest was aroused in the movement and more 
support obtained than ever before. As a result, 
the chances of success in the future appear to be 
brighter. 



PROGRESS REPORT 

The pictures reproduced on this page indicate the prog¬ 
ress which has been made toward the restoration of the 
Tryon Palace at New Bern. The west wing, the only part 
of the original Palace still standing, has been stripped 
down (upper left) to its eighteenth century portions. Since 
this picture was taken, considerable progress has been 
made toward its restoration. 

Excavation of the main building (lower left) is con¬ 
tinuing. All dirt from the Palace proper is carefully sifted 
in search of artifacts which tell much about life in North 
Carolina’s early capitol and governor’s residence. Behind 
the east wall of the main building may be seen exploratory 
trenches dug in the Palace grounds. 

The artifacts uncovered are currently stored on tables 
(upper right), in boxes, and in cabinets in the Restoration 
headquarters. A group of these artifacts is currently being- 
exhibited in the Hall of History. 



RALEIGH, N. C 


















































NORTH CAROLINA LIBRARY CC.WTSSION 
RALEIGH, N. G. 

CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume II 


NOVEMBER, 1953 


Number 4 


ANNUAL MEETING 

The fifty-third annual meeting of the State Lit¬ 
erary and Historical Association will be held in 
Raleigh, Friday, December 4. A full day’s pro¬ 
gram has been planned for the occasion. 

At 10 :00 A. M. the business meeting—including 
reports of the secretary-treasurer and committee 
chairmen, the adoption of resolutions, and the 
election of officers—will be conducted in the 
Virginia Dare Ballroom of the Hotel Sir Walter. 
The winners of the A. A. U. W. Award for juvenile 
literature and the Roanoke-Chowan Award for 
poetry will be announced at this time. 

Following the business meeting three speakers 
will be heard: Dr. Henry S. Stroupe of Wake 
Forest will speak on “The First Fifty Years of 
the State Department of Archives and History”; 
Mr. Hoke Norris of the Winston-Salem Journal 
and Sentinel will discuss “North Carolina Non- 
Fiction Books of the Year”—a review of the vol¬ 
umes eligible for this year’s Mayflower Award; 
and Mr. Richard Walser of the State College Eng¬ 
lish Department, chairman of the Association’s 
committee on awards, will tell about the new 
awards granted this year. 

At the luncheon, also to be held in the Virginia 
Dare Ballroom, Dr. Dougald MacMillan of the 
English Department of the University of North 
Carolina will discuss the books eligible for this 
year’s Sir Walter Raleigh Award for fiction. 

The remaining sessions will be held in the new 
State Highway Building east of Capitol Square. At 
the dinner Dr. Frontis W. Johnston of Davidson 
will deliver the presidential address. At the eve¬ 
ning session, to be held in the Highway Audito¬ 
rium, there will be an address by Professor Allan 
Nevins of the History Department of Columbia 
University, to be followed by the announcement 
of the Mayflower and Sir Walter Raleigh awards 
for 1953. A reception will close the day’s activities. 

ALLAN NEVINS 

We believe that the State Literary and Histori¬ 
cal Association is fortunate this year in the selec¬ 
tion of its principal speaker—Allan Nevins, noted 
teacher, author, and lecturer. 

On any score Professor Nevins ranks among the 
top-flight historians of today. Since 1931 he has 
been a professor of American history at Columbia 


University. A prolific writer and editor, he has 
averaged better than a volume a year for the past 
quarter-century. Two of his biographies, Grover 
Cleveland (1932) and Hamilton Fish (1936), have 
won Pulitzer Prizes. His Ordeal of the Union 
(1947) won both the Scribner Centenary Prize 
and the Bancroft Prize for history. His latest 
work, The Statesmanship of the Civil War, was 
published by the Macmillan Company in Septem¬ 
ber. 



Columbia University 

Allan Nevins 

Professor Nevins also excels on the platform. 
Dr. Christopher Crittenden, secretary-treasurer 
of the State Literary and Historical Association, 
was so pleased with his recent address before the 
Society of American Archivists in Detroit that he 
determined to invite him to deliver the principal 
address at the annual meeting of the Association. 
A capacity audience is expected to hear Mr. 
Nevins’ speech in the Auditorium of the new 
Highway Building. 














CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume II NOVEMBER, 1953 Number 4 


Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 


by itself or in connection with any county, city, or town, 
or any group of citizens or organizations interested in 
the acquisition and preservation of sites having historic 
or archeological interest and value to the people of North 
Carolina and the communities in which such sites may be I 
located .... 


Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals. 

Edwin A. Miles, Editor 


HISTORIC SITES COMMISSION 

Within recent years North Carolinians have 
shown increasing interest in the matter of histori¬ 
cal preservation: Tryon Palace is now being re¬ 
stored ; Old Salem, Inc., recently conducted a 
successful campaign to raise $500,000; and the 
Parks Division of the State Department of Con¬ 
servation and Development has made significant 
progress in the restoration of Fort Macon, Petti¬ 
grew Plantation, and Town Creek Indian Mound 
—to mention only a few instances. 

As a further indication of this interest, the 
General Assembly of 1953 authorized the estab¬ 
lishment of a Historic Sites Commission to: 

determine criteria for the approval of historic and arche¬ 
ological sites, buildings, and other properties for State 
aid and fully to investigate and to consider from a his¬ 
torical standpoint all real property, with or without build¬ 
ings thereon, which may be considered to be such historic 
or archeological site as would justify the acquisition and 
ownership thereof by the State of North Carolina, acting 


The act further provides that no purchase from 
state funds can be made for the acquisition of such 
historic sites until approved by the Commission 
and that no properties shall be obtained in 
this manner unless there is “a feasible and prac¬ 
tical method of providing funds for the restoration 
and operation of such property.” Upon recom¬ 
mendation of the Commission, the Governor and 
Council of State may, at their discretion, appro¬ 
priate funds from the Contingency and Emergency 
Fund for the purchase of options not to exceed 
one-twentieth of the purchase price of the prop¬ 
erty—the option to last until sixty days after the 
convening of the next General Assembly. In such 
cases, preference is to be given to those projects 
in which state funds shall at least be equalled by 
funds from other sources. 

All properties acquired in this manner shall be 
administered by the State Department of Conser¬ 
vation and Development. The Department, how¬ 
ever, may make contracts with local groups for the 
maintenance of such properties. 

As members of the Historic Sites Commission 
Governor William B. Umstead has appointed Mrs. 
Ernest Ives of Southern Pines, president of the 



Charlotte Observer 


Members of the North Carolina Historic Sites Commis¬ 
sion are shown here with Governor William B.Umstead, 
September 25, at the group’s first meeting. From left to 
right are: Dr. Paul A. Reid, Dr. Hugh T. Lefler, Dr. 


Christopher Crittenden, William T. Polk, James A. 
Stenhouse, and Governor Umstead. Mrs. Ernest Ives, 
sixth member of the Commission, was not present at the 
meeting. 


/ 















Moore County Historical Society; Dr. Hugh T. 
Lefler of Chapel Hill, professor of history at the 
University of North Carolina; Mr. William T. 
Polk of Greensboro, associate editor of the 
Greensboro Daily News-, Dr. Paul A. Reid of 
Cullowhee, president of Western Carolina College; 
and Mr. James A. Stenhouse of Charlotte, an 
architect. Dr. Christopher Crittenden, director of 
the State Department of Archives and History, 
is ex officio secretary of the Commission. 

At the first meeting of the Commission, on 
September 25, members received their commis¬ 
sions from the Governor. At the business session 
immediately following, Mr. Stenhouse was chosen 
chairman and tentative criteria for evaluating 
historic sites were adopted. Members also en¬ 
dorsed in principle the acquisition of the Gulf Oil 
property adjacent to the Tryon Palace, discussed 
the need for obtaining additional land adjacent 
to the Wright Memorial at Kill Devil Hill and 
voted to commend the Catawba County Historical 
Association for its efforts to preserve the Bunker 
Hill Covered Bridge near Claremont. The secre¬ 
tary was requested to make a survey of historic 
and archeological sites throughout the state and 
to report its results to a future meeting of the 
commission. 

THE CHAIRMAN 

Mr. James A. Stenhouse, chairman of the His¬ 
toric Sites Commission, has long been interested 
in the preservation of North Carolina’s historic 
and archeological sites. Chief Architect of the J. N. 
Pease Company, an engineering and architectural 
firm of Charlotte, he was appointed earlier this 
year North Carolina preservation officer and 
chairman of the state committee on the preserva¬ 
tion of historic buildings for the American Insti¬ 
tute of Architects. 

As an architect, Mr. Stenhouse has developed 
a natural interest in old houses of North Carolina. 
During the past several years, through research 
and travel, he has made an inventory of historic 
buildings in the state. The list now numbers over 
620 buildings in 76 counties. He has also prepared 
a guide to historic sites in Mecklenburg and 
adjoining counties, which has been used to ad¬ 
vantage by several persons. 

Mr. Stenhouse’s interest in archeology is also 
of long standing. As a college student, he almost 
joined a University of Pennsylvania expedition 
to the Egyptian Valley of the Kings. His family 
has not let his interest lag since that time. “My 
boys,” he wrote recently, “are interested in the 
red skinned aboriginals and my wife, Louise, in 


the early history of the white men. This breaks the 
house into two camps—the diggers and the dust¬ 
ers.” 

A member of the National Tru^t for Historic 
Preservation, Mr. Stenhouse last year, for his 
study of Mecklenburg County historic sites, re¬ 
ceived the Charles A. Cannon Award for Histori¬ 
cal Research from the North Carolina Society for 
the Preservation of Antiquities. As chairman of 
the Historic Sites Commission, Mr. Stenhouse 
now has an opportunity for further contributions 
in a field well suited to his interests and talents. 

LITERARY AWARDS 

Among the busiest Tar Heels these days are 
the judges for the literary awards that will be 
announced at the annual meeting of the State 
Literary and Historical Association, December 4. 
Approximately one hundred fiction or non-fiction 
works by North Carolina authors are being con¬ 
sidered. 

Judges for the Mayflower Award are Prof. For¬ 
rest W. Clonts and Dr. H. B. Jones of Wake 
Forest, Dr. Frontis W. Johnston of Davidson, and 
Mr. Hoke Norris and Mr. Frank Borden Hanes of 
Winston-Salem. 

Judges for the Sir Walter Raleigh Award (as 
well as for the A. A. U. W. Award for Juvenile 
Literature and the Roanoke-Chowan Award for 
Poetry) are Dr. Dougald MacMillan and Dr. Wal¬ 
lace E. Caldwell of Chapel Hill, Mrs. L. A. Corri- 
her of Landis, Mrs. Rupert Gillett of Davidson, 
and Mr. Spencer Murphy of Salisbury. 

The Mayflower Award will be granted to the 
North Carolina author of the non-fiction work 
published during the twelve-month period ending 
August 31, 1953, that is adjudged best by the 
board of award. Authors whose works are being 
considered are as follows: 

LeGette Blythe of Huntersville, Richmond P. Bond of 
Chapel Hill, Cale K. Burgess of Raleigh, Alan Cooke of 
Durham, George Burton Cutten of Chapel Hill, C. Sylvest¬ 
er Green of Chapel Hill, Floyd Hunter of Chapel Hill, 
Raymond J. Jeffreys of Raleigh, Albert Keiser of Hickory, 
Estelle Cothran Latta of Durham, William A. McCall of 
Tapoco, Robert Leet Peterson of Durham, C. L. Spellman 
of High Point, Carl Sandburg of Flat Rock, J. Carlyle 
Sitterson of Chapel Hill, Mary T. Martin Sloop of Cross- 
nore, Charles S. Sydnor of Durham, Kelly G. Vester of 
Rocky Mount, Alban G. Widgery of Durham, Reese F. 
Williams of Asheville, and Paul A. Reid of Cullowhee. 

The Sir Walter Raleigh Award will be granted 
to the Tar Heel author of the fiction work that the 
judges consider to be the most outstanding. Be¬ 
cause no fiction award has been granted since 



1950, all works published during the three-year 
period ending August 31, 1953, are eligible. 

The following authors of juvenile literature are 
eligible for the special Roanoke-Chowan Poetry 
Award and for the Sir Walter Raleigh Award: 

Thelma Harrington Bell of Sapphire, Ruth and La- 
trobe Carroll of Asheville, Burgess Leonard of High Point, 
Mrs. Mack D. McCurry of Bostic, Frank H. Richardson 
of Black Mountain, Glen Rounds of Pine Bluff, Rebecca 
Sprinkle of Durham, and Manly Wade Wellman of Chapel 
Hill. 

The following poets have written works that 
are eligible for the special Roanoke-Chowan Po¬ 
etry Award and for the Sir Walter Raleigh 
Award: 

Cynthia de Ford Adams of Four Oaks, Jacob Oliver 
Alderman of Garner, Stewart Atkins of Gastonia, Zoe 
Kincaid Brockman of Gastonia, Frank Cooper of Whittier, 
Hannah Barham Davis of Warrenton, Charles Edward 
Eaton of Chapel Hill, Mrs. John Erskine of Weaverville, 
Frank Borden Hanes of Winston-Salem, Gilmer A. Jones 
of Franklin, Mable S. Lassiter of Burlington, Mary Louise 
Medley of Sanford, Hope Robertson Norburn of Asheville, 
Laura Howell Norden of Wilmington, James Larkin 
Pearson of Guilford College, Merle Price of Forest City, 
Martha M. Pingel of Greenville, Henrietta and John 
Smedes of Raleigh, Metta Folger Townsend of Lenoir, 
John Foster West of Elon College, and Irene S. Buckner 
of Pittsboro. 

Works by the following novelists are also being 
considered for the Sir Walter Raleigh Award: 

LeGette Blythe of Huntersville, Burke Davis of 
Greensboro, Inglis Fletcher of Edenton, Bernice Kelly 
Harris of Seaboard, Jesse G. Hollingsworth of Elkin, 
Laetitia Irwin of Southern Pines, Raymond J. Jeffreys 
of Raleigh, Joe Knox of Creston, Robie Macauley of 
Greensboro, Mrs. Mack D. McCurry of Bostic, Frances 
Gray Patton of Durham, Lettie Hamlet Rogers of Greens¬ 
boro, Fred E. Ross of Badin, and James H. Street of 
Chapel Hill. 

To be eligible for these awards the authors must 
have maintained legal or physical residence (or a 


combination of both) in North Carolina for the 
past three years. 

At the December meeting the winner of the 
Robert D. W. Connor Award for the best article 
by a North Carolina student published in The 
North Carolina Historical Review will also be 
announced. At the meeting of the North Carolina 
Society of County and Local Historians on the 
same date, the winner of the D. T. Smithwick 
Award for the best work on local history pub¬ 
lished during the three-year period ending July 
1, 1953, will be revealed. 



Photo by Ay cock Brown 


Representatives of the State Highway and Public Works 
Commission’s First Division are here shown at Hatteras 
shortly after the erection of the historical marker to Billy 
Mitchell, September 5, on the thirtieth anniversary of 
his famed experiments testing the effectiveness of air 
power against naval vessels. From left to right are: W. N. 
Spruill, engineer, Emmett Winslow, commissioner, Paul 
Alford, sign painter, and J. R. Faucette, sign supervisor. 
North Carolina’s state historical marker program is con¬ 
ducted jointly by the Archives, Conservation, and High¬ 
way departments. 



NORTH CAROLINA LI5RARY COMMISSION 


RALEIGH, N. C 







J ) jf 










































































j * O North Carolina State Library 

2 )/ r V r Raieigh 

i CAROLINA 


'■es- 



Volume II 


MARCH, 1954 


Number 6 


STATE LITERARY AND HISTORICAL 
ASSOCIATION 

A little over two years ago the State Literary 
and Historical Association launched a broader 
and more intensive program of activity and serv¬ 
ice. Plans are now in progress to make the cur¬ 
rent year the biggest and best yet. 

This year two regional meetings of the State 
Literary and Historical Association will be held. 
Further details concerning the May meeting, 
which is scheduled for Edenton, will be given in 
the next issue of CAROLINA COMMENTS, but 
you should be making your plans now to attend. 
During the late summer a second regional gather¬ 
ing, a joint meeting with the Western North Car¬ 
olina Historical Association, will be held some¬ 
where in the mountains. 

The Association’s membership campaign is 
continuing with Mrs. R. N. Simms of Raleigh as 
the new chairman of the membership committee 
and Russell M. Grumman of Chapel Hill as co- 
chairman. Although the Association has shown a 
tremendous growth—over 100% during a two- 
year period—it is felt that there is still plenty 
of room for expansion. 

Other standing committees of the Association 
are also making their plans for the current year. 
Chairmen of these committees are: Professor 
Richard Walser, committee on awards; D. L. 
Corbitt, committee on local historical societies; 
W. Frank Burton, committee on historical mate¬ 
rials ; and Colonel J. W. Harrelson, committee on 
museums. 

NEW PUBLICATIONS 

Two new publications of the State Department 
of Archives and History are now available for 
distribution. Dr. Henry Thomas Shanks, dean of 
Birmingham-Southern College, Birmingham, Ala¬ 
bama, is editor of The Papers of Willie P. Man- 
gum, Volume III, and William S. Powell of Chapel 
Hill, First Assistant, North Carolina Collection, 
University of North Carolina Library, is the au¬ 
thor of The Carolina Charter of 1663. 

Volume III of the Mangum Papers covers the 
years from 1839 to 1843 and contains, according 
to Dr. Shanks, “probably the most significant let¬ 
ters in the entire collection.” During this period 
Mangum returned to the United States Senate 


and was elected president pro tempore of that 
body in 1842. Among his many correspondents— 
over 350 letters are included in the volume—were 
George E. Badger, Henry Clay, William A. Gra¬ 
ham, John M. Morehead, and David L. Swain. 
Ten illustrations are reproduced, including por¬ 
traits of Mangum, Badger, Swain, William Gas¬ 
ton, Thomas Ruffin, and Reverdy Johnson. Also 
included are pictures of Mangum’s home, Walnut 
Hall, one of the showplaces of Durham County 
before it burned in 1933. 



Mangum Papers, Volume 111 

Front view of Walnut Hall 


The Carolina Charter of 1663 is an 80-page 
paper-bound book which relates not only the story 
of the granting of the charter but also the equal¬ 
ly interesting narrative of how the document 
came to North Carolina, where it is now displayed 
in the Hall of History. In addition, there are bio¬ 
graphical sketches of each of the eight Lords 
Proprietors, portraits of seven of them, a four- 
color reproduction of the first page of the charter, 
a map showing the extent of the grant, and a 
carefully edited text of the original document. 
The story of the Fundamental Constitutions of 
Carolina, written by John Locke and designed 
as the frame of government for the new colony, 
is also discussed. 

These two interesting volumes may be obtained 
for $1.00 apiece upon application to the Depart¬ 
ment’s Division of Publications, Box 1881, Ra¬ 
leigh. Also available are Volumes I and II of the 
Mangum Papers. A complete list of available 
publications will be sent upon request. 








CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume II 


MARCH, 1954 


Number 6 


Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 

Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals. 


Edwin A. Miles, Editor 


LOCAL HISTORIANS 

William S. Powell of Chapel Hill, author of 
The Carolina Charter of 1663 (see above), is this 
year’s president of the North Carolina Society of 
County and Local Historians. According to Mr. 
Powell, plans for the year’s activities are now 
being made. 

Each year the program of the Society is cen¬ 
tered around a group of historical tours in var¬ 
ious parts of the state. For this spring and sum- 



Dorothy R. Phillips—Archives & History 

William S. Powell 


mer tours have been tentatively scheduled for 
Columbus, Pasquotank, Rutherford and Polk, and 
Caldwell counties. 

At the December meeting of the Society the 
first D. T. Smithwick Award for excellence in the 
field of local historical writing was granted. Mr. 
John A. Oates of Fayetteville, author of The Story 
of Fayetteville, was the recipient. The award will 
be granted biennially. 

Officers of the Society, in addition to Mr. Pow¬ 
ell, are Mrs. S. T. Peace of Henderson, Manly 
Wade Wellman of Chapel Hill, and Colonel J. F. 
Stanback of Mount Gilead, vice presidents; and 
Mrs. Musella W. Wagner of Chapel Hill, secre¬ 
tary-treasurer. 



Dorothy R. Phillips—Archives & History 


On Friday night, March 19, at 8:00 P.M., a ceremony 
is planned for the formal opening of the Hall of History’s 
model railroad exhibit. Shown here are two of the models 
included in the exhibit—the pioneer “Raleigh” engine of 
the old Raleigh and Gaston Railroad and a modern diesel 
engine, both lent by the Seaboard Air Line Railroad. Other 
trains include models of an 1870 coal burner, a steam 
locomotive of the early 20th century, and an electric train 
of the early 1930’s. The Hall of History Railroad was in¬ 
stalled by the Raleigh Model Railroad Club. The nucleus 
of the exhibit was the model railroad collection of the 
late Cyril Granville Smith of Charlotte. Further details 
concerning the opening ceremony, which will call for the 
driving of the traditional golden spike, will be announced 
in the press. In connection with the exhibit the State De¬ 
partment of Archives and History has published a small 
booklet relating to the history of railroads in North Caro¬ 
lina. 


ALBERT BARDEN COLLECTION 

On October 1, 1953, Albert Barden, Raleigh 
commercial photographer, died after a brief ill¬ 
ness. For forty-five years he photographed the 
Tar Heel scene and earned for himself an en¬ 
viable reputation as a skilled artist of his trade. 
Upon his death, he left his negatives—approxi¬ 
mately 25,000 in all—to the State Department of 
Archives and History. 

A native of Tunbridge Wells, England, Barden 
moved to Raleigh in 1907, when he was only nine¬ 
teen years old. For awhile both he and his father, 
also a photographer, were employed in the studio 
of Cyrus P. Wharton and Manly W. Tyree at 
1191/2 Fayetteville Street. A few years later the 
younger Barden moved across Fayetteville Street 
to manage Ellington’s Studio in the newly open¬ 
ed Shepherd Building. Here he maintained offices 
for the next forty years, opening his own in¬ 
dependent photographic studio in 1925. 

The Albert Barden negative collection provides 
an excellent mirror of life in Raleigh and North 



















Carolina during the first half of the twentieth 
century, for Barden photographed many subjects 
of commercial, scenic, historical, and news-worthy 
interest. Almost every year, from a vantage point 
atop the Capitol, he photographed Fayetteville 
Street. In addition, there are well over one hun¬ 
dred views of the Capitol, including one which 
became perhaps his most famous photograph 
(see cut opposite). 

Because of the vastness of the collection and 
the incomplete identification of many of the sub¬ 


Albcrt Barden—Archives & History 

Albert Barden 

jects, the problem of cataloguing the negatives 
has been a major one. A special appropriation 
by the Council of State enabled the hiring of an 
employee for this purpose. To date approximately 
one-fifth of the collection has been filed. From 
time to time The Netvs and Observer has publish¬ 
ed some of the more interesting pictures and its 
readers have been very helpful in identifying the 
subjects. 

A current exhibit in the Hall of History fea¬ 
tures a collection of Barden’s cameras as well as 
a group of scenes which he photographed and 
painted in color. 

By making available his splendid photographic 
collection to the people of North Carolina, Albert 


Albert Barden—Archives & History 

This photograph from the Albert Barden Collection was 
taken in December, 1916, during- the annual meeting of 
the State Literary and Historical Association. Former 
President William Howard Taft (in the rear seat at 
the extreme right) was the principal speaker that year. 
In the front seat facing the camera is R. D. W. Connor, 
then secretary of the State Historical Commission (now 
the Department of Archives and History). The other two 
gentlemen in the rear seat have been tentatively identified 
as Governor Locke Craig, who introduced Taft at the 
meeting, and Dr. Howard E. Rondthaler, then president 
of the State Literary and Historical Association. 


The Capitol at Night 

much light on the recent history of our state. It 
is hoped that other photographers, like Barden, 
will take steps to see that their own reproductions 
of the Tar Heel scene will be preserved by the 
Department of Archives and History. 


Barden did a great service to his fellow citizens— 
of this and future generations. There are prob¬ 
ably other similar collections that would shed 


Albert Barden—Archives & History 











BATTLE FOR MOORE'S CREEK BRIDGE 

In 1926, shortly after the 150th anniversary of 
the Whig victory at Moore’s Creek Bridge, Presi¬ 
dent Calvin Coolidge signed an act establishing 
the battleground, described as the site of “one of 
the most memorable battles of the Revolutionary 
War,” as a national military park. Since 1933 
the site has been administered by the National 
Park Service under the Department of the In¬ 
terior and has attracted thousands of visitors 
annually. 

Recently the status of Moore’s Creek National 
Military Park has been placed in jeopardy, for it 
has been officially proposed that the federal gov¬ 
ernment relinquish control of the site on the 
grounds that it is not of sufficient national sig¬ 
nificance. Gravely concerned by this recommenda¬ 
tion, United States Senators Clyde R. Hoey and 
Alton A. Lennon and Representative Graham A. 
Barden consulted Interior Department officials, 
who promised that a hearing will be held before a 
final decision is made in this matter. It will re¬ 
quire an act of Congress before the federal gov¬ 
ernment can abandon a national park. 

The significance of the battle of Moore’s Creek 
Bridge was better appreciated in 1776 than it is 
by some Americans in 1954. Alexander Purdie’s 
Virginia Gazette congratulated North Carolina 
on “the utter demolition of the Tory interest in 
that province, which puts a finishing stroke on 
the machinations of master Martin, their wicked 
and unprincipled governour.” Ezra Stiles, presi¬ 


dent of Yale University, was likewise jubilant 
when he heard the news. “The Colonels Moore, 
Martin, Castvell, Polk, Thackston, Lillington & 
Long,” he confided to his diary, “have great 
Merit; any one of these Gent, in this Country 
would be an over match for a Howe, Burgoyne, 
or a Clinton.” The Annual Register, at that time 
perhaps the leading British periodical, warned 
that the battle of February 27, 1776, had crushed, 
perhaps permanently, the North Carolina Tories, 
on whose strength so much reliance had been 
placed in formulating British plans for the con¬ 
quest of the southern colonies. 

In 1896 John Fiske, noted American historian, 
wrote: 

The effect of the victory was as contagious as that of 
Lexington had been in New England. Within ten days 
10,000 militia were ready to withstand the enemy. . . . 
A provincial congress was forthwith assembled, and in¬ 
structions were sent to the North Carolina delegates in 
the Continental Congress, empowering them “to concur 
with the delegates in the other colonies in declaring in¬ 
dependency and forming foreign alliances. . . .” * 

North Carolinians can do their part in the cur¬ 
rent battle for Moore’s Creek Bridge by writing, 
as individuals and through their civic and patriot¬ 
ic organizations, to Honorable Douglas McKay, 
Secretary of the Interior, Washington, D. C. Also 
let your congressman and senators know that you 
are behind them in the fight to preserve the 
Moore’s Creek Battleground as the national shrine 
that it has deservedly become. 

* John Fiske, The American Revolution (Boston and 
New York: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1896), I, 177. 



State Library 
Box 990 
Raleigh, N. C 


L 




NORTH CAROLINA LIBRARY 'COMMISSION /.? 

l/i ** RALEIGH, N.C. ■ ' 

2 CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Volume III MAY, 1954 \ Number 1 


EDENTON MEETING 

The time is drawing nigh for the third annual 
spring meeting of the State Literary and Histor¬ 
ical Association. The first such session was held 
two years ago in the Cape Fear Valley. Last year 
the Association met in the Piedmont. This spring 
the group will assemble on May 14 and 15 in 
Edenton, in the historic Albemarle region of 
North Carolina. 

The program will begin at 1:30 P. M., Friday, 
May 14, with registration at the Joseph Hewes 
Hotel. At 2 :30 the first meeting will take place 
in the Chowan County Courthouse (see cut )—the 
oldest courthouse in the state used for its original 
purpose. Miss Elizabeth Vann Moore will speak 
on Edenton’s historic houses and sites, which will 
then be visited by the group. A tea at the home 
of Mrs. Richard Elliott will follow the tour. 



Albert Barden—Archives & History 

Chowan County Courthouse 


A dinner meeting at 7:00 Friday night in St. 
Paul’s Parish House will feature a talk by Pro¬ 
fessor Richard Walser on “Literary Highlights 
of the Albemarle.” A reception at the James Ire¬ 
dell House, given by the Edenton Tea Party Chap¬ 
ter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, 
will end the day’s activities. 

At 9 :30 on Saturday morning at the courthouse 
Mrs. Duncan Wales will talk on historic houses of 
Chowan County, following which there will be a 


tour of these houses, ending at Bandon Plantation, 
the home of our president, Mrs. Inglis Fletcher 
(see cut), where the luncheon meeting will be 
held. Mrs. Fletcher will speak on “The Chowan 
River and Bandon Plantation.” The program will 
end about 2:30 P.M., leaving several hours of 
daylight traveling for those members wishing to 
return home that afternoon. 



Dorothy R. Phillips—Archives & History. 

Mrs. Inglis Fletcher 

Make your plans to attend this meeting in the 
historic town located “in the forks of Queen 
Anne’s Creek.” Let’s make this year’s spring 
gathering the most successful of all. 

H. of H. R. R. 

With Secretary of State Thad Eure driving the 
traditional golden spike (see cut), North Caro¬ 
lina’s newest railroad line began operation on 
March 19. On that date the Hall of History Rail¬ 
road, a model exhibit designed to tell the history 
of railroading in the state, was formally dedi¬ 
cated in a ceremony held at the State Department 
of Archives and History. 

(Continued on page 2) 








CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Volume III MAY, 1954 Number 1 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 

Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals. 

Edwin A. Miles, Editor 


(Continued on page 1) 

Carl Goerch, associate publisher of The State 
magazine, delivered the dedicatory address on 
“Railroading in North Carolina.” Following the 
driving of the golden spike—*4 inch in length and 
1/32 inch in diameter—a demonstration of the 
trains was given by members of the Raleigh Model 
Railroad Club who installed the exhibit. A recep¬ 
tion concluded the evening’s program. 

The Hall of History Railroad originated with 
the donation of the model railroad collection of 
the late Cyril G. Smith of Charlotte by members 
of the family. Mr. Smith, a one-time railroad man, 
made several models of engines, passenger cars, 
and freight cars—of the type used in North Caro¬ 
lina during the early decades of the 20th century. 

The Seaboard Air Line Railroad lent two 
models for the exhibit—one of the pioneer 
“Raleigh” engine of the Raleigh and Gaston Rail¬ 
road and one of a modern diesel engine with 
streamlined passenger cars. The rolling stock of 
the H. of H. R. R. consists of models of the early 
1840’s, the post-Civil War period, the early 1900’s, 
and the present day. 

The models are scaled not only in size but also 
in speed. The “Raleigh” is geared to travel at a 
much slower pace than the diesel. Thus while the 
former appears to be going at 15 m.p.h., the 
latter seems to be making 60 or 70. All the trains 
are O gauge or quarter inch scale with the tracks 
laid one and one quarter inches apart. An outside 
third rail is used for the 20-volt alternating cur¬ 
rent. 

On display with the exhibit is a brass bell for¬ 
merly used by one of the steam enginees of the 
Southern Railway Company. The bell, mounted 
on a handsome stand, bears the following inscrip¬ 
tion: “The State Department of Archives and 
History, Raleigh, N. C. Gift of Southern Railway, 
1954.” 

The Raleigh Model Railroad Club, in coopera¬ 
tion with the staff of the Hall of History, installed 


the exhibit and provided the necessary landscap¬ 
ing. For the past year members of the Club, led 
by their president Dan Wiggs, have been engaged 
on the project, working on it one or two nights 
each week. 

According to Mrs. Joye E. Jordan, head of the 
Hall of History, it is hoped that still other models 
may be obtained in order that a more complete 
history of railroading in North Carolina may be 
demonstrated through the exhibit. In connection 



Dorothy R. Phillips—Archives & History 


Secretary of State Thad Eure is shown driving the 
golden spike at the ceremony opening the Hall of History 
Railroad on March 19. Looking on with approval are four 
members of the Raleigh Model Railroad Club who in¬ 
stalled the exhibit. They are (left to right) Francis Ed¬ 
wards, Dan Wiggs, President, Captain J. M. Smith, and 
Hubert Eisenhart. 

with the opening, the State Department of Ar¬ 
chives and History has published a pamphlet, 
“The Hall of History Railroad,” written and il¬ 
lustrated by Miss Ann Beal, a member of the 
staff of the Hall of History. The pamphlet is 
available upon request. 

The model railroad exhibit may be seen during 
the regular hours of the Hall of History, which is 
open from 9 to 5 Mondays through Saturdays and 
from 2 to 5 on Sundays. 

JUNIOR HISTORIANS 

In the January, 1954, issue of CAROLINA 
COMMENTS we spoke of the movement to or¬ 
ganize Junior Historian Clubs in North Carolina. 
Several significant steps have since been taken 
to implement this program which was authorized 
by the General Assembly of 1953. 

On January 28 a preliminary workshop was 
held at the State Department of Archives and 











NOKIH CAROLINA LIBRARY COMMISSION 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


History to acquaint a selected group of social 
studies teachers with projects that might be un¬ 
dertaken by Junior Historians. On April 2 and 3 
more than 175 elementary and secondary school 
teachers attended a conference at Duke University 
on “Using Local Historical Resources in Teach¬ 
ing Social Studies.” 

At last report, two Junior Historian Clubs had 
been organized in the Tar Heel State. Approxi¬ 
mately sixty eighth grade students of Roxboro’s 
Earl Brasher School organized the Junior His¬ 
torian Club of Roxboro, the first such group in 
North Carolina. Since that time a club has been 
formed in Lillington. By next fall it is expected 
‘that several additional clubs will be active in 
various parts of the state. 

SALES DESK 

The State Department of Archives and History 
has installed a small desk in the Portrait Gallery 
of the Hall of History where colored slides and 
prints of historic buildings, scenes, and items re¬ 
lating to North Carolina history may be purchas¬ 
ed. Plans are also being made for the sale of post 
cards, notepaper, and porcelain plaques depicting- 
similar scenes. 

The colored slides depict such topics as models 
from the Hall of History Railroad, the Wright 
Brothers’ historic flight of 1903, the State Capitol, 
Canova’s Statue of Washington, and the Tryon 
Palace. These and other slides are available for 
$ .30 apiece or four for $1.00. Glossy prints of 
similar scenes may be obtained for $ .75 and 
matted prints for $1.00 apiece. Photostatic copies 
of the first page of the Carolina Charter of 1663 
may be obtained for $1.50. Colored photostats of 
the same document sell for $5.00. 

For further information concerning the sales 
desks, write Mrs. Joye E. Jordan, Head, Division 
of Museums, State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh. 

! 

OUR OUTDOOR DRAMAS 

When summer comes to North Carolina it will 
be outdoor drama time once again. This year there 
will be at least three such productions in the Tar 
Heel State, and North Carolinians will be playing 
a major role in the presentation of a fourth 
drama just outside the borders of the state. 

The nation’s pioneer outdoor drama, Paul 
Green’s “The Lost Colony,” will be presented for 


the fourteenth season at Waterside Theatre, Roa¬ 
noke Island, from June 26 through September 5. 
At Mountainside Theatre, Cherokee, Kermit Hun¬ 
ter’s “Unto These Hills” will open its fifth season 
on June 26 and continue through Labor Day 
(September 6). Both of these productions will be 
given every night except Monday during the in¬ 
clusive dates. 

Mr. Hunter’s “Horn in the West” will be pre¬ 
sented for its third season in the Daniel Boone 
Amphitheatre, Boone, from June 25 through 
Labor Day, every night except Sunday. 

At Kings Mountain National Military Park, 
South Carolina, the Kings Mountain (North Car¬ 
olina) Little Theatre will stage twelve perform¬ 
ances of Florette Henri’s “The Sword of Gideon.” 
Dates this year will be every Thursday, Friday, 
and Saturday night, July 22-August 14. 

Dr. Christopher Crittenden, director of the 
State Department of Archives and History, has 
written an article, “History As You Like It—The 
Outdoor Historical Drama,” which will appear in 
the summer issue of American Heritage. This ar¬ 
ticle tells of North Carolina’s pioneer role in the 
development of this dramatic mode of presenting 
American history to the public. 

American Heritage is a quarterly publication 
of the American Association for State and Local 
History. An annual subscription may be obtained 
for $3.00 by writing Box 969, Harrisburg, Penn¬ 
sylvania. 



Dorothy R. Phillips—Archives & History 

One of the interesting new acquisitions of the Hall of 
History is a miniature of Hugh Waddell (1734-1773), 
North Carolina hero of the French and Indian War. The 
miniature (see cut), which has been passed down through 
the family, was donated by Mrs. Duncan Cameron Wad¬ 
dell, Jr., of Asheville. 




LAMINATION 

One of the problems of maintaining an archival 
program for the State of North Carolina is that of 
preserving old records that are in danger of 
deterioration. By a process known as lamination, 
the State Department of Archives and History has 
restored some 25,000 pages of manuscript records 
during the past four years. 

Among the records preserved in this manner 
have been many of the Department’s most val¬ 
uable documents—the log book of the Confederate 
Cruiser Shenandoah, Blackbeard’s chart book, the 
oldest known issue of a North Carolina news¬ 
paper, and other early colonial, state, and county 
records. 



A document (left) that was restored in the Department’s 
repair shop. The same document (right) before it was 
laminated. 

Recently the Department’s Division of Archives 
and Manuscripts has begun to restore some of the 
records in the Secretary of State’s office. The 
manuscript Constitution of North Carolina, draft¬ 
ed by the Convention of 1868, has been restored 
and bound in handsome red buckram. At present 
work is proceeding on the lamination of the 150 


NORTH CAROLINA 


volumes of land grant records in the custody of 
that office. 

The process of lamination is a complicated one. 
First, the document to be restored is thoroughly 
cleaned and pressed. It is then passed through 
two chemical solutions to neutralize the paper’s 
acidity—the quality that makes it brittle. Next 
a sheet of cellulose acetate is placed on each side 
of the document, with long fibre tissue over the 
acetate. The whole is then laminated or welded 
together by the application of heat. 



Dorothy R. Phillips—Archives & History 


Mrs. Frances Harmon Whitley and Miss Mary Jane 
Hutchens are shown operating the laminating machine 
of the State Department of Archives and History. The two 
young ladies are members of the Department’s Division of 
Archives and Manuscripts, headed by W. Frank Burton, 
State Archivist. 


The present process of lamination has general¬ 
ly replaced the old silking process formerly used 
by many archival agencies. The laminating ma¬ 
chine of the Department of Archives and His¬ 
tory—the only one in North Carolina and one of 
the few in the nation—is doing a good job of pre¬ 
serving old records that otherwise might deterio¬ 
rate beyond repair. 


LIBRARY COMMISSION 



RALEIGH, N. C 













fJOniH CAKULmA L lKAKY CUMM 

>\ f(AJLEfCx*H N» Go 

1 CAROLINA COMMENTS 


B- ^ 


Volume III 


JULY, 1954 


Number 2 


REPORT FROM EDENTON 

The spring meeting of the State Literary and 
Historical Association at Edenton, May 14-15, 
was a complete success—except for the weather. 
And in spite of the rain a large crowd was in at¬ 
tendance. Over 125 persons were present for one 
or more of the sessions. 

Our thanks go to the many citizens of Edenton 
who contributed so much to the success of the 
program. Mrs. Richard Goodwin was chairman of 
the local arrangements committee and all are 
agreed that she did a splendid job. 

AUGUST MEETING 

On August 27 and 28 the third August regional 
meeting of the State Literary and Historical As¬ 
sociation with the Western North Carolina His¬ 
torical Association will be held in Asheville. 

The first joint meeting of the two societies 
took place in 1952 at Appalachian State Teachers 
College in Boone. Last year the two groups met at 
Western Carolina College in Cullowhee. Both of 
these meetings were well attended and it is hoped 
that this year’s program will attract an even 
larger group to the “Land of the Sky.” 

Mr. Samuel E. Beck of Asheville, president of 
the Western North Carolina Historical Associa¬ 
tion, is this year’s program chairman. Members 
of the participating associations will be given fur¬ 
ther details when arrangements for the program 
have been completed. But make your plans now— 
and plan to bring the whole family—to this year’s 
mountain meeting of these two cultural organiza¬ 
tions. 

MEMBERSHIP DRIVE 

At Edenton we heard encouraging reports 
about the membership drive of the State Literary 
and Historical Association. The meeting served 
as a rallying point for the movement in the Albe¬ 
marle district, although the drive is still con¬ 
tinuing. Mr. William S. Tarlton of Creswell, dis¬ 
trict chairman, reports that almost one hundred 
new members from that area have joined the As¬ 
sociation this year. 

In the future Carolina Comments will 
bring reports concerning the drives to be conduct¬ 


ed this year in other sections of the state. Mrs. 
R. N. Simms of Raleigh is state membership 
chairman and Mr. Russell Grumman of Chapel 
Hill is co-chairman. 

At the present time a special inducement is 
being offered to obtain new members of the As¬ 
sociation—a free copy of either William S. 
Powell’s Carolina Charter of 1663 or the facsimile 
edition of Lemuel Sawyer’s Blackbeard, two publi¬ 
cations of the State Department of Archives and 
History. 

Carolina Charter of 1663 relates the story of 
the granting of that document and how the origi¬ 
nal came to North Carolina, where it is on display 
in the Hall of History (see cut). Blackbeard was 
the first published drama by a North Carolinian 
and the first with a North Carolina setting. The 
facsimile edition contains an introduction by Pro¬ 
fessor Richard Walser. 

Tell your friends of this special offer and urge 
them to join the Association— or send their names 
to the editor and we will see that each one re¬ 
ceives a personal invitation to become a member. 



Members of the Executive Board of the State Depart¬ 
ment of Archives and History are shown here inspecting 
the Carolina Charter of 1663, on display in the Hall of 
History. They are, left to right, McDaniel Lewis, Greens¬ 
boro, Mrs. B. T. Williams, Stedman, W. T. Laprade, Dur¬ 
ham, B. F. Brown, chairman, Raleigh, Clarence W. 
Griffin, Forest City, and Mrs. Preston F. Patton, Hen¬ 
dersonville. The seventh member of the Board, Miss 
Gertrude Carraway, New Bern, was not present when 
this picture was taken. 









CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Volume III JULY, 1954 Number 2 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 

Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals. 

Edwin A. Miles, Editor 


NEW EDITOR 

With the September issue of Carolina Com¬ 
ments, Mr. William S. Tarlton becomes the 
new editor. Persons who have items of interest to 
our readers are urged to communicate them to 
Mr. Tarlton, Box 1881, Raleigh, North Carolina. 

LITERARY AWARDS 

Although the winners of North Carolina’s top 
literary awards will not be announced until De¬ 
cember 3, at the annual meeting of the State Lit¬ 
erary and Historical Association in Raleigh, work 
is already proceeding on the compilation of eligi¬ 
ble books, the securing of review copies from pub¬ 
lishers, and the selection of a panel of judges. 
This is quite a task. Last year, for instance, al¬ 
most one hundred titles were considered. 

As usual, greatest interest centers around the 
two major awards—the Mayflower Cup for non¬ 
fiction and the Sir Walter Raleigh Award for fic¬ 
tion. In choosing winners for these competitions, 
the judges will have no easy task, for there are 
a host of fine books eligible. 

The Mayflower Cup, granted by the Society of 
Mayflower Descendants in the State of North Car¬ 
olina since 1931, will be awarded to the North 
Carolina writer of the non-fiction book published 
during the year ending August 31 that is adjudged 
best by a board of award. 

The Sir Walter Raleigh Award, established in 
1952 by the Historical Book Club, will be granted 
to the Tar Heel author of the year’s best fiction 
volume to be selected in a similar contest. 

Other awards to be granted include the Roa- 
noke-Chowan Award for the author of the best 
volume of verse and the A. A. U. W. Award for 
the writer of the best juvenile work published 
during the year. 

This year the R. D. W. Connor Award will be 
granted by the Historical Society of North Caro¬ 
lina to the author of the best article in the field 
of North Carolina history published in The North 
Carolina Historical Review in the four issues end¬ 
ing with that of July, 1954. The award is a cash 
prize of $25. 


NEW HISTORICAL MARKERS 

This summer motorists on Tar Heel highways 
will notice several new historical markers that 
have been or soon will be erected. North Caro¬ 
lina’s historical marker program is conducted 
jointly by the State Department of Archives and 
History, the State Department of Conservation 
and Development, and the State Highway and 
Public Works Commission. 

The Advisory Committee on Historical Mark¬ 
ers—composed of historians from several colleges 
and universities of the state—endeavors to have 
the program reflect as many aspects of Tar Heel 
history as possible. These new markers indicate 
that trend. An attempt has also been made to 
secure as far as practicable a geographic distribu¬ 
tion of markers throughout the state. Now there 
is at least one marker in 99 of North Carolina’s 
100 counties. 

Several ceremonies were held this spring to 
mark the unveiling of new markers. On April 20 
a marker pointing out the site of General Griffith 
Rutherford’s camp along Hominy Creek was 
unveiled in a ceremony at Enka in Buncombe 
County. On April 23 a similar program was held 
on Rockfish Creek in Cumberland County for the 
erection of a marker indicating the camp site of 
General James Moore’s forces prior to the battle 
of Moore’s Creek Bridge. 



Kiffin Y. Rockwell 


On May 18 a marker for Kiffin Y. Rockwell, 
(see cut), of World War I’s Lafayette Escadrille, 
was dedicated near his home in Asheville. On 
June 15 a ceremony for the unveiling of a marker 
for Judson College at Hendersonville was attend¬ 
ed by over 75 persons. 

Other new markers include the following: 

“BRUNSWICK. Founded c. 1725, long a prin¬ 
cipal port of N. C., site of Spanish attack, 1748, 
and of Stamp Act resistance, 1766. Later aban- 








doned. Was 2 mi. S. E.” On NC 130 in Brunswick 
County. 

“ST. PHILIPS CHURCH (see cut). Anglican, 
built under act of 1751. Graves of Governors 
Arthur Dobbs and Benjamin Smith and U. S. 
Justice Alfred Moore. Ruins 2 mi. S. E.” On NC 
130 in Brunswick County. 



Ruins of St. Philips Church, Brunswick 


“SAMUEL SWANN. Speaker of assembly 
nearly 20 years, leader popular party, compiler 
first printed revisal of N. C. laws (1752). Home 
stood one mile south.” On NC 210 in Pender 
County. 

“RICHARD HENDERSON. Founder of 
Transylvania Colony (Ky.) & Nashville (Tenn.), 
author Cumberland Compact (1780), judge, mem¬ 
ber N. C. Council of State. Grave 6 mi. N.” On 
US 1 near Henderson, Vance County. 

“EDENBOROUGH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 
Early medical school, chartered 1867, conducted 
by Dr. Hector McLean. Closed c. 1877. Stood one- 
half mile south.” On US 15A just west of Raeford, 
Hoke County. 

“MONROE’S CROSSROADS. Gen. Kilpat¬ 
rick’s Union cavalry repulsed Gen Hampton’s 
Confederate cavalry there, Mar. 10, 1865, ten 
miles north. Now in Fort Bragg area.” On US 
15A in Raeford, Hoke County. 

“JOSEPH WINSTON. Major in Revolution, 
a commander at Kings Mountain, Congressman, 
state legislator. Town of Winston named for him. 
Home was 2/3 mi. N.” On NC 56 between Ger- 
manton and Walnut Cove, Stokes County. 

“TORY RENDEZVOUS. Before going to 
battle of Moore’s Creek Bridge, Feb., 1776, Tories 
of this area met in Cross Hill, at Alexander Mor¬ 
rison’s home, 125 yards S. W.” On NC 22 and 
NC 27 just northwest of Carthage, Moore Comity. 


“JAMES P. COOK. Leader in founding of the 
Stonewall Jackson Training School, state senator, 
editor Concord “Standard” (1888-96) and “Up¬ 
lift.” Home i /2 block W.” On US 601 in Concord, 
Cabarrus County. 

“HIDDENITE. A gem found only in N. C., 
named for W. E. Hidden, mineralogist of N. Y., 
who prospected in this area about 1880. Mines 
were nearby.” On NC 90 just north of Hiddenite, 
Alexander County. 

“RUTHERFORD COLLEGE. Evolved from 
private school opened c. 1853 by R. L. Abernethy. 
Operated 1900-1933 by Methodist Church. Closed 
1935. The original site 1.3 mi. N.” On US 70 and 
6U between Vcdclese and Connelly Springs, Burke 
County. 

“LENOIR RHYNE. Coeducational, Lutheran 
college, named for W. W. Lenoir and D. E. Rhyne. 
Opened as Lenoir College during academic year 
1891-2. One block north.” On US 70A in Hickory, 
Catawba County. 

“ECHOTA MISSION. Methodist. Maintained 

by Holston Conference for Cherokee c. 1840-1885. 

* 

School established 1850. Missionary’s house 
stands 1/2 mile south.” On US 19 in Jackson 
County. 

“FLAT ROCK. Landmark for Indians and the 
pioneer white settlers of this area, lies nearby. 
Town of Flat Rock named for this natural forma¬ 
tion.” On US 25 in Flat Rock, Henderson County. 

Since the inauguration of North Carolina’s 
State Historical Marker Program in 1936, over 
730 markers have been erected by the cooperating 
departments. 



A recent acquisition of the Hall of History is a copy 
of this drawing of the Confederate States Military Prison 
at Salisbury, made by Fred Wile of the 20th Massachu¬ 
setts Volunteers, who was imprisoned there following his 
capture during the Civil War. The copy was obtained from 
the New-York Historical Society, New York City, through 
whose courtesy this drawing is reproduced. 













AYCOCK RESTORATION 

Last month a significant step was taken towards 
the restoration of the Charles B. Aycock birth¬ 
place near Fremont, in Wayne County. Mr. Dan 
MacMillan of Fayetteville was appointed architect 
by the Aycock Memorial Commission to draw up 
plans for the project. Mr. MacMillan will work 
closely with Mr. E. W. Reinecke, contractor, also 
of Fayetteville. 



Birthplace of Charles B. Aycock 


The Charles B. Ayccck Memorial Commission 
was established by the General Assembly of 1949 
to acquire the Aycock birthplace and “establish it 
as a perpetual memorial.” In 1952, after the prop¬ 
erty had been acquired, the fund-raising program 
began. Although the goal has not yet been reached, 
enough has been raised to make this step possible. 

Plans call for the complete restoration of the 
house (see cut), in which Aycock was born. It was 
removed from its original site many years ago. 
Also to be restored or reconstructed are other 


farm buildings that were on the property. Thus 
the Aycock restoration project will not only serve 
as a shrine to North Carolina’s “Educational 
Governor,” but will also depict a more or less 
typical North Carolina middle-class farm of a 
century ago. 



Charles B. Aycock 

Dr. D. J. Rose of Goldsboro, chairman of the 
Commission, has done an able job in spearheading 
the drive for funds. He has received considerable 
assistance from his co-officers, Mrs. Paul Borden 
of Goldsboro, vice chairman, Miss Gertrude Weil, 
Goldsboro, secretary, and Mr. H. L. Stephenson, 
Smithfield, treasurer, and from other members of 
the Commission. 


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NORTH CAROLINA LIBRARY COMM'.SSIQB 
>/ 3 RALEIGH, N. G. 

CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume III 


SEPTEMBER, 1954 


Number 3 


REPORT FROM ASHEVILLE 

The summer regional meeting of the State 
Literary and Historical Association was held 
August 27-28 at Asheville. It was conducted 
jointly with the Western North Carolina Histori¬ 
cal Association, which had the role of host to the 
state association. 

The day sessions were held in the library of 
Asheville-Biltmore College, situated on the top¬ 
most crest of Sunset Mountain, overlooking Ashe¬ 
ville. From the assembly room an open wall 
afforded a spectacular aerial view of the city 
and the mountains beyond, and all present must 
have sensed the appropriateness of this compelling 
mountain view to a historical program devoted 
to the mountain region of the state. 



State News Bureau 

View of Asheville 


The host organization supplied the program, 
which featured the following speakers: Mrs. In- 
glis Fletcher of Edenton, who spoke on the place 
of the historical novelist in the field of history; 
David H. Corkran of Black Mountain, on “The 
Unpleasantness at Stecoe, 1751” ; John Gillespie 
of Gatlinburg, Tenn., on “Cherokee Music—A 
Vanishing Art Form”; Miss Clementine Douglas 
of Asheville, on “The Heritage and Development 
of Western North Carolina Crafts”; Mrs. Wilma 
Dykeman Stokely of Newport, Tenn., on “The 
Broken Pieces; Aftermath of the Civil War in 
the French Broad Country”; and Clarence Griffin 
of Forest City, on “The Bechtler Coinage.” 


A pleasant afternoon interlude was a reception 
at “Richmond Hill” as guests of Miss Marjorie 
Pearson and Mr. Thomas Pearson, with a tour 
of their interesting home. The members were 
also given a special invitation to visit the 
Thomas Wolfe Memorial house (“My Old Ken¬ 
tucky Home”), and on Saturday afternoon the 
novelist’s sister, Mrs. Mabel Wolfe Wheaton, was 
at the home as hostess. 

Mr. Samuel E. Beck of Asheville, president of 
the Western North Carolina Historical Associa¬ 
tion, was in charge of arrangements, and all will 
agree that he and his group did a splendid job. 
The Asheville meeting is considered by all to have 
been successful and a good illustration of the 
value of regional meetings as a supplement to 
the winter meeting at Raleigh. 

THE EXECUTIVE BOARD 

The Executive Board of the Department of 
Archives and History met in regular meeting on 
August 20 at Raleigh. Since the resignation last 
May of Dean B. F. Brown, who had moved from 
Raleigh to Florida, the board had been without a 
chairman. McDaniel Lewis of Greensboro, mem¬ 
ber of the board since 1947, was elected the new 
chairman. 

Meeting with the board for the first time was 
Josh L. Horne of Rocky Mount, appointed by 
Governor William B. Umstead to fill the vacancy 
created by the resignation of Dean Brown. In a 
ceremony in the Governor’s office prior to the 
board meeting, Mr. Horne was sworn in by 
Justice E. B. Denny and given his commission 
by Governor Umstead. Mr. Horne is editor of the 
Rocky Mount Evening Telegram, is a former mem¬ 
ber of the Board of Conservation and Develop¬ 
ment (1934-49) and was chairman of that body 
(1944-49). He has long had a keen interest in 
North Carolina’s historic sites and has been a 
leader in the movement to preserve and restore 
historic Halifax. 

The Executive Board considered various mat¬ 
ters relating to the Department of Archives and 
History and approved the budgetary requests for 
the 1955-57 biennium. The requests for the new 
biennium total $371,000, which in comparison to 
the $320,000 that is expected to be spent during 
the current biennium. 






CAROLINA COMMENTS 


HISTORIC SITES COMMISSION 


Volume III SEPTEMBER, 1954 Number 3 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 

Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals. 

William S. Tarlton, Editor 


NEW MARKERS 

Two new historical highway markers, reflecting 
the policy of broadening the scope of the marker 
program, were unveiled recently. On August 26, 
near Winston-Salem, a marker commemorating 
the introduction of registered Guernsey cattle 
into North Carolina by Dr. H. T. Bahnson was 
unveiled during ceremonies attended by a good 
crowd of interested persons. Those present in¬ 
cluded friends and breeders of the Guernsey cow, 
members of Dr. Bahnson’s family, and others. 
Appropriate to the occasion, a fine Guernsey cow 
was also present and occupied a position of honor. 
This magnificent animal, or some other, had been 
milked and the milk made cool for the refresh¬ 
ment of the crowd. 



On August 29 a marker was unveiled at Flat 
Rock pointing out the rock formation which served 
as a landmark for Indians and pioneers in the 
early days and which gave its name to the old 
resort village of Flat Rock. The program was 
under the direction of Mrs. Sadie Smathers 
Patton of Hendersonville, and featured short 
speeches by General Edward P. King and others. 
The Flat Rock marker is the 741st to be erected 
since the marker program was begun in 1935. 


The Historic Sites Commission of North Caro¬ 
lina, with James A. Stenhouse of Charlotte pre¬ 
siding, met on August 31 in the Greensboro Public 
Library. Present at the meeting, in addition to the 
chairman, were Paul A. Reid, Cullowhee; Wil¬ 
liam T. Polk, Greensboro; Christopher Critten¬ 
den, Raleigh; and W. S. Tarlton, Raleigh. 

The Commission heard a delegation of Kinston 
citizens, headed by John G. Dawson, who present¬ 
ed a proposal for establishing a memorial park 
at the site of Governor Richard Caswell’s grave 
at Kinston. Following this, George H. Maurice 
of Eagle Springs requested in behalf of the Moore 
County Historical Society $5,000 for the res¬ 
toration of the Philip Alston house (“the House 
in the Horseshoe”), recently purchased by the 
Moore County organization. The Commission 
voted to endorse this request. 

The Alston House is a notable example of 
colonial architecture and also marks the site of 
a Revolutionary military engagement. It was here 
that a force of Whigs under Philip Alston was 
defeated by David Fanning’s Tories in 1781. The 
house was later the home of Benjamin Williams, 
Governor of North Carolina, 1800-02. 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Kellenberger, represent¬ 
ing the Tryon Palace Commission, requested and 
received the Commission’s endorsement for a state 
appropriation of $100,000 for the purchase of 
additional land needed for the Tryon Palace 
restoration. 

RECENT COUNTY TOURS 

During the past few years the North Carolina 
Society of County and Local Historians has stimu¬ 
lated interest in local history through its sponsor¬ 
ship of county tours. This year several tours have 
been conducted and others are promised. 

The first tour of the season was conducted in 
Sampson County, on May 9. Mrs. Taft Bass of 
Clinton led the tour of this big county, which 
included visits to the old Boykin family cemetery, 
the site of the old Revolutionary gun factory near 
Butler Crossroads, the ghost town of Lisbon, the 
Faison home near Turkey, the Major James Moore 
home, and House’s Mill near Newton Grove. The 
group had lunch at the Sampson Memorial Park 
and an afternoon tea at House’s Mill on a pavilion 
built over the millrace. 

On April 25 there was a tour of the neigh¬ 
bor county of Pender, led by Judge Clifton Moore 
and Miss Mattie Bloodworth of Burgaw. The 
group visited the Moore’s Creek Bridge battle- 







NORTH CAROLINA LIBRARY COMMISSION 

RALEIGH, N. O. 

ground, “Stag Park.” the estate of colonial Gov- BARDEN PHOTO COLLECTION 


ernor Burrington, and other outstanding spots, 
including Sloop Point plantation, where lunch 
was served. 

On June 13 a group assembled on Pilot Moun¬ 
tain to begin a tour of Surry County. After 
surveying the county from this vantage point, 
the group went on to visit the Mt. Airy Granite 
Quarry, the Jesse Franklin home, the Cumberland 
Knob Park on the Blue Ridge Parkway, and 
“Roundabout,” site of the home of Colonel Ben¬ 
jamin Cleveland of King’s Mountain fame. The 
Surry tour was led by Professor Felix Hickerson 
of Chapel Hill. 

On July 11, led by Mrs. Sadie Smathers Patton 
of Hendersonville and Carroll P. Rogers of Tryon, 
a crowd of interested people toured Polk County. 
Points of interest visited included Marvil Mills; 
Howard Gap; the Sidney Lanier House; the site 
of the old Block House, a landmark in the early 
survey of the North Carolina-South Carolina line; 
and Gillette Woods, the home of William Gillette, 
famous actor of yesteryear. 

150TH BIRTHDAY OF ST. DAVID'S CHURCH 

The congregations of St. David’s Parish, in 
Washington and Tyrrell counties, maintain a 
generous pride in the history of their parish, 
and particularly in the old mother church, St. 
David’s, located at Creswell. On August 15 they 
observed the 150th anniversary of this quaint 
old church. 

It was in the early part of 1804 that the Rev¬ 
erend Charles Pettigrew, the first bishop-elect of 
the Episcopal Church in North Carolina, com¬ 
pleted at his own expense a chapel on his “Bel¬ 
grade” plantation and opened it to use in an area 
that had had no church previously. Known as 
Pettigrew Chapel till 1858, it was in that year 
enlarged by the Pettigrew descendants and Josiah 
Collins, a planter at nearby Lake Phelps, and re¬ 
christened St. David’s. 

The church is not now used for regular services, 
but the local congregation, with due regard to its 
historic interest, keep it in excellent condition 
and use it occasionally for homecoming and other 
special services. The interior furnishings, includ¬ 
ing the backless benches used by the slave com¬ 
municants, are kept as they were in the years 
before the Civil War. Across the road from the 
church is the Belgrade plantation house, built in 
1797 by “Parson” Pettigrew for his residence. 


Norman Larson of the Hall of History, Depart¬ 
ment of Archives and History, says that some 
14,000 of the approximately 20,000 negatives in 
the Barden Collection have been identified as to 
subject. The problem of identification often re¬ 
quires resourcefulness and imagination. One pro¬ 
cedure that has given uniformly successful re¬ 
sults is to print the more difficult specimens in 
the newspapers and wait for the resulting public 
response to establish identification. The response 
has always been good. Some pictures have 
brought scores of letters suggesting identifica¬ 
tions. 



Albert Barden—Archives & History 

I)o you recognize this old home? 



Albert Barden—Archives & History 

And this? 


The Barden Collection was left to the Depart¬ 
ment of Archives and History by the well-known 
Raleigh photographer, Albert Barden, at his death 
in 1953. It is a significant historical record for the 
period from 1907 to 1953. 


r 







"SOMERSET PLACE" 


“Somerset Place,” the ante-bellum Collins plan¬ 
tation residence at Lake Phelps, Washington 
County, has been restored by the Department of 
Conservation and Development as a project of 
Pettigrew State Park and is open daily to the 
public without charge. The plantation was started 
in the 1780’s as a vast swamp reclamation project. 
The company of Collins, Allen and Dickinson 
patented nearly 125,000 acres of swampland, 
brought a shipload of slaves from Africa, and 
proceeded to dig canals and other drainage works 
for a rice plantation. The culture of rice was feas¬ 
ible because the lake lies some six to eight feet 
above the level of the field land, making it possible 
to run lake water onto the fields for flooding. 

In 1829 Josiah Collins III came to Somerset 
Place to make it his home. During the next two 
or three years he built the mansion house now 
standing, and during the remaining years before 
the Civil War greatly expanded and improved the 
cultivated plantation. By 1860 he was cultivating 
more than 2,000 acres with 328 slaves. His home 
was a center of social life that drew people from 
far and near. 



Foundation of the Slave Chapel at Somerset Place 
as revealed by archeological excavation. 



State News Bureau 


The Somerset Place house as seen from Lake Phelps. 

The mansion house has pleasant exterior pro¬ 
portions, with fine double galleries on three sides. 
It is not furnished, but the interior exhibits in¬ 
teresting woodwork and several well proportioned 
rooms. The gardens (now laid out and soon to be 
planted) comprise more than five acres, enclosed 
within a picket fence. Brick walks lead to all 
parts of the dwelling area, and six of the original 
outbuildings still stand in a cluster near the main 
house. Archeological research has revealed the 
foundations of about a dozen buildings that were 
formerly on the lot, including slave quarters, the 
slave chapel, the slave hospital, and the overseer’s 
house. 

Somerset Place is situated on the margin of 
Lake Phelps. From the grounds, and especially 
from the upstairs porches, the view of this 16,600 
acre lake is most impressive. 


NORTH CAROLINA LIBRARY COMMISSION 



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1 CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Volume III NOVEMBER, 1954 Number 4 


ANNUAL MEETING 

Plans are being completed for the fifty-fourth 
annual meeting of the State Literary and His¬ 
torical Association, to be held in Raleigh on Fri¬ 
day, December 3. As in many previous years, all 
sessions will be held at the Hotel Sir Walter. 

The meeting will open with a business session 
in the Virginia Dare Ballroom at 9:30 A.M. Next 
in order, three speakers will be heard: Mr. Harry 
Golden of Charlotte, editor of The Carolina Israe¬ 
lite, Dr. Paul Murray of East Carolina College, 
Greenville, and Mr. Robert Mason of the Sanford 
Daily Herald. Mr. Golden will speak on “The 
Jewish People of North Carolina,” relating his 
address to the three hundredth anniversary of 
Jewish settlement in America which is being cele¬ 
brated this year. Dr. Murray will give a historical 
sketch of The North Carolina Historical Revieiv 
during its first thirty years of publication, and 
Mr. Mason will review the fiction -books in this 
year’s Sir Walter Raleigh competition. 

During the morning session three of the annual 
literary awards will be presented. These are the 
Roanoke-Chowan Award for poetry, the A.A.U.W. 
Award for juvenile literature, and the R. D. W. 
Connor Award for the best article on North 
Carolina history published in The North Carolina 
Historical Revieiv. 

At the subscription luncheon the non-fiction 
books eligible for the 1954 Mayflower Award 
will be reviewed. At the subscription dinner in 
the evening, Mrs. Inglis Fletcher of Edenton will 
deliver her presidential address, and at the even¬ 
ing session Dr. Louis B. Wright of Washington, 
D. C., director of the Folger Shakespeare Li¬ 
brary, will speak on “The Elizabethan Back¬ 
ground of North Carolina History.” At this ses¬ 
sion the Mayflower and the Sir Walter Raleigh 
awards will be presented. A reception for mem¬ 
bers and their guests in the Virginia Dare Ball¬ 
room will conclude the sessions. 

As in previous years the Literary and Histor¬ 
ical Association will meet in conjunction with 
other state organizations of kindred interest. 
These are the Society of County and Local His¬ 
torians, the Society for the Preservation of An- 
(Continued on Page 3) 


THE LITERARY AWARDS 

Preliminary lists of books eligible for this 
year’s literary awards demonstrate that North 
Carolina writers are producing at the usual brisk 
rate. Judges for the various competitions are 
busy with the always difficult task of deciding 
which books are best among a large number of 
good ones. 

Judges for the Mayflower Award, given for the 
best non-fiction work of the year, are J. E. Dowd 
and Mrs. Maurice G. Townend of Charlotte, Leon¬ 
ard Hurley and Miss Louise Alexander of Greens¬ 
boro, and Herbert O’Keef of Raleigh. They will 
choose a winner from a list of 26 eligible books. 

The judges for the Sir Walter Raleigh Award 
for fiction are Mrs. Bernice Kelly Harris of Sea¬ 
board, Robert Mason and Mrs. Robert Benson of 
Sanford, and Robert H. Woody and Charles E. 
Ward of Durham. They have a total of 33 books 
from which to pick the best fiction work of the 
year. 

In the American Association of University 
Women competition for juvenile fiction the tenta¬ 
tive listing shows that 16 books are eligible, and 
in the poetry competition for the Roanoke- 
Chowan Award 10 volumes are entered. For the 
R. D. W. Connor Award 15 articles in The North 
Carolina Historical Revieiv are eligible. 

LOUIS B. WRIGHT 

Dr. Louis B. Wright, principal speaker for the 
December 3 meeting of the State Literary and 
Historical Association, is a scholar and speaker 
of outstanding reputation. A native of Green¬ 
wood, South Carolina, he received his formal edu¬ 
cation at Wofford College and the University of 
North Carolina and studied in Europe. 

Starting adult life as a newspaperman, he 
shifted to teaching and academic scholarship. His 
record in this field includes service as a member 
of the English faculty of the University of North 
Carolina, research scholar and professor at the 
Huntington Library and Art Gallery in Califor¬ 
nia, and visiting professor at several California 
colleges and universities. Since 1948 he has been 
director of the Folger Shakespeare Library. He 
has authored and edited numerous works in the 
(Continued on Page 2) 





CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume III NOVEMBER, 1954 Number 4 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 

Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals. 

William S. Tarlton, Editor 


WHO WANTS TO BE HOST? 

The State Literary and Historical Association 
is ready to make plans for its next regional spring 
meeting. By custom, determined by weather con¬ 
ditions, the spring meeting is held in either the 
eastern or piedmont section and the summer meet¬ 
ing in the western part of the state. The annual 
winter meeting is always held at Raleigh. 

If your town is east of the mountains and 
would like to have the opportunity of sponsoring 
the 1955 spring meeting, please get in touch with 
Dr. Christopher Crittenden, secretary of the As¬ 
sociation, Box 1881, Raleigh. You will need to 
have a local group to help with arrangements for 
the program. 

N. C. WINS HISTORY AWARDS 

During the recent annual meeting of the Ameri¬ 
can Association for State and Local History it 
was announced that North Carolina had won 
three of the Associations forty-seven special 
awards for 1954. 

One award went to the Department of Archives 
and History for its first fifty years of achieve¬ 
ment. The citation specially mentioned the de¬ 
partment’s work in collecting, preserving, and 
publishing historical materials, in developing a 
leading state historical museum (the Hall of His¬ 
tory) , and in marking historic spots under its 
historical highway marker program. 

The award for the best state history of the 
year was made to Hugh T. Lefler and the late 
Albert Ray Newsome for their new history of 
North Carolina, published this year by the Uni¬ 
versity of North Carolina Press. The third award 
went to the Raleigh Model Railroad Club for set¬ 
ting up the model railroad exhibit in the Archives 
and History Department’s Hall of History. 

Dr. Christopher Crittenden, director of the 
Archives and History Department, attended the 
meeting held at Madison, Wisconsin, September 
9-11, and served as chairman of the Association’s 
nominating committee. 


THE RESTORED WACHOVIA MUSEUM 

On September 18 Governor William B. Umstead 
officiated at the opening of the restored Wachovia 
Museum at Old Salem. Ceremonies were held in 
Salem Square, heart of the old Moravian village. 

The Wachovia Museum has the distinction of 
being one of the oldest museums of continuous 
history in the state. It was begun 109 years ago 
as a collection of relics from the Moravian mis¬ 
sion fields. In 1895 it was taken over by the new¬ 
ly organized Wachovia Historical Society, and 
under this organization’s care it has grown into 
a notable collection of local antiquities. During 
the past few months the collection has been reor¬ 
ganized and enlarged and has now been re-placed 
in the old Boys’ School building and annex. 



Photo by Frank Jones 

The restored Wachovia Museum in Old Salem as the 
crowd gathered for the reopening ceremonies on Septem¬ 
ber 18. 


This interesting old brick building was erected 
in 1794 to house the Moravian school for boys. It 
was used as a school until 1896 when it was made 
available as quarters for the museum collection. 
Recently restored by Old Salem, Incorporated, it 
is once again in its original condition and takes 
its position as one of the key exhibition buildings 
in the Old Salem restoration. 


Wright, Continued from Page 1 

humanities and in history. He has long been a 
member, and is now chairman, of the Advisory 
Board of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial 
Foundation. 

We are happy to welcome Dr. Wright back to 
North Carolina for this occasion and we are sure 
that members of the Association will both enjoy 
and profit from his address. 














THE STAFF 

Fifty years ago, when the Department of 
Archives and History was beginning its career as 
the North Carolina Historical Commission, the 
staff consisted solely of the late R. D. W. Connor, 
secretary of the Commission, who served without 
salary. It was not until 1907 that a salaried staff 
was organized. It consisted of Dr. Connor, a 
stenographer, and a janitor. 

By 1916 there were six regular members and 
in 1920 nine. The depression held the number to 
nine as late as 1940, but by 1950 the total had 
grown to 16. At the present time there are 30 
regular members and one who is temporary, mak¬ 
ing a total of 31. 

Except for comparatively static periods during 
the depression and World War II, the growth of 
the staff reflects steady expansion of the depart¬ 
ment in all its divisions. Under present arrange¬ 
ments 16 staffers are assigned to the Archives 
Division, 6 to the Hall of History, 4 to the 
Division of Publications, 4 to the Director’s office, 
and one to the Highway Marker Program. 


Dorothy R. Phillips—Archives and History 

Staff of the Department of Archives and History 

Shown above are 28 of the 31 members of the staff. 
Kneeling are Henry Perry and Marvin Rogers. Front 
row: Marjorie Rose, Mrs. Blanche M. Johnson, Christoph¬ 
er Crittenden, and William S. Tarlton. Second row: Mrs. 
Julia C. Meconnahey, Mrs. Doris H. Harris, Mrs. Beatrice 
Hardie, Rachel Roberts, Elizabeth Ann Cannady, and 
Mary M. Whitaker. Third row: Jean S. Denny, Bernice 
Day, Leslie Lou Stewart, Anne McDonald, and Beth Crab¬ 
tree. Fourth row: Mrs. June S. Cherry, Barbara Stough¬ 
ton, Mrs. Mary R. Watson, Mrs. Dorothy R. Phillips, Mrs. 
Joye E. Jordan, and Mrs. Elizabeth W. Wilborn. Back 
row: Mrs. Frances H. Whitley, Rebecca Ball, Barbara 
McKeithan, Norman C. Larson, and D. L. Corbitt. Not 
present for the photograph were W. Frank Burton, Mrs. 
Mary J. Rogers, and Leonard Austin. 


Annual Meeting, Continued from Page 1 
tiquities, the Folklore Society, the State Art 
Society, the North Carolina Poetry Society, and 
the Roanoke Island Historical Association. Mem¬ 
bers and the general public are invited to attend 
all the sessions, December 1-3. 


Dorothy R. Phillips—Archives and History 

“Buck Springs,” home of Nathaniel Macon 
Buck Springs, the Warren County home of Nathaniel 
Macon, was restored in 1937. The photograph above con¬ 
firms the description of Macon’s neighbor, who wrote that 
the Senator’s home was a “neat little single-storied frame 
house sixteen feet square, with an upstairs and a cellar 
furnished in the plainest style for his own dwelling, with 
a sufficient number of outhouses to accommodate his vis¬ 
itors.” Macon was three times Speaker of the U. S. House 
of Representatives (1801-7), U. S. Senator (1815-28), and 
North Carolina’s chief spokesman for Jeffersonian prin¬ 
ciples. Macon County was named in his honor. 


Dorothy R. Phillips—Archives and History 

The Penelope Barker House, Edenton 
Two years ago this house, then standing almost derelict 
in the heart of Edenton’s business district, was in danger 
of being torn down to make way for a supermarket. At 
considerable cost, civic and patriotic groups came to its 
rescue and moved it to a city-owned lot on the waterfront, 
where it is being restored as a useful community house. 

The old building dates from the eighteenth century and 
is a splendid example of domestic architecture of its 
period. At one time it was the home of Penelope Barker, 
chairman of Edenton’s famous tea party. 












HALL OF HISTORY PARTY 


As a means both of obtaining further photo 
identifications and of giving the public an oppor¬ 
tunity to sample the Barden photograph collec¬ 
tion, the Hall of History recently exhibited some 
200 Barden prints during a social hour. 




vva/£ 

WHAT? 


4/p V'JH/'j 

WHERE? 



Dorothy R. Phillips—Archives and History 


Guests viewing the Barden photographs on display dur¬ 
ing the Hall of History’s party. Guests were given paper 
and pencils and asked to write down their identifications 
of the photographs displayed on the walls. 


About seventy-five people came to the party and 
joined in a contest to see who could identify the 
largest number of the old pictures. The results of 
the Hall of History’s little guessing game have 
not been completely tabulated, but it is certain 
that a good number of heretofore unidentified 
photos will now be positively labeled. 

One of the two Barden prints published in the 
September Carolina Comments was readily 
identified as the Spring Hill place near Louisburg, 
scene of the first annual conference of the Meth¬ 
odist Episcopal Church in 1785. The other picture 
has not yet been identified. 


OLD TRINITY OF CHOCOWINITY 

A homecoming program marking the 180th 
anniversary of old Trinity Church was held at 
Chocowinity, Beaufort County, on October 3. 

The church building is reputed to have been 
erected for the Reverend Nathaniel Blount about 
the time of his ordination in 1773. The year 1774 
is locally accepted as the date of its completion. 
Several years ago it was moved about a mile from 
its original location to a spot in Chocowinity and 
was at that time repaired and modernized. Pains 
were taken, however, to retain as much as pos¬ 
sible of its ancient character, as the accompany¬ 
ing photograph shows. 

Closely associated with old Trinity’s history is 
the record of Trinity School, founded in the 
middle 1850’s by the Reverend N. Collin Hughes 
and operated, with several interruptions, till 1908. 
Trinity School made an outstanding contribution 
to education and religion. It claimed credit for 
sending no less than 33 young men into the 
Episcopal ministry. 



Photo by Lawrence Wofford 


Trinity Church after relocation and repairs 



NORTH CAROLINA LIBRARY COMMISSION 


RALEIGH, N. C. 















b - V' N0HTH CAROLINA LIBRARY fKMI'SSION 

carolii^T^ments 

Volume III JANUARY, 1955 Number 5 


REPORT ON THE ANNUAL MEETING 

In contrast to last year the State Litei^ary and 
Historical Association had fine weather for its 
annual meeting in Raleigh on December 3, and 
this was in part responsible for good attendance 
at the different sessions. Some 200 were present 
at the morning session, 126 at the subscription 
luncheon, 159 at the subscription dinner, and 
about 400 at the evening session. For the meet¬ 
ing a varied program of serious lectures and 
papers, award presentations, and opportunities for 
social visiting was provided. 

This year’s five literary awards were presented 
as follows: the Mayflower Award, given for the 
best non-fiction work of the year, to Hugh T. 
Lefler and the late Albert Ray Newsome of Chapel 
Hill for their North Carolina: The History of a 
Southern State, published by the University of 
North Carolina Press; the Sir Walter Raleigh 
Award for fiction to Ovid Williams Pierce of Wel¬ 
don for his novel The Plantation published by 
Doubleday, the setting of which is laid in Halifax 
County in the early years of this century; the 



News and Observer staff photo. 


Winners and announcers of the Mayflower and 
Sir Walter Raleigh awards. 

Left to right: Dr. Hugh T. Lefler of Chapel Hill, co¬ 
winner of the Mayflower Award for non-fiction; Mrs. 
Preston B. Wilkes of Charlotte, governor of the May¬ 
flower Society, who presented the award; Mrs. Albert 
Ray Newsome of Chapel Hill, widow of Dr. Newsome, 
co-winner of the award; Miss Clara Booth Byrd of Greens¬ 
boro, president of the Historical Book Club, who pre¬ 
sented the Sir Walter Raleigh Award for fiction; and 
Ovid Williams Pierce of Weldon, winner of the award. 


Roanoke-Chowan Award for poetry to Thad Stem, 
Jr., of Oxford, for his volume of verse entitled 
The Jacknife Horse, published by The Wolf’s Head 
Press, Raleigh; the AAUW Award for juvenile 
literature to Mrs. Mebane Holoman Burgwyn of 
Jackson for her Penny Rose, published by the Ox¬ 
ford University Press; the R. D. W. Connor 
Award for the best article on North Carolina his¬ 
tory or biography appearing in The North Caro¬ 
lina Historical Revieiv to Hugh F. Rankin of 
Chapel Hill. A graduate student in history in the 
University of North Carolina, Rankin has won 
the Connor Award two years in succession. His 
winning article this year is entitled “Cowpens: 
Prelude to Yorktown,” and is the story of that 
Revolutionary battle. 



Announcers and recipients of awards at the 
Association’s morning session. 

Left to right are Roy Parker, Ahoskie, who presented, 
and Thad Stem, Jr., Oxford, who won the Roanoke- 
Chowan Award for poetry; Mrs. Lillian Parker Wallace, 
Meredith College, who presented, and Plugh F. Rankin, 
Chapel Hill, who won the R. D. W. Connor Award; and 
Mrs. Carl A. Plonk, Asheville, who presented, and Mrs. 
Mebane Holoman Burgwyn, Jackson, who won the AAUW 
Award for juvenile literature. 

The speakers heard during the meeting well 
served the serious intent of the association. At 
the evening session Louis B. Wright of Washing¬ 
ton, director of the Folger Shakespeare Library, 
read a paper on the Elizabethan policies govern¬ 
ing the settlement of Roanoke Island by Sir 
Walter Raleigh. This colonization scheme, accord- 
Continued on page 3 












CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Volume III JANUARY, 1955 Number 5 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 


Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals. 

William S. Tarlton, Editor 


THE ZEBULON BAIRD VANCE PAPERS 

Volume I of a series of Zebulon Baird Vance 
Papers has been turned over to the printer and 
will be published in the fall. The series is being 
edited by Frontis W. Johnston, head of the his¬ 
tory department of Davidson College, who is also 
writing a biography of Vance. Volume I will cover 
Vance’s career to the end of 1862, when he had 
been governor four months and when North Caro¬ 
lina had been in the Southern Confederacy a little 
more than a year and a half. Seven or eight vol¬ 
umes will complete the series. 

As editor, Dr. Johnston has had to deal with 
some 15,000 individual manuscripts, most of 
which are in the Department of Archives and 
History. The collection consists of both official 
and personal letters, including the courtship let¬ 
ters that passed between Vance and his second 
wife. Roughly one-half of the collection will ap¬ 
pear in the published volumes. 



Photo by Dorothy It. Phillips. 


Professor Frontis W. Johnston (left) and D. L. Corbitt, 
head of the publications division of the Department of 
Archives and History (center) turn over the typescript 
for the first volume of the Zebulon Baird Vance Papers 
to L. B. Phillips, director of the N. C. State College 
Print Shop. Dr. Johnston holds one of the original manu¬ 
script letters from which the printed series will be taken. 


NORTH CAROLINA SOLDIER HONORED BY 
VIRGINIA UDC 

On November 20 in Richmond Christopher Crit¬ 
tenden, director of the North Carolina Depart¬ 
ment of Archives and History, was the main 
speaker at the dedication of a marker in memory 
of Private Henry L. Wyatt, the first soldier on 
either side to be killed in battle in the Civil War. 

Wyatt was born at Richmond in 1842 but soon 
moved with his parents to Pitt County, North 
Carolina, and still later to Tarboro. Early in 1861 
at the age of 19 he volunteered for service with 
the Edgecombe Guards. This unit joined the First 
North Carolina Regiment and marched to Vir¬ 
ginia under the command of Colonel D. H. Hill. 
Hill’s regiment participated in the Battle of 
Bethel, June 10, 1861, and it was here that young 
Wyatt was killed. 

Wyatt was buried with military honors in 
Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, and during the 
Civil War several southern army camps were 
named for him. In 1912 the State of North Car¬ 
olina erected a monument to him on the Capital 
Square in Raleigh. 



Richmond News Leader staff photo. 


Dr. Christopher Crittenden, head of the North Carolina 
Department of Archives and History, and Mrs. W. R. 
Rickman, a member of the Lee Chapter of the UDC. 
Richmond, unveil the monument in Richmond’s Hollywood 
Cemetery. 











NEW HISTORICAL MARKERS 

On October 13 a historical highway marker was 
unveiled at Henderson for Richard Henderson, 
founder of the Transylvania Colony in Kentucky 
and of Nashville, Tennessee, judge, and member 
of the North Carolina Council of State. The pro¬ 
gram was arranged by a local group headed by 
Samuel H. Allen of Henderson and featured an 
address by Archibald Henderson of Chapel Hill, 
a descendant of Judge Henderson. Christopher 
Crittenden represented the Department of Ar¬ 
chives and History and made a short talk about 
the department’s historical marker program. 

A marker was unveiled near Mt. Holly, Gaston 
County, on October 16 pointing out the home of 
Joseph Dickson, brigadier general in the Revo¬ 
lution, state legislator, and member of Congress. 
The program was arranged and sponsored by the 
William Gaston Chapter of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution. Among those on the pro¬ 
gram were Clarence W. Griffin of Forest City, 
Christopher Crittenden of Raleigh, Mrs. Kay 
Dixon of Gastonia, regent of the DAR chapter 
sponsoring the program, and Frank B. Rankin 
of Mt. Holly. 

On November 30 a marker was dedicated to 
James Hogun, general in the Revolution, whose 
plantation home was located close by the present 
town of Hobgood, Halifax County. The program, 
held in the Hobgood School auditorium, was ar¬ 
ranged by Miss Helene White. Mrs. L. W. Leggett 
of Hobgood, Stuart Smith of Scotland Neck, and 
William S. Tarlton of the Department of Archives 
and History were among those who spoke during 
the program. 

Other markers recently erected without special 
ceremonies include those to David F. Houston at 
Monroe, the Duke Homestead near Durham, and 
the six marking the Roanoke River in Martin, 
Bertie, Halifax, and Northampton counties. 


Continued from page 1 

ing to Dr. Wright’s findings, was a policy measure 
aimed at thwarting Spanish sea power and ter¬ 
ritorial dominion in the New World. 

In his paper on The North Carolina Historical 
Review Paul Murray of East Carolina College said 
that the files of The Review for the thirty years 
since its beginning constitute a rich source of 
information on North Carolina history for all 
periods and phases. 

Harry Golden of Charlotte, editor of The Caro¬ 
lina Israelite, made a vivid presentation of the 


role Jews have played in the history of North 
Carolina. Noting that Jews were present in the 
colony in its earliest years, he traced their prog¬ 
ress from rural peddler and occasional profes¬ 
sional man to merchant, businessman, and com¬ 
munity-minded citizen. 

In a review notable for thoughtful content and 
sprightliness of style, Robert Mason of Sanford, 
editor of the Sanford Herald, evaluated the 1954 
fiction books eligible for the Sir Walter Raleigh 
competition. At the luncheon meeting Leonard B. 
Hurley of Greensboro, head of the English depart¬ 
ment of Woman’s College, presented a detailed 
and interesting analysis of the non-fiction works 
competing for the Mayflower Award. 

The outgoing president, Mrs. Inglis Fletcher 
of Edenton, in a speech at the dinner meeting, 
spoke about the early English voyages to the 
Carolina coast and of their effect in stimulating 
the men of Devon and other coastal areas to 
migrate to America. 

At the business session new officers for 1955 
were elected as follows: president, Fletcher M. 
Green of Chapel Hill, head of the department of 
history of the University of North Carolina; vice- 
presidents, John Harden of Greensboro, Hugh 
Morton of Wilmington, and R. H. Taylor of Cullo- 
whee. Reelected as secretary-treasurer was Chris¬ 
topher Crittenden, director of the Department of 
Archives and History, Raleigh. Elected to the 
Executive Committee were Mrs. Lillian Parker 
Wallace of Meredith College and William H. Cart¬ 
wright of Duke University. 

Mrs. R. N. Simms of Raleigh, chairman of the 
membership committee, reported there was a net 
gain of 216 members during the year, increasing 
the membership by 21 per cent and bringing the 
total number to 1,231. D. L. Corbitt, chairman of 
the committee on local historical societies, re¬ 
ported that with the active assistance of his com¬ 
mittee eleven new county societies were formed 
during the year. These new organizations are in 
Carteret, Cherokee, Gates, Graham, Mecklenburg, 
Mitchell, Northampton, Onslow, Pasquotank, 
Rockingham, and Wilkes counties. 

Meeting at Raleigh with the Literary and His¬ 
torical Association during the December 1-4 peri¬ 
od of annual cultural society meetings were the 
North Carolina Folklore Society, the State Art 
Society, the Society for the Preservation of An¬ 
tiquities, the Society of County and Local His¬ 
torians, the Society of Mayflower Descendants in 
North Carolina, and the North Carolina Poetry 
Society. 



THE DIVISION OF ARCHIVES AND MANUSCRIPTS 

The Department of Archives and History's di¬ 
vision of archives and manuscripts conducts a 
broad and comprehensive program. Within its 
varied functions it processes, stores, and makes 
available for public use the historical records 
turned over to its care. These include official state 
records, a large collection of maps, census rec¬ 
ords, military records, county records, and per¬ 
sonal collections. In addition, it operates a records 
management program under which non-current 
records of various state agencies are taken in and 
processed. 

The division has custody of about 9,100 cubic 
feet of official archives and private manuscripts, 
including papers of the governors, records of the 
Secretary of State, legislative papers, and records 
of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. The 
division has older records from 78 of the state’s 
100 counties and almost complete older records 
from 24 counties. It has microfilm copies of earlier 
deeds and wills from 62 counties, and more than 



Storage conditions of one county’s older records at the 
time they were acquired by the Department of Archives 
and History several years ago. Such poor storage is no 
longer prevalent in our county courthouses, thanks in 
part to the missionary work of the division of archives 
and manuscripts, headed by W. Frank Bui-ton. 


2,200 maps, 881 volumes of account books of 
North Carolina planters, merchants, and business¬ 
men, and a large collection of diaries. 

Facilities for genealogical research in the ref¬ 
erence library are extensive. They include a large 
number of North Carolina wills, inventories of 
estates, deeds, marriage bonds, census records, 
and Revolutionary and Civil War records. 



Scene in one of the Department’s archive areas, illus¬ 
trating the orderly and proper storage of county and other 
records. 


MRS. ELIZABETH H. u 
library commission 

fiALEIGH, n. c. 


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CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume III 


MARCH, 1955 


Number 6 


PREVIEW OF SPRING MEETING 

Friday and Saturday, May 6-7, are the dates 
set for the spring meeting of the State Literary 
and Historical Association. The place is Rocky 
Mount, at the Ricks Hotel. 

The meeting will begin early Friday after¬ 
noon with registration at the hotel. It is expected 
that there will be talks or papers on the history 
of Nash and Edgecombe counties and on the im¬ 
portance of the Tar River in North Carolina’s 
past. There will probably also be a trip to the 
historic town of Halifax, with a tour of the town 
and a picnic lunch. 

The host organization will be Historic Halifax, 
Inc., in cooperation with the Rocky Mount Cham¬ 
ber of Commerce and other local groups and in¬ 
dividuals. 

It is expected that a program featuring the 
Rocky Mount-Halifax area will specially appeal 
to a large number of the Association’s members 
and that there will be a good turnout for the May 
meeting. Further details will be sent you by mail 
later. In the meantime you can make your hotel 
reservations by writing to the Ricks Flotel. 

"HOPE" 

With a name that belies its present derelict con¬ 
dition, "Hope,” the colonial mansion pictured on 
this page, was once one of the finest of the large 
houses in North Carolina. Thought to have been 
built about 1770, it was the birthplace and home 
of David Stone, United States Senator and Gov¬ 
ernor of the state, 1808-10. 

The front elevation features a splendidly pro¬ 
portioned pedimented porch, with a rare Chinese 
Chippendale balustrade. On the second floor are 
one of the few ballrooms of early North Caro¬ 
lina, handsomely finished with paneled wainscot¬ 
ing and dentiled cornices, and a library furnished 
with built-in floor-to-ceiling bookcases. On the 
first floor are the spacious entrance hall, the par¬ 
lors, and other rooms, all with woodwork intact. 

“Hope” is located on N. C. Highway 308, near 
Windsor. Through the efforts of the Bertie County 
Historical Association interest in its preservation 
has been aroused. The state is being called upon 


to appropriate funds to help stop the process of 
decay that is advancing upon another of North 
Carolina’s few remaining colonial mansions. 



A recent photo of “Hope,” showing the front elevation. 
Note paneled shutters and Chinese Chippendale balustrade 
on second story porch. 



One of the bookcases in the library. 































CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Volume III MARCH, 1955 Number 6 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 


Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals. 

William S. Tarlton, Editor 


HALL OF HISTORY CRAFTS CLASS 

As a part of its general effort to interest young 
people in the history of our state, the Hall of His¬ 
tory is conducting a weekly Saturday morning 
class in crafts. The class, consisting of boys and 
girls of eighth and ninth grade age, has the use of 
three new looms and an electric pottery kiln tor 
weaving and pottery-making, and woodburning 
pencils for etching historical motifs on wood. 

On the looms the students duplicate the fabrics 
and patterns of early home weaving. Patterns are 
taken from drafts handed down from early times, 
and such old North Carolina favorites as 
“Summer-and-Winter,” “Honeysuckle,’ “Tobacco 
Leaf,” and “Jackson’s Victory” have become new 
favorites in the class. In the pottery class objects 
are shaped by hand and then are decorated with 
historical illustrations and glazed. 

The work of the students will form an ex¬ 
hibit in the Hall of History. Later they will be 
allowed to take specimens home as keepsakes. 



Photo by Norman Larson—Archives and History 


Three students at work in the crafts class. The student 
in the background is operating the small loom and the 
two in the foreground are shaping pottery bowls. The 
electric kiln is in the right background. 


ADMINISTRATION OF STATE-OWNED 
HISTORIC SITES 

By a bill introduced February 11 the General 
Assembly has been asked to transfer the admin¬ 
istration of state-owned historic sites from the 
Department of Conservation and Development, 
which now exercises that function through its 
Division of State Parks, to the Department of 
Archives and History. The bill sets July 1, 1955, 
as the date for the transfer. 

This bill is the result of a recommendation 
by the Commission on Reorganization of State 
Government, following special studies. The Com¬ 
mission was authorized by the 1953 General As¬ 
sembly, and appointed by the late Governor Wil¬ 
liam B. Umstead, to study the state administra¬ 
tion and make recommendations for changes found 
to be needed or desirable. The Commission has 
recommended changes in several other areas in 
addition to that of historic sites. 

If House Bill 221 is enacted into law the De¬ 
partment of Archives and History will add a sig¬ 
nificant new function to its program. Historical 
properties owned by the state at present include 
Town Creek Indian Mound (Montgomery Coun¬ 
ty), the James Iredell House (Edenton), Ala¬ 
mance Battleground (Alamance County), and the 
site of colonial Brunswick Town (Brunswick 
County). Additional properties due to come un¬ 
der state ownership later include Tryon Palace 
(New Bern) and the Charles B. Aycock Birth¬ 
place (Wayne County). 

NEW COLLECTION OF SHEET MUSIC 

A fine collection of popular sheet music—hot, 
sweet, and patriotic—-of the Civil War period has 
just been acquired by the Hall of History. 

George W. Gelbach, Jr., Edenton High School’s 
history instructor, has made a loan deposit of four 
large volumes collected by his grandmother and 
great aunt, residents of Baltimore during the 
middle of the last century. The volumes contain 
piano adaptations of the classics, sentimental bal¬ 
lads, dance arrangements and marches, seasonal 
catch tunes, and a generous sprinkling of patriotic 
numbers inspired by the Civil War, which was 
raging when the Gelbach young ladies played and 
sang this music in their parlors. 

The Gelbachs were ardently pro-southern, and 











consequently most of the war music favors the 
South. Two pieces have North Carolina author¬ 
ship. “The Wild Ashe Deer,” with a deer chase 
tempo and words to match, was written by Mrs. 
A. V. Pendleton of North Carolina. A war ballad 
entitled “Wearin of the Grey” was written by a 
North Carolinian who identified himself as “Tar 
Heel.” 

The collection includes several Stephen Foster 
songs and early editions of “Dixie,” “Maryland, 
My Maryland,” “When This Cruel War Is Over,” 
and “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight.” The 
collection, typical of mid-nineteenth century par¬ 
lor music, is a valuable addition to the folk music 
that the Hall of History is gathering. 



“Grafted into the Army” seems to be a satire against the 
drafting of soldiers in the North. The northern mother 
in the illustration sings of her son’s "being “grafted” into 
the army as she displays “the trousies he use to wear.” 



NfcVY YORK 

Published by J l PETERS, dOO Hiwdwuy 

Illustrated cover of “Nora O’Neal, A Beautiful Ballad.” 

Stonewall 
Jacksons 
W A V. 

1',. li-' . i i.\ M I I.l.i :i’ A l’,l At 1 1 A M ! ’• 

Kn'rr'il a- t. A'< / '' j ■ • ■ • f • ■ ' " ■ ♦ 

“Stonewall Jackson’s Way” is the well known song, re¬ 
portedly taken from the pocket of a dead Confederate 
soldier, in which General Jackson is called “The Blue Light 
Elder,” because of his habit of holding prayer meetings 
Elder” because of his habit of holding prayer meetings 
in camp. 











NEW HISTORICAL MARKERS 

At its meeting January 28, 1955, the Advisory 
Committee on Historical Markers approved six¬ 
teen new historical markers for Tarheel high¬ 
ways, as follows: 

WACHOVIA MUSEUM—Begun in 1845, has ex¬ 
hibits of Moravian relics. Housed in Boys’ School 
building, built in 1794 and used as school till 1896. 
(Forsyth County.) 

SWANNANOA TUNNEL—Longest (1,800 ft.) 
of 7 on railroad between Old Fort and Asheville. 
Constructed by convict labor, 1877-79. (Buncombe 
County.) 

ROSE GREENHOW—Confederate spy and Wash¬ 
ington society woman. Drowned near Fort Fish¬ 
er, 1864, while running Federal blockade. (New 
Hanover County.) 

SCOTCH HALL—Plantation setting for the novel 
“Bertie,” by George H. Throop (1851), tutor in 
the family of G. W. Capehart. (Bertie County.) 

WINGATE JUNIOR COLLEGE—Coeducational, 
Baptist. Opened as the Wingate School in 1896. 
College courses added in 1923. (Union County.) 

WILLIAM B. UMSTEAD—Governor, 1953-54 
U. S. Senator, Congressman; Democratic leader; 
and lawyer. (Durham County.) 

4-H CLUB-—First in North Carolina organized 
at Ahoskie in 1909 as a corn club. Beginning of 
present large organization of rural youth in state. 
(Hertford County.) 


CLYDE R. HOEY—United States Senator, 1945- 
54, Congressman, governor, N. C. legislator, law¬ 
yer, editor. (Cleveland County.) 

SHERMAN’S MARCH—General Sherman, with 
a part of his army, on March 9-10, 1865, camped 
at Bethel Presbyterian Church (established be¬ 
fore 1800). (Hoke County.) 

WILLIS SMITH—United States Senator, 1950- 
53, speaker N. C. House of Representatives, presi¬ 
dent American Bar Association. (Wake County.) 

LEVI COFFIN—Anti-slavery leader, reputed 
president of “Underground Railroad,” was born 
near here, 1789. Moved to Indiana, 1826. (Guil¬ 
ford County.) 

JAMES IREDELL, JR.—Governor, 1827-28, 
U. S. Senator, compiler of Revisal of N. C. Laws, 
state legislator, judge, lawyer. (Chowan County.) 

MOSES A. CURTIS (1808-1872)—Botanist, au¬ 
thority on North American flora, author, and 
Episcopal minister. (Orange County.) 

LAKE COMPANY—Josiah Collins, Sr., and part¬ 
ners drained part of 100,000-acre tract near Lake 
Phelps with 6-mile canal, completed 1787. (Wash¬ 
ington County.) 

BETHABARA—First community founded by 
Moravians in North Carolina (1753), later 
known as “Old Town.” Church erected 1788. (For¬ 
syth County.) 

HIGH POINT COLLEGE—Methodist. Opened in 
1924 with aid from the city of High Point. Coed¬ 
ucational. (Guilford County.) 


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7 RALEIGH, N . C. 

CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume IV 


MAY, 1955 


Number 1 


STATE LITERARY AND HISTORICAL 
ASSOCIATION 

SPRING REGIONAL MEETING 


Friday, May 6—Rocky Mount 

12:30-2:30 Registration—Ricks Hotel, Rocky 
Mount 

2:30 Ricks Hotel—“The History of Nash 

County,” Mrs. Ruth Jeffreys 

“The History of Rocky Mount and 
the Rocky Mount Mills,” Reading 
Bulluck 

“Sidelights of Nash County His¬ 
tory,” William L. Pierce 


4:30 Tea—Old Rocky Mount Mills Home 

(offices of Rocky Mount Mills) 

Tour of Rocky Mount Mills 

6 :30 Dinner—Ricks Hotel—“The Tar Riv¬ 

er and its Place in North Carolina 
History,” Mrs. W. Gray Williams 

8:00 Ricks Hotel—“Customs in Daily Life 

in Colonial Edgecombe,” Mrs. E. L. 
Daughtridge, Jr. 

“Rebirth of Historical Interest in 
the Coastal Plain,” Ray S. Wilkin¬ 
son 


CONSTITUTION HOUSE—where the Halifax Resolves, 
first state sanction of American independence, and the 
first state constitution of North Carolina were adopted, 
1776. This old landmark will be visited during the session 
of the Literary and Historical Association at Halifax, 
May 7. 


Saturday, May 7—Go to Halifax (drive 28 miles 
north of Rocky Mount on U.S. 
301). 

10:30 Woman’s Club Building, Halifax— 

Papers on Historic Sites in the 
Town of Halifax, Mrs. Sterling M. 
Gary, presiding 

Tour of the town 

1:30 Lunch—Colonial Manor (3 miles 

north of Halifax on U.S. 301). 

Talk on the progress of The Histori¬ 
cal Halifax Restoration Associa¬ 
tion, Ray S. Wilkinson, president 


Also to be visited is the old CLERK’S OFFICE, built some 
200 years ago for the clerk of the Halifax District court 
and now restored and used as the public library. 



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CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume IV MAY, 1955 Number 1 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 


Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals. 

William S. Tarlton, Editor 


MARKER UNVEILINGS 

Two new historical highway markers for Hoke 
County were unveiled on March 11 in ceremonies 
held in the Raeford High School auditorium. A 
large crowd of students and local citizens were in 
attendance. 

The markers commemorate Edenborough Medi¬ 
cal College, the first medical school in North 
Carolina to operate under a state charter, and the 
Civil War battle of Monroe’s Crossroads, a cavalry 
action between Confederate and Federal forces 
in March, 1865. 

Paul Dickson, editor and publisher of the Rae¬ 
ford Netvs-Journal, presided and William S. Tarl¬ 
ton of the Department of Archives and History 
was the speaker. 

In making these historical marker unveilings 
an occasion for our young people to observe sig¬ 
nificant events in local history, Raeford High 
School did what it is hoped that other schools will 
continue to do. The Enfield and Hobgood schools 
have also taken advantage of similar opportunities 
in recent months. 

THE 1880 CENSUS 

The Department of Archives and History has 
rounded out its holdings of North Carolina census 
records for the first century of Federal census 
taking with the acquisition this month of the 
original county population schedules of the 1880 
census. The National Archives presented the 
schedules in line with its policy of disposing of 
certain original records. Microfilm copies were 
retained in Washington. 

The 25 large volumes of 1880 schedules were 
brought to Raleigh recently by W. Frank Burton, 
State Archivist. The records are in fair shape, but 
the paper is brittle and needs special attention. 

The Department now has available for public 
use the census records from the first census of 
1790 to that of 1880. The first census is printed. 
The others are either microfilms or originals. 


TRYON PALACE CONTRACTS LET 

Sealed bids for construction of the main unit 
of Tryon Palace were opened at a meeting of the 
Tryon Palace Commission in Raleigh, March 16. 
William Muirhead of Durham was awarded the 
general contract on a low bid of $577,000. Plumb¬ 
ing, heating, ventilating, and dehumidification 
sub-contracts were awarded to other North Caro¬ 
lina firms at low bids totaling $105,312. 

The general contractor commits himself to com¬ 
plete the contracts within 600 consecutive days. 
This means that completion of the Palace, eagerly 
awaited by North Carolinians, can be predicted 
with a fair degree of certainty for 1957. The two 
wings have already been restored, and plans are 
being readied for landscaping the grounds and 
planting the gardens, which will follow the main 
construction work. 

Much of the finish work for the main building, 
requiring special skills not available locally, is 
excluded from the contract awarded to Mr. Muir¬ 
head. This work will be executed by skilled work¬ 
ers of the architect’s choice and under his super¬ 
vision. Under this heading are the plastering, 
painting, carved and molded trimwork, and other 
decorative finish work. 

HALIFAX GAOL 

With Governor Luther Hodges as the main 
speaker, the old Halifax Gaol was dedicated as a 
historical museum in a special program held at the 
site on April 12. Other speakers were state senator 
Lunsford Crew, Dr. Christopher Crittenden, di¬ 
rector of the Archives and History Department, 
Eric Rodgers, assistant to the director of the 
Department of Conservation and Development 
and Ray S. Wilkinson and Mrs. Sterling M. Gary, 
president and vice-president respectively of the 
Historical Halifax Restoration Association, which 
has acquired the historic old jail and is restoring 
it as a museum. 

The jail, a solid brick structure that was con¬ 
sidered an unsually large and commodious jail in 
its time, figured in early Revolutionary history. 
It was in this building that Alan Macdonald, hus¬ 
band of Flora Macdonald, and other tory officers 
were imprisoned following their capture at the 
Battle of Moore’s Creek Bridge in February, 1776. 

A large crowd attended the dedication program 
and toured the historic spots in Halifax. The old 
town will again be toured during the spring meet¬ 
ing of the State Literary and Historical Associa¬ 
tion, May 6-7. 









HISTORICAL FASHION SHOW 

The Sir Walter Cabinet, an organization of 
legislators’ and state officials’ wives which func¬ 
tions biennially during the legislative sessions, 
were guests of the Department of Archives and 
History at a historical fashion show on March 15. 

The program got underway with a color-slide 
showing of some 30 early North Carolina houses, 
such as might have provided proper settings in 
real life for many of the costumes modeled in the 
fashion parade that followed. The parade, illus¬ 
trating feminine fashion during a period of a cen¬ 
tury and a half, began with a long, low-cut gown 
of 1789, the year President Washington was in¬ 
augurated. It included examples of the full-skirt 


costume of the ante-bellum period and the bustles 
of the 1870’s, and ended with examples of flapper 
fashion, which are probably more astonishing in 
retrospect than they were in their time. 

A total of 33 dresses were modeled by Needham- 
Broughton Home Economics students and Ar¬ 
chives and History staff members. The dresses are 
all from the Hall of History. 

Special guests were Mrs. Luther Hodges and 
Mrs. Luther Barnhardt, whose husband is presi¬ 
dent of the state senate. A social hour followed 
the program. 

The program was planned and conducted by 
Mrs. Joye E. Jordan, administrator of the Hall of 
History, and her staff. On April 13 it was present¬ 
ed as an educational program over WUNC-TV. 



Some of the models in the fashion parade. Left to right, Jayn Hayes, wearing a dress of about 1810, poses with Canova’s 
George Washington; Nancy Walcott, in a taffeta dress of about 1850, poses elegantly beside a picket fence; Charlotte 
Clayton and Joy Parker, in summer dresses of the early 190 0’s, consider whether to ride in a 1902 model car built in 
North Carolina; and Grace Mahler, in a gorgeous red flapper outfit, looks coy behind her feather boa. 


PERSON'S ORDINARY 

As early as 1779 Thomas Person. Regulator and 
Revolutionary leader, operated an inn, or ordi¬ 
nary, in the “Old Ornery” building at Littleton. 
In later years a quarrel that ended in a sensational 
duel and a visit by Lafayette became a part of the 
old inn’s tradition. 

Though needing restoration, the inn has never 


been altered from its original condition and is a 
fine example of an early inn. The Littleton Wo¬ 
man’s Club is now going to restore it as a histori¬ 
cal exhibit and clubhouse. 

North Carolinians interested in preserving one 
of the state’s few remaining colonial inns are in¬ 
vited to contribute to the project. Write to Mrs. 
Horace P. Robinson, Littleton, N. C. 

















NEW HISTORY BULLETIN 

The Western North Carolina Historical Associ¬ 
ation, embracing 23 counties in the western part 
of the state, has started publication of a four-page 
quarterly bulletin under the editorship df Clarence 
W. Griffin of Forest City, who is also vice-presi¬ 
dent of the association and a member of the 
Executive Board of the State Department of 
Archives and History. The bulletin is devoted to 
news and historical notes of interest to members 
of the association and other citizens of the moun¬ 
tain area. The first number appeared just prior 
to the association’s first 1955 quarterly meeting at 
Hendersonville, January 29. 

Those responsible for starting the bulletin turn¬ 
ed a neat trick in financing whereby the bulletin 
is made the means of communicating associational 
circular correspondence to members and the usual 
cost of circular correspondence applied to the bul¬ 
letin. To make up the difference in cost the bulletin 
carries paid advertisements. 

If readers of Carolina Comments have news 
items and historical notes of special interest to 
the western part of our state, they are invited to 
send them to Mr. Griffin, Forest City, North Caro¬ 
lina. 

HISTORIC SITES 

In the March number of Carolina Comments 
it was noted that a bill was pending in the current 
General Assembly to transfer state-owned historic 
sites from the Department of Conservation and 
Development to the Department of Archives and 
History. The bill has now been passed and the 
sites will be transferred July 1. 


VANCE'S FOLLY 

A system of earthern breastworks, called by 
some “Vance’s Folly” because Governor Vance 
was responsible for it, was erected around Raleigh 
in 1863 as a defense against expected Federal 
raids. The enemy did not appear at Raleigh, how¬ 
ever, until the war was virtually over, and by that 
time the retreat of General Johnston left the city 
little choice but to surrender peacefully. This it 
did April 13, 1865. Although the breastworks in 
the end were useless, at one stage of the war they 
represented a firm intention on the part of the 
city to “bid defiance to any Yankee raid.” Re¬ 
ferring to the fortifications, the Raleigh Register 
of July 8, 1863, editorialized that “if the Yankee 
thieves come here after wool, they will go back 
shorn.” 

The passage of 92 years has all but obliterated 
the physical remains of these brave fortifications, 
but the Department of Archives and History now 
has a detailed map record of them, thanks to the 
alertness of Col. J. F. Stanback of Mt. Gilead. 
Some weeks ago Col. Stanback found the map in 
the National Archives and upon his suggestion 
the Department ordered a photostatic copy. 

The map, drawn in 1863, is about forty inches 
square and shows the city of Raleigh and environs, 
with the encircling fortifications, all in fine detail. 
It shows that the breastworks took in not only the 
city proper but a good portion of surrounding 
open country as well. Notwithstanding this gen¬ 
erous inclusion of border areas, the enclosed area 
is small by comparison with the city of today, dem¬ 
onstrating in a dramatic way the capital city’s 
growth since the Civil War. 


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North Carolina State Uorary 
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CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume IV 


JULY, 1955 


Number 2 


SUMMER REGIONAL MEETING 


The summer regional meeting of the State 
Literary and Historical Association will be held 
with the Western North Carolina Historical As¬ 
sociation, August 19-20, at Mars Hill College, 
Mars Hill. The program will be as follows: 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 19 
1:00-2:30 Registration, College Dormitory 
2:30 College Auditorium 

(Fletcher M. Green, presiding) 

Welcome, Hoyt H. Blackwell, president, 
Mars Hill College 

“Centennial History of Mars Hill College,” 
J. A. McLeod, Mars Hill College 
“The North Carolina Minerals Museum,” 
S. T. Henry, publisher, Spruce Pine Netvs 

8:00 College Auditorium 

(Clarence W. Griffin, presiding) 

Address, Fletcher M. Green, president, State 
Literary and Historical Association 
“The Wonders of the Smokies” (illustrated 
with slides), Arthur Stupka, naturalist, 
Great Smoky Mountains National Park 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 20 
10:00 College Auditorium 

(Mrs. Sadie S. Patton, presiding) 
“Conditions in Western North Carolina 
During the Civil War,” James Elliott, 
Clemson College 

“The Toe River Valley,” Jason B. Deyton, 
superintendent, Mitchell County Schools 
Business Session 

During the meeting you may get rooms and 
meals at the college at a cost of $4.50 for four 
meals and one night’s lodging. If you wish to 
arrive a day early and stay a day late you may 
get a college room at $1.00 a night and take meals 
in town. All linens are furnished. Do not write 
the college for reservations until further notice. 


REPORT FROM THE ROCKY MOUNT-HALIFAX 
MEETING, MAY 6-7 

Judged by the interest it stirred up in the 
general area of Rocky Mount and Halifax, the 
spring regional meeting of the State Literary 
and Historical Association was eminently suc¬ 
cessful. The local area contributed the largest 
share of the attendance, but members came from 
as far east as Currituck County and as far west 
as Chapel Hill and Wake Forest. 

The program focused attention on the history 
of the Tar and Roanoke river region, the first time 
this has been done in a general meeting of the 
sort. There were tours of historic points of in¬ 
terest in Rocky Mount and Halifax, and papers 
on the history of Nash and Edgecombe counties, 
Rocky Mount, Halifax, the Tar River, and on the 
revival of historical interest in the Coastal Plain 
generally. 

Those present also got a good first-hand account 
and view of the work being done by the Histori¬ 
cal Halifax Restoration Association, which has 
undertaken a program of restoring outstanding 
historic sites in the Old Town of Halifax. 

LIT AND HIST MEMBERSHIP 

A recent tabulation of members of the State 
Literary and Historical Association reveals that 
there are now 1,293 of us. Five years ago there 
were only 438. 

Growth in the past few years has been striking, 
but if our organization is to equal similar organi¬ 
zations in several of the comparatively new mid- 
western states, we have a long way yet to go. 
The membership of such state historical societies 
as those of Wisconsin, Illinois, and Missouri runs 
into the thousands. 

Chowan County, with a population of less than 
13,000, has a total of 51 members. If our most 
populous counties had members in the same pro¬ 
portion, some of them would have up to 800. Wake 
has the largest county representation with 162, 
which is a fine showing, but if Wake would equal 
Chowan’s standing it would need a total of 550. 

It is planned that our membership campaign 
will be accelerated in all parts of the state in the 
months ahead. 








CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume IV JULY, 1955 Number 2 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, ' Raleigh, N. C. 


Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals. 

William S. Tarlton, Editor 


MARKER UNVEILINGS 

On May 12 a historical highway marker com¬ 
memorating the organization in 1909 of the first 
4-H Club in North Carolina was unveiled at Ahos- 
kie High School, Ahoskie. A good number of those 
who had a part in the original organization 46 
years ago were present, including Dean I. 0. 
Schaub and T. E. Browne, who were chiefly re¬ 
sponsible for organizing the 1909 group. 

From the small beginnings of 1909 the 4-H 
Club movement in North Carolina has grown 
enormously and now leads the nation in member¬ 
ship, with more than 146,000 boys and girls en¬ 
rolled. 

On May 28 during college commencement exer¬ 
cises a marker was unveiled for Wingate Junior 
College, Wingate, Union County. Former presi¬ 
dent C. C. Burris gave a historical account of the 
college, which opened in 1896 as a high school 
and was raised to junior college level in 1923. 


TOWN CREEK INDIAN MOUND 

Among the historic sites to be transferred to 
the Department of Archives and History under 
legislation passed by the 1955 General Assembly 
is Town Creek Indian Mound, located in Mont¬ 
gomery County on the bank of Little River. 

This 53-acre tract is the site of an ancient In¬ 
dian political, religious, and cultural center. It 
was here that a tribe of Muskogean-speaking In¬ 
dians, who settled the upper Pee Dee Valley early 
in the sixteenth century, built their “square” - 
the symbolic soul of the Taliva or tribe, the place 
where all matters of politics and religion were 
settled. This square was made by four rectangu¬ 
lar sheds placed in the center of a plaza. On the 
west they built the mound to serve as the elevated 
foundation of their main temple. On the other 
three sides the plaza was surrounded by a series 
of other religious and mortuary structures. 

The mound, and the palisade surrounding it, 
have been restored by the State Parks Division of 
the Department of Conservation and Develop¬ 
ment, and restoration of the temple on the mound 
is scheduled. A wealth of historic and pre-historic 
artifacts has been recovered from the area, and 
some of these are on display in a temporary mu¬ 
seum. Archeological research will be continued in 
order to determine the full scope of Indian occu¬ 
pation and use of the site, and eventually the 
major Indian structures will be reconstructed. 

The Town Creek Mound is located some five 
miles east of Mt. Gilead, between North Carolina 
Highways 73 and 731. The route is well marked 
with signs. 



Shown hez-e are seven members of the 1909 Corn Club, 
forerunner of North Carolina’s 4-H clubs, and others 
present at the marker unveiling in Ahoskie. They are 
(left to right) W. R. Parker, C. A. Worrell, E. C. Hill, C. 
W. Parker, T E. Browne, Henry T. Brown, J. Raynor 
Moore, Troy Newton, I. O. Schaub, and L. R. Harrill. 


Photo by State Nctvs Bureau 

The Temple Mound at Town Creek —As the photo¬ 
graph shows, the geometrically designed mound and ramp 
have been restored. The temple building which stood on 
top of the mound is now being reconstructed. 




















N. C. MINERALS MUSEUM 

The Museum of North Carolina Minerals, locat¬ 
ed on the Blue Ridge Parkway at Gillespie Gap five 
miles south of Spruce Pine, was opened in special 
ceremonies on June 17. The museum displays 
specimens of some 300 precious stones and miner¬ 
als found in the state and undertakes to tell the 
history of North Carolina mining and minerals 
use to the present. The museum building was 
erected at the expense of the state, but the mu¬ 
seum itself is administered by the National Park 
Service. 

In addition to their geological and historical 
interest, the exhibits are of practical interest to 
persons who want to know about mining, the 
finishing of gem stones, the distribution of min¬ 
erals, and their use in the state’s important min¬ 
erals industry. 

Historical items include English china objects 
made by Josiah Wedgewood from North Carolina 
clay in 1777 and native gold coined in 1838 at 
the Bechtler Mint in Rutherford County. 

HISTORIC SITES PROGRAM 

Legislation enacted by the 1955 General Assem¬ 
bly places with the Department of Archives and 
History responsibility for developing a state pro¬ 
gram of historic site preservation in North Car¬ 
olina. Preliminary plans for this new program 
are now being worked out, but it will take some 
time to settle all the details. 

The Department is glad to accept this new 
function and expects to make it an outstanding 
part of the overall departmental program. To pre¬ 
serve our significant historic sites - such as bat¬ 
tlefields, buildings, and other tangible relics of 
our past - will contribute greatly to an under¬ 
standing of our historical heritage and will also 
prove of commercial advantage in promoting 
tourist interest. 

For the 1955-1957 biennium a total of $48,586 

I is available for the historic sites program. Of 
this amount $9,816 is assigned to Alamance Bat¬ 
tleground, Alamance County; $4,928 (second year 
only) to the Aycock Birthplace, Wayne County; 
$14,942 to Town Creek Indian Mound, Mont¬ 
gomery County; $5,000 to the Alston House, 
Moore County; $6,000 to Historic Halifax, Hali¬ 
fax County; $2,000 to Bentonville Battleground, 
Johnston County; $400 to the preservation of a 
covered bridge in Catawba County; $3,000 to the 
Governor David Stone house (“Hope”), Bertie 
County; and $2,500 to the Penelope Barker house 
in Edenton, Chowan County. 



Photo by State News Bureau 

North Carolina Gem Cutter —Near Spruce Pine, in 
the heart of the minerals-producing region of Western 
North Carolina, Roby Buchanan cuts and polishes native 
stones. He is shown at work on an amethyst. Gem stones 
and other minerals of North Carolina are displayed at 
the Minerals Museum on the Blue Ridge Parkway. 

BACK FILES OF THE REVIEW 

In order to conserve space for current publi¬ 
cation storage, the Department’s Division of Pub¬ 
lications is offering complete or partial files of 
The North Carolina Historical Revieiv for the 
regular price of $2.00 per volume or fifty cents 
per number. 

The Revieiv was begun in January, 1924, and 
is published quarterly. Its files contain articles 
on all phases and periods of North Carolina his¬ 
tory and on many subjects outside of strictly state 
history. It also contains documents, book reviews, 
and historical news. 

If you are interested, communicate with Mr. 
D. L. Corbitt of the Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh. 







GOVERNOR CASWELL'S GRAVE 

The 1955 General Assembly appropriated $25,- 
000 toward the purchase of a tract of land around 
the grave of Richard Caswell, North Carolina 
Revolutionary leader and first governor of the 
state. The grave is in a half-acre family cemetery 
plot on U. S. 70, a mile west of Kinston. 

In recent years commercialization of the area 
bordering the graveyard caused concern among 
Kinston citizens and others, who felt that further 
encroachment would spoil the grave site and ren¬ 
der it impossible of development as a memorial. 
Last year the City of Kinston and Lenoir County 
took an option on twenty-two acres around the 
grave. With the help of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution and other patriotic organi¬ 
zations, appeals were made for state aid in com¬ 
pleting the $43,000 purchase. The state appropria¬ 
tion of $25,000 has rewarded their efforts. 

The Governor Richard Caswell Memorial Com¬ 
mission will develop the twenty-two acres as a 
memorial to the state’s first governor. 

CRITTENDEN CONDUCTS INSTITUTE 

Dr. Christopher Crittenden lectured before the 
Institute of Historical and Archival Management 
for the two days of June 23-24. The Institute is 
held annually at Cambridge, Massachusetts, and 
is sponsored jointly by the history department of 
Harvard University and by Radcliffe College. The 
Institute is a clearing house for thought and dis¬ 
cussion in the field of archival and other organized 
historical work. Its faculty is composed of the 


heads of the leading historical and archival agen¬ 
cies in the country. 

In his first day’s lecture Dr. Crittenden gave a 
report on historical work done in the United 
States as a whole, and analyzed the work of differ¬ 
ent types of agencies and organizations in the 
field—national, state, local, and private. The sec¬ 
ond day was given to a report on the work of the 
North Carolina Department of Archives and His¬ 
tory, as an example of one of the leading state 
organizations engaged in archival and historical 
work. 

NEW PUBLICATIONS 

The Department of Archives and History an¬ 
nounces the publication during the last two 
months of the fourth volume of The Papers of 
Willie Person Mangum, edited by Henry T. 
Shanks, and the eighth and final volume of the 
Records of the Moravians in North Carolina, edi¬ 
ted by Dr. Adelaide L. Fries and Dr. Douglas L. 
Rights. Dr. Fries translated and edited the first 
seven volumes of the Moravian Records and had 
started on the eighth when she died in 1949. Dr. 
Rights completed the volume. 

Mr. D. L. Corbitt, head of the Department’s 
division of publications, reports that the new 
volumes are being mailed out at a brisk rate, 
particularly the Moravian Records, which have 
proved one of the most popular of all the Depart¬ 
ment’s publications. 

Dr. Shanks has completed the editorial woi’k 
for the Mangum series, and the fifth and last 
volume is now in the hands of the printer. It is 
expected to be ready for distribution next year. 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE LIBRARY 
RALEIGH, N. C* 






North Caro'ir.a L rnry Commissioii 
Raieiyii, N. C. 


pUPUU^xOy* 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume IV 


September, 1955 


Number 3 



Barden Photo Collection, Archives & History 


Home of John F. Tompkins, agricultural reformer, a 
founder of the State Fair, who published and edited the 
“Fanners Journal,” 1852-53, in Bath. Now used as 
Episcopal Rectory. 

BATH'S BIRTHDAY 

The period from Saturday, October 1, through 
Tuesday, October 4, has been set aside to com¬ 
memorate the 250th anniversary of the incor¬ 
poration of the town of Bath. 

Historic Bath is the oldest incorporated town 
in North Carolina, having been established by 
act of the colonial assembly in 1705. Local citi¬ 
zens as well as many other historically minded 
folks, including the 1955 General Assembly which 
passed legislation authorizing the Governor to 
appoint a commission to celebrate Bath’s 250th 
birthday and authorizing the allocation of funds 
up to $2,500 to assist in the celebration, recognize 
Bath’s historical significance. 

The oldest church standing in North Carolina 
(St. Thomas, 1734), is still worshipped in and 
the Parish of St. Thomas in 1700 established the 
first public library in North Carolina. The Marsh 
House, the Glebe House, the Buzzard Hotel, all 
built during the middle 1700’s, are well preserved. 

Bath has given five governors to the State. It 
has given a wealth of legend as well, for stories 
of intrigue and of the pirate Blackbeard are all 
part of the quiet countryside, which was the first 
official port of entry, complete with tobacco ware¬ 
houses. Bath was a meeting place of the colonial 
assembly and played an important part in the ear- 
|ly political, social, and economic life of the Prov¬ 
ince. 


HISTORIC SITES-NEW PROGRAM 

In order to carry out more fully the Depart¬ 
ment of Archives and History’s new historic 
sites program, the position of Historic Site Spe¬ 
cialist has been created. To each of the sites re¬ 
cently acquired a specialist has been or will be 
assigned. He will undertake necessary research, 
develop and restore the site, and interpret the 
site to the public through museum exhibits, public 
lectures, and writings. 

Work is already underway on two of the newly 
acquired sites. Town Creek Indian Mound in 
Montgomery County has been assigned to Wil¬ 
liam W. Wood, Jr., a graduate of Davidson Col¬ 
lege with graduate training at the University of 
Chicago and elsewhere. He was formerly with 
the Department of Conservation and Develop¬ 
ment and has been at Town Creek for about a 
year. Norman C. Larson, a graduate of Wake 
Forest College and a museum curator with the 
Department of Archives and History for the 
past year, has been placed in charge of Alamance 
Battleground in Alamance County. 

HISTORY ON DISPLAY 

The Hall of History, a division of the Depart¬ 
ment of Archives and History, has displays depict¬ 
ing North Carolina life and means of livelihood 
from colonial days to the present time. These dis¬ 
plays are changed and added to from time to time 
and among the new permanent exhibits are the 
following: 

Olds Memorial Room—Wright Brothers’ Flight 
(in diorama) 

Confederate Room—Inflation and Plantation Life 

Transportation and Industry 
Blockade and the Albemarle 
Federal Occupation 
Costumes of the Period 

Reconstruction and After Room—Model Car Ex¬ 
hibit - Automobiles, 1902-1914. 

Temporary displays include Tarheel Legends, 
a series of paintings by Bill Ballard; Display of 
Combat Pictures of North Carolina’s “Old Hickory 
Division,” in European Theater during World 
War II; and a display of North Carolina National 
Guard’s Motto and uniforms of Colonel Jasper 
N. Craig. 








CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume IV September, 1955 Number 3 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 


Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and individuals. 


Grace B. Mahler, Editor 


DONORS TO THE DEPARTMENT 

The names listed below are those who have 
shown their interest in the program of the State 
Department of Archives and History during the 
months of May, June, and July by loaning or 
giving to the Department documents and items 
cf historic interest for preservation and display. 

Archives Division 

Mrs. Kay Dixon, Gastonia 

Miss Rena Harrell, Charlotte 

Mr. David Cox, Hertford 

Mr. R. N. Musgrave, Greensboro 

Mrs. M. G. Mann, Raleigh 

Mrs. A. A. Padgett, Newport News, Va. 

Mrs. Mary Rogers, Raleigh 
Dr. James W. Patton, Chapel Hill 
Mr. John R. Peacock, High Point 
Mr. George Hill, Elizabeth City 
Col. J. F. Stanback, Mt. Gilead 
Mrs. G. Guy Penny, Garner 
Mr. W. E. Hennessee, Salisbury 

Museums Division 

The Governor’s Office, Raleigh 

The News and Observer, Raleigh 

Mr. F. O. Clarkson, Charlotte 

Estate of Mrs. Charles E. Quinlan, Waynesville 

Mrs. Jacob Battle, Rocky Mount 

Mrs. William Leslie, Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Mr. A. C. Kerley, McCain 
Mrs. Lois Kerley Jones, McCain 
Mr. Robert R. Bridgers, Raleigh 
Mrs. Dess M. Gurganus, Raleigh 
Mr. Arnold Joslin, Raleigh 
Industrial Commission, Raleigh 
Mr. Larry Kemp, Raleigh 

U. S. Department of the Interior, Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. John L. Sanders, Charlotte 

Mr. Hugh B. Johnston, Jr., Wilson 

Mr. James F. Peacock, Benson 

Major Rene B. Irby, Jr., Raleigh 

Adjutant General’s Office, Raleigh 

Mr. Fred W. Mahler, Jr., Raleigh 

HISTORICAL TOUR 

The North Carolina Society of County and 
Local Historians is planning a tour of Raleigh, 
September 18, to acquaint its members and the 
public with Raleigh’s historical significance. 

The tour is being arranged by the staff of the 


Department of Archives and History and it will 
begin at 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, September 18. 
The meeting place will be at the west end of the 
Capitol. There will be a picnic lunch (please bring 
your own), at Pullen Park at 1:30, or in case 
of rain, in the Hall of History (Edenton and 
Salisbury streets). 

Among places that will probably be visited are 
the Marshal DeLancey Haywood House, Haywood 
Hall, the Joel Lane House, Andrew Johnson birth¬ 
place, and several of the colleges. For further par¬ 
ticulars please write to Dr. Christopher Critten¬ 
den, Department of Archives and History, Box 
1881, Raleigh, North Carolina. 

SUMMER WORKSHOP 

A workshop was held for the first time this 
summer to acquaint teachers of the elementary 
grades with the methods of teaching social stu¬ 
dies and their application in North Carolina 
schools. 

The workshop was conducted by Appalachian 
State Teachers College at Boone from Tuesday, 
July 5, through Friday, July 15. The initiator 
and director of the program was Dr. D. J. White- 
ner, dean of the College, and the co-ordinator was 
Mrs. Lois H. Floyd, Supervisor of Schools in Lum- 
berton. Dr. Christopher Crittenden, Director of 
the State Department of Archives and History, 
one of the four consultants, reports that the work¬ 
shop was very stimulating and that plans are be¬ 
ing made to continue the program next year. It 
was attended by twenty-seven educators and six 
guest speakers qualified in various phases of so¬ 
cial studies education. 

FOLK SONGS-LORE RECORDED 

Americana, a collection of American folk songs 
and folk lore, has been recorded by station WRAL 
in Raleigh in cooperation with the Department 
of Archives and History. George Hall, Program 
Director of WRAL, assembled the music and pro¬ 
duced the 15 minute programs. The editing and 
narration were done by W. S. Tarlton of this De-' 
partment. 

Seventeen programs have been heard in the Ra¬ 
leigh area Sunday afternoons. The recordings are 
on sixteen-inch discs at thirty-three and a third 
rpms and are available to schools, historical 
groups, and other radio stations that would like to 
play one or more of the series. 

More information on the availability of these re¬ 
cordings may be had by writing to the Hall of 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, North Carolina. 










NEW MEMBERS 


We are very glad to welcome 68 new members 
into the State Literary and Historical Associa¬ 
tion. The following people joined the Association 
during the months of May, June, and July. We 
thank them and the friends who have in many 
cases suggested them for membership for their 
interest and active support. 

Mr. Elwood Everett, Hamilton 

Miss Olive Winstead, Ransomville 

Mrs. P. D. McLean, Ransomville 

Dr. Carlton N. Adams, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. R. W. Barnwell, Burlington 

Dr. Richard L. Burt, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. Margaret B. Evans, Murfreesboro 

Mrs. Susan D. Williams, Rocky Mount 

Mrs. L. T. Penniman, Rocky Mount 

Mr. Ray S. Wilkinson, Rocky Mount 

Mrs. K. L. Greenfield, Kernersville 

Mrs. T. S. Dickens, Jr., Halifax 

Mrs. R. E. Warren, Smackover, Arkansas 

Miss Elizabeth H. Copeland, Greenville 

Mrs. Richard T. Fountain, Rocky Mount 

Mrs. Margaret B. Gouge, Hamptonville 

Mrs. Sallie B. Edwards, Washington 

Miss Rebecca P. Rogers, Durham 

Mrs. Walter G. Rhyne, Gastonia 

Mrs. C. E. Shaw, Halifax 

Mr. H. B. Marrow, Smithfield 

Mrs. Edward Stephen Grady, Smithfield 

Mrs Jacob Battle, Rocky Mount 

Mr. Frank P. Meadows, Rocky Mount 

Mr. W. M. Howard, Jr., Greenville 

Mrs. James R. Hare, Asheville 

Mrs. Ernest W. Leary, Edenton 

Mrs. W. Lloyd Horne, Greensboro 

Mr. Dennis H. Holliday, Enfield 

Dr. James W. Brown, Jr., Kannapolis 

Mr. Denison K. Bullens, Southern Pines 

Mr. Henry Belk, Goldsboro 

Dr. and Mrs. Henry F. Barnes, Cullowhee 

Mr. Jack P. Greene, Durham 

Gen. Pierre Mallett, Asheville 

Mrs. Andrew Jamieson, Oxford 

Mrs. W. B. Davenport, Mackeys 

Mrs. Eugene G. Click, Elkin 

Mr. Charles S. Sullivan, Durham 

Mrs. J. Williamson Brown, Yanceyville 

Mrs. James S. Lewis, Jr., Goldsboro 

Mrs. Ed F. Ward, Smithfield 

Mrs. Richard S. Gorham, Rocky Mount 

Mrs. M. I. Fleming, Rocky Mount 

Charlotte Public Library, Charlotte 

Mrs. C. E. Venters, Bath 

Mr. D. Worth Joyner, Rocky Mount 

Mrs. Douglas T. House, Louisburg 

Mr. Edwin G. Wilson, Wake Forest 

Miss Bessie Gaddy, Wingate 

Mr. E. L. Washburn, Rocky Mount 

Miss C. Virginia Smith, Rocky Mount 

Mrs. W. E. Williams, Texarkana, Ark. 

Mr. S. B. Pearmon, Charlotte 

Mrs. C. E. Wilkins, Goldsboro 

Mr. Herbert R. Paschal, Jr., Washington 


Mrs. George Davis Crow, Chapel Hill 
Dr. John A. Crow, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Mrs. William O. Crotts, Charlotte 
Mrs. A. P. Thorpe, Rocky Mount 
Mrs. Margarette G. Griffin, Rocky Mount 
Miss Laura P. Ervin, Morganton 
Mrs. Lawrence W. Towe, Hertford 
Miss Elizabeth E. Jones, Asheville 
Mrs. Joseph Lee Carlton, Winston-Salem 
Miss Jean Craig, Reidsville 
Mr. D. L. Crowell, Jr., Salisbury 

ALAMANCE BATTLEGROUND-HISTORIC SITE 

Alamance Battleground, a forty-acre tract in 
Alamance County, is the site of the Battle of 
Alamance on May 16, 1771. This site has been 
transferred to the Department of Archives and 
History under the provisions of legislation pass¬ 
ed by the 1955 General Assembly. 

On this battleground was fought a two-hour 
battle between approximately 2,000 back country 
North Carolinians called “Regulators” and about 
1,000 Provincial Militia under the command of 
Governor William Tryon. For seven years or more 
the “Regulators” had become more and more 
restless and discontented with the many legal pro¬ 
cedures and the money-greedy petty officials in 
power, and this short though costly battle was 
the culmination of their years of grievances. The 
“Regulators” lost 200 wounded and 9 killed. The 
Militia suffered 61 wounded and 9 killed and were 
the victors of the day, thus quieting the Regula¬ 
tor movement. 

The site has not been developed. It is now iden¬ 
tifiable only by the familiar marker erected un¬ 
der the historical highway marker program and 
by a monument erected in the late 1800’s. Mark¬ 
ing of the battle lines and positions of the troops 
and a museum containing data pertinent to the 
Regulator movement and to the Battle of Ala¬ 
mance are among the proposed developments. 

BOARD MEMBERS ASSUME OFFICE 

Dr. Fletcher M. Green, president of The State 
Literary and Historical Association, Kenan pro¬ 
fessor, and head of the Department of History at 
the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 
was appointed a member of the Executive Board 
of the State Department of Archives and History 
by Governor Hodges. Dr. Green succeeds Mrs. B. 
T. Williams of Stedman. Along with Mr. Josh L. 
Horne of Rocky Mount, who was reappointed, 
Dr. Green took the oath of office at a meeting of 
the Board, July 30, 1955. Both Dr. Green’s and 
Mr. Horne’s terms of office extend through March. 
1961. 



EARLY AMERICAN SILVER 

Have you ever used a marrow spoon, a dredger, 
a mote spoon? Have you ever looked at the silver 
on your table and wondered where the pattern 
came from? Have you ever thought of that not 
so awfully long ago day when a silver service or 
Hat silver was not bought from open stock, and 
when choosing a silver pattern was a task of hav¬ 
ing your own pattern designed for your own spe¬ 
cial taste? Dr. George Barton Cutten of Chapel 
Hill has written several books on the patterns 
and the silversmiths and their trade, and since 
1945 his collection of early American silver has 
been on display in the Hall of History in Raleigh. 



Barden Photo Collection , Archives & History 


One of the three display cases of the Cutten Silver 
Collection. 

This display contains 154 pieces - silver service, 
tea sets, water pitchers, tankards, mugs, patch 
box, watch chains, ladies back combs, and flat 
silver among other pieces hand-wrought by col¬ 
onial artisans dating back to 1655. With the ex¬ 
ception of about ten pieces where the silver is 
unmarked or the workman unknown, the artisans 
and their dates are listed, 1868 being the latest 
given date. 

Dr. Cutten is a North Carolinian by choice. He 
was born in Amherst, Nova Scotia, attended Ca¬ 
nadian and American universities, and holds no 
less than ten degrees from these schools. He was 
president of Acadia College in Canada for twelve 
years and president of Colgate University in New 
York State from 1922 to 1942. Dr. Cutten was al¬ 
so acting president of Colgate Rochester Divinity 
School, but has now retired to live in Chapel Hill 
where he continues his writing and work on his 
many interests. Dr. Cutten is recognized as one of 


the foremost collectors of early American silver 
and this collection, which is on loan to the State 
Department of Archives and History, is valued at 
$25,000. 

BOOKS ENTERED IN LITERARY CONTESTS 

During the summer months there are ten men 
busy reading the books that have been published 
by North Carolinians during the months between 
September 1, 1954, and August 31, 1955. The 
books that have been turned over to the judges 
at this printing that are eligible for the May¬ 
flower Award for non-fiction, the Sir Walter Ra¬ 
leigh Award for fiction, the A. A. U. W. Juvenile 
Award, or the Roanoke-Chowan Poetry are as 
follows: 

100 Chapel Talks, by Albert Clayton Reid; Learning 
to Have Faith, by John A. Redhead; The Scotswoman, by 
Inglis Fletcher; The Admiral and The Empress, by Lin¬ 
coln Lorenz; The Fun We’ve Had, by Dorothy Fremont 
Grant; The Forbidden City, by Muriel Molland Jernigan; 
Legacy, by Harry B. Stein; Dark Heritage, by John 
Foster; Prairie Town Boy, by Carl Sandburg; Abraham 
Lincoln, by Carl Sandburg; I Play at the Beach, by Doro¬ 
thy Koch; Rebel Mail Runner, by Manly Wade Wellman; 
Moonf lower, by Mebane Holloman Burgwyn; Booker T. 
Washington and the Negro’s Place in American Life, by 
Samuel R. Spencer, Jr.; John Rattling Gourd of Big Cove, 
by Corydon Bell; Prose Poems and Other Trivia, by J. 
Ray Shute; They Called Him Stonewall, by Burke Davis; 
I Remember, by Hersey Everett Spence; Confederate 
Finance, by Richard Cecil Todd; The Moral Foundation 
of Democracy, by John H. Hallowell; Education and Re¬ 
sponsibility, by Tunis Romein; Constructive Liberalism, 
by Milton S. Heath; The Raleigh Register, 1799-1863, by 
Robert Neal Elliott, Jr.; Tarheel Ghosts, by John Harden; 
Rebels and Democrats, by Elisha P. Douglass; Dead and 
Gone, by Manly Wade Wellman; Streams, Lakes, and 
Ponds, by Robert E. Coker; The South in American Lit¬ 
erature, 1607-1900, by Jay B. Hubbell; Man and Christ, 
by Albert Clayton Reid; The Home Place, by Nettie Mc¬ 
Cormick Henley; Snow, by Thelma Harrington Bell and 
Corydon Bell; Sketches of Burke County, by Cordelia 
Camp; Some Pioneer Women Teachers of North Carolina, 
by Cordelia Camp, and Bernice Kelly Harris, Storyteller 
of Eastern Carolina, by Richard Walser. 

There are other volumes that have not been 
received from the publishers at this time, and in¬ 
evitably there are some deserving books that 
have not come to our attention. If you know of 
any books written by authors who have main¬ 
tained legal or physical residence in North Car¬ 
olina for the preceding three years and whose 
books have been published during the prescribed 
year’s limit, we will appreciate your letting us 
know of them. 









Nortn Carolina Library Commission 

yT Raleigh, N. C. 

CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume IV NOVEMBER, 1955 Number 4 


STATE CONTESTS 

Twenty-three additional books have been added 
to the lists of the various literary contests. Per¬ 
haps some works that are eligible have been left 
out, but we have tried through correspondence 
with publishers and through state-wide newspaper 
releases to obtain all those volumes written by 
North Carolinians who meet the residence, subject 
matter, and publishing date requirements. 

The judges for the various awards deserve a 
great deal of credit and thanks for their efforts to 
read and discern the best work in each class. The 
judges for the Mayflower contest for non-fiction 
are Mr. Aycock Brown of Manteo; Mr. David 
Stick of Kill Devil Hills; Dr. Frontis W. Johnston 
and Dr. W. P. Cumming, both of Davidson Col¬ 
lege, and Professor J. Carlyle Sitterson of the 
University of North Carolina. For the Sir Waiter 
Raleigh contest for fiction, the A. A. U. W. contest 
for juvenile literature, and the Roanoke-Chowan 
competition for poetry, the judges include Mr. T. 
J. Lassiter and Mr. E. V. Wilkins, both of Smith- 
field; Dr. Preston W. Edsall and Dr. Lodwick 
Hartley, both of State College; and Professor 
Walter Spearman of the University of North 
Carolina. 

The books added to the list, as of October 15, 
are as follows: Digby the Only Dog, by Ruth and 
Latrobe Carroll; Up To Infinity, by Wilbur S. 
Crowder; My Old Kentucky Home, by W. E. 
Debnam; The French Broad, By Wilma Dyke- 
man ; Just For The Fun of It, by Carl Goerch; 
After Innocence, by Ian Gordon; Run and Find 
the Arrows, by Luther C. Hodges; Nothing Ain’t 
No Good, by E. P. Holmes; But Mine Was Differ¬ 
ent, by Arthur Palmer Hudson; Life Will Begin 
at 100, by Raymond J. Jeffreys; Glimpses of Beau¬ 
ty, by Grace Saunders Kimrey; Mama’s Little 
Rascal, by Edgar Mozingo; Good Morning Miss 
Dove, by Frances Gray Patton; How to Get Along 
With Children, by Frank Howard Richardson; 
Geography of North Carolina, by Bill Sharpe; In 
This the Marian Year, by H. A. Sieber; Drought, 
by Edith Hutchins Smith; Home Folks, by Laura 
E. Stacy; Poltroons and Patriots, by Glenn 
Tucker; Be Firm My Hope, by James R. Walker, 
Sr., Fort Sun Dance, Flag on the Levee, and Gray 
Riders, by Manly Wade Wellman. 



Courtesy Hall of History 


Mrs. William Leslie, formerly Colonel Westray Battle 
Boyce, and her portrait, which was presented to the Hall 
of History on October 18, 1955. 

CEREMONY 

On October 18 a portrait of Colonel Westray 
Battle Boyce, second Director of the WAC (July 
12, 1945-May 5, 1947), was presented to the Hall 
of History. The portrait, painted by Helen Holt 
Hawley, well known artist, was presented by 
Colonel Boyce’s mother, Mrs. H. H. MacKay, 
formerly of Rocky Mount. 

Those attending the presentation included Mrs. 
William Leslie (Colonel Westray Battle Boyce), 
Colonel Boyce’s mother, Mrs. H. H. MacKay, Mrs. 
Jacob Battle of Rocky Mount, who is Colonel 
Boyce’s grandmother, Colonel John Foreman of 
the North Carolina Adjutant General’s Office, Sec¬ 
retary of State Thad Eure, Dr. Christopher Crit¬ 
tenden and Mrs. Joye E. Jordan of the Depart¬ 
ment of Archives and History. 

The portrait and a display of eight medals 
awarded Colonel Boyce will be kept in the Hall 
of History’s portrait gallery with the portraits of 
other dedicated and distinguished North Carolin¬ 
ians. 












CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Volume IV November, 1955 Number 4 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 


Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals. 

Grace B. Mahler, Editor 


MEMBERSHIP 

There has been quite a lot said about member¬ 
ship lately—how the Association has gained in 
memberships from 438 in 1950 to 1,200 and more 
in 1955. We are happy about this gain, for your 
State Literary and Historical Association is sup¬ 
ported mainly by the dues of its membership. 

Let us consider, however, members as well as 
memberships. Webster’s Dictionary defines a 
member as “a part of,” a working part of a whole. 
In this day of service and joining, most of our 
membership is made up of you who are a part of 
many other worthwhile organizations. The State 
Literary and Historical Association would also 
like you to be “a part of” it. 

The meetings this past year have been well 
planned and the speakers and tour arrangements 
have been excellent. We hope more of you will 
come to these meeting in the future and be a part 
of them. 

We have had no organized membership cam¬ 
paign this past year. Letters go out to the names 
we receive from you. We would like a great many 
more names of prospective members, friends you 
believe would take an active and interested part 
in our program. A large membership is not our 
prime concern, active members are. 

During the year we lose around 250 of our 
memberships—most of them in the spring and 
summer quarters, many of them persons who 
joined at the regional meetings of the season be¬ 
fore. 

We do not want the State Literary and Histori¬ 
cal Association to become just another organiza¬ 
tion to you. There is a definite need in both the 
historical and literary fields for the Association, 
and with the proposed expanded program we 
know that it can be one of the most worthwhile 
groups in the state. 

We need support. We need members. We need 
you. 


NEW MEMBERS 

We are very glad to welcome 31 new members 
into the State Literary and Historical Association. 
The following people joined during the months of 
August, September, and October. We thank them 
and the friends who have in many cases suggested 
them for membership. 

Miss Margaret Alston, Henderson 

Mrs. Jeanie G. Austin, Henderson 

Miss Anne Batten, Charlotte 

Mr. J. G. Crihfield, Greensboro 

Mrs. J. G. Crihfield, Greensboro 

Brigadier General James C. Cooper, Henderson 

Mrs. James C. Cooper, Henderson 

Mr. Albert Devane, Lake Placid, Florida 

Mr. B. B. Dougherty, Boone 

Judge Allen H. Gwyn, Reidsville 

Mrs. Harvey M. Heywood, Asheville 

Mrs. C. C. Hines, Winston-Salem 

Mr. Edgar W. Hirshberg, Greenville 

Mrs. T. G. Horner, Henderson 

Miss Grace Saunders Kimrey, Ramseur 

Mr. I. M. Little, Jr., Robersonville 

Reverend E. Donald McMahan, Fayetteville 

Mrs. E. Donald McMahan, Fayetteville 

Mr. Dalton M. Parker, Sunbury 

Mrs. Dalton M. Parker, Sunbury 

Mrs. R. Hunt Parker, Roanoke Rapids 

Mr. W. Carey Parker, Raleigh 

Mr. A. Huntington Patch, Asheville 

Mrs. C. W. Pegram, Apex 

Mrs. M. W. Peterson, Charlotte 

Mr. Glenn Robertson, Mount Airy 

Mrs. Robert Sheridan, Rocky Mount 

Mrs. C. A. Street, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. S. S. Toler, Jr., Rocky Mount 

Mrs. F. L. Weiland, Nashville, Tennessee 

Mrs. A. H. Zealy, Jr., Goldsboro 

DONORS 

The names listed below are those who have 
shown their interest in the program of the State 
Department of Archives and History during the 
months of August, September, and early October, 
by loaning or giving to the Department documents 
and items of historic interest for preservation 
and display. 

Archives Division 

Mr. J. B. Blaylock, Yanceyville 

Mr. W. E. Church, Winston-Salem 

Commercial National Bank, Charlotte 

Mrs. Kay Dixon, Gastonia 

Mrs. Ingiis Fletcher, Edenton 

Mr. Clarence W. Griffin, Forest City 

Miss Rena Harrell, Charlotte 

Mr. W. E. Hennessee, Salisbury 

Miss Clara Laney, Monroe 

Mrs. Memory Lester, Chapel Hill 

Mr. William B. Little, Fayetteville 

Mr. R. N. Musgrave, Jr., Greensboro 

Dr. James W. Patton, Chapel Hill 

Mrs. J. Guy Penny, Garner 

Mr. Carl W. Simmons, Rockland, Maine 

Mrs. S. W. Sparger, Durham 

Colonel J. F. Stanback, Mt. Gilead 

Mr. Charles W. Stanford. Chapel Hill 

Stewart Clan Magazine. Olathe, Kansas 

Museums Division 

Mrs. D. T. Dickie, Henderson 

Dr. Christopher Crittenden, Raleigh 

Mr. Bobby Gurkin, Raleigh 

Miss Mabel Leigh Hunt, Indianapolis, Indiana 

Mr. Bob Ruiz, Raleigh 










LOCAL HISTORICAL SOCIETIES 

During the past few months, Mr. D. L. Corbitt, 
chairman of the Association’s committee on or¬ 
ganizing local historical societies, has been ac¬ 
quiring information on the county and local his¬ 
torical societies and associations. He has heard 
from thirty-five such groups, composed of a total 
membership of 2,075. 

The largest of the county societies, that of 
Wayne County, has a membership of 326 with 
the Mecklenburg Historical Association running 
second with 240. 

The Randolph County Historical Association 
is the oldest, formed on November 3, 1911, and 
now numbering 25 members. The Johnston County 
Historical Society is the most recently organized 
with a membership of 78. 

A list of the local organizations follows with 
the name of the secretary or member to whom 
you may address your correspondence. If your 
group is omitted, Mr. D. L. Corbitt, Box 1881, 
Raleigh, N.C., will appreciate receiving informa¬ 
tion including a list of officers, date of formation, 
current membership, and objectives. 

Ashe Historical Society, Inc., Mr. Wade Eller, 
Warrensville; Beaufort County Historical Society, 
Dr. Allen H. Moore, Washington; Bertie County 
Historical Association, Mr. Thomas F. Norfleet, 
Jr., Roxobel; Caldwell County Historical Associa¬ 
tion, Mrs. W. E. Alexander, Lenoir; Camden 
County Historical Society, Mr. J. F. Pugh, Old 
Trap; Carteret County Historical Society, Miss 
Amy Muse, Beaufort; Catawba County Historical 
Association, Mrs. Pearl Tomlinson, Hickory; 
Cherokee County Historical Society, Mrs. Lonzo 
Shields, Murphy; Columbus County Historical 
Society, Miss Alice Lowe, Chadbourn; Currituck 
County Historical Society, Mrs. Alma 0. Roberts, 
Moyock; Gates County Historical Society, Mr. S. 
P. Cross, Gatesville; Hertford County Historical 
Association, Mrs. W. D. Boone, Winton; Johnston 
County Historical Society, Mrs. W. B. Beasley, 
Smithfield; Macon County Historical Society, in¬ 
active; McDowell County Historical Association, 
Mrs. J. F. Ragaz, Marion; Mecklenburg Historical 
Association, Mrs. Georgie S. Grey, 1607 Dilworth 
Road West, Charlotte; Mitchell County Historical 
Society, Mrs. A. E. Gouge, Bakersville; New Bern 
Historical Society, Miss Rose Carraway, 207 
Broad Street, New Bern; New Hanover Historical 
Commission, Mr. Louis T. Moore, Wilmington; 
Onslow County Historical Society, Mr. H. L. 
Barbee, Jacksonville; Pasquotank Historical So¬ 
ciety, Mr. F. P. Markham, III, 100 Locust Street, 


Elizabeth City; Pender County Historical Asso¬ 
ciation, Mrs. Robert Grady Johnson, Burgaw; 
Pitt County Historical Society, Miss Tabitha M. 
DeVisconti, Farmville; Randolph County Histori¬ 
cal Association, Mrs. Hal W. Worth, Asheboro; 
Robeson County Historical Society, Mrs. G. T. 
Bullock, Red Springs; Rockingham County His¬ 
torical Association, Mr. Lawrence E. Watt, Reids- 
ville; Stanly County Historical Society, Mrs. K. 
L. Young, Norwood; Tyrrell County Historical 
Association, Mr. Glenn Woodley, Columbia; War¬ 
ren County Historical Society, Miss Maria Boyd, 
Warrenton; Washington County Historical Socie¬ 
ty, Miss Matilda Alexander, Creswell; Wayne 
County Historical Society, Mrs. N. A. Edwards, 
P. O. Box 385, Goldsboro; Wilkes County Histori¬ 
cal Society, Miss Thelma Laws, Moravian Falls. 

HIGHWAY MARKERS 

On Sunday, August 14, at the annual home¬ 
coming of Bethel Presbyterian Church near Rae- 
ford, Hoke County, a historical highway marker 
was unveiled pointing out the site of the encamp¬ 
ment of General W. T. Sherman and a part of 
his army there in March, 1865. 

On Saturday, September 17, a marker was un¬ 
veiled on US 29 near Charlotte pointing out the 
birthplace of James W. Cannon, founder of Can¬ 
non Mills and the town of Kannapolis. Eugene T. 
Bost of Concord was the speaker. Mr. W. S. 
Tarlton represented the Department at both of 
the unveilings. 

ANNUAL MEETING 

Plans for the annual meeting in Raleigh on 
Friday, December 2, are taking form and a letter 
with the final program will be sent to the Asso¬ 
ciation’s members some two weeks before hand. 

At the present time our list of speakers is as 
follows: Bruce Catton of New York, editor of 
American Heritage, who will discuss some fea¬ 
tures of the Civil War; David Stick, author of 
Kill Devil Hills, who will review the Mayflower 
books; Walter Spearman of the School of Journa¬ 
lism at the University of North Carolina, who 
will review the Sir Walter competition entries; 
Clarence Griffin of Forest City, editor, and presi¬ 
dent of the Western North Carolina Historical 
Association. 

There will be other well-known speakers on 
the program and this year’s meeting promises to 
be the most interesting and informative of any 
in the Association’s history. We hope you will 
make plans to attend. 


THOMAS WOLFE AWARD 


Current North Carolina literature is receiving 
more and more recognition. The Mayflower Cup 
has been given for the best literary work by North 
Carolinians since 1931, the Sir Walter Raleigh 
Cup since 1952, and the A. A. U. W., Roanoke- 
Chowan, and R. D. W. Connor awards since 1953. 

This year a new award is being made—the 
Thomas Wolfe Memorial Award—presented on 
behalf of the Western North Carolina Historical 
Association and the Thomas Wolfe Memorial As¬ 
sociation to the outstanding author of Western 
North Carolina for 1955. 

Mr. Thomas Pearson of Asheville, Miss Annie 
Westall of Asheville, and Dr. David R. Hodgin 
of Boone make up the Board of Award. The 
Award is to be given annually at the October 
meeting of the Western North Carolina Historical 
Association in commemoration of the birth-month 
of Thomas Wolfe. 

MERIT AWARDS 

Awards of Merit for 1955 were made at the 
annual meeting of the American Association for 
State and Local History in Williamsburg on Sep¬ 
tember 26. Dr. Louis C. Jones, Director of the 
New York Historical Association, Cooperstown, 
New York, was chairman of the Awards Com¬ 
mittee. The Home Place, by Nettie McCormick 
Henley of Laurinburg, won an award for popular 
history. The Roanoke Island Historical Associa¬ 
tion, with headquarters at Manteo, received an 
award in the category of regional, county, and 
local historical societies. 


COUNTY AND LOCAL AWARDS 

Mr. William S. Powell, president of the North 
Carolina Society of County and Local Historians, 
has announced that that Society will present The 
Smithwick Cup for the best book on county and 
local history at their annual meeting in December. 

This award was first presented in 1953 by Dr. 
D. T. Smithwick. This year the cup is donated by 
Mr. and Mrs. S. T. Peace of Henderson. The 
award is presented semi-annually. Eight books 
have been submitted at this time. 

The North Carolina Society of County and 
Local Historians plans also to present certificates 
to the newspapers which have contributed the 
best in historical feature writing and publication 
of state history. For this competition the state 
is divided into nine zones and one newspaper 
from each zone will be selected. 

ROBERT D. W. CONNOR AWARD 

The R. D. W. Connor Award will be presented 
at the Association’s annual meeting on behalf of 
the Historical Society of North Carolina. The 
award is made to the author of an article, publish¬ 
ed in the North Carolina Historical Review in the 
preceding four issues ending with that of July, 
in the field of North Carolina history or biography. 

The award is made in honor of Robert D. W. 
Connor, educator, author, and historian. He serv¬ 
ed as the first secretary of the Historical Com¬ 
mission, was the first Archivist of the United 
States, was the first Burton Craig Professor at 
the University of North Carolina, and was writ¬ 
ing a documentary history of the University when 
he died February 25, 1950. 


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North Carolina Library Commission 
Ralcis’v N. C. 




CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume IV 


January, 1956 


Number 5 


STUDENTS STUDY 



Old-Fashioned Christmas Tree, in tiie Hall of History 


GREETINGS FOR THE HOLIDAY SEASON 

As the old year draws to a close and we enter 
the new year, we pause to take stock of what we 
have accomplished in the past and of what we 
hope to do in the future. From the beginning the 
State Department of Archives and History and 
the State Literary and Historical Association 
have worked very closely together. When one has 
gone forward, so has the other - and the problems 
of one have been those of the other. As wise old 
Benjamin Franklin once said, we must all hang 
together or we will all hang separately. 

Within the past few years both the Department 
and the Association have progressed in many 
ways, have come to render broader and more ef¬ 
fective services to the people of our State. We 
have come a long way. But when we begin to 
analyze, to think of all that we could do, we 
realize that as yet we have only scratched the 
surface. There are almost limitless possibilities 
in the field and we hope to take advantage of 
many of these during the coming year. 

At this holiday season, we bring you greetings 
and best wishes from the staffs of the Depart¬ 
ment and of the Association. We look forward to 
working with you in the future as we have done 
in the past. Christopher Crittenden 


The State Department of Archives and History 
in cooperation with the Department of History of 
Meredith College trains seniors who are majoring 
in history at the college, in archival, museum, and 
publication work. The girls attend their classes in 
the Education Building twice a week throughout 
the semester, take part in the work that is being 
performed, and study methods or procedures in 
archives, publishing, and museum fields. Mrs. 
Julia C. Meconnahey instructs them in archival 
works, Mrs. Joye E. Jordan in the museum field, 
and Mr. D. L. Corbitt in historical publishing. 

The Meredith seniors who are now completing 
this course are Catharine Atkins of Albemarle, 
Mary Ann Braswell of Rocky Mount, Angela 
Griffith of Raleigh, Ruth Haines of Parkton, Mrs. 
Peggy Ennis Hatcher of Morrisville, Mildred 
Rebecca Knight of Raleigh, Lois Pond of Lynch¬ 
burg, Virginia, Barbara Sellers of Cherryville, 
Dorothy Elizabeth Smith of Raleigh, Peggy Jo 
Williams of Black Mountain, and Mrs. Shirley 
White Byrum of Raleigh. 

NEW MEMBERS 

We are very glad to welcome 35 new members 
into the State Literary and Historical Association. 
A good many of them are authors and as such will 
help us expand our service in the literary field 
this coming year. We are looking to all our new 
members to help us make their membership in the 
Association worth while. New members who join¬ 
ed in November and December are listed below: 

Miss Stella W. Anderson, West Jefferson 

Mr. Clifton Beckwith, Raleigh 

Dr. Hubert A. Coleman, Greenville 

Mr. Jessie F. DeShong, Shelby 

Mr. Judson R. Dicks, Raleigh 

Dr. Elisha P. Douglass, Chapel Hill 

Dr. Preston W. Edsall, Raleigh 

Mr. and Mrs. William B. Harrison, Rocky Mount 

Mr. Milton S. Heath, Chapel Hill 

Mrs. Samuel H. Hobbs, Sr., Raleigh 

Mr. Luther C. Hodges, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. Donald Holliday, Enfield 

Mr. C. S. Jones, Jr., Raleigh 

Mrs. William Leslie, Scarsdale, New York 

Mrs. H. H. MacKay, Poolesville, Maryland 

Mr. William A. Mahler, Jr., Raleigh 

Mr. William M. Mann, Jr., Enfield 

Mr. and Mrs. Kennon W. Parham, Raleigh 

Miss Margaret Pruden, Edenton 

Dr. A. C. Reid, Wake Forest 

Mr. J. Ray Shute, Monroe 

Dr. Hersey Everett Spence, Durham 

Dr. Samuel R. Spencer, Jr., Davidson 

Mr. and Mrs. Lionel Stevenson, Durham 

Mr. Glenn I. Tucker, Flat Rock 

Mr. Manly Wade Wellman, Chapel Hill 

Mr. E. V. Wilkins, Smithfield 

Mr. James Wood, Edenton 









CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Volume IV January, 1956 Number 5 


Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 

Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals 

Grace B. Mahler, Editor 


CUTTEN SILVER 

Dr. George Barton Cutten and Mrs. Inglis 
Fletcher spoke to the Association at the evening 
session on December 2. Mrs. Fletcher gave a brief 
statement regarding the Cutten collection of sil¬ 
ver, which for ten years has been on display in the 
Hall of History where it has been seen by approxi¬ 
mately 1,000,000 people. Dr. Cutten explained 
more fully the background and significance of the 
collection. He has offered to sell it to the state for 
a price less than its true worth and the Associa¬ 
tion has taken it upon itself, with Mrs. Inglis 
Fletcher as chairman of the project, to raise the 
necessary $15,000. Letters went out to the general 
membership on December 6, and to other friends 
of the Association on December 7. When this 
issue of Carolina Comments went to press we had 
already heard from contributors to the fund, and 
their names are listed below. 

Miss Susan Grey Akers, Chapel Hill 

Mrs. Robert W. Barnwell, Burlington 

Battle, Winslow, and Merrell, Rocky Mount 

Mrs. E. B. Borden, III, Goldsboro 

Mrs. Mebane H. Burgwyn, Woodland 

Miss Nan G. Clark, Tarboro 

Mrs. Reba Davis Clevenger, Raleigh 

Mrs. Sara Borden Cobb, Goldsboro 

Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Combs, Raleigh 

Mrs. Lyman A. Cotten, Chapel Hill 

Mrs. Paul Price Davis, Yadkinville 

Mr. Charles E. Echerd, Taylorsville 

Mrs. H. G. Etheridge, Asheville 

Mrs. Inglis Fletcher, Edenton 

Mrs. Nancy M. Froelich, Jackson 

Mr. F. L. Fry, Greensboro 

Miss Mildred J. Gifford, Hickory 

Mr. James A. Gray, Jr., Winston-Salem 

Mrs. Bernice Kelly Harris, Seaboard 

Dr. J. E. Hodges, Maiden 

Mr. Josh L. Horne, Rocky Mount 

Mr. A. J. Hutchins, Canton 

Mr. E. Bain Johnson, Thomasville 

Mr. Hugh B. Johnston, Jr., Wilson 

Mrs. Ida B. Kellam, Wilmington 

Mrs. George W. Knott, Kinston 

Mr. McDaniel Lewis, Greensboro 

Dr. James W. Moffitt, High Point 

The National Bank of Lumberton, Lumberton 

Mr. Joe R. Nixon, Lincolnton 

Mrs. M. G. Norfleet, Jackson 

Mrs. Penelope Davis Plummer, Raleigh 

Mr. L. B. Pope, Kernersville 

Miss Julia J. Robertson, Charlotte 

Miss Sara Louise Stewart, New Bern 

Miss Mabel A. Townsend, McDonald 

Dr. G. A. Tripp, Buies Creek 

Professor Richard Walser, Raleigh 

Mrs. Mary Etta Walters, Hertford 

Brig. Gen. J. E. Wood, Elizabeth City 

Mrs. I. J. Young, Henderson 


OFFICERS 

At the annual meeting of the State Literary 
and Historical Association, the following officers 
for the coming year were elected: 

President—A distinguished attorney who has 
played a leading role in promoting interest in 
history in the Chowan section of the state, who 
is an active and loyal member of the Association, 
who helped establish the Roanoke-Chowan Award 
for Poetry, and who has been of great service to 
the people of the state in the fields of banking and 
law, Mr. Gilbert T. Stephenson of Pendleton. 

Vice President—A lady who has been active in 
the work of the Association and who is currently 
President of the Sampson County Historical So¬ 
ciety and publisher of the Sampson County Year¬ 
book, Mrs. Taft Bass of Clinton. 

Vice President—A man who has had a long and 
distinguished career in the historical profession, 
having received his doctorate in history at the 
University of North Carolina, who has taught at 
several colleges, and who is now head of the De¬ 
partment of History at Greensboro College and 
Secretary-Treasurer of the Historical Society of 
North Carolina, Dr. Marvin L. Skaggs of Greens¬ 
boro. 

Vice President—A man whose interest in North 
Carolina and its history is evidenced by the fact 
that he is a North Carolinian “by choice,” by his 
very capable leadership in the Historic Halifax 
Restoration Association, and by his active par¬ 
ticipation in civic affairs, Mr. Ray S. Wilkinson 
of Rocky Mount. 

Member of the Executive Committee (1956- 
1958)—A man who is a leader in the legal field, 
a former candidate for Governor, and prominent 
in cultural and civic activities, Mr. R. Mayne 
Albright of Raleigh. 

Member of the Executive Committee (1956- 
1958)—A man who is noted for his interest in 
philanthropic and educational institutions, indus¬ 
try and history, who has had a distinguished 
record in both world wars, and who now serves 
the state in the House of Representatives, Con¬ 
gressman Thurmond Chatham of Elkin. 

Secretary-Treasurer—Still a new officer after 
twenty years as Secretary-Treasurer of the Asso¬ 
ciation, active in historical organizations on both 
state and national levels; Director of the State 
Department of Archives and History and our 
strongest believer in the interest and pride of all 
North Carolina’s citizens in their historical heri¬ 
tage, Dr. Christopher Crittenden of Raleigh. 




DUES 

As you know, the work of the Association is 
supported by dues received from its membership. 
Part of the dues goes towards the printing of 
The Review and Carolina Comments, for postage, 
and for materials; part becomes the salary of the 
Association’s employee; part is held aside to bear 
the expenses of the annual meeting and the vari¬ 
ous projects that are carried out during the year 
such as the literary contests—the cost and time 
spent in assembling and forwarding the books. 

An amendment dealing with the dues and classi¬ 
fications of membership was discussed and passed 
by the membership at the Association’s annual 
meeting on December 2. Each member had been 
sent a copy of this proposed amendment prior to 
the meeting, but it is herein reviewed. 

“Classifications of membership in the Associa¬ 
tion, and the dues for each, shall be as follows: 


Student . 

. ..$ 2.00 


Affiliate 

(with other societies) . . 

4.00 


Annual . 

5.00 


Sustaining . 

. . 25.00 


Life . 

. . . 100.00 


Corporate 

Firms with less than 

100 employees . 

. . 50.00 

minimum 

Firms with between 100 and 


500 employees . 

. . 100.00 

minimum 

Firms with over 

500 employees . 

. . 200.00 

minimum 

Honorary . 




Student members, of whom we hope to ob¬ 
tain many, will receive The Review and Carolina 
Comments. 

Affiliate memberships will be dues in addition 
to the dues paid to the allied society. That is, if 
the dues of the allied society are $2.00, joint mem¬ 
bership with full privileges in both groups would 
be $6.00. 

Annual members will continue to receive The 
Revieiv, Carolina Comments, notification of all 
meetings and projects, and voting privileges. 
Joint membership of two members of the same 
immediate family at the same address, will be 
$8.00, with $2.00 for each additional member. 

Sustaining membership is for anyone who feels 
that he would like to contribute more to the ex¬ 
panded program of the Association. It is an an¬ 
nual membership with full privileges. All such 
memberships will be duly noted in Carolina Com¬ 
ments and in the annual printed program. 

A life membership will entitle the member to 
full privileges in the membership of the Associa¬ 
tion for life. 


Corporate memberships will be annual member¬ 
ships based on the number of employees of the 
firm and will be given due recognition for the con¬ 
tributions made to the state and its heritage by 
such organizations. 

Honorary memberships will be given to those 
whose guidance and assistance to the Associa¬ 
tion are deemed worthy of signal recognition. 
It is planned that at no time will there be more 
than ten such members. Honorary members will 
have the full privileges of membership. 

The first bills with the new fees will go out for 
those whose memberships come due after mailing 
the January, 1956, issue of The North Carolina 
Historical Review. 

PUBLICATIONS 

By action of the Executive Board of the State 
Department of Archives and History, it has been 
deemed advisable to charge $3.00 per volume for 
our documentary volumes effective January 1, 
1956. Also a subscription for The North Carolina 
Historical Revieiv will be $3.00 per year or $.75 
per copy. 

An announcement will be made in the near 
future concerning the distribution of the Depart¬ 
ment’s pamphlets. 

The action of our Executive Board was neces¬ 
sary because of the advance in cost of paper 
stock and printing. This is the first time in the 
history of The Review that an increase in price 
has been made. 

DONORS 

The names listed below are those who have 
shown their interest in the program of the State 
Department of Archives and History during No¬ 
vember and December, by loaning or giving to the 
Department documents and items of historical 
interest for preservation and display. 

Archives Division 
Mrs. J. S. Atkinson, Elkin 
Honorable R. Gregg Cherry, Gastonia 
Mrs. Christopher Crittenden, Raleigh 

Daughters of the American Revolution in North Carolina 
Professor Chalmers G. Davidson, Davidson 
Mrs. Sterling M. Gary, Halifax 

Germantown Historical Society, Philadelphia, Pennsyl¬ 
vania 

Mrs. Howard S. Giere, Hammond, Louisiana 

Miss Rena C. Harrell, Charlotte 

The Lakeside Press, Chicago, Illinois 

Mr. McDaniel Lewis, Greensboro 

Mrs. R. Hunt Parker, Raleigh 

Mr. Edwin W. Pou, Raleigh 

Miss Betsey Lane Quinlan, Waynesville 

Mrs. Mary J. Rogers, Neuse 

Mrs. George Seaborn, Portsmouth, Va. 

State Library, Raleigh 
Mrs. Lelia Welch, Waynesville 
Miss Hattie Lou Whitfield, Kinston 
Miss Mary C. Wiley, Winston-Salem 
Mrs. Julien Wood, Edenton 











SPRING MEETING 

The executive committee of the State Literary 
and Historical Association will meet in January 
to discuss plans for the coming year. One item 
which will be brought up will be the location of 
the 1956 spring regional meeting. As you know, 
this meeting is traditionally held in the eastern 
section of the state, while the summer meeting is 
held in the western part. Anyone wishing to spon¬ 
sor such a meeting should get in touch with Dr. 
Christopher Crittenden, Box 1881, Raleigh. 

HISTORY ON DISPLAY 

There are some new permanent displays in the 
Hall of History, a division of the Department of 
Archives and History, Mrs. Joye E. Jordan, 
Museum Administrator, and Mrs. Howard B. 
Farley, Jr., Exhibits Curator, have announced. 
The displays include: 

Olds Memorial Gallery —Diorama of stage 
coach travel with model stage and figures mak¬ 
ing a stop at the Black Swan Inn. 

Diorama of covered wagon of the type used 
widely by North Carolina farmers and pioneers. 
Confederate Room —Steps To Secession (includ¬ 
ing debates, letter from Lincoln, and Governor 
Ellis’ reply). 

Recruiting and Equipping An Army (displays 
of guns and rifles, sword and scabbard, a dag- 
guerreotype and rosette from one of the first 
North Carolina units). 

Reconstruction Room —A life-size street scene 
of the nineties with old brick sidewalk, store 
windows of “Cameron’s Corner” and “Caro¬ 
lina Fashions” filled with gifts and apparel of 
the time. 


HOUSE IN THE HORSESHOE 

The Department of Archives and History has 
just acquired by purchase the “House in the 
Horseshoe” on Deep River in upper Moore County. 
The property is being restored and administered 
by the Moore County Historical Association under 
contract with the Department. The Moore County 
group has been interested in the project for 
several years and has already largely restored the 
exterior. Individuals and D.A.R. Chapters in the 
area are now undertaking to restore the interior. 

The house dates from about 1760 and is a good 
example of domestic architecture of the middle 
18th century period. The “great room,” or living 
room, features very fine carved woodwork, said 
to have been executed by a French carver. The 
site, in a sweeping horseshoe bend of the river, 
commands an impressive view. 

During the Revolution the Alston House was 
the scene of a brisk engagement between a group 
of whigs under Philip Alston, owner of the place, 
and a band of tories under the notorious David 
Fanning. The walls of the house today show battle 
scars from the fight which took place on a sum¬ 
mer’s day in 1781. 

Later the house was the home of Benjamin 
Williams, Revolutionary officer and four times 
Governor of North Carolina. Governor Williams 
died there is 1814. 

The property will be developed, restored, and 
furnished to the period of the Revolution. Appro¬ 
priate exhibits will also be installed to tell the 
story of the Revolutionary engagement that took 
place there. 



NORTH CAROLINA LIBRARY COMMISSION 


RALEIGH, N. C 






North Carolina Library Commission 

// XV C Raleigh, N. C & ' 

^JC^ 

CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume IV March, 1956 Number 6 



Courtesy Hall of History 


Interior Scene of Huntley Kitchen 

MEMORIAL GIFT 

The “separate kitchen” of many old North 
Carolina homes has come a long way. The case 
in point is the kitchen given to the Department 
cf Archives and History by Mr. Haywood B. 
Huntley, Mr. Leslie J. Huntley, and Mr. Fulton 
A. Huntley as a memorial to their mother, Mrs. 
Mary Allen Huntley of Wadesboro. This kitchen 
arrived in Raleigh on February 7, from Wades¬ 
boro, and has been placed in a lot on North Salis¬ 
bury Street across from the Hall of History. It 
is open to the public. 

The kitchen itself is white frame with a stone 
chimney. The interior measures 15 by 18 feet 
and contains many antiques such as a churn, 
iron kettles, old cutlery, china, bottles, and pitch- 
jers, along with waffle irons, popcorn poppers, and 
water dippers. Larger items include a table and 
chairs and an old fashioned “safe.” Walnut 
frames on the walls hold a picture of the “death 
of Jackson,” a picture of the casket of Lee, a 
sampler, and a cover from The Progressive Farm- 
jer. 

With the kindness of the Huntley family, and 
the aid of the North Carolina State Highway 
Patrol, the North Carolina Department of Public 
Buildings and Grounds, and the City of Raleigh, 
the Department has obtained another exhibit of 
the North Carolina life of yesterday. 


DEPARTMENT NOTES 

The Department of Archives and History has 
been busy on many fronts of late—not least of 
which is the constant attempt to preserve some 
of the State’s historic buildings, two of which are 
noted below. 

Early in February, the Department was noti¬ 
fied of the Army’s plan to tear down the officers’ 
quarters at historic Fort Johnston on N. C. High¬ 
way 130 in Southport, Brunswick County. The 
historical importance of this site is briefly this: 
As protection against Spanish pirates, the Assem¬ 
bly authorized construction of Fort Johnston. 
The fort was completed in 1764 and named for 
Governor Gabriel Johnston. At the end of May, 
1775, Royal Governor Josiah Martin was forced 
to flee from the palace in New Bern by Whig 
demonstrations. He sought refuge at Fort John¬ 
ston, where he arrived June 2, 1775. John Ashe 
led troops from lower Cape Fear to Brunswick. 
Martin escaped aboard a British ship and Whigs 
burned the fort on July 19, 1775. In 1794, the 
State ceded the fort to the Federal Government. 
It was rebuilt, 1794-1809. It was seized by Con¬ 
federates in 1861. In recent years it has been 
used by dredge crews and survey parties. 

Also in February, the Department became in¬ 
terested in the 140-year-old Calvin Jones home 
in Wake Forest. This house is the oldest in Wake 
Forest, the college has grown up around it, and 
it has been the home of earlier Wake Forest pres¬ 
idents, as well as a familiar landmark. General 
Jones sold the present structure to the State Bap¬ 
tist Convention in 1832. The Southeastern Bap¬ 
tist Seminary now plans to put a cafeteria where 
the Jones house stands and unless someone moves 
the house away, plans to have it torn down. 

Dr. Crittenden was a panel member at the Con¬ 
ference on the Writing of Regional History in 
the South on February 15, in Miami, Florida. The 
conference was sponsored by the University of 
Miami, the Historical Association of Southern 
Florida, and the American Jewish Historical Cen¬ 
ter of the Jewish Theological Seminary of Ameri¬ 
ca. Dr. L. Quincy Mumford, Librarian of Congress, 
was also on the program, speaking on “Sources 
of Regional History in the South.” 














CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Volume IV March, 1956 Number 6 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 


Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals 

Grace B. Mahler, Editor 


REGIONAL MEETING 

This year’s spring regional meeting will be held 
at Nags Head, May 18-19. Headquarters will be 
at The Carolinian and reservations may be made 
direct to the hotel. Room (including meals) will 
be $9.00 for each person (double, twin beds), 
$10.00 (single). The Roanoke Island Historical 
Association is the sponsoring group and plans 
are already underway for a bang-up meeting. 
Dare County will be highlighted in talks and dis¬ 
cussions, and activities will include a beach picnic. 
Make plans now to attend and bring your family 
and friends. The program will be included in the 
May issue of Carolina Comments. 

THE BLOCK HOUSE 

Horse racing might not seem worthy of his¬ 
torical note but The Block House Steeplechase, to 
be held April 14, at Tryon, is unique in many ways. 

The race course takes its name from the site of 
“The Block House” which stood for over 150 
years before it was removed and rebuilt as the 
home of Mr. A. D. Plamondon, Jr., in 1944. It 
was constructed in the 1760’s as a fortification in 
wars between the Indians and English, and mark¬ 
ed the terminal point of the 1772 boundary sur¬ 
vey between North Carolina and South Carolina. 
A historical marker close by on US 176 was erect¬ 
ed in 1952 and reads: “THE BLOCK HOUSE. 
Early landmark, western terminus of the 1772 
boundary survey between North and South Caro¬ 
lina. Stood 1/2 mile east.” 

Not only does the steeplechase run over a course 
rich in fact and legend of the Indians, the English, 
and boundary disputes between the two states, 
but it runs its two miles in three counties—Polk 
County, North Carolina, and Greenville and 
Spartanburg counties, South Carolina. 

Items of historical interest or plans for pilgri¬ 
mages or meetings with historical significance 
and background are gratefully received by your 
editor. Please let us know of the activities of your 
local historical society as well. 


MORAVIAN EASTER SERVICE 

6:00 A.M. Easter Salutation and Response:— 
Minister: The Lord Is Risen! 
Congregation: The Lord Is Risen Indeed! 
Hymn of Salutation: “Hail, All Hail, Victorious 
Lord and Saviour! 

Thou has burst the bonds of death.” 
The Easter Morning Litany: The Christian Con¬ 
fession of Faith 

(First Portion) 

6 :14 A.M. Procession from Church to God’s Acre 
Church Bands playing chorales antiphonally 

(The Congregation will go in reverent procession to 
God’s Acre where sleep the bodies of so many of our 
Beloved dead. The Service is not being discontinued 
at this point. The passing from the Church to the 
Graveyard is a solemn part of the entire period of 
worship. Over six hundred ushers have been placed at 
various points between Salem Square and God’s Acre 
to be of assistance to you.) 

6:35 A.M. Chorales by United Bands on God’s 
Acre while congregation assembles 
6:45 A.M. The Easter Morning Litany 
(Second Portion) 

Hymn of Thanksgiving: “I Give Thee Thanks 
Unfeigned, O Jesus, Friend in Need” 
Benediction. 

Postlude Chorales by United Bands 

This is the Order of Sei-vice for the Easter 
service of the Moravian Church. It had its origin 
in 1732 in the village of Herrnhut, Saxony, and 
has continued with but little variation since 1772 
in Winston-Salem under the auspices of “Salem 
Congregation” and in the other Moravian commu¬ 
nities of Bethabara, Bethania, and Kernersville. 

People of all faiths from all parts of the country 
come to Old Salem to join in this moving and 
memorable service. They are summoned on Easter 
morning from all parts of Winston-Salem by the 
clear, joyous band music. The church band, begun 
in 1774 with six members, now is divided into 
six divisions, and has grown to a membership of 
over four hundred, composed of fathers, sons, 
daughters, and grandchildren. 

God’s Acre, where the last part of the Easter 
morning service is held, is described as a “field 
in which the bodies of loved ones are sown in 
faith as ‘natural bodies’ which in due course of 
time will be raised as ‘spiritual bodies.’ ” The 
white horizontal gravestones symbolize the Mora¬ 
vian belief in the democracy of death and make 
it impossible to distinguish among the graves 
between rich and poor. 

Old Salem, with its restored historic homes 
and public buildings, will have special tours dur¬ 
ing the Easter weekend. 






•'iTJ'Tl! 


PILGRIMAGE 


North Carolina Library i. 
Raleigh, N. C 


CONTRIBUTORS 


The second annual pilgrimage of “Colonial 
Murfreesboro and Countryside,” sponsored by the 
Murfreesboro Woman’s Club, will be held on Sat¬ 
urday and Sunday, April 14 and 15. 

Warren Place, the home of the president of the 
State Literary and Historical Association and his 
wife, Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert T. Stephenson, will be 
one of the highlights of the tour this year. Warren 
Place is in Pendleton, Northampton County. 

Other plantation homes, homes of former states¬ 
men, pre-revolutionary homes, and historic Cho¬ 
wan College, will be open during these two days 
to the guided tours which originate at the Wom¬ 
an’s Club Building. 

DONORS 

The names listed below are those who have 
shown their interest in the program of the State 
Department of Archives and History during 
November and December, by loaning or giving to 
the Department documents and items of historical 
interest for preservation and display. 

ARCHIVES 

Department of Conservation and Development 
Mrs. T. C. Karnes, Winston-Salem 
Mrs. Jay McLean, Savannah, Georgia 
Mrs. R. Hunt Parker, Raleigh 
Mr. William H. Richardson, Raleigh 
HALL OF HISTORY 

Mr. Frederick W. Bogert, Paramus, New Jersey 

Miss Kathryn Griffin, Durham 

Moses H. Cone Memorial Museum, Blowing Rock 

Old Salem, Inc., Winston-Salem 

Wake County Board of Alcoholic Control 

Sir Walter Raleigh Chapter of the North Carolina Society 

of the Colonial Dames of the 17th Century 

NEW GUIDE 

The new edition of the Guide to North Carolina 
Historical Highway Markers has been received in 
the offices of the Department of Archives and His¬ 
tory. It was prepared by Edwin A. Miles, former¬ 
ly with the Department, and William S. Tarlton, 
Historic Sites Supervisor. 

The 1956 edition is pocket size, containing 109 
pages which include a list and description of the 
755 highway markers in the state. Also included 
are a map showing the 17 marker districts, 17 
illustrations, and a detailed index. 

A total of 208 markers has been added since 
the last edition of this booklet in 1949. The ma¬ 
jority of these new markers have been in the 
v/est, giving that section better balance with the 
older part of the state. 

The new Guide has a picture of the State Capitol 
on the cover, costs twenty-five cents, and may be 
obtained by writing the Department of Archives 
and History, Box 1881, Raleigh. 


The organizations and persons who have con¬ 
tributed to the Cutten Silver Fund since the last 
issue of Carolina Comments are as follows: 

Rev. Walser H. Allen, Raleigh 

Catawba County Historical Association 

The North Carolina Society for the Preservation of 

Antiquities 

Mr. L. P. Baer, Poland, Ohio 

Mrs. Josie D. Bennett, Rocky Mount 

Dean W. E. Bird, Cullowhee 

Miss Marian H. Blair, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. George W. Capehart, Windsor 

Dr. and Mrs. L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh 

Mr. John A. Clark, Jr., Bremerhaven, Germany 

Mrs. E. L. Clay, Oxford 

Mrs. George D. Crow, Chapel Hill 

Mrs. W. D. Davenport, Mackeys 

Mr. David P. Dellinger, Chapel Hill 

Mr. G. P. Fowler, Hickory 

Mrs. 0. Max Gardner and Family, Shelby 

Mrs. Sterling M. Gary, Halifax 

Miss Ida M. Gaskill, Wilmington 

Mr. Edmund H. Harding, Washington 

Mr. Herbert L. Harper, Nashville, Tennessee 

Colonel R. L. Hill, Wilmington 

Mrs. W. L. Horne, Greensboro 

Dr. W. P. Jacocks, Chapel Hill 

Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Koonce, Raleigh 

Mrs. Helen M. Lamb, Henderson 

Mrs. Joel G. Layton, Lillington 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Lunsford Long, Warrenton 

Mrs. Emily B. McDowell, Scotland Neck 

Mrs. Roscoe D. McMillan, Red Springs 

Miss Elizabeth G. McPherson, Shiloh 

Mrs. C. F. McRae, Burnsville 

Mrs. Wheeler Martin, Williamston 

Mrs. Mildred T. Miller, Mooresville 

Mrs. E. Earle Moore, Shelby 

Mrs. M. W. Peterson, Charlotte 

Mrs. S. R. Prince, Elon College 

Mrs. M. B. Stephenson, Garysburg 

Mrs. R. R. Stone, Wilmington 

Mrs. A. B. Stoney, Hickory 

Miss Loy E. Stroup, Cherryville 

Mrs. Lawrence W. Towe, Hertford 

Mrs. R. Harry Underwood, Murfreesboro 

Mrs. J. M. Vail, Edenton 

THOMAS NORCOM HOUSE 

On Friday afternoon, February 24, the Sir 
Walter Raleigh Chapter of North Carolina Society 
Colonial Dames Seventeenth Century placed a 
replica of the Thomas Norcom House in the Hall 
of History. 

The Thomas Norcom House is believed to be 
the oldest home now standing in North Carolina, 
having been built in the seventeenth century. It 
now belongs to Mr. and Mrs. Grayson Harding 
and is located about ten miles from Edenton. 

Mrs. Thomas Stamps, President of the Sir 
Walter Chapter, presented the scale replica of 
the house to the Department of Archives and 
History. 




MEMBERSHIP 

The Executive Committee of the State Literary 
and Historical Association met on January 24 to 
plan the program for the coming year. One ques¬ 
tion which was cleared up was that of three of 
the types of membership voted upon at the Annual 
Meeting in Raleigh on December 2. These member¬ 
ships included Affiliate, Student, and Corporate. 

It was decided that Affiliate membership would 
be granted to those county historical societies 
which either now have or will bring into joint 
membership with their society and the Associa¬ 
tion, ten members. Any local society with ten 
members in both groups will be eligible for the 
reduced rate of $4.00 annual membership in the 
State Literary and Historical Association for 
those members and any others of their member¬ 
ship. Letters are being mailed to each of the 
county societies inviting them to take advantage 
of this reduced rate for their members. The dues 
will be received in this office from the county so¬ 
cieties’ treasurers, rather than mailed directly 
from the member to the office here. 

It was deemed necessary to break the student 
memberships into two groups. The $2.00 student 
membership is to be for high school and grammar 
school students and includes a subscription to 
Carolina Comments but not a subscription to The 
North Carolina Historical Review. A $3.00 stu¬ 
dent membership is open to college or university 
students, from freshmen through graduate stu¬ 
dents, and includes subscriptions to both Carolina 
Comments and The North Carolina Historical Re¬ 
view, as well as all the other rights and privileges 
of annual members. 

Corporate Memberships have now been placed 
in the category of Corporate Contributors and 


will still receive The North Carolina Historical 
Review as well as Carolina Comments. Mr. M. R. 
Dunnagan, Public Information Officer of the Em¬ 
ployment Security Commission in Raleigh, is head 
of the group to study the ways and means of 
securing more corporate contributors. 

NEW MEMBERS 

We are glad to welcome eleven new members 
who have joined the State Literary and Historical 
Association in the period from December 15 to 
February 15. They are: 

Mr. James D. Allison, Greenville 

Mr. John R. Aman, Clinton 

Mrs. D. B. Dana, Ephraim, Wisconsin 

Mr. Wilborne Harrell, Edenton 

Dr. R. B. House, Chapel Hill 

Mr. Marvin B. Koonce, Jr., Raleigh 

Mr. Lincoln Lorenz, Greensboro 

Mrs. J. Ray Micholas, Ardsley-on-Hudson, New York 
Dr. W. T. Rainey, Fayetteville 

Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, Wake Forest 
Mr. Paul Van Divort, Raleigh 

STAFF APPOINTMENT 

Mrs. Fanny Memory Blackwelder of Raleigh 
has been added to the staff of the Department of 
Archives and History as supervisor of the State 
Record Center. Mrs. Blackwelder graduated with 
a history major from Meredith College and re¬ 
ceived her master’s degree in history and her 
bachelor of laws degree from the University of 
North Carolina. She is also a well-known contri¬ 
butor to The North Carolina Historical Review 
and has had experience in her chosen fields as 
instructor of history at Meredith College and 
judge of Cabarrus County Domestic Relations 
Court and also in private law practice. 



1 


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North Carolina State Library 
'0 o< Raleigh 


CAROLINA 


Volume V 


MAY, 1956 



Number 1 


Guests, and Speakers 

David Stick (author of Grave¬ 
yard of the Atlantic ), “History 
in Your Own Back Yard” 



* •*** 


Courtesy North Carolina Neivs Bureau. 

Wreckage of the Schooner, “Laura A. Barnes,” on Bodie 
Island (Outer Banks), near Nags Head 

SPRING REGIONAL MEETING 

The spring regional meeting of the State Liter¬ 
ary and Historical Association is being held with 
the co-operation of the Roanoke Island Historical 
Association, May 18-19, at Nags Head. The pro¬ 
gram is as follows: 


FRIDAY, MAY 18 


12:30-2:15 

2:30 


3:00 


5:00-6:00 

7:30 


Registration, Carolinian Hotel Lobby 
Meeting, Cypress Room, Carolinian 
Hotel, President Gilbert T. Stephen¬ 
son, presiding 

Introductory Remarks, President 
Gilbert T. Stephenson 
Welcome, Lawrence Swain, Coun¬ 
ty Commissioner from Nags Head 
District 

Description of Planned Tours, 
R. E. Jordan, Manager, Roanoke 
Island Historical Association 
Tour of Historic Attractions on Roa¬ 
noke Island 

Elizabethan Gardens 
Fort Raleigh 
Lost Colony Theater 
Yaupon Tea, Host, Carolinian Hotel 
Dinner Meeting, Dogwood Room, 
Carolinian Hotel, President Gilbert 
T. Stephenson, presiding 

Introduction of Officers, Special 


A Representative of National Park 
Service, “The Cape Hatteras National 
Seashore Recreational Area—Plans 
for Historical Development” 

9:30 Pine Room of Carolinian Hotel— 

Recreation 


SATURDAY, MAY 19 
7:30-8:00 Breakfast 

8:30 Catch Oregon Inlet Ferry to Hatteras 

Island 

9:00-10:00 Drive through Villages of Rodanthe, 
Waves, Salvo, Avon, and Buxton to 
Cape Hatteras Lighthouse and 
Museum 


10:00-10:30 Tour of Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, 
and National Park Service Museum 
of the Sea 

10:30-11:30 Drive through Villages of Frisco, 
Hatteras, and Return to Cape Point 
for Picnic Lunch 


11:30-1:00 


1 : 00 - 2:00 


5:00-6:00 


6:00-6:30 


Picnic Lunch at Cape Point, Beach¬ 
combing, and Tour of Historic 
Wrecks 

Return Trip to Catch 2:20 Ferry 
across Oregon Inlet. Remainder of 
afternoon for rest and relaxation 
Tour of Wright Memorial at Kill 
Devil Hills 

Carolinian Hotel, Refreshments, 
Host, Roanoke Island Historical As¬ 
sociation 


6:30-8:00 Dinner 

8:00-9:30 Motion pictures of Dare County and 
“The Lost Colony” shown in the 
Cypress Room of the Carolinian 
Hotel 

Headquarters will be at the Carolinian Hotel 
and reservations should be made direct to the 
hotel. Room (including meals) will be $9.00 for 
each person (double, twin beds), $10.00 (single). 






CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Volume. V.’ . • - . *'• 3tfAy».l'956 * - Dumber 1 

-* ‘ —— —-— . —;— . . .i - 

Publfshecfby fhe'Stpte: Department -o£ Archives and 
■ Rj^toryy Box; 1881, Raleigh, N.* C:' 


Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals 

Grace B. Mahler, Editor 


DARE COUNTY 

Dare County, the scene of the State Literary 
and Historical Association’s 1956 spring regional 
meeting, is among the wealthiest of all our coun¬ 
ties in history, legend, “firsts,” hospitality, diver¬ 
sity of activity, and plans for the future. 

We are proud to have been invited by our 
friends, the Roanoke Island Historical Associa¬ 
tion, to visit Dare County and we hope you are 
planning to spend the whole week end or longer. 

Recreation time may find you hunting ship¬ 
wrecks or sea shells or fishing in the surf or 
sound. Or a spare moment may find you listing 
some of the historical firsts of the area - Virginia 
Dare, first child born of English parents in the 
New World; site of the experiments of R. A. Fes¬ 
senden and the first successful attempts with 
wireless telegraphy; scene of the world’s first suc¬ 
cessful powered airplane flights, by Orville and 
Wilbur Wright; site of the first outdoor historical 
symphonic drama in America, “The Lost Colony”; 
and first expanse of sea shore to be taken over and 
developed by the National Park Service as a rec¬ 
reational area. 

During the regional meeting you will have a 
chance to hear about this “Birthplace of Ameri¬ 
ca” from people who live in the area and know 
it best. You will have a chance to see Fort Ra¬ 
leigh, on Roanoke Island, which was designated 
a national historic site in 1941 and restored in 
1950. Objects which were discovered in the ex¬ 
cavations are displayed in a museum at the site. 
Also on Roanoke Island is the Elizabethan Garden 
which is a project of the Garden Club of North 
Carolina. This formal garden adjoins Fort Ra¬ 
leigh and the Waterside Theater and contains 
priceless antique garden ornaments. Wright Mem¬ 
orial, the Hatteras Lighthouse, the Dunes of 
Dare, and many other historic sites will be visited. 

From meetings with discussions to a cook-out 
on the beach at Cape Hatteras, this will be a 
meeting long to be remembered. We hope you 
and your friends and guests will take advantage 
of this opportunity and enjoy Dare County. 



HISTORY ON WHEELS 

The mobile museum of the Department of Ar¬ 
chives and History will soon be on the road again. 
Remembered by many as the bearer of the French 
Thank-You gifts which were displayed through¬ 
out the state some years ago, the trailer this time 
will carry to Alamance County the story of the 
War of the Regulation and the Battle of Ala¬ 
mance. A two-week tour of the county is planned 
beginning about May 16. 

Included in the exhibit will be documents, pho¬ 
tographs, maps, and artifacts. Of significance 
will be an architect’s drawing of a proposed mu¬ 
seum for Alamance Battleground State Historic 
Site. The tour has been planned to stimulate in¬ 
terest in the eventual establishment of a perma¬ 
nent museum at the Battleground. 

Norman Larson of the Department of Archives 
and History will act as curator of the trailer-mu¬ 
seum which is expected to reach all of the towns 
in Alamance County. Stops will be made at schools 
and public buildings. 

Alamance Battleground is one of the sites turn¬ 
ed over to the State Department of Archives and 
History under authority of a 1955 act. Work has 
been in progress since July, 1955, towards its de¬ 
velopment as a State Historic Site. 

NEW MEMBERS 

We are glad to welcome eight new members 
who have joined the State Literary and Histori¬ 
cal Association in the period from February 15 
to April 15. They are: 

Captain Risden T. Bennett, Jr., Southern Pines 

Mr. F. A. Cathey, Gastonia 

Mr. Samuel B. Dees, Raleigh 

Mr. M. R. Dunnagan, Raleigh 

Eighth Grade, Junior High School, Henderson 

Mrs. A. B. Elam, Jr., Asheville 

Miss Emma Walker Hubbard, Clinton 

Mr. Ralph Hardee Rives, Charlottesville, Virginia 









LITERARY CONTESTS 


BERTIE COUNTY TOUR 


Books are once again being received in the 
office for consideration in this year’s literary com¬ 
petitions. The contest rules are the same for the 
four contests which are the Mayflower competi¬ 
tion for non-fiction, Sir Walter Raleigh competi¬ 
tion for fiction, A. A. U. W. competition for juve¬ 
nile literature, and the Roanoke-Chowan contest 
for poetry. The rules state that the author must 
have maintained actual or legal residence in North 
Carolina for the three years preceding the con¬ 
test period; that the book’s date of publication 
must fall during the twelve months ending August 
31, 1956; and that the book must be original. We 
will appreciate your letting us know of any such 
volumes. 

The judges for this year’s volumes of fiction 
are Dr. Fletcher M. Green, Head of the Depart¬ 
ment of History, and Dr. C. Hugh Holman of the 
Department of English, both at the University 
at Chapel Hill; and Mrs. Ruth 0. Jeffreys, Libra¬ 
rian of the Thomas Hackney Braswell Memorial 
Library, and Mrs. Hassell H. Weeks, both of 
Rocky Mount. 

The judges of this year’s works of non-fiction 
are Mr. Clarence W. Griffin, newspaper editor, and 
Mrs. C. W. Biggerstaff, both of Forest City; Dr. 
H. Broadus Jones, Head of the Department of 
English, and Dr. Percival Perry of the Depart¬ 
ment of History, both of Wake Forest College; 
and Mr. Jay Jenkins, Raleigh correspondent for 
The Charlotte Observer. 

DONORS 

Below are listed those who have made loans 
or gifts to the State Department of Archives and 
History during March and April. 

Archives 

Attorney General’s Office, Raleigh 

Daughters of the American Revolution of North Carolina 
The D. H. Hill Library, North Carolina State College, 
Raleigh 

Durham League of Women Voters, Durham 

The Governor’s Office, Raleigh 

League of Women Voters, Chapel Hill 

The North Carolina Society of the Cincinnati 

Mrs. James P. Cook, Concord 

Mr. J. L. Jackson, Raleigh 

Mr. James Wyche Poole, Greensboro 

Miss Ida Carrie Seale, Bay Pines, Florida 

Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Smith, New Bern 

Hall of History 

State Museum of Natural History, Raleigh 

Mrs. Fanny Memory Blackwelder, Raleigh 

Mrs. R. E. Blake, Wilmington 

Mrs. Ripley Hitchcock, Greenwich, Connecticut 

Miss Virginia Horne, Wadesboro 

Mrs. Blanche M. Johnson, Raleigh 

Mrs. Sadie S. Patton, Hendersonville 

Mrs. Stanberry Speer, Saint Davids, Pennsylvania 

Mr. Ronald Von Staussen, Miami Beach, Florida 


On April 20-22 the Bertie County Historical 
Association sponsored the first old homes tour, to 
raise funds for the preservation and restoration 
of “Hope,” the home of David Stope (Governor, 
1808-1810). 

“Hope” is of historical interest not only because 
it is one of the few remaining homes of early 
governors but also because it is one of the most 
perfect examples of Georgian architecture in 
North Carolina. It is located five miles from Wind¬ 
sor and is one of the historic sites for which an 
appropriation was made by the 1955 General As¬ 
sembly. 

Other homes visited were: “Thunderbolt,” a 
small manor house built in the 18th century and 
authentically restored; “Jordan House,” built in 
1713 and one of the oldest brick homes in the 
state; “Scots Hall,” located near the mouth of the 
Chowan River and one of the best examples of a 
river plantation house in North Carolina; “Rose- 
field,” birthplace of William Blount, signer of the 
United States Constitution; “Windsor Castle,” 
birthplace of the four Winston brothers; St. 
Thomas Episcopal Church; and other restored and 
authentically furnished homes of Bertie County. 

HALIFAX 

The young Historic Halifax Restoration Asso¬ 
ciation on April 12 commemorated the 180th an¬ 
niversary of the passage of the Halifax Resolves 
and the first North Carolina constitution in old 
Halifax. Dr. Christopher Crittenden delivered the 
principal address. 

As part of the day-long activity, the first colon¬ 
ial doll dressing contest and auction was held. Be¬ 
lieved to be the only such contest and auction in 
existence, the entries exceeded the ambitious 
hopes of the Association and provided members 
and guests with another interesting exhibit in 
the historic town. 

Six of the eighty dolls received were auctioned 
off, bringing $125. The doll bringing the highest 
bid was a model of Marie Antoinette, made by 
Mrs. Sterling M. Gary of Halifax, which sold for 
$51. 

The dolls’ clothes were hand-sewn from ma¬ 
terials and in the style worn during the life of 
John Paul Jones. William R. Davie and his wife 
as well as the Davies’ maid were displayed, and 
Martha and George Washington were two other 
character dolls representing the colonial period. 

The prize winning dolls are on display in Hali¬ 
fax, and others, which came from all over the 
United States, will be auctioned at a later date. 


BENTONVILLE BATTLEFIELD 

Bentonville, site of the largest battle ever 
fought in North Carolina and the last great bat¬ 
tle of the Civil War, was the gathering place for 
a joint meeting of the Wayne, Johnston, and 
Sampson county historical societies on Sunday, 
April 8. 

The Bentonville Battleground is one of the his¬ 
toric sites for which an appropriation was made 
by the last General Assembly, a total of $2,000 
for the 1955-1957 biennium. Long-range plans for 
the battlefield include a museum containing rifles, 
minnie balls, letters, flags, books, and other souve¬ 
nirs of the vicious engagement of March 19-21, 
1865. Also a large map, showing the deployments 
of the 60,000 Federal and 14,000 Confederate 
troops engaged, will be placed at a point conven¬ 
ient for study by tourists and history students. 
Some of the earthworks remain on the site and 
these will be exhibited and roadside markers will 
be erected to point out other important sites on 
the batHefiield. 

One cf the interesting incidents of the meeting 
came when Colonel Hugh Dortch asked all those 
in the Wayne County group who had a kinsman 
in tne Battle of Bentonville to stand. Nineteen 
responded, and each told who his kinsman was. 

HISTORICAL MARKERS 

Twenty-two new historical highway markers 
have been approved for erection, it has been an¬ 
nounced by the Department of Archives and His¬ 
tory. These will bring the total in North Carolina 
to almost eight hundred. The markers wfill be 
placed in twenty separate counties and will com¬ 
memorate varied subjects. 


GOVERNORS 

Photographs of all of North Carolina’s Gover¬ 
nors of whom there are known pictures have been 
mounted and framed and are now for sale. The 
dimensions are tw r enty-four and one-half inches 
by thirty-two and one-half inches and the price is 
$12.50. For further information you may contact 
Mr. W. H. Eller, Box 67, Raleigh, North Carolina. 

SPRING ARTS FESTIVAL 

An Arts and Science Museum has been formed 
in Statesville to provide a program for exhibit¬ 
ing materials in the visual arts and sciences for 
that area and for the entire state. Extensive long- 
range plans are being drawn up, but in the imme¬ 
diate future—May 16, 17, and 18—the Museum 
will attempt to bring North Carolina artists and 
the public together to create a better understand¬ 
ing of contemporary painting. The Spring Arts 
Festival will be held at the Statesville Country 
Club and the artists will be professionals whose 
w r orks are frequently exhibited at large national 
museums. Mrs. K. C. Eller, Jr., is the chairman 
of the project. 

EDITOR'S HANDBOOK 

The State Department of Archives and History 
has compiled and published a manual for use in 
the Department and for the use of editors and 
authors who from time to time edit or prepare 
material for publication. Mrs. Elizabeth W. Wil- 
born, a member of the staff of the Division of 
Publications, prepared the work and although all 
rules pertinent to writing, editing, and publishing 
are not included, such rules and regulations as are 
applicable to the publications of the Department, 
with special emphasis on The North Carolina His¬ 
torical Review, are found therein. 


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North Carolina State Library 

R&leigh _ _ 

CAROLINA COMMENTS 


1 / 


DUPLICATE 


Volume V 


JULY, 1956 


Number 2 



Courtesy North Carolina News Bureau 

Orchestra Rehearsal at Transylvania Music Camp 

SUMMER REGIONAL MEETING 

The summer regional meeting of the State Lit¬ 
erary and Historical Association will be held at 
Brevard College, August 10-11. The Western 
North Carolina Historical Association is our host 
group. 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 10 

12:30-2:00 Registration, Lobby of Womens Res¬ 
idence Hall 

2:00 Meeting, Auditorium, Dunham Hall, 

Mrs. Sadie Smathers Patton, Pres¬ 
ident, Western North Carolina His¬ 
torical Association, presiding 

Invocation, Reverend C. Edward 
Roy 

Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag- 
Welcome to Brevard, Hon. John 
Ford, Mayor 

Welcome to Brevard Music Festi¬ 
val, John D. Eversman 
Welcome from Waighstill Avery 
Chapter, D.A.R., Mrs. Randall 
Lyday 

Welcome, Dr. Robert H. Stamey 
of Brevard College 
“Brevard on the Old Estatoe 
Path,” by Mrs. Mary Jane 
McCrary 

“Folklore of the Blue Ridge,” by 
Virgil L. Sturgill 

4:00-6:00 Tea, Brevard College Library, 

Waighstill Avery Chapter, D.A.R. 
6:00-7:00 Dinner, College Cafeteria 
8:00 Evening Meeting, Auditorium, Dun¬ 

ham Hall, Christopher Crittenden, 
Secretary, State Literary and His¬ 


torical Association, presiding. 

Introduction of Officers, Special 

Guests, and Speakers 

Address: “Prospectus of a Book 

of Tar Heel Humor,” by A. P. 

Hudson 

“Robert Henry, Famous Pioneer 
Settler,” by Albert S. McLean 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 11 


8:00-8:30 

10:00 


12 : 00 - 1:00 

1:30 

2:30 


6:00-7:00 

8:00 


Breakfast, College Cafeteria 
Meeting, Auditorium, Dunham Hall. 
George W. McCoy, presiding 

“Historic Hominy Valley,” by 
William F. Lewis 
“Old Fort of Pre-Revolutionary 
Days,” by Miss Mary Greenlee 
Business Session 
Lunch, College Cafeteria 
Tour to Beech Gap, conducted by 
the Transylvania Historical Society 
Beech Gap, Unveiling by the United 
Daughters of the Confederacy of a 
Monument at the Confederate Mem¬ 
orial Forest, Honoring the 125,000 
North Carolinians who Served in 
the Southern Armed Forces, 1861- 
1865. Mrs. R. N. Barber, Sr., 
Chairman 

Dinner, College Cafeteria 
Transylvania Music Festival 


SUNDAY, AUGUST 12 

2:00 Transylvania Music Festival 

8:00 Outdoor Drama, “Unto These Hills,” 

Cherokee 

Headquarters will be at Brevard College. Room 
and the three meals (dinner on Friday, breakfast 
and lunch on Saturday) will be $4.50 per person. 
If you plan to stay for dinner on Saturday night 
and in your room until Sunday, the total charge 
will be $7.50 per person. 

A letter with the program of the Transylvania 
Music Festival, which will be in progress while 
we are there, will be sent to you later this month. 

In order to obtain the fine accommodations off¬ 
ered by Brevard College, we have guaranteed that 
fifty of you will be in attendance. We hope that 
you will make your plans now for you and your 
family to attend the Brevard gathering and the 
Transylvania Music Festival. Reservation slips 
will be sent to you a little later. 








CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume V JULY, 1956 Number 2 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 


Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals 

Grace B. Mahler, Editor 


COOLNESS AND CULTURE 

August 10-11 will mark the fifth summer re¬ 
gional meeting of the State Literary and Histori¬ 
cal Association held in the western part of the 
state with the co-operation of the Western North 
Carolina Historical Association. We have had cool¬ 
ness and culture at Boone, Cullowhee, Asheville, 
and Mars Hill. We have been entertained by “Horn 
in the West” and toured the Blue Ridge. We have 
seen “Unto These Hills” and visited the Great 
Smokies. We have paid homage to Thomas Wolfe’s 
birthplace and we have heard many enlightening 
and entertaining talks on many subjects. 

Once again as hot weather comes to the state, 
the cool mountains hold an invitation—which is 
issued also by Brevard College and the WNCHA. 
It is an invitation to take advantage of a vaca¬ 
tion weekend in an area where the folks who 
know it best have planned to show it to us and 
tell us about it. David Stick spoke of “History 
in Your Own Backyard” at the spring meeting at 
Nags Head and our members and friends of the 
west can show us their backyard. The rest of us 
can bring to the meeting our plans and projects 
from our locales to exchange and enrich the 
plans and projects of others. 

W hether you are a collector, a genealogist, a lo¬ 
cal historian, a person interested in a particular 
phase of history or in preserving historic sites, 
or whether you are brought close to history be¬ 
cause of an interest in the tourist trade, in indus¬ 
trial growth, in the literary field, or for compan¬ 
ionship, the Association tries to bring about a 
closer relationship with you through the regional 
meetings by learning of your interests and proj¬ 
ects and by becoming better acquainted with you 
as a person as well as a member. 

We who attended had a rewarding meeting at 
Nags Head this spring, as we have had at pre¬ 
vious regional meetings. We w T ill have an excep¬ 
tional time at Brevard. We hope that many, many 
more of you will bring your interests there to 
share with us. We hope that coolness and culture, 
informality and congeniality, and a desire to look 
into someone else’s backyard and see what they’re 
about, will bring you and your family on a vaca¬ 
tion weekend to Brevard, August 10-11. 


NEW MEMBERS 

We are glad to welcome twenty-four new mem¬ 
bers who have joined the State Literary and His¬ 
torical Association in the period from April 15 
to June 15. 

Mrs. Ethel Stephens Arnett, Greensboro 

Mr. Glenn II. Arnold, Atlanta, Georgia 

Mr. and Mrs. O. L. Baum, Kitty Hawk 

Mrs. Margaret D. Bayne, Nags Head 

Mrs. C. L. Blackburn, Wilson 

Miss Kate M. Blanchard, Hertford 

Mrs. V. N. Burgess, Dallas, Texas 

Mr. and Mis. Thomas Chears, Jr., Kill Devil Hills 

Mr. M. L. Clark, Elizabeth City —Sustain ing Membership 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam N. Clark, Tarboro 

Mrs. D. S. Coltrane, Raleigh 

Mr. George D. Finch, Thomasville 

Colonel A. L. Fletcher, Raleigh 

Mr. Allyn F. Hanks, Manteo 

Mrs. E. C. Harris, Mobile, Alabama 

Miss Lou Jackson, Beulavilie 

Mrs. Victor R. Johnson, Pittsboro 

Mrs. F. S. Lawrence, Whitakers 

Miss Barbara McKeithan, Raleigh 

Mrs. C. P. Mitchell, Elizabeth City 

Mrs. J. A. Pilley, Durham 

Mrs. Ashley T. St. Amand, Wilmington 

Dr. William A. Smith, Raleigh 

Mrs. Charles B. Williams, Beulavilie 

MEMBERSHIP DRIVE 

Mrs. Elizabeth House Hughey and Mr. John 
R. Jordan, Jr., co-chairmen of the Membership 
Committee, have announced plans for a member¬ 
ship drive to take place on Friday, October 12. 
This date has special significance for the Asso¬ 
ciation since October 12 has heretofore been 
known as North Carolina Day in the pub'ic 
schools, a plan instigated and brought about by 
the Association in 1901. The date is also Columbus 
Day and University of North Carolina Day. The 
plan will be for each member to bring just one 
friend into the Association’s membership. You 
will be hearing more about this and we will count 
on your full co-operation and support. 

DONORS 

Below are listed those who have made loans 
or gifts to the State Department of Archives 
and History during March and April. 

Archives 

Miss Jean Craige, Reidsville 

Greensboro League of Women Voters, Guilford College 

Mrs. Clifford Hall, Wake Forest 

Mr. Cullen B. Hatch, Mount Olive 

Mr. Richard Mason, Raleigh 

Mrs. Martha B. Mathis, Jacksonville, Florida 

Mrs. R. Cashwell Moore, Bowden 

Raleigh League of Women Voters, Raleigh 

Mrs. George F. Smith, Jackson, Mississippi 

Mr. Karl Smith. Greensboro 

Miss Mary C. Wiley, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. Betty Vaiden Williams, Raleigh 

Hall of History 

Mrs. Jacques Busbee, Seagrove 
Mr. E. W. Krieble, Wooster, Ohio 
Mr. Donald J. Rulfs, Raleigh 
Miss Mabel Tomlinson, Raleigh 
Miss Elizabeth L. Whitaker, Littleton 







LITERARY CONTESTS 

Twenty-five volumes have been received for 
consideration in the various literary contests 
sponsored each year by various groups in co-op¬ 
eration with the Association. The following have 
been forwarded to the judges of the contests: 

The Sir Walter Raleigh competition for fiction 
—A Piece of Luck, by Frances Gray Patton; The 
Fallen Angel, by William T. Polk; Mg Lord Mon- 
leigh, by Jan Cox Speas. 

The Mayflower contest for non-fiction— Greens¬ 
boro, North Carolina, by Ethel Stephens Arnett; 
Ben Franklin’s Privateers, by William Bell Clark; 
The Prayers of Jesus, by Ralph S. Cushman ; Gray 
Fox, by Burke Davis; Jeivish Roots in North Car¬ 
olina, by Harry Golden; The Secret of Happiness, 
by Billy Graham; Providence of Wit in the Eng¬ 
lish Letter Writers, by William H. Irving; My 
Brother Adlai, by Elizabeth Stevenson Ives; The 
University in the Kingdom of Guatemala, by John 
Tate Lanning; Charles E. Maddrey, An Auto¬ 
biography; Roaming the Hills with John Parris, 
by John Parris; Christian Eschatology and Social 
Thought, by Ray C. Petry; The Religious Press in 
the South Atlantic States, by Henry S. Stroupe; 
Tecumseh, Vision of Glory, by Glenn Tucker; A 
Country Doctor in the South Mountains, by B. E. 
Washburn; The Pastor’s Hospital Ministry, by 
Richard K. Young. 

The Roanoke-Chowan contest for poetry— 
Change of Sky, by Helen Bevington; From Sea 
to Sky, by Edith Deaderick Erskine; Paths of 
Shining Light, by Vera Idol; Parousia, by John 
Mahoney; Salem Christmas Eve, by Julia Mont¬ 
gomery Street. 

The A. A. U. W. competition for juveniles— 
Fiddler’s Fancy, by Julia Montgomery Street. 

We feel sure there are a great many more vol¬ 
umes that are eligible. For the book to be eligible 
the author must have maintained actual or legal 
residence in North Carolina for the preceding 
three years, and the book must have been publish¬ 
ed within the period September 1, 1955, to August 
31, 1956. We will appreciate learning of addi¬ 
tional titles. 

HISTORICAL DRAMAS 

North Carolina’s three outdoor historical sym¬ 
phonic dramas are all in progress again. “The 
Lost Colony” at Manteo resumed its portrayal 
of Sir Walter Raleigh’s small group on Roanoke 
Island on June 30, to play until September 2. 
“Horn in the West” at Boone, the story of Daniel 
Boone, began on June 30, to run until September 
3, and “Unto These Hills” at Cherokee, the story 
of the Cherokee Indians, began on June 26, and 
will run through September 3. 


R. D. W. CONNOR AWARD 

This year’s judges of the R. D. W. Connor Board 
of Award are Dr. Henry S. Stroupe of Wake 
Forest College, Mr. George W. McCoy of Asheville, 
and Dr. Sarah Lemmon of Meredith College. 

The award of $25.00 is given as a memorial to 
the late Robert D. W. Connor for the purpose of 
stimulating interest in the publication of articles 
of high quality in the field of North Carolina his¬ 
tory. 

The Historical Society of North Carolina pre¬ 
sents the award annually to the author of the 
article (published in The North Carolina Histori¬ 
cal Review in the four issues ending with that of 
July) in the field of North Carolina history or 
biography that is judged by the Board to be most 
worthy of recognition. 

THOMAS WOLFE AWARD 

The second annual Thomas Wolfe Memorial 
Trophy will be presented this year at the October 
meeting of the Western North Carolina Historical 
Association. Entries must be in the hands of Miss 
Annie Westall, 64 Edgewood Road, Asheville, by 
July 28. 

To be eligible for this award the author must 
be a native or bona-fide resident of the region em¬ 
braced by the Western North Carolina Historical 
Association (made up of the twenty-three west¬ 
ernmost counties), or a resident of any other 
region who writes fiction or non-fiction, the scene 
of which is laid in Western North Carolina. 

UNWRITTEN BOOKS 

The Committee on Unwritten Books, headed 
by Professor Richard Walser of Raleigh and in¬ 
cluding also Miss Porter Cowles, Mr. William S. 
Powell, and Professor Walter Spearman, all of 
Chapel Hill, and Miss Dorothy Lou Dickey and 
Mrs. Miriam Rabb, both of Raleigh, held its first 
meeting on April 24. 

An advisory board was selected and names of 
authors and illustrators were suggested for a 
mailing list. The purpose of the Committee is to 
compile lists that may lead to the writing and 
publishing of books to fill omissions of periods 
and personalities of North Carolina in the libra¬ 
ries. It was made clear, however, that the Com¬ 
mittee’s function is to compile lists of the need¬ 
ed books on various subjects concerning North 
Carolina and to make such information available, 
but that neither the Committee nor the Associa¬ 
tion can be responsible for publishing or finding 
a publisher for any manuscript. 



Courtesy W. S. Tarlton 


The Alston House State Historic Site 

THE ALSTON HOUSE 

Mrs. Elizabeth Stevenson Ives of Paint Hill 
Farm, Southern Pines, has made a gift of $5,000 
to he Moore County Historical Association, Inc. 
This donation will enable the Moore County group 
to complete the interior and exterior restoration 
of The Alston House State Historic Site (The 
House in the Horseshoe), which is located ten 
miles north of Carthage on Deep River. The gift 
came from the royalties of My Brother Adlai, 
Mrs. Ives’ book concerning her brother, Adlai 
Stevenson. 

TOWN CREEK INDIAN MOUND 

Stanley South, candidate for the master’s de¬ 
gree in anthropology at the University of North 
Carolina, has replaced Jack Walker who is re¬ 
turning to the University, as Historic Site Spe¬ 


cialist at Town Creek Indian Mound in Mont¬ 
gomery County. 

Mr. South will continue the archaeological work 
as well as the restoration of some of the structures 
close by the mound and part of the temple on 
the mound itself. Town Creek Indian Mound is 
one of the State Historic Sites administered by 
the Department of Archives and History. 

VISITORS 

During the period from October, 1955, through 
May, 1956, 702 groups totalling some 30,910 
school children visited the Hall of History of 
the Department of Archives and History. These 
children represent almost every county in the 
state. Before the tour each group is greeted by a 
member of the Hall of History staff and given a 
seven minute slide program and lecture on the 
exhibits they will see in the museum. 

The Hall of History was also visited by a large 
number of individuals not only from North Car¬ 
olina but from many other states and foreign 
countries as well. 

HISTORIC HALIFAX 

At a meeting on June 27 the Historic Halifax 
Restoration Association outlined the accomplish¬ 
ments of the past year and Ray Wilkinson, pres¬ 
ident of the group, listed the projects for the 
coming year. These projects will include conduct¬ 
ing a historical survey to ascertain what struc¬ 
tures and sites of the Colonial period should be 
restored or otherwise developed; completing a 
prospectus for the Association’s future program; 
developing the area around Magazine Springs 
for presentation of outdoor drama; and acquir¬ 
ing additional historic properties. 


1 


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CAROLINA'COMMENTS 


B- 


Volume V 


SEPTEMBER, 1956 


Number 3 



Museum Collection 


North Carolina State Exposition—October, 1884 

NORTH CAROLINA FAIRS 

“Come to the fair,” will soon be the tune sung 
throughout North Carolina. There are community 
fairs, county fairs, district fairs, agricultural, in¬ 
dustrial, and livestock fairs. There are fairs and 
festivals too throughout the year featuring 
crafts, folk dance, and folk music. North Carolina 
is truly rich in fairs. 

There is no known date of the first fair held in 
North Carolina, but it is known that country 
fairs existed in the late 1700’s. They were first 
held to provide markets for produce and later 
under the auspices of local agricultural societies 
they were established to encourage scientific farm¬ 
ing. In 1792 the legislature was authorized to es¬ 
tablish the dates and places of local fairs and in 
1794 the power was transferred to county courts. 
These activities, their places and dates, were ap¬ 
pointed “for the convenience of the inhabitants, so 
as to afford an opportunity and give encourage¬ 
ment to industry by collecting the inhabitants for 
the purpose of exchanging, bartering, and selling 
of all such articles as they may wish or be necessi¬ 
tated to dispose of.” 

The fairs became important as markets, and in 
the early 18Q0’s traveling entertainers such as 
jugglers, minstrels, and wire-walkers began to 
perform for the visitors, buyers, and sellers. 

Then came the organization of the agricultural 
societies. The first known of these was that of 
Edgecombe County, organized in 1810 and follow¬ 
ed after the War of 1812 by at least 17 others—in 
Beaufort, Duplin, Halifax, Cumberland, Wake, 
Robeson, Northampton, Guilford, Chatham, Lin¬ 


coln, Rowan, Orange, Mecklenburg, Rutherford, 
Surry, Stokes, and Richmond counties. A state 
agricultural society was formed in 1818 which is 
believed to have helped to establish the Agricul¬ 
tural Fund set up in 1822 to assist other county 
groups come into being. In 1824 the Beaufort 
County Agricultural Society had its first fair 
(the first known to have been established in the 
state by an incorporated society), and premiums 
were offered. In 1852 the State Agriculture So¬ 
ciety was incorporated for the purpose of en¬ 
couraging county fairs and county societies, and 
this group held the first North Carolina State 
Fair on a 16-acre tract 10 blocks east of the 
Capitol in Raleigh on October 18-21, 1853—where 
the new State Office Building is being erected. 



Grand Stand at the State Fair Race Track— No Date 
Given 


A county fair in the 1850’s was usually held at 
the courthouse with homespun and vegetables be¬ 
ing shown inside—livestock outside. Judging took 
place during the morning and in the afternoon 
an address was delivered at one of the local 
churches. After this service, speeches and the 
awarding of premiums were in order. 

This year there are 61 fairs listed in North 
Carolina for the period from August 22 through 
October 23. They are still in 1956 dedicated to 
the same purposes as set forth in 1794, and by 
William W. Holden in an editorial in The North 
Carolina Standard on October 26, 1853: “(1) 
the people of all portions of the State will be 
brought annually into closer social and business 
intercourse; and (2) agriculture, mechanics, 
household industry and the arts will be stimulated 
and encouraged.” 







CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Volume V SEPTEMBER, 1956 Number 3 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 


Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals 

Grace B. Mahler, Editor 


NORTH CAROLINA DAY 

It is expected that October 7-13 will be observed 
as North Carolina Heritage Week—a week in 
which citizens of our State will be reminded of 
what has gone into the making of our greatness. 
We hope that you will be thinking of ways in 
which your clubs, civic organizations, discussion 
groups, and classes can heighten the interest of all 
Tar Heels in the events, the people, and the writ¬ 
ten and spoken words that have brought the State 
to the prominent position it holds today. 

On October 12, the next to the last day of Her¬ 
itage Week, each member is asked to recruit a 
minimum of one friend (and as many more as 
possible). Newspapers, radio, and television will 
co-operate to make this week and North Carolina 
Day a success, but most vital will be the help 
from you individual members. 

Throughout the year the Association asks little 
of its members other than an interest in history, 
particularly the history of North Carolina. For 
your dues you receive various publications and 
an invitation to all Association functions. You 
are urged to vote at the annual meeting and thus 
to help govern your Association. 

But, like any healthy institution, the Association 
is frankly dependent upon its members for sup¬ 
port of various kinds. A great help—which every 
member can give easily—is moral support. And 
proof of moral support can be the enlistment of 
some other citizen to join the Association. 

The drive will be held on Friday, October 12, as 
announced by Membership Committee Co-chair¬ 
men Mrs. Elizabeth House Hughey and John R. 
Jordan, Jr., in the July issue of Carolina Com¬ 
ments. Later in September we will send you a kit 
containing a printed list of names of current 
members and other informative material, and 
membership blanks. 

Part of the theory of local history is to bring 
back into focus the rule of the individual. He 
largely makes history anyway. The theory of the 
membership campaign is just the same: The in¬ 
dividual member of the Society will make the 
history of the campaign. 


THE BEGINNING 

October must needs be an important month to 
the people of North Carolina. For one thing, on 
October 23, 1900, the organization meeting of 
The State Literary and Historical Association 
was held in the Music Hall of the Olivia Raney 
Library in Raleigh. 

The Association came into being in the year that 
Charles B. Aycock was elected Governor. That 
was the year that marked a renewal of intellectual 
development in the State that one historian has 
called the “Dawn of Culture” after the “Twilight” 
of Reconstruction. 

The first purposes of the Association were “the 
collection, preservation, production, and dissemi¬ 
nation of our State literature and history; the 
encouragement of public and school libraries; the 
establishment of an historical museum; the in¬ 
culcation of a literary spirit among our people; 
the correction of printed mis-reprcsentations con¬ 
cerning North Carolina, and the engendering of 
an intelligent healthy State pride in the rising 
generation.” To a large degree these original pur¬ 
poses have been accomplished, and where the full 
purpose could not be realized, it has been incor¬ 
porated into future constitutions and projects. 

The month of October was also important to the 
Association’s early program, for in 1901 North 
Carolina Day in the public schools was authorized 
by law and was observed as a yearly celebration 
every October. It was a day to “be set apart in 
the schools of our State for the consideration of 
some important fact of State history, with ap¬ 
propriate public exercises. . . .” 

The programs included many subjects during 
the years of North Carolina Day observance. 
Areas, settlements, local and county history, lit¬ 
erature, and people were taken up in successive 
years. The program of exercises for North Caro¬ 
lina Day in 1911, for instance, was as follows: 

“1. North Carolina Day. (Let some pupil 
read the law setting apart North Carolina day, 
and explain its origin and purpose.) 

“2. The Old North State. (To be sung by the 
school.) 

“3. Charles Brantley Aycock. (A biographical 
sketch written and read by some pupil.) 

“4. Universal Education. (This or one of the 
other extracts from Aycock’s speeches printed in 
this pamphlet, to be declaimed by some pupil— 
a boy preferable.) 

“5. Educational Progress during Aycock’s Ad¬ 
ministration. (A paper by some pupil.) 

“6. The Aycock Monument, and Why the 
School Children of North Carolina Should Contri- 












bute to it. (An original oration by some pupil . . .) 

“7. Taking up the Contributions of the Chil¬ 
dren. 

“8. America. (To be sung by the school.)” 

Also in 1901 the Executive Committee laid plans 
for a movement to expand the State’s librai'y facil¬ 
ities. The committee urged the General Assembly 
to amend the existing state library law so as to 
permit the establishment of libraries in the public 
schools of rural districts. The General Assembly 
compiled and the Association afterward kept 
close watch over the administration of the Rural 
Library Act, as it came to be called. 

The Association in 1903 petitioned the legis¬ 
lature for the creation of the Historical Commis¬ 
sion (now the State Department of Archives and 
History) and the bill was enacted in that year. 
Frequently between 1904 and 1910 the Associa¬ 
tion petitioned the legislature for a building to 
house the Commission and its valuable records 
and historical artifacts. Finally in 1911 the Gen¬ 
eral Assembly appropriated $250,000 to erect the 
building (now known as the Library Building). 

In 1905 the Association “lobbied” successfully 
for the “History Text-book Act” which provided 
funds “to promote the production and publication 
of school books relating to the history, literature, 
or government of North Carolina, for use in the 
public schools.” 

There have been only thirteen years in the 
fifty-six-year history of the Association when at 
least one award was not made for literary en¬ 
deavor. The Association has championed the 
cause of writers and journalists and historians in 
securing recognition within the boundaries of the 
State as well as without. 

The Association has fostered such groups as the 
Antiquities Society, the Art Society, and numer¬ 
ous county societies, and has worked in harmony 
with the other cultural societies. It has lent active 
assistance to the efforts of other North Carolina 
organizations engaged in parallel undertakings 
such as the Andrew Johnson Memorial in Raleigh, 
begun in 1915; the project of the Virginia Dare 
Association to place a painting of the first baptism 
in America in the National Capitol in 1923; and 
other similar activities up to the present day of 
the Association’s interest in the Cutten Silver 
Collection and the proposed Historymobile unit. 

The Association is now engaged in several proj¬ 
ects in varied fields. Its Committee on Unwritten 
Books is hard at work on the endless task of seek¬ 
ing to fill the need for books on North Carolina 
subjects. The Corporate Contributor Committee 


is making strides in bringing the Association and 
its facilities to the attention of North Carolina 
businesses. The Committee on County Historical 
Societies is working with interested groups in 
counties not yet organized but expressing a need 
and interest. The Awards Committee is hard at 
work compiling the lists of books by North Caro¬ 
lina authors to be brought to your attention. The 
Membership Committee is making plans for 
North Carolina Heritage Week and for North 
Carolina Day, our one-day membership drive. 

At the end of 1901 the Association had 150 
members. At present the total membership is 
1,223. In 1901 the Association launched a wide 
and necessary program. In 1956 there are many 
important projects yet to be undertaken. 

DONORS 

Below are listed those who have made loans 
or gifts to the State Department of Archives and 
History during July and August. 

Archives 

Miss Susan Brandon, Birmingham, Alabama 

Caswell-Nash Chapter of the D. A. R., Raleigh 

Miss Caroline Cunningham, Arlington, Virginia 

Miss Marybelle Delamar, Raleigh 

Mrs. Sallie Glascock Giverson, Houston, Texas 

Mr. Houston G. Jones, Raleigh 

Mrs. Max Pick, New York, N. Y. 

Mrs. Mary J. Rogers, Neuse 
Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Warren, Raleigh 
Mrs. W. Gray Williams, Rocky Mount 
Hall of History 

North Carolina Association of Broadcasters, Inc., 

Greensboro 

Miss Emily Barefoot, Raleigh 
Mrs. Esther Stone Cahn, Raleigh 
Mrs. Ruth Allen Lyons, Wadesboro 
Mr. Gurney P. Hood, Raleigh 

CONFEDERATE SERVICE RECORDS 

Forty-three rolls of 16 mm. film bearing the 
Index to Compiled Service Records of Confederate 
Soldiers Who Served in Organizations From the 
State of North Carolina have been received by 
the State Department of Archives and History, it 
is announced by State Archivist H. G. Jones. 

This Index is a supplement to Moore’s Roster 
of North Carolina Soldier's in the War Between 
the States and gives the name, rank, and the unit 
with which the soldier served. This information 
is normally sufficient for those seeking member¬ 
ship in the United Daughters of the Confederacy. 

The microfilmed Index was purchased under a 
co-operative plan by the North Carolina Division 
of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, 
Mrs. Ashley T. St. Amand, President, and the 
Department of Archives and History, each paying 
half of the cost. 


t UM - 


LITERARY CONTESTS 

In the July issue of Carolina Comments 25 
books that are eligible for this year’s literary 
contests were listed. Also, 24 more have been 
received and forwarded to the judges of the con¬ 
tests, as follows: 

The Sir Walter Raleigh competition for fiction 
—Green Pond, by Evan Brandon; Big End of 
the Horn, by Julia Canaday; Dear Doctor Dick, 
by J. Allen Hunter; The Story of Six Loves, by 
Richard Carroll Johnson; Will West, by Paul C. 
Metcalf. 

The Roanoke-Chowan contest for poetry— Fire 
on the Mountain, by Mrs. Lena Mearle Shull; 
Anecdotes of the Last War, by Charles Olsen; 
Along Life’s Pathway, by Mrs. Ruth Hash Wil¬ 
liams. 

The Mayflower contest for non-fiction— Come 
Unto Me, by Julian Butler, Jr.; Agricultural De¬ 
velopments in North Carolina, 1783-1860, by 
Cornelius Oliver Cathey; Military Justice in the 
Armed Forces, by Robinson O. Everett; Tar Heel 
Writers I Know, by Bernadette Hoyle; Other 
People’s Lives, by Rosalie Massengale; On the 
Trail of Daniel Boone in North Carolina, by F. H. 
Maurice; Thinking About God, by R. L. Middleton ; 
History of North Carolina Baptists, Volume 2, by 
George Washington Paschal; History of Colonial 
Bath, by Herbert R. Paschal, Jr.; From Buncombe 
to Mecklenburg, by Mrs. Sadie S. Patton; Zeb’s 
Black Baby, by S. T. Peace; One Clear Call, by 
Agnes Phillips; The Government and Administra¬ 
tion of North Carolina, by Robert S. Rankin; 
George W. Coble, by Arlin Turner; The Living 
Past of Cleveland County, by Lee B. Weathers; 
Latv and Press, by W. C. Lassiter. 

We urge you to let us know of any other titles 
than these or the ones printed in the July Com¬ 
ments which may be eligible this year. At the 


present count we have received 30 volumes for 
the Mayflower contest for non-fiction, 10 for the 
Sir Walter Raleigh contest for fiction, 8 for the 
Roanoke-Chowan competition for poetry, and one 
for the AAUW competition for juveniles. 

NEW MEMBERS 

We are glad to welcome 40 new members who 
have joined the State Literary and Historical 
Association in the period from June 15 to August 
30: 

Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Adickes, Raleigh 

Mrs. Paul Borden, Goldsboro 

Mrs. Kate B. Covington, Raeford 

Mrs. J. Rufus Creech, Smithfield 

Miss Blanche Cromartie, Raleigh 

Mrs. J. S. Crowley, Wilmington 

Mrs. J. Neal Davis, Winston-Salem 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Y. Ellis, Shelby 

Mr. Daniel W. Fagg, Jr., Mt. Olive 

Mrs. George B. Flint, Raleigh 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Roscoe Foreman, Elizabeth City 

Mrs. J. C. Gardner, Henderson 

Mrs. Kate T. Gary, Henderson 

Mrs. J. M. Guthrie, Charlotte 

Mrs. Eugene Harris, Goldsboro 

Mrs. Joseph K. Isley, Greensboro 

Mrs. Lloyd Jarrett, Asheville 

Miss Ruth Jones, Smithfield 

Miss Sallie H. Jones, Hendersonville 

Mrs. Benton Ludwig, Salisbury 

Mrs. William Bright May, Fayetteville 

Mrs. C. C. McClees, Durham 

Mrs. M. L. McKeithan, Raeford 

Miss Mignon MacMillan, Red Springs 

Mrs. J. A. Overton, Sanford 

Mrs. Anne M. Price and family, Jacksonville 

Mrs. Wilmer I. Smith, Durham 

Mrs. E. H. Southerland, Jr., Wilmington 

Mr. and Mrs. 0. A. Speight, Southern Pines 

Miss Lallah R. Stephenson, Smithfield 

Mrs. Ethel P. Stowe, Belmont 

Mrs. J. H. Summerville, Charlotte 

Miss Anne Smedes Vass, Raleigh 

Mrs. Robert W. Watkins, Boone 

Mrs. A. B. Willingham, Rocky Mount 



0 *N 

066 *°9 






^ v North Carolina State Library 

v'' ~ Raleigh _ 

k CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume V 


NOVEMBER, 1956 


Number 4 


LITERARY CONTESTS 



Photo by Stanley South 


Town Creek Indian Mound—State Historic Site 

TOWN CREEK INDIAN MOUND 

Town Creek Indian Mound, one of the State 
Historic Sites which were turned over to the De¬ 
partment of Archives and History by act of the 
1955 General Assembly, is being restored on the 
original location. 

The site, which covers 53 acres on the banks of 
Little River in Montgomery County near Mount 
Gilead, is the location of an ancient Indian politi¬ 
cal, religious, and cultural center. The tribe of 
Indians who built this “square” spoke Muskogean 
and settled the upper Pee Dee Valley early in the 
sixteenth century. The square was made by four 
rectangular sheds placed in the center of a plaza. 
These were religious and mortuary structures. On 
the west a mound was constructed to serve as the 
elevated foundation for their major temple. 

The temple is being reconstructed on the exact 
site of the original structure, for during archeo¬ 
logical research the original post holes were dis¬ 
covered. The construction of the temple will be 
rough posts and poles, a thatched roof, and daubed 
walls. 

The mound and temple and the buildings sur¬ 
rounding were part of the Indian’s ceremonial 
village. Chiefs and priests lived there and lesser 
members of the tribe built villages at varying dis¬ 
tances from it. 

A wealth of historic and pre-historic artifacts 
has been recovered from the area and some are 
on display in the Site Museum. There is also a 
display of pen and ink drawings in the museum 
showing in particular the early animals found in 
North Carolina which were hunted by the Indians. 


There have been 57 volumes entered in the 
various literary competitions for 1956. Of this 
number 49 have been listed in previous issues of 
Carolina Commeyits. The additional eligible books 
are as follows: 

The Mayflower contest for non-fiction —Here 
Will I Dwell, by Nancy Alexander; They Passed 
This Way, by Malcolm Fowler; Must They Sell 
Apples Again ? by Raymond J. Jeffries; Parso?i of 
the Hills, by C. A. Keyes; Ali-Mat Takes Off, by 
Mrs. Park Mathewson; A History of Moore Coun¬ 
ty, 17f7-18f7, by Blackwell P. Robinson. 

The Sir Walter Raleigh contest for fiction — 
A Gift for Penelope, by Lucy M. Cobb; Wilderness 
Road, by Paul Green. 

The Roanoke-Chowan contest for poetry —The 
Known Way, by Marjorie Craig. 

The AAUW competition for juvenile literature 
—To Unknown Lands, by Manly Wade Wellman. 

The awards for the best work entered in each 
of the literary competitions will be given at the 
annual meeting of the Association on December 7. 
At the morning meeting the Roanoke-Chowan 
Group will present their award for the best work 
of poetry and the American Association of Uni¬ 
versity Women will announce their award for the 
best work of juvenile literature. The Society of 
Mayflower Descendants in the State of North 
Carolina and The Historical Book Club of North 
Carolina will present their respective awards for 
non-fiction and fiction at the evening meeting. 

ALAMANCE BATTLEGROUND CAMPOREE 

On September 21, 22, and 23 a camporee was 
held on the Alamance Battleground. There were 
375 boy scouts there representing 25 troops of 
the Alamance District Cherokee Council. 

The program of the week-end included a talk 
by Mr. Howard White, Editor of the Burlington 
Daily Times News, on the history and significance 
of the Battleground and the honor of camping 
where the Regulators fought against Governor 
Tryon in 1771. 

On Sunday morning Reverend Glenn Echard of 
the Alamance Lutheran Church set up an altar 
at the monument and held church services for the 
boys. 

In showing their appreciation for the use of 
the State Historic Site, the scouts cleared under¬ 
brush from a large area of the battleground 
woodland. 










































CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume V NOVEMBER, 1956 Number 4 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 

Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals 

Grace B. Mahler, Editor 

MEMBERSHIP 

Some confusion seems to have arisen as a result 
of the one-day membership drive. As was stated 
in the July issue of Carolina Comments and in 
the September issue as well, October 12 was the 
proposed date on which each member would in¬ 
vite a non-member friend to join the Association. 
It was felt that such a personal drive would be 
more effective than other means of solicitation. 
On October 9 a letter explaining the purpose of 
the membership drive and enclosing material 
giving information on the Association was sent 
to each member. We have received a few new 
members as a result of this mailing. We have also 
received a number of checks from some of you 
who have recently paid your dues and from others 
of you who would not have been billed until the 
next quarter. These payments are being credited 
to your membership account. This has involved 
some reorganization of the bookkeeping and in 
the case an error is inadvertently made in your 
billing, please let us know. 

If you know of a friend who will enjoy mem¬ 
bership in The State Literary and Historical As¬ 
sociation, please hold your own one-dav member¬ 
ship drive today and invite him to join. 

RED LETTER DAY 

December 7 is the date of the 56th annual 
meeting of The State Literary and Historical 
Association. Mark it on your calendar in red for 
there will be two presentations in particular at 
that meeting which will make December 7 a red 
letter day for all North Carolinians. 

The morning session will include the first of 
these presentations in the form of a paper by 
William S. Powell of the University of North 
Carolina Library. Mr. Powell did research in Eng¬ 
land this past summer on a Guggenheim Grant 
and he will reveal his findings concerning the 
origins of the colonists sent to the New World 
by Sir Walter Raleigh. 

At the luncheon session, the Honorable Thur¬ 
mond Chatham will present the Department of 
Archives and History with invaluable documents. 
These documents fill in a large part of the several 
years in our colonial history about which we have 
had very little written information. 

Make your plans now to be present. 


NEW MEMBERS 

We are glad to welcome 23 new members who 
have joined the State Literary and Historical As¬ 
sociation in the period from August 31 to October 
15: 

Mrs. John Barksdale, Leaksville 

Mrs. William A. Bivens, High Point 

Miss Annie G. Burroughs, Oxford 

Mrs. Robert B. Butler, Warrenton 

Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Credle, Tarboro 

Mr. James N. Early, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. Thomas William Elliott, Edenton 

Mr. Harry Gatton, Arlington, Vii-ginia 

Mr. D. H. Greer, High Point 

Mrs. Frank Harper, Jr., Raleigh 

Miss Lura A. Heath, Monroe 

Mrs. William A. Horne, Atlanta, Georgia 

Dr. M. A. Huggins, Raleigh 

Mrs. W. D. Lawson, Jr., Gastonia 

Mr. W. K. Littleton, Badin 

Mrs. H. H. Memory, Lumberton 

Mr. Lafayette Patterson, Raleigh 

Mrs. James M. Peden, Raleigh 

Mrs. T. Nelson Ricks, Mount Olive 

Mr. Warren Smith, Smithfield 

Mrs. Frances F. Snyder, Claremont 

Mr. Cornelius Thomas, Wilmington 

NEW ORGANIZATION 

Mr. W. S. Tarlton, Historic Sites Supervisor 
of the Department of Archives and History, has 
been elected Second Vice President of a new or¬ 
ganization, The North American Association of 
Historic Sites Public Officials. 

The organization meeting of this Association 
was held at Woodstock, Vermont, on September 
27-28. It was sponsored by the Historic Sites 
Commission of the State of Vermont and arrange¬ 
ments were made through the Governors’ offices 
of the various states. There were about eighty 
representatives present. The purposes of this 
group were set forth in the adopted constitution 
and seek primarily to promote the restoration 
and maintenance of historic sites as a function of 
government. 

The program of the meeting included a talk 
by Mr. Tarlton on the Historic Sites program in 
North Carolina. 

JOINT SESSION 

Part of the annual convention of The Southern 
Historical Association will be a joint session with 
The State Literary and Historical Association 
in the ballroom of the Union Building, Duke Uni¬ 
versity, at 10:00, Saturday morning, Novem¬ 
ber 17. Our president, Gilbert T. Stephenson, will 
preside; Dr. D. J. Whitener of Boone will tell of 
the background of our Association; Dr. H. S. 
Stroupe of Winston-Salem will cover the history 
of our State Department of Archives and His¬ 
tory; Professor Richard Walser of Raleigh will 
explain the North Carolina literary and historical 
awards. The discussion will be led by Dr. Christo¬ 
pher Crittenden. 

The three-day convention will begin on Thurs¬ 
day morning, November 15 with headquarters in 
the Washington Duke Hotel. All of us are wel¬ 
come to attend. 





ANNUAL MEETING 

The annual meeting of The State Literary and 
Historical Association has “grown from a modest 
assembly of local citizens to discuss ways and 
means of advancing the cause of literature ana 
history in their state, to a virtual congress of 
specialized societies representing almost all of the 
cultural activities within North Carolina and cli¬ 
maxed by a series of distinguished addresses de¬ 
livered by some of the most prominent men in 
the country.” 

The early annual meetings of the Association 
were held during Fair Week. After 1909 until 
1920 the Raleigh meeting was held on a date 
convenient for the speaker, and since that time 
it has been held during the first week of December 
with very few exceptions. Only once has the 
Association failed to hold its annual meeting and 
that was during an epidemic of influenza in 1918. 
The meeting has been held in Raleigh every year 
since the Association’s founding. 

One of the principal features of the annual 
sessions have been the addresses. Until 1907 these 
consisted entirely of papers given by the members 
of the Association. In 1907 the practice was begun 
of inviting a prominent personage from outside 
of North Carolina to give the principal address. 
Since the eighth annual session the Association 
has presented some of the ablest and most promi¬ 
nent men in this country and from abroad. 

This year, as is the custom, the annual meetings 
of the various cultural groups will be held in 
Raleigh during the first week in December. The 
North Carolina State Art Society will meet on 
Wednesday, December 5. The North Carolina So¬ 
ciety for the Preservation of Antiquities and The 
Roanoke Island Historical Association will meet 
on Thursday, December 6. And The State Literary 
and Historical Association, the North Carolina 
Folklore Society, The North Carolina Society of 
County and Local Historians, and the North Caro¬ 
lina Poetry Society will meet on Friday, Decem¬ 
ber 7. 

The program of The State Literary and His¬ 
torical Association will include papers given by 
Professor Richard Walser and Mr. William S. 
Powell and a review of North Carolina fiction 
of the year after the business meeting on Friday. 
The R. D. W. Connor Award, the Roanoke-Chowan 
Award, the AAUW Award, and the American 
Association of State and Local History Awards 
will also be announced at the morning session. 
There will be a review of North Carolina non¬ 
fiction and the presentation of important docu¬ 
ments given by the Honorable Thurmond Chatham 
at the luncheon meeting. President Gilbert T. 
Stephenson will deliver his presidential address 


at the dinner meeting. And at the evening session, 
Dr. Roy Nichols of the University of Pennsylvania 
will make the main address. The Sir Walter 
Raleigh and Mayflower Awards will be presented 
after Dr. Nichols’ address, before the reception. 

CALVIN JONES HOUSE 

In the March, 1956, issue of Carolina Comments 
there was an article on the 140-year-old Calvin 
Jones House in Wake Forest. It is the oldest stand¬ 
ing home in Wake Forest, one of the first meeting 
places for classes of Wake Forest College, the 
home of earlier Wake Forest presidents, as well 
as a familiar landmark. General Jones sold the 
present structure to the Baptist State Convention 
in 1832, and since then it has been used as a resi¬ 
dence and for classes. 

The Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary 
plans to put a cafeteria near where the Jones 
House stood and the house was to be torn down 
unless someone had it moved from that location. 

The Calvin Jones Memorial Society, Inc., was 
organized in June for the purposes of moving the 
house and restoring it. Many individuals co¬ 
operated by giving their time and money. Wake 
Forest College made a gift of money and also do¬ 
nated a new site on the old college tennis court 
property on North Main Street. The house is 
being moved and will be placed on its new site 
around which will be developed a Wake Forest 
College Memorial Park. It is proposed that the 
house be used as a town library when restoration 
is completed. 

MANGUM PAPERS 

The Department of Archives and History has 
announced the completion of the last volume of a 
set of five volumes containing the letters and per¬ 
sonal papers of Willie Person Mangum. 

The Papers of Willie Person Mangum cover the 
years 1807-1894. Volume I contains letters and 
papers 1807-1832; Volume II—1833-1838; Vol¬ 
ume III—1839-1843; Volume IV—1844-1846; and 
Volume V covers the period from 1847 to 1894. 

These volumes are primarily political in char¬ 
acter and give information on North Carolina and 
national politics particularly for the years 1821 to 
1853. Willie Person Mangum served in the nation¬ 
al House of Representatives, in the United States 
Senate, and was close to the heart of the State and 
national Whig party for most of his political ca¬ 
reer. Many of the letters are from important 
State and national figures of his day and shed a 
great deal of light on the problems and complexi¬ 
ties of life in the nineteenth century. 

The volumes may be obtained for three dollars 
each from Division of Publications, State Depart¬ 
ment of Archives and History, Box 1881, Raleigh. 


DONORS 

Below are listed those who have made loans or 
gifts to the State Department of Archives and 
History during September and October. 

Archives 

Mr. J. S. Atkinson, Elkin 

Mrs. Guy M. Beaver, Concord 

Mr. John S. Bell, Jacksonville 

Mr. J. Burch Blaylock, Yanceyville 

Mr. S. Burrell Bragg, London Bridge, Virginia 

Miss Elizabeth Burch, Mt. Croghan, South Carolina 

Mr. Mark Bennett Byron, III, Westport, Connecticut 

Carteret County Historical Society, Beaufort 

Mr. John E. Coe, Chicago, Illinois 

Mr. D. L. Corbitt, Raleigh 

Dr. Christopher Crittenden, Raleigh 

Daughters of the American Revolution of North Carolina 

Miss Marybelle Delamar, Raleigh 

Duke University Library, Durham 

Mrs. James F. Evans, Haverford, Pennsylvania 

Mr. Clarence W. Griffin, Forest City 

Miss Wynona Fowler, Raleigh 

Mrs. R. S. Heard, West Point, Georgia 

Mr. Charles Robert Hollomon, Raleigh 

Mrs. D. W. Huggins, Clayton 

Mrs. Chessie B. Mann, Whitakers 

Mrs. J. S. Moore, Gainesville, Florida 

Mr. Roy Parker, Jr., Windsor 

Mrs. Guilford Simplon, Knoxville, Tennessee 

Colonel J. F. Stanbaek, Mt. Gilead 

Mr. E. R. Tull, Rockingham 

The Estate of Mrs. Charles E. Quinlan, Waynesville 

Miss Hester Womack, Ruffin 

Mrs. Herbert C. Woodall, Smithfield 

Hall of History 

Miss Winifred E. Cobb, Tallahassee, Florida 
Dr. Christopher Crittenden, Raleigh 
Mrs. E. M. Powell, Raleigh 

R.D.W. CONNOR AWARD 

Since 1954 the Historical Society of North 
Carolina has presented the Robert D. W. Connor 
Award to the author of an article in the field of 
North Carolina history or biography published 
in The North Carolina Historical Revieic. The ar¬ 
ticles which are eligible this year for the $25.00 


cash award were published in the four issues of 
The Revieic starting with the October, 1955, issue 
and ending with the July, 1956, issue. 

Some of the eligible articles are as follows: 
“Property and Trade: Main Themes of Early 
North Carolina Newspaper Advertisements,” by 
Wesley H. Wallace; “Bedford Brown: State 
Rights Unionist, Part I and Part II,” by Houston 
G. Jones; “North Carolina and the British In¬ 
vestor, 1880-1910,” by Alfred P. Tischendorf; 
“Evidence of Manual Reckoning in the Cittie of 
Ralegh,” by J. C. Harrington; “The Mysterious 
Case of George Higby Throop (1818-1896) ; or, 
The Search for the Author of the Novels ‘Nags 
Head,’ ‘Bertie,’ and ‘Lynde Weiss,’ ” by Richard 
Walser; “The Movement of Negroes from North 
Carolina, 1876-1894,” by Frenise A. Logan; “The 
Mind of North Carolina Advocates of Mercan¬ 
tilism,” by C. Robert Haywood; “The Downfall 
of the Democrats: The Reaction of North Caro¬ 
linians to Jacksonian Land Policy,” by William 
S. Hoffmann; “Cultural and Social Advertising 
in Early North Carolina Newspapers,” by Wes¬ 
ley H. Wallace; “Educational Activities of the 
Disciples of Christ in North Carolina, 1852-1902,” 
by Griffith A. Hamlin; “Johnston’s Last Stand— 
Bentonville,” by Jay Luvaas; and “James Yadkin 
Joyner, Educational Statesman,” by Elmer D. 
Johnson. 

The judges for the Robert D. W. Connor com¬ 
petition are Dr. Sarah M. Lemmon of Meredith 
College, Mr. George W. McCoy of the Asheville 
Citizen Times, and Dr. Henry S. Stroupe of Wake 
Forest College. The award will be given to the 
author of the prize-winning article at the morning 
session of the annual meeting of The State Liter¬ 
ary and Historical Association on December 7. 


•D *N ‘HOianVH 

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isam v^foijna 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 



Volume V* 


JANUARY, 1957 \ Number 5 

■ -- \ - - 

Mr. Chatham said that he had obtained the 
documents through an English bookdealer whose 
acquaintance he had made in 1919, when, as a 
young sailor, he had visited London. At that time 
Mr. Chatham asked the dealer if he had available 
any manuscripts or documents pertaining to 
North Carolina that he might purchase. When the 
reply was negative, Chatham instructed the dealer 
to watch for any such material and to inform 
him in the event of its being found. Several years 
passed, with no word coming from England. 
Later, however, word was received of the dis¬ 
covery of the 1664-1674 documents and soon they 
arrived and remained in Mr. Chatham’s posses¬ 
sion until he presented them to the State. 


Photo by Dorothy R. Phillips, Hall of History 

Left to Right. H. G. Jones, Thurmond Chatham, McDaniel 
Lewis, examine the documents. 


Mr. Chatham presented the papers as a gift 
from himself, his wife, and three sons. 


CAROLINA DOCUMENTS 1664-1674 

“Every North Carolinian is an alumnus of the 
State Department of Archives and History, and 
so it is to this agency that I present these docu¬ 
ments.” 

Speaking to the members of the State Literary 
and Historical Association at their annual meet¬ 
ing on Friday, December 7, Congressman Thur¬ 
mond Chatham, member of the Executive Com¬ 
mittee of the Association, offered the preceding 
statement as an explanation of his giving to the 
Department a valuable collection of documents 
concerning North Carolina’s early history. Mr. 
Chatham stated that he felt that the State as a 
whole would benefit most fully if the collection 
were placed in the State archival agency. 

Consisting of correspondence between Royal 
Governors Stephens and Carteret and the Lords 
Proprietors, as well as other records, the docu¬ 
ments cover the period 1664-1674 and provide a 
picture of life in the Albemarle section of North 
Carolina during this time. Instructions to the 
governors and reports from them to the Lords 
Proprietors show what was expected of the colo¬ 
nists and what was accomplished by them in the 
early years of undue hardship. Reports of crops, 
weather, construction of buildings, and other 
necessary everyday proceedings bring into clearer 
focus this ten-year period which heretofore had 
been rather obscure. 

The Department of Archives and History con¬ 
siders the collection to be its outstanding acquisi¬ 
tion of recent years and will hold the documents 
ready for use by scholars and students of the 
period. 


Mr. McDaniel Lewis of Greensboro, Chairman 
of the Executive Board of the Department of 
Archives and History, accepted the gifts in be¬ 
half of the Department and the State. 



Lords Proprietors appointment of Peter Carteret to the 
Council in 1664. 


OFFICERS 

Mr. Gilbert T. Stephenson was re-elected Presi¬ 
dent of the State Literary and Historical Asso¬ 
ciation at the annual meeting on December 7. Also 
re-elected were the Vice Presidents, Mrs. Taft 
Bass, Dr. Marvin L. Skaggs, and Mr. Ray S. 
Wilkinson, and the Secretary-Treasurer, Dr. 
Christopher Crittenden. The terms of two execu¬ 
tive committee members, Mr. James A. Gray, Jr. f 
and Dr. Paul Murray, expired and Dr. Robert B. 
House and Colonel Jeffrey F. Stanback were elect¬ 
ed to serve on this committee for the years 1957- 
1959. 






















CAROLINA COMMENTS 


AMENDMENTS 


Volume VI JANUARY, 1957 Number 5 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 


Issued to Members of the State Literary and Historical 
Association, Public Libraries, and Individuals 

Grace B. Mahler, Editor 


BOOKS 

From January through November, 1956, no 
less than 11,373 new books in all categories were 
published in the United States. The South leads 
all other sections of the country in the number of 
books written and holds onto its place as the 
literary capital of the nation. 

There were 57 of these new books on the lists 
for the North Carolina literary awards this year. 
Of these 37 were non-fiction and 20 were fiction. 
The fiction was broken down into 10 novels, 8 
books of poetry, and 2 juveniles. 

Since these books were written by North Caro¬ 
linians who have had actual or legal residence in 
the State during the last three years and since 
the awards were set up to encourage more writ¬ 
ing by North Carolinians and on North Carolina 
subjects, it is interesting to note the following: 
Of the 37 books of non-fiction, 7 were histories 
and sketches of North Carolina counties and 
towns; 6 were biographies or autobiographies of 
North Carolinians, and the total number of books 
dealing mainly with North Carolina subjects was 
20. Of the 10 novels or short stories, 6 dealt with 
North Carolina, and 1 each of the books of poetry 
and juvenile literature were about the State. 

The Association’s Committee on Unwritten 
Books hopes to make progress this year in its ef¬ 
forts to have more books written on North Caro¬ 
lina subjects. Lists of topics that need to be cov¬ 
ered and of the State’s authors and illustrators 
are being compiled. Suggestions of either 
authors, illustrators, subject matter, and publish¬ 
ing companies will be appreciated by the Commit¬ 
tee. 

The books which won the literary awards for 
1956 are as follows: A.A.U.W. Award for juve¬ 
nile literature— Fiddler’s Fancy, by Julia Mont¬ 
gomery Street; Mayflower Award for fiction — 
Tecumseh, Vision of Glory, by Glenn Tucker; 
Roanoke-Chowan Award for poetry— Change of 
Sky, by Helen Bevington; Sir Walter Raleigh 
Award for non-fiction— A Piece of Luck, by Fran¬ 
ces Gray Patton. 

Books are already coming in for the 1957 com¬ 
petitions. Please let us know of any titles that will 
be eligible. 


Two constitutional amendments were passed 
at the business session of the annual meeting, as 
follows: 

Article I, Section 1, of the Constitution then 
read as follows: “This Association shall be called 
The State Literary and Historical Association of 
North Carolina.” Amended to read: “This 
Association shall be called the North Carolina 
Literary and Historical Association, Incorpo¬ 
rated.” 

Article II, Section 1, of the Constitution then 
read as follows: “The officers of the Association 
shall be a President, three Vice-Presidents, and 
a Secretary-Treasurer. Of the President and the 
three Vice-Presidents, no two shall be residents 
of the same county.” Amend Article II, Section 1, 
to read as follows: “The officers of the Association 
shall be an Honorary President, who shall be the 
Governor of North Carolina, ex officio; a Presi¬ 
dent, three Vice-Presidents, and a Secretary- 
Treasurer. Of the President and the three Vice- 
Presidents, no two shall be residents of the same 
county.” 

DONORS 

Below are listed those who have made loans or 
gifts to the Department of Archives and History 
during the period between October 15 and De¬ 
cember 15. 

Archives 

Mrs. William S. Alexander, Fairmont 

Mrs. Webb Culberth, Roseboro 

Mrs. Kay Dixon, Gastonia 

Mrs. S. Scott Ferebee, Shawboro 

Mr. Hugh B. Johnston, Wilson 

Mr. D. E. Kilgore, Clarkwood, Texas 

Miss Netta Little, Wadesboro 

Miss Jane Macon, Brunswick, Georgia 

Mann Film Laboratories, Winston-Salem 

Dr. Pat Ireland Nixon and Dr. Pat Ireland Nixon, Jr., San 

Antonio, Texas 

U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Carroll P. Rogers, Tryon 
Mr. Verne Rhoades, Asheville 
Colonel Paul A. Rockwell, Asheville 
Mrs. Fannie Vann Simmons, Kenly 
Mrs. George B. Smith, Star 
Mr. L. R. Tucker, New Bern 
Radio Station WPTF, Raleigh 

Waxhaws Chapter of D. A. R., Lancaster, South Carolina 
Miss Mary C. Wiley, Winston-Salem 
William Gaston Chapter of D. A. R., Gastonia 
Mr. J. H. Withers, Broadway 

Hall of History 

Mr. Earley W. Bridges, Greensboro 
Dr. Sarah Lemmon, Raleigh 
Mr. McDaniel Lewis, Greensboro 
Mrs. Mildred B. Pope, Clayton 
Mr. Fred L. Weede, Asheville 
Mrs. L. F. Williams, Raleigh 







ANNUAL REPORTS 

Following are condensed drafts of reports of 
the Secretary-Treasurer of your Association and 
of the chairmen of the various committees which 
were given at the business session of the annual 
meeting in Raleigh, December 7. 

Report of the Secretary-Treasurer —During the 
year your Association moved forward along a 
broad front. . . . There is still more to be done 
than our staff can handle adequately, however, 
and further steps will need to be taken so that we 
can keep up with mere office routine. 

One of the most time-consuming of all the tasks 
that must be handled is the conduct of the various 
literary contests. While it is believed that these 
are worth while, we should realize that a large 
portion of the time of our staff was devoted to 
setting up the boards of award, preparing lists 
of eligible volumes, obtaining from the publishers 
copies of these volumes, passing the latter on to 
the boards of award, determining whether certain 
volumes are eligible, tabulating the ballots of the 
judges, and performing other related duties. We 
estimate that during the year a total of over 200 
man hours was devoted to this purpose alone. 

The financial statement of your Association 


follows: 

Balance on hand, July 1, 1955 .$ 676.24 

Receipts, July 1, 1955-June 30, 1956_ 4,644.38 

Total receipts and beginning balance. . . 5,320.62 
Disbursements, July 1, 1955- 

June 30, 1956 . 4,487.04 

Balance on hand at close of business, 

June 30, 1956 . 833.58 


Report of the Committee on Awards —Several 
questions were taken up during the year by this 
committee. The question of how to deal with 
books that are eligible for a competition a certain 
year but that for one reason or another are not 
included, was considered. It was agreed that the 
procedure be left as it is now—that is, that in 
each case of this kind the Secretary of the State 
Literary and Historical Association consult the 
organization making the award. If that organi¬ 
zation wants the book in question to be included 
the following year, then that will be done, and 
vice versa. 

The need for securing financial assistance in 
conducting the various literary competitions was 
considered. The Committee voted to recommend 
that the Mayflower Society and The Historical 
Book Club of North Carolina each be requested to 
appropriate $50 annually and that the American 
Association of University Women in North Caro¬ 
lina and the Roanoke-Chowan Group be asked to 


appropriate $15. The Roanoke-Chowan Group and 
the Mayflower Society contributed to this fund. 

The means of the selection of judges and the 
systems used in judging were clarified. 

Report of the Corporate Contributors Com¬ 
mittee —A list of about 600 names of men heading 
larger corporations in the State was prepared and 
a letter was sent to these men in the spring out¬ 
lining plans and purposes of this committee, prom¬ 
ising a folder giving further data, and asking 
support and suggestions. 

From these individuals 157 replies were re¬ 
ceived, 19 firms eliminating themselves from par¬ 
ticipation, 125 expressing interest, and 13 enclos¬ 
ing checks which totaled $1,250. 

Later an additional 450 were sent letters and 
folders. 

Report of the Committee to Organize Local 
Historical Societies —Groups have been organized 
this year in Caswell, Northampton, Hertford, 
Wake, Harnett, and Brunswick counties, and in 
the Lower Cape Fear area. There are approxi¬ 
mately 3,000 persons who are now members of 
county historical societies in North Carolina. 

Report of Membership Committee —The affiliate 
membership classification was reviewed and the 
following explanation approved: “An affiliate 
membership permits members of local historical 
associations of which at least ten individuals will 
be members of both the local and State organiza¬ 
tions, to become members of the State Literary 
and Historical Association of North Carolina for 
$4.00 each, when memberships are collected and 
sent in by the treasurers of local historical organi¬ 
zations.” Approximately 200 prospective members 
were circularized. North Carolina Heritage Week 
was observed October 7-13 with a special mem¬ 
bership drive on October 12. 

Total membership to date is 1,209 representing 
1,042 renewals and 167 new members. 

Report of the Unwritten Books Committee —A 
committee of 6 met to talk over the needs in the 
field of North Carolina literature. Others were 
invited to help in an advisory capacity and 21 
have accepted. It is hoped that a report will soon 
be sent out including not only the subjects to be 
treated but also suggested authors, illustrators, 
and publishers. 

The Report of the Committee on Resolutions — 
Appreciation was expressed to all those who have 
arranged and worked at the three meetings this 
year. The 1956 necrology of the Association was 
recorded. 






Photo by W. S. Tart ton. Historic Sites 


Restored main building and sentry box of Tryon Palace. 

TRYON PALACE 

The Tryon Palace Commission held a meeting 
in New Bern on November 26-27. Miss Gertrude S. 
Carraway had previously tendered her resignation 
as Commission member and Secretary. A resolu¬ 
tion was adopted expressing appreciation for the 
service she had rendered in those capacities and 
pledging full cooperation in connection with her 
new duties as Director of the Palace. 

The exterior work on the Palace is nearing com¬ 
pletion. The restoring and reproducing of the 
interior are continuing and acquisitions by gift 
and purchase are being designated for certain 
places in appropriate rooms. A tentative model 
of the grounds and gardens that are planned was 
on display for the Commission members and Mr. 
Morley J. Williams, who is in charge of the land¬ 
scaping, plans to use only native materials. 

Mrs. John A. Kellenberger, Commission Chair¬ 
man, announced that the Personnel Committee 
had elected Mr. G. Norman-Wilcox, for twenty- 
five years Curator of Decorative Arts at the Los 
Angeles County Museum, Pasadena, California, as 
Curator for Tryon Palace for one year. 


NEW MEMBERS 

We are glad to welcome 46 new members who 
have joined the State Literary and Historical 
Association in the period from October 15 to 
December 15. 

Miss Anna Brooke Allan, Chapel Hill 

Mrs. W. Burr Allen, Asheville 

Miss Hazel Baity, Raleigh 

Mrs. L. C. Bost, Shelby 

Mrs. Brank B. Bradley, Wadesboro 

Mrs. James M. Braswell, Elm City 

Mrs. Ray H. Cagle, Asheville 

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce R. Carter, Raleigh 

Catawba County Historical Association, Hickory 

Mr. Lester V. Chalmers, Jr., Raleigh 

Mr. W. R. Chambers, Marion 

Mr. George D. Colclough, Elon College 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence W. Cramer, Chapel Hill 

Mrs. Paul E. Davis, Raleigh 

Mr. P. A. Emmons, Jr., Badin 

Mrs. Francis E. Field, Asheville 

Rev. W. W. Finlator, Raleigh 

Rev. and Mrs. John W. Foster, Davidson 

Mrs. Perry R. Hamlin, Brevard 

Mrs. G. B. Haney, Oxford 

Judge Hamilton H. Hobgood, Louisburg 

Mr. William Johnson, Asheville 

Mr. J. E. Kanipe, Asheville 

Mrs. M. B. Lufty, Reidsville 

Miss Cornelia S. MacMillan, Red Sp ri ngs 

Mrs. William M. Mann, Sr., Enfield 

Mrs. Roger G. Martin, Roanoke, Virginia 

Mr. A. H. McDonald, Jr., Winston-Salem 

Mrs. Frances Smithwick McFarland, Louisburg 

Mrs. Leon Oettinger, San Marino, California 

Miss Emma Riddick Parker, Smithfield 

Mrs. Rom B. Parker, Jr., Enfield 

Mrs. Janies H. Price, Kannapolis 

Mrs. W. H. Romm, Moyock 

Mr. B. J. Savage, Jr., Boone 

Mrs. J. R. Sheppard, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. G. B. Weeks, Goldsboro 

Mrs. J. M. Williams, Chapel Hill 

Miss Lena Mae Williams, Chapel Hill 

Mr. R. Parker Wilson, Wilson 

Miss Margaret B. Wright, Murfreesboro 

Dr. and Mrs. Marshall B. Wyatt, Pinehurst 




Carolina State Library 
_ Raleigh _ _ 

f CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Volume V March, 1957 Number 



Hall of History photo 


One of the three Irish glass chandeliers to hang in the 
reconstructed Tryon Palace. This is one of a pair which 
measures five feet long with a three foot spread. 

TRYON PALACE CHANDELIERS 

The three 18th century Irish glass chandeliers 
that have hung in the Governor’s Mansion since 
December, 1950, have been taken down and will 
now become part of the furnishings of Tryon 
Palace for which they were purchased. 

The late Mrs. Maude Moore Latham of Greens¬ 
boro, who made possible the restoration of Tyron 
Palace, along with her daughter, Mrs. J. A. Kellen- 
berger of Greensboro, Chairman of the Tryon 
Palace Commission, purchased these chandeliers 
as well as a valuable collection of other furnish¬ 
ings. 

Portraits, painted between 1680 and about 1760, 
18th century Chippendale chairs, tables, stools, 
cabinets, and bookcases, silver dating back to 1679 
—all these were stored at Williamsburg and later 
displayed at the Greensboro Historical Museum. 
They are now being sent to New Bern to furnish 
Tryon Palace, which is nearing completion. 


6 

TV PROGRAM 

On January 27, 1957, the State Department of 
Archives and History began a series of television 
broadcasts entitled “Our Heritage.” Produced 
through the co-operation of WRAL-TV, Channel 
Five, the programs are designed to present to 
viewers in the Channel Five area an interesting 
and enlightening picture of segments of North 
Carolina’s history- The first program discussed 
settlement in North Carolina from the Lost 
Colony to the Dutch Colony at Terra Ceia. Subse¬ 
quent programs will include discussions of social 
life, medicine, and religion in North Carolina from 
the state’s origin to the early 1900’s. Production 
dates will be the fourth Sunday in each month 
through April. The time is 5:30 P.M. 

NEW MEMBERS 

We are glad to welcome 33 new members who 
have joined The North Carolina Literary and 
Historical Association in the period from De¬ 
cember 15 to February 15. 

Mrs. L. H. Ballard, Bryson City 

Mrs. Charles W. Banner, Greensboro 

Mrs. William F. Blake, Burgaw 

Mr. R. W. Blanchard, Clinton 

The Cedars, Milledgeville, Georgia 

Mrs. David C. ClarK, Roanoke Rapids 

Mr. Sheffield Clark, Jr., Nashville, Tennessee 

Elon College Book Club, Elon College 

Mrs. Alvis L. Florance, Yanceyville 

Mrs. Charles Goding, Archdale 

Mr. W. B. R. Guion, New Bern 

Mrs. Perry R. Hamlin, Charlottesville, Virginia 

Mr. T. Holt Haywood, Clemmons, South Carolina 

Heritage Press, Inc., Charlotte 

Miss Bessie Hilliard, Rocky Mount 

Mr. James Byron Hilliard, Rocky Mount 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Jack Hooks, Kenly 

Dr. H. Broadus Jones, Winston-Salem 

Mr. C. R. Joyner, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. Beulah H. Kelly, Tabor City 

Mrs. Ralph L. Lewis, Greensboro 

Mr. Donald M. McCorkle, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. Frank H. McRae,, Salisbury 

Mrs. Donald Morris. Blanche 

Miss Anna Ogburn, Lewisville 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Richardson Preyer, Greensboro 

Sampson County Public Library, Clinton 

Mr. H. W. Stafford, Greensboro 

Mrs. C. Eugene Stephenson, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. Louis Taylor. Milledgeville, Georgia 

Mrs. Henry S. Wilson, Winston-Salem 

NEW EXHIBIT 

A memorial to the late Alexander Mathis, au¬ 
thor of The Lost Citadel, has been provided by 
his wife in the Hall of History in Raleigh. 

The memorial is located in the Roanoke Island 
Room of the museum and includes material per¬ 
taining to Mathis’ work on Roanoke Island, the 
Amadas-Barlow expedition, and the Lane and 
White settlements. A facsimile of the title page 
and the dedication page of the original manu¬ 
script, copies of John White’s maps of the south¬ 
east coast of North America and the coast of 
North Carolina; a copy of The Lost Citadel (pub¬ 
lished in 1954) and information on Mathis are 
included in the display. 










CAROLINA COMMENTS 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Volume V March, 1957 Number 6 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 


Issued to Members of The North Carolina Literary and 
Historical Association, Incorporated, to Public Libraries, 
and to Individuals. 

Grace B. Mahler, Editor 


SPRING MEETING 

The 1957 spring regional meeting of The North 
Carolina Literary and Historical Association will 
be held in Bertie County with headquarters at 
the Duke of Windsor Hotel in Windsor, May 10-11. 
A definite program has not been set, but it is 
planned that we visit a number of places includ¬ 
ing “Hope,” Avoca, the sites of Batts’ House and 
Eden House, Snakebite Township, and Colerain. 

There is evidence that the earliest permanent 
settlement in North Carolina may have been on a 
piece of land between the mouths of the Chowan 
and Roanoke rivers in what is now Bertie County. 
The first recorded exploration to the Chowan 
River was that of John Pory, secretary of the 
Virginia Colony, in 1622. In 1653 the Virginia 
Assembly granted to Roger Green, who had just 
explored the region, 1,000 acres for himself and 
10,000 acres for the first 100 people who would 
settle on the Roanoke River south of the Chowan 
“next to those persons who have had a former 
grant.” This statement and the fact that on the 
Nicholas Comberford map of 1657 is shown a 
neatly drawn house marked Batts’ House near 
what is now called “Avoca” give credence to the 
belief that in what is now Bertie County may have 
been the first permanent settlement in the present 
State of North Carolina. Nathaniel Batts, previ¬ 
ously Governor of Roanoke, is thought to have 
owned Batts’ House and to have settled in the 
Bertie area about the mid-1600’s as Governor of 
South Albemarle. 

The oldest known house standing in Bertie 
County is Jordan Farm, a small brick house said 
to have been built in 1713 by Joseph Jordan. 
There are several homes built in the late 1700’s 
and early 1800’s still being lived in. 

It is particularly appropriate that we visit 
Bertie County in this year that marks the 300th 
anniversary of the Comberford Map, which is an 
important record of the early settlement of North 
Carolina and a valued document of Bertie County 
history. 

The program for the two-day meeting will be 
published in the May issue of Carolina Comments, 
but make a note of May 10-11 now for attending 
our sixth annual spring regional meeting. 


The Executive Committee of your North Caro¬ 
lina Literary and Historical Association met on 
January 23 in Raleigh. The following matters 
and reports were discussed. 

The place and time of the spring regional meet¬ 
ing was the first item of business. The Associa¬ 
tion had received warm invitations from Bertie 
County, from Clarendon Plantation, from Wil¬ 
mington, and from Winston-Salem. Since the As¬ 
sociation has met in the Wilmington area and 
in Winston-Salem, it was the consensus that we 
should accept the invitation of Bertie County dur¬ 
ing its celebration of the 300th anniversary of 
the Comberford Map. 

The place and time of the summer regional 
meeting is to be left up to the Western North 
Carolina Historical Association. 

The time of the 1957 annual meeting was set 
for December 6, the first Friday in December, in 
accordance with custom. The addition of another 
day so that music may be included in Culture Week 
was discussed as well as the feasibility of schedul¬ 
ing meetings so that they would not conflict. It 
was unanimously agreed that a committee repre¬ 
senting participating societies should meet in the 
summer to decide these matters. 

Choices for out of state speakers for the annual 
meeting were discussed and the group voted to 
invite Professor T. V. Smtih of Syracuse Univer¬ 
sity to deliver the main address. 

The papers of incorporation were drawn up 
and duly signed and witnessed and the Associa¬ 
tion will henceforth be known as The North Caro¬ 
lina Literary and Historical Association, Incorpo¬ 
rated. 

The possibility of having a trail such as the 
Lincoln Mile in Illinois commemorating such men 
as Boone, Washington, and Lafayette and the 
route they took through the State was discussed. 
This would be undertaken with the help of a local 
historical group. 

A budget of $8,400 was submitted to the Com¬ 
mittee and approved. 

The reports and plans of the Membership Com¬ 
mittee, the Committee on Unwritten Books, the 
Committee on Local and County Historical Socie¬ 
ties, the Awards Committee, and the Corporate 
Contributors Committee were read and discussed 
with expansion of services being the prime ob¬ 
jective for the coming year. 

The appointment of a Long Range Planning 
Committee was approved. This committee will 
report back to the Executive Committee. 






JUNIOR HISTORIANS 

The General Assembly in 1953 authorized the 
establishment by the State Depai’tment of Ar¬ 
chives and History in cooperation with the De¬ 
partment of Public Instruction and other inter¬ 
ested agencies or organizations of a Junior His¬ 
torical Organization in North Carolina. 

The general direction of the North Carolina 
Junior Historian Association is under an advis¬ 
ory council which includes the Governor of the 
State of North Carolina, the State Superintendent 
of Public Instruction, the Director of the State 
Department of Archives and History, a represen¬ 
tative of the State Literary and Historical Asso¬ 
ciation, and representatives from elementary, sec¬ 
ondary and higher educational institutions. 

Any organized history club in a school may 
petition for membership in the Tarheel Junior 
Historian Association. They receive a charter 
from the Executive Secretary (Mrs. Joye E. 
Jordan, Museum Administrator of the Depart¬ 
ment of Archives and History) and a list of sug¬ 
gested projects for the new group to undertake. 
The aims of the Junior Historian movement is to 
supplement and in every way possible aid and 
support the utilization of local materials in the 
elementary grade curricula; to stimulate greater 
development of character; to teach citizenship, 
and to supply for the young people a knowledge 
and understanding of the economic, historic, dem¬ 
ocratic, and civic facets of their life. 

There are now 1032 5th and 8th grade Junior 
Historian members in 28 groups throughout the 
State. The groups and their schools are as follows: 
Backtrackers, Goldsboro Junior High, Goldsboro; 
Capital City Junior Historian Club, Josephus 
Daniels Junior High School, Raleigh; The Cardi¬ 
nal Club, Tar Heel; Cardinals, Hasty School, 
Thomasville; Clarkton Historians, Clarkton Ele¬ 
mentary, Clarkton; Carr Junior Highstorian Club, 
Carr Junior High, Durham; The Dogwood Club, 
Hasty School, Thomasville; E. E. Smith Junior 
Historian, E. E. Smith High School, Kenansville; 
Harnett Junior Hi Historian Club, Harnett High, 
Dunn ; Hunters Club, Richard B. Harrison, Selma; 
Inglis Fletcher Club, Edenton Elementary, Eden- 
ton; Junior Historian Club, Bladenboro School, 
Bladenboro; The Junior Tar Heel Club, Mount 
Olive High School, Mount Olive; The Margaret 
Faison Chapter, Clinton Junior High, Clinton; 
Midivay Junior Historian Club, Midway Ele¬ 
mentary, Lexington; Mt. Ulla Junior Historian 
Club, Mount Ulla School, Mt. Ulla; Old North- 
State Junior History Club, Claremont School, 
Claremont; Pine Needles Club, Reeds School, Lex¬ 
ington; Ralph Bunch Club, Booker T. Washington 


High School, Clarkton; The Ramblers, Richard 
B. Harrison, Selma; The Searchers, Wm. M. 
Cooper Elementary School, Clayton ; Tar and Pine 
Junior Historical Club, Claremont School, Clare¬ 
mont; Tarheel Historian Club, Josephus Daniels 
Junior High School, Raleigh; Tarheel History 
Club, Welcome School, Welcome; Tarheel Junior 
Historian Club, Murphy Elementary, Raleigh; 
Teen-Age Tcir Heels, Denton High School, Denton ; 
Wallburg Junior Historian Club, Wallburg; White 
Oak Junior Historian Club, White Oak. 

THURMOND CHATHAM 

The death of Thurmond Chatham in February 
means the loss of an interested and enthusiastic 
supporter of historical activities in North Caro¬ 
lina. Mr. Chatham had restored a historic house 
in Ronda, where he made one of his homes, and 
only a few months ago he donated to the Depart¬ 
ment of Archives and History a unique and very 
valuable collection of documents relating to the 
history of North Carolina. He was a member of 
the Executive Committee of the North Carolina 
Literary and Historical Association and in many 
other ways he showed continued and active sup¬ 
port and interest in the history of his State. 

DONORS 

Below are listed those who have made loans or 
gifts to the Department of Archives and History 
during the two-month period from December 15 to 
February 15. 

Archives 

Mrs. Hallie J. Austin, Raleigh 

Mrs. E. M. Chappell, Durham 

Mrs. James P. Cook, Concord 

Mr. Ted Creech, Wendell 

Mrs. E. H. Daughtry, Mount Olive 

Mrs. Kay Dixon, Gastonia 

Miss Bettie Sue Gardner, Reidsville 

Mr. Clarence W. Griffin, Forest City 

Dr. J. E. Hodges, Maiden 

Mr. H. G. Jones, Raleigh 

Mrs. W. N. H. Jones, Raleigh 

Mr. McDaniel Lewis, Greensboro 

Mr. J. L. Mixson, Dadeville, Alabama 

Raleigh Chamber of Commerce, Raleigh 

Mrs. C. P. Robinson, Gastonia 

Mrs. William Royster, Raleigh 

Mr. Bill Sharpe, Raleigh 

Mrs. J. Milton Stokes, Littleton 

Mr. Richard Walser, Raleigh 

Dr. D. J. Whitener, Boone 

Mr. Emmett Winslow, Hertford 

Mrs. Lillian F. Wood, New Bern 

Hall of History 

Mrs. George W. Craig, Asheville 
Mrs.Sam Dunn, Enfield 

Mrs. Eliza Briggs Furlong and Mrs. Sarah Briggs Trentman, Raleigh 

Mr. J. Baxter Johnson, Sr., Raleigh 

Mrs. Virginia H. Schoenborn, Raleigh 

Dr. Joshua J. Skinner, Hertford 

Mrs. William B. Umstead, Durham 

HOUSE IN THE HORSESHOE 

The Alston House, or House in the Horseshoe, 
in Moore County, will be formally opened to the 
public on Saturday, April 6. Watch for announce¬ 
ments—and come if you can. 





An exhibit of the dresses of North Carolina’s first ladies. 


Hall of History Photo 


FIRST LADY FASHIONS 

Dresses of some of North Carolina’s first ladies 
are on display in the Ante-Bellum Room of the 
Hall of History. The display had its formal open¬ 
ing during the two-day inaugural ceremonies of 
Governor Luther H. Hodges, and four first ladies 
were present: Mrs. Luther H. Hodges, Mrs. J. M. 
Broughton, Mrs. J. C. B. Ehringhaus, and Mrs. 
O. Max Gardner, as well as members of the Sir 
Walter Cabinet and wives of North Carolina 
Supreme Court justices. 

The dresses shown above and the dates of the 
Governor’s term in office are as follows, left to 
right: the inaugural gown of Mrs. William B. 
Umstead (1953-1954), a pale blue V-necked chif¬ 
fon full-length gown embroidered with seed 
pearls; a blue lace evening gown of Mrs. W. Kerr 
Scott (1949-1953) ; the wedding gown of Mrs. 
R. Gregg Cherry (1945-1959), made of white net 
with a white satin train and a belt trimmed with 
white satin rosettes; a crepe chiffon square-necked 
evening gown trimmed with brilliants of Mrs. 


J. M. Broughton (1941-1945) ; the inaugural gown 
of Mrs. Clyde R. Hoey (1937-1941), fashioned of 
gold crepe with intricate draping and a shawl 
effect of thick fringe; the inaugural gown of Mrs. 
J. C. B. Ehringhaus (1933-1937), made of cream 
brocade satin with a bolero jacket and short train; 
the inaugural gown of Mrs. 0. Max Gardner 
(1929-1933), fashioned of white velvet trimmed 
with diamondettes with a yard long train; a gown 
of Mrs. William W. Kitchin (1909-1913) with a 
lace yoke, a high lace collar, and a cummerbund 
effect with an inset of metallic embroidery; the 
wedding gown of Mrs. Daniel L. Swain (1832- 
1835), made of white satin with a bell skirt; an 
empire style gown of Mrs. Richard Caswell (1776- 
1780, 1784-1787), made of gold brocaded crepe. 

The inaugural gown of Mrs. Locke Craig (1913- 
1917), has recently been given to the Department 
of Archives and History by Mrs. George W. Craig 
of Asheville and it will be included in this exhibit. 
It is made of white crepe de Chine and is trimmed 
with beads and velvet flowers. 


NORTH CAROLINA LIBRARY COMMISSION 



RALEIGH, N. C 















•mu uiui ui 


'Z-M, Raleigh 

CAROLINA COMMENTS 


i Volume VI May 



Hall of History Photo 

“Hope,” a colonial mansion built about 1770 and 
located near Windsor. It was the birthplace and home 
of David Stone, United States Senator and Governor 
of the State, 1808-1810. 

REGIONAL MEETING 

The spring regional meeting of the North 
Carolina Literary and Historical Association will 
be held in co-operation with the Bertie County 
Historical Association, May 10-11, at Windsor. 
The program is as follows: 

FRIDAY, MAY 10 

12:00-l :45 Registration, Community Building 
2:00 Meeting, Community Building, 

Christopher Crittenden, Secretary, 
Presiding 

Welcome, E. S. Askew, President, 
Bertie County Historical Associa¬ 
tion: Joseph Spivey, Mayor of 
Windsor; James A. Speight, Rep¬ 
resentative from Bertie County 
2:30 Ceremonies by the United Daugh¬ 

ters of the Confederacy, Confederate 
Monument 

3:00 Tour of “Hope.” Hosts, Dr. and Mrs. 

J. E. Smith. Comments by John E. 
Tyler, Bertie County Historian 
5:00 Tea at “Windsor Castle.” Hosts, Dr. 

and Mrs. Cola Castelloe 

7:30 Dinner Meeting, Community Build¬ 

ing, President Gilbert T. Stephenson, 
Presiding 


1957 Number 1 

Introduction of Speaker, Christo¬ 
pher Crittenden, Secretary 
W. P. Gumming, Davidson Col¬ 
lege, “The Earliest Permanent 
Settlements in North Carolina, 
circa 1650” 

SATURDAY, MAY 11 

9:00 Meeting, Community Building, Pres¬ 

idents Gilbert T. Stephenson and 
E. S. Askew Presiding 

Introduction of Speakers, George 
C. Spoolman, Clerk of Superior 
Court, Bertie County 
H. R. Paschal, Jr., East Carolina 
College, “The Tuscarora Indians” 
Display of Indian Relics, and Re¬ 
marks, Roy Johnson, Editor, 
Daily Neivs, Murfreesboro. 

10:00 Tour of “Rosefield.” Hosts, Mrs. 

Moses B. Gillam and Miss Helen 
Gillam 

Tour of St. Thomas Episcopal Church 
10:30 Tour of “Avoca” 

11:15 Tour of “Scotch Hall.” Hosts, Mr. 

and Mrs. George W. Capehart. Re¬ 
freshments 

12:00 Tour of Eden House Beach 

12:30 Tour of Mount Gould 

1:15 Picnic Lunch, Colerain Beach Pavil¬ 

ion. President Gilbert T. Stephenson, 
Presiding 

Introduction of Speaker, J. A. 
Pritchett, Attorney, Windsor 
Address, Ray Wilkinson, Vice 
President, The North Carolina 
Literary and Historical Associa¬ 
tion, Rocky Mount 
2:30 Adjournment 

Headquarters will be at the Community Building, 
Windsor. Information concerning rooms, meals, 
program, and tours may be obtained there. Rooms 
in the area range from $2.25 to $5.00 for singles, 
and from $5.00 to $9.00 for doubles. 

In Windsor, you may write to the Duke of 
Windsor Hotel, the Lancaster Motel, Box 427, or 
to Mrs. Goodwin Spivey. In Williamston, you may 
find accommodations at the Ross Motel or the 
Breezewood Motel. 

Meals will be by subscription. Dinner will be 
$2.00. The picnic lunch will be $1.25. 
























CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume VI May, 1957 Number 1 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 


Issued to Members of The North Carolina Literary and 
Historical Association, Incorporated, to Public Libraries, 
and to Individuals. 

Grace B. Mahler, Editor 


BISHOP IVES CABIN 

Last summer the Church of the Holy Cross at 
Valle Crucis purchased the Bishop Levi S. Ives 
cabin from its owners with plans to restore the 
cabin which has great historical value to the 
Church and to the mountain area. 

The cabin was built in 1843 and used by Bishop 
Ives when he came to the valley. He established 
a mission there with a three-fold purpose: to pro¬ 
vide an associate mission for the people in the 
northwest mountain area, to establish a day- 
school for mountain children, and to organize a 
seminary to train local men for the ministry. 

The congregation at Valle Crucis has a commit¬ 
tee to restore the cabin and a site has been select¬ 
ed for the building. They have estimated that the 
restoration will cost $1,750 and they will be glad 
to receive contributions for this work. 

Contributions should be mailed to Mrs. Howard 
Murry at Valle Crucis and marked “Bishop Ives 
Cabin.” 

FOREST HISTORY FOUNDATION 

The Forest History Foundation, Incorporated, 
was until June, 1955, a special project of the Min¬ 
nesota Historical Society at which time it became 
incorporated in and is now affiliated with more 
than 100 of the leading collecting and educational 
institutions in the United States and Canada. It 
now has its headquarters at 2706 West Seventh 
Boulevard, St. Paul 16, Minnesota. 

The purposes of this foundation are to collect, 
preserve, and disseminate the history of the North 
American forests and all forest-related activities. 

The Forest History Foundation wishes to be 
notified if you have or know the location of such 
items as diaries, correspondence, photographs, or 
perhaps old lumber company records shedding 
light on pioneer loggers, paper makers, foresters, 
and conservationists. The Foundation is not a col¬ 
lection center; rather, it locates and negotiates 
for the deposit of the materials in a local or re¬ 
gional historical society library or archives. Once 
the material is deposited, the society through its 
publications notifies interested persons so that 
they may utilize it. 


AWARDS COMMITTEE 

The Association’s Committee on Awards met in 
Raleigh on March 6 to make some changes in the 
regulations for the annual literary competitions. 

Present were Mr. W. S. Powell, Chairman, Mrs. 
Guion Griffis Johnson, Dr. Sturgis Leavitt, Pro¬ 
fessor Richard Walser, Dr. Christopher Critten¬ 
den, and Mrs. Grace B. Mahler. 

The Committee first considered the matter of 
which months should constitute a contest year. 
It was felt that the period from September 1 
to August 31 often kept eligible books from reach¬ 
ing the hands of the judges in time to have fail- 
consideration before the votes had to be in. There¬ 
fore it was decided that the contest year should 
run from July 1 to June 30 in order for the judges 
to have ample time to read all the books. This will 
go into effect this current year and this time the 
contest period will cover only ten months. Since 
the preliminary list of eligible books so far totals 
42, it seems that there will be an ample number 
of entries. 

The next question to be considered was whether 
an award could be won by an author in consecu¬ 
tive years. After some discussion, it was the sense 
of the Committee that the regulations for each 
contest be changed to prevent the same author’s 
winning the same competition for two consecutive 
years. 

These changes were voted on and approved by 
the Executive Committee of the Association and 
by the various groups that present the awards 
through the Association. 

DONORS 

Below are listed those who have made loans or 
gifts to the Department of Archives and History 
during the two-month period from February 15 
to April 15. 

Archives 

Mrs. U. B. Alexander, Kittrell 

American Association of Social Workers, North Carolina 

Chapter, Raleigh 
Mr. D. L. Corbitt, Raleigh 
Miss Bettie Sue Gardner, Reidsville 

The Genealogical Society of the Church of Jesus Christ 

of Latter Day Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah 
Miss Bettie June Hayes, Hillsboro 
Mr. W. E. Hennessee, Salisbury 
Mr. H. G. Jones, Raleigh 
Mr. Mike Leavister, Raleigh 
Mrs. Virginia P. Lidwin, Crystal City, Texas 
Mr. Armistead Maupin, Jr., Raleigh 
Mrs. Eunice G. Robinson, Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. Maryline Cauthen Westenhaver, Auburn, Alabama 
Mr. Charles M. White, Manson 

Hall of History 

Mr. Earley W. Bridges, Greensboro 

Mr. Erastus D. Nixson, La Mesa, California 

Mrs. Mildred B. Pope. Clayton 

Mrs. Edwin C. Rochelle, Raleigh 

Mrs. H. F. Twitty, Warrenton 











Hall of History Photo 

Exhibit of a school room of fifty years ago which may 
be seen in the Portrait Gallery of the Hall of History. 


map is also five cents and is available upon re¬ 
quest. 

Money Problems of Early Tar Heels and The 
North Carolina State Flag, both 14-page booklets 
and 10 cents apiece, are in their third printing and 
are now available. Tar Heel Tales, ^84 pages, and 
The War of the Regulation and the Battle of Ala¬ 
mance, May 16,1771,2>2 pages, are in their second 
printing and are 15 cents apiece. The History of 
the Great Seal of North Carolina is in its sixth 
printing, has 40 pages, and is available for 15 
cents. All these pamphlets are illustrated and are 
excellent source material for individuals, schools 
and libraries. 


SCHOOL ROOM EXHIBIT 

In honor of the 100th anniversary of the North 
Carolina Education Association and The National 
Education Association, a new exhibit was ar¬ 
ranged in the Hall of History showing a school 
room of the past century. Included in the exhibit 
is a territorial map, an old world globe, slates and 
wooden desks, ink wells, McGuffey readers, a 
dunce stool and cap, and a portrait of General 
Lee. 

The school room is a great favorite with the 
hundreds of school children who are visiting the 
Hall of History every day. Photographs are taken 
of some of the groups in place at the desks and 
doing their lessons at the blackboard. 

NEW PUBLICATIONS 

The North Carolina Department of Archives 
and History has available the Public Addresses, 
Letters and Papers of William Kerr Scott, Gov¬ 
ernor of North Carolina 1959-1953, edited by Mr. 
D. L. Corbitt and published by the Council of 
State. The “Go-Forward” program of Governor 
Scott is well documented in this volume and gives 
a broad account of the problems, reforms, and 
achievements during the four years of his admin¬ 
istration. This volume is free upon request to the 
Department of Archives and History, Box 1881, 
Raleigh. 

The Department has also recently printed two 
maps available upon request for five cents apiece. 
One map is a county outline map, 9 by 18 inches, 
which can be used in studying the educational, 
agricultural, and industrial development of the 
State as well as for designating population, vot¬ 
ing, and political subdivisions and other purposes. 

The second map, 9^2 by 22 inches, shows the 
principal engagements of the Civil War in North 
Carolina. It was taken from Volume I, Histories 
of the Several Regiments and Battalions From 
North Carolina in the Great War 1861-65. This 


NEW MEMBERS 

We are glad to welcome eight new members 
who have joined The North Carolina Literary and 
Historical Association in the period from Febru¬ 
ary 15 to April 15. 

Mr. George Watts Hill, Durham 

Mr. Meredith Johnson, Mount Vernon, Virginia 

Mrs. Harry McMullan, Washington 

Mrs. J. Harvey Oliver, Sr., Fayetteville 

Dr. David E. Plummer, Thomasville 

Senator and Mrs. Benjamin H. Summer, Rutherfordton 

Mr. John T. Welch, Oxford 

NEW BOOKS 

Books have started arriving in the Association’s 
office for the 1957 literary competitions. The fol¬ 
lowing titles have been received: 

Mayflower competition for non-fiction— Can We 
Believe the Bible?, by Jesse Baldwin; James Shep¬ 
herd Pike, by Robert Franklin Durden; The 
Eighteenth-Century Enlightenment in the Uni¬ 
versity of San Carlos de Guatemala, by John Tate 
Lanning; History of North Carolina, Volumes I 
and II, by Hugh Talmage Lefler; Ali-Mat Takes 
Off Again, by Alice Clarke Mathewson; Rebel 
Boast, by Manly Wade Wellman; George Ber¬ 
nard Shaw: Man of the Century, by Archibald 
Henderson. 

Sir Walter competition for fiction— Tall Houses 
in Winter, by Doris Betts; Caleb, My Son, by Lucy 
Daniels; Move Over Mountain, by John Ehle; 
The Devil Must, by Tom Wicker. 

A.A.U.W. competition for juveniles— True Love 
For Jenny, by Mebane Holoman Burgwyn ; Tough 
Enough’s Trip, by Ruth and Latrobe Carroll; 
Kappy Oliver, by Nona Walker. 

Roanoke-Chowan competition for poetry — 
Pickapot and. Other Poems, by Andrew Hewitt; 
Something the West Will Remember, by H. A. 
Sieber. 

If you know of other works that will be eligible, 
please let us know. 










Hall of History Photo 


“Rosefield” is located at the southern limits of Wind¬ 
sor. It was originally the property of John Gray, who 
donated the town site in 1768. It was the birthplace of 
William Blount, member of Continental Congress, signer 
of the Federal Constitution, and governor of the South 
West Territory. 



Hall of History Photo 


“Avoca” is located at the west end of Albemarle 
Sound close to the site of “Batts House.” The present 
house was built prior to 1828. 



Hall of History Photo 

“Scotch Hall” is situated between the Roanoke River 
and Albemarle Sound. The present house was built 
about 1835 by the Capehart family, who still own it. 
The property belonged to William Maule. Surveyor- 
General under Governor Eden (1714-1722), and his 
widow, Penelope Galland. Charles Pettigrew, first Bish¬ 
op-Elect of the North Carolina Episcopal Church, also 
lived here. 


MORAVIAN CRAFTS 

In the Special Room of the Hall of History a 
display has been set up commemorating the 500th 
anniversary of the Moravian Church and the 
200th anniversary of the Moravians in North 
Carolina. The display contains the implements of 
Moravian crafts used in their everyday life. There 
are home-made toy and cookie molds, stove tiles 
and roof tiles, a fire bucket, candle snuffers, float¬ 
ing wicks, night lamps, and a series of “thought 
for the day” cards. 


•0 *N *HDI3*IVH 



IHVHen 31VJ.S VKnOHVO HJLHON 
















V** , Raleigh 

/z CAROLINA COMMENTS 

I 

Volume VI July, 1957 Number 2 


GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

The North Carolina General Assembly ended 
its regular 1957 session on June 12. Among the 
many acts passed were several dealing with his¬ 
toric sites in North Carolina to be administered 
by the North Carolina Department of Archives 
and History. These acts appropriated a total of 
$104,500 for such historic sites, and $30,000 to 
the Aycock Birthplace Commission for the resto¬ 
ration of the Aycock Birthplace, which later will 
be administered by the Department of Archives 
and History; $20,000 for the Stonewall Jackson 
Scholarship; and $25,000 toward the construction 
of the Major General William C. Lee Memorial in 
Dunn in memory of the founder of the first Air¬ 
borne Division. 

Bentonville Battleground in Johnston County, 
preserved in part and the 51 acres on which stands 
the Harper House, used during the battle (March 
19-21, 1865) as a hospital, will be purchased. Ben¬ 
tonville is one of the best preserved Civil War 
battlefields and is the site of one of the last im¬ 
portant battles of the War. 

The Governor Richard Caswell Memorial in 
Lenoir County will be developed in the manner of 
a historic site and will have a museum. Permanent 
improvements will be made on the land which is 
part of the old Caswell Plantation overlooking the 
Neuse River. The graveyard is part of this proper¬ 
ty. 

Repair, acquisition, and maintenance of historic 
buildings and sites in the Town of Bath in Beau¬ 
fort County are provided for in recognition of 
the oldest incorporated town in the State. 

The House in the Horseshoe, Revolutionary War 
battlesite in Moore County, will have further 
permanent improvements. 

Person’s Ordinary in Warren County, as one of 
the last surviving inns in North Carolina dating 
from before the Revolution, will be preserved as 
an example of the numerous wayside inns which 
were an important feature of colonial life. 

The birthplace of James K. Polk, eleventh Presi¬ 
dent of the United States, will be restored and 
maintained in Mecklenburg County. 

Alamance Battleground in Alamance County 
will be more fully developed as a tourist and edu¬ 
cational attraction and will be provided with a 
museum. 

Town Creek Indian Mound in Montgomery 
County will also see further development in the 


manner of a historic site and with increased 
museum facilities will better serve the public. 

The Zebulon Baird Vance birthplace in Bun¬ 
combe County will be purchased and restored as 
a permanent memorial to North Carolina’s war¬ 
time governor. 

The amounts appropriated in these special acts 
to the Department of Archives and History for 
the 1957-1959 biennium are as follows: 


Alamance Battleground .$15,000 

Bentonville Battleground 25,000 

Governor Richard Caswell Memorial 25,000 

Colonial Bath 10,000 

House in the Horseshoe 500 

Person’s Ordinary 4,000 

James K. Polk Birthplace 7,500 

Town Creek Indian Mound 10,000 

Zebulon Baird Vance Birthplace. 7,500 


Appropriated also to the Department of 
Archives and History for the development and 
maintenance of these various properties was the 
sum of $107,636 for the biennium. This amount 
is to be divided as follows: 

Historic Sites Division. Central Administration, 
approximately $12,000 for each year of the 
biennium; 

Alamance Battleground, $7,928 the first year and 
$6,178 the second; 

Bentonville Battleground, $4,308 the first year and 
$6,008 the second; 

Aycock Birthplace, $5,792 the first year and $7,142 
the second; 

Brunswick Town, approximately $10,000 each- 
year ; 

Covered Bridge, Catawba County, $200 each year 
for repairs and alterations; 

James Iredell House, $2,000 each year for repairs; 

Town Creek Indian Mound, approximately $9,000 
each year; 

Historic Halifax, $3,000 each year. 

In addition to these amounts, the sum of ap¬ 
proximately $22,000 was appropriated for the ad¬ 
ministration of Tryon Palace in New Bern. Restor¬ 
ation work has nearly been completed and it is 
expected that the Palace will be opened to the 
public in 1958. The Department of Archives and 
History will assist and cooperate in the admini¬ 
stration of the Palace, which will be classified as. 
a State Historic Site. 











CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume VI July, 1957 Number 2 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 

Issued to Members of The North Carolina Literary and 
Historical Association, Incorporated, to Public Libraries, 
and to Individuals. 

Grace B. Mahler, Editor 


CULLOWHEE MEETING 

On August 16 and 17 the annual joint regional 
meeting of the State Literary and Historical As¬ 
sociation and the Western North Carolina His¬ 
torical Association will be held at Western Caro¬ 
lina College, Cullowhee. Dr. Rosser H. Taylor of 
the Department of Social Sciences at the College 
is chairman of the program and arrangements 
committee. 

This will be the sixth such regional meeting 
held jointly by the two associations. At this writ¬ 
ing the program has not been completed, but 
indications are that it will be interesting and 
informative. 

The Friday afternoon session will have as 
featured speakers William D. McKee of Cashiers 
and High Hampton Inn, and Paul Kelley of 
Vonore, Tennessee. Mr. McKee will read a paper 
on “The H. Volume in Jackson County,” and the 
subject of Mr. Kelley’s address will be “The Story 
of Fort Loudoun.” 

This session will be followed by a tea given by 
the college in the Library. 

Glenn Tucker of Flat Rock will address the 
meeting at the Friday dinner session. The subject 
of his talk will be “Some Aspects of North Caro¬ 
lina’s Participation in the Gettysburg Campaign.” 

On Saturday morning a panel discussion will be 
presented by Dr. Taylor on the subject, “Cultural 
Centers in North Carolina.” 

On Saturday evening members will have the 
opportunity to visit Cherokee and view Kermit 
Hunter’s drama, “LTnto These Hills.” 

LITERARY CONTESTS 

Judges have been named to the Boards of 
Award which consider the books entered in the 
various literary competitions. 

Those who will serve on the Mayflower Board 
of Award for non-fiction are Dr. Richard N. Cur¬ 
rent, Head of the Department of History, and Dr. 
Leonard B. Hurley, Head of the Department of 
English, both of the Woman’s College in Greens¬ 
boro; Miss Katherine Noyes of the Department 
of English at Wilmington College and Mr. Wins¬ 
ton Broadfoot of Wilmington; and Miss Annie 
Lee Singletary of the Journal-Sentinel in Winston- 
Salem. 

The judges for the Sir Walter Raleigh com¬ 


petition for fiction, the A.A.U.W. competition for 
juvenile literature, and the Roanoke-Chowan com¬ 
petition for poetry are Dr. E. Malcolm Carroll, 
Chairman of the Department of History, and Dr. 
Charles E. Wood, Chairman of the Department 
of English, both of Duke University; Mrs. Jessica 
Valentine of the Bull’s Head Book Shop in Chapel 
Hill; Professor Phillips Russell, Head of the 
Department of Journalism at the University at 
Chapel Hill; and Miss Charlesanna Fox, Librarian 
of Asheboro. 

The judges for the Robert D. W. Connor com¬ 
petition for the best article in the field of North 
Carolina history or biography published in The 
North Carolina Historical Review in the four 
issues ending with July, 1957, are Dr. Alice B. 
Keith of Meredith College, Dr. Herbert T. Paschal 
of East Carolina College, and Dr. Percival Perry 
of Wake Forest College. 

KNOW YOUR HISTORIC SITES 

A new exhibit in the Portrait Gallery of the 
Hall of History depicts the historic sites of North 
Carolina which are now open to the public. These 
sites include those maintained by both the Federal 
and State governments and also by private organi¬ 
zations. 

The pictures are arranged in panels showing 
the historic houses, battlegrounds, and memorials 
from the coast to the mountains. Those pictured 
in the coastal section are the Wright Memorial 
at Kitty Hawk; Fort Raleigh at Manteo; Saint 
Paul's Church, the Iredell House, and the Barker 
House at Edenton ; Saint Thomas Church at Bath; 
Somerset Place at Pettigrew State Park; Tryon 
Palace at New Bern; Fort Macon near Beaufort; 
the Bellamy Mansion, Fort Fisher, Moore’s Creek 
Bridge, and Orton Plantation near Wilmington; 
Saint Phillip’s Church ruins at Brunswick; and 
Bentonville Battleground in Johnston County. 

In the Piedmont section the historic sites in¬ 
clude the State Capitol and the Andrew Johnson 
House at Raleigh; the Bennett Place near Dur¬ 
ham ; the House in the Horseshoe near Carthage; 
Town Creek Indian Mound in Montgomery Coun¬ 
ty; the Maxwell Chambers House in Salisbury; 
the Old Stone House near Salisbury; Alamance 
Battleground near Burlington; Guilford Court¬ 
house National Military Park near Greensboro; 
and Old Salem in Winston-Salem. 

Sites in the western part of the State include 
the Thomas Wolfe home in Asheville and Ocon- 
aluftee Indian Village at Cherokee. 

The exhibit also includes undeveloped sites of 
historical significance such as the Vance and 
Ayeock birthplaces and Caswell’s grave. The dis¬ 
play is arranged to introduce visitors in the 
museum to the many and varied historic sites 
which can be visited throughout North Carolina. 









KNOW YOUR TOWN 

From the Progress Report of the Tryon Palace 
Restoration for the period of from November 15, 
1956, to May 20, 1957, comes the following in¬ 
formation concerning a project which is also 
being emphasized in one form or another by other 
tourist centers in the State. 

Miss Gertrude Carraway, Restoration Director 
of Tryon Palace, at the suggestion of Mrs. J. A. 
Kellenberger, Chairman of the Tryon Palace Com¬ 
mission, started free classes in New Bern history 
for New Bern women on January 15, for the pri¬ 
mary purpose of training guides or hostesses for 
the Restoration when it is opened to the public. 

Interest developed far beyond expectations, 
with an enrollment of 125 individuals. There were 
16 lessons, all well attended, and a series of 
lectures by those closely associated with the 
restoration work and with New Bern was given, 
along with lessons conducted by the Director. 

Some of the students participated in the pro¬ 
grams with sketches of local churches and old 
homes and many undertook special research. On 
May 4 written examinations of 50 questions on 
local history were given the students, and 44 
women received Tryon Palace Restoration Certi¬ 
ficates of Award. Of the 44, no less than 31 ex¬ 
pressed an interest in becoming Palace guides or 
hostesses. 

As a result of the success of the course, requests 
have come for additional courses, including night 
classes to include men students. The New Bern 
Merchants’ Association has asked the Restoration 
Director to have programs on local history next 
fall for sales clerks in New Bern stores. 

ELIGIBLE BOOKS 

Additional books have arrived in the Associ¬ 
ation’s office to be entered in the various literary 
competitions. Their titles are as follows: 

Mayflower competition for non-fiction —Thomas 
Hardy and the Cosmic Mind, by J. 0. Bailey; 
Urban Land Use Planning, by F. Stuart Chapin, 
Jr.; Lengthened Shadmvs: A History of Gardner - 
Webb College, 1907-1956, by F. B. Dedmond; 
Tarheel Talk, by N. E. Eliason; A History 
of Meredith College, by Mary Lynch Johnson; 
Policy Formation in Railroad Finance, by John T. 
O’Neil; For Teenagers Only, by Frank Howard 
Richardson; The Cokers of Carolina, by G. L. 
Simpson, Jr.; A Survey of the Old Testament, by 
W. W. Sloan; To ward a More Democratic Social 
Order, by Wendell Thomas; The University of 
North Carolina, 1900-1930, by Louis Round Wil¬ 
son. 

Sir Walter competition for fiction —El Tigre, 
by Edith Hutchins Smith; The Founders, by Paul 
Green; Blacktop, by Bertha B. Moore; Chattering 


Cherubs, by Anne Davis Rabe. Remembrance 
Way, by Jessie Rehder. 

A.A.U.W. competition for juveniles —Roberta 
E. Lee, by Burke Davis; Taffy of Torpedo Junc¬ 
tion, by Nell Wise Wechter; Autumn on Breezy 
Hill, by Betsy McCurry. 

Roanoke-Chowan competition for poetry —Part 
of Each Day, by Cynthia Deford Adams; Dream¬ 
er’s Wine, by Ruby P. Shackleford; Ten Angels 
Swearing, by Dorothy Edwards Summerrow. 

If you know of additional titles which have not 
been listed above or in the May issue of Carolina 
Comments, please let us know. 

DONORS 

Below are listed those who have made loans or 
gifts to the Department of Archives and History 
during the two-month period from April 15 to 
June 15. 

ARCHIVES 

Mr. Duncan Baxter, Fort Payne, Florida 

Mrs. W. B. Beasley, Smithfield 

Mr. Winston Broadfoot, Wilmington 

Mr. D. L. Corbitt, Raleigh 

Mr. T. B. Gillespie, St. Augustine, Florida 

Mr. Benjamin Grady, Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. A. C. Husketh, Kittrell 

Johnston-Pettigrew Chapter of the United Daughters 
of the Confederacy, Raleigh 
Mr. William P. Johnson, Raleigh 
Mrs. Dixie Jones, Pell City, Alabama 
Mr. Normam Larson, Raleigh 

North Carolina Federation of Business and Professional 
Women’s Clubs, Raleigh 
Mrs. R. Hunt Parker, Raleigh 
Miss H. Ethel Ray, Asheville 
Mrs. Mary Rogers, Neuse 
Mrs. Mary Sullivan, Selma 
Mrs. W. H. Trentman, Raleigh 

United States Justice Department, Washington, D. C. 
Mrs. Lonnie Weathers, Rolesville 

HALL OF HISTORY 

Mr. Gurney P. Hood, Raleigh 
Mrs. Angus W. McLean, Lumberton 
Colonel William J. Payne, Charlotte 
Tryon Palace Restoration, New Bern 
Mrs. John Sanders, Raleigh 
Miss Ethel Speas, Raleigh 
Colonel Jeffry F. Stanback, Mt. Gilead 
Mrs. Jane P. Withers, Raleigh 

JAMES MADISON 

The University of Chicago and the University 
of Virginia are sponsoring the publication of a 
new and complete edition of the papers of James 
Madison. The editors will appreciate information 
about the location of letters by or to James Madi¬ 
son or his wife, especially letters in private pos¬ 
session or among uncalendared manuscripts in 
the collections of public or private institutions. 
Please address The Papers of James Madison, 
1126 East 59th Street, Chicago 37, Illinois. 


LIMITED EDITION 


CONTRIBUTIONS NEEDED 


A copy of a book entitled The Old Dutch Bury¬ 
ing Ground of Sleepy Hollow in North Tarry town. 
New York —.4 Record of the Early Gravestones 
<nid Their I ascriptions, 1!)53, has been received in 
this office. The book was printed in limited edition 
by a private foundation in connection with the 
restoration of some of the stones at Sleepy Hol¬ 
low and is concerned with the preservation of 
historical monuments and records. The foundation 
is interested in obtaining a wide distribution of 
the book, which contains notes on proved methods 
of preserving and restoring old gravestones, to 
parishes or organizations which own such burying 
grounds dating from before 1860. The book is 
also of considerable interest from a genealogical 
point of view. Perry, Shaw, Hepburn and Dean, 
Architects, 955 Park Square Building. Boston 16. 
Massachusetts, will be glad to send a free copy to 
any interested and responsible group. 

NEW MEMBERS 

We are glad to welcome the following new mem¬ 
bers who have joined The North Carolina Literary 
and Historical Association in the period from 
April 15 to June 15. 

Mrs. E. A. Anderson, Charlotte 

Mrs. Richard Paxton Badham, Edenton 

Mrs. F. I. Barber, Forest City 

Mr. George W. Bradham, Greensboro 

Miss Katherine K. Carmichael, Chapel Hill 

Mr. Richard Fetzer, Rocky River, Ohio 

Miss Sarah E. Hamilton, Lumberton 

Mrs. Anne S. Harrison, Black Mountain 

Mrs. Frank McCrary, Colerain 

Mr. Dennis E. Myers, Charlotte 

Mr. Charles A. Nichols, Asheville 

Mr. B. B. Plyer, Jr., Wilson 

Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Price, Greensboro 

Miss Frances P. Smith, Liberty 

Mr. Durward T. Stokes, Graham 

Mr. David M. Warren, Panhandle, Texas, Life Member 
M rs. N. W. Weldon, Stovall 


Contributions are being asked for the preserva¬ 
tion of Bentonville Battleground in Johnston 
County and the need is immediate. The Bentonville 
Battleground Association, Inc., has an option on 
the land which includes the old Confederate ceme- 
tary; Harper House, which was used as a field 
hospital for both sides after the battle; and a 
section of woods which includes the best preserved 
battlements and trenches of the Civil War. This 
option will expire on September 1. 

The total amount needed is $50,000 of which 
$39,000 has already been raised from the follow¬ 
ing sources: The General Assembly appropriated 
$25,000; Johnston County appropriated $10,000; 
and $4,000 has been raised from individual con¬ 
tributions. An additional $11,000 must be raised. 

This cause is enhanced by the fact that this 
battlefield surpasses all others in that it has been 
so little disturbed and, by preserving what is left, 
now could well become one of the most visited and 
important memorial sites to the Confederacy. 

The July, 1956, issue of The North Carolina His¬ 
torical Review carried an account of the battle 
at Bentonville on March 19-21, 1865. The article 
was written by Dr. Jay Luvaas of the Duke Uni¬ 
versity Library and gives details of the actions of 
both Sherman’s and Johnston’s armies in this 
encounter. 

Contributions should be made out to the Benton¬ 
ville Battleground Association, Inc., in care of Mr. 
William R. Britt, Box 526. Smithfield. 



Raleigh 

f CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume VI September, 1957 Number 3 

CORPORATE CITIZENSHIP AWARD 


The North Carolina Literary and Historical 
Association will present a new award at its annual 
meeting in December. The name of the award is 
the Corporate Citizenship Award and it will con¬ 
sist of a first prize and not more than three 
honorable mentions. The consideration will go to 
those business organizations that are adjudged 
to have rendered the greatest service to the liter¬ 
ary, historical, and general cultural advancement 
of their community or of the State of North Caro¬ 
lina during the twelve-month period ending June 
30. 

Every chamber of commerce in North Carolina 
will be entitled to nominate for an award not more 
than two business concerns, with headquarters or 
a branch located in the immediate area of the 
organization. 

The Board of Award consists of five members, 
one to be appointed by the executive head of each 
of the following organizations: the National Asso¬ 
ciation of Manufacturers, the United States Cham¬ 
ber of Commerce, the American Bankers Associa¬ 
tion, the American Association for State and Local 
History, and the Southern Historical Association. 

This award is an outgrowth of the Corporate 
Contributors’ Committee and the Businessmen’s 
Committee of The North Carolina Literary and 
Historical Association. The Corporate Contribu¬ 
tors’ Committee is made up of organizations which 
contribute to the furthering of the program of 
the Association. The Contributors are as follows: 
Burlington Industries Foundation. Greensboro; 
Carolina Delivery Service Company, Charlotte; 
Chatham Manufacturing Company, Elkin; The 
Dickson Foundation, Inc., Mount Holly; Fayette¬ 
ville Observer, Fayetteville; Heritage Furniture, 
Inc., High Point; Hotel Sir Walter, Raleigh; 
Jefferson Standard Foundation, Charlotte; Occi¬ 
dental Life Insurance Company, Raleigh; J. N. 
Pease and Company, Charlotte; Piedmont Pub¬ 
lishing Company, Winston-Salem; Smith’s Heat¬ 
ing, Kinston; Textiles Incorporated, Gastonia; 
United Furniture, Lexington ; B. 0. Vannort Engi¬ 
neers, Inc., Charlotte. 

The Businessman’s Committee is made up of 
private citizens who are interested in finding ways 
in which business and cultural groups can comple¬ 
ment each other’s activities. The following serve 
in this consulting capacity: T. B. Duckett, Raleigh ; 
M. R. Dunnagan, Raleigh; W. E. Gladding, Kin¬ 
ston; James A. Gray, Winston-Salem; John Har¬ 


den, Greensboro; Sturgis LeavittV Chapel Hill; 
McDaniel Lewis, Greensboro; Charles J. Parker, 
Raleigh. 

The award will be based on general services of 
a company such as physical appearance of its 
plants and grounds; contributions to the educa¬ 
tional and charitable institutions of its area; 
fringe benefits to personnel; and its relationship 
toward the over-all business atmosphere of the 
State. Cultural services will also play a part in 
the consideration of each entry such as scholar¬ 
ships given, sponsorship or encouragement of such 
activities as lectures, little theater, adult education 
activities, local historical restoration work, and 
other fields. 

All entries are to be submitted to Dr. Chris¬ 
topher Crittenden, Box 1881, Raleigh, by October 1 
and the recipient will be announced on December 6. 

BENTONVILLE—HISTORIC SITE 

Bentonville Battleground has been purchased 
and saved largely through the interest and efforts 
of individuals and various county and other his¬ 
torically minded groups. Not the least among 
these are two men, Mr. William R. Britt, attorney 
at law of Smithfield, and Mr. Hershel V. Rose, 
Clerk of Superior Court of Johnston County. Mr. 
Britt’s interest and work on this project may be 
traced to a sense of gratitude to the United 
Daughters of the Confederacy since he was a re¬ 
cipient of a UDC fellowship during his college 
years. Mr. Rose is a member of the Executive 
Board of the North Carolina Department of Ar¬ 
chives and History. 

Some of the organizations which have helped 
raise the money and provoke interest in the Ben¬ 
tonville project are the local historical societies 
of Cumberland, Harnett, Johnston, Sampson, and 
Wayne counties, as well as the United Daughters 
of the Confederacy. The money to purchase the 
51 acres was raised—$25,000 appropriated by the 
1957 General Assembly, $10,000 appropriated by 
Johnston County, $13,000 raised by private con¬ 
tributions and a bank loan of $2,000. 

Mr. George K. Gelbach of Edenton has been em¬ 
ployed by the Department of Archives and His¬ 
tory as the Historic Site Specialist for Benton¬ 
ville Battleground. A native of Maryland, he is a 
graduate of Gettysburg College, Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, and received his master’s degree in 
southern history at Duke University. He has been 
teaching in the Edenton schools for the past nine 
years. 




CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume VI September, 1957 Number 3 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 


Issued to Members of The North Carolina Literary and 
Historical Association, Incorporated, to Public Libraries, 
and to Individuals. 

Grace B. Mahler, Editor 


KEEPING ABREAST 

As more and more is learned about our history 
and as new techniques for discovery, preserva¬ 
tion, and dissemination of historical information 
are found, it is necessary for those in the field to 
keep abreast of recent developments. 

For this reason members of the staff of the 
North Carolina Department of Archives and His¬ 
tory have been studying and teaching this sum¬ 
mer along with the performance of their regular 
duties. 

Mr. H. G. Jones, State Archivist, attended in 
Washington the Eleventh Institute on the Preser¬ 
vation and Administration of Archives, spon¬ 
sored jointly by the National Archives, the Li¬ 
brary of Congress, the Maryland Hall of Records, 
and the American University. The four-week 
course was attended by archivists from all over 
the United States and from two foreign countries. 
Mr. Jones made the highest grade in the class. 
Along with the scheduled lectures and Institute 
work, Mr. Jones took as his project in the National 
Archives, “Analyzing and Indexing by Minor 
Place or District Names the North Carolina 
Census of I860.’’ 

Mrs. Fanny Memory Blackwelder, State Rec¬ 
ords Center Supervisor, attended in Washington 
the Fourth Institute on Records Management, 
sponsored by the National Archives and the 
American University. People from Federal, state, 
and private management centers attended this 
two-week course. 

Mrs. Martha H. Farley, Exhibit Curator for the 
Hall of History, spent a week in Washington at 
the laboratories of the National Park Service 
learning new exhibition techniques. The making 
of models and the arranging of various types of 
displays were pointed out during the week’s study. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Lewis Battle Watkins, Laminat- 
or for the Department, spent a week in Richmond, 
Virginia, at the shop of Mr. W. J. Barrow observ¬ 
ing new techniques in laminating work. Mr. Bar- 
row is the inventor of the Barrow Laminator, 
and the North Carolina Department of Archives 
and History owns one of the fewer than twenty 
Barrow units in the world. 


Dr. Christopher Crittenden, Director of the De¬ 
partment of Archives and History, conducted a 
series of lectures before the Institute on Histori¬ 
cal and Archival Management at Radcliffe Col¬ 
lege in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He delivered 
talks on both state archives and local archives. 

WBC AWARD 

The Westinghouse Broadcasting Company has 
announced the establishment of an award which 
is designed to stimulate interest and encourage 
cooperation between local historical societies and 
local radio and TV broadcasters. 

Any radio or television station in the United 
States and its possessions (with the exception of 
the stations of the Westinghouse Broadcasting 
Company) and the corresponding state or local 
historical society will be eligible to compete for 
the awards, which are as follows: 

1. A grant of $500 to the radio or television 
station which produces the program of a local 
historical nature which, in the opinion of the 
panel of judges, contributes most to the local his¬ 
tory of that community. 

2. A grant of $500 to the historical society of 
the city or town in which the winning radio or 
television station is located. In the event that 
there is no such local society, the grant will be 
given to the state historical society in which the 
winning radio or television station is located. 

3. Honorable mention scrolls will be awarded 
to the programs which, in the opinion of the same 
judges, place second and third. 

Any participating radio or television station, 
having produced the program or series of pro¬ 
grams of local historical significance during the 
period up to and including December 31, 1957, 
should submit it by tape, film, or transcription to 
the state or local historical society for considera¬ 
tion by January 15, 1958. 

The state or local historical society will appoint 
a panel of five judges, other than its own mem¬ 
bers, and it in turn will send on or before Febru¬ 
ary 1, 1958, its winning selection to the Westing¬ 
house Broadcasting Company offices in New York, 
attention Richard M. Pack, Vice President—Pro¬ 
gramming, 122 East 42nd Street, New York 17. 
New York. The three winners will be selected by 
a panel of national judges appointed by WBC and 
consisting of outstanding historians, educators, 
and broadcasters. The winner will be announced 
during the next meeting of the Boston Confer¬ 
ence, expected to be held sometime during March. 
1958. 

It is hoped that a great many of our local and 
county historical societies will enter this contest. 
Good relations between the societies and radio 
and TV in the state are necessary and working 
together on this project should prove very worth¬ 
while. 









UNWRITTEN BOOKS REPORT 

What four North Carolina subjects are in great¬ 
est need to have books written about them? A 
recent report of the Association’s Committee on 
Unwritten Books names these: colonial North 
Carolina (from 1663 to 1776) ; the building of 
railroads in North Carolina; the Sir Walter 
Raleigh colonies on Roanoke Island (for juvenile 
readers) ; and North Carolina landmarks, includ¬ 
ing famous homes, battlefields, gold mines, and the 
like, with photographs and descriptive text. 

These four are the only double-starred items of 
more than one hundred topics needing the atten¬ 
tion of energetic authors and imaginative pub¬ 
lishers. Requests for free copies of the full report 
may be sent to Mrs. Grace B. Mahler, Box 1881, 
Raleigh. 

Although the Committee is unable to provide 
material aid for writers or to solicit publishers 
for their manuscripts, it is believed that any sub¬ 
ject on the list will find eventual acceptance if 
given a successful treatment. 

Topics are slanted toward the lay and the juve¬ 
nile reader. For the school-age youngster, subjects 
searching for authors are Governor Tryon and his 
palace; the Battle of Bentonville; famous Carolina 
pirates; trappers, frontiersmen; famous Indians 
such as Junaluska and Attakullakulla; preachers; 
industrial leaders; the history of state and national 
parks; cotton and tobacco culture; folklore; and 
archeology. And these are only a beginning. 

For the adult reader of popular nonfiction, a 
number of North Carolina subjects are suggested: 
North Carolina capitals; Tar Heel art and artists; 
crafts, craftsmen, and craft centers such as Jug- 
town and Penland; biographies of Charles B. 
Aycock, James Boyd, and 0. Max Gardner, to list 
only three; and more histories of North Carolina 
counties and rivers. 

The report tells about authors already said to be 
at work, and gives the subjects on which they are 
writing. Also there is a list of illustrators and 
photographers who might collaborate with writers. 

The result of more than a year’s study and re¬ 
search, the report is submitted by a committee 
composed of Miss Porter Cowles, Mr. William S. 
Powell and Professor Walter Spearman of Chapel 
Hill; and Miss Dorothy Lou Dickey, Mrs. Miriam 
Rabb, and Professor Richard Walser, Chairman, 
of Raleigh. 

Advisers who have helped the committee are 
Mr. Henry Belk of Goldsboro; Miss Cora Paul 
Bomar of Raleigh; Mr. Francis E. Bowman of 
Durham; Mr. Winston Broadfoot of Durham; 
Mrs. Mebane Holoman Burgwyn of Jackson; Dr. 
William H. Cartwright of Durham, Mr. D. L. 
Corbitt of Raleigh; Dr. Christopher Crittenden 
of Raleigh; Mr. John Ehle of Chapel Hill; Mrs. 


Inglis Fletcher of Edenton; Mrs. Nancy M. Froe- 
lich of Jackson; Mr. Harry Golden of Charlotte; 
Mrs. Charlotte Hilton Green of Raleigh; Mr. 
Clarence W. Griffin of Forest City; Mrs. Berna¬ 
dette Hoyle of Smithfield; Mrs. Martha Langston 
Harrelson of Raleigh; Mrs. Elizabeth H. Hughey 
of Raleigh; Dr. Hugh T. Lefler of Chapel Hill; 
Mr. George W. McCoy of Asheville; Mrs. Theodore 
Rondthaler of Oeracoke; Mr. Bill Sharpe of Ra¬ 
leigh ; Mr. David Stick of Kitty Hawk; Mr. George 
M. Stephens of Asheville; and Dr. D. J. Whitener 
of Boone. 

NEW MEMBERS 

We are glad to welcome the following new mem¬ 
bers who have joined The North Carolina Literary 
and Historical Association in the period from 
July 15 to August 15. 

Mrs. H. Bascom Baucom, Monroe 

Miss Ora Blackmun. Asheville 

Mr. William R. Britt, Smithfield 

Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Forbus, Chapel Hill 

Mrs. William Daniel Holmes, Jr., Edenton 

Mrs. Ben C. Hough, Lancaster, South Carolina 

Mrs. G. Henry Jackson, Raleigh 

Miss Mary W. McNeill, Montreat 

Mr. R. H. Martindale. Greensboro 

Mrs. Helen P. Murray, Bailey 

Mr. William A. Parker, Raleigh 

Mr. William A. Pridgen, Media, Pennsylvania 

Mr. H. V. Rose, Smithfield 

Mrs. Harry J. Shonts, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. S. Owen Smith, Jr., Fayetteville 

Mr. and Mrs. S. O. Southall, Jr., Wilson 

Mrs. J. F. Surratt, Panhandle, Texas 

Mr. and Mrs. M. C. Todd, Wendell 

Mrs. J. H. Turner, Red Springs 

LITERARY CONTESTS 

More books have arrived at the Association's 
office to be entered in the various literary competi¬ 
tions. Their titles are as follows: 

Mayflower competition for non-fiction— .James 
W. Davis—North Carolina Surgeon, by LeGette 
Blythe; The Red Strings Baseball Team of Yadkin 
County, North Carolina, 1896-1902, by M. R. 
Dunnagan; Oeracoke, by Carl Goerch; Home on 
the Yadkin, by Thomas W. Ferguson; Autocondi¬ 
tioning, by Hornell Hart; Slavery and Catholicism, 
by R. R. Miller; Stories Old and New of the Cape 
Fear Region, by Louis T. Moore; 0. Henry in 
North Carolina, by Cathleen Pike; T. S. Eliot’s 
Poetry and Plays, by Grover C. Smith; A History 
of Atlantic Christian College, by Charles Cross¬ 
field Ware. 

Sir Walter competition for fiction— The Crown 
Tree, by LeGette Blythe; Web of Our Life, by 
Joseph B. Roberts; Birthright, by Lettie Hamlett 
Rogers. 

Roanoke-Chowan competition for poetry— Part 
of Each Day, by Cynthia Deford Adams; Hurri¬ 
cane and Other Poems, by Robert Morris; What¬ 
soever Things are Lovely, by Sneed Ogburn; 
Dreamer’s Wine, by Ruby P. Shackleford; Back¬ 
side of Heaven, by Leroy Sossaman; Ten Angels 
Swearing, by Dorothy Edwards Summerrow. 


A.A.U.W. competition for juvenile literature— 
Gone is My Goose, by Dorothy Koch. 

If you know of additional titles which are not 
listed above or in the May issue of Carolina 
Comments, please let us know. 

R. D. W. CONNOR AWARD 

Since 1954 the Historical Society of North Caro¬ 
lina has presented annually the Robert D. W. 
Connor Award of $25 to the author of an article 
in the field of North Carolina history or biography 
published in The North Carolina Historical Re¬ 
view in the four issues ending with the July 
number. 

Some of the articles eligible this year are “John 
Lawson’s Alter Ego—Dr. John Brickell,” by Percy 
G. Adams; “Organization and Early Years of the 
North Carolina Bar Association,” by Fannie Mem¬ 
ory Blackwelder; “Josephus Daniels as a Reluc¬ 
tant Candidate,” by E. David Cronon; “North 
Carolina Fiction, Drama, and Poetry, 1955-1956,” 
by C. Hugh Holman; “North Carolina Non-Fiction 
Books, 1955-1956,” by H. Broadus Jones; “The 
Colored Industrial Association of North Carolina 
and Its Fair of 1886,” by Frenise A. Logan; “The 
Collegium Musicum Salem: Its Music. Musicians, 
and Importance,” by Donald M. McCorkle; “Gif¬ 
ford Pinchot at Biltmore,” by Harold T. Pinkett; 
“Roanoke Colonists and Explorers: An Attempt 
at Identification,” by William S. Powell; “The Cot¬ 
ton Textile Industry in Ante-Bellum North Caro¬ 
lina, Parts 1 and 2,” by Diffee W. Standard and 
Richard W. Griffin; “Life and Literature,” by Gil¬ 
bert T. Stephenson; “Dare County Belle-Lettres,” 
by Richard Walser. 

NEW LEAFLET 

The Department of Archives and History has 
just had published another folder telling of the 
services available to the public by the Depart¬ 
ment. An earlier folder was published in 1956 de¬ 


scribing the facilities and materials available for 
genealogical research and was entitled “The Ar¬ 
chives of the North Carolina Department of Ar¬ 
chives and History.” 

The new eight page folder is entitled “Histori¬ 
cal Research in the North Carolina Department of 
Archives and History.” It describes materials and 
services available for historical research other 
than genealogy. The major classifications of mate¬ 
rials are listed such as State Records, County Rec¬ 
ords, Federal Archives Relating to North Caro¬ 
lina, Foreign Archives Relating to North Caro¬ 
lina, Maps, Newspapers, Pamphlets, Printed 
Works, Personal Collections, and Reproductions. 
Each classification is briefly explained. 

For copies of either or both of these folders, 
write to State Archivist, Box 1881, Raleigh. 

DONORS 

Below are listed those who have made loans ox- 
gifts to the Department of Archives and History 
during the period between June 15 and August 15. 

ARCHIVES 

Mrs. Taft Bass, Clinton 

Mrs. Antoinette Jenkins Bowen, Raleigh 
Miss Bessie E. Carman, New Bern 
Mr. D. L. Corbitt. Raleigh 

Daughters of the American Revolution. Colonel Polk Chapter, Raleigh 
Mrs. Kay Dixon, Gastonia 

Mrs. Cecye Dodd Eastman, Walterboro, South Carolina 
ESSO, Ballowe’s ESSO Servicenter, Raleigh 
Mr. Reuben L. frost, Wilmington 
Mrs. O. Max Gardner, Shelby 

Genealogical Society of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day 
Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah 
Mr. Clarence Griffin, Forest City 
Mrs. A. C. Hewitt, Marion 
Mr. Norman C. Larson. Raleigh 

Lions International, District 31-B. North Carolina 
National Archives, Washington. D. C. 

Mr. Robert S. Roddenbery, Jr., Moultrie, Georgia 
Senator W. Kerr Scott. Haw River 
Mr. F. M. Southerland. Mebane 

Lt. Colonel John S. Tyler, Fort McPherson, Georgia 
Mrs. E. A. Veazie. Winston-Salem 
Virginia State Library. Richmond. Virginia 

HALL OF HISTORY 

W'illiam Daniels Camera Shop, Raleigh 
Mrs. George Flint. Raleigh 
Mr. John C. Groff. Raleigh 
Mrs. A. L. Purrington. Jr., Raleigh 
Mr. Ralph Perry Rogers. Raleigh 
Mrs. George F. Syme. Raleigh 

Mr. Bert Q. and Mrs. Georgia Brewer Tilley, Raleigh 
Mrs. Jane P. Withers, Raleigh - - 



•o *Hoi2nva 


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; 4 






Norib Carolina Siaie Library 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume VI 


November, 1957 


Number 4 


ANNUAL MEETING 

The fifty-seventh annual meeting of The North 
Carolina Literary and Historical Association will 
be held at the Hotel Sir Walter in Raleigh on 
December 6. The program will include the follow¬ 
ing: 

At the morning session, Miss Gertrude Carra- 
way, Restoration Director of Tryon Palace at 
New Bern, will talk on “History is an Impor¬ 
tant Product.” New Bern, Craven County, and 
the rest of the State realize more and more the 
importance of preserving and displaying history 
and Miss Carraway will speak from her experi¬ 
ences in this field. 

Glenn Tucker of Flat Rock, last year’s recipient 
of the Mayflower Award for his book, Tecumseh, 
Vision of Glory, will talk on “Hoke’s Brigade at 
Gettysburg.” This will deal with the assault of 
the North Carolina regiments on Cemetery Hill on 
the night of July 2, 1863. 

Phillips Russell of Chapel Hill will review North 
Carolina fiction of the year, which includes the 
books eligible for the Sir Walter Raleigh, AAUW, 
and Roanoke-Chowan literary awards. There are 
32 books of fiction entered in these competitions. 

Herbert R. Paschal, Jr., of East Carolina Col¬ 
lege in Greenville, will present the R. D. W. 
Connor Award. This award is given each year 
for the best article on a North Carolina subject 
published in The North Carolina Historical Re- 
view. There are twelve eligible articles. 

Mrs. M. W. Peterson, President of the North 
Carolina Division of the American Association 
of University Women, will present the AAUW 
Award for juvenile literature. There are nine 
books entered in this competition. 

Mrs. Mebane H. Burgwyn of Jackson, winner 
of the 1954 AAUW Award for her book Penny 
Rose, will announce the Roanoke-Chowan Award 
for poetry. Ten volumes are eligible for this 
award. 

The American Association for State and Local 
History Award will be presented by W. S. Powell 
of the University of North Carolina Library at 
Chapel Hill. 

The luncheon session will include a review of 
North Carolina non-fiction works for the year 
which are eligible for the Mayflower Award. There 
are twenty-nine books entered for this Award. 
Mr. Winston Broadfoot of the Duke University 
Library will give this review. 

The Governor’s reception for the various socie¬ 


ties participating in culture week will be held 
Friday afternoon. 

At the dinner meeting Gilbert T. Stephenson of 
Pendleton will deliver his presidential address, 
“Literature and History.” 

T. V. Smith, professor emeritus of poetry, 
philosophy, and politics at Syracuse University, 
will speak on “Poetry, Politics, and Philosophy” 
at the evening session. The presentation of the 
first annual Corporate Citizenship Award will be 
announced. 

The evening session will be closed by the pre¬ 
sentation of the Sir Walter Raleigh Award for 
fiction by Miss Clara Booth Byrd of Greensboro, 
president of The Historical Book Club of North 
Carolina, and the announcement of the Mayflower 
Award for non-fiction by Mrs. Preston B. Wilkes, 
Jr., of Charlotte, governor of the Society of May¬ 
flower Descendants in North Carolina. A recep¬ 
tion will follow. 

CORPORATE CITIZENSHIP AWARD 

Ten firms have been nominated for the Associa¬ 
tion’s first annual Corporate Citizenship Award, 
representing some of North Carolina’s finest in¬ 
dustries. 

The award will be announced at the evening 
session of the annual meeting, December 6, in the 
Hotel Sir Walter. 

Judges for this award are Samuel M. Berry of 
Atlanta, for the National Association of Manu¬ 
facturers; Robert P. Butson of Roanoke, Virginia, 
for the Chamber of Commerce of the United 
States of America; Donald R. McNeil of Madison, 
Wisconsin, for the American Association for State 
and Local History; Merle E. Selecman of New 
York, for the American Bankers Association; and 
Francis B. Simkins of Farmville, Virginia, for 
the Southern Historical Association. 

NEW BOOKLET 

The Hall of History of the Department of Ar¬ 
chives and History has a new booklet available 
to teachers and group leaders who are coming to 
Raleigh to tour the Capitol, the Governor’s Man¬ 
sion, the Andrew Jackson House, and the Hall of 
History. It describes the buildings and the various 
rooms in the Hall of History, tells how and when 
these places may be visited, and has suggested 
questions for the groups to answer after they have 
completed their visit. The booklets are available 
on request from the Hall of History, Box 1881, 
Raleigh. 




CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume VI November, 1957 Number 4 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 

Issued to Members of The North Carolina Literary and 
Historical Association, Incorporated, to Public Libraries, 
and to Individuals. 

Grace B. Mahler, Editor 


MEMBERSHIP 

With the annual meeting fast approaching, it is 
time again to take a look at where the Association 
stands in its various activities. In all quarters 
but one there has been definite progress—new 
county historical societies have been organized; 
more than the usual number of books written by 
North Carolinians have been entered in the liter¬ 
ary competitions; the report of the Committee on 
Unwritten Books has been published and distri¬ 
buted ; the new Corporate Citizenship Award has 
been established; and so on through the different 
projects the Association has undertaken. 

The one important part of our program that 
has fallen behind, however, is our membership 
and our present members can be our greatest help 
in rectifying this. So far this year, we have had 
152 new members join. However, this does not 
make up for the loss of renewals. We hope that by 
December 6 we will have received these renewals 
as well as many more names of prospective mem¬ 
bers to whom we may write. We ask for your 
continuing help in our membership campaign. 

CHRISTMAS GIFT 

Why not give a membership in the North Caro¬ 
lina Literary and Historical Association for 
Christmas? We hope that you enjoy your part in 
its program, whether serving on committees, at¬ 
tending the meetings, or receiving the publica¬ 
tions. And we hope that you have some family or 
friends who will enjoy participating too. If you 
will tell us by December 15 the names of those to 
whom you want memberships sent as a Christmas 
gift and state whether they would like the gift 
copy of the facsimile edition of Blackbeard or 
The Carolina Chatter of 1663, we will send them 
the gift book, Christmas wrapped, and a card giv¬ 
ing your name. Their subscription will start with 
the January issue of The Review. 

As you will recall, memberships range from 
$5.00 for one annual member to $8.00 for two 
annual members at one address, $10.00 for three 
members living at the same address, $25.00 for 
sustaining membership, $100.00 for life member¬ 
ship, and $3.00 for a student membership. 


NEW BERN FIREMEN'S MUSEUM 

The only North Carolina award to be made this 
year by the American Association for State and 
Local History will be presented to the New Bern 
Firemen’s Museum at the annual meeting of The 
North Carolina Literary and Historical Associa¬ 
tion on December 6. The award is presented for 
outstanding work in the field of preservation of 
local history. 

The New Bern Firemen’s Museum was estab¬ 
lished in 1955 and was dedicated on June 24, 
1957, in ceremonies which included the presenta¬ 
tion to the Museum by the Honorable H. de 
Torrente, Swiss Ambassador to the United States, 
of a Swiss flag, trophies, the de Graffenried coat 
of arms, the banner of Berne, Switzerland, and 
a portrait of Baron Christopher de Graffenried. 

The Museum has prepared a printed folder giv¬ 
ing the history of fire fighting in New Bern and 
has on display pictures, trophies, and the original 
fire-fighting equipment. 

The history of fire fighting on an organized 
scale in New Bern that is displayed in the Fire¬ 
men’s Museum starts with the chartering of the 
Atlantic Hook and Ladder Company on May 14, 
1845. The New Berne Steam Fire Engine Com¬ 
pany, No. 1, was organized on January 1, 1865, 
by Union soldiers who used a hand pump. This 
pump reached its maximum output when eight 
men exerted their weight on each end of the 
pump’s cross beam lever. A sixteen man crew 
pulled the vehicle to the scene of the blaze. 



Sketch made from av original picture of the old hand 
pumper used by the Union Army during the occupation 
of New Bern, 1862-65. The United States Government 
gave this hand pumper to the New Bern Steam Fire 
Engine Company, Number 1, organized January 1, 1865. 

In 1868 a new steam fire engine called the 
“Amoskeag” was assigned to the New Berne 
Steam Fire Engine Company, No. 1, and was used 
until 1884. This engine saw action in the fire 
which destroyed the interior and bell of New 
Bern’s Christ Episcopal Church in 1871. 







Service Reel used for tire service by Button Fire Com¬ 
pany, 1885-1901. Noiv on display in the New Bern Fire¬ 
men’s Museum. 


The Button Steam Engine which arrived in 
1884 has been preserved and is on display in the 
Museum. This engine set two world’s records 
which still hold. One record was its ability to 
produce standing quick steam in one minute and 
46 seconds. It also broke the world’s record for 
running quick steam, which was two minutes and 
12 seconds. When this Button engine arrived in 
New Bern, the firemen of Company No. 1, moved 
it in front of the restored Christ Church and 
threw a stream of water over the more than 150- 
foot-high steeple. This company was thereafter 
known as the Button Company. In 1911 the Button 
Company broke another world record in Charlotte. 
Ben Hurst was the horse pulling the hose wagon 
and the record reads like this: Ran 300 yards, 
laid 288 feet of hose, connected to hydrant, screw¬ 
ed on nozzle, and showed water in 26 and 2 '5 
seconds. 

The Button Company and the Atlantic Com¬ 
pany, the oldest chartered fire-fighting company, 
were serious rivals and “which fire company 
reached a blaze first used to be more important to 
New Bernians than damage done or whose house 
burned. Each company had its following of en¬ 
thusiastic fans. If one of the engines happened to 
dash out of the station with its whistle blowing, 
that became the piece de resistance for future 
arguments about quick steam. 

“The Atlantic colors were pink and white. The 
Button’s were blue and white. Enthusiastic moth¬ 
ers of that era showed their preference for a fire 
company by dressing their babies in its colors.” 

To be a fireman in the old days was to be some¬ 
body, and to be rocognized as a staunch fireman 


used to command almost as much respect as being 
a staunch churchman. 

The New Bern Firemen’s Museum Committee 
is made up of L. R. Tucker, chairman; Albert W. 
Brison, secretary-treasurer; Guy E. Boyd; John 
T. Pugh; Ethridge H. Ricks; and R. Clyde Smith. 
Robert L. Stallings and the late J. Vernon Blades 
are listed as honorary members. 


DONORS 

Below are listed those who have made loans or 
gifts to the Department of Archives and History 
during the two-month period from August 15 to 
October 15. 

ARCHIVES 

Miss Hattie Alexander, Charlotte 

American Association of University Women, Raleigh 
Branch, Raleigh 

Mrs. Asbury C. Barnett, Asheville 

Miss Kathleen Bernard, Raleigh 

Mr. Curtis Bynum, Asheville 

Miss Mary Carlton, Warsaw 

Colquitt Chapter, U.D.C., Smyrna, Georgia 

Davie Poplar Chapter, N.S.D.A.R., Chapel Hill 

Mrs. Cecye Eastman Dodd, Walterboro 

Mr. H. G. Jones, Raleigh 

Mrs. H. V. Norris, Delco 

Mrs. Charles Ross, Lillington 

Mrs. Ed Stine, Midland, Texas 

Tuesday Afternoon Book Club, Raleigh 

University Microfilms, Ann Arbor, Michigan 

HALL OF HISTORY 

Mrs. Ada Corbett, Raleigh 

Miss Elizabeth Dortch, Raleigh 

Mr. George Gelbach, Raleigh 

Mr. Grover King, Raleigh 

Mrs. Gustav Lichtenfels, Asheville 

North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh 

LITERARY COMPETITIONS 

Sixty-one books have been entered in the vari¬ 
ous literary competitions by North Carolina 
authors. 

In addition to the titles previously printed in 
Carolina Comments, the following have been re¬ 
ceived and forwarded to the judges: 

Mayflower competition for non-fiction— Threads 
of Gold, by Myrtie Lee Powers; The Ahoskie Era 
of Hertford County, by Roy Parker. 

Sir Walter Raleigh competition for fiction— 
Blacktop, by Bertha B. Moore; A Twist of Yarn, 
by Emmitt Lookabee. 

A.A.U.W. competition for juveniles— Gone is 
My Goose, by Dorothy Koch; The Magic Pin, by 
Ina B. Forbus. 

Roanoke-Chowan competition for poetry—7, 
The City, by Ron Levin; The Star of Hope, by 
Grace Saunders Kimrey. 


CULTURE WEEK 

Several changes have been made in the over-all 
program of culture week this year which are ex¬ 
pected to make the week more smooth and more 
enjoyable for all concerned. 

Beginning with the addition of Tuesday to the 
customary three-day program, the North Caro¬ 
lina Federation of Music Clubs will present a 
schedule including representatives of most of the 
best known music groups in the State. Mr. and 
Mrs. Benjamin F. Swalin of Chapel Hill will repre¬ 
sent the North Carolina Symphony Society with 
a program of movies and music. Donald M. 
McCorkle of Salem College will give a talk, “The 
Moravian Contribution to American Music,” with 
musical illustrations by members of the Collegium 
Musician Salem. Chamber music will be represent¬ 
ed by the Wilmington Chamber Music Group, 
made up of Mrs. Horace Moore, Mrs. Eric Norden, 
and Mrs. Edward Weaver, which will present se¬ 
lections by J. S. Bach and Ernest Toch. The 
dinner session will include an address by Mrs. 
Maurice Honigman of Gastonia, National Board 
Member from the North Carolina Federation of 
Music. After the address, members of the Grass 
Roots Opera will present Sunday Excursion, by 
Alec Wilder. 

Wednesday’s program, devoted to art, will in¬ 
clude an address by Perry Rathbone, Director 
of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Massa¬ 
chusetts, who will speak at the evening session on 
“The Art of Collecting Art.” 

Thursday the Antiquities Society will have 
reports on its preservation projects. Dr. E. 
Lawrence Lee, Jr., professor of American colonial 
history at The Citadel, will speak on “Old Bruns¬ 
wick Town.” Mr. and Mrs. John A. Kellenberger 
of Greensboro, and Miss Gertrude Carraway and 


Mr. G. Norman-Wilcox of New Bern will speak 
on “The Restoration of Tryon Palace.” 

The Roanoke Island Historical Society will hold 
its executive committee session on Thursday. 

Friday will include the program of The North 
Carolina Literary and Historical Association and 
The North Carolina Folklore Society. The latter 
group will present folktales told by Richard Chase 
of Boone; folksongs by I. G. Greer of Chapel Hill, 
accompanied by Mrs. Greer; and dances by the 
Dixieland Square Dancers. 

The North Carolina Society of County and 
Local Historians and the North Carolina Poetry 
Society will hold their meetings on Saturday 
morning this year. Reports, announcements, and 
awards will be made at these meetings. Mrs. Edith 
Earnshaw of Wake Forest will read her poetry 
at the Poetry Society meeting. 

NEW MEMBERS 

We are glad to welcome 18 new members who 
have joined The North Carolina Literary and 
Historical Association in the period from August 
15 to October 15. 

Mr. Floyd S. Bennett, Richmond, Virginia 

Mrs. Edith Ferguson Carter, Ferguson 

Mrs. Mildred Couneill, Mount Olive 

Mr. Albert J. Ellis, Jacksonville 

Miss Esther Evans, Durham 

Mr. Thomas W. Ferguson, Ferguson 

Mrs. Patsy Goodwin, Charlotte 

Miss Elizabeth Gray, Murphy 

Mrs. J. A. King, Greensboro 

Mr. Daniel Lane, Jr., Chicago, Illinois 

Mr. and Mrs. James H. Parish, Wendell 

Colonel C. Wingate Reed, Asheville 

Miss D. Faye Reeves, Jacksonville 

Mrs. Eugene T. Robeson, Winston-Salem 

Mr. R. L. Shuford, III, Tryon—L ife Member 

Mr. James Oscar Thomas, Leaksville 

Woodleaf High School Library, Woodleaf 





State Library 
Box 990 
Raleigh, N. c 


L 











| V sxaieign 

/ CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Volume VI .January, 1958 x Number 5 



Hall of History Photo 

Corporate Citizenship Award. Shown, left to right, are 
•J. R. Covington, receiving the award for Jefferson 
Standard Broadcasting Company; Christopher Critten¬ 
den, Secretary of the Association, and Hugh Morton, 
who presented the award on behalf of the Association. 

FIRST AWARD RECIPIENT 

J. R. Covington, vice-president of Jefferson 
Standard Broadcasting Company and secretary 
of the Jefferson Standard Foundation, accepted 
the first annual Corporate Citizenship Award for 
his company at the evening session of the Asso¬ 
ciation’s annual meeting. 

Hugh Morton, real estate and promotion man 
of Wilmington and Linville, presented the award 
and gave a brief resume of those things which 
made the company superior in the judgement 
of the Board of Award. These included the four- 
year scholarships extended to two undergraduates 
in the radio and television fields, one at State 
College and one at the University; the program 
of contributions to worthy organizations in 
Charlotte and the rest of the State; the employee- 
employer relationship; and the over-all policy of 
educational and social awareness. 

The judges, in choosing Jefferson Standard, 
pointed out that the choice was difficult since 
each of the eleven companies make great con¬ 
tributions to their community and also to the 
State. The choice was a hard one, and it was the 
consensus of the judges that North Carolina was 
indeed fortunate to have these corporations and 
firms located within its boundaries. 

OFFICERS FOR NEW YEAR 

The Nominating Committee presented a new 
slate of officers for 1958 to the business session 


of the annual meeting, and the following were 
unanimously elected: 

As honorary president, Governor Luther H. 
Hodges of Raleigh. 

As president, Dr. D. J. Whitener, a Dean of 
Appalachian State Teachers College at Boone. 

. As vice presidents—Mr. Henry Belk, Editor 
of the Goldsboro News-Argus; Mr. Herbert 
O’Keef, Editor of the Raleigh Times; Mrs. Wilma 
D. Stokely, author, of Asheville. 

As secretary-treasurer, Dr. Christopher Crit¬ 
tenden, Director of the State Department of 
Archives and History. 

As members of the executive committee—Mrs. 
John G. Burgwyn, author, of Jackson; Colonel 
Hugh Dortch, attorney at law of Goldsboro; Mr. 
Paul Green, author and playwright, of Chapel 

Hill. 

Mrs. Burgwyn was elected to fill the unexpired 
term of Thurmond Chatham who was elected for 
the period 1956-1958 and whose place has been 
vacant since his death last spring. 

Colonel Dortch will be a member of the com¬ 
mittee for the years 1958-1960, succeeding Mrs. 
Lillian Parker Wallace of Meredith College. 

Mr. Green will succeed Dr. William H. Cart¬ 
wright of Duke University for the term 1958- 
1960. 

NEW MEMBERS 

We are glad to welcome 18 new members who 
have joined The North Carolina Literary and 
Historical Association in the period from October 
15 to December 15. 

James E. Bristol, Andrews 
Mrs. Rufus T. Carr, Lawrence, Long Island, 
New York 

Leonard George Corby, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. Braxton Jones, Alexandria, Virginia 

Robert A. Jones, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. John H. Little, Pinetops 

Mrs. Alex D. McLennon, Atlanta, Georgia 

James F. Peacock, Benson 

Robert M. Peatross, Raleigh 

Charles L. Price, Greenville 

St. Louis Public Library, St. Louis, Missouri 

Mrs. Sarah Jane Starnes, Asheville 

William Blount Stewart, Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. W. F. Taylor, Goldsboro 

Dr. and Mrs. J. J. Van Noppen, Boone 

Mrs. Nell Wise Wechter, Greensboro 

Mrs. Wesley R. Willis, Farmville 







CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume VI January, 1958 Number 5 


Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 

Issued to Members of The North Carolina Literary and 
Historical Association, Incorporated, to Public Libraries, 
and to Individuals. 

Grace B. Mahler, Editor 



Hall of History Photo 

Members of the staff of the Department of Archives 
and History who served at the annual meeting reception 
are left to right: Mrs. Earl T. Wilborn, Mrs. Rebecca 
Knight Clegg, Mrs. Fannie Memory Blackwelder, Miss 
Barbara Lloyd, Mrs. William Kuhn, and Miss Ann 
Kilby. 

COOPERATION 

The Literary and Historical Association was 
in large part responsible for the establishment in 
1903 of the North Carolina Historical Commission 
(now the North Carolina Department of Archives 
and History). Now the members of the staif of 
Archives and History are in large part responsi¬ 
ble for the success of the Association’s share of 
“Culture Week.’’ Throughout the year the two 
organizations are closely allied, and during the 
Association’s annual meeting the cooperation is 
most in evidence. 

H. G. Jones, State Archivist, was in charge of 
the physical arrangements for the morning meet¬ 
ing. W. S. Tarlton, Head of the Division of His¬ 
toric Sites, was in charge of the luncheon session. 
Miss Barbara McKeithan of the Hall of History 
was responsible for arrangements at the dinner 
meeting. Miss Beth Crabtree of the Division of 
Publications was in charge of the evening session. 
And Mrs. Earl T. Wilborn of the Division of 
Publications was responsible for the reception. 
Their efficient planning and execution made it 
possible for every one of the sessions to begin 
on time and to end on time, making a busy day 
less confusing. 


CAUSE FOR CELEBRATIONS 

One of the resolutions passed by the North 
Carolina Literary and Historical Association at 
its annual meeting on December 6 reads as fol¬ 
lows : “That our President be authorized and re¬ 
quested to appoint three special committees to plan 
and work for the following: (a) the celebration 
in 1963 of the 300th anniversary of the grant¬ 
ing of the Carolina charter by King Charles II; 
(b) the celebration of the approaching Civil War 
centennials; (c) a new, specially designed build¬ 
ing to house our State Department of Archives 
and History.” 

The first of these committees is expected to 
develop a broad program for the celebration of 
the tercentenary of the granting of the Carolina 
charter. This anniversary, it is hoped, will mark 
the climax of a number of historical activities 
in North Carolina. The year can serve as a 
target date in that connection. Since the area 
of Carolina as defined in this charter (and fur¬ 
ther extended by the new charter of 1665) in¬ 
cluded South Carolina as well as North Carolina, 
it is expected that that State will be invited to 
participate in the celebration. Also included were 
what is now Georgia, the northern part of Flori¬ 
da, and all territory westward to the “South 
Seas.” This latter takes in all or large parts of 
the present states of Tennessee, Alabama. Missis¬ 
sippi, Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas, 
New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, and California 
(as well as the northern part of Mexico). It is 
likely that all these States of the Union will be 
invited to participate. 

The second committee will work in the field 
of the Civil War centennials. Throughout the 
Nation there is a great deal of interest in these 
approaching anniversaries, and a series of cele¬ 
brations will be held over the four-year period. 
Since North Carolina played such a large part 
in this conflict, was “first at Bethel, farthest to 
the front at Gettysburg and Chickamauga, and 
last at Appomattox,” gave more men to the 
Southern cause than did any other State and 
suffered the heaviest losses in manpower of any 
State of the Confederacy, and was the scene of a 
number of significant battles, there appears to 
be a broad area for the planning and activities of 
this committee. 

The third committee is expected to work for 
a new building for the State Department of 
Archives and History. That Department (former¬ 
ly the State Historical Commission, established 
in 1903) was first housed in the State Capitol. 
In 1914 it moved to the second floor of what is 
now the Library Building and in 1939 to the 
first floor and part of the ground floor of what 









is now designated as the Education Building. 
This edifice, designed primarily as an office build¬ 
ing, is not suited in all ways to the special needs 
of the Department, and maximum services to the 
public can never be rendered until the Department 
is housed in a structure specially planned to meet 
its special needs. The estimated cost of such 
a building (excluding the necessary land) is 
$1,500,000. 

AUTHORS OF THE YEAR 

The 1957 literary awards were presented at 
the fifty-seventh annual meeting of the Associa¬ 
tion on December 6. Since 1905 there have been 
only eleven years in which no award has been 
made through the Literary and Historical Asso¬ 
ciation. In those forty-one years, only one man 
has won a total of three awards for non-fiction 
and that man is Archibald Henderson of Chapel 
Hill who won the Mayflower Cup this year for 
his work, George Bernard Shaw: Mari of the 
Century. Dr. Henderson had been presented the 
Patterson Cup in 1911 for his volume, George 
Bernard Shaw: His Life and Works, and in 1932 
he was awarded the Mayflower Cup for his vol¬ 
ume, Bernard Shaw: Playboy and Prophet. 

Three other men have each received two awards 
in the non-fiction field—Clarence Poe for A 
Southerner in Europe and Where Half the World 
is Waking Up: Josephus Daniels for Our Navy 
at War and The Wilson Era: Years of Peace, 
1910-1917; and Jonathan Daniels for A South¬ 
erner Discovers the South and The Man of Inde¬ 
pendence. 

In the fiction field, Mrs. Doris Betts of Sanford 
won the Sir Walter Raleigh Award for her novel, 
Tall Houses in Winter. She has had a short story 
collection published in 1953 and is now working 
on her second novel. This award is relatively new, 
having been started in 1952 by the Historical 
Book Club of North Carolina. In the six years it 
has been presented, Mrs. Frances Gray Patton 
(twice), Ovid Pierce, Inglis Fletcher, and Paul 
Green have been the other recipients. 

The American Association of University 
Women award for juvenile literature went to 
Mrs. Nell Wise Wechter of Greensboro for her 
book, Taffy of Torpedo Junction. This is the fifth 
annual award for juveniles and former recipients 
are Ruth and Latrobe Carroll (twice), Mebane 
Holloman Burgwyn, and Julia Montgomery 
Street. 

For poetry, the fifth annual Roanoke-Chowan 
Award was made to Mrs. Dorothy Edwards 
Summerrow of Gastonia for her book of verse, 
Ten Angels Swearing. Those who have received 
this award before are Frank Borden Hanes, 
Thad Stem, and Helen Bevington. 


For an article on North Carolina history pub¬ 
lished in The North Carolina Historical Review, 
Richard W. Griffin of Athens, Alabama, and 
Diffee W. Standard of Chapel Hill won the fifth 
annual R. D. W. Connor Award for their two- 
part work, “The Cotton TextiTp Industry in 
Ante-Bellum North Carolina.” Hugh F. Rankin, 
Paul Conkin, and H. G. Jones have been awarded 
this honor in previous years. 

VISITING FIREMEN 

The visiting firemen of the New Bern Fire¬ 
men’s Museum were at the morning and luncheon 
session of the annual meeting in full force, along 
with representatives of the Craven County Com¬ 
missioners, New Bern Historical Society, New 
Bern City Schools, Chamber of Commerce, Junior 



Hall of History Photo 


Members of the group who came to the annual meeting 
in Raleigh from New Bern in honor of the Firemen’s 
Museum which received the AASLH award. Left to 
right are L. R. Tucker, Chairman of the Firemen’s 
Museum Committee; Albert W. Brinson, Secretary- 
Treasurer; C. Walker Hodges, Jr., and John T. Pugh, 
Committee members; R. L. Stallings, Jr., Mayor of 
New Bern; and R. Clyde Smith, Committee member. 

Chamber of Commerce, Merchants Association, 
Rotary Club, Lions Club, Professional and Busi¬ 
ness Women’s Club, and Tryon Palace Commis¬ 
sion, as well as the City Manager, the Mayor, and 
others. Twenty-one persons from New Bern made 
the trip expressly for this occasion. 

The Museum was awarded the American 
Association for State and Local History Award 
for outstanding work in the field of local history. 

The Chairman of the Museum Committee, L. 
R. Tucker, received the award for the Museum. 
It was presented by W. S. Powell of the Uni¬ 
versity of North Carolina Library at Chapel 
Hill, past editor of the American Association for 
State and Local History History News. 


* * p * 


NEW MUSEUM 

The 54th annual observance of the first flight 
by the Wright Brothers at Kill Devil Hills was 
held on December 17. Included among the partici¬ 
pants were Peter J. Schenk, president of the Air 
Force Association, Conrad L. Wirth, Director of 
the National Park Service, and Christopher 
Crittenden, Director of the State Department of 
Archives and History who represented Governor 
Luther H. Hodges. These men along with others 
participated in the ground-breaking ceremonies 
for a visitor center and fiight museum in the 
Wright Brothers National Memorial area. This 
proposed visitor center and museum will cost ap¬ 
proximately $250,000 and should be completed in 
two years. It will serve to introduce visitors to the 
history and geography of the area they will visit. 

Dare County with Fort Raleigh, The Lost Col¬ 
ony, the Wright Memorial. Cape Hatteras Nation¬ 
al Seashore Recreational Area, and Other attrac¬ 
tions is becoming more popular every year. In 
the last eleven months 307,509 persons have vis¬ 
ited Cape Hatteras. In the same period 98,209 
have visited Fort Raleigh and 315,143 have come 
to the Wright Memorial. The center will be de¬ 
signed to serve these visitors who come in greater 
numbers every year. 

Other features of the celebration were the 
music of the Elizabeth City High School Band, 
which has missed only one celebration since 1940: 
the East Carolina College AFROTC Team in a 
precision drill demonstration; an aerial tribute by 
United States Air Force aircraft; and a ceremony 
in which wreaths from the City of Dayton, Ohio, 
and from the State of North Carolina were placed 
at the base of the granite monument. 

At the luncheon which followed these ceremo¬ 
nies, Christopher Crittenden and Conrad L. Wirth 
made talks on the work that is being done to pre¬ 
serve the history of the area. 


The presentation of the General Electric Air 
I rophy to Captain Robert E. Sheridan, Comman¬ 
der of the USAF B-47 which established a flight 
record last May, was also made at the luncheon. 

DONORS 

Below are listed those who have made loans or 
gifts to the Department of Archives and History 
during the two-month period from October 15 to 
December 15. 

ARCHIVES 

James W. Atkins, Gastonia 
Mrs. W. B. Beasley, Smithfield 
Burton Historical Collection of the Detroit Public 
Library, Detroit, Michigan 
J. H. Granbery, New York, New York 
Guilford Battle Ground Chapter, D. A. R., 
Greensboro 

Mrs. Hester Hope, York, South Carolina 
Mrs. W. Lloyd Horne, Greensboro 
H. G. Jones, Raleigh 
W. K. Littleton, Badin 
Buxton Midyette, Jackson 
Louis T. Moore, Wilmington 
Louis Poisson, Jr., Wilmington 
George Powell, Jr., Macon, Georgia 
Mrs. Bartlett Richards, Hinsdale, Illinois 
Mrs. Bessie Hinton Silver, Raleigh 
J. F. Stanback, Mt. Gilead 
A. R. Yates, Bogalusa, Louisana 

HALL OF HISTORY 

Henry Beatty, Tomahawk 
Miss Elizabeth Dortch, Raleigh 
J. Virgil Henderson, Monroe 
Mrs. Sidney I. Howell, Upper Montclair, New 
Jersey 

Miss Della Mary Lewis, Raleigh 

H. R. Wilkins, Spartanburg, South Carolina 


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CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Volume VI 


March, 1958 


Number 


PLANNING FOR 1958 

On January 15 at the Hotel Sir Walter, a lunch¬ 
eon meeting of the Association’s executive com¬ 
mittee was held. It was very well attended, with 
only two members absent because of previous 
commitments. 

Among the matters discussed were the meetings 
of the Association, regional as well as annual. It 
was agreed that, provided the necessary arrange¬ 
ments could be made, the spring regional meeting 
be held in Greenville either the second or third 
week end in May in connection with the 50th anni¬ 
versary of East Carolina College, and with the co¬ 
operation of the Pitt County Historical Society. 
The summer meeting place will be left up to the 
Western North Carolina Historical Association as 
has been the custom. A number of names were 
suggested for the main speaker for the annual 
meeting, but none was definitely decided upon. 
Paul Green suggested that we choose a speaker 
for the content of his talk as well as for his name 
as a drawing card. 

The reports of the heads of committees were 
made and a great deal of emphasis was put on the 
need to raise the membership total. The Associa¬ 
tion needs both the strength and the encourage¬ 
ment of new members as well as of its older 
friends and a concerted effort will be made to 
interest more citizens in its program. 

The budget was approved as follows: 


Balance on hand Jan. 1, 1958 $1,143.34 

Estimated receipts through 

Dec. 31, 1958 5,500.00 


Total $6,643.34 

Estimated expenditures through Dec. 31, 1958 

Salaries 

Administrative Assistant $2,500.00 

Stenographer Clerk 1,000.00 

Meetings—Net Cost 

Annual 700.00 

Regional 25.00 

Office Supplies, Postage, Printing 700.00 

Travel 50.00 

Miscellaneous 100.00 


Total $5,375.00 

Estimated Balance Dec. 31, 1958 $1,263.34 


Various new committees were discussed and the 
secretary was directed to make appointments to 
these. 


6 

\ 

The question of whether or not the Association 
should continue to participate in the presentation 
of literary awards was discussed and was sent 
back to the Awards Committee for study. 

This meeting was adjourned at 2:00. 

Immediately following the executive committee 
meeting, another meeting was held—that of the 
Committee and representatives of the allied so¬ 
cieties. Represented were the Art Society, the 
Roanoke Island Historical Association, the Society 
of County and Local Historians, the Antiquities 
Society, the Historical Book Club, the Federation 
of Music Clubs, the Mayflower Society, the Folk¬ 
lore Society, the Symphony Society, and the Lit¬ 
erary and Historical Association. 

The meetings of these societies held during the 
week of December 3-7, 1957, were discussed by 
the participants. That there might be more com¬ 
plete coverage by radio and press of the meetings, 
a closer tie-in of the various programs’ themes, 
and more emphasis on achievements of North 
Carolinians whether they be President Andrew 
Johnson or rising North Carolina artists, were 
some of the suggestions brought forth during this 
session. The program schedules for this year are 
much the same as last with the Governor’s recep¬ 
tion being held again on Friday. The Roanoke 
Island Historical Association’s luncheon meeting 
will be on Tuesday rather than Thursday, but 
this was the only time change made at the meet¬ 
ing. The meeting adjourned at 3:30. 

GIFT 

The North Carolina Literary and Historical 
Association, through the kindness of Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard J. Reynolds, has had sent to each of the 
902 high schools in the State a copy of A New 
Geography of North Carolina, Volume 2, by Bill 
Sharpe. 

This volume contains information on 25 of the 
100 counties. Volume I, published in 1954, con¬ 
tained 21 county descriptions and Volume III, 
containing information on more of the counties, 
is expected to be ready in 1959 or 1960. 

It is felt that this work will be of real value in 
the schools, for it contains much valuable infor¬ 
mation, is well indexed and illustrated, and in 
style is readable for the student or the researcher. 
The Association expresses its appreciation to Mr. 
and Mrs. Richard J. Reynolds for making this 
gift possible. 






CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Volume VI March, 1958 Number 6 

Published by the State Department of Archives and 
History, Box 1881, Raleigh, N. C. 


Issued to Members of The North Carolina Literary and 
Historical Association, Incorporated, to Public Libraries, 
and to Individuals. 

Grace B. Mahler, Editor 


WBC HISTORY CONTEST 

Two entries were sent from North Carolina to 
the Westinghouse Broadcasting Company, Inc., 
for consideration in their contest for TV and 
radio programs on local history. 

From the Pasquotank County Historical Soci¬ 
ety went a tape recording of a panel program en¬ 
titled “Ask the Historian.” The script was com¬ 
piled by General John A. Wood, Reverend George 
F. Hill, and Mr. Bob Thessin of Radio Station 
WGAI. Mrs. Fred Eason, Mrs. H. D. Walker, 
Reverend George F. Hill, and Mr. Fred Fearing 
comprised the round table and Mr. Robert Thomas 
was the moderator. 

From Greensboro, through the cooperation of 
Station WFMY-TV and the Greensboro Junior 
League, a kinescope of a drama, “Come In, Mr. 
Greene,” was entered. This program gave the 
story of the Battle of Guilford Courthouse as told 
by the ghosts of General Nathanael Greene and 
General Charles Corwallis and their men to two 
visitors to the Greensboro area. 

The award of $500 will be announced on March 7 
in Baltimore. The judges for the contest are 
Bruce Catton, editor of American Heritage; Carl 
Haverlin, president of Broadcast Music, Inc.; Roy 
Meredith, motion picture and TV producer; Allan 
Nevins, Professor of History at Columbia Univer¬ 
sity ; and Ralph Newman, historian and writer. 

NEW MEMBERS 

We are glad to welcome 15 new members who 
have joined The North Carolina Literary and 
Historical Association in the period from Decem¬ 
ber 16 to February 15. 

James L. Barden, Chapel Hill 
Grover C. Batts, Washington, D. C. 

Burton F. Beers, Raleigh 

Mrs. Henry Belk, Goldsboro 

Mrs. Gertrude L. Chadbourn, Greensboro 

Mrs. Mary R. Cowan, Sylva 

Mrs. Robert H. Cude, Winston-Salem 

Zeno L. Edwards, Washington 

Herbert A. Harkins, Raleigh 

Mrs. Lillian Hirt, Cullowhee 

Mrs. Henry W. Maddrey, Severn 

James F. Peacock, Benson 

Norris W. Preyer, Charlotte 

Robert E. Tapp, Wilmington 

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Whitaker, Murfreesboro 


NEW INDEX 

The Index to the North Carolina Confederate 
Pension Applications has been completed, Mr. 
H. G. Jones, State Archivist, has announced. The 
index is in two series—the first of which is made 
up of one volume containing the applications 
from veterans and widows from 1885 to 1901. The 
first General Pension Law had gone into effect in 
North Carolina in 1885 and was considered so 
strict that a very small percentage of veterans and 
widows could qualify. In 1901 a revised pension 
law was passed that was more liberal and four 
volumes of names of applicants make up the sec¬ 
ond series of the Archives’ index. 

This index was compiled by Mrs. Rebecca K. 
Clegg, Mrs. JoAnn W. Kuhn, Mrs. Beatrice Har- 
die, and Mrs. Memory F. Blackwelder of the Rec¬ 
ords Center. It is for use in the search room of 
the Department of Archives and History to facili¬ 
tate the locating of information on North Caro¬ 
lina’s Confederate soldiers. 

ACCESSIONS 

Below are listed those who have made loans or 
gifts to the Department of Archives and History 
during the two-month period ending February 15. 

HALL OF HISTORY 

Mrs. J. Roger Brooks, Kinston 
H. B. Garden, Rockingham 
Armistead J. Maupin, Raleigh 

North Carolina State Museum of Natural History, 
Raleigh 

Mrs. Alice J. Taylor, Winnabow 
John J. Walker, Raleigh 

ARCHIVES 

Henry Beatty, Tomahawk 
Robert B. Barker, Mt. Rainier, Maryland 
Daughters of the American Revolution, Caswell-Nash 
Chapter, Raleigh 

Daughters of the American Revolution, Colonel Polk 
Chapter, Raleigh 

Daughters of the American Revolution, Guilford Battle 
Chapter, Greensboro 

Daughters of the American Revolution, Richard Clinton 
Chapter, Clinton 

Benjamin Grady, Washington, D. C. 

Estate of Miss Annie Grogan, Winston-Salem 

Charles Holloman, Raleigh 

Walter M. Hunter, Alexandria, Louisiana 

W. P. Jacocks, Chapel Hill 

H. G. Jones, Raleigh 

F. M. Manning, Williamston 

Mrs. Carl McMurray, Marion 

Mrs. George H. Petteway, Charlotte 

William S. Powell, Chapel Hill 

Mrs. Mary J. Rogers, Raleigh 

Schering Corporation, Paul Wickman, Bloomfield, New 
J ersey 

Bill Sharpe, Raleigh 

Mrs. W. W. Umphlett, Wilson 

United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina 
Division 

J. K. Waitt, Raleigh 

Mrs. W. T. Wood, Macon, Georgia 







DESCENDANTS 

Tryon Palace in New Bern, which is nearing 
completion, is to have a registry book containing 
the names of the Council and Assemblymen of 
Governor Tryon’s First Assembly, 1766-1768. 
This Assembly met in two sessions. The first was 
from October 30 to December 2, 1766. The second 
session was held from December 5, 1767, to Janu¬ 
ary 16, 1768. 

The Tryon Palace Commission would also like 
to have included in this registry the names of all 
known descendants of these men. Please send any 
information you may have concerning the de¬ 
scendants of the persons whose names follow to 
Miss Gertrude Carraway, Restoration Director, 
Tryon Palace Commission, Box 966, New Bern. 


GOVERNOR’S COUNCIL, 1766-1768 

William Tryon, Governor 

John Rutherford 
Charles Berry 
William Dry 
Robert Palmer 
Benjamin Heron 
James Murray 


James Hassel 
Lewis Henry DeRosset 
Edward Brice Dobbs 
John Sampson 
Henry Eustice McCulloh 
Alexander McCulloh 


Samuel Strudwick 


ASSEMBLY 

John Harvey, Speaker 
William Herritag-e, Clerk 
John Burgwin, Clerk 


Anson County 
Beaufort, Bath 
Beaufort, Bath 
Beaufort County 
Beaufort County 
Bertie County 
Bertie County 
Bertie County 
Bladen County 
Bladen County 
Brunswick, Brunswick 
Brunswick County 
Brunswick County 
Bute County 
Bute County 
Carteret County 
Carteret County 
Chowan, Edenton 
Chowan County 
Chowan County 
Chowan County 
Chowan County 
Craven, New Bern 
Craven County 
Craven County 
Cumberland, Campbellton 
Cumberland, Campbellton 
Cumberland County 
Cumberland County 
Currituck County 
Currituck County 
Currituck County 
Currituck County 
Currituck County 
Dobbs County 
Dobbs County 


Charles Robinson 
Patrick Gordon 
Peter Blinn 
John Barrow 
Thomas Respess 
Cullen Pollock 
William Gray 
Robert Lennox 
William Bartram 
Hugh Waddell 
Maurice Moore 
Robert Howe 
John Paine 
Benjamin Person 
Benjamin Ward 
William Cole 
Richard Cogdell 
Joseph Hewes 
Samuel Johnston 
Timothy Walton 
James Bond 
James Blount 
Alexander Elmsley 
Thomas Clifford Howe 
Jacob Blount 
Richard Grove 
John Walsh 
Walter Gibson 
Farquard Campbell 
John Woodhouse 
Henry White 
Stephen Williams 
Kader Merchant 
Joshua Campbell 
Richard Caswell 
Abraham Sheppard 


Duplin County 

Felix Kenan 

Duplin County 

Joseph Williams 

Edgecombe County 

William Haywood 

Edgecombe County 

Duncan Lemmon 

Granville County 

Robert Harris 

Granville County 

Samuel Benton 

Halifax, Halifax 

Joseph Montfort 

Halifax County 

John Bradford 

Halifax County 

William Branch 

Halifax County 

Willie Jones 

Hertford County 

Benjamin Wynns 

Hertford County 

Matthias Brickell 

Hyde County 

William Webster 

Hyde County 

John Smith 

Johnston County 

Needham Bryan 

Johnston County 

Benjamin Hardy 

Mecklenburg County 

Thomas Polk 

Mecklenburg County 

Martin Fifer (Phifer) 

New Hanover, Wilmington 

Cornelius Harnett 

New Hanover County 

John Ashe 

New Hanover County 

James Moore 

Northampton County 

Robert Jones 

Northampton County 

Henry Dawson 

Northampton County 

Edmund Smithwick 

Onslow County 

William Cray (Gray) 

Onslow County 

Richard Ward 

Onslow County 

Edward Vail 

Orange County 

Edmund Fanning 

Orange County 

Thomas Lloyd 

Pasquotank County 

Samuel Swann, Jr. 

Pasquotank County 

Thomas Taylor, Jr. 

Pasquotank County 

Joseph Jones 

Pasquotank County 

John Sawyer 

Pasquotank County 

Benjamin Palmer 

Perquimans County 

Benjamin Harvey 

Perquimans County 

John Harvey 

Perquimans County 

Charles Blount 

Perquimans County 

John Skinner 

Perquimans County 

Andrew Knox 

Pitt County 

John Spier 

Pitt County 

John Simpson 

Rowan, Salisbury 

John Mitchell 

Rowan County 

John Frohock 

Rowan County 

Griffith Rutherford 

Tyrrell County 

Stevens (Stephen) Lee 

Tyrrell County 

Benjamin Blount 

Tyrrell County 

Jasper Charlton 

Tyrrell County 

Francis Ward 


NEW PUBLICATIONS 

The volume, The Public Addresses, Messages, 
Letters and Papers of William Bradley Umstead, 
Governor 1953-195U, has come from the printers 
and copies are now ready for distribution. This 
volume is illustrated, and contains 414 pages of 
the words and deeds of Governor Umstead’s ad¬ 
ministration. It is available upon request to the 
Department of Archives and History, Box 1881, 
Raleigh. 

Also, a facsimile of page 1 of the Charter of 
1663 has been reproduced by the Department. 
This Charter was granted by Charles II to the 
Lords Proprietors, seven of whom, along with 
Charles II, are pictured under the document. On 
the reverse side is the full text. The page meas¬ 
ures 20 V 2 inches by 26 inches and is available at 
fifty cents per copy from Box 1881, Raleigh. 



Hall of History Photo 


The Hall of the House of Representatives, State Capitol, 
scene of the fii-st Correspondence Management Workshop, 
sponsored by the Department of Archives and History. 

FIRST WORKSHOP 

North Carolina has had another first take place 
within her borders—this time it was planned by 
the State Department of Archives and History 
instead of merely being recorded therein. North 
Carolina is the first State to hold a workshop in 
cooperation with the National Archives and Rec¬ 
ords Service. The material and emphasis of the 
workshop came out of the Hoover Commission 
Survey which showed how the Federal Govern¬ 
ment could save $100,000,000 a year by adopting 
certain practices and principles. These practices 
and principles were taught to some 27 State offi¬ 
cials during the week February 3-7. These officials 
represented 23 State departments. 

The Correspondence Management Workshop 
was held first in the Senate Chamber, later in the 
Hall of the House, in the Capitol. It was taught 
by Mr. A. K. Johnson, Jr., Chief of the Records 


Management Division, National Archives and 
Records Service, Region 4, Atlanta. The emphasis 
of the course was the improvement of letter writ¬ 
ing and how appreciable amounts of time and 
money can be saved by the use of form and guide 
letters, and through a Four S Formula. This for¬ 
mula stresses Shortness, Sincerity, Strength, and 
Simplicity. Those taking the course practiced this 
formula in omitting unnecessary words, phrases, 
explanations, and repetitions in their letters. 



Vllirit Wakei a. Ufox, Plain*! 


the 4S FORMULA 


MMMKUSS 
WMS. MTOMUTOI 

lswranw- 

smwu.nusB 

-IWOfWW-- 
MUMS. MI1ECTNB 

' 5. UHT 

suToens 


Hall of History Photo 


H. G. Jones, State Archivist; Christopher Crittenden, 
Director, Department of Archives and History; and A. K. 
Johnson, Jr., Chief of Records Management Division, 
Atlanta, look at Rules for Letter Writing. 


This workshop was carried out at no cost to 
the State other than traveling expenses and a per 
diem for Mr. Johnson. If the practices taught are 
carried out by the departments represented in 
the class, correspondence procedures and practices 
of the various State agencies may be expected to 
improve. 




foTina S'ate Ubrary. 


y 

































Date Due 

JUL 1 
































































BRODART. INC 

Cat No. 

23 233 

Printed in U S A