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CAROLINA STATE 
RALEIGH 


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APR 2 4 1980 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 

PUBLISHED BIMONTHLY BY THE NORTH CAROLINA 
OFFICE OF ARCHIVES AND HISTORY 


Volume XXI, Number 1 


January, 1973 


Culture Week Held November 28-December 2 

The several organizations which traditionally hold their meetings during 
the days now known as Culture Week met for business sessions, programs, 
luncheons and dinners, and the awarding of many honors for achievements 
in various fields of art, culture, and history. The climax occurred on the 
evening of December 1 when the Mayflower, Sir Walter Raleigh, and Chris¬ 
topher Crittenden Memorial awards were made. 

North Carolina Literary and Historical Association 

Following an address, “Thomas Wolfe Once Again,” by Dr. Louis D. 
Rubin, Jr., professor of English at the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill, the three major awards were given. The Sir Walter Raleigh 
Award for fiction went to Daphne Athas of Chapel Hill for her book, Entering 



The Christopher Crittenden Memorial Award was presented to William S. Powell of Chapel 
Hill, right, by Dr. H. G. Jones. (Photographs by the Office of Archives and History unless other¬ 
wise specified.) 







The Sir Walter Raleigh Award was pre- Mr. John F. Bivins, Jr., right, won the May- 
sented by Mrs. John K. Brewer, left, on flower Cup for his book, The Moravian 
behalf of the Historical Book Club of North Potters in North Carolina. The presentation 
Carolina, Inc., to Miss Daphne Athas for was made by Mr. Samuel B. Dees, governor 
her book, Entering Ephesus. of the Mayflower Society in North Carolina. 

Ephesus-, the presentation was made by Mrs. John K. Brewer, president of 
the Historical Book Club of North Carolina, donor of the award. The May¬ 
flower Cup for nonfiction was presented to Mr. John F. Bivins, Jr., of 
Winston-Salem for The Moravian Potters in North Carolina. Presentation 
was made by the governor of the Mayflower Society in North Carolina, Mr. 
Samuel B. Dees of Raleigh. The third recipient of the Christopher Crittenden 
Memorial Award was Mr. William S. Powell of Chapel Hill, president of 
the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association during 1972. Mr. 
Powell was honored for his contribution “to the stimulation of interest in 
and knowledge of North Carolina History.” Dr. H. G. Jones, state historian 
and administrator of the Office of Archives and History and secretary- 
treasurer of the association, made the presentation. Mr. Powell presided 
at the evening session. Recipients of the several awards were honored at a 
reception following the meeting. 

Earlier in the day the association held its business session, at which time 
Frank Borden Hanes of Winston-Salem was elected president; William E. 
King of Durham, Henry Lewis of Chapel Hill, and Max Williams of 
Cullowhee, vice-presidents; and James S. Brawley of Salisbury and Mrs. 
Margaret Harper of Southport, members of the executive committee. 

Following the business meeting, a review of North Carolina fiction of the 
year was given by Mrs. Betty Hodges of Durham; and a slide-lecture was 
presented by Mr. John L. Sanders, director of the Institute of Government 
in Chapel Hill, on “Building the State Capitol, 1833-1840.” Mrs. A. Vason 
Hamrick, Jr., of Shelby, announced that there was no winner of the Ameri¬ 
can Association of University Women Award for Juvenile Literature for 
1972. Dr. Thomas C. Parramore of Raleigh, on behalf of the Roanoke- 
Chowan Group, presented the Roanoke-Chowan Poetry Award to Fred D. 
Chappell, writer-in-residence at the University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro, for his book of poetry, The World between the Eyes. For the 
American Association for State and Local History, Mr. John G. Zehmer, 
Jr., presented Certificates of Commendation to the Murfreesboro Historical 
Association for its contributions and for “imaginative use of the Roberts 
House as a focal point of the town’s adaptive-use preservation program,” 


2 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 






and to the Raleigh Historic Sites Commission for preserving the Mordecai 
House and its contents. Awards of Merit were given to the Tryon Palace 
Commission for its restoration of the John Wright Stanly House, to the 
High Point Historical Society for its broad program, and to Mr. John F. 
Bivins, Jr., for his book, The Moravian Potters in North Carolina. Mr. 
Powell presided at the business portion of the morning session, and Dr. Ina 
W. Van Noppen, a vice-president of the association, presided during the 
remainder of the morning meeting. 

Vice-President Peter W. Hairston presided during the luncheon meeting. 
Mr. Richard Walser reviewed North Carolina nonfiction of the year at that 
time. Following his paper, the Robert D. W. Connor Award was presented 
by Dr. Elmer L. Puryear, Jr., on behalf of the Historical Society of North 
Carolina, to Dr. Don Higginbotham of Chapel Hill for his article, “James 
Iredell’s Efforts to Preserve the First British Empire”; the article was 
published in the Spring, 1972, issue of the North Carolina Historical 
Review. 

Mr. Powell’s presidential address, “Carolina Creatures from Roanoke 
Island to Purgatory Mountain,” was delivered during the dinner meeting. 
Dr. Jones presided in the absence of Dr. Edward W. Phifer, Jr., who was ill. 



The Roanoke-Chowan Poetry Award went to Fred D. Chappell for his book of poetry, The 
World between the Eyes. In the left-hand photograph above, Dr. Thomas C. Parramore, left, 
made the presentation on behalf of the Roanoke-Chowan Group. American Association for 
Local History Certificates of Commendation were given to the Murfreesboro Historical Asso¬ 
ciation and to the Raleigh Historic Sites Commission; Awards of Merit went to Tryon Palace 
Commission, to the High Point Historical Society, and to John F. Bivins, Jr., for his book on 
Moravian potters. In the right-hand photograph above, left to right, are John D. Hamilton, 
who accepted the award for the High Point group; Mr. Bivins; Mrs. John A. Kellenberger, for 
the Tryon Palace Commission; Mr. E. Frank Stephenson, Jr., who was present to receive the 
Murfreesboro certificate; and Mr. William Dodge III, representing the Raleigh Historic Sites 
Commission. 

Roanoke Island Historical Association 

Mrs. Fred W. Morrison, chairman, presided when the association met 
for a luncheon meeting on November 28. Highlight of the occasion was the 
announcement of the winners of the Morrison Award, given annually for 
a significant contribution to North Carolina arts. The 1972 winners were 
Dr. and Mrs. James Semans of Durham; the award was announced by Mr. 
Sam Ragan, chairman of the Morrison Award Board. Presentation will be 
made next summer at a performance of The Lost Colony in Manteo. The 
association’s directors announced the election of Mrs. William C. Friday 
of Chapel Hill as new chairman; she succeeds Mrs. Morrison who resigned 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 1, JANUARY. 1973 


3 





after serving eleven years. A report on The Lost Colony was also given 
during the luncheon meeting. 

North Carolina Federation of Music Clubs 

The federation began its sixteenth annual Music Day on November 28 
with a varied program of music and ballet. The Colvin School of Dance of 
Gastonia opened the afternoon performance, and a piano recital by James 
Reid Smith, Jr., of Rockingham concluded the program. Mrs. James B. 
Doggett, state president, presided at the banquet that evening. Vice- 
chairman of Music Day, Mrs. Q. O. McAllister of Raleigh, extended greet¬ 
ings to the group; the Hinda Honigman Composers Cup was presented by 
Miss Martha L. Kendrick, chairman of the North Carolina Music Day 
Composers’ Contest, to Rose Marie Cooper of Greensboro. Professor Earl 
E. Beach of East Carolina University’s School of Music was the dinner 
speaker. The day’s program ended with the performance of an opera, A 
Game of Chance, by Seymour Barab; direction was under John McCrae 
of the Brevard Music Center. A reception honoring Mrs. Doggett, guests, 
and artists was held following the opera. 

North Carolina Art Society 

During the business meeting on November 29 Finley White of Durham 
was reelected president; Mrs. Isaac Manly of Raleigh was elected vice- 
president, and Charles Lee Smith, Jr., of Raleigh was reelected secretary- 
treasurer. The associate director of the North Carolina Museum of Art, 
Moussa Domit, reported during the luncheon meeting on recent acquisitions. 
Speaker for the dinner meeting was Richard F. Brown, director of the 
Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, Texas. At the dinner 1972 winners 
of the thirty-fifth annual North Carolina Artists’ Exhibition were 
announced. Major purchase awards went to Alice Fellows of Durham, first 
purchase award of $1,000 for her sculpture, “Moon Egg III”; R. W. 
Kinnaird of Chapel Hill, $500 for an acrylic painting; and similar sums 
to Dean Leary of Greenville for a fiber glass and masonite construction, and 
to Ralph Cox of Athens, Georgia, for an enamel painting. A reception was 
held at the Museum of Art following the dinner; the 1972 North Carolina 
Artists’ Exhibition was opened at that time. 

Society for the Preservation of Antiquities 

President John E. Tyler opened the business meeting of the society the 
morning of November 30. The following officers were elected: Mrs. Henry 
Zenke of Greensboro, president; William J. Moore of Greensboro, vice- 
president; Mrs. Sarah R. Houser, Miss Gertrude S. Carraway, Mrs. John 
W. Labouisse, Harry Gatton, and Mrs. Lura S. Tally, directors; and E. 
Frank Stephenson, Jr., Mrs. Jack E. Brinson, Banks C. Talley, Jr., John 
G. Newton, Thomas A. Gray, John Harden, Miss Katherine Howell, Mrs. 
J. H. Winkler, Miss M. Mellanay Delhom, Mrs. H. Leslie Moody, and Harley 
E. Jolley, vice-presidents for the eleven congressional districts. Dr. H. G. 
Jones and Mr. Tyler are ex officio members of the board of directors. 


4 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Reports on preservation projects were given by Mrs. Ernest L. Ives for 
the Moore County Historical Society; Mr. John E. Raper, Jr., Fayetteville 
Arsenal; Harry L. Thompson, Historic Hope Foundation, Inc.; Miss Mary 
Virginia Horne, John Wright Stanly House; Davis Waters, Historic 
Edenton; and Dr. Jones, State Capitol and State Historic Sites. 



Ruth Coltrane Cannon Cups were given to Historic Hope Foundation, Inc., Governor Robert 
W. Scott, Mrs. Joye E. Jordan, and Miss M. Mellanay Delhom. Pictured above, left to right, 
are Mrs. W. E. White, representing Hope; Governor Scott, Mrs. Jordan, and Miss Delhom. In 
the right-hand photograph President John E. Tyler is shown presiding at the luncheon meet¬ 
ing of the Society for the Preservation of Antiquities. 

Speaker at the luncheon was Mr. Clement E. Conger, chairman of the 
Fine Arts Committee, Department of State, and curator of the White House, 
whose topic was “Masterpieces of Americana, Diplomatic Reception Rooms, 
Department of State.” Slides were used to illustrate his address. Winners 
of the Cannon Cups, given for accomplishments in historic preservation 
and restoration, were Governor Robert W. Scott, for his “support for and 
active participation in historic preservation”; Miss M. Mellanay Delhom, 
director of the Delhom Gallery and Institute for Study and Research in 
Ceramics at the Mint Museum in Charlotte, for her “achievements in 
historical research and preservation, especially in establishing a noteworthy 
start in the study, publicizing and potentialities of North Carolina 
ceramics”; Mrs. Joye E. Jordan, assistant administrator of the Office of 
Archives and History, for her many achievements in the field of preserva¬ 
tion; and Historic Hope Foundation, Inc., for its efforts to restore Hope, 
the home of Governor David Stone in Bertie County. 

North Carolina Museums Council 

Speaker for the council meeting, held on November 30 in the Archives 
and History-State Library Building, was Richard F. Gibbs, director of the 
North Carolina American Revolution Bicentennial Commission. Officers 
were reelected: Eugene T. Upchurch of Raleigh, president; William J. 
Moore of Greensboro, vice-president; and Mrs. Peggy R. Hopson of Raleigh, 
secretary-treasurer. New members of the board of directors include Miss 
Bea Blount of Salisbury, Mrs. Carolyn Milner of Wilmington, and Mr. Gene 
Capps of Winston-Salem. Recipient of the North Carolina Museums Council 
Annual Award was Frank L. Horton, director of the Museum of Early 
Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem. 

The North Carolina Museums Council served as the host group for a 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 1, JANUARY, 1973 


5 



reception for all members of Culture Week organizations; the event was 
held in the Archives and History-State Library Building from 4:30 to 6:00 
on November 30. Christmas music by the Broughton Ensemble, under the 
direction of Mrs. Judith E. Freeman, and exhibitions of pottery making by 
Mrs. Elaine Reed, weaving by Mrs. Frances Whitley, and spinning by Mrs. 
Oliveira Warren were “extras” for those who attended. 



The North Carolina Museums 
Council award was presented to 
Frank L. Horton. In the photograph 
to the left, Russell Peithman, 
right, is handing the award to Mr. 
Horton. Below, left, Elaine Reed 
is demonstrating pottery making 
to Mrs. Frances Whitley, C. F. W. 
Coker, Mrs. Dan K. Moore, and 
Dr. Lawrence Brewster. A portion 
of the receiving line and guests 
attending the reception given by 
the North Carolina Museums 
Council is shown in the photo¬ 
graph below, right. 



North Carolina Symphony Society 

Richard Wangerin, president of the American Symphony Orchestra 
League of Washington, D.C., spoke at a luncheon meeting at the Velvet 
Cloak Motel on November 30. That evening the North Carolina Symphony, 
under the direction of John Gosling, presented a concert in the Meredith 
College auditorium. A reception, held in the Bryan Rotunda at Meredith, 
followed. 


North Carolina Arts Council 

A luncheon meeting for members of the board was held at the Sir Walter 
Hotel on December 1. 


North Carolina Folklore Society 

The society reelected its officers: John Foster West of Boone, president; 
Thad Stem, Jr., of Oxford, first vice-president; Charles Gordon Zug III of 
Chapel Hill, second vice-president; Sylvia Lyons Render of Durham, third 
vice-president; and Harry C. West of Raleigh, secretary-treasurer. Presi¬ 
dent West presided at the afternoon session on December 1. The program 
was highlighted by selections on an antique music box by Dr. W. Amos 


6 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 








Abrams of Raleigh, a presentation of folk songs by Newell Baker of Pilot 
Mountain, a talk on “Blues in North Carolina” by Wilton J. B. Bastin of 
England, and audience participation in party games. Several awards were 
made. The Brown-Hudson Folklore Award went to Dr. Joseph D. Clark of 
Raleigh for his scholarly contributions; to Miss Mary Myrtle Cornwell of 
Waynesville for sponsoring folk crafts at the State Fair’s Village of Yester¬ 
year; and to Artus Moser of Swannanoa for his contribution of North 
Carolina ballads to the Folklore Archives of the Library of Congress and 
also for his achievements as a performer and recording artist of ballads. 
The society voted its second life membership to Jay B. Hubbell of Durham; 
he is the only living charter member of the Folklore Society. 


Society of Mayflower Descendants in the State of North Carolina 
Historical Book Club of North Carolina 

The two groups jointly honored their officers and the winners of the May¬ 
flower and Sir Walter Raleigh awards at a coffee hour at the Carolina Country 
Club on Saturday morning, December 2. 

North Carolina Poetry Society 

The North Carolina Poetry Society honored three of its veteran members, 
North Carolina Poet Laureate James Larkin Pearson, Zoe Brockman, and 
Charlotte Young, on December 2. Their poetry was read at the morning 
session which followed a business meeting. Dr. Thomas N. Walters of the 
North Carolina State University faculty and author of a new book of poetry 
was the speaker at the luncheon session. The Rev. S. L. McKay, president 
of the society, presided along with Mrs. Jean McCamy, vice-president of the 
organization. 


North Carolina Society of County and Local Historians 

Another Saturday morning meeting was that of the County and Local 
Historians. President R. B. Cooke of Durham presided. Speaker was Mr. 
John G. Zehmer, Jr., director of the Division of Historic Sites and Museums 
of the Office of Archives and History, whose topic was “This Old House— 
Recognizing Early Architecture.” Speaker at the luncheon was R. V. 



The Smithwick Award was presented to Mrs. Elizabeth Simpson Smith, who is shown in 
the photograph above, left. Mr. Claude H. Moore is making the presentation in both that 
picture and the one to the right; in the latter, Mrs. Margaret McMahan is being given an 
award of merit as winner of both second and third places in the Smithwick competition. 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 1, JANUARY, 1973 


7 




Asbury, Jr., executive director of Historic Wilmington Foundation, Inc., 
who spoke on “Preservation of Wilmington Historic Areas.” The society 
reelected Mr. Cooke as president; Miss Clara Laney of Monroe as third vice- 
president, Mrs. Margaret McMahan of Fayetteville as secretary, and the 
Rev. Donald McMahan of Fayetteville as treasurer. Mrs. John H. Winkler 
of North Wilkesboro was moved up from second to first vice-president, and 
Senator Hector MacLean of Lumberton was named second vice-president. 

The 1972 Smithwick Award was presented to Mrs. Elizabeth Simpson 
Smith of Charlotte for her article, “Founding Father—Revered or Rejected,” 
which appeared in the Shelby Daily Star and was later reprinted in the 
State. Mrs. Margaret McMahan won second and third places in the compe¬ 
tition for her two-part biographical study of James Robert Adair, which was 
published in the Robesonian of Lumberton, and for “Prologue to Revolution: 
Storm on the Cape Fear,” which was published in the State Port Pilot of 
Southport. 

Membership Lists Available 

Because membership lists were omitted from the printed Culture Week 
program this year, several organizations duplicated their own lists and 
have them available for 50 cents each by mail: Copies for the Literary and 
Historical Association, the Society for the Preservation of Antiquities, and 
the Museums Council may be ordered from these organizations at 109 East 
Jones Street, Raleigh, 27611, and that for the Society of County and Local 
Historians may be ordered from the society at 121 Hinsdale Avenue, 
Fayetteville, 28305. 

The decision of the Culture Week Coordinating Committee to discontinue 
carrying the extensive lists in the printed program was based upon drastic 
increases in printing costs and the pressure of deadlines. 

Edenton Symposium Deemed Success 



The Edenton Symposium, spon¬ 
sored by the Historic Edenton 
Commission in cooperation with 
the Office of Archives and His¬ 
tory, was held October 23-25 in 
Edenton. One of the lecturers was 
Mr. Frank L. Horton of the Museum 
of Early Southern Decorative Arts 
in Winston-Salem. He is shown 
here lecturing on the furniture of 
the Edenton area. Some of the 
exhibit pieces are shown to his 
left. 


8 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 










Plans Announced for Tryon Palace Symposium 

The fifth annual Tryon Palace Symposium on the Eighteenth Century 
Decorative Arts will be held under the joint sponsorship of Tryon Palace 
and East Carolina University March 11, 12, and 13. Meetings will be held 
in the Tryon Palace Auditorium in New Bern. Plans for the program include 
“Pleasant Hill at Shakertown, Kentucky,” by Mr. James L. Cogar, presi¬ 
dent; “Furniture of the Southern Piedmont,” by Mr. Henry D. Green of 
St. Simons Island, Georgia; “Oriental Rugs: Selection and Care,” by Mr. 
Jerome Kambourian of Fredricksburg, Virginia; and tours of the Tryon 
Palace Complex and a tour of New Bern. Speakers for “Chinese Export 
Porcelain” and “Southern Furniture” have not yet been announced. For 
further information write to Donald R. Taylor, curator of education at Tryon 
Palace in New Bern, 28560, or to Tryon Palace Symposium, Division of 
Continuing Education, East Carolina University, P.O. Box 2727, Greenville, 
27834. 


Ground Broken For New Records Center 



Governor Scott symbolically broke ground on December 13 for the Office of Archives and 
History’s new State Records Center, shown above in Architect F. Carter Williams’s render¬ 
ing. At left is the present Archives and History-State Library Building, and in background is 
the State Legislative Building. The structure will provide one floor of offices and workrooms 
and seven levels of shelving capable of housing approximately 125,000 cubic feet of semi¬ 
current records of state agencies. Costing $1.6 million, the building was the only one 
authorized for state government in Raleigh by the 1971 General Assembly. Construction is 
expected to begin in the spring of 1973 with completion estimated for late the following 
year. (Photo by Office of F. Carter Williams, F.A.I.A.) 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 1, JANUARY, 1973 


9 

































C.S.S. JSeuse Visitor Center Opened 



In the picture at right, former State Senator Thomas J. White, chairman of the Advisory 
Budget Commission, is shown cutting the ribbon held by Representative Daniel T. Lilley signi¬ 
fying the official opening of the new visitor center (shown in the left-hand photograph) at 
the C.S.S. Neuse State Historic Site at Kinston on October 22. Senator White and Representa¬ 
tive Lilley played leading roles in the recovery of the remains of the Confederate ram and in 
obtaining legislative appropriations for the development of the site. Both spoke briefly, 
along with Dr. H. G. Jones, state historian and administrator of the Office of Archives and 
History, during the informal ceremony which was followed by a viewing of a narrated slide 
program. Temporary exhibits, to be augmented when funds are available, are on display. 
The facility is open daily except Mondays. 


Markers Dedicated in Wilkes County 

Markers for three Wilkes County leaders in the Revolutionary War were 
dedicated on October 28; the ceremony was held at the marker site, which 
is near the grave of Gen. James Welborn west of Wilkesboro. Welborn 
served in the militia during and immediately after the Revolution. The 
second marker is for the grave of Col. Richard Allen, who fought in the 
Battle of Kings Mountain, served in the militia, and was the first sheriff of 
Wilkes County; his grave is located on a farm near Roaring River. The third 
marks the site of the home of Gov. Montfort Stokes; his home, recently 
destroyed by fire, was located west of Wilkesboro and east of the W. Kerr 
Scott Dam. 

Speakers included a historian with the National Park Service, Mr. 
Charles C. Snell of Washington, D.C., and two representatives from the 
Office of Archives and History, Mrs. Elizabeth W. Wilborn and Mr. A. L. 
Honeycutt, Jr. 

Properties Entered on National Register 

Properties recently added to the National Register of Historic Places are 
the Cape Lookout Light Station, Carteret County; the Thomas Jerkins 
House and the Rhem-Waldrop House, Craven County; Cool Spring Place, 
Cumberland County; Mendenhall Plantation Buildings, Guilford County; 
Tucker’s Grove Camp Meeting Ground, Lincoln County; and Troublesome 
Creek Ironworks, Rockingham County. 


10 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 






Genealogy Service Available on Saturdays 

The Genealogy Section of the North Carolina State Library is now open 
for service six days a week, from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mrs. Lois S. Neal 
is the librarian in charge of the section. 

With Saturday service now available in the State Library, genealogists 
are able to work there and in the State Archives every day in the week except 
Sunday. A professional librarian is on duty in the Genealogy Section at all 
times. 

No other section of the State Library is open on Saturdays. 


Wood Papers Added to Archives 

The Archives Section recently arranged, described, and microfilmed the 
papers of H. McGuire Wood, a designer and builder, who was business 
manager, director of the work-experience program, and professor of a course 
in small house design at Black Mountain College, 1942-1945. The collection 
consists of a number of letters from other faculty members, college bulletins, 
and student work plans. After 1945 Mr. Wood continued to live in the town 
of Black Mountain where he conducted a design and building service until 
his death in 1971. Included in the papers are plans for seventy-two houses 
designed by Mr. Wood. 

Another National Register Property Lost 


Great Falls Mill at Rockingham, which had been pro¬ 
posed for restoration as a southern textile museum, was 
destroyed by fire on October 8. 

Ironically, the owners had only a few days previously 
committed themselves to making available to a local 
group the large interesting structure for proposed use as 
a museum of textile manufacturing. 

The mill was the second National Register entry to be 
destroyed by fire in 1972 (the Montfort Stokes House in 
Wilkes County burned in April). (Photo by Richmond 
County Daily Journal.) 



VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 1, JANUARY, 1973 


11 


Recent Acquisitions Are Displayed 



The North Carolina Museum of History has started a series of displays featuring recent 
acquisitions. The case is located on the first floor of the museum in the adult lounge section. 

Currently on display are two covered Waterford glass wassail bowls, circa 1820; a woman’s 
silver tobacco pipe, circa 1732; some handcrafts from the Morgan-Tyler collection; and a 
pair of French dueling pistols dating from the 1840s. This is a changing display, and new 
artifacts will be placed in the case as they are received by the museum. 

Index to Carolina Comments Available upon Request 

An index to Volume XX (1972 issues) of Carolina Comments will be 
available about February 1. To save costs, the index will not be sent to 
subscribers and members of the North Carolina Literary and Historical 
Association except on request. Persons who wish to receive the index should 
address their requests to the Division of Historical Publications, Office of 
Archives and History, 109 E. Jones St., Raleigh, 27611. There is no charge. 

Newspapers Are Microfilmed 

The Newspaper Microfilm Project of the Technical Services Section 
recently completed the filming of revised editions of the Tribune (Henderson, 
weekly) from 1873 through 1876, and the Fool Killer (Moravian Falls, 
monthly) from 1910 through 1929. Film copies will soon be available for 
public use in the Search Room. 

Local, State Records Sections Are Active 

The Local Records Section recently arranged and transferred to the 
State Archives for public use permanently valuable records from Chowan, 
Gates, Pamlico, Sampson, and Wilkes counties. Phase II microfilming was 
recently completed in Ashe, Chowan, Davie, Forsyth, Gates, and Wilkes 
counties. This brings to twenty-eight the number of counties thus completed. 
Work is currently under way in Johnston, Rowan, and Watauga counties. 

Field office records of the State Highway Commission, including those of 


12 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 



highway districts, division equipment superintendents, division right-of-way 
agents, and right-of-way relocation assistance personnel, were inventoried 
for the first time by records management analysts of the State Records 
Section. A records inventory of the Comptroller’s Division of the Depart¬ 
ment of Social Services was recently completed; the revised records disposal 
schedule is being reviewed by officials in that division. The division has 
records holdings totaling approximately 4,450 cubic feet; about 57 percent 
of the total is housed in the State Records Center. The new schedule will 
provide for the transfer of several large groups of accounting records, 
thereby alleviating an acute records storage problem in the Albemarle 
Building, which houses the offices of Social Services. 

Report Given on Archives and History Staff Activities 

Dr. H. G. Jones attended the meeting of the National Trust, and on 
November 13-14 in St. Louis he participated in a discussion on a guide to 
manuscripts being prepared by the American Association for State and 
Local History. 

Mr. C. F. W. Coker, director, Division of Archives and Records; Mr. 
Paul Hoffman, chief, Archives Section; and Mr. George Stevenson, Jr., of 
the Archives Section, attended the annual meeting of the Society of Ameri¬ 
can Archivists in Columbus, Ohio, October 31-November 3. Mr. Coker gave 
a paper during a session entitled “An Evaluation of Recent State Archives 
Buildings.” He also served as chairman of a panel workshop on public 
relations activities in archival institutions. 

Mr. Coker spoke to the Genealogy Section of the Indiana Historical 
Society in Indianapolis on November 4. The subject of his talk was “Search¬ 
ing Your Family in North Carolina.” 

On October 12 the Archives conducted a one-day workshop on genealogy 
for the North Carolina Society, Daughters of the American Revolution. The 
workshop was attended by approximately eighty ladies representing most 
areas of the state. 

Mr. R. E. Youngquist, chief, State Records Section, addressed the Caro- 
linas Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admission Officers 
(CACRAO) at its annual meeting held in Greensboro in November. His 
topic was “Identifying and Safeguarding Vital Student Records.” 

Miss Mary Crettier, a graduate of the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill, joined the State Records Section as a microfilmer in October. 

Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell, director of the Division of Historical Publi¬ 
cations, represented the Office of Archives and History at the Southern 
Historical Association in Hollywood, Florida, November 15-18. She was 
recently named chairman of the Editorial Board of the American Archivist, 
official publication of the Society of American Archivists. The Editorial 
Board met in Washington, D.C., on December 11. 

On October 20 Mr. Bruce MacDougal and Miss Janet Seapker met with 
members of the Wilmington City Council to explain the National Register 
program and the value and variety of architectural styles in Wilmington. 
A bus tour of the historic district followed. Mr. C. Greer Suttlemyre and 
Miss Seapker attended the annual meeting of the National Trust for 
Historic Preservation held in Washington, D.C., October 25-29. Mr. 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 1, JANUARY, 1973 


13 



MacDougal, Miss Seapker, and Mr. Suttlemyre are members of the staff of 
the Survey and Planning Unit of the Division of Historic Sites and 
Museums. 


Executive Board Meets 



The Executive Board of the State Department of Archives and History held its semiannual 
meeting October 17. Members of the board in attendance are pictured above, left to right, 
seated: Dr. Edward W. Phifer, Jr., of Morganton; Dr. Hugh T. Lefler of Chapel Hill; Mr. T. 
Harry Gatton of Raleigh, who was elected chairman; Dr. Gertrude S. Carraway of New Bern; 
and Dr. Gordon S. Dugger of Chapel Hill. Standing, left to right, are representatives of the 
office and Mr. Sam Ragan, secretary of the Department of Art, Culture and History: Mr. Fred 
S. Harbin, coordinator of the Division of Historical and Commemorative Commissions; Mr. 
C. F. W. Coker, director of the Division of Archives and Records; Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell, 
director of the Division of Historical Publications; Mr. Ragan; Dr. H. G. Jones, state historian 
and administrator of the Office of Archives and History; Mrs. Joye E. Jordan, assistant 
administrator of the Office of Archives and History; Mr. John G. Zehmer, Jr., director of the 
Division of Historic Sites and Museums; and Mr. Michael W. Brantley, director of the Division 
of Tryon Palace. Two members of the board—Mr. Josh L. Horne of Rocky Mount and Orlando, 
Florida, and Dr. Fletcher M. Green of Chapel Hill—were absent when the photograph was 
taken. 


Journal on Appalachian Region Is Published 

Appalachian Journal, a new magazine about the Appalachian region, 
is scheduled for publication twice each year, with the first issue published 
in December, 1972. The first issue included the first of two hitherto unpub¬ 
lished manuscripts of William Gilmore Simms, entitled “The Idylls of the 
Appalachians’’; the second will appear in the next issue of the Appalachian 
Journal. Other features of the December issue are “Who Are Southern 
Mountaineers?” by Cratis Williams; “The Making of a Man,” by Jesse 
Stuart; a story on the beginnings of forestry in the region, by John and Ina 
Van Noppen; and four pieces on “Phalanx of Children,” by Robert Coles, 
Thomas Cottle, Kenneth Eble, and George Wesley. Editor of the new pub- 


14 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 










lication is Dr. Jerry Williamson, a member of the English faculty at 
Appalachian; Dr. H. G. Jones is a member of the Area Board of Advisers. 
Subscriptions are $8.00 per year. 

Colleges and Universities 


Campbell College 

Dr. Vernon 0. Stumpf published “The Underground Film in London” 
in the May issue of Film and History and “The Archive Film Conference 
in London: An Interpretative Report” in the September issue of the same 
periodical. 

Duke University 

Several representatives of the Department of History attended the 
Hollywood, Florida, meeting of the Southern Historical Association, 
November 15-18. Dr. John TePaske served as commentator for a session 
on “Colonial Administration under the Bourbons”; and Dr. Anne Firor 
Scott was one of two commentators for a session entitled “The Liberated 
Southern Woman of 1913.” Other Duke people at the meeting included 
Drs. Mattie Russell, Joel Colton, and Charles Young. 

Meredith College 

Dr. Thomas C. Parramore discussed “History from the Outside: A 
Perspective on Old Edenton,” at the Edenton Symposium on October 24. 
Dr. Sarah M. Lemmon attended the Southern Historical Association. 

North Carolina State University 

Dr. Burton F. Beers served as chairman of a session on “Twentieth- 
Century British Far Eastern Relations” at the Southern Historical Asso¬ 
ciation in Hollywood, Florida. The session was held November 17. Other 
members of the faculty who attended the Hollywood meeting included 
Drs. Stuart Noblin, Ralph Greenlaw, and William C. Harris. 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

The program scheduled for the University Seminar on Southern History 
and Culture was recently announced by Dr. John S. Reed of the Department 
of Sociology. The seminar was planned for university faculty and invited 
guests; speakers during the fall were Dr. George B. Tindall of the Depart¬ 
ment of History, whose topic was “Populism: A Semantic Identity Crisis,” 
and Dr. Merle Black of the Department of Political Science, who spoke on 
“Instant Replay: The South and the Election of 1972.” Speakers tentatively 
scheduled for future sessions include John Earle of Wake Forest; Louis 
Rubin of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Edwin Yoder of 
the Greensboro Daily News', Kenneth Morland of Randolph-Macon Woman’s 
College; Matthew Hodgson of the UNC Press; and Donald Shaw, Thad 
Beyle, and John Reed, all of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Members of the steering committee, in addition to Dr. Reed, are Drs. Donald 
Mathews, Hugh Holman, James Prothro, and Louis Rubin. 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 1, JANUARY, 1973 


15 


Dr. James W. Patton served as chairman of a November 16 session of the 
Southern Historical Association in Hollywood, Florida. The subject of the 
program was “Francis B. Simkins: Southern Historian.” The next morning, 
Dr. Barbara B. Schnorrenberg presided over a session entitled “Women, 
Law, and Society in Early Modern Europe.” Others from the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill who attended the association included Dr. 
George B. Tindall, who is the incoming president of the organization, Mr. 
William S. Powell, Dr. Isaac Copeland, and Dr. C. 0. Cathey. 

Warren Wilson College 

Dr. Thomas B. K. Lee of the Department of History attended a fourteen- 
day conference in Taipei, Taiwan, several months ago. The first meeting 
of the National Reconstruction Seminar was sponsored by the Taiwan 
government. Dr. Lee has recently edited Modem History of China and 
Japan, a compilation of writings by Asian scholars. 

Western Carolina University 

Dr. Brian Joseph Walton presented a paper entitled “The Election of 
Antebellum Southern Senators” at the Southern Historical Association in 
Hollywood, Florida, on November 18. 

State, County, and Local Groups 

Anson County Historical Society 

Chairmen of committees for the society and for the Boggan-Hammond 
House were called by President R. V. Liles to meet October 31 for the 
purpose of discussing plans relating to development of the county’s histori¬ 
cal and cultural assets. An effort will be made to involve the county as a 
whole in the work of the society. Leading the discussion were John J. 
Dunlap, general treasurer; Col. Henry Huntley, first vice-president and 
chairman of membership, dues, and memorials; Mrs. Lucy McQuague 
and Mary Louise Medley of the research committee. 

Beaufort Historical Association 

The association agreed at its October 24 meeting to assist in teaching 
the county’s history at East Carteret High School by helping accumulate 
pictures, newspaper articles, and other material on Carteret’s past. The 
association decided at that time to plan Christmas events at the Joseph 
and Josiah Bell houses. President of the Beaufort Historical Association 
is J. 0. Barbour, Jr. 

Brunswick County Historical Society 

The Brunswick County Historical Society met November 13 with Mrs. 
Marie Rourk presiding. William G. Faulk, Jr., site manager, Brunswick 
Town State Historic Site, gave a brief summary of the work at Brunswick 
Town and told of the progress being made on the Frying Pan Lightship at 
Southport. Miss Janet Seapker, survey specialist with the Office of Archives 


16 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


and History, spoke, explaining methods used in conducting an architectural 
inventory; she encouraged members to inventory their county. The follow¬ 
ing officers were elected for 1973: president, Mrs. Lucille Blake; vice- 
president, Harold Aldridge; secretary-treasurer, Miss Helen Taylor; 
directors, Mrs. Marie Rourk and R. V. Asbury. 


Caldwell County Historical Society 

The week of November 6-10 was set aside for the society’s Hobby Show 
at the National Guard Armory. Among items shown was an old mailbox 
used at the Carlheim Hotel from 1809 to 1899; it was displayed by James 
B. Dula, first vice-president of the society. 

Chapel Hill Historical Society 

The society has recently published Phillips Russell’s book, These Old 
Stone Walls ; the book was printed by Seeman Printery of Durham. Profes¬ 
sor Russell donated the manuscript to the society. Orders should be sent 
to Box 503, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 27514; the book is priced at $5.00. 
Speaker for the November meeting of the society was Stuart C. Schwartz, 
archaeologist with the Office of Archives and History, whose topic was “The 
State of Archaeology: Recent Historic Site Excavations in North Carolina.” 
His talk was illustrated with color slides. The society’s oral history project 
has made tapes on which are recorded reminiscent talks by Dr. L. R. Wilson, 
Carl Durham, and Mrs. Roy W. Homewood. 

Halifax County Historical Association 

The association met November 10 with Richard F. Gibbs, executive 
secretary of the North Carolina American Revolution Bicentennial Com¬ 
mission, as speaker. Plans were announced for a bus tour to Williamsburg 
on December 28. 

Haywood County Historical Society 

Guest speaker at the September 25 meeting of the society was Mrs. 
Aurelia Cathey, who discussed highlights in the development of the Bethel, 
Pigeon Valley, and Sonoma areas. The talk was supplemented with displays 
of books, newspapers, and artifacts relating to the places mentioned. 


Hillsborough Historical Commission 

The annual meeting of the commission was held November 11, with Mr. 
James Webb, chairman, presiding. Reports were presented by Mrs. Alfred 
Engstrom and Dr. Charles Blake; they discussed work being done toward 
the goal of designating historic zoning for Hillsborough and toward listing 
Hillsborough as a historic district on the National Register of Historic 
Places. Officers elected to serve two-year terms are Mrs. R. W. Isley, chair¬ 
man; Mr. Lucius Cheshire, vice-chairman; Mrs. Fred Cates, secretary; and 
Mr. Wilson Cole, treasurer. 


VOLUME XXI. NUMBER 1, JANUARY. 1973 


17 


Hillsborough Historical Society 

The annual meeting was held October 19 with Mr. Sam Ragan, secretary 
of the Department of Art, Culture and History, as speaker. New officers are 
Alexander Shepherd, president; Miss Betty June Hayes, vice-president; 
Mrs. William Hopewell, Sr., secretary; and Mrs. Kay Winecoff, treasurer. 
The Engstrom Award was presented to Mrs. Lillie May Isley of Cedar Grove 
for her outstanding service to the society; she served as president for the 
past three years. 

Historic Robeson, Inc. 

A new organization is Historic Robeson, Inc., formed to work toward the 
preservation and restoration of historic sites in Robeson County. 

Historical Society of North Carolina 

Members of the society met at Elon College on October 27. During the 
afternoon session, a panel on the subject of “Teaching North Carolina 
History: What, Why, Whether” was held, with William H. Cartwright of 
Duke, William S. Powell of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 
Sarah M. Lemmon of Meredith, Mary Vann Wilkins of the North Carolina 
Department of Public Instruction, and Mrs. Anne Kennedy of LeRoy Martin 
Junior High School in Raleigh as participants and with Dr. Thomas C. 
Parramore of Meredith College as moderator. Dr. Harley Jolley of Mars 
Hill was in charge of the next portion of the program, during which time a 
film and brief remarks were presented on “The Cradle of Forestry in 
America.” Dr. Elmer L. Puryear of Campbell College gave his presidential 
address, “Graham A. Barden and the Fight over Federal Aid to Education,” 
at the evening session. 

The society voted to establish an annual award for the best research 
paper in North Carolina history by an undergraduate student from an 
accredited senior North Carolina college or university, written during the 
academic year June 1 to May 31. The society will give $50.00 and a paid 
student membership in the North Carolina Literary and Historical Asso¬ 
ciation to the recipient; announcement of the winner will be made at the 
annual meeting of the association. Details regarding the competition will 
be sent to the history departments of eligible institutions. 

New officers elected during the business portion of the meeting are Dr. 
Richard L. Watson of Duke, president; Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell of the 
Office of Archives and History, vice-president; Dr. Durward T. Stokes 
of Elon, secretary-treasurer, and Dr. Edward W. Phifer, Jr., of Morganton, 
council member. 

Lower Cape Fear Historical Society 

The October 13 meeting was held at St. James Great Hall. Dr. Thaddeus 
W. Tate, Jr., spoke on “Academic Scholarship and the Local Historical 
Society.” The society’s October Bulletin featured an article by Virginia 
Walsh entitled “Excerpts from Methodist Records Spanning One Hundred 
Seventy-five Years.” Miss Walsh served as chairman of the Records Com- 


18 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


mittee for the Anniversary Committee of Grace United Methodist Church 
in Wilmington; Frank I. Ballard was chairman of the Anniversary 
Committee. 

Montgomery County Historical Society 

The October 24 meeting was held at the Methodist Church in Star with 
Senator Hector MacLean as speaker. 

Mordecai Square Historical Society 

The annual meeting of the society was held on September 19 at the 
Mordecai House in Raleigh. Officers are James Nelson, president; Mrs. 
Scott Venable, vice-president; Mrs. Clauston Jenkins, Jr., secretary; James 
Craig, treasurer; and Mrs. C. Jackson Brakebill, assistant treasurer. The 
Mordecai House is open Sunday afternoons from 2:00 to 4:00 and Wednes¬ 
days from 10:00 to 1:00. 

Museum of the Albemarle 

“Old Times of the Albemarle” was the theme for the Albemarle Antiques 
Show and Sale held in Elizabeth City September 22-24. The only display 
not for sale was that provided by the Museum of the Albemarle, which 
prepared an exhibit “significant to the show’s purpose: to recall the old 
days of the Albemarle’s rich past.” 

Nash County Historical Association 

The association met November 9 in the Farm Bureau Building near 
Nashville. Speaker on that occasion was Mr. Hugh B. Johnston of Atlantic 
Christian College. 

New Bern Historical Society 

The September issue of the society’s newsletter contained several 
announcements of interest: The Board of Directors decided to close the 
Attmore-Oliver House from October 1 until April 1 for reasons of economy; 
an increase in dues, effective in 1973, will mean a membership for an indi¬ 
vidual will be $10.00, one for a family will be $20.00, and that for a business 
will be $100.00; the annual formal benefit ball and midnight breakfast are 
scheduled for February 16 at the Ramada Inn; and the biennial tour of old 
homes will be held on April 14. 


North Carolina Society of County and Local Historians 

The society toured Asheville and vicinity on October 15 as guests of the 
Western North Carolina Historical Association. The group was welcomed 
by Dr. Richard W. Iobst of Western Carolina. The tour began with a stop 
at the Thomas Wolfe House; next on the agenda was a stop at the Asheville 
Community Theater for coffee and doughnuts, during which time the 
society’s president, Robert B. Cooke of Durham, addressed the two societies. 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 1, JANUARY. 1973 


19 



During a visit to the Asbury Memorial United Methodist Church, Mrs. 
Luther Oates, church historian, gave a history of Asbury Memorial. The 
afternoon plans included a tour of the Vance Birthplace; a scenic drive 
through the mountains to the Carson House by way of Mars Hill, Burnsville, 
Spruce Pine, and Marion; and a social hour at the Carson House. 



Members of the North Carolina Society of County and Local Historians were photographed 
on the lawn of the Carson House by one of their group, the Reverend Donald H. McMahan. 


Northampton County Historical Society 

A dinner meeting was held in Jackson on October 6. Mrs. Elizabeth W. 
Wilborn of the Office of Archives and History spoke on “North Carolina’s 
First Ladies”; she was introduced by Charles Bridgers, vice-president of 
the society. President of the Northampton group is Carl Witt. 

Northwest North Carolina Historical Association 

Approximately 300 people attended the association’s meeting on October 
22. In charge of the meeting was Joe C. Matthews of East Bend, president 
of the group. Reports were given on several restoration projects, and the 
participants toured the Methodist church, where artifacts of Rockford were 
displayed; the Old Courthouse; York Tavern; and several other sites. The 
Story of Rockford, by Mrs. Lucy Hamlin Houck, was on display; the author 
autographed copies. 

Old Salem 

Gardner Gidley, president of Old Salem, Inc., has resigned; a committee 
headed by Charles B. Wade, Jr., is seeking a successor. Mr. Gidley will 
continue to serve as president until his successor is named. On November 
6 Christopher Gilbert of Leeds, England, spoke under the auspices of Old 
Salem and MESDA. Mr. Gilbert is noted for his work on Thomas Chippen¬ 
dale and for his essays on English furniture. “Salem Christmas—1800” 
was held on December 12. 


20 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 



Pamlico County Historical Association 

The association in cooperation with the high school’s Junior Historians 
sponsored a film, The Cooper’s Craft, on October 31. The film is the first in 
a projected series on crafts practiced in the colony two centuries ago. 

Pitt County Historical Society 

Members of the society met for a buffet dinner in Greenville on November 

13 and heard an address by Michael J. Powles, first secretary at the 
Embassy of New Zealand in Washington, D.C. Powles discussed various 
aspects of life in his country and showed a film entitled Amazing New 
Zealand. He was introduced by the program chairman, Dr. Ralph Hardee 
Rives. 

New officers of the society include John B. Lewis, Jr., of Farmville, 
president; Miss Annie Turner, Greenville, corresponding secretary; Miss 
Minnie M. Wiggins, Greenville, recording secretary; and W. C. Eagles, 
Greenville, treasurer. 

Randolph Historical Society 

The society is considering the move of the Asheboro Female Academy 
to a permanent site on city school property. Society member Tom Presnell 
requested that the city school board authorize the lease of school property 
to the historical society; the board authorized the lease at its September 

14 meeting, after conferring with Mr. Presnell and Dr. Joe Suggs, president 
of the society. 

Rockingham County Historical Society 

Henry V. Anderson, president of the society, appeared before the com¬ 
missioners of Rockingham County to request funds to aid in the restoration 
of the Wright Tavern in Wentworth; the commissioners responded with an 
appropriation of $5,000. This sum \frill be matched with state funds. 

Rowan County Historic Properties Commission 

The commission was established by an ordinance enacted by the county 
commissioners on October 2. Commission members will recommend to 
county governing bodies structures and sites which should be designated 
as historic properties; they will also seek to restore and preserve such 
properties. 

Rutherford County Historical Society 

The society met October 17 at Isothermal Community College. The 
program was on the subject of the impact of the proposed Clinchfield Dam 
on Rutherford and Polk counties. Sam Thomas of Forest City showed slides 
of the area which would be inundated by the proposed dam. Ben H. Sumner 
of Rutherfordton is president of the society. 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 1, JANUARY, 1973 


21 



Society of Mayflower Descendants in the State of North Carolina 

Samuel B. Dees of Raleigh was elected governor of the society at its 
twenty-fourth annual meeting, recently held in Charlotte. 

Society of the War of 1812 in North Carolina 

Over a hundred persons attended the unveiling of a highway historical 
marker honoring Lt. Col. Andrew Joyner (1786-1856), a distinguished 
officer of the First North Carolina Volunteers in the War of 1812, the 
afternoon of October 29. The ceremony was held in Roanoke Rapids. The 
marker was presented on behalf of the state by Mrs. Elizabeth W. Wilborn 
of the Office of Archives and History. Other program participants included 
the Reverend J. Edward Morrison and Lester Green and a group of Boy 
Scouts from Roanoke Rapids. Following the unveiling, officers and mem¬ 
bers of the Society of the War of 1812 in North Carolina were hosts for a 
candlelight cocktail party honoring those who attended the ceremony. 

Stokes County Historical Society 

Thanks to efforts made by the society, the old Stokes County jail will 
probably be saved. The structure was scheduled for demolition; but after 
an appeal from the society, which hopes to restore the jail, the county com¬ 
missioners voted to retain the old building, which was completed in 1904. 

Surry County Historical Society 

The society has announced plans to restore the old Bernard Franklin 
home; it has made a down payment on the house and four acres of land. 
Members met in Dobson the end of September and again on October 19; 
both meetings were held at the Surry Community College. 

Wachovia Historical Society 

The annual meeting of the society was held at the Old Salem Reception 
Center on October 9. Dr. Jerry L. Surratt of Wingate College spoke on the 
topic, “Breakdown of Church Control and Emergence of Civil Government 
in Salem.” 

Wake County Historical Society 

On Sunday afternoon, October 22, members of the society gathered at 
Peace College, an institution which is celebrating its centennial this year. 
Assistant President J. R. Stewart related the history of Peace and conducted 
a tour of the old buildings. He displayed an old journal of the Raleigh 
Academy, covering the years 1802-1811, which was from the Peace Library; 
the historic book was presented to the society which, in turn, placed it in 
the State Archives. President of the Wake County Historical Society is 
J. Bourke Bilisoly. 


22 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Washington County Historical Society 

A candlelight reception was held at Somerset State Historic Site on 
October 22. Hostesses in each room of the antebellum mansion described 
the furnishings to guests who toured the house. More than 400 persons 
attended the event. Mrs. Emily Henson is president of the society. 

Western North Carolina Historical Association 

Mrs. Moffitt Sinclair Henderson of Salisbury was named 1972 winner 
of the Thomas Wolfe Literary Award for her book, A Long, Long Day for 
November. The trophy was presented on October 28 during the fall meeting 
of the association, which was held at the Carson House near Marion. The 
presentation was made by Dr. Evelyn Underwood of Mars Hill College, 
awards committee chairman. The subject of the winning book was Samuel 
Price Carson, a man who once lived in the historic house. It is interesting 
to note that Mrs. Henderson’s mother was the last of the Carson family to be 
born in that house. 

Speaker at the meeting was G. Selwyn King of Asheville who discussed 
the building of the Western North Carolina Railroad in the mountain region. 
Serving as president of the Western North Carolina Historical Association 
is Jesse P. Surles. 



Mrs. Henderson, left, is shown as she received the Thomas Wolfe Award from Dr. 
Underwood. The picture was taken at the Carson House. (Photograph courtesy of the 
McDowell News [Marion].) 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 1. JANUARY. 1973 


23 














CAROUNA COMMENTS 

Published in January, March, May, July, September, and November by 
the Office of Archives and History, Archives and History-State Library 
Building, 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27611. 

H. G. Jones, Editor in Chief 
Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell, Editor 






12 



CAROUNA COMMENTS 

PUBLISHED BIMONTHLY BY THE NORTH CAROLINA 
OFFICE OF ARCHIVES AND HISTORY 


Volume XXI, Number 2 


March, 1973 


New Secretaries Sworn In 



Governor James E. Holshouser, 
Jr., chose the Archives and His¬ 
tory-State Library Building for the 
first ceremonial functions of his 
administration—a press con¬ 
ference, the swearing in of six 
members of his cabinet, and a 
cabinet meeting. In the top photo 
he is shown (center) with the new¬ 
ly appointed secretaries at the 
ceremony on January 10. Pic¬ 
tured, left to right, are David L. 
Jones, Social Rehabilitation and 
Control; Tenney I. Deane, Jr., 
Commerce; David T. Flaherty, 
Human Resources; Governor Hols¬ 
houser; Bruce Lentz, Transporta¬ 
tion and Highway Safety; Mrs. Grace J. Rohrer, Art, Culture and History; and William L. 
Bondurant, Administration. In the lower photo, Mrs. Rohrer is shown taking the oath of office 
from Chief Justice William H. Bobbitt. Mrs. Rohrer succeeded Sam Ragan, the first secretary 
of the Department of Art, Culture and History. (Photographs by the Office of Archives and 
History unless otherwise specified.) 










South Atlantic Archives ami Records 
Conference to Meet in Raleigh 

On May 3-4 archivists, manuscripts curators, records managers, and in¬ 
terested government officials will meet for the eighth annual South Atlantic 
Archives and Records Conference, to be held in the Archives and History- 
State Library Building in Raleigh. Sponsored by the state archival agen¬ 
cies of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, as well as by 
the National Archives and Records Service and the Society of American 
Archivists, the conference will highlight such areas of interest as computers 
and microfilm, the proposed National Historical Records Act, and archival 
plans for the observance of the American Revolution Bicentennial. Persons 
interested in more information should write to the Director, Division of 
Archives and Records, Office of Archives and History, 109 E. Jones Street, 
Raleigh, 27611. 


Records Center Ground-Breaking 



Posing here with a shovelful of dirt beside the architect’s drawing of the proposed State 
Records Center are, from left, Governor Bob Scott, Dr. H. G. Jones, and Architect F. 
Carter Williams, F.A.I.A. The informal ceremony was held on December 13, and bids for 
the new building with a capacity of 125,000 cubic feet of records are expected to be opened 
this spring. 


Volume of Records Grows 

In its annual report to the governor of records holdings for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1972, the Office of Archives and History noted that the 
volume of new records created by state agencies continued to increase. 

Records created during the period totaled 55,588 cubic feet as opposed 
to 40,048 cubic feet the preceding year—an increase of 15,540 cubic feet or 


26 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 




the equivalent of 9,712 full file drawers. However, during the same period 
23,531 cubic feet were removed from state office areas—11,947 feet by 
destruction and 11,584 feet by transfer to the State Records Center. 

For every 6.4 cubic feet of records destroyed or transferred to low-cost 
storage in the State Records Center, approximately $70 in cost avoidance 
savings was realized by the participating agency in that the agency could 
reuse the file cabinets emptied by the disposal of records no longer needed 
for daily operations rather than buy additional cabinets. For the one year 
period from July 1, 1971, to June 30, 1972, these savings totaled $256,900. 

Total holdings of state agencies in Raleigh amounted to 253,671 cubic 
feet, including 72,084 feet in the State Records Center. Noting that the rate 
of disposal was far below the rate of accumulation, the report concluded, 
“To regain control will require greater effort in applying records schedules 
now in effect and greater concentration on reducing retention periods of 
many records in state offices to the minimum legal and administrative re¬ 
quirements.” 

The need for additional space for economical housing of semicurrent 
records led to legislative appropriations for an additional State Records 
Center, ground for which was symbolically broken on December 13. 


Report on Records, Filming 

The Archives Section of the Division of Archives and Records, in con¬ 
junction with the Genealogical Society of the Church of Jesus Christ of Lat¬ 
ter Day Saints, has begun work on an automated statewide index to exist¬ 
ing marriage bonds. The computer input will be prepared in Salt Lake City, 
Utah, and sent to Raleigh for processing and printing. The end result, a state¬ 
wide index to marriage bonds, should be a welcome addition to genealogical 
finding aids available at the Archives. 

The section, with the help of the State Records Section, has filmed the 
WPA Pre-1914 Cemetery Inscription Survey, working papers, and card 
index. The thirty-six reels of microfilm, which are available in the Search 
Room, are also available for reproduction. 

Researchers interested in the unbound records of Wilson County will be 
pleased to know that records of the county from the time of its formation 
up to around 1920 have been made available for public use. Valuable addi¬ 
tions have been made recently to records of Ashe, Caldwell, Davie, Guilford, 
and Johnston counties. Additional volumes of minutes have been added to 
those of the Edenton District Superior Court. 

Phase II microfilming has been completed in thirty counties. Work is 
currently under way in Catawba and Rowan counties. While microfilming 
in the county courthouses, the department invites churches to bring their 
permanently valuable records by to be microfilmed for security. This ser¬ 
vice is provided to the churches without cost to them. 

The Newspaper Microfilm Project of the Technical Services Section re¬ 
cently completed the filming of the Henderson Daily Dispatch (Henderson, 
daily) from 1916 through 1940. Film copies will soon be available for public 
use in the Search Room. 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 2, MARCH, 1973 


27 


Portrait of First Archivist to be Presented 

The family of the late Robert Digges Wimberly Connor, first secretary 
of the North Carolina Historical Commission (the predecessor to the Office 
of Archives and History) and first archivist of the United States, will present 
an oil portrait at ceremonies in the Archives and History-State Library 
Building at 3:30 p.m. on Friday, April 27. The public is invited to attend. 

The portrait, painted by William C. Fields of Fayetteville, will be un¬ 
veiled by Miss Kate Whitfield Connor, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David M. 
Connor of Wilson. It will be formally presented on behalf of the family by 
H. G. Conner III of Wilson and Louis M. Connor, Jr., of Raleigh both neph¬ 
ews of Dr. Connor. 

Dr. James L. Godfrey, chairman of the Department of History at the Uni¬ 
versity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will deliver the memorial address. 
Dr. Godfrey was a student and later a colleague of Dr. Connor. 

Dr. Connor was secretary of the Historical Commission from its creation 
in 1903 until 1921 when he became Kenan Professor of History and Govern¬ 
ment at Chapel Hill. He was chairman of the Department of History in 1934 
when President Roosevelt appointed him first archivist of the United States, 
a position that he left in 1941 to fill the newly created Craige Chair of His¬ 
tory and Jurisprudence at UNC. He died in 1950. 

Richardson Foundation Makes Grants 

Challenge grants totaling $35,000 for historic preservation and restora¬ 
tion in North Carolina have been authorized for 1973 by the Smith Richard¬ 
son Foundation, Inc., Governor Bob Scott announced on January 3. 

The recipients are as follows (the first figure indicates the foundation’s 
grant; the second represents the amount of qualifying funds required to be 
raised by the sponsoring organization): Historic Halifax Restoration As¬ 
sociation for the moving and stabilizing of the Sally-Billy House in Halifax 
County, $5,000 and $5,000; Surry County Historical Society for the acquisi¬ 
tion and stabilization of and research on the Bernard Franklin House, 
$5,000 and $10,000; Historic Bath Commission for the continued restora¬ 
tion of the Van Der Veer House in Bath, $5,000 and $5,000; Greensboro 
Preservation Society for the continued restoration of Blandwood, the home 
of Governor John M. Morehead, $5,000 and $10,000; Rockingham County 
Historical Society for the continued restoration of the Wright Tavern in 
Wentworth, $5,000 and $5,000; Joel Lane House, Inc., for the continued 
restoration of the Joel Lane House in Raleigh, $5,000 and $10,000; and 
St. John’s Art Gallery, Inc., for the restoration of the historic house contain¬ 
ing the gallery in Wilmington, $5,000 and $10,000. 

If all of the challenges are met, the grants will result in the investment 
of at least $90,000 over and above normal expenditures for historical work 
in the state. 

According to Dr. H. G. Jones, state historian and administrator of the 
Office of Archives and History through which these grants are administered, 
“The Smith Richardson Foundation inaugurated in 1960 this program of 
assistance for local groups across the state interested in historic preserva- 


28 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


tion and restoration. Total contributions by the Foundation since the 
beginning of the program amount to $379,616. These grants have served 
as an incentive in the raising of an additional sum of more than $505,000. 
No other private source has supported historic preservation so generously 
in the state.” 


Properties Are Added to National Register 



^ 5 ? 



Additions to the National Register include 
the Boggan-Hammond House and Alexander 
Little Wing in Wadesboro (above, left), the 
William Mitchell House in Hertford County 
(above, right), the Dortch House in Nash Coun¬ 
ty (below, left), and the Lewis-Smith House in 
Raleigh, Wake County. 


Historic Buildings Threatened by State Plan 

Two Raleigh buildings on the National Register of Historic Places are 
threatened by destruction by the same state government that is charged by 
law with encouraging and assisting in the preservation of historic proper¬ 
ties. 

The Lewis-Smith House at 515 North Wilmington Street and the Sea¬ 
board Office Building at 325 Halifax Street are proposed to be removed to 
make way for office buildings, underground parking, and street changes. 
The State Government Center Plan has already been approved by the cogni- 


VOI.UME XXI, NUMBER 2, MARCH. 1973 


29 

































zant executive bodies and awaits only the necessary appropriation. Funds 
are being requested from the 1973 General Assembly for the first phase of 
the project; the budget item for this request, which would result in the re¬ 
moval of the Lewis-Smith House, is found in Volume III of the printed 
budget, page 11, item 1. Funding for the portion of the project that would 
remove the Seaboard Office Building will be requested at a later session 
according to the Department of Administration. 

Because Section 121-8.1 of the General Statutes requires an opportunity 
for the North Carolina Advisory Council on Historic Preservation to com¬ 
ment on any state-sponsored project affecting a property on the National 
Register, the matter will be considered by the council at its April meeting, 
and its comment will be made public. 




If the State Government Center Plan is implemented fully, the two historic buildings 
pictured above (the Lewis-Smith House, left, and the Seaboard Office Building, right) will 
be destroyed to be replaced by modern buildings and street alterations as indicated in the 
drawing at top. The location of the Lewis-Smith House is indicated by “1” and the Seaboard 
Building by “2.” 


Local Communities Can Preserve History 

Citizens accustomed only to the wringing of hands when still another his¬ 
toric building falls victim to the wrecker’s ball can now use their energies 
more constructively. 

By Chapter 160A (Article 19, Part 3A) of the General Statutes, a county 
or municipality is authorized to establish one or more historic district com¬ 
missions for the purpose of preserving, or encouraging the preservation of, 


30 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


























entire districts adjudged to be of historical and architectural importance. 
Prior to 1971 only eight towns had that authority. 

Chapter 157A, also enacted in 1971, authorizes a county or municipality 
to establish a historic properties commission with authority to acquire, 
restore, preserve, and operate historic properties. Such a commission may 
also recommend that the governing board of the county or municipality 
designate specific buildings and sites as “historic properties,” after which 
action an owner must give the commission ninety days written notice before 
demolishing, removing, or materially altering a designated property. During 
this waiting period the commission may negotiate with the owner or others 
with a view toward preserving the property. 

Interested citizens should request that their county or city officials in¬ 
vestigate these acts and establish the commission most appropriate for their 
community. This step will be much more effective than wringing hands or 
calling Raleigh. The authority now rests with the governing bodies of coun¬ 
ties and municipalities. 

Stipe Elected to National Trust Post 

Professor Robert E. Stipe of the School of Law and assistant director of 
the Institute of Government of the University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill has been elected to the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees 
of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. A trustee since 1971, he 
was appointed to the Executive Committee at a recent meeting in Washing¬ 
ton. He is also a member of the International Relations Committee, the 
Committee on Preservation Law, and a special committee developing future 
programs for the National Trust. Professor Stipe has been active in the 
Chapel Hill Historical Society and has been a leader in preservation efforts 
in Orange County. 

The National Trust is seeking to broaden its programs through various 
means, including advertisements which seek support for its work. Dr. Stipe 
has been actively promoting this endeavor of the organization. 



Let's face it. Most people never think about pre¬ 
serving our cities. Not until the wrecking ball 
swings next door. 

Understandable. It's difficult for some people to get 
emotionally involved until they’re personally 
threatened. 

But the threat is apparent. Since 1930, nearly half of 
all designated buildings of historic and architec¬ 
tural significance have been destroyed. Completely. 
Now, entire sections of cities are disappearing. 
And. every intelligent American is affected by 
the loss. 

What can one person do? Join the National Trust 
for Historic Preservation and help us. through 
your concern, to make progress and preservation 
a mutual and workable goal. For membership 
information, write: James Biddle. President. The 
National Trust for Historic Preservation,7-10 Jack- 
son Place. N.W., Washington. D.C. 20006. 



One of the advertisements being used by the National Trust for Historic Preservation 
is shown here. (Photograph courtesy of Robert E. Stipe.) 


VOLUME XXI. NUMBER 2, MARCH. 1973 


31 











Log Barn Erected at Vance Birthplace 

A barn, erected from hewn oak logs taken to the new site from their ori¬ 
ginal location near Newton, is the latest addition at the Vance Birthplace 
State Historic Site. The barn is the ninth and last exhibition building 
planned for the Vance place. Participating in the barn project were the fol¬ 
lowing people on the staff of the Office of Archives and History: Ben Gilles¬ 
pie of the Division of Historic Sites and Museums, Ron Garrett of the Polk 
Birthplace State Historic Site, Doug Aycock of the Caswell-Newse State 
Historic Site, and Bill Herald of the Bennett Place State Historic Site; 
representatives of the Asheville Division of the State Highway Commission 
who joined in the project were Jack Slagle and Joe Cheap. Additional hand- 
split oak shingles are being made for the roof so that the barn can be com¬ 
pleted. Site manager at the Vance Birthplace, which is located on Reems 
Creek Road near Weaverville, is Robert O. Conway. 

Paisley Shawl Added to Collection 

The North Carolina Museum of History recently acquired a historic pais¬ 
ley shawl. It was donated to the museum by Mrs. Stephen J. Wall of Clay¬ 
ton. These shawls were originally made in India and Persia, and they were 
called “camel blankets” because they were made to be used as camel or 
horse blankets. The recently acquired shawl was made in India around 1825. 
The shawls became so popular in Europe and America that the weavers in 
Paisley, Scotland, began to produce cheap copies and the town gave its 
name to the pattern. These shawls were popular in America in the 1850s 
and 1860s. 



32 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 




'P'U&tcC *£ 


0 ** 



Her byline is familiar, and her articles have appeared in the Charleston 
News and Courier, Raleigh News and Observer, Presbyterian Journal, 
Fayetteville Observer, and other southern publications. These stories, some¬ 
times accompanied by pen and pencil sketches, have won several awards, 
including two at the 1972 meeting of the North Carolina Society of County 
and Local Historians. 

Mrs. Margaret Taylor McMahan is a native of Greensboro where she 
graduated from WCUNC, now UNC-G, with a major in English. She sub¬ 
sequently attended, among several other institutions, L’Ecole Francais in 
New York City, and taught school for several years in Canton. Following 
her marriage in 1930 to the Reverend E. Donald McMahan, her time was 
divided between church work and historical activities. 

Cumberland County and Fayetteville, where she now lives, provide her 
with subjects for numerous writings meticulously researched, though her 
interests have no geographical limits. Three of her published works have 
been John A. Oates and the Campbellton Children, Fayetteville Folks — 
Lines and Rhymes, and Presbyterians Anonymous—A Study in Charac¬ 
ter. Her current projects include a biography of General Braxton Bragg and 
a history of the Confederate Arsenal at Fayetteville. 

Among the organizations that have attracted Mrs. McMahan is the 
Society of County and Local Historians, of which she has been secretary 
since 1967. Two years later her husband was elected treasurer of the same 
organization, thus forming an effective husband-wife team. They are a famil¬ 
iar pair at meetings of historical organizations, and both are avid readers 
and writers of history. 

For her many years of research and promotion of historical activities, 
Mrs. McMahan deserves the accolade, “Friend of History.” 



VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 2, MARCH, 1973 


33 









A Note to North Carolina Authors 

North Carolina authors are reminded that some publishers do not auto¬ 
matically enter their books in the literary competitions conducted each 
year through the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association. Au¬ 
thors who meet the residency requirement (a legal or physical resident of 
the state for the immediately preceding three years) and who have had 
published between July 1, 1972, and June 30, 1973, a book of original writ¬ 
ings meeting the requirements for entry in the competition for the May¬ 
flower Society Cup (nonfiction), Sir Walter Raleigh Award (fiction), AAUW 
Award (juvenile literature), and Roanoke-Chowan Award (poetry), should 
ascertain if their works have been entered by writing to Dr. H. G. Jones, 
secretary-treasurer of the North Carolina Literary and Historical Associa¬ 
tion, 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, 27611, giving the title of the book, its 
publisher, and the date of publication. 

Books should be entered as they are published so that judges will not be 
faced with a heavy load following the deadline of June 30. Three copies of 
each book must be furnished for the use of the judges. Winners will be an¬ 
nounced during Culture Week, which is scheduled in Raleigh this year 
during the period of November 13-17. 

Index Is Available 

Announcement was made in the January Carolina Comments with regard 
to the preparation of an index to the 1972 issues. The index is now avail¬ 
able for distribution, and anyone desiring to have a copy is invited to write 
to the Division of Historical Publications, Office of Archives and History, 
109 E. Jones St., Raleigh, 27611. There is no charge. 

Grants Available for “Public Policy Issue’" Programs 

The North Carolina Committee for Continuing Education in the Humani¬ 
ties, which awarded matching grants in 1972 for several projects relating 
to local history, expects to have available additional funds for appropriate 
projects in 1973. Among the history-related programs assisted by the com¬ 
mittee were the following: “Identifying Lenoir County’s Past,” sponsored 
by the Lenoir County College and Lenoir County Historical Association; 
“The History of the Family in North Carolina,” sponsored by UNC-Greens- 
boro; “Value Development in Transitional Oakwood,” sponsored by Mere¬ 
dith College; and “Richmond Remembers,” sponsored by the Sandhill Re¬ 
gional Library System. 

The proposed program must be centered on some issue of public policy 
relating to the statewide theme, “Traditions in Transition: The Impact of 
Urbanization on North Carolina Communities,” and on at least one of the 
subthemes—the family, political decision-making, and land-use planning. 

A booklet describing the program and requirements for qualification may 
be obtained from the committee at 1209 West Market Street, Greensboro, 
27412. 


34 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Counterfeit Printing Plate Is in Museum 


An examination of the right half of 
a copper printing plate for a 1776 
$5.00 North Carolina bill reveals 
that the negative was printed in re¬ 
verse. 



During the American Revolution the economies of the colonies were fragile 
at best, and North Carolina’s was one of the most unsteady. The colony’s 
provincial congresses authorized the printing of bills without levying taxes 
to underwrite their value. Because the British knew an unstable economy 
could not support a war effort, they paid counterfeiters to print bogus cur¬ 
rency. The North Carolina Provincial Congress, sitting at Halifax in April, 
1776, authorized the printing of $1,250,000; copper plates were to be en¬ 
graved by Gabriel Lewyn, a Baltimore goldsmith. 

The North Carolina Museum of History recently acquired the right half 
of a copper printing plate used for printing 1776 $5.00 North Carolina bills. 
The plate appears to have been broken in two by bending it back and forth, 
and there is a small hole drilled on a center line near the right edge. 

The plate was found on an Indian site. Indians had a fondness for brass 
and copper gorgets, and this might explain the hole. Of more singular in¬ 
terest is the fact that the plate is counterfeit. On close inspection, the crude¬ 
ness of the plate is evident; the engraving is not at all in index with the 
various $5.00 notes which have been compared with it. On the original plate, 
the engraver was supposed to cut the authorization date as “April 2 d 1776,” 
but he made a mistake and placed the small “d” before the “2.” The counter¬ 
feiter was clever enough to copy this obvious error; but other than this, his 
work was poor and he did not make a very good reproduction. 

For the most part, money plates were destroyed after the authorized bills 
had been printed, and certainly a counterfeiter would want to destroy his 
incriminating plates. Breaking the plate in half would not be a very secure 
way of disposing of the evidence. One can only wonder why this rectangle 
of copper was never destroyed. 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 2, MARCH, 1973 


35 



Personnel Activities and Changes Noted 

Dr. H. G. Jones, state historian and administrator, and Messrs. John G. 
Zehmer, Jr., and A. L. Honeycutt, Jr., of the Division of Historic Sites and 
Museums, attended the National Conference of State Liaison Officers for 
Historic Preservation in Washington, January 30-February 2. Dr. Jones 
spoke on the activities of the Advisory Committee to the National Register, 
of which he is chairman. 

Miss Suzanne Smith, archives and history assistant II, on January 19 con¬ 
sulted with members of the staff of the National Union Catalog of Manu¬ 
script Collections in the Library of Congress. The consultation was ar¬ 
ranged because of plans of the Archives concerning the preparation of en¬ 
tries for that guide. 

Mr. R. E. Youngquist, chief of the State Records Section, attended a 
seminar in Washington, D.C., on the use of the computer in historical socie¬ 
ties and museums. The seminar was presented by the American Association 
for State and Local History with support from the National Museum Act, 
which is administered by the Smithsonian Institution. 

Recent personnel changes in the Office of Archives and History include 
the following in the Local Records Section: Mrs. Ruby D. Arnold was pro¬ 
moted to archives and history assistant II; Mrs. Beverly H. Allen, clerk II, 
was promoted to archives and history assistant I; Mr. Murray D. Parker, 
Jr., joined the staff as archives and history assistant I; Mrs. Maxie Wall, 
clerk II, transferred from the State Records Section; and Miss Kay A. Good¬ 
rich, archives and history assistant I, resigned. In the State Records Sec¬ 
tion Mr. James Mercer, clerk III, transferred from Local Records, replac¬ 
ing Mr. George Oakley, who resigned; Mr. Bobby McClain transferred 
from the Archives Section, and, at the time of his transfer, was promoted to 
clerk I; Mr. William Pretty transferred from the Employment Security 
Commission to the section and was promoted to clerk II, replacing Mr. J. Ed 
Miller, who transferred to another state agency. 

Colleges and Universities 


Campbell College 

The college and the Harnett County Historical Society will jointly sponsor 
the Conference on Celtic Studies on March 17. Dr. Anne T. Moore attended 
the New Orleans meeting of the American Historical Association. 

Duke University 

The new university archivist of Duke is Dr. William Eskridge King, a 
Salisbury native who received his B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees from that 
institution. He formerly taught at West Virginia Wesleyan and at North 
Carolina Wesleyan colleges; last year he was a National Historical Publica¬ 
tions Commission Fellow in Advanced Editing of Documentary Sources for 
American History. In that capacity he was assigned to the Papers of Andrew 
Johnson, a project based at the University of Tennessee. Dr. King’s office 
is in the Perkins Library; he is working under the administrative jurisdic¬ 
tion of the executive offices of the university. 


36 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Dr. Gert H. Brieger contributed an article, “Medicine on the Frontier,” 
to the 1972 edition of Readers Encyclopedia of the American West. He also 
wrote “The Development of Surgery: Historical Aspects Important in the 
Origin and Development of Modern Surgical Science,” which is the first 
chapter in D. C. Sabiston, editor, Christopher’s Textbook of Surgery, pub¬ 
lished in the fall of 1972. Dr. Brieger is a member, 1972-1973, of the Macy, 
Jr., Foundation. 

Dr. William H. Chafe is the author of The American Woman: Her Chang¬ 
ing Social, Political, and Economic Roles, 1920-1970, published last fall by 
the Oxford University Press. 

Dr. Raymond Gavins spoke at the Association for the Study of Negro 
Life and History, held in Cincinnati in October, on the subject “Gordon 
Blaine Hancock: A Black Profile from the South.” He published “Cultural 
Pluralism in the Southeastern United States: Toward an Understanding 
of Historical Conflict” in the October issue of the High School Journal. 

The authors of “Aniceti Kitereza: A Kerebe Novelist” are Gerald W. 
and Charlotte M. Hartwig; the paper was published in Volume III, Num¬ 
ber 2, 1972, of Research in African Literatures. 

Dr. Frederic B. M. Hollyday took as his topic “Bismarck and Kaiser 
Friedrich III: The ‘Chancellor Crisis’ of 1888” at the November 1 meet¬ 
ing of the sixth annual Duquesne University History Forum. The forum was 
held in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

“The Commission of the Peace in the Eighteenth Century: A New 
Source,” by Norma Landau, was published in the November issue of the 
Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research. 

Dr. Warren Lerner served as chairman of a session on “The Comintern 
Presence in China” at the December 30 meeting of the American Historical 
Association in New Orleans. On the same date and at the same meeting 
Dr. Bernard S. Silberman spoke on “Japan in the Late Nineteenth Cen¬ 
tury.” Dr. Silberman served as book review editor of the Journal of Asian 
Studies for 1972 and is a member of the Board of Directors for the Asian 
History Association of the American Historical Association for the current 
academic year. He was on the program committee for the New Orleans meet¬ 
ing of the AHA. Another assignment he holds is that of membership on the 
Monograph Committee for the Association for Asian Studies, 1972-1974. 

Dr. Martin A. Miller had an article, “Neglected Figures in the History 
of Socialism,” in the Winter, 1972, issue of the newsletter of the Study 
Group for European Labor and Working Class History. His introductory 
article, “D. D. Akhsharumov and the Petrashevskii Circle,” appeared in 
Vospominaniia (Memoirs) by D. D. Akhsharumov, published by the Orien¬ 
tal Research Partners of Cambridge, England, in 1972. 

Dr. John F. Oates appeared on a November 16 session of the Southern 
Historical Association in Hollywood, Florida, taking as his topic, “The 
Quality of Life in the Ancient World as Reflected in the Papyri of Roman 
Egypt.” The next day, at the same meeting, Dr. Harold T. Parker served as 
chairman of a session on “Social Tensions in Restoration France.” Dr. 
Parker received the Annual Distinguished Teacher’s Award presented by 
the National Association of Schools and Colleges of the United Methodist 
Church; the award was made in January. 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 2. MARCH. 1973 


37 



Dr. Richard A. Preston contributed a chapter, “Military Influence on the 
Development of Canada,” to a 1972 publication entitled The Canadian Mili¬ 
tary: A Profile, edited by Hector J. Massey. 

Dr. Anne Firor Scott had an article, “Making the Invisible Woman Visi¬ 
ble,” in the November issue of the Journal of Southern History. 

Dr. John J. TePaske is the author of a chapter, “Quantification in Latin 
American Colonial History,” which is included in The Dimensions of the 
Past: Materials, Problems, and Opportunities for Quantitative Work in 
History, edited by Val R. Lorwin and Jacob Price. 

Dr. Charles R. Young published “English Royal Forests under the Ange¬ 
vin Kings,” in the November issue of the Journal of British Studies. 

East Carolina University 

The eighth annual East Carolina University Symposium on History and 
the Social Studies was held February 16 at Try on Palace. The symposium 
was “designed to bring together professional specialists at the university 
level and teachers of the social studies to examine new interpretations and 
the latest findings in the field of history and the social studies.” The theme 
for the 1973 conference was “The American Revolution: In Thought and 
Action.” 

Mr. Hugh Wease of the Department of History at East Carolina was in 
charge of arrangements. The department chairman, Dr. Herbert R. Paschal, 
spoke on “New Bern in the Revolutionary Era: A Case Study”; and Dr. 
Roy N. Lokken took as his topic, “Political Ideas of the Revolution.” Other 
participants included Dr. Don Higginbotham of the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill whose topic was “North Carolina in the Revolu¬ 
tion” and Mr. Richard F. Gibbs, director of the North Carolina American 
Revolution Bicentennial Commission, who spoke on plans and work of the 
commission. 

Livingstone College 

Dr. Thomas A. Schweitzer is the new chairman of the Department of His¬ 
tory at Livingstone. Visiting professor of history is Mr. Albert Boothby. 

Meredith College 

Dr. Sarah M. Lemmon, chairman of the Department of History and Poli¬ 
tical Science, appeared on WRAL-TV on December 11 to discuss the topic, 
“Preserving Historic Oakwood.” 

North Carolina School of the Arts 

Dr. William H. Baskin III, academic dean, has announced that the School 
of the Arts is accepting applications for two positions in history. One is a 
part-time teaching job in the field of American history on the high school 
level; the other, a college position, is for a full-time person specializing in 
European and British history. 

North Carolina Wesleyan College 

Kenneth V. Finney was named instructor in history, effective January 1. 


38 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Queens College 

Dr. Mollie Camp Davis served as chairman of a session on “The Liberated 
Southern Woman of 1913” when the Southern Historical Association met in 
Hollywood, Florida, last November. Dr. Norris W. Preyer also attended the 
association. Representing Queens at the American Historical Association in 
New Orleans in December was Dr. Richard W. Reichard. Dr. Davis is 
directing “a program dealing with the impact of urbanization upon the 
Charlotte community.” This responsibility began in January and will con¬ 
tinue through March; the program is being financed by a $2,000 grant to 
the history department from the National Endowment for the Humanities. 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

On January 15 Professor John Earle of Wake Forest University and on 
February 5 Edwin Yoder of the Greensboro Daily News spoke in Chapel 
Hill at the University Seminar on Southern History and Culture. 


University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

A noncredit course on research in the fields of family and local history 
is being offered by the university. The eight-week course, which began 
January 16, is under the sponsorship of the Department of History; co¬ 
ordinator is Dr. Robert M. Calhoon, associate professor of history. Financ¬ 
ing was possible through a $4,000 grant from the North Carolina Commit¬ 
tee for Continuing Education in the Humanities. 

Wake Forest University 

In conjunction with Old Salem, Historic Bethabara, Reynolda House, 
and MESDA, Wake Forest is offering “a program blending the traditional 
study of history with training and experience in historic sites and mu¬ 
seums. Classroom and site experience in preservation will be combined with 
the regular graduate offerings in a program leading to the M.A. in His¬ 
tory.” The course will require three semesters of nine months and two sum¬ 
mer sessions for completion. Financial aid is available; applicants must 
qualify for admission to graduate study in history. For further informa¬ 
tion write to Dr. J. Edwin Hendricks, Department of History, Wake Forest 
University, Winston-Salem, 27109. 

State, County, and Local Groups 

Anson County Historical Society 

The Anson County Historical Society and the Wadesboro Garden Club 
jointly sponsored an open house at the Boggan-Hammond House on Decem¬ 
ber 17. Christmas in the Williamsburg manner included decorations made 
of fruits, berries, greenery, and other natural materials; and members of 
the society and club were dressed in eighteenth century costumes for the 
occasion. Over 300 people attended the function; proceeds will be used to 
develop the garden and grounds. 


VOLUME XXI. NUMBER 2. MARCH. 1973 


39 


Bertie County Historical Association 

Harry Lewis Thompson of Windsor has been elected president of the 
association; he succeeded Mrs. W. E. White of Colerain. 

Burke County Historical Society 

C. Greer Suttlemyre, Jr., survey specialist with the Division of Historic 
Sites and Museums of the Office of Archives and History, presented a slide 
lecture on North Carolina architecture, with special emphasis on Burke 
County buildings, when the society met on January 16. 

Catawba County Historical Association 

The association met January 3 and heard a discussion of the formation 
of the county, presented by G. Sam Rowe. Mr. Rowe is a former president 
of the organization; the current president is Mrs. Rome Jones. 


Chapel Hill Historical Society 

Three members of the society’s Preservation Committee presented the 
December 3 program on the topic “Our Own Historic Past.” John Macfie 
discussed “Historic Chapel Hill Sites,” a topic he illustrated with maps 
prepared by Tom Rose and Paul Wager; Dr. Wager discussed “The Churches 
and Graveyards of Southern Orange County”; and Hugh Brinton took as 
his topic, “Old Chapel Hill Homes.” Dr. Ralph Watkins presided. For the 
January 7 meeting, the program featured the Southern Historical Collec¬ 
tion. Its director, Dr. J. Isaac Copeland, was the speaker. 

Speaker for the February 4 meeting was Dr. Paul Wager, professor emeri¬ 
tus of political science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
and author, with Dr. Hugh T. Lefler, of the bicentennial history of Orange 
County. Dr. Wager discussed the formation of the county, the history of its 
politics, and changes in government and in the state public school system. 

Plans are being made for the directors of the society and those of the new¬ 
ly organized Preservation Society to meet jointly several times a year. Offi¬ 
cers of the Preservation Society are Mrs. William Friday, president; Mrs. 
Kay Kyser, vice-president; J. Sib Dorton, secretary; and E. M. Gesell, 
treasurer. Professor Robert E. Stipe, vice-president of the Chapel Hill 
Historical Society, resigned because of duties with the National Trust; he 
has been succeeded by Dr. Charles Blake of Hillsborough. 

Duplin County Historical Society 

The society honored Dr. William Dallas Herring on November 18; he 
was recognized for his contribution to education in North Carolina. Three 
hundred people attended the luncheon meeting and heard an address by Dr. 
Charles F. Carroll, retired superintendent of public instruction. Dr. Herring 
serves as chairman of the State Board of Education; both he and Dr. Carroll 
received plaques from the Duplin County Historical Society. Mrs. Wayne 
Jordan serves as president of the organization. 


40 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 



Harnett County Historical Society 

The society met at the courthouse in Lillington for its December meeting. 
A slide presentation on the history of Duplin County, prepared by the 
James Sprunt Institute, was featured. Several members of the Harnett as¬ 
sociation have taken slides and photographs in the hope of preparing a 
similar program on their county. The members held their Christmas party 
on December 16 at the home of the secretary. Buddy Brown. 

Hillsborough Historical Society 

April 14 and 15 are the dates set aside for Hillsborough’s House and Gar¬ 
den Tour. Tickets, which will be $3.00 and $1.50, may be purchased at the 
old courthouse, the departure point for the tour. Historic houses will be open 
to the public as will several of the old colonial gardens and public buildings. 
Many of these have not been opened before. 

The society met January 11 to hear Mrs. Catherine Barnes of the North 
Carolina National Bank; she discussed Christ Church in Raleigh and its 
old parish house, saved by the bank which moved the structure and restored 
it as a branch office. William S. Powell of Chapel Hill spoke at the February 
22 meeting, taking as his topic, “Carolina Creatures from Roanoke Island 
to Purgatory Mountain.” 

To mark the fifteenth anniversary of the Orange County Historical Mu¬ 
seum, in February, an exhibit of watches and small clocks was sched¬ 
uled. 

Historic Salisbury Foundation 

On December 9 and 10 more than 600 people attended an open house at 


Josephus W. Hall House in Salisbury. (Photograph courtesy of James S. Brawley.) 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 2, MARCH, 1973 


41 





the Josephus W. Hall home on South Jackson Street in Salisbury. In 1859 
Dr. Hall and his wife moved into the house which had been erected in 1820 
for use as the girls school of the Salisbury Academy. Appropriately, the 
theme of the festival was “Christmas, 1859.” Hall’s descendants lived in the 
house until the summer of 1972, when it was purchased by the Historic 
Salisbury Foundation for $50,000. The purchase price included all the fur¬ 
nishings, some of which are late eighteenth and early nineteenth century 
pieces from the old Thomas L. Cowan house in which Mrs. Hall was born. 
The Hall House is located in the center of two city blocks containing a dozen 
nineteenth century buildings; it and two others have been placed on the 
National Register of Historic Places. Plans are being made to open the house 
to visitors on weekends beginning in early spring. 

Lower Cape Fear Historical Society 

The society held an open house at the Latimer House on December 21. 

Old Salem 

Old Salem, Inc., has a new president and chief administrative officer. He 
is R. Arthur Spaugh, Jr., production manager of the Washington Mills 
Division of Washington Group, Inc. The Winston-Salem native is a graduate 
of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and has a master’s de¬ 
gree in business administration from Harvard University. Mr. Spaugh suc¬ 
ceeds Gardner Gidley. 

The 1972 report of Old Salem’s activities has been issued. Mr. Gidley’s 
summary reported progress in many areas. Outstanding was the relocation 
of the Salem College Library to a site approximately 90 feet south on Church 
Street. As a result the site of the Gottlieb Schober House, circa 1795, will 
be available; it is hoped that the house will be reconstructed at that loca¬ 
tion. 

Person County Historical Society 

The delegates from the society appeared before the Person County Board 
of Commissioners on January 4 to discuss efforts made to persuade Caro¬ 
lina Power and Light Company to donate land for the restoration of 
McGehee’s Mill. The company offered the two buildings and 2.5 acres of 
land, but additional land is needed. The commissioners appointed a commit¬ 
tee to discuss the project further with power company officials. The society’s 
president, Mrs. Madeline Eaker, and Henry Pleasant presented the matter 
to the commissioners. 

Randolph County Historical Society 

The society met November 16, at which time directors were elected. Fol¬ 
lowing the membership meeting, the new board of directors met and elected 
Tom Presnell as president; B. B. Walker and W. Howard Redding, vice- 
presidents; Charlesanna Fox, secretary; and John F. Redding, treasurer. 
Mr. Presnell, during the meeting, reported that the Academy was moved 
on November 14 and is now on the East Walker Avenue school property. 


42 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Society for the Preservation of Historic Oakwood 

The society sponsored a tour of eleven homes in the Oakwood section of 
Raleigh on December 17. Homes in the historic section of the city were suit¬ 
ably decorated for the Christmas season. Some have been restored, and much 
interest has been shown in saving the section from destruction and deteriora¬ 
tion. 

Surry County Historical Association 

A fund-raising drive in which $10,000 will be sought for the purchase and 
restoration of the Bernard Franklin House was launched in November. 
Several changes in officers of the society became necessary because of the 
resignation of both the president and treasurer. The new president is 
Robert Merritt, who replaced Elliott Woltz; the new treasurer is Miss Ruth 
Minick, who replaced Mrs. J. Cecil Hill. Mrs. Cama Merritt is continuing 
to serve as secretary. 

Transylvania Historical Commission 

The following officers were reelected at a meeting on December 19: Mrs. 
Mary Jane McCrary, chairman; Robert T. Gash, vice-chairman; Mrs. Thel¬ 
ma Ferguson, secretary; and Joe H. Tinsley, treasurer. 

Wake County Historical Society 

Members of the society met in the auditorium of the Archives and History- 
State Library Building on the afternoon of January 7 to hear Mr. John L. 
Sanders, director of the Institute of Government, discuss the building of 
the State Capitol. The talk was illustrated with slides. For the society’s 
February 4 meeting, members gathered in Smedes Hall on the campus of 
St. Mary’s Junior College. Following a coffee hour, the head of the Depart¬ 
ment of History, Mrs. Martha Stoops, discussed the history of the school. 
At the conclusion of her presentation, members and guests toured the cam¬ 
pus. The society will hold its March 11 meeting at St. Augustine’s College. 

Wilkes Historical Society 

Two hundred copies of The Country Youth, by B. B. McGee, were recent¬ 
ly donated to the society by James Larkin Pearson. Mr. Pearson privately 
printed the book, which he believes to be the first written by anyone in 
Wilkes County, in 1964. Copies are available at the public library for a dol¬ 
lar; proceeds go to the historical society. 


CAROUNA COMMENTS 

Published in January, March, May, July, September, and November by 
the Office of Archives and History, Archives and History-State Library 
Building, 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27611. 

H. G. Jones, Editor in Chief 
Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell, Editor 


VOLUME XXI. NUMBER 2. MARCH. 1973 


43 







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Raleigh, N. C. 27611 



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C.Zi 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


PUBLISHED BIMONTHLY BY THE NORTH CAROLINA 
OFFICE OF ARCHIVES AND HISTORY 


Volume XXI, Number 3 


May, 1973 


Connor Portrait, Jones Bust Presented 




R. D. W. Connor. (Photograph from John Paul Jones. (Photographs by Office 
Johnson’s Studio, Fayetteville.) of Archives and History unless otherwise 

specified.) 


In ceremonies held on April 27 and 28, respectively, a portrait of Robert 
Digges Wimberly Connor and a bust of John Paul Jones were presented to 
the Office of Archives and History. 

Connor, the secretary of the North Carolina Historical Commission 
(predecessor of the Office of Archives and History) from its founding in 1903 
until 1921, served as first archivist of the United States from 1934 to 1941. 
Both before and after his federal service he was a distinguished professor 
of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

The portrait, painted by William C. Fields of Fayetteville, was the gift 
of Connor’s relatives, represented at the ceremony by H. G. Connor III of 
Wilson and Louis M. Connor, Jr., of Raleigh. Miss Kate Whitfield Connor 
and David M. Connor III unveiled the portrait which was accepted by the 
chairman of the Executive Board, T. Harry Gatton of Raleigh. 





Dr. James L. Godfrey, chairman of the Department of History at UNC-CH 
and a former student and colleague of Connor, delivered the main address. 

The John Paul Jones bust, a gift of Mr. and Mrs. John R. Parker of 
Charlotte, was accepted on behalf of the state by Governor James E. 
Holshouser, Jr., and of the Office of Archives and History by Mr. Gatton. 
Senator Sam J. Ervin, Jr., delivered the main address. 

The bust is a copy of the original located in the Pennsylvania Academy 
of Fine Arts, Philadelphia. 

According to tradition, young John Paul was befriended by Willie Jones 
of Halifax and assumed the Jones surname. The Executive Board, in author¬ 
izing the acceptance of the bust, noted that it “take [s] neither an affirmative 
nor negative stand on the controversy surrounding the question of John 
Paul Jones’s connections with North Carolina but note[s] instead that the 
controversy itself has become a part of North Carolina history, and conse¬ 
quently, feels that the acceptance and display of the bust may lead to further 
studies that will shed more light upon the subject. .. 

The bust will be displayed in the visitor center now being designed for 
the Halifax State Historic Site. 

Gold History Corporation Established 

The Gold History Corporation, a private nonprofit corporation for the 
purpose of promoting interest in and knowledge of the history of gold in 
North Carolina, was organized in Concord on February 27. 

Harold Hornaday, executive vice-president of Cannon Mills, was named 
chairman of the board of directors of the new corporation which will seek 
funds to supplement state appropriations for the development of the Reed 
Gold Mine into a state historic site. Dr. H. G. Jones and Dr. Richard F. 
Knapp of the Office of Archives and History participated in the first meeting. 

Archaeologists Discuss Statewide Program 

Archaeologists from across the state met in informal session at Catawba 
College in Salisbury on February 16 to discuss means of encouraging and 
coordinating a statewide archaeological program. Professor Peter P. Cooper 
II was in charge of arrangements. 

Presided over by Dr. David S. Phelps of East Carolina University, the 
group discussed the current archaeological picture in North Carolina and 
expressed the need for greater use of academic archaeologists in solving the 
state’s archaeological problems. Dr. H. G. Jones outlined the Office of 
Archives and History’s proposed program to harness all archaeological 
resources in the state into a cooperative program between the state agency 
and the institutions offering archaeological training. Senator Charles H. 
Taylor of Transylvania County discussed problems relating to Indian 
archaeology. 

The group elected an archaeological advisory council consisting of Jones, 
Phelps, and Professors Bennie C. Keel of UNC-CH, John T. Dorwin of 
Western Carolina University, and J. Ned Woodall of Wake Forest Univer¬ 
sity. The council met in Winston-Salem on March 1 to continue discussions. 


46 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


A roster of professional archaeologists in the state is being prepared by 
Dr. Phelps. 

The Archaeological Society of North Carolina has been revitalized, and 
its March Newsletter announced plans for “an active, stimulating series of 
newsletters, meetings, and journals, which we hope will make all of us more 
active members of our prestigious, 40-year-old Society.” Six newsletters and 
four meetings are planned each year, and there will be new editions of the 
Southern Indian Studies. The spring meeting was held at Morrow Mountain 
State Park and Town Creek Indian Mound on April 15 with Dr. Joffre L. 
Coe, director of the Research Laboratories of Anthropology at UNC-CH, 
speaking on the natural history and archaeology of the Morrow Mountain 
area. 

Persons interested in archaeology are welcome to membership. Dues of 
$3.00 may be mailed to the society at Box 561, Chapel Hill, 27514. Charles 
M. Carey of Morganton, vice-president of Drexel Enterprises, is president 
of the society. 

Preservation Council Opposes Destruction 

The North Carolina Advisory Council on Historic Preservation on March 
29 heard arguments for and against the State Government Center Plan 
which threatens two Raleigh buildings on the National Register of Historic 
Places—the Lewis-Smith House and the Seaboard Coastline Office Building. 

Mr. Carroll L. Mann, Jr., state property officer and a member of the 
council, presented the case for the plan. Speaking in opposition were Dr. 
H. G. Jones and Mr. Bruce MacDougal of the Office of Archives and History, 
and Mrs. Francis E. Winslow, Jr., of the Raleigh Historic Sites Commission. 

After hearing both sides and studying the maps of the area, the council 
voted to urge the governor and the State Capital Planning Commission to 
modify the plan to save and incorporate the two buildings as a part of the 
government mall proposed for the areas bounded by Wilmington, Lane, 
Salisbury, and Peace streets. 

Land Donated at Fort Dobbs 

Dr. Banks C. Talley, Jr., former chairman of the Raleigh Historic Sites 
Commission, has donated to the state of North Carolina approximately 2.5 
acres of land adjoining the Fort Dobbs site in Iredell County. The gift was 
in memory of his mother, the late Mrs. Mary Colvert Talley, whose farm 
adjoined the fort site. 

This gift, along with the original 10-acre tract previously donated by the 
Fort Dobbs Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution and 
purchases from adjoining landowners, brings to 32 acres the size of the state- 
owned tract which will be developed by the Office of Archives and History as 
a state historic site. Acquisition has been made possible through the joint 
efforts of the Iredell County Historical Society, a matching grant by the 
state, and a $43,481 grant from the Department of the Interior. Funds for 
development have been requested in the 1973-1974 budget. 

Development plans call for additional research and reconstruction of log 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 3, MAY. 1973 


47 


bastions and curtain walls of the fort which was used during the French and 
Indian War. The actual fort site covers only about an acre, but surrounding 
land will be used for picnicking, nature study, and passive recreational 
purposes. Long-range plans call for the construction of a visitor center and 
a manager’s residence. 


“Old Main’”’ Burned 

“Old Main,” the first brick building on the once all-Indian Pembroke State 
University, was left with only its outer walls standing on March 18. Local 
authorities suspected arson. 

Governor Holshouser on March 23 announced plans to request the General 
Assembly to appropriate funds for the reconstruction of the building which 
had for months been the center of controversy among the Lumbee Indians. 

Federal Historic Properties Transferable 

Public Law 92-362, passed by Congress in 1972, authorizes the General 
Services Administration to transfer surplus historic federal property to 
states and localities for revenue-producing purposes to cover the cost of 
restoration, maintenance, and operation of the property. 

Local officials anticipating the discontinuance by the federal government 
of buildings having historical importance may wish to investigate the possi¬ 
bility of county or municipal acquisition under the new program. No funds 
are available from the federal government, and the locality must show a 
practical plan for using and preserving the property. 

Information on the program may be obtained from the General Services 
Administration in Washington. 


Historic Places Listed on National Register 



Pictured, top row, are the Cowee Mound and Village Site in Macon County and Mitchell 
College Main Building in Iredell County; second row, Lebanon in Harnett County and Elgin in 
Warren County. (Additional pictures on next page.) 


48 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 








Shown, top row, are the Coffin Medical School and Old Quaker Meetinghouse, both in the 
Jamestown Historic District, Guilford County; and bottom row, Richard Mendenhall Store 
or Counting House, also in the Jamestown Historic District, and the Railroad House in 
Sanford, Lee County. These historic sites were recently listed on the National Register. 


Bicentennial Director Named 

Mrs. Dabney Miller Enderle in March was named director of the North 
Carolina American Revolution Bicentennial Commission, succeeding Mr. 
Richard F. Gibbs. 

A New Orleans native and graduate of the University of Alabama, Mrs. 
Enderle was associated with WWL-TV in New Orleans before coming to 
Raleigh ten years ago. She has been active in volunteer programs and has 
worked with the Wake County Department of Social Services. 

Vance Birthplace Prepares for Spring Tours 

In 1972 the Zebulon B. Vance Birthplace State Historic Site was visited 
by 18,180 people. Schools in Cabarrus and Rowan counties sent more 
students and teachers to the site than any others. Ninety-four organized 
groups took 3,900 people to the Reems Creek attraction. Reservations are 
now being made by schools for spring tours to the Vance Birthplace; site 
manager is Bob Conway. 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 3, MAY. 1973 


49 

















Takers Wanted—at Less than $.003 a Page 

A summer sale will be conducted from May through August this year by* 
the Division of Historical Publications of the Office of Archives and History. 
The five-volume set, The Papers of Willie Person Mangum, edited by Henry 
Thomas Shanks; the first three volumes of The Papers of William Alexander 
Graham, edited by J. G. de Roulhac Hamilton; The Poems of Governor 
Thomas Burke of North Carolina, edited by Richard Walser; and a facsimile 
edition of The Journal of the House of Burgesses of the Province of North 
Carolina, with an introduction by William S. Powell, will be sold for only 
$15.00. These books contain over 5,000 pages, so buyers will be getting an 
unusual bargain. 



Only 100 sets will be sold at the sale price; the offer is not being made to 
dealers. The sale price applies only to the complete set; individual volumes 
will be sold at regular prices ($3.00 each for all except The Journal of the 
House of Burgesses, which is $1.00). Shipping charges and sales tax will be 
paid by the Office of Archives and History. 

Address orders to the Division of Historical Publications, Office of 
Archives and History, 109 E. Jones St., Raleigh, N.C., 27611. Check or 
money order should accompany the order for the sale books. 

Staff Members Address Community College Classes 

With the beginning of the fall term last year, the Department of Com¬ 
munity Colleges instituted a new local history and genealogy course in 
several of the community colleges and technical institutes across the state. 
Designed to teach the techniques of local history and family history or 
genealogy, the course has had the backing and assistance of the Office of 
Archives and History. Several members of the Archives staff have assisted 
in orientation sessions for teachers of the course and in the preparation of 


50 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 






instructional materials. On various occasions, representatives from the 
Archives have conducted individual class sessions on the services offered by 
the State Archives to the local historian and genealogist, and tours of the 
Archives have been conducted for classes which have been able to arrange 
trips to Raleigh. 

Division Reports on New Archives Holdings and 

Other Activities 

During the January-March quarter the State Archives received a total 
of 112 new accessions. The Local Records Section recently transferred to the 
State Archives for public use a very large and valuable group of Davidson 
County records, including an unusually large number of estates records, 
most of which date from 1823 to 1915. Valuable unbound records were added 
to existing groups from Graham and Polk counties, and bound volumes of 
county court minutes and other significant records were added to the exist¬ 
ing group from Yancey County. 

The Local Records Section transferred eight church record groups and 
two municipal record groups; the latter included an Edenton Town Lot 
Book, 1722-1734. The sixteen state agency record groups included a copy of 
the first Biennial Report, 1876, of the Department of Corrections 
(Penitentiary). 

Among the private collections accessioned were the H. McGuire Woods 
Papers and the Frederick Rogers Mangold Papers, both of which pertain to 
Black Mountain College. The Woods Collection, which includes correspon¬ 
dence, printed material, and house plans and sites, is available either in 
the original or on 35 mm. negative microfilm. The Mangold Papers consist 
primarily of correspondence. Other private collections include additions to 
the Thomas Henderson Papers and the Charles Lewis Hinton Papers, and 
two account books—one unidentified, and one of John R. Johnson, a shoe¬ 
maker from Warrenton. 

Additions to the Newspaper Collection were also accessioned. The largest 
groups were from Charlotte, Durham, Fayetteville, and Lincolnton; other 
cities represented were Greensboro, Lexington, Raleigh, and Salisbury. The 
remainder of the new holdings include four organization records groups, two 
cemetery records, two miscellaneous collections (local history), and twenty- 
two miscellaneous genealogies and Bible records. 

The Newspaper Microfilm Project has begun a survey of the newspaper 
resources of Chatham and Lee counties. Readers are urged to contact the 
project if they know the location of copies of old newspapers published in 
these counties. The Archives would like to borrow the papers to microfilm, 
and all copies will be promptly returned to owners. Full credit will be given 
in the published microfilm. 

Phase II microfilming has been completed by the Local Records Section 
in thirty-two counties and is currently under way in Davidson, Johnston, 
and Yancey counties. 

The division’s State Records Section is presently reevaluating the dispo¬ 
sition of fiscal records in state agencies. The long-range goal of the study is 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER S. MAY, 1973 


51 


to design a standard records retention schedule which can be applied uni¬ 
formly to financial records of all state agencies. 

Information Sought on Tom Day 

Thomas Day, a free Negro cabinetmaker of Milton, is the subject of an 
intensive search for information by Tony P. Wrenn of Alexandria, Virginia. 
Mr. Wrenn, a native of Caswell County, has been interested in Day for some 
time and began serious research on him early in 1972 while conducting an 
architectural survey of Caswell County, including Milton, for the Office of 
Archives and History. 

Day was active as a cabinetmaker and carver of house interiors from 1823 
to 1861, working from his house and workshop in Milton. He was born about 




Pictured here are two newel posts and a 
desk attributed to Tom Day. Above, left, is a 
newel post in the Paschal House in the 
Yanceyville vicinity, Caswell County; 
above, right, is a newel post in the Bartlett 
Yancey House, also in the Yanceyville vi¬ 
cinity; below, left, is a desk in the home of 
Mr. Richard Seawell in Raleigh. (Caswell 
County photographs by Tony Wrenn; 
Raleigh photograph by Charles Clark.) 


52 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 








1801 and died about 1861. The absence of both birth and death records make 
the exact dates difficult to determine, as does the general scarcity of material 
on minority groups. In the current effort Mr. Wrenn is attempting to locate 
and catalog the known or attributed work by Day. He is also attempting to 
assemble Day material, including letters, bills of sale, accounts, news arti¬ 
cles, and other records. Eventually all the material collected will be given to 
the Office of Archives and History. 

Anyone having information on Thomas Day, or owning furniture attrib¬ 
uted to him, is asked to communicate directly with Tony P. Wrenn, P.O. Box 
1112, Alexandria, Virginia, 22313, or with the Office of Archives and History 
for referral to Mr. Wrenn. 

Archives and History Staff News 

Among the addresses of Dr. H. G. Jones, state historian and administrator 
of the Office of Archives and History, were the following: Sandwich Club of 
Raleigh on “The Vanishing Culture of the Inuit”; Kannapolis Rotary Club 
on “Gold Fever: The Redevelopment of Reed Gold Mine”; Tobacco Sympo¬ 
sium at East Carolina University on “A Living Tobacco Historic Site”; and 
Durham Lion’s Club on “The Duke Homestead.” On April 9 Dr. Jones 
delivered the annual Pi Gamma Mu fraternity address at Elon College on 
“From Paralyzed Throat and Contorted Body: The Miserable Existence of 
the Most Quoted Man in North Carolina History.” He presided over a meet¬ 
ing of the Culture Week Coordinating Committee on March 8 at which time 
plans were approved for the 1973 Culture Week which will be held in Raleigh 
November 13-17. 

On March 28 Dr. Jones met with the Tobacco History Corporation in 
Durham to discuss the work of the corporation which was organized to assist 
the Office of Archives and History in the development of Duke Homestead 
into a tobacco historic site. Among other meetings were the Historic Halifax 
Restoration in Raleigh on February 20; Wake County History Project com¬ 
mittee, March 1; Executive Committee of the North Carolina Literary and 
Historical Association in Raleigh, March 8; and the Try on Palace Sympo¬ 
sium in New Bern, March 11. 

Edwin C. Freeze joined the staff of the Local Records Section of the 
Division of Archives and Records on January 24. He is working as a micro¬ 
film camera operator in the eastern counties of North Carolina. 

David Stephens, a member of the staff of the State Records Section, 
recently spoke at the Department of History of Lenoir Rhyne College; he 
discussed state and national archival programs. Mr. Stephens is an alumnus 
of Lenoir Rhyne. 

Charles Greer Suttlemyre, Jr., spoke to the Caldwell County Committee 
for Continuing Education in the Humanities on March 30; he presented a 
slide lecture on North Carolina architecture with emphasis on Caldwell 
County buildings. 

On March 21 Ruth Little-Stokes spoke to the Raleigh Town and Country 
Garden Club about historic Raleigh neighborhoods. 

Mrs. Mary Reynolds Peacock of the Division of Historical Publications 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 3, MAY, 1973 


53 


spoke to several groups on early silversmiths. She has been revising the 1948 
edition of Silversmiths of North Carolina, by George B. Cutten. The revised 
edition, which contains a great deal of additional information found since 
the first edition was published, will be off the press by early fall. Mrs. 
Memory F. Mitchell, director of the Division of Historical Publications, 
spoke in March to two Raleigh book clubs. 


“Lit and Hist” Seal Redrawn 


A seal once used by the North Carolina 
Literary and Historical Association has been 
redesigned and will become a “trademark” 
of the 72-year-old organization. Pictured at 
right, the art work of the redrawn seal was 
done by Edward F. Turburg, restoration 
specialist in the Division of Historic Sites 
and Museums. 



UNC Press Announces Publication Delay 

The University of North Carolina Press has announced that the publi¬ 
cation of the third edition, revised, of North Carolina: The History of a 
Southern State, by Hugh T. Lefler and Albert R. Newsome, will be delayed 
from the previously announced May date to August 1. Teachers using this 
volume should note that although it will not be ready in time for summer 
school courses, it will be available in time to fulfill orders for fall semester 
classes. The new revision is priced at $14.95 for the trade edition and $10.00 
for the text edition. The text edition is sold only to bookstores or institutions 
ordering in quantity for classroom use. 

Colleges and Universities 


Campbell College 

Dr. Vernon 0. Stumpf published an article, “The Radical Ladies of Wil¬ 
mington and Their Tea Party,” in the February, 1973, issue of the Lower 
Cape Fear Historical Society’s Bulletin. Campbell College, on March 17, 
jointly sponsored with the Harnett County Historical Society the second 
annual Conference on Celtic Studies. The following papers were presented: 
Malcolm Fowler of Lillington, “The Argyll Colony”; Dr. Charles Haws of 
Old Dominion University, “Scots Immigration to Eastern North Carolina”; 
Dr. Paul Yoder of Campbell College, “Early American Clocks.” The First 
Captain’s Company of the reactivated First North Carolina Regiment, 
Continental Line, demonstrated Revolutionary War maneuvers. Dean 
Arnold Pope gave a demonstration of caber throwing and other Highland 
athletics. The conference bagpiper was the Reverend James D. MacKenzie 
of Robbins. 


54 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 



















East Carolina University 

Dr. Herbert R. Paschal, professor and chairman of the Department of 
History, read a paper, “England Enters the New World: The Raleigh 
Colonies,” during East Carolina’s Symposium on the United Kingdom and 
Europe, March 28-29. Dr. Anthony J. Papalas, assistant professor, pub¬ 
lished an article, “Herodes Atticus and His Son,” in Platon: Journal of 
Hellenic Philologians, Athens, Greece, 1972. 

The first annual Symposium on the History of Tobacco and the North 
Carolina Tobacco Society was held at East Carolina March 21-22. The fol¬ 
lowing members of the university’s Department of History participated: Dr. 
Fred D. Ragan served as moderator for the session on “Tobacco History 
and Myth”; Dr. Joseph F. Steelman moderated the session on “Geniuses 
and Innovators”; Professor Walter T. Calhoun was moderator for “Preser¬ 
vation of Tobacco Materials,” a session at which Dr. Paschal read a paper 
on “The Arents Collection of the New York Public Library” and Dr. John 
C. Ellen read a paper on “The Institute for Historical Research in Tobacco”; 
and Dr. Henry C. Ferrell served as moderator for the session on “Recent 
Trends in Tobacco Cultivation and Processing.” 

Meredith College 

Dr. Frank L. Grubbs, Jr., was promoted to rank of professor, effective 
February 23; Dr. Grubbs has been granted a sabbatical leave for the fall 
term, 1973. Mrs. Carolyn B. Grubbs, who was recently promoted to assistant 
professor, has been appointed to the accreditation team to evaluate West 
Cary Junior High School. Dr. Rosalie Prince Gates has been named part- 
time assistant to the president of Meredith. Dr. Sarah M. Lemmon was 
appointed to the ad hoc committee to evaluate the position of treasurer of 
the Organization of American Historians, effective in March. Dr. Lemmon 
was named Raleigh’s Woman of the Year on March 19. 

North Carolina State University 

Dr. Bernard Wishy, head of the American studies program at the Uni¬ 
versity of California, Berkeley, has been appointed head of the Department 
of History at North Carolina State University, effective August 20. Dr. 
Wishy received B.A. and Ph.D. degrees in history from Columbia University, 
and M.A. and B. Litt. degrees in political science from Yale and Oxford 
universities, respectively. He is a specialist in the design of computer sys¬ 
tems for universities, libraries, and hospitals. Dr. Wishy taught history at 
Columbia University from 1954 to 1963; he has been at Berkeley since 1968. 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Featured speaker for the March 5 meeting of the University Seminar on 
Southern History and Culture was Professor J. Kenneth Morland of 
Randolph-Macon Woman’s College. His topic was “The Anthropological 
Study of a Regional Culture.” The last meeting of the group was held on 
April 20; at that time Mr. Matthew Hodgson, director of the UNC Press, 
discussed “books about, by, and for Southerners.” 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 3, MAY, 1973 


55 


University of North Carolina at Wilmington 

The Community-University Humanities Committee of the City of Wil¬ 
mington, New Hanover County, and the University of North Carolina at 
Wilmington jointly sponsored a project in the humanities entitled “Com¬ 
munity and University: How Do We Grow and Where Should We Go 
Together?” The program was held from February 5 to March 19 at the 
university. Mr. Walser H. Allen, Jr., served as chairman of the Community- 
University Humanities Committee. Participants on the February 5 program 
included Dr. William H. Wagoner, chancellor of the university; Mr. Richard 
F. Gibbs, director of the North Carolina American Revolution Bicentennial 
Commission; Dr. Bryghte D. Godbold, staff director, Goals for Dallas, of 
Dallas, Texas; and a number of local officials. Various seminars were held 
on February 12, 19, 26, and March 5 and 12. 

State, County, and Local Groups 

Brunswick County Historical Society 

The society met March 5 at the Brunswick Town Visitor Center with 
Mrs. Lucile D. Blake presiding. Mr. John G. Zehmer, Jr., director of the 
Division of Historic Sites and Museums of the Office of Archives and 
History, spoke on the subject of the acquisition of historic sites by historical 
societies. Mr. W. G. Faulk, Jr., gave a brief report on the Brunswick Town 
site. Mrs. M. H. Rourk presented the old home of the quarter, Hickory Hall, 
of Calabash. 

Buncombe County American Revolution Bicentennial Committee 

Colonel Paul A. Rockwell of Asheville and Dix Sarsfield of Black Moun¬ 
tain, members of the committee, have been named to prepare a brochure 
on the life of Colonel Edward Buncombe for whom Buncombe County was 
named. William F. Lewis, chairman of the county committee, made the 
appointments. 

Burke County Historical Society 

At the January 16 meeting of the society, a report was given by Mrs. 
Douglas Barnett on acquisitions since the society began gathering materials 
in 1939. She reported that there are more than 500 books deposited in the 
North Carolina room of the library, a complete file of the North Carolina 
Historical Review, microfilm of the News-Herald, from 1939 to 1970 and 
bound copies from 1932, a vertical file of twenty filled drawers, and other 
materials. Officers elected at the meeting are Rondal Mull, president; 
Robert L. Connelly, Robert Byrd, and Fred Cranford, vice-presidents; Mrs. 
O. L. Horton, secretary; Miss Abbie Ross, treasurer; and Mrs. Douglas 
Barnett, curator. C. Greer Suttlemyre, Jr., of the Division of Historic Sites 
and Museums of the Office of Archives and History, was the speaker for 
the meeting. 


56 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Carolinas Genealogical Society 

The Charlotte society’s scheduled meetings are held the second Monday 
of each month. New officers include Mrs. Sylvia H. Lynch of Charlotte, 
president; Mrs. Frank Gulledge of Monroe, recording secretary; Mrs. W. 
Oscar Starnes of Monroe, treasurer; Mrs. R. E. Heath of Monroe, corre¬ 
sponding secretary; and Mrs. Gordon Briscoe of Charlotte and Mrs. L. G. 
Marsh of Monroe, coeditors. 

Carteret Historical Research Association 

The association sponsored a display of Indian artifacts on February 23 
and 24 in Beaufort. Included were arrowheads collected by Mike Carraway, 
a student at East Carteret High School. 

Chapel Hill Historical Society 

The March 4 meeting of the society was held at the Institute of Govern¬ 
ment with Collier Cobb, Jr., speaking on “Chapel Hill in the William Meade 
Prince Era.” Mr. Cobb and the author of The Southern Part of Heaven were 
boyhood friends and, after a thirty-year separation, resumed their friendship 
when Prince returned to Chapel Hill. At a meeting of the directors of the 
society, held February 7, it was voted to repay all loans made by individuals 
and by the society for the publication of These Old Stone Walls, by Phillips 
Russell. The book has had “a remarkably successful sale.” At the present 
time 182 persons are members of the society. 

Chapel Hill Preservation Society 

Mrs. William C. Friday, president of the society, reported in February 
that she would ask the Chapel Hill Board of Aldermen to establish histori¬ 
cal zoning and the creation of a historical planning and review board. The 
purpose of the society is “to protect, preserve and conserve individual build¬ 
ings and open spaces in and near Chapel Hill which reflect its history and 
culture.” 

Currituck County Historical Society 

At the society’s dinner meeting on February 21, the original handwritten 
notebook of Henry Beasley Ansell was on display. Ansell wrote a “History 
of Currituck County and Tales of Knott’s Island, North Carolina,” between 
1907 and 1912. The Currituck County Historical Society had the notebook 
copied and bound and plans to present it to the Currituck Public Library. 
The notebook eventually may be edited and published. Darrell Merrell, a 
senior at J. P. Knapp High School, spoke on his display of artifacts, includ¬ 
ing a skull, of the Currituck Indians. Claymon Sawyer of Elizabeth City 
played selections on his guitar. 

Gaston County Historical Society 

The newsletter of the society for 1972 was recently published. Included 
in this issue of the Gaston County Historical Bulletin is the index for 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 3, MAY, 1973 


57 


volumes 15 through 17, covering the years 1969 through 1971. The bulletin 
also includes reports on February, May, August, and November, 1972, 
meetings of the society. William N. Craig served as president during the 
year. 

Greensboro Historical Museum 

A house is being reconstructed in the park behind the Greensboro Histori¬ 
cal Museum as a memorial to the birth of Dolley Madison near Guilford 
College. Much of the material being used in the house is from the period 
in which Dolley Madison lived; it is being taken from the 200-year-old 
Isley House, which was moved to the park from eastern Guilford County. 
Logs from Dolley Madison’s alleged birthplace will be used as replacement 
material in the house. William J. Moore is director of the museum. 

Hillsborough Historical Society 

Speaker at the March 22 meeting was Mrs. Catherine Cockshutt of the 
Division of Historic Sites and Museums of the Office of Archives and 
History. She discussed Hillsborough architecture. Featured on the Historic 
Hillsborough House and Garden tour, held April 14 and 15, were the 
Patterson-Palmer House, the Nash Law Office, Twin Chimneys, the Nash- 
Hooper Gardens, Chatwood, Ayr Mount, and the Burwell School. The March 
issue of Carolina Comments reported on the January meeting of the society, 
but the meeting had to be canceled because of snow. The research committee 
of the Hillsborough Historical Society has agreed to undertake a historic 
sites survey of the northern half of Orange County for the Office of Archives 
and History; a similar survey of the southern half is being done by the 
Chapel Hill Historical Society. 

Historic Wilmington Foundation 

Janet K. Seapker of the Division of Historic Sites and Museums of the 
Office of Archives and History spoke at the February 24 meeting of the 
foundation. She discussed the potential for preservation in Wilmington, 
with concentration on the commercial area. 

Jones County Historical Society 

Members of the society have undertaken the task of restoring the old 
Jones County jail, located behind the courthouse in Trenton. Used for the 
jail, built in 1867, was brick from an earlier structure which was destroyed 
by Union sympathizers during the Civil War. An accurate history of the 
structure is still unknown, but the jail is considered one of the oldest stand¬ 
ing buildings in the county. The county historical society is soliciting funds 
from individuals and groups to further the restoration project. 

Lower Cape Fear Historical Society 

Frank Horton, director of the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts 
in Winston-Salem, spoke at the February 16 meeting of the society. In speak- 


58 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


ing on colonial craftsmen and their work, Mr. Horton incorporated in his 
talk research which he and his assistant, Miss Mildred McGehee, had done 
in the Wilmington and Lower Cape Fear region. The society’s Bulletin for 
February reported that the Latimer House was being decorated and fur¬ 
nished. The Latimer House committee is seeking furnishings and objects 
of art of the period of 1850 or earlier to add to the collection; suitable gifts 
for memorials are being solicited, and the appraised value of the gifts is 
tax deductible. Persons interested in contributing to this cause should get 
in touch with the president of the society, Dr. James R. Beeler, or any other 
officer. 

Montgomery County Historical Society 

The society met January 29 at the Biscoe Elementary School. New officers 
are Mrs. S. B. Steger of Mt. Gilead, president; Mrs. Herman Atkins of Mt. 
Gilead, chaplain; Mrs. Martha McKinnon Harris of Mt. Gilead, first vice- 
president; Mr. John N. Haywood of Troy, second vice-president; Mrs. Earl 
Bruton of Candor, third vice-president; Mrs. Katie MacAulay Rankin of 
Mt. Gilead, corresponding secretary; Mrs. Charlie Buie of Biscoe, recording 
secretary; Mr. Charlie Johnson of Biscoe, treasurer; Mrs. Max Overton of 
Eldorado, librarian; Mrs. Reid Elliott of Troy, historian. A panel of mem¬ 
bers presented plans for the proposed calendar of events to be observed in 
North Carolina during the bicentennial of the American Revolution. Mrs. 
Charles Johnson, Miss Elizabeth Kirk, and Austin Garriss served as mem¬ 
bers of the panel. 

Moore County Historical Association 

Manly Wade Wellman spoke at the March 29 meeting of the association, 
held in the Southern Pines Municipal Building. He discussed the new Moore 
County history he is writing. Reports were also given on the society’s vari¬ 
ous restoration projects. The sixteenth annual Antique Fair was held March 
21 at the National Guard Armory in Southern Pines; proceeds from the 
fair are used for restoration work being sponsored by the Moore County 
Historical Association. Mrs. Watson G. Scott served as general chairman of 
the fair. 

Moravian Music Foundation 

A grant of $79,675 has been awarded to the foundation by the National 
Endowment for the Humanities to permit a continuation of the foundation’s 
project of cataloging its collection of music manuscripts and early printed 
music. The grant runs for three years and will be increased to $229,675 over 
this period, with matching funds coming from the Winston-Salem area. 
Matching funds have been provided by the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, 
which has given $50,000; and by the Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation, 
which has contributed $25,000. The cataloger of the project is Miss Mary 
Cumnock. The project is under the supervision of the foundation’s director, 
Mr. Karl Kroeger. 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER S, MAY. 1973 


59 


Murfreesboro Historieal Assoeiation 

President of the Murfreesboro Historical Association, E. Frank 
Stephenson, Jr., was named one of five outstanding young men in the state 
at the North Carolina Jaycees Award Weekend in Raleigh on February 10. 
Director of admissions at Chowan College, Stephenson received recognition 
for his contributions to the Murfreesboro historical program. Mr. 
Stephenson was named “Tar Heel of the Week” by the Raleigh News and 
Observer on March 4. 


New Bern Historieal Society 

The annual New Bern Historical Society Ball was held the night of 
February 16. Couples paid $30.00 each to attend the affair; proceeds are 
used to support New Bern’s Attmore-Oliver House and other historic sites 
in the town. 


North Carolina Society of County and Local Historians 

Senator Hector MacLean of Lumberton has been named president of the 
Society of County and Local Historians; he replaces R. B. Cooke of Durham 
who died January 24. 

North Carolina Society, Sons of the American Revolution 

On February 24 the society held its annual black-tie banquet in honor of 
General Washington. The event was sponsored by the General Francis Nash 
Chapter of Durham, Chapel Hill, and Hillsborough; it was held in the 
Carolina Inn in Chapel Hill. Dr. Ralph Hardee Rives of East Carolina Uni¬ 
versity was the principal speaker. Chairman of the year’s banquet was 
Richard Franklin Boddie of Durham, and vice-chairmen were William 
Austin Coffer of Raleigh and John Braxton Flowers III of Durham. 


North Carolina United Methodist Conference, 

Commission on Archives and History 

The commission held its second meeting on March 3 at historic Rehoboth 
Church near Creswell and Plymouth in Washington County. Dr. Alan D. 
Watson of the University of North Carolina at Wilmington spoke on “The 
Institutional Background of Methodism in North Carolina.” Dr. A. L. 
Whitehurst and Mrs. Beverly Strodtz presented a brief historical sketch of 
the church, which was built in 1850-1853, but which dates from an earlier 
church in the community. C. Franklin Grill of Scotland Neck is president 
of the commission, which is composed of ministerial and lay delegates from 
each district within the North Carolina Conference. In September the com¬ 
mission met at historic Whitakers Chapel and Eden Church, both near 
Enfield, and heard Mr. Don Lennon of East Carolina University speak. Dr. 
Ralph Hardee Rives is vice-chairman of the commission and the Reverend 
David Jones is secretary. 


60 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Northampton Historical Society 

The society was featured in a display in the Elizabeth Buxton Memorial 
Room of the Northampton County Memorial Library during January. 
Several artifacts were exhibited. 

Northwest North Carolina Historical Association 

The association met April 15 at the Babcock School of Management of 
Wake Forest University. Dr. J. Edwin Hendricks introduced the speaker, 
Dr. David L. Smiley, who spoke on the topic, “Priscilla, Poky, Anne, Eliza 
and You—The Four Traditions of Women in American History.” During 
the business session brief reports on historical activities were presented by a 
representative from each of the counties belonging to the association. Joe C. 
Matthews is president of the organization. 

Orange County Historical Museum 

Clyde A. Erwin, Jr., president of Wayne Community College, was the 
featured speaker for the fifteenth anniversary celebration of the Orange 
County Historical Museum on February 25. A commemorative display of 
old glass and watches was arranged as part of the anniversary celebration. 
A special leaflet on the history of the old town clock written by Mrs. Clarence 
Jones was distributed. 

Pitt County Historical Society 

Members and guests of the society met at the Parish House of St. Paul’s 
Episcopal Church in Greenville on March 29. They viewed a film, A King’s 
Story, by Jack Le Vien. The 1967 film based on the life of King Edward 
VIII was made available to the society through the English-Speaking Union 
of the United States. President John B. Lewis, Jr., of Farmville presided at 
the short business session. Dr. Ralph Hardee Rives of Greenville gave back¬ 
ground information concerning the film and the events it portrayed. 

Richmond Hill Law School Commission 

The commission met January 26 and elected Jimmy Hutchens president; 
Pride Wooten, vice-president; Lois Hobson, secretary; and Bill Rutledge, 
treasurer. The commission discussed specifications for shelters and trails 
in the picnic area. Groups wishing to visit the site should call (919) 699-8125 
in advance of their planned trip. 

Roanoke Island Historical Association 

The annual membership drive of the association began March 1 under 
the direction of Mrs. L. Richardson Preyer of Greensboro. The membership 
campaign is scheduled in the spring so as to provide funds needed for the 
opening of The Lost Colony on Roanoke Island in the summer. Memberships 
are available in several categories: regular, $5.00; sustaining, $10.00; spon¬ 
soring, $25.00; and patron, $50.00. Members are entitled to one reserved 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 3, 1973 


61 


seat ticket for each $5.00 value of the membership and a copy of the souvenir 
program. More expensive life, donor, and benefactor memberships are also 
available. 

Rockingham County Historical Society 

The society has learned that a challenge grant for the reconstruction of 
the Wright Tavern has been made by the Smith Richardson Foundation. 
The grant, in the amount of $5,000, will be matched by funds raised by the 
society prior to December 31. Mrs. S. R. Prince is president of the group. 
Speaker for the society’s last meeting, held December 10, 1972, at the 
Whitcomb Student Center of Rockingham Community College in Went¬ 
worth, was Dr. Lindley S. Butler. His topic was “The Papers of Governor 
David S. Reid.” 

Surry County Historical Association 

The Surry County Community College library has become a depository 
for the association, which wishes to add to its collection of books and 
materials in the field of history. The association is soliciting books, pam¬ 
phlets, and publications which contain stories or information about North 
Carolina in general and Surry County in particular. Persons having state 
and county histories, reports, family histories, genealogies, or fiction relat¬ 
ing to North Carolina are urged to contribute to the collection. The society 
has been notified that it has received a $5,000 grant from the Smith 
Richardson Foundation, contingent upon matching funds of $10,000 being 
raised by the society. The funds will be used for the acquisition and restora¬ 
tion of the Bernard Franklin House. Mr. Robert Merritt of Mt. Airy is 
president of the group. 

Union County Historical Society 

The Union County Historical Society met February 20 at the courthouse 
in Monroe. Robert B. Clark of Monroe was elected president; Clara Laney, 
executive vice-president; Mrs. Thomas P. Dillon, secretary; David Whitley, 
treasurer; Mrs. George S. Lee, historian; and Mrs. R. Ernest Heath, 
librarian. Charles Norwood, outgoing president, discussed the efforts of 
the society to preserve the county’s 1886 courthouse. He reported that 
investigation had showed the basic structure to be sound. 

Wake County Historical Society 

Members of the society met on the campus of St. Augustine’s College in 
Raleigh on the afternoon of March 11. They were welcomed by Mr. Wiley 
M. Davis, special assistant to the college president. After a brief business 
session, led by the society’s president, J. Bourke Bilisoly, the academic 
dean of St. Augustine’s, Dr. Thelma Roundtree, presented a history of that 
institution. The society was also treated to a brief but unique motion picture 
history of the college. The visiting group then toured the campus. The host 


62 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


institution gave a coffee hour for the society prior to adjournment of the 
meeting. 

Waldensian Museum 

Plans for the construction of a museum were unveiled February 17 at 
the one hundred and twenty-fifth anniversary of the Emancipation Proc¬ 
lamation of the Waldensians. The celebration was held in the Presbyterian 
church at Valdese. The museum, to be built at the corner of Italy Street and 
Saint Germain Avenue, will consist of approximately 3,000 square feet and 
will cost not more than $92,000. Chairman of the historical committee which 
announced the plans is W. Harold Mitchell. Waldensian historical items are 
presently on display in Tron Hall, which is not equipped to provide neces¬ 
sary protection for valuable artifacts. A challenge grant of $25,000 has been 
offered by Mrs. John P. Rostan, Sr., John P. Rostan, Jr., and the Waldensian 
Bakeries. To receive the grant, additional funds will have to be raised; 
approximately $22,000 is now available in the treasury. 

Yadkin County Historical Society 

The society met January 19 at the Yadkin County Library with Hilton 
Jones, president, presiding. In order to qualify for a grant from the Bureau 
of Outdoor Recreation, the society is having to deed the Richmond Hill Law 
School and twenty-four acres of land to the county, but one acre is being 
retained so the society can qualify for a matching HUD grant. The society 
voted to turn the property over to the county as soon as the legal work can 
be completed. Jimmie Hutchens is chairman of the Richmond Hill Law 
School Commission. The Reverend Grady Burgess, a special guest of the 
society, has written a poem entitled “Richmond Hill.” The poem gives the 
history of the founding of the law school by Judge Richmond M. Pearson. 
Mr. Burgess read the 51-stanza poem to the society, which plans to place 
copies in the History Room of the Yadkin County Library and in the law 
school. 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Published in January, March, May, July, September, and November by 
the Office of Archives and History, Archives and History-State Library 
Building, 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27611. 

H. G. Jones, Editor in Chief 
Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell, Editor 


OLUME XXI, NUMBER 3, 1973 


63 






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CAROLINA COMMENTS 


PUBLISHED BIMONTHLY BY THE NORTH CAROLINA 
DIVISION OF ARCHIVES AND HISTORY 


Volume XXI, Number 4 


July,1973 


It’s Now “Department of Cultural Resources” 

The former Department of Art, Culture and History became the Depart¬ 
ment of Cultural Resources on July 1 as a result of Chapter 476 of the 
Session Laws of 1973, and the previous Office of Archives and History was 
redesignated the Division of Archives and History. 

These were among significant statutory changes which were designed to 
complete the reorganization of cultural agencies. The name change was 
supported by the department to emphasize the interrelationship of the 
various cultural programs and to promote the image of art, history, music, 
and libraries as “resources.” 

Major agencies in each department were changed from “offices” to “di¬ 
visions.” Former divisions became sections. Other major units in the Depart¬ 
ment of Cultural Resources will be the Division of the Arts and the Division 
of the State Library, each headed by a “director.” 

In the Division of Archives and History, there will be the Archives and 
Records Section, Historic Sites and Museums Section, Historical Publica¬ 
tions Section, and Try on Palace Section, each headed by a “chief’; sub¬ 
sections will be branches, headed by a “head”; and units, headed by a 
“supervisor.” It is anticipated that only time will eliminate the initial con¬ 
fusion surrounding the change of designations. 

The act also rewrote the organic law regarding archives and history, the 
first complete revision of Chapter 121 of the General Statutes since 1955. 
The Executive Board of the former State Department of Archives and 
History and the North Carolina Advisory Council on Historic Preservation 
were abolished and their duties were transferred to a new North Carolina 
Historical Commission, composed of seven members, at least four of whom 
must have had training and/or experience in the fields of archives, history, 
historic preservation, or museums administration. Members of the former 
Executive Board will continue to serve on the Historical Commission until 
their previous appointments end and their successors are appointed by the 
governor for six-year terms. 

In addition, the bill re-created the following history-related state bodies: 
Tryon Palace Commission, U.S.S. North Carolina Battleship Commission, 
Sir Walter Raleigh Commission, Executive Mansion Fine Arts Committee 
(formerly Commission), and American Revolution Bicentennial Committee 
(formerly Commission). A new committee—America’s Four Hundredth 
Anniversary Committee—was created to advise the department “on the 







planning, conducting, and directing of appropriate observances of . . . the 
commemoration of the landing of Sir Walter Raleigh’s colony on Roanoke 
Island.” 

Commissions re-created but declared not to be state agencies within the 
meaning of the reorganization act were the Roanoke Island Historical 
Association, Edenton Historical Commission, Historic Bath Commission, 
Historic Hillsborough Commission, Historic Murfreesboro Commission, 
and John Motley Morehead Memorial Commission. 

Finally, the following history-related bodies were abolished: Daniel Boone 
Memorial Commission, Bennett Place Memorial Commission, Durham- 
Orange Historical Commission, Transylvania County Historical Commis¬ 
sion, Lenoir County Historical and Patriotic Commission, Charles B. 
Aycock Memorial Commission, Pitt County Historical Commission, Stone¬ 
wall Jackson Memorial Fund, Guilford County Bicentennial Commission, 
and Raleigh Historic Sites Commission. It was noted that local-purpose 
commissions can be re-created by counties and municipalities under G.S. 
Chapter 157A (after July 1, Chapter 160A). 

A future edition of Carolina Comments will carry an identification of new 
designations and titles in the Division of Archives and History. 

General Assembly Supports Historic Preservation 

The 1973 General Assembly gave unprecedented support to the cause of 
historic preservation in North Carolina, including appropriations totaling 
nearly $3 million for capital improvements. 

The sum of $1,307,000 was appropriated to the Division of Archives and 
History for restoration and construction work at existing state historic 
sites and three new ones—Reed Gold Mine, Duke Homestead, and Fort 
Dobbs. In addition, $254,500 was appropriated—subject to dollar-for-dollar 
matching funds—for assistance in a dozen local historic restoration projects: 
John Wheeler House, Murfreesboro ($35,000); Old Burying Ground, Beau¬ 
fort ($15,000); Richmond Hill Law School, Yadkin County ($20,000); 
Historic Hope, Bertie County ($7,000); Hezekiah Alexander Homeplace, 
Charlotte ($32,500); Fort Defiance, Caldwell County ($35,000); Joel Lane 
House, Raleigh ($20,000); Old Wilkes County Jail, Wilkesboro ($11,000); 
Newbold-White House, Perquimans County ($25,000); Wright Tavern, 
Wentworth ($15,000); Barker and Cupola Houses, Edenton ($9,000); and 
Bernard Franklin House, Surry County ($30,000). 

The Department of Administration was appropriated $575,000 for the 
restoration of the Executive Mansion and an additional $400,000 to complete 
the interior restoration of the State Capitol. 

Among increases in the operating budget of the Division of Archives and 
History was an appropriation of $64,327 for the development of a statewide 
archaeology program. 

Executive Mansion to Continue as Home of Governors 

The General Assembly of 1973 turned down a recommendation of the 
Executive Residence Building Commission and provided instead an ap¬ 
propriation of $575,000 for the renovation of the present Executive Mansion 


66 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 



at 200 North Blount Street. The commission had proposed the building of a 
new residence for the first family and the use of the present mansion for 
ceremonial purposes. 

The Assembly, however, in Chapter 597 of the Session Laws, directed that 
the appropriation “be used to renovate the entire Governor’s Mansion to 
render it a safe and comfortable structure in which the Governor may hold 
public and ceremonial functions and in which at the same time the Governor’s 
family may have private areas which will allow ordinary family living with¬ 
out interference from the public.” 

Preservationists therefore were successful in urging the continued use of 
the present mansion as both a residence and ceremonial center for the chief 
executive. 

It is anticipated that restoration will be undertaken within the next two 
years. Rental quarters for the Holshouser family will be provided from the 
Contingency and Emergency Fund while the restoration is in progress. 

Colonial Records Program Supported by Foundation 

The Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, Inc., has announced a new two-year 
grant totaling $24,000 to assist the Division of Archives and History in 
continuing its program of obtaining copies of English records relating to 
North Carolina. 

The grant brings to a total of $74,000 the funds contributed by the founda¬ 
tion to the program, thus supplementing state appropriations for the Colonial 
Records Project. These funds have been instrumental in allowing the as¬ 
signment of Dr. Robert J. Cain to the task of ferreting out of the Public 
Record Office in London hitherto uncopied records relating to North Caro¬ 
lina during the colonial period. 

The Cain transcripts and copies will be available to researchers in the 
State Archives as they are cataloged. In addition, appropriate materials will 
be published in future volumes of the new series of The Colonial Records 
of North Carolina. Three volumes of the series have already been published 
and a fourth is expected to be published by the end of the year. The latter 
volume will be titled North Carolina Higher-Court Records, 1702-1708. 

Historic Preservation May Qualify For Revenue Sharing 

In its analysis of the revenue sharing act passed by Congress in 1972, 
the National Trust for Historic Preservation calls attention to the qualifica¬ 
tion of historic restoration for capital expenditures from a city or county’s 
share of funds allocated under the act. 

Funds for operating programs are limited to “high priority expenditures” 
such as public safety, public transportation, health, social services, and 
mvironmental protection, but there appear to be no limitations imposed 
’or capital expenditures. At least two communities have already allocated 
"evenue-sharing funds for historic preservation: Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 
illocated $100,000 for the restoration of the Magnolia Mound Plantation 
Souse; and in Bellingham, Washington, $100,000 in revenue-sharing money 
vas allocated to remodeling the old city hall. Concludes the trust, “It is now 
ip to state and community preservation groups to make their state and 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 4, JULY, 1973 


67 




local governments . . . more aware than ever before of the importance of 
preservation.” A copy of the federal guidelines regarding revenue sharing 
is available from the National Recreation and Parks Association, Division 
of Special Programs, 1601 North Kent Street, Arlington, Virginia, 22209. 

Properties Are Entered on National Register 

Historic properties in twenty-seven counties of North Carolina were 
recently entered on the National Register of Historic Places. The thirty-six 
entries are: Brunswick County, Orton Plantation; Buncombe County, 
Grove Park Inn; Burke County, Swan Ponds; Carteret County, Gibbs House 
and Jacob Henry House; Caswell County, Milton State Bank; Catawba 
County, Shuford House and Propst House; Chowan County, Wessington 
House; Craven County, Clear Spring Plantation; Cumberland County, 
Fayetteville Woman’s Club and Oval Ballroom, Oak Grove, and Mansard 
Roof House; Davie County, Cooleemee and Davie County Jail; Durham 
County, Fairntosh Plantation; Edgecombe County, Coats House; Forsyth 
County, Korner’s Folly and Zevely House; Franklin County, Cascine; 
Gaston County, Belmont Abbey Cathedral; Guilford County, Founders Hall; 
Halifax County, Eagle Tavern and Shell Castle; Lincoln County, Woodside; 
Mecklenburg County, Victoria; Orange County, Heartsease; Pamlico 



Left to right, above, are the Coats House, Edgecombe County; an interior view of Korner’s 
Folly in Kernersville; and China Grove, Janeiro, Pamlico County. (Photographs by the 
Division of Archives and History unless otherwise specified.) 



68 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 












Left, Propst House, Hickory; right, Clear Spring Plantation, Jasper, Craven County. 



Left, Fairntosh Plantation, Durham County; right, Heck-Lee House, 503 East Jones Street, 
and Heck-Pool House, 218 North East Street, in background, both in Raleigh. 



Left, Richmond Temperance and Literary Society Hall, Scotland County; right, Person’s 
Ordinary, Warren County. 


'ounty, China Grove; Scotland County, Richmond Temperance and 
/iterary Society Hall; Union County, Pleasant Grove Camp Meeting 
Ground; Vance County, Ashland; Wake County, J. S. Dorton Arena and 
ileck Houses; Warren County, Person’s Ordinary and Little Manor/Mosby 
tall; and Watauga County, Mast General Store. Eleven of these sites are 
ictured. 


OLUME XXI, NUMBER h, JULY, 1973 


69 












Incentive Grants Offered by NCSPA 

Each year the North Carolina Society for the Preservation of Antiquities 
presents Incentive Grants to historical and preservation organizations to 
assist them in their initial movement toward preserving historic sites and 
structures. Information regarding these grants and application forms may 
be secured by writing to Mrs. Frances H. Whitley, Assistant Secretary- 
Treasurer, North Carolina Society for the Preservation of Antiquities, 109 
East Jones Street, Raleigh, N.C., 27611. 

Application for Incentive Grants must be received at society headquarters 
on or before October 15, 1973. Recipients will be notified by the Incentive 
Grant Committee around the first of November. Awards will be presented 
at the society’s annual meeting during Culture Week in Raleigh on Thurs¬ 
day, November 15. 

Ceremonies Held at Thomas Burke Grave 

The North Carolina Society, Sons of the American Revolution, unveiled 
a plaque to Thomas Burke at Tyaquin Plantation near Hillsborough on May 
27. Burke was a member of the Continental Congress and served as Revolu¬ 
tionary War governor of North Carolina. Participating in the ceremony 
was the First North Carolina Regiment of Foot, which paraded and fired 
eighteenth century muskets. Dr. Ralph Hardee Rives of Greenville, president 
of the North Carolina society, delivered the main address. The General Nash 
Chapter of the SAR was in charge of the ceremonies. 

The First Regiment of Foot, which was commissioned in 1968 to help with 
the state’s celebration of the American Revolution bicentennial, has dress 
and equipment of the Revolutionary period. In addition to its other activities 
at the ceremony, it opened a reconstructed Revolutionary War encampment 
near the Burke grave. 

The restoration of the Burke gravesite is the SAR’s contribution to the 
bicentennial. A steel fence has been installed around the entire cemetery and 
the grave marked with a bronze marker. The gravesite was deeded to the 
Sons of the American Revolution many years ago, and in 1944 a monolith 
was erected by the SAR chapter at Duke and UNC-CH. The project has been 
headed by J. B. Flowers III and Richard F. Boddie of Durham. 

Last Call for Literary Entries 

July 15 is the deadline for receipt of books for entry in the four literary 
competitions conducted by sponsoring organizations through the North 
Carolina Literary and Historical Association. These are the Mayflower Cup 
(nonfiction), Sir Walter Raleigh Award (fiction), Roanoke-Chowan Award 
(poetry), and the American Association of University Women Award 
(juvenile literature). 

Eligible are books published between July 1, 1972, and June 30, 1973, by 
persons who have been actual or legal residents of North Carolina for the 
three consecutive years preceding June 30 of this year. Books must have 
been published during that period—i.e., officially released by their pub¬ 
lishers. Three copies of each entry are required to be received by the as¬ 
sociation at 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, 27611. 


70 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


The following books have already been entered: 

Mayflower: Ethel S. Arnett, Mrs. James Madison: The Incomparable 
Dolley, Marvin L. Brown, Jr., Heinrich von Haymerle: Austro-Hungarian 
Career Diplomat-, Ola Maie Foushee, Art in North Carolina ; H. Shelton 
Smith, In His Image, But . . . ; Earl E. Thorpe, The Old South: A Psycho- 
histoi'y; A. Earl Weatherly, The First Hundred Years of Historic Guilford; 
M. Jewell Sink and Mary Green Matthews, Pathfinders, Past and Present, 
A History of Davidson County, North Carolina; Sydney Nathans, Daniel 
Webster and Jacksonian Democracy; Leora H. McEachern and Isabel M. 
Williams, Salt, That Necessary Article; Faris Jane Corey, Exploring the 
Mountains of North Carolina; J. K. Rouse, The Noble Experiment of Warren 
C. Coleman; Manly Wade Wellman, A Southern Mountain Fastness and Its 
People; and Marguerite E. Schumann, The First State University—A Walk¬ 
ing Guide. 

Roanoke-Chowan: Thomas Walters, Seeing in the Dark; L. Grady 
Burgiss, Richmond Hill; Blanche M. Garrett, On the Tides of the Wind; 
William Harmon, Legion: Civic Choruses; and Ron Bayes, Porpoise. 

Archives Conference Meets in Raleigh 

The South Atlantic Archives and Records Conference met in Raleigh, on 
May 3-4. In addition to the North Carolina State Archives, sponsors were 
the Society of American Archivists, the South Carolina Department of Ar¬ 
chives and History, the Georgia Department of Archives and History, the 
Florida Division of Archives, History and Records Management, and the 
National Archives and Records Service. 

Sessions were held on the National Historical Records Act, Computer 
Output Microfilm, Microfilm as a Management Tool, the American Revolu¬ 
tion Bicentennial Celebration, Documentation Standards, and Archival 
Publications. 

Approximately 130 people, representing 24 organizations, institutions, 
and corporations, attended the conference. Two representatives were present 
from the Public Archives of Canada. Among other matters of business, the 
archival agencies of the state of Virginia were admitted to full membership in 
the South Atlantic group. The Georgia Department of Archives and His¬ 
tory will serve as host for the next meeting of the South Atlantic Archives 
and Records Conference. 


Libraries Discuss Bicentennial Plans 

The Bicentennial Council of the Thirteen Original States sponsored a con¬ 
ference of state libraries in Philadelphia May 14-16. The purpose of the con¬ 
ference, attended also by representatives of archival agencies and other in¬ 
stitutions with collections of private manuscripts, was to survey Revolu¬ 
tionary War bicentennial activities of a bibliographic nature and to propose 
lourses of action in relation to original documentary source material. Res- 
)lutions proposing active programs in preparation of guides to manuscripts, 
•estoration and preservation of documentary material, microfilming of 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER i, JULY, 1973 


71 



records, and publicity of these programs were adopted. The conference was 
attended by Mr. Philip Ogilvie, state librarian, and Mr. George Stevenson, 
archives and history assistant II. 


Archivist of Bahamas Visits State Archives 


On May 17-18 Mrs. D. Gail Saun¬ 
ders, archivist of the Bahama Is¬ 
lands, visited the State Archives. 
Mrs. Saunders is visiting archival 
institutions throughout the East in 
order to facilitate planning for the 
Bahamian Archives. The Bahamas 
will become the independent Com¬ 
monwealth of the Bahamas on July 
10, and Mrs. Saunders will be the 
country’s first national archivist. 



Paul Hoffman, left, who heads the Archives 
Branch, took Mrs. Gail Saunders, archivist of 
the Bahamas, on a tour of the State Archives; 
they are shown in the Search Room. 


Finding Aids Completed for Weil Collection; 

Other Records Processed 

Finding aids have recently been prepared for the Gertrude Weil Collec¬ 
tion of over 100 manuscript boxes. A lifelong resident of Goldsboro (1879- 
1971), and North Carolina’s first graduate of Smith College (1901), Miss 
Weil was an activist in Jewish organizations, the suffragette movement, and 
many local, state, and national humanitarian projects. 

Among the 6,200 family letters are those written by Gertrude from the 
Horace Mann School in New York (1895-1897) and Smith College (1897- 
1901), and by her two brothers from the University of North Carolina (1895- 
1901), as well as the letters of her mother to the four Weil children, includ¬ 
ing Janet Weil [Bleuthenthal] at the State Normal and Industrial College, 
Greensboro (1908-1910), and Smith (1910-1914). Other family records in¬ 
clude travel diaries, lecture notes and essays, address books, engagement 
calendars, theater books, and snapshots. 

A substantial portion of the collection contains materials (correspondence, 
minutes, reports, programs, publications) of North Carolina organizations 
such as the Equal Suffrage Association, League of Women Voters, Federa¬ 
tion of Women’s Clubs, Charles B. Aycock Memorial Commission, Con¬ 
ference for Social Service, Committee on Interracial Cooperation, Associa¬ 
tion of Jewish Women, Temple Sisterhood, Civil Liberties Union, Library 
Commission, and North Carolina Literary and Historical Association. 

The Local Records Branch recently transferred to the State Archives a 
large group of bound records from Cumberland County which includes 
county and superior court minutes, accounts and inventories of estates, 
marriage registers, and numerous others. Valuable bound records from Hay¬ 
wood and Henderson counties have also been added to existing collections 


72 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 




from those counties. All of the above records are available for use by the pub¬ 
lic in the Search Room. 

Phase II microfilming has been completed in thirty-six counties and is 
currently under way in Cumberland, Haywood, and Randolph counties. 

All churches in these counties are invited to have their records micro¬ 
filmed while division representatives are working in the courthouses. Min¬ 
utes, registers, and other valuable records are microfilmed without cost to 
the churches involved. The microfilm will be placed in security storage; in 
the event of the loss or destruction of original records, copies can be pro¬ 
vided at a very small cost. 

The State Records Branch recently accessioned and transferred to the 
State Archives 275 cubic feet of records of the Department of Social Ser¬ 
vices dating from 1919 to 1965. Many of the papers of Dr. Ellen Winston, 
former commissioner of public welfare, are included in the collection. 

The Newspaper Microfilm Project recently completed the filming of the 
Chatham News (Siler City, weekly, semiweekly) from 1926 through 1945. 
Film copies will soon be available for public use in the Search Room. 


Patton Memorial Established 

An endowment fund as a memorial to the late Professor James W. Pat¬ 
ton, who died suddenly in Charleston, South Carolina, on May 17, has been 
established in the Southern Historical Collection of the University of North 
Carolina Library at Chapel Hill. The longtime director of the SHA, upon 
his retirement from that position, had continued his affiliation with the uni¬ 
versity by teaching in the Department of History. He retired from teach¬ 
ing in May. Contributions should be made payable to the Patton Memorial 
Fund and mailed to the Southern Historical Collection, Louis Round Wil¬ 
son Library, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 
27514. 


Former Archives and History Employees Die 

In 1950 Mrs. William S. West, better known as “Miss Susie,” retired after 
thirty-five years with Archives and History. Her service began in 1915 
when the North Carolina Historical Commission had just moved from the 
Capitol to its new headquarters in what is now the building used by the 
North Carolina Court of Appeals. She was responsible for the collection of 
many of the records which are preserved in the State Archives. Mrs. West 
died on May 16, after an illness of several months, at the age of ninety-four. 


Thomas G. Britt retired in 1969 after thirty-eight years in state govern¬ 
ment, the last ten of which were with Archives and History. He joined the 
staff as head of the Newspaper Microfilming Project in 1968 and was pro¬ 
moted to supervisor of the Technical Services Section. Under his supervi¬ 
sion all known copies of North Carolina newspapers published from 1751 
to 1900 were microfilmed. Britt died in Raleigh on June 6. 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER U, JULY, 1973 


73 


'P'UCKct *lty64t&Uf . . 

The fact that Frank L. 

Horton is recognized by 
everyone as a “Friend of 
History” is no reason for 
not repeating it. For, after 
all, how many other North 
Carolinians have dedicated 
more than twenty years to 
the preservation of history 
—on a fulltime basis—and 
refused to be paid for their 
time? 

Now director of the Mu¬ 
seum of Early Southern 
Decorative Arts at Old Sa¬ 
lem, Frank Horton has 
played the leading role in 
the restoration of the Mora¬ 
vian community that is rec¬ 
ognized nationally for its 
authenticity and charm. No 
less an honor than the (McNabb Studio; photograph courtesy of Old Salem.) 
Crowninshield Award of the 

National Trust in 1970 acknowledged his dedication and contribution to 
this outstanding North Carolina project. 

Mr. Horton was born in Raleigh but grew up in Winston-Salem. He at¬ 
tended New Mexico Military Institute and Pace Institute and entered the 
antiques business in Virginia. Following service in the armed forces he es¬ 
tablished his business in Winston-Salem but soon turned his attention to 
the Old Salem restoration project in the late 1940s. He has supervised the 
restoration of more than forty buildings. He and his mother, the late Mrs. 
Theo L. Taliaferro, founded MESDA and turned their already superb 
furnishings collection over to Old Salem, Inc., along with a generous endow¬ 
ment. 

Old Salem is unprecedented in southern attempts to portray the history 
of the region, largely because of the philosophy followed by Frank Horton 
and the officers of Old Salem, Inc. He stated this philosophy plainly in 1952: 
“There will be no window dressing. We plan to restore the old village as it 
was and not as we imagine it should be.” The same strict code has been fol¬ 
lowed in regard to MESDA: authentic, documented interiors and furnish¬ 
ings. Together, the restored community of Old Salem and the unexcelled 
collection of interiors and furnishings at MESDA provide North Carolinians 
with one of the nation’s outstanding historic attractions—one based upon 
solid research and rigid adherence to the evidence. 

Frank Horton, a man who has devoted his full time for nearly a quarter of 
a century to preserving North Carolina and southern heritage, is indeed a 
“Friend of History.” 



74 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 








Governor’s Portrait Presented 



The official portrait of former 
Governor Robert W. Scott was ac¬ 
cepted by his successor, Governor 
James E. Holshouser, Jr., in cere¬ 
monies in the State Legislative 
Building on May 4. 

The portrait, painted by Daniel 
E. Greene of New York City, was 
unveiled by the former governor’s 
only son, Kerr, and youngest daugh¬ 
ter, Janet. Dr. James H. Semans of 
Durham, chairman of the Board of 
Trustees of the North Carolina 
School of the Arts, gave the presen¬ 
tation address. The ceremony was 
presided over by House Speaker 
James E. Ramsey, Jr., and Lieuten¬ 
ant Governor James B. Hunt, Jr. 

The statutes require the paint¬ 
ing of the portrait of each gover¬ 
nor. Following public display in the 


Archives and History-State Library T he official portrait of Gov. Robert w. Scott 
Building, the portrait was trans- was painted by Daniel E. Greene, 
ferred to its place of honor in the Executive Mansion. 


New Staff, Intern Begin Work 

Celia Benton, a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the University of North Caro¬ 
lina at Chapel Hill, with honors in history, joined the staff of the Historical 
Publications Section as a summer intern on June 4. She is assigned to the 
Colonial Records Project. Miss Benton plans to enter the American Studies 
program at the University of Minnesota in the fall. 

Several additions were made to the staff of the Historic Sites and Muse¬ 
ums Section on April 2. Jo Ann Watson began working as an archaeology 
laboratory technician; she is a graduate of the University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill, where she worked under the direction of Professor Bennie C. 
Keel. 

William R. Frick joined the staff as curator of exhibits. A graduate in 
anthropology-sociology from the University of Wisconsin, he also completed 
three years of work-study under Yugoslav art historian Rajko Lozar. Mr. 
Frick formerly served as director of the Rahr Civic Center and Public Mu¬ 
seum in Manitowoc, Wisconsin. 

The position of conservator was filled by Paul K. Meares. After under¬ 
graduate work at East Carolina, Mr. Meares attended Virginia Seminary 
for three years. Prior to his ordination in the Episcopal church, he worked 
for seven years with DuPont as a craftsman machinist; he also served as an 
apprentice in the applied physics laboratory at the Johns Hopkins Uni¬ 
versity. 

VOLUME XXI, NUMBER i, JULY, 1973 


75 





Michael O. Smith began his duties as furnishings specialist on April 9. 
The 1964 graduate of William and Mary has a master’s degree in museum 
practice from the University of Michigan; his most recent position was assis¬ 
tant at the Henry Ford Museum. 

Two recent additions to the staff of the Archives and Records Section in¬ 
clude Mrs. Rose Ennemoser, who was employed as secretary of the Civil 
War Roster Project on March 15; and Mrs. Mona Davis, who joined the 
staff of the Technical Services Branch in the Document Restoration Labora¬ 
tory on April 16. 

t 

Director Travels, Speaks 

Dr. H. G. Jones presided over a meeting of the State Historic Preserva¬ 
tion Officers Policy Group in Washington, D.C., on May 21-22. He presided 
at a dinner meeting on June 7 during the Charlotte-Mecklenburg historic 
preservation conference titled “Does the Past Have a Future?” On June 8 
he presented the annual Junior Historian awards on behalf of the North 
Carolina Literary and Historical Association at a ceremony in Raleigh at 
which Mrs. Grace J. Rohrer, secretary of the Department of Cultural Re¬ 
sources,was the main speaker. On June 15 Dr. Jones conducted the New 
England Regional Workshop at Augusta, Maine, on the subject of “Collect¬ 
ing, Organizing, and Caring for Manuscripts and Records.” 


Colleges and Universities 

Belmont Abbey College 

Don Cresswell, who joined the staff as assistant professor of history last 
August, spoke on March 13 to the Military Classics Seminar at Fort Myer, 
Virginia, on the breakdown in political and military command in the British 
army during the Revolution. Later in March he was the guest of the Ameri¬ 
can Civil War Round Table of the United Kingdom. On the last day of 
March he lectured in London on “The American Civil War, the Second War 
for American Independence.” Mr. Cresswell is director of the Belmont 
Abbey College library as well as a member of the faculty of the history 
department. 

Duke University 

A number of members of the history faculty at Duke participated in ses¬ 
sions of the Organization of American Historians, which held its 1973 meet¬ 
ing in Chicago, April 11-14. Dr. William H. Chafe read a paper on “Diver¬ 
gent Perspectives on Social Change: Race Relations in Greensboro, North 
Carolina” in a session on “Black and White Oral Traditions: Unused Re¬ 
search Tools.” In the same session Dr. Lawrence C. Goodwyn presented a 
paper, “Toward a Multi-Racial History of the South.” “Southern Black 
Leadership, 1930-1945” was the topic of Dr. Raymond Gavins’s paper in 
the session on “The Perils and Prospects of Black Leadership.” Dr. Anne F. 
Scott was chairman of a session on “Women and Medicine in Nineteenth- 
Century America.” 

Dr. Joel Colton is completing his second year as chairman of the Academic 


76 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Council of Duke, the highest elected faculty body at the university. He 
participated in a colloquium on Leon Blum sponsored by the Centre Nation¬ 
al de la Recherche Scientifique in Paris, April 5-6. 

Dr. John S. Curtiss wrote Russian Social History from 1815 to 1917 as 
part of a new text being published by Montreal University for Heath. “The 
Historical Perspective of Richard Hooker: A Renaissance Paradox,” by 
Dr. Arthur B. Ferguson, was included in the Spring issue of the Journal of 
Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Dr. Warren Lerner has edited a fest¬ 
schrift honoring W. W. Kulski, who retired this year as J. B. Duke Professor 
of Russian Affairs; the work will appear as the Summer, 1973, issue of the 
South Atlantic Quarterly. Dr. Sydney Nathans’s Daniel Webster and Jack¬ 
sonian Democracy was published in March in the Johns Hopkins Press 
series on history and political science. 

A seminar of the Society for French Historical Studies, held in March, 
was on the subject of the Annales school of historiography; it was led by 
Dr. Harold Parker. Dr. Richard A. Preston published “Ethno-Cultural 
Pluralism in Military Forces: An Historical Survey” in M. Cross and R. 
Bothwell (eds.), Policy by Other Means: Essays in Honor of C. P. Stacey, 
Toronto, 1973. Dr. Theodore Ropp presented a paper, “Military Strategy 
Before Napoleon,” at the National War College, Washington, D.C., in 
February. In May he read a paper on “Technology and Modern Warfare” at 
the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. 

The Lectures in American Civilization at the University of New York, 
Fredonia, were delivered by Dr. Anne F. Scott. Dr. John T. TePaske has 
been appointed chairman of the James Alexander Robertson Memorial Prize 
Committee of the Conference on Latin American History. A paper was 
presented by Dr. Charles R. Young on “The Forest Eyre in England During 
the Thirteenth Century” at a Conference on the English Plea Rolls, held in 
Chicago under the sponsorship of the American Society for Legal History on 
April 13. 

A $256,000 grant from the Rockefeller Foundation and the Mary Rey¬ 
nolds Babcock Foundation is making it possible for Duke to initiate a five- 
year program in multiracial oral history. Fellowships will be awarded to 
ten graduate students who will work to develop oral history sources, parti¬ 
cularly among blacks, with the goal of providing new perspectives on race 
relations in the twentieth century. Lawrence Goodwyn will head the pro¬ 
gram and William Chafe will serve as associate director. 


East Carolina University 

Dr. Henry C. Ferrell, Jr., was promoted to rank of professor, effective 
May 1. Dr. Fred D. Ragan, associate professor, on May 9 was named a Dan- 
forth Associate by the Danforth Foundation. On May 4 a special award was 
presented by Phi Sigma Pi, national honor fraternity, to Dr. Richard C. 
Todd, professor of history, by which he was recognized for leadership and 
scholarship; he is serving his third consecutive two-year term as national 
vice-president of the organization. Dr. Todd was elected to the honor society 
of Phi Kappa Phi on April 18. Two members of the East Carolina faculty, 
Drs. John C. Ellen and Wilkins B. Winn, were named Outstanding Educa¬ 
tors of America for 1973. 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 1>, JULY, 1973 


77 


Meredith College 

Mrs. Erika Fairchild of the Department of History and Political Science 
is scheduled as a program discussant for the New Orleans meeting of the 
American Political Science Association to be held in September. The his¬ 
tory and sociology departments of the college have completed the Oakwood 
Study under a grant from the North Carolina Committee for Continuing 
Education in the Humanities. Architectural photographs, oral history tapes, 
maps, and questionnaire results are available from the college library. 

Methodist College 

Dr. Clarence C. Hulley, professor of history, retired at the end of the 
spring term. Joining the Methodist College history faculty is Dr. Robert 
Colby Perkins, associate professor. Dr. Perkins, whose Ph.D. is from the 
University of South Carolina, most recently taught at Concord College in 
Athens, West Virginia. 

North Carolina State University 

Dr. William C. Harris has a chapter, “The Reconstruction of the Com¬ 
monwealth,” in the recently published book edited by Dr. Richard A. 
McLemore, A History of Mississippi. On April 10 Dr. Stuart Noblin was 
inducted in North Carolina State University’s chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, a 
national honor society dedicated to outstanding scholarship and character. 
Walter L. Seegers, acting head of the history department, retired on June 30. 
A member of the faculty since 1936, he had specialized in colonial and early 
national American history; he will teach on a limited basis during the aca¬ 
demic year, 1973-1974. Dr. Richard C. Lipsey, head of the history staff at 
NCSU’s Fort Bragg branch, also retired June 30. Joining the staff as assis¬ 
tant professor, effective August 20, will be Mr. Frederick F. Czupryna, 
whose field is Japanese history. 

North Carolina Wesleyan College 

The Outstanding Professor of the Year Award was presented, for the 
third time, to Dr. Allen S. Johnson, professor of history. The annual award is 
given by Nu Gamma Phi fraternity. 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Promotions to rank of professor in the Department of History were ap¬ 
proved by the trustees at their April 13 meeting for Drs. Lamar J. R. Cecil, 
Donald G. Mathews, John K. Nelson, and John Semonche. 

Wake Forest University 

Dr. Balkrishna G. Gokhale published “Miscellanea: Notes on the His¬ 
tory of an Indian City in the XVIIth Century,” in the Journal of the Eco¬ 
nomic and Social History of the Orient, Volume 15, Part 3, December, 
1972. His article, “Anagarika Dharmapala: Toward Modernity through 
Tradition in Ceylon,” appeared in Contributions to Asian Studies, Vol- 


78 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


ume 4, 1973. Dr. Percival Perry, news editor of the Historian, journal of 
Phi Alpha Theta, represented the international council of Phi Alpha Theta 
at the annual regional meeting of North Carolina chapters at Winston- 
Salem State University on March 31. He also represented the council at 
the regional meeting for the state of Georgia, held at the University of 
Georgia, Athens, April 7. Dr. Perry spoke to the Chesterfield County His¬ 
torical Society in Chesterfield, South Carolina, on April 27, taking as his 
subject, “Early Transportation in the Pee Dee Area.” 


State, County, and Local Groups 

Alamance County Historical Association 

The association’s annual meeting was held May 9 at the Alamance Bat¬ 
tleground State Historic Site. The following officers were elected: W. Cliff 
Elder, president; Mrs. R. Homer Andrews, vice-president; George D. Col- 
clough, secretary-treasurer. Mr. Colclough reported that Dr. George Troxler 
had prepared a history of Pyle’s Massacre, fought outside Graham, which 
was being printed and would soon be ready for distribution. He is working 
on the history of the Battle of Lindley’s Mill; this history and others relat¬ 
ing to the Revolutionary War are being planned for publication before or 
during 1975. 

Beaufort County Historic Properties Commission 

The commission was named by the Beaufort County Board of Commis¬ 
sioners for the purpose of recommending the acquisition of historic proper¬ 
ties and ways of using and conserving them for the education and enrich¬ 
ment of the county’s citizens. 

Burke County Historical Society 

When the society met on April 17 its president, Rondal Mull, introduced 
Charles M. Carey of Morganton, president of the Archaeological Society of 
North Carolina, who showed slides and artifacts and discussed finds which 
he and his wife had made in the vicinity of Morganton. Carey showed a 
number of prehistoric artifacts and told his audience that man probably 
lived in the Burke County area before 12,000 b.C. 

Carteret Historical Research Association 

Mrs. Nettie Murrill of Emerald Isle was guest speaker when the associa¬ 
tion met in Beaufort on March 12. She spoke on the lore of the Outer Banks, 
placing emphasis on Diamond City and the surrounding villages. At the 
April 9 meeting Mr. Charles McNeill spoke about Portsmouth Island. 

Caswell County Historical Association 

The first meeting of the year was held April 10 at Gunn Memorial Public 
Library with Mr. Henry Anderson of Rockingham County presenting a 
program. 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER i, JULY, 1973 


79 


Catawba County Historical Association 

Speaker at the March meeting was Mrs. Glenn Long, who discussed Cal¬ 
vin H. Wiley, William Alexander Graham, and Zebulon B. Vance. Mrs. 
Long is a former president-general of the UDC. During the business ses¬ 
sion the new director of the Catawba County Library, Richard B. Meldrom, 
discussed his avocation, which is genealogy. He announced his hope of 
forming a local genealogical society; and he plans to teach a class in geneal¬ 
ogy, possibly through Catawba Valley Technical Institute. Mrs. Rome Jones 
continues as president of the association. 


Chapel Hill Historical Society 

The society met April 29 at the Institute of Government to hear J. Maryon 
Saunders, who served as alumni secretary of the University of North Caro¬ 
lina for forty years, speak on his years at the university. A feature of com¬ 
mencement weekend was a walking tour of the campus, led by Professor 
John Allcott on May 12. Dr. Allcott, for the first time, led the group to his¬ 
toric buildings but also compared the old buildings with the new architec¬ 
ture on the campus. The tour began at the Davie Poplar and from there the 
group went to the center of the old campus and then on to “The Pit” at the 
south end of the campus where new buildings are located. 


Chapel Hill Preservation Society 

The society has acquired the Betty Smith House and will sell it to a per¬ 
son interested in maintaining it as a landmark. The house was built around 
1850 by the university for an unidentified professor; in 1858 it was sold 
to Andrew Mickle, who lived there through the Civil War. Mickle sold it in 
1885 to Dr. Adolphus W. Mangum, a UNC professor; he and members of 
his family lived there until it was sold to novelist Betty Smith and her hus¬ 
band in 1944. Concern for the preservation of the house led to the formation 
of the Chapel Hill Preservation Society following the death of Miss Smith. 
Mayor Howard Lee issued a proclamation designating the week of May 6 
as Chapel Hill Historic Preservation Week. President of the society is 
Mrs. William C. Friday. 

Cleveland County Historical Association 

John L. Sanders, director of Chapel Hill’s Institute of Government, spoke 
at the April 27 meeting of the association. He discussed the history of the 
State Capitol, illustrating his talk with slides. H. C. Wilson is president of 
the Cleveland group. 


Davidson County Historical Association 

Speaker at the April 30 meeting of the association was the president of 
the Historic Salisbury Foundation, Inc., Edward Clement. The meeting was 
held in the small courtroom of the Davidson County Courthouse in Lexing¬ 
ton. 


80 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Friends of Hope 

On May 10 the annual meeting of the Friends of Hope, a subsidiary of 
Historic Hope Foundation, was held at Hope Plantation near Windsor. Dur¬ 
ing the business session L. A. Bailey of Rocky Mount, chairman of the 
Friends’ Acquisitions and Foundation Committee, reported that $2,000 had 
been raised toward furnishings since Hope was officially opened last sum¬ 
mer. John G. Zehmer, Jr., chief of the Historic Sites and Museums Section 
of the Division of Archives and History, gave a slide-illustrated lecture in 
which he traced the history of the architecture of Hope. In the evening a 
buffet dinner for the Friends and Directors of Hope was held at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Steven Burch in Windsor. A candlelight reception, honor¬ 
ing the Friends group, was later held at Hope Plantation; the entire mem¬ 
bership of the Friends was invited. The Friends of Hope Committee is 
limited to fifty members; Mrs. Ernest L. Ives and Waylon L. Jenkins serve 
as cochairmen. The first lady of North Carolina, Mrs. James E. Hols- 
houser, Jr., is serving as honorary chairman of the group. 

Halifax County Historical Association 

Mrs. Robert E. Vick, Weldon historian, spoke on the life of Col. Andrew 
Joyner when the association had its May meeting. Many members of the 
association were in Raleigh the afternoon of April 28 for the unveiling of 
the John Paul Jones bust. Dennis H. Holliday of Route 1, Scotland Neck, 
is president of the association. 

Harnett County Historical Society 

Ruth Little-Stokes of the Historic Sites and Museums Section spoke to 
the society on April 30. She presented a slide talk on the Rory Matthews 
log house. G. E. Welborn of Dunn presided and Hewitt Brown was in charge 
of the program. 

Hillsborough Historical Society 

The May 17 dinner meeting of the society was held at the Colonial Inn in 
Hillsborough. Speaker at the meeting was Mr. William L. Burns, vice- 
president of the Central Carolina Bank and Trust Company in Durham. On 
April 7 a bronze plaque and certificate, designating the Nash-Hooper House 
as a National Historic Landmark, were presented to the present owners, 
Mr. and Mrs. Cecil L. Sanford. Mr. L. Boyd Finch represented the secre¬ 
tary of the interior at the ceremony, and Duke University’s president, Terry 
Sanford, delivered the address. 

Historic Bath Commission 

Mr. and Mrs. G. D. Elliott, Jr., and Mr. and Mrs. Ray Brooks were hosts 
to commission members and guests the night of April 29. About sixty per¬ 
sons attended the dinner in Bath. Representing the Division of Archives 
and History were Mrs. Joye E. Jordan, Mr. A. L. Honeycutt, Jr., and Mr. 
Michael O. Smith. Capt. Henry Bridges of Tarboro, chairman of the com¬ 
mission, presided at the commission meeting held on April 30. 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 4 , JULY, 1973 


81 


Historic Cabarrus, Inc. 

The first meeting of the organization was held May 21. Historic Cabarrus, 
Inc., is a nonprofit organization of history buffs and others, its first project 
being the preservation and restoration of the Cabarrus County Courthouse, 
a brick and stucco structure completed in 1876. The project will be dubbed 
“Courthouse ’76.” A watercolor painting of the building has been printed 
in a limited edition of 488; the prints, signed and numbered by the artist, 
will be awarded to sustaining and patron members of Historic Cabarrus, 
Inc., on a first-come, first-served basis. The artist is Mel E. Kester, a cor¬ 
porate official of Cannon Mills, who began painting in 1969. President of 
the Cabarrus County historical group is Mrs. Janet Magaldi, one of its 
founders. 

Historic Hillsborough Commission 

Mrs. Grace J. Rohrer, secretary of the Department of Cultural Resources, 
was the speaker at the dinner of the Historic Hillsborough Commission at 
the Colonial Inn on May 30. It was announced that the Z. Smith Reynolds 
Foundation of Winston-Salem had made a $5,000 grant to the commission 
for assistance in the restoration of the Burwell School. 


Historic New Bern Foundation, Inc. 

Miss Janet K. Seapker of the Historic Sites and Museums Section spoke 
at the organizational meeting of the Historic New Bern Foundation on 
May 23. She presented a slide lecture showing the number of buildings 
that are candidates for rehabilitation under the foundation’s revolving fund. 


Historic Robeson, Inc. 

The president of the group, Dewey Bruce, served as master of ceremonies 
when some twenty-five people took a tour of a portion of Robeson County 
on April 15. Those touring the county visited Asbury Methodist Church and 
heard Miss Mable Townsend of McDonald speak on the history of the site. 
Several historic houses in the area were also visited. At Ashpole Presby¬ 
terian Church the pastor, Russell Park, and Miss Lucia Mae McCallum met 
the visitors. Miss McCallum served as guide and pointed out places of in¬ 
terest on the church property. Refreshments were served by women of the 
church. The remains of old grist mills near Lennon’s Mill Pond and the 
former Proctor Law Office, on Elm Street in Lumberton, were also points 
of interest on the tour. Historic Robeson, Inc., is planning a fund drive to 
permit purchase and renovation of the law office. The purpose of Historic 
Robeson, Inc., is to preserve the heritage of Robeson County. 

Historical Society of North Carolina 

The spring meeting of the society was held at the University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro on April 6. Papers were read by Dr. Burton Beers 
of North Carolina State University, whose topic was “North Carolina’s 


82 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Role in America’s Encounter with Asia,” and Dr. Don Higginbotham of the 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, whose paper was on the sub¬ 
ject of “North Carolina and the American Revolution.” Richard Iobst of 
Western Carolina University, Don Lennon of East Carolina University, and 
John Woodard of Wake Forest University participated in a panel entitled 
“The Newer Collections: An Informal Discussion.” The evening session 
was concluded by William S. Powell of the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill who talked about his proposed dictionary of North Carolina 
biography; Mr. Powell read several sketches which had been submitted 
and offered suggestions with regard to the preparation of entries for the dic¬ 
tionary. Many members of the society are writing biographical sketches 
for the multivolume work. 

Lenoir County Historical Association 

The second annual Kinston and Lenoir County Crafts and Creative Arts 
Show was held March 31 in Kinston. The association was one of the spon¬ 
sors of the show. Demonstrations were given of quilting, egg decoration, 
string art, weaving, glass blowing, spinning, and canvas work. Heirloom 
and quality crafts were also on display. A sales room featured handmade 
crafts which were made available to the public. 

Lower Cape Fear Historical Society 

The society’s Bulletin included an article, “Alfred and Susan Jane 
(DeBose) Gurganious Letters, September, 1861-July, 1862.” The letters be¬ 
tween Alfred Gurganious and his wife are in the possession of their great- 
grandson, Harris E. Malpass; they relate experiences during the Civil War. 
The May 9 meeting of the society was held at the Governor Dudley House, 
with C. F. W. Coker, chief of the Archives and Records Section of the Divi¬ 
sion of Archives and History, speaking on “The Centennial Celebration in 
Wilmington of the American Revolution.” 


McDowell County Historical Society 

Mrs. Worth Cox was elected president of the society at the April 27 meet¬ 
ing held at McDowell Public Library. Other officers elected for a two-year 
term were Mrs. Tom Greenlee, vice-president; Mrs. Lyle Morgan, secretary- 
treasurer; and Mrs. Arthur Fossett, publicity chiarman. The newly elected 
officers were installed by the retiring president, Dr. Cato Holler. 

Miss Ruth Greenlee gave a report on Carson House, stating that a total 
of 11,913 visitors have registered since the restored historical landmark 
was opened to the public in September, 1964. More than 1,000 people from 
states other than North Carolina and from thirty foreign countries have 
visited the site. 

Mrs. Fossett reported on the course on Local History and Genealogy held 
at McDowell Technical Institute during the winter. The course was coordi¬ 
nated by Robert 0. Conway, regional representative of the Division of Ar¬ 
chives and History and site manager at the Vance Birthplace State His¬ 
toric Site. Thirty-six members attended the eleven class sessions. 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 4 , JULY, 1973 


83 


Following the business meeting Mr. Conway showed slides of historic 
sites in North Carolina and talked on the early settlement of the state. 

The next meeting will be at Carson House, Friday, July 20. 



The class in local history and genealogy at McDowell Technical Institute was photographed 
by Bob Conway, who taught the class. 

Madison County Historical Society 

On April 7 the group toured Greeneville, Tennessee, once the home of 
Andrew Johnson, Davy Crockett, and Colonel James H. Rumbaugh. 


Moore County Historical Association 

The annual meeting of the association was held at the House in the Horse¬ 
shoe on May 6. Mrs. Ernest L. Ives gave the history of the house; she sup¬ 
ported the idea of a drama to be presented there in 1976 as part of the bi¬ 
centennial observance. Elected to serve the association as officers for the 
coming year are Dr. Galen Jones of Southern Pines, president; Mrs. John A. 
McPhaul, vice-president; Mrs. Ronald Christie, treasurer; Mrs. Joseph 
Marley, secretary; Mrs. Ronald Christie, corresponding secretary; and 
Miss Lena Stewart, membership chairman. Presiding at the meeting was 
Earl Hubbard, president, who reviewed the year’s activities. Announce¬ 
ment was made of a profit of $1,844.50 from the Antiques Fair. 

Moores Creek Battleground Association 

The American Revolution Bicentennial flag and certificate were pre¬ 
sented, and the premiere showing of Our Uncommon Heritage was fea¬ 
tured, at Moores Creek National Military Park on May 6. Presiding was 
Raymond L. Ives, superintendent of Moores Creek National Military Park. 
The flag and certificate were presented by Gene Anderson, of Governor 
Holshouser’s staff, and accepted by David D. Thompson Jr., director of the 
Southeast Region National Park Service. He was introduced by Gary E. 
Trawick, chairman of the Pender County Bicentennial Commission. The 
program concluded with eighteenth century military maneuvers presented 
by the North Carolina Brigade with parts of the First and Second North 
Carolina Regiments. Refreshments were provided by the association. Prior 
to the program, a “living history demonstration” was presented by the staff 


84 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 



of Moores Creek National Military Park. Franz David Cone was the High¬ 
land Scot and Terry Mitchell, the Patriot. 

Murfreesboro Historical Association 
Historic Murfreesboro Commission 

A portrait of the Reverend Daniel Southall, who moved to Murfreesboro 
in 1816 and remained there for fourteen years while serving as Methodist 
minister, farmer, and merchant, was presented to the Murfreesboro His¬ 
torical Association by Mr. I. Harding Hughes, Jr., of Durham. Announce¬ 
ment of the donation was made by E. Frank Stephenson, Jr. Winton na¬ 
tive Thomas C. Parramore of Meredith College was instrumental in ob¬ 
taining the gift for the association. The portrait will be sent to Murfrees¬ 
boro after its restoration in Chapel Hill has been completed. 

The association, in cooperation with the Historic Murfreesboro Commis¬ 
sion, has published Renaissance in Carolina II, a heavily illustrated 168- 
page report on historic preservation in the town. The volume, by Mr. Ste¬ 
phenson, is available for $10.00 per copy. 

On June 8 the Historic Murfreesboro Commission and the Murfreesboro 
Historical Association held their seventh annual spring meeting. The events 
of the day began with the dedication of the 1790 William Rea Store at the 
site on Williams Street. The restored Rea Store was donated to the asso¬ 
ciation by Mr. and Mrs. Edwin P. Brown and has been restored for use as 
a museum with special exhibits on the early life and development of Mur¬ 
freesboro. A special exhibit on Richard J. Gatling, inventor of the Gatling 
gun, will also be in the museum when the exhibits are installed in the 1790 
store building. 

Following the dedication a public luncheon was held at Chowan College, 
with Mr. Archie K. Davis, chairman of the board, Wachovia Bank and Trust 
Company, Winston-Salem, as the principal speaker. A brief business ses¬ 
sion was held during the luncheon, and the annual Historic Murfreesboro 
Awards were presented at the luncheon. 

Following the luncheon a number of Murfreesboro buildings were open 
to the public, including the Roberts-Vaughan house, William Rea Store, 
Hertford Academy, Masonic Hall, and Chowan College. At 3:00 p.m. a 
special business meeting of the Historic Murfreesboro Commission was held 
to discuss the statewide fund-raising campaign now under way by the com¬ 
mission and association. The commission meeting was held at the Roberts- 
Vaughan House. 

Nash County Historical Association 

The third annual tour of old homes was held on May 20, according to 
information released by the association’s president, T. E. Ricks. The tour 
began with the old Lewis House on the edge of Rocky Mount. 

New Bern Historical Society 

The fiftieth anniversary banquet was held at the Ramada Inn on April 11; 
Vermont C. Royster of Chapel Hill was the featured speaker. Mr. Royster 




VOLUME XXI, NUMBER J,, JULY. 1973 


85 




was introduced by Donald Taylor, curator of education at Tryon Palace. 
Officers elected at the meeting are Dr. C. T. Barker, president; Mrs. Thomas 
O. Moore, first vice-president; Mrs. Edwin R. Williams, second vice-presi¬ 
dent; Miss Janet Latham, secretary; and Robert A. Ipock, treasurer. Dr. 
Junius Davis, president, presided and welcomed the guests. C. B. Beasley 
presented a portrait of the late Mrs. Richard Nixon Duffy to the society; 
Mrs. Duffy was one of the founders of the organization and was active in 
planning the restoration of Tryon Palace. The portrait was given by her 
children and grandchildren. W. F. Ward presented a portrait of the late 
Judge R. A. Nunn to the society because of his work in historic preservation 
in New Bern; it was given by his daughters. 

North Carolina Society of County and Local Historians 

On May 6 the society met in Raleigh for a tour of Wake County, which was 
sponsored by the Wake County Historical Society, the Raleigh Historic 
Sites Commission, and the North Carolina Division of Archives and His¬ 
tory. A devotional period and memorial service for Robert B. Cooke, the 
late president of the Society of County and Local Historians, was led by 
Dr. Harold Dudley. The current president, Hector MacLean of Lumberton, 
presided over the brief business session. He announced plans for the Robert 
B. Cooke Memorial Award, to be presented periodically for the best his¬ 
tory written on a North Carolina family. An initial donation of $50.00 has 
been made by Mr. and Mrs. Charles Blake of Hillsborough to help implement 
the award. 

Following a film, The Making of Wake, which was introduced and shown 
by Mr. Richard L. Rice, visitors drove to the Oakwood section of Raleigh. 
Mrs. Vallie Henderson, one of the residents of the historic section, led a tour 
of the restored area; the Makepeace-Hoadley House and the gardens at the 
Ames Christopher home were open to the tourists. From Oakwood the 
group drove to Yates Mill to see the historic structure and have a picnic 
lunch. After the noon meal, a tour of the Capitol Square area was conducted 
by Dr. Thornton W. Mitchell. The day’s last activity was a tour of the Mor- 
decai House; refreshments were served there. 

Those involved in planning and carrying out the day’s program included 
Bourke Bilisoly, president of the Wake County Historical Society; Dr. H. G. 
Jones and Mrs. Joye E. Jordan of the Division of Archives and History; 
Mr. William Dodge III, president of the Raleigh Historic Sites Commission; 
Mrs. Margaret McMahan, secretary of the Society of County and Local 
Historians; and Miss Marie D. Moore, a member of the Wake County society 
and the staff of the Division of Archives and History, who served as co¬ 
ordinator. 

North Carolina Society, Sons of the American Revolution 

The 1973 state convention was held at Weldon-Roanoke Rapids on 
April 14. A tour to colonial Halifax and to Loretta, the home of Gen. Wil¬ 
liam Richardson Davie, were highlights of the meeting. M. Alain Dejammet, 
counselor at the French embassy in Washington, spoke at the banquet; he 
stressed ties between the United States and France through the centuries. 
He also outlined plans of the French to participate in the commemoration of 


86 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


the American Revolution bicentennial. Dr. Ralph Hardee Rives of Enfield 
and Greenville was reelected president and David Carlos Smith of Raleigh 
was reelected vice-president. New officers include Richard Franklin Boddie 
of Durham, secretary-treasurer-registrar; William Cofer of Raleigh, his¬ 
torian; and Jerry Lynn Higgins of Cary, genealogist. The Reverend Sted- 
man B. Bryan of Fayetteville will again serve as chaplain. 

Old Salem 

The annual meeting was held on May 23. A series of slides were shown to 
illustrate activities which are seldom if ever seen by either visitors or those 
in frequent contact with Old Salem projects. Mrs. Gordon Hanes served as 
narrator for the program. A report was given by President R. Arthur 
Spaugh, Jr.; M. C. Benton, Jr., chairman of the trustees, presided. 

Pitt County Historical Society 

Harold Creech, manager of the Greenville Chamber of Commerce and Mer¬ 
chants Association, spoke on “Greenville: Past, Present, and Future” at 
a dinner meeting of the society held in Greenville on May 24. He distri¬ 
buted copies of several documents significant in the history of the town. 
Creech was introduced by the program chairman, Dr. Ralph Hardee Rives. 

Rutherford County Historical Society 

The history of the North Carolina State Capitol was the subject of the 
program held on March 29 at Isothermal Community College. John L. 
Sanders, director of the Institute of Government at the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill, was featured speaker. 

Stokes County Historical Society 

The society met in the courthouse in Danbury April 10 with the presi¬ 
dent, J. G. H. Mitchell, in charge of the business meeting. A committee was 
named to do research relative to the cost of preserving and landscaping the 
area surrounding the old ironworks at Danbury. The old jail in the town 
has been given to the society for use as a county museum, and efforts will 
be made to raise money for the museum. 

Western North Carolina Historical Association 

The association’s annual Achievement Award was presented to Bun¬ 
combe County’s folklorist, Bascom Lamar Lunsford, on Saturday, May 5. 
The silver trophy was presented by John McLeod of Mars Hill. Lunsford 
was the founder of the Mountain Folk Festival, held annually in Asheville; 
he had recorded more than 600 mountain ballads for the Columbia Univer¬ 
sity library. 

The association also presented an “Award of Outstanding Service” and a 
silver dish to Dr. William E. Bird, president-emeritus of Western Carolina 
University, a founder and past president of the organization. Col. Paul Rock¬ 
well of Asheville was named president-emeritus for life. 

Reelected as officers of the Western North Carolina Historical Associa- 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER U, JULY, 1973 


87 


tion were Jesse P. Surles of Asheville, president; Mack White of Asheville, 
vice-president; and Miss Collie Garner of Asheville, secretary. Serving an 
initial term as treasurer will be Mrs. Jo Lunsford Herron of Lake Juna- 
luska. 

Speaking at the May meeting, held at Mars Hill College, were H. Arch 
Nichols, Asheville conservationist, who spoke on the Appalachian Trail, 
and William J. Weaver of Cherokee, who discussed oral history. 

Yadkin County Historical Society 

The society met May 6 with Hilton Jones, president, presiding. Plans for 
the purchase and restoration of the Evans schoolhouse were presented by 
Jimmie Hutchens, vice-president. He also reported that construction plans 
for the picnic area and trails at Richmond Hill were under way. 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Published in January, March, May, July, September, 
and November by the Division of Archives and His¬ 
tory, Department of Cultural Resources, Archives and 
History-State Library Building, 109 East Jones 
Street, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27611. 


H. G. Jones, Editor in Chief 
Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell, Editor 



o 




CAROLINA COMMENTS 

PUBLISHED BIMONTHLY BY THE NORTH CAROLINA 
DIVISION OF ARCHIVES AND HISTORY 


Volume XXI, Number 5 


September, 1973 


Mezzanine Floor Exhibits Opened 

The exhibits on the mezzanine of the North Carolina Museum of History 
were opened to the public in August. These exhibits are arranged in three 
groupings: “North Carolina First Family Fashions,” a series of period 
rooms, and transportation. 

The “North Carolina First Family Fashions” exhibit consists of six period 
settings in which gowns worn by many of North Carolina’s first ladies are 
displayed. A Federal setting houses an empire gown thought to have been 
worn by Mrs. Richard Caswell (Sarah Heritage), whose husband was the 
first governor of the independent state of North Carolina. Gowns worn by 
Mrs. David S. Reid and Mrs. William W. Holden are displayed in an 1850 




Above, a dentist’s and a doctor’s office 
from the 1920s; left, inaugural gowns of 
four of the governors’ wives. These are two 
of several new exhibits in the Museum of 
History. (Photographs by Division of Ar¬ 
chives and History.) 









parlor. A sunporch with wicker furnishings and plants provides the back¬ 
ground for gowns belonging to Mrs. William W. Kitchen, Mrs. Locke Craig, 
Mrs. Cameron Morrison, Mrs. Angus W. McLean, and Mrs. 0. Max Gardner. 
In the 1940s deep-colored walls and floral carpets were the rage, and grouped 
in a living room of the period are gowns worn by Mrs. J. C. B. Ehringhaus, 
Mrs. Clyde R. Hoey, and Mrs. J. Melville Broughton. “Early American” was 
the “in” decor for many during the 1950s. A pine-paneled den provides the 
background for gowns worn by Mrs. W. Kerr Scott, Mrs. William B. 
Umstead, and Mrs. Luther H. Hodges. A contemporary setting in off-white 
with chrome and walnut accents houses gowns that belonged to Mrs. Terry 
Sanford, Mrs. Dan K. Moore, Mrs. Robert W. Scott, and Mrs. James E. 
Holshouser, Jr. 

In the center of the mezzanine are eight period rooms. A dentist’s office 
and a doctor’s office display medical equipment of the mid-1920s. The 
museum’s collection of early photographic artifacts are on display in a re¬ 
creation of an early twentieth century photographer’s studio. The visitor, by 
looking through the large view camera, can see the same image as the photo¬ 
grapher. An 1840 sheathed room from a Moore County log house exhibits an 
unusually well-detailed mantel with overmantel. The William Waldo Dodge, 
Jr., silver shop and display room reflect the quaint architecture of Biltmore 
Forest. Displayed in these two rooms are several pieces of silver made by 
Dodge along with custom-made tools and furnishings from his shop. North 
Carolina’s long history of furniture making is suggested by an early carpen¬ 
ter shop. Here, an array of hand tools can be seen; especially noteworthy are 
the numerous molding planes. Two shop windows, one showing examples 
from the museum’s toy collection and the other displaying tobacco products, 
complete the center exhibit grouping. 

On display in the transportation section of the mezzanine are various types 
of vehicles: two coaches, a buggy, a “Conestoga” wagon, and a 1903 auto¬ 
mobile made by Mr. Gilbert S. Waters of New Bern. The earlier of the two 
coaches is thought to have belonged to Governor Samuel Johnston and will 
be added when the restoration has been completed. 

At the rear of the mezzanine, two windows overlook the Executive Mansion 
and provide one of the best views available. A panel, located in the area, pro¬ 
vides a brief history and description of the mansion. 

With the opening of the mezzanine, the initial installation of exhibits in 
the new galleries of the North Carolina Museum of History is complete. 

Southeastern Museums Conference to be Held in Raleigh 

The Southeastern Museums Conference will meet in Raleigh October 17- 
20. The conference, which is a regional meeting of the American Association 
of Museums, includes representatives from thirteen states. The North Caro¬ 
lina Museum of History will serve as the host group, assisted by the North 
Carolina Museum of Art, the Ackland Museum, and the North Carolina 
Museum of Natural History. The council of the Southeastern Museums Con¬ 
ference has authorized attendance by individuals interested in the museums 
field upon payment of the registration fee. Interested persons should contact 
Mrs. Mae Wood Bell, Rocky Mount Children’s Museum, Rocky Mount, North 
Carolina, for additional information and preregistration forms. 


90 


CAROI.ISA COMMENTS 


The tentative schedule includes registration and a keynote speech on Octo¬ 
ber 17 in the auditorium of the North Carolina Museum of History and the 
North Carolina Awards Dinner at the Sir Walter Hotel at 8:00 that evening. 
The next day will be devoted to workshops and tours, a reception and banquet 
at the Sir Walter from 6:30 to 9:00, and informal discussion groups at 9:30 
p.M. On October 19 the American Association of Museums National Museum 
Act seminar is scheduled. The keynote address, “Museums and the Bicenten¬ 
nial,” will be delivered by Oscar Handlin of Harvard University. Optional 
tours will be arranged for Saturday, October 20. 


Reed Gold 


Mine Development Begun 



Development of the Reed 
Gold Mine as a state historic 
site was begun during the 
summer with the partial 
opening of the underground 
adits and the appointment 
of a site manager. 

Geological Resources, 

Inc., of Raleigh, under con¬ 
tract with the Division of 
Archives and History, open¬ 
ed a portion of the Linker 
Adit on the west side of Up¬ 
per Hill. Although extensive 
work will be required before 
public access is allowed 
deeper into the mine, visi¬ 
tors will be able to walk into 
the mouth of the tunnel. It 
is hoped that the more diffi¬ 
cult task of opening deeper 
portions of the mine will 
begin in the fall or winter. 

Appointed as site man¬ 
ager effective July 9 was 
George W. Stinagle, who 
worked during the summer 

with Dr. Richard F. Knapp |_mk e r Adit, June 6, 1973. (Photograph by H. G. Jones.) 
on the history of gold min¬ 
ing. Mr. Stinagle, a former officer in the Marine Corps, was a teaching fellow 
at East Carolina University where he received his master’s degree in history. 


Town Creek Date Pushed Back 

“During the first half of the sixteenth century, Indian migrants from the 
South replaced the Siouan-speaking tribes in the upper Pee Dee basin,” says 
the first sentence of the Division of Archives and History’s informational 
leaflet on the Town Creek Indian Mound State Historic Site. 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 5, SEPTEMBER, 1973 


91 





Now, however, the migration to the Pee Dee has been moved back about a 
hundred years—to roughly the middle of the fifteenth century. 

This was one of the interesting facts revealed recently by Dr. Joffre L. Coe. 
director of the Research Laboratories of Anthropology at UNC-CH, who has 
continued to study the Pee Dee group over the past several decades. 

Another instance of the value of history and archaeology—the continued 
broadening of man’s knowledge of his past. 

Properties Are Entered on National Register 

Additions to the National Register since the last report, published in the 
July issue of Carolina Comments, include Magnolia Place and Tate House in 
Burke County; Magnolia Place in Caldwell County; Caswell County Court¬ 
house, Warren House and Store in Caswell County; Andrews Mound in 
Cherokee County; Stagville in Durham County; Oakland and William R. 
Davie House in Halifax County; Farmville Plantation in Iredell County; 
Fort Branch in Martin County; Governors Island in Swain County; and 
Estey Hall, Crabtree Jones House and Peace College Main Building in Wake 
County. Several of these significant historic sites are pictured here and on 
the next page. 


Left, Magnolia, Morganton, Burke County (photograph by Tony Vaughn); right, Stagville, 
Durham County (photograph by Catherine Cockshutt). 


Left, Caswell County Courthouse, Yanceyville (photograph by Tony P. Wrenn, 1969); right, 
Warren House, Prospect Hill, Caswell County (photograph by Randall Page). 


92 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 





















Left, Oakland, Halifax County; right, Elmwood Plantation, Iredell County (photographs by 
Randall Page). 



Left, Crabtree Jones House, Raleigh, Wake County; right, Peace College Main Building 
(photographs by Randall Page). 



Left to right, Warren Store, Warren County (photograph by Tony Wrenn); Fort Branch, 
Martin County (photograph by H. G. Jones); William R. Davie House, Halifax County (photo¬ 
graph by S. C. Schwartz). 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 5, SEPTEMBER. 1973 


93 

























Museum of History Sponsors Program 

In July the North Carolina Museum of History presented a series of pro¬ 
grams on “The Architectural Heritage of North Carolina,” a continuation of 
its series entitled “Month of Sundays.” On July 1 Greer Suttlemyre, survey 
specialist, discussed “The Architecture of Western North Carolina”; on July 
5 Catherine Cockshutt, survey supervisor, spoke on “Great Plantations of 
North Carolina”; on July 8 Ruth Little-Stokes, survey specialist, took as her 
topic “Building for the Climate: Architecture before Air Conditioning”; on 
July 22 John G. Zehmer, Jr., chief, Historic Sites and Museums Section, dis¬ 
cussed “The European Background of North Carolina Architecture: Part I, 
Federal and Greek Revival”; and on July 29 Bruce MacDougal, head, Re¬ 
search, Restoration, and Survey Branch, discussed “The European Back¬ 
ground of North Carolina Architecture: Part II, The Romantic Styles.” All 
programs were presented in the auditorium of the Archives and History— 
State Library Building. 

Museum Workshop Held at Quail Roost 

The North Carolina Museums Council sponsored a two-day workshop for 
museum directors and representatives from their governing boards August 
1-3. Topics discussed were fund raising, grants, and museum-related law. 
Because a limited amount of grant money is received by North Carolina 
institutions, speakers discussed ways of correcting this deficiency. Kyran 
McGrath, director of the American Association of Museums, outlined sources 
of federal grants and answered questions on the topic. Representatives from 
North Carolina granting agencies—Jim Noel, executive director of the North 
Carolina Committee for Continuing Education in the Humanities; Dale H. 
Gramley, executive director of the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation; and 
Edgar Marston, director of the North Carolina Arts Council—also partici¬ 
pated in the session. 

Russell I. Peithman, director of the Charlotte Nature Museum, who 
attended the American Law Institute-American Bar Association Course of 
Study on Legal Problems of Museum Administration, and Kyran McGrath 
served as cochairmen of the session on legal problems. They discussed poli¬ 
cies governing the acquisition of objects, problems of museum acquisition, 
laws and policy, protection of the museum against liabilities, tax deductions 
for donations, and other related matters. Because the format was informal 
and designed so that participants could ask questions freely, a small group 
was in attendance. Quail Roost Conference Center, which accommodates a 
maximum of forty people, was selected as the meeting place. An invitation 
to attend the workshop was extended to directors and trustees of all North 
Carolina museums. 

Vance Birthplace Artifacts on Exhibit 

A number of mountain artifacts from the Vance Birthplace State Historic 
Site’s traveling exhibit were on display during the summer in the Appala¬ 
chian Room of the Appalachian State University Library in Boone. The 
exhibit was arranged by Dr. A1 Corum, dean of learning resources at Appa¬ 
lachian. Robert 0. Conway is site manager at Vance Birthplace. 


94 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Aid for Colonial Records 


Mrs. Grace J. Rohrer, secretary of cul¬ 
tural resources, on June 13 accepted from 
Smith Bagley, president of the Z. Smith 
Reynolds Foundation, Inc., a check for 
$12,000 to assist the Division of Archives 
and History in its document-copying pro¬ 
gram in England. A similar amount will be 
available next fiscal year as a part of a 
total $24,000 grant. 

Archives and History Issues New Publications 

Volume V of The Papers of William Alexander Graham, edited by J. G. de 
Roulhac Hamilton and Max R. Williams, was published May 30. Preliminary 
work on this volume was done before the death of Dr. Hamilton, but editing 
was completed by Dr. Williams, professor of history at Western Carolina 
University who will edit additional volumes in the series. Volume V, which 
covers the years 1857-1863, is priced at $15.00. 

Volume IV of North Carolina Troops, 1861-1865: A Roster was published 
on June 22. The volume contains rosters and unit histories for the Fourth 
through the Eighth Regiments of North Carolina State Troops (infantry) 
and the names and service records for approximately 9,000 men. It was edited 
by Weymouth T. Jordan, Jr. The fourth volume of the Roster is priced at 
$12.00. In the June issue of Civil War Times Illustrated, Dr. James I. 
Robertson, Jr., referred to the Roster project, saying, “Scholars who have 
already used the North Carolina compilation are unanimous in acclaiming 
it to be the finest state roster ever produced. It could have even more illus¬ 
trious value if it were to spark similar undertakings by states who have 
neglected thousands of yesteryear’s heroes.” 

The first revision of the department’s recent Guide to County Records in 
the North Carolina State Archives, issued in 1972, has been published. 
Twenty-five pages update the holdings of county records in the State 
Archives. The revised pages are numbered so that holders of the 1972 edition 
can remove the outdated pages and insert new ones. The revision is available 
for 50 cents. 

A new 17-page pamphlet, North Carolina Courts of Law and Equity Prior 
to 1868, has been published as Archives Information Circular Number 9. 
Purpose of the circular, which was prepared by George Stevenson and Mrs. 
Ruby D. Arnold, is to provide researchers with information which will assist 
them in locating, using, and interpreting records of the six kinds of county 
courts and the eleven kinds of higher courts which existed in North Carolina 
between the dates 1670 and 1868. An appendix naming the counties and 
showing what higher courts of law had jurisdiction over each county is in¬ 
cluded. Price of the circular is 25 cents per copy. 

A handsome new color brochure on the Tryon Palace Restoration Complex 
is now available upon request from the palace office at Box 1007, New Bern. 

The other new publications may be ordered by addressing the Historical 
Publications Section of the Division of Archives and History at 109 East 
Jones Street, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27611. 



VOLUME XXL NUMBER 5. SEPTEMBER, 1973 


95 




Records Are Microfilmed, Accessioned, Transferred 

The Central Microfilm Unit of the State Records Branch has microfilmed 
plans and blueprints of patented materials in the Reginald Fessenden Papers 
for security purposes; included are Fessenden’s works on wireless and teleg¬ 
raphy. Over 530 microfilm images were filmed on the project. 

Between the first of March and the end of May the Archives Branch enter¬ 
ed 78 new accessions, including: 7 Fibredex boxes plus 2 reels of microfilm 
from Archives and History; 14 cubic feet of records from the State Library; 
14 cubic feet from the attorney general (opinions and non-opinions for state 
officials); 31 Conservation and Development scrapbooks; 9 cubic feet of 
Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission records; 11 cubic feet of records 
from the Board of Correction and Training; 10 cubic feet from the Board of 
Elections; 26 cubic feet of Highway Commission records; 66 cubic feet of 
auditor’s records; 16 cubic feet from the Local Government Commission; 
and 24 cubic feet of records from the Board of Paroles. Microfilm from the 
secretary of state and General Assembly and small groups of records from 
the Governor’s Inaugural Committee, Governor Morehead School, Depart¬ 
ment of Agriculture, and the Department of Juvenile Corrections were also 
accessioned. Additionally, the Local Records Branch transferred to the State 
Archives several valuable collections from Yancey, Pasquotank, Henderson, 
Yadkin (45 marriage bonds and 54 Fibredex boxes of estate papers), Hay¬ 
wood (includes 16 marriage bonds), Cumberland, and Warren (a volume of 
Lists of Taxables) counties. Some of these records are original and some are 
microfilm. 

The Local Records Branch also transferred microfilmed church records 
from Pasquotank County; original church records were received from vari¬ 
ous donors from Orange, Davie, Robeson, Johnston, and Caswell counties. 
Phase II microfilming is under way in Buncombe, Randolph, and Robeson 
counties; work has been completed in thirty-nine counties. While Phase II 
microfilming is being done, churches in the counties are urged to have their 
records of value microfilmed for security. Minutes, registers, and other rec¬ 
ords of historical value are microfilmed without charge to churches involved. 
Microfilm of these records is placed in security storage and is available for 
duplication at a small cost should the original records be destroyed or lost. 

Nine private collections were accessioned, including two groups of account 
books. The Dr. J. Edward Smoot Collection contains Cabarrus County his¬ 
tory and photographs which were accumulated when Dr. Smoot was working 
on a history of the county. Other collections include the Thaddeus Samuel 
Ferree Papers, and the William Rufus Stephenson Papers; there were addi¬ 
tions to the R. W. Scott II Collection (7 scrapbooks), the McDaniel Lewis 
Papers, the Whitmel T. Sharrock Papers, and a Josephus Daniels Letter. 

Also recently accessioned were a reel of English records (Admiralty 
Office); 41 reels of tape recordings; cemetery records from Beaufort, Ran¬ 
dolph, and Pender counties; 43 reels of microfilmed newspapers from Dunn, 
New Bern, Roxboro, and Windsor; and organization records from th° North 
Carolina State Mothers’ Association (scrapbook), North Carolina Committee 
on Patient Care (Microfiche folios), and the Sir Walter Cabinet (a cassett 
tape recording). 


96 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Old Newspapers Are Sought 

The Newspaper Microfilm Project of the Archives and Records Section 
has undertaken a survey of the newspaper resources of Harnett County. 
Readers knowing the location of copies of old newspapers published in Har¬ 
nett should contact the State Archives so that the project can borrow the 
papers and microfilm them. All copies will be promptly returned to owners, 
and full credit will be given in the published microfilm. The project has 
recently completed microfilming the Harnett County News, published weekly 
in Lillington from 1919 through 1950. Film copies will soon be available for 
public use in the Search Room. 

Additions, Activities of Staff Noted 

Dr. Thornton W. Mitchell, assistant state archivist (state records) from 
1961 to 1970 and more recently internal management consultant with the 
State Department of Administration, assumed duties August 16 as chief, 
Archives and Records Section, Division of Archives and History. He suc¬ 
ceeded Mr. C. F. W. (Fred) Coker who has been appointed an archivist in the 
National Archives in Washington. Mr. Coker had served in the State 
Archives for ten years, the last three years as head of the section (formerly 
division). 

Dr. Stephen J. Gluckman, formerly instructor at Howard University, 
joined the staff as archaeologist in June. New archaeological assistants are 
E. Lawrence Babits, who did his graduate work at the University of Mary¬ 
land, and James W. NeSmith, a graduate of the University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill. Dr. Bennie C. Keel, formerly of the Research Laboratories of 
Anthropology at UNC-CH and in the fall to join the faculty of Wright State 
University in Ohio, was a consultant to the program during the months of 
July and August. 

Mr. Dabney M. Coddington, Jr., recently joined the staff of Tryon Palace 
to give special attention to the interpretive program. 

Miss Catherine Jackson, formerly secretary to the assistant director, was 
promoted to archives and history assistant trainee in the Archives Branch 
effective August 15. 

Mr. H. Sidney Linton, formerly public information officer for Archives 
and History, resigned in July to take a position with the Carolina Power and 
Light Company. 

Mr. Bruce MacDougal, head of the Research, Restoration, and Survey 
Branch of the Historic Sites and Museums Section, attended the third 
annual conference in planning for community appearance and historic pres¬ 
ervation at Appalachian State University at Boone. The conference was 
held June 20-23. Mr. MacDougal spoke on “Preservation Programs of the 
National Park Service and the State of North Carolina” and on “The 
Methods for Conducting an Architectural Survey.” Mr. Greer Suttlemyre, 
survey specialist, also spoke twice at the conference, taking as his topics 
“Understanding North Carolina Architecture” and “Adaptive Use and 
Suitability.” 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 5, SEPTEMBER, 1973 


97 



Plans for Culture Week Progress 

North Carolina’s annual Culture Week is scheduled for November 13-17 
at the Sir Walter Hotel in Raleigh. More detailed information will be sup¬ 
plied by mail to members of participating societies. Dates for the various 
groups are as follows: 

Tuesday: Roanoke Island Historical Association and Federation of Music 
Clubs. Wednesday: Art Society and Symphony Society. Thursday: Antiq¬ 
uities Society and Museums Council. The annual reception for all societies 
will also be held on Thursday afternoon. Friday: Literary and Historical 
Association, Folklore Society, and Arts Council. Saturday: County and 
Local Historians, Poetry Society, Mayflower Society, and Historical Book 
Club. 


Additional Books Entered in Literary Competition 

The following additional books were received prior to the July 15 deadline 
for entry in the four literary competitions conducted through the North 
Carolina Literary and Historical Association by, respectively, the May¬ 
flower Society, Historical Book Club of North Carolina, Roanoke-Chowan 
Group, and the American Association of University Women: 

Mayflower: Thad Stem, Jr., The Tar Heel Press-, Ina W. Van Noppen 
and John J. Van Noppen, Western North Carolina since the Civil War-, 
Glenn Tucker, Mad Anthony Wayne and the New Nation; John Ehle, The 
Cheeses and Wines of England and France with Notes on Irish Whiskey ; 
George E. Mowry, Another Look at the Twentieth-Century South; Robert 
F. Durden, The Gray and the Black: The Confederate Debate on Emancipa¬ 
tion; Lewis Leary, William Faulkner of Yoknapatawpha County; Mary 
Snead Boger, Charlotte 23; James L. Peacock, Indonesia: An Anthropologi¬ 
cal Perspective; Carl L. Anderson, Poe in Northlight; Lionel Stevenson, 
The Pre-Raphaelite Poets; Richard O. Bates, The Gentleman from Ohio: 
An Introduction to Garfield; Meredith L. Butterton, Metric 16; Charles 
Heath, You Can Save America; Nancy and Bruce Roberts, The Governor; 
Thomas A. Spragens, Jr., The Politics of Motion: The World of Thomas 
Hobbes; Mary Lee McMillan and Ruth Dorval Jones, My Helenka; F. Roy 
Johnson, The Algonquians, Volume I, Pre-History; F. Roy Johnson, The 
Algonquians, Volume II, Histoi-y and Traditions; Horton Cooper, North 
Carolina Mountain Folklore and Miscellany; and Henry C. Bridgers, Jr., 
East Carolina Railway: Route of the Yellow-hammer. 

Sir Walter Raleigh: Helen Tucker, No Need of Glor-y; Ben Haas, Daisy 
Canfield; Fred Chappell, The Gaudy Place; Joseph L. S. Terrell, A Time of 
Music, A Time of Magic; and Guy Owen, The Flim-Flam Man and the 
Apprentice Grifter. 

Roanoke-Chowan: J. Robert Shirley, Another Window; Emily Wilson, 
Doivn Zion’s Alley; and Ronald H. Bayes, The Casketmaker. 

American Association of University Women: Barbara M. Parramore, 
The People of North Carolina and Barbara M. Parramore, The People of 
North Carolina, Teacher’s Resource Guide. 

Awards to the winners will be made during the annual meeting of the 
association on November 16 in Raleigh. 


98 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Magazine Features Milton 

Southern Antiques and Interiors, published at High Point, began its 
second year with an extensive article on the town of Milton in Caswell County 
and a new series of “Southern States’ Reports” in which historic preserva¬ 
tion activity throughout the South is reviewed. Ruth Little-Stokes of the 
Survey Unit in Archives and History wrote the 14-page illustrated Milton 
article titled “Paradise Lost.” 

The magazine, “dedicated to the preservation of our southern heritage,” 
is published quarterly by the Southern Antiques Society at P.O. Box 26, 
High Point, 27261. Annual membership is $8.00. 

Society Promotes Historical Archaeology 

Historians will be interested in the Society for Historical Archaeology, 
now in its sixth year, which has among its aims the promotion of “scholarly 
research in, and the dissemination of knowledge concerning historical 
archaeology,” particularly in the era since the beginning of explorations of 
the non-European world. 

The society invites into membership both professionals and interested lay¬ 
men who share its interest in history as it emerges from archaeological 
research and the study of written records. Membership fees for individuals 
are $7.50 per year, including the annual journal, Historical Archaeology, 
and the quarterly Newsletter. Applications may be sent to Roderick Sprague, 
secretary-treasurer, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University 
of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho, 83843. 

Bicentennial Plans Are Announced 

The North Carolina American Revolution Bicentennial Committee has 
announced several plans for future months. Under the direction of Mrs. 
Dabney Enderle, the unit “is committed to preserving the best of the past 
and pursuing the best for the future.” Several plans are being proposed, 
including the construction of a Bicentennial Plaza in Raleigh; construction 
of a “culture barge” which will tour the North Carolina coast with a library, 
historical displays, musical programs, and other events; encouragement of 
outdoor dramas on the lower Cape Fear River and at Snow Camp; celebra¬ 
tion of the First Provincial Congress in New Bern—it is hoped with a visit 
from Queen Elizabeth of England and the British ambassador; rewriting 
the state history curriculum for proposed use in the eighth and ninth grades 
to make the history unit attractive; initiation of statewide bicentennial 
debates, with winners participating in the finals in Williamsburg in 1974; 
the establishment of bicentennial committees in high schools; production of 
a training film for the North Carolina Bicentennial Committee and one 
entitled Revolution which will contrast the concept of revolution in 1976 
with that of 1776; production of a tourist map of historic sites and trails; 
and publication of an almanac of contemporary affairs, which will catalog 
contributions made by minority groups. 

The Bicentennial Committee has employed several area coordinators who 
will assist in implementing city and county bicentennial plans and who will 
act as liaison field representatives. Eddie Barham is area coordinator for 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 5, SEPTEMBER, 1973 


99 


the northeastern part of the state; Larry Tise is coordinator for the north¬ 
western section; Denise Brown has responsibility for the southeastern part 
of the state; and a fourth coordinator for the southwestern counties will be 
named shortly. Other new members of the staff include Mrs. Patricia B. 
Moss, assistant, who is working on educational projects in connection with 
the bicentennial, including the rewriting of the history curriculum; Mrs. 
Liz Fentress, media director, who is setting up promotional programs and 
publications to increase public awareness of the bicentennial; Martha White, 
field operations secretary; and Carol O’Brien, secretary to the director. 


Colleges and Universities 

Campbell College 

Dr. Anne T. Moore and Dr. Vernon O. Stumpf were promoted to the rank 
of professor of history, effective June 1. 

East Carolina University 

Dr. William H. Cobb published an article, “From Utopian Isolation to 
Radical Activism—Commonwealth College, 1925-1935,” in the Arkansas 
Historical Quarterly, Summer, 1973. Dr. Loren K. Campion presented a 
paper, “Twentieth Century Britain—From World’s Banker to Europe’s 
Needy Relative,” at the East Carolina University European Area Studies 
Symposium, held in Greenville on March 29. 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Mr. William S. Powell, former curator of the North Carolina Collection, 
joined the faculty of the Department of History as professor, effective Au¬ 
gust 1. 


State, County, and Local Groups 

Anson County Historical Society 

John J. Dunlap of Wadesboro was elected president of the society at a 
special meeting of the board of directors on May 10. He succeeds R. V. Liles. 
Bennett M. Edwards was named a member of the society’s board of directors. 

Archaeological Society of North Carolina 

The Archaeological Society of North Carolina held its summer meeting 
on August 4 at Warren Wilson College at Swannanoa and heard reports on 
two mountain projects. 

Main speakers were Dr. Harvard Ayers, Appalachian State University, 
on “Archaeological Field School of the Watauga,” and Dr. Joffre L. Coe, 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, on “Excavations at Warren 
Wilson.” Slides of the latter project were shown by Trawick Ward of Warren 
Wilson College. 

The society, of which Charles M. Carey is president, welcomes into mem- 


100 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


bership citizens interested in the preservation of archaeological resources. 
Dues of $3.00 per person may be mailed to the society at Box 561, Chapel 
Hill, 27514. A quarterly newsletter is issued by Larry Clark, editor. 



Pictured left to right at the meeting of the Archaeological Society of North Carolina are 
Charles M. Carey, president, and Dr. Joffre L. Coe, director of the Research Laboratories of 
Anthropology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, executive secretary of the 
group. Behind them may be seen a portion of the excavations of the prehistoric archaeolog¬ 
ical site on the grounds of Warren Wilson College. (Photo by H. G. Jones.) 

Bertie County Historical Association 

The association held its annual spring meeting at the Cashie Baptist 
Church Fellowship Hall on May 31. A slide presentation was featured; this 
was presented by E. Frank Stephenson, Jr., director of Historic Murfrees¬ 
boro. He discussed plans and progress of the $5 million restoration project 
there. Approximately 2,000 people have visited Bertie County since last 
October with the purpose of visiting historic sites, most of the visitors going 
to see Historic Hope. 

Brunswick County Historical Society 

At a May meeting of the society, held in Shallotte, a Civil War program 
was conducted by R. G. Hobbs, Sr., and R. G. Hobbs, Jr., of Delco. They dis¬ 
played a Georgia Confederate uniform and other Civil War artifacts. 

Catawba County Historical Association 

A dedicatory service was held June 17 on N.C. 16 north of Conover for the 
purpose of unveiling a highway historical marker to note the founding of St. 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 5, SEPTEMBER, 1973 


101 






John’s Lutheran Church. Mrs. Rome Jones, president of the Catawba County 
association, and Judge Wilson Warlick were among the speakers. 

Currituck County Historical Society 

Announcement has been made by Mrs. John R. Wright, Jr., of the avail¬ 
ability of The Journal of the Currituck County Historical Society. The new 
publication contains a number of original drawings, accounts of historical 
events in the county, and numerous photographs. A brief history of the 
county by President S. Curtis Gray, Jr., is included in the preface to the 
volume. Two features are “The History of Medicine in Currituck County,” 
by Dr. Charles N. Wright, and “The History of Market Shooting in Currituck 
County,” by E. 0. Baum. 

Duplin County Historical Society 

The society met July 14 with Dr. Dallas Herring, chairman of the State 
Board of Education, as speaker. Plans were discussed concerning an effort 
to mark the site of the Battle of Rockfish, the only battle of the Revolutionary 
War which was fought in Duplin County. The site is on the outskirts of 
Wallace. Presiding at the Saturday meeting was Mrs. Wayne Jordan, 
president. 

Eastern Cabarrus County Historical Society 

A new historical society was organized June 10 for the purpose of saving 
and restoring the Mt. Pleasant Collegiate Institute. One of many college 
buildings built in Mt. Pleasant before the turn of the century still stands. 
Though the building is intact, it will require extensive renovation before it 
can safely be used as a museum or a historic site. The meeting, called by Dr. 
Archie Barringer, was held at the Mt. Pleasant Community Hut. 

Eastern North Carolina Genealogical Society 

The society, which was organized in the spring of 1972, opens its member¬ 
ship to any person interested in genealogy. Meetings are held the third 
Monday of each month at 7:30 at the Craven Technical Institute, Racetrack 
Road, New Bern. Officers for 1972 include Ray Prescott of Farmville, presi¬ 
dent; David R. Taylor of Havelock, first vice-president; Mrs. Michael Morrow 
of Jacksonville, second vice-president; Mrs. Fred H. Whitty of New Bern, 
secretary-treasurer; Mrs. Ray Prescott of Farmville, corresponding secre¬ 
tary; and Mrs. James Wight of New Bern, historian-librarian. 

Granville County Historical Society 

The society, in cooperation with the John Penn Chapter, Daughters of the 
American Revolution, and the Granville County Bicentennial Committee, 
sponsored a July 4 celebration at the Granville County courthouse in Oxford. 
Thad Stem, Jr., chairman of the Granville Bicentennial Committee, noted 
that the courthouse was dedicated July 4, 1838. A portion of the Declaration 
of Independence was read by Claude A. Renn, president of the Granville 
County Historical Society. Dr. Ralph Hardee Rives of Enfield and Greenville 


102 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


addressed the group on the life of John Penn, who was one of the three signers 
of the Declaration of Independence from North Carolina. Mrs. C. G. Royster 
of Bullock, regent of the John Penn Chapter, DAR, presented to Mrs. John 
Blount McLeod, regent of the North Carolina Society, DAR, a signature of 
John Penn for the DAR Archives in Washington, D.C. It will be placed with 
the signatures of William Hooper and Joseph Hewes, the other signers from 
North Carolina. 

The Granville County Historical Society met the afternoon of June 23 and 
at that time approved a proposal that a guide map to historical points be 
prepared and published. Mrs. Royster was named chairman of the committee 
to proceed with the undertaking. 

Hillsborough Historical Society 

Society members recently celebrated the burning of the mortgage on the 
Nash Law Office on West Margaret Lane. The office is owned by the society 
and is now occupied by Alexander Shepherd, president. Repairs are being 
made to the exterior, and the interior is being repainted. The society is oper¬ 
ating an office in the old courthouse from June to October on Saturdays, 
Sundays, and Mondays. Visitors are urged to obtain information from the 
office about Hillsborough and its historical advantages. 

Historic Richmond Hill Law School Commission 

The commission met June 10 to discuss the budget for fiscal year 1974, a 
caretaker, park development, and other business matters. On May 27 the 
commission learned that Brig. Gen. Hayne D. Boyden, heir to the estate of 
Thomas and Marjorie Pearson, the son and daughter of Richmond M. Pear¬ 
son, Jr., had donated a portrait of Chief Justice Richmond M. Pearson to the 
commission. The portrait will be located in the history room of the Yadkin 
Public Library in Yadkinville until Richmond Hill is restored. The charcoal 
portrait was painted around 1870 by “Thomas” of New York. 

Historic Robeson 

The fund drive of Historic Robeson to restore the old E. K. Proctor Law 
Office and establish it as a county museum has attracted widespread atten¬ 
tion. Joseph Mitchell, a writer with the New Yorker, donated $50.00 to the 
cause. His gift was matched by the Pine Needles Garden Club. Historic 
Robeson is seeking $20,000 for its project; donations may be sent to A1 
Sharpe at the Robesonian. 

Historic Stanly Commission 

J. C. Holbrook was elected chairman of the Historic Stanly Commission; 
E. H. Morton, Jr., was named vice-chairman; Mrs. Reade Pickier, secretary; 
and Mrs. Windell Talley, treasurer. The commission heard James B. Lloyd, 
chairman of the Rowan County Historic Properties Commission, discuss his 
commission’s work. Mr. Lloyd outlined steps which need to be taken in order 
to designate historic sites. The commission was recently appointed and given 
the responsibility of designating historic properties within Stanly County 
and taking steps to preserve those properties if possible. 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 5, SEPTEMBER, 1973 


103 


Historic Winston, Incorporated 

Despite some opposition because of plans to use the building as the city- 
county library system’s administrative offices, Historic Winston, Inc., re¬ 
ceived permission from the Forsyth County commissioners to set up a 
museum in a portion of the Bahnson House. The county recently acquired 
the house and plans to remodel it. 

Hyde County Historical Society 

The annual meeting of the society was held on February 25 in New 
Holland. Mrs. Millie Andrews reported on the displays at the East Carolina 
Bank, where one case is filled with items given to the historical society. Mrs. 
Retta Neal read several of her poems, and Mrs. Exiededell Blake read a 
poem, “On Lake Drainage,” which was written by her father in 1918. The 
suggestion was made that members begin making an effort to locate local 
poetry which could be collected and printed. Mrs. Marina Baum planned the 
program. Dues in the society are $3.00 or a contribution to the historical 
society; they may be sent to the Hyde County Historical Society, Post Office 
Box 85, Fairfield, North Carolina, 27826. 

Lenoir County Historical Association 

At a dinner session held on May 17 a committee was appointed to investi¬ 
gate the possibility of obtaining and restoring an old rural school in Lenoir 
County. Reginald Stroud, president, named Talbot Capps and Henry Bullock 
cochairmen of the committee to report on the project to the board of directors. 
Guest speaker at the meeting was Robert Winters, founder of the Southern 
Antiques Society and publisher of the Southern Antiques and Interiors. R. L. 
Hood, John T. Capps, and Miriam Maynard were elected to the association’s 
board of directors. On May 19 members visited restored buildings in Bertie 
and Washington counties; of particular interest was a tour of Hope 
Plantation. 

Littleton College Memorial Association 

Approximately eighty-five members and guests met on July 14 at North 
Carolina Wesleyan College in Rocky Mount. Featured speaker was Mrs. 
Lilian Bridges Rhodes Alberti, of St. Louis, Missouri, a daughter of the late 
president of the college. She reminisced about her parents and early life in 
the town of Littleton. Memorabilia associated with the former college were 
on display for the occasion. 

Mecklenburg Historical Association 

A dinner meeting was held May 21 at the Philadelphia Presbyterian 
Church in Mint Hill. Hector MacLean was the featured speaker. 

Moravian Music Foundation 

The foundation received word in January that it had received a three-year 
grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to continue its 
cataloging of early manuscript and printed music in its custody. The $220,675 


104 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


grant began April 1 and runs to March 31, 1976; matching funds were pro¬ 
vided by the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation and the Mary Reynolds Babcock 
Foundation. 

Nash County Historical Association 

The association met May 19 to tour a portion of Nash County. The group 
left from Stonewall, often called the Lewis Place, which is now headquarters 
for the Nash County Historical Association. Tour directors were Dr. Marga¬ 
ret Battle, Billy Diehl, and T. E. Ricks, president of the association. Other 
sites visited included Tar Primitive Baptist Church, the Arthur Shearin 
House, the Cornwallis Camp Site on Stony Creek, the Griffin-Sessons-Cooper 
House, the Dr. Matthews House at Matthews Crossroads, Rose Hill, and the 
Billy Lew Arrington House. 

Person County Historical Society 

The society sponsored a campaign to preserve and restore McGehee’s Mill, 
one of the county’s oldest landmarks. Located on the Hyco River, it dates 
back to the late 1700s. Mrs. Bruce Eaker, president of the Person County 
group, reported that sufficient funds had been raised to move the mill intact 
to a temporary location on a nearby hill, thereby saving the structure from 
flood waters of an after-bay to be built by Carolina Power and Light 
Company. 

Pitt County Historical Society 

The society met May 24 to hear a discussion of early land transactions in 
Pitt County. Harold Creech, executive director of the Greenville Merchants 
Association, was the speaker. 

Rutherford County Historical Society 

Drs. John and Ina Van Noppen discussed some of the background work 
done in preparing their book, Western North Carolina since the Civil War, 
when they spoke to the May 22 meeting of the Rutherford County Historical 
Society. Sam Thomas of Forest City was elected president of the society for 
1973-1974; Kenyon Withrow of Hollis, vice-president; and Mrs. Baxter 
Doggett of Forest City, treasurer. New directors are Worth Bland of Ruther- 
fordton, Miss Joan Goforth of Rutherfordton, and Mrs. F. I. Barber, Sr., of 
Forest City. Mrs. Claude Lieurance of Rutherfordton will continue as secre¬ 
tary. Outgoing president is Ben H. Sumner of Rutherfordton. 

Snow Camp Historical Drama Society 

The society sponsored the 1973 Randolph County Wagon Train May 25-27 
at Pleasant Hill Christian Church Recreational Park in southern Alamance 
County. Wagons began arriving Friday afternoon and trains were formed 

I Saturday and Sunday mornings. Lunch was served on the trail. Interested 
persons were invited to join the train by wagon, horseback, or walking; no 
motorized vehicles were permitted. Wagon masters were Arnold Kirkman 
and Cecil and Carol Kinney, all from the Asheboro area. Proceeds are to be 
used for the building fund for William Hardy’s outdoor drama, The Sword of 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 5. SEPTEMBER, 1973 


105 




Peace, which is being produced at Snow Camp. In conjunction with the 
wagon train, a flea market was held at the camp. 

Surry County Historical Society 

An illustrated lecture was given by Mrs. David Welker of the Museum of 
Early Southern Decorative Arts on May 27 at Surry Community College. 
Mrs. Welker spoke on “North Carolina Furniture of the Piedmont.” The 
society recently compiled a list of thirty-seven places of historical interest in 
Surry County. 

Unifour Archaeological Society 

The new archaeological society was recently organized by a group of 
hobbyists and amateur archaeologists under the sponsorship of the Cultural 
Arts Commission of the Western Piedmont Council of Governments. Chair¬ 
man of the society is Larry Clark of Morganton. Charles Carey of Morganton 
is program chairman; Tom Stine of Hickory, treasurer; and Janie Shipley 
of Taylorsville, publicity chairman. The society “is dedicated to studying 
prehistoric and early historic data in this region....” 

Wake County Historical Society 

Richard L. Rice, Raleigh architect, has been elected president of the Wake 
County Historical Society to succeed J. Bourke Bilisoly. Other officers 
elected at the June 3 meeting are Mrs. Charles Silver, vice-president; Mrs. 
Henri Dawkins, recording secretary; Mrs. M. F. Coxe, corresponding secre¬ 
tary; and Mrs. Allen Langston, treasurer. New board members are Mrs. 
Frank Kennedy, Mrs. W. C. Pierson, and L. C. Liles, Jr. Nearly a hundred 
members and guests of the society met at the town of Holly Springs in south¬ 
western Wake County for a tour of historic places there on June 3. A high¬ 
light of the tour was the visit to the Leslie-Alford-Mims House, built in the 
early 1800s. This meeting of the society concluded a series of meetings held 
in various towns throughout the county during the preceding months. Mr. 
Rice announced that Ron Holland would serve as editor of Wake History 
News. The society also plans to sponsor an art and photography contest in 
the high schools of Wake County and Raleigh with cash prizes for winners of 
drawings and photos of historic houses and buildings. A study committee is 
working to suggest ways of getting the society actively engaged in preserva¬ 
tion and restoration. Mr. Rice reported that the Wake County Bar Associa¬ 
tion was raising funds for the Iredell Law Office. 

On July 4 the society sponsored the eleventh annual walking tour of the 
Capitol Square area. The tour was conducted by Dr. Thornton W. Mitchell. 

Washington County Historical Society 

The society met July 5 at the Pettigrew Regional Library. Three graduate 
students, working on a special project as part of research for the Museum of 
Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, presented the program. 
Though the researchers, Doreen Bolger, Elizabeth Dahill, and Gilbert Vin¬ 
cent, are based in Edenton, they are studying the northeastern region for 


106 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


evidence of early southern craftsmen and their work. 

Western North Carolina Historical Association 

Dr. Cordelia Camp, a former member of the association who served for 
many years as its secretary-treasurer, died July 10. She joined the staff of 
Cullowhee State Normal School, now Western Carolina University, in 1927 
and was a member of the staff there for twenty-three years. Dr. Camp wrote 
The Influence of Geography upon Early North Carolina, which was published 
by the Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission; she also wrote booklets 
on Governors Zebulon B. Vance and David L. Swain. 

The association met July 28 in Brevard. Tributes to Dr. Camp were paid 
by Col. Paul Rockwell and Dr. Paul A. Reed. Miss Bobbie Jean Nicholson 
spoke on “Our Heritage”; and information relative to Brevard’s Festival of 
the Arts was presented by Mrs. Mary Jane McCrary. Persons interested in 
joining the association should send $4.00 to the treasurer, Mrs. Lewis E. 
Herron, Post Office Box 111, Lake Junaluska, 28745. 

Wilkes Historical Society 

The society met on May 21 at the Wilkes Public Library in North 
Wilkesboro. 

Yadkin County Historical Society 

Dr. Hugh T. Lefler, professor of history at the University of North Caro¬ 
lina at Chapel Hill, has donated a collection of books to the society. These 
will become part of the Hugh T. Lefler Memorial Library which is in the 
historical room of the Yadkin County Public Library. Jimmie R. Hutchens, 
director of the society, has announced that the collection will be renamed the 
Hugh T. Lefler Caroliniana Collection. Hilton Jones, who is president of the 
Yadkin society, has announced that plans are progressing for the purchase 
and moving of the Evans schoolhouse. Hubert H. Hoots of Yadkinville is 
chairman and treasurer of the schoolhouse committee, and he has secured 
an option from the owner. Purchase price for the building is $1,200. There 
are plans to put the building on the grounds at Starmount High School 
where it will be restored and preserved as a historic site. Anyone wishing 
to contribute to the project should contact Hubert H. Hoots or Jack Wishon 
at the Central Carolina Bank in Yadkinville. 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Published in January, March, May, July, September, 
and November by the Division of Archives and His¬ 
tory, Department of Cultural Resources, Archives and 
History-State Library Building, 109 East Jones 
Street, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27611. 

H. G. Jones, Editor in Chief 
Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell, Editor 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 5, SEPTEMBER. 1973 


107 



03 

c_ 

7T 

so 

9 > 

rf- 

n 


Division of Archives and History 
Department of Cultural Resources 
109 East Jones Street 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27611 





CAROLINA COMMENTS 

PUBLISHED BIMONTHLY BY THE NORTH CAROLINA 
DIVISION OF ARCHIVES AND HISTORY 


Volume XXI, Number 6 


November, 1973 


Wilmington Town Book-Original and Published Editions 

The town fathers of Wilmington kept a detailed record of the day-to-day 
activities of the municipality between the years 1743 and 1778. Such matters 
as marketing, street repair, fire protection, building regulations, and con¬ 
sumer protection came within the purview of the governing authorities. This 
book, the only known extant record of its kind, was published by the Division 
of Archives and History after being edited by Don Lennon of East Carolina 
University and Mrs. Ida Brooks Kell am of Wilmington. 

The Lower Cape Fear Historical Society, at a special meeting and recep¬ 
tion the night of September 19, honored the editors and Mrs. Memory F. 
Mitchell, chief of the Historical Publications Section, and Mrs. Mary 
Reynolds Peacock, editorial assistant who saw the book through the press. 
On that occasion the first copies of the published edition were displayed. 
Mr. Henry Jay MacMillan of Wilmington presented the original manuscript 
copy of the Wilmington Town Book to Mrs. Mitchell for the State Archives. 



A page of the original Wilmington Town Book and the published edition were photo¬ 
graphed by Charles Clark of the Division of Archives and History. (All photographs 
by division staff unless otherwise noted.) 



















Copies of the published edition are available for $10.00 each and may be 
ordered from the Historical Publications Section, Division of Archives and 
History, Department of Cultural Resources, 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, 
27611. 


Slate Seal Used in Search Room 



The State Seal pictured above was executed by Dr. W. Dallas Herring of Rose Hill. Dr. 
Herring made the seal for the Archives Search Room where it now hangs. 


Archives Issues New Leaflet 

A new leaflet, Private Papers in the North Carolina Archives, issued by 
the Archives and Records Section, is an invitation to the public to deposit in 
the State Archives family papers of historical interest. The who, when, what, 
and how of giving and using private collections are explained. A free copy 
may be obtained upon request. 

Archives Has Exhibit in Asheville 



The traveling exhibit pictured above, entitled "North Carolina and the Federal Constitu¬ 
tion,” was executed by Mr. George Stevenson of the Archives and Records Section and 
Mr. William Frick of the Historic Sites and Museums Section. The exhibit is currently on 
display at Pack Memorial Public Library in Asheville. 


110 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 












Culture Week—A Reminder 

Programs were mailed to members of Culture Week societies, but a re¬ 
minder of the dates November 13-17 is in order. The Society for the Preser¬ 
vation of Antiquities is scheduled for November 15, and the Literary and 
Historical Association meetings will be held the following day. The Sir 
Walter Raleigh, Mayflower, and Christopher Crittenden awards will be 
presented on Friday evening following Mr. Archie K. Davis’s address, “The 
Veil of Humility.” 

Records Are Accessioned, Filmed 

During the months of June through August a total of 73 items were acces¬ 
sioned in the Archives Branch. These include the following: 

The Local Records Section transferred 15 Fibredex boxes of Cumberland 
County wills; 128 boxes of Wayne County civil and criminal action papers; 79 
boxes of Alexander County records; 78 boxes of Yadkin County records; and 
14 Wayne County marriage bonds, as well as volumes from Robeson (47), 
Randolph (89), Montgomery (18), and Buncombe (70) counties, and a single 
volume from the city of Asheville. In addition to 1 reel each of Onslow 
County tax lists and Burke County land entries, Local Records also transferred 
security negative microfilm of Davie, Wake, and Watauga county records; 
church records from Burke, Wake, and Watauga counties; and 1 reel from 
the city of Raleigh. 

State agency records transferred were: Archives and History (1969 gen¬ 
eral correspondence of the Division of Archives and Records Management 
and film of the Scuppernong Farm Project Book from the Historic Sites and 
Museums Section); 1 reel of Minutes of the Board of Education, Department 
of Public Instruction; and 1 reel of Minutes of the Board of Conservation 
and Development. 

Additions were made to several existing private collections: the Hugh 
Morson, Samuel A. Ashe, W. Kerr Scott, Reconstruction (information re 
the murder of John W. Stephens), the Siamese Twins (a lithograph of the 
twins), Jeffrey F. Stanback, Josephus Daniels, and Heriot Clarkson papers. 
New collections included the Dr. Wiley D. Forbus manuscript, “Medicine in 
North Carolina”; the Claude Joseph Sauthier manuscript on architecture 
and maps; the Mecklenburg Iron Works Records [ca. 65 cu. ft.]; and six 
account books. 

The remainder of accessions were records of the Daniel Boone Associa¬ 
tion, Inc.; 1 volume of highway maintenance maps; a Civil War muster roll 
(Company B, Nineteenth Regiment); cemetery records from Cumberland, 
Harnett, Iredell, Mecklenburg, and Anson counties; 13 miscellaneous 
genealogies; 72 reels of the Oxford Public Ledger; and 2 additions to the 
English Records (2 reels plus 1,003 items). 

Personnel of the Local Records Branch are currently working on valuable 
collections of local records from the counties of Camden, Gates, Macon, 
Orange, and Wayne. Many of these records will be available for public use 
in the Archives Search Room within the next few weeks. 

Phase II microfilming is currently under way in Cherokee and Mont¬ 
gomery counties. Upon completion in these counties, microfilming will 
begin in Cabarrus and Richmond counties. Forty-two counties have been 
completed to date under this phase of the microfilm program. 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 8, NOVEMBER, 1978 


111 


Mezzanine Exhibits Are Open 

The mezzanine exhibits in the North Carolina Museum of History were 
officially opened on September 8, at 8:00 p.m. when four former first ladies— 
Mrs. Robert W. Scott, Mrs. Dan K. Moore, Mrs. J. Melville Broughton, 
and Mrs. J. C. B. Ehringhaus—cut the ribbon. Approximately 250 guests 
attended the ceremony and the reception which followed. 

The opening of the mezzanine completes the initial installation of ex¬ 
hibits in the North Carolina Museum of History. The exhibits are located 
on three floors in the east wing of the Archives and History-State Library 
Building. The first floor exhibits entitled “Stone Age to Space Age” show 
highlights of the state’s history arranged in chronological order. The mez¬ 
zanine depicts life in North Carolina; and the second floor exhibits, including 
two special displays tracing the development of firearms and communica¬ 
tions, are mainly concerned with items made by North Carolinians. 



Left to right, on the mezzanine balcony, are Mrs. Joye E. Jordan, assistant director of the 
Division of Archives and History; Mrs. J. Melville Broughton and Mrs. J. C. B. Ehringhaus, 
former first ladies; Mrs. Grace J. Rohrer, secretary of the Department of Cultural Resources; 
and Mrs. Robert W. Scott and Mrs. Dan K. Moore, also former first ladies. 


Museum Acquires Rare Miquelet 

The North Carolina Museum of History has acquired a rare seventeenth 
century miquelet fowling piece. The miquelet ignition system, developed 
in Spain during the middle years of the sixteenth century, is a forerunner 
of the flintlock system in firearms. Miquelets became quite popular in the 
Mediterranean countries and some extremely attractive firearms of this 



This rare Spanish miquelet was recently presented to the Museum of History. 


112 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 





type were made in both Spain and Italy. 

The museum’s new miquelet, believed to have been created for a Spanish 
nobleman, was a custom-made gun produced in Spain between 1630 and 
1680; it has a hinged, folding stock and was originally carried in a fitted 
case. The stock is cherry wood with eight-karat gold furniture while the 
ramrod tip and hinge retainers are ivory. The smooth bore is about 10- 
gauge, and the firearm is only 30 inches long. 

In the 1600s ornate guns were made for wealthy individuals by skilled 
craftsmen, and each custom-made piece is something of a work of art. This 
miquelet was donated to the North Carolina Museum of History by the heirs 
of Dr. George H. Petteway of Charlotte. 

Gold History Activities Under Way 

The Gold History Corporation, a private nonprofit group, is moving ahead 
with plans to foster interest in the history of gold in North Carolina. The 
corporation, formed in Cabarrus County, is seeking new members from all 
sections of the state. Those interested in taking part in the society’s ex¬ 
panding program should contact Mr. Harold P. Hornaday at the Gold 
History Corporation, P.O. Box 1029, Concord, 28025. 

One of the benefits of membership is the opportunity to enjoy such func¬ 
tions as the special guided tour of the Reed Gold Mine State Historic Site 
which took place October 11. On hand for this first official event at the 
famous old mine were a number of state and local dignitaries including Lt. 
Gov. James B. Hunt, Jr., Secretary of Cultural Resources Grace J. Rohrer, 
and several members of the General Assembly. Dr. H. G. Jones, director of 
the Division of Archives and History, briefed the visitors on progress and 
plans for development at the site. Then the group examined the recently 
reopened Linker Adit, which now extends more than 100 feet into the hill¬ 
side, and other prominent features at the mine. The guests also inspected 
the first major archaeological project in progress at the site; this work is 
being guided by staff members of Archives and History. 

Archaeology Section Is Established and at Work 

With the expansion of the archaeological program has come the establish¬ 
ment of a separate section of the Division of Archives and History. The 
unified and comprehensive program, which includes both land and under¬ 
water archaeology, will continue to stress historic sites archaeology but will 
will be cooperating with other archaeologists in North Carolina. 

The staff of the section includes four new members—Dr. Stephen J. 
Gluckman, chief of the section, and Messrs. L. R. Babits, J. Woods NeSmith, 
and T. Thompson, archaeological assistants—and four others. 

Archaeologists have been engaged in various research projects. Mr. 
Stuart Schwartz, in conducting excavations at the Cupola House in Edenton, 
uncovered the burial of a child in front of the house. The burial was tenta¬ 
tively identified as that of a female less than a year old. Also in front were 
a nineteenth century privy and an earlier brick foundation which is present¬ 
ly thought to be a burial chamber. Excavations in the rear of the house 
were designed to locate the remains of the kitchen and any remaining evi- 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 6, NOVEMBER, 1973 


113 


dence of the gardens, but modern construction seems to have destroyed all 
traces of these elements. 

Mr. Schwartz also worked at Halifax; excavations there were carried 
out as part of a field school in archaeology in cooperation with North Carolina 
Wesleyan University. A large and impressive colonial ruin was located and 
partially uncovered, and current plans provide for the continuation of the 
excavation of this foundation during the spring of 1974. Dr. Gluckman also 
directed an excavation project in Halifax. With the aid of six Meredith 
College students, lot 55 was explored; during the one-week dig, an eighteenth 
century foundation was partly excavated. Materials from this work will be 
analyzed and then the staff will return to Halifax to complete excavation 
of the structure. Other plans include projects at the Reed Gold Mine in 
Cabarrus County, at the original site of the Joel Lane House in Raleigh, and 
at Fort Fisher and other sites in the Lower Cape Fear area. 

Underwater projects have been the responsibility of Mr. Gordon P. Watts, 
Jr., underwater archaeologist, and Mr. Leslie Bright, preservationist. They 
continued to oversee work on several Civil War blockade-runners being con¬ 
ducted under Archives and History permit by Underwater Archaeological 
Associates, Inc., off Southport. Through issuance of a combined permit to 
the U.S.S. Monitor Foundation and Underwater Archaeological Associates, 
Inc., a search was made for the ironclad U.S.S. Monitor. The permit called 
for search of a nine-square-mile area off Buxton; several possible locations 
were recorded by divers, but nothing definitive was recovered. 

In still another project, Messrs. Watts and Bright joined scientists from 
the Duke Marine Research Laboratory and other institutions aboard the 
R. V. Eastwood in an offshore search for the Monitor. Several wrecks were 
located in depths exceeding 200 feet, but analysis of underwater video tape 
was not completed. Negative evidence relating to one of the wrecks is en¬ 
couraging in that no data indicate the wreck is not the Monitor. Analysis of 
the data will continue and plans for intensive work on the wreck will be 
carried out in the future. 



Meredith College students are shown participating in an archaeological dig at Halifax. 


114 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 



New National Register Entries Pictured 





Left, the Rudisill-Wilson House in Catawba County. The Edenton Historic District was placed 
on the National Register; above, right, is shown West Queen Street, a portion of the district. 


Two other views of the Edenton Historic District shown are the Chowan County Courthouse 
and green, left; and right, the Barker House. 


The Moore House, also now called Gwydir, is in Caswell County. Above, left, is the exterior 
of the rear of the house; right, a portion of the stair bracket and stringer ornament. (Photo¬ 
graph at right by T. P. Wrenn.) 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 6, NOVEMBER, 1973 


115 




















Liberty Row is a historic district in Fayetteville, Cumberland County. It is pictured above, 
left. The Humphrey-Williams House, right, is in Lumberton, Robeson County. 



The Dallas Historic District, Gaston County, centers on the former courthouse which is 
pictured at the left. Shown at right is the hotel at 113 Main Street in Dallas, also part of the 
historic district. 



The Pinehurst Historic District is in Moore County. At left is the Carolina Hotel; at right, 
a street scene in the historic district. 


116 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 
















Report on Archives and History Staff 

Mr. Marvin K. Rogers, museum guard, died on September 28 after a brief 
illness. He had been with Archives and History for approximately twenty- 
four years. 

Mrs. Myrle Fields joined the staff as secretary to Mrs. Joye E. Jordan, 
assistant director, September 4. In the State Records Branch of the Archives 
and Records Section, Mrs. Myrtle Hilton, steno III, joined the staff as a full¬ 
time employee in June replacing Mrs. Lois Hardee who transferred to the 
Microfilm Unit. Mr. John Hicks, clerk II, replaced Mr. Jay Dublin, who 
resigned, in the Records Center Unit in July. Mr. Robert “Joe Boy” Harris, 
clerk I, replaced Mr. Bobby McClain who resigned; this appointment, too, is 
in the Records Center Unit. Mrs. Mae Javan Beasley, clerk II, joined the 
Microfilm Unit in July. Mr. Carter Freeze, microfilm camera operator, re¬ 
signed from the Local Records Branch August 3. 

Dr. H. G. Jones, director of the Division of Archives and History, and Mr. 
John G. Zehmer, Jr., chief of the Historic Sites and Museums Section, at¬ 
tended the American Association for State and Local History in Edmonton, 
Alberta, Canada, September 18-21. Dr. Jones read a paper on “Historic Re¬ 
sources and the Human Environment.” The following week Dr. Jones pre¬ 
sided over a meeting of the State Historic Preservation Officers Policy 
Group at Mackinac Island, Michigan. 

Dr. Thornton W. Mitchell, chief, Archives and Records Section, and Mr. 
Frank D. Gatton, head, Local Records Branch, represented the Division 
of Archives and History at the annual meeting of the Society of American 
Archivists in St. Louis, Missouri, September 25-28. Mr. Gatton and Mr. 
Percy Hines attended the annual convention of the North Carolina Clerks of 
Superior Court in Pinehurst August 9. Mr. Gatton also went to the conven¬ 
tion of the North Carolina Association of County Commissioners on August 
16 and 17. 

Complementing the “Month of Sunday” series at the Museum of History, 
Ruth Little-Stokes, Greer Suttlemyre, and Catherine Cockshutt appeared on 
brief segments of the Bette Elliott television program, outlining the sub¬ 
jects of their Sunday presentation. Mrs. Cockshutt and Mr. Suttlemyre pre¬ 
sented a special program on North Carolina plantations as part of “Transi¬ 
tion,” an interdisciplinary one-year curriculum at North Carolina State 
University. To supplement the classes on pre-Civil War history, Mrs. Cock¬ 
shutt gave a slide lecture, September 13, on North Carolina plantations, 
with special emphasis on Fairntosh; the following day, Mr. Suttlemyre 
guided the students and faculty on a tour of that Durham County planta¬ 
tion and of Hillsborough sites. Mr. Suttlemyre, on August 12, presented a 
National Register Certificate at the Pleasant Grove Camp Meeting Ground 
in Union County. 

Dictionary of North Carolina Biography Being Compiled 

A reference work which promises to be of lasting value to those interested 
in North Caroliniana is now being compiled under the direction of William 
S. Powell, professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill. With the assistance of members of the Historical Society of North 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 6, NOVEMBER, 1973 


117 






Carolina and other interested persons, a list of names of several thousand 
North Carolinians from all walks of life has been compiled. Certain categories 
have been routinely included such as governors, senators, and cabinet offi¬ 
cers; also incorporated in the work are many early explorers, authors of 
distinction, leaders in education, law, religion, business, and other cate¬ 
gories. A special effort has been made to see that outstanding women and 
members of the minority races are included. No living person will be listed, 
however. 

With the Dictionary of American Biography as a model, plans have been 
laid for the preparation of concise, factual biographies of these people. To 
date around 300 people have consented to write sketches of more than 1,500 
of those listed. Several hundred names from the list still remain to be as¬ 
signed to authors. Mr. Powell is seeking the names of potential authors of 
sketches which will range from 500 to 2,000 words. He requests that anyone 
experienced in biographical research who feels qualified to contribute to 
this work write him of his or her interest. He would be especially pleased to 
have the names of those willing to undertake to write five or more sketches 
of subjects which will be assigned. Many of those remaining to be written 
are congressmen, governors, etc., for whom basic information is readily 
available. He may be addressed at the Department of History, University of 
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 27514. 

A preliminary study indicates that this work will be complete in seven 
or eight volumes, and the University of North Carolina Press has expressed 
an interest in its publication if funds to subsidize a portion of the costs are 
available. Mr. Powell is optimistic that the project will materialize as 
planned. 

Undergraduate Student Award Offered by HSNC 

The Historical Society of North Carolina is offering an annual award, to be 
presented during the meeting of the Literary and Historical Association, 
for the best research paper on North Carolina history written by an under¬ 
graduate student from an accredited North Carolina senior college or uni¬ 
versity. The paper must be written during the academic year June 1 to May 
31. 

Purposes of the award are to promote an early interest in historical re¬ 
search and to develop future historians; and “to acquaint young people with 
the work of historical societies and foster membership and continuing 
support of local and state historical societies.” 

The award consists of $50.00 in cash, a paid student membership in the 
North Carolina Literary and Historical Association for one year, and a certifi¬ 
cate. The recipient will be the guest of the Historical Society of North 
Carolina at the luncheon and dinner meetings of the association the year the 
award is presented. 

Rules require that each paper be submitted in triplicate and that each be 
accompanied by a letter from the student’s major professor attesting to the 
undergraduate status of the student and the originality of the paper. Papers 
should normally be not less than 5,000 words; they will be judged on origi¬ 
nality of topic, quality of research and style, and overall excellence. Entries 


118 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


should be sent to the secretary of the Historical Society of North Carolina, 
Dr. Durward T. Stokes, Elon College, Elon College, N. C., 27244, by June 15 
of each year. 

Miss Mary L. Thornton Dies 

Miss Thornton, librarian of the North Carolina Collection at the Uni¬ 
versity of North Carolina Library in Chapel Hill from 1917 to 1958 died 
September 27 after a long illness. She will long be remembered for her work 
in building the North Carolina Collection and for her publications, particu¬ 
larly A Bibliography of North Carolina, 1589-1956 and Official Publications 
of the Colony and State of North Carolina, 17U9-1939. 

AASLH Receives Grants 

Two major grants were recently awarded to the American Association for 
State and Local History to provide for a consultant service and five spe¬ 
cialized seminars during the coming year. The Smithsonian Institution, 
which administers the National Museums Act, notified the association of 
the action. 

The success of the initial consultant service led to the grant renewal for 
that program. Liberalized terms will allow smaller museums to participate 
more easily in the cost-sharing program. For example, historical museums 
with annual operating budgets of less than $50,000 may receive a consultant 
at no charge except payment of lodging and meal expenses. Larger institu¬ 
tions will be asked to pay half the transportation cost as well. Interested 
persons should write to the AASLH at 1315 Eighth Avenue, South, Nash¬ 
ville, Tennessee, 37203, for applications. 

Five specialized seminars will be offered under National Museums Act 
support. Each class will be limited to twenty-five participants. Tentative 
topics include the interpretation of history through audio and still picture 
media, small history museum architecture, design and production of mu¬ 
seum publications, business operations of the historical museum, and his¬ 
toric house restoration techniques. 

Bicentennial Committee Adds Staff 

William Grist, a native of Charlotte, is now serving as coordinator for the 
Southwest Area for the North Carolina American Revolution Bicentennial 
Committee. He was educated at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. 
In his new capacity he will serve twenty-five counties. Mrs. Shawn S. Stokes 
was recently employed as a secretary. 

Paintings by Mrs. Betty Daniel are now on display in Director Enderle’s 
office; interested persons are invited to see these works of art which are 
available for sale. 

Colleges and Universities 

Barber-Scotia College 

Anthony E. Ekong attended the Summer Program for College Teachers at 
Columbia University from July 2 through August 17. He earned credit there 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 6. NOVEMBER, 1973 


119 


toward his doctorate. Albert B. Turner was appointed director for the Center 
of Political and Social Development in August. Miss Sue Katzman, associate 
professor of history, joined the Clinic to Improve College and University 
Teaching at the University of Massachusetts during the summer. She stud¬ 
ied the program there and wrote a proposal for a similar project for the black 
college in the South. She also made training films for the micro-teaching 
laboratory which is associated with the clinic and with the School of Edu¬ 
cation. 

Campbell College 

Dr. Vernon O. Stumpf attended the reception of the Royal Historical 
Society on July 4, the Anglo-American Conference of Historians at the Uni¬ 
versity of London, Institute of Historical Research, July 5-6, and the Con¬ 
ference on Film Propaganda and the Historian: An Assessment of the 
British Official Film for the Study and Teaching of the Second World War, 
at the Imperial War Museum, July 9-11. During this time abroad, Dr. 
Stumpf also did research and traveled in Amsterdam, Dublin, and London. 

East Carolina University 

Dr. Wilkins B. Winn is the author of Pioneer Protestant Missionaries in 
Honduras: A. E. Bishop and J. G. Cassel and the Establishment of the Central 
American Mission in Western Honduras, 1896-1901, published in Cuernavaca, 
Mexico. Dr. Henry C. Ferrell, Jr., was promoted to professor, effective in 
July. Dr. Kathleen E. Dunlop is a visiting professor teaching history at the 
overseas campus in Rome, Italy, during the academic year 1973-1974. 

Guilford College 

Alexander R. Stoesen spoke on “Contemporary Politics and the Comforts of 
History” on July 22 at the Unitarian Church in Greensboro. 

Livingstone College 

Dr. Thomas A. Schweitzer was named chairman of the Division of Social 
Sciences in September. He will continue in his capacity as chairman of the 
Department of History. 

Meredith College 

Mrs. Erika Fairchild had the assignment of speaking on the topic “Insti¬ 
tutional Needs and Personal Rights: The Problem of Privacy in a Prison 
Setting,” at the Southern Political Science Association in Atlanta, Novem¬ 
ber 1-3. Dr. Frank L. Grubbs, Jr., had an article, “Organized Labor 
and the League to Enforce Peace,” in Labor History, Volume 14, Number 
2. He also published “The International Outlook of the People’s Council on 
America,” in Science & Society, Fall, 1973, issue. Dr. Sarah M. Lemmon’s 
book, Frustrated Patriots: North Carolina and the War of 1812, was pub¬ 
lished by the University of North Carolina Press in September. Beginning 
in January, “Capital City Semester, a Visiting Interinstitutional Experience 


120 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


in State Government,” will be offered by the Department of History and 
Political Science at Meredith. 

North Carolina State University 

Dr. Bernard Wishey, whose appointment as head of the Department of 
History was announced in the May issue of Carolina Comments, is now filling 
the position. He was formerly head of the American studies program at the 
University of California, Berkeley. 

Pfeiffer College 

William D. Cotton, professor of history, retired; and Lawrence J. Durrett 
was named head of the department. Eugene I. Earnhardt was appointed 
associate professor of history and was named chairman of the Division of 
Social Sciences. 

School of the Arts 

Two new instructors in history have joined the staff, reflecting the ex¬ 
panded offerings in history at the School of Arts. Mrs. Leslie Neumann is 
teaching social studies in the high school department, and Mr. William 
Pruitt is teaching history on the college level. 

University of North Carolina at Wilmington 

Dr. Henry G. Crowgey was promoted to professor, and Walser H. Allen 
to associate professor. Rebecca Cunningham and Andrew F. Rowe received 
one-year appointments as instructors, and Anthony Reid was named part- 
time instructor in the Department of History. 

Wake Forest University 

Dr. Richard L. Zuber was named to the Advisory Editorial Board of the 
Division of Archives and History, effective July 1. 

Warren Wilson College 

Dr. Sheldon Neuringer, associate professor of history, was appointed 
chairman of the Department of History and Political Science in July. Dur¬ 
ing the summer he had a study grant from the National Endowment for 
the Humanities, which enabled him to participate in a seminar on “Per¬ 
spectives on the History of Slavery and Race Relations in the United States” 
at Northwestern University. Dr. Thomas B. Lee was named chairman of 
the International Studies Committee, effective in August. He is serving as a 
member of the board of directors of the American Association of the 
Teachers of Chinese Language and Culture and was project director, Summer 
Seminar in Taiwan, May-July of this year. This summer seminar was 
sponsored by Warren Wilson College and the University of South Carolina. 
Tom Showalter was a member of a study tour sponsored by the University 
of California at Berkeley, which was held in Leningrad and Moscow for four 
weeks during the summer. 


VOLUME XX'., NUMBER «, NOVEMBER. 1973 


121 


Winston-Salem State University 

Dr. William F. Sheppard, associate professor of history, was assigned 
additional duty as director of continuing education, effective August 16. 
Austin Washington was named assistant professor of history, effective 
September 1. 


State, County, and Local Groups 

Alamance County Historical Association 

The association is asking for histories of families which originated in the 
Alamance County area. Persons having such information are asked to send 
it to George D. Colclough, secretary-treasurer of the association, P. 0. Box 
411, Burlington, 27215. The association is also interested in histories of 
churches and other organizations. The Alamance group has been fortunate 
in obtaining histories prepared by the Reverend David Isaac Offman (1864- 
1954), who served as pastor of various Lutheran churches in the Alamance 
County area. He spent a good part of the latter years of his life preparing 
family histories and left his collection with another Lutheran minister, the 
Reverend Paul Kinney. Kinney’s widow passed the material on to Mr. Col¬ 
clough, who reports that the association is making plans to copy these his¬ 
tories so that they will be available to the families at a reasonable cost. 
Copies will also be placed in various libraries in North Carolina and in the 
State Archives. 

Anson County Historical Society 

On August 15 the Judge Samuel Spencer restored stone well and homesite 
in Lilesville township were dedicated. Senator Hector McLean, chairman 
of the North Carolina Bicentennial Committee, delivered the dedicatory 
address. A biography of Spencer was presented by Judge Walter E. Brock of 
the North Carolina Court of Appeals. Senator McLean was introduced by 
H. Pat Taylor, Jr., former lieutenant governor of North Carolina. Presiding 
was John Jennings Dunlap of Wadesboro, president of the society. Vice- 
presidents are Henry Huntley and William F. Short; treasurer, J. A. Hardi¬ 
son, Jr.; and secretary, Glenn F. Webb. 

Brunswick County Historical Society 

The society met August 27 at the Southport-Brunswick County Library 
with Mrs. Lucille D. Blake presiding. William G. Faulk, Jr., site manager 
of Brunswick Town, gave a summary of the work at Brunswick Town. Mrs. 
Blake read a paper on the Summerville Plantation house at Phoenix prior 
to the program presented by Mr. C. F. W. Coker, former chief of the Archives 
and Records Section of the Division of Archives and History. He discussed 
in some detail the work of the section. A social hour followed the program. 

Carson House 

A Long, Long Day for November, by Mrs. Moffitt Sinclair Henderson, has 
been selected by the Library of Congress for reproduction in large type 
and/or on recordings for the blind and handicapped. 


122 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Catawba County Historical Association 

Mr. Greer Suttlemyre, a member of the staff of the Historic Sites and 
Museums Section, presented to the association a slide lecture on archi¬ 
tecture in North Carolina, with special emphasis on Catawba County, on Sep¬ 
tember 5. 

Chapel Hill Historical Society 

The society has sold over 2,000 copies of Phillips Russell’s These Old 
Stone Walls and is reprinting the book. The new edition will be indexed. 
A booklet, Historic Buildings and Landmarks of Chapel Hill, N.C., which will 
contain a map of the historic area and forty-two illustrations, is also being 
published by the society. The booklet will be 95 cents plus postage and sales 
tax; orders should be sent to the society at Box 503, Chapel Hill, 27514. 

Cleveland County Historical Association 

Over 100 people participated in the annual tour of historic sites in the 
Cleveland County area. Three busloads of people visited the Grover and Kings 
Mountain areas. Places toured included Shiloh Presbyterian Church, Col. 
William Graham marker, the Bufford Hambright home, and the Shiloh 
cemetery in Grover. The George Stewart home, Preston Goforth cabin, and 
Kings Mountain Battleground were also points of interest. The tour began 
with a “roundabout trip” through Shelby; and the former residence of 
James Love, who donated land for the city of Shelby in 1841, was pointed out. 
The former homes of Governors Clyde R. Hoey and O. Max Gardner were also 
shown. Dr. Wyan Washburn conducted the tour. 

Haywood County Historical Society 

The society met at the Haywood County Courthouse on July 24. New 
officers were elected: president, Mr. Leon “Chip” Killian; first vice- 
president, Mr. Craig Reeves; second vice-president, Mr. Joe Cathey; secre¬ 
tary, Miss Sara Jo Thomas; and treasurer, Mrs. J. B. Soesbee. Danny Ray 
discussed the need for permanent places to house collections of historical 
artifacts. 

Hillsborough Historic District Commission 

Named to the commission recently were Robert Strickland, Mrs. K. C. 
Winecoff, Lucius Cheshire, Jr., George Teer, Sr., and Mrs. Mary Leigh 
Webb. The commission is responsible for making decisions on the appropri¬ 
ateness of alterations, movement, and demolition of structures within the 
historic district. The commission also passes on architectural features such 
as signs and other exterior fixtures of new buildings constructed within the 
area. Members serve four-year terms. The new members were installed in a 
special meeting held in the Colonial Inn. On that occasion John G. Zehmer, 
Jr., chief of the Historic Sites and Museums Section of the Division of Ar¬ 
chives and History, was speaker. 

Historic New Bern Foundation, Inc. 

Dr. F. P. King was elected president of the foundation at a meeting of the 
board of directors held in the Jones House in the Tryon Palace Complex on 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 6, NOVEMBER, 1973 


123 


September 5. Elected to serve with him were Mrs. D. L. Ward, first vice- 
president; Mrs. George Bullock, second vice-president; Mrs. Robert L. 
Stallings, third vice-president; Mrs. William Bell, fourth vice-president; 
Mrs. Dale Millns, secretary; Mr. Kenneth Spruill, treasurer. The vice- 
presidents will serve as chairman of the Public Relations, Acquisitions, 
Restoration, and Membership committees, respectively. 

Lower Cape Fear Historical Society 

The society’s first Clarendon Award was made to Crockette Hewlett for 
her book Between the Creeks. This award is given for outstanding contribu¬ 
tion to the interpretation, appreciation, and preservation of the history of 
the Lower Cape Fear through historical writing; it is a replica of the silver 
punch bowl presented to the society this year by Emma Bellamy Williamson 
Hendren and the board which served in 1972-1973. 

Three recent gifts given the society include a $4,000 grant given by Mr. 
Bruce Cameron to be used toward the restoration of the Latimer House; 
many original deeds and papers belonging to the late Marsden Bellamy, 
presented by his daughter Mrs. Peter Brown Ruffin, to be kept in the Ida 
B. Kellam Records Room; and two chairs, given by Mrs. Allen Jones of 
Charleston, South Carolina, which were part of the original furnishings of 
the Latimer House. The house and records room were open to the public 
each Monday during the summer. 

New officers are Mrs. Leora Hiatt McEachern, president; Mr. Samuel 
Hughes, vice-chairman; Mrs. Loran Marcroft, recording secretary; Dr. 
Jackson Sparks, assistant treasurer; Mrs. Robert Walker, assistant archi¬ 
vist; Mrs. R. W. Williams, publications; and Mr. Hughes, Clarendon Award. 
Membership dues in the society are $5.00 a year. Members receive the so¬ 
ciety’s Bulletin and are privileged to attend three outstanding programs and 
two receptions each year. 

McDowell County Historical Society 

The society met at the Carson House on July 20. A slide program of the 
Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site was presented. The society has 
undertaken the project of restoring Andrews Geyser near Old Fort, which 
formerly received widespread attention when passenger trains passed the 
Blue Ridge Mountains en route to Asheville during the late 1800s and early 
1900s. The geyser has been idle since 1971. Mrs. Virginia Adams, projects 
chairman, discussed the project at a recent meeting of the society. Various 
contacts are being made with property owners to work out details. Mrs. 
Mabel Cox is president of the McDowell County group. 

Madison County Historical Society 

The society met September 15 at Wolfe-Laurel. Mr. and Mrs. Raleigh 
English, Mrs. Grace Sams English, and Mr. and Mrs. Bill Phoenix took part 
in the program on early settlers in the north and northeastern parts of the 
county. 

North Carolina Society of Colonial Dames XVIIth Century 

The society voted at its annual meeting on May 5 in Wilmington to sup¬ 
port the restoration of the Eagle Tavern at Halifax State Historic Site as its 


124 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


major bicentennial project. The ten chapters throughout North Carolina are 
undertaking individual bicentennial projects which will be coordinated by 
the organization’s Bicentennial Committee, made up of chapter presidents 
and chaired by the president of the state society. 

North Carolina Society of County and Local Historians 

The society had its summer tour of Kinston and environs on August 12. 
Lenoir County Historical Society President William C. Hatcher and Regi¬ 
nald Stroud, immediate past president, were in charge of arrangements. The 
Kinston Woman’s Club assisted with the coffee at the Caswell-Neuse State 
Historic Site. Points visited by the society included Harmony Hall; Croom 
Meeting House, where there was a short devotional service; White Rock 
Presbyterian Church; Lafayette Plantation, which is now vacant; Cedar 
Dell, which is now used as the Kennedy Home for Children; and the Ram 
Neuse and Caswell Museum. A social hour at the home of Mrs. Douglas 
McDaniel concluded the day’s events. Fifteen new members have recently 
joined the society. 

Northwest North Carolina Historical Association 

A tour of historic sites in Forsyth and Stokes counties was conducted 
October 6. Beginning at the Bethania Moravian Church, participants toured 
Bethania, Wrights Courthouse, and Richmond Courthouse in Forsyth 
County; the Rock House Site, Stokes County; and Moratock Iron Works 
Furnace on the Dan River in Stokes County. Plans were made by Joe C. 
Matthews, president of the association. 

Onslow County Historical Society 

Thomas C. Loftfield, archaeologist of Hillsborough and Chapel Hill, was 
speaker at the July 18 meeting held in Richlands. The speaker discussed the 
Indian occupation of the coastal areas with particular reference to the White 
Oak River area. President of the society is K. B. Hurst, who presided. 

Railroad House Historical Association 

The board of directors of the association met on September 10. President 
Hal Siler reported on progress being made toward the observance next year 
of the centennial of Sanford. A public organizational meeting was planned 
by the Centennial Committee for September 26. 

Raleigh Historic District Commission 

The old Raleigh Historic Sites Commission was revamped by the Raleigh 
City Council and made a new fourteen-member Historic Property and 
Historic District Commission. The move united members of the old Andrew 
Johnson Commission and the sites commission. The council approved $5,000 
from the local sales tax funds to be used toward the restoration of the Joel 
Lane House, Members of the new commission are: Mrs. Godfrey Cheshire, 
Jr., Mrs. James L. Cresimore, Mrs. Robert E. Leak, William W. Dodge III, 
George E. London, Mrs. Dan K. Moore, Mrs. Bailey P. Williamson, Dr. 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 6, NOVEMBER, 1973 


125 


Sarah M. Lemmon, Mrs. Edward B. Steele, Mrs. Alma T. Williams, Peter 
P. Williams, Mrs. William Creech, Mrs. Joye E. Jordan, and J. C. Knowles. 

Randolph County Historical Society 

The society’s president, Tom Presnell, was killed the afternoon of August 
9 when his car, which was parked at a rest stop area, was struck by a tractor- 
trailer which went out of control. Presnell was former clerk of Randolph 
County Superior Court. 

Sir Walter Raleigh Chapter, Colonial Dames XVIIth Century 

The Raleigh chapter recently set up a graduate scholarship fund which 
has been named for Dr. Doris E. King, immediate past president of the 
organization. The scholarship, of at least $200, will be awarded in 1973 for 
study during the 1973-1974 academic year; preference will be given to 
women accepted for work toward the M.A. degree at North Carolina State 
University, where Dr. King is professor of history. Preference will also be 
given to Wake County citizens and to women who are working in early 
American and preferably North Carolina history. 

Spring Friends Meeting 

The Spring Friends Meeting, RFD, Snow Camp, in Alamance County, 
was established October 13, 1773. On October 13 of this year the group ob¬ 
served its bicentennial with an all-day program at which time the history 
of the church was reviewed and a historic marker unveiled by representa¬ 
tives of the Division of Archives and History. Main speaker was Dr. Edd 
Burrows, Department of History, Guilford College. Greetings were extended 
by George Colclough, secretary-treasurer of the Alamance County Historical 
Association. 

Stokes County Historical Society 

A meeting was held August 6 in Walnut Cove. At that time Richard 
Regensburg, archaeologist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill, was guest speaker. He is supervising an archaeological dig concerning 
the Saura Indians on the Dan River. On September 8 the society conducted 
an auction of articles donated by its members at the courthouse square in 
Danbury for the purpose of raising funds for the restoration of the old jail. 
More than $1,500 was realized from the project. President of the group is 
J. G. H. Mitchell. 

Transylvania County Historical Commission 

The commission held its first meeting July 19 at the Transylvania County 
Courthouse. Chairman is Mrs. Carl McCrary, who called the meeting to 
order. In August a joint meeting was held with the Transylvania County 
Historical Association, and it was agreed that the association would here¬ 
after work with and through the commission. During a separate meeting of 
the association Robert Gash was named chairman. Plans for a membership 
drive and association goals as well as formal plans of the commission are 
being worked out, according to Mrs. McCrary. 


126 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Wachovia Historical Society 

The annual meeting of the society was held at the Old Salem Reception 
Center on October 16. Dr. Clark A. Thompson of Salem College spoke on the 
topic “The Eighteenth Century—A New Heart and a New Man.” Dr. Frank 
P. Albright is president of the society. 

Wake County Historical Society 

The society sponsored a Labor Day tour of Raleigh’s City Cemetery, 
where many of the city’s first residents are buried. The tour was led by Dr. 
Thornton W. Mitchell, a past president of the society. 


Western North Carolina Historical Association 

At a July 28 meeting members voted unanimously to begin a campaign to 
establish a Southern Highlands Museum and Appalachian Culture Center 
at the Pearson House in the Richmond Hills section of Asheville. The idea 
is that the association cooperate with other organizations in the project. 
Speaker for the afternoon meeting was Miss Bobbie Jean Nicholson of 
Brevard College, who characterized the “Mountaineer” with line drawings, 
slides, and recordings of mountain music. Jesse Surles, president of the 
association, was in charge of the meeting. 

October 26-27 were the dates for the Oktoberfest Symposium sponsored 
by the association in cooperation with Mars Hill College, the United States 
Forest Service, and the North Carolina Society for the Preservation of 
Antiquities. Dr. Harley Jolley of Mars Hill College presented a paper en¬ 
titled “Cradle of Forestry in America,” which was followed by a bus tour to 
the Pink Beds in Pisgah National Forest. The evening paper on Thomas 
Wolfe was given by Mr. J. Meehan of Pack Memorial Library. Featured 
speaker on Saturday morning was Mr. Richard Walser of Raleigh who spoke 
on “Zeb Vance, Humorist.” This meeting was held at the Vance Birthplace, 
and those in attendance went on a tour of the site at the conclusion of the 
symposium. 

Wilkes Genealogical Society 

The society, Box 1629, North Wilkesboro, 28659, invites persons in¬ 
terested in the genealogies of early western North Carolina settlers to visit 
its facilities in the Wilkes Public Library on C Street in North Wilkesboro. 
The collection includes over 500 books, North Carolina census schedules, 
and other research materials. Contributions of Bible records, family his¬ 
tories, and genealogies are appreciated. The society was formed in 1967, 
and persons interested in promoting the collection, recording, and preserva¬ 
tion of genealogy, particularly that of early settlers, are eligible for member¬ 
ship. Dues are $3.00 a year, and members receive quarterly bulletins and 
are entitled to free queries. Proceeds from the sale of compiled and mimeo¬ 
graphed courthouse records and other publications are used to further the 
work of the society. Additional information may be obtained from the society 
at the address given above. 


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 6. NOVEMBER, 1973 


127 




Wilkes Historical Society 

The Upper Yadkin Valley in the American Revolution, by Betty Waugh, 
was presented to the Wilkes County Library through the society, repre¬ 
sented by President Jay Anderson, on August 18. Dr. Waugh also attended 
the presentation ceremony. Another copy is being presented to the Wilkes 
Community College, on behalf of the society, by Mr. and Mrs. W. K. Sturdi¬ 
vant. 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Published in January, March, May, July, September, and November by the Division of 
Archives and History, Department of Cultural Resources, Archives and History-State 
Library Building, 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27611. 

H. G. Jones, Editor in Chief 
Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell, Editor 


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CAROLINA COMMENTS 

PUBLISHED BIMONTHLY BY THE NORTH CAROLINA 
DIVISION OF ARCHIVES AND HISTORY 


Index to Volume XXI, 1973 

A 


brams, W. Amos, presents music box selections, 6-7 

ckland Museum, sponsors museums conference, 90 

dair, James Robert, is subject of biographical study, 8 

dams, Mrs. Virginia, is projects chairman of McDowell group, 124 

dministration. Department of, receives appropriation for restoration of Executive 
Mansion, 66 

.dmiralty records, English, in archives, 96 
griculture. Department of, records of, 96 

.lamance County, families from, are studied, 122; Spring Friends Meeting there, 
history of, 126 

.lamance County Historical Association, news of, 79, 122; participates in Spring Friends 
Meeting, 126 

.lbemarle Antique Show and Sale, news of, 19 

.Iberti, Mrs. Lilian Bridges Rhodes, speaks to Littleton College group, 104 

.lbright, Frank P., is president of Wachovia group, 127 

■ldridge, Harold, is officer of Brunswick group, 17 

.lexander County, records of, 111 

Jexander Little Wing, pictured, 29 

llcott, John, leads Chapel Hill tour, 80 

lien, Mrs. Beverly H., is promoted, 36 

lien, Richard, is memorialized on marker, 10 

lien, Walser H., Jr., is chairman of Community-University Humanities Committee, 56; 
is promoted, 121 

jnerican Association for State and Local History, awards of, 2-3; receives grant, for 
consultant service and seminars, 119 
American Association of Museums, its regional meeting, 90 

American Association of University Women Award, announcement concerning, 2; entries for, 
listed, 98; mentioned, 70 

American Revolution Bicentennial, observance of, at Moores Creek, 84; plans for, are 
announced, 99-100; to be discussed, 26; session on celebration of, 71 
.merican Revolution Bicentennial Committee, announces plans, 99-100; is re-created, 65 
.merica's Four Hundredth Anniversary Committee, is created, 65-66 
nderson. Gene, presents flag and certificate, at Moores Creek, 84 
nderson, Henry V., is officer of Rockingham County group, 21; presents program at 
Caswell meeting, 79 

nderson. Jay, represents Wilkes society at book presentation, 128 

ndrew Johnson Commission, becomes part of Raleigh Historic District Commission, 125 

ndrews, Mrs. Millie, reports on Hyde County displays, 104 

ndrews, Mrs. R. Homer, is officer of Alamance group, 79 

ndrews Geyser, efforts to restore, are made in McDowell County, 124 

ndrews Mound, Cherokee County, is on National Register, 92 

nsell, Henry Beasley, notebook of, is displayed, 57 

nson County, records of. 111 

nson County Historical Society, news of, 16, 39, 100, 122; sponsors Christmas open 
house, 39 

ntique Fair, Moore County, is held, 59; profit from, 84 
■ppalachian Culture Center, plans for, 127 
■ppalachian Journal, published, 14 

.rchaeological Advisory Council, is chosen, 46; meets in Winston-Salem, 46 
.rchaeological Society of North Carolina, is revitalized, 47; its newsletter, 
announces plans, 47; news of, 100-101 
rchaeologists, meet in Salisbury, 46 

'Architectural Heritage of North Carolina, The," is subject of "Month of Sundays" 
program, 94 






Archival Publications, session on, 71 
Archives, issues leaflet on private papers, 110 

Archives and History, Division of, activities of its staff, 13-14, 36, 53-54, 75-76, 
97, 117; assists in local history and genealogy courses, 50-51; establishes 
archaeological program, 113; is new designation, 65; opposes state government plan, 
47; receives appropriation for archaeology program, for restoration and construction 
66; receives grant for colonial records, 67; records of, 96, 111; sponsors tour for 
NCSCLH, 86; to develop Fort Dobbs, 47 
Archives and History, Office of. See Archives and History, Division of 
Archives and Records, Division of. See Archives and Records Section. 

Archives and Records Section, accessions records, 11, 51, 73, 96, 111; conducts 

genealogy workshop, 13; is new designation, 65; plans marriage bond index, 27; seeks 
old newspapers, 51 

Archives Information Circular Number 9, is published, 95 

Arnett, Ethel S., her Mrs. James Madison: The Incomparable Dolley, is Mayflower entry, 
71 

Arnold, Mrs. Ruby D., is promoted, 36; writes North Carolina Courts of Law and Equity 
Prior to 1868, 95 

Arrington, Billy Lew, House, is on tour of Nash group, 105 

Art, Culture and History, Department of, becomes Department of Cultural Resources, 65 

Arts, Division of the, is unit of Cultural Resources, 65 

Asbury, R. V., is officer of Brunswick group, 17; speaks at NCSCLH, 7-8 

Asbury Memorial United Methodist Church, is stop on tour, 20 

Asbury Methodist Church, is visited on tour, 82 

Ashe, Samuel A., Collection, 111 

Ashe County, records of, 12, 27 

Asheboro Female Academy, to be moved, 21 

Asheville, records of. 111 

Ashland, Vance County, is on National Register, 69 
Ashpole Presbyterian Church, is visited on tour, 82 
Association of Jewish Women, mentioned, 72 

Athas, Daphne, pictured, 2; receives Sir Walter Raleigh Award, 1-2 
Atkins, Mrs. Herman, is chaplain of Montgomery group, 59 

Attmore-Oliver House, proceeds of ball used for, 60; to be closed in winter, 19 
Attorney General, records of, 96 
Automobile, 1903, is displayed, 90 

Aycock, Doug, helps in Vance Birthplace barn project, 32 
Ayers, Harvard, speaks at archaeology meeting, 100 
Ayr Mount, opened for tour, 58 


B 

Babits, Lawrence E., is archaeological assistant, 97, 113 
Bagley, Smith, pictured, 95 

Bahama Islands, its archivist visits Archives, 72 
Bahnson House, to be used as museum, 104 
Bailey, L. A., reports on finances at Hope, 81 
Baker, Newell, presents folk songs, 7 

Ballard, Frank I., is chairman of Wilmington committee, 19 
Barab, Seymour, his opera performed, 4 

Barber, Mrs. E. I., Sr., is director of Rutherford County group, 105 

Barber-Scotia College, news of, 119-120 

Barbour, J. 0., Jr., is president of Beaufort group, 16 

Barham, Eddie, is bicentennial employee, 99-100 

Barker, C. T., is officer of New Bern group, 86 

Barker House, Chowan County, pictured, 115; receives financial assistance, 66 
Barnes, Mrs. Catherine, speaks to Hillsborough group, 41 

Barnett, Mrs. Douglas, is curator of Burke group, 56; reports on Burke acquisitions, 56 

Barringer, Archie, calls meeting of Cabarrus group, 102 

Bartlett Yancey House, newel post in, pictured, 52 

Baskin, William H., Ill, seeks applicants, 38 

Bastin, Wilton J. B., talks to NCFS, 7 

Baton Rouge, Louisiana, uses revenue-sharing money for historic preservation, 67 

Battle, Margaret, directs tour of Nash group, 105 

Battle of Rockfish, efforts to mark site of, 102 

Baum, E. 0., has article in Currituck publication, 102 

Baum, Mrs. Marina, plans Hyde County program, 104 

Bayes, Ron, his Porpoise, is Roanoke-Chowan entry, 71 

Beach, Earl E., speaks at Music Federation, 4 


130 


asley, C. B., presents portrait to New Bern society, 86 
asley, Mrs. Mae Javan, joins microfilm unit, 117 
aufort, 57 

aufort County, cemetery records of, 96 

aufort County Board of Commissioners, names history properties commission, 79 
aufort County Historic Properties Commission, news of, 79 
aufort Historical Association, news of, 16 
eler, James R., receives contributions, 59 

ers. Burton F., is on program of SHA, 15; reads paper at HSNC, 82-83 
11, Mrs. Mae Wood, her role in museums conference, 90 
11, Mrs. William, is officer of New Bern foundation, 124 
llamy, Marsden, records belonging to, 124 

llineham, Washington, uses revenue-sharing money for historic preservation, 67 
lmont Abbey Cathedral, Gaston County, is on National Register, 68 
lmont Abbey College, news of, 76 

nnett Place Memorial Commission, is abolished, 66 
nton, Celia, is summer intern, 75 

nton, M. C., Jr., presides at Old Salem meeting, 87 

mard Franklin House, Surry County, grant for, 28; receives financial assistance, 

66; restoration of, 43, 62 

rtie County, visitors to, 101, 104 

rtie County Historical Association, news of, 40, 101 
tty Smith House, is acquired by Chapel Hill society, 80 
tween the Creeks, wins Clarendon Award, 124 
yle, Thad, participates in University Seminar, 15 

centennial Council of the Thirteen Original States, sponsors conference of state 
libraries, 71 

centennial Plaza, Raleigh, is proposed, 99 

lisoly, J. Bourke, is officer of Wake group, 22, 62, 86, 106 
ltmore Forest, architecture of, displayed, 90 
rd, William E., receives WNCHA award, 87 
scoe Elementary School, 59 

vins, John F., Jr., pictured, 2, 3; receives Award of Merit, 3; receives Mayflower 
"up, 2 

ack, Merle, participates in University Seminar, 15 
ack Mountain College, records of, 11, 51 

ake, Charles, contributes to Cooke memorial award, 86; is officer of Chapel 
lill group, 40; presents report at Hillsborough meeting, 17 
ake, Mrs. Charles, contributes to Cooke memorial award, 86 
ake, Mrs. Exiededell, reads poem at Hyde County meeting, 104 

ake, Mrs. Lucille, is officer of Brunswick group, 17; presides at Brunswick meeting, 

56; 122; reads paper at Brunswick meeting, 122 

and. Worth, is director of Rutherford County group, 105 

andwood, grant for, 28 

authenthal, Janet Weil, corresponds with Gertrude Weil, 72 
aunt, Bea, is officer of NCMC, 5 
ibitt, William H., pictured, 25 

Idie, Richard Franklin, heads Burke grave project, 70; is officer of SAR group, 87; 
serves as chairman of SAR banquet, 60 

;gan-Hammond House, is open at Christmas, 39; meeting of committee for, 16; pictured, 

:9 

.ger, Doreen, doing special research in Washington County, 106 
idurant, William L., pictured, 25 

'thby, Albert, joins Livingstone College faculty, 38 

'den, Hayne D., presents portrait of Richmond M. Pearson to the Richmond Hill 
ommission, 103 

kebill, Mrs. C. Jackson, is officer of Mordecai Square group, 19 
.ntley, Michael W., pictured, 14 

wley, James S., is on executive committee of NCL&HA, 2 

wer, Mrs. John K., pictured, 2; presents Sir Walter Raleigh Award, 2 

wster, Lawrence, pictured, 6 

i.dgers, Charles, is officer of Northampton group, 20 
dgers, Henry, is chairman of Bath commission, 81 
1 eger, Gert H., is member of Macy, Jr., Foundation, 37; publishes article, 37; publishes 
ihapter in book, 37 

S.ght, Leslie, is preservationist, 114; searches for Monitor, 114 
1 nson, Mrs. Jack E., is officer of NCSPA, 4 
1 nton, Hugh, is on Chapel Hill program, 40 
1 scoe, Mrs. Gordon, is coeditor for genealogical group, 57 
• 11, Thomas G., dies, 73 

1 ck, Walter E., presents biography of Spencer, 122 


131 



Brockman, Zoe, poetry of, read at NCPS, 7 
Brooks, Ray, is host to Bath commission, 81 
Brooks, Mrs. Ray, is hostess to Bath commission, 81 

Broughton, Mrs. J. Melville, attends museum opening, 112; gown of, displayed, 90; 
pictured, 112 

Broughton Ensemble, sings at reception, 6 

Brown, Buddy, his house is scene of Christmas party, 41 

Brown, Denise, is bicentennial employee, 100 

Brown, Edwin P., donates Rea Store to Murfreesboro, 85 

Brown, Mrs. Edwin P., donates Rea Store to Murfreesboro, 85 

Brown, Hewitt, is in charge of Harnett program, 81 

Brown, Marvin L., Jr., his Heinrich von Haymerle: Austro-Hungarian Career Diplomat, is 
Mayflower entry, 71 
Brown, Richard F., speaks at NCAS, 4 
Bruce, Dewey, is president of Robeson group, 82 
Brunswick County Historical Society, news of, 16-17, 56, 101, 122 

Brunswick Town State Historic Site, its visitor center, mentioned, 56; news of, given 
to Brunswick group, 16 

Bruton, Mrs. Earl, is officer of Montgomery group, 59 
Bryan, Stedman B., is officer of SAR group, 87 
Buggy, is on display, 90 

Buie, Mrs. Charlie, is officer of Montgomery group, 59 
Bullock, Mrs. George, is officer of New Bern foundation, 124 
Bullock, Henry, is named to Lenoir committee, 104 
Buncombe, Edward, to be subject of brochure, 56 

Buncombe County, its American Revolution Bicentennial Committee, news of, 56; records, 
96, 111 

Burch, Steven, is host at dinner, 81 
Burch, Mrs. Steven, is hostess at dinner, 81 

Bureau of Outdoor Recreation, grant from, for Yadkin group, 63 

Burgiss, L. Grady, his Richmond Hill, is Roanoke-Chowan entry, 71; writes poem on 
Richmond Hill, 63 

Burke, Thomas, grave of, is site of ceremonies, 70; identified, 70 

Burke County, history of, is discussed, 79; National Register entries from, 92; record; 
of. 111 

Burke County Historical Society, news of, 40, 56, 79 

Burns, William L., speaks in Hillsborough, 81 

Burrows, Edd, speaks to Alamance group, 126 

Burwell School, grant for, 82; opened for tour, 58 

Butler, Lindley S., is on program of Rockingham County group, 62 

Buxton, archaeological research near, 114 

Byrd, Robert, is vice-president of Burke group, 56 


C 

C.S.S. Neuse State Historic Site, its visitor center, pictured, opened, 10 
Cabarrus County, Gold History Corporation formed there, 113; records of, 111; records c, 
in Smoot Collection, 96; sends visitors to Vance Birthplace, 49 
Caldwell County, National Register entry from, 92; records of, 27 

Caldwell County Committee for Continuing Education in the Humanities, hears Suttlemyre,>3 
Caldwell County Historical Society, news of, 17 

Calhoon, Robert M., coordinates course on research in family and local history, 39 
Calhoun, Walter T., participates in History of Tobacco Symposium, 55 
Camden County, records of. 111 

Cameron, Bruce, makes grant to Lower Cape Fear group, 124 
Camp, Cordelia, death of, 107 

Campbell College, news of, 15, 36, 54, 100, 120; sponsors Conference on Celtic Studies. 
54 

Campion, Loren K., presents paper, in Greenville, 100 
Cape Lookout Light Station, is on National Register, 10 
Capitol Square, walking tour of, sponsored by Wake County group, 106 
Capps, Gene, is officer of NCMC, 5 

Capps, John T., is director of Lenoir County group, 104 
Capps, Talbot, is named to Lenoir committee, 104 

Carey, Charles M., is officer of archaeological society, 47, 100, 106; pictured, 101; 
speaks at Burke meeting, 79 

Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site, is subject of program, 124 
Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission, records of, 96 
Carolina Comments, index to, available, 12, 34 
Carolina Genealogical Society, news of, 57 


132 


irolina Hotel, Pinehurst, pictured, 116 

irolina Power and Light Company, donates land for Person County project, 42; mentioned, 
105 

:rpenter shop, is displayed, 90 

rraway, Gertrude S., is officer of NCSPA, 4; pictured, 14 
.rraway, Mike, his arrowheads displayed, 57 

irroll, Charles F., addresses Duplin County group, 40; receives plaque from Duplin 
County group, 40 

rson, Samuel Price, is subject of book, 23 

rson House, is site of WNCHA meeting, 23; is stop on tour, 20; is visited by many, 

83; McDowell group meets there, 84, 124; news of, 122 
rteret Historical Research Association, news of, 57, 79 
rtwright, William H., is on program of HSNC, 18 
seine, Franklin County, is on National Register, 68 
swell, Mrs. Richard, her gown exhibited, 89 

swell County, courthouse there, is on National Register, pictured, 92; mentioned, 52; 

National Register entries from, 92; records of, 96; report on town of Milton, in, 99 

swell County Historical Association, news of, 79 

swell-Neuse State Historic Site, is host to NCSCLH group, 125 

tawba College, is site of archaeological meeting, 46 

tawba County, is emphasized in slide lecture, 123; records of, 27 

tawba County Historical Association, news of, 40, 80, 101-102, 123 

tes, Mrs. Fred, is officer of Hillsborough group, 17 

they, Mrs. Aurelia, speaks at Haywood County meeting, 17 

they, C. 0., attends SHA, 16 

they, Joe, is officer of Haywood group, 123 

cil, Lamar J. R., is promoted at UNC-CH, 78 

afe, William, is associate director of Duke program, 77; presents paper, 76; publishes 
book, 37 

;apel Hill, its SAR chapter, holds banquet, 60 

lapel Hill Board of Aldermen, is asked to establish historical zoning, 57 

lapel Hill Historical Society, its Preservation Committee, presents program, 40; makes 

survey for Office of Archives and History, 58; news of, 17, 40, 57, 80, 123 

lapel Hill Preservation Society, formed to preserve Smith House, 80; is organized, 40; 

lews of, 57, 80 

appell, Fred D. , pictured, 3; wins Roanoke-Chowan Poetry Award, 2 

arles B. Aycock Memorial Commission, is abolished, 66; mentioned, 72 

arles Lewis Hinton Papers, additions to, 51 

arlotte, newspapers of, 51 

atham County, newspapers of, 51 

a tham News, Siler City, microfilmed, 73 

atwood, opened for tour, 58 

aap, Joe, helps in Vance Birthplace barn project, 32 
Karokee County, National Register entry from, 92; records of, 111 
Kashire, Mrs. Godfrey, Jr., is member of Raleigh Historic District Commission, 125 
Kashire, Lucius, Jr., is member of Hillsborough commission, 123; is officer of 
lillsborough group, 17 

Kina Grove, Pamlico County, is on National Register, 68-69; pictured, 68 
Kiwan College, is open to public, 85 

Kiwan County, courthouse there, pictured, 115; records of, 12 
Kristie, Mrs. Ronald, is officer of Moore County group, 84 
Kristopher, Ames, his gardens are open to NCSCLH, 86 

Kristopher Crittenden Memorial Award, presented, 1; to be presented. 111 
Kirch records, are microfilmed, 27, 73, 96 
K:y Cemetery, Raleigh, is toured, 127 
Cvil Liberties Union, 72 
C7il War, 58 

Cri.1 War muster roll, preserved. 111 

Cirendon Award, is made to Crockette Hewlett, 124 

Cirk, Joseph D. , wins NCFS award, 7 

Cirk, Larry, edits archaeological newsletter, 101; is officer of archaeological 
iociety, 106 

Cirk, Robert B., is officer of Union County group, 62 
Cirkson, Heriot, Collection, 111 

C:ar Spring Plantation, Craven County, is on National Register, 68; pictured, 69 

Ciment, Edward, speaks to Davidson County meeting, 80 

Civeland County, historic sites there, are listed, toured, 123 

Civeland County Historical Association, news of, 80, 123 

C-nchfield Dam, effect of, on Rutherford and Polk counties, discussed at meeting, 21 
Ciches, are on display, 90 


133 





Coats House, Edgecombe County, is on National Register, pictured, 68 
Cobb, Collier, Jr., speaks at Chapel Hill meeting, 57 
Cobb, William H., publishes article, 100 

Cockshutt, Mrs. Catherine, appears on TV program, 117; gives slide lecture on 
plantations, 117; is on "Month of Sundays" program, 94; speaks in Hillsborough, 

58 

Coddington, Dabney M., Jr., joins Tryon Palace staff, 97 

Coe, Joffre L., pictured, 101; speaks at archaeological meeting, 47, 100; uncovers new 
Town Creek facts, 92 

Cofer, William, is officer of SAR group, 87 
Coffer, William Austin, works on SAR banquet, 60 
Coffin Medical School, Guilford County, pictured, 49 
Cogar, James L., is on Tryon Palace Symposium, 9 

Coker, C. F. W., attends SAA, 13; pictured, 6, 14; resigns, 97; speaks at Lower Cape 
Fear meeting, 83; speaks in Brunswick County, 122; speaks in Indianapolis, 13 
Colclough, George D., is officer of Alamance group, 79; is on program at Spring Friends 
Meeting, 126 

Cole, Wilson, is officer of Hillsborough group, 17 
Coles, Robert, publishes article, 14 

College and Universities, news of, 15-16, 36-39, 54-56, 76-79, 100, 119-122 
Colonial Dames XVIIth Century, Sir Walter Raleigh Chapter, news of, 126 
Colonial Records of North Carolina, The, new series, published, 67 
Colonial Records Project, has summer intern, 75; receives grant, 95 
Colton, Joel, attends SHA, 15; participates in colloquium in Paris, 76-77; serves as 
chairman of Academic Council at Duke, 76-77 
Columbia University, has recordings of mountain ballads, 87 
Colvin School of Dance of Gastonia, performs for music federation, 4 
Committee on Interracial Cooperation, 72 
Committee on Patient Care, North Carolina, records of, 96 

Community Colleges, Department of, offers local history and genealogy courses, 50 

Community-University Humanities Committee of the City of Wilmington, sponsors project. 

Computer Output Microfilm, session on, 71 

Cone, Franz David, is Highland Scot, 85 

Conestoga wagon, is displayed, 90 

Conference for Social Service, 72 

Conference on Celtic Studies, is held, 36, 54 

Conger, Clement E., speaks at NCSPA, 5 

Connelly, Robert L., is vice-president of Burke group, 56 
Connor, David M., 28 
Connor, Mrs. David M., 28 

Connor, David M., Ill, unveils Connor portrait, 45 
Connor, H. G., Ill, presents portrait, 28, 45 

Connor, Kate Whitfield, to unveil portrait, 28; unveils Connor portrait, 45 
Connor, Louis M., Jr., presents portrait, 28, 45 

Connor, Robert Digges Wimberly, brief sketch of, 28, 45; portrait of, to be presented, 
28, presented, pictured, 45 

Conservation and Development, Board of, records of, 96, 111 

Conway, Robert 0., coordinates local history and genealogy course, 83; is manager of 
Vance Birthplace, 32, 49, 94; shows slides of historic sites at McDowell meeting, 84 
Cooke, Robert B., addresses NCSCLH and WNCHA, 19; death of, 60; is officer of NCSCLH, 

8; memorial award established for, 86; memorial service for, 86; presides at NCSCLH, 
Cool Spring Place, is on National Register, 10 
Cooleemee, Davie County, is on National Register, 68 
Cooper, Peter P., is in charge of archaeological program, 46 
Cooper, Rose Marie, wins Composers Cup, 4 
Cooper's Craft, The, is sponsored by Junior Historians, 21 
Copeland, Isaac, attends SHA, 16; speaks at Chapel Hill meeting, 40 

Corey, Faris Jane, her Exploring the Mountains of North Carolina, is Mayflower entry, 7 

Cornwallis Camp Site on Stony Creek, is on tour of Nash group, 105 

Cornwell, Mary Myrtle, wins NCFS award, 7 

Correction and Training, Board of, records of, 96 

Corrections, Department of, its 1876 Biennial Report, 51 

Corum, Al, arranges Vance Birthplace exhibit, 94 

Cottle, Thomas, publishes article, 14 

Cotton, William D., retires, 121 

Counterfeit printing plate, description of, 35; pictured, 35 
Country Youth, The, copies of, donated to Wilkes group, 43 
"Courthouse, 76," is Cabarrus County project, 82 
Cowan, Thomas L., furnishings from house of, 42 
Cowee Mound and Village Site, Macon County, pictured, 48 
Cox, Mrs. Mabel, is president of McDowell group, 124 


134 


Cox, Ralph, wins art award, 4 

Cox, Mrs. Worth, is elected president of McDowell group, 83 

Coxe, Mrs. Mary Frances, is officer of Wake County group, 106 

Crabtree Jones House, Wake County, is on National Register, 92; pictured, 93 

Craig, James, is officer of Mordecai Square group, 19 

Craig, Mrs. Locke, gown of, displayed, 90 

Craig, William N., serves as president of Gaston group, 58 

Cranford, Fred, is vice-president of Burke group, 56 

Creech, Harold, speaks in Greenville, 87; speaks to Pitt County group, 105 
Creech, Mrs. William, is member of Raleigh Historic District Commission, 126 
Cresimore, Mrs. James L., is member of Raleigh Historic District Commission, 125 
Cresswell, Don, joins Belmont Abbey staff, 76; lectures in London, 76 
Crettier, Mary, joins Archives and History staff, 13 
Crockett, Davy, his ties with Greeneville, Tennessee, 84 
Crowgey, Hanry G., is promoted, 121 

Cultural Resources, Department of, is official name of agency, 65 
'Culture barge," is proposed, 99 

Culture Week, dates of 1973 meetings of, announced, 53; its Coordinating Committee, 
decision of, 8, meets, 53; plans for, announced, 98; report on, 1-8; schedule of. 111 
Cumberland County, records of, 73, 96, 111 
Cumnock, Mary, catalogs Moravian music, 59 
unningham, Rebecca, joins UNC-W staff, 121 

upola House, archaeological work there, 113; receives financial assistance, 66 
urrituck County Historical Society, news of, 57, 102; preserves notebook, 57 
urrituck Indians, 57 

urrituck Public Library, receives notebook, 57 
urtiss, John S., writes part of text, 77 

utten, George B., his book on silversmiths, being revised, 54 
zupryna, Frederick F., joins NCSU staff, 78 


D 

AR, Fort Dobbs Chapter, donates land for Fort Dobbs, 47 
ahill, Elizabeth, her research in Washington County, 106 

alias, Gaston County, historic district there, pictured, 116; its Main Street, pictured, 
116 

anbury, preservation in, is reviewed, 87 

aniel, Mrs. Betty, her paintings displayed, 119 

aniel Boone Association, records of. 111 

aniel Boone Memorial Commission, is abolished, 66 

aniels, Josephus, addition to collection of papers of, 96, 111 

avidson County, records of, 51 

avidson County Historical Association, news of, 80 
avie, William Richardson, his home is on tour, 86 
avie County, records of, 12, 27, 96, 111 
avie County Jail, is on National Register, 68 

avis, Archie K., speaks at Murfreesboro luncheon, 85; to address NCL&HA, 111 
avis, Junius, presides at New Bern meeting, 86 

avis, Mollie Camp, directs National Endowment of Humanities program, 39; serves as 
chairman of SHA session, 39 
avis, Mrs. Mona, joins staff, 76 
ivis, Wiley M., welcomes Wake County group, 62 
awkins, Mrs. Henri, is officer of Wake County group, 106 

ay, Thomas, career of, 52-53; information on, sought, 52; work of, pictured, 52 
;ane, Tenney I., Jr., pictured, 25 

■.es, Samuel B. , is elected governor of Mayflower Society, 22; pictured, 2; presents 
Mayflower Cup, 2 

;jammet, Alain, speaks at SAR banquet, 86-87 

:lhom, M. Mellanay, is officer of NCSPA, 4; pictured, 5; wins Cannon Cup, 5 
ntist's office, 1920s, is on exhibit, 90; pictured, 89 

■partment of the Interior, grant from, makes Fort Dobbs development possible, 47 
amond City, is subject of talk, 79 

ctionary of North Carolina Biography, plans for, outlined, 117-118 

ehl, Billy, directs tour of Nash group, 105 

lion, Mrs. Thomas P., is officer of Union County group, 62 


cumentation Standards, session on, 71 

dge, William Waldo, Jr., his silver shop, is displayed, 90 

dge, William W., III, helps plan NCSCLH tour, 86; is member of Raleigh Historic 
District Commission, 125; pictured, 3 


135 



Doggett, Mrs. Baxter, is officer of Rutherford County group, 105 
Doggett, Mrs. James B., is honored, 4; presides at music federation banquet, 4 
Domit, Moussa, directs Museum of Art, 4 
Dortch House, pictured, 29 

Dorton, J. Sib, is officer of preservation society, 40 
Dorwin, John T., is on archaeological advisory council, 46 
Dublin, Jay, resigns, 117 

Dudley, Harold, conducts memorial service, 86 

Duffy, Mrs. Richard Nixon, her portrait, presented to New Bern society, 86 
Dugger, Gordon S., pictured, 14 

Duke Homestead, appropriation for, 66; its development as tobacco historic site, 53 
Duke Marine Research Laboratory, searches for Monitor, 114 
Duke University, news of, 15, 36-38, 76-77 
Dula, James B., displays old mailbox, 17 

Dunlap, John J., is president of Anson group, 100; participates in Anson County meeting 
16; presides at Anson meeting, 122 
Dunlop, Kathleen E., teaches in Rome, 120 
Dunn, microfilmed newspapers from, 96 
Duplin County Historical Society, news of, 40, 102 
Durham, newspapers of, 51; SAR chapter there, holds banquet, 60 
Durham, Carl, participates in oral history project, 17 
Durham County, National Register entry from, 92 
Durham Lion's Club, hears H. G. Jones, 53 
Durham-Orange Historical Commission, is abolished, 66 

Durrett, Lawrence J., is named head of Pfeiffer College department, 121 


E 

Eagle Tavern, Halifax County, is on National Register, 68; restoration of, 124-125 

Eagles, W. C., is officer of Pitt group, 21 

Eaker, Mrs. Bruce, reports on McGehee's Mill project, 105 

Eaker, Mrs. Madeline, appears before Person County commissioners, 42; is officer of 
Person County group, 42 

Earle, John, participates in University Seminar, 15; speaks at University Seminar, 39 
Earnhardt, Eugene I., is given position, 121 

East Carolina University, its Symposium on History and the Social Studies, is held, 38; 
its Tobacco Symposium, 53; mentioned, 46, 60; news of, 38, 55, 77, 100, 120; sponsors 
Tryon Palace Symposium, 9 

East Carteret High School, mentioned, 57; students there, study Carteret history, 16 

Eastern Cabarrus County Historical Society, news of, 102 

Eastern North Carolina Genealogical Society, news of, 102 

Eble, Kenneth, publishes article, 14 

Eden Church, 60 

Edenton, archaeological work there, 113 
Edenton District Superior Court, records of, 27 
Edenton Historic District, pictured, 115 
Edenton Historical Commission, is re-created, 66 
Edenton Symposium, success of, 8 

Edenton Town Lot Book, transferred to Archives, 51 

Education, Board of, records of, 111 

Edwards, Bennett M., is director of Anson group, 100 

Ehringhaus, Mrs. J. C. B., attends museum opening, 112; gown of, displayed, 90; pictured 
112 

Ekong, Anthony E., attends summer program, 119-120 
Elder, W. Cliff, is officer of Alamance group, 79 
Elections, Board of, records of, 96 
Elgin, Warren County, pictured, 48 

Ellen, John C., is named Outstanding Educator of America, 77; participates in History of 
Tobacco Symposium, 55 

Elliott, Bette, is hostess to museum representatives on TV program, 117 

Elliott, G. D., Jr., is host to Bath commission, 81 

Elliott, Mrs. G. D., Jr., is hostess to Bath commission, 81 

Elliott, Mrs. Reid, is officer of Montgomery group, 59 

Elmwood Plantation, Iredell County, pictured, 93 

Elon College, its Pi Gamma Mu address, 53 

Enderle, Mrs. Dabney, displays art in office, 119; heads bicentennial plans, 
identified, 49; is named director of NCARBC, 49 
English, Mrs. Grace Sams, takes part in Madison County program, 124 
English, Raleigh, takes part in Madison program, 124 
English, Mrs. Raleigh, takes part in Madison program, 124 


136 


English records, microfilm of. 111 

Sngstrom, Mrs. Alfred, presents report at Hillsborough meeting, 17 
tagstrom Award, presented to Mrs. Lillie May Isley, 18 
tanemoser, Mrs. Rose, joins staff, 76 
iqual Suffrage Association, 72 

irvin, Sam J., Jr., delivers address at John Paul Jones bust presentation, 46 
Irwin, Clyde A., Jr., speaks at Orange County Historical Museum, 61 
tatey Hall, Wake County, is on National Register, 92 

Ivans schoolhouse, plans for purchase and restoration of, presented, 88 
ixecutive Board, becomes North Carolina Historical Commission, 65; meets, 14; passes 
resolution concerning John Paul Jones, 46; pictured, 14 
ixecutive Mansion, is seen from mezzanine, 90; to be renovated, 66-67 
kecutive Mansion Fine Arts Committee, is re-created, 65 

kecutive Residence Building Commission, its recommendation, turned down, 66-67 


F 

airchild, Mrs. Erika, speaks in Atlanta, 120; will participate in New Orleans meeting, 
78 

aimtosh Plantation, Durham County, is on National Register, 68; pictured, 69 
armville Plantation, Iredell County, is on National Register, 92; pictured, 93 
aulk, William G., Jr., gives report on Brunswick Town, 56; speaks at Brunswick meeting, 
16; summarizes work at Brunswick Town, 122 
ayetteville, newspapers of, 51 
ayetteville Arsenal, is subject of report, 5 

ayetteville Woman's Club and Oval Ballroom, Cumberland County, is on National Register, 

68 

ederation of Women's Clubs, 72 

ellows, Alice, wins art award, 4 

entress, Liz, is bicentennial employee, 100 

aree, Thaddeus Samuel, his papers, 96 

srguson, Arthur B., publishes article, 77 

arguson, Mrs. Thelma, is officer of Transylvania group, 43 

arrell, Henry C., Jr., is promoted, 77, 120; participates in History of Tobacco 
Symposium, 55 

assenden, Reginald, his papers, microfilmed, 96 
ields, Mrs. Myrle, joins staff, 117 
ields, William C., paints Connor portrait, 28, 45 
inch, L. Boyd, represents secretary of the interior, 81 
inney, Kenneth V. , joins North Carolina Wesleyan faculty, 38 
irst and Second North Carolina Regiments, are on program at Moores Creek, 84 
irst Captain's Company, First North Carolina Regiment, Continental Line, demonstrates 
maneuvers, 54 

irst North Carolina Regiment of Foot, participates in Burke grave ceremonies, 70 
irst Provincial Congress, New Bern, celebration of, planned, 99 
Laherty, David T., pictured, 25 

Lorida, is sponsor for South Atlantic Archives and Records Conference, 26 
Lorida Division of Archives, History and Records Management, sponsors South Atlantic 
Archives and Records Conference, 71 

-owers, John Braxton, III, heads Burke grave project, 70; works on SAR banquet, 60 
>ol Killer (Moravian Falls), is microfilmed, 12 
irbus, Wiley D., his manuscript is preserved, 111 

irsyth County, historic sites there, are toured, 125; records of, 12 
>rt Branch, Martin County, is on National Register, 92; pictured, 93 

>rt Dobbs, appropriation for, 66; budget for, 47; land donated at, 47; plans for, 47-48 

irt Dobbs Chapter, DAR, donates land for Fort Dobbs, 47 

irt Defiance, Caldwell County, receives financial assistance, 66 

>rt Fisher, archaeological plans for, 114 

issett, Mrs. Arthur, is officer of McDowell group, 83; reports on local history and 
genealogy course, 83 

Hinders Hall, Guilford County, is on National Register, 68 

ushee, Ola Male, her Art in North Carolina, is Mayflower entry, 71 

wler, Malcolm, presents paper at conference, 54 

x, Charlesanna, is officer of Randolph County group, 42 

anklin, Bernard, efforts made to save his old home, 22 

eeman, Mrs. Judith E., directs Broughton Ensemble, 6 

eeze, Carter, resigns, 117 

eeze, Edwin C., joins Local Records Section, 53 
ench and Indian War, Fort Dobbs used during, 48 

ick, William R., executes traveling exhibit, 110; joins staff, 75 


137 




Friday, Mrs. William C., asks for historical zoning, 57; elected officer of Roanoke 
Island Historical Association, 3; is officer of preservation society, 40, 80 
"Friend of History," Frank L. Horton, 74; Margaret T. McMahan, 33 
Friends of Hope, news of, 81 

Frying Pan Lightship, news of, given to Brunswick group, 16 


G 


Game of Chance, A, is presented, 4 
Gardner, Mrs. 0. Max, gown of, displayed, 90 
Garner, Collie, is officer of WNCHA, 88 

Garrett, Blanche M., her On the Tides of the Mind, is Roanoke-Chowan entry, 71 
Garrett, Ron, helps in Vance Birthplace barn project, 32 
Garriss, Austin, is on program, 59 

Gash, Robert T., is officer of Transylvania group, 43, 126 
Gaston County, its courthouse, pictured, 116 
Gaston County Historical Bulletin, contents of, 57-58 
Gaston County Historical Society, news of, 57-58 
Gates, Rosalie Prince, is given administrative post, 55 
Gates County, records of, 12, 111 

Gatling, Richard J., exhibit on, in Murfreesboro, 85 

Gatton, Frank D., attends Clerks of Superior Court meeting, attends County 
Commissioners meeting, attends SAA, 117 

Gatton, T. Harry, accepts Connor portrait, 45; accepts John Paul Jones bust, 46; 
pictured, 14 

Gavins, Raymond, presents paper, 76; publishes article, 37; speaks in Cincinnati, 37 
Genealogical Society of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, to participate 
in marriage bond index preparation, 27 
Genealogy Section, North Carolina State Library, hours for, 11 
General Assembly, gives support to preservation projects, 66; records of, 96 
General Francis Nash Chapter, SAR, holds banquet, 60; plans ceremonies at Burke grave, 
General Services Administration, is authorized to transfer surplus historic federal 
property to state, 48 

Geological Resources, Inc., opens Linker Adit, 91 

Georgia, is sponsor of South Atlantic Archives and Records Conference, 26 
Georgia Department of Archives and History, sponsors South Atlantic Archives and Record 
Conference, 71; to serve as host for 1974 meeting of South Atlantic Archives and 
Records Conference, 71 

Gesell, E. M., is officer of preservation society, 40 

Gibbs, Richard F., is succeeded by Dabney Miller Enderle, 49; participates in 

Wilmington program, 56; speaks at symposium, 38; speaks in Halifax County, 17; speaks 
to NCMC, 5 

Gibbs House, Carteret County, is on National Register, 68 
Gidley, Gardner, leaves Old Salem, 42; resignation of, 20 
Gilbert, Christopher, speaks at Old Salem, 20 
Gillespie, Ben, helps in Vance Birthplace barn project, 32 
Gluckman, Stephen J., directs archaeological project in Halifax, 114; heads 
archaeological section, 113; joins staff as archaeologist, 97 
Godbold, Bryghte D., speaks at Wilmington meeting, 56 
Godfrey, James L., speaks at Connor portrait presentation, 28, 46 
Goforth, Joan, is director of Rutherford County group, 105 
Gokhale, Balkrishna G., publishes articles, 78-79 

Gold History Corporation, activities of, 113; is organized in Concord, 46 
Goodrich, Kay A., resigns, 36 

Goodwyn, Lawrence, heads Duke program, 77; presents paper, 76 

Gosling, John, directs North Carolina Symphony, 6 

Governor Morehead School, records of, 96 

Governor's Inaugural Committee, records of, 96 

Governors Island, Swain County, is on National Register, 92 

Graham, William Alexander, is subject of talk, 80 

Graham County, its records, 51 

Gramley, Dale H., participates in museums council workship, 94 

Granville County Historical Society, news of, 102-103; plans to issue guide map, 103 
Gray, S. Curtis, Jr., writes history of Currituck County, 102 
Gray, Thomas A., is officer of NCSPA, 4 

Great Falls Mill, destroyed by fire, is on National Register, pictured, 11 
Green, Fletcher M., 14 

Green, Henry D., is on Tryon Palace Symposium, 9 
Green, Lester, participates in marker program, 22 
Greene, Daniel E., paints portrait of Governor Scott, 75 


138 




reeneville, Tennessee, is toured by Madison County group, 84 

reenlaw, Ralph, attends SHA, 15 

reenlee, Ruth, reports on Carson House, 83 

reenlee, Mrs. Tom, is officer of McDowell group, 83 

reensboro, newspapers of, 51 

reensboro Historical Museum, news of, 58 

reensboro Preservation Society, receives Richardson grant, 28 
riffin-Sessons-Cooper House, is on tour of Nash group, 105 
rill, C. Franklin, is president of Methodist commission, 60 
rist, William, joins bicentennial committee staff, 119 
rove Park Inn, Buncombe County, is on National Register, 68 

rubbs, Mrs. Carolyn B., is appointed to accreditation team, 55; is promoted, 55 
rubbs, Frank L., Jr., is promoted, 55; publishes articles, 120 

jide to County Records in the North Carolina State Archives, revision of, published, 95 
rilford College, news of, 120 
jilford County, records of, 27 

jilford County Bicentennial Commission, is abolished, 66 
jlledge, Mrs. Frank, is officer of genealogical group, 57 
jrganious, Alfred, his letters, published, 83 
/ydir, Caswell County, pictured, 115 


H 

ID, grant from, for Yadkin group, 63 
liirston, Peter W., presides at NCL&HA, 3 

ilifax, archaeological research there, pictured, 114; is toured by SAR group, 86 

ilifax County Historical Association, news of, 17, 81 

lifax State Historic Site, to display John Paul Jones bust, 46 

.11, Josephus W., his home, history of, 42 

milton, J. G. de Roulhac, edits Graham Papers, 50, 95 

milton, John D., pictured, 3 

mrick, Mrs. A. Vason, Jr., makes announcement at NCL&HA, 2 
ndlin, Oscar, gives keynote address at museums conference, 91 
nes, Frank Borden, is officer, NCL&HA, 2 

!nes, Mrs. Gordon, participates in program at Old Salem, 87 
rbin, Fred S., pictured, 14 

Irdee, Lois, transfers to microfilm staff, 117 
;rden, John, is officer of NCSPA, 4 
irdison, J. A., Jr., is officer of Anson group, 122 
!rdy, William, writes outdoor drama, 105-106 

Irmon, William, his Legion: Civic Choruses, is Roanoke-Chowan entry, 71 
Imett County, newspapers of, 97; records of. 111 

lmett County Historical Society, news of, 36, 41, 81; sponsors Conference on Celtic 
Studies, 54 

lmett County News, microfilmed, 97 

Irper, Mrs. Margaret, is on executive committee of NCL&HA, 2 

Irris, Mrs. Martha McKinnon, is first vice-president of Montgomery County group, 59 

Irris, Robert "Joe Boy," joins Records Center staff, 117 

1-rris, William C., attends SHA, 15; publishes chapter in book, 78 

trtwig, Charlotte M., publishes article, 37 

Irtwig, Gerald W., publishes article, 37 

ticher, William C., arranges for NCSCLH tour, 125 

fws, Charles, presents paper at conference, 54 

t/es, Betty June, is officer of Hillsborough group, 18 

bArood, John N., is officer of Montgomery group, 59 

bjwood County, records of, 73, 96 

bwood County Historical Society, news of, 17, 123 

Hirtsease, Orange County, is on National Register, 68 

Hith, Mrs. R. Ernest, is officer of genealogical group, 57; is officer of Union County 
;roup, 62 

H:k Houses, Wake County, are on National Register, 69 
F.k-Lee House, pictured, 69 
H:k-Pool House, pictured, 69 

Hiderson, Mrs. Moffitt Sinclair, her book to be reproduced for blind, 122; pictured, 23 
'ins Thomas Wolfe Literary Award, 23 
H derson, Thomas, additions to papers of, 51 
H derson, Mrs. Vallie, leads tour of Oakwood, 86 
H derson County, records of, 96 
H derson Daily Dispatch, is filmed, 27 

Hdren, Emma Bellamy Williamson, presents punch bowl to Lower Cape Fear group, 124 

139 



Hendricks, J. Edwin, has information on Wake Forest course, 39; introduces speaker, 61 
Henson, Mrs. Emily, is officer of Washington County group, 23 
Herald, Bill, helps in Vance Birthplace barn project, 32 

Herring, William Dallas, is honored, 40; makes seal for Search Room, 110; receives 
plaque from Duplin County group, 40; speaks to Duplin group, 102 
Herron, Mrs. Jo Lunsford, is officer of WNCHA, 88 
Hertford Academy, is opened to public, 85 
Hewes, Joseph, his signature in DAR archives, 103 
Hewlett, Crockette, wins Clarendon Award, 124 

Hezekiah Alexander Homeplace, Charlotte, receives financial assistance, 66 
Hickory Hall, 56 

Hicks, John, joins Records Center staff, 117 

Higginbotham, Don, reads paper at HSNC, 83; receives Robert D. W. Connor Award, 3; 
speaks at symposium, 38 

Higgins, Jerry Lynn, is officer of SAR group, 87 
High Point Historical Society, wins Award of Merit, 3 
Highway Commission, records of, 96 
Highway maintenance maps, preservation of. 111 

Hill, Mrs. J. Cecil, is former officer of Surry County group, 43 

Hillsborough, historic zoning for, 17; its SAR chapter, holds banquet, 60; supporters 
of, aim for National Register recognition, 17 
Hillsborough Historic District Commission, news of, 123 
Hillsborough Historical Commission, news of, 17 

Hillsborough Historical Society, its January meeting canceled, 58; news of, 18, 41, 58 
81, 103; undertakes survey for Archives and History, 58 
Hilton, Mrs. Myrtle, joins Records Center staff, 117 
Hinda Honigman Composers Cup, is presented, 4 
Hines, Percy, attends Clerks of Superior Court meeting, 117 

Historic Bath Commission, is re-created, 66; news of, 81; receives Richardson grant, 2 
Historic Bethabara, cooperates in course offering, 39 

Historic Buildings and Landmarks of Chapel Hill, N.C., to be published, 123 
Historic Cabarrus, Inc., news of, 82 

Historic district commissions, legal authorization for, 30-31 
Historic Edenton, is subject of report, 5 

Historic Halifax Restoration Association, meeting of, 53; receives Richardson grant, 2. 
Historic Hillsborough Commission, is re-created, 66; news of, 82 
Historic Hillsborough House and Garden tour, features of, outlined, 58 
Historic Hope, Bertie County, is toured by visitors, 101; receives financial 
assistance, 66 

Historic Hope Foundation, is subject of report, 5; mentioned, 81; wins Cannon Cup, 5 
Historic Murfreesboro Awards, are presented, 85 

Historic Murfreesboro Commission, discusses fund-raising campaign, 85; holds annual 
meeting, 85; is re-created, 66; news of, 85 
Historic New Bern Foundation, Inc., news of, 82, 123-124 
Historic Robeson, Inc., news of, 18, 82, 103 

Historic Salisbury Foundation, Inc., its president speaks in Davidson County, 80; news 
of, 41-42; purchases home, 42 

Historic Sites and Museums Section, is new designation, 65; records of. 111 
Historic Stanly Commission, news of, 103 
Historic Wilmington Foundation, news of, 58 
Historic Winston, Inc., news of, 104 

Historical Archaeology, Society for, seeks members, 99 

Historical Book Club of North Carolina, gives breakfast, 7; scheduled, 98 
Historical Publications Section, is new designation, 65; issues new publications, 95; 
plans sale, 50 

Historical Society of North Carolina, establishes new award, 18; news of, 18, 82; offei 
undergraduate student award, 119 
Hobbs, R. G., Jr., gives program in Brunswick County, 101 
Hobbs, R. G., Sr., gives program, 101 
Hobson, Lois, is officer of Richmond Hill group, 61 
Hodges, Mrs. Betty, reviews fiction, 2 
Hodges, Mrs. Luther H., gown of, displayed, 90 
Hodgson, Matthew, participates in University Seminar, 15, 55 
Hoey, Mrs. Clyde R., gown of, displayed, 90 
Hoffman, Paul, attends SAA, 13; pictured, 72 
Holbrook, J. D., is Stanly officer, 103 
Holden, Mrs. William W., her gown exhibited, 89 
Holland, Ron, is editor of Wake History News, 106 
Holler, Cato, installs McDowell officers, 83 
Holliday, Dennis H., is officer of Halifax County group, 81 
Holly Springs, is toured by Wake County group, 106 


140 


[ollyday, Frederic B. M., speaks at Duquesne University, 37 
lolman, Hugh, is on steering committee of University Seminar, 15 
[olshouser, James E., Jr., accepts John Paul Jones bust, 46; makes announcement 
concerning Pembroke, 48; pictured, 25 

lolshouser, Mrs. James E., Jr., gown of, displayed, 90; is honorary chairman of Hope 
group, 81 

omewood, Mrs. Roy W., participates in oral history project, 17 

oneycutt, A. L., Jr., attends Bath meeting, 81; attends National Conference for State 
Liaison Officers for Historic Preservation, 36; speaks in Wilkes County, 10 
ood, R. L., is director of Lenoir County group, 104 
ooper, William, his signature in DAR archives, 103 

oots, Hubert H., accepts Evans schoolhouse contributions, 107; heads committee, 107 
ope, is visited by Lenoir group, 104; reception held at, 81; restoration of, is 
recognized, 5 

opewell, Mrs. William, Sr., is officer of Hillsborough group, 18 
opson, Mrs. Peggy R., is officer of NCMC, 5 

omaday, Harold, is chairman of Gold History Corporation, 46; mentioned, 113 
ome. Josh L., 14 

ome, Mary Virginia, reports on John Wright Stanly House, 5 

Drton, Frank, does research on Wilmington area, 59; is "Friend of History," 74; 
pictured, 6, 8, 74; receives NCMC award, 5; speaks at Edenton Symposium, 8; speaks in 
Wilmington, 58 

Drton, Mrs. 0. L., is secretary of Burke County group, 56 

Duck, Mrs. Lucy Hamlin, her book featured, 20 

Duse and Garden Tour, Hillsborough, plans for, announced, 41 

Duse in the Horseshoe, is scene of meeting, 84 

Duser, Mrs. Sarah R., is officer of NCSPA, 4 

Dwell, Katherine, is officer of NCSPA, 4 

lbbard, Earl, reviews activities of Moore County group, 84 
lbbell, Jay B., made life member of NCFS, 7 

lgh T. Lefler Caroliniana Collection, in Yadkin County Public Library, 107 
lghes, I. Harding, Jr., presents portrait to Murfreesboro, 85 

lghes, Samuel, is chairman of Clarendon Award, 124; is officer of Lower Cape Fear group, 
124 

illey, Clarence C., retires, 78 
imphrey-Williams House, Lumberton, pictured, 116 

int, James B., Jr., presides at Scott portrait presentation, 75; tours Reed Gold Mine, 
113 

mtley, Henry, is officer of Anson group, 122; participates in Anson County meeting, 16 
irst, K. P., presides at Onslow meeting, 125 

itchens, Jimmie R., announces gift of books to Yadkin group, 107; is chairman of 
Richmond Hill group, 61, 63; presents plan for Evans schoolhouse, 88 
de County Historical Society, news of, 104 


I 

a B. Kellam Records Room, to contain records of Lower Cape Fear area, 124 

augural gowns, pictured, 89 

centive grants, offered by NCSPA, 70 

dian occupation, coastal areas, discussed at meeting, 125 
■ bst, Richard, is on program of HSNC, 83; welcomes NCSCLH, 19 
Hck, Robert A., is officer of New Bern group, 86 

.edell County, land there, donated for Fort Dobbs site, 47; National Register entry 
from, 92; records of. 111 

Hdell County Historical Society, makes possible development of Fort Dobbs, 47 
.sdell Law Office, funds for, 106 

Hey, Mrs. R. W., is officer of Hillsborough group, 17; wins Engstrom Award, 18 
las, Mrs. Ernest L., gives history of House in the Horseshoe, 84; is chairman of Hope 
group, 81; reports on Moore County Historical Society, 5 
Ids, Raymond L., presides at Moores Creek ceremony, 84 


j P. Knapp High School, mentioned, 57 
- S. Dorton Arena, Wake County, is on 
0:kson, Catherine, is promoted, 97 
Hob Henry House, Carteret County, is 
dies Sprunt Institute, prepares slide 
Jiestown Historic District, sites in, 


J 


National Register, 69 

on National Register, 68; pictured, 68 
program, 41 
pictured, 49 


141 


Jenkins, Mrs. Clauston, Jr., is officer of Mordecai Square group, 19 
Jenkins, Waylon L., is chairman of Hope group, 81 

Joel Lane House, Raleigh, archaeological plans for, 114; funds for restoration of, 28, 
66, 125 

John Motley Morehead Memorial Commission, is re-created, 66 
John Paul Jones, bust, unveiled, 81 

John Wheeler House, receives financial assistance, 66 

John Wright Stanly House, is subject of report, 5; recognized by AASLH, 3 

Johnson, Allen S., receives award, 78 

Johnson, Andrew, his ties with Greeneville, Tenn., 84 

Johnson, Mrs. Charles, is on program, 59 

Johnson, Charlie, is officer of Montgomery group, 59 

Johnson, John R., account book of, 51 

Johnston, Hugh B., speaks in Nash County, 19 

Johnston, Samuel, his coach, to be displayed, 90 

Johnston County, records of, 12, 27, 51, 96 

Jolley, Harley E., is officer of NCSPA, 4; is on program of HSNC, 18; presents paper at 
Oktoberfest symposium, 127 

Jones, Mrs. Allen, gives chairs to Lower Cape Fear group, 124 
Jones, Mrs. Clarence, writes leaflet on Hillsborough town clock, 61 
Jones, David, is officer of Methodist commission, 60 
Jones, David L., pictured, 25 

Jones, Galen, is officer of Moore County group, 84 

Jones, H. G., attends National Conference of State Liaison Officers for Historic 
Preservation, 36; attends National Trust, 13; comments on Richardson grants, 28-29; 
conducts New England Regional Workshop, 76; gives talks, 53; helps plan NCSCLH tour, 
86; is director of NCSPA, 4; is elected to archaeological advisory council, 46; is 
involved in Gold History Corporation, 46; is on board of new journal, 15; opposes 
state government plan, 47; participates in archaeological meeting, 46; pictured, 1, 
14, 26; presents Christopher Crittenden Award, 2; presents Junior Historian 
awards, 76; presides at NCL&HA, 3; presides at meeting of State Historic Preservation 
Officers policy group, 117; presides at meetings, 76; reads paper at AASLH, 117; 
reports on State Capitol, 5; reports on State Historic Sites, 5; seeks entries for 
NCL&HA awards, 34; speaks at C.S.S. Neuse dedication, 10: speaks at National 
Conference of State Liaison Officers, 36; tours Reed Gold Mine, 113 
Jones, Hilton, announces plans for Evans schoolhouse, 107; is officer of Yadkin group, 
63; presides at Yadkin meeting, 88 

Jones, John Paul, bust of, pictured, 45, presented, 45, 46; to be displayed at Halifax 
State Historic Site, 46; tradition concerning, 46 
Jones, Mrs. Rome, is president of Catawba County group, 40, 80, 102; speaks at marker 
unveiling, Catawba County, 102 
Jones, Willie, befriends John Paul, 46 
Jones County Historical Society, news of, 58 
Jones County jail, restoration of, 58 

Jordan, Mrs. Joye E., attends Bath meeting, 81; has new secretary, 117; helps plan 
NCSCLH tour, 86; is member of Raleigh Historic District Commission, 126; pictured, 5, 
14, 112; wins Cannon Cup, 5 

Jordan, Mrs. Wayne, is president of Duplin County group, 40; presides at Duplin meeting 
102 

Jordan, Weymouth T., Jr., edits Volume IV of Roster, 95 
Joseph Bell House, Christmas events at, 16 
Josephus W. Hall House, pictured, 41 
Josiah Bell House, Christmas events at, 16 

Journal of the Currituck County Historical Society, The, is published, 102 
Journal of the House of Burgesses of the Province of North Carolina, The, offered for 
sale, 50 

Joyner, Andrew, is subject of talk, 81; marker honoring, 22 
Juvenile Corrections, Department of, records of, 96 


K 

Kambourian, Jerome, is on Tryon Palace Symposium, 9 
Kannapolis Rotary Club, hears H. G. Jones, 53 
Katzman, Sue, receives training in Massachusetts, 120 

Keel, Bennie C., is consultant to archaeological program, 97; is on archaeological 
advisory council, 46; mentioned, 75 
Kellam, Mrs. Ida Brooks, edits The Wilmington Town Book, 109 
Kellenberger, Mrs. John A., pictured, 3 
Kendrick, Martha L., presents Composers Cup, 4 

Kennedy, Mrs. Anne, is on board of Wake County society, 106; is on program of HSNC, 18 


142 


Kester, Mel E., does painting of Cabarrus County Courthouse, 82 

Killian, Leon "Chip," is officer of Haywood group, 123 

King, Doris E., has scholarship named for her, 126 

King, F. P., is elected president of New Bern foundation, 123 

King, G. Selwyn, speaks at WNCHA, 23 

King, William Eskridge, brief sketch of, 36; is officer of NCL&HA, 2; is university 
archivist at Duke, 36 
King Edward VIII, film on life of, 61 
King's Story, A, is viewed by Pitt group, 61 
Kinnaird, R. W., wins art award, 4 
Kinney, Carol, is wagon master, 105 
Kinney, Cecil, is wagon master, 105 
Kinney, Paul, inherits histories, 122 

Kinston and Lenoir County Crafts and Creative Arts Show, is held, 83 

Kinston Woman's Club, is host to NCSCLH group, 125 

Kirk, Elizabeth, is on program, 59 

Kirkman, Arnold, is wagon master, 105 

Kitchen, Mrs. William W., gown of, displayed, 90 

Knapp, Richard F., is involved in Gold History Corporation, 46; works on gold mine, 91 
Knowles, J. C., is member of Raleigh Historic District Commission, 126 

Kbmer's Folly, Forsyth County, interior view of, pictured, 68; is on National Register, 
68 

Kroeger, Karl, is director of Moravian Music Foundation, 59 
yser, Mrs. Kay, is officer of preservation society, 40 


L 

abouisse, Mrs. John W., is officer of NCSPA, 4 

andau, Norma, publishes paper, 37 

ane Street, is boundary of government mall, 47 

aney, Clara, is officer of NCSCLH, 8; is officer of Union County group, 62 
angston, Mrs. Allen, is officer of Wake County group, 106 
atham, Janet, is officer of New Bern group, 86 

atimer House, furnishings of, 124; is decorated and furnished, 59; is scene of open 
house, 42; restoration of, 124 
eague of Women Voters, 72 

eak, Mrs. Robert E., is member of Raleigh Historic District Commission, 125 
eary, Dean, wins art award, 4 
ebanon, Harnett County, pictured, 48 

ee, Mrs. George S., is officer of Union County group, 62 

ee, Howard, issues proclamation. Chapel Hill Preservation Week, 80 

ee, Thomas B. K., attends Taiwan conference, 16; is involved in international proiects, 
121 

ae County, newspapers of, 51 

afler, Hugh T., donates book collection to Yadkin society, 107; his North Carolina 
history to be published, 54; pictured, 14; writes book, 40 

inmion, Sarah M., attends SHA, 15; discusses Oakwood on TV, 38; is member of Raleigh 
Historic District Commission, 126; is named to ad hoc committee, 55; is named Raleigh's 
Woman of the Year, 55; is on program of HSNC, 18; publishes book, 120 
Jnnon, Don, edits The Wilmington Town Book, 109; is on program of HSNC, 83; speaks at 
Methodist conference, 60 
;nnon's Mill Pond, is on tour, 82 

:noir County, historic sites there, toured by NCSCLH group, 125 

moir County Historical and Patriotic Commission, is abolished, 66 

;noir County Historical Association, is host to NCSCLH, 125; news of, 83, 104 

moir Rhyne College, 53 

:ntz, Bruce, pictured, 25 

;mer, Warren, edits festschrift, 77; serves as chairman at AHA session, 37 
:slie-Alford-Mims House, is visited by Wake County group, 106 
Vien, Jack, 61 

:wis, Henry, is officer of NCL&HA, 2 

wis, John B., Jr., is officer of Pitt group, 21; presides at Pitt meeting, 61 
wis, McDaniel, addition to papers of, 96 
wis, William F., makes appointments, 56 
wis House, is on tour, 85 

wis Place, headquarters for Nash County group, 105 

wis-Smith House, is affected by state plan, 29-30, 47; is on National Register, 29; 
pictured, 30 

wyn, Gabriel, engraves copper plate, 35 
xington, newspapers of, 51 


143 



Liberty Row, Fayetteville, pictured, 116 
Library Commission, 72 

Lieurance, Mrs. Claude, is officer of Rutherford County group, 105 

Liles, L. C., Jr., is board member of Wake County society, 106 

Liles, R. V., calls Anson County meeting, 16; mentioned, 100 

Lilley, Daniel T., pictured, speaks at C.S.S. Neuse dedication, 10 

Lincolnton, newspapers of, 51 

Linker Adit, is opened, 91, 113; pictured, 91 

Linton, H. Sidney, resigns, 97 

Lipsey, Richard C., retires, 78 

Literary competitions, entries for, listed, 98; regulations concerning, 70 
Little Manor/Mosby Hall, Warren County, is on National Register, 69 

Little-Stokes, Ruth, appears on TV program, 117; is on "Month of Sundays" program, 94; 

speaks in Raleigh, 53; speaks in Harnett County, 81; writes article on Milton, 99 
Littleton College Memorial Association, news of, 104 
Livingstone College, news of, 38, 120 
Lloyd, James B., speaks at Stanly meeting, 103 
Local Government Commission, records of, 96 

Local history and genealogy, class in, at McDowell Technical Institute, discussed, 83; 
pictured, 84 

Local Records Branch, activities of. 111; microfilming by, 27, 51, 96; transfers records 
to State Archives, 12, 51, 72-73 
Loftfield, Thomas C., speaks at Onslow meeting, 125 
Lokken, Roy N., speaks at symposium, 38 

London, Mrs. George E., is member of Raleigh Historic District Commission, 125 

Long, Mrs. Glenn, speaks at Catawba meeting, 80 

Long, Long Day for November, A, to be reproduced for blind, 122 

Loretta, is toured by SAR group, 86 

Lorwin, Val R., edits book, 38 

Lost Colony, The, fund drive for, is held, 61-62; report on, presented, 4 
Lower Cape Fear, archaeological plans for area of, 114; outdoor drama on, is encouraged 
by bicentennial, 99 

Lower Cape Fear Historical Society, has reception for presentation of The Wilmington 
Town Book, 109; its Bulletin has article on Alfred Gurganious letters, 83; news of, 
18-19, 42, 58-59, 83, 124 
Lozar, Rajko, 75 

Lumbee Indians, controversy among, 48 

Lunsford, Bascom Lamar, wins WNCHA Achievement Award, 87 
Lynch, Mrs. Sylvia H., is president of genealogical group, 57 


Me 

McAllister, Mrs. Q. 0., greets music federation group, 4 
McCallum, Lucia Mae, welcomes tour group, 82 
McCamy, Mrs. Jean, is officer of NCPS, 7 

McClain, Bobby, promoted, 36; resigns, 117; transfers to State Records Section, 36 
McCrae, John, directs opera, 4 

McCrary, Mrs. Mary Jane, is officer of Transylvania group, 43, 126; speaks at WNCHA 
meeting, 107 

McDaniel, Mrs. Douglas, gives social hour for NCSCLH group, 125 

MacDougal, Bruce, explains National Register program in Wilmington, 13; is on Historic 
Sites and Museums staff, 13-14; is on "Month of Sundays" program, 94; opposes state 
government plan, 47; speaks at conference at Boone, 97 
McDowell County Historical Society, news of, 83-84, 124 
McDowell Technical Institute, 83 

McEachern, Leora Hiatt, her Salt, That Necessary Article , is Mayflower entry, 71; is 
officer of Lower Cape Fear group, 124 
McGee, B. B., his The Country Youth donated to Wilkes group, 43 
McGehee, Mildred, does research on Wilmington area, 59 
McGehee's Mill, land for, 42; to be preserved by Person group, 105 
McGrath, Kyran, participates in museums workshop, 94 
McKay, S. L., presides at NCPS, 7 
Mackenzie, James D., is bagpiper, 54 
McLean, Mrs. Angus W., gown of, displayed, 90 

MacLean, Hector, is officer of NCSCLH, 8, 60; presides over business session of NCSCLH, 
86; speaks in Anson County, 122; speaks to Mecklenburg group, 104, speaks at 
Montgomery meeting, 19 
McLeod, John, presents WNCHA award, 87 
McMahan, Donald, is officer of NCSCLH, 8 

McMahan, Mrs. Margaret, helps plan NCSCLH tour, 86; is "Friend of History," 33; is 


144 


officer of NCSCLH, 8; pictured, 7; wins in Smithwick competition, 8 
MacMillan, Henry Jay, presents original Wilmington Town Book, to Archives, 109 
'lcNeill, Charles, speaks at Carteret meeting, 79 
•lcPhaul, Mrs. John A., is officer of Moore County group, 84 
IcQuague, Mrs. Lucy, participates in Anson County meeting, 16 


M 

lacfie, John, is on Chapel Hill program, 40 
lacon County, records of, 111 
ladison, Dolley, memorial to, 58 

ladison County Historical Society, news of, 84, 124 

lagaldi, Mrs. Janet, is president of Cabarrus group, 82 

lagnolia, Burke County, pictured, is on National Register, 92 

lagnolia Mound Plantation House, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, restoration of, 67 

lakepeace-Hoadley House, is toured by NCSCLH, 86 

taking of Wake, The, is shown, 86 

lalpass, Harris E., owns letters, 83 

langold, Frederick Rogers, papers of, accessioned, 51 

[angum, Adolphus W., buys Chapel Hill property, 80 

lanly, Mrs. Isaac, is officer of NCAS, 4 

iann, Carroll L., Jr., defends state government plan, 47 

[ansard Roof House, Cumberland County, is on National Register, 68 

[arcroft, Mrs. Loran, is officer of Lower Cape Fear group, 124 

iarley, Mrs. Joseph, is officer of Moore County group, 84 

farriage bonds, to be indexed, 27 

[ars Hill College, cooperates in Oktoberfest symposium, 127; is scene of WNCHA meeting, 
88 

'arsh, Mrs. L, G., is coeditor of genealogical group, 57 
arston, Edgar, participates in museums council workshop, 94 
artin County, National Register entry from, 92 

ary Reynolds Babcock Foundation, makes grants, to Duke, 77; to Moravians, 59; to 
Moravian Music Foundation, 105 
asonic Hall, Murfreesboro, is opened to public, 85 
assey, Hector J., edits book, 38 

ast General Store, Watauga County, is on National Register, 69 

athews, Donald, is on steering committee of University Seminar, 15; is promoted at 
UNC-CH, 78 

atthews, Joe C., is officer of NNCHA, 20, 61; plans tour for NNCHA, 125 
atthews, Mary Green, her Pathfinders Past and Present: A History of Davidson County, 
is Mayflower entry, 71 

atthews, Rory, his house, is subject of talk, 81 
atthews House, Matthews Crossroads, is on tour of Nash group, 105 
ayflower Cup, entries for, 70-71, 98; entries sought for, 34; presented, 1; to be 
presented. 111 

ayflower Descendants, Society of, in the State of North Carolina, scheduled, 98 

aynard, Miriam, is director of Lenoir County group, 104 

eares, Paul K., joins staff, 75 

ecklenburg County, records of. 111 

acklenburg Historical Association, news of, 104 

ecklenburg Iron Works, records of, preserved. 111 

edley, Mary Louise, participates in Anson County meeting, 16 

eehan, J., speaks at Oktoberfest symposium, 127 

eldrom, Richard B., discusses genealogy, 80 

embership lists, availability of, 8 

endenhall Plantation Buildings, are on National Register, 10 
ercer, James, transfers to State Records Section, 36 

eredith College, news of, 15, 38, 55, 78, 120-121; students of, participate in 
archaeological dig, pictured, 114 
arrell, Darrell, speaks on his artifacts, 57 
l.jrritt, Mrs. Cama, is officer of Surry County group, 43 
ferritt, Robert, is officer of Surry County group, 43, 62 
ithodist College, news of, 78 
|>zzanine, exhibits on, are opened, 89, 112 
lckle, Andrew, buys Chapel Hill property, 80 
Lcrofilm as a Management Tool, session on, 71 
filer, J. Ed, transfers to state agency, 36 
Lller, Martin A., publishes articles, 37 
Lllns, Mrs. Dale, is officer of New Bern foundation, 124 
Liner, Mrs. Carolyn, is officer of NCMC, 5 


145 




Milton, Caswell County, featured in Southern Antiques and Interiors , 99; is home of 
Tom Day, 52 

Milton State Bank, Caswell County, is on National Register, 68 
Minick, Ruth, is officer of Surry County group, 43 
Miquelet, is acquired by museum, 112; history of, 113; pictured, 112 
Mitchell, J. G. H., is president of Stokes group, 126; presides at Stokes County 
meeting, 87 

Mitchell, Joseph, donates money to Historic Robeson project, 103 

Mitchell, Mrs. Memory F., attends Editorial Board meeting in Washington, 13; attends 
Lower Cape Fear Historical Society meeting, 109; attends SHA, 13; is officer of HSNC, 
18; named chairman of Editorial Board, 13; pictured, 14; speaks in Raleigh, 54 
Mitchell, Terry, is Patriot, 85 

Mitchell, Thornton W., attends SAA, 117; becomes chief, Archives and Records Section, 

97; conducts Capitol Square tour, 86; conducts Wake tours, 106, 127 
Mitchell, W. Harold, announces plans for museum, 63 
Mitchell College Main Building, Iredell County, pictured, 48 
Montgomery County, records of. 111 

Montgomery County Historical Society, news of, 19, 59 
"Month of Sundays" series, is continued, 117 
Moody, Mrs. H. Leslie, is officer of NCSPA, 4 
Moore, Mrs. Anne T., attends AHA, 36; promoted, 100 
Moore, Claude H., pictured, 7 

Moore, Mrs. Dan K., attends museum opening, 112; gown of, displayed, 90; is member of 
Raleigh Historic District Commission, 125; pictured, 6, 112 
Moore, Marie D., helps plan NCSCLH tour, 86 
Moore, Mrs. Thomas 0., is officer of New Bern group, 86 

Moore, William J., directs Greensboro museum, 58; is officer of NCMC, 5; is officer of 
NCSPA, 4 

Moore County, history of, 59; room from log house there, exhibited, 90 
Moore County Historical Society, is subject of report, 5; news of, 59, 84 
Moore House, Caswell County, pictured, 115 
Moores Creek Battleground Association, news of, 84-85 

Moores Creek National Military Park, its staff presents history demonstration, 84-85 

Moravian Music Foundation, news of, 59, 104-105 

Mordecai House, hours for, 19; recognized by AASLH, 3 

Mordecai Square Historical Society, news of, 19 

Morehead, John M., home of, receives grant, 28 

Morgan, Mrs. Lyle, is officer of McDowell group, 83 

Morgan-Tyler collection, acquisitions from, pictured, 11 

Morland, J. Kenneth, participates in University Seminar, 15; speaks at University 
Seminar, 55 

Morrison, Mrs. Cameron, gown of, displayed, 90 

Morrison, Mrs. Fred W., presides, 3; resigns from Roanoke Island Historical Society 
position, 3-4 

Morrison, J. Edward, participates in marker program, 22 
Morrison Award, presented, 3 

Morrow, Mrs. Michael, is officer of genealogical group, 102 

Morrow Mountain, history and archaeology of, discussed, 47 

Morrow Mountain State Park, is site of archaeological meeting, 47 

Morson, Hugh, Collection, 111 

Morton, E. H., Jr., is Stanly officer, 103 

Moser, Artus, wins NCFS award, 7 

Moss, Patricia B., is bicentennial employee, 100 

Mount Pleasant Collegiate Institute, restoration of, is project of Cabarrus group, 102 
Mull, Rondal, introduces speaker at Burke meeting, 79; is president of Burke group, 56 
Murfreesboro Historical Association, holds annual meeting, 85; news of, 60, 85; 

receives Certificate of Commendation, 2; wins award, 3 
Murrill, Mrs. Nettie, speaks at Carteret association, 79 
Museum of Art, is site of reception, 4 

Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts, cooperates in course offering, 39; its directoi 
is Friend of History, 74; mentioned, 58 
Museum of History. See North Carolina Museum of History 
Museum of the Albemarle, news of, 19 


N 

Nash County Historical Association, news of, 19, 85, 105 
Nash-Hooper Gardens, opened for tour, 58 

Nash-Hooper House, is designated as National Historic Landmark, 81 
Nash Law Office, mortgage on, burned, 103; opened for tour, 58 


146 


Nathans, Sydney, his Daniel Webster and Jacksonian Democracy, is Mayflower entry, 71; 
publishes book, 77 

National Archives and Records Service, sponsors South Atlantic Archives and Records 
Conference, 26, 71 

National Endowment for the Humanities, makes grant to Moravian Music Foundation, 59, 
104-105 

National Historical Records Act, to be discussed at archives conference, 26; session on, 
71 

National Museum Act, is administered by Smithsonian Institution, 119 

National Register of Historic Places, additions to, 10, 29, 48-49, 68-69, 92-93, 115-116; 

entries on, burned, 11; includes Raleigh buildings, 47; lists Salisbury landmark, 42 
National Trust for Historic Preservation, advertisement of, pictured, 31; calls 
attention to revenue-sharing provisions, 67; programs of, 31 
Neal, Mrs, Lois S., announces schedule for Genealogy Section, 11 
Neal, Mrs. Retta, reads poems at Hyde County meeting, 104 
Nelson, James, is officer of Mordecai Square group, 19 
Nelson, John K., is promoted at UNC-CH, 78 
NeSmith, James Woods, is archaeological assistant, 97, 113 
Neumann, Mrs. Leslie, joins School of the Arts faculty, 121 

Neuringer, Sheldon, is named chairman of history department, 121; receives grant, 121 
New Bern, microfilmed newspapers from, 96 

New Bern Historical Society, announces benefit ball, 19; announces biennial tour of 
old homes, 19; its ball is held, 60; news of, 19, 60, 85-86 
News and Observer, names Stephenson "Tar Heel of the Week," 60 
Newsome, Albert R., his North Carolina history, to be published, 54 
Newspaper Collection, additions to, 51 

Newspaper Microfilm Project, activities of, 73; begins survey of Chatham and Lee counties 
51; films Henderson Daily Dispatch, 27; surveys Harnett County newspaper resources, 

97; work of, 12 

Newton, John G., is officer of NCSPA, 4 

Nichols, H. Arch, speaks at WNCHA meeting, 88 

Nicholson, Bobbie Jean, speaks at WNCHA meeting, 107 

Noblin, Stuart, attends SHA, 15; is inducted into Phi Kappa Phi, 78 

Noel, Jim, participates in museums council workshop, 94 

North Carolina, is sponsor of South Atlantic Archives and Records Conference, 26 
North Carolina Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, holds meeting, 47; is 
abolished, 65; to comment on state government center plan, 30 
"North Carolina and the Federal Constitution," is traveling exhibit, 110 
North Carolina Art Society, report on meeting of, 4; scheduled, 98 
North Carolina Artists' Exhibition, is opened, 4; winners of, 4 
North Carolina Arts Council, meeting of members of board of, 6; scheduled, 98 
North Carolina Awards Dinner, 91 

North Carolina Brigade, is on program at Moores Creek, 84 
North Carolina Collection, UNC-CH, its former librarian, dies, 119 
North Carolina Committee for Continuing Education in the Humanities, announces 
availability of funds, 34; makes grant to Meredith, 78; makes grant to UNC-G, 39; 
programs assisted by, in 1972, listed, 34 
North Carolina Courts of Law and Equity Prior to 1868, is new pamphlet, 95 
North Carolina Federation of Music Clubs, report on meeting of, 4; scheduled, 98 
'North Carolina First Family Fashions," is new museum exhibit, 89 
North Carolina Folklore Society, news of meeting of, 6-7: scheduled, 98 
lorth Carolina Higher-Court Records, 1702-1708, is scheduled for publication, 67 
North Carolina Historical Commission, is established, 65 

North Carolina Literary and Historical Association, executive committee of, meets, 53; 
its competitions outlined, 70; its role in undergraduate student award, 18, 118-119; 
its seal, pictured, 54; mentioned, 72; report on meeting of, 1-3; scheduled, 98, 111; 
sponsors literary competition, 34 
lorth Carolina Museum of Art, sponsors museum conference, 90 

North Carolina Museum of History, acquires counterfeit copper plate, 35; acquires rare 
miquelet, 112; acquisitions for, pictured, 12; its mezzanine exhibits, described, 

89-90; opens new exhibits, 112; presents Sunday programs, 94, 117; sponsors museums 
conference, 90 


orth Carolina Museum of Natural History, sponsors museums conference, 90 
orth Carolina Museums Council, gives reception, 5-6; its award presented, 5; receiving 
line at its reception, pictured, 6; report on meeting of, 5-6; scheduled, 98; sponsors 
workshop, 94 

orth Carolina Poetry Society, news of meeting of, 7; scheduled, 98 
orth Carolina School of the Arts, news of, 38 

orth Carolina Society, Daughters of the American Revolution, members attend genealogy 
workshop, 13 


North Carolina Society for the Preservation of Antiquities, cooperates in Oktoberfest 
symposium, 127; offers incentive grants, 70; scheduled, 98 
North Carolina Society of Colonial Dames XVIIth Century, news of, 124-125 
North Carolina Society of County and Local Historians, news of, 7-8, 19-20, 60, 86, 125; 

scheduled, 98; touring members of, pictured, 20 
North Carolina Society, Sons of the American Revolution, news of, 60, 86-87: unveil 
plaque at Burke grave, 70 

North Carolina State Library, its Genealogy Section, hours for, 11 

North Carolina State University, includes program on plantations, 117; news of, 15, 55, 
78, 121 

North Carolina Symphony, gives concert, 6 

North Carolina Symphony Society, news of meeting of, 6; scheduled, 98 
North Carolina: The History of a Southern State, revised edition, to be published, 54 
North Carolina Troops, 1861-1865: A Roster, Volume IV, is published, 95 
North Carolina United Methodist Conference, Commission on Archives and History, news of, 
60 

North Carolina Wesleyan College, is visited by Littleton College alumni, 104; news of, 
38, 78; students of, participate in archaeological dig, 114 
North Wilkesboro, is headquarters for Wilkes Genealogical Society, 127; meeting held 
there, 107 

Northampton County Historical Society, news of, 20, 61 
Northampton County Memorial Library, 61 

Northwest North Carolina Historical Association, news of, 20, 61, 125 
Norwood, Charles, discusses preservation of courthouse, 62 
Nunn, R. A., his portrait is presented to New Bern society, 86 


0 

Oak Grove, Cumberland County, is on National Register, 68 
Oakland, Halifax County, is on National Register, 92; pictured, 93 
Oakley, George, resigns, 36 

Oakwood, Raleigh section, has historical significance, 43; is toured by NCSCLH, 86; stud 
of, is conducted by Meredith students, 78 
Oates, John F., is on program of SHA, 37 

Oates, Mrs. Luther, gives history of Asbury Memorial church, 20 

O'Brien, Carol, is bicentennial employee, 100 

Offman, David Isaac, prepares histories, 122 

Ogilvie, Philip, attends Philadelphia conference, 71-72 

Oktoberfest Symposium, includes bus tour, 127; is held, 127 

Old Burying Ground, Beaufort, receives financial assistance, 66 

"Old Main," burns, 48 

Old Quaker Meetinghouse, Guilford County, pictured, 49 

Old Salem, cooperates in course offering, 39; meeting held there, 127; news of, 20, 42, 

Old Wilkes County Jail, Wilkesboro, receives financial assistance, 66 

Onslow County, records of. 111 

Onslow County Historical Society, news of, 125 

Orange County, records of, 96, 111 

Orange County Historical Museum, its anniversary observed, 41; news of, 61 
Orton Plantation, Brunswick County, is on National Register, pictured, 68 
Our Uncommon Heritage, is shown at Moores Creek Battleground, 84 
Outer Banks, is subject of talk, 79 

Overton, Mrs. Max, is officer of Montgomery group, 59 
Oxford Public Ledger, microfilm of. 111 


P 

Pack Memorial Public Library, has archives display, 110 
Paisley shawl, described, pictured, 32 
Pamlico County, records of, 12 

Pamlico County Historical Association, news of, 21 
Papalas, Anthony J., publishes article, 55 

Papers of William Alexander Graham, The, offered for sale, 50; Volume V, is published, 9 
Papers of Willie Person Mangum, The, offered for sale, 50 
Park, Russell, welcomes tour group, 82 

Parker, Harold T., is on program of SHA, 37; leads seminar for French Historical Studies 
77; receives the Annual Distinquished Teacher's Award, 37 
Parker, John R., presents bust, 46 
Parker, Mrs. John R., presents bust, 46 


148 


Parker, Murray D., joins staff, 36 
Paroles, Board of, records of, 96 

Parramore, Thomas C., is on program of HSNC, 18; obtains gift for Murfreesboro, 85; 
participates in Edenton Symposium, 15; pictured, 3; presents Roanoke-Chowan Poetry 
Award, 2 

Paschal, Herbert R., participates in History of Tobacco Symposium, 55; reads paper, 55; 

speaks at symposium, 38 
Paschal House, newel post in, pictured, 52 
Pasquotank County, records of, 96 
Patterson-Palmer House, opened for tour, 58 

Patton, James W., memorial to, 73; participates in program of SHA, 16 
Paul, John, assumes Jones's surname, is befriended by Willie Jones, 46 
Peace College, is visited by Wake group, 22; its Main Hall is on National Register, 92; 
is pictured, 93 

Peace Street, is boundary of government mall, 47 

Peacock, Mrs. Mary Reynolds, attends Lower Cape Fear Historical Society meeting, 109; 
speaks on silversmiths, 53-54 

Pearson, James Larkin, donates books to Wilkes group, 43; poetry of, read at NCPS, 7 
Pearson, Marjorie, is heir of Richmond M. Pearson, 103 

Pearson, Richmond M., founds law school, 63; portrait of, presented, 103 
Pearson, Thomas, is heir of Richmond M. Pearson, 103 
Pearson House, to be used for museum, 127 
Pee Dee, migration to, 91-92 

Peithman, Russell I., participates in museums council workshop, 94; pictured, 6 
Pembroke State University, building at, is burned, 48 
Pender County, cemetery records of, 96 

Penn, John, his signature is presented for DAR archives, is subject of address, 103 
Penn, Mrs. John Blount, receives Penn signature, 103 

Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, its John Paul Jones bust is copied, 46 
Perkins, Robert Colby, joins Methodist College staff, 78 
Perry, Percival, attends meetings, 79; speaks in South Carolina, 79 
Person County Historical Society, news of, 42, 105 

Person's Ordinary, Warren County, is on National Register, pictured, 69 
Petteway, George H., heirs of, present miquelet to museum, 113 
Pfeiffer College, news of, 121 

Phelps, David S., prepares roster of archaeologists, 47; presides over archaeological 
meeting, 46 

Phifer, Edward W., Jr., is officer of HSNC, 18; mentioned, 3; pictured, 14 

Phoenix, Bill, takes part in Madison program, 124 

Phoenix, Mrs. Bill, takes part in Madison program, 124 

Photographer's studio, is exhibited, 90 

Pickier, Mrs. Reade, is Stanly County officer, 103 

Pierson, Mrs. W. C., is board member of Wake County group, 106 

Pine Needles Garden Club, donates money to Historic Robeson project, 103 

Pinehurst Historic District, pictured, 116 

Pitt County Historical Commission, is abolished, 66 

Pitt County Historical Society, news of, 21, 61, 87, 105 

Pleasant, Henry, appears bedore Person County commissioners, 42 

Pleasant Grove Camp Meeting Ground, Union County, is on National Register, 69; receives 
National Register certificate, 117 

Poems of Governor Thomas Burke of North Carolina, The, offered for sale, 50 
Polk County, records of, 51 

Pope, Arnold, demonstrates caber throwing, 54 
Portsmouth Island, is subject of talk, 79 

Powell, William S., attends SHA, 16; discusses proposed dictionary of North Carolina 
biography, 83; is on program of HSNC, 18; pictured, 1; plans Dictionary of North 

Carolina Biography, 117-118; presides at NCL&HA, 3; presents presidential address, 3; 

promoted, 100; receives Christopher Crittenden Memorial Award, 2; seeks writers for 
Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, 118; speaks to Hillsborough group, 41; writes 
introduction to Journal of the House of Burgesses, 50 
Powles, Michael J., addresses Pitt group, 21 
Prescott, Ray, is officer of genealogical group, 102 
Prescott, Mrs. Ray, is officer of genealogical group, 102 

Presnell, Tom, is killed, 126; is officer of Randolph County group, 42; reports on 

Academy project, 42; requests lease of property, 21 
Preston, Richard A., publishes chapter, 38; publishes in book, 77 
Pretty, William, promoted, 36; transfers to State Records section, 36 



Preyer, Mrs. L. Richardson, heads Roanoke Island drive, 61 
Preyer, Norris W., attends SHA, 39 
Price, Jacob, edits book, 38 


149 


Prince, Mrs. S. R., is officer of Rockingham group, 62 
Prince, William Meade, is subject of talk, 57 
Private collections, are sought, 110 

Private Papers in the North Carolina Archives, is new publication, 110 
Proctor Law Office, is visited on tour, 82; restoration of, 103 
Propst House, Catawba County, is on National Register, 68; pictured, 69 
Prothro, James, is on steering committee of University Seminar, 15 
Pruitt, William, joins School of the Arts faculty, 121 
Public Instruction, records of Department of, 111 

Puryear, Elmer L., is on program of HSNC, 18; presents Robert D. W. Connor Award, 3 


Q 

Quail Roost Conference Center, site of museums council workshop, 94 

Queen Elizabeth, 99 

Queens College, news of, 39 


R 

R. V. Eastwood, archaeologists aboard, search for Monitor, 114 

Ragan, Fred D., is named Danforth associate, 77; participates in History of Tobacco 
Symposium, 55 

Ragan, Sam, mentioned, 25; pictured, 14; presents Morrison Award, 3; speaks in 
Hillsborough, 18 

Railroad House, Lee County, pictured, 49 
Railroad House Historical Association, news of, 125 

Raleigh, newspapers of, 51; records of. 111; streets of, involved in state government 
plan, 47 

Raleigh City Council, creates Raleigh Historic District Commission, 125 
Raleigh Historic District Commission, news of, 125-126 

Raleigh Historic Sites Commission, chairman of, donates land, 47; is abolished, 66; is 
revamped, 125; opposes state government plan, 47; receives certificate of commendation 
3; sponsors tour for NCSCLH, 86; wins award, 3 
Ramsey, James E., Jr., presides at Scott portrait presentation, 75 
Randolph County, cemetery records of, 96; records of, 73, 96, 111 
Randolph County Historical Society, news of, 21, 42, 126 
Randolph County Wagon Train, 1973, sponsored by Snow Hill group, 105 
Rankin, Mrs. Katie MacAulay, is officer of Montgomery group, 59 
Raper, John E., Jr., reports on Fayetteville Arsenal, 5 
Ray, Danny, presents needs to Haywood group, 123 
Rea Store, is dedicated, opened to public, 85 
Reconstruction, records concerning. 111 
Records, accessioning, filming of. 111 

Records Center, annex to, pictured, 26; ground-breaking for, 9, pictured, 26; savings 
resulting from use of, 26 
Records holdings, report on, 26-27 

Redding, John F., is officer of Randolph County group, 42 
Redding, W. Howard, is officer of Randolph County group, 42 
Reed, Mrs. Elaine, demonstrates potterymaking, pictured, 6 

Reed, John S., announces University Seminar, 15; is on steering committee of University 
Seminar, 15 

Reed, Paul A., pays tribute to Cordelia Camp, 107 

Reed Gold Mine, appropriation for, 66; archaeological plans for, 114; development there, 
91; funds for, 46; tour of, 113 
Reeves, Craig, is officer of Haywood County group, 123 
Regensburg, Richard, speaks to Stokes group, 126 
Reichard, Richard W., attends AHA, 39 
Reid, Anthony, joins UNC-W staff, 121 
Reid, Mrs. David S., her gown exhibited, 89 
Renaissance in Carolina II, published, 85 
Render, Sylvia Lyons, elected officer of NCFS, 6 

Renn, Claude A., reads portion of Declaration of Independence, 102 
Revolution, training film for bicentennial committee, 99 
Reynolda House, cooperates in course offering, 39 
Rhem-Waldrop House, is on National Register, 10 

Rice, Richard L., introduces film to NCSCLH, 86; is elected president of Wake society, 
106 

Richard Mendenhall Store or Counting House, Guilford County, pictured, 49 
Richmond County, records of. 111 
"Richmond Hill," poem by Grady Burgess, 63 

Richmond Hill Law School, Yadkin County, receives financial assistance, 66; report on 


150 




progress at, 88 

Richmond Hill Law School Commission, mentioned, 63; news of, 61, 103 

Richmond Temperance and Literary Society Hall, Scotland County, is on National Register, 
pictured, 69 

Ricks, T. E., announces tour of old homes, 85; directs tour of Nash group, 105 
Rives, Ralph Hardee, addresses Granville group, 102-103; delivers address at Burke 
grave ceremonies, 70; introduces Pitt County speaker, 21, 87; is officer of Methodist 
commission, 60; is officer of SAR group, 87; is on program of Pitt group, 61; speaks 
at SAR meeting, 60 

Roanoke-Chowan Award, entries for, 70-71, 98; entries sought for, 34; is presented, 2, 3 
Roanoke Island Historical Association, is re-created, 66; news of, 61-62; report on, 

3-4; scheduled, 98 

Robert D. W. Connor Award, is presented, 3 

Roberts-Vaughan House, is opened to public, is scene of meeting, 85 
Robertson, James X., Jr., is quoted on Civil War Roster Project, 95 
Robeson County, records of, 96, 111; toured, 82 
Rockefeller Foundation, makes grant to Duke, 77 
Rockford, artifacts of, displayed, 20 

Rockingham County Historical Society, news of, 21, 62; receives Richardson grant, 28; 
requests funds for Wright Tavern, 21 

Rockwell, Paul A., pays tribute to Cordelia Camp, 107; presents WNCHA award, 87; to write 
on life of Edward Buncombe, 56 
Rogers, Marvin K., dies, 117 

Rohrer, Mrs. Grace J., pictured, 25, 95, 112; speaks at Hillsborough meeting, 82; speaks 
at Junior Historian luncheon, 76; sworn in as secretary of Art, Culture and History, 

25; tours Reed Gold Mine, 113 

Ropp, Theodore, presents paper in Washington, reads paper at West Point, 77 

Rose, Tom, prepares maps, 40 

Rose Hill, is on tour of Nash group, 105 

Ross, Abbie, is treasurer of Burke group, 56 

Rostan, John P., Jr., offers challenge grant, 63 

Rostan, Mrs. John P., Sr., offers challenge grant, 63 

Roundtree, Thelma, presents history of St. Augustine's College, 62 

Rourk, Mrs. M. H., participates in Brunswick meeting, 56 

Rourk, Mrs. Marie, is officer of Brunswick group, 17; presides at Brunswick meeting, 16 

Rouse, J. K., his The Noble Experiment of Warren C. Coleman, is Mayflower entry, 71 

Rowan County, records of, 12, 27; sends visitors to Vance Birthplace, 49 

Rowan County Historic Properties Commission, establishment of, 21 

Rowe, Andrew F., joins UNC-W staff, 121 

Rowe, G. Sam, discusses formation of Catawba County, 40 

Roxboro, microfilmed newspapers from, 96 

Royster, Mrs. C. G., presents Penn signature to DAR, works on Granville map, 103 
Royster, Vermont C., speaks in New Bern, 85-86 

Rubin, Louis D., Jr., addresses NCL&HA, 1; is on steering committee of University 
Seminar, 15; participates in University Seminar, 15 
Rudisill-Wilson House, Catawba County, pictured, 115 

Ruffin, Mrs. Peter Brown, presents records to Lower Cape Fear group, 124 
Rumbaugh, James H., his ties with Greeneville, Tennessee, 84 
Russell, Mattie, attends SHA, 15 

Russell, Phillips, his book published, 17; his book is reprinted, 123; his These Old 
Stone Walls, discussed, 57 
Ruth Coltrane Cannon Cups, awarded, 5 

Rutherford County Historical Society, news of, 21, 87, 105 
Rutledge, Bill, is officer of Richmond Hill group, 61 


S 

St. Augustine's College, is host to Wake County group, 62-63; to be toured by Wake 
group, 43 

St. John's Art Gallery, Inc., receives Richardson grant, 28 

St. John's Lutheran Church, marker for, Catawba County, 101-102 

St. Mary's Junior College, is toured by Wake group, 43 

Salem Christmas—1800, 20 

Salem College Library, relocation of, 42 

Salisbury, newspapers of, 51 

Salisbury Street, is boundary of government mall, 47 
Sally-Billy House, grant for, 28 
Sampson County, records of, 12 

zanders, John L., addresses Wake County group, 43; speaks at Cleveland County meeting, 
80; speaks at Rutherford County meeting, 87; talks on State Capitol, 2 


151 


Sandwich Club of Raleigh, hears H. G. Jones, 53 
Sanford, plans centennial, 125 

Sanford, Cecil L., his house is designated as National Historic Landmark, 81 

Sanford, Mrs. Cecil L., her house is designated as National Historic Landmark, 81 

Sanford, Terry, delivers address in Hillsborough, 81 

Sanford, Mrs. Terry, gown of, displayed, 90 

Sarsfield, Dix, to write on life of Edward Buncombe, 56 

Saunders, Mrs. D. Gail, visits archives, pictured, 72 

Saunders, J. Maryon, speaks to Chapel Hill group, 80 

Saura Indians, archaeological dig concerning, 126 

Sauthier, Claude Joseph, manuscripts preserved. 111 

Sawyer, Claymon, plays guitar, 57 

Schnorrenberg, Barbara B., participates in program at SHA, 16 
School of the Arts, news of, 121 

Schumann, Marguerite E., her The First State University—A Walking Guide, is Mayflower 
entry, 71 

Schwartz, Stuart, his archaeological work in Edenton, 113, Halifax, 114; speaks in 
Chapel Hill, 17 

Schweitzer, Thomas A., is chairman of Livingstone College department, 38, 120 
Scott, Anne Firor, delivers lectures in American Civilization, 77; is on program of 
SHA, 15; publishes article, 38; serves as chairman of session, 76 
Scott, Janet, unveils portrait, 75 
Scott, Kerr, unveils portrait, 75 

Scott, R. W., II, addition to collection of papers of, 96 

Scott, Robert W., announces Richardson grants, 28; breaks ground for Records Center, 

9; official portrait of, 75; pictured, 5, 26; wins Cannon Cup, 5 
Scott, Mrs. Robert W., attends museum opening, 112; gown of, displayed, 90; pictured, 
112 

Scott, W. Kerr, collection of papers of. 111 
Scott, Mrs. W. Kerr, gown of, displayed, 90 
Scott, Mrs. Watson G., is chairman of Antique Fair, 59 
Scuppernong Farm Project Book, is preserved. 111 

Seaboard Office Building, is affected by state plan, 29-30, 47; is on National 
Register, 29; pictured, 30 

Seapker, Janet, attends National Trust, 13; explains National Register program in 
Wilmington, 13; is on staff of Division of Historic Sites and Museums, 14; speaks at 
Brunswick meeting, 16-17, at Wilmington, 58; speaks at New Bern, 82 
Seawell, Richard, desk in home of, pictured, 52 
Secretaries, of governor's cabinet, sworn in, 25 
Secretary of State, records of, 96 
Seegers, Walter L., retires, 78 

Semans, James H., speaks at Scott portrait dedication, 75 
Semans, Mrs. James H., wins Morrison Award, 3 
Semonche, John, is promoted at UNC-CH, 78 
Shanks, Henry Thomas, edits Mangum Papers, 50 
Sharpe, Al, receives donations for Robeson project, 103 
Sharrock, Whitmel T., addition to collection of papers of, 96 
Shaw, Donald, participates in University Seminar, 15 
Shearin, Arthur, his house is toured by Nash group, 105 
Shell Castle, Halifax County, is on National Register, 68 

Shepherd, Alexander, is officer of Hillsborough society, 18; lives in old Nash Law 
Office, 103 

Sheppard, William F., is given extra duties, 122 
Shipley, Janie, is officer of archaeological group, 106 
Short, William F., is officer of Anson group, 122 
Showalter, Tom, is member of study tour, 121 
Shuford House, Catawba County, is on National Register, 68 
Siamese Twins, records relating to. 111 

Silberman, Bernard S., is book review editor of Journal of Asian Studies, 37; is 
director of Asian History Association of AHA, 37; is on Monograph Committee of 
Association for Asian Studies, 37; is on program committee for AHA, 37; reads paper 
at AHA, 37 

Siler, Hal, reports on centennial plans for Sanford, 125 
Silver, Mrs. Charles, is officer of Wake County group, 196 
Silver shop, is displayed, 90 

Silversmiths of North Carolina, being revised, 54 
Simms, William Gilmore, his manuscript, published, 14 

Sink, M. Jewell, her Pathfinders, Past and Present: A History of Davidson County, is 
Mayflower entry, 71 
Sir Walter Cabinet, records of, 96 

Sir Walter Raleigh award, entries for, listed, 98; entries sought for, 34; mentioned, 


152 


70-71; presented, 1; to be presented. 111 

Lr Walter Raleigh Chapter, Colonial Dames XVIIth Century, news of, 126 

Lr Walter Raleigh Commission, is re-created, 65 

.agle. Jack, helps in Vance Birthplace barn project, 32 

niley, David L., speaks at NNCHA, 61 

lith, Betty, buys Chapel Hill property, 80 

lith, Charles Lee, Jr., is officer of NCAS, 4 

lith, David Carlos, is officer of SAR group, 87 

lith, Mrs. Elizabeth Simpson, pictured, 7; wins Smithwick Award, 8 

nith, H. Shelton, his In His Image, But . . ., is Mayflower entry, 71 

lith, James Reid, Jr., presents recital, 4 

lith, Michael 0., attends Bath meeting, 81; joins staff, 76 

lith, Suzanne, consults with Library of Congress staff, 36 

lithsonian Institution, administers National Museum Act, 119 

lithwick Award, is presented, 7-8 

loot. Dr. J. Edward, papers of, contain Cabarrus County material, 96 
tell, Charles C., speaks at Wilkes County marker dedication program, 10 
low Camp, outdoor drama there, is encouraged by bicentennial, 99 
low Camp Historical Drama Society, news of, 105-106 
icial Services, Department of, records of, 13, 73 

iciety for the Preservation of Antiquities, luncheon meeting of, pictured, 5; report 
on meeting of, 4-5; to meet. 111 

iciety for the Preservation of Historic Oakwood, news of, 43 

iciety of American Archivists, sponsors South Atlantic Archives and Records 

Conference, 26, 71 

iciety of Mayflower Descendants in the State of North Carolina, gives breakfast, 7; 
news of, 22 

iciety of the War of 1812 in North Carolina, news of, 22 

lesbee, Mrs. J. B., is officer of Haywood group, 123 

imerset State Historic Site, is scene of candlelight reception, 23 

ms of the American Revolution, restore Burke gravesite, 70 

iuth Atlantic Archives and Records Conference, held in Raleigh, 71; scheduled, 26 
mth Carolina Department of Archives and History, sponsors South Atlantic Archives 
and Records Conference, 26, 71 

iuth Carolina, University of, sponsors Taiwan project, 121 

mthall, Daniel, portrait of, given to Murfreesboro, 85 

mtheastern Museums Conference, council of, 90; is held in Raleigh, 90 

mthern Antiques and Interiors, features Milton, 99 

luthern Highlands Museum, plans for, 127 

luthern Historical Collection, longtime director of, dies, 73 

mthern Indian Studies, plans for, announced, 47 

>arks, Jackson, is officer of Lower Cape Fear group, 124 

>augh, R. Arthur, Jr., gives report on Old Salem, 87; is president of Old Salem, 42 
lencer, Samuel, his homesite restored, 122 

irague, Roderick, receives applications for Historical Archaeology membership, 99 
ring Friends Meeting, news of, 126 

iruill, Kenneth, is officer of New Bern foundation, 124 
agville, Durham County, is on National Register, pictured, 92 
allings, Mrs. Robert L., is officer of New Bern foundation, 124 
anback, Jeffrey F., papers of. 111 

arnes, Mrs. W. Oscar, is treasurer of genealogical group, 57 
ate Archives, accessions of, 51; has traveling exhibit, 110 
ate Auditor, records of, 96 

ate Capital Planning Commission, is urged to modify plan, 47 

ate Capitol, building of, 2; funds for restoration of, 66; is subject of program, 80, 
87; is subject of report, 5 

ate government, study of, sponsored by Meredith College, 120-121 

ate Government Center Plan, its effect on historic structures, 29-30, 47; picture of, 
30 

’ate Highway Commission, records of, 12-13 
■ate Historic Sites, are subject of report, 5 

'ate Library, is unit of Cultural Resources, 65; records of, 96 
• ate Mothers' Association, records of, 96 

ate Records Branch, microfilms Fessenden Papers, 96; report on activities of, 12-13, 
26-27, 51-52, 73, 96 

ate Seal, as used in Search Room, pictured, 110 

aele, Mrs. Edward R., is member of Raleigh Historic District Commission, 126 
aelman, Joseph F., participates in symposium on history of tobacco, 55 
ager, Mrs. S. B., is president of Montgomery County group, 59 
am, Thad, Jr., elected officer of NCFS, 6; speaks in Granville County, 102 
:aphens, David, speaks at Lenoir Rhyne College, 53 


153 



Stephens, John W., records relating to. 111 

Stephenson, E. Frank, Jr., announces donation of portrait, 85; is honored by Jaycees, 
60; is named "Tar Heel of the Week," 60; is officer of NCSPA, 4; is president of 
Murfreesboro group, 60; pictured, 3; publishes Renaissance in Carolina II, 85; speak; 
in Bertie County, 101 
Stephenson, William Rufus, papers of, 96 

Stevenson, George, Jr., attends SAA, 13; attends Philadelphia conference, 71-72; 

executes traveling exhibit, 110; writes North Carolina Courts of Law and Equity Prioi 

to 1868, 95 

Stewart, J. R., gives history of Peace College, 22 
Stewart, Lena, is officer of Moore County group, 84 
Stinagle, George W., is site manager of Reed Gold Mine, 91 
Stine, Tom, is officer of archaeological group, 106 

Stipe, Robert E., activities of, elected to Executive Committee of National Trust for 
Historic Preservation, 31; resigns Chapel Hill office, 40 
Stoesen, Alexander R., speaks in Greensboro, 120 

Stokes, Durward T., is officer of HSNC, 18; to receive undergraduate student award 
entries, 119 

Stokes, Montfort, his house destroyed by fire, 11; site of home of, marked, 10 
Stokes, Mrs. Shawn S., joins Bicentennial Committee staff, 119 

Stokes County, efforts made to save its old jail, 22; historic sites there, are toured, 
125 

Stokes County Historical Society, news of, 22, 87, 126 

Stone, David, his home recognized, 5 

"Stone Age to Space Age," is museum exhibit, 112 

Stonewall, is site of Lewis Place, 105 

Stonewall Jackson Memorial Fund, is abolished, 66 

Stoops, Mrs. Martha, presents St. Mary's College history, 43 

Strickland, Robert, is member of Hillsborough commission, 123 

Strodtz, Mrs. Beverly, presents sketch of Rehoboth Church, 60 

Stroud, Reginald, arranges for NCSCLH tour, 125; is president of Lenoir group, 104 
Stuart, Jesse, publishes story, 14 

Stumpf, Vernon 0., his activities abroad, summarized, 120; promoted, 100; publishes 
article, 15 

Sturdivant, W. K., presents book to Wilkes Community College, 128 
Sturdivant, Mrs. W. K., presents book to Wilkes Community College, 128 
Suggs, Joe, is officer of Randolph group, 21 

Summerville Plantation House, Brunswick County, is subject of paper, 122 
Sumner, Ben H., is officer of Rutherford group, 21, 105 
Surles, Jesse P., is officer of WNCHA, 23, 88, 127 
Surratt, Jerry L., speaks at Wachovia meeting, 22 

Surry County Community College library, is repository for Surry association, 62 
Surry County Historical Society, news of, 22, 43, 62, 106; receives Richardson grant, 2i 
Suttlemyre, Greer, appears on TV program, 117; attends National Trust, 13; discusses 
his "Month of Sundays" program, 94; guides tour of plantation, 117; is on staff of 
Division of Historic Sites and Museums, 14; presents National Register certificate, ir 
Union County, 117; presents program on plantations, 117; presents slide lecture, 123; 
speaks at Boone conference, 97; speaks in Burke County, 40, 56; speaks in Caldwell 
County, 53 

Swain County, National Register entry from, 92 
Swan Ponds, Burke County, is on National Register, 68 
Sword of Peace, The, outdoor drama, being produced, 105-106 
Symposium on the History of Tobacco, is held, 55 


T 

Talley, Banks C., Jr., donates Fort Dobbs land, 47; is officer of NCSPA, 4 

Talley, Mrs. Mary Colvert, her land donated to Fort Dobbs, 47 

Talley, Mrs. Windell, is Stanly officer, 103 

Tar Primitive Baptist Church, is on tour of Nash group, 105 

Tate, Thaddeus W., Jr., speaks at Lower Cape Fear meeting, 18 

Tate House, Burke County, is on National Register, 92 

Taylor, Charles H., discusses Indian archaeology, 46 

Taylor, David R., is officer of genealogical group, 102 

Taylor, Donald R., furnishes information on Tryon Palace Symposium, 9; introduces 
Royster, 86 

Taylor, H. Pat, Jr., introduces Hector MacLean, 122 
Taylor, Helen, is officer of Brunswick group, 17 

Technical Services Section, former head of, dies, 73; filming done by, 27 
Teer, George, Sr., is member of Hillsborough commission, 123 

TePaske, John, is on program of SHA, 15; published chapter, 38; serves as chairman of 


154 


committee, 77 

'hese Old Stone Walls, is reprinted, 123 

"Thomas," paints portrait of Chief Justice Richmond Pearson, 103 

homas, Sam, is officer of Rutherford group, 105; is on program for Rutherford group, 21 

homas, Sara Jo, is officer of Haywood group, 123 

homas Jerkins House, is on National Register, 10 

homas Wolfe Literary Award, is presented, 23 

hompson, Clark A., speaks at Wachovia meeting, 127 

hompson, David D., Jr., accepts flag and certificate, at Moores Creek, 84 
hompson, Harry Lewis, is president of Bertie group, 40; reports on Historic Hope 
Foundation, 5 

hompson, T., is archaeologist, 113 
hornton, Mary L., dies, 119 

horpe, Earl E., his The Old South: A Psycho-history, is Mayflower entry, 71 
indall, George B., attends SAH, 16; is incoming president of SHA, 16; participates in 
University Seminar, 15 

insley, Joe H., is officer of Transylvania County group, 43 
ise, Larry, is bicentennial employee, 100 
obacco History Corporation, meets in Durham, 53 
obacco shop, is displayed, 90 

obacco Symposium, East Carolina University, hears H. G. Jones, 53 
odd, Richard C., receives award, 77 
own Creek, date of, discussed, 91-92 

own Creek Indian Mound, is site of archaeological meeting, 47; its informational leaflet, 
91 

ownsend, Mable, speaks on history of Asbury Methodist Church, 82 
oy collection, is displayed, 90 
ransportation, is portrayed in exhibit, 90 

ransylvania County Historical Association, cooperates with commission, 126 

ransylvania County Historical Commission, is abolished, 66; news of, 43, 126 

rawick, Gary E., is on program at Moores Creek, 84 

ribune (Henderson), is microfilmed, 12 

ron Hall, holds Waldensian historical items, 63 

roublesome Creek Ironworks, is on National Register, 10 

roxler, George, prepares history of Pyle's Massacre, 79; works on Battle of Lindley's 
Mill, 79 

ryon Palace, is site of East Carolina Symposium, 38; receives Award of Merit, 3; sponsors 
Tryon Palace Symposium, 9 

ryon Palace Commission, is re-created, 65; wins award, 3 

ryon Palace Restoration Complex, new color brochure on, 95 

ryon Palace Section, is new designation, 65 

ryon Palace Symposium, meeting of, 53; plans for, 9 

ucker's Grove Camp Meeting Ground, is on National Register, 10 

jrberg, Edward F., does art work on NCL&HA seal, 54 

urner, Albert B., is named director of Center of Political and Social Development, 120 

amer, Annie, is officer of Pitt group, 21 

jin Chimneys, opened for tour, 58 

/aquin Plantation, is site of ceremonies, 70 

jler, John E., is director of NCSPA, 4; pictured, 5; presides at NCSPA, 4 


U 


.S.S. Monitor, is object of search, 114 

.S.S. Monitor Foundation, obtains permit for underwater archaeological research, 114 
S.S. North Carolina Battleship Commission, is re-created, 65 
ostead, Mrs. William B., gown of, displayed, 90 
idergraduate student award, requirements of, outlined, 118-119 

iderwater Archaeological Associates, Inc., is engaged in research, search for Monitor, 

114 

iderwood, Evelyn, pictured, presents award, 23 
lifour Archaeological Society, news of, 106 
.ion County Historical Society, news of, 62 

lited States Forest Service, cooperates in Oktoberfest symposium, 127 
liversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, news of, 15-16, 39, 55, 78, 100 
liversity of North Carolina at Greensboro, is host to HSNC, 82; news of, 39 
liversity of North Carolina at Wilmington, news of, 56, 121 

liversity of North Carolina Press, announces delay in publication, 54; expresses interest 
in Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, 118; mentioned, 55 

liversity Seminar on Southern History and Culture, announcement of, 15; meetings of, 55 


155 




Upchurch, Eugene T., is officer of NCMC, 5 

Upper Yadkin Valley in the American Revolution, The, is presented to Wilkes library, 1: 


V 

Vance, Zebulon B., is subject of talk, 80 

Vance Birthplace State Historic Site, adds log barn, 32; has traveling exhibit, 94; is 
stop on tour, 20; meeting is held there, 127; mentioned, 83; prepares for spring tout, 
49 

Van Der Veer House, grant for, 28 

Van Noppen, Ina W., presides at NCL&HA, 3; publishes article, 14; speaks at Rutherford 
County meeting, 105 

Van Noppen, John, publishes article, 14; speaks at Rutherford meeting, 105 
Venable, Mrs. Scott, is officer of Mordecai Square group, 19 
Vick, Mrs. Robert E., speaks in Halifax County, 81 
Victoria, Mecklenburg County, is on National Register, 68 
Vincent, Gilbert, doing special research in Washington County, 106 

Virginia, sends representatives to South Atlantic Archives and Records Conference, 71 


W 

WPA Pre-1914 Cemetery Inscription Survey, is filmed, 27 
Wachovia Historical Society, news of, 22, 127 
Wade, Charles B., Jr., heads committee, 20 
Wadesboro Garden Club, sponsors Christmas open house, 39 

Wager, Paul, is on Chapel Hill program, prepares maps, 40; speaks at Chapel Hill meetin 
40 

Wagoner, William H., participates in Wilmington program, 56 

Wake County, is toured by NCSCLH, 86; its high schools, plan for art and photography 
contest, 106; National Register entries from, 92; records of. 111 
Wake County Historical Society, news of, 22, 43, 62-63, 106, 127; sponsors tour for 
NCSCLH, 86 

Wake County History Project, meeting of committee of, 53 

Wake Forest University, cooperates in course offering, 39; mentioned, 46, 61; news of, 
39, 78-79, 121 

Waldensian Bakeries, offers challenge grant, 63 
Waldensian Museum, location of, news of, 63 
Walker, B. B., is officer of Randolph County group, 42 
Walker, Mrs. Robert, is officer of Lower Cape Fear group, 124 
Wall, Mrs. Maxie, transfers to Local Records Section, 36 
Wall, Mrs. Stephen J., presents paisley shawl to museum, 32 

Walser, Richard, edits Burke Poems, 50; reviews nonfiction, 3; speaks at Oktoberfest 
symposium, 127 

Walsh, Virginia, publishes article, 18 

Walters, Thomas, his Seeing in the Dark, is Roanoke-Chowan entry, 71; reads poetry, 7 
Walton, Brian Joseph, is on program for SHA, 16 

Wangerin, Richard, speaks at luncheon meeting of Symphony Society, 6 

Ward, Mrs. D. L., is officer of New Bern foundation, 124 

Ward, Trawick, shows slides at archaeology meeting, 100 

Ward, W. F., presents portrait of Judge Nunn to New Bern society, 86 

Warlick, Wilson, speaks at marker unveiling, 102 

Warren, Mrs. Oliveira, demonstrates spinning, 6 

Warren County, records of, 96 

Warren House, Caswell County, is on National Register, pictured, 92 

Warren Store, Caswell County, is on National Register, 92; pictured, 93 

Warren Wilson College, news of, 16, 121 

Washburn, Wyan, conducts Cleveland County tour, 123 

Washington County, is visited by Lenoir group, 104 

Washington County Historical Society, news of, 23, 106-107 

Watauga County, records of, 12, 111 

Waters, Davis, reports on Historic Edenton, 5 

Waters, Gilbert S., his automobile displayed, 90 

Watkins, Ralph, presides at Chapel Hill meeting, 40 

Watson, Alan D., speaks at Methodist conference, 60 

Watson, Jo Ann, joins staff, 75 

Watson, Richard L., is officer of HSNC, 18 

Watts, Gordon P., is underwater archaeologist, searches for Monitor, 114 
Waugh, Betty, her The Upper Yadkin Valley in the American Revolution, is presented to 
Wilkes library, 128 


156 




fayne County, records of. 111 

tease, Hugh, is in charge of symposium arrangements, 38 

featherly, A. Earl, his The First Hundred Years of Historic Guilford, is Mayflower 
entry, 71 

feaver, William J., speaks at WNCHA meeting, 88 

Jebb, Glenn F., is officer of Anson group, 122 

/ebb, James, presides at Hillsborough meeting, 17 

/ebb, Mrs. Mary Leigh, is member of Hillsborough commission, 123 

f/eil, Gertrude, identified, 72 

Zeil Collection, finding aids completed for, 72 

Jelbom, G. E. , presides at Harnett meeting, 81 

lelbom, James, is memorialized on marker, 10 

felker, Mrs. David, gives illustrated lecture to Surry County group, 106 

Tellman, Manly Wade, his A Southern Mountain Fastness and Its People, is Mayflower entry, 
71; speaks in Moore County, 59 
fesley, George, publishes article, 14 

tessington House, Chowan County, is on National Register, 68 

'est, Harry C., elected officer of NCFS, 6 

fest, John Foster, elected officer of NCFS, 6 

'est, Mrs. William S., dies, 73 

est Queen Street, Edenton, pictured, 115 

'estern Carolina University, mentioned, 46; news of, 16 

estern North Carolina Historical Association, is host to NCSCLH, 19-20; news of, 23, 
87-88, 107, 127 

estern North Carolina Since the Civil War, discussed at meeting, 105 

hite, Finley, is officer of NCAS, 4 

hite. Mack, is officer of WNCHA, 88 

hite, Martha, is bicentennial employee, 100 

hite, Thomas J., pictured, 10; speaks at C.S.S. Neuse dedication, 10 
hite, Mrs. W. E., is past officer of Bertie group, 40; pictured, 5 
hitehurst, A. L., presents sketch of Rehoboth Church, 60 
hitley, David, is officer of Union County group, 63 

hitley, Mrs. Frances, demonstrates weaving, 6; has application forms for incentive 
grants, 70; pictured, 6 

hitty, Mrs. Fred H., is officer of archaeological group, 102 
iggins, Minnie M., is officer of Pitt group, 21 

ilbom, Mrs. Elizabeth W., presents marker, 22; speaks at Northampton meeting, 20; 
speaks in Wilkes County, 10 
iley, Calvin H., is subject of talk, 80 

ilkes Community College, receives copy of The Upper Yadkin Valley in the American 
Revolution, 128 

ilkes County, markers there, dedication of, 10; records of, 12 
ilkes County Library, receives copy of The Upper Yadkin Valley in the American 
Revolution, 128 

ilkes Genealogical Society, news of, 127 
ilkes Historical Society, news of, 43, 107, 128 
ilkins, Mary Vann, is on program of HSNC, 18 
illiam Mitchell House, pictured, 29 

illiam R. Davie House, Halifax County, is on National Register, 92; pictured, 93 
illiams, Mrs. Alma T., is member of Raleigh Historic District Commission, 126 
illiams, Mrs. Edwin R., is officer of New Bern group, 86 
illiams, Cratis, publishes article, 14 

illiams, F. Carter, draws plans for new Records Center, 9; pictured, 26 
illiams, Isabel M., her Salt, That Necessary Article, is Mayflower entry, 71 
illiams. Max R. , edits Graham Papers, 95; is officer of NCL&HA, 2 
illiams, Peter P., is member of Raleigh Historic District Commission, 126 
illiams, Mrs. R. W., is officer of Lower Cape Fear group, 124 
illiamsburg, to be toured by Halifax group, 17 

illiamson, Mrs. Bailey P., is member of Raleigh Historic District Commission, 125 
illiamson, Jerry, edits new journal, 14-15 

ilmington, colonial record of, published, 109; preservation in, discussed, 58 

Llmington Street, is boundary of government mall, 47 

ilmington Town Book, is published, pictured, 109 

Llson, H. C., is officer of Cleveland group, 80 

Llson, L. R., participates in oral history project, 17 

llson County, records of, 27 

Lndsor, microfilmed newspapers from, 96 

Lnecoff, Mrs. K. C., is member of Hillsborough commission, 123; is officer of 
Hillsborough group, 18 

Inkier, Mrs. J. H., is officer of NCSPA, 4, 8 

Lnn, Wilkins B., is named Outstanding Educator of America, 77; publishes book, 120 


157 



Division of Archives and History 
Department of Cultural Resources 
109 East Jones Street 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27611 


North Carolina State Librai r 


ti c, 



Carolina 
iomments 


Published Bimonthly by the North Carolina Division of Archives and History 


✓ 


Volume XXII, Number 1 J|JL g fg/g January, 1974 


Culture Week Held in November 

For the first time in many years Culture Week was held in November 
rather than December. The meetings, scheduled for November 13-17, were 
held in Raleigh. Many awards were given during the five days, climaxed by 
the presentation of the Mayflower, Sir Walter Raleigh, and Crittenden 
Memorial awards on Friday evening. 

A reception for all societies was held at the Mordecai House on the after¬ 
noon of November 15. 


North Carolina Literary and Historical Association 

The North Carolina Literary and Historical Association held meetings 
throughout the day on Friday, November 16. The association presented its 
Christopher Crittenden Memorial Award to John E. Tyler of Roxobel, head 
of the preservation group which saved and restored Hope Plantation, the 
home of Governor David Stone near Windsor. Mr. Tyler has been president 
of the North Carolina Society for the Preservation of Antiquities and has 
been an active member and was the founder of the Bertie County Historical 
Society. The Sir Walter Raleigh Award for fiction went to Fred Chappell, 
writer-in-residence at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, for 
his third novel, The Gaudy Place. Dr. Lionel Stevenson, professor of English 
at Duke University, won the Mayflower Society Cup for nonfiction for The 



Shown here is the receiving line for one of the many receptions given during the week— 
his one on Friday evening in honor of the winners and speakers during the Literary and His- 
orical Association meetings. (Photos by Division of Archives and History.) 














Coveted awards presented during the 
NCL&HA’s evening meeting are shown here. 
In upper left photo, Sam B. Dees, right, pre¬ 
sented the Mayflower Cup to Matthew Hodg¬ 
son, director of the UNC Press, representing 
the winner, Lionel Stevenson, who could not 
be present. In photo at upper right, Miss 
Olivia Burwell, right, presented Fred Chap¬ 
pell’s Sir Walter Raleigh Award to his 
mother, Mrs. J. T. Chappell. At left, John 
E. Tyler accepted the Christopher Crittenden 
Memorial Award from H. G. Jones. 

Pre-Raphaelite Poets. Neither Mr. Chappell nor Dr. Stevenson could be 
present; Mr. Chappell’s award was accepted by his mother, Mrs. J. T. 
Chappell; Dr. Stevenson’s by Dr. Matthew Hodgson, director of the Univer¬ 
sity of North Carolina Press, which published the book. 

Preceding the presentations at the evening meeting Mr. Archie K. Davis 
of Winston-Salem spoke on “The Veil of Humility.” Presiding at the evening 
meeting was the association’s president, Frank Borden Hanes, also of Win¬ 
ston-Salem. Mr. Hanes presented his presidential address, “Looking for 
Pierson Ricks,” at the dinner meeting. Henry W. Lewis, director of the In¬ 
stitute of Government and vice-president of the association, presided at the 
dinner which was held at the Sir Walter Hotel. Winners were honored at a 
reception following the evening meeting. 

Earlier in the day the association’s annual business meeting was held with 
Mr. Hanes presiding. Dr. Henry S. Stroupe of Wake Forest University was 
elected president. Reelected were Dr. Max R. Williams of Western Carolina 
University, Dr. William E. King of Duke University, and Mr. Henry Lewis of 
Chapel Hill, vice-presidents; and Dr. H. G. Jones, secretary-treasurer. Re¬ 
elected to the Executive Committee were Dr. James H. Brewer of North 
Carolina Central University and Dr. Guy Owen of North Carolina State Uni¬ 
versity. 

Dr. King presided at the morning program. North Carolina nonfiction of 
the year was reviewed by Dr. Lala Carr Steelman of East Carolina University; 
and Mr. Thad Stem of Oxford presented a paper, “Absent with Leave, or How 
Musty Files Came Alive.” Following the morning program several awards 
were presented. Mrs. A. Vason Hamrick, Jr., of Shelby presented the Ameri¬ 
can Association of University Women Award for Juvenile Literature to Dr. 



2 






Barbara M. Parramore of Raleigh for her book, The People of North Caro¬ 
lina. The Roanoke-Chowan Poetry Award was presented by Dr. Hargus 
Taylor of Murfreesboro, convener of the group, to Ronald H. Bayes, writer- 
in-residence at St. Andrews Presbyterian College in Laurinburg, for his 
book of poetry, The Casketmaker, Four awards of merit and two certificates 
of commendation, sponsored by the American Association for State 
Local History, were presented by Mr. John G. Zehmer, Jr., of Raleigh. 
Awards of merit were given to Historic Hope Foundation of Windsor, to the 
Historic Wilmington Foundation, to the Southern Antiques Society of High 
Point, and to William S. Powell of Chapel Hill for his book, The First State 
University: A Pictorial History of the University of North Carolina. Certifi¬ 
cates of commendation were awarded to Manly Wade Wellman of Chapel 
Hill for his book, The Kingdom of Madison: A Southern Mountain Fastness 
and Its People, and to the Robeson County Board of Education for restora¬ 
tion of a one-room schoolhouse in that county. 

At the luncheon meeting Dr. Williams presided. North Carolina fiction, 
poetry, and juvenile literature of the year were reviewed by Mr. Sam Ragan of 
Southern Pines. The Robert D. W. Connor Award was presented by Dr. 
Richard L. Watson, Jr., on behalf of the Historical Society of North Carolina 
to Memory F. and Thornton W. Mitchell of Raleigh. The award was given for 
their two-part article, “The Philanthropic Bequests of John Rex of Raleigh,” 
which was published in the North Carolina Historical Review. 




Daytime winners of awards through the 
Literary and Historical Association are shown 
here. In photo at upper left, Ronald H. Bayes 
of St. Andrews College received the Roa¬ 
noke-Chowan Poetry Award from Hargus 
Taylor of the Roanoke-Chowan Group, far 
left; and Barbara M. Parramore of N. C. 
State University, second from right, received 
the AAUW Award for Juvenile Literature 
from Mrs. A. Vason Hamrick, Jr., represent¬ 
ing the AAUW in North Carolina. In photo at 
upper right are winners of American Asso¬ 
ciation for State and Local History Awards: 
from left to right, Rev. D. F. Lowry for the 
Robeson County Board of Education, Robert C. White for Historic Hope Foundation, William 
3. Powell, Robert E. Winters, Manly Wade Wellman, and R. V. Asbury, Jr. (for the Historic 
Wilmington Foundation). At left, Richard L. Watson, Jr., presents the Historical Society of 
vJorth Carolina’s Robert D. W. Connor award to Dr. and Mrs. Thornton W. Mitchell. 


Roanoke Island Historical Association 


The annual business meeting and subscription luncheon of the association 
were held on November 13, presided over by Mrs. William C. Friday of 
Chapel Hill, chairman. Mr. Huntington Cairns, on behalf of the Morrison 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 1, JANUARY, 19U 


3 








Award board, announced that the winner of the award was Francis Speight, 
artist-in-residence at East Carolina University. The award is presented 
annually by residents of Dare County in honor of Dr. and Mrs. Fred Morri¬ 
son of Washington. Paul Green, author of The Lost Colony and other his¬ 
torical dramas, told the Roanoke Island Historical Association that the 
historical drama was “bubbling up all over America.” During the luncheon 
meeting Mark Sumner, director of the Institute of Outdoor Drama in Chapel 
Hill, also spoke of the growing popularity of outdoor dramas. 

North Carolina Federation of Music Clubs 

The federation’s annual music day was held November 13. Various awards 
were announced during the program. Jacqueline Butler Hairston won the 
1973 North Carolina Music Day Composer’s Award for her composition, 
“Nowhere to Lay His Head.” Mrs. Hairston, recently of Charlotte, was 
presented the Hinda Honigman Composers Cup at the music day banquet. 
Four other North Carolinians who received special awards for their contri¬ 
butions to music include David Weatherspoon of Raleigh, opera chairman 
of the North Carolina Federation of Music Clubs and director of the National 
Opera Company. He received an award for his longtime promotion of opera 
in North Carolina. Dr. Preston Hancock of Raleigh received a special award 
for composition and for his work with the State Department of Public In¬ 
struction. Mr. and Mrs. James York of Mocksville received a special award 
for contribution to folk music literature; he is folk music archivist of the 
North Carolina Federation of Music Clubs. Mrs. Grace Rohrer, secretary 
of the Department of Cultural Resources, spoke at the music day banquet 
on the subject, “State of the Arts.” Mrs. James B. Doggett, president, pre¬ 
sided at the dinner meeting. Following the presentation of the Hinda Honig¬ 
man Composers Cup, the winning composition was performed for those in 
attendance. During the afternoon meeting the audience heard a performance 
of Pagliacci by the National Opera Company of Raleigh. 

A concert was presented the evening of November 13 by the North Caro¬ 
lina Symphony Chamber Group. A reception honoring Mrs. Doggett, artists, 
and guests, followed the concert. 

North Carolina Art Society 

The society met November 14. At its annual business meeting Mrs. Isaac 
Manly of Raleigh was elected president; Andrew S. Lundy of Chapel Hill, 
vice-president; Charles Lee Smith of Raleigh, secretary-treasurer; and Mrs. 
R. Franklin Poole, Jr., of Raleigh, Mrs. Charles M. Reeves, Jr., of Sanford, 
Mrs. Ernest A. Hamill of Asheville, and Finley T. White of Durham, di¬ 
rectors. The climax of the Art Society day came with the announcement that 
Ralph Cox of Athens, Georgia, had won the North Carolina Art Society’s 
$1,000 first purchase award for his painting “Forms on Green.” This award 
and others were announced at the dinner meeting of the society held at the 
Sir Walter Hotel. A new prize in the competition, the $950 Rauch Industries, 
Inc., purchase award, went to Dennis Zaborowski of Chapel Hill for his oil 
painting, “Pink Coffee Cup.” Three $500 purchase awards went to Gina 


4 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Gilmour of Charlotte for “Doll Baby,” an acrylic; to Frank Faulkner of 
Winston-Salem for “Agin Court,” an acrylic; and to Sherry Waterworth of 
Boone for “Skewer II,” a wood and lead sculpture. North Carolina National 
Bank donated $800 in purchase awards with $500 going to Henry Peterson of 
Newton, Massachusetts, for “Portrait Painting,” an oil, and $300 to Michael 
Loyer of Chapel Hill for “The Sportsman,” an acrylic. Three $100 honorable 
mention prizes went to Keith Lambert of Greensboro for “Interlock Six,” a 
stoneware sculpture; Willie B. Grimes of Salisbury for “Carr Street Win¬ 
dow,” an oil; and Paul Hartley of Winston-Salem for “Protection VII,” a 
mixed media work. Caroline Vaughn of Durham received the $75 print 
award for “An Labarre, Bonnie and Jody.” A painting by William Merritt 
Chase, “Dorothy, Helen and Bob,” was presented to the Museum of Art by 
the State Art Society in honor of Mr. Edwin Gill, who has served as a trustee 
of the museum for many years. 

At the dinner meeting, the speaker was George C. Seybolt of Dedham, 
Massachusetts, president of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. Following the 
dinner meeting, the 1973 North Carolina Artists Exhibition was opened at 
the Museum of Art, and a reception honored the winning artists. 

North Carolina Symphony Society 

The society held its annual meeting on November 14 at the Velvet Cloak 
Motor Hotel. Ralph Rizzolo of the National Endowment for the Arts, Wash¬ 
ington, D. C., was the speaker at the luncheon meeting. 

North Carolina Society for the Preservation of Antiquities 

At a business meeting on November 15 the society considered a name 
change of the organization, referring the matter to its officers and directors 
for final action. The proposed name is Historic Preservation Society of 
North Carolina, Inc. Mrs. Henry C. Zenke of Greensboro, president, presided 
at the morning meeting. Officers elected at that time include Mrs. Zenke, 
president; William J. Moore of Greensboro, vice-president; Miss Gertrude 
S. Carraway of New Bern, Mr. Harry Gatton of Raleigh, Mrs. Sarah R. 
Houser of Charlotte, Mrs. John W. Labouisse of Richmond, Virginia, Mrs. 
Lura Tally of Fayetteville, on the board of directors; Dr. H. G. Jones, John 
E. Tyler of Roxobel, and John G. Zehmer, Jr., are ex-officio members. Vice- 
presidents of the congressional districts are E. Frank Stephenson, Jr., of 
Murfreesboro; Mrs. Jack E. Brinson of Tarboro, Mrs. Copland Kell of Beau¬ 
fort, Dr. Banks C. Talley, Jr., of Raleigh, Thomas Alexander Gray of 
Winston-Salem, John Harden of Greensboro, Mrs. Thomas H. Wright, Jr., 
of Wilmington, Mrs. J. H. Winkler of North Wilkesboro, Miss M. Mellanay 
Delhom of Charlotte, Dr. Harley E. Jolley of Mars Hill, and Mrs. H. Leslie 
Moody of Hickory. 

Reports on preservation projects were presented by a number of individ¬ 
uals. Mr. Henry C. Zenke, representing the Greensboro Preservation So¬ 
ciety, spoke on Blandwood, home of Governor John Motley Morehead; Mrs. 
E. M. McEachern, representing the Lower Cape Fear Historical Society, 
discussed the Latimer House; the Raleigh Historic Properties Commission 
was represented by Mr. William W. Dodge III who discussed Mordecai 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 1, JANUARY, 197i 


5 


Square and the various projects in connection therewith; Mr. Henry V. 
Anderson spoke on the Rockingham County Historical Society’s restoration 
of Wright Tavern; Mr. Charles Jack and Mr. A. L. Honeycutt, Jr., repre¬ 
senting the Hezekiah Alexander Foundation, discussed the restoration of 
the Hezekiah Alexander House; and Mr. John Hamilton discussed the 
restoration of the blacksmith’s shop on the John Haley House property, a 
project of the High Point Historical Society. All of these projects were illu¬ 
strated with slides. 

Incentive grants of $200 each were given to the Dolley Madison Memorial- 
Isley Cabin, a project of the Greensboro Historical Museum; the Latimer 
House, being preserved at Wilmington by the Lower Cape Fear Historical 
Association; and the William Gaston House Restoration Association, a 
statewide group with headquarters at New Bern. 





In photo at upper left holding their Can¬ 
non Cups are Robert E. Stipe, Ava L. Honey¬ 
cutt, Jr., and Henry C. Landon III. Dr. 
Gertrude Carraway, extreme left, in photo at 
upper right, presented the Antiquities So¬ 
ciety’s incentive awards to Mrs. John A. 
Shields for the Gaston House, Mrs. E. M. 
McEachern for the Latimer House, and 
Henry C. Zenke for the Dolley Madison 
Memorial. At left, Nicholas B. Bragg accepts 
for Reynolda House, Inc., from Mrs. Joye E. 
Jordan, the Museums Council’s award. 

The society, at a joint luncheon meeting with the North Carolina Mu¬ 
seums Council, heard Dr. Stephen J. Gluckman, chief of the Archaeology 
Section of the Division of Archives and History, speak on “Cohabitation— 
the Arts, Sciences, and Archaeology.” 

Mrs. Zenke again presided when the dinner meeting was held in the 
Raleigh City Club at the Hotel Sir Walter. Frank L. Horton, director of the 
Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts and Old Salem, was featured 
speaker; his topic was “North Carolina Antiquities—New Discoveries,” 
which he illustrated with slides. At the dinner meeting the Museums Coun¬ 
cil’s annual award was presented to Reynolda House at Winston-Salem for 
its arts and humanities program. Nicholas B. Bragg, Reynolda’s executive 
director, and Mrs. Barbara Lassiter of New York and Winston-Salem, 
granddaughter of the original owner of the house, received the award for 
the Reynolda House and its program. Ruth Coltrane Cannon cups were 
presented to Robert E. Stipe, professor of law and government and assistant 
director of the Institute of Government at Chapel Hill, for his contributions 


6 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 













to preservation on a local, state, national, and international basis; to Dr. 
Henry C. Landon III for his efforts as chairman of Old Wilkes, Inc., which 
sponsored the restoration of the Old Wilkes County Jail and its adaptive use; 
and to A. L. Honeycutt, Jr., restoration supervisor of the Historic Sites and 
Museums Section of the Division of Archives and History, for his efforts on 
behalf of many preservation and restoration projects in North Carolina. 



Of the many speakers, three are shown here: left, Frank L. Horton of Old Salem, and 
center, Stephen J. Gluckman of the Division of Archives and History, both speaking to the 
joint meetings of the Antiquities Society and Museums Council; and right, Rear Admiral Alex 
M. Patterson, speaking at the Genealogical Exploratory Session. 

North Carolina Museums Council 

In addition to the joint luncheon meeting, held with the Society for the 
Preservation of Antiquities and mentioned above, the council held a brief 
business meeting at which time officers and board members were elected 
and reports were heard. Elected president of the council was William J. 
Moore of Greensboro; vice-president, Cleve Scarborough of Charlotte; secre¬ 
tary-treasurer, Mrs. Elizabeth Pitt of Winston-Salem; member of the board 
as a representative of history, Gene Capps of Winston-Salem; and member 
of the board as a representative of children’s museums, Lester M. Goodwin 
of Southern Pines. 


Genealogical Exploratory Session 

Approximately 150 people attended a session held at the Sir Walter Hotel 
on the afternoon of November 15 for the purpose of discussing the idea of a 
genealogical association in North Carolina. Rear Admiral A. M. Patterson 
of Raleigh presided. Panel participants included Milton Rubincam, book 
review editor for the National Genealogical Society in Washington, D.C.; 
Mrs. Ruth Corry, editor, Georgia Genealogical Quarterly, Atlanta; and 
Mrs. Stahle Linn, Jr., genealogist and local historian of Salisbury. The 
group voted to organize an association and appointed the steering commit¬ 
tee, composed of Admiral Patterson; Mrs. Lois Neal of the State Library; 
Mrs. Linn; Miss Edith Clark, Salisbury; Mrs. W. 0. Absher, North Wilkes- 
boro; Mr. Hugh B. Johnston, Jr., Wilson; Mr. Charles R. Holloman, 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 1, JANUARY, 1971, 


7 




Raleigh; and Miss Mary Lou Phillips, Charlotte. 

For additional information, persons interested may contact Admiral 
Patterson at 2425 West Lake Drive, Raleigh, 27609. 


North Carolina Arts Council 

A luncheon meeting for members of the board of the Arts Council was held 
at the Raleigh City Club on November 16. 


North Carolina Folklore Society 

The society met the afternoon of November 16 with John Foster West 
of Boone, president, presiding. W. Amos Abrams of Raleigh presented the 
prelude, “Musical Caskets No. 1 and No. 2,” dated in the 1880s. The Pente¬ 
costal Fellowship Choir of Durham, Yvonne Lane, president; the Grand¬ 
father Mountain doggers of Newland, David Alexander, director; and the 
Dulcimer Players and Singers, with Virgil L. Sturgill from Asheville and 
Charles Joyner from Laurinburg, were participants on the program. During 
the business meeting Dr. Joyner was elected president; Sylvia Lyons Render 
of Durham, first vice-president; F. Roy Johnson of Murfreesboro, second 
vice-president; Lena Mayberry of Rutherfordton, third vice-president; and 
John Foster West of Boone, secretary-treasurer. Brown-Hudson Folklore 
awards were presented to Mrs. E. W. Cook of Watauga County who has 
helped preserve the art of knotting and fringe tying; to Virgil L. Sturgill, 
dulcimer player; and posthumously to Bernice Kelly Harris, writer of note; 
the latter award was accepted by two of Mrs. Harris’s nieces. 


Society of Mayflower Descendants in the State of North Carolina 
Historical Book Club of North Carolina 

The two organizations honored their officers and Mayflower and Sir 
Walter Raleigh awards recipients at a coffee hour held at the Governors’ 
Inn, Research Triangle Park, the morning of November 17. 

North Carolina Poetry Society 

The society met the morning of November 17 for a business meeting, a 
poetry workshop, and a luncheon program. Officers were elected in Septem¬ 
ber: the Rev. S. L. McKay of Broadway, president; Mrs. Jean McCamy of 
Wake Forest, first vice-president; Mrs. Campbell Reeves of Raleigh, second 
vice-president; Mrs. Betty M. Daly of Broadway, recording secretary; Mrs. 
Righton McCallum of Asheville, treasurer; and Miss Mary Louise Medley 
of Wadesboro, treasurer of royalties. 


North Carolina Society of Comity and Local Historians 

The society met Saturday morning, November 17. Hector MacLean of 
Lumberton, president, presided. Malcolm Fowler of Lillington spoke on the 
topic, “Writing Local History,” and reports were given of various tours and 
other activities of the society during the past year. Phillips Russell of Chapel 
Hill, whose topic was “Remembering Thomas Wolfe,” was the speaker at a 


8 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 



In photo at left, Micajah Wyatt presents the Peace Award to Mrs. Mary G. Matthews, center, 
and Miss Jewell Sink. Right, Mrs. Margaret McMahan receives the Smithwick Cup from 
Richard Walser, Jr. 


subscription luncheon following the morning meeting. Awards presented by 
the society were announced during that meeting. The 1973 Peace Cup, 
which is given biennially, was awarded to M. Jewell Sink and Mary Green 
Matthews for their book, Pathfinders, Past and Present: A History of 
Davidson County, N.C. Second place in the category went to Dr. Ethel 
Stephens Arnett of Greensboro for her book, Mrs. James Madison: The 
Incomparable Dolley. Third place went to Mrs. Moffitt Sinclair Henderson 
for A Long, Long Day for November, a biographical novel about Samuel 
Price Carson. The 1973 Smithwick Award for outstanding newspaper writ¬ 
ing on North Carolina history went to Mrs. Margaret McMahan of Fayette¬ 
ville, who frequently writes newspaper stories on local and state history. 
This winning entry was “A Man and His House: Willie Jones and the 
Grove,” published in the Roanoke-Rapids Daily Herald for October 11. 
Second place went to Dr. Lindley S. Butler of Reidsville, and third to Dr. 
Mason P. Thomas of Chapel Hill. 

Details concerning the Robert B. Cooke Award, which will honor the 
society’s immediate past president, who was a life member of the organiza¬ 
tion and an outstanding civic and cultural leader, were announced. The 
award will be open to all North Carolina writers interested in genealogy 
and will be offered biennially for the best in-depth story of a North Carolina 
family. Entries will not be limited as to length; publication must be event¬ 
ually planned though actual publication is not necessary for entry; ac¬ 
curacy, authenticity, depth, importance, quality of writing, and readability 
are factors to be considered by the judges. The first award will be made in 
1974; and for this year, writings already undertaken or completed will quali¬ 
fy for the competition; thereafter, entries must have been completed within 
the successive two-year periods. It is suggested that competitors consult 
existing bibliographies so as to preclude duplication of work already done. 
A silver cup will be given to the winner. Additional details may be obtained 
from the society’s secretary, Mrs. Margaret McMahan, 121 Hinsdale Ave¬ 
nue, Fayetteville, 28305. 

Officers elected at the November 17 meeting were president, Mr. Mac- 
Lean; first vice-president, James W. Wall of Mocksville; second vice-presi¬ 
dent, Mrs. Mary Jane McCrary of Brevard; third vice-president, Mrs. W. 
Fred Nix of Gibsonville; secretary, Mrs. McMahan; and treasurer, the Rev. 
Donald McMahan of Fayetteville. 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 1, JANUARY, 1974 


9 







An Open Letter . . . 

In this the final issue of Carolina Comments for which I will serve as editor in 
chief, I furnish the following explanation for my resignation as director of the 
Division of Archives and History effective February 28, 1974. 

There are no partisan politics involved. I have been given personal support by 
the administration and particularly by Secretary Rohrer in the face of politically 
interested aspirants. I am personally grateful to the secretary for this confidence, 
but even more, I am reassured by her attention to the professional nature of the 
position. I have worked harmoniously under five governors without having been 
pressured to substitute political for professional decisions. 

Nor are personalities involved. I have had excellent relations with the secretary 
and other state officials, both in and outside of the Department of Cultural Re¬ 
sources. 

And certainly my interest in historic preservation is not at fault. One cannot put 
in a sixty to eighty hour week, Saturdays and Sundays included, without an almost 
uncontrollable love for the work. My greatest pride is in what we have accomplished 
in the past seventeen and a half years—the transformation of a good department 
into a great one recognized throughout the nation for its size, quality, and com¬ 
prehensiveness. It is easy for one to assume that all progress began the day he 
came to a position, but the pioneering work of the staff under Connor, Newsome, 
Crittenden, and others belies such an assumption. Still, I share with hundreds of 
dedicated staff members over the years a sense of accomplishment for having, for 
instance, strengthened our archival program; improved our records management 
program for state agencies; started innovative programs extending to local govern¬ 
ments and newspapers; expanded our state historic sites program and launching 
new projects such as Reed Gold Mine, Duke Homestead, and Fort Dobbs; brought 
the Museum of History into more visibility; inaugurated a new statewide archaeol¬ 
ogy program; broadened our historical publications program; moved into the new 
Archives and History-State Library Building; and obtained funds for a new State 
Archives Annex. The Department of Archives and History thus reached its highest 
point of recognition at the very time that it was to be eclipsed by reorganization. 

Reorganization itself, however, need not have led to the horizontal deterioration 
of the state’s historical program. A department of cultural agencies was first sug¬ 
gested by the Department of Archives and History, and the idea was pursued with 
state officials charged with implementing the constitutional amendment reducing 
the number of state agencies. With a few changes, the first phase of reorganization 
was both workable and desirable. It was the second phase—Chapter 476 of the 
Session Laws of 1973 —that threw over all professional programs in the department 
the cloud of suspicion that political determinations could replace scholarly judg¬ 
ments. Yet, the law can be changed. More difficult is the changing of a philosophy 
of government—one that has come to grip governments all over the country—which 
threatens professional programs. That philosophy argues that authority must be 
centralized beyond professional hands but the application of authority must be 
delegated to as many different hands as possible. Thus, instead of a program retain¬ 
ing its integrity and ability to accomplish a particular task, the task must be 


10 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 



divided up so that various aspects of it are handled by different offices. This leads 
to horizontal deterioration or paralysis because the person or office theoretically 
responsible for the program has no authority over others through whom portions 
of the program pass. Thus blame cannot be established when the program bogs 
down. Each person involved can claim that he cannot move until the other fellow 
does. Besides, there are other priorities, and this particular matter must wait. In 
street parlance, we call this “passing the buck.” In government, it is more like 
wasting the buck—the taxpayer’s dollar. 

It is this theoretical interest in “efficiency” that is making government (yes, 
North Carolina state government) so inefficient, for it is based upon an assumption 
that all agencies are alike and that all programs can be cut into slices which are 
handed out to offices that sometimes are incapable of understanding the principles 
and purposes of the program and the results sought. Consequently nonprofessional 
elements are thrown into the program, thwarting or radically changing the original 
purpose. 

This penchant for diffusion and confusion of authority is as dangerous to pro¬ 
fessional programs as is the statutory delegation of scholarly functions to politically 
appointed offices. Together they are driving professionals out of state government. 
We have lost in four months two outstanding section chiefs. I join the exodus with 
greater sadness than I care to express because I am pessimistic about getting the 
lesson across to those who can reverse the tragic and erroneous theories before even 
history is forced to accept myth rather than fact and historians too accept as the 
highest motive the attitude that “I’ll ride it out. After all, I’ve got to have a job.” 

It is the system, therefore, not the program, that causes me to become a “quitter.” 
Yet, I do not conceive of myself as a quitter, because I have concluded that perhaps 
I can be a better friend of the department as a patron than as an employee. I go to 
my new position with the North Carolina Collection with enthusiasm because it, 
like Archives and History, has as its objective the dissemination of knowledge of 
our state’s great heritage. I promise the same friendly interest that was characteris¬ 
tic of my predecessor in the collection, Professor William S. Powell. 

I of course cannot speak for my successor, but I believe that all of the commit¬ 
ments to preservation projects heretofore made by me will be honored, not only be¬ 
cause they were made in good faith but also because they are highly meritorious. 
I will be happy to be of such service to the division as I may be asked to give, for 
its welfare is the justification for my leaving. To the thousands of North Carolinians 
with whom I have worked since 1956 in the stimulation of interest in our state’s 
heritage, I urge the same sense of service to my successor. 

To my colleagues in the division, most of whom I brought into state government, 
I express my personal thanks for their dedication to our state’s history and my hope 
that changes will come which will again provide the incentives so necessary and fit¬ 
ting for perpetuating and improving upon North Carolina’s archival, archaeological, 
and historical program. Let what we have done thus far be only a beginning. 


H. G. JONES 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER I. JANUARY, 197i 


11 



Director, Section Chief Resign 


Dr. H. G. Jones, state archivist from 1956 to 1968 and director of the De¬ 
partment of Archives and History (later the Division of Archives and His¬ 
tory) for the past five years, has resigned effective February 28. He will be 
on vacation after January 31. Dr. Jones has been appointed curator of the 
North Carolina Collection at the University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill and will assume his new duties in February. He will continue as secre¬ 
tary-treasurer of the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association. 

Also leaving on January 31 will be Mr. John G. Zehmer, Jr., chief of the 
Historic Sites and Museums Section of the Division of Archives and History 
since 1972. Mr. Zehmer will become architectural historian for the Planning 
Department of the city of Richmond, Virginia, on February 1. 

Successors in neither office had been announced at press time. 


Workshop Held for Genealogists 


On October 26 and November 1 the Archives and Records Section was 
host to workshops to introduce the genealogical resources and services of the 
Department of Cultural Resources to members of the Daughters of the 
American Colonists and the Daughters of the American Revolution. 

The facilities of the State Archives and the Genealogical Section of the 
State Library were described by Paul P. Hoffman, head of the Archives 
Branch and by Mrs. Lois Neal, genealogy librarian, followed by a walking 
tour of the Archives and the State Library. 

Also discussed during the full-day session were county records of interest 
to the genealogist by Frank D. Gatton, head of the Local Records Branch, 
and printed sources and reference books for the genealogist by George 
Stevenson, archivist. 

This is the second year the workshop has been conducted with a format 
planned by the department with Mrs. Stahle Linn, Jr., who is state regent 
of the Daughters of the American Colonists and state chairman of lineage 
research for the Daughters of the American Revolution. 


Thornton W. Mitchell, chief of the Ar¬ 
chives and Records Section, welcomes the 
Daughters of the American Revolution to 
the Genealogy Workshop on November 1. 
Others seated at the speakers’ table are Paul 
Hoffman, Lois Neal, and Jo Linn. 



12 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 



New Archives Information Circulars Available 

The Archives Branch has published two additional Archives Information 
Circulars. Archives Information Circular Number 10, by George Stevenson, 
is entitled A Select Bibliography for Genealogical Research in North Caro¬ 
lina and is a basic guide for the beginning genealogist. It is available free of 
charge at the Search Room desk. Archives Information Circular Number 11, 
entitled Military Personnel Records in the North Carolina State Archives, 
1918-196U, was published as a result of the fire in July, 1973, at the National 
Personnel Records Center (military) which destroyed approximately 82 
percent of the World War I and World War II army personnel records. 
Copies of statements of service for most, but not all, North Carolina military 
personnel who were discharged at the close of World War I are in the Ar¬ 
chives. So are duplicate copies of separation reports for most, but not all, 
North Carolinians who registered under the draft law and served in World 
War II. These records prove military service only, and include no medical 
records, special orders, etc. Archives Information Circular Number 11 gives 
a summary account of these records and explains how veterans and their 
families can obtain copies. 

Archives Exhibit features Trademarks 




TRADEMARKS 


MARKS OP DISTINCTION ! 




Jesse R. Lankford of the Archives Branch of the Archives and Records Section, assisted 
by William R. Frick of the Programs Branch of the Historic Sites and Museums Section, 
prepared an exhibit on trademarks that were registered with the secretary of state in the 
early part of this century and which are now in the Archives. Among them is the original 
application for the registration of the trademark for Pepsi-Cola, which was developed by 
a New Bern pharmacist. The exhibit was displayed at Culture Week and can currently be 
seen at the Archives. 


Archives Is Visited by Thai Archivist 

Mrs. Benjamas Kamalapat Tontyaporn of Bangkok, Thailand, visited the 
Archives and Records Section from October 29 to November 5. Mrs. Tontya- 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 1, JANUARY, 1971, 


13 








































porn has been in the United States for two years studying library science at 
the University of Wisconsin with a specialty in archival administration. 
She was to assume a position in the field of records management at the 
Royal Archives of Thailand upon her return home in late 1973. 



Mrs. Benjamas Tontyaporn of Thailand 
with Paul P. Hoffman, head of the Archives 
Branch. 


Newspapers Sought, Filmed 

The Newspaper Microfilm Project of the Archives and Records Section 
has begun a survey of the newspaper resources of Johnston County. Readers 
knowing the location of copies of old newspapers published in Johnston are 
invited to contact the State Archives so that the project can borrow the papers 
and microfilm them. All copies will be promptly returned to owners and 
full credit will be given in the published microfilm. 

The project has begun filming the Charlotte News, daily, from 1899 
through 1930. Film copies will soon be made available for public use in the 
Search Room. 

Records Management Program Saving Dollars 

The 1973 annual survey of records holdings of state agencies, institutions, 
boards, and commissions conducted by the State Records Branch revealed 
the greatest reduction in the rate at which new records are being created in 
state government since inception of the records management program in 
1961. Had these records been created, over $90,000 in file equipment and 
7,212 square feet of office space would have been required to accommodate 
them. 

Sound evidence that the state records management program is working 
was also found in other areas of the report. For example, 24,317 cubic feet of 
records were removed from state office areas in accordance with records dis¬ 
position schedules; destruction of records of no further value by state agen¬ 
cies increased 1,066 cubic feet over the previous year’s figure; and cost 
avoidance savings from records management activities totaled $263,449. 
Regrettably, had space been available in the presently packed State Records 
Center to accept all records scheduled to be transferred, an additional $248,- 
100 in office space and filing equipment could have been freed for reuse. 

Despite obvious gains there is still cause for concern and need for even 
greater efforts. The volume of state records has grown to 279,324 cubic feet 
— enough records to form a one cubic foot path from Raleigh to Goldsboro 


14 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 



via Highway 70. The solution to establishing a controlled balance between 
the rate at which records are created and disposed of is even better, more 
efficient, and total records management. With the full cooperation and par¬ 
ticipation of all state agencies, adequate facilities, and prompt disposition, 
this solution can be realized. 

New Reference Service Starts 

Reference servicing of the central microfile of engineering plans and 
drawings by the State Records Branch began recently with the filling of a 
request for school plans from the Department of Public Instruction. 

The microfile system, proposed in 1969 and funded by the 1971 General 
Assembly, began full time operation in September, 1971. Since then, 104,502 
plan pages have been reduced to 35 mm. microfilm images and 75,268 are 
already mounted in aperture cards. 

The completed project will place all engineering plans and drawings sub¬ 
mitted to state agencies since 1911 into one central system capable of pro¬ 
viding duplicate aperture copycards with diazo film images or 18 x 24 inch 
hardcopies. The finished project will encompass close to a million cards. 


Salute to North Carolina at North Hills 



The Department of Cultural Resources participated in a weeklong “Salute to North 
Carolina,” sponsored by North Hills Shopping Center, Raleigh. Exhibits in the mall repre¬ 
sented all divisions of the department. The Division of Archives and History had special 
exhibits featuring the archives, historic sites and museums, and historical publications. A 
portion of the publications exhibit is pictured here. The event was held October 1-6. 

Carolina Comments Index 

An index to 1973 issues of Carolina Comments will be available soon. It 
will be sent free of charge to anyone wishing a copy. Interested persons 
should write to the Historical Publications Section of the Division of Ar¬ 
chives and History at 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, 27611. 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 1, JANUARY, 1971, 


15 






Book on Silversmiths Is Published 

North Carolina Silversmiths, 1696-1850, is an enlarged and revised edi¬ 
tion of the 1948 publication by George Barton Cutten. The revision is by 
Mrs. Mary Reynolds Peacock of the staff of the Historical Publication Sec¬ 
tion of the Division of Archives and History. The book contains 207 brief 
biographical sketches of individual silversmiths and short histories of firms, 
over ninety illustrations, and the marks of thirty-four silversmiths and/or 
partnerships. The handsomely bound edition, in a silver cover, is available 
for $15.00 from the Historical Publications Section. A limited edition of 
1,000 numbered copies will make this of particular value to collectors. Many 
new illustrations are included which were not in the 1948 edition. 

A tea honoring persons who brought old silver in to be photographed was 
given the afternoon of December 4 by members of the staff of the Historical 
Publications Section. First copies of the book were available at that time. 

Fifty Years Old— N.C. Historical Review 

The North Carolina Historical Review has now been published for fifty 
consecutive years. The first issue was published in January, 1924; the fif¬ 
tieth volume was completed with publication of the Autumn, 1973, issue. 

An article detailing the history of the first fifty years of the Review will be 
included in one of the 1974 issues. It is being written by Dr. Thomas C. 
Parramore of Meredith College. 

Court Rules State Owns Cannons 

The North Carolina Court of Appeals ruled on November 14, 1973, in the 
case of the State v. R. L. Armistead, et al., that the state is the owner of 
three Civil War cannons last year from the Roanoke River adjacent to Fort 
Branch. The court ruled that the cannons are covered by a 1967 state law, 
G.S. 121-22, which makes the state owner of all archaeological artifacts 
which have laid unclaimed on the bottoms of state navigable waters for more 
than ten years. 

The guns, now in the custody of the Division of Archives and History, 
are on public display in Hamilton (Martin County). The Fort Branch Battle¬ 
ground Commission is cooperating with the division in the preservation 
treatment of the weapons. 

Archives and History Staff Additions, Activities 

New members of the staff of the Archives and Records Section include 
Harold R. Nixon, who joined the Local Records staff November 1 as a micro¬ 
film camera operator, and Mrs. Bonnie Jean Register who went to work 
with the Technical Services Branch on October 17. Mr. Nixon will be as¬ 
signed to eastern counties. 

In the Historic Sites and Museums Section several site managers assumed 
their duties in October and November: Jamie Ann Boozer at the House in 
the Horseshoe, Billy E. Holman at Fort Dobbs, and Louis Hafermehl at the 
Iredell House. Robert O. Con’Cvay, former site manager at the Vance Birth¬ 
place, is now western regional representative, with an office in Asheville; 


16 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Mrs. Sudie Wheeler is serving as site manager at the Vance Birthplace. 
Bobby Jones and Hoyle Elam are new grounds maintenance men at Caswell- 
Neuse and Town Creek Indian Mound, respectively. The new restoration 
carpenter, Herbert Bradshaw, will be working on buildings at the historic 
sites. Additions to the secretarial staff of the Historic Sites and Museums 
Section include Ms. Sondra Ward and Ms. Carolyn Butler. John Flowers 
joined the staff of the Research, Restoration, and Survey Branch as a survey 
specialist; part-time employees are Steve Massengill, who is with the Re¬ 
search Unit, and Lindsey Hamilton with the Survey Unit. Burl Lindsey was 
promoted to position of head guard at the Museum of History, replacing 
Marvin Rogers, deceased; Lindsey’s former place as utility-guard was filled 
by James Moore. 

Members of the staff participated in numerous meetings, both within and 
out of North Carolina. Mr. Greer Suttlemyre and Ms. Janet Seapker, survey 
specialists, went to Cleveland, October 10-14, for the National Trust for His¬ 
toric Preservation. Mr. Bruce MacDougal, head of the Research, Resto¬ 
ration, and Survey Branch, and Mr. Edward Turberg, restoration specialist, 
attended the Victorian Era Preservation Workshop in Philadelphia, Sep¬ 
tember 20-23. Mr. A. L. Honeycutt, Jr., restoration specialist, attended the 
Association for Preservation Technology Conference in Boston, September 
27-30. These members of the staff of the Historic Sites and Museums Section 
plus Mr. John G. Zehmer, Jr., chief of the section; Mr. Samuel P. Townsend, 
assistant chief of the section; Mrs. Catherine Cockshutt, survey supervisor; 
Mrs. Elizabeth W. Wilborn, researcher; Mr. Jerry Cross, researcher; and 
Ms. Ruth Little-Stokes, survey specialist, attended and/or spoke to meet¬ 
ings in Raleigh, Edenton, Apex, Burnsville, Charlotte, Hillsborough, Ashe¬ 
ville, Wilmington, Fayetteville, and Yanceyville. 

Dr. H. G. Jones, director, Division of Archives and History, and Mrs. 
Memory F. Mitchell, chief, Historical Publications Section, attended the 
Southern Historical Association in Atlanta, November 7-10. Dr. Jones also 
spoke at meetings of the Tobacco History Corporation in Durham November 
20, State History Administrators in Atlanta December 7, and Durham Engi¬ 
neers Club in Durham December 13, and attended various board and com¬ 
mission meetings in the state. 

Mrs. Mary Reynolds Peacock, editorial assistant, Historical Publications 
Section, spoke to several organizations on early silversmiths in North Caro¬ 
lina. Mr. William S. Price, Jr., editor of the Colonial Records Project, and 
Miss Beth Crabtree, editorial assistant, also spoke to Raleigh groups. Mr. 
Price recently completed all requirements for the Ph.D. degree in history 
at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The graduate school 
there accepted his work on the third volume of higher-court records, with an 
expanded introduction, as his dissertation. The volume is being published by 
the Division of Archives and History as the fourth volume in the new 
Colonial Records series; it will be off the press in late spring. 


NCARBC Adds Staff 

Ardath Goldstein has been added to the staff to fill the position vacated by 
Dennis Brown, who resigned to accept the post of assistant secretary of the 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 1, JANUARY, 1971, 


17 


Department of Corrections. Miss Goldstein, a graduate of Brown University 
and a resident of Cary, is area coordinator of the southeast region. Prior to 
her affiliation with the Bicentennial Committee she was with the North 
Carolina Museum of Art; earlier in her career she was curator of the Mer¬ 
rill Chase Gallery in Chicago. 



The prominent location of the Archives and History-State Library Building, lower right 
center, in the state government complex is revealed in this aerial photograph taken re¬ 
cently by Charles A. Clark of the Division of Archives and History. The picture, taken in a 
northwesterly direction with Jones Street in the foreground, includes several major state 
buildings. The two streets running east from upper left to lower right are Jones Street, fore¬ 
ground, and Lane Street, background. Other buildings from west to east on Jones Street 
are the red brick Employment Security Building, the marble-sided Administration Building, 
and the five-pyramided State Legislative Building. Just out of the picture in the grove at the 
lower right is the Executive Mansion. Along Lane Street from west to east are the red brick 
Cooper Health Building, the low brick State Records Center, the high-rise Albemarle Build¬ 
ing, and the newly opened white Bath Building. Just north of the State Legislative Building 
on Halifax Street is the historical gem, the Seaboard Coastline Office Building, which his¬ 
torians and environmentalists are seeking to save from demolition by the state. 


Obituaries 

Ralph B. Hanes of Winston-Salem, formerly a member of the Executive 
Board of Archives and History, died on July 21, 1973. 

Mrs. Marvin Lucian Skaggs, longtime member of the staff of the library 
at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, died October 23. Her 
husband who survives her, was a member of the faculty of the Department of 
History at Greensboro College. 

Mr. Dennis H. Holliday of Route 1, Scotland Neck, president of the Halifax 
County Historical Association, died on October 14. 


18 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 



New Roof for the Capitol 



The historic State Capitol is sporting a new copper roof as is shown in this aerial photo¬ 
graph made by Charles A. Clark. The exterior restoration of the building constituted phase 
one of the project to return the Capitol to its earlier appearance. Work on interior restoration 
is expected to begin in the spring. At upper right are the Labor Building and the Agriculture 
Building. 


Colleges and Universities 

Campbell College 

Julietta Haynes, Vernon O. Stumpf, and W. Conard Glass attended the 
Southern Historical Association in Atlanta, Georgia, November 7-10. 

Guilford College 

Dr. Henry G. Hood spoke on October 7 to the Unitarian Church in Greens¬ 
boro. Dr. Alexander R. Stoesen published “Road from Receivership: Claude 
Pepper, the DuPont Trust and the Florida East Coast Railway” in a recent 
issue of the Florida Historical Quarterly. He is serving as North Carolina 
representative on the Membership Committee of the Organization of Ameri¬ 
can Historians. Dr. O. Theodore Benfey was named Dana Professor of Chem¬ 
istry and the History of Science in September. 

North Carolina State University 

Assistant Professor H. D. Metzgar received a grant from the U.S. Office 
of Education and the Southern Atlantic States Association for South Asian 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 1, JANUARY, 1971, 


19 


Studies which is permitting him to travel and study the art, history, and 
religions of India. He will be there through the academic year 1973-1974. 
Assistant Professor Edith Sylla read a paper, “On the Physics of the Eu¬ 
charist,” before the Colloquium on Science, Theology, and Philosophy in the 
Middle Ages held at Harvard University during the fall. She is coeditor of 
the proceedings of this meeting. Professor Burton F. Beers and Assistant 
Professor Charles Carlton attended the Duquesne University History 
Forum held during the fall. Dr. Carlton read a paper on “A Familiar Prob¬ 
lem: London’s Bankrupcty in the late 17th Century.” Dr. Beers was chair¬ 
man of the session on “The Early American China Trade.” Instructor James 
Crisp participated in the session “Texas—Western or Southern” at the 
Western History Association in Dallas in October. Mr. Crisp’s paper was 
titled “Antebellum Texas as a Variation of the Southern Experience.” Assis¬ 
tant Professor William H. Beezley is the author of Insurgent Governor: 
Abraham Gonzalez and the Mexican Revolution in Chihuahua, recently pub¬ 
lished by the University of Nebraska Press. 


Sacred Heart College 

Recent additions to the faculty include Dr. Edward H. McGeen, assistant 
professor of history; Mr. Allan M. Axelrad, assistant professor in the 
American Studies Department; and Ms. Roberta K. Gladowski, assistant 
professor and chairperson of the American Studies Department. 


St. Augustine’s College 

Dr. Elmer C. Schwertman spoke September 23 at the Raleigh Unitarian 
Fellowship, taking as his topic, “Paul Tillich and the Emergence of the 
Existentialist Mode in Christian Theology.” 


St. Mary’s College 

An open forum, “Families and Urban Schools,” was held at St. Mary’s 
November 17-18. Basic issues in contemporary education were discussed. 


Shaw University 

Dr. Urabi Mustafa visited institutions and groups in Iraq, Kuwait, 
Jordan, Libya, and Lebanon in August and September; on each occasion he 
discussed the United States and the Middle East. Mr. Walid Sharif was 
named assistant professor in August. 

Wake Forest University 

The Z. Smith Reynolds Library of Wake Forest has received two fine 
collections of books and manuscripts which were collected by the late 
Charles H. Babcock. The collections were presented by Mrs. Babcock, widow 
of the collector who now lives in Los Angeles. One consists of 679 volumes of 
major and minor authors of the South, with many first editions included. 


20 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


The second collection includes approximately 1,500 volumes of rare books, 
predominantly in English and American literature from the sixteenth 
through the nineteenth centuries. Included in the collection are nineteen 
literary manuscripts, including representative writings of Thomas Gray, 
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Thomas De Quincey, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, 
William Cullen Bryant, Havelock Ellis, Bret Harte, James Fenimore 
Cooper, Henry David Thoreau, and Booth Tarkington. A catalog, which is 
being prepared, will soon be available for sale. 

Dr. James Howell Smith spoke at the Association for the Study of Afro- 
American Life and History in New York on “The Image of the Lawman in 
Black Literature.” The meeting was held October 19. Dr. David Warren 
Hadley published “Beethoven and the Philharmonic Society of London: A 
Reappraisal” in the Musical Quarterly for July. Drs. Smith and James P. 
Barefield were promoted from assistant to associate professor, and Dr. 
Michael Loy Sinclair was promoted from instructor to assistant professor. 

Stale, County, and Local Groups 

Archaeological Society of North Carolina 

Charles M. Carey of Drexel was reelected president of the Archaeological 
Society of North Carolina which met in Morgan ton on October 27. Speakers 
included Dr. Robert Stephenson of the University of North Carolina on 
“Relationship between Professional and Amateur Archaeologists”; Dr. 
H. G. Jones, director of the Division of Archives and History, Raleigh, on 
“A Statewide Archaeological Program”; and Dr. Howard Ayers of Appa¬ 
lachian State University on “A Paleo-Indian Site in Virginia.” A survey of 
fluted points in North Carolina was begun under the chairmanship of Phil 
Perkinson of Raleigh. 

The society’s membership is open to persons interested in archaeology. 
Dues of $3.00 per year may be sent to the secretary at Box 561, Chapel Hill, 
27514. 


Beaufort Historical Association 

The association recently asked the town to appropriate $5,000 to help 
match a state grant of $15,000 to be used for the restoration of the Ann 
Street Cemetery. The request was presented by Nelson Taylor, attorney, who 
commended Carteret County for assisting the Beaufort Historical Associa¬ 
tion in the acquisition of the Cramer House, the county’s third courthouse. 
Matching funds for the cemetery project must be raised by June 30,1974. 

Mrs. Roger B. Callaghan recently donated to the association an eighteenth 
century four poster bed which will be used at the Joseph Bell House. Mrs. 
John Costlow is president of the Beaufort Historical Association. 

Burke County Historical Society 

Dr. E. R. White, director of radiation therapy at Valdese General Hos¬ 
pital, spoke at the October meeting of the society. Dr. White, whose special 
interest is military history, briefly reviewed a number of aspects of the 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 1, JANUARY, 19U 


21 


county’s history. Bicentennial suggestions for Burke County include the 
establishment of a commemorative monument to Charles and Joseph Mc¬ 
Dowell at Kings Mountain; historical markers at significant locations; the 
marking of graves of Revolutionary War veterans and preservation of old 
cemeteries; the publication of a Burke County history; and establishment 
of a central registry of Burke veterans. 

Carson House 

On October 7 the Carson-McDowell Clan met at Carson House for an all¬ 
day gathering. Dorothy M. DuBose MacDowell, who is working on the his¬ 
tory of the MacDowells, presented the speaker, Robert E. Winters, Jr., editor 

of Southern Antiques and Interiors. 

Caswell County Historical Association 

The association met October 16 at the Yanceyville Presbyterian Church. 
Speaker for the occasion was Ms. Ruth Little-Stokes of the Historic Sites 
and Museums Section of the Division of Archives and History. She discussed 
historic buildings in Yanceyville and Caswell County which have been re¬ 
cently nominated for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. 

Chapel Hill Historical Society 

The October 7 meeting was held at the Institute of Government, with the 
institute’s former director, John L. Sanders, now vice-president for planning 
of the Consolidated University, as featured speaker. Mr. Sanders has photo¬ 
graphed outstanding historic structures and sites in North Carolina, and he 
illustrated his talk with slides. At the November 4 meeting Dr. Carl E. 
Anderson, professor of biological chemistry and nutrition at the university, 
whose hobby is archaeology, was the speaker. Dr. Anderson is particularly 
interested in the ancient peoples of Central America. On December 2 a joint 
meeting was held with the Chapel Hill Preservation Society; Mrs. William 
C. Friday and Mrs. Kay Kyser gave a joint report on the work of the preser¬ 
vation group, illustrating their subjects with slides. 

Alan Boles is the new treasurer of the Chapel Hill Historical Society; he 
succeeded Mrs. Evelyn Sadler. He and John Macfie are editors of a new bro¬ 
chure on Chapel Hill’s historic sites; they have also agreed to compile a 
history of Chapel Hill. The brochure is available for $1.00 plus sales tax and 
postage. Roger Foushee is president of the society. Letters addressed to the 
organization should be sent to P. O. Box 503, Chapel Hill, 27514. 

Chapel Hill Preservation Society 

The society sponsored an old quilt exhibit at the Horace Williams House; 
the exhibit was opened November 4. The announcement was made by Mrs. 
Kay Kyser, a leader in the society. 


Cleveland Comity Historical Association 

The association again was in charge of the “House of Yesteryears,” one of 
the features of the Cleveland County Fair. The fair ran from October 5 


22 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


through October 13. A log cabin was constructed on the fairgrounds several 
years ago to serve “as a dedication to the memories of Cleveland County. 
...” It was furnished with items similar to those used a century ago. 

Eastern Cabarrus Historical Society 

The society was recently incorporated. Directors and incorporators are 
David Eugene Hough, Hoy A. Moose, R. Brown McAllister, A. L. Barringer, 
Virginia M. Smith, and J. Archie Smith. They are all of Mt. Pleasant. 

Franklin County Historical Association 

The county commissioners of Franklin County recently approved a re¬ 
quest from the association to turn over to the group the old county jail for 
use as a historical museum when the new jail, construction of which will 
begin in early 1974, is completed. T. H. Pearce, president of the historical 
association, presented the request. Note was taken of the fact that the 
Franklin County Historical Association asked the county commissioners to 
consider the action six months earlier. About thirty members of the local 
association were present at the meeting. 

Halifax County Historical Association 

The association met on October 12 at the Halifax Episcopal Church with 
Dennis H. Holliday presiding. Flora Parker of Route 3, Enfield, was elected 
secretary to fill the position formerly held by Mrs. O. A. Davis, who declined 
reelection. On Sunday, November 25, the association sponsored the presenta¬ 
tion of a portrait of Judge Walter Clark with Associate Justice Joseph 
Branch making the principal address. Mrs. Robert E. Vick presided. Persons 
interested in joining the Halifax County Historical Association should write 
to Mrs. Quenton Gregory, Post Office Box 6, Halifax, 27839, for additional 
information. Mr. Holliday died two days after the October 12 meeting. 

Harnett County Historical Society 

The society met September 24 at the courthouse in Lillington. At that 
time plans were formulated for Harnett’s observance of the American Revo¬ 
lution bicentennial. Society members were invited to attend a Campbell 
College faculty seminar concerning the bicentennial, held September 23. 
Mrs. Dabney Enderle, director of the Bicentennial Committee, was present. 
On October 28 the Flora MacDonald Historical Marker at Cameron Hill 
Presbyterian Church was dedicated; the service served as the October meet¬ 
ing of the society. 

Hillsborough Historical Society 

The annual meeting of the society was held October 18 in Strudwick Hall. 
A change in the bylaws extended terms of officers to two years so no election 
was held. “The Savannah Story,” an illustrated lecture which was prepared 
by the National Trust for Historic Preservation, was presented; Dr. Charles 
Blake of Hillsborough delivered the lecture. The original area of Hills¬ 
borough plus a small adjacent area at the northeast corner of the town is 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 1, JANUARY, 197i 


23 


being registered as a historic district. The commissioners of Hillsborough 
amended the town zoning ordinance to protect this district. The Engstrom 
Award, named in honor of Mrs. Alfred Engstrom of Chapel Hill, who has 
done a great deal of research in the history of Hillsborough, was awarded to 
Mrs. Donald Matheson of Hillsborough. 


Hillsborough Historical Commission 

The commission held its tenth anniversary meeting on the evening of 
November 6, complete with a birthday cake. The main speaker was Mrs. 
Elizabeth R. Daniels of Chapel Hill, who discussed and showed slides of 
early furniture found in Orange County. She and her husband, Dr. George 
B. Daniels, who have photographed much of the furniture, invite information 
on other pieces in the county. Staff members from the Division of Archives 
and History—Dr. H. G. Jones, Mrs. Catherine Cockshutt, and Mr. A. L. 
Honeycutt, Jr.—joined members of the commission in the anniversary ob¬ 
servance. 


Historic Cabarrus, Inc. 

Historic Cabarrus was organized in the spring by a group of citizens in 
an effort to preserve the courthouse and other historic landmarks in Cabar¬ 
rus County. Membership is now 225. In October an advertising and educa¬ 
tional campaign was undertaken, using the theme “The courthouse will fall 
without your support.” In November a Historic Cabarrus Day was held at 
the Carolina Mall, and members were present to discuss restoration with 
interested citizens. In December an appeal was made to citizens to give $1.00 
each as a Christmas gift to the old courthouse. Other activities are planned 
for several months on into the spring. Restoration of the courthouse is 
planned for 1976 after offices are moved into a new structure which is now 
under construction. 

Historical Society of North Carolina 

The fall meeting of the society was held at Meredith College on October 
12. During the afternoon session A. M. Secret, associate professor in the 
School of Journalism at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 
presented a paper, “Race Relations and Press Opinions in South Carolina, 
1954-1964.” At that same session, Dr. Richard F. Knapp, Division of Ar¬ 
chives and History, read a paper, “Golden Promise in the Piedmont: The 
Story of John Reed’s Mine.” Dr. Richard L. Watson, Jr., of Duke Univer¬ 
sity, presented his presidential address that evening on the topic, “Principle, 
Party, and Constituency: The North Carolina Congressional Delegation, 
1917-1919.” New officers elected at the meeting were: president, Mrs. 
Memory F. Mitchell of the Division of Archives and History; vice-president, 
Dr. Blackwell P. Robinson of the University of North Carolina at Greens¬ 
boro; secretary-treasurer, Dr. Durward T. Stokes of Elon College; and 
council members, Dr. J. Isaac Copeland of the University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill and Dr. William E. King of Duke University. 


24 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Latta Place, Inc. 

The corporation met on November 7 and elected Miles J. Boyer as presi¬ 
dent to succeed Dr. Chalmers G. Davidson. The group plans to restore and 
preserve the Latta Place which it describes as “the last architecturally sig¬ 
nificant plantation house remaining on the Catawba River in Mecklenburg 
County from the ante-bellum period.” The buildings and three acres of land 
were given to the corporation by Crescent Land and Timber Corporation of 
Charlotte. The Mecklenburg County Commissioners have granted $35,000 
to the project on a matching condition. 


Lenoir County Historical Association 

Conway Rose spoke to the association on September 18, taking as his topic 
the Tuscarora Indians. He called them “the meanest Indians in North 
America east of the Mississippi River.” He traced the migration of Indians 
over 1,000 years ago from Mongolia on across the Alaskan land bridge and 
through the Bering Straits. He was introduced by Reginald Stroud. Mrs. 
Isabelle Fletcher presided in the absence of Bill Hatcher, the president. The 
association also endorsed Mrs. Beverly Wooten as chairman of the Lenoir 
County Bicentennial Commission. 


Lower Cape Fear Historical Society 

The Lower Cape Fear Historical Society’s Bulletin contained an article 
by Alan D. Watson of the Department of History, University of North Caro¬ 
lina at Wilmington, on the subject “William Dry: Passive Patriot.” The 
October 24 meeting was held in St. James Great Hall with Dr. David A. 
McLean, chairman of the Department of Anthropology, St. Andrews Pres¬ 
byterian College in Laurinburg, as speaker. He spoke on the topic, “Archaeo¬ 
logical Work in Robeson County, and the Indian Museum of the Carolinas, 
Laurinburg.” President of the Lower Cape Fear Historical Society is Mrs. 
E. M. McEachern of Wilmington. 


Mecklenburg Historical Association 

Miss Mary Louise Davidson of Rosedale, Charlotte, has been elected presi¬ 
dent, succeeding Dr. Douglas Glasgow. 


North Carolina Presbyterian Historical Society 

The society met on October 3-4 at the First Presbyterian Church at Reids- 
ville. Mrs. J. S. Evans, Jr., of Statesville, and Mrs. Jack James of Reidsville, 
arranged the program. An address, “Historical Views of Rockingham 
County,” was presented by Mr. Henry V. Anderson of Eden; and a tour of 
historic churches and places followed. Included on the tour were Bethesda, 
Milton, Red House, Speedwell, Wentworth, and Yanceyville Presbyterian 
churches; Chinqua-Penn Plantation; Wright Tavern, Wentworth; and the 
Caswell County Courthouse. The Reverend James D. MacKenzie is president 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 1, JANUARY, 197U 


25 


of the society, and new members are welcome. Dues of $2.00 may be mailed 
to Mr. Vernol R. Jansen, Secretary, North Carolina Presbyterian Historical 
Society, P. O. Box 10785, Raleigh, 27605. 

Northampton County Historical Society 

The society met in Jackson on October 27. Following a social hour and 
dinner, A. J. P. Edwards of Pratt Institute talked on the subject of “An 
Investigation and Research into the History of Northampton County Court¬ 
house.” Slides illustrated the program. President Carl Witt presented three 
books to Mrs. Arthur Suiter, a member of the Northampton Memorial Li¬ 
brary Board of Trustees. The books will be placed in the library as me¬ 
morials to Bernice Kelly Harris, Audrey Long, and Mrs. J. N. Ramsey. A 
resolution in memory of Mrs. Harris was read by Mr. Witt. 

Old Salem 

An exhibition of Davidson County furniture entitled “The Swisegood 
School of Cabinetmaking” was opened on November 4. The exhibit was held 
in MESDA’s new exhibition hall and featured cabinet work of Mordica 
Collins, John Swisegood, Jonathan Long, and Jesse Clodfelter. These men 
were all early nineteenth century craftsmen. A fifty-six page catalog, telling 
the story of the cabinetmakers, is on sale at MESDA for $2.00. 

Person County Historical Society 

McGehee’s Mill, the subject of an intensive move for preservation, has 
been moved 1,000 yards up a hill. The mill now overlooks the work being 
done on Carolina Power and Light Company’s new cooling lake. The society 
still needs funds to relocate the structure. The Person County Historical 
Society hopes to raise between $75,000 and $100,000 to relocate and restore 
the mill; grants from private foundations will be sought, and an application 
is being made through the Person County Board of Education to the State 
Department of Public Instruction for a planning grant. 

Pitt Comity Historical Society 

The society met on September 20 at the Woman’s Club in Greenville. Dr. 
David S. Phelps, associate professor of anthropology at East Carolina, spoke 
on “The Challenge of the Tar River’s Early History.” The president of the 
Pitt County society is John B. Lewis of Farmville. 


Randolph Comity Historical Society 

Members of the society elected J. D. Ross, Jr., and Fred M. Kearns, Jr., 
to fill unexpired terms of two directors, the late Tom Presnell and B. B. 
Walker. Presnell was president of the society at the time of his accidental 
death during the summer. The society has given high priority to its project 
of completing the restoration of the old Female Academy on West Walker 
Avenue. 


26 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Rockingham County Historical Society 

The society met October 28 at Rockingham Community College. Mr. 
Henry V. Anderson of Eden gave a slide program on the progress of the 
Wright Tavern restoration. The society discussed the need to raise funds 
with which to match a Richardson Foundation grant of $5,000 before the end 
of the year and also discussed the proposed pamphlet on the Wright Tavern, 
the text of which is being written by Dr. Lindley Butler of Rockingham 
Community College. 

Wachovia Historical Society 

On October 16 the society elected Edwin L. Stockton, Jr., president; 
Reverend Burton Rights, vice-president; Mrs. C. Eugene Stephenson, secre¬ 
tary; and Mrs. Zachary Bynum, Jr., treasurer. 

Wake County Historical Society 

The society met on October 21 in the Archives and History-State Library 
Building to hear Carroll L. Mann, Jr., state property officer, speak on the 
topic, “State Government Complex.” He discussed plans for the North Hali¬ 
fax Street area of downtown Raleigh. On November 18 the society sponsored 
a walking tour of the four churches located at each corner of Capitol Square. 
Guides were present at the First Baptist Church, corner of Edenton and 
Salisbury streets; First Presbyterian Church, corner of Salisbury and 
Morgan streets; First Baptist Church, corner of Wilmington and Morgan 
streets; and Christ Episcopal Church, corner of Wilmington and Edenton 
streets. The program was arranged by Dr. Thornton W. Mitchell. Richard L. 
Rice is president of the Wake County Historical Society. 

Western North Carolina Historical Association 

The Thomas Wolfe Award was presented by the association to Drs. Ina 
and John Van Noppen for their book, Western North Carolina Since the 
Civil War. The award was made at the association’s annual awards banquet 
on October 26 in Asheville. 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Published in January, March, May, July, September, 
and November by the Division of Archives and His¬ 
tory, Department of Cultural Resources, Archives and 
History-State Library Building, 109 East Jones 
Street, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27611. 

H. G. Jones, Editor in Chief 
Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell, Editor 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 1, JANUARY. 197U 


27 



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Division of Archives and History 
Department of Cultural Resources 
109 East Jones Street 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27611 



North Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 


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Published Bimonthly by the North Carolina Division of Archives and History 


Volume XXII, Number 2 


March, 1974 


Iredell Bible Presented 

Mr. James Iredell of Smithfield, Virginia, on January 21 presented the 
family Bible of Governor James Iredell, Jr., to the people of the state of 
North Carolina. Accepted by Mrs. James E. Holshouser, Jr., in a brief 
ceremony in the Executive Mansion, the Bible records the births, marriages, 
and deaths of Governor Iredell’s family. The first entry on June 6, 1815, 
records his marriage to Frances Johnston Tredwell. Following the presenta¬ 
tion, the Bible was placed in an Iredell exhibit on the first floor of the 
Archives and History-State Library Building; it will eventually be placed 
in the North Carolina State Archives. 



Left, Mrs. James E. Holshouser, Jr., accepts on behalf of the people of North Carolina the 
family Bible of Gov. James Iredell, Jr. Shown above are Mrs. Holshouser; James Iredell, 
great-grandson of Governor Iredell, who presented the Bible; and Mrs. James Iredell. Right, 
Mr. Iredell places the Bible in the case housing the special Iredell exhibit on the main floor 
of the Archives and History-State Library Building. (Photographs by Division of Archives and 
History unless otherwise specified.) 


New Historic Sites under Development 

Considerable progress was made during the fall and winter toward 
development of North Carolina’s three newest state historic sites. 

At the Reed Gold Mine in Cabarrus County, site of the first documented 
discovery of gold in the United States, Geological Resources, Inc., of Raleigh 
completed initial work in opening and stabilizing both Linker Adit and 
Linker Shaft as well as the installation of an elevator in the latter shaft. 
Meanwhile the Raleigh firm of Newberry, Ashford and Associates was 
appointed architect for the new buildings (visitor center-museum, manager’s 













residence, and maintenance building) and the firm of Bass, Nixon and 
Kennedy was selected to design and install a sewage treatment system. These 
developments followed the earlier completion of the acquisition of the 822- 
acre tract through a combined purchase-donation arrangement with the 
heirs of the late A. L. Kelly; the preparation of a master development plan 
by the National Park Service in cooperation with the Archives and History 
staff; and an underground engineering study by Geological Resources, Inc. 
Basic research in the form of two lengthy manuscripts was completed by 
Dr. Richard F. Knapp, special projects officer. Two employees are at work 
at the site—George W. Stinagle, manager, who lives in a mobile home on 
the property; and Gerald Almond, grounds maintenance man. An archaeo¬ 
logical project will be conducted at the mine in the summer of 1974. The 
Gold History Corporation, headed by Harold P. Hornaday, president of 
Cannon Mills Company, is actively supporting the development. It is hoped 
that the site will be officially opened to the public by the fall of 1975. 

At the Duke Homestead in Durham a “living” historic site portraying the 
history of tobacco will be developed. The state accepted title to the 6.74-acre 
“Newton Tract,” a gift from Liggett & Myers, Inc.; and the recording of the 
deed for the 37.09-acre Homestead tract, a gift from Duke University, was 
expected momentarily. The Durham firm of Carr, Harrison, Pruden and 
DePasquale was appointed architect for the new buildings—a visitor center- 
museum, manager’s residence, and maintenance building. Restoration of the 
historic buildings will be next in line for priority. Intensive research on the 
site and tobacco history was begun by Dr. Knapp and Steve Massengill, a 
graduate student in history at North Carolina State University. The 
Tobacco History Corporation, headed by Herbert C. Bradshaw, former 
editor of the Durham Herald, set a goal of $250,000 with which to augment 
state funds in the development. The corporation’s first priority is the prepa¬ 
ration of a motion picture on tobacco history for showing in the new visitor 
center-museum. Although new facilities will not be completed before 1975, 
it is expected that the historic buildings will be open on a limited schedule 
during the summer of 1974. 

Preliminary plans for the visitor center-museums at both the Reed Gold 
Mine and the Duke Homestead were approved in January by Dr. H. G. 
Jones, former director of the Division of Archives and History who initiated 



Left, the architect’s drawing of the proposed visitor center-museum at the Duke Homestead 
State Historic Site; right, a drawing of a comparable building at the Reed Gold Mine State 
Historic Site. 


30 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 




the two projects, and Dr. Knapp, who is projects officer in charge of them. 

Plans for improvement at Fort Dobbs, a site near Statesville commemorat¬ 
ing the colony’s role in the French and Indian War, were awaiting approval 
by the Department of Administration. E. B. Stafford, P.E., of Statesville 
designed the facilities which will include a large pavillion, a parking lot, 
and grounds improvement. Stafford also will design a manager’s residence. 
The DAR Chapter House is being renovated for a small visitor center, and 
the Archaeology Section will reexcavate the fort’s earthworks in 1974. 
Adequate acreage has now been acquired, and the Department of Transporta¬ 
tion has been requested to change the course of the county road which now 
passes over a portion of the fort site. Billy Holman, site manager, and Roy 
Wilson, grounds maintenance man, are at work at the site. Bruce Mac- 
Do ugal, head of the Research, Restoration, and Survey Branch, is project 
officer. It is hoped that the site will be officially opened to the public in late 
1974 or early 1975. Supporting the Division of Archives and History in the 
project are the Iredell County Historical Society, the Daughters of the 
American Revolution, and the Iredell County Bicentennial Committee. 


Thomas Wolfe Memorial May Become State Historic Site 

The “Old Kentucky Home” (“Dixieland” in Thomas Wolfe’s books) will 
become a state historic site if the General Assembly approves a plan 
negotiated between Dr. H. G. Jones, former director of the Division of 
Archives and History; Ernest J. Ward, city manager of Asheville; and Fred 
W. Wolfe, only surviving brother of Tom Wolfe. 

Under the tentative agreement, the city of Asheville would transfer the 
National Historic Landmark to the state provided the General Assembly 
makes appropriations for its restoration and operation as a state historic 
site. 

The old boarding house, located only a short distance from his birthplace 
(now demolished), was home for young Tom Wolfe during his formative 
years. Many of his personal effects, now the property of the family, are pre¬ 
served in the house at 48 Spruce Street. Formerly open only from late spring 
to early fall, the property will be open year-round if incorporated into the 
state historic site system. 



The Thomas Wolfe Memorial in 
Asheville may become a state 
historic site. 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 2, MARCH, 197A 


31 






Smith Richardson Foundation Offers Three Grants 

The Smith Richardson Foundation, Inc., of Greensboro has offered chal¬ 
lenge grants to three organizations assisting in the preservation of historic 
buildings in North Carolina. 

The grants, announced by Dr. H. G. Jones, liaison representative between 
the foundation and the Division of Archives and History, require dollar-for- 
dollar matching by funds raised locally during 1974; they are as follows: 
Lower Cape Fear Historicial Society for the Latimer House in Wilmington, 
$2,500; Fayetteville Woman’s Club for the Nimocks House in Fayetteville, 
$2,500; and McDowell County Historical Society for the Carson House near 
Marion, $2,384. Both foundation and matching funds must be used for actual 
restoration work. 

Dr. Jones said that if all three organizations qualify for their grants, the 
Smith Richardson Foundation will have contributed $387,000 toward 
historic preservation projects through the Division of Archives and History 
since 1960. These grants will have served as an incentive for the raising of 
an additional sum of more than $512,000. No other private source has so 
generously supported historic preservation in the state. 


Archaeological Work at Moores Creek 

Archaeologists from the Archaeology Section of the Division of Archives 
and History recently began work at Moores Creek National Military Park, 
Revolutionary War site in Pender County. It was there, on February 27, 
1776, that Col. Richard Caswell and Col. Alexander Lillington led a group 
of Patriots to victory over more numerous Loyalist forces. The victory pre- 



Shown here is a cut through the major Patriot 
earthworks. The vertical dark stain in the right- 
hand wall of the excavation marks the place 
where dirt was removed to throw up the simple 
fortifications. In the foreground is Gehrig 
Spencer, site manager at Fort Fisher State 
Historic Site; with camera, Dr. Stephen J. Gluck- 
man, chief of the Archaeology Section; and with 
drawing board, Leslie Bright, preservationist in 
the Archaeology Section. 


32 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 



vented the Loyalists from joining the British squadron on the coast, thereby 
blocking a full-scale invasion of the South. 

Archaeologists, working under a contract with the National Park Service, 
are looking for earthworks thrown up by the Patriots and are also searching 
for the Revolutionary period road which ran to Moores Creek bridge. So far 
results of their work have shown that the National Park Service’s recon¬ 
structed earthworks are essentially correct in location and construction. 
Those engaged in the project hope to obtain sufficient information to support 
reconstruction of the two sets of earthworks and the road. 

Publications Bargain Offered 

Members of the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association may 
now buy publications of the Division of Archives and History at a 10 percent 
discount. An up-to-date list of books, pamphlets, maps, and other publica¬ 
tions in print will soon be mailed to each member of the association. When 
ordering, members should simply write on the order that they belong to the 
Literary and Historical Association. 

Because of several requests, the $15.00 sale of five volumes of The Papers 
of Willie P. Mangum, the first three volumes of The Papers of William 
Alexander Graham, The Journal of the House of Burgesses of the Province 
of North Carolina (facsimile of the first book printed in North Carolina), 
and The Poems of Governor Thomas Burke of North Carolina is again being 
offered. These ten books contain a total of over 5,000 pages. Persons ordering 
the sale volumes should include with the order a check or money order for 
$15.00; shipping costs and tax will be paid by the Division of Archives and 
History. Send orders to the Historical Publications Section, Division of 
Archives and History, Department of Cultural Resources, 109 E. Jones St., 
Raleigh, 27611. The 10 percent discount does not apply to the sale volumes 
or to periodicals. 

Students Profit from Archives Experience 

College students are currently making use of the North Carolina State 
Archives in programs ranging from short-term internships to a year’s 
research for a doctoral dissertation. Intern programs, sometimes called 
“mini-mesters,” are designed by the colleges to give students insight into the 
day-by-day work of various professions, not necessarily those related to their 
major field of study. 

Two history interns, Carol Stultz and Brenda Hale, from Mars Hill Col¬ 
lege in Madison County, spent two weeks in January observing and partici¬ 
pating in the activities of the Archives and Records Section and the programs 
of the Museum of History. Ann Hagood, a senior history major from Con¬ 
verse College in Spartanburg, South Carolina, was assigned to the Archives 
Branch for a six-week program in which one of her projects was to devise 
an index to a group of state agency papers. Biology major Jefferson Smith 
of Wofford College, Spartanburg, South Carolina, spent three days of his 
internship checking early North Carolina sources for a mention of a South 
Carolina site which is being restored. 

Nine students who had studied archival principles during the fall semester 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 2, MARCH, 1971, 


33 




Top, left, interns Ann Hagood of Converse 
College and Brenda Hale and Carol Stultz of 
Mars Hill College check into the map case 
in the Search Room; top, right, graduate 
students Eric Anderson of the University of 
Chicago and Barbara Lathraum of Johns 
Hopkins University study in their stack car¬ 
rels; bottom, left, NCSU students (clock¬ 
wise) David Reid, Holly Thompson, Steve 
Massengill, and Charles Morris examine 
records they will arrange and describe. 


in the North Carolina State University course on archival administration 
began work in the second semester applying those principles as they ar¬ 
ranged and described papers of the Carolina Charter Tercentenary Com¬ 
mission under the supervision of Dr. Thornton W. Mitchell, acting director 
of the Division of Archives and History and adjunct professor at North 
Carolina State University. 

Candidates for doctoral degrees and professors on sabbatical leave oc¬ 
casionally visit the Archives for extended research into state and county 
records, also making use of private manuscript collections both in the 
Archives and at the universities in the Research Triangle area. Barbara 
Lathraum of Johns Hopkins University is researching for a year in docu¬ 
ments of the colonial period for her dissertation. Another doctoral candidate 
in residence, Eric Anderson of the University of Chicago, is spending six 
months studying manuscripts of the last quarter of the nineteenth century. 
Mr. Anderson is a student of Dr. John Hope Franklin who in 1967 brought 
an entire seminar class from the University of Chicago for a two-week 
search into records of the Reconstruction era. 


Archival Institute Announced 

The Division of Archives and History has announced that an institute on 
the use of records in the North Carolina State Archives will be held May 
20-24. The institute is planned as an intensive four-day seminar on the use 
of various kinds of records in the State Archives. It will consist of dis¬ 
cussions and demonstration workshops on such subjects as land records at 
both the state and county level, marriage records, wills and estate papers, 
military records to 1865, census and tax records to 1880, and court records. 


34 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 









Registration in the institute is limited to twenty-five persons, and there 
will be a $25.00 registration fee. Further information may be obtained by 
writing the Archives and Records Section, Division of Archives and History, 
109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, 27611. 

Local Records Available for Use by Researchers 

The Local Records Branch personnel are currently appraising, arranging, 
and describing valuable unbound records from the counties of Gates, Johns¬ 
ton, Orange, Robeson, and Wake. One hundred and eleven volumes and 219 
Fibredex boxes of records from various counties have been recently trans¬ 
ferred to the State Archives for public use. The branch has also received 
175.1 cu. ft. of valuable unbound records which will be worked later. 

Branch personnel have completed microfilming records in five additional 
counties and are currently working in Bladen, Madison, and Wayne counties. 

The second edition of the Guide to Research Materials in the North Caro¬ 
lina State Archives; Section B: County Records has been received from the 
printer and is available for distribution. This publication lists all county 
records, both original records and microfilm copies, which are available to 
the researcher in the North Carolina State Archives as of December 1, 1973. 
The publication may be ordered from the Publications Section of the depart¬ 
ment at a cost of $3.50 per copy or it may be purchased in the Archives 
Search Room. 


New Schedule Approved 



Secretary James E. Harrington 
of the Department of Natural and 
Economic Resources prepares to 
sign a new records disposition 
schedule for the regional offices 
in his department as David O. 
Stephens of the State Records 
Branch clarifies a point. The 
schedule provides disposal 
authority for over 500 cu. ft. of 
records in five offices located in 
various regions of the state. 


Symphony Society Records Scheduled 

The State Records Branch is presently conducting a program to extend its 
records management services to the North Carolina Symphony Society, Inc. 
This organization, which is a part of the Department of Cultural Resources, 
recently deposited some 25 cu. ft. of permanently valuable records in the 
State Archives where they are now available for public inspection. The State 
Records Branch is preparing a files plan and a records disposition schedule 
to control paper-work procedures in the organization and to provide official 
disposal and retention authority for the records. 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 2, MARCH, 1971, 


35 



Tryon Palace Symposium Scheduled 

The sixth Tryon Palace Symposium on the 18th Century Decorative Arts 
will be held at Tryon Palace in New Bern March 25, 26, and 27. Sponsors 
are the Tryon Palace Commission and the Division of Continuing Education 
of East Carolina University in cooperation with the Tryon Palace Restora¬ 
tion and the Division of Archives and History. The program will include 
sessions on “The Gardens of Tryon Palace Complex,” presented by Mr. 
W. H. Rea; “Herbs and Kitchen Gardens,” by Mrs. Mary Campbell; 
“Stitches in Time (Historical American Needlework),” by Mrs. Susan B. 
Swan; “Miniature Furniture,” by Mr. Peter B. Schiffer; and “Preservation 
and the Bicentennial,” by Mrs. Richard E. Byrd. In addition each partici¬ 
pant will have an opportunity to attend two workshops. Mrs. Grace J. 
Rohrer, secretary of the Department of Cultural Resources, will preside at 
a dinner the evening of March 26. 

Reservations should be made by sending a check for $46.00 per person to 
Symposium, Division of Continuing Education, East Carolina University, 
P. 0. Box 2727, Greenville, 27834. Checks should be made payable to the 
university. 


Department Represented at SHPO Meeting 

Five members of the staff of the Division of Archives and History parti¬ 
cipated in the annual meeting of the National Conference of State Historic 
Preservation Officers in Washington, D.C., January 30-February 2. 

Dr. H. G. Jones, state historic preservation officer for North Carolina, 
served as chairman of the conference’s policy group and as a member of the 
nominating committee. Dr. Stephen J. Gluckman, chief of the Archaeology 
Section, served on a special study group. Others attending were Bruce 
MacDougal, head of the Research, Restoration, and Survey Branch; Mrs. 
Catherine Cockshutt, supervisor of the Survey Unit; and A. L. Honeycutt, 
Jr., restoration supervisor. 

Properties Added to National Register 

North Carolina properties added to the National Register of Historic 
Places since the November issue of Carolina Comments was published 
include the following: Burke County, Bellevue and Quaker Meadows; Cas- 



Left, Bellevue; right, Quaker Meadows. Both in Morganton, Burke County. 


36 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 





well County, Milton Historic District, Yanceyville Historic District, Bartlett 
Yancey House, and Rose Hill (Bedford Brown House); Catawba County, 
Weidner Rock House; Currituck County, Currituck Beach Lighthouse; 
Henderson County, Flat Rock Historic District; Lenoir County, Herring 
House; Mecklenburg County, Dinkins House; Orange County, Hillsborough 
Historic District; Perquimans County, Land’s End (Leigh House) and 
Samuel Nixon House; Wake County, Briggs Hardware Building; Warren 
County, Coleman-White House; and Watauga County, Gragg House. 



Left, Milton Historic District, with Main Street facing east including Union (Yellow) Tavern, 
Friou-Hunt-Hurdle House, and Jones House; right, Dongola, which is located in the Yancey¬ 
ville Historic District, Caswell County. 



Left, a scene in the Yanceyville Historic District of Caswell County; right, Rose Hill in the 
same county. 



Left, West King Street in the Hillsborough Historic District, Orange County; right, Weidner 
Rock House in Catawba County. 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 2 , MARCH, 1974 


37 



















Left, Saluda Cottages in Flat Rock Historic District, Henderson County; right, Dinkins 
House, Nations Ford Road, Mecklenburg County. 



Left, Land’s End (Leigh House) at Durant’s Neck, Perquimans County; right, Samuel Nixon 
House, also Perquimans County. 



Left, Currituck Beach Lighthouse, Currituck County; right, Briggs Hardware Store, 220 
Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, Wake County. 


38 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 











Left, Coleman-White House, Warrenton, Warren County; right, Gragg House, Watauga 
County. 


Staff Changes Announced 

Dr. Thornton W. Mitchell, chief of the Archives and Records Section, has 
been named acting director of the Division of Archives and History by Mrs. 
Grace J. Rohrer, secretary of the Department of Cultural Resources. He will 
serve in that capacity until a successor to Dr. H. G. Jones is appointed. 

Bruce MacDougal was named acting chief of the Historic Sites and 
Museums Section. He will fill the position formerly held by John G. Zehmer, 
Jr., until a permanent appointment is made. 

Dr. Kent Allyn Schneider joined the staff of the Archaeology Section on 
January 15 as an archaeologist. Dr. Schneider received his B.S. degree in 
biology from Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina, in 1963; 
his M.A. in anthropology from the University of Georgia, Athens, in 1967; 
and his Ph.D. in archaeology from the same university in 1972. He has had 
over ten years of comprehensive experience in archaeology and was responsi¬ 
ble for developing the mobile archaeological laboratory program at the 
Geochronology Laboratory at the University of Georgia last year. Dr. 
Schneider has also taught anthropology at Knox College, Galesburg, Illinois. 
He has published more than a dozen professional papers related to arch¬ 
aeology. 

On January 1 Miss Margaret S. Odell joined the staff of the Civil War 
Roster Project as a part-time assistant to the editor. 


New Name Is Approved for Antiquities Society 

The board of directors of the Society for the Preservation of Antiquities 
met January 22 to implement changes, authorized by the membership at the 
November 15 annual meeting, in the name and charter of the society. The 
organization’s official name is now the Historic Preservation Society of 
North Carolina, Inc. The directors also authorized changes in membership 
dues. Five classes were approved: patron, $1,000; life, $500; contributing, 
$25.00; annual, $10.00; and joint annual (husband and wife or two member¬ 
ships at the same address), $15.00. 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 2 , MARCH, 197b 


39 




The board regretfully accepted the resignation of Mr. John G. Zehmer, Jr., 
secretary-treasurer of the society for the past year. Mr. Zehmer is moving 
to Richmond, Virginia. Appointed acting secretary-treasurer is Mrs. 
Elizabeth W. Wilborn, research supervisor with the Historic Sites and 
Museums Section of the Division of Archives and History. 

The society’s address remains 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, 27611. 


Oral History Workshop Planned 

The National Oral History Association for the Southern Appalachian 
Mountain Region is scheduled to meet in October, 1975, at the Grove Park 
Inn in Asheville. The conference is sponsored by the Appalachian Con¬ 
sortium, which is an association of colleges, universities, and public service 
agencies in the region. The consortium is conducting programs throughout 
the mountain areas of North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia, one of which 
is an oral history project with the Cherokee Indians. 


Reward Is Offered for Diary 

James D. Johnstone, attorney in Georgetown, South Carolina, is offering 
a $100 reward for a photocopy of the Gilbert Johnstone diary referred to by 
the late John A. Oates on page 33 of his book, The Story of Fayetteville. 
Oates says, “Governor Johnson [sic] had built a great palace on the river, 
four miles above the present town of Elizabeth Town, and there he concealed 
for a number of years his brother, who had escaped British vengence [sic] 
after Culledon. ... in a diary kept by Governor Johnson’s brother during 
these eventful times (and recently discovered by a great grandson in Georgia, 
among a mass of old papers) it is related that Francis Marion organized his 
famous band in the Court House in Bladen. . . .” Mr. Johnstone emphasizes 
the fact that his offer does not refer to the well-known letter from Gilbert 
Johnstone to his daughter-in-law, Susanna, dated March 8, 1790. Persons 
wishing to correspond with Mr. Johnstone with regard to this matter should 
write to him at 1524 Front Street, Georgetown, South Carolina, 29440. 

Colleges and Universities 

Belmont Abbey College 

Donald H. Cresswell participated on the program of the Popular Culture 
Association, Southeastern, in Atlanta on September 28. His topic was 
“Viewing the American Revolution through Drawings and Prints Made 
between 1765 and 1790.” He is serving as vice-chairman of the Bicentennial 
Committee of Gaston County. 

Duke University 

Several Duke people participated in the American Historical Association 
meeting in San Francisco. On December 28 Dr. Philip B. Calkins spoke on 
“Bengal and Bihar,” Dr. Joel Colton served as chairman of a session entitled 
“French Provincial Politics under the Second Empire and the Third 


40 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Republic,” and Dr. John J. TePaske spoke on “The Colonial Period.” The 
next day Dr. John Cell served as a commentator for a session on “Informal 
Empire: Case Studies in the Techniques of Control.” The last day of the 
meeting, December 30, Dr. Arthur B. Ferguson was chairman of a session 
entitled “Continental Protestant Influence in the Early English Reforma¬ 
tion.” 

East Carolina University 

The Lawrence F. Brewster Building, named in honor of a former professor 
of history, was dedicated on January 20 on the campus of the university. 
Dr. Brewster retired in 1969. 

Elon College 

Dr. Durward Stokes, chairman of the Department of Social Science, has 
been commissioned to write the history of Dillon County, South Carolina. 
The history is under the sponsorship of the Dillon County Historical Society. 
Dr. Stokes has published articles in several journals, including the North 
Carolina Historical Review and the South Carolina Historical Magazine. 

Methodist College 

Joining the faculty as associate professor of history last fall is Dr. Robert 
G. Perkins. 

North Carolina State University 

Rosemary E. Begemann is scheduled to present a paper, “Meaning of the 
French Revolution for England: Views of the English Press, 1789-1793,” 
at the March 7-9 meeting of the Missouri Valley History Conference in 
Omaha. Announcement has been made that Charles H. Carlton is recipient 
of the Folger Fellowship for 1974-1975. 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

John F. Kasson spoke at the fourth biennial convention of the American 
Studies Association, meeting in San Francisco on October 19, on the topic, 
“The Factory as Republican Community: The Early History of Lowell, 
Massachusetts.” He is the author of “Industrialization Triumphant,” in 
The Study of American History, published in January by the Dushkin 
Publishing Group. W. J. McCoy has published “The Non-Speeches of 
Pisander in Thucydides, Book Eight,” in the University of North Carolina 
Press publication, The Speeches of Thucydides. 

Dr. George B. Tindall presented his presidential address, “Beyond the 
Mainstream: The Ethnic Southerners,” at the Southern Historical Associa¬ 
tion in Atlanta on November 8. His article, “The People’s Party, was pub¬ 
lished in History of U.S. Political Parties, Volume II, edited by Arthur M. 
Schlesinger, Jr.; included in the same work, Volume III, is an article entitled 
“The Progressive Party, 1912 and 1924,” by Dr. George E. Mowry. 

Mr. William S. Powell was in Whiteville on January 24 to talk on “Settle¬ 
ment of the Cape Fear,” which was part of the Humanities Program with 
the theme “Life in Our Tri-Cultural Society.” His and Dr. Hugh T. Lefler’s 


VOLUME XXII. NUMBER 2, MARCH. 1971, 


41 


Colonial North Carolina—A History, was recently published by Charles 
Scribner’s Sons as the North Carolina volume in the series, A History of the 

American Colonies. 

Dr. Joseph H. Tulchin was on the December program of the American 
Historical Association in San Francisco, taking as his topic, “Informal 
Empire in Argentina.” He and Dr. David J. Danelski edited The Auto¬ 
biographical Notes of Charles Evans Hughes, published last year by the 
Harvard University Press; this volume is one of the Legal History Series, 
edited by Stanley Katz. Dr. Tulchin is serving as associate editor of the 
Latin American Research Review. 

Dr. Michael Rogers McVaugh spoke at the Regional Parapsychology 
Conference on “The Historian’s Perspective on Parapsychology.” 

Mr. Jerry C. Cashion was named instructor of North Carolina history 
last September. 

Dr. Don Higginbotham spoke in Yorktown, Virginia, on October 19 at 
the Yorktown Day Association; his topic was “The Significance of York¬ 
town.” He published “The Relevance of the American Revolution in the 
July, 1973, issue of the Anglican Theological Review. 

Dr. Samuel H. Baron read a paper, “Plekhanov, Trotsky, and the De¬ 
velopment of Soviet Historiography,” at the annual meeting of the Southern 
Slavic Conference in Columbia, South Carolina, in October. He presented the 
same paper in a colloquium sponsored by the Department of History at the 
University of California at Berkeley. Dr. Baron served as chairman of a 
session, “Muscovy Observed: Inside and Outside Perspectives,” at the 
Western Slavic Association in San Francisco in October. He published an 
article, “The Fate of the gosti in the reign of Peter the Great,” in Cahiers du 
Monde Russe et Sovietique, published in Paris last fall. 

University of North Carolina at Charlotte 

The first North Carolina Oral History Coordinating Conference was held 
at the university on December 4. Director of the UNC-C Oral History Pro¬ 
gram is Joseph F. Boykin, head librarian. Reports on oral history programs 
across the state were presented by Jacquelyn Hall of the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill, J. Patrick Morgan of Appalachian, John H. Ness 
of the United Methodist Church, Lawrence Goodwyn of Duke, Paul Hoffman 
of the Division of Archives and History, Maurice Stirewalt of the Depart¬ 
ment of Community Colleges, John Woodard of the Baptist Historical Col¬ 
lection at Wake Forest, Evelyn Underwood of Mars Hill, Edward Perzel of 
the university at Charlotte, and Roger Manly of Davidson. An afternoon 
session was devoted to a discussion of ways to coordinate oral history in 
North Carolina. Dr. Edward Perzel and Dr. Harley Jolley were designated 
representatives on a steering committee which will determine the need of a 
statewide organization. Persons interested in further information should 
write to Dr. Perzel at the Department of History, University of North Caro¬ 
lina at Charlotte, 28213, or to Dr. Jolley at the Department of History at 
Mars Hill, 28754. 

Wake Forest University 

Dr. J. Edwin Hendricks published “Charles Thomson and the Creation 


42 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


of ‘A New Order of the Ages,’ ” in America: The Middle Period, recently 
issued by the University Press of Virginia. 

A new graduate program at Wake Forest offers historic preservation and 
museum training in combination with work leading to a master’s degree in 
history. An internship course provides practical experience. Dr. Hendricks 
is directing the program, which began last fall. Further information may be 
obtained by writing to Dr. Hendricks at P. 0. Box 7806, Reynolda Station, 
Winston-Salem, 27109. 

Warren Wilson College 

Dr. Thomas B. Lee spoke on “Confucian Influence on Chinese Polity” at 
the Southeastern Regional Conference, Association of Asian Studies, held at 
North Carolina State University on January 18. 

Winston-Salem State University 

Dr. Howard A. Barnes spoke at the annual meeting of Phi Alpha Theta, 
held in San Francisco on December 27, on the topic, “Horace Bushnell: 
Gentry Elitist.” Dr. William F. Sheppard published “Another Elite Corps: 
The Foreign Service of the U.S.” in the Marine Corps Gazette for January. 

State, County, and Local Groups 

Brunswick County Historical Society 

The society met November 12 at the Brunswick Town Visitor Center- 
Museum; Mrs. Lucille D. Blake, president, presided. William G. Faulk, 
Brunswick site manager, discussed work being done at the site and pre¬ 
sented a slide program on Southport and its Fourth of July Festival. Miss 
Ardath Goldstein, area coordinator for the North Carolina American 
Revolution Bicentennial Committee, spoke on ways in which the Brunswick 
group could observe the bicentennial of the American Revolution; she also 
discussed statewide planning for the bicentennial. Officers elected for 1974 
are president, Mrs. Blake of Leland; vice-president, Harold Aldridge of 
Southport; secretary and treasurer, Grover Gore of Southport; and 
directors, Mrs. J. T. Kezziah of Shallotte and R. V. Asbury of Wilmington. 

Catawba County Historical Association 

Sidney Halma, new director of the Catawba Comity Historical Museum 
was speaker at the November 7 meeting of the association. Mrs. Rome Jones 
is president of the Catawba historical organization. 

Chapel Hill Historical Society 

On January 6 Mrs. Albert Coates spoke on “The Coming of Women to 
the University of North Carolina” when the society held its monthly meeting 
at the Institute of Government. A member of the society, Mrs. Alfred Eng- 
strom, was presented the Medal of Honor by the Davie Poplar Chapter of 
the Daughters of the American Revolution at its annual luncheon in Chapel 
Hill. Mrs. Engstrom is noted for her research in the history of Hillsborough; 
she is currently working with Mrs. George Doaks in conducting surveys of 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 2. MARCH. 197A 


43 


old Orange County cemeteries for the historical society’s research com¬ 
mittee. 

Cleveland County Historical Association 

At its November 19 meeting the association elected Dr. W. Wyan Wash¬ 
burn as president; David E. Beam, first vice-president; John Henry Moss, 
second vice-president; Pansy Fetzer, treasurer; Clara Greene, recording 
secretary; Mrs. John B. Hamrick, corresponding secretary; and Mr. and 
Mrs. R. Hubbard Hamrick, curators. A brief report on plans to commemorate 
the centennial of the town of Kings Mountain was presented by the mayor, 
John Henry Moss. 

Greensboro Historical Museum 

The museum has recently acquired several new collections, including 
Victorian silver and glass given by Mrs. Rod Cook of Greensboro. Much of 
this was used in the White House during the Benjamin Harrison adminis¬ 
tration. A nineteenth century medical collection was given by an anonymous 
donor and Dr. E. W. Plunkett of Clinton, Ohio; an anonymous gift of Civil 
War carbines was recently acquired; the Charles Edison Fund of East 
Orange, New Jersey, placed a significant collection of Thomas A. Edison 
material with the museum. All of these collections may be seen at the 
Greensboro Historical Museum, which is located in the Richardson Civic 
Center, 130 Summit Avenue. 

Harnett County Historical Society 

The society’s Christmas party was canceled because of snow. New officers 
are Ed Cameron of Olivia, president; Jim Withers of McDougald Road in 
Western Harnett, vice-president; and Hewitt Brown of Coats, secretary- 
treasurer. 

High Point Historical Society 

The society and the Museum Guild sponsored a program at the High 
Point Museum on December 11 with folk singer Clark Jones as guest per¬ 
former. Both the Haley House and the blacksmith shop were open to the 
public prior to the concert; demonstrations were given at the Haley House 
to show how eighteenth century people prepared for the holidays and at the 
blacksmith shop where Dr. John Andrews operated the forge. 

Hillsborough Historical Society 

Members of the society saw two films at the November 15 meeting. The 
Landmark Challenge and Williamsburg Restored were produced, respec¬ 
tively, by the Mobile Historic Development Commission and by Colonial 
Williamsburg, Inc. 

Historic Cabarrus, Inc. 

Miss Sarah Walker, director of elementary education in the Concord City 


44 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Schools, spoke to the organization on November 19, taking as her topic, “Our 
Heritage—A Treasure.” Historic Cabarrus sponsored a drawing for several 
craft items on Historic Cabarrus Day, held November 24 at the Carolina 
Mall. A new downtown information center was opened January 1; there, 
the general public has access to information about the old courthouse and 
other projected restorations. The center is equipped with a small reading 
and social area, and free coffee is offered to visitors. Mrs. Janet Magaldi 
is president of the organization. 

Lower Cape Fear Historical Society 

The society’s annual Christmas reception was held at the Latimer House 
December 12; area books were on sale for the convenience of the members. 
Included with the January issue of the society’s Bulletin was an insert 
entitled “Lower Cape Fear Revolutionary War Events, 1765-1774.” Pre¬ 
pared by the society’s president, Mrs. Leora H. McEachern, and Isabel M. 
Williams for the New Hanover County American Revolution Bicentennial 
Committee, the sheet itemizes by date and brief description significant 
events in the Lower Cape Fear region during the years just preceding the 
Revolution. An article by Wayne S. Arnold, “Early Presbyterianism in the 
Lower Cape Fear,” was the feature of the January Bulletin. The society’s 
meeting of January 16 was held in the St. James Great Hall, with John K. 
Neeley speaking on “Restoration of the Society Hill Area around Independ¬ 
ence Hall, Philadelphia.” 

Madison County Historical Society 

The annual meeting was held at the French Broad Electric Membership 
Corporation building in Marshall on November 10. Bill Weaver of Cherokee 
presented a program on oral history. 

Moravian Music Foundation 

At its October 13 meeting Charles W. Miller was elected chairman of the 
board of the foundation. He succeeded R. Arthur Spaugh, who remains a 
member but who asked to be relieved of responsibility as chairman. 

Nash County Historical Association 

A candlelight reception was held at Stonewall, property which the as¬ 
sociation hopes to restore, on December 30. The house is considered one of 
the best examples of late federal architecture in North Carolina, according 
to T. E. Ricks, president of the Nash group. Miss Kathy McCarter, assistant 
secretary of the Department of Cultural Resources, represented the depart¬ 
ment at the function. Mr. Hugh B. Johnston, Jr., of Atlantic Christian Col¬ 
lege, spoke at the January 10 meeting of the organization. 

North Randolph Historical Society 

The society has given notice that it is having to cease publication of its 
quarterly. It will continue to operate the St. Paul Museum on High Point 
Street in Randleman. 


VOLUME XXII. NUMBER 2. MARCH, 1974 


45 


Old Salem 


Old Salem’s 1973 report details progress in many areas. The appearance 
of the historic district was improved by pruning and new plantings, a new 
wing was constructed at MESDA, the Wachovia Museum was renovated, 
restoration of the 1824 Traugott Leinbach House was begun, and significant 
new accessions were added to various collections. 

Pamlico Comity Historical Association 

Guest speaker for a joint meeting of the association and the county’s 
bicentennial committee, November 27, was Ed Barham, Jr., a representative 
of the North Carolina American Revolution Bicentennial Committee. The 
county is planning to continue compilation of a history of Pamlico County. 
Various plans are being made for the Pamlico County observance of the 
bicentennial of the American Revolution. 

The association is also preparing a genealogical history of Pamlico County 
black families; the first “chapter,” which is ready for distribution, is on 
black families of Bayboro. The association contributed funds through the 
PACE program to make it possible for Teresa Jones, a junior at North Caro¬ 
lina Central University, to work on the project; sale of the finished publica¬ 
tion will provide money for reimbursement to the association. 

Pasquotank Historical Society 

The society sponsored its third consecutive Moravian love feast at Cann 
Memorial Presbyterian Church on December 13. Dr. Clifford Bair was in 
charge of the Moravian music; the Rev. Ragland Fletcher of Cann Memorial 
presided, and the Rev. E. P. Mickey of Winston-Salem was guest speaker. 
E. O. (Jack) Baum is the society’s president. 

Person County Historical Society 

Mrs. Lois S. Neal, head librarian of the Genealogical Services Branch, 
State Library, was the featured speaker at the November 27 meeting of the 
society. The meeting was held in the library at Roxboro. 

Pitt County Historical Society 

Ed Barham, Jr., area coordinator for the North Carolina American 
Revolution Bicentennial Committee, spoke at the dinner meeting of the 
society on November 29. He discussed plans for local bicentennial activities, 
illustrating his talk with a special bicentennial planning film. 

Randolph County Historical Society 

At its November 8 meeting Mrs. Carolyn Hager was elected president of 
the Randolph society. Other officers elected at that time are Mrs. Neal 
Blevins, vice-president; John Redding, treasurer; and Charlesanna Fox, 
secretary. Dr. Joseph Griffith, mayor of Liberty, spoke on the history of his 
town. On December 13 the members saw a documentary film depicting 
pottery making and something about the lives of potters in lower Randolph 
and upper Moore counties. Those who attended were asked to bring 


46 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


mementos of past Christmases which would be helpful in illustrating ways 
in which people of Randolph County had observed the season in earlier 
years. 

Southern Antiques Society, Inc. 

The Fall, 1973, issue of Southern Antiques and Interiors includes a 
section entitled “Southern States’ Reports: Historic Preservation Work at 
the State Agency Level.” Reports on Florida, South Carolina, North Caro¬ 
lina, and Alabama are included. Annual membership in the society, which 
includes a subscription to the quarterly publication, is $8.00 per year for 
an individual and $10.00 for a couple. Membership fees should be sent to 
the Southern Antiques Society, Inc., P. O. Box 26, High Point, 27261. 

Stokes County Historical Society 

The society met November 20 in Walnut Cove. Larry Tise, a member of 
the staff of the North Carolina American Revolution Bicentennial Com¬ 
mittee, showed a film on plans for the commemoration of the bicentennial. 

Swain County Historical Society 

A new historical society is that recently organized in Swain County. The 
first formal meeting was held January 17 in Bryson City. Prior to that time 
a group of twenty residents of the county elected temporary officers and 
drew up a constitution and bylaws. George Ellison, Gerald McKinney, Jim 
Gillespie, and Mrs. Erwin Casada were named temporary officers. Mack 
White, vice-president of the Western North Carolina Historical Association, 
and Dick Iobst, archivist of Western Carolina University, spoke to the 
group and assisted in perfecting the organization. 

Upper Cape Fear Historical Society 

A new organization, the Upper Cape Fear Historical Society, was formed 
November 15 in Fayetteville. The group hopes to establish a museum on the 
Upper Cape Fear area. Mrs. Nancy Adams and Howard Alligood were two 
of the nine organizers; no officers were elected, but Jim Sinclair was elected 
chairman of a committee to coordinate the new society’s activities with 
various state and county bicentennial projects. The first major project of the 
group will be a display of historic artifacts at local banks. 

Wake County Historical Society 

The society met at the Church of the Good Sheperd on January 20 as the 
church began its centennial commemoration. The meeting was held in the 
chapel, which was the original church building used for the first time on 
Easter Sunday, 1875. The Rev. Louis C. Melcher and Dr. Sarah M. Lemmon 
told the group something about the history of the Raleigh church and then 
guided a tour of the present sanctuary. 

Washington County Historical Society 

The society and the Division of Archives and History cosponsored a 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 2, MARCH, 197A 


47 


candlelight reception and open house at Somerset Place December 9. Over 
400 residents of the Albemarle area attended the event. Earlier in the 
holiday season, on November 25, the society held its fourth annual Christmas 
Love Feast and Service of Lights at historic Rehoboth Methodist Church. 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Published in January, March, May, July, September, and November by the Division 
of Archives and History, Department of Cultural Resources, Archives and History- 
State Library Building, 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27611. 

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Published Bimonthly by the North Carolina Division of Archives and History 


Volume XXII, Number 3 


May, 1974 


Johnston, Knowles Appointed to Historical Commission 

Dr. Frontis W. Johnston and Mr. J. C. Knowles, recently appointed 
members of the North Carolina Historical Commission by Governor Hols- 
houser, were sworn in at the meeting of the commission held February 28. 
Dr. Johnston, a graduate of Davidson College and Yale University, has been 
a member of the faculty of Davidson since 1935. He has been dean of the 
faculty and dean of the honors college as well as professor of history. Dr. 
Johnston has been president of both the North Carolina Literary and His¬ 
torical Association and the Historical Society of North Carolina. He has 
been a member of the board of trustees of North Carolina Agricultural and 
Technical University since 1961. 

Mr. Knowles, a native of Duplin County, served as executive secretary of 



Prior to the meeting of the North Carolina Historical Commission on February 28, Mr. J. C. 
Knowles of Raleigh and Dr. Frontis W. Johnston of Davidson College were sworn in as new 
members of the commission by Secretary of State Thad Eure. Shown above is Secretary of 
State Eure, right, administering the oath to Mr. Knowles, left, and Dr. Johnston, center. 
(Photographs by Division of Archives and History.) 











the North Carolina Academy of Family Physicians for twelve years. At the 
present time he is director of Historical Raleigh, Inc., a free-lance writer, 
and an amateur historian. Mr. Knowles is a member of the Raleigh Historic 
Properties Commission; he has served as a member of the Raleigh Board of 
Education since 1969. 

Historical Commission Meets 

The North Carolina Historical Commission, of which Mr. Harry Gatton 
has been named chairman by Governor Holshouser, met February 28 for its 
regular spring meeting. After hearing reports from the acting director and 
heads of the five sections in the Division of Archives and History, the com¬ 
mission adopted resolutions honoring former members Josh L. Horne and 
Fletcher M. Greene. A resolution was also adopted expressing gratitude for 
the service of Dr. H. G. Jones for the past eighteen years. 

During the afternoon session, the commission conducted hearings on 
legislation for state grants-in-aid pending before the 1974 General Assembly 
and on the proposed demolition of the Seaboard Coast Line Railroad Office 
Building in connection with the construction of the State Government Center 
in Raleigh. The commission, after considering criteria for grants contained 
in the General Statutes of North Carolina, recommended approval of legis¬ 
lation to establish the Thomas Wolfe Memorial in Asheville as a state historic 
site and of grants-in-aid to assist in the restoration and preservation of 
Thalian Hall, Wilmington; Harmony Hall, Kinston; and Stonewall, Rocky 
Mount. The commission also adopted a resolution strongly recommending 
preservation of the Seaboard Coast Line Railroad Office Building and its 
continued location at the present site. 



During the meeting of the North Carolina Historical Commission, hearings on reguests for 
state grants-in-aid and on the Seaboard Coast Line Office Building were held. Pictured at the 
hearings are, left to right, Dr. Thornton W. Mitchell, acting director of the Division of Archives 
and History; members of the commission, Dr. Frontis W. Johnston, Dr. Hugh T. Lefler, Chair¬ 
man Harry Gatton, Dr. Gertrude S. Carraway, and Mr. J. C. Knowles; Mrs. Grace J. Rohrer, 
secretary of the Department of Cultural Resources; and Dr. Edward W. Phifer, Jr., vice- 
chairman of the commission. During the hearing on the retention and preservation of the 
Seaboard Coast Line Railroad Office Building, Mrs. Bailey P. Williamson of the Raleigh 
Historic Properties Commission, shown above, right, spoke in favor of keeping the building 
intact at its present site. 


Jones Honored at Dinner 

On February 28 approximately 150 friends and associates of Dr. H. G. 
Jones gathered to pay tribute to him at a dinner held at the Sheraton 


50 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 








Crabtree Inn in Raleigh. Dr. Jones, who resigned as director of the Division 
of Archives and History to become curator of the North Carolina Collection 
at Chapel Hill, was the recipient of several gifts, including a typewriter, an 
engraved desk set, and an enrolled copy of a resolution of commendation 
passed by the North Carolina Historical Commission at its meeting earlier 
in the day. Mr. Harry Gatton, chairman of the commission, presided. 
Speakers were Dr. Thornton W. Mitchell, acting director of the Division of 
Archives and History; Mrs. Grace J. Rohrer, secretary of the Department of 
Cultural Resources; Mrs. Joye E. Jordan, assistant director, Division of 
Archives and History; Dr. Gertrude S. Carraway, member of the commis¬ 
sion; Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell, chief of the division’s Historical Publications 
Section; and Dr. Jones. 



Left, Mrs. Grace J. Rohrer is speaking at the dinner given in honor of Dr. Jones. Others 
at the head table, left to right, Dr. Thornton W. Mitchell, Mrs. Harry Gatton, Mrs. Jordan, 
Mrs. Robert W. Scott, Dr. Jones, Mr. Gatton (just behind Mrs. Rohrer), Mrs. Memory F. 
Mitchell, and Dr. Gertrude S. Carraway. In the foreground, backs to camera, are Mr. A. L. 
Honeycutt, Jr., and Dr. Frontis W. Johnston. Right, Dr. Jones displays one of several gifts he 
has just opened while Mrs. Joye Jordan looks on. 


Workshop for Teachers 

An all-day workshop on the facilities of the State Archives and the State 
Library useful to teachers of North Carolina history was conducted in 
January for eighth and ninth grade history teachers of the Raleigh City 
School District. 

Teachers were welcomed by Mrs. Grace J. Rohrer, secretary of the Depart¬ 
ment of Cultural Resources; Dr. Thornton Mitchell, acting director of the 
Division of Archives and History; and Mr. Philip Ogilvie, state librarian. 

Overall activities of the Division of Archives and History were presented 
by Paul P. Hoffman in an illustrated lecture, followed by specific information 
on the use of the search room of the State Archives by Mrs. Ellen Z. McGrew. 
Historical books and pamphlets published by the Division of Archives and 
History were discussed by Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell. 

After coffee at the Governor’s Mansion, the resources of the Museum of 
History, Historic Sites (Survey Unit), and Archaeology Section were ex¬ 
plained by Mrs. Natalie Miller, Ms. Ruth Little-Stokes, and Lawrence E. 
Bab its, respectively. 

Librarians Lois Neal and Marilyn Webb discussed the reference services 
and audiovisual aid resources of the State Library. 

Following the workshop, a tour of Capitol Square was conducted by Dr. 
Mitchell. 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 3, MAY, 197J, 


51 



$136,781 in Federal Grants Announced 

Ten federal grants-in-aid totaling $136,781 for historic restoration pro¬ 
jects in North Carolina have been announced for the 1974 fiscal year. The 
grants, under the National Historic Preservation Act, were recommended 
by Dr. H. G. Jones, former state historic preservation officer, and approved 
by the United States Department of the Interior’s National Park Service. 

The grants-in-aid, which require dollar-for-dollar matching, are as fol¬ 
lows: Clerk’s Office, Halifax, $20,000; Owens House, Halifax, $8,500; Sally- 
Billy House, Halifax, $37,500; Bonner House, Bath, $5,500; Hezekiah 
Alexander Springhouse, Charlotte, $10,000; Newbold-White House, Per¬ 
quimans County, $12,500; John Wheeler House, Murfreesboro, $10,000; 
Richmond Hill Law School, Yadkin County, $7,500; Bernard Franklin 
House, Surry County, $10,000; and Third Factory, Duke Homestead, Dur¬ 
ham, $15,281. 

These “bricks and mortar” grants are in addition to a survey and planning 
grant of $147,000 to the Division of Archives and History for the continuation 
of the statewide survey and revision of the new state plan for historic 
preservation. 

Governor Names Members of Bicentennial Committee 

Gov. James E. Holshouser, Jr., announced March 12 the names of four new 
members and one reappointed member of the North Carolina American 
Revolution Bicentennial Committee. The new members are Ethelyn Arch 
Conseen of Cherokee, Mary Jane Garner of Chapel Hill, Robert G. Kellogg 
of Winston-Salem, and Armistead J. Maupin of Raleigh; Ernie Greup of 
Durham was reappointed. All five will serve for five years. Hector MacLean 
of Lumberton is chairman of the committee. 

Exhibit of Revolution Scheduled for Raleigh 

“Manuscripts of the American Revolution,” a traveling exhibit sponsored 
by the Manuscript Society and the Smithsonian Institution, will be on 
display in the Archives and History-State Library Building from May 17 
to June 15, 1975. 

This exhibition has been established to herald the forthcoming bicenten¬ 
nial celebration of the founding of the United States as an independent 
nation. Documents and letters were selected to provide a panorama of the 
era beginning with the Stamp Act of 1765 and ending with the election of 
George Washington. 

The major events of these twenty-nine years will be highlighted by thirty- 
five manuscripts including letters written by George Washington, Samuel 
Adams, Benedict Arnold, and others. 

The North Carolina State Archives has lent a letter written by John Penn 
while he was a member of the North Carolina Board of War in Hillsborough 
to Gen. Henry W. Harrington, September 20, 1780. The army, under Gen. 
Horatio Gates, had suffered at Camden, South Carolina, “the most disastrous 
defeat ever inflicted on an American army.” Scattered, hungry, and almost 
naked, the army made its way to Hillsborough. In the letter Penn asks for 


52 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


help in getting supplies. 

The exhibit opened at the Detroit Historical Museum in October of last 
year. Other states where it will be shown are Idaho, Missouri, Illinois, 
Mississippi, Tennessee, Washington, Indiana, Iowa, Georgia, and Florida. 


T '~' L\y 

~ -- S. -if..,, ,-- 

j?' — S -—- s/fisy* 

4L~~ S> SA44 &•/£-? fL 

jA * /- y. „ ~/0%y/Zs£~„,yy. - /t-.--.* ^ 

t/y yy*~~.- y?-r~f £s y* 

a s/~/?/£,*>: M* ~A~si?y,r~/ A/~~A 1 f 'y~AS',.y~ 

/,y* , 4, 44 A //y~/ 4 44 4lA /.r^s A ^ Q-^y^~*JA?} 4^ ~,~4 4^^444 y f A,l4J^y 

_ 4.4,.^ /• yy,^4^Xpp,^~ y a,_ 

, .,,,2 k ~~.Tsy„4 v,.- — y~ ,y~.~- 

, c y&sr^y 
fa,^, CJ***S cfe**? &**+**?y£- Jy£s* sx~*~e*~ ; yS*,0 S3 +^a~*j 

_ #/< <• *” "' *•«» *«*«'•* ^ #f Po«- OU 4 , 

^^y /*r- /yflj tjrfrrlf ; T ^ 

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r f //<ri j 






^//* sK.rer f- yiU&r* **py 

North Carolina’s contribution to the exhibit is a letter written by John Penn. 


Service Awards Presented 

Service awards were presented to sixty employees of the Division of 
Archives and History at a special ceremony on March 6 presided over by 
Mrs. Grace J. Rohrer, secretary of the Department of Cultural Resources. 
Receiving special recognition for more than thirty years’ service were Miss 
Beth G. Crabtree, Mrs. Joye E. Jordan, and Mrs. Mary J. Rogers. 

Other awards were: twenty years —Leonard Alston, Bessie W. Bowling, 
Mary D. Farmer, Marion T. James, Joseph A. Lee, Memory F. Mitchell, 
Richard W. Sawyer, and Elizabeth W. Wilborn; fifteen years —John D. 
Ellington, Madlin Futrell, Edna F. Gordon, A. L. Honeycutt, Grace C. Ipock, 
Ruth C. Langston, Samuel P. Townsend, and Maxie C. Wall; ten years — 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 3, MAY, 1971 


53 





Recipients of thirty-year serv¬ 
ice awards are, left to right, Mrs. 
Mary J. Rogers, Mrs. Joye E. 
Jordan, and Miss Beth Crabtree. 


Ruby D. Arnold, Carolyn C. Bradshaw, Freda Brittain, Robert 0. Conway, 
Prisca Crettier, Virginia S. Currie, William G. Faulk, Robert L. Fry, Percy 
W. Hines, Ray Hocutt, Peggy Hopson, Donald E. Horton, James Ivey, Roger 

C. Jones, James H. Mercer, Thornton W. Mitchell, and Dorothy M. Tankard; 
five years —Leslie Bright, Irma Carroll, Charles Clark, Carrie Dennis, Rose 
Ennemoser, Don Flowers, Frank Gatton, Robert Grissett, Jon R. Holland, 
W. T. Jordan, Ellen McGrew, Natalie Miller, Larry G. Misenheimer, Marie 

D. Moore, Mary Reynolds Peacock, Minnie K. Peebles, Sammie L. Shine, 
Keith Strawn, Harold Stroud, Betty Tyson, James R. Vogt, James A. 
Weathers, Irene E. Yarbrough, and R. E. Youngquist. 

Service by these employees represents more than 660 years service to the 
state of North Carolina and to the Division of Archives and History. 


Revolutionary War Ship’s Log Sought 

An unidentified sunken ship in eastern Pitt County has temporarily 
stumped members of the Archaeology Section. One possibility is that it may 
be of the Revolutionary War period. In order to identify this vessel, persons 
having knowledge of the ship’s log of the State Ship Caswell (1776-1779), 
or diaries for the same period belonging to Willis Wilson, Hance Bond, or 
Christopher Calver are requested to contact the Archaeology Section of the 
Division of Archives and History. Any other diaries dealing with early 
shipping in North Carolina would also be of assistance. 

Destroyed Records Reconstructed 

On February 11 the North Carolina State Archives transferred to the 
National Personnel Records Center (Military) in St. Louis a duplicate 
(photostat) set of military service reports. These reports are for approxi¬ 
mately 86,000 North Carolinians who served in the Army, Navy, Marine 
Corps, and Coast Guard during World War I. They will restore information 
needed to prove military service for North Carolinians whose records were 
among the 82 percent destroyed in the fire which burned in the Records 
Center during July 12-17, 1973. 

Since the copies of the reports in the North Carolina State Archives do not 
include complete files, the chief value of the records transferred to St. Louis 
will be in verifying the identity of a benefit claimant as a North Carolina 
veteran of World War I; the transferred records are not sufficiently detailed 
to establish or support benefit claims for disabled veterans. 


54 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 



Additions to National Register 





Four North Carolina sites have been 
added to the National Register of Historic 
Places. Top row, left, McCurdy House in 
Cabarrus County and Long Street Presby¬ 
terian Church, Fort Bragg Military Reserva¬ 
tion, in Hoke County; middle row, two 
views of the Garland-Buford House in Cas¬ 
well County; left, Statesville City Hall in 
Iredell County. 


South Atlantic Archives and Records Conference 


The 1974 South Atlantic Archives and Records Conference will be held in 
Atlanta on May 2-3. The conference host is the Georgia Department of 
Archives and History. Other conference members are the official archival 
agencies of the states of North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, and Vir- 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 3, MAY, 197J,i 


55 


























ginia, as well as the National Archives and Records Service. The conference 
is planned primarily for the benefit of junior archivists, but there will be 
several general sessions of interest to all in the archival field. For further 
information please contact Miss Ann Pederson, Georgia Department of 
Archives and History, Atlanta, Georgia, 30334. 

Restricted Release of 1900 Census 

The 1900 population schedule was opened to historical, genealogical, and 
legal research in the microfilm research room of the National Archives on 
December 3, 1973. Certain restrictions have been imposed to prevent un¬ 
warranted invasion of privacy. In brief, a researcher must go to the National 
Archives, present credentials, and complete census data-use agreement, 
which in turn must be approved by officials at the Archives, before having 
access to the microfilm. No part of the schedule may be photocopied. 

The following information is included in this census: address; name; 
relationship to head of family; sex; race; age; marital status; number of 
years married; for women, number of children bom and now living; birth¬ 
place of person and parents; if foreign born, year of immigration and whether 
naturalized; occupation; months not employed; school attendance; literacy; 
ability to speak English; whether on a farm; home owned or rented; if 
owned, whether mortgaged. 

Further details are included in the revised edition of Information Cir¬ 
cular No. 2 North Carolina Census Records, 178U-1900, by Ellen Z. McGrew, 
available in the search room of the State Archives for 25 cents. 

Archives Accessions Records 

From December through February a total of 145 items was accessioned by 
the Archives Branch. These included the following: 

The Local Records Branch transferred 113 volumes from Stanly, Cabarrus, 
Johnston, Wayne, Bladen, Madison, and McDowell counties; 15 Fibredex 
boxes of Robeson County wills; 20 McDowell County marriage bonds; a 
folder of Edenton District Court records; and 5 Fibredex boxes of miscel¬ 
laneous county records. 

State agency records received included a memorial to the General Assem¬ 
bly [1855], and transfers within the Division of Archives and History— 
correspondence from the Director’s Office and Archives and Records Section, 
1970-1971, and the records of the N.C. Tercentenary and. the Confederate 
Centennial commissions. 

Of the 19 private collection entries, three were additions to the Robert W. 
Scott II Collection, the Harold Minges Scrapbooks, and the Siamese Twins 
Collections. Three of the new collections are related to the Black Mountain 
College Papers: they are the Allan Sly Papers (including a doctoral disser¬ 
tation on music at Black Mountain, by Anna Hines); the Ernst Krenek 
Letters; and the Clark Foreman Papers. 

In addition there were 36 miscellaneous genealogies and Bible records, 57 
additions to the newspaper collection (originals), local histories from War¬ 
ren, Bladen, and Columbus counties, additions to both the World War I and 


56 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


World War II papers, and organization records from the N.C. League of 
Women Voters, Black Mountain College (microfilmed scrapbook), and the 
Society of the War of 1812 in the State of North Carolina (framed charter). 

Burke Newspapers Wanted 

The Newspaper Microfilm Project of the Archives and Records Section has 
undertaken a survey of the newspaper resources of Burke County. Readers 
knowing the location of copies of old newspapers published in Burke are 
urged to contact the State Archives so that the project can borrow the papers 
and microfilm them. All copies will be promptly returned to owners, and 
full credit will be given in the published microfilm. 

Town of Weaverville Scores First 

The first request from a municipality for copies of plans from the central 
microfile of engineering plans and drawings being assembled by the State 
Records Branch was processed in February of this year for the town of 
Weaverville. The plans of the town’s water and sewage system were drawn 
in the early 1900s and are now permanently preserved on microfilm. 

New State Fiscal and Personnel Records Standards Published 

The State Records Branch has readied new and expanded records reten¬ 
tion and disposition standards for the fiscal and personnel records of state 
government. Part of an overall plan of records management for state records 
which have grown to over 279,324 cubic feet, the publications are designed 
to ensure that all records in the two series are preserved only as long as 
required for administrative purposes and disposed of in a timely manner 
thereafter. 

Literary Entries Invited 

Authors are reminded that entries for the Mayflower, Sir Walter Raleigh, 
Roanoke-Chowan, and AAUW awards in literature must be submitted (in 
three copies) to the Secretary-Treasurer, North Carolina Literary and His¬ 
torical Association, 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh 27611, by July 15. Books 
must have been officially published between July 1, 1973, and June 30, 1974, 
and authors must have been actual or legal residents of North Carolina for 
three years immediately preceding the closing date. 

Frederick Douglass Papers Wanted 

On September 1 of last year, an eight-year project to collect and edit the 
papers of Frederick Douglass was begun at Yale University, with Dr. John 
W. Blassingame as editor. Sponsored by Yale and the Association for the 
Study of Afro-American Life and History, the project is supported by the 
National Endowment for the Humanities and the National Historical Publi¬ 
cations Commission. Anyone having or knowing the whereabouts of Douglass 
letters is invited to write to Dr. Blassingame at 2103 Yale Station, Yale 
University, New Haven, Connecticut, 06520. 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 3, MAY, 1971, 


57 


Obituaries 


Mr. Josh L. Horne of Rocky Mount died March 15. Appointed a member of 
the Executive Board of the State Department of Archives and History by 
Gov. William B. Umstead in 1954, Mr. Horne served as chairman from 1965 
until October, 1972. He continued as chairman emeritus of the board (now 
the North Carolina Historical Commission) until February of this year. Mr. 
Horne was well known for his service on numerous boards and commissions, 
and his many contributions to North Carolina will be a lasting memorial to 
him. 

Dr. James H. Brewer, former professor of history at North Carolina Cen¬ 
tral University and more recently head of the Afro-American Studies Cur¬ 
riculum at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, died March 8. 
Dr. Brewer participated in many activities in the field of history. In 1970 he 
won the Mayflower Cup for his book, The Confederate Negro, 1861-1865. 

Mrs. Blanche Hardee Rives of Enfield, longtime leader in cultural and 
historical activities in Halifax County and eastern North Carolina, died 
December 17. 


Colleges and Universities 


Campbell College 

The college and the Harnett County Historical Society cosponsored the 
third annual Conference on Celtic Studies on March 16. Papers were pre¬ 
sented by Dr. Vernon 0. Stumpf of Campbell, Professor William S. Powell of 
the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Adm. A. M. Patterson of 
Raleigh, and the Rev. Nash A. Odom. Luncheon speaker was the Rev. James 
A. M. Hanna of Oak Hill, Ohio. 

East Carolina University 

The university, in cooperation with the North Carolina Council for the 
Social Studies, sponsored the ninth annual Symposium on History and the 
Social Studies on February 8. Participants for the morning program and 
their topics included Anthony Papalas, “European History: An Overview”; 
Thomas Herndon, on the Middle Ages; Philip Adler, on Contemporary 
Europe; Bodo Nischan, “Early Modern History of Europe: Reformation 
Period”; and William H. Cobb, “Early Modern History of Europe: Seven¬ 
teenth Century.” At the luncheon session, Professor Warren Lerner of Duke 
spoke on “Teaching European History in Secondary Schools.” The afternoon 
discussion topic was “Western Studies in the Secondary Schools of North 
Carolina,” led by Helen Reed, North Lenoir High School; Mary Van Wilkins, 
State Department of Public Instruction; and Gerald Eubanks, New Bern 
Senior High School. 

On March 27 the second annual Tobacco History Symposium, with the 
theme “Tobacco’s Impact upon Towns and Town Life in North Carolina,” 
was presented by the Institute for Historical Research in Tobacco and the 
Division of Continuing Education of East Carolina University; it was spon¬ 
sored by the North Carolina Committee for Continuing Education in the 


58 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Humanities and the National Endowment for the Humanities. A morning 
session, “Tobacco in Transition: The Changing Scene in Town and State,” 
was moderated by Fred D. Ragan of East Carolina; Dr. Durward T. Stokes 
of Elon College presented a paper, “Milton: The Growth and Decline of a 
Tobacco Town.” The second morning paper was given by Dr. G. Melvin 
Herndon of the University of Georgia on the subject “Clay and Fig, Snuffbox, 
Chaw, Stogie, Makings and Tailormade: The Impact of Changing Modes of 
Tobacco Consumption on Tobacco Culture.” William S. Humphries, food and 
agricultural news editor in the Department of Agricultural Information at 
North Carolina State University presented the luncheon paper, “The Impact 
of Tobacco upon North Carolina Towns.” Afternoon papers, with Dr. Charles 
L. Price of East Carolina as moderator, were devoted to “The Impact of 
Tobacco and the Reynoldses upon the Growth of Winston-Salem,” given by 
Dr. Nannie May Tilley, professor emerita of East Texas State University, 
and “The American Tobacco Company and the Development of Durham as a 
Tobacco Manufacturing Center,” presented by Dr. Robert F. Durden of 
Duke University. 

Dr. James Hugh Wease was promoted March 1 to the rank of associate 
professor. 

Guilford College 

Dr. Josephine L. Moore became assistant academic dean, effective Febru¬ 
ary 1. Dr. Martha H. Cooley is president of the state AAUP, February, 1974- 
February, 1975. She is to be on leave during the 1974-1975 academic year 
for research and travel in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union. 

High Point College 

The Wrenn Memorial Library recently received 100 books on Canadian 
history and culture, a gift of Canada’s Council and Foreign Affairs Depart¬ 
ment in Ottawa. High Point is one of the few colleges in the United States 
offering a course in Canadian history. 

Thirty-six people participated in Lucy Washington’s class in historic 
preservation in North Carolina, given during the January interim term. The 
class took one-day trips to historic sites in the Piedmont area and spent 
several days on guided tours in eastern North Carolina. The trips were sup¬ 
plemented by speakers and by the use of slides and films. 

Meredith College 

Dr. Sarah McCulloh Lemmon spoke on March 12 at the Johnston County 
Forum in Smithfield on the topic “A Historical Overview of American Edu¬ 
cational Objectives.” On February 27 she appeared on WUNC-TV, discussing 
“Victorian Restoration in Raleigh.” She was appointed to the Advisory 
Board of the North Carolina Internship Program on March 1; the appoint¬ 
ment was made by Dr. William C. Friday. 

North Carolina State University 

Strolling at State: A Walking Guide to North Carolina State University, 
by Marguerite E. Schumann, was published by the North Carolina State 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 3, MAY, 1971, 


59 


University Alumni Association, Inc., and North Carolina State University 
Foundation, Inc. The 97-page booklet is indexed and illustrated; it gives 
information on seventy buildings and other places of interest and includes 
something about the history of NCSU and prominent individuals who con¬ 
tributed to its history. A map for each “walk” adds to the usefulness of the 
publication. Copies, which are $1.04 each, may be ordered from the NCSU 
Alumni Association, Box 5876, Raleigh, 27607. 

Pfeiffer College 

Dr. Peter F. Barty has been named assistant professor of history, effective 
in August. 

Queens College 

Dr. Mollie Camp Abernathy served as chairman of a session on “Women 
and Radicalism” at the March 7 meeting of the Missouri Valley History 
Conference in Omaha, Nebraska. 

Shaw University 

Mrs. Munawar Mustafa, chairman of the Department of History, is on 
leave for further study at Duke University. Dr. Urabi Mustafa is acting 
chairman during her absence. 

Warren Wilson College 

Min-yu Wang will assume the position of assistant professor of history 
and political science in August. 


State, County, and Local Groups 

Alamance County Historical Association 

The association arranged with the Genealogical Society of the Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints to microfilm family records prepared 
during the first part of this century by the late Isaac Offman. Copies of the 
film have been placed in the Elon College library, the State Archives, the 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Duke University, and Lenoir 
Rhyne College. George Colclough, secretary-treasurer of the association, is 
having copies of various family histories in Alamance County prepared and 
is making them available for sale at reasonable cost. 

Burke County Historical Society 

At the society’s annual meeting on January 15, Mrs. Abbie Seals Hilde¬ 
brand spoke on the history of southeastern Burke County. 

Catawba County Historical Association 

The association met on January 27. A short audiovisual presentation 
showed the relationship of the blacksmith to the colonial community. “Black¬ 
smiths as Craftsmen” was the theme of the program, and the role of the 


60 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


blacksmith was discussed by Ray Cline of Newton and Ben Drum of Sherrills 
Ford. Drum, though now eighty-six years of age, is still active as a smith; 
Mr. Cline is also an active blacksmith, having worked at the trade since 1913. 
A reception was held on March 6 in Newton in honor of Judge Wilson 
Warlick, who celebrated his eighty-second birthday. The retired federal 
judge has been an active member of the association for many years and 
served on the committee that published the county’s history. 

Chapel Hill Historical Society 

Dr. Charles Blake spoke to the organization on February 3, presenting 
slides on the restoration and preservation of Savannah. On March 3 Mr. 
Collier Cobb, Jr., reminisced about early days in Chapel Hill; this program 
stemmed from a talk given in March, 1973, which had been so well received 
that Mr. Cobb was asked to speak again in 1974. Speaker for the March 31 
meeting was Dr. Carlyle Sitterson, former chancellor of the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, whose topic was “Industrial Leadership in 
North Carolina from 1865-1900.” The society’s directors recently voted to 
appropriate $400 to a student project concerned with the design of Chapel 
Hill’s historic district. The project is being supervised by Dr. Sidney Cohn of 
the university’s Department of City and Regional Planning and Russell 
Wright, city planner of Providence, Rhode Island. The society is also trying 
to obtain information about the Chapel Hill and Carrboro communities and 
is interested in old films, home movies, snapshots, and the like. Persons 
wishing to contribute to the project are asked to write to the society at Box 
503, Chapel Hill, 27514. 


Cleveland County Historical Association 

The association, on January 28, voted to ask permission to use part of the 
courthouse for a county historical museum in view of plans to move many of 
the county offices elsewhere. Samuel B. Townsend, assistant chief of the 
Historic Sites and Museums Section of the Division of Archives and History, 
spoke on some of the problems encountered in establishing a county museum. 
Anyone interested in joining the Cleveland County Historical Association 
may do so by sending $2.00, the annual dues, to Mrs. Pansy B. Fetzer, P.O. 
Box 1167, Shelby, 28150. 

Currituck County Historical Society 

The society met March 4 in Moyock with President S. Curtis Gray presid¬ 
ing. Roy Sawyer, Jr., publications chairman, announced that the society’s 
annual Journal will be available by May 1 and will be $4.00 a copy. Mrs. 
Barbara Hudson and Mrs. Barbara Snowden presented their study, “Historic 
Homes and Sites in Northern Currituck,” which was illustrated with slides. 
Twenty-four homes and sites were featured, and related artifacts were 
displayed. 

Davidson County Historical Association 

The association met January 28 to hear W. Ray Mercer discuss the pos¬ 
sibilities of restoring the old county courthouse. Mr. Mercer is the High 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 3, MAY, 19U 


61 


Point architect whose firm handled the renovation of the Lexington post 
office for use of the county library. He estimated that it would cost nearly 
$190,000 to restore the building’s exterior and interior. 

Franklin County Historical Society 

The society presented an award to Thilbert Pearce of Franklinton at its 
February 28 meeting. Miss Lucy P. Burt made the presentation. Mr. Pearce 
has been active in the society since its founding in 1964. At the February 
meeting Ed Barham, area coordinator for the North Carolina American 
Revolution Bicentennial Committee, showed a film explaining the objectives 
of the state program and telling about various bicentennial projects being 
planned in counties and towns of the state. 

Greensboro Historical Museum 

In January the museum issued the first number of its Journal. Organized 
in 1924 as the Greensboro Historical Museum Society, the museum is cele¬ 
brating the half-century mark with the quarterly newsletter, an enlarged 
sales area, and maintenance of all exhibit areas. Plans have been made to 
open the Dolley Madison Memorial in May; the memorial, which will be a 
restoration of the eighteenth century Isley House, is very similar to Dolley 
Payne’s birthplace. 

Harnett County Historical Society 

Edward Cameron of Olivia assumed his office as new president of the 
society when it met in January. The society voted to reactivate a committee 
which will consider the restoration of the Rory Matthews House near 
Angier. A film prepared by the North Carolina American Revolution Bicen¬ 
tennial Committee was shown by Ardath Goldstein, area coordinator. 

High Point Historical Society 

Mrs. Norman Andrews was elected president; Ronald E. Griffin, vice- 
president; Mrs. Sanders Dallas, secretary; and Jack Rochelle, treasurer, 
when the society met February 12. J. V. Morgan, first president of the society 
and a leader in construction of the society’s museum, was named winner of 
the Mary Lib Joyce Award. The award was established to recognize out¬ 
standing service by a member of the organization, and Morgan was the first 
recipient of the honor. 

Hillsborough Historical Society 

Dr. Edwin H. Cady, professor of English at Duke University, spoke on 
Ogden Nash and read some of his poetry at the February 21 meeting of the 
society. At the March 21 meeting Mr. H. C. Bradshaw spoke on Gen. Francis 
Nash. The society has announced that a longtime member, Mrs. Alfred 
Engstrom of Chapel Hill, received a DAR Medal of Honor for her historical 
researches. 


62 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Historic Cabarrus 

Trustees of Historic Cabarrus met February 11 to hear Frank Stephenson, 
Jr., president of the Murfreesboro Historical Association. The organization 
is endeavoring to save the old county courthouse; a feasibility report from 
Grier-Fripp Associates was presented at the meeting. 

Historic Salisbury Foundation 

The tree survey and registration committee of the foundation met January 
28 and proceeded with plans to register trees of unusual interest in Salisbury 
and Rowan County. Chairman of the committee is Mrs. Emma Jean Hawley. 

Komers Folly 

New officers of Korners Folly are Dr. W. T. Walker, president; Mrs. 
Imogene Lamb, secretary; and Ted Kerner, treasurer. On February 15 
“Cupid’s Ball” was held for stockholders and friends; June 15 and 16 a 
flower show will be held. Proceeds from both events will be used for restora¬ 
tion. Italian painters have already restored the Little Theater in the unique 
house. 

Lenoir County Historical Association 

Stan Bumgarner, artist in residence at Lenoir Community College, pre¬ 
sented a program of classical guitar music when the association met on 
January 12. 


Malcolm Blue Historical Society of Aberdeen 

In the fall of 1973 a group of interested citizens of Moore County met to 
formulate a plan to preserve and restore the nineteenth century Malcolm 
Blue House near Old Bethesda Presbyterian Church. On April 6 the society 
toured the Civil War Monroe’s Crossroads Battlefield, near the Malcolm 
Blue House, and historic Long Street and Sandy Grove Presbyterian 
churches. 

Mecklenburg Historical Association 

Guest speaker at the association’s March 18 dinner meeting was Professor 
William S. Powell, of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, who 
took as his topic “Settlement of the Piedmont Area.” 

Montgomery County Historical Society 

The society met February 25 with Mrs. H. B. Miller, president, presiding. 
She presented Mr. John N. Haywood, program chairman, who introduced 
the speaker, Miss Frances Haywood. A musical program was presented by a 
group from Candor under the direction of Mrs. Eleanor Fitzgerald Chappell. 
Mount Gilead members of the society were hostesses for the February 
meeting. 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER S. MAY, 1971, 


63 


Mordecai Square Historical Society 

The society sponsored a needlework exhibition March 27-30 at the Raleigh 
Woman’s Club, with proceeds being set aside for the Mordecai Historical 
Park. Mrs. Lisbeth Perrone, well-known authority on needlepoint, conducted 
three workshops as a special feature of the event. 

New Beni Historical Society 

The society’s fifth annual ball was held February 16 at the New Bern 
Shrine Club. Music was provided by Barry Shank, director of music at East 
Carolina University, and his orchestra. 

North Carolina Presbyterian Historical Society 

The society held its annual meeting at Peace College, Raleigh, on March 
15, with the outgoing president, the Rev. James MacKenzie, presiding. Rev. 
James A. M. Hanna of Jackson County, Ohio, addressed the society on “The 
Ancient Celtic Church.” Mr. Edwin A. West announced that his book, The 
Elise Academy and Upper Moore County, v/ould be off the press in April. 
Copies may be ordered from the society, Box 10785, Raleigh, 27605, price 
$10.00, including tax. Officers were elected for two-year terms as follows: 
Rear Admiral A. M. Patterson, president; Mrs. I. T. Avery, Jr., first vice- 
president; and Mr. Edwin A. West, second vice-president. At the 1973 
annual meeting Dr. Thomas A. Spence was elected third vice-president. Mr. 
V. R. Jensen, general secretary of the Synod of North Carolina, is the per¬ 
manent secretary-treasurer. The fall meeting and tour are scheduled to be 
held in the Charlotte area with Sugar Creek Church serving as host. 

North Carolina United Methodist Conference’s 
Commission on Archives and History 

Members of the commission met March 2 at Zion United Methodist Church 
near Mount Gilead with Dr. Ralph Hardee Rives, chairman, presiding. A 
sketch of the historic church was presented by the Rev. Lawrence Lugar of 
Mount Gilead. Plans were made to cooperate with the Commission on 
Archives and History of the Western North Carolina United Methodist Con¬ 
ference and the Duke University Divinity School in a special bicentennial 
celebration of Methodists in 1976. Larry E. Tise, area coordinator for the 
North Carolina American Revolution Bicentennial Committee, outlined the 
program being planned by that organization. 

Northampton County Historical Society 

The society met for a dinner meeting on March 29 in Jackson. President 
Carl Witt presided. Mrs. J. P. Morgan, chairman of the nominating com¬ 
mittee, presented the following slate of officers: Mrs. John Stanley, presi¬ 
dent; Mr. W. H. S. Burgwyn, Jr., vice-president; and Mr. J. P. Morgan, 
secretary-treasurer. All were elected. Mrs. Stanley presented the book, The 
Strange and Beautiful World of Orchids, to the Northampton County 
Library as a memorial to Mrs. Louise Daughtry Witt; a resolution was read 
by Mr. Charles Bridgers in memory of Mrs. Witt. Judge W. H. S. Burgwyn 
of Woodland spoke to the group, calling his talk “Reminiscenses.” 


64 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Pasquotank Historical Society 

At a February 12 meeting of the society Mrs. E. 0. Baum, treasurer, dis¬ 
cussed early acts of rebellion in Pasquotank against the English crown. The 
society is planning an active role in the local bicentennial observance. 

People to Preserve Jockey’s Ridge, Inc. 

Because the tallest sand dune (138 feet) on the east coast of the United 
States is threatened by development at its base and the surrounding area, an 
association has been formed to seek special legislation and funds for land 
acquisition in the area. The nonprofit organization, People to Preserve 
Jockey’s Ridge, Box 201, Nags Head, N.C., 27959, is seeking contributions 
to save this significant North Carolina landmark. A national fund-raising 
drive is being launched. Further information may be obtained by writing to 
the organization at the address given above or by calling 919-942-3525. The 
association’s slogan is “S.O.S.—Save Our Sand-Dunes.” An application has 
been filed to have the area classified as a National Natural Landmark. 

Perquimans County Restoration Association 

The association met February 21 to continue its efforts to restore the 
Newbold-White House. Funds for the next phase will be provided by match¬ 
ing grants from the National Park Service and the state; a drive for local 
funds will soon be launched. A target date for opening the house is 1976, in 
hopes of making the restoration a contribution to the bicentennial observ¬ 
ance. Herbert Nixon is projects chairman and Mrs. Jean Winslow is financial 
secretary. 

Person County Historical Society 

The society is conducting a drive to obtain information to be used in 
writing a history of the county, according to Mrs. Madeline Eaker, president. 
Materials on the county will be preserved and made available to persons 
doing research on the area. No decision has been made as to who would write 
a Person County history, but the society wants to obtain the services of a 
writer after materials have been collected. 

Pitt County Historical Society 

The film Westminster Abbey—Hall of Kings was shown at the February 
21 meeting in Greenville. Dr. Herbert R. Paschal reported on preliminary 
plans to observe the bicentennial of the city of Greenville in September. 
President Donald R. Lennon presided over the business meeting. 

Railroad House Historical Association 

Members held their monthly meeting at the Railroad House in Sanford. 
Marvin Gaster and several classes on genealogy and local history were 
special guests. A number of acquisitions have been received in recent weeks, 
including an 1873 hand-embroidered shawl, two large concrete planters, 
and a load of firebrick for curbing. 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 3, MAY, 1971, 


65 


Rockingham County Historical Society 

The society and Rockingham Community College cosponsored a February 
7 meeting on the American Revolution bicentennial plans, with Larry E. 
Tise, regional coordinator for the state committee, speaking on “The Failure 
of Revolutionary Ideals after 1776.” A county bicentennial committee is 
being formed under the direction of Charles Rodenbough of Madison. The 
society recently published a 32-page, illustrated booklet entitled Wright 
Tavern: A Courthouse Inn and Its Proprietors, by Dr. Lindley S. Butler. 
Proceeds from its sale will go toward restoration of the tavern. Copies, at 
$1.50 each, may be ordered from the historical society at P.O. Box 84, 
Wentworth, 27375. Those interested in joining the Rockingham County His¬ 
torical Society should send $2.00 dues for an individual membership and 
$3.00 for a family membership to the above address. 

Rutherford County Historical Society 

The organization met February 19 for a program on early days in Trvon. 
Mrs. Norman Frost was narrator. Sam Thomas is president of the Ruther¬ 
ford County society. 

Sanford Historical Society 

Though not formally named yet, a group of citizens of Sanford met Feb¬ 
ruary 27 to form a new historical society. They hope to create interest in 
local history and genealogy and help preserve historically significant places 
and things. Temporary officers are Lewis McBride, chairman; Ronald 
Porter, vice-chairman; and Doris McCracken, secretary 7 . Interest in organiz¬ 
ing the society grew out of a course in local history given at Central Carolina 
Technical Institute. 

Swain County Historical Society 

The society met January 17, established a historical research program, 
and selected committees to work in several areas. George Ellison was named 
head of a committee to collect printed and manuscript materials; his com¬ 
mittee will also compile a bibliography. Jules Johnson was chosen chairman 
of the committee to collect photographs and other visual materials. The 
Swain County library will house materials collected by these committees. 
On February 15 the group again met to hear proposed bylaws read by Mr. 
John Quinnett, chairman of the Constitution Committee, and to discuss 
various organizational matters. Dues were set at $3.00 per year, and meet¬ 
ings were scheduled for the second Thursday in each month. Various special 
committees and chairmen were designated. Dr. Richard W. Iobst of Western 
Carolina University discussed area associations and organizations relevant 
to the Swain County group. 

Transylvania County Historical Association 

On February 16 the group met at Silvermont. Membership dues are $3.00, 
and all persons interested in the history of Transylvania County are invited 
to join. 


66 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Wake County Historical Society 

J. C. Knowles, executive director of Historical Raleigh, Inc., spoke when 
the society met on March 24. He discussed his plans for the restoration and 
adaptive use of Raleigh’s Hinsdale House, which has been threatened with 
destruction. On April 21 the society sponsored a tour of the Rolesville-Wake 
Crossroads area of Wake County. 

Webster Historical Society 

A new society has been organized in Webster, Jackson County, for the 
purpose of raising funds for and promoting the preservation and restoration 
of the town. Following the chartering of the organization, a preliminary 
meeting was held in April of 1973; formal organization took place last fall. 
Betty Price was elected president; Marilyn Jody, vice-president; Mary 
Morris, secretary; and Jim Simpson, treasurer. On December 10 a luncheon 
meeting was held for the purpose of informing the county commissioners and 
bank officials in Sylva concerning plans of the society. On December 3 and 
January 7 representatives of the society met with the town council and the 
Jackson County School Board to discuss the purchase of the Webster school. 
The board accepted an offer of $115,000 for the school at the latter meeting, 
and plans were made to pay a $1,500 option on February 4, with the remain¬ 
der to be paid on or before July 10. Plans call for the building to be used as 
a community center and town office building. Webster served as county seat 
of Jackson County from 1853 to 1913. Persons living in western North 
Carolina are invited to join the society as active members; those living out¬ 
side the area will be associate members; dues for both groups are $5.00 per 
person. The Appalachian Consortium has awarded a grant of $2,466 to the 
Webster project, the funds to be used for a photographic essay, a newsletter, 
and an archives collection. 

Western North Carolina Historical Association 

The association met January 26 in Asheville. Albert McLean, retired 
postal worker, presented the story of Robert Henry, a pioneer in the Ashe¬ 
ville area who is said to have been the first school principal in that city. 
William Weaver, an instructor at the Job Corps Center at Cherokee, pre¬ 
sented a history of the Smoky Mountains. 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Published in January, March, May, July, September, and November by the Division 
of Archives and History, Department of Cultural Resources, Archives and History- 
State Library Building, 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27611. 

Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell, Editor 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 3, MAY, 197J, 


67 




Division of Archives and History 
Department of Cultural Resources 
109 East Jones Street 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27611 


^^^^^a^lm^^tateUbrary 


Raleigh 


Carolina^ 
bmments' 



Published Bimonthly by the North Carolina Division of Archives and History 


Volume XXII, Number 4 


July, 1974 


Capitol Copper Jewelry Available 

Nearly 3,000 pounds of used copper, weather-worn and stained, was taken 
from the State Capitol when the roof was replaced with new copper in 1972. 
Various ideas were advanced concerning the use of this metal, but no practi¬ 
cal solution was found until Mrs. Joye Jordan, assistant director of the Divi¬ 
sion of Archives and History, came up with the idea of jewelry made from 
the dome’s old roof. Stuart Nye, well-known North Carolina craftsman from 
Asheville, agreed to make pins, earrings, bracelets, and other items of 
jewelry, using the dogwood and pine bough motifs. 

There are fourteen separate items for sale, ranging in price from $3.00 for 
a dogwood lapel pin to $9.00 for a pine bough bracelet. Capitol copper jew¬ 
elry, first placed on sale in March, proved so successful that many people 
had to wait to have their orders filled. Now, however, orders are again being 
taken, and persons interested in the jewelry may buy it at the sales desk in 
the lobby of the Archives and History-State Library Building in Raleigh or 
by mail. An order blank may be obtained and jewelry ordered by writing to 
the Sales Desk, Division of Archives and History, 109 East Jones Street, 
Raleigh, 27611. On mail orders there is a postage and handling charge of 



Two styles of dogwood pins are among the pieces of jewelry made from Capitol dome 
copper. (Photograph by News and Observer.) 









$1.00. Persons ordering jewelry may experience some slight delay in deliv¬ 
ery, dependent on the demand at any particular time. 

Ben Owen Pottery Exhibit 

An exhibition containing over 200 pieces of Ben Owen pottery opened 
June 1 in the North Carolina Museum of History. The exhibition is on the 
second floor of the museum and will remain open through July 15. 

Mr. Owen is one of North Carolina’s outstanding potters. As a young man 
he and Jacques Busbee, the owner of Jugtown in Moore County, visited 
prominent art schools and museums in New York, Washington, and New 
Orleans. Together they selected designs and forms which could be perfected 
through the media and methods that Ben knew. During the next thirty-six 
years the pottery made by Ben Owen at Jugtown became world famous. He 
not only refined the traditional shapes found in North Carolina but created 
pottery based on Chinese, Korean, and Persian designs. His glazes, fired in 
a wood burning “groundhog” kiln, include “tobacco-spit” brown, buff, bright 
orange, salt glaze, opaque white, “frog-skin” green, and mirror black. 

In 1959 Ben Owen left Jugtown and began turning pottery at his home in 
the Westmoore community. It is this pottery, stamped “Ben Owen Master 
Potter” that is on display in the current exhibition. In the past thirteen 
years his pottery has been exhibited in Cairo, Egypt; Haifa, Israel; the 
Smithsonian Institution; and in numerous other locations in this country 
and abroad. 



Mr. Owen lights the candles signifying the official opening of the exhibit of his pottery 
in the Museum of History. Watching are Mr. John Ellington, administrator of the museum, 
and Mrs. Owen. In the photograph at the right several pieces of Mr. Owen’s opaque white 
pottery are shown. (Photographs by Division of Archives and History unless otherwise 
specified.) 


Museums, Historic Sites Sections Reestablished 

Effective July 1 the former Historic Sites and Museums Section was re¬ 
organized into separate sections, with the Historic Sites Section responsible 
for state historic sites, historic restoration and preservation, and survey 
and with the Museums Section administering the North Carolina Museum 
of History and interpretative exhibits at the historic sites. The two organi¬ 
zations were merged on November 12, 1969, but the workload of the com¬ 
bined section has imposed increasing burdens as it has grown. 

Heading the new Historic Sites Section will be Bruce MacDougal, for¬ 
merly head of the Research, Restoration, and Survey Branch and acting 
chief of the Historic Sites and Museums Section since February 1. Admin- 


70 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 






istrator of the North Carolina Museum of History and chief of the Museums 
Section is John Ellington, formerly head of the Programs Branch, Historic 
Sites and Museums Section. 



John Ellington, left, and Bruce 
MacDougal look over a model of 
the proposed renovation of the 
museum at Town Creek Indian 
Mound State Historic Site. 


Archives Institute Held in May 

Twenty-nine participants took part in the North Carolina State Archives 
Institute for Advanced Researchers held May 20-24 at the Archives and 
History-State Library Building in Raleigh. Participants came from Texas, 
Mississippi, Illinois, Virginia, New York, and Georgia as well as from North 
Carolina. Sessions were devoted not only to methodology in the use of 
records, but to the use of land records, marriage records, wills and estate 
papers, military records, census and tax records, and court records. Staff 
members taking part included Mrs. Mary J. Rogers, Dr. Richard F. Knapp, 
George Stevenson, Mrs. Ruby Arnold, Miss Cathy Jackson, Miss Betty 
Yarbrough, Mrs. Ellen McGrew, Dr. William S. Price, Jr., and Percy Hines. 
Outside speakers included Mrs. Margaret Hofmann, Martha Paskewich, Mrs. 
Mattie Erma Parker, and Dr. Charles Holloman. The institute was planned 
and supervised by Paul H. Hoffman, assistant archives administrator. 



The photographs above show participants in the Archives Institute held in May. In the left, 
Mrs. Grace J. Rohrer is welcoming the group and Mr. Paul Hoffman and Dr. Thornton W. 
Mitchell are seated at the head table. 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 4 , JULY, 197U 


71 




Records Management Functions Returned 

By agreement between Mrs. Grace J. Rohrer, secretary of the Department 
of Cultural Resources, and Mr. William L. Bondurant, secretary of the De¬ 
partment of Administration, records management functions which were 
transferred to the latter department in 1970 were returned to the Division 
of Archives and History effective May 2. The division thus once again as¬ 
sumed responsibility for activities relating to records creation, utilization, 
and maintenance in state agencies. This new agreement will increase the 
records management responsibilities already being exercised by the State 
Records Branch, Archives and Records Section. 

Connor Portrait Hung in Search Room 



Artist William C. Fields 
of Fayetteville makes the 
final adjustment of his 
portrait of R. D. W. 
Connor now hanging on 
the wall of the Search 
Room of the State Ar¬ 
chives. Dr. Connor was 
secretary of the North 
Carolina Historical Com¬ 
mission (forerunner of 
the Department of Ar¬ 
chives and History) from 
1903 until 1921 and ar¬ 
chivist of the United 
States from 1934 to 
1941. 


Restoration of Fort Macon 


Fort Macon, located in Carteret County, is to be restored according to an 
announcement made by James E. Harrington, secretary of the Department 
of Natural and Economic Resources. Work is scheduled for completion by 
the summer of 1975. The fort was finished in 1826 and was used during the 
Civil War, Spanish-American War, and World War II. Funds for restoration 
were provided by the 1973 General Assembly for use by State Parks, but the 
Department of Cultural Resources is cooperating in the restoration endeav¬ 
or. Mrs. Grace J. Rohrer, secretary of the Department of Cultural Resources; 
Dr. Thornton W. Mitchell, acting director of the Division of Archives and 
History, and other representatives of the department were present for an 
inspection and discussion of plans on April 8. 


72 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 





Tar Heel Junior Historian Awards and Picnic 

The third annual Tar Heel Junior Historian Day was held at Yates Mill 
near Raleigh on May 17. Over 250 Tar Heel Junior Historians and guests 
gathered to hear the guest of honor, Mrs. James E. Holshouser, Jr. Awards 
for the twelfth annual Literary and Arts Contest sponsored by the North 
Carolina Literary and Historical Association were presented by Dr. H. G. 
Jones, secretary-treasurer of the association. Junior historians from Albe¬ 
marle, Edenton, Henderson, Lucama, and Salisbury were awarded top 
honors on projects entered in eight categories. Three-dimensional arts 
projects including scale models of historic buildings as well as research 
papers were submitted by the club members. History teachers within the 
schools served as advisers. 

In the Individual Arts category first place went to Ronnie Deans, Spring- 
field Junior Historian Club, Springfield Junior High School, Lucama, for 
the project Corn Mill. Mr. Luther Bryant served as adviser. Honorable men¬ 
tion went to Tommy Haste, Chief Rockahock Junior Historical Society, 
Chowan Academy, Edenton, for the project Newbold-White House. Mrs. 
Virginia H. Wood advised the club. 

First place in the Group Arts category went to a newly formed club in 
the association, the Tar Heel Eagle Historians Club, Erwin Junior High 
School, Salisbury, for St. Luke’s Episcopal Church. Mrs. Catherine B. Safrit 
advised the club. Honorable mention was presented to the Five Teenagers 
History Club, Eastern North Carolina School for the Deaf, Wilson, for 
Moonshine, North Carolina Style. Mr. Ronald Pace advised the club. 

The Individual Literary award went to Melanie Morris for the Newbold- 
White House-, she is a member of the Chief Rockahock Junior Historical 
Society, Chowan Academy, Edenton, which won the Group Literary award 
for the project Church Histories: Chowan, Gates, and Perquimans. Mrs. 
Virginia H. Wood served as adviser for both these winning entries. 

To be eligible for the Special Achievement category a school must have 
won awards in three previous contests. This year the traveling Special 
Achievement trophy was retired; in its place four new permanent awards 
have been established: Special Achievement Individual Arts, Special 
Achievement Group Arts, Special Achievement Individual Literary, and 
Special Achievement Group Literary. Two of the four were won by members 
of the History Seekers Club, Albemarle Junior High School, Albemarle, and 
the other two by the club itself. The Special Achievement Individual Arts 
award was presented to Tim Dwight for History of the Civil War in North 
Carolina, a rotating diorama depicting eight significant battles fought in 
the state. The club won the Special Achievement Group Arts award for St. 
Thomas Church at Bath. First place in the Special Achievement Individual 
Literary category went to the club’s Anne Holshouser for The History of 
Organ Lutheran Church. The Special Achievement Group Literary award 
was presented to the club for the project The Reed Gold Mines. Mr. Jim 
Yandle advised the Albemarle group. Honorable mention in the Special 
Achievement Group Arts category went to the Vance Junior Historian Club, 
E. M. Rollins School, Henderson, for Tobacco in Vance County, Mr. Ted 
Scott Henson served as adviser. 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 1>, JULY, 1971, 


73 



Junior Historian winners were photographed after awards were announced on May 17. 


Projects were rated on historical accuracy, contribution to state and local 
history, workmanship, and style of presentation. Winning projects will be 
on display in the Tar Heel Junior Historian Gallery of the North Carolina 
Museum of History for one year. 

Judges for the contest were Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell and Mrs. Natalie 

G. Miller of the Division of Archives and History, Department of Cultural 
Resources, and Mr. Jesse Vuncannon of the State Department of Public 
Education. 

Mrs. Virginia Currie, vice-regent of the Bloomsbury Chapter of the 
Daughters of the Revolution presented copies of The North Carolina Gazet¬ 
teer to the History Seekers Tar Heel Junior Historians, Albemarle Junior 
High School, for work in the recording of visual history and to the Yadkin- 
ville Tar Heel Junior Historians, Yadkinville Elementary School, for out¬ 
standing service to the community. 

A special plaque was presented to Mrs. Joye E. Jordan, first executive 
secretary of the Tar Heel Junior Historian Association (1953-1972), who 
retired at the end of June as assistant director of the Division of Archives 
and History. 

Awards Provided by Historic Preservation Society 

Each year the Historic Preservation Society of North Carolina, formerly 
known as the Society for the Preservation of Antiquities, presents incentive 
grants to historical and preservation organizations for the purpose of help¬ 
ing them in their initial steps toward preserving historic sites and struc¬ 
tures. Application forms and information may be obtained from Mrs. Frances 

H. Whitley, Historic Preservation Society, 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, 
27611. Applications should be at the society headquarters before October 1; 
recipients will be notified by the Incentive Grants Committee around the 
first of November and awards will be presented at the society’s annual 
meeting during Culture Week on November 14. 

The society also presents a cash award, through the North Carolina Fed¬ 
eration of Women’s Clubs, to the individual club which has been deemed 


74 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 







outstanding in encouraging and participating in historic preservation. The 
1973 award was presented to the Edenton Woman’s Club at the annual con¬ 
vention of the federation in Charlotte, April 30-May 3. The Edenton 
Woman’s Club has been active in working toward the restoration, preserva¬ 
tion, and beautification of Colonial Edenton; twelve biennial “Pilgrimages 
of Colonial Edenton and Countryside” have been conducted. During these 
pilgrimages, 4,500 visitors have visited Edenton sites which are open at 
no other time to the general public. 

DAR to Help with Sally-Billy House 

At its March meeting the North Carolina Society, Daughters of the 
American Revolution, adopted a resolution to assist with the furnishing of 
the Sally-Billy House as its bicentennial project. 

The Sally-Billy House, a representative Halifax County plantation house, 
is presently located near Scotland Neck, but it is to be moved to Halifax and 
restored by the Division of Archives and History as an integral part of the 
Historic Halifax restoration. The furnishings for the house will be outlined 
in a plan prepared by the Division of Archives and History. After the plan 
is complete, the DAR will assist the division in the acquisition of artifacts 
for the house either by purchase or by gift. 

Try on Palace Institutes Craft Program 

The Tryon Palace Commission, at its April 17 meeting, approved plans 
for the development of a crafts program at the Tryon Palace Restoration. 
Exhibits and demonstrations are being planned. The director of the new 
program will be Donald R. Taylor, curator of education, who is in charge 
of the interpretive and educational programs of the restoration. Assisting 
him is Mrs. Lemabel C. Parry. Crafts carried on at Tryon Palace will be 
incorporated in the interpretive program; opportunities to demonstrate 
other crafts are available at the John Wright Stanly House and the Steven¬ 
son House. The first project will be candlemaking, which will be carried out 
in the laundry of the east or kitchen wing of Tryon Palace. Future plans call 
for exhibits on soapmaking, spinning, and weaving. The processing of flax 
will be presented in exhibit form, and spinning of wool will be shown on 
spinning wheels in the Tryon Palace collection. The commission is hoping 
to receive an offer of a loom in working condition so that weaving can be 
incorporated in the crafts program in the future. Chairman of the Tryon 
Palace Commission is Mrs. John A. Kellenberger. 

Archives and Records Section Reports 

The Local Records Branch has completed phase II inventorying and mi¬ 
crofilming of permanently valuable records in the counties of Anson, Bladen, 
Brunswick, Columbus, Madison, McDowell, Polk, Transylvania, Wayne, 
and Wilson during the last several weeks. Work is currently under way in 
Edgecombe, New Hanover, and Union counties. The records of fifty-seven 
counties have now been microfilmed under this phase of the program. 

Records have been received from the counties of Anson, Bladen, Bruns¬ 
wick, Columbus, Johnston, Madison, McDowell, Polk, Wayne, and Wilson 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 4, JULY, 1974 


75 



and are available for use in the Archives Search Room. 

Churches are cordially invited to have their minutes and registers micro¬ 
filmed without cost to them. To take advantage of this excellent opportunity 
to provide security for such records, churches are invited to contact the 
Local Records Branch for further information. 

The State Records Branch is presently completing a project to extend its 
records management services to all mental health facilities in the state. 
These facilities include state mental hospitals, mental retardation centers, 
and alcoholic rehabilitation centers. Since these institutions contain many 
of the same kinds of administrative and medical records holdings, standard 
disposition instructions are being devised to govern the records retention 
and disposition operations at the facilities. The large volume of records held 
by these institutions makes this project especially significant. The budget, 
accounting, and personnel records alone amount to over 2,100 cubic feet in 
volume; so this standard records disposition plan should result in substan¬ 
tial cost reductions for filing equipment and office space. 

The Newspaper Microfilm Project of the Archives and Records Section 
is continuing a survey of the newspaper resources of Burke County. Readers 
knowing the location of copies of old newspapers published in Burke should 
contact the State Archives so that the project can borrow the papers and 
microfilm them. All copies will be promptly returned to owners, and full 
credit will be given in the published microfilm. 

Archives Information Circulars Available 

A new seven-page pamphlet, Maps and Other Cartographic Records in 
the North Carolina State Archives, has been published as Archives Informa¬ 
tion Circular Number 12. Purpose of the circular, which was prepared by 
George Stevenson, is to offer a few suggestions about the use of maps and to 
describe summarily the maps and other principal cartographic records in 
the North Carolina State Archives. Copies of North Carolina Census Rec¬ 
ords, 178U-1900, recently revised, are also available. This publication, Ar¬ 
chives Information Circular Number 2, was written by Ellen Z. McGrew. 
Copies of both publications are available for 25 cents each from the Histori¬ 
cal Publications Section, Division of Archives and History, Department of 
Cultural Resources, 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, 27611. 

Joel Lane Remains Are Reinterred 

The remains of the family of Joel Lane, from whom land was purchased 
for the capital of North Carolina in 1791, were reinterred on March 30 in 
Raleigh City Cemetery. The ceremony reenacted a burial service of the eigh¬ 
teenth century, with eight soldiers of the second regiment, Continental 
Army, commanded by Cecil Edgerton of Godwin, as participants. The re¬ 
mains were buried in a pine coffin with handmade nails. The Rev. Louis C. 
Melcher, rector of the Church of the Good Shepherd, conducted the service. 
The city of Raleigh donated a plot for the grave. The remains had been exca¬ 
vated by state archaeologists over five years ago when the Eugene Gooch 
House on the corner of Morgan Street and Boylan Avenue in Raleigh was 


76 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


demolished to make room for a parking lot. Local tradition had it that the 
graveyard was under the porch of the house; archaeologists never identified 
any one set of remains as those of Lane, but they were determined to be those 
of seven adults, any of whom could have been Lane. The reinterment was 
sponsored by the Wake County Committee of the Colonial Dames which is 
restoring Lane’s home, Wakefield, in Raleigh. 

Edenton Symposium Held in April 

The second Edenton Symposium, conducted April 18, 19, and 20, was 
sponsored by the Edenton Historical Commission in cooperation with His¬ 
toric Edenton, Inc., the Cupola House Association, the James Iredell Asso¬ 
ciation, the Barker House Association, and the Department of Cultural 
Resources, Division of Archives and History. 

Responsible for the planning and organization of the symposium were 
Mrs. Ross Ingles, chairman of the Edenton Symposium Committee; Mrs. 

• William J. Stevenson, chairman of the Edenton Historical Commission; 
and Mr. Louis Hafermehl, site manager at the James Iredell House, Edenton 
State Historic Site. 

The sixty participants, after registering in the Barker House, visited the 
Cupola House, Chowan County Courthouse, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 
and the James Iredell House, the nucleus of Historic Edenton. Speakers dur¬ 
ing the three days were Dr. Thomas C. Parramore, assistant professor of 
history, Meredith College, Raleigh, who spoke on “History from Outside; 
a Perspective on Old Edenton,” and “In Search of Dr. Armitage; the Medi¬ 
cine Men of Old Edenton”; Mr. Bruce MacDougal, acting chief of the His¬ 
toric Sites and Museums Section, Division of Archives and History, whose 
topic was “National Architectural Trends as Reflected in the Architecture 
of Edenton,” followed by visits to the Leigh House, Beverly Hall, and Wess- 
ington, homes not usually open to the public. Mr. MacDougal also filled in 
for Mr. A. L. Honeycutt, Jr., restoration supervisor, Historic Sites and 
Museums Section, giving his architectural analysis and tour of the Coffield 
House, which is presently being restored, and assisting with the tour of the 
unrestored Coke House. 

Mr. Frank L. Horton, director of the Museum of Early Southern Decora¬ 
tive Arts, Old Salem, spoke on “Furniture of the Edenton Area,” and 
exhibited examples of the work of local cabinetmakers. 

Mrs. David Zehmer substituted for Mrs. Elizabeth W. Wilborn, supervisor 
of research, Historic Sites and Museums Section, who was unable to attend 
because of illness; she spoke on “The People Who Have Lived at Hayes.” 
Mr. John G. Zehmer, Jr., architectural historian for the city of Richmond, 
Virginia, took as his topic “Hayes: An Architectural Analysis.” These two 
talks were followed by an interpretive tour of the Hayes Plantation. 

The final speaker was Mr. Donald Parker, director of the Department of 
Landscape Architecture, Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia, who presented 
“The Cupola House Garden and its Precedents.” 

The participants were also given a complete tour of the Hope Plantation, 
the 1803 home of Governor David Stone near Windsor, restored and main¬ 
tained by the Historic Hope Foundation, John E. Tyler, president. 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER It. JULY, 19U 


77 


Additions to National Register Pictured 



The Beaufort Historic District, Carteret County, has been placed on the National Register 
of Historic Places. Three scenes from the district are, left to right, the Joseph Bell House, 123 
Turner Street, Beaufort; the Beaufort Waterfront; and houses at 301, 305, and 307 Ann Street, 
the Gee Craft House centered. (Photograph of the Ann Street houses is by E. T. Wrenn.) 



An individual entry on the National Register is Beaufort’s Burying Ground, Ann Street, 
shown left. The Wilmington Historic District (New Hanover County) has also been listed on 
the National Register; pictured above, right, is the 100-200 block of North Third Street (east 
side), showing the City Hall, New Hanover County Courthouse, and St. James Church. 



Included in the Wilmington Historic District are the Bellamy Mansion and Kenan Memorial 
Fountain, 503 Market Street, left; and the Z. Latimer and Edward Savage houses, located on 
the 100 block. South Third Street (west side.) 


78 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 



















Two Rockingham County houses are recent additions to the National Register: the Gov¬ 
ernor Reid House in Reidsville, left, and High Rock, also in Reidsville. (Photographs by 
Neil Pearson.) 



Green River Plantation, left, is a Polk 
County entry on the National Register. 


Last Call for Literary Entries 

July 15 is the deadline for receipt of books for entry in the four literary 
competitions conducted by sponsoring organizations through the North 
Carolina Literary and Historical Association. These are the Mayflower Cup 
(nonfiction), Sir Walter Raleigh Award (fiction), Roanoke-Chowan Award 
(poetry), and the American Association of University Women Award (juve¬ 
nile literature). 

Eligible are books published between July 1, 1973, and June 30, 1974, by 
persons who have been actual or legal residents of North Carolina for the 
three consecutive years preceding June 30 of this year. Books must have 
been published during that period—i.e., officially released by their pub¬ 
lishers. Three copies of each entry are required to be received by the associa¬ 
tion at 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, 27611. 

The following books have already been entered: 

Mayflower: Sarah Lemmon, Frustrated Patriots: North Carolina and 
the War of 1812) Bynum Shaw, Divided We Stand ; Henrietta H. Wilkinson, 
The Mint Museum of Art) Sylvia Wilkinson, The Stainless Steel Carrot) 
Maxine Fountain and Anna Cate, Enthusiasts All) Helen Bevington, Beau¬ 
tiful Lofty People) Willie Snow Ethridge, Side by Each) Vance Havner, 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER U, JULY, 197U 


79 






Though I Walk through the Valley; Hugh T. Lefler and William S. Powell, 
Colonial North Carolina: A History ; and Robert McCluer Calhoon, The 
Loyalists in Revolutionary America, 1760-1781. 

Sir Walter Raleigh: Sarah S. Allen, Ginger Hill; Doris Betts, Beasts of 
the Southern Wild and Other Stories; Robert Early, The Jealous Ear; June 
Strader, Tide’s Rise; John Foster West, Appalachian Dawn; Helen Tucker, 
The Virgin of Lontano; and Linda Grimsley, Guerrilla in the Kitchen. 

Roanoke-Chowan: Julia Fields, East of Moonlight; Heather Miller, 
Horse Horse Tyger Tyger; Campbell Reeves, Coming out Even; and Mary 
Bohanon, Earth Bosom and Collected Poems. 

American Association of University Women: Joyce Proctor Beaman, 
All for the Love of Cassie; Ozell K. Freeman, North Carolina, The Goodliest 
Land; and Suzanne Newton, Clo Arnold’s Corners. 

Change of Addresses Needed 

Members of the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association and 
subscribers to the North Carolina Historical Review are urged to notify the 
association and the Historical Publications Section, respectively, of changes 
of address. With rising costs of printing and postage, it is essential that the 
mailing list be accurate. The post office charges 32 cents to return a single 
copy of the Review, and copies often are returned with no indication of a 
forwarding address. Every effort is being made to hold costs down, and the 
cooperation of members and subscribers in the matter of address changes 
will be appreciated. 


Staff Activities and Additions 

Twenty-one representatives from the Archives and Records Section 
attended the ninth annual South Atlantic Archives and Records Conference 
held in Atlanta, Georgia, May 2-3. Archives and History representatives 
included the following people: Thornton W. Mitchell, Paul P. Hoffman, 
Dick Lankford, Cathy Jackson, Mrs. Minnie Peebles, Suzanne Smith, Mrs. 
Joan Lashley, Frank Gatton, Murray Parker, Rita Harwell, Mrs. Beverly 
Allen, Roger Jones, Ray Hocutt, Don Horton, R. E. Youngquist, Mrs. Sally 
Hunter, Mrs. Peggy Murray, Don Flowers, David Stephens, Mrs. Bessie 
Bowling, and Gebhardt Lanz. 

Mr. Frank Gatton, head of the Local Records Branch of the Archives and 
Records Section, attended the National Microfilm Association meeting in 
Boston, May 7-10. Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell, chief of the Historical Publi¬ 
cations Section, represented the Department of Cultural Resources at the 
Organization of American Historians in Denver April 17-19. Representa¬ 
tives of the Historic Sites Section attended several meetings. Janet Seapker, 
survey specialist, and Edward Turberg, restoration specialist, attended the 
Carpenters’ Symposium held in Philadelphia March 26-29; Dr. Richard 
Knapp, special projects officer, and Richard W. Sawyer, Jr., operations head, 
attended a Tobacco History Symposium in Greenville March 27; and Ruth 
Little-Stokes, Greer Suttlemyre, and Janet Seapker, survey specialists, and 
Bruce MacDougal, acting chief, Historic Sites and Museums Section, at¬ 
tended the National Trust for Historic Preservation Building Codes Con¬ 
ference in Washington, D.C., May 17-19. 

These staff members, as well as Catherine Cockshutt, survey supervisor; 


80 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


John Flowers, survey specialist; A. L. Honeycutt, Jr., restoration super¬ 
visor; Samuel P. Townsend, assistant chief of the section; Elizabeth W. 
Wilborn, research supervisor; and Jerry Cross, researcher, attended and/or 
spoke to meetings in Raleigh, Hamlet, Halifax, Wilmington, Charlotte, 
Jamestown, Plymouth, Durham, and Hillsborough. Mr. Honeycutt lectured 
to a graduate library science class at the University of North Carolina in 
Chapel Hill on historic preservation, and Mr. MacDougal lectured to the 
graduate class at Wake Forest University on historic preservation and 
museum work. Mr. Honeycutt also made two taped television appearances, 
one concerning the Sally-Billy House in Halifax and the other regarding the 
Joel Lane House in Raleigh. 

Recent additions to the Historic Sites and Museums Section staff are 
Robert Topkins, survey specialist; Carla Block, photographic assistant; 
Frederick Masseno, restoration specialist; and Carolyn Harper, secretary. 
Miss Maxine Stokes of Magnolia joined the staff of the State Records Branch 
in March as a microfilmer. 


Obituaries 

Mrs. Bettie Baker Pitt Davenport of Creswell, a leader in historical and 
religious activities in Washington County, died March 12. 

Mrs. Laura S. Worth, historian of Randolph County and a former teacher, 
died on March 27. She was a leader in the establishment of the Randolph 
County Historical Society and served as its secretary for many years. 

W. Clark Medford of Waynesville, who wrote a great deal about the moun¬ 
tain people of Haywood County, died April 1. He received the annual achieve¬ 
ment award presented by the Western North Carolina Historical Association 
in 1969. 

David Allen Rohrer, son of Mrs. Grace J. Rohrer, secretary of the Depart¬ 
ment of Cultural Resources, died April 13. 

Mrs. Pattie Bruce Wooten, longtime secretary of the Pitt County His¬ 
torical Society, died in Greenville on May 4. 

George R. Ross died May 11. He was a longtime member of the Tryon 
Palace Commission and was active in the Moore County Historical Society. 
He was particularly interested in the House in the Horseshoe and in efforts 
to make it a state historic site. Mr. Ross was also actively engaged in efforts 
to establish a southern textile museum. 


Colleges and Universities 

Duke University 

Effective in September, Dr. Robert F. Durden will succeed Dr. Joel Colton 
as chairman of the Department of History; at the same time, Dr. Anne F. 
Scott will succeed Dr. Charles R. Young as director of graduate studies. Dr. 
Norma Landau has resigned and will be replaced by Miss Jean A. Scott. Dr. 
Anne F. Scott was a member of the program committee for the Organization 
of American Historians which met in Denver April 17-20. 

Tne Canadian Studies Program was begun in September, 1973, with 
support of the Donner Foundation and the Office of Education of the Depart¬ 
ment of Health, Education and Welfare. A seminar for teachers from North 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER A, JULY, 197A 


81 


Carolina, Virginia, and South Carolina, was organized by the Canadian 
Studies Center. 

The Winter, 1974, issue of the South Atlantic Quarterly was devoted to 
“Essays in Southern History in Honor of Robert H. Woody”; Dr. Woody is 
professor emeritus at Duke. The issue was edited by E. Stanly Godbold, Jr., 
A. V. Huff, Jr., and Mattie U. Russell. Dr. Richard L. Watson, Jr., is now 
associate editor of the South Atlantic Quarterly. 

Dr. John R. Alden recently published Robert Dinwiddle, Servant of the 
Crown. Dr. Robert F. Durden has been on leave the past academic year while 
completing a book on the Duke family. Feature speaker for Black Heritage 
Week at Drury College, Springfield, Missouri, on March 5 was Dr. Raymond 
Gavins whose topic was “The Dynamics of Black Leadership, 1954-1964: 
From Martin Luther King to Malcolm X.” Dr. Gerald Hartwig was awarded 
a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities for June, 1973, 
to June, 1974, for his project, “The Development and Evaluation of African 
Cultural Materials for North Carolina Public Schools.” 

The Harmon Memorial Lecture was presented at the United States Air 
Force Academy on March 11 by Dr. I. B. Holley, Jr. Dr. Frederic B. B. 
Hollyday has been named European Program Chairman for the 1975 South¬ 
ern Historical Association. Dr. Warren Lerner spoke at Boise State College 
in January on “The End of the World Revolution” and at East Carolina 
University in February on “The Teaching of History.” His National Endow¬ 
ment for the Humanities Summer Grant for College Teachers was renewed 
for this summer. A paper was read in February by Dr. Harold T. Parker on 
“The Annales School and the Marxist Interpretation of the French Revolu¬ 
tion” at Florida State University. He and Dr. Marvin I. Brown, Jr., of North 
Carolina State University, are publishing this spring a book in three vol¬ 
umes or nine narrative booklets entitled Major Themes in Modem European 
History: An Invitation to Inquiry and Reflection. 

Dr. Anne F. Scott is visiting Coe Professor of American History at Stan¬ 
ford University this summer; she was commencement speaker at the Uni¬ 
versity of Georgia. Dr. Richard L. Watson, Jr., served as chairman of a 
session on April 18 at the Organization of American Historians in Denver 
on the subject “Overview: The Progressive Era.” Dr. Charles R. Young 
was commentator on a paper presented to the Sewanee Medieval Colloquium 
on April 6. On May 8 he served as commentator for three papers at the West¬ 
ern Michigan Conference on Medieval Studies; he attended the subsequent 
meeting of the Medieval Academy of America. 

East Carolina University 

Drs. Roy N. Lokken, William N. Still, and Wilkins B. Winn were promoted 
to rank of professor, effective March 1. On April 22 Drs. Fred D. Ragan and 
Lala C. Steelman were named “Outstanding Educators for 1974.” 

Guilford College 

Alexander R. Stoesen represented North Carolina at the meeting of the 
membership committee of the Organization of American Historians at 
Denver, Colorado, on April 18. 


82 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Lenoir Rhyne College 

John P. Fogarty spoke at the American Oriental Society on March 27 in 
Santa Barbara, California, taking as his topic, “An Egyptian Prototype for 
the Israelite Tabernacle.” Carolyn B. Huff will be promoted to the position 
of associate professor in September. She will also serve as chairman of the 
Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences. 


Livingstone College 

Dr. Thomas A. Schweitzer and Mr. William H. Clontz will be on leave 
during the academic year 1974-1975. 

North Carolina State University 

Dr. William C. Harris, associate professor, published “The Creed of the 
Carpetbaggers,” in the May issue of the Journal of Southern History. Mem¬ 
bers of the faculty gave papers at several meetings held in March: James A. 
Mulholland spoke to the American Society for Metals, held in Raleigh, on 
the topic “The Metallurgist as Historian”; James E. Crisp at Peace College 
on “Watergate and Willie Stark: All the King’s Men Today,” which was 
presented as part of “North Carolina Perspective: The Mind of the South”; 
and Fred Czupryna at the Asian Studies Seminar, held at the University of 
Virginia, on “Japanese Attitudes Toward International Racism: Govern¬ 
ment and Press, 1913-1921.” Dr. Mary E. Wheeler, associate professor, has 
been awarded a Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Award for the 
academic year 1974-1975; her subject will be “Exchange Scholar between 
United States and the Soviet Union and the Soviet Ministry of Higher and 
Specialized Secondary Education.” Associate Professor John M. Riddle 
has been granted a fellowship by the American Council of Learned Societies 
for the 1974-1975 academic year. Dr. Murray A. Downs, professor of history, 
has been named assistant provost of the university, effective in July. 


University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

The North Carolina Collection has recently received copies of various 
articles and short stories written by the late Peirson Ricks. The material 
was presented by David Ricks, his brother, of Winston-Salem. 

Dr. H. G. Jones, curator of the collection, spoke at the South Atlantic 
Archives and Records Conference in Atlanta on May 2. He is serving as 
consultant to the Concordia Historical Institute of St. Louis and as chair¬ 
man of the bylaws committee of the American Association for State and 
Local History. 


University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Another walking guide by Marguerite Schumann has been published. This 
one, written with Virginia Terrell Lathrop, is Bricks and People: A Walk¬ 
ing Guide to the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Copies may 
be purchased from the Alumni Office, University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro, for $1.00; an additional 25 cents is charged for mail orders. The 


VOLUME XXII. NUMBER i, JULY. 1971, 


83 


56-page booklet is illustrated and indexed and will be of interest to all those 
who have any connection with the university and its campus. 

Western Carolina University 

Nearly $10,000 in grant money has been awarded to faculty members of 
the university. In the Department of History grants were given to Dr. Max 
R. Williams to support his work in editing the William A. Graham Papers 
and to Dr. Constance Head for her biographical study of the Roman emperor 
Julian. Five volumes of The Papers of William A. Graham have been pub¬ 
lished, and a sixth is at the printer’s; the series is one of those being pub¬ 
lished by the Division of Archives and History. 

Winston-Salem State University 

Professor William F. Sheppard published “Another Elite Corps: The 
Foreign Service of the U.S.,” in the Marine Corps Gazette for January. 

State, County and Local Groups 

Alamance County Historical Association 

The annual meeting was held at the Alamance Battleground on May 16. 
Dr. Algie Newlin, retired professor of history of Guilford College and a 
native of Alamance County, was the main speaker. 


Alexander County Historical Association 

The group met at the Alexander County Library on April 1 to hear Homer 
Keever of Iredell County. He discussed land grants and other records of use 
to persons interested in doing historical research. Mr. Keever was intro¬ 
duced by W. N. Watt, president of the association. 


Association of Historians in Eastern North Carolina 

The Association of Historians in Eastern North Carolina held its organ¬ 
izational meeting at the Tryon Palace Auditorium in New Bern on February 
26. Temporary committees and a council were named. The council met in 
Wilmington April 19, and on May 4 the association was formally constituted. 
Forty-two persons attended the May 4 meeting, which was also held at 
Tryon Palace. Dr. Vernon 0. Stumpf of Campbell College spoke on “Gov¬ 
ernor Josiah Martin: The Road to New Bern.” 

Officers elected for the 1974-1975 academic year are Professor Walser H. 
Allen, Jr., of the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, president; 
Dr. William N. Still of East Carolina University, first vice-president; Dr. 
William R. Dempsey of Fayetteville State University, second vice-president; 
Mr. Michael W. Brantley of the Tryon Palace Restoration, secretary; and 
Dr. Arthur Steinberg of Craven County Community College, treasurer. 
Persons in eastern North Carolina who are engaged in the study and teach¬ 
ing of history are eligible for membership; dues are $5.00; meetings are 
planned for each spring and fall. 


84 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Beaufort Historical Association 

Proceeds from a luncheon and fashion show held April 24 at the Josiah 
Bell House will be used to help pay the cost of moving the Sallie Pool Thomas 
House from Craven Street in Beaufort to a location in the restoration area. 
The association is working to raise $1,500 to be used in moving the house. 


Caswell County Historical Association 

The Caswell County Historical Association met on April 9 in Yanceyville 
to hear a guest speaker, Dr. Luther Byrd, professor of history at Elon Col¬ 
lege. Membership in the association is $1.00 a year, and interested indivi¬ 
duals are invited to join. 


Catawba County Historical Association 

The association honored Judge Wilson Warlick on his eighty-second birth¬ 
day with a public reception on March 6. Many tributes were paid to Judge 
Warlick. The Catawba County Historical Association has recently acquired 
a number of artifacts for its museum’s collection: quilting frames, a Con¬ 
federate $10.00 bill, books, an oak hall divider, a straw basket, and other 
objects. Several manuscripts and a number of photographs have also been 
accessioned by the association for its museum. 


Chapel Hill Historical Society 

The society met April 28 at the Institute of Government in Chapel Hill. 
Speaker for the afternoon’s program was Dr. Samuel Seldon, professor emer¬ 
itus of dramatic art, whose topic was “Fifty-Six Years of the Carolina Play- 
makers.” 

Dr. John Allcott conducted his annual campus walk during the 1974 com¬ 
mencement. The tour, held May 11, began at the Davie Poplar. 

The society’s Preservation and Research Committee is headed by Brent 
Glass, a graduate student who is working to record interviews with persons 
connected with the early history of the University of North Carolina and the 
communities of Chapel Hill and Carrboro. 

James M. Webb, Chapel Hill architect, was named to fill the unexpired 
term of Robert E. Stipe on the board of directors. President of the board is 
Roger Foushee; Charles Blake, vice-president; Mrs. Marvin Allen, secre¬ 
tary; Dr. Charles Hooker, treasurer. Mrs. Memory Lester, a Chapel Hill 
genealogist, has agreed to direct genealogical research under the Research 
and Preservation Committee’s program. 


Cleveland County Historical Association 

On April 23 the association began making plans to equip a museum in the 
Cleveland County Courthouse with historical artifacts. Dr. Wyan W. Wash¬ 
burn, president, served as moderator of a panel which discussed the kinds of 
items to go in the museum. Persons owning old documents and artifacts 
have been asked to get in touch with Mrs. Pansy Fetzer or any member of 
the association. There are currently about 250 members of the organization. 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER U. JULY, 19U 


85 


Columbus County Historical Society 

Dr. W. Conard Gass read a paper at the society’s April 8 meeting, taking 
as his topic “The Role of Middle Class Women in Antebellum North 
Carolina.” 

Eastern Cabarrus Historical Society 

The society met in Mt Pleasant April 21 to review plans for converting 
the old Mt. Pleasant Collegiate Institute into a museum. Dr. A. L. Barringer 
spoke on the society’s acquisition of the property and on plans for its use; 
he was introduced by President Eugene Hough. 

Tlic Eastern North Carolina Genealogical Society 

The society, organized in 1972, meets the second Monday of each month 
at 7:30 at the Craven Community College in New Bern. President of the 
organization is David R. Taylor of Havelock. At the April meeting the first 
issue of the society’s quarterly Review was distributed to members. Mrs. 
Francis Duffy is historian-librarian; inquiries concerning membership 
should be addressed to her at 1504 Spencer Avenue, New Bern. 

Friends of Historic Hope 

The annual meeting of Friends of Historic Hope was held on April 24 at 
Hope Plantation. Mrs. James E. Holshouser, Jr., honorary chairman of the 
organization, spoke briefly at the luncheon, which was followed by a tour of 
the mansion. Guest speaker was Miss Mildred Lanier, curator of textiles for 
Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. She presented a slide lecture on fabrics 
used in decorating colonial homes since the eighteenth century and discussed 
materials imported from England and fabrics made in the colony. 

Friends of Hope is a subsidiary organization of Historic Hope Founda¬ 
tion; fifty members are appointed by the board of directors of the foundation. 
Mrs. Ernest L. Ives is chairman and Mr. Wayland L. Jenkins, Jr., is cochair¬ 
man. The directors of Historic Hope Foundation were hosts for the annual 
meeting at which approximately sixty people attended. 

Hillsborough Historical Society, Inc. 

Mrs. Catherine Cockshutt and Mr. Mark Burnham discussed national 
historic areas and historic zoning at the April 18 meeting of the society. The 
Horticulture Committee has agreed to maintain the Governor Burke grave 
as a historic site, and plantings have been improved there thanks to support 
from the Davie Poplar Chapter, DAR, and the General Francis Nash Chap¬ 
ter, SAR. The SAR has general supervision of the property. A joint memo¬ 
rial service was held at the grave on May 12. 

The society sponsored Rose Day in Hillsborough on May 30; gardens at 
the Nash Law Office, Nash-Hooper House, Mrs. Charles F. Dority’s, and 
Chatwood were open, and Mrs. Leonie Bell of Philadelphia spoke on the 
topic “Roses for Remembrance.” 


86 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Historic Cabarrus, Inc. 

A meeting was held April 2 at Memorial Hall in Concord. William F. 
Grist, coordinator for the southwest region for the N.C. American Revolu¬ 
tion Bicentennial Committee, spoke on preparations for the bicentennial. 
On April 26, as a climax to North Carolina Heritage week, local authors, 
including J. K. Rouse, P. O. Greene, and Misses Eugenia and Adelaide Lore, 
were honored at a reception given at the organization’s Concord head¬ 
quarters. 

Historic Halifax Restoration Association 

The association awarded Historic Halifax Resolves Awards on April 12 
during the annual ceremonies held in observance of the anniversary of the 
adoption of the Halifax Resolves. The winners included the schools of Salis¬ 
bury for the restoration of the Setzer School; the High Point Historical 
Society and the Junior League of High Point, joint winners, for their restor¬ 
ation of the Haley House in High Point; and the Robeson County Board of 
Education for its restoration of a one-room country schoolhouse. 

Walnut plaques with sterling silver inscribed plates were presented to 
winners. 

Historic Robeson, Inc. 

Possession was taken in April of the old E. K. Proctor Law Office, a res¬ 
toration project of Historic Robeson. A lease-purchase option requires the 
organization to obtain $10,000 by October and an additional $10,000 in the 
future; $5,000 has been realized through various fund-raising projects. 
Plans are to use the building as headquarters for the secretary and as a 
mini-museum. President of Historic Robeson is Eugene W. Hachney; vice- 
president, R. G. Cashwell; secretary, Mrs. Douglas P. Murray; and trea¬ 
surer, Albert M. Sharpe. 

Historic Salisbury Foundation 

The foundation has taken steps to save the old dependency of the Pres¬ 
byterian manse, a two-room building seemingly doomed to destruction. The 
trustees of the Maxwell Chambers Foundation gave the building to the 
Historic Salisbury foundation; the structure will be moved to the Ellis- 
Innes corner in Salisbury. There it will be renovated and managed by the 
Citizens Savings and Loan Company. The new location is in the historic 
Salisbury district according to Ed Clement, president of the foundation. 

The annual meeting of the foundation was held May 29 in the old Rowan 
Courthouse. President Clement reported that $11,160 had been paid on the 
Dr. Josephus Hall House; three additional payments of $9,000 each, plus 
interest, are still owed. Mrs. Janice Fuller and Mr. James Dunn gave a slide 
presentation, “Salisbury’s Storybook Tower,” on the old bell tower the 
foundation is trying to save; and prizes were awarded for sketches of the 
tower. Mrs. Emma Jean Hawley, representing the Tree Survey and Regis¬ 
tration Committee, reported on the first four trees listed on the “Rowan 
Register of Landmark Trees.” 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER i, JULY, 197J, 


87 


Historical Raleigh, Inc. 

On May 5 Historical Raleigh sponsored an autograph party for Dr. Hugh 
T. Lefler and Mr. William S. Powell of the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill. They are authors of Colonial North Carolina: A History, re¬ 
cently published by Charles Scribner’s Sons. Mr. Powell spoke to an audi¬ 
ence of approximately seventy-five people. The event was arranged by Mr. 
J. C. Knowles, director of Historical Raleigh. 

Historical Society of North Carolina 

The society met at Davidson College on April 12. Papers were read at the 
afternoon session by Dr. Robert E. Gallman on “Slavery and the Economic 
Structure and Performance of the Antebellum South” and by Dr. David 
Smiley on “Ben and Comfort: Fiction Interprets Carolina Reconstruction.” 
Following dinner a session entitled “The Oakwood Study,” was presented 
by two Meredith College students, Catherine Murff, who spoke on “The 
Economic Development of North Bloodworth Street” and Donna Hopewell, 
whose topic was “Oral History in Oakwood Neighborhood”; the program 
was concluded by Dr. Sarah M. Lemmon, professor of history at Meredith, 
who showed slides and talked on the topic “Victorian Architectural Design 
in Oakwood-Blount Street Area.” Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell, president, 
presided over the business session. The society’s fall meeting will be held 
at Appalachian State University on October 4. 

Judge Gaston House Restoration Association, Inc. 

The association is endeavoring to restore the Judge William Gaston 
House, Craven and New streets, in New Bern. The board of directors met 
March 27 to outline plans for the work. President of the organization is 
Mrs. John Shields. Plans are to begin as soon as details can be worked out; 
restoration will include the hall and the drawing room of the home. An 
effort is being made to complete the restoration of the lower floor of the 
house by August when New Bern will hold its bicentennial celebration. 

Lee County Historical and Genealogical Society 

An organizational meeting of the society was held in March, and members 
of the new organization met again on April 2. At that time, an announce¬ 
ment was made that the daughters of the late Mr. and Mrs. D. W. Winstead, 
Sr., were donating their old homeplace to the group as a memorial to their 
parents. President Lewis McBryde accepted the gift. Plans for the use of the 
property have not yet been made, but the society has pledged to keep the 
property in good repair. Incorporation papers for the new organization have 
been filed with the secretary of state, and membership dues have been set 
at $5.00 annually. The society will continue its efforts to save the Murchison- 
Lasater House on Trade Street. 

Lenoir County Historical Association 

On March 19 the association adopted a resolution supporting the County 
Bicentennial Commission; and Mrs. Beverly Rochelle, chairman of the com¬ 
mission, discussed some of the problems in connection with bicentennial 
projects in Lenoir County. 


88 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Events recently sponsored by the association include the Crafts and 
Creative Arts Show on April 20; Flea Market on April 21; a tour of Pink 
Hill on April 28; and the regular association meeting on May 16, with E. 
Frank Stephenson, Jr., of Murfreesboro as speaker. The April 28 tour, 
sponsored by the Pink Hill Historical Committee, included the following 
points of interest: Jonas Stroud House; Pleasant Hill Lodge; Richard 
Noble, Sr., House; James Davis House; Davis Cemetery; William Areatus 
Jones House; and the Old Tyndall House. All of the sites are from the eight¬ 
eenth and nineteenth centuries. 

W. C. Hatcher is president of the historical association. 


Lincoln County Historical Association 

The association met April 18 in Lincolnton, with Mrs. Marion Ritzert 
presiding. The group discussed needs of Lincoln County, one suggestion be¬ 
ing the desirability of a week of county history in the local schools. Mrs. 
Ritzert resigned as temporary president and was replaced by Frank Hull 
Crowell, who will serve until a permanent election is held. 


Lower Cape Fear Historical Society, Inc. 

The Bulletin published by the Local Cape Fear Historical Society in April 
contained a diary kept from June through August, 1862, by Albert Franldin 
Williams. The soldier marched 400 miles from North Carolina into Virginia, 
was captured near Richmond, imprisoned at Fort Delaware and later ex¬ 
changed in Virginia. The diary is owned by his grandson, Wiley Franklin 
Elliott of Wilmington. 

On April 17 the society met to hear Janet K. Seapker, survey specialist 
with the Division of Archives and History, speak on the topic “This is 
Wilmington—NOT CHARLESTON.” The following officers were elected 
for 1974-1975: Mrs. E. M. McEachern, president; Samuel Hughes, vice- 
president; Miss Leila Stack, recording secretary; Mrs. W. B. Rodman, 
corresponding secretary; Donald E. Brown, treasurer; Dr. Jackson Sparks, 
assistant treasurer; Mrs. Ida B. Kellam, archivist; and Mrs. Robert Walker, 
assistant archivist. Directors were also elected. Mrs. McEachern will be 
serving a second term. 

The society’s annual membership reception was held at the Latimer House 
on May 22. At that time the Clarendon Award, “for outstanding contribu¬ 
tion to the interpretation, appreciation and preservation of history of the 
Lower Cape Fear through historical writing,” was presented to Mrs. Kellam 
and Don Lennon of East Carolina University for their edition of The Wil¬ 
mington Town Book, 17U3-1778. The book was published last fall by the 
Division of Archives and History of the Department of Cultural Resources. 


Madison County Historical Society 

The society’s spring meeting, April 20, was held in Jonesboro, Tennessee, 
at the home of Mr. Paul Fink. Mr. Fink, owner of a large collection of mate¬ 
rials on the State of Franklin, spoke briefly and exhibited his collection prior 
to taking the group on a tour of the town. 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER U, JULY, 197J, 


89 


Mecklenburg Historical Association 

The association observed May 20 with a ceremony at the Signers Monu¬ 
ment in front of Mecklenburg County Courthouse. That evening the group 
had a dinner meeting with John F. Bivins, Jr., curator of collections and 
director of restoration at Old Salem, as speaker. He discussed the restoration 
of Old Salem and the gathering of decorative arts for the restored houses. In 
December the Mecklenburg Historical Association published Old Charlotte- 
Old Mecklenburg, Today, by Ruth Blackwelder, with photography by A. 
Haynes Dunlap. Miss Mary Louise Davidson is president of the Mecklen¬ 
burg association. 

Moore County Historical Society 

The seventeenth annual Antiques Fair of the society was held at the 
Southern Pines Armory March 28 and 29. Mrs. Ernest L. Ives, founder of 
the fair and chairman for many years, was honorary chairman; Miss Lena 
Stewart served as general chairman. 

Mordecai Square Historical Society 

The needlework exhibition held in Raleigh to raise funds for society proj¬ 
ects announced winners including a first place purchase award of $1,500. 
Winner of this award was Walter G. Nottingham of River Falls, Wisconsin, 
for his stitched applique entitled “Dawson Mola.” 

Twenty-nine members of the society toured Murfreesboro on April 27. 
The trip was arranged by Mrs. Charles Lee Smith, donor of the Wheeler 
House to the Murfreesboro Historical Association. A guided tour of the 
restored buildings was conducted by E. Frank Stephenson, Jr., and Mrs. 
Harry Underwood. 

The formal opening of the Ellen Mordecai Garden was held the afternoon 
of May 5 with William W. Dodge III, chairman of the Raleigh Historic 
Properties Commission, presiding. Brief remarks were made by Mrs. Bailey 
Williamson, president of the Mordecai Square Historical Society; Mrs. J. 
Allen Adams, chairman of the landscape committee; Frank Evans, director 
of the Raleigh Department of Parks and Recreation; and Clarence E. 
Lightner, mayor of Raleigh. The garden was planted to conform to a country 
garden of the 1830s, and an effort was made to reproduce the garden Ellen 
Mordecai described to her granddaughter. 

Museum of Albemarle 

The museum is sponsoring a children’s hour this summer. Crafts, stories, 
games, and other attractions are planned for elementary schoolchildren. An 
exhibit of money owned by the museum is to be displayed at the Peoples 
Bank and Trust Company in Hertford. 

Nash County Historical Association 

Recipient of the first life membership in the association is Miss Martha 
Gupton of the Benvenue community. The presentation was made by the 
association’s president, T. E. Ricks, to Miss Gupton for her success in obtain¬ 
ing more than sixty members for the association in the first sixty days of 


90 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


1974. Life memberships are offered to individuals obtaining fifty new mem¬ 
bers in a calendar year. Annual dues are $3.00 for an individual or $5.00 for 
a couple; anyone with an interest in local history is invited to join. 

New Bern Historical Society 

Treasurer of the society, R. A. Ipock, recently made the final payment on 
the lot on Pollock Street behind the Attmore-Oliver House. The property 
was purchased in 1968. Profits from the annual benefit ball and the treasury 
were enough to make the $2,000 final payment. The actual profit from the 
ball was $1,264.18. 

North Carolina Society of County and Local Historians 

Sampson County historian Claude H. Moore and his wife, of Turkey, were 
hosts to the society on April 28 when a record number met in Clinton. Old 
homes, including the 1839 Col. John Ashford House, the 1856 Dr. Allmand 
Holmes House, the 1840 Alfred Johnson House, the John Blaney Williams 
home (an authentic replica of a seventeenth-century Jacobean house made of 
old woods collected in Sampson County over the past twenty-five years) 
were visited. Following lunch the group went to historic Boykin and Faison 
cemeteries, the 1828 Thompson House, and the 1832 John J. Moore House. 
The tour ended at Mr. Moore’s 1770 Cabin Museum where a social hour 
was held. 

North Carolina Society, Sons of the American Revolution 

Dr. Herbert C. Bradshaw of Durham was elected president of the organi¬ 
zation at the state convention held in Greensboro in April. Other officers are 
William D. Snyder, Jr., of Greensboro, vice-president; Neill A. Jennings, Sr., 
also of Greensboro, secretary-treasurer-registrar; Jerry L. Higgins, Sr., of 
Cary, genealogist; and William T. Coman of Durham, historian. Richard F. 
Boddie of Durham was elected as a national trustee of the state society. 
James G. W. MacLamroc spoke on the history of Guilford County in the 
American Revolution, and William S. Powell of Chapel Hill addressed the 
convention on the subject of “North Carolinians—Reluctant Revolu¬ 
tionaries.” 

Northampton County Historical Society 

Mrs. John H. Stanley of Woodland was elected president of the organiza¬ 
tion at a dinner meeting on March 29. Bill Burgwyn of Woodland was elected 
vice-president, and Jack P. Morgan was made secretary. Guest speaker for 
the evening was Judge W. H. S. Burgwyn, Sr., of Woodland, who reminisced 
about early residents of the county. 

Parkton Historical Foundation 

The foundation invited about 120 local citizens to a banquet and exhibit 
in April for the purpose of explaining its goals. Chartered in 1973, the 
foundation is working to preserve the local railroad depot, historic buildings, 
and artifacts. Plans call for the establishment of a museum in the depot when 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 4, JULY, 1974 


91 


renovations are made. Proceeds from the banquet are to be used in part to 
build a fence around the depot. 

Pasquotank Historical Society 

The society conducted a genealogical workshop May 14, with representa¬ 
tion from Perquimans, Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck, Dare, and Hyde 
counties in attendance. Jack Baum is president of the society. 

Perquimans County Restoration Association 

The association has been receiving many donations for restoration of the 
Newbold-White House. The Perquimans County Historical Society has 
helped raise funds for the project, and gifts of more than $100 each have been 
made from several individuals and businesses in Perquimans County. 

Person County Historical Society 

A Roxboro native, Stuart L. Wright, is writing the history of Person 
County. He hopes to have the book ready by Christmas. The society is search¬ 
ing for materials and information to be used in the writing of the history. 
Family letters and records, dated newspaper clippings, church histories, 
pictures and maps, and other materials, are being sought. Mrs. Madeline 
Eaker, president of the organization, is urging people who have materials 
on Person County to make them available to the society. 

Pitt County Historical Society 

Speaker at the May 16 dinner meeting of the society was Dr. Charles 
Price, professor of history at East Carolina University, who spoke on the 
Reconstruction period in Pitt County. The following officers were elected: 
Dr. Ralph Hardee Rives, president; Dr. Lawrence Brewster, vice-president; 
and Mrs. Mae Joyner Gates, recording secretary. Reelected were Miss Annie 
Turner, corresponding secretary, and W. Conner Eagles, treasurer. 

Preservation of Historic Oakwood, Inc. 

The society recently filed an application to rezone a twenty-block area 
of Raleigh’s Oakwood neighborhood. The request for the historic district 
was made in an effort to prevent the construction of high-rise apartment 
buildings near the state government area and also to prevent the division of 
single family dwellings into apartments. The hearing was held before a 
joint City Council-Planning Commission meeting on May 16, but no decision 
was announced. Robert A. Hoadley, who lives in the Oakwood section, filed 
the application. 

Railroad House Historical Association 

The History of Sanford, published by the association for the Sanford 
Centennial, is now available for $2.00. President of the Railroad House His¬ 
torical Association, Hal Siler, presented the first copy to Marvin Gaster, 
author of the first chapter of the book. The 100-page history is illustrated. 


92 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Randolph Comity Historical Society 

Donations to be used for the restoration of the Patterson Cottage in 
Liberty may be sent to the Randolph County Historical Society, addressed 
to the attention of Miss Charlesanna Fox, Randolph County Library, 201 
Worth Street, Asheboro, 27203. A meeting to discuss restoration of the 
cottage was held in Liberty on April 16 with Dr. Joe Suggs, chairman of 
Randolph County’s Bicentennial Committee, in charge of the meeting. 
Present president of the society is Mrs. Carolyn Hager. The Patterson 
Cottage is believed to be one of the oldest dwellings in the downtown area of 
Liberty, and officers of the Randolph County Historical Society have voted 
to sponsor the Liberty project and serve as a collection agency for funds 
donated for the restoration. 

Scotland County Historical Association 

The society hopes to restore the Stewart-Hawley-Malloy House as a bi¬ 
centennial memorial. The family of the late Harry W. Malloy has offered to 
give the house and five acres of land to the association. This house is the 
only structure still standing in the old Stewartsville village, the first com¬ 
munity in the area which became Scotland County. Acceptance of the house 
is contingent on funding to cover expenses of renovation and maintenance, 
according to A. B. Gibson, founder of the association, and Hewitt Fulton, its 
president. 

Southern Appalachian Historical Association 

The spring membership and appreciation banquet was held May 4 in 
Boone. George Bitzas from Knoxville, Tennessee, entertained the group with 
a program of popular and classical songs. 


Stanly County Historical Society 

In December the society published My Folk, The First Three Hundred 
Years: A Study of Many First Settlers of Old Anson and Richmond Coun¬ 
ties, North Carolina, 1670-1970, by Eleanor Pratt Covington McSwain. 
The illustrated book, two volumes in one, contains history and genealogy. 
Additional information may be obtained from Mrs. McSwain at 813 West 
Main Street, Albemarle, N.C. 


Stokes County Historical Society 

The society met March 18 in Valdese with Dr. Emmett R. White, professor 
of radiology at Valdese General Hospital, speaking on the Revolution in 
Stokes County. 

Swain County Historical Association 

Two members of the association, Mr. Bill Weaver of Cherokee and Mr. 
Winifred Cagle of Bryson City, were on the program of the Southern Appala¬ 
chian Oral History workshop at Mars Hill College March 22-23. It was 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER U. JULY, 197J, 


93 


sponsored by the Appalachain Consortium and the Department of History 
at Mars Hill. Several other members of the association attended the meeting. 

Vance County Historical Society 

Articles of incorporation and bylaws were adopted April 9 when a group 
of Vance County citizens met in Henderson for the purpose of organizing a 
historical society. John R. Mundy, temporary chairman, presided. Dues 
were set at $3.00 per year and Mundy appointed Capt. William Brewer as 
chairman of the nominating committee. On April 30 the group installed as 
officers the following: John Mundy, president; Edward Yancey, vice- 
president; Mrs. Ruby Jones Lassiter, secretary; and Mrs. Marvin Davis, 
treasurer. 

Wake County Historical Society 

Forty-six members of the society and their guests took a day-long bus 
trip to Historic Hope and to Edenton on May 18. On June 16 Miss Beth 
Crabtree, chairman of the City Cemetery Committee of the society, spoke 
at the annual business meeting on the restoration of the cemetery. 

Webster Historical Society 

A cookbook, containing not only recipes but also pen and ink drawings 
of Webster, will be on sale this fall at about $5.00; reservations for copies 
of the book should be sent to the Webster Historical Society. The book is 
being compiled by Florence and Joe Parker Rhinehart. The society and 
Western Carolina University were cohosts to the Appalachian Consortium 
which met March 15 at the Webster School. Borden Mace was elected the 
first full-time executive director of the consortium. 

Wendell Historical Society 

The society was incorporated in April, after having been organized several 
years. The immediate concern of the group is to preserve a building in 
Wendell which was the town’s first post office in the 1890s. The society has 
about 260 members. A benefit ball was held May 18 as a fund-raising project. 

Western North Carolina Historical Association 

The association met April 27 at the Parish House of St. John’s in the 
Wilderness near Hendersonville. The program, given in cooperation with 
the Historic Flat Rock Society, was planned around Flat Rock and points 
of interest there. A history of St. John’s in the Wilderness was presented by 
James P. Clouse, and other significant places were discussed by Mrs. Marnie 
Andrews. 

The association’s 1974 Achievement Award was given to Going Back 
Chiltoskey, Cherokee Indian woodcarver. The citation was read by William 
G. Tydeman of Mars Hill at the April 27 meeting. During the business meet¬ 
ing Dr. Richard W. Iobst of Western Carolina University reported on activi- 


94 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


ties of the Appalachian Consortium and on plans for the national meeting 
of the Oral History Association to be held in Asheville in October, 1975. 
President of the Western North Carolina Historical Association is Jesse P. 
Surles, who presided at the April meeting. 

Two unnamed mountain peaks near Cherokee are to be named in honor of 
two Cherokee soldiers, according to an announcement made by Rep. Roy A. 
Taylor on April 19. The action resulted from a request made by the Western 
North Carolina Historical Association to the U.S. Board of Geographic 
Names. The mountains will be named for Gen. Stand Watie, an Indian 
general in the Confederate Army, and Watie’s grandson, Adm. Joseph J. 
Clark, who served in World War II. 

At a called meeting of the association on June 22 there was a discussion 
of plans relative to the establishment of a museum and Appalachian Heri¬ 
tage Center in the Smith-McDowell House on the Asheville-Buncombe 
Technical Institute campus in Asheville. Plans were made for a public open 
house at the Smith-McDowell House on July 21. 

Wilson County Historical Society 

Hugh B. Johnston, Jr., was elected president of the society at its May 1 
meeting. Other officers elected at that time are J. Marshall Daniel, Jr., first 
vice-president; Jerry Morris, second vice-president; Miss Alice Farmer 
Herring, secretary; and John G. Ashe, Jr., treasurer. A program on the 
early history of the old Falls of Tar River Baptist Church was presented by 
the president; during the business session it was decided to urge all Wilson 
County churches to prepare histories. 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Published in January, March, May, July, September, and November by the Division 
of Archives and History, Department of Cultural Resources, Archives and History- 
State Library Building, 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27611. 

Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell, Editor 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER h, JULY, 1971, 


95 




Division of Archives and History 
Department of Cultural Resources 
109 East Jones Street 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27611 



Worth Carolina Stale Library 

Raleigh N 

"tv 


Carolina*^ 
Comments 



Published Bimonthly by the North Carolina Division of Archives and History 


Volume XXII, Number 5 


September, 1974 


Archives and History Director Is Named 

On July 3 announcement was made by Mrs. Grace J. Rohrer, secretary of 
the Department of Cultural Resources, that Robert Edwin Stipe had been 
named new director of the Division of Archives and History, effective Sep¬ 
tember 1. Mr. Stipe, professor of public law and government and assistant 
director of the Institute of Government at Chapel Hill, has worked coopera¬ 
tively with the Division of Archives and History for several years. He wrote 
the state laws on preservation and has held numerous state offices in various 
historical groups; he is a nationally recognized leader in the historic pre¬ 
servation movement. 

Mr. Stipe, a Pennsylvania native, 
has his undergraduate and law de¬ 
grees from Duke University and his 
Master of Regional Planning from 
the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill. He has taught courses 
in historic preservation and urban 
design at the Chapel Hill uni¬ 
versity. 

The new director spent several 
years lecturing in England and has 
conducted conferences and work¬ 
shops throughout the United 
States. He was senior Fulbright 
Research Fellow at University Col¬ 
lege of London, England, in 1968- 
1969. Books, monographs, articles, 
and reports on historic preserva¬ 
tion and urban design and wide 
experience in research and consultation in the fields of preservation and 
planning are also to his credit. 

A Cannon Cup award was presented to him in 1973 at the annual meeting 
of the North Carolina Society for the Preservation of Antiquities. He has 
drafted legislation on historic properties, districts, and zoning and was a 
founder of the Chapel Hill Historical Society and adviser to the Chapel Hill 
Preservation Society. 

Mr. Stipe is married to the former Josephine Davis Weedon, and they have 
two sons. 



Robert E. Stipe, new director of the Divi¬ 
sion of Archives and History. (All photographs 
by Division of Archives and History unless 
otherwise specified.) 







Mrs. Jordan Is Honored 

On June 28 a retirement dinner was held at the North Carolina State 
University Faculty Club in honor of Mrs.'Joye E. Jordan, assistant director 
of the Division of Archives and History, who retired at the end of June. She 
was formerly administrator of the Historic Sites and Museums Section and 
is well known throughout North Carolina and the nation for her work with 
the North Carolina Museum of History. 

Dr. Gertrude H. Carraway, a member of the North Carolina Historical 
Commission, presided at the dinner. Speakers included Dr. H. G. Jones, 
former director of the Division of Archives and History; Miss Kathy McCar¬ 
ter, assistant secretary of the Department of Cultural Resources who repre¬ 
sented Secretary Grace J. Rohrer; Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell, historical pub¬ 
lications administrator; Mr. John Ellington, museums administrator; Mr. 
Samuel P. Townsend, assistant historic sites administrator; and Dr. Thorn¬ 
ton W. Mitchell, acting director of the Division of Archives and History. 
Eight silver goblets and several small gifts were presented to Mrs. Jordan. 
As a climax to the occasion, Mrs. Jordan was crowned “Copper Queen” by 
Dr. Mitchell; the crown was made of copper from the Capitol dome. 



Mrs. Jordan displays her gift of silver 
goblets at the dinner held in her honor. 


Raleigh State Capitol Site of Film 

In early June the North Carolina State Capitol in Raleigh was the scene 
of the taping of “The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson,” an NPACT-BBC 
(National Public Affairs Center for Television—British Broadcasting Cor¬ 
poration) coproduction. This film centered on the dramatization of the 1868 
Senate trial which sought to impeach President Johnson. Although the 
House had voted for impeachment on the grounds of Johnson’s violation of 
the Tenure of Office Act, degrading the presidency, ridiculing Congress, and 
impeding the execution of the Reconstruction laws, the Senate failed by one 
vote to attain the two-thirds majority necessary for conviction. 

The North Carolina State Capitol, which was completed in 1840, was 
selected as a filming site because of its identification with the era and also 
because of its similarity to the United States Senate chambers, where film¬ 
ing is prohibited. 

Not only did the Department of Cultural Resources cooperate in this 
venture, but local theatrical groups supplied supporting actors and actresses 
and several firms lent period items to add authenticity to the surroundings. 


98 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 




Employees of state government were invited to attend the filming, and to 
participate “noisily” upon request. 

“Impeachment,” which was shown on PBS television on July 1, is one in 
a series of documentaries being produced by NPACT-BBC. A prior produc¬ 
tion released in January was entitled “Shall We Have a King?”; it was a 
dramatization of the American 1787 Constitutional Convention delibera¬ 
tions on the powers of the American presidency. 

New Exhibit in Archives 

“DEFIANCE . .. First Step to Independence” is the title of a new exhibit 
commemorating North Carolina’s first Provincial Convention at New Bern, 
August 25-27,1774. Prepared by Cathy Jackson of the Archives Branch with 
the assistance of the Museum Exhibits Branch, the three-panel exhibit is on 
display outside the Search Room. An identical display has been presented 
to the New Bern Public Library. 

The legends on the center panel explain: 

In June 1774, the Massachusetts legislature issued a call for a meeting in Phila¬ 
delphia of representatives from the various colonies. Governor Josiah Martin refused 
to call the assembly to elect delegates; however, North Carolina leaders determined 
that an independent meeting would be held in New Bern August 25. Governor Mar¬ 
tin, on advice from the council, directed the people that county meetings were illegal 
and urged them to prevent meetings of certain “deputies.” 

Despite Governor Martin’s proclamation of August 13,1774, seventy-one delegates 
from thirty of thirty-six counties met in New Bern on August 25-27, probably at 
the old courthouse . . . with John Harvey serving as moderator. Though the delegates 
professed loyalty to the king, they adopted resolutions denouncing acts of parliament 
and elected three delegates to the Continental Congress in Philadelphia. The meeting 
reflected the unity of the people in defiance of royal authority and showed the begin¬ 
nings of intercolonial cooperation. 



DEFIANCE 


FIRST STEP TO 


AUGUST 25*27, 17U 


FIRST PROVINCIAL CONVENTION 


The display pictured here is 
located just outside the Search 
Room of the State Archives. 


The panel on the left states: 

The North Carolinians adopted an association of economic sanctions almost 
identical to those passed by Virginia. They included an agreement for complete non¬ 
importation from Great Britain beginning January 1, 1775, and a resolution stating 
that if grievances were not settled by October 1, 1775, all shipments, including tobac¬ 
co, to Great Britain would cease. Also among the resolutions were a statement in 
support of the citizens of Massachusetts and a ban on the use of East India Tea by 
North Carolinians. 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 5, SEPTEMBER, 197J> 


99 


On the right-hand panel are photographs and biographical sketches of 
the three delegates elected by the convention to the first Continental Con¬ 
gress: Joseph Hewes, Richard Caswell, and William Hooper. 

Archivists Exchange Knowledge 

Archivists from the Bowman Gray School of Medicine Library and the 
Historical Foundation of the Presbyterian Church at Montreat attended a 
mini-course in archival administration sponsored by the Archives Branch, 
June 12-14. Participants were Lannae Graham of Montreat, Nancy 
Ekstrand of Bowman Gray, new archivists at their respective institutions, 
and Virginia Ann Jones, Bowman Gray librarian. They studied procedures 
used in the State Archives for the collection, preservation, processing, and 
description of state, county, church, and private manuscript collections. 

Archivist Marilyn Adams of the manuscript section of the Georgia State 
Archives, spent three days in the Research Triangle studying methods used 
in the manuscript repositories at Duke University, the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill, and the North Carolina State Archives. 

Other archivists on summer working-visits were M. Stone Miller, head 
of the Department of Archives and Manuscripts at Louisiana State Uni¬ 
versity, and Ellen Z. McGrew, staff archivist, who spent two days in the 
State Archives in Augusta, Maine. 



Marilyn Adams, right, and Ellen McGrew 
look over manuscripts from one of the col¬ 
lections in the State Archives. 


Workshop Is Held for Community College Librarians 

A two-day workshop was conducted June 25-26 by the State Archives and 
the Department of Community Colleges to instruct community college 
librarians in the use of county records on microfilm. The majority of com¬ 
munity colleges in the state have purchased from the Archives “core collec¬ 
tions” (county records to about 1870), as well as relevant records from 
parent counties. A number of the colleges have also purchased “core” records 
of adjacent counties. 

To enable the librarians to assist students enrolled in local history and 
biography courses taught in the community colleges, indepth instruction 
was provided by Frank Gatton, assistant records administrator (Local 
Records). Mr. Gatton also conducted an evening laboratory session in the 
Search Room. Others taking part in the workshop were Dr. Maurice Stire- 
walt and Miss Carol Andrews of the Department of Community Colleges; 


100 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Mrs. Lois Neal, genealogical librarian of the State Library; and Dr. Thorn¬ 
ton W. Mitchell and Mr. Paul P. Hoffman of the Division of Archives and 
History. 


Faculty Interns Work in Archives and History 

The Division of Archives and History was host on July 18-19 to three 
professors, recipients of state government faculty fellowships for in-service 
learning in the Department of Cultural Affairs. Phyllis Allran, teacher of 
English, speech, and drama at Peace College; Dr. Howell Smith, history 
professor at Wake Forest University; and Johnny Crossno, history professor 
at Peace College, received instruction in the programs of six sections of the 
division (Archives and Records, Museums, Historical Publications, Historic 
Sites, Archaeology, and Bicentennial sections). 


Faculty interns meet with Bruce Mac- 
Dougal, right, historic sites administrator. 
Seated from left to right are Dr. Howell Smith 
of Wake Forest University and Johnny 
Crossno and Phyllis Allran of Peace College. 

Gertrude Weil and Woman Suffrage 

Kala Ladenheim, one of the editors of a woman’s rights magazine in 
Tennessee, is researching the papers of Gertrude Weil, a member of her 
family who was a leader in the woman’s rights movement in North Carolina 
a half century ago. Miss Ladenheim, a graduate of Radcliffe College and the 
granddaughter of Emil Rosenthal of Goldsboro, is writing a biography of 
Miss Weil, with special attention to her formative years, including those at 
Horace Mann [High School] in New York, 1895-1897, and Smith College, 
1897-1901, to her efforts for the ratification of the woman suffrage amend¬ 
ment to the Constitution. 

The papers of Gertrude Weil were given to the North Carolina State 
Archives soon after her death in 1971 at age ninety-one. Miss Weil became 
active in the woman’s movement almost a half century after it began. The 
National and American Woman Suffrage associations were organized in 
1869, and were combined in 1889 into the National American Woman Suf¬ 
frage Association. Its purpose was to secure the right to vote to women by 
appropriate legislation on both national and local levels. 

The first local suffrage league in North Carolina was formed in Morgan- 
ton in 1913. In November that year the N.C. Equal Suffrage League was 
formed; and through its president, Mrs. Archibald Henderson, the league 
declared itself opposed to any form of militancy and determined to gain the 
vote by an appeal to reason and fair play. 

Several cities in the state established local chapters; Goldsboro was one 
of them. Gertrude Weil and her sister-in-law Elizabeth Rosenthal were 



VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 5, SEPTEMBER, 1971, 


101 



Gertrude Weil (1879-1971), one of the leaders of the woman suffrage movement in North 
Carolina, was photographed a few years after her 1901 graduation from Smith College. In the 
picture at the right, Miss Kala Ladenheim reads the letters and journals of her cousin Gertrude 
Weil while sitting under a 1920 woman suffrage poster from the Weil Collection in the Archives. 


charter members, and Gertrude was elected president at the first meeting 
in April, 1914. 

Miss Weil also served the North Carolina Equal Suffrage Association as 
third vice-president, 1917; state congressional chairman, 1918, and presi¬ 
dent, 1919-1920. For all her efforts, the North Carolina legislature voted 
against ratification in 1920; and Tennessee, the next state voting, cast the 
decisive vote in favor of woman suffrage. 


Papers of W. R. Valentiner 

Personal papers of Wilhelm R. Valentiner, the first director of the North 
Carolina Museum of Art, have been transferred from the museum to the 
Archives. Dr. Valentiner, a leading authority on the works of Rembrandt, 
died in 1958, leaving these papers in a bequest to the Museum of Art. The 
collection will be restricted until publication of the Valentiner biography 
by Mrs. Bernhard Sterne, a former professor of history at Wayne University. 

Letter Added to Private Collections 

An employee of the Division of Archives and History has donated to the 
Archives one of the longest and most interesting letters in the collection of 
private papers. Mrs. Donna Goswick, secretary in the Colonial Records 
Branch, has deposited a twenty-six-page letter that has survived in her 
family from a North Carolinian who made the trek with his family over the 
Oregon Trail in 1852. Her cousin Miss Nellie Whitfield of Franklinton gave 
the letter to Donna for safekeeping, and Donna deemed the Archives the best 
place for preservation. 


102 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 



Mrs. Goswick and Paul Hoffman, assistant 
archives administrator, look over the 1852 
letter given to the State Archives by Mrs. 
Goswick. 

William W. Cooke, who wrote the letter to his parents in Franklinton in 
September, 1852, recounts his family’s trip from Missouri to the Oregon 
Territory. After describing conditions near Portland where they have set¬ 
tled, Cooke reverts to April, 1852, in Missouri and begins almost daily 
entries from a journal he kept as they walked and rode along the Oregon 
Trail. Part of a nine-wagon train, Cooke had with him his wife, four children, 
two wagons, another driver, ten oxen, six cows, and two horses. 

The entries record those things of most importance to the travelers and 
those who might follow: rockiness or muddiness of the trail, rivers to be 
crossed, toll bridges and ferries, mountains to be climbed, water for drink¬ 
ing, grass for animals, weather, trading posts, landmarks, Indians. The 
brief, matter-of-fact entries of the hardships and the griefs are dramatic in 
their starkness and lack of detail. 

In one of his few digressions William Cooke tells of his amusement at 
standing on a ten-foot snowbank in July, eating snow, and thinking of his 
sweltering family back in North Carolina “calling on ice and fans to keep 
you cool.” 

Because Mrs. Goswick plans to edit and publish the letter, the document 
is restricted at present. 

Students in the Search Room 

Without the help of students to handle 
the summer work load, the Search Room 
reputation for good service would never 
survive until Labor Day. This year’s stu¬ 
dents, pictured left to right, were Meg 
Scott of Wake Forest University, shown 
answering a request by mail; Druscilla 
Ramey of North Carolina State University, 
waiting on Search Room patrons; and 
Wilson Hayman of Princeton University, 
responding to a telephone question. Super¬ 
visor Mary Rogers is shown working at 
her desk. 




Archives Accessions Records 

Ninety-nine entries have been accessioned by the Archives Branch of the 
Archives and Records Section in recent months. State agency records trans¬ 
ferred to the Archives include: Archives and History, correspondence of the 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 5, SEPTEMBER, 197U 


103 








assistant director, 1969 and 1972; three Fibredex boxes of photographs from 
the director’s office, ca. 1950s-1974; and a reel of microfilm for Volume L 
(1973) of the North Carolina Historical Review. From the office of the sec¬ 
retary of state came oaths of office for members of the House of Representa¬ 
tives, 1939-1971; from the Symphony Society, one reel of microfilm of min¬ 
utes for 1940-1949; and from Social Services, two reels of the County Letters 
File and Index, 1943-1974. 

Transferred from the Local Records Branch were seventy-nine Fibredex 
boxes of Hillsborough District Court records; one item from the Salisbury 
District; twelve volumes of Brunswick County records; eighteen volumes 
from Columbus County; one item from Perquimans County; two items 
(copies) of Granville County lists of tithables; five volumes of Polk County 
records; thirty-nine from Wilson County; and Rowan, Guilford, and un¬ 
known county records added to the collection of county records received 
from donors other than county officials. 

Seven new private manuscript collections were received, including the 
Gregg Collection from the Tryon Palace Commission, and the Ocracoke 
Lifesaving Station records (one volume, 1883-1894). Additions were made 
to the Robert W. Scott II Collection, the Siamese Twins Collection, and the 
John Vann Papers. 

Other accessions were seventeen additions to the Newspaper Collection 
(instate) and one reel of Spokane, Washington, newspapers; one church 
history from Wayne County; cemetery records for northeastern North 
Carolina and for Rockingham and Iredell counties; an addition to the Civil 
War collection; a local history for Duplin County, added to the miscella¬ 
neous collections; and nineteen miscellaneous genealogies and Bible records. 
Also accessioned were additions to records of the North Carolina Federation 
of Music Clubs, the DAR, the Sir Walter Cabinet, and a new group on Caro¬ 
lina College. 


New Volume of Colonial Records Published 

The fourth volume in the new Colonial Records series was published in 
June. This volume, North Carolina Higher-Court Records, 1702-1708 was 
edited by Dr. William S. Price, Jr., who is head of the Colonial Records 
Branch of the Historical Publications Section. A coffee hour was given by 
the Historical Publications Section in honor of Dr. Price and his staff, Mrs. 
Ruth C. Langston and Mrs. Donna Goswick, on August 13. Persons inter¬ 
ested in purchasing this latest volume in the Colonial Records series should 
send a check for $16.00 to the section at 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, 
27611. The price of the book was based on the actual printing cost, which 
was $15,753 for 1,000 copies. 

Advisory Editorial Committee Has New Member 

Dr. Carolyn A. Wallace of the University of North Carolina’s Southern 
Historical Collection has been named to the Editorial Committee which 
functions as an advisory group to the Historical Publications program. The 
committee is made up of five members. Dr. Wallace replaced Dr. Max R. 
Williams of Western Carolina University whose five-year term had expired. 


104 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Other members of the committee are Drs. Joseph F. Steelman and Richard 
Zuber and Messrs. Richard Walser and William S. Powell. 

“Month of Sundays” Programs Continue 

The Museum of History continued its popular “Month of Sundays” pro¬ 
grams in August with films on travel and far-away places. Shown during 
the four Sundays were The Neighboring Shore and Outward Bound ; Kitty 
Hawk to Paris: The Heroic Years; The Voyage of the Brigantine Yankee; 
and West to the Mountains and Whaler Out of New Bedford. All films were 
shown in the Auditorium, Archives and History-State Library Building in 
Raleigh. 


Docent Training Is Offered 

Docent training for the North Carolina Museum of History will begin 
September 9 in the Conference Room at the Archives and History-State 
Library Building. It will continue for five consecutive Mondays from 10:00 
A.M. until noon. Volunteers will help with gallery interpretation, including 
guided tours and special craft demonstrations; costuming; and the repro¬ 
duction of items in the collections of the Museum of History. 

Culture Week Set For November 12-16 

Culture Week for 1974 will be held in Raleigh Tuesday through Saturday, 
November 12-16. Most events will occur in the Hotel Sir Walter. 

The schedule for participating societies is as follows: Tuesday —Roanoke 
Island Historical Association and Federation of Music Clubs; Wednesday — 
Art Society; Thursday —Symphony Society, Genealogical Society, Historic 
Preservation Society, and Museums Council; Friday —Literary and His¬ 
torical Association, Folklore Society, and Arts Council; and Saturday — 
County and Local Historians, Poetry Society, Mayflower Society, and His¬ 
torical Book Club. 

The Mayflower Cup and the Sir Walter Raleigh Award will be presented 
as usual at the Friday evening session of the Literary and Historical Asso¬ 
ciation. Mr. Ivor Richard, permanent representative of the United Kingdom 
to the United Nations, will be the main speaker. Mr. Richard, a barrister-at- 
law and former Labour party member of Parliament for Barons Court, will 
speak on the general subject of British views of the American colonies in 
1774. 

Among other speakers during the week will be Mr. John Edwards, general 
manager of the Chicago Symphony, who will address the Symphony Society; 
and Mr. John G. Newton, marine superintendent, Oceanographic Program 
of the Duke University Marine Laboratory, who will speak at the annual 
awards dinner of the Historic Preservation Society. Mme. Rosamond 
Bernier, art critic, publisher, and a founding editor of the French magazine, 
L’Oeil, is the speaker for the Art Society’s annual dinner. 


AIA Committee Offers Award 

The Historic Resources Committee of the North Carolina Chapter of the 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 5, SEPTEMBER, 1971, 


105 


American Institute of Architects, wishing to recognize significant historic 
preservation and/or restoration projects, will present appropriate awards 
at a Culture Week dinner sponsored by the Historic Preservation Society 
on November 14. Persons interested in submitting projects for consideration 
should write for further information from the committee at 115 West 
Morgan Street, Raleigh, 27601. Completed entries are due on October 15. 

National Register Entries Are Pictured 




Left to right, are two streetscapes from the Oakwood Historic District in Raleigh: 500 and 
502 Polk Street and the Pullen houses at 404, 408, 410, and 416 Elm Street. 



Left, the House of Memory in Oakwood Cemetery, also in Raleigh’s Oakwood Historic 
• District. Right, a street shot of the Henderson House in the Trenton Historic District, Jones 
County. 



Also in the Trenton Historic District are, left, Grace Episcopal Church and Parish House, 
Lakeview and Weber streets and, right, the mill pond. 


106 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 









A National Register entry from Nash County is The Meadows-Josh Horne House, left; from 
Perquimans County is Stockton, shown at the right. 



Apologies Are Due 

The Historic Preservation Society of North Carolina sends copies of 
Carolina Comments to all of its members. Through an error in the mail 
room, the Addressograph plates used by the society were improperly used, 
and some members may have received more than one copy of the July issue 
of Carolina Comments and others may have received no copy. If you are a 
member of the Historic Preservation Society and have not received a July 
Carolina Comments, please notify Mrs. Frances H. Whitley, Historic Pre¬ 
servation Society, 109 E. Jones Street, Raleigh, 27611. The July issue of 
Carolina Comments contained information on incentive grants offered by 
the society, and Mrs. Whitley is anxious that all members have this in¬ 
formation. 

Members of the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association may 
have been concerned because of the late arrival of their recent issue of the 
North Carolina Historical Review. University Graphics, which prints the 


VOLUME XXII. NUMBER 5, SEPTEMBER. 197U 


107 











Review , moved into a new building in June. The one accident sustained in 
the move affected the Review. The door to the truck moving the type for the 
Summer issue jammed; in trying to open it, the operator forced the door 
with the result that the metal type fell out, was garbled and mashed. Un¬ 
fortunately, the type also broke all five toes on one of the operator’s feet. A 
great deal of the type for this issue of the Review had to be reset, resulting 
in a delay of a month in mailing the July issue. Because the Autumn issue 
will contain the index for the 1974 volume, there is a possibility that it will 
be delayed briefly, but it is hoped that this issue will be out' by the middle 
of October. 


Changes, Additions to Staff Announced 

Effective July 1 the Civil War Roster Project, under the editorship of 
Mr. W. T. Jordan, Jr., was transferred from the Archives and Records Sec¬ 
tion to the Historical Publications Section. Mr. Jordan and his staff will be 
designated the Civil War Roster Branch of the Historical Publications Sec¬ 
tion. Effective the same date, the Colonial Records Project, under the 
editorship of Dr. William S. Price, Jr., was also given branch status. The 
Colonial Records Project was transferred from the Archives and Records 
Section to the Historical Publications Section several years ago. Miss 
Dianne Massey returned to work in the Civil War Roster Branch on June 4; 
she formerly worked with the branch but had been in school during the past 
academic year. 

Mr. Patrick H. Garrow began work as an archaeologist on August 1. Mr. 
Garrow attended the College of William and Mary and received his A.B. and 
A.M. degrees in anthropology from the University of Georgia. He has had 
field experience and has taught anthropology. 

Mrs. Betty 0. Tyson was promoted to the position of registrar of the North 
Carolina Museum of History, effective July 1. Mr. J. Ron Holland was pro¬ 
moted to head the Audiovisual Media Services Branch of the Museums Sec¬ 
tion, effective August 5. 

Mrs. Margaret Murray joined the staff of the State Records Branch of the 
Archives and Records Section in February as a records management analyst 
I. Mrs. Murray was formerly employed by the Defense Department and 
completed an intern program while with the federal agency. Miss Pam 
Nowell joined the Microfilm Unit staff in May as a microfilmer; she re¬ 
placed Mrs. Mae Javan Beasley who resigned in March. Mrs. Linnie B. 
Averitt transferred from the Management Systems Division, Department of 
Administration, to the State Records Branch in March as a records tech¬ 
nician trainee but resigned in May to be married. 

In the Local Records Branch of the Archives and Records Section, Mr. 
Holmes Croom, clerk III, retired on disability, effective June 1. Mrs. 
Maxie Wall was promoted from clerk II to clerk III, also effective June 1. 
Mr. Harold Nixon, clerk III microfilmer, resigned from his position, ef¬ 
fective June 30; and Mrs. Nancy Barker, clerk II, joined the staff effective 
July 1. 

Mrs. Mary Frances Williams joined the staff of the Technical Services 
Branch of the Archives and Records Section as a technician; she reported 
for work in June. 

Mr. Larry Misenheimer was promoted from audivisual specialist to 


108 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


interpretive planner in the Historic Sites Section. The new site manager at 
Town Creek Indian Mound State Historic Site is Mr. Archie C. Smith, Jr. 
Donald Wooten recently began work as grounds maintenance man at Fort 
Dobbs State Historic Site. 

During May Mr. A. L. Honeycutt, Jr., restoration supervisor, and Mr. 
Edward F. Turberg, restoration specialist, conducted an architectural sur¬ 
vey of seventeenth century houses in Maryland and Virginia in order to 
accumulate information to be used in restoring the Newbold-White House 
in Perquimans County. In May Ms. Catherine Cockshutt, survey branch 
supervisor spoke before various groups in Charlotte, Lenoir, and Tarboro. 
Mr. Bruce MacDougal, historic sites administrator, spoke to the North Car¬ 
olina Home Economics Association in Greensboro; and Mr. Samuel P. 
Townsend, assistant historic sites administrator, attended the annual meet¬ 
ing of the American Association of Museums in Fort Worth, Texas, June 2-6. 

Snow Camp Drama Opens 

An 800-seat amphitheater was filled on July 4 when the new outdoor 
drama, The Sword of Peace, was performed for the first time. Gov. James E. 
Holshouser spoke at opening ceremonies held at the Snow Camp site earlier 
in the day. The new drama was written by William M. Hardy. 

Colleges and Universities 

East Carolina University 

Dr. Philip J. Adler, associate professor, published “Hapsburg School 
Reform among the Orthodox Minorities, 1770-1780” in the Slavic Review 
for March. He had an article, “Notes on the Beginnings of Modern Serbian 
Literature: The Kurzbeck Press in Vienna and Its Successors, 1770-1800,” 
in the 1974 volume of Southeastern Europe. Dr. James H. Wease was pro¬ 
moted to associate professor, effective March 1. Dr. Bodo Nischan, assistant 
professor, and his wife, the former Gerda Baumann, have been selected as 
associates for the 1974-1975 Danforth Associate Program. Dr. Nischan was 
named Fellow in the Southeastern Institute of Medieval and Renaissance 
Studies when it met at Duke University July 15-August 23. 

North Carolina Wesleyan College 

Dr. Richard L. Watson III was promoted to assistant professor effective 
September 1. 

Queens College 

Dr. Mollie C. Davis Abernathy spoke in Deland, Florida, on March 1 at 
the Southeastern American Studies Association. She took as her topic 
“Women’s Rights in the South.” She has been elected president of the South¬ 
ern Regional Popular Culture Association for 1974. Dr. Richard W. Reichard 
was named chairman of the Department of History, effective June 1. 

University of North Carolina at Charlotte 

Drs. Dan L. Morrill and Edward S. Perzel made talks to various social 
and public organizations during the 1973-1974 academic year, using as 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 5, SEPTEMBER, 1971, 


109 


their topic, “The Urban Center Needs Its Past.” In May Dr. John E. Wrig- 
ley read a paper at the International Petrarch Conference. The month before 
he had spoken to the World Petrarch Conference on “Petrarch and History.” 
Dr. Harold Josephson has written a book to be published this fall by the 
Associated University Presses, James T. Shotwell and the Rise of National¬ 
ism in America. Another expected publication for the fall is Dr. K. David 
Patterson’s The Northern Gabon Coast to 1875, to be published by the 
Oxford University Press. 

Effective July 1 Dr. Wrigley was promoted to the rank of professor, Dr. 
Josephson to associate professor, and Dr. Lyman L. Johnson to assistant 
professor. Dr. Philip Boucher was appointed instructor; Dr. Eric Monk- 
konen, assistant professor; and Ms. Aingred James, instructor. Visiting 
professor is Dr. Thomas C. Cochran, editor of the American Historical 
Review, and Mr. A. J. Anthony Morris. 

University of North Carolina at Wilmington 

Dr. Alan D. Watson was promoted to the rank of associate professor ef¬ 
fective with the beginning of the fall term. 

Wake Forest University 

Dr. J. Edwin Hendricks, who directs the Historic Preservation and 
Museum Training Program, is the author of The Franklin House: The 
House, the Family, and Their Historical Perspective, which was recently 
published by the Surry County Historical Society. 


Conference on Loyalists to be Held 

Several faculty members from North Carolina are scheduled to partici¬ 
pate in a conference on the subject of “Loyalists and American Loyalism” 
to be held February 6-8, 1975, in St. Augustine, Florida. Drs. John Alden 
of Duke University, Robert Calhoon of the University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro, Don Higginbotham of the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill, and Carole Troxler of Elon College are among the participants. 
For additional information write to Werner Braatz, Chairman, Conference 
Group for Social and Administrative History, P.O. Box 1293, Oshkosh, 
Wisconsin, 54901. 


State, County, and Local Groups 

Cumberland County Historical Society 

Members of the society visited the State Archives and the Museum of 
History in Raleigh May 5. 

Davidson County Historical Association 

Dr. J. Edwin Hendricks, associate professor of history at Wake Forest 
University, spoke at the meeting of the association on April 29. He discussed 
historical treasures of Davidson County and advised the group concerning 


110 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


plans for a county museum. In the absence of the society’s president, James 
F. Mock, Miss Jewel Sink, vice-president, presided. Miss Sink reported on a 
trip to Hillsborough and on conferences with Orange County people con¬ 
cerning the museum there. 

Granville County Historical Society 

The society met May 25 in the conference room of the R. H. Thornton 
Library. Members having information about churches or historic sites were 
asked to take it to the meeting or contact Mrs. C. G. Royster at Bullock. 


Greensboro Historical Museum 

On May 20 the Dolley Madison Birthplace Memorial opened at the re¬ 
stored eighteenth century Isley House. Mrs. Margaret Brown Klapthor, 
curator of the First Ladies Hall at the Smithsonian Institution, addressed 
the group which attended the dedication. She was introduced by Mr. Carl 
0. Jeffress, a past president of the museum. Presiding over the ceremony 
was Mayor E. S. (Jim) Melvin. Mrs. Joye E. Jordan, assistant director of the 
Division of Archives and History of the Department of Cultural Resources 
until her recent retirement, spoke briefly at the dedication. 



The Great Room of the Isley House fea¬ 
tures North Carolina and Pennsylvania 
furnishings. (Photo by John Page, Greens¬ 
boro News Company.) 


High Point Historical Society, Inc. 

Mrs. Norman Andrews, president of the society, recently announced the 
resignation of John Hamilton as director of the High Point Museum, effec¬ 
tive June 30. The society announced in May that a traveling exhibit of 
Handicrafts of the Southeast would be displayed in High Point. The exhibit, 
which was touring the United States under the auspices of the Smithsonian 
Institution, was sponsored locally by the Alderman Company and Wachovia 
Bank and Trust Company. 

Historic Cabarrus, Inc. 

Historic Cabarrus held its second annual meeting on May 20. Mrs. Janet 
Magaldi, president, gave a report on the activities of the previous year. As 
of March 18 there were 389 members in the organization. 

Historic New Bern Foundation, Inc. 

The foundation is a volunteer organization organized a little over a year 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 5, SEPTEMBER, 197U 


111 




ago. Through it a revolving fund provides money for saving local historical 
landmarks in danger of destruction. A life directorship is $600 and a life 
membership is $100. Persons interested in the foundation should contact 
the president, Dr. Francis P. King, 210 Wilson Point, New Bern; or the 
membership chairman, Mrs. William H. Bell, Jr., 1601 Lucerne Way, New 
Bern. As of May 12 there were 116 active members. In its first year the 
foundation purchased the eighteenth century gambrel roofed Elijah Clark 
House at 616 Middle Street; as of March the home was sold to Mr. and Mrs. 
William Smith who are restoring it under guidelines set up by the founda¬ 
tion. A second purchase was of two lots on Change Street to which the 
Hendren-Roberts House has been moved. The historic home was the gift of 
the Centenary Methodist Church, but the foundation paid for the lots and 
the expense of moving the structure; protective work is being done until an 
interested buyer can be found. 

Historical Foundation of the Presbyterian and Reformed Churches 

The newsletter of the foundation contains an announcement relative to 
its 1974 Prize for Concise Presbyterian History. Competition is open to all 
Presbyterians, and rules regarding the contest may be obtained from the 
editor of Historical Foundation News, Montreat. The contest closes 
November 1. 

Hoke County Historical Society, Inc. 

An organizational meeting of the Hoke County Historical Society held 
in late June approved bylaws, established dues, and elected officers and a 
board of directors. Miss Josephine Hall was in charge of the meeting until 
officers were elected. Mr. Cliff Blue of Aberdeen spoke on experiences in 
forming the Moore County Historical Society; following his speech, officers 
were elected: Palmer Willcox, president; Mrs. Carson Davis, Jr., vice- 
president; Mrs. John K. McNeill, Jr., secretary; and Miss Caroline Parker, 
treasurer. Annual membership dues were set at $3.00 with larger donations 
being welcomed. General membership meetings were scheduled for the 
spring and fall, but the board of directors will meet more often. Anyone 
interested in joining the society should contact one of the officers. 

Littleton College Memorial Association 

Alumnae and friends of the former Littleton College met at North Caro¬ 
lina Wesleyan College on July 13. Members of the association voted to pre¬ 
sent a memorial gift to the library of North Carolina Wesleyan College in 
memory of the late Mrs. Blanche Hardee Rives, a member of the class of 
1910. Secretary of the organization is Miss Ophelia Barker of Milton. 
Speaker at the morning session was the Reverend W. Alton Tew of Durham. 

Lower Cape Fear Historical Society 

The society is cooperating with the Wilmington-New Hanover County 
American Revolution Bicentennial Association in archaeological excava¬ 
tion at Hilton, home of Cornelius Harnett. The excavation is being done 
under the supervision of the Division of Archives and History; Dr. Charles 


112 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Graham is the society’s representative. Mr. Henry MacMillan, Latimer 
House chairman, recently reported that exterior painting and repairs had 
been made and other improvements completed. Various furnishings have 
also been added. 


Maxton Historical Society 

A new organization is the Maxton Historical Society which has recently 
been formed and which has named Roland (Chick) Seals as its first presi¬ 
dent. The society is an outgrowth of the town’s Centennial Commission, Inc. 
John C. (Pete) Hasty has been named executive director; the organization’s 
purpose will be to continue researching and to preserve Maxton’s history. 
Miss Patsy Hamer has been elected president elect; Dr. Bryant Wicker, first 
vice-president; Robert Fairley, second vice-president; and Charles B. Hoff¬ 
man, secretary-treasurer. Mayor John F. Moser will serve as an ex-officio 
member of the board of directors. The organization plans a kick-off date for 
a charter membership drive in the near future. 


Murfreesboro Historical Association 
Historic Murfreesboro Commission 

The Duke Lawrence House, an eighteenth century house located near 
Rich Square, was recently donated to the association by James T. Cooke of 
Murfreesboro and Dr. Quintin E. Cooke, Jr., of Hendersonville, Tennessee, 
in memory of their late father, Dr. Q. E. Cooke of Murfreesboro. The original 
house was built in 1747 by John Duke and was enlarged to its present size 
in 1787 by John and Mary Duke Lawrence. 

On June 8 the eighth annual Historic Murfreesboro Week concluded with 
annual meetings of the Historic Murfreesboro Commission and the associa¬ 
tion. Mrs. Dorothy H. Brown, chairman of the commission, presided at the 
first meeting; she made a personal challenge grant of $5,000 to be used for 
the restoration of the John Wheeler House. President Walter C. Lackey 
presided at the annual meeting of the association. Various reports were 
presented, and announcement was made that the 1975 Lafayette Ball would 
be held as a fund-raising project on January 25. Officers elected include: 
Walter C. Lackey, president; Andrew V. Brown, vice-president; H. K. 
Burgwyn, treasurer; Mrs. R. H. Underwood, secretary; and E. Frank 
Stephenson, Jr., executive director. Special awards were presented to Dr. 
Thomas C. Parramore of Raleigh and to Mrs. Howard Brown of Murfrees¬ 
boro for their contributions to the program. 

Dr. Stephen J. Gluckman met with Mr. Stephenson on July 2 for an 
inspection of the site of the John Wheeler House. Dr. Gluckman, state 
archaeologist, will undertake archaeological work at the site in November. 
Mr. John Ellington, administrator, North Carolina Museum of History, 
met with Mr. Stephenson July 9 to complete plans for museum exhibits to 
be placed in the restored Rea Store. On July 17 Messrs. A. L. Honeycutt, Jr., 
Edward F. Turberg, and Frederick Masseno, all restoration specialists with 
the Historic Sites Section of the Division of Archives and History, met with 
Mr. Ryland Edwards, architect for the Wheeler House restoration, to dis¬ 
cuss plans for the work. 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 5, SEPTEMBER, 19H 


113 


Nash County Historical Association 

The association sponsored a tour of old homes on May 26. The cost was 
$3.00 per person, and houses included were the Thorn ton-Rosser and 
Herbert houses near Fishing Creek, the Ricks Faulkner House near Red 
Oak, and other historic sites. 

North Carolina Genealogical Society 

The thirteen statewide organizations which meet annually during Culture 
Week will be joined this year by a fourteenth. The North Carolina Genealog¬ 
ical Society, chartered by the secretary of state, was organized in Raleigh 
on June 22 when it adopted bylaws and elected officers and a board of direc¬ 
tors. Dr. Charles R. Holloman of Raleigh was elected president. 

The purpose of the organization is “to increase interest in and raise the 
standards of genealogical research and compilation by means of educational 
programs, workshops, and the publication of genealogical data.” The first 
issue of the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal is to be issued in 
October, and the society will hold its first annual session on November 14 
in Raleigh during Culture Week. 

The society’s membership is open to all who are interested in genealogy, 
either as amateurs or as professionals. Annual dues are $10.00 and may be 
sent to the treasurer at P.O. Box 1492, Raleigh, 27602. 



Officers and directors of the North Carolina 
Genealogical Society are: seated, Mrs. W. O. 
Absher, North Wilkesboro, director; Mrs. 
Leora H. McEachern, Wilmington, director; 
Mrs. Stahle Linn, Jr., Salisbury, second vice- 
president; and Mrs. Henry E. Kendall, 
Raleigh, treasurer. Standing: Hugh B. 
Johnston, Jr., Wilson, first vice-president; 
Richard Meldrom, Newton, director; Dr. 
Charles R. Holloman, Raleigh, president; 
and George Stevenson, Raleigh, secretary. 


Old Salem 

Mrs. Grace J. Rohrer, secretary of the Department of Cultural Resources, 
was speaker at the annual meeting of Old Salem on May 29. The meeting 
was held at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts. Mrs. Rohrer 
took as her topic, “Land of Beginnings.” 

Railroad House Historical Association 

The association met May 13 at the Railroad House. Progress reports were 
given with regard to the Old Seaboard Station, gravel for a parking lot, and 
other projects. Hal Silver is president of the organization. Mr. Silver pre¬ 
sided when the association met July 8 to discuss building of new display 
cabinets, order of jack-stands for the old firetrucks, and sale of remaining 
copies of the history of Sanford. A check from Mr. Luther White, who was 
born in the Railroad House, was reported by the treasurer, Florence 
Robinson. 

114 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 





Stokes County Historical Society 

Dr. J. Edwin Hendricks of Wake Forest University spoke at the July 11 
meeting of the society. Because of his interest in the history and preservation 
of the Rock House in western Stokes County, Dr. Hendricks used that as 
the theme of his talk. 

Surry County Historical Society 

The society has published The Franklin Home, the story of the eighteenth 
century home of Bernard Franklin. The Surry group owns the house and 
surrounding land and is trying to raise funds to be used in its restoration. 
The new history may be obtained from Miss Ruth Minick, treasurer of the 
organization, at 341 Franklin Street, Mount Airy; copies are $1.25 by mail. 

Transylvania County Historical Commission 

The commission met July 13 to discuss plans for the future. It was de¬ 
cided to concentrate on erection of historical markers, establishment of a 
county historical museum, and publication of a county history. The com¬ 
mission, whose chairman is Dr. John Eastes, will work closely with the 
Transylvania County Historical Association and the Transylvania Bi¬ 
centennial Committee. 


Wake County Historical Society 

At a meeting on June 16 the following officers were elected: Mrs. Charles 
Silver, president; Mr. Hardy Berry, first vice-president; Mr. Charles Poe, 
second vice-president; Mrs. Kenneth T. Knight, treasurer; Mrs. Henri 
Dawkins, secretary; and Miss Cornelia Tongue, corresponding secretary. 
New board members are Dr. Thornton W. Mitchell, Mrs. H. Royster 
Chamblee, and Mr. William Joslin. 

Warren County Historical Association 

Members of the association plan to publish a brochure on Nathaniel 
Macon’s homeplace as a fund-raising project, the money to be used for the 
restoration of Buck Spring, Macon’s home. The group met on July 1, pre¬ 
sided over by Mrs. James Beckwith, president. Announcement was made of 
an appropriation of $3,000 by the Warren County Board of Commissioners 
to the county’s Bicentennial Committee for use in the restoration of Buck 
Spring. The restoration will be Warren County’s contribution to the bicen¬ 
tennial; and the Warren County Historical Society, Inc., will supervise and 
implement the restoration. A report was given on the restoration of the 


CAROUNA COMMENTS 

Published in January, March, May, July, September, and November by the Division 
of Archives and History, Department of Cultural Resources, Archives and History- 
State Library Building, 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27611. 

Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell, Editor 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 5, SEPTEMBER, 1971, 


115 



comcrib at Macon’s home by Jesse Pegram, Littleton contractor. Restora¬ 
tion of the smokehouse will be the next endeavor. A recent gift by W. Duke 
Jones to the Warren County Historical Association is the 1857-1862 ledger 
of John R. Johnson, shoemaker of Warrenton. 

It was voted to increase the price of The County of Warren to $10.00 a 
copy. A limited number of copies are still available and may be purchased 
from the Warren County Memorial Library. 


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Published Bimonthly by the North Carolina Division of Archives and History 


Volume XXII, Number 6_ November, 1974 

New Records Center Construction Begins 

Construction of the new State Records Center and Archives Annex 
Building began August 1. 

Confined mainly to excavation and the driving of piling in the initial 
phases, it is anticipated that floors and columns will be discernible in the 
next few weeks. 

The building was designed by architect F. Carter Williams. It is being 
constructed by the Davidson and Jones Construction Company of Raleigh 
and is expected to be completed by September, 1975. The building will cost 
close to $2 million. 


A 



Construction of the State Records Center and Archives Annex Building was photographed 
early in September. The building will be connected to the present Archives and History- 
State Library Building by an underground tunnel, excavation for which is shown immediately 
behind the pile driver. Approximately 220 piles will be driven for the new building, each 
capable of bearing a weight of 60 tons. Construction cranes are shown at the left. (Photo¬ 
graphs by Division of Archives and History unless otherwise specified.) 





















The new facility will rise four stories and is designed to make maximum 
use of office and storage space. Double-decking the storage shelving and 
installing mesh catwalk balconies will create seven levels of storage at a 
fraction of the cost of actual floors. Throughout, the storage shelving is 
two deep, or doubled, thereby increasing the space utilization ratio. 

The construction site is located directly behind the Archives and History- 
State Library Building at the intersection of Lane and Blount streets. 

Museum Features New Displays 

A special exhibit based on items from the North Carolina Sports Hall of 
Fame is on display in the large lobby case opposite the main entrance to the 
North Carolina Museum of History in the Archives and History-State 
Library Building. Included in the exhibit are Enos Slaughter’s bat, Roman 
Gabriel’s jersey, Richard Petty’s coveralls, and Estelle Page’s golf club. 

A major quilt exhibition, “Artistry in 
Quilts,” is scheduled to open with a gen¬ 
eral reception for the public on Novem¬ 
ber 10 in the Folk Art and Home Indus¬ 
try Gallery of the North Carolina 
Museum of History. The exhibition 
contains over 100 quilts. A dogwood 
patterned quilt was especially commis¬ 
sioned for the show. Both antique and 
contemporary quilts are included in the 
exhibition which will run through mid- 
January. 

One of the patterns featured in the 
quilt exhibit is the dogwood square. 



Construction Is Begun at Halifax 

Construction has begun on the $200,000 visitor center-museum at the 
Halifax State Historic Site. This center will not only act as a starting-off 
point for a tour of Historic Halifax but will feature exhibits depicting life 
in the Roanoke Valley from its very early days of inhabitation up to the late 
1800s. Newberry, Ashford and Associates of Raleigh are architects for the 
project. 


HAER Contract Explained 

The Division of Archives and History, in cooperation with the National 
Park Service, is currently undertaking an inventory of historic industrial 
sites and engineering works in the state of North Carolina under the 
Historic American Engineering Record (HAER) program. The inventory 
seeks to locate such achievements as bridges, canals, waterworks, transpor¬ 
tation facilities, power plants, industrial complexes, etc., which are asso¬ 
ciated with the technological, industrial, and engineering heritage of North 
Carolina. 

Brent D. Glass, a Ph.D. candidate at UNC-CH, is serving as the inventory 
director; he is assigned to the Survey and Planning Branch of the Historic 
Sites Section. The primary interest is in recording existing structures rather 


118 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 



than sites of previous achievements. More significant sites will receive 
extensive historical and architectural study. Anyone having information 
concerning a site that might be of interest to Mr. Glass and HAER is 
invited to contact him in the Survey office. 


Culture Week—A Reminder 

Programs were mailed to members of 
Culture Week societies, but a reminder 
of the dates November 12-16 is in order. 
The Literary and H istorical Association’s 
meetings will be held on Friday, Novem¬ 
ber 15. The Mayflower, Sir Walter 
Raleigh, and Christopher Crittenden 
awards will be presented on Friday 
evening after Ambassador Richard’s ad¬ 
dress on “British Views of the American 
Colonies on the Eve of the Revolution.” 



Ivor Richard, Queen’s Counsel, the 
United Kingdom’s permanent repre¬ 
sentative to the United Nations. 
(Photograph by Blackstone-Shel- 
burne, New York.) 


Scott Documentary Is Published 

Gov. James E. Holshouser, Jr., formally presented the first copy of 
Addresses and Public Papers of Robert Walter Scott, Governor of North 
Carolina, 1969-1973 to his predecessor on August 28. The ceremony was held 
in the Archives and History-State Library Building. Other participants 
included Dr. Thornton W. Mitchell, then acting director of the Division of 
Archives and History; Mrs. Grace J. Rohrer, secretary of the Department 
of Cultural Resources; and Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell, historical publications 
administrator, who edited the volume. 

A display of published and unpublished letter books of former governors 
included the manuscript letter book of Gov. Richard Caswell, the first chief 
executive to serve under the state constitution, and published volumes for all 
governors since the administration of Gov. Thomas W. Bickett. The pub¬ 
lished documentary volumes of papers of Governors Vance, Graham, Ellis, 
and Jarvis were also exhibited. 

Attending the afternoon ceremony were members of the supreme court 



Left, Governor Holshouser presents the first copy of the Scott documentary to former 
Governor Scott. Right, Mrs. Robert W. Scott (right) hands a gift to Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell, 
editor of the volume. Secretary of State Thad Eure is in the background. 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 6, NOVEMBER, 197J, 


119 





and the court of appeals, cabinet members, and other state officials as well 
as friends and associates of Governor Scott. Mrs. Dan K. Moore poured 
punch at a reception following the ceremony. 

A limited number of copies of the Scott documentary will be available 
from the Historical Publications Section of the Division of Archives and 
History upon request. Because of a problem in the bindery, there has been 
delay in delivery of the total order. 


National Register List Grows 



Pictured on these two pages are several additions to the National Register of Historic 
Places. Top, left, is Vesuvius Furnace in Lincoln County; right, Black Jack, Nash County. 
Middle, left, Sutton-Newby House, Perquimans County; right. Cove Grove, Perquimans 
County. Bottom row, left, St. John's Episcopal Church, Fayetteville, Cumberland County; 
right, Ellerslie, Cumberland County. 


120 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 











Top, left, Moratock Iron Furnace, Stokes County; right, Mill Hill, Cabarrus County. Middle, 
left, Green Duke House, Soul City, Warren County; right, Bluff Presbyterian Church, Cumber¬ 
land County. Bottom, left, Bull Durham Tobacco Factory, Durham County; right, Endor Iron 
Furnace, Lee County. 


VOLUME XXII. NUMBER 6, NOVEMBER. 197i 


121 











Reginald Fessenden and the Canadian Archives 

This year’s meeting of the Society of American Archivists in Toronto, 
Canada, October 1^4, was attended by State Archivist Thornton W. Mitchell 
and Paul P. Hoffman, head of the Archives Branch. 

At the Canadian luncheon meeting on October 3, Dr. Mitchell, on behalf of 
the state of North Carolina, presented to the Public Archives of Canada a 
microfilm copy of the extensive Reginald A. Fessenden Collection deposited 
by Fessenden’s son in the N.C. State Archives in 1944. 

Professor Fessenden (1866-1932), inventor and physicist, was born and 
educated in Canada. Before becoming a professor of electrical engineering 
at Purdue University, he was associated with Thomas Edison. In 1900-1902 
he lived on Roanoke Island, North Carolina, where he conducted experiments 
in wireless telegraphy under the auspices of the U.S. Weather Bureau. 

Recognized as the originator of the continuous wave principle in wireless 
transmission, Fessenden held over 500 patents, mostly in the field of radio. 
He made the first known radio broadcast of speech and music on December 
24, 1906, from Brant Rock, Massachusetts. Also in 1906 he made what may 
have been the first two-way trans-Atlantic wireless telegraphic contact— 
between Brant Rock and Machrihanish, Scotland. 

His better-known inventions in fields other than radio are the fathometer 
(sonic depth finder for ships), the smoke cloud for tanks, the turbo-electric 
drive for battleships, the wireless compass, and various submarine signaling 
devices. 



Reginald A. Fessenden is shown in his 
study with the radio-talking violin which he 
invented in 1906. An electromagnet was 
placed near the strings of the violin which 
reproduced sounds when audio-frequency 
vibrations flowed through the electro¬ 
magnetic winding. 


Exhibits Prepared on Central Prison 

An exhibit entitled “Central Prison .... Citadel on the Temple of Love” 
has been recently presented by the Division of Archives and History to the 
Department of Social Rehabilitation and Control. The exhibit, prepared by 


122 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 




Dick Lankford of the Archives Branch, was officially accepted by Social 
Rehabilitation and Control Secretary David Jones and Central Prison 
Warden Sam Garrison. A duplicate of the new exhibit is currently on display 
outside the entrance to the Archives Search Room. 

The exhibit chronicles the creation of Central Prison with the following 
information: 

Article XI, section 3, of the 1868 Constitution of North Carolina directed the 
General Assembly to provide for the erection of a prison at some central and 
accessible point within the state. In compliance with the state constitution, the 
1868-1869 session of the General Assembly enacted legislation providing for the 
establishment of a penitentiary to be located at or near the city of Raleigh. 

On May 4, 1869, the Commissioners for the Erection of a Penitentiary unanimously 
voted to select a site on the west side of Raleigh known as the “Temple of Love” as 
the location for the state prison. The land was owned by Miss Kate Boylan and was 
acquired at a cost of $200 per acre for the approximately 22 acres involved. 

Colonel William J. Hicks (1827-1911) served as architect and warden of the new 
penitentiary. He was promoted to the position of chief architect in 1872 and four 
years later the General Assembly appointed him prison warden, a position Hicks 
held for 25 years. Hicks’s skill as a builder was utilized in the construction of many 
public buildings with the most notable being the Governor’s Mansion and Central 
Prison. 

Modern principles of design were incorporated into the plans for the structure, 
and when it was completed in 1884, the penitentiary was considered to be the best 
in the South. Examination of the architects’ reports reveals that most of the con¬ 
struction was done by convict labor usually working under minimal supervision. 



An exhibit on Central Prison was presented to the Department of Social Rehabilitation and 
Control. A duplicate may be seen at the entrance to the Search Room. 

Article Based on Calvin Cowles Papers 

The collection of papers photographed (page 124) was created by Calvin J. 
Cowles who was a merchant in western North Carolina during the ante¬ 
bellum period, the president of the Constitutional Convention of 1868, and 
postwar assayer and custodian of the U.S. Branch Mint in Charlotte. The 
papers, dating from 1817 to 1885, were given to the State Archives by Mrs. 
Calvin J. Cowles, a daughter of Gov. William W. Holden, in 1914 and 1934. 
A much larger collection of Calvin Cowles’s papers was given to the Southern 
Historical Collection at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 
1968 by his great-grandson, state Sen. Hamilton C. Horton of Winston- 
Salem. The poster shown on the left was printed for Cowles’s store in Elk- 
ville near the Wilkes-Caldwell county line in 1849. 

Manuscript boxes shown in the picture contain incoming letters; the 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 6, NOVEMBER, 1971, 


123 



















The Cowles Collection from the 
State Archives is pictured here. 
Note the contrast between a 
poster of the Cowles days and a 
recent poster depicting a North 
Carolina mountain scene. 


volumes contain copies of Cowles’s outgoing correspondence on tissue paper 
pages. The standing volumes were the most fragile and have been laminated 
and rebound. 

The volumes of 1850-1853 were called manifold letter books. Carbon paper 
was placed between a lined tissue page and a blank sheet of writing paper. A 
letter was written directly on the tissue paper. The carbon copy on the 
sheet of writing paper was mailed to the addressee. 

Beginning in 1854 Cowles bought a new type letter book, called letterpress 
book, which remained in general use until the typewriter became popular. 
This book also had tissue pages, but no lines. A letter was written in ink on 
regular writing papers. Copies were made by placing the original letter 
under one of the tissue pages which was then dampened with water. With 
adjacent pages protected by blotting paper, the book was closed and placed 
in a letterpress. Several pounds of pressure were applied, and the image 
from the letter was transferred to the tissue paper page. 

The newest issue of the North Carolina Historical Review, Autumn, 
1974, contains an article researched in these collections of the Calvin 
Cowles papers in Chapel Hill and Raleigh. Susan Sokol Blosser, formerly on 
the staff of the Southern Historical Collection, has published part of the 
story of Cowles’s almost forty-year attempt to interest more geologists, engi¬ 
neers, northern capitalists, English investors, colonizing immigrants, and 
prominent North Carolinians in the development of mineral lands in the 
western counties of the state. The title of the article is “Calvin J. Cowles’s 
Gap Creek Mine: A Case Study of Mine Speculation in the Gilded Age.” 


Malayasian Visitor Hosted 

Records management and Records Center operations were the main topic 
of a recent tour and one-day orientation held for Mr. Alphonso, a staff 
member of the Records Center in Malaya. The event was hosted by Mr. 
Paul P. Hoffman, head, Archives Branch, and Mr. Ronald E. Youngquist, 
assistant records administrator (State Records). 

Mr. Alphonso, who boasts of only one name, is currently touring state 
and federal records management agencies as part of a State Department 
sponsored program. Prior to arriving in this country, Mr. Alphonso had 
been studying archival and records management subjects in England. 

Upon completion of his visits in the United States, Mr. Alphonso will 
return to England to complete his studies. 


124 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 













Marriage Bonds Being Indexed 



The Archives and Records Section is 
now producing a computerized statewide 
marriage bond index, which will supple¬ 
ment the county abstracts which have been 
used in the Search Room for many years. 
When the computer project is completed, 
the approximately 150,000 marriage bonds 
which have been preserved (bonds were 
used in North Carolina from ca. 1740 to 
1868 when the current licensing system 
was adopted) will be both indexed alpha¬ 
betically by grooms’ names and cross- 
indexed by brides' names. Shown here are 
archivists Suzanne Smith and Murray 
Parker proofreading a preliminary print-out 
document. 


Report Shows Progress in Records Management 

The State Records Branch has recently completed its twelfth annual 
survey of the records holdings of state agencies, institutions, and licensing 
and examining boards. The report, which was submitted to Gov. James E. 
Holshouser early in September, is designed to measure the effectiveness of 
the records management program in controlling the creation, maintenance, 
and disposition of state government records. 

The report shows that during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1974, signifi¬ 
cant progress was made in disposing of records in state agencies and in 
transferring them to the low-cost storage facilities at the State Records 
Center. This was accompanied by a decrease in the volume of new records 
that were created during the year when compared with previous years. 
These factors are clear indications of progress in the records management 
program. 

During the reporting period 29,563 cubic feet of records were removed 
from state offices either by destruction in the agencies or by transfer to the 
Records Center. This marks an increase of 18 percent over the previous 
fiscal year, and produced dollar savings of $443,415 resulting from savings 
in file cabinets and office space that would have been needed to house the 
records if these actions had not occurred. The volume of new records created 
by state agencies during the year fell to 45,997 cubic feet, a 17 percent 
decrease over the amount created two years ago. 

The report also shows a decline in the rate of growth of state government 
records. Although the total volume has grown to 293,139 cubic feet, the 
rate of growth was reduced to a 5 percent increase over the previous year, 
as compared to a 14 percent increase two years ago. This reduced rate of 
growth seems encouraging since government programs and services con¬ 
tinue to expand from year to year. 

Archives Accessions Records 

From June through August a total of fifty-nine items were accessioned by 
the Archives Section. 

The Local Records Branch transferred records from Anson (35 volumes), 
Beaufort (8 reels), Onslow (6 reels and 1 volume), Gates (105 boxes and 5 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 6, NOVEMBER, 1974 


125 


volumes), New Hanover (1 volume), Orange (135 boxes), Cleveland (1 folder), 
and Halifax (18 volumes) counties. State agency records received included 
groups from the Governor Morehead School (4 volumes), Water and Air 
Resources (a total of 4 reels of microfilm), the State Stream Sanitation Com¬ 
mittee (1 reel), Archives and History (11 reels), and the N.C. Supreme Court 
(6 cu. ft.). 

Four additions were made to previously accessioned private collections: 
the Bryan Grimes Papers, the Fred A. Olds Papers, the Robert W. Scott II 
Collection, and the Edward W. Pou Papers. New private collections acces¬ 
sioned were the Mrs. V. J. McKnight Papers, the Wilhelm Valentiner 
Papers, the Warrenton Railroad Company Records (microfilm), the Rev. 
Samuel Rothrock.Diaries (microfilm), the John T. Revelle Diary, the Banks 
Arendell Papers, the Lena Mayberry Collection, the Mrs. Mary Deal Haynes 
Papers, and the Riddle Family Papers. 

The remainder of accessions consisted of organization records (additions 
to the DAR, N.C. League of Women Voters, and N.C. Literary and Historical 
Association holdings); 13 miscellaneous genealogies and Bible records; 
church records (Rowan and Caswell counties); cemetery records (Columbus 
and Durham counties); military collections (two additions to the Civil War 
records); local histories (Wake County); and security microfilm. 


New Colonial Records Volume Is Highlighted 




The Museums Section prepared the ex¬ 
hibit on the new volume, North Carolina 
Higher-Court Records. It may be seen on 
the second floor of the Museum of History. 
Honored at a coffee hour following publi¬ 
cation of the new volume were Dr. William 
S. Price, Jr., who edited the volume with 
the assistance of his staff, Mrs. Donna H. 
Goswick, center, and Mrs. Ruth C. Langston. 


Museum Acquires Snuff Box 

The North Carolina Museum of History has acquired an intriguing silver 
shoe-shaped snuff box. The intrigue involves a handpenned note found with 
the box which reads: “The snuff box of Doctor Thomas A. Burke of North 
Carolina 1781—Elizabeth B. Burke.” Staff research has failed to associate 
the box with Governor Burke or to identify the author of the note. 

The show is graced with floral and scroll designs. Two thirds of the top 


126 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 







of the box opens on a hinge and depicts a cherub. The rear and right sides 
of the shoe show male and female figures and the left side of the shoe shows 
a male. It is made of solid silver and silver solder. 

Style, craftsmanship, and hallmarks place the piece in mid-eighteenth 
century Ireland. 


The snuff box recently acquired by the 
Museum is described in the accompanying 
article. 



Staff News Includes Appointment of Tise 

Dr. Larry Tise was named assistant director of the Division of Archives 
and History, effective September 1. He succeeded Mrs. Joye E. Jordan who 
retired June 30. Dr. Tise is a graduate of Duke University who also received 
a master of divinity degree from the same institution; his Ph.D. in history 
is from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 


Dr. Tise, the new assistant director of 
the Division of Archives and History. 


Dr. Tise, an ordained minister in 
author of Yadkin Melting Pot: Methodism and Moravians in the Yadkin 
Valley and A House Not Made with Hands. The Winston-Salem native 
formerly was an editor with Blair Publishing Company in his native city. 
While at Chapel Hill he had a teaching fellowship, and he has also had a 
Research Triangle Fellowship and a Ford Foundation Fellowship in Ethnic 
Studies. 

Prior to assuming his present position, Dr. Tise was area coordinator in 
northwestern North Carolina for the North Carolina American Revolution 
Bicentennial Committee. 



VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 6, NOVEMBER. 1971, 


127 




Also on September 1 Mrs. Freda Brittain transferred from a position as 
secretary to the administrator of the Museums Section to that of secretary 
to the director of the Division of Archives and History, Dr. Robert E. Stipe. 
During September Mrs. Edna Gordon, who had served as secretary to both 
the late Dr. Christopher Crittenden and to Dr. H. G. Jones, returned to the 
office from retirement so as to assist with the transition in the director’s 
office. Mrs. Brittain also worked in the director’s office for a time during the 
administration of Dr. Crittenden. Filling Mrs. Brittain’s old position in the 
Museums Section is Mrs. Gail Jordan. Others who have recently begun work 
in the Museums Section include Rodney Barfield, interpretation specialist; 
Miss Martha Battle, typist in the Collections Branch; Joel Bargamian, 
audiovisual technician; and Barry Dunn, museum guard. Mrs. Barbara Lee, 
receptionist at the sales desk in the lobby of the Archives and History-State 
Library Building, is now a member of the Museums staff. 

New employees in the Historic Sites Section are Nancy Murray, steno II 
in Administration; Deborah Barr, typist II in the Interpretations Branch; 
Sherwood Godwin, grounds maintenance man at Duke Homestead; Mar¬ 
garet Davis, research assistant in Survey and Planning; and Kathleen Pepi, 
part-time survey specialist, and Mary Alice Hinson, contractual architec¬ 
tural researcher, both in Survey and Planning. Bruce MacDougal, adminis¬ 
trator of the Historic Sites Section, and Samuel P. Townsend, assistant 
administrator, attended the annual meeting of the American Association for 
State and Local History in Austin, Texas, in September. Mr. Townsend 
was chairman of a session on “Archaeology with a Difference.” He also 
recently spoke to the steering committee for forming the Fayetteville- 
Cumberland County History Museum. 

Miss Eleanor Hill reported for work September 3 as a part-time clerk II 
in the Civil War Roster Branch of the Historical Publications Section. The 
Meredith College graduate is continuing her studies in the graduate school 
at North Carolina State University while doing editorial work on the Civil 
War Roster. 

A number of changes have occurred in the Archives and Records Section. 
After more than thirty-eight years of service in the Search Room of the 
North Carolina State Archives, Mary J. Rogers retired July 31. On the day 
of her retirement Mrs. Rogers received a letter from Governor Holshouser 
who wrote: 

Your contribution to all aspects of the development of the Archives in its formative 
years is widely recognized within North Carolina and the Nation. We have been 
honored to have had your help in making the Archives into the fine institution that 
it is today, and we feel that you have played an important role in that achievement. 

Co-workers of Mrs. Rogers have formed an ad hoc committee to commis¬ 
sion the painting of her portrait. Friends of Mrs. Rogers will be invited to 
subscribe to a fund to be used in defraying the cost of the portrait to be 
painted by William C. Fields of Fayetteville. Upon completion the portrait 
will be publicly unveiled and presented to the state of North Carolina. 
Inquiries may be addressed to the Mary J. Rogers Portrait Committee, 109 
E. Jones St., Raleigh, N.C., 27611. 

Miss Irene E. (Betty) Yarbrough has been appointed Search Room super¬ 
visor succeeding Mrs. Rogers. Miss Yarbrough, a native of Winston-Salem, 
is a graduate of Atlantic Christian College in Wilson. She has been employed 
in the Archives Branch since January, 1966. 


128 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Mr. Joe A. Mobley of Raleigh has been named an archivist I in the Search 
Room. A graduate of North Carolina State University in history, Mr. Mobley 
anticipates the completion of all work for his M.A. in history from N.C. State 
in December. 



Left, Dr. Thornton W. Mitchell reads a letter of appreciation from Governor Holshouser 
to Mrs. Rogers on the occasion of her retirement. Right, Miss Yarbrough has succeeded Mrs. 
Rogers as supervisor in the Search Room. 


Mr. Robert Rand reported for work on August 1 as a clerk II (microfilmer) 
in the Technical Services Branch of the Archives and Records Section. Two 
new employees in the State Records Branch are Mr. Bobby Tomlinson, clerk 
I messenger, who reported on August 12; and Mrs. Diane Strickland, tem¬ 
porary part-time typist II, who went to work on August 15. 

The North Carolina American Revolution Bicentennial Committee has 
added Dr. Jeffrey Crow and Dr. Lawrence Jefferson Wheeler to its staff. 
Dr. Crow is heritage director and will be responsible for writing a pamphlet 
series on North Carolina’s involvement in the Revolution. He will also be 
coordinating a symposium on “The Experience of Revolution in North Caro¬ 
lina and the South.” Dr. Crow’s A.B. is from Ohio State University; he 
has an A.M. from the University of Akron and a Ph.D. from Duke University. 
Dr. Wheeler, as community director, will coordinate local participation and 
will provide services of the state office to local organizations. He is a gradu¬ 
ate of Pfeiffer College with an A.M. from Appalachian State University and 
a Ph.D. from the University of Georgia. He has had further study in Paris. 
Prior to joining the Bicentennial Section, he was assistant professor of 
history at Pfeiffer. 



Left, Jeffrey Crow; right, Lawrence Wheeler. 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 6, NOVEMBER, I97i 


129 



Bicentennial Observance Held in New Bern 

A ten-day celebration called “American Revolution Bicentennial Festival” 
was held in New Bern August 16-25. Opening ceremonies were held on 
Friday, August 16. The following Sunday and Monday Tryon Palace was 
opened free of charge to residents of the town and Craven County. The 
climax of the observance occurred on August 25 when featured speakers at 
an evening program held on the lawn of Tryon Palace were Governor Hols- 
houser and the Honorable John W. Warner, former secretary of the navy, 
who is now chairman of the American Revolution Bicentennial Administra¬ 
tion. Music for the occasion was provided by the North Carolina Symphony 
and the United States Navy “Seachanters.” 

Washington-Beaufort County Bicentennial Celebration 

To commemorate the county bicentennial a special medal has been 
issued. North Carolina’s Washington, named for the first president, is one 
of the cities which will be celebrating its bicentennial as the nation cele¬ 
brates its two-hundredth anniversary; it has been designated a national 
“American Revolution Bicentennial City.” The medal, from art sculptured 
by Roger Akens and minted by the Lincoln Mint, may be obtained in either 
silver or bronze. The medals, in a limited edition, serially numbered, are 
IV 2 inches in diameter. Orders should be sent to the Washington-Beaufort 
County Bicentennial Commission, Box 1776, Washington, N.C., 27889. A 
check or money order in the amount of $20.00 for each sterling silver medal 
and $5.00 for each bronze medal should accompany each order; the cost 
includes postage and handling. 


Obituaries 

Mrs. Martha Langston Harrelson died July 22. She was a former teacher 
at LeRoy Martin Junior High School in Raleigh and served as club adviser 
in the Tar Heel Junior Historian Association. Mrs. Harrelson was also a 
former vice-president of the Wake County Historical Association. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Wall Wilborn died August 22. Mrs. Wilborn joined the 
staff of Archives and History as an editorial assistant on September 1, 1954; 
she was head of the research unit of the Historic Sites and Museums Section 
at the time of her death. One of her responsibilities was the North Carolina 
Highway Historical Marker Program. At the time of Mrs. Wilborn’s death 
her family requested that there be no flowers but in lieu thereof friends who 
wished to do so might contribute in her memory to the North Carolina 
Collection. Funds will be used with the approval of the family for the 
enrichment of the collection; contributions should be addressed to the col¬ 
lection at the University of North Carolina Library, Chapel Hill, N.C., 
27514. 


Colleges and Universities 

East Carolina University 

Mr. Donald R. Lennon, assistant professor of history, spoke on “Colonial 
Town Life in Eastern North Carolina” on September 14. He addressed the 
Major Benjamin May Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution. 


130 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


High Point College 

Dr. Morris F. Britt, associate professor of psychology, served as instructor 
for a course in genealogical research and family history given at High Point 
College this past summer. 

Meredith College 

Dr. Frank L. Grubbs, Jr., spoke on “Politics and the Christian Ethic” at 
St. Michael’s Episcopal Church in Raleigh in June. He was named “Out¬ 
standing Christian Teacher,” a Meredith College annual award, in May. 
Dr. Erika Fairchild published an article entitled “New Trends in Correc¬ 
tions Policy” in the September issue of Policy Studies Journal. 

North Carolina School of the Arts 

Dr. Betty Talbert was named instructor in history effective September 1. 

North Carolina Central University 

Dr. George W. Reid was named chairman of the Department of History in 
August. Dr. Reid’s Ph.D. is from Howard University, and he formerly taught 
at Fayetteville State University and at Southeastern Community College. 

North Carolina State University 

Edith Sylla took as her topic “Medieval Logic and the Infinite” at the 
International Congress of History of Science, which met in Tokyo and 
Kyoto, Japan, August 19-27. She was named U.S. delegate to the General 
Assembly of the International Union of the History and Philosophy of 
Science, which also met in Tokyo. Dr. Marvin L. Brown, Jr., is coauthor 
with Dr. Harold T. Parker of Major Themes in Modern European History: 
An Invitation to Inquiry and Reflection, which is being published this year 
by the Moore Publishing Company. Three persons named assistant professor 
at the university are Douglas Thomas Nelson, Donald Moore Scott, and 
Charles Joseph Constantin. 

Queens College 

Dr. Mollie C. Abernathy, assistant professor, is scheduled to serve as 
commentator at a session of the Southern Historical Association in Dallas, 
Texas, November 9. The topic of the session is “Dissent in the New South.” 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

For the first time since its quarters were opened in 1952, the North 
Carolina Collection has had its Reading Room and offices painted and 
rearranged. Additional space is greatly needed; for example, the Robert 
Ruark Collection of forty-nine shipping cases and many additional items 
cannot be opened to the public because of absence of shelf space. 

A videocassette of the television program, “The Impeachment of Andrew 
Johnson,” has been deposited in the North Carolina Collection through the 
cooperation of the National Public Affairs Center for Television and Hugh 
R. Fisher of the UNC-TV Network. Also added to the collection recently 
were books of the late M. C. S. Noble and his daughter, the late Miss Alice 
Noble. 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 6. NOVEMBER. 1971, 


131 



Dr. H. G. Jones, curator of the collection, gave a paper on “The Politiciza¬ 
tion of History” at the annual meeting of the American Association for State 
and Local History in Austin, Texas, September 26. He continues as a 
member of the council and as chairman of the bylaws committee. In August 
Dr. Jones assisted the Concordia Historical Institute in Missouri in drafting 
a plan for the strengthening of its program. He served this year as nominat¬ 
ing committee chairman of the Archaeological Society of North Carolina 
and was reelected to a three-year term on the North Carolina Humanities 
Committee. 

A number of members of the faculty at Chapel Hill have presented papers 
at professional meetings in 1974 but have not reported their activities to 
Carolina Comments until a few weeks ago. These include Dr. Gerhard L. 
Weinberg, who read a paper at the Pilsudski Institute of America in April; 
Dr. John Butler Tomaro, who spoke at Case Western Reserve University in 
February; Dr. E. Willis Brooks, who appeared on programs at Fayetteville 
Technical Institute in February and at St. Andrews College in April; Dr. 
Samuel H. Baron whose paper was presented at the Mid-West Conference on 
Slavic Studies in May; Dr. S. R. Williamson who was on programs at the 
U.S. Army War College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, in May and the Foreign 
Service Institute in June; Dr. Samuel F. Wells, Jr., spoke at the History 
Club, The Citadel, in May; Dr. Lawrence D. Kessler lectured at a class at 
Fayetteville Technical Institute in March; Dr. Joel R. Williamson was 
interviewed for a Voice of America program in January; Dr. J. S. Tulchin 
participated in a panel at the Organization of American Historians in 
Denver in April and spoke at several institutions in Buenos Aires, Argen¬ 
tina, in June; and Dr. Barbara B. Schnorrenberg was on the program of the 
Society for Eighteenth Century' Studies, which met in Philadelphia in April. 

Dr. Tomaro published ‘‘Dissertation Note” in Volume LX, 1974, of 
Catholic Historical Review, Dr. Baron’s article, “Plekhanov, Trotsky, and 
the Development of Soviet Historiography,” was published in the July issue 
of Soviet Studies (Glasgow); Dr. S. R. Williamson had an article, “Influence, 
Power, and the Policy Process: The Case of Franz Ferdinand, 1906-1914,” 
in the Historical Journal , 17 (1974); and Dr. Tulchin published “Decoloniz¬ 
ing an Informal Empire” in International Interactions, Vol. I (1974). 

Dr. Brooks served as program chairman of the Southern Conference on 
Slavic Studies for its October 18-19 meeting at Vanderbilt University. On 
July 24 Dr. J. Isaac Copeland was named a member of the Advisory Council 
for Atlanta-Chicago Area Federal Records Centers of the National Archives. 
Dr. Tulchin was made a member of the Bicentennial Committee on Inter¬ 
national Conferences of Americanists in April, and in July he became 
associate editor of the Latin American Research Review. Dr. Schnorrenberg 
is chairman of the Nominating Committee of the American Society for 
Eighteenth Century Studies for 1973-1974 and a member of the Executive 
Board, Southeastern American Society for Eighteenth Century Studies. 

Honors received by Chapel Hill faculty members in recent months include 
a grant to Dr. Baron from the American Association for Advancement of 
Slavic Studies for the funding at Chapel Hill of a conference on recent 
Soviet historiography. Dr. Copeland was awarded an honorary Doctor of 
Literature degree by Presbyterian College on June 2. In June Dr. Tulchin 
was named Distinguished Lecturer with the Fulbright Program. 


132 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 


Wake Forest University 

Dr. Margaret J. Osier was appointed assistant professor of history in 
August. 

State, County, and Local Groups 

Alexander County Historical Society 

The society met August 5 at the Alexander County Library in Taylors¬ 
ville. A new microfilm reader, purchased by the society for the historical 
room of the library, was demonstrated. Revolutionary War soldiers and the 
first schools and teachers were subjects discussed at the meeting. 

Cleveland County Historical Association 

The executive committee, at an August 14 meeting, passed a resolution 
requesting the county commissioners to provide space in the old courthouse 
for a county historical museum. The committee also voted to accept the log 
cabin at the county fairgrounds to be used again as a display area for the 
association. Members of the committee learned that Gov. James E. Hols- 
houser, Jr., and probably Gov. John West of South Carolina would attend 
ceremonies at Kings Mountain on October 5. 

Duplin County Historical Society 

The society met at Rose Hill on July 13. Miss Alice Mallard of Teachey 
is treasurer of the society and can furnish information to persons interested 
in joining. 

Gaston County Historical Society 

The society’s August meeting was held in the Abbey Room at Belmont 
Abbey College with William N. Craig, president, in the chair. A program on 
Catawba Indians was presented by Jack Page, guidance counselor at Ash- 
brook High School; Mr. Page displayed arrowheads and other artifacts. The 
society’s recently published Historical Bulletin for 1973 reported on activi¬ 
ties of the organization during the past year. The publication also contained 
a sketch on the life of Col. Joseph Howe, written by a descendant, Wayne 
Howe. Officers of the society, in addition to Mr. Craig, are Mrs. Harmon 0. 
Williams, Dallas, vice-president; Mrs. Clarke R. Starnes, Jr., Gastonia, 
secretary; and Dalton Stowe, Dallas, treasurer. Persons interested in join¬ 
ing the society should send $2.00 to Mr. Stowe at Dallas, 28034. Information 
about its activities may be obtained from Mr. Craig at Route 3, Box 369, 
Union Road, Gastonia, 28025. 

Guilford County Genealogical Society 

An organizational meeting of the society was held at the Greensboro 
Historical Museum, 130 Summit Avenue, Greensboro, on July 24. Dr. 
Morris F. Britt of High Point College was elected president of the group. 

Hillsborough Historical Society 

The society and the Hillsborough Historical Commission have been given 
space for temporary quarters in the 1803 Ruffin-Roulhac house. The house 


VOLUME XXII, NUMBER 6. NOV EMBER, 197 i 


133 


has been restored for use as the town hall, but permission for the society to 
use space was granted by the Hillsborough Board of Commissioners. The 
carriage house, when restored, will provide a public meeting room and 
visitor center, according to Fred S. Cates, mayor of Hillsborough. The house 
is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. 

Historic Cabarrus 

Historic Cabarrus, Inc., marked Heritage Week and National Library 
Week with an exhibit of books by Cabarrus County authors. Pamphlets on 
the Cabarrus County Courthouse were also prepared and distributed; an 
intensive drive for funds is being carried out in an effort to preserve and 
restore the historic structure. Fifteen classes were involved in a “walk into 
history” project; the third, fourth, and fifth grades visited the headquarters 
of Historic Cabarrus where they heard A. Campbell Cline, local writer and 
historian, talk on the county’s heritage. 



Mr. A. Campbell Cline is shown as he 
talked to a group of Cabarrus County 
schoolchildren about the heritage and 
history of their county. (Photograph by 
Frank Furr.) 


Historic Hillsborough Commission 

At its September 4 meeting six new members of the commission, appointed 
by Governor Holshouser, and five reappointed members were sworn in at a 
dinner meeting held at Hillsborough’s Colonial Inn. Judge Robert Martin 
of the North Carolina Court of Appeals administered the oath of office; he 
was introduced by Lucius Cheshire, Sr. New members, presented by Mrs. 
Grace J. Rohrer, secretary of the Department of Cultural Resources, are 
Dr. Ronald G. Witt, Mrs. Saragene Boericke, Miss Evelyn Lloyd, Jack 
Martin, Ray Montgomery, and Marion Clark, all of Hillsborough. Dr. 
Charles H. Blake, Dr. Henry W. Moore, Dr. Robert J. Murphy, and E. 
Wilson Cole, of Hillsborough, and George Watts Hill of Durham, are mem¬ 
bers recently reappointed. The commission also includes a number of ex 
officio members and eighteen individuals whose terms have not yet expired. 

Dr. Blake introduced Dr. Larry Tise, assistant director of the Division of 
Archives and History, who spoke on plans and programs for the observance 
of the bicentennial in North Carolina. Mrs. Robert W. Isley, chairman of 
the commission, presided at the September meeting. Mr. Cheshire is vice- 
chairman, and Mrs. Fred S. Cates is secretary. 

Mecklenburg Historical Association 

Miss Mary Louise Davidson, president of the association, has asked that 


134 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 




the address of the association be published in Carolina Comments. Those 
interested in corresponding with Miss Davidson or others in the association 
should write to P.O. Box 4032, Charlotte, N.C., 28204. Headquarters of the 
association are located at 3427 North Tryon Street in Charlotte, 28206. 

North Carolina Society of County and Local Historians 

The society’s annual summer tour took place July 28 in the Durham area 
with Mrs. Robert Bruce Cooke and John B. Flowers III in charge of local 
arrangements. Members of the organization met at the Burroughs-Wellcome 
Building in the Research Triangle Park where they registered and had 
coffee. After attending the morning service at Duke Chapel, they were led on 
a guided tour of the campus; after lunch the history of the university was 
presented by the Duke archivist, Dr. William E. King. A program on 
Durham County Indians was given by Dr. Duncan Heron, George Pyne, 
and Margaret Hygard. Prof. Richard Sanders of Duke served as speaker and 
guide at the Cameron Plantation, and in midafternoon James McPherson 
participated as narrator and director at the Washington Duke Homestead. 
The last stop was the Bennett Place, where site director Harold Moringo was 
in charge. The full day was concluded with a social hour given by the Dur¬ 
ham County Historical Preservation Society, Mrs. E. S. Haywood, president. 

Pitt County Historical Society 

Speaker at the September 19 dinner meeting, held at the Candlewick Inn 
at Greenville, was Ian Lowe, a member of the Ashmolean Museum staff in 
Oxford, England. Musical selections were given by Tom Burge, artist-in¬ 
residence at the Halifax County Technical Institute; and a talk on the 
celebration of the bicentennial in Greenville, October 4-11, was given by 
Mrs. Elizabeth Wilkerson. The society sponsored a special flag-raising 
ceremony on the opening day of the commemoration and at that time pre¬ 
sented several flags to the city. Dr. Ralph Hardee Rives is president of the 
Pitt group. 

Rutherford County Historical Society 

The Rutherford County Historical Society and the Society of Old Tryon 
County recently asked the commissioners of Rutherford County to lease to 
them the old county jail building for use as a county history museum. The 
proposal was presented by Kenyon Withrow of Hollis, president of the his¬ 
torical society. The project would be carried out as part of the county’s 
observance of the bicentennial. 

Wake County Historical Society 

A tour of Raleigh’s old City Cemetery was sponsored by the society on 
Labor Day. The tour was led by Dr. Thornton W. Mitchell, state archivist, 
Division of Archives and History. 

Western North Carolina Historical Association 

Members met at the Smith McDowell House, which has been leased for 
two years by the association, for a work session on September 27 and 28. 
They wore work clothes and furnished their own tools and equipment so as 
to clean the house and make needed repairs. Anyone interested in contribut- 


VOLUME XXII. NUMBER 6, NOVEMBER. 197U 


135 


ing to the project should address President Jesse P. Surles, 10 Cameron 
Street, Asheville, 28801. 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Published in January, March, May, July, September, and November by the Division 
of Archives and History, Department of Cultural Resources, Archives and History- 
State Library Building, 109 East Jones Street, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27611. 

Robert E. Stipe, Editor in Chief 
Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell, Editor 


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Published Bimonthly by the North Carolina Division of Archives and History 


Index to VolumeXXII, 1974 


A 

Abernathy, Mollie C. : professional activities of, 60, 109, 131 
Abrams, W. Amos, presents prelude at NCFS, 8 

"Absent with Leave, or How Musty Files Came Alive," is subject of NCLHA paper, 2 
Absher, Mrs. W. 0.: is on steering committee of genealogical group, 7; is pictured, 

114 

Achievement Award, WNCHA, is presented, 94 

Adams, Mrs. J. Allen, participates in Mordecai ceremony, 90 

Adams, Marilyn: pictured, studies archival methods, 100 

Adams, Mrs. Nancy, is organizer of Upper Cape Fear Historical Society, 47 

Adams, Samuel, letter from, included in exhibit, 52 

Addresses and Public Papers of Robert Walter Scott , publication of, 119-120 

Adler, Philip J.: publishes articles, 109; speaks at East Carolina symposium, 58 

Administrative Building, pictured, 18 

Advisory Editorial Committee, has new member, 104 

"Agin Court," is title of art winner, 5 

Agriculture Building, pictured, 19 

Alamance County Historical Association, news of, 60, 84 
Albemarle, Junior Historians from, win awards, 73 
Albemarle Building, pictured, 18 

Alden, John R. : participates in conference on Loyalists, 110; publishes book, 82 
Aldridge, Harold, is officer of Brunswick group, 43 
Alexander, David, is director of mountain doggers, 8 

Alexander County Historical Association: buys microfilm reader for library, 133; news 
of, 84 

Allan Sly Papers, new collections relating to, 56 
Allcott, John, conducts campus tour, 85 

Allen, Mrs. Beverly, attends South Atlantic Archives meeting, 80 
Allen, Mrs. Marvin, is officer of Chapel Hill society, 85 
Allen, Walser H., Jr., is officer of AHENC, 84 

Alligood, Howard, is organizer of Upper Cape Fear Historical Society, 47 

Allmand Holmes House, is toured, 91 

Allran, Phyllis, summer intern, is pictured, 101 

Almond, Gerald, works at Reed Gold Mine, 30 

Alphonso, Mr., visits State Archives, 124 

Alston, Leonard, receives service award, 53 

American Association for State and Local History, its awards announced, 3 
American Association of University Women Award: entries for, sought, 57, 79; presented 
to Barbara Parramore, 2-3 

"American Revolution Bicentennial City," is designation given Washington, 130 

American Revolution Bicentennial Committee, staff of, 17, 129 

"American Revolution Bicentennial Festival," is held in New Bern, 130 

"An Labarre, Bonnie and Jody," is title of winning print, 5 

Anderson, Carl E., speaks at Chapel Hill, 22 

Anderson, Eric, works in archives, 34 

Anderson, Henry V.: reports on Wright Tavern, 6; speeches of, 25, 27 
Andrews, Carol, is instructor in workshop, 100 

Andrews, John, operates forge at Haley House Blacksmith Shop, 44 
Andrews, Mrs. Marnie, is on program, 94 

Andrews, Mrs. Norman: announces resignation of Hamilton, 111; is officer of High Point 
group, 62 

Ann Street Cemetery, funds for restoration of, are sought, 21 
Anson County, records of, 75-76 







Antiques Fair, is held in Moore County, 90 

Appalachian Consortium: makes grant to Webster project, 67; meets at Webster School, 
94; report on, 95; sponsors National Oral History Association, 40; sponsors workshop 
93-94 

Appalachian Heritage Center, plans for, 95 
Archaeological Society of North Carolina, news of, 21 

Archaeology Section: its work, pictured, 32; report on work of, 32-33 
Archival Institute, plans for, announced, 34 

Archives: accessions of, 56-57, 60, 103, 125; features new exhibits, 13, 99, 123; 
indexes marriage bonds, 125; is subject of study, 100; is visited by Thai archivist, 
13-14; records of, 56; report of, 75-76; sponsors workshops, 12, 100; staff 
activities of, 80; transfers records to St. Louis, 54 
Archives and History, Division of: engages in archaeological excavation in Lower Cape 
Fear area, 112; has new director, 97; records of, 56, 103-104, 126; sponsors Edenton 
Symposium, 77; staff of, 16-17, 39, 53-54, 80-81, 108-109, 127-128 
Archives and History-State Library Building, pictured, 18 
Archives Information Circulars, are available, 13, 76 
Archives Institute, pictures of, report on, 71 
Archivists, attend course in archival administration, 100 
Arendell, Banks, his papers in Archives, 126 
Arnett, Ethel Stephens, is honored for her book, 9 
Arnold, Benedict, letter from, included in exhibit, 52 

Arnold, Mrs. Ruby: participates in Archives Institute, 71; receives service award, 54 
Arnold, Wayne S., publishes article in Lower Cape Fear Historical Society's Bulletin, 
"Artistry in Quilts," exhibit announced, 118 
Arts Council, plans for, 105 

Asbury, R. V., Jr.: is officer of Brunswick group, 43; pictured, 3 
Ashe, John G., Jr., is officer of Wilson County group, 95 
Asheville-Buncombe Technical Institute, house there, its use planned, 95 
Association of Historians in Eastern North Carolina, is new organization, 84 
Attmore-Oliver House, 91 
Averitt, Mrs. Einnie B., resigns, 108 

Avery, Mrs. I. T., Jr., is officer of Presbyterian group, 64 
Axelrad, Allan M., joins staff of Sacred Heart, 20 
Ayers, Howard, speaks at archaeological society, 21 


B 

Babcock, Mrs. Charles H., makes gift to Wake Forest library, 20-21 

Babits, Lawrence E., speaks to teachers, 51 

Banks Arendell Papers, in Archives, 126 

Bannerman House, pictured, 107 

Barefield, James P., is promoted, 21 

Barfield, Rodney, joins A&H staff, 128 

Bargamian, Joel, joins A&H staff, 128 

Barham, Ed., Jr., makes speeches, 46, 62 

Barker, Mrs. Nancy, joins A&H staff, 108 

Barker, Ophelia, is officer of Littleton College group, 112 

Barker House, registration for symposium there, 77 

Barker House Association, sponsors Edenton Symposium, 77 

Barnes, Howard A., speaks at Phi Alpha Theta meeting, 43 

Baron, Samuel H., professional activities of, 42, 132 

Barr, Deborah, joins A&H staff, 128 

Barringer, A. L., is director of Cabarrus group, 23 

Barty, Peter F., joins Pfeiffer staff, 60 

Bath Building, pictured, 18 

Battle, Martha, joins A&H staff, 128 

Baum, E. 0. "Jack," is president of Pasquotank group, 46, 92 

Baum, Mrs. E. 0., speaks to Pasquotank group, 65 

Bayboro, its Negro families are subject of study, 46 

Bayes, Ronald H., pictured, wins Roanoke-Chowan Poetry Award, 3 

Beam, David E., is officer of Cleveland group, 44 

Beasley, Mrs. Mae Javan, resigns, 108 

Beaufort Burying Ground, pictured, 78 

Beaufort Historic District, pictured, 78 

Beaufort Historical Association, news of, 21, 85 

Beaufort Waterfront, pictured, 78 

Beckwith, Mrs. James, is officer of Warren group, 115 

Beers, Burton F., participates in Duquesne University Forum, 20 

Beezley, William H., publishes book, 20 

Begemann, Rosemary E., to present paper in Omaha, 41 


138 


Ll, Mrs. Leonie, speaks in Hillsborough, 86 

LI, Mrs. William H., Jr., is active in New Bern foundation, 112 

Llamy Mansion, pictured, 78 

.levue (Burke County), pictured, 36 

.mont Abbey College, news of, 40 

ifey, 0. Theodore, joins staff of Guilford College, 19 

mard Franklin House: history of, published, 115; receives grant, 52 

-nier, Mme. Rosamond, to speak during Culture Week, 105 

■ry, Mrs. Hardy, is officer of Wake group, 115 

ferly Hall, is visited by symposium participants, 77 

ile, of Iredell, is placed in Archives, 29 

:kett, Thomas W., documentary of papers of, displayed, 119 

:zas, George, is on Southern Appalachian program, 93 

'ens, John F., Jr., speaks in Mecklenburg County, 90 

ick Jack, pictured, 120 

ick Mountain College, records of, 56, 57 
icksmiths, discussed, at Catawba meeting, 60-61 
tckwelder, Ruth, her book published, 90 
iden County, records of, 56, 75-76 

lir, Clifford, is on program for Pasquotank group, 46 

tke, Charles: is member of Hillsborough Commission, 134; is officer of Chapel Hill 
iociety, 85; speaks, 23, 61 

ike, Mrs. Lucille D., is president of Brunswick group, 43 
issingame, John W., seeks Frederick Douglass papers, 57 
ivins, Mrs. Neal, is officer of Randolph group, 46 
ick, Carla, joins A&H staff, 81 

isser, Susan Sokol, writes article on Calvin Cowles, 124 
le, Cliff, is speaker in Hoke County, 112 
iff Presbyterian Church, pictured, 121 

iricke, Mrs. Saragene, is member of Historic Hillsborough Commission, 134 
es, Alan: edits brochure, 22; is treasurer of Chapel Hill group, 22 
id, Hance, diary of, sought, 54 

idurant, William L., signs agreement concerning records management, 72 
iner House, Bath, receives grant, 52 

izer, Jamie Ann, is site manager at House in the Horseshoe, 16 
tcher, Philip, is named instructor, 110 

'ling, Mrs. Bessie: attends South Atlantic Archives meeting, 80; receives service 
ward, 5 3 

man Gray, archivists from, take course, 100 
er, Miles J., is president of Latta Place, Inc., 25 
kin, Joseph F., directs oral history program, 42 
kin cemetery, is toured, 91 

lan, Kate, her land sold for Central Prison, 123 
dshaw, Mrs. Carolyn C., receives service award, 54 
dshaw, Herbert, is restoration carpenter, 17 

dshaw, Herbert C.: heads Tobacco History Corporation, 30; is president of SAR group, 
1; speaks to Hillsborough group, 62 

gg, Nicholas B., accepts award for Reynolda House, pictured, 6 
nch, Joseph, makes address at Halifax meeting, 23 
ntley, Michael W., is officer in AHENC, 84 

wer, James H., is on Executive Committee of NCLHS, 2; obituary of, 58 
wer, William, his role in Vance group, 94 

wster, Lawrence: building named for, 41; is officer of Pitt County group, 92 

cks and People: A Walking Guide to the University of North Carolina at Greensboro , 

ublication of, 83 

dgers, Charles, reads Witt memorial resolution, 64 
ggs Hardware Store (Wake County), pictured, 38 
ght, Leslie: pictured, 32; receives service award, 54 
nson, Mrs. Jack E., is officer of NCSPA, 5 

tt, Morris F.: gives genealogical course, 131; is officer of Guilford group, 133 

ttain, Mrs. Freda: is director's secretary, 128; receives service award, 54 

oks, E. Willis, is program chairman, participates in college programs, 132 

wn, Andrew V., is officer of Murfreesboro group, 113 

wn, Dennis, resigns from NCARBC, 17-18 

wn, Donald E., is officer of Lower Cape Fear group, 89 

wn, Mrs. Dorothy H., presides at Murfreesboro meeting, 113 

wn, Hewitt, is officer of Harnett group, 44 

wn, Mrs. Howard, wins award in Murfreesboro, 113 

wn, Marvin I., Jr., his book, 82, 131 

wn-Hudson Folklore Awards, are presented, 8 

nswick County, records of, 75-76, 104 

nswick County Historical Society, news of, 43 


139 


Bryan Grimes Papers, additions to, 126 
Bryant, Luther, is Junior Historian adviser, 73 
Buck Spring, restoration of, 115 
Bull Durham Tobacco Factory, pictured, 121 

Bumgarner, Stan, presents program at Lenoir County meeting, 63 
Burge, Tom, is on program in Pitt County, 135 
Burgwyn, Bill, is officer of Northampton group, 91 
Burgwyn, H. K., is officer of Murfreesboro group, 113 
Burgwyn, W. H. S., Jr., is officer of Northampton group, 64 
Burgwyn, W. H. S., Sr., speaks in Northampton County, 64, 91 
Burke, Elizabeth B., has snuff box, 126 

Burke, Thomas A., note concerning snuff box relating to, 126 

Burke County: history of, is planned, 22; newspapers of, wanted, 57, 76; plans 
bicentennial observance, 22; veterans registry of, 22 
Burke County Historical Society, news of, 21-22, 60 
Burnham, Mark, speaks in Hillsborough, 86 
Burt, Lucy P., presents award in Franklin County, 62 
Burwell, Olivia, pictured, 2 
Busbee, Jacques, is potter, 70 
Butler, Mrs. Carolyn, joins A&H staff, 17 

Butler, Lindley S., is recognized by NCSCLH for his article, 9; professional activitie: 
of, 27, 66 

Bynum, Mrs. Zachary, Jr., is officer of Wachovia Historical Society, 27 
Byrd, Luther, speaks in Caswell County, 85 

Byrd, Mrs. Richard E., to speak at Tryon Palace Symposium, 36 


C 


Cabarrus County, records of, 56 

Cabarrus County Courthouse, pictured, 107 

Cabin Museum, is site of NCSCLH social hour, 91 

Cady, Edwin H., speaks to Hillsborough group, 62 

Cagle, Winifred, is on Southern Appalachian program, 93 

Cairns, Huntington, announces winner of Morrison award, 3-4 

Calkins, Philip B., is on AHA program, 40 

Calhoun, Robert, participates in conference on Loyalists, 110 
Callaghan, Mrs. Roger B., donates bed to Beaufort association, 21 
Calver, Christopher, diary of, sought, 54 

Cameron, Edward, is officer of Harnett County group, 44, 62 
Campbell, Mrs. Mary, to speak at Tryon Palace Symposium, 36 
Campbell College, news of, 19, 58 
Canada, makes gift to High Point College, 59 
Canadian Studies Program, described, support of, 81 
Cannon Cups: are presented, 6-7; winners of, pictured, 6 
Capitol, new roof of, pictured, 19 

Capitol copper, jewelry from: availability of, 69; pictured, 69 
Capitol Square, is toured by teachers, 51 
Capps, Gene, is on board of NCMC, 7 

Carey, Charles M., is officer of archaeological society, 21 

Carlton, Charles, professional activities of, 20, 41 

Carolina Charter Tercentenary Corporation, records of, arranged, 34 

Carolina College, records of, 104 

Carolina Comments, index to, available, 15 

"Carr Street Window," is title of winning painting, 5 

Carraway, Gertrude S.: is director of NCSPA, 5; pictured, 6, 50, 51; speaks, 51, 98 
Carrboro, information on, is sought by historical society, 61 
Carroll, Mrs. Irma, receives service award, 54 
Carson House, news of, 22, 32 

Carson-McDowell Clan, meets at Carson House, 22 
Casada, Mrs. Edwin, is officer of Swain County group, 47 
Cashion, Jerry C., is named instructor, 42 
Cashwell, R. G., is officer of Historic Robeson, 87 
Casketmaker, The, wins Roanoke-Chowan Poetry Award, 3 
Caswell, log of, sought, 54 

Caswell, Richard: is featured in exhibit, 100; letter book of, 119; mentioned, 32 

Caswell County, church records of, 126 

Caswell County Historical Association, news of, 22, 85 

Catawba County Historical Association, news of, 43, 60-61, 85 

Cates, Fred S., explains plan for Ruffin-Roulhac house, 134 

Cates, Mrs. Fred S., is officer of Hillsborough Commission, 134 


140 


ell, John, is on AHA program, 41 
emetery records, added to Archives, 104 
ensus, 1900s, restricted release of, 56 

entenary Methodist Church, donates historic house to foundation, 112 
antral Carolina Technical Institute, history class there, leads in formation of 
historical society, 66 
antral Prison, exhibits on, 122-123 

aamblee, Mrs. H. Royster, is director of Wake group, 115 
nange of addresses, need for, stressed, 80 

:iapel Hill, information on, is sought by historical society, 61 

lapel Hill Historical Society, news of, 22, 43-44, 61, 85 

napel Hill Preservation Society, news of, 22 

lappell, Mrs. Eleanor Fitzgerald, leads musical program, 63 

happell, Fred, receives Sir Walter Raleigh Award, 1 

nappell, Mrs. J. T.: pictured, 2; receives award for her son, 2 

harles Edison Fund, places collection in Greensboro Historical Museum, 44 

harlotte, meetings there, 81 

hase, William Merritt, wins art award, 5 

natwood, gardens there, opened, 86 

hesbire, Lucius, is officer of Hillsborough Commission, is on program, 134 
hief Rockahock Junior Historical Society, representative of, wins Junior Historian 
award, 73 

hiltoskey, Going Back, receives Achievement Award, 94 
howan County Courthouse, is visited, 77 

hristopher Crittenden Memorial Award, is presented, 1, 118 
hurch of the Good Shepherd, is toured by Wake County group, 47 
ivil War records, in Archives, 104, 126 

ivil War Roster Project, becomes branch of Historical Publications Section, 108 

itizens Savings and Loan Company, to renovate historic structure, 87 

ity Cemetery, Raleigh: is subject of talk, 94; Lane is interred there, 76 

ity Council-Planning Commission, hears request on Oakwood, 92 

ity Hall, Wilmington, pictured, 78 

larendon Award, is presented, 89 

lark, Charles A.: receives service award, 54; takes aerial photographs, 18, 19 

lark, Edith, is on steering committee of genealogical group, 7 

lark, Elijah, his house is purchased by New Bern foundation, 112 

lark, Joseph J., mountain named for, 95 

lark, Marion, is member of Hillsborough Commission, 134 

lark, Walter, portrait of, 23 

lark Foreman Papers, are transferred to Archives, 56 

lement, Ed, is president of Historic Salisbury Foundation, 87 

lerk's Office, Halifax, receives grant, 52 

leveland County Fair, exhibit there, 22-23 

leveland County Historical Association, news of, 22-23, 44, 61, 85, 133 

line, A. Campbell, pictured, talks to schoolchildren, 134 

line, Ray, speaks at Catawba County meeting, 61 

lodfelter, Jesse, his cabinet work is featured, 26 

lontz, William H., is on leave, 83 

louse, James P., presents program, 94 

oates, Mrs. Albert, speaks at Chapel Hill meeting, 43 

obb, Collier, Jr., speaks to Chapel Hill group, 61 

obb, William H., speaks at East Carolina symposium, 58 

ochran, Thomas C., is visiting professor at UNC-C, 109 

ockshutt, Mrs. Catherine, attends meetings, speaks, 17, 24, 36, 80, 86, 109 
Cohabitation—the Arts, Sciences, and Archaeology, The," is subject of antiquities 
talk, 6 

ohn, Sidney, supervises Chapel Hill project, 61 
olclough, George, seeks preservation of family histories, 60 
ole, E. Wilson, is member of Hillsborough Commission, 134 
oleman-White House (Warren County), pictured, 39 

olleges and universities, news of, 19-21, 40-43, 58-60, 81-84, 109-110, 130-133 
ollins, Mordica, his cabinetwork is featured, 26 

olonial Dames, Wake County Committee of, sponsors Lane reinterment, 77 
olonial North Carolina: A History, is published, 88 
olonial Records, publication of, 104, 126 

olonial Records Project, becomes branch of Historical Publications Section, 108 
olton, Joel: is on AHA program, 40-41; retires as department chairman, 81 
olumbus County, records of, 56, 75-76, 104, 126 
olumbus County Historical Society, news of, 86 
oman, William T., is officer of SAR group, 91 

ommission on Archives and History of the Western North Carolina United Methodist 
Conference, 64 


Community Colleges, Department of, sponsors workshop for its librarians, 100 
Concordia Historical Institute, uses H. G. Jones as consultant, 132 
Conference on Celtic Studies, is held, 58 
Connor, R. D. W. , his portrait, 72 

Conseen, Ethelyn Arch, is member of Bicentennial Committee, 52 
Constantin, Charles Joseph, joins staff of NCSU, 131 

Conway, Robert 0.: opens office in Asheville, 16; receives service award, 54 
Cook, Mrs. E. W., receives Brown-Hudson Folklore Award, 8 
Cook, Mrs. Rod, presents collection to Greensboro Historical Museum, 44 
Cooke, James T., donates house to Murfreesboro group, 113 

Cooke, Quintin E. , Jr., donates house to Murfreesboro group, is memorialized, 113 

Cooke, Mrs. Robert Bruce, is hostess to NCSCLH, 135 

Cooke, William W., writes letter in 1852, 103 

Cooley, Martha H., holds AAUP office, is on leave, 59 

Cooper Health Building, pictured, 18 

Copeland, J. Isaac: activities of, 24, 132; receives honorary degree, 132 
Corry, Mrs. Ruth, is panel participant, 7 

Costlow, Mrs. John, is president of Beaufort association, 21 
County of Warren, The, price of increased, 115 
Cove Grove, pictured, 120 

Cowles, Calvin, papers of: discussed, 123; pictured, 124 
Cowles, Mrs. Calvin J., gives Cowles papers to Archives, 123 
Cox, Ralph, wins art award, 4 

Crabtree, Beth: activities of, 17, 94; pictured, 54; receives service award, 53 

Crafts and Creative Arts Show, held, 89 

Craig, William N., is officer of Gaston group, 133 

Cramer House, acquisition of, 21 

Crescent Land and Timber Corporation, makes grant to Latta Place, Inc., 25 

Cresswell, Donald H., is on Atlanta program, 40 

Crettier, Mrs. Prisca, receives service award, 54 

Crisp, James, professional activities of, 20, 83 

Crittenden, Christopher, his secretary, 128 

Croom, Holmes, retires, 108 

Cross, Jerry, activities of, 17 

Crossno, Johnny, is summer intern, pictured, 101 
Crow, Jeffrey, joins Bicentennial staff, pictured, 129 
Crowell, Frank Hull, serves in Lincoln County, 89 

Cultural Resources, Department of: cooperates with filming of Andrew Johnson impeachme 
dramatization, 98-99; has faculty interns, 101; participates in exhibit, 15; sponsors 
Edenton Symposium, 77 

Culture Week: announcement of, 105, 119; is held, 1 
Cumberland County Historical Society, news of, 110 
Cupola House, is visited, 77 

Cupola House Association, sponsors Edenton Symposium, 77 

Currie, Mrs. Virginia: presents books to Junior Historians, 74; receives service award 
54 

Currituck Beach Lighthouse (Currituck County), pictured, 38 
Currituck County Historical Society, news of, 61 
Czupryna, Fred, speaks, 83 


D 

Dallas, Mrs. Sanders, is officer of High Point group, 62 
Daly, Mrs. Betty M., is officer of poetry group, 8 
Danelski, David J., edits book, 42 

Daniel, J. Marshall, Jr., is officer of Wilson County group, 95 
Daniels, Mrs. Elizabeth R., speaks at Hillsborough meeting, 24 
Daniels, George B., photographs furniture, 24 

Daughters of the American Revolution: assist with furnishing Sally-Billy House, 75; 

records of, 104, 126; support Fort Dobbs project, 31 
Davenport, Mrs. Bettie Baker Pitt, death of, 81 
Davidson, Chalmers G., 25 

Davidson, Mary Louise, is president of Mecklenburg Historical Association, 25, 90, 134 
Davidson and Jones Construction Company, builds Records Center Building, 117 
Davidson County, furniture of, featured at Old Salem, 26 
Davidson County Historical Association, news of, 61-62, 110-111 
Davis, Archie K., speaks at NCLHS, 2 

Davis, Mrs. Carson, Jr., is officer of Hoke group, 112 

Davis, Margaret, joins A&H staff, 128 

Davis, Mrs. Marvin, is officer of Vance group, 94 


142 


vis, Mrs. 0. A., 23 

vis Cemetery, is toured, 89 

wkins, Mrs. Henri, is officer of Wake group, 115 
ans, Ronnie, wins Junior Historian award, 73 
es, Sam B., pictured, 2 

efiance . . . First Step to Independence" is new exhibit in Archives, 99 
lhom, M. Mellanay, is officer of NCSPA, 5 
mpsey, William R., is officer in AHENC, 84 
nnis, Carrie, receives service award, 54 

troit Historical Museum, has American Revolution exhibit, 53 
nkins House (Mecklenburg County), pictured, 38 
ixieland," to become historic site, 31 

aks, Mrs. George, conducts survey of Orange cemetery, 43-44 
cents, work in museum, 105 

dge, William W., III: participates in Mordecai ceremony, 90; reports on Mordecai 
Square, 5-6 

ggett, Mrs. James B., presides at music clubs meeting, 4 
>oll Baby," is winning painting, 5 

'lley Madison Memorial-Isley Cabin: opening of, 62, 111; receives incentive grant, 6 

mgola (Caswell County), pictured, 37 

irity, Mrs. Charles F., her gardens opened, 86 

lorothy, Helen and Bob," is title of winning painting, 5 

iwns, Murray A., is named assistant provost, 83 

urn, Ben, speaks at Catawba County meeting, 61 

iffy, Mrs. Frances, is officer of genealogical group, 86 

ike Homestead: is new historic site, 30; visitor center-museum there, drawing of, 
pictured, 30 

ike Lawrence House, is given to Murfreesboro group, 113 

ike University: its divinity school, 64; its manuscript repository studied, 100; 

news of, 40-41, 81-82; receives copy of Isaac Offman records, 60 

llcimer Players and Singers, presents program to folklore group, 8 

inlap, A. Haynes, illustrates book, 90 

inn, Barry, joins A&H staff, 128 

lplin County, records of, 104 

lplin County Historical Society, news of, 133 

lrden, Robert F., professional activities of, 59, 81, 82 

lrham, meetings there, 81 

lrham County, cemetery records of, 126 

;ight, Tim, wins award, 73 


E 

igles, W. Conner, is officer of Pitt County group, 92 

iker, Mrs. Madeline, seeks materials on Person County, 65, 92 

jst Carolina University: news of, 41, 58-59, 82, 109, 130; sponsors Tryon Palace 
Symposium, 36 

istem Cabarrus Historical Society, news of, 23, 86 
istern North Carolina Genealogical Society, news of, 86 
istes, John, is chairman of Transylvania group, 115 

lenton: is toured by Wake group, 94; Junior Historians from, win awards, 73 
lenton District Court, records of, 56 
lenton Symposium, report on, 77 

lenton Woman's Club, wins award offered by Historic Preservation Society, 75 

igecombe County, records of, 75-76 

Iward Savage House, pictured, 78 

Iward W. Pou Papers, additions to, 126 

Iwards, A. J. P., speaks at Northampton meeting, 26 

Iwards, John, to speak during Culture Week, 105 

Iwards, Ryland, is architect for Wheeler House restoration, 113 

cstrand, Nancy, attends archives course, 100 

Lam, Hoyle, is maintenance man at Town Creek site, 17 

Lijah Clark House, is purchased by New Bern foundation, 112 

Use Academy and Upper Moore County, publication of, 64 

Lien Mordecai Garden, is opened, 90 

Llerslie, pictured, 120 

Llington, John: heads Museums Section, 71; pictured, 70; plans Murfreesboro exhibits, 
113; receives service award, 53; speaks, 98 
Lliott, Wiley Franklin, owns historic diary, 89 
Llis, John W., his documentary displayed, 119 
Llison, George, is officer of Swain County group, 47, 66 


143 


Elon College, news of, 41, 60 
Employment Security Building, pictured, 18 
Enderle, Mrs. Dabney, speaks in Harnett County, 23 
Endor Iron Furnace, pictured, 121 

Engstrom, Mrs. Alfred: conducts survey of Orange cemeteries, 43-44; has award named in 
her honor, 24; receives award, 43, 62 
Engstrom Award, is given to Mrs. Donald Matheson, 24 
Ennemoser, Mrs. Rose, receives service award, 54 
Ernst Krenek Letters, are transferred to archives, 56 
Eubanks, Gerald, speaks at East Carolina symposium, 58 
Eure, Thad, pictured, 49, 119 

Evans, Frank, participates in Mordecai ceremony, 90 

Evans, Mrs. J. S., Jr., arranges program for Presbyterian group, 25 

Exhibits in Archives, pictured, 13, 99, 123 


F 

Faculty interns, spend time in Department of Cultural Resources, 101 
Fairchild, Erika, publishes article, 131 
Fairley, Robert, is officer of Maxton group, 113 
Faison cemetery, is toured, 91 

Falls of Tar River Baptist Church, history of, presented, 95 
"Families and Urban Schools," is open forum, sponsored by St. Mary's, 20 
Farmer, Mrs. Mary D., receives service award, 53 

Faulk, William G.: discusses work at Brunswick Town, 43; receives service award, 54 

Faulkner, Frank, wins art award, 5 

Faulkner, Ricks, his house is toured, 114 

Fayetteville Woman's Club, receives grant, 32 

Federal grant, for preservation, announced, 52 

Federation of Music Clubs, plans for, 105 

Federation of Women's Clubs, North Carolina, award is presented through, 74 

Female Academy, restoration of, 26 

Ferguson, Arthur B., is on AHA program, 41 

Fessenden, Reginald, pictured, work of explained, 122 

Fetzer, Pansy: is officer of Cleveland group, 44; mentioned, 61, 85 

Fields, William C.: pictured, 72; to paint portrait of Mary Rogers, 128 

Fink, Paul, society meets at his home, 89 

First State University: A Pictorial History of the University of North Carolina, The, 
wins AASLH award, 3 

Five Teenagers History Club, wins Junior Historian award, 73 

Flat Rock Historic District (Henderson County), its Saluda Cottages, pictured, 37 

Fletcher, Mrs. Isabelle, presides at Lenoir meeting, 25 

Fletcher, Ragland, presides at Pasquotank meeting, 46 

Flora MacDonald Historical Marker, dedicated, 23 

Florida, is participant in South Atlantic Archives meeting, 55 

Flowers, Don: attends South Atlantic Archives meeting, 80; receives service award, 54 
Flowers, John: gives talks, 81; joins A&H staff, 17; is host to NCSCLH, 135 
Fogarty, John P., speaks in California, 83 

Folk Art and Home Industry Gallery, Museum of History, has new exhibit, 118 
Foreman, Clark, his papers, are transferred to Archives, 56 
"Forms on Green," is winning painting, 4 

Fort Branch Battleground Commission, cooperates in matter of Civil War cannons, 16 
Fort Dobbs, is new historic site, 31 
Fort Macon, restoration of, 72 

Foushee, Roger, is officer of Chapel Hill society, 22, 85 
Fowler, Malcolm, speaks at NCSCLH meeting, 8 

Fox, Charlesanna: is officer of Randolph group, 46; receives donations for society, 93 
Franklin, Bernard, his house, 52, 115 
Franklin, John Hope, 34 

Franklin, State of, materials on, exhibited, 89 

Franklin County Historical Society, news of, 23, 62 

Franklin House, The, is published by Surry group, 115 

Fred A. Olds Papers, additions to, 126 

Frederick Douglass Papers, are sought, 57 

Frick, William R., designs trademarks exhibit, 13 

Friday, William C., appoints Sarah Lemmon to advisory board, 59 

Friday, Mrs. William C.: presides over RIHA meeting, 3; reports on preservation work 
at Chapel Hill, 22 

Friends of Historic Hope, news of, 86 

Friou-Hunt-Hurdle House (Caswell County), pictured, 37 

Frost, Mrs. Norman, is narrator for Rutherford group, 66 


144 


ry, Robert L., receives service award, 54 
iller, Mrs. Janice, presents slide program, 87 
jlton, Hewitt, is president of Scotland group, 93 
itrell, Mrs. Madlin, receives service award, 53 


G 

ibriel, Roman, his jersey displayed, 118 
illman, Robert E., speaks at HSNC, 88 
irland-Buford House, pictured, 55 

imer, Mary Jane, is member of Bicentennial Committee, 52 

irrison, Sam, receives exhibit on Central Prison, 123 

arrow, Patrick H., works as archaeologist, 108 

ass, W. Conard: attends SHA, 19; speaks in Columbus County, 86 

aster, Marvin: is guest at Railroad House meeting, 65; writes chapter of Sanford 
history, 92 

aston County Historical Society, news of, 133 
aston House: grant for, 6; restoration of, 88 
ates, Horatio, 52 

ates, Mrs. Mae Joyner, is officer of Pitt County group, 92 
ates County, records of, 35 

atton, Frank: attends meeting, 80; is instructor in workshop, 100; receives service 
award, 54; speaks at genealogical workshop, 12 

atton, Harry: is director of NCSPA, 5;' is named chairman of NCHC, 50; pictured, 51; 
presides at dinner honoring Jones, 51 
atton, Mrs. Harry, pictured, 51 

audy Place, The, is winner of Sir Walter Raleigh Award, 1 
avins, Raymond, speeches of, 82 
ae Craft House, pictured, 78 

anealogical Exploratory Session, news of, 7-8 

anealogical Society of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, microfilms 
Isaac Offman records, 60 
anealogists, workshop for, 12 

aneral Assembly, considers legislation for state grants-in-aid, 50 
aneral Assembly [1855], records of, 56 

aorgia Department of Archives and History: is host to archives meeting, 55; sends 
representative for study, 100 
Lbson, A. B., is founder of Scotland group, 93 
ill, Edwin, is honored by Museum of Art, 5 
Lllespie, Jim, is officer of Swain County group, 47 
Llmour, Gina, wins art award, 4-5 

Ladowski, Roberta K., joins staff of Sacred Heart, 20 
Lasgow, Douglas, 25 

Lass, Brent: heads Chapel Hill committee, 85; works on HAER program, 118-119 
iuckman, Stephen J.: attends Preservation Officers meeting, 36; inspects site of 
John Wheeler House, 113; pictured, 7, 32; speaks at NCSPA meeting, 6; to undertake 
archaeological work in Murfreesboro, 113 

Jdbold, E. Stanly, Jr., edits South Atlantic Quarterly issue, 82 

>dwin, Sherwood, works at Duke Homestead, 128 

)ld History Corporation, supports Reed Gold Mine, 30 

)ldstein, Ardath, joins NCARBC staff, 17; speaks, 43, 62 

joch House, archaeological excavation there, 76 

jodwin, Lester M., is on board of NCMC, 7 

)odwyn, Lawrence, presents report on oral history, 42 

srdan, Mrs. Edna: is on A&H staff, 128; receives service award, 53 

sre, Grover, is officer of Brunswick group, 43 

jswick, Mrs. Donna: gives letter to Archives, 102; is on Colonial Records staff, 104; 
pictured, 103, 126 

ivemor Morehead School, records of, 126 

race Episcopal Church and Parish House, pictured, 106 

ragg House (Watauga County), pictured, 39 

raham, Charles, participates in archaeological excavation, 112-113 

raham, Lannae, attends archives course, 100 

raham, William Alexander, his documentary displayed, 119 

randfather Mountain doggers, presents program at NCFS, 8 

ranville County, records of, 104 

ranville County Historical Society, news of. 111 

ray, S. Curtis, presides at Currituck meeting, 61 

cay, Thomas Alexander, is officer of NCSPA, 5 

reen, Fletcher M., is commended in resolution, 50 


-145 


Green, Paul, speaks at RIHA meeting, 4 

Green Duke House, pictured, 121 

Green River Plantation, pictured, 79 

Greene, Clara, is officer of Cleveland group, 44 

Greene, P. 0., is honored, 87 

Greensboro Historical Museum, news of, 44, 62, 111 
Gregg Collection, added to Archives, 104 

Gregory, Mrs. Quenton, to furnish information on Halifax organization, 23 

Greup, Ernie, is member of Bicentennial Committee, 52 

Grier-Fripp Associates, presents feasibility report, 63 

Griffin, Ronald E., is officer of High Point group, 62 

Griffith, Joseph, speaks at Randolph County meeting, 46 

Grimes, Bryan, his papers, additions to, 126 

Grimes, Willie B., wins art award, 5 

Grissett, Robert, receives service award, 54 

Grist, William F., speaks in Concord, 87 

Group Arts Awards, are announced, 73 

Grubbs, Frank L., Jr., is named "Outstanding Christian Teacher," speaks, 131 
Guide to Research Materials in the North Carolina State Archives; Section B; County 
Records, second edition, is published, 35 
Guilford College, news of, 19, 59 

Guilford County Genealogical Society, news of, 133 
Gupton, Martha, receives life membership, 90 

H 


Hachney, Eugene W., is officer of Historic Robeson, 87 
Hadley, David Warren, publishes article, 21 

Hafermehl, Louis: is site manager at Iredell House, 16; plans symposium, 77 

Hager, Mrs. Carolyn, is president of Randolph group, 46, 93 

Hagood, Ann: pictured, 34; works in Archives, 33 

Hairston, Jacqueline Butler, wins Music Day Composer's Award, 4 

Hale, Brenda: pictured, 34; works in archives, 33 

Haley House: award for, 87; demonstrations of crafts there, 44 

Halifax: meetings there, 81; visitor center-museum there, is constructed, 118 

Halifax County Historical Association, news of, 23 

Halifax Resolves Awards, are made, 87 

Hall, Jacqueline, presents oral history program, 42 

Hall, Josephine, is in charge of Hoke County meeting, 112 

Halma, Sidney, speaks at Catawba meeting, 43 

Hamer, Patsy, is officer of Maxton group, 113 

Hamill, Mrs. Ernest A., is director of NCAS, 4 

Hamilton, John: discusses blacksmith's shop at Haley House, 6; resigns as director of 
High Point Museum, 111 

Hamilton, Lindsey, is part-time employee of A&H, 17 
Hamrick, Mrs. A. Vason, Jr.: pictured, 3; presents AAUW award, 2 
Hamrick, Mrs. John B., is officer of Cleveland group, 44 
Hamrick R. Hubbard, is officer of Cleveland group, 44 
Hamrick, Mrs. R. Hubbard, is officer of Cleveland group, 44 
Hancock, Preston, receives NCFMC award, 4 

Handicrafts of the Southeast, exhibit on display in High Point, 111 

Hanes, Frank Borden, speaks at NCLHA, 2 

Hanes, Ralph B., death of, 18 

Hanna, James A. M., speaks, 58, 64 

Harden, John, is officer of NCSPA, 5 

Hardy, William M., writes new drama, 109 

Harmony Hall, receives recommendation of NCHC, 50 

Harnett County, plans observance of American Revolution, 23 

Harnett County Historical Society, news of, 23, 44, 58, 62 

Harold Minges Scrapbooks, additions to, 56 

Harper, Carolyn, joins A&H staff, 81 

Harrelson, Mrs. Martha Langston, obituary of, 130 

Harrington, Henry W., receives letter from John Penn, 52 

Harrington, James E.: announces restoration of Fort Macon, 72; pictured, 35 
Harris, Bernice Kelly: book given in memory of, 26; is awarded Brown-Hudson folklore 
award, 8 

Harris, William C. , publishes article, 83 
Hartley, Paul, is winner of art award, 5 
Hartwig, Gerald, receives grant, 82 

Harwell, Rita, attends South Atlantic Archives meeting, 80 
Haste, Tommy, wins Junior Historian award, 73 

Hasty, John C. "Pete," is executive director of Maxton group, 113 


146 


itcher, W. C., is officer of Lenoir County group, 25, 89 

iwley, Mrs. Emma Jean: is chairman of committee, 63; reports on landmark trees, 87 

lynes , Julietta, attends SHA meeting, 19 

lyman, Wilson, pictured, works as summer employee, 103 

lynes, Mary Deal, her papers in Archives, 126 

lywood, Mrs. E. S., is officer of NCSCLH, 135 

lywood, Frances, speaks at Montgomery County meeting, 63 

iywood, John N., introduces speaker to Montgomery group, 63 

ad, Constance, receives grant, 84 

:nderson, Junior Historians from, win awards, 73 

nderson, Mrs. Moffitt Sinclair, wins honor for A Long, Long Dag for November, 9 
nderson House, pictured, 106 
ndren-Roberts House, is moved, 112 

ndricks, J. Edwin, professional activities of, 42-43, 110, 115 
nry, Robert, is subject of talk, 67 

nson, Ted Scott, advises Junior Historian winners, 73 
rbert House, is on Nash County tour, 114 
mdon, G. Melvin, speaks at tobacco symposium, 59 
mdon, Thomas, speaks at East Carolina symposium, 58 
ron, Duncan, speaks to NCSCLH, 135 

rring, Alice Farmer, is officer of Wilson County group, 95 

rzel, Edward, is on steering committee of oral history group, 42 

wes, Joseph, is featured in exhibit, 100 

zekiah Alexander Springhouse, Charlotte, grant for, 52 

cks, William J., his work on Central Prison, 123 

gginbotham, Don, professional activities of, 42, 110 

ggins, Jerry L., Sr., is officer of SAR group, 91 

gh Point College, news of, 59, 131 

gh Point Historical Society, news of, 44, 62, 87, 111 
gh Rock, pictured, 79 

ldebrand, Mrs. Abbie Seals, speaks at Burke County meeting, 60 
11, Eleanor, joins A&H staff, 128 

11, George Watts, is member of Hillsborough Commission, 134 

llsborough District Court records, transferred to State Archives, 104 

llsborough Historic District (Orange County), West King Street there, pictured, 37 

llsborough Historical Society, news of, 23-24, 44, 62, 86, 133-134 

nes, Anna, her dissertation, 56 

nes, Percy, participates in Archives Institute, 71; receives service award, 54 

nsdale House, proposed adaptive use of, discussed, 67 

nson, Mary Alice, works for Historic Sites, 128 

storic American Engineering Record program, is explained, 118 

storic Cabarrus, Inc., news of, 24, 44-45, 63, 87, 111, 134 

storic Cabarrus Day, held, 24 

storic Edenton, sponsors Edenton Symposium, 77 
storic Flat Rock Society, presents program, 94 
storic Halifax Restoration Association, news of, 87 
storic Hillsborough Commission, news of, 134 
storic Hope, is toured, 77, 94 
storic Hope Foundation, wins AASLH award, 3 
storic Murfreesboro Commission, news of, 113 
storic Murfreesboro Week, report of, 113 
storic New Bern Foundation, Inc., news of, 111-112 

storic Preservation Society of North Carolina, Inc.: is new name of Antiquities 

group, 39; is proposed name, 5; its awards, 74, 106; offers copies of Carolina 

Comments, 107; plans for, 105 

storic Robeson, Inc., news of, 87 

storic Salisbury Foundation, news of, 63, 87 

storic Sites and Museums Section: is reorganized, 70; report on activities of, 29-30, 
80-81 

storic Wilmington Foundation, wins AASLH award, 3 
storical Book Club, news of, 8, 105 

storical Foundation News, to furnish information on contest, 112 
storical Foundation of the Presbyterian and Reformed Churches, news of, 112 
storical Foundation of the Presbyterian Church at Montreat, archivists from, take 
course, 100 

storical Publications Section, sale of publications of, 33 
storical Raleigh, Inc., news of, 88 

storical Society of North Carolina: is served by Erontis W. Johnston, 49; news of, 24, 

88 

story of Sanford, is published, 92 
story Seekers Club, wins award, 73 


147 




Hoadley, Robert A., files application on Oakwood, 92 

Hocutt, Ray: attends South Atlantic Archives meeting, 80; receives service award, 54 
Hodgson, Matthew, pictured, receives award for Lionel Stevenson, 2 
Hoffman, Charles B., is officer of Maxton group, 113 
Hoffman, Mrs. Margaret, participates in Archives Institute, 71 

Hoffman, Paul P.: attends meetings, 80, 122; is host to Malayasian visitor, 124; is 
instructor in workshop, 101; pictured, 12, 14, 71, 103; plans Archives Institute, 71; 
speaks, 12, 42, 51 

Hoke County Historical Society, Inc., is organized, 112 
Holland, Ron R: is promoted, 108; receives service award, 54 
Holley, I. B., Jr., gives lectures, 82 

Holliday, Dennis H.: death of, 18, 23; presides at Halifax meeting, 23 
Holloman, Charles R.: heads NCGS, 114; is on steering com m ittee of genealogical group, 
7; participates in Archives Institute, 71 
Hollyday, Frederic B. B., is chairman for SHA, 82 
Holman, Billy, is site manager at Fort Dobbs, 16, 31 
Holshouser, Anne, wins Junior Historian award, 73 

Holshouser, James E., Jr.: names bicentennial members, 52; names chairman of NCHC, 50; 
participates in Kings Mountain ceremony, 133; pictured, 119; presents Scott documenta 
119; receives report on records management, 125; sends letter to Mary Rogers, 128; 
speaks, 109, 130 

Holshouser, Mrs. James E., Jr.: pictured, 29; receives Iredell Bible, 29; speaks, 73, 
86 

Honeycutt, A. L., Jr.: attends meetings, 17, 24, 36; conducts architectural survey, 10' 
discusses restorations, 6, 113; gives talks, 81; pictured, 6, 51; presents report, 77 
receives recognition, 7, 53 
Hood, Henry G., speaks in Greensboro, 19 
Hooker, Charles, is officer of Chapel Hill society, 85 
Hooper, William, is featured in exhibit, 100 
Hopewell, Donna, speaks at HSNC, 88 
Hopson, Mrs. Peggy, receives service award, 54 
Horace Williams House, exhibit there, 22 
Homaday, Harold P. , supports Reed Gold Mine, 30 
Horne, Josh L., is commended in resolution, 50; obituary of, 58 

Horton, Donald E.: attends South Atlantic Archives meeting, 80; receives service 
award, 54 

Horton, Frank L., pictured, 7; speaks, 6, 77 
Horton, Hamilton C., gives Cowles papers to SHC, 123 
Hough, David Eugene, is director of Cabarrus group, 23 
Houser, Mrs. Sarah R., is director of NCSPA, 5 
Howe, Joseph, is subject of brief article, 133 
Howe, Wayne, writes article on Joseph Howe, 133 
Howell, Smith, pictured, 101 

Hudson, Mrs. Barbara, presents study at Currituck meeting, 61 
Huff, A. V., Jr., edits South Atlantic Quarterly issue, 82 
Huff, Carolyn B., is promoted, 83 

Hughes, Samuel, is officer of Lower Cape Fear group, 89 
Humphries, William S., speaks at tobacco symposium, 59 
Hunter, Mrs. Sally, attends South Atlantic Archives meeting, 80 
Hygard, Margaret, speaks to NCSCLH, 135 


I 

"Impeachment of Andrew Johnson, The," is shown on PBS television, 99; is taped in 
Raleigh, 98; videocassette of, presented to North Carolina Collection, 131 
Individual Literary Award, winners of, 73 
Ingles, Mrs. Ross, plans Edenton Symposium, 77 
Institute for Advanced Researchers, held in Archives, 71 
"Interlock Six," is title of winning sculpture, 5 
Iobst, Richard W., professional activities of, 47, 66, 94-95 
Ipock, Mrs. Grace C., receives service award, 53 
Ipock, R. A., makes payment on Pollock Street lot, 91 
Iredell, James, pictured, presents Bible to state, 29 
Iredell, Mrs. James, pictured, 29 
Iredell Bible, is presented to state, 29 
Iredell County, records of, 104 

Iredell County Bicentennial Committee, supports Fort Dobbs project, 31 
Iredell County Historical Society, supports Fort Dobbs project, 31 
Isley, Mrs. Robert W., is chairman of Hillsborough Commission, 134 
Isley House, room of, pictured, 111 


148 


,es > * Ernest L.. is chairman of Friends of Hope, 86; is founder of Antiques 

Fair, 90 

fey, James, receives service award, 54 

/or, Richard: pictured, 119; to speak at Culture Week, 105, 119 


J 

lck, Charles, discusses Hezekiah Alexander House, 6 

ickson, Cathy: attends South Atlantic Archives meeting, 80; participates in Archives 
Institute, 71 

imes, Aingred, is named instructor, 110 

imes, Mrs. Jack, arranges program for Presbyterian group, 25 
imes, Mrs. Marion T., receives service award, 53 
imes Iredell Association, sponsors Edenton Symposium, 77 
imes Iredell House, is visited, 77 

insen, Vemol R. : furnishes information on Presbyterian society, 26; is officer of 
Presbyterian group, 64 

iffress, Carl 0., is on Greensboro program. 111 

mkins, Wayland L., Jr., is cochairman of Friends of Hope, 86 

innings, Neill A., Sr., is officer of SAR group, 91 

ickey's Ridge, preservation of, discussed, 65 

■dy, Marilyn, is officer of Webster Group, 67 

■el Lane House, is subject of TV program, 81. See also Wakefield 

hn Ashford House, is toured, 91 

ihn Blaney Williams House, is toured, 91 

ihn J. Moore House, is toured, 91 

hn T. Revelle Diary, in Archives, 126 

'hn Wheeler House: receives grant, 52; restoration of, 113 

■hnson, Andrew, film on impeachment of, 98-99 

hnson, F. Roy, is officer of NCFS, 8 

hnson, John R., his ledger preserved, 115 

hnson, Jules, is committee head of Swain group, 66 

hnson, Lyman L., is promoted, 110 

hnston, Frontis W.: brief identification of, 49; is appointed to Historical Commission, 
49; pictured, 49, 50, 51 

hnston, Hugh B., Jr.: is on steering committee of genealogical group, 7; is president 
of Wilson County group, 95; pictured, 114; speaks at Nash County meeting, 45 
hnston County: newspapers of, are sought, 14; records of, 35, 56, 75-76 
hnstone, James D., offers reward for diary, 40 

lley, Harley E.: is officer of NCSPA, 5; is on steering committee of oral history 
group, 42 

nas Stroud House, is toured, 89 

nes, Bobby, is maintenance man at Caswell -Neuse site, 17 
nes, Clark, presents program at High Point meeting, 44 
nes, David, receives exhibit on Central Prison, 123 

nes, H. G.: approves plans for visitor center, 30; attends meetings, 17, 24, 36; 
becomes curator of North Carolina Collection, 12; his resignation, 10-11, 12; is 
committee chairman, 83, 132; is commended in resolution, 50; is consultant, 83, 132; 
is ex-officio director of NCSPA, 5; is honored at dinner, 50-51; is officer of NCLHS, 

2, 12; mentioned, 39; negotiates agreement, 31; pictured, 2, 51; presents Junior 
Historian awards, 73; recommends grant under National Historic Preservation Act, 52; 
speaks, 17, 21, 83, 98, 132 

nes, Roger C.: attends South Atlantic Archives meeting, 80; receives service award, 54 

nes, Mrs. Rome, is president of Catawba group, 43 

nes, Teresa, works on history of Negro families in Bayboro, 46 

nes, Virginia Ann, attends archives course, 100 

nes, W. Duke, donates ledger to Warren association, 115 

nes, William Areatus, his house, toured, 89 

nes House (Caswell County), pictured, 37 

rdan, Mrs. Gail, joins A&H staff, 128 

rdan, Mrs. Joye E.: pictured, 6, 51, 54, 98; receives plaque from Junior Historians, 

74; receives service award, 53; represents Cultural Resources at Greensboro program, 

111; retires, 98, 127; speaks at dinner honoring Jones, 51; suggests use of Capitol 
copper, 69 

rdan, Thomas J., his documentary displayed, 119 

rdan, W. T., Jr.: receives service award, 54; transfers to Historical Publications 
Section, 108 

seph Bell House, pictured, 78 

sephson, Harold, is promoted, writes book, 110 
sephus Hall House, payments are made on, 87 


149 


Josiah Bell House, activities there, 85 
Joslin, William, is director of Wake group, 115 
Journal, Currituck Historical Society, is published, 61 
Journal , published by Greensboro Historical Museum, 62 
Joyner, Charles, is president of NCFS, 8 

Judge Gaston House Restoration Association, Inc., news of, 88 
Junior Historian winners, are pictured, 74 
Junior League of High Point, receives award, 87 


K 

Kasson, John F., publishes book, speaks in San Francisco, 41 
Kearns, Fred M., Jr., is director of Randolph group, 26 
Keever, Homer, speaks in Iredell County, 84 
Kell, Mrs. Copeland, is officer of NCSPA, 5 
Kellam, Mrs. Ida B., receives Clarendon Award, 89 

Kellenberger, Mrs. John A., is chairman of the Tryon Palace Commission, 75 

Kenan Memorial Fountain, pictured, 78 

Kendall, Mrs. Henry E., is pictured, 114 

Kerner, Ted, is officer of Korners Folly, 63 

Kessler, Lawrence D., lectures in Fayetteville, 132 

Kezziah, Mrs. J. T., is officer of Brunswick group, 43 

King, Francis P., is president of New Bern foundation, 112 

King, William E.: is active in NCLHS, 2; is member of council of HSNC, 24; speaks to 
County and Local Historians, 135 

Kingdom of Madison: A Southern Mountain Fastness and Its People, The, wins AASLH award 
3 

Klapthor, Mrs. Margaret Brown, speaks at Greensboro Historical Museum, 111 
Knapp, Richard F.: attends Tobacco History Symposium, 80; does research on Duke Home¬ 
stead, 30; is projects officer at Reed Gold Mine, 30; mentioned, 31; participates in 
Archives Institute, 71; reads paper at HSNC, 24 
Knight, Mrs. Kenneth T., is officer of Wake group, 115 

Knowles, J. C.: brief identification of, 49-50; is appointed to Historical Commission, 
49; pictured, 49, 50; plans Historical Raleigh event, 88; speaks to Wake group, 67 
Korners Folly, news of, 63 

Krenek, Ernst, his letters, are transferred to Archives, 56 

Kyser, Mrs. Kay, announces exhibit opening, reports on preservation work at Chapel Hill 

22 


L 


Labor Building, pictured, 19 

Labouisse, Mrs. John W., is director of NCSPA, 5 

Lackey, Walter C., is officer of Murfreesboro group, 113 

Ladenheim, Kala: pictured, 102; researches Weil papers, 101-102 

Lafayette Ball, announcement of, 113 

Lamb, Mrs. Imogene, is officer of Korners Folly, 63 

Lambert, Keith, wins art award, 5 

Landau, Norma, resigns, 81 

Landmark Challenge, The, is viewed by Hillsborough society members, 44 
Landon, Henry C., III: pictured, 6; receives Cannon Cup, 7 
Land's End, Leigh House (Perquimans County), pictured, 38 
Lane, Joel: his house, 77, 81; his remains are reinterred, 76 
Lane, Yvonne, is president of Durham choir, 8 

Langston, Mrs. Ruth C.: is on Colonial Records staff, 104; pictured, 126; receives 
service award, 53 

Lanier, Mildred, speaks at Friends of Historic Hope, 86 

Lankford, Jessie R. "Dick": attends South Atlantic Archives meeting, 80 
Lashley, Mrs. Joan, attends South Atlantic Archives meeting, 80 
Lassiter, Mrs. Barbara, receives award for Reynolda House, 6 
Lassiter, Mrs. Ruby Jones, is officer of Vance group, 94 
Lathraum, Barbara, pictured, works in archives, 34 
Lathrop, Virginia Terrell, publishes walking guide, 83 

Latimer House: grant for, 6, 32; pictured, 78; reception held there, 45 

Latta Place, restoration of, 25 

Latta Place, Inc., news of, 25 

Lawrence, John, builds house, 113 

Lawrence, Mary Duke, builds house, 113 

Lawrence F. Brewster Building, is dedicated, 41 


150 



eague of Women Voters, N.C., records of, 57, 126 

ee, Mrs. Barbara, transfers to Museums Section, 128 

ee, Joseph A., receives service award, 53 

ee, Thomas B., speaks at Asian Studies meeting, 43 

ee County Historical and Genealogical Society, news of, 88 

efler, Hugh T.: is honored at autograph party, 88; pictured, 50; publishes book, 41-42 
eigh House, is visited by symposium participants, 77 

emmon, Sarah McCulloh: appears on TV, is on advisory board of internship program, 59; 
speaks, 47, 59 

ena Mayberry Collection, in Archives, 126 

ennon, Donald R.: gives talk, 130; is president of Pitt group, 65; receives Clarendon 
Award, 89 

enoir County, has National Register entry, 37 

enoir County Historical Association, news of, 25, 63, 88 

enoir Rhyne College, news of, 60, 83 

emer, Warren: grant to, 82; speaks at East Carolina symposium, 58; speeches of, 82 
ester, Mrs. Memory, directs genealogical research, 85 
ewis, Henry W., his role in NCLHS, 2 

ewis, John B., is president of Pitt County Historical Society, 26 
exington, renovation of post office of, 62 
ightner, Clarence E., participates in Mordecai ceremony, 90 
illington, Alexander, 32 

incoln County Historical Association, news of, 89 
indsay. Burl, is promoted, 17 

inn, Mrs. Stahle, Jr.: is on steering committee of genealogical group, is panel 
participant, 7; pictured, 12, 114; plans genealogical workshop, 12 
iterary competitions, entries for, listed, 79-80 

ittle-Stokes, Mrs. Ruth, attends meetings, speaks, 17, 22, 51, 80 
ittleton College Memorial Association, news of, 112 
ivingstone College, news of, 83 

loyd, Evelyn, is member of Hillsborough Commission, 134 

ocal Records Branch: transfers records to Archives, 56, 75-76, 104, 125-126; work of, 
35, 75-76 

okken, Roy N., is promoted, 82 
ong, Audrey, book given in memory of, 26 
ong, Jonathan, his cabinetwork is featured, 26 
ong, Long Dag for November, A, wins honor, 9 

ong Street Presbyterian Church: is on tour of Malcolm Blue Historical Society, 63; 
pictured, 55 

Looking for Pierson Ricks," is subject of Hanes's speech at NCLHS, 2 

ore, Adelaide, is honored, 87 

ore, Eugenia, is honored, 87 

owe, Ian, speaks to Pitt group, 135 

ower Cape Fear Historical Society, news of, 25, 32, 45, 89, 112-113 

Lower Cape Fear Revolutionary War Events, 1765-1774," is published by Lower Cape Fear 
Historical Society, 45 
owry, D. F., pictured, 3 
oyalists, conference on, scheduled, 110 
oyer, Michael, wins art award, 5 
ucama, Junior Historians from, win awards, 73 

ugar, Lawrence, presents sketch of historic church at Methodist meeting, 64 
undy, Andrew S., is elected vice-president of NCAS, 4 


Me 

cAllister, R. Brown, is director of Cabarrus group, 23 

cBryde, Lewis: accepts Winstead gift, 88; is officer of Sanford Historical group, 66 
cCallum, Mrs. Righton, is officer of poetry group, 8 
cCamy, Mrs. Jean, is officer of NCPS, 8 

cCarter, Kathy: attends Nash County meeting, 45; speaks at Jordan retirement dinner, 

98 

cCoy, W. J., his publication, 41 

cCracken, Doris, is officer of Sanford historical group, 66 
cCrary, Mrs. Mary Jane, is officer of NCSCLH, 9 
cCurdy House, pictured, 55 

acDougal, Bruce: attends meetings, 17, 36, 80, 128; is named acting chief of Historic 
Sites and Museums Section, 39; is project officer for Fort Dobbs, 31; pictured, 71, 
101; speaksj77, 109; to head Historic Sites Section, 70 
cDowell, Charles, commemorative monument to, 22 
cDowell, Joseph, commemorative monument to, 22 


151 


MacDowell, Dorothy M. DuBose, presents speaker at Carson House gathering, 22 

MacDowell County, records of, 56, 75-76 

McDowell County Historical Society, receives grant, 32 

McEachern, Leora H. (Mrs. E. M.): is officer of Lower Cape Fear group, 25, 89; pictured, 
6, 114; publishes "Lower Cape Fear Revolutionary War Events," 45; reports on the 
Latimer House, 5 

McGeen, Edward H., joins staff of Sacred Heart, 20 
McGehee's Mill, work on preservation of, 26 

McGrew, Mrs. Ellen Z.: her North Carolina Census Records, 1784-1900, is revised, 56; 
participates in Archives Institute, 71; pictured, 100; receives service award, 54; 
speaks to teachers, 51; works in Maine Archives, 100; writes Information Circular, 76 
McKay, S. L., is officer of poetry group, 8 

MacKenzie, James D., is president of Presbyterian group, 25-26, 64 
McKinney, Gerald, is officer of Swain County group, 47 
McKnight, Mrs. V. J., her papers accessioned, 126 
MacLamroc, James G. W., speaks at SAR meeting, 91 
McLean, Albert, speaks to WNCHA, 67 

McLean, David A., speaks at Lower Cape Fear meeting, 25 

MacLean, Hector: is chairman of bicentennial committee, 52; is officer of NCSCLH, 8, 9 
McMahan, Donald, is officer of NCSCLH, 9 

McMahan, Mrs. Margaret, is officer of NCSCLH, pictured, wins Smithwick Award, 9 

MacMillan, Henry, reports on Latimer House, 113 

McNeill, Mrs. John K., Jr., is officer of Hoke group, 112 

McVaugh, Michael Rogers, speaks at parapsychology conference, 42 

M 


MESDA, has furniture exhibit, 26 

Mace, Borden, is director of Appalachian Consortium, 94 

Macfie, John, edits brochure, 22 

Macon, Nathaniel, his homeplace, 115 

Madison County, records of, 56, 75-76 

Madison County Historical Society, news of, 45, 89 

Magaldi, Mrs. Janet: is officer of Historic Cabarrus, 45; reports, 111 

Malaya, sends visitor to State Archives, 124 

Malcolm Blue Historical Society of Aberdeen, news of, 63 

Malcolm Blue House, restoration of, 63 

Mallard, Alice, is treasurer of Duplin group, 133 

Malloy, Harry W., gives house for restoration, 93 

"Man and His House: Willie Jones and the Grove, A," wins Smithwick Award, 9 

Manly, Mrs. Isaac, is elected president of NCAS, 4 

Manly, Roger, presents report on oral history, 42 

Mann, Carroll L., Jr., speaks to Wake County group, 27 

"Manuscripts of the American Revolution," is traveling exhibit, 52-53 

Maps and Other Cartographic Records in the North Carolina State Archives , is available, 
Marriage bonds, are indexed, 125 

Mars Hill College, sponsors Appalachian meeting, 93-94 
Martin, Jack, is member of Hillsborough Commission, 134 
Martin, Robert, swears in members of Hillsborough Commission, 134 
Mary Deal Haynes Papers, in Archives, 126 
Mary Lib Joyce Award, is given to Morgan, 62 

Massengill, Steve: does research for Duke Homestead, 30; is part-time A&H employee, 17; 
pictured, 34 

Masseno, Frederick: discusses Wheeler House restoration, 113; joins A&H staff, 81 

Massey, Dianne, is employed on Civil War Roster, 108 

Matheson, Mrs. Donald, receives Engstrom Award, 24 

Matthews, Mary Green, pictured, wins Peace Cup, 9 

Matthews, Rory, his house, restoration of, 62 

Maupin, Armistead J., is member of bicentennial committee, 52 

Maxton Historical Society, is organized, 113 

Maxwell Chambers Foundation, gives building to Historic Salisbury, 87 
Mayberry, Lena: her collection, in Archives, 126; is officer of NCFS, 8 
Mayflower Award: entries for, sought, 57, 79; is given to Lionel Stevenson, 1; 

presentation of, 1, 105, 119 
Mayflower Society, plans for, 105 
Meadows-Josh Horne House, The, pictured, 107 

Mecklenburg County, commissioners there, make grant to Latta Place, Inc., 25 
Mecklenburg Historical Association: address of, 134-135; news of, 25, 63, 90 
Medford, W. Clark, death of, 81 
Medley, Mary Louise, is officer of NCPS, 8 

Melcher, Louis C.: conducts Lane service, 76; is on program of Wake County group, 47 


152 


Meldron, Richard, is pictured, 114 

Melvin, E. S. "Jim," is on Greensboro program, 111 

Mercer, James H., receives service award, 54 

Mercer, W. Ray, speaks at Davidson County meeting, 61 

Meredith College, news of, 59, 131 

Methodist College, news of, 41 

Metzgar, H. D., receives grant, 19-20 

Mickey, E. P., is speaker at Pasquotank meeting, 46 

Military Personnel Records in the North Carolina State Archives, 1918-1964, is available 
13 

Mill Hill, pictured, 121 

Mill Pond, Trenton Historic District, 106 

Miller, Charles W., is chairman of Moravian Music Foundation, 45 
Miller, Mrs. H. B., presides at Montgomery meeting, 63 
Miller, M. Stone, works in State Archives, 100 

Miller, Mrs. Natalie G.: judges Junior Historian contest, 74; receives service award, 

54; speaks to teachers, 51 

Milton Historic District (Caswell County), pictured, 37 
Minges, Harold, his scrapbooks, additions to, 56 
Minnick, Ruth, is officer of Surry group, 115 

Misenheimer, Larry: is promoted, 108-109; receives service award, 54 

Mitchell, Mrs. Memory F.: attends meetings, 17, 80; is president of HSNC, 24, 88; judges 
Junior Historian contest, 74; participates in Scott documentary presentation, 119; 
pictured, 3, 51, 119; receives service award, 53; speaks, 51, 98; wins Robert D. W. 
Connor Award, 3 

Mitchell, Thornton W.: arranges Wake County program, 27; attends Fort Macon inspection, 
72; attends meetings, 80, 122; conducts tours, 51, 135; directs work of NCSU students, 
34; is director of Wake group, 115; is instructor in workshop, 101; is named acting 
director of Archives and History, 39; participates in Scott documentary presentation, 
119; pictured, 3, 12, 50, 71; presents Fessenden film to Canada, 122; receives service 
award, 54; speaks, 51, 98; welcomes teachers, 51; wins Robert D. W. Connow Award, 3 
Mobley, Joe A., joins A&H staff, 129 
Mock, James F., is president of Davidson group, 111 
Monkkonen, Eric, is named assistant professor, 110 

Monroe's Crossroads Battlefield, is toured by Malcolm Blue Historical Society, 63 

Montgomery, Ray, is member of Hillsborough Commission, 134 

Montgomery County Historical Society, news of, 63 

"Month of Sundays," is Museum program, 105 

Moody, Mrs. H. Leslie, is officer of NCSPA, 5 

Moore, Claude H., is host to NCSCLH, 91 

Moore, Mrs. Dan K., participates in Scott documentary occasion, 120 

Moore, Henry W., is member of Hillsborough Commission, 134 

Moore, James, is utility guard, 17 

Moore, Josephine L., becomes dean, 59 

Moore, Marie D., receives service award, 54 

Moore, William J.: is elected president of NCMC, 7; is officer of NCSPA, 5 

Moore County Historical Society: formation of, discussed, 112; news of, 90 

Moores Creek National Military Park, archaeological work done there, 32-33 

Moose, Hoy A., is director of Cabarrus group, 23 

Moratock Iron Furnace, pictured, 121 

Moravian Music Foundation, news of, 45 

Mordecai, Ellen, describes garden, 90 

Mordecai House, Culture Week reception is held there, 1 
Mordecai Square Historical Society, news of, 64, 90 
Morgan, J. P., is officer of Northampton group, 64, 91 

Morgan, Mrs. J. P., presents slate of officers at Northampton meeting, 64 

Morgan, J. Patrick, presents report on oral history, 42 

Morgan, J. V. , wins Mary Lib Joyce Award, 62 

Moringo, Harold, speaks to NCSCLH, 135 

Morrill, Daniel L., talks to various group, 109 

Morris, A. J. Anthony, is visiting professor at UNC-C, 109 

Morris, Charles, pictured, 34 

Morris, Mary, is officer of Webster group, 67 
Morris, Melanie, wins Junior Historian award, 73 
Morrison, Fred, is honored by award, 4 
Morrison, Mrs. Fred, is honored by award, 4 
Moser, John F., is officer of Maxton group, 113 

Moss, John Henry, is officer of Cleveland group, presents report, 44 
Mt. Pleasant Collegiate Institute, use of, planned, 86 
Mowry, George E., publishes article, 41 

Mrs. James Madison: The Incomparable Dolley, wins honor, 9 


153 



Mulholland, James A., speaks, 83 

Munday, John R., is officer of Vance group, 94 

Murff, Catherine, speaks at HSNC, 88 

Murfreesboro Historical Association, news of, 113 

Murphy, Robert J., is member of Hillsborough Commission, 134 

Murray, Mrs. Douglas P., is officer of Historic Robeson, 87 

Murray, Mrs. Margaret, joins A&H staff, 108 

Murray, Nancy, joins A&H staff, 128 

Murray, Mrs. Peggy, attends South Atlantic Archives meeting, 80 

Museum of History: acquires snuff box, 126; administration of, 70; features new displays 
118; offers docent training, 105; sponsors "Month of Sundays," 105 
Museum of the Albemarle, news of, 90 
Museums Council, plans for, 105 

Museums Section: is established, 70; prepares exhibit on Colonial Records, 126 
Mustafa, Mrs. Munawar, is on leave, 60 

Mustafa, Urabi: is acting chairman at Shaw, 60; visits foreign institutions, 20 
My Folk, The First Three Hundred Years, is published, 93 


N 

Nash, Francis, is discussed at Hillsborough meeting, 62 
Nash, Ogden, is discussed at Hillsborough meeting, 62 
Nash County Historical Association, news of, 45, 90-91, 114 
Nash-Hooper House, gardens there opened, 86 
Nash Law Office, gardens there opened, 86 

National Archives and Records Service, participates in South Atlantic Archives and 
Records Conference, 56 

National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers, holds meeting, 36 
National Endowment for the Humanities, sponsors tobacco symposium, 59 
National Historic Preservation Act, grants under, recommended, 52 
National Natural Landmark, Jockey's Ridge designated as, 65 
National Park Service, its role in archaeological work, at Moores Creek, 33 
National Personnel Records Center (Military), receives North Carolina records, 54 
National Register of Historic Places: additions to, pictured, 36-38, 55, 78-79, 106-107, 
120-122; has Caswell County nomination, 22 

National Trust for Historic Preservation Building Code Conference, has A&H representatives 
in attendance, 80 

Natural and Economic Resources, Department of, has records disposition schedule, 35 
Neal, Mrs. Lois: is instructor in workshop, 101; is on steering committee, of genealogies 
group, 7; pictured, 12; speaks, 12, 46, 51 
Neeley, John K., speaks at Lower Cape Fear meeting, 45 
Nelson, Douglas Thomas, joins staff of NCSU, 131 
Ness, John H., presents report on oral history, 42 
New Bern, has bicentennial ceremony, 130 
New Bern Historical Society, news of, 64, 91 

New Hanover County: courthouse there, pictured, 78; its American Revolution Bicentennial 
Committee, publishes "Lower Cape Fear Revolutionary War Events," 45; records of, 75-76 
Newberry, Ashford and Associates, are architects for Halifax visitor center, 118 
Newbold-White House: Perquimans County, receives grant, 52; restoration of, 65, 92, 109 
Newlin, Algie, speaks in Alamance, 84 
Newspaper Collection, accessions to, 104 

Newspaper Microfilm Project: films Charlotte News, 14; seeks Burke County papers, 57, 76; 

seeks Johnston County newspapers, 14 
Newton, John G., to speak during Culture Week, 105 
Nimocks House, grant for, 32 

Nischan, Bodo: is honored, 109; speaks at East Carolina symposium, 58 

Nischan, Gerda Baumann, is honored, 109 

Nix, Mrs. Fred, is officer of NCSCLH, 9 

Nixon, Harold R.: joins A&H staff, 16; resigns, 108 

Nixon, Herbert, is project chairman for Perquimans group, 65 

Noble, Alice, books of, presented to North Carolina Collection, 131 

Noble, M. C. S., books of, presented to North Carolina Collection, 131 

Noble, Richard, Sr., his house is toured, 89 

Northampton County Historical Society, news of, 26, 64, 91 

North Carolina American Revolution Bicentennial Committee, staff of, 17, 129 
"North Carolina Antiquities—New Discoveries," is subject of antiquities talk, 6 
North Carolina Art Society, news of, 4-5 
North Carolina Arts Council, news of, 8 

North Carolina Census Records, 1784-1900: availability of, 76; is revised, 56 
North Carolina Central University, news of, 131 


154 



North Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, offers awards, 105-106 
North Carolina Collection: additions to, 83, 131; report on progress there, 131 
North Carolina Committee for Continuing Education and Humanities, sponsors tobacco 
symposium, 58-59 

North Carolina Confederate Centennial Commission, records of, 56 
North Carolina Court of Appeals, rules that state owns cannons, 16 
North Carolina Equal Suffrage Association, 102 

North Carolina Equal Suffrage League, brief discussion of, 101-102 
North Carolina Federation of Music Clubs: news of, 4; records of, 104 
North Carolina Folklore Society: news of, 8; plans for, 105 

North Carolina Genealogical Society: officers of, pictured, 114; plans for, 105; 
purpose of, defined, 114 

North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, is published, 114 
North Carolina Heritage week, observed in Cabarrus, 87 

North Carolina Higher-Court Records: is featured in exhibit, 126; is published, 104 
North Carolina Historical Commission: commends H. G. Jones in resolution, 51; holds 
hearings, meets, 50; its hearings, pictured, 50 
North Carolina Historical Review: celebrates fiftieth anniversity, 16; film of, 104; 

has article on Calvin Cowles, 124; late publication of, explained, 107-108 
North Carolina Literary and Historical Association:- is served by Frontis W. Johnston, 49; 
its reception, pictured, 1; members of, receive discount for publications, 33; members 
of, receive explanation, 107; plans for, 105; records of, 126; report on 1973 meeting 
of, 1-3 

North Carolina Museums Council: holds joint luncheon meeting with antiquities group, 6; 

makes award to Reynolda House, 6; news of, 7 
North Carolina National Bank, offers purchase award, 5 

North Carolina Oral History Coordinating Conference, is held at UNC-C, 42 
North Carolina Poetry Society: news of, 8; plans for, 105 
North Carolina Presbyterian Historical Society, news of, 25-26, 64 
North Carolina School of the Arts, news of, 131 

North Carolina Society for the Preservation of Antiquities: adopts new name, 39; its 
president receives Crittenden Award, 1; news of, 5-7 
North Carolina Society of County and Local Historians: news of, 8-9, 91, 135; plans for, 

105 

North Carolina Society, Sons of the American Revolution, news of, 91 
North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame, is displayed by Museum, 118 
North Carolina State University, news of, 19-20, 41, 59-60, 83, 131 
North Carolina Supreme Court, records of, 126 

North Carolina Symphony: its chamber group, presents concert for NCFMC, 4; plays at 
Tryon Palace, 130 

North Carolina Symphony Society, Inc.: accepts records management services, 35; news of, 5; 

plans for, 105; records of, 104 
North Carolina Tercentenary Commission, records of, 56 

North Carolina United Methodist Conference's Commission on Archives and History, news of, 64 

North Carolina Wesleyan College, news of, 109 

North Hills: exhibit there, pictured, 15 

North Randolph Historical Society, news of, 45 

Nottingham, Walter G., wins needlework prize, 90 

Nowell, Pam, is microfilmer, 108 

"Nowhere to Lay His Head," is winner of NCFMC award, 4 


0 

Oakwood Historic District, pictures of, 106 
Obituaries, 18, 58, 81, 130 

Ocracoke Lifesaving Station records, in Archives, 104 

Odell, Margaret S., joins A&H staff, 39 

Odom, Nash A., speaks at Campbell College, 58 

Offman, Isaac, family records of, are microfilmed, 60 

Ogilvie, Philip, welcomes teachers, 51 

Old Charlotte-Old Mecklenburg, Today, published, 90 

"Old Kentucky Home," to become historic site, 31 

Old Salem, news of, 26, 46, 114 

Old Tyndall House, is toured, 89 

Olds, Fred A., additions to papers of, 126 

"Open Letter, An," 10-11 

Oral History Association, report on, 95 

Oral History Workshop, plans for, announced, 40 

Orange County, records of, 35 

Osier, Margaret J., is named to Wake Forest staff, 133 


155 


Owen, Ben: his pottery described, exhibited, pictured, 70; pictured, 70; sketch of, 70 
Owen, Mrs. Ben, pictured, 70 

Owen, Guy, is on Executive Committee of NCLHS, 2 
Owens House, Halifax, receives grant, 52 


Pace, Ronald, advises Junior Historian winner, 73 

Page, Estelle, her golf clubs displayed, 118 

Pagliacci , is presented to NCFMC group, 4 

Pamlico County Historical Association, news of, 46 

Papers of William A. Graham, The, published, 84 

Parker, Caroline, is officer of Hoke group, 112 

Parker, Donald, speaks at Edenton, 77 

Parker, Flora, is officer of Halifax County group, 23 

Parker, Harold T., professional activities of, 82, 131 

Parker, Mrs. Mattie Erma, participates in Archives Institute, 71 

Parker, Murray: attends South Atlantic Archives meeting, 80; indexes marriage bonds, 
pictured, 125 

Parkton Historical Foundation, news of, 91-92 

Parramore, Barbara M.: pictured, 3; receives AAUW award, 2-3 

Parramore, Thomas C.: speaks at Edenton Symposium, 77; wins award in Murfreesboro, 113 
writes history of Review, 16 

Parry, Mrs. Lemabel C., assists in crafts program at Tryon Palace, 75 
Paschal, Herbert R., gives report at Pitt meeting, 65 
Paskewich, Martha, participates in Archives Institute, 71 
Pasquotank Historical Society, news of, 46, 65, 92 

Pathfinders, Past and Present: A History of Davidson County, N.C ., is winner of Peace 
Cup, 9 

Patterson, A. M.: is officer of Presbyterian group, 64; is on steering committee of 
genealogical group, pictured, presides at genealogical meeting, 7; speaks at Campbell 
College, 58; to furnish information on genealogical group, 8 
Patterson, David K., writes book, 110 
Peace Cup, presentation of, 9 

Peacock, Mrs. Mary Reynolds: receives service award, 54; revises silversmiths book, 16 
speaks, 17 

Pearce, T. H., presents request to Franklin County commissioners, 23 
Pearce, Thilbert, receives award in Franklin County, 62 
Pederson, Ann, 56 

Peebles, Mrs. Minnie K.: attends South Atlantic Archives meeting, 80; receives service 
award, 54 

Pegram, Jesse, restores corncrib at Macon's home, 115 
Penn, John, his letter, 52, 53 

Pentecostal Fellowship Choir, is on program of folklore meeting, 8 
People of North Carolina, The, receives AAUW award, 3 
People to Preserve Jockey's Ridge, Inc., news of, 65 
Peoples Bank and Trust Company, displays money exhibit, 90 
Pepi, Kathleen, joins A&H staff, 128 

Perkins, Robert G., joins Methodist College faculty, 41 

Perkinson, Phil, begins survey of fluted points in North Carolina, 21 

Perquimans County, records of, 104 

Perquimans County Historical Society, fund raising by, 92 
Perquimans County Restoration Association, news of, 65, 92 
Person County, its history to be written, 65 
Person County Board of Education, funds from, are sought, 26 
Person County Historical Society, news of, 26, 46, 65, 92 

Perzel, Edward: presents report on oral history, 42; talks to various group, 109 
Peterson, Henry, wins art award, 5 

Petrone, Mrs. Lisbeth, conducts workshop for Mordecai Square Historical Society, 64 

Petty, Richard, his coveralls displayed, 118 

Pfeiffer College, news of, 60 

Phelps, David S., speaks at Pitt meeting, 26 

Phifer, Edward W., Jr., pictured, 50 

"Philanthropic Bequests of John Rex of Raleigh, The," is winner of Robert D. W. Connor 
Award, 3 

Phillips, Mary Lou, is on steering committee of genealogical group, 8 
"Pink Coffee Cup," is art winner, 4 
Pink Hill, tour of, 89 

Pink Hill Historical Committee, arranges tour, 89 
Pitt, Mrs. Elizabeth, is officer of NCMC, 7 


156 



Pitt County Historical Society, news of, 26, 46, 65, 92, 135 
Pleasant Hill Lodge, is toured, 89 

Plunkett, E. W., presents medical collection to Greensboro Historical Museum, 44 

Polk County, records of, 75-76, 104 

Poole, Mrs. R. Franklin, Jr., is director of NCAS, 4 

Popalas, Anthony, speaks at East Carolina symposium, 58 

Porter, Ronald, is officer of Sanford historical group, 66 

"Portrait Painting," is title of winning painting, 5 

Potters, of Randolph and Moore counties, are subject of film, 46 

Pou, Edward W., additions to papers of, 126 

Powell, William S.: is honored at autograph party, 88; is member of Editorial 

Committee, 105; pictured, 3; publishes book, 41-42; speaks, 41, 58, 63, 91; wins AASLH 
award for his book, 3 

Pre-Raphaelite Poets, The, receives Mayflower Society Cup, 1-2 
Preservation of Historic Oakwood, Inc., news of, 92 
Presnell, Tom, 26 

Price, Betty, is officer of Webster group, 67 
Price, Charles L., speaks, 59, 92 

Price, William S., Jr.: completes requirements for Ph.D., 17; edits Colonial Records, 
126; heads Colonial Records Branch, 108; his North Carolina Higher-Court Records, 
1702-1708, 104; participates in Archives Institute, 71; pictured, 126; speaks, 17 
Proctor Law Office, restoration of, 87 
"Protection VII," is title of winning painting, 5 

Public Instruction, Department of: funds from, are sought, 26; its school plans on 
microfile system, 15 
Pyne, George, speaks to NCSCLH, 135 


Q 

Quaker Meadows (Burke County), pictured, 36 
Queens College, news of, 60, 109, 131 
Quilts, in exhibit, 118 

Quinnett, John, discusses bylaws for Swain group, 66 


R 

Ragan, Fred D.: is named Outstanding Educator, 82; speaks at tobacco symposium, 59 
Ragan, Sam, reviews fiction, 3 

Railroad House Historical Association, news of, 65, 92, 114 
Raleigh Historic Properties Commission, 50 
Ramey, Druscilla, pictured, works as summer employee, 103 
Ramsey, Mrs. J. N. , book given in memory of, 26 
Rand, Robert, joins A&H staff, 129 

Randolph County Historical Society, news of, 26, 46, 93 

Rauch Industries, offers purchase award, 4 

Rea, W. H., to speak at Tryon Palace Symposium, 36 

Records Center and Archives Annex Building: construction of, pictured, 117; location 
of, 118 

Records management: functions relating to, transferred to Cultural Resources, 72; 

report on, 76, 125; value of program of, described, 14 
Redding, John, is officer of Randolph group, 46 
Reed, Helen, speaks at East Carolina symposium, 58 

Reed Gold Mine: progress there, 29-30; visitor center-museum there, drawing of, 
pictured, 30 

Reeves, Mrs. Campbell, is officer of NCPS, 8 

Reeves, Mrs. Charles M., Jr., is director of NCAS, 4 

Register, Mrs. Bonnie Jean, joins A&H staff, 16 

Rehobeth Methodist Church, service held there, 48 

Reichard, Richard W., is named department chairman, 109 

Reid, David, pictured, 34 

Reid, David S., his house, pictured, 79 

Reid, George W., joins staff of N.C. Central University, 131 
"Remembering Thomas Wolfe," is subject of paper at NCSCLH meeting, 8 
Render, Sylvia Lyons, is officer of NCFS, 8 

Reorganization, its effect on Archives and History, explained, 10-11 

Revelle, John T., his diary, in Archives, 126 

Revolutionary War ship, log of, sought, 54 

Reynolds House, receives NCMC annual award, 6 

Rhinehart, Florence, compiles book, 94 


157 




Rhinehart, Joe Parker, compiles book, 94 

Rice, Richard L., is president of Wake County Historical Society, 27 
Richard, Ivor: pictured, 119; to speak during Culture Week, 105 
Richmond Hill Law School, Yadkin County, receives grant, 52 
Ricks, David, presents material to North Carolina Collection, 83 
Ricks, Peirson, materials of, presented to North Carolina Collection, 83 
Ricks, T. E.: is president of Nash County group, 45; presents life membership to Martha 
Gupton, 90 

Ricks Faulkner House, is on Nash County tour, 114 
Riddle, John M., receives fellowship, 83 
Riddle Family Papers, in Archives, 126 

Rights, Burton, is officer of Wachovia Historical Society, 27 

Ritzert, Mrs. Marion, presides in Lincoln County, 89 

Rives, Mrs. Blanche Hardee: memorial to, 112; obituary of, 58 

Rives, Ralph Hardee: is officer of Pitt County group, 92, 135; presides at Methodist 
meeting, 64 

Rizzolo, Ralph, is speaker at NCSS, 5 

Roanoke-Chowan Award, entries for, sought, 57, 79; is presented, 3 
Roanoke Island Historical Association: news of, 3-4; plans for, 105 
Roanoke Valley, life there, depicted, 118 

Robert B. Cooke Award, regulations concerning, outlined, 9 
Robert D. W. Connor Award, is presented, 3 
Robert W. Scott II Collection, additions to, 56, 104, 126 
Robeson County, records of, 35, 56 

Robeson County Board of Education: receives award, 87; wins AASLH award, 3 

Robinson, Blackwell P., is officer of HSNC, 24 

Robinson, Florence, is officer of Railroad House group, 114 

Rochelle, Mrs. Beverly, discusses bicentennial plans, 88 

Rochelle, Jack, is officer of High Point group, 62 

Rockingham County, records of, 104 

Rockingham County Historical Society, news of, 27, 66 
Rodenbough, Charles, heads bicentennial committee, 66 
Rodman, Mrs. W. B., is officer of Lower Cape Fear group, 89 

Rogers, Mrs. Mary J.: participates in Archives Institute, 71; pictured, 54, 103; receives 
service award, 53; retires, 128 
Rogers, Marvin, 17 
Rohrer, David Allen, death of, 81 

Rohrer, Mrs. Grace J.: cooperates in restoration endeavor, 72; names Robert E. Stipe new 
director of A&H, 97; participates in Scott documentary presentation, 119; pictured, 50, 
51, 71; presents members of Hillsborough Commission, 134; presents service award, 53; 
presides at Tryon Palace Symposium dinner, 36; signs agreement concerning records 
management, 72; speaks, 4, 51, 98, 114; welcomes teachers, 51 
Rolesville-Wake Crossroads, area toured by Wake group, 67 
Rory Matthews House, restoration of, 62 
Rose, Conway, speaks at Lenoir County meeting, 25 
Rose Day, is sponsored in Hillsborough, 86 
Rose Hill (Caswell County), pictured, 37 
Ross, George R., death of, 81 

Ross, J. D., Jr., is director of Randolph group, 26 
Rothrock, Samuel, his diaries, in Archives, 126 
Rouse, J. K., is honored, 87 
Rowan County, records of, 104, 126 

Royster, Mrs. C. G., seeks information in Granville County, 111 
Rubicam, Milton, is panel participant in genealogical meeting, 7 
Ruffin-Roulhac House, is restored, 133-134 

Russell, Mattie U., edits South Atlantic Quarterly issue, 82 
Russell, Phillips, speaks at NCSCLH meeting, 8 
Ruth Coltrane Cannon cups. See Cannon Cups. 

Rutherford County Historical Society, news of, 66, 135 


S 


Sacred Heart College, news of, 20 
Sadler, Mrs. Evelyn, 22 

Safrit, Mrs. Catherine B. , advises Junior Historian winner, 73 

St. Augustine's College, news of, 20 

St. James Church, pictured, 78 

St. John's Episcopal Church, pictured, 120 

St. John's in the Wilderness, history of, presented, 94 

St. Mary's College, news of, 20 

St. Paul Museum, is operated by North Randolph Historical group, 45 


158 


St. Paul's Episcopal Church, is visited, 77 
Salisbury, Junior Historians from, win awards, 73 
Salisbury District records, transferred to State Archives, 104 
Sallie Pool Thomas House, moving of, 85 

Sally-Billy House (Halifax): is subject of TV program, 81; plans for, 75; receives grant, 

Saluda Cottages (Henderson County), in Flat Rock Historic District, pictured, 37 

Samuel Nixon House (Perquimans County), pictured, 38 

Samuel Rothrock Diaries, are in Archives, 126 

Sanders, John L., speaks at Chapel Hill meeting, 22 

Sanders, Richard, speaks to NCSCLH, 135 

Sandy Grove Presbyterian Church, is toured by Malcolm Blue Historical Society, 63 
Sanford Historical Society, news of, 66 

"Savannah Story, The," is presented at Hillsborough meeting, 23 

Sawyer, Richard W., Jr.. attends Tobacco History Symposium, 80; receives service award 
53 

Sawyer, Roy, Jr., makes announcement at Currituck meeting, 61 
Scarborough, Cleve, is officer of NCMC, 7 

Schiffer, Peter B., to speak at Tryon Palace Symposium, 36 
Schneider, Kent Allyn, joins A&H staff, 39 
Schnorrenberg, Barbara B., professional activities of, 132 
Schumann, Marguerite, publishes walking guides, 59, 83 
Schweitzer, Thomas A., is on leave, 83 
Schwertman, Elmer C., speaks in Raleigh, 20 
Scotland County Historical Assocation, news of, 93 
Scott, Anne F., professional activities of, 81-82 
Scott, Donald Moore, joins staff of NCSU, 131 
Scott, Meg, pictured, works as summer employee, 103 

Scott, Robert W., II, additions to papers of, 56, 104, 126; his documentary, presented, 
119; pictured, 119 

Scott, Mrs. Robert W. , pictured, 51, 119 

Seaboard-Coastline Railroad Building: is subject of hearing, 50; pictured, 18; receives 
recommendation of NCHC, 50 

Seals, Roland "Chick," is officer of Maxton group, 113 
Seapker, Janet, attends meetings, 17, 80; speaks, 89 
Secret, A. M., reads paper at HSNC, 24 
Secretary of State, records of, 104 
Seldon, Samuel, speaks in Chapel Hill, 85 

Select Bibliography for Genealogical Research in North Carolina, A, is available, 13 

Service Awards, presentation of, 53-54 

Setzer School, receives award, 87 

Seybolt, George C., speaks at NCAS, 5 

Shank, Barry, provides music for New Bern ball, 64 

Sharif, Walid, joins staff at Shaw, 20 

Sharpe, Albert M., is officer of Historic Robeson, 87 

Shaw University, news of, 20, 60 

Sheppard, William F., publishes articles, 43, 84 

Shields, Mrs. John A.: is president of Gaston House organization, 88; pictured, 6 

Shine, Sammie L., receives service award, 54 

Siamese Twins, addition to collection of records of, 56, 104 

Silver, Mrs. Charles, is officer of Wake group, 115 

Silver, Hal: is president of Railroad Association, 114; presents Sanford history, 92 
Silversmiths of North Carolina, 1696-1850, is published, 16 
Simpson, Jim, is officer of Webster group, 67 

Sinclair, Jim, is committee chairman. Upper Cape Fear Historical Society, 47 
Sinclair, Michael Loy, is promoted, 21 

Sink, Jewel: is officer of Davidson group. 111; pictured, wins Peace Cup, 9 
Sir Walter Cabinet, records of, 104 

Sir Walter Raleigh Award: entries for, sought, 57, 79; presentation of, 1, 105, 118 

Sitterson, Carlyle, speaks to Chapel Hill group, 61 

Skaggs, Mrs. Marvin Lucian, death of, 18 

"Skewer II," is title of winning sculpture, 5 

Slaughter, Enos, his bat displayed, 118 

Sly, Allan, new collections relating to papers of, 56 

Smiley, David, speaks at HSNC, 88 

Smith, Archie C., Jr., is site manager at Town Creek, 109 

Smith, Charles Lee, is officer of NCAS, 4 

Smith, Mrs. Charles Lee, arranges Murfreesboro tour, 90 

Smith, Howell, is summer intern, 101 

Smith, J. Archie, is director of Cabarrus group, 23 

Smith, James Howell, is promoted, speaks, 21 


159 


Smith, Jefferson, works in Archives, 33 

Smith, Suzanne: attends South Atlantic Archives meeting, 80; indexes marriage bonds, 
pictured, 125 

Smith, Virginia M., is director of Cabarrus group, 23 
Smith, Mrs. William, purchases historic house, 112 

Smith-McDowell House: restoration of, 135; to contain Appalachian Heritage Center, 95 

Smith Richardson Foundation: its contributions, totaled, 32; makes grant for Wright 
Tavern restoration, 27; offers grant, 32 
Smithwick Award, is given to Mrs. Margaret McMahan, 9 
Snow Camp, is site of new drama, 109 

Snowden, Mrs. Barbara, presents study at Currituck meeting, 61 
Snuff box, pictured, 126 

Snyder, William D., Jr., is officer of SAR group, 91 
Social Services, records of, 104 

Society of Mayflower Descendants in the State of North Carolina, news of, 8 
Society of the War of 1812, North Carolina, records of, 57 
Somerset Place, reception there, 48 

South Atlantic Archives and Records Conference: meeting of, 55-56; participants in, 80 
South Atlantic Quarterly , honors Woody, 82 

South Carolina, is participant in South Atlantic archives meeting, 55 

Southern Antiques and Interiors, contents of, 47 

Southern Antiques Society, Inc., news of, 47; wins AASLH award, 3 

Southern Appalachian Historical Association, news of, 93 

Spaugh, R. Arthur, 45 

Special Achievement award, explanation of, 73 
Special Achievement Group Arts award, is made, 73 
Special Achievement Group Literary award, is made, 73 
Special Achievement Individual Literary award, is made, 73 
Speight, Francis, wins Morrison Award, 4 
Spence, Thomas A., is officer of Presbyterian group, 64 
Spencer, Gehrig, pictured, 32 

"Sportsman, The," is title of winning painting, 5 

Springfield Junior Historian Club, representative of, wins Junior Historian award, 73 

Stack, Leila, is officer of Lower Cape Fear group, 89 

Stanley, Mrs. John, is officer of Northampton group, 64 

Stanley, Mrs. John H., is officer of Northampton group, 91 

Stanly County, records of, 56 

Stanly County Historical Society, news of, 93 

Starnes, Mrs. Clarke R., Jr., is officer of Gaston group, 133 

State Archives. See Archives 

State Capitol: is scene of impe'achment film, 98-99; jewelry made from dome of, 69 
State, County, and Local Groups, news of, 21-27, 43-48, 60-67, 84-95, 110-116, 133-136 
State Legislative Building, pictured, 18 
"State of the Arts," is subject of music day speech, 4 

State Records Branch: initiates microfile system for school plans, 15; microfilms town 
records, 57; news of, 76; prepares schedule, 35; prepares standards, 57; reports on 
records holdings, 14-15, 125; works with Symphony Society, 35 
State Records Center, pictured, 18 
State Stream Sanitation Committee, records of, 126 
State v. R. L. Armistead, et al., decision in, 16 
Statesville City Hall, pictured, 55 

Steelman, Joseph F., is member of Editorial Committee, 105 

Steelman, Lala C.: is named Outstanding Educator, 82; reviews nonfiction, 2 
Steinberg, Arthur, is officer in AHENC, 84 
Stem, Thad, reads paper at NCLHS meeting, 2 

Stephens, David, attends South Atlantic Archives meeting, 80; pictured, 35 
Stephenson, Mrs. C. Eugene, is officer of Wachovia Historical Society, 27 
Stephenson, E. Frank, Jr.: guides tour, 90; is officer of Murfreesboro group, 113;.is 
officer of NCSPA, 5; speaks, 63, 89 
Stephenson, Robert, speaks at archaeological meeting, 21 
Sterne, Mrs. Bernhard, writes Valentiner biography, 102 

Stevenson, George: his A Select Bibliography for Genealogical Research in North Carolina 
is available, 13; participates in Archives Institute, 71; pictured, 114; prepares 
Information Circular, 76; speaks at genealogical workshop, 12 
Stevenson, Lionel, wins Mayflower Cup, 1 
Stevenson, Mrs. William J., plans symposium, 77 
Stewart, Lena, is chairman of Antiques Fair, 90 
Stewart-Hawley-Malloy House, restoration of, 93 
Still, William N.: is officer of AHENC, 84; is promoted, 82 
Stinagle, George W., is manager at Reed Gold Mine, 30 

Stipe, Robert E.: brief sketch of, 97; his secretary, 128; is named director of A&H, 97; 


160 


pictured, 6, 97; receives Cannon Cup, 6-7; resigns from Chapel Hill board, 85 
Stirewalt, Maurice: is instructor in workshop, 100; presents report on oral history, 42 
Stockton, pictured, 107 

Stockton, Edwin L., Jr., is president of Wachovia Historical Society, 27 
Stoesen, Alexander R., professional activities of, 19, 82 
Stokes, Durward T., professional activities of, 24, 41, 59, 159 
Stokes, Maxine, joins A&H staff, 81 

Stokes County Historical Society, news of, 47, 93, 115 
Stone, David, his home is toured, 77 
Stonewall, receives recommendation of NCHC, 50 
Stowe, Dalton, is officer of Gaston group, 113 
Strawn, Keith, receives service award, 54 
Strickland, Mrs. Diane, joins A&H staff, 129 

Strolling at State: A Walking Guide to North Carolina State University , is published, 59 

Stroud, Harold, receives service award, 54 

Stroud, Reginald, introduces Conway Rose, 25 

Stroupe, Henry S., is elected president of NCLHS, 2 

Stuart Nye, craftsman firm, produces copper jewelry, 69 

Stultz, Carol: pictured, 34; works in archives, 33 

Stumpf, Vernon 0., professional activities of, 19, 58, 84 

Sturgill, Virgil L., is awarded Brown-Hudson award, is on program of NCFS, 8 

Suggs, Joe, is chairman of Randolph committee, 93 

Suiter, Mrs. Arthur, receives book for Northampton library, 26 

Sumner, Mark, speaks at RIHA meeting, 4 

Surles, Jesse P., is officer of WNHA, 95, 136 

Surry County Historical Society: news of, 115; publishes The Franklin House, 110 
Suttlemyre, Greer, attends National Trust, 17, 80 
Sutton-Newby House, pictured, 120 

Swain County Historical Society: is new organization, 47; news of, 66, 93-94 
Swan, Mrs. Susan B., to speak at Tryon Palace Symposium, 36 
Swisegood, John, his cabinetwork is featured, 26 

"Swisegood School of Cabinetmaking, The," exhibit at Old Salem, 26 
S word of Peace, The, is new historical drama, 109 
Sylla, Edith, professional activities of, 20, 131 
Symposium on History and the Social Studies, held, 58 


T 

Talbert, Betty, is named instructor at School of the Arts, 131 

Talley, Banks C., Jr., is officer of NCSPA, 5 

Tally, Mrs. Lura, is director of NCSPA, 5 

Tankard, Mrs. Dorothy M. , receives service award, 54 

Tar Heel Junior Historian Association, awards of, 73 

Taylor, David R., is president of genealogical group, 86 

Taylor, Donald R., directs crafts program, 75 

Taylor, Hargus, pictured, 3 

Taylor, Nelson, presents request of Beaufort association, 21 
Taylor, Roy A., makes announcement on mountain peaks, 95 
Teachers, attend State Archives and State Library workshop, 51 
TePaske, John J., is on AHA program, 41 

Tew, W. Alton, speaks at Littleton College Memorial Association, 112 

Thalian Hall, receives recommendation of NCHC, 50 

Third Factory, Duke Homestead, Durham, receives grant, 52 

Thomas, Mason P., is recognized by NCSCLH for his article, 9 

Thomas, Sam, is president of Rutherford group, 66 

Thomas Wolfe Award, is presented to Van Noppens, 27 

Thomas Wolfe Memorial: pictured, 31; receives recommendation of NCHC, 50; to become 
historic site, 31 
Thompson, Holly, pictured, 34 

Thornton-Rosser House, is on Nash County tour, 114 
Tilley, Nannie May, speaks at Tobacco Symposium, 59 

Tindall, George B.: gives SHA presidential address, publishes article, 41 
Tise, Larry: becomes assistant director of A&H, 126; brief sketch of, pictured, 127; 
speaks, 47, 64, 66, 134 

Tobacco History Corporation, seeks funds for Duke Homestead, 30 

Tobacco History Symposium, is held, 58-59 

Tomaro, John Butler, gives speech, publishes article, 132 

Tomlinson, Bobby, joins A&H staff, 129 

Tongue, Cornelia, is officer of Wake group, 115 

Tontyaport, Mrs. Benjamas Kamalapat: pictured, 14; visits Archives, 13-14 


161 


Topkins, Robert, joins A&H staff, 81 

Town Creek Indian Mound State Historic Site, model of, pictured, 71 
Townsend, Samuel P., attends meetings, speaks, 17, 61, 81, 98, 109, 128; receives 
service award, 53 
Trademarks exhibit, pictured, 13 
Transylvania County, records of, 75-76 

Transylvania Bicentennial Committee, to work with commission, 115 
Transylvania County Historical Association, news of, 66, 115 
Transylvania County Historical Commission, news of, 115 
Tredwell, Frances Johnston, 29 
Trenton Historic District, picture of, 106 

Troxler, Carole, participates in conference on Loyalists, 110 
Tryon Palace, participates in bicentennial observance, 130 

Tryon Palace Commission: approves crafts program, 75; its Gregg Collection transferred 
to Archives, 104 

Tryon Palace Symposium, schedule for, 36 

Tulchin, Joseph S., professional activities of, 42, 132 

Turberg, Edward: attends meetings, 17, 80; conducts architectural survey, 109; discusses 
Wheeler House restoration, 113 
Turner, Annie, is officer of Pitt County group, 92 
Tydeman, William G., reads citation, 94 

Tyler, John E.: is ex-officio director of NCSPA, 5; is president of Historic Hope, 77; 

pictured, 2; receives Christopher Crittenden Memorial Award, 1 
Tyson, Mrs. Betty 0.: is promoted, 108; receives service award, 54 


U 

Underwood, Evelyn, presents report on oral history, 42 
Underwood, Mrs. Harry, guides tour, 90 

Underwood, Mrs. R. H., is officer of Murfreesboro group, 113 
Union County, records of, 75-76 

Union (Yellow) Tavern (Caswell County), pictured, 37 

United States Board of Geographic Names, receives requests, 95 

United States Navy "Seachanters," sing at Tryon Palace, 130 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: its archival repository studied, 100; news 
of, 41-42, 83, 131-132; receives copy of Isaac Offman records, 60 
University of North Carolina at Charlotte, news of, 42, 109-110 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro, news of, 83 
University of North Carolina at Wilmington, news of, 110 
Upper Cape Fear Historical Society, is new organization, 47 


Valentiner, W. R., papers of, 102 
Valentiner, Wilhelm, additions to papers of, 126 
Vance, Zebulon B., his documentary displayed, 119 
Vance Junior Historian Club, wins award, 73 
Vance County Historical Society, news of, 94 
Vann, John, addition to papers of, in Archives, 104 
Van Noppen, Ina, wins Thomas Wolfe Award, 27 
Van Noppen, John, wins Thomas Wolfe Award, 27 
Vaughn, Caroline, receives art award, 5 

"Veil of Humility, The," is subject of Archie K. Davis's speech, 2 
Vesuvius Furnace, pictured, 120 

Vick, Mrs. Robert E., presides at Halifax meeting, 23 
Virginia, is participant in South Atlantic archives meeting, 55-56 
Vogt, James R., receives service award, 54 
Vuncannon, Jesse, judges Junior Historian contest, 74 


W 




Wachovia Historical Society, news of, 27 

Wake County: local histories of, in Archives, 126; records of, 35 
Wake County Historical Society, news of, 27, 47, 67, 94, 115, 135 

Wake Forest University: has summer interns in Department of Cultural Resources, 101; new 
of, 20-21, 42-43, 110, 133; offers historic preservation program, 43 
Wakefield, restoration of, 77 
Walker, B. B., 26 


162 




Walker, Mrs. Robert, is officer of Lower Cape Fear group, 89 
Walker, Sarah, speaks to Historic Cabarrus group, 44-45 
Walker, W. T., is officer of Korners Folly, 63 
Wall, James W., is officer of NCSCLH, 9 

Wall, Mrs. Maxie: is promoted, 108; receives service award, 53 

Wallace, Carolyn A., is on Editorial Committee, 104 

Walser, Richard, is member of Editorial Committee, 105; pictured 9 

Want, Min-yu, joins Warren Wilson staff, 60 

Ward, Ernest J., negotiates agreement, 31 

Ward, Mrs. Sondra, joins A&H staff, 17 

Warlick, Wilson, is honored at Catawba reception, 61, 85 
Warner, John W., speaks at Tryon Palace, 130 
Warren County, records of, 56 

Warren County Bicentennial Committee, is at work, 115 

Warren County Board of Commissioners, makes appropriation for restoration, 115 
Warren County Historical Society, news of, 115-116 
Warren Wilson College, news of, 43, 60 

Warrenton Railroad Company, records of, in Archives, 126 

Washburn, W. W.: is president of Cleveland group, 44; moderates panel, 85 

Washington, commemorates bicentennial, 130 

Washington, George, letter from, included in exhibit, 52 

Washington, Lucy, holds class in historic preservation, 59 

Washington-Beaufort County Bicentennial Celebration, is held, 130 

Washington County Historical Society, news of, 47-48 

Water and Air Resources, records of, 126 

Waterworth, Sherry, wins art award, 5 

Watie, Stand, mountain named for, 95 

Watson, Alan D.: is promoted, 110; publishes article in Lower Cape Fear publication, 25 
Watson, Richard L., Jr.: pictured, 3; presents Robert D. W. Connor Award, 3; professional 
activities of, 24, 82 
Watson, Richard L., Ill, is promoted, 109 
Watt, W. N., is president of Alexander group, 84 
Wayne County, records of, 56, 75-76, 104 
Wease, James Hugh, is promoted, 59, 109 
Weathers, James A., receives service award, 54 

Weatherspoon, David, receives NCFMC award for promotion of opera, 4 

Weaver, William, presents programs, 45, 67, 93 

Weaverville, its records, microfilmed, 57 

Webb, James M., is on board of Chapel Hill society, 85 

Webb, Marilyn, speaks to teachers, 51 

Webster, drawings of, to be in book, 94 

Webster Historical Society, news of, 67, 94 

Webster School, purchase of, discussed, 67 

Weedon, Josephine Davis, is married to Robert E. Stipe, 97 

Weidner Rock House (Catawba County), pictured, 37 

Weil, Gertrude: pictured, 102; sketch of, 101-102 

Weinberg, Gerhard L., reads paper, 132 

Wellman, Manly Wade, pictured, wins AASLH award, 3 

Wells, Samuel F., Jr., speaks at The Citadel, 132 

Wendell Historical Society, news of, 94 

Wessington House, is visited by symposium participants, 77 

West, Edwin A.: is officer of Presbyterian group, makes announcement concerning book, 64 
West, John, is scheduled to participate in Kings Mountain ceremony, 133 
West, John Foster, is officer of NCFS, 8 

Western Carolina University: is host to Appalachian Consortium, 94; news of, 84 
Western North Carolina Historical Association, news of, 27, 67, 94-95, 135-136 
Western North Carolina Since the Civil War, wins Thomas Wolfe Award, 27 
Westminster Abbey-Hall of Kings, film, is shown at Pitt meeting, 65 
Wheeler, Mary E., receives award, 83 

Wheeler, Lawrence Jefferson, joins Bicentennial staff, pictured, 129 
Wheeler, Mrs. Sudie, is site manager at Vance Birthplace, 17 
White, E. R., speaks at historical society meetings, 21-22, 93 
White, Finley T., is director of NCAS, 4 
White, Luther, donates to Railroad House, 114 

White, Mack, assists in organizing Swain County Historical Society, 47 
White, Robert C., pictured, 3 

Whitfield, Nellie, seeks safekeeping for document, 102 

Whitley, Mrs. Frances H.: has information on awards, 74; requests information, 107 
Wicker, Bryant, is officer of Maxton group, 113 

Wilborn, Mrs. Elizabeth W.: attends meetings, gives talks, 17, 81; her paper presented 
at Edenton, 77; is named acting secretary-treasurer of preservation group, 40; obituary 
of, 130; receives-service award, 53 


163 


Wilhelm Valentiner Papers, additions to, 126 

Wilkerson, Mrs. Elizabeth, is on program in Pitt County, 135 

Wilkins, Mary Vann, speaks at East Carolina symposium, 58 

Willcox, Palmer, is officer of Hoke group, 112 

William Areatus Jones House, is toured, 89 

Williams, Albert Franklin, his diary published, 89 

Williams, F. Carter, is architect for Records Center Building, 117 

Williams, Mrs. Harmon 0., is officer of Gaston group, 133 

Williams, Horace, exhibit at his house, 22 

Williams, Isabel M., publishes "Lower Cape Fear Revolutionary War Events," 45 
Williams, Mrs. Mary Frances, joins A&H staff, 108 

Williams, Max R.: is officer of NCLHS, 2; presides at NCLHS meeting, 3; reveives grant, 
84; retires from Editorial Committee, 104 
Williamsburg Restored, is viewed by Hillsborough society members, 44 
Williamson, Mrs. Bailey: participates in Mordecai ceremony, 90; pictured, 50 
Williamson, Joel R., is interviewed for Voice of America, 132 
Williamson, S. R., professional activities of, 132 
Wilmington Historic District, pictured, 78 

Wilmington-New Hanover County American Revolution Bicentennial Association, works with 
Lower Cape Fear Historical Society, 112 
Wilmington Town Book, 1743-177b, The, receives Clarendon Award, 89 
Wilson, Roy, is maintenance man at Fort Dobbs, 31 
Wilson, Willis, diary of, sought, 54 

Wilson County: churches there, urged to prepare histories, 95; records of, 75-76, 104 
Wilson County Historical Society, news of, 95 
Winkler, Mrs. J. H., is officer of NCSPA, 5 
Winn, Wilkins B., is promoted, 82 

Winslow, Mrs. Jean, is officer of Perquimans group, 65 
Winstead, D. W., donates homeplace to Lee County group, 88 
Winstead, Mrs. D. W., donates homeplace to Lee County group, 88 
Winston-Salem State University, news of, 43, 84 
Withers, Jim, is officer of Harnett group, 44 

Winters, Robert E., Jr.: pictured, 3; speaks at Carson House, 22 
Withrow, Kenyon, is officer of Pitt group, 135 

Witt, Carl: presents book at Northampton meeting, 26; presides at meeting, 64 

Witt, Mrs. Louise Daughtry, memorial to, 64 

Witt, Ronald G. , is member of Hillsborough Commission, 134 

Wolfe, Fred W. , negotiates agreement, 31 

Wood, Mrs. Virginia H., advises Junior Historians, 73 

Woodard, John, presents report on oral history, 42 

Woody, Robert H., is honored by South Atlantic Quarterly, 82 

Wooten, Mrs. Beverly, is cochairman of Lenoir County Bicentennial, 25 

Wooten, Donald, is employed at Fort Dobbs, 109 

World War I, additions to records of, 56 

World War II, additions to records of, 57 

Worth, Mrs. Laura S., death of, 81 

Wright, Russell, supervises Chapel Hill project, 61 
Wright, Stuart L., writes Person County history, 92 
Wright, Mrs. Thomas H., Jr., is officer of NCSPA, 5 

Wright Tavern: A Courthouse Inn and Its Proprietors , publication of, 66 
Wrigley, John E., is promoted, reads papers, 110 

"Writing Local History," is subject of paper at NCSCLH meeting, 8 
Wyatt, Micajah, pictured, 9 


Y 

Yancey, Edward, is officer of Vance group, 94 

Yanceyville Historic District (Caswell County), scene from, pictured, 37 
Yandle, Jim, advises Junior Historians, 73 

Yarbrough, Irene E. "Betty": appointed Search Room supervisor, 128; participates in 
Archives Institute, 71; receives service award, 54 
York, James, receives NCFMC award, 4 
York, Mrs. James, receives NCFMC award, 4 

Young, Charles R.: comments on paper, 82; is succeeded by Anne Scott, 81 
Youngquist, R. E.: attends South Atlantic Archives meeting, 80; receives service 
award, 54; is host to Malayasian visitor, 124 


164 


z 


Z. Smith Reynolds Library, Wake Forest, receives collection, 20-21 
Zaborowski, Dennis, wins art award, 4 

Zehmer, Mrs. David, substitutes at Edenton Symposium, 77 

Zehmer, John G., Jr.: announces AASLH awards, 3; attends meetings, makes talks, 17, 77; 
is ex-officio director of NCSPA, 5; mentioned, 39; resigns A&H post, 12; resigns HPSNC 
post, 40; to become architectural consultant of Richmond, 12 
Zenke, Henry C.: pictured, 6; reports on Blandwood, 5 
Zenke, Mrs. Henry C.: is officer of NCSPA, 5; presides at meeting, 6 
Zuber, Richard, is member of Editorial Committee, 105 


Note—The following abbreviations were used in this index: 


A&H 

AASLH 

AAUP 

AAUW 

AHA 

AHENC 

HPSNC 

HSNC 

NCARBC 

NCAS 

NCFS 

NCFMC 

NCGS 

NCHC 

NCLHA 

NCMC 

NCPS 

NCSCLH 

NCSPA 

NCSS 

RIHA 

SAA 

SAR 

SHA 

UNC-C 

UNC-CH 

WNCHA 


Division of Archives and History 
American Association for State and Local History 
American Association of University Professors 
American Association of University Women 
American Historical Association 

Association of Historians in Eastern North Carolina 
Historic Preservation Society of North Carolina 
Historical Society of North Carolina 

North Carolina American Revolution Bicentennial Committee 

North Carolina Art Society 

North Carolina Folklore Society 

North Carolina Federation of Music Clubs 

North Carolina Genealogical Society 

North Carolina Historical Commission 

North Carolina Literary and Historical Association 

North Carolina Museums Council 

North Carolina Poetry Society 

North Carolina Society of County and Local Historians 

North Carolina Society for the Preservation of Antiquities 

North Carolina Symphony Society 

Roanoke Island Historical Association 

Society of American Archivists 

Sons of the Revolution 

Southern Historical Association 

University of North Carolina at Charlotte 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Western North Carolina Historical Association 


CAROLINA COMMENTS 

Published in January, March, May, July, September, 
and November by the Division of Archives and His¬ 
tory, Department of Cultural Resources, Archives and 
History-State Library Building, 109 East Jones 
Street, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27611. 

Robert E. Stipe, Editor in Chief 
Mrs. Memory F. Mitchell, Editor 


165 












Division of Archives and History 
Department of Cultural Resources 
109 East Jones Street 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27611